Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text



| WHAT'S ON TODAY»

—
Court of Grand Sessions 19.00 a.m
Court of Ordinary 11.00 p.m
Mobile Cinema, Belmont
Giris’ School Pasture 7.30 p.m
Police Band Concert,
Hastings Rocks ........... 8.00 p.m.

Le

For the Cause that lacks assistance
‘Cainst the Wrongs that need resistance
For the Future in the distance

And the Good that I can do.

ESTABLISHED 1895

a

Pavbaros

PRIDAY, AUGUST 20, 1952










~ aa
YESTERDAY'S REPORT
Rainfall-fxom Codrington...
Total ratmfalt for month te da
Slighest “Témperature: #8 05 °°
Lewest’ Tempérafure®, 73.0 °#y
Wind Velocity 4 miles per Rov
Barometer (9 a.m) 22.960 1 p.m

19-Day
Sunrise: 5.49 a i} -
Sunset: First Quantef, August 26
Lighting: 7.00 p.m
High Tide: 10 51 a.m
Low Tide: 4.21 a.m





29.287

10.20 p.m

PRICE : FIVE CENTS



2.22 p.m
eee

C.C. Council Told Of Aims Of W.I. Committee

BARTON MAKES SPECIAL | ADDRESSING CHAMOTER OF COMMERCE Sage
APPEAL FOR SUPPORT :
OF B.LF.

R. A. E. V. BARTON, Secretary of the West
India Committee, told members of the Coun
cil of the Chamber of Commerce yesterday after
noon of the aims of the Committee and the work
it was doing. He also quoted a large number of
examples showing how widespread the Commit-





Kremlin Transfers
Malik From U.N.

UNITED NATIONS, New York, Aug. 28,

Jakob A. Malik joined the ranks of recalled Red diple-
mats as the Kremlin announced in a hote reeeived here
late yesterday that Valerian A. Zorin, architect of the 1948
Communist coup in Czechoslovakia, would take over
Malik’s United Nations post next month. The Kremlin note
said that Malik whose veto blocked the West in the United
Nations Security Council con almost every major issue

tee’s work was and stressed the need for member-
ship.

Mr. G. H. King, President of the Chamber, extended a
welcome to Mr. Barton whom he described as no stranger
to the West Indies. He said that there was nothing special
they had on the agenda to discuss, but as Mr. Barton was
in Barbados, he felt that it would be a good idea to have
him meet the members of the Council and have a general



except the Korean war, would return to Moscow for a new

assignment.



Kisenhower
Lowes

Moscow's beckoning of Malik
vas the latest in a sweeping
eries of Kremlin-directed diplo-
natie changes that began arly
his summer with a surprise triple
ransfer that sent Ambassador
Alexander S. Panyushin from
Washington to Peiping, Andrei A.

°
talk. There might be some matters which members would Platitudes ? Gromyko from the Kremlin's
like to raise and he was sure Mr. Barton would assist them Woreign | Office to Landon, and
in that direction as much as possible. ‘i WASHINGTON, Aug. 28. Weiegten. in from London to

Se oe The two chief rivals for the ;
Â¥ es apg n. ees members * Presidency promised on Thure- Zorin 50, Soviet Deputy Foreign
that an tha Provident Ree porte ovt. avice day to start slugging soon in} Minister will be the third with



ed out, he was no stranger to the]
West Indies, having served in
three of the colonies and visited

Offered To



their campaign to win the White
House. Dwight Eisenhower, under
criticism from some supporters

that rank to represent Russia 4%
the United Nations, First was
Gromyko who used the veto 24

all of them e a who think his campaign is off to|/times, He was succeeded hy
i : senc ‘ a slow start, assured a group of |Malik who “noed” 17 times in
ot SE youl coooeet nF tenet Oil Companies New York Republican leaders|his tenure of something more than
happiness which he always had a that ihe will wage a “fighting|three years to block the West
when he was here and it was a WASHINGTON, Aug. 28, | hard-hitting campaign that will s 5
great pleasure ene to meet; The State Departinent i on| start in the very near future.’ Seasoned Diplomat
o his old friends. Friday that for foreign poli ssaaeea ten — cereeeee Zorin is a seasoned Soviet dip-
He said that he had met Mr.!reasons it occasionally offered | started testing out his gloves ov lomat. At 20 he held a directive

2a:



Jones, the Secretary of the} advice to American Oil Companies}
Chamber 27 years ago in B.G./ operating in the Middle Bast, but}
and was very grateful to the/it never tried to pass on to the|
members of the Council of the/trust aspects of any Compai |



Wednesday night with some
shorts at Eisenhower in a speec*)
in New Jersey. Stevenson's aide
eald; “You are noting’—that

post in a young Communists’
League of Russia. In 194] he en-
tered the Russian Foreign Office

h e - f a at ” Stevenson is all set to open the|2”"d in 1945 he became Ambassy
biti ume | } Paeamrene:. Semmes Commaniiies, )O" 22 ASN that post, bi ook
ee ee he was informed was @! The long Suppressed Federal} — - MEA. EV. BARTON, Secretary} He said that plans already|eappeared in Czechoslovakia

y. Trade Commission report made} e of the West India Committee (stand-{have been made for a “co-or-| when the Communists overthrew
B.LF. public only by the Senate Small| estr 7 oO t 1¢ ae oO { ing) addressing members of the}dinated hard hitting’ campaign | Gen Masaryk’s regime in 1948 and

At the conclusion of Mr, Bar-| Business Committee charged that} \ K ” / J / Council of the Chamber of Com-} Democratic National Chairman] was generally credited with en-
ton’s talk, questions were asked/| five big United States oil concerns) meree at a special meeting held yes-}Siephen Mitchell sniped at the] sineering the coup that put the
about the British Industries Fair| were involved in an international! e ~ e e 9 | terday Republican nominee with a state-| *zechs behind the iron curtain,
which centred around the direct'scheme to keep petroleum prices} é NON I, to R. are Mr. R, M. Cave, Mr.j{ment that every day General] Vo stranger to the United Nations
value of and the direct results and profits high, The Compahic ani ar Oommissioners L. Briggs Collins, Mr. A. 8. Bryden, } \isenhower sounds more like} ie served as a member of the
7 The matter | have denied the charges. One of ' F 7 ao ‘aire aoe V. | covernor Dewey.” He has out- soviet delegation to the General
Council ‘after the various tater: (te the Socony Vacuum arton, Mr, G. H. Bing, President } icone Dewey in the use of plati-] Assembly in 1947.

said
\that its foreign operations Pm

of the Chamber and Mr. A. M. Jones,

udes and generalites
ests concerned had been con-/, Sear sp Secretary of the Chamber. : sane? ‘ ; f - ‘
sulted. supported by the Administration, Backing the camera is Mr. G. D. Informed sources said that He was expected to take over

Mr. Barton in the course of|2"¢ that charges were made for

his talk, told the Council ,how Democratic Election. Campaign|



Report for Erection of Market



Thursday

Eisenhower has assured worried

Bynoe. Republican leaders in New York



—UP

‘rom Malik about September 15,

Forty six year old Malik’s last

purposes. The Vestry of St. Michael at their meeting yesterday, u D : that he will start “slugging’’) fort at the Wnited Nations was

@ on page 3 an, ihe | unanimously adopted a report from the Sanitary Commis-!| STORM APPROACHES 4 rs “aie. aero he}. oe attempt “ae ems

e partment said that lanai aris St, Michael forwarding plans. speci- . Ss W ll S Il ‘deliberately” has been keeping] warfare charges on the United

Feisal Arrives At \it bas “endeavoured to follow | faceless aa 8 gr rs the cemtise ofa District Market | gy ugar ' e€ wraps on his campaign because] States. He was rebuffed twice

closely the foreign operations of : Ear le Hell, oe, - oom ae ore ~ ied 5 he Sonn not want to “spend his}the last time yesterday in at-

American and other Companies. at Bagie rail, , f ¢ tropical siorm in the A U d F strength” too early, Stevenson is|tempts to force a full debate on

Santa Barbara Both brought Macao with The Sanitary Commissioners had been appointed a ee - o t n er our also in Nee Sues lining up east-] bacterial weapons in the Disarm-

Compan fficials and througt committee by the Vestry to go into the question. | ut ro closer to uw - ern nationality groups and labour}ament Commission, and the Se-

LOS ANGELES, Aug. 28. Shee eeaatain "oe ions eee eae aa se ad " i : : Bahamas and the Florida Cents Per [ b leaders behind his candidacy, curity Council threw out his de-
King Feisal II of Iraq arrived 7 Hon. V. C. Gale, Churchwarden,| Plans and specifications before coast on with J , 4 sive

From time to time some of the









mand that it appeal to all couri+



at Santa Barbara, California at] Amer seadinanies Hav adé@| presided. There were also present |they had been submitted to Gov~- ||» winds of 50 to 75 miles per tries to ratify the 1952 Genev:
9.30 p.m. on Wednesday, dined j¢o; sia a uae Ronen: Messrs , D. Mottley, HA. "tudor, ernment, but members coulc see || hour. Leonard Pardue said (Fron, Our Own Correspondent) % : protocol cnttewing poison gas ang
at Biltmore Hotel, and retired for| agreements available to the D..|J. 0. Tudor, F, C. Goddard, Victor them privately, He then moved |! that the 200 mile belt of LONDON, Aug, 28 Canadian $ Down [{crm warfare UP
3 ra ; aval > De+lAncce CO Clan one 5 é » report o 2 Se ry ' » “OI IN, AUG. 20, y

me, et at po Ypnnen said partment on some matters, eee Pe prowae, mative Coeumdssliners fe adopted and piv oe ae fhe world price for sugar in MONTREAL, Aug, 28

s “shy and courteous,” eae BTS A it ° 6 Sf specifications : : , ; the next 12 months is likely to be| poaae - oe

a ; ; ee : ee - E ttley, who moved.that the plans and specification ” “ oe , is y , Minn ited § “ ar ‘
es dl ee ann ie Se hayek GuesOnE the: Depart. in winaae af tha tock slanins- be submitted te Government. ete i al - Ba below four cents, This forecast | , Aa eam a States dollar to- Crew Escapes From
' 4 g is schedu ojment indicated that it did or did ed the Vestry that as far back as; Mr. Victor Chase seconded the Shere yg te Figee made by EB. D, and F, Man in,,' Siena ©, Sinerent
eave on Thursday for Sanjnot object to the particular course 1943 machinery ‘had been set in/motion, He said that it was a vest ar Lit a nies ze their latest circular takes intog(, i rt a ‘ - aad teens B i Pl >
Diego. of action,” motion for the erection of a dis-|Very long time now that they had | cae bet course, “We are onsideration the enormous Tueed math SURES, unchanged from urning Tr lane
—U.P. —UP. been trying to erect a market on || M0t auite out of danger yet sarry-over expected in Cuba, This] "ugsday’s close. It took 96 1/8 '



trict market at Eagle Hall.

Tomorrow should be the de-






cents Canadian to buy $1. Ameri-

The Vestry’s Act he 2 -o| the site in question and especial y : arry-over may bé the largest : SAN ANTONIO, Texas, Aug. 28.

ae ee ae ry ee the people in the district had a eisive day, and its last work- ince the war, says the circular, } C4", The pound sterling, worth] /y United States Air Force B-17

V : trative power concerning such| great desire to see the plan con¢ ing day before a long holi- ind is expected to be consider-| $297 % was up vs from Tuesday.| caught fire minutes after its take-
a ) anes as markets in the hands of the Ves-|to fruition, day week-end.”"—U.P, ably in excess of the agreed fixed The Canadian dollar was down] off from Kelly Air Force base at

Red Power Plants

SEOUL, Aug. 28.

Navy war planes from three United States carriers
braved the thickest anti-aircraft fire of the Korean war to
blast two important North Korean power plants with 2,000-
pound bombs. It was one of the heaviest ait attacks of the
war on Communist power supply. It caught the Reds fever-
ishly trying to repair the damage inflicted on the plants by
previous allied strikes.

“Corsairs”, “Skyraiders”, and ‘“Pantherjets” zoomed
down on chosen number one and two hydro-electric plants









Government had since re-
quested the Vestry to submit
plans and specifications and the
Sanitary Commissioners had been |
appointed a committee of that
Vestry to deal with the matter
and to report back to the Vestry.

Mr. Went Co-opted

try.



Commissioners
Went,

The
had in turn ¢oropted Mr.
the Colonial Engineer, who had
conferred with them and had been
most useful in helping with sug-
gestions to bring the old plans
submitted some years ago and
bring them up, to date.

Sanitary



@ on page 3







999 System Goes

Into Operation |

THE Police 999 Emergency Telephone System goes |
into.operation to-day for the service of the public. The|
opening ceremony will be performed by Hon. R. N. Turner
Colonial Secretary, at 9.30 a.m, at the Police Control Room
at Central Station.

“The installation of this modern equipment brings the







| er million tons,

| taking all




at a premium of 4s) per cent.
in terms of United States funds
in closing foreign exchange deal-
ings to-day,
was up sy at $2.78 v4. ACP)

quantity of one and three-quar-




As the general world consump-
tion seems to have been sealed
down, and European production
is expected to rise E. D. and F.
Man say it is diMcult to see
where Cuba will be able to mar-
et her sugar next year. And
factors into considera-
tion, the world price is likely to
be below four cents rather than
above

U.S. And Britain
Continue Talks



DVOCATE



















San Antonio, but the pilot belly- »
landed absolutely safe in an open
field and the crew of six jumped

The pound sterling, out uninjured.
' —UP.

aS NS SS NS SN NN NE

&

: c The plans had then been pre- Barbados Police into line with the most up-to-date Police 3 A
: in northeast Korea with rockets and one-ton bombs. pared by Mr. Harold Clarke of} Forces throughout the United Kingdom : ‘ f prides.
i i é Messrs Clarke and Tucker. % : ; é 7 i .
The carrier pilots said that the a Mes: k d Tucker, | wealtt M Y: Teytaey. Seta Hasnont eee ; O O l Pi bl 2
; Co ni: est Korean cities and towns markex He did not think that it was uit, ajor » A, Stoute, Deputy Commisstoner of n ul roobotem
; mmunists threw up the heaviest > ‘
4 screen of anti-aircraft fire theyfor Allied air attacks, —U.P. ‘politic for them to publish the) Police, told the Advocate yesterday. TEHERAN, I a 28 a
have seen thus far in the war m oo : - : The 999 Emergency System] +> ee eee eee eee «
However, all. Unised futions POLICE B.T. AND 999 CONTROL ROOM will work in conjunction with| Jor American and British rep: 2
Sinkaa staph. cgbete carriers, , : e@ ® < E Radio Telephone st : ‘i nd time in twenty four hours as s iG
: The Navy said that the anti- - ESCs: tthlled at Bolice Herdocurte.,| Teheran prepared for a possible Pd 2 : : bre
: aireraft fire was so thick and Bridgetown pease Heatauarters, enewal of bloody clashes be-| This year the ‘Advocate’ is running &
. , 8 c ’ ote ’ 5 . :* + . tas + r
accurate that the pilots were un- George, District C, St Phill ween Communist and govern- bi a Christmas Card Competition, the bf
4 able to get a clear picture of District @, St. Peter, District f nent supporters bad results of which will be published in &
; what damage they _ inflicted. St. Joseph, and there are two] United States ambassador Loy)», the Christmas numbe:. ;
. e isse> y in mobile 1 6 f sso sta lenderson anc sritish large | #4
Planes from the “Essex” went inits. All af these fend 1 British Charg . : ey &
S first to hit the chosen one. “Sky- |tions and the mobile units wili]2'Affaires George Middleton con~| ™% _ Competitors should note the follow &
5 raiders dropped 2,000 pounc be constantly in radio com-j erred again on the oil problem.) s 8 ing points :— &
blockbusters on the generator munication with the Police Con- . ; | at i ;
busting: As ee = por the trol Room. ratte ’ groups plan demonstra-| a! The competition is open to all read- &
corner of the plant, smashing in The termi swite: ar se oups pi wet BST od ars ‘ sate’ : ¢ 3 ¢ .
its wall. Then the “Boxer” “aad hin ' awe ur Syalenn rae tone oe eras outaide the city to 2 wil mau cards can e
“Princeton” flyers teamed up to situated in the Control Room.| °°" Re ZOruUmA Gay. Since the) om ’ * : = oe
hit fae choker two, he eaninee The service will be available] 2eath of last month riot victims. | Cards can be made iy any process &
was unasgessed due to smoke and from 9.00 a.m. today. ie eereremanl, Srempenary. Aa 2 —painting, drawing, photographic, wa
heavy anti-aircraft fire. Major Stoute said that in ease ese a va would i= a ren 3 etc, &
: of any Emergency, requiri VEEEe > MAne GPU! ;
in we te promrt Police action, the public]! The Government —spokesmat -S A competitor can enter any num- x
me TERS. Pemneee, SOONG 0 are asked to dial 999 and give|Dr. Ali Abada said that in the | ber of cards, but all cards must be %
from three carriers to attack particulars. This will be thejmeeting with Premier Mohammed | 2 original work
hydro electric plants and to blast | channel through which they will] Mossadegh, Henderson and Mids | wa . : mi ; &
other Red installations from the |get most speedily the Police} dieton assured him that Britain’s | Preference will be given to cards Fa
battle line northward. Air Force j action whieh ts required. reply to TIran’s last note on the | 5 with a Barbadian or West Indian
sae light bombers took over the He said that for routine com-| problem would be submitted by 2 flavour and to novelty cards. w
night shift to assault the supply munieation, the public are asked| September 3rd Henderson also! # . 7 HE
concentration near Sohung in P continue to dial 08, the Police] conferred ‘on Thursday with 2a The judging will be done by a z
northwestern Korea. An attack by elephone xchange, and ask|deputy Premier Baher Kazemi | ae judging committee which will in- .
15 B-26's came after a Radio Seou! oer ee Cae OF Dex —UP, oo clude the Editor. Their decision will &
broadcast warning to civilians in ; partment required. They should sei be final ee
a target nel ready" ~ aa aa Ss Vi 7 | A Pp is ( will b foilows First &
Sohung is one of the 7 orth-} ; & fir ee ee es sa oil ro: + 3 rizes e as 101 ws : rst- ea
Mageauses” in. Trinidad md 1 y xa garet rumair ® $40.00; Second—$20.00; Third—$10.00; ee
s : : | enon thoi eh ata " Dax . ~ 3 é to consolati orizes of $5.00 ee
Snake Off Peru proved of invaluable service to Tours Paris Shops iB and two consolation prizes o x
« the colony in the detection of | a each. KK
ime,” a Trinidadiz told the . ‘ x . .
Th Fordham University” Seis avecste yeterday. President crospat - ont 2 A selection of the cards will be dis- &
he versity S-} 7 r= “Js residen ruman’s caqaugnter ' ¢ ave ¢ > § Ors >? Stati ;
Ograph recorded an earthquake! He said that in many cases,| Margaret arrived by train from ® played at the Advocate Stationery ye
7 miles’ from New York, ae comme might have cor and went on a quick i and later at the Barbados Museum. ae
€ , ated iee nthe mitted offences and escaped, the; at ten i ofc . . . . i
ce ier het rs Quick thinking of a persed a & Bie fix Deloss Bf The closing date for the competi- *
the coast « ee who lialed 999 brought the] » guard centre of recent crit-| SR tion is 4.00 p.m. on October 31st; but =
‘ i oo to ie aero of the] ic in Sweden for alleged rough | competitors can start sending in their te
offence an e offender was] tact ermainec the back-!; entries boa
HARRIS FOR COURSE IN | immediately apprehended cties, remained in the ba k 2 entries now. &
ADVANCED SANITATION tae ieee Margare rair thirty A All ecards should be addressed to x
aie ia | IVERSON RESIGNS } ate t 1 she |} on] 2 the Editor, The Advocate, Bridge- Pt
’ : a ota et WASHINGTO? me ts a rare a town &
DD ‘ a lie
anced . x 4
Traini f A = operation Tor the public today Anyone reqviring nour on 7 that Ke isit | uae br
on September prompt Police thor ne ee et R 8 T Pol Co ly . ean ~ aa ot i “a = m4
arial pe The 9 tem w ; tion with 1e Radio Telephone Systen he Police ntrol -resident of the Institut f Inter-~ Tas aaniae maaan ed aS POS ONE NE NE ONS BNE OO CAE ONC EE OE EE:
| Room +Above) Polite Headquarters, bridgetown : a UP up, NPEPRGRGLGE DEBE GE PEGA GE DK PR DR DN INGE TN NN SNE











PAGE TWO







BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Caub Calling

K.C.MuG
lopment
hair-

GEORGI EEL

are i Brit -



on Wednesday by

eting of the
t the arib-
issior Provident Fund

of







of hic he C man Sir
G € ex © be baek in Bar-
) week-end
Returning Home
M pte ter ee ge who h
Ai 1 in the. island
three 4 ars, left yes-
ening by B.W.LA for
rrinidad here she will spend
bout two weeks be ae returning
to hes home, British Guiana.
While in Trinidad she will be
taying with her aunt,
Back to Trinidad
EAVING. by last night's plane
+ was Mrs, R, Power who has
een holidaying in Barbados. With

her were her two grandchildren

e father Francis Power, is a
p artt er in Sellier & Co., Solicitors,
Trinidad Mrs, Power herself ha:
been an At chitect and Builder for
30°years. She is a widow All
were guests at Cacrabank Hotel.



Spent Ten Days
RS. MOLLY LEWIS, the wife

of Mr. R, S. Lewis, Manager
of Rose’s: Lime Juice, Dominica,
spent ten days in Barbados en

route for Jamaica, New York and

England She was a guest
Cacrabank Hotel.
Yarried at James Street

ES TERDAY afternoon at

Jamés Street Methodist
Church at 4.30 p.m. Miss Dorothy
Eldene Osborne, daughter of Mr.
and Mrs, Frank D, L. Osborne ot
“Dorsville’, Dash Road, Bank
Hall was married to Mr, Egbert
Carlton Brancker, son of the late

Mr.
Mrs
“Ebony”,
Michael,

The ceremony which was fully
choral Was performed by the Rev
F, Lawrence and the bride who
was given in marriage by her
father wore a dress of Chantilly
lace and nylon over slipper satin
with close fitting lace bodice fea-
turing a yoke with a Peter Pan
eollar and long lace sleeves. Her
dress carried a panel of lace in
the front and her over-skirt of
nylon ended in a train. Her veil
was tipped with a tiara of orange
blossams and she carried a bou-
qutt of Michaelmas daisies and
pink rosebuds

Watter Stafford Brancker
Mabelle Brancker
Emmerton’s Lane,

and
of
St.

She was attended by Miss
Dorcus Brancker as Maid-of-Hon-
our and she wore orchid organza
with a full flair skirt and close
fitting bodice. The double-U neck
was decked with flowers and she

wore green accessories, Her head-
dress was crinoline and roses and
h¢t bouquet roses and Queen
Anne’s Lace,

The bridesmaids, Misses Colleen
Osborne, Nola Thornhill, Janice
and Muriel Bayley wore, peach
blue and pink nylon, respectively,
with long full flair skirts with





idle instrumentalist making faces
Th W . through the
e “ orms ad ad al rod | like this,
4 rn | when a
—But It Could Only Run Underground— |nose tickled by a flute. The con-
By MAX TRELL |ductor heard’ her
Sy MA} tL | | brought in the brass with a sud-
“YOU know,” Knarf said to his den summons from his b&ton, to
sister Hanid as he sat down besi le | drown her silly titters,
het; “I just rode on an underground | |

railroad. | was under the garden, |
and under the house, and under all |

the, apple trees and blackberry |
bashes. And I think I rode under- |
neath the pond, too, but I’m not
sure.”

Hanid was listening to her brother |
with a surprised look on her face.
“An underground railroad?” she!
said at last. “Where did you find
an underground railroad?”

“Well,” said Knarf, “I was sitting
at-the foot of the garden wall next
ta that old apple-tree stump when
allat once I heard someone saying:
‘All aboard!’ At first | thought 1}
must have just imagined hearing |
someone saying this. Bee ause, when |
I looked around, | couldn't see any-
thiig. Then a few minutes later 1)
heard the same voice saying: ‘Ba
aboard, all aboard! Next stop the}
bottom of the garden!”

Found a Hole

“This time,” said Knarf, “1 really
looked. 1 knew the voice must be
coming from somewhere. Suddenly
| found a little hole just on the |
other side of the apple-tree stump
| put my ear to it and listened as
hard as L could. 1 distinetly heard
the puffing of a locomotive. | also
heard a lot of little voices saying



things lik ‘Did you buy your
ticket, dear?’ ‘Does this train go to
the pond?’ ‘Hurry, hurry or we'll
miss it!’ ‘Take your seats, every-
body !’’

“My goodness!” exclaimed Hanid
“What did you do then?”











| couldn't see any plants or flowers

| The train



SIR GEORGE SEEL
Two Weeks

R. GEORGE SWANSTON

who came over to spend two
weeks’ holiday returned to St.
Lucia on Wednesday by B.W.1.A
He is attached to the Education
Department in Castries and dur-
ing his stay here he was a guest
at Leaton-on-Sea, Worthing



Son and Heir





SON and heir was born to

Mr. and Mrs. Karl Bohne,

Mander ", Government Hill on

Wednesday Mother oid babe

ire doing fine,

Vo Study Accountancy

R. CECIL BROWNE, a clerk

4 at the General Post Office, left

the island on Sunday by the S.S,

Colombie for England on long

leave during which period he pro-

poses to take a course in Account-
ancy. Accompanying him was his
nother who has gone to spend
tir vith her brother
They are the son and widow of
the late Mr, P. G, Browne, a
former Headmaster of the Cole-
ridge School.
Oa Business
R. ROY SKINNER and Mr.
Geoffrey Martin of R. J.
Shannon & Co, Trinidad, who

have been in Barbados on bisiness
returned to
guests

for four weeks,
Trinidad, 30th

have
were

Enjoyed Holiday

Cacrabank Hotel.
and Mrs.

Mc
Caracas,

a vacation
Sweeney

in

They
Hotel

were

and were

at

J. S. Sweeney of
have been spending
Barbados.
is Representative
General Electric Co.
guests

Mr.
of the
in Venezuela.

at Cacrabank
delighted with
their stay in the island.



MR. AND MRS. EGBERT BRANCKER

close fitting bodices. Their head-
dresses were matching posies,

The duties of bestman fell to
Mr. Seibert A, Thornhill, brother-
in-law of the groom of Dominica,
and those of ushers fell to Mr
Sydney Gittens, and Mr. Stanley
Linton, A reception was held at
the home of the bride's parents
and the honeymoon is being spent
at Atlantis, Bathsheba,



Of went the locomotive,

| cept that there were lights all along
the way—little glowing lights. Ow
first stop was the bottom of the
garden, and it really was the bot
| tom. You could see all the’ roots
growing down from the top, but you



It looked very upside-down, thoug!
no one else in the train except me
seemed to notice anything strans«
about it, An old.lady-worm sitti
next Lo me opened up a basket shi
was carrying, and asked me if
wanted a radish and turnip sa:

wich, But 1 thanked her and t«
her 1 didn’t,
“The next stop was under tt

apple orchard. The apple tree 1
looked like a forest of twisted s
rode in and out am
them, and everyone looked out
the window as we went by. Then
slowed down as we pa a tan:

t
1













“I made myself small,” answered | Of roots that were so thick .t
Knar?, “because the hole was no | thought sure we were going to |
larger than a worm-hole. Then || one of them.
wriggled down into it, feet first. | W hat were they, Rnart??

Then 1 slid and fell and shot down | The roots of that oft, old o
until 1 landed on the bottom. And | ‘ree at the bottom of the hill. A
there I was, in a railroad station!’ | finally it started to rain. | mean, |

“Oh! At the bottom of the worm. | thought it was fain. The windows
hole, Knarf?” get ell wet, But it wasn't rain at all

| We Were just under the p u

All the passenyers were worms le See a
Thay der the bottom of the pond — and the

hey were all dressed in neat brown | was :

— Water was dripping down That was
suits and they all stood on one foot. the last station. Ever: heel” &
They were all crowding to get on} ae) RAE Le Gh ‘
thy tral ; . | get out. 1 didn’t know where t:
he train, and | got pushed on, toe | p it the w ;

SP eanond lates ihelkenime Aes tae | 3] 1@ worm-conductor showed e
raat. ahd tone Notive Fave | the way out, Up another worm hole
7%, BOG ‘ ve ent.
oe Just watch out for the robins
Was vit dark underground?" | young nian!’ he told me. He must
nid asked, ar have thor ight | was a worm, too!” |
as sort of like a tunnel ex-! laughed Knarf. [

FASHIONED

LONDON,

Are we to bid goodbye to the
short haircut,
cuts, poodle cuts and the rest of

them?

A return to longer hair is fore~ week, cut once a month. Brushes,

cast this week by John French, a
leading London hairstylist.
“Women like something news’ he
announced, “It is, time for a
change in hairsty} rue enough.
But women have m particular-

ly fond of short hair. It has
lcoked smart, it has been
eosy to keep under control,

easy to launder at home, and has
always looked neat under a hat.
Most women, I feel, will be
quite prepared to watch other
people grow their hair and so be

in fashion, but will keep their
own short.

“Calculated Carelessness” is
French’s new theme song. His

styles have a natural, rather than
a “set” appearance. “First Night”,
focust attention on the forehead
and neck. The fringe, curling soft-
ly, rises to a peak in the. cent@,

and a group of curls at the nape

of the neck. '
One disadvantage about a new
nair fashion advocating longer

hair is that it takes time. Compare
the statistics of the new and the
old, and you will see the differ-
ence. “Short” has frequently been
as shert as one inch, never longer
than three inches; the new “long”
style is five inches. Now, hair
grows, on an average, at the
slow rate of half-an-inch a month,
Think in advance if you do want



Spent a Week

R. G. C, HURSTFIELD of

Geddes Grant & Co., Port-
of-Spain, has been in Barbados
for three weeks. His wife and son,
Jonathan, joined him for one
week, and enjoyed their holiday
immensely. All were guests at
Cacrabank Hotel, and have now
returned to Trinidad.



Listening Hours

FRIDAY, AUGUST °
400—7.15 p m.

29, 1952
19. 76M, 25.53M
noc

The Daily

tpn. The News, 4.10 p.m.
Service, 4.15 p.m, Home At Eight, 5 pm
I'igar, 5:15 p.m Music for Dancing,
6 p.m. Seottish Magazine, 6.15 p.m.
Tix1, 6.45 p.m. Sports Round-Up and
Programme Parade, 7 p.m, The News,
7.10 p.m. Home News from Britain
71-1090 p m 26. 53M, 31. 32M

7:15 p.m. West Indian Diary, 7.45 p.m
The Case of the Night-watchman’'s Friend,
8.15 p.m, Radio Newsreel, 8.30 p.m
World Affairs, 8.45 p.m. Interlude, 8.55
p.m. From the Editorials, 9 p.m Hing
Up the Curtain, 10 p.m. The News,
rom. News Talk, 10.15 p.m Fortratts
froat Memory, 10.30 p.m. From the Third
Programme.



BY THE WAY .. .8y seacucomBer

T a recent concert a critic was
struck by the
harpist sat further
harp than is usual,
harpist who has woace
been frightened by a momentarily

A lady

léguy of St.

“Zugarramurdi”
nose,

fact that the
back from the

giggling

wires often recoils
I remember an occasion
pretty harpist had her

In Arabia
the wires of the harp are barbed,
{to protect women players—which
| would not have suited Mme, Irou-
Etienne-de-Baigorry,
who used to play the Basque song
with her flexible

Not much competition

N Narbonne there was a young- |
ster who used to play the piano
balancing
I once

with his nose,

while

upside down on a bicycle,

asked his father
hereditary,

He said, “No.
wanted to choose a profession that
was not too overcrowded.”

Going no places

Â¥LKLA MAW BAT AT, the Bur-
was yesterday
shown a model of the car that ran
week without stopping at
100 miles

asked,

mese magnate,
for a
more than

“Where,” he
zoing in such a
explained to
wasn’t -going
ticular;

Mrs.

him
anywhere
“It just raced round and

hurry?”

A. &. Stuart’s School
of Dancing

Presents

REVUEDEVILLE 1952

Under the distinguished patronage of His Excellency
the Governor and Lady Savage

EMPIRE THEATRE

On Wednesday 3rd., Thursday 4th., Friday 5th
September at 8,30 p.m.

MATINEE: Friday 5th at 5 p.m.
Music by Capt. Raison, A.R.C.M., and Police Band

Booking Office opens Friday, August 29th from

8.30 a.m.—12 noon; from 1.30—3.30 p.m.

it this gift was
My boy

an hour,
“were they
It was
that the car
in par-





DURABLE SHEETS AND PILLOW CASES

PILLOW CASES
SHEETS 70 x 100
SHEETS

or
oO

) x 100

SHEETS 90 x 100

36”

WHITE BUTTER MUSLIN
Also

QUALITY PRINTED SOUND RAYONS 96 cts

Cc

REPES, DISTINCTIVE

DESIGNS

$1.06

T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS

YOUR SHOE

DIAL 4220

STORES

DIAL 4606

aoa ak i al

and

round a track.” “Were they in
time?” he asked. “In time fo»
what?” said an official. “For what-
ever they had to do,” replied the
Burmese. “They didn’t have any-
thing to do,”’ was the answer, “it
was just a record.” “Oh,” said
the Burmese, deep in thought.

The week's Gold Cup

IN LONDON

Threat To Short Hair Vogue

to chrysanthemum@ French passes on these golden





(eect 7 tame mama

DOROTHY BARKLEY



By

your hairstyle to
around Christmas.,

be fashionable er with the beauty of the hair,’
he comments.
you cannot have a good hairstyle
unless the hair is in perfect con-
dition,

Have you ever thought that
your haircut and accessories are
linked by fashion? “A_ well-
styled haircut needs stylish ac-
cessories,” says French, Recently,
he opened a boutique in his sa-
locn, and is the first
hairdresser to d? so. He aims at
providing - original and interest-
ing accessories. A glance at a
current selection from his bou-

rues for general care of the hair.
It should be shampooed once a

combs. and other ‘tools should
always be spotlessly clean, pre-
ferably kept in individual grease-
proof bags. At the first sign cf
illhealth of hair or scalp, you
should place yourse’f in the care
of an expert.

French has a trained trichelo-
gist on his staff who gives both
personal and postal treatment
courses for the hair and scalp:
This postal course may interest
readers overseas. If you require
treatment, you simply fill ina
specially printed postcard sup-
plied by the trichologist. He asks
for details about the scalp (is it
oily) greasy, inflamed, or dry?),
about the hair itself, (is it drv,
brittle, greasy, splitting, falling
out?), and about the condition of
the face, nese and chin. He an>-
lyses your particular problem
from these details, and then pre-
pares an individual formula for
the treatment.

“I am concerned with the con-
dition of the hair, the hairdress-

WARNER BROS.

Proudly present at the
BARBAREES

PLAZA

(DIAL 5170)

OPENING FRIDAY
4.45 & 8.30 p.m.

and Continuing Daily

ing out his aim.

Rattan and wickerwork are
popular just now. In his boutique,
French. has delightful bracelets,
earrings and baskets in these
materia's. From brightly colour-
ed cotton squares, he has made
the “Pigtail Scarf” and the “Pi-
rate Scarf”.

He made the pirate scarf by
gathering the ends into a tail, and
tying them twice—close to the
head, and again at the tip—with
matching* raffia. But he would
not reveal his method for making
the pigtail scarf. That is a pro-
fessional secret.








FOR THE FIRST TIME
it A HUNDRED YEARS ,4
uw THE CAMERA GOES





PRESENTED BY Wanians Bros.

STARRING

STEVE PHILIP CAREY
COCHRAN - BRIAN 22
DOROTHY HART

AND (UMUIEIEN MURDER] - [IMEZECEARSON] FORGERY









ROODAL THEATRES

EMPIRE \

To-day 2.30 & 8.30
and continuing daily



OLYMPIC

TODAY to MON
4.30 & 8.15

ROXY
TODAY 4.30 & 8.15

Charles Magraw.:) {TODAY 4.30 & 9.15

ROYAL
{pop Rathbone —

















4.45 & 8.30 Jose Ferrer— wee Jergens Nigel Bruce
GENTLEMAN who said the| wait Disney's Mala Powers) sRMOURED CAR in
other day that it was “bad ROBBERY! press TO KILL
form” to discuss one of his horses | SNOW WHITE CYRANO- | uk GEite ow! itt
in terms of money, continued: “I}AND THE SEVEN/ pE BERGERAC | With FAMILY, HONEY
refuse to speak of its monetary DWARFS aa raley Granger MOON
value, just as I would refuse to} | _Ann_ Blyth Istarring
speak of my wife in that way.’ by Technicoln| GIRL FROM ae |fred Mac Murray —
And people dare to accuse me] Extra 2 Reel Short: SAN LORENZO) 4.43 & 8.15 Claudette Colbert
of exaggerating the craze for ani-| poy and the Eagle | starring Paramdint present: eg = ‘SUN.
"Windows “af th a TOMORROW at | Quncan pene | THE BIG Betty Davis
isdom oO. e ag 30 p.m. ___ Leo Carrillo Gary Merrill
Witen the Nile is in flood the} hole Serial tomorow Night). CARNIVAL in
wife of the water-diviner goes FEDERAL Whole Serial | Starring
hungry. (Old Egyptian saw.) JUNGLE GIRL = |itk Douglas JANOTHER MAN'S
é ; ” OPERATOR 99 With | Jan Sterling |
ore Mae ook Sha ier MIDNITE Tomorrow) Francis Gifford | MIDNITE POISON
hide? Fi hh men a io et Night Tom Neal | Tomorrow ae and
orchids. ichtre! at a 5 —sri, =| Roy Rogers uble
aginative approach! And note that! haa ee | WAR | inte ore eee Or ra. velit: UNIVERSE
ey were ocety. wayside blooms| S°UIX crry suE THE CIMARON | and (eabrine
e oO y s - ’, a . ON . TEXAS |Jac =
plucked at en, with the dew on] With Gene Autry HOT STEEL Pe Moon” eat cate Paige
them, I knew a girl whose ad-
mirers sept her such masses of
flowers that 7 - 3° is
shop in the es' ni very i
morning, ater ine Beet Aaweriee, METRO 20th
she drove to the shop wi el g- i
day’s offerings and sold them at a COLDWYN G CENTURY
whacking great profit. She was
found out when her assistant tried MAVER Fox

to sell a heap of roses to one of
her admirers. His card was still
on them.

We can Supply

yi Cream of Wheat
Corn Flakes
Macaroni

Rice

Starch

Luncheon Beef Loaf
Veal Loaf
Hamburger Stake
Meat Lunch
Swift's Sausages
Palethorpe’s Sausages
Vienna Sausages
Macaroni & Cheese
Spaghetti & Cheese
Cooking Butter 1's.
Cooking Butter 5's,
Hams 5 to 10 Ibs
Cheese per Ib

STUART & SAMPSON
(1938) LTD.

Headquarters for Best Rum %

Tins

Se aaa seaN



PRESENT ANOTHER WINNER
OPENING TO-DAY
* & 8.30 p.m. and Continuing

20, | |p sean!

CENTURY-FOX
PRESENTS WITH PRIDE AND LOVE

Wi






we thee,

atte see. sae

EART

TECHNICOLOR ‘

ee






oo

H
|
i









Neve, if y

ger)
SUSAN tid a ae.)

ern ten

ony Pa em mC CRU Met ORE Peak onr ig

SLOT Utena ant







4

|
i
?

The maxim is that |

six ater ear ree

London |

tique, will show how he is carry-|

: FRIDAY, AUGUST 29, 1952

ot

a pay iat) a STARS *

ry

and 40) {an

ee

aa



For Friday, August 29, 1952
Look in the section 1n which your birthday comes and
find what your outlook is, according to the stars.

ARIES -—Nothing lost by being friendly, sevsneiia,

March 21—A 20 in fact, much to be gained, including win-
- ning others’ confidence in you. A good day. *

—Sort of day in which you steady-going,

Saas able Taureans can

21—May 20reasonable and very cap
ee make real progress and at same time sol-
idify present position, holdings. But don't

flounder. ¥ * *

GEMINI —Before embarking on new ideas, pro-
May 21—June 21 positions, try to finish matters started ee
those needing immediate attention. Pre-

pare for a clean slate next week,

CANCER —We normally like better that for which 3
June 22—July 23 we have to fight and win than gain without

much effort. You may have to hustle some

today, but it will be worth the while. os

LEO —Please heed Gemini noe mae. ene
24—. down over-enthusiasm, eep emands
— — within reason but push forward rightly
with hope and faith. Enjoy week-end

sensibly. ¥
VIRGO —Favourable influences prevail, particu-
Ang. 23—Sept. 23 larly for worthy interests, sound business
management. Heed your conscience, also
health essentials; take time for needed rest.

-*

—Be your well-balanced reasonable self
and have less difficulty getting through
day’s programme—IF you heed warnings, +
and cheerfully accept responsibilities,
* *
SCORPIO _A little unction, afided healthy ambition, 3
Oct. 24—Nov. 22 plus fairness, and you should net a pleas-

*

LIBRA
Sept. 24—Oct. 23

ant, productive day. If your occupation or
other demands are exacting, keep cool, you
can achieve,

—Team up your mental astuteness with
your capable physical prowess and you
have a combination that can handle a swell
job, add to your laurels. Fresh opportunity

now. ~ +

—New and unusual propositions, some of
value; new materials and methods equally
favoured with everyday routine and fam-
iliar activities.

*
*
*
*
*

* PISCES
Feb. 21—March 20

SAGITTARIUS
Nov. 23—Dec, 22

CAPRICORN
Dec. 23 — Jan, 21

AQUARIUS —Heed Scorpio now and you can benefit.
ae 22 nay +5 20 Must speed up notably in occupational
duties but don’t go in for unnecessary
chmnges. Quickly clear up unfinished tasks.

—Avoid extremes and profit more in
achievement. A keen but even disposition
can make this a beneficial day. New and
familiar matters both favoured.

YOU BORN TODAY: Excellent reasoning faculties; you
are innately purposeful, sonstructive, intelligent. Usually as
middle of the road in decisions. High imagination, ieee
powers; Virgoans make able journalists, critics, analysts, oe *
ticians, actors. Birthdate: John Locke, famous philosopher,

(Copyright, 1952, King Features Syndicate, Ine.)

ke ke ke wee we we kK we eK

SFE

SA SSS SSL
GAIETY

Hurricane Precaution }}){} ne Garden—St. James
HINT No, ll TODAY & TO

MAT. SUN. 4.30 PM.
“TAP ROOT” (Technicolor)
After A Hurricane —
Unless your are qualified

*









—



HEFLIN, Susan HAYWORTH &
Sui “PARDON MY SARONG"
Bud ABBOTT & Lou COSTELLO

Midnite Ss. SUN, & MON.

x





* 8.30 p.m. |
to render assistance keep ‘SPORT of |, |THE SAXON, |
Pras from damaged Paul Gagne Robert spate |
areas, You will only agp ery & Alfred

ork- ACROSS the -
hamper the rescue w pitios |“SHADOW of A

aay Charles Starrett _'
Ser ee

PLAZA THEATRES | THEATRES

Joseph Cotton

















OISTIN
(Dial 8404)
TODAY (only)

445 & 8 30 p.m.

“NIGHT BOAT TO

BRIDGETOWN
(Dial 2310)

8 Shows TODAY
— 445 & 8.30 p.m.

BARBAREES
(Dial 5170)
TODAY 4.45 & 8.30 p.m
& Continuing Daily



2

and continuing Daily at]| Warners’ New Hit! s pe
4.45 & 8.00 pm : “INSIDE THE WALLS obert Newton
Another Thrilling Action|] of FOLSOM PRISON" || “SHADOWS. on

Film from Warner Bros. BEACON HILL”

‘ with a ___Roddy Mc Dowall Me Dowall
teve Davi =——————SSS==—
RETREAT HELL COCHRAN — BRIAN Sat. to Mon.



4.45 & 8.30 pm
The Big Action Hit!
“STEEL HELMET"
Gene EVANS & Jame
EDWARDS
‘SAT. 8 Special 1.30 Pp ™
“SILVER CITY

Frank LOVEJOY
Richard CARLSON

SAT. Special 1 0 p.m

“OUTLAWS of
TEXAS"
Whip WILSON &
“TRAIL’S END"







SAT. Special 9.30 & 130
“OUTLAW BRAND”
Jimmy WAKELY &











Johnny Mack BROWN BONANZA’
“WEST OF EL DORADO” = || Rex ALLEN &
5 = || “GUNMEN of
ohnny Mack BROWN |! Midnite Special SAT ABILENE"
____ Rocky LANE
Midnite Special SAT. 3 Thrillers; a
P “MILLION DOLLAR “Midnite Special SA’
Thrilling New Serial PURSUIT’ (new) |/“BUCKAROO SHE F
‘ROYAL MOUNTED Penny EDWARDS & OF TEXAS” &
RIDES AGAIN” “SOUTH of RIO” “TIMBER TRAIL”
Bill KENNEDY it Monte HALE Monte HALE re HALE gee Monte HALE (color) |



STARRING

"a (MEJD eOomoCARLSTN TAMBLYN QUIS

scacey sur MILTON SPERLING © TED SHERDEMAN owmecrea &» JOSEPH H LEWIS

“UNITED STATES PICTURES... 2... WARNER arc
PP i A 7 A BaIncETEWN

(DIAL 2310)
OPENING FRIDAY 2.30— 4.45 & 830 p.m.

and Continuing Daily 4.45 & 8.30 p.m,















FRIDAY, AUGUST 29,

Fire In Grenada Renders I

Appeal Launched CARDINAL AT K. of C. PROCESSIONAL

1952

BARBADOS



For Subscriptions

(From Our Own Correspondent)
ST. GEORGE'S, August 25.
ABOUT 100 persons, nearly half their number child-
ren ranging from infaney to mid-teenage, have been ren-
dered homeless here as the result of a fire which destroyed
a tenement building and four other houses early yesterday

morning.

The destitute are temporarily housed at the Youth
Centre, former Grenada Boys’ Secondary School, and Sal-

vation Army night shelter

as sleeping quarters and are

fed at Foresters Social Workers League breakfast shed.
The majority are humble working class folk who have been
bereft of all their possessions.

A broadcast appeal was made
yesterday afternoon by Mr. A, N.
Hughes, Chairman of the St.
George’s District Board, for sub-
scriptions to a relief fund, which
has been headed by His Excel-
lency Sir Robert Arundelt with
a $50.00 donation, and for gifts
of clothing and other comforts to
be sent to a committee led by
Lady Afundell.

Both Sir Robert and Lady
Arundell visited the burnt out
area yesterday morning and also
inspected the temporary relief
arrangements.

Scene of the fire was the corner
of Hughes Street (old Jack’s
Alley) and Tyrrel Street, though
one of the razed buildings lay on
the opposite side of Tyrrel Street,
apparently caught by blazing air-
borne debris.

The alarm was given at 12.30
a.m. when fire was seen within a
large walled and galvanized shed
housing Mr. Joe Pitt’s furniture-
making establishment on Hughes
Street but the flames had already
taken such hold of this location
that within a matter of minutes
the roof was blown through,
sending a column of flame and
smoke spiralling upwards, and
by the time the Fire Brigade
arrived on Tyrrel Street the
neighbouring tenement was
ablaze. A building of appalling
condition consisting of a wooden
upper floor resting on walls which
hemmed in a lower series of
rickety rooms, the tenement was
greedily engulfed in the inferno
and, as the occupants had been
able to evaeuate it with what
little they could take, the fire-
fighting had to be concentrated
on a maze of other small build-
ings in the vicinity as well as on
the opposite side of Tyrrel Street,

The fire was brought under
control about two and a half hours
after the alarm, the damage list
read: Pitt’s furniture shop com-
pletely destroyed with heavy loss
of electrically operated machinery
as well as sewing machines with
a quantity of straw-made items
which the establishment also
turned out for the tourist trade;
the tenement, owned by the widow
of the late Geoffrey Haynes, des-
‘troyed; two small houses owned
by the late D, G. Lusan destroyed;
4 tailor shop half burnt out—all
on the corner lot. On the opposite
side of Tyrrel Street a two-floor
house owned and occupied by Mr.
J. R. Davis, well known employee
of the local office of Cable and
Wireless, was also destroyed with

only a few household effect
Saved. o
Loss in personal belongings

was generally heavy, owners suf-
fering frem the flames as well as
some looting which occurred in
the confusion as householders in
the vicinity on both sides of Tyrrel
Street began to clear their resi-
dences for fear of spread of the

The Fire Brigade and Police, as
well as volunteer helpers, includ-
ing seamen from the H.L.S.
Crofter, worked heroically,

Legislators Want
Many Privileges

(Prem Our Own Correspondent)
GRENADA, Aug. 28.

The West Indian today front-
piaee and bannerlined its *

ucia correspondent’s report of a
speech made in Castries by Dr.

‘arl La Corbiniere, one of the
delegates to a recent Gairy sum-
moned Elected Legislators party
in which the talks were character-
ised as chiefly aimed at obtaining
privileges for electivs themselves,
chairman Gairy said.

Turning down the proposal Hon,
George Charles (St. Lucia), dis-
cussed the cost of living instead of
the issues.

La Corbiniere, reporting to the
citizens at a Trade Unionists pub-
lic meeting disclosed that the
agenda revealed only when the
vonference began in camera sitting,
proposed the introduction of legis-
ation for the following privileges
for members of the Council; Pen-
sions, free medical and surgical
treatment, freedom from arrest,
priority over other members of the
public for attention at government
health centres and government de-
partments, free transportation,
free house tax, and the same privi-
leges as Governors and Adminis-
trators, free¢em from import
duties on cars, free car license,
radio, etc., the right to requisition
government buildings free of
charge and travel freely between
the Windwards.

Gairy , seen by your correspond-
ent, generally describes La Cor-
biniere’s speech 3s a gross mis-
representation of the facts of the
proceedings,





Egyptian Officials
May Work In
Shirt Sleeves

CAIRO, Aug. 28.
Egypt let down a few more
hairs On Wednesday—again in
the gentlemen’s apparel depart-
ment. All government official:
should work in their shirtsleeves





discarding those stuffy coar

neckties 2nd tarboushe Social
Affairs Minister Znoheri

aid. He said he wanted the cabi-
net ever ¢ hiexa

1e Wicials be mmforta
rle t

Egypt

Garana would

‘Nelson’ Brings
62 Passengers

For Barbados

One hundred and twenty-nine
passengers arrived in the island
on board the S.S. Lady Nelson
yesterday morning. Ot this
amount, 62 landed and the other
67 were intransit.

The passengers disembarkin,
here came from St. Vincent,
Grenada, Trinidad and British
Guiana. Those intrensit are going
to Dominica, Antigua, St. Lucia,
St. Kitts, Montserrat, Bermuds,
Boston, Halifax and Montreal.

Those landing were: From
Trinidad: Mr. J. B, Vidal, Mrs.
J. B, Vidal Miss T. S. Vidal, Miss
T. B. Vidal, Master J. B. Vidal,
Mr. E. 8S. Larrier, Mr. C. Archer,
Master V. Archer, Master J.
Archer, Mrs. A. J. Corbin, Miss
A. J. Corbin, Miss M. B. Brown,
Miss A. M. Julien, Mr. A. A.
Clarke, Mr. C. Greaves, Mr. A, J.
Frenche and Mr. A. B. Scantle-
bury.

From Grenada: Miss J. Lessey,
Mr. R. Pike, Mrs, R. Pike, Mr.
V. Lessey, Mrs. E. Lessey, Mr.
R. Wason, Mr.

C. DaSilva, Mr.
C. Morris, Mr. S. Harris, Mr. I.
Harris, Mr. S. King, Mr. N.
Marshall, Mr. J. Pilgrim, Mr. R.
Pilgrim, Mr. L. Lovell, Mr. C.
Alleyne, Mr. S. Clarke, Mr. D.
Prescod, Mr. D. Parris, Mr. C.
Morris, Mr. T. Morris, Miss E.
Morris, Mrs. J. Haynes, Miss C.
Haynes, Miss H. Haynes, Mr.
L. A. Davidson, Master W.
Browne, Mr. E. Lashley Mr.
Cc. E. Johnson, Mr. C. Seals and
Mr. A. Van Duin.
From St. Vincent: Mr. H.

Hammond, Miss M. Maude, Mrs.
M. Lowe, Miss D, Lowe, Mrs.
F. Belmar, Miss F. Belmar, Miss
H. C. Burke and Miss N, John.
From British Guiana: Mr. A.
Emerson, Mr, J. Gordon, Miss C.
Deane and Miss V. L, Alleyne,
The Nelson also brought a
quantity of cargo to the island.
Two casks and a barrel of vege-
tables came from St. Vincent, 200
cylinders of gas, 800 cartons of
grapefruit juice, 50 drums of fatty
acids, shirts, paper bags and
printed matter from Trinidad
and garments, boys’ caps, medi-
cal preparations and 30 crates of
oranges from British Guiana.

While in Carlisle Bay the
Nelson will load 1,000 tons of
sugar for Montreal, a small

quantity of molasses for Halifax
and rum and general cargo for
Bermuda and the nofthern
islands. She leaves tomorrow
night at nine o’clock.

Yesterday one of the clerks
was kept busy in the Third Class
Passengers section of Messrs.
Gardiner Austin & Co. Ltd., her
Agents, as many people from the
northern islands sought pas-
‘sages.

One passenger hinted that she
was trying to escape the heat in
Barbados but was_ surprised
when rain began to fall soon
after she was handed her ticket
for St. Lucia,



Moharram Guilty Of
Abusing Authority
For Personal Gain

CAIRO, August, 28,



It was announced that the
Egyptian Government Purge Com-
mittee found former Wafdist
Minister of Public rks, Osman
Moharram, guilty of abuse of
authority for rsona! gain, The
Committ commended = dis-
ciplinary action to be taken against
him.

In the first ruling any of

six government purse committees



created earlier tis month to
clean up the Administration,
Moharram was found guilty of
extending Alexandria seaways

network so his own
benefit by thé project

The extension cost the muni-
cipality of Alexsndria . £60,000
($168,000). Mohamed Raafat
former Director of the municipal-
ity was found guitty of complicity
in the case.

house would

The Committee pointed out that
Moharram cannot be tried on the
basis of the new ministerial re-
sponsibility law because the law
is not retroaetive. Nor can he
be tried on the basis of administra-
tive disciplinary action because
he is no longer in the government

The Committee suggested that
he government:seek new legisla-
tion extending disciplinary action
to ‘apply to former officials.







The Cabinet will meet today
under the Presidenc; Premie
Maher to discuss the fimal version

f the lane form dcheme, It was
ex] ed that the Cobinet decision
would be announced immediately

fter the meeting.

Mahe ¥ al xpected tc

fie h Cabinet today.
Obser i t four Ministers
1 ! > the ¢ net and six or

i b pointe

r* fate will go to
Me . f the Medit









FRANCIS CARDINAL SPELLMAN (center) of New York walks in the sol-
emn processional entering St. Vincent’s Church in Los Angeles, The
eeremony formally opened the Knights of Columbus’ 70th annual con-
vention. Messages from President Truman and Pope Pius XII were
read at the opening session of the order, (International Soundpheto)





F.A.O. Home Eeonomist
Finds Much To Do
In Trinidad

PORT-OF-SPAIN,

On the eve of her departure from Trinidad after a
three-month’s stay, Miss Elsa Haglund, Home Economist
of the Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United
Nations, gave an account of her activities since the conelu-
sion of the jointly sponsored F.A.O.—Caribbesn Commission
Conference on Home Economics and Education in Nutrition,
which met at Kent House in early July.

Miss Haglund came to Trinidaci
a month previous to the Con-
ference to work with the Com-
mission’s Central Secretariat in
making preparations, Kent House
has been her headquarters,

Recently Miss Haglund
cipated in the Caribbean
Conference of the Young
Women’s Christian Association
and lectured at a two-day course
on Home Economics for officials
of the Public Health Department
of the Government of Trinidad
and Tobago, held under the
auspices of the British Council.
She addressed an open meeting of
the Y.W.C.A. Conference on the
subject, “Your and My Responsi-
bility to the United Nations,” and,
at the other seminars discussed
with delegates the’ problem of
food and health,

Talks With Teachers

On one occasion, teachers in
the territory’s various Domestic
Science centres assembled in
Port-of-Spain to discuss with
Miss Haglund the problem. of de-
veloping and improving the
teaching of Home Economics in
the school. She deseribed them
as a very interested group. In
Tobago, Miss Haglund held what
she termed “very lively discus-
sions” on Home Economics teach-
ing with Domestic Seience teach-
ers and interested students at the
ag * Anstey High School,

iss Haglune reported wide-~
spread interest in the recommen-
dation of the Conference on House
Economies and Education in Nu-
trition that the University of
Puerto Rico conduct a 3-months’
course (in English) for Mome
Economics workers next year,
Many individuals to whom she
talked expressed the desire to take
such a course.

Other activities included; a dis-
cussion of school feeding with
personnel operating Trinidad’s
“Breakfast Sheds”; visits to Gas-
parillo where she saw some Home
Improvement projects, to the
Women’s Inatitute in La Laine,
and to community centres in
Princess Town and Williamsville
attendance at a Community Rally,
in Tunapuna,

Smokeless Fireplace

Visiting homes in , Miss
Haglund observed that chulhas
were without vents for smoke and,
in some cases, were too low either
for safety or for comfort in cook-
ing. She has been able to supply
a diagram and detailed instruc-
tions for the construction of a
smokeless fireplace designed in
India, and now in use in Jamaica,
among other places.

Miss Haglund plans to leave
Trinidad Sunday, August 31 for
Jamaica, where she will take part
in the Adult Education Seminar
to be held by the Extra Murai
Department of the University
College to the West Indies,
September 1—20. One of the
seminar topics will be “Home
Economies for the Caribbean.” On
the request of the Jamaica Gov-
ernment, and with the approval
of the Food and Agriculture
Organisation, Miss Haglund wil!
remain in Jamaica for at least a
month following the Seminar

Before returning to FAO heac-
quarters in Rome, Italy, she v"
visit Antigua and St. Kitts to
confer with officials and others «
problems relating to the bett
application’ of modern home
economics techniques.

parti-
Area



Two Terrorists
Sentenced Tio Die

SAIGON, Aug. 28.

A military tribunal sentencexi
two Vietnam terrorists to de: th
and five to life imprisonment ‘|<
placing plastic bombs under 1.0
automobiles in downtown Saigon
last January, killing two person
and injuring 30.

The condemned men are me'n-
bers of Trinh Minh, the Coadaist
Dissent organization which br:
away from the Vietnam forves
several months ago because th»
Jisagreed with Emperor Bao D

policy. The attack took place
January 9 in front of the the;
id wn hall when two pla






automobi
s0mbs es



And Then
The Rains!

Yesterday morning was just as

‘warm as any other morning
during this week. But shortly
after nine o'clock dark clouds

gathered in the sky, and people
began to expect rain. Even be-
fore the first drizzle at about
9.30 am. it started to get cooler.

During the morning fairly
heavy showers (fell and dark
clouds continued to form in the
sky. The thermometer, which
on the previous morning showed

91 degrees Fahrenheit in the
Shade, now read five degrees
less. This was. po relief. The

wind could scarcely be felt and

humidity was great.

The majority of people who
walked the main streets of the
City sought shelter from the rain
in stores, few trying to walk
through it, even when it was only
drizzling.

One vendor who
near Broad Street
“This is flu rain’.
who entered drug stores, only
intending to shelter, bought
Phensic tablets and Aspirins.

Along the waterfront work
was held up four long periods.
Labourers scampered off to take
shelter, deserting lighters and
dranes.

Local Scouts Help
At Grenada fire

Fifteen members ot the James
Street Scout Troop, Fourth Bar-
bados, who were in Grenada
for ten days, assisted in extin-
guishing a fire in Grenada which
early, on Sunday morning des-
troyed five houses and left about
100 homeless, Nearly half of
those homeless were children,

The Scouts returned to the
island yesterday morning by the
§.S. Lady Nelson, the same boat
on which they left on Saturday
night, August 16,

The group was led by Rover
Leader, Charles Morris, assisted
by Cub Master Sydney Harris
and Assistant Scwut Master, Basil
King.

Mr. Morris told the Advocate
that they had a very enjoyable
time, visiting many places. The
Grenadians were very hospi-
table.

He said that on the Sunday
morning when the fire occurred
around 12.30 o’clock the boys
were aroused by shouts of: “St.
George’s on fire.’ The James
Street Boys, as well as the First
Queen’s Royal College Scouts of
Trinidad, who were also camp-
ing at Tanteen, Military Quar-
ters of Grenada, turned out and
assisted the Grenada Fire Bri-
gade. “The boys wete highly
complimented by the ire
Chief,” said Mr. Morris.

Mr. Morris said that the Scouts
regret having to return so soon

was selling
remarked:
Some people



because they could not fulfil
their engagements.
“Grenada is extremely hot,”

said Mr. Morris. He feels that it
is even warmer than Barbados.



Larceny ‘Case
Adjourned
ease in which

a tailor of
St. Michael

The
Rawlins
Land,

Delamere
is charged
with larceny as a_ bailee
of £1 11s. 2d. belonging to
Gordon Niles on March 29 was
adjourned yesterday by . His
Worship Mr. E. A. McLeod
Police Magistrate of District
“A” until September 9.

Sgt. Alleyne attached to Cen-|

tral Station *is prosecuting for}
the Police from information re-
ceived,

The case for the prosecution is)
Niles}
‘was in a shop at Church Village, |
St. Michael he gave three and a!

that on March 29 while

self yards of khaki
5s, 10d. a yard to the defendant
o that he could make him
pair of pants
The sfendant promised to
the pants on March 31
did Three
Nile till did
the defendant

fie e Polic

valued at}

a}

George |

ADVOCATE

Barton Makes
Special Appeal

@ From Page 1

the West India Committee had
kept Members of Parliament in-
cormeqd about happenings in the
West Indies, particularly in
times of crisis; the efforts of the
West India Committee which
yielded such a handsome result
when the Committee backed an
appeal for contributions to the
Jamaica Hurricane Relief Fund;
assistance in advising on the
choice of educational establish-
ments and in one instance, the
launching of a young West
Indian on a career of training as





an architect,

ie said that the Committee

t helped West Indians in
Brita who were in difficulties,
or particular example being
hat of a case of a former RAF
man who had become destitute
and ill and for whom the Com-
mittee secured assistance from

the appropriate Benevolent Fund.

Prestige Exhibits

Mr. Barton made a_e special
appeal for support for the Brit-
ish Industries Fair, pointing out
that while great results might
not be very obvious, what peo-
ple had to consider, would be
the impression created on the
thousands in the United Kingdom
who walked through "the West
Indies section and did not find
the name of Barbados so much
as mentioned, while Jamaica,
Trinidad and even the smal}
islands of the Windward and
Leeward groups shone down
from the illuminated sign
backed by attractive prestige
exhibits in light and colour.

In eonnection with his appeal
for membership, Mr. Barton
said that he was unable to pro-
mise any particular benefit for
any prospective member excep*
of course the not inconsiderabic
benefit of receiving the West
India Committee Circular.

should be a matter of con-
cern to everybody in the West
Indjes that there should be ar
active body with a high au-
thority and prestige of the Wes
India Committee, ready to serve
in any West Indian cause at a
moment’s notice. People who in-
sured their premises did not
complain if they did not get

fire and people who supported
the West India Committee would
de so with the knowledge’ that
the help of that Committe:

it

might, but not unnecessarily, be
reede@ personally
by themselves.

and urgently







|

LNAMELWAHE,
GLASSWARE
PAINTS



|
|

GENERAL







Vestry Of
St. Michael

@ from page 1

The market as planned would
be a tropical market, (an open
ait market as some people termed
it) and there was no chance of its
being as hot and badly ventilated
as the one which they had used at
Cheapside in the past

The report was unanimously
adopted.

Church Village School

The Vestry dealt with a letter
from the Very Reverend Dean
Hazlewood in connection with the
purchase of the Church Village
Girls’ School.

The letter pointed out that a
survey of the area had shown that
it consisted of 6,900 square feet
If suitable terms could be ar-
ranged steps would be taken to
obtain legislative sanction for the
sale of the premises to the Vestry
for a named figure.

That concession had been madc
on the understanding that the
vreperty was being acquired and
would be used for publie and
parochial service.

The alternative seemed to be,
the letter went on to state, that
the owners should cbtain legisla-
tive sanction to sell the premises
at the best market price and that
the Vestry would have the oppor-
tunity of bidding at the sale,

Mr, Mottley said that there was
a body of opinion that subscribed
to the view that the additional
space could be acquired for ex-
tending the Scavenging Depart-
ment, Whatever the setup turned
out to be, whether it was that
Vestry or a Mayor and Corpora-
tion, the streets still had to bé
cleaned and they would require
an adequate Scavenging Depart-
ment,

Site Desirable

Since the acquisition of the site
was desirable, he moved that
committee of the Vestry along
with two independent valuers be
ippointed to go into the question

of price, ete. and report to the
Vestry. !

The Chairman appointed Messrs
KE. D, Mottley, ©, Tudor, C

Carlton Browne of the Vestry anc
subject to their acceptance, Messr:

c, R. Armstrong and H. H, Wil- |

liams to serve on that cominittec

which would be under his chair~ |

1anship,

Mr. Mottley tabled a motion for
discussion at the next meeting o!

the Vestry to the effect: “As’ # |
result of the findings of the Cour'
of Common Pleas in the recent

ases of Omnibus Companies vs |
the Vestry, that this Vestry dis- |

cuss at their next meeting what

GCGLLLGLGGILGD GS

10% CASH DISCOUNT

UN

Homeless

Secondary Schools
Teachers Will
Meet On Sept. 1

An Extraordinary
Meeting of the
\ssistant Teachers in Secondary
Schools will be held in the
Library of Harrison College, by
nd permission of the Headmas-
“, on Monday September 1,
starting at 10 a.m,

The meeting has been. called
in connection with the appoint-
ment of the Salaries Commis-

mer to review and make recom-
mendations regarding the re
muneration of al! Government
ervants in Barbados, excluding
hese covered by the Turner

»nmittee Report except where

is considered anomalies still
exist and would be created by the

ummendations to be made.
rhe delegation appointed

General
Association of





to







mek an interview with the au-
erities, although it has not been
;vanted such an interview, 1s
pee to report progress at
‘onday’s meeting The Associa-
will also comsider the mat-

of submitting written evi-
nee in connection with the
iquiry by the Salaries Commis-

yer



uRS. BELLA LUMSDEM
DIES IN GRENADA

(From Que Own Correspondent)
ST, GEORGE'S, Aug. 26.
The death took place at the
lony Hospital last Sunday of
ella Lumsden, wife of Mr, Clay-

m Luresden who is resident in
New York,
Besides her husband the de-

eased leaves a son, Carl in New
wk and a daughter here, Miss
Lsmai Lumsden of the Education
Department,
A large gathering attended the
ineral at the St. George’s R.C
“hureh,



‘eps should be taken to ensure
lat an equitable tax be paid by
bus Concessionaires”,

The Vestry recommended Rev-
rend K, A. B, Hinds as a member
{ the Old Age Pensidm Claims
ommittee to fill the vacancy
reated by the resignation of Rev-
rend W. M, Malone from July 31
After dealing with some matters

ot bi Relief, the meeting termin-
ated,

Wik HAVE IN



PAGE THREE

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PAGE FOUR

BARBADOS ei ADVOCATE

ae ee {8 Fe ye
hinewcr



tisewf qv

Printed by the Advecate Oe., Ltd, Mre~* #1. Gridgctewn



__ Friday, August 29, es

W. L. c OMMITTEE |

THE Secretary of the West India Com-
mittee is at present in Barbados where he
has halted on the first stage 6f a compre-
hensive tour of the British Caribbean.

The recent war introduced hundreds of
Barbadians to the headquarters of the West
India Committee in London and the wel-
fare work performed by the Ladies Com-
mittee under Lady Davson and, later, Lady
Winifred Gore will be remembered with
appreciation by many service men and
women.

But apart from service men and women
who passed through London during the
war and apart from the less than two hun-
dred members of the West India Committee
resident in Barbados, the West India Com-
mittee is little known by Barbadians.

That is a great pity. Because there can
hardly exist anywhere in the world today
an organisation which has played so great
a part in the history of the West Indies.

Records still exist today at the London
headquarters of the first general meeting
of the West Indian merchants which was
held in that City on April 11th 1769.

Ever since that date the activities of the
West Indian merchants have been concern-
ed with the development of trade with the
West Indies and with, the promotion oj

West Indian interests.
a
In more recent years the Society of Wesi

Indian Merchants and Planters developec
into the West India Committee which was
incoproated by Royal Charter in 1904.

In the words of the Charter the West
India Committee is formed of British sub
jects personally interested in the agricui-
tural and manufacturing industries and
trade of the British West Indies, Britisi:
Guiana and British Honduras. Member:
subscribe voluntarily to the funds of th:
Association, the object of which is by
united action to promote the interests oi
such industries and trade and thus increase
the general welfare of the British Carib-
bean,

Throughout this century the West Indi:
Committee has served its members wel)
and because of their influence in London
and knowledge of West Indian trade need:
they have been able to champion the trad-
ing interests of the West Indies by dealing
directly with government departments ir
the United Kingdom. Today West Indiar.
governments are no longer dependent on
the West India Committee for representa-
tion in London: and West Indian politici-
ans have been flying to London to holc
negotiations with departments of the Brit-
ish Government and to support the claims
of Caribbean organisations such as the
British West Indies Sugar Association o
the Banana Growers Association 0!
Jamaica. This year West Indian govern
ments opened a new chapter in trade nego-
tiations between the United Kingdom and
the West Indies by opening a Trade Com
missioner Service in London.

Few persens in the West Indies wili
know that the opening of such a Trade
Commissioner service in London was re
commended many years ago by the Wesi
India Committee in London, but the
willingness of the Committee today to
co-operate with that service is well-known
and was conveyed by cable to the first
meeting of the Regional Economic Com-
mittee last year.

_ So far from competing in any way with
the West India Committee the inaugura-
tion of the Trade Commissioner Service
in London ought to give a boost to the West
India Committee and should result in an

increase of members from the British
Caribbean.

_ The Trade Commissioner Service in Lon-
don like the Regional Economic Com-
mittee in the West Indies is a creature of
the seven British Caribbean governments.
It eannot represent the personal interests
of those engaged in agricultural or manu-
facturing industries although it can assist
agencies like the West India Committee
to promote such interests.

From the point of view of West Indian
governments the existence of the Trade
Commissioner Service in London will
facilitate any negotiations which West
Jndian governments might like to make
through this agency in London. But from
the point of view of individual trading
‘interests the Trade Commissioner Service,
being a creature of seven West Indian gov-
ernments, will be unable to approach indi-
vidual problems with any independence of
judgment. .

For independent championing of private
interests which may seldom coincide with
the interests of one or more West Indian
governments the West India Committee
remains equipped by almost two centuries
of experience and knowledge to carry out
the aims of its Royal Charter: “by unit:
action to promote the interest of such in-
dustries and trade and thus increase the
general welfare” of the Caribbean terri-
tories. Today as never before the. West
India Committee has an important role to
play in matters affecting West Indian trade.
It is up to all organisations and individuals

free a swell its
and strenethen its effective

to the West

who champion ition to

1embership
F ‘ Indies.



Loeal Government In

Local or decentralised govern-
ment has figures largely in the ad>
ministration of the United King-
dom since Saxon times, but the
present system of local government
by elected councils has been oper-
ating for less than a century. In
addition to the provision of normal
public services such as Water sup-
ply, drainage, street lighting,
refuse collection, local authorities
now play an important part in the
execution of, for example, the
national health service, the hous-
ing programme, and town and
country planning.

Â¥ of Local Authority

nue Wales and Northern
Ireland are divided for local gov-
ernment purposes into Administra-
tive Counties and County Bor-
oughs. County Boroughs are towns
independent of County Councils.
No town of less than 75,000 popu-
lation can now become a_ county
borough. Administrative Counties
are divided, under, the County
Councils, into Municipal Boroughs,
Urban Districts and Rural Dis-
tricts, each with its own Council.
Rural Districts are subdivided into
Parishes,

In Scotland, local government
yuthorities are County Councils,
Town Councils and District Coun-
cils. Special arrangements exist in
London, where local government
is divided between the London
County Council, the Corporation
xf the City of London and the
Metropolitan Borough Councils,

Functions of Local
Authorities

(a) Environmetal Services; are
services designed to secure and
mprove the citizen’s surroundings,
yublic health, road safety, the pro-

vision of parks and playgrounds,

tte, These services are usually
dministered by District or Parish
Jouncils (for | Administrative
*ounties), or by County Borough
Souncils (who are what may be
ermed all-purpose authorities).
neluded among environmental



NEW YORK.

ARCH R. MARTIN, a 47-year-
old salesman of British goods, is
} packing to sail home with a tough
1 nenenas for British manufactur-
ers,

He arrived in America seven
saonths ago, his brief cases. bulg-
} ing with seven lines of products,
nd expected a big welcome.
But this is what happened, He
‘pounded the pavement” and
iade more than 200 calls in the
heatwave To cut expenses he
lived in a 7s, -a-day room, gave
p his daily highball and lunched
n a bowl of soup. He lost
ist. 11lb,





° * *

THESE are his conclusions
The prestige of the “Made in
fritain”’ label is fading. The
American market will be lost
inless British manufacturers stop
wying to force on it goods made
aceording to their ideas and start

| making things the way Americans
want them.

Sample experience: When he
reported the American buyers’
complaint that a British soup did
ot suit American tastes the
‘coup maker replied: “Canadians
nd South Africans like it; why
‘on’t Americans learn to?”

British goods must be packed
» meet American ideas, They
cust be designed to meet intense
smpetition, But, above all, you
can only sell what Americans
want, made in the way Ameri-
cans want it made.

P.S.. Martin got some orders.

And after a rest back home in
Sulwich the will return in two |





Britain
services is the important work of
town and country planning, which
1s done by County and Couniy
Borough Councils.

¢b) Protketive Services: such as
fire, police and civil defence, are
maintained by County Councils or
County Borough Councils (Town
Councils in Scotland) or by Joint
Boards representing more than ole
area, There are special police and
fire arrangements in London,

y (¢) Personal Services: are such
as maternity and child welfare
services, education, housing, care
of the aged and infirm, provision
and upkeep of jibraries, museums
and art gallarics, For these the
type of authority varies accordiug
to the service provided.

Electoral System

Elections to local Councils are
held regularly, at fixed intervals
and according to fixed rules, under
much the same conditions, includ-
ing suffrage, as national elections.
Candidates, who must satisfy a
number of legal; residential and
personal qualiiications, and who
must be properly nominated, stand
either as Independents or 2s
political party representatives, Tne
jarger Council areas are usually
subdivided into wards or constitu-
encies for voting purposes, Coun-
cillors are elected: to serve fur a
period of three years. They are
unpaid.

The actua] work of the councils
is organized as follows:—questions
of policy and principle are gen-
vrally decided by the whole coun-
cil; committees and
tees are then appointed to carry
out detailed administration, There
are various types of local author-
ity committee: statutery commit-
tees (ihese are compulseory under
an Act of Parliament), standing or
permanent committees and special

or ad hee committees; there are
also joint committees representing
_mnore than one local

sub-commit- ;

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

1. The execution of policy|
rests with. salaried officers and
employees appointed and paid by
the councils.
Relations With Central
Government |
It is assumed that local author-
ities are responSible bodies com-
petent to discharge their own
functions, consequently, interfer-
ence by the central government is
kept to the minimum. The func-
tions of local authorities are in any
case precisely limited by the Act
or Acts of Parliament governing
their duties in any given field of
activity. The Central Govern-
ment Departments do, however,
have powers of supervision, ’in-

_spection and financial control, and

the right to issue advisory cir-
culars. |The Ministry of Housing
and Local Government is the
central department most closely
concerned with local government.
Other ministries—e.g. Ministry of
Health, Ministry of Education—
have direct relations with local
authorities on matters within their

control.
Finance

Local government finances are
directed chiefly from grants from
the central government. local
rates, and loans. Accounts are
controlled by a Finance Committee
and audited annually.

Government grants take various
forms, such as the payment of a
percentage of local authority ex-
penditure on certain services, or
grants to the poorer authorities
to bring their resources into line
with those of wealthier areas.
Rates are a form of local taxation
levied on al} land and buildings
n a local government area, based
on valuations by Inland Revenue
officers (in Seotland by assessors),
and collected from owners or
cecupiers by local authorities
themselves. Loans may be raised
by local authorities for specific
purposes, with the approval of the
Central Government Departments
concerned, usually through the

authority Public Works Loans Board.



by Newell Rogers

months to go on plugging.

ADMIRAL ALAN KIRK, ex-
U.S. Ambassador to Moscow, has
been chosen by President Tru-
man to head the Government's
Psychological Warfare Strategy
Board which fights the Moscow
propagandists,

AMERICA’S new drinking fad
-gin and tonic—sends sales
soaring, Distillers bottled 100 per
cent more gin in June than a year
ago, Long articles explain that
it was developed by British colo-
nisers in the tropics as “a

medi-

cine” and brought home by re-
tiring saihibs,

LARGEST labour. body the

8,000,000-member American Fed-
eration of Labour, invites Eisen-
hower and Stevenson to speak at
its annual convention. Then it
will decide whom to back. The
other big union organisation, the
6,000,000-member Congress of
Industrial Organisations is going
to back Stevenson.

THE business man's’ white-
collar shirt is losing out to the
sportsman’s open-neck shirt
worn with shirt tails outside his
trousers, White-collar shirt pro-
duction is down 31 per cent. sports
shirts up 56 per cent. No neckties
with sports shirts.

WEALTHY Howard Cullman,
one of New York’s leading back-
ers of Broadway shows, appeals
for theatres to be run on the
London model. He points out that

while ten shows run on Broad-

Our Readers Say:

Class Distinctions

1o the Editor, the Advocate,

SIR,—Please permit me to re-
ely through your most valuabie
vurnal to a letter written by
“CHRISTIAN”;

First he claims that the Barba-
dian people are too desirous or
maintaining class distinctions in
heir little island. I am a middl2
class man, and one who is hoping
,nat some day Barbadians of all
walks of life will enjoy life alike,
without material prohibitions.
Jut this can never be the end of
class distinction. It is in this very
state that man displays himself
as he really is, and will be clas-
sified not in terms of material
possessions, but by what he be-
lieves, by what he thinks, by
what he says, by what he does
and by what he is, It was in this
very state of equal opportunity
a the rich cities of Greece and
Asia Minor that men began to
hink of the mind, bringing about
he birth of philosophy and psy-
chology. There will never be an
end of elass distinction, because
men are 1.t made equal. Talents
are not shared according to Krem-

lin dictates, nor trade union
fanaticism.
“CHRISTIAN” spoke of love,

and I presume that ‘he meant
ove for neighbours. Love for our
seighbours is the very foundation
of a socialist party, a socialist
government, a socialist state, In
3arbados people have a long
and ‘weary way to go towards
socialism. There is nothing sociat-
ist about Barbadian politica!

rganisations, Here we have a
»olitical party truckling to the
nultitude of manual workers,
ind «caring nothing about any
ather kind of werker. Manua'
vorkers like Christian are chrisi-
ans. They are revelling in their
rwn joys, All others are dead,
hey only are alive. Tne Barbados
niddle class have been enduring
his state of affairs for a long
ime and that time is now at an
end.

As regards the advancements
f the Island, let us not sit and
roact about what our fathers left
1s. Since we were men Barbados
Sas been in a lethargic state and
s now sliding on the retrogres>

Uv middle class this is time for
ACTION.

SON OF THE FATHER.

Likes And Dislikes
To the Editor, the Advocate,

SIR I wa
your note

very pleased t
welcoming

comments n

on your paper and since then I

see that a simple controversy has Deaf

Man With Soup For Sale

way, London. has 40. He wants
smoking fn “the tbeatres, liquor
in theatre bars, and tickets sold
directly to the public instead of
to brokers.

FOR seven years wee Glasgow-
born Alex (Sandy) Ackland
brought me up to the Daily Ex-
press office in Rockefeller Centre
in the lift. To-day he resigned
his lift job. He won the part of
John Rankine, Rabbie Burns’s
drinking companion, in a Broad-
way-bound play “Comin’ Through
the Rye.” It is based on Burns's
life.

CAPTAIN FEDOR BELOV,
Soviet hero of World War II, ar-
rived with great secrecy at West-
over Air Force base in Massa-
chusetts. With him was _ his

Chicago bride, Adele Koskovsky, |

who married him in Germany.
They were whisked away under
heavy protective guard: The
Russian captain fled from Com-
munist rule.

DR. KARL VON COSEL, an
X-ray scientist, who so loved his
girl friend that he kept her after

she died and. serenaded her
nightly with organ music, has
died at Zephyr Hills, Florida. He

often claimed he would live for

" ever,

Cosel made 1940 headlines
when the girl, aged 19, was found
embalmed in his home, He had
fallen in love with her in hos+
pital and when she died he got
her family’s permission to erect
a vault. But he took her home
instead.

10.35 p.m.



tion in Aid of the Blind and the
would be grateful if you

been started concerning Rope and will publish in your columns the

Culture.

is simple indeed and Denington's
criticism is fair and deserving.

I do not want to appear attach tat
ropey but â„¢ find that simpleton eat ed - Statement of Revenue

Expenditure in connection

with the Charity Ball which was
held at the Marine Hotel on 26tis

When a West Indian, as I be- July last.

dieve Hopkinson is, can sit down
and pen a collection of big words

The Committee welcomes this

and tasteless phrases which _majf/} cpportunity of thanking all those

difficult reading more

cult, who contributed to the success of

you must expect criticism on this the venture, — the Advocate Co.

kind of false journalism.

Ltd.,

for advertising, those who

Now Mr, Wditor, I am suggest- sold and bought tickets for the
ing to you that you run a Gallup Ball, the Commissioner of Police

Poll to find out from your read~ #5»

ers their likes and dislikes. As
a matter of fact, such a poll could
be conducted every six or nine
months for the improvement of
your journal.

the free use of the Police

Orchestra, those who assisted by
taking charge of side attractions
and by donating or
freshments, and

selling re-
all those firms;

When this poll is conducted it which so generously contributed

tom be classified into four sec- prizes.

tio!
FIRST CLASS SPORT:

Some of your
articles; Flash Gordon; The Phan-
tom; and Carib Calling
SECOND CLASS SPORT:

At the Cinema; The Stars and
You; and the Comic Page.
THIRD CLASS SHORT

West Indian Culture; Education
Notes and Godson’s articles,
REAL SPORT:

Coppin’s Commentaries; Racing
Notes; Reports of Sports; Nathan-
icl Gubbins and Beachcomber.

When the poll is checked you
will perhaps discover that REAL
SPORT will head the list with a

The Committee assures

the public of Barbados that they
have
leaders; Hunte’s worthy cause.

helped forward a_ very

Yours faithfully,

Signed:— ALLAN COLLY-
MORE — President, B’dos
Assn. in aid of the Blind
and the Deaf.
BETTY L. ARNE—Chairman,
Organising Committee.
ISOLINE MOORE)

DOREEN WARD)—Members, |

Organising Committee.

Revenue



recommendation that THIRD Tickets . 689.00

CLASS SPORT should be dropped aaa, Receipts 105.00

altogether. ey gee 516.88
‘Our Common Heritage’ and Hetrechments s a 82.02

‘The People of Barbados’ should Balloons AF cs 19.54

win a place of their own. Par Corsages xis ae 30.88

Excellence. Farm & Garden notes Side attractions os 95.92

and Gardening Hints. What's Donation — ents

Cooking in the Kitchen and Cook fyotel ae 50.00

with Mary are a great tribute to

your paper. 1,589.24
Hoping that this will give you

an idea as to what features read- Expenditure

ers like or dislike and thanking

you for fayour of publitation. Rent of Ball Room» .. 240.00

ADA ADAMS.
Ed, Note:

correspondent, but

her for her suggestions ané Helpers

criticisms.

Assn. In Aid Of Blind
And Deaf

Social Welfare
Garrison,

St. Michael,

August, 1952.

c/o The Office,

he Advocate,



Printing and Advertis-

The Editor fails to un- ing y ‘ pe 29.40

derstand the meaning of the Bar Tickets ry

word ‘sport’ as used by this Drinks and. Refresh-
thanks ments ‘

Signed :—

6.00
390.89
6.00

DEPOSIT. AT BAR-
CLAYS BANK 866.95
CASH IN HAND... 50.00
1,589.24

P. OTHELLO EVELYN,









Hon. Treasurer, |
B’dos Assn. in Aid of Blind!
ind Deaf,







6th August, 1952,

FRIDAY, AUGUST 29, 1952

; “THE GOLDEN VOICE NURSERY RECORD BOOK”







AVALLEY IN THE
SHADOW GETS A TEXT

By JAMES LEASOR

LYNTON, Devon.

Church bells boom proudly out tonight
across the wounded valley of Lynmouth and
over the sullen sea. Not even the roar of the
angry River Lyn nor the staccato bark of
the pneumatic drills used by rescue squads
can drown these bells.

There is no weeping here. From the pulpit
of St. Mary’s Church a Scots-born vicar, the
Rey. E. H. Souttar, preached his sermon this
evening on the text “And when Jesus saw
the city He wept.”

At morning service—conducted without a
server because the server ten-year-old RoN-
ney Dimmock, is among the missing — the
sermon’s theme was: “Be of good cheer.”

The holidaymakers who booked at Lyn-
mouth have gone from their holiday homes.

Some are in the Jubilee Hall, with other
unlucky people who have lost their houses.
Others have moved up the 400ft. cliff here to
Lynton, where the locals have opened their
own homes warmly to these unexpected
visitors.

And, after the worst week-end in the
history of this Devon holidayland, a spirit of
comradeship reminiscent of the blitz days in
London has been born.

Lynmouth is a fantastic sight, a town split
down the centre by the river. (Old people
are saying that the river went back to the
course it took a century ago before “improve-
ments.”) The foreshore, up which the tide
is ereeping tonight, is strewn with boughs,
wooden beams, cars flattened as if by sledge
hammers.

Gulls wheel above the mess screaming for
titbits from the crates of biscuits and cakes,
the joints of meat, and the sweets that were
washed out from the shops. Trees were
carried out into the bay and now sprout
grotesquely from the deep water.

IN ONE ROOM ...
A Folded-down Bed

AS the torrent went down the High-street,
it ripped away most of the tarmac car park
outside the Glen Lyn Restaurant which still
bravely advertises “Teas, morning coffee,
lunch,”

Two cars are still in a doorless garage with
tree branches on the roof,

The river ripped some houses in two, and
yet, oddly, some furnishings were little
affected.

In one top-floor bedroom, for instance, the
bed is turned down neatly for a guest who
never came back to sleep. Books are on a
bedside table, coats flaunt from hangers and
hooks, foray

In another, a bathroom mirror is still un-
broken, although the wall from which it
hangs leans over drunkenly.

IN THE MUD...

Bottles Of Pickles
RESCUE men are trying to clean up the
place. The angry river rolled down boulders
as big as a small room, and this afternoon the

ago — story with Songs and Music on a gratnophone record
o help you read it in the re

ADVOCATE ‘STATIONERY







HELPS

@ SKYLINE KITCHEN SETS
@ FRENCH FRY CUTTER — ONION & VEG. CHOPPER
@ COFFEE MILLS & MINCERS in Three Sizes
@ EGG WHISKS — ELECTROPLATED TEA STRAINERS
@ DRAIN RACKS — ASBESTOS STOVE MATS

bom ee

iC. S. PITCHER & CO.

E~BOBOBB-BOGBwA BF



Ph. 4472



2 GGLYGL2LFS

Hey! Hearties 2








Here's Hartley's!

,
:
.
:
3



First Choice on any Shelf”

valley echoed and re-echoed as these were
dynamited. There was just no other way to
move them.

Mud is feet thick in the Highstreet. Mud,
and layers of tins of fruit, bottles of pickles,
petrol tins, sofas, and mattresses.

You can see how deep the flood waters ran
by the brown rim half way up shop windows.

Jams and Jellies

Marmalades

AT THE CAFE...
Tables Laid, Still

ODD things happened. Souvenirs for holi-
daymakers —- beaten brass bowls, hollow
Lucky Lynmouth Pixes and the like—floated
away down the street.

As the water rose, tables and chairs and
huge wooden-framed pictures tried to swim
out of the windows, and stuck there.

The Ssland Café still advertises teas. Ii
is really an island now, with a river of mud
one side, a roaring Lyn on the other.

Ironically, the tables are set for tea out-
side .... Some with white china, the others
heaped with mud nad rubble.

Outside the Bath Hotel are a baker’s dozen
of cars up to their axles in mud, half full of
bracken and leaves. They stand faithfully
where their owners left them after dinner on
Friday night.

FROMAHOME.. .
A Set Of Antlers
MEN trudge stoically through the mud

Crystals

Da Costa & Co. Ltd.

RD PPLEALELLELELSESSAGLSR

EAT
MORE

SPECIALS
Boneless Salt Beef
—52c. per Ib
Bone Meal—18e per Ib
t Carrots—24c, per Ib
Dressed Rabbits—36c. per tb

Thick Salt Fish











‘i ‘ ‘ i Mackerel
carrying the precious bric-a-brac of their Pilchards
homes: a set of antlers from the parlour wall eee
grandama’s ormolu clock; a framed motto: Lobster
“East, West, Home is Best. ‘ saree Paste
Side streets are blocked with muddied Ondane.
junk: in a corner a pile of sodden books bleed Frozen Haddock
their red cover dyes away. —L.ES, Seeket Sieve
Beef Suect—30c. per Ib
SECOND TIME LUCKY — || poncecrance :
|| PREPARE SUGGESTIONS
| aa For Your Overseas
i|| Bird’s Eye Fr
TWICE a Mexican underground move- Vegetables mi Parcels
ment smuggled Spanish-speaking Gene ||} Cauliflower Molasses in tins

Brussel Sprouts

AD =
Handa aan rrowroot Starch in pkgs.

Fuson, a California newsman, into the United Fruit Juices

States. He posed as a Czech Communist.||} Spinach Guava Jelly
Smugglers charged him $20 (£7) for fake||] Mixed Vegetables eat Cheese
birth and border-crossing papers, and $40 oo ee the Heat” Beef Suet

(£14) for the trip. a Gin and Canada Dry

| Sliced Beans
Sharp’s the word for
|

He played his part well. When the border “TONIC” 0 TOFFIES
ol caught him the first time it sent him} Se ee ns
back to Mexico. Next time the smugglers got ||

ack to Mex | Goddard’ s for Best Grocery Service |

b “







—







FRIDAY, AUGUST 29, 19

52



Clerk Acquitted
Of Accounts

An Assize jury after about half an hour’s deliberation
yesterday acquitted Keith Squires, a 26-year-old clerk, of

the charge of falsification o

f accounts on or about August

31 last year. Hearing of the case lasted nine days before
Mr. Justice J. W B. Chenery. His Lordship discharged

Squires.

Squires was charged with having on or about August
31, 1951, while he was a clerk or a mevead of D. V. Scott,
with intent to defraud, made or concurred in making a
false entry in a book belonging to or in the possession of
his employer, purporting to show that on August 31, rum

vats 1, 2, and 3, the propert
Cheapside, Bridgetown, con

and 2,820 proof wine gallons.

Counsel for Squires were Mr.
E. W. Barrow ang Mr. F. G.
Smith.

Hon. C. Wylie, Attorney Gen-
eral, and Mr. F, E. Field, prose-
cuted for the Crown.

The Attorney General said that
he would repeat the arguments
he had used the previous day in
his address and asked them to
aceept that the intent to defraud
was very evident. Indeed, when
a man wrote the type of letter
the accused wrote, they had the
evidence, not only the inference,
that there was the intention to
defraud.

His Lordship said; “Mr. Fore-
man and gentlemen of the Jury,
we are now reaching the penulti-
mate stage of this long and pro-
tracted trial, and first of all I must
commend you for the obvious care
and patience with which you
have listened to all the evidence,
the cross-examination, re-exami-
nation: and the care with which
you have followed arguments
propounded, both by the Counsel
for the defence and for the Pro-
secution,

Irrelevant Point

The Learned Attorney General
has said that reference has been-
made to the fact that he is not a
Barbadian. I shall only say this
—that_the fact that he is not a
Barbadian matters not one whit.
The traditions of the English Bar
are universal, world wide and
know no limitations whatever.
Therefore that fact is entirely
irrelevant to that question and
you will agree with me he has
earried out his duty with the tra-
ditions of the bar and put his case
for the Crown as it shold be put.

The Counsel for the defence,
Mr. Smith, not a Counsel of long
standing, in Mr, Barrow’s ab-
sence, has done all that could be
done for his client very ably. If
at times in a long trial there are
clashes between Counsel, you
must not take these very serious-
ly. They are part of the legal
game.

The duties of the prosecuting
counsel at the Court of Grand
Sessions are obviously different
from those of the defence Coun-
sel. The defence counsel is apt to
be more easily stirred to his feet
than the Prosecution _Counsei
whose duties are different,

These are preliminary obser-
vations which it is fitting and
proper that I mention at the out-
set, :

Jurys Duty

However, the jury are the sole
judges of the farts and it is not
for counsel either for the defence
or the prosecution, or myself, for
the Judge himself, to tell them
that the facts should have a cer-
tain interpretation or not. That
is solely your province, and a
province which must not be in-
vaded. If I suggest to you that
the true interpretation of the
facts are so and so, you may or
may not agree with me, and a
Judge must not take upon him-
self to impress his opinions on
the facts too strongly. The whole
principle of British justice in
such a case is that 12 men are
drawn from all walks of life to
try the issue on broad principles.
The technical equipment of the
Judge is not necessary at all for
the trial of this issue. You 12
men have the issues in your
hands, The legal nicities are not
for you, but the broad basis of
facts will guide you, along with
the experience you have gathered
from the ordinary walks of life.

You will also bear in mind
this, that you are to find the de-
fendant guilty when—to use the
old phraseology—the matter is
proved to you beyond a reason-
able doubt. The Lord Chief
Justice Lord Goddard in a case,
the King against Summers, which
went to the Criminal Appeal,
said that this phrase, reasonable
doubt, was not to his mind a
satisfactory phrase and attempts
to define it lead to confusion and
it would be very much better if
that expression was not used and
instead the jury was told to re-
gard the evidence and make sure
it satisfied them so that they felt
sure in coming to their verdict.

Formula

That is the test you must satis-
fy yourself of. You must feel
sure in coming to your verdict.
That is what the Lord Chief Jus-
tice laid down as the formula to
be adopted in this matter and the
reasonable doubt no longer occu-
pies the exalted place it used to
occupy. I only mention that at
the outset so that you would have

eee
Â¥



nr

HARRISON'S

y of D! V. Scott & Co. Ltd., at
tained respectively 2,796, 1,380

the proper test, You must be
satisfied and feel sure.

You have listened to the evi-
dence day after day. It has been
long and voluminous, and the
cross-examination extremely pro-
tracted—not unnecessarily per-
haps. Mr. Thorpe was cross-ex-
amined the whole of one day and
&@ good part of another. Therefora
you may find yourselves, if you
are not careful, enmeshed in the
multiplicity of evidence and may
be apt to lose sight of the main
issue you have to decide, You may
get lost in small minute details
and overlook the particular issue.

The accused is charged with
falsification of accounts... Falsi.
fication of accounts is compara-
tively a modern offence. It was
introduced in the 70’s of the last
century to make provision for an
offence which before there was no
means of trying in Law, It is
purely a statutory offence. It is
a criminal offence ang the neces-
sary ingredients in this must be
proved in this also—what is
known as the guilty mind. You
will have to find that the same
way you find it in the other
offences in Law.

Witnesses’ Evidence
I do not propose to go through
the evidence in minute detail. It
is really not necessary in as much
as counsel for the detence and the
Prosecution have during the past

few days taken you through
the whole evidence. It really
would be superfluous to go

through everything again; and no
doubt you will still have vividly
in your mind the witnesses and
how they gave their evidence.
Keith Squires, being a servant
of D. V. Scott”’—that is not dis-
puted. The defence has not chal.
lenged that. “With intent to de-
fraud” well, on that I will direct
you later in this summing up,
“Made or concurred in making a
false entry in a book...”, the book
is here and you will see it when
the time comes for you to retire
before you give your verdict.
This book has mostly been refer-
wed to as the red book — it
does not mean it suffers in

any way from Communist in-
fluence, any Communist infil-
tration; that is just an easy

way of referring to the book. You
will look through it carefully and
remember the evidence, The
book will speak for itself, but you

will also remember the evidence |

of witnesses like Mr. Segtt in re-
gard to this book. As I say the
book speaks for itself, and in
looking at it, you will easily come
to the conclusion in your own
minds as men of common sense,
as to what kind of a book it is,
what it purports to be.
Kind of Book

You will bear that in mind and
remember the remarks of the At-
torney General on this book, be-
cause this is the book in which
the false entries are alleged to
have been made. You will re-
member that this book was in
existence before the defendant
became a clerk at D. V. Scott.
You will remember that when
you have to consider the evidence
as to the nature of the book, You
will fing instructions of various
kinds, and notes, and comments
made in it, some in red ink, some
in pencil, That you will bear in
mind, and all of these matters
will help you to decide the nature
of this book.

One thing, there is no doubt
that it is a book as set out in the
charge—belonging to and in the
possession of D. V,‘Scott & Co.
Ltd., and it is not disputed either,
that this is the book in which the
accused made entries.

As I say, it is most important
for you to look through that book
carefully, examine it carefully,
and see what it purports to be.
But you will also, because as you
know it'is your duty, consider the
whole of the evidence and if there
is any evidence concerning this
book, you will bear that in mind,
and you will remember that Mr.
Scott is the witness, naturally, in-
evitably, who is best in a position
to speak about this book.

Memorandum Book

Questions had been put to him
and he was asked who supplied
the book. He said he, meaning the
firm, and Squires used it so that
if he, Mr, Scott, made any quer-
ies, Squires would be in a position
to answer reasonably and intelli-
gently. He was asked if he would
describe the book as a_ personal
memorandum kept by the accus-
ed and he said “yes”. You will
bear that part of the evidence of
Mr. Scott in ming when you come













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SEPARATORS
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the B.W.I. and all are Buy “SAMCO”
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WO kes casa ge $66.42 20x16x15”%.... $120.05
‘DOMO” CHURNS 24x 18x17” .... $166.55
vee teens bees $30.74 28x 20x 19” .... $205.38
LOCAL DISTRIBUTORS
HARDWARE DEPT.
Tels: 3142 and 2364 |



BARBADOS



Of Falsification

to consider the book, which still
will speak for itself.

The book, as I said, was in ex-
istence before the defendant went
there, and there are notes of in-
structions and the various parts
are marked for you and you will
therefore have little trouble, I
hope, in going through this mat-
ter. Some are in red ink, and they
will strike your attention very
quickly, The defence has not
challenged that this is the book in
wnich the entry was made nor
that the defendant was a clerk or
servant.

During the covrse of this case,
you have heard evidence, a con-
siderable amount of _ evidence
given, maybe in cross-examina-
tion of witnesses, tending to show
that a state of slackness, ineffici-
ency, neglect, anc what not ex-
isted at the Cheapside Rum Bond.
Witnesses under cross-examina-
tion were forced to admit that
they put their signatures and
initials to matters like regauging
and retesting when it was not
done. You will remember the
evidence of Neblett who said he
did not himself retest ang re-
gauge, but he put.down his sig-
nature. Evidence is given pur-
porting to show this state of in-
efficiency existed at the Govern-
ment Rum Bond and the Customs
generally. And you may have
heard Mr, Thorpe himself say
that when he took over, the books
were hopelessly in arrears, though
he endeavoured as best he could,
to bring them up to a reasonable
state of efficiency.

Staff Inadequate

You also beard evidence from
Mr. Thorpe that he took steps to
bring the matter to the notice of
the authorities that the staff ws
inadequate and things of that
kind, and you will bear that in
mind in so far as may become
necessary when you regard the
atmosphere in which these pro-
ceedings took place at the Cheap-
side Rum Bond, There is that
prevailing state of inefficiency,
neglect, slackness, whatever you
feel to call it, which seems to
characterise the proceedings at
the Cheapside Rum Bond, As I
say, when you consider the whole
matter, you will bear the atmos-
phere in which these matters
proceeded.

I am not going to worry you
with minute details of all of these
points. You will doubtless agree
it is unnecessary for me to go
through all that to enable you to
come to a decision in this matter.
But I will tell you that the de-
fence has proceeded on the line
that it was impossible due to lack
of supervision, rum: not locked in
the corridor, one thing and an-
other, petty -pilfering, rumours
that rum had been going through
the back door, for anybody to say
correctly what was the state of
affairs on 3lst August in relation
to the rum in these three vats
which is the subject of this false

entry.

Charge—False Entry _

On the other hand, you will
bear in mind that the accused is
not charged with abstracting the
rum, stealing it or anything of
that kind, but only with making a
false entry. .The learned Attorney
General stressed that point to you
more than once, But on the other
hand, you can well ask yourself
whether, if these conditions pre-
vailed and the situation was as it
was, whether there was the pos~
sibility that the rum could have
disappeared between 31st August
‘and 14th perenne: whether it +4

ssible for you when you com
ot consider your verdict, to say
that on the 31st the return made
was not correct, _
could not have been there.

And here you will also bear in
mind the letter written by the
accused and the statement made.
That letter and that statement
show unmistakably that the ac-
cused knew of the conditions pre-
vailing at the rum bond. But you
will ask yourselves whether—and
you will do that when you come
to study the letter—whether the
fact that he knew of these condi-
tions meant that when he made
the entry on that particular date,
he must have known that that
entry was not correct and that
he made it with the intent to de-
fraud.

The two things do not neces~
sarily hinge one on the other. The
mere fact of making an incorrect
entry does not mean that he did
it with intent to defraud. You
will ask yourselves whether
under the particular circum-
stances this intent to defraud
would arise, Because from the
evidence, the rum there is in the
custody of the Government, not
the accused.

An Example

Suppose for instance, the ac-
cused or anybody else was run~
ning a shop for D. V. Scott, and
the goods, rum, or whatever it
may be, were in the charge or
posssesion of whoever it may be.
Scott under such a circumstance,
would be acting on the assump-
tion that this rum or whatever
it may be, is in the possession and
care and control of this shopkeep~





“SAMCO”
SAFES

FIRE AND BURGLAR

RESISTING
Body plate (top, bottom
and sides) of one steel
plate bent by hydraulic

pressure, %” solid steel door
plate, wrought steel cham-
bers’ 2144” to 3” in thickness
filled with best quality fire-



er, and therefore the figures sup-
plied to him by this shopkeeper
are those which must correspond
to the rum in the particular shop.
If these figures are wrong, the
ebvious inference is the intention
to defraud. The bond is not_in any
sense in the custody of the ac-
cused, but Government, There are
people in charge of the safeguard
of that rum. Scott knows that if
the rum had not been shipped oy
anything, it is in Government's
possession, Government’s control,
Government’s care, and it is for
Government to see about the safe-
puarding of this rum. Therefore
when you compare these instances
that are parallel, it will assist
you in coming to a conclusion on
this question ofsintent to defraud.
As I said, if it was the shopkeeper
who had this rum in his control,
and the figures he supplied were
incorrect, there could only be that
intention—to defraud. If the rum
is in the safe keeping of Govern-
ment, Scott would tell himself if
it has not been shipped, it must be
there.

As I said, that analogy will help
you at arriving at your conclu-
sion, though it is a matter for
you,

Letter And Statement

As I say, you will bear in mind
the letter the accused wrote, and
tthe statement. The learned Attor-
ney General has told you that the
knowledge of the accused is best
got from his own statement. In
reading that, you will read the
whole in relation to the whole
state of affairs,

Here is this position in which
the defendant finds himself, to use
his words, in difficulty. Well, he
unburdens himself as any man
might do, to somebody else. The
best man he thinks about is Jones,
and he writes a letter to him, He
says in his letter: “I have to mus-
ter all the courage in my frame to
face Mr. Scott.” You will ask
yourselves as men of experience
and knowledge of the world,
whether it would not have been
better for him in a much earlier
stege of the proceedings to muster
his courage and face Mr. Scott,
put his cards on the table, and
say what the position was.”

His Lordship said that in con-
sidering the letter they had to
consider whether it reflected the

mind of the man who was in
trouble, in difficulties, and not
necessarily one who had a

criminal mind. They should read
the letter with the statement he
had made, and consider both in
the light of all the evidence.

The Officer in charge of the
bond had said that the deficiency
might have or might not have
taken place after the entry was
made and before it was realised
it was missing. The Officer in
eharge had also said that Squires’
returns might have been correct,
and Mr. Scott had said that his
entry was a correct entry of what
should have been there, But they
were not to isolate these in-
stances, but take them in rela-
tion to all the other evidence. It
still might be that one statement
might illuminate the — situation
like a searchlight suddenly
switched on in a dark room,

They would remember Mr,
Thorpe had said that he had
never visited the bond 4 night
with Mr. King to deliver rum

to a merchant and it was for them
to decide whom they would be-
lieve Mr. Thorpe, or Mr. King
who said that he did go with him.
Then there was the question of
the duplicate key of which Mr.

that the rum Thorpe did not know.

-

The jury retired for about half
an hour and then returned the
verdict of not guilty.

Man Fined

His Worship Mr. C. L Walwyn
Police Magistrate of District ‘A’
yesterday fined Arnott Griffith a
25-year-old labourer of Black
Rock, St. Michael 20/- for the
unlawful possession of a quanti-
ty of sugar which he was convey-
ing along the Wharf.



The fine is to be paid in 14
days or in default 14 days’ im-
prisonment with hard labour.



Conimunist Women
Protest Against

American Troops

BERLIN, Aug. 28.

Half a hundred ‘Communist
women demonstrated in front of
the United States High Commis-
sion Headquarters against the
presence of American troops in
Berlin, The women carried signs
demanding that the troops stop
their daily training exercises in
the adjacent Grunewald forest.
= Berlin police dispersed the
mob.

—U.P. *

| CLOSED FOR STOCK-TAKING
Re-opening on MONDAY, ist SEPTEMBER

Attractive Merchandise at Reasonable Prices

oe
Sor

ADVOCATE



Inquest Again

THE inquest into the circum-
stances surrounding the death ol
Cecil Hope a chauffeur oi
Jackmans, St. Michael, was
further adjourned yesterday until
today by His Worship Mr. E. «..
McLeod Police Coroner of
District “A.”

Cecil. Hope died some hours
after he was admitted to the
General Hospital on August 3
Yesterday two more witnesses
gave evidence in the inquest.

Inspector G. Springer said that
on August 3, he went to the
Britton’s Hill Police Station about
4.45 a.m., and saw Cpl. Edwards
and 2 number of Police constables
in the Charge Office. There was a
prisoner at the Station and he was

lying on the floor of the Charge
Office.
Cpl. Edwards reported to him

that the prisoner had given his
name as George Garnes of Jack-
mans, St. Michael and had been
arrested during the night tor
loitering in the Pine Hill,

The prisoner was wearing
erocus bag shirt underaeath
outer shi:t and had a_ revolver
which had been siolen on some
previous occasion when there was
a xobbery near Waterford Plan-
tation,

Cpl. Edwards said that the
prisoner had rushed to the front
door and “burst” it open and had
fallen down the. steps..

“TI looked at the prisoner who
appeared to be sleeping and shook



him but he made no response.
The prisoner was taken to Dr.
Cate who ordered him to the
General Hospital,” Inspector

Springer told the Court,

Police Constable 457 Sandiford
said that on August 3, he arrived
at the Britton’s:Hiil Police Station
with the motor van and reported
his arrival to the Orderly.

He went in to the Station Office
and saw Cpl. Edwards and other
policemen there. About 4.30 a.m.,
while sitting in the van, he heard
a crash and then heard someone
shouting for “Stop him, Stop him.”

He went to the entrance of the
Station and on entering saw a
man lying on the floor. Inspector
Springer arrived soon after and
the man was taken to the General
Hospital.

Airline Men Claim
They Should Fly
The Queen

‘R.A.F. Are Not The Best’

By JAMES STUART

Who should fly tae Queen’s
wirplane? Except im special clr
curmstances she flies in a Viking
of the Queen’s Flight, wnich is &
Royal Air Force unit.

Some airline pilots are now
suggesting that the job should be
taken out of the hands of the
RA#-and given to the most ex-)
perieneed airline skippers. {

j



Comment on this discussion
comes from Aerius in the jour-|
nat of, the British Air Line
Pilots’ Association, The Log. Bu, |
said an official of the Association, |
these views are his own, and not
in any way the. views of , the!
Association, i

Aerius js a well-known Brit-}
ish Overseas Airways Corpora-
tion pilot, !

He says: “There can be na}
doubt that those who are en-
trusted with the Queen's, lite}
should be of the highest ex-}
perience available,

“When she travels by sea her

ships are commanded by men
with many years at sea; her
chauffeurs have sat in the

driving seat for countless years;
her engine drivers have spent a
lifetime on the tracks.”

Aerius suggests that it is RAF
practice to promote the ‘good
chaps,” with an inevitable switch
from the cockpit seat to an ad-
ministrative chair, “The men
who regularly fiy are the junior
officers,” he says.

“It is my feeling that a special
organisation should be set up to
take care of the Queen’s Flight,
and that its pilots should come
from the ranks of the most
senior airline pilots — from the
ranks of those with 30 years in
the cockpit...

“Such an honour would be the
most strived after position in the
realms, of air transport, and
would form a fitting climax to
the careers of men who had
devoted their lives to the cause
of the air.”

Navigation Experts

The Queen could fly to the
ends of the earth and still know
‘hat her pilots, at least, had all
been, there before,

The RAF pilots of the Queen's
Flight are all “Green Ticket”
men, experts at navigation and
bad weather flying.

In theory any of them can be
selected to fly the Queen, but
usually her pilot is Wing-Com-
mander R. C, E. Scott, AFC, a
34-year-old New Zealander.

He joined the Royal New
Zealand Air Force just before
the 1939-45 war and transferred
to the RAF in 1940. He has spent!
two-and-a-half years in the;
Royal Flight.

—L.E.S.



WITH

in All Departments
and LOTS OF BARGAINS



Cave Shepherd

10. HW, 12 AIS Mread Street.



|
motion on the matter so. tha |
:
{

rebuilding of






Sanitary Commissioners

Adjourned Accept Pians For Market







PAGE FIVE



LABOUR FINED FOR
WOUNDING







; Lovell, a labouter of

ckie} Christ Church + was

rday ordered to pay a fine

3 or the erection of the proposed distric Dy 5/+ im 14 days or 14 days’

z L. ANS ior the erectio the propose 4 listrict market impriaoneneat ler: fix Weenie

at Eagle Hall, drawn up t srs Clarke and Tucker, wr ct. Walwyn, Police Mazis-

were received and accepted by the Sanitary Commissioners trate of District “A”, for in-

.M | at their meeting held at the Parochial Build- flicting bodily harm on sethe

ngs yesterday Licorish on January 21.. Lovell
eh appealed.

These plans and specifi

drafting expenses were forv

passed on to the Governmei

Present at the meeting wer
Mr. J. M. Kidney, (Chairman) |
Mr.. C. B. ayfe, Hon. V. C.}
Gale, M.L.C. Mr. E. D. Moitley,
M.C.P. and Mr. Victor Chase, }

by

Mr. Ben Gibson was present
invitation,
sence oi

Wilkinson
chairman,

Excuses for the al
Mr. Goddard and M
were offered by | th«

Mr. Mottley moved and Mr,
Victor Chase seconded «tie mc
tion that Mr. M. Gill be appoint

ed Sub-Sanitary Inspector ol i
the parish. Before the appoini-/
ment of Mr, Gill, Mr. Ben Gibso.) |
was asked: by the Chairman i |

say something of Mr, Gill's



Extra Heurs OF Work

The Commisstoners for tha]
second time postponed considera
tion of a letter from Mr
Motiley with rerard to, an
application from the Inspeete: |
supervising the labour of the de- |
partment, for remuneration for}
extra hours of work. On thi:
matter the chairman said that|
the Board had had some diseus.,
sion on the matter at thei la
meeting and after refusing «7 -]
plications from other member }

of the staff they could not now}
go back on their décision, j

Mr, Mottley said that Mr, Wi? -/
kinson and Mr, Goddard ha
seen the reasonableness in 1)



application and that was why i |
was placed on the agenda tho |
first time. The chairman aske
Mr, Mottley to make a ne

eould be considered at the nex
meeting of the Commissioners.
The Board granted an applice
tion from Barclays Bank for the
their premises tu
Plans have alread:
been submitted,

Bread Street.



Cor Damaged

The right front fender and ax}
of the motor cer L-101 owned an
deiven by Ivan Sobers of Checi
Hall, St, Luey were damaged whe
the car was invelved in "i
accident on Black Rock road, *
Michael with the motor bus M-3°
the property of the National Bu
Co., and driven by Beresford Tull
of Fitts, Village, St. Michael abou
11,55 a.m., yesterday.




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o
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A THERMOS FLASK }}/%

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2 POSSESS SSCS HIRES SDE

















ations along with the bill for
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a
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6 FINE BLENDS TO CHOOSE FROM -
Sole Agents: MESSRS. A, 5S.



Licorish said that the defen-
dant hit her with a stick on her
right hand and other parts of her
body.

tins



in vacuum



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BADOS

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WIDE MOUTH FOR ICE 2 ‘
$4.25; $6.78; $18.67; $30.70 * >
NARROW MOUTH for \e
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$1.41; $1:63; $3.00; $2.40 ie RANGE OF
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and the most appreciated ©
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ENGINEERS, BRASS and IRON FOUNDERS
Works contain rnodern appliances for the execution of
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Dealers in AGRICULTURAL MACHINERY
GENERAL ENGINE ROOM STCRES
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— THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY [1D.

4650 Workshop :
%







PAGE SIX



ip eps sinister tte mene
FREDERICK — On Avgust 2, 1952,
Leonard Frederick blacksmith), His
funeral Will leave St, John’s Intirmary
at 4.36 to-day off St. John's Cometer,
Eilene (widow), Curnus, Celestine,
Mareia, Anderson (vhildren), Wini-
fred Worrell and Miriam Green

(sieters). ‘The Codrington family,
29,8.62—1n



SKEETE—At her residence Marine Square
Lower Westbury Road, St. Michael
yesterday. Charlotte Albértine; age
year. The funeral wi.i leave the aboy
residence at 4.00 p.m. to-day for S*
Legnard’s Church

John, Fred, William Skeete (sons
Thamonda Seale, isis Phillip
Gladys Bryan, Fulvia Niles, Leon
Carter, Allen Skeete (daughters;
(New York Papers please copy)
29.8. 52—tn



F@eR GENT

mate - aon
HOUSES

a ee

APARTMENT at “Cardiff!” Tin Aven:

BelleVilie, to an approved tenant fro:

ist October 1052. priv Mrs. Percy }
Burton. Telephone 3528 29.8. 52-~



BRIGHTWOOP-—St. Lawrence post f,
nished from Ist September. Apply Joh
M. .Bladon & Co. Phone 4640. Plant
tions building 29.8.52—-1

BUNGALOW — To An Approved Te.
ant. Bungalow Modern Sea-Side, ful)
furnished Bungalow. Excellent ses
bathing. For further particulars Appi:
to No. @ Coral Sands, Worthing.

s 24.8. 52—30

RUNGALOW-—On Sea, Main Road Has:

Â¥ comfortably furnished, Piny

lish’ bath — 2 hedrooms Servanis

coms ~—- Verandahs -- From Septembe:
‘elephone 2949. 16,8 52—t.f,

rs perpen

BUNGALOW-—Small Bungaiow at Ba:

Geld Beach, St. Peter. Comfortably fur

nished. Refrigerator, Two bedroon

eee mr . Garage ete. From Sox
. $



“CHELIIOLME” Chelsea Gardens, us
furnished, Tnaspeetion Duily 4—8.
26.8.52



5
i

emergence een
FLAT — From ist September. V+
modern, fidly furnished, seaside 4.1
Telephone, Gna stove Blectric vefriger. |
tor. ete Maresol Beach WFPiats, §&
Lawrence Gap Phone a



ete nema =



7 ; leaders who have risen to promi-

7.9.92", |tade sharpeners, ete.” Dial 4018 Cour-{2-cars. Water and electric services in| ting war prisoners. Peiping ic! "y» Touch With Barbados |nence § duri ,

A ‘ an uring the occupation

Sak From lat Sepremb. Cottar> | esy Garage. 23,8.52—6n.[ stalied. In tion by appointment wit) said that this was the only solu- . period
k—From Ist September a Cottnt.: | 4 — the tenant Mrs. Roach,» Dial e461. tion to the deadlock on repatria-| Coastal Station .

at White, St. Michael. All mode | The above will be set up for sale a* | 1 a eat N,| CABLE AND. WIRE TW.) Lta., |, Y0Shida came to office on Octo-

Headley, Whitchall Road. : | MESCELLANKOUS eave comenipe ine Sth wxteat ieee han ani ares t oN. advise that they can now communicate ber 19, 1948 after a bribery scan-

97 .8.52- 2 SOO y Bus “\has pointbla refused to with the following ships through their| dal cause the downfall of Prime

3 | Sehigaeseishacminniatemiiaiecimintpeaaemtces Ee POTCHINSON & BANFIELD. |any prisoners who do not want to! Parbados Coast Station:- r Minister Hitoshi Assida. He was

“MARIO”, Newly built Bungalow ai BUTTER-—Cooking Butter in 261b Tin 17.8.52—-6n.| go back to Communism, The Red s Thorshov, s.s Isaparodi, 8.8, . -
Kew Rond,. near Spooner’s Hill ecor-

teining drawing, dining, 3 bedrooms wit!
roping water, Garage, possession iron)
ist_ September 1962. Apply FR. Archer
MoKenzie, Victoria St, Dinl 2947,

bt 29.8.52-—8n

* SUMM SET", St. Lawrence Gap--
From September. Wully furnished, 4
bedrooms, “Safe sea-bathing. Apply
He god, St. Lawrence Gap

29.8. 52—~in

ae tr a tte

WANTEW

pats }

- MISCELLANEOUS

iin aeannoamnaneraeeeaiititinanee

A PARROT CAGE — State condition
and price to NORA C/o, Advocate,

29, B.52——Jn

ne pate epee ena omen at

a ee Dae ts any gees:
food price pald, Apply Thani Bros. [fr
Wm) Henry Street, Diat 2408



28.8. 52—:

Denmark Will
Sell Britain
Bacon Cheaper

LONDON, Aug. 28.

. Dénmark agreed to supply
bacon to Britain at a lower price,
according to the British Food Min-
istry. Under the new two-yea:
contrect~agreed upon at Copenha

germ, bacon will be supplied at eighi
per cent. Less during the yer

ending October 2, 1953. This pric«
may be varied during the secon’
year by mutual agreement by not
more than 10 per cent. Denmar!

is Britain’s largest appa of
bacon, The price cut will not low-
er the cost te the British consumer
sinee bacon is subsidized and gov

ernment will lower the subsid)
accordingly. ee

Gairy Plays In
Cricket Match

GRENADA, Aug, 28
In apparent cynical pr oe
of a large section of the com-

munity and the resurgence o°
the agricultural strike wave
Gay this afternoon joined :
Randtul, of St. David M.M.W.U
strikers in a cricket matic? ©
Tariteen prounds St. George's
this. afternoon with a union
banner staked. on the boundary
Spectators were few however til!
near the closing stages when
some disinterested town work~
ers idied on the road nearby.
The strike sftuation remains
unchanged _ but rts in the
erea tell the likelihood of an
attempt at an island wide
strike call perhaps oe base
on. the prospects a, wags
boost Staten ough this is un-
officially. notified. :







FOR NICE
THINGS TO
ist |

*, KOO BAKED BEANS
} NS RN 2 cc ccits wacanen

25
K.L.B. PEARS in tins" .43
Kc? PEARS ,, ,.. .16
K “WEET

ue no” 39 |

IMPERIAL SAU-
SAGES
BEEF LOAF. ,.\ .60

And for The BEST to Drink
COCOA MALT
TONO~

Our Popular

FIVE STAR RUM



SS



“LASSIFIED ADS.

TELEPHONE 25086

perenne se nin ne rr

{ trailers, Ete, Dial 618—Courtes +




ons
4 |
INCE & Co., Ltd. |



BARBADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY, AUGUST 29, 1952

(POMLIC SALES |Went By Plane |) | Jap Premier GOVERNMENT NOTICE
|

















































REAL ESTATE : | But Returned SEA AND AIR Dissolves SHORTAGE OF WATER

UGA ystems an Baaglow The public are requested to exercise the greatest care in the

e - ~
Parliament use of water and to report any leakage to the Waterworks Depart-

| FoR same [Sette Qn Bieyele | JRARIC |

The house contyins Drawing end Din



ment (Telephones: day 3715, night 3725).





Oo. aaeeiiiee hing water) breaktast. roma, “citehen-| WITH THE FIRST MARINE || : TOKYO, Aug. 28. Unless full co-operation is received immediately, the use of
AUTOMOTIVE ctle, usual vonveniences, Garage und AIRW)NG IN KORBA, | In Carlisle Bay The Japanese Premier, Shigeru | water for gardens, etc., will have to be prohibited,
"






: sale ie “aptai ‘harles iis «t|_S.8. “Lady Nelson”, 4,695 tons, from}called for new general elections | ~~ i
CAR—Otie 8 b.p. Austin Car; one[ Sle Public competition at our Office} Captain Charles Willis «f| "yh he sclaon tons, , $
model B. P. Ford, Phone S002 C, R. James Street on Friday 12th September | Doucette, Texas started out Of Vavente: “Mane Ainddbont Auaie ee for October 1, the first to be helri wm Ooric

ee appointment. Dial 2850, (His first Korean mission in 4} Sloop “Signet”, 10 tons. from Tortola, in Independent Japan since the ai

Applewhaite, Lakes Folly. 29.8.52—3n






















= ; weir ‘ came back|Uréer Ceptain R. O'Neale; Agents: |end of occupation.

wolbing citer, dies. instal. abe Se eared hak Rg bicycle. ee srhooner, Ormase | Auecuarates "The dissolution came in re- “

Â¥ : . ? _ . EPARTURES ; ~ S

Swan Street, Dial 4559 or 8417. c pie een %.8.52—-10n | Wijlis’ plane ran short of fuel| S.S. “Bruno” 1549 tone, under Cap-|Sponse to demands from opposi-

30-8-82— 9» | “CLARENDON—Biack Rock, St Michae!,{@S he was returning from ajtin A Helberg tor San Juan tion parties, the press, and mem- ; . y Ni The M/V “CARIBBEE” will
CAR—One (1) Four seater Standard ; | 0PP0site St. Stephen's Church. Standin«/combat mission on tihe west 00st) isin A Ruytenhes for Pik ynder Cap-|bers of Yoshida’s own Libera! | TO-DAY'S NEWS FLASH accept Cargo ond Passengers for
H.-P. tourer in good working order, Apply Pe ot gy AP aap OM osibintie, |and the thirty-year-old pilot was] ‘ F oe Party. Dominica, Antigve, Montserrat
; orn eee ' Resi : ntcninmiiinesmananatitincn tes na ; Be
_sp [for Mortgage can be arranged. Apply: |forced to parachute over allied E. These groups pointed out ihet ond tember, 1952
O° 29.0.0a--am | for Mortaage can be arranged actiters ie Uaaaed te Gotten SEAWELL GREY AIR LETTER Tuesday Sep

the present government and the FORMS—Ready Gummed

—_—_—_—_—— E ARRIVALS

CAR—Hillman Minx—Excellent condi- ae __.__. 7-8-5271" | field near a schoolhouse and i= | mVEDNESDAY, 27TH AUGUST Diet were elected three and a hali |! 69) peer ENE — For Bind- The M/V “MONEKA” will
poke Seceth Rete ee eee eee Offers Will be received in writing u»|Mmediately was surrounded by 200/from Yrimidad: 2 years ago under Allied ocupation | LD — aceept Cargo and Passengers for
crcned ik ta. nears tedantine is (Phone | 12,4gem. Tuesday. 16th, September i952. | children. otmuntngs, O° Aste, eee 3: |and do not now represent the | ing 5S Bevel Nevin and St. itis, ‘Dute ot
4324). 27.6,90—t..n. | Sok Me servants room at Glendale. (Res'- | Willis walked to the road and| miller, G. Van-Wagenngen, P. Pempro,| Will of the Japanese people. | — For Binding

Sailing to be notified
B.W.1. SCHOONER OWNERS

SAMSONITE
gether With a quantity of oid lumi. | Started back to the base. A Korean |S. Tempro, P. Tempro. B. Parkinson | Yoshida said that he will seek re- | Wood, China Ete.

aud greenheart. Also separate offier:;|policeman came along on aj,?"d M. Parkinson. election and again appea ~ 1
for a quantity of old gaivanize sheet Revels and insisted Sa the | Prem Venessela: a = Ptr

MORRIS 5 ton Trucks with auxiliary
gear box. Morris 10 ecwt, Vans and
Pick-Ups. Two Four Door Minors



At ; :
* ASSOCIATION (ING.
: ; eee M. Nunez, tero, ers for a chance to head the new ’
Morris Oxfords. from stock now. | #ebeclon of the items can be made ol fier take it to get home. H Seenz, M. Soens and J, Saewr””” | Government. S JOHNSON’S Consignee Tele. No. 4047
we ealting, ort Royal Garege Lid-15 m. and on Saturdays between the | Seven milesslater Willis came] py, gyenaga ree A eTURES Yh a statement announcing th: | {i STATIONERY
‘ 8. . hours Fee We sopination to Dr jup to his headquarters and asked | j4. Brathwaite, R. Williams, R Brigg, | @issolution of the Diet, the Cabi- |}

nla
USED CARS—Available from stock: a
cod assortment of luding
forris Oxford,, Austin i) Vauxhall
Velox. Courtesy Garage. Dial 6.
23.8.52—6n

ct }
Kk. SANDIFORD, if “anyone was looking for me?” | A. Nicholls, C, Lusan, D. Alexander, B. net said: “To further postpone == = y
ChurehWarden, St. Thomas Next day Willis flew back to the| Ai “ender, M. Lowe, G. Lowe, ©. George general elections might ecomane

'
29.8.52—4 so - in ag oe na >. te oan ie and stimulate political and finan- ep . N “
aan ak Pwaedaide toad. es tributed a g of cookies} M. Patel, R. Taaffe, C. Evans, R.| cial unrest. . tli t al t hi
° Twe ad, :
ond light ineealied, S800 ft. var kiss he had persuaded the mess ser-!Cieveland, Sir G. Seel, E. Johnson, K. and an a 1on eams fis



CSB.4.







: Johnson, M. Johnson, D. Johnson, J. The Yoshida Government was
ELECTRICAL See at tase, eee ee athe oy [Beant to make, Phillips, FE. Moreelle, G. Blenman, C.|to have .completed its term of
be ymore Rock, price $1,500. t —U-P. Power, B. Power, A. Power, M. Katkins,
nd can be rented also smail houses i) . . | office in five months. .
islet ensiok bllnsigtl various districts from $600.00. One () M. Lewis, O. Hull, G. Chan-Sing, L. ‘ : SOUTHBOUND
ol = —_e Tne - ~-egusclon THuae ino eebine aris Carrasquel, O. Carrasquel, M.’ Culver- Sources close to Yoshida said Sails Sails Sail. Arrives Sail
Dial cop WOKE 23, panes Price $560.00 Apply Jos. St, Hill, Rex! | 2 s neues, w Cuiverbouse, K. Culverhouse,} Yoshida notified Emperor Hiro- Montreal Halifax Boston Barbados Barbados
| | Botte Agent, Tweedie Road ox Dye | TUSISTS = suMshet Menthe: H. MeLeod, F- | hito of his decision to dissolve the |
PYE CAR RADIOS-—6 Tube with R.i’, | 127. 27.0,62—1.. | p eo

el, R. h, J. Thi ; CANADIAN STRUCT
sear 6 ee TET econ A ee ; C. Richmond, K. 'Kucieh. G: Kueich, N- a. i this week when Pe LADY RODNEY SO oh ae asept.- Beni. 18 Sept

7 | ate ae ited | “CSTIRLING", a two-storeyed stonewal! inntity, call early, P, C. 8, Meffei dwellinghouse “in feneras Sener On Return Of Moetrmann, C. Preltes, D. Preites, R.|Nasy Ynountain’ villa, FAY Sen aca a Sep P 24 Sept. 25 Sept.
STRA’ mi

Co., Ltd. 27 .8.62—t.2.n,









tas | ri ti ; 100 miles 2 Sept. 2% Sept. 27 Sept. 6 Oct. 7 Oci,
r;} rn * a a
ee YDB, (St. Michael, standin. Pewee Pee north of Tokyo.
RADIOW-il Tube” Phileo Radio wit, {| 7,068 square feet of ‘and, and ton Tr e . NORTHBOUND
Bendepread in good Wecking cuivt. Ave ,| taining open and closed verandahs, draw- ar risoners V._Dominquez, J. Alvarez, N. Saade,| _ Only the house of Represente- Arrives Satis Arrives Arrives Arrives
Lashiey Ltd, 20, Swan Street ing and dining tsome, 2 Bedrooms, eac’ A one = Mag an 9 Se beaee tives will be affected by the disso- GER Barbados Barbados Beston Heallifax Mentresi
29.8. a running water, en C., ane: | % " sein, - J. Souto, . i CAN. CHALLEN -- u; 2 Sept.
c 0 8.000 Taal eemventinces. ‘Whter and Misetriel Souto, B, Souto, C. Souto, G. MacMurray, |!Ution, The House of Councillor: Ni ere 28 Aug. 30 Aug. 9 Sept. wt. 14 Sept.
ty installed. Garage ane Bervasta’ x00 MUNSAN, Korea, Aug, 28, A. Venderdoll and E. Vanderdol! ae ere is not affected b» ABADI beothcc ad ice Ps So" Fa Sept. — 4 Sept. 23 Sept.
im yard, unist ¢ amatcn: . e changes in erm AN STR! « Sept. — 9 Oct 12 Oct.
MECHANICAL Inspection on application to Miss Brev | 4 Com ae inet a Pmeagg od its!" R. Legge and J. Legge ng Government, at wae | eet. Beet 1 Oe: te et, te oot,
‘ ‘ Parkinson, Strathclyde. Dial 2452. emand that the United Nations |For Antigaa: October e1ections promise to be | CANADIAN CHALLENGER 6 Cet. 8 Oct. — @ Oct. 24 det.
alent : ——-—-| ‘The property will be set up for sale | give up plans to “hold. hack]. Greaves, Bp ise to LADY NELSON be ha 19 Oct. 21 Oct. 20 Oct. ‘Bi Get. 4 Nov.
FERGUSON AGRICULTGRAL EQUIP-} bY public competition at our office | prisoners” if it wants a truce in For Puerto Rico: i one of the most dramatic, if noi
MENT, including ‘Traetors, ‘ames Street, Bridgetown, on Frida | : " J. Parker, G. Starling. D. | Peterkin, | the most bitterly fought, in Jap- Tr
29th August at 2 p.m eng ~ There were no meetings at /R Haynes, L. Curnmings, L. Mayers, M 7.

Crass mow earth L t i 2 $e)
boxes, "Cane “carts and Hvaraulle tip YRARWOUD & BOYCE, ~|the Panmunjom truce camp. The! Mivers, J Mayers, G. Mayers, 0. Wilx-|@nese history. Wartime politica! | vor turtner particulars, appty to—
Ot

Solicitors. it talks were in the midst of |7°°?: V. Burgie, Prof. C. Bourne, B.|and military figures who wer¢

"| the fifth consecutive weekly re-| ‘mot, C. ‘Webster, “A, “Weraer ad |2Ut8ed from public life by the} GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD.—Agents.
“THURCISDON” on the sea at Max | cessi, Neither side has been able! "- Drayton occupation will be running for the

* : first time, They will o
l’s Coast, Christ Church, standlag © i pose ney
‘S oda ey perches of 1AoeA “Gat age fo to agree on a solution for rep tria-

erage. 2.8. 52—6r .

ee RCN e+

MASSEY-HARRIS AGRICULTURAT.
EQUIPMENT — including TRACTORS,
Grags cutters, Rakes, Loaders, knife















Sh ‘Tins ant iM Ting, Aluw tib Pacit.
Anchor Table Butter. W. M. FORD, 55.
Tloebuck Street. Dial 3489.

\propaganda voice also sadosedl| CNETS 2.& Afvionn Moos, 9.1, Bonaire 1949. cle the = tem da ‘on ~
rier Mee eneied te. Me a les, Tagelus, 5.s, Silverteak, ss. Aleoa elections. ida w re-
Govtia "Manning to offer for sale hee} United States warplanes of 422/Clipper, s.s. Atlantic Transporter, 5...

miestanonion
: ant ; > : respect of ocupation leaders for | » T ;

preperty “Flodden” in, Culloden Road {mew — “violations” of Chinese) )* Star ©. Paris Clip: so. Tin’ tthe way in which he guided |% CG" RAN SATLANTIQUE
Atlantic Princess, s.s. Urania, s.s. | Japan through stormy days of |. y



26 .8.52—2n

BAROMETERS, Thermometers and The house contains five bedroom: territory from July 25 to August

dining room, brenkfast room, loung



















































tivd: Ae Cc i ad see rs 3 = = aa) Soeeies 5 Standella, s.s. Oranjestad, s.s. Rio| Red te i i .
wiagriglion of Whe recinon ing-fSUva fal? ge aay Sttl~ [Manchurian soll, ue? OF] achat... tain, ss mo be Lal trenty, and the (rarwition wp heec | Sallimge from Southampton to Guadeloupe, Martinlaue,
Lower Brond Street, or Dim Sins, “|About 4% eres or ee et | On August 16 a report from) Maria De Larrinaga, s.s. Samana, s.s, | Pendence,—U,P, se bados, Trinidad, La Guaira, Curacao & Jamaica
28.3.52—t.¢.n. eee 258) We . Mukden, “capital of Manchuria! Guadeloupe, * Wade: WwW ee ‘ x
ellis ltnsthainiealinlane te _ = aera if s ° a8! ’ 8 as Y.
iAS — cod Woent, corn] ye tila, asians, for |sald United States planes dropped) Hof Riis” Aarchatale S|
Blakes, All Bran, Rice Krispies and Oat- | 4, and rately. Inquirie mbs sou o nghsi and on! Siiedrecht and s.s. Corrales . e e From Sow 0.
flakes in Tin. W. M, FORD. (ial 24m, {O87 Of fhe land, separately, Inauicic:| A cust 15 bombed Antung big aii —_—_——_—sqX( German Socialists ee Aarne: Sathetes
me Larsen hae 2 pcan] Mower CARMINGTON §, stat. |base city just across the Yalu! RATES OF EXCHANGE May Fi *“DE GRASSE” .. 22nd Aug, 1952 .. 3rd Sept, 1952
cncmethsliialii-mnsieiindllbic time comengphiinntingeneniggittmmninsinis , 1° ver, Send NEW YORK Buyh :
GALVANWBED SHEETS — "A imivedf ee Dero péteone were said to bel 79 910% pr, Cheques on and Y favour *Not calling at Guadeloupe
quan of best quality English gaivan- 4 ss * Bankers 71 6/10% pr 7
ised aheots 26 ‘, very 1 ices injured, While the United Nations SAILING RBADO
Bint 2696, Auto fyre co. a Ga AUCTION sought to drive a wedge between Dumond Drafts 71 4/10% pr Ollenhauer | FROG Se S TO BUROPE
il Ae Raper rage eo pgaeacs "Seg aN North Korea, China and Russia,| 79 3/10% pr. Cable aeons From Barbados Arrives Southam;
TEAScRomeval’ Pes, eed” | YNDER THE IVORY HAMMER |Peiping retaliated by claiming)” 10 » Eowensy 19 MIB BE | the Soctalist Pasty Wilt ence, “COLOMBIE” .. 24th Aug, 1952 Sth Sept, i002
Gibbes Plantation, Bt. Peter, $8.00 por} By instructions received. 3 will sell on British casualties in Korea had] 50 pr Silver oat 20% pr. to follow the “reunited Cuban *“DE GRASSE” 16th Sept, 1952 & 26th Bent, 1952
: 10e, ) friday ugus' » a essrs. Chelse > CAN. ” -* ” ee
yeh eR ph 9.0.52—Sn | Garage, Piktola st! G) 1948: 10 41. | Mounted in recent weeks by more] 4 510°, pr. Cheanes on front” line laid down by the late * ee
“SURSCRIBD now to. the Deity| ferme CASH. Salem 2 Bun. British forves ne A Pr tor Demand Dratts 18.45% pre eas i Pamachsr, according “00 *Sailing direct to Southampton
: now oO ea Serms * sm, PY gtiscssweeneee erat ‘afts 78.45% pr. n :
geicersoh, Sappeney Medias ap Mes | vinchale aftitivrs. |american military folly.” |g s;iju ge. Summa arene B08 wr | Te added that there te litle doubt | §
i n y AL meer, c } 3/10%% RR EL os cen dF aeey y
fais Siew dee aces publication ir 26.8.52—44 —UP. 78 8/107 ir Gurrency 7 Lid pr that Erich Ollenhauer, Schuma- R. M. JONES & CO., LTD.,—Agents. :
Sondon, Cenigct Inn Gaile, C/o. Adve aos dresses ss CQUBONS 19 410% pr. ome Sepuay since 1946, will be | ‘s9OSogo6eesess6 cate 'O., he at epresentative 7 si % pr Silver * pr. confirm in the
tel. aitg. isto | POU MLIC NOTECRS U. as —_———_ by the ennuel ee cee |
TINNED MEATS—Corned Beef, Lunch- | -——-———-—-—_- >_> e C. W.L. Gets 200 : MAIL NOTICES opening in Sorted on Septem- 1
eon Beet, Roast Beef and Sausages: W THE ate a OLETY LIFE 3 Mails for Grenada by the Sch. May ber 24, WANTED
we Fe Nemworermnriny Lost Foner Bed Hospital | ic. 3! iior'2Pnsty War's ts noon, | ycT Pe BkeSS service said that poli- |
: ~~" | Kathleen Braithwaite, the Executrix Sut co Gh nee Aca ieee world have rhe : puarout nl ee
. . . © 220 pam, o e 3 . x
b the late Christopher Augustus Braith KINGSTON, JAMAICA, Mate ton Bt Lucia, Dominica, Mont- | Schumacher’s deuth, tore goat REPRESENTATIVE—Full time representative
Consta ula waite, having made xworn depositic: Aug. 28. cerrat, Antigun, St, Kitts, Bermuda, | about hi i * :
chat Poliey No. 14.400 on the fe of tie 1 A new teaching hospital at| Boston, Halifax’ and) Montreal. by tne They : pone nie successor. wanted for Canadian Life Insurance Co., in Barbados.
; iP. ris er ugustus raithwat » = adv son W s closed at 2 . . . sae : . *
Take Li ife-Savin has been lost, and having made applica. | U.C.W.I, will be ready for: work tka General Post Office As funnies Pareet timate statement on “he wore Application in writing are invited which will be treated
B | ion to the Directors tor the payment of | Monday morning, and docal {yn Registered Mail at 12 noon and | was that made.by O |§ in strict confidence. Apply: “Insurance Underwriter”
‘ thy monies due under the sanre medical authorities are losing no «ci! and Registered Mail at 2 p.m. | thy made. by Ollenhauer in | b v .
Courses NGTICE is heveby given that unless | fee in pPeincing. thie hosoitel ta oedinary Mallat 230 pen. on theta | {€ Memorial service for Schuma-| | ¢/o Barbados Advocate, 26.8.52.—5n.
any objection is raised within one.month s if ipl . nisl August, 1082 cher in Hanover last Sunday when
f the cate hereef, the said Policy monies | the service o e community. | “Matis for St. Lucia by the M.V. Lady | he said: “We have to complete his| 4
ng GRORGEBT AU a, [on Be Lit ae Ringson Shake anil Sc! Saleh uate ae: | ot without him, bute Miser | papery ss ea omag
F .G » Aug. 26, Gk. BROWNE, See Se eee een ec ia neon and te >| The fight for a new Germany not |
jn ltigetraas ea Ser tat Bitte { Wil begin fo "ocupy. University |i Mp i then Aura | Yet endes, the socal onder mot yet |g YOU CAN GET
- 8. ts 1952 arran reunificati “4 7
or of the local Somes: in \adamADOS. MURUAR Lats eaengeneae are completed in| many-in "treedom is ae Gen % GALVANISED NAILS
ithin the past week twenty-} 4s y 5 7 OLICY . a : tained, %
six N.C.O’s and men have earned| “OSWALD EVERTON JONES ‘having| The hospital buildings “aro Greek Freighter The integration. of the German| AT 30c. PER LB.
the Bronze Medallion of the} “de sworn deposition that Policy No.|capable of accommodating 200 i iS people in a Ei d_inter-| > fro
R v . $59 on bis life has been lost, and|/}eqs and all necessary staff have an eh he m---
Royal Life Soving Society in tesis} (\ving made application to the Directors | ih tin Pit ; Dama ed national community of German) : %
neld here and another fifteen} grant a duplicate of the same. been waiting for weeks readly ee E' people in a European and inter-! CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD ,
passed the first year's examina-} NOTICE is hereby given that unless for the go ahead, Nurses for the national community of peoples! + 4 ” ?
. : y oO month -| ‘WiCTOR j ig on + .
ion for First, Aid certificate off \ye"Gate hereof the duplicate Poles] NCW hospital are mostly Jo-) VICTORIA, British Columbia, | based on freedom and equally | ; PIER HEAD AND BROAD STREET. ‘
the St. John’s Ambulance ‘ar Will be issued tance rainy ut technica August 28, | still has to be completed. :
Brigade e eee 1 EN By Order, rsonnel from abroad are also} The Greek freighter “Eugenia * U.P. — 40UOEG9695599695909509565S0SH8H999999MGSHOSEOSS:.
Fully accredited examiners C. K. BROWNE, ere and have been keeping! (Chandris” docked in Victoria on i b sari ,

ee ide themselves in practice at King-

eo Wednesd with he rt plate
conducted the tests in both, ston Public Hospital so that the], e ‘re Abbads as eae ignatis

torn
prganisation should have no otter striking an uncharted reef
U.S. To Be Sea Serene MAING Next of ‘the Aleutien Islands a week
5 ago. Marine surveyors inspected
U.C.W.I, with completion of] '\2° :
Represented On this hospital will now be able the vessel, and it was believed

to give undergrads a full course that repairs would take about





Grenada Nurses
Celebrate







edicin' gery three weeks, The ship was return-
(From Our Own Correspondent) Coal-Steel Board in mi * and our ‘ ing from Japan at the time of s .
NADA, the mishap. : HE RIGHâ„¢
In celebration ef iis first anni- PARIS, Aug. 28. . 1 —(UP.) i m
versary, the Grenada Nurses’} The initial steps for official Reds Protest



United States representation at
the High Authority of the Euro~ 4 2 ° s APPRO °H
pean oal-Steel Community was Against Incidents 22 Injured In RE
announced by am H, Draper,}..__ SB sd San pe

junior United States special repre- PANMUNJOM, Aug. 28. ighway Crash

sentative in Europe. Following} Communist truce negotiators ;
talks with Jean Monnet, President | protested on Thursday against the| ALBUQUERQUE, New Mexico, gf vy
of the High Authority, Draper said | killing and wounding of 69 pris- Aug. 28.

that William M. Tomlinson has|oners of war in incidents which Twenty-two persons were in- pre

been designated as acting United|ihe United nations said were pro-| jured -- four critically, one

States representative to the Com~|voked by the Reds themselves. seriously—when a speeding gaso-

munity pending the final form of| A formal protest from North| {ine transport crashed into a

American, representation. Korean General Nam Il was|fos Angeles bound bus on the

Monta ieee eee seer sae handed to a laision officer at a|imain highway near here.

brief meeting. Nam’s protest was} Tihe rest of the 37 passengers
to discuss how Bust Steel Pool |244ressed to senior Allied negoti-| aboard the Continental Railways ENJOY THE MUSIC OF YOUR
ie S'S. and Britain, though not|*t0r Major General Harrison. | bus were shaken up but unin-
members, have signified their in-| Im his letter Nam asked the} jured and of 18 others injured,

, . | Allies to “immediately stop such|six were in hospital at Sandia ED MP ER
ie with weiMeaw. = brutal and cowardly action”. Nam “base here and the rest released BELOV. co Os Ss
—U.P. | Pointed out that the latest figures) after first aid treatment,
ON THIS BEAUTIFUL

LIPS -_.

RADIOGRAMS

Association has arranged = a
special programme of events for
the week August 31—September
5. Opening with services on Sun-
day morning at the Anglican and
Noman Catholic Churches, each
atterngon on succeeding days
there will be special lectures ‘io
whieh the public is invited. His
Sxcellency the Governor will
give the opening address when
Dr. L. M. Comissiong, Senior
Medical Officer, speaks on “Plan-
uing for Health,” with Hon, T. A.
Marryshow as chairman. Succeed-
1 speakers will be Drs. A,
soltysik, B, Rapier, C. L, Fergu-
on, Lioya Radix, C., Gun-Munro,
t. Japal and R. Courtenay and
he Chairman Hoh, FE. M, Gairy.
Chief Justice Jackson, Mr. A.
Norris Hughes and Sir Clement
Malone.

The series will conclude with
2 dance,





NOTICE ANNOUNCING



Readers and Subscribers
to the ADVOCATE News-
paper in Maxwell Road and



Whether you are conva-
lescing or simply need »
heaith-building tonic,
YEAST-PHOS is the answe
to your problem. Vitamin:
aod minerals combined in
» YEAST-PHOS are your key
.4 to good health.

a ne

surrounding districts are VERI-THIN BETTY -A watch she'll treasure @ Nicely styled and finished Cabinet
asked to note that we have for its alluring beauty and faithful accuracy. @ Two record Chambers.
@ Three speed Automatic Changer
@ Twelve inch ticonal-speaker
@ Ten valve Radio
@ Changes 10” and 12” records mixed.

appointed Mr, Clyde Jones, 15 Jewels, Gold filled, guaranteed $81.60
Top Rock, Christ Church, OTHER MODELS to $140.71
as our distributing agent || Gents’ GRUEN WRIST WATCHES





ti yOR THE for the districts as from $81.04 to $163.21 aa |
| ood pein CS nd ta i f
. oh | Monday September 1. 16 and 17 Jewels ON Ask for a Demonstration i
fea, pala 1 rae ae SEE YOUR JEWELLERS at at your Dealers
x STYLES a | ADVOCATE CO., LTD.
| PESTSHE (| y 7 1 m7 i
. SEE THE MI ’ Circulation Dep % ° DELIMA & q @.. x TD. DIAL 4284 MANNING & cO LTD i
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FRIDAY, AUGUST 29, 1952 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE SEVEN

A NNR Stns



mK 4 Cine

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PAGE EIGHT



The South

Local Batting And

Bowling Averages

(By O. S. COPPIN)

THE SOUTH AFRICAN tour-of Australia opens on
October 24 with a four day fixture against Western Aus-
tralia at Perth, The South Africans will play twenty-two

matches during their five months’ tour.

For those who follow International cricket critically,
I should like to point out that the South African tour is
most sensibly arranged according to recent
teams touring Australia other than the recent

team,

There is no question that the first Test match at Brisbane on
West Indies were clearly defeated December 5 after playing

by Australia, That is admitted first class matches.

and therefore any reflection on
the tour should be construed in
the light of valuable experience
gained that must be chronicled
and kept for future reference and
mistakes made must never be re-
peated,

Criticisms

For this reason alone I must
refer to several criticisms of mine
made when the itinerary for the
West Indies tour was first an-
nounced and which criticisms
were supported at the end of the
West Indies tour by Lindsay
Hassett, Australian Test captain
and also by John Goddard, West
Indies captain.

My claim was that the West
Indies agreed to play their First
Test match against Australia too
soon and were called upon to
meet Miller, Lindwall and com-
pany for the first time in a Test
without having first met them in
a State game.

Let us compare the West Indian
list of fixtures with the fixture
list for the South African tour.

The W.I. Tour

The West Indies played two
two-day games, one against New-
eastle at Newcastle, and the other





Here is a list of the
which I suggest that readers of
this column cut out for future
reference :—

October 24—28, v, Western
Australia, Perth.

October 31—November 4, v.
South Australia, Adelaide.

FB vd 7—11, v. Victoria,
elbourne.

November 14—i8, v, New South Small time and space at my dis- I am warned to expect one big
Wales, Sydney,

November 21—¥2, v. New South for this period for batsmen whose
Wales Country, New Castle.

November 25—26, v. Queens- 3 innings of 25 runs each and
lang Country, Bundaberg.

November 28—December 2, v. each. England,
Queensland, Brisbane,

The difference between these
fixtures can clearly be seen, and
certainly the strange arrangement
to which the West Indies cricket
officials agreed in the names of
those who had to play the cricket
ihemselves is an obvious reason
why the captain-elect of a tour-
g team should be consulted in
matters of this sort.

The Fixtures

BATTING AVERAGES
(Qualification 3 Innings of 25 runs each)



ractice by
est Indies

five

fixtures

BARBADOS ADVOCATE





December 5—10, First Test,





prcbane WRONG-GRIP JAKE

December 12—16, v. Australia
Al, Sydney.

December 19—20, v. Victoria
Country, Ballarat

December 24—26—30, Second

Test, Melbourne, -
January 1—5, v. New South BO WLING
Wales, Sydney. F

January 6—7, v. New South

TIPPED AS TEST

SURPRISE

Wales Country, Orange.
January 9—14, v. Third Test, By DENIS COMPTON
Sydney

January 16—17, v. Tasmania,

WITH the Test rubber settled and Surrey home in ‘the

Hobart. championship race, next season’s visit from Australia is the
January 19~—21, v. Tasmania, big problem to be considered.

Launceston. Encouraging as have been this summer’s results, we.
- senpary 24—29, Fourth Test, must not forget that no country has won the rubber against

January 31—February 4, v. Australia since Douglas Jardine’s team went there in

Victoria, Melbourze. 1932-3.
Without being anything but

february 6—12, Fifth Test, optimistic about England’s pros- W

Melbourne. pects, I know that Australia will
February 14—18, v. South Aus- be mighty hard to defeat. ,

tralia, Adelaide. — Already Australia is preparing
February 20—21, v, South Aus- for the tour, One prominent!

tralia Country, Port Lincoln. cricketer there has sent me his
March 18—21 or 18—20, v. “unofficial” forecast of the players
Western Australia, Perth, who will come under Sir ald

i Bradman’s management—which is
a er ee. a Soe regarded as an automatic appoint-
of a few eading nm ment,
and bowlers this season. The According to my friend, another
Pe Pe aa ae ot — rig mg is Parag Lindsay Hassett
Pp ul e end o e w captain. ‘
series in'the First Division, As he proved last winter against
Since that time there has been the West Indies, Lindsay is still
a number of telephone calls and “ustralia’s best and most reliable
requests running into hundreds by batsman and I have no doubt
members of the sporting public that, given. normal form this win-
for the figures of their favourite te", he will readily accept tho

honour.
plaxers; Come-back
This cannot be done in the

surprise. My inrormant says that
37-year-old Jack Iverson, who an-
qualification for inclusion must be ee LT ee tone sy oe
. to make a come-back,

bowlers must have 10 wickets He is said to be keen to visit

posal but I have compiled figures

These are as follows: “Wrong-grip Jake’, as some
Australians call him, could make
a tremendous difference to the
side.

To my mind the one doubt
would be whether he could stand

against Queensland country xi at BATSMEN I. N.O. Total HS. Av woe strain of cricket six days
Townsville. They then played a DPD. Atkinson . 4 0 375 145 93.75 The histor
- 3 z ais : . y of tours has
aur Say, gave vs, Queensland at , 3. Williams 5 2 209° 94 69.66 proved the difficulty of keeping
In other words, they began C’ Aiking |. So 90 59.00 back a bowler primarily for th:
: “ ns +s ve go a 0 171 110 57.00 big games. It seldom works out
their tour on Qctober 26 and G, proverb:
played their first Test match at hfs ey a i + 5 2 170 117 56.66 that way.
Hrisbahs. on November @ after G. Hutchinson 5 2 156 68* 52.00 If Iverson dogs well this winter,
laying one first class match C, Hunte a 6 2 195 114 48.75 I have little doubt that he will be
: The South Africans play West- N. Marshall ze 3 0 137 117 45.66 invited. ’
ern Australia at Perth, South &- Harris 3 0 133 72 44.33 In that case, Australia’s Test
Australie, Victoria, New South J. Goddard 6 2 172 96* 43.00 bowling could well be the same
¢ 4 J. Greenidge .. 5 1 164 57* 41.00 88 that which allowed Freddie
Wales (Country xi and State) B ‘st t 300
Queensland (Country xi and 7. Birkett 6 0 232 134 38.66 eee ta aia i 0 Peeith a ant
State) before they meet Austra- ©. Cave 3 1 17 é2* 9B. See te et Milt Johnston, Jack
lia in the first Test Match, C. Smith ‘ é €¢ mm 10) ees ee
In other words, they begin their S- Rudder. ct eg 11 7 £2.00
tour on October 24 and play their C. Blackman (Police) 6 0 210 70 35.00 World’s fastest
Bers ep Ta NS AE tha 4s 4 1 104 51° 34.66
W. Farmer 5 0 170 69 34.00 Such an attack might be thought
CRICKET O. Fields 4 1 101 44 33.66 to be reaching the stage where it
C. DePeiza 6 0 197 78 32.83 is experienced but not exception-
erent N. Harris ” 3 1 63 49" 31.50 @lly fiery but in powers of pene-
F. King ea 4 2 62 ‘34% 31,90 tration I believe it would be al+
Umrigar Scores F. Tudor... % o.8 114 38 28.50 Most as strong as 18 months ago.
; x woe nT a : _ 198 * 27-33 Keith and a wens eT bow tans
Thir d Double RIND Lr 2% ‘ 7 106 58 26.50 er than any in the world. There’s
. no reason for complacency.
Century BOWLING Our need is to give our batsmen
: as much practice as _ possible
(From Qur Own Correspondent) (Qualification 10 Wickets) against fast bowling.
LONDON, Aug. 28. BOWLERS 0. M. R. W AV,. I would like to see a Test Trial
A great double century—his C, B. Williams .. +o) oe 16 283 31 9.12 next season with the probable
third of the tour—by Polly Umri- F. Phillips 67.5 13 149 15 9.93 batsmen pitted against Fred
gar enabled the Indians to finish B, Atkinson Si: vie 8. - A Bee ee ee ee
the second day of their match H, Barker 106.2 27 248 24 10.33 Supported by South African
with Kent at Canterbury in a K. Bowen i es 65 16 189 13 14.53 Cuan McCarthy, the fastest
strong position. Coming in after F. King .. e 88 Le te nae. OE ee ee
four wickets had fallen cheaply D, Atkinson 127.1 36-304 19 16.00. ¢eneem Sate Cuan Would Be ae
Umrigar flogged the Kent attack H, King 72.4 18 167 10 16.70 . ighted to help.
unmercifully during a stay of C, Bradshaw 60.4 9 212 12 17.66 One man ee oe for
nearly five hours. He was last G. Edghill 81.5 19 237 12 19.75 Shoniara thie oF : oe
out at 392 after having made 204. S, Headley 66 8 288 14 20.57 Carmbridge. s year’s captain o
Another century maker was E, L. G, Hoad 90.5 10 333 15 22.20 Several times before big matches
eee eal ee tenons Spree David has aseea Cuan to go t0 the
§ ae n m ,
Worcester was his first in first GOYS AND GIRLS MEET HERE ON SATURDAYS bowl flat out. arp ae,

class cricket.





SCOREBOARD—
Warwick
268 and 119
(Edrich 6 for :
Middlesex............ 163 and 41 foc
4. *

Leicester versus Somerset
Somerset..., wll.
Leicester, .325 for 3 (Tom-

kin 116, Parmer 105 not out).

Hants versus Worcester
Worcester... 203,
Hants...........475 for 9 (Dare 109

not out).





Lanes versus Sussex



Surrey versus Northants

Surx7rey, iss. 383 for 8 declared
and 43 for 2,
Northants.....,......283.

Kent versus the Indians
BOMB isis ds .evotisnnt 217 and 49 for 2.
The Indians............392 (Umrigar

204). i
Gloucester ‘versus Notts
PIOUS icispisitays: 311 for 6 declared.

Gloucester............ 323 for 7 de-

clared (Emmett 117, Young 99).

[ They'll Do It Every Time tcowet te
es = Mignon

| THE COMMITTEE.
AND I HAVE, AT

ASTER MANY HEH- HEH
BALLOTS, REACHED A

THE CHILOREN FARADE
PAST ONCE AGAIN=-
WE ARE PLEASED TO
ANNOUNCE THAT THE
WINNER IG +++













ay

ae

“€
a

ZL

ONE. KID WINS
{ AND THE JUDGES
= WIND UP WITH
200 ENEMIES
APIECE: ALL. \ ““2Z72m
Re eccnel // THERE QUGHT DO

Oe a

bea LLU
Soh 6h



Satchel Club

Trinidad to London—

David declares this has been
the fastest bowling he has faced
anywhere and says he feels the
better-equipped through having
played against it,

Old friends
Other names sent me are those

of our old friends Arthur Morris,
Neil Harvey, and Douglas Ring—







al 18 my dream came true “rhetlowine wou ve coming

No, 4 in a sporting series by E. McDONALD BAILEY C. McDonald, I, McDonald,

WAS 18, and had just left college, when the opportunity
‘ had ave 8 gf —‘ a came my way.
was a trip the Mother untry, and I was selecte
with three other athletes to run for “Trin an | Australia :
championships in 1939. I had worked hard for this selection,
and felt it was the just reward for my efforts.
I was to run in the 100 and 229 ; —

yards at the White City Stadium,
ind had my first experience of a
tinder track and of the huge
crowds, all ot which I found very
nerve-racking,

Fow people realised, not even
myself, that 1 should return to
become “A.A, dual champion
from 1946 to 1951, with one
exception—1948.

However, it was the experience
that mattered. I lined up in the
100 yards heat_ feelin: like a
nervous kitten, I was eliminated
at once.

My distance
But came the 220 yards, and.
after surviving the first round, f
Managed to reach the semi-finals.

Wx

AK




















E COMMISSIONER WAS
CHUMP TO TAKE ON THIS JOB»:
BETTER OECLARE ITA TIE
ALL AROUND, IF HE DON’T
WANT HIS HEAD HANDED
3 TO HIM






for the first time: — @
Thoms and J. Chambers (Vie~
toria), L. Duldig, N. Dansie, G,
Noblet, and G. R. Langley (South,

J. Munro (Western

idad at the AAA

It may be, perhaps, significant
to many of you that it was in the |
220 yards, ena not in the 100 j
yards, at which I wes better. But |
I myself have always felt that |
220 yards wes my dictance, espe- |
olally when 1 am in good shape |

The bright lights of London
fascinated me. I enjoyed the
sight-seeing of the various beauty
spots very much, I met many
friends, and made many friends,

One of the strangest experi-
ences Lt had in London was waik-
ing Regent-street one hot
sures gay. 1 found myself
unwittingly the centre of attrac-
tion, I-was wearing a full cream
sult Which I was told was a varity | LY,
in London even on the hottes\
days.



London Express Service:






oy GET A LOAD OF
THE MOTHERS GIVING

THE COMMISH THE GLAD

EYE*THEY OUGHT TO

|
|
|
|
|
|





JUST BEFORE THE
@ ROOF FALLS IN

SEA ISLAND



FOREST HILLS,L.1.

ewe

KRAFT FOODS LTD.

KRAFT
DAIRYLEA
eta sete aN



Australia), J. Burke (New South
ales) and K. Archer (Queens-
land).

Noblet is a lively medium-fast
bowler who moves the ball away
from the bat. Langley, Munro,
and Ian McDonald keep wicket.

The others are mainly known
for their batting.

Events during the coming Aus-
tralian season will largely fashion
the final choice but, at the moment,
the above list is thought to con-
tain all the most likely candidates.

Judging by personal knowledge
and experience of most of the
players named, Lindsay will be in
charge of a powerful team.

Only the-best will be good
enough to challenge it.

Nine waited

While hesitating to unearth a
“New Larwood” in every nook
and cranny, I know that North-
amptonshire hold high hopes of
Frank Tyson, the 22-year-old fast
bowler who made such a remark-
able debut against India.

When Freddie Brown declared
on the first day enough time re-
mained for Frank to be given only
one over.

A field of nine men behind the
bat was placed for this 6ft. 3in.
giant ‘who was instructed to “let
her go,”

The first ball flew from Mantri’s
bat at such speed that Fred Jake-
man at second slip could not hold
it. Instead he hurt his hand a
good deal in trying for the catch.

Then Roy was beaten by the
speed of the next three. He man-
aged to touch the fifth ball of the
over but a catch to the wicket-
keeper resulted. :

Some of the India players said
that is faster than Fred
Trueman and, judging by the way
the Northants fielders retreated a
further two yards after every ball
in the first over, this could well

be so,
—LES.

Mathias Can’t
Decide Between
Football And Japan

CALIFORNIA, Aug. 28.
Robert Mathias, twice Olympic
decathlon champion, said on
Thursday that he was undecided
between football and Stanford
University this autumn or a track
tour of Japan. The big full back
dropped a bomb on Stanford's
football hopes on Wednesday
when the announced that he
would not be available for three
games this season because of an
invitation to tour Japan. He told
United Press on Thursday, how~
ever that he would not make the
final decision for at least two
days. He said: “It is a hard de-

cision to make. +e,





Egyptians ‘

Postpone

, ie

Channel Swim
% ENGLAND, Aug. 28.
Seven Egyptian swimmers, in-

cluding a six man relay team and
one soloist have decided to make
their channel crossing attempts
at 05.40 GMT on Friday instead of
Thursday night as planned, A
sudden change in direction and
increase in velocity of the wind
caused the Egyptians to delay
their plunge. oe

oe Na ASE lhl? d 9) 21) |

NOW'S THE TIME TO ORDER

LINEN SUITS

LIGHT TROPICAL SUITS
AND

COTTON SHIRTS



bh’): stems P. ¢. S&S. MAFFEI & Co., Lid.
‘ THANX ANDA ae
THE HATLO LI oor ay, â„¢ _ : +9
top. br FRANC FOGARTY, TOP SCORERS IN TAILORIN
7? es

Africa—Australia 1952-53 Tour

Trinidad Win
NetbaH Tournament

Prem Our Own Correspondent)
_ ST. GEORGE'S, Aug. 26.
Trinidad has won the ladies’

last fortnight,

SPORTSMAN’s DIARY: ‘EP TBALL

FA Expected
To Sanction

Night League Netball

here during the
being undefeated in their matches
and Grenada
they met twice.

ONE of these days, maybe—and
maybe not—the big clubs of the
Football League, Arsenal, Spurs,
and the others, will play competi-
tive floodlit soccer, Today I hear

about to pioneer such a movement.
They are to write soon to the
F.A., asking for sanction for a
floodlit soccer league. They expect
the blessing of the ruling body.
PETER SMITH, secretary of
Headington, describes as “highly
successful” the series of experi-

last year against Footbal! League
clubs, Joining with Headington are

another club belonging to_ the B.L.C. TO PLAY EMPIRE

B.C.L, will meet Empire Inter-
mediates on Sunday next at Bank
Hall and the following Sunday.
|The game
the Southern League fixtures, | B.C.L,

I take leave to doubt whether|the following: —

Goddard (Captain), Gerald
(Police Boys’

T. Hinds, R.
r G. Sobers, B.
(Middlesex) ,
(Radcliffe), L. Jones

Southern League, Kidderminste;
Harriers, Others will join in,
though tic evening competition
will be kept entirely separate from |

floodlit football will ever become!

a major sport in England. Why? | Sober
Winter rain, fog and frost make'Club),
watching outdoor football at night | Pinder, (Rangers),

an uninviting business. Far better
watch it on television.
‘Brown Flash’ Levula

WORLD'S greatest Rugby Union
wing three-quarter—that is what
Australia and New Zealand think
of Fiji international JO LEVULA,
known in those parts. as the
“Brown Flash.” “af

Levula, who is 21, 6ft. 2in., and
14st., is the star of the sensational
Fijian team currently beating
down all Rugby Union opposition |
in Australia, They are so though
the Australians cull them “Black
Cement.”

JACK REARDON, Australian
international who has played
against all Rugby League countries

YOUTHFUL



with St.
both of whom
Grenada was runner up,
io ee are ‘the results of
sear 30 of s ler cl e series; winners named first:

me some of the suaalioy clive s08 "Tak ot Vineens Sbeate:
Grenada—St. Vincent 27—16.
Trinidad—Grenada 19—13.
Trinidad__St. Vincent 21—19.
Grenada—St, Vincent 28—24.
Trinidad—Grenada 20—14,
match of
was played this after-

mental matches his club played Sean’ J a mixed

When ONE will do

MAGI
HEALING | OIL

is an efficient remedy
Externally—for cuts, sprains

tourney

XI will be chosen from

Internally — for colds,
coughs, colic, sore throat

for your Stock as well
It’s your First-Aid Kit
Bo

Bcurne (Lancashire),
——————

INSURANCE ,
COMPANY



is convinced that Levula couid be
the greatest winger in the world
in either code,

Enlightened Benefit

BENEATH all the clowning on
the field there was a more serious
side to the Arsenal vs Middlesex
floodlit cricket at Highbury, It
added £650 to the benefit fund of
Middlesex bowler, JACK
YOUNG,

Ex-Sussex captain HUGH
BARTLETT, watching with his
wife and two sons, said: “I
really cannot see that it has
possibilities for first class teams,
but I must say I think it great
fun.”

Dick Tallboys Dies
DICK TALLBOYS, for 35 years
boatman to the Oxford University
Boat Club, died at Oxford.
Tallboys’ grandfather was
waterman to Magdalen College
and the family have been asso-
ciated with Oxford rowing for
more than a century. When the
Oxford University crew came
down to the tideway for boat
race practice Tallboys was there
in blue reefer jacket and Oxford
cap. His job was to keep the boat
in trim, He claimed the Oxford
eights of 1937 and 1938 as the
best winning crews.

Without Comment
FROM Mr, T. Fenwick, of Bond
Street, W.I., comes this letter :
“A Soviet magazine warns Rus-
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Full Text

PAGE 1

r.\r.E TWO ItARRADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY. AUGUST 29. 1852 QcUtib QaUinq FASHIONED IN LONDON By DOROTHY BARKLEY Threat To Short Hair Vogue S K C M.i '• %  %  S.: I\< tmrmimg i t omr M l %  %  1 dad she will i). I ;mnt. mn f ID I rilliiUlit L EAVIff :hts plantwail M cen holidaving In Ilarriados. With Bar wetherself hiis l 1 ;icr;ibank lintel. Spent Tin Day* | Will i %  i Juice, Dominica, B Anwe to bid LONDON. to the our hairstyle to be faahlonable er with the beauty <>f the iround Christmas., he cornmrnts. The maxini Sim anil Itr'ir A nd hen was born to I Karl Bohnc sh rl h *' rcul > chrynanthemuief French pas Slmh *i\ ..jdlng London hairstyli.-: always be spotlessly clean, proinked by fashion? "A wellM K ( BCIL BROWNE, .. dork "Women like something rww" h-..> ferably kapl in individual greasestyled haircut need* stylish Beat I Iff! announced. "It is__tune f-r a proof bag*. .M the ftr^t sign rt ressories," sayi FTench. Recently. .** tJheSTARS" *' ral Post Office, left announced ._ %  i. ss %  h.mge In hairstylftflBTrue enough. lineal th of hair or calp. Kngland on long lint women have Men particular* iiould place yourse f In DM period bo proJy fond of short hair. It nas t an expert, lo t;.ki> a course In AccountI, oked smart. It has been Acconip.in\mg him % % %  • ha keep %  oaJ to .-under a, hoVnV ^ "" \ h .,„>, .ooKed ne-t under a ha, ££? f( ."—--. „,olr zzivL L l ris-ar a L5 TH., * ..ster of the Cole School people grow the ir fashion, but will keep Oi Baa/JMN own short. OY SKINNER gad Mr. '•Calculated Carelessness" Martin of R. J. Fmuhs new theme French has a trained trichclo"s !" !" 'E.': * %  < %  . * j." ho giv bh 1 postal Ireaimt'iii the hair and scalo. n postal course may Inteteit haTr and 'o be !" * n overseas. If you require "—iment, you simply fill in a you he opened a boutique in his salocn, and i* the first l hairdresser to d* so, H< irrvidlng original and interesting accessories. A glance at a -lection from his boutique, will show how he 1ft carrying out his aim. For Knd;.>. Am* M l952 Look in the Bastion in which your birthday come* and find what your outlook it. according to tha atari. AXOHI -Nothing lost by being friendly, amenable;" lfarck 21—April Urn fact, much to be gained, including winTAURIIH nlng others' confidence • —Sort of day A good etey.~ * hii-h you steady-going, thi M", HIR OMUI SFK1. /„.. % %  / %  CEORCK aTO B W l M n i: .'. Co Tnnid.a. who styles have a natural, rather than M >tMo.bM a - %  a,„.e.„ance "First Nihf. J^ "L££ Z %  •* Mtt %  it to focust attentim, on the forehead ",n -nrt^h^it X. mndltlon H • itueala at rnd nerk. The frinje, curhnf aotl. !" ^ nd „ "^' '"' !" X .!S .''•iji.viif rioiimay *F(. .,,.,! M, .1. S S M i.l.V LEWIS UH He Is At' k r.t-r.-ii Dectisi Co In Vtpniualg, iii Jaime* >/*<• %  / y i s T | i: ii A Y m Slu.rf' has frequently been as short as one Inch, never lORfgi than Inraa Inches; the new "long" style is five Inches. Now, hair grows, on an average, at the slow rate of hulf-an-lnch %  rgontit, Think in advance if you do want %  i Frank D. L Osbnrne Ms The brj Colleen Sydm Cittern, and M held al iiud WuriH Biiyliy wore peach th,home of th< pink nylon, respi i flveh .,:„! the honeyrm win long full Balr Spi-nt u HVvl; M R. G. C. HURSTFIELD of Geddes Grant ft Co., Portof-Spaln, has been in Barbados ("i three week.His wife and son. Jonathan, joined him for one week, and enjoyed their holiday Immensely. All were guests at Cacrabank Hotel, and have now returned to Trinidad. Rattan and wickerwork are I popular Just now. In hit boutique, pecially printed postcard supFrench has delightful bracelet*, %  olied by the trichologlst. He asks earrings and baskets (or details about the scalp (is :t materia's. Prom brightly Colourolly) greasy. Inflamed, or dry?), ed cotton .squares, he has made %  bout the hair Itself, (la it drv. the "Pigtail Scarf"' and the l*iScarf. Hm mid* the pirate scarf by gathering the anda Into %  tail, and lyses your particular problem tying them twice—close to the from these details, and then pn-head, and again at the tip—with pares an individual formula for matching* raffia. But he would the treatment. not reveal hi method for makm : "I am concerned with the conthe pigtail scarf. That Is a prodition of the hair, the halrdresifesslonal secret. WAIIMR BROV Proudly present al the IIVKIIVIt. IN PLAZA (III VI -.I/O) OPENING FRIDAY 4.45 & 8.30 p.m. and Continuing Daily JnlT M Jg 2! V1B00 Aw. a *|t .. I* %  •pt. M—Oct. 23 Listening /fours p m Th* Nr'i tlOpin T>>r PU 1 Up ni Horn* Al Eight. S pm I %  >. Ill pin Muc (or Danclnc p m Scoliuh M*s>rlnc. II) pm T. .i. • 43 p in RpofU Round-Up "nd rioannun* Paiod*. 7pm The New*. 7 IP p m Home N*wi frwn UrlUin I i.\ i- p m a BH. si MM ran TNI FIRST TIM r. *. IN A HUNDRED VIARS k v JMI CAMIM COII INSIDE THE WAILS OF I ii We.1 Indian Duny. 7 15 p m ... friend, Kadio Ncwirrrl. 13V p m IBra. %  44 p tn InUllud*, ft U | EdlluiuU. %  1 Th hfi II 11 10 j BY THE WAY PRISON l DAVID COCHRAN • BRIAN WARNER BROS. STEVE .By BEACHCOMBER DAVID — PHILIP CAREY TED oe CORSIAM DOROTHY HART AND nIIHDiiuDe..-Ca3IinsoN -CEEjgiioRGW A T a reci t conceit i %  struck by the fact that the time? The Worms Had a Railroad —But It Could On'y Run Underground— B) V \\ lltrl.l. "YOU 1 Mid to Mi %  t rode on an unilci gi aui d and undei : niid hlarklierry j %  %  %  1 think I rode under' neath MM I tOO, I ll I'm DOt %  ras Mulcning to her brolhn on her fare. "An und< said at In^t. "Where l % %  you (In an unilrrtftotind railroad 1 gnu sitting i nail ni %  f -;i\ ing I Ubught I mosl have I ft DSC, when I i lieai'i Ihe sanu voice ftavtng All abon i'i, all • board I Kexi itoa the round a track." "Were Ihey he asked. "In time fe* .: further l>ack from the what'" said an official. "For whatii up than ll u-u.il. %  vei they had to do." replied the A IMK barnlgl wbo hi .". lUninese. "They didn'l have any%  .I'.'iinl by a momentarily thing to do." was the answer, "it .rc-^ pare for a clean slate next week. OANOBH —We normally like better that for which ^T Tno 29—Juljr 23 we have to fight and win than gain without much effort. You may have to hustle some today, but It will be worth the vUnl< Jf• * —Please heed Gemini advice now. Tone^ down over-enthusiasm, keep demands W withjn reason but push forward rightly with hoot and faith. Enjoy week-end —Favourable influences prevail, partlcu-^ ly for worthv interests, sound business^ iiiagcment. Heed your conscience, also health essentials; take time for needed rest. * * Be vour well-balanced reasonable ^-lf and have less difficulty getting through day's programme—IF you heed warnings,^ and cheerfully accept responsibilities. * *. A little unction. rnWeri healthy ambition. Ay plus fairness, and you should net a pleasant, productive day. If your occupation or other demands are exacting, keep cool, you^ can achieve. Team up vour mental astuteness withJ^ lt ,;,ble" physical prowess and you have a combination that can handle a swell Job, add to your laurels. Fresh opportunity^ now. • • A — New and unusual propositions, some mAr value; new materials and methods equally favoured with everyday routine and familiar activities J^ AQUAHIDfl IL.ci Scorpio now and you can benefit. Jan. 22 Ptb. 20 Must speed up notably in oecj^orulj|duties but dont go In for unnecessary chpnges. Quickly clear up unfinished tasks. —Avoid extremes and profit more In ,cnt. A keen hut even disposition can make this a beneficial day. New anda*. familiar matters both favoured. YOU BORN \ .riiooni mako able journalim. crlllcs. analysis, poll...or, Birthda.e: John Lorkc famous phllosophCT.l (Copyriiht. 1SJ. KUu Fralam Sndk. lw.) SCORPIO Oct. 24— NOT. BAOITTARInil Nov. 23—Dae 22 CAPRICORN Dec. 23 —Jan. 21 PISCES Tab. 21—Marcu Cu )RN TODAY; Excellent reasoning faculties; yo"^ 8 urpose.ul. :onruc;,ve, Intelbxent Uun y toke'T realli ml (he loroniolit ri"|it thnt there were lights nil alona Ihe way-litUe*: ( ll.. KHi<<<.', and ii really wit. ten. Von eouM Hg nil | gi owing down fron Uwtop It looheii eery upsldt-down, no one else in the train t seemed to not let ai uni'ci The train rode in nr.d Ml %  • %  %  lotted dowT. % %  ai pp %  ( m %  I o.inil a lie !o "i' tim* M Knarf, -i looked. II %  i ltl hole Jus*. ,i it. An old Is j I un %  i aitO it Mini : I 1 Bi %  l %  ..l tier and %  i.< i I didn't. %  huj iro .1 Thg n>\t Una DON ihi, train go t. „,,.>,. , %  :m-s Itl tnen-:"o\cl!i"What d • l %  Kna./ 1 i ITghl sure i larger than a •orm-hole. I I "Whal ore the] : %  ttnl Thf '"•'' %  ualll I %  i ly u started i< i ight It n. rain. I he hale. Knarf ?I They mi %  %  i tool, ami otl on It dark •w, Witrn ihe Nile if in flood the wife of ihe tenter-dlniner noes liunaru. (Old Egyptian saw.) ^VERY morning." says my paper, "he sent her costly orchids." Fichtrel whal an Imaginative approach? And note that they were costly. None of your wayside blootm plucked at dawn, with the daw 00 them. I knew a girl whose adBfjt her such masses of small Every 1.1 oi the cat that ran morning, after the first deliveries. k without stopping at she drove to the shop with the r AI n%% %fey 100 miles an hour, day's offerings and sold them at a w %  " %  "J MAYO. iiii.-i-. \of niiir/i ioiiifxlitiim I N Narboiine there WM a youngster who used to play the piano ivitn ins rum white iwn on -i i^i cte i ongta anked his father 11 this gift was ii* said, • v uWn/j i"i plnrvf I I KLA MAW BAT AT, the Burflowers that she set up w-strrdny shop In the West End. %  hOVl i fur n moro "Where." he ftafcad, "uiif tlW) whacking great profit. She going in such a hurry?" It was found out when her assistant tried oxplalned to him that the car to sell a heap of roses to one of warat Vang anywhere in parher admirers. His card was still It Just raced round and on them %  ort of like got rli net, lint it .>.,, ramai Wi nan I I hat n lh lul ftl one hail heit la w Hut the %  the wfty oul. up annthat %  %  % %  l t underground T young man:' he lold me Mc ftftu • ':ghl I U as • trorra, tea m. £. Stuart's of ZDancing REVUEDEVILLE 1952 Under tl ilahed pMronan of His Exccllcncv th Oovtrnof and Lady Savage AT EMPIRE THEATRE On Hednrsdny :lrrl.. Thursday llh.. Friday Slh Srulemht-r at 8.30 p.m. MATINKK: Friday 51h at 5 pjn. Music li> Capl. RRISI \.R CM., and Police Rand Boukiim illliro opens Friday. August 29th from S.IIO a.m.—12 noon; from 1.30—3 30 p.m. nel H DURABLE SHEETS AND PILLOW CASES PILLOW CASES 97 cts. SHEETS 70 x 100 $5.70 SHEETS 81) v 100 $6.28 10 \ 100 $7 46 31)' WHITE BUTTEK MUSUN 43 els. QUALITY PHIN'TED SOUND RAYONS 96 els CREPES, DISTINCTIVE DESIGNS $1.06 T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS YOIK smii sin DIAL 4220 DIAL 1G0T. Man* ljinch*on H*f INI V*I l,f ( %  •.mbunrr' -lV. Moat L-tnch %  wfffi •l al |,aa* S %  %  icihofri*'! a <• %  •'< VK.nn. 8auwM Mctonl a rhw. %  tuahfltl rV Che— Cnnhlnff HutUr l*f. %  Hams ft la la lb. Ctmmm (• lb STOAT & SAMI'SIIV (1938) LTD. ll-Mdg.uarl.-r* lor tlist Kum S • Rsoal WaffR* Nina WcUutl Uiu MarW • Hiclwd tafa Mn S-w.in.ei tfa Smai mi fntmai h lUlU f Mill r>recteri tn "*" LOVEJOY BO HlAKLciUN RUS "IAMtJLYI, AN T *LI UNITED STATES PICTURES -„ SL^WARNER BROS. IM ill Hinm.i ions %  r "-/*•*/% (Blil 3|#) OPENING FRIDAY 2.304.45 & 8 30 p.m. and Continuing Daily 4.45 & 8.30 4



PAGE 1

FRIDAY. AUGUST 21 1*52 MARIIADOS ADVOCATE PAGE THKEE Fire In Grenada Renders 100 Homeless Appeal Launched For Subscriptions CARDINAL AT Kof C. PROCESSIONAL (From Our Own Correspondent) August 25. ABOUT 100 person*, nearly half their number child,:ir ,i i\ in iiml-teennge, hove been ren. %  ment building and four other houses early yesterday nonitBg. The destitute are temporarily housed at the Youth Centre, Comer (irenada Boys' Secondary S'hool, and Salvation Army night shelter as sleep:" .md are fed at Foresters Social Workers League breakfa .vorking class lolk who have been It of uti then | A broadcast appeal was made — yesterday afternoon by Mr. A. N. Chairman of the St. George's District Board, lor sub% %  lief fund, which His ExrclBlr Robert Arundclt with a $50.00 donation, and for gift* ng and other comforts to |0 committee 1**1 bj Lady Afundell. I loth Sir Robert and Lai AfUndeU visited the burnt out area yesterday morning and also inspected the temporary relief arrangements. Scene of the file was the wmer of Hughes Sheet > yeauruay morning. CM In amount, bj landed and lbs otic t •" wera intransil The passengers disembarking AIIey) Li antf Tyirei Street, thmafb &£ ** %  -'""" ££ *%£& one of the rared buildings lay on <;" the opposite side of Tyrrel Street. *"" %  %  .*"*' '";• %  %  •/• ,*" %  apparently caught by blazing air D 2 muuc t; Antl ua %  borne debrtg. St Kilts. Monism..; iu-rmud The alarm was given at 12-3" Boston. Halifax and Montreal, a.m. when Are was seen within a Those landing war. Prom large walletl and galvanized shed Tnnid-d Mr J B. \ housing Mr. Joe Pitt's furniture' %  B. Vidal Mis* T. S. VI making establishment on Hughes T. B Vidal, Master J. B. Vida:. Btreel but the flames had already Mr. E. S. Larrier. Mr. C. Archer, taken ouch hold of this location Maaler V. Archer. M %  that within a matter of minutes Archer. Mrs. A. J. Corbm. M. the roof was Mown through, *• •' Corbm. Miss M. B. Brown. %  ending a column of flame and Miss A. M. Juhen. Mr A A. smoke spindling upwards, and <"'rke. Mr. C. Greavea, Mr. A J. by the time the Fire Brigade %  %  £"*• ,nd Mr A B ScanUearrived on Tyrrel Street the *"*£*• „ neighbouring tenement was ..* !" m t l !* n d .t : M *" {L.^ %  Wage A building of appalling Mr R ***, Mrs. RPike, Mr. condition consisting of a wooden v Leeswy. Mrs. E. Lwaey. Mi upper floor resting on walls which Wason. Mr C DaSUva. Mr, hemmed In a lower series of ( Morris. Mr. S. Ham Mr. I. rickety rooms, the tenement was "arris, Mr. S. King, Mr. N. mgUlM in the inferno Marshall. Mr. J. Pilgrim. Mr F and, as the occupants had been Pilgrim. Mr. L. Lovel l evacuate It with what Alleyne. Mr. S. Clarke little they could take, the OrePreseod, Mr D Parri' had to be concentrated Morns, Mr. T. Mom-, on a maze or other small buildMorrl-, Mrs J. Hnyu^ UM vanity n MIJ as „,, Havnes. Miss H. Ha] the opoosite side of Tyrrel Street. L. A Davidson, Maatei %  >.< i i ilimoult' %  of . baa Con* assistance (rote LM apfaTOprtaU nenevolcn! Fund Praallaje i xhiblli support for the Bi I Iji.'t while great a ear) oca n !, 1,.. .% %  .".j flANCit CARDINAL ITILLMAN (cQtr) of Naw York wallu In the solemn processional antarlng St VLnoent'a Church In !,. %  • Angalaa. The eeremony formally opened the Knights of Columbus' 70th annual conventinn. Meaasgta from President Truman and Pop* Pius XII war* read at the opening nation of the or *er. i liternallonal £oundpheaj F.A.O. Home Economist Finds Much To Do In Trinidad PORT-OF-SPAIN, On the eve of her departure from Trinidad after three-month's stay. Miss Klsa Haglund, Home Economist Neked of the Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Naiions. gave on account oi her activities gtnee the con.-lu,, .— llllh hU DnMi sjonofthejomt^sponsorwiF.A.O.-CanbbeMU-omm.ssion fo £"„£ %  %  ." %  M, H iilewood in aitb the .chaac of the Church Village The lettepafntad "Ut that a %  .'. consisted of 6,900 s.j if suitable terms could be arample lying obtain li former RAf miaea to the Vestry Darned iigure. That concession had been mad> Baa LindernUinding that thv %  l used !or p\i A rondary SrhcwWh l'r\ ill Moet On Sept. I • I raoidtnar\ (, ^f the As*,ers in Secondar> ir tin I %  >. 'id paraai lleadmasember 1 itg at 10 am. %  i-eting lias been called n conneitioi uith the appulnt%  lent o.* e reeomragaJdaH the ra. I ados, e\cludln Turner Report except where alics still ... ..i K> 'hi latlnn* tu be made. %  .. i %  %  lew with the aui not been %  %  %  %  %  -1' also cog %  i ut it'ina I The ,ilternali\e seeine,! lo !>.-. gasnt en to state, that %  n should obtain legitl;its mien" '" "''' ,Ml Pi*tialari whit peo%  < 'I"' best market price and th.i: had lo consider. wo,il,i bC V* reaaio,, created on the ''"'''J ' balding at the sale. K,,. i %  %  K on r Mottley gasd that there waa iked through fh> Weat d> ol fffinkin that sutMcrlbed Indies >actlon and d d not find ' "" V, V the name of Barbados so much ^V cou d he acquired as mentioned, while Jamaica. ''' ,,,,in .„ lh ': ^'i-vcnglng Depar:Trinldad and even die small islands of the Windward and Leeward groups shone dowr from the Illuminated sign by attractive prestlr* m light and colour. uent Whatever the reiii|i turn> .ut to Iw. whetlier it was th.it %  %  Mayor and Corpon.UOO, Iha streets still had to bl would require %  daKj itti B ivtagagai Dai %  i ient. Conference on rfome Iconomica and Educaii. which met at Kent House in early July Site Desiriihlr in Nutrition, Mbl Haglund came t'> Tumda I %  %  arosh ith the Com nm^ions Central Secretariat In making preparation*, Kent House Recently .iisllagluno |artigfr '' %  eipated in ihe Carlbltt-aa.i at well as sewing machines with '• Belmar. Miss F. Belmar. Miss wlUl delegate* the problem ol a quantity of straw-made items H. C. Burke and Miss N. John. fous Domestic centres assembled in barrel of veaaV r***-* 'dkw stf l to disruas with an deatroyed; SESmSSSmtU St. Vincent. 200 Mta H^und the problem of decyUnden of gaa. 800 cartons of veloptng and improving the *frun juice, 50 drums of fatty ii anil In shirts, paper bogs and ,he whool. Site describ.--t them printed matter from Trinidad M -i very InU-rested group. In and garments, boys* enps, modiTobago. Miss Haglund held what eal prepiir.itioni "' a** termed "very lively discusornnges from British Oulana loo*" on Homo Econeenles taachin s^ iara i nacbWhiie in carl lie Bay Ina Q) a tg il( the Nelson will load 1.000 tuns of Bishop Aiutey High School. NU.;.I fOT_ Montreal., % %  ..^nall M^ )SB Haglunt' reported wldeE. and terturr-d at a two-day course s (. on Horn.Ecoiiotnics for .ilTiei.d ;S^*3S!!i^r5TfflSl -;; f*U??£ .SB? E**lar^T£i M^ and IUIMIIX! held under the ,. started to gei eooler. „, wnd people wr ,o sup|-ut-Id ilu. -mii^vil 'HI ,>i.,,,m, > ,.•...lorgentl 91 degrees rahrei.hr t „, the ,heriuartvef. -.hade, now read five aagreaa Since the aciiulsitlon of the silt ias desn. red that a of Lha Vestry alona %  1111 '" independent valuers be i in au into the quastiot, mice, etc. and repor' >'i '' %  !" % %  '" i • %  <' % %  i'h, Chajraaan aagaaniad Mtasri cen lo everybody in the We, h M-.ttl. itdi C •h.Lt thenshould D It ,. u.-n Bl V< active body with a high ausubject to their acceptance, Messrt II rtt] and prestige of Lb. W< n. Armstrong and H II Wi' India Conimittee. ready to servo t) im .,, ,,,, In any West Indian cause im ur his chair irtS. BELLA LUMSDCM DIES IN GRENADA I OB II 9 Ittgj. 2 %  h Ion) Hospital last Bu ells Lumsden. v.-lfe 3t After dealing with aon %  i Tax Belief, the meeting le-minted If you are embarrassed with flatulence... natuaaxe. hennhurn a*i oincr indtgaatioa discomforts alter eiimt are often tigi'i oi K.vi ii. Put things right in J..ihlc BUKg time *iih *Dolta* Stomach Pov.clcr.lt settles your iomwh. rapidl) new esc—i *CHI and icstoong hi I hakax*. Radativc. * mr, mnM a-l .ii-.. am !•— l*f* .' wMir^"'iii'ii<(•* *•* %  • ,<.•* •• I* ( ltotolM.< M .,i" to.'Mr Muttlij la n it the next meeting Q< the Vi ti i to ina scna I S raguH ol Lha llndlni of UM out %  Ceeamon Pleas ID the recent th*Vestrv. that thlVestrv dls russ at their next no % %  I turned out for the tourist ir.ide" Emerson. Mr J. Gordon. Miss C. the tenement, owned by the widow D 7^ np an /L Mi8S V K-fiSS* of the late Geoffrey Hayi— "-Thc NeUo B1 * broK> h troyed; two small he by thc late O. G. L\. a tailor shop half burnt out—all on thicorner lot. On the oppoaf side of Tyrrel Street a two-floor BOUea owned and occupied bv Mr. J. R. Davtt, well known emplovee of th,. lo,.„i nflke .f Cable and was also destroyed with only .. frw household effects saved. Loss in personal belongings I* 8 ? %  anarally heavy, on Yesterday one of the aklfesJ was kept busy In the Third Class Passengers section of Messrs. Qardtra Austin A C •. l*td., her Agents, as many people from the northern islands sought pasOne passenger hinted that aho was trying to escape the h< Barbados but when rain begi after she was handed her ticket for St. Lucia, rating 'rom the flames as well aome loo.ing which occurred in the confusion as householders m the vlclnjty on both sides of Tyrrel Street began to clear their residences for fear of spread of the Ore. The Fire Brigade and Police, as well as volunteer helpers, including seamen from the H L.S f'rafter. worked heroically. Legislators Want Many Privileges Pram Oar oi*n c. ii"iuitdn>D GRENADA, Aug. 28. The Wen Indian today frontpaged and bannerlined its St. ... „,. JiE 0 corr "pP d jt' rport of a Mohurrmii OuiIt> CH •pcecii made in Castries by Dr. Carl La Corbiniere, one of the delegates to a recent Gairy summoned Elected Legislators party in which the talk-, were eharacteri hicfly aimed at obtaining for clectivs themselves, chairman Gairy said Turning down the proposal Hon. e^ George Charles (St. Lucia), dls**fiS cussed the rost of living Instead of the issues. Lo Corbiniere. reporting to the citizens at a Trade Unionists public meeting disclosed that the agenda revealed only when the onference began in camera sittink. proposed lbs uitiodurtlon of legisIpfon for the following privileges for members of the Council; Pension!, free medical and surgical treatment, freedom frorr arrest, iiriority over other members of the nubhc for attention at government health centres and government departments, free transportation. quantity of molasses for Halifax ,; pi ,. 11( | Interest in UK .and rum and general cargo for n^io,, of the Conference on House ilernunl.i and the iiortnern p,„, lun ,| Ca un ,i Edueatu>u in Nuislands. She leuves tomorrow nllon hilI ttxf University of night at nine u clock. Puerto Rteo conduct a S-months' (in English j less. This was DO relief. Tho ild acareab ba felt and huiniditv was | | TinDSBjOrttj of people who walked thi' ma n utreeU, of tile City sought shelter from the rain u. store*, few trying lo walk through it, even when it was only %  ri/Eling. One vendor wlm was selling neur BioaU BtraOl renuurked. "This la flu rain". Some peopla %  .in. .r.i. red ''"on stores, only ntenojtng to heller, bought I'liensie tablets .md Aspirins. Along the waterfront work %  ra bald up four long Mrtoda. scampered off to take -i altar, datartlni ttflhlai M djranes. Locai Scouls ifvlp At Grenada lire ^gt-nt fur HiNiie Economics workers next Many individuals to whom she Fifteen members m Uie James talked expresaed the desire to take street Scout Troop, Fourth Barsuch a course. bados. who were oi Grenada Other activities included a dlsfor ten days, assisted ID extlncuealon of school feeding with giilshmg a lire in Grenada which personnel operating Trinidad's rarly. on Sunday morning des"Breakfast Sheds"; visits to Gastroyed live houses and left about parillo where she saw some Ho-ue loo homeless. Nearly half of was surprised improvement projects, to the those homeless were children, to fall soon Women's Institute In La Lune. The Scouts returned, to tho d to community centres in island yesterday morning by the Princess Town and WlUlamsville S-S. Lady Nelson, the -ame boat attendance at a Communltv Rally on which they left on Saturday spun Smokeless Fireplace right. August 16. The group Abusing Authoritv For Personal Gain uJ ITE vi!*<*" %  Charles Morns, assisted Visiting homes in Trfnidad. Miss Cub Mu „ er s ^ „„,,, lagluml observed tfiat rhulhas nnd f^,^^ Stlwt Master. Basil [I and King. Mr. Morris told the Advocate that they had a very i time, visiting many phu | I i I were very hospiwere without vents for smoke and. n some cases, were too low either for safety or for comfort In cooking. She has been able to supply CAIRO. August. 28, 1( diagram and detailed instrucGreriadi.i rai announced that thc turns for the construction of a table. "ment Purge Cot %  m <>keless fireplace designed in He said that on the Sunday ittee Bound lei Wafdi .1 India, and now In use In Jamaica, morning when the fire occurred rks, Osmi.rt Qmi>n g other places. around 12.30 o'clrxk the boy* Mbbjurram, pd tabuso of Miss Haglund plans to Leave were aroused by Shouts of. "St. authority Cor person*I gain. TinTrinidad Sunday. August II fw G*afjs/i on flre.' The James Committee ocd duJamaica, where she will take part Street Hoys, as him. In n %  -(•; genrei irni %  \ • %  'irk an hft owi I i gainst in the Adult Education Semlm. to be held by the Extra Mural i any e* Department of the University 'College to the West Indies. September t—20 One of the seminar topics will be -Home aiiiy of Economics for the Caribbean.'' Or seaways the request of the Jamaica Oov%  ment, and with the approval payments, free transportation. ,. J *• ., r od .,''' nd „ Agrlcultui< free houae tax. and the same privl. li, v "*" JI^^ OrganlaaUon. MUs Haglund wilt leges as Governors, and Admim. '" *S( *J'V ""main In Jamaica for at least a trators. freedi.m from Import <*l8.000). Mohamed Baafat mon t h following the Seminar duties on cars f free car license. '• %  '•m i Dl l .unicip.nlBefore returning to FAO he.radio, etc.. the right to requisition ny waa round id .f complicity quarters in Rome. Italy, she governmen' buildings free visit Antigua and St. Utts I > -harge an^ '.ravel freely between confer with officials and other' (he Windwards. I d out tha: problems :elatlng to the be" Oairi s-^n hy your correspond||ohai am C*l not be tried on the application' of modern horr ent. genera.Iy describes La Coi., of the new ministerial reeconomics techniques. binlere's speech as a gross mis,po nB ibility Law because the law Nor ean he —~^^—^-^^^— on the basis>nf administrative disc because he Is no longer in the t i-laUon artendlnej dl SAIGON. Aug. 2* i A military tribunal sentvre > ; The Cabinet will meet tcday two Vietnam terrorists to d* .!i .. and five to life imprisonment "tahci t" 'i vsnten P'sc'ng plasiie bombs under l i It was f" nobfiM ln ^ wnt T mi 8 l ion EgvpC let dun a few m n-l decision '"f* f'^^Z'Jr ,n two P*"" hairs on Wednesday—again In \ red immediately an ^ 1 ^fl!zJX^. „„„ „ m ^, •he ^"^m,'s .pparel depu bei of^f^ Mln !" The O-d TcSd workU^nX^irUta, | U "^JSlS^JSi •>et today. way ,roTn th Vietnam Hreei •er, • months_ W bec._te h nnd dx or %  Queen's Royal College Scouts Trinidad, who were also cami*ing at Tantcen, Military eeivtd. The case for the pro— c utlon is March 29 wt was In a shop at Church Village. St Michael he gave three and %  % % %  5s. lOd. n yard so that he could mak> pah* of pants. %  Vndant pr>mised to give n 21 but • f-e weeks passed and Miles still hear from the defendant about the pants and notified thc Police.





PAGE 1

srx. BARBADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY, AlKWS* 2, '*i CLASSIFIED ADS. HI i"j% Ulf.D ri'iiHRiib o L**> 11-t %  %  <•KSI.1I.Al .trrr j_ hi MI i %  Had. Ml n* %  _r. TRa I unrr.il v.... laave Uvt afe-ov ,iig*ii-r >l 4 oo y m la-da tor %  asnard'f C* John. r<>. .' %  m • % %  I t*M n.'...!.!.. Ssalr. Lo.< fu„tt Otetlv. T-. .11 ruKW Nile. Lew Carter. All-n skarta UuMein <•*• >-ra r.wPW*M •* ava.sai ttrvi -•• Ot-tofW lltVl t Uwrmf post I, It Cn plum4M> fanl %  n bUMfca j • *—: m-Nf.ALOW T*. An Atfim-d T I •ill BunfaMw Modarn S en SsS a Rll lurrUahsd asmaslew kwllM it> tMiliii.r rai iWOtst ptrtieuLr. An,.. T4*.! Ssrvd.. Waeihing S4.I.BB—a. i %  %  %  V .<:l Prom ftfptftl.bl .ligRaeir SMS %  %  — D# Bw jam T*ies*Qn. U'i> Mei* tlr.-.i Uairaal RMrn ri*u. Uwri. Oi I'homMM HCLSt.r.-.n *i WhUrtui'i. SI •V %  : HOMI. i-'OK BAJLC ALTUMOMVI-. r-oa.l y * UAH V.u.hall 14 H P oiaing frder IStt nvdri la an Street Dial 499* r MIT SS t.SS. CAR-Ona Hi ro-ir M>r H P teuree in fMd art Mag o C A Pr*rs* phone Ssf* Iveo. flnr or.ly IMVO ...•-Etl-vln Mayh. %  %  M H I l( MORRIS 1 tan Trucks with auxllUrs .rear baa. Mm-rle 10 earl Van* and % %  irk-Up. Two an. Roiir Dear Mirum MorrU (..for*. All iron Neck ,o waning Essl Royal "STU*FD CAIUV-Avallakla fr. .'< 10*. run> arg* FXECTWCAL 1 >iCAR RADIO*e lube wi.n R. "age • and 1] "> molfi A iHoii. %  < IK rt S$—% • ,. .1 Tub*' rhile* MrXIIAMCAl, i H AOIHCUI.TURA1. go, 1 ),: Mr-NT. iPtludWi-Tractors. Plou#k< ':rasa mi.Km. esrU> •coop*. Uan.pot earn .-.i r .rage. MAjnrV-TlABWI AOWCULTUBA1 i OUIPklBfT — liwliidlnc TRACTOBS r.rwa mittvn. tUk*>. Load*, knu. .•-!•!. att Dial 4*1* Cfu %  i Cam*. n •.—*i TiutcnxAv -.. K fhMtd. nrtr )-•.*. Hill ro%  r. HI uul *at..i C^.iatK. p I arro of land Laid out tor too TalTT Farm or RoaMonoo PoxIbllilM I al n r u ago *• %  ; bo artangod ApRb N' Hulchlcaon OT Dial 4*03 %  <" 4 u m Tondoi 101 h. BcpOatntoOr IRK' '<* the ..: %  %  .i..io. i' %  P M O SI Thn*.i I. ri Hh i SEA AND AIR TRAFFIC In Carlisle Bay %RRIVAIJ< S l*d Moloon". 4,fdi .. I. C WJIIOVO. I. ..ii-.Auilln ft Co &Mo. -mnat-. 1* aom. .ron, TorWU, %  n H O-Noolo. Aaonla: Irl.oonor O-nor. AaaorUUon Iir P*kTi RRl "ndor CapJu,p Premier Dissolves Parliament Ono proprrV al T*.-u.idiRoad, aalr i %  iihl moullrd 3.RH ft of land -woodaldc ltd., aoina roooonabla Houaa al Collymort Rorb. urlca SI4M.fi' Land can he i—la-l >iao amall nouar* u tarloui diirici. f:cm Mao oo. o !" < Ch*v,olt True. >B toad vorfclni oid. Prlca ttdt 00 Apply JOB Rl 1*I. t* Af-nt. Tword.ldo Road or DU combat miraion on o v.'et con.'t and the thirty-year-old pilot wai forced to parachute over alliol territory He landed In %  r*c field near a Khoolhousv and immediately was surrounded by 20>) hlldren. Willis wi.lki-.! BO |h road and started back lo Ihe base. A Kort.it> polireman came along on • %  bicycle m; %  w. i %  'SiiHuna**, a to dwolllnfkouao In •rl'llATHCI.YDR. St ro foot of and. and tor nd cioaod vorojutaha. drjv I room*. 3 bod"ima aa< W4Ur. bitchrn *c %  W.itor and KltolrK. Oaraco and Reivantf root M.M Brc Tarkinaun. SlroUKlyda Dial MfC Ttia proparty will bo sat comprtlttan at 'anier. SUeti, nnildriowi.. .•SI." Augdft at 1 p ii. YFARWCJD U BOYCK, .-, I..•.!. %  I China Insists On Return Of War Prisoners %  'i MaiM yard. I ufllo rtid. %  Tram i..jioma. —i.fo Hi llya-aad. Rt Fully firnlihad. Uao :i %  %  W-wrir* MlSCKrUlaAPfXOUS inUd -ny )U antu .. Broa. tr. -i MSB Denmark Will Sell ItriUiin Bacon Qkeap&r LONDON. Aug. 18. DatuiiaiK agreed to suppi'. uacgn to Britain nt a lowi nrlei to the Britiah Ft-e. nm-eed upon at COpeTlh SB will be suppll"i.<: I M LTSL duiing ths y<%  lobcr 2, 1053. This pil fiiay be vurieil during ihe scour year uy mutual agreement by n bacon. The prlca cut will not km • ti lhatar> a.w %  01 .nir.>.i (Ttni %  iianli al R R M'n.l. A (". LR Ijm'or R.oad Slraat. ..r Dial Si;.ft 3B J ..2 1 %  ._ Whaot, CR Itakoo. All Rrao. >UnKrWpIn and Oa(rtrtbri lit Tin. W M llil... l.,,l : lixrburk atxaat I.AIVANHERU SHEETS A I'trilwa I boot quallly Cn|lnh uai% .i ...a dir*t SB !"(-. y.r low prie. Oatl SSM. Auio Tyro Co I %  let i i M I*. Bar lb TirVRClSnON" on thr aaa al Ma. ell'' CooM. Chrnl Churrh. Hand.n %  niHla II potrhaa o. IwM I ORl Wiitr and rlnrtne oarvlcaa in i-attio.i by appoinimont WII :.c unant Mn Ro^ch Dial SMI Tnr abova will bo aet up for ul ublir oropatll.-n al our iifnr*. Jamc Mroat. on rrkiay ibr sttn A.I,..-I is*, it 2 US p m. HVTCMINRON A PAHrltI.il II a kt—Sti M, Stdra n Dtata RUnarROin BO* IO <: 1'i'inr' ii %  Dalm >i..I". nr A. Jifiy a fro d-> %  -I'rr ... f^Hirion. Contact I'n Oolr. C a Airi Local Rr|HO*ani->tliTal Ilia il*A-.tf.p TINNRD MBATR--7ornad Roof. IJII.PI>. Roaal Ural and •* 1 < roan %  no %  .. slraat pw MI IB H 'I .1, Tba houaa %  %  1 land Virwing Mra Manning rrot* phOH RHSl Cirri will b> conaldorrd lo. Ill gdsrtj or for Ina hauar *i> %  %  i ARR1NUTON R SSALY. Mieaa AUCTION JNDER THE IVORY HXMME..•iiona r-c-ivcd I %  %  iid.v Aiigual Stlh. at Moaara Chaia. fold "I %  !> IMS -10 II I -i IDanufd in orc.cfenl' %  Ml Sale at 1 p.in VINCENT tlHlPFITH. *. n %  i MUNSAN. Ko-ea, Aug. 2t Communist Chln;i repeated I demand ihat Ihe 1'nited Nalr give up plans to "hold bad; prisoners" If It wait* a truce Ii Korea. There were no meetings H the Panmunjom trice camp. Tlv' truce talks were In the midst %  >'' the fifth consecutive weekly roceu Neither side has been able 1 to agree on a solution for repatrla-1 [ ting war prisoner*. Pelplni/ Radi said that this was the only w>lu tlon to the deadlock on repatrintlng prisoners of war. Tha UJf. Iins pointblonk refused to retun jany prisoners who do not want tol igo back to Comn.unism. The Re. i propuganda voice alA. accused United States Wc>rpUnes of 422 jnew "violations" of Chine* ; territory from July 25 to August 21. Including two bombings of Manchurlan soil. On August 16 %  report from Mukden, "capital of Manchurln said United States planes dropped bombs south of Penghsl and on August 15 bombed Antung big ;ii b*e city Just across the Yalu River Two persona were said '-> be injured. While the United Nationtought to drive u wedge betwee.. North Korea. China and Russia. Peiplng letaliated by elaimliu nitish easuRlUes In Korea han mounted in recent weeks by morv than 400 per cent, "the price British forces sre paying f< AmTlcnn mlMtary folly." A Niihoila. C Luaan. D A>aaandar. R %  . '. i inaRsei Rt PMa Bvaaa. R (.•a%*Una. S Alvarrr. N Saado, Raad.>. M A Raada, M Cabrrra. I-aynr. H KIWn. Dr J Souta, Rt. C Souto. O MarMurra • %  aatditU GOVERNMENT NOTICE ;lui -r %  nd E L*uc and J !* %  .• AaUcda %  .i-i. 1 SlarUn*. M llaynn. L Ciinmins*. L Mayan. M Mayor.. O Mayers. O Wllk RstTJhi, Riot C Rourna. D LMSMS F Bourta. A JVsnmaH. M iOtL C Watoalor. A Wabairi aid T(. ? n Touch With Barbados Coastal Station Tl' %  %  inr.xijn BRtR %  Bap rag Constabulary luko Liff-Saving (jouraex .. ...II. i-....' ST GEORGE'S. Aug. M. ii i BgM .ud not RlU . p.-Miiinent pail i isvs of the local Cinstabulai> Wihm Hie pasl fSwafe iRRMJljr%  ix N.C.O.a and men have sanv I :hc Brunrc Mrdallion of ir.e RoysJ Life i'vin, Rvdtjtj In b r.eld here nnd another UtaOR passed taw first year's examlnnlon for Ftnt Aid eertillcate of ho St John'.Ambulant c tlrlgade Fully accredited eananJMfl -onducted the tests in both. Grenada Nursrs Celebrate GRENADA lu celebration f its first unni vi*rsar>'. the Grenada Nurses' VssoeUUon has arranged spoclal programme pf sv Augu si—Beptamba >. Opening with services on Suuii" Anglican and loman Catholic Churches, en %  n on >uccecUui t : d here v. ill be special lecture.-. %  > the Gov i i a address w\\ Or. U M. ConlsskNig. Senior Medicnl Officer, speaks llun. T %  Inirysliow as chairman. RRMceeduill bo Dr* nty-t.k. B. Rapier, C U iWu% %  UoW R ..'I,. G. h-Muni .enay al Cl %  an He i I M. Gun %  tics Jai %  n, Mr nn Sir Clem. Malone. The series will con. !• %  HLIf >lll.< 1111 ILAKRAROD MI1IAI i II I \--\ lasii ao('iii\ LOST V I i BssdRfesrHss. it,i 'ha Ula Chrlatopbrr Aucutl .'..lla. havbig road. wn. hal Polio. K.i 14. < %  Itasser Anruu. I %  %  h %  flu* undrr tho • ;..ol IO• .II lia paid %  BIU1WME. Sacral.i y IS B 63 4R Ml. RAHRAROa HI ri Al. Lit r l>a.*ad -ithm ona moi.n %  he data haraof U.e dupllent.roll. krd lor will ba loaned By Ordar. C K BROW.NK. %  oscsssn U.S. To Be Represented On Coal'Steel Board PARIS. Aug. 28. The initial steps for official United States representation M the High Authority of the European Coal-Steel Community was announced by William H. Draper. junior United States special representative in Europe. Followiiir talks with Joan Monnet, President the High Authority, Draper said that William M. Tomlinson has b. en designated as acting United Suites representative to the Community pending the final form ..f American representation. Monnct's talks with Draper followed his trip to London last wick i %  discuss how Britain Intends 111 •:• itself to ths Coal Steel Pool. nth US. and Britain, though not i embers, have signified their Ii ^.i work as closely as pov ..lo with the Community. —U.P. V.C.W.I. Gets 200 Bed Hospital Aka f %  At Ian n. Ci nraiii. i %  /.Hani* Prlncosa. %  a Urania, a th-anie-tad. %  Rio jaeasS, %  S lJ.laa. • a Hfct Da la IB !• uro, a *. Da Ij.rt.naaa. S^mana. .i. OuadehHlp'. %  %  RarOui. V i Roamphar. %  • Ka-tor. • %  Ulna M, TOKYO. Aug. 28. The Japanese Premier. Shlgeit Yoshida dissolved the Diet BSW called for new general electiontor October I, the first to be heln in ir.dependsnt Japan since t:n end of occupation. The dissolution came in response to demands from opposition parties, the press, and members of Yoahkla's own Liberal These groups pointed out its I the present government ind the Diet were elected three and a hah irs ago under Allied ncupetlor. and do not now represent tht will of the Japanese people Yoshida said that he will seek reelection and again appeal to foier for a chance to head the ne Government. ni a statement announcing th< dissolution of the Diet, the Cabinet safd: "To further postpon' t general elections might encourum and stimulate political and ftnnnoa 1 unrest. The Yoshida Government was to have completed Us term or office in five months. Sources close to Yoshida sai<. Yoshida notified Emperor Hir<> hito of his decision to dissolve the I Diet earlier this week when ht vlsiied the Japanese ruler at hn Nasu mountain villa. 100 miles north of Tokyo. Only the house of Representatives will be affected by the dissolution. The House of Councillor: upper chamber is not affected bthe changes In Government. October elections promise lo h. one of the most dramatic, If n-v the most bitterly fought, in Japanese history. Wartime politic.. and military figures who wen purged from public life by th< occupation will be running for th tlrt time. They will oppose nev leaders who have risen to prominence during the occupatioi period, Yoshida came to office on Octo' %  IB, 1848 after a bribery scanil cause the downfall of Print" Minister Ifitoshi Assfda. He was returned to office on February Ifl 1P4B elections. Yoshida won rerespect of oeupation leaders fn, vav In which he guide.: through stormy days "f Red terrorism in 1049, the penc. treaty, and the transition to lnd< pendenee.—IJ.p. SHORTAGE <>f \rti: The public are requested to sssstsswJ ihe greatest < use of water and to report any leakage to the Waterworks Department (Telephones: day 3715, night 3725) Unless full co-operation is received imn water for garden* got will RsrVfj so m SHIPPilJG NOTICES TR* M.V "CARaBBi:! arresS Csrfo and Pasaar.f-rra lor DornfaUca. Ai.tkfaa. Morrtsarrat Nevii and St Tuaaday Jnd Rsptssa b sr ISH Tb* M.V -'MOMBKA wilt %  Dno.mit... Anlivna M.m"--iral. Nasu ana S* Sallmii in b* noflAsd R W.I. SCHOOMSR IIWM1I ASSOCIAriOV %  iv i | CsssssRBSS IsftS. No i .i; **•rf^-'XaVtSROrVV Canadian Natinnal Steamshi|is Sl'.drrrht -nd i .KrtHk HATKS or gXCUiWE MEW VORR RsylwaSRffl ., n 10 Daanand Drafts a 1 HIpr %  • %  I M SO %  pr. %  pasts Bankar7S S' 10 pr Dam and DinftTH 45 < p' SUM bran* TB S/IS* se .: I !•> [ t Cum!" 7J I 10 ur Couponi :r. R p. Sllvei ST. '. pr MAIL NOTICES i Past %  aaaei II i... i low) ..I tbs Or. ..ndar ,-Parcel Mall al IS no.ni i-t Mail and Ordinary Mall al OJI IIK3hi. Annual. ISSS. lira. Mont Ai.tig.in. SI Killilrasi ii, i... KINGSTON. JAMAICA Aug. 28. A new leaching hospital ,.t '. -C WI wiU be ready for SftJ Monday morning, and local S'l^lndR-Sra? ni.iueal .luthorllivs are losing no i p %  time In bringing this hospital l the service of the communii... , M v ^j, Patients now on tno waituu.. *n. i. d.u ..i tnr a>ar-i rw-i llsi at Kingston Public Hospital OnVa aa under: -Parcel Mall and Rag .11 bsjgtt to occupy Unlversil; Hosplti 1 Monday morning if .iirangements are completed m Ume. The hospital buildings ami capable of accommodating 2j '" %  ds and all necessary sta" hnve' ••een in waiting for weeks read", j for the go ahead. Nurses for the) new ho'pltal are mostly J"mnipan inhed but technic.il ixrsfnnel from abn>iid are also here nnd have been keeping Ihemselves In precUce at Kingston Public Hospital so that the Organisation should have no difficulty In getting started next week. U.C.W.I. w'th completion of this hospital will now be able give undergrads g full course medicine and surgery. .I II I ttM IMPERIAL SAUBaTKT LOAF.. .. H And for TT'e BFST to Drink COCOA MALT TONOOur Popular HU "TAR ItfM !.• nea IVase her and the rest rcle.. e>• ;i o.! IS aYv 11 9apt IT Sei>t IS *>, i H Sent SSSei' • Ort Ifjf. i ArmArrlrrii. %  %  -iR> Au| I |ii llS.pt 14 fapt ioSa-l SSSap^ a Ori noci IS Ort. IS Oct 11 Ort 14 Oct 4 Nav. far Isnfear sarMaskari, apply as— GARDINER AUSTIN A CO., LTD. Agaats. C'G'TRANSATLANTIQUE Salllns. from Soulhasnptin to (iu.ideloape. Martinique, Barhaalos. TrlBldad. La Gu^lra. Ceracao at Jamaica German Socialists Hay Favour Ollenhauer Arrives 3rd Sept., 1952 BONN, Aug. 28 I ^l %  Socialist Party will continue V> VLJZ'.u tr >' B Teuniied Germar. %  O front line laid down by the lai< "I Kuri Schumacher, according to S the party's Dress aervl lh.il idded Ihat there is little doubt *i Erich Ollenhauer. Schuma-Jl chers deputy since 1848, will be confirmed in the party leadership iy the annual party convention %  wniriS in Dortmund on SeptemThe press service said that political columnists throughout th. world have been speculating stnci Schumacher's death last weel ibout his possible successor. They added that the only legi Imate statement on the subjeel •rag that made by Ollenhauer In the memorial service for Schum;.h*r in Hanover last Sunday when ie said: "We have to complete hiwork without him, but in his spirit The fight for a new Germany no* •nded. the social order not yet arranged, the reunification of Germany in freedom Is still to be a'"alned. The integration of the Oermiin %  eople In a European and interlatlonal community of German \ people in a European and inter' national community of peopl<" based on freedom and equall* v i itm has to be completed —r.p. From Sduthaaapton "DE GRASSE" 22nd Aug.. 1052 •Not calling at Guadeloupi SAUJNG I :-HM BARBADOS TO VCROPB Froan Barbadoa Arrive* SeothaiaB4on COLOMBIE" 24th Aug., 1952 . 5th Sept.. 1952 ""DE GRASSE'' . 18th Sept., 1982 . 28th Sept., 1953 •Selling direct to Southampton R. M. JONES Jk CO., LTD.,—AsenU. **V>o*4fV# ;; ,'s,',',;; '.',',--'.',',-.*,*-***,'-'---'.v,v*v.v*W*,*,'-v.V WAMIII KEPKKSKNTATIVE^Full time representative wanted for Canadian Life Insurance Co.. in Barbados. Application in writing are invitrd which will be treated in strict conlidcrcc Apply: ''Insurance Underwriter", c o Barbados Advocate. 26.8.52.—5fL • %  ->w..-ttoo ao'woo&a a %  J OO YOU CAN GET KAiA'ASMSEO AT 30c. PER LR from CENTRAL PIER HEAD XAIUS FOUNDRY LT. AND BROAD STREET. jsat aa aaa aa aaaaaa i war xt i vf. vm.TKiN imi i atluiin, b#uty nd faithful accuracy. IS Jewels. Gold til cl. guaranteed S81.C0 OTHER MC >ELS to 8I44.T1 Qaalr/ GIUIEN WRIST WATCHES Ml-04 lo tir.].2l IS and 17 Irjraajk Sr> : MS 1. IH IIM \ A tO.. L19. 20 Broad St. and aj Marine Gardens IHE RIGH APPROACH t:\JOY THE MUStC OF YOL'R BEM.OYED COMPOSERS O.X Till* BF..WT1FVL PHILIPS iir*? /• ^ul ifcrtWAADIOCRAMS • Nir.l, yled and llni.hrd Cabinet # Two %  ..ril Chamber*. • Three -peed Automatic Changer a Twelve i .cl. ticonal.speaker Ten valve Radio Changes I" and 12" .-ecords mixed. Is* lor a Ih'iinmsii-tiiii.i, at i/imillfuli't-s BAL 4214 MANNING & CO. LTD.





| WHAT'S ON TODAY»

—
Court of Grand Sessions 19.00 a.m
Court of Ordinary 11.00 p.m
Mobile Cinema, Belmont
Giris’ School Pasture 7.30 p.m
Police Band Concert,
Hastings Rocks ........... 8.00 p.m.

Le

For the Cause that lacks assistance
‘Cainst the Wrongs that need resistance
For the Future in the distance

And the Good that I can do.

ESTABLISHED 1895

a

Pavbaros

PRIDAY, AUGUST 20, 1952










~ aa
YESTERDAY'S REPORT
Rainfall-fxom Codrington...
Total ratmfalt for month te da
Slighest “Témperature: #8 05 °°
Lewest’ Tempérafure®, 73.0 °#y
Wind Velocity 4 miles per Rov
Barometer (9 a.m) 22.960 1 p.m

19-Day
Sunrise: 5.49 a i} -
Sunset: First Quantef, August 26
Lighting: 7.00 p.m
High Tide: 10 51 a.m
Low Tide: 4.21 a.m





29.287

10.20 p.m

PRICE : FIVE CENTS



2.22 p.m
eee

C.C. Council Told Of Aims Of W.I. Committee

BARTON MAKES SPECIAL | ADDRESSING CHAMOTER OF COMMERCE Sage
APPEAL FOR SUPPORT :
OF B.LF.

R. A. E. V. BARTON, Secretary of the West
India Committee, told members of the Coun
cil of the Chamber of Commerce yesterday after
noon of the aims of the Committee and the work
it was doing. He also quoted a large number of
examples showing how widespread the Commit-





Kremlin Transfers
Malik From U.N.

UNITED NATIONS, New York, Aug. 28,

Jakob A. Malik joined the ranks of recalled Red diple-
mats as the Kremlin announced in a hote reeeived here
late yesterday that Valerian A. Zorin, architect of the 1948
Communist coup in Czechoslovakia, would take over
Malik’s United Nations post next month. The Kremlin note
said that Malik whose veto blocked the West in the United
Nations Security Council con almost every major issue

tee’s work was and stressed the need for member-
ship.

Mr. G. H. King, President of the Chamber, extended a
welcome to Mr. Barton whom he described as no stranger
to the West Indies. He said that there was nothing special
they had on the agenda to discuss, but as Mr. Barton was
in Barbados, he felt that it would be a good idea to have
him meet the members of the Council and have a general



except the Korean war, would return to Moscow for a new

assignment.



Kisenhower
Lowes

Moscow's beckoning of Malik
vas the latest in a sweeping
eries of Kremlin-directed diplo-
natie changes that began arly
his summer with a surprise triple
ransfer that sent Ambassador
Alexander S. Panyushin from
Washington to Peiping, Andrei A.

°
talk. There might be some matters which members would Platitudes ? Gromyko from the Kremlin's
like to raise and he was sure Mr. Barton would assist them Woreign | Office to Landon, and
in that direction as much as possible. ‘i WASHINGTON, Aug. 28. Weiegten. in from London to

Se oe The two chief rivals for the ;
Â¥ es apg n. ees members * Presidency promised on Thure- Zorin 50, Soviet Deputy Foreign
that an tha Provident Ree porte ovt. avice day to start slugging soon in} Minister will be the third with



ed out, he was no stranger to the]
West Indies, having served in
three of the colonies and visited

Offered To



their campaign to win the White
House. Dwight Eisenhower, under
criticism from some supporters

that rank to represent Russia 4%
the United Nations, First was
Gromyko who used the veto 24

all of them e a who think his campaign is off to|/times, He was succeeded hy
i : senc ‘ a slow start, assured a group of |Malik who “noed” 17 times in
ot SE youl coooeet nF tenet Oil Companies New York Republican leaders|his tenure of something more than
happiness which he always had a that ihe will wage a “fighting|three years to block the West
when he was here and it was a WASHINGTON, Aug. 28, | hard-hitting campaign that will s 5
great pleasure ene to meet; The State Departinent i on| start in the very near future.’ Seasoned Diplomat
o his old friends. Friday that for foreign poli ssaaeea ten — cereeeee Zorin is a seasoned Soviet dip-
He said that he had met Mr.!reasons it occasionally offered | started testing out his gloves ov lomat. At 20 he held a directive

2a:



Jones, the Secretary of the} advice to American Oil Companies}
Chamber 27 years ago in B.G./ operating in the Middle Bast, but}
and was very grateful to the/it never tried to pass on to the|
members of the Council of the/trust aspects of any Compai |



Wednesday night with some
shorts at Eisenhower in a speec*)
in New Jersey. Stevenson's aide
eald; “You are noting’—that

post in a young Communists’
League of Russia. In 194] he en-
tered the Russian Foreign Office

h e - f a at ” Stevenson is all set to open the|2”"d in 1945 he became Ambassy
biti ume | } Paeamrene:. Semmes Commaniiies, )O" 22 ASN that post, bi ook
ee ee he was informed was @! The long Suppressed Federal} — - MEA. EV. BARTON, Secretary} He said that plans already|eappeared in Czechoslovakia

y. Trade Commission report made} e of the West India Committee (stand-{have been made for a “co-or-| when the Communists overthrew
B.LF. public only by the Senate Small| estr 7 oO t 1¢ ae oO { ing) addressing members of the}dinated hard hitting’ campaign | Gen Masaryk’s regime in 1948 and

At the conclusion of Mr, Bar-| Business Committee charged that} \ K ” / J / Council of the Chamber of Com-} Democratic National Chairman] was generally credited with en-
ton’s talk, questions were asked/| five big United States oil concerns) meree at a special meeting held yes-}Siephen Mitchell sniped at the] sineering the coup that put the
about the British Industries Fair| were involved in an international! e ~ e e 9 | terday Republican nominee with a state-| *zechs behind the iron curtain,
which centred around the direct'scheme to keep petroleum prices} é NON I, to R. are Mr. R, M. Cave, Mr.j{ment that every day General] Vo stranger to the United Nations
value of and the direct results and profits high, The Compahic ani ar Oommissioners L. Briggs Collins, Mr. A. 8. Bryden, } \isenhower sounds more like} ie served as a member of the
7 The matter | have denied the charges. One of ' F 7 ao ‘aire aoe V. | covernor Dewey.” He has out- soviet delegation to the General
Council ‘after the various tater: (te the Socony Vacuum arton, Mr, G. H. Bing, President } icone Dewey in the use of plati-] Assembly in 1947.

said
\that its foreign operations Pm

of the Chamber and Mr. A. M. Jones,

udes and generalites
ests concerned had been con-/, Sear sp Secretary of the Chamber. : sane? ‘ ; f - ‘
sulted. supported by the Administration, Backing the camera is Mr. G. D. Informed sources said that He was expected to take over

Mr. Barton in the course of|2"¢ that charges were made for

his talk, told the Council ,how Democratic Election. Campaign|



Report for Erection of Market



Thursday

Eisenhower has assured worried

Bynoe. Republican leaders in New York



—UP

‘rom Malik about September 15,

Forty six year old Malik’s last

purposes. The Vestry of St. Michael at their meeting yesterday, u D : that he will start “slugging’’) fort at the Wnited Nations was

@ on page 3 an, ihe | unanimously adopted a report from the Sanitary Commis-!| STORM APPROACHES 4 rs “aie. aero he}. oe attempt “ae ems

e partment said that lanai aris St, Michael forwarding plans. speci- . Ss W ll S Il ‘deliberately” has been keeping] warfare charges on the United

Feisal Arrives At \it bas “endeavoured to follow | faceless aa 8 gr rs the cemtise ofa District Market | gy ugar ' e€ wraps on his campaign because] States. He was rebuffed twice

closely the foreign operations of : Ear le Hell, oe, - oom ae ore ~ ied 5 he Sonn not want to “spend his}the last time yesterday in at-

American and other Companies. at Bagie rail, , f ¢ tropical siorm in the A U d F strength” too early, Stevenson is|tempts to force a full debate on

Santa Barbara Both brought Macao with The Sanitary Commissioners had been appointed a ee - o t n er our also in Nee Sues lining up east-] bacterial weapons in the Disarm-

Compan fficials and througt committee by the Vestry to go into the question. | ut ro closer to uw - ern nationality groups and labour}ament Commission, and the Se-

LOS ANGELES, Aug. 28. Shee eeaatain "oe ions eee eae aa se ad " i : : Bahamas and the Florida Cents Per [ b leaders behind his candidacy, curity Council threw out his de-
King Feisal II of Iraq arrived 7 Hon. V. C. Gale, Churchwarden,| Plans and specifications before coast on with J , 4 sive

From time to time some of the









mand that it appeal to all couri+



at Santa Barbara, California at] Amer seadinanies Hav adé@| presided. There were also present |they had been submitted to Gov~- ||» winds of 50 to 75 miles per tries to ratify the 1952 Genev:
9.30 p.m. on Wednesday, dined j¢o; sia a uae Ronen: Messrs , D. Mottley, HA. "tudor, ernment, but members coulc see || hour. Leonard Pardue said (Fron, Our Own Correspondent) % : protocol cnttewing poison gas ang
at Biltmore Hotel, and retired for| agreements available to the D..|J. 0. Tudor, F, C. Goddard, Victor them privately, He then moved |! that the 200 mile belt of LONDON, Aug, 28 Canadian $ Down [{crm warfare UP
3 ra ; aval > De+lAncce CO Clan one 5 é » report o 2 Se ry ' » “OI IN, AUG. 20, y

me, et at po Ypnnen said partment on some matters, eee Pe prowae, mative Coeumdssliners fe adopted and piv oe ae fhe world price for sugar in MONTREAL, Aug, 28

s “shy and courteous,” eae BTS A it ° 6 Sf specifications : : , ; the next 12 months is likely to be| poaae - oe

a ; ; ee : ee - E ttley, who moved.that the plans and specification ” “ oe , is y , Minn ited § “ ar ‘
es dl ee ann ie Se hayek GuesOnE the: Depart. in winaae af tha tock slanins- be submitted te Government. ete i al - Ba below four cents, This forecast | , Aa eam a States dollar to- Crew Escapes From
' 4 g is schedu ojment indicated that it did or did ed the Vestry that as far back as; Mr. Victor Chase seconded the Shere yg te Figee made by EB. D, and F, Man in,,' Siena ©, Sinerent
eave on Thursday for Sanjnot object to the particular course 1943 machinery ‘had been set in/motion, He said that it was a vest ar Lit a nies ze their latest circular takes intog(, i rt a ‘ - aad teens B i Pl >
Diego. of action,” motion for the erection of a dis-|Very long time now that they had | cae bet course, “We are onsideration the enormous Tueed math SURES, unchanged from urning Tr lane
—U.P. —UP. been trying to erect a market on || M0t auite out of danger yet sarry-over expected in Cuba, This] "ugsday’s close. It took 96 1/8 '



trict market at Eagle Hall.

Tomorrow should be the de-






cents Canadian to buy $1. Ameri-

The Vestry’s Act he 2 -o| the site in question and especial y : arry-over may bé the largest : SAN ANTONIO, Texas, Aug. 28.

ae ee ae ry ee the people in the district had a eisive day, and its last work- ince the war, says the circular, } C4", The pound sterling, worth] /y United States Air Force B-17

V : trative power concerning such| great desire to see the plan con¢ ing day before a long holi- ind is expected to be consider-| $297 % was up vs from Tuesday.| caught fire minutes after its take-
a ) anes as markets in the hands of the Ves-|to fruition, day week-end.”"—U.P, ably in excess of the agreed fixed The Canadian dollar was down] off from Kelly Air Force base at

Red Power Plants

SEOUL, Aug. 28.

Navy war planes from three United States carriers
braved the thickest anti-aircraft fire of the Korean war to
blast two important North Korean power plants with 2,000-
pound bombs. It was one of the heaviest ait attacks of the
war on Communist power supply. It caught the Reds fever-
ishly trying to repair the damage inflicted on the plants by
previous allied strikes.

“Corsairs”, “Skyraiders”, and ‘“Pantherjets” zoomed
down on chosen number one and two hydro-electric plants









Government had since re-
quested the Vestry to submit
plans and specifications and the
Sanitary Commissioners had been |
appointed a committee of that
Vestry to deal with the matter
and to report back to the Vestry.

Mr. Went Co-opted

try.



Commissioners
Went,

The
had in turn ¢oropted Mr.
the Colonial Engineer, who had
conferred with them and had been
most useful in helping with sug-
gestions to bring the old plans
submitted some years ago and
bring them up, to date.

Sanitary



@ on page 3







999 System Goes

Into Operation |

THE Police 999 Emergency Telephone System goes |
into.operation to-day for the service of the public. The|
opening ceremony will be performed by Hon. R. N. Turner
Colonial Secretary, at 9.30 a.m, at the Police Control Room
at Central Station.

“The installation of this modern equipment brings the







| er million tons,

| taking all




at a premium of 4s) per cent.
in terms of United States funds
in closing foreign exchange deal-
ings to-day,
was up sy at $2.78 v4. ACP)

quantity of one and three-quar-




As the general world consump-
tion seems to have been sealed
down, and European production
is expected to rise E. D. and F.
Man say it is diMcult to see
where Cuba will be able to mar-
et her sugar next year. And
factors into considera-
tion, the world price is likely to
be below four cents rather than
above

U.S. And Britain
Continue Talks



DVOCATE



















San Antonio, but the pilot belly- »
landed absolutely safe in an open
field and the crew of six jumped

The pound sterling, out uninjured.
' —UP.

aS NS SS NS SN NN NE

&

: c The plans had then been pre- Barbados Police into line with the most up-to-date Police 3 A
: in northeast Korea with rockets and one-ton bombs. pared by Mr. Harold Clarke of} Forces throughout the United Kingdom : ‘ f prides.
i i é Messrs Clarke and Tucker. % : ; é 7 i .
The carrier pilots said that the a Mes: k d Tucker, | wealtt M Y: Teytaey. Seta Hasnont eee ; O O l Pi bl 2
; Co ni: est Korean cities and towns markex He did not think that it was uit, ajor » A, Stoute, Deputy Commisstoner of n ul roobotem
; mmunists threw up the heaviest > ‘
4 screen of anti-aircraft fire theyfor Allied air attacks, —U.P. ‘politic for them to publish the) Police, told the Advocate yesterday. TEHERAN, I a 28 a
have seen thus far in the war m oo : - : The 999 Emergency System] +> ee eee eee eee «
However, all. Unised futions POLICE B.T. AND 999 CONTROL ROOM will work in conjunction with| Jor American and British rep: 2
Sinkaa staph. cgbete carriers, , : e@ ® < E Radio Telephone st : ‘i nd time in twenty four hours as s iG
: The Navy said that the anti- - ESCs: tthlled at Bolice Herdocurte.,| Teheran prepared for a possible Pd 2 : : bre
: aireraft fire was so thick and Bridgetown pease Heatauarters, enewal of bloody clashes be-| This year the ‘Advocate’ is running &
. , 8 c ’ ote ’ 5 . :* + . tas + r
accurate that the pilots were un- George, District C, St Phill ween Communist and govern- bi a Christmas Card Competition, the bf
4 able to get a clear picture of District @, St. Peter, District f nent supporters bad results of which will be published in &
; what damage they _ inflicted. St. Joseph, and there are two] United States ambassador Loy)», the Christmas numbe:. ;
. e isse> y in mobile 1 6 f sso sta lenderson anc sritish large | #4
Planes from the “Essex” went inits. All af these fend 1 British Charg . : ey &
S first to hit the chosen one. “Sky- |tions and the mobile units wili]2'Affaires George Middleton con~| ™% _ Competitors should note the follow &
5 raiders dropped 2,000 pounc be constantly in radio com-j erred again on the oil problem.) s 8 ing points :— &
blockbusters on the generator munication with the Police Con- . ; | at i ;
busting: As ee = por the trol Room. ratte ’ groups plan demonstra-| a! The competition is open to all read- &
corner of the plant, smashing in The termi swite: ar se oups pi wet BST od ars ‘ sate’ : ¢ 3 ¢ .
its wall. Then the “Boxer” “aad hin ' awe ur Syalenn rae tone oe eras outaide the city to 2 wil mau cards can e
“Princeton” flyers teamed up to situated in the Control Room.| °°" Re ZOruUmA Gay. Since the) om ’ * : = oe
hit fae choker two, he eaninee The service will be available] 2eath of last month riot victims. | Cards can be made iy any process &
was unasgessed due to smoke and from 9.00 a.m. today. ie eereremanl, Srempenary. Aa 2 —painting, drawing, photographic, wa
heavy anti-aircraft fire. Major Stoute said that in ease ese a va would i= a ren 3 etc, &
: of any Emergency, requiri VEEEe > MAne GPU! ;
in we te promrt Police action, the public]! The Government —spokesmat -S A competitor can enter any num- x
me TERS. Pemneee, SOONG 0 are asked to dial 999 and give|Dr. Ali Abada said that in the | ber of cards, but all cards must be %
from three carriers to attack particulars. This will be thejmeeting with Premier Mohammed | 2 original work
hydro electric plants and to blast | channel through which they will] Mossadegh, Henderson and Mids | wa . : mi ; &
other Red installations from the |get most speedily the Police} dieton assured him that Britain’s | Preference will be given to cards Fa
battle line northward. Air Force j action whieh ts required. reply to TIran’s last note on the | 5 with a Barbadian or West Indian
sae light bombers took over the He said that for routine com-| problem would be submitted by 2 flavour and to novelty cards. w
night shift to assault the supply munieation, the public are asked| September 3rd Henderson also! # . 7 HE
concentration near Sohung in P continue to dial 08, the Police] conferred ‘on Thursday with 2a The judging will be done by a z
northwestern Korea. An attack by elephone xchange, and ask|deputy Premier Baher Kazemi | ae judging committee which will in- .
15 B-26's came after a Radio Seou! oer ee Cae OF Dex —UP, oo clude the Editor. Their decision will &
broadcast warning to civilians in ; partment required. They should sei be final ee
a target nel ready" ~ aa aa Ss Vi 7 | A Pp is ( will b foilows First &
Sohung is one of the 7 orth-} ; & fir ee ee es sa oil ro: + 3 rizes e as 101 ws : rst- ea
Mageauses” in. Trinidad md 1 y xa garet rumair ® $40.00; Second—$20.00; Third—$10.00; ee
s : : | enon thoi eh ata " Dax . ~ 3 é to consolati orizes of $5.00 ee
Snake Off Peru proved of invaluable service to Tours Paris Shops iB and two consolation prizes o x
« the colony in the detection of | a each. KK
ime,” a Trinidadiz told the . ‘ x . .
Th Fordham University” Seis avecste yeterday. President crospat - ont 2 A selection of the cards will be dis- &
he versity S-} 7 r= “Js residen ruman’s caqaugnter ' ¢ ave ¢ > § Ors >? Stati ;
Ograph recorded an earthquake! He said that in many cases,| Margaret arrived by train from ® played at the Advocate Stationery ye
7 miles’ from New York, ae comme might have cor and went on a quick i and later at the Barbados Museum. ae
€ , ated iee nthe mitted offences and escaped, the; at ten i ofc . . . . i
ce ier het rs Quick thinking of a persed a & Bie fix Deloss Bf The closing date for the competi- *
the coast « ee who lialed 999 brought the] » guard centre of recent crit-| SR tion is 4.00 p.m. on October 31st; but =
‘ i oo to ie aero of the] ic in Sweden for alleged rough | competitors can start sending in their te
offence an e offender was] tact ermainec the back-!; entries boa
HARRIS FOR COURSE IN | immediately apprehended cties, remained in the ba k 2 entries now. &
ADVANCED SANITATION tae ieee Margare rair thirty A All ecards should be addressed to x
aie ia | IVERSON RESIGNS } ate t 1 she |} on] 2 the Editor, The Advocate, Bridge- Pt
’ : a ota et WASHINGTO? me ts a rare a town &
DD ‘ a lie
anced . x 4
Traini f A = operation Tor the public today Anyone reqviring nour on 7 that Ke isit | uae br
on September prompt Police thor ne ee et R 8 T Pol Co ly . ean ~ aa ot i “a = m4
arial pe The 9 tem w ; tion with 1e Radio Telephone Systen he Police ntrol -resident of the Institut f Inter-~ Tas aaniae maaan ed aS POS ONE NE NE ONS BNE OO CAE ONC EE OE EE:
| Room +Above) Polite Headquarters, bridgetown : a UP up, NPEPRGRGLGE DEBE GE PEGA GE DK PR DR DN INGE TN NN SNE








PAGE TWO







BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Caub Calling

K.C.MuG
lopment
hair-

GEORGI EEL

are i Brit -



on Wednesday by

eting of the
t the arib-
issior Provident Fund

of







of hic he C man Sir
G € ex © be baek in Bar-
) week-end
Returning Home
M pte ter ee ge who h
Ai 1 in the. island
three 4 ars, left yes-
ening by B.W.LA for
rrinidad here she will spend
bout two weeks be ae returning
to hes home, British Guiana.
While in Trinidad she will be
taying with her aunt,
Back to Trinidad
EAVING. by last night's plane
+ was Mrs, R, Power who has
een holidaying in Barbados. With

her were her two grandchildren

e father Francis Power, is a
p artt er in Sellier & Co., Solicitors,
Trinidad Mrs, Power herself ha:
been an At chitect and Builder for
30°years. She is a widow All
were guests at Cacrabank Hotel.



Spent Ten Days
RS. MOLLY LEWIS, the wife

of Mr. R, S. Lewis, Manager
of Rose’s: Lime Juice, Dominica,
spent ten days in Barbados en

route for Jamaica, New York and

England She was a guest
Cacrabank Hotel.
Yarried at James Street

ES TERDAY afternoon at

Jamés Street Methodist
Church at 4.30 p.m. Miss Dorothy
Eldene Osborne, daughter of Mr.
and Mrs, Frank D, L. Osborne ot
“Dorsville’, Dash Road, Bank
Hall was married to Mr, Egbert
Carlton Brancker, son of the late

Mr.
Mrs
“Ebony”,
Michael,

The ceremony which was fully
choral Was performed by the Rev
F, Lawrence and the bride who
was given in marriage by her
father wore a dress of Chantilly
lace and nylon over slipper satin
with close fitting lace bodice fea-
turing a yoke with a Peter Pan
eollar and long lace sleeves. Her
dress carried a panel of lace in
the front and her over-skirt of
nylon ended in a train. Her veil
was tipped with a tiara of orange
blossams and she carried a bou-
qutt of Michaelmas daisies and
pink rosebuds

Watter Stafford Brancker
Mabelle Brancker
Emmerton’s Lane,

and
of
St.

She was attended by Miss
Dorcus Brancker as Maid-of-Hon-
our and she wore orchid organza
with a full flair skirt and close
fitting bodice. The double-U neck
was decked with flowers and she

wore green accessories, Her head-
dress was crinoline and roses and
h¢t bouquet roses and Queen
Anne’s Lace,

The bridesmaids, Misses Colleen
Osborne, Nola Thornhill, Janice
and Muriel Bayley wore, peach
blue and pink nylon, respectively,
with long full flair skirts with





idle instrumentalist making faces
Th W . through the
e “ orms ad ad al rod | like this,
4 rn | when a
—But It Could Only Run Underground— |nose tickled by a flute. The con-
By MAX TRELL |ductor heard’ her
Sy MA} tL | | brought in the brass with a sud-
“YOU know,” Knarf said to his den summons from his b&ton, to
sister Hanid as he sat down besi le | drown her silly titters,
het; “I just rode on an underground | |

railroad. | was under the garden, |
and under the house, and under all |

the, apple trees and blackberry |
bashes. And I think I rode under- |
neath the pond, too, but I’m not
sure.”

Hanid was listening to her brother |
with a surprised look on her face.
“An underground railroad?” she!
said at last. “Where did you find
an underground railroad?”

“Well,” said Knarf, “I was sitting
at-the foot of the garden wall next
ta that old apple-tree stump when
allat once I heard someone saying:
‘All aboard!’ At first | thought 1}
must have just imagined hearing |
someone saying this. Bee ause, when |
I looked around, | couldn't see any-
thiig. Then a few minutes later 1)
heard the same voice saying: ‘Ba
aboard, all aboard! Next stop the}
bottom of the garden!”

Found a Hole

“This time,” said Knarf, “1 really
looked. 1 knew the voice must be
coming from somewhere. Suddenly
| found a little hole just on the |
other side of the apple-tree stump
| put my ear to it and listened as
hard as L could. 1 distinetly heard
the puffing of a locomotive. | also
heard a lot of little voices saying



things lik ‘Did you buy your
ticket, dear?’ ‘Does this train go to
the pond?’ ‘Hurry, hurry or we'll
miss it!’ ‘Take your seats, every-
body !’’

“My goodness!” exclaimed Hanid
“What did you do then?”











| couldn't see any plants or flowers

| The train



SIR GEORGE SEEL
Two Weeks

R. GEORGE SWANSTON

who came over to spend two
weeks’ holiday returned to St.
Lucia on Wednesday by B.W.1.A
He is attached to the Education
Department in Castries and dur-
ing his stay here he was a guest
at Leaton-on-Sea, Worthing



Son and Heir





SON and heir was born to

Mr. and Mrs. Karl Bohne,

Mander ", Government Hill on

Wednesday Mother oid babe

ire doing fine,

Vo Study Accountancy

R. CECIL BROWNE, a clerk

4 at the General Post Office, left

the island on Sunday by the S.S,

Colombie for England on long

leave during which period he pro-

poses to take a course in Account-
ancy. Accompanying him was his
nother who has gone to spend
tir vith her brother
They are the son and widow of
the late Mr, P. G, Browne, a
former Headmaster of the Cole-
ridge School.
Oa Business
R. ROY SKINNER and Mr.
Geoffrey Martin of R. J.
Shannon & Co, Trinidad, who

have been in Barbados on bisiness
returned to
guests

for four weeks,
Trinidad, 30th

have
were

Enjoyed Holiday

Cacrabank Hotel.
and Mrs.

Mc
Caracas,

a vacation
Sweeney

in

They
Hotel

were

and were

at

J. S. Sweeney of
have been spending
Barbados.
is Representative
General Electric Co.
guests

Mr.
of the
in Venezuela.

at Cacrabank
delighted with
their stay in the island.



MR. AND MRS. EGBERT BRANCKER

close fitting bodices. Their head-
dresses were matching posies,

The duties of bestman fell to
Mr. Seibert A, Thornhill, brother-
in-law of the groom of Dominica,
and those of ushers fell to Mr
Sydney Gittens, and Mr. Stanley
Linton, A reception was held at
the home of the bride's parents
and the honeymoon is being spent
at Atlantis, Bathsheba,



Of went the locomotive,

| cept that there were lights all along
the way—little glowing lights. Ow
first stop was the bottom of the
garden, and it really was the bot
| tom. You could see all the’ roots
growing down from the top, but you



It looked very upside-down, thoug!
no one else in the train except me
seemed to notice anything strans«
about it, An old.lady-worm sitti
next Lo me opened up a basket shi
was carrying, and asked me if
wanted a radish and turnip sa:

wich, But 1 thanked her and t«
her 1 didn’t,
“The next stop was under tt

apple orchard. The apple tree 1
looked like a forest of twisted s
rode in and out am
them, and everyone looked out
the window as we went by. Then
slowed down as we pa a tan:

t
1













“I made myself small,” answered | Of roots that were so thick .t
Knar?, “because the hole was no | thought sure we were going to |
larger than a worm-hole. Then || one of them.
wriggled down into it, feet first. | W hat were they, Rnart??

Then 1 slid and fell and shot down | The roots of that oft, old o
until 1 landed on the bottom. And | ‘ree at the bottom of the hill. A
there I was, in a railroad station!’ | finally it started to rain. | mean, |

“Oh! At the bottom of the worm. | thought it was fain. The windows
hole, Knarf?” get ell wet, But it wasn't rain at all

| We Were just under the p u

All the passenyers were worms le See a
Thay der the bottom of the pond — and the

hey were all dressed in neat brown | was :

— Water was dripping down That was
suits and they all stood on one foot. the last station. Ever: heel” &
They were all crowding to get on} ae) RAE Le Gh ‘
thy tral ; . | get out. 1 didn’t know where t:
he train, and | got pushed on, toe | p it the w ;

SP eanond lates ihelkenime Aes tae | 3] 1@ worm-conductor showed e
raat. ahd tone Notive Fave | the way out, Up another worm hole
7%, BOG ‘ ve ent.
oe Just watch out for the robins
Was vit dark underground?" | young nian!’ he told me. He must
nid asked, ar have thor ight | was a worm, too!” |
as sort of like a tunnel ex-! laughed Knarf. [

FASHIONED

LONDON,

Are we to bid goodbye to the
short haircut,
cuts, poodle cuts and the rest of

them?

A return to longer hair is fore~ week, cut once a month. Brushes,

cast this week by John French, a
leading London hairstylist.
“Women like something news’ he
announced, “It is, time for a
change in hairsty} rue enough.
But women have m particular-

ly fond of short hair. It has
lcoked smart, it has been
eosy to keep under control,

easy to launder at home, and has
always looked neat under a hat.
Most women, I feel, will be
quite prepared to watch other
people grow their hair and so be

in fashion, but will keep their
own short.

“Calculated Carelessness” is
French’s new theme song. His

styles have a natural, rather than
a “set” appearance. “First Night”,
focust attention on the forehead
and neck. The fringe, curling soft-
ly, rises to a peak in the. cent@,

and a group of curls at the nape

of the neck. '
One disadvantage about a new
nair fashion advocating longer

hair is that it takes time. Compare
the statistics of the new and the
old, and you will see the differ-
ence. “Short” has frequently been
as shert as one inch, never longer
than three inches; the new “long”
style is five inches. Now, hair
grows, on an average, at the
slow rate of half-an-inch a month,
Think in advance if you do want



Spent a Week

R. G. C, HURSTFIELD of

Geddes Grant & Co., Port-
of-Spain, has been in Barbados
for three weeks. His wife and son,
Jonathan, joined him for one
week, and enjoyed their holiday
immensely. All were guests at
Cacrabank Hotel, and have now
returned to Trinidad.



Listening Hours

FRIDAY, AUGUST °
400—7.15 p m.

29, 1952
19. 76M, 25.53M
noc

The Daily

tpn. The News, 4.10 p.m.
Service, 4.15 p.m, Home At Eight, 5 pm
I'igar, 5:15 p.m Music for Dancing,
6 p.m. Seottish Magazine, 6.15 p.m.
Tix1, 6.45 p.m. Sports Round-Up and
Programme Parade, 7 p.m, The News,
7.10 p.m. Home News from Britain
71-1090 p m 26. 53M, 31. 32M

7:15 p.m. West Indian Diary, 7.45 p.m
The Case of the Night-watchman’'s Friend,
8.15 p.m, Radio Newsreel, 8.30 p.m
World Affairs, 8.45 p.m. Interlude, 8.55
p.m. From the Editorials, 9 p.m Hing
Up the Curtain, 10 p.m. The News,
rom. News Talk, 10.15 p.m Fortratts
froat Memory, 10.30 p.m. From the Third
Programme.



BY THE WAY .. .8y seacucomBer

T a recent concert a critic was
struck by the
harpist sat further
harp than is usual,
harpist who has woace
been frightened by a momentarily

A lady

léguy of St.

“Zugarramurdi”
nose,

fact that the
back from the

giggling

wires often recoils
I remember an occasion
pretty harpist had her

In Arabia
the wires of the harp are barbed,
{to protect women players—which
| would not have suited Mme, Irou-
Etienne-de-Baigorry,
who used to play the Basque song
with her flexible

Not much competition

N Narbonne there was a young- |
ster who used to play the piano
balancing
I once

with his nose,

while

upside down on a bicycle,

asked his father
hereditary,

He said, “No.
wanted to choose a profession that
was not too overcrowded.”

Going no places

Â¥LKLA MAW BAT AT, the Bur-
was yesterday
shown a model of the car that ran
week without stopping at
100 miles

asked,

mese magnate,
for a
more than

“Where,” he
zoing in such a
explained to
wasn’t -going
ticular;

Mrs.

him
anywhere
“It just raced round and

hurry?”

A. &. Stuart’s School
of Dancing

Presents

REVUEDEVILLE 1952

Under the distinguished patronage of His Excellency
the Governor and Lady Savage

EMPIRE THEATRE

On Wednesday 3rd., Thursday 4th., Friday 5th
September at 8,30 p.m.

MATINEE: Friday 5th at 5 p.m.
Music by Capt. Raison, A.R.C.M., and Police Band

Booking Office opens Friday, August 29th from

8.30 a.m.—12 noon; from 1.30—3.30 p.m.

it this gift was
My boy

an hour,
“were they
It was
that the car
in par-





DURABLE SHEETS AND PILLOW CASES

PILLOW CASES
SHEETS 70 x 100
SHEETS

or
oO

) x 100

SHEETS 90 x 100

36”

WHITE BUTTER MUSLIN
Also

QUALITY PRINTED SOUND RAYONS 96 cts

Cc

REPES, DISTINCTIVE

DESIGNS

$1.06

T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS

YOUR SHOE

DIAL 4220

STORES

DIAL 4606

aoa ak i al

and

round a track.” “Were they in
time?” he asked. “In time fo»
what?” said an official. “For what-
ever they had to do,” replied the
Burmese. “They didn’t have any-
thing to do,”’ was the answer, “it
was just a record.” “Oh,” said
the Burmese, deep in thought.

The week's Gold Cup

IN LONDON

Threat To Short Hair Vogue

to chrysanthemum@ French passes on these golden





(eect 7 tame mama

DOROTHY BARKLEY



By

your hairstyle to
around Christmas.,

be fashionable er with the beauty of the hair,’
he comments.
you cannot have a good hairstyle
unless the hair is in perfect con-
dition,

Have you ever thought that
your haircut and accessories are
linked by fashion? “A_ well-
styled haircut needs stylish ac-
cessories,” says French, Recently,
he opened a boutique in his sa-
locn, and is the first
hairdresser to d? so. He aims at
providing - original and interest-
ing accessories. A glance at a
current selection from his bou-

rues for general care of the hair.
It should be shampooed once a

combs. and other ‘tools should
always be spotlessly clean, pre-
ferably kept in individual grease-
proof bags. At the first sign cf
illhealth of hair or scalp, you
should place yourse’f in the care
of an expert.

French has a trained trichelo-
gist on his staff who gives both
personal and postal treatment
courses for the hair and scalp:
This postal course may interest
readers overseas. If you require
treatment, you simply fill ina
specially printed postcard sup-
plied by the trichologist. He asks
for details about the scalp (is it
oily) greasy, inflamed, or dry?),
about the hair itself, (is it drv,
brittle, greasy, splitting, falling
out?), and about the condition of
the face, nese and chin. He an>-
lyses your particular problem
from these details, and then pre-
pares an individual formula for
the treatment.

“I am concerned with the con-
dition of the hair, the hairdress-

WARNER BROS.

Proudly present at the
BARBAREES

PLAZA

(DIAL 5170)

OPENING FRIDAY
4.45 & 8.30 p.m.

and Continuing Daily

ing out his aim.

Rattan and wickerwork are
popular just now. In his boutique,
French. has delightful bracelets,
earrings and baskets in these
materia's. From brightly colour-
ed cotton squares, he has made
the “Pigtail Scarf” and the “Pi-
rate Scarf”.

He made the pirate scarf by
gathering the ends into a tail, and
tying them twice—close to the
head, and again at the tip—with
matching* raffia. But he would
not reveal his method for making
the pigtail scarf. That is a pro-
fessional secret.








FOR THE FIRST TIME
it A HUNDRED YEARS ,4
uw THE CAMERA GOES





PRESENTED BY Wanians Bros.

STARRING

STEVE PHILIP CAREY
COCHRAN - BRIAN 22
DOROTHY HART

AND (UMUIEIEN MURDER] - [IMEZECEARSON] FORGERY









ROODAL THEATRES

EMPIRE \

To-day 2.30 & 8.30
and continuing daily



OLYMPIC

TODAY to MON
4.30 & 8.15

ROXY
TODAY 4.30 & 8.15

Charles Magraw.:) {TODAY 4.30 & 9.15

ROYAL
{pop Rathbone —

















4.45 & 8.30 Jose Ferrer— wee Jergens Nigel Bruce
GENTLEMAN who said the| wait Disney's Mala Powers) sRMOURED CAR in
other day that it was “bad ROBBERY! press TO KILL
form” to discuss one of his horses | SNOW WHITE CYRANO- | uk GEite ow! itt
in terms of money, continued: “I}AND THE SEVEN/ pE BERGERAC | With FAMILY, HONEY
refuse to speak of its monetary DWARFS aa raley Granger MOON
value, just as I would refuse to} | _Ann_ Blyth Istarring
speak of my wife in that way.’ by Technicoln| GIRL FROM ae |fred Mac Murray —
And people dare to accuse me] Extra 2 Reel Short: SAN LORENZO) 4.43 & 8.15 Claudette Colbert
of exaggerating the craze for ani-| poy and the Eagle | starring Paramdint present: eg = ‘SUN.
"Windows “af th a TOMORROW at | Quncan pene | THE BIG Betty Davis
isdom oO. e ag 30 p.m. ___ Leo Carrillo Gary Merrill
Witen the Nile is in flood the} hole Serial tomorow Night). CARNIVAL in
wife of the water-diviner goes FEDERAL Whole Serial | Starring
hungry. (Old Egyptian saw.) JUNGLE GIRL = |itk Douglas JANOTHER MAN'S
é ; ” OPERATOR 99 With | Jan Sterling |
ore Mae ook Sha ier MIDNITE Tomorrow) Francis Gifford | MIDNITE POISON
hide? Fi hh men a io et Night Tom Neal | Tomorrow ae and
orchids. ichtre! at a 5 —sri, =| Roy Rogers uble
aginative approach! And note that! haa ee | WAR | inte ore eee Or ra. velit: UNIVERSE
ey were ocety. wayside blooms| S°UIX crry suE THE CIMARON | and (eabrine
e oO y s - ’, a . ON . TEXAS |Jac =
plucked at en, with the dew on] With Gene Autry HOT STEEL Pe Moon” eat cate Paige
them, I knew a girl whose ad-
mirers sept her such masses of
flowers that 7 - 3° is
shop in the es' ni very i
morning, ater ine Beet Aaweriee, METRO 20th
she drove to the shop wi el g- i
day’s offerings and sold them at a COLDWYN G CENTURY
whacking great profit. She was
found out when her assistant tried MAVER Fox

to sell a heap of roses to one of
her admirers. His card was still
on them.

We can Supply

yi Cream of Wheat
Corn Flakes
Macaroni

Rice

Starch

Luncheon Beef Loaf
Veal Loaf
Hamburger Stake
Meat Lunch
Swift's Sausages
Palethorpe’s Sausages
Vienna Sausages
Macaroni & Cheese
Spaghetti & Cheese
Cooking Butter 1's.
Cooking Butter 5's,
Hams 5 to 10 Ibs
Cheese per Ib

STUART & SAMPSON
(1938) LTD.

Headquarters for Best Rum %

Tins

Se aaa seaN



PRESENT ANOTHER WINNER
OPENING TO-DAY
* & 8.30 p.m. and Continuing

20, | |p sean!

CENTURY-FOX
PRESENTS WITH PRIDE AND LOVE

Wi






we thee,

atte see. sae

EART

TECHNICOLOR ‘

ee






oo

H
|
i









Neve, if y

ger)
SUSAN tid a ae.)

ern ten

ony Pa em mC CRU Met ORE Peak onr ig

SLOT Utena ant







4

|
i
?

The maxim is that |

six ater ear ree

London |

tique, will show how he is carry-|

: FRIDAY, AUGUST 29, 1952

ot

a pay iat) a STARS *

ry

and 40) {an

ee

aa



For Friday, August 29, 1952
Look in the section 1n which your birthday comes and
find what your outlook is, according to the stars.

ARIES -—Nothing lost by being friendly, sevsneiia,

March 21—A 20 in fact, much to be gained, including win-
- ning others’ confidence in you. A good day. *

—Sort of day in which you steady-going,

Saas able Taureans can

21—May 20reasonable and very cap
ee make real progress and at same time sol-
idify present position, holdings. But don't

flounder. ¥ * *

GEMINI —Before embarking on new ideas, pro-
May 21—June 21 positions, try to finish matters started ee
those needing immediate attention. Pre-

pare for a clean slate next week,

CANCER —We normally like better that for which 3
June 22—July 23 we have to fight and win than gain without

much effort. You may have to hustle some

today, but it will be worth the while. os

LEO —Please heed Gemini noe mae. ene
24—. down over-enthusiasm, eep emands
— — within reason but push forward rightly
with hope and faith. Enjoy week-end

sensibly. ¥
VIRGO —Favourable influences prevail, particu-
Ang. 23—Sept. 23 larly for worthy interests, sound business
management. Heed your conscience, also
health essentials; take time for needed rest.

-*

—Be your well-balanced reasonable self
and have less difficulty getting through
day’s programme—IF you heed warnings, +
and cheerfully accept responsibilities,
* *
SCORPIO _A little unction, afided healthy ambition, 3
Oct. 24—Nov. 22 plus fairness, and you should net a pleas-

*

LIBRA
Sept. 24—Oct. 23

ant, productive day. If your occupation or
other demands are exacting, keep cool, you
can achieve,

—Team up your mental astuteness with
your capable physical prowess and you
have a combination that can handle a swell
job, add to your laurels. Fresh opportunity

now. ~ +

—New and unusual propositions, some of
value; new materials and methods equally
favoured with everyday routine and fam-
iliar activities.

*
*
*
*
*

* PISCES
Feb. 21—March 20

SAGITTARIUS
Nov. 23—Dec, 22

CAPRICORN
Dec. 23 — Jan, 21

AQUARIUS —Heed Scorpio now and you can benefit.
ae 22 nay +5 20 Must speed up notably in occupational
duties but don’t go in for unnecessary
chmnges. Quickly clear up unfinished tasks.

—Avoid extremes and profit more in
achievement. A keen but even disposition
can make this a beneficial day. New and
familiar matters both favoured.

YOU BORN TODAY: Excellent reasoning faculties; you
are innately purposeful, sonstructive, intelligent. Usually as
middle of the road in decisions. High imagination, ieee
powers; Virgoans make able journalists, critics, analysts, oe *
ticians, actors. Birthdate: John Locke, famous philosopher,

(Copyright, 1952, King Features Syndicate, Ine.)

ke ke ke wee we we kK we eK

SFE

SA SSS SSL
GAIETY

Hurricane Precaution }}){} ne Garden—St. James
HINT No, ll TODAY & TO

MAT. SUN. 4.30 PM.
“TAP ROOT” (Technicolor)
After A Hurricane —
Unless your are qualified

*









—



HEFLIN, Susan HAYWORTH &
Sui “PARDON MY SARONG"
Bud ABBOTT & Lou COSTELLO

Midnite Ss. SUN, & MON.

x





* 8.30 p.m. |
to render assistance keep ‘SPORT of |, |THE SAXON, |
Pras from damaged Paul Gagne Robert spate |
areas, You will only agp ery & Alfred

ork- ACROSS the -
hamper the rescue w pitios |“SHADOW of A

aay Charles Starrett _'
Ser ee

PLAZA THEATRES | THEATRES

Joseph Cotton

















OISTIN
(Dial 8404)
TODAY (only)

445 & 8 30 p.m.

“NIGHT BOAT TO

BRIDGETOWN
(Dial 2310)

8 Shows TODAY
— 445 & 8.30 p.m.

BARBAREES
(Dial 5170)
TODAY 4.45 & 8.30 p.m
& Continuing Daily



2

and continuing Daily at]| Warners’ New Hit! s pe
4.45 & 8.00 pm : “INSIDE THE WALLS obert Newton
Another Thrilling Action|] of FOLSOM PRISON" || “SHADOWS. on

Film from Warner Bros. BEACON HILL”

‘ with a ___Roddy Mc Dowall Me Dowall
teve Davi =——————SSS==—
RETREAT HELL COCHRAN — BRIAN Sat. to Mon.



4.45 & 8.30 pm
The Big Action Hit!
“STEEL HELMET"
Gene EVANS & Jame
EDWARDS
‘SAT. 8 Special 1.30 Pp ™
“SILVER CITY

Frank LOVEJOY
Richard CARLSON

SAT. Special 1 0 p.m

“OUTLAWS of
TEXAS"
Whip WILSON &
“TRAIL’S END"







SAT. Special 9.30 & 130
“OUTLAW BRAND”
Jimmy WAKELY &











Johnny Mack BROWN BONANZA’
“WEST OF EL DORADO” = || Rex ALLEN &
5 = || “GUNMEN of
ohnny Mack BROWN |! Midnite Special SAT ABILENE"
____ Rocky LANE
Midnite Special SAT. 3 Thrillers; a
P “MILLION DOLLAR “Midnite Special SA’
Thrilling New Serial PURSUIT’ (new) |/“BUCKAROO SHE F
‘ROYAL MOUNTED Penny EDWARDS & OF TEXAS” &
RIDES AGAIN” “SOUTH of RIO” “TIMBER TRAIL”
Bill KENNEDY it Monte HALE Monte HALE re HALE gee Monte HALE (color) |



STARRING

"a (MEJD eOomoCARLSTN TAMBLYN QUIS

scacey sur MILTON SPERLING © TED SHERDEMAN owmecrea &» JOSEPH H LEWIS

“UNITED STATES PICTURES... 2... WARNER arc
PP i A 7 A BaIncETEWN

(DIAL 2310)
OPENING FRIDAY 2.30— 4.45 & 830 p.m.

and Continuing Daily 4.45 & 8.30 p.m,












FRIDAY, AUGUST 29,

Fire In Grenada Renders I

Appeal Launched CARDINAL AT K. of C. PROCESSIONAL

1952

BARBADOS



For Subscriptions

(From Our Own Correspondent)
ST. GEORGE'S, August 25.
ABOUT 100 persons, nearly half their number child-
ren ranging from infaney to mid-teenage, have been ren-
dered homeless here as the result of a fire which destroyed
a tenement building and four other houses early yesterday

morning.

The destitute are temporarily housed at the Youth
Centre, former Grenada Boys’ Secondary School, and Sal-

vation Army night shelter

as sleeping quarters and are

fed at Foresters Social Workers League breakfast shed.
The majority are humble working class folk who have been
bereft of all their possessions.

A broadcast appeal was made
yesterday afternoon by Mr. A, N.
Hughes, Chairman of the St.
George’s District Board, for sub-
scriptions to a relief fund, which
has been headed by His Excel-
lency Sir Robert Arundelt with
a $50.00 donation, and for gifts
of clothing and other comforts to
be sent to a committee led by
Lady Afundell.

Both Sir Robert and Lady
Arundell visited the burnt out
area yesterday morning and also
inspected the temporary relief
arrangements.

Scene of the fire was the corner
of Hughes Street (old Jack’s
Alley) and Tyrrel Street, though
one of the razed buildings lay on
the opposite side of Tyrrel Street,
apparently caught by blazing air-
borne debris.

The alarm was given at 12.30
a.m. when fire was seen within a
large walled and galvanized shed
housing Mr. Joe Pitt’s furniture-
making establishment on Hughes
Street but the flames had already
taken such hold of this location
that within a matter of minutes
the roof was blown through,
sending a column of flame and
smoke spiralling upwards, and
by the time the Fire Brigade
arrived on Tyrrel Street the
neighbouring tenement was
ablaze. A building of appalling
condition consisting of a wooden
upper floor resting on walls which
hemmed in a lower series of
rickety rooms, the tenement was
greedily engulfed in the inferno
and, as the occupants had been
able to evaeuate it with what
little they could take, the fire-
fighting had to be concentrated
on a maze of other small build-
ings in the vicinity as well as on
the opposite side of Tyrrel Street,

The fire was brought under
control about two and a half hours
after the alarm, the damage list
read: Pitt’s furniture shop com-
pletely destroyed with heavy loss
of electrically operated machinery
as well as sewing machines with
a quantity of straw-made items
which the establishment also
turned out for the tourist trade;
the tenement, owned by the widow
of the late Geoffrey Haynes, des-
‘troyed; two small houses owned
by the late D, G. Lusan destroyed;
4 tailor shop half burnt out—all
on the corner lot. On the opposite
side of Tyrrel Street a two-floor
house owned and occupied by Mr.
J. R. Davis, well known employee
of the local office of Cable and
Wireless, was also destroyed with

only a few household effect
Saved. o
Loss in personal belongings

was generally heavy, owners suf-
fering frem the flames as well as
some looting which occurred in
the confusion as householders in
the vicinity on both sides of Tyrrel
Street began to clear their resi-
dences for fear of spread of the

The Fire Brigade and Police, as
well as volunteer helpers, includ-
ing seamen from the H.L.S.
Crofter, worked heroically,

Legislators Want
Many Privileges

(Prem Our Own Correspondent)
GRENADA, Aug. 28.

The West Indian today front-
piaee and bannerlined its *

ucia correspondent’s report of a
speech made in Castries by Dr.

‘arl La Corbiniere, one of the
delegates to a recent Gairy sum-
moned Elected Legislators party
in which the talks were character-
ised as chiefly aimed at obtaining
privileges for electivs themselves,
chairman Gairy said.

Turning down the proposal Hon,
George Charles (St. Lucia), dis-
cussed the cost of living instead of
the issues.

La Corbiniere, reporting to the
citizens at a Trade Unionists pub-
lic meeting disclosed that the
agenda revealed only when the
vonference began in camera sitting,
proposed the introduction of legis-
ation for the following privileges
for members of the Council; Pen-
sions, free medical and surgical
treatment, freedom from arrest,
priority over other members of the
public for attention at government
health centres and government de-
partments, free transportation,
free house tax, and the same privi-
leges as Governors and Adminis-
trators, free¢em from import
duties on cars, free car license,
radio, etc., the right to requisition
government buildings free of
charge and travel freely between
the Windwards.

Gairy , seen by your correspond-
ent, generally describes La Cor-
biniere’s speech 3s a gross mis-
representation of the facts of the
proceedings,





Egyptian Officials
May Work In
Shirt Sleeves

CAIRO, Aug. 28.
Egypt let down a few more
hairs On Wednesday—again in
the gentlemen’s apparel depart-
ment. All government official:
should work in their shirtsleeves





discarding those stuffy coar

neckties 2nd tarboushe Social
Affairs Minister Znoheri

aid. He said he wanted the cabi-
net ever ¢ hiexa

1e Wicials be mmforta
rle t

Egypt

Garana would

‘Nelson’ Brings
62 Passengers

For Barbados

One hundred and twenty-nine
passengers arrived in the island
on board the S.S. Lady Nelson
yesterday morning. Ot this
amount, 62 landed and the other
67 were intransit.

The passengers disembarkin,
here came from St. Vincent,
Grenada, Trinidad and British
Guiana. Those intrensit are going
to Dominica, Antigua, St. Lucia,
St. Kitts, Montserrat, Bermuds,
Boston, Halifax and Montreal.

Those landing were: From
Trinidad: Mr. J. B, Vidal, Mrs.
J. B, Vidal Miss T. S. Vidal, Miss
T. B. Vidal, Master J. B. Vidal,
Mr. E. 8S. Larrier, Mr. C. Archer,
Master V. Archer, Master J.
Archer, Mrs. A. J. Corbin, Miss
A. J. Corbin, Miss M. B. Brown,
Miss A. M. Julien, Mr. A. A.
Clarke, Mr. C. Greaves, Mr. A, J.
Frenche and Mr. A. B. Scantle-
bury.

From Grenada: Miss J. Lessey,
Mr. R. Pike, Mrs, R. Pike, Mr.
V. Lessey, Mrs. E. Lessey, Mr.
R. Wason, Mr.

C. DaSilva, Mr.
C. Morris, Mr. S. Harris, Mr. I.
Harris, Mr. S. King, Mr. N.
Marshall, Mr. J. Pilgrim, Mr. R.
Pilgrim, Mr. L. Lovell, Mr. C.
Alleyne, Mr. S. Clarke, Mr. D.
Prescod, Mr. D. Parris, Mr. C.
Morris, Mr. T. Morris, Miss E.
Morris, Mrs. J. Haynes, Miss C.
Haynes, Miss H. Haynes, Mr.
L. A. Davidson, Master W.
Browne, Mr. E. Lashley Mr.
Cc. E. Johnson, Mr. C. Seals and
Mr. A. Van Duin.
From St. Vincent: Mr. H.

Hammond, Miss M. Maude, Mrs.
M. Lowe, Miss D, Lowe, Mrs.
F. Belmar, Miss F. Belmar, Miss
H. C. Burke and Miss N, John.
From British Guiana: Mr. A.
Emerson, Mr, J. Gordon, Miss C.
Deane and Miss V. L, Alleyne,
The Nelson also brought a
quantity of cargo to the island.
Two casks and a barrel of vege-
tables came from St. Vincent, 200
cylinders of gas, 800 cartons of
grapefruit juice, 50 drums of fatty
acids, shirts, paper bags and
printed matter from Trinidad
and garments, boys’ caps, medi-
cal preparations and 30 crates of
oranges from British Guiana.

While in Carlisle Bay the
Nelson will load 1,000 tons of
sugar for Montreal, a small

quantity of molasses for Halifax
and rum and general cargo for
Bermuda and the nofthern
islands. She leaves tomorrow
night at nine o’clock.

Yesterday one of the clerks
was kept busy in the Third Class
Passengers section of Messrs.
Gardiner Austin & Co. Ltd., her
Agents, as many people from the
northern islands sought pas-
‘sages.

One passenger hinted that she
was trying to escape the heat in
Barbados but was_ surprised
when rain began to fall soon
after she was handed her ticket
for St. Lucia,



Moharram Guilty Of
Abusing Authority
For Personal Gain

CAIRO, August, 28,



It was announced that the
Egyptian Government Purge Com-
mittee found former Wafdist
Minister of Public rks, Osman
Moharram, guilty of abuse of
authority for rsona! gain, The
Committ commended = dis-
ciplinary action to be taken against
him.

In the first ruling any of

six government purse committees



created earlier tis month to
clean up the Administration,
Moharram was found guilty of
extending Alexandria seaways

network so his own
benefit by thé project

The extension cost the muni-
cipality of Alexsndria . £60,000
($168,000). Mohamed Raafat
former Director of the municipal-
ity was found guitty of complicity
in the case.

house would

The Committee pointed out that
Moharram cannot be tried on the
basis of the new ministerial re-
sponsibility law because the law
is not retroaetive. Nor can he
be tried on the basis of administra-
tive disciplinary action because
he is no longer in the government

The Committee suggested that
he government:seek new legisla-
tion extending disciplinary action
to ‘apply to former officials.







The Cabinet will meet today
under the Presidenc; Premie
Maher to discuss the fimal version

f the lane form dcheme, It was
ex] ed that the Cobinet decision
would be announced immediately

fter the meeting.

Mahe ¥ al xpected tc

fie h Cabinet today.
Obser i t four Ministers
1 ! > the ¢ net and six or

i b pointe

r* fate will go to
Me . f the Medit









FRANCIS CARDINAL SPELLMAN (center) of New York walks in the sol-
emn processional entering St. Vincent’s Church in Los Angeles, The
eeremony formally opened the Knights of Columbus’ 70th annual con-
vention. Messages from President Truman and Pope Pius XII were
read at the opening session of the order, (International Soundpheto)





F.A.O. Home Eeonomist
Finds Much To Do
In Trinidad

PORT-OF-SPAIN,

On the eve of her departure from Trinidad after a
three-month’s stay, Miss Elsa Haglund, Home Economist
of the Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United
Nations, gave an account of her activities since the conelu-
sion of the jointly sponsored F.A.O.—Caribbesn Commission
Conference on Home Economics and Education in Nutrition,
which met at Kent House in early July.

Miss Haglund came to Trinidaci
a month previous to the Con-
ference to work with the Com-
mission’s Central Secretariat in
making preparations, Kent House
has been her headquarters,

Recently Miss Haglund
cipated in the Caribbean
Conference of the Young
Women’s Christian Association
and lectured at a two-day course
on Home Economics for officials
of the Public Health Department
of the Government of Trinidad
and Tobago, held under the
auspices of the British Council.
She addressed an open meeting of
the Y.W.C.A. Conference on the
subject, “Your and My Responsi-
bility to the United Nations,” and,
at the other seminars discussed
with delegates the’ problem of
food and health,

Talks With Teachers

On one occasion, teachers in
the territory’s various Domestic
Science centres assembled in
Port-of-Spain to discuss with
Miss Haglund the problem. of de-
veloping and improving the
teaching of Home Economics in
the school. She deseribed them
as a very interested group. In
Tobago, Miss Haglund held what
she termed “very lively discus-
sions” on Home Economics teach-
ing with Domestic Seience teach-
ers and interested students at the
ag * Anstey High School,

iss Haglune reported wide-~
spread interest in the recommen-
dation of the Conference on House
Economies and Education in Nu-
trition that the University of
Puerto Rico conduct a 3-months’
course (in English) for Mome
Economics workers next year,
Many individuals to whom she
talked expressed the desire to take
such a course.

Other activities included; a dis-
cussion of school feeding with
personnel operating Trinidad’s
“Breakfast Sheds”; visits to Gas-
parillo where she saw some Home
Improvement projects, to the
Women’s Inatitute in La Laine,
and to community centres in
Princess Town and Williamsville
attendance at a Community Rally,
in Tunapuna,

Smokeless Fireplace

Visiting homes in , Miss
Haglund observed that chulhas
were without vents for smoke and,
in some cases, were too low either
for safety or for comfort in cook-
ing. She has been able to supply
a diagram and detailed instruc-
tions for the construction of a
smokeless fireplace designed in
India, and now in use in Jamaica,
among other places.

Miss Haglund plans to leave
Trinidad Sunday, August 31 for
Jamaica, where she will take part
in the Adult Education Seminar
to be held by the Extra Murai
Department of the University
College to the West Indies,
September 1—20. One of the
seminar topics will be “Home
Economies for the Caribbean.” On
the request of the Jamaica Gov-
ernment, and with the approval
of the Food and Agriculture
Organisation, Miss Haglund wil!
remain in Jamaica for at least a
month following the Seminar

Before returning to FAO heac-
quarters in Rome, Italy, she v"
visit Antigua and St. Kitts to
confer with officials and others «
problems relating to the bett
application’ of modern home
economics techniques.

parti-
Area



Two Terrorists
Sentenced Tio Die

SAIGON, Aug. 28.

A military tribunal sentencexi
two Vietnam terrorists to de: th
and five to life imprisonment ‘|<
placing plastic bombs under 1.0
automobiles in downtown Saigon
last January, killing two person
and injuring 30.

The condemned men are me'n-
bers of Trinh Minh, the Coadaist
Dissent organization which br:
away from the Vietnam forves
several months ago because th»
Jisagreed with Emperor Bao D

policy. The attack took place
January 9 in front of the the;
id wn hall when two pla






automobi
s0mbs es



And Then
The Rains!

Yesterday morning was just as

‘warm as any other morning
during this week. But shortly
after nine o'clock dark clouds

gathered in the sky, and people
began to expect rain. Even be-
fore the first drizzle at about
9.30 am. it started to get cooler.

During the morning fairly
heavy showers (fell and dark
clouds continued to form in the
sky. The thermometer, which
on the previous morning showed

91 degrees Fahrenheit in the
Shade, now read five degrees
less. This was. po relief. The

wind could scarcely be felt and

humidity was great.

The majority of people who
walked the main streets of the
City sought shelter from the rain
in stores, few trying to walk
through it, even when it was only
drizzling.

One vendor who
near Broad Street
“This is flu rain’.
who entered drug stores, only
intending to shelter, bought
Phensic tablets and Aspirins.

Along the waterfront work
was held up four long periods.
Labourers scampered off to take
shelter, deserting lighters and
dranes.

Local Scouts Help
At Grenada fire

Fifteen members ot the James
Street Scout Troop, Fourth Bar-
bados, who were in Grenada
for ten days, assisted in extin-
guishing a fire in Grenada which
early, on Sunday morning des-
troyed five houses and left about
100 homeless, Nearly half of
those homeless were children,

The Scouts returned to the
island yesterday morning by the
§.S. Lady Nelson, the same boat
on which they left on Saturday
night, August 16,

The group was led by Rover
Leader, Charles Morris, assisted
by Cub Master Sydney Harris
and Assistant Scwut Master, Basil
King.

Mr. Morris told the Advocate
that they had a very enjoyable
time, visiting many places. The
Grenadians were very hospi-
table.

He said that on the Sunday
morning when the fire occurred
around 12.30 o’clock the boys
were aroused by shouts of: “St.
George’s on fire.’ The James
Street Boys, as well as the First
Queen’s Royal College Scouts of
Trinidad, who were also camp-
ing at Tanteen, Military Quar-
ters of Grenada, turned out and
assisted the Grenada Fire Bri-
gade. “The boys wete highly
complimented by the ire
Chief,” said Mr. Morris.

Mr. Morris said that the Scouts
regret having to return so soon

was selling
remarked:
Some people



because they could not fulfil
their engagements.
“Grenada is extremely hot,”

said Mr. Morris. He feels that it
is even warmer than Barbados.



Larceny ‘Case
Adjourned
ease in which

a tailor of
St. Michael

The
Rawlins
Land,

Delamere
is charged
with larceny as a_ bailee
of £1 11s. 2d. belonging to
Gordon Niles on March 29 was
adjourned yesterday by . His
Worship Mr. E. A. McLeod
Police Magistrate of District
“A” until September 9.

Sgt. Alleyne attached to Cen-|

tral Station *is prosecuting for}
the Police from information re-
ceived,

The case for the prosecution is)
Niles}
‘was in a shop at Church Village, |
St. Michael he gave three and a!

that on March 29 while

self yards of khaki
5s, 10d. a yard to the defendant
o that he could make him
pair of pants
The sfendant promised to
the pants on March 31
did Three
Nile till did
the defendant

fie e Polic

valued at}

a}

George |

ADVOCATE

Barton Makes
Special Appeal

@ From Page 1

the West India Committee had
kept Members of Parliament in-
cormeqd about happenings in the
West Indies, particularly in
times of crisis; the efforts of the
West India Committee which
yielded such a handsome result
when the Committee backed an
appeal for contributions to the
Jamaica Hurricane Relief Fund;
assistance in advising on the
choice of educational establish-
ments and in one instance, the
launching of a young West
Indian on a career of training as





an architect,

ie said that the Committee

t helped West Indians in
Brita who were in difficulties,
or particular example being
hat of a case of a former RAF
man who had become destitute
and ill and for whom the Com-
mittee secured assistance from

the appropriate Benevolent Fund.

Prestige Exhibits

Mr. Barton made a_e special
appeal for support for the Brit-
ish Industries Fair, pointing out
that while great results might
not be very obvious, what peo-
ple had to consider, would be
the impression created on the
thousands in the United Kingdom
who walked through "the West
Indies section and did not find
the name of Barbados so much
as mentioned, while Jamaica,
Trinidad and even the smal}
islands of the Windward and
Leeward groups shone down
from the illuminated sign
backed by attractive prestige
exhibits in light and colour.

In eonnection with his appeal
for membership, Mr. Barton
said that he was unable to pro-
mise any particular benefit for
any prospective member excep*
of course the not inconsiderabic
benefit of receiving the West
India Committee Circular.

should be a matter of con-
cern to everybody in the West
Indjes that there should be ar
active body with a high au-
thority and prestige of the Wes
India Committee, ready to serve
in any West Indian cause at a
moment’s notice. People who in-
sured their premises did not
complain if they did not get

fire and people who supported
the West India Committee would
de so with the knowledge’ that
the help of that Committe:

it

might, but not unnecessarily, be
reede@ personally
by themselves.

and urgently







|

LNAMELWAHE,
GLASSWARE
PAINTS



|
|

GENERAL







Vestry Of
St. Michael

@ from page 1

The market as planned would
be a tropical market, (an open
ait market as some people termed
it) and there was no chance of its
being as hot and badly ventilated
as the one which they had used at
Cheapside in the past

The report was unanimously
adopted.

Church Village School

The Vestry dealt with a letter
from the Very Reverend Dean
Hazlewood in connection with the
purchase of the Church Village
Girls’ School.

The letter pointed out that a
survey of the area had shown that
it consisted of 6,900 square feet
If suitable terms could be ar-
ranged steps would be taken to
obtain legislative sanction for the
sale of the premises to the Vestry
for a named figure.

That concession had been madc
on the understanding that the
vreperty was being acquired and
would be used for publie and
parochial service.

The alternative seemed to be,
the letter went on to state, that
the owners should cbtain legisla-
tive sanction to sell the premises
at the best market price and that
the Vestry would have the oppor-
tunity of bidding at the sale,

Mr, Mottley said that there was
a body of opinion that subscribed
to the view that the additional
space could be acquired for ex-
tending the Scavenging Depart-
ment, Whatever the setup turned
out to be, whether it was that
Vestry or a Mayor and Corpora-
tion, the streets still had to bé
cleaned and they would require
an adequate Scavenging Depart-
ment,

Site Desirable

Since the acquisition of the site
was desirable, he moved that
committee of the Vestry along
with two independent valuers be
ippointed to go into the question

of price, ete. and report to the
Vestry. !

The Chairman appointed Messrs
KE. D, Mottley, ©, Tudor, C

Carlton Browne of the Vestry anc
subject to their acceptance, Messr:

c, R. Armstrong and H. H, Wil- |

liams to serve on that cominittec

which would be under his chair~ |

1anship,

Mr. Mottley tabled a motion for
discussion at the next meeting o!

the Vestry to the effect: “As’ # |
result of the findings of the Cour'
of Common Pleas in the recent

ases of Omnibus Companies vs |
the Vestry, that this Vestry dis- |

cuss at their next meeting what

GCGLLLGLGGILGD GS

10% CASH DISCOUNT

UN

Homeless

Secondary Schools
Teachers Will
Meet On Sept. 1

An Extraordinary
Meeting of the
\ssistant Teachers in Secondary
Schools will be held in the
Library of Harrison College, by
nd permission of the Headmas-
“, on Monday September 1,
starting at 10 a.m,

The meeting has been. called
in connection with the appoint-
ment of the Salaries Commis-

mer to review and make recom-
mendations regarding the re
muneration of al! Government
ervants in Barbados, excluding
hese covered by the Turner

»nmittee Report except where

is considered anomalies still
exist and would be created by the

ummendations to be made.
rhe delegation appointed

General
Association of





to







mek an interview with the au-
erities, although it has not been
;vanted such an interview, 1s
pee to report progress at
‘onday’s meeting The Associa-
will also comsider the mat-

of submitting written evi-
nee in connection with the
iquiry by the Salaries Commis-

yer



uRS. BELLA LUMSDEM
DIES IN GRENADA

(From Que Own Correspondent)
ST, GEORGE'S, Aug. 26.
The death took place at the
lony Hospital last Sunday of
ella Lumsden, wife of Mr, Clay-

m Luresden who is resident in
New York,
Besides her husband the de-

eased leaves a son, Carl in New
wk and a daughter here, Miss
Lsmai Lumsden of the Education
Department,
A large gathering attended the
ineral at the St. George’s R.C
“hureh,



‘eps should be taken to ensure
lat an equitable tax be paid by
bus Concessionaires”,

The Vestry recommended Rev-
rend K, A. B, Hinds as a member
{ the Old Age Pensidm Claims
ommittee to fill the vacancy
reated by the resignation of Rev-
rend W. M, Malone from July 31
After dealing with some matters

ot bi Relief, the meeting termin-
ated,

Wik HAVE IN



PAGE THREE

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BARBADOS ei ADVOCATE

ae ee {8 Fe ye
hinewcr



tisewf qv

Printed by the Advecate Oe., Ltd, Mre~* #1. Gridgctewn



__ Friday, August 29, es

W. L. c OMMITTEE |

THE Secretary of the West India Com-
mittee is at present in Barbados where he
has halted on the first stage 6f a compre-
hensive tour of the British Caribbean.

The recent war introduced hundreds of
Barbadians to the headquarters of the West
India Committee in London and the wel-
fare work performed by the Ladies Com-
mittee under Lady Davson and, later, Lady
Winifred Gore will be remembered with
appreciation by many service men and
women.

But apart from service men and women
who passed through London during the
war and apart from the less than two hun-
dred members of the West India Committee
resident in Barbados, the West India Com-
mittee is little known by Barbadians.

That is a great pity. Because there can
hardly exist anywhere in the world today
an organisation which has played so great
a part in the history of the West Indies.

Records still exist today at the London
headquarters of the first general meeting
of the West Indian merchants which was
held in that City on April 11th 1769.

Ever since that date the activities of the
West Indian merchants have been concern-
ed with the development of trade with the
West Indies and with, the promotion oj

West Indian interests.
a
In more recent years the Society of Wesi

Indian Merchants and Planters developec
into the West India Committee which was
incoproated by Royal Charter in 1904.

In the words of the Charter the West
India Committee is formed of British sub
jects personally interested in the agricui-
tural and manufacturing industries and
trade of the British West Indies, Britisi:
Guiana and British Honduras. Member:
subscribe voluntarily to the funds of th:
Association, the object of which is by
united action to promote the interests oi
such industries and trade and thus increase
the general welfare of the British Carib-
bean,

Throughout this century the West Indi:
Committee has served its members wel)
and because of their influence in London
and knowledge of West Indian trade need:
they have been able to champion the trad-
ing interests of the West Indies by dealing
directly with government departments ir
the United Kingdom. Today West Indiar.
governments are no longer dependent on
the West India Committee for representa-
tion in London: and West Indian politici-
ans have been flying to London to holc
negotiations with departments of the Brit-
ish Government and to support the claims
of Caribbean organisations such as the
British West Indies Sugar Association o
the Banana Growers Association 0!
Jamaica. This year West Indian govern
ments opened a new chapter in trade nego-
tiations between the United Kingdom and
the West Indies by opening a Trade Com
missioner Service in London.

Few persens in the West Indies wili
know that the opening of such a Trade
Commissioner service in London was re
commended many years ago by the Wesi
India Committee in London, but the
willingness of the Committee today to
co-operate with that service is well-known
and was conveyed by cable to the first
meeting of the Regional Economic Com-
mittee last year.

_ So far from competing in any way with
the West India Committee the inaugura-
tion of the Trade Commissioner Service
in London ought to give a boost to the West
India Committee and should result in an

increase of members from the British
Caribbean.

_ The Trade Commissioner Service in Lon-
don like the Regional Economic Com-
mittee in the West Indies is a creature of
the seven British Caribbean governments.
It eannot represent the personal interests
of those engaged in agricultural or manu-
facturing industries although it can assist
agencies like the West India Committee
to promote such interests.

From the point of view of West Indian
governments the existence of the Trade
Commissioner Service in London will
facilitate any negotiations which West
Jndian governments might like to make
through this agency in London. But from
the point of view of individual trading
‘interests the Trade Commissioner Service,
being a creature of seven West Indian gov-
ernments, will be unable to approach indi-
vidual problems with any independence of
judgment. .

For independent championing of private
interests which may seldom coincide with
the interests of one or more West Indian
governments the West India Committee
remains equipped by almost two centuries
of experience and knowledge to carry out
the aims of its Royal Charter: “by unit:
action to promote the interest of such in-
dustries and trade and thus increase the
general welfare” of the Caribbean terri-
tories. Today as never before the. West
India Committee has an important role to
play in matters affecting West Indian trade.
It is up to all organisations and individuals

free a swell its
and strenethen its effective

to the West

who champion ition to

1embership
F ‘ Indies.



Loeal Government In

Local or decentralised govern-
ment has figures largely in the ad>
ministration of the United King-
dom since Saxon times, but the
present system of local government
by elected councils has been oper-
ating for less than a century. In
addition to the provision of normal
public services such as Water sup-
ply, drainage, street lighting,
refuse collection, local authorities
now play an important part in the
execution of, for example, the
national health service, the hous-
ing programme, and town and
country planning.

Â¥ of Local Authority

nue Wales and Northern
Ireland are divided for local gov-
ernment purposes into Administra-
tive Counties and County Bor-
oughs. County Boroughs are towns
independent of County Councils.
No town of less than 75,000 popu-
lation can now become a_ county
borough. Administrative Counties
are divided, under, the County
Councils, into Municipal Boroughs,
Urban Districts and Rural Dis-
tricts, each with its own Council.
Rural Districts are subdivided into
Parishes,

In Scotland, local government
yuthorities are County Councils,
Town Councils and District Coun-
cils. Special arrangements exist in
London, where local government
is divided between the London
County Council, the Corporation
xf the City of London and the
Metropolitan Borough Councils,

Functions of Local
Authorities

(a) Environmetal Services; are
services designed to secure and
mprove the citizen’s surroundings,
yublic health, road safety, the pro-

vision of parks and playgrounds,

tte, These services are usually
dministered by District or Parish
Jouncils (for | Administrative
*ounties), or by County Borough
Souncils (who are what may be
ermed all-purpose authorities).
neluded among environmental



NEW YORK.

ARCH R. MARTIN, a 47-year-
old salesman of British goods, is
} packing to sail home with a tough
1 nenenas for British manufactur-
ers,

He arrived in America seven
saonths ago, his brief cases. bulg-
} ing with seven lines of products,
nd expected a big welcome.
But this is what happened, He
‘pounded the pavement” and
iade more than 200 calls in the
heatwave To cut expenses he
lived in a 7s, -a-day room, gave
p his daily highball and lunched
n a bowl of soup. He lost
ist. 11lb,





° * *

THESE are his conclusions
The prestige of the “Made in
fritain”’ label is fading. The
American market will be lost
inless British manufacturers stop
wying to force on it goods made
aceording to their ideas and start

| making things the way Americans
want them.

Sample experience: When he
reported the American buyers’
complaint that a British soup did
ot suit American tastes the
‘coup maker replied: “Canadians
nd South Africans like it; why
‘on’t Americans learn to?”

British goods must be packed
» meet American ideas, They
cust be designed to meet intense
smpetition, But, above all, you
can only sell what Americans
want, made in the way Ameri-
cans want it made.

P.S.. Martin got some orders.

And after a rest back home in
Sulwich the will return in two |





Britain
services is the important work of
town and country planning, which
1s done by County and Couniy
Borough Councils.

¢b) Protketive Services: such as
fire, police and civil defence, are
maintained by County Councils or
County Borough Councils (Town
Councils in Scotland) or by Joint
Boards representing more than ole
area, There are special police and
fire arrangements in London,

y (¢) Personal Services: are such
as maternity and child welfare
services, education, housing, care
of the aged and infirm, provision
and upkeep of jibraries, museums
and art gallarics, For these the
type of authority varies accordiug
to the service provided.

Electoral System

Elections to local Councils are
held regularly, at fixed intervals
and according to fixed rules, under
much the same conditions, includ-
ing suffrage, as national elections.
Candidates, who must satisfy a
number of legal; residential and
personal qualiiications, and who
must be properly nominated, stand
either as Independents or 2s
political party representatives, Tne
jarger Council areas are usually
subdivided into wards or constitu-
encies for voting purposes, Coun-
cillors are elected: to serve fur a
period of three years. They are
unpaid.

The actua] work of the councils
is organized as follows:—questions
of policy and principle are gen-
vrally decided by the whole coun-
cil; committees and
tees are then appointed to carry
out detailed administration, There
are various types of local author-
ity committee: statutery commit-
tees (ihese are compulseory under
an Act of Parliament), standing or
permanent committees and special

or ad hee committees; there are
also joint committees representing
_mnore than one local

sub-commit- ;

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

1. The execution of policy|
rests with. salaried officers and
employees appointed and paid by
the councils.
Relations With Central
Government |
It is assumed that local author-
ities are responSible bodies com-
petent to discharge their own
functions, consequently, interfer-
ence by the central government is
kept to the minimum. The func-
tions of local authorities are in any
case precisely limited by the Act
or Acts of Parliament governing
their duties in any given field of
activity. The Central Govern-
ment Departments do, however,
have powers of supervision, ’in-

_spection and financial control, and

the right to issue advisory cir-
culars. |The Ministry of Housing
and Local Government is the
central department most closely
concerned with local government.
Other ministries—e.g. Ministry of
Health, Ministry of Education—
have direct relations with local
authorities on matters within their

control.
Finance

Local government finances are
directed chiefly from grants from
the central government. local
rates, and loans. Accounts are
controlled by a Finance Committee
and audited annually.

Government grants take various
forms, such as the payment of a
percentage of local authority ex-
penditure on certain services, or
grants to the poorer authorities
to bring their resources into line
with those of wealthier areas.
Rates are a form of local taxation
levied on al} land and buildings
n a local government area, based
on valuations by Inland Revenue
officers (in Seotland by assessors),
and collected from owners or
cecupiers by local authorities
themselves. Loans may be raised
by local authorities for specific
purposes, with the approval of the
Central Government Departments
concerned, usually through the

authority Public Works Loans Board.



by Newell Rogers

months to go on plugging.

ADMIRAL ALAN KIRK, ex-
U.S. Ambassador to Moscow, has
been chosen by President Tru-
man to head the Government's
Psychological Warfare Strategy
Board which fights the Moscow
propagandists,

AMERICA’S new drinking fad
-gin and tonic—sends sales
soaring, Distillers bottled 100 per
cent more gin in June than a year
ago, Long articles explain that
it was developed by British colo-
nisers in the tropics as “a

medi-

cine” and brought home by re-
tiring saihibs,

LARGEST labour. body the

8,000,000-member American Fed-
eration of Labour, invites Eisen-
hower and Stevenson to speak at
its annual convention. Then it
will decide whom to back. The
other big union organisation, the
6,000,000-member Congress of
Industrial Organisations is going
to back Stevenson.

THE business man's’ white-
collar shirt is losing out to the
sportsman’s open-neck shirt
worn with shirt tails outside his
trousers, White-collar shirt pro-
duction is down 31 per cent. sports
shirts up 56 per cent. No neckties
with sports shirts.

WEALTHY Howard Cullman,
one of New York’s leading back-
ers of Broadway shows, appeals
for theatres to be run on the
London model. He points out that

while ten shows run on Broad-

Our Readers Say:

Class Distinctions

1o the Editor, the Advocate,

SIR,—Please permit me to re-
ely through your most valuabie
vurnal to a letter written by
“CHRISTIAN”;

First he claims that the Barba-
dian people are too desirous or
maintaining class distinctions in
heir little island. I am a middl2
class man, and one who is hoping
,nat some day Barbadians of all
walks of life will enjoy life alike,
without material prohibitions.
Jut this can never be the end of
class distinction. It is in this very
state that man displays himself
as he really is, and will be clas-
sified not in terms of material
possessions, but by what he be-
lieves, by what he thinks, by
what he says, by what he does
and by what he is, It was in this
very state of equal opportunity
a the rich cities of Greece and
Asia Minor that men began to
hink of the mind, bringing about
he birth of philosophy and psy-
chology. There will never be an
end of elass distinction, because
men are 1.t made equal. Talents
are not shared according to Krem-

lin dictates, nor trade union
fanaticism.
“CHRISTIAN” spoke of love,

and I presume that ‘he meant
ove for neighbours. Love for our
seighbours is the very foundation
of a socialist party, a socialist
government, a socialist state, In
3arbados people have a long
and ‘weary way to go towards
socialism. There is nothing sociat-
ist about Barbadian politica!

rganisations, Here we have a
»olitical party truckling to the
nultitude of manual workers,
ind «caring nothing about any
ather kind of werker. Manua'
vorkers like Christian are chrisi-
ans. They are revelling in their
rwn joys, All others are dead,
hey only are alive. Tne Barbados
niddle class have been enduring
his state of affairs for a long
ime and that time is now at an
end.

As regards the advancements
f the Island, let us not sit and
roact about what our fathers left
1s. Since we were men Barbados
Sas been in a lethargic state and
s now sliding on the retrogres>

Uv middle class this is time for
ACTION.

SON OF THE FATHER.

Likes And Dislikes
To the Editor, the Advocate,

SIR I wa
your note

very pleased t
welcoming

comments n

on your paper and since then I

see that a simple controversy has Deaf

Man With Soup For Sale

way, London. has 40. He wants
smoking fn “the tbeatres, liquor
in theatre bars, and tickets sold
directly to the public instead of
to brokers.

FOR seven years wee Glasgow-
born Alex (Sandy) Ackland
brought me up to the Daily Ex-
press office in Rockefeller Centre
in the lift. To-day he resigned
his lift job. He won the part of
John Rankine, Rabbie Burns’s
drinking companion, in a Broad-
way-bound play “Comin’ Through
the Rye.” It is based on Burns's
life.

CAPTAIN FEDOR BELOV,
Soviet hero of World War II, ar-
rived with great secrecy at West-
over Air Force base in Massa-
chusetts. With him was _ his

Chicago bride, Adele Koskovsky, |

who married him in Germany.
They were whisked away under
heavy protective guard: The
Russian captain fled from Com-
munist rule.

DR. KARL VON COSEL, an
X-ray scientist, who so loved his
girl friend that he kept her after

she died and. serenaded her
nightly with organ music, has
died at Zephyr Hills, Florida. He

often claimed he would live for

" ever,

Cosel made 1940 headlines
when the girl, aged 19, was found
embalmed in his home, He had
fallen in love with her in hos+
pital and when she died he got
her family’s permission to erect
a vault. But he took her home
instead.

10.35 p.m.



tion in Aid of the Blind and the
would be grateful if you

been started concerning Rope and will publish in your columns the

Culture.

is simple indeed and Denington's
criticism is fair and deserving.

I do not want to appear attach tat
ropey but â„¢ find that simpleton eat ed - Statement of Revenue

Expenditure in connection

with the Charity Ball which was
held at the Marine Hotel on 26tis

When a West Indian, as I be- July last.

dieve Hopkinson is, can sit down
and pen a collection of big words

The Committee welcomes this

and tasteless phrases which _majf/} cpportunity of thanking all those

difficult reading more

cult, who contributed to the success of

you must expect criticism on this the venture, — the Advocate Co.

kind of false journalism.

Ltd.,

for advertising, those who

Now Mr, Wditor, I am suggest- sold and bought tickets for the
ing to you that you run a Gallup Ball, the Commissioner of Police

Poll to find out from your read~ #5»

ers their likes and dislikes. As
a matter of fact, such a poll could
be conducted every six or nine
months for the improvement of
your journal.

the free use of the Police

Orchestra, those who assisted by
taking charge of side attractions
and by donating or
freshments, and

selling re-
all those firms;

When this poll is conducted it which so generously contributed

tom be classified into four sec- prizes.

tio!
FIRST CLASS SPORT:

Some of your
articles; Flash Gordon; The Phan-
tom; and Carib Calling
SECOND CLASS SPORT:

At the Cinema; The Stars and
You; and the Comic Page.
THIRD CLASS SHORT

West Indian Culture; Education
Notes and Godson’s articles,
REAL SPORT:

Coppin’s Commentaries; Racing
Notes; Reports of Sports; Nathan-
icl Gubbins and Beachcomber.

When the poll is checked you
will perhaps discover that REAL
SPORT will head the list with a

The Committee assures

the public of Barbados that they
have
leaders; Hunte’s worthy cause.

helped forward a_ very

Yours faithfully,

Signed:— ALLAN COLLY-
MORE — President, B’dos
Assn. in aid of the Blind
and the Deaf.
BETTY L. ARNE—Chairman,
Organising Committee.
ISOLINE MOORE)

DOREEN WARD)—Members, |

Organising Committee.

Revenue



recommendation that THIRD Tickets . 689.00

CLASS SPORT should be dropped aaa, Receipts 105.00

altogether. ey gee 516.88
‘Our Common Heritage’ and Hetrechments s a 82.02

‘The People of Barbados’ should Balloons AF cs 19.54

win a place of their own. Par Corsages xis ae 30.88

Excellence. Farm & Garden notes Side attractions os 95.92

and Gardening Hints. What's Donation — ents

Cooking in the Kitchen and Cook fyotel ae 50.00

with Mary are a great tribute to

your paper. 1,589.24
Hoping that this will give you

an idea as to what features read- Expenditure

ers like or dislike and thanking

you for fayour of publitation. Rent of Ball Room» .. 240.00

ADA ADAMS.
Ed, Note:

correspondent, but

her for her suggestions ané Helpers

criticisms.

Assn. In Aid Of Blind
And Deaf

Social Welfare
Garrison,

St. Michael,

August, 1952.

c/o The Office,

he Advocate,



Printing and Advertis-

The Editor fails to un- ing y ‘ pe 29.40

derstand the meaning of the Bar Tickets ry

word ‘sport’ as used by this Drinks and. Refresh-
thanks ments ‘

Signed :—

6.00
390.89
6.00

DEPOSIT. AT BAR-
CLAYS BANK 866.95
CASH IN HAND... 50.00
1,589.24

P. OTHELLO EVELYN,









Hon. Treasurer, |
B’dos Assn. in Aid of Blind!
ind Deaf,







6th August, 1952,

FRIDAY, AUGUST 29, 1952

; “THE GOLDEN VOICE NURSERY RECORD BOOK”







AVALLEY IN THE
SHADOW GETS A TEXT

By JAMES LEASOR

LYNTON, Devon.

Church bells boom proudly out tonight
across the wounded valley of Lynmouth and
over the sullen sea. Not even the roar of the
angry River Lyn nor the staccato bark of
the pneumatic drills used by rescue squads
can drown these bells.

There is no weeping here. From the pulpit
of St. Mary’s Church a Scots-born vicar, the
Rey. E. H. Souttar, preached his sermon this
evening on the text “And when Jesus saw
the city He wept.”

At morning service—conducted without a
server because the server ten-year-old RoN-
ney Dimmock, is among the missing — the
sermon’s theme was: “Be of good cheer.”

The holidaymakers who booked at Lyn-
mouth have gone from their holiday homes.

Some are in the Jubilee Hall, with other
unlucky people who have lost their houses.
Others have moved up the 400ft. cliff here to
Lynton, where the locals have opened their
own homes warmly to these unexpected
visitors.

And, after the worst week-end in the
history of this Devon holidayland, a spirit of
comradeship reminiscent of the blitz days in
London has been born.

Lynmouth is a fantastic sight, a town split
down the centre by the river. (Old people
are saying that the river went back to the
course it took a century ago before “improve-
ments.”) The foreshore, up which the tide
is ereeping tonight, is strewn with boughs,
wooden beams, cars flattened as if by sledge
hammers.

Gulls wheel above the mess screaming for
titbits from the crates of biscuits and cakes,
the joints of meat, and the sweets that were
washed out from the shops. Trees were
carried out into the bay and now sprout
grotesquely from the deep water.

IN ONE ROOM ...
A Folded-down Bed

AS the torrent went down the High-street,
it ripped away most of the tarmac car park
outside the Glen Lyn Restaurant which still
bravely advertises “Teas, morning coffee,
lunch,”

Two cars are still in a doorless garage with
tree branches on the roof,

The river ripped some houses in two, and
yet, oddly, some furnishings were little
affected.

In one top-floor bedroom, for instance, the
bed is turned down neatly for a guest who
never came back to sleep. Books are on a
bedside table, coats flaunt from hangers and
hooks, foray

In another, a bathroom mirror is still un-
broken, although the wall from which it
hangs leans over drunkenly.

IN THE MUD...

Bottles Of Pickles
RESCUE men are trying to clean up the
place. The angry river rolled down boulders
as big as a small room, and this afternoon the

ago — story with Songs and Music on a gratnophone record
o help you read it in the re

ADVOCATE ‘STATIONERY







HELPS

@ SKYLINE KITCHEN SETS
@ FRENCH FRY CUTTER — ONION & VEG. CHOPPER
@ COFFEE MILLS & MINCERS in Three Sizes
@ EGG WHISKS — ELECTROPLATED TEA STRAINERS
@ DRAIN RACKS — ASBESTOS STOVE MATS

bom ee

iC. S. PITCHER & CO.

E~BOBOBB-BOGBwA BF



Ph. 4472



2 GGLYGL2LFS

Hey! Hearties 2








Here's Hartley's!

,
:
.
:
3



First Choice on any Shelf”

valley echoed and re-echoed as these were
dynamited. There was just no other way to
move them.

Mud is feet thick in the Highstreet. Mud,
and layers of tins of fruit, bottles of pickles,
petrol tins, sofas, and mattresses.

You can see how deep the flood waters ran
by the brown rim half way up shop windows.

Jams and Jellies

Marmalades

AT THE CAFE...
Tables Laid, Still

ODD things happened. Souvenirs for holi-
daymakers —- beaten brass bowls, hollow
Lucky Lynmouth Pixes and the like—floated
away down the street.

As the water rose, tables and chairs and
huge wooden-framed pictures tried to swim
out of the windows, and stuck there.

The Ssland Café still advertises teas. Ii
is really an island now, with a river of mud
one side, a roaring Lyn on the other.

Ironically, the tables are set for tea out-
side .... Some with white china, the others
heaped with mud nad rubble.

Outside the Bath Hotel are a baker’s dozen
of cars up to their axles in mud, half full of
bracken and leaves. They stand faithfully
where their owners left them after dinner on
Friday night.

FROMAHOME.. .
A Set Of Antlers
MEN trudge stoically through the mud

Crystals

Da Costa & Co. Ltd.

RD PPLEALELLELELSESSAGLSR

EAT
MORE

SPECIALS
Boneless Salt Beef
—52c. per Ib
Bone Meal—18e per Ib
t Carrots—24c, per Ib
Dressed Rabbits—36c. per tb

Thick Salt Fish











‘i ‘ ‘ i Mackerel
carrying the precious bric-a-brac of their Pilchards
homes: a set of antlers from the parlour wall eee
grandama’s ormolu clock; a framed motto: Lobster
“East, West, Home is Best. ‘ saree Paste
Side streets are blocked with muddied Ondane.
junk: in a corner a pile of sodden books bleed Frozen Haddock
their red cover dyes away. —L.ES, Seeket Sieve
Beef Suect—30c. per Ib
SECOND TIME LUCKY — || poncecrance :
|| PREPARE SUGGESTIONS
| aa For Your Overseas
i|| Bird’s Eye Fr
TWICE a Mexican underground move- Vegetables mi Parcels
ment smuggled Spanish-speaking Gene ||} Cauliflower Molasses in tins

Brussel Sprouts

AD =
Handa aan rrowroot Starch in pkgs.

Fuson, a California newsman, into the United Fruit Juices

States. He posed as a Czech Communist.||} Spinach Guava Jelly
Smugglers charged him $20 (£7) for fake||] Mixed Vegetables eat Cheese
birth and border-crossing papers, and $40 oo ee the Heat” Beef Suet

(£14) for the trip. a Gin and Canada Dry

| Sliced Beans
Sharp’s the word for
|

He played his part well. When the border “TONIC” 0 TOFFIES
ol caught him the first time it sent him} Se ee ns
back to Mexico. Next time the smugglers got ||

ack to Mex | Goddard’ s for Best Grocery Service |

b “







—




FRIDAY, AUGUST 29, 19

52



Clerk Acquitted
Of Accounts

An Assize jury after about half an hour’s deliberation
yesterday acquitted Keith Squires, a 26-year-old clerk, of

the charge of falsification o

f accounts on or about August

31 last year. Hearing of the case lasted nine days before
Mr. Justice J. W B. Chenery. His Lordship discharged

Squires.

Squires was charged with having on or about August
31, 1951, while he was a clerk or a mevead of D. V. Scott,
with intent to defraud, made or concurred in making a
false entry in a book belonging to or in the possession of
his employer, purporting to show that on August 31, rum

vats 1, 2, and 3, the propert
Cheapside, Bridgetown, con

and 2,820 proof wine gallons.

Counsel for Squires were Mr.
E. W. Barrow ang Mr. F. G.
Smith.

Hon. C. Wylie, Attorney Gen-
eral, and Mr. F, E. Field, prose-
cuted for the Crown.

The Attorney General said that
he would repeat the arguments
he had used the previous day in
his address and asked them to
aceept that the intent to defraud
was very evident. Indeed, when
a man wrote the type of letter
the accused wrote, they had the
evidence, not only the inference,
that there was the intention to
defraud.

His Lordship said; “Mr. Fore-
man and gentlemen of the Jury,
we are now reaching the penulti-
mate stage of this long and pro-
tracted trial, and first of all I must
commend you for the obvious care
and patience with which you
have listened to all the evidence,
the cross-examination, re-exami-
nation: and the care with which
you have followed arguments
propounded, both by the Counsel
for the defence and for the Pro-
secution,

Irrelevant Point

The Learned Attorney General
has said that reference has been-
made to the fact that he is not a
Barbadian. I shall only say this
—that_the fact that he is not a
Barbadian matters not one whit.
The traditions of the English Bar
are universal, world wide and
know no limitations whatever.
Therefore that fact is entirely
irrelevant to that question and
you will agree with me he has
earried out his duty with the tra-
ditions of the bar and put his case
for the Crown as it shold be put.

The Counsel for the defence,
Mr. Smith, not a Counsel of long
standing, in Mr, Barrow’s ab-
sence, has done all that could be
done for his client very ably. If
at times in a long trial there are
clashes between Counsel, you
must not take these very serious-
ly. They are part of the legal
game.

The duties of the prosecuting
counsel at the Court of Grand
Sessions are obviously different
from those of the defence Coun-
sel. The defence counsel is apt to
be more easily stirred to his feet
than the Prosecution _Counsei
whose duties are different,

These are preliminary obser-
vations which it is fitting and
proper that I mention at the out-
set, :

Jurys Duty

However, the jury are the sole
judges of the farts and it is not
for counsel either for the defence
or the prosecution, or myself, for
the Judge himself, to tell them
that the facts should have a cer-
tain interpretation or not. That
is solely your province, and a
province which must not be in-
vaded. If I suggest to you that
the true interpretation of the
facts are so and so, you may or
may not agree with me, and a
Judge must not take upon him-
self to impress his opinions on
the facts too strongly. The whole
principle of British justice in
such a case is that 12 men are
drawn from all walks of life to
try the issue on broad principles.
The technical equipment of the
Judge is not necessary at all for
the trial of this issue. You 12
men have the issues in your
hands, The legal nicities are not
for you, but the broad basis of
facts will guide you, along with
the experience you have gathered
from the ordinary walks of life.

You will also bear in mind
this, that you are to find the de-
fendant guilty when—to use the
old phraseology—the matter is
proved to you beyond a reason-
able doubt. The Lord Chief
Justice Lord Goddard in a case,
the King against Summers, which
went to the Criminal Appeal,
said that this phrase, reasonable
doubt, was not to his mind a
satisfactory phrase and attempts
to define it lead to confusion and
it would be very much better if
that expression was not used and
instead the jury was told to re-
gard the evidence and make sure
it satisfied them so that they felt
sure in coming to their verdict.

Formula

That is the test you must satis-
fy yourself of. You must feel
sure in coming to your verdict.
That is what the Lord Chief Jus-
tice laid down as the formula to
be adopted in this matter and the
reasonable doubt no longer occu-
pies the exalted place it used to
occupy. I only mention that at
the outset so that you would have

eee
Â¥



nr

HARRISON'S

y of D! V. Scott & Co. Ltd., at
tained respectively 2,796, 1,380

the proper test, You must be
satisfied and feel sure.

You have listened to the evi-
dence day after day. It has been
long and voluminous, and the
cross-examination extremely pro-
tracted—not unnecessarily per-
haps. Mr. Thorpe was cross-ex-
amined the whole of one day and
&@ good part of another. Therefora
you may find yourselves, if you
are not careful, enmeshed in the
multiplicity of evidence and may
be apt to lose sight of the main
issue you have to decide, You may
get lost in small minute details
and overlook the particular issue.

The accused is charged with
falsification of accounts... Falsi.
fication of accounts is compara-
tively a modern offence. It was
introduced in the 70’s of the last
century to make provision for an
offence which before there was no
means of trying in Law, It is
purely a statutory offence. It is
a criminal offence ang the neces-
sary ingredients in this must be
proved in this also—what is
known as the guilty mind. You
will have to find that the same
way you find it in the other
offences in Law.

Witnesses’ Evidence
I do not propose to go through
the evidence in minute detail. It
is really not necessary in as much
as counsel for the detence and the
Prosecution have during the past

few days taken you through
the whole evidence. It really
would be superfluous to go

through everything again; and no
doubt you will still have vividly
in your mind the witnesses and
how they gave their evidence.
Keith Squires, being a servant
of D. V. Scott”’—that is not dis-
puted. The defence has not chal.
lenged that. “With intent to de-
fraud” well, on that I will direct
you later in this summing up,
“Made or concurred in making a
false entry in a book...”, the book
is here and you will see it when
the time comes for you to retire
before you give your verdict.
This book has mostly been refer-
wed to as the red book — it
does not mean it suffers in

any way from Communist in-
fluence, any Communist infil-
tration; that is just an easy

way of referring to the book. You
will look through it carefully and
remember the evidence, The
book will speak for itself, but you

will also remember the evidence |

of witnesses like Mr. Segtt in re-
gard to this book. As I say the
book speaks for itself, and in
looking at it, you will easily come
to the conclusion in your own
minds as men of common sense,
as to what kind of a book it is,
what it purports to be.
Kind of Book

You will bear that in mind and
remember the remarks of the At-
torney General on this book, be-
cause this is the book in which
the false entries are alleged to
have been made. You will re-
member that this book was in
existence before the defendant
became a clerk at D. V. Scott.
You will remember that when
you have to consider the evidence
as to the nature of the book, You
will fing instructions of various
kinds, and notes, and comments
made in it, some in red ink, some
in pencil, That you will bear in
mind, and all of these matters
will help you to decide the nature
of this book.

One thing, there is no doubt
that it is a book as set out in the
charge—belonging to and in the
possession of D. V,‘Scott & Co.
Ltd., and it is not disputed either,
that this is the book in which the
accused made entries.

As I say, it is most important
for you to look through that book
carefully, examine it carefully,
and see what it purports to be.
But you will also, because as you
know it'is your duty, consider the
whole of the evidence and if there
is any evidence concerning this
book, you will bear that in mind,
and you will remember that Mr.
Scott is the witness, naturally, in-
evitably, who is best in a position
to speak about this book.

Memorandum Book

Questions had been put to him
and he was asked who supplied
the book. He said he, meaning the
firm, and Squires used it so that
if he, Mr, Scott, made any quer-
ies, Squires would be in a position
to answer reasonably and intelli-
gently. He was asked if he would
describe the book as a_ personal
memorandum kept by the accus-
ed and he said “yes”. You will
bear that part of the evidence of
Mr. Scott in ming when you come













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BARBADOS



Of Falsification

to consider the book, which still
will speak for itself.

The book, as I said, was in ex-
istence before the defendant went
there, and there are notes of in-
structions and the various parts
are marked for you and you will
therefore have little trouble, I
hope, in going through this mat-
ter. Some are in red ink, and they
will strike your attention very
quickly, The defence has not
challenged that this is the book in
wnich the entry was made nor
that the defendant was a clerk or
servant.

During the covrse of this case,
you have heard evidence, a con-
siderable amount of _ evidence
given, maybe in cross-examina-
tion of witnesses, tending to show
that a state of slackness, ineffici-
ency, neglect, anc what not ex-
isted at the Cheapside Rum Bond.
Witnesses under cross-examina-
tion were forced to admit that
they put their signatures and
initials to matters like regauging
and retesting when it was not
done. You will remember the
evidence of Neblett who said he
did not himself retest ang re-
gauge, but he put.down his sig-
nature. Evidence is given pur-
porting to show this state of in-
efficiency existed at the Govern-
ment Rum Bond and the Customs
generally. And you may have
heard Mr, Thorpe himself say
that when he took over, the books
were hopelessly in arrears, though
he endeavoured as best he could,
to bring them up to a reasonable
state of efficiency.

Staff Inadequate

You also beard evidence from
Mr. Thorpe that he took steps to
bring the matter to the notice of
the authorities that the staff ws
inadequate and things of that
kind, and you will bear that in
mind in so far as may become
necessary when you regard the
atmosphere in which these pro-
ceedings took place at the Cheap-
side Rum Bond, There is that
prevailing state of inefficiency,
neglect, slackness, whatever you
feel to call it, which seems to
characterise the proceedings at
the Cheapside Rum Bond, As I
say, when you consider the whole
matter, you will bear the atmos-
phere in which these matters
proceeded.

I am not going to worry you
with minute details of all of these
points. You will doubtless agree
it is unnecessary for me to go
through all that to enable you to
come to a decision in this matter.
But I will tell you that the de-
fence has proceeded on the line
that it was impossible due to lack
of supervision, rum: not locked in
the corridor, one thing and an-
other, petty -pilfering, rumours
that rum had been going through
the back door, for anybody to say
correctly what was the state of
affairs on 3lst August in relation
to the rum in these three vats
which is the subject of this false

entry.

Charge—False Entry _

On the other hand, you will
bear in mind that the accused is
not charged with abstracting the
rum, stealing it or anything of
that kind, but only with making a
false entry. .The learned Attorney
General stressed that point to you
more than once, But on the other
hand, you can well ask yourself
whether, if these conditions pre-
vailed and the situation was as it
was, whether there was the pos~
sibility that the rum could have
disappeared between 31st August
‘and 14th perenne: whether it +4

ssible for you when you com
ot consider your verdict, to say
that on the 31st the return made
was not correct, _
could not have been there.

And here you will also bear in
mind the letter written by the
accused and the statement made.
That letter and that statement
show unmistakably that the ac-
cused knew of the conditions pre-
vailing at the rum bond. But you
will ask yourselves whether—and
you will do that when you come
to study the letter—whether the
fact that he knew of these condi-
tions meant that when he made
the entry on that particular date,
he must have known that that
entry was not correct and that
he made it with the intent to de-
fraud.

The two things do not neces~
sarily hinge one on the other. The
mere fact of making an incorrect
entry does not mean that he did
it with intent to defraud. You
will ask yourselves whether
under the particular circum-
stances this intent to defraud
would arise, Because from the
evidence, the rum there is in the
custody of the Government, not
the accused.

An Example

Suppose for instance, the ac-
cused or anybody else was run~
ning a shop for D. V. Scott, and
the goods, rum, or whatever it
may be, were in the charge or
posssesion of whoever it may be.
Scott under such a circumstance,
would be acting on the assump-
tion that this rum or whatever
it may be, is in the possession and
care and control of this shopkeep~





“SAMCO”
SAFES

FIRE AND BURGLAR

RESISTING
Body plate (top, bottom
and sides) of one steel
plate bent by hydraulic

pressure, %” solid steel door
plate, wrought steel cham-
bers’ 2144” to 3” in thickness
filled with best quality fire-



er, and therefore the figures sup-
plied to him by this shopkeeper
are those which must correspond
to the rum in the particular shop.
If these figures are wrong, the
ebvious inference is the intention
to defraud. The bond is not_in any
sense in the custody of the ac-
cused, but Government, There are
people in charge of the safeguard
of that rum. Scott knows that if
the rum had not been shipped oy
anything, it is in Government's
possession, Government’s control,
Government’s care, and it is for
Government to see about the safe-
puarding of this rum. Therefore
when you compare these instances
that are parallel, it will assist
you in coming to a conclusion on
this question ofsintent to defraud.
As I said, if it was the shopkeeper
who had this rum in his control,
and the figures he supplied were
incorrect, there could only be that
intention—to defraud. If the rum
is in the safe keeping of Govern-
ment, Scott would tell himself if
it has not been shipped, it must be
there.

As I said, that analogy will help
you at arriving at your conclu-
sion, though it is a matter for
you,

Letter And Statement

As I say, you will bear in mind
the letter the accused wrote, and
tthe statement. The learned Attor-
ney General has told you that the
knowledge of the accused is best
got from his own statement. In
reading that, you will read the
whole in relation to the whole
state of affairs,

Here is this position in which
the defendant finds himself, to use
his words, in difficulty. Well, he
unburdens himself as any man
might do, to somebody else. The
best man he thinks about is Jones,
and he writes a letter to him, He
says in his letter: “I have to mus-
ter all the courage in my frame to
face Mr. Scott.” You will ask
yourselves as men of experience
and knowledge of the world,
whether it would not have been
better for him in a much earlier
stege of the proceedings to muster
his courage and face Mr. Scott,
put his cards on the table, and
say what the position was.”

His Lordship said that in con-
sidering the letter they had to
consider whether it reflected the

mind of the man who was in
trouble, in difficulties, and not
necessarily one who had a

criminal mind. They should read
the letter with the statement he
had made, and consider both in
the light of all the evidence.

The Officer in charge of the
bond had said that the deficiency
might have or might not have
taken place after the entry was
made and before it was realised
it was missing. The Officer in
eharge had also said that Squires’
returns might have been correct,
and Mr. Scott had said that his
entry was a correct entry of what
should have been there, But they
were not to isolate these in-
stances, but take them in rela-
tion to all the other evidence. It
still might be that one statement
might illuminate the — situation
like a searchlight suddenly
switched on in a dark room,

They would remember Mr,
Thorpe had said that he had
never visited the bond 4 night
with Mr. King to deliver rum

to a merchant and it was for them
to decide whom they would be-
lieve Mr. Thorpe, or Mr. King
who said that he did go with him.
Then there was the question of
the duplicate key of which Mr.

that the rum Thorpe did not know.

-

The jury retired for about half
an hour and then returned the
verdict of not guilty.

Man Fined

His Worship Mr. C. L Walwyn
Police Magistrate of District ‘A’
yesterday fined Arnott Griffith a
25-year-old labourer of Black
Rock, St. Michael 20/- for the
unlawful possession of a quanti-
ty of sugar which he was convey-
ing along the Wharf.



The fine is to be paid in 14
days or in default 14 days’ im-
prisonment with hard labour.



Conimunist Women
Protest Against

American Troops

BERLIN, Aug. 28.

Half a hundred ‘Communist
women demonstrated in front of
the United States High Commis-
sion Headquarters against the
presence of American troops in
Berlin, The women carried signs
demanding that the troops stop
their daily training exercises in
the adjacent Grunewald forest.
= Berlin police dispersed the
mob.

—U.P. *

| CLOSED FOR STOCK-TAKING
Re-opening on MONDAY, ist SEPTEMBER

Attractive Merchandise at Reasonable Prices

oe
Sor

ADVOCATE



Inquest Again

THE inquest into the circum-
stances surrounding the death ol
Cecil Hope a chauffeur oi
Jackmans, St. Michael, was
further adjourned yesterday until
today by His Worship Mr. E. «..
McLeod Police Coroner of
District “A.”

Cecil. Hope died some hours
after he was admitted to the
General Hospital on August 3
Yesterday two more witnesses
gave evidence in the inquest.

Inspector G. Springer said that
on August 3, he went to the
Britton’s Hill Police Station about
4.45 a.m., and saw Cpl. Edwards
and 2 number of Police constables
in the Charge Office. There was a
prisoner at the Station and he was

lying on the floor of the Charge
Office.
Cpl. Edwards reported to him

that the prisoner had given his
name as George Garnes of Jack-
mans, St. Michael and had been
arrested during the night tor
loitering in the Pine Hill,

The prisoner was wearing
erocus bag shirt underaeath
outer shi:t and had a_ revolver
which had been siolen on some
previous occasion when there was
a xobbery near Waterford Plan-
tation,

Cpl. Edwards said that the
prisoner had rushed to the front
door and “burst” it open and had
fallen down the. steps..

“TI looked at the prisoner who
appeared to be sleeping and shook



him but he made no response.
The prisoner was taken to Dr.
Cate who ordered him to the
General Hospital,” Inspector

Springer told the Court,

Police Constable 457 Sandiford
said that on August 3, he arrived
at the Britton’s:Hiil Police Station
with the motor van and reported
his arrival to the Orderly.

He went in to the Station Office
and saw Cpl. Edwards and other
policemen there. About 4.30 a.m.,
while sitting in the van, he heard
a crash and then heard someone
shouting for “Stop him, Stop him.”

He went to the entrance of the
Station and on entering saw a
man lying on the floor. Inspector
Springer arrived soon after and
the man was taken to the General
Hospital.

Airline Men Claim
They Should Fly
The Queen

‘R.A.F. Are Not The Best’

By JAMES STUART

Who should fly tae Queen’s
wirplane? Except im special clr
curmstances she flies in a Viking
of the Queen’s Flight, wnich is &
Royal Air Force unit.

Some airline pilots are now
suggesting that the job should be
taken out of the hands of the
RA#-and given to the most ex-)
perieneed airline skippers. {

j



Comment on this discussion
comes from Aerius in the jour-|
nat of, the British Air Line
Pilots’ Association, The Log. Bu, |
said an official of the Association, |
these views are his own, and not
in any way the. views of , the!
Association, i

Aerius js a well-known Brit-}
ish Overseas Airways Corpora-
tion pilot, !

He says: “There can be na}
doubt that those who are en-
trusted with the Queen's, lite}
should be of the highest ex-}
perience available,

“When she travels by sea her

ships are commanded by men
with many years at sea; her
chauffeurs have sat in the

driving seat for countless years;
her engine drivers have spent a
lifetime on the tracks.”

Aerius suggests that it is RAF
practice to promote the ‘good
chaps,” with an inevitable switch
from the cockpit seat to an ad-
ministrative chair, “The men
who regularly fiy are the junior
officers,” he says.

“It is my feeling that a special
organisation should be set up to
take care of the Queen’s Flight,
and that its pilots should come
from the ranks of the most
senior airline pilots — from the
ranks of those with 30 years in
the cockpit...

“Such an honour would be the
most strived after position in the
realms, of air transport, and
would form a fitting climax to
the careers of men who had
devoted their lives to the cause
of the air.”

Navigation Experts

The Queen could fly to the
ends of the earth and still know
‘hat her pilots, at least, had all
been, there before,

The RAF pilots of the Queen's
Flight are all “Green Ticket”
men, experts at navigation and
bad weather flying.

In theory any of them can be
selected to fly the Queen, but
usually her pilot is Wing-Com-
mander R. C, E. Scott, AFC, a
34-year-old New Zealander.

He joined the Royal New
Zealand Air Force just before
the 1939-45 war and transferred
to the RAF in 1940. He has spent!
two-and-a-half years in the;
Royal Flight.

—L.E.S.



WITH

in All Departments
and LOTS OF BARGAINS



Cave Shepherd

10. HW, 12 AIS Mread Street.



|
motion on the matter so. tha |
:
{

rebuilding of






Sanitary Commissioners

Adjourned Accept Pians For Market







PAGE FIVE



LABOUR FINED FOR
WOUNDING







; Lovell, a labouter of

ckie} Christ Church + was

rday ordered to pay a fine

3 or the erection of the proposed distric Dy 5/+ im 14 days or 14 days’

z L. ANS ior the erectio the propose 4 listrict market impriaoneneat ler: fix Weenie

at Eagle Hall, drawn up t srs Clarke and Tucker, wr ct. Walwyn, Police Mazis-

were received and accepted by the Sanitary Commissioners trate of District “A”, for in-

.M | at their meeting held at the Parochial Build- flicting bodily harm on sethe

ngs yesterday Licorish on January 21.. Lovell
eh appealed.

These plans and specifi

drafting expenses were forv

passed on to the Governmei

Present at the meeting wer
Mr. J. M. Kidney, (Chairman) |
Mr.. C. B. ayfe, Hon. V. C.}
Gale, M.L.C. Mr. E. D. Moitley,
M.C.P. and Mr. Victor Chase, }

by

Mr. Ben Gibson was present
invitation,
sence oi

Wilkinson
chairman,

Excuses for the al
Mr. Goddard and M
were offered by | th«

Mr. Mottley moved and Mr,
Victor Chase seconded «tie mc
tion that Mr. M. Gill be appoint

ed Sub-Sanitary Inspector ol i
the parish. Before the appoini-/
ment of Mr, Gill, Mr. Ben Gibso.) |
was asked: by the Chairman i |

say something of Mr, Gill's



Extra Heurs OF Work

The Commisstoners for tha]
second time postponed considera
tion of a letter from Mr
Motiley with rerard to, an
application from the Inspeete: |
supervising the labour of the de- |
partment, for remuneration for}
extra hours of work. On thi:
matter the chairman said that|
the Board had had some diseus.,
sion on the matter at thei la
meeting and after refusing «7 -]
plications from other member }

of the staff they could not now}
go back on their décision, j

Mr, Mottley said that Mr, Wi? -/
kinson and Mr, Goddard ha
seen the reasonableness in 1)



application and that was why i |
was placed on the agenda tho |
first time. The chairman aske
Mr, Mottley to make a ne

eould be considered at the nex
meeting of the Commissioners.
The Board granted an applice
tion from Barclays Bank for the
their premises tu
Plans have alread:
been submitted,

Bread Street.



Cor Damaged

The right front fender and ax}
of the motor cer L-101 owned an
deiven by Ivan Sobers of Checi
Hall, St, Luey were damaged whe
the car was invelved in "i
accident on Black Rock road, *
Michael with the motor bus M-3°
the property of the National Bu
Co., and driven by Beresford Tull
of Fitts, Village, St. Michael abou
11,55 a.m., yesterday.




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Licorish said that the defen-
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body.

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4650 Workshop :
%




PAGE SIX



ip eps sinister tte mene
FREDERICK — On Avgust 2, 1952,
Leonard Frederick blacksmith), His
funeral Will leave St, John’s Intirmary
at 4.36 to-day off St. John's Cometer,
Eilene (widow), Curnus, Celestine,
Mareia, Anderson (vhildren), Wini-
fred Worrell and Miriam Green

(sieters). ‘The Codrington family,
29,8.62—1n



SKEETE—At her residence Marine Square
Lower Westbury Road, St. Michael
yesterday. Charlotte Albértine; age
year. The funeral wi.i leave the aboy
residence at 4.00 p.m. to-day for S*
Legnard’s Church

John, Fred, William Skeete (sons
Thamonda Seale, isis Phillip
Gladys Bryan, Fulvia Niles, Leon
Carter, Allen Skeete (daughters;
(New York Papers please copy)
29.8. 52—tn



F@eR GENT

mate - aon
HOUSES

a ee

APARTMENT at “Cardiff!” Tin Aven:

BelleVilie, to an approved tenant fro:

ist October 1052. priv Mrs. Percy }
Burton. Telephone 3528 29.8. 52-~



BRIGHTWOOP-—St. Lawrence post f,
nished from Ist September. Apply Joh
M. .Bladon & Co. Phone 4640. Plant
tions building 29.8.52—-1

BUNGALOW — To An Approved Te.
ant. Bungalow Modern Sea-Side, ful)
furnished Bungalow. Excellent ses
bathing. For further particulars Appi:
to No. @ Coral Sands, Worthing.

s 24.8. 52—30

RUNGALOW-—On Sea, Main Road Has:

Â¥ comfortably furnished, Piny

lish’ bath — 2 hedrooms Servanis

coms ~—- Verandahs -- From Septembe:
‘elephone 2949. 16,8 52—t.f,

rs perpen

BUNGALOW-—Small Bungaiow at Ba:

Geld Beach, St. Peter. Comfortably fur

nished. Refrigerator, Two bedroon

eee mr . Garage ete. From Sox
. $



“CHELIIOLME” Chelsea Gardens, us
furnished, Tnaspeetion Duily 4—8.
26.8.52



5
i

emergence een
FLAT — From ist September. V+
modern, fidly furnished, seaside 4.1
Telephone, Gna stove Blectric vefriger. |
tor. ete Maresol Beach WFPiats, §&
Lawrence Gap Phone a



ete nema =



7 ; leaders who have risen to promi-

7.9.92", |tade sharpeners, ete.” Dial 4018 Cour-{2-cars. Water and electric services in| ting war prisoners. Peiping ic! "y» Touch With Barbados |nence § duri ,

A ‘ an uring the occupation

Sak From lat Sepremb. Cottar> | esy Garage. 23,8.52—6n.[ stalied. In tion by appointment wit) said that this was the only solu- . period
k—From Ist September a Cottnt.: | 4 — the tenant Mrs. Roach,» Dial e461. tion to the deadlock on repatria-| Coastal Station .

at White, St. Michael. All mode | The above will be set up for sale a* | 1 a eat N,| CABLE AND. WIRE TW.) Lta., |, Y0Shida came to office on Octo-

Headley, Whitchall Road. : | MESCELLANKOUS eave comenipe ine Sth wxteat ieee han ani ares t oN. advise that they can now communicate ber 19, 1948 after a bribery scan-

97 .8.52- 2 SOO y Bus “\has pointbla refused to with the following ships through their| dal cause the downfall of Prime

3 | Sehigaeseishacminniatemiiaiecimintpeaaemtces Ee POTCHINSON & BANFIELD. |any prisoners who do not want to! Parbados Coast Station:- r Minister Hitoshi Assida. He was

“MARIO”, Newly built Bungalow ai BUTTER-—Cooking Butter in 261b Tin 17.8.52—-6n.| go back to Communism, The Red s Thorshov, s.s Isaparodi, 8.8, . -
Kew Rond,. near Spooner’s Hill ecor-

teining drawing, dining, 3 bedrooms wit!
roping water, Garage, possession iron)
ist_ September 1962. Apply FR. Archer
MoKenzie, Victoria St, Dinl 2947,

bt 29.8.52-—8n

* SUMM SET", St. Lawrence Gap--
From September. Wully furnished, 4
bedrooms, “Safe sea-bathing. Apply
He god, St. Lawrence Gap

29.8. 52—~in

ae tr a tte

WANTEW

pats }

- MISCELLANEOUS

iin aeannoamnaneraeeeaiititinanee

A PARROT CAGE — State condition
and price to NORA C/o, Advocate,

29, B.52——Jn

ne pate epee ena omen at

a ee Dae ts any gees:
food price pald, Apply Thani Bros. [fr
Wm) Henry Street, Diat 2408



28.8. 52—:

Denmark Will
Sell Britain
Bacon Cheaper

LONDON, Aug. 28.

. Dénmark agreed to supply
bacon to Britain at a lower price,
according to the British Food Min-
istry. Under the new two-yea:
contrect~agreed upon at Copenha

germ, bacon will be supplied at eighi
per cent. Less during the yer

ending October 2, 1953. This pric«
may be varied during the secon’
year by mutual agreement by not
more than 10 per cent. Denmar!

is Britain’s largest appa of
bacon, The price cut will not low-
er the cost te the British consumer
sinee bacon is subsidized and gov

ernment will lower the subsid)
accordingly. ee

Gairy Plays In
Cricket Match

GRENADA, Aug, 28
In apparent cynical pr oe
of a large section of the com-

munity and the resurgence o°
the agricultural strike wave
Gay this afternoon joined :
Randtul, of St. David M.M.W.U
strikers in a cricket matic? ©
Tariteen prounds St. George's
this. afternoon with a union
banner staked. on the boundary
Spectators were few however til!
near the closing stages when
some disinterested town work~
ers idied on the road nearby.
The strike sftuation remains
unchanged _ but rts in the
erea tell the likelihood of an
attempt at an island wide
strike call perhaps oe base
on. the prospects a, wags
boost Staten ough this is un-
officially. notified. :







FOR NICE
THINGS TO
ist |

*, KOO BAKED BEANS
} NS RN 2 cc ccits wacanen

25
K.L.B. PEARS in tins" .43
Kc? PEARS ,, ,.. .16
K “WEET

ue no” 39 |

IMPERIAL SAU-
SAGES
BEEF LOAF. ,.\ .60

And for The BEST to Drink
COCOA MALT
TONO~

Our Popular

FIVE STAR RUM



SS



“LASSIFIED ADS.

TELEPHONE 25086

perenne se nin ne rr

{ trailers, Ete, Dial 618—Courtes +




ons
4 |
INCE & Co., Ltd. |



BARBADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY, AUGUST 29, 1952

(POMLIC SALES |Went By Plane |) | Jap Premier GOVERNMENT NOTICE
|

















































REAL ESTATE : | But Returned SEA AND AIR Dissolves SHORTAGE OF WATER

UGA ystems an Baaglow The public are requested to exercise the greatest care in the

e - ~
Parliament use of water and to report any leakage to the Waterworks Depart-

| FoR same [Sette Qn Bieyele | JRARIC |

The house contyins Drawing end Din



ment (Telephones: day 3715, night 3725).





Oo. aaeeiiiee hing water) breaktast. roma, “citehen-| WITH THE FIRST MARINE || : TOKYO, Aug. 28. Unless full co-operation is received immediately, the use of
AUTOMOTIVE ctle, usual vonveniences, Garage und AIRW)NG IN KORBA, | In Carlisle Bay The Japanese Premier, Shigeru | water for gardens, etc., will have to be prohibited,
"






: sale ie “aptai ‘harles iis «t|_S.8. “Lady Nelson”, 4,695 tons, from}called for new general elections | ~~ i
CAR—Otie 8 b.p. Austin Car; one[ Sle Public competition at our Office} Captain Charles Willis «f| "yh he sclaon tons, , $
model B. P. Ford, Phone S002 C, R. James Street on Friday 12th September | Doucette, Texas started out Of Vavente: “Mane Ainddbont Auaie ee for October 1, the first to be helri wm Ooric

ee appointment. Dial 2850, (His first Korean mission in 4} Sloop “Signet”, 10 tons. from Tortola, in Independent Japan since the ai

Applewhaite, Lakes Folly. 29.8.52—3n






















= ; weir ‘ came back|Uréer Ceptain R. O'Neale; Agents: |end of occupation.

wolbing citer, dies. instal. abe Se eared hak Rg bicycle. ee srhooner, Ormase | Auecuarates "The dissolution came in re- “

Â¥ : . ? _ . EPARTURES ; ~ S

Swan Street, Dial 4559 or 8417. c pie een %.8.52—-10n | Wijlis’ plane ran short of fuel| S.S. “Bruno” 1549 tone, under Cap-|Sponse to demands from opposi-

30-8-82— 9» | “CLARENDON—Biack Rock, St Michae!,{@S he was returning from ajtin A Helberg tor San Juan tion parties, the press, and mem- ; . y Ni The M/V “CARIBBEE” will
CAR—One (1) Four seater Standard ; | 0PP0site St. Stephen's Church. Standin«/combat mission on tihe west 00st) isin A Ruytenhes for Pik ynder Cap-|bers of Yoshida’s own Libera! | TO-DAY'S NEWS FLASH accept Cargo ond Passengers for
H.-P. tourer in good working order, Apply Pe ot gy AP aap OM osibintie, |and the thirty-year-old pilot was] ‘ F oe Party. Dominica, Antigve, Montserrat
; orn eee ' Resi : ntcninmiiinesmananatitincn tes na ; Be
_sp [for Mortgage can be arranged. Apply: |forced to parachute over allied E. These groups pointed out ihet ond tember, 1952
O° 29.0.0a--am | for Mortaage can be arranged actiters ie Uaaaed te Gotten SEAWELL GREY AIR LETTER Tuesday Sep

the present government and the FORMS—Ready Gummed

—_—_—_—_—— E ARRIVALS

CAR—Hillman Minx—Excellent condi- ae __.__. 7-8-5271" | field near a schoolhouse and i= | mVEDNESDAY, 27TH AUGUST Diet were elected three and a hali |! 69) peer ENE — For Bind- The M/V “MONEKA” will
poke Seceth Rete ee eee eee Offers Will be received in writing u»|Mmediately was surrounded by 200/from Yrimidad: 2 years ago under Allied ocupation | LD — aceept Cargo and Passengers for
crcned ik ta. nears tedantine is (Phone | 12,4gem. Tuesday. 16th, September i952. | children. otmuntngs, O° Aste, eee 3: |and do not now represent the | ing 5S Bevel Nevin and St. itis, ‘Dute ot
4324). 27.6,90—t..n. | Sok Me servants room at Glendale. (Res'- | Willis walked to the road and| miller, G. Van-Wagenngen, P. Pempro,| Will of the Japanese people. | — For Binding

Sailing to be notified
B.W.1. SCHOONER OWNERS

SAMSONITE
gether With a quantity of oid lumi. | Started back to the base. A Korean |S. Tempro, P. Tempro. B. Parkinson | Yoshida said that he will seek re- | Wood, China Ete.

aud greenheart. Also separate offier:;|policeman came along on aj,?"d M. Parkinson. election and again appea ~ 1
for a quantity of old gaivanize sheet Revels and insisted Sa the | Prem Venessela: a = Ptr

MORRIS 5 ton Trucks with auxiliary
gear box. Morris 10 ecwt, Vans and
Pick-Ups. Two Four Door Minors



At ; :
* ASSOCIATION (ING.
: ; eee M. Nunez, tero, ers for a chance to head the new ’
Morris Oxfords. from stock now. | #ebeclon of the items can be made ol fier take it to get home. H Seenz, M. Soens and J, Saewr””” | Government. S JOHNSON’S Consignee Tele. No. 4047
we ealting, ort Royal Garege Lid-15 m. and on Saturdays between the | Seven milesslater Willis came] py, gyenaga ree A eTURES Yh a statement announcing th: | {i STATIONERY
‘ 8. . hours Fee We sopination to Dr jup to his headquarters and asked | j4. Brathwaite, R. Williams, R Brigg, | @issolution of the Diet, the Cabi- |}

nla
USED CARS—Available from stock: a
cod assortment of luding
forris Oxford,, Austin i) Vauxhall
Velox. Courtesy Garage. Dial 6.
23.8.52—6n

ct }
Kk. SANDIFORD, if “anyone was looking for me?” | A. Nicholls, C, Lusan, D. Alexander, B. net said: “To further postpone == = y
ChurehWarden, St. Thomas Next day Willis flew back to the| Ai “ender, M. Lowe, G. Lowe, ©. George general elections might ecomane

'
29.8.52—4 so - in ag oe na >. te oan ie and stimulate political and finan- ep . N “
aan ak Pwaedaide toad. es tributed a g of cookies} M. Patel, R. Taaffe, C. Evans, R.| cial unrest. . tli t al t hi
° Twe ad, :
ond light ineealied, S800 ft. var kiss he had persuaded the mess ser-!Cieveland, Sir G. Seel, E. Johnson, K. and an a 1on eams fis



CSB.4.







: Johnson, M. Johnson, D. Johnson, J. The Yoshida Government was
ELECTRICAL See at tase, eee ee athe oy [Beant to make, Phillips, FE. Moreelle, G. Blenman, C.|to have .completed its term of
be ymore Rock, price $1,500. t —U-P. Power, B. Power, A. Power, M. Katkins,
nd can be rented also smail houses i) . . | office in five months. .
islet ensiok bllnsigtl various districts from $600.00. One () M. Lewis, O. Hull, G. Chan-Sing, L. ‘ : SOUTHBOUND
ol = —_e Tne - ~-egusclon THuae ino eebine aris Carrasquel, O. Carrasquel, M.’ Culver- Sources close to Yoshida said Sails Sails Sail. Arrives Sail
Dial cop WOKE 23, panes Price $560.00 Apply Jos. St, Hill, Rex! | 2 s neues, w Cuiverbouse, K. Culverhouse,} Yoshida notified Emperor Hiro- Montreal Halifax Boston Barbados Barbados
| | Botte Agent, Tweedie Road ox Dye | TUSISTS = suMshet Menthe: H. MeLeod, F- | hito of his decision to dissolve the |
PYE CAR RADIOS-—6 Tube with R.i’, | 127. 27.0,62—1.. | p eo

el, R. h, J. Thi ; CANADIAN STRUCT
sear 6 ee TET econ A ee ; C. Richmond, K. 'Kucieh. G: Kueich, N- a. i this week when Pe LADY RODNEY SO oh ae asept.- Beni. 18 Sept

7 | ate ae ited | “CSTIRLING", a two-storeyed stonewal! inntity, call early, P, C. 8, Meffei dwellinghouse “in feneras Sener On Return Of Moetrmann, C. Preltes, D. Preites, R.|Nasy Ynountain’ villa, FAY Sen aca a Sep P 24 Sept. 25 Sept.
STRA’ mi

Co., Ltd. 27 .8.62—t.2.n,









tas | ri ti ; 100 miles 2 Sept. 2% Sept. 27 Sept. 6 Oct. 7 Oci,
r;} rn * a a
ee YDB, (St. Michael, standin. Pewee Pee north of Tokyo.
RADIOW-il Tube” Phileo Radio wit, {| 7,068 square feet of ‘and, and ton Tr e . NORTHBOUND
Bendepread in good Wecking cuivt. Ave ,| taining open and closed verandahs, draw- ar risoners V._Dominquez, J. Alvarez, N. Saade,| _ Only the house of Represente- Arrives Satis Arrives Arrives Arrives
Lashiey Ltd, 20, Swan Street ing and dining tsome, 2 Bedrooms, eac’ A one = Mag an 9 Se beaee tives will be affected by the disso- GER Barbados Barbados Beston Heallifax Mentresi
29.8. a running water, en C., ane: | % " sein, - J. Souto, . i CAN. CHALLEN -- u; 2 Sept.
c 0 8.000 Taal eemventinces. ‘Whter and Misetriel Souto, B, Souto, C. Souto, G. MacMurray, |!Ution, The House of Councillor: Ni ere 28 Aug. 30 Aug. 9 Sept. wt. 14 Sept.
ty installed. Garage ane Bervasta’ x00 MUNSAN, Korea, Aug, 28, A. Venderdoll and E. Vanderdol! ae ere is not affected b» ABADI beothcc ad ice Ps So" Fa Sept. — 4 Sept. 23 Sept.
im yard, unist ¢ amatcn: . e changes in erm AN STR! « Sept. — 9 Oct 12 Oct.
MECHANICAL Inspection on application to Miss Brev | 4 Com ae inet a Pmeagg od its!" R. Legge and J. Legge ng Government, at wae | eet. Beet 1 Oe: te et, te oot,
‘ ‘ Parkinson, Strathclyde. Dial 2452. emand that the United Nations |For Antigaa: October e1ections promise to be | CANADIAN CHALLENGER 6 Cet. 8 Oct. — @ Oct. 24 det.
alent : ——-—-| ‘The property will be set up for sale | give up plans to “hold. hack]. Greaves, Bp ise to LADY NELSON be ha 19 Oct. 21 Oct. 20 Oct. ‘Bi Get. 4 Nov.
FERGUSON AGRICULTGRAL EQUIP-} bY public competition at our office | prisoners” if it wants a truce in For Puerto Rico: i one of the most dramatic, if noi
MENT, including ‘Traetors, ‘ames Street, Bridgetown, on Frida | : " J. Parker, G. Starling. D. | Peterkin, | the most bitterly fought, in Jap- Tr
29th August at 2 p.m eng ~ There were no meetings at /R Haynes, L. Curnmings, L. Mayers, M 7.

Crass mow earth L t i 2 $e)
boxes, "Cane “carts and Hvaraulle tip YRARWOUD & BOYCE, ~|the Panmunjom truce camp. The! Mivers, J Mayers, G. Mayers, 0. Wilx-|@nese history. Wartime politica! | vor turtner particulars, appty to—
Ot

Solicitors. it talks were in the midst of |7°°?: V. Burgie, Prof. C. Bourne, B.|and military figures who wer¢

"| the fifth consecutive weekly re-| ‘mot, C. ‘Webster, “A, “Weraer ad |2Ut8ed from public life by the} GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD.—Agents.
“THURCISDON” on the sea at Max | cessi, Neither side has been able! "- Drayton occupation will be running for the

* : first time, They will o
l’s Coast, Christ Church, standlag © i pose ney
‘S oda ey perches of 1AoeA “Gat age fo to agree on a solution for rep tria-

erage. 2.8. 52—6r .

ee RCN e+

MASSEY-HARRIS AGRICULTURAT.
EQUIPMENT — including TRACTORS,
Grags cutters, Rakes, Loaders, knife















Sh ‘Tins ant iM Ting, Aluw tib Pacit.
Anchor Table Butter. W. M. FORD, 55.
Tloebuck Street. Dial 3489.

\propaganda voice also sadosedl| CNETS 2.& Afvionn Moos, 9.1, Bonaire 1949. cle the = tem da ‘on ~
rier Mee eneied te. Me a les, Tagelus, 5.s, Silverteak, ss. Aleoa elections. ida w re-
Govtia "Manning to offer for sale hee} United States warplanes of 422/Clipper, s.s. Atlantic Transporter, 5...

miestanonion
: ant ; > : respect of ocupation leaders for | » T ;

preperty “Flodden” in, Culloden Road {mew — “violations” of Chinese) )* Star ©. Paris Clip: so. Tin’ tthe way in which he guided |% CG" RAN SATLANTIQUE
Atlantic Princess, s.s. Urania, s.s. | Japan through stormy days of |. y



26 .8.52—2n

BAROMETERS, Thermometers and The house contains five bedroom: territory from July 25 to August

dining room, brenkfast room, loung



















































tivd: Ae Cc i ad see rs 3 = = aa) Soeeies 5 Standella, s.s. Oranjestad, s.s. Rio| Red te i i .
wiagriglion of Whe recinon ing-fSUva fal? ge aay Sttl~ [Manchurian soll, ue? OF] achat... tain, ss mo be Lal trenty, and the (rarwition wp heec | Sallimge from Southampton to Guadeloupe, Martinlaue,
Lower Brond Street, or Dim Sins, “|About 4% eres or ee et | On August 16 a report from) Maria De Larrinaga, s.s. Samana, s.s, | Pendence,—U,P, se bados, Trinidad, La Guaira, Curacao & Jamaica
28.3.52—t.¢.n. eee 258) We . Mukden, “capital of Manchuria! Guadeloupe, * Wade: WwW ee ‘ x
ellis ltnsthainiealinlane te _ = aera if s ° a8! ’ 8 as Y.
iAS — cod Woent, corn] ye tila, asians, for |sald United States planes dropped) Hof Riis” Aarchatale S|
Blakes, All Bran, Rice Krispies and Oat- | 4, and rately. Inquirie mbs sou o nghsi and on! Siiedrecht and s.s. Corrales . e e From Sow 0.
flakes in Tin. W. M, FORD. (ial 24m, {O87 Of fhe land, separately, Inauicic:| A cust 15 bombed Antung big aii —_—_——_—sqX( German Socialists ee Aarne: Sathetes
me Larsen hae 2 pcan] Mower CARMINGTON §, stat. |base city just across the Yalu! RATES OF EXCHANGE May Fi *“DE GRASSE” .. 22nd Aug, 1952 .. 3rd Sept, 1952
cncmethsliialii-mnsieiindllbic time comengphiinntingeneniggittmmninsinis , 1° ver, Send NEW YORK Buyh :
GALVANWBED SHEETS — "A imivedf ee Dero péteone were said to bel 79 910% pr, Cheques on and Y favour *Not calling at Guadeloupe
quan of best quality English gaivan- 4 ss * Bankers 71 6/10% pr 7
ised aheots 26 ‘, very 1 ices injured, While the United Nations SAILING RBADO
Bint 2696, Auto fyre co. a Ga AUCTION sought to drive a wedge between Dumond Drafts 71 4/10% pr Ollenhauer | FROG Se S TO BUROPE
il Ae Raper rage eo pgaeacs "Seg aN North Korea, China and Russia,| 79 3/10% pr. Cable aeons From Barbados Arrives Southam;
TEAScRomeval’ Pes, eed” | YNDER THE IVORY HAMMER |Peiping retaliated by claiming)” 10 » Eowensy 19 MIB BE | the Soctalist Pasty Wilt ence, “COLOMBIE” .. 24th Aug, 1952 Sth Sept, i002
Gibbes Plantation, Bt. Peter, $8.00 por} By instructions received. 3 will sell on British casualties in Korea had] 50 pr Silver oat 20% pr. to follow the “reunited Cuban *“DE GRASSE” 16th Sept, 1952 & 26th Bent, 1952
: 10e, ) friday ugus' » a essrs. Chelse > CAN. ” -* ” ee
yeh eR ph 9.0.52—Sn | Garage, Piktola st! G) 1948: 10 41. | Mounted in recent weeks by more] 4 510°, pr. Cheanes on front” line laid down by the late * ee
“SURSCRIBD now to. the Deity| ferme CASH. Salem 2 Bun. British forves ne A Pr tor Demand Dratts 18.45% pre eas i Pamachsr, according “00 *Sailing direct to Southampton
: now oO ea Serms * sm, PY gtiscssweeneee erat ‘afts 78.45% pr. n :
geicersoh, Sappeney Medias ap Mes | vinchale aftitivrs. |american military folly.” |g s;iju ge. Summa arene B08 wr | Te added that there te litle doubt | §
i n y AL meer, c } 3/10%% RR EL os cen dF aeey y
fais Siew dee aces publication ir 26.8.52—44 —UP. 78 8/107 ir Gurrency 7 Lid pr that Erich Ollenhauer, Schuma- R. M. JONES & CO., LTD.,—Agents. :
Sondon, Cenigct Inn Gaile, C/o. Adve aos dresses ss CQUBONS 19 410% pr. ome Sepuay since 1946, will be | ‘s9OSogo6eesess6 cate 'O., he at epresentative 7 si % pr Silver * pr. confirm in the
tel. aitg. isto | POU MLIC NOTECRS U. as —_———_ by the ennuel ee cee |
TINNED MEATS—Corned Beef, Lunch- | -——-———-—-—_- >_> e C. W.L. Gets 200 : MAIL NOTICES opening in Sorted on Septem- 1
eon Beet, Roast Beef and Sausages: W THE ate a OLETY LIFE 3 Mails for Grenada by the Sch. May ber 24, WANTED
we Fe Nemworermnriny Lost Foner Bed Hospital | ic. 3! iior'2Pnsty War's ts noon, | ycT Pe BkeSS service said that poli- |
: ~~" | Kathleen Braithwaite, the Executrix Sut co Gh nee Aca ieee world have rhe : puarout nl ee
. . . © 220 pam, o e 3 . x
b the late Christopher Augustus Braith KINGSTON, JAMAICA, Mate ton Bt Lucia, Dominica, Mont- | Schumacher’s deuth, tore goat REPRESENTATIVE—Full time representative
Consta ula waite, having made xworn depositic: Aug. 28. cerrat, Antigun, St, Kitts, Bermuda, | about hi i * :
chat Poliey No. 14.400 on the fe of tie 1 A new teaching hospital at| Boston, Halifax’ and) Montreal. by tne They : pone nie successor. wanted for Canadian Life Insurance Co., in Barbados.
; iP. ris er ugustus raithwat » = adv son W s closed at 2 . . . sae : . *
Take Li ife-Savin has been lost, and having made applica. | U.C.W.I, will be ready for: work tka General Post Office As funnies Pareet timate statement on “he wore Application in writing are invited which will be treated
B | ion to the Directors tor the payment of | Monday morning, and docal {yn Registered Mail at 12 noon and | was that made.by O |§ in strict confidence. Apply: “Insurance Underwriter”
‘ thy monies due under the sanre medical authorities are losing no «ci! and Registered Mail at 2 p.m. | thy made. by Ollenhauer in | b v .
Courses NGTICE is heveby given that unless | fee in pPeincing. thie hosoitel ta oedinary Mallat 230 pen. on theta | {€ Memorial service for Schuma-| | ¢/o Barbados Advocate, 26.8.52.—5n.
any objection is raised within one.month s if ipl . nisl August, 1082 cher in Hanover last Sunday when
f the cate hereef, the said Policy monies | the service o e community. | “Matis for St. Lucia by the M.V. Lady | he said: “We have to complete his| 4
ng GRORGEBT AU a, [on Be Lit ae Ringson Shake anil Sc! Saleh uate ae: | ot without him, bute Miser | papery ss ea omag
F .G » Aug. 26, Gk. BROWNE, See Se eee een ec ia neon and te >| The fight for a new Germany not |
jn ltigetraas ea Ser tat Bitte { Wil begin fo "ocupy. University |i Mp i then Aura | Yet endes, the socal onder mot yet |g YOU CAN GET
- 8. ts 1952 arran reunificati “4 7
or of the local Somes: in \adamADOS. MURUAR Lats eaengeneae are completed in| many-in "treedom is ae Gen % GALVANISED NAILS
ithin the past week twenty-} 4s y 5 7 OLICY . a : tained, %
six N.C.O’s and men have earned| “OSWALD EVERTON JONES ‘having| The hospital buildings “aro Greek Freighter The integration. of the German| AT 30c. PER LB.
the Bronze Medallion of the} “de sworn deposition that Policy No.|capable of accommodating 200 i iS people in a Ei d_inter-| > fro
R v . $59 on bis life has been lost, and|/}eqs and all necessary staff have an eh he m---
Royal Life Soving Society in tesis} (\ving made application to the Directors | ih tin Pit ; Dama ed national community of German) : %
neld here and another fifteen} grant a duplicate of the same. been waiting for weeks readly ee E' people in a European and inter-! CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD ,
passed the first year's examina-} NOTICE is hereby given that unless for the go ahead, Nurses for the national community of peoples! + 4 ” ?
. : y oO month -| ‘WiCTOR j ig on + .
ion for First, Aid certificate off \ye"Gate hereof the duplicate Poles] NCW hospital are mostly Jo-) VICTORIA, British Columbia, | based on freedom and equally | ; PIER HEAD AND BROAD STREET. ‘
the St. John’s Ambulance ‘ar Will be issued tance rainy ut technica August 28, | still has to be completed. :
Brigade e eee 1 EN By Order, rsonnel from abroad are also} The Greek freighter “Eugenia * U.P. — 40UOEG9695599695909509565S0SH8H999999MGSHOSEOSS:.
Fully accredited examiners C. K. BROWNE, ere and have been keeping! (Chandris” docked in Victoria on i b sari ,

ee ide themselves in practice at King-

eo Wednesd with he rt plate
conducted the tests in both, ston Public Hospital so that the], e ‘re Abbads as eae ignatis

torn
prganisation should have no otter striking an uncharted reef
U.S. To Be Sea Serene MAING Next of ‘the Aleutien Islands a week
5 ago. Marine surveyors inspected
U.C.W.I, with completion of] '\2° :
Represented On this hospital will now be able the vessel, and it was believed

to give undergrads a full course that repairs would take about





Grenada Nurses
Celebrate







edicin' gery three weeks, The ship was return-
(From Our Own Correspondent) Coal-Steel Board in mi * and our ‘ ing from Japan at the time of s .
NADA, the mishap. : HE RIGHâ„¢
In celebration ef iis first anni- PARIS, Aug. 28. . 1 —(UP.) i m
versary, the Grenada Nurses’} The initial steps for official Reds Protest



United States representation at
the High Authority of the Euro~ 4 2 ° s APPRO °H
pean oal-Steel Community was Against Incidents 22 Injured In RE
announced by am H, Draper,}..__ SB sd San pe

junior United States special repre- PANMUNJOM, Aug. 28. ighway Crash

sentative in Europe. Following} Communist truce negotiators ;
talks with Jean Monnet, President | protested on Thursday against the| ALBUQUERQUE, New Mexico, gf vy
of the High Authority, Draper said | killing and wounding of 69 pris- Aug. 28.

that William M. Tomlinson has|oners of war in incidents which Twenty-two persons were in- pre

been designated as acting United|ihe United nations said were pro-| jured -- four critically, one

States representative to the Com~|voked by the Reds themselves. seriously—when a speeding gaso-

munity pending the final form of| A formal protest from North| {ine transport crashed into a

American, representation. Korean General Nam Il was|fos Angeles bound bus on the

Monta ieee eee seer sae handed to a laision officer at a|imain highway near here.

brief meeting. Nam’s protest was} Tihe rest of the 37 passengers
to discuss how Bust Steel Pool |244ressed to senior Allied negoti-| aboard the Continental Railways ENJOY THE MUSIC OF YOUR
ie S'S. and Britain, though not|*t0r Major General Harrison. | bus were shaken up but unin-
members, have signified their in-| Im his letter Nam asked the} jured and of 18 others injured,

, . | Allies to “immediately stop such|six were in hospital at Sandia ED MP ER
ie with weiMeaw. = brutal and cowardly action”. Nam “base here and the rest released BELOV. co Os Ss
—U.P. | Pointed out that the latest figures) after first aid treatment,
ON THIS BEAUTIFUL

LIPS -_.

RADIOGRAMS

Association has arranged = a
special programme of events for
the week August 31—September
5. Opening with services on Sun-
day morning at the Anglican and
Noman Catholic Churches, each
atterngon on succeeding days
there will be special lectures ‘io
whieh the public is invited. His
Sxcellency the Governor will
give the opening address when
Dr. L. M. Comissiong, Senior
Medical Officer, speaks on “Plan-
uing for Health,” with Hon, T. A.
Marryshow as chairman. Succeed-
1 speakers will be Drs. A,
soltysik, B, Rapier, C. L, Fergu-
on, Lioya Radix, C., Gun-Munro,
t. Japal and R. Courtenay and
he Chairman Hoh, FE. M, Gairy.
Chief Justice Jackson, Mr. A.
Norris Hughes and Sir Clement
Malone.

The series will conclude with
2 dance,





NOTICE ANNOUNCING



Readers and Subscribers
to the ADVOCATE News-
paper in Maxwell Road and



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lescing or simply need »
heaith-building tonic,
YEAST-PHOS is the answe
to your problem. Vitamin:
aod minerals combined in
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a ne

surrounding districts are VERI-THIN BETTY -A watch she'll treasure @ Nicely styled and finished Cabinet
asked to note that we have for its alluring beauty and faithful accuracy. @ Two record Chambers.
@ Three speed Automatic Changer
@ Twelve inch ticonal-speaker
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appointed Mr, Clyde Jones, 15 Jewels, Gold filled, guaranteed $81.60
Top Rock, Christ Church, OTHER MODELS to $140.71
as our distributing agent || Gents’ GRUEN WRIST WATCHES





ti yOR THE for the districts as from $81.04 to $163.21 aa |
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be SET SE ca ee || ES ESSE:


&



FRIDAY, AUGUST 29, 1952 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE SEVEN

A NNR Stns



mK 4 Cine

The popularity of John White shoes is built on
VALUE, as well as DEPENDABILITY. Comfort
and style ?— Yes, certainly— they are as easy-
fitting and smart looking as you could wish. But
od Es their outstanding VALUE is what men expect and
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TO HELP US..DID THAT MEANS THIS MOB Stores throughout Barbados,
HE SAY ANYTHING }< s WILL STOP AT NOTHING
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TRAFFIC ALIVE.



HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON



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——

PAGE EIGHT



The South

Local Batting And

Bowling Averages

(By O. S. COPPIN)

THE SOUTH AFRICAN tour-of Australia opens on
October 24 with a four day fixture against Western Aus-
tralia at Perth, The South Africans will play twenty-two

matches during their five months’ tour.

For those who follow International cricket critically,
I should like to point out that the South African tour is
most sensibly arranged according to recent
teams touring Australia other than the recent

team,

There is no question that the first Test match at Brisbane on
West Indies were clearly defeated December 5 after playing

by Australia, That is admitted first class matches.

and therefore any reflection on
the tour should be construed in
the light of valuable experience
gained that must be chronicled
and kept for future reference and
mistakes made must never be re-
peated,

Criticisms

For this reason alone I must
refer to several criticisms of mine
made when the itinerary for the
West Indies tour was first an-
nounced and which criticisms
were supported at the end of the
West Indies tour by Lindsay
Hassett, Australian Test captain
and also by John Goddard, West
Indies captain.

My claim was that the West
Indies agreed to play their First
Test match against Australia too
soon and were called upon to
meet Miller, Lindwall and com-
pany for the first time in a Test
without having first met them in
a State game.

Let us compare the West Indian
list of fixtures with the fixture
list for the South African tour.

The W.I. Tour

The West Indies played two
two-day games, one against New-
eastle at Newcastle, and the other





Here is a list of the
which I suggest that readers of
this column cut out for future
reference :—

October 24—28, v, Western
Australia, Perth.

October 31—November 4, v.
South Australia, Adelaide.

FB vd 7—11, v. Victoria,
elbourne.

November 14—i8, v, New South Small time and space at my dis- I am warned to expect one big
Wales, Sydney,

November 21—¥2, v. New South for this period for batsmen whose
Wales Country, New Castle.

November 25—26, v. Queens- 3 innings of 25 runs each and
lang Country, Bundaberg.

November 28—December 2, v. each. England,
Queensland, Brisbane,

The difference between these
fixtures can clearly be seen, and
certainly the strange arrangement
to which the West Indies cricket
officials agreed in the names of
those who had to play the cricket
ihemselves is an obvious reason
why the captain-elect of a tour-
g team should be consulted in
matters of this sort.

The Fixtures

BATTING AVERAGES
(Qualification 3 Innings of 25 runs each)



ractice by
est Indies

five

fixtures

BARBADOS ADVOCATE





December 5—10, First Test,





prcbane WRONG-GRIP JAKE

December 12—16, v. Australia
Al, Sydney.

December 19—20, v. Victoria
Country, Ballarat

December 24—26—30, Second

Test, Melbourne, -
January 1—5, v. New South BO WLING
Wales, Sydney. F

January 6—7, v. New South

TIPPED AS TEST

SURPRISE

Wales Country, Orange.
January 9—14, v. Third Test, By DENIS COMPTON
Sydney

January 16—17, v. Tasmania,

WITH the Test rubber settled and Surrey home in ‘the

Hobart. championship race, next season’s visit from Australia is the
January 19~—21, v. Tasmania, big problem to be considered.

Launceston. Encouraging as have been this summer’s results, we.
- senpary 24—29, Fourth Test, must not forget that no country has won the rubber against

January 31—February 4, v. Australia since Douglas Jardine’s team went there in

Victoria, Melbourze. 1932-3.
Without being anything but

february 6—12, Fifth Test, optimistic about England’s pros- W

Melbourne. pects, I know that Australia will
February 14—18, v. South Aus- be mighty hard to defeat. ,

tralia, Adelaide. — Already Australia is preparing
February 20—21, v, South Aus- for the tour, One prominent!

tralia Country, Port Lincoln. cricketer there has sent me his
March 18—21 or 18—20, v. “unofficial” forecast of the players
Western Australia, Perth, who will come under Sir ald

i Bradman’s management—which is
a er ee. a Soe regarded as an automatic appoint-
of a few eading nm ment,
and bowlers this season. The According to my friend, another
Pe Pe aa ae ot — rig mg is Parag Lindsay Hassett
Pp ul e end o e w captain. ‘
series in'the First Division, As he proved last winter against
Since that time there has been the West Indies, Lindsay is still
a number of telephone calls and “ustralia’s best and most reliable
requests running into hundreds by batsman and I have no doubt
members of the sporting public that, given. normal form this win-
for the figures of their favourite te", he will readily accept tho

honour.
plaxers; Come-back
This cannot be done in the

surprise. My inrormant says that
37-year-old Jack Iverson, who an-
qualification for inclusion must be ee LT ee tone sy oe
. to make a come-back,

bowlers must have 10 wickets He is said to be keen to visit

posal but I have compiled figures

These are as follows: “Wrong-grip Jake’, as some
Australians call him, could make
a tremendous difference to the
side.

To my mind the one doubt
would be whether he could stand

against Queensland country xi at BATSMEN I. N.O. Total HS. Av woe strain of cricket six days
Townsville. They then played a DPD. Atkinson . 4 0 375 145 93.75 The histor
- 3 z ais : . y of tours has
aur Say, gave vs, Queensland at , 3. Williams 5 2 209° 94 69.66 proved the difficulty of keeping
In other words, they began C’ Aiking |. So 90 59.00 back a bowler primarily for th:
: “ ns +s ve go a 0 171 110 57.00 big games. It seldom works out
their tour on Qctober 26 and G, proverb:
played their first Test match at hfs ey a i + 5 2 170 117 56.66 that way.
Hrisbahs. on November @ after G. Hutchinson 5 2 156 68* 52.00 If Iverson dogs well this winter,
laying one first class match C, Hunte a 6 2 195 114 48.75 I have little doubt that he will be
: The South Africans play West- N. Marshall ze 3 0 137 117 45.66 invited. ’
ern Australia at Perth, South &- Harris 3 0 133 72 44.33 In that case, Australia’s Test
Australie, Victoria, New South J. Goddard 6 2 172 96* 43.00 bowling could well be the same
¢ 4 J. Greenidge .. 5 1 164 57* 41.00 88 that which allowed Freddie
Wales (Country xi and State) B ‘st t 300
Queensland (Country xi and 7. Birkett 6 0 232 134 38.66 eee ta aia i 0 Peeith a ant
State) before they meet Austra- ©. Cave 3 1 17 é2* 9B. See te et Milt Johnston, Jack
lia in the first Test Match, C. Smith ‘ é €¢ mm 10) ees ee
In other words, they begin their S- Rudder. ct eg 11 7 £2.00
tour on October 24 and play their C. Blackman (Police) 6 0 210 70 35.00 World’s fastest
Bers ep Ta NS AE tha 4s 4 1 104 51° 34.66
W. Farmer 5 0 170 69 34.00 Such an attack might be thought
CRICKET O. Fields 4 1 101 44 33.66 to be reaching the stage where it
C. DePeiza 6 0 197 78 32.83 is experienced but not exception-
erent N. Harris ” 3 1 63 49" 31.50 @lly fiery but in powers of pene-
F. King ea 4 2 62 ‘34% 31,90 tration I believe it would be al+
Umrigar Scores F. Tudor... % o.8 114 38 28.50 Most as strong as 18 months ago.
; x woe nT a : _ 198 * 27-33 Keith and a wens eT bow tans
Thir d Double RIND Lr 2% ‘ 7 106 58 26.50 er than any in the world. There’s
. no reason for complacency.
Century BOWLING Our need is to give our batsmen
: as much practice as _ possible
(From Qur Own Correspondent) (Qualification 10 Wickets) against fast bowling.
LONDON, Aug. 28. BOWLERS 0. M. R. W AV,. I would like to see a Test Trial
A great double century—his C, B. Williams .. +o) oe 16 283 31 9.12 next season with the probable
third of the tour—by Polly Umri- F. Phillips 67.5 13 149 15 9.93 batsmen pitted against Fred
gar enabled the Indians to finish B, Atkinson Si: vie 8. - A Bee ee ee ee
the second day of their match H, Barker 106.2 27 248 24 10.33 Supported by South African
with Kent at Canterbury in a K. Bowen i es 65 16 189 13 14.53 Cuan McCarthy, the fastest
strong position. Coming in after F. King .. e 88 Le te nae. OE ee ee
four wickets had fallen cheaply D, Atkinson 127.1 36-304 19 16.00. ¢eneem Sate Cuan Would Be ae
Umrigar flogged the Kent attack H, King 72.4 18 167 10 16.70 . ighted to help.
unmercifully during a stay of C, Bradshaw 60.4 9 212 12 17.66 One man ee oe for
nearly five hours. He was last G. Edghill 81.5 19 237 12 19.75 Shoniara thie oF : oe
out at 392 after having made 204. S, Headley 66 8 288 14 20.57 Carmbridge. s year’s captain o
Another century maker was E, L. G, Hoad 90.5 10 333 15 22.20 Several times before big matches
eee eal ee tenons Spree David has aseea Cuan to go t0 the
§ ae n m ,
Worcester was his first in first GOYS AND GIRLS MEET HERE ON SATURDAYS bowl flat out. arp ae,

class cricket.





SCOREBOARD—
Warwick
268 and 119
(Edrich 6 for :
Middlesex............ 163 and 41 foc
4. *

Leicester versus Somerset
Somerset..., wll.
Leicester, .325 for 3 (Tom-

kin 116, Parmer 105 not out).

Hants versus Worcester
Worcester... 203,
Hants...........475 for 9 (Dare 109

not out).





Lanes versus Sussex



Surrey versus Northants

Surx7rey, iss. 383 for 8 declared
and 43 for 2,
Northants.....,......283.

Kent versus the Indians
BOMB isis ds .evotisnnt 217 and 49 for 2.
The Indians............392 (Umrigar

204). i
Gloucester ‘versus Notts
PIOUS icispisitays: 311 for 6 declared.

Gloucester............ 323 for 7 de-

clared (Emmett 117, Young 99).

[ They'll Do It Every Time tcowet te
es = Mignon

| THE COMMITTEE.
AND I HAVE, AT

ASTER MANY HEH- HEH
BALLOTS, REACHED A

THE CHILOREN FARADE
PAST ONCE AGAIN=-
WE ARE PLEASED TO
ANNOUNCE THAT THE
WINNER IG +++













ay

ae

“€
a

ZL

ONE. KID WINS
{ AND THE JUDGES
= WIND UP WITH
200 ENEMIES
APIECE: ALL. \ ““2Z72m
Re eccnel // THERE QUGHT DO

Oe a

bea LLU
Soh 6h



Satchel Club

Trinidad to London—

David declares this has been
the fastest bowling he has faced
anywhere and says he feels the
better-equipped through having
played against it,

Old friends
Other names sent me are those

of our old friends Arthur Morris,
Neil Harvey, and Douglas Ring—







al 18 my dream came true “rhetlowine wou ve coming

No, 4 in a sporting series by E. McDONALD BAILEY C. McDonald, I, McDonald,

WAS 18, and had just left college, when the opportunity
‘ had ave 8 gf —‘ a came my way.
was a trip the Mother untry, and I was selecte
with three other athletes to run for “Trin an | Australia :
championships in 1939. I had worked hard for this selection,
and felt it was the just reward for my efforts.
I was to run in the 100 and 229 ; —

yards at the White City Stadium,
ind had my first experience of a
tinder track and of the huge
crowds, all ot which I found very
nerve-racking,

Fow people realised, not even
myself, that 1 should return to
become “A.A, dual champion
from 1946 to 1951, with one
exception—1948.

However, it was the experience
that mattered. I lined up in the
100 yards heat_ feelin: like a
nervous kitten, I was eliminated
at once.

My distance
But came the 220 yards, and.
after surviving the first round, f
Managed to reach the semi-finals.

Wx

AK




















E COMMISSIONER WAS
CHUMP TO TAKE ON THIS JOB»:
BETTER OECLARE ITA TIE
ALL AROUND, IF HE DON’T
WANT HIS HEAD HANDED
3 TO HIM






for the first time: — @
Thoms and J. Chambers (Vie~
toria), L. Duldig, N. Dansie, G,
Noblet, and G. R. Langley (South,

J. Munro (Western

idad at the AAA

It may be, perhaps, significant
to many of you that it was in the |
220 yards, ena not in the 100 j
yards, at which I wes better. But |
I myself have always felt that |
220 yards wes my dictance, espe- |
olally when 1 am in good shape |

The bright lights of London
fascinated me. I enjoyed the
sight-seeing of the various beauty
spots very much, I met many
friends, and made many friends,

One of the strangest experi-
ences Lt had in London was waik-
ing Regent-street one hot
sures gay. 1 found myself
unwittingly the centre of attrac-
tion, I-was wearing a full cream
sult Which I was told was a varity | LY,
in London even on the hottes\
days.



London Express Service:






oy GET A LOAD OF
THE MOTHERS GIVING

THE COMMISH THE GLAD

EYE*THEY OUGHT TO

|
|
|
|
|
|





JUST BEFORE THE
@ ROOF FALLS IN

SEA ISLAND



FOREST HILLS,L.1.

ewe

KRAFT FOODS LTD.

KRAFT
DAIRYLEA
eta sete aN



Australia), J. Burke (New South
ales) and K. Archer (Queens-
land).

Noblet is a lively medium-fast
bowler who moves the ball away
from the bat. Langley, Munro,
and Ian McDonald keep wicket.

The others are mainly known
for their batting.

Events during the coming Aus-
tralian season will largely fashion
the final choice but, at the moment,
the above list is thought to con-
tain all the most likely candidates.

Judging by personal knowledge
and experience of most of the
players named, Lindsay will be in
charge of a powerful team.

Only the-best will be good
enough to challenge it.

Nine waited

While hesitating to unearth a
“New Larwood” in every nook
and cranny, I know that North-
amptonshire hold high hopes of
Frank Tyson, the 22-year-old fast
bowler who made such a remark-
able debut against India.

When Freddie Brown declared
on the first day enough time re-
mained for Frank to be given only
one over.

A field of nine men behind the
bat was placed for this 6ft. 3in.
giant ‘who was instructed to “let
her go,”

The first ball flew from Mantri’s
bat at such speed that Fred Jake-
man at second slip could not hold
it. Instead he hurt his hand a
good deal in trying for the catch.

Then Roy was beaten by the
speed of the next three. He man-
aged to touch the fifth ball of the
over but a catch to the wicket-
keeper resulted. :

Some of the India players said
that is faster than Fred
Trueman and, judging by the way
the Northants fielders retreated a
further two yards after every ball
in the first over, this could well

be so,
—LES.

Mathias Can’t
Decide Between
Football And Japan

CALIFORNIA, Aug. 28.
Robert Mathias, twice Olympic
decathlon champion, said on
Thursday that he was undecided
between football and Stanford
University this autumn or a track
tour of Japan. The big full back
dropped a bomb on Stanford's
football hopes on Wednesday
when the announced that he
would not be available for three
games this season because of an
invitation to tour Japan. He told
United Press on Thursday, how~
ever that he would not make the
final decision for at least two
days. He said: “It is a hard de-

cision to make. +e,





Egyptians ‘

Postpone

, ie

Channel Swim
% ENGLAND, Aug. 28.
Seven Egyptian swimmers, in-

cluding a six man relay team and
one soloist have decided to make
their channel crossing attempts
at 05.40 GMT on Friday instead of
Thursday night as planned, A
sudden change in direction and
increase in velocity of the wind
caused the Egyptians to delay
their plunge. oe

oe Na ASE lhl? d 9) 21) |

NOW'S THE TIME TO ORDER

LINEN SUITS

LIGHT TROPICAL SUITS
AND

COTTON SHIRTS



bh’): stems P. ¢. S&S. MAFFEI & Co., Lid.
‘ THANX ANDA ae
THE HATLO LI oor ay, â„¢ _ : +9
top. br FRANC FOGARTY, TOP SCORERS IN TAILORIN
7? es

Africa—Australia 1952-53 Tour

Trinidad Win
NetbaH Tournament

Prem Our Own Correspondent)
_ ST. GEORGE'S, Aug. 26.
Trinidad has won the ladies’

last fortnight,

SPORTSMAN’s DIARY: ‘EP TBALL

FA Expected
To Sanction

Night League Netball

here during the
being undefeated in their matches
and Grenada
they met twice.

ONE of these days, maybe—and
maybe not—the big clubs of the
Football League, Arsenal, Spurs,
and the others, will play competi-
tive floodlit soccer, Today I hear

about to pioneer such a movement.
They are to write soon to the
F.A., asking for sanction for a
floodlit soccer league. They expect
the blessing of the ruling body.
PETER SMITH, secretary of
Headington, describes as “highly
successful” the series of experi-

last year against Footbal! League
clubs, Joining with Headington are

another club belonging to_ the B.L.C. TO PLAY EMPIRE

B.C.L, will meet Empire Inter-
mediates on Sunday next at Bank
Hall and the following Sunday.
|The game
the Southern League fixtures, | B.C.L,

I take leave to doubt whether|the following: —

Goddard (Captain), Gerald
(Police Boys’

T. Hinds, R.
r G. Sobers, B.
(Middlesex) ,
(Radcliffe), L. Jones

Southern League, Kidderminste;
Harriers, Others will join in,
though tic evening competition
will be kept entirely separate from |

floodlit football will ever become!

a major sport in England. Why? | Sober
Winter rain, fog and frost make'Club),
watching outdoor football at night | Pinder, (Rangers),

an uninviting business. Far better
watch it on television.
‘Brown Flash’ Levula

WORLD'S greatest Rugby Union
wing three-quarter—that is what
Australia and New Zealand think
of Fiji international JO LEVULA,
known in those parts. as the
“Brown Flash.” “af

Levula, who is 21, 6ft. 2in., and
14st., is the star of the sensational
Fijian team currently beating
down all Rugby Union opposition |
in Australia, They are so though
the Australians cull them “Black
Cement.”

JACK REARDON, Australian
international who has played
against all Rugby League countries

YOUTHFUL



with St.
both of whom
Grenada was runner up,
io ee are ‘the results of
sear 30 of s ler cl e series; winners named first:

me some of the suaalioy clive s08 "Tak ot Vineens Sbeate:
Grenada—St. Vincent 27—16.
Trinidad—Grenada 19—13.
Trinidad__St. Vincent 21—19.
Grenada—St, Vincent 28—24.
Trinidad—Grenada 20—14,
match of
was played this after-

mental matches his club played Sean’ J a mixed

When ONE will do

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Enlightened Benefit

BENEATH all the clowning on
the field there was a more serious
side to the Arsenal vs Middlesex
floodlit cricket at Highbury, It
added £650 to the benefit fund of
Middlesex bowler, JACK
YOUNG,

Ex-Sussex captain HUGH
BARTLETT, watching with his
wife and two sons, said: “I
really cannot see that it has
possibilities for first class teams,
but I must say I think it great
fun.”

Dick Tallboys Dies
DICK TALLBOYS, for 35 years
boatman to the Oxford University
Boat Club, died at Oxford.
Tallboys’ grandfather was
waterman to Magdalen College
and the family have been asso-
ciated with Oxford rowing for
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race practice Tallboys was there
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cap. His job was to keep the boat
in trim, He claimed the Oxford
eights of 1937 and 1938 as the
best winning crews.

Without Comment
FROM Mr, T. Fenwick, of Bond
Street, W.I., comes this letter :
“A Soviet magazine warns Rus-
sian youth against the dangers of
football, How absurd.
“Likeymany others who have
played both soccer and rugger, I
know in which of the two you run
the greater risk of injury, and
that’s not rugger.”

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PAGE 1

WHAT'S ON TODAY Court ..I (Inttd IMUII O B It of OMUuri Moeila rinmi. tMmoni tlirto School rirluit *ol Band CWIltl, HkHinfi Rnrki ESTABLISHED 1895 FRIDAV AUGUST 29. 1952 PRICE : FIVE CENTS YtSUgDAVS R-POB! ^PllPiiln •• %  n. i *— '1 MiLrw > m to *UOM PlM! QUMMT A th< Business Commiti five big United States ntl were involved in tin intcniaii.-n.il — scheme to keep petroleuM value of and the direct results, and proflta high. The %  S^tS^LmS £LJ!5 !" VS ,|Mlve dcnled ""> -* %  '•* %  One ol them the Socony Vacuum said 1 that Its foreign operations wen the | terwtll be further discussed by Council after the various W ests concerned had been consulted. Mr. Barton In the course of hi* talk, told the Council how # on page 3 Feisal Arrives At Santa Barbara LOS ANGELES. Aug. 2g. King FCIJ.I1 II <>f Iraq arrived a*. Baata P.I. i... c.iii,„!,.., M 0.30 p.m. on Wednesday dined at Biltmore Hotel, and reUred for the night. Hotel authorities said that he was "shy and courteous." and that he appeared slightly tired. The King is scheduled to leave on Thursdav for Ran Diego. —U.P. supported by the Adnu: and that charge* weie made tpr iH'mociniU' Election Campaign purpoaat. The State Department aald that it has "endeavourad to follow closely the foreign ope American and other CompanleBoth brought diacuasions with Company officials and UirOUgfa other channels of operations" rr-mi time to time aotna of u. American companies have made* copies of thai i ntei national agreements available to partment on some matters. On other questions the Department Indicated that H did a dU not object to the particular course of action." —U.P. Vestry of St. Michael Adopt Sanitary Commissioners Report for Erection of Market Navy Planes Blast Red Power Plants SEOUL. Aug. 28. Navy war planes from three United States carriers braved the thickest anti-aircraft lire of the Korean war to blast two important North Korean power plants with 2,001) pound bombs. It was one of the heaviest ait attacks of the war on Communist power supply. It caught the Reds feverishly tryina to repair the damage inflicted on the plants b, previous allied strikes. "Corsairs", "Sky raider-.", and "Panlheru-t /.t*-iu< down on chosen number one and two hydro-elect i b in northeast Korea with rockets and one-ton bombs The carrier pilots said that the Communists threw up the heaviest Korean cities and sawn screen of anti-aircraft fire they'or Allied ahattacks. -II' have seen thus far in the war However, all United Nations oi St. Mi'-hael at then n'ectin.: ; unanimously adopted a report from the Sanitary Cnmmis%  loners ol the parish of St. Michael forwarding plan-., gpet %  lirat, i ites for the erection of a District Market ;ii Kai:le Hall. The Sanitary Commissioners had been appoin'i-d | committee by the Vestry to tfo into the question Ion. V < Qale, Churchwarden, j Rj" 11 " d P^l^aUons before linrstded. TbSff were also present ""•> •' %  'U been submitted loGov Messrs E. 1> MutUev, H. A. Tudor ernmenl but nienibrri|COUl< see J.O.Tudor r C i;. "Con.n adopted ami that the plans and specllVatinii' be submitted lc Ooverninent. Mr. Victor Chase seconded tic motion. He s.ilrf thnt it was n Vrj RSsf time now that they h. d iecn trying to erect a market on the site in question and especial > the people in the district had great desire to *ee the pi to fruition. *) on pa*r 3 Hewitt and T w alHtar, Mr. E. D Mottley, who mov.n the adoption of tlie report, remitted the Vestry that as far back agl 1943 machinery had been set In motion for the erection of a district market jt Eagle Hall. try's Act had been so as to vest the administrative power concerning *utn market! in the hands of the Ve;try. <;..vrinnient had rjuested the Vcslry to submit plans and specification* and Ihi Sanitary Commissioneri had been appointed -i committee of that Vestry to deal with the malt' I and to report back to the Vestry. Mr. Went Co-opted Tin Santt.ii> Cotiunuwlg—i s had In turn co-opted Mr. Went, •he Colonial Engineer, who hail I had been most useful in helping with sugi bring the old plans years ago and bring them up to date. The plans had then been prepared by Mr. Harold Clarke of Messrs Clarke and Tucker. He did not think that il WH %  i them to publish the STlHtV %mtOACHB& BAHAMAS MIAMI, MorHa. Aug. Il Tlie tropical -H'M In III' Atlantic rflmlnKhrtl In ferebut rolled closer to tin li >,.,...•. .ind the r'lorldn eaaol n IIIMI.-IL uiih wind* f SS to 75 miles IHI hoar. %  %  -1 I'srdue jirf lhal the ijoa mile belt at rain wiuall* .nxl WSBsffg I • %  itl* •;' %  milt-. i hul • Hill III' • tsl I.I Ml.. | • nd muvlns at a IS milr JU hour pjrr • %  ) ", ,i north PrWJtwaid course. "We arc not MIIU out of danaer yr| TomorroM should he the foi be tctrvioi -if tho imhiuThi openinsj coremony will l p> rfurmed by Hon. R. N. Turner Colonial Secretary %  '' : %  • m. at the PoUoc Control Room at Central Station "The inataUot on ol th rnodavn nuipmtni tu Bnrbndoi Police mt*. lint vitn th.rnoM up-to-date Pollc Forces throyKhoui tin I'n ted Kingdom and the O wealth." Maior R A. Stmte, JJcputv Commissroner i.f Police, tnld the Advocate Ufrdat The i.ay EniciKci,, MTt A E V. FIARTON. gerrstsry of thf Wo-t Inrtln Oommlttos (atandma i addressing awaaoen of tka Cannnl of tti* Ohsmhar of Costmere* *\ i ipeclal meeting hM yes%  lll 'V I. tn K are Mr B H Cava. Mr. t. BilgB' Cnlliii*. Mr A K Bryrtan. Mr. D. A. Lucia Smith. Mr. A. E. V. Barton. Mr. O II King, PruWdant of th* Chamber and Mr A M Jones. HatiaUiy of tha Ohasaber. Baiklug the caotra la Mr O D. Byae*. Sugar Will Sell At Under Four Cenlw IVr Lb. i %  nli LGNItON. Aug. 2H I % %  Win Id |>ll> %  fnl •llglll the next 12 months Is likely to be below fom rent*. Thin forecast MI<0) I !) slid f Man I ha h i.,'. %  in'., %  ion i h e cniM Beans %  vi-1 lad in nii.t This, i may '>? the large*! krcular, 'rtei i think hla campaign la off U II start, assured a group el V..rk Itepuhliian leader lhal lie will wage a Tlghtliu U i hafeUAf i iiin|inn lhal wi I i.iit in IIH ran M tl futuie." Govern... Adlai Strvens.t *rted (mlimi IKII higlovai D Vednsgalas nlghl vrlUt am. • %  trui .it Eieenhowri In a speei* Ni i lanay, Stevennari nine %  •Ml You are geaUMT "' <\WIIHIHI is all set in onan Ihs i'"" 1 'ti. Natlimal Co He said that plan* .ilio> *'i rri.Kle fin .. I>-II i.natl hnrrt hitting' campaign ii' mo. ratfe National chairman aphan Mltehatt sniped at the i publican nominee v> 111 ktnl lhal everj dB) Qensa •: Isgnhoerer sounds moro like %  .inn r> gray." He has out* '. ne Ih'wey In the iiae of pliillIMl genf-rallU- Informed •otirccs said lhal f nnhoWOI has jamn-.! wnrrle-l RepubUean leaden in New York hi will .twit 'slugging' 1 %  'nil it meiin.voters Hint In ItUlNUaassV 1 bag Iwen keeping ^raps on hla campaign IHV.-IHM* he does not want to "spend hi* Mlength" too enrly. Stevenson w Bl ii in Sow Vork lining up easl. im nationality groups and labour (ciders behind hi* candidacy -IT fttsBtOeWa 1 b01 km vgg The latest In < ries of Kl changes thai hi! Mill .I'II ,,: ..( Malik I reeled dlploliegan earls iirprisa trlptf %  then planes returned safely carriers. The Navy said that tlie anli!ire was *-i thick aii.l accuiatc that the pilots were unable to get a clear picture 1 what damage they inflirte-i Planes from the "Essex" went in first to hit the chosen one. "Skyraiders" dropped 2.000 BOIaBI blockbu*ter> rm the generator building. At least one bomb hit the comer of the plant, smashing tn Its wall. Then the "Boxer** and "Princeton" flyers teamed up to I it the chosen two. The nan-tige was unasseseed due to smoke -ind heavy anti-aircraft fire 222 Planes Some 227 WBj plane from three MrTSPfS to attach hydro electric plants and to but other Red installations from the batta* Une northward. Air force I'-20 light boml-ra look over the right shift to assault the supply coTKentratien near Sohung h northwestern Korea. An a*ta-k b; IS B-2*rs came after a Radio Seou brradeaM warning to %  :et are;i to, move out Sohung is one of the 78 NorthS'uakr Off I'oru NEW YORK. Aus 28. I' >'dham University S*iS Bph recorded in i'a'lhquale mile< from Nev V %  n II —I'.P HARMS FOR COURSE IN ADVANCED SANITATION ^ Hums, Sanitary I Inspector has bosi %  A.i< e(a are i ranlled si Poll sWdgaj to wB id •. r ii '" %  l' Dislnci f, SI I* ni i Pte tr l t l V si Josepl rowla units, AH tf those sta%  %  M r;i'lu> i '.i i• with the Pnltee Co i trot Room. The terminal switch board Oi this new NO system is als situated In the Control Room Tti service will !*• from 9.00 a.m. today. %  ir %  Emergency, %  : to dial 099 and give parttniliirThiwill be the channel through which they will get otoel N action which ( s re>iuiieH He said that foi rm.' %  to continue to dial 08. Tssesjkhone %  gchange, and for the Station. Office or I'ep^iriment required. They I rontlnus |o dial 07 In cawof KM system waa recent!-' ed IN Trinidad Advocate %  ,."iterday. Ho %  i Bus! mlnals might have mmind escsped. the quick thinking of the pemon who dialled 999 brought the Police to the vicinity of the offence and the offender was Immediately .-ipprt-hen 'lanaffiaii $ Down MONTREAL. Aug 28 The United States dollar tn day cloned .1 %  diM-oiinl i 3 7/78 per cent In term* 0 1 IfUsdlafl funds, unchanged fmt close It took 96 I inadlan to buy fl Amen • %  .in. The pound sterling, worth -.' T; %  >-.i up from Tv asaj riadmn dollnr was down .t ,. iteimiiin of 4^i ier cent. ..I United States fundi 'losing foreign exchange dealm;a to-day. The pound -terliim M $2 78

i .n-fer that *ent Mexander S. Panyushin DrOM Av-hington tO Nlptag. A i QaTayfco from the Kremlin 1 !" "oreign Offici' to tendon and Oenffstf Zarubin from laindon t i Washington Zorln 50, Soviet Deputy foreign Minister will be the ttUl .hat rank to leprosont Russia it United Nitinns r i iyko who used the veto 21 i. He was succeed| | Malik who "noed" II itenure of something more th.in hree years to block tM w*i SeaHmed Diplomat '/Mrtn in a seasoned Soi .mat. At 20 he held lHt in a young Communuts' gue of Russia. In IfHI tered the Russian Foreign Office ind Ui lt*i he beenme Ambaasn* dor to CsechosloviikL.i. Although ie had left that post, h t-appeared in vhen the CommumsU nvciinrew NM Mosaryk \ ragdM 1948 and Wag generally UltaUtod 'vilh en:meering the coup "iiil put th.'*echs behind the iron curtain. jo ass-angnr in ihe Unltad Nattogar; ie served as a manlier of the .viel delegation to th. Uaassssty In 1947. He was expected to take over mm Malik about September |4i ,'*orty six year old Malik** last "fort .it the United Natl 1 fruitless atrempl i i warfare charge* on the United Slates. He was rebuffed the last time yesterday in attempts tu force n full debate on hactenal weapon-, in the Disarmament Commission, and the Security Council threw mil ind % %  mind that It appeal tn nil courttires i„ ratify the 1952 Geneva protocol outlawing poison gas sod germ warfare.—U.P. (iron ErM'upf.HFrom Burning IMune SAN ANTONIO. Texas. Aug 28. United States Air Torre B-17 tiiught lire mmutea after its tnkeB from Kelly Air Force base at Baa Antonio, but the pilot bellylanded absolutely safe In nu open field and the crew of -lx jumped nit uninjured. —U.P. StlWHHnH*HHM*HWWWK^' U.S. And lirihrin < nnthmr Talk* On Oil Problem ThiiKKAiy iraa Aug, 211 Top ftaiorh an and Bi Wish rei the 9C' nd .iiiii' IM twenty foui %  '.. %  ties be> 11111 uni'i and goveniMBt Slipp British Charge Ulddleton eonomrnunsst and pro-gov%  rnmait groupplan demnnstrni-ins on Friday D %  tg gay Sim %  the %  %  ill strength i"ikesmar Dr. Ali Almda MI id that In thi %  dleton sssured him that Itritain'r iti mi the pioblem would % %  -non alse • >n Thui 1 deput** P K issrnl 3 ADVOCATE 1 CHRISTMAS CARD 1 COMPETITION %  IVERSON RESIGNS WASHINGTON. Aug 28 The State Department announced on Thursday neth Iverson has resigned ;*• President of the Instituteof InterAmerican Alfa. —U.F. UurgartH I FiMiiiin Tours Paris Shops PARIS. Aug 28 1.1 Truman s daughtci Margaret arrived by tral .ii a quick tour of the II bodyguard, centre o* re. icism in Sweden for alleged rough tactics, remained In the backMargaret'a train wSS %  %  Ing the train to Le H.. ned to board ;. night. !! %  %  —U.P. This year the 'Advo; ate' is running 11 Christmas C.nu Ci optrttttOO, UM results of which will be published in the Christmas nuiiibei. CompaUton should iota ii*c Tollow ing points:— The competition is open to all renders of the 'Advocate' and cards can be ol anv siae or shap; Cards can be made by any process —rainlinK. drawing, photographic, etc. A competitor can enter any number of. cords, but all cards must be original work. Preference will be Kiven to CaVdl with a Barbadian or West Indian flavour and to novelty cards. The ju.ii'ini! will be don jud^ine; coiiiinittee v/nich will include the Editor. Their decision will be final. Prizes will be ns followi: First S40.00; Second—$20.00; Third—$10 00; and two consolation prizes of $.-i.00 each. A selection of the cards will be displayed at the 'Advocate' Stationery ind later at the Barbados Museum. The closing date for the competition is 4.00 p.m. on October Slat; but competitors can start sending in their entries now. All cards should be addressed to the Editor, The Advocate. Bridgetown. a a %  %  r*saiiiiaB8Mw



PAGE 1

PAGE UGHl SASBADOS ADVOCATE miliW M (.1 ST 29. 19S2 The South Africa—Australia 1952-53 Tour Wf 1 *^ tf kvep her *a*^ -^| Local Batting And Bowling Averages (By O. S. COPPIN) THK SOUTH AFRICAN t..ur...f Austmlia opens n October 24 with a four day fixture against Western Australia at Perth. ThiSouth Africans will play twenty-two matches during their live months' lour. For thoM who follow International cruU't critically, 1 should like to point out that the South African tour is IRiBMd according to recent practice by teams touring Australia other than the recent West Indies team. There is no question that the first Test match at Brisbane on West Indies wan batted December 5 after playing five D> Australia. That Is admit! and Iherofoie a.iy redaction on The difference between these the 'our should be construed In fixtures can clearly be seen, and the light of valuable experience certainly the strange arrangement thai mifll bo %  hronkaari' to which the West Indies cricket and kepi fa future n>Terence and ifflctals agreed in the names of m i'!imi %  never be I paated. Criticisms those who had to play the rnckct iiemseives Is an obvious reason *hy the captain-elect of a touring team should be consulted in matters of this sort. The Fixtures Here Is a list of the fixtures A'hich I suggest that reader* of his column cut out for future eference :— October 24—28, v. Western For this reason alone I must refer to several ciilitisms of mine made when the itinerary for the West Indies tou.was first announced and vtileh were supported .it the end of the West Indies tour by Lindsay Has^tt. Australian Test captnin and also by John Goddard. West Australia. Perth. Indies captain. October 31—November 4, v. My claim was that the West South Australia. Adelaide. Indies agreed to play their Mr*. November 7—11. v Victoria, Test match against Australia too Melbourne. soon and were called upon to November 14—IP. v New South meet Miller. I.iiHwall and eomW\ites, Sydney. d the first time in a Te-t November 21—1.2, v. New South without having first met them In Wide* Country. New Castle. a State game. November 25—28. v. Qucenslt us compare the West Indian land Country. Bundaberg. fixtures with the fixture November 16—December 2. v. list for the South African tour. Queensland. Brisbane. December S—10. First Test. Hn.-Kii." December 12—16, v. Australia XL BydJ Dacambar IB—20. v Victoria Country, Ballarat December 24—26—30, Second Test, Melbourne. January 1—3, v New South Rydbajr. January 6—7. v. New South Wales Country, Orange January 9—14. v. Third Test. Sydney. January 16—17. v. Tasmania. B January 19—2t. v. Tasmania. I-aum i'*lon. Jan.i.irv 24—39. Fourth Test. Adelaide January 31—February 4. e Victoria, Melbourne. rebruary 6—'2. Fifth Test. Melbourne. February 14—18, v South Australia. Adelaide. February 20—21, v. South Australia Country, Port Lincoln. March 18—21 or 18—20, v. Western Australia, Perth. ON Sunday 1 quoted the figures of a few of the leading batsmen and bowlers thi* season The ilgures were baaed on aamea ployed up to the end of the third series In the First Divblt.n. Sim. that time there has been a number of telephone calls and requests running into hundreds by members of the sporting public for the figure* of their favourite nlajwa" This cannot be done in the small time and apace at my disposal but I have compiled figures for this period for bat.4nen whose qualification for inclusion must be 3 innings of 23 runs each and l>owlers must have 10 wickets each These are ns follows: SKTBALL Trinidad W in VtbaH Tournament %  From Out Otto Cunnponaml> ST GEORGES. Aug. 26. Trinidad has won the ladies' Netball tournament played off here during the last fortnight. ONE of these days, maybe—and being undefeated In their matches WITH the Test rur-ber settled and Surrey home in the maybe not—the big clubs of the W|1 J s Vincent and Grenada championship race, next season's visit from Australia is the Football League. Arsenal. Spur*. g *bom iney met twice. hut problem to be considered. WRONG-GRIP JAKE TIPPED AS TEST BOWLING SURPRISE By DENIS COMPTON FA Expected To Sanction Night League ATTRACTIVE YOUTHFUL -/i#M of rigour uve floodlit socii-i Today I hear Following are the results EncouraKing as have been this summer's results, we ln V t Jomeof tbVTiinaller clubs are ,h **. winners n TrinidadSt. Vincent 20—16 Grenada—St. Vincent 27—16 —, , %  --—-—.-l.'.ll. *UTII1m lilt Kllto. must not fori>el that no country has won the rubber against about to pioneer su< i Australia since Douglas Jardit.o's team went there in They anto write soon to the 1932-3. FA., nsklng for sanction for ft Without being anything but Australia), J. Burke (New South floodlit soccer league. They expect Optimistic iboul England's prosWales) arul K. Archer (Queens'he bleswing of the ruling body, peels. I know that Australia will land). PETF.Ii SMITH, secretary of be mighty hard to defeat Noblct Is a lively medium-fast lleadington. describes as "hlfhly Already Australia Is preparing howler who moves the ball away successful" the series of experifor the tour. One prominent from the bat. Langlcy. Munro. mental matches hi* club played tricketer there has sent me his and Ian McDonald keep wicket | us t yeas against Football league "unofficial" forecast of the players The others are mainly known C | UD SJ Joining with Heading who will eome und-r Sir Donald for their batting. another club belonging iy th< B.L.C. TO PLAY FMPIRF Ilradman's management—whleh is Events during the coming Aus^ uXY Qm L#a* Kiridermin.Uv IMM regarded as an automatic appointti:.lian season will largely fashion Harrtera. Others will Join In. J..I nt. thi fin.il choice but. at the moment. According to my friend, another the above list certainty .Mil be bcured, \ u) ,/ +. l,,ptted t / Al liverish fy t ^ Why be t: con.ti] or li< t-r suffer indigestion ? Bile Bcaaa •nil make you vitally fit, full of energy, brighi-eyed and happy BESURE TO RET THESE KDICaLL' TESTF 0 aHD APPROVED BILE BEaJ_< Trinidad—Grenada 19—13. Trinidad_St. Vincent 21—IB. Grenada—St. Vincent 28—24 Trinidad—Grenada 20—14. Presentation match of the SAM played this afternoon. Trinidad nit**tin.{ %  mixed team of the losers. B.C.L. will nu-et Empire Intermediates on Sunday next at Bank con'hu>Vevening competition Hall and tpe following SuAda£ Ihrt-L.nd*y llawett tn all Uie m -1s at .2.30. The ptain. Judging by personal knowl^lge lhe S 0 1 "* !" .V^*"*.*?^** :_^_J* C \-.. XI will be chosen from I take leave to doubt whether'i he following:J be ^ m ^ K G^d-rd (Captain). Gerald major sport in England why. .Sobers. Norville, (police Boy*' Winter rain, fog and frost make club). W. Clarke T Hind Winter nun. log ana irost muse Club). W. Clarke. T. Hind.-, R watching outdoor football at nighti I'mder, (Rjingers), (, Sobers, B* ,m uninviting business. Far better (;reen (Middlesex >, Rogers The W.I. Tur The We' EBOSJ i>l*yed two Iwo-day gumes, one against Newcastle at Newcastle, and the other against Queensland country xi nt Townsvillc. They then played JI four day gave v*. Queensland .it Brisbane. In other words, they began their tour on Cictober 26 and played their firs' Test match at Brisbane on November 0 after playing one first class match. The South Africans play Western Australia a* Perth. South Australia. Victoria, New South Wales (Country xi and State). S iicensland (Country xl and ate) before they meet Australia in the first Test Match. In other words, they begin their tour on October i4 and play their CMICKST Uinrigar Scon's Third Double Century i i in LONDON, Aug. 28. A great double century—his tMrd of the tour--by Polly Umrt; n anaMtfl Uie Indians fa llius i the second ilay of their match with Kent at Canterbury in . strong poaitton. Coming in aflei four Wkkau had fa leu cheap'. UOU gar (logged the Kent attack H. King unmercifully during a stay >t |V hours. He was 1" I out at 392 after having made 204. Another century maker was Hampshire's left arm bowler Dare whose 100 not on' Worcester was his first In first class cricket. SCOREBOARD— Middlesex versus Warwick Warwick 268 and 119 (Bdrlch 6 for S). Middlesex .183 and 41 fo.BATTING AVERAGES (Qualification 3 Innings of 25 runs each) BATSMEN I. N.O. Total H.S. As he proved last winter against and experience of most of tfit the West Indies. Lindsay is still players named, Lindsay will be in floodlit football wiU nuslralla's best and most reliabl-? charge of a powerful team. batsman and I have no doubl Only the best will be good thai, given normal form this winenough to challenge it. tar, he will readily accept tho honour. Nine waited Come-back While hesitating to unearth | "New Larwood" in every nook I am warned to expect one big and cranny, I know that Northsurprise. My iniwrmant says thai amptonshlre hold high hopes of S7-year-old Jack Ivenson. who anFrank Tyson, the 22-year-old f.*t ySffltatariSal JoSvSErV nounced his retirement at the end bowler who made such a remark? f *} n | ^ m !" nal '">_ L „ T^. of the 1950-51 MC.C. tour is about able debut against India J" 0 *" *" J !" |M,rt afl lh to make a come-b^ck. When Freddie Brown declared Brown Flash. He is said to be keen to visit on the first day enough time reLevuU. who 1* 21. an. zm. and England. mained for Frank to be given only Mst. is the star of the sensatenal "Wrong-grip Jake", as some one over. Fijian team currently beating Australians call him, could make A field of nine men behind the down all Rugby Union opposition a tremendous difference to the bat was placed for this 8ft. 3ln. in Australia They at* so though I side. giant 'who was instructed to "let the Au-itralixn-. call them "Black itch It on television (RadclifTe). L. Jones 'Brown Flash' LevuU \< Blackman (Ron WORLD'S greatest Rugby Union Q< urne (Lancashire). wing three-quarter-that Is what Australia and New Zealand think' (Sydney). ), D. Atkinson .. 4 0 375 149 1 B. William* n 2 20V* 94 N. S Lucas .. ft 1 236 90 t\ Atkins 0 171 110 0, li-ovrrbs 1 2 170 117 G HuU-lllnsbn .'i 2 1.16 6B C. Hunt* fl 2 196 114 N. Marshall 1 0 137 117 ll i ii. .1 0 133 72 J. Goddard 2 172 96 J. Gmnldfc n 1 164 57 T. Blrkptt A 0 232 134 E. Cavp .1 1 77 A2 1'. Smith II 0 214 105 S. Rudder 4 2 71 37 C. Blackmail (Police) 6 0 210 70 N. Harrison 4 1 104 61 W Famwr . A 1) 170 69 ii nidi < 1 101 44 C. DcBslia .. A 0 197 78 N tterrU s 1 A3 49 r King 4 2 62 14 F. Tudor e 2 114 38 (* Blackman (II.C.) . A 0 1A4 A4 K Walcott 4 • 106 St BOWLING (Qualiliciition 10 Wickets I BOWLERS O It, R W r B. Williams . 10 283 31 F Ifillllp. 61 1 13 149 IS F. Atkinson 5 I 11 132 13 11. lliiiki-i IM 1 27 24A 24 K Bawsjn at 16 IW 13 F Kina .. M 14 146 10 D. Atkinson .. . 127 1 3A 304 19 11. King 72.4 %  1A7 lu C. Braushaw 80 < 9 212 12 0 TAfhm 11 A If 337 12 S. llradley B 28H 14 %  1. i! Hoad .. SO. 1 10 333 IS Av 93.75 %  J .; .i.. 52.00 48.75 45.66 44.33 43.00 41.00 38.68 3830 35.88 31.50 35.00 34 66 34.00 33.66 32.83 31.50 31.00 28.50 27.33 26-10 Av, 9.12 9.91 10.18 10.XI H i.i 14.80 16.00 16.70 17 66 19.18 M.57 22.20 To my mind the one doubt her go," would be whether he could stand The flrst ball flew from Mantri's up to the strain of -Ticket six days bat at such speed that Fred Jakes week. The history of tours has pravrd the sUsBculty f keeping ii im.nl. fnr 'h hi* ramro. It xelJom works out speed of the next three thai Wax *6ed to touch the fifth ball of the If Ivcrson does well this winter, over but a catch to the wicketI have little doubt that he will be keeper resulted invited So !" of ,h Indl P"V8rB add In that ease, Australia's Test 'hat Frank is faster than Fred bowling could well be the same Trucrnan and. Judging by ihewnv as that which allowed Freddie the Northsnta fielders retreated I Brown's team to pass S00 only further two yards after every ball once in ten innings—Keith Miller, in the first over. Ray Undwiill. Bill Johnston, Jack )>e so. Iverson and Ian Johnson. Cswssul JACK ternatu REARDON. AustrBliar ho has playt man at second slip could not hold ;,„!,„( (( || Rugby League counlrle it. Instead he hurt his hand good deal in trying for the catch 'inced that Lcvula could lx the greatest winger in the woru thi could well -L.I.B World', fastest night be thought Such an to be reaching the stage where it is experienced but not exceptionally fiery but in powers of pene(ration I believe It would be aU most as strong ns 18 months ago. When they let themselves go. Keith and Ray can still bowl faster than any in the world. There's no reason for complacency. Our need Is tn give our batsmen Thursday much practice as possible betw >f.,lliius Gan't Decide Between Football And Japan CALIFORNIA, Aug. : Robert Mathias, twice Oly! decathlon champion that he wi football Knlighlencd Bcncnt BENEATH all the clowim.K OB the Held there wa< a more serious bide to the Arsenal vs Middlesex floodlit cricket at Highbury. It added £650 to the benefit fund ot Middlesex bowler. JACK YOUNG Ex-Sussex captain HUGH UARTLETT. watching with his wife and two sons, said: "I really cannot see that it has possibilities for flrst class Warns, but I must say I think It great fun." Dick Tallboy* Dies DICK TALLBOYS, for 35 years boatman to the Oxford Universtt.v Boat Club, died at Oxford. Tallboys' grundf.it her was waterman to Magdalen CoUag* and the family have been assoundeclded ciatcd with Oxford rowing toe ml Stanford more than a century. When the M>|gainst fast fcowllng. UntveiMtv BMg autumn or %  track Oxford University crew I would like to see a Tea* TrUI tour of japan. The big full bock ,i oW n to the tideway for boat next season with the pr.bable dropped a bomb on SUnford, rac e practice !" lboy. waalheie bat-men pitted again.! Fred f.MHball hopes on Wednesday n b lue reefer Jacket and Oxford Tmesnan and Brian SUUiam— when *ie announced that he cap HiB iob was i 0 Keep the bout supported b* South Afrlcaa would not be available for three n trtlIL He claimed the Oxford uan Mcrsrthy. the fastest games this season because of an ^^ of in7 and 1938 as the bowler In Knrlind today. invitation to tour Japan. He toio ^^ wul nlng crews. I am .mi 8ES uould b. de*Z*~ "" ,7^^' h' Wi.hout Comment lighted to help. ever thai he wvuio noi III.IR* L.. ... .. ,, ... %  %  ,. nw i c .i c „/ Bond man % %  £* thankful tor lln.l .loclrion (. 1-* > %  • JS&EZSTtittSJF is 111D GIHLB MEET HERE OH STuBDV9 uivhvl Hub C nan's co-operation Kheppard. this year's captain of cislon to make. Cambridge. Several times before big matches David has asked Cuan to go to the nets with him at Fencer's and to %  -wl flaf out. Doeid declares (his hoi been the fastest bou'ltno he has faced aniru'herr and says he feels the bcller-equippA'd throuph hauinp played aaainsl It. —U.P. Egyptians Postpone Channet Swim A Soviet mapazine warns Rusnan youth auainsf fhe danpers of rupby football. Ifou* absurd. "Like* "ianp others tcho hare played botn soccer and rupyer, / £ knou in tehtch of the ruo you run trie greater risk of injury, and (hat's not ruflfler." Leicester versus Samerset BOOMI %  %  -.311. Leicester 325 (or 3 (Tomkin 116, Purmcr 103 not out I. Hants versus Worcester Worcester 203. Hants 475 for 9 (Dare IM not out). Lanes Sussex 259 and 73 for J. .. 177. Trinidad to London— a I 18 my dream came true \... 4 in u spa.ting srrir. hy E. McDONALD BAILEY I WAS 18, and had Just left college, when the opportunity 1 had always dreamed of came my way. It was a trip to the Mother Country, and 1 wus selected ftin three other athletes lo run for Trinidad al the AAA luimptnnshlps in I93B 1 hd worked hard for this selection .itid fell it was the Just reward tor my efforts l out to rim in tor lik) and %  i ENGLAND. Aug. 28. Seven Egyptian swimmera, inOld friends Other names sent me ore those of our old friends Arthur Neil Harvey, and Douglas Ring— ..II here in 1948. "'"'V 4 Q"5'MT on Friday instead"of The following woulo be coming !'""" Y „, Bh ,, D i a nnci A soloist have decided to make their channel crossing attempts Thursday night as planned. f C Mc?Sn.^ e i. McDonald. O. wdden change 'n/lrecUon and Thorns and J Chambers (Vicincrease in velocity^ of the w toria), L. Duldig, N. Dansle, G. caused the Egyptians Noblet, and G. R. Langlcy (South their plunge. 1 Australia^, J Munro (.Western delay -VP. Surrey versus Narthanb. Surrey 383 for 8 declare; .ind 43 for 2. NorthanU 283. Kent vrntu* the liirifsni Ken: 217 and 49 fo,;• The Indians .392 tUmrigai 204). Glowcatrr \frwus NetU ;tll for 8 declare 323 foi 7 deRnuMtt 117. Young 991. trip 10. rards t u^ wio.p citv etaui • ml l.ad inv iirm exDrnrocnf %  .r< uiul nt \\\r liugr p-rowds. all ot which t found \m %  eiveracking. I -|'e reiillnM. not *t> SJUSSU. Uisi 1 •liquid return lu %  ft. iW. 1 ssrsa % %  .I'. .-. It *•• the r-xprn*iiri> %  THHI. I lined op til l.t-a: l-etlns Ilk' a %  -ilieii. 1 WM sumluutrd at r-nm. My distance But CIUIIP UM DQ rards. sid. 1UT •uimjnn ih first icvinU. 1 niBtiKcl to irnoli the ifnu-nnil*. H may be. prrhsps. sigalflcsnt to nianr ot von that li wu In ins JX yajd* mu no*In Uie ion yards, at which I r I betU-r. But 1 mywll havt> DU-.VK felt u.i. '."to lartl % %  > itu ii | uo I.road shs The Bright UahU of Lundoi^ iwtrkiisK'd m. I enjoyed tii* -iisht-jee.iii oi ui .srlixii bi-iut. • pot* very much I met nini:> friends, tuid mdini m | One of the strung.*'. iF < n iwittinsW tn* entn ..: %  itmr nut whit I' I ant* %  ea on Hi-' ..v.. i. a log FW... BtnsM ^11 Efo It EveryTime ~-—By Jimmy Hitlo KRAFT FOODS LTD. V /THE CCrvtWSSlO'JER WAS A y [ CHOMP ID TA I .1 BIKI nioy tUo rouse llhr-i.1,-mond llrort Tr-.til.lAmo-n %  r>" Sim blendlns the flml <1'. nds ooro ntouth and nun-sly BJH' %  I, the Votli. Iton tld ua'"'' AaMM*oMal "ink* soar mouti*t t-nd OTO your toelh o' m-moy t-i.'i • %  i rotarn of ompty it.i KMT *o**r FCR PROTECTION AGAINST ALL RISKS INCLUDING GLASS 0*1* THt fiHGER'FIRB %  INCHES YOU/ FIRE MOTOR BICYCLE BURGLARY MONEY GOLFERS MARINE AGENTS CAVE SHEPHERD & CO., LTD. BROAD STREET — DIAL 3545 : 7\ %  (JUST 3EFORE THE V rOC R4U-S IN-— ft KI TUA^< AHDA l^T OF TWC HATUD UO TO F4N< FOGAtTY, r -C5T •4ILLS.L.I. **IW-si'rt WM&B3BS &/J? NOW'S THE TIME TO ORDER LINEN SUITS LIGHT TROPICAL SUITS I AND QL~ SEA ISLAND COTTON SHIRTS ^ I4 S. MAI I II A ... I t.l. |Sm %  TOP HCIIUB8 IN TAILOR1S ^^ There LH such a thing..! When tailored in our MOYGASHEL TROPICALS GABARDINES — and even TWEEDS C.B. Ric 8& Co. •f ll.llai. U>r IIV fan -it it piif Irani •./.


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FRIDAY, AUGUST 29, 1952 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PACK SEVEN HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON FLINT OF THE FLYING SQUAD .... BY ALAN STRANKS GEORGE DAVIES •VAT 1 ftf 1 5T400fD VUAS CfV HIS *w>*TO A*f-ff r us. ~ K*e*HS *>"S MOB %  TO xaer THCl* "OTTffW DOT BLONDIE BY CHIC YOUNG The popularity of John While shoes is twill arc as i-a\*Nltmi: and smart looking as >ou tould wish. Hut lb. i' uuisi jinli'i\ \IU is ti.c men expect and •lat II I I, -per lb MIXBP Pin— H-M. Iki RENCO l HI IsK—prr 12-o> tin Ml limit MM IT PKOCEMS ill fc USE—per Vlb It* MIA1HIM SHU I IKiill" t III.EHE t < l-lb lift B \MM ii i IMIH ICGAB HltlllAI. ICING SI i. VI. t.KI I \ A VI.II.OH SPIJT PEAS SIVII. II OH\S..I MAKMAI.AIH— 7-1 \PIE PEAN't T BrTTI'.K ri KPI-I: tiKAPi:-*—10-01. Tins 4.11 .41 .17 1ST .•I D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street m y rattan \o Aim SAVE ftMfcaWl fl H "kt.nl WMtff MBHafB) Wr. • l-ms fruit Shorlcake —'j lb pk|. al JOc. racta i lb pkc at 3*c. eac* With St. ^PF" ~


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FRIDAY. .MOIST 29. 1952 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PACT FIVE Clerk Acquitted Of Falsification Accounts Inquest Again Adjourned % %  ii' 1 Bf /-\ f "f "f III II #..N "> consider the book, which .till ... and ih.-rrf.-nUM flmim. — ^^.f m -^s*-'^*w*m'& w u ,,,,, lor lu .if. plM ,„ him bv ,),„ ^upkorpri rouadku *• da The book, as I said, was in exarv lh"iu> which must correspoiui l"ii II.. p... _,._;.„; ,_ latence before thdefendant went ,„ ti,, um ,., ,. particular shop. Jackmana, St. Michael. %  An Assize jury after about half an hours deliberation ihet.-. ami there are note, of mTr utH, figures are wron* U •* %  ••> %  < %  yesterday acquitted Keith Squires, a 26-year-old clerk of structiomi and the various parts obvious u todaj by His w<" the ehar,;c of f.lsidcal.on of accounts on or about August SSX'eliav, >&tf£&i £ gfef .£'"'* C !" "' in going through this matThero a"' Cecil Hope dictl tome hoj'i „— Some are in icd Ink. and they people m charge of the safeguard gfl (to the Squires. will strike your attention I .„„ gi-oit knows that it Genera! Hospital on August 3 Squires was chareed with havinu on or about AuiRisl quic l> J*? .^ ,cncc ,v h ** ."?' 'ho mm had not he-n shipped -; yesterday two m >ro 31. 1951, while he was a clerk or a servant of D V. Scott, SSehT? aSr? -S !" dTnc? an thlr ta Government'* g... —j.t _—. .. _,_. _. ... :**."• *•.•******• *"'< "•* " nl p w ,s maa " ot possession. Government's control, inspector G. Springer ni or Governments care, and It is for on August 3. be wml Sanitary Commissioners Accept Plans For Market ; USOi rt l 7 w JI last year. Hearun,' of the case la*ted nine davs before howf Mr. Justice J. W B. Chenerj. His Lordship discharged ter So THE Inquest Into lh* %  ordered 14 days or 14 days* %  V rtel market %  ITS irate of District "A", for ir.ipp.. "'" %  lions along with the bill for p a****. Itd | which was A *£ !" scheduled to i it. UM Qcn i and will subsequent I>• be rlgn t h„ n d body. i -i othei with Intent to defraud, made or concurred in making a that the deX false entry in a book belonging to or in the possession of servant, hit employer, purporting to show that on August 31. rum Du in the course of thh ease, vats I 2. an,, S 3S property of D. V. Scot, ?c£ I.,.,.. S &*& "SSS^TM^Si Choapside. Bridgetown, contained respectively 2.796, 1..180 given, maybe in iron % % % %  Una and 2,820 proof wine gallons. tion of witnesses, tending I Counsel for Squires were Mr. the proper test. You must be **bat a state of slackness, .nefflciE. W. Barrow ana Mr. P. G. satisfied and feel sure. ency, neglect, an* what not exSmith. You have listened to the eviisted at the Cheapside Rum Bond. Hun. C. Wylie, Attorney Gendonee day after day. It has been Witnesses under cross-examinaeral. and Mr. F. E. Field, proselong and voluminous, and the *' on were forced to admit that cuted for the Crown. cross-examination extremely pro,n ey P ul their signatures and The Attorney General said that traded—not unnecessarily perinitials to matters like regauging ,J repeat the arguments haps. Mr. Thorp.* was cross-exfl "d retetting when It was not : %  the safeHi %  '"'e 4.4:, .,.nv. ft ,id saw Cpl. I when yon compatoff | ngtablal that are parallel, it will a.— ,,. he w. roH "i eon this question of .intent to defraud. As 1 said, (f it was the shopkeeper who had this rum in his control. inures he supi %  Incorrect, there could only he th'tt i— to defraud. If the rum %  K ne. Hon. V. r. K. D ... M Ben %  ..! %  was pn H %  offered by t* el .rni.ii. FRESHFROMSOOTUHOi ^ \n vacuum tm l^V^ ) w Ofl ;' %  ( % %  % %  .. him th.UM 1 ma-is, St. Michael and had been e • he had used the previous~day in aniinedthe wholVof 'one'day and done You ul remember thi his address and asked them to o good part of another. Tlicrefora evidence of Neblett who said he ,n '^T *" f ke TP' 1 1 *. 0 Gov rr n ": am-.ttcd rliin lor t(.,pan 1 At, Scott would tell h It h:i< not been shipped, it must b* there. accept that the intent to defraud you may find yourseives, if ycu ^' d no himself was very evident. Indeed, when are not careful, enmeshed in the 8 au 8e. but he put retast arm was very evident. Indeed, when are not" careful^ enmeshed "in "trie B au 8'. but he put dt man wrote the type of letter multiplicity of evidence and may nature. Evidence is given purthe accused wroic. they had the be apt to lose sight of the main porting to show this state ot inevldence, not only the inference, issue you have to decide You may efficiency existed at the Gove-nthat there was the intention to get lost in small minute details "ent Rum Bond and the Cuitom:. defraud. and overlook the particular issue, generally. And yi may have i reasonable His Lordship sa.d : "Mr. ForeThe accused a charged with heard Mr. Thorpe himself say man and gentlemen of the Jury, falsification of accounts Finaltnat wnpn n< ,oolt over, the books we are now reaching the penult!flea tion of accounts is comparaw e ro hopelessly in arrears^ though mate stage of this long and prolively a modern offence. It was he endeavoured as best he could, traded trial, and !!rst of all I must introduced in the 70's of the last t0 bring them up t> commend you for the obvious care century to nuke provision for an "a 1 of efficiency, and patience wuh which you offence which before there was no have listened to all the evidence, means of trying in Law It Is Staff Inadequate the cross-examination, re-exami. purely a statutory offence. It is nation, and tie care with which a criminal offence and the necesYou also heard evidence from ••" '" " %  "-* have followed J^iments sary ingredients In this must be Mr. Thorp* that he took steps to | 1( ,. v ,, thls pnsiUon loitering in the I'nn Kill The prl ctoviis bag aturt undei As I sad. that analogy will help "';'-; ;n his sigyou al atl -ivln„ at vour eoncluthotiKh || Ma marer for prertoui CM vott Keller And Statement %  .111, M %  Chsii*. m Of Worl i Dthed i < Hi' %  %  %  As I say. you will bear In n £j? m nA h %  %  %  ccused wi He *ui ttatemenl The !• %  •• ' loping and shook extra hour* of work. G tl propounded, both bv Uie Counsel proved In this also—what is bring the matter to the notice ol ,.„ . fendant flnd himself, to ufor the defence and for the Proknown as the guilty mind. You the authorities that the staff m cuti n. the same inadequate the other kind, and mind in and things that s will have to And th Irrelevant Point way you find ft lr. The Learned Attorney General offences in Law. has said that refi renoa baa been made to the fact that he Is not a Witnesses Evidence atmosphere in which these proUarbadian. I shall only say this I do not propose to go through ceedings took place at the Cheap—that the fact that he is not a Ihe evidence in minute detail. It side Rum Bond. There Is <* (a(;i it in to Dr. i r %  I Cain ^'ii> w %  the fiim on I General HcMsltal." Inspecb ; %  I %  could not nov said thai liii PoUea Btetion -.. y %  %M. m word,. |n diniruliv W.U. he with lh,motor van knowledge "f QM leeuted Is besl Kot from his own statement h reading that, you will whole In relation to the whl> which %  "not a the evidence Barbadian matters not one whit, is really nol necessary in as much prevailing stale of inefficiency, Ypursc ] v The traditions of the English Bar as counsel for the defence and the neglect, slackness, whatever you k ,„, w i (H 1 1 (lf ,,.„ .,.,„, ore universal, world wide and Prosecution have during the past fee) to call it. which seems to ^h-pinjo^^iot hiw TSSn s '''" l ,, nd on iractense the proceedings %  know linulations whatever, few days taken you through i vidence. It really the Cheapside superfluous to go say. when yo lion the table, and say what the position was." Therefore that fact is entirely Ihe whole irrelevant to thit question and would bo you will agree with mo he has through everything again; and no matter, you will bear the atmosc.nned out his duty with the Iradoubt you will still have vividly phere in which these matters !" ditiijns of the bar and put his case in your mind the witnesses and proceeded. for the Crown as it should be put. how they gave their evidence. The Counsel for the deJaU* Keith Squires, being a servant I %  !" " to # T'**,*? !" Jirln.. n L7)l Mr. Smith, not a Counsel of long of 1>. V. Scotf-that is not diswith minute de a .is of a,11 of these Stdertaff gtlaMcr th e,.had to standing. ,n Mr. Barrow's nbpuled. The defence has nol thai. Po !" **Yo Wl11 d ubtl * ,"• %  ?• SSd nf ^5L, JST^ %  i sence, has done all that could be lenged that. "With intent to deW is unnecessary for me to go ntfjdiat the !" n who as in done for his clicS very ably. If fraud" well, on that I w.ll direct through all that to enabUyou to -rn M in -""^ and not at times m ;i lon| tn.d then are you later in th;s summing up. eomc to a decision in_ this matter, netessarilv one' *ho'bad a clashes bttweui Counsel, you *IUda or concurred In making a ut I will tell you that the doGfttltMl intod. The) ShouJ • take theft • %  <• MrtouaCal entry in a book...", the book lence has proceeded on the lu.e the letttu with the ggtintnt he ly. They are ,>.rl of the leg^ is here aild you will see it when that It was Impossible due to lack had !" ** nd consider both .n mp ,hc t,me comes for you to retire of supervision, rum not locked in the light of all the evidence. The duties of Ihe prosecuting before you give your verdict, the corridor, one thing ana ancounsel at the Court of Grand This book has mostly been referother, petty .piUering. Sessions are obviously different led to as the red book — it that rum had been "" %  • "•"'Tn might have from those of the defence Coundees scl. The defence rounsel is apt to eny way be more easily sl.rred to his feet fluence, than the Prosecution Counsel nation; whose duties arc diffeient. way o* referring to the book. You wnicn -v .>—,. -• r eturn*, might have been correct These are preliminary obserwill look through it carefully and entry. and kfr. Kt had* a3d% vatlons which i' is fitting and remember the evidence The entry was a correct entry of UIMU proper that I mri.tlon at the outbook wJU speak for itself, but you Charge—False Entry h >, n u wiU also remember the evidence on the other hand, yuu will of witnesses like Mr. Scott in rebear In mind that the accusedi la ptan ,.„ s bil nrd to BUS book. As f say the nol charged with abstracting the JJ*JJ g ut '' book speaks for itself, and In runl( stealing ft 'JF^SSSJi Z& rSfht to*!?^ i„ bu.der L s buntetf as any man his irrival to the Orda I] P c far is mav become I"'*? 1 ""v'V'!"!!'^ ,'"l Th "'' v "'" !n ' ""' S ''' hST vm. rL^ti the },eSt "*" he "' Cpl. Edwards and %  : nnd he writes a latter to him. It<„ Ucemen there. About 4.30 %  1 avk in his letter: "I have to musin the ran, he heard Mr. Mottuw to mal II the courage in m> frame lo a ,m h and hen heard someon'' nv Mr. Scott. You will aJk h„ u ti :g for "Stop Inei. Stop luin." Id men ol H a % %  I to I mtrence of the entering saw a The B the no,,,. 1 %  *rom Barclays Bank for th Only Scotland, trsdnional home of fine tobaccos, could produce Four Square. Only in Four Square tobaccos will you find selected leaf, blended with skill banded down by successive generations for over 140 years. FOUR SQUARE TOBACCOS .it better for hln ich earll mart lying < Hum Bond "As I !" r !" n,m l a mu !" Mr r Springer arrived s insider the whole %  *•• ol the proceedings to muate„, r „. in WH !ilhcn t „ „„. ,;,..,,.,., ; **courage and face Mr. Scott, |{QIUII] ("Kin anil of the'i %  %  1 %  %  li • PINI BLENDS TO CHOOSf FBOM %  MAD! Ml Agmu: Mlv.' IT DOZIf OS fAISLtT %  LTD. Airline Men Claim They Should Fly The Queen 'R.A.F. Arc Not The Best* T-or Damaged .. plane ExNpt ._, rumours Tt >? onk-er in Cham f U] Bw 111 1 Via uiu had been Ioin through hond had sold that,the dclV-ic-icy .,i in.Quatn'l FIIKIII, v., em H SufcrTil th" b$S door, to. anybody to ay |"b>ht have or ,„,l„ n„l Have Ko-1 All ftra Sit. ffSi cLmunSt ineo.rX what w.. the mat. ot Uton pl.ee .tter the entry ., Some al.lme ptW, The rlffl i Of the mii' | i the BT • By JAMEM 8TUAKI Wi.Lt ahetiu 0) to, i %  %  %  f ritta, VTIU re, A MV %  %  ] I i.- %  S3^.w OiSSaS taK r^"on3U,AuVu,n relation "•*-'£-. '"tj^* set. Jury s Duty However, the Jury are the solo Judges of the farts and it Is looking at it, you will easily come .v.... uind but onlv with making ior eoun.l either to. the defence ,„ ,„,. con luslo „ „, vour ow „ 5JL •&? %  '"'""> Altomey !" }* h < or the pr,.see-ut.on or mysell for mind „ ,„,.„ o( common „ n g"'^ s \ tciicd that point lo y..u llkl |h> JUCSJ hiin-clf to tell them wh k|nd f b ^ k J tf „" r "t hi „! on Ve But on the other that th. laet, Aould have .Mrwh „ „ „„ ,„ ^ more than J. ask „ tain interpretation or not. 1 hat Kjnd o[ g^ k S3-, |t then, conditions pre. o,l.ly your province, and a iT.nd the situation wa. as it illuminate the I i searchlight suddenly Itched on in a dark room. igge .nig that liKen out of the hands of tho I | >-n I., th. ii i .i t i Conuneni on this discussion' m Aerlus in tha lo i.i MM BI ill b Air UH hiPilots 1 Association, The Log. But, id an ofhcJal .f the AseoolaUan,] tl n are his own, and not! %  %  i nt i. anj way the views of ine province which must not be invaded. If I suggest to you that the true interp-station of the facts are so and so, you may or may not agree with me, and a Judge must not lake upon him"""^ ish Oversell pilot. They would remember Mr. ||a ..v.: Tliere can be T".r|> h !" d -aid that lie had doubt thai thOM WBO ;m never visited the bond n nlghl m led sdlh tba Queen's well-kn >"ii Brit : Airways Corpoi.i-. remember the remarks of the Atwa5| whether there was the posw ,ih Mr. King to deliver rum should bt Of the highest torncy General on this book, bes ibilily that the rum could have u> a merchant and it was for i nee available. cause this is the book in which alsappeared between 31st August u, decide whom they would he%  ;\; ,1; by en her the false entries are alleged to wn d 14th September; whether it is lieve Mr. Thorpe, or Mr. King h pS are eommaiuinl | hove been made. You will repossible for you when you come who said that he did go with him with many years at se,i. hci that this book was in t „ consider your verdict, to soy Then there was the question of ehl uffsun huve sal m UM istence before the defendant tr a t on the 31*1 the return made the duplicate key of which Mr. iiuing ne.M for '".i Hns < %  i, %  : clerk at D, V. Scott. wuf n „i correct, that the rum Thorpe did not know. til angina drive] turn *pent a lit) ,ime mi ttli 1r.it k The Iury retired for about half Aerlus suggests thai it i HAr' self to impress his opinions the facts too strongly. The whole "^J !" c Sch C, a le case f is^ha? l^men are You will remember that when ^ not tav.'he there. drawn from all walks of life to > ou h f VP to consider the evidence And h ere you will also bear In StSi ttS on broad principles. !" l f > h . of the book. You mlnd „„ lo „ e r written by the The technical equipment of the !" n d instructions of various UCCUBetS 0 nd the sUtement made. not necessary at all for k ind B ',_ a ?, a .^..""A 5 0 mmen ? That letter an.l that statement Judge You 12 r made ind comments red ink, i how unmistakably that the ocused knew of the conditions preralling at the rum bond. But you %  /ill ask yourselves whether—and .11 do that when you come Mail Fined His Worship Mr. C. L Walwyn Police Magistrate of District St. *%£j t *£!*JE2' in"vour * P*ncl. That you will bear in S. TL ilial nieffies are not !" ind. and all of these matters ir d you T rfut l ?he broad basis "of will help you to decide the nature this, that you .re to tlnd the deft?" !" ?,? ,?„. V d ,,„ u U d tlther 'he entry on that particular dale „ nI wfu eoacisio „ o( ,„.„„. fendant BUilty when-to use the J/'' 1 ,-' !" '"'"bli"^^..!:Tth. • mu h "" k " wn ""\ !E l> of sugar which he was convey. ,„, old phraseology-the matter ,s <>>""> *g"52 ln %lhlch ""' entry was not correct and that proved to you b-yond a reasonAs I it is most important he made it with the intent to deng along the Wharf. SuLeTordoLddard^.^' £you to^hrju^ ih^K -^ „„ Ihe K,n c 'f'^ c f""'Z'\^l ind 'what Tt purport? to ^ rily hinge one on the other. The STsS S pira-rle^bl'e ^ou wi,,^ hec^e „ you mere ..c^ ,* >>~ %&*£?&££ SSSSSSSffS 5aKrSJtfS" CKvmmunist Women that expr.icn M not ^rt ml w(|uld Brl „ B^eauM lrMn the "' S ';".1 „',, l/nV. Zi mike |ody of lh| Canmnma „„ t Memoniiidum Book Ihe accused. Questions had been put to him An Example Formula ."K?^ w if. iS?!!. w iS.S ".tf Suppo for inance, the .ccused or anybody^ else was fy yourself of. You gate! the evidence, oun man* u.*l'":^' ft satislled them so that they felt to P* sure in coming to their verdict. the book. He said he. meaning the ,erd,et. }-. ***>i>***ji^'*** ^ y ^JTin the .1 of whoever it That is what the Lord Chief Justp answer reasonably and laid down a, ,-. to J^ *-tt he^would P^„ ^ >" longer occumemorandum kept by the accuswould be acttm be adopted in thi reasonable doubt hour and then returned Lbs preettca verdict of not guilty. cl.aps." with an inrviUI.L| Crean Ihe cwkpit seat to *i Irativa til. i i i %  who regularly lly jin* the efflcets," he says. "It Is my feeling that n special organisation should be set up to %  ol ihe Quean's Flight. and that its pilots should come Black fr„m ihe ranks of die mot* .senior airline pilots — from the ks of those with 30 years In cockpit . i honour would he tin .-t Strtved after position in the alms, of air trans|*>rt, and ould form o fitting clima* tho oaresa or men who ad their lives to the ( of the air." Navigation Fxpcrls The QlMtn OOUld lly I" the %  nil and still ^J nt her iillots, at least, had l -en there before. The RAF pilots of tho Quee Flight are ell | j | M -.0 m *" f '''P p^, • "t nnvlgalion and] JIM UN. ^ U|t 28 l-d weather flying. a hundi*d %  Communist ,,, theory any of them eon bel ,. i. de m 2 n, ? rnI ^., ,." nt ot adreted to fly the Queen, but! ihe United state, nigh OommtoSally her pilot I Wlruj Com"• ".''. %  %  % %  '" '' %  .: aruler It C V Srot'. AFC whatever It I; \ r,ur t American iroj-ps In 34-ve:r-o1.1 New Zealander. H-nin riw women carried signs HP joincdj the Royal Newl demanding that Ihe troo,* lop ZmUmi Air Force Just before! 1M9-4S war and transferred TO-DAY'S SPECIAL PINE APPLE CREAMS THI FINEST P1.AC1. KNIGHTS MX & CITY PHARMACY SODA FOUNTAINS The line in to be paid In H in default 14 days' Imprisonment with hard labour. Pn*fest Against American Troops Half v.. I| the assumpr„m" ".= ?Berlin PU d.ily training exercises in ii, w .. Hiunewiilil t.irest. „. lh( HA p ln |,,, 0 He h „ 51x nt niS the exalted place it used to .d .nd h. said "yes". You will tion that this rum or wria.ev,, occupy I in* mention that at bear that p.rt of th. ,vid.nee ot it may be. Is In the P^''"' n %  ould have Mr. Scott in mind when you com. care and control of this shopkecpdisperscd tho t,vo-and-a-half lloy.il Flight. year. HOMO rilKAM SIvl'AIIAlOIIS ARE IKC;m.Y EFFICIENT EASY TO OPERATE AND SOON PAY FOR THEMSELVES Hundreds in UM .11 over the B.W.I, and all arcgiving complete satisfaction $66 "DOMO" CHURNS 130.74 SAFES FIRE ANT! TUIRGI.AR RESISTING Body plate (lop. bottom and sides) of one ^teel plate bent by hydraulic pressure. W solid steel door plate, wrought steel rhar ber*' 2y '" 3" in thi-kness filled with best quality flreretisting material. Buy "SAMCO" For SAFETY 20 X 16 X 15 .. S120.05 24 x 18 X 17" .. $166.55 2 X 20 X 18" 1205.38 II4KKISONS LOCAL DISTRIBUTORS HARDWARE DEPT. T.U: 3141 and UM CLOSED FOR STOCK-TAKING Re-opening on MONDAY, 1st SEPTEMBER WITH Attractive Merchandise at Reasonable Prices in All Departments and LOTS OF BARGAINS I'ave Shepherd A I'o. Lid 10. II. 12 .V 1.1 ltrnil Slrrl. FULL RANGE OF SIZES IN STOCK Itciut'iiirWr— II'N HARRISONS for HUMBERS lilt BARBADOS lOliNDBV LTD. Wl %  '.• I'ark Road, I ENGINEERS, BRASS and RON FOUNDERS Works contain modern ar-pliances frr the exi"-' lirat-claxs work of all Kinds. Bl ly to hUGAK MACHINERY and SI Dealers in ACnlCUITlIRAF. ttd Uescnption %  TION PROJECTS. PUMPING ECTRICAL lNSTALI^T;i Salislaclion, Quality and Serk-o Contact i Till-; BARBADOS FOl'NDRY LTD. \irksliop ,'t*+eeoe-*>eeee e ;-M •*!•!* leeaeeas %  •; % 



PAGE 1

AC1 BARBADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY, AUGUST 2, 1952 BArftADOSsA AD\taiE r...>._i ii r —tMm** kr Ik* > rrida>. Aiwiisl 29. 19&2 W.I. COMMITTEE THE Sit :.-...> ,if the West India Committee is at (MMOt in Barbados ulu-n&• has hailed on the first stage if a comprehensive tour of the British Caribbean. The recent war introduced hundreds of BaiU-dian.s to the headquarters of the West India Committee in London and the wellair work perforcned by the Ladies Committee under Lady Davson and, later. Lady Winifred Gore will be remembered with appreciation by many service men and women. But apart from service men and women who passed through Ixindon during thr war and apart from the less than two hundred members of ihe Wmt India Committee resident in Barbados, the West India Committee is little known by Barbadians. That is a great pity. Because there can hardly exist anywhere in the world today ion which h;is played so tfre.il ;i part in the history of the West !r dtel Records still exist today at the London headquarter; of the first genet.ii of the West Indian merchants which w.i I i that City on April 11th 1769. Ever .since that date the activities of the Weal Indian merchants have been oonCH 11 ed with the development of trade with the West ilidies and with the promotion < %  : West Indian interests. In more recent years the Society of Wesi Indian Merchants and Plant* rs developed into the V,V I India Committee which WBI incoproated by Royal Charter in 1904. In the WOrdi of the Charier tl India Committee is formed of Br jects personally interested in UM %  LgftflUt turol and manufacturing industries ano j trade of the British West Indies, 1 Guiana and British Honduras. Member Kriba voluntarily to the funds of thAssociation, the object of which is b> united action to promote the LntaTC such industries and trade and thus incrras the general welfare of the British Carib bean. Throughout this century the West Lbdii Committee has served its members wel; and because of their influence in UmdOl and knowledge of West Indian trade need: tiny have been able to champion the trading interests of the West Indies by dealing directly with government departments ii the United Kingdom. Today West Indiai governments are no longer dependent or the West India Committee forraprastttto tion in London: and West Indian politic! ans have been flying to London to holt negotiations with departments of the Bru ish Government and to support UM cUii of Caribbean organisations such as tin British West Indies Sugar Association oi the Banana Growers Association o Jamaica. This year West Indian govern ments opened a new chapter in trade nego tiations between the United Kingdom ant the West Indies by opening a Trade Com missioner Service ir. I/indon. Few persons in the West Indies wil know that the opening of such a Trad* Commissioner service in London was re commended many years ago by the Wttt India Committee in London, but thr willingness of the Committee today U co-operate with that service is well-known and was conveyed by cable to the firs' meeting of the Regional Economic Committee last year. So far from competing in any way with the West India Committee the inaugura tion of the Trade Commissioner Service in London ought to give a boost to the West India Committee and should result in an increase of members from the British Caribbean. The Trade Commissioner Service in London like the Regional Economic Con mitt** in the West Indies is a creature of the seven British Caribbean govtflnnv a\ It cannot represent the personal interest.' Of UM 6 engaged In agricultural or manufacturing industries although it can assist like the West India Committee to promote such interests. From the point of view of West Indian governments the existence of the Trade Commissioner Service in London will facilitate any negotiations which West Sndian governments might like to make through this agency in London. But from the point of view of individual trading interests the Trade Commissioner Service. being a creature of seven West Indian governments, will be unable to approach individual problems with any independence of judgment. For independent championing of private which may seldom coir.' the Interests ! policy L i with tular.ed officers and .i.i,;oyeos appointed and paid by %  B e U tto— With Central (.nvimment It is assumed that local aulhorlo the provision of normal fb) .Wctlve Barvkai N b as llcs are ^^^^j^ bodll s tiXa HKfeM water supAl. police andI civil defence, ai%  ^ w ( £ chiiIl I)l( lf ,, WM ply. drainage, street lighting, maintained by I ,„ns*quentry, refuse collection, local author. orougta Council .. L government is now play an important part in iho Council* in Scotland) or by Joint k lo |hm>n mum The funcexecutioo of. Cor example, thr Boards represenliiii. more than one tUtnH ot ioC ul authorities are In any I .cc.il ot largely in ih. ministration of the United Kingdom since Saxon tun. ,-ortant work oi present system oi local gov* %  -^ WI,,V by elected councils has been opcr• done by County and County aiing for leas than a century. In iJomugh Council* national health service, the housing programme, and town and n. country planning. Type* of Local Authority England. Wales and Northei 1 precisely limited by the Act AVALLEYINTHE SHADOW GEISATEXT By .iWlls LEASOR LYNTON. Devon. Church bells boom proudly out tonight across the wounded valley of Lynmouth and over the sullen sea. Not even the roar of the angry River Lyn nor the staccato bark of %  %  e arrangements ini Indun. or Acts of Parliament 'governing j .h e rmcumatic drills used by rescue squads (•) m il M il VrvUr , ln fc „ y flv e n Held of Wt ^ „ as maternity an i cluld w< -The Central Governservlces, education, housing, care m( ru Departments do, however. "> cr ded between the Lai .nncil. the C'ornoralii:. ,1 th.City Of Umdon and tr.e p*,^ „ ( < %  t.n llorough Councils. mwajd Ireland are divided for local govof the aged and infirm, pr powers of supervis i.rpose* into AdmlnuAniand upkM| 'Ion und financial control, and %  iilies and County Borand ait galleries, 1W these I he the right to is.sue advisory ciroughs. County Boroughs are towns type of authont/ varies according culars. The Ministry of Housing Independent of County Councils, to the service provided. and Local Government is the No town of less than 75,000 popuElectoral SvM.-m central departtnent most closely lalion can now become a county Etc-cUon; u> lo t.1 Councils are concerned with ocal government borough. AdminUtiative Counties ntUI ri guUr |,, B OsWd intervals £' h m ; m *\", w "** -^' nlsl .^ ot .,.,. divided, under the County nnd acc „ lliu to Xl d rule,, und, % %  Health Minlstx; of Education— %  J Boroughs, B n direct relations with local and Rural Dig,„ ttanRe M ... .authorities on matters within their ih its own Council. Candidate*.' who must satisfy t •**** %  n ...,ite subdivided into number of legal, re-ldenlial and Utiance Pi i b" personal qualuic-Uons, and who Local %  Y2f n T? n i Hand, local government lu .^ u properlj nominated, stand """ectcd chlel.y rron tUtboritsta are County Councils. r „ (ll ris independent* or ui ,ht> central nove —• fajs 1 src=s -*-* 5S?SSr! pcrcenUfc of local authority ~ pendilure on ccrlaln services, or ;> to the poorer authorities I'lllictloiis ill Local The actual work of %  .'. (irlna ltlciT resources Into line Authorities, ideations with „,„„ of wduiHr areas. (nl Envlwmn-tal Hcrvlcf; of : P" 1 ".'* "Hates are a form of local taxation ,.l lo MOOT ..in %  i %  > 1'ie whole coun]( vled „ a |, i and „ n d buildln|s mnmvi Ihe iiu/cu's surrounding*. l! COmmllMea and sub-commit)n a local government area, based .!,hl„ I .lit, mut-afclv thetiro'" %  '"' valuations by Inland ll.'vcnur a,,'.ll pi;. !" .'.., r,„nSeollandbye.), Ic Thes.ervlces are usual ... lypc^ of local auth.. ,-,ed from owners or • or Parish "' ; '"" by local aulhorilies lor /SnlSIllrlSS, •" ... Loans may be raised h. rCThrMa n Act of I i.,i,l..aundln..r i, y local authorities forspeeitlr 1 % ,.. ^ I pc.Ml p,,,:, with Ihe approval of Ihe e what mar be., iral (lovernment Departmenta ..resenting roncerned. usuallv through the .ulhorlty Public Works Lo3n^ Hoard. •THE GOLDEN VOICE NURSERY RECORD BOOK" tells the %  Bfl and Music on a grnniophone record to help you read it in the Book. &f ADVOCATE STATIONERY it H-pui-nosc authorities). unonK environmental Ulan With S*MI|I For Sale %  Xrwill llri*or% NEW YOIIK ARCH II MARTIN, a 47-year• id Mlesn h noods, is |iackln lo sail home with a tough icsaage (ut British mnnufaeturl/ny. London has *0. Hwants % %  moking In "li'iiti>eatre-i. litjuoi in theatre bars, and tickets sold t<> the public instead of ADMIR/ ,K. ex|o brokers. CS. Aanbassodor to Moscow, hos FOR seven years wee GlasgowHe arrived in America seven been cbOM i i i. ubom Alex is is what happened. He pi hii \i(i job. He won the part of pounded the pavement" and ..MEKICVS new ilrlnktng r,i John Rankine, Rabble Bums's tore than 200 calls ID the -i-in and ton cump.niion. in n UmadTo cut expenses he poArlnC. D 100 pa r-bound DU Comin'Through l.ved In %  7s.-;i-day room, gave cent RlOrc I live." It is based on Bums'! :J his dally highball and lunched ggo Lon| -1 lin that life (i a bowl of soup. He lost it WM davdo u e d bj Britl h OOlOCAITAIN FEDOR BE1-OV. I*. I" 1 ':Soviet hero of World War 11. IT• . cine" and brouehl home by renV ed with great secrecy nt WestTHLsr; ..iihis conclusion* tiring sahibs. rjv** Air Force base In Massabo preaUse of the "Made in, chusetts. With htm was his ritain" label bj fading. The LARGEST Laboui bod} ho Chicago bride. Adele Koskovskv, •mericun market will be lost a.Cdo.OOO-memUr American Fedwh(l marned him in C .nless British manufaeturcrs stop araUon of Labour, invites Ein-nThey were whisked awav undoi rylilg to force on It goods made how> UHM m%  > convention Than it Russian captain fled from Com%  aking thlngl the way Americana will deckle whom to bMk. The munist rule. .vant Hi rther big union organisation, the nit KARL VON COSEL. nn Simple i -\| %  .I.T.I.%  When he 6,000.000-m em b e r Congress of x -i who so loved Ma %  •ported the American buyers' Industrial OrganlMUODJ is gu.ng .,,1 (..end thin he kepi .her after .mplaint that a British soup did to bark Stevenson. t |he Morh)e Ho(e Qn ^ When a West Indian, as I beJuly UtfL mat tue Bai-baj eV( Hopklnton is. can sit down and pen a collection of big words The Committee welcomes this nd tasteless phrases which ma/ ipportunity of thanking all those .ficir little island. I am a middl' difficult reading more difficult, who contributed to the "uccess of ..as* man, and one who is boffUU you must expect criticism on this tho venture. — the Advocate Co. ml some day Uarbadians of all kind Oi false Journalism. Lid., for advertising, those who walks of life will enjoy hie alike, Now Mr. Editor, I am suggestfJ \d pnd bought tickets for the v/iUioul material prohibitioiLs. Ing to you that you run a Callup Bajl u,e Commissioner of Police lut tins can never be the end of r.. to find out from your read,-„ r tno tnv use „f ^ police lto.s dislinction. It Is In thi* vciy cn 'J!* 1 "" likes and dislikes. As orchestra, those who assisted by il"^,'""T" ^"".r/,.S C ',:^ U ry h s a ix P, '" C nlit eki " %  * Oi side a 1 .raclion s tate that man claicnt of .5 he really is, and will be tia„ jd no. „i u !" of maleria, %£%£*" .losscssions but by what he boWh ,, n lhl -, .| is conducted by what he thinks, by SnOU i d bo classified mjo tour what lie says, by what he dOM tions: ind by what he is. It was in th's FIKST CLASS SI'ORT nd by donating or sclluii; refreshments, nnd nil tho*e Arms ., which so generously contributed :prizes. The Committee assures the public of Barbados that thev h \e iie'ped forward a very orthv c Your i use. faithfully. the Comic Pane. IMIKl. CLASS SHORT ,., ,,.t made tquaL TakWU M Wg Indian Culture: Lducu lot shared Recording to Krem%  union %  i:n: Signed:— AIJ^UJ COLLYMORE — President, B'dos Assn. In aid of the Blind and the -Deaf. BETTY L. ARNE—Chalrmar. Organising Committee. ISOLINE MOORE) UOREEN WARD)—Members. Organising committee. Rr\i-nue : of equal opportunity Some o? your leaders; Hunte'i I ti< rich cities of Greece and articles; Flash Cordon; The PhaiiVia Minor that men bafttl '•' him; nnd Carib Calling hlnk or the mind, bringing about NM'OM. CLASS SPORT: he hirth Of philosophy and psy.At the Cinema; The Sl->rs and Ugy. There wfl] never ii % %  an ^ %  id nl i bee__.. West Indian Culture: Education Notes and Cod RJ \I, sl'OHT : Coppln's Connientaries. Etacb) | Notes; Reports i f Sports; Nathani HRiaTIAK jpokc of lov ,,., (juhbh... und Ilejehrombrr. evening on the text "And when Jesus saw the city He wept." At morning service—conducted without a server because the server ten-year-old RoVney Dimrnock, is among the missing — the sermon's theme was: "Be of good cheer." The holidaymakers who booked at Lynmouth have gone from their holiday homes. Some are in the Jubilee Hall, with other | unlucky people who have lost their houses. Others have moved up the 400ft. cliff here to Lynton, where the locals have opened their own homes warmly to these unexpected visitors. And, after the worst week-end in the history of this Devon holidayland, a spirit of comradeship reminiscent of the blitz days in Ix>ndon has been born. Lynmouth is a fantastic sight, a town split down the centre by the river. (Old people are saying that the river went back to the course it took a century ago before "improvcnents.") The foreshore, up which the tide is creeping tonight, is strewn with boughs. wooden beams, cars flattened as if by sledge hammers. Gulls wheel above the mess screaming fo titbits from the crates of biscuits and cakeihe joints of meat, und the sweets that wen washed out from the shops. Trees we:. carried out into the bay and now sprout grotesquely from the deep water. IN ONE ROOM . A Folded-down Bed AS the torrent went down the High-streel it ripped away most of the tarmac car park outside the Glen Lyn Restaurant which st.ll bravely advertises "Teas, morning coffee. lunch." Two cars are still in a doorless garage with tree branches on the roof. The river ripped some houses in two, and yet, oddly, some furnishings were little affected. In one top-floor bedroom, for instance, the bed is turned down neatly for a guest who never came back to sleep. Books are on bedside table, coats flaunt from hangers a**U hooks. \ In another, a bathroom mirror is still unbroken, although the wall from which it hangs leans over drunkenly. IN THE MUD . Bottles Off Pickles RESCUE men are trying to clean up thr place. The angry river rolled down boulders as big as a small room, and this afternoon the valley echoed and re-echoed as these were dynamited. There was just no other way to move them. Mud is feet thick in the Highstreet. Mud, and layers of tins of fruit, bottles of pickles, petrol tins, sofas, and mattresses. You can see how deep the flood waters ran by the brown rim half way up shop windows. AT THE CAFE . Tables Laid, Still ODD things happened. Souvenirs for holiclnymokers — beaten brass bowls, hollow Lucky Lynmouth Pixes and the like—floated away down the street. As the water rose, tables and chairs and huge wooden-framed pictures tried to swim out of the windows, and stuck there. The Island Cafe still advertises teas. Ii is really an island now, with a river of mud one side, a roaring Lyn on the other. Ironically, the tables are set for tea outside .... Some with white china, the others heaped with mud nad rubble. Outside the Bath Hotel arc a baker's dozer, of cars up to their axles in mud, half full of bracken and leaves. They stand faithfully where their owners left them after dinner on Friday night. FROM A HOME . A Set Off Antlers MEN trudge stoically through the mu" carryirg the precious bric-a-brac of then hpffttt. a set of antlers from the parlour wall granuma's ormolu clock; a framed motto "Fast. West. Home is Best. Side streets are blocked with muddin. junk: in a corner a pile of sodden books bleed their red cover dyes away. —1..E.S. SECOND TIME LUCKY TWICE a Mexican underground movement smuggled Spanish-speaking Gene Fuson, a California newsman, into the United States. He posed as a Czech Communis*. Smugglers charged him $20 (£7) for tiki birth and border-crossing papers, and $40 (£14) for the trip. He i ui well. When the border hi him the first time it sent him back to Mexico. Next time the smug^h him through. fffsf KITCHEN ggl HELPS 0 SKVI.ISE KITCHEN SETS 0 FRENCH FRY CUTTER — ONION A VEO. CHOPPER 9 COFFEE MILLS MINCERS In Three Stmas • EOO WHISKS — ELECTROPLATED TEA STRAINERS • DRAIN RACKS — ASBESTOS STOVE MATS fcTiX PITCHER & CO. 1*. S> ^ £ £ £ i 2Z2 Zt$im$ZZZ'*fi Hey! Hearties Here's Hartley's! — first f'huirv nn any Shelf" Jams and Jellies Marmalades Crystals Da Costa & Co., Ltd. EAT MORE FISH Thick Salt ii-.ii Herrum In Sim.Marker.", Pilchard* Sardine* Salmon Lobster Lobster Paste Shrimp* Oyatrrs i i ..-in Haddook Smoked Ktpperv EASY TO PltlJ'Altlv Bird'* Eye Frozen \ 'MililirialMnrM Brunei Sprout* Garden Pc. Spinach Sllrcd Beans Mixed VneUblra Beat Ihe Heal a Gin and Canada Dry •TONH SIMMI,S itoneleu Salt Beef —52c. per lb Bone Meal—18e per lb Orrrta—I4c. per lb ni-rvwd Rabblto—3€e. per tb Ber Suet—3c. per tb SI..IMMr\S For Your Oversea* Parceta Mola.**.es in tins \rrovi N:,r, h ,„ i>ki;v Fruit JntoM Guava Jelly Guava Cheese Honey Beef Suet Sharp's the word (or TOFFIES Goddard's for Best Grocery Service ,< i