Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text




ESTABLISHED 1895

Mossadegh

$10,000,000 U.S.
Aid Offer Ridiculed

TEHERAN, Aug, 30,

Premier Mohammed Mossadegh told the nation on Sat-
urday night that Iran could not accept the three point
proposal for settling the Iranian oil dispute, put forward by
President Truman and Prime Minister Churchill. Mossadegh
delivered this reply in a special announcement broadcast
from Radio Teheran.

He said he will call both houses of Parliament into
session to draft a formal reply on the plan. Official action
came shortly after one of Mossadegh’s principal advisers
said that suggestions were not satisfactory.

Oil expert Kazem_ Hassibi ‘told
the United Press that Iran could
not accept the three point Anglo-
American offer—especially © point
one which states that Iran must
have regard for the legal posi-!
tion of parties betore nationali-

Hurricane
Threatens

sation.” ‘ ; | ; Fl id.
Hassibi said nationalization is pper ori a
an accomplished fact and Britain

will fail if it is trying to obtain
confirmation of 1933 agreement
with ithe Anglo-Iranian oil com.
any. He said Iran wished to
ave no further dealings with ihe

JACKSONVILLE, Florida, Aug. 30,
A hurricane with winds up to
85 miles an hour whirled north-
ward through the Atlantic today,
‘Anglo-Tranian, and would no‘ threatening upper Florida and
eae the’ company’s partici- the Georgian coasts with high!
pation in oil operations in Iran, tides and rough seas. It was felt)
t ‘that the tropical disturbance
He ridiculed the offer of might hit the mainland, but it
$10,000,000 from the United States.' swerved suddenly to the north
He said that if Iran did not accept jast night.

£10,000,000 or $26,000,000 fron .
Centre Located

the Anglo Iranian Oil Company,|



| square.



itjing from the British freighter

Reje



From All Quarters
2 HALF-DRUNK
HALF-DROWNED
IN SEA OF WINE

Rome: The daughter of the late
King Victor Emmanuel III of
Italy, Princess Jolands and her
husband came across a wreeked
lorry and saw th? driver and his
mate trapped in the cabin, strug-
gling in a red liquid. They opened
the door and out flopped the driv.
ers half drunk, half-drowned
in a sea of wine. In the crash a
120-gallon tank of wine had burst
and the wine had poured into their
cabin,

Sydney: A conference of radio
scjentists was told this week that
a newly designed valve, smaller
than a pea, makes it possible to
build radio s@ts only a few, inches
The valve is called s
transisor and is almost everlast'ng,
but it costs 26 times as much as
an ordinary valve.

Capetown: A troop of baboons
which raid kitchens for food and
even open refrigerators is terri-

ing housewives who live on a
hillside above the British naval
base at Simonstown near Cape-
town. On the sound of the dock-
yard 5 o’clock hooter, however,
they disappear — because they
fear men but care nothing for
‘women. :

Sydney: Eight Sydney dockers
were awarded £9,969 damages this
week because they were burned
by mustard gas they were unload-

in January, 1943

into the open/Security regulations barred their

she definitely would not “sell |
herself for $10,000,000. ee
Mossadegh’s rejection came Forecasters indicated that
after a cabinet meeting. The might even veer to the northeast|Indomoneus
broadcast message said that and whirl out
United States ambassador . Loy Atlantic. A plane flew into the/claim until the war was ended.
Henderson and British envoy,“eye” of the storm shortly after,

George Middleton submitted the
same proposals on. Wednesday
but that Mossadegh, told them
Iran could not accept such pro-
posals. The broadcast said two!

C . ye : | Resort towns and military es-
Golamats ,. premier’ 32; redraft tablishments 300 miles along the

; i |coasts horthward from here to

were still winehidapanet | Wilmington, North Carolina;|

| were battened down and all ships!

Co operation ‘either had fled or sought sheltered ,
President Truman and Prime,

Minister Churchill today ap-

harbours.

The weather
pealed to Dr. Mohammed Mos last night that the hurricane
sadegh for Persian co-operation
in solving the Anglo-Iranian dis-

midnight and located its centre}
about 150 miles east southefst of|
Jacksonville.

probably would continue to swerve
northwards, possibly keeping the



nppeal handed to Dr.| full might of its winds from the
Piaandeeh Ploday by George United. States shoreline, but they
Middleton, British Chéeaarge warned 6f high tides and rough
D’Affaires and Loy Henderson, seas.
American Ambassador in Tehe-| _uUP.
ren, was accompanied by three sail
praposals...

Hussein, Churchill
Exchange Messages

LONDON, Aug. 30.
King Hussein of Jordan, 17-

1, The Taverrpation rational Court of
Justice at the Hague should de-

cide the question of compensation
to be paid for the nationalisation
of the Anglo-Iranian Company's
industry in Persia.

sia rnment
‘ind ise ail Sorepane shone i on year-old monarch who succeed
tiate for the flow of Persiah oil to] Sis father ailing King Talal last

month on Friday thanked Prime
Minister Winston Churchill for a
cordial message of friendship.

The King’s reply to Foreign
;Secretary Anthony Eden by a
Jordan ‘minister expressed grati-
tude for “your warm feelings,”
exports to Persia and on Persia’s| and added “I hope that the strong
sterling and the United States|bonds fortunately existing be-
Government would make ar im-{tween the great country of Great
mediate grant of $10,000,000 in| Britain and my country will in-
economic assistance to Persia, crease in strength and grow in

|

firmness during the forthcoming
Messages

years.
The joint Truman-Ch
peal to Mossadegh said:

the world’s markets.

3. If the Persian Government
agrees to these proposals the oil
company should arrange for the
marketing of the oil now stored in
Persia, while the British Govern-
ment would relax restrictions on



urchill ap-| There has also been a cordial
“We have |exchange of message between



Nine Killed In
U.S. Labour Day
Accidents

NEW YORK, Aug. 30.
The Labour Day holiday traffic

bureau said late|Jam began claiming its victims on

Saturdzy, At least nine persons
died in traffic accidents over the
nation, Georgia led the list with
four dead. New Mexico, New
York, Illinois, Kansas, and Cali-
fornia each reported at least one
traffic death.
The National Safety Council
at Chicago feared that 480 per-
sons would die in traffic fatalities
over the. long week-end. e toll
last year was 461, >



Plane Crashes:
Kills 5-Year-Old

DENMARK, Aug. 30.
A Swedish two seater plane

St. David's workers contribute a

Sunday Advocat

BARBADOS, AUGUST 31, 1952

ets Joi

United States Will Fig

fight the Korean war to a



Ps
JUBILEE GARDENS as seen

from Messrs Gardiner

ht

Korean War To A Finish |

UNITED NATIONS, NEW YORK,
The United Nations Sat

ug. 30.

pecay night pledged itself to

nish and re-affirmed its de-

termination to maintain troops in Europe within the North
Atlantic Treaty Organization.

*Ambassador Warren R, Austin, Chief United States
delegate to the United Nations said in a statement that “we
intend to help the United Nations see thé job through in
Korea because in success there will be a powerful stimulant
to greater progress in building an effective*United Nations

Security

System.

Gairy Will
Reduce Strike

(From Our Own Correspondent)
GRENADA, Aug. 30.

Gairy plans to call off strikes
at_all St, David’s Estates on Mon.
day ex etit ait
which ‘Struck if sympathy
saying this estate would face
abandonment as. long as other

shilling each pay day to the main.
tenance of their fellows. Gairy
says the management of Petit
Etang must start considering three
months’ back pay together with
new wages—Cight shillings for
men, seven for women—among a
host of other privileges, and be-






crashed into a festival crowd on| fore the cocoa crop comes in, the:
Saturday killing a five-year-old | Agriculturists Union will be ask~}

vyirl and seriously injuring three
other persons. Five other persons
were slightly hurt.

Six Swedish planes were land-
ing during the festival demon-
stration. One was piloted by the
Swedish spcerts pilot Nils Bunde
Sjpeberg. It landed with the wind
across the runway.

The plane rushed over the
field) through rope barriers and
into the crowd.

The Pilot remained in ihe plane

i sssages from our tw2|Churchjll and Jordan’s Prime|for several minutes too shocked
freeeas te eee regarding the}Minister Te Fkymabdul Huda,|io move, The injured children
recent talks with you as well as;the Fereign Office said. and adults screamed as 5,000
your communication | to Her U.P.| persons looked on. UP.

Majesty’s Government”,

The proposal that the Interna-
tional Court of Justice should ad-
judicate in the question of com-
pensation is made without preju-
dice to the legal position of the
two partics to the dispute iin-
mediately before nationalisation
and to all claims and counter
claims of both parties.

The Anglo-Iranian Company
would seek arrangements for the
movement of oil as agreements
were reached upon a price and
as suitable conditions for loading
permitted. Appropriate payment
would be made for the oil moved.
The offer of an American grant
was made to assist Persia in her
budgetary problems.—U.P,



an interview published in
Epoca, Farouk is quoted as

too many inventions in the
to have much money.”

EISENHOWER GREETED IN NEW YORK



4

WEARING A BROAD GRIN, Gen. Dwight Eisenhower waves to ad-
mirers on his arrival at La Guardia Field, New York, with his smiling
wife, Mamie. Gov. Thomas E. Dewey (right) was on hand to officially
welcome the G.O.P. Presidential candidate. Ike addressed the opening
session of annual Legion convention in Madison Square Garden

34th

world incredible offers have arrived.
have been the target of innumerable inventors.



Ex-King Farouk Offered
Several Villas In Italy

ROME, Aug. 30.

Ex-King Farouk of Egypt on Saturday is quoted as
saying that he received “incredible” requests by posts for
money and offers of “thousands” of castles and estates.

In
an Italian Weekly Magazine
saying: “From all parts of the
For example: “I
They make
world and to invent you have

Farouk is described as waving
a bunch of newspaper clippings
‘and exclaiming: “I know the
technique of certain parts of the
Press. All newspapers of the
world arrive here and daily I dis-
sover extraordinary statements
that I am supposed to have made
and the strangest events in which
I am supposedly involved.

“I believe I have beaten the
most celebrated Hollywood star in
evoking the strangest fantasies of
every country. And all that brings
on avalanches of letters, So far
there have been offers of about
1,000 villas for sale, mostly from
Italy.

“This adorable Italy is full of
villas for sale. They have even
offered me a farm with ten cows
and a proposal has arrived from
the Isle of Elba, but America also ¢
is not joking. Several anaes
invited me to buy a large
Forouging project for two million,
dollars.”

Asked if he would like to stay
long in Italy Farouk is quoted as
treplying with a smile: “If you
}wish a provisional answer I will
‘say that the future is in the hands
\°* God.”

|. Asked if he received letters from

‘Egypt since his exile Farouk ;
paused, puffed at his cigar and
jsaid: “I am informed of what is

ing on in my country”.

A correspondent who wrote an
interview said he is “convinced”
\that a line of “first hand” infor-
{mation existed between Capri and
Cairo despite rigorous Egyptian

censorship

i

U.P,

j

ed for higher wages too,

The present wage scale |s $1.20
and $1.00. Gairy also makes a
point at present of not recognis-
ing the Agriculturists Union
which some months ago was regis.
tered as incorporating the old

| Agricultural Society, the Agricul-

tural Employers’ Society and the
Coconut Growers’
contending that the unionists
represent a new body to which
his union does not owe legal moral
or other obligation. This is taken
to imply that the stock
undertaking event in the strike
g’ven the Agricultural Employ-
ers’ Society by the M.M.W.U., is
no longer valid therefore there was
no grouse when, stock went un-
tended as a result of sympathy
strikes,

B.G’s GOYERNOR
LEAVES FOR U.K.

GEORGETOWN, B.G., Aug. 30.

On the first leg of his journey
to the U.K., Governor Sir Charles
Campbell Woolley, K.C.MG.,
O.B.E., M.C., accompanied by
Lady Woruley, sailed for Port-of-
Spain by the Saguenay Terminals
“Sunwalt” late noon today,

As the ship left the harbour,
guns at Fort William Frederick
boomed out B.G's final salute.

Just before embarking His Ex-
cellency had saluted the War
Memorial inspected by Guards cf
Honour, from local forces and he
bade farewell to the Judiciary,
Members of the Executive and
Legislative Councils, Heads of
Departments, the Mayor and
Town Councillors and friends.

The Governor's extended term
of office ends in October this year.
His regime of over five years has
been marked by continued devel-
opinental progress begun in the
preceding regime of Sir Gordon
Lethem and the country is now
on the verge of its greatest con-
stitutional change withal.

From Trinidad Sir Charles pro-
eeeds by other means of trans-
portation to Montreal and hopes
to be in the United Kingdom by
scotember 21,

Lady Woolley will be proceed-
ing to the U.K, by the “Golfito”,



arriving there on September 13
w 14,
Not yet 60 years of age, Sir

Charles at the end of his term
will have served for 31 years in
the Colonial Service.—CP)

Lady Arundell
Opens Exhibition

(From Our Own Correspondent)

GRENADA, Aug. 30



|
|

!

Association, '

care’

‘



|

i

ee

i

Austin’s statement followed the
U.S. reply to a letter from the
U.N. Collective Measures Com-
n.ittee regarding implementations
by member states of the General
Assembly resolution of two years
ago call upon the nations to
earmark to be used by the
United ons to repel aggres.
sion anywhere*in the world, The
US ly was transmitted Sat-

er stressing that this coun-
try’s contribution to collective
security includes participation in
the Korean conflict the letter said
“the United States takes this op-



SUBULEE GA#DENS



PRICE : SIX CENTS



E41 1.9.—U.K. Proposal }

U.N. Planes Blast
Red Power Piani

SECUL, Aug. 38,

United Nations warplanes stepped up the presstire on

the Communists again early today when American Super-
forts blasted an important Red power plant in north
Korea. The raid came a few hours after Allied figh





er
bombers hit the North Korean capital of Pyongyang with

v

the war.

one of the’ heaviest assaults of
- - Seventeen

$10,000 Paid |
In Forecast
At Santa Rosa

Japan-based
Superforts roaroed ove ‘h
number one plant and dropped
high explosives on a hoge, powe
house *
Superforts were over the targ
for nearly three hours. Trey us?
electric aiming devices to she

Ie

B25













down bombs on some undamager
areas and on instaliations that the
3 Communists have been trying
(Prem Our Own Correspondent) repair. The returning p lots sai
‘ ORT-IP-SPAIN, Aug. oe that they made “excellent bomb
The biggest forecast’ im. the} yuns” and that Ube Red anti-
history of Trinidad racing—$10,009 | civcraft fire was %y Te thy
was paid this afternoon in th’ |oopsnunist nis mc s Onvad®
Seventh Race at the Santa Rosa | Sa Lo x 7 ~. | passes at th 169" ect Tired ne
meeting which was won by Mrs | shot: Y ‘ a
May Chin's Red Velvet with Mon-|" 44); & $F hats
; ‘ f ed pli lew : ecord off
roe and Bright Light following i. rey ee By sig irda sietet >,

1,443 sortiesfte “dun





that order





c

g-bombs, bul- C)
s f

% rere by} =

pa i » ‘ lets, and nagat™ on
Austin’s Offices, The race was the Grell & Co..|Rriday, bu uffe
ay Ltd. Trophy over a distance of aix 7 sl "
furlongs for C Wi ;s only. J. c,| minor losses isiderin
uriongs for nners only. J. ©-liense curtain fire




Sehneider’s Hope Dawns in a
single outing at the first day of the
Four Day Meeting, convincingly
won the Capt. Cipriani Memorial
Cup Event, beating such favour-
ites as Lupinus and Footmark
over a distance of seven and a half
furlongs for Class Al and A2 and
Bl and B2 only.

RESULTS

zy the in

Bate For B.W.L.
Federation Talks

{ ‘loth Draped ee
Over Statue
Of Justice

LONDON, Aug. 30.













The 2ilded statue of Justice—
we figure of Justice not}; Arima STAKES. About Five Fur- KINGSTON, Awz. 29
blindfolded — which shines out longs Class G2, Three Years Old and The Government proposed ta
ever London from the top of the over end £100,000 to a combine ‘n
Central Criminal Court, the “Old + ees % Blue Bird. 3. Mish) cluding the Close Brufhers of
Bailey,” was found to have a VISITORS STAKES. About 5 Fur-}| London who are i
black cloth drape over its face tongs, Class Gi onty. uke over the Bus
today The police believe that i mk Hur, 2 Pepperwine, 3. Blue! porate Area with

mebody climbed 200 feet to the], oie cape: alent ¢ Fartones, | million population
statue with the cloth during the Class Fl and F2 only Bustamante, who is
night 1 protest against last}! CAPT. CIPRIANI MEMORIAL ou London on Sunday, stated that
nigh’s announcement of the re- ae aie te eats Class Al and Ag an interview, he will discuss con-
prieve of the three times child 1. Hope Dawns. 2. Dormay. 3. False Stitutional issues with the Secret-
layer John Straifen, Pride ‘ ary of State. He will also seek

MAIDEN STAKES. About 6 Furtongs,| 9 definite date for B.W I. Fed-

Lost October Straffen strangied Class ©, Winners only enation talks, meet the Close
two litle girls, He was sent to], + FSi bie hora «| Brothers Franchise jssue and get
Broadmoore Criminal Asylum Furlongs. Class D1 and D? and kt] information about the welfare

fier being found insane and un- and &# only,

of West Indians migrating te Bri-



fit to plead. 1. Bore Seneey 8. SR: Ole e FEF tain in search Of jobs C.F.
Last month the killer’ escaped | ;, About 6 Furlenes, Class ©. Winners

from the asylum for a few hours, Only. - \

and shortly after he was recap- 1, Red Velvet, 2, Monroe. 3. Brig ‘

tured. Another little girl was Lint. ’DAD FACTORY

4 About 6 Furlongs Class Fi and FY
only. Four Years Old and Over,
1. Kismet) @ My Own, % Flame

Flower.

found strangled,

INSPECTOR TO
VISIT GRENADA

(From Our Own Correspondent)
GRENADA, Aug. 30,

Found guilty of this third mur
der, Staffen was sentenced to hang
on September 4.



Canada On Charge













portunity reaffirm oe state-] The Criminal an Court re The Finance Committee of the
ment regarding the maintenance} ectcd his appeal against the was Sat ® leg slature has approved Govern-
of forces in Europe.” Jeath sentence, and ose Of Discriminating ment action to invite the’ Senior
. ignest legal authority, Attorn »| . 1cvory Inspector of Trinidad te
Maintenance Of Forces General Lionel Heald, to allow Against W wf. visit and collaborate with the
Th siginal United States} ‘he cuse to Ho to the last court of Attorney General and Labour
pebbetadad ih, seaintetaace » of appeal the House of Lords, KINGSTON, Aug. 29 Adviser with a view to modifying
’ c Charges against Canada _ for|and su‘ting Grenada’s require-
furces in Suro unset mT Last nicht it»was officially an- discriminating against West In-} ments to the Model Factory Or-
was contained in’p similar letter! vounced that the Home Secreta ians, will be laid by representa | dinance recently received from
to the Collective Measures Com. “tage ,} alens, Ww be Alc rene ere Leeeeranee | Scent eC
itt in June, 1951 had recommended for the formal) tives of the Britisn Caribbean! the Secretary of State The col-
i a said “We are convinced] Approve! of Queen Elizabeth the! Parliamentary Group, attending] ony'’s legislation on th mattett
that the United Nations must have|second rep-ieve of Straffen, This} the Commonwealth Parliament-| is now out-moded
at ts disposal, the means to main~ ;#utomati means the commu | ary Conference opening in Ottawa The decision was also taken to
t i International peace Those | tion of St#iiTen’: death sentence! on September 8. send the Foreman of t Me Bota ric
eine will be made ‘available o imprisonment for life Recently resentment has beew} Station, on a three-months’ course
only if the countries believe in —wv.P. | Browing against the Canadian bar) und the trini ya Ge ernmet
‘ollective security and will stand etiniebiioatin - on coloured West Indians enter-| Botanist to enable hi uperv. s-
te red to contribute to collec- ing the country. Economic and|ing of the production of econo
ore ees Q i B’ { Gq “tf : A N » financial relations will also bejand ornamental plants it the
tive action in accordance with the 4 aos Gets A NeW ertiaeeel A aye
U.N. Charter, : discussed,——C.P, stati

He said “Korea proves our will
te work and (f necessary to fight
for peace. Those who made tra-
mec miscaleulations in Korea
should not forget the terrible price
they already paid for under-
estimating the determinion of
free peoples.

The United States’ letter sald
this eountry will review its con
“ribution to collective securlity
afier the end of hostilities in
Korea” and after United States
fcrees there had been withdrawn”
He said in addition to its present
military commitments on behalf
of the United Nations, the U.S.
has made available to its allies
“vertain United States military
end naval bases in the Pacific and
training bases and facilities with-
in the continental limits of the
United States,”

The letter emphasized that
“the United States has for some
time applied and is at present
applying for “economic and, fin-
ancial sanctions” against aggres-
sors in Korea, “The foremost
gmong the sanctions is an em-
bargo on exports and strategic
materials to Communist China,
which were voted by the General
Assembly after it had branded
‘the Peim'ing regime as an aggres
sor-—U.P. *



Congressmen May
Have Gaused Riots

NEW YORK, Aug. 30
Scripps - Howard newspapers



weekly Washington column re-
ported Saturday that visiting
Congressmen may have set off
new riots among Red prisoners
of war on Koje.
Trouble started the night be
fore four House members arrived

for a conference with Major Gen-
eral Haydon L. Boatner Camp
Commander General Boatner said



prisoners learned by frepevine
of the expected. visit and rioted
as a demonstration. Our diplo-
mats at Hong Kong were red-
faced when a high British official
met the House delegation, noted
three were midwest Republican
and remarked they were u
doubtedly isolationist

The visitors biew their to;




Lady Arundel] this afternoon,/and lectured their hosts on Bri-
evened the exhibition at the tain’s trading with enemy recos
Grenada Arts Club which also nition of Red China. The Four
cancided with the close of the Congressmen were Ralph Harve
two-week course given to Club Harold Ost: w. Harry McG
member Mr. M. P. Alladir i Wil MeCul

dad Art Officer U.P





olitical Party






A new political party, the Bar-
bados United Party, has beer
formed. At a recent meeting Mr
Graftan Clarke and Mr. 8. Agarde
were elected as President anc
Vice President respectively, wit! |)
Rnd Mir’, te Wood ae Abetatars RAL SIGH—Makers of the
Secretary WORLD'S CHAMPION
The objects of the party are CYCLE Ali
‘to unite its members spiritually, ie: <->
politically, economically, and 1 Y bg MSF
socially,” The party promises that, ne ene
if it ts suecessful, it will do its —
best to bring to the notice of the
members of the House of As-
sembly the needs and sufferings
of the people of Barbados,
The party is open to member-
ship

“Study Of Bologna”
Given To B.G. Govt





(From Our Own Correspondent)
GEORGETOWN, Aug, 30.
The U.S. Congress Library has
presented the British Guiana Gov-
ernment with a volume of the
Study of Bologna presented by |
the School of Miniature Painting i
in Hungary which is based on a i}
Latia manuseript of the Four- i
teenth Century Hungarian Bible &
of Demeter Nekesei-Litoez { U You are ona §
The document has been deposit- . . $
ed a: the Carnegie Public Library WINNER when you ride a Raleigh! —— |
Georgetow: ]
i A Raleigh was the choice of Reg Harris—World’s }
S. H. DALGLIESH Professional Sprint Champion for the second year in |
, , ; succession. Here is proof of the wisdom of buying |
TRANSFERRED TO B.G. P '

your bicycle from a Company with such great







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” ARCHER 2 OR 4SPEED GEAR AND DYNOHU! @



Mr, S. H. Dalgliesh, Manager technical experience and knowledge that designed
of ihe Barbados branch of the and built the record-breaking RALEIGH.
Royal Bank of Canada, has been
transferred to Georgetown, n
British Guiana ‘ Manager f
the branch there
Mr. F. H.” Be, In Inspecto |
Superv ’s Departr t, Port-of- =
Spain, will suc cad. Mr. Dalg al THE ALL-STEEL BICVCLE I
rs a a cpg t and A Product af Raleigh Industries Limited, Nowingham, England, |
aC oO £ rive par on
or about September r
The poi ) “T CAVE, SHEPHERD
nncunced of Mr. G. \ f & CO., LTD.
town B.G., as I es 10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street.
of-Spain Tri |
Myr J Sn i|
}
i]







Va




































































went away with a puzzled frown.

With love to the middlemen

GLOBE

this Evening at 8.30

FIRST WITH SPORT FLASHES

GLOBE

ane on ming Here lives, in this obscure retreat,
2 ©“ ¢ ea | The victim of @ tragic joke.
Presents 1O-DAY and ever the Week 5 & 8.3e | whee ohen tec'l nabhing’ tek to

NEWS FROM HELSINKI
See Andy Stanfield winning the 200 metres
See Rev. Bob Richards winning the Pole Vault
See the Amazing Zatope’: doing the 5,000 metres
See Harrison Dillard winni ; ? metre Hurdle
WHITE CITY A.A.A. CiLAM" ONSHIPS
Thrill as MacDonald Bailey wins the 100 yds.

| eat,

Grew too much food, and %9
| went broke.





CENTURY=F0x
Gives You With
Pride and Joy

GAIETY

The Garden—-St James
MATINEE TO-DAY 4% PM
‘TAP BOOT” (colt Van BEFLIN &
“PARDON MY SARONG”
Bud ABBOTT & Lou COSTELLO

“

o . i ‘ a oe -
See Arthur Wint winning kv 449 yds. nda Song in TONiTE 2 Tomonsow Nes ®
; ‘ 3 its He Robert MONTGOMERY &
All this will the top Musical art... Allred | H. TCHCOCK'S oe

“WITH A SONG IN MY HEART”

Joseph COTTON
‘Tues. & We 30 p.m, (Whole Serial

' “ROYAL wounTE RIDES AGAIN’
Another Mighty

Metion Picture

OPENING FRIDAY 5th
SEPT.



" GANETTA DRESS SHOP

(Next Door te Singer’s)



FOR ONE WEEK ONLY

Discount on all
COTTON FRCCKS.

SPECIAL :
10%



AT LAST!
Kenneth Roberts’ Long Awaited...
Long-to-be-Remembered ...

hanyin
NTA

TECHNICOLOR

|

Mrs. A. L. Stuart’s School
of Dancing

Presents

REVUEDEVILLE 1952

Under the distinguished patronage of His Excellency
the Governor and Lady Savage

AT

EMPIRE THEATRE

On Wednesday 3rd., Thursday 4th., Friday 5th
September at 8.30 p.m.
MATINEE: Friday 5th at 5 p.m.
Music by Capt. Raison, A.R.C.M., and Pelice Band
BOOKING OFFICE OPENS EVERY DAY
From 8.30 a.m. — 12 Noon — From 1,30 pam, — 3.30 p.m.

Boxes & Orchestra
House



the Jane Froman story,

resem mic OLOkK
Havifano - Califoun
Wivie-Rifife | GLOBE”



A FREE HOLIDAY FOR ONE WEEK FOR TWO
PEOPLE AT THE SANTA MARIA HOTEL,
IRENADA IS THE FIRST DOOR PRIZE
At The

BEACHCOMBERS' BALL
PARADISE BEACH CLUB

From 9 p.m. on SEPTEMBER 6TH
NEXT SATURDAY

will present

STICKETS S150 _—

% Arranged for you 20 aquariums of Beauty and effortless

by the ;

S BARBADOS
HOTEL :
ASSOCIATION i

; if

665+ < “
SOSOS CGS OPPO PSPSPS PP POPSOSOSOP GOGO FSS OTSOSOOD,



Admission: 362

1/6 for ADULTS



9d. for CHILDREN and NURSES

PFS PSD

eo

PEPDO® PODOSS CDOPHG POY OHSG HH HHS OSH GH HOS HOF

PIP DIOOY



®@Clifle McClean, M



Mae LUBE se Sapna SLR le! oie Set, $1.00
BBMCOMY oes isa tsensonese sabe ommyedizenees ' At the DRILL HALL, GARRISON, on Sat., Sept. 6th. and Sunday, Sept. 7th
PIII IEG GLLLPRIBELLD DLE

THE BARBADOS POULTRY ASSOCIATION

PAGE TWO SUNDAY ADVOCATE
ip tincianaenine
] ;
eR nn ree eae, ? 3 ‘B THE W A 7 R. D. A. PERCIVAL, Ag
hi } ; The Ontass & Menten t 4 y M sistant dtemeonele. Adana
i | HE ; . to the Comptrofier fer Develep-
i i | 2 ADVOCATE’S SOCIAL CLUB By BEACHCOMBER ment and Welfare, left on Friday
Kt . aa ‘iieeimaianiias = | Under the Patrenage oj by B.W.1.A. for British Guiana to
}) ~~ BRIDGETOWN “BARBAREES ~ OISTIN the Hon. ¥, Cy Gale, M.L€. E report that redio signals 98Sist the Government jm pre~
(Dial 2810) (Dial 5170) . ee te erreae nal invite you to their ' have been picked up trom ures agi fer e, full neee
} TODAY TO TUES TOD. Y TO TUES ~ 1.40. eS pm DANCE | stars 30,000 lightyears away draw? ain ce aa aiilinn the uae
if 8 p.n ; a5 w pow i etiolated gene \ attention to -the recent .¢ ri- . ft
yy Another Thrilling Action [warns ew Hit oes ie ee at the ments of Dr. Strabismus .( US. Judge
) Film from Warner Bros : : ss ‘ ye
i : INSIDE THE WALLS]! .. STEEL |2 VOLUNTEER DRILL HALL 9! G0d Preserve) of Utrecht. MONG the passengers leav-
if RETREAT HELL tee: libs 9 : HELMET” en These sigmals are given out by ing last night by the Lady
i Richard CARLSON PO Neamt A-type MONDAY NIGHT, 6TH goncentrations of intggpteligg Nelson sor Boston on. their w
{ COCHRAN BRIAN|| pete OCTOBER, 1 hydrogen. Strabismus sas baek to New York were Mr. ar
Ise NEXT ATTRAC (iON aso | gees , that if this hydrogen ‘could be Mrs. Herman C. Stoute, two
{{ Errol Flynn Doubte peee Sree yc awen tear) Music by sucked ut from betwee the Barbadians who had been hol
«rocky MOUNTAIN’ « |] 7° Se VETOR Hh : ee SRF Perey Green's Orchestra stars by a huge rocket-propelled daying here for the past three
i “CAPTAIN BLOOD and sa, kam Do SUBSCRIPTION: —::— 2/- vacuum-cleaner, the smal] amount weeks as guests at the Hotel
{ THURS. Special 1.89 p.m BIETANT. Sens” REVENGE” & Va nine“ 9 of hydrogen left would offer a les? Royal :
Da ve hnicolor) ‘OUTLAW COUNTRY” sncing irom pm. condensed surface, as it were, Mr. Stoute, an Old ,Comber-
: “BONANZA” Garry COOPER WED. Gnly Tiebedfe: ney Srenatandtte for the reception of signals sent merian, is Judge of the Muni-
x ALLEN & TROMD Special 1.30 pos 4.45 & 8.390 pm Formal Dress Optional out eo our earth. The suction cipal Court of New York City.
“a » ar — a s eo! «pm . . - y
“GUNMEN of ABILENE ; “SILVER CITY wat controlled by a ther te dedi
, ovky LANE Lash 1.» RUE Double see Atta NANEM molecular pump with 6 He expressed délighy.
— 7 Shy ° ocx ALIGN 4
FRIDAY re ctvanae @ BSUNMER af rotating ae a Berbados 1s Progressing
i ‘ROOM FOR ONE_moge™ || “ow ‘OUTIL W_ COUNTRY args ee uae Sieratea “ rea “sels FTER spending nve weeks’
== microbars, with a A in his native Barba-
"| Reuter , would exert dos, Mr. Wilkinson,
} a tor U. on
of 8 the
at. an oe _— morning by B.W.LA, via Anti-
miles above 'Y guq and Puerto Rico.
EMPIRE OLYMPIC ROXY ROYAL is that the whole thing A member of the American Aid
Today to Tuesday io-Day & Tomerrew, To-day to seen Pe.amy iss » snows | burst, sal the sage for the West Indies Inc.,
143 & 8.90 8.10 . 1% o 8. 120 a Bs Mr has “been residing
Jose ER ee Pcturs ; in '
Jalt Disney" Mala POWERS the U.S.A. for the past
Walt Disney's "0 } ts Bette DAVIS Semeergudpsiancen. years. He was last here in 1920
SNOW WHITE CYRANO | THE. BIG in ye when he a couple of months,
j i w Bat At . Ww said that he had
AND THE SEVEN pe percerac| CARNIVAL anotHEeR MAN'S ere district im nated grest progress_in the island
Starring ' yesterday a ? . ,
DWARFS and seine! heii: POISON “No ge, he particularly with regard to hous-
ces, | ak orn | TORS we Se eB cet Ay niece Sasa ae
Hecnieeles SAN LORENZO] snort:ot at Aces MR. UNIVERSE ox ae cod 7 at USA
maiet cena tactics. | Wes « Thee. Starring —_ don’t the people like fruit?” he He was however astonished to
Boy And The & unc1o. REY ALDO es Jack Carson- asked, “Yes,” they said, “but see the number of automobiles in
Wedd Thee tuetday & Wea. | Gar) Coopmr | 740i. Palke arele on sinach of nae Pee the tiand andi wee oti mane sur~.
136 & 8.15 in Mon. & Tubs either give wey i at the number of ace!
at 8.30 p.m, ces he ew 4.20 & BIS “the com
_ Friday “Janie, PAIGE i DIED ae DAWN Lawrence Tierney— said oe. oa which he thought was at a a
at 5 & 8.30 p.m. int < . Arline, Roberts - 7 3 they id mum.
iy sand in ;
Mtr. AL, Stuart's) Mt. UNIVERSE ° she “Then if you grew none you A Pa
Dancing Sehool and CASINO TO KOKEA Fae ave off than you are
Presents ’ ‘ Som and would be better ¥ PARTY was held at the
vesen PARDON MY — [Coming Soon Paar Pt now, and ody would have any residence of Mr. Chessie
REVUEDEVILLE Staring (CAVE OF THE fruit to eat?” “Something like “p on Tuesday night to
Paul HENRIED Duncan HEENALDO Dining Room om Terrace. that,” they said. “I see, nas mark the occasion of his birthday.
1952 Merle OBERON OUTLAW Leo CARELLO Telephone 8148 and 8611. the the meet eee, Wee Oo," The Misses Gloria and Simone
[SSS es eM j : fas
i teay i. Tikla Maw Bat At Drysdale of St, Lucia, and Miss

Mona Harding of British Guiana,
who are at present holidaying in
the iskand, were guests of honour.

Back to St. Lucia
ETURNING to St. Lucia last
night by the Lady Nelson
was Mr. Arthur P. Charles, Super-
intendent cf the Voice Publish-
ing Co., Ltd. He was accompan-

ied by his son whom he had
brought over for medical treat.
ment.

Farewell Party
EMBERS of the Snappers
| Water Polo team held a
| Farewell Party at the residence
/of Mr, Kenneth Ince, Sna per
Captain, in honour of Mr. William
“Billy” Manning and Mr. Frank
Manning, both Snapper players,
who will be leaving shortly for
Canada to study.
Better known as the “Manning
Twins”, Billy and Frank have

given some exceptionally good:

performances during their Water
Polo career. They were also out-
standing in the various Aquasic
Sports held by Harrison College

anew the Snapper members
turning out were: Messrs. Del-
bert Bannister, George McClean,
‘alcolm Browne, ke
Ken Ince, and other old Snapper
players. There was also a very
good turn out of Water Polo play-
ers and enthusiasts.

fist Birthday

PARTY was held at the

home of Mr, & Mrs, Wm.
MeD. Forde, “Myrtice Villa,”
River Road last night It was in
honour of their youngest daugh-
ter, Marie, who celcbrated her
twenty-first birth@ay yesterday:
Many of her friends were there
and the evening was a very
pleasant one. Carib joins in wish-
ing Marie all the best in the

future.
For U.S.A.
ISS JEAN PHILLIPS, daugh-
ter of Mrs, Robertine Phil-
lips, Maxwell, Christ Church, re-
turned last Wednesday -night by
B.W.LA. from Trinidad after
spending a few days there. Jean
expects to leave for U.S.A. with-
in a few weeks. She will reside
there.

For Long Holiday
RRIVING from Trinidad
yesterday morning by
B.W.1.A. were Mr. and Mrs, Cecil
McCartney who were accom-
panied by their. daughter Diana
aged five and their infant son.
Mrs. McCartney is the =
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. C, A, L.
Gale, Abingdon, St. Michael,
where she and her family will be
spending a long holiday. Mr.
eCartney is an engineer em-
ok at Forest Reserve in
| Trinidad,

THEIR MIDSUMMER

SHOW OF POULTRY and PIGEONS

For the first time in Barbados

AN EXHIBITION OF GOLD AND TROPICAL.

movement

Open from 2 p.m. to 11 p.m. on SATURDAY
;
2 pm. to 8 pm. on SUNDAY

Refreshments on Sale

PHPOPHPHGOSHOSS HOHOE

DAS: Seat AY,



Carib Calling

For Three Weeks
ISS MARGO BROWN, a Civil
Servant of Trinidad, ar-
rived here on Thursday by the
Lady Nelson to spend three
weeks’ vacation. Miss Brown is at-
tached to the Post Offiee brancn

of the Serviee. She is staying at















| England with Sir Robert, plans to
; remain for several weeks longer.

My. & Mrs. C W.
“Holloway”, Ivy.

Also, arriving by the same boat
to spend va on here was Miss
Angela Julien, Secretary at the
Imperial College, St. Augustine,
Trinidad. Miss Julien is staying at
Mr. & Mrs. Kenneth St. John, St.
Peter and hopes to be here for a
month,

Cumberhbatch,

On Holiday
ISS MARJORIE DEY ar-
oe from British Guiana
three weeks’ vacation
te She is the guest of Mrs.
Dereen Matthews of “Westgate”,
Land’s End.

_Honeymeen Coupte’
M® and MRS. "RAYMOND
LEGGE of Trinidad who
were honeymooning in Barbados
as guests at the Hotel Royal, left
on Thhursday by B.W.1A. for Ja-
maica,
Mr. Legge is Sales Manager of
B.W.1LA. stationed in Trinidad,
Old Lodge Boy
ASTER DENNIS MANELSKI,
whose father holds an im-
portant position in the Research
Department of the Venezuelan
Government, is in Barbados for
a month’s holiday and is staying
as a guest at Cacrabank Hotel.

Dennis was formerly at the Lodge p.

School and will be
shortly to his home.

Seconded to Trinidad
R. ALWYN HOWELL, Civil
Servant attached to the
Auditor General’s Dept. left the
island by B.W.1.A. for Trinidad
yesterday afternoon. Mr. Howell
has been seconded to the Colo-
nial Audit Dept. in Trinidad for
a period of three months to

undergo a course of training.

returning



MR. WINSTON CHURCHILL
Exhibition at Drill Halt

HE Barbados Poultry
sociation Inc. will be stag-

As-

ing theic Midsummer Show at tie head

Drill Hall on Saturday and Sun-
day, the 6th and 7th of Septem.
ber,
Due to lack of space, no Tur-
Geese, Ducks or Rabbits
Sir be exhibited but, in addition
to the usual show of Poultry and
Pigeons, there will be displayed
about twenty aquariums of Gold
and Tegies Fish.
This will be the fisst occasion
on whieh an exhibition of this
kind has been staged in Barbados
and, for those who have never
had the privilege of attending
one of these Shows in larger
Countries, it will be a revelation,
The h to be exhibited will
comprise specimens from every
corner of the Globe and will in-
clude, of course, the famous
Siamese Fighting Fish and the
Pompadour Fish, the rarest of
all freshwater fish,
Barbadians will now have the
opportunity — es the
popularity harming
cao which claims. fourteen
million enthusiastic keepers of
these watery pets in the United
States of America alone.

AUGUST 31,.

_ 1952

(meee



MR. AND MBS.
Married Last Thursday
N THURSDAY, August 28, at

4.30 p.m. at Mt, Tabor
Moravian Church, Mr. Carl
Moore, elder son of Rev. and Mrs.
C. Moore of Sharon, St.
Thomas, took as his bride Miss
Thora King, eldest daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. C. King of Jack-
son, St. Michael.
The ceremony which was fully
choral with Mr. Owen Pilgrim

at the organ was performed by
Rev. D, C. Moore, assisted by
Rev. A. C. Pilgrim and Rev. E.

E, New.

The bride, who was given in
marriage by her father wore a
dress of slipper satin and lace.
The skirt was qi slipper satin
the bodice featured a lace yoke
ending in a very long train and
with a low neckline, and long
close fitting sleeves ending in a
point. Her headdress was a
lara of orange blossoms with a
full-length veil, She wore slip-
per satin shoes. The trousseau
was the igift of the bride’s cousin,
Miss Muriel Fenty of U.S.A. She
carried a heart.shaped bouquet
of caracas daisies, tube roses and
Queen Anne’s lace.

She was attended by her sis-
ter Miss Joan King, as Maid-of-
Honour with the Misses Gloria
and Elsie Moore, sisters of the
bridegroom as bridesmaids. The
Maid-of-Honour wore a balleri-
na-length dress of orchid organza
with gold accessories, She carried
a bouquet af orchids,

The bridesmaids wore bal-
lerina-length dresses of identical
cut in blue taffeta with matching
dresses and accesso
carried bouquets of an
lilies.

The duties of bestman
Rohe by . Mr. Asquith
Niehols while those of ushers
fell to Mr. Cyril King, brother
of the bride and Mr. Carl W‘ck.
ham.

The reception was held
Sharon, home of the bride-
groom’s parents and the honey-
moon is being spent at St. Philip.

Two Specia! Flights

were

at

-W.I A. had twe special flights

from Barbados to Maiquetia
(Venezuela) on the 27th and 28th
August. These were operated in
order to accommodate the. influx
of Venezuelans back home who
arrived here during the month of
August.

Canadians End Holiday
R. and MRS, GOODMURPHY
left the island recently by
T.C.A, on their way to Montreal,
Canada, They were spending a

vacation at Caerabank Hotel.

‘es and La
urium ,

BASTL COZIER

Quiet Weddi
T 5.30 pm. at St.

ng
Patrick’s

Roman Catholic on Tuesday

evening, Mr.
second son of Mr, and

Basil Vernon Cozier,

Mrs B. L.

Cozier of San Juan, Trinidadâ„¢tookâ„¢
as his bride Miss Carol Eleanor

Perkins,
and Mrs. P. L. Perkins
dale”, Belmont Road,
mony was

The bride who made

solemnised by
Revd, Father Parkinson,

elder daughter of Mr.

of “Earns
The. cere-
~ the
S.J. t
a charm~

ing picture in an elegant creation

of blonde lace
adorned with
ried a bouquet of whit
and coralita and was
marriage by her
duties of bestman .were
by Mr.

and

rhinestones,

father,

organza,
car-
e gerber as:

given in
The
performed

Prank Edwards while

thos of usher fell to Mr. Bernard.

Perkins,

brother of the bride.

Miss Angela Perkins sister of

the bride, was the sole

attendant.

She wore a dress cut on identical
lines as the bride’s and carried a

fan
Daisies.

shaped bouquet of Caracas

After the wedding, a reeeption

was held at “Glenlee”,

Belmont

Road. The happy eouple who have

been honeymooning at

Spring, Bathsheba, 1

Powell
eave this

weekend to make their home in

Trinidad,

’

Spent A Month

RS.

M

EDWIN JAMES
infant daughter Mary,

and. -
re-

turned to British Guiana on-Fri-..
day morning by B.W.LA,» after -

spending
“Mayville
wrence.
Mr. James who has
daying here for the
months,

a month’s
Guest

House,”

holiday . at

been holi=
past two

expects to remain for

another month, He is salesman of::

Harold E, White. and Co, Ltd,,

Manufaeturers Representatives,
He told Carib that. this is his

first visit to Barbados

and he js -

enjoying every moment of it.
To Take Up’ Appointment
EV. HAROLD LANE, . Curate:

of St. Michael’s

Cathedral,

left last night in the Lady N

for Antigua where he

will take

up a new appointment. .
Professor of Law

ROFESSOR Charles

Bourne

and Mrs, Bourne and their in-
fant were passengers by oS
for Puerto Rico on Thursday last.
They are intransit for Vancouver,

B.C,

and has been spending a ~

holiday here with Mrs, Bourne's

parents Mr. and Mrs, A.

G, Farms

er, Oughterson, St. Philip.

Mr. Bourne is Professor of Law >
at the University of British .
Columbia.



West Indian Table Talk

LONDON, August 22.

Major-General Sir Robert Nev-
ile, Governor of the Bahamas
will be back in Nassau this week
after a month’s “‘working holiday”
fn England. When I saw him on
Thursday ‘the told me that he has
pone of news for the Bahamas

vernment, He has spent many
hours discussing matter affecting
the colony with heads of the Col-

onial Office. Among < ae he
investigated was a a
of buying a tug tender ship-

to-shore passenger work at Nas-
sau. He also had talks about the

ing, and airport facilities. Be-
tween tims. he wedged in a short
trip to Sweden.

Lady Neville,

who came to

She will be living at theiy home,
Uplands Park, Brook Surrey,
which they let while they were
in Nassau. Luckily, the house
became vacant just before they
arrived in Britain at the end
of last month and they were able
to take it over again, This is the
main reason for Lady Neville’s
extended stay.
World Cruise

Due to call at British Guiana
on a round-the-world voyage in
his 32 ton yaeht ‘Maid of Alphen”
is Mr. W. A. Ellis who, with his



on

ide lt las

Bahamas dollar expenditure ceil-

CREPES,

iain en a hl lt alte,

By LONDONER
companion Lieut. Commander
James L, Cox is making final
preparation for the trip at Tor-
quay, Devon. First port of call
will be Lisbon. From there the

voyage will take them to the
Canary Islands, B.G., Panama,
Peru, Tahiti, Sydney, Singapore

and Cape Town, and finish at
Takoradi, Gold Coast. This is
where Mr. Ellis has lived for 11
years. The yacht is expected to
cover most of the 50,000 miles
under sail,
Professor for Jamaica

After attending the sixth In-
ternational Grassland Congress in
Pennsylvania, Professor Martin
Jones, Professor of Agricultura)
Botany at King’s College, New-
castle-yfon-Tyne, Durham, will

visit Jamaican and Trinidad and -

British Council auspices to lee-
ture and advise on grassland
development. He will be in
Jamaica from September 13 to 23,
and in Trinidad from September
24 to October 2. His programme
ineludes a_ visit to*the Imperial
College of Tropical Agriculture.

Mannequin
Attractive twenty-one-year-old will

Miss Patricia Neville, of Kensing-
ton, who sail# for Jamaica next
month to be a bridesmaid at her
brother’s wedding, is one of six

girls chosen to model
the Coronation Year

gowns ‘in ©
collections.

For the past three years Miss

Neville has

toured Britain and

part of Europe as a ballet dancer.
When she feturns from -Jamaica
in Novemyxr, she will begin her
training as a mannequin. °~

Winter Services

I can this week give some de-
tails of BOAC’s winter services
as they will affect the Caribbean.
tember 1 the London-
will cease
and

From Sep
Montego Bay service
to call at Prestwick
operate
Bermuda

is likely to
once to

tween
*



last from Montego
following day.

, Also
QUALITY PRINTED SOUND RAYONS 96 cts
DISTINCTIVE DESIGNS $1.06

T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS

YOUR SHOE STORES

DIAL 4220

DIAL 4606



will



DURABLE SHEETS AND PILLOW CASES

PILLOW CASES
SHEETS 70 x 100
SHEETS 80 x 100
SHEETS 90 x 100







SUNDAY, AUGUST 31, 1952 SUNDAY ADVOCATE
At The Cinema:

: POULTRY Farm And Garden |?=
With A Song NOTES By AGRICOLA >

PACE THREE
: sscsisiinaineenaiadninaainareeai

ence eect Scena a rrNen em tn







Blemishes
- Cleared

i
i
|
i
! - eens ate 7 ee
Doe you havs a skin | . eas | |
try 9 <8 |
pins inuiepe! ' | BW " n mS |
i ha
|
|
{
i

a

















































HERB GARDENS Saicee Gimme < ;

In M Hea rt Last week 1 streised the im- _ Pas See oes . Il cidnseatiiaianat
portance of clean an@ adequate THIS column, as is generally known, has devoted much isang ea ral cuts apd Ph oo eA =| |
ee eS ak peal _ Sent of its space to the important question of food crop produe- Dou't euries che saibery of Sires sen § = ca | | lo poeeuse WOR

. : size tor your chicks, can Ray tion. One of our policies is to keep an eye on the adver-} Curicura Ointment. and step our in| The sseret of ||
By Gc. Bw be cleaned and are s against. tising matter in the daily press and to draw attention to} soesss sauces aa see asuperb | |
ale ee te a a _ to 3 suth products which, with a little encores ae t Tal cur, a peor flavour with fish | BOTTLE of Lea &

: a od ba g WE a one be grown locally. In this way, many fruits and vegetables oe | AN irks. nua is Boones Perrins is as neces-

EW A thy iste itke Barteros, ts veoney Tue tO eee tar eee Te CneS. one nave been treated as fully as space would permit and, we Yale dhl, to thoke Sch délicioms | | sexy eee eelle and Sock
speculate that the vast majority of people have never . From 3 x one trust, not without some use to those interested, especially by adding Lea & Perrins Sauce | | sat ‘

of a gallant and courageous entertainer called ° S8ton ea. adequate person ‘ ' : || on a table. It improves

an. This young eg d is one of America’s foremost {°",..'° P re ee ee ess ot pacha og. pai | fried, baked or grilled
water is pure and germ free use two teaspoonfuls of Lea & | G, 0s

though her activities have been cur- except after heavy rains but the And so, to-day, we wish to Ge Ni Perrins in fish-cakes, fish-pies | | fish, combines wonder-

ed as a result of an injury received in a plane crash litter and dro) tf will spread GARDENING HINTS point to a few of the less im-]- fling hts and poached fish for four people, | fully with meat, and
; ‘ ‘dé, Miss Froman is still in the top rostet of ge™ms if they get the water. yaa but, nevertheless, highly and what a difference Lea & | | ,
' ; oni 2 a. a gord os Moe make ’ abe commodities prominently es en Perrins makes! The secret of | | ™akes cheese — always a
: cS . : ; oe ers adding FOR AMATEURS wed in the advertising columns : the flavour that only. Lea & || favourite with men—bet-
—. With A So In Heart, showing at the Globe, is the some cryptals of permanganate last week, We refer partieutarly Getting up rights, burning sensa- eerie can give fits in the da ae ss
of her lifé and ther her name means anything to of potash or consult your feed to pot herbs in 0. a am of ¥ 5 : : ter than ever. Always
story or a deal Water fountains pe dried form, in ¥ organs, whitish discharge, recipe, For more than 100 |
ye i of not, the film is tops in all round good entertainment. { ie noeand = Flowers For The House cluding sage, mint, parsley and} gui eg Ag AE A years, ever since it was brought put out a bottle of Lea
Tt is a lavish and spectacular ; and disinfected. Feeders ought (Cont’d.) or “) Rese and lone, of manly are to England from the Far East, gy & Perrins Sauce at meal
ction with a ‘cate re ap~ once a week. It is useful when picking flowers __ It is, we think, true to say that Siand (a most important sax gla..d the recipe has been Lea & times—and please every-
pe story. The ear’ ions mat F Shei tien, seh for the house to know something the earliest gardens featured 2 = S yrerestne | troubles Perrins’ closely-guarded secret cers family | ;
of the film her rather un~ i about their le i r Plants considered valuable for —no other sauce makes such One im your family ¢
chicks uiré on inch feéder ngth of life after P e and take the new F
ronan: ae ton alee . ied space each. From three weeks Peing picked. or medicinal properties—‘physic ae UE. palke Rogena. a difference to the simplest 4g
was manag’ . : to si ‘ gardens’, as they were commonly . food. eS
ber, a ee. 286 to fame, Then, at Feeder pubs eer a i eae h ne which come under the called. in fact, the monasteries, vou 3 righ reine your ise: a ; i 4
1943, when she was at the heigh sary. If you don't allow sufficient be HES an a Sie can only rectory and vicarage gardens of Hvears ve and sake yeu Sal —— Ra aeeea EE Saeco ee
of Pe nts plane in feeder space only the days. The Rose aah “esate _ not so long ago were noted for] Rogers” "QUBser oF money beck. Bet ss |
~ a a Bg eee chicks are going to get enough perfect the Arst day after gig, their efforts in this direction, Un-| ‘uarantee protects you. ' LE A & PE RRI WS
bps ad troops, ere to eat and you encourage “can- ~ re» Tagus _ = cee nibalism” at an early _ o oh wae ka ércupia ells fallen“into desuetude in modern eee Ce ©. ;
the Wan ld the would probably eS Ae ae Oe nD Ses OR ASTHM A MUCUS Khe ginal and genuine
n the other hand there are ek og

‘which does not allow adequate : ancient usage in the Holy Lapd.
eating space. Be careful not to gov Sewers, ee ae oud In this connection, a vast range
waste feed by using poor feed- 41) Jast in water for a week or Of knowledge was attributed to

WORCESTERSHIRE SAUCE
out of hospitals, on and off oper-

Don't let coughing, sneesing, ehak-





























ating tables, interspersed with ing equipment or by filling the oven longer. Anthuriums if picked Selomon: “from the cedar that is] {Ig attacks of Grononitis or Avi %
the odd show, where she was feeders too full. After the first ot the rishi stage will often noe in Libanus to the hyssop that ay’ ge right. without Crs ALIGN
acre ot ten Se We ata, Shh only” tworttinns dull “and ions for three weeks in the house, A sbringeth out of the - wall”| DAce. Mis gross met ims is fol
nightclub engagements . where feed will be wasted. To kee ie Tot depends however on the time (I Kings IV, 33). There were through the blood, thua reaching the
she, th#inéd to @ metal prop water Yountains free from a flowers aré picked, and the way different hyssops and this one is eee oral tube. he Geet
to mt a fall. Then she de- litter Gna ecatarainiten scene in which they are treated after thought to have been wild mar-| Atey S.wars 1. Helps loosen ands
cided to undertake a U.S,O. tour get them on Sine atetioetos Any Peing picked, joram, Again, in the Book of Wis-| move thick strangling mucus 2. ‘tyus
r the armed forees, and armed Water or dropeings i. tne All flowers should be picked dom (VII, 20), Solomon is credited] Nae lean ae pene nee:
with her crutches and an amaz- neighbourhood of the fountains @ither in the early morning, or the with knowledge of the ‘aiversities] at@ roughing, | wheesing @anceziug
ing amount of guts, she travelled SUSAN HAYWARD esa eke prevented from conta- late afternoon. Immediately after of plants and the virtues of roots”.| Zuuvanteed, Gee MENDACO trom

en
ovet thirty thousand miles to Korean war drama in docu- minating the main litter area of being pickéd placé them, stems hemist today.

mentary style. The title is taken the pen, down, in a bucket of deep water _ It is thie case that formerly there




































; i 1 place for at least two Was great pride in herb gardens,
rom the fighting words of go jon the « Sea th En hi "lz
come-back is thrilling and Jane qyarine General Oliver P. Smith ne + Bi ours, anid. if y have been notably in England, which com,

Froman deserves ail the credit in he; WAS dake Dy Cebviannd- — — and dry there is no pickéd in the evening leave them j TO-DAY'S NEWS FLASH



|
Loosened Firs! Day | '





change it, unless of the bucket overnight. If this is
ents at Pusan about the impend- course there is an outbreak of done, it will be found’ that the where the fragrant flowers and











9 >. 3 ing Marine pullback, snapped, disease. If you it clean and flowers are stronger and fresher aromatic scents could be enjoyed.
come sat tens : plays dane “Retreat, hell! We're just at- dry you can add to it every when they are arranged, and as @ There was a large choice of plants |} STANLEY GIBBONS
bl i ae - te remark- tacking in another direction!” three weeks for periods longer consequence easier to handle. available : the recognized culin-|}f POSTAGE STAMP
able piece work, ave never i : than a year. When do res Another tip which prolongs the ary herbs, such as mint, parsley CATALOGUE 1953
seen 'Miss Froman, but critics ean e ayer Se. wine he move the litter it make an. life of cut flowers is to keep them gaye, marjoram, thyme and chives: PART I
say that Susan Hayward, with ‘ eae Sent ee hated: to Cxoglient _ manure _ for out of the wind. Nothing makes nex: some not only useful for BRITISH EMPIRE
her beauty and showmanship, eee tae tate . oes as kitchen garden or flower bed cut flowers wilt and droop quicker gaycurings but for their fragrance (Complete)
a oo vo ro nreceed y, Seoul. With the we eee occur, eanhiy — to let — a eee and also, for treatment of ‘cotds’ $4.00 Each
id characteristics so tha ‘ te } a : any people change the water : 7

sce haga Ga Pt Net Sg RS ae eat Ta coe BOAR atlf JOHNSON
startling, K vases of flowers daily, but this is ;

One of the outstatding achieve: then on, surrounded by hordes healthy ones. Remove them at not only unnecessary, but the con- be sweet bay, rosemary, lavender,

“ ists i
ments of Miss Hayward's por- seit tortie tan. tee i ote ba a good chance stant disturbance and handling of Cl@ry, bergamot, =the —hyssops, |}

one ee oe synehron- their way to the seaport of " But always remember to éleam he Sowers is bad for them, ou) lovage, tansy and others,

ien : aera with goed Hungnam. and, disinfect all pment and will keep it sweet, and this in the A recent book—‘Gardenage’ by
solos are beautifully sung and 4 large part of the film is don't hesitate to in aSsis4 case of the short lived flowers ig Geoffrey Grigson, published by
Miss Hayward’s “dubbing” is the @uthentic combat film taken at tence from a vet when ‘in doubt. 31] that is needed. gutledge—has a good deal to say
most remarkable I have seen. 1 ‘te time, of the actual amphi- With those that last a week or about changes in modern garden-
could detect no weakness in the Pious landings at Inchon and the longer, the water should be ing. Most early gardens were in-
cast which includes David Wayne ‘mous _ strategic — withdrawal M changed about the fourth or fifth deed magical or medicinal or util-

fhe whimsical ayne during December 1950, together Oscow day, at the same time snipping off ftarian, To-day, with a greater
as e whimsical and appealing with other fighting sequences. half an inch off the end of each range of specimens and horticul-



Your Horoscope
















vaudevillian who discovers the : { stem, ing any dro ones, ‘ y !
Ginger; Rory Cathoun ag the hand- Headed by Frank covelor. Miss Norman and re-arranging the whole Vase “our great gardens tend 10 be- | ot'what he state inant tga
some and dashing Air Force the cast is a capable one, Mr. of flowers our & 1 s * the] of wour past experiences, your strong and FLY THEM HOME 6 oO A.C
pilot who rescues her and later Lovejoy gives a sound _perfor- . come piant-z0os. Again, weak points, ete? Here is your chance - * .

to test FREE the skill of Pundit Tab:



arriés i The “long-life” flowers are a hi
m her and Thelma Ritter, â„¢ance as the conscientious com- Where Do You Buy bedifis a busy bousewite or author of this book himself a son



























yet ; he Manse—criticises the Estab- | India’s most fam- . Ht your child¥én ave at NEY FOR THE COSt OF
one of thé screen’s best come- Mander with Richard Carlson the working woman who, while of the ous Astrologer y

running a close second as a ¢ 4 lished Church for its remoteness i School in the United - rT,
Giang, 28 the composite of all Titrine reservist “recaes’ to YOU Clothes? liking flowers in her home, yet has from the old religions of the soil, \yl° PY amply aes an a, va See

rot a great deal of time to spend pn Mg , dom make atrangements Your children fly in swift,
tart humour and dry temarks active duty, Young Rusty Tamblye RUSSIAN women have a sense on arranging them. But a litle Mueh could, of course, be said of }ence 10, umetuy J am to bring them horite fot the dure Speedbirds, attended

will éxci ! PUBposes
banish any sentimentality. Una iq Wun ectesen tenes Bh i hie of style, but only a small selection time once a week is possible to the lessons the garden teaches of [pit ip an envi.
























higher things, but we have no in- reputation? : Summer holidays. by an experienced and

Merkel, ay alee ls ae ae family vow _> the Mane and aa, says che baa tet a i ag pens thal eratn Gok tanta of purguing that aspect of] The aceurscy of P B.0.A.C’s student fares ate friendly crew who took
= — ’ oe oP ce co t leaves 7. ned. to ber home. The Hall, W st will last a week or longer may be the subject here, Readers wh0}ina the available to all full time after their every wish.

; : , Farleigh (Kent), after nine months useful to those who do not know have been keeping these notes may | oractical | advice ‘ studeats it thé United Consult your Travel Agent

Meticulous = preduction and Grim and gripping, jit is a in Moscow. much about flowers, . , kefer to “Garden Mysteries” of} ir icope | on ot Kingdom who are tinder 26 or British West Indian

splendid direction are but two Of thoroughly honest picture of the September 9, 1951.





























g ' 3 f age — they enjoy Airways,
the attributes of this film. A ility and cruelty of war, and . She was governeds to the Flowers That Last Long : yeats 0 ay’
third is the high quality of the we virtue a. Gaah-er direction, family of an official at the British When Cut But, to return to this question the ROUND TRIP JOUR- Lower Broad Street,
popular songs\ that are sung. is completely devoid of mélo- Embassy, _ Anthurium, Pentas, Tube-rose, of local production, How nice. and : yy emer
Richatd Rodgers has four songs dramatic heroics. “In the summer all thé Russian yyarigold, Orchid, Ground Orchid, pleasant it would be if, some- els, Changes, Lit; Z : oo
to his name including the title py) pf Women wear dust coats in Hght Gerbera, Eucharist Lily, Gladioli, where around our own kitchen} (sation, | Lucky Cn B.Q.A.C. TAKES GOOD CARE OF YoU
song and Blue Moon, while the INSIDE THE WALLS OF pastel shades, which seem chi¢ ¥xora, Tamarisk, Pinks, Zinnia, door, we could establish a little} jc Nave astounded ed the mt
Gershwin brothers contribute FULSOM PRISON and colourful until you have seen Carnations. corner for some of the culinary] world over, GEONen MACHER at New '
Embraceable You. Other weil At the Plaza, Barbarees, IN- several thousand of them,” says herbs especially—-where we could i . Rpt seu must possess
known favourites are Tea for ging THE WALLS OF FULSOM Miss Norman, _ rush out and gather a ftesh leat} ry popularise his avetem, Tabore will
Two, ’ré Either Too Young pRISON . depicts living The; sie! abbitbaee tn flour before the public holidays, bere, another one there, a blos~J..« A ate eta-
Gia Pacing 04 ve eaek te conditions. and diseipline me! standards are not good, but they Which occur several times a year. << mor oo ey ee eae Mi or Mies, aga neo and date ti j ay obo Mods
, pax tage existed in ifornia’s Stat® think th decorative.” Miss Norman considers the , : y m
—to mention only a few. Prison prior to 1944. Though the pic gs Re rng sagt erally to be a friend~ committing them to the ‘fixings'}money wanted for ical Work, :
— oe oe ie a ans Te tg eghaed mor re pore to Dy. deebly dlesse inwieoe, Sn peonle wage 7 wats of them =< ae “n ko linn Bamps or ‘Coinek tor a bie Wel °
of production numbers an e af new systems enology 2 > visit fare whatever ure, moniais and other int iterature. ies
theré is a génuine patriotic fer- one old, the “violence ound eruel- and women were apt to approach el welcome the chance to visit or two of each ie efi that is're- You w mn ‘be ‘“ raved vate 8 naka ibe BRIMISH OVERSEAS AIRWAYS CORPORATION
sata _ ‘ :

ur in the final scene of Miss ty of the former regime are Miss Norman to ask where she quired; fresher, tastier and more|" :
Froman’s U.S.O. tour that is hon- accented with such flagrant sen. had bought her clothes, Her reason for coming home” piquant than all the dried bottled [nny “not 'be "made apain. ‘Addeoa,
est and moving. I don't think Sationalism that they completely wien she told them, no more She is to be married next month. its palatability after being open-| Puno TABORE, (Dept

mere ie ange doubt hat WITH A Short “scone of Folsom, as it a ae tin see
w e 3 .
its ‘pla

today. Had the treatment of the
tomatically among yrobiem presented been. different,
e value of the film might have
been enhanced, but as it is, the

Foie. at the Plaza, Bridge- result is just one more brutal
towh, RETREAT, HELL! is a new prison drama. .























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SUNDAY ADVOCATE

Yesterday’s Cricket



ENGLAND WIN TEST
SERIES WITH INDIA
W.L Cricket Officials Asleep ? ?

By O. S. COPPIN

HE TEST match series between England and India have now been
7 completed and there has been an overwhelming victory recorded
for England with three Tests won, and the other drawn,

Two main questions at once confront followers of International
cricket, one is a general one and the other peculiarly affects the West
|Indies as a member of the Imperial Cricket Conference.

I shall deal with the general aspect first and it is this—How far
can we predict the chances of this victorious England team against
| Australia next summer? How strong is the England team now?
| 1 doubt that there is anyone living who can forecast with any
| degree of certainty what will be the outcome of the England—Aus-
tralia Tests, since we all must of necessity be familiar with the
glorious uncertainties of this wonderful game we call cricket.

ANALYSIS PERMITTED

OWEVER this should not prevent us, certainly not this scribe.
| from analysing the respective chances in the light of the recent
| performances of these two countries,
| . Since the India—England Tests are the most recent, let us deal
| with them first. I think that it will be generally conceded that in
Bedser and Trueman England possess the finest opening attack they
|have been able to put into the field since the restoration of Test
| cricket after the war, at least on performance.
| With Bedser as the constant partner they have experimented
j from time to time with Pollard, Edrich, Bailey, Tremiett, Butler and
ompany but even at their best, regardless of the opposition against
which they have been ranged can any of these be credited with hav-
ing attained the speed, thrust and ferocity which young Trueman
has produced against the Indian team. .

GAP PARTLY BRIDGED

FTHAT being so we are entitled to assume that at long last England

has been able to bridge to some comforting extent the wide gav
which has existed in the past two tilts with Australia in the opening
| bowling department,
This must not be construed to mean that I have placed the suc-
leess of the recent combination of Bedser and Trueman above the
| streamlined, high powered effectiveness of the world pace bowling
twins Lindwall and Miller but it does restore some sort of balance
leven to the extent of ensuring some measure of retaliation in case
of another “bumper” season.

TRANSITION PERIOD
EPORTS are to the effect that the Australian team is going
through a period of transition and they will in all likelihood be
| forced to adapt themselves to English conaitions if they strike a damp
season and be compelled to-negotiate the spate on English medium
seamers, is

On the other hand players like Graveney, May, Sheppard, Wat-
kins, and of the more senior brigade Hutton himself, Ikin and Simp-
son, possessed of an almost complete knowledge of the vagaries of
the English wickets, will form a strong batting nucleus to counter
| what Australia will have to offer.

SUSPECTED AUSTRALIA’S STRENGTH

L HAVE always suspected the reputed strength of Australian teams
| to England and it has happened far too often to be put down
to chance or coincidence.that a tour to England has provided the
scope whereby the seeds of careful coaching, self dedication and down-
{right individual effort have resulted in an abundantly fruitful and
\ historic harvest time.

But what of our individual deductions from the Test? It seems
patent to me that we who have already defeated India in India
should be the favourites to win this series if we can be assured that
we will have the services of our professionals. Skipper John God-
|dard made no bones about this when I interviewed him on his
return from Australia. “
It must seem obvious to those who have followed the series that
| pace bowling is the Achilles Heel of the best of the Indian players
and although they were a young team they showed no improvement
| throughout the tour in their methods of dealing with attacking pace
| bowling on a wicket that was not a batsman’s wicket,

Mankad whom I consider one of the world’s leading all-rounders
has stated that he will not be available for the tour and therefore
bowling of the type of Ghulam Ahmed, Hazare himself, Phadkar
and the like will not be classed in the realms of the “cataclysmic”
as some people classified the early attack on the Australian tour of
Lindwall and: Miller.

PROFESSIONALS MUST PLAY /

T follows then that it is incumbent upon the West Indies cricket

officials to ensure that we acquire the services of the professionals
and that we recruit some sort of pace bowling talent that will possess
the necessary thrust to turn the tide in our favour. ‘

The West Indies, following their victory in the Tests with Eng-
land in 1950 were by common consent recognised as the logical chel-
lengers of Australia for world cricket supremacy. _ This tour is now
history. The West Indies were beaten but not disgraced and it is
reasonable to conclude that as a result of this they have been accord~
ed second in world cricket circles. ;

England will be meeting Australia next summer in another chap-
ter of the celebrated fight for the “Ashes”. We have defeated New
Zealand and I have never given South Africa a thought, so that if
we are defeated by the Indians and England win the “Ashes” or
share the moral honours then the West Indies will have lost several
places in the rating of International cricket.

| W.I. BOARD UNCARING
4 BY on the other hand ,recent event have proved
that West Indies official cricket circles are
either uncaring or unaware of these facts, Whv
has a captain not been appointed yet? John God-
dard who led the West Indies to Victory in the
West Indies in 1948, in India in 1949 and England
jn 1950 and nearly sacrificed his “guts” in Austra-
lia is available. “It follows then that he should
have been appointed ages ago.

People have to arrange for leave and if they
happen to be in an executive position then his
even. more difficult, Tomorrow is the beginning
of September and the Indians are due in Decem-
/ per, any normal person would have expected that
the West Indies Board would have appointed a cap-
tain months ago and would have already co-opted
‘him to deal with the persons whom they are going
., to invite,

*;} They have not yet invited Goddard to accept









the captaincy and I understand that there is a
qivange plot afoot to supplant him with two of the

John Goddard )oys.
SECOND SPRING
F this non-playing armchair senate decides that burlesque is the
better part of valor they must be warned that a complete break-

J

down in West Indies cricket is in the offing. No amount of burlesque,



j tances and ball grips can make Wong pu, Chinee Mu Mu

} batty frongsingh a world beater in time for the visit of the Indians.
Â¥ Let us stick to commonsense. If it is found that senile decay
has been affecting West Indies cricket officials in high places well
Vers let us get them a pantaloon with pouch on side early and retire
» some safe distance to graze. :

a ore ie a at stake to allow our more chivalrous senti-
nants to justify a strange era of nonsense.





CARLTON vs EMPIRE
Empire 232 and (for 6 wkts) 210
Carttemy cin. eee eee aa 92

Empire skittled out Carlton
for 92 at Black Rock yesterday in
reply to their first innings score
of 232 and then went on to make
210 for the loss.of six wickets by
close of play.

Chiefly responsible for Carlton’s

meagre score were pace’ bowler
H. Barker and slow left arm
bowler Adzil Holder. Barker

trundled effectively to bag 5 for
42 in 14.4 overs, three of which
were maidens, while Holder
collected 3 for 23 after sending
down 9 overs.

The wicket was good’ when
Carlton resumed their first
innings with the Hutchinson

brothers, Reynold 25 and Geoffrey
3, with the total standing at 39
for two. wickets.

It was not long before Empire
got their first wicket for the day
when pace bowler Barker sent
back Reynold Hutchinson by the
lbw route without any addition to
his over week score. The ball
now triumphed over the bat and
there was a regular procession of
batsmen to and from the wickets.

Eight wickets had now fallen
for 54 and it was left to Warren
who came in at this. stage and
knocked up a quick 31 including
five fours and one six.

The innings closed at 3 o’clock
with Carlton’s total standing at
92,

With a lead of 140, Empire
started their second innings and
further consolidated their posi-
tion by registering 210 for the loss
of 6 wickets,

Conrad Hunte led the way with
a fine knock for 51 including
three boundaries. Other useful
contributions were made by Grant
45, Rudder 35, King 26 Depeiza
21 and Holder 20.

Grant and Depeiza put on 52
for the second wicket and de-
lighted the crowd with some
forceful cricket. Later in the
evening, Horace King got an
aggressive 26 including six
boundaries four of which he took
off J. A. Williams in on over.

Rudder and Holder then kept
up the end and were still to-
gether when stumps were drawn,
the latter with 20 including three
boundaries and the former with 35
ircluding two boundaries,

WANDERERS vs POLICE

Police 156 and
Wanderers . 2.0.0... 6.00005
Denis Atkinson, Wanderers
Skipper scored a century for his
team in their match against Police
at the Bay yesterday. Atkinson's
115 enabled his team to amass 314
for nine wickets. His total includ-
ed 14 fours and four sixes, He was
caught by Byer at mid-off off the
bowling of C. Blackman.

Police on the first
were bowled out for 156. When
stumps were drawn Wanderers
had scored 95 without loss, W.
Knowles was 72 not out and
Evelyn 17 not out.

When play resumed yesterday
the Wanderers score was taken
to 123, At this stage Knowles
who had added only five runs to
his over week total, was caught
by Sobers off the bowling of Carl
Mullins.

Wanderers however carried
their ‘total to 314, A partnership
by D, Atkinson and R. Lawless
carried the score from 160 for
seven to 308 for 8. At this stage
Lawless was bowled by Mullins
for 53. Perry Evelyn also contribu-
ted a valuable 55,

Carl Mullins, bowling for the
Constables, sent down 25 overs, of
which three were maidens, and
took seven wickets for 93 runs, G.
Sobers and C. Blackman took one
each for 80 and 28 respectively.

In their second innings Police
have lost. one wicket for 103
runs, C. Blackman was bowled by
Denis Atkinson for 42, F. Taylar
and A, Blenman, the not out bats-
men, are 49 and nine respectively.

SPARTAN vs PICKWICK
Pickwick 242 & (for 1 wkt.) 54
Spartan 215

Despite a grand innings of 78
not out by G. N. S. Grant, Spartan
conceded first innings lead points
to Pickwick by 27 runs at the end
of the second day of their First
Division Cricket match at Queen’s
Park yesterday. Pickwick scored
242 and for 1 wicket, 54, and
Spartan scored 215 jn their first
innings.

On the first Saturday of play,
Pickwick’s Skipper, John Goddard
showed himself to be in good form
when he scored 71, not out, though
he had been given a chance in
his thirties. In Pickwick’s first
innings, Frank King took four
wickets for 50 runs,

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Spartan went back at the wicket
yesterday to continue their over
week score of 14 for the loss of
one wicket. “Shell Harris batted
well and confidently. He had a
go at the bowling until he was
eventually caught by the wicket-
keeper off E, Edwards, for 63 runs.

Grant batted a superb innings,
and his foot work was nice to
watch. He was never troubled by
the Pickwick attack, but rather
played their bowling with all con-
fidence, His steady cautious batting
is illustrated in the 31 singles he
scored in his innings, but he also
had occasion to hit a six.

When Frank King joined him
at the wicket it seemed as though
Spartan would make a fair bid
for gaining first innings lead, but
King was eventually run out for
35. He had just hit two fours, and
on sending a shot through square
leg, darted off for a run, Birkett
who was fielding at that position,
was swift throwing in, and King
was run out,

Spartan were unfortunate in
having another batsman run out.
Griffith who usually opens the
innings,for Spartan, went at num-
ber eight, but was run out when
he had not yet scored, Added to
this, Phillips, was absent.

For Pickwick E. L, G, Hoad
took three for 74 and E, Edwards
three for 38.

In the second turn at the wicket,
Pickwick are 54 for the loss of
one wicket, A. M. Taylor is 21
and S. Birkett 26, Taylor hit a six.

COLLEGE vs LODGE
AT COLLEGE
Colfege Ist Innings (for nine
wkts) decld .. 355
Lodge 88 and (for 6 wkts) 60

Harrison College after declaring
when their score had reached 355
runs for the loss of nine wickets
in their first innings, dismissed
Lodge for 88 runs yesterday the
second day of their First Division
cricket match at College. Failing
to, save the follow on Lodge are
now 60 runs for the loss of six
wickets.

College concluded their first
innings at 2.20 p.m., yesterday
with Malcolm Worme undefeated
with 147 runs out of 355 runs.
Best bowling performance was
given by K. re took five
of the College wickets for 68 runs
in 16 overs.

In the Lodge first innings, J.

4 Outram topscored with 23 runs

while the next best score of 20
runs was made by Skipper Wilkie,
At lunch time Lodge had lost four
cf their wickets in the first innings
for 40 runs,

Bowling at medium pace Mr.
Headley in seven over captured
three of the Lodge wickets for 11
runs and C, Smith three for 23 in
six overs and four balls.

Lodge opened their second
innings at 4.30 p.m, with their
opening pair Grant and Murray
but when the score was eight,
Grant was nicely caught by the
College skipper, C. Smith at fine
leg for a duck,

G. Foster the right arm slow
bowler for College bowled steadily
and had three of the Lodge wickets
for 16 runs in their second innings
when stumps were drawn, He
bowled Murray, Farmer and
Brookes for 16, 0 and 16 respec~
tively.

Lodge have now scored 60 runs
for six wickets in their second
turn at the wicket.

Egyptian
Swims English
Channel

FOLKSTONE, Southern Eng.,
Aug, 30
After finishing his Channel swim
from England to France in heavy
weather, Said El Arrabi, 35-year-
old Egyptian policeman, returned
bere by motor-boat this morning.
El Arrabi was swept ashore on
the French coast near Cape Gris
Nez early today by waves eight
feet high, He waded to the
beach 17 hours, 42 minutes after
he had entered the water at
Dover. The Egyptian, who had
swum the Channel last year, was
the fourth successful swimmer
for the present Channel “season.”
The weather, which spoiled his
attempt at a record, also caused
two English swimmers to aban.
don the hope of starting from the
French side today. They were
Miss Margaret Feather, 21, and
Sergeant George Gray, senior
swimming instructor to the Royal
Marines,

@ On page 5.



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RESERVATIVE




SUNDAY, AUGUST 31, 1952

RACING NOTES

By BEN BATTLE



SANTA ROSA MEETING

Y this time the first day of the Arima Santa Rosa Meeting will have

been completed. An astonishing number—145—horses have been
entered which must; I imagine, constitute a record. The entries,
however, are remarkably well distributed and there are few races with
less than a dozen and only one with more than two dozen horses
entered, Not that an entry of twenty five, which is the number listed
for the Jetsam Handicap is not a frightening amount on the little
Arima track, but it is to be expected that a number of these will be
scratched. Obviously, a good deal of care and attention has gone
into the framing of the races and a well balanced programme has
resulted.

Barbados entries are limited strictly speaking to Mr. Chase’s Pretty
Way, whom apparently Doctor Dottin has succeeded in putting back
on her feet, and Embers. The latter may be seeking a lucky track,
but after her performance in August I certainly do not fancy her
chances against the strong C Class field which she will have to meet,
Pretty Way, at her best would be a force to be reckoned with, but we
shall have to wait and see whether her recovery is complete,

Although Mr. Barnard’s string really hail from St. Vincent we
see so much of them that we can follow their fortunes with justifiable
interest. I shall be surprised if anything gets near to Bright Light in
the Derby Trial Stakes nor do I think that that will be her only suc-
cess. In the 2-year-old races, Mr. Barnard has a strong hand with
Faerie Queene and Rose Leaves and the former will give us some idea
of the relative form for we have already seen her in action, Among
the other two-year-olds I notice Surety, a full brother to the useful
Assurance has been going very well,

The only new sires to have out 2-year-olds are Bold Friar who is
responsible for a half-bred which goes by the remarkable name of
Der Runner—an appellation that could only have originated in Trini-
-dad, and Ghenghis Khan who has a roan colt—Memoir—out of that
very good creole Fragrant Memories. Ghenghis Khan himself was out
of Felicitas and hence his use as a sire would give breeders access to
Mr. Barnard’s rarest strain of blood.

A word about the stakes. These are on a most lavish scale and
range from the three thousand dollar first prize offered for the Captair.
Cipriani Memorial Cup down to the one thousand, one hundred and
fifty for the G Class races. The latter are thus almost as valuable as
our own Champion Stakes which attracted a field of our very best
horses, Another feature of the meeting with which we in Barbados
compare very shabbily, lies in the number of Trovhies which are
offered, No fewer than ten races carry these in addition to the prize
money and there can be no doubt that they add tremendously and
out of all proportion to their value to the pleasure of winning a race.
Most of them are donated by private firms and it is hard to believe
that similar contributions would not be made in Barbados if the right
approach were used, At least it is something that our Turf Club might

very well try.
“CHARLIE SMIRKE”

English visitors to our August meeting might have been startled
by the thought that the Aga Khan’s No. 1 jockey had elected to pay
us a visit. Vociferous cheers for “Smirkey” would have gone far to
confirm this. But it was all meant in very good part and the famous
nickname concealed the identity of our latest addition to the ranks of
jockeys. Young Blades did not meet any success at his first meeting
but he did set at least one record when he was forced to put 1p weight
in order to “catch” 86 pounds, His rides on Cottage he may charge to
experience but I was quite impressed with the way he handled Devil's
Symphony in the North Gate Handicap, and the foundation of what
can develop into a good seat and hands were there for all to see. Space
has prevented me mentioning his debut before; in doing so now I
might perhaps, as a piece of advice, paraphrase that once given to
Sir Pelham Warner, “Keep a straight course and a modest mind and
you will go far.”

TWO NEWCOMERS

There are two new arrivals in the paddock in whom readers may
be interested. The first of these is Highlyn, a two-year-old black filly
by His Highness out of Marilyn, by Coup de Lyon out of Maryfield.
Highlyn who has joined the increasingly powerful Goddard stable,
has started once in England and was placed third. The other new-
comer is Highland Spur, a two-year-old brown colt by Hotspur (by
Hyperion) out of Highland Polly by Berwick out of Love’s Feast.
Owned, I understand, by Mr. Bunny Edwards, Highland Spur has
started six times in England and has placed second twice and third
once.

I should perhaps have headed this paragraph three newcomers but,
as the third is a man and not a horse and has, moreover, pleaded with
me not to involve him in undue publicity, I shall refrain. As a hint,
however, of the identity of our latest addition to the ranks of owners I
shall caution fans to watch the form of Viceroy closely now that he
has changed stables.



Basketball Ass’n . Red House Wins

Choose Committee Conipetition Shoot

THE’ Basketball Association
have appointed Messrs, Noel
Symmonds, James Archer and
G. Greenidge, as the Selection
Committee of the teams which will
represent Barbados when the
Trinidad basketball players,
Carib-bears, make their tour here
early in October.

The Red House team captained
by Major Chase was the winning
heuse in the House Competi-
tion Shoot which took place at
the Government Range yesterday
afternoon. This house had an
aggregate of 459 points while the
second place was taken by Blue
Heuse with 457 points and third
place went to Green House with

4 ints.
They will be three Colony ~~? P°™

games, a Colt’s game a game
against Harrison College, and one
against Harrison College Old Boys
and Carlton combined.

The heat presented a problem
but the wind was steady. There
was also a slight mirage.

The eight best seores were:—

The Presentation matches which Major 0. F.C. Walcott 97 points
were to have been played last Mr. T. A. L. Roberts 96 points
Thursday night, were postponed Mt. H. F. Cuke 93. paints
a t : ‘ , Mr. M. A. Tucker 93 points
ue to rain until next Thursday i
when His Excellency, the ‘a * etre "a coor

% r. T. G. McKinstry points
dace is expected to be mr. L. W. Hassell 92 points
* Major A. S. Warren 91 points



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SUNDAY, AUGUST 3i,
SPORTSMAN’S DIARY

Kent Cricket
Captaincy
In Doubt

W. MURRAY-WOOD, will
neither confirm nor deny rumours
that he is not retaining the cap-
taincy of Kent next season, But
the cOunty’s secretary-manager,
Mr. N. CHRISTOPHERSON, tells
me that it is almost certain that
Murray-Wood will be invited to
earry on.

Thirty-five-year-old Murray-
Weod said, after aceepting the
captaincy this year; “If I cannot
make a success of the job, I will
not hold it for more than one

season.”
Criticised
Kent have had a far from suc-
season, Many members
have criticised Murray-Wood’s
captaincy. Some say his tactical
ideas are too set and that some
defeats could have been victories
had his captaincy been less rigid.
season Ként finished next
to last in the championship. At
present there are three teams be-
low them. Odd thing is that
Kent’s second XI won the Minor
Counties championship last sea-
son, and if they win their last
match, against hire, they will
finish runners-up this season with
the right to challenge the top
club—probably Lancashire—for
the championship.





DP.

Evans Will Be Fit
GODFREY EVANS, England
wicket-keeper, put his hand in his
pocket—and the result was an in-
jury which prevented him from
keeping wicket in part of the
Kent v. Leic matoh at Lough-

borough.

“In the pocket was a sharp
pencil,” he told me to-day, “The
point passed under the nail of
the middle finger and broke off.
I had to go to a doctor to have
the lead taken out and I was
advised that for the time being
a bandage shovld remain on the

Ainge.

“T batted all right and_could
have kept wicket
the state of the match had made
it mecessary.

Gwilliam Will Play

HERE is a good kick-off to the
rugby séason at Twieckenham—
a match between Harlequins and
an Intérnational XV _ raised by
Sir WA WAKEFIELD. The
game will be played on Septem-
ber 6 (3.15).

Schoolmaster JOHN GWIL-

LIAM, the former Cambridge
University forward who p!
18 times for Wales and led them
to two triple erown victories will
captain Sir Wavell Wakefield’s
XV.

Cambridge Capture

W. KNIGHTLEY-SMITH, the
Highgate schoolboy, whose _left-
handed batting for Middlesex
since mid-summer has shown ex~
ceptional promise, goes up to
Cambridge in October. But he
may not have to wait until next
summer to get his first Blue. He
should earn one for soccer, for ha
is an accomplished full-back

His chances 1k bright. Both
G. TORDOFf and G. WH
FIELD, Cambridge’s backs against
Oxford last ‘season; have gone

down,

With five Old Blues and some
experienced _ seniors
Cambridge, who have not beaten
Oxford since 1947, have good
prospects of breaking the
sequence in the match at Wembley
in December.

Wanstead

IF Wanstead win the Northern
section of the Evening Standard
club cricket table they are pre-
pared to play a challenge match
against the Southern section win-
ners.

They are the second club to
agree. Beddington have already
intimated they will be willing to
play in this match if they win
the Southern section.

Wanstead have a good chance
of finishing top, Although their
last two games have been rained-
off, they still have a four-point
lead over Finchley.

Three clubs are iti the running
for the Southern leadership
Mitcham have regained it, but

from Beddington and Sutton.

The nena a er ae on
August final placings
met di on the Mitcham v.
Beddin, game that day.

—L.E.S.

PHYSICIAN

4 TU
t_ TUL

————

1952





ray a

Lindwall Pre

To Mow

Down here in the South

of league cricket in Lancashire. Attention,

of international importance,



pares
Us Down

little is heard of the heroes
pane. for one

Ray Lindwall. Next season he

will be trying to mow down England wickets instead of
morden.

those of Bacu

Up to to-day Tandwain, after
only a moderate beginning, had
taken 78 Lancashire League
wickets at eight runs and a bit
each on behalf of his club,
Nelson,

Only two other professionals,
both of them Australians and
both spin rather than speed
bowlers, ae an even as
many as ickets. Th are
BRUCE DOO , Sis Lane
cashire. 79, and CECIL PEPPER,
Burnley, 76.

Duckworth’s View

To remind us of his all-round
qualities Lindwall has also scored
413 runs for an average of 37.

Lindwall will be 31 on October
3, which is “getting on” for a
fast bowler. Ought we therefore
to write him off for international
cricket? Decidedly no, to judge
from what my friend GEORGE
DUCKWORTH says:

“Lindwall is carry: a stone
of extra weight hetkate he has
had no six-day cricket this season.
I will not say that he is certainly
as good as ever, but he is
good enough to return next
season to the flood tide of big
cricket.

Little Support

“This dummer he has hardly
bowled at all on a fast wicket, he
has not been bowling to a ring of
accomplished slip fieldsmen and
he has not had the support of a
first-class bowler at the other
end,

“I saw five catches off his
bowling put down in half an
hour. That means that he has
had to take inmost of his wickets
cleaned bowled or lbw. He has
done it. Don’t belittle him.”

Even so, Lindwall’s league
figures need not send shivers
down our _ spines. League

if cricketers are much easier prey

than Hutton, Sheppherd, Ikin,
Graveney, May and the others
Family Divers
ATHER and son are compet-
ing in the English diving
championship at New Brighton,
The father is HAROLD JOINER,
& Watford papermaker and a
pre-war Herts county champion
who launched the Highgate Div-
ing Club in 1935. A wartime
parachute jumping instructor, he
returned to active diving last
year to get his son DOUGLAS
interested.

Harold Joiner performed well
in the men’s plain high diving
though he did not finish among
the first three.

Douglas Joiner competes in the
boys’ event to-day.

“Pop” Joiner intends keeping
in competition diving. “I am
looking forward to having three
of the family competing in the
nationals next year, My nine-
year-old daughter PAMELA is
already showing great promise,”
he said. :

They Stay At Oval
(P*ORINTHIAN-CASUALS ;

the Isthmian League club,
will continue to play at The
Oval for at least four more years,

This was announced to-day by
Corinthian-Casuals and Surrey
County Cricket Club.

When Corinthian-Casuals first
played at The Oval it was under-
stood that renewal of the con-
tract would depend on _ the
ground’s condition after a trial
period of two years. Apparently
arene is satisfied, 6

e season at The Ova!
on Saturday, Setober 4. Until
then Corinthian-Casuals will
play their home matches at
Cheshunt.

Cycling Boost
RITISH Mice manufac-
turers are to sponsor cycle

and Rawtenstall and Tod

Ronnie Clayton
Is Willing To
Fight McCarthy

oa GEORGE WHITING
orts are being made
feather-weight c! Rotate
i toe Sin “as t match
in w
star of the East od eye
Sammy McCarthy,

The idea, I suppose, is that
McCarthy, ineligi! by rule for

championship consideration until
his 2lst birthday in November,
should profitably employ the next
few months learning as much
about Clayton as possible.

Clayton is willing, but I fear
there will have t be = much
powerful bargaining before the
McCarthy party show any signs
of interest.

“McCarthy has won 16 and
drawn one of his 17 fights, but ‘he
is neh a baby, and in no hurry
to fight champi ” says mana-
ger Jack King. “This fight this
week with Johnny Molloy, who
knocked him down twice, shows
that he is still in need of ex-
perience.”

An understandable attitude —
but completely different from the
being shown by the management
of that other feather-weight
“find,” 20.year-olqd Johnny But-



CARLTON vs. EMPIRE
EMPIRE—Ist Innings Whe besce
CABRLTON—1st Innings

Cc. Me Kenzie e Grant b Williams 11

:
°
9
i
cv
e :
2

5/49. chine a
"| "BOWLING ‘ANALYSIS

°o M R WwW
E Av. williams 8) 3 tet
. . s 6
H. a ’ ; : 3 1
A. Hol 3
TRE—2nd mains
oO. nea é€ ¢, f Hams
b J. A. Williams yeaaes 3
£. W. Grant c Lucas b Cox 45
C. Depeiza ec Lucas t Cox 2
C, Hunte Lb.w. J. A. Williams 51
Ww. A b &
H. A. King b Cox 26
S. Rudder not ‘out 3s
A. Holder not out . 20
Extras: w. 2 1b. 1 3
Total (for 6 wkts.) 210
Fall of wickets:— 1/4, 2/56, 3/93, 4/104
8/149, 6/183.
BOWLING ANALYSIS
o M R W
K. B, Warren 14 1 2 0
JA. Ww 10 0 “7 2
Cc. B. Williams "4 ° 2 °
Cc. S. Cox “ 1 40 4

POLICE vs. WANDERERS
POLICE—Ist Innings .... yeas 156
WANDERERS — ist

W. Knowles e Sobers b Mullins 7
D. Evelyn ¢ Mullins b Sobers 55
G. Proverbs 1.b.w, Mullins . q
D. Atkinson c Byer b Blackman 115
D. Mayers ¢ (wkpr) Dodson b
Mullins . - 1
D. Lawless b Mullias 5
L. St. Hill b Mullins 11
R. Lawless b Mullins 53
H. Toppin b Mullins 0
G. Skeete absent e
Il. Ramsay sot out e
Extras: 16
Total (for 9 wkts.) 314

terworth, of Rochdale. y Fall of, ariekets:— aaa, 2/125, ae,
12 Stopped BOWLING ANALYSIS’ |
° R Ww
Ex-cotton operative Butter- C. Bradshaw ~ 9 o Mm 0
worth, having stopped 12 oppo- C. Mullins * : e ‘
nents, outpointed three others, ¢ sebers oa
and drawn with another, is now J Byer 2 . 2S
acknowledged in the North as the % moccoe " : = :
most damaging young puncher ;
seen in those parts since the c, piackman ® D. Atkinson «a
war. F. Taylor not out 49
So confident are his mentors— 4. Blenman not out 9
he is managed by Tom Hurst, tras: wae
Bruce Woodcock’s pilot — that Total (for one wkt.) 103
they have advertised their wil. Fall of wicket:— 1/86,
lingness to match him against BOWLING Anes ae
Clayton for a_ sidestake Of », Atkinson 4 4 % 1
£1000, with the slightly destric- } Ramsay 3 $2) tee te
tive “rider” that the champion R. Lawless 2 o wm 0
weighs in at the title limit of } 5 Hil ea a tae

nine stone, '
—L.E.S.



Davis Scores First
Century Of Season

(From Our Own Correspondent)
LONDON, Aug. 30.

Former England captain Fred-
dy Brown came to the rescue of
Northants against Gloucester with
a brilliant 116 which included a
six and 12 fours. When he weni
in, Northants had lost four wickets
for 39 runs. With Eddie Davis,
Brown added 213 for the fifth
wicket. After Brown had been
dismissed by Lambert, Davis re-
mained to score 108, his first cen-
tury of the season. e

The Indian tourists in the last
match against a county are in
‘trouble at Bournemouth. Reply-
ing to Hampshire’s 256 by close of
piay, they had lost two wickets
for 26 runs,

SCOREBOARD
Middlesex versus Lancashire
Middlesex 175



Laneashire ....



Leicestershire versus
MDE sii sscachrecwnvelsibassanscegondanas 428.
Kent versus Y
BRGAS isi inireageoes 249, (Wardle 5
for 69).
YOrKSHIe ooo. cccsseueeesesees 18 for 1.
Sussex versus Derbyshire

Sussex oo...

Derbyshire

Northants
bert 5 for 83.









racing at Herne HiN next season. ae ae Vers me 26 for 1.
Previously they have mere.y Wosthawer .
given trophies. This will mean 4 Glamorgan 29 for 2.
higher standard and more a9- Buckinghamshire versus Warwick
pearances by leading continental Warwick ..........0.. 361 for 7 de-
stars and our own champion, ¢|ared,
REG HARRIS, who has raced juckinghamshire ........ 26 for 0.
there only once this year.
\ Dashing
OR the benefit of English visit- smithâ„¢ appears KNIGHTLEY

ors, a Swedish paper publish-
es county cricket scores. The Mid-
dlesex left-hander W. Knightley-

OR.
oTte
BEEWELL

as
HYPHEN SMITH. Oh, well, he
has been described as “a dashing
batsman.”—.L.E.S.

1 Toppin .... 4 i ee
PICKWICK vs. SPARTAN

PICKWICK .... 242 and (for 1 wkt.) 64
SPARTAN. ese tate -. M5
SPARTAN—1st Innings
L. F. Harris ¢ wkpr. b Ware id 63
A. Atkins c Jordan b BE. L. G. 4
E, Cave Lb.w. b Hoad ... ‘ 4

N. Harrison c W. Greenidge b
Edwards ‘ “4 ° 10

N. Grant not out ....+0..+++: Pree, |

K. Walcott ¢ wkpr. b Edwards 5

SCOREBOARD

i 1/17, a/8B, 9/44, 4/48,
34

SUNDAY ADVOCATE â„¢

N. Hatfis stpd wkpr
S Griffith run out
F. King run out
K. Bowen c Foster b Birkett
F Phillips absent

Extras:

Total

b Hoad

(for 9 wkts.)

Fall of wickets: 1/11, 2/23, 3/78,
5/91 @/104, 7/105, 8/170, 9/215.
BOWLING ANALYSIS

M R
H. R, Jordan 22 4 S4
J... Greenidge il 2 26
£. L. G. Hoad 19 0 74
J. Goddard 4 i 8
©. Edwards 12 3 38
W Greenidge 3 0 7
S. Birkett. 2.2 0 2

PICKWICK—2nd Innings

A.M. Taylor not out

£. Edwards b K. Bowen
S. Birkett not out
Extra:

Total (for 1 wkt.)

HARRISON COLLEGE vs.

DGE
HARRISON COLLEGE—Ist Innings

lelwor ncwovest pibleccton

£. Hope 1.b.w. b Brookes 2
E. Tudor ec Brookes b Wilkie 10
C Smith stpd, (wkpr. Grant
b Farmer : 30
Cc. Blackman b Riley 41
A. Alleyne b Farmer 9
Mr. S. Headley b Riley .. es
M. Worme not out Mm
M. Simmons c Mr, Wilkes b Riley 0
S. Hewitt ¢ Mr, Wilkes b Riley 57
Cc. Reid c Mr. Wilkes b Riley 7
Extras: 12
Total (for 9 wkts.) 358

- 1/2, 2/42, 3/48, 4/48,
9/355.
LYSIS
M

ra of wickets: 2.
6, 6/191, T/191, 8/341
BOWLING ANA!

S

<

Brookes
G
Wiikie
». Farmer
Mr, Riley
R. Goddard
1 Murray

cco~--woe
~2S33ean

2
LODGE—1st Innings
G.,.Grant 1b.w. b Simmonds
J. Murray b Mr, Hoodie
J. Hutson b Mr, Headley
1. Farmer b Mr, Headley
KK. Brookes b Smith ee
tt. Goddard b_ Foster

-
BOM SOMO

~

Mi. Wilkes Lbww. b Foster

G, Wilkie stpd, (wkpr. Blackman)
b Smith

J. Outram b Smith

'S. Riley not out

5, Reifer absent

Extras: .

lel outs ou

Total (for 9 wkts.)

Fall of wickets:— 1/12, 2/18, 3/13, 4/14,
5°26 6/38, 7/48, 8/67, 9/88.
BOWLING spain

Mr, Headley
M. Simmons
Cc. Foster
Reid

eoas
wows

Cc
c 6.4
LODGE—2nod_ [nnings
’. Grant ¢ Smith b Simmons
Murray b Foster
Hutson run out
J Farmer b Foster
K. Brookes b Foster
G. Wilkie not out
Mr, Wilkes not out
J Outram ¢ Worme b Smith
Extras:

Zo wowrws

Gio
-
SSe3

Total (for 6 wkts.)

Islaee

8

Fall of wickets; 1/8, 2/26, 3/26, us
5 50 y
BOWLING ens a

oO rR W
Mr. Headley .. 4 0 ll 0
M. Simmons 3 0 9 1
f£. Hope 2 1 1 0
G. Foster 7 2 16 3
Cc. Smith 6 2 18 1

th Pntinininrniitiitininstitateitnil

SOCCER:

Grimsby Gain Six Points

(From Our Own Correspondent)
LONDON, Aug. 30.

Grimsby Town, with the Eng-
lish soccer season @ three
matches old, they alone of the 92
League Clubs have gained six
points. Their grand three-nil
away win over Bradford enabled
them to maintain a 100% record
and a clean sheet in the goals’
against column.

How are the mighty fallen! Be-
fore today’s matches there were
12 elubs hoping to emerge in the
same position as Grimsby.

Arsenal

shed two-one at
home to Sunderland: West-
bromwich failed at home to

Burmley; Middlesborough also at

- home dropped a point to Dreston

and so the tale of woe goes on.
The most surprising defeat war
Arsenal's, For the last point
Sunderland gained at Highbury
was in 1046 and their last win
there was as far back as 1930.
But today Arsenal has been un-
lucky, Alteady beaten the

. absence of Barnes, Smith, ‘bes
its and Logie they suffered a terrible

misfortune when outside right
Roper had to leave the field after
a few minutes owing to an injury
to his right foot. He returned
after treatment, but was little
more than a passenger.
Sheffield United Beaten

Another of the former 100 per-
centers who failed at home were
Sheffield United. They were
beaten two-nil by the newly
relegated Huddersfield who seem-
ed determined to get back into
the First Division as soon as
possible. Their win over United

placed thern at the top of the











FEEL LIKE

MELLOo/ THar, You Doc ? +

ALREADY YEA / WHAT'S THAT:
yeaun/ CARIB o1D THE TRICK

ALL RIGHT SORE
FINEST BEER

Second Division Table.

Cardiff City’s first home match
‘of the season on returning to the
First Division after an absence of
23 years, brought them their first
points and goals. They routed
fellow promotion winners~ Shef-
field on Wednesday to the tune of
four-nil,

The final matches in the first
stage of the Scottish League Cup
were played today. As a result
Kilmarn Sterling, Morton, St.
Johnstone, ndee Third, Lanark,
Rangers and Hivernian qualify for
the quarter finals.

The tailpiece — former England
outside right Stanley Matthews,
normally a maker of goals, was
today the scorer of one. In a
dazaling run he beat three Bolton
defenders and coolly capped the
ball past the goalkeeper Hanson,
It was Matthews’ first goal since
September 8 last year.

CHANNEL SWIM—from 4.



When within four miles of
Dover in stor weather early
today, Roberto Ruiz, 29-

year-old mechanic from Aseun-
cion, Paraguay, had to give up
his Channel swim attempt from
France to England, Ruiz started
from Cape Griz Nez at 13.12
G.M.T. yesterday and was taken
from the water at 03,15 G.M.T. to-
day. His trainers and others in th
accompanying boat consider

that although he was still swim-
ming strongly, it was too dan-
gerous for him to continue in the
very rough conditions which made
it almost impossible for the boat
to keep contact with the wee.



A’ NEW MAN




is THE



jnscceaies ES



| AUG. 31 — NO. 239

|

PAGE FIVE










The Topic
of
Last Week

Last night a big child ery out
The food could not suffice

it_was a big man. crying
Because he missed his rice

His dear old-time housekeeper
Said man it don't sound nice
You are a hard back old man

And can't de without rice? that

Fo:

goo

hair is always “as

He said like many Bajans 1 as it looks . . . sriiaft,
No matter what you eat
If riee not on our menu

e “grub’ ts tcomplete





lustrous . . . obviously well

TNA
TONIC H
rant
asd Wa

cared for

lead
the

4
Shut up he said, don't argue follow “the

_1 am the working man
You women want all money
break down both your hands

—

of discriminating men

world over

JULYSIA

HAIR CREAM

This talk start up a “bing bang” pi

And boys they then combine
‘Twas then the next door neighbour
Cried call up “nine-nine-nine
. . .

This modern police unit
WRl help improve the place
And maybe check somebody
From being a disgrace

Words sped, blows followed after
Big mouth plus a black eye

The man denied the ‘cursing
The blows he couldn't den



Boys this thing came from far
For politics came in

Few merchants in the Government
Ts just an awful sin

The house full up with lawyers ;

You take it for a court
Lou says give me more merehants

Starvation is no sport

The Cream of Wlairdressings

S.M.G. AGENCIES
J. &R. BUILDING, PALMETTO STREET, BRIDGETOWN, BARBADOS

Oh Jill be covetul-thats

li we get rice and four
Cornmeal and some pig snout
We have no time for fighting
And bursting people's mouth
. .

Trade enquiries to

Poor people own ail belly
And belly calls for food
And boys when food don't turn ¢
We ate in no sweet mood
* . .





»



You who are little better

Don't know the hell some see

All last week some poor people , °

Exist on beead and tea. Mm. CW adi $ t
Even the flour short now UMmmys Mm . 0 é a
Thursday and Friday night dian

aay Seared

When the “week-money" run out amt ,
Some hardly get a bite s | > a Hs a: I } [ DONT WORRY, JEAN.
Of course “looge-guat”’ can never | ‘i e TS NOT A RADIO
Tell what the “tie-goat’ see } SET AT ALL. ITS
, y what's wert | REDIFFUSION — JusT
Don't know w ua pores ‘ DSPEAKER WITH
One thing is sure and certain A WIRE DIRECT TO

Yes one and ail will face
Some time, somg, where, down yonder
Next door “the other place.”

THe Strupto .

So while we all are living
Under the Sun and
Ae we alt half starving
Cheer up with J. & R
‘

sponsored by

J&R BAKERIES
makers of |
ENRICHED BREAD
and the blenders of
J&R RUM














THERE YOU ARE, BILL. RELAVYED
STRAIGHT FROM THE SPUD
OY WIRE. ITS PERFECT

LISTENING AND WONDERFULLY
CHEAP TO RUN.

HOW AMAZING, MARY!
1VE NEVER HEARD A
PROGRAMME SO CLEARLY,
BILL AND | WOULD LOVE
(T= BuT WE'VE GOT

NO ELECTRICITY.



























ITS AMAZING!
REDIFFUSION IS JUST
THE JOB FOR US MARY.






selbnii
You DON'T NEED IT.
JEAN, REDIFFUSION
SUPPLIES ITS OWN
CURRENT! WHY DON
YOU BRING BILL IN
ONE NIGHT? HE

CAN HEAR IT FOR






>No appetite? No pep? The
rich, blood*building proper-
ties of YEAST-PHOS will
Arestore lost energy and will

Tike keep you fit!
STAT |

TONIC



aa. ia 7-as



~ WONDER WHEELS N? 2

Why Hercules is
the finest cycle
in Barbados

AT WORK IN THE DESIQUING
OFFICE AT BIRMINGHAM

No mateer where Hercules cycles go they are the most
suitable for local conditions. This is because Hercules
engineers are constantly studying the special requirements
of ewery country. Latest designs, finest quality materials
qed matchless craftsmanship, have made Hercules the’
world’s ferourite bicycic.

Bn cle
Ine tner p 75-day ¥

Hercule

SOLD BY ALL LEADING DEALERS

THE HERCULES CYCLE & MOTOR CO. LTD., BIRMINGHAM, ENGLAND
REPARSENTATIVES
T. GEDODES GRANT LTD.,



BRIDGETOWN

EAS 478







PAGE SIX

For
Women

Only



Not quite! This concerns both a man and
his girl. A tropical evening, lovely music
and the partner you want in you: arms. Yet

no matter how well she dances, if unpi-asan)
breath offends, your evening is ruined. Make
sure YOU don’t offend. Take an Amplex tablet a day, and chasc
unpleasant breath away — for ever! Amplex, the tiny chlorophyli
deodorant dispenses for ever all unpleasant body odours.

And we've dispensed for ever
our flying troubles, Ever heard
of Air-Sick tablets by Savory &

Moore? You should try them
next time you fly. No nausea at
all just sit back and “watch
th» clouds roll by.” You'll en-
joy every minute of your flying

thne, Just as we do— now that
we'v? tried Air-Sick tablets, but
they MUST be *y Savory & Moore.



“I’ve gotten rid of some li
00. Osquitos, flying cockroaches, rai ies
ail those little horrors that seem to arte oe
most insecticides. But in a VAMOOSE-PUFFER
they’ve “met their waterloo.” Yes, sir! A few
puffs from the Vamoose, in the handy puffer
tin and the battle ground in strewn vith dead
bodies. VAMOOSE those horrid ins: cts away—
Vamoose is wonderful, I say.” :

ttle flying troubles

seen her about for ages.
‘Oh yes, since I took your advice and bought :
tin of MEDILAX. It certainly gingered me u

invigorates the system,
this for yourself,



“As I was saying, June. I find all
BANDBOX PREPARATIONS so soften-
ing for the hair. As for their brilliantines
they not only burnish but actually help
to FEED the hair-roots.”. What Jun.
says is true, and in the tropics the roots
of the hair need extra nourishment.

Highlighting the BANBOX series of
hair-beautifiers is COLAIRE, the new
hair-dressing tinted to suit your type.
Just stroke it on your waves and curls,
and they will fairly dance with light.
ay applied and just as easily brushed

OF. 6.5

/

HANDS” How true this is. To you
they look for extra care in every possible
way. Safeguard their health by seeing
that they are we!:-nourished. Give
them extra resistance by

daily diet,
beverages instead of sugar.
D by Savor
extra ‘something’ your child needs!



An easy way indved! No
exercise,-no diet, just take a SILF â„¢4
TABLET A DAY, AND SILF
THAT UGLY FAT AWAY, Silf
is a harmless vegetable compounu
which, if taken regularly, takes
away those ugly extra pounds you
long to lose. Try SILF SLIMMING
TABLETS — THEY REALLY
WORK.

Sole Agents covering this column

INTERNATIONAL TRADING
CORPORATION LTD.
Telephone 5009, Your Suppliers

Stocked by:-

J. L. Linton, “High Street. P. A, Clarke, Cosmopolitan

E. C. Gill, Olympia Pharmacy. Pharmacy
Empire Pharmacy, Tudor Street. K. V. Worm, Roebuck Street,

A. F. Jones, High Street, Stoute’s Drug Store, Roebuck St.

H. C. Walkes, Tudor Street, C. C, Browne,, Roébuck Street.

H. L. Hutson, Tudor Street, A, A, Browne, Eagle Hall.

Rock’s Drug Store, Tudor Street. H. E. Pilgrim, Progressive Phur-
F, S. Olton, Swan Street. macy, Nelson Street.

Hines & Co., Roebuck Street,



a ey







_ Something else is pretty wonderfui too, See-
ing Mary chatting over the fence again. Haven’t
“Feeling better, Mary,”

P i, rice j.
1 feel fine, now.” Medilax, by the way, is on macaroni, rice (now more plenti

of the most gentle of laxatives, yet one of thr
most sure, MEDILAX not only ensures INNER
CLEANLINESS but thoroughly tones up and

Try it, and experience



“YOUR CHILD'S LIFE IS IN YOUR | each.



Standard Pharmacy, Tweedside Rd. | 4 mp

| ¢

Eden’s Bride
Ignores Emerald |
Superstition

By EILEEN ASCROFT

Miss Clarissa Churchill niece of |
the Prime Minister, has no super-
stitions about emeralds being un-
lucky.

Her fiancé, Foreign Secretary |
Anthony Eden, gave her a large |
square-cut emerald set with dia-
monds,. It is an unusual choice for
modern brides, say London jew-
ellers. |

Most girls are superstitious of
green stones. And as they are soft |
in texture they are easily dam- |
aged, |

They can also be the most ex-
pensive stones in the world. A)
perfect flawless stone is worth
about £2,000 a carat and is more
costly than a diamond, weight for
weight.

Emeralds, which carry the
meaning “success and happiness in
marriage,” were first mined in|
Upper Egypt and India. Cleopatra
liked to adorn herself with carved
emeralds. :

One member of the Royal Fam-
ily who chose an emerald engage-
ment ring is the Princess Royal.
The Queen frequently wears a
wedding present evening necklace
of diamonds and emeralds,

Owner of one of the finest col-
lections of emeralds to-day is the
Sultana of Johore. She recently
had a dress made in two shades of |
green to show off the fine colours |
of her collection.

Emeralds are usually set with
diamonds in platinum, like the
ring of Clarissa. But many recent |

exhibition pieces have been set}
in the sister metal, palladium,
which is

not so expensive and |
lighter in weight, |
No Potatoes?

I carried out a 12-man check |
to-day among London’s leading



chefs for potato substitute ideas |
to helo the housewife beat the |
present shortage. |

Here are their suggestions .. .

ful), dried beans, dumplings,
noodles, batter pudding, suet crust
roast with the joint.

Worth of a Wife {

What is the value of a good
wife to her husband? Men, par-
ticularly divorce court judges, are
always trying to find the answer
to this intriguing question.

“I do not think there is any
figure which is big enough to
assess for the loss of a good wife
and a good mother,” said Judge
A. C. Caporn in Nottingham Di-
vorce Court the other day. In this
case he assessed the value of the
wife at £500,



Une husband who puts the value

of his wives far higher is 58-
year-old millionaire playboy Tom-
my Manville. He has had nine
waves and estimates that his wives
cost him an average of £250,000



Researches by a New York mag-
azine“ led to the conclusion that
the less your husband earns the
more valuable you are as a wife.

making | But if your husband is a wealthy
GLUCOSE D a regular part. of their|man your money value to him ‘is
Mix it in their juices and|very low indeed,

GLUCOSE
& Moore will give that

All Housework

To the £700-a-year man his
wife is worth £3,500, for she does

\all the housework, looks after the

children, is clever about house-
keeping, and stretches his income
to the limit. She is, say the statis-
ticians, worth five times as much
as her husband,

When a man’s income rises to

1,500 his wife’s value falls to
| £2,500. She stili does a certain
amount of the housework and
| cooking. Although her husband

can afford comfort he cannot afford
luxury. So she, too, is a valuable
asset.

It is the wife of the £3,000-a-
year man whose value drops
sharply in comparison ot her
husband’s income. She employs
a cook, nurse and maid. Her
value is strictly social. She is
worth only £4,000, just a little
more than her husband.

And as for the wife of the
£8,000-a-year man: her job is

merely to make contacts for her

husband, nurture his ego, create
a charming background, and wear
ink coat. She is going cheap
at around £1,200.

All this should make the wife
with no fur coat, a 14-hour work-
ing day and a_ stretched-to-the-

| limit housekeeping budget very

'

happy.

She’s a Sleuth

This week’s career woman is 35,
with good looks and charm.

She is dark-haired, dark-eyed,
| has the ability 'to look like a
glamour girl, a countess or a works
ung girl at will—and she tackles
a job which is usually held by
men,

SUNDAY ADVOCATE



hoppins
pre’

THE IDEA

Of WHICH IS TO PUT
ZEST BACK INTO BUYING

AST year’s fashion
was the Duster
Cdat. This year's

fashion is the Duster Coat
The difference is the price

Then the cheapest you
could get them was a7
Now they are in all the shops
starting at &5 10s.

Never were there sO many
variations on a single theme.

You can get them in faille,
rayon shantung grosgrain.
Sat'n, piqué, towelling. and linen.

You can get them in pink,
scarlet, pale blue, navy blue,
grey. brown lavender, and,
naturally, in black, but sur-
orisingly in white too.

You can get them with short
sleeves. long sleeves, three-
quarter sleeves, and sleeveless.

You can get them knee lenzth
for the beach and ground length
for the evening.

You can get them collarless,
almost collarless (mandarin
style), or very much collared
(highwayman Style).

And they al) have one thin;
in common. They are fu
enough to cover a multitude of
last vear's dresses

Hold everything



Closed

Open

* BEST {DEA you can’t buy

here—yet—is the travellin;
handbag from Paris. picture
above. It is a big carry-all
shoulder-bag made of brown
leather and white linen

One half of it unfolds to make
an extra large pouch, ideul for
all the odds and ends you collect
travelling.

It's a bargain

* THE SNIP-HUNTER this

week reports on some black
stiffened net (it looks like tiny-
meshed wire netting) 54 inches
wide, reduced from 17s. lld. a
yard to 7s, 6d., because of slight
imperfections.

‘Phe Snip-hunter paid tor one
yard and got an extra quarter
thrown in because of those
imperfections. With it = she
made a stiff under-petticoat to
wear with a fuil-skirted party
dress.

Like this: Taking the 54-inch
side of the net to be used for

leating round the waist, cut off
8 inches for length from waist
to hem. (But check your own
measurements to make sure the
skirt is the vight length.)

Pleat the net on to a piece of
Petersham ribbon the width of
your waist; finish off the placket
and sew on two hooks and eyes.

Turn up the hem and bind it
with a very wide piece of black
ribbon. This will keep the net
from laddering vour nylons,

ee es arene Sy
and would lose her value to the
agency for which she works if
her identity were known.

She is married, with no chil-
dren, and has a four-room flat.
Her wardrobe is large so that she
can take a post as a housekeeper
at a moment’s notice or leave for
the Continent to become a guest in
a smart hotel.

Her dressing-table is loaded
with cosmetics—paint and powder
for night-clubbing, greasepaint
and hair colourings if she wants
to look older and greyer than her
years.

Her £9-a-week job, with ex-
penses paid, consists largely of
collecting exact information. Many
of her assignments are connected
with the divorce courts.

She started as a store detective,
but found the watch on shop-
lifters monotonous, “My present
job is more varied and interest-
ing.’

Only the biggest agencies employ full-time women

Home PAGE

A ‘tag’
for Vivien
Leigh’s
daughter

By VENETIA MURRAY

OW hard its it for a
. girl growing up to
realise she is going
through life with a tag to
her name ?
Such a is Suzanne
Holman. And the tag

that accompanies her
wherever she goes is

irl

@ Suzanne fivlman, 18-year-oid daughter

of Vivien Leigh, finds that a famous
| That's Vivien Leigh's. mother raises the ordinary problems.
daughter.” Home Page

invited Suzanne to tea to find the principal, and say ° You must
out if the tricky mother-and- take her’ or anything like
daughter relationship js trickier that... .”

when the mother is famous and
Shocks...

the daughter thereby tagged

‘s hd agems that. Paes en

rin own to earth, the > vi

relationship js neither more nor Greaiiy cueatine : on

being Mummy’s

daughter in my career. People

imagine what 1 ought to look

like and they get a shock there.

xkeKeKeKaKaK aa Kaa OK Kk OK:

less tricky than between any
other mother and a growing-
up girl.
Suzanne is a blue-eyed 18.
petite. plump, and pretty.



Then they itnagine what I
4 She lives with her barrister ought to act like and th t

ares Leigh be ae in a Worse one.” eee
a*on-Square at. but = she

frequently pops | round the elaine ote co

comer, to sce “Mummy and “She thinks I'm not hatd-work-

{Laurence Olivier! in ing enough,”
Suzanne 1s at the Royal Ramones passion fot

sophistication sometimes has to
be curbed by stern parental
command, ere was the case
of the lipstick—“A lovely
purple one which I wore coming
back from a Swiss finishing
school, maak said I looked
like something from the Folies
Bergére and threw it out.”

(T'S ALL VERY WELL
TO SAY ‘SAUTE’...

HE beginner in the kitchen opens a cookery book, all
eager to try out her novice hand, then finds herself
transfixed by the cook-book jargon of strange names

and complex instructions

So this week the Home Page cookery column 1s strictly for
beginners or for those who need to brush up their cookery
language.

Here is what some of those bewildering terms mean :—

BLANCHING.—Dip food into boiling water for a few minutes
then plunge into cold water. This is uscd to help remove the skins

from tomatoes. peaches, and almonds, or for shrinking fruits like
apples. before packing into preserving jars.

Acudemy of Dramatic Art. She
gol in at the second attempt.
Ang of that, she says:

‘The first time they didn't

:.w who I was, but the second
ey did. and I got in,

“But. honestly Mummy did
not ring up Sir Kenneth Barnes









CARAMELISE.—To heat sugar unti)] it turns brown | (Used

In sweets and puddings.) Ege

CROUTONS.—Small pieces ‘
of Parent or fried bread used Better batter
eae oe - And here ts what they

MARINADE.—A mixture ot | @- AD ; 5) tare
vinegar, spices, herbs, ete., in | roore mean when they talk
which meat is steep ore RIC ane
cooking to improve the flavour A THICK mat ree ft
and make it more tender Oi) Simply means a mixture
is often added to the vinegar, Which looks rather like ae
You can also marinate mush- ‘hick, pre-war cream. It

spreads slowly when dropped
from a spoon and.it is used
for things like scones.

A THIN BATTER
thin cream—the sort

rooms and fish.

SAUTE.—To toss in a smal!
quantity of hot fat over a low
heat with a lid on the pan
until the fat is absorbed.

is like

ou

ROUX.—A mixture of could buy for a brief spell last
melted fat and flour cooked year. It spreads quickly when
together. This is the first you drop itt into the r:n from

&@ spoon or jug
London Express Service

stage of sauce with fat.

AUGUST 31, 1952

SUNDAY,

Se STARS:

+

ci “B
Be




FOR SUNDAY, AUGUST 31, 1942
/
Look in the section in which your birthday

comes and «
find what your outlook is, according to the stars, ’

ARIES Seek to know the right answers from the *«
March 21—April 20right sources; don't hesitate to review,
double-check. Remember church services, x

When others oppose, and affairs seem gen-
erally to go awry, don't become either dis-
couraged or touchy. Strive the harder.

.

GEMINI Be careful with criticisms; being quick to

May 21—June 21 tell others what you'think about their be-
haviour is for Gemini to exterminate for
good and harmonious living.

TAURUS
April 21-—May 20

*
*
*
*

Today is just the sort of period for promot-
ing better understanding and good fellow-
ship, to create at least the disposition for
agreement. Don't be stubborn.

*

Please note Gemini and Cancer, and while
your hazards to a successful day may not
be the same, the recipe does hold good

generally.
* *

CANCER
June 22—July 23

LEO
July 24—Ang, 22

“4

We all like a compliment once in a while,
and many do better with praise than criti-
cism. In this world none can expect all
apple-pie order, Smile, ¥

-*

Think things over first; review procedures
and possible contentions. Being diplomatic
helps, if you aren’t violating good princi- *
ples. Prayer important.

H.
Seize upon just opportunities—those that
will not compromise with right nor hurt
another needlessly. Use today for a better
tomorrow and week. Pray. *

*

If your day is free, enjoy true relaxing
that revitalizes energy, strengthens you
for work ahead. If you must work, do it
willingly, smilingly.

VIRGO
Aug. 23—Sept. 23

LIBRA
Sept. 24—Oct. 23

SCORPIO
Oct. 24—Nov. 22

SAGITTARIUS
Nov. 23—Dec. 22

Do not tend to feel sorry about the past
nor that you have been slighted. Waste
no time mooning. Forward with a prayer. >

x
CAPRICORN
e Dec. 23— Jan. 21

AQUARIUS
Jan, 22 — Feb. 20

*
*«
ye Feb.
*«

Better days than this one? Yes, but every-
day can, should, record an advance as
Aquarians are so capable of doing when *
he (she) organizes his (her) abilities.
21—March 20 fee] the sort of freedom they like, neither
will you in many respects. But this is an

PISCES If others don’t have things their way, nor
excellent reviewing, researching rebuilding *
time.

s

YOU BORN TODAY have many abilities, varied talents, a
wealth of will power. Place yourself outside YOU, try to see
how others come by their opinions. And observe that there
are good successful ways not always in line with yours. Have
more than one interest, different from your daily routine. This
is the birthdate of many famous writers, including Theophile
Gautier, French novelist.

xkxKweKeKe Ke KehUK OK OFX
Some Seaman

Strange requests received from every year on educational sub-
men at aen have been reported jects and hobbies, 5 ;
by the London headquarters of But some. recent inquiries
the Seafarers’ Education Service from British seamen. have been
in Balham. unusual,
More than a quarter of a
million books are sent to seamen

*
*

*
*«

L.E.S.



_— + -
various types and ages of wom
on whom they can call for special
duties. 3

How is it possible to join ‘the
service? Most beginners start in REVUEDEVILLE 1952, under
the big stores, where 80 per cent. pe es patronage of ae
of detectives are women. Reason Excellency e Governor an
is that 90 per cent. of shoplifters Lady Savage, opens at the Empire
are women, Theatre on Wednesday night at

Back to 1930 8.30 o’clock with repeat perform.

Princess Margaret is reviving a Sant aa pans and Lord
jewellery fashion which was ataeantn ae 5 orclock, on Friday
popular the year she was born—

1930,

It is for the jewelled initial
handbag clip. Her diamond M
appears on the silk handbag that
she has carried recently, °

Jewellers say there has been a
sudden demand for them again—
mostly with removable fittings, so
that they can aiso be worn as a
brooch.

The first letter of the Christian
name is usually used, either in
metal, pewels or paste. Latest
idea is jade.

Looking Ahead

The Show produced and direc-
ted by Mrs. A. L. Stuart. Princi-
pal of tie School of Dancing, is
staged by a cast of over fifty
“Stuartettes” and is of the usual
high standard. That Revuede-
ville has found a place in Barba-
dian “show Business” is indeed a
tribute to its merit. Ever since
the first show was put over, on
myriads of occasions Revuedeville
has been the subject of much dis-
cussion.

The girls and boys take their
places now with more confidence

Christmas novelty cards this
year will say it with music. I
have already heard one designed
as a small musical box playing
Jingle Bells.

There are also musical birthday
ecards which play Happy Birthday

than in the past two shows. This
year, too, there is more variety
and there is more singing—which
shows that not only is dancing
their line but also music in all its
forms, The stage settings, scenery,
and the gorgeous costumes are
all the work of Mrs. Stuart.



cor Brush your teeth with Ipana and you clean
them extra-white. And, because of the unique formula
underlying Ipana’s “refreshingly different’? mint flavour,
you fight decay by reducing acid-forming bacteria. Massage
Ipana into your gums and you help keep them firm and
healthy. ‘In this way, Ipama acts as a safeguard against
tooth-losses, more than half of which are caused by gum
troubles. For whiter teeth, healthier gums, follow the Ipana wayi

THE TOOTH PASTE..

mas!

éy 9% ‘
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investigators, The largest have
‘about 20 men and two women.
Smaller agencies have lists of

|. She keeps her name secret be-
,cause she is a woman detective

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The dip cut
carried to its fashion
ultimate—a deep, unfaltering,
decisive line. which exploits the
beautiful exactness of Skyline fit. D'Orsay,

most flattering of Skyline courts, may be had in
Black, Mariner Grey, Pacific Blue and Parkway Green
suede, or Cherry Red Caif.

THE FASHION SHOES WITH A CHOICE OF WIDTH-FITTINGS

*



* *

Made by C. & j. Clark Led. (Wholesale only) Street, Somerset, Englane

Local Agents: Alec Russell & Co,, Barbados.



to You, The vocals are Mr. Eric Morris,
Miss Norma Gaskin, Mr, Neville

Phillips, and the Glee Singers,

*People To-day
—L.E.S,

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REVUEDEVILLE 1952

dance,

You'll be pleased to hear
“Joseph” tell of Barbados and its
natives—the numbers are too nu-~
merous to accord individual mem-
tion,

The Music Makers, the Police
Band. under the Supervision of
Captain Raison, M.B.E. will sup-
ply the music.

Miss Juliet Gaskin who stole last
year’s show is back again witk
“IT may be wrong.”

The tiny tots are good; the boys
co-operate readily and with
special effort to assist their part-
ners, produce an effective com-
bination, “Because I’ve lost my
Love” composed by Cedric Phillips
is one of the tunes to which they



7

“OH LA-LA”!

“A Bathing Suit’!!
she sees Joseph in his “Pre-Historic” bathing suit.

Exclaims Thelma Barker when



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SUNDAY, AUGUST 41,





1952

1M APPR “FS COURIER-STYLE. SHE ANNOUNCES—
We are now approaching my

Selected Sights for some

Unlikely Tourisis

I

exhibitions.

’M out to promote the Anne Edwards Tours of Puris
I’d like to transport hundreds of tourists, show then
a number of famous Paris landmarks, visit counties:

But not, of course the tourists, the landmarks, anv

the exhibitions |

ally get together on a tour

The Anne Edw. s
would be if. ..(9 | wrapped in transparent pape
managers anu whetue so they look Uke a peele
facturers, waiters and | orange
taxi-drivers, cleaners and ['d love to introduce th

shop-girls. The landmarks
would be French managers
and manufacturers. waiters

people who manage little dres
snops in Britain
to something

and taxi-drivers. cleaners inci oer.
. a meh than «
and shop-girls. The exhibi- night club
tions would be the know-how the little dress
with which these people do shops in Paris
their jobs. There they wil!
Don urn @p » nem

that I’m out to prove the

dearer and worse ,
clever enough when we try

' would stop at the
Paris sweetshops

UT I am out to prove
that, from a woman's
there are

viewpoint,

run aWay with the idea

French
are more clever than we ure,
and sell everything better and
cheaper. What they sell is often
and we are

or take in a4
Waist within
the mour or
press the frock
you ouy while
you walt, And
no charge for
either,

I'd Like some
Bnglis! bax
drivers 10 se@ »
sight that is
far more in
structive than



Arent Bookt nie eee eee Napoleon's Tomb—the signt 0)
And especially, 1 dont think 4. Paris taxi-driver receiving «

it is bright of all those people
who provide nousehold services
wo go on behaving us if they
Maud never recovered from the

3d. tip with courtesy and charm

Td like the Lost Proper;
people to see the way property
lost in # tax! rewurns to vou the

war—iike an old lady trading op same day. “J / take it to the

an iliness she bad ten vears ago, police.” explainea the drive1
E£ee—it was agony. low” as 1 get nothing. I / bring it

fed Ray used to say to Madame. she will surely awe
But Lee—tt was a long time . me a tip

ago.

So that is why ['d love to

I'd stop at the

take a busioad o1 sweet manu-

tacturers to see somet

hung just
as typica! of Paris as the Eiffel

eating spots

vei HERE are « nuD
noumeome dred deuignirut signs
The: windows fillea with in aris never
giant lollies 2ft. nigh in scarlet. ‘"¢luded in the usuul ane oe
emerald, and amber CNOCO - ney’ ag ‘ Soiree i ei
wie cigareites packed Uke & Goli\e ‘ tnis afternoon, and
popular brand smoters 318 ever dream of charging «
of chocolate ci and pipe and messenger tee.
ugnter pink sugar pigs @ THE BARROW BOYS wnt
siiver-wrapped chocolate “wrap ounches of grapes in
umbreltas fruit. drops trunspurent puper so thev iook

‘shaned like orange quarters anc

PARIS.
AN earl’s daughter with a
French accent is back in Paris

after dancing among the ruins
of ancient Greece. She is slim,
Latin-looking, 28-year-old Lady
Madeleine Lytton, daughter otf
Lord Lytton, artist peer who died
last year.

She was born in Paris, has
spent most of her life there. Her
mother is French; she was the
late Lord Lytton’s second wife.
Lady Madeleine’s great-grand-
father, Bulwer Lytton, wrote the
Last Days of Pompeii.

Lady Madeleine began to train
as a dancer at the age of five
under Lisa Duncan, one of the
numerous adopted daughters of
the fnatistic Isadera.* Now, she
says, “I am a character dancer, I
carry on the Isadora Duncan
tradition—the plastic expression
of music.”

In Greece, where she was in
vited to dance in the Delphic
Festival, Lady Madeleine stayed
some months. She gave recitais,
wearing ancient Greek cos-
tume at Athens and Patras; danc~

orett¥ and stuv cleat

Lady Madeleine Dane

EVELYN IRONS

By

ed in the
Rhodes

open air theatre at
before the King and
of Greece. She was accom-
panied by flute and ee
take my dancing very scz.ously,”
she says,

She was in Paris with her
mother and father when France
fell, and they moved south to
unoccupied France in 1941 Mrs.
Churchill wrote to Lord Lytton
advising him to make. his way
home. The family escaped
through Spain and Portugal be-
fore the whole of France was oc-
cupied.

Since her father’s death. Lady
Madeleine has continued to live
with her mother in his studio
flat near the Observatoire. This
week-end they leave on a motor-
ing holiday.

Lady Madeleine’s future plans:
dancing tours in Germany and

the United States.



**I thought I'd come over and
see how you were getting on.
Tom still away ?”*

‘*Yes, he won't be back tili next
week. He has to spend quite
lot of time up-country these days.”

“*I wonder you’re not afraid of
staying here alone—so isolated,
too.”’ ‘

**Oh, I’ve got Rex to look after
me. He’s company for me, anda
wonderful house-dog, yvou.know.””

|
}
**T can believe that. He doesn’t
miss much of what’s going on.
Not like our Rufus—-honestly, |
that dog seems mor: dead than |
alive these days. Lot of use |
he’d be if anything
happened !""
** Believe it or not, Rex
was just like that at one
time. He used to mope
BOB MARTIN’S CONDITION
breed.
eopy of



From all good chemists and stores
booklet ‘The care of your dog’ by

round the place, hardly touching
his food, just ne use to any-
one.**

“*Well, something’s made a
wonderful change in him.*’

** Bob Martin's, my dear. You've
heard of their Condition Tablets,
Y expect—but you obviously
haven't tried them!"

**No ... Do they really do any
good ?”” ,
**Look at Rex! Apparently the
food dogs normally get lacks
vitamins and minerals and so on.
So then they cet out of condition
(that’s what's the matier with
Rufus). You give him one Bob
Martin's a day. i'm sure
that’s what he needs.”’
“*Thank goodness you
told me! I'll get a packet
on the way back.’
TABLETS for dogs of any age

Write for a free
Bob Martin.



Lecal Agents: L. M. B. MEYERS & CO. LTD.

BRIDGETOWN,

BARBADOS.

THE TCyY SHOPS which
i1rOop Woah exife Key when you
sy eC ea LOVE UfDey knoV





LOW 4s.) We Ze ist)

1 WOULD SHOW the men
Soo Us deicCalessen stores in
england 3Ometning far more

refeh Wiah phe roues Bergere
tae tabies full Ol rewdy-to-eat

|
|
|
|

00d ita French delica’ n.

Al si .. une wind thwart coulo
“@ jone cheaper here . Uke
sumde = Nigoise = ot tomato
ereep) = peppers, ~cucumope:
ancnuvy black olives sump
fish = dressed with ou and
vinegat the bution musn
‘ooms and diced” oeewroo ,,
jressea vib garlic ana parsies

Me pastry cases filled with



SUNDAY

if the Dig London shops
the scarves abd Nats and cowon
frocks ID the new Dior Rose (s

ds.

snopped chicken In sauce, 4no nsid

the Scullion shells with aheese on De Be ip a g. aien
und Gish lung readY oread wonien even better than n
"rumbed tO M@al in tne oven, . worren? few long
even (when are cusier) "he = oearl necklets with a pendant
nayonnaise ‘bev tollop iio of chinestone roses . th

cartons tO gO With the
coiled eggs they dye rea

I'd stop at the
airport? buffets

rard-

e
new spray ear-ciips like a cloud:
ass ot ditenn iS. :

en e1 r ave wu
dozen different necklines imsteud
of ulternating between
neeks and Peter Pan collars. ~*

the way

wt

‘BD ABB «4 ousiona Om yes. there are a lot o!
I of the men who run = sights to cheer a woman's heart
Station amd airpor’ in Paris but nos the ones

ouffets to see
never see ip this country—a
Vast open Pastry tart filled witn
fresh raspberries in she Paris
air-station. Yet raspberries ure

a st@nr vou

cheaper nere and our oasirv
much better,
'D TAKE coucnes full of

English waiters und wutresses

‘o see that famous Paris insti-

“unon—tne a water wno
ie

Can manage « sm ot welcome

trippers are ysunlly shown

And at the ead
—a clue

HBRB wre the
eleaners ana
I taundries who collec:

vowt dress after breakfust ana
return tt in cme for dinner
une ootei maids who will oring

when vou demand ana &' von wnyuhing to eat or drink
en. always spreads voli» 4: uny time ot night or day
clean cloth ¢whether you dine :

at puper-cloth check-
(ana

never turn «a har uo you

usk [6! coffee With u Knife ana

damask cloth evel» one d .
ponders the menu with you ut ‘Ork oO @at Whar vou dough
mgth and never never piles elsewhere) the big stores
up the chairs or flicks our the (‘9 Which they wrap everything
fignt while vou linger over you buy im pretly paper tie i
coffee (because ne Knows the ‘firmiy and sioi in a wood-ana
chances are you will order white namdle so the packet is
another and out up We Mp) strong enough © cross ‘the

I'd stop at the
dress shops

Db RUN a = specta:
I week-ena trip tor
dress and fabric ano

wel und accessory munuluc-

cosset

Channel with you.

I'm sure at the end ot my

crips some of my tourists woulg
get a clue about one aspect ol
Frencn civilisation that differs
teeply from our own

in France the indtvtdual they,
caiole cherish and

urers see » specia: feature cove with courtesy ts THE

ot France—the way in wmcn ati CUSTOMER In England the

“mese shings are copied at al) 77reature they corner chivoy

orice levels Within six months queue ip, and kick around is. oj
NI OU tne aresses in 7478" THF CUSTOMER

UD POT

om olow on ret neare



Le Crocodile
MANY Paris celebrities are ih
Deauville this month. They in-
clude writer Colette, actor Sacha

Guitry end Australian jockey
Rae Johnstone.
Black-haired, 47 years old,

Johnstone has now, as he fore-
shadowed earlier, split with M.
Marcel Boussac, the owner for
whom he has ridden since 1950
in the best-paying racing part-
nership in recent memory,

The French call Johnstone “Le
Crocodile” because of his method
of coming up from the rear to
devour his adversaries. Jacko
Doyasber®, who will now ride all
the Boussac horses trained by

» ids nicknamed Tarzan
beca of his handsome figure

At Deauville, Johnstone inter-
rupted a sunbathe to tell me:
“Tt’s true that a number of own-
ers are after me now that I am



LOndoD Fxoress Service

es Among The Ruins

to be a free-lance, but I have
made no decision yet about the
St, Leger. I rode my last Boussac
horse, Alcinus, in the Grand
Prix at Vichy last Sunday. }
shall probably not ride for him
again, There is no quarrel.

“We have parted by mutual
consent. I am not dissatisfied
with the money | made witb
Boussac; it was a good deal.”

Johnstone does not plan to
leave France. His wife, the form-
er dancer Mile. Guy, is a French-
woman from Brittany, “And,”
says Johnstone, “I have lived in
Paris for 20 years.”

Johnstone went to Paris from
England in 1932 to see the Grand
Prix. There he met the French
owner Pitrre Wertheimer, who
invited him to go to Chantilly for
one month. He never went back
Johnstone speaks English to his
French horses.

His daily weight-control diet:
two biscuits, two grills, one salad



exciting Lavender than that

England in the famous

GROSSM

in England by distillers
famous since 1835

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SOLS DISTRIBUTORS:

8, A. BENJAMIN LTB., P.O. BOX 97, BRIDGETOWM,

Supplies of Old Cottage Lavender —
perfume, soap and talcum —
- available at your beauty-counter mow !
Nowhere will you find truer, more

which comes to you direct from











are

‘| Most popular



ADVOCATE PAGE SEVEN

iy oo gl if) |.
WHAT'S COOKING | rs
IN THE KITCHEN | “lan About Town cake

fashion figure in
|EGG DISCS WITH HAM CREAM r

















































HELENE CURTIS

et IN AMER- i’S SO C©-0-O-L, SO DE-| * e 22

| 3 y has satisfied leading Beauty LuiGHTFULLY G@-O-O-L and I’m Y/ 7.

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Buttert Shampoo makes hair softer, more make you really comfortable with ®

| tam iy lustrous, more manageable and [CE - EAU - DE - COLOGNE. *

} \After boiling the eggs and after|°*Tt#inly more lovely when Yes it is, Ice~Eaurde-Colonge and Over-ture

taking the théll off cut tt in washed with the Helene Curtis the original German product €

|small dises, Cut sdme bread. in Shampoo plus Egg yes, real from that famed line — 4711

| dises the same size and toast’ it.|°22! Your are invited to judge (Four-Seven-Eleven). J. A. Mar-

After toasting, butter the bread by the results. But if your hair son & Son Ltd., are exclusive

dises, Prepare a ham cream by|'S ©Xtta dry, the HELENE CUR- representatives for this liquid ice

TIS MILKY SHAMPOO restores
the vital oils, Try it and see —
from drug and dry goods stores.

mincing.some ham and adding
some white sauce to it, Put it in
| the icing bag. Put the egg discs on
toast and press the ham cream
through the bag into the egg discs
trying to give it a rose shape,

EGG TARTS
Tarts of puffed pastry.or vastry

this Iee-Eau-de-Colonge on
» at the best shops, decidedly

1 Toilet necessity.

° .

« +
101 MELLION OHICKS is a lot
of chicks for anyone’s garden.
PURINA PRODUCTS have proven
that this number of chicks grow

*

*

TAKE A DREAM AND A WISH
COME TRUE, add a_ portion of
erace amd charm and mix in a
«uartz of blue” and you have the



only HILLMAN COUPE IN
brisée ( next reci into husky egg-layers every year. onjo : lets title a)
| Boiled eggs, 2° At Jason Jones & Co.. Lid. PUR- bat it’s beeline neni
| Salmon INA LAYENA is one of a whole |). scgans in bine. grow. manson
Worcester Sauce range of Poultry Feeds, is a 32> Secens Due, grey, rasroon,
| . ; treen and black — a_ glinting
Mustard certain booster of production. joy of finery in the car world
Gelatine Remember a Purina Dealer is , ’

ind definitely the world’s most

pe ular light car. Come on in to

Ce'e’s on Monday (first thing) and

se» them and don’t be tempted,
vll buy anyway.

.

quality minded, brings his cus-

tomers quality results — and m

Barbsdos, your Purina dealer js

Jason Jones (4403).
+. *



Make some tarts with puffed
pastry about 2 inches in diameter.
be the eggs in small pieces and
the salmon. Mix them together

then add a few drops of Worcester .

sauce and English or French} FIRST AND ONLY LAUNDRY a c ,
| mustard, Mayonnaise too can be/OF ITS KIND ON THE ISLAND — FIRE! ACCIDENT! THEFT! —
used. ~-the Sanitary Laundry with its deen, I’m not imsured! This is

modern machinery and methods
produces quality-first-work. Fresh,
too, with new ideas, Sanitary
Laundry have just issued an all~
time low in wholesale price lists
for bulk laundering. With its
four depots at Pine Rd., Marhill
St., Aquatic Club Gap and St.
Lawrence, this progressive or-
ganization is ‘way ahe@ad in
pleasing and benefiting old and
new clients,

* *

FRESHNESS AND ZING at
any time of day — even in this
heat, can be yours with LIMO-
LENE. A product of the Bornn
Bay Rum Co,, it’s a tropical pick-
you-up-a n d-go. FLORALENE
TOILET WATER is a_ ladies
and if you're a new-
comer to the Island, you'll know
why as soon as you feel the cool

where you can be, in Harold |

! PASTRY BRISRE K'dney’s office in the K. R. Hunte
Flour 3 ozs. & Co, Ltd. Building, Lower
Salt Bread Street ph. 5027. Harold
Butter 2 ozs, represents the INSURANCE COM-
Water 3 tablespoonsful,
Put the flour on your pastry

beard. Make a hole in the middle

and put a pinch of salt, the butter

}and the water, Mix all the ingre-

dients together, Do not work the

dough too long. Roll it into a ball

and leave for a quarter of an

hour, When ready put it in your

small tins and bake in moderate

oven.

CUCUMBER SALAD OR
CUCUMBER HORS D’OEUVRES
Cut the cucumbers in very fine
Slices like paper. Put them in 4
bowl and put some salt over them
Leave then like that for half an
hour. Then take the slices and dry

PANY OF NORTH AMERICA
Companies, Philadelphia, offering
coverage for over 600 different
kinds of risk. Read the full
story in K. R. Hunte’s Insurance
id today, it says: “WE
EETWEEN YOU

* "





STAND
AND LOSS.”

e *

BUILT IN THE GLASGOW
PACTORY OF OLIVETTI
these remarkable OLIVETTI
TYPEWRITERS have come to
S. P. Musson Son & Co. Lid,
(seen their ad today?) and are
selling at a price to beat the
hand: 11” $260; 15” $298; 18’ $325;
beautifully put together with au-
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tomatic margin setting

a = mapein, Put them in afperfection of it, Bornn’s Bay writing keys to give 90 characters Geauine Maidenform Brassi-
dish and season ‘hem with pepper,JRum Co., feature these locally and signs. You are invited to ma ee
very little salt, olive oil ear, imade Lotions at all leading stores avrange for demonstration at eres are made only inthe United
chopped parsley adding one orf— or if you care to phone, it’s your convenience — ph, 3713. States of America. cones hee
Evo ae of cream. Put the] :938. « * mi ‘ a
ish in the fridge for at least one . * * eee *
hour. Serve as hors doeuvres or} FULL CREAM MELK— a new , GLASSWARE IN ALL VARIB- Thore is a Mmarilenform ‘at
salad. shipment is here of Pasturized TIES at C. S, Pitcher & Co., now. for every type of figure.
an ENUTRICIA Dried Full Cream What a selection including Aquar-

Milk and this is something for ivms! You'll find Ovenware

(Featproof) with covers, Fruit
\D.shes, Glasses -—— here’s some-
ihing now, Frigidaire Bottles, —
' gal, and full gallon Screw Cap
Glass Jars, Coasters, Sandwich
Pilates, Ash Trays and Rose
Bowls. And, I assure you, much
more to choose from. Dial 4472
f in doubt, but it'll pay you to go
to Pitcher’s,

svery home. The distinctive Blue
and White Tins on the Grocery
Shelves are priced at $1.22 for
1% tins and $5.58 for Slbs, Nut-
vicia is a Simeon Hunt & Son
listribution and among the most
popular selling brands on the
Island. Remember your stocks at
his time of the year and order
your supply on Monday

Midday Swim

THANKS to the = agreeable
Paris habit of taking two hours
off for lunch, many office work-
ers have a midday swim on hoi
August days. At the Bains De-
ligny, near the Concorde Bridge,
oldest pool in Paris (it dates
from 1801), 1 paid 3s., plus ‘a
small tip to the woman in charge
of the changing room and after
the swim had a hot restaurant
lunch with wine for 12s,

Average number of swimmers
in August; 3,000 a day, To-day
there will probably be double
that. Théy bathe in Seine water,
filtered and strongly chlorinated
wear: Bikinis, So
many bronzed bodies strewed
the planks of the sunbathing en-
closure that it was difficult to
find a place in the sun,

The pool was reconstructed in
the last century with the burial
ship which transported the body
of Napoleon to Paris.
























WHY BUY THREE
REMEDIES
When ONE will do














in


















You can now obtain the following HEALING OIL

is an efficient remedy —{{

Externally—for cuts, spraing”
and bruises
Internally — for colds;
coughs, culic, sore throa’
and also
for your Stock as well

It’s your First-Aid Kit
Bottle



from “YOUR STATIONERS"

STANLEY GIBBONS STAMP CATALOGUE
BRITISH EMPIRE 1953 asiNiing
LOOSE LEAF STAMP ALBUMS, HINGES,
also PERFORATION GAUGES and WATER MARK TRAYS
MAGNIFIERS, TWEEZERS

ROBERTS & CO.

Dial 3301










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and three glasses of water.
a race he drinks a glass of milk.

Johnstone went to unoccupied
France in 1940, but stayed there
He won the Grand Prix in Mar-
seiies in 1942, At Monte Carlo
he was picked up by the Italians
and interned. Liberated on the
Italian surrender, he was caught
again and imprisoned near Bel-
fort by the Germans, He escaped
and reached the Maquis with his
wife shortly before the liberation,

London Please Copy

ST. LAZARE station has a
creche for mothers travelling
with their babies. Open daily
from 6.30 a.m. to 10.30 p.m. it
has facilities for bathing, bottle-
heating and resting.

* . *

Some flats have a slate let into
the door so that visitors finding
the owners out can leave a mes-
sage.

(World Copyright Reserved)

“American-born Isadora Dun-
can founded a school of dancing
in Moscow, married Soviet poet
Sergé Essenin, died in car acci-
dent at Nice 1927.

—L.E.S,

BLINDING

HEADACHES

‘MADE HER HELPLESS

-
~e
ad

esvs

We've all seen the room that seems to smile, Gaily
patterned curtains frame the windows, and here and
there placed just right to catch the light, is a piece of
polished brass, glistening, gleaming all day long. The
floor too, sparkles with a well chosen covering that
matches the curtains, and the whole atmosphere is one
of comfort and luxury



People who

suffer from

severe head-

be interested in

ow this woman
—

brought relief
aches’ will
ing h

We can help you turn your home into such spots

of beauty with our - - - ,

LOVELY PATTERNS OF FLOOR COVERING

”

“DURAGLIT” to keep the Brass shining
“O'CEDAR POLISH” for the furniture and

linoleum.
alwa:
stomesh

—o—

THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM

Corner of Broad and Tudor Streets.

won't have to worry any more.
And that is just how Kruschen
brings swift and lasting relief—-
by cleansing the system thor-
oughly of all harmful, pain-giving
Waste.

Ask your nearest Chemis»
Stores for Kruschen,

» ’
or















PAGE EIGHT

BARBADOS ea ADVOCAT

Cis Sal Sa =e re Bg,
Printed by the Advocate Co., Lté., Bre-* 41. Bridgotewan





Sunday, August 31,1952. _

LIVESTOCK CRISIS

THE future of the livestock industry in
3arbados is causing great concern amongst
those who know most about it—the keep-
ers of livestock. Opinions vary as to the
reasons why the livstock industry faces a
isis but there is general agreement
among livestock owners that a crisis is
developing and in some instances has
already been reached.

In the statement of policy issued at the
time of the !ast general elections the Labour
Party which is now largely responsible for
governing Barbados pledged itself to in-
tensify ‘the “grow more food campaign”
which includes the rearing of livestock.”

Despite that pledge the livestock indus-
try of Barbados has reached a stage where
the keeping of livestock is becoming too
expensive to be carried on much longer.
Whatever theories may be held by others
to the contrary, .the experience of many
persons engaged in the industry is that the
rewards of keeping livestock do not justify
the expenses involved.

Pig-keepers who used to buy young pigs
to replace pigs sold for butchering are be-
coming less numerous with every pig
slaughtered.

Dairy-owners are having to give their
labour and in many cases the labour of
some members of their family free to make
any return on their capital invested in
cattle. Some dairies.run at a loss: others
are selling out. Why are these things
happening in an island administered by a
Labour Party pledged to intensify “the
“grow more food” campaign “and whose |
Governor has repeatedly spoken in favour
of increasing the production of lé¢al food’.
| No ready made answer tan be given. |

There is no doubt that the local govern.
ment is sincere when it champions a policy.
of increasing local food production. Not
only is it.committed to such a poli¢y but
the rising cost of the Port of Bridgetown
make it imperative that Barbados should
import the minimum of its food from out-
side. ve

How is it then) that despite official gov-
ernment pledges and promises the keepers
of livestock are finding it daily more dif-
ficult to continue rearing’ because
feeding costs, ape rising â„¢

ment? Nan

Since November 1950 the price of animal
feed mixed in Barbados according to a
formula prepared by Sir. John Saint and
under the supervision of one trading com-
pany in Bridgetown has risen from $5.64
per 100 Ib. bag to its present price of $10.00
per 100 lb, bag. ‘

Sir John Saint’s formula includes. seven.
different types of feed.

After pollard, coconut-meal is mixed in
greater proportions than any others. The
majority of these mixtures) come from -
Canada and South Ameri¢a, but the mineral
mixture is imported from the United King-
dom and coconut-meal is of course a by-
product of the copra industry.

The prices at which. copra products are
sold depend on the,price-paid for, copra.
This price is decided, at meetings: of the
Oils and Fats conference and it has been
rising steadily during recent years. - Since
coconut meal is. one: of .-the . major in-
gredients of Sir John Saint’s formula
(there are 40 parts of coconut meal. as.com-
pared with 50 parts of pollard) it is obvious
that any increase in’ the price paid for
copra is going to be followed by an increase

e the price of... ... Since one way traffic was instituted in
meat remains rigidly controlled by govern- “Bridgetown users of the Central Foundry

in the price paid for coconut meal. “The

prices paid for the imported. ingredients
used according to Sir John Saint’s formula
have risen with the increased ‘freight
charges which have resulted from the ex-
pensiveness of Bridgetown’s port charges,
and because of the depreciation of West
Indian currency with relation to hard cur-
rency.

Yet increases in. the price ,of coconut
meal must be held responsible for some
part of the spectacular rise in the price of
animal feed from $5.64 per 100 lb. bag to
$10.00 per 100 lb. bag over a two year
period. The frequency of the rise in price
of locally mixed animal feed is also a
matter for concern.

Between March 1950 and December 1951
the price remained stable at° $6.12 per 100
lb. bag. Between December 1951 and
February 1952 the price jumped from $8.08
per 100 lb. to $9.80 per 100 lb. bag. And
between February 1952 and April 1952
there was a further rise from $9.80 per 100
Ib. bag to $10.00 per 100 Ib. bag.

If it be argued, as it sometimes is argued
by government officials, that everything
else has almost doubled in price since 1950
then there seems no reason why the gov-
ernment should keep the price of meat con-
trolled under defence regulations made in
1939



The time has come for the keepers of

livestock to come into the open with facts
and figures if they want to convince the
government of the justice of their claims.
Beeause the government believes that it is
helping the livestock industry and sincerly
thinks that is carrying out a policy designed
to intensify the “grow more food cam-
paign.”

If it can be proved that the cost of local
balance animal feed is too high for the
quality of the feed thus supplied then the
livestock owners should agitate for the
lowering of the cost or for the encourage-
ment of imported ready mixed feed which
some livestock owners claim give better
results for only a slightly higher expendi-
ture,

If it is impossible to reduce the costs of
locally mixed animal feed then the govern-
ment must realise that the livestock owner
eannot continue to rear cattle which when
butchered will not repay the cost of rear-
ing. :

If, as is also stated by government
officials and livestock owners, the mixing
of animal feed locally breaks down because
of unofficial post-mixings in retail shops
the benefits of Sir John’s formula would
not appear to be felt island-wide.

The best way for livestock owners to con-
vinee-the government that they cannot
aake livestock rearing pay under existing
conditions is to quote figures to prove that
{ney are in fact losing money. Representa-
Ulons by the Livestock owners and by the
/ gricultural Society will obviously receive
ittention from a government pledged to
jitensify the “rearing of iivestock”: but
11¢ publication in the Press of the struggles
ci livestock owners to make livestock rear-
jag profitable will bolster those efforts and
may show the government how to prevent
the collapse of a vital industry.



FIRE STATION

_ THE site of the Central Foundry and the
the site of the former Bridgetown Railway
Station were both considered unsuitable
by the Select Committee of the Legislative
Council which reviewed the question of
finding the best site in Bridgetown for a
new Fire Station.

The reasons for rejecting both these sites
‘vere published in the Press. At first sight
‘hey appear to be very good reasons indeed.
But on closer inspection there seems to be
a case for revision of opinion,

Car Park find little difficulty in getting out
cf Bridgetown or into Bridgetown because
all traffic leaving the Central Foundry Car
Park is compelled to turn right on leaving.
“f a Fire Station were built on the Central
Foundry Car Park, a Fire Engine leaving
the Station could approach or leave the
City with a minimum delay by the simple
expedient of blowing its siren, However
dense the traffic might be at certain peak
periods of the day in the vicinity of the
Central Foundry Car Park, it seems un-
likely that any delay would be caused to a
fire engine which gave warning of its
pfesence, so long as the one way system of
traffic is practised.

With regard to the “noisiness” of the site
it is difficult to understand just what was
intended by the expression. If the sugges-
tion: was intended to convey that the
Central Foundry site would be too noisy
for firemen, how do the income tax officials
support that noise today, and how did the
Central Foundry staff and the Schooner
Pool staff support noise a few years back?

But the reasons given for deciding
against the site formerly occupied by the
Railway Station is éven less convincing.
If. the Victoria Bridge is to be rebuilt (and
plans for its rebuilding have often been
made) why should a Fire Station at the

_side of a modern spacious bridge be

described as on the wrong side? If it is
decided to build a deep water harbour on
the Bay Street side it might well prove to
be as much on the right side as Jubilee
Gardens igs now said to be on the right.

The question of a site for the Fire Station
is, obviously important. But it is less im-
portant than the decision as to the site of
the Deep Water Harbour. Before making
up their minds to banish the Fire Station
to St. Cecilia Barracks or to destroy the
beautiful Jubilee Gardens of Bridgetown
a decision ought to be taken on the ques-
tion of a deep water harbour. If a deep
water harbour is ‘built along Bay Street
then the former Railway Station would
Bridgetown. Ifa deep water harbour is
built along Fontabelle then so much land
will be reclaimed that the government will
have no difficulty in finding a suitable site
for a fire station. Meanwhile if the Fire-
risks in Bridgetown are thought to be so
perilous that they cannot be tackled by
firemen living under their present cramped
conditions, then a temporary site at the
Central Foundry or at the Railway Station
would appear more desirable than destroy-
irig Jubilee Gardens or buying private
property near Temple Yard.

SUNDAY ADVOCATE





The man who






















Sundays

I never thought [ would read it

again, but there it was in a dear

little woman’s magazine—“De-

Fae pir y ones in the
unting field, she’s still frigh

fond of horses,” gran

Gees frightfully fond of horses

Though accidents infer

‘That the horses she’s so fond of
Are not so fond of her.

For horses, they remember
As well as elephants,

And women they don’t care for
They kick them in the pants,

They throw them over hedges
And into icy pools

And laugh a bitter horse laugh
At sprawling, muddy fools,

At night time in the stables,
They’re smiling in the hay

And dreaming of the accidents
that make a horse’s day.

Verv Red Dean

ACK from China, where he
-” has been investigating allega.
tions of germ warfare, Venerabli
N. Gubbins, better known as the
Red Dean, more on account of his
high colour than his politics, was
interviewed by reporters,

After stating that he had irre-
futable proof that the United
Nations forces had dropped in-
fected insects on Chinese territory,

he was asked, “What sort of in.
sects?”

= said, oe
e@ was asked, “How man -
bottles?” 2 7a

He said, “I can’t count all the
bluebottles in China.”

“How do you know any of
them were dropped by aircraft?”

“Because some of them were
airsick.”

“If the bluebottles were infect-
ed with a disease, what was the
disease?”

“Influenza”.

“How do you know it was in-
fluenza?”

“Because many bluebottles
were sneezing.”

“Assuming the bluebottles were
infected, how did they convey,
influenza to the Chinese?”

“The Chinese eat live bluebot-
tles when they can’t get birds’
nests and boiled pekingese.”



TOO much praise will give Jack
a swollen head and Barbadians as
a group are not noted for humil-
ity. Lest they begin to gloat over
some.of the proofs of their live
social conscience when they should
be spurred on to further efforts
I am going to pull back the cur-
tain and reveal the major dis-
grace of the island—its appalling
tenantries.

Last week I have been reading
a publication of the Housing
Board dated May 1945 and deal-
ing with eight slum tenantries in
Bridgetown,

Since that date at the Pine
and Bay Estates much has been
done to improve housing conditions
in the city and its suburbs, but
T am told on good authority that
most of the appalling conditions
described in the housing survey
of eight slum tenantries in Bridge-
town still obtain to-day, And my
own casual glances down hack
alleys confirm the official view.
Some idea of the leeway to be
made up with regard to housing
can be gained from study of a
more recent survey of 39 tenan-
tries made by the Housing Board's
office in 1947.

On these tenantries which occu-
pied 332 acres in 1947 were living
27,171 perscas divided into 8,408
families.

Of the total number of houses

jutilised by these families, 3,022

were unfit for habitation and
4,357 were in need of repair or
enlargement,

It is interesting to note that of
the houses unfit for human habita-
tion more than half or 56 per cent
were owner occupied while 67%
of houses needing repair or en-
largement were also owner occu-
pied,
Of special interest too at a
period when there is a tendency
in some circles to attribute over-
crowding in houses to large
families is the fact that most of
the overcrowding recorded occurs
among families requiring only two
rooms,

Of a total number of 2450 new
houses required 11 are for houses
larger than five rooms, 34 for
houses of five rooms, 102 for
houses of 4 rooms, 588 for houses
of three rooms, 1715 for houses



Apppreciative

To the Editor, the Advocate,

SIR,—I crave the indulgence of
your widely read columns just to
let Mr. George Hunte know that
if there is anyone who surely ap-
preciates his writings and more
especially those on the histories of
social organisation, it is I.

It is a very good idea of allow-
ing the public to know something
about the background of social
organisations in the island, be-
cause there are some people who
are taken up with nearly all poli-
tics; that I am sure if they were
questioned on some of the social
| structure in our midst, they would
}be very far out. So that is why I
must lend my ‘support to. Mr

keeps Barbados
laughing on






“What do they eat them with?”

“Chopsticks.”

“Wouldn't it be difficult to eatch
and eat a live bluebottle with
chopsticks?”

“Not if it was weak with in-
fluenza,

“How are the Chinese doctors
dealing with the situation?”

“By putting them to bed and
giving them aspirin.”

“The Chinese?”

“No, the bluebottles,” said Red
Dean Gubbins, going a little red-
der as he flounced out of the room.

Talking to Yourself
“T am a great talker. If I
can’t find anybody to talk to,

I talk to myself”—

Confession to a Columnist
. SAID to the manager, I said,

I won't put up with it any
longer, I said.

“Twenty-five years I’ve worked
for you, I said, and the last rise
I got was a measly £1 a week
ten years ago.

“There you sit, I said, fat and
smug, leaning back in your swivel
chair telling me that you can't
afford another £1 a week be-
cause times are bad. They’re not
bad for you, I said, you great,
overfed slob, I said.

“But for the work I’ve done
here, I said, you couldn’t afford
to send your mentally retarded
son to the university, nor give
champagne parties to parade your
hideous daughter before the eli-
gible peerage like fat stock at a
cattle show. You'd better get her
off soon, I. said, before she gets
foot and mouth disease,

“Who are you. I said, to merry
your daughter into the peerage. I
said. Why, I said, if you hadn't
used my brains to make your
money the peerage wouldn't let
you in at the tradesmen’s en-
trance, let alone into the family,

“you common little upstart, I said

“For 25 years I’ve wanted to
give you a smack in the puss, T
said. And now I’m going to do
it. Take that, and that, and that
and that.”

* ¥
' “What did the manager say?”
asked an interested bystander,

dodging the blows.

NATHANIEL GUBBINS

a ET SAE A

“The manager said “Corney-
croft, as you have made your re-
quest in a proper and respectful
manner I will put you in charge
of another ledger at an extra 1
a week. You may go now,’ ”

Bedside Manner

R. P. T. O’FARRELL’S ad-

vice in his presidential ad-
dress to the British Medical
Association in Dublin, “that the
doctor should be quite frank and
positive in his statements - to
patients,” is fully endorsed by his
colleague, Dr. Gubbins, the Fleet-
street quack, who is notorious for
his brutal frankness.

To a patient who complained
of “a feeling of fullness” in his
stomach, Dr, Gubbins said, “Your
stomach feels full ‘because it is
overfull; and it is overfull be-
cause you're a pig.” d

*

To a_ patient who wanted a
“quick cure for a headache,” Dr,
Gubbins said: “As the quickest
cure for a headache is decapita-

tion, perhaps your butcher will
oblige.”

To another who said he couldn't
sleep, felt sick after every meal,
had floating specks before the vis-
ion, dull singing in the ears, rheu-
matism in every joint, and dign’t
think life worth living, Dr. Gub-
bins advised, “Climb to the top of
Nelson’s Monument, and throw
yourself off—that is if your rheu-
matism isn’t too bad.”

* ob *

Dr. Gubbins is equally frank
with paying patients who’ want
to discuss their imaginary trou-
bles with a psychiatrist,

A man who thought he was a
failure in life because his father
had hit him when he was a boy
was told: “If Your fathér had hit
you harder and more often you
might have been earning a lot of
money now instead of wasting it

here. That will be twenty
guineas.”
Another who said he could

make no headway socially be-
cause of “an illusion that he was
unpopular” was told: “It is no
illusion, You are unpopular. That
will be fifty guineas.”

- L.E.Ss.



Behind The

Curtain

By George Hunte

of 2 rooms and 954 single persons
required accomodaton in hostels
or flats.

The majority of families living
in tenantry houses comprise be-
tween two and four persons and
families exceeding six are every-
where in a minority. The analysis
of family sizes in Carrington
Village made in the survey dated
May 1945 is typical,

Of a total number of 3540 per-
sons, 51% were living in families
of two-four : 23% were living in
families of 4—6 : 17% were single
persons : 5% were families of
7—8; 3% were families of
9—10 and 1% were families of 1)
and over,

The idea that large families
are responsible for overcrowded
conditions and for houses being
unfit for human habitation is also
disproved by the Housing Board’s

alysis of family sizes living in
fuses unfit for habitation in Car-
rington village.

Of the total number of such
families living in houses unfit for
habitation 49% were from families
zt 2—4: 24% were single persons:

1% were families of 4—6 :34%
were families of 7—8 : 14% were
families of 9—10 and 1% were
families of 11 and over,

The squalor and unloveliness of
tenantry life is forcefully brought
into relief by the authors of the

ousing. Survey of eight slum

antriés in Bridgetown,

Cracked ceilings, water logged
broken stairs decayed woodwork
and, lack of ventilation characterise
Suttle Street, where cooking is
carried on in individual rooms
and Sepperase Ways on oil stoves
and pots and where the litter
in the street turns into sludge
after rains.

In Phillips tenantry of 485
houses containing 1671 persons,
218 were unfit for habitation and
215 in need of repair.

Chapman's Lane tenantry re-
ceived special mention because of
sanitary conditions, “Though
difficult to prove” comment the
authors of the survey" it was fair-
ly evident that many people made

Our Readers Say:



Hunte for his wise approach on
such matters.

Next, Sir, I should state that if
Mr. Hunte’s writings must be suc-
cessful, he must not only write on
vig organisations, he must remem-
ber that some of them are given
Government aid to help them on,
as well as they are attuned to
those who afe fairly wealthy and
who will also give not only fin-
ancially, but a portion of their
personal presence. But he must
also come to organisations which
have been striving without the aid
of Government, but just get help
from a few admirers of good
vauses ,and there are many of
such organisations.

Li. B. CLARKE

Slum

as little use as possible of their
latrines (the structural conditions
of which were bad) and used
empty spots and. the Emmerton
aitch. A case of a surface well
only 2 ft. 6 ins. from a pit latrine
was recorded,

The Emmerton ditch, a concrete
lined culvert passing down one
side of the tenantry flows very
slowly, particularly at high tide.
The foul water smells badly
though the culvert is brushed down
daily. In very wet weather it
floods the surrounding land. Since
only, 13. of the 345 houses in the
tenantry have water taps on the
premises no washing facilities
exist.”

Things may have changed \in
Chapman’s Lane since 1945 but
many of the comments made in
the report will surely be applica-
ble to conditions today. The
revelations of the 1945 housing
survey and the statistics compiled
in 1947 are disturbing for two
reasons.

In all these tenantries in 1947
the highest average land rent paid
was 89 cents monthly in
Folly slum area opposite Chap.
man’s Lane And the average
monthly house rent $6.76 was
highest in the same area. Rents
have probably increased consider-
ably since the analysis of 1947 was
made but wages have also risen
so that tenantry dwellers ought to
be no worse and should in many
cases be better off in 1959.

Many thousands of tenantry
dwellers are always: seeking to
move to the new government built
houses on the Bay Estate and Pine
and provide “live” proofs that
unsatisfactory conditions still
prevail in the tenantries of Bridge-
town and its suburbs, 5

If Barbadians are estimated to
be 212,000 persons to-day. it is a
sober thought that nearly one-
eighth of them live in conditions
brought to light in the Housing
Board's Survey of 1947. Plainly
none of us are giving housing the
attention it deserves.’ We must
turn over a new leaf and discover
why so many persons who can
afford to own houses live under
such dreadful conditions?

If we can find out we may be
well on the road to putting things
right, :



Education

To the Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,—It was about election
time that politicians promised the
electorate ‘better houses, better
education of children etc. Now I
understand that the Parry—Cole-
ridge School was built ‘to hold
over three hundred children, but
the school master will not take
on roll more than twe hundred
because, “provision has not been
made for additional _ pupils,”
hence, many children who have
passed the entrance examination
are not allowed to enter the
school.

ROGER WILGIAMS,













COCKTAILS AT THEIR



SUNDAY, AUGUST 31,

Patterned
& Plain

These delightful materials!

LINENS .

Pea

1952

“THE GOLDEN VOICE NURSERY RECORD BOOK”

tells the story with Songs and Music on a gramophone record
to help you read it in the Book.

+
ADVOCATE STATIONERY



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SUNDAY, AUGUST 1952

ROGUES OF THE SEA;

31,



Like Houdini, Bartholomew
Portugues could get out of any-
thing. A man full of guile and as
wicked. a cut-throat as ever
reamed the seas, this Portuguese .__.

irate captain was, al] the same { —

ibued with courage, a virtue— f=
or perhaps a vice—which was-f
fairly common among the-Butcan-
eers of the period. y

The stories of th® marly times
that he tricked,“death are not
known, but one actount of how |
Bartholomew Portugues escaped
a Spanish gallows is recorded, and
I will tell it here.

The story begins with Portugues
eruising off Cuba in a small ship
carrying thirty men and four
small guns, His prey soon came
along, a great ship bound for
Havana from Maracaibo and car-
rying seventy men and twenty big

guns. +
Nothing daunted, the pirates .
attacked but were thrown back, ‘
suffering little damage, however. re
Shouting to his men, Portugues ,. iy

sprang on board the Spanish ship “

again, and fighting like maniacs

By IAN GALE



the buccaneers cut down twenty
Spaniards and took the ship.

He then steered a course for
Cape St. Anthony where he plan-
ned to do some repairs on tie ship
and take in fresh water. But he
never reached the Cape for three
large Spanish ships intercepted
him and took his ship without diffi-
culty. The pirates were stripped
of their booty, which included
some 70,000 pieces of eight, and §
made prisoners below decks.

A Storm EP

Two days after their misfortune
a ee a at ore — ae
arated the Spanish ships, the ship
with the pirates on board eventu= : BARTHOLOMEW PORTUGUES

making Campechy. Unluckily floats. en, when everyone was

ne Portugues was well known asleep he stabbed his guard and Savin rene’. Nails nd
in that city, having committed slipped overboard with his wine being unable to swim, he hunted
many robberies on the coast and jars. On reaching the shore he until he found an old’ board with
having actually escaped from a took to the woods and not daring some large nails in it, These pail
prison in Campechy before. to appear, hid himself for three he sharpened on a stone until A re

Determiried to teke no chances days, living on wild herbs, were like small knives and with

me, e mag-

Intrates decided that. it would be _ From his hiding place in a hol- nat sad r mate at
safer to leave him guarded on low tree he saw the Spaniards ann ma net meg mag hc f
board ship while they erected a searching for him, and when they .,./f¢ Was icky in finding a pirate
gibbet to Rack him the next day. eventually gave up the search he 5 up a or hie at Golpho Triste—

Bartholomew Portugues heard made his way to Golpho Triste. ae Te of ae whe had arrived a
of this and made strenuous efforts It took him a fortnight to get there. He id t before from Jamaica.
to escape during the night, Not He had nothing to eat but raw irony — his story and per-
being able to swim he-got hold of shellfish, which he found on the boat ; em to let him have a
iwo empty earthenware wine jars rocks in the sea and he carried oid ey (oe so that he
and stopped them up in such a his water supply in.a small cala- cauhite the cote. in pons gd ane
way that they cotid be used as bash. bean kept picle ane e

= In this. small boat he and his
small “crew” set out for Campechy
and arrived there eight days later.
Portugues waited until night had
fallen and then rowed quietly out
to the ship. The Spaniards on
board were taken completely by
surprise, believing the boat to be
one from the shore bringing out
contrabard goods.

They ‘vere soon overpowered
and the pirates immediately
weigheu anchor and sailed out of
the harbour.

Bartholomew Portugues was
now a happy man, A turn of for-
tune had made him rich and pow-
erful again and he was master of
the very ship in which a few
weeks before he had been prison-
er, He sat on deck and made ex-
travagant plans, in fact he had al-
ready planned another expedition,
when they approached the Isle of

. Pines on the south side of Cuba.

But fortune is fickle and in a
few hours a terrible storm blew
up and forced the proud ship on
the Jardines Rocks where she was
lost completely.

Bartholomew Portugues and his
companions managed to escape in
a canoe, in which they eventually
reached Jamaica, Fortune ,which
had protected him now forsook
him completely, however, and al-
though he continued his “career”
he was always unsuccessful.

When Will: Britain Give Fleming

By CHARLES WINTOUR

PIRATES BOARDING A



His Due?

|Has any British invention cf essence of the mould “penicillin”

brought more uni- , , after the name of the mould
real Henown to this country than if “one of the most beneficent which was “penicillium nota-
the discovery of penicillin? discoveries in the history of tym.” * |:

ingenious Medicine” Fleming himself was unable
as British scientists have been, The Smugglers to complete the concentration
most of their pioneering work The value of the drug to hu- and purification of penicillin.
has been turned quickly to account manity may be measured by the That stage of the work, with ae
for destructive ends. Radar, jet eagerness with which other coun- demonstration of its pas ag
propulsion, atomic energy—in all tries have rushed to make it. properties, ‘was carried -
these developments peaceful uses Countries already producing the some years later by a team oO}

Shrewd, daring and

aoe ried ; ; ‘ ta i ‘ity
had perforce to take second place drug in commercial quantities workers at Oxford Universit:
& dames needs, include the United States, France, under. the leadership of “ Sir

All the greater glory, therefore, Japan, Yugoslavia and Italy. A Howard Florey and Dr. Chain,

in Finally American scientists found
this a method of producing the mould
in large quantities.

attaches to penicillin, the drug new factory is being opened
whose healing and antiseptic pro- India with American aid
perties saved the lives of thous- year,

ands cf soldiers..in the last. war There is still such a demand

i at i ize

saved the lives of scores for it on the Continent that Nobel Pr ;

Wasa ef people since then. border patrols occasionally catch What recognition has Fleming
All. Benefit smugglers trying to cross the received for the epoch-making

Alps with vials of the drug. And flash of genius which detected
the Russians have paid penicillin the new drug? :
the compliment of claiming that abroad honours have

they discovered it first. poured upon him without stint.

His Honour

Of course no dispute
becoming in- about the discovery of
brought about in the Western world,
@ speedy recovery. It has been our belongs exclusively
used with success against all Alexander Fleming,
forms of blood poisoning, includ- — ;
ing venereal disease. in his research laboratory at St. dom df the city o

It has opened an-entirely new Mary's Hospital Paddington, Pro- humanitarign
field of drug production. Many fessor Fleming, as he then was,
new anti-biotics — substances noticed that bacteria which he
produced by living organisms was growing on “plates” had been
which are poisonous to bacteria contaminated
—have followed the discovery of carried
penicillins, Stteptomycin, aureo- throwin

The Whole world has benefited
from ‘penicillin. Wheye in earlier
days soldiers suffered intense pain
from infected wounds which re-
mained open for six months or
more, nicillin was able to pre-
vent e wounds
fected at all and

y Prize for medicine with Florey.
exists He was made a commander of

The hon-

to Sir Merit
Grand

and given the
Cross of
award from
number of academic distinctions.
by a mould spore street of a town

in by the air, Instead of Morocco named after him.
out the contaminated At home the prophet,

mycin, chloromycetin —all these plate Fleming spotted that this not entirely without honour, has
miracle drugs” owe the inspira~ little mould, only 1/6000th of an certainly not received his due
tion of their discovery to penicil- inch, was inhibiting, and indeed He was knighted
lin.’

* Bevan, when Minister of destroying,
. had good reason to call v



aded. Fleming named this killing

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In 1945 he shared the Nobel

penicillin the French Legion of Honour,
awarded the American Medal of
Spanish
Alfonso X.
In 1928, when he was working Apart from picking up the free-

f Verona, an
the
Variety Clubs of America and a

Fleming has even had the main
in Spanish

while

in 1944 when
the germs it had in- the significance of penicillin was





SUNDAY ADVOCATE

The planter of Barbados had
been caught in an economic sys-
tem from which there had been no

m4 escape. Had there been a system

ef free labour, the initial invest-
ment would not have been one
third as much. Sugar cane could
not be grown and manufactured
without the negro slave, and in
bad times he could not, like the
employer of labour in a manufac-
turing city, turn off his hands.
These slaves were his property,
end valuable property at that;
which had to be carried at any
cost short of ruin.

The negro slave had had at least
one great advantage over the free
factory worker of northern clim-
ates, for he was property and had
to be taken care of, clothed and
fed, while the factory worker was
just turned off and shut down, like
a machine, when hard times hit
whatever line of manufactured
goods he happened to work in.
This also applies to the difference
between the negro slave and the
white indentured servant in Bar-
bados itself, for it appears that
the negro slaves enjoyed much
better conditions on the planta-
tions than the white indentured
servants imported, more often than
not, deported from Europe. The
white servants suffered gravely, as
the right to their services was
bought and sold in much the same
as the slave was acquired, only
that their service was for a speci-
fied duration of time. This limit-
ed time of service was a great
handicap to the white indentured
servants, as it caused the planter
to have less interest in their wel-
fare than in that of the negro
slaves who were perpetual ser-
vants and therefore ‘the most use-
ful appurtenances’ of a plantation.
What mattered if the’ white servant
died, his term of service had been
purchased for a mere pittance,
and anyhow after the term ex-
pired someone else would have to
be purchased to fill his place;
while the negro was purchased at
a fair price and for life, therefore,
if the negro was ill treated, and
died, the loss was far greater than
the unfortunate white indentured
servant. In almost every case the
slave was found under far more
congenial circumstances than the
wretched European, cver whom
the planter ruled with an iron rod.
There appears to be little racial
fiction between the white inden-
tured servant and the negro slave
while both suffered the bonds of
servitude, for there are anany re-
cords of mulatto bastards born to
white indentured servant women
for the negro slave men with
whom they shared their lives.
The term ‘SLAVERY’ is taken to-
day by many people to mean only
one thing, that is the oppression
of the negro by the white owner,
it may, therefore, be a shock for
them to learn that slavery was not
confined to this class, for many
freed coloured people were them-
selves owners of slaves.

Sir Robert Schomburgh, who
visited this Island within a decade
of the emancipation, writing on
the slave period. states—

“It cannot be denied that acts
of cruelty were committed upon
the unfortunate slave-popula-
tion, but we may controvert the
general charges against the cul-
onists which were unsparingly
poured forth at that period,
What injustice would a for-
eigner commit towards the Eng-
lish nation if he were to judge

of their character from the
police reports in the daily
papers! yet such an injustice

was committed in stigmatizing,
by a sweeping charge, those
who possessed estates in the
West Indies with the cruelties
committed by a few. The ‘John
Bull’, the ‘British Mercury’, the
‘Glasgow Courier’, and occas-
ionally the ‘Quarterly Review’,
were the’ advocates of the West
Indies; and their cause was
otherwise defenced by individ-
ual talent and skill.”())
The first day of August 1838 was
ordered to be ‘As a day of Solemn
Thanksgiving, and Devout Suppli-













Bartholomew Portugues, Who Had Nine Lives
The People of Barbados XXI

By JOHN PRIDEAUX
cation to Almighty God.’ And
‘that it be duly observed in all
Churches, Chapels and other
places of Public Worship through-
but the land, as becometh a con-
siderate and Christian People.’ On
the morning of this day all classes
f people in their best clothes were
seen visiting the various Churches
and Chapels; these people were
mostly the descendants of the

frican slaves who had been im-
Ported to the Island, but there
‘were a few whites among them
At the Cathedral the Governor
and the Lieutenant General Com-
manding Her Majesty's Troops at
Barbados were in attendance. On
this auspicious occasion, His Lord-
ship, the Bishop of Barbados, Rt
Hon, William H. Coleridge, D.D.
delivered the sermon, and took for
his text the 24th verse of the 7th
chapter of the Epistle of St. Paul
to the Corinthians—“Brethren, let
every man wherein he is called
therein abide with God.”

All the people of Barbados were
surprised to see how quietly and
orderly the day passed and many
expressed their feelings with ‘we
never witnessed a more quiet and
noiseless scene than was present-
ed this morning, even in our dense
population,’ The only slight dis-
turbance recorded is when the
Band of the Militia, playing mar-
tial music, caused a temporary ex-
citement among the ‘lower orders’
whose attention is always attract-
ed by military shew and parade.’

The Editor of the ‘Barbadian
Newspaper’ comments—

“We feel aimose overwhelmed
with awe, and admiration, and
astonishment, at the wonderful
works which the mighty hand
of God has brought to ‘pass in
this quarter of the world, Ard-
ently as we have wished, we
scarcely expected to be permit-
ted to see such a change in our
civil relations. We are thank-
ful to God that we ‘have’ been
spared to see the commence-
ment of an era which must
totally change the character of

West Indian society; and will,

we doubt not, by the blessing of

an improved state of religion
and morals, and all the charac-
teristics of a well regulated

Christian community.” (2)

For a few days all went well on
the plantations, the labourers en-
joying their new freedom were
working well under the ‘located
labour’ system, but on the 8th of
August, 1838, is recorded what
must have been the very first
strike on any plantation in Bar-

bados. The labourers, mostly un-
educated people, did ne. quite
understand the new laws, and

some of them were saying that if
they entered into contracts to ful-
fil any certain type of work that
they would be making themselves |
inito slaves again; While others
were on strike for higher wages,
and these were supposed to be of
such a high demand that the
planters, who had been heavily hit
financially through emancipation,

uld ill afford to pay without en-
Midseins the fimancial position of
their estates,

This state of affairs continued
for some weeks. when a Commit-
tee consisting of Archdeacon

arry, Lieut-Colonel Maxwell, and
Mr. Joseph Garrdway, was ap-
pointed to visit the various par-
ishes, explaining to the people the
exact requirements of them and
the obligations of their former
owners to them, On one of these
occasions Lt,-Cdlonel Maxwell)
told a gathering of labourers that
the labourer in England, who was
as free as they were, were com-
pelled to work six days of the
week and only had the Sabath
day to rest, while those of Barba-
dos were only compelled to work
for five days per week on the
plantations, to fulfil their obliga-
tions to the owners of the land on
which they were living, and had
two days per week for themselves.
These speeches had effect on some
of the gangs on various plantations
who returned to work, but there
were still some who were being







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PAGE NINE

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s.irred up by agitators, and were
restless and refused to work

This Committee issued a full
report of the situation to His
Excellency the Governor, and












concludes the report with the
rollowing statement
“Our great fear is from the

influence of bad advice, given,
whether orally, or in print, to the
as yet inexperienced, and for the
most part, unlettered freemen;
but we trust that by good advice

from their real friends, and
equitable treatment from their
employers, under a just and

IT COSTS NO MORE
— PROBABLY LESS

ON SALE AT ALL
LEADING STORES

vigilant administration of the
laws , the good sense and good
feeling of the peasantry will be
enabled to resist the evil in-

fluences alluded to and _ that
they will soon become both
happier and more profitable
members of society, in the use
of that freedom which has been
so wisely and so generously
bestowed upon them.” ©
In 1840, a new franchise Act on

different lines was passed raising

the freehold qualification for
voters, and introducing new ele-
ments of qualification, The quali-
fication for membership of the
House of Assembly was also
raised

After the abolition of slavery

throughout the British Empire, a
state of slavery still continued in



the United States of America, ea ae
Even though the Atlantic Ocean
was being patrolled by different

A GREAT NAME... 1 GRAND WHISKY

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nationalities, who were out to sup-
press the slave trade, there were
captains of ships who ran the risk
and smuggled these unfortunate
wretches into the United States of
America, where slavery did not
end until 1863, when it ‘was
abolished by proclamation by
President Lincoln, One man who
played a great part in the abolition
of slavery in the States was Dr.
David Livingston (1813-—1873),
and who had been in South Africa
since 1841, knew of the ravages
of the slave trade, and was deter-
mined to do something about it.
He wrote that ‘sending the Gospel
to the pagans must include much
more than is suggested by the
usual picture of the missionary,
namely, a man going about with a
Bible under his arm. The develop-
ment of commerce ought especially
to be attended to Success
in this would spread the blessings
of civilization far wider than
efforts which were wholly spirtual
and educational and limited to one
small tribe,”
(To be continued)
1 ‘History of Barbados’ by Sir
Schomburgh, p. 458
2. ‘The Barbadian Newspaper
Ist 1998

3. “The Barbadian
26th 1630

Robert
August

Newspaper,’ Sept

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PAGE TEN



By WILLIAM FORRES STEWART

A Hh a i is ge

eee a a anemia

It Can Cha
Face Of Th

e karth:

Pietures by Frank Watkins





PREPARING to disgorge ite 1)
ing round the pooi.

Came a time when man ana
his spade were together faced by
obstacles above and below the
earui’s surface permitting of no
deviation from the original plan
and no Ggeparture to another area,
Came.a time, too, when these
obstacles were further aggravated
by the need of speed, not only to
be overeome but overcome within
the overal plan, itself a part of
strict schedule. So obstacles and
speed liued up against man and
kis spada and depending on the
country, conditions ang circum-
stances, the problem was solved
with the introduction of machin-
ery to a greater or lesser degreq
and as a matter of assistance to,
rather than precedence over, man
and his spade, In all parts of the
world where t-has been construc-
tively used,im. the literal sense,
the machif#Tias made possible
the near*impossible, and in the
final couht’ ébntributed mightily
to the ecredtufe comforts of man,
who, with hig spade, remains an
essential ‘in. fhe successful com-
pletion of ¢vém a machine driven
operation, Such, for instance, as
that at .Three Houses . Factory
Ltd., St. Philip, which hag Ms-
tened to the roar of the most
recent addition to the range of
excavating, caterpillar ‘tractors,
the first seen in Barbados and one
of a few throughout the British
West Indies.

by

Jointly operated Messra
Harold Manning and Sonny Edg-,
hill, this excavating tractor camé
into the Island in May of this
year. Although weighing all of
eight tons, the machine is some-
thing of-a ‘mighty mite’ and has
an overmll measurement of No
more than fourteen feet. A quick

>

tons of clay, the

change artist, this mecbeal et!
marvel can be adaptad to bul
dozing, grading etc., with com
paratively minor adjustments,

Vianager Evelyn Reece at Three
fouses Factory swept a pointing
nger over @ vast quagmire, seven
icet deep, behind his buildings.

This entire area will measure
~bout four hundred feet by a
indred feet across when finished,
od will store the cool water tor
pumping into the Factory’s con-
ensers.”” :

I asked where the water wa
coming from and he showed me
i ditch seven feet. wide by six

feet deep that ran round the outer Along the narrow, bumpy surface »

perimeter of the pool,

“This water,” he said, “was
originally two small rivers that
have their source high up in St.
John. We used the tractor to
channel this ditch and cOnnect the
streams. Over there,” he pointed
to the end of the reservoir, “we'll
control tha depth of water inside
the pool by concrete weirs.”
| looked at the huge expense and
the busy little tractor pound-
ing through the heavy clay with
\s swinging bucket tipping out a
load of one and half tons. The
bucket measures one and a half
cubie yards and has an actual
capacity load of two and a half
tons, It’s phenomenal.

To Messrs Manning and Edghill
{ remarked thet the tractor must
ave been very busy out here at
Three Houses Factory since arriv-
ing in May.

Sonny looked at me; “Since
May? Not since May, laddie. This
job’s taken three weeks to date
ejid we expect to finish it in a
cay or two.”

t
at

Traxcav tor approaches the completion of the bank-

W4 walked along the side of
ihe exeavated pool, a retaining
bank built from the dredged
joam. I looked down at the slinky
water of the seven-foot-wide
suveam and along its four-hundred
toot length. In three weeks the
tractor had extended these banks;
added three feet to their height;
lengthened the pool by all of two
hundred feet and changed the
course and made one river out of
two—all in a matter of three
weeks and a day.

1 sat
the

close to where
being completed

down
“uk was

of it came the squat, powerful
shape of the tractor, expertly;
coi trolled by the driver in his
open cabin, guiding the tracks
over the torn surface. Its great
maw filled with a ton and a half
ot sodden loam, it roared closer to
the mound of its making. The
driver pulled at a levar and the
thing seemed to open its teeth
and disgorge all over the earth.
There was a _ lightening sound
trom the diesel engine—consum-
ing a gallon and a half an hour—
ur the strain was teased with the
silling of the load, and then the
n.achine backed off, turned and
headed away for a repeat opera-
ton. It was fascinating to Watch
d a curious picture of lumber-
g@ agility and manoeuvrability,
ithin an enormous concentration
power,
Said I to Manager Reece on
c~parting; “I expect you'll use
the tractor for avening out the
tanks and surfaces,”

He shook his head; ‘No, not for
t at sort of job. For that, we'll
+oed men and spades,”

a
ir
v
oO



AT THREE HOUSES FACTORY L"’)., the original pool has been more than doubled in area with an
added 3 ft. in depth. This is the reservoir from which water is pumped to cool the Factory’s con-
densers and serves to illustrate the capabilities of the Traxcavator in the space of three weeks,



We the undermentioned
attention of our Customer
creased: —

(1) High cost «
(2) Continuall

(30) days and accounts will

after Several months c
we have no other c!
as f ist October, 1952

ar

J. N. ¢ SK
Stansfeld
Scott & Co., |
Alleyne, Arthur ¢
W. A, Medford & |
hnson & Red
e & Co., | i
Perkins & (
St t & Sampson



LFS DR OL DNEOOOEE 629606 OPE OOOO



POP@A DOGS +

a ee
>POFODDF-H9HHHOHHHHHHOHOHSHE + +

NOTICE

et

We very much regret h

Seott & ¢



2 £



cers beg to draw to the
that, owing to the in-

+oods,

rising operating expenses,

>

we will no longer be able to extend credit over thirty

be payable when rendered.

ig to take this step, but
consideration, we find
ll have te enforce same

Ltd., >
Co, Ltd,

Ltd.

DDBOL®DHOOOGHOGH DDH. OGY

j





4 99900008

$ From SATURDAY AUG. 30
To SATURDAY SEPT. 6

O40

OOOO

10%

2%

oe

5:99000O004O9OO

POD

O00



SUNDAY



1 HAVE been doing a good
deal of thinking about this sub-
ject. And this is what I want to
say: —

There is no possible doubt that
some people have a special and
remarkable power of healing
which seems to be outside the or-

dinary range of medical prac-
tite,
What has to be remembered

is that a parish priest in his
ordinary ministry often finds that
those to whom he gives the
sacraments, or with whom he
prays, do have their health re-
tored.
QUESTION ONE: Can you cite
cases to parallel those noted?
YES, only the other week my
ehaplain, the Reverend R. C.
Walls, was rung up in the middle
of the night to go to a local hos-
pital where a baby girl of seven
months was said to be dying of
bronchial pneumonia,
_He found she had been bap-
tised, so he prayed and anointed
her, asking her parents to join
‘heir faith to his own. In a week
‘hat baby was home, cured,
When I was dean of Pembroke

‘ollege there was an under-
raduate who had had | four
perations for peritonitis: “ an-

ther abscess had formed, and
he doctor said there was no hope,
I gave him Holy Communion,
nd prayed with him. Later the
‘octor told me that the young
nan’s temperature had dropped

ig

aa

ere



ADVOCATE

‘We Are To Blame That Healing!
nge The Has Moved Out Of Church Hands’







: The second member of
the “Daily Express advisory
Panel of Bishops sums up
the “Daily Express” advisory

Dr. HAROLD WYNN

Bishop of Ely
vight down. Today that boy is
himself a doctor.

You see, when a parish priest
is doing his job properly and is
a real pastor, he is praying with
his sick parishioners all the
time, And he—with the doctor
in sueh cases—is taking part in
# joint ministry.

Mind you, Christians have for
far too long failed to bring this
side of the Church's work suffi-
ciently to the attention of people.

Thus the idea has gone around
that spiritual healing takes place
only outside the Church’s minis-
try. Mea culpa: we are to blame
for this failure,

QUESTION TWO: What about
those patients who do not get
well after prayer?

AH, that bring us to the heart
of the whole business, What
really matters is not the health of
the body.

That is only incidental to the
much bigger thing—the doing of
the will of God in and through
every situation that comes our
way,

This may mean new health in
quite miraculous ways, or it may

By



THE TRAXCAVATOR changed the course of two rivers and made
them one, to flow along this prepared channel measuring 7ft. across

with a depth of 6ft.



I'll Give You A Fancy Name

For Your Headache
ARE YOU SCARED 10 SEE YOUR DOCTOR ?—No. 3

NOW, I am going to take the
risk of giving you a high-sounding
name for a pain in the head.

It is a risk—because labels for
commonplace ailments often be-
come fashionable, and then
patients stream in to consulting
‘ooms with their own diagnoses,

Slipped disc is the recent
clussic example, Once that label
‘aught on with the public any-
vwne with a twinge in the back
would arrive at the surgery and
say, almost triumphantly, “My
tise has slipped.”

Usually it was the imagination
hat had slipped.”

Now for that pain in the head
if you have one—even i! ,ou have
it. p»etty frequently—the odds are
pretty high these days that you
have a “functional headache.”

There's vou fashionub's phras
if you want it, But to a doctor,
functional heacache is one wh

not—-repeat not—caused b>
inything organic,

The Daughter

THE cause can pe found outside
the body, by frustration or hidden
worry,

‘It is important ty this series
because the very act of gettin:
secretly alarmed roout a rash
a swelling can bring,on a fv ic-
tional headache, ’

| have had such patients come
to me and say: ‘I guessed I had
so-and-so doctor, but I daren’t tell
anybody. And then the pains in





OTHER

A DOCTOR talks frankly to
those who worry in secret—
a surgery report by JAMES
LEASOR.

my head started—and I was cer-
tain.”

In the case of Miss H~—— I was
able to tell her that she was cer-
tainly wrong in her fear that she
had a brain tumour: her father
had died of one,

At nights she would lie awake,
worrying who would look after
her aged mother if anything hap~
pened to her, desperately trying
o will herself well again,

Miss H had held her problems
in for too long. She came to me at
he headache stage: violent throb-
bing headaches. Had she gone on
then other signs—a trembling of
he Bande lassitude—might have
ppeare




j 4
Yet she had nothing physically

' matter with her.

| explained all this to her and

' arranged for her mother to go

1o a nursing home while she

‘ot/’on holiday.. The headaches
Vanished.

“ew people seem to realise that
being in the head are usually not
very serious. People who worry
in s@eret about possible brain

nours, madness, and the like
usually worry in vain.

The Driver

Another cause of pains in the
head are eyes that need attention.
Well, that’s easy enough in these
days if you give the doctor a
chance to advise you,

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LPPHD DOG ODDHOPDO PO POOH PDF OP-DDHEPGO HP OPGG- KAP HHOO AO OOP DG







PPPLOOD SOP POH HOGOSD

AUGUST 31, 1952
OOO

THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LD.

White Park Road, Bridgetown

SUNDAY,





ENGINEERS, BRASS and IRON FOUNDERS

Works contain rnodern appliances for the execution of
first-class work of all kinds, and i to
SUGAR MACHINERY and

] in AGRICULTURAL MACHINERY and
mere GENERAL ENGINE ROOM STORES
of all Description

IRRIGATION PROJECTS, PUMPING UIPMENT
and ELECTRICAL INSTALLATIONS a SPECIALTY

For
Satisfaction, Quality and Service

THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LTD.

Phone > 4546, 4650 Worksh~ p

mean accepting continued suffer-
ing with courage.

I know, for example, of two
parents whose devotion io an
imbecile chiid had been so mar-
vellous that they had come to an
understanding of the love of God
which they might never have
reached in other circumstances, .

Suffering has its place in the
world as we know it. To look
for health and pray for it, but to
accept suffering if health is not
given, is to prove that you have
got hold of something very im-
portant.

You show that you recognise
the ring of triumph lying behind
the words “Thy will be done.”
Yes, triumph, not the poor, pas-
sive fatalism which most people
think those words imply.

Wien I was vice-principal of
a Cambridge a college.
the principal, essor B. K.|4
Cc gham, who was very deaf, |
told me that he had received the
laying-on of hands, and was no
better, and_then said with a
smile: —

“I can be terribly irritable: if
I heard everything, what a trial
I might be to my friends: that
may account for it.”

QUESTION THREE: Have you

Phone 4528 Stores Dept:

Your Entire Health:

depends on proper elimination of poisonous matter,
which interferes with the natural functions of your

“DR. NEDD'S SULPHUR BITTERS”

enables your system to throw off such poisonous matter,
by increasing the action of the Stomach, Liver, Bowels,
and Kidneys, preventing the accumulation of waste
matter, aud talleving such symptoms as:—

1, so it would be i)
me to pass judgment. It is ali}
teatter for scientific examination.
Faith is not involved in it so far
as I understand.

QUESTION FOUR: How would
you explain the apparent fact
that faith is not needed in al}
cases of the cures which have
been reported?

I SEE no reason why there
should not be physical cures of
the body even if the patient has
no faith.

What I am quite sure is that
faith is needed if not only the
body but the whole personality
is to be healed.

There is no personal response
of the soul without faith, and
to that extent the healing will
have been incomplete. .I recog-
nise most profoundly the minis-
try of the doctor in all this,

Many a man I know has been
far more than a physician of the
body: there are many Christian
doctors who in the course of theic
work are conscious of help over
and above their medical skill.

They, with the parson and the}:
men and women who show
special gifts of direct healing
through their own faith, should
surely work together, all within
the loving purpose, the power
and the will of God.—L.E.S.

SICK HEADACHE, LOSS OF APPETITE, CONSTIPA-
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SKIN ERUPTIONG........ete., ete.

Get a Bottle of:—

DR. NEDD'S SULPHUR BITTERS today

and note the difference in your general HEALTH
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Retail Price $1.44—Large Size

ae ,





WE STAND BETWEEN YOU AND LOSS

‘A challenging statement? Yet true! And serves to

Then neuralgia and fibrositis in| introduce to the Barbados Public, one of the

the neck muscles have a lot to an«
swer for. ; F

A patient of mine drove
throughout last winter with one
window broken in his car.

He noticed a slight draught at
the time—but never associated
this with the throbbing headaches
he would get when he tried to
work,

His pains stopped, though, when
he had his wirdow fixed!

‘the Colonel

One patient of mine, a real fire-~
eating colonel of the old school,
who liked his burra-pegs and his
wolf as much at 78 as he did half
a eentury ago, complained that a
foo-strenuous round gave him
headaches,

Now his headaches were caused
by him attempting too much
strenuous exercise for his age-
sardened arteries. The exertion
forced the blood through them,
ansi the artery walls were not naw
as elastic as they used to be. They
just could not deal easily with the
pressure,

Result: a pain in his head, like
a big pulse beating.

INSURANCE COMPANY OF
NORTH AMERICA
Companies, Philadelphia



Through.our Agency, THE INSUKANCE COMPANY
OF NORTH AMERICA Companies, makes this sugges-
tion: ‘Protect what you have,” by taking full advantage
of coverage for:

FIRE

The colonel took thi éasily, 7
cut down nis golf and his Gens, |
ind his headaches left nim.
know now that his prim irrita-
tion was that a friend of same

age could outdo him in exercise
and feel no ill at all.

But the colonel was wise, as you
sk be.
should —L.E.S.

ACCIDENT
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Phone HAROLD D. KIDNEY — 5027

SUPPLIES K. R. Hante & Co., Led.







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ie



_ SUNDAY, AUGUST 31, 1952



Armstrong First Barbados

Officer With Atom Training

CAPTAIN W. H. R. ARMSTRONG, Superintendent of

Police, who is in charge of

the 999 Emergency Telephone

System and the Radio Telephone Equipment, told the Ad-
vocate on Friday that he was the first Barbadian Officer
attending the Senior Police Officer’s Course in England to
be trained in Atomic warfare relating to civil defence.
Captain Armstrong returned to the island over the last
week-end by the S.S. Golfite,

He left here on March 14 and
arrived in England on March 23,
His first week was spent in Lon-
don where he took the opportu-
nity of visiting the Ccelonial Office
and also New Scotland Yard, At
New Scotland Yard he was taken
around the s¢veral departments,
including the special Branch
Information Department where
all the 999 calls are directed.

He said that the Metropolitan
was the first Force in the U.K.
to make use of the 999 system.
He was very impressed with the
Information Room at New Scot-
land Yard where a staff of 20 is
attached. There are also tele-
printers which connect up all
stations of the Information Room
with the Police Exchange.

He said that the Information
Room has everything pertaining
to communications. A recent in-
troduction was the International
Police Wireless which links In-
formation Room with the Head-
quarters of the Paris Police, and
the Police Forces in Belgium,
Holland, Italy. Switzerland,
Norway, Sweden and Denmark.

He said that on March 31, after
a very cold week-end in London
where it snowed very heavily, ne
left for the Police College at
Ryton-on-Dunsmore, near Coven-
try, Warwickshire. His Senior
Officer’s Course started on the
following day.

52 On Course

There were 52 Senior Officers
on the course. Many were from
Metropolitain Police. There were
also officers of Police Forces from
all over England and Wales. He
was the only West Indian Police
Officer but there were Colonial
Officers from Malaya, Kenya,
Uganda, Zanzibar and Tangan-
yika.

He said that during the ll
weeks which the course lasted,
there were lectures by many
prominent Police Officers. Other
Lectures were from Universities,
The students also visited Forensic
Science Laboratories where they
saw the latest methods of crime
investigation. They took part in
syndicate discussions and each
Senior Officer, together with two
others, prepared a research paper
on the subject given to them.

He said that these discussions
were very interesting and many
new subjects on Police matters
were introduced for discussion
among the students as a result of
the papers.

“Each student gave a lecture
for 15 minutes on a subject which
he was given to prepare and this
proved of great assistance in
that it provided proper training
in public speaking on subjects
which gave the student practic
in preparing his lecture, as in
many instances the subject of the
lecture itself had nothing to do
with Police Work,” he . said.

During the period at the Col-
lege students were given a week’s
course in atomic warfare reé-
lating to civil defence. They were
shown the latest methods’ whica

would affect the Police in civil
defence in relation to atomic
warfare.

At the College there were also
given a lecture by General Sir
Miles Dempsey on Leadership and
others by Sir Harold Scott, Com-
missioner of the Metropolitan Po-
lice and Sir Theobald Matthew,
Director of Public Prosecutions

“The Commandant and Staff
of the College all have the wel-
fare and training of the stu-
dents at heart and the College
itself is provdiing not only Eng-
lish Police, but Colonial Police
with an academy which has
proved its worth and is daily in-
creasing the knowledge of Colon-
jals and at the same time help-
ing to foster esprit-de-corps
between Police Forces in the
United Kingdom and the Com-
monwealth.” Capt. Armstrong said.

The course was interrupted on
a few occasions when they visited
various Police Forces,

Useful Visit

He said that he went to Surrey
and found this week’s visit most
useful as it gave him an oppor-
tunity of studying policing of a
county by a Force similar in size
to the Barbados Police Force. “I
consider that our Force is up to
just as high a standard as the
Surrey Police Force, except that
they are fortunate to be provided,
as is the case with most U.K.
Police Forces, with most modern
and adequate transport and radio
equipment, thus providing the
force with speed in the prevention
and detention of crime and pro-
viding Police service to the pub-
lic.”

He said that during his stay at
Surrey he had the privilege of
being instructed by the Chief
Censtable, Mr. Simpson, who is




ate

DeLuxe

th



CAPT. ARMSTRONG

the brother of Lady Shaw, wife
of Sir John Shaw, a former Gov-
ernor of Trinidad and Tobago.
He also met Sir John and Lady
Shaw both of whom were very
interested in hearing news of the
West Indies.

Capt. Armstrong returned to
London where he was attached
to the Traffic Department of the
Metropolitan Police for one week
studying modern Traffic Control,
both from the administrative side
as well as the practical street
duty and accident prevention
duty in London.

He said that he was very much
impressed with the efficiency of
that Department when it was con-
sidered that all of the office ad-
ministrative work was done by
civilians while the Police were
fonly used on actual. traffic duty
in vehicles, on motoreycles and
on foot along the streets of Lon-
don and the Metropolitan area.

He was able to study the latest
method of automatic traffic sig-
nalling and was taken to see the
traffic lights controlling traffic at
some of the busiest and most com~<
plicated junctions in the Metro-
politan area.

“T am gconvinced that traffic
lights would be a great asset to
Barbados at several junctions in
and aroun? the City of Bridge-
town,” he said.

Dog Training

After completing his traffic
attachment, he was attached to
D Department of the Metropoli-

tan Police to study Police Dog
training, at the Imber Court
training. At the Imber Court

Metropolitan Police Mounted and
Dog Training School in Surrey.
He. was shown the Police Dogs
and together with eight Consta-
bles from Trinidad and Bermuda,
who were being trained in Police
Dog Management, obtained prac-
tical experience in the training of
Police Dogs.

He witnessed demonstrations
given by some of the most famous
dogs in the Metropolitan Police,
including “Ben”, a Labrador and
“Rajah II” an Alsatian. Both of
these dogs had over 100 arrests
to their credit.

“These dogs were almost like
human beings. Their obedience,
tracking, attacking and disarm-
ing of criminals were spectacles
to see,” he said.

He said that the Metropolitan
Police had over 90 dogs on its
strength and they were stationed
in and around London. These
dogs remained at the home of
their Police Handlers who were
all Constables and performed
seven hours duty each day or
night.

Dogs Patrol Alone

“They were used principally for
patrolling London’s parks and
Royal residences and nightly the
dogs may be seen on duty by
themselves patrolling in the
grounds of Marlborough House
and Buckingham Palace.”

“They are also used for patroll-
ing together with their handlers
im lonely districts in the Metro-
politan area and while the
handler is on his beat, the dog is
going into and out of dark and
lonely alleys, strects and bombed
areas searching for people who
may be loitering with evil in-
tent.”

He said that quite recently in
Hyde Park 12 young boys were
behaving like hooligans and
wilfully smashed chairs. When
they were approached by three
Constables who were on patrol
with their dogs — one was the
famous Rajah IIl—the boys dis-
persed and ran in various direc-
tions. The dogs were sent after
them and rounded up the 12 who
were brought to the Station and
charged. It was considered that
had it not been for the dogs not

@ on page 16

5

CHAMPIONS



Church Services

ANGLICAN
ST LEONARD'S
12TH SUNDAY AFTEP TRINITY
m. Holy Communion 9 am



t & Sermon 3 pun Sunday
Sch & Bible Glasses 7 p.m. Even-
song & Sermon
METHODIST
JAMES STREET: 11 a.m. Rev. T. J
Furley 3 p.m. Sunday School Rev
G. Marshall, 7 p.m. Rev. F. Lawrence

Monday 7 p.m
Rev. G. Marshall
PAYNES BAY: 9.0
Merville, 7 p.m. Rev
WHITEHALL: 9.30
Lawrence, 7 pm. Mr

Welcome Service for

a.m Mr H
T. S. Payne
a.m Rev F
J. A. Griffith

GILL MEMORIAL: 1! p.m, Rev..G
Mershall, 7 p.m, Mr. L. D. Roach

HOLETOWN: 8.30 a.m. Mr. G. Sin-
kier. 7 p.m. Mr. V. B. St. John."

BANK HALL 330 am. Mr. G
Harper, 7 p.m. Mr. McAllister

SPEIGHTSTOWN: 11 a.m. Mr. Hiis-
bands 7 p.m Rev. T. J. Purley

Wednesday 7.30 p.m, Welcome Service
—Kev. G. Marshall

SELAH: 11 a.m. Mr. Barnett. 7 p.m.
R.M

BETHESDA: 11 a.m, Mr, Bannister.
T p.m. P.M.

BETHEL—11 a.m. Mr. I. Bilackn@n,
7 p.m. Rev. F. Lawrence

DALKEITH—11 a.m. Mr. G. Mar-
ville, 7 p.m. Mr. McAllister.

BELMONT—11 a.m. Mr = F

Broomes, B.A., 7 p.m, Mr.-V. Pilgrim.
SOUTH DISTRICT—9 am. Mr. J. Lovell,

7 p.m. Mr. St. Hill
PROVIDENCE—11 a.m Mr L
Waithe, 7 p.m. Mr. C. Forde
VAUXHALL--9 a.m Rev. K E
Towers, 7 p.m. Mrs. Furley.

COLLYMORE ROCK A.M.E. CHURCH
Exposition: Exodus IX con
Sunda; School 7.15 pen
Evongelistic Service, Community Sing-
ing. Minister — Rev. A. E. Gilkes.
THE ST. JAMES’ NATIONAL BAPTIST
ANNIVERSARY SERVICE
11 a.m. Matins and Sermon, 7.15 p.m

ll a.m
3.30 p.m

Auniversary Service from the Youth
Movement: 16th Year. Preacher for both
services the Rev, J. B. Grant L.Th.,
Minister-in-Charge.

5 p.m, Monday; Wednesday; Friday
T:aining for Youths, this will be con-
ducted by the Rev L. Bruce-Clarke

(Assistant Pastor) and Mrs. Olga Browne.

EBENEZER: 11 a.m. Revd. S. W.
Crosse, 3 p.m Concluding Session of
Weekend Conference Speaker Revd.
K, E. Towers, B.A., B.D. Sacrament
of Lord's Supper

BEULAH: 11 a.m. Mr. A
p.m. Mr. E. Callender

SHREWSBURY: 11 a.m. Mr
Miller, 7 p.m Mr. O. Brathwaite o

RICES: 11 a.m. Mr. G. Brathwaite,
7 p.m. Mr, R. Garnes

THE ST. NICHOLAS EPESCOPAL

ORTHODOX, WELCHES ROAD

11 a.m, Matins and Sermoh, preacher
Rev. Deaconess C. Barrow, 7 p.m. Even-
song and Sermon, Preacher Evangelist
Cc. A. Young

7.30 p.m, Tuesday; Evening Prayers
and Address, Preacher Rev. L. Bruce-
Clarke. The Subject will be “The Eter-
nal Election’ (2nd Timothy chapte? 1
verse 9).

THE SALVATION ARMY

LONG BAY—11 a.m. Holiness Meeting;
3 p.m. Company Meeting, 7 p.m. Salva-
tion Meeting. Snr. Major & Mrs. W.
Morris, Divisional Commander

BRIDGETOWN CENTRAL: 11
Holiness Meeting. 3 p.m Company
Meeting. 7 p.m. Salvation Meeting. Sr.
Cayvtain W. Bishop.

WELLINGTON STREET: 11 a.m. Holi-
ness Meeting. 3 p.m. Company Meeting.
7 p.m. Salvation Meeting. Sr. Major [5

Lucas, 7

4

oO. H.

a.m.

Gibbs.
CARLTON: 11 a.m. Holiness Meeting.
3 pm. Company Meeting. 7 p.m. Wel-

eome Service for Captain I. Staine.
CHECKER HALL: 11 am. Holiness

Meeting. 3 p.m. Company Meeting. u

p.m. Salvation Meeting. Lieutenant E

Cox.
OISTIN: 11 a.m. Holiness Meeting,
3 p.m, Company Meeting 7 p.m, Salva-

tror. Meeting. Lieutenant K. Gibbons.

Pix CORNER: 11 a.m, Holiness Meet~-
3 p.m, Company Meeting. 7
Sr. Major J.

-pm.

ing.
Hol-

Salvation Meeting.
lingsworth
EGOLF BAPTIST CHURCH
Tudor St. — Rev. K, P. Hansen

Sunday Morning: 9.30 a.m Sunday

School A class for every age, 10.00
a.m. Worship Service. Message -- “The
Day of Pentecost”

Sunday Evening 7.30 p.m
Service.

Monday— 7.30 p.m Baptist Young
Peoples Union. Interesting programme

Evangelistic

including Chap. 1 of continued story,
“Rock of Life.” r
Wednesday — 7.30 p.m. Praise and

Prayer Service. Speaker; Mr. Forde of

Jackson,

B.B.C. RADIO NOTES:





The Colour Bar In Britain

BBC listeners in the British
Isles have recently heard a
series of programmes in which
Wynford Vaughan Thomas has
een airing his views on sub-
jects about which he _ feels
strongly.. One of these is ‘The
Colour Bar in Britain,’ about
which Wynford Vaughan
Thomas says that he is only too
vividly conscious of the dangers
to the unity of the Common-
wealth. This programme will be
repeated for the benefit of
overseas listeners to the BBC on
Monday and Wednesday of the
coming week. The broadcast
gives Vaughan Thomas’s report
on the colour bar along with his
personal comments on the posi-
tion of coloured people in the
U.K., what form the bar takes,
how it works, and the sort of
people who operate it. Among
those who will be heard in the
programme are Learie Constan-
tine, his daughter Gloria, Milton
Prescod, a social worker from
British Guiana, Dr, Ruth Landis,
a distinguished American an-
thropologist, and Mr. N’Dem, a
Nigerian anthropologist who is
researching on the position of
the African in Britain for the
University of Edinburgh. In ad-
dition listeners will hear the
views of an English landlady, a
trade-union official, the organiser
of a boys’ club at Cardiff, a
member of the British Council
end a member of the National

Union of Students. The pro-
gramme will be on the air at
9.00 p.m on Monday, Ist. Sep-

tember and will be repeated at
4.15 p.m, on Wednesday, 3rd.
Sept. The Monday broadcast will

be in the 25 and 31 metre
bands, 11.75. and 956 mega-
cycles respectively and the
Wednesday broadcast in the 19

metre band, 15,19 megacycles.
STARS OF THE CARIBBEAN
On Saturday, 6th, Sept. the
BBC will present another in the
series of Commonwealth Variety

A Champion of Champions —

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PAGE ELEVEN









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DEPARTURES
8.8, Biographer, 4,073 tons for London,
Sch. Burma D. 58 tons for Trinidad, S.S.
Surmont 4,305 tons for St. John’s New
Brunswick. M.V. Lady Joy 46 tons for
St. Lucia. S.S. Lady Nelson 4,655 tons for

Bermuda,
SEAWELL

ARRIVALS BY B.W.LA.
ON FRIDAY
From Jamaica:
F. Brady, E. Mitchell, L,
Birch, A. Pemberton,
From Antigua;



Birch, R,

@ A. BARNES & CO, LTD.
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ovan, E,. Lankford, D. Williams, M.
House, A. House, E, Bynoe, L. Alexander

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ON SATURDAY

For Venezuela:

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Diehl, M. Diehl, A, Diehl, J. Diehl, J.
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For Trinidad:
ON FRIDAY

R. Wenzelman, F. Wenzelman, * Y.
Wenzelman, A, Wenzelman, C, Couva,
E. Foncette, R, Foncette, W. Leung, C.
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MAIL NOTICE

Mails for Dominica, Antigua, Montser-
rat, Nevis and St. Kitts by the M.V
Caribbee will be closed at the General
Fost Office as under:—

Parcel Mail at 12 (noon), Registered
Mail at 2 p.m. and Ordinary Mail at 2.30
p.m. on the 2nd September, 1952.



WW
\)\\Y

programmes, this featuring a
number of West Indian artists
resident in Britain, The compere
of the programme will be Learie
Constantine who is working
among coloured seamen for the
Ministry of Labour now that
he has given up _ international
cricket and has settled in Britain.
Among the stars whom he will
introduce are the Errol Barrow
trio, Luckie Robinson of Jamai-
ca who was one of Carroll Levie’s
discoveries and now devotes
himself to music although he was
originally studying economics
after being demobilised from the

R.A.F., Margerie Few, also of
Jamaica, who has wide ex-
perience in concert work in

Britain as a classical pianist, and
Edric Connor, the famous bari-
tone from Trinidad, The broad-
cast will be given on Saturday,
6th, Sept. lasting for half an hour
and starting at 6.15 p.m. It will
be beamed to tiis area in the
25 metre band, 11,75 megacycles.
REVIEW OF ‘CARIBBEAN
VOICES’

On Sunday, 3ist. August,
Henry Swanzy, who produces the
weekly programme of West
Indian writing beamed to, the
Caribbean every Sunday, will
give another of his six-monthly
reviews of this series, ‘Caribbean
Voices.’ In the broadcast he will






speak on the contributions e
which have been used since the
last broadcast on the subject in ;
February of this year. Apart :
from the interest to successfu!
contributgrs of hearing. their

GIVES MO

work criticised, or praised, the
talk will be well worth hearing
by all those who are aware of
what contemporary writers from
the Caribbean are now «doing In
the field of literature. Mir
Swanzy’s talk will be given as
the second, half of the pro-
gramme, the first half being a
sketch by the famous Jameican
humorist, Louise Bennett,
broadcast begins at 7.15 p.m.

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PAGE TWELVE

This West Indian

By A. S. HOPKINSON





Cult

mistake we aré making at présez:t
is believing that we have already

What reached that





: f the smaller ‘communities’. There are wed that stage. We are, in
blending the fiv r six races upper middle class Jamaicans and reality, _ far from it as we could
of the West Indies into one? None upper class Grenadians and lower Possibly he






at all cording to Hitler. Every class Guianese and lower middle New Spirit

possible good, according to com- cl Dominicans. In addition to all 7
mon sense. Hitler ysuld talk of these amusing combinations, there And what, culturally spepking,
blood impurity and the suppres- are Portuguese upper middle WOuld be the advantages of the
sion of the Aryan race and the class Jamaicans, and ‘white’ lower ™€W race? Again this question can
weakening of the strain and what middle class Grenadians, and East be answered in a single brief
not. But if we look closely we Indian lower class Guianese, and Word: unity. The Indian will be
must see that there can’t be any negro lower class Dominicans. But @bile to forget that his ancestors of
sense in this argument. Hardly let us examine this division and three or four generations ago came
any of the races living in any of sub-division and isolation in one from India and that it is therefore
the countries of the world are, island, say Barbados, and in one his duty to maintain his nation-
strictly speaking, pure. What do social financial class, the middle lity, religion, habits, and culture

Wwe mean when we say the Eng-
lish race? The word ‘England’ is
a corruption of ‘Angle-land’, which
evidently marks the Nordic tribes,
the Angles, who originally came to
the island as sea-marauders, The
Saxons, closely related to them,
also came over and settled even-
tually in the east. But even before
these there were the Celts, the tall
blond blue-eyed race that Caesar
met when he came over to Britain,
the followers of Vercingetorix and
Boadicea, adherents to the reli-
gion of the Druids, the courageous
warriors who are chiefly respons-
ible for the Irishman’s traditional
temper, Then there were the Scan-
dinavian Vikings, who left no
slight trace in the island. After
them the Danes. Then William
the Conqueror’s aristocratic band
of Normans who flogged Harold at
Hastings and took over the coun-
try. During the Tudor period the
Flemish, who came over in droves
as refugees from their own coun-
try, settling in Britain and turn-
ing their talent for weaving into a
profitable business and, incident-
ally, leaving their skill with the
‘English’. And, of course, in mod-
ern times who can measure the

— such as they are — defiantly
against the influence of other races.
The Chinese will be able to forget
that his great-great-grandfather
kept a laundry in China. Indeed,
there will be no hundred per cent
Chinese or Indians at all. We will
then be free. There will be no
half severed roots tying us un-
certainly to this or that country.
There will be no absurd collection
of Fatherlandisms, conscious or
unconscious. We will all know
only one fatherland, the one in
which we were born. We will all
know, only one political destiny;



el There is the ‘white’ middle
class as opposed to the negro mid-
dle class. And there is the fair
middle class as opposed to the dark
middle class, And there is the less
fair middle class, and the light
brown middle class, and the brown
middle class, and the dark brown
middle class. All of these form
separate strata. They do not, if
humanly possible, tell each other
‘good morning’—this is especially
true of the women—far iess carry
on an intimate conversation with
each other.

Intermarriage is, of course, for
the most part, out of the question,
They travel around in cliques, like
schools of fish. At dances they sit
around the walls.of the dance floor
in separate circles, getting up only
to go to the bar together or dance
with each other, and returning to
the precise area of the floor that
they left. Now seeing that this
condition obtains in all the differ-
ent islands to a greater or lesser
extent, we are tempted to con-
iernn the overconfident politicians,
‘nation mongers’, and ‘culture
maniacs’ as either grossly stupid
or unforgivably ignorant of social

Erected At

be situated in the Chelston
Road.

influx of races into England and facts.

say exactly by Pow ae be B.G. Approaches The New

new wave affect the already 1 7
promiscuous blood mixture? When Type Beckles Hill.

we talk of the ‘English’ race we
are including all these. And, con-
sidering their remarkable achieve-
ments in the past, particularly in
soldiering, sailoring, and literature,
no sane man can do otherwise than
throw the whole Hitlerian theory
of race overboard. To talk of an
American race would be absurd;
modern America represents every
race and physical type in the

Members agreed that this stand-
S pipe, in its present position, is
~ unsuitable as people have to stand
on the road when drawing water.
The proposed position will bring
it nearer to the majority of people
‘hose places where there are many Who draw water from it and at the
"aces and where they are éniscon same time remove it from the
and mellowed inte a fairly char publie highway.

acteristic type, Briti ‘
taience yee ritish Guiana, for The Manager also submitted a

To be gure, t
in the Caribbe;
fication of th
quite so noti
really there

here are some area
an where this strati
population is not
Sera though it is
even if it is f -
ing. But this is true presbeiy ic

n n 7 most of the com: the re-developed

oe > pke teins eee i in ae world, Thee, ant Bay tutnie which showed electric
e can turn only to Ja : ’ orthern ur : .

perhaps, China for blood purity. less Nordic) ‘ea ined a lights, hydrants, standpipes, etc,

Southern Europeans (like the iy a en sane ae

Portuguese), There is the Indi: ¢
‘ype, and the negro type and the ~
Mongolian type (Chinese), and the

will
milies,

How We Are Divided
A new West Indian race is the
sole way to national wnity. And

accommodate 1,265

y oe The Board postpotied the ques-
it is a certain way. Mere political /\0!ginal Indian type. And what tion of the sale of « small trian-
federation or customs union would 75 5? important about this all is

gular area of land at Chelston to
Mr, Brooks of Chelston Lime
Work and discussed at length the
question of the selling of large
gesting a a the oe, of
there is’ a mo: ridgetown, connection,
‘aH Canat te ri Pationatio’ further discussion will take place
—attitude amo them than *¢ the next meeting. :

among the Barbadians. They have,
for the most part, bridged the mul-
litudinous gaps between the races
and the colours. This is perha

that the tendency to mix and inter-
marry 1s strong enough to make it
possible for only a small portion
of the population to claim to be
pure anything, Consequenjly,

accomplish nothing. What mat-
ters is the spirit, not the form, It
is not until we can look at our
fellows in the various islands as
belonging to much the same phy-
sical type as ourselves that we
can begin talking of ‘nationality.’
And it is not until we can talk of
nationality that we can dream of.
‘culture’, Culture is not academic
exercises; it is the expression of
the life attitude of a pecple, And
the idea of a people implies union.
Our politicians realise this, but
they have got Hold of the stick at
the, wrong end. They want to
make sure of the legal form with-
out thinking about the real atti-
tude at all. At present we are
more fragmentarily divided than
the bits of a broken drinking glass.
Not only are we all separated into
Trinidadians, and Jamaicans, St.
Lucians and Vincentians, Guian.
ese and Hondurians, Antiguans and
Barbadians, but class restrictions
and isolations cut us up into even

Consideration of the question of
tunning a co-operative shop at
the Pine Estate was postponed.
Why the British Guianese are the The Board considered the esti-
most militantly individualistie Mates. for the financial year
group in the whole Caribbean, 1953-54 but this matter was also
They fight shy of federation be. Postponed until its next meeting.
cause of some vague consciousness A meeting will be fixed shortly
of a ‘continental’ destiny, But this to deal with these matters.
only goes as an éxample of the
unity among: a people that is no
longer distinctly stratified accord-
ing to the — . an ae ae,
ist’s hand-book. If much the same {''"\'* 3
could be accomplished in all the °P°* Wht no words can utter.
West Indian islands, only the in- ‘The office ot, poetry if not fener” us
sular barriers will remain to be t!nk accurately, but feel. truly
broken down, The super-confident TENCE E |W. | Reweknnes

By jimmy Hatlo
LOOK AT HEM PUTTING. Gi
ON AIRG “WATERING THE ~“<
LAWN, NO LESS--I REMEMBER
WHEN IT WAS A JOB TO MAKE
HIM TAKE A BATH==++



Gem For To-day









it



SEE US*-L DON'T
WANT THEM TO
THINK WE WERE



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Was
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3 More Standpipes To Be —

The Housing Board at their meeting yesterday agreed
with the recommendation of the Managing Secretary that
three more standpipes be erected at the Bay Estate. Two will

The Board also agreed with the recommendation that
an existing standpipe which is situated along the wall of
St. Michael’s Almshouse, be removed to First Avenue,

Virtue and genuine graces in thetiselvé’ yentor of the mines which blew

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the destiny of the West Indies. We
will all be soldiers, whether sol-|
diers with the pen or soldiers from |
the platform, or soldiers with the
rifle. But we will be fighting for |
4 eountry and its ambitions, not}
merely for a transplanted race
which, uncertain of the future of |
the land in which it finds itself,
and conscious only of a vague
memory of the traditions of a
country that it has left behind by
many generations, clings to the
Fatherland because it has a more
definite claim upon its affections,
These attitudes will be co-ordin-
ated into a common national life
attitude which will be the basis
and i ration of our literature,
our music, our painting, our sculp-












































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scientific and ie:
He had been given the freedom
of Paddington, where he works,
and of Chelsea, where he lives.
But nothing further had come
his Way from thé British Gov-
ernment.

Surely this is a churlish way
fo treat a great man. Fleming
and his colleagues, in accordance
with the usual British practice,
néver patented their healing dis-
coveries, The result was that al-
though the basic facts about
penicillin had been given free to
the world this country has had
fo pay dollars in royalties to
American firms for the right to
use their technique of commer-
cial manufacture; As Fleming
himself has wryly commented
“It seems a pity we should have
to.pay for what is our own.”

Vast sums nave oeen given to
British inventors for wartime
researches. Sir Frank Whittle
was given £100,000 for his work
on jet propulsion. Sir Robert
Watson Watt received £50,000
for his work on radar, The in-

CALL IN AND SELECT
YOUR MASTER

PADLOCKS

FROM

PLANTATIONS LTD.







KLIM “; MILK

OIRST IN PREFERENCE THE WORLD OVEB

up the German dams was given
£10,000. But Fleming, like other
doctors, has been given nothing.

Explaining the Government's
golicy in 1944, Mr. Attlee, then

e Lord President of the Coun-
cil, said that any system of
financial rewards, even if desir-
able, could not be administered
equitably in practice. The Gov-
ernment supported medical re-
search in Ss, and did not
offer payment by. results,

But why should it be possible
to admifister a system of re-
wards for radar research, surely
a tremendously complicated field,
‘while it is not though possible tu
make payments for a medical

AGAIN! .

i

discovery about which there is
dispute?
It’s Time
Since successive British Gov-

ernments seem determined not
to pay out any money for one
of the greatest medical discover-
ies of the century, then surely
they should have been spurred
on to give higher recognition to
Sir Alexander Fleming in other
ways, Other doctors, with less
to distinguish them, have been
made peers. Other scientists have
received the Order of Merit.

It would be a graceful gesture
Yor Coronation Year if Fleming,
one of the Queen’s most illus-
trious subjects, was at last given
the recognition which the im-
portanee of his discovery war-
rants. This modest genius should
have to wait no longer for hid
just reward.-

(World Copyright Reserved)

*

(By Cable)

GRAN PRIX SWITZERLAND

ASH OFFER ,
a Zs First. TAURFFI driving PERRARI

>

aoe...

MoToR oll

LEADERSHIP IN LUBRICATION

Phone 2109, 4406, 3534





og. 3A TTS



7 ee ee ence Toe ee TS ee ee ge ee ee







SUNDAY, AUGUST 31, 1952 SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAGE THIRTEEN
-—$— cnieaitiiensasepeseiibagenetilentee

HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON



@.

g 1S.
the

By Appointment
Gin Distillers

to the Late
King George VI

ye.




FLINT OF THE FLYING SQUAD.... BY ALAN STRANKS .& GEORGE DAVIES
























PA JONGS'S!,. FHAT'S OUR ~ (Vik 60 70 Ra JONGS'S/
' TURNE =D IN ANY THING ASIATIC PFUEND WHO FIUNS TONIGHT AS A
jON TOADY LEECH'S






THE ‘ADE ROOM!











CUSTOMER...
[aacxcmouNns> ISN'T IT? CHOP SUEY AND a5 \ KNOW me.
WORKING 2¢ A BEBOP DIVES ROUNDS |)39 8 I) |
LONDON... -—— | ss Ye IF YOU'RE i



ah GOING UNOER

YOU MIGHT COVER, FLINT,

+ GET A LEAD ony
TOLDY'S ASSOCIATES
FAOM THAT SOURCE.)

{ KITCHEN PORTER
aT Pa JONGG'S

Gordons

Stands Sujoreme

BY CHIC YOUNG














ea eS SSNS) STITT - : THE COLGATE WAY
Per: Cees eves Ten Saaren

i Sere re wa AND WHO at aly 9 I HOME DENTAL CARE
es SS COLGATE
[ IP OseER) => Ss

Â¥CLEANS YOUR TEETH INC
Â¥CLEANS YOUR BREATH /( NZ
aN) es Always brush your teeth

Â¥ HELPS PREVENT DECAY UE right after eating with ,
COLGATE DENTAL CREAM



FLASH GORDON THE WONDER BOOK OF HOW IT’S DONE











I SWIPED... ER, TOOK TWO HEAT GUNS
AND SET OUT TO FIND POR MYSELF/
BuT L /COT LOST IN THIS CRAZY
PLACE / BOY — WHAT A PLANET Lo
GIVES YA THE WILLIES! WHY,
JUST THIS MORNING, 1...

... AFTER WE LANDED HERE, TEX, KENT
AND DALE WANTED TO MAKE ALL KINDS
OF GOOFY PREPARATIONS BEFORE
STARTING THE SEARCH FOR MY FATHER!

ath » AGAIN! I'VE BEEN

ty pees HEARING THAT FUNNY
Bee 7 WAIL ALL MORNING...

* 3 ND IT DOESN'T SOUND

Most of us take too much for granted, We do not bother very

: OO ree! THERE =




much about how the necessities, luxuries and amenities of life



BUT WHO WANTED TO WAIT FOR THEM?S

a
eS
bz

are provided, so long as we receive them when we want them.
But supposing we are suddenly called upon to make and do

for ourselves, What then?

How would you organise the delivery of millions of letters
or the production of a daiiy newspaper, or the feeding
arrangements for great city like London?

This fascinating volume, packed with hundreds of inter-
esting pictures, will open your eyes to the many processes

involved in the creation of all kinds of everyday goods and



services. li also shows how many adventurous and far from

everyday tasks are performed.








BUT BULLETS MOVE
FASTER THA AN EITHER }#







WE MGHT CoTRLN
JUNIOR THERE ...GUT
NOT THAT TRAIN /

ke! | _ SS ihe . z : F a a. ol 4 iat ee AD | zi oe oh ’
lhe al , : \f-
é Te > io Se = ii
H oe PARDON ME- M2 =m ||
5oaR’S 5 LOCKED 50 | } VIGGS - BUT I HAVE | | H |] _ THROUGH THE om |
THAT NEW BUTLER Yl @iy |i /hi Lor SOMETHING FOR } |] ._ -AFRANS SOM = Sle
{| | fEH pret } i | ers : | b\ \ : > 4
SO HE'S GONE TO BUCKAROO
PAGAN Lee AGAIN!

ON SALE AT THE = ADVOCATE STATIONERY





eS

SANG NNN NG NG NS NG NUS NU NNN NN NN NS ENE NW



ADVOCATE
CHRISTMAS CARD
COMPETITION

This year the ‘Advocate’ is running
a Christmas Card Competition, the
results of which will be published in
the Christmas number.

Competitors should note the follow-
ing points :—~












WON'T COME IN AN! YOU - - OPEN
ANNOY ME inane i THE DOOR!




The competition is open to all read-
ers of the ‘Advocate’ and cards can
be of any size or shape,

Cards can be made by any process
—painting, drawing, photographic,
etc,



A competitor can enter any num-
ber of cards, but all cards must be
original work,

Preference will be given to cards
with a Barbadian or West Indian
flavour and to novelty cards,

The judging will be done by a
judging committee which will in-
clude the Editor. Their decision will
be final.

Prizes will be as foilows: First—
$40.00; Second—$20.00; Third—$10.00;

and two consolation prizes of $5.00
each.



A selection of the cards will be dis-
played at the ‘Advocate’ Stationery
and later at the Barbados Museum.

The closing date for the competi-
tion is 4.00 p.m. on October 3ist; but
competitors can start sending in their
entries now.

All cards should be addressed to
the Editor, The Advocate, Bridge-
town,





THESE JEWELS
SO CLOSE +«





| MORNING | i
WHEN THE





MADRS DN INNINGS NN NIN IN EDN PON DN ARON

is
\ ERR DN DS DDS DN DS DADS DS BE DS DS PRPS DN DN DN DN BR DN NN DRS 8 LE DR GR DR DM DN DN SN GD ON A DN GN DREN BN INAS

x



= ye 7 Feepy | [oN ae TE |
MOMMY, ME AND JERRY, f BELIEVE J ERRY WH 1EN HE }
| yr DARLINGS | | SA ID THE MEN KIDNAPPED BOE 2, NO {
fi BACK == Fa | HIM. 181 GOES To SHOW, NEN ER
_ i-’ | Yi DOUBT A - Fe
see Aa = “| | CHILD J a2
a N24] ada
> WY, rhe 2 £5) tg 4.







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SOUS > ge i Fy a as i a ll el ieee ie Dee la





















































































sed's illness and also for the
many and various expressions of sym-
pathy tendered thém in their bereaye-
ment
I Reginald Hunt, Lottie and Iris Hunt,
Ciyde Hunt, Enid and Roy Hunt, Nurse
Hunt, Hazel Sealy; Millicent Tappin.

PAGE FOURTEEN SUNDAY ADVOCATE
aomncremneninemanee é
> ’ ~
CLASSIFIE PUBLIC SALES GOVERNMENT N@TICES
Al * - .
TELEPHONE 2508 REAL ESTATE
ALL THAT cx Dwellinghoure \
DIED , ek “Sep ts ee FOR SALE
ALLEYNE—On Aug 30 1952, at her FOR SALE fue wean a be ae ‘ Seer ee
resiience Kew Land, " Promenade cement |inoved on or betgre ‘the Btn day of With regard to the following notice which was published in the
} September é é i 5
er funeral will leave t AUTOMOTIVE ee oe erly wc to on tpress it is notified for general information that the closing date for
bove Jence at 4.2 7m. to-day . >
for tte Shaeiture “Gommates “| CAR—One 8 Bp. Austin Car; one] G ies aq Hoo? land wk Juncs lana, {ihe Teceipt of tenders referred to in paragtaph 3 of the notice has
. model B. FP. Ford, Phone 5062 C, R a ee : ee er r i ‘
Claudine and Leon Archer Replewhaite, Lalas. Wolly 29.8.53-9n | Lower Westbury Rowd next to Mr, Ponti- been extended antil the 15th of September, 1952 :— f
Anita Miller (daughte [iam The some had a waser well and “Tenders are invited for the condemned Tug and Water Boat
: Leon, Alexander, Douglas, | CAR—One (1) Vauxhall Wywern Car. ]"* 2° End Shot ee eer “Ida”
Robert, Velda, Noel, Verne and] Phone 3861 31. 8.52—In Pe NE ee ..
Louis igrand-children) Hoe ogre ona - a 5 oe i ee “Length 76’, Beam 16’, Draught 8 6” — #30 B.H.P., Coal burning
-_ © -One (1) Vauxhall Wyvern Car , es z * oe aie » . " .
BELLAMY—Marthi 83,|27,000. New battery, new tyres. Cole coy / ACen la fe Aa oo cylinder reciprocating engine.
i 4 a Te. Co... 14g _ 8.5220} feet — fine view overlooking the sca — “Tenders should be forwarded in sealefl envelopes addressed to
a ihe above vesidence this] CARS—Morris Miner 2 Door Saloun] “open! building site | | | Ite Colonial Secretary (and not to any officer by name) so as to reach
° : st . a- > mile Ake ” 1s o ooo : area Sa
evening at 4.80 o'clock for St. Barna-| 1-400 Guloon 11000 miles. Eaeccliont con. [Bele Hall. Dial 2047, R. Archer Me|the Colonial Secretary’s Office not ‘later than 4 ‘p.m; on Friday the
bas ur a ‘ len : , Hictoria Stre
Friends are asked to attend d:uon. Fort Royal Garage Ltd. Tele-|*°?2i¢ Victoria Street 20.8.52e3n | 5th of August, 1952, The envelope showld be clearly marked—
The Bellamy Family phone 4504 “1, 8.52—dn * “Tender for Ida”
31.8.52 -— — omnia ’
- - ‘ (1) Property at Junction of St, Matthi- :
intuiifti_piniittinntiimaii—ez_ mn t CARI Yaual Weve. Sasi. # : ee “The sale of craft ‘onditional removal from the
CHEESFEMAN—On the 20th. August 195/] lent condition. Owner driven, no rens-[°o &9P. and re ee on . eat me wal bere -On its al
Florence Albertha Cheeseman (89). able offer refused. Apply Williams |} 1 hall presently cou. | ~areenage within such period of time as sha be decided upon by
The neral leaves her late residence | Court, Opposite Sayescourt Gov't m eoviielar i
Crumys 1 Street, St. Michael, at 4H ) Ch. or Sealy’s “iarage, "Bay St. vteaiae on app itera y $1000 sa," or costed = Shipping nae
this evening for the West bury Ceme.f 31.8,52—In. J ""(2) One upstairs property of Govern-} Further information is obtainable from the Harbour ang Ship-
Jon. Brathwaite \Sons), Heler | CAR—Damaged Vauxhall 10, No.J7cnt Hill, standing on approximately | ping Master. .
Mason) Siste: 4—2140. Can be viewed at Mr. Crafg's|” + j “The Government does not bind itself accept the highest
a id tarage, Roebuck St. Offers in sealed] poy oneal, Property, st Civilian Ra, at En MARIE to, eas or
E Her funeral wi take} :nvelopes to K,. RB. C. Foster, R. M. Piand a s any tender.
the Westbury Cemetery at] Jones & Co., Ltd., by 6.9.52. + 2.
deh this eeuoleg” ‘wheee 7 - y 69 30. 8.$2—-2n ee Due property (stone) at Water St., 31.8.5 2n.
e asked to attend —_—______- eho i ty a ‘ papel " ——, of Whe
ile, Mackie Seale, Enyth Cae nengee Ford Prefect, No wat Stensikaten Mew Noa pe SIS oa .
velyn Seale —247, Can be viewed at Messrs, Mc , artic nae . RDERS
31.8.52 | Enearney’s Garage Offers in sealed} < cues aes oer - Pea PART ONE oO
nnn p nvelopes to KR. C. Foster, Ro M = f ‘ ot Py,
WILLIAMS—Rebecca (better known a ones & Co,, Ltd., by 6.9.52. x ca , Major 0. F. GC. WAI©OTT, E.D.
Widow’). Her funeral will leave her $0.8.Stri' | CBee maken kine wine ete , Cnt”
daughter's tesidence, Walker's Val- ley, seorge, for St. George's Par- CAR—Damaged Studebaker car No. pine Hill, St. Michael. : Issue No, 31. 2 Aus. @
ish’ Church at 4.30 o'clock this} 9—125. Can be viewed at Messrs The house contains Drawing and Din-
evening MeEnearney’s Garage. Offers in sealed]ipg rooms, 3 Bedrooms (one with run-|!- HARADES
Mrs. Evelyn Birkett (daughter: [| -nvelopes to K. R. V. Foster, R. M.| ing water) breakfast rooms, Kitchen- All ranks will parade at Regt. H.Q. ‘at 1706 hours on Thu 4 Sept. 52.
Gladstone Gill (grandson}, Joseph} Jones & Co., Ltd. P.O. Box 241, by} ite, usual conveniences. Garage and Coys will continue their tra’ with a view to fi the A.M.C.
Birkett (son-in-law) ek 6.9.52 30.8.52—2n } ...vants’ rooms. Electricity installed. a ee oe their Coy ey Min bor ane 6 oe nee
Jae 7 a. oe ae The above property will be set up for a miniature ranges. “B’ ‘ay .M.C.
| CCAR—Vauxhall 14 HP. in perfect] je by Public competition at our Office} | Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays of eneh week wef 1 Sept. 52. Ali ranks
THANKS eee order. 1947 model. Apply 20.) tumes Street on Friday 12th September of “B" Coy who have not yet been allotted @ time to fire should get in tovich
CLINTON--We the undersignea beg tc} “8” Street ial 4559 or 84 _ay, | 1952 at 2 p.m. with the R.S.M. as soon as possible, ‘
return thanks to all those in sympathy 29.8.52—3n spection by appointment. Dial 2650.]2. SAFETY INS-—OPEN RAN!
t wreaths, cards, or attended the : “7 rer YEARWOOD & BOYCE, Officers who have not yet received and signed for a copy of Range Standing
° y Mr CAR—Hillman Minx—Excellent condi Solicitors. Orders should apply at H.Q. before they undertake’ the duties of Range
neral of our dear beloved mother off |... owner driven, done only 13,000 miles Omi
» Land, Tudor Bridge, St, Michael § 2°". : Soe 27.8 .52-—10n cer ‘ ;
ST ee ce eae cunt Zand sos2 gcentact — Edwin Mayhew, Gitten: § ———————— —____—_____ ORDERLY OFFICER AND ORDERLY SERJFANT FOR WEEK ENDING
Maseoll’s, Clinton's and Seales’ (family) roney & Co., Ltd., Palmetto St. (Phone | CLARENDON—Black Rock, St, Michael, 8 SEPT. 82.
41.8 52—in.§ *94)- 27.86.52-—t.f.n. | opposite St. Stephen's Chureh. Standing QuEe, Soe ut. A..H. Clatke
+s ab chbalian.” inaas meh 2 1 acre of land. Laid out fon woos jeant Sjt. Williams, E.D.
N AN y Y GREEN beg Rae s a oing | tairy Farm or Residence Possibilities * SKEWES-CO’
1 Chante ait thay Solan, rathers. Gard Pg Apply Skeete, Office 4277, home] ‘cr Mortgage can be arranged. Apply: = S.0.L. .. Fatat
and telegrams, sympathised with them] ‘" 30.8.52—-In]L, N, Hutchinson or Dial ag: cana! The Barbados ;
in their recent bereavement, -8.52—Tn. | PAST ORDERS
a . | THE BARBADOS REGIMENT N
ae ELECTRICAL Offers will ‘be reeéived in wating _ THE BARB. ME . SERIAL NO. 28
LEWITT—We the undersigned beg to re-] — ——— —________—____ J 4 p.m. Tuesday, 16th, Septem | x
t . ‘or the servants room at Glendale, (Resi-'1. LEAVE: ;
turn thanks to ail those wyto dent YE CAR RADIOS—6 Tube with RF I'D ee he PMO. St. Thomas) | D LB. anted 1. week’s P/Lenve wet
wreaths, cards or attended the pene Stage 6 _~ 12 Volt models. A_ limited gether with a quantity of old lumber 14 Aug. 52
) any other whys express eir| quantity, call early. P. C. S. Maffei & F 7 ; {
sympathy due to the death of Evans} Co., Ltd. 1.6. 08=6.2.. [28 Senbeet e, eee e FM. Meds, Be. aie meen ee
Hewitt (better known as late for ae e eit foes +2 a age ie ug. 5a.
mason of the Public Works Dept, RADIO—11 Tube. Philco Radio with J TsPecton oo LD. 4 Major,
Mrs. Keturah Hewitt (wife!, Rev. | Sendspread in good working order. Appl | “eamesdays between the hours of ~ $.0.L.F. & Adjutant,
Lionel Smith (brother-{n-law) . Lashley Ltd., 20, Swan Street. pm. and on Saturdays ; oan Dr The Barbados Regiment.
31,8,52—1n 29.8. 52—ar J hours of 10-2 on application to - :
seed ptieethiiaiind Cc. C. Clarke on oe SANDIFORD
HUNT—The famity of the late Millicent] RADIOGRAM — Separate units Rw] zm :
Mildred Hunt of Station Hill, St. | Reeeiver 8 watt amplifier Collaro ¢ Churchwarden, St opis
Michael, gratefully return thanks to all|rreed turntable. Six long playing rec
ance rendered them during}ords. $150.00. Telephone 3274 or 4430

31.8.52—1n

MURPHY—We beg through this medium
to return thanks to all those kind

friends who sent wreaths, letters of

condolence, or in any way expressed

their, sympathy in our recent be-

reavement. ‘
Avbrey S. Munphy, Vera Kirby, Lilhan









Grant, Millicent Agard, Laurel Bourne,
Ralph King 31.8,52—1n
ROBINS We the undersigned beg
through this medium to return thanks
to all those in sympathy who attended
the funeral, sent wreaths, cards or in
any other way condoled their sympathy
of our dear beloved father James
Robinson (63) Ellerton, St. George

whieh took place On August 28th 1952.

Clarice Robinson (wife) and the Rob-
inson’s family 31.8.52—1n
SIMPSON—We the undersigned beg

through this medium to thank all those
who sent wreaths, cards, or have in
any way sympathised with us in our

recent bereavement.
The Simpson family 31,8,52—1n,





N MEMORIAM

AGARD.—In loving memory of our dea





niece Barbara’ Agard, who died on
August 80th 1949

A sleep in Jesus’ peaceful rest
Whose waking is supremely blest
No fear, no woe, shall dim, that hour

That manifests the Saviour’s pow'r
Always remembered by —
Tne Agard'’s family 31.8.52—In
—_—_———







CLARKE-—In loving memory of our déa:
on Walter Clarke who was laid to res
3lst August, 1951

“Lgfe was desired but Jesus knew
Eternal rest was best for you

Not gone from memory nor from lov:
But to the Father's home above.”

Clarenee (father) Elste (mother) sister

a: da brothers 31.8.52—I1n

EARLE—in loving memory of my dea

nd and father Charles Christopher

hasba:
i », who departed this life on the 29th



of meurt, 1950
Deep in my heart lies a picture
More precious than silver or gold
The picture of my beloved husbanc
Whose momory wlll néver grow old
Ever will be remembered by —
Vernice Earle (wife), Gilbert and Johr
(sons), Clarice and Desma (daughters),
Robert Greenidge (son-in-law) and six
grand children $1.6,52——1n





McCLEAN—To the glory of God and ir
loving memory of my dear belovec
son Edward Algernon St. Elmo Me-
Clean who fell asleep one year to-day
wounded hearts, be comforted,

The Dear God knoweth bes

For when the evening shadow e@ll,
The night will bring you rest

Soon in the golden city

oO





















The boys and girls shall play,
And through the dazzling mansions
Reloice in endless day
Bebert S$. MeClean and Family
41.8.52--1n
WILTSIIRNE—In loving memory of our
dear mother De!mena Wiltshire, whc
departed this life on Ist September 1949
Gone from us but leaving memorte:
Memories that will always linger
Whilst upon the earth we stay
Htugh Wiltshire (husband), Arthur, Ethel-
bert, Pre ym, Cleveland, Oscar, Hillary
ns r Edna, Cetavia, Wilhelmina,
.acintna (daughters), grand and friends
triends 31.8.52—In
HOUSES
\PARTMENT at “Cardiff.” 7th Avenue,
Pelleville, to an approved tenant from
let October 1952. Apply Mrs. Perey H
I 1 Telephone 3528 29.8.52—2r
‘OD, St. Lawrence Gap—



t furnished
September 1st
4640

bungalow available
Own sea frontage.
Dial 31.8.52—1n
BEACH COURT—Hastings. Fully furn-
ished. From 15th Sept. to 15th December
hive S448 between 4.30 and 6.00 p
31.8.5:



1

BUNGALOW—On Sea, Main Road Hast



























ings, very comfortably f ished, E: i av 1 i ¥
ings. very comfortably furnished, Eng vlindrigal Tanks 6147 x V4" dea. 000 W. the appointees may be confirmed in the permanent, pensionable posts
,oms —+ Verandahs — From Septembe: | £'V8. 2 Gaty Cxiindsical Tanks & x 44s’ | after one year’s satisfactory service.
“lephone 2949. 16.8.52—t.f.;. deam wil ‘onieal Bottoms; capacity 7
selephe vine gallons 700, Apply: Manages, Free passages to St. Vincent to take up appointments are pro-
CHANDOS, 2nd Avenue, Belleville. | Bruce Vale Factory. 31.8.52—8n. | vided.
Pulyy furnished Available Ist Septem- ar : 4 ‘ :
er ang woke co oanD 0.8 bean Applications, with details of education, qualifications, age and
repeal ep eerrenenem ener WANTED experience, and copies of not more than three testimonials should be
ropa, Wie Thoiama, “Cemtalaing Dining . ———~ | sent to the Education officer, Department of Hducation, St. Vincent,
bra ‘ — a6 i anf ;
¢ Drawing Room, 2 Bedrooms, Water MISCELLANEOUS as soon as possible, as the successful candidates will be expected to
Greenhill, St. Michael. Phone 3988. WANTED TO PURCHASE assume duty at the beginning of next term on 15th September, 1952.
90.8.52—2n] ONE small property at Rockley or 31.8.52—2n
- = Deyrell's Rand for about £2,000. Dial ri
‘EASY REACH" Small sea-sice } 2645, 30.8.52—2n
infalow Bayfield Beach, St. Peter nea | —————— ~_____ resis dan r
bbes Beach. Comfortably furnishee | SMALL BUNGALOW — Pamisnea or} Vacant Post of Food Crop Inspector and Clerk of the
2 hee nepyanin ean iot 205 Core rane Lave wens Gen. : Government Factory, Lancaster.
Dial 3355. co oes Applications are invited for the post of Food Crop Inspector and}
HOUSE us wwe storey all dwelling Clerk of the Gevernment Factory, Lancaster.
ise. a erick’s Bay, St Loe) SSS ‘ i
Phone 3957 31.8.52-—1n, At 2. The salary of the post is $1,596 per annum, plus the prevail-
— . oy . TO EARN i 5 ivi 5 7 7
etiam syvaes day Ramtaaties Oaleas noanie ns oko uae ing cost of living allowance payable to Public Officers. The is
Whitehall, St. Michael. All modern throughout the British Empire temporary and non-pensionable and may be terminated at one month’s
conveniences Apply to Mrs, Julia have increased their salaries notice on either side
lieadley, Whitehall Road. through studying our easy postal x . ‘ inte ‘ ‘ ‘
27.8.52—3n Sourets n BOOK-KEBPING, SEC- 3 The Officer will be required to furnish himself with motor
ansatehapininte Uietpdenbtntgneic, § ’, SINESS on ™ . on | ‘ : “ er ;
ROGHiOn WurAuEe Gr cebordlmeaa GANZATION, COMMERCIAL transport and will be paid a mileage allowance in accordance with
Cool Airy room 4 windows LAW, ECONOMICS, ete. Reduced {{\] current rates payable to Government Officers.
on premises “Clifton Terrace,” fees to overseas students Diplo- ji! \ A } ; : cin g .
Gini” Near Ohwlaon aa mas awarded. Prospectus free. {\ pplications stating age, qualifications and experience sHould
MS a) he a. RONDO Boao or ,| be addressed to the Director of Agriculture, Department of Science and
‘ELLANE ~ Dept B.A.5) 116, High Holb {J Agriculture, Bridgeto and should be submitted not later than the
ae MISCELLANEOUS London, W.C.1, England. 1] 6th of Septen 1952
Pe SU aeemeneeaaces Sy I : 31.8.52-2n |




























































































































We have been instructed by Mrs.

31,8. 52-
7 Gerald Manning to offer for sale her

in



“Flodden” in Culloden Road.







preperty
POULTRY The house contains five bedrooms,
ee ee en ana See tp nae p a tetrenn dining room, breakfast room, lounge,
PIGEONS—Imported Carneaux Pigeon: Jenclosed gallery and, usual offices,
—2 pairs Yelows, 1 pair Reds (very§Servants rooms, garage and stable.
large type). Apply P. D. Maynard JAbout 4% acres of lend. Viewing by
Porters, St. James, or Dial 978, appointment with Mrs, Manning (Tele- SS
-8,52—3n I phone 2355) — —
P’ofters will be considered for the se m
ROULTRY—Imported Brown Leghorns [| vrhole property or for the house and 4
6 pullets 2 cockerels (4% months old) part of the land separately. Inquiries _

Apply — P, D. Maynard Porters, St
James. 30.8.52—31

LIVESTOCK

COW—Holstein Cow, 24 pts

to the undersigned.
Messrs. CARRINGTON & SEALY;
Lucas Street.
28,8.52—5n.













per day





Me pra ony AUCTION
Be ng, Ot “| UNDER THE SILVER D’Arey A. Seott
sedigree bitch. Phone woo ttt! Te HAMMER

31.8, 52 ty vecommendativn of Lloyd Agents
ve will sell on MONDAY Ist September
t Plantations Ltd: Warehouse, Bay
itreet, 10 Bags D.C. Sugar.

BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.,

Auctioneers

-In Auctioneer and Real Estate Agent

offers for sale 14 spots of land at
Maxwell Road, Christ Church,
They have a frontage of 70 feet
and a depth of 180 feet. Terms

HORSES-—-Three year old thoroughbre«
fly “Fluffy Ruffles’ by Pink Flowe
ex Golden Faity by Gold Bridge £65
anded—2 jyear old thoroughbred fill
Sweet Violet” by Full Bloom ex Fai

Araby by Fairway £800 landed. Apply 30-8.52-—2n,





1, R. Edwards. Phone 2520. can be arranged. Also several
22.8.52—fn spots at Thorpes, St. James, and
— UNDER THE SILVER at Hothersal Tu
N E ersa rning, just above
FURNITUR HAMMER Waterford. Dial 2645.
TUESDAY 9th. The Late Miss Elsie

—_—_—
FURNITURE—-Four Simmons Bedstead:

and Springs 3° 3” $35.00 each also we t. John's Sale

load

“Visby,” Eagle Hail









pring-filled mattresses $40.00 each, Wha : rits* ny
WÂ¥er. Hurry, Ring 3373, Mrs. Giraud ohare Greiatee eee tree tee
31.8.52—1n TUESDAY i6th The Late Miss M. A.
inashaw's Sale “Bervie” Strathclyde. GLASSES—A pair of gl ith
TM rv of glasses
MISCELLANEOUS BRANKER, TRO’ AN & CO., lenses Thursday dn Broad Street, Findes
Be Auctioneers will be rewarded on returning to Advo-
A PIANO for sale. Terms reasonable Sa ene hae ee 3 ye
Apply: Mrs. Cuthbert Brathwaite “Th:





tome"’ Salters, St. George.

\ 31.8.52—In

ANTIQUES of every description, Glas:

thina, eld Weal Asa aioe ae om The Secretary of State for the Colonies has advised this Govern-
colours. Early books, Maps Autograph | nent that a limited number of seats along the Coronation Route can



te., at Flopringss Antique Sh i
toyal Yacht Club. sin a tern

BAROMETERS, Thermometers and
ivdrometers, Come in and see ver:
‘ide selection of these precision instru

xe made available to persons normally résident ih Barpades, The
‘ost is £5.10.0 for a covered seat and £3.10.0 fcr an uncovered
ieat,

nents at K. R, Hrnte fe Ca. Lid Persons who wish to avail themselves of this opportunity should
ower Broad Street, or Dial 6136. cn ‘orward their names in writing to thé Colonial Secretary’s Office. Not
o. -n



nore than two tickets will be allocated to each applicant, and tickets

IMPROVED SPRING CUSHIONS will not be transferable

< ete ey of Felt Padde 2.
pring Cushions, ch Spring individu
ly pocketed, Really a lovely jol “— i

UNIVERSITY OF LONDON

nished in domestic just ready for you



fapestry covers. $10.00 each. Apply a APPROVAL OF CANDIDATURE FOR 1953 DIPLOMA

mee tor— The Sta "dos

wee tor The Standard Agency (B'dos EXAMINATIONS AND 1954 FINAL EXAMINATIONS
30.8.52—2n

JUST HECEIVED Popuiar Gamer fa Candidates for any of the above mentioned Examinations are

Luding Canasta, Pitt, Monopoly. Toto ‘erinded that their Form of Application for Approval of Candidature

Stetactne stan ees seey S nust reach the University of London on or before the 1st October,

‘t moderate prices. Harrison's (Show 1952,

toom Dept.) Broad Street.
31.8.52—3n
scanner stentless isenesineteenenontansnmasns
LADIES’ AND GENTS’ WATCHES
A collection of Ladies- and Gents 1
nd 17 Jewel wrist watches. Your chancc

The necessary forms may be obtained on application to the}
Department of Education, Garrison,
Department of Education. ;

20th August, 1962. 31.8,52—2n,







© get a good watch at cost price Apply
(t= The Standard Agency (B’dos) Go.
4, Swan Street. Dial 3620
30.8, 52—2n VACANT POSTS

—_—_—_———
Mild Steel Plates—3/8, 5/16, \%4, 3/16-
‘x & 1/8, 1/16 —~¥ x & to ¥ x WY
dial 2696, Auto Tyre Co., Trafalgar and

GRAMMAR SCHOOL, ST. VINCENT

Applications are invited for the following posts: —












spry Stretts ssbb hctetab (i) An Assistant Master (Graduate) who will be required to
PIANO — in good Condition. Appl: teach English and Latin or History up to Higher School
: M s. : rs » ra si ear . = 8 er sah
cuss O. Fenty near ee ts Certificate Standard.
aa Sea one anes (ii) An Assistant Master of Inter-Arts or Higher School Cer-
Gibhes Pune St. Peter. $8.00 per tificate Qualifications who will be required to teach Gen-
00 Ibs. or 10¢, per Ib, hein iaks eral Subjects up to School Certificate standard. Abilitv
osc : ud ciasencchin to assist the Games Master, and to take charge of the
8

Fi taine o5! Meer. te. a pe Cadet Corps will be taken into consideration,

— BOR erving in Barbados by Ai The salaries offered are: —

ondon, Contact’ tan Gale, C/o. Adve (s) ae careraceee-3i, 648 by $96 to $1,920.

‘ +» Local Representative ( or Inter-Arts, ete.,—$1,200 by $72 to $1,440.
Tel. 3118. 7.4.52—t.t. a i :
ae 4 te A temporary Cost of Living Allowance is payable at the usual



ee
TORNADO—International Tornado K.39
425.00 nearest. Owner leaving Island
Enquiries Yacht Club or Telephone 4430
31.8.52—In

ee
TANKS—2 Galvanised Tanks 6 x 4 x 3
i Iron Tanks 6%4/ x 4/ x ¥ 3 Galvanised

rates granted to Civil Servants.

The commencing salaries will depend on the selected candidates’
experience,

The appointments will be probationary in the first instance, and






































@ Gots skin really clean
© Banishes perspiration odor
© Leaves body sweet and dainty

. Bea eee

at the

On
te:





¢

AVARIETY ENTERTAINMENT

In Ald of Local Talent Broadcast
Over Radio Rediffusion

» will be staged b:
THE ALL STARS DRAMATIC
TROUPE

CHILDREN’S GOODWILL
LEAGUE, CONSTITUTION RD.
MONDAY NIGHT

at 745 p.m.

orien. Ist 1852
D SION:—Reserved Seats 2/-
Unreserved Seats 1/-

Music
Mr. Sydney Niles’
Re!



Orchestras

REAL ESTATE
FOR SALE

One wall building at
Street’ beside the Housecraft
, standing on 2,710 sq. ft. of

2. Property at Spry Street.
3. prope ad low at
Brighton Road, Rock, Going
for below cost. Apply to—
D'ARCY A. 5
Dial Y -8,52—2n.









‘




















REALTORS LIMITED
OFFERS

CHURCHILL

" Phontas ca

with built in
ning water, com-

ition Drawin, and Di
Ki is ining

ants rooms. Alsip
sea. A sound
contact us now.

and two
right of way

investment, ‘so

WYNDAL
Partly stone and lath and plaster

red yards from the

ley Beach.

nm approximately 10,000 square

t land, situate at Rockley, on

i Bus route and within a :few
famous

On approximately

t

sea. It com

Downstairs: G:
réoms, with bath

jarage,
and totlet, and

BUNGALOW

19,000 square

land, situate just off

iy New Hoa overeoking

‘view unobstriicted “to

the
a

three bed-

servants

enough room for whatever

may require.

Lovely stone
three
oom,

and hot

house compri:
bedrooms, large

» dining room,
Sa tek gee wit Sab

cold water,

nstairs: three spare rooms,

ing on approximately

about 100 yards

‘hen and shower room. Stand-

2% acres of
from Gibbes

Inspection by appointment only,
COVE SPRING COTTAGE

A lovely cottage

standing on

its own private bathing.

t roods twenty seven hi
dees sttuate at St. James Coast,

ises three

and

. Bath and
hot and cold running water,

rages a aa and

LAND
Upton

St. James Coast,
Tub.

Near ri
ie cuptetin,

a gallery on

guar-

near Colony

ermine permet ee

REALTORS

REAL £tsTATE

Limited

AGENTS

AUCTIO!
5 NEERS

151/RR Rokbuck
Bridgetown

Street,
Phone 4900














1
















|



















SUNDAY,

SHIPPING NOTICES





The M/V “CARIBBEE” will
aceept Cargo and Passengers for

SEA VIEW GUEST

Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat
HOUSE Nevis and St. Kitts. Sailing
Tuesday 2nd September, 1952.
BARBADOS
HASTINGS, The M/V “MONEKA” will
Daily end Longterm Rates accept Cargo and Passengers for
Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat,

Nevis and St. Kitts. Date of
Sailing to be notified.

B.W.1. SCHOONER OWNERS
ASSOCIATION (INC.)

Consignee Tele. No. 4047

ucted on juest.

fambech Gant
welcome.

Dinner and Cocktail

J. H, BUCKLAND
Proprietor.

|

Canadian National Steamships











Sails Satis Sat Arrives Salls
Montresl Wailtfax Boston Barbados Barbados

3 Sept. “@Sept. 8Sepi. IT Sepi, 18 Sept

12 Sept. 15 Sept. - 2% Sept. 25 Sept.

22 Sept. 25 Sept. 27 Sept. 6 Oct, 7 Oct.
Arrives Arrives Arrives . Arrives
Batbadeos Barbados ® Halifax Mentreal

28 Aug. 20 Aug. Sept. “fi Bee is Bept.

a - ug. .

> Sept. 10 Sept. os ry Sept. 23 Sept.

25 Sep. 29 Sept. — 9Oct 12 Oct.
Y RODNEY os ° 30 Sept. 2 Oct. 11 Oct. 12 Oct. 16 Oct.
CANADIAN CHALLENGER 6 Oct. 8 Oct. —_ 21 Oct. 24 Oct.
LADY NELSON os ee 19 Oct. 21 Oct. 2 Get. 31 Oct. 4 Nov.



For



further particulars, apply to—

GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD. —Agents.

















































GENERAL CERTIFICATE of EDUCATION
CAMBRIDGE SCHOOL & HIGHER SCH. CERT.
Bar, and other

can successfully you!
London Universi =a, Basen A: 100'Gradaie Tutors, 22,000
|. Moderate ag Myr me mention

u
C.D. Parker, . LL.D., Director of Dept.DL9,

WOLSEY HALL, OXFORD ‘cAno

it for the above examina-

MR. & MRS.
DEIGHTON GRIFFITH

Beg to Remind
Their Friends and Well Wishers
of their

MR. CECIL LUCAS
invites you to his

ANNUAL DANCE

At K. G. MEMORIAL PARK,







2 ANNUAL DANCE
on
MONDAY NIGHT A
a
1ST SEPTEMBER, 1952 FOUR HILL PLANTATION,
ADMISSION — %- ST. PETER
Music by Percy Green's Orchestra on SEPTEMBER 4TH, 1952
Refreshments on sale at 9 p.m.




SUBSCRIPTION :o: $1.00

Mr. Perey Green's Orchestra will
supply the Music. . c

31.8.52—2n.

Buses leave Bus-stand, Church
Village, Ebenezer; and Blades Hill

at 8 p.m,
. 31.8,52——In













The Members'‘of the
WEYMOUTH CLUB
request the pleasure of your

Company
to their

DANCE

at
QUEEN'S PARK
on
SATURDAY NIGHT
4th OCTOBER, 1952
Music — Clevie Gittens Orchestra

Subseription -— $1.00
Tickets not transferable

Mrs, VIOLET McGEARY



requests the pleasure of your
Cdmpany

DANCE
at QUEEN'S PARK HOUSE
on MONDAY NIGHT,
Ist September, 1952
at 8 p.m
ADMISSION — 2/6
Mir. Clevie Gittens’ Orchestra will
suppiy Mupic
REFRESHMENTS ON SALE





HURRICANE PRECAUTION HINT No.5

KEEP A FEW POUNDS OF NAILS AND A HAMMER
IN A HANDY PLACE.
These can be obtained from - - -

CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.

NAILS at 30c. per lb.
HAMMEBS at $1.63 each,

| KEEP COOL
—— by

using Natural Gas
for Cooking

It’s easiest
Cleanest &
Speediest

Call and see the
New Gas Cookers
AT YOUR GAS
SHOWROOM

WANTED

REPRESENTATIVE—Full time representative
wanted for Canadian Life Insurance Co., in Barbados.
Application in writing are invited which will be treated
in strict confidence. Apply: “Insurance Underwriter”,
c/o P.arbados Advocate. 26.8.52.—5n.

1953



AMATEUR BOXING
CHAMPIONSHIPS

Under the auspices of

CANADA DRY

will take place at the - - -

MODERN: HIGH SCHOOL STADIUM
AT 8 PM.

ON FRIDAY, 12TH SEPTEMBER
CANADA DRY STEEL BAND IN ATTENDANCE

BAR — MUSIC — THRILLING ENCOUNTERS
























































$

THREE CONTEMPORARY NOVELISTS

A series of three lectures by
MR. R. LE FANU

At
The British Council, Wakefield,

Whitepark, St. Michael
Monday, September 8th—5.00 p.m.—EM M. FORSTER

Monday, September 15th—5.00 p.m.—
GRAHAM GREENE

Monday, September 22nd—5.00 p.m.—_JOYCE CARY

Admission Free

-

POSSE GEE SS9SSOPOSSS OO FGOS

%
o
FSSOSSSSS9SS IS IO 9S FS SHS GOGSE HODSO PSS GOS SOS DIOGO? ’



AUGUST 31, 1952



JOHN

M4.
BLABDON

es ce.

AFS., F.V.A.

Extensive Listings of Goed
Class Property and Land
Always Available

FOR SALE



bungalow on corner
wide frontages. Pleasant garden
with flower beds, lawn, .
patio, and number of bearing fruit
trees. Accommodation comprises
large living room, covered gallery,
3 bedrooms with built-in ward-
robes, well fitte¢c kitchen, garage
with covered way to house, ser-
vants’ quarters and all usual,
offices. All public utility services.
im our opinion, this property is
one of the most attractive homes
now available in th emedium price
range.

MODERN HOME, St. Peter —
A luxurious\y appointed residence,
with four bedrooms, 3 tiled bath-
rooms with hot and cold, butler’s
pantry, kitchen, storerooms, 2
gerages. The grounds are
ly laid out with a profusion of
flowering shrubs. Own right of
way to sea.

RESIDENCE, BLACK ROCK —
Soundly constructed property with
3 bedrooms, 2 living rooms, dining
room and gallery. On land of ap-
prox. 1 acre. Offered at £3,000.

BUILDING LAND, ST. LAW-
RENCE COAST — Excellent plot
n good position with wide sea
frontage. Ideab site for sea-side
bungalow. One of the few vacant
lots available on this popular
coast.

ll, GRAEME HALL

—2 Storey coral stone house with
3 bedrooms, dining and living
room, verandah & kitchenette up-
stairs, with garage, servants’
quarters and laundny below. This
house is set well back in its
grounds of about 1/3 acre, is not
wverlooked and has uno

‘view seawards. Open to offers

LAND, TWEEDSIDE ROAD—On
main road with 101/ frontage.
Heal situation for _ business
premises, Total area 18,738 sq. ft.

BUSINESS PREMISES—DWELL-
ING HOUSE, ROEBUCK STREET.
Good situation for retail shop in
this busy part of.town, £2,000.

SWEETFIELD, St. Peter — An
estate type house built of stone.
Contains large living room with
French windows leading onto
covered verandahs with view of
sea. 3% bedrooms, kitchen, store-
rooms and usual outbuildings,
garage and servants’ quarters.
Approx 2% acres well laid out
grounds with right of way over
beach.

COVE SPRING HOUSE, ST.
JAMES — One of the few pi
erties on this popular coast wit
a completely private and secluded
bathing beach. The grounds of
about 1% acres are well wooded
and could readily. be converted
into one of the show places of



the Island. The house is of 2
storeys and possesses ible
character. .

NEW BUNGALOW, ROCKLEY—
Commodious home with 3 bed-
rooms, large living room, wide
verandah with good view, kitchen,
pontry, servants’ quarters and
storerooms, Good situation near
Golf Course £4,300.

NEWTON LODGE, MAXWELL
COAST Solidly constructed
stone house containing enclosed
galleries, spacious drawing room
and dining room, and breakfast
room, 3 bedrooms, 2 garages etc.,
Lately occupled by U.S. Consul.

BEMERSYDE, ST, LAWRENCE,
—Strongly built coral stone bun-
galow spacious airy rooms and
galleries. Accommodation com-
prises:— separate drawing and
dining rooms, 3 double bedrooms,
large kitchen and pantry, 3 ser-
vants’ rooms, garage and fernery.
This property is situated on the
best bathing beach at St. Law-
rence, is within easy of
Town by bus or car, and in our
opinion would be very suitable
be conversion into a small guest
couse.

SEA FORT, ST. JAMES — Care-
fully re-modelled 2 storey se
on one of the most attractive
in this increasingly popular area.
eo coral and sand beach
room, lounge, verandshs on
floors, 3 bedrooms, detached
servant's quarters.
PROPERTY, WHITE PARK
ROAD —Solidly built 2 storey
house with 7 bedrooms, spacious
seoen ben poms and Stas an
also detached annex w
room and 2 bedrooms. Suitable
for conversion to flats, guest
house, school or offices.

MALTA, ST, PETER—Exten-
sively re-modelled house of mas-

i

sive stone construction with
approx. % acre flower gardens,
lawns and young fruit

There are spacious verandahs on
two sides with views over beach,
large living room, 3 double bed-
rooms, 2 bathrooms {both ,with
tubs) modern kitchen and butler’s
pantry, downstairs is the ry,
good servants’ accommodation for
3, 2 garages and storerooms. Full
public services plus own deep
well with electric pump. Right
of way over beach with
bathing. Opportunity for a dis-
criminating buyer.

ROUMAIKA, DAYRE!
—Imposing property wit
tion rooms, 6 bedrooms, kitchen,
pantry, large verandahs, garage
and store-rooms. Could be con-
verted into Guest House or Club.
City. Very attractive and cen!
located stone bungalow
bathrooms and toilet, pantry and
kitchen. Good courtyard at rear.
Ba’
built modern stone

bungalow on brow of cliff afford-
kitchen, laundry, servants’
and garage, A property
on.

double carriageway on

Very reasonable figure

stantially

ing fine view of this wild and
good

ti

rocky coast. 3

neti

ROAD. Near Golf Course. Un«
session.

WHITEHALL FLATS — Cod-
nished self-contained flats.

Gap — Compact furnished bunga«
Own sea frontage.

Furnished from Sept. ist.
COAST Furnished or unfur-
,


































imately 14,000 sq. ft. well
built property contains a front
gallery large lounge, separate
diningroom, 3 large 2

— Sub-

kitchen servants’
garage. Electricity
water. Over 6 acres.
WYNDOVER, St. Peter —
country home with over 4% a
containing productive
and flower gardens, algo a P
orchard has been
riodernised by the

There are 2 wide veranda, arn

ing and dining rooms, 3
bedrooms with washbasins,



living room, 2 side

NEW HOUSE-ROCKLEY NEW
furnished. With immediate pos-
rington Hill, Choice of 4 unfur-
BRIGHTWOOD, St. Lawrence
low available from Sept, ist.
ll, GRAEME HALL TERRACE—
NEWTON LODGE, MAXWELL’S
nished with tmmediate possession.

&
Plantations B
Phone 4640



SUNDAY, AUGUST 31, 1952 SUNDAY ADVOCATE



“Robust” Man Dies By Misadventure



PAGE FYTREN





STOMAGH
PAINS

DUE TO INDIGESTION

Try just ONE DOSE
of MACLEAN PPAR?
STOMACH POWDER! This
scientifically balanced formula
a relieves Stomach Pains

lence, Heartburn, Nausea
or Acidity due to Indi

alee |

E sae E d. d Aft 5 : eR is pointed out in Halsbury that eye : #5 nq ulry n e iter beer 14 it takes, but it ie gus poneay eave Se Seeee Handicrafts In | BR. Stomach

Anyhow, you know the area, You for squashing inquisitions—if on } eg e

e met Edwards and Edwards told the evidence there is no reason
eI y earin you how this man said some of ffor bringing in a particular ver-
r d the things the Police reported c}et, and so on,
were true and some lies.

A Coroner's jury yesterday returned a verdict of death ~ They come to the Station, There L& A¢eerdance With Facts

e |

You have to find in accordance I |

- . i i ave a p

due to misadventure when the enquiry iato the circum- ®re few discrepancies here, and it with the facts. Under these con.

: ; ; is for you to view them to the ait: " ; It is hardly possible to visit the fashioned. T ¢> lignum vitae tree
stances surrounding the death of Cecil Hope, a 28-year-old joct of your ability. Yor remem. 2L0ns I propose to leave you. Ijand of Wood and Water without in fact, like the ackee is a feature
chauffeur of Jackmans, St. Michael, finished before His per that of the man sitting “or ee = oe dhe ee i Sine in Pking acquaintance with its of Jamaica, In the countryside |
Worship, Mr. E. A. McLeod, Coroner of District “A”. standing...It is said by some which I have permitted so many "2hdicrafts. Por arriving by air, too were seen flelds with sisal and
Hope died at the General Hospital on August 3. that he was put to sit in a chair, things to be asked. And 1 have pate, erminal building either at with the Jippi Jappa palm. The
The Coroner said: “Mr. F im anid ‘Gantie of It is also said he was put on the done it because. Mr. Field said Palisadoes or Montego Bay air- straws chiefty used are Jippi Jappa,

Bee ere floor. T es i ae ports, they catch the eye, set out silver thatch and big thatch—
the jury, many of you who are now sitting on this jury— een waa wees ibaetet eon —- wien siteld te attractively in show cases: hats in palms—sisal, and coconut straw.

rhaps the majority of you—no doubt I have seen on many that in falling down the ste various styles and sizes, to suit the The Government of Jamaica
: is , ; , , ps, he Im -Halsbury we have the : :
dificult enquiries, and enquiries involving aceidents where had vn ‘a bive shirt One et'the Congners™ Act here's MYR, gas sober convivial clan, takes active Interest» th hand
you have one witness telling you of a car in a certain posi= ees a aad eee ie ranks like. this. t, and Brooches, handbags, valises and ment in the quality of Jippi Jappe
tion, and how fast it was going, and so on. and ap his way tc the atetion’ for ‘aa ee ‘ana has ttavelling kits, blankets, fabrics. weaving, which it was felt was

Every enquiry, in_my humble tion. I will come to that later. there was no exhibition of ‘pain.’ been an amendment in the Law. table mats and coasters, rugs, deteriorating, the Government in \\

1 â„¢ B&B. MEYERS & CO, LTD.,
P.O, Box 171, Bridgetown.







opinion, is difficult. But you use To Captain Farmer, the doctor - i lunch baskets, wooden egg cups February this year initiated the ‘
your common sense in arriving at said, “The injuries I found were me nreed With Seen a SS brought about ang bottle cases, trays, Cate Jippi Jappa Development Scheme:
how this man came to his death. jot consistent with the man hav- Cpl. Edwa eae toa mean eet ona In Trinidad, D raré- and tings and other nick-nacks, toys. six centres with twelve girls each SQ
As you go along. you will have ing been beaten about 1 a.m., . : ao th aaenta : These goods are likely to attract for a three months course of train- one
gained quite a lot of experience. and then walked to Brittons Hill how the Gazettes were searched ther places, there are no more attention if you arrive by boat, be~ ing, the results have been satis-| —)
It has never been my practice to Police Station, then breaking UB: He was nmandcuffed. You !quisitions by Coroners. After cause practically all the principal factory: the standard of the weave} ~
tell you, “If you ‘peliev this down a door at the station about know the evidence, he sprang, there is a situation, and a charg? stores carry these lines. showed marked improvement. |
idk ee-oae Sontilod d if that’ 4.30 a.m. and then falling down S°M® Say sprang... One police- ‘0 be brought against someone, Jamaica Welfare (Cottage In- some of the trainees even tried |
that b your adit “So ie filet of ataire™ ng man went towards the door, He the Medical Officer performs the dustries Ltd.) began in a small out a few new designs all on their) ~
| ac ie, a a Peed When he th t hit the door, collided with the post mortem. A little evidence is way in 1938 as a home improve- own, e.g. vanity sets, new types of| -—~
oners do it, and with due respect € ‘ara ey were not paluster, and so on, You remem- taken, and so on. ment project to assist in raising belts and hats, and also new types} ~~
to. them — they have their prov. Consistent, that does not prevent per Inspector Springer said he’ Anyhow you have the evidence ‘the standard of living, at the in- of weaves. | we
ince and I have mine — the very anyone of you, or the majority of was sleeping or appeared to be which you must take as a whae Stance. of that able Jamaican, The centre in Kingston, the |









; thing I might be trying to avoid YOu, coming to a conclusion that sleeping. Inspector Springer is and use your com Norman Ma , QC, There was parent organisation, has’ over- |
might be the very thing which they are consistent if you think not a doctor, but there . acai If ‘ir. Farhier cos Mr Niled a skeleton of six doing social grown its quarters in Hanover | The Only er
might happen, the creating of they are consistent. I only point he was unconscious when picked wants me to tell you anything work which ineluded handicrafts Street, and occupies in addition |

confusion. I am going to put the OUt these things to "you to giv? yp. He never regained consci- more I will ou, but in this field since then there premises in Sutton St, not far | es « *
facts before you, and it is for you YOU & clue of how you are going ousness, but ake things to confuse my wee “Se has been wvemarkable progress. off, Miss Rose Pinnock, its super- | contali Ning Vitamin B,
gentlemen, ta assess these facts, 19 a8sess these things. And you about crimes he committed and opinions, you have had the evi- [here are now seven handicraft intendent, on a tour of inspection |
When you hear that it is to be Will not pick out bits of the evi- so on. He faded out, Tney said dence, Mr. Farmer has read to Centres distributed over the island in the islands under Colonial De- | s ss
in aceordance with the evidence, dence only, but take the whole of the telephone was out of order, you. each with an instructress in velopment and Welfare, spent six If you want to get QUICK RELIEF I~










that ; ‘the’ evidence, and they took him t 5 t fe -¢ charge, employing around forty months in Barbados in 1947. | from PAIN, and also to enjoy the
who ‘Gos "into the bon a Cie just Mr, Niles he said, “The who oodaens him “to the ‘hospital oan somata wok come on ‘ girls ula on Sot ~~ of que poreibshises in the bani | er nk TT aie’ :
. : at aa ating is istent wit i r yt “Sm 5 ‘ : eceive work done outside; in this ness, she speaks highly, she thinks | ie * ’ adicts,
believed at sight or disbelieved. 8 is consistent with having When they got to the hospital, the © The Jury returned the verdict ae 3 is estimated that over a Serhedinn girls ae nat cate oat. | There’s nothing else like YEAST —=

‘ been caused by a blunt instru- i . ‘ 7-4 :
You have seen the witnesses and ay porter said his mame was Cecil of death due to misadventure per re concerned in ‘ t s the’ iccal VITE. It is the ONLY pain
oo demeanours. aude Been inal es cee be coat iad about 15 minutes delibera- agree pai " ee fen “ae of pe SIs, which ALSO contains th
‘This case has taken quite a few book, That 7: a . tion, t for last year was lit ‘a » sisal second t tonic Vitamin B,. Don’t wait—
* boo! as Taylor’s His mother came here and told The turnover ¥ quality and our sisal second to $e Seas See
x which } and get some YEAST-VI'TE
around £35,000 the bulk of none. .

days, and there has been no stone Medical Juris ;

prudence—I will not you, and you will come to the trom let .

left unturned to put the case go into the history of Dr. Taylor, conclusion whether or not he told Vessels Bring aneda Cat hod Meee. Age
% Y js not to be inferred |

bere Te You have had Police tie sutbex, bas he — doctor a lie. His mother said he is Cecil ne Nassau, - It

es 1 s as yer, é s g . 5 . » thes
, in enquiries, médical testimony his pnewisten te nic oh — rete tad po what be gid it mt General Carga from tals are we lamaien
is a highly. important thing, par- of Taylor's Medical Jurisprudence drove, after some months. You goods are agopuier = ially
ticularly in a Coroner's enquiry. has become so well known that it may wonder what he was doing ©%€ motor — vessel and two itself, for the —— oS d by
The first thing a Coroner has to has often been quoted in cases all this time, schconers arrived in Carlisle Bay ®re” comm q alks of life. Due
do is to request a doctor to per- and can be read in Coroner's In arriving at a verdict, .you yesterday morning. ‘ omen a Sar r

They en local product,
form a post mortem. Dr. Ward Courts. are going to pay attention to all the Sch. Triumphant Star, from Ji rns nowever, state, only be-



For
HEADACHES

NERVE PAINS ,
COLDS, CHILLS,
RHEUMATIC PAINS









performed the post mortem in the material parts of the evi- Trinidad, Sch. Anita H. trom’ | mport-

this instance. It is important in’ Mr. Farmer quoted a passage dence. If you are satisfied on Demerara and the MotorVessel Sa be apg hs. Bet Bw oe RELIEVES YOUR PAIN

this sense — you had a view of Which illustrated the difficulty at assessment of the evidence that Caribbee from Dominica.’ Oe heble ana "“YEAST-VITE "
the body, but a jury on a whole, arriving at a pontine haemor- the man brought about his own The Triumphant Star brought ; B ts employed to a small MAKES YOU FEEL WELL » sedis

is not compelled to take more Thage. It was the case in which a death by his own free volition,— jn 260 drums of colas” and 50 ee i the principal wood in Trede Mork

than a casual vi piece of parasol was found brok- I would, mot have to tell you 5 i ’ lignum
a se oh in cue helen en off in the deceased. You will what verdict to return, On the ge hy peouignt Mf 300 age on ane ta tneoventing the number
glance, ‘he has to have a look. 1 Teémember Dr. Ward said that other hand, if you are not satis- vine ang 500 bags of charcoal f articles into which this wood is
an not propose te ‘fall: ite tle- there again when haemorrhage fied.. Dr, Ward said he got @ “mwenty-six casks of fresh fegit™ _
men, I ¢aw this or that, and it is Starts is the time when the pon- severe beating. The evidence is . 1. "btought in by the Caribbeé. (f= -
ig etpecdaten: oth ib cackae’s tine haemorrhage becomes fatal. eae hye rial dad tai AD these vesee ate consigned to!
evidence. If I did not see the He said that the piece of parasol —''"t: Mud Said. thet nontine the §chooner, Owners’, Associa-

YEAST-VITE











1 " 7 what Dr. Ward said, that’ pontine
bay, the enquiry could) be ay fave, yarded hacmorage, jacmorhage could stil” have tan. et
. t _ occurred... well, it is for you. eae eke eee
Anyhow, Dr, Ward performed Skt by fake tak ace re ts You know the various verdicts, RATES OF EXCHANGE. | A GRAND FETE

the post mortem. You heard the
injuries described by Dr. Ward.
He. said he saw the body and it

Some verdicts are very good avout 1992
and some very bad. 1 am asking 30, 1952
3 Selt i
you, whatever you do, do not 71. 4°)"py chaltes + a Buying |

against the facts,

in Ald of Charity Funds
When it comes to the pros and a

eons, gentlemen, it is a matter























































was the body of a well nurished entire} : tump to conclusions. Assess the Bankers 71.8% pr BUCCANEER LODGE ROOM
y for you. When it comes i Z j ,
man, and he told you yesterday, t Dr. Ward going out of his real om Pe eae a ae Dense APF i ay tik On SATURDAY 0TH SEPTEMBER
Dr. Ward, of the only inquiry ta orbit, it is purely =z att f . p SGRRR 3Y ; 18.4% pr. Cable seer eet nese Hii, From Lam? pm
the front, The majority of the ‘ Ss Pp y a matter for It is said that the Law is 60 7j'9% pr Currency 10-34 pr. vat
; you. per cent. Law and 40 per cent. Coupons 49.6% ir. |) ADMISSION 1/6, CHILDREN %d
injuries were on the man’s back. ~ ] 6 th ot of
i us come to the aspect of a commensense. You are laymen, Uimotuabinn Sreneaeuaniaay Steel Band In Attendgnce waste
Dr. Ward. was recaliph: aa aye man omar wehe a gentlemen, When 1§ comes:to the won pr. cueauge 6 Hell @ certary’s experience ond There is such
* - a man. e live a Ww, you are not bound to agree " Bank va 19% pr. eS tests by doctors in famous clinics prove |
eral questions were put to small community. It is no good with everything they say, but....... Demand Gratis 78.85% pr | We | Dod Pile satkiy oid Tee} | a thing..!
To Mr. Field he said, “It is my trying to hide things. We hear a you must give credence “o some «-...:\:-. Sight Drafts 78.7% py of ak and poisons, Then your
opinion that falling down a flight Jot of things. It is not your provine of the things, When it comes to §)-8% pr Cable |
» When 7% 3% pr. Curfeney | blood is clear—your backache disappears When tailored
of twenty stairs would produce to decide on what you hear out- the evidence,, it is for you to ,......... and is robust |
, ; ; tired replaced by t | ‘
minor abrasions and coneussions side. I will quote from Halsbury. assess it. When it comes to Dr. and . You feel ger. in our
on the body. .. .” and he went If a juryman were to know the Ward’s opiniop and the case Mr., : : ey Insist on Dodd's Kidney Pills. Only. a MOYGASHEL ‘
further than that. facts, they are so strong on it that Farmer read to you, you are en~ WEATHER REPORT |! NOTICE for large bottle at all chemists. @ JI4 Dente

When asked if the haemorrhage you have to be called and put in titled to weigh everything and
could have been caused by fall- that stand and sworn so that your carefully assess the evidence

oe We beg to aotify our Cus-
ing down the steps, he used the fellow jurymen would know what &%d come ‘to a decision that is

YESTERDAY { tomers and the General Pub-

e » || TROPICALS
Dodd‘ Kidney Pills GABARDINES





word, “May.” When asked about you know. That happened once in Stand proper to come’ to in this|| Rajall from Codrington: | °]/ Wile that HUTRON'S DRUG | gag ey
‘ se. ‘ ‘ i e

wae Hie said thet the pone Salk soeeuining a ars hes 1 ee ee Oh ae Henne Sat Tot a mon © || W holidays as from the 7th of | Hurri p tion TWEEDS

time haemorrhage cou! have if you jeve that this man wit : 2.04 ins, . ) xr to 2ist Septem-

caused death od that the pied 1 ordered the man to be free volition brought about his Temperature; 74.0 °F, | \ peptone - P } urricane recau 10

various injuries found must be death, what verdict you will re. ) HINT No. 12

Wind Velocity 4 miles per
hour
Barometer (9 a.m.) 29.929

(11 a.m.) 29.928 ea
TO-DAY | 669663099005

Sunrise: 5.49 a.m. : JUST RECEIVED

You are perfectly entitled to P ;
viewed a conglamarate wholes draw inferences, and there is the ‘U) If you take all the evi-

“In the absence of disease of the evidence co this revolver, if you Gene, and assess it carefully and
arteries, a pontine haemorrhage pelieve. I have gone to the ex- Seale rs ‘ouknow. wnet
is due to severe trauma. He te q tent of getting the card checked “jt is sometimes said, if this
you that, Of course he ee for the number.. You have to saYounon this, and if that, then that. |
the brain and the spinal chord: this is a prope: register. Youll am not-dging that. I have very
You would have to take it that weigh that evidence. So then, he good reason for not doing that. It
there was no disease of the ar. haqa revolver. It is true he had :

| 31.8,52—3n.
: : Check that everything
that might blow loose is
secured, Store small loose
objects such as garden
tools, refuse bins, porch



Sunset: 6.11 p.m.
Moon; First Quarter, August
28






























WARDONIA RAZOR RLADES

i mtine haemorrhage i «1
opinion that por and you will use your common. Dea ere

5 at Combermere next Saturday 6th
following the injuries described, sense in coming to a reason for his

Sept, (11,30 a.m.)

; ; Lighting: 7.00 p.m. shes
teries. no bullets in it, But there it is,| ~Ooosssos $9$9056955955%, : furniture, etc. inside the
To Mr. McLeod, he said, “It is 3° weapor, of that nature even || High ‘Tide: 1.14 a.m. |
my opinion that in the absence of without. "bullets, coupled with) I. P. S.. TYPEWRITING RS Ra “DeANb's" eter essence $I} newee, |
ie uries mi ings, ill ist you.|@ ### gyang ££ «Bl beet 606CU.|LhUMVONAR UU. Ol Ce eee = SSS" |
ig ge Suara was tne nondileocebiat. with ; EXAM. = | MOREION MALTED MILK
pentine haem: ge. It is MY holes, the crocus bag and so on at ince iene Wil be held MILLER'S WORM POWDERS
|
would take place within an hour a revolver under the cir- 1.®.§.—Oldest in the word! ANSIPRIG GRATING
at the most, assuming all the in- cumstances 5 |B Scns hla PR oe INFANTON san oF van
juries were inflicted at the same The Police told you that they in England twice as much LOKOL DROPS THE eer oa of Bolton la

as any other
NOTE ALSO: H wasC B.R. whe
started these Typewriting Ex-
aminations in B/dos,
C. B. ROCK, F.1.P.S.,
Sole 1.P.8, Representative

time. re-
“A subdural haemorrhage could _ Soe rene

cause death by itself” This is a and things of that kind.

factor to bear in mind, “ . . i, Well, you come to the Police

could cause death by itself.” It jeaying Britton’s Hill on a parti- oe ye

could be caused by falling down oyjar morning with instruetions | §

a flight of stairs. Whenever you to patrol. They were dressed in | ¥6666666660660699060000"

try to get at the doctor, he falls plain clothes. It is well establish-

s
baek on “ .. . a conglomerate oq that they were going into an
whole.” area where crimes have been
Quoted Passage committed from time to time.

My best advice to you is this, You have seen them, ang they Cause Ki led in 3 Days

mt ~ «at the

(. CARLTON BROWNE

Wholesale & Retail
Druggist |
} 136 Roebuck St. Dial 2813

CHELDREN’S GOODWILL
LEAGUE (Constitution Road)

on -
SATURDAY 6th SEPTEMBER 1952
ADMISSION %/-

Musie by Perey Green's Orchestra



REFRESHMENTS ON SALE

DANCE | CB. Rice & Co.



i elegant appearance



commonsense is a _ very told you they had no weapon of | ssid

thing. You have seen Dr, Ward. any kind, they had no cudgels, no| | The Nerv Clist application of Nixo. S¢ ‘ONE _WE HAVE IN STOCK... HH a

He has told you what he has batons, They met a man. They like magic, Use Nixogerm tonight TERRAZZO Marble Chips iit na
to say, and he told you what his told you the moon was young. and you will soon see your skin be-

/ETERNITE Marble Finished Sheets if
TRINIDAD Cedar Boards HEE
ALUMINIUM Corrugated Sheets i

3c. Each

opinion is, It is for you to assess The man walks towards them. Pryrily soft, smooth und clear Nixo-
and weigh the evidence. He said The man is asked what he is doing ;

lasting dependability









































a
bdural haemorrhage could there at that hour, and you know ‘Ause Pimples. Boils, ALUMINIUM Gut 18 24". 80,” 36”

help Sauna death, but .. said his answer—his mentioning of a] yore eee en eer mublos . ARB ADOS GALVANISED aetna ts Pack
that all the injuries must be taken girl Carmen. There is a check up until you renove the Kerma that hide BARBED WIRE
as a conglomerate whole. In other and there is no Carmen. They) 2), 'Nixoderm trom vour chemist to- AKERIES TD.
words, you cannot divide them. oceed to search him and find a day under the positive guarentee that } \

There has been too, the blunt few things. They leaye there) N'xoderm wi ee and smosth or | 4 Dial 4758 iq Establisned T HERBERT LTD Incorporated
instrument described in various then, and all that time he was money |i Ni | 1860 i * 1926
"Phe Police’ told you of the OE eet with them. until they Nixoderm rewiri f JAMES STREET i if ROEBUCK 8ST.
ioumney tiie the Pi to the met Cpl. Edwards. I never asked| Mer Skin Troubles package ~ ao ——S— } , a

SS iE

DO YOU REALISE THE NEED FOR MORE









QUALIFICATION? We can supply from stock the {
2 Oi ke voce
IF sO, . °
prs ; following Roofing terial=—
manship Building and General Agriculture ¢
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Automobile \ebateaibs per = ’ . “ 7
oma Pater echt Corrugated Galv’d Sheets , olivetti
Electrical Instaliation and ’
‘Wiring School Certificate Course. 6’, 7, 8’, 9’, 10’ 26 and 28 Gauge
General Electrical Engin- Accountancy. , | We are pleased to anrounce the appointment of our im
eering Course. Civil Service Entrance ‘ | firm as Sole Agents in Barbados of The British ii
Gee poli Fromotion Course | {| Corrugated Aluminum Sheets Gureta Tiecwsne en oe ee SO
Write for full particulars if course is not mentioned. 6’, 7’, 8’, 9, and 10’ 4 IT’S HERE! Hi
Write ‘o the: See the merits of these machinies for yourself by Hits

; 1 POST COUPON TO P.O. dialling 3713 and arranging a personal demonstration. fig
Caribbean Educational BOX 207, POS.

jJu-C Dry Ginger Ale

Institute Please send me Free Book. THE OLIVETTI ie
P.O. Box, 307, P.O.S., ilo anas< kee e8 ; 6’, 7, 8 and 1 | ind
Sales Address ..... ‘ . ‘ | QUALITY, PURITY & WHOLESOMENESS 11” — $260 15” — $298 18” — $325 iF

Corrugated Everite Sheets





. ilestint ‘ab dieweer. of : were a na
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ieorzuve tonpoe [ase 1 Wilkinson & Haynes Co., Ltd. vik eae maine |S. P. Musson Son & Co., Lid.





if





os





“Semen ws
—_





PAGE

Scout Notes:

SIXTEEN



Commissioners’ Conference
Postponed



juriy the ne veek
om September 5 to Septem-

Thg Conference had had
postponed owing to a num-
of difficulties and it is hoped
soon tO announce the new date
it is im nt that the Commis-
sioners’ Conference be held an-
nually and ata stateq time as it
will be the only one of its kind.
Con ioners are asked when
date 3 announced to
‘ial effort to attend
it is lesirable
epli Circular
the the
Commis-





to be



ber













most
to the
Secretary of
n or to the *
rimself,



“Lion” In Camp
; Sea Scouts
mp at Gun Hill
> able to put in

The First Bar
held a te

recent.
recent.

Daco





some good training an j to be out
of the heat and dust of the city
for a brief pericd. The boys

thoroughly enjoyed being in camp
ani as if to rep for the kind-
ness to them, th-y gave the lion
at Gun Hill a_ thorough scraping
and painting, The lion new looks
down over the undulating hills
anid valieys froin St. George to
“hrist Church in al) ifs glory. H>
car now he ecn from an even
great listane> than before



Good (Wishes

Scouts ang Seouters
with pleasure that Mr. R. S_ Jor-
dan, Area. Comm yner for St
John who had been compelled to
undergo a miner operation, i
now out of h>spital and is pursu-
ing his regular activites. Mrs.
Jordan too, has recently returned
from a short trip to Tobago.

will learn






Congrats

Congratulations to the
Street, Fourth Barbados Group,
on the performance of a small
party which aceorcing to observ-
ers, rendered vaiuable help when
a fire broke out in Grenada where
they were camping, Barbados
Scouts. and especially the Fourth v
Barbados, bear a name of high 1
repute in Grenada and this will
serve to enhance that reputation
even further, ‘

James

The Chief Scout Yaris i

CUBS with the real Scout
spirit.

One of the nicest things that
happened to me was at a Cub
Rally ot Barbados. Trey were
joily good, thuse Cubs, and
thoroughly enjoyed the games
and jungle dances.

Just before I talked to them
» two small Cubs came up and

handed me an envelope with 10

ASAE BPEESSFSEESSEEESESSEEGSEFSEEEEESSSSSESSSG
BRERBBBBAAEFEAA EEE AAaSFr AAA PAF > FA





there
rice and flour. Housewives every-

bakeries were temporarily closed.

a ee ee ee eet

o

First Barbados














DIES AFTER ACCIDENT

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

715 — 10.45







2 WITH BICYCLE
E an / 00
Office r W ith A. 8. Cato performed a | ee E
a se post mortem examination at the
Alom Training General Hospital Mortuary
terday morning on the
@ From Page 11 25-year-old _ labourer . Charles *'°!
dollars 96 cents, about £2. 5s. more than three or four of the Brerton of Newbury, St. George. }
which they had collected amongst boys would have been arrested.
themselves—and those Cubs don’t Referring to another incident, was detained at the ——
have many pennies to spare—and Capt. Armstrong said that recent- General Hospital about 9.50 p.m
t they gave me u beautifully ly Police Dog Rex was suecess- on August 29 suffering from head
tten mess: asking me to fully used to search Epping injuries after he was‘involved in ¥
3 it to “the Ssout who needs it Forest for a~case of attempted an accident with a bicycle, abou! jy, «
mo suicide. A young lady was ‘found 8.45 p.m. the same day on New- Londor
at Epping Road in a distressed jhyry Road, St. George. He ‘ev
I was most touched and, as @ condition and suffering from the gieq minutes after he wa

matter of fact, I was going to talk

; effects of an overdose of aspirin
to them about the Princess Alice

She requested the Police to search









admitted to the Hospita’.



106 — 715 pom

p.n

4.15 pu

m

The News, 7.110 p.m
From Britain

15 pom
jay Service, 8.15 p.in
8.30 pon
The
romenade Concerts, 10.00 p.m. The
10 10 : '

F

MONDAY,
10 — 7.15 pm

LISTENING HOURS

SUNDAY

1.76 M 25.58 a
: 4.10 pr Inter-*
For The Commor Good, |
4 Sunday Half Hour, 5.00 p.m
From The Bible, 5.10 p.m. Interludz, 4.15
yes=- p.m Lehar. 5.45 p.m Arthur's Inn,
5 6.15 pm. English Magazine, 6.45 p.m
BOSE vcgeeims. Parade. a witerhide, ¢.08

AUGUST. i+



The



Home News



pm

25.68 M 31.32 M





Caribbean Veices, 7.45 p.m
Radio News-

8.55 p.m
From

Piano Music
8.00 p.m



Editorials,

'
m Nows Talk 18 7
, 10.45 p.m. Why I Be-




‘orum

SEPTEMBER ‘1
: 19.76 M 25.53 M

4.00 p.m. The News, 4°.10 p.m The!




Home for Crippled Children at foy her friend. a man, who to- Duily Service, 4.15 p,m, The Case of the
the Cane. I have told the story’ gether with herself had decided Sient | Watehonad os oe 7B)
to Cubs in many parts of the to take aspirin and was some- TREATED AFTER FALL Peter vorke. 5.00 p.m. Welsh Miscel-
world of how I had seen those where in the forest. leony, 6.15 p.m. Listeners’ Choice, 6.45
hoys with plaster casts all over While the lady was taken to FROM BICYCLE Sage ey Me itis News, 140 bam. |
pe hadilec lah : e : - 4 rade, p.m eo fe m. |
the’ a dancing the en hospital, Police Dog Rex and his Home News From Britain
of St ol K ae w - ae ene handler were summoned to the Adolphus Carter of Martindales 7.15 — 10.86 p.m, ..... . 25.53 M $1.32 M
yee ‘ald ee e only part’ scene and the dog was given one Road. St. Michael was treated at “7.15 p.m. Books To Read & Ballet, 7.45
y co 10Vve, of the lady’s shoes to smell. ‘The ¢h> General Hospital for a cut p.m. The Choir, - ands. Pipes, and
ll, of course, there was no ce piwenprgperonnflicy! 2 a seent on his head after he fell from hig ree SE Paci he thy eal grag
m in my mind who were 8nd about one hour later it Gis~ bicycle on Halls. Road, St. 71 European survey. 8.43 pm, tter-
he Scouts who needed it most as ene ine about 5d miles \ichael about 10.45 a.m. yester- lude, 8.65 p.m. From The Editorials
I could imagine what joy it would inside Epping Forest. The man day. St J dt dye ee li w
tt Cite des.) ener was in a serious condition. He ~~" 9.30 p.m, Majestic Orotanrn: 20,07 90
1¢3e Cubs to re 1

that

PIV?
Cubs in other parts of the Empire

was taken to St. Margaret’s Hos-
pital by Police Car and detained.
Within a few days he recovered:
and (had it not been for the dog,

were thinking of them. So off it

went to them,

But that isn’t the end of the the man would have died.
story. There were several Cubs Pe, - ba i
there who evicently hadn’t had a Studied Communications |

chance to subseribe and as I was
speaking they came quietly up
and slipped an extra penny or
sixpence into the envelope.

He said that after the Dog
Course, he was attached to Not-
tingham Police for a week where
he studied communications. He
was very pleased to visit Notting-
ham because the Trinidad and
Barbados Systems, which he was
partly responsible for, were to a

I thought to myself, “These
Cubs have the real Scout spirit.”
And it was grand to see them so

keen and enjoying all the fun of jarge extent based on the Not-
Cubbing and yet never allowing tingham Police and the book
their enjoyment to keep their’ which was written by the Chief

minds away from trying to help Constable of that City.



who didn’t have the same From Nottingham he went to
chances as they had. Staffordshire where he _ spent
(From the Scout) three weeks studying the latest

methods of Police Training. The
training of both men and women
in all forms of Police work was}
extremely impressive,” he said. |
He spent two days with the}
Gloucester Regiment where he!
studied Riot Control and one day
with Pye Ltd., where he was |
showed all the latest equipment |
including the motoreycle equip-|
ment which he hopes will shortly |
be introduced in Barbados and!
which has worked successfully
in the Metropolitan Police.
Captain Armstrong said that he:
drove nearly 6,000 miles and
visited many interesting places. |
He liked very much the Troop-
ing of the Colour at the Queen’s
Birthday Parade and the Royal|
Tournament, a show staged by:
the three fighting services,
“These courses are of great:
benefit to Police Officers and I!
hope that in time to come, many |
more members of the Barbados,





Slight Relief In
Rice And Floun
Shortage

During the
was a

few weeks
shortage of

past
severe

vhere made similar complaints—
o ri¢e, no flour.

Rice borrowed from Trinidad
arrived last week, and as a re-
salt the rice shortage was not so
icute. Yet the flour shortage still
prev.i.ed, and as a result some






Yesterday, however, the most
welcome sight of flour being
langed alony the wharfside was

eeen,. “and in the out districts r i \
here were many traffic blocks Police Force -will go to the U.K,}
caused by motor lorries laden The co-operation and kindness of,
with flour for various. shop- the English Police could not have

been better and the experience
gained cannot be equalled,” Cap-
tain Armstrong ended. '

keepers. .
Therefore the housewives cries
are hushed temporarily at least.






Os os:



Pique in Orchid,
quoise, pink, white
$1.00 per yard,
“prints” 36” wide
35c, per yard

~ alico Cambric
From 30c per yard.

DOMESTIC

Mercerised
2,006 yds.

tur-
Now

poplins over
in many shades,

suitable for making almost
any type of garment. Due
to quantity it will be sold

as low as 84c. per yird.

Home Furnishings -

Lionese Sheets 70x90

$5.10 each.

90x108 $5.88 each,
Shecting 72” wide (,, $2.26
Bed spreads in an array of
colours (; $4.96

“LADIES’ SHOES”

The = grondest
ladies shoes will await you.
Imagine buying a pair of
real Dress shots per pair

$3.84 per pair and
$5.84 per pair also
Ballerinas $1.57 per pair.



arade of



Tapesiry — in beautiful
bright colours 48” wide (a
$2.08 ner vard,

Table covering ‘tn. 25 ‘shades
(q@ $1.19 per yard,

LINGERIE -

Brissieres — in Brocaded
satin 240 pairs given away
price 68c. per pair.

Panties -— Silk.
This is startling news —
We have 400 dozen pairs
and again giving-away price
will be 2 pairs for $1.00.
also obtairoble are better
grades ranging from = 72c.
to $1.08 per pair,

Waist slips
bought @
Z

ean now be

$1.38 each,
Whole pett'coats clearing @
$1.38 each.

Ladies cotton “vest 2 for
$1.50

Children’s vest and P.nties

2 fc» 82.00.
iaaieeâ„¢ DRESS GOODS
Cotton Department — -— —
g What an array —

Nightgowns — Silk — Whet an assortment of

Now $3.48 each. beautiful printyd Crepes.

Some English, some French,

e seme American — The
Flowered Spuns = cmazing thing is the Price

$1.00 per yard

Feautiful big Fowerea de-
ens. Here is something
for your

‘Fugette.” 36” wide

Kimonos. : Printed
now — $3.98 each.
Z

The front
;}and head lamp were damaged.













money 88c. per yd. From 48c. per yard.
ee Z ~ ~ we Z
BLBAAAAFFE FAAS BAAS AAI AAS

fork of the bicycle

pm



Crepe Coneord in 10 beau-
liful colours something new,
its different from the old.
Particularly suitable for big
occasions. Now $1.47 per
yard.

American Printed Bembergs
42” wide exclusive in design
and of a light soft texture
$1.42 per yard.

x — a
LADIES HATS -
We sell some of the smartest
Ladies Hats in the city and

during the sale our first big
shipment of the most gay





and smartest designs will
be opened.

But firsts — 40 gozen
women’s Bonnett shape
Straws, °t ano her giving
away price $1.56 each.
Cryoline Flops Now $1.36

each,

Other faney Hats 48c. each,
Felt Hats and other kinds
$2.00 and $3.00 each,

A real time fer saving,



The News,

The

Top Tunes





Consider all the

Features

We offer!

WORKMANSHIP :

QUALITY
SUITINGS

You Surely Must

P.¢. 8. MAFFEE
& (C0. LTD.

as the “TOP” SCORERS

1



10.10 p.m. News Talk, 10 15
Health of Man, 10.30 p.m. Tip

STYLE

Decide on

N TAILORING,



Neosil Crepe De chine will
be sold at 72c. per yard.

Plain. white Crepes Fine
quality. Now Te. per yd.

“Spun Woven Silks”

16 pastel shades 36” wide
nearly 3,000 yards at a
givirg away price of 6%c.
per yard.

Schoo! Requisites !
Hair cords, , suitable for
College and Secondary
school uniforms prices cut
to $1.00 per yard.

*

Vanama Hats for reopening
of school — A complete
new shipment to be sold at
$1.36.

Licens — Vat dyed im an
rssortment of colours Truly
a good buy for Domestic
Servants, as low now as 72c.
per yard.



Shopping Bags all to be

cleared at big reductions
from $2.40 each.
ee ee ee
FAEESFEELE SES





See the Grandest Display of Merchandise
your eyes will ever feast upon

OPENING |
TO-MORROW SEPT. Ist

ON PARADE







SUNDAY, AUGUST



31,



WONDERFUL
AFTER-STOCK



1952


















~ RECORD
BREAKING



{
A REAL BARGAIN
TIME FOR
LADIES
From To
FLOWERED CREPES ...... $3.97 $1.50
2.03 1.02
2.29 1.08 |
1.96 1.02
2.41 1.50
2.52 1.40
2.78 1.02
3.16 1.80
3.20 1.20
4.03 1.20
FLOWERED SHANTUNG .. 2.25 1.80
FLOWERED TOOLINA .... — 1.67 1.50
PRINTED HOPSAC ....... 167 . 1.02
See our special display of short ends of
Dress Materials normally marked Less } of
Value.
Special extra discount of 25% allowed
during the coming week.
DRESS GOODS DEPT.
CAVE SHEPHERD & CO. LID.
10, 11, 12 & 13, Broad Street
j
a, i





Organdie Anglaise — 42”
wide also of Amcrican
Origin a wonderful mater-
ial for kids special wear.
Now $2.55 per yard.

Khaki at its bss! heavy
quality @ $108. per yd.
Blue Demin Drill @ $1.08
per yd. 200 dozen pairs
Gents socks priced (2 pairs
for 81.30,

White Elastic shorts Now
V5c. pr.

Boys shirts for reopening of
school from 60c. each to
$2.18 each.



Pyjamas a necessary Item
cost only $5.25 pr.

Boys Pyjamas Now $3.43.

In our tweed Department
Prices are slashed to the
bone — Plain Grey Suiting.
Now sold (7 $4.88 per yd.
Light ‘fropical 3 shades (
$2.95 per yard.
More durable
stripe design (;

tweeds in
§.98 per ya.

Ze LBBB
PARA FAF FFF

a
?

|
|

Â¥

Dear Sirs,-- You have got to work hard like a

machine from morning till nite.

Then wher you get the few cents
| evry thing so darn dear. Stop —
} expensive goods come to The Model
|
1

|

| lead to the...





THE MODEL STORE

CORNER OF BROAD & TUDOR STREETS

in your hand,
it — refuse to buy
Store Sale then
check, on your savings, Look ! — Shirts in stripe design.
Long sleeve dress shirts will be sold (, $2.88 each.

Change pues 100 dozen all colours from 24c. eaeh ard
| several o’her Items too numerous t omention all roads

MODEL STORE SALE

Corner Broad & Tudor

Streets:













Full Text

PAGE 1

• %  %  ^ SUNDAY. AIGCST 11. I52 SUNDAY ADVOCATE IFTri V "Robust" Man Dies By Misadventure Enquiry Ended After Lengthy Hearing ___ ... ipointed <>ui in Halsburv that, how on* n takes, but >t is vug. poram have t.. be mv ceeegesie-t i! takes ten minutes. ful There are 'iin; nouLslttons— If 011 met Edwards and Edwards b tinman said *imr of for bringing in j particular cei • the things the Police reported a.*, and so UII. were (rue and suite lies. I. Arraniaakd-.With fari*. A Coroners jury yesterday .eturned a verdicl of death They come to the Station. The! ,*.,..,. due to misadventure when the enquiry ...to thr circum%  :, • [•* discrepancies here, and it Wl!h -^ acU under then? con. stance:, surrounding the death of Cecil Hope, a 28-vear-old tJ b !# you lo .^w'i" w rm lo tK irou. I WSSTM! fl^rfJlr' 1 ?" 1 %£&.'&' "" sr £rT"B !" -" 2SL.T5 r*.^ ^VTu' Handicrafts In Jamaica •vas put to alt Police Station. then breaking t ;' J h door at the station about tell you. "If you believe this, down this be your verdict, and If that, 430 a.m. and then falling dow that be your verdict. Some Corthe flight of star oners do it. and with due respect When he says they were not ^1^..HaUbMry we have Ihe tine.-s Acl here ... It has "".'""I. """ ""* %  1.1 oca-lias (o, socriimlT"!! !" m ?S !" '' ! It.vellini M, blnkeu, fabric weaving, which ft wa.'ltlt w. S.n^. !" o n !" m ?1!1 xiV % %  bi m " d "> %  "" %  '"* delerlotatln.. theOovwometlt ml T CerffiuST 1 rocJ5 iS tu ~* >"**<• %  wood " '" ""* "bru"> ihl. yoar mltiatcd Ihe 11 Z an^J ulm.IT brou 1 " boot mid bmlle caaw. tray., napkin Jlppi Jappa Devalopmanl Sehema In TrlnJiU ii.-. 1 ""' nd ,h r nlclc-nack. toys six centraa with twelve glrla each „LL 1 ," k Dtm,r,r %  "•' Tlieae toocb arc likely lo attract lor a three monlh. court* of trainplace. Ihc-re arcno more mention If you arrive by boat, beIB* the result, have been >atimf inapectof Springer ^ thing which th'y J cSSSST,' St L^in, * %  ctor ^there U no do Ihe creating o. ***"* conaislent. I only point _^ Wta unco.WC.ou* when Die standard of living, at the i "appeared to be which vou "must l*ke as a who e **anee of_ that able Jamaic .your common sense. Vorman a,jjf. Q.C. Hun Mr Farmer or Mr. Nil"* :i skeleton aUff of six doing 1 doubt to them — they have their pfov consistent, that ince and 1 have mine — the very anyone of you. or th thing 1 might bo might be the very might happen, the creeling ol "! ey ."IL c ? n f w Jf n 1 t J onI > P 0 *"' he" waa'unconscwu." when~ P Kked w-Vnu' mi' t7."t"ll vou 1'tiylhinl work which included handi c—foMOn. I am going to put the out ** *"'" l >"" "> fv* Ht fl( ve| eRaitied ^, IS( .,. mprfl wl „ ,, „'„ d ^^ but u. thla fleld since then the fl lads before y..u. and H u for you f ou l lue gf hu *,vou '"' )ta ouaiau, but muttered things %  confuse vou* Y-'u h.vr |S• * %  '* pl1 '*arkable progress tientlemen. to aaaess thes<. Lpets, \J** V S '^ ^mgs And you aboul cnmes ne ccpm,,.,*! Jlld oagnloias, you tva Had the evt"" •. "f* "• hw'^erafi WnCfl nu hear that It is to be J !" not .^ oul blt f '^.^'i -o on. He faded out loey Mid .'en.c Mr. Fanner has .red ,,. rentrei distribute,! over the island in .ucordaiue with the evidence. ^Tv?? !" .^ ,hc 'P" on w ""> -" order, yoj. each with M irurtructrew lhal does not mean every witness V, rSt tiii 1, ^ „,,, and tb *> took hlm ,0 Dr Cal Gentlemen. I would be glad if wno gucs into the box is to be w„ ,.„• f ,C5 "'' %  SP'. '"* *ho ordered him to the hospital, vou rouldar vour verdict.'' fvlleved at sight or disbelieved ^\ J^'K i*' ,'' got to the hospital, the Tin lurv returned the verdict You have seen the witnesses and !" i !" ^ m T, t „* u "" K' rler "^ h,s *"* was Cecil ( ,r dCrtt h due to nlaad thelr demeanour. 7il S !" ,-H . SK AT% '"ve*ti*liui they Bfu r lbouI M mtnuledcliberafew ._ Cap,a,n """er read from A found his name was Cecil Hope ... ciiuio ^ K> ^' l book was Ta y |or * His mother cam • here and told 7 all this lima. schcuners do is to request a doctor to parand can be read In Coroner'* 1" an King at a verdict, you yesterday lorm a post mortem. Dr. Ward Courts. are going io paj aitanUaa to all '"• Bch performed the posi mortem in ihe material parts of the eviTrinidad. SeJv Am tals instance. It Is important In Mr. Farmer quoted a panagja Demerata and the Mob lals cerise — you had a view of *hich illustrated the difficult) %  '' assessment of the ex-iderne thai Cuibbee from Donlfrioa the body, but a jury on a whole, arriving at a pontine haemorthe man brought about his own The Triumphant Star not compelled to take more r h ge '-' was ". ,c tils *\'" wh ."' h ;i %  **! f^' ,ls mv tn ? vuUtion.— tn jgo drums of colas .•mployiiig around fort> virlifulllliM. These centres also receive wrk done outtidr; in this way 11 w estimated that over a _. thousand persons are concerned in but gifted the businaaa. The turnover tor last year was %  round .t-o.tOO the bulk of which v;,* Iioin exi-.rts i*> EnglatKl, f'aoada U.S.A., Australia. Bermu"* %  !" %  believe, apart from u '"•><< haemorrha..^ ".L.,^*" '^ ", "u„f. S Twenty-x Ska of lie.h fruil men. I raw ,h„ or thai, and I, ,s J^h.".!'^^ Co" !" '.^ {£ !" ^^^^^l. ^" " ^^ He tytid that the piece of pa ly have retarded haemorrhage. _. ^ You do not know all the partlcu'"'emorrhage could still have two. K1 %  of the case, but vou are en1^5^ orfbJtfJSlgS **TKS OF KUUIAME Some vcrdictt are very good and some very bad. I am asking vou, whatever you do. do not Jump to conclusions. Assets the evidence as nine reasonable men would assess it. It Is said that the Law per cent. U^ and *0 per cent. cumin en sense. You are laymen. When it comes to the ^ not bound to agree in accordance with the doctor*! evidence. If I did not see the body, the enquiry could be squashed. Anyhow, Dr. Ward performed the poet mortem You heard the injuries described by Dr. Ward. He said he saw the body and it i the body of a well nurished weigh tiled to take that, and against the facts. When it comes lo the pros and eons, gentlemen, it is a matter entirely for you. When it comes rX"VjK2 h I# I? d T ?**?**£: to ** War ^ awing out of his real Ur. Ward, of the enly Inquiry to) OI K„ ,, ., „,,—71 *I matte, for the front. The majority of the !" u P m r injuries were on the man's back. Ul ^ ^^ to lne Mperl „, „ Doctor KexallaaJ person who has died being %  good K cnilcmei, Dr. Ward was recalled, and sevman or a bad man. We live in a Law. you MVt AvauftT . iau M.n VORK %  y M nil %  Sight or denuuid main Pt ClWe Ciuporn CAN1RA i in. i ***4 r oral uuestiona were put to hlnv small community. It ia no pood with 'everything thov soy, but To Mr. Field he said. "It is my trying to hide things. We hear a you must give credence -n some opinion that falling down a fligflot of tilings. It is not your provino of the UVngs. When it come. %  > of twenty stairs would produce to decide on what you hear outthe evidence., it is for you to minor abrasiona and conc\non side. I will quote from Halsbury. aaeeaa it. When It comes to Dr. on the body. . ." and he went if a juryman were to know the Ward's opinio[i and the case Mr. further than that. facts, they are so strong on it that Farmer read to you. you are enWhen asked if trie haemorrhage you have to be called and put in ^Ued to weigh everything and could have been caused by fallthat stand and sworn so that your earerully assess the evidence ing down the steps, he used the Miow jurymen would know what 2d come to a decision that word. "May." When asked about vou know. That happened once in %  aj.bdur.il haemorrhage he said m> Court. A juryman got up and •could.' He said that the ponsald something that gave me a line haemorrhage could have ,.,„,, and OIdelvd the man w ^ aused death and that uv~ <"i"'i "i an H.mk.i'. n*ti,- Dralui Si|hl Drain Cublti t'liTltnio Couponi various injuries found must be You are p,,^,^ enlll |ed viewed a coii K lu(narate whi>k? d|aw lnfcroricw> an ^ neri ba the In the absence of disease of tho evidence fl M% revolver, if you 2 arteries, a pontine haemorrhage M itw. I have gone to the ex*' i due to severe trauma. He tells len of ,, et ,i ng Ihe Cflrd checked AIL ttaavt fie" ,I.„II>IIL .... r^nSBtPltaVI & .. ^ aLa, nber. You have to say h J 1 .., 0 pr0 i W %  "? ,e h ^'S 0 !' H " '' 0, ** %  'n* 1 have v* '. %  !? ** t .y i yi .^..^SfTlW" reas n tor not doing that. II you that. Of course he opened (or ^ the brain and the spinal chord. You would have to take it that ^ tnere was no disease of the ar. had „ revolver n is true he had tertet*. no bullets in it But there It is. To Mr. McLeod. he said. %  It Is a weap0n D f that nature even my opinion that ln the absence of w „ h out bullets, coupled with the Injuries mentioned at the omtr things, will assut you. back, he could no have ciad a Thtre w „ u, c handkerchief with pontine haemorrhage. It is my holes, the crocus bag and so on opinion that pontine haemorrhage Bnd you W1 |j lI3t your commonfollowing the Injuries described. wn5e ,„ com n tj a reason for his would take place within an hour having a revolver under Ihe cirat the most, assuming all the ineurnsuU ices. juries were Inflicted at the same Tfke police told you that they time. have been getting various re"A subdural haemorrhage could pori*, robbery, violence, rape, cause death by itself." This is a and thlngs ol lhBt ktnd. factor to bear in mind. Well, you come to the Police could cause death by itself." It | cav i n8 Britton's Hill on a partlrould be caused by falling down cu | ir morning with mstruettons a flight of stairs. Whenever you IO pa trol. They were dressed in try to get at the doctor, he falls plaln c | 0 thaa. It is well establishbeek or. .a conglomcnite ^j tnat lhcy weiV going into an whole." area where crimes have been Quoted Passage committed from time to time. Mv best advice to you is this. You have seen them, an d they cominonsense is a very good told you they had no weapon of thing. You have seen Dr. Ward, any kind, they had no cudgels, no He has told you what he has batons.' They met a man. They to say, and he told you what hi told you the moon was young, opinion is. It Is for you to assess The man walks towards them, and weifch the evidence. He said The man is asked what he is doing that subdural haemorrhage could there at that hour, and you know ."• %  ve caused death, but he said bis answer—his mentioning of a ihat all the injuries must be taken girl Carmen. There it a checkup ,i. a ..iiglomerate whole. In other and there is no Carmen. They words, you cannot divide them, proceed to •earcn him and find %  There ha* been too. the blunt few things. They leave there iratrument described In various then, and all that time he was ways "t charged The Police .old you of the He walks with them until they from the Pine to the met Cpl. Edward-. I never askec fit and proper to rome to In this Bear In mind at all time?, thai if you believe that this man with free volition brought about his death, what verdict vou will re turn. If you take all the evidence and assess it carefully and doubt, you know wh.it %  edict i" return. It is sometimes said, I Olb and if thai, then that. '>'*' r r *'** r *** t r*~S.',' r '*',' r e ;' tourney Salesmanship. Petroleum Technology DO YOU REALISE THE NEED FOR MORE QUALIFICATION? ar ABE YOt INTERESTED IN MAKING MORE MONEY? IF SO. ENROL NOW FOR ONE OF THESE COURSES. Architectural DmurfauAr-ef sanlUn Inspector Course s a a ae hl p Building and r jjk tieneral Agriculture Design Course. LJ/m Course. A.M.* I.. tClvll. Flee. I i ..m. Practice. .•mi Meeh.) ^T^ !" Aatonwblle Repairman's 1 COIirse. JBBBBalfl Electrical lnsull.ii .mi IP< | I U %  .. — ,, a^-. Wiring Came. B ^hoei tertlflc-le Course. General Electrical EnglnI ^V \ecOuntanry. eerlng Course. iasBBsr Civil Service Entrance General Certificate or EdLgW Course. uoaitee. pV MaM Prsot*ei Write far ful' irtlculars if course is not mentioned Write 'he Caribbean Educational Institute PO. Box. 307. P.OS.. Trinidad a inbt for : ITI8H INSTITUTE Or BNO TECH. ft BBTTUH TUTORIAL INSTITUTE LONDON THERE IS NO TOMORROW POST COUPON TO P.O. BOX 307. PO.S. Please send me Free Book. Name Address Subject of Career of Interest Age -POST TODAY' P S. TYPEWRITING EXAM. [ P 8 Tml HBIM-II NUTR ALSO H wat C B R wh • l.,r'rd .lira* Tv|irrHiM K #mlnallci.( K, R *. i II IHK-K. ripi. %  IPS I'o -nl.tl.r 31 • M-m Pimples Go Cause Killed in 3 Days WEATHER REPORT VESTt:RI>AV i; mil ill from Codrbutlen: nil TUI rainfall for m.mt'i 1 i date: 2.04 In*. Teanperature: 14.0 "• Wkad Veteelly 4 mllrs pri hour Rarumrler (9 a.m.) 29.9*9 ill a.m.) 2f.Sg ro*A> .Sunrise: 3,49 a.m. .Sunset: t..ll p.m. Moon: Find OuarUr. Auiual 21 I IK Mine 1.W p.m. High Tide: 1.14 > m I'm Tide: 1.0-t a.m.. a.aS p.n Ify-HiWaHiunijciQl UK KM I from l'AIN, snJ -I henrfiu of Viumin U, TOO m take YBAa 1 Mil I .. There's nothing caw like MAS Mil It h 'Ii I ONU ; rtlu-.cr friden A; in toiu, Vkaaua B I go snd get .otn %  U AM I Tshlei. IH. For HEADACHES NERVE PAINS COLDS, CHILLS. RHEUMATIC PAINS RELIEVES TOUR PAIN %  ad MAMS rou nei wtn |.Utp| I'a. •.,. • 'UMinc a.-m 1 %  nlt.B %  M K ill I imnt.u %  i %  %  -•"• %  %  • %  m niaai t • .. -i ,. • i i in iniini i i %  Ni.ad.rm .|ll I 1 rear al Nixoderm SCONES 3c. Each %  beg to .lutil. our Cusirrs iiiiri Uie (Jener.il Pubthat Ht'TSON'S URI't. STORE will ba closed fo ,lid..vs ,.s from the 1 SepU-mbvr to 21st Sepb ber HTITSON ,118 52 t ',;','.;*.'S.;**<'.:'. BACKACHE IS YOUR 'a WARNING! aWasdw is ui>K T ihfir.l .im D ( KUn*. Ttssssh. Ths tuasers • Uw bUod'. M*-. Wki ri. i*t Mltf -rito, UlMd •/ ^e ITMSI aaW fbwiag la mry aam asa w—ri; rwr Uosd ab-MM ia I*... with %  nU pow— %  .wd nidi. Dnw TI Ixl '* %  " %  HBH a fmtuty'i •iswitnra and sriaMatr tsata li t aartan In Umi-i. Hinwi pr*ft lha. DMU'I klaW r Pill* aukUr rid *w W—* sf film ands and pviaana. Than IUI Uaa i. raar-re karkarha diupi*ar> MJ rmm laad Ming la raslacaJ h, rabatt Itaakh and marrf. Tau fa*l yaari )*unti In.,M Mi a KNWT KUa. D-d T tm lar p bsttla at aH rtiassali M Dodd's Kidney Pills Hurricane Precaution HINT No. |2 YEAST-VITE RECEIVED num. ursM RSM* % %  AND -. aiti m-rv. 14VOM4L ii-iltl li K MM iwn *•!! I (L CARLTON BROWNE Whalesale Retail Druggist %  Roebuck HI. Dial MIS i'heck that everythini; ] that mlgh: hlow luoie terured. Store omall loose objeetK >uch a* garden tools, refuse hin*. porch (urnittire. etc inaldr the houae. DANCE < IIHJlKrN S (.i">DWll4. laMgnl 'Conalllullon Bol %  ATUKDAY Mli HHTT.MIir.H l^i' %  ahMlasiON t/MUM Wt Par** (I..... €.,,i...t lOXrHrHIIMENlt OM HAlX %  T aaa>a*oaa>g tiM t. > ll!J 3$ a There is such a thing ..! When Iniliired in mir MOYI1ASIIII TKoriCALS (.AIIAKIHNKS — mill i-vcii TWKKUS C D. Rico If Co. •f II..11.... %  tan Tff '!ffl H II fl B AHBAUOS I AKEHIES Ii Dial 47S8 JAMES STREET Til WF. HAVE IN STttCK . I l I:K 1//... agarbla Chlpa I I I KMTI: Marbla Plnkhrd NbaeU TRINIDAD Cegar Beanla AI.VMINIVM CatmgaUg Slir.l, MIMIMIM GDtlrlinf — Ig". t4" OALVANISBD Corrag.lad Rkee-ta RARRI'.D 1MIII t'Libllshcd 1M0 RIIHII i K II '<* vtMit MUppifJ I'r-tmt sttivli thf fttllnti iitfi Hnoli—n Mtili-rinl— Red Cedar Shingles No. 1 & 2 Corrugated Galv'd Sheets 6', 7', 8'. 9', 1(1' 2 and 28 flaugr Corrugated Aluminum Sheets •', T, 8'. r. anal HI' Corrugated Everite Sheets '. V. 8 and 10 Wilkinson & Haynes Co., Ltd. A BOTTLE GOES A Lon f WAY f#-.S HERE'. Ju-C Dry Ginger Ale QUALITY PUlim i WIIOLrSOMf.CS, nlrngad U.i-lh.t u. give you THF. Pr.RTT.CT MIXTURr 1 Ii 1 H See — elegant appoonrntoe ami limling dependability 1 -dl We are pleaaied lo an unelha .iinn>Milraeii| ol our firm as Sole Umli. in Kirlud.Nt of Il.e Hriliah Olivetti Ltd manutgi. lurer* of thr line rjnge ef tlllvetl, Ttpewrders See Ihe merlls o( lhe*e machines for vouivlf br dialling ST1S and iirranglnn 4 personal drmonttratluD %  a llll -l IVKT11 11" — geo is" — S2N inS. P. Mus.1,,1, Son & Co.. Ltd. 1 H m mm B%  %  %  wm i. m



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StXDAV. Al'GUST Jl. 1K2 SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAGE SEVEN AN>T. |W\RI)S introduces a eew Gu*dc to Pan* W*H iMKtoMrfcsby f.^.'-g* UI II ftrXTFS COURIER-STYLE SHE ANNOUNCES We are now approaching my Selected Sights for some Unlikely Tourists I 'M oui to promote the Anne Edwards Tours OJ I'd like to transport hundreds of tourists, shim thi u Dumber of famous Puns landmarks, visit counties exhibitions But not. oi com • the tourists, the landmarks, am the exhibition ally get together on %  tour The Anne Ed* would managers anu .wiidtacturers. t.u'.ii ana taxi-drivers. cleaner* and ihop-girla. The landmark* would De French managers and manufacturers waiter.* and taxi-drivers, cleaner-, and shop-girls The exhlbi lioiio would be iiuknow-how with which theae people rio their Job* Dona run away wiin 'he idea that I'm oui to prove die French are more clever than we are. and tell everyihins oeiiei and cheaper. What thev sell Is often a-arer and worse and *f anlevn i-noiiKh when we in I would stop at tht Par it sweef shops UT I am oui to pruv. liat from u woman'* viewpoint there arr 'hings we are noi ven i gbl abOQt *nd especially 1 don i linos it is Bright ol all those people wno orov.de nousenoid service* 'o go on oenaviDK as ll ihe> riuO never recoverea Irom thr r -uke an old lady giant IOI lie? ;it nigii ID scariei •merald. ana amDei tnoco >ttie cigsu-c.ies oacaed uar %  sopuiai bruna wnoser* *r '* pollc"." explamea the rlnwi : i oel not'tmull l otcito •.<> Madame n'tternl w>% "it' me a ftp Id stop at tht eating spots T IB •LOWER SHOP* *hsre iney *a> or course i will delivei it 'ni> alternuiiii ana nevei dremii fu-'xina 'IU'WIIKtl I'T < lilt RARRU* iiDVs *!.. ^flnooplaie [M p ouncher ol gmpee iti umbrella* iruu Swv* iruu-tp*feiit uwpvi ie '-1iutk U > uw iurj. '.iu nit. jeitcMtsaarii storee m anueiaim lai aunt — .> ( ne rxi.eruenrei* ruil ol iewd>-u>-eKi ixxi n M rrvuon aciicMteaacu A. .. in :i,i uiat ooUlo I0TH lic*pet oere like Nivoue ol iruei. -jpera tact % %  %  iii"*. ttan iivv<"i wim c %  .iH-h* ,r! outfon musn %  viiiu .DO si cad aaeifOBt irestHM .r rfailK ana onunrn M 'r\ utitl tilled ltd .luppsa -,n cken in tanoe no :ie muiiii. tfiellr w T> JtieMt -•na ash :ilug re oil t jreun rumaea u. ie* m 'tie jven %  ven iwneo *U* *"* *ni uavonnn:* (•• Mlloi anaop io iro wnji *ne %  rd.TOilcd eggs rnev dve r.'xi d ifop of 'he o.rporr buffets I U I tkfc %  OUlKwu ot mr men wno run station *na airpor mflela to tge .. ,., wnen vou lemand Imnei • 'en aiwavs ipread> *on %  •leiin -:nu iwnehei vou line ii oaper^'loth anc ponder* 'Q iiieuti wuh vou •' lengt* And nevenever pileup the eMin i>t flicks out 't\* lignt *htl* vou linger >vecodee (because rie know* trie fhanoee Me vou *.ll ordc innth<" inr) OW no -*s *loi Id sfop at tht dress shops I U KliN • *oeet. weea-eno ; r.p loi treas ana tubnr *no jewel and coe nunul-.Uirers %  *ee • ipes-,i le.ure ii Prjice—me eat in *rM_n al iing* >re -'ititen ai ah %  ir-ar leveLwiU) list niuD'iiill PUIN1 ill' I ute Ifl >t m uw o.k UMtdon snops) . •iie ^arvaa .ua riat-n ana COUJD IIX-U io Ui••* sprav rar-c4ipa like a clauo our,t of raindrops the wai Prencn cheap dreasea pave %  rSOeSO ilirTerent oeekltncs mte. : Of iltemuiitiK Besween sn iteea^ and Pe'er Pan eoDara On res. there are a loi m -igli't to cheer a woman's heat' n Paru but not the nget %  rin-jer* aee usually mown And at tht tmd —a thit • m-\ tlSKk. a>r ; ii I • trail at* ana A. : .undnes who colltv •ow tres* After oreakhat nn raiuni it in riniF toi dinner ne iioia4 niaKlr. wno will onuc ..t anyUUilg ID eat oi lnn-> ai -i. unie ol mum ,n ia%  no tevei uin> ., naJi il -I*L I I "tin %  *,((, a knife ana Rsn | i> Bt *ri*ii i-ou noagn-isewn rei the bin itors* n riiii Uiev rii "Vervinin^ >ou ou> in pretlv Dapci lie %  irimv ana sloi in a wooa-aiei %  ii' landle so tne packs* •troag enouxn to TOWS -lie Jhunnel with vou I'm sure at the ena oi uj trip* •onie ol uiv touiutw woulu ket clue about one aapect the rag disci 'tryiBK to : -lve it a ro#e shap. tOO TAKTS if puffed paslr>'.OT oastrj bnaee i se* next redpe) Boil lx^i.1 \taku a hole in Ihe middle aad put .i pinch of salt, the butter im.l lh,. water. Mix nil the Ingre dienbj together. Do not wnrk Hie dough top long. Holi It Into a bat HMl i foi quarter of ..: hour. When ready put It In yosiL small lins and bake In mndenite oven. llriMUR HALAD Oft < i i i %  ii HI.K nous ixni M;rt'ut lee euoOMbwal in very one Isllcaa like paper Put them in I onwl and put some salt over them leiive the.n like that for half an hour. Then take the slices and dry them it. a napkin Pot them u i i-h md %  eeeon hem %  • ilh pea*) very littlst salt, olivg ml vinegar, chopped parsley adding on* i two teaspoonaful of cream. Pal tt dish lh the fridge for at least one hour. Serve as hon d'oeuvraa salad. Midday Swim THANKS to the ogieeauit Peru habit 1 ukuig two lyjurn off for lunch, many oil Inm erg hav>' .* nudday .•wun on nvl August dayg. At Uie Bains iv Ugn>. noar tho Concorde Bridge, otdeat pool m Parti (it dotes Irom lttuif. 1 paid 3s., plus i small Up to the woman In charge ot the khaiiging room and afUtr the swim had a hot restaurant Uuii.li .;li wine fur 12a, Average uumbci ul NWIUUIUU in August, 3.000 g u.o. To-day there will probaOly i doubk that. They bathe In Seiin water, illieiud od gtronyly ebloriDaled Most populat wear. Uikinib. Se many bionscu bodic* btiewed the pUnka of the tinb.iUilng en ClOBUre Uut It was diXHcult tt i iid a place in Uie aun. Tho pool was recoostrui.-ted ia the last century wiUi the burial ship whitii transported the body of Napoleon to Paris PARIS. AN carl's daughter with a French accent is back in Paris after dancing among the ruins of ancient Greece. She is .slim. LaUn-kioking. 2g-year-old Ledy Madeleine Lyllon, daughter of Lord Lytton, artist peer who died last year. She was bom in Paris, bag spent most of her life there. Her mother Is French; she was the late Lord Lytton's second wife. Lady Madeleine's great-grandfather Bulwer Lytton. wrote the List Days of Pompeii. Lady Madeleine began tu erase as a dancer at the age of five under Lisa Duncan, one of the numerous adopted daughters of the fnatlstic Isadora." Now. *he says. "I am a character dancer, I carry on the Isadora Duncan tradition—tho plastic expression of music." In Greece, where shr wag invited to dance In the Detphk Festival, Lady Madeleine stayed tome months. She gave recital', wearing ancient Greek costume at Athens and Pntras: dancLady Madeleine Dances Among The Ruins By EVELYN IRONS ed in the open ,.ir theatre .tt Rhodes before the King and Queen of Greece. She was accompanied by flute and harp. "I take my dancing very sci.jusly," •MO says. She was In Paris with her mother and father when Fratu fell. ; ( nd they moved south iu unoccupied France in HMl Mr.. Churchill wrote to Lord Lytton advising him to make his way home. The family escaped through Spain and Portugal before the whole of France was occupied. Since her father's death. Lady M>dcleine has continued tn live with her mother in his studio flat near the Observatolre. Thit week-end they leaee on a motoring holiday. Lady Madeleine's future plans: dancing tours in ''•> rniany and the United State* Le Crocodile MANY Paris celebrities ..re in Deauvllle this month. They include writer Casetae, actor Haoha Galtry -tij Australian ]ocke\ lag Jahneleas. niack-haired. 17 years old. Johnston has now. as he fore%  liadowed earlier, split with M. Wareel tseaaaac, the owner for whom he has ridden since I950 in the beat-paying racing partnership In recent memory. The French call Johnstone "Le Crocodile'* because of nil nn-Wm %  if coming up from tho rear U> devour his adversarie*. Jaeke Deyaseeie, who will now ride all the Bouseac horses trained by -tembbu, is nicknamed Taraii-. beeuussj of his handsome figure At Deauville. Johnstone Interrupted a sunbathe to tell me 'It's true that a number of own ers are after me now that I am to be a irea-lancc, but I hav* made no decision yet about tht St. Leger I rode my last Bouseac horse, Alcinus, in the Grand Prix at Vichy last Seodaj I shall probably noi ride for him again. There is no quarrel. "We have parted by mutual consent. I am not dissatisfied with the money l made with Moussnc; it was a good deal." Jonnstone does not plan to have France. His wife, the former dancer Mile. Guy. In a Frenchwoman from Brittany. "And." ay Johnstone, "I have lived in Purls for 20 yean." Johnstone went to Paris from England In 1932 to see the Qrand Prix. There lie met th* Prencn owner Pierre Wertfaetmer. who invited him to go to Chantilly for one month. He never went back Juhnstone speakEnglish to hi-. French horses His daily weight-'ntroi diet: two biscuits, two grilbt, one salad %  ni three glusae*. of walet After a lace he drinks a glas*. of Break, Johnstone went to Ufjoceupted France in 1IMU. but stayed there. He won the Grand Prix in Mar-eiilea in 1942. At Mont. Carlo he was picked up by u Italian ami uiternedQbermted 'i .'i' Italian surrender, he wa* %  aught again and imprisoned item ll'l loi t by the Germana. He eacapeu ali-l narhMl Ul" ftla ,l.i ^ II. in '' i...ill> before M.i ubci JI.MJI London Please Copy ST. I.A/.ARK %  ith foi ,the lh, ; their babies. Open dally from 'i.ati a.m. to man i>m ha* facilities for bathinv. beettgheatlng and rostlng. Some flats have a slat, i the door so that visitorc HndiiM the owners out can leave a n •rid Copyright linger vex 'erieww-bom faadore Dunlunded a sehoot of daNcmg •scow, 'named Soviet poet Cssenin, died m rar aeciU Nice 1827 —L.E.S. Afxtn MoutTZwn III IIM t I KII.X IN \Mr>RICA has satisfied leading Beauty Salons that Ui HelctwCurtis bi-mpiio makes hair geCt luorimanageable and certainly more lovely when washed with the HeU Shampoo plus Egg — yes, real egg! Your are invited u. judne by the results. Hut if your luiu %  ITS MILKY 3JIAMPOO restorts Riil oils. Try it and *ee — i drug and dry goods stores 101 atnUJON CHICK* u a lot liUcka for anyone's garden. PL'HINA PRODUCTS bave proven thai this number of husky egg-la At Jason Jonas oi Co., Ltd., PUKU4A LA YEN A is one of a whole range of Poultry Feeds, Is a i-rtain booster of producUon. liiinoniber a Purina Dealer i quality minded, brings his cus'mers quality results — and m llart-idos, your Puruui dealer is Jason Jones (,4403). KIIU4T ANU ONLY I w MM: Of IT!* KINO ON THE ISI^Nl* IBM SaniUiry Uiundry with l%a BttggBrB inacaunery and meUvjUproducea qualily-hrsl-wurk Fresii, too. wiUi new ideas. Sanitary Laundry have just issued an ailrime low in wholesale n i for bulk laundcruig. With Hg four depots at Pine Rd., Martini St.. Aquatic Club Gap and Si. I ranlzallon is "way ahead In pleasing and benetlling old and new clients. FREHflNEHS AND /IM. .1 any time of day even in thinet. can be yours with LiMOLKNE. A product of the BORU Hav Ruin Co. It's a tropical pick/..u-up-a n d-go. PLOKALflNE TOILET WATER is a ladi*>' f.'ivduriij.' and if you're a newict to the Island, you'll kno.s why as soon as you feel the cool perfeehon of n. Bonu n Co., feature these locally made Lotions at all leading sloe. 1 or .f vou care to phone, it'i "Hi: • • • PVUi GUAM MILK a new shipment is here of PasturUed ^irTRiciA Dried Full .thing for rverj borne Tin md White Tin'on thi Groceiy >L22 fur III tins and *5.M for Uba. Nut-I. I.I %  Simeon H'lni %  BOSJ iistiiiiuiion and ssaggu bae safgal popular telling brand.-, on HW Island. Remember fOUl his time of the rtM M rttsW vour supply Bfl KOM \Jf ITS SO C-O-O-U HO DKi '.mi i in con I jn ,i ri,, .toing my best, you'.I agree, to mike you really comfortable with II K EAC DK COLOGNE. %  PJBJM %  I longe and origind German product %  t famed Una wftl 1-a.i -Seven-Eleven) J. A. Mar. .V Son Ltd. rare exclusive : itlves for thi <-Enu-de-Colot:. Bl the beet ^hops. decidedly M necessity. • • • r.Utt A OREAM AND A ffawal 'ME TRUE, add a portion ->f i B iitd charm ami mix in a %  lhie" and vou have |he II1IJ.MAN COUP1 IN CK t Cole's Garage — geel nhewtitintl. Matching il gfO Sedans in blue, tun mimnn. r an and black — a *bn (he worlds n. 1 • < iular light cir. Come mi in Ui 8*1 on Monday fflmt thing) and them a-iiul don't l> •.•i l .|it,.l ) • ill buy nnywav FIRI! AtTIDENT! THF.PT! %  I %  II. I'm not m-unil 1 This •% u can be, in Ha,..Id H K dne/s office In the K R, Hunt* .V Co.. Ltd. Building, Lower 4-....,l Street ph. 5027. Harold i-i-l lesent.s the INSUHANt K COMIYY OF WORTH AMERICA %  i, Philadelphia. ofTermg ro'.erage for over 60fl dirferent risk. Read the full %  '••ry ia K R HUnte's Insurance nl t.Klay. it suys: *WE STAND TWEEN YOU AND IX)SS.Itt ILT IN THE ULASGOW PtfTOKY OF OLIVETTI — ll.ese rornarkable OLIVETTI IM'EWRITBRS have ...rne to S P Musson Son %  Co., Ltd., I'VII their ad today?) and are soiling at a price to beat the I ind! M S2BO; IS g^KH, 18" U'J6; U-uutifuUy put togetlier with auti natig margin setting and 45 %  fee W eharactars and signs. You ant Invited •>• arrange fur demonstration .<( v.. L.I t'oiivenience ph. S7IS (.I^HSUAKE IN ALL VAaUKTIES at C. S. Phcher A Co.. now. %  l ecUon Including AquarYou'll Bad Ovenwnre I iipri-,fi with covers, FruK i ; I laaea — here's aomem, Frlgldaire Hottles. — .1 and bill gallon Screw Cap Glase Jars. Coasters. Sandwich A-,h Trays and Rose Bowls. And, I assure you, much mtre to choose from. Dial 4472 in doubt, but H'll %  • %  vou to jo In Pitcher'* I drcanied I wan a fashion fipurp in maiden/om Ovcr-Iurr" h'sliue! Meie'. UM linn, flatlerin. BKppotl tO gi*e you a really dreamy figure.. .|i> make your ailhoueltr tiul) lanhional-le' DwafOTet ther rtire** lid, tla loveline-s ktaeafl I" i"Ui faveriu fabric-. Uaaalne Maidenlnrm Braaaiares are raw.le old. intln I idled atBaus of Araeri. a TVaee is a m*f'drfl/rW// t..i even tvpeol agur* You can now obtain the following from "YOUR STATIONERS" STANLEY (.minis-. sTAMF CATALOGUE nHiTisn i Minir i'1-.t EfMlNE LEAF STAMP AI.RCMK. lONGEg, alsa PERFORATION C1AVOB8 .Old WATER MARK TRAYS MAtiNIFIERS. runvills ROBERTS ran t in M. Sx. you know. "loan believe ihal. Hcdoesn'i rroaa much of what's g o Bag on Voi like our Ruftis -rKrerestly. that dog seams nsor* dead than alive these da>s lot of use he'd be if anvrhjng happened''' "BetUve ll ft no'. Rex was ktt like ihal al om time. He used lo mope tcwendet 0 • BLINDING HEADACHES MADE HER HELPLESS "Vfcll. something's made a wonderful ch:inc rn him." "Bob Matttt's, my dear. You've heurd vl il.eir ( omiitum Tablet'. I upeii bui Mm obvtoadx hmtett'l Irirdihem'" "No . I>o they realh do anv good"' "Looi al Rr> Apparenllv ihe I,HHI dots normal!* get tacks fiiamtm and minerals and ma on. So then they eel out of cond*in*n taraN'i whm't the mailer with Rutm*}. You gire him IMW Bob Martin's a day. I'm sort thai'* what he mernkt." "Thank goodncs* you told me! I ll get a packet on the way back." Snpplica of CHd Cottage Uve parfuaac, soap and takuan — .ire available at your beauty-counter Nowhere will you find truer, rriore exciting Lavender than tfaat wtuch comes io you direct fn England in the famous Grossinith green bohtlc. fiROSS.MITII BOB MARTINS CONDITION TABLETS for doak of any age or breed. From all good chemists and stores. Write for a free copy of the booklet *Thc care of your aog' by Bob Martin. Laeai Agaale: L MK. MXYEKS A CO. LTD. BRIDGETOWN, BARBADOS. s. a. IIMJAMIM LII, r.o. aox 'J', aaiDbitowat. >• %  ) %  offer g severe hsadaohas will be Interested la reading bow this womaa andad her troubles t— "I waa needaobes neeaied to lose mv atgnt and all riowar io mr hnda aacTwaa rbroed to lie down for hours at a Mme. My a int. who baa taken Km-' lien sn •-r y-ar. auggeated my brripg '.hem. I eld ao, and I've not :.tA a return of those terrible headaehes for months. In fact, I feel quite cored "—M W llealaohee caa nearly alwaye be r r.oed to a eUaordered atome/:h and io the anaoapected retention in toe svetem of stagnating waste material, which poisons UM blood. Remove the pofaonous aooumolatlona — prevent thsm from [ormlng again—and yon l won't bava to worry anv more. And that la Just bow Kruacliou brlnxs swift and laatt'ig raUer-by <1 sensing the sy


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PAOI mi i: MNDXY ADVOCATE SUNDAY, AlOl'ST U1K If you fad worn out. dpri.a\ *t general I p run down a |lflM or two a 4aj> af L(.(U Tontc Wtnt wilt fKkIy rattore toe. •* r I •"d ton* up ih* whole nroui lyttasja. Giving new vitality K fo'ti'ie. ?oo igaintt fever and axKiuition and rtr-mMf. Bu kfut Tonic Wine U aipccUHvaluable iftar illness. ^IfcitS^ %  rHnuiM<|ll Whikvpnae%ttniid.*tlfKiloiirfai I-OB) *lM V iaoc fium ite fiiu tip. ^ QUEEN SCOTCH WHISKY Sole Importers :— W.I MONBO€ 1 CO I'D BRIDGFTOWN. UPtlADOl MBS i GooilimoiTJSngsalicgtowitI)iGiIlfittfc ;/ InTpitcofSTddicI ion 'to vanning, IIK I n-lislinuin siiiii* in Hit moriHii; 1 .; [With glf* at the comfort ndfating, 4, ..' .That Bluc'. GUkttcSfto bring hii>lac. ^NriiuraYly IhcnTcll-groomr^,".-. '".. men of England and every other country too, use Blue Gillette Blades. The sharpest edge in the worJdtnsurcs them a smooth, .; easy, close shave that slays] • clean nil day.ond Blue Gillette • .Blades Jasl so long thai It is' "t he mos t economical shave too. %  --> _-4S^-. *5BI*ts-30^ VRADC LNQUIRlcs rOt 1. CiEliDES DRAM I.I.VI.I I. ENGLAND WIN TEST Yesterday's Cricket SERIES WITH INDIA W.I. Cricket Officials Asleep ? f RACING NOTES BY Bf\ Ail I' I CABLTON v* EMPIRE Spartan went back at the wicket Empire XXt and (for kU> tU yesterday to continue their over rarltem . •* %  w.-ek score if 14 fur the IOH of Empire skittled out Carlton one w.cket. "Stall Harris batted /or 92 at Black Ilork yesterday in well and confidently. He had a reply to their first inning* ore go at the bowling until he was of 232 anri than wort on to make eventually caught by the wicket210 for the l-.s of six wicket* by keeper off E. Edward*, for 63 run*. -as! .... -. ••.: ires KT; ^x^SiSL^S2JSSZ ,„ e:.gre score were poce bowler watch. He w;>s never troubled by less than a dozen and only one SANTA KOSA MEFT1NG B Y this time the first day of the Anma Santa Rosa Meeting will have been completed. An astonishing number-US-horses have been record. Tin BY ft. .-. ...-. . i_nirTr i ms IUOI wur u> rm %  * .—-.---.,—-. .T HI TST a i i -igland and India have now been meagre scon wenpace bowler wat i MM than a dozen and only one with more man rwo an • % %  an m ha? Ien an ovr.vhelming victory recorded H. Barker and slow left arm n„. 1'i.kwi.k .iU.uk, but rather in itTCd. Not that an entry of twenty five, which is the number itstea for England with three Teats won. and the other drawn. OOWtftr Ad/il Holder. Barker plafjd their bowling with all confor nc j ttMm Handicap is not a frightening amount on the little Two main question* M t followers of International trundled effectively to bag 5 for ndence. His steady cautious hatting ,__,.,, h „ >. .„ ^ ,. X Detted that a number of these will be %  i :he other peculiarly affects the West 42 In 11 4 ov< i Ihree of win. h „ uiuatrated In the 31 singles he A rtm *' ', !" .' " !" Jl7T,7rf care and attention ha* gone Crick* Conference. wan maid.Holder !Cor *i i n hU innings, but hTalso scratched. Obviously, a good deal of care and *\ tenU !" ""*?"; 1 sh;.:. i general aspect first and it is this—How far collected 3 for 23 after sending ^a occasion to hit a six. Into the framing of the races and a well balanced programme nas can we predict the chances of this victoriousEngland team against ,( 0 wn a overs. When Frank King joined him resulted. The wicket was good when kt h( u i tkoI lt N ccmt\l as though Barbados entries are limited strictly speaking to Mr. Chase's Pretty i would make a fair bid Waj wnom apparently Doctor Dottin has succeeded in putting back on her feet, and Embers. The latter may be seeking a lucky track, toll *..,. ii.-.fui name" we call cricket. a"~with^lFta*al standing at 39 ^tTZL'SXS^iSZ^ ^ but after her performance in August I certainly do not fancy her when their first ; Australia next summer? How strong is the England team now? |i nbt that there is anyone living who can forecast wita any Carlton degree of certainty what will be the outcome of the England-Aus|TiT1 ,ng with the Hutchlnson f^-T^uT.^rst 'iMlnn lead, but !•" %  T. .ill must of necessity be fam.b.r w,th the bn^hers. Reynold 23 and Geoffrey Kmfwu eventually run out for [glorious uncertainties of this wonderful gaga a w qil eriO fcaa. :i „,, h irie toul standing at 39 J 5 He had lust hit two fours, and but after her perform-mc ist wicket for the day ANALYSIS PEKM1TTK1) for tw ] IfoWEVEH this -hould not prevent us. certainly not this scribe. it w i Km from analysing the respective chances In the light of the rm r I f. erformances of these two countries. *hen Since the Indll England Test* arc the most recent, let us deal back Reynold Hutchinson by hem first. I think that It will be generally conceded that in tm route witi out any addition to "S-^C-." ^—.^ unfortunate li I Truernao England possess the finest opening attack they nis over week ton. The ball %  field which she will have to meet. wickets. sending a shot through %  quaff* chances against the strong C Clasi not long before Empire ]( ^ amrtmd M ,.>r r.m. nirnett rrty Way, at her best would be a force to be reckoned with, but '" iho a/as neuilng at that position, 5nB u navc to W8 it and sec whether her recovery is complete. rker **(;* was" swift throwinc in. and King Although Mr. Barnard's string really hail from St. Vincent we i recent, ie us ar*i ,i K iteyrioin uuwrmiwii MJ •'• ly conced*d that in £*• route will out any addition to ** n Jrt.r% w Bedser and Trueman England possess the finest opening attack they n over week store. The ball ££TnNhw^l.mun run .-it Interest. I shall be surprised H anyinmg geui near have been ab&l to put into the Held since the restoration of Test now triumphed over the bat and pATi"* ^VTIIMUIIIV ODCIW UH the Derby Trial Stakes nor do 1 think that that wil ALL OVER THE WORLD see so much of them that we can follow their fortunes with justifiable Interest. 1 shall be surprised if anything gets near to Bright Light in .11 be her only sueompany hut cv. regardless of Ihc opposition agains: (u) 54 an rt it was left to Warren he had iwl yet scoreo. Added to o( lhe relative f orm f OT we have already seen her in action. Among .lu.h ihr\ li.iv Uvn ranged tan any o( these be credited with hav^h,, ciime j n „t ift„ stage and .vas aoscnt. lhc other two-year-olds I notice Surety, a full brother to the useful •ig attained the speed, thrust and ferocity which young Truemjtn Rnockc d up • quick 31 Including For llcliwick El. u. Houd A h ,^ m w u i.as pioduced against the Indian team. • five fours and one six took three for . and E. Edwards - %  %  ... GAP PARTLY BRlOGED The innings \ lock three for 38, Ti e only new sires to have out 2-ycar-olds are Bold Friar who Is T>JIAT being so wc are entitled 10 assume thai at long last England will, Carllon's total standing at In the secoiul turn at the KKU^ responsible for a half-bred which goes by the remarkable name of w,„. h'ha'sTx,:;'^ S 5^* mean lhat 1 have placed the aucfurther consolidated their post__. very good Creole Fragrant Memories. Ghenghis Khan himself was out cess of the recent combination of Bedser and Trueman above the „„,, by registering 210 for the loss .£ ,V,., v ;.V-t "' Fellcltas and hence his use as a sire would give breeders access to %  '''c^rad^unte led the way with CelWe lgTi*3Sc£ n.ne H> l^rnard'.rare strain of blood. fine knock for 51 including wkU) afceU 5 A word about the stakes. These are on %  most lavish scale and •Jiree .jountlaries. Other useful Lodge 8B and (far • wkUl 10 rnnge from the three thousand dollar first prize offered for the Captalr. contributions were niade_by Grant Harrison College after declaring Cipriani Memorial Cup down to the one thousand, one hundred ard i .. %  ..ill and Miller but it does restore some sort of balance even to iRe extent of ensuring some measure of retaliation in .asc of .mother "bumper" season. TRANSITION PERIOD EPOKTS are to the effect that the Australian team is going through a period of transition and they will In all likelihood be 11 26 Depci/a uri en their score had reached 3*5 flf(y for tne G Cla 45. Hudder 35. 21 and Holder 20. run, for the lose of nine wlcke's rhnmninn Utakaa C.rant and Dopciza put on 52 in TntMr flrs mnlngs. dismissed "" own Champion Stakes second wicket and de.^ f or e8 ^1* yesterday the horses. Another feature of the meeting rowd with some p^cond dav of their First Division compare very shabbily, lies in the number of Troohloi The latter are thus almost as valuable as hich attracted a Held of our very best th which we in Barbados which are t* 10 cricket match at College. Falling offered. No fewer than ten races carry these in addition to the prire forced to adapt themselves to English conn lions if they strike a damp or th %  compelled to negotiate the spate on English medium H|Enlcd •earners. -j. forceful cricket. Later IN On the other hand players like Gravcney, May. h fPP a !" c T*i" t vt ning. Horace King got an ^^ |he tMow on Lodge arc money and 'here can be no doubt that they add tremendously and .r^se^.^^^ bSSSSi -our J%S£S. -k - — " " ' "* %  >"<"" %  < U- — • -he pleasure of winning a race, ihe' English wickets, will form a strong batting nucleus to counter clR j A Williams in on over. College concluded what Australia will have to offer. Rudder and Holder then_ kept SUSPKC'TK.n AUSTRALIA'S STRKNGTII up the end and still ,£ innings 2.20 p. h .^. v ii t.f tssfsfl m 'IPTIBITII bs prtnti Im nd U ibard to btltaini yesterday tnat similar contributions would not be made in Barbados if the right with Malcolm Wurme undefeated npproach were used. At least it is something that our Turf Club might well try. CHARI.IK SM1KKF." I HAVE always suspected the reputed strength of Australian teams Mther when stumps were *""• wllh 147 n „, oul o( 355 runs, to England and It has happened far too often to be put down ,„. latter with 2" including three bwlUn g ...rfonnance was ,„ ,.„.„„, „ coil I U t" Kng and has provided the lawndarles and the'ormer with 3S f !" I „ „ v „ ts^j?as*ssmS2s&xtti -1 !" ;.: t „ %  S vr^r* x or """ E g sh '" - ur Au "" 1 "g* -""' ar - -^ historic harvest time HANDUtMIS v. ptll.lt F. in IB overs inninsi 1 hy the thought that the Aga Khans No. 1 jockey had elected to pay But what of our individual deduction, from the Test? It see !" ^ ^ ^ ( ,„, In .e ^^ ^ J*^, u a visit. Vociferous cheers for -Smirkey" would have gone far to " ; rTthi," £&>1 w^ VS b^a'iured that Wanderers iM 2n, !" "he n^rt M.t .re of 20 connrm thU. But it was all meant in very good part and the famous Skipper John GodDenis Atkinson. Wanderers [Uns WM ^j, by skipper Wilkie. nickname concealed the identity of our latest addition to the ranks of ? Mould be thi ,ve win hir faeoufltea ii> win dard mnde no bones about return M Ihil rfrofessiniiiiK hen I in ten* tewed him > ... %  %  "'":: IUM wo, mad his Skipper scored a century for hutM lutl( h Ilim team In their match against Poll Who have followed the stries that at th Bay £* %  £** Atkinson's 1 team !*•> ^ hn wr ^ n „.\ m KlTlit"l ..I dealing with attacking pace on .. v.nket thai .I'^man s wirkei. - of the world's leading all-rounders in ,. 1 ,,,n ooi b svallabb ";r the toil rllng of the type of Chilian. Ahmed. Hazare %  1 the like will not lie clai-sed in the realms of f their wickets for 40 runs. _, Bowling at medium pace Mr. -ui.-Ket %  H. total mcludHc dl [„ ,„,„ OVCl CStlshirOd eTottha LHlge wickets for 11 aught by Mr ^ mld-oO off a |mi in<( ,. Sm (h nre ,. (or 23 m """ nB L n i'r.'l" ^tM.dMX pv crs an i four balls on the tirst S;ittii(ii L'KtKe had lost four jockeys. Young Blades did not meet any success at his first meeting the first innings but he did set at least one record when he was forced to put up weight in order to •'catch" 86 pounds. His rides on Cottage he may charge to experience but I was quite impressed with the way he handled Devil's Symphony in the North Gate Handicap, and the foundation of what can develop into a good seat and hands were there for all to see. Space has prevented me mentioning his debut before; in doing so now 1 Police on the i !" |1 ? l S?2! Lodge opene I their second mi g hl perhaps, as a piece of advice, paraphrase that once given to sjrSL'S. : syss sS U" 0 r-JTuSiS 8 ^ -. "K.e P a £& „„„ a „* „*^ had scored M without loss. W. ? ,^. n ^ xorc wu ,1^,,, JWl will go far. Knowlea was 72 not out and (;r lU w> nlceVj C1UJ0 „ by the TWO NEWCOMF.KS I I II 11 not out. College aklpper, C. Smith at fine tv.ien play resumed yi-stei-day ^ (Qf Q dutk There are two new arrivals in the paddock In whom readers may '"' 1 S m 'i'i r ''Ih| K0 1 C W KncS.t G P"*" lh rtBhl !" 8low be interested. The llrst of these is Highlyn. a two-year-old black filly ".* bowler 'r College bowltst steadily i„ His Highness out of Marilyn, by Coup dc Lyon out of Marylleld. Highlyn who has joined the Increasingly powerful Goddard stable, ..nd therefore ......self Pltadfcar ,lnd the like will not ! %  cla.sed in the realms of Ihe •cataclysmic a, some people I • Mfll atUdl oa the Australian tour of i M i Her. PBOFE8SIONAU9 MUST PLAY I T Mlowi then that II is incumbent upon the West Indies cricket onicinis... ensure that ... acquire the services of •h',P'i 1 S!Li-, and that we recruit s.m.e sort of pace bowling talent that will possess Ihe necessary thrust to nun the tide In our '• who had added only live runs to „„,, ha d three of the Lodge wicket: lowing tlieir victory In the Tests with En, R ,„ ul vvld> t ulsM andnau tiuc, % % %  !"£" % %  • ^d-g, ..,„! in 1.50 were by common consent roa^ed a. the logic a ehaU g^ fl „„. u ,„. |ln| „, t .„., o,^6 runs^ n their eco ndjnnl g. h||> ^^ ^ (n EnEland aM wu placcd ^ ., world cricket supremacy TW_lour is now %  ,hen """'I' r armcr aP ,d comae Is Highland Spur, a two-year-old brown colt by Hotspur (by :i'!ud\;Vll It uV.''XM,':r,.,lia next summer in another chaph, U. Atklnaon and B. Lawless \,^ „. now cored M „,„, IT of fha• e.lebrVte.1 Tght for the "Ashes". We have defeated New earri.,1 the score from 60 for , wickets In their second I „ i ,„, i', ..,.' %  .. Sv South AMeg, thouttht, ... th..II ma to KM la I A%  „. M .,, „ .,, „„, ,. we m dete-ited bv the Indians and England win the "Ashes" or Lawless was bowled by Mul MIS hare me moVal honours then the We Indies will have lost several for 53 Perry Evelyn .Uo contribuplaees In the rating of Inlernafonal cricket. ted a valuable 33 W.I. BOARD CNCARINC Carl Mullins. Ixwllng for the %  other hand .recent event have proved Conrtahlea. se-nt down 23 overs, of B UT on the other hand .recent event have proved *-•", %  •,—" %  — "•—' -' --U ,ha, West indie, ontcl.1 cricket circles . which ...ee were inaid^ .nd look seven wickets Vn 93 runs. G Sobers and C. Blackman took one fach for 80 and 28 i aaTiifllifaij In their second innings Police : .m e wicket for 103 C. Blackman was bowled by Denis Atkinson f„r 42. f, T..vl;ir nnd A. Blcnnmn, the not tnit baUi men. are %  * %  BDjd nine respect Egyptian Swims Englisli Channel Owned. 1 understand, by Mr. Bunny Edwards, Highland Spur has started six times In England and has placed second twice and third once. I should perhaps have headed this paragraph three newcomers but. as the third Is a man and not a horse nnd has, moreover, pleaded with me not to Involve him in undue publicity, I shi-ll refrain. As a hint, however, of the identity of our latest addition to the ranks of owners I shall cautioh fans to watch the form of Viceroy closely now that he has changed stables. FOLKSTONE, Southern En&\. Aug. 30 Afler nnUhing his Channel swim ely. from England to France in heavy ll-ei. Said El Arrabi. 35-yc-ai Basketbo 11 Ass % n Red H-wiw Wins Choose Committee Coinpetition Shoot THE John Goddard either uncaring or unaware nf these facts. Whv ha* H captain not been appointed yet? John Goddard who led the West Indies to Victory In the West Indies In 1948, in India in 11M9 nnd England in 1950 nnd nearlv sacrificed his "guts" in Australia is available It follows then that he should n appointed ages ago. People have to arrange for leave and If they hnppen to be In an executive position then his -.ire difficult. Tomorrow is the beginning of Sept*, inter nnd the Indians arc due In DeeernUgr. av normal person would have the West Indies Board would have ac, tain months ago nnd would have all _. __ ,_ him to deal with the persons whom they are going nol CMX by G N s G r*t\U Spartan Nez early today by waves fight lepreeent Barbados when the aggregate of 459 uoTnts whu'e the to invite. ^^ conceded llrst Innings lead points feet highHe waded to the, T'lnKlad basketball players. Mcond |ace waa tnkcn b Bluc The. bav* not yet invited (.oddard to accepi 1(1 ... cKw ck bv 2 l runs at the end beach 17 hours, 42 minutes after Carib-beors. make their tour here House with 457 points nnd third the MsnalACy and I understand that thereJs a of hc wmgai ((i> ,, nri: Klrst he nad entered the water a* early in October. pkice Wl m lo Crveil UoUM wllh Itrange P'ot afoot to supplant him wllh two of the DiViM(1|1 Cnrk et malch at Queen's Dwer. The Egyptian who had .J 50 m| boys. Park yesterday. Pickwick scored *"> the Channel last year, waa The y will be three Colony ^ SECOND SPRINT. „ 242 and for 1 wicket. 54. and £? 1 f our ^_ suc .'^ !H, I^L. ^* !"!" ^ amM Coll ' "* rame ^P. hca P^n'fd . problem SPARTAN vs Pit KWH'K „| (l ~ Egypl'ian pTil.ceman,' returned ha Basketball As p pointed Messrs. elation The Red House team captained Noel by Major Chase was the winning the House Compotie expected that plek.lck 2 i Ifor I wkt) M here by motor-boat this morning. .Symmonds Jamea Archer and i'5""' "• ">' "" ^SS^, ippolnted a capsaarta. 213 El Arrabi was swept ashore on O. Greenidge. as the Selection { h !" G ~'. !" 1 c V !" yestSdav Iready co-opt.-u "5,..,.,,,. „ ,,;„„| ,„„,„, „f 78 the French COM near Cape Grls Committee of the teams which will Xrnn" """iSl hoiKe. had an th, L s.n etna -. i. V !" ._. p ._. -_. ,.!,. ....... t ^.... Mffhi .n^nwani UI^I.DH.H, ...>.. it.n airernoon. I nis nouse l*fl •> rind was steady, also a slight mirage. There II.fourth .ueeessful swimmer the romplcte breakt,, n i n gs. lluin-. t.i.ket 'is in lh "S w S; !" X"Ki „<*> SJ %  "* Sr""i d hn r'nrShrrl '"" ^^^ *"> !" "> ' ta "" and boll grips can make >'ig pu Ch Inc. " Prckwlek s Sklliper .John Goddard don nc hopc „, lUlr „ n g from m o -..v.. !" ...s, -,... T Roberta as point" a world benu-r in time for the vlsiii of the inmara. dhowed himself to be in good form %  ,,,, .,de today Thev were " > h v< W'-n played last %  }• %  %  £ r„£ nt SZ. SSt to c..„,„u,ns,-nse If It is found that -J^' W .„„„ he „„,„, -,,_ „„, „„,, ,„„,,„ ^^."i^l^enther. 21. and Thursday night, were proponed JJ J g*J^ * £„", ,,. *, .'alfeeting W MJ" • • £ „" !" h 'J 1 \ ^*£ tly '£,"£'„ he had been g,v chance ,„ s. r e.„„ \w,,*r Oray, ,-nlor due to ram until ne.t Thursday Cap t S Weal rerhead 92 pOtnls Mil lei Ii1" lln1 " I" 1 "' 11 "" 1 his thirties. In Pickwick's first swimming instructor to the Royal when Ills F.xccllcncy. the Mr T ,; MeKinatry 112 points sale distance to ,grale._ n ^ ^^ chivalrous sentiInnings, Frank King took four Marines. Governor, Is expected lo be Mr j, W. Hasscli 2 points a I this non-l.lating armchair scnale decides that burlesque ti batting nnd Wrong5li.gr e Sparl.m score.! 215 hi their first f %^^H2 iJ ,1 ^ L.deMhisi "* u mt Harrl90n College, and one but the „ n .S^ Z&SZL \r^ b 't^ "^"pnalenu^Uori^tchea which " the visit of the'"diani. |)n| found that senile tlecay The eight best scores were:— ajor O. F. C. Waleott 97 points" Hum lo some There i* "' nts to Jualil> to graze, much at stake to allow our more i ii strange crn of nonsense. rvicket* for 50 On page 5. piesent. Miijor A. S. Wai 91 Doints %  > &f&f &f < • * %  ee I MMMM I M JUST OPENED BffiKMYRE CANVAS 72" WIDK—FOR BUS TOPS and BBSS. INNER HOOD LINING 56" WIDE. FAWN AND GREY LIONIDE LEATHERETTE 50" WIDE. ATTRACTIVE SHADES BLACK MIRACLE ADHESIVE P.-OZ. or 5-OZ. TUBES &f ECKSTEIN BROTHERS BAY STREET DIAL 4269 ATCENTION! CAR OWNERS ^fcly.#ip %  ?(? PP& -^? -*9^aJ ifm^HUi NtWi IMPROVED < \ DUNLOP TmckeBus 7fiv*t.T ... 1 %  WOOD PRESEHVATIVt: Obtainable from ECKSTEIN BROS. — Bav Slreel I



PAGE 1

ro ': : I l s SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY. AUGUST 31. 1K2 CLASSIFIED ADS. TtLEFHOKE MOS DIED August V 1I. at kr • i m to-day %  Ciaudme ard Leon Archer ri i i x. -M %  %  si MKli'*:. 4 %  %  VMIIIIM-Retssrca .letter Known ft " %  •*! will leave hoi OaoraWl Par 4*> o clerk thb ion SALB AUTOMOTIVE CAM One 1. Vau.iiall l> ITOM Nr. behktry, new lire*. Col* A Co Lid • %  > ?.i : %  I'AHU Mama Mine* > Door Sei-ot I.4W mi!.. Ltfcr new Mix Door Saloon H.Mo niiiaf_%  i i.on Fort Roia! Qaxig* L'J TH. MM HM .1 0 s -4r> TARIBM Vauxhall Wytr.n Eacell %  rat refu<*d Api % %  j.t. Oniio.ite •aynaramt Qov't rrm -*ul> *ijr*ge I 31 %  51 In CAP Damaged %  t.e viewed ai Mi Crafg'i iarag*. Roebuck M Of/era In aralc) nvelope, to K It C r 'one* Co Lid. by %  B M AH—Damaged Ford Prefect. HI Can br viewed al Meaara arneys Garage) Offer t In elopes to K It C Foal... H •a Co. LU.. b> • • M 11.193 THANKS l IS |.l. %  II inoe* in •vmpath: —m wteaths. cards, or attended th* funeral or out daai beloved mother of si Michael i.i >d -ssi a. ,1*.' .f.mllvi 31 a SJ In D DOOOI a* omon MI .-.I-. b> '<" '1 telegrams, 'ympathlaed wHh Ihni %  i bereavement si • ssthe %  inioip1 bog in M lo ail theae wjio ami id. •>attended Ihe fun %  %  havi i .pi aaa I due to the eeeth of Evane Iirwm (better known a* S t a da V ei late UM %  c Wink. l*pl. KeevlU .—Hei. Rev %  i oil r %  %  Jl til In 111 v, lamlll ol th* late Mlllleent .< Ji-tn>n Hill. Mi.hri %  mirAill) return ihank. i< for Ihe aaasatanrc rondrrrd th*". during Ihe drr*.M* llln*** and also for thr mi y.inoii. rof-tcaatoni of aymrlered th.hr. in their bcrcaye%  %  Mb. Mllh. I In Ml npni-We Ma r.tu inani nough tl.ll to ail lh< v.re*th.. Ii any m enpreased %  %  v.. i Klrbi .L-ird. Laurel i. Jl infill be-In BOBXIMSON W< th. .l.taigned b*S rrtum thank Who uttendco .i ami .-rrolh*. taid. n d %  %  'i I'" thrr JimM Hl.it.i-. St GmiK pM tMh IBM ..I Ihn II 31 %  99 ,MI-I,N IV, Iha tindrnlmMl i,n to ihank all Ihon Ah*, rard*. or havr b .'i,i-.(| .nil u* 111 DO lirrrnvamcnl. n (.mil. 31.U-|n IN MKMORIAM ,',\kii in lot nj nw man "' oof niKi Barbaia AitorH. who dMd A.muat nti ii^a %  %  (ill rrat KIIIK M ai(|>t — f B mll> 31 %  !*I I .KM In lovii.B mrwiory ol who -..ii t. 1M ,-l l.ul Jen i i • i %  horn* abovr ••-, |-UI .rr.^hc. %  fill %  M -In i i at i | i ii.band find falhrr Cbab %  •II la on ihr IHb •t 1*90 i irl nr a plrlur* i l'i> i.i .... en in niMiubrrad by 1*1, Oilbrrl and Johi i riv-iii.i idanghtrra ion-ln-la*i and al Mini II %  aJ in >t,t 1.1 I i Wllhrltntiu .nd frtrod* : %  M in f OH KENT HOUSES i IIU'li buntalnw nvailabl* Own aaa fruntaflr 31 %  M -In 1Mb 8rpt to llth IXrrinbri i ... FM 3U uirrn ft 30 and BOO p m 31 a 9-an >w ii„ s,t. Mam H^ad Haai %  I I i 'il.rd. F-i -uiooma Cr(v-<\'%  •nd.h. — fl riaphonc 3t MM s,pumb,. IS %  HII. CHANDOf*. 2nd Avrnur. Briurvllla • ii Al.illBlllr 1*1 g.plrm i i Phono MM or MBO DlUki omfortoblr ColU|e "Mrl >• 94 Tbomaa COHUIDHIX Dlnlni rawing Room. 2 Brdrooma. Wal*. I K*iU Apply G W H4MM. haol. r~ MH-lurl. Pon JO I 9t--Ir Small ira-aW • iNbrs Bcacb ComforlBbl) hrajahoi .tnU' room 33*3 II %  M—n ... 1-t KvplrinMr ColUfi Ail modrii vrmmrra. Apply lo Mr. Juli, mlcy. Whllrhll Road. 37 I M—3r Airy tnoni ft wtndowi Trrrac*." 31 %  tt—lit. MIS< :!.! ANEOUS > %  and Coolaralora. Dial M9 I 51-fn CXI D-i.i-ard NIitdrlHtkrr rai '..,, t virord al Ml "UtJuarmv, l Oara a a Offrra In a nvrlopr. to K. R V FOator. R •onra al Co Ltd f O lk>< 141. in 1 • M %  | 1 k PI III.K SALES REAL ESTATE Tn bo drmoHal I •vrd on ni btfarr th Join dftt IMplarnkor I0U Apph It MM IM an <;ovenMCT XOTH'KK • IU MI n : %  Tbr aainr .,m kilrhrn fardrn Apply lo ^'AnoA. *.ott Dial M4S 30 H M E'£lo Hall D...I M4T II. I -Huntrd it il) Proparty al Junrti.f of #1 MaMlrit pap and D..i-.:,, Road. oonalatMa; r a Iwo -totird houw wllh ahop OM •t.mdr.g on approalmalrrr MOO aq ft • 31 Ora> upalalri pmprrly of Govam* laitdlnK on approximately %  %  < II S n of land • 3i On* wall propanv al Civilian Rd IV-.• ll-.ll. utaMdtng on ono righth of ifti Our proporty latanal Ot Wetar M.. %  | L-Wof land. il. 3 unall propcrllM al Klnf'i VllUfr. d KaaMlaarton Nrw Road, raapae U oo i p. ror parttcuUm ronlad K SondlforJ. pr II Dial 3314' IT %  J 4n CAR VniuUll 14 II 1' in prtlrci liking urdrr 1047 midal Appl> M onn Slrarl Dial ftl of MI7 MOM-3n Aft—Hlllman Mln*Kirrll-nt iiact Edwin Miybrw. I inoy A Co. Lid Palmalto SI. | iS3ti. IT %  M> S M CAP -Black Ml'4A Col %  ap Apply Sk>*lr Offlco 41TT. hoi M M %  53ELECTRICAL inriy PCS RADIO—II Tuba Phllco Radio *lt. "••ndaprrod In good workm* ordrr Appl laohloy Lid. . Swan SUort 3* a u *• RADKKiltAM BJoparaW unit a aVlf %  w H ampliftm mlablr Sin tamg playing r IM 00 Trlrpbonr XT.* |M| POUl.TRY PIGEONS Importrd Camram Pi 1 pain Yalows, | pair Krda larg* lypri Apply t D Ma) Pt-nnra. St. Jam*., or Dial 'illt oirprrty -Floddrn" In Cullodrn Rood. Th hounl> rooina. garago and (table I 4"4j acrra of land Viewing by nbig iTrie1HILTRV Importrd |t.ov.„ i, t i ,„. 1 ii'ill.l. 3 corkarrla %  >, month, ol Apply — P. D. Maynard Portora. i ao, so a ft* I.IVESTfHK i sa-i HOUSES Tl,ryou old thorotielih: Illy "Fluffv Kulfli |tv I'hih rim -\ Ooldrn Fairy by Gold nrldgr *f* old thmiiiiuhbrrd flu by Full ni-.m as Fi Apply ndrdI %  iwrot Vlolrt" raby by Fairway COM landed It Edwarda Phon* 3SJ0. FUKN1TUBE i nurnvM F.i Hv.W,-.! Fill S|l, „ J Ji alao iw. ring-nilrd ma itrMar. t% oo ri*rh WHH t 33T3. hi %  Oli-ud 1 il M "IIS. KH.A\K1I'S A PIANO for BSla, Trima r — -MI \pply: Mr* Citi.bort Brathw:illo Ifjfafr Siitrr.. St Oorgp 31 a S ANTItllJIS of rvrry fJBMftBMoai OfeU hino. old Jawrii, flna Silver Wntn %  itouia. Early booki. Mapi Aulograpl if ill Qorrlnge* Anliquc Snop adJoUilr flyal Vachi Club 1 1 91 t.f i i'.A,;oM,TLHS i. T imilui in. nelrra. O „,.. i and art Id* wlrrtlon of ItHM pr*Ciion %  VtllU al K R K pocket id Rrally •• n ilnmealkf Jul iMdv lor ... lapniry covrra SI0 M each Apply n :— The Standard Agency iB'do. 14 SO.HI Streol Dial Agem-v ltd rJM ao a si -ir JUST PaTcElVED PopuUr Oann In %  ding Ouia>la. Pl„ Monopoly. TotO "'y. and PegHv. Abo a va.lrly o i.M.ii.ir Jig.Saw purrle. A[( ticm t iiKMlerate ixh-ag Harilaon'a iSho MM Dopt.i Hrond Street 31. %  II Hi I Al.li* AND r:M<. MAti-ltis A ..'-lii*, of Ladle.and tJe.H. 1 id 17 .'ewel wil.t walchra Your charvc i gel a pood watch al coat price Appl The Sl.mit.iit Ami.i i IIH.I.1 %  *.. 11 SSarl Plat**—ay, 3'1, H, >/>•f i/l. i n 3* x a* tn v x r I MM. Aulo Tyr* Co. Trafalgar ami i' Klreet* M a M t r %  • PIANO Mr* O. I Club good Condition Appl. nl> near Paiadi** Ifcar 3i a M. \n l-EAS—Jaounrlval J>ea. c* ilbsoa Plan i.i tn i n. Si ivier . or IBc. per lb SUlACRm* BOW to lb* Pali 'l>i>Bpa. Fnglanda leading Dally N. •per now arriving In Barbado* bv Ai FII a ha daya after pohlicaiinn t ondon. Contact bin Oale, C o Advn ,* %  4' i V 3 a*lv.irilae %  Itndiical Tank. 0'.' .>.dra BOO w !• 1 Oalr Cylindrical Tank. 0/ 4'i %  an with 1 (t Conical Bottom., cnpacil turn gallono 7M Apply atanagei inice Vole lactory 31 a W -In V.VMIII MISCELLANEOUS %  MAIX RI'NGAIXIW FurnHhrd i-l lor male or Rent. 81 Lav n ..in road. Worthing or Maxw< LtAKN I %  .. .. H ':.%  ill.. ,1 Uii iiiaa awarded. I'r.i.|..i li fioe.— LONDON -i Minn. Of COM*. I In I Dvpt DA.Ii 110 High Holborn m Bto %  .11 IV.ingalow rolled -SANTA MARIA" with a.110 •^iiarr feel of kind atUxhed .tlual* I'm* Mill, ftl Micha.1 The bouao contains Drawlngt and DlnII rootna. 3 Pedroomi lone wllh n kftfj woi-ri brrakfaal rooma. Kiirh. 7h* -bovr proport i tie by Public rcmprtllioo al our OfBc 'imea Street on F.Ida. Ilth SeptemMj %  M at I pm. Inapectlo.. Mover. ... ejhan 37 I 5S-10n CLARENDON—BUck H--k. St. Ulcl.ael. k -poaltSt St. *iandtn II I arra of land Lotd out ta pDog olry Farm or Realdmc* Po.ibllltlaa i Moilgag* can be aiiangrd Apply: N Kiitehlneen or Dial etOS. M %  M-Tn SHIPPirJG NOTICES i acdJNl mrrMfttS addreaadd to FOR SALE With regard lo Ihe following notica> Whkh wai published to the a il is nolintd for general information thai the ctoatrif date for ihe receipt of tenders referred to In paragraph 3 of the notice hat bfton extruded until the 15th of September, M — 'Twdere re invited for the ronoemned Tug and Water Boot Ida". "Length 7fJ\ Beam 16', Draught 8' V— W) B.H.P. Coal burning MO cylinder reciprocating engine. 'Tender* *.hould be forwarded ihe Colonial Secretary (and not to any officer by rtarna) so as to reach the Colonial Secretary's Office not later than 4 p.m. on Friday the Ifltt of August, 1952. The envelope should be rlearly marked— Tender for Ida". "The sale of the craft will be conditlanal on Its removal from the c.'ir-eenngc within such period of time as shaH be decided upon by in? Harbour and Shipping Master. "Further informafion is obtainable from the Harbour and Shipiing Master. "The Government does not bind itself to accept the highest or ny tender. %  tit. BBS SIA VIEW 1,1 hi HOUSE IIASTINOB. BAKBADOB Daily end Longtcnn Rate* quoted r*i request, t'eruoonent Oowata uelcume Dlnnoe and CecataU rartaea arranged]. J. H. BLCKLAND Proprlator. Montirrr.l titta Sailing Md Soptemb a t. 1097 M v IMBA' -HI %  i acaooNaa OWNBBB ASSOCIATION IDIC. I Cawalgoee Tala. Canadian National Steamships KMIMB II PART ONE ORDERS Matar O l" O WA1XOTT, V P 'eaaaaaBdlot. The Bartade. M|laaM M Aai m Offer, mil b. leeetved In wmmg up ft pm Tuaaday. MBh Septembai ISM. ir Ihe aeivar.1* room *t (Jlend.le. R***inoe of ihe P M O St Thonuii toirlher a. It" a quantity of old hrrnbe* hAJiACato All rank* -ill pored* al Rest M Q at ITe* houre on Thureday 4 Sept 93 Cora will ronilnu* their weapon training wtlh a view to firing the A at C under the direction of their Coy Coenmed*r< 11 Q Cov la again allotted the open .•rid miniature rang** "' C.will be Sring Ue A M C on Monday.. Wedneedao and Fndayi ol raoh ereek wef 1 Sept rl A ll tanke of -B" coy who have not vei been allotted a lime to f.re ihrnild gel in touch with the R B M a. anon at poaMbl*. SAFETY PKBPAimONN> OPEN RANQV OtotSII bo have not yet received and dgoed lor n rop of Range Standing Otdera .hould apply at H Q before they luidertake Ihe dulle. of Range Officer oaMJILY OpncCR AND oRDTRLY SERJFANT FOR WF.1K rNDINfl MUD SKEWRft-COX. klalor. SO L.r. Adlulant. The Barbado* Rerirnent SERIAL NO M BOt'TNBOrND CANADIAN CONSTRUCTOR 1ADY RODNEY CANADIAN CKALl-ENGFJI LADY rfSTLSON NUMainii Mi CANADIAN CHALLENGER LADY NVLSON CANADIAN CRUTSEh CANADIAN CONSTRLCTOB LADY HODNKY ,. CANADIAN C1IAIJXNOER LADY NELSON aajNM I garvj i bo made on i* between the hour, ol IS—* i on Saturday, between Ihe 101 on applk'HtHM to Dr ar* %  :,1 been in Hi nr ted by Mrs. I FAVr-r^lVaLeS"" SSI LCpl Pelorkin. L I %  PH r.raW N *,. lad I week'. P/Leove w'l ig 93 led 3 waeaa' S Leave wef >ff as. SKJTWIS-COX. Major. SO L.f. Adjutant The Bar bad o* Rifime. [i|...inl'iirnl with Mra ihoM &XOffen will ,.t... i... nrof tli* land r|..i-tely InquirM Ute underalgitod i( .Mil IMiTON St ^EALV. Luce* Street. Sic < I I B 93Bn AUCTION I Mii.U THE SILVER HAMMER i. will aril or. MONDAY l^t September t PlanUtiona Lid Warehotier. Bay i..!!. U V bupor r.i: \M.l i: TROTMAN a. CO, Aurttanrera M.B an UNDER THE SILVER HAM.MKR •: UESDAY Slh Th* Late I I %  I John'* Rale 'Vl-lrt.Faille Nal! MY lib) Mra ArlW Sale Tha > loth The Late Mlaa M. A : i -.%  ..,, I .!, IlKANKKK. TROTMAN A CO.. Aurtionrcn 31 fl 93— In. ODEX TNI FAMILY SOAP O Gru rtla nally eha O aaaia* rartndw ode O Lima body re*rl and tenty AVOID Off'NOING -USE'ODCX D'Arey A. Scott Auction**! ..nd Heal Batata Agon! oiTera fd> aale 14 lpot. of land al Maiwell Ii ,.„l. Chrl.l Church Thev BBVB a frontage of 70 feet and a depth of IM leet Termi can be arranged. Alao .ever. %  pot. al Thorpea. Ml. jomra. am al llotheraal Turning, jult aboyi W.ierlord Dial 1*49 30 a 51— In ym IOSI V FOI\\|p LOST pair of glaaaee with itrong i In Hroad Street. Finder l.llll IIM1IM VOTIIIS AVABimiirtlRTAUIMCIIT i In AM of Leoal TMenl Breodraai Ova* atedle Betflffaalaa will be itagad by mi ALL ST AM um IT II IBOCFI at Iha C-HILDREN S QOODWILL l 'Mil r. CONSTFTl'TION RD On MONDAY NlQrtT SeBleaBfe.r lei ISM u Id am ADMU1SION:—Baeaned SeUa t/Kualc by Mr Sydney Nile*Orclie.tr.. atafreakararaU On Sale Follow The Crowd — Don't Mlaa II Tirkeu Cta be Obtained Praia An. Mearkar of The Traape The Sccrolaiy of State for the Colonies has advised this GovernMgri that a limited number of seats along the Coronation Route can >e made available to persons normally resident In Btrbedos. Tne •ost is £5.10.0 for u covered seat and £3.10.0 f:r an uncovered • .t i os who wish to avail themselves of this opportunity should 'orWafd ihcir nnmes in writing to the Colonial Secretary's Office. Not i two tickets will be allotted to each applicant, and tickets vill not be transferable. 31.8.82—In. IMVCHSITV OF LONDON API'ROVAI. Or < \Miiii \ l l RF FOR 195J DIPLOMA EXAMINATIONS AND 1954 FINAL EXAMIN'ATTONB l.iic-i for any of the above mentioned Examinations are -(•minded that their Form of Application for Approval of Candidature mist reach the University or London on or before the 1st October. 1952. The necessary forms may be obtained on apoliratlon to the ")o|>;iiim>nt of Education. Garrison, department of Education. 20th August. 1952. 31.8.52—2n. VACANT POSTS C.RAMMAR SCHOOL, ST. VINCENT : !icationB are invited ft>r the following posts: — Street 1 On* .lone wall Bungalow nt Frighten Road. Black Rock Going for below coat Apply toD ARCY A SCOTT. Dial SMS M 1 M In The* Vat-ani Post of FIMMI Crop Inspector and Clerk of Ihe ( %  overnirteni Farlory. Lancaster. Applications arc invited for the post of Food Crop Inspector and CMrk of tinCM vuniment Factory. Lancaster. 2 The salary or the post is $1,596 per annum, plus the prevallng cost of Beilaf, allowance payable to Public Ofncera. The cost is emporary and nor-pensionable and may be terminated al one month's either side. 3 The Officer will be required to furnish himself with motor transport and will be paid a nUlensa)B allowance in accordance with %  Q rajfl ment Officers. 4. A | ttini tfs, qualifications and experience should be addressed to HK Director of Agriculture. Department of Science and i. and should be submitted not later than the nth of Beptagnber, 1952. ; 31 8 52—In REALTORS LIMITED OFFERS i hi at HM i Thiee) Dedrooma wiUi built m ctipboard. and running water, canBinaiiun Drawing and Dining Bbdma Kitrhrn. Garage and two E rrant* raorno AJao right of way ao* A aound investment, ao eontaci u. now ""Mill. aUy alone and lath and ptaetar Ion approilmately lo.oon aquar* feet land, .ituat, at Rorklev. on She HUB route ana: wiiHn a *•_ fWkley I arteod SAINOALOW Oh approilmately IS.oOu aauarr %  M •cted the aea it comprUe* three bedT" in., drawing and dining room. kitchen, lovely tiled toilet ad Mth. Downataira Oarage, arrvonU reeraa. with bath and loflet. and quite enough room for whatever yu may require. SWBST FIELD Lovely atone houee rumpn.iog upataira. three bedroom.. :,nt* lfVir room, dining room, iwo letleta and bath, one with tub bath and hot and cold waitr. gallery Dowrxtain three apor* rooma, kRiiieiL and ahowrr room Standing on ipproilniaieW tS acre* ot %  and about IM yarda from Oibt.. Inapoctlon by appoint-nei a onry, t on sriM, luiui.i A lovelv cotlase Handing on two nwda twenty Ht *ii perchea of land, iliuat* al 91 Jam*. Coaat. having it, own private bathing II tempi wi thr* bedrooma WBBt private baih and tolhrt to main bodrooiTi. tfraa'Dig and dining rpoea guropean Bath and toilet with hot and cold running water modern kiti-her„ and gallcr* on iwo aldea LAN* Hoar (.Tpttm •!,,„„;„„ ^y^ amieed Par trie UaSvt Jatnea Coaat. near Colony club REALTORS Limited %  SAL SaTATE AUMfTS %  •L/kSt Sea*art Barrel r-ea. aaao to Aug 31 Aug 3 SeptB ft>pt IS S*pt 19 Sept. 23 Sepl 19 Sept 'Sept I %  ftpj >i Sept. —• 10 Srp 11 Sept S Sept IT Sepl IS Sept M Sept S3 Sept 17 Bepi • Oct. T Ocl Arrive* Arrive* Arrirra %  eeeea Mania. Meolrral — to Aug. 1 Sepl • Sevt 11 aXvpf. 14 Sept ^i* Sept. 13 *pt — S Oct II Oof II Oct. 13 Oet M — SI Oet. M Oct M Oet 11 Oct. ft M*v Par farther parMaaavra. apply ae— GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD.— Agent*. MOI HT UDT COUUII IO GBNERAL CERTIFICATE of EDUCATION CAMBRIDGE SCHOOL 4 HIGHER SCH. CERT. Waatay Uall, Oilonl can ixmlul. itt [*r* ,o.i b> po-' I IM A" 1 — %  ••' dBBa; ataa Ibr L—g— OarreeeHy Dageeoa; A.C> I.I.A.| Bar. i •aaaea. DeJaVaii t. no diaadvamaga Suit ..t o.c louu-edja. TeWf akaaMaaM, IVSO-Sl. Medaraw Feaa, laauaaamu Proapaciua II i—aBiifniniifiiair p mail n n LL t>.Diracw* %  s-udi WOLSEY HALL, OXFORD ANNUAL DANCE Ml Mi.II M I \l:l. SB. M.IB MONDAY NKIHT 1ST aCPTEMBBB. D4T: ADaHHUON — t/fa.le by Ferry Green'. Oroh Melre.hmenta on aale uare leave Du..*Und. Chun lltagr. Ebeneter and Blad*. 11 al S p m 31 S S3— DANCE at Iff/IBN-H PARK HOI on MONDAY NIGHT I.I September. ISM MISSION — t/a GlUene orahralra will aepply Maflr rtDFIiesilMENTS UN SALX HURRICANE PRECAUTION HINT No. 5 KEEP A FEW POUNDS OF NAILS AND A HAMMER IN A HANDY PLACE. ThasB can bo obtained from • • < i;\II.AI I Ol KDIIl LTD. KEEP root by n.'inu rValural COM for Cooking Kt easiest Cleanest A 5predlest Call and see Ihe New Got Cookers AT YOUR GAS SHOWROOM WAXTED REPRESENTATIVE—Full time representative wanted for Canadian Life Insurance Co., in Barbados. Application in writing are invited which will be treated in stri-t confidence. Apply: "Insurance Underwriter", c/'o harbados Advocate. 26.8.52.—6n1953 AMATEUR BOXING CHAMPIONSHIPS Under the auspices of CANADA DRY SCHOOL STADIUM 8 P.M. will take place al Ihe MODERN HIGH ON FRIDAY, 12TH SEPTEMBER CANADA DRY STEEL BAND IN ATTENDANCE BAR — MUSIC — THRILLING ENCOUNTERS 28.8.52—6n. THREE CONTEMPORARY NOVELISTS A series of lhree lectures by MR. R. LE FANU Al The British Council, Wakefleld. Whitepark. St. Michael Monday. September 8th—5 00 p.m. -EM M. FORSTER 3 .; Mondav. September 15th—500 p.m.— J GRAHAM GREENE >; Monday. September 22nd—5 00 p.m.^JOYCE CARY j Admission Free Exltnalve LfeUnas •! — Clui Proper!! *na Lui Alwaj* Av.ll.fclr FOR SALE IWSmfCNCT. YHE OABDBTN WotmilNC. Modern coral .tar* bungalow on corner alt* with Wld* frontage* Plraaaol garden wllh flower bedi. lawn, concret* patio, and number of bearing frun trees Accommodallon comprtaea rotoea. well mW kllrhen. garage %  ill. covered wi. to houee. earvanla" quarter* and all ueuaL | office. All public uUllty aervlce*, (n our optnloti thU properly la on* of the mo.l allracllve nornoa now available In th rmedlum price BMW MODFHN rlOMt. St Peter — A antirtoueX' oppoinled iiaHanea. wtlh four bedrooma. S Hied bathrooms with hot and cokl. btitler'a pantry. kllehen. ilnrerc-orra. I gerage< Th* ground, arc *o*rtly laid out wlUt a prolu.ioii of flowering ahrub. Own right of PERIDENCE. BLACK BOCK — Soundl* conatritted property will 9 bedrooma I living rooma. dining room and gallery. On land of opproK 1 acre Offered at (3.000 Mi it DIN(, LAND. ST LASThENCF. COAST — E>c*lleM plot n goad poaltlon wnh wld* aea frontage Ideal alte for sea-aide bungalow On* of th* few vacant lots available on this popular 11, GRAEME HALL TERRACE 1 %  Mfea mr.il .tone houe with 1 bedroom., dining and living room, verandah kitchenette upitalri. wllh garage BBeVSaWW quarter" and laundrtv below. Thla house i" set well neck in its around* of about I 1 acre, is not OMrlonhed and ho. unobstructed viaw soaarprdg Open to often I.ANI1. TXVEXDSIDB ROAD—On main road wllh 101' frontage. Ideal ait ii at Ion for but l near premiere. Total area 1S.TM sq. ft BUSINESS PftEMUBat—DWELL. INtI HOl'SE ROKRUCK STREET. Good alluallon for retail ahop In this busy part otjown. fil.MO. HWEETF1ELD. St Peler — An e.tatr type bouse built of Stone. Contains targe living room with French windows leading onln covered vrrartdnha with urst of ! %  S bedroo m s, kitchen, ttoreri-oma and u.ual outbuildings. garage and aervanta' quarters. Appro a H* acres well laid out grounds with right of way ever COVE SPRING HOUSE. ST JAMES One of ih* few properties on this popular coaat with a completely private and secluded bathing beach. The grounds of about IH acre* are well wooded and con id readily be converted Into one ol the show places Of Ihe Island The houa* Is of I aloreya and poaaeaaea noticeable i luii.icier NEW BUNGALOW, RkOCKLCY— Commodlou. home wllh 9 b*dloom*. large living room, Wldo verandah with B id view kitchen, -i nlr. %  erv.uiia i|uuriei< and •loieroom* Good situation near Goll Course E4SM. NEWTON I.ODOR. MAXWELL COAST SottaUv aanaUuetad %  lone houae containing enclosed gollerlei. ipaciou aide gallsrSM. kllrhen arrvanls' quarters and varagr Electric Kv and mams WYNDOVER Si Peter Tata country ham* wllh ova* 4la acre* .untaintng productive vrgetabet -nd Sower garden-. al*o a large been completely RENTALS NEW HOUSEBrJCKLSY NPSf ROAD Near Coif Couree Usvfurni.iied Wiih irnmedlatr potWllimiALL FLATS — CteaV rlngton Hill Choice of 4 unfurn I shed self-contained flatt PRX7IITWOOD. Tt Lawrence Oap Compact furnished bungalow available from Ment 1st. Own aea frontage 11 C.RAFur HALL TtSUIACElumlied from Sept. IM !" 2P* I^DGE. MAXWELL'S A T f%l "*l <" unfurnirned witn immediate poeceislon. Plantations Bildlng PlWSM 4S4S



PAGE 1

SL'N'DAY. ACGl'ST 31, 152 s| \nAY ADVOCATE Armstrong First Barbados Officer With Atom Training CAPTAIN W. H. R. ARMSTRONG, Superintendent of Police, who is in charge of the 999 Emergency Telephone System and the Radio Telephone Equipment, told the Advocate on Friday that he was the firsl Barbadian Officer attending the Senior Police Officer's Course in England to be trained in Atomic warfare relating to civil defence. Captain Armstrong returned to the island over the last M week-end by the S.S. Gullitr. He left here on March 14 and arrived in England on March 23. His Ant week was spent in London where he took the opportunity of visiting the Colonial Ofnc" and also New Scotland Yard. At New Scotland Yard he was taken around the several department-, including the special Brace i Information Department whete all the 999 calls are directed. He uud that the Metropolitan was the first Force in the OJC, to make use of the 9*9 system He yas very impressed with the Information Room at New Scotland Yard where a staff of 20 is attached. There are also teleprinters which connect up all station* of the Information Room with the Polite Exchange. He said that the Information Room has everything pertaining to communications. A recent introduction was the International Police VirHsM Men links Itiformation Room with the Headquarters of the Paris Police, and the Police Forces in Belgium Holland Italy. Switzerland Church Services '' &f >•>••*' &f •••'**• &f &f • &f&f &f uau i" *• %  -I IH'V Mil) IJTH dt/NI'AY \WTtV TRINITY S a in Holy ftwmu.in'n 9 %  n. ^•trrwH. 1 p in SUn4.v St •.... , Bible tu n. T p m K\cu i Mii.ms •* II -.< I I,.I lli.r.h .1 < Mai *• a>i4s*i**>. %  pr n*. i mwowii JAMBS STItEJCT II M B. I T F ulrv 3pm Suiidnv Srti. J ManHall. T p m Kt\ r la*Nn<* WMIKUI %  Monday T p m Walcom. Sa ir, Taatlmon *•* C Manluil) ) Tl 11 rflaUM • • OM, Who <-pmir,^iiUrd tH* II*hi |o Wilna ail daaknaam halh .hinad in OUT her. lv lha itshi M Wia fcnowtrSs* of %  lory ol C a> 1.11.i-t < I*. nii' TtILAM SAUSAGE tr. HM DRAPES PEACHES COD ROES BBISlSaUM I p m. P M 11 l >il l BsasssWi aiac>r.r>. ""rur•> Mary I Jl •mn-ka aalab Ih* Maa.iahar.ii> ISi HsA ass r MM SEA AND AIR CAPT. ARMSTRONG the brother of Lady Shaw, of Sir John Shaw, a former Gov>• %  %  villa. T p m M BKLMONT-ll a m B-">nir. HA T p m SOl-Ttl KIS-nUCT 9 1 p m Mi St Hi.'. l-Hovim.M I ..llh r 1 p m Mr VAt'XHAIJ, - Tower.. 7pm Mrs FUrlay. ("MIMIHl HOIK AM* I Ml HI H II am rapoallion BKodo* IX eoa 3 30 p m Hindi, Schi-il 1 IS p^n Lv.iniichiiH Service Community Sii>( ina Mini.lrr H*v A E Qllk aa fc.,o Ami* Srh Lvdia B H, n P> THE NT JAMES NATIONAL MAfTMT n„,^ M .„ scl. Frank.vn *D H 1 U(MIVaWSA* SHU1.1 ( ,,.,;** %  T |.h.,.t Sn. | II a m Maim, and Sermon. T IS p m Anita H. Sch laudalpna. Sch DUi Annivrrmarv Service Irom th* '.ouin sch Entrrpn-a. UV. Carlbbce 1 lath Yaa' llaachrr lot both M.non llcllr *A\.li>. S.K laa Parodl. <-* lb* Hn J H Orant U Tb.. AHKIVAI-K '• '_.. SI. b l-arti.1l. 4JM loss, (rum In Carlisle Bay sill i '. ( ndrr lai>t i: UK Ltd Norway. Sweden and Denmark. emor of triiudad and Tobago. "V£*J He said that on March 31, after a very cold week-end in London where It snowed very heavily, left for the Police ColleflS P.yton-on-Dunsmore, near CovciIrv, Warwickshire His Senior Offlcer'i Course started on th* followini; day. He also met Sir John and Lady Shaw both of whom were very interested in hearing news of the West Indies. Capt. Armstrong returned tJ London where he was attached to the Traffic Department of the Metropolitan Police for one week .studying modern Traffic Control. both from the administrative side ns well as the. practical course. Many jwe from duty and Hccidenl prevention duty in London. He said that he was very much all over England and Wales. 1tmprtls tll wllh the emcl 4 cy (pf was the only West Indian PoUcJ nflt lXpar ment when „ was con Officer but there were Colonial glderc(J 0u|l a)1 rf ^ ^^ ^ Officers from MaUja. Keny,. mlnlMralive work w „ don bv Uganda, Zanzibar and TanganclvlUaM whHe ^ ^^ w „ |( j !" ,.. .. only used on actual traffic duty *>DaCo.li thr Kr\ I MV Carlbbe*. 100 I atari and Mr. OIa Bro*"* undar Capt. G Oumba. Com %  'I • "" Revo. 8. W Schoonar O-nnl AHoriation. in coni.-iudins Saaaion .rf g^, A r.lta. SI ton-. Horn Br Conference Spaafear Hvd. atlm under Capl C. Maiell Cui Owan' AauM-latlun A.,. Wavkrnd K F. Tower*. II A B D. Sacrameni sin. 52 On Course There wcie 52 Senior Olllcers : on the Metropolitaln Police. Tilt-re WM also office i a of Police Forces from He said lhat during the weeks which the course 11 ,'. In vehicles, on motorcycles and BiiMsusi BTT"T~S "s'pm Company ilcu on foot along the streets of Lon""" t> m *l " *•*•" ^_.. **** IWt % %  Vila: 1111" % % % % %  m "V>— "— _-=?-. there were lecture, by many don flnd (h(> Me1ropoIllan nrr ... c ^^"^ ,, JiiV He was able to study the latcf-t M Mmim 3 P %  "" discussions Senior Officer, together with two ] others, prepared a research paper ;'.ch Ttlumphanl Sia: T"nidd. Comiiwd tu Schooner 0*ni "ininiiiBJI %  -'..i.e., i. Un MSM hH laSMHSV nVli Biirma D Ml tons (or Trinidad, S S Burmonl 4J0ft lona lor St Johna Naw muiuwick. M.V. Lady Joy %  torn lor St Lucia. SS. Lady Ncl.on CSU lona lor Barmuda SEA WELL ARSIVALK 111 li I \ ON rRIDAV I'"" Jaraalra r Bradv. E Mitrhell 1. Iln.i' Birth. A P*mb*rl.-i I ..... Anliayi J. Tappin. F Clark*. t'rean rim. HI-.. M. Maney A Kol. I. Koaki. J Donu'M. B. Lnnklord. D. William*. M Houa*. A Horn E Bvnoe L Al*iande< II !>..,.....,> ON SATURDAY •r. rraat Trl-laad. „ C. CumberfcaWh. D Mohammad. H llelli.ibotdr. D DiiboH T. Oflddard. O Company Maelui*. MnHm C Mr Cartrw Y. Mc Cartby, P p in Salvauon MaaUnf Sr Valor T. Me Cartby. a. Me Carthy. O. SMI. W ibbi. PlUpatrlck, J Thort*. A. Thorn* 1 CARL/TON: 11 a m. Holineaa Martins. Coddard, E Fung. I t'atlm i m Company Martina T p m WalDLI'AaTI MlBY B W I A. im* VrvH-e (or CapUin 1 S'aine (N SATURDAY CIIFCKKH HAIJ-II m Holli>eii T „ Vtanarl*: 3 pm Company klntlnf. g. Wairham. D Waraham, S. Waieii in Salvjtinn Meellnf Ueulanalil E | ia m, J Wareham. M RayMl, J lAomK C... O. Small W. Small. D Small. II Small OnrrW H "> Hollnaaa M^#U5. J. Duninn. S Nathan. M Nathan O 1 i> ni Company Meeting 7pm i*alvaDlehl. M. Dlehl. A Dlebl J. Dlehl, J i H Hajraag. Licmen-nt K Olbion. ChJiboleau, Sir J Saint. E Wakott. P j'lt CORNER Ham Hollneaa Mret M.N.W J Mordacal, S. De Caatro. ins J pin Company Meeting 1 Pjn. rr Trinidad. Salvation Meeting. Sr. Major J. HoiON rRlDAY llliilv.iirtti -.melman. KMKEWSHfKV II J m M r !.-.||e.-. T p in Mr O Bialh..il.nCM 11 am Mr G. Brath-aite "riis'ir Mcioi.AH srtscorAi. osriiouox. HI.< nt.ROAO II a in Matina and Sermdh. preach*) j..\ i),... .1,. -. C BM %  %  '< i> > % %  %  ,.. idl.g and Sermon. Preacher Evangellat l A Young T p m Tueaday: Evening Proyera ..ml Addreo. Preacher Kav I. B"*i Clark* Tne Sih|*ct will be "The Blei Ml Mutism" '*d Ttmothy chapter TMI HAI.VATION ABMY I^tN'G HAY -II in llolmeaa Sleet In. 3 u m Company Meeting. T p m Saivi t.on Meeting S..r Major a Hn *it>rn. DivUlnnal ContTiindcr MKIlXiETOWN CESTHAI 1 I BAPTIST t-HVB V .,!•.. 'Tlvl j t mail a r. ing J, Leung, V You Young, A JamaiUr. lamadar. N Hota(. „ ^ new subjects on Polica matters were Introduced for discussion Dog Training among the students as a result of — %  the papers. After completing his traffic %  *•,• *£ %  "Each student gave a lecture attachment, he was attached to n m wor*iup senior 15 minutes on a subject which D Department of the Mctropolto.. of "^""v";*'. ho was given to prepare and this tan Police to study Police Dotf St **|^" T proved of great assistance in training, at the Imber Court *,.„*., i so that it provided proper training training. At the Imber Court rn>i ; in public speaking on subject* Metropolitan Police Mount*-l and which gave the student practir* Dog Training School in Surrey. in preparing his leciure, as in He. was -mown the Police Do.vs many instances the subject o( the and together with eight Constalecturo itself had nothing to do bles from Trinidad and Bermuda, with Police Work." he said, who were being trained in Police During the period at the ColDog Management, obtained praclege students were given a week':; tical experience in the (raining of course in atomic warfare rePolice Dogs. laling to civil defence. Thev were He witnessed demonstrations tjijcj listeners in the British programmes, this featuring %  shown ihe litest methods' whlc.i given by some of the most famous isles have recently heard a number of West Ind an artists VmiM -ifloct the P..lice in civ I OOfBj in the Metropolitan Policn. series of programmes in which resident in Britain. The compen IT!" „, ,,'.„,,, ,r, amm'c Including "Ben", a Ijibrador and Wynford Vaughan Thomas has of the programme will be lasaru •i %  , "•''"' -Rajah II" an Alsatian. Both of .een airing his views on subConstantino who is working si*!', gviinana tv.r*„ .•*. il.o these dogs had over 100 arrests lects about which he feels among coloured seamen for the At the ColleKe here were also to t()e r t Mrongly. One of these is 'The Ministrj of Labour now tha fi V en r. a „J t lor^f \ "There dog.were almost like Colour Bar in Britain." about he has gven up inU-ni-tiun;.] Miles Dtinpsey on l..-.uii'rship an.i human ^^^ Thcir nbcdiencP w h c h Wynford Vaughan cricket and has settled in Britain others by Sir HarOM >*""". l --''' tracking, attneking and disarmThomas says that he is only too Among Lie stars whom he will missioner of the Metropolitan F0in of cr m i na | 5 wcrc spectacles vividly conscious of the dangers introduce are the fcrrol Barrow lice and Sir Theobald .Matthew, (Q 9pe .. ne ^^ lo lne un ity of the Commontrio. Luckte Robinson of JamaDirector of Public Prosecutions Uc M j d tha ,' h(1 Metropolitan wealth. This programme will bo ca who wot one of Carroll Levle's "The Commandant and SUIT p„y KC had over 90 dogs on its repeated for the benefit of discoveries and now dSTOSI of the College all have the welstrength and they were stationed overseas listeners to the BBC on himself to music although he was fare and training of the stuj n an d around London. These Monday and Wednesday of tha originally %  tud y' n , > c r onom 11 r dents at heart and the College n „ HS remained at the home of coming week. The broadcast after„being demobilised from the itself b urovdilng not only Engiheir Police Handlers who were gives Vaughan Thomas's report RAT. Maigerle Few a ,„ !" lish Police, but Colonial Police t n Constables and performed on the colour bar along w-.lh his Jamaica, who has wide exbclwccn Pohcr Frcos ,„ Iho P"^ '* !" 0 "" JJ !" ""' „„,,,„„„„,. „,.l,rle Con.Unnd .larlin, l 1.15 p.m. Tl wi" United Kingdom and Iho Com>;' If„ e !" "J„ !" *H"K, tZ line, his duhl.r Gloria. Milton bo beamed lo (All area In the PreKOd, a Joelal worker from 25 metre bond, 11.75 meacy.-UBritish Guiana. Dr. Ruth LandU, REVirw OF 'I-/VKIBBLAN B.B.C. RADIO NOTES: The Colour Bar In Britain .llhrc.pt. Armstrong Mlrf. ">'* • seen The course wa. Interrupted on a lew oc-ca c ions whe" they visilel varlou. Police Force*. American anVOICE8' Mr. N'Dem, a On Sunday 31.1. AuKust duly by Ihemselves patrolling In t h ids of Marlborouah Hou-. and Buckingham Palace.%  distinguished -They ore also used for patroll, if^S^" -S1i, Useful VUil ing together.wllh l^lr hMjdlm SS2 c !; in , n !" n t 'The-po;ilion' of weikiyprogram...of West He said lhat he went to Surrey In oncly distrtcts In the MMro, hu A(rlcan ,„ Drlulin for the Indian writing be micd lo the end found this week's visit mo.t poliian area and "hue the Up|V ,. r ,i, v „ f mmburgh. In adCaribbean every Sunday, will lawful as it gave him an opporhandler s on his beat the dog is d ,, lon llrtcncr> wl u hear the give another of his nx-ro lunlty ol studying policing of a *"" '"'" and !" "' ?"* a "j\ views of an English landlady, a reviews of this aerie... 'Carl county M a FoiclanUar b slie '" e '' %  "* %  ; sn T cl = na hombed lr „ de un ion official, the organiser VoicesIn the hroaarant I. ?,?Th.' K„ (,' P.tl ,Force I %  "" r"hlng for people who f ^ , ub al Cardiff, a speak on Ihe conlrlb ^der thm.r Force is up to ; ',. be """"" %  • '"" memhefof the British Council Aich have been u-l sin, w V. hi.h Z standird as the ,cnl and a member of the National last broadcast on the iubji B**. ** £&,. F ore? eSent th.1 He a d "".' '"" r ? !" My '" "" lo ' S"""" u Th' 1*" rebruary ol this yo.r. Apart Surrey Mice r orce .ex. ipt that „ vde p rk 12 young „„,, wen wlll be o„ the air at from the interest to succeajfu they are forturato to be provided, i^.,,,^, llke hooUgana and j iM BJ „ on Monday. 1st. Sepc.,nlr.buu,rs "' hear.ng. Ihe: as Is the case with most U.K. w ||fully smashed chairs When trrn bcr and will be repeated at work eiwcuwd, or pruPolice Forces, with most modem tne> wcrc approached by three 4 15 pm on Wednaaday, 3rd. talk will be well wortn hearln and adequate transport and radio Constables who were oil patrol gvp lt The Monday broadcast wlll by all those who ara wan • .lulpment. thus providing Ihe with their doga — one was Ihe i*. m the 29 and 31 metro what eontenin'.rary Mil force with speed in ihe prevention ramous Rajah II—the boys disbands. 1175 and 9.56 megathe Caribl*jii annow ltd and detention of crime and propersed and ran In various direeryctes respectively and tho ihe nel.l of lileratu'e Mi viding Police service b. the publions. The doga were >t-nl after Wednesday broadcast in Ihe If Sw;,i./v talk will be g ven as lie." them and rounded up the 12 who met..l*n.l. 15.ly megacycles. Uie secon.l half of the proHi said lhat during his slay at were brought to the Station and STARS OF Till: CAHIBIIKAN gramme. Ihr Hist half MBa .. Surrey he had Ihe privilege of charged. It was considered that On Saturday. lh. Sept. the sketch by the famous Jai being Instructed by the Chief had it not been for the dogs not BBC Crnstab'e, Mr. Simp-on. who is • on page 1< series ill present another In the humorist. Louisa BeaiMtt, of Commonwealth Variety broadcast begins at 7.13 p.n. AgJhaM CHAMPIONS v.* ,M . II T, lS r A Champion of Champions — Safety—Proved on the Speedway for your protection on the Highway. — wiih built-in dcputdojbilitu." Charles Mc Enearney & Co., ltd. [W DC V0V R1DF TRIUMPH, AMBASSADOR OR SILVER KINCi This shipment of Ambassadors Is sold out at sight but you oould book now for next shipment. The floatlng-rlde Silver King bikes • A. BARNES & CO.. LTD. TO Al.l. PAINFUL .HUNTS YOU 1.1. BF. AMAZED AT Tin:./ 5COOI h on sale at all 0... Sloret S KNIGMl'S 110 ..i MM i mii ii mmm .ii S T RK< El I 'Eli PLATINUM & GOLD WEDDING RINGS Ihin'l .Mi*s This Oppiirtiinitv — Come in Karly and Select Your* — AT YOUR JEWELLERS LOUIS L. BAYLEY %  Siitrt' where vmi r.in alw.iv-. bt MM f the VKRY BKST iii QUAUTY and SKKVICK LOUIS L. BAYLEY Holion I. ...... Ph.ni.:i!i9 Aquatic (luh 11...nil Phone 41197 FOR STYLE i'OMFOHl BUY A AND VAEUE RELIANCE SHIRT OIITAIiVAREE AT STORES M.I, 11:MHX1. GIVES MO; Esso Extra Motor Oil lengthens the life of you car because it contains-. 1 UpLtD yoWL aw! I. "Special Detergent" that —fights carbon and varnish deposits; 2. "Oxidation Inhibitor that —raduces oxidation of lubricant: 3. 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PACK TEN M\lm AUYOCATE M\UAI U'.LST 31. IHl It Can Change The Wc to To BlanM That HeaUn TTn**o fif The* Frtrth* Has Moved Out Of Church Hands' •r da 1 of t>U .bout Uii> >ul>. _„ „„„_,, ,„_•_ „, i"B ith courage. Hv WILLIAM KORKKS STEWART h> Frank H'alkins -*,fjtmum ..m.jtju ject. And this is what 1 wnt to *ay.— IIQ possible doubt that • %  n,e v-.jp:.' iuv .. speci*. and m .ikjblf power of healing MOU '*' *• outside the ordinary ranar o* mt-dicul pen. ncr. Wh-l has to be n mvmbcrod is that a parish priest in hijrdmary nilnutry often nnds that those to wfcom he gives the f . ..mienls, or with whom he prays, do have their health retored. %  I t -ilt.N MM Can you rite ta parallel those noted? second member of !'. Oailu Express advisory Fatal of Bishops 'umi up i lw Krvrrtw" advisory rt> !>r. HAROLD (flNN gl. down. Todav that boy •If a docU ourage 1 know, for example, of two parents whose devotion io an -mbecil. child had been so mar-. rtflom that they had come to an i understanding of the love of God .vhirh they might never navel .-eached in other circumstancas. Suffering has ita place in the world as we know It. To look Y .u see. when • parish priest tor health and pray for it, but to doing his job properly and U accept suffering if health is not r.,,1 pastor, he If praying with r tant HaHll taking part ii. jumt ministry. You show that you rei-ognuK' IfJnd you, Christiana have for the r-ng of triumph lying behind rRU*AaUNU tu aiagurgc its 1> ,n* rouufl ifi* potfi. Cine %  UBM *bm nun Phtt a Wt %  i taoa pt'iniitting al deviation from the uriguiul ptau and no jep.ir'uir to an loo, mum those obstacles were further aggia by the need of ipeeu, M DDl| t i be overcome but UVWOOtt*) ifttUn the overall ,,i strict schedule. So obstacles and speed l.ned up against mau and his &pd4 on m the country, conditions and circumstances, the piublem was H With the introduction of machln' rv to a greater or leaser dl jp i and as a IHgtlf of Mtltainco U: cl**, Ui TISSOJ* .lor nppiii DM Ike coniplftlun ut the bank tow i I "Ml. Ill llll'. It..Ill larvel ....'i be .ulaptwd to bu.1 %  alDg, grwUng i -. % %  i .it Three i pointing i .i VOft quaglii. I>ehind hj buildings. This entire area will bout four hundred root by a %  YES, only "the other week my ,r : " lo "i ra,1#~ii "i ,,,„ ba u-iiiMy IrHlable: ,1 bu.liv.. Whl | M .^ryuun,. wtal „ an, -,*** u...,, ,.., u, „..„„. ,„ njayy.^ 3 S ...Moils ta pMUdlHi: an., I, ,„.ido..UI la tfct ort-iTION THKEE ; b ~ e J .l '"""" — -' IWMSI^S! ."" „""* ,'T:r", %  „ %  "" on """ ~ m ur ,x"^- nii^r'^!! eta told RM tli.ii •>,< %  votsU Phil mO) agau Dm (• %  ..Ith IB No'ohviicTfl nr ohv>ioloeirt tm judgment. THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LID. While Park Road. Bridgetown ENGINEERS, BRASS and IRON FOUNDERS Work* contain modern appliances (or the execution of first-class work of all kinds, and especially to SUGAR MACHINERY and STEAMSHIPS Dealers in AGRICULTURAL MACHINERY and GENERAL ENGINE ROOM STORES of all Description IRRIGATION PROJECTS, PUMPING EQUIPMENT and ELECTRICAi. INSTALLATIONS A SPECIALTY For SatbfacUao, tonality and Sarvke Contact THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LTD. Phorre : 4548, 4650 WorkslK p Phone 452? Stores Dept: %  MM 00O0O MM >•• ised, hat baby was hou When I was dean 'OllefJB tfier Have >nlrol thu depth of water inside • pool by concrete weirs." I looked at the hugs expense and the busy little tractor poundit through the heavy clay with swinging bucket tipping out a BOO and half tons. The I i K't measures one and a half ids and has an actual %  ipociqj I'tfd or two and a half '-. phenomenal. To Messrs Manning and EdghUl remarked that the tractor must ,,iboon very btiy out here ot u Factory since arrlva n Hoy, %  ban) looked at me; "Since iff Not since Ma-, laddie. This token three weeks to date re expect n nnlh it in i • tVMI." %  eeks and a day. 1 -at down close t.. fftteM w.-is being completed \n>ng uie nurrow, bumpy surface '>. it came the su,uat, powerful hope of the tractor, expertly; co trolled by the driver In bin o) en cabin, guiding Uie tracko 0 •r the torn surface. Its giuul n aw filled wMl, a ton and a hair 01 BOddOD loam, It roarc.l closer |fi he mnuiiU of lt| inaking. The i.iiver pulled at a lover and th u.ing seemed to open iu tcetn and disgorge all over the earth. There was a lightening sound Horn the diesel engine—coniumI i piloB and a half an hour— %  the strain was based with the ilhng of the load, and then the INbacked off, turned and *i aded away for a repeat opera. ii. It was fascinating to watch ..da curious picture of lumberti g agility and manoeuvrability, v .Hun an enormous conrentratloii 11 power. H 1 bo Manuger Recce on parting; "I expect you'll use 1 tractor for irrenlng out the inks and surfaces.'* id; "No. not for ol sort of Job. For that, we'll Od men and spades." It Is %  lamination, n it ^i far THE TRAXCAVATOR clmngsd the course of two rivers and mad* them ons, to flow along this prpsvd channel measuring 7ft. across with a depth of 6ft. i-atter lot sclentim Faith la IKK mvolved ,.. I imdontand 'i i -iioN FOUR: Haw weald yaa explain the apparent faci that f.1th Is not needed In all esaea of tke care* which have been reported? I SEE no reason why there should not be physical cures of the body even If the patient has no faith. What I am quite sure Is that t.iith is needed if not only the bxly but trie whole personality i: to be healed There Is no personal response of the soul without faith, and to that extent the healing will have been Incomplete. I recognise most profoundly the minlsti-y of the doctor In all this. Many a man [ know has bean far more than %  physician of the t'Jdy: there are many Christian %  *ctors who in the course of their work are conscious of help over >--h;: Q d U icS r o a { on e UmOUr: h6r llh ith a twinge in the back M Miflh i s *j„> would li e awake, It thejiurgery and v nrying who would look after nore than doubled In area wtta sa PVOMd to cool the Factory's conin the spac.> of three weeks. NOTICE Vfj the undprmei I m of our Cm rreased:— 111 Hiyh cost i iu draw to the that, owing to the ina in vi 'riumphamTy.' bw slipped." I 'i .lly I* was the hsssglnatJ i M hurt supped." NOW for that pain in the head il nu have one oven I. .,ou have t p etty riviiuc i', %  (,.., pretty hian these days that you ninettonal headache.'' il ppu *...'! II in' h %  he i one i%  nol—ropt %  '"i ctujed by i fvihlng orgaaic. The Daughter ii'K oatiao can oe foi n the body, i>> bugtratlon or hidden H is Important tj t. ..au-ie the ear* act of gettii* %  e retly alarmed roout a rush upline can hrlng.on %  fr .<'mtial headache. I have had such patient", come to mc and say: 'I guessed I had %  o-and-so doctor, but 1 daren't tell nvbody. And then the pains In aged mother if anything hapiied to nor, desperately trying will herself well again. %  UyII had hold her problems hi had his wirriow fixed' The Colonel One patiri.i of mine, a real nrecatlng colonel of the old school. i liked his burrn-pegs and hi: Ote came lomeit ^f „ „, uch at 78 as he dld ha i, '"" fnt Uirob, ,,. mury nao, complained that a Had she gone on toc-sttenuoua round gave him signs—a trembling of headaches. &f iiude—might have red. • had nothing physically latter srith her. i explained oil this to her and arranged for her mother to go rsing home while she or. holiday. The headachej pie seem to realise that the head are usually not v > serious. People who worn in secret about possible brain madness, and the like lly worn b The Driver \nothcr cause of pains in the hj id are eyes that need attention. Well, that's easy enough in these dsyi if you give the doctor a ih:ince to advise you. N<.w his headaches were caused hv him attempting too much -'icnuoii* exercit* for hU age. irdened arlvrios. The exertion i-irced the blood through them, ml the artery walls were not now lastlc as they used to be. They lusl could not deal easily with the Dreggttro, Result: a pain In his head, like X pulto beating. I he colonel took things easily. cul down nls golf and his drinks, fid his headaches left nlm. I know now that his primary IrritaUon was that a friend of the tame age could outdo him in exercise and feel no ill at all. Hut the colonel was wise, as you aid be. —UE.8. %&f&f eeeoeooeoo < &f • (2) Contn.i. npwttlnij wpnann. \r A*O will no longer be able ti extend credit over Uiinv (30) days *nd act iunti will livable when rendered. We very much regret 1 to uku this sle)>. but %  i [deration %  have to enforce same st !t Octobei J. N Ltd.. ) Be ( Arthui %  • % %  i & %  FOR ONE WEEK ONLY From SATURDAY AUG. 30 To SATURDAY SEPT. 6 _,. Sainsbury fc4)d- -' %  *• %  ee-o *+4 10 % iH IHMIHIM OS (,H\>llll IMWIMHHI. i till ti> >. \III PAINS % tt V). LEABU ONC. SAL. uuikiiv u vi us. OTHER (.OODS CALL IN EARLY AT GENERAL HARDWARE SUPPLIES Yf0UMEntire* litttlth:depends on proper elimination of poisonous matter, which interferes with the natural functions of your system "DR. NEDDS SULPHUR BITTERS" enable*, your system to throw oft* such poisonous mutter. by increasing the action of the Stomach, Liver, Bowels, and Kidneys, preventing the accumulation of waste matter, and relieving such symptoms as:— SICK HEADACHE, LOSS OF APPETITE. CONSTIPATION. COLIC, LIVER COMPLAfcNT. PIMPLES. SKIN ERUPTIONS etc.. etc. Get a Bottle of:— DR. NEDDS SULPHUR BITTERS ft* and note the difference in your general HEALTH Obtainable at:— BOOKERS (BDOS) DRUG STORES LTD. Broad StreCT. and Hiatings (ALPHA PHARMACY) WE STAND BETWEEN YOU AND LOSS A challengini statement ? Vet true I And aervea to introduce to the Barbadea Public, one of the INSURANCE COMPANY OF NORTH AMERICA Companies, Philadelphia Throuijh our Agency. THE IXSIKANCE COMPANY OK NORTH AMERICA Companies, makes this suggestion: 'Protect what you have.'' by taking full advantage of coverage for: FIRE MARINE ACCIDENT THEFT BUSINESS INTERRUPTION BURGLARY YACHTS OF ALL TYPES MOTOR COMPENSATION and coverage suitable for at least six hundred different kinds of risk. i\. KIDNEY — 5027 14. R. II....I, L-< ... Ltd.



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I *W SUNDAY. UO.IST ill. lS2 SUNDAY ADVO< i ROGLES OF THE SEA; Bartholomew Portugues, By IAN GALE Who Had Nine Lives Like Hou.iini. Barthol.,. Portugues could get (..it of anything. A man full uf guile and u wicked a cut-thru..: roamed tov teas, ihis Portuguese —i-—.--.^—— pirate captain. M. -11 the ttBW tS imbued with courage %  v. or perhaps a vice—which . %  P^P fairly common ten of the period. The stone* of Ute martv that he tricked dci'h ..re not known, but one account of how Bartholomew Portugues escaped a Spanish gallows is recorded, and I will tell it here The story begins with Portugues cruising off Cuba in a small ship carrying thirty men and tour small guns. His prey soon came along, a great snip bound for Havana from Maracalbo and carrying seventy men and twenty big guns. Nothing daunted, the pirates attacked but were thrown back, suffering little damage, however. Shouting to his men, Portugues Sprang on board the Spanish ship •gain, and fighting like maniacs the buccaneers cut down twenty Spaniards and took the ship. He then steered a course for Cape St. Anthony where he planned to do some repairs on •.;..> ship and take in fresh water But he never reached the Cape for three Urge Spaniah ships intercepted Urn and took his ship without difficulty. The pirates were stripped Of their booty, which Included tome 70.000 pieces of eight, and made orisoners below decks. A Storm Two days after their misfortune a severe storm blew up -and separated the Spanish ships, the ship With the pirates on board eventually making Campechy. Unluckily IHH11 The People of Barbados XXI The planter of Barbados hau By JOHN PKIDKAt \ eeii tjughl in an •conooiU >--laUoe to Alinighlv Ood" Aim 'cm from which there had been no 'mat it bv duly observed In all h Commute* Issued a full i-srape. Had .there been a vstt-.i. Churches, r impels and -ithei repot of to His vt free labour, the Initial investnitres of Public Worship throughI %  %  ment would not have been OfM ul Ir " Itod. as be third as much. Sugar cane could odcrate and Christian People.' On not be grown and manufactured be muriuiig of this day all classes without the negro slave, and In if people in their best clot i bad times he could not. like the v.iM'ly and so gid upon then In 1840, a new li.m. '"' """ 'W''> %  "" different lines was passed nftlauU much orderly the day passed and many 1tM f h w „..inni-ii....i. fw *". %  : ^r.!^"u.X,n ,.rw eleCathedial the Qovenm The negro slave had had at least %  ne cut down some branches purchased for a mere pittance he saw the Spaniards inti made a makeshift raft. and anyhow after the term exHe was lucky in finding a pirate plred someone else would ha illpped overboard with his lant, On reaching the shore he took li> the woods and not daring to appear, hid himself for three wing on wild herbs. -hite servants suffered gravely, as population The only slight dlsthe right to then M rvi.e* %  turbance recorded is when the > ""A-d bought and sold in much the same Hand of the Militia, playing marAfter the abolition of slavery aa the slave was acquired, only r' comments— DssUonaUtlas who war* out to supto have less interest in their wel,„,.,. ,„,. i!,,,. i,. liU -. then mtt and and smu,. aslonuhment, at the wonderful !" "V %  "" • %  % % %  ;-.'';' %  ''""" %  '' orks which the mighty hand "'"h' ' l >he United States of . Amnili'i >L t.i-.n nan. All* .1 rching for him, and when they ** e !" mtually gave up the search he ? n 'P f l i pira 1 >isteM&St to'hang him 1 the next day" eVenVuVlty'gav^up'Vhe search'he h 'P* 1 *? ch 1 or "l G ty ****%  i^ hi | PU ffc h *^ d fl hl u ^"l Bartholomew Portugues heard made his way to Golpho Trlste "/lend; of his who had arrived a while the negro was purchased at of this and made strenuous effortIt tooK him a fortnight to get there. Jf w <*•*• before from Jamaica, a fair price and for ife. ih. to evane during the night. Not He had nothing to eat but raw He ">W them his story and per'f, lh *"*f ro w * '" treated, and being able to JBm he got hold of ShellfUh, which he found on the J^ded them to let him have a died, the loss was far gWoler than Sroemplveartru-iiwarc w,..o urocks Hi the sea and he carried boat and twenty men so that he the unfortunate white indenture,! and stopped them up In such %  hii water supply in a small cala*ffL. r 5 !" n ~? .P*^9W and way that they could be used as bash. In almost eve-y ._ apturc the ship in which he had -'lave was found under far been kept prisoner. congenial circumstance! tin In this small boat he and his wretched European. ',ver small "crew" set out for Campechy 'he planter ruled witn an lr. and arrived there eight days later. There appears to \< htti %  the more I the ihom t rod. il When WU1 Britain Give Fleming His Due? Has any British invention f recent years brought more universal renown to this countrv ihaa the discovery of penicillin' Shrewd, daring and ingenious at British scientists haw bean, most of their pioneering work By CHARLES WINTOI R has been turned quickly to account manity may be measured by tho That stage of the work, with £ for destructive ends. Radar, jet oagatnessj with which other coundemonstration of its therapeutic propulsion, atomic energy—In all tries have rushed to make it. properties, was carried oul these dcvilopmcnls peaceful uses Countries already producing the some years later by a team of had perforce to take second place djug In commercial quantities workers at Oxford University to defence needs. iu.lu.le the United States, France^ under, tho leadership of Sir All the greater glorv. thercfoic. Japan. Yugoslavia and Italy. A Howard Florey and Dr. Chain attaches to penicillin, the drug new factory is being opened in Finally American scientists found whose healing and antiseptic proIndia with American aid th's a method of producing the mould perties saved the lives of thou year. ui large quantities, ands cf soldiers in the last war There is still such a demand ., . „ for It on the Continent that N obel ***** „ border patrols occasionally catch What recognition has Fleming f.mugglers trying to cross the received for the epoch-making Alps w;th vials of the drug. And flash of genius which delected the Russians have paid penicillin the new drug* th> compliment of claiming that From abroad honours have thev discovered It flrft. poured upon him without "tint. Ul „ In 194& he shared the Nobel Mi* Honour prije for medicine with Florey. Of course no dispute exists up waa mf ,de a commander of vent the wmmds tx-coming inabout the discovery of penicillin lhe French Legion of Honour, Acted at all end brought about in the Western world. The (ionawarded the American Medal of a speedy recovery. It has been our belongs exclusively to Sir Merit iind given the Spanlsl Used with, sit. cess againat all Alexander Fleinn K ,;,.„„, CrusH of Alfonso X forms of blxl poUwning. includIn 1928. when he was working Apart from picking up the freeing venereal disease. in n?s research laboiatory at $1. dom df the city of Verona, an It has opened an entirely new Marys Hospital Paddington. prohumanitarian award from the field of drug production. Many fess/r nrming. as he then was. Variety Clubs of America and new anti-biotics — substances noticed that bacteria which he number of academic distinction) of Ood has brought to pass in America, where slavery did this quarter of the world. Ardend until 1863. when it was ently as we have wished, we abolished by pntclam.ition by scarcely expected to be permitPresident Lincoln One man who ted to see such a change in our played a great part in the abolition ilvll relations. We are thankof slavery m the Stales was Dr. ful to Ood that we 'have' been David Uvingston <1813 1873). spared to see the commenceami who had b*vn In South Africa ment of an era which must „ince 1841. knew of the ruvage* Totally change the character of „ f lh( skiv< ,,.„, .,„,( „,,, (MM West Indian luxi-'iv. ..IHI will ,,.,,.,. ..,,, (| , wc doubt no, by the blessing of H HTntl> ,„ > 9tndu g np (; and'mor^and iu the iSSS '" ,h * mU '",udo ""^ SSJSlS a will rcguhnS n1 """ '""" % %  -% %  % %  ''••'* '"" For a few days all went well oil '.';"'} r> '' ?f? " l "*'^ '" l w, "> a Portugues waited until night had Action between the white Indenthe plantations, the labourers en' ' under his arm l he n^nopfallcn and then rowed quietly out turcd servant and the negro slave (OylM their new freedom were inent of COIIIIIH-. ., %  „n. ht to the ship. The Spaniards on while both suffered the bonds of working well under the 'located '> *** intended t.. Muvois board were taken completely by servitude, for there are-many relidK>ur' syslcm, but on the 8th Of "> "<" would spri surprise, believing the boat to be cords of mulatto bastards bom to August. 1838. is recorded what <>f civilization f.ir wide, than one from the shore bringing out white indentured servant women musl MW been the very first tflo : wholly spirtua) contrabard goods. for the negro slave men with "trikc on any plantation In Barand educational and limited to one They vcre soon overpowered whom they shared their lives. bdoa. Thr labourers, mostly unand th'. pirates immediately The term 'SLAVERY is taken toeslucated people, did Of., quite wcighej anchor and sailed out of making themselves erful again and he was master of confined to this class, for many UPto slaves again. While others the verv ship In which a few freed coloured people were IhcmW* !" on strike for higher wages. weeks before he had been prisonselves owners of slaves and these ware MpposWd to Da w er. He sat on deck and made exSir Robert Sehomburgh. who sUCh a high drmand that the travagant plans, in fact he had olvisited this Island within a di eado l lantara, who had been hcaviK hM ready planned nnother expedition, of the emancipation, writing on On.mclally through emanetl illori when they approached the Isle of Ihc slave period states| 'U ill kff"rd to pas witlwut enPines on tlu south side of Cuba. %  hneVctng live ftaancir.l position of It cannot be denied mat acts tn. of cruelty were committed upon "his state of affairs continued the unfortunate slave-ixipul.ifor soms weeks when g Commntion, but we may cnnlrovert the tee consisting of Archdeacon general charges against the colParrv. Li cut-Colonel Maxwell, and unlsls which were unsparingly Mr. Joseph Garrflwuy, was apjx>ured forth at that prriod. pointed to visit the various parWhat iniusti.e would a i i plaining to the paopla the elgner commit towanls the Ki.ci xacl requuremenul of them and llsh nation if he were to Judge ih< obUgfl0BJ of their former of their iharacter from the oWnart to them. On one of these pottos reports in the dl I Lt -Cnhmel Maxwell papers! yet such an mjusii" lot gaUMrlni of labourers that was committe yd Ako I.IHKHTY (I SI1IONS — Al — Cave Shepherd &ft, lid. kMGIITS DRlli STOKES ^^1 THEIR -r^j GLEAMING SPARKLE I.I.H U IM S CHATEAU NUF DU PAPE 1947 83 56 MONTOIRE ROBE 2.91 POHMARD 1M7 3 86 COTER DE REAUNE 1947 3 Ol) MAOOM 1947 2 75 COTE8 DU RHONE 1947 3 00 REAUJOLAIH 1847 3 00 U II Ml-. WIMS CHAOLIS 1947 83 86 LA TOUR BLANCHE 8AUTBRNE 1940 4 ^0 WEMMERHIIOEK 2 10 BLUE NUN L>'IBPRAMILCH ... 1940 4.BO NIERSTEIN KEIBLINO 1949 3.87 OEUWERZTKAMINER 1949 3.12 TRIHBACH RIBEAUVILLE .... 1946 2 81 • IMIMI MOIIMIS MARTEI.I. XXX BRANDY ,., 36c. to 86.00 PCRIeSTEIN BEER per bottle 24c. I'KRLHTEIN BEER p*-r carton 84.90 I.'ABBE FRANCOIS CHERRY BRANDY 82 .'-0 4 84 SO f'REME DE ULNTHE 12 .'-) 84 !W 0OATEB PLYMOUTH OIN per betU* 2 to COATLS PLYMOUTH OIN per case 24 00 • COCKADE FINE RUM STA.XSFELD SCOTT A Co„ Ltd.



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PA.-.E TWELVE SfNDAT ADVOCATE -I NDAY, AUGUST 11. IMi This West Indian Culture —5 By A. S. HOPKINSON ^£ — — ^^ a —^ ^^ ~ # jj iwhrvniK ih*t ra have already will all he soldiers, whether aolThere are r **f,'?* d ,ha, st *f* We are, I he pen or soldiers from bleiidir.£ of the OVP <.r six race* upper middle class Jamaicans and r ** 'w%  "r f->.fi it an we could the platform, or eoknera wiih trw of the %  w pm tlai renadi;in and lowar P<* 1, > **. rifle But we will be flfthtinit for ind lower middle Ncvi Spin! a countr> and its ..r-ibitiona, not PMaibL Domini In ridditiori toall merely for a transplanted race uismR combinations, there An <* *" %  culturall> sp taking, whleh. uncertain of the future of %  i. Pottufuaat upper middle *uld be the advantajas of the the land in which It finds itaelf, aion of the Aryan r*M aa*. the class Jamairana, and 'while' lower jaw faeT Again this question can and conscious only of a vague weakening of the strain and what middle class Orenadians. and Kt '* %  an.-wered in a single brie' memory of the traditions of a not. But if v fluianese, and word: unity. The Indian will b* country that it bad left behind by must >' .11.'! be anv m-gni lower class Dominicans But abje to forgrt that his arteaston of manfaaaratioas. clings to the sense In this argument Hardlv let US examine this division and three or four generation! ago came F.-itherland because it has a more m of ..ii-dlvlslon and isolation in one trcm India ami lh "' • %  therefore dcdnite claim upoo its affection!. the countries of the world are. island, say Barbados, and in one hl da,v to maintain his nationTheae atUtudes will be co-ordinstrictly speaking, pure. What do social financial class, the middle alrtv reUgion, habits, and culture ated into a common national life we mean when wc say the Eng.lasThere is tne 'white' middle — uch Xh *y are defiantly attitude which will be the basis lish race'' The word %  England' is ri.i :• %  oppowd to the nefrn midagainst the influence of other races ami inspiration of our literature, a corruption of Aiiglt--land'. which die .lass. And there i U>c mo "t part, out of the question Vikings, who left no Tl 'y travel around In cliques, like slight trace in the island After schools of ftah. At dances they sit them the Danes. Then William -"""mi the wnUs of the dance floor the Conqueror's aristocratic band '" ^"parate circles, getting up only of Normans who flogged HaroM '< %  bai together or dance Hastings and took over the coun"h each other, and retumlnj: to try. During the Tudor period the "'' Precise area of the floor that %  %  Iin droves ,r . v leftNow seeing that thi* as refugees from their own rniinBOOdtUoa obtains In all the differtry, settling in Britain and turncnt islands to a greater or lesser for weaving into a extent, we. are temoted to conpmfltable business and. incidentdenm the overconfident politicians ally, having their 0(111 with the nation mongers', and 'culture %  English'. And. of course, In modni.infaca' as either grossly stupid crn times who can measure the ", unforgivably ignorant of social influx of races into England and say exactly by how much each tt.fi. Approaches The New new wave afreeted the already Tvnn promiscuous blood mixture? When *.*P* talk of the 'English*, race we To be sure, there axe are Including all these And eonin the Caribbean where thu £ r'.'n! sideriiii' theli unnrkable achieve"catlOfl of the ntini.iui .7 7. 3 More Standpipes To Be Erected At Bay Estate The Housing Board at their meeting yesterday agreed with the recommendation of the Managing Secretary that. thre* more slandpipea be erected at the Bay Estate. Two will i be situated in the Chelston area and the other at Beckles Road. The Board also agreed with the recommendation that an existing .standpipc which is situated along the wall of St. Michael's Almshouse. be removed to First Avenue, Beckles Hill Members agreed that this stand%  Mating nU 'ation of the popuUlioN lie so noticeable, though &?•£!£ ^ '" "* P*< Pinion. people have to stand il when drawing water. ... th, past, particularly In soldiering, sailoring. and literature, really there even if' it is tnl fan Tn proposed position will bring no sane man can do otherwise than mg. But this Is true nrcclMlv . '' nerr to the majority of paMft throw the whole Hit leruu. th) %  -,. „I:e a where there armar!v wh driw Wfl,Pr from anrt a ,h of race overboard. To talk of ar -aces and >,.. MTTT" !" nv American rare would l>e absurd; modern Am> race and |.. world, jusl like the West Indies, types in :i We can turn and perhaps. China for blood pui" <-s and where they are mixed amr tbno remove d mellowed Int* a fairly charP ubiic highway. When Will Britain Give Fleming His Due? • Freaa rage • St appiw-UteU. Since then ..• America represents even aeterlatic type Uni.th riafiw£ id physical type in th .southern jLonSn.^n.lf !K Th >** %  ••. **> f "'^ *+ <* 1'addmgton, wi i race is the ,,; ....TiTT V i,e " l ?Pv ana the unity And %  A I on * an V'Pf < Ch1 "^), and the fnmm :>! % %  ft*) what union would * "nportant about thU all is How We Are I>ivide4 A new West Indian race Is thi sole way to national It Is a certain way. 1\ federation or customs accomplish nothing. What matters is the spirit, not the form. II is not until we can look at oui fellows in the various islands as belonging to much the same physical type as ourselves that we can begin talking of 'nationality.' And il is not until we can talk of "~ a,t 'tudc Europeans tuguesc). There i oped. iccommodiite 1,2$ft (like the The Board postponed the quesei on of the sale of a small trianha'. theteiVdeiVcvt<7rn*i" ^t"^J* BuI 1 urL of land %  Chelston to io treat marry i. B ^:n^ !" ^ X .„ n ii n er .: Mr. Brooks of Chelston Ume and his "-' .^1' --^ ^ 111W „ oi the population to claim to be pure .inything. Consequently, learned societies. the freedom here he work.-, id of Chelsea, where he lives. flu. toothing further had come his way from the Brwan clover nmeot. burely Ihls is a churlish way ., praat man. Fleming olieagues, in accoidanco 1 British practice, nritisn pn fir heafini oationalit\ that wm can drearn of nrr lll 'he narbadians. They have, 'culture Culture is not academic JU1 '"• "ost part, bridged the mulit is the expression of '"udinous gaps between the races Mihuic of a pec pie. And ""'d t^ colours. JThis is perhaps icney to for U onlv"rf mi l!l e^&£ W,,rk ond dlwuesod at length the w.th the n.mUi,^ VTIJIL^.? ?? question of the selling of large never patented their hearing dlsxisting tenantries in the City of covenes. The result was that alIhere Is a more prongunced Br,d K*town. In this connecUon, though the basu i... is about national'—not to sav 'natlona1it' ,url ""-''" dlseuasson will take place penicillin hud been tiivn free to Id this country has had long iadiar Uj^ ut the next meeting. fo pay dollars In royalties Consideration of the question of American tlnna for the rigat to inning a co-operative shop at use their technique uf commer%  ii e l i n J K UUj wu portpunedplal awuilaeturc As Fleming the klea of n people implies union, why Ihe British Guiancse are the Th,} Ito rtl considered the eslihimself has wryly commented Our politicians realise this, but ino81 inllliantly individualistic ,,inu ** or the iinuncial year "It seems a pity we -liouid hav they have gut hold of the stick at K*oup in the whole Caribbean. 1B5 3-** but this matter was also to pay for what is our own." the wrong end. They want to Th *> "ght shy of federation bepostponed until Its next meeting. Vast sum* nave uccn given to make sure of the legal form with"ause of some vague consciousness A meeting will be fixed shortly Untish inventors for wart out thinking about the real attlof %  'continental' destiny. But this to deal with these matters, lude at all. I are only goes as an example of the "" -l more hragrnentarU] divided than unity among a people that Is no --. c iJ pf .i broken diinkimi glass, longer distinctly stratified accordUem ror I o-day Not only are we all separated Into uig to ihe notes in an anthropologTrlmdadiaii-. and J.-.maicans. St. Ittx hand-book. If much the same Luclati .nans. Guian. could be accomplished in all the eseand Honclurians. Anl'.guans and West Indian Islands, only the In'rhc < Barbadians, but class restrictions ular barriers will remain to be "**• and isolations cut us up into even broken down. The super-confident researches. Sir Frank Whittle was given £ lOU.ooo for his work On jet propulsion. Sir Robert Wat.son Watt received £50.000 for his work on radar, Tin TIKVII DO Ir Every lime "~**M J?'w££uT\$w m mU ventor of U1 mJnes which blew 3aea*aaesffi rlv But lrr\ up the German dams was £10.000. But Fleming, like other doctors, has been given nothing. Kxplaining ihe Government's policy in l44. Mr. Atllee, then Ihe Lord President of the Coun. I. said that any system of financial rewards, even If desirable, could not be a-dmiuilered equitably In practice. The Govrtunent supported mecEcal reearcb in progress, and did nol oiler payment by results. But why should It be possible t" administer a system of rewards for radar research, surely .. tremendously complicated Held, while it is not though pownl.li make payments for a med.cal discovery about which there is dispute? It's Time Since successive British Governments seem determined not |i> pay out any money for one of the greatest medical discover :es of ihe century, then surely they should have been spurred on to give higher recognition I' Sir Alexander Fleming in other ways. Other doctors, with less |0 distinguish them, have been mad* peers. Other scientists ha recetvat the Order of Merit. It would be a graceful gesture for Coronation Year if Fleming, one of the Queen's most illusiiious subjects, was at last given the recognition which the 'mporfetfaM of his discovery warrants. This modest genius should have to wait no longer for his ju^t reward.< World Os*t right Reserved I LI' Glands .Made Active and -Youthful Vigour Restored In 24 Hours CYCLING AT ITS BEST American Doctor's Discovery Strengthens Hood. Nerves, Body, Memory, train. Muscles, and Ind urtmce— %  ettei Than Otand Operations. Thaiiti 10 Ui dMoaur* f an Ajnalio noMoi. ll M %  •< %  r M l* H fat la*M "i (i prnwwidr *U. %  ••• %  WMM If UIXFllllll I|||R IN in. Y-jtnfal Vitoiu. ABSIIMO. ind Vi. L I'.H diHoxfi vhlib U a aiapl uialB*et ud Nil W UN Htm: *. anOM. a.Utrli B |i %  tv'flMI W H if lit. ** ""• "" *""" N" .~(ill II II Dliaaaai • far >u Io luff'i Horn LNI at Vk|or and ManhoM W.a. •• %  •Ipfjr Mjl %  *-, %  M i mw lmpi.1" S1004. SHUr SlID, DfBtMIMl *M f*icr n*s issuss ru a*r:j u> ihu tfawlg ".n thai mi HfMlU rwwrea Ha % %  in % %  : %  %  .1 %  (land acJiiiy aad a*rv> Kti. H iDiriaH^ and Mllond W *Ui Swl .•.Ibful |MH iai te>tr m un SMir*irf. ahica \c\u MO pui. bkH) ad liuraiif >.. ,< • ir.|i. •lift •• anarp and .lialu JBIIJ % % %  k larnuta la m'>.in i( Lei W I WgSSL*8 feAV *# % %  &"•%-';,.";: Sli;n.\l. (ASH OFFER d a .14.1. liiD.n Ka O Oiinnini. r*t*nll> _.^ n.1. rWI and sajunkta bMwa .1. ulaWiihad mm SstfeM >f IMH laimuta. -M•• inn had dafted all olh.w.aim*ni It nu i.KH.d ina latiaai mm i itmaiui. 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Sl'SDAY. AUGUST 31. 1H2 ——• SUNDAY ADVOCATE PACK FIVE SPOKTSMAirS DIAMY Kent Cricket Captaincy In Doubt W. MURRAY-WOOD. will i either confirm nor deny rumour? that he 1* not retaining the csptatney n f Kci! next season. But the county'-, secretsn>-manager. Mr N. CHRISTOrvtERSON. tells me that it b> almost certain that lWirray-Wood will be Invited to carry on. Thlrty-flve-year-old MurrayWaod said, after accepting that captaincy this year; "If I cannot make a success of the )Ob, 1 will net hold ft for more than one season." Criticised Kent have had a far from successful season. Many members have criticised Murray-Wood's captaincv. Some say his tactical ideas are too set and that some defeats could have been victories had his captaincy been less rigid. Last season Kent finished newt to last In the championship. At present there are three teems below them. Odd thing Is that Kent's second Xl won the Minor Counties championship last season, and if they win their last match, sgninst Wiltshire, they will nnish runners-up this season with the right to challenge the top club—probably I^ancashtre—for the championship. Evans Will Be Fit GODFREY EVANS. England wicket-keeper, put his hand In his pocket—and the result was an inJury which prevented him from keeping wicket In part of the Kent v Leicester match at Loughborough. "In the pocket was a sharp pencil." he told me te~4ay. "The point passed under the nail of the middle finger and broke off. I had to go to a doctor to have the lead taken out and 1 was advised that for the time being a bandage should remain on the finger. %  *I batted all right and could have kept wicket yesterday if trie state of the match had made it Lindwall Prepares To Mow Us Down Down here in the South little is heard of the heroes of league cricket in Lancashire. Attention, please, for one of international importance. Bay Lindwall. Next season ha will be trying to mow down England wickets instead of those of Bar-up and Rawtenstall and TodmoTden. Up to to-day Lindwall, after %  only ;i moderate beginning, had taken 78 Lancashire League wickets at eight runs and bit each on behalf of his club Nelson. Only twp utbar prsisssional* both of them Australians and both spin rather than speed boujkra. had taken even as '"7 as 60 wicket*. They Ronnie Clayton h Willing To fight McCarthy By GEORGE WHITING KfTorts are bemg made to pair BRUCE DOOLAKm. East LanI**" 1 **"weight champion RomUe casoire. 79, and CECIL PEPPER '•*>' ,on "' %  £. m !" *}*" tcn Burnlev 78 It London with thai rising young star of the East End. Stepney's Duckworth's View ;.'> &f a ,*£ upo#e w „„, ?."£! 5* i\? w Ve I? 8e L S7 V hU 2lBl birthday in November, Undwall will be 31 on October should profitably employ the neat 3. which la "getting on" for a few month* learning as much fast bowler. Ought we therefore i.bout Clayton as possible. to write him off for international Clayton %  willing, but I fear cricket? Decidedly no, to Judge there will have U> be much from what my friend GEORGE powarM bargaining before the DUCKWORTH says: McCarthy party show any signs "Lindwall Is carrying a stonu of interest of extra weight because he has "McCarthy has won 16 and drawn one of his 17 fights, but he still a baby, and in no hurry had no six-day cricket this s ill not say that he is certainly , aw. but he 1. %  ^Sr^.TB.I Rood enough Ut return season to the flood aide cricket. Little Support "This sumi of "biff *•* **r? -'""""X Motioy. vnw ^* knocked him down twice, shows that he is still in need of exnderstandable attitude — hardly fi bowled at all on a fast wicket, he but completely different from the has not been bowling to a ring of being shown by the management accomplished slip fieldsmen and of that other feather weight he has not had the support of a "find." 20.yeas-old Johnny Btuflrst-class bowler at the other asTwtirwi. of R."chdale. "i aaw live catches off Jus l2 Stopped bowling put down in half Buttt-r12 oppoothers. Ex-cottou openiiive hour. That means that he ha* worth> navln( sU ,pped had to take most of his wickets n€ n t,. outpointed tan cleaned bowled or lbw. He has i,d drawn with another, Is now done It. Don't belittle him." acknowledged in the North as the Even so. Undwail's league moat damaging young puncher figures need not send shivers seen down our spines. League war. cricketers are much easier prey Sc than Hutton, Sheppherd, Ikln. he i Gmveney. May and the others Bruce those parts since the t hey ha Gwilliam Will Play HERE is a good kick-off to the rugby season at Twickenham— n match between Harlequins and an International XV raised by Sir WAVELL WAKEFIELD The game will be played on September 6 (3.15). Schoolmaster JOHN GWILLIAM. the former Cambridge Univer^ty forward who played 18 times for Wales and led them to two triple crown victories will captain Sir Wavell WaUcneld's XV. Cambridge Capture W. KNIGHTLEY-SMITH, the Highgate schoolboy, whose lefthanded batting for Middlesex since mid-summer has shown exceptional promise, goes up to Cambridge in October. But he may not have to wait until next summer to get his first Blue, He should earn one for soccer, for he Is an accomplished full-back His chances !" bright. Both G. TORDOtr and O. WHITFIELD. Cambridge's backs against Oxford last season, hare gone? down. With five Old Blues and some experienced seniors returning Cambridge, who have not beaten Oxford since 1947, have good prospects of breaking the sequence In the match at Wembley In December. Wanstead Agree IF Wanstead win the Northern section of the Evening Standard club cricket table they ore prepared to play a challenge match against the Southern section winners. They are the second club to agree. Beddlngton have already intimated they will be willing to play In this match If they win the Southern section. Wanstead have a good chance of finishing top. Although their last two games have been rntnedoff, they still have a four-point lead over Flnehley. Three clubs are iri the running for til a Southern leadership Mitcham have regained it, but only one point separates them from Beddlngton and Sutton. The competition closes on August 90 and the final placing. may depend on the Mitcham v. Beddlngton game that day. —LJbaT> Family Divers [jnjnaai RATHER and son are compelClayton for ing in the English diving ^lOOO. with the slightly destrle-rlht,n **• "rtder" that the champion indent are his mentors— unseed by Tom Hurst. Woodcock's pilot — that dverllsed their wil match him against atdestake of ;nrr, SJSSO^S. sf-js ' "" %  • ,,m "" Watford papermaker and a —L.KS Davis Scores First pre-war Herts county champion who launched the Highgate Diving Club in 1935. A wartime parachute Jumping Instructor, he returned to active diving last -*. r\m ear — year to get his son DOUGLAS UOUllirj Uf 3008011 interested. BBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBSBBBBBBL.--..— „ Harold Joiner performed well in the men's plain high diving though he did not finish among the first three. Douglas Joiner competes in the boys" event to-day. "Pop" Joiner intends keeping in competition diving. "1 am looking forward to having three of the family competing in His n.ilioiuil* next year. My year-old daughter PAMKLA i LONDON. Aug. 30 Former England captain Fred dy Brown came to the rescue of Northants against Gloucester with .i brilliant 116 which included six and 12 fours. When he wen in, Northanls had lost four wickets for 39 runs. With Eddie Davis. Brown added 213 for the fifth wicket. After Brown had been ?*"" %  dismissed by Lambert. Davis re* *• mained to score 108, his first cenalreadjr showing great promise," t(iry of lhe ..MOO. lie said. The Indian tourists in the last aw. c* *. r* i match against a county are in They Stay At Oval .rouble at Bournemouth Reulvg^OMNTHlAN^CASUALS EC, tr the Isthmian League club, 111 continue to play at The lug to Hampshire's 256 by close of iy. they had lost two wickets .-.' 26 runs. Oval for at least four more years, SCOREBOARD This was announced to-day by Corinthian-Casuals and Surrey County Cricket Club. When Corinth Ian-Casuals first played at The Oval it was understood that renewal of the contract would depend on the ground's condition after a trial period of two year". Apparently everyone is satisfied. The season opens at The Ova' on Saturday. October 4. Until then Corinthian-Casuals win play their home matches It Cheshunt. Cycling Boost B RITISH bicycle manufacturers are to sponsor cycle racing at Herne Hill next season Previously they have mere v given trophies. ThH will mean i higher standard and more npBuckinghamshire v pearances by leading continental Warwick stars and our own champion. ,i ( ,red EEO HARRIS, who has raced there only once this year. Paining F OR the beneflt af Ensllsh vlaltOBSMO appear* a* KNIGHTLKV era. a Swedish paper publishin fill N SMITH. Oh. well, he • cewily cricket score*. The MMh . been •escribed aa "a dashlnc dieses left-hander H Knlghtlc}l>alsman.~—.L.B.H. Mtsddleasx versus Lancashire Middlesex US I.incflBhlre 1 M Hampshire verasa ladlasw Hampshire 266 Indians 2d for 2. Leicestershire versus Surrey Surrey 4M. Kent versa* Yorkshire Kent MS, (Wsrdle or 69). Yorkshire 18 for 1. Smmrx versus Derbyshire Sussex 216 Derbyshire 65 for 3. '.l.iueestershlre verses NseShsass Northants 324 (I*mi 1 :> for 63. Gloucestershire 26 for 1. fllaanontssi verse* Wseesusstsr Worehester 233 Glamorgan 28 for 2. ansss Warwick 361 for 7 . %  Iluckinghamshu 26 for 0. OR. OTTO BEIWILL PMVtlCIMM M %  ,. %  —= JSSBl^ 4* m c \ ^4*lLbo/TNWT .you VOC? ] ftL IIKE NEM MftM J i SASSSjOy/ VSaW / %  rt HWT '* nmifj [TSSH/CARIB D "t> TC TRICII VALL I&HT SOSE IS TMfc J %  II j*l^ RN1WHEUI '} JP 7 '/if "-onepoc | Hcrcaks cycle* go Ibey r* the mail tat local coodioooa. Tim it because Hercules I are constantly studym | the special requirements Latest deai|:i i, driest quality materials crafrsmanship. Iiave made Hercules the bscyde Hercules SOLD BY ALL LEADING DEALERS IHS issBcuiss crcu a noro* co LTD %  S U SIIOI U M. INCLANO BJBSJBBBBBBJTSBJ T. GEDDES GRANT LTD.. BRIDGETOWN






ESTABLISHED 1895

Mossadegh

$10,000,000 U.S.
Aid Offer Ridiculed

TEHERAN, Aug, 30,

Premier Mohammed Mossadegh told the nation on Sat-
urday night that Iran could not accept the three point
proposal for settling the Iranian oil dispute, put forward by
President Truman and Prime Minister Churchill. Mossadegh
delivered this reply in a special announcement broadcast
from Radio Teheran.

He said he will call both houses of Parliament into
session to draft a formal reply on the plan. Official action
came shortly after one of Mossadegh’s principal advisers
said that suggestions were not satisfactory.

Oil expert Kazem_ Hassibi ‘told
the United Press that Iran could
not accept the three point Anglo-
American offer—especially © point
one which states that Iran must
have regard for the legal posi-!
tion of parties betore nationali-

Hurricane
Threatens

sation.” ‘ ; | ; Fl id.
Hassibi said nationalization is pper ori a
an accomplished fact and Britain

will fail if it is trying to obtain
confirmation of 1933 agreement
with ithe Anglo-Iranian oil com.
any. He said Iran wished to
ave no further dealings with ihe

JACKSONVILLE, Florida, Aug. 30,
A hurricane with winds up to
85 miles an hour whirled north-
ward through the Atlantic today,
‘Anglo-Tranian, and would no‘ threatening upper Florida and
eae the’ company’s partici- the Georgian coasts with high!
pation in oil operations in Iran, tides and rough seas. It was felt)
t ‘that the tropical disturbance
He ridiculed the offer of might hit the mainland, but it
$10,000,000 from the United States.' swerved suddenly to the north
He said that if Iran did not accept jast night.

£10,000,000 or $26,000,000 fron .
Centre Located

the Anglo Iranian Oil Company,|



| square.



itjing from the British freighter

Reje



From All Quarters
2 HALF-DRUNK
HALF-DROWNED
IN SEA OF WINE

Rome: The daughter of the late
King Victor Emmanuel III of
Italy, Princess Jolands and her
husband came across a wreeked
lorry and saw th? driver and his
mate trapped in the cabin, strug-
gling in a red liquid. They opened
the door and out flopped the driv.
ers half drunk, half-drowned
in a sea of wine. In the crash a
120-gallon tank of wine had burst
and the wine had poured into their
cabin,

Sydney: A conference of radio
scjentists was told this week that
a newly designed valve, smaller
than a pea, makes it possible to
build radio s@ts only a few, inches
The valve is called s
transisor and is almost everlast'ng,
but it costs 26 times as much as
an ordinary valve.

Capetown: A troop of baboons
which raid kitchens for food and
even open refrigerators is terri-

ing housewives who live on a
hillside above the British naval
base at Simonstown near Cape-
town. On the sound of the dock-
yard 5 o’clock hooter, however,
they disappear — because they
fear men but care nothing for
‘women. :

Sydney: Eight Sydney dockers
were awarded £9,969 damages this
week because they were burned
by mustard gas they were unload-

in January, 1943

into the open/Security regulations barred their

she definitely would not “sell |
herself for $10,000,000. ee
Mossadegh’s rejection came Forecasters indicated that
after a cabinet meeting. The might even veer to the northeast|Indomoneus
broadcast message said that and whirl out
United States ambassador . Loy Atlantic. A plane flew into the/claim until the war was ended.
Henderson and British envoy,“eye” of the storm shortly after,

George Middleton submitted the
same proposals on. Wednesday
but that Mossadegh, told them
Iran could not accept such pro-
posals. The broadcast said two!

C . ye : | Resort towns and military es-
Golamats ,. premier’ 32; redraft tablishments 300 miles along the

; i |coasts horthward from here to

were still winehidapanet | Wilmington, North Carolina;|

| were battened down and all ships!

Co operation ‘either had fled or sought sheltered ,
President Truman and Prime,

Minister Churchill today ap-

harbours.

The weather
pealed to Dr. Mohammed Mos last night that the hurricane
sadegh for Persian co-operation
in solving the Anglo-Iranian dis-

midnight and located its centre}
about 150 miles east southefst of|
Jacksonville.

probably would continue to swerve
northwards, possibly keeping the



nppeal handed to Dr.| full might of its winds from the
Piaandeeh Ploday by George United. States shoreline, but they
Middleton, British Chéeaarge warned 6f high tides and rough
D’Affaires and Loy Henderson, seas.
American Ambassador in Tehe-| _uUP.
ren, was accompanied by three sail
praposals...

Hussein, Churchill
Exchange Messages

LONDON, Aug. 30.
King Hussein of Jordan, 17-

1, The Taverrpation rational Court of
Justice at the Hague should de-

cide the question of compensation
to be paid for the nationalisation
of the Anglo-Iranian Company's
industry in Persia.

sia rnment
‘ind ise ail Sorepane shone i on year-old monarch who succeed
tiate for the flow of Persiah oil to] Sis father ailing King Talal last

month on Friday thanked Prime
Minister Winston Churchill for a
cordial message of friendship.

The King’s reply to Foreign
;Secretary Anthony Eden by a
Jordan ‘minister expressed grati-
tude for “your warm feelings,”
exports to Persia and on Persia’s| and added “I hope that the strong
sterling and the United States|bonds fortunately existing be-
Government would make ar im-{tween the great country of Great
mediate grant of $10,000,000 in| Britain and my country will in-
economic assistance to Persia, crease in strength and grow in

|

firmness during the forthcoming
Messages

years.
The joint Truman-Ch
peal to Mossadegh said:

the world’s markets.

3. If the Persian Government
agrees to these proposals the oil
company should arrange for the
marketing of the oil now stored in
Persia, while the British Govern-
ment would relax restrictions on



urchill ap-| There has also been a cordial
“We have |exchange of message between



Nine Killed In
U.S. Labour Day
Accidents

NEW YORK, Aug. 30.
The Labour Day holiday traffic

bureau said late|Jam began claiming its victims on

Saturdzy, At least nine persons
died in traffic accidents over the
nation, Georgia led the list with
four dead. New Mexico, New
York, Illinois, Kansas, and Cali-
fornia each reported at least one
traffic death.
The National Safety Council
at Chicago feared that 480 per-
sons would die in traffic fatalities
over the. long week-end. e toll
last year was 461, >



Plane Crashes:
Kills 5-Year-Old

DENMARK, Aug. 30.
A Swedish two seater plane

St. David's workers contribute a

Sunday Advocat

BARBADOS, AUGUST 31, 1952

ets Joi

United States Will Fig

fight the Korean war to a



Ps
JUBILEE GARDENS as seen

from Messrs Gardiner

ht

Korean War To A Finish |

UNITED NATIONS, NEW YORK,
The United Nations Sat

ug. 30.

pecay night pledged itself to

nish and re-affirmed its de-

termination to maintain troops in Europe within the North
Atlantic Treaty Organization.

*Ambassador Warren R, Austin, Chief United States
delegate to the United Nations said in a statement that “we
intend to help the United Nations see thé job through in
Korea because in success there will be a powerful stimulant
to greater progress in building an effective*United Nations

Security

System.

Gairy Will
Reduce Strike

(From Our Own Correspondent)
GRENADA, Aug. 30.

Gairy plans to call off strikes
at_all St, David’s Estates on Mon.
day ex etit ait
which ‘Struck if sympathy
saying this estate would face
abandonment as. long as other

shilling each pay day to the main.
tenance of their fellows. Gairy
says the management of Petit
Etang must start considering three
months’ back pay together with
new wages—Cight shillings for
men, seven for women—among a
host of other privileges, and be-






crashed into a festival crowd on| fore the cocoa crop comes in, the:
Saturday killing a five-year-old | Agriculturists Union will be ask~}

vyirl and seriously injuring three
other persons. Five other persons
were slightly hurt.

Six Swedish planes were land-
ing during the festival demon-
stration. One was piloted by the
Swedish spcerts pilot Nils Bunde
Sjpeberg. It landed with the wind
across the runway.

The plane rushed over the
field) through rope barriers and
into the crowd.

The Pilot remained in ihe plane

i sssages from our tw2|Churchjll and Jordan’s Prime|for several minutes too shocked
freeeas te eee regarding the}Minister Te Fkymabdul Huda,|io move, The injured children
recent talks with you as well as;the Fereign Office said. and adults screamed as 5,000
your communication | to Her U.P.| persons looked on. UP.

Majesty’s Government”,

The proposal that the Interna-
tional Court of Justice should ad-
judicate in the question of com-
pensation is made without preju-
dice to the legal position of the
two partics to the dispute iin-
mediately before nationalisation
and to all claims and counter
claims of both parties.

The Anglo-Iranian Company
would seek arrangements for the
movement of oil as agreements
were reached upon a price and
as suitable conditions for loading
permitted. Appropriate payment
would be made for the oil moved.
The offer of an American grant
was made to assist Persia in her
budgetary problems.—U.P,



an interview published in
Epoca, Farouk is quoted as

too many inventions in the
to have much money.”

EISENHOWER GREETED IN NEW YORK



4

WEARING A BROAD GRIN, Gen. Dwight Eisenhower waves to ad-
mirers on his arrival at La Guardia Field, New York, with his smiling
wife, Mamie. Gov. Thomas E. Dewey (right) was on hand to officially
welcome the G.O.P. Presidential candidate. Ike addressed the opening
session of annual Legion convention in Madison Square Garden

34th

world incredible offers have arrived.
have been the target of innumerable inventors.



Ex-King Farouk Offered
Several Villas In Italy

ROME, Aug. 30.

Ex-King Farouk of Egypt on Saturday is quoted as
saying that he received “incredible” requests by posts for
money and offers of “thousands” of castles and estates.

In
an Italian Weekly Magazine
saying: “From all parts of the
For example: “I
They make
world and to invent you have

Farouk is described as waving
a bunch of newspaper clippings
‘and exclaiming: “I know the
technique of certain parts of the
Press. All newspapers of the
world arrive here and daily I dis-
sover extraordinary statements
that I am supposed to have made
and the strangest events in which
I am supposedly involved.

“I believe I have beaten the
most celebrated Hollywood star in
evoking the strangest fantasies of
every country. And all that brings
on avalanches of letters, So far
there have been offers of about
1,000 villas for sale, mostly from
Italy.

“This adorable Italy is full of
villas for sale. They have even
offered me a farm with ten cows
and a proposal has arrived from
the Isle of Elba, but America also ¢
is not joking. Several anaes
invited me to buy a large
Forouging project for two million,
dollars.”

Asked if he would like to stay
long in Italy Farouk is quoted as
treplying with a smile: “If you
}wish a provisional answer I will
‘say that the future is in the hands
\°* God.”

|. Asked if he received letters from

‘Egypt since his exile Farouk ;
paused, puffed at his cigar and
jsaid: “I am informed of what is

ing on in my country”.

A correspondent who wrote an
interview said he is “convinced”
\that a line of “first hand” infor-
{mation existed between Capri and
Cairo despite rigorous Egyptian

censorship

i

U.P,

j

ed for higher wages too,

The present wage scale |s $1.20
and $1.00. Gairy also makes a
point at present of not recognis-
ing the Agriculturists Union
which some months ago was regis.
tered as incorporating the old

| Agricultural Society, the Agricul-

tural Employers’ Society and the
Coconut Growers’
contending that the unionists
represent a new body to which
his union does not owe legal moral
or other obligation. This is taken
to imply that the stock
undertaking event in the strike
g’ven the Agricultural Employ-
ers’ Society by the M.M.W.U., is
no longer valid therefore there was
no grouse when, stock went un-
tended as a result of sympathy
strikes,

B.G’s GOYERNOR
LEAVES FOR U.K.

GEORGETOWN, B.G., Aug. 30.

On the first leg of his journey
to the U.K., Governor Sir Charles
Campbell Woolley, K.C.MG.,
O.B.E., M.C., accompanied by
Lady Woruley, sailed for Port-of-
Spain by the Saguenay Terminals
“Sunwalt” late noon today,

As the ship left the harbour,
guns at Fort William Frederick
boomed out B.G's final salute.

Just before embarking His Ex-
cellency had saluted the War
Memorial inspected by Guards cf
Honour, from local forces and he
bade farewell to the Judiciary,
Members of the Executive and
Legislative Councils, Heads of
Departments, the Mayor and
Town Councillors and friends.

The Governor's extended term
of office ends in October this year.
His regime of over five years has
been marked by continued devel-
opinental progress begun in the
preceding regime of Sir Gordon
Lethem and the country is now
on the verge of its greatest con-
stitutional change withal.

From Trinidad Sir Charles pro-
eeeds by other means of trans-
portation to Montreal and hopes
to be in the United Kingdom by
scotember 21,

Lady Woolley will be proceed-
ing to the U.K, by the “Golfito”,



arriving there on September 13
w 14,
Not yet 60 years of age, Sir

Charles at the end of his term
will have served for 31 years in
the Colonial Service.—CP)

Lady Arundell
Opens Exhibition

(From Our Own Correspondent)

GRENADA, Aug. 30



|
|

!

Association, '

care’

‘



|

i

ee

i

Austin’s statement followed the
U.S. reply to a letter from the
U.N. Collective Measures Com-
n.ittee regarding implementations
by member states of the General
Assembly resolution of two years
ago call upon the nations to
earmark to be used by the
United ons to repel aggres.
sion anywhere*in the world, The
US ly was transmitted Sat-

er stressing that this coun-
try’s contribution to collective
security includes participation in
the Korean conflict the letter said
“the United States takes this op-



SUBULEE GA#DENS



PRICE : SIX CENTS



E41 1.9.—U.K. Proposal }

U.N. Planes Blast
Red Power Piani

SECUL, Aug. 38,

United Nations warplanes stepped up the presstire on

the Communists again early today when American Super-
forts blasted an important Red power plant in north
Korea. The raid came a few hours after Allied figh





er
bombers hit the North Korean capital of Pyongyang with

v

the war.

one of the’ heaviest assaults of
- - Seventeen

$10,000 Paid |
In Forecast
At Santa Rosa

Japan-based
Superforts roaroed ove ‘h
number one plant and dropped
high explosives on a hoge, powe
house *
Superforts were over the targ
for nearly three hours. Trey us?
electric aiming devices to she

Ie

B25













down bombs on some undamager
areas and on instaliations that the
3 Communists have been trying
(Prem Our Own Correspondent) repair. The returning p lots sai
‘ ORT-IP-SPAIN, Aug. oe that they made “excellent bomb
The biggest forecast’ im. the} yuns” and that Ube Red anti-
history of Trinidad racing—$10,009 | civcraft fire was %y Te thy
was paid this afternoon in th’ |oopsnunist nis mc s Onvad®
Seventh Race at the Santa Rosa | Sa Lo x 7 ~. | passes at th 169" ect Tired ne
meeting which was won by Mrs | shot: Y ‘ a
May Chin's Red Velvet with Mon-|" 44); & $F hats
; ‘ f ed pli lew : ecord off
roe and Bright Light following i. rey ee By sig irda sietet >,

1,443 sortiesfte “dun





that order





c

g-bombs, bul- C)
s f

% rere by} =

pa i » ‘ lets, and nagat™ on
Austin’s Offices, The race was the Grell & Co..|Rriday, bu uffe
ay Ltd. Trophy over a distance of aix 7 sl "
furlongs for C Wi ;s only. J. c,| minor losses isiderin
uriongs for nners only. J. ©-liense curtain fire




Sehneider’s Hope Dawns in a
single outing at the first day of the
Four Day Meeting, convincingly
won the Capt. Cipriani Memorial
Cup Event, beating such favour-
ites as Lupinus and Footmark
over a distance of seven and a half
furlongs for Class Al and A2 and
Bl and B2 only.

RESULTS

zy the in

Bate For B.W.L.
Federation Talks

{ ‘loth Draped ee
Over Statue
Of Justice

LONDON, Aug. 30.













The 2ilded statue of Justice—
we figure of Justice not}; Arima STAKES. About Five Fur- KINGSTON, Awz. 29
blindfolded — which shines out longs Class G2, Three Years Old and The Government proposed ta
ever London from the top of the over end £100,000 to a combine ‘n
Central Criminal Court, the “Old + ees % Blue Bird. 3. Mish) cluding the Close Brufhers of
Bailey,” was found to have a VISITORS STAKES. About 5 Fur-}| London who are i
black cloth drape over its face tongs, Class Gi onty. uke over the Bus
today The police believe that i mk Hur, 2 Pepperwine, 3. Blue! porate Area with

mebody climbed 200 feet to the], oie cape: alent ¢ Fartones, | million population
statue with the cloth during the Class Fl and F2 only Bustamante, who is
night 1 protest against last}! CAPT. CIPRIANI MEMORIAL ou London on Sunday, stated that
nigh’s announcement of the re- ae aie te eats Class Al and Ag an interview, he will discuss con-
prieve of the three times child 1. Hope Dawns. 2. Dormay. 3. False Stitutional issues with the Secret-
layer John Straifen, Pride ‘ ary of State. He will also seek

MAIDEN STAKES. About 6 Furtongs,| 9 definite date for B.W I. Fed-

Lost October Straffen strangied Class ©, Winners only enation talks, meet the Close
two litle girls, He was sent to], + FSi bie hora «| Brothers Franchise jssue and get
Broadmoore Criminal Asylum Furlongs. Class D1 and D? and kt] information about the welfare

fier being found insane and un- and &# only,

of West Indians migrating te Bri-



fit to plead. 1. Bore Seneey 8. SR: Ole e FEF tain in search Of jobs C.F.
Last month the killer’ escaped | ;, About 6 Furlenes, Class ©. Winners

from the asylum for a few hours, Only. - \

and shortly after he was recap- 1, Red Velvet, 2, Monroe. 3. Brig ‘

tured. Another little girl was Lint. ’DAD FACTORY

4 About 6 Furlongs Class Fi and FY
only. Four Years Old and Over,
1. Kismet) @ My Own, % Flame

Flower.

found strangled,

INSPECTOR TO
VISIT GRENADA

(From Our Own Correspondent)
GRENADA, Aug. 30,

Found guilty of this third mur
der, Staffen was sentenced to hang
on September 4.



Canada On Charge













portunity reaffirm oe state-] The Criminal an Court re The Finance Committee of the
ment regarding the maintenance} ectcd his appeal against the was Sat ® leg slature has approved Govern-
of forces in Europe.” Jeath sentence, and ose Of Discriminating ment action to invite the’ Senior
. ignest legal authority, Attorn »| . 1cvory Inspector of Trinidad te
Maintenance Of Forces General Lionel Heald, to allow Against W wf. visit and collaborate with the
Th siginal United States} ‘he cuse to Ho to the last court of Attorney General and Labour
pebbetadad ih, seaintetaace » of appeal the House of Lords, KINGSTON, Aug. 29 Adviser with a view to modifying
’ c Charges against Canada _ for|and su‘ting Grenada’s require-
furces in Suro unset mT Last nicht it»was officially an- discriminating against West In-} ments to the Model Factory Or-
was contained in’p similar letter! vounced that the Home Secreta ians, will be laid by representa | dinance recently received from
to the Collective Measures Com. “tage ,} alens, Ww be Alc rene ere Leeeeranee | Scent eC
itt in June, 1951 had recommended for the formal) tives of the Britisn Caribbean! the Secretary of State The col-
i a said “We are convinced] Approve! of Queen Elizabeth the! Parliamentary Group, attending] ony'’s legislation on th mattett
that the United Nations must have|second rep-ieve of Straffen, This} the Commonwealth Parliament-| is now out-moded
at ts disposal, the means to main~ ;#utomati means the commu | ary Conference opening in Ottawa The decision was also taken to
t i International peace Those | tion of St#iiTen’: death sentence! on September 8. send the Foreman of t Me Bota ric
eine will be made ‘available o imprisonment for life Recently resentment has beew} Station, on a three-months’ course
only if the countries believe in —wv.P. | Browing against the Canadian bar) und the trini ya Ge ernmet
‘ollective security and will stand etiniebiioatin - on coloured West Indians enter-| Botanist to enable hi uperv. s-
te red to contribute to collec- ing the country. Economic and|ing of the production of econo
ore ees Q i B’ { Gq “tf : A N » financial relations will also bejand ornamental plants it the
tive action in accordance with the 4 aos Gets A NeW ertiaeeel A aye
U.N. Charter, : discussed,——C.P, stati

He said “Korea proves our will
te work and (f necessary to fight
for peace. Those who made tra-
mec miscaleulations in Korea
should not forget the terrible price
they already paid for under-
estimating the determinion of
free peoples.

The United States’ letter sald
this eountry will review its con
“ribution to collective securlity
afier the end of hostilities in
Korea” and after United States
fcrees there had been withdrawn”
He said in addition to its present
military commitments on behalf
of the United Nations, the U.S.
has made available to its allies
“vertain United States military
end naval bases in the Pacific and
training bases and facilities with-
in the continental limits of the
United States,”

The letter emphasized that
“the United States has for some
time applied and is at present
applying for “economic and, fin-
ancial sanctions” against aggres-
sors in Korea, “The foremost
gmong the sanctions is an em-
bargo on exports and strategic
materials to Communist China,
which were voted by the General
Assembly after it had branded
‘the Peim'ing regime as an aggres
sor-—U.P. *



Congressmen May
Have Gaused Riots

NEW YORK, Aug. 30
Scripps - Howard newspapers



weekly Washington column re-
ported Saturday that visiting
Congressmen may have set off
new riots among Red prisoners
of war on Koje.
Trouble started the night be
fore four House members arrived

for a conference with Major Gen-
eral Haydon L. Boatner Camp
Commander General Boatner said



prisoners learned by frepevine
of the expected. visit and rioted
as a demonstration. Our diplo-
mats at Hong Kong were red-
faced when a high British official
met the House delegation, noted
three were midwest Republican
and remarked they were u
doubtedly isolationist

The visitors biew their to;




Lady Arundel] this afternoon,/and lectured their hosts on Bri-
evened the exhibition at the tain’s trading with enemy recos
Grenada Arts Club which also nition of Red China. The Four
cancided with the close of the Congressmen were Ralph Harve
two-week course given to Club Harold Ost: w. Harry McG
member Mr. M. P. Alladir i Wil MeCul

dad Art Officer U.P





olitical Party






A new political party, the Bar-
bados United Party, has beer
formed. At a recent meeting Mr
Graftan Clarke and Mr. 8. Agarde
were elected as President anc
Vice President respectively, wit! |)
Rnd Mir’, te Wood ae Abetatars RAL SIGH—Makers of the
Secretary WORLD'S CHAMPION
The objects of the party are CYCLE Ali
‘to unite its members spiritually, ie: <->
politically, economically, and 1 Y bg MSF
socially,” The party promises that, ne ene
if it ts suecessful, it will do its —
best to bring to the notice of the
members of the House of As-
sembly the needs and sufferings
of the people of Barbados,
The party is open to member-
ship

“Study Of Bologna”
Given To B.G. Govt





(From Our Own Correspondent)
GEORGETOWN, Aug, 30.
The U.S. Congress Library has
presented the British Guiana Gov-
ernment with a volume of the
Study of Bologna presented by |
the School of Miniature Painting i
in Hungary which is based on a i}
Latia manuseript of the Four- i
teenth Century Hungarian Bible &
of Demeter Nekesei-Litoez { U You are ona §
The document has been deposit- . . $
ed a: the Carnegie Public Library WINNER when you ride a Raleigh! —— |
Georgetow: ]
i A Raleigh was the choice of Reg Harris—World’s }
S. H. DALGLIESH Professional Sprint Champion for the second year in |
, , ; succession. Here is proof of the wisdom of buying |
TRANSFERRED TO B.G. P '

your bicycle from a Company with such great







> NO CYCLE IS COMPLETE WITHOUT A STURMEY |
” ARCHER 2 OR 4SPEED GEAR AND DYNOHU! @



Mr, S. H. Dalgliesh, Manager technical experience and knowledge that designed
of ihe Barbados branch of the and built the record-breaking RALEIGH.
Royal Bank of Canada, has been
transferred to Georgetown, n
British Guiana ‘ Manager f
the branch there
Mr. F. H.” Be, In Inspecto |
Superv ’s Departr t, Port-of- =
Spain, will suc cad. Mr. Dalg al THE ALL-STEEL BICVCLE I
rs a a cpg t and A Product af Raleigh Industries Limited, Nowingham, England, |
aC oO £ rive par on
or about September r
The poi ) “T CAVE, SHEPHERD
nncunced of Mr. G. \ f & CO., LTD.
town B.G., as I es 10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street.
of-Spain Tri |
Myr J Sn i|
}
i]




Va




































































went away with a puzzled frown.

With love to the middlemen

GLOBE

this Evening at 8.30

FIRST WITH SPORT FLASHES

GLOBE

ane on ming Here lives, in this obscure retreat,
2 ©“ ¢ ea | The victim of @ tragic joke.
Presents 1O-DAY and ever the Week 5 & 8.3e | whee ohen tec'l nabhing’ tek to

NEWS FROM HELSINKI
See Andy Stanfield winning the 200 metres
See Rev. Bob Richards winning the Pole Vault
See the Amazing Zatope’: doing the 5,000 metres
See Harrison Dillard winni ; ? metre Hurdle
WHITE CITY A.A.A. CiLAM" ONSHIPS
Thrill as MacDonald Bailey wins the 100 yds.

| eat,

Grew too much food, and %9
| went broke.





CENTURY=F0x
Gives You With
Pride and Joy

GAIETY

The Garden—-St James
MATINEE TO-DAY 4% PM
‘TAP BOOT” (colt Van BEFLIN &
“PARDON MY SARONG”
Bud ABBOTT & Lou COSTELLO

“

o . i ‘ a oe -
See Arthur Wint winning kv 449 yds. nda Song in TONiTE 2 Tomonsow Nes ®
; ‘ 3 its He Robert MONTGOMERY &
All this will the top Musical art... Allred | H. TCHCOCK'S oe

“WITH A SONG IN MY HEART”

Joseph COTTON
‘Tues. & We 30 p.m, (Whole Serial

' “ROYAL wounTE RIDES AGAIN’
Another Mighty

Metion Picture

OPENING FRIDAY 5th
SEPT.



" GANETTA DRESS SHOP

(Next Door te Singer’s)



FOR ONE WEEK ONLY

Discount on all
COTTON FRCCKS.

SPECIAL :
10%



AT LAST!
Kenneth Roberts’ Long Awaited...
Long-to-be-Remembered ...

hanyin
NTA

TECHNICOLOR

|

Mrs. A. L. Stuart’s School
of Dancing

Presents

REVUEDEVILLE 1952

Under the distinguished patronage of His Excellency
the Governor and Lady Savage

AT

EMPIRE THEATRE

On Wednesday 3rd., Thursday 4th., Friday 5th
September at 8.30 p.m.
MATINEE: Friday 5th at 5 p.m.
Music by Capt. Raison, A.R.C.M., and Pelice Band
BOOKING OFFICE OPENS EVERY DAY
From 8.30 a.m. — 12 Noon — From 1,30 pam, — 3.30 p.m.

Boxes & Orchestra
House



the Jane Froman story,

resem mic OLOkK
Havifano - Califoun
Wivie-Rifife | GLOBE”



A FREE HOLIDAY FOR ONE WEEK FOR TWO
PEOPLE AT THE SANTA MARIA HOTEL,
IRENADA IS THE FIRST DOOR PRIZE
At The

BEACHCOMBERS' BALL
PARADISE BEACH CLUB

From 9 p.m. on SEPTEMBER 6TH
NEXT SATURDAY

will present

STICKETS S150 _—

% Arranged for you 20 aquariums of Beauty and effortless

by the ;

S BARBADOS
HOTEL :
ASSOCIATION i

; if

665+ < “
SOSOS CGS OPPO PSPSPS PP POPSOSOSOP GOGO FSS OTSOSOOD,



Admission: 362

1/6 for ADULTS



9d. for CHILDREN and NURSES

PFS PSD

eo

PEPDO® PODOSS CDOPHG POY OHSG HH HHS OSH GH HOS HOF

PIP DIOOY



®@Clifle McClean, M



Mae LUBE se Sapna SLR le! oie Set, $1.00
BBMCOMY oes isa tsensonese sabe ommyedizenees ' At the DRILL HALL, GARRISON, on Sat., Sept. 6th. and Sunday, Sept. 7th
PIII IEG GLLLPRIBELLD DLE

THE BARBADOS POULTRY ASSOCIATION

PAGE TWO SUNDAY ADVOCATE
ip tincianaenine
] ;
eR nn ree eae, ? 3 ‘B THE W A 7 R. D. A. PERCIVAL, Ag
hi } ; The Ontass & Menten t 4 y M sistant dtemeonele. Adana
i | HE ; . to the Comptrofier fer Develep-
i i | 2 ADVOCATE’S SOCIAL CLUB By BEACHCOMBER ment and Welfare, left on Friday
Kt . aa ‘iieeimaianiias = | Under the Patrenage oj by B.W.1.A. for British Guiana to
}) ~~ BRIDGETOWN “BARBAREES ~ OISTIN the Hon. ¥, Cy Gale, M.L€. E report that redio signals 98Sist the Government jm pre~
(Dial 2810) (Dial 5170) . ee te erreae nal invite you to their ' have been picked up trom ures agi fer e, full neee
} TODAY TO TUES TOD. Y TO TUES ~ 1.40. eS pm DANCE | stars 30,000 lightyears away draw? ain ce aa aiilinn the uae
if 8 p.n ; a5 w pow i etiolated gene \ attention to -the recent .¢ ri- . ft
yy Another Thrilling Action [warns ew Hit oes ie ee at the ments of Dr. Strabismus .( US. Judge
) Film from Warner Bros : : ss ‘ ye
i : INSIDE THE WALLS]! .. STEEL |2 VOLUNTEER DRILL HALL 9! G0d Preserve) of Utrecht. MONG the passengers leav-
if RETREAT HELL tee: libs 9 : HELMET” en These sigmals are given out by ing last night by the Lady
i Richard CARLSON PO Neamt A-type MONDAY NIGHT, 6TH goncentrations of intggpteligg Nelson sor Boston on. their w
{ COCHRAN BRIAN|| pete OCTOBER, 1 hydrogen. Strabismus sas baek to New York were Mr. ar
Ise NEXT ATTRAC (iON aso | gees , that if this hydrogen ‘could be Mrs. Herman C. Stoute, two
{{ Errol Flynn Doubte peee Sree yc awen tear) Music by sucked ut from betwee the Barbadians who had been hol
«rocky MOUNTAIN’ « |] 7° Se VETOR Hh : ee SRF Perey Green's Orchestra stars by a huge rocket-propelled daying here for the past three
i “CAPTAIN BLOOD and sa, kam Do SUBSCRIPTION: —::— 2/- vacuum-cleaner, the smal] amount weeks as guests at the Hotel
{ THURS. Special 1.89 p.m BIETANT. Sens” REVENGE” & Va nine“ 9 of hydrogen left would offer a les? Royal :
Da ve hnicolor) ‘OUTLAW COUNTRY” sncing irom pm. condensed surface, as it were, Mr. Stoute, an Old ,Comber-
: “BONANZA” Garry COOPER WED. Gnly Tiebedfe: ney Srenatandtte for the reception of signals sent merian, is Judge of the Muni-
x ALLEN & TROMD Special 1.30 pos 4.45 & 8.390 pm Formal Dress Optional out eo our earth. The suction cipal Court of New York City.
“a » ar — a s eo! «pm . . - y
“GUNMEN of ABILENE ; “SILVER CITY wat controlled by a ther te dedi
, ovky LANE Lash 1.» RUE Double see Atta NANEM molecular pump with 6 He expressed délighy.
— 7 Shy ° ocx ALIGN 4
FRIDAY re ctvanae @ BSUNMER af rotating ae a Berbados 1s Progressing
i ‘ROOM FOR ONE_moge™ || “ow ‘OUTIL W_ COUNTRY args ee uae Sieratea “ rea “sels FTER spending nve weeks’
== microbars, with a A in his native Barba-
"| Reuter , would exert dos, Mr. Wilkinson,
} a tor U. on
of 8 the
at. an oe _— morning by B.W.LA, via Anti-
miles above 'Y guq and Puerto Rico.
EMPIRE OLYMPIC ROXY ROYAL is that the whole thing A member of the American Aid
Today to Tuesday io-Day & Tomerrew, To-day to seen Pe.amy iss » snows | burst, sal the sage for the West Indies Inc.,
143 & 8.90 8.10 . 1% o 8. 120 a Bs Mr has “been residing
Jose ER ee Pcturs ; in '
Jalt Disney" Mala POWERS the U.S.A. for the past
Walt Disney's "0 } ts Bette DAVIS Semeergudpsiancen. years. He was last here in 1920
SNOW WHITE CYRANO | THE. BIG in ye when he a couple of months,
j i w Bat At . Ww said that he had
AND THE SEVEN pe percerac| CARNIVAL anotHEeR MAN'S ere district im nated grest progress_in the island
Starring ' yesterday a ? . ,
DWARFS and seine! heii: POISON “No ge, he particularly with regard to hous-
ces, | ak orn | TORS we Se eB cet Ay niece Sasa ae
Hecnieeles SAN LORENZO] snort:ot at Aces MR. UNIVERSE ox ae cod 7 at USA
maiet cena tactics. | Wes « Thee. Starring —_ don’t the people like fruit?” he He was however astonished to
Boy And The & unc1o. REY ALDO es Jack Carson- asked, “Yes,” they said, “but see the number of automobiles in
Wedd Thee tuetday & Wea. | Gar) Coopmr | 740i. Palke arele on sinach of nae Pee the tiand andi wee oti mane sur~.
136 & 8.15 in Mon. & Tubs either give wey i at the number of ace!
at 8.30 p.m, ces he ew 4.20 & BIS “the com
_ Friday “Janie, PAIGE i DIED ae DAWN Lawrence Tierney— said oe. oa which he thought was at a a
at 5 & 8.30 p.m. int < . Arline, Roberts - 7 3 they id mum.
iy sand in ;
Mtr. AL, Stuart's) Mt. UNIVERSE ° she “Then if you grew none you A Pa
Dancing Sehool and CASINO TO KOKEA Fae ave off than you are
Presents ’ ‘ Som and would be better ¥ PARTY was held at the
vesen PARDON MY — [Coming Soon Paar Pt now, and ody would have any residence of Mr. Chessie
REVUEDEVILLE Staring (CAVE OF THE fruit to eat?” “Something like “p on Tuesday night to
Paul HENRIED Duncan HEENALDO Dining Room om Terrace. that,” they said. “I see, nas mark the occasion of his birthday.
1952 Merle OBERON OUTLAW Leo CARELLO Telephone 8148 and 8611. the the meet eee, Wee Oo," The Misses Gloria and Simone
[SSS es eM j : fas
i teay i. Tikla Maw Bat At Drysdale of St, Lucia, and Miss

Mona Harding of British Guiana,
who are at present holidaying in
the iskand, were guests of honour.

Back to St. Lucia
ETURNING to St. Lucia last
night by the Lady Nelson
was Mr. Arthur P. Charles, Super-
intendent cf the Voice Publish-
ing Co., Ltd. He was accompan-

ied by his son whom he had
brought over for medical treat.
ment.

Farewell Party
EMBERS of the Snappers
| Water Polo team held a
| Farewell Party at the residence
/of Mr, Kenneth Ince, Sna per
Captain, in honour of Mr. William
“Billy” Manning and Mr. Frank
Manning, both Snapper players,
who will be leaving shortly for
Canada to study.
Better known as the “Manning
Twins”, Billy and Frank have

given some exceptionally good:

performances during their Water
Polo career. They were also out-
standing in the various Aquasic
Sports held by Harrison College

anew the Snapper members
turning out were: Messrs. Del-
bert Bannister, George McClean,
‘alcolm Browne, ke
Ken Ince, and other old Snapper
players. There was also a very
good turn out of Water Polo play-
ers and enthusiasts.

fist Birthday

PARTY was held at the

home of Mr, & Mrs, Wm.
MeD. Forde, “Myrtice Villa,”
River Road last night It was in
honour of their youngest daugh-
ter, Marie, who celcbrated her
twenty-first birth@ay yesterday:
Many of her friends were there
and the evening was a very
pleasant one. Carib joins in wish-
ing Marie all the best in the

future.
For U.S.A.
ISS JEAN PHILLIPS, daugh-
ter of Mrs, Robertine Phil-
lips, Maxwell, Christ Church, re-
turned last Wednesday -night by
B.W.LA. from Trinidad after
spending a few days there. Jean
expects to leave for U.S.A. with-
in a few weeks. She will reside
there.

For Long Holiday
RRIVING from Trinidad
yesterday morning by
B.W.1.A. were Mr. and Mrs, Cecil
McCartney who were accom-
panied by their. daughter Diana
aged five and their infant son.
Mrs. McCartney is the =
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. C, A, L.
Gale, Abingdon, St. Michael,
where she and her family will be
spending a long holiday. Mr.
eCartney is an engineer em-
ok at Forest Reserve in
| Trinidad,

THEIR MIDSUMMER

SHOW OF POULTRY and PIGEONS

For the first time in Barbados

AN EXHIBITION OF GOLD AND TROPICAL.

movement

Open from 2 p.m. to 11 p.m. on SATURDAY
;
2 pm. to 8 pm. on SUNDAY

Refreshments on Sale

PHPOPHPHGOSHOSS HOHOE

DAS: Seat AY,



Carib Calling

For Three Weeks
ISS MARGO BROWN, a Civil
Servant of Trinidad, ar-
rived here on Thursday by the
Lady Nelson to spend three
weeks’ vacation. Miss Brown is at-
tached to the Post Offiee brancn

of the Serviee. She is staying at















| England with Sir Robert, plans to
; remain for several weeks longer.

My. & Mrs. C W.
“Holloway”, Ivy.

Also, arriving by the same boat
to spend va on here was Miss
Angela Julien, Secretary at the
Imperial College, St. Augustine,
Trinidad. Miss Julien is staying at
Mr. & Mrs. Kenneth St. John, St.
Peter and hopes to be here for a
month,

Cumberhbatch,

On Holiday
ISS MARJORIE DEY ar-
oe from British Guiana
three weeks’ vacation
te She is the guest of Mrs.
Dereen Matthews of “Westgate”,
Land’s End.

_Honeymeen Coupte’
M® and MRS. "RAYMOND
LEGGE of Trinidad who
were honeymooning in Barbados
as guests at the Hotel Royal, left
on Thhursday by B.W.1A. for Ja-
maica,
Mr. Legge is Sales Manager of
B.W.1LA. stationed in Trinidad,
Old Lodge Boy
ASTER DENNIS MANELSKI,
whose father holds an im-
portant position in the Research
Department of the Venezuelan
Government, is in Barbados for
a month’s holiday and is staying
as a guest at Cacrabank Hotel.

Dennis was formerly at the Lodge p.

School and will be
shortly to his home.

Seconded to Trinidad
R. ALWYN HOWELL, Civil
Servant attached to the
Auditor General’s Dept. left the
island by B.W.1.A. for Trinidad
yesterday afternoon. Mr. Howell
has been seconded to the Colo-
nial Audit Dept. in Trinidad for
a period of three months to

undergo a course of training.

returning



MR. WINSTON CHURCHILL
Exhibition at Drill Halt

HE Barbados Poultry
sociation Inc. will be stag-

As-

ing theic Midsummer Show at tie head

Drill Hall on Saturday and Sun-
day, the 6th and 7th of Septem.
ber,
Due to lack of space, no Tur-
Geese, Ducks or Rabbits
Sir be exhibited but, in addition
to the usual show of Poultry and
Pigeons, there will be displayed
about twenty aquariums of Gold
and Tegies Fish.
This will be the fisst occasion
on whieh an exhibition of this
kind has been staged in Barbados
and, for those who have never
had the privilege of attending
one of these Shows in larger
Countries, it will be a revelation,
The h to be exhibited will
comprise specimens from every
corner of the Globe and will in-
clude, of course, the famous
Siamese Fighting Fish and the
Pompadour Fish, the rarest of
all freshwater fish,
Barbadians will now have the
opportunity — es the
popularity harming
cao which claims. fourteen
million enthusiastic keepers of
these watery pets in the United
States of America alone.

AUGUST 31,.

_ 1952

(meee



MR. AND MBS.
Married Last Thursday
N THURSDAY, August 28, at

4.30 p.m. at Mt, Tabor
Moravian Church, Mr. Carl
Moore, elder son of Rev. and Mrs.
C. Moore of Sharon, St.
Thomas, took as his bride Miss
Thora King, eldest daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. C. King of Jack-
son, St. Michael.
The ceremony which was fully
choral with Mr. Owen Pilgrim

at the organ was performed by
Rev. D, C. Moore, assisted by
Rev. A. C. Pilgrim and Rev. E.

E, New.

The bride, who was given in
marriage by her father wore a
dress of slipper satin and lace.
The skirt was qi slipper satin
the bodice featured a lace yoke
ending in a very long train and
with a low neckline, and long
close fitting sleeves ending in a
point. Her headdress was a
lara of orange blossoms with a
full-length veil, She wore slip-
per satin shoes. The trousseau
was the igift of the bride’s cousin,
Miss Muriel Fenty of U.S.A. She
carried a heart.shaped bouquet
of caracas daisies, tube roses and
Queen Anne’s lace.

She was attended by her sis-
ter Miss Joan King, as Maid-of-
Honour with the Misses Gloria
and Elsie Moore, sisters of the
bridegroom as bridesmaids. The
Maid-of-Honour wore a balleri-
na-length dress of orchid organza
with gold accessories, She carried
a bouquet af orchids,

The bridesmaids wore bal-
lerina-length dresses of identical
cut in blue taffeta with matching
dresses and accesso
carried bouquets of an
lilies.

The duties of bestman
Rohe by . Mr. Asquith
Niehols while those of ushers
fell to Mr. Cyril King, brother
of the bride and Mr. Carl W‘ck.
ham.

The reception was held
Sharon, home of the bride-
groom’s parents and the honey-
moon is being spent at St. Philip.

Two Specia! Flights

were

at

-W.I A. had twe special flights

from Barbados to Maiquetia
(Venezuela) on the 27th and 28th
August. These were operated in
order to accommodate the. influx
of Venezuelans back home who
arrived here during the month of
August.

Canadians End Holiday
R. and MRS, GOODMURPHY
left the island recently by
T.C.A, on their way to Montreal,
Canada, They were spending a

vacation at Caerabank Hotel.

‘es and La
urium ,

BASTL COZIER

Quiet Weddi
T 5.30 pm. at St.

ng
Patrick’s

Roman Catholic on Tuesday

evening, Mr.
second son of Mr, and

Basil Vernon Cozier,

Mrs B. L.

Cozier of San Juan, Trinidadâ„¢tookâ„¢
as his bride Miss Carol Eleanor

Perkins,
and Mrs. P. L. Perkins
dale”, Belmont Road,
mony was

The bride who made

solemnised by
Revd, Father Parkinson,

elder daughter of Mr.

of “Earns
The. cere-
~ the
S.J. t
a charm~

ing picture in an elegant creation

of blonde lace
adorned with
ried a bouquet of whit
and coralita and was
marriage by her
duties of bestman .were
by Mr.

and

rhinestones,

father,

organza,
car-
e gerber as:

given in
The
performed

Prank Edwards while

thos of usher fell to Mr. Bernard.

Perkins,

brother of the bride.

Miss Angela Perkins sister of

the bride, was the sole

attendant.

She wore a dress cut on identical
lines as the bride’s and carried a

fan
Daisies.

shaped bouquet of Caracas

After the wedding, a reeeption

was held at “Glenlee”,

Belmont

Road. The happy eouple who have

been honeymooning at

Spring, Bathsheba, 1

Powell
eave this

weekend to make their home in

Trinidad,

’

Spent A Month

RS.

M

EDWIN JAMES
infant daughter Mary,

and. -
re-

turned to British Guiana on-Fri-..
day morning by B.W.LA,» after -

spending
“Mayville
wrence.
Mr. James who has
daying here for the
months,

a month’s
Guest

House,”

holiday . at

been holi=
past two

expects to remain for

another month, He is salesman of::

Harold E, White. and Co, Ltd,,

Manufaeturers Representatives,
He told Carib that. this is his

first visit to Barbados

and he js -

enjoying every moment of it.
To Take Up’ Appointment
EV. HAROLD LANE, . Curate:

of St. Michael’s

Cathedral,

left last night in the Lady N

for Antigua where he

will take

up a new appointment. .
Professor of Law

ROFESSOR Charles

Bourne

and Mrs, Bourne and their in-
fant were passengers by oS
for Puerto Rico on Thursday last.
They are intransit for Vancouver,

B.C,

and has been spending a ~

holiday here with Mrs, Bourne's

parents Mr. and Mrs, A.

G, Farms

er, Oughterson, St. Philip.

Mr. Bourne is Professor of Law >
at the University of British .
Columbia.



West Indian Table Talk

LONDON, August 22.

Major-General Sir Robert Nev-
ile, Governor of the Bahamas
will be back in Nassau this week
after a month’s “‘working holiday”
fn England. When I saw him on
Thursday ‘the told me that he has
pone of news for the Bahamas

vernment, He has spent many
hours discussing matter affecting
the colony with heads of the Col-

onial Office. Among < ae he
investigated was a a
of buying a tug tender ship-

to-shore passenger work at Nas-
sau. He also had talks about the

ing, and airport facilities. Be-
tween tims. he wedged in a short
trip to Sweden.

Lady Neville,

who came to

She will be living at theiy home,
Uplands Park, Brook Surrey,
which they let while they were
in Nassau. Luckily, the house
became vacant just before they
arrived in Britain at the end
of last month and they were able
to take it over again, This is the
main reason for Lady Neville’s
extended stay.
World Cruise

Due to call at British Guiana
on a round-the-world voyage in
his 32 ton yaeht ‘Maid of Alphen”
is Mr. W. A. Ellis who, with his



on

ide lt las

Bahamas dollar expenditure ceil-

CREPES,

iain en a hl lt alte,

By LONDONER
companion Lieut. Commander
James L, Cox is making final
preparation for the trip at Tor-
quay, Devon. First port of call
will be Lisbon. From there the

voyage will take them to the
Canary Islands, B.G., Panama,
Peru, Tahiti, Sydney, Singapore

and Cape Town, and finish at
Takoradi, Gold Coast. This is
where Mr. Ellis has lived for 11
years. The yacht is expected to
cover most of the 50,000 miles
under sail,
Professor for Jamaica

After attending the sixth In-
ternational Grassland Congress in
Pennsylvania, Professor Martin
Jones, Professor of Agricultura)
Botany at King’s College, New-
castle-yfon-Tyne, Durham, will

visit Jamaican and Trinidad and -

British Council auspices to lee-
ture and advise on grassland
development. He will be in
Jamaica from September 13 to 23,
and in Trinidad from September
24 to October 2. His programme
ineludes a_ visit to*the Imperial
College of Tropical Agriculture.

Mannequin
Attractive twenty-one-year-old will

Miss Patricia Neville, of Kensing-
ton, who sail# for Jamaica next
month to be a bridesmaid at her
brother’s wedding, is one of six

girls chosen to model
the Coronation Year

gowns ‘in ©
collections.

For the past three years Miss

Neville has

toured Britain and

part of Europe as a ballet dancer.
When she feturns from -Jamaica
in Novemyxr, she will begin her
training as a mannequin. °~

Winter Services

I can this week give some de-
tails of BOAC’s winter services
as they will affect the Caribbean.
tember 1 the London-
will cease
and

From Sep
Montego Bay service
to call at Prestwick
operate
Bermuda

is likely to
once to

tween
*



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following day.

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SUNDAY, AUGUST 31, 1952 SUNDAY ADVOCATE
At The Cinema:

: POULTRY Farm And Garden |?=
With A Song NOTES By AGRICOLA >

PACE THREE
: sscsisiinaineenaiadninaainareeai

ence eect Scena a rrNen em tn







Blemishes
- Cleared

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Doe you havs a skin | . eas | |
try 9 <8 |
pins inuiepe! ' | BW " n mS |
i ha
|
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i

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HERB GARDENS Saicee Gimme < ;

In M Hea rt Last week 1 streised the im- _ Pas See oes . Il cidnseatiiaianat
portance of clean an@ adequate THIS column, as is generally known, has devoted much isang ea ral cuts apd Ph oo eA =| |
ee eS ak peal _ Sent of its space to the important question of food crop produe- Dou't euries che saibery of Sires sen § = ca | | lo poeeuse WOR

. : size tor your chicks, can Ray tion. One of our policies is to keep an eye on the adver-} Curicura Ointment. and step our in| The sseret of ||
By Gc. Bw be cleaned and are s against. tising matter in the daily press and to draw attention to} soesss sauces aa see asuperb | |
ale ee te a a _ to 3 suth products which, with a little encores ae t Tal cur, a peor flavour with fish | BOTTLE of Lea &

: a od ba g WE a one be grown locally. In this way, many fruits and vegetables oe | AN irks. nua is Boones Perrins is as neces-

EW A thy iste itke Barteros, ts veoney Tue tO eee tar eee Te CneS. one nave been treated as fully as space would permit and, we Yale dhl, to thoke Sch délicioms | | sexy eee eelle and Sock
speculate that the vast majority of people have never . From 3 x one trust, not without some use to those interested, especially by adding Lea & Perrins Sauce | | sat ‘

of a gallant and courageous entertainer called ° S8ton ea. adequate person ‘ ' : || on a table. It improves

an. This young eg d is one of America’s foremost {°",..'° P re ee ee ess ot pacha og. pai | fried, baked or grilled
water is pure and germ free use two teaspoonfuls of Lea & | G, 0s

though her activities have been cur- except after heavy rains but the And so, to-day, we wish to Ge Ni Perrins in fish-cakes, fish-pies | | fish, combines wonder-

ed as a result of an injury received in a plane crash litter and dro) tf will spread GARDENING HINTS point to a few of the less im-]- fling hts and poached fish for four people, | fully with meat, and
; ‘ ‘dé, Miss Froman is still in the top rostet of ge™ms if they get the water. yaa but, nevertheless, highly and what a difference Lea & | | ,
' ; oni 2 a. a gord os Moe make ’ abe commodities prominently es en Perrins makes! The secret of | | ™akes cheese — always a
: cS . : ; oe ers adding FOR AMATEURS wed in the advertising columns : the flavour that only. Lea & || favourite with men—bet-
—. With A So In Heart, showing at the Globe, is the some cryptals of permanganate last week, We refer partieutarly Getting up rights, burning sensa- eerie can give fits in the da ae ss
of her lifé and ther her name means anything to of potash or consult your feed to pot herbs in 0. a am of ¥ 5 : : ter than ever. Always
story or a deal Water fountains pe dried form, in ¥ organs, whitish discharge, recipe, For more than 100 |
ye i of not, the film is tops in all round good entertainment. { ie noeand = Flowers For The House cluding sage, mint, parsley and} gui eg Ag AE A years, ever since it was brought put out a bottle of Lea
Tt is a lavish and spectacular ; and disinfected. Feeders ought (Cont’d.) or “) Rese and lone, of manly are to England from the Far East, gy & Perrins Sauce at meal
ction with a ‘cate re ap~ once a week. It is useful when picking flowers __ It is, we think, true to say that Siand (a most important sax gla..d the recipe has been Lea & times—and please every-
pe story. The ear’ ions mat F Shei tien, seh for the house to know something the earliest gardens featured 2 = S yrerestne | troubles Perrins’ closely-guarded secret cers family | ;
of the film her rather un~ i about their le i r Plants considered valuable for —no other sauce makes such One im your family ¢
chicks uiré on inch feéder ngth of life after P e and take the new F
ronan: ae ton alee . ied space each. From three weeks Peing picked. or medicinal properties—‘physic ae UE. palke Rogena. a difference to the simplest 4g
was manag’ . : to si ‘ gardens’, as they were commonly . food. eS
ber, a ee. 286 to fame, Then, at Feeder pubs eer a i eae h ne which come under the called. in fact, the monasteries, vou 3 righ reine your ise: a ; i 4
1943, when she was at the heigh sary. If you don't allow sufficient be HES an a Sie can only rectory and vicarage gardens of Hvears ve and sake yeu Sal —— Ra aeeea EE Saeco ee
of Pe nts plane in feeder space only the days. The Rose aah “esate _ not so long ago were noted for] Rogers” "QUBser oF money beck. Bet ss |
~ a a Bg eee chicks are going to get enough perfect the Arst day after gig, their efforts in this direction, Un-| ‘uarantee protects you. ' LE A & PE RRI WS
bps ad troops, ere to eat and you encourage “can- ~ re» Tagus _ = cee nibalism” at an early _ o oh wae ka ércupia ells fallen“into desuetude in modern eee Ce ©. ;
the Wan ld the would probably eS Ae ae Oe nD Ses OR ASTHM A MUCUS Khe ginal and genuine
n the other hand there are ek og

‘which does not allow adequate : ancient usage in the Holy Lapd.
eating space. Be careful not to gov Sewers, ee ae oud In this connection, a vast range
waste feed by using poor feed- 41) Jast in water for a week or Of knowledge was attributed to

WORCESTERSHIRE SAUCE
out of hospitals, on and off oper-

Don't let coughing, sneesing, ehak-





























ating tables, interspersed with ing equipment or by filling the oven longer. Anthuriums if picked Selomon: “from the cedar that is] {Ig attacks of Grononitis or Avi %
the odd show, where she was feeders too full. After the first ot the rishi stage will often noe in Libanus to the hyssop that ay’ ge right. without Crs ALIGN
acre ot ten Se We ata, Shh only” tworttinns dull “and ions for three weeks in the house, A sbringeth out of the - wall”| DAce. Mis gross met ims is fol
nightclub engagements . where feed will be wasted. To kee ie Tot depends however on the time (I Kings IV, 33). There were through the blood, thua reaching the
she, th#inéd to @ metal prop water Yountains free from a flowers aré picked, and the way different hyssops and this one is eee oral tube. he Geet
to mt a fall. Then she de- litter Gna ecatarainiten scene in which they are treated after thought to have been wild mar-| Atey S.wars 1. Helps loosen ands
cided to undertake a U.S,O. tour get them on Sine atetioetos Any Peing picked, joram, Again, in the Book of Wis-| move thick strangling mucus 2. ‘tyus
r the armed forees, and armed Water or dropeings i. tne All flowers should be picked dom (VII, 20), Solomon is credited] Nae lean ae pene nee:
with her crutches and an amaz- neighbourhood of the fountains @ither in the early morning, or the with knowledge of the ‘aiversities] at@ roughing, | wheesing @anceziug
ing amount of guts, she travelled SUSAN HAYWARD esa eke prevented from conta- late afternoon. Immediately after of plants and the virtues of roots”.| Zuuvanteed, Gee MENDACO trom

en
ovet thirty thousand miles to Korean war drama in docu- minating the main litter area of being pickéd placé them, stems hemist today.

mentary style. The title is taken the pen, down, in a bucket of deep water _ It is thie case that formerly there




































; i 1 place for at least two Was great pride in herb gardens,
rom the fighting words of go jon the « Sea th En hi "lz
come-back is thrilling and Jane qyarine General Oliver P. Smith ne + Bi ours, anid. if y have been notably in England, which com,

Froman deserves ail the credit in he; WAS dake Dy Cebviannd- — — and dry there is no pickéd in the evening leave them j TO-DAY'S NEWS FLASH



|
Loosened Firs! Day | '





change it, unless of the bucket overnight. If this is
ents at Pusan about the impend- course there is an outbreak of done, it will be found’ that the where the fragrant flowers and











9 >. 3 ing Marine pullback, snapped, disease. If you it clean and flowers are stronger and fresher aromatic scents could be enjoyed.
come sat tens : plays dane “Retreat, hell! We're just at- dry you can add to it every when they are arranged, and as @ There was a large choice of plants |} STANLEY GIBBONS
bl i ae - te remark- tacking in another direction!” three weeks for periods longer consequence easier to handle. available : the recognized culin-|}f POSTAGE STAMP
able piece work, ave never i : than a year. When do res Another tip which prolongs the ary herbs, such as mint, parsley CATALOGUE 1953
seen 'Miss Froman, but critics ean e ayer Se. wine he move the litter it make an. life of cut flowers is to keep them gaye, marjoram, thyme and chives: PART I
say that Susan Hayward, with ‘ eae Sent ee hated: to Cxoglient _ manure _ for out of the wind. Nothing makes nex: some not only useful for BRITISH EMPIRE
her beauty and showmanship, eee tae tate . oes as kitchen garden or flower bed cut flowers wilt and droop quicker gaycurings but for their fragrance (Complete)
a oo vo ro nreceed y, Seoul. With the we eee occur, eanhiy — to let — a eee and also, for treatment of ‘cotds’ $4.00 Each
id characteristics so tha ‘ te } a : any people change the water : 7

sce haga Ga Pt Net Sg RS ae eat Ta coe BOAR atlf JOHNSON
startling, K vases of flowers daily, but this is ;

One of the outstatding achieve: then on, surrounded by hordes healthy ones. Remove them at not only unnecessary, but the con- be sweet bay, rosemary, lavender,

“ ists i
ments of Miss Hayward's por- seit tortie tan. tee i ote ba a good chance stant disturbance and handling of Cl@ry, bergamot, =the —hyssops, |}

one ee oe synehron- their way to the seaport of " But always remember to éleam he Sowers is bad for them, ou) lovage, tansy and others,

ien : aera with goed Hungnam. and, disinfect all pment and will keep it sweet, and this in the A recent book—‘Gardenage’ by
solos are beautifully sung and 4 large part of the film is don't hesitate to in aSsis4 case of the short lived flowers ig Geoffrey Grigson, published by
Miss Hayward’s “dubbing” is the @uthentic combat film taken at tence from a vet when ‘in doubt. 31] that is needed. gutledge—has a good deal to say
most remarkable I have seen. 1 ‘te time, of the actual amphi- With those that last a week or about changes in modern garden-
could detect no weakness in the Pious landings at Inchon and the longer, the water should be ing. Most early gardens were in-
cast which includes David Wayne ‘mous _ strategic — withdrawal M changed about the fourth or fifth deed magical or medicinal or util-

fhe whimsical ayne during December 1950, together Oscow day, at the same time snipping off ftarian, To-day, with a greater
as e whimsical and appealing with other fighting sequences. half an inch off the end of each range of specimens and horticul-



Your Horoscope
















vaudevillian who discovers the : { stem, ing any dro ones, ‘ y !
Ginger; Rory Cathoun ag the hand- Headed by Frank covelor. Miss Norman and re-arranging the whole Vase “our great gardens tend 10 be- | ot'what he state inant tga
some and dashing Air Force the cast is a capable one, Mr. of flowers our & 1 s * the] of wour past experiences, your strong and FLY THEM HOME 6 oO A.C
pilot who rescues her and later Lovejoy gives a sound _perfor- . come piant-z0os. Again, weak points, ete? Here is your chance - * .

to test FREE the skill of Pundit Tab:



arriés i The “long-life” flowers are a hi
m her and Thelma Ritter, â„¢ance as the conscientious com- Where Do You Buy bedifis a busy bousewite or author of this book himself a son



























yet ; he Manse—criticises the Estab- | India’s most fam- . Ht your child¥én ave at NEY FOR THE COSt OF
one of thé screen’s best come- Mander with Richard Carlson the working woman who, while of the ous Astrologer y

running a close second as a ¢ 4 lished Church for its remoteness i School in the United - rT,
Giang, 28 the composite of all Titrine reservist “recaes’ to YOU Clothes? liking flowers in her home, yet has from the old religions of the soil, \yl° PY amply aes an a, va See

rot a great deal of time to spend pn Mg , dom make atrangements Your children fly in swift,
tart humour and dry temarks active duty, Young Rusty Tamblye RUSSIAN women have a sense on arranging them. But a litle Mueh could, of course, be said of }ence 10, umetuy J am to bring them horite fot the dure Speedbirds, attended

will éxci ! PUBposes
banish any sentimentality. Una iq Wun ectesen tenes Bh i hie of style, but only a small selection time once a week is possible to the lessons the garden teaches of [pit ip an envi.
























higher things, but we have no in- reputation? : Summer holidays. by an experienced and

Merkel, ay alee ls ae ae family vow _> the Mane and aa, says che baa tet a i ag pens thal eratn Gok tanta of purguing that aspect of] The aceurscy of P B.0.A.C’s student fares ate friendly crew who took
= — ’ oe oP ce co t leaves 7. ned. to ber home. The Hall, W st will last a week or longer may be the subject here, Readers wh0}ina the available to all full time after their every wish.

; : , Farleigh (Kent), after nine months useful to those who do not know have been keeping these notes may | oractical | advice ‘ studeats it thé United Consult your Travel Agent

Meticulous = preduction and Grim and gripping, jit is a in Moscow. much about flowers, . , kefer to “Garden Mysteries” of} ir icope | on ot Kingdom who are tinder 26 or British West Indian

splendid direction are but two Of thoroughly honest picture of the September 9, 1951.





























g ' 3 f age — they enjoy Airways,
the attributes of this film. A ility and cruelty of war, and . She was governeds to the Flowers That Last Long : yeats 0 ay’
third is the high quality of the we virtue a. Gaah-er direction, family of an official at the British When Cut But, to return to this question the ROUND TRIP JOUR- Lower Broad Street,
popular songs\ that are sung. is completely devoid of mélo- Embassy, _ Anthurium, Pentas, Tube-rose, of local production, How nice. and : yy emer
Richatd Rodgers has four songs dramatic heroics. “In the summer all thé Russian yyarigold, Orchid, Ground Orchid, pleasant it would be if, some- els, Changes, Lit; Z : oo
to his name including the title py) pf Women wear dust coats in Hght Gerbera, Eucharist Lily, Gladioli, where around our own kitchen} (sation, | Lucky Cn B.Q.A.C. TAKES GOOD CARE OF YoU
song and Blue Moon, while the INSIDE THE WALLS OF pastel shades, which seem chi¢ ¥xora, Tamarisk, Pinks, Zinnia, door, we could establish a little} jc Nave astounded ed the mt
Gershwin brothers contribute FULSOM PRISON and colourful until you have seen Carnations. corner for some of the culinary] world over, GEONen MACHER at New '
Embraceable You. Other weil At the Plaza, Barbarees, IN- several thousand of them,” says herbs especially—-where we could i . Rpt seu must possess
known favourites are Tea for ging THE WALLS OF FULSOM Miss Norman, _ rush out and gather a ftesh leat} ry popularise his avetem, Tabore will
Two, ’ré Either Too Young pRISON . depicts living The; sie! abbitbaee tn flour before the public holidays, bere, another one there, a blos~J..« A ate eta-
Gia Pacing 04 ve eaek te conditions. and diseipline me! standards are not good, but they Which occur several times a year. << mor oo ey ee eae Mi or Mies, aga neo and date ti j ay obo Mods
, pax tage existed in ifornia’s Stat® think th decorative.” Miss Norman considers the , : y m
—to mention only a few. Prison prior to 1944. Though the pic gs Re rng sagt erally to be a friend~ committing them to the ‘fixings'}money wanted for ical Work, :
— oe oe ie a ans Te tg eghaed mor re pore to Dy. deebly dlesse inwieoe, Sn peonle wage 7 wats of them =< ae “n ko linn Bamps or ‘Coinek tor a bie Wel °
of production numbers an e af new systems enology 2 > visit fare whatever ure, moniais and other int iterature. ies
theré is a génuine patriotic fer- one old, the “violence ound eruel- and women were apt to approach el welcome the chance to visit or two of each ie efi that is're- You w mn ‘be ‘“ raved vate 8 naka ibe BRIMISH OVERSEAS AIRWAYS CORPORATION
sata _ ‘ :

ur in the final scene of Miss ty of the former regime are Miss Norman to ask where she quired; fresher, tastier and more|" :
Froman’s U.S.O. tour that is hon- accented with such flagrant sen. had bought her clothes, Her reason for coming home” piquant than all the dried bottled [nny “not 'be "made apain. ‘Addeoa,
est and moving. I don't think Sationalism that they completely wien she told them, no more She is to be married next month. its palatability after being open-| Puno TABORE, (Dept

mere ie ange doubt hat WITH A Short “scone of Folsom, as it a ae tin see
w e 3 .
its ‘pla

today. Had the treatment of the
tomatically among yrobiem presented been. different,
e value of the film might have
been enhanced, but as it is, the

Foie. at the Plaza, Bridge- result is just one more brutal
towh, RETREAT, HELL! is a new prison drama. .























questions were asked.

There is plenty of food, but
for the ordinary family it is very
expensive,

It is impossible for the Russians
to buy a bag of flour when they
like. Instead, they are issued with













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SUNDAY ADVOCATE

Yesterday’s Cricket



ENGLAND WIN TEST
SERIES WITH INDIA
W.L Cricket Officials Asleep ? ?

By O. S. COPPIN

HE TEST match series between England and India have now been
7 completed and there has been an overwhelming victory recorded
for England with three Tests won, and the other drawn,

Two main questions at once confront followers of International
cricket, one is a general one and the other peculiarly affects the West
|Indies as a member of the Imperial Cricket Conference.

I shall deal with the general aspect first and it is this—How far
can we predict the chances of this victorious England team against
| Australia next summer? How strong is the England team now?
| 1 doubt that there is anyone living who can forecast with any
| degree of certainty what will be the outcome of the England—Aus-
tralia Tests, since we all must of necessity be familiar with the
glorious uncertainties of this wonderful game we call cricket.

ANALYSIS PERMITTED

OWEVER this should not prevent us, certainly not this scribe.
| from analysing the respective chances in the light of the recent
| performances of these two countries,
| . Since the India—England Tests are the most recent, let us deal
| with them first. I think that it will be generally conceded that in
Bedser and Trueman England possess the finest opening attack they
|have been able to put into the field since the restoration of Test
| cricket after the war, at least on performance.
| With Bedser as the constant partner they have experimented
j from time to time with Pollard, Edrich, Bailey, Tremiett, Butler and
ompany but even at their best, regardless of the opposition against
which they have been ranged can any of these be credited with hav-
ing attained the speed, thrust and ferocity which young Trueman
has produced against the Indian team. .

GAP PARTLY BRIDGED

FTHAT being so we are entitled to assume that at long last England

has been able to bridge to some comforting extent the wide gav
which has existed in the past two tilts with Australia in the opening
| bowling department,
This must not be construed to mean that I have placed the suc-
leess of the recent combination of Bedser and Trueman above the
| streamlined, high powered effectiveness of the world pace bowling
twins Lindwall and Miller but it does restore some sort of balance
leven to the extent of ensuring some measure of retaliation in case
of another “bumper” season.

TRANSITION PERIOD
EPORTS are to the effect that the Australian team is going
through a period of transition and they will in all likelihood be
| forced to adapt themselves to English conaitions if they strike a damp
season and be compelled to-negotiate the spate on English medium
seamers, is

On the other hand players like Graveney, May, Sheppard, Wat-
kins, and of the more senior brigade Hutton himself, Ikin and Simp-
son, possessed of an almost complete knowledge of the vagaries of
the English wickets, will form a strong batting nucleus to counter
| what Australia will have to offer.

SUSPECTED AUSTRALIA’S STRENGTH

L HAVE always suspected the reputed strength of Australian teams
| to England and it has happened far too often to be put down
to chance or coincidence.that a tour to England has provided the
scope whereby the seeds of careful coaching, self dedication and down-
{right individual effort have resulted in an abundantly fruitful and
\ historic harvest time.

But what of our individual deductions from the Test? It seems
patent to me that we who have already defeated India in India
should be the favourites to win this series if we can be assured that
we will have the services of our professionals. Skipper John God-
|dard made no bones about this when I interviewed him on his
return from Australia. “
It must seem obvious to those who have followed the series that
| pace bowling is the Achilles Heel of the best of the Indian players
and although they were a young team they showed no improvement
| throughout the tour in their methods of dealing with attacking pace
| bowling on a wicket that was not a batsman’s wicket,

Mankad whom I consider one of the world’s leading all-rounders
has stated that he will not be available for the tour and therefore
bowling of the type of Ghulam Ahmed, Hazare himself, Phadkar
and the like will not be classed in the realms of the “cataclysmic”
as some people classified the early attack on the Australian tour of
Lindwall and: Miller.

PROFESSIONALS MUST PLAY /

T follows then that it is incumbent upon the West Indies cricket

officials to ensure that we acquire the services of the professionals
and that we recruit some sort of pace bowling talent that will possess
the necessary thrust to turn the tide in our favour. ‘

The West Indies, following their victory in the Tests with Eng-
land in 1950 were by common consent recognised as the logical chel-
lengers of Australia for world cricket supremacy. _ This tour is now
history. The West Indies were beaten but not disgraced and it is
reasonable to conclude that as a result of this they have been accord~
ed second in world cricket circles. ;

England will be meeting Australia next summer in another chap-
ter of the celebrated fight for the “Ashes”. We have defeated New
Zealand and I have never given South Africa a thought, so that if
we are defeated by the Indians and England win the “Ashes” or
share the moral honours then the West Indies will have lost several
places in the rating of International cricket.

| W.I. BOARD UNCARING
4 BY on the other hand ,recent event have proved
that West Indies official cricket circles are
either uncaring or unaware of these facts, Whv
has a captain not been appointed yet? John God-
dard who led the West Indies to Victory in the
West Indies in 1948, in India in 1949 and England
jn 1950 and nearly sacrificed his “guts” in Austra-
lia is available. “It follows then that he should
have been appointed ages ago.

People have to arrange for leave and if they
happen to be in an executive position then his
even. more difficult, Tomorrow is the beginning
of September and the Indians are due in Decem-
/ per, any normal person would have expected that
the West Indies Board would have appointed a cap-
tain months ago and would have already co-opted
‘him to deal with the persons whom they are going
., to invite,

*;} They have not yet invited Goddard to accept









the captaincy and I understand that there is a
qivange plot afoot to supplant him with two of the

John Goddard )oys.
SECOND SPRING
F this non-playing armchair senate decides that burlesque is the
better part of valor they must be warned that a complete break-

J

down in West Indies cricket is in the offing. No amount of burlesque,



j tances and ball grips can make Wong pu, Chinee Mu Mu

} batty frongsingh a world beater in time for the visit of the Indians.
Â¥ Let us stick to commonsense. If it is found that senile decay
has been affecting West Indies cricket officials in high places well
Vers let us get them a pantaloon with pouch on side early and retire
» some safe distance to graze. :

a ore ie a at stake to allow our more chivalrous senti-
nants to justify a strange era of nonsense.





CARLTON vs EMPIRE
Empire 232 and (for 6 wkts) 210
Carttemy cin. eee eee aa 92

Empire skittled out Carlton
for 92 at Black Rock yesterday in
reply to their first innings score
of 232 and then went on to make
210 for the loss.of six wickets by
close of play.

Chiefly responsible for Carlton’s

meagre score were pace’ bowler
H. Barker and slow left arm
bowler Adzil Holder. Barker

trundled effectively to bag 5 for
42 in 14.4 overs, three of which
were maidens, while Holder
collected 3 for 23 after sending
down 9 overs.

The wicket was good’ when
Carlton resumed their first
innings with the Hutchinson

brothers, Reynold 25 and Geoffrey
3, with the total standing at 39
for two. wickets.

It was not long before Empire
got their first wicket for the day
when pace bowler Barker sent
back Reynold Hutchinson by the
lbw route without any addition to
his over week score. The ball
now triumphed over the bat and
there was a regular procession of
batsmen to and from the wickets.

Eight wickets had now fallen
for 54 and it was left to Warren
who came in at this. stage and
knocked up a quick 31 including
five fours and one six.

The innings closed at 3 o’clock
with Carlton’s total standing at
92,

With a lead of 140, Empire
started their second innings and
further consolidated their posi-
tion by registering 210 for the loss
of 6 wickets,

Conrad Hunte led the way with
a fine knock for 51 including
three boundaries. Other useful
contributions were made by Grant
45, Rudder 35, King 26 Depeiza
21 and Holder 20.

Grant and Depeiza put on 52
for the second wicket and de-
lighted the crowd with some
forceful cricket. Later in the
evening, Horace King got an
aggressive 26 including six
boundaries four of which he took
off J. A. Williams in on over.

Rudder and Holder then kept
up the end and were still to-
gether when stumps were drawn,
the latter with 20 including three
boundaries and the former with 35
ircluding two boundaries,

WANDERERS vs POLICE

Police 156 and
Wanderers . 2.0.0... 6.00005
Denis Atkinson, Wanderers
Skipper scored a century for his
team in their match against Police
at the Bay yesterday. Atkinson's
115 enabled his team to amass 314
for nine wickets. His total includ-
ed 14 fours and four sixes, He was
caught by Byer at mid-off off the
bowling of C. Blackman.

Police on the first
were bowled out for 156. When
stumps were drawn Wanderers
had scored 95 without loss, W.
Knowles was 72 not out and
Evelyn 17 not out.

When play resumed yesterday
the Wanderers score was taken
to 123, At this stage Knowles
who had added only five runs to
his over week total, was caught
by Sobers off the bowling of Carl
Mullins.

Wanderers however carried
their ‘total to 314, A partnership
by D, Atkinson and R. Lawless
carried the score from 160 for
seven to 308 for 8. At this stage
Lawless was bowled by Mullins
for 53. Perry Evelyn also contribu-
ted a valuable 55,

Carl Mullins, bowling for the
Constables, sent down 25 overs, of
which three were maidens, and
took seven wickets for 93 runs, G.
Sobers and C. Blackman took one
each for 80 and 28 respectively.

In their second innings Police
have lost. one wicket for 103
runs, C. Blackman was bowled by
Denis Atkinson for 42, F. Taylar
and A, Blenman, the not out bats-
men, are 49 and nine respectively.

SPARTAN vs PICKWICK
Pickwick 242 & (for 1 wkt.) 54
Spartan 215

Despite a grand innings of 78
not out by G. N. S. Grant, Spartan
conceded first innings lead points
to Pickwick by 27 runs at the end
of the second day of their First
Division Cricket match at Queen’s
Park yesterday. Pickwick scored
242 and for 1 wicket, 54, and
Spartan scored 215 jn their first
innings.

On the first Saturday of play,
Pickwick’s Skipper, John Goddard
showed himself to be in good form
when he scored 71, not out, though
he had been given a chance in
his thirties. In Pickwick’s first
innings, Frank King took four
wickets for 50 runs,

Saturday



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Spartan went back at the wicket
yesterday to continue their over
week score of 14 for the loss of
one wicket. “Shell Harris batted
well and confidently. He had a
go at the bowling until he was
eventually caught by the wicket-
keeper off E, Edwards, for 63 runs.

Grant batted a superb innings,
and his foot work was nice to
watch. He was never troubled by
the Pickwick attack, but rather
played their bowling with all con-
fidence, His steady cautious batting
is illustrated in the 31 singles he
scored in his innings, but he also
had occasion to hit a six.

When Frank King joined him
at the wicket it seemed as though
Spartan would make a fair bid
for gaining first innings lead, but
King was eventually run out for
35. He had just hit two fours, and
on sending a shot through square
leg, darted off for a run, Birkett
who was fielding at that position,
was swift throwing in, and King
was run out,

Spartan were unfortunate in
having another batsman run out.
Griffith who usually opens the
innings,for Spartan, went at num-
ber eight, but was run out when
he had not yet scored, Added to
this, Phillips, was absent.

For Pickwick E. L, G, Hoad
took three for 74 and E, Edwards
three for 38.

In the second turn at the wicket,
Pickwick are 54 for the loss of
one wicket, A. M. Taylor is 21
and S. Birkett 26, Taylor hit a six.

COLLEGE vs LODGE
AT COLLEGE
Colfege Ist Innings (for nine
wkts) decld .. 355
Lodge 88 and (for 6 wkts) 60

Harrison College after declaring
when their score had reached 355
runs for the loss of nine wickets
in their first innings, dismissed
Lodge for 88 runs yesterday the
second day of their First Division
cricket match at College. Failing
to, save the follow on Lodge are
now 60 runs for the loss of six
wickets.

College concluded their first
innings at 2.20 p.m., yesterday
with Malcolm Worme undefeated
with 147 runs out of 355 runs.
Best bowling performance was
given by K. re took five
of the College wickets for 68 runs
in 16 overs.

In the Lodge first innings, J.

4 Outram topscored with 23 runs

while the next best score of 20
runs was made by Skipper Wilkie,
At lunch time Lodge had lost four
cf their wickets in the first innings
for 40 runs,

Bowling at medium pace Mr.
Headley in seven over captured
three of the Lodge wickets for 11
runs and C, Smith three for 23 in
six overs and four balls.

Lodge opened their second
innings at 4.30 p.m, with their
opening pair Grant and Murray
but when the score was eight,
Grant was nicely caught by the
College skipper, C. Smith at fine
leg for a duck,

G. Foster the right arm slow
bowler for College bowled steadily
and had three of the Lodge wickets
for 16 runs in their second innings
when stumps were drawn, He
bowled Murray, Farmer and
Brookes for 16, 0 and 16 respec~
tively.

Lodge have now scored 60 runs
for six wickets in their second
turn at the wicket.

Egyptian
Swims English
Channel

FOLKSTONE, Southern Eng.,
Aug, 30
After finishing his Channel swim
from England to France in heavy
weather, Said El Arrabi, 35-year-
old Egyptian policeman, returned
bere by motor-boat this morning.
El Arrabi was swept ashore on
the French coast near Cape Gris
Nez early today by waves eight
feet high, He waded to the
beach 17 hours, 42 minutes after
he had entered the water at
Dover. The Egyptian, who had
swum the Channel last year, was
the fourth successful swimmer
for the present Channel “season.”
The weather, which spoiled his
attempt at a record, also caused
two English swimmers to aban.
don the hope of starting from the
French side today. They were
Miss Margaret Feather, 21, and
Sergeant George Gray, senior
swimming instructor to the Royal
Marines,

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RESERVATIVE




SUNDAY, AUGUST 31, 1952

RACING NOTES

By BEN BATTLE



SANTA ROSA MEETING

Y this time the first day of the Arima Santa Rosa Meeting will have

been completed. An astonishing number—145—horses have been
entered which must; I imagine, constitute a record. The entries,
however, are remarkably well distributed and there are few races with
less than a dozen and only one with more than two dozen horses
entered, Not that an entry of twenty five, which is the number listed
for the Jetsam Handicap is not a frightening amount on the little
Arima track, but it is to be expected that a number of these will be
scratched. Obviously, a good deal of care and attention has gone
into the framing of the races and a well balanced programme has
resulted.

Barbados entries are limited strictly speaking to Mr. Chase’s Pretty
Way, whom apparently Doctor Dottin has succeeded in putting back
on her feet, and Embers. The latter may be seeking a lucky track,
but after her performance in August I certainly do not fancy her
chances against the strong C Class field which she will have to meet,
Pretty Way, at her best would be a force to be reckoned with, but we
shall have to wait and see whether her recovery is complete,

Although Mr. Barnard’s string really hail from St. Vincent we
see so much of them that we can follow their fortunes with justifiable
interest. I shall be surprised if anything gets near to Bright Light in
the Derby Trial Stakes nor do I think that that will be her only suc-
cess. In the 2-year-old races, Mr. Barnard has a strong hand with
Faerie Queene and Rose Leaves and the former will give us some idea
of the relative form for we have already seen her in action, Among
the other two-year-olds I notice Surety, a full brother to the useful
Assurance has been going very well,

The only new sires to have out 2-year-olds are Bold Friar who is
responsible for a half-bred which goes by the remarkable name of
Der Runner—an appellation that could only have originated in Trini-
-dad, and Ghenghis Khan who has a roan colt—Memoir—out of that
very good creole Fragrant Memories. Ghenghis Khan himself was out
of Felicitas and hence his use as a sire would give breeders access to
Mr. Barnard’s rarest strain of blood.

A word about the stakes. These are on a most lavish scale and
range from the three thousand dollar first prize offered for the Captair.
Cipriani Memorial Cup down to the one thousand, one hundred and
fifty for the G Class races. The latter are thus almost as valuable as
our own Champion Stakes which attracted a field of our very best
horses, Another feature of the meeting with which we in Barbados
compare very shabbily, lies in the number of Trovhies which are
offered, No fewer than ten races carry these in addition to the prize
money and there can be no doubt that they add tremendously and
out of all proportion to their value to the pleasure of winning a race.
Most of them are donated by private firms and it is hard to believe
that similar contributions would not be made in Barbados if the right
approach were used, At least it is something that our Turf Club might

very well try.
“CHARLIE SMIRKE”

English visitors to our August meeting might have been startled
by the thought that the Aga Khan’s No. 1 jockey had elected to pay
us a visit. Vociferous cheers for “Smirkey” would have gone far to
confirm this. But it was all meant in very good part and the famous
nickname concealed the identity of our latest addition to the ranks of
jockeys. Young Blades did not meet any success at his first meeting
but he did set at least one record when he was forced to put 1p weight
in order to “catch” 86 pounds, His rides on Cottage he may charge to
experience but I was quite impressed with the way he handled Devil's
Symphony in the North Gate Handicap, and the foundation of what
can develop into a good seat and hands were there for all to see. Space
has prevented me mentioning his debut before; in doing so now I
might perhaps, as a piece of advice, paraphrase that once given to
Sir Pelham Warner, “Keep a straight course and a modest mind and
you will go far.”

TWO NEWCOMERS

There are two new arrivals in the paddock in whom readers may
be interested. The first of these is Highlyn, a two-year-old black filly
by His Highness out of Marilyn, by Coup de Lyon out of Maryfield.
Highlyn who has joined the increasingly powerful Goddard stable,
has started once in England and was placed third. The other new-
comer is Highland Spur, a two-year-old brown colt by Hotspur (by
Hyperion) out of Highland Polly by Berwick out of Love’s Feast.
Owned, I understand, by Mr. Bunny Edwards, Highland Spur has
started six times in England and has placed second twice and third
once.

I should perhaps have headed this paragraph three newcomers but,
as the third is a man and not a horse and has, moreover, pleaded with
me not to involve him in undue publicity, I shall refrain. As a hint,
however, of the identity of our latest addition to the ranks of owners I
shall caution fans to watch the form of Viceroy closely now that he
has changed stables.



Basketball Ass’n . Red House Wins

Choose Committee Conipetition Shoot

THE’ Basketball Association
have appointed Messrs, Noel
Symmonds, James Archer and
G. Greenidge, as the Selection
Committee of the teams which will
represent Barbados when the
Trinidad basketball players,
Carib-bears, make their tour here
early in October.

The Red House team captained
by Major Chase was the winning
heuse in the House Competi-
tion Shoot which took place at
the Government Range yesterday
afternoon. This house had an
aggregate of 459 points while the
second place was taken by Blue
Heuse with 457 points and third
place went to Green House with

4 ints.
They will be three Colony ~~? P°™

games, a Colt’s game a game
against Harrison College, and one
against Harrison College Old Boys
and Carlton combined.

The heat presented a problem
but the wind was steady. There
was also a slight mirage.

The eight best seores were:—

The Presentation matches which Major 0. F.C. Walcott 97 points
were to have been played last Mr. T. A. L. Roberts 96 points
Thursday night, were postponed Mt. H. F. Cuke 93. paints
a t : ‘ , Mr. M. A. Tucker 93 points
ue to rain until next Thursday i
when His Excellency, the ‘a * etre "a coor

% r. T. G. McKinstry points
dace is expected to be mr. L. W. Hassell 92 points
* Major A. S. Warren 91 points



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/

SUNDAY, AUGUST 3i,
SPORTSMAN’S DIARY

Kent Cricket
Captaincy
In Doubt

W. MURRAY-WOOD, will
neither confirm nor deny rumours
that he is not retaining the cap-
taincy of Kent next season, But
the cOunty’s secretary-manager,
Mr. N. CHRISTOPHERSON, tells
me that it is almost certain that
Murray-Wood will be invited to
earry on.

Thirty-five-year-old Murray-
Weod said, after aceepting the
captaincy this year; “If I cannot
make a success of the job, I will
not hold it for more than one

season.”
Criticised
Kent have had a far from suc-
season, Many members
have criticised Murray-Wood’s
captaincy. Some say his tactical
ideas are too set and that some
defeats could have been victories
had his captaincy been less rigid.
season Ként finished next
to last in the championship. At
present there are three teams be-
low them. Odd thing is that
Kent’s second XI won the Minor
Counties championship last sea-
son, and if they win their last
match, against hire, they will
finish runners-up this season with
the right to challenge the top
club—probably Lancashire—for
the championship.





DP.

Evans Will Be Fit
GODFREY EVANS, England
wicket-keeper, put his hand in his
pocket—and the result was an in-
jury which prevented him from
keeping wicket in part of the
Kent v. Leic matoh at Lough-

borough.

“In the pocket was a sharp
pencil,” he told me to-day, “The
point passed under the nail of
the middle finger and broke off.
I had to go to a doctor to have
the lead taken out and I was
advised that for the time being
a bandage shovld remain on the

Ainge.

“T batted all right and_could
have kept wicket
the state of the match had made
it mecessary.

Gwilliam Will Play

HERE is a good kick-off to the
rugby séason at Twieckenham—
a match between Harlequins and
an Intérnational XV _ raised by
Sir WA WAKEFIELD. The
game will be played on Septem-
ber 6 (3.15).

Schoolmaster JOHN GWIL-

LIAM, the former Cambridge
University forward who p!
18 times for Wales and led them
to two triple erown victories will
captain Sir Wavell Wakefield’s
XV.

Cambridge Capture

W. KNIGHTLEY-SMITH, the
Highgate schoolboy, whose _left-
handed batting for Middlesex
since mid-summer has shown ex~
ceptional promise, goes up to
Cambridge in October. But he
may not have to wait until next
summer to get his first Blue. He
should earn one for soccer, for ha
is an accomplished full-back

His chances 1k bright. Both
G. TORDOFf and G. WH
FIELD, Cambridge’s backs against
Oxford last ‘season; have gone

down,

With five Old Blues and some
experienced _ seniors
Cambridge, who have not beaten
Oxford since 1947, have good
prospects of breaking the
sequence in the match at Wembley
in December.

Wanstead

IF Wanstead win the Northern
section of the Evening Standard
club cricket table they are pre-
pared to play a challenge match
against the Southern section win-
ners.

They are the second club to
agree. Beddington have already
intimated they will be willing to
play in this match if they win
the Southern section.

Wanstead have a good chance
of finishing top, Although their
last two games have been rained-
off, they still have a four-point
lead over Finchley.

Three clubs are iti the running
for the Southern leadership
Mitcham have regained it, but

from Beddington and Sutton.

The nena a er ae on
August final placings
met di on the Mitcham v.
Beddin, game that day.

—L.E.S.

PHYSICIAN

4 TU
t_ TUL

————

1952





ray a

Lindwall Pre

To Mow

Down here in the South

of league cricket in Lancashire. Attention,

of international importance,



pares
Us Down

little is heard of the heroes
pane. for one

Ray Lindwall. Next season he

will be trying to mow down England wickets instead of
morden.

those of Bacu

Up to to-day Tandwain, after
only a moderate beginning, had
taken 78 Lancashire League
wickets at eight runs and a bit
each on behalf of his club,
Nelson,

Only two other professionals,
both of them Australians and
both spin rather than speed
bowlers, ae an even as
many as ickets. Th are
BRUCE DOO , Sis Lane
cashire. 79, and CECIL PEPPER,
Burnley, 76.

Duckworth’s View

To remind us of his all-round
qualities Lindwall has also scored
413 runs for an average of 37.

Lindwall will be 31 on October
3, which is “getting on” for a
fast bowler. Ought we therefore
to write him off for international
cricket? Decidedly no, to judge
from what my friend GEORGE
DUCKWORTH says:

“Lindwall is carry: a stone
of extra weight hetkate he has
had no six-day cricket this season.
I will not say that he is certainly
as good as ever, but he is
good enough to return next
season to the flood tide of big
cricket.

Little Support

“This dummer he has hardly
bowled at all on a fast wicket, he
has not been bowling to a ring of
accomplished slip fieldsmen and
he has not had the support of a
first-class bowler at the other
end,

“I saw five catches off his
bowling put down in half an
hour. That means that he has
had to take inmost of his wickets
cleaned bowled or lbw. He has
done it. Don’t belittle him.”

Even so, Lindwall’s league
figures need not send shivers
down our _ spines. League

if cricketers are much easier prey

than Hutton, Sheppherd, Ikin,
Graveney, May and the others
Family Divers
ATHER and son are compet-
ing in the English diving
championship at New Brighton,
The father is HAROLD JOINER,
& Watford papermaker and a
pre-war Herts county champion
who launched the Highgate Div-
ing Club in 1935. A wartime
parachute jumping instructor, he
returned to active diving last
year to get his son DOUGLAS
interested.

Harold Joiner performed well
in the men’s plain high diving
though he did not finish among
the first three.

Douglas Joiner competes in the
boys’ event to-day.

“Pop” Joiner intends keeping
in competition diving. “I am
looking forward to having three
of the family competing in the
nationals next year, My nine-
year-old daughter PAMELA is
already showing great promise,”
he said. :

They Stay At Oval
(P*ORINTHIAN-CASUALS ;

the Isthmian League club,
will continue to play at The
Oval for at least four more years,

This was announced to-day by
Corinthian-Casuals and Surrey
County Cricket Club.

When Corinthian-Casuals first
played at The Oval it was under-
stood that renewal of the con-
tract would depend on _ the
ground’s condition after a trial
period of two years. Apparently
arene is satisfied, 6

e season at The Ova!
on Saturday, Setober 4. Until
then Corinthian-Casuals will
play their home matches at
Cheshunt.

Cycling Boost
RITISH Mice manufac-
turers are to sponsor cycle

and Rawtenstall and Tod

Ronnie Clayton
Is Willing To
Fight McCarthy

oa GEORGE WHITING
orts are being made
feather-weight c! Rotate
i toe Sin “as t match
in w
star of the East od eye
Sammy McCarthy,

The idea, I suppose, is that
McCarthy, ineligi! by rule for

championship consideration until
his 2lst birthday in November,
should profitably employ the next
few months learning as much
about Clayton as possible.

Clayton is willing, but I fear
there will have t be = much
powerful bargaining before the
McCarthy party show any signs
of interest.

“McCarthy has won 16 and
drawn one of his 17 fights, but ‘he
is neh a baby, and in no hurry
to fight champi ” says mana-
ger Jack King. “This fight this
week with Johnny Molloy, who
knocked him down twice, shows
that he is still in need of ex-
perience.”

An understandable attitude —
but completely different from the
being shown by the management
of that other feather-weight
“find,” 20.year-olqd Johnny But-



CARLTON vs. EMPIRE
EMPIRE—Ist Innings Whe besce
CABRLTON—1st Innings

Cc. Me Kenzie e Grant b Williams 11

:
°
9
i
cv
e :
2

5/49. chine a
"| "BOWLING ‘ANALYSIS

°o M R WwW
E Av. williams 8) 3 tet
. . s 6
H. a ’ ; : 3 1
A. Hol 3
TRE—2nd mains
oO. nea é€ ¢, f Hams
b J. A. Williams yeaaes 3
£. W. Grant c Lucas b Cox 45
C. Depeiza ec Lucas t Cox 2
C, Hunte Lb.w. J. A. Williams 51
Ww. A b &
H. A. King b Cox 26
S. Rudder not ‘out 3s
A. Holder not out . 20
Extras: w. 2 1b. 1 3
Total (for 6 wkts.) 210
Fall of wickets:— 1/4, 2/56, 3/93, 4/104
8/149, 6/183.
BOWLING ANALYSIS
o M R W
K. B, Warren 14 1 2 0
JA. Ww 10 0 “7 2
Cc. B. Williams "4 ° 2 °
Cc. S. Cox “ 1 40 4

POLICE vs. WANDERERS
POLICE—Ist Innings .... yeas 156
WANDERERS — ist

W. Knowles e Sobers b Mullins 7
D. Evelyn ¢ Mullins b Sobers 55
G. Proverbs 1.b.w, Mullins . q
D. Atkinson c Byer b Blackman 115
D. Mayers ¢ (wkpr) Dodson b
Mullins . - 1
D. Lawless b Mullias 5
L. St. Hill b Mullins 11
R. Lawless b Mullins 53
H. Toppin b Mullins 0
G. Skeete absent e
Il. Ramsay sot out e
Extras: 16
Total (for 9 wkts.) 314

terworth, of Rochdale. y Fall of, ariekets:— aaa, 2/125, ae,
12 Stopped BOWLING ANALYSIS’ |
° R Ww
Ex-cotton operative Butter- C. Bradshaw ~ 9 o Mm 0
worth, having stopped 12 oppo- C. Mullins * : e ‘
nents, outpointed three others, ¢ sebers oa
and drawn with another, is now J Byer 2 . 2S
acknowledged in the North as the % moccoe " : = :
most damaging young puncher ;
seen in those parts since the c, piackman ® D. Atkinson «a
war. F. Taylor not out 49
So confident are his mentors— 4. Blenman not out 9
he is managed by Tom Hurst, tras: wae
Bruce Woodcock’s pilot — that Total (for one wkt.) 103
they have advertised their wil. Fall of wicket:— 1/86,
lingness to match him against BOWLING Anes ae
Clayton for a_ sidestake Of », Atkinson 4 4 % 1
£1000, with the slightly destric- } Ramsay 3 $2) tee te
tive “rider” that the champion R. Lawless 2 o wm 0
weighs in at the title limit of } 5 Hil ea a tae

nine stone, '
—L.E.S.



Davis Scores First
Century Of Season

(From Our Own Correspondent)
LONDON, Aug. 30.

Former England captain Fred-
dy Brown came to the rescue of
Northants against Gloucester with
a brilliant 116 which included a
six and 12 fours. When he weni
in, Northants had lost four wickets
for 39 runs. With Eddie Davis,
Brown added 213 for the fifth
wicket. After Brown had been
dismissed by Lambert, Davis re-
mained to score 108, his first cen-
tury of the season. e

The Indian tourists in the last
match against a county are in
‘trouble at Bournemouth. Reply-
ing to Hampshire’s 256 by close of
piay, they had lost two wickets
for 26 runs,

SCOREBOARD
Middlesex versus Lancashire
Middlesex 175



Laneashire ....



Leicestershire versus
MDE sii sscachrecwnvelsibassanscegondanas 428.
Kent versus Y
BRGAS isi inireageoes 249, (Wardle 5
for 69).
YOrKSHIe ooo. cccsseueeesesees 18 for 1.
Sussex versus Derbyshire

Sussex oo...

Derbyshire

Northants
bert 5 for 83.









racing at Herne HiN next season. ae ae Vers me 26 for 1.
Previously they have mere.y Wosthawer .
given trophies. This will mean 4 Glamorgan 29 for 2.
higher standard and more a9- Buckinghamshire versus Warwick
pearances by leading continental Warwick ..........0.. 361 for 7 de-
stars and our own champion, ¢|ared,
REG HARRIS, who has raced juckinghamshire ........ 26 for 0.
there only once this year.
\ Dashing
OR the benefit of English visit- smithâ„¢ appears KNIGHTLEY

ors, a Swedish paper publish-
es county cricket scores. The Mid-
dlesex left-hander W. Knightley-

OR.
oTte
BEEWELL

as
HYPHEN SMITH. Oh, well, he
has been described as “a dashing
batsman.”—.L.E.S.

1 Toppin .... 4 i ee
PICKWICK vs. SPARTAN

PICKWICK .... 242 and (for 1 wkt.) 64
SPARTAN. ese tate -. M5
SPARTAN—1st Innings
L. F. Harris ¢ wkpr. b Ware id 63
A. Atkins c Jordan b BE. L. G. 4
E, Cave Lb.w. b Hoad ... ‘ 4

N. Harrison c W. Greenidge b
Edwards ‘ “4 ° 10

N. Grant not out ....+0..+++: Pree, |

K. Walcott ¢ wkpr. b Edwards 5

SCOREBOARD

i 1/17, a/8B, 9/44, 4/48,
34

SUNDAY ADVOCATE â„¢

N. Hatfis stpd wkpr
S Griffith run out
F. King run out
K. Bowen c Foster b Birkett
F Phillips absent

Extras:

Total

b Hoad

(for 9 wkts.)

Fall of wickets: 1/11, 2/23, 3/78,
5/91 @/104, 7/105, 8/170, 9/215.
BOWLING ANALYSIS

M R
H. R, Jordan 22 4 S4
J... Greenidge il 2 26
£. L. G. Hoad 19 0 74
J. Goddard 4 i 8
©. Edwards 12 3 38
W Greenidge 3 0 7
S. Birkett. 2.2 0 2

PICKWICK—2nd Innings

A.M. Taylor not out

£. Edwards b K. Bowen
S. Birkett not out
Extra:

Total (for 1 wkt.)

HARRISON COLLEGE vs.

DGE
HARRISON COLLEGE—Ist Innings

lelwor ncwovest pibleccton

£. Hope 1.b.w. b Brookes 2
E. Tudor ec Brookes b Wilkie 10
C Smith stpd, (wkpr. Grant
b Farmer : 30
Cc. Blackman b Riley 41
A. Alleyne b Farmer 9
Mr. S. Headley b Riley .. es
M. Worme not out Mm
M. Simmons c Mr, Wilkes b Riley 0
S. Hewitt ¢ Mr, Wilkes b Riley 57
Cc. Reid c Mr. Wilkes b Riley 7
Extras: 12
Total (for 9 wkts.) 358

- 1/2, 2/42, 3/48, 4/48,
9/355.
LYSIS
M

ra of wickets: 2.
6, 6/191, T/191, 8/341
BOWLING ANA!

S

<

Brookes
G
Wiikie
». Farmer
Mr, Riley
R. Goddard
1 Murray

cco~--woe
~2S33ean

2
LODGE—1st Innings
G.,.Grant 1b.w. b Simmonds
J. Murray b Mr, Hoodie
J. Hutson b Mr, Headley
1. Farmer b Mr, Headley
KK. Brookes b Smith ee
tt. Goddard b_ Foster

-
BOM SOMO

~

Mi. Wilkes Lbww. b Foster

G, Wilkie stpd, (wkpr. Blackman)
b Smith

J. Outram b Smith

'S. Riley not out

5, Reifer absent

Extras: .

lel outs ou

Total (for 9 wkts.)

Fall of wickets:— 1/12, 2/18, 3/13, 4/14,
5°26 6/38, 7/48, 8/67, 9/88.
BOWLING spain

Mr, Headley
M. Simmons
Cc. Foster
Reid

eoas
wows

Cc
c 6.4
LODGE—2nod_ [nnings
’. Grant ¢ Smith b Simmons
Murray b Foster
Hutson run out
J Farmer b Foster
K. Brookes b Foster
G. Wilkie not out
Mr, Wilkes not out
J Outram ¢ Worme b Smith
Extras:

Zo wowrws

Gio
-
SSe3

Total (for 6 wkts.)

Islaee

8

Fall of wickets; 1/8, 2/26, 3/26, us
5 50 y
BOWLING ens a

oO rR W
Mr. Headley .. 4 0 ll 0
M. Simmons 3 0 9 1
f£. Hope 2 1 1 0
G. Foster 7 2 16 3
Cc. Smith 6 2 18 1

th Pntinininrniitiitininstitateitnil

SOCCER:

Grimsby Gain Six Points

(From Our Own Correspondent)
LONDON, Aug. 30.

Grimsby Town, with the Eng-
lish soccer season @ three
matches old, they alone of the 92
League Clubs have gained six
points. Their grand three-nil
away win over Bradford enabled
them to maintain a 100% record
and a clean sheet in the goals’
against column.

How are the mighty fallen! Be-
fore today’s matches there were
12 elubs hoping to emerge in the
same position as Grimsby.

Arsenal

shed two-one at
home to Sunderland: West-
bromwich failed at home to

Burmley; Middlesborough also at

- home dropped a point to Dreston

and so the tale of woe goes on.
The most surprising defeat war
Arsenal's, For the last point
Sunderland gained at Highbury
was in 1046 and their last win
there was as far back as 1930.
But today Arsenal has been un-
lucky, Alteady beaten the

. absence of Barnes, Smith, ‘bes
its and Logie they suffered a terrible

misfortune when outside right
Roper had to leave the field after
a few minutes owing to an injury
to his right foot. He returned
after treatment, but was little
more than a passenger.
Sheffield United Beaten

Another of the former 100 per-
centers who failed at home were
Sheffield United. They were
beaten two-nil by the newly
relegated Huddersfield who seem-
ed determined to get back into
the First Division as soon as
possible. Their win over United

placed thern at the top of the











FEEL LIKE

MELLOo/ THar, You Doc ? +

ALREADY YEA / WHAT'S THAT:
yeaun/ CARIB o1D THE TRICK

ALL RIGHT SORE
FINEST BEER

Second Division Table.

Cardiff City’s first home match
‘of the season on returning to the
First Division after an absence of
23 years, brought them their first
points and goals. They routed
fellow promotion winners~ Shef-
field on Wednesday to the tune of
four-nil,

The final matches in the first
stage of the Scottish League Cup
were played today. As a result
Kilmarn Sterling, Morton, St.
Johnstone, ndee Third, Lanark,
Rangers and Hivernian qualify for
the quarter finals.

The tailpiece — former England
outside right Stanley Matthews,
normally a maker of goals, was
today the scorer of one. In a
dazaling run he beat three Bolton
defenders and coolly capped the
ball past the goalkeeper Hanson,
It was Matthews’ first goal since
September 8 last year.

CHANNEL SWIM—from 4.



When within four miles of
Dover in stor weather early
today, Roberto Ruiz, 29-

year-old mechanic from Aseun-
cion, Paraguay, had to give up
his Channel swim attempt from
France to England, Ruiz started
from Cape Griz Nez at 13.12
G.M.T. yesterday and was taken
from the water at 03,15 G.M.T. to-
day. His trainers and others in th
accompanying boat consider

that although he was still swim-
ming strongly, it was too dan-
gerous for him to continue in the
very rough conditions which made
it almost impossible for the boat
to keep contact with the wee.



A’ NEW MAN




is THE



jnscceaies ES



| AUG. 31 — NO. 239

|

PAGE FIVE










The Topic
of
Last Week

Last night a big child ery out
The food could not suffice

it_was a big man. crying
Because he missed his rice

His dear old-time housekeeper
Said man it don't sound nice
You are a hard back old man

And can't de without rice? that

Fo:

goo

hair is always “as

He said like many Bajans 1 as it looks . . . sriiaft,
No matter what you eat
If riee not on our menu

e “grub’ ts tcomplete





lustrous . . . obviously well

TNA
TONIC H
rant
asd Wa

cared for

lead
the

4
Shut up he said, don't argue follow “the

_1 am the working man
You women want all money
break down both your hands

—

of discriminating men

world over

JULYSIA

HAIR CREAM

This talk start up a “bing bang” pi

And boys they then combine
‘Twas then the next door neighbour
Cried call up “nine-nine-nine
. . .

This modern police unit
WRl help improve the place
And maybe check somebody
From being a disgrace

Words sped, blows followed after
Big mouth plus a black eye

The man denied the ‘cursing
The blows he couldn't den



Boys this thing came from far
For politics came in

Few merchants in the Government
Ts just an awful sin

The house full up with lawyers ;

You take it for a court
Lou says give me more merehants

Starvation is no sport

The Cream of Wlairdressings

S.M.G. AGENCIES
J. &R. BUILDING, PALMETTO STREET, BRIDGETOWN, BARBADOS

Oh Jill be covetul-thats

li we get rice and four
Cornmeal and some pig snout
We have no time for fighting
And bursting people's mouth
. .

Trade enquiries to

Poor people own ail belly
And belly calls for food
And boys when food don't turn ¢
We ate in no sweet mood
* . .





»



You who are little better

Don't know the hell some see

All last week some poor people , °

Exist on beead and tea. Mm. CW adi $ t
Even the flour short now UMmmys Mm . 0 é a
Thursday and Friday night dian

aay Seared

When the “week-money" run out amt ,
Some hardly get a bite s | > a Hs a: I } [ DONT WORRY, JEAN.
Of course “looge-guat”’ can never | ‘i e TS NOT A RADIO
Tell what the “tie-goat’ see } SET AT ALL. ITS
, y what's wert | REDIFFUSION — JusT
Don't know w ua pores ‘ DSPEAKER WITH
One thing is sure and certain A WIRE DIRECT TO

Yes one and ail will face
Some time, somg, where, down yonder
Next door “the other place.”

THe Strupto .

So while we all are living
Under the Sun and
Ae we alt half starving
Cheer up with J. & R
‘

sponsored by

J&R BAKERIES
makers of |
ENRICHED BREAD
and the blenders of
J&R RUM














THERE YOU ARE, BILL. RELAVYED
STRAIGHT FROM THE SPUD
OY WIRE. ITS PERFECT

LISTENING AND WONDERFULLY
CHEAP TO RUN.

HOW AMAZING, MARY!
1VE NEVER HEARD A
PROGRAMME SO CLEARLY,
BILL AND | WOULD LOVE
(T= BuT WE'VE GOT

NO ELECTRICITY.



























ITS AMAZING!
REDIFFUSION IS JUST
THE JOB FOR US MARY.






selbnii
You DON'T NEED IT.
JEAN, REDIFFUSION
SUPPLIES ITS OWN
CURRENT! WHY DON
YOU BRING BILL IN
ONE NIGHT? HE

CAN HEAR IT FOR






>No appetite? No pep? The
rich, blood*building proper-
ties of YEAST-PHOS will
Arestore lost energy and will

Tike keep you fit!
STAT |

TONIC



aa. ia 7-as



~ WONDER WHEELS N? 2

Why Hercules is
the finest cycle
in Barbados

AT WORK IN THE DESIQUING
OFFICE AT BIRMINGHAM

No mateer where Hercules cycles go they are the most
suitable for local conditions. This is because Hercules
engineers are constantly studying the special requirements
of ewery country. Latest designs, finest quality materials
qed matchless craftsmanship, have made Hercules the’
world’s ferourite bicycic.

Bn cle
Ine tner p 75-day ¥

Hercule

SOLD BY ALL LEADING DEALERS

THE HERCULES CYCLE & MOTOR CO. LTD., BIRMINGHAM, ENGLAND
REPARSENTATIVES
T. GEDODES GRANT LTD.,



BRIDGETOWN

EAS 478




PAGE SIX

For
Women

Only



Not quite! This concerns both a man and
his girl. A tropical evening, lovely music
and the partner you want in you: arms. Yet

no matter how well she dances, if unpi-asan)
breath offends, your evening is ruined. Make
sure YOU don’t offend. Take an Amplex tablet a day, and chasc
unpleasant breath away — for ever! Amplex, the tiny chlorophyli
deodorant dispenses for ever all unpleasant body odours.

And we've dispensed for ever
our flying troubles, Ever heard
of Air-Sick tablets by Savory &

Moore? You should try them
next time you fly. No nausea at
all just sit back and “watch
th» clouds roll by.” You'll en-
joy every minute of your flying

thne, Just as we do— now that
we'v? tried Air-Sick tablets, but
they MUST be *y Savory & Moore.



“I’ve gotten rid of some li
00. Osquitos, flying cockroaches, rai ies
ail those little horrors that seem to arte oe
most insecticides. But in a VAMOOSE-PUFFER
they’ve “met their waterloo.” Yes, sir! A few
puffs from the Vamoose, in the handy puffer
tin and the battle ground in strewn vith dead
bodies. VAMOOSE those horrid ins: cts away—
Vamoose is wonderful, I say.” :

ttle flying troubles

seen her about for ages.
‘Oh yes, since I took your advice and bought :
tin of MEDILAX. It certainly gingered me u

invigorates the system,
this for yourself,



“As I was saying, June. I find all
BANDBOX PREPARATIONS so soften-
ing for the hair. As for their brilliantines
they not only burnish but actually help
to FEED the hair-roots.”. What Jun.
says is true, and in the tropics the roots
of the hair need extra nourishment.

Highlighting the BANBOX series of
hair-beautifiers is COLAIRE, the new
hair-dressing tinted to suit your type.
Just stroke it on your waves and curls,
and they will fairly dance with light.
ay applied and just as easily brushed

OF. 6.5

/

HANDS” How true this is. To you
they look for extra care in every possible
way. Safeguard their health by seeing
that they are we!:-nourished. Give
them extra resistance by

daily diet,
beverages instead of sugar.
D by Savor
extra ‘something’ your child needs!



An easy way indved! No
exercise,-no diet, just take a SILF â„¢4
TABLET A DAY, AND SILF
THAT UGLY FAT AWAY, Silf
is a harmless vegetable compounu
which, if taken regularly, takes
away those ugly extra pounds you
long to lose. Try SILF SLIMMING
TABLETS — THEY REALLY
WORK.

Sole Agents covering this column

INTERNATIONAL TRADING
CORPORATION LTD.
Telephone 5009, Your Suppliers

Stocked by:-

J. L. Linton, “High Street. P. A, Clarke, Cosmopolitan

E. C. Gill, Olympia Pharmacy. Pharmacy
Empire Pharmacy, Tudor Street. K. V. Worm, Roebuck Street,

A. F. Jones, High Street, Stoute’s Drug Store, Roebuck St.

H. C. Walkes, Tudor Street, C. C, Browne,, Roébuck Street.

H. L. Hutson, Tudor Street, A, A, Browne, Eagle Hall.

Rock’s Drug Store, Tudor Street. H. E. Pilgrim, Progressive Phur-
F, S. Olton, Swan Street. macy, Nelson Street.

Hines & Co., Roebuck Street,



a ey







_ Something else is pretty wonderfui too, See-
ing Mary chatting over the fence again. Haven’t
“Feeling better, Mary,”

P i, rice j.
1 feel fine, now.” Medilax, by the way, is on macaroni, rice (now more plenti

of the most gentle of laxatives, yet one of thr
most sure, MEDILAX not only ensures INNER
CLEANLINESS but thoroughly tones up and

Try it, and experience



“YOUR CHILD'S LIFE IS IN YOUR | each.



Standard Pharmacy, Tweedside Rd. | 4 mp

| ¢

Eden’s Bride
Ignores Emerald |
Superstition

By EILEEN ASCROFT

Miss Clarissa Churchill niece of |
the Prime Minister, has no super-
stitions about emeralds being un-
lucky.

Her fiancé, Foreign Secretary |
Anthony Eden, gave her a large |
square-cut emerald set with dia-
monds,. It is an unusual choice for
modern brides, say London jew-
ellers. |

Most girls are superstitious of
green stones. And as they are soft |
in texture they are easily dam- |
aged, |

They can also be the most ex-
pensive stones in the world. A)
perfect flawless stone is worth
about £2,000 a carat and is more
costly than a diamond, weight for
weight.

Emeralds, which carry the
meaning “success and happiness in
marriage,” were first mined in|
Upper Egypt and India. Cleopatra
liked to adorn herself with carved
emeralds. :

One member of the Royal Fam-
ily who chose an emerald engage-
ment ring is the Princess Royal.
The Queen frequently wears a
wedding present evening necklace
of diamonds and emeralds,

Owner of one of the finest col-
lections of emeralds to-day is the
Sultana of Johore. She recently
had a dress made in two shades of |
green to show off the fine colours |
of her collection.

Emeralds are usually set with
diamonds in platinum, like the
ring of Clarissa. But many recent |

exhibition pieces have been set}
in the sister metal, palladium,
which is

not so expensive and |
lighter in weight, |
No Potatoes?

I carried out a 12-man check |
to-day among London’s leading



chefs for potato substitute ideas |
to helo the housewife beat the |
present shortage. |

Here are their suggestions .. .

ful), dried beans, dumplings,
noodles, batter pudding, suet crust
roast with the joint.

Worth of a Wife {

What is the value of a good
wife to her husband? Men, par-
ticularly divorce court judges, are
always trying to find the answer
to this intriguing question.

“I do not think there is any
figure which is big enough to
assess for the loss of a good wife
and a good mother,” said Judge
A. C. Caporn in Nottingham Di-
vorce Court the other day. In this
case he assessed the value of the
wife at £500,



Une husband who puts the value

of his wives far higher is 58-
year-old millionaire playboy Tom-
my Manville. He has had nine
waves and estimates that his wives
cost him an average of £250,000



Researches by a New York mag-
azine“ led to the conclusion that
the less your husband earns the
more valuable you are as a wife.

making | But if your husband is a wealthy
GLUCOSE D a regular part. of their|man your money value to him ‘is
Mix it in their juices and|very low indeed,

GLUCOSE
& Moore will give that

All Housework

To the £700-a-year man his
wife is worth £3,500, for she does

\all the housework, looks after the

children, is clever about house-
keeping, and stretches his income
to the limit. She is, say the statis-
ticians, worth five times as much
as her husband,

When a man’s income rises to

1,500 his wife’s value falls to
| £2,500. She stili does a certain
amount of the housework and
| cooking. Although her husband

can afford comfort he cannot afford
luxury. So she, too, is a valuable
asset.

It is the wife of the £3,000-a-
year man whose value drops
sharply in comparison ot her
husband’s income. She employs
a cook, nurse and maid. Her
value is strictly social. She is
worth only £4,000, just a little
more than her husband.

And as for the wife of the
£8,000-a-year man: her job is

merely to make contacts for her

husband, nurture his ego, create
a charming background, and wear
ink coat. She is going cheap
at around £1,200.

All this should make the wife
with no fur coat, a 14-hour work-
ing day and a_ stretched-to-the-

| limit housekeeping budget very

'

happy.

She’s a Sleuth

This week’s career woman is 35,
with good looks and charm.

She is dark-haired, dark-eyed,
| has the ability 'to look like a
glamour girl, a countess or a works
ung girl at will—and she tackles
a job which is usually held by
men,

SUNDAY ADVOCATE



hoppins
pre’

THE IDEA

Of WHICH IS TO PUT
ZEST BACK INTO BUYING

AST year’s fashion
was the Duster
Cdat. This year's

fashion is the Duster Coat
The difference is the price

Then the cheapest you
could get them was a7
Now they are in all the shops
starting at &5 10s.

Never were there sO many
variations on a single theme.

You can get them in faille,
rayon shantung grosgrain.
Sat'n, piqué, towelling. and linen.

You can get them in pink,
scarlet, pale blue, navy blue,
grey. brown lavender, and,
naturally, in black, but sur-
orisingly in white too.

You can get them with short
sleeves. long sleeves, three-
quarter sleeves, and sleeveless.

You can get them knee lenzth
for the beach and ground length
for the evening.

You can get them collarless,
almost collarless (mandarin
style), or very much collared
(highwayman Style).

And they al) have one thin;
in common. They are fu
enough to cover a multitude of
last vear's dresses

Hold everything



Closed

Open

* BEST {DEA you can’t buy

here—yet—is the travellin;
handbag from Paris. picture
above. It is a big carry-all
shoulder-bag made of brown
leather and white linen

One half of it unfolds to make
an extra large pouch, ideul for
all the odds and ends you collect
travelling.

It's a bargain

* THE SNIP-HUNTER this

week reports on some black
stiffened net (it looks like tiny-
meshed wire netting) 54 inches
wide, reduced from 17s. lld. a
yard to 7s, 6d., because of slight
imperfections.

‘Phe Snip-hunter paid tor one
yard and got an extra quarter
thrown in because of those
imperfections. With it = she
made a stiff under-petticoat to
wear with a fuil-skirted party
dress.

Like this: Taking the 54-inch
side of the net to be used for

leating round the waist, cut off
8 inches for length from waist
to hem. (But check your own
measurements to make sure the
skirt is the vight length.)

Pleat the net on to a piece of
Petersham ribbon the width of
your waist; finish off the placket
and sew on two hooks and eyes.

Turn up the hem and bind it
with a very wide piece of black
ribbon. This will keep the net
from laddering vour nylons,

ee es arene Sy
and would lose her value to the
agency for which she works if
her identity were known.

She is married, with no chil-
dren, and has a four-room flat.
Her wardrobe is large so that she
can take a post as a housekeeper
at a moment’s notice or leave for
the Continent to become a guest in
a smart hotel.

Her dressing-table is loaded
with cosmetics—paint and powder
for night-clubbing, greasepaint
and hair colourings if she wants
to look older and greyer than her
years.

Her £9-a-week job, with ex-
penses paid, consists largely of
collecting exact information. Many
of her assignments are connected
with the divorce courts.

She started as a store detective,
but found the watch on shop-
lifters monotonous, “My present
job is more varied and interest-
ing.’

Only the biggest agencies employ full-time women

Home PAGE

A ‘tag’
for Vivien
Leigh’s
daughter

By VENETIA MURRAY

OW hard its it for a
. girl growing up to
realise she is going
through life with a tag to
her name ?
Such a is Suzanne
Holman. And the tag

that accompanies her
wherever she goes is

irl

@ Suzanne fivlman, 18-year-oid daughter

of Vivien Leigh, finds that a famous
| That's Vivien Leigh's. mother raises the ordinary problems.
daughter.” Home Page

invited Suzanne to tea to find the principal, and say ° You must
out if the tricky mother-and- take her’ or anything like
daughter relationship js trickier that... .”

when the mother is famous and
Shocks...

the daughter thereby tagged

‘s hd agems that. Paes en

rin own to earth, the > vi

relationship js neither more nor Greaiiy cueatine : on

being Mummy’s

daughter in my career. People

imagine what 1 ought to look

like and they get a shock there.

xkeKeKeKaKaK aa Kaa OK Kk OK:

less tricky than between any
other mother and a growing-
up girl.
Suzanne is a blue-eyed 18.
petite. plump, and pretty.



Then they itnagine what I
4 She lives with her barrister ought to act like and th t

ares Leigh be ae in a Worse one.” eee
a*on-Square at. but = she

frequently pops | round the elaine ote co

comer, to sce “Mummy and “She thinks I'm not hatd-work-

{Laurence Olivier! in ing enough,”
Suzanne 1s at the Royal Ramones passion fot

sophistication sometimes has to
be curbed by stern parental
command, ere was the case
of the lipstick—“A lovely
purple one which I wore coming
back from a Swiss finishing
school, maak said I looked
like something from the Folies
Bergére and threw it out.”

(T'S ALL VERY WELL
TO SAY ‘SAUTE’...

HE beginner in the kitchen opens a cookery book, all
eager to try out her novice hand, then finds herself
transfixed by the cook-book jargon of strange names

and complex instructions

So this week the Home Page cookery column 1s strictly for
beginners or for those who need to brush up their cookery
language.

Here is what some of those bewildering terms mean :—

BLANCHING.—Dip food into boiling water for a few minutes
then plunge into cold water. This is uscd to help remove the skins

from tomatoes. peaches, and almonds, or for shrinking fruits like
apples. before packing into preserving jars.

Acudemy of Dramatic Art. She
gol in at the second attempt.
Ang of that, she says:

‘The first time they didn't

:.w who I was, but the second
ey did. and I got in,

“But. honestly Mummy did
not ring up Sir Kenneth Barnes









CARAMELISE.—To heat sugar unti)] it turns brown | (Used

In sweets and puddings.) Ege

CROUTONS.—Small pieces ‘
of Parent or fried bread used Better batter
eae oe - And here ts what they

MARINADE.—A mixture ot | @- AD ; 5) tare
vinegar, spices, herbs, ete., in | roore mean when they talk
which meat is steep ore RIC ane
cooking to improve the flavour A THICK mat ree ft
and make it more tender Oi) Simply means a mixture
is often added to the vinegar, Which looks rather like ae
You can also marinate mush- ‘hick, pre-war cream. It

spreads slowly when dropped
from a spoon and.it is used
for things like scones.

A THIN BATTER
thin cream—the sort

rooms and fish.

SAUTE.—To toss in a smal!
quantity of hot fat over a low
heat with a lid on the pan
until the fat is absorbed.

is like

ou

ROUX.—A mixture of could buy for a brief spell last
melted fat and flour cooked year. It spreads quickly when
together. This is the first you drop itt into the r:n from

&@ spoon or jug
London Express Service

stage of sauce with fat.

AUGUST 31, 1952

SUNDAY,

Se STARS:

+

ci “B
Be




FOR SUNDAY, AUGUST 31, 1942
/
Look in the section in which your birthday

comes and «
find what your outlook is, according to the stars, ’

ARIES Seek to know the right answers from the *«
March 21—April 20right sources; don't hesitate to review,
double-check. Remember church services, x

When others oppose, and affairs seem gen-
erally to go awry, don't become either dis-
couraged or touchy. Strive the harder.

.

GEMINI Be careful with criticisms; being quick to

May 21—June 21 tell others what you'think about their be-
haviour is for Gemini to exterminate for
good and harmonious living.

TAURUS
April 21-—May 20

*
*
*
*

Today is just the sort of period for promot-
ing better understanding and good fellow-
ship, to create at least the disposition for
agreement. Don't be stubborn.

*

Please note Gemini and Cancer, and while
your hazards to a successful day may not
be the same, the recipe does hold good

generally.
* *

CANCER
June 22—July 23

LEO
July 24—Ang, 22

“4

We all like a compliment once in a while,
and many do better with praise than criti-
cism. In this world none can expect all
apple-pie order, Smile, ¥

-*

Think things over first; review procedures
and possible contentions. Being diplomatic
helps, if you aren’t violating good princi- *
ples. Prayer important.

H.
Seize upon just opportunities—those that
will not compromise with right nor hurt
another needlessly. Use today for a better
tomorrow and week. Pray. *

*

If your day is free, enjoy true relaxing
that revitalizes energy, strengthens you
for work ahead. If you must work, do it
willingly, smilingly.

VIRGO
Aug. 23—Sept. 23

LIBRA
Sept. 24—Oct. 23

SCORPIO
Oct. 24—Nov. 22

SAGITTARIUS
Nov. 23—Dec. 22

Do not tend to feel sorry about the past
nor that you have been slighted. Waste
no time mooning. Forward with a prayer. >

x
CAPRICORN
e Dec. 23— Jan. 21

AQUARIUS
Jan, 22 — Feb. 20

*
*«
ye Feb.
*«

Better days than this one? Yes, but every-
day can, should, record an advance as
Aquarians are so capable of doing when *
he (she) organizes his (her) abilities.
21—March 20 fee] the sort of freedom they like, neither
will you in many respects. But this is an

PISCES If others don’t have things their way, nor
excellent reviewing, researching rebuilding *
time.

s

YOU BORN TODAY have many abilities, varied talents, a
wealth of will power. Place yourself outside YOU, try to see
how others come by their opinions. And observe that there
are good successful ways not always in line with yours. Have
more than one interest, different from your daily routine. This
is the birthdate of many famous writers, including Theophile
Gautier, French novelist.

xkxKweKeKe Ke KehUK OK OFX
Some Seaman

Strange requests received from every year on educational sub-
men at aen have been reported jects and hobbies, 5 ;
by the London headquarters of But some. recent inquiries
the Seafarers’ Education Service from British seamen. have been
in Balham. unusual,
More than a quarter of a
million books are sent to seamen

*
*

*
*«

L.E.S.



_— + -
various types and ages of wom
on whom they can call for special
duties. 3

How is it possible to join ‘the
service? Most beginners start in REVUEDEVILLE 1952, under
the big stores, where 80 per cent. pe es patronage of ae
of detectives are women. Reason Excellency e Governor an
is that 90 per cent. of shoplifters Lady Savage, opens at the Empire
are women, Theatre on Wednesday night at

Back to 1930 8.30 o’clock with repeat perform.

Princess Margaret is reviving a Sant aa pans and Lord
jewellery fashion which was ataeantn ae 5 orclock, on Friday
popular the year she was born—

1930,

It is for the jewelled initial
handbag clip. Her diamond M
appears on the silk handbag that
she has carried recently, °

Jewellers say there has been a
sudden demand for them again—
mostly with removable fittings, so
that they can aiso be worn as a
brooch.

The first letter of the Christian
name is usually used, either in
metal, pewels or paste. Latest
idea is jade.

Looking Ahead

The Show produced and direc-
ted by Mrs. A. L. Stuart. Princi-
pal of tie School of Dancing, is
staged by a cast of over fifty
“Stuartettes” and is of the usual
high standard. That Revuede-
ville has found a place in Barba-
dian “show Business” is indeed a
tribute to its merit. Ever since
the first show was put over, on
myriads of occasions Revuedeville
has been the subject of much dis-
cussion.

The girls and boys take their
places now with more confidence

Christmas novelty cards this
year will say it with music. I
have already heard one designed
as a small musical box playing
Jingle Bells.

There are also musical birthday
ecards which play Happy Birthday

than in the past two shows. This
year, too, there is more variety
and there is more singing—which
shows that not only is dancing
their line but also music in all its
forms, The stage settings, scenery,
and the gorgeous costumes are
all the work of Mrs. Stuart.



cor Brush your teeth with Ipana and you clean
them extra-white. And, because of the unique formula
underlying Ipana’s “refreshingly different’? mint flavour,
you fight decay by reducing acid-forming bacteria. Massage
Ipana into your gums and you help keep them firm and
healthy. ‘In this way, Ipama acts as a safeguard against
tooth-losses, more than half of which are caused by gum
troubles. For whiter teeth, healthier gums, follow the Ipana wayi

THE TOOTH PASTE..

mas!

éy 9% ‘
ape!’ REFRESHINGLY DIFFERENT
“A A PRODUCT OF BRISTOL-MYERS, LONDON AND NEW RK



investigators, The largest have
‘about 20 men and two women.
Smaller agencies have lists of

|. She keeps her name secret be-
,cause she is a woman detective

|
|
|
|
|





The dip cut
carried to its fashion
ultimate—a deep, unfaltering,
decisive line. which exploits the
beautiful exactness of Skyline fit. D'Orsay,

most flattering of Skyline courts, may be had in
Black, Mariner Grey, Pacific Blue and Parkway Green
suede, or Cherry Red Caif.

THE FASHION SHOES WITH A CHOICE OF WIDTH-FITTINGS

*



* *

Made by C. & j. Clark Led. (Wholesale only) Street, Somerset, Englane

Local Agents: Alec Russell & Co,, Barbados.



to You, The vocals are Mr. Eric Morris,
Miss Norma Gaskin, Mr, Neville

Phillips, and the Glee Singers,

*People To-day
—L.E.S,

QUICKLY

er Phenstic...

Hh

Mi

ti

He

I
|



The famous threefold action of PHENSIC tablets RELIEVES
PAIN, SOOTHES NERVES, COUNTERACTS DEPRESSION.
No matter how intense the pain, no matter how weary your nerves,
how depressed you feel, PHENSIC tablets will bring you relief and
comfort, quickly and safely. Remember this — PHENSIC tablets
neither harm the heart nor upset the stomach. Don’t accept
substitutes. Keep a supply of PHENSIC tablets by you!

Phensic



TWO TABLETS BRING QU/CA RELIEF
FROM RHEUMATIC PAINS, LUMBAGO, NERVE PAINS, ©
HEAMACHES, NEURALGIA, INFLUENZA, COLDS & CHILLS






REVUEDEVILLE 1952

dance,

You'll be pleased to hear
“Joseph” tell of Barbados and its
natives—the numbers are too nu-~
merous to accord individual mem-
tion,

The Music Makers, the Police
Band. under the Supervision of
Captain Raison, M.B.E. will sup-
ply the music.

Miss Juliet Gaskin who stole last
year’s show is back again witk
“IT may be wrong.”

The tiny tots are good; the boys
co-operate readily and with
special effort to assist their part-
ners, produce an effective com-
bination, “Because I’ve lost my
Love” composed by Cedric Phillips
is one of the tunes to which they



7

“OH LA-LA”!

“A Bathing Suit’!!
she sees Joseph in his “Pre-Historic” bathing suit.

Exclaims Thelma Barker when



4 4 @

BRILLIANTINE & HAIR CREAM

to highlight your
crowning glory

CLE

—



ACI

POWDER:
COLD

ROUGE

CREAM VANI
SUNDAY, AUGUST 41,





1952

1M APPR “FS COURIER-STYLE. SHE ANNOUNCES—
We are now approaching my

Selected Sights for some

Unlikely Tourisis

I

exhibitions.

’M out to promote the Anne Edwards Tours of Puris
I’d like to transport hundreds of tourists, show then
a number of famous Paris landmarks, visit counties:

But not, of course the tourists, the landmarks, anv

the exhibitions |

ally get together on a tour

The Anne Edw. s
would be if. ..(9 | wrapped in transparent pape
managers anu whetue so they look Uke a peele
facturers, waiters and | orange
taxi-drivers, cleaners and ['d love to introduce th

shop-girls. The landmarks
would be French managers
and manufacturers. waiters

people who manage little dres
snops in Britain
to something

and taxi-drivers. cleaners inci oer.
. a meh than «
and shop-girls. The exhibi- night club
tions would be the know-how the little dress
with which these people do shops in Paris
their jobs. There they wil!
Don urn @p » nem

that I’m out to prove the

dearer and worse ,
clever enough when we try

' would stop at the
Paris sweetshops

UT I am out to prove
that, from a woman's
there are

viewpoint,

run aWay with the idea

French
are more clever than we ure,
and sell everything better and
cheaper. What they sell is often
and we are

or take in a4
Waist within
the mour or
press the frock
you ouy while
you walt, And
no charge for
either,

I'd Like some
Bnglis! bax
drivers 10 se@ »
sight that is
far more in
structive than



Arent Bookt nie eee eee Napoleon's Tomb—the signt 0)
And especially, 1 dont think 4. Paris taxi-driver receiving «

it is bright of all those people
who provide nousehold services
wo go on behaving us if they
Maud never recovered from the

3d. tip with courtesy and charm

Td like the Lost Proper;
people to see the way property
lost in # tax! rewurns to vou the

war—iike an old lady trading op same day. “J / take it to the

an iliness she bad ten vears ago, police.” explainea the drive1
E£ee—it was agony. low” as 1 get nothing. I / bring it

fed Ray used to say to Madame. she will surely awe
But Lee—tt was a long time . me a tip

ago.

So that is why ['d love to

I'd stop at the

take a busioad o1 sweet manu-

tacturers to see somet

hung just
as typica! of Paris as the Eiffel

eating spots

vei HERE are « nuD
noumeome dred deuignirut signs
The: windows fillea with in aris never
giant lollies 2ft. nigh in scarlet. ‘"¢luded in the usuul ane oe
emerald, and amber CNOCO - ney’ ag ‘ Soiree i ei
wie cigareites packed Uke & Goli\e ‘ tnis afternoon, and
popular brand smoters 318 ever dream of charging «
of chocolate ci and pipe and messenger tee.
ugnter pink sugar pigs @ THE BARROW BOYS wnt
siiver-wrapped chocolate “wrap ounches of grapes in
umbreltas fruit. drops trunspurent puper so thev iook

‘shaned like orange quarters anc

PARIS.
AN earl’s daughter with a
French accent is back in Paris

after dancing among the ruins
of ancient Greece. She is slim,
Latin-looking, 28-year-old Lady
Madeleine Lytton, daughter otf
Lord Lytton, artist peer who died
last year.

She was born in Paris, has
spent most of her life there. Her
mother is French; she was the
late Lord Lytton’s second wife.
Lady Madeleine’s great-grand-
father, Bulwer Lytton, wrote the
Last Days of Pompeii.

Lady Madeleine began to train
as a dancer at the age of five
under Lisa Duncan, one of the
numerous adopted daughters of
the fnatistic Isadera.* Now, she
says, “I am a character dancer, I
carry on the Isadora Duncan
tradition—the plastic expression
of music.”

In Greece, where she was in
vited to dance in the Delphic
Festival, Lady Madeleine stayed
some months. She gave recitais,
wearing ancient Greek cos-
tume at Athens and Patras; danc~

orett¥ and stuv cleat

Lady Madeleine Dane

EVELYN IRONS

By

ed in the
Rhodes

open air theatre at
before the King and
of Greece. She was accom-
panied by flute and ee
take my dancing very scz.ously,”
she says,

She was in Paris with her
mother and father when France
fell, and they moved south to
unoccupied France in 1941 Mrs.
Churchill wrote to Lord Lytton
advising him to make. his way
home. The family escaped
through Spain and Portugal be-
fore the whole of France was oc-
cupied.

Since her father’s death. Lady
Madeleine has continued to live
with her mother in his studio
flat near the Observatoire. This
week-end they leave on a motor-
ing holiday.

Lady Madeleine’s future plans:
dancing tours in Germany and

the United States.



**I thought I'd come over and
see how you were getting on.
Tom still away ?”*

‘*Yes, he won't be back tili next
week. He has to spend quite
lot of time up-country these days.”

“*I wonder you’re not afraid of
staying here alone—so isolated,
too.”’ ‘

**Oh, I’ve got Rex to look after
me. He’s company for me, anda
wonderful house-dog, yvou.know.””

|
}
**T can believe that. He doesn’t
miss much of what’s going on.
Not like our Rufus—-honestly, |
that dog seems mor: dead than |
alive these days. Lot of use |
he’d be if anything
happened !""
** Believe it or not, Rex
was just like that at one
time. He used to mope
BOB MARTIN’S CONDITION
breed.
eopy of



From all good chemists and stores
booklet ‘The care of your dog’ by

round the place, hardly touching
his food, just ne use to any-
one.**

“*Well, something’s made a
wonderful change in him.*’

** Bob Martin's, my dear. You've
heard of their Condition Tablets,
Y expect—but you obviously
haven't tried them!"

**No ... Do they really do any
good ?”” ,
**Look at Rex! Apparently the
food dogs normally get lacks
vitamins and minerals and so on.
So then they cet out of condition
(that’s what's the matier with
Rufus). You give him one Bob
Martin's a day. i'm sure
that’s what he needs.”’
“*Thank goodness you
told me! I'll get a packet
on the way back.’
TABLETS for dogs of any age

Write for a free
Bob Martin.



Lecal Agents: L. M. B. MEYERS & CO. LTD.

BRIDGETOWN,

BARBADOS.

THE TCyY SHOPS which
i1rOop Woah exife Key when you
sy eC ea LOVE UfDey knoV





LOW 4s.) We Ze ist)

1 WOULD SHOW the men
Soo Us deicCalessen stores in
england 3Ometning far more

refeh Wiah phe roues Bergere
tae tabies full Ol rewdy-to-eat

|
|
|
|

00d ita French delica’ n.

Al si .. une wind thwart coulo
“@ jone cheaper here . Uke
sumde = Nigoise = ot tomato
ereep) = peppers, ~cucumope:
ancnuvy black olives sump
fish = dressed with ou and
vinegat the bution musn
‘ooms and diced” oeewroo ,,
jressea vib garlic ana parsies

Me pastry cases filled with



SUNDAY

if the Dig London shops
the scarves abd Nats and cowon
frocks ID the new Dior Rose (s

ds.

snopped chicken In sauce, 4no nsid

the Scullion shells with aheese on De Be ip a g. aien
und Gish lung readY oread wonien even better than n
"rumbed tO M@al in tne oven, . worren? few long
even (when are cusier) "he = oearl necklets with a pendant
nayonnaise ‘bev tollop iio of chinestone roses . th

cartons tO gO With the
coiled eggs they dye rea

I'd stop at the
airport? buffets

rard-

e
new spray ear-ciips like a cloud:
ass ot ditenn iS. :

en e1 r ave wu
dozen different necklines imsteud
of ulternating between
neeks and Peter Pan collars. ~*

the way

wt

‘BD ABB «4 ousiona Om yes. there are a lot o!
I of the men who run = sights to cheer a woman's heart
Station amd airpor’ in Paris but nos the ones

ouffets to see
never see ip this country—a
Vast open Pastry tart filled witn
fresh raspberries in she Paris
air-station. Yet raspberries ure

a st@nr vou

cheaper nere and our oasirv
much better,
'D TAKE coucnes full of

English waiters und wutresses

‘o see that famous Paris insti-

“unon—tne a water wno
ie

Can manage « sm ot welcome

trippers are ysunlly shown

And at the ead
—a clue

HBRB wre the
eleaners ana
I taundries who collec:

vowt dress after breakfust ana
return tt in cme for dinner
une ootei maids who will oring

when vou demand ana &' von wnyuhing to eat or drink
en. always spreads voli» 4: uny time ot night or day
clean cloth ¢whether you dine :

at puper-cloth check-
(ana

never turn «a har uo you

usk [6! coffee With u Knife ana

damask cloth evel» one d .
ponders the menu with you ut ‘Ork oO @at Whar vou dough
mgth and never never piles elsewhere) the big stores
up the chairs or flicks our the (‘9 Which they wrap everything
fignt while vou linger over you buy im pretly paper tie i
coffee (because ne Knows the ‘firmiy and sioi in a wood-ana
chances are you will order white namdle so the packet is
another and out up We Mp) strong enough © cross ‘the

I'd stop at the
dress shops

Db RUN a = specta:
I week-ena trip tor
dress and fabric ano

wel und accessory munuluc-

cosset

Channel with you.

I'm sure at the end ot my

crips some of my tourists woulg
get a clue about one aspect ol
Frencn civilisation that differs
teeply from our own

in France the indtvtdual they,
caiole cherish and

urers see » specia: feature cove with courtesy ts THE

ot France—the way in wmcn ati CUSTOMER In England the

“mese shings are copied at al) 77reature they corner chivoy

orice levels Within six months queue ip, and kick around is. oj
NI OU tne aresses in 7478" THF CUSTOMER

UD POT

om olow on ret neare



Le Crocodile
MANY Paris celebrities are ih
Deauville this month. They in-
clude writer Colette, actor Sacha

Guitry end Australian jockey
Rae Johnstone.
Black-haired, 47 years old,

Johnstone has now, as he fore-
shadowed earlier, split with M.
Marcel Boussac, the owner for
whom he has ridden since 1950
in the best-paying racing part-
nership in recent memory,

The French call Johnstone “Le
Crocodile” because of his method
of coming up from the rear to
devour his adversaries. Jacko
Doyasber®, who will now ride all
the Boussac horses trained by

» ids nicknamed Tarzan
beca of his handsome figure

At Deauville, Johnstone inter-
rupted a sunbathe to tell me:
“Tt’s true that a number of own-
ers are after me now that I am



LOndoD Fxoress Service

es Among The Ruins

to be a free-lance, but I have
made no decision yet about the
St, Leger. I rode my last Boussac
horse, Alcinus, in the Grand
Prix at Vichy last Sunday. }
shall probably not ride for him
again, There is no quarrel.

“We have parted by mutual
consent. I am not dissatisfied
with the money | made witb
Boussac; it was a good deal.”

Johnstone does not plan to
leave France. His wife, the form-
er dancer Mile. Guy, is a French-
woman from Brittany, “And,”
says Johnstone, “I have lived in
Paris for 20 years.”

Johnstone went to Paris from
England in 1932 to see the Grand
Prix. There he met the French
owner Pitrre Wertheimer, who
invited him to go to Chantilly for
one month. He never went back
Johnstone speaks English to his
French horses.

His daily weight-control diet:
two biscuits, two grills, one salad



exciting Lavender than that

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famous since 1835

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perfume, soap and talcum —
- available at your beauty-counter mow !
Nowhere will you find truer, more

which comes to you direct from











are

‘| Most popular



ADVOCATE PAGE SEVEN

iy oo gl if) |.
WHAT'S COOKING | rs
IN THE KITCHEN | “lan About Town cake

fashion figure in
|EGG DISCS WITH HAM CREAM r

















































HELENE CURTIS

et IN AMER- i’S SO C©-0-O-L, SO DE-| * e 22

| 3 y has satisfied leading Beauty LuiGHTFULLY G@-O-O-L and I’m Y/ 7.

| a Cees, Salons that the Helene Curtis doing my best, you'll agree, to WLLL A OVINS
Buttert Shampoo makes hair softer, more make you really comfortable with ®

| tam iy lustrous, more manageable and [CE - EAU - DE - COLOGNE. *

} \After boiling the eggs and after|°*Tt#inly more lovely when Yes it is, Ice~Eaurde-Colonge and Over-ture

taking the théll off cut tt in washed with the Helene Curtis the original German product €

|small dises, Cut sdme bread. in Shampoo plus Egg yes, real from that famed line — 4711

| dises the same size and toast’ it.|°22! Your are invited to judge (Four-Seven-Eleven). J. A. Mar-

After toasting, butter the bread by the results. But if your hair son & Son Ltd., are exclusive

dises, Prepare a ham cream by|'S ©Xtta dry, the HELENE CUR- representatives for this liquid ice

TIS MILKY SHAMPOO restores
the vital oils, Try it and see —
from drug and dry goods stores.

mincing.some ham and adding
some white sauce to it, Put it in
| the icing bag. Put the egg discs on
toast and press the ham cream
through the bag into the egg discs
trying to give it a rose shape,

EGG TARTS
Tarts of puffed pastry.or vastry

this Iee-Eau-de-Colonge on
» at the best shops, decidedly

1 Toilet necessity.

° .

« +
101 MELLION OHICKS is a lot
of chicks for anyone’s garden.
PURINA PRODUCTS have proven
that this number of chicks grow

*

*

TAKE A DREAM AND A WISH
COME TRUE, add a_ portion of
erace amd charm and mix in a
«uartz of blue” and you have the



only HILLMAN COUPE IN
brisée ( next reci into husky egg-layers every year. onjo : lets title a)
| Boiled eggs, 2° At Jason Jones & Co.. Lid. PUR- bat it’s beeline neni
| Salmon INA LAYENA is one of a whole |). scgans in bine. grow. manson
Worcester Sauce range of Poultry Feeds, is a 32> Secens Due, grey, rasroon,
| . ; treen and black — a_ glinting
Mustard certain booster of production. joy of finery in the car world
Gelatine Remember a Purina Dealer is , ’

ind definitely the world’s most

pe ular light car. Come on in to

Ce'e’s on Monday (first thing) and

se» them and don’t be tempted,
vll buy anyway.

.

quality minded, brings his cus-

tomers quality results — and m

Barbsdos, your Purina dealer js

Jason Jones (4403).
+. *



Make some tarts with puffed
pastry about 2 inches in diameter.
be the eggs in small pieces and
the salmon. Mix them together

then add a few drops of Worcester .

sauce and English or French} FIRST AND ONLY LAUNDRY a c ,
| mustard, Mayonnaise too can be/OF ITS KIND ON THE ISLAND — FIRE! ACCIDENT! THEFT! —
used. ~-the Sanitary Laundry with its deen, I’m not imsured! This is

modern machinery and methods
produces quality-first-work. Fresh,
too, with new ideas, Sanitary
Laundry have just issued an all~
time low in wholesale price lists
for bulk laundering. With its
four depots at Pine Rd., Marhill
St., Aquatic Club Gap and St.
Lawrence, this progressive or-
ganization is ‘way ahe@ad in
pleasing and benefiting old and
new clients,

* *

FRESHNESS AND ZING at
any time of day — even in this
heat, can be yours with LIMO-
LENE. A product of the Bornn
Bay Rum Co,, it’s a tropical pick-
you-up-a n d-go. FLORALENE
TOILET WATER is a_ ladies
and if you're a new-
comer to the Island, you'll know
why as soon as you feel the cool

where you can be, in Harold |

! PASTRY BRISRE K'dney’s office in the K. R. Hunte
Flour 3 ozs. & Co, Ltd. Building, Lower
Salt Bread Street ph. 5027. Harold
Butter 2 ozs, represents the INSURANCE COM-
Water 3 tablespoonsful,
Put the flour on your pastry

beard. Make a hole in the middle

and put a pinch of salt, the butter

}and the water, Mix all the ingre-

dients together, Do not work the

dough too long. Roll it into a ball

and leave for a quarter of an

hour, When ready put it in your

small tins and bake in moderate

oven.

CUCUMBER SALAD OR
CUCUMBER HORS D’OEUVRES
Cut the cucumbers in very fine
Slices like paper. Put them in 4
bowl and put some salt over them
Leave then like that for half an
hour. Then take the slices and dry

PANY OF NORTH AMERICA
Companies, Philadelphia, offering
coverage for over 600 different
kinds of risk. Read the full
story in K. R. Hunte’s Insurance
id today, it says: “WE
EETWEEN YOU

* "





STAND
AND LOSS.”

e *

BUILT IN THE GLASGOW
PACTORY OF OLIVETTI
these remarkable OLIVETTI
TYPEWRITERS have come to
S. P. Musson Son & Co. Lid,
(seen their ad today?) and are
selling at a price to beat the
hand: 11” $260; 15” $298; 18’ $325;
beautifully put together with au-
and 45

It’s true! Here's the firm, flat-

tering support to give you a”
really dreamy figure ...to make ~
your silhouette truly fashion.
able! Discover Over-ture’s lift,
its loveliness today! [n your
favorite fabrics. .

tomatic margin setting

a = mapein, Put them in afperfection of it, Bornn’s Bay writing keys to give 90 characters Geauine Maidenform Brassi-
dish and season ‘hem with pepper,JRum Co., feature these locally and signs. You are invited to ma ee
very little salt, olive oil ear, imade Lotions at all leading stores avrange for demonstration at eres are made only inthe United
chopped parsley adding one orf— or if you care to phone, it’s your convenience — ph, 3713. States of America. cones hee
Evo ae of cream. Put the] :938. « * mi ‘ a
ish in the fridge for at least one . * * eee *
hour. Serve as hors doeuvres or} FULL CREAM MELK— a new , GLASSWARE IN ALL VARIB- Thore is a Mmarilenform ‘at
salad. shipment is here of Pasturized TIES at C. S, Pitcher & Co., now. for every type of figure.
an ENUTRICIA Dried Full Cream What a selection including Aquar-

Milk and this is something for ivms! You'll find Ovenware

(Featproof) with covers, Fruit
\D.shes, Glasses -—— here’s some-
ihing now, Frigidaire Bottles, —
' gal, and full gallon Screw Cap
Glass Jars, Coasters, Sandwich
Pilates, Ash Trays and Rose
Bowls. And, I assure you, much
more to choose from. Dial 4472
f in doubt, but it'll pay you to go
to Pitcher’s,

svery home. The distinctive Blue
and White Tins on the Grocery
Shelves are priced at $1.22 for
1% tins and $5.58 for Slbs, Nut-
vicia is a Simeon Hunt & Son
listribution and among the most
popular selling brands on the
Island. Remember your stocks at
his time of the year and order
your supply on Monday

Midday Swim

THANKS to the = agreeable
Paris habit of taking two hours
off for lunch, many office work-
ers have a midday swim on hoi
August days. At the Bains De-
ligny, near the Concorde Bridge,
oldest pool in Paris (it dates
from 1801), 1 paid 3s., plus ‘a
small tip to the woman in charge
of the changing room and after
the swim had a hot restaurant
lunch with wine for 12s,

Average number of swimmers
in August; 3,000 a day, To-day
there will probably be double
that. Théy bathe in Seine water,
filtered and strongly chlorinated
wear: Bikinis, So
many bronzed bodies strewed
the planks of the sunbathing en-
closure that it was difficult to
find a place in the sun,

The pool was reconstructed in
the last century with the burial
ship which transported the body
of Napoleon to Paris.
























WHY BUY THREE
REMEDIES
When ONE will do














in


















You can now obtain the following HEALING OIL

is an efficient remedy —{{

Externally—for cuts, spraing”
and bruises
Internally — for colds;
coughs, culic, sore throa’
and also
for your Stock as well

It’s your First-Aid Kit
Bottle



from “YOUR STATIONERS"

STANLEY GIBBONS STAMP CATALOGUE
BRITISH EMPIRE 1953 asiNiing
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and three glasses of water.
a race he drinks a glass of milk.

Johnstone went to unoccupied
France in 1940, but stayed there
He won the Grand Prix in Mar-
seiies in 1942, At Monte Carlo
he was picked up by the Italians
and interned. Liberated on the
Italian surrender, he was caught
again and imprisoned near Bel-
fort by the Germans, He escaped
and reached the Maquis with his
wife shortly before the liberation,

London Please Copy

ST. LAZARE station has a
creche for mothers travelling
with their babies. Open daily
from 6.30 a.m. to 10.30 p.m. it
has facilities for bathing, bottle-
heating and resting.

* . *

Some flats have a slate let into
the door so that visitors finding
the owners out can leave a mes-
sage.

(World Copyright Reserved)

“American-born Isadora Dun-
can founded a school of dancing
in Moscow, married Soviet poet
Sergé Essenin, died in car acci-
dent at Nice 1927.

—L.E.S,

BLINDING

HEADACHES

‘MADE HER HELPLESS

-
~e
ad

esvs

We've all seen the room that seems to smile, Gaily
patterned curtains frame the windows, and here and
there placed just right to catch the light, is a piece of
polished brass, glistening, gleaming all day long. The
floor too, sparkles with a well chosen covering that
matches the curtains, and the whole atmosphere is one
of comfort and luxury



People who

suffer from

severe head-

be interested in

ow this woman
—

brought relief
aches’ will
ing h

We can help you turn your home into such spots

of beauty with our - - - ,

LOVELY PATTERNS OF FLOOR COVERING

”

“DURAGLIT” to keep the Brass shining
“O'CEDAR POLISH” for the furniture and

linoleum.
alwa:
stomesh

—o—

THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM

Corner of Broad and Tudor Streets.

won't have to worry any more.
And that is just how Kruschen
brings swift and lasting relief—-
by cleansing the system thor-
oughly of all harmful, pain-giving
Waste.

Ask your nearest Chemis»
Stores for Kruschen,

» ’
or












PAGE EIGHT

BARBADOS ea ADVOCAT

Cis Sal Sa =e re Bg,
Printed by the Advocate Co., Lté., Bre-* 41. Bridgotewan





Sunday, August 31,1952. _

LIVESTOCK CRISIS

THE future of the livestock industry in
3arbados is causing great concern amongst
those who know most about it—the keep-
ers of livestock. Opinions vary as to the
reasons why the livstock industry faces a
isis but there is general agreement
among livestock owners that a crisis is
developing and in some instances has
already been reached.

In the statement of policy issued at the
time of the !ast general elections the Labour
Party which is now largely responsible for
governing Barbados pledged itself to in-
tensify ‘the “grow more food campaign”
which includes the rearing of livestock.”

Despite that pledge the livestock indus-
try of Barbados has reached a stage where
the keeping of livestock is becoming too
expensive to be carried on much longer.
Whatever theories may be held by others
to the contrary, .the experience of many
persons engaged in the industry is that the
rewards of keeping livestock do not justify
the expenses involved.

Pig-keepers who used to buy young pigs
to replace pigs sold for butchering are be-
coming less numerous with every pig
slaughtered.

Dairy-owners are having to give their
labour and in many cases the labour of
some members of their family free to make
any return on their capital invested in
cattle. Some dairies.run at a loss: others
are selling out. Why are these things
happening in an island administered by a
Labour Party pledged to intensify “the
“grow more food” campaign “and whose |
Governor has repeatedly spoken in favour
of increasing the production of lé¢al food’.
| No ready made answer tan be given. |

There is no doubt that the local govern.
ment is sincere when it champions a policy.
of increasing local food production. Not
only is it.committed to such a poli¢y but
the rising cost of the Port of Bridgetown
make it imperative that Barbados should
import the minimum of its food from out-
side. ve

How is it then) that despite official gov-
ernment pledges and promises the keepers
of livestock are finding it daily more dif-
ficult to continue rearing’ because
feeding costs, ape rising â„¢

ment? Nan

Since November 1950 the price of animal
feed mixed in Barbados according to a
formula prepared by Sir. John Saint and
under the supervision of one trading com-
pany in Bridgetown has risen from $5.64
per 100 Ib. bag to its present price of $10.00
per 100 lb, bag. ‘

Sir John Saint’s formula includes. seven.
different types of feed.

After pollard, coconut-meal is mixed in
greater proportions than any others. The
majority of these mixtures) come from -
Canada and South Ameri¢a, but the mineral
mixture is imported from the United King-
dom and coconut-meal is of course a by-
product of the copra industry.

The prices at which. copra products are
sold depend on the,price-paid for, copra.
This price is decided, at meetings: of the
Oils and Fats conference and it has been
rising steadily during recent years. - Since
coconut meal is. one: of .-the . major in-
gredients of Sir John Saint’s formula
(there are 40 parts of coconut meal. as.com-
pared with 50 parts of pollard) it is obvious
that any increase in’ the price paid for
copra is going to be followed by an increase

e the price of... ... Since one way traffic was instituted in
meat remains rigidly controlled by govern- “Bridgetown users of the Central Foundry

in the price paid for coconut meal. “The

prices paid for the imported. ingredients
used according to Sir John Saint’s formula
have risen with the increased ‘freight
charges which have resulted from the ex-
pensiveness of Bridgetown’s port charges,
and because of the depreciation of West
Indian currency with relation to hard cur-
rency.

Yet increases in. the price ,of coconut
meal must be held responsible for some
part of the spectacular rise in the price of
animal feed from $5.64 per 100 lb. bag to
$10.00 per 100 lb. bag over a two year
period. The frequency of the rise in price
of locally mixed animal feed is also a
matter for concern.

Between March 1950 and December 1951
the price remained stable at° $6.12 per 100
lb. bag. Between December 1951 and
February 1952 the price jumped from $8.08
per 100 lb. to $9.80 per 100 lb. bag. And
between February 1952 and April 1952
there was a further rise from $9.80 per 100
Ib. bag to $10.00 per 100 Ib. bag.

If it be argued, as it sometimes is argued
by government officials, that everything
else has almost doubled in price since 1950
then there seems no reason why the gov-
ernment should keep the price of meat con-
trolled under defence regulations made in
1939



The time has come for the keepers of

livestock to come into the open with facts
and figures if they want to convince the
government of the justice of their claims.
Beeause the government believes that it is
helping the livestock industry and sincerly
thinks that is carrying out a policy designed
to intensify the “grow more food cam-
paign.”

If it can be proved that the cost of local
balance animal feed is too high for the
quality of the feed thus supplied then the
livestock owners should agitate for the
lowering of the cost or for the encourage-
ment of imported ready mixed feed which
some livestock owners claim give better
results for only a slightly higher expendi-
ture,

If it is impossible to reduce the costs of
locally mixed animal feed then the govern-
ment must realise that the livestock owner
eannot continue to rear cattle which when
butchered will not repay the cost of rear-
ing. :

If, as is also stated by government
officials and livestock owners, the mixing
of animal feed locally breaks down because
of unofficial post-mixings in retail shops
the benefits of Sir John’s formula would
not appear to be felt island-wide.

The best way for livestock owners to con-
vinee-the government that they cannot
aake livestock rearing pay under existing
conditions is to quote figures to prove that
{ney are in fact losing money. Representa-
Ulons by the Livestock owners and by the
/ gricultural Society will obviously receive
ittention from a government pledged to
jitensify the “rearing of iivestock”: but
11¢ publication in the Press of the struggles
ci livestock owners to make livestock rear-
jag profitable will bolster those efforts and
may show the government how to prevent
the collapse of a vital industry.



FIRE STATION

_ THE site of the Central Foundry and the
the site of the former Bridgetown Railway
Station were both considered unsuitable
by the Select Committee of the Legislative
Council which reviewed the question of
finding the best site in Bridgetown for a
new Fire Station.

The reasons for rejecting both these sites
‘vere published in the Press. At first sight
‘hey appear to be very good reasons indeed.
But on closer inspection there seems to be
a case for revision of opinion,

Car Park find little difficulty in getting out
cf Bridgetown or into Bridgetown because
all traffic leaving the Central Foundry Car
Park is compelled to turn right on leaving.
“f a Fire Station were built on the Central
Foundry Car Park, a Fire Engine leaving
the Station could approach or leave the
City with a minimum delay by the simple
expedient of blowing its siren, However
dense the traffic might be at certain peak
periods of the day in the vicinity of the
Central Foundry Car Park, it seems un-
likely that any delay would be caused to a
fire engine which gave warning of its
pfesence, so long as the one way system of
traffic is practised.

With regard to the “noisiness” of the site
it is difficult to understand just what was
intended by the expression. If the sugges-
tion: was intended to convey that the
Central Foundry site would be too noisy
for firemen, how do the income tax officials
support that noise today, and how did the
Central Foundry staff and the Schooner
Pool staff support noise a few years back?

But the reasons given for deciding
against the site formerly occupied by the
Railway Station is éven less convincing.
If. the Victoria Bridge is to be rebuilt (and
plans for its rebuilding have often been
made) why should a Fire Station at the

_side of a modern spacious bridge be

described as on the wrong side? If it is
decided to build a deep water harbour on
the Bay Street side it might well prove to
be as much on the right side as Jubilee
Gardens igs now said to be on the right.

The question of a site for the Fire Station
is, obviously important. But it is less im-
portant than the decision as to the site of
the Deep Water Harbour. Before making
up their minds to banish the Fire Station
to St. Cecilia Barracks or to destroy the
beautiful Jubilee Gardens of Bridgetown
a decision ought to be taken on the ques-
tion of a deep water harbour. If a deep
water harbour is ‘built along Bay Street
then the former Railway Station would
Bridgetown. Ifa deep water harbour is
built along Fontabelle then so much land
will be reclaimed that the government will
have no difficulty in finding a suitable site
for a fire station. Meanwhile if the Fire-
risks in Bridgetown are thought to be so
perilous that they cannot be tackled by
firemen living under their present cramped
conditions, then a temporary site at the
Central Foundry or at the Railway Station
would appear more desirable than destroy-
irig Jubilee Gardens or buying private
property near Temple Yard.

SUNDAY ADVOCATE





The man who






















Sundays

I never thought [ would read it

again, but there it was in a dear

little woman’s magazine—“De-

Fae pir y ones in the
unting field, she’s still frigh

fond of horses,” gran

Gees frightfully fond of horses

Though accidents infer

‘That the horses she’s so fond of
Are not so fond of her.

For horses, they remember
As well as elephants,

And women they don’t care for
They kick them in the pants,

They throw them over hedges
And into icy pools

And laugh a bitter horse laugh
At sprawling, muddy fools,

At night time in the stables,
They’re smiling in the hay

And dreaming of the accidents
that make a horse’s day.

Verv Red Dean

ACK from China, where he
-” has been investigating allega.
tions of germ warfare, Venerabli
N. Gubbins, better known as the
Red Dean, more on account of his
high colour than his politics, was
interviewed by reporters,

After stating that he had irre-
futable proof that the United
Nations forces had dropped in-
fected insects on Chinese territory,

he was asked, “What sort of in.
sects?”

= said, oe
e@ was asked, “How man -
bottles?” 2 7a

He said, “I can’t count all the
bluebottles in China.”

“How do you know any of
them were dropped by aircraft?”

“Because some of them were
airsick.”

“If the bluebottles were infect-
ed with a disease, what was the
disease?”

“Influenza”.

“How do you know it was in-
fluenza?”

“Because many bluebottles
were sneezing.”

“Assuming the bluebottles were
infected, how did they convey,
influenza to the Chinese?”

“The Chinese eat live bluebot-
tles when they can’t get birds’
nests and boiled pekingese.”



TOO much praise will give Jack
a swollen head and Barbadians as
a group are not noted for humil-
ity. Lest they begin to gloat over
some.of the proofs of their live
social conscience when they should
be spurred on to further efforts
I am going to pull back the cur-
tain and reveal the major dis-
grace of the island—its appalling
tenantries.

Last week I have been reading
a publication of the Housing
Board dated May 1945 and deal-
ing with eight slum tenantries in
Bridgetown,

Since that date at the Pine
and Bay Estates much has been
done to improve housing conditions
in the city and its suburbs, but
T am told on good authority that
most of the appalling conditions
described in the housing survey
of eight slum tenantries in Bridge-
town still obtain to-day, And my
own casual glances down hack
alleys confirm the official view.
Some idea of the leeway to be
made up with regard to housing
can be gained from study of a
more recent survey of 39 tenan-
tries made by the Housing Board's
office in 1947.

On these tenantries which occu-
pied 332 acres in 1947 were living
27,171 perscas divided into 8,408
families.

Of the total number of houses

jutilised by these families, 3,022

were unfit for habitation and
4,357 were in need of repair or
enlargement,

It is interesting to note that of
the houses unfit for human habita-
tion more than half or 56 per cent
were owner occupied while 67%
of houses needing repair or en-
largement were also owner occu-
pied,
Of special interest too at a
period when there is a tendency
in some circles to attribute over-
crowding in houses to large
families is the fact that most of
the overcrowding recorded occurs
among families requiring only two
rooms,

Of a total number of 2450 new
houses required 11 are for houses
larger than five rooms, 34 for
houses of five rooms, 102 for
houses of 4 rooms, 588 for houses
of three rooms, 1715 for houses



Apppreciative

To the Editor, the Advocate,

SIR,—I crave the indulgence of
your widely read columns just to
let Mr. George Hunte know that
if there is anyone who surely ap-
preciates his writings and more
especially those on the histories of
social organisation, it is I.

It is a very good idea of allow-
ing the public to know something
about the background of social
organisations in the island, be-
cause there are some people who
are taken up with nearly all poli-
tics; that I am sure if they were
questioned on some of the social
| structure in our midst, they would
}be very far out. So that is why I
must lend my ‘support to. Mr

keeps Barbados
laughing on






“What do they eat them with?”

“Chopsticks.”

“Wouldn't it be difficult to eatch
and eat a live bluebottle with
chopsticks?”

“Not if it was weak with in-
fluenza,

“How are the Chinese doctors
dealing with the situation?”

“By putting them to bed and
giving them aspirin.”

“The Chinese?”

“No, the bluebottles,” said Red
Dean Gubbins, going a little red-
der as he flounced out of the room.

Talking to Yourself
“T am a great talker. If I
can’t find anybody to talk to,

I talk to myself”—

Confession to a Columnist
. SAID to the manager, I said,

I won't put up with it any
longer, I said.

“Twenty-five years I’ve worked
for you, I said, and the last rise
I got was a measly £1 a week
ten years ago.

“There you sit, I said, fat and
smug, leaning back in your swivel
chair telling me that you can't
afford another £1 a week be-
cause times are bad. They’re not
bad for you, I said, you great,
overfed slob, I said.

“But for the work I’ve done
here, I said, you couldn’t afford
to send your mentally retarded
son to the university, nor give
champagne parties to parade your
hideous daughter before the eli-
gible peerage like fat stock at a
cattle show. You'd better get her
off soon, I. said, before she gets
foot and mouth disease,

“Who are you. I said, to merry
your daughter into the peerage. I
said. Why, I said, if you hadn't
used my brains to make your
money the peerage wouldn't let
you in at the tradesmen’s en-
trance, let alone into the family,

“you common little upstart, I said

“For 25 years I’ve wanted to
give you a smack in the puss, T
said. And now I’m going to do
it. Take that, and that, and that
and that.”

* ¥
' “What did the manager say?”
asked an interested bystander,

dodging the blows.

NATHANIEL GUBBINS

a ET SAE A

“The manager said “Corney-
croft, as you have made your re-
quest in a proper and respectful
manner I will put you in charge
of another ledger at an extra 1
a week. You may go now,’ ”

Bedside Manner

R. P. T. O’FARRELL’S ad-

vice in his presidential ad-
dress to the British Medical
Association in Dublin, “that the
doctor should be quite frank and
positive in his statements - to
patients,” is fully endorsed by his
colleague, Dr. Gubbins, the Fleet-
street quack, who is notorious for
his brutal frankness.

To a patient who complained
of “a feeling of fullness” in his
stomach, Dr, Gubbins said, “Your
stomach feels full ‘because it is
overfull; and it is overfull be-
cause you're a pig.” d

*

To a_ patient who wanted a
“quick cure for a headache,” Dr,
Gubbins said: “As the quickest
cure for a headache is decapita-

tion, perhaps your butcher will
oblige.”

To another who said he couldn't
sleep, felt sick after every meal,
had floating specks before the vis-
ion, dull singing in the ears, rheu-
matism in every joint, and dign’t
think life worth living, Dr. Gub-
bins advised, “Climb to the top of
Nelson’s Monument, and throw
yourself off—that is if your rheu-
matism isn’t too bad.”

* ob *

Dr. Gubbins is equally frank
with paying patients who’ want
to discuss their imaginary trou-
bles with a psychiatrist,

A man who thought he was a
failure in life because his father
had hit him when he was a boy
was told: “If Your fathér had hit
you harder and more often you
might have been earning a lot of
money now instead of wasting it

here. That will be twenty
guineas.”
Another who said he could

make no headway socially be-
cause of “an illusion that he was
unpopular” was told: “It is no
illusion, You are unpopular. That
will be fifty guineas.”

- L.E.Ss.



Behind The

Curtain

By George Hunte

of 2 rooms and 954 single persons
required accomodaton in hostels
or flats.

The majority of families living
in tenantry houses comprise be-
tween two and four persons and
families exceeding six are every-
where in a minority. The analysis
of family sizes in Carrington
Village made in the survey dated
May 1945 is typical,

Of a total number of 3540 per-
sons, 51% were living in families
of two-four : 23% were living in
families of 4—6 : 17% were single
persons : 5% were families of
7—8; 3% were families of
9—10 and 1% were families of 1)
and over,

The idea that large families
are responsible for overcrowded
conditions and for houses being
unfit for human habitation is also
disproved by the Housing Board’s

alysis of family sizes living in
fuses unfit for habitation in Car-
rington village.

Of the total number of such
families living in houses unfit for
habitation 49% were from families
zt 2—4: 24% were single persons:

1% were families of 4—6 :34%
were families of 7—8 : 14% were
families of 9—10 and 1% were
families of 11 and over,

The squalor and unloveliness of
tenantry life is forcefully brought
into relief by the authors of the

ousing. Survey of eight slum

antriés in Bridgetown,

Cracked ceilings, water logged
broken stairs decayed woodwork
and, lack of ventilation characterise
Suttle Street, where cooking is
carried on in individual rooms
and Sepperase Ways on oil stoves
and pots and where the litter
in the street turns into sludge
after rains.

In Phillips tenantry of 485
houses containing 1671 persons,
218 were unfit for habitation and
215 in need of repair.

Chapman's Lane tenantry re-
ceived special mention because of
sanitary conditions, “Though
difficult to prove” comment the
authors of the survey" it was fair-
ly evident that many people made

Our Readers Say:



Hunte for his wise approach on
such matters.

Next, Sir, I should state that if
Mr. Hunte’s writings must be suc-
cessful, he must not only write on
vig organisations, he must remem-
ber that some of them are given
Government aid to help them on,
as well as they are attuned to
those who afe fairly wealthy and
who will also give not only fin-
ancially, but a portion of their
personal presence. But he must
also come to organisations which
have been striving without the aid
of Government, but just get help
from a few admirers of good
vauses ,and there are many of
such organisations.

Li. B. CLARKE

Slum

as little use as possible of their
latrines (the structural conditions
of which were bad) and used
empty spots and. the Emmerton
aitch. A case of a surface well
only 2 ft. 6 ins. from a pit latrine
was recorded,

The Emmerton ditch, a concrete
lined culvert passing down one
side of the tenantry flows very
slowly, particularly at high tide.
The foul water smells badly
though the culvert is brushed down
daily. In very wet weather it
floods the surrounding land. Since
only, 13. of the 345 houses in the
tenantry have water taps on the
premises no washing facilities
exist.”

Things may have changed \in
Chapman’s Lane since 1945 but
many of the comments made in
the report will surely be applica-
ble to conditions today. The
revelations of the 1945 housing
survey and the statistics compiled
in 1947 are disturbing for two
reasons.

In all these tenantries in 1947
the highest average land rent paid
was 89 cents monthly in
Folly slum area opposite Chap.
man’s Lane And the average
monthly house rent $6.76 was
highest in the same area. Rents
have probably increased consider-
ably since the analysis of 1947 was
made but wages have also risen
so that tenantry dwellers ought to
be no worse and should in many
cases be better off in 1959.

Many thousands of tenantry
dwellers are always: seeking to
move to the new government built
houses on the Bay Estate and Pine
and provide “live” proofs that
unsatisfactory conditions still
prevail in the tenantries of Bridge-
town and its suburbs, 5

If Barbadians are estimated to
be 212,000 persons to-day. it is a
sober thought that nearly one-
eighth of them live in conditions
brought to light in the Housing
Board's Survey of 1947. Plainly
none of us are giving housing the
attention it deserves.’ We must
turn over a new leaf and discover
why so many persons who can
afford to own houses live under
such dreadful conditions?

If we can find out we may be
well on the road to putting things
right, :



Education

To the Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,—It was about election
time that politicians promised the
electorate ‘better houses, better
education of children etc. Now I
understand that the Parry—Cole-
ridge School was built ‘to hold
over three hundred children, but
the school master will not take
on roll more than twe hundred
because, “provision has not been
made for additional _ pupils,”
hence, many children who have
passed the entrance examination
are not allowed to enter the
school.

ROGER WILGIAMS,













COCKTAILS AT THEIR



SUNDAY, AUGUST 31,

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SUNDAY, AUGUST 1952

ROGUES OF THE SEA;

31,



Like Houdini, Bartholomew
Portugues could get out of any-
thing. A man full of guile and as
wicked. a cut-throat as ever
reamed the seas, this Portuguese .__.

irate captain was, al] the same { —

ibued with courage, a virtue— f=
or perhaps a vice—which was-f
fairly common among the-Butcan-
eers of the period. y

The stories of th® marly times
that he tricked,“death are not
known, but one actount of how |
Bartholomew Portugues escaped
a Spanish gallows is recorded, and
I will tell it here.

The story begins with Portugues
eruising off Cuba in a small ship
carrying thirty men and four
small guns, His prey soon came
along, a great ship bound for
Havana from Maracaibo and car-
rying seventy men and twenty big

guns. +
Nothing daunted, the pirates .
attacked but were thrown back, ‘
suffering little damage, however. re
Shouting to his men, Portugues ,. iy

sprang on board the Spanish ship “

again, and fighting like maniacs

By IAN GALE



the buccaneers cut down twenty
Spaniards and took the ship.

He then steered a course for
Cape St. Anthony where he plan-
ned to do some repairs on tie ship
and take in fresh water. But he
never reached the Cape for three
large Spanish ships intercepted
him and took his ship without diffi-
culty. The pirates were stripped
of their booty, which included
some 70,000 pieces of eight, and §
made prisoners below decks.

A Storm EP

Two days after their misfortune
a ee a at ore — ae
arated the Spanish ships, the ship
with the pirates on board eventu= : BARTHOLOMEW PORTUGUES

making Campechy. Unluckily floats. en, when everyone was

ne Portugues was well known asleep he stabbed his guard and Savin rene’. Nails nd
in that city, having committed slipped overboard with his wine being unable to swim, he hunted
many robberies on the coast and jars. On reaching the shore he until he found an old’ board with
having actually escaped from a took to the woods and not daring some large nails in it, These pail
prison in Campechy before. to appear, hid himself for three he sharpened on a stone until A re

Determiried to teke no chances days, living on wild herbs, were like small knives and with

me, e mag-

Intrates decided that. it would be _ From his hiding place in a hol- nat sad r mate at
safer to leave him guarded on low tree he saw the Spaniards ann ma net meg mag hc f
board ship while they erected a searching for him, and when they .,./f¢ Was icky in finding a pirate
gibbet to Rack him the next day. eventually gave up the search he 5 up a or hie at Golpho Triste—

Bartholomew Portugues heard made his way to Golpho Triste. ae Te of ae whe had arrived a
of this and made strenuous efforts It took him a fortnight to get there. He id t before from Jamaica.
to escape during the night, Not He had nothing to eat but raw irony — his story and per-
being able to swim he-got hold of shellfish, which he found on the boat ; em to let him have a
iwo empty earthenware wine jars rocks in the sea and he carried oid ey (oe so that he
and stopped them up in such a his water supply in.a small cala- cauhite the cote. in pons gd ane
way that they cotid be used as bash. bean kept picle ane e

= In this. small boat he and his
small “crew” set out for Campechy
and arrived there eight days later.
Portugues waited until night had
fallen and then rowed quietly out
to the ship. The Spaniards on
board were taken completely by
surprise, believing the boat to be
one from the shore bringing out
contrabard goods.

They ‘vere soon overpowered
and the pirates immediately
weigheu anchor and sailed out of
the harbour.

Bartholomew Portugues was
now a happy man, A turn of for-
tune had made him rich and pow-
erful again and he was master of
the very ship in which a few
weeks before he had been prison-
er, He sat on deck and made ex-
travagant plans, in fact he had al-
ready planned another expedition,
when they approached the Isle of

. Pines on the south side of Cuba.

But fortune is fickle and in a
few hours a terrible storm blew
up and forced the proud ship on
the Jardines Rocks where she was
lost completely.

Bartholomew Portugues and his
companions managed to escape in
a canoe, in which they eventually
reached Jamaica, Fortune ,which
had protected him now forsook
him completely, however, and al-
though he continued his “career”
he was always unsuccessful.

When Will: Britain Give Fleming

By CHARLES WINTOUR

PIRATES BOARDING A



His Due?

|Has any British invention cf essence of the mould “penicillin”

brought more uni- , , after the name of the mould
real Henown to this country than if “one of the most beneficent which was “penicillium nota-
the discovery of penicillin? discoveries in the history of tym.” * |:

ingenious Medicine” Fleming himself was unable
as British scientists have been, The Smugglers to complete the concentration
most of their pioneering work The value of the drug to hu- and purification of penicillin.
has been turned quickly to account manity may be measured by the That stage of the work, with ae
for destructive ends. Radar, jet eagerness with which other coun- demonstration of its pas ag
propulsion, atomic energy—in all tries have rushed to make it. properties, ‘was carried -
these developments peaceful uses Countries already producing the some years later by a team oO}

Shrewd, daring and

aoe ried ; ; ‘ ta i ‘ity
had perforce to take second place drug in commercial quantities workers at Oxford Universit:
& dames needs, include the United States, France, under. the leadership of “ Sir

All the greater glory, therefore, Japan, Yugoslavia and Italy. A Howard Florey and Dr. Chain,

in Finally American scientists found
this a method of producing the mould
in large quantities.

attaches to penicillin, the drug new factory is being opened
whose healing and antiseptic pro- India with American aid
perties saved the lives of thous- year,

ands cf soldiers..in the last. war There is still such a demand

i at i ize

saved the lives of scores for it on the Continent that Nobel Pr ;

Wasa ef people since then. border patrols occasionally catch What recognition has Fleming
All. Benefit smugglers trying to cross the received for the epoch-making

Alps with vials of the drug. And flash of genius which detected
the Russians have paid penicillin the new drug? :
the compliment of claiming that abroad honours have

they discovered it first. poured upon him without stint.

His Honour

Of course no dispute
becoming in- about the discovery of
brought about in the Western world,
@ speedy recovery. It has been our belongs exclusively
used with success against all Alexander Fleming,
forms of blood poisoning, includ- — ;
ing venereal disease. in his research laboratory at St. dom df the city o

It has opened an-entirely new Mary's Hospital Paddington, Pro- humanitarign
field of drug production. Many fessor Fleming, as he then was,
new anti-biotics — substances noticed that bacteria which he
produced by living organisms was growing on “plates” had been
which are poisonous to bacteria contaminated
—have followed the discovery of carried
penicillins, Stteptomycin, aureo- throwin

The Whole world has benefited
from ‘penicillin. Wheye in earlier
days soldiers suffered intense pain
from infected wounds which re-
mained open for six months or
more, nicillin was able to pre-
vent e wounds
fected at all and

y Prize for medicine with Florey.
exists He was made a commander of

The hon-

to Sir Merit
Grand

and given the
Cross of
award from
number of academic distinctions.
by a mould spore street of a town

in by the air, Instead of Morocco named after him.
out the contaminated At home the prophet,

mycin, chloromycetin —all these plate Fleming spotted that this not entirely without honour, has
miracle drugs” owe the inspira~ little mould, only 1/6000th of an certainly not received his due
tion of their discovery to penicil- inch, was inhibiting, and indeed He was knighted
lin.’

* Bevan, when Minister of destroying,
. had good reason to call v



aded. Fleming named this killing

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In 1945 he shared the Nobel

penicillin the French Legion of Honour,
awarded the American Medal of
Spanish
Alfonso X.
In 1928, when he was working Apart from picking up the free-

f Verona, an
the
Variety Clubs of America and a

Fleming has even had the main
in Spanish

while

in 1944 when
the germs it had in- the significance of penicillin was





SUNDAY ADVOCATE

The planter of Barbados had
been caught in an economic sys-
tem from which there had been no

m4 escape. Had there been a system

ef free labour, the initial invest-
ment would not have been one
third as much. Sugar cane could
not be grown and manufactured
without the negro slave, and in
bad times he could not, like the
employer of labour in a manufac-
turing city, turn off his hands.
These slaves were his property,
end valuable property at that;
which had to be carried at any
cost short of ruin.

The negro slave had had at least
one great advantage over the free
factory worker of northern clim-
ates, for he was property and had
to be taken care of, clothed and
fed, while the factory worker was
just turned off and shut down, like
a machine, when hard times hit
whatever line of manufactured
goods he happened to work in.
This also applies to the difference
between the negro slave and the
white indentured servant in Bar-
bados itself, for it appears that
the negro slaves enjoyed much
better conditions on the planta-
tions than the white indentured
servants imported, more often than
not, deported from Europe. The
white servants suffered gravely, as
the right to their services was
bought and sold in much the same
as the slave was acquired, only
that their service was for a speci-
fied duration of time. This limit-
ed time of service was a great
handicap to the white indentured
servants, as it caused the planter
to have less interest in their wel-
fare than in that of the negro
slaves who were perpetual ser-
vants and therefore ‘the most use-
ful appurtenances’ of a plantation.
What mattered if the’ white servant
died, his term of service had been
purchased for a mere pittance,
and anyhow after the term ex-
pired someone else would have to
be purchased to fill his place;
while the negro was purchased at
a fair price and for life, therefore,
if the negro was ill treated, and
died, the loss was far greater than
the unfortunate white indentured
servant. In almost every case the
slave was found under far more
congenial circumstances than the
wretched European, cver whom
the planter ruled with an iron rod.
There appears to be little racial
fiction between the white inden-
tured servant and the negro slave
while both suffered the bonds of
servitude, for there are anany re-
cords of mulatto bastards born to
white indentured servant women
for the negro slave men with
whom they shared their lives.
The term ‘SLAVERY’ is taken to-
day by many people to mean only
one thing, that is the oppression
of the negro by the white owner,
it may, therefore, be a shock for
them to learn that slavery was not
confined to this class, for many
freed coloured people were them-
selves owners of slaves.

Sir Robert Schomburgh, who
visited this Island within a decade
of the emancipation, writing on
the slave period. states—

“It cannot be denied that acts
of cruelty were committed upon
the unfortunate slave-popula-
tion, but we may controvert the
general charges against the cul-
onists which were unsparingly
poured forth at that period,
What injustice would a for-
eigner commit towards the Eng-
lish nation if he were to judge

of their character from the
police reports in the daily
papers! yet such an injustice

was committed in stigmatizing,
by a sweeping charge, those
who possessed estates in the
West Indies with the cruelties
committed by a few. The ‘John
Bull’, the ‘British Mercury’, the
‘Glasgow Courier’, and occas-
ionally the ‘Quarterly Review’,
were the’ advocates of the West
Indies; and their cause was
otherwise defenced by individ-
ual talent and skill.”())
The first day of August 1838 was
ordered to be ‘As a day of Solemn
Thanksgiving, and Devout Suppli-













Bartholomew Portugues, Who Had Nine Lives
The People of Barbados XXI

By JOHN PRIDEAUX
cation to Almighty God.’ And
‘that it be duly observed in all
Churches, Chapels and other
places of Public Worship through-
but the land, as becometh a con-
siderate and Christian People.’ On
the morning of this day all classes
f people in their best clothes were
seen visiting the various Churches
and Chapels; these people were
mostly the descendants of the

frican slaves who had been im-
Ported to the Island, but there
‘were a few whites among them
At the Cathedral the Governor
and the Lieutenant General Com-
manding Her Majesty's Troops at
Barbados were in attendance. On
this auspicious occasion, His Lord-
ship, the Bishop of Barbados, Rt
Hon, William H. Coleridge, D.D.
delivered the sermon, and took for
his text the 24th verse of the 7th
chapter of the Epistle of St. Paul
to the Corinthians—“Brethren, let
every man wherein he is called
therein abide with God.”

All the people of Barbados were
surprised to see how quietly and
orderly the day passed and many
expressed their feelings with ‘we
never witnessed a more quiet and
noiseless scene than was present-
ed this morning, even in our dense
population,’ The only slight dis-
turbance recorded is when the
Band of the Militia, playing mar-
tial music, caused a temporary ex-
citement among the ‘lower orders’
whose attention is always attract-
ed by military shew and parade.’

The Editor of the ‘Barbadian
Newspaper’ comments—

“We feel aimose overwhelmed
with awe, and admiration, and
astonishment, at the wonderful
works which the mighty hand
of God has brought to ‘pass in
this quarter of the world, Ard-
ently as we have wished, we
scarcely expected to be permit-
ted to see such a change in our
civil relations. We are thank-
ful to God that we ‘have’ been
spared to see the commence-
ment of an era which must
totally change the character of

West Indian society; and will,

we doubt not, by the blessing of

an improved state of religion
and morals, and all the charac-
teristics of a well regulated

Christian community.” (2)

For a few days all went well on
the plantations, the labourers en-
joying their new freedom were
working well under the ‘located
labour’ system, but on the 8th of
August, 1838, is recorded what
must have been the very first
strike on any plantation in Bar-

bados. The labourers, mostly un-
educated people, did ne. quite
understand the new laws, and

some of them were saying that if
they entered into contracts to ful-
fil any certain type of work that
they would be making themselves |
inito slaves again; While others
were on strike for higher wages,
and these were supposed to be of
such a high demand that the
planters, who had been heavily hit
financially through emancipation,

uld ill afford to pay without en-
Midseins the fimancial position of
their estates,

This state of affairs continued
for some weeks. when a Commit-
tee consisting of Archdeacon

arry, Lieut-Colonel Maxwell, and
Mr. Joseph Garrdway, was ap-
pointed to visit the various par-
ishes, explaining to the people the
exact requirements of them and
the obligations of their former
owners to them, On one of these
occasions Lt,-Cdlonel Maxwell)
told a gathering of labourers that
the labourer in England, who was
as free as they were, were com-
pelled to work six days of the
week and only had the Sabath
day to rest, while those of Barba-
dos were only compelled to work
for five days per week on the
plantations, to fulfil their obliga-
tions to the owners of the land on
which they were living, and had
two days per week for themselves.
These speeches had effect on some
of the gangs on various plantations
who returned to work, but there
were still some who were being







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PAGE NINE

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s.irred up by agitators, and were
restless and refused to work

This Committee issued a full
report of the situation to His
Excellency the Governor, and












concludes the report with the
rollowing statement
“Our great fear is from the

influence of bad advice, given,
whether orally, or in print, to the
as yet inexperienced, and for the
most part, unlettered freemen;
but we trust that by good advice

from their real friends, and
equitable treatment from their
employers, under a just and

IT COSTS NO MORE
— PROBABLY LESS

ON SALE AT ALL
LEADING STORES

vigilant administration of the
laws , the good sense and good
feeling of the peasantry will be
enabled to resist the evil in-

fluences alluded to and _ that
they will soon become both
happier and more profitable
members of society, in the use
of that freedom which has been
so wisely and so generously
bestowed upon them.” ©
In 1840, a new franchise Act on

different lines was passed raising

the freehold qualification for
voters, and introducing new ele-
ments of qualification, The quali-
fication for membership of the
House of Assembly was also
raised

After the abolition of slavery

throughout the British Empire, a
state of slavery still continued in



the United States of America, ea ae
Even though the Atlantic Ocean
was being patrolled by different

A GREAT NAME... 1 GRAND WHISKY

GRANTS

Keotok

nationalities, who were out to sup-
press the slave trade, there were
captains of ships who ran the risk
and smuggled these unfortunate
wretches into the United States of
America, where slavery did not
end until 1863, when it ‘was
abolished by proclamation by
President Lincoln, One man who
played a great part in the abolition
of slavery in the States was Dr.
David Livingston (1813-—1873),
and who had been in South Africa
since 1841, knew of the ravages
of the slave trade, and was deter-
mined to do something about it.
He wrote that ‘sending the Gospel
to the pagans must include much
more than is suggested by the
usual picture of the missionary,
namely, a man going about with a
Bible under his arm. The develop-
ment of commerce ought especially
to be attended to Success
in this would spread the blessings
of civilization far wider than
efforts which were wholly spirtual
and educational and limited to one
small tribe,”
(To be continued)
1 ‘History of Barbados’ by Sir
Schomburgh, p. 458
2. ‘The Barbadian Newspaper
Ist 1998

3. “The Barbadian
26th 1630

Robert
August

Newspaper,’ Sept

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PAGE TEN



By WILLIAM FORRES STEWART

A Hh a i is ge

eee a a anemia

It Can Cha
Face Of Th

e karth:

Pietures by Frank Watkins





PREPARING to disgorge ite 1)
ing round the pooi.

Came a time when man ana
his spade were together faced by
obstacles above and below the
earui’s surface permitting of no
deviation from the original plan
and no Ggeparture to another area,
Came.a time, too, when these
obstacles were further aggravated
by the need of speed, not only to
be overeome but overcome within
the overal plan, itself a part of
strict schedule. So obstacles and
speed liued up against man and
kis spada and depending on the
country, conditions ang circum-
stances, the problem was solved
with the introduction of machin-
ery to a greater or lesser degreq
and as a matter of assistance to,
rather than precedence over, man
and his spade, In all parts of the
world where t-has been construc-
tively used,im. the literal sense,
the machif#Tias made possible
the near*impossible, and in the
final couht’ ébntributed mightily
to the ecredtufe comforts of man,
who, with hig spade, remains an
essential ‘in. fhe successful com-
pletion of ¢vém a machine driven
operation, Such, for instance, as
that at .Three Houses . Factory
Ltd., St. Philip, which hag Ms-
tened to the roar of the most
recent addition to the range of
excavating, caterpillar ‘tractors,
the first seen in Barbados and one
of a few throughout the British
West Indies.

by

Jointly operated Messra
Harold Manning and Sonny Edg-,
hill, this excavating tractor camé
into the Island in May of this
year. Although weighing all of
eight tons, the machine is some-
thing of-a ‘mighty mite’ and has
an overmll measurement of No
more than fourteen feet. A quick

>

tons of clay, the

change artist, this mecbeal et!
marvel can be adaptad to bul
dozing, grading etc., with com
paratively minor adjustments,

Vianager Evelyn Reece at Three
fouses Factory swept a pointing
nger over @ vast quagmire, seven
icet deep, behind his buildings.

This entire area will measure
~bout four hundred feet by a
indred feet across when finished,
od will store the cool water tor
pumping into the Factory’s con-
ensers.”” :

I asked where the water wa
coming from and he showed me
i ditch seven feet. wide by six

feet deep that ran round the outer Along the narrow, bumpy surface »

perimeter of the pool,

“This water,” he said, “was
originally two small rivers that
have their source high up in St.
John. We used the tractor to
channel this ditch and cOnnect the
streams. Over there,” he pointed
to the end of the reservoir, “we'll
control tha depth of water inside
the pool by concrete weirs.”
| looked at the huge expense and
the busy little tractor pound-
ing through the heavy clay with
\s swinging bucket tipping out a
load of one and half tons. The
bucket measures one and a half
cubie yards and has an actual
capacity load of two and a half
tons, It’s phenomenal.

To Messrs Manning and Edghill
{ remarked thet the tractor must
ave been very busy out here at
Three Houses Factory since arriv-
ing in May.

Sonny looked at me; “Since
May? Not since May, laddie. This
job’s taken three weeks to date
ejid we expect to finish it in a
cay or two.”

t
at

Traxcav tor approaches the completion of the bank-

W4 walked along the side of
ihe exeavated pool, a retaining
bank built from the dredged
joam. I looked down at the slinky
water of the seven-foot-wide
suveam and along its four-hundred
toot length. In three weeks the
tractor had extended these banks;
added three feet to their height;
lengthened the pool by all of two
hundred feet and changed the
course and made one river out of
two—all in a matter of three
weeks and a day.

1 sat
the

close to where
being completed

down
“uk was

of it came the squat, powerful
shape of the tractor, expertly;
coi trolled by the driver in his
open cabin, guiding the tracks
over the torn surface. Its great
maw filled with a ton and a half
ot sodden loam, it roared closer to
the mound of its making. The
driver pulled at a levar and the
thing seemed to open its teeth
and disgorge all over the earth.
There was a _ lightening sound
trom the diesel engine—consum-
ing a gallon and a half an hour—
ur the strain was teased with the
silling of the load, and then the
n.achine backed off, turned and
headed away for a repeat opera-
ton. It was fascinating to Watch
d a curious picture of lumber-
g@ agility and manoeuvrability,
ithin an enormous concentration
power,
Said I to Manager Reece on
c~parting; “I expect you'll use
the tractor for avening out the
tanks and surfaces,”

He shook his head; ‘No, not for
t at sort of job. For that, we'll
+oed men and spades,”

a
ir
v
oO



AT THREE HOUSES FACTORY L"’)., the original pool has been more than doubled in area with an
added 3 ft. in depth. This is the reservoir from which water is pumped to cool the Factory’s con-
densers and serves to illustrate the capabilities of the Traxcavator in the space of three weeks,



We the undermentioned
attention of our Customer
creased: —

(1) High cost «
(2) Continuall

(30) days and accounts will

after Several months c
we have no other c!
as f ist October, 1952

ar

J. N. ¢ SK
Stansfeld
Scott & Co., |
Alleyne, Arthur ¢
W. A, Medford & |
hnson & Red
e & Co., | i
Perkins & (
St t & Sampson



LFS DR OL DNEOOOEE 629606 OPE OOOO



POP@A DOGS +

a ee
>POFODDF-H9HHHOHHHHHHOHOHSHE + +

NOTICE

et

We very much regret h

Seott & ¢



2 £



cers beg to draw to the
that, owing to the in-

+oods,

rising operating expenses,

>

we will no longer be able to extend credit over thirty

be payable when rendered.

ig to take this step, but
consideration, we find
ll have te enforce same

Ltd., >
Co, Ltd,

Ltd.

DDBOL®DHOOOGHOGH DDH. OGY

j





4 99900008

$ From SATURDAY AUG. 30
To SATURDAY SEPT. 6

O40

OOOO

10%

2%

oe

5:99000O004O9OO

POD

O00



SUNDAY



1 HAVE been doing a good
deal of thinking about this sub-
ject. And this is what I want to
say: —

There is no possible doubt that
some people have a special and
remarkable power of healing
which seems to be outside the or-

dinary range of medical prac-
tite,
What has to be remembered

is that a parish priest in his
ordinary ministry often finds that
those to whom he gives the
sacraments, or with whom he
prays, do have their health re-
tored.
QUESTION ONE: Can you cite
cases to parallel those noted?
YES, only the other week my
ehaplain, the Reverend R. C.
Walls, was rung up in the middle
of the night to go to a local hos-
pital where a baby girl of seven
months was said to be dying of
bronchial pneumonia,
_He found she had been bap-
tised, so he prayed and anointed
her, asking her parents to join
‘heir faith to his own. In a week
‘hat baby was home, cured,
When I was dean of Pembroke

‘ollege there was an under-
raduate who had had | four
perations for peritonitis: “ an-

ther abscess had formed, and
he doctor said there was no hope,
I gave him Holy Communion,
nd prayed with him. Later the
‘octor told me that the young
nan’s temperature had dropped

ig

aa

ere



ADVOCATE

‘We Are To Blame That Healing!
nge The Has Moved Out Of Church Hands’







: The second member of
the “Daily Express advisory
Panel of Bishops sums up
the “Daily Express” advisory

Dr. HAROLD WYNN

Bishop of Ely
vight down. Today that boy is
himself a doctor.

You see, when a parish priest
is doing his job properly and is
a real pastor, he is praying with
his sick parishioners all the
time, And he—with the doctor
in sueh cases—is taking part in
# joint ministry.

Mind you, Christians have for
far too long failed to bring this
side of the Church's work suffi-
ciently to the attention of people.

Thus the idea has gone around
that spiritual healing takes place
only outside the Church’s minis-
try. Mea culpa: we are to blame
for this failure,

QUESTION TWO: What about
those patients who do not get
well after prayer?

AH, that bring us to the heart
of the whole business, What
really matters is not the health of
the body.

That is only incidental to the
much bigger thing—the doing of
the will of God in and through
every situation that comes our
way,

This may mean new health in
quite miraculous ways, or it may

By



THE TRAXCAVATOR changed the course of two rivers and made
them one, to flow along this prepared channel measuring 7ft. across

with a depth of 6ft.



I'll Give You A Fancy Name

For Your Headache
ARE YOU SCARED 10 SEE YOUR DOCTOR ?—No. 3

NOW, I am going to take the
risk of giving you a high-sounding
name for a pain in the head.

It is a risk—because labels for
commonplace ailments often be-
come fashionable, and then
patients stream in to consulting
‘ooms with their own diagnoses,

Slipped disc is the recent
clussic example, Once that label
‘aught on with the public any-
vwne with a twinge in the back
would arrive at the surgery and
say, almost triumphantly, “My
tise has slipped.”

Usually it was the imagination
hat had slipped.”

Now for that pain in the head
if you have one—even i! ,ou have
it. p»etty frequently—the odds are
pretty high these days that you
have a “functional headache.”

There's vou fashionub's phras
if you want it, But to a doctor,
functional heacache is one wh

not—-repeat not—caused b>
inything organic,

The Daughter

THE cause can pe found outside
the body, by frustration or hidden
worry,

‘It is important ty this series
because the very act of gettin:
secretly alarmed roout a rash
a swelling can bring,on a fv ic-
tional headache, ’

| have had such patients come
to me and say: ‘I guessed I had
so-and-so doctor, but I daren’t tell
anybody. And then the pains in





OTHER

A DOCTOR talks frankly to
those who worry in secret—
a surgery report by JAMES
LEASOR.

my head started—and I was cer-
tain.”

In the case of Miss H~—— I was
able to tell her that she was cer-
tainly wrong in her fear that she
had a brain tumour: her father
had died of one,

At nights she would lie awake,
worrying who would look after
her aged mother if anything hap~
pened to her, desperately trying
o will herself well again,

Miss H had held her problems
in for too long. She came to me at
he headache stage: violent throb-
bing headaches. Had she gone on
then other signs—a trembling of
he Bande lassitude—might have
ppeare




j 4
Yet she had nothing physically

' matter with her.

| explained all this to her and

' arranged for her mother to go

1o a nursing home while she

‘ot/’on holiday.. The headaches
Vanished.

“ew people seem to realise that
being in the head are usually not
very serious. People who worry
in s@eret about possible brain

nours, madness, and the like
usually worry in vain.

The Driver

Another cause of pains in the
head are eyes that need attention.
Well, that’s easy enough in these
days if you give the doctor a
chance to advise you,

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LPPHD DOG ODDHOPDO PO POOH PDF OP-DDHEPGO HP OPGG- KAP HHOO AO OOP DG







PPPLOOD SOP POH HOGOSD

AUGUST 31, 1952
OOO

THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LD.

White Park Road, Bridgetown

SUNDAY,





ENGINEERS, BRASS and IRON FOUNDERS

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Phone > 4546, 4650 Worksh~ p

mean accepting continued suffer-
ing with courage.

I know, for example, of two
parents whose devotion io an
imbecile chiid had been so mar-
vellous that they had come to an
understanding of the love of God
which they might never have
reached in other circumstances, .

Suffering has its place in the
world as we know it. To look
for health and pray for it, but to
accept suffering if health is not
given, is to prove that you have
got hold of something very im-
portant.

You show that you recognise
the ring of triumph lying behind
the words “Thy will be done.”
Yes, triumph, not the poor, pas-
sive fatalism which most people
think those words imply.

Wien I was vice-principal of
a Cambridge a college.
the principal, essor B. K.|4
Cc gham, who was very deaf, |
told me that he had received the
laying-on of hands, and was no
better, and_then said with a
smile: —

“I can be terribly irritable: if
I heard everything, what a trial
I might be to my friends: that
may account for it.”

QUESTION THREE: Have you

Phone 4528 Stores Dept:

Your Entire Health:

depends on proper elimination of poisonous matter,
which interferes with the natural functions of your

“DR. NEDD'S SULPHUR BITTERS”

enables your system to throw off such poisonous matter,
by increasing the action of the Stomach, Liver, Bowels,
and Kidneys, preventing the accumulation of waste
matter, aud talleving such symptoms as:—

1, so it would be i)
me to pass judgment. It is ali}
teatter for scientific examination.
Faith is not involved in it so far
as I understand.

QUESTION FOUR: How would
you explain the apparent fact
that faith is not needed in al}
cases of the cures which have
been reported?

I SEE no reason why there
should not be physical cures of
the body even if the patient has
no faith.

What I am quite sure is that
faith is needed if not only the
body but the whole personality
is to be healed.

There is no personal response
of the soul without faith, and
to that extent the healing will
have been incomplete. .I recog-
nise most profoundly the minis-
try of the doctor in all this,

Many a man I know has been
far more than a physician of the
body: there are many Christian
doctors who in the course of theic
work are conscious of help over
and above their medical skill.

They, with the parson and the}:
men and women who show
special gifts of direct healing
through their own faith, should
surely work together, all within
the loving purpose, the power
and the will of God.—L.E.S.

SICK HEADACHE, LOSS OF APPETITE, CONSTIPA-
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ae ,





WE STAND BETWEEN YOU AND LOSS

‘A challenging statement? Yet true! And serves to

Then neuralgia and fibrositis in| introduce to the Barbados Public, one of the

the neck muscles have a lot to an«
swer for. ; F

A patient of mine drove
throughout last winter with one
window broken in his car.

He noticed a slight draught at
the time—but never associated
this with the throbbing headaches
he would get when he tried to
work,

His pains stopped, though, when
he had his wirdow fixed!

‘the Colonel

One patient of mine, a real fire-~
eating colonel of the old school,
who liked his burra-pegs and his
wolf as much at 78 as he did half
a eentury ago, complained that a
foo-strenuous round gave him
headaches,

Now his headaches were caused
by him attempting too much
strenuous exercise for his age-
sardened arteries. The exertion
forced the blood through them,
ansi the artery walls were not naw
as elastic as they used to be. They
just could not deal easily with the
pressure,

Result: a pain in his head, like
a big pulse beating.

INSURANCE COMPANY OF
NORTH AMERICA
Companies, Philadelphia



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OF NORTH AMERICA Companies, makes this sugges-
tion: ‘Protect what you have,” by taking full advantage
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FIRE

The colonel took thi éasily, 7
cut down nis golf and his Gens, |
ind his headaches left nim.
know now that his prim irrita-
tion was that a friend of same

age could outdo him in exercise
and feel no ill at all.

But the colonel was wise, as you
sk be.
should —L.E.S.

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|

ie



_ SUNDAY, AUGUST 31, 1952



Armstrong First Barbados

Officer With Atom Training

CAPTAIN W. H. R. ARMSTRONG, Superintendent of

Police, who is in charge of

the 999 Emergency Telephone

System and the Radio Telephone Equipment, told the Ad-
vocate on Friday that he was the first Barbadian Officer
attending the Senior Police Officer’s Course in England to
be trained in Atomic warfare relating to civil defence.
Captain Armstrong returned to the island over the last
week-end by the S.S. Golfite,

He left here on March 14 and
arrived in England on March 23,
His first week was spent in Lon-
don where he took the opportu-
nity of visiting the Ccelonial Office
and also New Scotland Yard, At
New Scotland Yard he was taken
around the s¢veral departments,
including the special Branch
Information Department where
all the 999 calls are directed.

He said that the Metropolitan
was the first Force in the U.K.
to make use of the 999 system.
He was very impressed with the
Information Room at New Scot-
land Yard where a staff of 20 is
attached. There are also tele-
printers which connect up all
stations of the Information Room
with the Police Exchange.

He said that the Information
Room has everything pertaining
to communications. A recent in-
troduction was the International
Police Wireless which links In-
formation Room with the Head-
quarters of the Paris Police, and
the Police Forces in Belgium,
Holland, Italy. Switzerland,
Norway, Sweden and Denmark.

He said that on March 31, after
a very cold week-end in London
where it snowed very heavily, ne
left for the Police College at
Ryton-on-Dunsmore, near Coven-
try, Warwickshire. His Senior
Officer’s Course started on the
following day.

52 On Course

There were 52 Senior Officers
on the course. Many were from
Metropolitain Police. There were
also officers of Police Forces from
all over England and Wales. He
was the only West Indian Police
Officer but there were Colonial
Officers from Malaya, Kenya,
Uganda, Zanzibar and Tangan-
yika.

He said that during the ll
weeks which the course lasted,
there were lectures by many
prominent Police Officers. Other
Lectures were from Universities,
The students also visited Forensic
Science Laboratories where they
saw the latest methods of crime
investigation. They took part in
syndicate discussions and each
Senior Officer, together with two
others, prepared a research paper
on the subject given to them.

He said that these discussions
were very interesting and many
new subjects on Police matters
were introduced for discussion
among the students as a result of
the papers.

“Each student gave a lecture
for 15 minutes on a subject which
he was given to prepare and this
proved of great assistance in
that it provided proper training
in public speaking on subjects
which gave the student practic
in preparing his lecture, as in
many instances the subject of the
lecture itself had nothing to do
with Police Work,” he . said.

During the period at the Col-
lege students were given a week’s
course in atomic warfare reé-
lating to civil defence. They were
shown the latest methods’ whica

would affect the Police in civil
defence in relation to atomic
warfare.

At the College there were also
given a lecture by General Sir
Miles Dempsey on Leadership and
others by Sir Harold Scott, Com-
missioner of the Metropolitan Po-
lice and Sir Theobald Matthew,
Director of Public Prosecutions

“The Commandant and Staff
of the College all have the wel-
fare and training of the stu-
dents at heart and the College
itself is provdiing not only Eng-
lish Police, but Colonial Police
with an academy which has
proved its worth and is daily in-
creasing the knowledge of Colon-
jals and at the same time help-
ing to foster esprit-de-corps
between Police Forces in the
United Kingdom and the Com-
monwealth.” Capt. Armstrong said.

The course was interrupted on
a few occasions when they visited
various Police Forces,

Useful Visit

He said that he went to Surrey
and found this week’s visit most
useful as it gave him an oppor-
tunity of studying policing of a
county by a Force similar in size
to the Barbados Police Force. “I
consider that our Force is up to
just as high a standard as the
Surrey Police Force, except that
they are fortunate to be provided,
as is the case with most U.K.
Police Forces, with most modern
and adequate transport and radio
equipment, thus providing the
force with speed in the prevention
and detention of crime and pro-
viding Police service to the pub-
lic.”

He said that during his stay at
Surrey he had the privilege of
being instructed by the Chief
Censtable, Mr. Simpson, who is




ate

DeLuxe

th



CAPT. ARMSTRONG

the brother of Lady Shaw, wife
of Sir John Shaw, a former Gov-
ernor of Trinidad and Tobago.
He also met Sir John and Lady
Shaw both of whom were very
interested in hearing news of the
West Indies.

Capt. Armstrong returned to
London where he was attached
to the Traffic Department of the
Metropolitan Police for one week
studying modern Traffic Control,
both from the administrative side
as well as the practical street
duty and accident prevention
duty in London.

He said that he was very much
impressed with the efficiency of
that Department when it was con-
sidered that all of the office ad-
ministrative work was done by
civilians while the Police were
fonly used on actual. traffic duty
in vehicles, on motoreycles and
on foot along the streets of Lon-
don and the Metropolitan area.

He was able to study the latest
method of automatic traffic sig-
nalling and was taken to see the
traffic lights controlling traffic at
some of the busiest and most com~<
plicated junctions in the Metro-
politan area.

“T am gconvinced that traffic
lights would be a great asset to
Barbados at several junctions in
and aroun? the City of Bridge-
town,” he said.

Dog Training

After completing his traffic
attachment, he was attached to
D Department of the Metropoli-

tan Police to study Police Dog
training, at the Imber Court
training. At the Imber Court

Metropolitan Police Mounted and
Dog Training School in Surrey.
He. was shown the Police Dogs
and together with eight Consta-
bles from Trinidad and Bermuda,
who were being trained in Police
Dog Management, obtained prac-
tical experience in the training of
Police Dogs.

He witnessed demonstrations
given by some of the most famous
dogs in the Metropolitan Police,
including “Ben”, a Labrador and
“Rajah II” an Alsatian. Both of
these dogs had over 100 arrests
to their credit.

“These dogs were almost like
human beings. Their obedience,
tracking, attacking and disarm-
ing of criminals were spectacles
to see,” he said.

He said that the Metropolitan
Police had over 90 dogs on its
strength and they were stationed
in and around London. These
dogs remained at the home of
their Police Handlers who were
all Constables and performed
seven hours duty each day or
night.

Dogs Patrol Alone

“They were used principally for
patrolling London’s parks and
Royal residences and nightly the
dogs may be seen on duty by
themselves patrolling in the
grounds of Marlborough House
and Buckingham Palace.”

“They are also used for patroll-
ing together with their handlers
im lonely districts in the Metro-
politan area and while the
handler is on his beat, the dog is
going into and out of dark and
lonely alleys, strects and bombed
areas searching for people who
may be loitering with evil in-
tent.”

He said that quite recently in
Hyde Park 12 young boys were
behaving like hooligans and
wilfully smashed chairs. When
they were approached by three
Constables who were on patrol
with their dogs — one was the
famous Rajah IIl—the boys dis-
persed and ran in various direc-
tions. The dogs were sent after
them and rounded up the 12 who
were brought to the Station and
charged. It was considered that
had it not been for the dogs not

@ on page 16

5

CHAMPIONS



Church Services

ANGLICAN
ST LEONARD'S
12TH SUNDAY AFTEP TRINITY
m. Holy Communion 9 am



t & Sermon 3 pun Sunday
Sch & Bible Glasses 7 p.m. Even-
song & Sermon
METHODIST
JAMES STREET: 11 a.m. Rev. T. J
Furley 3 p.m. Sunday School Rev
G. Marshall, 7 p.m. Rev. F. Lawrence

Monday 7 p.m
Rev. G. Marshall
PAYNES BAY: 9.0
Merville, 7 p.m. Rev
WHITEHALL: 9.30
Lawrence, 7 pm. Mr

Welcome Service for

a.m Mr H
T. S. Payne
a.m Rev F
J. A. Griffith

GILL MEMORIAL: 1! p.m, Rev..G
Mershall, 7 p.m, Mr. L. D. Roach

HOLETOWN: 8.30 a.m. Mr. G. Sin-
kier. 7 p.m. Mr. V. B. St. John."

BANK HALL 330 am. Mr. G
Harper, 7 p.m. Mr. McAllister

SPEIGHTSTOWN: 11 a.m. Mr. Hiis-
bands 7 p.m Rev. T. J. Purley

Wednesday 7.30 p.m, Welcome Service
—Kev. G. Marshall

SELAH: 11 a.m. Mr. Barnett. 7 p.m.
R.M

BETHESDA: 11 a.m, Mr, Bannister.
T p.m. P.M.

BETHEL—11 a.m. Mr. I. Bilackn@n,
7 p.m. Rev. F. Lawrence

DALKEITH—11 a.m. Mr. G. Mar-
ville, 7 p.m. Mr. McAllister.

BELMONT—11 a.m. Mr = F

Broomes, B.A., 7 p.m, Mr.-V. Pilgrim.
SOUTH DISTRICT—9 am. Mr. J. Lovell,

7 p.m. Mr. St. Hill
PROVIDENCE—11 a.m Mr L
Waithe, 7 p.m. Mr. C. Forde
VAUXHALL--9 a.m Rev. K E
Towers, 7 p.m. Mrs. Furley.

COLLYMORE ROCK A.M.E. CHURCH
Exposition: Exodus IX con
Sunda; School 7.15 pen
Evongelistic Service, Community Sing-
ing. Minister — Rev. A. E. Gilkes.
THE ST. JAMES’ NATIONAL BAPTIST
ANNIVERSARY SERVICE
11 a.m. Matins and Sermon, 7.15 p.m

ll a.m
3.30 p.m

Auniversary Service from the Youth
Movement: 16th Year. Preacher for both
services the Rev, J. B. Grant L.Th.,
Minister-in-Charge.

5 p.m, Monday; Wednesday; Friday
T:aining for Youths, this will be con-
ducted by the Rev L. Bruce-Clarke

(Assistant Pastor) and Mrs. Olga Browne.

EBENEZER: 11 a.m. Revd. S. W.
Crosse, 3 p.m Concluding Session of
Weekend Conference Speaker Revd.
K, E. Towers, B.A., B.D. Sacrament
of Lord's Supper

BEULAH: 11 a.m. Mr. A
p.m. Mr. E. Callender

SHREWSBURY: 11 a.m. Mr
Miller, 7 p.m Mr. O. Brathwaite o

RICES: 11 a.m. Mr. G. Brathwaite,
7 p.m. Mr, R. Garnes

THE ST. NICHOLAS EPESCOPAL

ORTHODOX, WELCHES ROAD

11 a.m, Matins and Sermoh, preacher
Rev. Deaconess C. Barrow, 7 p.m. Even-
song and Sermon, Preacher Evangelist
Cc. A. Young

7.30 p.m, Tuesday; Evening Prayers
and Address, Preacher Rev. L. Bruce-
Clarke. The Subject will be “The Eter-
nal Election’ (2nd Timothy chapte? 1
verse 9).

THE SALVATION ARMY

LONG BAY—11 a.m. Holiness Meeting;
3 p.m. Company Meeting, 7 p.m. Salva-
tion Meeting. Snr. Major & Mrs. W.
Morris, Divisional Commander

BRIDGETOWN CENTRAL: 11
Holiness Meeting. 3 p.m Company
Meeting. 7 p.m. Salvation Meeting. Sr.
Cayvtain W. Bishop.

WELLINGTON STREET: 11 a.m. Holi-
ness Meeting. 3 p.m. Company Meeting.
7 p.m. Salvation Meeting. Sr. Major [5

Lucas, 7

4

oO. H.

a.m.

Gibbs.
CARLTON: 11 a.m. Holiness Meeting.
3 pm. Company Meeting. 7 p.m. Wel-

eome Service for Captain I. Staine.
CHECKER HALL: 11 am. Holiness

Meeting. 3 p.m. Company Meeting. u

p.m. Salvation Meeting. Lieutenant E

Cox.
OISTIN: 11 a.m. Holiness Meeting,
3 p.m, Company Meeting 7 p.m, Salva-

tror. Meeting. Lieutenant K. Gibbons.

Pix CORNER: 11 a.m, Holiness Meet~-
3 p.m, Company Meeting. 7
Sr. Major J.

-pm.

ing.
Hol-

Salvation Meeting.
lingsworth
EGOLF BAPTIST CHURCH
Tudor St. — Rev. K, P. Hansen

Sunday Morning: 9.30 a.m Sunday

School A class for every age, 10.00
a.m. Worship Service. Message -- “The
Day of Pentecost”

Sunday Evening 7.30 p.m
Service.

Monday— 7.30 p.m Baptist Young
Peoples Union. Interesting programme

Evangelistic

including Chap. 1 of continued story,
“Rock of Life.” r
Wednesday — 7.30 p.m. Praise and

Prayer Service. Speaker; Mr. Forde of

Jackson,

B.B.C. RADIO NOTES:





The Colour Bar In Britain

BBC listeners in the British
Isles have recently heard a
series of programmes in which
Wynford Vaughan Thomas has
een airing his views on sub-
jects about which he _ feels
strongly.. One of these is ‘The
Colour Bar in Britain,’ about
which Wynford Vaughan
Thomas says that he is only too
vividly conscious of the dangers
to the unity of the Common-
wealth. This programme will be
repeated for the benefit of
overseas listeners to the BBC on
Monday and Wednesday of the
coming week. The broadcast
gives Vaughan Thomas’s report
on the colour bar along with his
personal comments on the posi-
tion of coloured people in the
U.K., what form the bar takes,
how it works, and the sort of
people who operate it. Among
those who will be heard in the
programme are Learie Constan-
tine, his daughter Gloria, Milton
Prescod, a social worker from
British Guiana, Dr, Ruth Landis,
a distinguished American an-
thropologist, and Mr. N’Dem, a
Nigerian anthropologist who is
researching on the position of
the African in Britain for the
University of Edinburgh. In ad-
dition listeners will hear the
views of an English landlady, a
trade-union official, the organiser
of a boys’ club at Cardiff, a
member of the British Council
end a member of the National

Union of Students. The pro-
gramme will be on the air at
9.00 p.m on Monday, Ist. Sep-

tember and will be repeated at
4.15 p.m, on Wednesday, 3rd.
Sept. The Monday broadcast will

be in the 25 and 31 metre
bands, 11.75. and 956 mega-
cycles respectively and the
Wednesday broadcast in the 19

metre band, 15,19 megacycles.
STARS OF THE CARIBBEAN
On Saturday, 6th, Sept. the
BBC will present another in the
series of Commonwealth Variety

A Champion of Champions —

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Sch. Burma D. 58 tons for Trinidad, S.S.
Surmont 4,305 tons for St. John’s New
Brunswick. M.V. Lady Joy 46 tons for
St. Lucia. S.S. Lady Nelson 4,655 tons for

Bermuda,
SEAWELL

ARRIVALS BY B.W.LA.
ON FRIDAY
From Jamaica:
F. Brady, E. Mitchell, L,
Birch, A. Pemberton,
From Antigua;



Birch, R,

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M. Maxey, A. Koski, I. Koski, J. Don
ovan, E,. Lankford, D. Williams, M.
House, A. House, E, Bynoe, L. Alexander

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For Venezuela:

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Diehl, M. Diehl, A, Diehl, J. Diehl, J.
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For Trinidad:
ON FRIDAY

R. Wenzelman, F. Wenzelman, * Y.
Wenzelman, A, Wenzelman, C, Couva,
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MAIL NOTICE

Mails for Dominica, Antigua, Montser-
rat, Nevis and St. Kitts by the M.V
Caribbee will be closed at the General
Fost Office as under:—

Parcel Mail at 12 (noon), Registered
Mail at 2 p.m. and Ordinary Mail at 2.30
p.m. on the 2nd September, 1952.



WW
\)\\Y

programmes, this featuring a
number of West Indian artists
resident in Britain, The compere
of the programme will be Learie
Constantine who is working
among coloured seamen for the
Ministry of Labour now that
he has given up _ international
cricket and has settled in Britain.
Among the stars whom he will
introduce are the Errol Barrow
trio, Luckie Robinson of Jamai-
ca who was one of Carroll Levie’s
discoveries and now devotes
himself to music although he was
originally studying economics
after being demobilised from the

R.A.F., Margerie Few, also of
Jamaica, who has wide ex-
perience in concert work in

Britain as a classical pianist, and
Edric Connor, the famous bari-
tone from Trinidad, The broad-
cast will be given on Saturday,
6th, Sept. lasting for half an hour
and starting at 6.15 p.m. It will
be beamed to tiis area in the
25 metre band, 11,75 megacycles.
REVIEW OF ‘CARIBBEAN
VOICES’

On Sunday, 3ist. August,
Henry Swanzy, who produces the
weekly programme of West
Indian writing beamed to, the
Caribbean every Sunday, will
give another of his six-monthly
reviews of this series, ‘Caribbean
Voices.’ In the broadcast he will






speak on the contributions e
which have been used since the
last broadcast on the subject in ;
February of this year. Apart :
from the interest to successfu!
contributgrs of hearing. their

GIVES MO

work criticised, or praised, the
talk will be well worth hearing
by all those who are aware of
what contemporary writers from
the Caribbean are now «doing In
the field of literature. Mir
Swanzy’s talk will be given as
the second, half of the pro-
gramme, the first half being a
sketch by the famous Jameican
humorist, Louise Bennett,
broadcast begins at 7.15 p.m.

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PAGE TWELVE

This West Indian

By A. S. HOPKINSON





Cult

mistake we aré making at présez:t
is believing that we have already

What reached that





: f the smaller ‘communities’. There are wed that stage. We are, in
blending the fiv r six races upper middle class Jamaicans and reality, _ far from it as we could
of the West Indies into one? None upper class Grenadians and lower Possibly he






at all cording to Hitler. Every class Guianese and lower middle New Spirit

possible good, according to com- cl Dominicans. In addition to all 7
mon sense. Hitler ysuld talk of these amusing combinations, there And what, culturally spepking,
blood impurity and the suppres- are Portuguese upper middle WOuld be the advantages of the
sion of the Aryan race and the class Jamaicans, and ‘white’ lower ™€W race? Again this question can
weakening of the strain and what middle class Grenadians, and East be answered in a single brief
not. But if we look closely we Indian lower class Guianese, and Word: unity. The Indian will be
must see that there can’t be any negro lower class Dominicans. But @bile to forget that his ancestors of
sense in this argument. Hardly let us examine this division and three or four generations ago came
any of the races living in any of sub-division and isolation in one from India and that it is therefore
the countries of the world are, island, say Barbados, and in one his duty to maintain his nation-
strictly speaking, pure. What do social financial class, the middle lity, religion, habits, and culture

Wwe mean when we say the Eng-
lish race? The word ‘England’ is
a corruption of ‘Angle-land’, which
evidently marks the Nordic tribes,
the Angles, who originally came to
the island as sea-marauders, The
Saxons, closely related to them,
also came over and settled even-
tually in the east. But even before
these there were the Celts, the tall
blond blue-eyed race that Caesar
met when he came over to Britain,
the followers of Vercingetorix and
Boadicea, adherents to the reli-
gion of the Druids, the courageous
warriors who are chiefly respons-
ible for the Irishman’s traditional
temper, Then there were the Scan-
dinavian Vikings, who left no
slight trace in the island. After
them the Danes. Then William
the Conqueror’s aristocratic band
of Normans who flogged Harold at
Hastings and took over the coun-
try. During the Tudor period the
Flemish, who came over in droves
as refugees from their own coun-
try, settling in Britain and turn-
ing their talent for weaving into a
profitable business and, incident-
ally, leaving their skill with the
‘English’. And, of course, in mod-
ern times who can measure the

— such as they are — defiantly
against the influence of other races.
The Chinese will be able to forget
that his great-great-grandfather
kept a laundry in China. Indeed,
there will be no hundred per cent
Chinese or Indians at all. We will
then be free. There will be no
half severed roots tying us un-
certainly to this or that country.
There will be no absurd collection
of Fatherlandisms, conscious or
unconscious. We will all know
only one fatherland, the one in
which we were born. We will all
know, only one political destiny;



el There is the ‘white’ middle
class as opposed to the negro mid-
dle class. And there is the fair
middle class as opposed to the dark
middle class, And there is the less
fair middle class, and the light
brown middle class, and the brown
middle class, and the dark brown
middle class. All of these form
separate strata. They do not, if
humanly possible, tell each other
‘good morning’—this is especially
true of the women—far iess carry
on an intimate conversation with
each other.

Intermarriage is, of course, for
the most part, out of the question,
They travel around in cliques, like
schools of fish. At dances they sit
around the walls.of the dance floor
in separate circles, getting up only
to go to the bar together or dance
with each other, and returning to
the precise area of the floor that
they left. Now seeing that this
condition obtains in all the differ-
ent islands to a greater or lesser
extent, we are tempted to con-
iernn the overconfident politicians,
‘nation mongers’, and ‘culture
maniacs’ as either grossly stupid
or unforgivably ignorant of social

Erected At

be situated in the Chelston
Road.

influx of races into England and facts.

say exactly by Pow ae be B.G. Approaches The New

new wave affect the already 1 7
promiscuous blood mixture? When Type Beckles Hill.

we talk of the ‘English’ race we
are including all these. And, con-
sidering their remarkable achieve-
ments in the past, particularly in
soldiering, sailoring, and literature,
no sane man can do otherwise than
throw the whole Hitlerian theory
of race overboard. To talk of an
American race would be absurd;
modern America represents every
race and physical type in the

Members agreed that this stand-
S pipe, in its present position, is
~ unsuitable as people have to stand
on the road when drawing water.
The proposed position will bring
it nearer to the majority of people
‘hose places where there are many Who draw water from it and at the
"aces and where they are éniscon same time remove it from the
and mellowed inte a fairly char publie highway.

acteristic type, Briti ‘
taience yee ritish Guiana, for The Manager also submitted a

To be gure, t
in the Caribbe;
fication of th
quite so noti
really there

here are some area
an where this strati
population is not
Sera though it is
even if it is f -
ing. But this is true presbeiy ic

n n 7 most of the com: the re-developed

oe > pke teins eee i in ae world, Thee, ant Bay tutnie which showed electric
e can turn only to Ja : ’ orthern ur : .

perhaps, China for blood purity. less Nordic) ‘ea ined a lights, hydrants, standpipes, etc,

Southern Europeans (like the iy a en sane ae

Portuguese), There is the Indi: ¢
‘ype, and the negro type and the ~
Mongolian type (Chinese), and the

will
milies,

How We Are Divided
A new West Indian race is the
sole way to national wnity. And

accommodate 1,265

y oe The Board postpotied the ques-
it is a certain way. Mere political /\0!ginal Indian type. And what tion of the sale of « small trian-
federation or customs union would 75 5? important about this all is

gular area of land at Chelston to
Mr, Brooks of Chelston Lime
Work and discussed at length the
question of the selling of large
gesting a a the oe, of
there is’ a mo: ridgetown, connection,
‘aH Canat te ri Pationatio’ further discussion will take place
—attitude amo them than *¢ the next meeting. :

among the Barbadians. They have,
for the most part, bridged the mul-
litudinous gaps between the races
and the colours. This is perha

that the tendency to mix and inter-
marry 1s strong enough to make it
possible for only a small portion
of the population to claim to be
pure anything, Consequenjly,

accomplish nothing. What mat-
ters is the spirit, not the form, It
is not until we can look at our
fellows in the various islands as
belonging to much the same phy-
sical type as ourselves that we
can begin talking of ‘nationality.’
And it is not until we can talk of
nationality that we can dream of.
‘culture’, Culture is not academic
exercises; it is the expression of
the life attitude of a pecple, And
the idea of a people implies union.
Our politicians realise this, but
they have got Hold of the stick at
the, wrong end. They want to
make sure of the legal form with-
out thinking about the real atti-
tude at all. At present we are
more fragmentarily divided than
the bits of a broken drinking glass.
Not only are we all separated into
Trinidadians, and Jamaicans, St.
Lucians and Vincentians, Guian.
ese and Hondurians, Antiguans and
Barbadians, but class restrictions
and isolations cut us up into even

Consideration of the question of
tunning a co-operative shop at
the Pine Estate was postponed.
Why the British Guianese are the The Board considered the esti-
most militantly individualistie Mates. for the financial year
group in the whole Caribbean, 1953-54 but this matter was also
They fight shy of federation be. Postponed until its next meeting.
cause of some vague consciousness A meeting will be fixed shortly
of a ‘continental’ destiny, But this to deal with these matters.
only goes as an éxample of the
unity among: a people that is no
longer distinctly stratified accord-
ing to the — . an ae ae,
ist’s hand-book. If much the same {''"\'* 3
could be accomplished in all the °P°* Wht no words can utter.
West Indian islands, only the in- ‘The office ot, poetry if not fener” us
sular barriers will remain to be t!nk accurately, but feel. truly
broken down, The super-confident TENCE E |W. | Reweknnes

By jimmy Hatlo
LOOK AT HEM PUTTING. Gi
ON AIRG “WATERING THE ~“<
LAWN, NO LESS--I REMEMBER
WHEN IT WAS A JOB TO MAKE
HIM TAKE A BATH==++



Gem For To-day









it



SEE US*-L DON'T
WANT THEM TO
THINK WE WERE



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American Doctor’s Discov foo sey that the Vi-Tobs
Strengthens Blood, Nerves, for thea who are old
Body, Memory, Brain, Mus- downs and “Worneei
cles, and Endurance—Better i

Than Gland Operations.

. Worn-out
TA
Thanks to the discovery of an rican

SPECIAL €






Doctor, it is now ible for ¢. who
feel promaturoly ‘ old, Run ne

‘orn-out. to experience °
Youthful Vigour, ‘Ambition, ane Vitality followed’ ey" tenewed ene
This great eeever? whieh & simple Dr. TA. Bit ergy and ambition, par-
home treatment can be secretly » Biles Geuterly graulyh °
by anyone, quickly brings a su of vi- | men and women in middle or older
tality and an ebility to enjoy the pleasures | And a widely known Italian doctor,
+t lo iooger Mt necessary for you to suffer out Frail and Bhsunten dies sorely era
from Loss ‘of Vigour and Manhood. Weak y t ieee balden Tee

influence
hich works its splendid

loon Pande, Netves and
petite, briny ater
ak, nervous,

the established system buildin
Memory and Body, Nervousness, Impure | of this formu!
Blood, Sickly Skin, Depression and Poor
Sleep. Instead you merely take this simple
home treatment a few days and you will
find that your vigour is red. No mat-
ter what your age, you will find that your
gland activity and a Fve force is increased
and vesvored. yea % find youthful ph si
cal power legave which builds
rich, pure blood and erally makes your
ingle with new ene! and vitality
This simple ¢ treatment ts in pleasant
easy-to-take tablet form ds
who have used it say that I is far better
than any otber method.

Works in 24 Hours

effects upon
liver—improve:
strength to
people.”

Guaranteed To Work

Vi-Tobs are not an experiment. This
simple home treatment, which can be used
with absolute secrecy, is the prescription
of an Ame: di Tt is amazingly
successful and is givmg new youth, vital-
ity, and energy to millions in America Be-
cause of its remarkable success, Vi-Tobe
are now distributed by chemists here un-

GENTS’ STANDARD BL




| der @ guarantee of comp! tisfac RACERS
This new medical dispovery. Known as | 5 peubaree satistaction
f sted b ti ‘or this reason you should not experiment
YicTone, bey bee rae ae omen st with Questionable drugs which may be CARRIERS

drastic and irritati: the delicate gland
and nervous system. Vi-Tobs not only have
proved their sterling worth by helping
millions of sufferers, but are guaranteed in
your own particular case Put Vi-Tebs to
the test. See for yourself how much young-
er, stronger, and more vigourous you can
feel with this doctor's prescription. Vi-
Tabs must bring y @ new feeling of en-

seem almost miraculous. It
obstinate cases that h
treatment. 1t has rescued the
premature old age‘ and debi!
made older men as ¢
brought happiness beyond all price to thou-
sands who believed that they were old,
worn-out, and finished with the ies o |
ife And the beauty of this re

Hey Fe tine

ood as new. It has
0








markable discovery is that | ey. and vitality, and be entirely satistac-
it brings results so | ‘ory oF you simply return the empty pack-
p quickly In 24 hours | “8° 8nd it costs nothing under the guare

antee You are the sole judge of your own
satisfaction. A_ special jouble-strength
bottle of 48 Vi-Tobs costs little, and lasts

you Can sge and feel |
tremendous im-|
provement and within |

? one week it will literal- } eight days. As the guarantee fully protects No. 16 Swan St.
ly make you s new man | YOU, you should get your treatment imme-
diately so that you too will know what St fs

o @ to feet 10 to 20
V T b years. younger
i-Tabs :

4 full of vigour
id vitalit
Restores Manhood and Vitality

i Vi-Tabs
Wy) Doctors Praise

Was
Doctors in Amerien and
- is meng other evuntrics



3 More Standpipes To Be —

The Housing Board at their meeting yesterday agreed
with the recommendation of the Managing Secretary that
three more standpipes be erected at the Bay Estate. Two will

The Board also agreed with the recommendation that
an existing standpipe which is situated along the wall of
St. Michael’s Almshouse, be removed to First Avenue,

Virtue and genuine graces in thetiselvé’ yentor of the mines which blew

CYCLING AT ITS BEST

GENTS’ STANDARD GREEN

OBTAINABLE AT

BARBADOS HARDWARE CO. LTD.

(THE HOUSE FOR BARGAINS)

RIDE A PHILLIPS SUPREME MODEL AND ENJOY

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

ure—5

the destiny of the West Indies. We
will all be soldiers, whether sol-|
diers with the pen or soldiers from |
the platform, or soldiers with the
rifle. But we will be fighting for |
4 eountry and its ambitions, not}
merely for a transplanted race
which, uncertain of the future of |
the land in which it finds itself,
and conscious only of a vague
memory of the traditions of a
country that it has left behind by
many generations, clings to the
Fatherland because it has a more
definite claim upon its affections,
These attitudes will be co-ordin-
ated into a common national life
attitude which will be the basis
and i ration of our literature,
our music, our painting, our sculp-












































A BLESSING TO
MOTHERS!

JACK and JILL
COUGH SYRUP

With Vitamin C
STOPS KIDDIES

COUGHS & COLDS
In a Jiffy

;



— AND TASTES SO GOOD THEY BEG FOR MORE!

Mothers, you'll
for little folks,

bless the day this amazing cough syrup, made especially
eame down from Canada to save kiddies—your kiddies

menace of coughs and ids that hang on and to
ture, our philosophy, our politics, dangerous complications. With JACK and JILL these nasty. sniffy
our statesmanship, and our sol- colds and bad .

go faster than you woe “yer possib
diery, We will make Shakespeare ee ee E Agari

and Wagner and Nietzsche and
Rembrandt yield first place in our
affection to our own mental ‘
I know quite well that internation-
alism is wiser than nationalism,
but you must be a nationalist be-
foré you become an international-
ist, which is simply saying that you
must learn to creep very well be-
fore you try to walk.

IT’S NEW, DIFFERENT SAFE
JACK and JILL is new but thoroughly tested in thousands of cases
and is guaranteed to relieve kiddies’ coughs and colds faster than
and most important of all JACK

anything you have ever tried,
and JILL is SAFE for the tiniest toddler.

Another famous Buckley Product

JACK and JILL is a product of the famous Buckley Laboratories
that gavé you Buckley’s Mixture, Canada’s largest selling cough and

‘, and is as fast and effective for kiddies’ colds as Buckley's
Mixture for your own. Get a bottle of JACK and JILL TODAY
and. have it handy.



KLIM is ideal for infant feeding—it’s always
pure; safe and uniformly nourishing. KLIM sup
plies the important food essentials needed for
babies to gtow strong and healthy. And KLIM is
readily digested—another important feature.

» Above all, KLIM is dependable. It’s not sarpris-
ing that so many Mothers prefer it!

Bay Estate
1. KLIM is pure, safe milk
area and the other at Beckles 2. KLIM keeps without refrigeration

3. KLIM quality is atways uniform
4. KLIM is excellent for growing children



5. KLIM adds nourishment to cooked dishes

When Will Britain
Give Fleming
His Due?

@ From 9
first appreciated. Since then
received

KLIM Is RECOMMENDED FOR INFANT FEEDING!










, @
7. KLIM Is safe in the specially-packed tin

8. KLIM Is produced under strictest control

scientific and ie:
He had been given the freedom
of Paddington, where he works,
and of Chelsea, where he lives.
But nothing further had come
his Way from thé British Gov-
ernment.

Surely this is a churlish way
fo treat a great man. Fleming
and his colleagues, in accordance
with the usual British practice,
néver patented their healing dis-
coveries, The result was that al-
though the basic facts about
penicillin had been given free to
the world this country has had
fo pay dollars in royalties to
American firms for the right to
use their technique of commer-
cial manufacture; As Fleming
himself has wryly commented
“It seems a pity we should have
to.pay for what is our own.”

Vast sums nave oeen given to
British inventors for wartime
researches. Sir Frank Whittle
was given £100,000 for his work
on jet propulsion. Sir Robert
Watson Watt received £50,000
for his work on radar, The in-

CALL IN AND SELECT
YOUR MASTER

PADLOCKS

FROM

PLANTATIONS LTD.







KLIM “; MILK

OIRST IN PREFERENCE THE WORLD OVEB

up the German dams was given
£10,000. But Fleming, like other
doctors, has been given nothing.

Explaining the Government's
golicy in 1944, Mr. Attlee, then

e Lord President of the Coun-
cil, said that any system of
financial rewards, even if desir-
able, could not be administered
equitably in practice. The Gov-
ernment supported medical re-
search in Ss, and did not
offer payment by. results,

But why should it be possible
to admifister a system of re-
wards for radar research, surely
a tremendously complicated field,
‘while it is not though possible tu
make payments for a medical

AGAIN! .

i

discovery about which there is
dispute?
It’s Time
Since successive British Gov-

ernments seem determined not
to pay out any money for one
of the greatest medical discover-
ies of the century, then surely
they should have been spurred
on to give higher recognition to
Sir Alexander Fleming in other
ways, Other doctors, with less
to distinguish them, have been
made peers. Other scientists have
received the Order of Merit.

It would be a graceful gesture
Yor Coronation Year if Fleming,
one of the Queen’s most illus-
trious subjects, was at last given
the recognition which the im-
portanee of his discovery war-
rants. This modest genius should
have to wait no longer for hid
just reward.-

(World Copyright Reserved)

*

(By Cable)

GRAN PRIX SWITZERLAND

ASH OFFER ,
a Zs First. TAURFFI driving PERRARI

>

aoe...

MoToR oll

LEADERSHIP IN LUBRICATION

Phone 2109, 4406, 3534





og. 3A TTS
7 ee ee ence Toe ee TS ee ee ge ee ee







SUNDAY, AUGUST 31, 1952 SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAGE THIRTEEN
-—$— cnieaitiiensasepeseiibagenetilentee

HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON



@.

g 1S.
the

By Appointment
Gin Distillers

to the Late
King George VI

ye.




FLINT OF THE FLYING SQUAD.... BY ALAN STRANKS .& GEORGE DAVIES
























PA JONGS'S!,. FHAT'S OUR ~ (Vik 60 70 Ra JONGS'S/
' TURNE =D IN ANY THING ASIATIC PFUEND WHO FIUNS TONIGHT AS A
jON TOADY LEECH'S






THE ‘ADE ROOM!











CUSTOMER...
[aacxcmouNns> ISN'T IT? CHOP SUEY AND a5 \ KNOW me.
WORKING 2¢ A BEBOP DIVES ROUNDS |)39 8 I) |
LONDON... -—— | ss Ye IF YOU'RE i



ah GOING UNOER

YOU MIGHT COVER, FLINT,

+ GET A LEAD ony
TOLDY'S ASSOCIATES
FAOM THAT SOURCE.)

{ KITCHEN PORTER
aT Pa JONGG'S

Gordons

Stands Sujoreme

BY CHIC YOUNG














ea eS SSNS) STITT - : THE COLGATE WAY
Per: Cees eves Ten Saaren

i Sere re wa AND WHO at aly 9 I HOME DENTAL CARE
es SS COLGATE
[ IP OseER) => Ss

Â¥CLEANS YOUR TEETH INC
Â¥CLEANS YOUR BREATH /( NZ
aN) es Always brush your teeth

Â¥ HELPS PREVENT DECAY UE right after eating with ,
COLGATE DENTAL CREAM



FLASH GORDON THE WONDER BOOK OF HOW IT’S DONE











I SWIPED... ER, TOOK TWO HEAT GUNS
AND SET OUT TO FIND POR MYSELF/
BuT L /COT LOST IN THIS CRAZY
PLACE / BOY — WHAT A PLANET Lo
GIVES YA THE WILLIES! WHY,
JUST THIS MORNING, 1...

... AFTER WE LANDED HERE, TEX, KENT
AND DALE WANTED TO MAKE ALL KINDS
OF GOOFY PREPARATIONS BEFORE
STARTING THE SEARCH FOR MY FATHER!

ath » AGAIN! I'VE BEEN

ty pees HEARING THAT FUNNY
Bee 7 WAIL ALL MORNING...

* 3 ND IT DOESN'T SOUND

Most of us take too much for granted, We do not bother very

: OO ree! THERE =




much about how the necessities, luxuries and amenities of life



BUT WHO WANTED TO WAIT FOR THEM?S

a
eS
bz

are provided, so long as we receive them when we want them.
But supposing we are suddenly called upon to make and do

for ourselves, What then?

How would you organise the delivery of millions of letters
or the production of a daiiy newspaper, or the feeding
arrangements for great city like London?

This fascinating volume, packed with hundreds of inter-
esting pictures, will open your eyes to the many processes

involved in the creation of all kinds of everyday goods and



services. li also shows how many adventurous and far from

everyday tasks are performed.








BUT BULLETS MOVE
FASTER THA AN EITHER }#







WE MGHT CoTRLN
JUNIOR THERE ...GUT
NOT THAT TRAIN /

ke! | _ SS ihe . z : F a a. ol 4 iat ee AD | zi oe oh ’
lhe al , : \f-
é Te > io Se = ii
H oe PARDON ME- M2 =m ||
5oaR’S 5 LOCKED 50 | } VIGGS - BUT I HAVE | | H |] _ THROUGH THE om |
THAT NEW BUTLER Yl @iy |i /hi Lor SOMETHING FOR } |] ._ -AFRANS SOM = Sle
{| | fEH pret } i | ers : | b\ \ : > 4
SO HE'S GONE TO BUCKAROO
PAGAN Lee AGAIN!

ON SALE AT THE = ADVOCATE STATIONERY





eS

SANG NNN NG NG NS NG NUS NU NNN NN NN NS ENE NW



ADVOCATE
CHRISTMAS CARD
COMPETITION

This year the ‘Advocate’ is running
a Christmas Card Competition, the
results of which will be published in
the Christmas number.

Competitors should note the follow-
ing points :—~












WON'T COME IN AN! YOU - - OPEN
ANNOY ME inane i THE DOOR!




The competition is open to all read-
ers of the ‘Advocate’ and cards can
be of any size or shape,

Cards can be made by any process
—painting, drawing, photographic,
etc,



A competitor can enter any num-
ber of cards, but all cards must be
original work,

Preference will be given to cards
with a Barbadian or West Indian
flavour and to novelty cards,

The judging will be done by a
judging committee which will in-
clude the Editor. Their decision will
be final.

Prizes will be as foilows: First—
$40.00; Second—$20.00; Third—$10.00;

and two consolation prizes of $5.00
each.



A selection of the cards will be dis-
played at the ‘Advocate’ Stationery
and later at the Barbados Museum.

The closing date for the competi-
tion is 4.00 p.m. on October 3ist; but
competitors can start sending in their
entries now.

All cards should be addressed to
the Editor, The Advocate, Bridge-
town,





THESE JEWELS
SO CLOSE +«





| MORNING | i
WHEN THE





MADRS DN INNINGS NN NIN IN EDN PON DN ARON

is
\ ERR DN DS DDS DN DS DADS DS BE DS DS PRPS DN DN DN DN BR DN NN DRS 8 LE DR GR DR DM DN DN SN GD ON A DN GN DREN BN INAS

x



= ye 7 Feepy | [oN ae TE |
MOMMY, ME AND JERRY, f BELIEVE J ERRY WH 1EN HE }
| yr DARLINGS | | SA ID THE MEN KIDNAPPED BOE 2, NO {
fi BACK == Fa | HIM. 181 GOES To SHOW, NEN ER
_ i-’ | Yi DOUBT A - Fe
see Aa = “| | CHILD J a2
a N24] ada
> WY, rhe 2 £5) tg 4.







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zz

SOUS > ge i Fy a as i a ll el ieee ie Dee la


















































































sed's illness and also for the
many and various expressions of sym-
pathy tendered thém in their bereaye-
ment
I Reginald Hunt, Lottie and Iris Hunt,
Ciyde Hunt, Enid and Roy Hunt, Nurse
Hunt, Hazel Sealy; Millicent Tappin.

PAGE FOURTEEN SUNDAY ADVOCATE
aomncremneninemanee é
> ’ ~
CLASSIFIE PUBLIC SALES GOVERNMENT N@TICES
Al * - .
TELEPHONE 2508 REAL ESTATE
ALL THAT cx Dwellinghoure \
DIED , ek “Sep ts ee FOR SALE
ALLEYNE—On Aug 30 1952, at her FOR SALE fue wean a be ae ‘ Seer ee
resiience Kew Land, " Promenade cement |inoved on or betgre ‘the Btn day of With regard to the following notice which was published in the
} September é é i 5
er funeral will leave t AUTOMOTIVE ee oe erly wc to on tpress it is notified for general information that the closing date for
bove Jence at 4.2 7m. to-day . >
for tte Shaeiture “Gommates “| CAR—One 8 Bp. Austin Car; one] G ies aq Hoo? land wk Juncs lana, {ihe Teceipt of tenders referred to in paragtaph 3 of the notice has
. model B. FP. Ford, Phone 5062 C, R a ee : ee er r i ‘
Claudine and Leon Archer Replewhaite, Lalas. Wolly 29.8.53-9n | Lower Westbury Rowd next to Mr, Ponti- been extended antil the 15th of September, 1952 :— f
Anita Miller (daughte [iam The some had a waser well and “Tenders are invited for the condemned Tug and Water Boat
: Leon, Alexander, Douglas, | CAR—One (1) Vauxhall Wywern Car. ]"* 2° End Shot ee eer “Ida”
Robert, Velda, Noel, Verne and] Phone 3861 31. 8.52—In Pe NE ee ..
Louis igrand-children) Hoe ogre ona - a 5 oe i ee “Length 76’, Beam 16’, Draught 8 6” — #30 B.H.P., Coal burning
-_ © -One (1) Vauxhall Wyvern Car , es z * oe aie » . " .
BELLAMY—Marthi 83,|27,000. New battery, new tyres. Cole coy / ACen la fe Aa oo cylinder reciprocating engine.
i 4 a Te. Co... 14g _ 8.5220} feet — fine view overlooking the sca — “Tenders should be forwarded in sealefl envelopes addressed to
a ihe above vesidence this] CARS—Morris Miner 2 Door Saloun] “open! building site | | | Ite Colonial Secretary (and not to any officer by name) so as to reach
° : st . a- > mile Ake ” 1s o ooo : area Sa
evening at 4.80 o'clock for St. Barna-| 1-400 Guloon 11000 miles. Eaeccliont con. [Bele Hall. Dial 2047, R. Archer Me|the Colonial Secretary’s Office not ‘later than 4 ‘p.m; on Friday the
bas ur a ‘ len : , Hictoria Stre
Friends are asked to attend d:uon. Fort Royal Garage Ltd. Tele-|*°?2i¢ Victoria Street 20.8.52e3n | 5th of August, 1952, The envelope showld be clearly marked—
The Bellamy Family phone 4504 “1, 8.52—dn * “Tender for Ida”
31.8.52 -— — omnia ’
- - ‘ (1) Property at Junction of St, Matthi- :
intuiifti_piniittinntiimaii—ez_ mn t CARI Yaual Weve. Sasi. # : ee “The sale of craft ‘onditional removal from the
CHEESFEMAN—On the 20th. August 195/] lent condition. Owner driven, no rens-[°o &9P. and re ee on . eat me wal bere -On its al
Florence Albertha Cheeseman (89). able offer refused. Apply Williams |} 1 hall presently cou. | ~areenage within such period of time as sha be decided upon by
The neral leaves her late residence | Court, Opposite Sayescourt Gov't m eoviielar i
Crumys 1 Street, St. Michael, at 4H ) Ch. or Sealy’s “iarage, "Bay St. vteaiae on app itera y $1000 sa," or costed = Shipping nae
this evening for the West bury Ceme.f 31.8,52—In. J ""(2) One upstairs property of Govern-} Further information is obtainable from the Harbour ang Ship-
Jon. Brathwaite \Sons), Heler | CAR—Damaged Vauxhall 10, No.J7cnt Hill, standing on approximately | ping Master. .
Mason) Siste: 4—2140. Can be viewed at Mr. Crafg's|” + j “The Government does not bind itself accept the highest
a id tarage, Roebuck St. Offers in sealed] poy oneal, Property, st Civilian Ra, at En MARIE to, eas or
E Her funeral wi take} :nvelopes to K,. RB. C. Foster, R. M. Piand a s any tender.
the Westbury Cemetery at] Jones & Co., Ltd., by 6.9.52. + 2.
deh this eeuoleg” ‘wheee 7 - y 69 30. 8.$2—-2n ee Due property (stone) at Water St., 31.8.5 2n.
e asked to attend —_—______- eho i ty a ‘ papel " ——, of Whe
ile, Mackie Seale, Enyth Cae nengee Ford Prefect, No wat Stensikaten Mew Noa pe SIS oa .
velyn Seale —247, Can be viewed at Messrs, Mc , artic nae . RDERS
31.8.52 | Enearney’s Garage Offers in sealed} < cues aes oer - Pea PART ONE oO
nnn p nvelopes to KR. C. Foster, Ro M = f ‘ ot Py,
WILLIAMS—Rebecca (better known a ones & Co,, Ltd., by 6.9.52. x ca , Major 0. F. GC. WAI©OTT, E.D.
Widow’). Her funeral will leave her $0.8.Stri' | CBee maken kine wine ete , Cnt”
daughter's tesidence, Walker's Val- ley, seorge, for St. George's Par- CAR—Damaged Studebaker car No. pine Hill, St. Michael. : Issue No, 31. 2 Aus. @
ish’ Church at 4.30 o'clock this} 9—125. Can be viewed at Messrs The house contains Drawing and Din-
evening MeEnearney’s Garage. Offers in sealed]ipg rooms, 3 Bedrooms (one with run-|!- HARADES
Mrs. Evelyn Birkett (daughter: [| -nvelopes to K. R. V. Foster, R. M.| ing water) breakfast rooms, Kitchen- All ranks will parade at Regt. H.Q. ‘at 1706 hours on Thu 4 Sept. 52.
Gladstone Gill (grandson}, Joseph} Jones & Co., Ltd. P.O. Box 241, by} ite, usual conveniences. Garage and Coys will continue their tra’ with a view to fi the A.M.C.
Birkett (son-in-law) ek 6.9.52 30.8.52—2n } ...vants’ rooms. Electricity installed. a ee oe their Coy ey Min bor ane 6 oe nee
Jae 7 a. oe ae The above property will be set up for a miniature ranges. “B’ ‘ay .M.C.
| CCAR—Vauxhall 14 HP. in perfect] je by Public competition at our Office} | Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays of eneh week wef 1 Sept. 52. Ali ranks
THANKS eee order. 1947 model. Apply 20.) tumes Street on Friday 12th September of “B" Coy who have not yet been allotted @ time to fire should get in tovich
CLINTON--We the undersignea beg tc} “8” Street ial 4559 or 84 _ay, | 1952 at 2 p.m. with the R.S.M. as soon as possible, ‘
return thanks to all those in sympathy 29.8.52—3n spection by appointment. Dial 2650.]2. SAFETY INS-—OPEN RAN!
t wreaths, cards, or attended the : “7 rer YEARWOOD & BOYCE, Officers who have not yet received and signed for a copy of Range Standing
° y Mr CAR—Hillman Minx—Excellent condi Solicitors. Orders should apply at H.Q. before they undertake’ the duties of Range
neral of our dear beloved mother off |... owner driven, done only 13,000 miles Omi
» Land, Tudor Bridge, St, Michael § 2°". : Soe 27.8 .52-—10n cer ‘ ;
ST ee ce eae cunt Zand sos2 gcentact — Edwin Mayhew, Gitten: § ———————— —____—_____ ORDERLY OFFICER AND ORDERLY SERJFANT FOR WEEK ENDING
Maseoll’s, Clinton's and Seales’ (family) roney & Co., Ltd., Palmetto St. (Phone | CLARENDON—Black Rock, St, Michael, 8 SEPT. 82.
41.8 52—in.§ *94)- 27.86.52-—t.f.n. | opposite St. Stephen's Chureh. Standing QuEe, Soe ut. A..H. Clatke
+s ab chbalian.” inaas meh 2 1 acre of land. Laid out fon woos jeant Sjt. Williams, E.D.
N AN y Y GREEN beg Rae s a oing | tairy Farm or Residence Possibilities * SKEWES-CO’
1 Chante ait thay Solan, rathers. Gard Pg Apply Skeete, Office 4277, home] ‘cr Mortgage can be arranged. Apply: = S.0.L. .. Fatat
and telegrams, sympathised with them] ‘" 30.8.52—-In]L, N, Hutchinson or Dial ag: cana! The Barbados ;
in their recent bereavement, -8.52—Tn. | PAST ORDERS
a . | THE BARBADOS REGIMENT N
ae ELECTRICAL Offers will ‘be reeéived in wating _ THE BARB. ME . SERIAL NO. 28
LEWITT—We the undersigned beg to re-] — ——— —________—____ J 4 p.m. Tuesday, 16th, Septem | x
t . ‘or the servants room at Glendale, (Resi-'1. LEAVE: ;
turn thanks to ail those wyto dent YE CAR RADIOS—6 Tube with RF I'D ee he PMO. St. Thomas) | D LB. anted 1. week’s P/Lenve wet
wreaths, cards or attended the pene Stage 6 _~ 12 Volt models. A_ limited gether with a quantity of old lumber 14 Aug. 52
) any other whys express eir| quantity, call early. P. C. S. Maffei & F 7 ; {
sympathy due to the death of Evans} Co., Ltd. 1.6. 08=6.2.. [28 Senbeet e, eee e FM. Meds, Be. aie meen ee
Hewitt (better known as late for ae e eit foes +2 a age ie ug. 5a.
mason of the Public Works Dept, RADIO—11 Tube. Philco Radio with J TsPecton oo LD. 4 Major,
Mrs. Keturah Hewitt (wife!, Rev. | Sendspread in good working order. Appl | “eamesdays between the hours of ~ $.0.L.F. & Adjutant,
Lionel Smith (brother-{n-law) . Lashley Ltd., 20, Swan Street. pm. and on Saturdays ; oan Dr The Barbados Regiment.
31,8,52—1n 29.8. 52—ar J hours of 10-2 on application to - :
seed ptieethiiaiind Cc. C. Clarke on oe SANDIFORD
HUNT—The famity of the late Millicent] RADIOGRAM — Separate units Rw] zm :
Mildred Hunt of Station Hill, St. | Reeeiver 8 watt amplifier Collaro ¢ Churchwarden, St opis
Michael, gratefully return thanks to all|rreed turntable. Six long playing rec
ance rendered them during}ords. $150.00. Telephone 3274 or 4430

31.8.52—1n

MURPHY—We beg through this medium
to return thanks to all those kind

friends who sent wreaths, letters of

condolence, or in any way expressed

their, sympathy in our recent be-

reavement. ‘
Avbrey S. Munphy, Vera Kirby, Lilhan









Grant, Millicent Agard, Laurel Bourne,
Ralph King 31.8,52—1n
ROBINS We the undersigned beg
through this medium to return thanks
to all those in sympathy who attended
the funeral, sent wreaths, cards or in
any other way condoled their sympathy
of our dear beloved father James
Robinson (63) Ellerton, St. George

whieh took place On August 28th 1952.

Clarice Robinson (wife) and the Rob-
inson’s family 31.8.52—1n
SIMPSON—We the undersigned beg

through this medium to thank all those
who sent wreaths, cards, or have in
any way sympathised with us in our

recent bereavement.
The Simpson family 31,8,52—1n,





N MEMORIAM

AGARD.—In loving memory of our dea





niece Barbara’ Agard, who died on
August 80th 1949

A sleep in Jesus’ peaceful rest
Whose waking is supremely blest
No fear, no woe, shall dim, that hour

That manifests the Saviour’s pow'r
Always remembered by —
Tne Agard'’s family 31.8.52—In
—_—_———







CLARKE-—In loving memory of our déa:
on Walter Clarke who was laid to res
3lst August, 1951

“Lgfe was desired but Jesus knew
Eternal rest was best for you

Not gone from memory nor from lov:
But to the Father's home above.”

Clarenee (father) Elste (mother) sister

a: da brothers 31.8.52—I1n

EARLE—in loving memory of my dea

nd and father Charles Christopher

hasba:
i », who departed this life on the 29th



of meurt, 1950
Deep in my heart lies a picture
More precious than silver or gold
The picture of my beloved husbanc
Whose momory wlll néver grow old
Ever will be remembered by —
Vernice Earle (wife), Gilbert and Johr
(sons), Clarice and Desma (daughters),
Robert Greenidge (son-in-law) and six
grand children $1.6,52——1n





McCLEAN—To the glory of God and ir
loving memory of my dear belovec
son Edward Algernon St. Elmo Me-
Clean who fell asleep one year to-day
wounded hearts, be comforted,

The Dear God knoweth bes

For when the evening shadow e@ll,
The night will bring you rest

Soon in the golden city

oO





















The boys and girls shall play,
And through the dazzling mansions
Reloice in endless day
Bebert S$. MeClean and Family
41.8.52--1n
WILTSIIRNE—In loving memory of our
dear mother De!mena Wiltshire, whc
departed this life on Ist September 1949
Gone from us but leaving memorte:
Memories that will always linger
Whilst upon the earth we stay
Htugh Wiltshire (husband), Arthur, Ethel-
bert, Pre ym, Cleveland, Oscar, Hillary
ns r Edna, Cetavia, Wilhelmina,
.acintna (daughters), grand and friends
triends 31.8.52—In
HOUSES
\PARTMENT at “Cardiff.” 7th Avenue,
Pelleville, to an approved tenant from
let October 1952. Apply Mrs. Perey H
I 1 Telephone 3528 29.8.52—2r
‘OD, St. Lawrence Gap—



t furnished
September 1st
4640

bungalow available
Own sea frontage.
Dial 31.8.52—1n
BEACH COURT—Hastings. Fully furn-
ished. From 15th Sept. to 15th December
hive S448 between 4.30 and 6.00 p
31.8.5:



1

BUNGALOW—On Sea, Main Road Hast



























ings, very comfortably f ished, E: i av 1 i ¥
ings. very comfortably furnished, Eng vlindrigal Tanks 6147 x V4" dea. 000 W. the appointees may be confirmed in the permanent, pensionable posts
,oms —+ Verandahs — From Septembe: | £'V8. 2 Gaty Cxiindsical Tanks & x 44s’ | after one year’s satisfactory service.
“lephone 2949. 16.8.52—t.f.;. deam wil ‘onieal Bottoms; capacity 7
selephe vine gallons 700, Apply: Manages, Free passages to St. Vincent to take up appointments are pro-
CHANDOS, 2nd Avenue, Belleville. | Bruce Vale Factory. 31.8.52—8n. | vided.
Pulyy furnished Available Ist Septem- ar : 4 ‘ :
er ang woke co oanD 0.8 bean Applications, with details of education, qualifications, age and
repeal ep eerrenenem ener WANTED experience, and copies of not more than three testimonials should be
ropa, Wie Thoiama, “Cemtalaing Dining . ———~ | sent to the Education officer, Department of Hducation, St. Vincent,
bra ‘ — a6 i anf ;
¢ Drawing Room, 2 Bedrooms, Water MISCELLANEOUS as soon as possible, as the successful candidates will be expected to
Greenhill, St. Michael. Phone 3988. WANTED TO PURCHASE assume duty at the beginning of next term on 15th September, 1952.
90.8.52—2n] ONE small property at Rockley or 31.8.52—2n
- = Deyrell's Rand for about £2,000. Dial ri
‘EASY REACH" Small sea-sice } 2645, 30.8.52—2n
infalow Bayfield Beach, St. Peter nea | —————— ~_____ resis dan r
bbes Beach. Comfortably furnishee | SMALL BUNGALOW — Pamisnea or} Vacant Post of Food Crop Inspector and Clerk of the
2 hee nepyanin ean iot 205 Core rane Lave wens Gen. : Government Factory, Lancaster.
Dial 3355. co oes Applications are invited for the post of Food Crop Inspector and}
HOUSE us wwe storey all dwelling Clerk of the Gevernment Factory, Lancaster.
ise. a erick’s Bay, St Loe) SSS ‘ i
Phone 3957 31.8.52-—1n, At 2. The salary of the post is $1,596 per annum, plus the prevail-
— . oy . TO EARN i 5 ivi 5 7 7
etiam syvaes day Ramtaaties Oaleas noanie ns oko uae ing cost of living allowance payable to Public Officers. The is
Whitehall, St. Michael. All modern throughout the British Empire temporary and non-pensionable and may be terminated at one month’s
conveniences Apply to Mrs, Julia have increased their salaries notice on either side
lieadley, Whitehall Road. through studying our easy postal x . ‘ inte ‘ ‘ ‘
27.8.52—3n Sourets n BOOK-KEBPING, SEC- 3 The Officer will be required to furnish himself with motor
ansatehapininte Uietpdenbtntgneic, § ’, SINESS on ™ . on | ‘ : “ er ;
ROGHiOn WurAuEe Gr cebordlmeaa GANZATION, COMMERCIAL transport and will be paid a mileage allowance in accordance with
Cool Airy room 4 windows LAW, ECONOMICS, ete. Reduced {{\] current rates payable to Government Officers.
on premises “Clifton Terrace,” fees to overseas students Diplo- ji! \ A } ; : cin g .
Gini” Near Ohwlaon aa mas awarded. Prospectus free. {\ pplications stating age, qualifications and experience sHould
MS a) he a. RONDO Boao or ,| be addressed to the Director of Agriculture, Department of Science and
‘ELLANE ~ Dept B.A.5) 116, High Holb {J Agriculture, Bridgeto and should be submitted not later than the
ae MISCELLANEOUS London, W.C.1, England. 1] 6th of Septen 1952
Pe SU aeemeneeaaces Sy I : 31.8.52-2n |




























































































































We have been instructed by Mrs.

31,8. 52-
7 Gerald Manning to offer for sale her

in



“Flodden” in Culloden Road.







preperty
POULTRY The house contains five bedrooms,
ee ee en ana See tp nae p a tetrenn dining room, breakfast room, lounge,
PIGEONS—Imported Carneaux Pigeon: Jenclosed gallery and, usual offices,
—2 pairs Yelows, 1 pair Reds (very§Servants rooms, garage and stable.
large type). Apply P. D. Maynard JAbout 4% acres of lend. Viewing by
Porters, St. James, or Dial 978, appointment with Mrs, Manning (Tele- SS
-8,52—3n I phone 2355) — —
P’ofters will be considered for the se m
ROULTRY—Imported Brown Leghorns [| vrhole property or for the house and 4
6 pullets 2 cockerels (4% months old) part of the land separately. Inquiries _

Apply — P, D. Maynard Porters, St
James. 30.8.52—31

LIVESTOCK

COW—Holstein Cow, 24 pts

to the undersigned.
Messrs. CARRINGTON & SEALY;
Lucas Street.
28,8.52—5n.













per day





Me pra ony AUCTION
Be ng, Ot “| UNDER THE SILVER D’Arey A. Seott
sedigree bitch. Phone woo ttt! Te HAMMER

31.8, 52 ty vecommendativn of Lloyd Agents
ve will sell on MONDAY Ist September
t Plantations Ltd: Warehouse, Bay
itreet, 10 Bags D.C. Sugar.

BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.,

Auctioneers

-In Auctioneer and Real Estate Agent

offers for sale 14 spots of land at
Maxwell Road, Christ Church,
They have a frontage of 70 feet
and a depth of 180 feet. Terms

HORSES-—-Three year old thoroughbre«
fly “Fluffy Ruffles’ by Pink Flowe
ex Golden Faity by Gold Bridge £65
anded—2 jyear old thoroughbred fill
Sweet Violet” by Full Bloom ex Fai

Araby by Fairway £800 landed. Apply 30-8.52-—2n,





1, R. Edwards. Phone 2520. can be arranged. Also several
22.8.52—fn spots at Thorpes, St. James, and
— UNDER THE SILVER at Hothersal Tu
N E ersa rning, just above
FURNITUR HAMMER Waterford. Dial 2645.
TUESDAY 9th. The Late Miss Elsie

—_—_—
FURNITURE—-Four Simmons Bedstead:

and Springs 3° 3” $35.00 each also we t. John's Sale

load

“Visby,” Eagle Hail









pring-filled mattresses $40.00 each, Wha : rits* ny
WÂ¥er. Hurry, Ring 3373, Mrs. Giraud ohare Greiatee eee tree tee
31.8.52—1n TUESDAY i6th The Late Miss M. A.
inashaw's Sale “Bervie” Strathclyde. GLASSES—A pair of gl ith
TM rv of glasses
MISCELLANEOUS BRANKER, TRO’ AN & CO., lenses Thursday dn Broad Street, Findes
Be Auctioneers will be rewarded on returning to Advo-
A PIANO for sale. Terms reasonable Sa ene hae ee 3 ye
Apply: Mrs. Cuthbert Brathwaite “Th:





tome"’ Salters, St. George.

\ 31.8.52—In

ANTIQUES of every description, Glas:

thina, eld Weal Asa aioe ae om The Secretary of State for the Colonies has advised this Govern-
colours. Early books, Maps Autograph | nent that a limited number of seats along the Coronation Route can



te., at Flopringss Antique Sh i
toyal Yacht Club. sin a tern

BAROMETERS, Thermometers and
ivdrometers, Come in and see ver:
‘ide selection of these precision instru

xe made available to persons normally résident ih Barpades, The
‘ost is £5.10.0 for a covered seat and £3.10.0 fcr an uncovered
ieat,

nents at K. R, Hrnte fe Ca. Lid Persons who wish to avail themselves of this opportunity should
ower Broad Street, or Dial 6136. cn ‘orward their names in writing to thé Colonial Secretary’s Office. Not
o. -n



nore than two tickets will be allocated to each applicant, and tickets

IMPROVED SPRING CUSHIONS will not be transferable

< ete ey of Felt Padde 2.
pring Cushions, ch Spring individu
ly pocketed, Really a lovely jol “— i

UNIVERSITY OF LONDON

nished in domestic just ready for you



fapestry covers. $10.00 each. Apply a APPROVAL OF CANDIDATURE FOR 1953 DIPLOMA

mee tor— The Sta "dos

wee tor The Standard Agency (B'dos EXAMINATIONS AND 1954 FINAL EXAMINATIONS
30.8.52—2n

JUST HECEIVED Popuiar Gamer fa Candidates for any of the above mentioned Examinations are

Luding Canasta, Pitt, Monopoly. Toto ‘erinded that their Form of Application for Approval of Candidature

Stetactne stan ees seey S nust reach the University of London on or before the 1st October,

‘t moderate prices. Harrison's (Show 1952,

toom Dept.) Broad Street.
31.8.52—3n
scanner stentless isenesineteenenontansnmasns
LADIES’ AND GENTS’ WATCHES
A collection of Ladies- and Gents 1
nd 17 Jewel wrist watches. Your chancc

The necessary forms may be obtained on application to the}
Department of Education, Garrison,
Department of Education. ;

20th August, 1962. 31.8,52—2n,







© get a good watch at cost price Apply
(t= The Standard Agency (B’dos) Go.
4, Swan Street. Dial 3620
30.8, 52—2n VACANT POSTS

—_—_—_———
Mild Steel Plates—3/8, 5/16, \%4, 3/16-
‘x & 1/8, 1/16 —~¥ x & to ¥ x WY
dial 2696, Auto Tyre Co., Trafalgar and

GRAMMAR SCHOOL, ST. VINCENT

Applications are invited for the following posts: —












spry Stretts ssbb hctetab (i) An Assistant Master (Graduate) who will be required to
PIANO — in good Condition. Appl: teach English and Latin or History up to Higher School
: M s. : rs » ra si ear . = 8 er sah
cuss O. Fenty near ee ts Certificate Standard.
aa Sea one anes (ii) An Assistant Master of Inter-Arts or Higher School Cer-
Gibhes Pune St. Peter. $8.00 per tificate Qualifications who will be required to teach Gen-
00 Ibs. or 10¢, per Ib, hein iaks eral Subjects up to School Certificate standard. Abilitv
osc : ud ciasencchin to assist the Games Master, and to take charge of the
8

Fi taine o5! Meer. te. a pe Cadet Corps will be taken into consideration,

— BOR erving in Barbados by Ai The salaries offered are: —

ondon, Contact’ tan Gale, C/o. Adve (s) ae careraceee-3i, 648 by $96 to $1,920.

‘ +» Local Representative ( or Inter-Arts, ete.,—$1,200 by $72 to $1,440.
Tel. 3118. 7.4.52—t.t. a i :
ae 4 te A temporary Cost of Living Allowance is payable at the usual



ee
TORNADO—International Tornado K.39
425.00 nearest. Owner leaving Island
Enquiries Yacht Club or Telephone 4430
31.8.52—In

ee
TANKS—2 Galvanised Tanks 6 x 4 x 3
i Iron Tanks 6%4/ x 4/ x ¥ 3 Galvanised

rates granted to Civil Servants.

The commencing salaries will depend on the selected candidates’
experience,

The appointments will be probationary in the first instance, and






































@ Gots skin really clean
© Banishes perspiration odor
© Leaves body sweet and dainty

. Bea eee

at the

On
te:





¢

AVARIETY ENTERTAINMENT

In Ald of Local Talent Broadcast
Over Radio Rediffusion

» will be staged b:
THE ALL STARS DRAMATIC
TROUPE

CHILDREN’S GOODWILL
LEAGUE, CONSTITUTION RD.
MONDAY NIGHT

at 745 p.m.

orien. Ist 1852
D SION:—Reserved Seats 2/-
Unreserved Seats 1/-

Music
Mr. Sydney Niles’
Re!



Orchestras

REAL ESTATE
FOR SALE

One wall building at
Street’ beside the Housecraft
, standing on 2,710 sq. ft. of

2. Property at Spry Street.
3. prope ad low at
Brighton Road, Rock, Going
for below cost. Apply to—
D'ARCY A. 5
Dial Y -8,52—2n.









‘




















REALTORS LIMITED
OFFERS

CHURCHILL

" Phontas ca

with built in
ning water, com-

ition Drawin, and Di
Ki is ining

ants rooms. Alsip
sea. A sound
contact us now.

and two
right of way

investment, ‘so

WYNDAL
Partly stone and lath and plaster

red yards from the

ley Beach.

nm approximately 10,000 square

t land, situate at Rockley, on

i Bus route and within a :few
famous

On approximately

t

sea. It com

Downstairs: G:
réoms, with bath

jarage,
and totlet, and

BUNGALOW

19,000 square

land, situate just off

iy New Hoa overeoking

‘view unobstriicted “to

the
a

three bed-

servants

enough room for whatever

may require.

Lovely stone
three
oom,

and hot

house compri:
bedrooms, large

» dining room,
Sa tek gee wit Sab

cold water,

nstairs: three spare rooms,

ing on approximately

about 100 yards

‘hen and shower room. Stand-

2% acres of
from Gibbes

Inspection by appointment only,
COVE SPRING COTTAGE

A lovely cottage

standing on

its own private bathing.

t roods twenty seven hi
dees sttuate at St. James Coast,

ises three

and

. Bath and
hot and cold running water,

rages a aa and

LAND
Upton

St. James Coast,
Tub.

Near ri
ie cuptetin,

a gallery on

guar-

near Colony

ermine permet ee

REALTORS

REAL £tsTATE

Limited

AGENTS

AUCTIO!
5 NEERS

151/RR Rokbuck
Bridgetown

Street,
Phone 4900














1
















|



















SUNDAY,

SHIPPING NOTICES





The M/V “CARIBBEE” will
aceept Cargo and Passengers for

SEA VIEW GUEST

Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat
HOUSE Nevis and St. Kitts. Sailing
Tuesday 2nd September, 1952.
BARBADOS
HASTINGS, The M/V “MONEKA” will
Daily end Longterm Rates accept Cargo and Passengers for
Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat,

Nevis and St. Kitts. Date of
Sailing to be notified.

B.W.1. SCHOONER OWNERS
ASSOCIATION (INC.)

Consignee Tele. No. 4047

ucted on juest.

fambech Gant
welcome.

Dinner and Cocktail

J. H, BUCKLAND
Proprietor.

|

Canadian National Steamships











Sails Satis Sat Arrives Salls
Montresl Wailtfax Boston Barbados Barbados

3 Sept. “@Sept. 8Sepi. IT Sepi, 18 Sept

12 Sept. 15 Sept. - 2% Sept. 25 Sept.

22 Sept. 25 Sept. 27 Sept. 6 Oct, 7 Oct.
Arrives Arrives Arrives . Arrives
Batbadeos Barbados ® Halifax Mentreal

28 Aug. 20 Aug. Sept. “fi Bee is Bept.

a - ug. .

> Sept. 10 Sept. os ry Sept. 23 Sept.

25 Sep. 29 Sept. — 9Oct 12 Oct.
Y RODNEY os ° 30 Sept. 2 Oct. 11 Oct. 12 Oct. 16 Oct.
CANADIAN CHALLENGER 6 Oct. 8 Oct. —_ 21 Oct. 24 Oct.
LADY NELSON os ee 19 Oct. 21 Oct. 2 Get. 31 Oct. 4 Nov.



For



further particulars, apply to—

GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD. —Agents.

















































GENERAL CERTIFICATE of EDUCATION
CAMBRIDGE SCHOOL & HIGHER SCH. CERT.
Bar, and other

can successfully you!
London Universi =a, Basen A: 100'Gradaie Tutors, 22,000
|. Moderate ag Myr me mention

u
C.D. Parker, . LL.D., Director of Dept.DL9,

WOLSEY HALL, OXFORD ‘cAno

it for the above examina-

MR. & MRS.
DEIGHTON GRIFFITH

Beg to Remind
Their Friends and Well Wishers
of their

MR. CECIL LUCAS
invites you to his

ANNUAL DANCE

At K. G. MEMORIAL PARK,







2 ANNUAL DANCE
on
MONDAY NIGHT A
a
1ST SEPTEMBER, 1952 FOUR HILL PLANTATION,
ADMISSION — %- ST. PETER
Music by Percy Green's Orchestra on SEPTEMBER 4TH, 1952
Refreshments on sale at 9 p.m.




SUBSCRIPTION :o: $1.00

Mr. Perey Green's Orchestra will
supply the Music. . c

31.8.52—2n.

Buses leave Bus-stand, Church
Village, Ebenezer; and Blades Hill

at 8 p.m,
. 31.8,52——In













The Members'‘of the
WEYMOUTH CLUB
request the pleasure of your

Company
to their

DANCE

at
QUEEN'S PARK
on
SATURDAY NIGHT
4th OCTOBER, 1952
Music — Clevie Gittens Orchestra

Subseription -— $1.00
Tickets not transferable

Mrs, VIOLET McGEARY



requests the pleasure of your
Cdmpany

DANCE
at QUEEN'S PARK HOUSE
on MONDAY NIGHT,
Ist September, 1952
at 8 p.m
ADMISSION — 2/6
Mir. Clevie Gittens’ Orchestra will
suppiy Mupic
REFRESHMENTS ON SALE





HURRICANE PRECAUTION HINT No.5

KEEP A FEW POUNDS OF NAILS AND A HAMMER
IN A HANDY PLACE.
These can be obtained from - - -

CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.

NAILS at 30c. per lb.
HAMMEBS at $1.63 each,

| KEEP COOL
—— by

using Natural Gas
for Cooking

It’s easiest
Cleanest &
Speediest

Call and see the
New Gas Cookers
AT YOUR GAS
SHOWROOM

WANTED

REPRESENTATIVE—Full time representative
wanted for Canadian Life Insurance Co., in Barbados.
Application in writing are invited which will be treated
in strict confidence. Apply: “Insurance Underwriter”,
c/o P.arbados Advocate. 26.8.52.—5n.

1953



AMATEUR BOXING
CHAMPIONSHIPS

Under the auspices of

CANADA DRY

will take place at the - - -

MODERN: HIGH SCHOOL STADIUM
AT 8 PM.

ON FRIDAY, 12TH SEPTEMBER
CANADA DRY STEEL BAND IN ATTENDANCE

BAR — MUSIC — THRILLING ENCOUNTERS
























































$

THREE CONTEMPORARY NOVELISTS

A series of three lectures by
MR. R. LE FANU

At
The British Council, Wakefield,

Whitepark, St. Michael
Monday, September 8th—5.00 p.m.—EM M. FORSTER

Monday, September 15th—5.00 p.m.—
GRAHAM GREENE

Monday, September 22nd—5.00 p.m.—_JOYCE CARY

Admission Free

-

POSSE GEE SS9SSOPOSSS OO FGOS

%
o
FSSOSSSSS9SS IS IO 9S FS SHS GOGSE HODSO PSS GOS SOS DIOGO? ’



AUGUST 31, 1952



JOHN

M4.
BLABDON

es ce.

AFS., F.V.A.

Extensive Listings of Goed
Class Property and Land
Always Available

FOR SALE



bungalow on corner
wide frontages. Pleasant garden
with flower beds, lawn, .
patio, and number of bearing fruit
trees. Accommodation comprises
large living room, covered gallery,
3 bedrooms with built-in ward-
robes, well fitte¢c kitchen, garage
with covered way to house, ser-
vants’ quarters and all usual,
offices. All public utility services.
im our opinion, this property is
one of the most attractive homes
now available in th emedium price
range.

MODERN HOME, St. Peter —
A luxurious\y appointed residence,
with four bedrooms, 3 tiled bath-
rooms with hot and cold, butler’s
pantry, kitchen, storerooms, 2
gerages. The grounds are
ly laid out with a profusion of
flowering shrubs. Own right of
way to sea.

RESIDENCE, BLACK ROCK —
Soundly constructed property with
3 bedrooms, 2 living rooms, dining
room and gallery. On land of ap-
prox. 1 acre. Offered at £3,000.

BUILDING LAND, ST. LAW-
RENCE COAST — Excellent plot
n good position with wide sea
frontage. Ideab site for sea-side
bungalow. One of the few vacant
lots available on this popular
coast.

ll, GRAEME HALL

—2 Storey coral stone house with
3 bedrooms, dining and living
room, verandah & kitchenette up-
stairs, with garage, servants’
quarters and laundny below. This
house is set well back in its
grounds of about 1/3 acre, is not
wverlooked and has uno

‘view seawards. Open to offers

LAND, TWEEDSIDE ROAD—On
main road with 101/ frontage.
Heal situation for _ business
premises, Total area 18,738 sq. ft.

BUSINESS PREMISES—DWELL-
ING HOUSE, ROEBUCK STREET.
Good situation for retail shop in
this busy part of.town, £2,000.

SWEETFIELD, St. Peter — An
estate type house built of stone.
Contains large living room with
French windows leading onto
covered verandahs with view of
sea. 3% bedrooms, kitchen, store-
rooms and usual outbuildings,
garage and servants’ quarters.
Approx 2% acres well laid out
grounds with right of way over
beach.

COVE SPRING HOUSE, ST.
JAMES — One of the few pi
erties on this popular coast wit
a completely private and secluded
bathing beach. The grounds of
about 1% acres are well wooded
and could readily. be converted
into one of the show places of



the Island. The house is of 2
storeys and possesses ible
character. .

NEW BUNGALOW, ROCKLEY—
Commodious home with 3 bed-
rooms, large living room, wide
verandah with good view, kitchen,
pontry, servants’ quarters and
storerooms, Good situation near
Golf Course £4,300.

NEWTON LODGE, MAXWELL
COAST Solidly constructed
stone house containing enclosed
galleries, spacious drawing room
and dining room, and breakfast
room, 3 bedrooms, 2 garages etc.,
Lately occupled by U.S. Consul.

BEMERSYDE, ST, LAWRENCE,
—Strongly built coral stone bun-
galow spacious airy rooms and
galleries. Accommodation com-
prises:— separate drawing and
dining rooms, 3 double bedrooms,
large kitchen and pantry, 3 ser-
vants’ rooms, garage and fernery.
This property is situated on the
best bathing beach at St. Law-
rence, is within easy of
Town by bus or car, and in our
opinion would be very suitable
be conversion into a small guest
couse.

SEA FORT, ST. JAMES — Care-
fully re-modelled 2 storey se
on one of the most attractive
in this increasingly popular area.
eo coral and sand beach
room, lounge, verandshs on
floors, 3 bedrooms, detached
servant's quarters.
PROPERTY, WHITE PARK
ROAD —Solidly built 2 storey
house with 7 bedrooms, spacious
seoen ben poms and Stas an
also detached annex w
room and 2 bedrooms. Suitable
for conversion to flats, guest
house, school or offices.

MALTA, ST, PETER—Exten-
sively re-modelled house of mas-

i

sive stone construction with
approx. % acre flower gardens,
lawns and young fruit

There are spacious verandahs on
two sides with views over beach,
large living room, 3 double bed-
rooms, 2 bathrooms {both ,with
tubs) modern kitchen and butler’s
pantry, downstairs is the ry,
good servants’ accommodation for
3, 2 garages and storerooms. Full
public services plus own deep
well with electric pump. Right
of way over beach with
bathing. Opportunity for a dis-
criminating buyer.

ROUMAIKA, DAYRE!
—Imposing property wit
tion rooms, 6 bedrooms, kitchen,
pantry, large verandahs, garage
and store-rooms. Could be con-
verted into Guest House or Club.
City. Very attractive and cen!
located stone bungalow
bathrooms and toilet, pantry and
kitchen. Good courtyard at rear.
Ba’
built modern stone

bungalow on brow of cliff afford-
kitchen, laundry, servants’
and garage, A property
on.

double carriageway on

Very reasonable figure

stantially

ing fine view of this wild and
good

ti

rocky coast. 3

neti

ROAD. Near Golf Course. Un«
session.

WHITEHALL FLATS — Cod-
nished self-contained flats.

Gap — Compact furnished bunga«
Own sea frontage.

Furnished from Sept. ist.
COAST Furnished or unfur-
,


































imately 14,000 sq. ft. well
built property contains a front
gallery large lounge, separate
diningroom, 3 large 2

— Sub-

kitchen servants’
garage. Electricity
water. Over 6 acres.
WYNDOVER, St. Peter —
country home with over 4% a
containing productive
and flower gardens, algo a P
orchard has been
riodernised by the

There are 2 wide veranda, arn

ing and dining rooms, 3
bedrooms with washbasins,



living room, 2 side

NEW HOUSE-ROCKLEY NEW
furnished. With immediate pos-
rington Hill, Choice of 4 unfur-
BRIGHTWOOD, St. Lawrence
low available from Sept, ist.
ll, GRAEME HALL TERRACE—
NEWTON LODGE, MAXWELL’S
nished with tmmediate possession.

&
Plantations B
Phone 4640
SUNDAY, AUGUST 31, 1952 SUNDAY ADVOCATE



“Robust” Man Dies By Misadventure



PAGE FYTREN





STOMAGH
PAINS

DUE TO INDIGESTION

Try just ONE DOSE
of MACLEAN PPAR?
STOMACH POWDER! This
scientifically balanced formula
a relieves Stomach Pains

lence, Heartburn, Nausea
or Acidity due to Indi

alee |

E sae E d. d Aft 5 : eR is pointed out in Halsbury that eye : #5 nq ulry n e iter beer 14 it takes, but it ie gus poneay eave Se Seeee Handicrafts In | BR. Stomach

Anyhow, you know the area, You for squashing inquisitions—if on } eg e

e met Edwards and Edwards told the evidence there is no reason
eI y earin you how this man said some of ffor bringing in a particular ver-
r d the things the Police reported c}et, and so on,
were true and some lies.

A Coroner's jury yesterday returned a verdict of death ~ They come to the Station, There L& A¢eerdance With Facts

e |

You have to find in accordance I |

- . i i ave a p

due to misadventure when the enquiry iato the circum- ®re few discrepancies here, and it with the facts. Under these con.

: ; ; is for you to view them to the ait: " ; It is hardly possible to visit the fashioned. T ¢> lignum vitae tree
stances surrounding the death of Cecil Hope, a 28-year-old joct of your ability. Yor remem. 2L0ns I propose to leave you. Ijand of Wood and Water without in fact, like the ackee is a feature
chauffeur of Jackmans, St. Michael, finished before His per that of the man sitting “or ee = oe dhe ee i Sine in Pking acquaintance with its of Jamaica, In the countryside |
Worship, Mr. E. A. McLeod, Coroner of District “A”. standing...It is said by some which I have permitted so many "2hdicrafts. Por arriving by air, too were seen flelds with sisal and
Hope died at the General Hospital on August 3. that he was put to sit in a chair, things to be asked. And 1 have pate, erminal building either at with the Jippi Jappa palm. The
The Coroner said: “Mr. F im anid ‘Gantie of It is also said he was put on the done it because. Mr. Field said Palisadoes or Montego Bay air- straws chiefty used are Jippi Jappa,

Bee ere floor. T es i ae ports, they catch the eye, set out silver thatch and big thatch—
the jury, many of you who are now sitting on this jury— een waa wees ibaetet eon —- wien siteld te attractively in show cases: hats in palms—sisal, and coconut straw.

rhaps the majority of you—no doubt I have seen on many that in falling down the ste various styles and sizes, to suit the The Government of Jamaica
: is , ; , , ps, he Im -Halsbury we have the : :
dificult enquiries, and enquiries involving aceidents where had vn ‘a bive shirt One et'the Congners™ Act here's MYR, gas sober convivial clan, takes active Interest» th hand
you have one witness telling you of a car in a certain posi= ees a aad eee ie ranks like. this. t, and Brooches, handbags, valises and ment in the quality of Jippi Jappe
tion, and how fast it was going, and so on. and ap his way tc the atetion’ for ‘aa ee ‘ana has ttavelling kits, blankets, fabrics. weaving, which it was felt was

Every enquiry, in_my humble tion. I will come to that later. there was no exhibition of ‘pain.’ been an amendment in the Law. table mats and coasters, rugs, deteriorating, the Government in \\

1 â„¢ B&B. MEYERS & CO, LTD.,
P.O, Box 171, Bridgetown.







opinion, is difficult. But you use To Captain Farmer, the doctor - i lunch baskets, wooden egg cups February this year initiated the ‘
your common sense in arriving at said, “The injuries I found were me nreed With Seen a SS brought about ang bottle cases, trays, Cate Jippi Jappa Development Scheme:
how this man came to his death. jot consistent with the man hav- Cpl. Edwa eae toa mean eet ona In Trinidad, D raré- and tings and other nick-nacks, toys. six centres with twelve girls each SQ
As you go along. you will have ing been beaten about 1 a.m., . : ao th aaenta : These goods are likely to attract for a three months course of train- one
gained quite a lot of experience. and then walked to Brittons Hill how the Gazettes were searched ther places, there are no more attention if you arrive by boat, be~ ing, the results have been satis-| —)
It has never been my practice to Police Station, then breaking UB: He was nmandcuffed. You !quisitions by Coroners. After cause practically all the principal factory: the standard of the weave} ~
tell you, “If you ‘peliev this down a door at the station about know the evidence, he sprang, there is a situation, and a charg? stores carry these lines. showed marked improvement. |
idk ee-oae Sontilod d if that’ 4.30 a.m. and then falling down S°M® Say sprang... One police- ‘0 be brought against someone, Jamaica Welfare (Cottage In- some of the trainees even tried |
that b your adit “So ie filet of ataire™ ng man went towards the door, He the Medical Officer performs the dustries Ltd.) began in a small out a few new designs all on their) ~
| ac ie, a a Peed When he th t hit the door, collided with the post mortem. A little evidence is way in 1938 as a home improve- own, e.g. vanity sets, new types of| -—~
oners do it, and with due respect € ‘ara ey were not paluster, and so on, You remem- taken, and so on. ment project to assist in raising belts and hats, and also new types} ~~
to. them — they have their prov. Consistent, that does not prevent per Inspector Springer said he’ Anyhow you have the evidence ‘the standard of living, at the in- of weaves. | we
ince and I have mine — the very anyone of you, or the majority of was sleeping or appeared to be which you must take as a whae Stance. of that able Jamaican, The centre in Kingston, the |









; thing I might be trying to avoid YOu, coming to a conclusion that sleeping. Inspector Springer is and use your com Norman Ma , QC, There was parent organisation, has’ over- |
might be the very thing which they are consistent if you think not a doctor, but there . acai If ‘ir. Farhier cos Mr Niled a skeleton of six doing social grown its quarters in Hanover | The Only er
might happen, the creating of they are consistent. I only point he was unconscious when picked wants me to tell you anything work which ineluded handicrafts Street, and occupies in addition |

confusion. I am going to put the OUt these things to "you to giv? yp. He never regained consci- more I will ou, but in this field since then there premises in Sutton St, not far | es « *
facts before you, and it is for you YOU & clue of how you are going ousness, but ake things to confuse my wee “Se has been wvemarkable progress. off, Miss Rose Pinnock, its super- | contali Ning Vitamin B,
gentlemen, ta assess these facts, 19 a8sess these things. And you about crimes he committed and opinions, you have had the evi- [here are now seven handicraft intendent, on a tour of inspection |
When you hear that it is to be Will not pick out bits of the evi- so on. He faded out, Tney said dence, Mr. Farmer has read to Centres distributed over the island in the islands under Colonial De- | s ss
in aceordance with the evidence, dence only, but take the whole of the telephone was out of order, you. each with an instructress in velopment and Welfare, spent six If you want to get QUICK RELIEF I~










that ; ‘the’ evidence, and they took him t 5 t fe -¢ charge, employing around forty months in Barbados in 1947. | from PAIN, and also to enjoy the
who ‘Gos "into the bon a Cie just Mr, Niles he said, “The who oodaens him â€