Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
——E

wholly owned
Standard Oil
Jersey, both named as defendants,
said that its prices have always
been “competitive” and “have not
been
against by any of the countries or
customers involved.

suits included Socony Vacuum Oil
Company
wholly owned subsidiary the So-
cony-Vacuum Overseas
Company, the Standard Oil Com-
pany, California, and four subsid-

iaries owned jointly with the Mr. A. E. V. Barton, Secretary
Bolten tenis bP ot pen of the West India Committee, told |
Caltex. Oceanic Limited . the the Advocate yesterday that the,
California=Texas Oil Company Committee is not merely a London |
Limited, and the East Cadre Sales |OP® Bor & remote. body, hut _ 3
Company “Ibody to quite a considerable ex-
Ye tent, composed of people living in

6é 2 e799 the West Indies; hence the first}
‘Dumping Oil thing ‘to remember is that the!

24 hours after the Senate’s small |the West India Committee
business committee made public Mr, Barton arrived here at}
the Mutual Security Agency memo |midday yesterday from England}

which said that four United States
firms were receiving “exorbitant”
prices for Middle East oil shipped
to Europe at the same time that
they were “dumping oil” on the
United States
prices.

al James P. McGranery said that
the Mutual Security Agency re-
ferred the cases for court action
after the companies refused to re-
fund oyerharges, He i
ation is of great i

only because of the
which the Governmen
recover,
whether the defendants, having
control over the supply of Middle
East crude oil
countries participating in the For-
eign Aid Programme,
the efforts of Government agen-
cies to vrotect government funds |
committed
and defence,

gress defined in the Foreign Aid
laws a policy to limit prices on
items
Standards were developed in ac-
cordance with those laws, declar-
ing that oil shipments to Marshall
Plan nations should be priced no
higher than comparable sales by
the same
port market price where the crude ; tary of the Sugar Producers’ Asso-
oil was produced.

camps.

of Panmunjom in the hope that

and to-m crow the French were





ESTABLISHED 1895



prwty

Over $67,
; ¢ NEW YORK, Aug. 23.

CHARGES that four major oil companies and six of |
their subsidiarizs had overcharged the United States for |
oil for Foreign Aid have been made by the Government. |
The charges were contained in suits filed by the Govern-|
ment in the United States’ District Court here late yes-,
terday. The suits seek to recover more than $67,000,000. |
The firms were accused of using their subsidiaries to main-|
tain a “two-price system” where under the Economic Co- |
operation Administration and Mutual Security Agency)
were charged too much for Middle Bast oil sent to Marshall |
Plan nations.

The Texas Company, one of the four major United |
States’ oil companies, denied the charges. They said thai!
their operations abroad were: “in the best interests of the |
United States and its citizens as well as of the foreign

countries involved.” | f

The Esso Export Corporation,
subsidiary of the
Company of New

WI. Cttee.
| Secretary

Visits Here
BACKGROUND TO W.I.

Supply {

PROBLEMS WANTED

questioned or protested

“Other companies named in the

Incorporated and_ its

problems of the members of the;

The suits were filed here oniy|West Indies are the problems of

by the S.S. Golfito and is a guess
the

at Ocean View Hotel.

On
‘

market at lower

In’ Washington Attorney Gener-




but also as a test of

shipped to the

ean block

te European recovery

“The contend that Con-

suits





bought for Foreign Aid.

Mr, A. E. V. BARTON

board to meet him were Hon'ble
G. D. L, Pile, Hon'ble H. A, Cuke

supplier and the ex-jand Mr. R. G, Mandeville, Secre-

ciation,

—U.P. @ on page 16



Special Meeting On
War Prisoners Called

PANMUNJOM, Aug. 23.
United Nations Korean armistice staff officers turned
over to the Communists the list of 13 redesignated prisoner-
of-war camps in South Korea. The list was handed to the

Reds at a special meeting of Liaison officers called by the

Allies.

Major-General Haydon L, Boatner, Commander of

U.N. war prisoners camps had announced the redesignation

of the camps five days ago, but this was the first time Com-

munists had been notified officially.

Boatner had emphasized that -
the changes were entirely admin-|
istrative and would facilitate’
communication and supply to)
Koje Island, scene of thea recent
Red prisoner riots and mainland
The announcement said
the change in camps was made
effactive on August 17. i

Colombian Army officers visit-
ed Panmunjom and Munsan to-|

day as part of Eighth Army|
Commander Gen@ral James A,!
Van Fileet’s new policy of

acquainting foreign troops fight-!
ing in Korea with armistica nego-
tiations.

Van Fleet’s idea was to give
foreign troops a first hand glimpse

it would give United Nations
fighting men a better understand-
ing of the truce talks. Repre-
sentatives from the Philippine
battalion took the tour yesterday

scheduled to be shown around. ,
ur.



475,000 COAL MINERS |
ON 10DAYSMEMORIAL |

HOLIDAY
PITTSBURGH, Aug. 23. |

A ten-day “memorial holiday”
began to-day for 475,000 coal min- °
ers on the orders of John L
Lewis, their Union President. ‘
Lewis ordered the men out of
the pits in tribute to fellow min-
ers who had died or been maimed
in mine disasters during the past

ten years.

The short lay-off was not ext
pected to deliver a paralyzing blow
to the industry. Since two week






ends and a labour day holida; A MENDE suth Trinidad) ex
during the period eI Table Ter t which
out only five working days. Phillips ¢ won the game

000,000

Barbados won at

Sunday Advocat



BARBADOS, AUGUS'" 24, 1952



se nn ee

Suits Filed For |

DELEGATES to the third
meeting of the Regional Labour
Board: Left to Right:

Major E. H Grell (St. Kitts-
Nevis); C. C. Low-a-Chee (An-
tigua); G. H. Scott, O.B.E.
(Jamaica); C. Greaves Hill
(Central Labour Organization) ;
F. C. Catchpole, O.B.E, (Dep.
Chairman); Sir George Seel,
K.C.M.G. (Chairman); R. G.
Roe (Sec.); 8S. .Hochoy, O.B.E
(Trinidad); N. Pearson (W.
Islands); R. N. Jack (Barba-
dos).



RED CONGRESS
WILL INDICATE

RuUSSIA’S POLICY| {J} K Unkind |

By DONALD J. GONZALES
WASHINGTON, Aug, 23.
High diplomatic officials said on
Saturday, that by October 11th
the world should have some hints

_of the future course of Russia’s

internal and foreign policies. They
believe the nineteenth Commun-
ist Party Congress, opening in

| Moscow on October 5, will indi-

cate changes for pe@ace or war
with Communism and who even
tually will take over Josef Stalin's
all powerful mantle.

The first party congress in thir.

te@n years also may see some of!
Stalin’s old line comrades retired!

or shifted to minor jobs, they said
to make way for younger and
more agysressive officials. The
200,000,000 Russian people
themselves will be
moves that will affect their daily
lives in years ahead. One thing
they can expect for sure is more
overtime work to meet new pro-
duction goals set by Kremlin lead-
ers in the name of 6,000,000 party
members,

Alter the meeting opens tha
party faithful in satellite coun-
tries will be tuned into radio Mos-
cow to get reports on speeches
that will develop a new code to
the Communist law. A statement
of some of the new measures that
will be rubber stamped by some
2,000 congress delegates already
have been released by the Soviet
hierarchy.

DEA{H DUE TO
NATURAL CAUSES

Dr. K. B. Simon who perform-
ed a post mortem examination on



the body of Lulia Brathwaite of
Dalkeith, Christ Church,

at the
Public Mortuary yesterday morn-
ing, attributed death to natural
causes, namely gastro enteritis.

Brathwaite was taken to the
Mortuary from her home where
she died suddenly.

FORE-HAND SMASH

ecuting a forehand smash in hi



19—21



looking for ,





REGIONAL LABOUR HOARD

:



U.N.’ INFANTRY DIG
INTO “BUNKER HILL”? \Begin Landing

SEOUL, KOREA, Aug. 23.

United Nations infantrymen dug in deeper on their
hard-won prize “Bunker Hill” as an ominous quiet hung
over most of the Korean battlefront.
who sacrificed more than 3,000 men in futile attempts to

Chinese Communists,

take the hill last week, showed no signs of making another

costly assault.
movement toward “Bunke
quickly thrown back.

To U.S. On
Mid-East

NEW YORK, Aug. 23.

Neéwspapers’ editorialized on
Saturday that “it is understand-
able if our British friends con-
cluded their military activities in
the Middle East because it became
too much of a drain upon their
overburden treasury. But they
are being less than kind when
they seek to unload these liabili-
ties on good old Uncle Sam by
labelling them “Middle Eastern
Command”.

That is what Field Marshal Sir
William Slim, Chief of Staff of
the British Army is trying to do.
On his visit tc General Ridgway’s
headquarters in Paris, Marshal
Slim said that there has been a
Mid East Command for the past
fifty years and “not a bad one
either.” But said it should now
become an allied command be-
cause “we don’t want to carry the
baby all the time”.






is trying to switch the labels on
his babies, Britain’s Mid East
Command consists of British gar-
risons in the Suez, Sudan, Malta,
Cyprus, Iraq and the British sub-
sidized Arab legion in Jordan,
But this is one time the bulwark
of British colonialism cannot be
made the Middle Eastern Com-
mand simply by changing its name
and having Unele Sam pick up
the cheque instead of Britain,

To most people, the Mid East
colonialism is a greater evil than
Communism, The Middle Eastern
Command which did not represen.
governments of the Middle East
would be regarded. therq as no-
thing more than the re-inforce-

ment of colonialism —U.P.



against R. Phillips in the third

The trouble is that Sir wits.

the Tehachapi

Their last thrust yesterday, the first Red

r Hill” in several days; was

B -ewhere ) rain, end clouds

covered of the battlefront
limiting to minor patrol
clashes. ited States Sabre jets

damaged o Communist MIG
15 « late yesterday in a ten-minute
deg fight south of Suiho reservoir
ir North Korea, Six Sabres had
| , waked ten MIGs near Sinuiju
@trliiee but made no claims.
| The Sth Airforce announced in

, its weekly summary, that three|

Communist MIGs were destroyed



seven days. The toll pushed Red
| jet casualties to 62 planes for the]
month, They said that the Rus-
sian-made jets have knorked!
down only one United States jet
in August. However, ground fire
and “unknown causes” cest the
| Allies six war planes this week.
{ Meanwhile United Nations
| planes kept pressure on th Com-
; munists with day and night raid

| on both coasts of North Korea,
Tha airforce said that the week's

| biggest strike along the 155-mile United Electrical Worker

| front was the destruction of oa
munitions factory at Nakwon,
near the Yalu River. During four
| days of the week these typhoons
‘didn’t slow down operations. in
| Korea, Allied planes from fields
and carriers hurled 4,120 separate
sorties at Communist targets.



'

{

From Recent — !

B.N.A. Flag Day |

The Babados Nurses Associa- |
tion collected $595.26 from their
recent Flag Day, Of. this $402.58
was collected in St. Michael,
$170.83 in Christ Church and
$22.26 from other receipts,

Flag Day expenses
$37.82. Miss E. Gibson
Association told the
that if they had had more collec-
tors, more would have been re-
ceived.



totalled
of

In Broad Street, $139.88 was
collected, $74.38 in offices, and
$66.50 from passersby along the

Street,





nn

Oil Companies Said To Have Overcharged

and six damaged during the past|

uP.|

($595.26 Collected

the;
Advocate |



U.S. Troops

“ e
ad ‘al ‘
Exercises
LA ROCHELLE, France
Aug. 23,

U.S. troops began a week-long
exercise in landing and disem-
barking men and material nlong

France’s Atlantic coast. Simul-
taneously Regional Communist
Party officials sent out instruc-

tions to waterfront workers to

refuse to handle any cargoes or
equipment used in the mano-
euvres, United States army am-

phibious craft and shallow draft
vessels were taking part in the
exercise which will employ newly
worked out methods for fast load-
ing and unloading of cargoes.
The manoeuvres will simulate
conditions that would be carried
out by the emergency arrival of
men and supplies to help defend
Europe tn case of aggression, as
well as disembarkment, Although
it was a United States show, staff
officers from other North Atlantic
Pact forces were prasent
ervers,—f



ws ob-



Utzion Officials

ry So End Strike
CHICAGO, Aug

International H
Farm

23.

rvester
Equipment
Inde-
moved in
the strike

The
Company and
pendent Union official:
an attempt to end
which has idled about 25,000 in
three State Federal Concilia-
tor Jay Oliver said that the union
and the management have agreed
to méet Wednesday in an
attempt to reach a contract agree-
ment,

It will be the first meeting since

on

union member walked out at
eight plants after their contract
expired at midnight on Wednes-
day. The Union has been
indapendent ince its expulsion
from the CIO because of its al-|
ledged le‘tist” leadings.—U.P. |
Kk am * ") |

rance To Import |

Meat From Uruguay |

PARIS, Aug, 23. |
France will import 5,000 tons |
of frozen beef from Uruguay and

an equal amount of fresh beef
from other Europ@an countries |
during three months of 1952. The

decision was taken

an Inter-ministerial
at which Premier
presided. The
imports, were

ordered for
August and

yesterday by
conference,
Antoine Pinay |
amounts of beef
the ame as those
the period of July,
September.—wU.P.

West Protest Killer's Body Found

1 ‘ e
To Russia
BERLIN, Aug. 23.
| The Western Allies in_ three

| Similar notes to General Vassily
Chuikov. Soviet C ommander
Eastern Germany, charged Russia
| with obstructing inter-zonal trade

| to divide Germany completely.
| Allied notes rejected Chuikov’s

STOCKHOLM, Aug. 23.
Tha body of Tore Hedin, 25, a
former policeman wanted for

| questioning in the death of eight

| persons in southern Sweden, was
found at the bottom of Bosarp
Lakq@ in Seania County. Police
Superintendent Alf Eliason said
that the body of Hedin was found
about 25 yards from the spot
his boat, which

| with a load of

' July 30 charge that the West waa!

violating the New York and Paris

! agreements for lifting the block-!

| ade of West Berlin,
| —U-P.



; and communications in an attermpt/ where the police yesterday found\
had been sunk
stones

had combed the

|
Earthquake Shakes
|. Celifornia

| DAKERSFIELD, California, |
Aug. 23.
| Another earthquake rattled

Southern California on Saturday
| as Bakersfield listed its dead at 2
and its damage at $100,000,000 dug
;out of the wreckage left by
| Priday’s bomb-like tremor
Southern California was shaken
at 10.10 a.m. G.M.T. another
of series of “after shocks” which
have occurred at inter Is sinc

quake three day

by



ago,
—U,P

j #erk killer chopped four
» to death with an axe and set fires

The
wooded
Seania all

police
wuthery
yesterday

province’ of
after a ber-
persons

in which four others died,
The crime was described by the
police as one of the bloodiest in

modern European history. As the

news of the gory rampage pread
through the towns and villages
af Scania, many parents refused
to allow their children to go to
school and many doors were lock-
ed and barred.—UwU.P.



Argentine Central Bank
May Grant





Import Licences
BUENOS AIRES, Aug !
The Argentir Cer | j
said it will consider
censes ¢ nport fa)
shemic
ly signed by anti U.P

eats aoeneaiecastiie A

CEOS SSO SSS S












PRICE : SIX CENTS

.

W.L Workers
Succeed In U.S.

SATISFACTORY reports on the efficiency
duct of the West Indian agricultural workers
United States were among the matters Hrought to tl
tention of the Regional Labour Board which m:
the past week at Hastings House, Barbacd
chairmanship of Sir George Seel, K.C.M.G., Comptroll
for Development and Welfare.

In the course of its discussions, the Board }





detail the existing arrangements for the well-be I
West Indian agricultural workers Among rece sReLO
ments in this direction has been the setting uj hole

centre in Miami early in the year under the direction o!
Mr. Anstey Jacques of Grenada.

The Board confirr
Karthquake






centre has been of great
to West Indians in trans © ar
from the United States 1









jally approved its establis nt
e F | The statement regarding ttt
~~ gener: success of West ind
Buries Four eves, ss.e, Wet nae
e o ed in report by Mr ¢
In California [oe 088 oe 3
viser to the Comptrolle ind My
S. Hochoy, 0.B.} I our Con
BAKERSFIELD, California, missioner for Trinidad i
Aug. 23. spected the headquarters of the
Searching parties poked through] Central Liaison Officer Wash-
the rubble of shattered buildings|ington at the beginnir the yea
for four persons beli¢ved buried} and also visited sore e camps
by a bomb-like earthquake that|of West Indian workers in dilfer-
crumbled Bakersfield business/ent parts of the United States
district, Another earthquake rip-
pled across Southern California Changes Recommended
early today, shaking some resi- In the course of its report, this
dents of Los Angeles out of their]/two-man committee expressed it
sleep. satisfaction with the work of the
The second tremor was much]joOrganisation, and re‘ommended
lightdr than the devastating jolt|that certain changes hould be
th whip-eracked through Bak-| made with a view to improving Its

ersield yesterday afternoon, rip-
ping

co

hospital facilities.
hit Los Angeles at 3.10 am. It





effectiveness: In particular, it was
proposed that the post of Deputy
Chief Liaison Officer should be
filled on a permanent basis as
as possible, and that, in view of
the great distances that have to be
traversed by the Liaison Officers



the
llepsing

fronts
roofs

from buildings,
and = crippling
Today’s quake

soon

+ felt as a series of small shakes





over a period of about 30 seconds. |!

The tremor was not felt here al-| in visiting the various camps, their

though it was noticed 60 miles;MuUmber should be inereased dur-

away in Lancaster, There were] ing the crop seasons, —

no reports of damage from the eee auopred th ea Art

second earthquake, mendations and reeorded fu

“ confidence in Mr, Herb -Mac-

Hospital Damaged donald, O.B.E Chief ,Liaison

Authorities said that 18 build-

@ on page 16

ings would have to be rebuilt in-

el
eri

000, and a hotel.
the latest in a long series of trem- ;
ors following in the wake of a

k

in nearby Arvin and. Tehchapi|

ig 26, Kern County Gen- m
vl Hospital, yelaad st 690,000. Caradian War
Veterans Parade

ier” quake that took 13 lives!





‘ h- TORONTO, Aug. 2°
and caused Considerable damage! poer War veteFans “old
re last July 21, from the first big one” seriousls

One of the worst problems fac<}),\nded younger men of the |
ing the city was the shortage of, and

ho
qu

Kern
containing
$3,000,000 worth of damage. Yes-

ter
ott
ad
ho
50
an
Jo.

32,807 population,

Sa
er
in

south, tore huge cracks in walls)" more planned to watch
and tumbled tons of bricks, plast-

er,

Wuch of the damage wag to bulld-
ings damaged in the July 21 shoe, | “Canada Year” |

CSS

6696S CPO OSSS

LLCS

44,4
-

GOSS

SOSOF

4,

POSSSSOS96S

1
youngster fresh
Korea shined medals and squar
shoulders on Saturday to take
pert in the Warriors Bay Parac
at the Canadian National Exhib!-
tion

spital

facilities, The July 21!
ake

knocked out part of the
County General Hospital,
400 beds, and did



w



day quake demolished
ler wing of the hospital, In] The
dition to quake injuries the wing through the city nd
spital Is caring for more than { 10 exhit ition on Saturd ter
victims of sldeping sickness, | oon and w nd up t th gran
illness now crippling San! & . aedias Sonor

f re : n ind where Brigadier J i M
aquin Valley, The city hag ®/ Rockingham the fir t Canad:

Commander in Korea, waited to
The tremor which was telt in| #ke the salute
cramento 250 miles north cf} Seme 10,000 veterans
‘e, but passed almost unnoticed |“ 4 regular forces were e>
Los Angeles only 100 miles! take part. Another thousand
from
stands in wheel-chai in hospital
streets, | cots or shakily on canes,
One of the biggest ex

the
annual parade



militia
pected

, and debris into the



hibit
oftici





rmed Forces of Canada
—UP.

as the “A
u.P.|

999949 9906566666666660464 O53 O66,.66 606 66664 COS
% 4 ; * eres
PPOLPDLPGPP PPC OOOO ILL X OLeeS >>

WINE can give x
so much pleasure to %
dining and entertaining %

but it isn’t any more
complicated than servings ¢

| tea or coffee. %






® QUALITY %
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Try serving Sherry to your guests $>
before dinner — slightly chilled. And %
add this K.W.V. Paarl to your -soups %
and other food for a new and distinct $$
| flavour, You will be delighted with %

| the results! §
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“The Wine of All Jime ¥
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SUNDAY ADVOCATE

















So i ee | M" GEORGE AMOS, formerly

MAKE THES A BR. 4 VE f | i Private Seevetars to Sur

’ , Pea Y ro aed 4 Sovernay of

} arbados, returned from England

SATURDAY OCTOBER 4th esterday in the Golffte where he
| | spent a holiday.

| He met Sir Hilary and Lady

rad } Blood in London and had dinner

with them and Sir Hilary said

c th he hopes to have a Iéok at

+ Barbados in the near future.
|

































































Preston FOSTER &

“WHIRLWIND RAIDERS”
Charles STARRETT

‘he Modern Dress Shoppe

Broad Street.

UNION STATION
a Ontong Friday

INSIDE THE WALLS
OF FOLSOM PRISON



Recital of Sacred Music
On Surday. 24th August 5
At 4.30 p.m.



xon Charm
Coming Fri:

RETREAT | HELL

=





fa
poUBT See
PPSPSPESSPDDVSSOD SOSES AS SECOSSS OO Oe



ot

Fo

' 1 rm FOR SUNDAY, AUGUST 24, 1952 | Leuble Wedding At
I tae icc ee a i | St. Matthias
10 he n which yo irtuday ¢ os a * —
ee a ee ie accordiah oie we, T. MATTHIAS CHURCH was
y ——— ¥ . . the seene of a double wed-
| HP { * ARIES : ibrations from most planets t + ding yesterday afternoon af 4.00
ut j Bie) i? ' March 2?—April 2¢ oul trike’ a responsive chord i o'clock. The parties were ‘he
i charitable nature, urge you to aid Misses Fleurette Kinch and Bar-
@ JAZZ BANDS ' neighbour and the unfortunate + bara Kinch daughters of Mr. and
FRAME, - 2965 { * * Mrs. Ernest Kinch of “Marlow”
{ I oss a is ee widest ite Hastings.
@ STEEL BANDs j * ee E : ; eee Bho tad: ee Oa The ceremony which was fully
e : i. = { Bey SY es vine t6 dak ae dane eae aaa choral was performed by the
® SIDE SHOWS i x ee shane ee Rev. Canon Harvey Reed. Mr.
: i , , { “s ie Alister Anthony Lee, son of the
You can’t afford to miss 4 : + * ¥ late Brigadier Ernest Alister Lee
this Shaw j GEMINI! Yeu born on the borderline nf the two R.A., and Mrs. E. A, Lee cf 3020
% stay 2i--tune 1 & faurus and Caneer (on either side o Foul Bay Road. Victoria, B.C.,
Admission by Ticket oniy ’ * * ini) bad better think wice before you Canada took as his bride Miss
; H+ a ‘as woe ee. . Gomini ean Barbara Kinch, elder sister, and
~ PQS "ORY Wty Wore.» she wore a dress of bridal satin,
ain * * eut on princess style with a
xo °PLLL®RPPEPPE LCE PPP APA CANCER This is a most auspicious time in which to chantilly lace yoke, sleeves and
R ~ ~ ¥ | * June 22—July 23 do things you have wanted to for ame 7s a long flowing train. Her finger
$ THE B (RBADOS 9 | time, But fit things in amicably for tip veil of nylon net was held in
% ik& - ¥ | Avoid personal friction. place by a lace i cap a
: ‘ med with flowers. e carri a
HOTEI - : % ¥% * * * * * Seniand of white orchids and
~ “hu f [ LEO Generally fine vibrations, but so have many tube reses,
* invit } July 24—Aug. 22 others.now,—and there will likely be ny Miss Fleurette Kinch was mar-
invites you to the suggestions on what to, and what N to, . oar a Proverbs, son of
‘ BE “4 me ‘On B 3) do, Be your congenial self; careful too! * by ag An oe eS
— “* WY,
* “Marathon”, Rockley Terrace and
. ad ‘ : i j ara i ji
x ERS : BALL ¥ Stop, look, listen—eonsider well all pro- a she wore a on of mee ones
* at PARADISE BEACH CLU ; VIRGO positions. Don’t be hasty making up your with a close fitting bodice, long
% on SATURDAY September 6, es - til } Aug. 23—Sept. 23 mind; note in what direction others lean. sleeves and an appliqued neck-~-
° BEACHCOMBER DRESS p.m. until—? * In pastimes, co-operate; in duties, the same, line and very full skirt ending in
‘ R 0: Tickets $1.50 a flowing train, Her finger tip
‘ | This day ealls for—some work, rest, travel, veil of nylon net was he in
A One-Week holiday for sept ee g3 something non-routine. Conserve ener * place by a juliet cap trimmed
adi "these days; be relaxed in mind, too, Don with daisies. She carried a bou-
2 People at the - - - | forget church. F quet of white orchids and tube
ah mM - roses.
o ; : They were attended by Miss
SANTA MARIA HOTEL % * Don’t tax mind and body with too many Nanette Kinch and Miss Sheila
: ei SCORPIO iffairs; on other hand, remember carefully Tryhane as_ bridesmaids and
GRENADA % * Oct. 244--Nov. ?2 your obligations. Church seivices and they wore similar dresses of nile
FREE Air Ticket x fonahly _S FIRST list. green ballerina length i ee
ir licKets — % eyelet organdy over a
%
’ = >) RIU ‘Tomorrow’s excellent aspect of your Jupi- skirt of nylon sheer featuring a
Courtesy of B.W.LA. X% * ars a ter urges you get some minor details out + ight bodice with neck and sleever
FREE A i % “9 . of the way for the coming ‘week’s bigger embroidered with seokoent et
EE ecommodation » * matters. dering. They ‘carr white
x * * * + lambs 1 ffs with daisie
Q ambs wool muiis
and Meals x 4 Be prompt and neat without being finicky ind headdresses to match.
M > oth vonderful % x waa be happy, albeit serene and serious about + The duties of ee bo
amy ower W ~ ec, 23-— Jan. Whose affairs that call for such, verformed by Mr. ar’ oor
Prizes : * * * eee nee ce nen
' x espectively ose 0
Â¥ * AQUARIUS Your planet Uranus suggests looking over tor tc Dr, Eyre Kinch, Mr. Davirl
GSSS “ot PPPOE ‘ Jan. 22 — Feb. 20 nice again that _plann pd schedule; trip or Reed, Dr. Malcolm Proverbs, and
fc tt ttt tan atev¢ : “aim have in mind. Pray, smile Mr. Harrold Nicholls. east ;
oe cheertu “| i e a
ba it A Tt £ y \* A reception was —
RO 0 i Rn * * * ‘Beverley’, The Garrison ant
Please take hint to Aquarius to-day. Your Mr. and Mrs. Lee left for Sam
PISCES inelination and configurations 7 i tle for their honey-
oxy | 4 é é gurations urge like Lord’s Cas €
EMPIRE OLYMPIC RORY ROYAL * Feb. 21—March 20 (roatment of day and affairs * moon while Mr, and Mrs, Prov-
To-Day to Wed. (To- Day & Tomerrow) To-Day ty | Last . ey ree | erbs are at the Crane Hatel.
1.45 & 8.90 4.20 & 8.15 netrad be ; ead mhieta, whalandne | YOU BORN TODAY are big of mind and heart, but often *
ow twine 4.45 onl¥ | pred Mac acne | Prese Presents XK disor pointed at the seeming negligence of yothers who disre- Assistant Medical
a sney's claire TREVO THE MOB i ie .
STORY OF Sali en THE GOLDEN Brodatiek * Craw ford ot a onan es 4 beatin eosaet hee vain sania aera Superintendent
IN HOOD and Richard Kile sirthdate of: Robert Herrick, English poet; Aubrey Beards- * © NTRANSIT from England ye's-
ROBII A DANGEROUS SALAMANDER er is ley, artist. terday by the Golfite weet
Color by Technicolor; ~ GAME Starring short: —K ing rehot : and Mrs. L, F. E Lewis and their
Starring Starring [ Peer ret) MARAE A ARRAY | ee a Re a a % |iwo children Leonard and Sylvia
Richard TODD Richard ARLEN “extra, Columbia's Whok g trom Trinidad
Joan Be And” DEVINE | possmmount, Beltish ‘Serial | Dr. Lewis who is Assistant
Sees | Tee 2 ews Se Tihourn POLELEEEE LEO PLP PLAS EL LOE LP LAE ALE LA PLP LSA LPLLAD Medical Supenntendent at the
U rsa e 4 8 | j HE | ‘
wie oe | ween | Se wi, § PANETTA DRESS SHOP § vee) rege! tes, xe
Opening Ceremony | hole § - | ek .’e Double Vietor JORY — 4 ‘ up to the on 0
of the = AIL SEIN TOMMY} beers TO KILL \“Wea. & Thurs end vacation leave ——— inna
Thursdsy =| Nonh BEERY fr Bred we vir re Glenn BORD \ (Next Door to Singer's) . Fo welts on ou goyeiaieey at the
at 8.90 Bm. Biv ch. at 4.80 only) Craunctte Corbert | Nina FOCH :
| ! 3 ndéie-aideoa Royal Infirmary.
The Barbados UNDERCOVER | in in Manchester
yYOMAN FAMILY ‘UNDERCOVER MAN a
welght-Litting mn HONEYMOON _ and EVENING BAGS—f » dost Rack From UK.
Association and Coming Soon ADVENTURES IN RV ENENG BAUS——irom $4.95
Presents The YRAFFIC IN CRIME) THE CRVERADO RS. DEREK FOWLES whose
WEIGHT - LIFTING) ~~ 3° rad a on oF William BISHOP ACQMAR HANDKERCHIEFS—freom ....... $13.86 husband is’ English qnd Hie
CHAMPIONS ABACAS yone a OUTLAW Gloria HENRY tory Master at Harrison College
COR TEE = z g : . re returned from England yesterdoy
= OLE OLIE || > Desses Made to Order for ail Geeasions by the Golfito after an absence of
PLAZA 1 Hi A i BRE cece ereercnarnntecacnst ta Ae pe
i EE - compa ° ,
4) |) | Andrew.
= —, a Xi Ta’ ’ ~ y ee =~
BRIDGELOW “ b. Dine ae (Dial 8404) 1 j fa & 7 OL EN aL) GA 1 E Ty
» Last = Shows
— ge LODAY & TOMORROW |] voday i & 8.0 PM The _Eaapiten— St ares
TODAY to mt solosoal Technicole sKoWs TO
erecta |e! ee peers} NEW rot eat
1o SPECIAL Shows on oa ‘oy URDER
won. a rues: 6.0 am. |] gk BASH Var Stiean ; ’ 9 t yf Much Talked About aEFLIN : HAYWARD I < d 2S Hi: ts $4. 32 i ‘ EK of the WEST” (Coles)
RON. BERD | GuTPasTy ws AHS aCe " ave wrae ote Ween ees
2 was at oo a Nera > 7 & TUES. 8.0 De
(Six Men On A Raft) anonels eta é Aue Lad 1€s Dx esses $518.00 aes he Bred: Pina ¥poO”"
Ali Speelal Added SS wa SARONG Dae Wt ewae “WARREN
Attraction ! Next Attraction H i d b > ‘
” td ABBOTT & 1 . LA av
na hoapenocs’ | EAGLE AND pyd ABBOTTS randbags BS 13 WW ct ee '
Charles oa ~ _————————
; MeGRAW & DIXON ‘ THE HAWK as . 4 SSS
WHURS, Specfal 1 = PM and ST. STEPHEN’ N CHURCH
“PHUNDERHOOF”

SSS




> oonommoennnsenommnnnnnscccomnnntcrtéC| IST OPENED .... I$ proceeds in Aid of | &

G 1 OBE \¢ NT : ] r Choir Funds

THIS EVENING 8.30 P.M. LAST SHOW AN ASSORTMENT Ok PAN BOOKS 21, 8, 52—2n.

SCARAMOUCHTIE AT ADVOCATE STATICNERY |
TO-MORROW AND TUESDAY 4.45 & 8.30 crc SEM ee
RIDERS OF TEIE PURPLE %AGi C ie ,
(George MONTGOMERY) ‘ A R ON CLUB
THE BEGINNING OR mk ib ' i j l ,





Tree

_ Br ian DONLEVY — Robert WALKER — Tom DRAKE

WEDNESDAY AND THURSDAY 445 & 8.30 ?.M
Johnny WEISMULLER — Maureen © ‘SULLIVAN

PROUDLY ANNOUNCES
THE OPENING DANCE AT THEIR

=



VARZAN IME APE SAN
BELLE STARR'S DAUGHTER : NEW CLUB BUILDING — BLACK ROCK

- ROMAN ON
SATURDAY IST. NOVEMBER

IN TRUE

MONTGOMERY — CAMERON — RYAN
OPENING FRIDAY AUG. 29TH 5 & 5 39 P.M.



1952

.

+ * WALLOWEEN

TRADITION
WITCHES-FLOOR
SHOW
SPOT & BALL DANCES

BEWITCHING TUNES BY CURWEN'S ORCHESTRA
DANCING 9.00 P.M. DRESS OPTIONAL

ADMISSION BY TICKET $1.00



starring
RORY viD THE

avi. CALHOUN: vii. Rl i

hese TOIT»

fog the Screen
nd Produced by



jcemvumr= sc





male . cone
OEE LEE LPPEPL PCCP PPP LAA APPL ALS SESE

6656166
PGF LLLP FLL OES

i

re F
SEs se nem

“4 <4
CSG PPPOE LOSO






SUNDAY, AUGUST 24, 1952

—

re et



Caub Calling



Mr. & Mrs. ALISTER A. LEE and Mr, & Mrs. ROY PROVERBS
Wedding At St. Leonard's Qualified In Nursing

while those of ushers fell to Mr.

ESTERDAY afternoon at 4.30 William Watson, Terrence Gill, ISS GUISE FODERINGHAM

; Mr. Teddy Davis and Mr. Harold :
- at St. Leonard’s Church, Ramsay, The reception was held of Grenada arrived here
Miss Dorrien Mitchinson Watson, 5+ Regan Lodge, St. Michael and Yesterday by the Golfite from Eng_

daughter of Mrs. Tris Watson and
the late John M. Watson of
“Walwyn”, Worthing was married
to Mr. Eustace Hutson Davis, son
of the late Mr. and Mrs. T. H.
Davis of Chelsea Road. .

The ceremony which was fully

land where she spent alr‘ost five
years,

Miss Foderingham who did
nursing at Sir Charles Hospital
after being awarded a C.D. and
W. Scholarshir. practised mid-

the honeymoon is being spent at

Powell Spring Hotel, Bathsheba.
1 Party -

PARTY was given by the

Adelphi Table Tennis Team

on Thursday night at “Parade

° , View,” Hastings in the honour of wifery for six months at Weir
fo HA Delete rn witae Mr, Christie Smith, Secretary of Bae santas eee after
was given in marriage by her the Tabe Tennis Association dite Ras a —— ery and as a
brother Mr. Ralph Watson and Who was married yesterday She fee eaten Lge oe
she wore a dress of ivory slipper afternoon. The visiting Trinidad in Secu. Ping: ga : ree iday
satin with a close fitting bodice Table Tennis Team, at present ("Goa The p Ran 5 eaton-
outtoned right through the high touring Barbados, were also in- tureieg +0 eundan ore re-
neck, Her long sleeves were —o — they —_ “erg = -

trimmed wit shantilly. lace a tending best wishes to Mr, anc : zs bs

the front ot Cod diet tidteese Mrs. Smith for health and happi- Birthday Party

panel % 4 spay lace frills. "&S5S. Oo” THURSDAY last Master
e long flowing train was of re Bria 5
slipper satin and her fall was einen TH og Mak Cae Meee Gk
kept in place by a lace cap and M* NEVILLE Francis, a Cus- Forest esate Trinidad “oalp-
orange blossoms, Her bouquet toms officer of Antigua ar- |-rated his fourth birthday at
was shell pink and white rose rived on a _ business visit on “Abingdon” St. Michael, the
buds with Michaelmas daisies and Friday and is a guest of Mrs. S. residence of his grandparents
maiden hair fern. Codrington, at Brittons X Road. yy, and Mrs. Louis Gale -
Her sole attendant was Miss Mr. Francis also served in the Among those present “at the
Rosemary Watson who wore @ last World War in the R.A.F. and party were:— David Allan. K
ballerina length dress of orchid has recently established a danc- Barnes, John and Helen Bowen.
organza with a tight fitting bodice ing school. He expects to be . :

with flowers at the neck to match Celine, Susan and Timothy Gale;

leaving the island soon to be in Gpyi. 7 A 3
the flowers in the dutch bonnet Antigua for his first big show. oe va oe Sade Canes:
headdress, She carried a bouquet He is Principal of the Antigua Rupert and Bernard Hunte:
of assorted ground orchids. Cultural Dancing Class which Felicity, Marilyn, Elizabeth, and

The duties of bestman were stages their show at the Happy pjiana Jones; Barbara and Dotty
performed by Mr. Basil Davis Acre Hotel on September 1.

Lee,



BRIAN “feeding” the cake to Marilyn, four-year-old daugiiter or mr. and Mrs. Harry vones and grand
daughter of Mr. aud irs. P. A. Lynch, with whom he cut the cake.

(Carib would appreciate similar pictures from parents which MUST be suitable prints for reproduc-
tion for this column.)

IMPORTANT

NOTICE

A. ob. Stuart's School
of Dancing

Presents to

REVUEDEVILLE 1952

under the distinguished patronage of His Excellency
The Governor Sir WILLIAM and Lady SAVAGE

Members
and
Friends

CLUB
MORGAN

WAS CLOSED
LAST NIGHT

DECEMBER

|

at

EMPIRE THEATRE

on Wed. 3rd, Thurs. 4th & Friday 5th Sept. — 8.30 p.m.
MATINEE: Friday 5th — 5 p.m.

BOOKING OFFICE OPENS - - -

LADIES “ARCOLA” SHOES

LOW CUT COURTS. Navy, Brown,

Black Suedes $13.69
White Nubuek .......0......... ds $14.50
VARIOUS STYLES Of BLACK & BROWN SUEDES
Backless & Toeless ....... $14.79
White Nubuck—Backless & Toeless $15.04

T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS

YOUR SHOE STORES

DIAL 4220 DIAL 4606



SUNDAY, AUGUST 24,

At The Cinema

—-





1952

Men Against The Sea
iy G.H.

A FEW years back, a young Norwegian scientist named
Thor Heyderdah| worked out the theory that the inhabit-
ants of the Polynesian Islands in the South Pacific had
originally come from the continent of South America and
not from the Asiatic Continent as other ethnologists
thought. Tc try to prove his theory, he and five other in-
trepid Scandinavians set out on a forty foot balsa raft built

precisely as ancient Spanish

craft used twelve hundred years ago.

records described the primitive
On this raft, they

sailed 4,300 miles from Callao in Peru to the Polynesian
Islands, following the course, believed by Heyderdahl, to
have been taken by pre- Inca people in ancient times.

KON-TIKI showing at the Plaza
Bridgetown is the actual day-by-
day record of this amazing
Odyssey across the Pacific, when
six men pitted their strength and
knowledge against the forces of
nature and emerged the winners.

The whole key-note of the
film is simplicity and all the
glossy finish of studio effects are
lacking, which emphasises all the
more, the stark authenticity of
the. picture, and the elements

against which the men had to be
constantly on guard, for survival.
Naturally, the moments of greatest
danger are not seen in the film.

















—& The Bible,
' p.m. Composer of The Week, 5.45 p.m

RHONDA FLEMING

The five day storm that nearly
wrecked the Kon-tiki can only be
imagined in the mind’s eye, but
if one has read the book and then
seeh the actual size of the raft on
which the men battled for days
through a storm of hurricane pro-
portions, it se¢ms impossible that
they should have survived such an

ordeal, However there are other
adventures that we do see—and
share in. The harpooning of
sharks has its moments, when the
men have to move nimbly on the
slippery “deck” to avoid being
bitten; the discovery of a living

snake mackerel, never before sen
by man and one of the uglies. fish
in the sea, and a whale shark that
measures forty-five to sixty fee,
with three thousand teeth in each
jaw, which decided to investigrie
the ¥aft at close quarters to the
fearful consternation of the ad-
venturers; flying fish, dolphin and
small squids or sea-cats 4s we call
them were daily visitors on the

raft and it was found that the
ink in the octopus was fine for any
correspondence! And last, but by
no means liast, the dramatic pile-
up of the Kon-tiki on a coral reef.

Throughcut the film there jis a
delightful commentary by Mr
tleyderdah! that is witty as well
as informative and once you

becom? accustomed to his lilting
Norwegian accent, you will find it
fascinating.

The film’s chief apreal lies in
the fact that this incredible story
actually happened and was re-
corded; in so far as possible, by
a 16-m. camera, and though at

timés, it is not too easy on the
eyes; since the images forever
move on a restless sea, it stands,
real and dramatic, as an heroic

record of men against the sea,



use Palmolive Soap as Doctors advised
for a Brighter, Fresher Complexion!

Doctors prove that Palmolive Soap can improve complexions
remarkably in many ways. Oily skin looks less oily—dull, drab
skin wonderfully brighter. Coarse-looking skin appears finer.
















The Last Outpost

At the Plaza Barbarees, we have
TH® LAST OUTFOST starring
Ronald Reagan and Rhonda Flem-
ing in a somewhat pretentious
Civil War eWestern presented in
Technicclor. The plot is a bit
thin—the characters stereotyped—
and we have two brothers fighting
on opposi:t sidet in the war be-
tween the States, but who join
forces to defend an outpost against
the Apaches. Though there is no
atterapt at any historieal signifi-
eance, there is plenty of action,
particularly in the final battle with
the Indians which is exciting if a
oit gory! The scenic backgrounds
are, of course, impressive and
there is some fast riding by soldier
and Apache alike.
Directed with a light tough
there are several humourous
sequences and one gets the impres-
sion that the director dixtn’t take
this one very seriously. Charac-
terizations are adequate with Mr.
Reagan and Miss Fleming indulg-
ing in an on-and-off romance in
which love finally triumphs.

LISTENING
HOURS

SUNDAY, AUGUST, 24
400 — 7.15 pm. '...... 19.76M 2% 59M



p.m. The N
lude, 4.15 p.m, The C
p.m. Sunday Half-Hour, 5.00 p.m. From
5.10 p.m. Interlude, 5.15

Arthur's Inn, 6.45 p.m. Programme
Parade & Interlude, 7.00 p.m. The News,
7.10 p.m. Home News From Britain.
71 — 1045 p.m. .. 2.58 M 31 32M
7.15 p.m. Caribbean Voices, 7.45 p.m
Sunday Service, 8.15 p.m. Radio News-
reel, 8.30 p.m. Spotlight on Central
Asia, 8.45 p.m Interlude, 8.55 p.m.
From The Editorials, 9.00 p.m. From
The Promenade Concerts, 10.00 p.m
The News, 10.10 p.m, News Talk, 10.15
p.m. London Forum, 10.45 p.m. Why 1

believe
MONDAY, AUGUST 25

4m) — 7.15 pom, 19.76 M 25 53M

4.00 p.m, The News, 4.10 p.m. The
Daily Service, 4.15 p.m, The Case of the
Night-Watchman's Friend,
Memory Lane, 5.00
5.0 p.m. Interlude,
venirs of Music, 6.00 p.m Welsh
Miscellany, 6.15 p.m. Listeners’ Choice,
645 p.m. Sports Round-up and Pro-
grarame Parade, 7.00 p.m. The News
Pregramme Parade, 7.00 p.m. The News,
7.140 p.m, Home News From Britain.
7.15 — 10.20 p.m, 23 538M 31.2 ™M

7.15 p.m. Books To Read & Theatre
Talk, 7.45 p.m, Ballads & Songs, 8.15
p.m. Radio Newsreel, 8.30 p.m. Euro-
pean Survey, 8.45 p.m. Interlude, 8.55
p.m. From the Editorials, 9.00 p,m.
Justice Comes Late, 9.35 p.m. Twen-
tieth Centuny Serenaders, 10.00 p.m.
The News, 10.10 p.m, News Talk, 10.15
p.m. The Health of Man, 10,30 p.m.
Tip Top Tunes.

Egyptian Doctors

e
Tour Minnesota
INDIANAPOLIS, Indiana, Aug.
20.

4.45 p.m
Cricket,
5.15 p.m. Sou-

m



Nineteen Egyptian doctors,
faculty members of Cairo medital
schools, went to the Mayo clinic
in Rochester Minnesota Wednes-
day in a 380 day professional
tour.

The ,group, headed by Dr.
Mohammed El Ayadi spent three
days here inspecting the Indiana
University, medical centre, and
the Eli Lilly medica] plant and
laboratories. They will visit
drug manufacturing plants and
hospitals in Michigan and ‘upper
New York after their Minnesota
visit. —UP.



1

advised:

huge









So, do as 36 skin specialists For 60 seconds,
f 2 massage with

3 Le eres

Everyone’s talking about this NEW
STORE for Mr. & Mrs. Public; for
Master & Miss Public too, with its

NEEDS — Mum and Dad are
interested
ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT, and
Dad has already selected from the
complete range of OFFICE FURNI-
TURE and TYPEWRITERS.



POULTRY
NOTES

FOR most poultry keepers in
Barbados the answer to which
comes first the or the chicken
ought to be the chicken.

This year for example thou-
sande of young oS hatched
ocelly or imported have been
bought by long-established poul-
try-keepers or by newcomers to
the business who have decided to
“grow their own eggs”.

The decision to buy chickens
rather than hatch eggs is wise be-
omnes pene you ‘Niesly
egg-hatching you are not to
be too successful with your incu-

to be
recommended.

You must decide the type of
poultry Rye! want to keep because
some chicks inherit a greater abil-
ity to lay more eggs than other
chicks and if it’s eggs, more =
and still more eggs you are r
then -buy chicks ith a strong

hereditary ability to lay.



Decide too whether you are
going to keep poultry for mea
hatching or breeding stock. [I
you try and combine one or more
of those activities you ape going
to have a lot of headaches,

Having decided (let us say that
you are going in eggs) your
next thought must be for equip-
ment,

Don’t rush off to the nearest
chick farm or chick im: and
buy week old chicks without hav-
ing obtained a house for your
chicks. You will have to build or
have made a wire-floored pen (not
more than 4” mesh) with a cover

and stan on raised legs (one
foot from the sho! be
afiequate). Opinions may vary

about the size of the wire or
shape or size of the pen Dut most
puny iewece ty Decades ee
at chicks ht to be off

th da
yt. yt un au ‘ween

If you are going in for chick
raising on a grand scale you can
allow a square foot for every two
chicks during the first six weeks.

That’s plenty of room.

Feed and water must be avail-
able at all times. Water is one of
the easiest methods of transmit-
ting disease germs and it is im-
possible to too much care to
ensure that water containers are
kept clean. Small chicks can
drown easily so be certain that
your containers ate safe. One of
the safety home made varieties
is an inverted bottle stfapped and
gradually emptying into a narrow

asin.

Each chick requires 2 Ibs. of
startena before a change to a
growing ration is made,

Wherever you Gecide to trans-
fer chicks from the raised wire-
floored pens to a brooder house or
pen, disinfect the pen before you
put the chicks in. When the =
is dry cover the floor with two
inches of megasse (3 bags of me-
gasse will cover the floor of a
6ft x 4ft pen.

Should you decide not to use the
wire-floored pens but to transfer
your chicks straight from the
hatchway to the pen, cover the
megasse with newspapers and
keep covered for four days until
the chicks have grown accustomed
to eat their feed from the feeders.

You must use feeders to avoid
waste of feed right from the be-
ginning. When chicks are -three
weeks old it is time to place low
roosts protected by wire. Each
chick should have three inches of
roosting space.





Wash with Palmolive Soap. | ~

"s soft, lovely lather,
Rinse!

choice of TOYS & SCHOOL





in the quantities of






Lower Bruad St.

the look well against such









SUNDAY

FarmA
iy

LAST week we considered the use of weter in relation
lants and indicated the need for its more efficient)

to
application, having regard

growth, To-day, it may be of interest to discuss the ques:
tion briefly in relation to livestock and, in this connection, ||
requirements have been more aecueniay

one authority in Britain gives the foll

ap
animal listed :

GARDENING HINTS.
FOR AMATEURS

(—Flower Arrangements—)

One of the greatest joys derived
from toiling in the garden is to
have fiowers to pick for the house.
Even the dullest room is trans-
formed by the addition of flow-
er, and a bowl or vase of well
arranged flowers is a joy,

So often people are heard to
say “oh I love flowers but I sim-
ply can’t arrange them” but, what
a defeatest attitude to take!

True, flower arrangement does
seem to come naturally to a
lucky few who are able to arrange
them beautifully without any
effort. But with most people it is
a matter of practice, and famili-
arity with the different kinds of
flowers.

All flowers, whether in a bowl
or vase look better for the addition
of some green, It may be their
own leaves, fern, asparagus, or
grasses, but the greenery seems to
form a background to them, and
bring out their colouring and
beauty.

Never pack flowers too closely,
or put too many in one vase, bui
space them, well intermixed with
green, so that they can be seen
to advanfige.

Choose your flowers with taste
too to suit the colouring of ths
room where they are to be used.
Most rooms in these days are
tinted in some soft pastel shade,
and against such a background
no descrimination of flower col-
our need be made, as any flowers
a back-
ground, But if the room is of some
dark shade, more choice must b?
given to the flowers, for it would
be fata] to arrange say a bowl of
marigolds against a deep red or
blue wall, they just would not
harmonise, and other similar
harsh contrasts must also be
avoided.

Almost as important as the
flowers are the bowls, and vases
in which they are put. It :s
useless to expect long stemmed
flowers to arrange wel] in a
receptacle that is too small or
short for them, or to expect much
from a bunch of short stemmed
flowers balanced on the top of
a tall vase. The receptacle must
suit the flowers they are to re-
ceive in size and shade, or the
arrangement cannot show to the
best advantage.

It pays too not to be too con-
servative in the choice of the
receptacle for the flowers as a
study of illustrations of flower
arrangements by famous people
will show.

A look at Constant Spry’s
beautiful book of flower arrange-
ment shows that the flowers ar®
by no means always arranged in
the conventional vase or bowl,
but are often put in such things
as a charming old-fashioned
soup-tureen, tankard, or some
other lovely, but unorthodox
receptacle.

Altogether flower arrangement
is not only fascinating for the
home, but it can develop into
lucrative work. Competent people
are always in demand to arrange
flowers for Hotel, parties, wed-
dings, Christenings, to make
bouquets, wreaths, corsages etc.
and what more charming way
could there be of earning?







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to the requirements of plant

measured. Thus | }
owing figures as|

ximate, daily, summer requirements for each class Of | 68$¢0~7O00090000000000000"

5

6 gallons
10 gallons

Horse at pasture :
Horse at work

Bullocs at pasture 6 gallons | >}

Cow in milk . 10 gallons} ,

Sheep } gallon | ‘
14 gallons |

depending on the wetness or dry-
ness of the weather, the amount
of exercise, temperature of the
air and so on. The food supplied
also influences the requirements
some extent. The same authority
states that, in general, a horse
requires 3lb. of water to every
pound of dry food, an ox 4 to 1
a sheep 2 to 1 and a pig 7 to 1
From this, it is reasoned that, in
ordinar? © circumstances, sheep
might be fed with dry food, cow:
with food which has been moist-
ened and pigs with sloppy food.

Let us examine in a little more
detail the case of the milking
cow, which requires a very liberal
supply of water. Not only has the
demands of her body to be met,
but water is essential for the
production of milk. It will be
readily understood, therefore, that
the modern, heavy yieldi dairy
cow is a_ tremendou of
water. Further, whe. ided
with water constantly, the evi-
dence suggests that a milk.og cow
will give a slightly larger yield
than if watered twice daily.
This observation has led to the}
installation of troughs or bowls in
cow stables immediately in front
of the animals. A fresh, piped in
water supply and suitable auto-
matic equipment. ensures that
purée drinking water is always at
their disposal.

i
'
These figures will vary somewhat



|



Some work at the Imperial
College, Trinidad, in regard to
the water requirements of dairy
gattle may be noted, Water con-
sumption in ration, pounds per
head per day per 1,000 lb. weight
of animal, for maintenance:

(a) Half-bred Holstein-Ze bu
cow — 99 lb. water per head per
day; made up of 34 Ib. in drinking
water, 56.5 lb, in the forage and
8.5 Ib. in wet grain.

(b) Pure-bred Holstein cow
137.5 lb. water per head per day;
made up of 72.25 Ib. in drinking
water, 57.5 Ib. in the forage and
7.75 |b. in wet grain. |

(ce) Pure-bred Zebu cow — 78
lb. water per head per day; made
up of 23.5 lb. in drinking water,
48 lb. in the forage and 6.5 lb. |
in wet grain.

In addition, for milk production |
per gallon of milk, average re-
quirement is two gallons of water
per day; less than this average,
however, if the milk yield is four
or more gallons per day, but
more than two gallons if a poor
milker giving say only one gallon
milk per day.

The very interesting point which
emerges from the above is the
outstanding difference in I
water requirements of the Zebu
and Holstein breeds, the former
requiring much less. The hardi-
ness of the Zebu for tropical con-|
ditions is thus exemplified. }

!



Finally, in addition to wate
actually consumed in the ration,
large quantities are required foi
animal and byre hygiene, wash-|
ing of equipment, utensils and so |
on, Figures for such purposes Fah |
to as much as 290 Ibs. per head
per day. (For practical purposes,
one gallon of water or milk may
be taken as weighing 10 Ib.)



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PAGE THREE



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PAGE FOUR



SUNDAY ADVOCATE








TENNIS RUBBER

College Old Boys Basketbali Champs
By O. S. COPPIN

GQ NONGRATULATIONS are in order for the Bar-

; bados Table Tennis Association for having

won the rubber in their fixtures with the South
Zone team of the Trinidad Table Tennis Associa-
tion.
| The results of the third and final Test are not
yet to hand as I write bu¥ the fact that Barbados
has won the first two is sufficient for the purposes
Gy of winning the rubber and justification for any
praise in the circumstances,

Before the visitors commenced their official fixtures with the
local team I hailed the series as a commendable step in the righ
direction of fostering friendly intercolonial rivalry.

NOT ALL TRINIDAD

The visitors did not constitute an All Trinidad team but it did
number among its ranks, players like Dr. Noble Sarkar who had
played representative International table tennis and Carl Williams
ihe present South Trinidad champion and Fenwick Debysingh, a
former South Trinidad champion who undoubtedly formed the

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| HOW D.D.D. ACTS SO QUICKLY

nucleus of a combination that from the beginning called forth
the best that we could put in the field against them.
They defeated Pelican, the senior division champions and a

strong combined team on each oceasion in convincing style and

there were few ot us who would have given Barbados the edge in

the Tests to come.
MAKING HISTORY

However. Barbados won the rubber and I think that this
uchievement is a new high in the history of organised table tennis
in the colony. There has been a decided complex and rank defeatism
in the ranks of local table tennis for some years now and it appeared
to me to have been the fashion to sponsor the idea that Barbados
table tennis was behind the rest of the entire world far less the
West Indies.

In spite of this, those with vision have stuck with the Barbados
Table Tennis Association and they have not given up their arms.

I would be the last te place this victory out of its correct perspec-
tive and complacently declare that Barbados Table Tennis had
arrived but on the other hand I challenge anyone, even the most
despicable detractors among us to classify this victory as something
less than a handsome indication that we have localised talent
capable of greater things in the Intercolonial table tennis arena and
that Barbados table tennis, with this added experience to their credit
can go forward to greater things.

H.C.0.B. BASKETBALL CHAMPS
ARRISON COLLEGE OLD BOYS are also in line for congratu-
Jations on having won the Basketball Knockout competition
this week. They beat Y.M.P.C, by the considerable margin of 35
to 21 points.

Y.MP.C, who had disposed of the powerful Carlton and College
teams earlier in the competition were expected to secure the edge
on Harrison College Old Boys but this was not to be, Y.M.P.C. con-
centrated on a tight zone defence and H.C.O.B. comprised of tail
players throughout maneouvred cleverly and penetrated their
defence.

Tall Algy Symmonds scored 19 of the 35 goals while the res:
of the team was made up of Noel Symmonds his brother another
six footer, K. Hall, J. Best and C. Forde.

His Excellency the Governor is due to present the trophies
at a presentation match next Thursday but I understand that the
Barbados Basketball Association will organise weekly practices in
preparation for the proposed tour of the Carib Bears in October,

CRICKET AVERAGES INTERESTING

HE fourth series of First Division games opened yesterday, ‘This

means that the 1952 cricket season is nearly halfway through
and so it is high time that we reviewed the figures returned in the
First Division games so far,

First of all it does seem certain that at least two batsmen should
reach the five hundred mark this season and two bowlers capture the
individual fifty wickets.

Both the batting as well as the bowling figures are in keeping
with those returned in satisfactory years for corresponding periods
and if this standard is maintained, I see no reason why the 1952
season should not be rated as a “¢

good local one,

DENIS HEADS
BATSMEN

ENIS ATKINSON heads the
batting averages with 9375
runs scored in four innings and
the excellent average of 93.75 and
is seventh in the list of bowlerg
having taken 19 wickets at a cost
of 16 runs each,



Reece errno

But for sheer all round excel-
lence I must yield the palm to
C “Boogles” Williams, West
Indies and Carlton all round
cricketer.

: “Boogles” has scored 209 runs
in five innings and he has been
undefeated in two of these, He
is second in the batting averages
with the good figures of 69.66 per

innings, and heads the bowling

averages with 31 wickets taken 3 |

at @ cost of 9.12 runs each in 95.5 °

overs, DENIS ATKINSON
GOOD ALSO

THER good batting figuras returned up to the end of the third

series include N. S. Lucas 236 runs in five innings (once not

out) average 59.00, C. Atkins 171 runs in three innings, average 57.00,

G. Proverbs 170 runs in five innings (twice not out) average 56.66,

G. Hutchinson 156 runs in five innings (twice not out) average 52.00,
C. Hunte 195 in six innings.

Bowlers besides “Boogles” Williams who have done well are
Fred Phillips, Spartan medium paced bowler who is second in thea
bowling averages having taken 15 wickets at a cost of 9.93 runs, Twa
other pace bowlers, Eric Atkinson of Wanderers and Barker of Empire
follow in the order mentioned. Atkinson has taken 13 wickets at a
cost of 10.15 runs in 55.1 overs while Barker in 106.2 overs has taken
24 wickets at a cost .of 10.33 runs. Keith Bowen. Spartan
slow spin bowler is fifth with 13 wickets taken at a cost of
14.53 in 65 overs while Frank King, Spartan pace bowler is next
with 10 wickets taken at a cost of 14.60 runs Gach in 58 overs.

POLICE CLUB SPORTS

taking part.

ME. BoT
TOORING “THE
“FOUNTAIN

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PRESCRIPTION |

- for Carlton were C.



WVE Recon
& Seews

IN SEARCH OF 1KE

—

POLICE vs. WANDERERS
Police ist Innings 156
Wanderers ist Innings (without

POF i av eedty +e hoes

Bowling for Wanderers, Louis

St. Hill and Denis Atkinson
skittled out the Police team in
the Police—Wanderers First

Division cricket match at the Bay
yesterday.

Police made 156 in their first
finmnings. Wanderers have so far
scored 95 without loss.

Capt. W. Farmer topscored for
the Constables with 59, C. Black-
man, who made 46, was the only
other batsman to score over 20
runs.

Denis Atkinson. was the most
successful bowler for Wanderers.
He sent down 24 overs, of which
seven were maidens, and took
five wickets for 64 runs. Louis
St. Hill also gave a good perform.
ance. He bowled 13 overs and
took four wickets for 27 runs,

W. Knowles and D. Evelyn

opened _ the Wanderers’ first
innings. When stumps were
drawn, the Wanderers’ total
was 95 without loss, Knowles,

who attacked the bowling of
Mullins and Bradshaw with suc-
cess, had 72 not out to his credit.
Evelyn is 17 not out.

PICKWICK vs. AEATAE
Spartan (for 1 wkt.) ...... 16

Pickwick were at the wicket
nearly five hours to score 242 runs
on the first day of their First
Division cricket match against
Spartan at Queen’s. Park yester-
day. Of this skipper John God-
dard had an undefeated knock
for 71,

In their half an hour’s spell at
the wicket, Spartan have lost 1
wicket for 16 runs.

Goddard was given a chance
off Frank King while in his thir-
ties. The fieldsman was E. Cave
But for this chance, Goddard
batted confidently and well, and
took eight fours.

Other batsmen who batted well
were T. S. Birkett, J. Greenidge
and M. Foster who respectively
seored 38, 32 and 31.

Pace bowler Frank King took
four wickes for 54 runs in 15
overs, and A. Atkins two for 40
in nine. King sent down quite a
number of bouncers and made
batsmen dodge them.

L. F. Harris bowled 14 overs
off which 59 runs were scored,
but he failed to secure a wicket.

With just over half an hour
more for play, Spartan opened
with Atkins and L, F. Harris,
Harris taking the place of the
other usual opening bat, Grif-
fith. The batsmen started cau-
tiously, but with the score only
four, Atkins was tempted to hit
at a ball outside the wicket from
E. L. G. Hoad, and sent it straight
to the lone slip field, Jordan.

Wicket keeper Evelyn soon
after dropped a catch from Har-
ris off J, Greenidge.

When stumps were drawn,
Spartan were 16 for the loss of
1 wicket.

CARLTON vs. EMPIRE

+ Empire .... 6 cece tee eles 232
; Carlton (for two wkts.) .. 39
A fine innings of 81 by

C. Depeiza and good supporting
knocks by E, A, V. Williams (40),
O. M. Robinson (30) and S. Rud-
der (24) he'ped Empire to boost
their tota] to 232 in their first
innings against Carlton as their
first division cricket game got
underway at Black Rock yester-
day afternoon.

By the drawing of stumps,
Carlton had registered 39 for the
jcss of two wickets.

The most successful bowlers
B. Williams
for 86 with his
flows in 24.4 overs and K. B.
Warren, their medium pacer,
who captured 3 for 64 in 15 overs.

The wicket was perfect when
Empire opened their innings with
Robinson and Hunte. They how-
ever, lost their first wicket with
only 17 on the board, but Willi-
ams became associated wita
Robinson in a_ second wicket
partnership which was productive
of 45 runs. Williams who was
missed at the unlucky 13, went
on to score a useful 40 which
included three boundaries before
he was bowled by Warren. /

Robinson who was batting
patiently, had his stumps knockecd

who bagged 5

BARBADOS WIN TABLE YESTERDAY’S GRICKET

back by Warren after
contributed 30 which
one boundary.

Quick Wickets

Empire lost some quick wickets,
but Depeiza and Rudder in a
seventh-wicket partnership, the
highest of the innings which was
productive of 52 runs, saved the
day for them.

Depeiza who had played a very
gocd innings during his stay at
the wicket, was missed once
when he had scored 21. He even-
tually lost his wicket when he
got his pad in front of one from
“Boogles” Williams and ws
adjudged 1|.b.w. His score was 81
including 11 boundaries.

Holder got a useful 19 inclu-
ding two boundaries while H. A.
King carried his bat for ten
including the only six of the day.

In the remaining minutes of
play, Carlton les* their opening
batsmen McKenzie after he had
contributed 11 and also Lucas
before he had scored. The Hutch-
inson brothers Reynold and
Geoffrey were together when
stumps were drawn with the total
at 39 fer the loss of two wickets.
Reynold is 25 includine three
boundaries end Geoffrey 3.

HARRISON COLLEGE vs,
LODGE

he had
included

Harrison College (for 7 wkts.) 293

Michael Worme who went at
number seven in the College bat-
ting order scored 108 not out in
the College first innings against
Lodge at College yesterday. He
hit 14 fours and gave one chance.
His score enabled College to score
a total of 293 runs for the loss of
seven wickets in their first innings
after batting the whole of the day.

College won the toss and batted
on a fine wicket, but had a shaky
start when they lost their first
wicket for one run. C, Blackman
who went at number four, scored
the next best score of 47 and Mr.
S. Headley made an attractive 43
before he was bowled by Riley.

S. Hewitt who is not out with
Worme, has 42 runs to his credit.

K, Riley who bowled at medium
pace was the most successful
bowler and took three of tha
College wickets for 57 runs. J.
Farmer—a slow right arm bowl-
er — took two for 52 in 12 overs.

The Lodge fast bowler K.
Brookes did not bowl as steadily
as in his last match and although
he bowled 17 overs he took one.
wicket. At times he was a bit
erratic. The other wicket was
taken by G. Wilkie. Me

The fielding vr the Lodge boys
was good but at times they gave
away runs when they threw in
badly.

STANDARD BRIDGE

By M. Harrison-Gray
Dealer: East
aa game ‘
KQ5
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git,
P E
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&

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= Bey

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on

Jil
5
K

&KQ

ya tense closing stages of

a needle match often
peogeee incongruous results.
final,
eading
advantage

with some wild overbidding ;

OSD
u

7154
10 3

n the 1952 Gold Cu

the team that were

with a few boards to

by their North-South pair in
Room 1

celebrated this

Special measures being
Spade, “South, passed. West f

U1 |. Wes
bid Two Hearts and North
Two _No-Trumps, :
should show 21 points. East
courageously bid Three
Hearts and _ South, th
visions of a slam, made a cue
nine ithe aioe: wala i

est’s double was

round to South, whose Five 3
Diamonds was also doubled.
Suspecting East's bids, North
redoubled with the obvious
hope of scaring him into &
Five Hearts, but to no avail.
The play will be given in
‘o-morrow’s feature.
\cancedonendieeseestenouvisetunnipenpeemiad

London Express Service.



There has been considerable interest evinced in the preparations
for thdse sports and the finals should be a day of keen rivalry.

Heats have been run off at each of the clubs and the finalists
: 4 Ss represent (the cream of the contestants from each club. Who knows?
HE Police Boys’ and Girls’ Clubs will hold their first Annual Talent scouts from the,Amateur Athletic Association of Barbados

Athletic Sports at Kensington on Monday, August 25, Repre~ should be on hand not only to give the Meet their moral support
sentatives from thirteen Boys’ Clubs and three Girls’ Clubs will be but should have little difficulty in discovering potential talent among
these youngsters for senior athletics.

—-_

HELLO JOE /sceuse

‘ Witt :

has. You
SAY IN THIS
COUNTRY” DE
FEED WAS



SUNDAY, AUGUST
RACING NOTES
By Ben Battle

OW that the Barbados Turf Club August Meeting is a matter of
history it is possible for us to indulge in that pleasant pastime

of being wise after the event. With the excitement and bustle of
the Races safely behind us, it is surprising how consistent. a picture
can be made of the form which at the time appeared so baffling.

Beginning at the top with the A Class we find that the only one
so classified to score was Harroween. This however, cannot be attrib-
uted to lack of opportunity but ,rather to the fact that the A) class
for this Meeting was weak both in numbers and quality. Rebate was
manifested below her best and it is probably not a well mare. The
same can be said of Notonite whose form was many pounds below
what we know he is capable of,, Harroween herself started four times
for her only victory which she achieved in the last race of the meet-
ing when she carried 118 lbs. She has never been much of a weight
carrier, but I could not help being somewhat disappointed at her
showing.

The B class was evenly matched and some of the best racing was
seen amongst them. The performance of Landmark who won the
Champion Stakes carrying top-weight was of course outstanding and
Mr. Chase’s mare undoubtedly merits promotion. Of the three new-
comers Mrs. Bear, from the same stable. shows every likelihood of
following in Landmark's footsteps, and possesses a devastating late
run which will stand her in good stead in distance races. The form
showed by Vectis and Spear Grass on the other hand was extremely
disappointing. Those consistent and hardworking campaigners Lun-
ways, Red Cheeks and Pepperwine, between them started no less than
fifteen times earning money on ten occasions. It is astonishing how
much work the highly strung Lunways can get through without any
apparent ill-effect. She has proved a good servant to Mr. Tommy
Edwards, Castle in the Air most surprisingly seemed to improve in
his behaviour as the meeting went on, Had his rider been able to
keep him balanced I thought, he might have just won the final-race.
By contrast Flying Dragon did nothing to redeem the run of bad
luck which has dogged his stable recently.

The C class winners in spite of havidig every opportunity only
managed to win two races between them. One of these went to
Bright Light who will be lucky to avoid promotion; the other to score
was Dashing Princess. She like most of Mr. Gill’s string was very
fit early and put in her best work during the first two days.

In C2, as we have already noticed, Abu Ali was the “find” of
the meeting. Aim Low was perhaps a little fortunate to be bracket-
ed with Magic Gaye in the first race, but thereafter the Handicappers
took a rather more enthusiastic view of her abilities than I did, and
she failed to place. Darham Jane is one for whom we are always
hearing excuses. The probability is that she is moderate. Devil’s
Symphony on the other hand may yet improve. Of the remainder
Test Match showed that it is possible even under our conditions for
a stayer almost totally devoid of pace to win races. His future will
depend to some extent on the number of long distance races which
may be framed, The Thing appears to be consistent but quite mod-
erate, while the less said about Embers the better. Trimbrook light-
ly framed but fluent in action showed good speed while Magic Gaye’s
performance was a triumph of ability over adversity.

The breakdown of Watercress before races appeared to leave the
Class at the mercy of Mary Ann but in actual fact, it was Top
Flight who dominated. A most attractive Bay Filly by Flotsam out
of that outstanding mare Meads, Mr. Wong’s entry had two firsts and
two seconds for her four starts; and it is to be hoped that her success
will encourage others to make the trip in the future, In defence of
Mary Ann it should be said that the tactics pursued in her last start
were such as to minimise her chances. In actual fact the duel for
early position in which she and Top Flight (the two top weights)
indulged resulted inevitably in the race going to that old sluggard
Cross Bow whom Holder rightly drove from flag fall to finish.

A.nong the F Class winners, the most significant development was
the emergence of Seedling, who after his rather disappointing show-
ing in the Derby came back to win two nice races. He is a useful
type of horse who should continue to improve. The very speedy
Miracle won her first start as she liked in brilliant time, but five
and a half is as far as she gets at present. First Admiral apparently
felt the effects of his Trinidad campaign. Cardinal a little “short”.
to begin with came on as the meeting progressed and credited his
owner breeder, with two wins. He will never be a world beater
but he is honest, consistent and likely to improve. March Winds
also lost his Maiden Certificate and Rambler Rose who earned money
in each of her four appearances was unlucky not to do the same.

The complete domination of the two year olds by Apple Sam is
I hope, a temporary phase. This must not be taken to mean that
I do not wish Mr. Goddard's splendid colt well, but in the interest
of racing I should like to see him with a bit more to do, Possibly
stiffer opposition will be forthcoming from among those who did
not face the starter this time, but I am confident that Apple Sam will
take a bit of beating no matter who he has to face.

Comment on the G class is almost unnecessary. The standard
prevailing is best assessed from the performance of Gavotte who, after
being left half a furlong, won the last race for her class comfortably
with top-weight.

SCOREBOARD’ —

24, 1952



POLICE vs, WANDERERS T S Birkett c Bowen b Atkins 38
Police First Innings J. Greenidge 1.b.w.. b Atkins . 32
F Taylor b D. Atkinson aa 41 J; Goddard’ not. Outs iscsi ee eee ee M8
Cc, Blackman c Mayers b D. C. Evelyn b Phillips ‘ ‘ 5
Atkinson Sind 46 M. Foster c L, E. Harris b N. Harris 31
C. Amey ¢ Toppin b D. Atkinson .. 5 W. Greenidge b_ Walcott bake tha
Vv’. Farmer c D. Lawless b D E, L, G. Hoad c Phillips b King 1
Atkinson bs 59 TT. Hoad 1.b.w., b King ae 17
J. Byer c D. Atkinson b St. Hill .. 14 4. R. Jordan b King 8
A, Blenman not out 3 Extras: b. 4, 15. 3 os JF 7
G. Sobers stpd. wkpr. Knowles, Sa
b St, Hill oe 0 Total . ‘ . 242
B. Dodson c wkpr, Knowles, b be aes
gt. Ai. + 0 Fall of wickets: 1—0, 2—14, 3—85, 4
Cc. Springer b D. Atkinson .. 9 —86, 5—91, 6—159, 7—199, 8—202, 9—228.
C. Mullins b St. Hill .. ; 0 BOWLING ANALYSIS
C. Bradshaw run out . 1 Oo M R w
Extras 8 @, King ... 18) ke BA, 4
— F. Phillips 13 3 38 1
Total - ssc. 1656 «4, F, Harris 14 1 59 0
— «,. Bowen oe 7 0 33 0
Fall of wickets: 1—24 2—48, 3—84, A Atkins . cece 0 40 2
4-135, 5—135, 6—135, 7—135, '8—144, N. Harris ...... 3 2 8 1
9—145, kK Walcott 3 1 7 1
BOWLING ANALYSIS Spartan — Hirst Innings
2: te. R w A. Atkins c Jordan bE. L, G. Hoad 4
, Atkinson . 24 a 64 5 LL. F. Harris not out .......... a
G. Skeete i 3 0 6 0 E. Cave not out Hastie Ss
R. Lawless 4 0 29 oO —_—
H. Toppin - 8 0 21 0 Total (for 1 wkt.) . 16
L, St. Hill 13 1 27 4 ame
EK. Ramsay 1 0 1 0 Fall of wickets: 1—11.
Wanderers — First Innings BOWLING ANALYSIS
W. Knowles not out tweed oe ae Oo M R w
D. Evelyn not out ........65. cee eee 17. «+H. R. Jordan its 1 6 0
Extras ........45 6 J, Greenidge . 3 1 4 0
— &. LL, G. Hoad .... 2 0 6 1
Total (without Joss) 95 CARLTON vs. EMPIRE
—— EMPTRE — IST INNINGS
BOWLING ANALYSIS O. M. Robinson b Warren .. ,, 30
oO M R w C. Hunte c. Wk, (Marshall) b G.
Cc, Bradshaw oa by ME A inc Edghill .....+. te eben Riu oe
Cc, Mullins ....... : “2s 0 27 0 E. A* V. Williams b Warren Ww
F. Taylor . diem 2 0 12 0 C. Depeiza ibw C. B. Williams .. 81
G, Sobers ..c-scinee & 0 20 0 E. W. Grant c wk. (Marshall
J. Byer... ond 1 0 5 9 WATE ees rictecedseeeeens a
PICKWICK vs. SPARTAN W. A. Drayton ¢ & bC. B.
Pickwick att ensengreresbee & 242 Williams =... ..+--5 Bids ‘ 1
Spartan (for 1 wkt.) ........... 16 O Fields run out ...........- rie 1
Pickwick — First Innings S. Rudder c G. Edghill b C. B
A, M. Taylor l.b.w., b F, King vin D WHAM Live ceecvceesessitboeses 4
E. Edwards run out ................ 9 e On Page 5

YES SIR/ THEYVE EVEN BOTTLED’
THE STUFF, AND CALLED IT “ex?

CARIB LAGER 2, THE FINEST BJ
a nV SEER BREWwEDY
Yi) ;



SUNDAY, AUGUST 24,
Olympic
Sports

Quiz

LONDON.
How closely did you follow the

Olympic Games? “Here are 20

questions on some of the high-

lights of the Helsinki fortnight.
1. Who won the first Olympic

Gold medal ever obtained

by a Luxembourger?

. In. only one of the follow-
ing events was the old
Qlympic record not broken.
Can you spot which one:
Throwing the nammer, 400
metres hurdles, 100 metres
and Hop step and jump.

3. Which female competitor

nm

won two individual gold
medals in the swimming
events?

4. Who was the only boxer

to win a gold medal at
Wembley in 1948 and at
5 pelaiay!? ¥
. Hungary beat Yugoslavia
in the Soccer final. © What
was the score?

6. In one of the boxing finals
a competitor was disquali-
fied for not entering suffici-
ently into the contest.
Which divisien was this
and what was the boxer’s
name?

7. Great Britain won only
one gold medal, in the Prix
Des Nation. Can you name
the three persons who made
up the British team?

8. In one of the swimming
events the father of the
winning competitor jumped
fully clothed into the pool
to congratulate his son.
Can you name the son and
the event?

9. Who did the United States
beat in the final of the
basketball?

10, Which athlete finished

runner-up in both the 100
metres and the 400.

11, Zatopek broke the Olympic
record each time in winning

the 5,000 metres, 10,000
metres and Marathon.
Right or wrong?

12. Who was the only com-
petitor to win two gold
medals in the cycling
events?

13. Which event did Mrs. Zat-
opek win?

14. How many gold medals did
the United States win in
the boxing events?

15. In the three stages of the
weight-lifting, press, snatch
and jerk, he lifted a total of
1,013}lbs and established a
new Olympic record. Who

is he?

16. Which country won the
Olympics Water Polo.

17. Which country won the
Olympics hockey?

18. Which was the only coun-
try to win two gold medals
in the Olympic yachting?

19. Which was the last track
and fleld event to be staged?

20. With a time of 8 minutes

12:8 seconds J .Tjukalov of
Russia won which event?

ANSWERS :

1. J. Barthel in the 1,500
metres.

2. 100 metres.

8. Bich Racne ek DSA)

ing and Spring-

board diving.

4. L. Papp of H who

won a gold medal at Wem-

bley in 1948, won the final

of the Light middleweight

contest. -

2—0

6. Johansson of Sweden in the
final of the heavyweight
division.

7. Colonel H. M. Llewellyn,
Colonel D. N. Stewart .and
Mr W. H. White.

8. J. Boiteux (France) 400

. metres free-style.

9. U.S.S.R. The score was
36—25.

10. N. McKenley (Jamaica).
11. Right. His times were 14
min. 6.6 secs, 29 mins. 17

secs and 2 hrs, 23 mins. 19.2

secs.

R. Mockridge (Australia) .

He won the 1,000 metres

time trial and with L. Cox

the 2,000 metres tanden.

The women javelin throw--

ing. She set a a new Olym-

pic record with a distance
of 165 ft. 7 ins.
The United States won 5
Gold medals for boxing.
They were fly-weight, light-

12,
13.

14.

1952



Junior Tennis
Championships

Held In Canada

OTTAWA, Aug. 21.

Rideau Lawn Tennis Club as-
‘sumed an international air on
Wednesday as racquet swingers
from the United States, Trinidad,
Cuba, and Switzerland joined
their Canadian counterparts for
the Canadian Junior Tennis
Championships.

The pick of the junior tennis
world, 200 strong, will start their
week-long tournament on Thurs-
day on the courts of the clut
nestled on the shore of the Rideau
River. A new entry this year is
Paul Karman, top junior ball
chaser from Havana, Cuba. The
carrier of the Trinidad colours

Penner of Port-of-Spain,
was here last year, but missed out
on the titles.—OC.P.

Basket Ball

H.C.O.B. Win Knock
Out Gompetition

Harrison College Old Boys
beat Y.M.P.C. on Friday night
35—21 to win the Basketball
Knock Out Competition. Algy

Symmonds scored 19 for College
Old Boys.

The senii-finals for the Knock
Out Compétition were played on
Tuesday when College Old Boys
won from Boys’ Club, and
Y.M.P.C. beat Harrison College.
A record number of spectators
turned up for the semi- finals.

The College—Y.M.P.C. semi-
fina! was a good match, but Col-
lege who won the Championship
Cup earlier in the season, allowed
Y:M.P.C. to direct the course the
game took and this helped to a
great extent in their defeat.

Ih the final College Old Boys
were een at their best and em-
ployed some skilful tactics to
out-manoeuvre their opponents.
Their team were A. Symmonds,
N. Symmonds, K. Hall, J. Best
and C. Forde. These five played
through, but P. Haynes was pres-
ent in case a substitute was called
for.

A pregentation Match will be
played on Thursday night at 8
pm. when His Excellency Sir

Alfred Savage is
present the trophies,

Following this, there will be
weekly practice matches in prep-
aration for the coming tour of
the Trinidad team, Carib-Bears
in October,

John Cobb Begins

“yy..2 Re

Trials Tuesday

LONDON.

John Cobb, hoider of the land
speed record of $94.20 m.p,i:.
begins trials August 26 at Loca
Ness, Scotland, with his Jei-
powered speed boat Crusader.

if they are successful, Cobb
will make an immediate attempt
on the water speed record, cur-
rently held by the American F.
Sayres, who reached 178.49. five
weeks ago,

The Super-Streamlined Crusa
der embodies a revolutionary
hull design and power plant.
From a birdseye view i, iooks
like some needle-pointed futur-
istic racing car with jet intakes
forward of the cockpit.

It will be shown publicly for
the first time August 22 at Kings-
ton-on-Thames, London’s boating
suburb, and then be hauled 500
miles to famous Loch Ness in the
Scottish Highlands.

Powered by a Ghost jet engine,
similar to those fitted in Comet
airliners, the Crusader has beeli
built with two _ pencil-shaped
outriggers each fitted to the hull
by twin spars to give high latern!
stability. The design was based
on an idea given Cobb by Reid
Railton who worked on Cobb's
record-breaking car. Aerodynn-
mic as much as hydraulic factors
were considered,

The 31ft speed boat is built of

expected to



ply and aluminium alloy, spa!
13 feet and, in running trim,
weighs just over three tons. For

possible emergency braking at
high speed, an experiment”!
form of parachute drogue h»
been fitted. —L.E.S.

weight, middleweight, light

heavyweight and heavy-
weight. a ge
15. J. Davis .\U.S.A.) in the
heavyweight S dtghtifting
16. Hungary.
17. India.

18. The United States of Amer-





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SUNDAY



JAMAICA OLYMPIC TEAM

ADVOCATE

THE TEAM which ‘represented Jamaica at the Olympic Games in’ Holsink.

(Back row)

La Beach, McKenley,

Parnum, Laing.

(Front row) Miles, Wint, MacDonald (Managor), Yancey (Coach), Davis.

Champ at Work



~

BITING his tongue, Frankie Sy-

mons displays the form that
brought him the junior marbles
championship at the Illinois State
Fair in Springfield. Frank won
over a large field of contestants.

, 43 Enter For
Canadian Long

Distance Swim

TORONTO, Aug. 20.

An impressive list of 43 men
from Canada, the United States,
Sweden and Egypt was drawn up
on Wednesday for the world’s
championship long distance swim
at the Canadian National Exhiii-
tion on Friday.

An early favourite, on the baisia
of practice workouts, was George
Gevan of Etobicoke, Ontario,
who is reported to have beaten
unofficialy by about three min-
utes, the fifteen-year-old record
of 4 hours 19 mins. 28 secs,

Another top contender was
Lars Bertil Waerle, Swedish dis-
tance champion who finished
sixth in the London Daily Mail
English Channel swim last year.

A competitive swimmer for 18
years. Waerle is being trained by
Georges Michele, veteran who
finished second in the inaugural
21-mile swim in 1921, Other en-

ants included the ‘three-man

gyptian team of Hassan Abou
Bakr, Abdel Latif and Said El
Araby.—U.P.
ica, They won the Inter-
national 6 metre class and
the International 5.5 metres
class.

19. The women’s_ high jump
won by Mrs. Ester Bran
of South Africa,

20. The single sculls ‘rowing.



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Table Tennis ‘

BARBADOS BEAT TRINIDAD 3—2

BARBADOS won

last night.

the th
from South Trinidad by thr:
A fair crowd of t

‘d and final table tennis tes
games to two at the Y.M.C.A
ble tennis fans saw the Sout}

Trinidad team fight hard to win this test but the local bov

were on their toes.



Shooting

Milton Tucker
Topscores

Miltos Tucker top-scored with
100 3* the Small Bore Rifle Shoot
at the miniature range at the Dri
Hall yesterday evening. T. A. I
Roberts was second with 99.

Due to the competitions which
vill’ be held from September 21
to September 27, the attendance
has greatly improved and some
members are hoping that it will
continue to improve.

The next practice shoot will take
part on Wednesday night, August

27

The eignt pest scores were as
follows: M. G. Tucker 100, T, A, L
Roberts 99, A. S. Warren 99, L, W.
Hassell 98, P. Chase 97, P. A, D.
Johnson 95, G. E. Martin 95 and
R. D, Edghill 95.

SCOREBOARD

@ From Page 4

\. Holder ¢ F. Edghill b ¢ B
Williams 19

iM. A. King not out l

H Barter b C. B. Williams 4

Extras: b. 13,w.1 .. 4

Total . ae

Fall of wickets:— 1—17, 2—62, 3—109

4+115, 5-120, 6~—196, 7—188,° 9-212:
9—229

BOWLING ANALYSIS

o M : 4
G. Edghill 7 3 16 1
J. A, Williams 6 31
Cc. B, Williams 24.4 3 86
K. B. Warren 16 1 Oh
F. B. Edghill . 5 21

CARLTON — 18T INNINGS
C. MeKenzie ¢ Grant b. William
R. St. C. Hutchinson not out
N. 8S. Laicas lbw Barker
G. Hutchinson not out

Total (for 2 wkts)



Fall of wkts: 1—17, 2—22
BOWLING ANAL
°o R
H. Barker 6 22

E A. V. Williams 6 3 16
H. A. King . 3 2
HARRISON COLLEGE vs.
AT COLLEGE

HARRISON COLLEGE LST INNINGS
E. Hope lbw b Brookes z

LODGE

FE, Tudor ec Brookes b Wilkie 10
c Smith stpd. (wk. Grant) b

Farmer )
C. Blackman b Riley 47

A. Alleyne b Farmer 9
Mr. S. Headley b Riley 4
M. Worme not out ... vy
M. Simmons ¢ Mr. Wilkes b Riley

S. Hewitt not out 42
Extras ’ it
Total (for 7 wkts) 2

Fall of wickets: 12, 2-42, 3

4—-48; 5106, 6—191, 7191.
BOWLING ANALYSIS
oO M R Y

K. Brookes 17 6 38
G. Outram 10 - 54
G. Wilkie 12 2 49
J. Farmer 12 1 52
K. Riley joer 28 1 57
R. Goddard . 3 = 21

L. Murray 2 - 7



Building Contractors,



Doctor N. Sarkar and A. Mool-

won their games for South
av while play-
‘ on the
occasionally de-



was



efensive and
ghted the fans

with a spectacular

mash while Murray at the other

1 ; doing all the attacking

) Sarkar won 21—-15, 21-15.
8--2T and 21—15

A. Mootchan who is another

lefensive player won his gami

I—18, 19—2] 21—18, 21—16

‘;00ding who played against him
und difficulty in returning hi
ackhand chops.

For Barbados N. Gill, R

Phillips and C. Shields won thei
sames in fine style and gave a
od exhibition of anticipation
nd control.
Perhaps the most exciting
ime was the one in which A
lendes met R. Phillips, Mende
south Trinidad) was the
tacker but every time hx
mashed, Phillips was there to
t the ball back. Phillips is a
rt stocky player who had a
trong back hand ehop and he
ide most of this in the last |

me against his rival, The game
ended 19—21, 15—21, 21—17, 21

19 ang 25—27 in favour of
Phillips.

After the last game was played
Mr. H. H. Williams, Secretary of
the Y.M.C.A. presented prizes
to the South Trinidad team,
The results were:—A. Moolchan
at C, Gooding, 21—19, 19—21,
18, 21—6, K. Assing lost to N
Gill 21—18, 16—21, 14 —21, 20—22,
Dr. N, Sarkar beat B, Murray
21-15, 2115, 18—21, 21-15, A.
Mendes lost to R. Phillips, 19—21,
15-—21, 21—17, 2i—19, 25—27, Cc



Williams lost to C. Shields 10~-21,
16—21

21—19, 102°







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|
j
|
}
|
|
|
j
}
topped to ponder 1
just by the way" i
And we view island |
Lou asked; Joe what to sav? |
beach a party
mantic mood
ci ing and possessing (?) |
\nd eating all the food |
|
day Wednesday, Thursday
Was spree from rise of gun |
t d the lorries
ist for fun |
= |
I ttle rice in Bridgetown |

oO went on
f you war
Go down

the spree
t to see rice
by “Cherry tree {

was a mis
Phat Lou
And when sh

ion outing
‘went out to see

|
e saw the menu |
She eried “Good Lord help me
The rice was in a small tayehe
\ lighter full of duck
\ full of gravy
we trike luck
. -
ow bananas |
f Canada Dr |
perch of lettuce
were passing by
.
that wa t
And bovs when lunch time came
|
!

Lnother basket rolled out
With exactly the same

rly breakfast

.
Tr



ind Louw and Robert
to change their host

An



most

|
rhis time this little sister |
Said she was half-way through |
\nd said to Lou girl come on

And try and make this de.

she gave LOU @ small Dasket
And this contained a goat
Beside the other cargo
1 load « Harrison boat |
" i pea rice od string b
Tr iniding and the pie

Eat ] wif

then Robert remembered
thousands without bread
ho at endure starvatio
na a til the dead !

met
1 eader too

vd Robert

wage to Lou \

» brother



We rildre Il, these outing

» toner
follow

it good on
ale



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You can smell it from far
And boys when they all sampled
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PAGE SIX







| Pe
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ee Grandmothers
7 =
~\ For 1952
° a B By A GRANNIE
£ eS THE JQB o1 being a grand-
k iS ome;»n parent in these days is a strange
£ y\ he? und exciling one, consisting of a
j * wy number of shocks and surprises,
of adventuring as it does--for gran-
4 INS ;nie—into strange and unknown
A% / 4 | e2rritory.
Nir’. hi Gone are the days when grand-
a sof We mother can proudly hand over the
> family Christening robe, and say
i/ “Of course dear he will be called
Jeremiah, after dear old uncle
No place for School Marm did you say? Oh but it is! Heres |Jerry.” 3
catcindd el i a Shea re aid could be a lesson for you, too She will be told cheerfully, but
Always use 2 SPA my parents used to say. SPA TOOTHBRUSHES | fondly to put the robe away, as
were the finest in her day, and they’re the finest now babies don’t wear “those things”
Well, folks, heré’s a spot of scientific these gays. And, that anyway
knowledge 1 didn’t Jearn at School the child won't be Christened be-
CHLOROPHYLL is nature’s .deodorant— fore he’s five or six months, when
mine too, This is “the morning after the a robe would look ridiculous.
night before.” I take an AMPLEX As to the name, the idea of
TABLET a day and you can’t smell a ealling the child (if its a boy)
drop the morning after. But you must “Jeremiah” is greeted with peals
INSIST ON AMPLEX—there is NQ of laughter. What will it be

that banishes
odours.

all

unpleasant bc

SUBSTYFPUTE for this ioaeent, Cac



Yes, girls,
tip the scales at a hundred and eighty
no diet — just

One

No exercise,
SLIMMING TABLETS,
tablet of SILF taken night and morning

pounds.

SILF



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fee eta

This little lady is deep in thought.
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Alay
Sm //

eh %
wo,

| BY

1
}

yA

as



Where’s she going to in such a hurry?
Ah, she's-heard about VAMOOSE, in
the puffer-tin, and is off to purchase

\
\

one. You're moving fast litt] giady, but 7
wait until you see VAMUJSE IN rl
ACTION! One or two puffs from the

handy puffer-tin, and you’ll see swift
action, Vamoose spells quick death to
all insect pests — buy a tin tomorrow.

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—S
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I'm the one who used to

called? They haven’t an idea.
When grannie enquires why the
delay in christening the child—-
five- weeks was the time in her
day—she is asked “what’s the
hurry?” And, on the spur of the
mement can think of no suitable
answer, All this of course takes

lier clear off familiar ground,
and, mentally floundering, she
tries to dismiss from her mind

the picture of a sweetly sleeping
infant looking like a Cherub in
a long lace robe, and replace it
with the vision of a_ bawling
struggling five months child, as
he tries to. beat off the strange
man who is attempting to pour
cold water en his head!
Preparation too for the expec-
ted baby bring more shocks to
grandmother, for they are, in her
opinion almost non existent.

The idea of everything ready
by the seventh month has “gone
with the wind.” No longer do
dozens of finest linen garments
hand tucked and embroidered
grow in piles, no longer is the

cot decked in satin bows and the
Baby Basket, nursery, and pram
all prepared weeks ahead in
readiness as fit for a little prince
or princess,

No. No. All that in the view of
the young couple is “fuss” and
a “Waste of money” and say
they “what does a baby want
with clothes in this climate”
Once again grandmother finds
herself at a loss and has to give
herself a mental shake as her
day-dreams of a dainty clad
baby plus bonnet and matinee
Jacket are replaced shudderingly
by those of a naked infant clad
fashionably in nething but a blue
spotted nappy, while visions of
the child dying painfully of
pneumonia haunt her.

When the baby actually does
arrive grannie’s mental condition
is such that she is prepared for
almost anything, and her baby
jcy and re.ief is great when she
sces that in appearance at any
rate, the child is just like the old
fashioned ones. Something famil-
iar at last,

But granaie’s shocks are by no
means ever. In her day, milk
was considered the proper food
for a baby up to a year,

Not so in 1952.

At five months her precious
grandchild is being fed strained
vegetables, and at a year old

c extraordinary food as

cheese, bacon unscraped meat,
mango, paWw-paw and goodness
knows what else goes down his
throat.

He is put to sleep alone in a
dark nursery—night lights are
old-fashioned—no rocking or pat-
ting. His hours are different, his
parents attitude to him is differ-
ent, end grandmother hears about
such things as “mether and
father complexes”, ‘possessive
»arents,’ “frustration” “fixa-
tion” ete. until her poor old brain
s in a whirl of confusion and
uncertainty.

The old ways are dead, Long
live the new,







,

, ob
| anyone with a delicate stomach.
yourself and your family,




cuckoo
CT eens

BNO” and “ FRUI





T SALT” are Registered 7

SUNDAY



ADVOCATE



It’s Called The ‘Windbag’ Line

LONDON.

Yet another suggestion of the
way you can look this season igs
given by up-and-coming Scottish
designer Ronald Paterson, He
calls his new look tha ‘“Windbag”
Line because it features “an in=
flated jacket which touches the
choulder blades and fits closely
over the hips.” He teams this
jacket with straight skirts as well
as full skirts,

He concentrates on “storm”
colours, suggesting misty grey,
copper or tan combined with
black. Colour acc@nts are piper
green, peacock blue, wild violet,
and midnight blue.

Fabrics include doeskin (for
suits and evening wraps), long-
haired shiny coatings (“silver
blue”, or platignum grey” in
colour), and chiffon jersey (draped
in Grecian lines for evening
dresses).

His coats have giant collars.
They could be phantom beaver
or piper green wool, or midnight
~— squirrel on copger coloured
wool,

And he continues to show th@



And, when it is all summed up
what is the answer?

The old ways are gone. Wil
these new ways produce safer,
happier and better balanced men
and women?

It is too soon for the whole
answer to be known, Certainly
the babies and young children
are healthier. Grandmother finds
in spite of the dark and lonely
nursery, and no rocking to sleep,
that the baby sleeps through the
night—an unknown thing in her
day. Far from dying of pneu-
monia from the lack of clothes
the little beggar does not even
catch cold as her babies did.

And the strange hours and diet
seem to suit him, for he grows
‘strong and sturdy. But what of
this new parental attitude, the
strange new alocf, almost
detached relation of the modern
parent to the child, will it
develop these children in some
untried way for the better? It is
too soon to tell, only time can
answer that.

But, in spite of all the shocks
and surprises grandmother fee.s
a slow growing confidence in
these new ways. The old ways
are gone, and as she watches her
sturdy healthy grandchild she
knews that the new ways in spiie
of their strangeness have much
to recommend them, and she
looks forward full of hope to the
child’s future.

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short evening dress which does
double duty as a cocktail dress
He uses such materials as blue
satin striped with black, black
faille, and black tulle embroid-
ered with chenille. A particularly
striking short evening dress in the
collection was in midnight blue
taffeta, Halter-necked, full skirt-
ed, it was draped with coral red
taffeta.

Evening dresses ar@ extrava-
gant, richly coloured and lavishly
embroidered, A mother-of-pearl
satin dress embroidé@red with dia-
mante arid pearl drops ... a tur-
quoise and gold brocade dress
draped with black velvet ...a
peacock blue satin dress with a
new season’s touch in its single
shoulder strap.

Star of the evening materials
in the collection was the new
white chiffon Jersey. Intricately
draped on a crinoline and worn
over 50 yards of starched petti-
coats, it was topped magnificently
by a “wild violet” doeskin wrap
cut on the same generots lines as
a bishop’s robes, with deep fox
cuffs dyed to tona.

New details noted: outsize
kooks (some two inches long) on
dresses and suits, always more
decorative than functional; little
topknot” hats made of feathers
punctuated with jewels, and the
“Leaf” Mmeckline, which offered
an interesting variation on the
traditional collar-line of suits and
cocktail dresses, Revers fanned
out across the bodice in the shape

of a leaf,

The Grasshopper Look

By way of contrast with this
London line, comes the “Grass-
hopper” look from Mme, Schis-
parelli in Paris. She has trans-
ferred the shapes and forms of
grasshoppers into fashion. Suit
revers jut forward to form ’wings
and coats and suits have pointed
tail panels. Curious hoods and
hars are formed from deep cow)
collars. Crowning touch is the
wide-winged cap—said to be in-
spired by that of an “amorous
grasshopper,’—whatever that may
be.

Unfortunately all photographs
of London’s new couture models
are embargoed until the end cf
this month. But here are two
new season’s dresses from the
collection designed by Pierre
Balmain for Rembrandt. Right: a
tailored cocktail dress in black
grosgrain. Smooth shouldered,
high necked, it has unusual tab-
buttoning. Left: a day dress in
amerald green wool. It has gath~
ered corages, and folded skirt
panelled over a_ sheath-tight
underskirt.

On silver-headed, pink noter
paper, Elizabeth Arden announces
that “Bath mits” are back on the
market for the first time since
the war. These are made of soft
towelling lined with creamed soap,
blended with soothing cosmetic
ingredients. Used as bath gloves,
and dipped in water, they give a
good lather even in*hard water,

The impossible happens and, oh, what a row

Woman

From R. M. MacCOLL
WASHINGTON,

IN Harrisburg, capital of the
State of Pennsylvania, a horren-
dous uproar breaks forth.

Politics, of course?

But no. The unbelievable, the
unmentionable, the impossible has
happened — a woman player has
been signed up to play for “an
officially accepted men’s baseball
team,

And what an eyeful she makes,
does Mrs. Eleanor Engle, brunette,
24-year-old stenographer with a
flashing smile and graceful figure.

*

IT’S the Harrisburg “Senators”
team, a minor league side, which
has thus smashed precedent and
precipitated a splintering row.

Now, although there have been
all-women teams playing against
each other more or less as a stunt
since the war, that had nothing to
do with the real thing.

And even in this land where
woman so often rules the roost,
it seems that the traditionalists

IPANA

IS THE ANSWER

Joins The

are not at all ready for “Mom”
to appear. with bat in hand.
* *

FIRST to signify his disapproval
is the club’s manager, gruff Clar-
ence Etchison, who didn’t know
the dreadful surprise about to be
sprung on him by the 24-man
board of goVernors,

“She'll play when hell freezes
over,” opines Etchison. “I'll have
no gals in my team.”

But the governors say that Mrs,
Engle has already been practising
with her male colleagues and
“looks real good.”

cs * e

BEFORE she can appear in a
match, however, her contra¢t must
be approved by the “Czar” of the
minor leagues, George Trautman,
over in Columbus, Ohio, And
Trautman is already muttering
that he “takes a dim view.”

Pretty Eleanor’s contract says
that she will get £1,200 for play-
ing through the remainder of the
current season.





Protect your gums and you protect your

teeth, for gum troubles cause over 50 per cent. of tooth-
losses. To promote firm, healthy gums, use Ipana tooth paste —

Ipana and Massage. Use Ipana,

also, to brush your teeth extra-

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REFRESHIN



THE TOOTH PASTE..
GLY DIFFERENT ,

A PRODUCT OF BRISTOL-MYERS, LONDON AND NEW YORK

3

SUNDAY, AUGUST 24,

- Anglo-American Babies

1952



Mothers ‘Fingerprints, Babies Footprints Are

Filed at the Hospital

(By VIVIEN BATCHELOR)

BURDEROP PARK, (Wilts.)

The swing doors leading to the
delivery room at the end of the
corridor opened. We heard a lusty
yell. Then a British nurse walked
cut carrying the latest British-
American to be born at Burderop

“It’s a boy,” she said through her
mask, “Isn’t he beautiful?”

The baby, name of Willis, was
the 16lst British-American to be
born at Burderop Park since the

. OB. section opened on January 8.

“O.B.” is the hospital nick-name

Southern England come to have
their babies. :

The babies are British-Ameri-
cans. Under British law they have
British nationality because they are
born here: by American law they
are American since their parents
are American citizens.

They are being born at the rate
of nearly 40 a month, When a new
wing now nearing completion is
opened, the hospital will be able
to take up to 75 a month.

The specialist in charge of the
section is Captain G. R. McNear,
of the U.S. Air Force Medical
Corps. ;

Head nurse in the section is
Captain Claire Egan, of the wo-
men’s section of the United States
Air Force nursing service. She
comes from Newport, Rhode Island.
She has a staff of three American
Air Force nurses, and four British
civilian’ nurses. ,

One of the British nurses is
Sister Barbara Cannings, whose
home is at Chisledon, near Swin-
don, She looks after the babies in
the glass-lined germ-proof nursery
where they are kept for five days,

Another British nurse, Miss O.
Foster,. looks after the babies at
night. I found both nurses talk-
ing proudly of young 3lb, 1loz.
Susan Gennigan, who was being
carefully reared in an incubator,
but was doing “mighty well”.

If babies are premature or
under weight they are kept in
incubators until they reach 5lb.
Then they are allowed to go home,

If the birth is normal the

mother is discharged from the

hospital after five days and is
collected by the father. I watched
Staff Sergeant D. McInturff, who
is stationed at Bassingbourne, and
his wife, Delia, climb into their
car with
Alan, Said Mrs, MclInturff:

and can be used over and over
again. They come in two fra-
grances—“Original”

five-day-old Thomas

(an almond

for Air Force Wives

“I never thought our first baby
would be born anywhere but in
America. I've been over here four
months and was going to stay back
home in El Paso, Texas, for him
to be born, but I’m glad I did not.”

Her husband had taken out the
front seat of the car and organised
a full-length bed for his wife. “I

Park American Air Force Hospital, couldn’t get an ambulance and I
near Swindon, Wilts.

did not expect to see her walking.
It’s grand,” he said, as he arranged
the cot,

Technical. Sergeant William
Fuller and his wife Elzina, whose
home is in Maine but who live at
Manston in Kent over here, took
out their baby daughter Lorraine.
thought I’d have a
well as an American
baby.” Said Mrs. Fuller.

The mothers-to-be come to
Swindon about a week before
their babies are expected (they
have to book months ahead.)
ey find it very difficult to
get into hotels.” Captain McNear
said.

“There are not many in the neigh-
bourhood,” i

Six weeks after the mother
leaves Burderop Park she is asked
to return for an examination of
herself and her baby. She also
makes a visit to see Captain
MecNear at least six months before
her baby is due.

There is no charge to the mothers
for medical or surgical service but
they pay for their food while they
are in hospital, and pay for their
own transport and hotel accommo-
dation.

I met one mother who had come
from Paris to have her baby—a
girl named Marie, She was Mrs.
D. K, Edwards, wife of the United
States Defence Minister in Paris.

Everything to do with having
a baby is made absolutely. normal
at Burderop Park. Within eight
hours of the birth the mother is
up on her feet.

Captain McNear says this makes
post-natal complications less likely,
As soon as a baby is due a neck-
lace is made of blue beads and let-
tered beads spelling out the moth-

’ er’s name. The beads are always

blue—I thought at first all the
babies were boys.

While the birth is taking place
the necklace is sterilised. As soon
as the nurse carries the infant out
the “label” is placed around its
neck and sealed with a lead bead.
The necklace is never removed
while the baby is in hospital.

A further identification check
is made by taking the mother’s
fingerprints and the baby’s foot-
prints. Both sets of prints are

_ filed. Since they never change

they can be checked years later
if necessary.
WORLD COPYRIGHT RESERVED



scent), ang “Blue Grass.” —L.E.S
“BING’S IN.” In millions of the dangers of helping hitch-hik-

American homes—and, more im-
portant, in the offices of the cool-
eyed men who wield the advertis-
ing dollars — the accolade is ac-
corded to “old groaner” Crosby,
after his TV debut on a 14-hour
non-stop programme designed to
raise money for America’s Olym-
pics team. There'll be plenty of
Bing on the little screens from
now on. Incidentally his “tele-
thon” — with Bob Hope — raised
£357,000.

POOR Gloria Swanson, Her lat-
est film, “Three For Bedroom C,”
has had one of the most merciless
“pannings” that I can recall from
America’s critics. Typical sample
(Baltimore Sun): “ ‘Sunset Boule-
vard’ delivered Gloria from the
obscure status of a has-been and
re-established her as a star of the
first magnitude, ‘Three For Bed-
room C’ may well send her back
to the museum.”

ALTHOUGH American motor-
ists are regularly warned about

In Paris
London

New York..

women are

buying perfume
this new way

INEXPENSIVE HANDBAG PHIALS

There is no finer
cost so little,
the same as that

ers, 25-year-old Charles Murphy,
of New. York, heeded the outstuck
thumbs of two youths as he was
driving his new car in Long Island.

After all, Murphy recalled it
was the kindness of other drivers
which had enabled him to hitch-
hike all the way from Los Angeles
hack to New York when he’d been
demobbed from the Navy.

But he was soon ordered to
“pull over and stop, bud.” The
youths handed him his bag and
drove away in his car,

Then came the unkindest cut
of all. For two hours the strand-
ed Murphy tried to thumb a ride
himself—but other motorists “trod
on the gas” when they saw him
signalling from the roadside.

AN advertisement in a New
York newspaper says there’s a job
going for a qualified stenographer
at a whopping 255 dollars a week
(about £91). Only snag—it’s in
Iceland,

“She looks real good.”




OF A COSTLY PERFUME
perfume made than Goya—yet it neea

The perfume in Goya handbag phials is

in Goya’s world-famous costly bottles—

there is simply less of it, These phials were introduced by

Goya so that a woman could carry perfume about with her,

in her handbag ;
matter where she
fragrance. Get a

Handbag Phials by

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the moors, sharp, clean and refreshing.
GOovA's vismation, Gay and vital,
4s sparkling as crystal.

In seven fragrances +

% Decision, Vibration, Goya Heather.

Gardenia, Great
Expectations, Pink Mimosa, * No. 5,

so that at any moment of the day, no
was, she could renew and refresh her
handbag phial of Goya perfume to-day !

a.

PAR»
LONDON

NEW YORK

.

MADE IN ENGLAND

Sole Distributors :

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SUNDAY, AUGUST 24, 1952 SUNDAY ADVOCATE

This Look—And No Other—Sums

PAGE SEVEN

p Man About Toun







———————

U dreamed I was a



OPENED DAILY SOLD OUT & :mous ‘Father Brown| well-rounded figure in
DAILY and no wonder at these Stwric The recently eceived
tonishing price ‘Tror 8c to ‘Low’ Company aricatures
Fa ny on Over a dollar per yar Low and verse by Helen # @ °
| ; these are DRESS MATERIALS Spalding and L, A. G. Strong is| Ae ‘
ae FROM _N E. WILSON & CO. on ; veryone’s reading. And I vasten NAW CH, OTS
S 7 | Swan St. the result of a Norti av——so is ‘Cricket Crusaders’ | Ye
1 / ‘American and European glean- bi Harold Dale |
ing by Mr. Wilson himself — ' . Allegro
newly returned from an extend- z

NEW SPACE, NEW ‘COMFORT,
NEW LIGHTING typify the re-
nodelled MILLINERY DEPT. of
the MODERN DRESS SHOPPE
n Broag St. Complementing the

jed buying tour in far places
; Superb qualities and in colours
| and patterns that are NEW from
| leading manufacturers for YOU

BELLE...



By PHYLLIS DIGBY MORTON yy 5 E. WILSON’S. Rate f new decor, the inimitable
j aed is terrific on these lines and Kreindler technique provides
IN a hundred years’ time, when ; ftiendly advice is to get in truly beautiful millinery from
historians thumb through the | serty while tha wrappings are Canada and the United States.
fashion books to find out what the Bae ng off. : rhis captivating headwear is of
girls looked like in the first ’ Velvet, Felt and Straw and quite
Cropped hairstyle | as the ray are reign of Elizabeth \ Gavan, a nit 1B-0 @ last word, in any earn
Poodle it. , how will the act? haa — y ow? Yer dedly the accent for a
Will they ara this 1952 Le 1“. bave added to Wedding or Cocktail party.
Summer Belle as she appear | e eservedly popular *
ona weduchiiie * dlonoreult lavours with JAMAICA DR 3 MORE THAN A MATCH FOR
Grail) she strike thers os qualns |GINGER ALE — an absolute {LLS8 & CHILLS — should in-
as this glamour girl of 1558, the | Winner from the start, my friend. crest you, you'd think?, It’s
year the First Blizabeth ascended | With the same assurance of ASPRO, the ready-to-hand de-
the throne? purity, quality and distinctive tenca against Colds, Headaches,

We might imagine our historian | flavour as the famous Ju-C Bev- .oothache, and just plain Nervi-



a - erages, this JAMAICA D , et all lots saan: a on
trying t - % , = é RY wess and lots of other comm
the 1952 aeae ea rey GINGER ALE is what Ginger ‘complaints too, Hygienically
int 2 meee Se ee Ale really should be, It’s on rapped in individual waxed-
ee = Se St tlsyes's mays sale everywhere. iper compartments, ASPRO
fe at the new Aericl - ° * n be taken safely by old and

FOR FISHER MEN—Plantation
Ltd. have received a new ship-
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$6", 48” by one inch, and it’s the
real McCoy for the coming Fish

ot Season. For the POULTRY

vung. Costing only 6c. for a
nall size packet, ASPRO can be
ith you at all times -— and
1ould be in this weather!

“ .

His research would show a slim,
curvaceous girl whose curves were
offen produced artificially. This
was achieved -by accentuating the
hips with horse-hair stiffening or



Â¥RIAD COLOURS JAM-PACK

pads stitched on the hips under MAN, there is two and three-foot (HESE GROANING SHELVES
the skirt, and petticoats lined with xy 3” netting. and with thoughts end if anything drops, it’s
Extra revealing bodice called the coarse net and trimmed with frills f fish again, mention should be NEVER quality. GEORGE!

Deep Plunge of lace,
Tortoise—Shell Effect

Her skin was sun-tanned, and

made of the very complete rance
1! FISHING LINES and HOOKS

‘arried by Plantations Ltd

SAHELY & CO. and their float-
ing stock (literally in and out’
ive offering SHEERS in Lemon,



often deliberately glossed with oil ‘ink; Peach, Blue, Orchid and
Her hair was cropped as casually A WHOLE LINE OF MORRIS White at $1.39. And TAFFETA

TiCoAt

as € boy's, but very carefully AUTOS have arrived at’ Wort VANTASIA in rich Gold, Royal f
streaked with contrasting colours las Royal Garage Ltd. Interested it re aan Po oy Have the shapely young figure
to give a tortojse-shell effect. The 5-ton MB Té CTA at $2.31 anc

fRUCKS? Morris \OIRE TAFFETA at $1.72 — all you've dreamed of! Let Al
first in its field with the Morris ¢) which have ial perfec-
She used a paint brush to make Vans and Pick-ups coasnie een f which have the usual perfec

es
‘

legro’s superb control mold

her mouth any shape she fancied. avourites. As for CARS! the Otay AMERICAN your curves to perfection. lift
She darkened and pencilled her Morris Minors (2 and 4-doors) are a . beautifully, cive you a
eyelids to give them a feline took hy you bea uid

In again in new colours and guar-
anteed to loosen the purse string
while the big 6-cylinder Oxford
ie ready
They will,
snough!

and then blanked them out with
dark glasses of fantastic shape and
colour.
Exposed—And Outlined

She wore in the street as well as
on the dan¢e-floor, a revealing
bodice—it exposed as well as out-
lined. .

In previous periods, such as tne

IF ANYONE SHOULD KNOW
HOW TO SOLVE IT — Courtesy |
Garage should. In fact they do!
What’s this? Your grass cutting
problems when the answer rests
with a HEAVY-DUTY 5’ TRAIL-|
ER TYPE MOWER. This new!
irvival accompanies Side-deliv-|
cry Rakes, Self-lifting Rakes and |

really fashionable bustline. See

Allegro® now. in your favoi
fabrics.

Genuine Maidenforin Bra si
eres are made only inthe tn

States of America.

to glide off
teo, if

floo;
lon

the

you look

17)



ADVOCATE BOND WRITING
PAPER & ENVELOPES—respec-
Full skirt, over crinoline petticoats, tively 66c 48¢. both

and offer

> Crop Colleetor: Ss ders).

a la Ballerina Napoleonic and Victorian eras, xcellent value in fine quality euethes on ee | ‘ bey, ,
where fashion had decreed a dar- Stationery, The Advocate Book Massey-Harris. and Ferguson| Taereisa 4d7d eiifotie
ingly low neckline the tendency Jept. as alway rovicde scel- Wheel Tractors & Farm Equip- ; rab
was to hold the bosom high, .tight- ent teadling’ ana’ to itch “nent — ahd they should kpaw! for every type of figure.

ly compressed. For the first tame







| ) ! the eye is G K Chester- ph, 4616.

in history, in 1952 fashion em- siinsesppucinssnininenteniningieatenaminatatsinsinaneginpeaapaannaigiired a pennibeiiie's |
phasised the division of a woman's

bosom. The brassiere of 1952 was - Th: ‘ pd mew,

designed to produce this effect. euoroomarue sy eanuven Ins {s tne eee yy

This was the summer that
the craze for dieting reached its
climax and was featured in every
newspaper and magazine or tele-
vision and radio. So her diaph-

industry, who said it, would ruin
their trade,

Well, there she is, our Summer
Belle of 1952, the first year of the

neo-Elizabethan era. As you sit on

| Happy RELIEF
FROMBACKACHE

Neighbour said “Take Doan’s Pills”

Her accessories might seem to
our historian an interesting mix-
ture, Outsize pearls in her ears
and round her throat. Short, white
cotton gloves on bare, brown arms,

the promenade and watch her -
swing past, judge her with the
coldly critical eye of the research
student of 2052,

Carton for

macy = Vi











—L, E. 8. , y P wil
tagm was fiat, her waist tiny, three or four clanking chain Ts = ae 2 . We cei Hoke tabckocaa
a its earn are OAttE by a bracelets. i - rheumatic pains, lumbago, stiff,
wide, wide belt tightly pulled in. What kind of hat? Our historian Ww >, T ; —— iI aching muscles apd joints or the
She swung her hips to show found to his surprise that more hat 8 Cooking In The Kitchen houks nt. ra Cr yy Sorted urinary disorders due to
off her ruffled petticoats under often than not she wore none. * de Sat sluggish kidney action when you
her full skirts. On her feet she This, he wrote in a marginal SALADS Cut in small slices the pine- COUGH MIXTU DE j might get happy relief. -
E bad. nofhing but @ nih te wad note, soma from the contemporary NEAPOLITAN SALAD apple, the bananas, 1 peeled This new chteha tei Utantel Bhd bles come a See, ee
High-heeled, strip-toed oes; sole boun er foot with a few records ve aroused a gi Smalj cauliflowers 2, Salt, Oil, orange ..® stolen if i wins VENO'S COUGH MIXTURE yple bless the y they te
painted toenails. thin thongs, deal of hostility from the millinery vinegar, Pepper, inahinian = pws 2 seems Se pa ogee ' ine VaRG + FOpel + ee pa Broan's Backache Kidney Pills.
tia ge ey "be oc ae YFP T ITT ee: Ce PUN " Green or black olives, Capers. pawpaw). Add 3 nuts in small medicine inside the bettle is the s ime pen Se tie ae ont
® This is the traditional salad picées of course. Cut the lettuce onderful remedy for stopping coughing kidneys forealey out their function
oO e irts et nger which is served in Neapolitan also in very small pieces. Mix pact. CsLiNg Sit. Bioetan, OOH of ridding the blood of excess
eee homes fo Christmas Eve. Cook with cream, 1 pingh of salt, 1 grease ia aes ondontra it ee acid and other impurities
re the cauliflowers « when read) ote sae d , lh ng chestand lungs. | Vié. Sis good fo . G ry-
By EILEEN ASCROFT pang og renee} foe, cowl nam hair is cropped very short, fluffed (they must not gn soft) cut ine Pee ae See: ee the whole family, Get some immedia‘ely, whan pound con's Pills to

PARIS
Aum clothes, according to
i the fashion designers, will be
two inches longer for day wear.
This tendency, seen in London
earlier this week, was confirmed

by the first of the Paris shows.
The Little Dressmaker’s dream
of the 1930's is launched again by
Jacques Fath. He plays the theme
of the jumper suit with loose cowl
neckline, hip-length waisted
jumper and tightly pleated skirt,
BY DAY it appears in flecked
wool jersey in tones of black and
cinnamon and donkey grey. FOR
©COCKTAILS he keeps the same

There is this loose-fitting look
about the whole of M, Fath’s col-
lection. A woman’s figure re-
mains her own secret.

Shoulders are still sloping with
low-set or Magyar sleeves.

Top coats are loose and straight,
with flat tailored collars and large
revers,

* * * *

Evening gowns have the same
cowl collar or draped, rounded
bust line, very loosely fitted.

Colours are black and white,
and brilliant shades of electric
violet and canasta red.

up at the sides and back. They
wear head-hugging turbans of
jersey off the forehead but well

down on the neck. Makeup is
pale, with concentration on the
eyes.

# * * *

RUYERE preserves thé natural
shoulder and waistline. The
skirt hangs softly, with fulness
drawn to the front, back or sides.
The Magyar sleeves remain, also
the big draped sleeves set in low.
The poncho cape, Mexican-
inspired, is worn over dresses and
suits.
Another version of the cape is

them in pieces, Season them with
salt, pepper, oil and vinegar. Add
the anchovies, a handful of black
or green olives, a handful of
capers. Mix everything and serve.
You can add some tinned salmon
or tunna fish.
FRUIT SALAD

For 6 people: Pineapple 3 o2z.,
Bananas 2, Orange 1, Apples,
Nuts, Lettuce, Cream % glass,
Salt, Sugar, Lime Juice.



shoulder cape in hand-knitted
flecked wool.

Materials are figure moulding
silky looking for day clothes, with

SALAD PROVENCAL

Beetroots 3, Onions 2, Ancho-
vies 8, Mustard, Vinegar | table-
spoonful, Pepper, Salt, Olive oil
3 or 4 tablespoonsful.

Bake 3 beetroots in the oven,
When cooked peel them and cut
them in small squares. Cook ir
the oven 2 onions, let them cook
for quite a long time, when ready
mash them and sift them, Collec
the purée in a bowl, then add
the 3 anchovies also sifted, the
mustard, 1 tablespoonful of vine-
gar, 1 pinch of pepper, a tiny bit
of salt and 3 or 4 tablespoonsful

ee ee er ae



$7OPS CoUo;is



QUICKLY /



their friends and neighbours. ®

si"? DOAN’S }*

Prater for

Your Now Tyres will have

The golden-haired M. Fath has
chosen auburn shades for his
models’ autumn hair styles. Their

of olive oil. Mix this sauce with
& fork by beating it thoroughly.
Add the beetroots and serve cold.

jersey top and adds a _ pleated
skirt,of needle run lace of chiffon.
Dresses confirm the new longer

three-quarter-length over a slim
skirt,
Yet a third known is a tiny

watered silk and gleaming satin
featured for the cocktail hour.
—L.E.S.







EVERYTHING |

IN MILEAGE

Wider, flatter, dewper tread
with a pattern that persists
to the end.






IW SAFETY

Serrated ribs an‘i knife
cuts to stop skidadiug on
wet surfaces.








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of Ferg S¢ Olfons IW COMFORT

A casing construciion

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with endurance

:
exquisite designs blossom across seersuckers, cambrics, voiles,



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wash after wash. . . these are the lovely crisp Ferguson

p |
a cottons that make lip so (] beautifully mito clothes

af











for your children and yourself,

/



choose carefully . .

use Faithfully . . vardicy make the right preparation

for your type of skin. Wash with one of their luxurious Soaps.

Obtainable from ail leading stores

For deep-down cleanliness use a Yardley Cleansing Cream.

#THE.GUARANTEE carried by all Ferguson Fabrics—

For the nightly massage which keeps your skin soft

itisfaction assured or the material 1

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and supple choose rich Yardley Night Cream.

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tone up with, Yardley Astringent or Toning Lotion,



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" TAR BOND STREBT -@urnpos Depots end OCistributors throughout the World ix







PAGE EIGHT

BARBADOS etl ADVOCAT,

aaa Sea See Bet
Printed by the Advecate Co., Lté., Bre-* #1. Bridsstewn

Sunday, August 24, 1952

Party Government

DURING an address to the Chamber of
Commerce on Wednesday the Hon. H. A.
Cuke referred to the passing late at night
of an address on which only seven’ out of
24 members of the House of Assembly
voted in favour.

The passing of that address is note-
worthy for several reasons.

Firstly it is remarkable for showing how
real is the cleavage which exists within
the Barbados Labour Party on matters of
policy. Of seven members of the Barba-
dos Labour Party who voted on the address
six voted against the official government
attitude to the address which had been
eloquently presented by a member of the
Executive Committee, Mr. F. L. Walcott.

Voting against the address and therefore
voting against the official party decision
which had been outlined by Mr. Walcott
were Messrs. Miller, Mapp, Barrow, Talma,
Holder and Brancker.

Mr. Cuke was concerned with the effect
which a resolution in favour of national-
ising the wire broadcast service system in
Barbados might have on prospective in-
vestors of capital in Barbados,

But so was Mr. F. L. Walcott. Speaking
with the responsibility of a member of the
Executive Committee and as spokesman
for the official view of his party, Mr. Wal-
cott warned: “We are in a subtle way
making this island of Barbados the one
island which people who want to invest
capital would avoid”. Yet in the voting
which took place on the address Mr. Wal-
cott was the only representative of the
Barbados Labour Party, for which he had
spoken officially, to cast his vote against
the address.

No clearer illustration could be given
of the difficulties which the leaders of the
Labour Party are experiencing in formu-
lating a rigid policy which is acceptable
to a majority of the Party.

The voting on the address in favour of
nationalisation of Rediffusion was not an
instance of individual party members re-
fusing to toe the party line as has hap-
pened on several occasions during the
present parliamentary session,

“Tt was an instance of the official and
responsible party representative, who
holds one of the four “ministerial” posts
being voted against by a numerical major-
ity of his own party. This is a strange
manifestation of party disunity and is an
outstanding example of the variance of
views existing among members of the
same political party.

Mr. Walcott was reported at the time
of the debate as having counselled mem-
bers to “devote their energies to the basic
needs of the community and stop all the
talk about nationalisation of Rediffusion
which would only tend to make outside
private investors avoid Barbados.”

Yet the only two members who voted
with him against the passing of the ad-
dress were not members of the Barbados
Labour Party on whose behalf Mr. Wal-

cott was entitled to speak with authority.

Besides the divergence of cpinion which
exists in the Labour Party, the inability
of the Government party to secure suffi-
cient votes to support its own official par-
ty decision on a matter of public import-
ance is worthy of note.

The suggestion has been made before
in the columns of this newspaper and by
private observers that there seems no
need for the House of Assembly to debate
matters of great importance to the com-
munity after dinner.

Members of the House of Assembly are
each paid $1,000 per year for their services
rendered as politicians. In addition the
following salaries are paid annually: to
the Speaker of the’ House of Assembly
$1,900, the Deputy Speaker of the House
of Assembly $1,450; Chairman of Commit-
tees $1,450, Leader of the House of As-
sembly $1,650. Members of the Executive
Committee receive a total remuneration
of $8,400.

Before the introduction of payment of
members of the House of Assembly, poli-
tical service was a_ particular form of
service which certain individuals elected
to give to the remainder of the community.
Today no one would attempt to disparage
the political service which is rendered
to the community by the paid elected
members of the House of Assembly yet
the fact that they are paid does give the
taxpayers a special interest in their poli-
tical activities.

And whereas it would have seemed un-
gracious in the days when members of
the House of Assembly gave their time
freely to discuss the affairs of state for
which they bore an especial responsibility

to suggest that the business of the House
should be conducted at any special hours,
today there is every reason ‘why the tax-
payers should be interested in the time
at which member to whose

of day

remun¢ ntribute conduct

their

ition they

SUNDAY

ADVOCATE



If the House of Assembly were in the
habit of meeting for more than one day
a week during the periods when the House
is in session the public would appreciate
the desire of members to expedite business
of the House by means of occasional late-
night sittings. But since the House rarely
meets more than one day per week in
full Assembly lateness of the commence-
ment of the business of the House and the
frequent extension of that business after
the hours of dinner has often caused
surprise.

The development of party government
in Barbados in recent years and the emer-
gence after the last elections of a political
party with an overwhelming majority in
the House of Assembly has accentuated
the obvious disadvantages of late night
sittings.

The climate of Barbados is such that no
man can be expected to give of his best
after a day spent in exercising a trade
or profession. Yet members of the House
of Assembly because of the habit of late
night sittings are expected to express
points of view and to contribute to de-
cisions affecting the whole community
after full day’s work very often in the
heat of the City.

The development of party government
has also resulted in diminution of the
administrative importance of the Civil
Service. It would be much more conveni-
ent and certainly much more efficient if
the House of Assembly could arrange for
18 meetings to be held during normal
working hours so that files on all subjects
could be made easily ‘available through-
cut the discussions of the House’s business.

Any visitor to the House of Assembly
during the hours before noon will have
noticed the much lower temperature
which prevails in that chamber at that
time of the day.

There may be reasons why it would be
impossible for the House of Assembly to
1evise its hours of meeting, but from the
point of view of climate, administrative
convenience, and greater efficiency the
case for commencing in the morning hours
reems a good one, And the remuneration
which members receive ought to compen-

ate them against loss of a day’s private
earnings.



On Names

THE importance of a name has perhaps
never been more vividly presented to the
man-in-the-street, or more correctly to
-he man in the theatre or easy chair than
by Oscar Wilde,

‘here are persons to whom the exact
spelling of a name or the correct pro-
neunciation of a surname or its precise
enunciation distinguish the man of refine-
iment from the brute beast.

Barbados as an island has never been
fortunate in receiving the homage of men
of refinement. From the beginning of its
arrival as a place name on the lips and
maps of civilised man it has experienced a

variety of nomenclatures. In English

literature the island is best known as “the
Barbadoes” and this picturesque spelling
wes adopted by the press-gangs who helped
to recruit’ English labour for the planta-
ticns in the high-handed fashion which is
more frequently associated in the minds of
readers of romantic novels with the verb
shanghai,”

On maps of the world Barbados has been
spelled in many ways, or has been
associated with several place names,
4smongst these are “Barbudos”, and “St.
Bernard.” On one unusual! map which
hangs on the wall of a well known Barba-
dian seaside home Barbados is situated
somewhere in the mid Pacitic. Scholars
and historians could no doubt add to the
list of spellings by which the island has
been remembered during the hundreds of
years which have elapsed since it first
came to the notice of seafaring men.
Mention ought to be made of the Letters
Patent with its quaint reference to “the
island of Barbados and its dependencies”
and to the habit common among so many
of its sons and daughters of pronouncing
it as if spelt “Buhbadus”, And if the name
of the island has undergone many trans-
formations of spelling and geographical
setting at the hands of learned men and
women from across the Seas, the names
of its towns, villages and inhabitants are
at the constant mercy of the publishers
of newspapers and especially of their em-
ployees. :

English sub-editors on the infrequent
occasions when they consider any news
emanating from Barbados as suitable for
the Empire-ignorant masses of the United
Kingdom are not averse to spelling our
ancient and venerable city of Bridgetown
older than Montreal forsooth as
Bridgton. Worse horrors have occurred.

But the newest and strangest of all the
alterations which have befallen our historic
names was perpetrated by no less an organ
of august opinion than — we chronicle it
with humility and as an example of the
pitfalls which daily best the publishers
of the printed word—The Times of London.
On August 14, 1952 subscribers of the
Times of: London reading of a conference
opening on September 9 to discuss
Canadian trade with, the West Indies were
told that “Dr. Grantley Adams and Mr.
Coke” were coming over from Barbados,
By contrast the names and styles of the
Jamaican and Trinidadian representatives
were correctly printed Barbadhs, it seems,
is not as well known in London circles as
we sometimes fondly imagine,

S foreign hot
net appear io be oilering thc
same sycopnantic we.come to ex-
hing rurouk now ‘he has been
|de-wironed 1 wonder if the piay-
jboy of the Near Sastern word
would care to stay with his Uncle
Nat tor a while?

Aithough we could not offer
him luxury in the Sea Nest, wé
could at least offer him a glimpse
of life he has never seen before,
and would proebab.y never want
to see again.

Of course, he would have to be
disciplined after a life of self-
indulgence. At first, he might
sulk over his breakfast kipper,
aud would, no doubt, fly into an
ex-reyal rage when he under-
stood that his ration card enti-
tled him to one stale egg a week.

Mad with hunger at his first
Sunday lunch, he might try to
snatch the entire joint off the
dish, though a sharp rap with
a carving knife over fat knuckles
woud teach him that his Uncle’s
life partner, the Plucky Little
Woman, is a_ strict believer in
fair shares and has no respect
whatever for V.I.Ps.

* x £

}




















At tea, having already wolfed
his butter ration, he would have
margarine toast, bloater paste
and sticky buns, but if he tried
to sake tne jot, another rap with
a teaspocn would keep his
hands in his pockets.

By supper-time he would be
too nervous of a crack from the
bread knife to reach for his
share of beans cn toast. After
supper, despite his love of the
gaming tables, his fingers would
be too sore to deal a hand at
ha’penny nap, the only card
game hig Uncle Nat can under-
stand,

Empty and weary, he would
then be put to bed in his Uncle’s
dressing-rcomh. As the bed there
is known as the Hog’s Back,
because the worn mattress
springs make it rise in the mid-
dle and slope sharply at either
side, he would spend most of the
night falling out of it.

Even if he dropped off to sleep,
he woud soon be awakened by
Lottie the Devil Cat, who jumps
through the open window soon
after midnight, like Cinderella

FOR

THE Y.M.C.A. came to Barba-
dos 35 years after its formation
in London. Last week the 72nd
annual general meeting was held
at the new headquarters in Pinfold
Street,

Writing about the Y.M.C.A, to
people of Barbados might well
stem to be teaching grandmother
what she has long forgot.

I myself am old enough to re-
member the Y.M.LC.A, as the place
where about sixteen years ago I
first learned how to throw a fout-
call into a hoop on a lawn
where now. stands a luxurious
motor car in a show window.
Today the Y.M.C.A, has crossed
the road and now owns acres of
playing fields around which a
nigh wall is being built.

In 1930 the Y.M.C.A, had 373
members. Today there are 657,
Mlembers pay 36 cents a month.
fhe premises are always open
and an old slogan “join the
Y.M.C.A, and say goodbye to
lonely evenings” seems aptly
phrased. Whether it’s billiards,
basket ball, table tennis, reading,
writing, debates, religious study
or light conversation on a cool
well-lit verandah that meets the
young man’s fancy in August
1952, he'll find it at the Pinfold
Street Headquarters of the “Y”.

Barbadians, people are fond of
saying (I sometimes say it my-
self) are a “cliquey” crowd; they
never mix, but oscillate in their
own circles. The truth of course
is never as simple as that and the
cliques of Barbades are nowhere
so sharply defined that they
don’t rub shoulders willy-nilly
on some day of the 265. At the
“Y” however there are 10 cliques

Members come from almost all
classes of Barbadian society, The

‘| Genera]. Secretary, whose enthu-

siasm and undaunted faith in the
*y” makes him perhaps its most
valuable asset, keeps a list ot
callings of members. The list
exceeds 600 but the following
cross section of members’ call-
ings indicates the absence of
‘liques. Today's “Y" members
include barmen,-chemists, aythars,
motor mechanics, merchants,
pedlars, electricians, tailors, cab-
inet makers, draughtsmen, cash
boys, parochial treasurers, mes-
-engers, planters, bookbinders,
bicycle repairers, overseers,
teachers, chauffeurs, clerks, stu-
dents, bookkeepers, telegraphists,
ministers of religion, jewellers,
civil servants, ‘welders, butlers
and salesmen. You could hardly
find a more mixed bag anywhere
else in the island or a collection





FENCE
ify NATHANIEL
GUBEINS

the ball, to sieep on the
ped or its Occupant.

eicer

It is said of the tough training
ut the brigade of Guards aepot
at Caternam that aller six weeks
mere, hey eltner make a recru:t
into the worid’s best soldier or
break his heart,

Much the sume could be said
of raining at the sea WNesi,
except that we could break Far-
ouk’s heart in haif the time.

NOTE TO ABOVE.—According
to a gossip column, and a possib.e
musprint, Farouk’s favourite
companion at all-night gambling
parues was a courtier called
Abdul El Ahmed Bey Bey.

He was also the origin of the
song ... “I Wonder Where My
Bey Bey is Tonight.”

Uops, Pardon Me

ROM a newspaper cooking

recipe:—

Salad Loaf:
from sandwich
length-wise into

. Margarine top
siices. Margarine other two
slices on both sides. Spread
bottom slice with mayonnaise,
top with chopped watercress
and lettuce. Cover with slice
that is margarined on both
sides. Spread with cream
cheese seasoned with chopped
onions, Cover with other slice
margarined on both sides.

Remove
loaf,
four _ slices.
and bottom

crust
Cut

Repeat mayonnaise spread
and salad layer. Cover with top
slice, margarine side down.

Coat top of loaf with mayon-
naise. Cut at table into one-
inch thick slices.
* oe * *
You can have my slice.
In Darkest London
N his arrival at Victoria
Station, Mr. Andrei Gromy-
ko, the new Russian Ambassador,
said: “I wish to be acquainted
with the British people.”

If he has been foxed by
Russian propaganda, he has a lot
to. learn.

For instance, he may believe
in the English boy who is the
chief character in “The Ballad



“of Oxford-street,”

SITTING ON THE

written by
the Russian poet Kostyrev and
recently broadcast, according to
the B.U.P., on Moscow’s radio.
Here is a‘ translation of two
of the verses:— ,
In Oxford-street a youngster
stands
' Aged twelve, with bright red
hair, .
He only dreams of food
becat

use
No food is ever there.
ae ae a doll, a pretty

That can both laugh and cry,
One 4. a smile, two tugs,

a .
“For a penny, sir, you try.”
According to Kostyrev, the
hard-faceqd men who are ignor-
ing the starving boy in Oxford-
street and letting “his consump-
tive mother lie on. a bed of rot-

ting straw,” are stockbrokers
walking to Thread-needle-street.
* a * *

When Gromyko knows more
about the geography of London,
he will also Know that the stock-~
brokers must not only be hard-
hearted but pretty jhard-up if
they have to walk all that way
when the piace is crawling with
buses and taxis.

When he has read the facts
and figures of juvenile delin-
quency in Britain, he will under-
stand that the prostrate woman
on the straw was probably
somebody else’s mother who was
as fit as a flea until the red-

haired boy hit her with a
home-made cosh,

* * * *
Later, when Gromyko has

become acquainted with Giles’s
cartoons, he will appreciate that
the following is a truer pictur?
of British youth today:—

In Oxford-street a. youngster
stands
Aged eight, with’ bright blue

eye,

He holds a cosh in either
hand ;

To sock the passers-by.

Sometimes he has a_ hand.
grenade

For aunts he cannot bear,

One tug, a pause, and then a

bang—
And auntie isn’t there.



MEN

of individuals less worthy of the
description of cliques,

Yet despite the apparent com-
prehensiveness of the list above
tnere is q notable absence of
dockworkers, street sweepers,
warehouse porters and other
manual workers. Since the
Y.M.C.A. is open to all men ot
good moral character and the
subscription is within the reach
of every worker the absence of
port workers: from its member~-
ship is «particularly noticeable,
especially when the work that
the “Y” does for the Navy and
Merchant Marine is remembered

While I was chatting to Mr,
Williams, the General Secretary
ast week, a seaman arrived with
a note from a steamship agent,
He and another seaman had been
left behind when their — ship
sailed. So they were sent along
to the “Y". Where else? Upstairs
in some of the seven bedrooms
were billetted visiting table~
tennis players. And in these same
bedrooms not. long ago lived
Trade Unionists who attended «#
course arranged by the C.D. & W
Organisation.

Each person living in the
Y.M.C.A. rooms pays $3.00 per
day for bed and full board.

Meals are served thoughout the
day at the Y.M.C.A. from 7.30 in
the morning until 7 at night and
the only break in cooking seems
to be between 2 p.m, and 3.30
om.

On special occasions the can-
teen downstairs is opened for th2
sale of light refreshments until
quite late, ° ;

One of the facilities offered by
the Y.M.C.A. is of especial value
to cash boys. These pay only 10
cents for a large Barbadian
breakfast which would cost other
members 60 cents. The difference
is made up by a special cash boy
fund.

Other boys make use of the
Y.M.C.A. to play table tennis
without paying membership fees,
although they_have to rent the bats
and balls, The “Y” has at least
three table tennis tables and they
are in use from dawn to late at
night.

Provisions for resident and visit-
ing guests have to be bought and
stored and more than $22,000 in
purchases were made for this pur-
pose laat year. Cooking is done
on gas stoves and gas rings and
there is a large refrigerator,

The “Y” also offers laundry
service on the premises.



Our Readers Say

Local Dramatic Films
= ae -
To the Editor, the Advocate,
SIR,—In the island to-day there
are many shows presented by
wmall groups such as the efforts
of the Barbados Players formerly
the Bridgetown Payers and the
Barbados Dramatic Club before
amalgamation. Then there is Mrs,
A. L. Stuart’s Revuedeville School
of Dancing which started in 1939
and for the last three years has
been” staging an annual show
with crowning success, Shows like
these are needed to show the out-
side world exactly what we can
do in stage performances and the



only means of so doing is the
Barbados Film Unit,
“The Barbados Film Unit which
is connected to the Education
Branch is run by the Government,
I do not know what is their limit
of production, but I do know that
t would really be considered
e financial ground
The Film Unit can make money

uetion ‘Give “Your

for itself, It started its work in
1950 and released its first pro-
Child A
Chance’ in January °51 to both the
local commercial cinema and the
Colonial Empire. Now this is a
documentary film and no doubt
there has not been any financial
receipts by the unit. It also has
filmed other documentary shorts
like ‘Better Pottery’, ‘Cotton In-
dustry’, Musical Ride’ in the Police
Department, the ‘Elections under
Adult Suffrage’ and the opening
of the House etc. I feel that in-
stead of filming all productions
of this type, the unit could use
a few thousand feet of film on
some of the local shows mentioned
previously, and with my sug-
gested scheme, the unit would
benefit financially and give oppor-
tunity to local talent to be known
outside of Barbados,

All the productions by the Bar-

bados Film Unit have met with
n favourable comment. How much
more W se shows of art



acting?

nd dramatic





ONLY

Cleanliness is easily practised in
buildings so generously equipped
with showers toilets and flush
latrines, The spacious verandah
looking on to the large playing
fields compare favourably with
many Barbadian clubs and is
almost as large as the downstairs
of the Trinidad Yacht Club,

Upstairs a large room is avail-
able for indoor table _ tennis.
lectures, musical performances,
amateur theatricals or religious
services,

Behind this room, is a reading
room and plans are now being
made for the establishment there
of the library which is presently
housed in another room near the
front of the building.

The “Y” offers several
rooms for use by Barbadian
organisations. The Chess Club
has permanent premises at the
“Y” and so has the Clerks Union,
Downstairs the front of the
building is reserved for the St.
John Ambulance Association.
Other organisations which have
made use of the Y building are
the British and Foreign Bible
Society, the S.P.C.A., the Foot-
ball Association, the Referees
Association, the Royal Navy and
Merchant League, the Elementary
Teachers Association, the Phar-
maceutical Society and the Extra-
Mural Department of the Uni-
versity College of the West Indies.

John Harrison who did so much
for West Indian painting that his
recall by the British Council was
everywhere regretted and whose
absence is still felt, made the ““Y”
his headquarters when in Barba-
dos. Everybody makes use of
the Y and even members of the
juries are “locked up” in “Y”
bedrooms until the ending of their
cases,

A catalogue of what goes on at
the “Y” or what the Y has done
for Barbadian young and older
men would fill more than a year’s
issue of Sunday Advocates.

small

The important thing to remem-
ber is that their work has been
made possible only by the devot-
ed service and support of genera-
tions of Barbadians. What the
Y is today: what it-has achieved:
and what Barbados owes to it
was all done by public-spirited
citizens of this island who laid
sound foundations in days which
are too often represented nowa-
days to have been without any
social conscience at all. After
completing seventy-two years of
service, the Y.M.C.A,. stands full
of vigour, proof against such
slanders and prepared to expand
still further its service to the men
of Barbados,



The Film Unit should devise
a scheme to go into operation in
the Suggested way. In a few weeks
time, Mrs. A. L, Stuart’s Revue-
deville of 1952 is coming up and
they could start off by using a
few thousand feet of film on this.
When this production is ready,
a print either 16MM or, 35MM
could be given to a Branch of
the Local cinemas or all of them,
if possible, and an agreement made
for part of the Box Office takings.
Not forgetting the fact that a film
made in Barbidos with Barbadian
actors and actresses would attract
more attention in general than the
regular film from overseas. This
would be a drawing card and
would build up box office takings
immensely.

The cut-for the local produc-
tion would be paid to the Barba-
Film Unit and help to de-
fray expenses incurred. It would
be a kind of ‘help yourself’ system,

dos

V. Cc.

SUNDAY, AUGUST 24, 1952



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SUNDAY, AUGUST 34,

1952

SUNDAY



ROGUES OF THE SEA—1
Francois Lolonois: Most Ferocious

Francois Loionois, ag his
would suggest, was born in France,
When he was still a youth, how-
ever, he was -transported to the
Caribbee iskands-as an indentured
servant, and when he had served
his time he went to Hispaniola
where he teamed up with some of
the hunters.

These hunters were called buc-
rs, their name coming from
their peculiar method of curing
beef by laying it/out in the sun,
which was called buchanning.
The beef so cured was itself
from wild or half wild cattle,
stolen from the Spaniards in His-
paniola — the island known today
as Haiti and San Domingo.

The headquarters of these
nomadic robber-hunters was the
little island of Tortuga de Mar, so
called from its supposed resem-
blance to a turtle. This island and
the meeting place of the pirates
in Jamaica, Port Royal, were
known as “the common refuge of
all sorts of wickedness, and the
seminary, as it were, of pirates and
thieves.”

Lolonois’s career as a pirate be-
gan in Tortuga. He started from
the bottom as an ordinary seaman
but behaved so courageously that
after three voyages he was put in
command of a ship by the Gov-
ernor of the island. His reputa-
tion for cruelty did not take long
to spread, and soon the Spaniards
in the Caribbean preferred to die
fighting rather than surrender to
him, for they knew he was with-
out mercy.

Bad Luck

He was successful at first and
amassed a small fortune. But then
his luck changed: he Jost his ship
in a storm off the coast of Cam-
pechy and although all the men
got to land they were pursued by
the Spaniards who killed most of
‘them and wounded Lolonois, He
was lucky to get away alive but
he was a crafty fellow and he
fooled the Spaniards by mixing
Sand with the blood from his
wounds, smearing it all over his
body, and then lying quietly
among thé dead until the enemy
had departed.

Although he was now literally
helpless he determined to get
even with the Spaniards who,
thinking he was dead, were cele-
brating his death with bonfires in
Campechy. He entered the city
in disguise and managed to per-
suade some slaves to join him.
With their aid he eventually got
back to Tortuga ina canoe and
there fitted out another ship,

In this small ship, which was
little bigger than.a canoe, he took
twenty men and sailed to the coast
of Cuba, Here he expected to find
rich booty, but some fishermen
sighted his shi d. jptommed the
Governor in H vast it “Lolonois
had come to roy them.”

‘

The Governor immediately de-
spatched. ship of ten guns and
ninety ~who had orders “not

to return “into; his, pre: with-
out having Tails destroyed those
Pirates.” To ‘assist them in this he

Sent along. 4. negroe ~ hangman
whose job was. “to hang immedi-
ately every one of the pirates ex-
cept Lolonois, ‘who. should be
brought alive to Havana.”

No rT

But events did ‘turn out as
the Governor expected. Lolonois
and his men-captured the Spanish
ship and cut off the heads of all
the crew—including the hangman
—except one man. This man
Lolonois sent back to the Governor
with a written message: “I shall
never henceforward give quarter
to any Spaniard whatsoever; and
I have great hopes I shall execute
on your own person the very
same punishment I have done upon
them you sent against me. Thus
I have retaliated the kindness you
designed to me and my compan-
ions.”

Luck was now in favour of
Lolonois.. With the good ship
under him again he soon captured
a merchantman laden with plate
and other merchandise, This
prize he took to Torfuga and after
dividing the booty started to
equip a fleet to harass the Span-
iards in the area. .

He went into partnership with
another pirate, Michael de Basco,
and soon they had a fleet of eight
ships ready for sea. And so
Lolonois set off “with intent to
rob, sack, and burn. whatsoever
he met with.” Within a short time
he had taken two valuable ships
and had sent them back to Tor-
tuga to be unloaded. Being en-
couraged by this success Lolonois
and his men set out to capture
Maracaibo, Venezuela. f

Their first task was to €apture
the fortresses on the bar which
protected the town of Maracaibo.
This they did after fierce fighting
and then t the following day
demolis the fortresses. In the
meantime the people of Maracaibo,



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name



- ae us
aie ete s
3°

et & FRANCOIS LOLONOTS.,
Fe ; eren wt Olonne ia 2" ok
ae Ceneraad van de Fra
~
having been informed that “the for Nicaragua but running into

pirates will presently be here with
two thousand men,” fled with as
much of their belongings as they
could take to the neighbouring
city of Gibraltar, or hid in the
woods,

When the pirates landed in
Maracaibo they were surprised to
find the city deserted, however
they soon made themselves at
home, occupying the best houses
and making the great church their
main guard.

The next day a large party of
pirates went out to bring in any
of the inhabitants they could find,
They returned in the evening with
20,000 pieces of eight and twenty
prisoners—men, women and child-
ren,

Some of these prisoners were
put on the rack to make them con-
fess where the rest of the goods
were hidden, but they refused,
Lolonois, drew his cutlass, how-
ever, and hacked one of the
Spaniards to pieces before the rest
saying, “If you do not confess and
declare where you have hidden
the rest of your goods, I will do
the like to all your companions,”
After this, one man confessed and
showed the pirates where the
goods were buried in the forest

No Fear »

After about a fortnight in Mara-
caibo the pirates set out to ravage
Gibraltar. That town was weil
prepared, however, and as the
pirates approached they saw an
army of 400 well armed soldiers
drawn up. Lolonois held a hasty
council of war, pointing out to the
men that they would gain much
riches from the city, and they all
promised to follow him. “Know
ye withal” Lolonois warned “that
the first man who shall show any
fear, or the least apprehension
thereof, I will pistol him with my
own hands.”

It was a desperate struggle. At
one time it looked as though the
Spaniards would win and Lolonois
called off his men suddenly and
pretended to retreat, “They flee,
they flee” shouted the Spaniards
and leaving their batteries
rushed after the pirates in wild
disorder. They had fallen into the
trap. The pirates wheeled around
and cut down some two hundred
men with their cutlasses, losing
only forty of their own men, After
this the town was theirs.

The pirates spent a month in
Gibraltar, a month of debauchery,
torture and robbery. After they had
collected all the booty they could
they threatened to burn the city
unleas a ransom of 10,000 pieces
of eight was paid in two days.
They visited Maracaibo again after
collecting the ransom and made a
similar threat, collecting another
large sum of money,

They then sailed to Hispaniola
where the spoil wis divided, and
then they went to Tortuga where
they spent it on debauchery,

Another Venture

Lolonois did not let much time
elapse before he organised another
venture. This time he planned to
visit Niearagua and pillage as
many towns there as he could.

ALolonois and his fleet—there
were six shins this time—set sail

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calms and adverse currents they
were forced after a while to put
into the river Xagua to search
for provisions, They took the town
of Puerto Cavallo and burned the
storehouses and then marched
on to capture San Pedro, When

LOLONOIS “grew outrageously p
iard’s heart,

they drew close to the town they
ran into an ambush, but after a
fierce skirmish they put the Span-
iards to flight. There were a few
unwounded prisoners and Lolo-
nois had them brought before him
for questioning. He wanted to
know whether any more Spaniards
were lying in ambush for him
further on, They refused to
answer, and growing outrageously
passionate Lolonois drew his cut-
lass, cut open the breast of one of
the Spaniards, pulled out the
heart began to bite and gnaw
with his teeth, like a ravenous
wolf, saying to the rest, “I will
serve you all alike, if you show
me not another way.”

another
hard

He was shown
Eventually, after a

way.
fight





Lolonois took the town, and after
pillaging it reduced it to ashes.

After this the pirates decided to
eareen their ships and clean the
bottoms, So leaving one ship in
the Guatemala river to await an
expected Spanish ship they sailed
away to some nearby islands and
set to work cleaning and painting.
Another reason for going to the
islands was the fact that the
fishing there was good—especially
turtle fishing—and the buccaneers
were running out of supplies,

They spent three months in
the islands and then hearing that
the Spanish ship had come hurried
back and captured it, They were
in for a disappointment, how-
ever, for instead of pieces of eight
ill they got from the ship was
fifty bars of iron, a small parcel of
peper and some earthenware jars
of wine

Pirates Discontented

Lolonoi ealled a council of

war and told them that he decided

te go to Guatemala, but his men
were becoming discontented be-
eause of lack of success and they
sailed for Tortuga leaving Lolo-

nois with only one ship.

Fortune had now turned her
back on Lolonois, and shortly
after the others had left, his ship
stuck on a sandbank off the
islands De las Pertas and it was
impossible to get her off again.
There was nothing left to do but
to break her up and make a long-
boat from her timbers and _ this
the pirates set to work to do.

When it was finished Lolonois
set out to the river of Nicaragua
and was again assailed by ill
fortune since he met with a com-
bined band of Spaniards and
Indians who killed off most of his
men, However, he and the few
remaining men got away in the
boat and Lolonois determined to
go to the coast of Carthagena to
capture some ships.

But it was the Indians of Darien
who were destined to prevent

assionate” and tore out the Span-

Lolonois frem
other ship.

As soon as he landed the sav-
age Indians—-called by the Span-
iards bravoes—took him prisoner
and tore him to pieces alive,
throwing his body limb by limb
into the fire, and his ashes into
the air that no trace should re-
main of so infamous a human
creature,

ever robbing an-



“Thus” writes Esquemeling, the
historian of the buccaneers, “ends
the history, the life and the mis-
erable death of that © infernal
wretch Lolonois, who full of hor-
rid, execrable, and enormous
deeds, and debtor to so much in-
nocent blood, died by cruel and
butcherly hands, such as his own
were in the course of his life.”

Botanists Study Pre-Historic
Age Of Tennessee

KNOXVILLE, Tennessee,

Aug’ 22.

Two botanists from the Univer-
sity of Tennessee left here on Fri-
day for a trek into the wild hin-
.erland of Mexico to preserve and
study living plant life that once
grew in West Tennessee's pre-
historic age of sixty or seventy
million years ago.

Botanists Dr. Aron Sharp and
Dr. Royal Shanks will explore
the rugged eastern slopes of Mex-
ico’s Sierras mountains where they
say tropical palm trees and tem-
perate maples and oaks now exist
together and once fed before the



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man age beasts that roamed west-
ern Tennessee.

Both scientists have spent the
last ten years examining fossil and
plant life of Tennessee’s 96
counties and this trip will provide
them with living tropical and tem-
perate plants that once lived side
by side in the State.

Two years ago Dr. Sharp visit-
ed. the site and brought back pre-
liminary reports on the resem-
blance of Tennessee's plant fossils
to that of plant life living in
Mexico's south west Tamaulipas,

‘ —U-P.

Your Co-operation

ADVOCATE

oa





By IAN GALE

Of The Pirates



The People Of B’dos (XX)

“SLAVERY”

Ky John Prideaux

In spite of all the opposition to slave owner was down £26. 17. 3

the abolition of slavery, ‘the
teachings of the clurgy was having
its effect, for it is recorded in
1823, that a marriage took place
at St. George’s Church by the
Rev. Mr. Went; one Robert Jor-
dan was married to Christian
Griffith, both slaves on Windsor
Ploniuon Chere ts an account
o& this wedding, which stated that



the couple had a Phaeton and a
pair of norses, while their friends
had three gigs and five horses,
and all the plantation gangs at-
tended the wedding. On _ the
return of the wedding party to
the house of the bridegroom in
the plantation yard, where tasty
dejeune was served. Then there
were rural ports until fou
o'clock when the party sat down
to sumptuous dinner of turkey
roast beef and pork, bridal cake,
gold and silver eaf and sugar
plums, besides fruit and wines,
and they danced until a late
hour. (1)

The Act passed by the House

of Commons, by which the state
of slavery was to be ‘utterly and
forever abohsheyl) and declared
unlawful throughout the British
Colonies,’ received royal assent
on the 28th day of August, 1833;
but it did not take effect in the
British Colonies until the first day

of August, 1834, This act arrived,
in Barbados on the Sth day o:
October, 1833, and was immedi-

ately made public by the Gover-
nor, Sir Lionel Smith, After this

a system of apprenticeship for
nonpraedial labourers was es-
tablished, and was to last until

August 1840,

‘he Act liberating the slaves,
often referred to as the ‘Magna
Charta’ of the Negro Race in the
British Dominions and Colonies,
awarded the sum of £20,000,000
as compensation to slave-owners
througnout the Empire. Of this
amount the sum of £1,721,345.
19. 7. fell to Barbados, This was
to be dealt with by a Com-
mission, The Governor appointed

the Honourable Ren Ham-
den, the Honourable J. W.
Clarke, the Honourabie _ the

Speaker, William Oxley, and Fors-
ter Clarke, Esqrs., to be auxiliary
commissioners, with himself and
the Attorney-General.) Then
began the necessary consequential
re-adjustments in political and
social institutions. These changes
were carried through chiefly by
the wise statesmanship and dis<
cretion of Sir Robert Bowcher
Clarke, the _ Solicitor-General.
One of his most valuable services
was the leading part he took in
the creation of the Assistant Court
of Appeal, a tribunal which has
proved to be a safety-valve for
the discharge of the passions
aggrieved by magisterial decisions.

The effect of the Christian
teachings and educational pro-
visions supplied by the Bishop and
Clergy were clearly shown at this
period, for instead of the freed
slaves celebrating their freedom
in riotous acts, the last hours of

nlavery and the first hours of
freedom were spent in the
churehes and chapels. The new

centres round which the emanci-
pated rallied were neither ignorant

agitators nor fire-brand orators, tation One historian writing of
but the Missionaries, the deacons, this system refers to how i

pastors and class-leaders of the worked in Antigua and Barbad
Christian Congregation under a He states that it ‘worked fairly
great leader—Bishop Coleridge. wel cn the basis of a reasonably |
The former masters were, how- well-assured supply of labour the
ever, still afraid of the planters, especially those in Bar-
freed slaves, and the bados, were able to effect very |
marked improvements in the |

fresh in their mindé, even al-
though the actual period of tree-
com had passed quietly into his-
tory. The Merchants in Bridge-
town, who had the most to lose
should these freed persons be-
come unruly, used their influence
in having a police force formed,
This was done in 1835; it is stated
to have been the first attempt in
the British West India Colonies to
establish a force of this descrip-
tion,

In August of the same year,
there was published a return of
the valuation of the slaves, so as
to be able to pay each slave owner
the correct amount. It was found
that there was a total of 83,146
slaves which was 339 more than
the Commissioners in London had
‘assumed, causing a slight deduc-



newly
actions of
Haiti and San Domingo were still

tion of 1/8%, per slave or £20.*

4. 0%.
set up for sale under the follow-
ing headings, and ‘were bringing
the prices quoted against them:

Fieid labourers, interior
Tradeamen and first

class inferior people £2 o%
Iiead people, tradesmen,

head domestics £38.17. Sy
toferior field labourers

and second class

people P £18.10.11'%
Inferior domestics £19. 8. BY
Second class £ 7.15. 5%
Caildren under six years

of age £& 3.17. 8%

Aged, diseased, etc., £ 1.13.10%

The general average of classi-,

fled valuation was £53. 5. 1% and
the average for actual sales over
the eight year period ending
December 1830 was £47. 1, 3%.
Thus it will be seen that each

NOTICE





Stock

10. 11,12 & 13) Broad Street.

At this period slaves pees

|
|
|
|





| Cave Shepherd & Co. Lid...
{



on the average for each slave
freed. This was a commercial loss
of approximately £ 2,250,000 that
the merchants and plantation
owners paid towards the freeing
of 83,146 persons. These figures
alone show why there was such
oppesition to the abolition of
slavery.(%)

The Apprenticeship
which was to have lasted until
1840, came to an end on_ the
Estates of the S.P.G. on the 30th
day of May, 1838. The Bishop
went to the Attorney’s residence,
Thomas G. King Esq at 12
o'clock, where people assembled
before the house and the Bishop

System,

explained the matter to them
The Bishop and Mr. King then
signed an agreement for the pur-

pose of securing to them all the

freedom ind privileges which
they would have enjoyed had
their freedom, been conferred by
Act. This agreement was signed

in the presence of Captain Cuy

page, Special Magistrate of tne
District, and witnessed by th

Archdeacon, the Rector of the |
Parish, the Principal and Tutor:
of Codrington College, and the
Chaplain of the Estates. The!
number of persons freed, wei

288 besides.7 infirm and 13 aged
persons. The Bishop's action was
followed by William Matson
Jarrow Esq., of Sterling Planta-
ion, who legally discharged his
sabourers on the following Thurs
day. Mr. Barrow freed 112
sons, These acts preceded
general Emancipation of
by a couple of months,
did not take place until
August, 1838

per
the
Slaves

for this}
Ist of |

The abolition of Slavery caused
many new problems, for in Barba-
dos where all the land was already |
occupied and cultivated by the!
former Masters, there was none |
available for the freed Slave, so]
the slaves were in the undesirable
position of having to work for |
their former owners, The Colo-
nial Office foresaw this, and in ;
memorandum they summed it uy
as trying to find ‘the best mod
of procuring a fair share of labour
for the Slave without using cruel
or unjustifiable means on the part
of the master.’ There was also the
problem that scme of the slaves
finding themselves free would not

be induced to work, thus th:
whole economy of the Islanc |
would be upset. The plantation
Systtm had been a

community
which bought heavily of imported |
goods, thus paying the taxes on |
these goods which supported the |
Government of the Island; but the |
freed slave, having to earn his own
living and support himself and
family, was not likely to be/able
to purchase the quantily of im-
ported goods as was done by the
plantation system

Thus, in Barbados, the ‘located
labour’ system was introduced
(and lasted until 1937) the fre:
slaves being collected in little vil-
lages or tenantries on each plan-
tation; the head of each hou
was granted a certain quantity of |
land which he worked as his
but he was under
work for the owner

ow!
obligation to |
of the plan





urowing and to a lesser extent i

of his life. He would have made}
the manufacture of sugar, Th
result was that in each of the

Islands the production of sugar im
the years 1842-5 exceeded chat

@ On Page 2
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PAGE TEN





eee

Love And Mr. Douglas

Postscript To A Happy Pagan

_. Who Helped To

Make Capri The Most Notorious !sland

NEW BOOKS me

By George Malcolm Thomson
FOOTNOTE ON CAPRI. By Nor-

man Dorglas. Sidgwick and
Jackson. 10s. Gd. 46 pages 48
photographs.

Not long before his death Nor-
man Douglas-broke a good reso-

jution——as was his custom—and,
taking up his pen, wrote a last
brief book on Capri, which he

had loved so tong and whieh he
—with his fellow-Scot, Sir Comp-
ton Mackenzie and the blind
Swede, Axel Munthe—had made
the most fanrous island “in the
world, or at least the most noto
rious. emotes

The little*bouk, excuse for som:
handsome photographs, may . bi
regarded as 4 footnote to Doug
las. If that-ds so, it is a gentle
postscript to a tempestttous-story,
in which theuthree guidiig star
were literature, love and lizards

The Aristocrats

The literature—like the love—
was wayward. As for the lizards
it was the search for a rare blur
lizard ‘that first took Déuglas 1
Capri. Curiosity about “anoth*)
lizard made him, as a boy, lear:
Russian, an accomplishment that
became. of critical importance,

George Norman . Douglass (2

s’s) was born in Austria In 1868
mother, an Austrian aristocrat;
father, Douglass of .Tilquhillie

(Deeside). The
Tilquhillie
old lands
And_ the
there.
No longer there. The castle i
a farmhouse. The Douglasses ar:
gone. Theit Raeburn portrait

are disper
Young an was sent to

schoo] at Uppingham; at 15 went
to Karlsruhe, where he stayed!
until he was 20 and where’ hc
set up an dyreeable little haren

rhyme. uns:
stands on te old,

name of Douglass

for four, He also began to write:
first work, an article,for Thx
Zoo!logist on the colour of crow



athers.

Like any other young man wit!
mere talent than industry he en
tered the British Diplomatic Ser-



vice in 1893. Soon there was an
opening fer a third secretary
the St. Petersburg Embassy,
notably unpopular post, ever in
Tsarist times. Douglas — whe

dropped one § for the purposes
of writing—astounded his stip°ri-
or by volunteering for the job.

Scandal

He did not, however, devote al!
his time to making treaties wit!
the Tsar or studying natural
history. He had a delirious love
affair with an aristocratic Ru:
sior woman whem he call
“Helen”, This high-toned amou
he was able to’ combine’ with
parallel activities on a lower
pane, e

A Russian friend was in the
habit of purchasing young girls
from their parents: later moarry-
ing ‘them off with a generou

portion. The simplicity of tha
system® made an irresistible ap-
peal to the young Scot, But i
was the affair with “Helen” th:

threatened to blow up into scan-
dal.

At this point, Douglas wrote
to the Foreign Office pointing ou
that Joe Chamberlain’s advocacy
of Imperial Preference necessi-
tated an on-the-spot investiga
tion of the tariff systems of thx
Dominions: he suggested himseli
for t¥is duty. Lord Salisbur
agreed#by sending him on a se-
cret mission to Afghanistan,

That. was the end of this caree
as a diplomat, although for 35
years after, Douglas was still o1
the Foreign Office list, receiviny
£100 a year,

Limericks, Too

He married his cousin,
Fiizgibbon; had two sons; was
divorced; lost his money = and
thereafter had to support himse!
by writing. He wrote enough 1t>
live om would have thought i
unintelligent.to write more,

He wrote, one fine novel
Wind, . some» charming trave!
books, ‘especially Siren Land, H
had a ‘weakness for byways ¢
scholarship; was learned abo.
London children’s street games;
composed a volume of imprope:
Limericks, this work was prose-
cuted by th vernment of that
eminem puritan Mussolini__and
was widely read when the Allied






Elsa

Sout

troops reached P-ris in 1944,
He had an imposing array cf
crabbed prejudices — against

English life; the English land
seape (“like living in a lettuce’’);
the Christian religion in any of
eruelty; conventional

j forms:




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“sing symptoms such as backache,
atic pains, lumbago, sciatica, bladder

Th trouble starts when the kidneys grow

slugs ish and fail to perform their natural
bd ‘on of filtering away impurities from
ne

vstem. You can réstore these vital
orge..s lo normal activity as many others
s Pils.

plc effect on the kidneys and you will
ried and trusted medicine has broug’

you need, Get a supply from your chemist.

He liked the
of Ouida; fine manners
pany of youth.

With all his talent, it might be
thought he could have made more
of his life. H would §* have
rejected the criticism. “I no long-
er complain of haw I squander-
ed my days; my one regret
that =f have not more of them
to sqaunder.”

It is said to be hard for a mod-
ern pagan to be happy Douglas
found it possible. A ‘Caledonian
Silenus, he presided lucid and
untroubled, over many strange
frolies ih Capri, where he settled
He was generous with money
(when he had it); veady with
bad advice was never too old t
set a bad example. He died at
‘apri, aged 82, impenitent.

CHE BELOVED VAGABOND. By

ality



writings
the com-

William J. Locke. The Bodley
Head. 1s. 6d. 310 pages.
There was a tacit understand-

ng bétween W. J. Locke and his
imirers that his stories shcul

epresent a slight, but decisiv
mprovement on life, and that h
Mardcters should be made _ of
e@me richer substance than flesh
nd blood. They were more dar

ing wittier and at the same time
both Wiser and more foolish than
we art

They dwelt noi on this earth
but inf’ some golden clime usual!
called “France” Not the Franc:
of grasping waiters but Franc

glimpsed by & myopic senti
mentalist travelling on a fas
train to the Riviera

How did this recipe work ou
in practice? While Locke lived
eminently well. Of his 30 book:
he sold over 10 million copies;
was a best-seller in Britain, the
United States and Russia. It en
abled him (a poor scholarship
boy. from Badgbados, ‘where the
was born in 1863, language mas-
Glenalmond, finally secre-
iry ff the Royal Institute of
British Architects) to become
the owner of a fine villa at
tour the vineyards
onee a year at vintage time and
to pursue his hobby—study of
famous criminal trials.

But the life of this tall, whim-
sical man “a Don Quixote in pa-
tent boots and a fancy waistcoat”,
was not wholly a matter of plod-
ding industry, well rewaraed. He
had his own private romance.

One day, in a French circus, he

Cannes, to

fell in love with a pretty circus
rider. She became his mistress;
for two years Locke travelled

everywhere with the circus, do-

ing any odd job that offered. Af-
ter that all his romances were
written ones. He married a

strong-minded woman and adop-
ted—in all but legal fact—tw
hildren, the survivor of whon
Mr. Leslie Mitchell, the broad
caster is present owner of th
Locke copyrights.
After 46 Years
How does the Locke formul
for success wear, as seen in Th
Beloved Vagabond, now in a ne.
ediuon 46 years. after its _ fir:
appearance?
The story has a frail structure
a light wit and no pretension:
Tne adventures it recounts ma
be unlikely; their implausibilit
is gracefully carried off, The cen
ral character, the Vagabond him
self, is an amusing charlatan t
whose frothy charm and bogu
‘philosophy” we succumb will
ingky enough.
Locke, in short, writes to pleas«
a rare quality which ought t
ensure Leslie Mitchell a sub !
stantial unearned income in 195:
World Copyright Reserved
—LES :
Library List |
THE BALLAD OF THE SAI
CAFE. By Carson McCuller: |
Cresset, 153., 433 pages. In he
thirties, Carson McCullers leaa:!
the poetic school of America,
fiction, The strange intensity o
her work, its obsession with th
macabre, emerges im the tith
story of this collection whici
presents the tragedy of Mis.

the hunchback who haunts boti.|
of them. A triumph of “atmos-
phere,” t

THE WATCH. By Carlo Levi,
Cassell, 15s., 296 pages. The best
post-war Italian writer — for
sreadth of humanity and depth

understanding—gathers togeth-

r in this volume (hardly a
\ovel) episodes of Rome, Na-
ples, Florence, from the end-of-
the-war period, Not another
“Christ Stopped at Eboli,” it
could only have been written by
the author of that masterpiece.

—L.E.S.






















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The Last



Hitler

One lesson above all others to
be learnt from the life of Adoli
Hitler is the importance of poli-
ties in the destiny of a nation.

Hitler controlled German pol-
itieal life and thereby controlled
Germany. Nowadays in the Brit-
ish Caribbean, dabblers of all types
who glory in the name of experts
profess to analyse, dissect and
find ready-made answers for al!
the ills of West Indian society.
Whenever it is suggested by ptr-
sons less gullible that this kind of
well-paid exercise is almost value-
less and has little bearing on West
Indian problems because politi-
cians are busily engaged in en-
trenching themselves and are
themselves propounding all the
inswers the experts withdraw like
snails into their insulated shells
and make purring noises of dis-
approval against the Siudacity of
those unfit to breathe their rare-
fied air.

For all such experts who have
uissed The Last Days of Hitler by
Trevor Roper, its availability in
a Pan edition gives them an oppor
tunity to see how important it ir
that they should not dither in
i political vacuum, What happened
in Germany could not happen in
Barbados nor in the British Carib-
bean on quite the same scale, but
the political apathy of those whc
vught to be playing the leading
role in West Indian politics and
the stupid pretence among the so-
called experts to be above poli-
tics makes it very possible thai
in miniature the Hitler story
could be re-enacted in these ter-
ritories, The Last Days of Hitler
exciting as the liveliest thriller, is
a challenge to all peoples to watel
and see that politicians do not be-

come dictators. It also squashes
all the fanciful stories about
Hitler which the Nazi mytholo-

‘ists have been so keen to foster

Pan hag recently published
Murder in Mesopotamia by Agatha
Christie and The Body on the
Beam by Anthony Gilbert. Agatha
needs no introduction to readers
of detective stories and Murder in
Mesopotamia gives Poirot a per-
fect background for the exercise
of his talents. The Body is found
on the beam of a house of ill-
repute in a London, street wher
xzentlemen prefer not to be rec
ognised. The evidence is over-
whelming against one man until
even more overwhelming evidenc>
is piled up against the real mur
derer. A taxi plays a key role in
the story,

og * *
Some people think that Margery
deserves a Place with
{ickens, Thackeray, Galsworthy
id other word painters of th
»glish character. Brittania New
»rtainly supports that contention

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SUNDAY















Days Of

In The Nutmeg Tree which Pan
has recently published, Margery
Sharp writes in alighter almost
kittenish vein and this story is full
of the holiday mood which som¢
English people achieve when visit-
ing the Continent. Even in thi
lighthearted novel, however, he:
skill at characterisation is alway
evident

What sort of person is the suc-
cessful author? In providing Clues
to Christabel, Mary Fitt attempts
to answer that question in the
highly charged atmosphere of a
murder story. A detective novel
that is certainly different.

Fans of the Saint, Leslie Char-
teris’ modern Robin Hood can
read of his exploits in London in
a recently published Pan.

It is interesting to compare
Edgar Wallace with the modern
detective writers and The India
Rubber Men, a new Pan publica-
tion. shows that when it comes to
telling a story Edgar Wallace can
hold his own











”

Two other new
special mention

In Father Malachy’s Miracle,
Bruce Marshall deals with the sub-
ject matter of the parable in
which the refusal of sinners to be-}
lieve iS said to be-proof against
testimony from the dead. Father
Malachy is a Roman Catholi¢
priest—a good Roman Catholic
priest who performs a miracle in
Edinburgh, He moves a dance hall
containing among others the Ro-
man Catholic Bishop's Big Bad
Brother to a rock in the ocean,
What follows is a brilliant satire
on contemporary man.

The bo incidentally contains
a factual account of what Roman
Catholics believe and details a
large number of popular Prostes-
tant supersitions about what Ro-
man Catholics believe. You must
not miss Father Malachy‘s Miracle.

Cc. §. Lewis, Fellow of Mag-
dalen College Oxtord drifted away
from Christianity as a young man,
but has since been active in its de-
fence. The Screwtape letters and
Problem of Pain are deservedly
read in all parts of the world,
and enjoy a special reputation
among Christians. In Out of the
Sent Planet, the author sees the
Earth in novel form from Malacan-
dva, a planet where there is more
harmony and peace and greater
respect for God’s Law than on
earth.

As in Father Malachy’s Miracle
the story always grips the reader’s
attention. Out of the Silent Planet
and other Pans 4qre obtainable
through the Advocate ae

H

Pans deserve







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Advocate Stationery.



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ADVOCATE



SUNDAY, AUGUST 24, 1952



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9

SUNDAY,

HU

=

AUGUST 24, 1952 SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAGE ELEVEN





OWS BODY OF EVA PERON

:

+





through the

Building where it will remain for a year. It will be permanently preserved and ultimately transferred : le y ig
to a monumental tomb in the heart of the Argentine capital. (International Soundphoto) ae ae ceabiisaadl Ge oan HEARING ?
2 $$ $$. er’s” and “Belle-Plain;” where

GE CORTEGE FOLL

=

B ye

a

HERE 1S A NEW VIEW of the impressive scene in Buenos Aires as the body of Eva Peron was drawn
streets hich atop a gun carriage. The body was taken to the General Labor Confederation



You Want A Sgt.-Major

ringleaders. Special writs
wore then obtain for these LOUIS | BAYLEY
‘three,’
Made as purely as a perfect process CAN ; oe
O oc Ol 9 eee Scooken so sone pret the] make it. Made with infinite care under
9 a Ss State, a :
Mr, Hollingsworth, intended exacting supervision. Each tablet sealed indi-

ARE YOU

I HAVE often regretted that I
never had the nerve to get my
revenge on the small boy wha

SCARED TO SEE YOUR DOCTOR?

A doctor speaks to those
who secretly fear a pain in
the back.

Doctors do not all agree on the
effects of high heels—but I know
that the Service women I once

The People
Of Barbados

@ from page 9

of the last six years of slavery.’

On Wednesday ith of July,
1838. there was a disturbance =
Walker’s Plantation’ in the parish
of St. Andrew. This arose through
Colonel Richard Morris, who as
a “Magistrate, put some of the
labourers of this estate in the
charge of a white constable and
two or three of the Estate con-
stables, and ordered that they be
carried to the Station-House of
District F. The Magistrate and the
other gentlemen then left and
proceeded to “Jeeve’s” where they
had some business. While they
were partaking of dinner, the
white constable arrived and stated
that “the people of the Estate had
risen in a body upon him and the
others, and rescued the prisoners
after very roughly handling the
constables; he had himself received
several blows, and one Estate con-
stable very narrowly escaped with
his life; indeed would have per-
rish but for timely succor.” The
following morning Colonel Morris
came up to Bridgetown, where he
interviewed the President — the
Governor being absent — and im-
pressed on him the situation ex-
isting in the Parish of St. Andrew.
The President gave him an order
vn the Inspector of Police, who on
Friday} the 13th, despatched a

some twenty or more idlers and
vagrants were seized and com-
mitted, but there was no trace of
the

swearing his life against one la-
bourer, who had threatened him.
It was also reported that the peo-
ple of “Belle-Plain” and “Bruce
Vale” Estates were also showing
themselves very insolent and un-







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” His was a joke; my retort winnings * didn't Bet the backaches my lenged the Managers of Estates to Marhill Street, Sisush; Buek ; These, in Designs you'll love.

o 2 e : super-high-heel patients complain fight it out with them, as the BRIDGETOWN ough, Bucks ’ a
would have been serious. I could “I can hardly sit down, and spout today. laimed that the ar, ; vy) =
have chalked Backache Building then I find it hard to get up. If claume: a y were as free as } y=

on the door of his modern house
in the cul-de-sac nearby.

I bend my back then—oh—the
pain. I’m sure it’s something

Maybe that had something to

do with their sergeant-major’s

the Managers, so they could fight
it out ever any matter. (6) These





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DISCOUNT, Don’t Delay! Come Today! And

For many modern homes—-and serious, doctor. tw your Se isha UP» former slaves and servants had Make your selection where you can be sure of
gardens of any age—are perfectly I was equally sure it wasn’t. “‘Tha trouble, of course, comes Peen accustomed to seeing the a GOOD DIAMOND, and that is at - - -

designed to encourage backache.

Have you ever thought just
how much your back has to put
up with during every day? Next
to your feet, it works harder than
any other part of your body, At

And yet, with so many simple
explanations, patients dream up
endless frightening diagnoses for
themselves,



He had just pitched into his
gardening, digging, hoaing, weed-
ing far too many hours—and too
suddenly—for a man of his age
and style of life.

For years he had sat in his car.

to ease up, to take things more
gently. He did so, and his back~

ache went,
Just—drill

if you wear low heels all day at
home, and then suddenly in the
evening expect your body to
welcome high heels,

The majority of
back cases are classed by doctors

pain-in-the

plywood between the mattress
and the springs of the bed. This
—or a hard mattress—takes some
of the wave out of the backbone,

landed gentlemen fight their duels
over love affairs or for some
small slight offered one to the
other, so this attitude was nothing
new to them; therefore, consider-
ing that they were as free as the

(To be continued)
The Barbadian Newspaper
20th, 1833.
Schomburgk’s History of Barbadgs,

March

re)

ROSES








‘
{.

)

ecu



LOUIS L. BAYLEY

the wok, * the ironing-board, dota , puoaenly, ek ee as “mechanical backache,” gentlemen themselves, they could .
even at the always-too-low dress- flabby back-muscles of his had to It is not serious—but it should avenge themselves for any insult ic Club Boot
ing table, life for women is back- do the work of a navvy. not be neglected. It. can often offered to them by their former f Bolton Lane & SS 4897
breaking. Result: they rebelled. I told him be helped by pushing a sheet of Masters. = Phone 3909 &





It is absurd, I assure you, to be SIMILAR pains can come from Five to ten minutes in a hot Pp 460. : a j ;

scared to go to a doctor with a taking up golf in later life, or bath before bedtime—followed, if ° The Barbadian Newspaper — April ies ; Cooling and Refreshing

pain in your back, In a majority ev@n from wielding a distemper possible, by some local heat and 4. ‘The’ Barbadian Newspaper June ;

of cases there is a simple, un- brush above your head while massage, is often a recommended 2nd, 1838. ' 1a MPO VY

alarming explanation. decorating a room, extra. 5+: (ee rumitmettga wean. poten. OF W. Ue GENT WE VTAND BETW REN YOU AND L

‘ Now most of what I have said And then — here it comes !— har ' ~ — AGENTS — F
{ Just—digging boils down to faulty posture—or exercises. Try these:— * oth, — Se odes ‘
‘ viet ae ‘Sao eee a the atcain put upon the body by (A) Lie flat on your back—on
, ’ e J—a unusua ture—so let’s look the fi :
commercial traveller, who had more closely at the Business of i aha i Seana’ bocaee A challenging statement? Yet true! And serves to

driven his small car round the
country for years.

how to sit and how to stand,
Over-fat people are in more

neck. Breathe deeply and slowly
without letting the lower part of

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Last seaso; z e § Mails for Dominica, Antigua, Montser-
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ah oe » me retired—s surplus _ weight — which their stoniach bulge. Moneka will be closed at the General
least 20 years too soon. frame isn’t designad to stand— Post Office as under:

But he had longed always to
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pulls them into unnatural stances.
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@ On Page 12

THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LID.

White Park Road, Bridgetown
aiaseergyanimaeircsnemageate
ENGINEERS, BRASS and IRON FOUNDERS
Works contain rnodern appliances for the execution of

first-class work of all kinds, and especially to
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of all Description

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and ELECTRICAL INSTALLATIONS A SPECIALTY

2.30 p.m. on the 25th August, 1952



Dealers

THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LID.

Phone : 4546, 4650 Workshop
Phone 4522 Stores Dept:



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J. N. Goddard & Sons Ltd.
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PAGE TWELVE

. &§5. INSON

By







HOPK

“We must st Clostly to-
gether. We must not iet narrow
il and petty-ming ed sel-
hsnness qgiviade us Ver sine
fustory first vegan lor us, ever
since our Islands were formed as
tne savage haunts of pirates. or

rich evergreen estates, we have
enclosed ourselves in the tiny

confines of a few hundred square
miles, never iooking at al] to our
neighbour islanders except as
envious protiteers regard their
competitors for market and
wealth; scamps and masters of
every deceitful art of glutton
commercialism who must be done
down at all costs. We have all
been Trinidadians or Jamaicans
or St. Lucians or Barbadians, that
is, s@parate and self sufficing
communities who want to share
nothing with anybody else, least
of ali trade, and who have de-
veloped socially, economically,
and politically without co-opera-
tion or sympathy, all looking in-
dividually to the mother country
for recruits for the business and
professional classes, and for
sympathy and even condescension
when we wanted our own politi-
cal liberties increased. When, for
instance, Cromwell cut off King
Charles’ head, Barbados refused
to recognise the authority of the

new dictator’s set, while the
other islands made no such dar-
ing comment in their ass¢mblies.
But the time for all that is over.
We must look on. ourselves as
brothers and sisters fighting 1
the common cause, as courageous
and capable pioneers of the West
India nation, as the peopie to
whom our descendants will be
able to lock back with pride ahd
say: “It is to them that-we owe
our self-respect and our ability
to stand up to the rest of the

’

nations of the world as equals.

Moreover, the mothet country
has bequeathed to us one of the
richest literatures and most
healthy cultures on the face of
the earth. Let us go on from
there, not in slavish imitation of
what has been so generously
handed on to us, but by using our
own individuality to build upon
the foundation that has been laid
for us. We must express every-
thing that is truly West Indian.
Our painters and playwrighte,

novelists and poets must present

to us aspects-of our own ° life,
ideas and feelings which we can
love and cherish, They must

bring out the sparkling beauty of
these enchanting islands witn
their silver beaches and perpetual
summer, their fresh breezes and
bright blue skies. We must cling
to these things as our very own
and from them build a new cui-
ture. Indeed our culture has
already been born, and it is now
adolescing. It is for us to foster
it, so that it will eventually flour-
ish in all its virile maturity.”
School-Made Culture

If I were to go on talking like
this, no one will attempt to con-
tradict me, far less to castigate in
impolite and scurrilously uncriti-
eal terms an author who, with
unquestionable goodwill, has set

down his innocent thoughts on
paper to the benefit of everyone
who chooses to read them.

Critics will applaud me for having
searched out the most dazzlingly
profound truths. The politicians
will tell me that I have hit the
nail on the head and that the
true reasons why we have not

yet attained federation and ulti-
mate national stat is pithiiy
ummed up in he proverp
‘United we stand; divided we
fall’! The poets will cheer me
for rediscovering the beauty of
our islands. The West Indians,
if they really accept such idea,
try to produce modern versions
of Constable and Turner by
simply referring to the works of
these artists and giving a West
Indian application (perhaps) .o
their theories of art; and Betore
long we will havé reconstructed
superficial, cheap,

a empty,
machine-made culture thor-
oughly and desperately fca-
demic in its approach and
totally respectale in” point
of ideals and doctrines, but none-
the-less inconsiderable and un-

attractively worthless because it
has been made in schools and
through the assistance of teachers’
notes and codes, and because the
people Who’ have produced it
have not lived a full-blooded life
but rather an idealised and fic-
tionised version of it, gleaned
from books and printed matter of
all” sorts. Besides, had IT ‘con-
tinued in the above strain, no one
would be so abominably concei-
.ted as to call me abominably
conceited for not caring to have
his approval, far less to pander
myself condescendingly to his
particular grades of taste and in-
telligence, whatever those might
be,

There are unpleasant and even
revolting things to be said. There
ure certain facts which — every-
body know to be facts, and which
some people deplore privately,
but which, particularly in Barba-
dos, polite people must pretend
to be ignorafit of and be sure

hot to mention in society, The
innocence of facial expression
which is s€en everywhere de-

ceives only the absolute foreignec,
and not even him for very long.
What is more, all these unpleas-
ant facts, together with some
others which are so prosaic as to
be neither pleasant nor unpleas-
ant, will have a direct and pro-
found influence on «the West
Indian ‘culture’ when it emerges.
The disheartening thing is that
the school-made

is now being consciously
structed at present and foisted
upon unthinking people. asa

SUNDAY



sult of so-small a number can
make life most nauseous to any-
one wh, Raving already had a
bre and more varied exper-
jence, find himself in this new
‘climate’ of opinion’, But there
are certain facts about the race
question Which are interesting to
the artistically minded person
and which, as they are not par-
ticularly distasteful, can he
minutely dissected and examined
without giving offence to anfiyone.
And the bearing of the race qués-
tion upon cultute no’ ‘one: will
attempt to question.

The Races Oi The West
Indies

A culture evoives after a people
has been living to long in ihe
game place, and has for so long
faced common problems that they
have developed a common and
original attitude to life. To speak
after Nietzsche’s manner, they
have long since evolved their owa
good and their own bad. They
have already arrived at an in-
dependant set of moral values,
caing whatever is advantageous

der

to them good and whatever
hinders their aims bad. And 4
people must without question

have the courage to make moral
valuations of this sort, or they
will never become great. No
true stateman can acknowledge
Kant's standard of moral values
applicable by every human being,
and called the Categorical Im-
perative. In short, there must
be something settled and mature
about a people before they can
hope to become a_ nation or
develop a culture for themselves.

Now, looking at the people of
the West Indies, can we really
eall them settled and mature?
They are quite the contrary; in
reality, a medley of races, each
with a different history and a
slightly different character. The
West Indian iy mottley-celoured.
There is hardly any place in the
world where all the races are so
evenly represented. This archi-
pelago is perhaps the most. truly
cosmopolitan spot to be found
unywhere. But the ideas and
mental atmosphere of each one
of the units have been thoroughly
disturbed by this uprooting and
transplanting, and it will take
centuries for us to become settled
into anything resembling psycho-
logical balance. But, most im-

‘culture’ which» portant of all, the poprennt ates
con* of the various races

rought here
were hardly of the best type and
in the one case (that of the

genuine and immortal product of*African) where the type was as

curs, escapes from the true West
Indian life, preferring to make
its own tentative and romanti-
cally uncertain attempt to find a
new and different sort of ‘beauty.’

Take, for instance, the question
of the races of the West Indies.
Nobody will deny that there are
some unpleasant aspects attached
to this matter, such as the occas-
ional nationalistic rivalry and the
respectable snobbishneéss that is
only too’ well known in these
islands. Also, in those places
(Barbados is the chief example)
where the races are few (in this
particular case, two) the mental
narrowness that is the direct re-



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gdod ag any that could be found
in his country, the race could
make no claim to genuine ad-
vanced ‘civilisation. The Negro,
culturally speaking, represents a
vague and terrifying memory of
primitive ritualistic | polytheism
and polydemonism, mingled with
the splendid tyranny of the
African Chiefs and all the reck-
less adventure and_ exciting
horror of native tribal wars,
strangely conditioned into meek
servility by the unscrupulous
slave-raiding Europeans who
purchased hosts of Negroes at the





A Mother of

Told Us This.





price of a few strings of brightly
coloured beads or a few’ pieces
of ammunition. All these things
he still remembers, but With un-

peakable revulsion and religious
feay rather than with pride. The
indian, for the mO8t part of the
lower castes, and deprived any-
way of caste when he crossed
the sea, can make claim to a sort
of mystical civilisation which he
has absorbed as religious train-
ing since the day he was born,
but a civilisation so scientifically
ignorant and set apart. from
reality that it cannot be thought
of as an advantage to anyone who
is foreed to live real life. This
type has for the past two genera-
tions been becoming anglicised in
point of habits, but still retains
a narrow fundamental national-
iam and, quaintly enough, would
like to regard as its home a coun-
try of which it khows nothing at
first ‘hand. The Portugese and
Chinese brought to these parts
as indentured servants after the
emancipation of the Negro slaves,
were also originally of the lowest
classes and consequently cons-
scious of no true civilisation and
culture at all except so much as
they could gather at a distance
from the upper classes, with
whom they could not mix socially.
Of these two races the Chinese

were probably the steadier
und more refined, fhough hardly
superior in any other ways.
Then there are the Aboriginal
Indians, few enough as _ it
is, and who can be set aside
as, in their original state,

the least civilised of all the West
Indian elements. Finally there
are the North Europeans, mostly
British, who were the masters of
all the rest. These were well
,epresented in their upper ‘classes,
which is natural since they were
the conquerors, and _ therefore
were the one powerful civilised
ahd civilising influence, But this
is the point: that in spite of the
conscious North European pre-
dominance, the other ¢élements
still retained; and retain, sub-
conscious or second-hand mem-
ories of the lands from = which
they came and the people from
whom they were descended.
A New Race

The people who talk’so coh-
fidently of the West Indian Nation
and the West Indian Culture do
not seem to realise all this. We
will hardly become a nation or
dévelop a culture until we have,
by a provess of intermarriage and
slow maturing, made a new race
cut of this medley of races.
When this has happened we can
hope to extract what is best in
every race and weld it together
into something thoroughly new
and unprecedented. The Hitlerian
theory of race’ cannot be taken by

us to be true, In fact, “we are
forced for our own good to accept
the very reverse as true. it is

here that our new moral valua-
tions must begin. It is a stupen-
dous task, and will take centuries
in the accomplishing, but that
only goea to show how abortive
and amusingly pretentious are
the efforts of the West Indian
Culture Maniacs,



a



I wouldn't change my Kiddies ¢

- for I’ve never been able to get
. they are drinkin} Oak Milk.

comes to me and says “Mummy Milk.”

like fresh Cow's Milk,

WORTH A TRY —

12 oz. Tin
3 1b, Tin.

but, you use far less Oak to get a glass of milk (only ONE
heaped tablespoon per glass instead of TWO or THREE.)





















GENTS’ STANDARD
RACERS .............
CARRIERS





OBTAIN

No. 16 Swan St.

SUCH A SAVING!

Oak is not only sold at a price you c

THE BEST MILK IN THE WORLD
AT A PRICE YOU CAN AFFORD .

L. J. WILLIAMS MARKETING
co.

RIDE A PHILLIPS SUPREME MODEL AND ENJOY
CYCLING AT ITS BEST

GENTS STANDARD GREEN .................
BLACK ..

BARBADOS HARDWARE C0. LTD.

(THE HOUSE FOR BARGAINS)

them to drink milk the way
Now, even my two year old
It really tastes

an afford to pay a

TO PAY

, LTD., Sole Agents.











$72.00
$70.0)
$75.0
$82.00
$50.00

ABLE AT

Phone 2109, 4406, 3534

ADVOCATE

This West Indian Culture (4)





: A Shorthand Literatu
— The Speightstown Library is Bodictcceping Englich Subjects Mathematics
‘ ‘ f ew Commercial Arithmetic General Education Public Speaking
3 pe Ss a s in bel Costing Geography Subjects
i books is week. ey wi : Economi Journalism Short Story Writing
Are You Scared put imto circulation shortly after one , a
To See Your Doctor 3, oo sher potidays have in- Bichicecsire fasiessiaag Orie ECan wont
" s cre intenamce achine Beri m neering
; Page 11 creased readers at that library Building ee Mechanical Gapinesring Surveying
@ From Page and so there is a demand for new Serpentry Moco? Enid veering \elecommuntcations
the straighten out the leg, Pooks. i Clvit Eng) ? Engineecing Wireless Telegraphy
then lower it slowly, keeping ven The Shortage of Food in the ¢ = Workshon Penedes
back flattened against the floor Leeward es is getting more § aeveyiog
4 the st h tucked in. Do 20d more severe. ' Etettric ¥ ae OVERSEAS SCHOOL
the same with the other leg and . When the shortage of rice was | y Ainecolaee ee ‘ ~ wee ns eg CERTIFICATE
repeat ten times. first “felt, breadfruit trees were | Fades BENMETY CO. 1.) GNEPAIECD, EROLANO CENERAL
gin) land with heels four’ to full, English potatoes were esion | Bhs! wr | cenriricare oF
rom a wall.
the lower part of the back hgainet could be had. irom ' =
the wall keeping the head and Breadfruits are becoming scarce | ‘ que Me
shoulders touching it. pow and ground provisions are of |. appre: ’ ; ©NO TODAY
Wit: chin in, hands on hips, ‘4e past, leaving English potatoe: | [for a sxe prospectus on
bepatte decsty raising the cheat, "it Ua dwives sep being rationca| | wy ows li
1 = Pious gic : ree Kia.
ding im the stomach, and keep. in thelr supply of rice. ave eek TD coupon: anid pose at

SUNDAY, AUGUST 24, 1952

PBoart count ts

can help you to success
through personal postal tuition

Terns OF MEN in important positions were once students of
The Bennett College. They owe their success to Personal Postal
Tuition — The Bennett College way. Yow have the same chance w
qualify for a fine career, higher pay and social standing.

One of these courses will lead to your advancement
Modern Business Methods Languages







SPEIGHTSTQWN ROLIND-.UP

“Herdsman Empties Sugar”
Bonds At Speightstown _

THE HARRISON LINER Herdsman anchored at!
Speightstown early yesterday morning to take the last of |
the sugar stored in bonds in St. Petertothe U.K. .

The Herdsman makes six ships that have called at
Speightstown during this year to load sugar. She is ex-
pected to get a load of about 1,500 tons.

Shortly after the Herdsman anchored, loading began.
She is expected to complete loading on Monday.

Accountancy









ing the back pressed to the wall.
Just poise

PUTTING your posture right
ean rapidly improve your mental
outlook and strengthen your re-
sistance to illness.

It really does help to keep you
alert, producing an invigorating
sense of well-being.

And, please, for your back’s

|



getting a few pints as their week's |
supply and are by their | '

told
dealers “not sure if you ‘will get ior ST BB RN han g on Bron hi |
U 0 ° cilia

next week.” Tinned soups are
selling.
, AND





Planters of the Leeward parishes
are getting worried over their}
crops. Weeks of steady sunshine
are withering their young can
crops and making the ground
hard and, in some places, crusty.





Rocce

sake, never lift anything heavy Rain is what they are hoping 7
off the floor without bending your for, A planter said that if the

knees, rainy season would step in nov.

the withery appearance of the
canes would vanish soon after.

° —L.E.S.

LL






A POH -
——_>eo eo





Kitchen garden keepers have * pe
S.S. “Seafarer” job keeping their vegetables and ;
8 greens looking fresh in_ their PosK q ,
gardens. They have to do quite THERE $ NOTHING
Sails F or Santos a bit of watering. | i
The SS. P. . ad The Police Band under Sgt. C.
for Santos Suse beware sailed Archer entertained the inmates of o 0 CURES AS SWIFTLY
loading a quantity of Douglas fir the St. Peter’s Almshouse ani {
and shingles. She arrived last TSidents of the parish to popular | Se
week from San Juan, Puerto “ance tunes and light music on | al (Ss ee AS
ico, and is also consigned to Wednesday night, | +i

The band was gladly receivea
by their audience after they had
not visited Speightstown for
few months.

For about an hour and a half

essrs. DaCosta & Co. Ltd.

The M.V. Canadian Cruiser
artived yesterday morning and
Pegi eas tons of general
cargo, e then loaded 550 car- ;
tons of rum for Trinidad. ‘She they played while they got hearty |
left yesterday evening for Gren- applause from the crowd. |
ada, Trinidad and Georgetown, |
British Guiana. |

' Yesterday afternoon t h e New Political Party |

Schooner Henry D. Wallace, under

the command of Capt, Wallace, A NEW political party has been
sailed for Trinidad. She was in formed by Grafton Clarke of Two |
port for over three weeks. Her Mile Hill, St. Michael. A meeting |
trip was delayed because she will be held later to decide the |
could not get sufficient cargo. name of th< party. }

_ FIRST
AGAIN! .



CANADA'S LARGEST
SELLING COUGH
AND COLD REMEDY

BUCKLEY'S

MIXTUR

ite Ae. Sak





*


































(By Cable)

ILLE MIGLIA

(General Classification}

First: BRACCO driving FERRARI

Third: FAGIOLI driving LACIA AURELIA
BOTH USED

.





ES cs a ee



SUNDAY, AUGUST 24, 1952 SUNDAY ADVOCATE





BY CARL ANDERSON |

|

HENRY

WHAT DOES “THAT MEAN -
HENRY ?





FLINT OF THE FLYING SQUAD.... BY ALAN STRANKS & GEORGE DAVIES

' :
| NUMBER FIVE CALLING
| AMVMIELAR ONE... WE





BRA. ck on eden elles tele

| CAUGHT THE CANA’ i Po (ie :
| BEFORE 17 SANG.. ,



ee CUTTING IN ON OUFT
Pn eS we

THERE'S THAT
PIRATE AGAIN...









WHAT NOW,
NUMBER ONE;
b OVER...

tae

*

BY CHIC YOUNG



HOW ABOUT THE SS]
TWO OF YOU COMING /7=+
OVER FOR DINNER y40 iLL Give N Ii
TONIGHT 2? roel DAGWOOD A} ||














ane eo APPLES—Fresh Red ...0..... 005.005. 45
\ oe aug PHONE BIRDS DE LUXE TABLE JELLIES .22
en a eS sit APRICEE DANE oiscsscccsdevaysessesssdnseisestveais 56
OC sees iulicicAkecssedessesipansersenns $1.40
CAMPBELL’S CR. OF CHICKEN

PN? > (ilu vcacespwsessssigsi db swhedisvassiosaapentes 46

CAMPBELL’S, MUSHROOM SOUP |
LUX FLAKES—Large Boxes ...... 45












Fe Paswones) Be > | | SPECIAL OFFERS AVAILABLE MONDAY TO WEDNESDAY AT ALL BRANCHES

Usually Now



PAGE THIRTEEN







By Appointment
Gin Distillers
to the Late
King George VI

IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE



ANCHOR TABLE BUTTER 1-!b pkgs. . $1.03
40 ” » ” 1- tins ..... 1.08
‘ és EVAPORATED MILK . 30
20 KRAFT CHEESE 14-I) pkgs, 44
KOLO TONIC ........ 144
50 = BUCKFAST TONIC WINE ...... 2.66
$1.25 PHOSPHERINE TONIC WINE ................-.-- 2.40
GORDON’S GIN .. 2.75
PIMMS NO. 1 CUP ...........ccccc cece cee uses 3.38
42 SCHWEPPES TONIC WATER ..._... 30
CANADIAN CLUB WHISKY ............. 5.50
SEGRAM’S WHISKY ........................ d 5.50

40 Just received small, shipment of FRESH FROZEN FRUIT



es

PRINCE GARL /
BENEATH uS/
THE KRAKEN'S
CHAMBER IS £
SPLITTING
OPEN!

DOUBLE BACK A BIT/

WE MUST HAVE TAKEN

WE'VE GOT TO FIN? THE A SIDE ROUTE /
OPENING THAT CAT USED TO
GET IN HERE... AN? HOPE
(T'S BIG ENOUGH FOR Ug
TO SQUEEZE THROUGH!







NT




HELLO- 1S THIS MRS JIGGS? \ AT THE NORTH POLE- ’ “a | ee ~
WELL-THIS IS STATION J-U-R-K- \74 |) WHAT ANIMALS DRAW THAT 1S CORRECT! “| Si XI WON! X
YOU WILL WIN $2000 IF you ||| THE SLEIGH OF A
CAN ANSWER THIS QUESTION - ( CHARACTER WHOSE ‘










WE'RE GOING 7 SUCH A SHAME! YOUR
, > CAR IS A COMPLETE W
THERE ARE SO





&



WE CAN'T HELP |
eK, FOLLOW ME /



ee

DEER ARE THE y WHAT'S BUT FOR \ HAPPENED?
ANIMALS | THE THE LIFR DID yYOuR
NOW ARE YOU READYP _— ) INITIALG ARE SS. | ) . ; ee || MATTER? Ios ME -T sf HUSBAND
tani HERE GOES- == ana ao ei aX ee —~s, DON'T , HIT YOU?
f KH pT ( > | 17 I Kies, ( KNOW ~ ey
UL » lay “7 1 Qtr eS . WHY? SZ
ab A ty OH- \I \Y @ Po / i} | “| ff Y,
f (25> | \ OEAR--)} | - / . | Tt BO
4 ‘ Mew a, Se ait eT d : Bd 7
A fu mi Hl og $2 ¥ f : Ost x. # of
y 6 I Yd a { - y See, a
a= Se | Y\nh \ } ae Jf
ten hy L - Hm AQ
»\ Be / VN

ALOT OF THe

AREN'T THEREF





D. 'V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street

COME, FLASH !|











HiM NOW!

THE WONDER BOOK OF HOW IT’S DONE

Most of us take too much for granted. We do not bother very
much about how the necessities, luxuries and amenities of life
are provided, so long as we receive them when we want them,
But supposing we are suddenly called upon to make and do
What then?

How would you organise the delivery of millions of letters
the production of a daily newspaper, or the feeding
great city like London?

for ourselves,

or
arrangements for

This fascinating yolume, packed with hundreds of inter-
esting pictures, will open your eyes to the many processes
involved in the creation of all kinds of everyday goods and
services, It also shows how many adventurous and far from
everyday tasks are performed

ADVOCATE

ON SALE -

AT THE STATIONERY











GUINNESS

STOUT
FOR STRENGTH




WHAT



= ARE |

OF THEM,

Ss



BY LEE FALK

WISE GUY! HE SHOOTS } ANYHOW, HE Dk WILY TOTHAT 3“)
AINT SEEN _WELLF -
THE TOY DOG



IF YOURE SO SMAP
MYSTERY MAN, / YOU KIDNAPPED THE
FIGURE THE ~, BOY FIX-THE





C. F. HARRISON & CO. (Barsapos) Ltd.
P.O. BOX 304
BARBADOS





PAGE FOURTEEN snieininatinpainnni SUNDAY ADVOCATE - SUNDAY, AUGUST 24, 1952





SEAoolrlED ADS. ee ae




















































High School| SHIPPING NOTICES





|
















- sainatciasemtaidein 1 shennan isiieinienhaiuctiicat eal he | Ry i
TELEPHONE 2508 PROFESSIONAL NOTICE REAL ESTATE px RESULTS OF ENTRANCE ROY NE ene | J OH
2x, 8, SCHOOL YEAR AL THERLANDS
oer ent ee B. O'NEALE pen Piet Our Recognized, Way- 1953,
‘> as to infofm his Patients & |Side and Private Agents — if Presentiy The M/V “MONEKA” will
JED FO SALE General Public that his office, will be |dt is a Buyer's or Seller's Market! D. F. The undermentioned pupils have gained STEAMSHIP co. accept and Passenger:
nn D tal R — for wae as. from Saturday ie pg a tenons Auctioneer & Real et ena te ane My a will be se a, Seen "
SIMPSON At hy Superlative sahenati vd Aug -opening Monday 24th Aug. tate Broker, Must and Will always Lead | 4m ie school year accord- G FROM EUROPE - ” sail Sica.
St Csoree. Yesterday, Extelle simp- | : 2.8.52—4n | with Attractive Prices, Re-Sale Values and | iN” as accommodation is provided. | M.S. R 22nd August, 1952 day 2 —_
sop. Age 10 years. The funeral will -— + + | Satistaction. Beat These Seven —1. AT] TREY must all present ives at the | M.S. A 1952. .
Seen, eee nase oak: Whe AUTOMOTIVE 5 NOTICE HAYSWATER, NEAR SEA—Almost New | Sool at.9 a.m. on Monday 8th Septem- $5. Sth tember, 1962 The MV * will :
St George Parish Church to-day at] “CAR See iy 8 HP. Standard Motor| AS from the 25th August to the 6th Ainnineee Mae, © Tommie Bilder hates : 7 ge 2 cecept Cargo and Passengers for es c@
"B a Simpson, ‘Bus Owner, |C@ in good condition. Phone . 4334., Sebtember both days inclusive the office |& Servant’s Room, about 7,000 sq. ft.,| 3- ALLDER, Anael Athena ~ ze Dominica, Antique, Mentesest, e
(Widower), George, Elliott (sons), 24.8.52—3n, | of the ee eee will be opened | Going for about £2,200. 2 AT WORTH-|, 2 Aaa, eee SATLING TO TRINIDAD, P wie se = ee ee AFS., F.V.A.
‘ ’ Da etre a —— ane on Ba y y ING MAIN RD.—Facing Sea, Right-of-|* 3- azel Odessa : ° =:
cae and Daphne Lowe |" CAR—Armstrong Siddeiy, 12 h.p. new N.S. FRASER, Way to Sea, A 3 Bedroom Bungalow Type.|/ 4- ALLEYNE, Marita vs : re
N.Y. Papers please copy atteries and tyrés, Very suitable for Pereenies. Carey Very Good Condition, Garage & Ser- #3 yo 5 al Mes. <3th August, 1953 oes ! Extensive Listings of Good
8 52—1 s or hired cars. Apply: Swan Store, vant’s Room, over 6,000 ft., Going , Hazel ora 2 ASSOCIATIO: . lass Pro; Land
Rem mR eS 2 oe = Swan Strect, or phone 3121 24.8.52—3n. |for about £22003. NEAR’ NAVY|, 7- BABB, Glyne Othniel SAILING TO AD & CURACAO snc anand c ‘Al aay hom
' KS 24.8.52—In nn GARDENS — A 3 Bedroom (with Basins|| 8- BARROW, Clairmonte 8 8. 17th August, 1952. Consignee Tele. No. 4047 ways. Av:
THANKS c — re NOTICE & Cupboards) Stone Bungalow, about in ier KLES, qeney Ararninthn M.S. 15th September,
oe CAR Morris G condition: tmen yes. Old, vertte Roof, 2 T Ad . » Una ‘bi!
NICHOLS—Mrs. J. R. Nichols and | Owner secured bigger car. Phone bs loses hone tae te aa Meccano Garage /& Servant’s Room, about 008 uh. BECRLES, Verlander 8. P. MUSSON, SON & CO., LTD. FOR SALE’
sampty bes oe Semnaoty siete oe ap- | or 4682. 21.8.52--3n. | both days inclusive, for_gronaal vacation. «a fee Going for about £3,100, 4. AT if. BELGRAVE, Dorothy Agents
preciation an gratitude ‘or JB cetead nape GOVT: lL, — Almost Ni 3 Be iB. Patrici:
Gedutitul Sowers-and the many tributes} CAR—One (1) 1061 Alain 90, tn very] ores are indy See ‘St room | 14. BEST, ‘Irene F roar
of affection paid by friends, known] good condition, done 8,000 miles, price 15. BISPHAM, Avril .
and unknown, to a much loved servant] $9200. Craig Garage, Roebuck Street. Robert Thom Limited. |1.000 sq. ft., Going for about £1,200. i. B |, James RESIDENCE, THE GARDEN,
of God, the Rev. J. R. Nichols, who} Dial 4553. 22.8.52—3n.| nial 4616—Office ‘le IN BELLEVILLE—One-Storey (Partly} 7. B , Judy Yvonne WORTHING — Modern coral stone
was called to higher service on August ; 23.8.52—2n. | Stone) 3 Bedroom, all Modern Conveni.| 18. BOXILL, thony Clodius a n ePaMms bungalow on corner site with
2nd. 24.8.52—-In] CAR—One (1) 60 H.P. Canadian 5 Z ~_! | erees, Very Good Condition, Going about| 19. ‘aple wide frontages. Pleasant garden
a ~|ecater Sedan Ford in good order. Price N 2. 2,000. BY CULLODEN RD., on , Everil Evoyne ; with flower beds, lawn, conerete
easonable. Apply: N. L. Seale & Co. OTILE Govt. land —-2 Roofs & Kitchen W patio, sad Sumber of bearing Erut
IN MEMORIAM Ltd. 21.8.52—2n,|_ The WOMEN’S SELF HELP ASSOCIA-| situched (1 Galvd: Roof 9) x 12 New. 1 BRATHWAITE, Betty Annette trees, |. Acgommodation' comprises

SPENCER—In loving memory of Inez





















— Verandahs — From September

re
Telephone 2949. 16.8. 52—t.f



CARS—One (1) i936 Master Chevrolet
‘iso (1) 1940 Dodge, both to be solid in















ELECTRIC DRILL PRESS Machines

Dial 4391. 23.8.52--6n

TYON will be closed on Wednesday 27th

end Thursday 28th August 1952,

for

Stock-taking. As from Ist September







ensemble The Modern Dress Shoppe,
Broad Street. 24.8.52—3n

this and arrange. their. dingly. | (Partly Stone) Bungalow, Stone Garage. }.
ue jnelt eens Enclosure, Conveniences, about

Roof 16 x 9 Almost New), Enclosed,

Going about $1,400. 7. OFF COUNTRY

KD,, — 2 Bedroom House with Land,












The above parcel of land will be st
up for sale by Public Competition st our
Friday 29th

BRATHWAITE. Ira Elain
BRATHWASPTE, Norma %
BRICE. Frenchie Randolpe
BRIDGEMAN.







ADMISSION — 1/6

Mr. CECIL SKEETE'S CHOIR







large living room, covered gallery,
3 bedrooms with built-in ward-
robes, well fittec kitchen, garage

grounds of about 1/5 acre, is not
overlooked and has unobstructed

20.
21.
22
2
vs.
arts. Apply: Warner's Garage, Villa] the subscription will be $1.20 per year.|£hop attached, Good Condition, Yields 28, , June CANADIAN CONSTRUCTOR with covered way to house, ser~
Groth Gass, long OF ta cne bore he ) tad, Britons Hill. 23.8.52—2n,| The “BOWER”, situated at the Gar-|§:4.00 p.m., Going about $1,500 IN| 27. BRITTON, Benjamin Abia > —— - = vants’ quarters and. all aaush
wae rison standing on over seven’ thousand ||,1GHTFOOT’S X LANE — A Desirable| 8. B . Gregston CAN. CHALLENGER 12 Sept. offices. All public utility services.
pe ‘or cure but all in vain CARS—Prefect Ford late 1950 very good|*4. ft. of land, contains gallery, 2/2 bedroom Cottage, Light, Water, Going| 28. BRYAN, Brenda Dolores LADY +53 na 22 Sept. in our opinion this property is
Until God Himself saw what was ‘endition, also one Austin A-70 1951 very} bedrooms, Drawing Room, Dining Room for Under $2,300 AT HASTINGS —| ™. BURKE. Hugh Gregory one of the most attractive homes
ood condition too, both cars going very| nd other modern conveniences. Phone |SfASIDE — “OLIVE BOUGE.” IN} 31. BURROWES, Noreen Odessa NORTHBOUND now available in a.
Aind tock our dear with Him to rest." | “asonable, Dial 95251. 4533. 15.8.52-3n | TUDOR ST.—Business Premises & Resi-| 32. BYNOE, Inez Albertha aaeteds range. : di
Remembered always by Isabel Jemmot' 13:9. 3.9. aa. ed Gee oN NELAON or. — A. 3 Bedeomed GAME, Bt Barbsdes MODERN HOME, St, Petec
3 aa ‘ottage, also a Business emises : A adene CANADIAN CHALLENGER toy L eal.
and Elmina Evelyn. 24.8.52—In CARS—One A-40 “Somerset” owner Applications NOTICE ar ih ark Residence. Please C Me when U require} 35. CATWELL, Barry Eunta LADY NELSON a os 28 Aug. BD ge chard: oo Pain. yg tg gee
mr aoe _ | artven — done only 1330 miles — Mke| time post of Clerk to Gi stlonere of | Muiost Anything in-Real Estate and Near- | 26. CLARKE, Elise Eleanor CANADIAN CRUISER .. 5 Sept. rooms with hot and cold, butler's
oe FOO, OWS 10F — 3,300] Health St. Lucy, at a salaay of $22.06 | Auvwhere. DIAL 3111 Call at “Olive) $f. GLARE, Rreite Agusta CANADIAN CONSTRUCTOR 25 Sep. pantry, kitchen, storerooms, 2
piles — condition perfect $2,400.00, One| per month . aay 6} Bough,” Hastings, Near Pavilion Court. | 58 CLARIKE, Gesele LADY RODNEY ... __.. 30 Sept. gerages. The grounds are experts
FOR RENT 3 1500 Singer — tyres, battery and) © 2 Applicants should possess an edu-| “00K FOR MY SIGN. 39. CLARKE, John Edward iGER 6 Oct. ly laid out with a profusion of
ondition excellent §2,500.00 Apply! cational qualification equivalent to the} i | SEES, Dee echeaals LADY NELSON ve ae 19 Oct. flowering shrubs, Own right of
‘helsea Garage 1980 Ltd.” Phone 4949. | Combridge School Certificate: a knowl-|9'!) BOARD AND SHINGLE HOUS i ECG Kekona way to sea,
|. 8.52—Bn. - x w room ir an i 2
——— eee eee ee ud bison touts kitehen attached painted in and out{ 43. CRICHLOW, Monica Schmegilow RESIDENCE, BLACK ROCK —
HOUSES MORRIS § ton Trucks with aasitiary| oniais, and be required to assume duty | #0 With glass windows. Price $1,000.00 44. CUMMINS. Lionel, McDonald For further partioulars, apply 1o— Sumndiy cobetiuted gunatty. Wis
‘ tear box. orris ewt, ‘ani . “ | or nearest offer pply Cuthbert Rogers, P Norma “
APARTMENT at Berwick Guest House | Pick-Ups, Two ang Four Door, Minors 4s, {OR plications ‘will, be ‘received in) Near Rices, St. Philip, 22.8.62—mn. | 4: BA vantey ofivia ia GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD. —Agents. sour and pallery. to tnd ot tee
ial 8133. 8 n | Morris lords, rom stoc! ; namin | ae . Alista! py
isan No. waiting. Fort Royal Garage Lia, | writing by the Chairman up to 15th) “CLARENDON—Black Rock, St. Michael,} 48- Grrthie Jeserene POTS Oe: aa rahe
BUNGALOW — To An Approved Ter | Telephone 4504. 8.682.) . H. YEARWOoD, | 9pposite St. Stephen's Church. Standing} 49. Eildica BUILDING LAND, ST. LAW-
ant, Bungalow Modern Sea-Side, full Chairman, Commissioners of Health,}@! 1 acre of land. Laid out for good| 59. » Megan Undine FOO", RENCE COAST — Excellent plot
furnished Bungalow, Excellent sea-| USED CARS—Available from stock; St. Lucy. wiry Farm or Residence, Possibilities 4 ELLIS, Golda Delcina m good ‘padiion wih wite: aes
bathing. For further particulars Apps | cod assortment of bargains ineludin 24.8.52—In. | £0F agé can be arranged. Apply:| 5% EVANS, Shirley Yvonne frontage. Ideal site for sea-sidé
to No. 6 Coral Sands, Worthing Morris Oxford, Austin A-40,, Vauxhall} 0] NN. Hutchinson or Dial 4803. 53, EVELYN, Trevor Almenston EA VIEW GUEST bungalow. One of the’ few vacant
24.8.52—8n | Velox. Courtesy Garage. Dial 4616. FOR SALE 21,8.52—Tn, z ove Thelma Agatha lots javailable on this popular
hide eee ea 23.8.52—6n. 6 ——____________________| £§. EVERSLEY, Shirley Ernestine SERVICE OF SONGS cons
LUNGALOW—Small Bungalow at Boy ictiite ia. Le at dee Mt. FIREBRAGE, David Lloyd
fiel€ Beach, St. Peter. Comfortably fur- \ DRESSES—. adjoining lots. n t. each, with} °f + ¥ will be given by
SE er ee ery ELECTRICAL { Oreses =n We Neve :iumh ened the| Water. Gas and Biectricity. “E. P.| 2) FOREML James Avia HASTINGS, BARBADOS MR. GEORGE PARRIS _h worst coteh dome house Hh
rvant's room. jarage etc nT chia —. finest assortment of dressy Dresses for : ‘ 60. (Shopkeeper) 3 bedrooms, dining and living
Sept, — Dee. ‘Phone 2383, %4.8.00—1N.| “AMERICAN ELECTRIC DEEP FREEZE: | cocktally and weddings also the stnartest $1,6.98—t0. | oF OA ee re Daily and Longterm Rates ae wie saathantee room, verandah & kitchenette up-
GALOW—On oat, eee a — SNomet fo’ states i Feleph Soa Velvets, Felts and frawe dlp, Hand- fe ee pats oe ot lang situste & c PL on nae Seeeeanh d cn request. CHURCH VILLAGE, St. PHILIP quartet ina. lannany, below. This
ii very comfortably furnished, Eng- F ; ¥ a » St. . the . . - ’ ‘ :
nae areey a artery nt ee .$,52—6n. thogs of stmilar materials to match any|‘: the late Eleanor Lacey, dec property v4. On SUNDAY, Sist AUGUST, 1252 house is set well back in its
66.
67
68.
69.
















































a a a view seawards. Open to offers in
‘ Office, James Street, on : Barbara Anita i
ie TDERED 7" : ¥ , arranged. i ;
HOUSE — Small, new, Stone, One floor | SUSE -ARRIVEDCA Tew JIFFY ALL: [superior Guality, Just the thing tor ‘not | AVEUS, 1982, at 2 pin. GOODRIDGE, Franklin Winfe J. H, BUCKLAND ‘diene Gok | Tee eT
2 | JUST ARRIVED—A few JIFFY ALL- . ing ot) For furth ieul + ms Please Invite Your Friends
Afouse Completely and comfortably fur er particulars apply to Mr. &
Purpose Electrical Hand Sprayers and | Season only $3.11 a yd. At Thani Bros. 7”. G * Proprietor. 16.8.52—3n. INCH MARLOW HOUSE = A
nit . Good residential district. Very Pr A. W. Harper, Lakes Folly, . 4 Delvine . 8.
Electrical Hand Drills. ices 24.8,52—In. 7 well placed house always kept
Auitaple for one, ge, O8e | reasonable, “Get vours to-day from. J. | ZED BEETS ; a, 72. GREAVES, ‘Elvira Selina "OOOOOOOSNSS890659S%:." | $999959S9S9995 FOSSSSOGS™ ||] cool by constant sea breezes
Adniite, Phone 4042. __ MERI |Homel-Smith & Co, Limited. Bridge) GALVAN = Henttea 20.8.82-mn. | 73. GR ret Amelia %S000900000006000000000005900055090 SSS S STS SSOOOS! ||| ilered for sale with approx: 4
MORECAMBE—The desirable residence | St"eet. Phone 4748 24.8.59--tn, [Shed théete 26 eduee ect low prices | Tr 4. . ill Rc Ma
“hlerecambe” Worthing next to yal ® no ~ | Dial Auta Tyre Co. "| NEW BUNGALOW-Situated at Blue 75. HAREWOOD, Jeanette Yvonne Seven sizes of scope for renovation and remodel-
‘Thamage ry + Bedeootns See ne weeme REFRIGERATOR — One tor , Wk tn | atee Sesece. 8 Bedrooms 9, Seles | 5 u OOD’ Monica Adelle ling.
wu ‘irs, Downstairs: Drawing room, unit 8, arage . Available . 1st “ Iistia e rev: ww
Foo em, 5 a Se sae Feice 400.00 or seleed th ee For life and last- September. BF. Mdghill. Phene tig 7: HARRIS,’ Marlene Unilds P ‘S BLO TORCHES LAND, TWEEDSIDE ROAD—On
ere et, large ga’ . * 4559 a 5 beau OHN- e ; .8.52—4n. , : . a d it wv f c
For particulars, apply: Manager, Empire ‘ rhe af. i86 | “api ard ® We . gue RED ard cet, qu AtMMnNG: * Wo-tenyed Mperall| 1° HEADER Mure ve S| ine! HOS anal a
| ;
OR'—Ist Avenue, Belleville. | Ft ager three oa” A Pe ik PK. J Hemel-gnntty co ttd,,| STRATHCLYDE, St. Michael, standing} 3. HERBERT, Wendy Dorlene $17.40 to $46.76 § BUSINESS PREMISES—DWELL-
A ble from Sept. ist, 3 Bedrooms | Cnaneer 7. lottrols Operated one unit |Eridge Street. Phone 4748 ;*¥@lon 7,068 square feet of ‘and, and con-| %- HINDS, Orene Odessa ‘ ING HOUSE, ROEBUCK STREET
with running water in each, Garage ete. | 0°") divigually. Foster Phone , * 91.8.52—4n. | taining open and closed verandahs, draw-| £3. HINDS. Myrta Matilda TRE Goud: titiatiod Ben setail. cael te
Dint 8680. m4.8.52—1n. |" 1 - Fron lmen. | meet" | an ining rooms, 3 bedrooms. aaah} 0 HOLDER, Barbara Resets CENTRAL EMPORIUM = = )\) oe Pie ee.
fi + , a :| IOUSEWIVES—Do you have Fioor|With running water,’ kitchen &c., 87. HOLDER, Cordean Clerine ‘ Core eroy
RADIOGRAM—Separate unite, R. 107| Problems which you do not seem to be| {ual conveniences. Water and Electric %- HOM Marva Gloreta | Corner Broad & Tudor Streets ; SWEETFIELD, St. Peter — An
WANTED Receiver. & watt amplifier. Collaro, 3 | able to overcome! Forget those troubles ig gueigiied. “Garage and Servants’ Soom) 9)’ OwWEES, Paylls Valseta : Opis ee Bayes, Dene Se Shain
- speed turntable. long a re- one 4748, . . jamel-Smi oO ee a Oe ee eee eee . - ad ontains large ving room wi
cords, $180.00. ‘Telephone or 4430, | Ltd., Street, and they wilt be|,,Jespection on application to Miss Bree} 9}. HOWE, Greta Patricia S SSS SSSSSSSS French windows leading — onto
24.8.52--In }orly too pleased to give Wice at no| Parkinson, Strathelyde. Dial 2452. 5 . re SS9SS9S9S9999999999995 6 SSSSSOSS*: covered verandahs with view of
HELP _ obligation’ whatsoever. Advice direct|, The property will be set up for sale} 9. 4 p Clarence ‘ sea. 3 bedrooms, kitchen, store-
ota FURNITURE from Bxperts. at the’ Uitsa-modern |, one "Betvctowns Su" Beldey'| $9. INNIS Johee Ponine BOROUGH OF SAN FERNANDO = &jj) vie, cna usvin | cotinaings,
STENOTYPIST with knowledge Bvsenrch tent of 5. C. akneon & Son [2th August at 2 4 xe ba a) og JA : Siciet Ashalin ‘ jarage of K-keeping and previous office = ” 5 0) » U.S.A. 7 Wo at 5A bean x 4“ acres we ou
@ mee. Apply "C.A." ¢/o Advocate eee tee Prog po Pa wes “ 20.8,52—5r. | prey cote Bonciors, 9%. JONES, Garmen Eileen VACANT POST—TOWN ENGINEER room with right of “way over
I.» . fi ’ . * ns 17.8.529n | 99. JONES, Budolphin e >
. 24.8.52—3n | Credle, mattress, folder pram. boys| “Have you bought wour JOHNSON’S 8. +
: _____- | bisycle. All Brat rate, condition. Furniture Waxep lately? not, do so] —>>aciepon on TTEr.| 101, JORDAN, Charles Chewstopher Applications igen te Graduates, Corporate Mem- COVE SPRING HOUSE, ST
ION. required by responsibic|“¥P\y: Mra. Clarke 8245 without delay, The renowned JOHN-| “THU! C On the sea at Max-| 13° KENNEDY iP! bers of Institutions of Civil or Municipal Engineers or equiva- JAMES — One of the few’ prop-
Young man with knowledue of Ate and 28.0-52—On. | SON'S Eurritire (Cream ae eel ae ge dh besches of land, “Ganaie for | 108. KING, Anthony. 8. Cals lent—10 years’ experience~Usual Borough E Ser- erties on, this popular ‘coast, with
Acetelyne Welding and Electrical Appar- Paste and Liquid Waxes are available at\) roods 18 perches of land. Garage for} oa: ie Velma Arlene vices—Population 35,000—Knowledge of ity an asset— a completely private and secluded
atus. So. arrangs Interview | reply LIVESTOCK your Dealers. 21.8.52-—4n (2 cars. Se ne areas So Sere Me ae Oe Wilbert Andateon D . bathing beach, The grounds of









‘Part-time for mini-



ANNOUNCEMENTS





HORSES—Three

ear old jhorougeneed
Aliy ‘Fluffy Ruffles" by Pink Flower







caesarean tenses
FERGUSON AGRICULTURAL EQUIP-

HOUSEWIVES—Don't slave on your

Flonrs in the old-fashioned way, buy. 'a
Tin of JOHNSON’'S Floor Cleaver, and



Always ask for “STUK."
‘ 22,8.52- Jn.



the tenant Mrs. Roach. Dial 8461 108.
The above will be set up for sale at| 107
public competition at our office, James 108.



would be sold as a whole or in not mor? | 127.

than four lots. All enquiries should be 12.





Dotteen Mabel
TLOYD, Marcia Juanita
LLOYD, Monica Yvonne

MOORE, Yvonne Glendora
MORGAN, Maurice Rudolph

$4,800—$240—$5,760 per annum—Starting
experience—Passage, leave, car allowance, Pension—
Quarters at 10% of Salary—For full details

salary sub-
ject





(with the distinctive flavour)

about 1% acres are well wooded
and could readily be converted

into one of the show places ot

Lately occupied by U.S. Consul,
LYNCHBURY, BELLEVILLE —

apply to Town
. lary | 25 a the Island. The house 1% of 2
mi ese Rane Fee 1B a gre: x Golden Die Wy gon Bridce Agte see how easily it gives you a clean, | Street, on Friday the 29th August 1952 1p. a Sitio, Raton Clerk, San Fernando, Trinidad, B.W.I, Applications close 30th storeys and ipobeaves noteeable
Pp: development whole time job | ‘sweet Violet” by Full Bloom ex Fair| #erm-free Floor. Obtainable at all lead- at 2.00 p.m : eo September, 1952. character.
a HUTCHINSON & BANFYELD, |!11. McCLBAN, Victor St. Clair
A — by letter only Business Pro-| Araby by Fairway £800 landed, Apply: | "2 Stores. 31.8.52-—4n, 17.8.52—émn.| 112. MALONEY, Denis Rudolph L. McD. CHRISTIAN,
motidn Syndicate, 53 Swan St, Srd Floor. | J, 1%. Edwards. Phone 2590. “INTERNATIONAL TORNADO K. | 115. MANIFOLD, Roland Stephen Town Clerk. NEW BUNGALOW, ROCKLEY—-
+4 : 23.8.52—2n 22.8.52—6n INTERNATSONAL TORNADO K.30./ — lls. MANNING, Myrtle Effiet: Commodious home with 3 bed-
5 ists ‘| 3450.00 nearest. Owner leaving Island. VALLAMBROSA” — Constitution Rd. | 1is- TA ELD va eal = , 1952. vooms, large living room, ‘wide
' ELLANEOUS PUPS—2) Bull-Terrier Pups; no reas-|F#auiries Yacht Club or Telephone 4430. Cypésite Queen's Park, All modern H MAPP. Dorial ne ames verandah with good view, kitchen,
- MISC. 0 mable offer refused Apphy | Cuthbert 24. 8.52—-1n eee Ors For full aia iW MAPP. ee te a pantry, servants' quarters and
; Rte jone ‘ -8,52—8n. P storerooms. Good situation near
% . Near Rices, St. Philip. , 1!6. MAP, Ophaniel Alphonso ¥
DIGS Fn lish Bachelor desires digs | ‘?#°r* LANTERNS, Primus, Veritas, Optimus, | ———-—__— ; Golf Course £4,300.
with aaxtant and evening meal. Box 28.8, Spare Parts Glass and Mita chimneys. ie oy eae ek Mts. Siw: im. Pe SN A PLEASURE AT ALL TIMES
‘Rr : 5 r" aynes o r s Cottage, 0. ‘
eRe ocne Ge, 93.§.89-2% |_.TWO LARGE, MULES. Apply: The | Specialist in, Pressure bamps. Chandler's | hilt, to offer for sale about 86,000 square | 121. MAYERS, Ernest Glenfield Se ee es
3 2 Ma’ Hann Hurdware, Reed an udor Streets A sq MAYERS. M " COAST Solidly constructed
—— = - ¢ eer, ele 23.8.59-—3n. %4.8.52—2n | {eet of land forming part of her prop- | 122. MA » Monica Feleta eas stone house containing enclosed
i COAT— “Coat” size | Ghureh. ns | erty known as Brittons Cottage. This | 139. MAYERS, Dalrymple, Clarevavep Salleries, spacious Grawing’ room
c/o Advocate Advts. ers 5 STUK GLUE—The 2 in 1 adhesive with ao us Baclosed on three sides with a tm STAs RATA, baa eiaiite e e e and dining room, ahd brealcfast
= -8.52—t.f.n the 1 uses. A powerful glue] substantial stone wall an ere is_a : a , - bi : 4
MECHANICAL for ee foe Office, aba Workshop | fine view over the harbovr. The laid 186 MILLAR, Keith Reynold room, 3 bedrooms, 2 garages ete


























































MENT, — includii Tractors, PI =~ |addressed to the undersigned. 19, MURRELL, Clive Leighton Pieasantly situated 2 storey house
—— Geass ‘stlawnes: ears. scope, sett] STUK GLAUJE—"Stuk” is colourless an CARRINGTON & SEALY, 180. PAYNE, Cecil Maureen Satisfies the most Fastidious Drinker ith wood erousie’ Gt’! aeout
1$:. PHILLIPS, Dorothy Patricia
CAREER—Be trained as a Newspaper | boxes, Cane carts and Hydraulic tip}ccourless, powerful and economical. If Lucas Street. 132, PILGRIM. Lynda hosehare 12,500 sq. ft., 3 galleries, large
r or a Feature Writer, Get de-|irsilers, Ete. © Dial 4616—Courtesy | it's * it Sticks. 14.8.52—Sn. : RIM: Robert Allan TRY THIS BLEND drawing room, dining room, stu@y,
tails of scheme from Barbados Press Club | Garage, 28.8.52—6n. 22.8,52-3n, | 13. PILGRIM, Ro} . well fitted kitchen, 3 double bed-
FKeadquarters No. 53 Swan Street. i ee tan AUCTION Eatin Nevin ere _ rooms, garage and usual offices,
34.6 ,52—3n MASSEY-HARRIS AGRICULTURAL | TURKISH TOWELS — Five Smart- . R Anita ‘itso’ = Blend led | Offers _ required, under £3,000
—_— FQUIPMENT — ineluding TRAC looking stripes $1.44. At Thani Bros FTE EEE Tae Re ae — Blended & Bottled by — would be considered.
Grass cutters, Rakes, Loaders, knife 24.8,.52—1In STREET ag TUESDA 6 138. SCANTLEBURY, Esmee
Whe BACK lade sharpeners, ete.’ Dial 461¢ Cour- | -—— eatahiitas iar ari idl an MA ese querts 1311S esate Senet. Thkoders 50 BEMERSYDE, ST. LAWRMNCE
‘esy Garage. .8.52—in. ‘OOLS— Suction , + At 0 a fe
n your pede rion” emtewarivers; “Gabinet_ bags] fort, 4, inch gnuge th is sapped) |W. BEAL, Marie Caagee HIN D. TAYLOR & SONS LTD. catow spacious sry sooma “and
n om! - a Z -
MACHINERY—One (1) 9” x 7” Robey,| screwdrivers, Slipjoint pliers, Combing. | io saition. electric. kettle, Per-| ia. SHEFMERD, Rawle Edw RHerIeN: | Roce neers Cat
2 nelosed, forced lubricated steam Engine | tion pliers, Hacksaws, Tappet spanners | ene aee oe etn ee eod oa andl ie REY, Phylli ‘sunita. Roebuck Street | ‘ine Dial 4335 prises:— separate drawing and
ec3e o run at 470 r.p.m, developing about|etc. Get your requirements at Chelsea} °\"¢ Salieri : ot Se ane iy. SOLER howd fet eons dining rooms, 3 double betirooms,
v L.H.P. at 100 Ibs, pressure. Two (2) | Gurage (1950) ed Phone 4949. Singer’ Treadle machines, Radios Mixing | :@. 2 ee, ee large kitchen- and pantry, 3 ser-
is caused by lazy kidneys. mali cold starting Diesel Engines, 10 19.8.52—6n Machines, bread slicer, Rubber floor] 45. SMALL, Aramintha vanta’ fooms af
‘are the blood’s filters. When 1S HLP. One (1) 22” x 36” 5 roller aes carpet and other useful items. TERMS| 46. SMITH, Gilbert Halioy. This eh eas, ate on ae
‘get out of order, excess acids and | <:)1 complete with C.S. Gearing, steam STAMPS FOR SALE Sieere ss 2 SO TOn ACME 5 eg 3 Foainth Yvonne bat batting beach ot Bi, awe
wastes in the system. angine, and Hydraulic Pressure Regu-| THE STAMP COLLECTION of a : -|is’ Sf HULL,’ Winston Archibald rence, is within easy reach of
: be " ating Equipment. Apply: D. M. Simp- | ceceased client will be set up for sale TASTT, Hamilton Whitfield Town by bus or car, and in our
backache, rheumatism, on & Co, 20.8,52—6n. | ‘1 lots at our office, James Street, Bridge- Under the Diamond Hammer TAIRT’ Prince stephen opinion would be very suitable
rest or that ‘tired out’ = t on TUESDAY 26th August a : . Prince { t atten Anite n
- own, I have been instructed "hy the Insur-| 1§2. TAYLOR, Coral Anita ) ‘or conversion into a small guest
follow. To make your kidneys POULTRY 2m. oop & BOYCE urce Co. to sell at Messrs. Fort Roya’ |}§,. TAYLOR, Coral Yvonne house.
—and to them in good order — ——_————— YEARW 2 ; Garage on Thursday next the 28th Aug |}s4. TAYLOR, Owen Clairmonte
use 's Kidney Dodd's Kidney COCKERELS—-New Hampshire Cocker- = f a as 8 pete y Se ie slightly M5. TAYLOR, Sarnuel j ~ ‘ ‘aie ealaebe 4 SP ee oe
iy 8 ths old. $3.00. Ker, British Daily | (amaged in acciden so One 5-pas-| 156. RNE, Gloria Eulinda ( : . d P. y re-mo 0
Pills quickly rid your over-burdened blood xe unetls ne © oa 8.52—1n, SUBSCRIBE a ma ook News. |8enser Dodge and one 1948 Vauxhali e. Aue Kenrick Peter . an offer YOu Goo To erties on one of the most ites
of acids and wastes so that pure, Sere Be en lal ca Telegraph, England's leading Datly Terms Cash. Inspection on the morn- rtrude in this increasingly popular area.
' in Barbados by Air 158. TROTMAN, Agnes Gertru e
blood flows to every nerve and muscle. POULTRY-—120 Leghorn Pullets iv to pape eee “ayes after ‘publication in |'n¢ of sale. D'Aray A, Scott, {uction- 139. WALCOTT, Carmen Gloria Beautiful coral and sand beach
. a ? from 4.30 p.m. eer, 8. n.|:80, WALCOTT, Derine Marjorie ‘ . and calm, safe bathing.
you feel better—look better —work months old can be seen Lphdon, Jan Gale, C/o. Advo- . *
better and you are ready to dance with | ‘"», *ftemoon. Phone Fred Earmichael | Te Go, Lidy ‘Local Hepresentative UNDER THE SILVER a. WATeOm, gesper wee at Sensible fFrices room, Jeune, verandah 98
ee te ae ae ; Tel, 3118. Aaa HAMMER VE ee Marguerite and servant's quarters. oer-
rs @. WEEKES, Buland Chesterfield =e. a
a 4 MISCELLAN ON TUESDAY 26th by order of Mrs. | if. WE! URN, Esme Maureen
re eS aus GOVERNMENT NOTICE | ocN re hoe erate | ABS! WECLINGTON Monica Yvonne IN ALL THE BEST RESIDENTIAL PROPERTY, WHITE PARK
‘Ocean Spray” Rockley, which includes | 166. Weare, Jennetns a pee, Sheet pane * eeay
TTRATIED a? averw danazint e ; Roekers, Upright and Corner Chairs, 14/) YARDE, Hyacin' ola ‘ bedr U
ANTIQUES of every description, Glass, . li f Wa M , reception roo d- dining room;
auggon, Plant stools, Ornament Tables | 163. YARDE, Marva ption rooms an & ;
eet ee Meher thule PPR Hurricane Re fe ulin Mahog. Painted Tables, Divan and | 169. YARDE, Selina Carmeta, AREAS. a = snes ee
ete., at Gorringes Antique Shop adjoining ae . Cushions, Mirrors, Curtains, Rush nd a for conversion to flats, guest
Royal Yacht Club. 8.2.58-—tE.n. Organisation sa etal Gia an cae Goring | > On the focus of the Betirence Beash- GENT house, school or offices.
DED SHEETS —Very superior quality | Deep Sleep Mattresses; Mahog. Linen | ination (a) Oe Ree a card ee es REAL ESTATE AG Ss, MALTA, ST. PETER—Exten-
‘ouble $6.21 single $4.01 24.8.52—1n. PPLY Press; Chest at, Drawers: Ceder and » years and carryin: a - A sively re-modelled house of mas-
- | RABOUR SUPPLY [sini Pra ex in Congeums MU, have cee eta, eee AUCTIONEERS, VALUERS and oa ee” eee a
BARKER 148 Cénecert Speaker in. se In the event of hurricane] Famus Stoves. Elec. 2-Burner Hot Plate wen tb) tuition for five years to - approx. ™% acre flower gardens,
flex cabinet, $50.00. Telephone 3274 or | : Ttenail fee" a Cots. 5) Merle. Hurley N lawns and young fruit trees,
ws 8.52—1n | striking Barbados Labour Forevs) Mitenen tend other tems a ac Bie wt) ‘Orlando Crichlow INSURANCE AGE ITS. There are spacious verandahs on
ADE LB aleaciive mae. | NU Lee, Sem ot relief work.) Pre ie'11.80 o'clock. Terms cash \) Henry ‘Bowen (c) Enabling Seholar- two sides with views over beach,
AUCTI BED SPREADS oy Otte e NG “tango, | AS #00n as possible after the hur-) BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO,, | :hips for five years to (9) Sylvia Alleyne large living room, 3 double bed-
(ONEER AND REAL a loy- Jones rooms, 2 bathrooms (both with
vgle $4.26, double $5.75 at ‘Thani Bros. }ricane, ap! its for employ 0) Beulah Bowen (11) Coretta 152 Roebuck Street .
“ESTATE AGENT NES Sh arty 24.8.52—In. | ment. are to report ‘at Auctioneers Ny syivan Brathwaite (@) House Schol- 151/152 Roebuc , tubs) ‘modern kitchen. ahd butler's
Off oe hedbainnains ormane sm , rk where the staff of veal th ___-2.8.52—2n | nips awarded on the results of the Phone 4900 pantry, downstairs is the laundry, ,
ers real estate of all de- LLOCK STONESA tt, 3 tt, 4 ft Block g Queen’s Park. where Annual Examination 1982 go to (13) Clau- y good servants’ accommodation for
scriptions including seaside CK oe ber it. Delivered. Contact} the Labour Department, will be] DER THE SILVER dine Forde (14) Colin dine (18) Bridgetown & 3 garages and Moretaeme. yu
posees. See him before buy- he Manager, Mount Brevitor Plantation] stationed, HAMMER Beane meerte (16) Sylvia Inniss (37) Sd Gath elactis “pure, “Sieet
you are having trou- t, Peter. Phone 91-34. * of way over beach with superb
‘ble*with the collection of al saps . cy i weleea Shere eietriai on iiiaead 28th by order of Mr. Idris | .§.99@@@6O00O0OSOSOS0OOOO, batting rere for a dis-
our t; S . L ns 5 ng, M. Mills we will sell his Furniture at r a uyer.
then ey oe as ae BASRA Pees eae bs at Barbados Academy and Press “rlythe’, Maxwell, which includes — .
vi wre yousand assorted Covinucaway price 6f@ CUD Building, commence Ist }| Very good Square Tip Top Table, Up- ROUMAIKA, DAYRELL’S ROAD

)
;



eharge 10%. Call in at his
office Middle Street where



ents each,

The Modern Dress Shoppe,
troad Street.

September. 36 cents per lesson.
Registration closes August 29 at





richt Chairs, Writing Table, Elec. Stand-



ard Lampy Ornament Tables, Double end

. DANCE

—Imposing property with 3 recep-
tion rooms, 6 bedrooms, kitchen,

5 Press Club Building 53 Swan Settee, Arm and Morris Chairs, alk in pantry, large verandahs, garage
cee see PP a eee 2n 2o. pied papery where particulars Mz hogany: Murphy Radio (Perfect, BY and store-rooms, Could be con-
« .8.52—2n. an obtaine:



«The Officers - Members
oO
the Advocate Social Club



——
CAR ACCESSORIES—Rubber Matting,
‘attery lads, Bulbs, Polishes, Chamois,
dusters, Cheese cloth,

ow and High tension wire,

yedalions are all things that car
ray need. May be obtained from Chel-
ea Garage (1950) Limited Phone 4949.













Whisk brooms, | °
Bonnet

‘ £$00460000000000006000" LSOSSSO ST SOSSOSSS SS SHOOE






23.8.52—2n

Boys. Clubs’, All Island

7%



J:maican Floor Mats, Rush Arm Chairs
and Rockers, Folding Card Table, book-
shelves, Coolerator, Militanr Chest ot
Drawers Pine Single

(good) Bedsteads,

Springs and Deep Sleep Mattresses,
Dressing and Bedside Tables, Press, all
i) mahogany: Canvas Cots; White Painted

Berstead and bed; Blue Painted Bedstead













QUEEN'S COLLEGE NETBALL
TEAM

AT
QUEEN'S COLLEGE

On FRIDAY, AUG. 29TH
at 8.30 p.m.



)}, WE CAN OFFER YOU - - -



verted into Guest House or Club.

RENTALS

WHITEHALL © PLATS — Cod-

Hin: ice of 4 unfur-
. > and Spring, Dressing Table, Desk and To defray expenses of recent tour aed ad oy fate”
request th le COOPS for Chickens .and_ Rabbits Championship ‘twy Cupboard: Glass and China Set of ADMISSION BY TICKETS mi 7
q e pleasure ninde of hale h meshwire. Dial 3162. Crystal Table Glass (45 pieces), Electri¢ BRIGH ‘St. Lawrence
of your company eT cae) tee len and Hot Plate; Seales, '2-Burner|@® obtainable from the members of Gap Conaabe Paptusncd bangs:
S f =) ; \ f | Stove; Larder, Kitchen Utensils, The T pn a rane
to their soars en i I I ee an ry Sige 3 mais Boon t low ae ise, ftom Sept. Ist.
Painied ‘able i a a Own sea frontage.
ICE Hoover and other items of interest.
DANCE $2 FO9OOOOO0000O0O9 Eaik SEER orclock Terms Cash. | 1, GRAEMEHALL TERRACE-
Under the Patronage of MR. CRCIL LUCAS KENSINGTON OVAI BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO., |} Furnished from Sept. 1st.
the Hon. V. C. Gale. MLC invites you to his yi apres 58-—2n } any eau y po $ 0 e S an NEWTON LC
. + ©. Gale, he é 2 pon LODGE, MAXWELL’S
1"
at 3.00 p.m. COAST — Furnished fur-
at E ANNUAL DANCE P == | nished with mwanediate DOSRaSIGE.
the Volunteer Drill Hail tcl se! eae SSR AT MONDAY, | FOR THE IST. TIME HINT No. 9 We can also do your AUCTIONEERING for you, so e
u in many years
on Monday night oie you can choose c .
: m on : ‘ontact your Real Estate Agents and Auctioneers.
6th October, 1952 MONDAY NIGHT 25th August, 1952
(Bank-holiday) IST SEPTEMBER, 1952 A GAS COOKER Joan i Biadeon
ADMISHION / Admissi | from 0 zee WARNINGS °
sea g a ADMISHION — 2/- Admission — —_ ES
Music by sekas te FUN aincanorekn 3) , REALTORS LIMITED & ce.
Percy Green's Orchestra Refre Adults -o- 1/- After a hurricane — °
Subscription -0- 3 c " alt re: ; beware of héulies. and tees ft} | Auctioneers
Formal Dress Optional c @ % | Children -o- 6d. > Te ae that have not completely {}}/ 151/152 Roebuck Street, Bridgetown, Barbados Plantations Building
Tickets not Transferable M.8.52—In © 21.8.52—2n. OP ar sikias collapsed. 24.8.52—2n. | *Phone 4900 Phone 4640

.







=





Sie tet, — anal. x
mips ~ cong RRNA ARS SDSS SS Pang J



SUNDAY, AUGUST 24,

CHURCH
SERVICES

ST. LEONARD'S
St. Bartholomew, Apestic & Martyr
TRINITY XI
: Holy Communjon. 9 »o.m
Matins & Sermon, 3 P.m. Sunday Schoo!
& Bible Classes, 7 p.m. Evensong &
Sermon
THE ST. JAMES NATIONAL BAPTIUs
11 a.m. Matins and Sermon, Preacher
Rev. J. B. Grant L.Th., Minister-in-
5 pm Monday: Wednesde.’; Friday:
Charge
training for youths
ducted by the
(Assistant
Browne



& am.

This wilt be con-
Rey I Bruc>-Clatke,
Pastor) ond
The Anniversary
the B'dos Youth Movement takes place
on Sunday Augest Qist ot. 7.15 pm
Preacher. the Rev. J. B. Grant. L.Th
COLLYMORE ROCK A.M.E. CHURCH
1! a.m. EXPOSITION -—- EXODOS: IX,

Mr Olga

Service of

3.20 p.m Sunday School. 7.15 p.m.
Evangelistic Service. All are cordially
invited. Minister.—Rev. FE. A. Gilkes.

BETHEL METHODIST CIRCUIT
Preaching Appointments for Sunday;

uso
BETHEL; 11 am. Rev. F. Clarke
7 p.m. Rev. K. E.: Towers, M.A., B.D.
DALKEs1¢; 9 a.m, Rev. T. J. Fur
ley. 7 p.m. Mr, J. Lovell.

BELMONT: 1la.m. Mr. G. BascomLe
7 p.m. Rev. T. J. Furley

so’ DISTRICT: 9 a.m. Mr. G
Brewster. 3.20 p.m. Missionrry Meeting.
7 p.m. Mr. T. Callender

BROVIDENCE: 11 a.m. Mr D.
Griffith, 7 p.m. Mr. L. Mayers.
VAUXHALL: lk a.m. Mr. D. White
7 p.m. Mr. C. Brathwaite.

EB ZER: 11 a.m. Mr. C. G. Reid,
7 pm, Rev. S.W. C. Crosse

BEULAH: 9 am, Rev. 8S. W. C. Crosse,
7 p.m. Mr. A. Bolder.
SHREWSBURY: 11 a.m. Mr. E. €al-
lender, 7 p.m. Mr. E. Brathwaite

RICES: 11 a.m. Rev. S$. W. C. Crosse
be m. Mr. G. Forde. Sunday School at
pm

THE SALVATION ARMY
BRIDGETOWN CENTRAL

11 a.m. Holiness Meeting, 3 p.m
Company Meeting, 7 p.m. Salvation
Meeting.

Sr. Major W, Morris Divisional Com-
mander.

WELLINGTON STREET
‘ll am. Holiness Meeting, 3 p.m
Sroomes Meeting, 7 p.m. Salvatior,

Major C. Levene.

SPEIGHTSTOWN

il am. Holiness Meeting, 3 p.m
Company Meeting, 7 p.m. Salvation
Meeting.
Sr. Captain S. Worrell

OISTIN
11 am. Holiness Meeting, 3 p.m
Company Meeting, 7 p.m ~ Salvation
Meeting.
Lieutenant K, Gibbons.

UR ROADS
11 am. Holiness Meeting, 3 p.m
Company Meeting, 7 p.m Salvation
Meeting.
Major L. Rawlins.

PIE CORNER

11 am. Holiness Meeting, 3. p.m
Company Meeting, 7 p.m. Salvation
Meeting.
Sr. Major J. Hollingsworth.

CARLTON -
ll am. Holiness Meeting, 3 p.m
Company Meeting, 7 p.m, Salvation

2

M b
Captain E. Bourne

EGOLF BAPTIST CHURCH
Tudor Street
Rev. K. P. Hansen — pastor
Sunday—10.00 Quarterly and farewell
in honour of our visiting evangelists,
Rev. Parker and ev. Starling, at

Queen's Park. Afternoon session begins
at 1.00. You are eordially invited to
be with us.

Sunday evening — 7.30 Evangelistic ser-~
vice at Egolf Baptist Church.

Monday evéning—Baptist Young Peo-
ple'’s Union.

Monday evening—Prayer
service.

Listen to “Echoes of Heaven" every
Tuesday and Thursday at 9.00 p.m. You
are cordially invited to attend an; of
the Fundamental Baptist Churches on the
Is.and,

THE ST, NICHOLAS EPISCOPAL
ORTHODOX

Welches Road
Matins and Sermon, Preacher
Barrow. 7 p.m.
Preacher: Rev

and Prajse

1L a.m.
Rev. Deaconess C
Evensong and Sermon,
J. B. Grant, L.Th.

7,30 p.m. Tuesday; Evening Prayers
and address, Freache.; Fev. L. Bruce-
Clarke. The Subject will be, ‘The

Lord’s Supper” (Corinthians 10th v. 16)

MORAVIAN
ROEBUCK ST.—1l1_ a.m. Revd. E. E,

New, 7 p.m. Revd. E. E. New.
GRACEHILL—ll a.m. O. R. Lewis.
7 p.m, W. Hayde

F'ULNECK—ll a.m. O. Weekes. 7 p.m.

Exg. Service. }
DUNSCOMBE—7 p.m. A. Alleyne.
MONTGOMERY—7 p.m. D. Culpepper. |
SHOPHILL—7 p.m. W. S. Arthur.

———————
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE |
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, SCHENTIST

Bridgetown, “Upper Bay Street
Sundays: 11 am. and 7 p.m. "
Wednesdays 8 p.m. A Service which

includes Testimonies of Christian Science
Healing.

SUNDAY, AUGUST &, 15%. 1
Subject of Lesson — S€rmen: MIND,
Goldew Text: Psalms 67 : 3. 4, Let the

people praise thee, O God: ... . For
thou shalt judge the people righteousl
and govern the nations upon earth.
The folowing Citations are included in |
the Lesson-Sermon; The Bible: Por th
cometh knowledge andn understanding.
Lord giveth wisdom: out of his mouth
EOveES Re o
Science and Health with ey ie
Scriptpres by MARY BAKER EDDY.
gasse will cover the floor of a
God is not separate trom the wisdor
The talents He gives we

He bestows.







ltch Germs
Killed in 7 Minutes

Your skin has nearly 50 million tiny
seams and oe Tee hide
and cause terrib Tening, cking,
Eczema, Peeling, Burning, Acre,

Ri Psoriasis, ckh

Pimples.” Poot ‘ten and other eet
ishes. nary treatments give only
temporary relief because they do not

kill the germ cause. The new discov-
ery, Nissan. kills the germs in 7
minutes is guaranteed to give you
a soft, clear, attractive, smooth skin
&% one neeek, of mana, yee on return
ee from. chemist

remoye the
Nixoderma ssi ciuse
Ter Skin Treubles trouble.

The Truth in
Your Horoscope

Would you like to know without

cost What the Stars eas

of your past experiences,
weak points, etc? Bage
to test FREE the skill of

India’s most fam-
ous Astrologer,
who by applying
the ancient sci-
ence to useful
urposes has
uilt up an envi-
able reputation?
The aceuyracy of
his predictions
and the sound
practical advice
contained in his
Horoscope on
Business, Specu-
Tatton, Finances,
Love. -_ affairs,
Friends, Enemies,
Lotteries, Trav-
els, Changes, Lit-
igation, Lucky
Times Sickness .
etc., have astounded educated ple the
world over. GEORGE MACKEY of New
York believes that Tabore must possess
some sort of second-sight.

To popularise his system Tabore will







































send wou FREE your Astral Interpreta- |

by: if you forward him your full name
(Mr.
birth all clearly written by yourself. No
money wanted for Astrological work,
postage etc., but send 1/- in B.P.O. (No
Stamps or Coins) for stationery,

monials and other intetesting /iterature. |
You will be amazed at the remarkable |

” of bis statements about you
affaits. Write now as this offer

be made again Address
PUNDIT TABORE, (Dept. 213-E), Upper
Forjett Street, Bombay 26., India. Postage
to India is 4 cents

Mrs. or Miss, addresses and date of |

testi- |





1952



BOYS ON

Pengeors es



2 :



THE TRACK OF A REWARD

ae eS SE Be





SIDING HIGH in the cab of a New York Central locomotive, Brandt

Rostohar (left)

and Charles M. Santmire, of Mohawk, N.Y., enjoy one

of their rewards for averting a serious train wreck last week. The quick
action of the puir in reporting @ “frozen” wheel on the Pacemaker as
the crack train thundered toward Chicago from New York paid off well
tor the young railroad enthusiasts.

$50 savings bonds by the railroa

The boys were also presented with

a’s superintendent. (International)



PACIFIC ISLAND HAS
TWENTY SCOUTS

LONDON, Aug.

_ The Scout movement is strong
in many of Britain’s overseas ter-
ritories. Few groups however, are
so isolated as that on Pitcairn
Island, lonely Pacific outpost of
“Mutiny on the Bounty” fame.

There, of the total population
of 130, twenty children. all those
eligible, are in the movement.

All the inhabitants of the three
square mile island are descendants
of the Bounty’s mutineers. And
the Patrol Leader of the Scout
Patrol is Thomas Christian, di--
rect descendant of Fletcher Chris-
tian, famous first officer of the
ship,

There are no shops, cinemas or
other amenities. However, the cost
of living is insignificant. There
is no rent to pay: wood for fuel
is plentiful, and there is plenty
of fruit available. The inhabi-
tants grow their own vegetables
and keep goats and poultry. And
Scouting and Guiding fill q great
need felt by the young people for
instruction and recreation of this
kind,

A hike of fourteen miles is one
of the tests for the Scouting First






giving vitamins and minerals
of YEAST-PHOS. Enjoy life
to the full! You'll feel

stronger, healthier witb . .

© VEAST-PHOS

GENERAL TONI



en nnvwe 1 OL $1,920; 1,920 x 120 — 2,880 x 144
| mencing salary above the minimum may be paid to the candidate}
| elected if his experience and qualifications warrant it.

j 3. Appointment will be on probaffon for two years in the first

Setting Up Nights
Makes Men Old

Getting up xlghts, ourning sensa-
tion of organs, whitish discharge,
oa ache at base of spine, groin
leg pains, nervousness, weak-
ness and loss of manly ur are

used by a disease of the Prostate

land (a most important sex gland
in men), To overcome these troubles
in 24 hours and quickly restore
and take the new
tific called Rogena.
No matter how long you have euf-
fered Rogena is guaranteed wet
you right, reinvigorate your =
te G and make you feel 10 to
years vounger or money back.
jogens ‘rom your chemist
@uarantee protects you. a 4

ASTHMA MUCUS -

Dissolved First Day

Choking, gasping, wheezin
Asthma and Bronchitls Dolson
eur system, sap your energy, ruin
a health and weaken your heart.
n 3 minutes MENDACO—the pre-
tion of & ous doctor—circu-

tes through the blood, quickly curb-
ing the attacks, The very first day the
strangling mucus is dissolved, thus
ving free, easy breathing and rest-

I sleep. No dopes, no smokes, no
frdections, Just take pleasant, taste-
less MENDACO tablets at meals and
Brose nthe 4 free Peo pare and
mchitis in next to no time, even
though you may have suffered for
years. NENDA ‘O is so successful
that it is guaranteed to give you free,
easy breathing in 24 hours and to
completely stop veut Asthma - 8 days
or money bac! urn of empty
ckage. Get SEN from your
Shemist The guarantee protects yow
e Cc



LEARN TO EARN
Thousands of L.S.C. Students
the British Empire
have increased the’ salaries
through studying our ea

in BOOK- a

SHIF, BUSINESS oOn-

ATION, COMMERCIAL

, ECONOMICS, ete. Reduced

fees to overseas students. Diplo-

mes awarded. Prospectus free.—

LONDON SCHOOL OF
COMMERCE

(Dept B.A.5) 116, High Holborn

London, W.C.I. England.

Postal
G, SEC-





WE HAVE



WAS

Class Badge. Although no Pit-
cairn Scout has yet reached this
standard, the former Scoutmaster,
Mr, A. Moverly, a New Zealander
who spent three years as school-
master on the tiny island, has
worked out a route covering this
distance.

First, the Scout will make a
complete circuit of the island on
foot. Then he will eirele it by

eanoe, go ashore again and cross

it on foot, and finally, make a
circuit by a different route.



GOVERNMENT NOTICES

WIRELESS AND REDIFFUSION LICENCES !
ELECTRICAL INTERFERENCE
1. The public is again reminded that, im accordance with the
provisions of the Wireless Telegraphy Act 1940 and the Regulations | friday
made thereunder, it is illegal to use or operate wireless apparatus of
ANY KIND (including Rediffusion loudspeakers) or to sell or deliver
any wireless apparatus unless the appropriate licence has first been
Also that no such licence is valid unless oll fees and sums
due in respect thereof have been paid,
2. Holders of licences for WIRELESS BROADCAST RECEIVERS
| are reminded that these licences expire on the 3lst day of July and
are renewable during the month of AUGUST by presentation of the
| licences at the Public Treasury and the payment thereinto of the sum



obtained.

|of TEN SHILLINGS,

3. The attention of the public is also invited to Section 14 of the



SUNDAY

SEA AND AIR

ADVOCATE



ARRIVALS —BY B.W.LA. THE BARBADOS REGIMENT SERIAL NO. 27







GOVERNMENT NOTICES

PAGE FIFTEEN





q —_
1 of Drug afd Patent







The Governor-in-Exeeutive Commitiee, pursuant to section 3. (2)

PART ONE ORDERS Attention is drawn to the Defence (Coni
’ and Proprietary Medicine Price Order, 1952, No. 8 whieh will be
TRAFFI Major 0. F i ALCOTT. &-D. published in the Official Gazett« Mouday 25th August, 1952,
ai Commanding. ; 2. Under this Order the maximum retail selling paises of “Sul-
{ Issue No. 20 ee ee 6 Avs. 88 |phur Bitters (Kings)”, “Morse Indien Rov Pills" °Chakes Pills,”
2 ee aa ie _— : ee 7 — ia “DBode's 4. hen
In Carlisle Bay GUSSAEEE BABOER BR COMMIDGIEN CARIDNEAN BURA Chases Paradol,” “Serubbs Ammonia” ax Dodd's "Keineg & L-vex
The following extract from a report by the Commander, Caribbean Area. dircete: | Pills” are as follows: na
Sch. May Olive, Sch. Emeline, Sch, to His Excellency the Governor as a result of his Annual Inspection, is published
Fsso Aruba, Sch. Lydia A., Sch, Phil for the information of all ranks. ; ; MAXIE RETAIL
Davidson, Seh. Everdene, Sch. “I have much pleasure in informing Your Excellency that | wea impressed by | x .
Sch D'Ortac, Sch. Lucien M. Smith the bearing and turn owt of the troops on parade and consider thelr standard to, ITEM UNI OF SALE PRICE
ue V. Moneka, M.V. Daerwood, Sch eae the Famtoanding Officer and his subordinates,” ts és ‘qingesiananiaeatiptitnn ‘
ary M. Lewis, Sch. Ui 5° ea lanng } m= i
Sch Laudelpha, S.8 ‘oa Pilgrim, an ranks will parade at Regt, HQ at 1700 hours on Thursday 26 Aue. 62 Cos | Sulphur Bitters (Kings) bottle $1.62
ARRIVALS y continue their weapon training with a view to their firing the A.M.C. under | Mop n ) ls
MV. Canadian Cruiser, 3,985 tong, the direction of their Coy Commanders. HQ Coy is allotted the open anal wes lodia Reet FS 3
Capt. Bird, from Dominica, Agents: miniature ranges. i Chases Pills 50
Messrs. Gardiner Austin & Co’, Ltd. Band ; | Paradol 52.
Schooner Rainbow M., 35 tons, Capt Band tices will be held on Mon, 25, Wed, 27 and Thurs, 28 Aug, 52. | =. ’ Scan
Marks, from Trinidad, Agents: Schooner [® ORDERLY OFFICER & ORDERLY SERJEANT FOR WEEK ENDING 1 SEP., 52. |forubbs Ammonia . iarge sized bottle 42
Owners’ Association Orderly Officer ; 2/Lt. H. A. Husbands ‘Ty * :
DEPARTURES Orderly Sergeant 381 Sjt. Robinson, V. N. | Dede Wikiney Sliver Pills battle 64
pat B's. Melaer tur bens okeee M. L. BD. SKEWES-COx, M 352
ss s arer ites. Sc! . ob Dd, at . ajor, 12
er Henry D. Wallace pe Trinidad, S.O.L.F. & Adiutags, ” | ind August, 1952. 24.8.5 In.
The Barbados Regiment
Seawell Sanita enhatee | THE PIONEER INDUSTRIES (ENCOURAGEMENT)
ACT, 1951

ON FRIDAY sensei ssteitllhahdianapadicneanensmamens-—vostgetiinil ncihanreialhagttvannenneesectit
Frem Antigo: STRENGTH DECREASE (a) of the Pi r a sour
_ William Thompson, Basil Pestaina, 578 Pte. Guiler, A. W. Permit to resign from the Regiment} . “ we manner Industries (Bneouragement) Act, 1951, hereby
Conetance Martin, Neville Francis, Gene w.e.f. 1@ Aug., 82. , causes this notice to be published of his intention to make the Order
Christopher, ernon topher, , sx , i Z ture ef © y
onica Christopher, Fiteroy Christ ok + eevee - gut below declaring the manufacture of clay products for the

oleridge Jarnes.
frem Jamaica:
Roy Burnham.
Tom Puerte Rico;

409 Sit. Reid, N. F. Qggated 3 weeks’ S/Leave w.e.f. 11 Aue

3. LEAVE—Privilege





_ Edgar Pollard, M. V_ Proverbs, Errol 495 Pte, Phillips, C Granted 6 months’ P/Leave with per
iit, Ernest Greaves? Maude Greaves, mission to leave the colony wef, 20
DEPARTURES — BY BWHLA Aug., 52
ON FRIDAY
Por Trinidad;
Selwen Clarke, Halm Goodridge, Ron- M, L. D. SKEWES-COX, Major,

ald Gilkes, Leon Senhouse, Hugh Seale; S$.0.L.P. & Adjutant,

Kite Holder; Rex Allamby; Aldric Joseph; | The Barbados Regiment

Soloman Hochoy; Thelma Hochoy; Ron«!

aid MecDavid-John; — Charles Ford; | | NOTICE

“herles Greaves-Hill; Arthur Shenfe : | ST ~ i
1 will be a Mess Meeting of the Officers’ Mess at 2015 hours on Sat. 30 Aug

52. Honorary Members may attend at 2045 hours. |
see meet









iene Pam eetee % HOUSECRAFT CENTRE, BAY STREET

ati = noe at The following programme of Day and Evening Classes will open
Use A.l. White Liniment. | 2 the Housecraft Centre, Bay Street from Monday 15th September to
Rub it on.and let the magic | Friday 28th November, 1952.

of its warmth do the rest. M . 6. ed
Buy A.1, today! onday 16.00 am,—12 Noon

eRe

WUT aa

Cake and Pastry Making,

Simple Cutting and Sewing.
2.00 p.m.— 4,00 p.m.— Preserves.

” Simple Dress Cutting.








{ 4.30 p.m.— 6.00 p.m.— Assorted Dishes.
rig Smocking.
Tuesday ., 4,30 p.m.— 6.00 p.m.— Cake and Pastry Making. ‘
Elementary Dressmaking.
| Wednesday 4.30 p.m.— 6.00 p.m.— Caribbean Cookery.
Simple Dressmaking.
| Thursday 4.30 p.m.— 6.00 p.m.— Advanced Cake Icing.

Advanced Dressmaking.
Advanced Butlering. |
> Simple Handicrafts.
Registration for all classes will take ie at the Housecra/i
Centre, Bay Street, between 10.00 a.m. and 12 Noon, and between 2.00 }
p.m. and 5.00 p.m. on Wednesday 10th and Thursday 11th September, |
1952.
Fees for all classes must be paid in advance for the term at the |
time of registering. '
5/- for each course in Sewing, Pattern Drafting, Smocking, and |
Handicrafts,
15/- fo reach course in Cake and Pastry Making, Cake Icing,
Assorted Dishes, Caribbean Cookery, Butlering and Preserves.
2/- will be refunded at the end of the term to all students who

4.30 p.m.— 6.00 p.m.—

we



|} Act which makes it illegal to use any vehicle, apparatus, motor, ete. i

| causing electrical interference with wireless reception.
4. Any inquiries on this subject should be addressed to the Gove

lernment Electric Inspector, Geddes Grant Building, Bolton

| Bridgetown.

| vehicle for use in the performance of his duties.
ence will be paid in accordance with the provisions of the Travelling

}

WHY PAY MORE?





Vacast Post of Assistant Engineer, Public Works Department

Applications are invited by the Government of Barbados for the
post of Assistant Engineer, Public Works Department.
2. The post is pensionable and the salary will be in the Stale

instance,

4. The appointment will be subject to Colonial Regulations anc
Service Regulations
, expenses not exceeding $1,440 will be payable on first appointment.
Service on a basic salary of $2,160 will count as qualifying service
for leave passages in terms of the Civil Establishment (Leave Pass-

the local. Civil

ages) Order, 1952.

5. The duties attaching to the post are to assist with all works

attend 75% of their classes.
Department of Education, |

13th Augus), 1952. 17,8.52—2n,

Lane,





24.8.52—2n, |
OF TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO OFFER |

FOR SALE j
The Auxiliary MOTOR Ketch Yacht i
“ARGOSY” f

about 63 tons gross |
about 49 tons net i

)

Said to have been built mainly of teak at Bruges in 1903, copper |
sheathed, Fitted with CUMMINGS DIESEL Motor ‘age unknown) 6!
cylinders, about 84 H.P. (registered), estimated to give a speed of |
approximately 8 knots on about 18 gals, fuel per hour. Three fuel |
tanks total capacity about 1,400/1,800 gals, ACCOMMODATION |
One large double cabin with W.C. attached, two single cabins, one |
used as Radio Operator’s cabin, one large saloon with sleeping accom-
modation, forecastle, galley with AGA stove and electric refrigerator.
Electric light ang radio transmitter and receiver, Certain varts of,
engine are missing, including self starting equipmen: |

THE GOVERNMENT

— $3,456 per annum, A com-}

Instructions,

and Passage



DIMENSIONS :— approximately 66ft. x 22ft. x 10ft. gins. draft

f maintenance, design and construction of buildings and wharf walls nspectable at Trinidad by arrangement, |

of the Department, the technical, administrative, financial and discip-
linary contyol of the department; also to perform such other duties
es the Colonial Engineer may require from time to time,

6. Candidates should preferably possess a Diploma or a Degree
exempting from Sections A and B of the Associate Membership
| Examination of the Institution of Civil Engineers with some experi-
ence in the construction and design of buildings.

7. The successful candidate will be required to keep a moto:

Allowance Regulations.

8. The successful candidate will be required to pass a medical
He may also be required to serve and reside anywhere
|in the Colony at the Governor's discretion.

9. Applications should be submitted to the Colonial Secretary,
Public Buildings, Bridgetown, to reach him not later than 31st August,
| 1952.

examination.

ge) FSM

BUY A



PEACOCK and BUCKAN’S
FOREST GREEN PAINT

(Specially made for the Tropics)

at $8.29 per gallon
GENERAL FTA RD W ARE Stretirs

RICKETT STREET (Opposite Post Office)







10. Certified copies (not originals)
; submitted ¥



FOR STYLE COMFORT AND VALUE

RELIANCE SHIRT

OBTAINABLE AT ALL LEADING



PHONE 4918 }
f

Best offers are invited “as she now lies.”
For orders to view, etc., apply to |

THE COMPTROLLER OF CUSTOMS AND EXCISE, |
PORT OF SPAIN, TRINIDAD, B.W.I,
16.8.52-—51, |



DEPARTMENT OF SCIENCE AND AGRICULTURE |

The Department of Science and Agriculture will have a limited ;
quantity of planting material of the variety B.45151 available for dis-
tribution later in the year. ‘

2. This variety has relatively thin canes, but is capable of giving |
very heavy vields of plant and ratoon cane, and has an excellent
juice, It is recommended for trial on a commercial seale in the high
rainfall areas only. ,

3. Those persons desirous of obtaining planting material of this
variety should apply in writing to the Director of Agriculture not
later than Tuesday, 30th September, 1952. Applicants will be in-
‘ormed in due course when they should send for pianting material

24.8.52—2n.

Travelling allow-



of testimonials should be

3.8.52—2n,



STORES

NOTICE

We regrei having to cause our
customers any inconvenience, but
we are forced to close our busi-
ness, as from Monday after-noon
until further notice. We cannot
obtain flour and we have no other
alternative.









oO

BARBADOS BAKERIES _ |

below

Building Industry to be a pioneer industry and clay tiles, hollow
tiles, reof tiles, floor tiles, clay briciss, hollow clay, pipes and building
blocks to be pioneer predicts of that industry.

2. Any person who- objects to the making of the Order set out
is hereby imvited to give writing ef his objection
and of the grounds on which he relies uppert \her¢ef to the Clerk
to the Executive Committee on or before the twenty-seventh day of
August, one thousand nine hundred and fifty-two, so that due con-
sideration may be given to any objections received pursuant to this

notice,
ORDER
THE PIONEER TAD URTAIES (SNCOURAREMTNT)
The Pioneer Industries (Clay roducts for the Building
Industry) Ord , 1952. ,

The Governor-in-Bxecutive Cormmittee, in exercise of the powers

netiee un
nm

conferred on him by section 3 (1) of *he Pioneer Industries (Encour-

agement) Act, 1951, hereby makes the following Order: —

1. This Order may be cited as the Pioneer Industry (Clay Pro-
Juets for the Building Industry) Order, 1992.

2. The manufacture of clay vreducts for the Building Industry

is hereby declared to be a pioneer industry and the following articles

are hereby declared, to be pioneer products of that industry: —
clay tiles, hollow tiles, roof tiles, floor tiles, clay bricks, hollow
clay pipes, building blocks
Made by the Governor-in-Executive Committee this
lay of one thousand nine hundred an: fifty-two,
By Command,
Clerk, Executive Committee.

DIAMONDS

ORC E

ma

als:




You can make your dull,
dey, hard-to-manage hair
sparkle like diamonds! Use
Piuko Hair Dressing and sce
howit brings out highlights.
With Pluko your hair looks
softer, longer, silkier—be-
comes so easy to arrange.












LooK
SMARTI

Always
use Pluko,

Just ask
for Piuko.

Treas URE ERM

Obtainable at. . .

RETAIL

rinight’s Ltd,
Bruce Weatherhead
Ad,

John Gill & Co,
Walkes’ Drug Store

PRICK Hinds’ Drug Store Nelson Pharmacy
' H. . Harris’ Drug &. C, Gall
Store P. A. Clarke
Stoute’s Drug Store (ALPHA PHARMACY)

3] - H. E. Pilgrim
and BOOKERS (P’°DOS Broad Street and Hastings

SOLE AGENTS

oe

N.E. WILSON & CO.

Dear Customers, please be advised that in order
to avoid disappointment in sharing of the numerous
bargains which Mr. Wilson, selected for you on his
recent visit to the U.K., Europe and America which
are being opened up for sale daily, it is necessary that
you SHOP DAILY at WILSON’S and do not wait for
special announcements in Newspapers or Rediffusion,
for in quite a number of instances, we find that before
we can advertise the stuff opened, it is sold out, often















|

HERE’S THE
LATEST
BULLETIN











in the same day on which it was opened,
We are now breaking own record by offering
“eet Quality Merchandise at prices which are causing

much comment
intended to avoid any seeniing Trait
’ WILSON'S desire that every

should share alike.

This advice i





m oof “curry-favout being

one of their customers

Merchandise at. very

& CO.

Dial 3676

Therefore, for Quality

Best prices, call early at

N.E. WILSON
























Jamaica.

PAGE

FO

SIXTEEN

TARE



ee



MR. AND MKS. H. A. DAVIS

APPOINTMENTS

who arrived here recently from

England to take up appointments on the staff of Harrison College.

They are both graduates of Leicester College.

ours B.A. English and his wife,
Sec ay of the West India
Henours B.A. in Geography.

SLA.



Adopt

Mr. Davis is an Hon-

a niece of Mr. A. E. V. Barton,
Committee now in Barbados, is an

W.1. Workers

Health Education Sycceed In U.S.

Committee Repori

THE Sanitary Inspectors’ As-
sociation at a mGeting at Queen’s
Park yesterday, adopted a report
of the Health Education Commit-
tee,. Members from St, Michael,
St. Philip,’ Christ Church, St.
Joseph, St. Janigs and St. George
attended this meeting.

The Report stated that the
Committee proposed an _ island-
wid@® campaign against tubercul-
osis. Medical practitioners will
be asked to lecture on this sub-
ject in the various parishes.

The Committee appointed Mr.
H. I. Bell, Presidénit of the Asso-
ciation, as Health Education Offi-
cer.

Mr. Bruce Maycock said he felt
the Committee had made an ex-
cellent choice in appointing Mr.
Bet as Health Education Officer.
Mr. Bell held three certificates of
the Royal Sanitary Institute and
had public health training in
Ile had been privileged
to work with Mr, Bell from time
to time and knew that he spared
no pains in passing on the benefits
of his training.

Health Centre

Mr. Bell thanked Mr,

Maycotk
(for his remarks

aud said that the

Public Health Campaign would
open with a conterence at Queen
Park early ngxt month. At this
conference, Mr. C, Gittens, Chief
Sanitary Inspector of St. Josepa,
will read @ paper on “Health
Edueaticn”, and there will he
talks on “The Functions of ‘a
Health Centre”, “The Impor: ance
of Meat Inspection”, and
March of Public Health in



bados” by other speukers.

The Campsign will begin on the
day following the conrerence,

The Committee plans publish-
ing .a quarterly pamoplet in
which mé@mbers will writé articles
on Health Education,

Within a few weeks members
of the Association will be work-
ing in conjunction with the Edu-
cation Department, ‘giving run-
ning commentaries on Health
Films to be shown by the Mobile
Cinema.



LECTURE ON

CO—OPERATION

Mr. Clive A, Beckles, Co-opera~
tive Officer, will lecture to mem-

bers and friends of the St. John’s ~

Cultural Association at the St.
John’s Mixed School on Thursday,
28th August, at 7.45 p.m

The topic which will be on “Co-
operation” should be of great in-
terest to the general public.



thi







JUST TAKE






UL NOT

i { DOLDRUM Is
44 TEACHING THE
KIO T BE A

@® from page 1
Officer, and his staff, and its ap-
preciation of the valuable services
rendered by Mr. Macdonald since
1943.

As evidence of the good opinion
of West Indian workers held by
American employers, Mr. Catch-
pole and Mr. Hochoy stated that
portunities. for advancement
were being increasingly offered to
West Indians—for example, to
posts as camp supervisers, though
these posts were formerly held by
American nationals, On their
side, a large number of West
Indians had renewed their con-
tracts

The Board devoted a good deal
of attention to the terms, of the
contracts signed between employ-
ers and workers, and discussed
means for improving them as
opportunity offered.

Among other decisions of the
Board was one to the effect that
2 pamphlet should be _ prepared,
for use in all the colonies con-
eerned, which should explain
fully and simply to each candidate
for employment the terms and
conditions under which he would
be workirz in the United States.

It was noted that the number
of West Indians now employed in

the United States was equal to
that of last vear. It was obvious-
ly not possible to make forecasts
for the future, since climatic and
manv other conditions which
ced not be predicted were in-

volved. Meanwhile, there was no
reason to suppose that hopes for
the continuance of the scheme
would prove to be unjustified.



Yisterday’s Weather

Report

Rainfall from Codrington: nil
Total rainfall for month to

date: 1.41 ins.
Temperature: 73.5 °F
Wid Velocity: 7 miles per hour
Barometer (9 a.m.) 29.954
(t1 a.m.) 29.953
TODAY
Sunrise: 5.48 a.m.

Sunset: 6.15 p.m.

Noon: New, August 20
Lighting: 7.00 p.m.

High Tide: 5.55 a.m., 6.17 p.m.
Low Tide; 11.54 a.m.





REMANDED

His Worship Mr. E, A. McLeod
Police Magistrate of District “A”
yesterday remanded 20-year-old
Harold Clayton Clarke, a tailor of
Wharton Gap, St. Michael, until
August 30 on a charge of stealing
iM Humber bicycle valued at
£9 7/6 the property of Gladstone
Willianis of Rock Hall, St. George
on August 16,



Kegiviered US Potent Ofce




ZZ
Z
Sg

IT EASY WORK BALLPLAYER AN’ \77 GIVE HIM BLISTERS
THE OL’ARM IN ARG. COLORUM AN’ HE COULDN'T
GRADUALLY JUST TO BE A WORK | BAT++-+
= GOTTA HORSE: he



. = =
V7/ it \VOULDN'T 00 TO
HAVE THE KIO CUT
THE GRASS:-+IT MIGHT,

SUNDAY ADVOCATE





~SUNDAY, AUGUST 24, 1952



W.1. Committee

Secretary Visits Here

@ from page t

He said that one of the chief
reasons for his visit to the West
India Committee’s members here
was to find out everything he
could that might help them. He
wanted to get local view points
and all possible background to
problems which the West India
Committee might help to solve.
He hoped that anyone who wanted
help, would take this opportunity
to come forward and ask for it.

Information

Mr, Barton is also nere to give
infatmation about the work of
tire Committee in London, He said
that everyone had heard how
the West India Committee and the
Britith West Indies Sugar Asso-
ciation had got together and
stecred the Commonwealth Sugar
Agreement to its triur nphant con-
clusion, That, of course, was
only onc, though a big item, with
whch the Committee had recently
becn contending.

“The tourist authorilies here
in Barbados are well aware of
the continuous efforts which the
Wert India Committee is putting
forth to stimulate interest in
Barbados and it would be an
extraordinary day on which I
went to my office and failed to
find several enquiries fram peo~-
ple wanting to know more about
this island as a health resort. But
again, I want to emphasise that
it is not only these big things
which take up our time. We want
to let it be widely known, thai
the serviecs of the West. Indi»
Committee are at the disposal of
all in the West Indies who require
them.

Primary Ov ject

“One of the primary objects of
the West India Committee to-day
as the Chairman reminded mem-
bers at the Annual General Meet-
ing last May, is to represent and
help the local man whether en-
gaged in minor industries or
playing his part in a larger sphere
as faithfully and effectively as jt
attends to the needs of the larg-
est m ‘mber companies.

On that. oceasion he said that

Mr. Campbell referred to the
establichment of a Trade Com-
missioner Service in the U.K.,

saying that they welcomed it and
agreed that it would perform a
most useful function. At the
same time, it would relieve the
West India Committee of much
routine work and thus place the
Cemmittee in a position, not only
to give the fullest attention to
important matters of policy and
those larger issues in which it
could employ its unquestioned
authority, but also to those impor-
tant details which daily called
for the assistance of an independ-
bnt investigator, negotiator or
advocate untied to any political
or government machine.

Happy Relations

“The West India Committee
continued Mr. Barton “has of
course for many years, had the
happiest relations with all de-
partments of H.M. Government in
the U.K., as well as with many
independent bodies and interests,
both public and private which,had
enabled it to exert effective in-
fluence in the right quarters at the
right time and as often as neces-
sary.

“A very important part of my
missicn is eonnected with the
question of increasing our mem-
bership obviously, the prestige
and influence of the Committee
must be linked to the strength of
its membership as regards both
qualify and quantity. If people in
the West Indies would realise the
importance of the part which the
West India Committee can play
in their interests, I feel there
would be no need to stress the

value of strengthening our mem-
bership. Let them try to imagine
how different the outlook for The
West Indies would be if there
were no such thing as a West In-
dia Committee ready to offer help
in any crisis or on any occasion,

» ~ntifully endowed with the
connections, prestige, information
and experience acquired in two

~Aturies of independent services.”

More Members

He said that he would like to
cppeal to the Barbados members
to make it their business to see
that each of them during the next
week would secure, at least one
additional member for the West
India Committee,

Asked about the replacement of
the “Lady Boats” in the West In-
dies, Mr. Barton said that Booker
Bros. were making investigations
into the possibilities of an inter-
island service in the Eastern Car-
ibbean with the full knowledge
and approval of the Colonial
Office, but he did not know of any
other proposal at the moment.
However, 'the West India Com-
mittee was losing no opportunity

By Jimmy Hatlo |
















, F JUNIOR DON’T
MAKE THE BiG LEAGUE,
MRS, COLDRUM CAN
ALWAYS GET A. JOB
AS GROUNDS KEEPER,










“a| Phay-By-PLAY DESCRIP-
TION OF THE eo
ATHLETE NEXT DOOR
ms x
THANX AND A TIP OF
THE HATLO CAP 7D
BRUCE WINTERS,
ALEXANDRIA , VA.













dl

«f stressing in official quarters, the }
importance of sea communication |
in this area. He said that it was|
quite ridiculous for the British
Government to talk of Federation
at one moment end the next, to
turn a deaf ear to one of the first
essentials of any federation. L

Mr, e& pressed delight
at being in the West Indies onde
again if only for a_ brief visi}.
Nowhere in this world, he said,
did he feel so completely at hom}.
Nowhere did he know people :«
friendly. To be here looking out
over the sparkling waters a

Barton

made him wonder whether he w
in fact back in the lands whic
had given him so much happiness
in the old days or whether he was
not just happily dreaming.

Former Posts

Prior to taking up his present
post, Mr. Barton held
posts in the West Indies and in
wast and West Africa, He was
formerly Comptroller of Customs
and Excise in Trinidad, Comp-+
woller of Customs, British Guiana
and Collector Ge sneral in Jamaica

In 1949 when Mr. _ Robert!
Gavin was appointed head of the
1on Metropolitan territories’
tion of the International Labour
Office at Geneva, it was necessary
for The West India Committee to
fin!* someone who had some
knowledge of the West Indies to

take his place aad so he gave up
his job as Managing Director of |
Booker Bros. McConnell & Co.,|
Ltd., in British Guiana to take up}

the appointment which he held
for two years and in which he has |
now decided to continue for just}
as long as his services are con-
sidered useful,

Seas SS

Remember the big date:

SATURDAY NIGHT
30th August, 1952
The GRAND OPENING of The
“20TH CENTURY SOCIAL CLUB"
Under the Patronage of
CANADA DRY BOTTLING
Ph, 5110

co. LTD.

James Smart's Caracas Night's
Orch. of B.G, in attendance
ADMISSION: by Invitation
A Free Portrait

Chez Marcel”

Sensational:
taken by *









SOSSSOSSOOS GOSO
A GRAND
wil be given by
MR. FRANK SPRINGER
(Better known as Selasie)
- at —
QUEEN'S PARK HOUSE
— on —
TUESDAY NIGHT
26th August, 152
ADMISSION 2/-
x Music by Percy Green’s Orchestra
BAP. SOLID
Bring along your friends
Prizes given for jitterbug and
slow fox trot dancers
Steel Band at intermission
24.8.52—1n




BARN DANCE & SOUCE
PARTY

KENNETH §&t.



Mr, & Mrs JOUN



Request the pieasure o:
Your Company
At their residence,
NEW STEAD, ST. PETER
ON SATURDAY NIGHT,
0th August, 1952
Music by a Popular Orchestra



Dancing Commencing at 9 pm
ADMISSION 3/6

Keep this date open
for

The Annual Leeward
BALL

on the 15th November
at

Paradise Beach Club

and watch this space.

Tickets -0- $1.00

24.8.52—T.F.N.









ee

HALLOWEE'N DANCE
fens Sante
November Ist, 1952

9 p.m, — 3 a.m.
in aid of

Royal & Merchant Navy
Welfare League Funds

A night of fun and
merriment
Keep this Date open and
watch for further details
Tickets — $1.00 each

obtainable from
League Members
24.8.52—1n.







The
Barbados Regiment

Sports Club
ANNUAL
DANCE

SATURDAY, SEPT.

27TH, 1952

2

FOO9S GOSS GO 99S SO OO9S

Y POSCDOSSSSSS9VSOETGFSDO SFOS SODEOOOS IOS SOGB TAGS.

FSF

{

SPOS SSS

several |

secs |






ions; also for London University
exams. Distanc> is no disadvanmge.
Successes, 1930-5}.

WOLSEY HALL,





Does your Roof



|
GOES FARTHEST

|

‘Phone 4456, 4267.

















|





a Silver Cup, and $25.00 in cash,

Souvenir Gifts.

itns of Cow & Gate Milk Food.

final judges.

+ 1959,



posteard size picture.

1 certify that

enclose lids taken
COW & GATE Milk Food
tee and Judges

Baby’s Name

Bern on baie a
Weight at Birth
Parents ....
Address
Sig.ature of Patent or Guardian
Date

< 4



HOME-STUDY COURSES FOR

GENERAL CERTIFICATE of EDUCATION
CAMBRIDGE SCHOOL & HIGHER SCH. CERT.

Wolsey Hall, Oxford, can successiuliy prepare

Beerees: Ac

Ae Stal? of over 100 'Greduaic Tutors. 22,000
rate Fees, instalments. Prospect!

examination) free from C.D. Purker MA LL.D, Di-ector or Su









Consider ali the

I hereby enter my baby for Barbados’ Bonniest Baby Contest,

I agree to abide











for the above examina
R.S.A.; Bar, and other

yon

se mention
ies. Dept DLY,

OXFORD exciano





need Painting ?

THEN BOWRANITE 17

and Forget it

For the best protection against Rust and Corrosion use

BOWRANITE Anti-Corrosive PAINT

LASTS LONGEST

One Gallon will cover 700—1,000 sq. ft.
Stocked in RED, GREY, BLACK.

BOWRANITE is supplied ready-mixed and
should be well stirred before use.

If required, a Special Thinners can be supplied
at $2.40 per gallon.

Wilkinson & Haynes Co., Ltd.

=

Sa









Features
We offer!

STYLE
WORKMANSHIP

QUALITY
SUITINGS

You Surely Must
Decide on

P.C. 5. MAPEFEL
& CO. LID.

as the “TOP” SCORERS
IN TAILORING.

PRIZES :

presented by Cow & Gate, Ltd,

RULES:

1. Al babies must be under 2 years of ase on October Sist, 1952,
2. A postcard size photograph of baby must be sent in together with 24 lids from





ENTRY FORM

J. B. LESLIE & CO., LTD., Representative COW & GATE LTD.,
P.O, Box 216, Collins’ Building, Bridgetown.





The tweive (12) leading babies will be selected by a Board of Judges for) final





FIRST PRIZE—The Cow and Gate Silver Challenge Bowl to keep for one (1) year,

SECOND PRIZE--S10.00 and a Plated Silver Cup, presented by Cow & Gate. .
THIRD PRIZE—S5.00 and a Plated Silver Cup, presented by Cow & Gate a

8. Parents agree to abide by the selections of the Special Committee and the

Jade.
The names of the selected twelve will appear in the “Sunday nhvenbet ier

November 9th and the final judging will take place on Saturday, 22nd November,



1952, and enclose


















‘lastic Tumblers Natural, Peach &

Bias. @ ...... .. $0.21 Each
» Pepper & Sali Shakers @ a soe
» Jelley Moulds & Pastry

Cutters @ ......... EP
» Measuring Cups @ ..... 15 Per Set
» Drawer Pulls @ e 12 Each
» Tumbler Holders @ ...... AAs
» Toailet Paper Holders @ .. 32" »
» Robe Hooks @ ........ St ae
» Saucepan Cover Knobs @ OC i»
» Funnels @ ...........5+: 7) aa

» Children’s Napkin Rings @ 60 Per Set
Enamel Jugs @ .... .91, 1.16, 1.24 & 1.36 Each
» Saucepans (Jury Brand) @ 3.40 & 3.77 Each

» Saucepans (Vollrath) @ 136
Fly Swatters @ ; & Be. 5,

CAVE

SHEPHERD
‘& CO. LTD

10, 11,12 & 13
Broad Street







There is such
a thing..!









When tailored
in our
MOYGASHEL
TROPICALS
GABARDINES
—and even
TWEEDS

C.B. Rice & Go.

of Boiton Lane





Nm Oe OO SEES FY
BEGEELGSGEGGEAGS A GLGGGG G BRA

Who is Barbados’

Bonniest Baby
of 1932 ?

The search for Barbados’ Bonniest Baby of 1952 is on,
and mothers are invited to enter their babies for
Barbados’ Bonniest Baby Contest of 1952 Barbados’
Bonniest Babies are of course Cow & Gate Babies
and this compefifion is open to all babies fed on
Cow & Gate Milk Food; the Food of Royal Babies
and the Best Milk for Babies when Natural Feeding fails.

ENTRIES CLOSE

ON SEPTEMBER

3O-

1952.



is a Cow & Gate Baby, and I

from



THIS IS YOUR ENTRY FORM—CUT IT OUT

..tins of



J. B. Leslie & Co.,

i

THE COW & GATE SILVER CHALLENGE BOWL

by the decision of the Special Commit- «

If you are not yet using Cow & Gate for your Baby, don't
delay. Get a tin from your nearest dealer and put baby on
COW & GATE Milk Food, the Best Milk for babies when
Natural Feeding Fails. Cow & Gate Milk Food is free from

all disease germs, including jubercle, diptheria and typho'd

Cow & Gate Food is safe because Cow & Gate roller process »
ensures that all disease germs are utterly destroyed whilst

the essential vitamins and valuable mineral salts which baby p
needs to grow straight bones and develop strong teeth remain )
intact. «

I FOOD »®

«

,

ee” BEAFEEEEAAASSEYS YS mS)
Ltd Sole Agents ZS PA$FAFAFAFAF FPA FF

5



Full Text

PAGE 1

PAGE TWELVE SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY. M 1.1 ST 2i. 1952 This West Indian Culture (4) 8) . v imrhi *>•' [or having null ui so mall %  < numbci cai )pm <>f bngntly dauUngly ill,,..' uf mo*: nauseous lo an* ..Iready latd i oi ammunition. All these tU tell me th.it I have hit lh^ br< rie r P< nil remember*. 1 ill on otd tad th..: the J.I. ,-. nnd nlnuelf m thi %  • true reaaoni wny wa have not -climate of opinion 1 But the* thai than with p i i i ioimr %  aqhW CaUy minded of carte when he IT wd enclosed, 0until i'niid we stand; divided > thai are Dot parLbs KB, can makr claim ( %  < i at>rt i.u .-K(u-.i'fi.il!' The poets will cheer me uculariy distasteful, can be cf i ystii il elvlla-atlon whh-h he miles, nevw looking al . Imply nr-frrring to UM commanialhaa who mu rUati and giving a wast .. all costs. We have all Indian application (perhaps) %  > bean TrtnldadJans vi Jamaicans their theories of art; and bafoi-" or Si. LAKLIIM or Barbadians, that long we will have reconstruct)-d i*. separate and sell Bifltanj „ superficial. cheap. empt., i-niiniunji.fs who wanl to shir* machine-made culture thoinothing unh anybody else, k t ougffly and .f al. trade, and who have ii ., in ita approach velopacl socially. a otaB? respectale In point and politically without co-ope. ri(l doctrinaa, but noneThe atocaa Oi The W*t Indies And the bearing of the rare qu< t. ,i .. ilisation so sell lion upon culture no one will Ign at .ipert frord .itiempt t<. question. It] that it cannot be thoMght of as an advantage to anyone who is foreed to live real life. Th, type has for the past two gei i •-• UOM been becoming anglicised in A culture evo.vea alter a poop t point of habits, but still retan s living So long in uii) n nanow fundamii.la! nstum SUM pi...., and has for so long %  and. quaintly ertOugfi, r0tiid desperately peafaced common problems that in-., like to regard as its home a cou i „„ Vv developed .i con " which it knows nothing >t iginal attitude to life. To speak i !" hand. The Portugese fti d fier Nietzsche's manner, tin > Chinese brought to these SPEIGHTSTQWH ROUNDUP llrnl^man biiiptien Sugar" Bom.8 Al SpeighlHlown HARRISON LINER Herdsman and Sfwightctown eatiy yesterday morning in lake Ibe last oi thr su^ar stored in bonds in St. Peter to the U.K. The Herdsman makes -ix ships that have catted Bl SpeiKhtstuwn during this year go load lugar. She is expei bad to Ret a load of about 1.500 tons Shortly after the Herdsman anchored, loading begar. She is expected to complete loading on Monday. The ftaelghlstown Uhran il expecting a collection books this week. They will be put into circulation -hortly after 'heir arrival. The summer holidays have in%  leaseo readers at that library and so there Is a demand for ne bodbM The SherUge f reed In inAre ion Scared To See Your Doctor gj From Page 11 can help you to success through personal postal tuition T MOUSAMDS of MSN in important poaiucos were once i The Bennett College Thev owe their success so Personal Pascal Tuition — The Bennett College way. Yam have the same chance as qualify for s hoc career, higher pay sad MI! itandBngOne of these courses will lead to yoaur advancenaasat irn iri %  %  MMMHAWI* •thy, all lookin,. and UDna "ve long: sidce evolved tKeli % %  rd" servanu afh ly worthless because it .ood gnti Uieir own bad. They omanctpation "I the Negro flaves, for recruits for the bu'inej^ rnada LB schoo S and agasg i were also (l riginally of the I. i professi"i lnough tha assistance of teacher*' dependant MH of moral value-:, olaiwes nnd consequently con sympathy and even condescensio notes and codes, and because the cll iinf wimiever is advantgeou> -clous of no true civilisation .. id when we wanted .,ur own polil.people who have produced it lo then good and wttataver culture at all except so much •* i A liberties increased. When, foi | iaV i not lived ., full-blooded lifo h | n(irrs their aims bad. And a **? w*" 10 father al a distance Instance, Cromwell cut oft Kinp \,.,i rather an Idealise'! Bgual without question rrom the upper classes, with l of It, kleaned n v ,. ^^ courage to make moral whom they could not mix socially. to racogDlaa the auihortty of tlie rrnm bonks and printed matter it valuation* of this sort, or they Of thew two race* the Chinee whtl the ,,H Mcrt;. Baiddei had 1 eonu lP Bl sat. No were probably the iteadler ilanda mada DO Mieh 'i.itinued in ihe above strain, no one lnjp 5 tatemnn can urknewlediie n "d more refined, thouch h.ird'. bla? would bo so abominably nor in any other way% But the tune for .<1I ft .1 as to call me abominably applicable' by every human belnc. Then there are the AborigiD.il We must look on. out • %  coited for not caring to have iind ct ^ea the Catagortca] ImhWUn* few enough as it i" ival, far les* u> pander i^rative In short there musl s and who can be *et askta mmon cause, acourage-ms myaaU ondescendingly lo iin Q grmiething lattled nnd matur oa, m 'heir ongina" -• • %  -. and earn tlculai gradae of taste and in,,„„„• u neonle before thev can hp lp3fl etviltsed ot all the Wc-i ( 8 hope to become a nation m Tn^ian dements. Finally Utjra ,i the pe|>ean -Hy vho were the masters nft These were well certain facts which body know to be facts, and whic'i people deplore pnvnteiy. nut which, particularly in Barbahas be*);;. %  ' ;.. .% %  i*ople mu-t j :.-t. i i i %  :.. be Ignorant of and be su.c .i t.. irsentftni In stK-iety. TtiO l Innpnanitl "t fncial expression (here, not in slavish imitation of wiiich to lean everywhere d*. 100 Is perhaps the most trul handed :il rhot avefJ bl in (< %  v.iv long. ,-osmopoIltan spot to ne found otta build upo-i What Is more, all these unpie.,-bnywher*. Bui the idea* and the Iho foundation thai has been laid unl hsCta, tOfethei With aome meiital atmosphere of *dl thern settled and mature' epre^tcd In their upper e!os. They are quile the contrary; in *** h natural since thay were reality, a mrdW bf racea, rtl 'ho conquerors, and there-fo-e with a different hfattgrj ,, the one powerful civllld r-llghtly different character. T he 'hd civllHnff tnnuence^ But this West Indian Is mottley-cotoured. >Pointthat In aptte of the There Is hardly any place m the u.mcious Norm Europoar v.orld where ill the raj i enly represented. This the eheas, stratihlea out the lev. then lower It slowly, keeping yoar back flattened against the floor Inward parishes Is getting more and the stomach tucked In. Do i,n d more severe the breadfruit trsw 'C'l Stand with heels four to '' ',' %  t>*iah potatoes were pln M> mrhe, imm a wait. Ratten '* "d "* !" d p^ovWon the tower part uf the back aaint uld oe had. ;hr wall krepini the head and "readTruils are becoming scarre .'loulders touchini It. ld pound iroviai..i. v %  W.il: chin in. hands on hips. "o past, leaving English bi^sth. deeply ralslna the caa, "'" ln %  od %  "PP 1 '. ,. holding to the .tomaeh. and keeaHousewives are being i Ing the back prrased lo thr wall. '" '" e,r *"&> * rice „ ^ K< t'.ing a feu pints as then a Just irnise supply and are told by the I dealers "not sure if you will get I PUTTING your posture riisht next week." Tinned soups g I can rapidly Improve your mental selling. outlook and strengthen your rePlanters of the I**wnrd parishc distance to illness. .uv aattlnsj worried over then It really docs help to keep you crops. Weeks of steady sunshine i'lert. producing an invigorating are withering Lheli sense of well-being. crops and makinp the firound | And, please, for your back"* hard and. %  ^ake, never lift anything heavy K ,,,. is ;vh.,t they are hoping ofTjhe floor without bending your f or A planter said tha rainy season would step ,n nov "• %  aTi the withery jppearanca of I ^^^^_^ canes would vanish soon after. i : j tfll*M"[ V.rth.n4 tMlMti SvktMM & i rs^.tioanSSBSBiMB I Drawtafi M...I Wort OVEFOFAS SCHOOL I CiRTinCATEOr nwanoa : I ior STUBBORN hang-on Bronchial COUGHS knew dominance, the other elemer' archll, M retained, and reuin. MBiod-band men>of tile lands from '. n i .one and the people from rVih iVne •*• %  IssBy were descended. ^J.S. "Sefarer" Kailtf For Suntos A New Race The people who I ru Idently of the West Indian Nation ind the We I Indian Culture do .01 aaetn to realise aU this We -„ther which are so prosaic as to ,,f the utltla have Ix-en thoroughly thing that uuly West 1 .„( s iurb*'d by this uprooting and Our painters and playwright liu w m have a diiect and protransplanting, and it will take and poeta must present found influence on the West centuries for us to become settled to u* aspectof our own life. Indian 'culture* when It emerge*. |sdo anything resembling paychogjhj f'-elingfi which we i an The dislieartenuig Uung is that logical balance. But. most imwill hardly become a nation or love and cherish. They must \\, P school-made 'culture' which, .poriaiit of all, the re present nthres develop a culture until we nn\e. bruiK ut the -ipiirkling beauty of ,. now (^ing consciously eon* e.f the various rnrea brouKht hero i.y a proees* of in terms n ia!i and Ai m %  ncnantfiif islimds artto ittueted M present and foisicd were hardly of the !-•""! 1>'I>'* .ind slow maturing, made a new rare their -ilvei beaches and perpetual upon unthinking people gf a In the one case (that of the < u t of tHll medley of psces summ. Hkd gsjntdlM .md immortal product of MHcan) whenthe type was as When (hihah"opened we ran bright blue skies. We must din* curs, escapes from the true West nood as 1 any that could be found hop* t" extract what Is oest in • things as our very own Indian life, preferring to mako In his country, the race could every race and weld B together and from them build a new culits own tentative and romantimake no claim to genuine adinto somrthm thnmughly new tuie. Indeed our culture has rally uncertain attempt to (Ind %  vanced civilisation. The Negro. ie tru.In fact *e are .f the mccs of the West Indies, primitive ritualistic polytheism forrcd for ou: .wn ^ood to ac<*in Nobody will deny that there are nnd imiydcmonism. mingled with the very reverse M true, i u some unpleasant aspects attache!* Uv UtoM mm wur-.o.i to twmmm %  ••>" ">• auin oi '.v,-. by ""nfofi"q'.Hltiini'i V lurpJv* ii"'V i*ut> aM SB SNUIr to toi IIM siiuxie ManatT BBS S4>. a*itoM tatr 11 '* b.o-1. BKtly SkM DniWH aM •••r s:-r P im-.d ou %  „,!. iau thti nixrit hwn* lr*aarr. lasva t vt.Tati hai^Wn ail y ll*iUf* i iU labial laim *n4 Uaaaaapdi v iad li aa< ihil II U fa> kaiui Mbai aMdtoT Thi. M> m t Sto al v i-Ton nai bara U-_ Amaixa and %  achl iin ahuaal aiiiacuiaua 11 nai f*nsv r oMUnala 5*5 ".i had d.fWd all WN Iraalntrnl U haa KUf4 lha JOUM lir pranalura Did aar aad a*ki11l> Il f mada alSrr anan ai food M oaw II ha • urn-out (nd Hniihad oil 1 man and aamaaj H And a aldal. I*. •I O Oiann>i>l, i cat Frail and Shii a> thai tn* VI.Taai idla U a>a> -:-. bafata U.atf Itan'V*-Saan. rd Warn^ul Par ir.HarK. lir T Bin B Canada t.iMf, inabiaodniMiTei B Itb(-1a* aiU>at,i 'i, l toTlt^",'" n ,ii'd'a-? am aad aBftllian. parIU -1." Illll'. .i %  .jaT^lawaa., M ,. %  .IK.au li.li.n (Wctor. D. as^*aB>* ,l Lld *** ', r w iait" aaiibBdfcaf arV**a • %  iid)M littaiMt or inn lotmula. -H*h aail* HI )r •S'tla hpan in* Mtod. flandi a** i Mm— ir-piaiti arji*ln#. IJB|I (i>alf paaVl!"" aviwiii*. bun*. fti %  Ml. ara-caf. e-i-d* Ou.ronlstd To Work Vl.TaS* art Ml an aapannai.i Tin tlmaat Maaa Utalatanl ahkh (an I. uaa %  lift aSaalato aaaaaat i> lh. M..aipi>an '••! Id tan.a.al ara na aSatrSbutod 0 • nh quailHinabli 0fu( SJ S raaaai qatoifvKI JSS_. Cwa a-ft'tt a talHfi'Con •I a*nnm huh an.i| b< drtkaiailand .. ..Tab* not ml. I.t-r i atoiUBt ...mi by l.|h| '" %  a. bui air luaraMrad % %  f •a-iiaall % %  nuih i. wre>i(t(. and mart •ifouioua t rt mull biliia foM a n,fHlina < aiad .lldllVaMbaaiilltalyA Jilt/it*'*' Oaf J ToM UH This. m > 1 woulga'l change mj Kiddl* Irom Oak Milk for anything. for I've never been able in u'i ihem to drinK milk the way thay are unnkiriR old at a prlrr sssj can afford to pay :—* 1^ os. Tin .. 3 lb. Tin but. ysu ue far lew Oak tn


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PAW -.IMH \ SUNDAY ADVUC'ATK St'NDAV, ll'GUST 24. lS3i ro T\ii: 11 Ai'i'oivi'.tiir.vrs W.I. Committee Secretary Visits Here (I l..|lli.lUU .!•• %  " %  attlnuoui effocl MR AM) MiuS II A JJAviii who arrived here recently from England to take up appointmenton the -U(! of Hainan College They are both graduates of Leicester College. Mr. Davis U an Hon iur BA. Engllili and bin wife, a niece of Mr. A. E. V. Barton, ry of too W • -'tor now in Barbados, In an i' B-A. in Geography. Tllh Sanitary Inspectors' Asortauon .it a martini .i Queen'i Commit %  si Phfllp, 'Chi : Church, ..' George id tended this m< • The Report stated that the iirnlttM propoed an islanday frnm page 1 He faid ih.it ..:• at the Chief I the West India Committees member* here was to tad %  %  v 'ythin ..' eotild thai might help l hem He wanted t<> get If and nil %  I'on.mmw ought h'-lp to *olve. Ho hope.; no wanted hl[< would take thi* opportunity IO come forward and Information M, Barl D kl also nere to give -n about the work of nittee in l.ondo:i. lie paid thai everyone had heard how i),. W--• India Commtltce end the I Weil Indie Sug' Astoria 100 had go: logeth.-, MM steered lh< Commonwealth Sutai iphant eonThat, ol courae, wa* ihough btsj item. *h wh h ihe Committee had reeentH %  • I % % %  , „ lUttMMlUC •" %  %  ti* aie well %  'aumuWta Intereal In %  nd it would be an %  xtraordloafj day on which I %  tO my Ofleea and failed to Ind vi..i i-io.uir.es from pip|f wjiniing '<> know more about d aa a health wri. But M on, I •nwl tt> emphasise tha-. 1 onl) ihese big thing,.up "in tuna. We want U> M .1 DC widely known, tha. ol UM W. H IndJ i Committee nre at the dl all HI me West Indies • them Primary O.jcrt %  One of the primary objects of tha Wi-st India Committee to-day •AS the Chairman reminded members at the Annual Generul Meeting last May. is to represent ami K.lp the local m.m whether engaged in minor industries or plaving hi* part in a larger sphere a. faithfully and effectively as ji U) the needs of IM largest m mber companies. On that occasion he said that Mr. Campbell referred to the of a Trade i ssioner Service in the U.K.. s.vtiiK that they welcomed it and ,7 m p ?* \, i. "ft !" 1 lhHl would ^ rtorm nd Wa staff, and its ap,_ „„..„, f unet ,rm. At the Id relieve th.o| in official Quarters, the l a of sea communication in this area. He *a.d that It was milte ridiculous for th;K of Federation ... moment i-nd the next •• turn a deaf ear t.. one of of any federation. C Mr. Barton e* pressed delijrfpi at being in the Weat Indies S um if only for a brief iwhcro In in, ett ha al hon.l Nowhere did he know people p in-niilv To be here looking oujl ovor the sparkling waters agaflri made him wonder whether he was in fact back in ihe lands whicfc had given him so much happinesa in the old days or vnether he wiia not Just happily dreaming. Former IV-t-. r to ifikmi' op nn present post. Mr. Barton held the Wa : In. he' and to I >frlca II-' .... %  i irm iii Ci rnptrollei of Custom* i %  i iaa in Ti uudad, C ,...ii ton Brll md CoUactoi Oeiteral in J alee. In i4 arhon afr. Kobert G ivin was uppomted head of Ihe M.'lriipuhtLin territories' sec-. u M of Ihe Inlernatioti.i 1 Of)lee at Geneva, it was necessary i fpi The V., ruitte.to fir' : %  otneono who had an ma I hno#lara ,oa by ee*i %  •> ih. •he***uinia o* SM '"' L4o U..-.n. D. f .. *C> RS A a.. MO*I,I. la,< i HI —ill %  P-eve> THEN BOWRANITE IT ttitfl I ttrf/fl it Vm ihf b?sf profeclfon against flusl and Corrosion use? BOWRANITE Ami-iorro. !" PAINT GOES FARTHEST — LASTS LONGEST One Gallon will cover 700— 1,000 aq. It. Slocked in RED. GREY. BLACK. BOWRANITE is supplied iady-mi*ed and should be woll stirred before use. II required, a Special Thinners can be supplied al S2.40 per gallon. IpeciaJU. jUt. SJ.A. Adopt \\ j. Workers Hi alth Education Succeed In U.S. t&jflSgf'yi'T/ iiominiltcf Hepori Ml Ofll.-r r, '•' li —"*m*aW* west India Committee of much Idanea of the good opinion "" l ">'. wnrk i,nd *"" l 1; '"' *** Indian workers held by ^''nnnnt.e ,n a VOgkm, not only n implovers, Mr. Catch* lve Uie fullest atlentlon to d Mi Mochoy stated that important matters of policy and importunities for advnnrement ""*e larger issues in which I* nl increiisinglv offered to could employ its unquestioned Wa I Indians—for example, to authority, but also to those impor, s a< camp supervisors though tant details which dally called osis. ICadlcal pmclitionen will "" "" u Wl '"' 'ormtrly held by for the assistance of an independad to lectureon this |] naUooaJa. On their i-nt invesligator. negotiator or jet i in the vai I**!-* "n>ber of West advocate untied to any political The Commitli Mi. ' l ; ir -' had renewed their conor government machine I .-... Tumblers Natural. Frseh A Blur | Pepper 4 Sail Shaken, '•< Jclln Mould* ct PiMtC'ntten \< M'Msurin* C'upe i • %  Drawer Palt* t> Tumbler Hotde-a . Talle: reaper U t'drn Rabe Haaks i Sum put ( teat Knobs '•< Funnels "< .. C'hlUrrn'a Napkue Itln^s ft nil an I Jugs tf* .91. l is. IJ4 A i.as Bach Saueepann iJur> BranJi I I N A %  %  '"' 1! I. liell. I'ie dSKi of the Assotiiilinn, as llr^ilh Education Officer. Happy Relations I I ti %  I The Board devoted a good deal it ion to the terms, of the Mimed between employ"The West India Committee Mr. Bruce liavycoek taJd '• fall %  nd I discussed eontinueld no' lad afora Inimil |n, ; m | quantitv, w people in Ived Meanwhile, therr was nn ,|„, Wo st Indies would realise the Sanitary raoaon to suppose that hopes tor importance 0 f t(,_. pn rt which the will read paper on i a will %  i iMpactlo i %  If" othei The Campinn ill ("liin on the day follow ng the conreronce, Tho Comnutlie pl.mv publ hing a qunrtcily jtan rild articl s %  i %  %  Within n few of th' Association "ill IH* working |n conjunction with the FAIUeatlon Dcpart-ncni, giving running commentaries on rlaalUi Films to bt Ih* Mobile I Health 'he %  onllnuanec of the HhCI | prove to be oniustifled. LECTURF. ON CO-OPERATION Y.ite.diy's Wcolhrr Report Rainfall from Codrliifton; nil Total rainfall for month ti date: 1 11 in-. Temperature: 73 6 r Wld Velocity: 7 miles per hour Barometer (0 ami 29 051 (11 a.m.) 20 063 TODAY Sunrise; 5 18 a.m. Sunset: 6 IS p tn I.-oou: Now. Atigu-t 20 Lighting: 7.00 p.m. m [i lid--%  ..... in ,r.i I. in Low Tide 11 M am. West India Committee can pla> in their interests. 1 feel there wuiild lie no need to stress the vania el strengthening our membership. Lei them try lo imagim tun different thoutlook for The West Indies would be if ther were no such thing as a West India Committee ready to offer help In any crisis or on any occ uifully endowed with e iiinectiuns. prestige, information mi experience acquired in t\ "mines of independent service! More Members He said that lie would like to 10 Ihe Barbados to make it their business to see that each of them during the next would secure, at least dlUana] membci for the West India Committee. Asked about th': replacement of the -Lady Boats' in Ihe Waal lnMr Barton raid that Booker REMANDED ih: Worship Mi B A Mclsooc Mr. chv.. A. Becklaa, Co-operaPolica iaeslitnta ol Districi A %  "•.; v, r '' "?".!' I] lecture lo mamV ierda> remantlcd 20-year-old In 'J. 1 J?* 1 !" h „ ,. ,.„ m ,.„, her, and friend, of the St John's M **"$* ,h\T.ll^Sladaf fulluial Aw.iiili.ni a! the St. Wharlon Cap. St. Michael, until tn with the fu 11 k">'. ^dg John's Mixrd School on Thursday, Ausaial SO on .. charge of stealing and PProy*' ,h *'?,*, 1V t, HOmbei bicycle valued at Office, but he did not know of any ThctolXcwY "CO0 7/eth. DrOMrt) Of QUdstona other proposal at the moment. .[ Hi.,., ll dl ST Oeorgc However, tha %  neral public. on August 1ft. I Bros, were making investigatic of an interWest India Committee was losing no opportunity I lu\ II Do ii livi ry I imc — liv Jimmv Hatlo 4 Jj^W-BV-PL/iy DCSCR1PTON OF THE FRUSTR4TEC3 /TmLETE NEXT POOR— 1U*NX AND A TIP Of TWe H*rru> CAP -rj Bffuce WiM-rtWS^ A^EXANORU, v*. The KarbailiiN Ke^imeul Nporls I lnh ANNUAL DANCE SATURDAY. SEPT. 27TH. 1952 The search (or Barbados'Bonniest Baby of 1952 it on, and mothers are invited to enter their babies (or Barbados' Bonniest Baby Contstt of 1952 Barbados' Bonniest Babies are of course Cow & Gate Babies and this competition is open to all babies (ed on Cow & Gate Milk Food, the Food of Royal Babies and the Best Milk (or Babies when Natural Feeding (ails. FXlHIhS CLOSE aW SI I'll Mill It .WIfl.VJ. •I lb> -i" in ('• % % %  Hint* ami Tkf %  (•*> <1) IflSlBI -..Mr. wHI a* ulHl'l S. %  II, ard S | lurl.r. |.r f, n. I mil • •• %  I Tkr aaese* *i ia MtoeSeS iweM m aer>r in n.-iaaau uveeak" •: N> MlurOi '.'. \„,., ..i,. L Mil roan l. n. Mtiui a CO. no. BeaaeaasjlaBlN row a OATS LTD.. ro r. tie. eaeaW naiidu*. BIMHUM. i i MI %  etse me babv lor lUibado.' BonnleX nby ContMt. iM. and M | pn>Irani else picture t MUty "*ai 1. %  Cow Oale Baby. .nd 1 '.ken ft**> ..1 >• of am i M1 Mil* had 1 MM IB aMea by U> deciUm ol th> Special Ga nmlller and Juaani tsej D*t on BMaM %  rnrrnla Addrru aiwai o* Pelent ir C.uardan Deir THf COW A GATE SILVER CHALLENGE -OWL If .< %  ar* aat ret SSBH CWB a flilr far rear *.:.. daa' iin-i ntl a tie fraea yaar aarei B eim taajseaaa, ditk*ria and iraka d C a f.al Taad U • %  (hrraew Cvw a fiair rellrr Beaeeei ''•'•• Ikal all llM df-trar>d "kiltI lk( 'uiillil %  lUmlat and Vllaal.lt mln-ral -all. kt %  •dTlil-i IS rOin ENTRY FORM—


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SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY, AUGUST 24, Hit p-IY For Women Only ,. %  Oh mil i! is' Hereto .-mid be a lesson fa \ rm parcnl. MSd lo *> SPA TOOTIIIsItt SHIN %  ihc nneft vw:i. folk?. here's a spot of scientific %  % % %  : %  I at School. < Hl.ORorilYl. nature'* deodorani— This i? "the morning aficr th.mithl befotc." I take an AMPLKX IABLKT a day and >ou can't smell %  drop Ihr mar nine after. But you mu INSIST ON AMFLEX—then N*1 UllSTfWTI for th.s miracle-work.* thai banishes all unpleasant t'x W odnurs. %  ***, fjlrls. I'm the OM who used to tip the Kales at a hundred and eighty No exercise, no diel — Just SILK SUMMING TABLETS. One tablet r SILK taken nlehl and mornlm vJZl live VOl' a lovely figure 1 ifc*•mlnr This lit tie lady M deep In thought. F.inul. I'l !!.. %  11 ui t-jt lo the wise woman presents M pjafahii KINIX I I FOAM. recommended by the medlral profession, btingi poise Had %  WBsri confidence tn thousands of wives the World Over. Tty RKNOKLL-FOAM the safe COBtracapuvi fur the faslidlou" woman. Mr. Smith here ha* something on hl mind. FI> mg on Monday and his problem la Alr-alekneaa. Cheer up, Mr Smith. ITCO can help roil AIR-SICK Tablet* by Kavery Moore will ensure far 0U a pleaaanl HUM. Pick up a bottle of AIR-HICK Tablet* on your way to the Airport, and fly in comfort every time. Where's she going to in such 11 hurry'' Ah. Bhe'a heard ahout VAMOOSE. In the pulicr-tln. and is off to purchase one. You're moving fa.H litH—'-idy. bul wait untU you see VAfcTJSE IN \( nOrtl One t two pHfTi. from the handy puffer-tin. and you'll see swift action. Vimoow apelh quirk death to all liiM-rl pe*t* — buy a lln tomorrow. P i\ We're the BANDBOX TWIN. Blonde Tiri.i Brunette. We believe In BANDHOX TROIICCTS. Almond Oil Sham: %  S...|>). %  f accordlRj to out typt HandlKix PI R| I Ml lui; Mil HAIR. and that gorgeous BLI'K. BRILLIANTINi: thai Inghl^l wave and curl, We love each one of the many BANDBOX Product*. Try those that suit you best. \pit running for something that suits us the best. SCROLL BALLPOINT PENH have come to town, in red. and blue, or both. Mom and Dad have SCROLLS — we want them to*. No messy smudges In OUR copy books when we use Scroll. Just pop 111 %  ictHl HOW and again wonderful' tm, lolfc hcra'i Uu MUgbou bandy. Any %  nquines about this column-ring INTERNATIONAL TRADING CORPORATION LTD. — 5009 •Today's Tip: Never out uu with substitute* %  \*k for what you want by name—and see H1.1i you get It. Grandmothers 1952 By A GRANNIE TMK hc is asked "what's tho hurry"' Ami. on the ?pu.* of the ncmenl can think of no suitable nswer All this of course takes off familiar ground. .in!, menially floundering, sin trti tfl dismiss from her mind the picture of a sweetly steeping nCaM lookUafl like a Cherub a long lace robe, and replace 1' li (he vim mi of a bawling .•Iruggling live months child. ,11 he trie* to beat off the strange man who is attempting to pom I in his head" •ion too for Ihc MpfbBbrlng more shocks m gi indmoiher, for they are. in he. 'in existent. The idea of everything ready bj the .seventh month has "gone III the wind." No longer do dozens of tlnest linen garments hand tucked and embroidered %  -t he young couple Is "fuss" and 1 "Waste of money" and say b*9 what does a baby wont %  ith clothes in tins climate". Jnce again grandmother linns 1 lOM .m,| hi %  to givo herself a mental shake at her n.iy-riM.iriis of a dainly clad baby pins boBnal and matinee Jaojorl are icpLiiMl shuddcrinsl-' by thflsc of a naked Infant clad fas hi o n ably m nothing but a blue Nad DapPTi whilo visions of tho Child dying painfully of Dig haunt her. Whm the baby actually dues 1 rive grannJo*| mental condition 1 such that she hi prepared for Imost anything, and her baby j-y and re jef Is great when sh_1 that in appearance at any rate, the child is Just like the old fl bjonod ones. Something familiar at last. But grannie's shocks are by no •ei. hi her day, milk ivaa considered, the proper food roi .1 baby up to g MMI. Noi so in 1952. At rive months bar Pt o cl o i ii grandchild is being fed strained vegetable*, and at a MRl OM >uch extruordinaiy food as IMOBB, baron UOaenptd meat. nangD, paw-paw and goiKlne.ss knows what else garente attitude to him is diffe-'Mf. 1 nd t'randmother hears about Rich things as "melher and father complexes", "possessive "fnr'tration'"flu ( lion" etc. until her poor old brain s in a whirl of confasiun an 1 i.nty. Tlw old ways are dead. Lona llTO the new. Anglo-American Babies Mothers Fingerprints. Babies Footprints Are Filed at the Hospital for Air Force Wives Your hair appears caressable ...kissable... LONDON. Yet another suggestion of the \ ay you can look Mil* season is given by up-aiid-comii.u designer Ronald Patcrson. He calls his new loo* tho "Windbag" Line because It features "an Inflated jacket which touches the DhouMar blades andj fit* closely over the hips." He teams this jacket with straight skirts a* well as full skirt*. He concentrates on "storm" colours, suggesting misty grey. copper or tan combined with black. Colour accOnts are piper green, peacock blue, wild violet. and midnight blue. Fabrics Include doeskin (for suits and evening wrap*), longhn'.red shiny coatings ("silver blue", or platlgnum grey" In colour), and chiffon jersey (draped in Grecian lines for evening draasaa). His coats have giant collars. They could be phantom beaver or piper green wool, or mldnighl blue squirrel on copger coloured wool. And he continues to show th*) 'B> VIVIfcN RATCHELOR) "1 never thought our nr*t baby __ „ would be born anywhere but in LURDEROP PARK. (Wilts.) Amnicm Ve i^,, ov^ he re four BsgJ doors leading to me mom^ and was going to *tay back ..elivery room at the end of the homc n Q p,^, T#xa8i for hlm torridor opened. W* heard a lusuy lo ^ borni tAit ,m flad j,,, not yell Then a British nurse walked Her husband had ^^fn „„, th e < %  r,^" 0 ",„,'?' !" j fS.*g* !" 'n hospital, and pay for their eied wllh chenille. A particularly hopper" look from Mm,. SchlaAn"• """'" SLTi Ji.i^IIi w lr n P" and hotel accommoslr.kin, short evening dress In Ihe poreUI In Paris. She haa transl J^"i'" m '^'^ v ?":^i' 'ijf"^ d Uon rolli.liun was In midnight blue (erred Ihe shapes and forms or She has a staff ol Ihree Ameman | mcl one molher who had <.ome laflela. Halter-necked, full skirlgrasshoppers into fashion. Sull Air Force nurses, and four British from pjri, i,, nllvc fa oaby.., d. II was draped wllh coral red revcrs jut forward to form'wing* civilian nones. ^^^^ __ .^ cirl named Marie. She was Mrs. It's Called The 'Windbag' Line is ilian nurses, taffeta. and coats and suits have pointed One of the British nurses is D K Edwards, wife of the United Evening dres^ ara; exeravatall panels. Curious hoods ana Sister Barbara Ca nn i n gs, whose states Defence Minister In Part* gant, richly coloured and lavishly hars are formed from deep cowl home is at Chisledon, near SwinEverything to do with having embroidered. A mother-of-pearl collars. Crowning touch is the don. She looks after the babies in a babv is made absolutely normal %  atta dress embroidered with dlawide-winged cap—said to be Inihe glass-lined germ-proof nursery at u urdcrop park Within emht iiiante and pearl drops ... a turspired by that of an "amorous when they are kept for five days. nours of n KM-U, the mnalii i uuoise and gold brocade dress urasshoppcr,"—whatever that maj ,,,, h __ (rtW Vfc "" %  ti raped with black velvet ... a be. Another British nurse. Miss O. c",LT.I S 5MLpeacock blue satin dress wllh a Unfortunately all photographs Foster, looks after the babies at post-na says this makes complications less likely. rew season's touch in its single of London's new couture models night. I found both nurses talk', _„,_ M nre embargoed until the end <- i n g proudly of young 31b. lloz. ffj^l^ ls due a neck> shoulder strap. .... r __ young this month. But here are two Susan Oennigan, who was being Star of the evena material? new season's dresses from th* caMfUlS reared In an Incubator. ,entd beads speUing out the moththe collection was the new collection designed by Pie. re Lu V "?^ dolns^miEhtv weH" """* hit* chiffon jersey. Intricately s-lmaln for ReKbrandr Right: a bu l f babied-re^emSire . .lr.pe4.0n a. crinoline and worn to wktflll dress in ,„ k u ^ weight Sey 1 ^^ in ^^JT" Sft lac* it made of blue beads and letname. The beads are always -1 thought at first all tine JS22S^ ^^rTZ,a"i^'^^ ,~*: ""SJrJS-"!.^ over 50 yard, of starched pettigrosgrain. Smooth cots. It was tapped mngnillceml, W g h necked. 11 has unusual tabSSSTSJ ^TZloZStlZZb^Z. ,h<> necklace 1, ,tarUId. As'soon by a "wdd vmleldoeskin wrap ..ultonlng. I^fl: a da, dres, In T *f? *' t?rt h l '^m u l me "' ""' ""1 'he Infant out ul^on tae same generoo, llnes.as emerald green wool. It has ga.h( Je b £J !" ' h e -label" Is placed around Tls enrages, and folded, skirt "I !" ?!, u .?,r"I. !" AJ. !" A ,. neck and sealed with a lead bead. The necklace i. never removed w'hile the baby is in hospital. bishop's robes, with deep fox ored "S* dy "L 1 0 ., na .^ . panelled over New details notedoutsize underskirt ->ks (some two inches long) or. on sllver-hended. the birth is normal the mother is discharged from the 'ath-'ieht hospital after five days and la sneatn-.ignt co |ected by the falher r watched pink note*Staff Sergeant t>. Mclnturh*, who And. when it Is all summed up what Is the answer? The old ways arc gone. Wi 1 these new ways produce safer, happier and better balanced men iiinl women? It is too soon for the whole answer to be known. Certainly the babies and young children .ire hjOsUt h kr. Grandmother llnds in spite of the dark and lonely nursery, and no rocking to sleep, that tho baby sleep* through the night—an unknown thing in her day. Far from dying of pneumonia from the lack of cloth-s the little beggar does not even catch cold as her babies did. And the strange hours and diet seem to suit him, for he grow: %  trong and sturdy. But what of llns new parental attitude, the M range new alocT. ..Im..* dutached relation of the modern parent lo the child, wl|l it develop these children In some untried way for the better? It Is too soon to tell, only time can answer that. But, in ,akln 'he mother's •i haU made of feather, market for the first time since ear with five-day-old Thomas ""pnnis and the baby's footpunciuated with jewels, and the the war. These are made of soft Alan. Said Mrs. Mclnturff: P" n %  B otii wh r P""ln< are Lear' necklme, wheh offered towelling lined with creamed soap n letI Sinc ,ne y never change an interesting variation on the blended with soothing cosmetic 0nd ca usc< ovcr flnd ovcr ,hey <:an ** cn *tPd years later "ditional collar-line of suits and ingredients. Use d as bath gloves, Pga'n. They come in two fraif necessary. Hevers fanned mid dipped in water, they give a grances—"Original" (an almond WOSLD copYUotir azaKHVSD 'n the shape good lather even in *hard water, scent), and "Blue Grass." —L.E.S rvktail dresses. at across Ihe bodice I The impossible happens and, oh, what a row Woman Joins Th W ol w aBt. OpM jntuiubtc fcod or drink. HNO'S safely rclicvei o*:i-* %  fiiy, a m. frequent cause of indigestion, flatulence or BMUtburQ, EN< .MiiUin. no sugar or har*h purgatiw. h b. pjrtn.ul.irly Mitsl i.' invonc with a delicate stomach. Keep your HNO'S handy — .ell and your family. Eno's 4 F ruit Salt' \,0 Protect your gums and you protect your teeth, for gum troubles cause over 50 per cent, of toothlosses. To promote firm, healthy gums, use Ipana tooth paste — Ipana and Massage. Use Ipana. also, to brush your teeth extrawhite and reduce ad-furming bacteria that causa decay. This is the way to keep your whole mouth healthy; the wsy you will find "refreshingly different" because of Ipana's mint flavour. THE TOOTH PASTE.. REFRESHINGLY DIFFERENT „ A Honucr or ,artTCH-m„s. IONOO" AND NTW VOK In Paris London New York women are buying perfume this new way INEXPfcMSlYE HANDBAC PHIALS OF A COSTLY I'l KM Mi There i no liner perfume made than Goya—yet it nee oatt 10 Ins*. Ihe perfume in Coys handbag phut. ihe same ai dial in Guyai world-1 a mom tauly bottle*— there is imply lew of it. These phiali were introduced by Goya H> Uiat a woman could carry perfume about with her, in her handbaa; ; so that ai any moment of the dav, no matter where. |vr was, the could renew and retreat) her fragrance. (. a handbag phial of Goya perfume 10-day I Handbag Phials by 1 11 r i 1 111 1 II. ,(•-' %  • ffM(t %  Ha ihaip. dean uil nCmdxis, '•"'I • %  *.. 0*1 —1....1I. it VfUiii < %  > %  !. ROBERTS & CO. VOl'R STATIONERS >w offers y,u — PASSEPARTOUT in all colour, AIIT CORNERS in Black and Brown REINFORCEMENT RINGS GUM STRIPS — and — SPEED-FIX TRANSPARENT ADHESIVE TAPE ROBERTS & CO. Dial JJ01 __ So 9 „„,,, VI



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ESTABUSIIK1' : % % %  ')•> iDOS AUfHJS' It, 195J Oil Companies Said To Have Overcharged Suits Filed For Over $67,000,000 N Y< KK A... CHARGES that four their subsidiaries had u\ercharged the united Stales foi oil fur Foreign Aid have been made by the (Juvernment. The charges were contain) the Govern merit in the United Suits' District Court here L. terdey The suits seek to recover more than $6".0(H).(H)U The firms were accused of twine; theii \> maintain a "two-price system where under thi Bci not operation Administration and Mutu.. Agencs were charged too much for Middle Bait oil :ni to Man-null Plan nations. The Texas Company, one of the four major United States' oil companies, denied the charflei They said tha! their operations abroad were: "in the beet interests of the United States and its citizens U well as of the countries involved." W.L C'ttee Secretary Visits Here BACKGROUND TO W.I. PROBLEMS WANTED Mr. A L. v. Banco, • of the West India Coin IUUIT. told the Ad. .that the mtretj .1 l^ondon one. nor a remote body, but %  botiy io quit lain bit extant, camp %  %  • living in nonce the first thing to that the problems of the men ben "i th< Pi Oommlttee Mr. Itnrlon arrived here at mklda) yesterdi from England 1 II tinOcean Vie* 11. 1W The Essn Export Corporation, whullv owned subsidiary of the Standard Oil Company of New Jersey, both named a* defendants uid that its prices IK. been "competitive" and "have not been questioned or against by any of the countries or customers involved. "Other companies named in the nuts included Socony Vacuum Oil Company Incorporated and Its whollv owned subsidiary the Socony-Vacuum Overseas Supply Conijiany, the Standard Oil Company, California, and four subsidiaries owned jointly with the Texas Company — the Bashrln Petroleum Company Limited, the Caltex Oceanic Limited, the California-Texas Oil Company Limited, and the East Cadre Sales Company. •'Dumping QU" The suits were filed here only 24 hours after the Senate's small business committee made public the Mutual Security Agency mi mo which said that four United States firms were receiving "exorbitant'' prices for Middle East oil shipped to Europe at the same they wire "dumping oil" on the United States market at lower prices. In Washington Attorney General James P. McGranerv said that Ihe Mutual Security Agency referred the cases for court action after the companies refused to refund ovtfrhargvk. He gald; "Tm* ation is of great importance, not only because of the $fl7,f)TO,000 which the Government 'teaks to recover, but also as a test of whether the defendants, having control -wrthsupply of Middle East crude oil shipped to the countries participating in the For1 eign Aid Froaramme. can block 1 tho efforts of Government agenj cles to • roteet government funds committ< il t. European recovery ( and defence. •The suits contend thai ConI rftss defined in the Foreign A; i |WI %  nohev to limit prices on Items bought for Foreign Aid. Standards were developed In accordance with those laws, declaring that oil shipments to Marshall Plan nations should be priced no higher than comparable sales by the same supplier and the export market pria where the crude oil was produced. meeting of tho Regional labour Board Left to Right: Major E. H Orel) (St Kitt* Ni-vi-i. C. C LosraCaee 4An Hgoai. O. II Scott OBF (Jamaica!. C. Orravo* Hill (Central Labour Organisation); r. C. Catchpol*. OBE (Dep Chairman): Sir George Seel. KC.Mtl. (Chairman): R O Rot (Seel. S. Hochoy. OBE (Trinidad). N Pearaon _t P. I Mr. A E. V BARTON board to meet him were Hon'blc (i l) 1. IMe. Hon'ble II. A. Cuke and sir. R lie, Secrctarj of lha Sugar I'rodu. ation. 1 on pare it, Special Meeting On War Prisoners Called PANMUNJOM. All United Nations Korean armistice staff officers turned over to the Communists the list of 13 redesign at ed prisoneruf-war camps In South Korea. The list was handed u> the Redi at a sDccial meeting of Ufueoti officers called by the Allies. Major-General Haydon L Boatner, Commander of U.N. war prisoners camps had announced the redesi^natiun of the camps live days ago. but this was the first time Communists had been notified officially Boatner had emphasized that the changes were entirely administrative and would facilitate communication and supply to Ko)e Island, recne of thu recent Red prisoner riots and I ramps. The announcement said the change in camps was made effort 1 ve On August 17. Colombian Army officers visited Panmunjom and Munsan today as part of Eighth Army Commander General James A. Van Fleet's new policy of acquainting foreign troops righting in Korea with armistice negoBBl I Van Fleet's idea was to give foreign troops a first hand glimpse of Panmunjom in the hope that it would give United Nation? lighting men a better understanding of the truce talks. Rev-re%  enta lives from trie Philippinbattalion took the tour yesterday and to-m.iTow Ihc French were scheduled to be shown around. t\r. RED CONGRESS WILL INDICATE RUSSIA'S POLK r;i By DONALD J. GON7 \i I WASHINGTON, AUK. 23 High diplomat. Saturday. that by October 11th the world should have some hints Of the future COarfC of ItusMi's I ind foreign pnlicios. They i believe the nineteenth Communkn I'.nt. Congress, opening In Moscow on October 5. will IndlI catc changes for poace or war with Communism and who evinLU uke over Josef Btalin'g all powerful mantle. The first party eongreteejn yean also may see some of I Stalin's old line comrade tiiey as d to nuike way for younger and more an i.ds. The 200.000.00.) Itussian p e o p I i themselves will be looking for i' theli dalu i years ahead. Urn il.n they can expect for sunovertime work to meet new induction goals set by Kiemhn leadrrs in the name of C.OOO.000 party members Alter the meeting opens tho i arty faithful In b I n be tuned into radio pfoscow to get reports on speeches that will develop a new code to the Communist law. A staUtmcni Of some of the in uiu be rubber stamped bv some 2.000 congress delegate twee been released by the Soviet %  U.N. INFANTRY D.IG INTO "BUNKER HILL" SEOUL. KOHEA. Aug. 23. United Nations infanlryrnen duy in deepei on their hard-won prize "Bunker Hill" as an ominous quiet hunfi mo t of the Korean battiefmnt. Chinese Communists. who sacrificed more than 3,000 men in futile attempts ti> take the hill last week, showed no ligna o( makiiin anothei ill Their last thru*-', yesterday, the first Red movement toward "Bunker Hill" in several deyi ciuirklv thrown back. I :\,.-r rain Ulit clout1 rovcied most of tho battlvfioot I.imtmg acHon to minor patrol I ci .(.nes. tinted States Sabre jets 1 two Communist MIG ester.tay In a ten-minute I d : Hgtit aoulh of Sudiu reservnir ir North Korea. Six Sabre* had kwd ten MIOs near Smmju ftti'.lat but made no claims. I The Sth Airforce aiinouuceil la its weekly summary, that three !" „ vn v Auai 9T I Ommurdsl MIGs were destroyed NI,W WKK. AU i ^ d^snated during the neal ,,, editorialised The toll pu sh^ Ited able If au Brit b Menek een> m(]|llll T| M Ml eluded thetr_ military .ictlvlUe. In |t )eU ^^ hry(fc hril clown only one United States Jc* UK Unkind To U.S. On Mid-East DEA'fH OUt. TO NATURAL CAUSES Hi K 11 Simon who perform* ortem eTtrmrnetifm on Uie body of LUlia Brathv. .i:te typnooni i . u\g to do. On his visit t. oineral Rlneway' headquarters in Paris, Marshal Slim said that there has been a MM EM C.mn.M for U>. *. 3^",= *,„„' %  ^ r .Y 1 „„ .„ eatiea "in don't want to curry tnr i tho tme". The trouble, is that Sir Willi-nsort:* at Communist tareeb*. r.p. If. S. Troops Ifr^in Landing Exercises l^A RCK HELL! i % Au, a landing i dleJMbarking men an,i material N0n| i ttlanta lunuJ %  . %  %  hon.-. to mterffuni isvttieri to refuse to bandli %  i it) nrvrea. United S phibiou* i i .. %  %  i. %  %  eaereb e %  hl< b will emi ssorked out i. ihod fw ,>t<.<\ From Recent tt.N.A. Flag Day onslsta <>t llnii'h garrisons in the Suez, Sudan, MalU, I rpru Iraq and ihe British subArab legion in Jordan. But this is one time the bulwark British coloniulism cannot be • Middle Eastern Command simply by changing Its name Inf. Uncle Sam pick UP ..•• Imtead of Britain. To iiio>l people, the Mid East in is a greater evil thai* Communism. Tho Middle Eastern ,'otemniKl which did not represen tinMiddle East would be regarded ihero, as nothing more Uian the re-inforcc' coloniali>m — IJ.P. MHtl.llVMI S>I\S|| 475.000 COAL MINF.RS ON 10 DAYS MEMORIAL HOLIDAY PITTSBURGH Aug. 23. A ten-day "memorial holiday" began to-day for 475,000 coal miners on the .orders of John L Lawio, their Union Presideant. Le^sds ordered Uie men" out of the pits in tribute t fellow miners who had died or been maimed Ir, mine -.,\ th-po£l ten years. Tho short lay-off was DOt expected to deliver a paralyzing blow to the industry ends and a labour day holiday fa'l during the period, miners will be irking days.—I'.P. The Bahdrto* Nurses \ Oted $595 21! from Utefl %  I UJ !.. uf tin-. $402 58 was collected in St. Mk-hael. $170.83 in Christ Chureft and *222 from Otber receipts. nag Day expenses totalled $37.82. Miss E Gibson of the Association told the AJeoeats that If they had hud more eoUeelors. more would have %  civ I In Broad Street, $139 88 vras collected, $74.38 In offices, and S06 50 from passer-by along the L'i;i >ii Offlciak IVj T t End Strike MIK | I The International I I %  %  hike "hn h hi | .'5,000 In i lot Jaj I %  and the managemenl \,. I %  %  ' iii.nl. 11 will b> %  expired it iin'huKht on w*ednat day. Tl %  from ihe CIO b> 1 %  — r.i*. Fiance To Iinport Heal I'rmiil rtij-iiuy j PAR] 111 in port 1,000 tone of fro/.-ri bet i iron IXni i of fn h beef from othei Bui during td. doc^&iuii v. i rday by an Intei .a wiiKii premiei AntduM pins %  I Tha tmount of bi %  I %  as th aj of Ji August and S i U mber.—I'.P. W.I. Worker* Succeed In L.S. 1 ACTOHY reporti on the enV. r the We rt Indian .1^1 icull iiral .' %  i United stair-, were amoru B '; %  % %  -.: 1 I •> the past week at Hastin^.s lion chaii manshlp ol 9b Geoi i : i %  I .. ..ii anl u t 'A Ifare In Ihe courtu' of its i KM ting arranRement West l .u! urricultural workers An toeci ccnire in Miami early in the year under the direeV Mr Anttsn Terniaar nf nrtnerle centre has been of gi to West Indi from tin''; I! i The stab %  i %  miauonei .. %  %  ington *'. '.: 'he year and also VISib I arll.<|wakr Burios Four In (California i ISKIKJ.IJ. i.'alifomla. Aug. 23. lug parties poked through tb rubtaaa >f ahaUered buitdlags for four penwHi* balierea bin by u bomb-like earthquake Ihtft crumbled Bakeranold busine-w Another earthquake i %  Southern I'ullfornla • ally today, shaking some rest Inajatei out of saefi %  %  i ii.I tn-inni \\ ,r. inui Ii %  ft than the osWaetattni Jolt ir iracked through Kakasjbarday afternoon, i Ipfronis from bulMliifcs. roofs ami rippUnfl i unities. Todav'a quaki hit Los Angeles at 3.10 a.m. It f %  mall sbakM I pat "i of alKKit 30 seconds. Tin tremor was not Ml here aiUiough it was notice,! 60 miles i' i'i lameaster, There" were rti at damage from %  OCOnd e.iMioiiake. Hospital llnii.i., il AuUioriUes -id that 18 Uill-i ii.gs would have to be rebuilt m> lui The July 21' a'iunke knotted oui part Of t! t ounty General Hospital. 40ii beds, and did Change* Recommended In the %  .i i 'i %  %  aUsfaction with the work of the i I made with vloa I' %  I %  IS OS soon view of unversed hv the UaJsol %  number anould ts ma the rrop seasora citnndenre in Ml I aid, OBF f> M sae Iti Canadian War \ eterartH Parade twt 'it.tl>. Mill Ul ,i, c ,. W.OOOJWO wurth of damage. Yes,l \ ovaae saasolaeaad 0 TORONTO *> r SOSSS-.T/IJ "..;. %  %  %  psrt i'i th v. I %  %  Tho annual %  umg throu i th, %  • ind whet I Kon i %  i wing of the hospital. .. addition to quake Injurii i caring for more than M viciims of shM'pIng sickness. •i illness now i rippling s %  -2.807 oopulatlon. The tremor which was Hfj |n nto 250 miles north f td aunoet unnoti* In Los Angoles only 100 mile go part. At huga sracfe in wall ro planned I "tid tumbled tons ..[ brick al •r, mid debris Into the itreet %  'i-'ii -,f the damage was to buUd-i On.of .. Ings damaged In Uie July 21 sh'. i as M uiado." t'.P.j p WINK run give M iniieh pleasure to ilinui:; mid entertuinhii: West Protesl To Uussia BERLIN, Aug 23. Ttie Western Allies hi three similar notes to General Vassity Chuikov Boeiai C ommandei* Eastern Germany, charged Russia *lth obstructing inter-xonal trade *nd communications n an atl< mpl to divide Germany eon Aiu^i notes rejected chuikovv July 30 charge that the W*-t v. i violating the New York and Pirl* for lifting the blockaea of West Berlin. j — v.r. I ;ii lli(|ii;ikr Shakes Gnlifornia A MENDCB (South Trinidad) executing a forehand amaah In hi* game againi Table Tenaia Teat which Barbados woo at th* V il CA last Phillips eventually won the gasae ID—21. 15| 19 sad 26—27, DAKSRSTIatLD I Aug. 23. Ano'her earthquake rattled Saturday dead at 2 and Its damage at $100,000,000 dui, out of | left bv bon *>-1ikbrat California was shaken at 10.10 ., of series of "after shocks" which %  occurred at Interval tat third j the Tehachapi quake thn BJ0, —ir Killrrs BIMI\ TOIIIUI M KIIOl.M. Aug 23. Thn body of TO former poUoi man w th of eight i fund it the bottom i Lake in Beams Counti PDUe Bupetlnb | aUaaon aid mat the body of Medin about tS %  %  ii'h i. %  Ito % %  I OBBbad 1 wooded southern pro* I | gerk killer chopped fo to deatii sritb si in whie-b four others di< d The nerving Sbevn te yeur lewata In-fore dinner — slightly rhillril. And add this K.W.V. I'aurl la VOU eoapi iind other food for I neu hlsd distinct flavour. You will be delighted with Ihc results: K.W.V. JAe Wins og Oil Jims k W V Sherry. Brandy, arul I |H



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PACK IK.Ill SUNDAY AUVfK ATK SUNDAY Al'GlST 24, 1S2 BA^BA^,^ ADVOCATE Sunday. August 24. 1952 Parl> liouriiiiHiil DUR] the Chamber <>i Commwct on Wednesday the Hon. H. A. •d to the passing late at nijjht oi en iddreei on winch only seven* out o( 24 meinbeis v( tlie House of Assembly rour. The passing of that address is nolcFoi Mveral reasons. Firstly it is remarkable for showing how real is the i nsCh exists within the Barbados Labour Party on matters of policy. Of seven members of the Barbados Labour Party who voted on the address .six voted against the official government attitude to the address which had been eloquently presented by a member of the Executive Committee, Mr. F. L. Walcott. Voting against the address and therefore voting against the official party decision which had been outlined by Mr. Walcott were %  fill 1 1. Miller, Mapp, Barrow, Talma, Holder and iiruncker. Mr. Cuke was concerned with the effect which a resolution in favour of nationalising the wire broadcast service eyiton) in Barbados might have on prospective investors of capital in Barbados. But so was Mr. P. L. Walcott. Speaking with the responsibility of a member of the Executive Committee and as spokesman for the official view of his party, Mr. Walcott warned: "We are in a subtle way making this island of Barbados the one island which people who want to invest capital would avoid". Yet in the voting which took place on the address Mr. Walcott was the only representative of the Barbados Labour Party, for which he had spoken officially, to cast his vote against the address. No clearer illustration could be given Of the ditlkullies which the leaders of the Labour Party are e\|nrieiicing in formulating a rigid policy which is acceptable to a majority of the Party. The voting on the address in favour of nationalisation of Hedillusion was not an instance of individual party members refusing to toe the party line as has happened on several occasions during the present parliamentary session. It was an instance of the official and responsible party representative, who holds one of the four "ministerial" posts being voted against by a numerical majority of his own party. This is a strange manifestation of party disunity and is an outstanding example :>f the variance of views existing among members of the same political party. Mr. Walcott was reported at the time of the debate as having counselled members to "devote their energies to the basic needs of the community and stop all the talk about nationalisation of Rediffusion which would only lend to make outside private investors avoid Barbados." Vet the only two members who voted with him against the passing of the address were not members of the Barbados Labour l'aiiy on whose behalf Mr. Walcott was entitled to speak with authority. Besides the divergence of < pinion which exists in the Labour Party, the inability of the Government party to secure sufficient votes to support its own official party decision on a matter of public importance is worthy of note. The suggestion has been made before in the columns of this newspaper and by private observers that there seems no need for the House of Assembly to debate matters of great importance to the community after dinner. : the House of Assembly are each paid $1,000 per year for their services rendered as politicians. In addition the following salaries are paid annually: to the Speaker of the House of Assembly $1,900. the Deputy Speaker of the House of Assembly $1,450; Chairman of Committees $1,450, Lender of the House of Assembly $1,650. Members of the Executive Coint .ve a total remuneration of $8,400. Before the introduction of payment of members of the House of Assembly, political service was a particular form of service which certain individuals elected to give to the remainder of the community. Today no one would attempt to disparage the political lervke which is rendered to the community by the paid elected members of the House of Assembly yet the fact that they are paid does give the taxpayers a special interest in their political activities. And whereas it would have seemed ungracious in the days when members of the House of Assembly gave their time freely to discuss the affairs of state In whi> B i>ecial responsibility • that the busuiesf of the Houso should be conducted at any s]>ccial h urs, tod;. reason why the taxpayers should be Interested In the time of day at which membei ren' I c nduct theii if the House of Assembly men in the habit of meeting for more than one day a week during the periods when the House is in session the public would appreciate I I B> inol members to expedite business of the House by means of occasional latenight sittings. But since the House rarely meets more than one day per eretik In full Assembly lateness of the commencement of the business of the House and tInfrequent extension of that butUM the hours of dinner has often caused surprise. The development of parly government in Barbados in recent years and the emer%  ncfJ after the last elections of a political peaty with en overwhelming majority in be Mouse of Assembly has accentuated he obvious disadvantages of late night The climate of Barbados is such that no man can be expected to give of his best after a day spent in exercising a trade or profession. Yet members of the House .f Assembly because of the habit ol late night sittings are expected to express] points of view and to contribute to decisions affecting the whole community after full day's work very often in the heat of the City. The development of party government has also resulted in diminution of the administrative importance of the Civil 3l rvice It would be much more convenint and certainly much more efficient if he House of Assembly could arrange for s meetings to be held during normal hours so that files on all subjects • mid be made easily available through< ut the discussions of the House's business. Any visitor to the House of Assembly tuning the hours before noon will have noticed the much lower temperature v/hich prevails in that chamber at that tune of the day. There may be reasons why it would be ble for the House of Assembly to levise its hours of meeting, but from Ihe ,K)int of view of climate, administrative (onvsnience, and greater efficiency the for commencing in the morning hours I good one. And the remuneration wfa Dh members receive ought to compenthera against loss of a day's private earnings. niii FENCE I %  i H> \ VIII \\IM O UlllW T K5 occupant. 4C*p : %  %  -trees," written by %  rccentb broadcast, accornmg 10 the B.U.P., on Moscow's radio. Here is a' translation of two 'if the versa*: — In Oxford-street a youngs'" %  tsndi Aged twelve, with bright reJ hair, H' 1 only dreams of food beeeeaa No food Is ever (here. He hold-, a doll, a pretty doll Thai can both laugh and cry, "tie tug, a mule, two tug*. a tear. "For n penny, sir, you try." Auuruln, to Kostyrev. th* A %  tafiAfj UM : tuafl lai piay.. n HI ran to Haj %  Nat inr .. %  .•rule*.' o.Allhougn we coutO not him RUM -i at tintough training could at least oiler him a glimpsw it uic Brigade or uuaias avpui of life he has never seen betttre, :.( tauan-m m-t -ur six WUA ,nd wuuki prcbaby never VS*>1 BMrv, U,.> MUM OHM tSfitlld on. fclO the wurias best sotatvr ..i %  *, he would have to be b>< disciplined alter a life of self* Much Uie s..im* could be said indulgence. At iti*t, ha might af LISUJUSUJ at UM avu, fs;, tula uver his breakfast kippei*. except mat m COUId Ores*, ruHHI would, no doubt, lly Into an ouKs heart in hail the time. raja when he under.NuTB TO AbuVL.—According Mood th..t his ration card enuto a gosdp column, and a poasibc hard-faced men who are lgnorIsd him to one stale egg a ween, nu.sui.ru, Kurouxs favourite ">g 'he starving boy in OxfordMid with hunger at his first companion at all-night gambling street and letting "his consumpsunday lunch, he might try to panics was a courtier called '>ve mother lie on a bed of rotBttetch the entire joint off the Abdul £1 Ahmed Bey bey. 'ing straw,"" are stockbrokers dish, though a sharp rap with He was also the, origin of the" walking to Thread-needle-street. Ing knife over fat knuckles song ... "I Wonder Where My • • • u d teach him that his Uncle's Bey Bey Is Tonight.'' When Hrnrnvko knou.it mnro Oops. Pardon Mc *^tJ*^#y^u£Z plfOM a newspaper cooking ne w ,i| also know mat the atock* rectos*— Di sasters must not only be hardSalad Loaf: Hcmovc crust lurried but pretty hard-up if fi"in sandwich loaf. Cut ihcy have to walk all that way kMgjth-VfsM into four slices, when the p.ace Is crawling wiUt rlna top and bottom buses and taxis. Margarine other two When he has read the facts slices on both sides. Spread and figures of Juvenile delinbotlom slue with miiyonnai.se. quency in Britain, he will undertop with chopped watcrcrest stand that the prostrate woman HUBS. Cover with slice on the straw was probably that is margarincd on both somebody else's mother who was Spread with cream as fit as a flea until the redcheese seasoned with chopped haired boy hit her with a onion*. Cover with other slice home-made cosh, margarined on both sides. • • • • Repeat mayonnaise spread Later, when Cromyko has and salad layer. Cover with lo, become acquainted with Giles's slice, margarine side down, cartoons, he will appreciate that Coat top of loaf with mayo:ithe following Is a truer plctur? nstos. Cut at table Into on.-„f British youth today:— Plu Woman, m a strict believer fair -hares and has no respect (M ( v.l.Fa. At Lee, bavlpfl alreedj >v.ii<-ii his butler ration, he v.ould nave margarine toast, DsOatei peat* and sticky buna, but if be trie i to bSJU UM lot, another rap wlLi •VOOld keep hi ijands in his pocketslly suppcr-llmc he would be too rtSTVOUi <>l .i crack irom Uie knife to res el l lor btj Ihsn •>( bSaM on toast. After Wip g S U 'i dsgpHe his love of the %  Hies, his lingers wou'd ^e too sore to deal a hand at ha'penny nap, the only card game his t'nele Nat can under.: J inch thick slices. O You can have mv slice. In Darkest London N his arrival al Victoria Station, Mr. Andrei GromvEmp'y and wc.iry, he would than bi put to bed In his Uncle'i osV As the bed Uiere ,known as the Hog's BacK, the worn mattress .pnngs make it rise In UU mid^, tnf > ntm Russian Ambasoador. die and slope sharply at either i; ,n -i wish to be acquainted %  ids, he would spend moM of the wlth | he British people." ling out of it. if he has been foxed by M n If he dropped IT to slen,. „,. tl; n p.cpagands, he has s lot ne v.mi d soon be awakened by ( j,. ;irn LotUf ttsa Dsvll Cat, who Jumps For ip^tancf he mav l>eli<.,-e through the open window SOOT m lho B, f i iR t,' ^oy w ho Is the afte, midnight, like Cinderella licr character In "The Ballad In Oxford-street a youngster stands Aged eight, with* bright blue eye. He holds a cosh In either hand To sock the passers-by. Sometime* he has a hand grenade For aunts he cannot bear, One tug. n pause, and then a bang— And auntie Isn't there. L.C.S. OII VlilM S 'IIIE importance of a name has perhaps never been more vividly presented to the :i i'i-iii-the-streel, or more correctly to he man in the theatre or easy chair than by Oscar Wilde. 'ifuTe are persons to whom the exact pcJUng of a name or the correct pro(.[ nciation of a surname or its precise rr.unciation distinguish the man of rellnei it from the brute beast. Barbados as an island has never been fortunate in receiving the homage of men of reflnesnent From the bcKinnin R of its inival as a place name on the Upe Ud maps of civilised man it has experiencd %  variety of nomenclatures. In English lit) ratlin the island is best known as "the '.Lirbadoes" and this picturesque spelling wt s adopted by the press-gangs who helped to recruit English labour for the planta: %  is in the bigh-handed feahion which is m re frequently associated in the minds of readen of romantic novels with the verb shanghai." On maps of the world Barbados has been spelled in many ways, or has been CssOClatad with several place names. I these are "Barbu f the island has undergone many trans' %  •i inations of spelling and geographical tatting at the hands of learned men and women from across the Seas, the names "'f its towns, villages and inhabitants are at the constant mercy of the publishers of newspapers and especially of their employees. English sub-editors on the infrequent occasions when they consider any news emanating from Barbados as suitable lor < rJninuc-ignorant masses of the United Kingdom are not averse to spelling our indent and venerable city of Bridgetown -older than Montreal forsooth — as Hndgton. Worse horrors have occurred. But the newest and strangest of all the alterations which have befallen our historic i tmea waa perpetrated by no leea an organ Of august opinion than — we chronicle it with humility and as an example of the p:ikills which daily best the publishers Of the printed word The Times of London. On August 14. 1952 %  ubecrtbera "f the Times of London reading of a COnii i ce opening on September 9 to Canadian trade with, the West Indies were told that "Dr. Grantlev Adam* and Mr. Coka" were coming over from Barbados. I % %  treat the ruunea and ityli m and Trinin. i Bntativea irectly printed. Ba; \ is not as wall known in London circles as we sometimes fondly imagine. FOR MEN ONLY THE V.M.C.A. came lu Barba_„ ., __ ,t!.-r Ita formation II* CMI*M llllMlt* i; Lo km. Last week the "2*id iDini.li ssmaral meeting mg hssa at Ihe new headquarters in I'uifold Cleanliness Is easily practised in buildings so generously equipped with shuwers toilets and flush viduals less worthy or the | ( .trines. The spacious verandah ption or cUqucs. hking on to the large playing Behind this room is a reading oom and plans are now being made for the establishment there of the library which la presently housed in another room near the rn.nl of 'he building. The "Y" offers several small rooms for use by Barbadian organisations. The Chess Club has permanent premises at the "Y" and so has the Clerks Union. •ven iicdrooms Q^, organisations which have tablemi(d e use of the Y building are Yet despue the apparent com,i e |da compere favourably with I about the Y.M.c.A. to prthens|siioai of the list abova many Barbadian clubs and is people of Barbados might weU "• %  ' %  B DOUbla absence of almost as large as Uie downstairs iCBing *ir.uuimuUier JotKworkvis, street sweeper*, G f the Trinidad Yacht Club. what she has long forgot. warehouse Peelan .nul other Upstairs a large room 1* availI myself am old enough to remanual workers. Since the able for indoor table tennis. member, the Y.M.C.A. as the place Y.U C-A. is o|H-n to all men o' lectures, musical performances, where about sixteen fttia ago I g^-i mogml characur and the amateur theatricals or religious 'Irst learned how to throw a foolsuitst-nption is within the reach gsn rtce i. oall Into m hoop on a lawn of every wurkcr the absence ut where now stand* a luxurious port wortwn* from its m'mbernotoff ear la a show window, ."hip uj parsteularb' noticeable. Today the Y.M.C.A. has crowd ogpecuOy when lh work that ihe road and now owns acres of Uie "Y" noes for the Navy and playing batdi around whtcB < atorrhaei Marine j ; remeinuered aigB wall is bing built. While I was chatting to Mr Will, u Oeoeral Secretnr* In 1930 the Y.M.C^\. had 37d last week, a seaman arrived with aambers. Tadn nsera aro 6JT. %  note from a steamship agent. ..lemoers pay 3U oants .. BUtltl He ami another gfamail had been ftva pn in. I % %  ira RlWaj Open WI behind when their ship ..nd an old *l"g;m "join i' \t ( A. an.i say goodbye lonely evenings" seems aptly m some .f th. Whether ifs billiaid-. wen hi kited u.,sk.t hali, table tennis, reading. Tunis players. A' ,,... it lltl ,i, .,ii,l F-reign Bible Writing, debate*, rellgQOUl study oedrooms not l/adi >n ivty. The (hr Y.M.C'.A. Ig cf especial value A catalogue of what goes on at General Secretary, whose enlhut o cosh boys. These pay onlv 10 J hl Y * what c Y ha t forgetting the fact that a film tagmg an anr f the H f,H '' ,,,,; 1 n-ide in Barbidos with Barbadian with crowning .-.ducliotw actors and adresses would attract ded to show the outo( ( | u type, the unit could use more attentio;i in general than the side world exactly what ere can a j tw thousand feet of film on regular film from overseas. This do In %  tea* poriosmancee and the ^me f the local show* mentioned would be a drawing card and only means of so dome is the p ev ( OUi iy i an d with my sugwould build up box office takings 1 %  -.e. the unit would immensely. !ted Uon would be paid to tho Barbados Film Unit und help to de%  know what is their limit All the pn Kind ions by the Bart !" !" *4 n .„„ %  net -rtth ***> ea^eesssS incurred. It ^ould How much be a kind of 'help yourself system. more would these shows of art Liic a ca Vag l V. C. CANASTA PLAYING CARDS (Complete with Instructions) $2.28 per Set PATIENCE PLAYING CARDS 72? per Set &f ADVOCATE STATIONERY A*U KITCHCN HELPS Iss* g> SKYLINE KITCHEN SETS • FRENCH FRY COTTER — NION A VEO. CHOPPER • COFFEE MILLS & MINCERS In Three Slses 0 EGG WHISKS — ELECTROPLATED TEA STRAINERS • DRAIN RACKS — ASBESTOS STOVE MATS C. S'. PITCHER & CO. Ph. 4472 TO OUR PLANTER AND TRADER FRIENDS You can now obtain A MONEY INSURANCE POLICY which will afford you cover against loss of money whilst intranslt between your premises and tho Bank (or other destination), or vice versa; also whilst in locked safes. • Our Agents will be pleased to give you full particulars and sdvlee. DA COSTA & CO.. LTD AGENTS DANB0LINE roofing painter Ideal for the protection of iron, steel and galvanised roofing under the moot arduous service conditions. Made with fast-to-llght pigments In Red. Tropical Green and Aluminium. Danbollne dries with a flexible glossy surface. Ask our agents for particulars. fttiiiltred K T/ Maik '!s*tA"i'/tfr//r>Mfrf<'-'//r/tt/.> Cj/Mrrfy j(m AGENTS DA COSTA & CO., LTD. COMMISSION DEPARTMENT. Vomvl l.i'l's fji-t u Itiint-r A "GOLD BRAID COCKTAIL m lOOt W*S UFf ATTEK A LONG SH\ BXTIi



PAGE 1

SUNDAV. AUGUST 24, 19SJ SUNDAI UIVO) fAGE FTVK Olympic Sports Quiz MOON. Hou closely Jid you follow ih.Oivmpic Games! H qiiC. semii gi^ti match, but College Wfto won llic Champiouhhlp Cup earlier in the season, allowed Y M I' ( Maine took and this helped to -i great extent in then del In the final College < were seen at their besl and em• lie skllfuj ti tntt-m;iiK>euvte their Op) !•! %  .! %  ] % % %  .,:, \ K Hall. J. Best •md C. V'< [ve played . ma preJ %  em In case a substitute *H called ror. A presentation Match will M pla>vd on Thursday night i.x 8 PA when IIL Kx.ell.iu, SI Alfred Savage %  %  present the tropbjas, Following this, there will be weekly practice matches In praparatlon for the ci-nilng tour ol the Trinidad team. Carlo-Bears in October. AUG. 24 — NO. 238 The Topic of Last Week THE TEAM which represented Jamaica at tSe'RynipUm (Bi.k row) La Beach, McKenley, Faroes*, Lain*. (Front row) Miles. Wlnt. Mac Donald i>. Yanccy , Papp of Hungary who won a gold medal at Wembley In 1048, won the final of the LUlbt middleweight QMteet 5. a—o. S. Johansson of Sweden in the final of the heavyweight division. 7 Colonel H M. Uewellyn, Colonel D. N. Stewart and Mr W. H. White. B J. Boiteux (France) 400 metres free-style. 9. U.S.S.R. The score was 38—25. D. N. MrKenley (Jamaica). 1. Right. His times were 14 min. 6.8 sees, 29 mins 17 sees and 2 hrs. 23 mins. 19.2 sect. R Mockridge (Australia). He won tha 1,000 metres time trial and with I.. Cox the 2.000 metres tanden. 13. The women Javelin throwing. She set up a new Olympic record with a distance of 105 ft. 7 Ins. The United States won 5 Gold medals for boxing. They were fly-weight, llght11 14 John Cobb Begins Trials Tuesday LONDON John Cobb, ho.ucr oi Bag Land speed rvcoru of -HM.zu mj.,,.. o.gina iu.Hi August _ii at i-i'... oUand, with bis Jepowtarad apetM ooal CnaWdasT. if uiey ,.rc succewlul, Cubu will make an immediate aitcmpi on the water *p*d record, currently Held by the American F. Sayrea, who reached 178.49. live WCCKS ago. The Super-Streamlined Crusa der embodies a revolutionary hull dtalgi. and power plant. From a birdseyc view U look: like some aeedlc-pointed fuiuristic racing car with Jet intakes forward of the cockpit. It will be shown publicly for the first time August 22 at Kingston-on-Thames. London's boating suburb, and then be hauled 500 miles to famous Loch Nes* in the Scottish Highlands. Powered by a Ghost jet engine. similar to those fitted in Comet airliners, the Cru-ader has ba*n built with two pencil-shaped outriggers each fitted to the hud by twin spars to give high later*' stabilityThe design was base! on an idea given Cobb by Raid ItsIIton who worked on Cobb record-breaking car. Aerodynmic as much as hydraulic facto. were considered. The 31ft speed boat is built nly and aluminium alloy, spar '3 fee* nd. in running trim. weighs iust over three ton. F< • possible emergency braking :' high speed, an exnerinvn' form of parachute drogue hbeen fitted. —UK.S. weleht, middleweight, light heswwelgh. and heavyweight. 15. J. Davis .U.S.A.I in th. heavyweight welghtlifUnK 16. Hungary 17. India II. The United States of AmerBARBADOS liFAl TJONIQAD J the %  from South Trinidad l.v Hi; lait nighl A I Trinidad i-.m Bghi hard b > atra DO their tnw. Shimlin;: Hilton Tucker Tops •IT1MO his tongue, Frankie Symone displays tha form that brought him .the Junior marbles championship at the Illinois State Fair tn Sprh afield. Frank won over a large field of contestant! 43 Enter For Canadian Long Distance Swim TOKONTO, Aug. 20. An impressive list of 43 men from Canada, the United States Sweden and Egypt wa* drawn up on Wednesday for the world"championship long distance swim at the Canadian National Exh.. i' Una on Friday. An ctrly favourite, on the batata of practice workouts, was George Gevan of Etobicoke, Ontario. : who is reported to have beaten unofficially by about three minutes. tl.e fifteen -year-old ri.-co.-u nf 4 hours 19 mins. 28 sees. Another top contender w.ts i artU WaarJa, Bwadlab d'.tance champion who finished sixth in the London Daily M„l! English Channel swim last year A aoBipatltiTa iwfaavav 'r '8 VJ tr e L being trained by Georges Michele, veterar. who finished second Ul the Inaugural 21-mlle swim In 1921. Other ene 'anw indaded the three-man gyptian team of Hassan Abou Bakr. Ahdel Latif und Said V Araby—UT. cores Mllto.. Tuckei i. i nred will 100-th. -t *hr ininiiiture ranga al tha Drl Hall yesterday avanfoj l A ; Koberts was second with 99 PUl .,. in,, rompetiti-ir^ whn % %  'ill !• held from September 21 10 September 27. the atfendnnre '-as peally Improviyl nnd some members are hoping that it will -ontinue to Improve. The >i..y*. practice nhoot will take part on Wdneada> nieht August [In. i. roqoWS: M G Tucker ion T A |. Holwrts 99, A. S. Warren 99 L W Hawell 98, V Chase 97, P A. D R'aTSiSiiiV M SCOREBOARD ., • Wnm Page 4 ..;';'?* %  •' *" Mhm b r a ble tcnnl In tins teal bul the l< kai aad A. Moolhua play%  • %  I H %  21 IS, 21—15,; 19 .. playei won all gam. i .'1 W. 21 -U. who played against him '.suing his Foi Barbados N Gill \; tpunaa at Una -tyie and gave a i • nd control. %  %  BlM .-tw.1 <;,-K| Ut4 h. ip %  BMl avet A i.ai.in lull ml durh %  II '.I Or %  awe ""-ni b> bieakgaat I*-l ><-llnl mil UM MSM* 1. 1 I riii. Ulw Ihi. little o.lri Il,i lease of well-being t.mClkl '* w • ,com •d b T ^ >^ ,i f <>ee 12 000docion edeantMu t— -2^-2/ at Graa) Brium tiara m n n da aanjM -I fesan. coJdt. bsidichsi. loothscha. '^"Mim. "euril(i|—tlm wonderful sew ipecific bnn|i row tm.nil quieh KaDal Irom ill ol ehsm torn lulls, foti csn bap H m two-ublet envelopes %  e ugh to brln| qukk reli4 from a boa* of pam Or m handy lOtiblM t ••. Or m SO-tabln bOfdai—k* e* • el lhct HI fow houw ARM YOURSELF AGAINST PAIH GCr AHACIN' TODAY 1 a ii IwHi il>Ma t.i>flar IN immt AHaOlt Cc 1s, Coughs )re Throats Bronchitis For quick, iure relief rub THERMOGENE Medtcated Rub all over your cheit. throat and back. Its healin| warmth relieves congeitlon. and breathing 'he pleatant medic nal vapour it givi off clean note throat and lungs MM M BMai Saiaa. i-h.in haat C. Goodlng 21 — 19. 19—21, 21—18. 21—6. K. Assing lost to N. fllll 21 — 18, 18—21, 14—21, 20—22 Dr N. S.irknr I-at B. Murrav XI—18 .'i I) H, ,\ Mend* lo I (a i< PI niips. 19—ai 18 11 21—IT, 11—10 2V Wil' Shields 10—21 L0r :B 2i %  %  %  %  %  %  I ,h Kir i i mm %  ... %  %  i %  n lli-y all .*rnptxl sponaord by J & R BAKERIES makers of ENRICHED BREAD .ind the blenderi of J & R RUM DOUBL CTION THERB )GENE MEDIC > ED RUB In big glass j. ToUl ((or S wkb' in i OIX.I %  vi PJ -. -IO I.I.1)11 ,, *l 'OI4 H.l IIMUUSON C'OI.IJUlB 1MT ISSM i I Hope ll.w I. Ilrn.hri y Tudor e Btookr. b W',,. .11 r Smlil. ilpd iv. <;, „|. 1, •) Tout ilor 1 >.i lea. They won the Interoal 0 metre class and the International 3 5 metres class. 19. The women's high Jump won by Mrs. Ester brand! of South Africa. 20. The single sculls'rowing. >'•!! Ol wlrfc.1. 1 -1. t a. leg, iei. 7 II HOW1.INU 4SAI.VI> (I M I II-.--.. IT ft I 'I Outran, 10 — 3 %  ; AH' 1. 11 1 < I Fam.rr 1/ 1 SJ2JX". 1 \ I. Murrv I — SERVE "" Mobiloil New SuperDetergent Formula Asanres UM ENGINE WEAK .• LE8B OIL OON8UMF.D .\*' HOIB IDLE* PER GALLON OF OABOUKE fP IN SENSATIONAL NEW RADIO ACTIVE TRACER TESTS Use of radio-active tracers from the Oak Ridge atomic pile—a btaxUing new and reliable method -measures the wear reducing qualities of MOBILOIL with new super-detergent formula Radioactive piston rings are installed in teat engines 'Hot" metal particles, worn off the rings Into the motor oil are then measured by Oelger counters and electronic recording devices. Compared with other high quality heavy-duty motor oils, afOBILOILl saow an almost unbeUeTesble cot In costly engine PROVE IT YOURRELT LESS ENGINE WEAR LESg OIL CONSUMED MORE MILES PER GALLON OF QASOLXlfB Tee Tear Next Oil Change. INSIST ON Mobiloil ATLAS PAINTS combin. ...1,..:, >nd economical protection with splendid decorative finish. Sugar Estate Managers, Engineers, Building Contractors. 1 Architects, specify ATLAS raaerCA, o-o. ***** gjaar*!, PAINTS PRODUCED IN ENGLAND BY THE MAKERS OF "ATLAS A" WOOD PRUIRVATIVB j Deioiii avoilablt frarr H. JASON JONES a CO LTD.. PO Bo* Ml. Bsrbadoi. "The Greatest Name in Motor Oils" GARDINER AUSTIN CO LTD ATLAS TROPICAL iinivn.ni.n nwoiin %  vv LIU m i Its best to UUL| Platignum PENS from $ 1.00 to $1.32. BAU-POIMTS $1.08 (Rof,lls 36C,• M/mje^tmt/mmtf^^t. -'V£ CO. ITO.. EITH. KENT, INGLANt C. L. PITT & Co., Ltd—Agent.. R. M. JONES & CO,. LTD-Agents


——E

wholly owned
Standard Oil
Jersey, both named as defendants,
said that its prices have always
been “competitive” and “have not
been
against by any of the countries or
customers involved.

suits included Socony Vacuum Oil
Company
wholly owned subsidiary the So-
cony-Vacuum Overseas
Company, the Standard Oil Com-
pany, California, and four subsid-

iaries owned jointly with the Mr. A. E. V. Barton, Secretary
Bolten tenis bP ot pen of the West India Committee, told |
Caltex. Oceanic Limited . the the Advocate yesterday that the,
California=Texas Oil Company Committee is not merely a London |
Limited, and the East Cadre Sales |OP® Bor & remote. body, hut _ 3
Company “Ibody to quite a considerable ex-
Ye tent, composed of people living in

6é 2 e799 the West Indies; hence the first}
‘Dumping Oil thing ‘to remember is that the!

24 hours after the Senate’s small |the West India Committee
business committee made public Mr, Barton arrived here at}
the Mutual Security Agency memo |midday yesterday from England}

which said that four United States
firms were receiving “exorbitant”
prices for Middle East oil shipped
to Europe at the same time that
they were “dumping oil” on the
United States
prices.

al James P. McGranery said that
the Mutual Security Agency re-
ferred the cases for court action
after the companies refused to re-
fund oyerharges, He i
ation is of great i

only because of the
which the Governmen
recover,
whether the defendants, having
control over the supply of Middle
East crude oil
countries participating in the For-
eign Aid Programme,
the efforts of Government agen-
cies to vrotect government funds |
committed
and defence,

gress defined in the Foreign Aid
laws a policy to limit prices on
items
Standards were developed in ac-
cordance with those laws, declar-
ing that oil shipments to Marshall
Plan nations should be priced no
higher than comparable sales by
the same
port market price where the crude ; tary of the Sugar Producers’ Asso-
oil was produced.

camps.

of Panmunjom in the hope that

and to-m crow the French were





ESTABLISHED 1895



prwty

Over $67,
; ¢ NEW YORK, Aug. 23.

CHARGES that four major oil companies and six of |
their subsidiarizs had overcharged the United States for |
oil for Foreign Aid have been made by the Government. |
The charges were contained in suits filed by the Govern-|
ment in the United States’ District Court here late yes-,
terday. The suits seek to recover more than $67,000,000. |
The firms were accused of using their subsidiaries to main-|
tain a “two-price system” where under the Economic Co- |
operation Administration and Mutual Security Agency)
were charged too much for Middle Bast oil sent to Marshall |
Plan nations.

The Texas Company, one of the four major United |
States’ oil companies, denied the charges. They said thai!
their operations abroad were: “in the best interests of the |
United States and its citizens as well as of the foreign

countries involved.” | f

The Esso Export Corporation,
subsidiary of the
Company of New

WI. Cttee.
| Secretary

Visits Here
BACKGROUND TO W.I.

Supply {

PROBLEMS WANTED

questioned or protested

“Other companies named in the

Incorporated and_ its

problems of the members of the;

The suits were filed here oniy|West Indies are the problems of

by the S.S. Golfito and is a guess
the

at Ocean View Hotel.

On
‘

market at lower

In’ Washington Attorney Gener-




but also as a test of

shipped to the

ean block

te European recovery

“The contend that Con-

suits





bought for Foreign Aid.

Mr, A. E. V. BARTON

board to meet him were Hon'ble
G. D. L, Pile, Hon'ble H. A, Cuke

supplier and the ex-jand Mr. R. G, Mandeville, Secre-

ciation,

—U.P. @ on page 16



Special Meeting On
War Prisoners Called

PANMUNJOM, Aug. 23.
United Nations Korean armistice staff officers turned
over to the Communists the list of 13 redesignated prisoner-
of-war camps in South Korea. The list was handed to the

Reds at a special meeting of Liaison officers called by the

Allies.

Major-General Haydon L, Boatner, Commander of

U.N. war prisoners camps had announced the redesignation

of the camps five days ago, but this was the first time Com-

munists had been notified officially.

Boatner had emphasized that -
the changes were entirely admin-|
istrative and would facilitate’
communication and supply to)
Koje Island, scene of thea recent
Red prisoner riots and mainland
The announcement said
the change in camps was made
effactive on August 17. i

Colombian Army officers visit-
ed Panmunjom and Munsan to-|

day as part of Eighth Army|
Commander Gen@ral James A,!
Van Fileet’s new policy of

acquainting foreign troops fight-!
ing in Korea with armistica nego-
tiations.

Van Fleet’s idea was to give
foreign troops a first hand glimpse

it would give United Nations
fighting men a better understand-
ing of the truce talks. Repre-
sentatives from the Philippine
battalion took the tour yesterday

scheduled to be shown around. ,
ur.



475,000 COAL MINERS |
ON 10DAYSMEMORIAL |

HOLIDAY
PITTSBURGH, Aug. 23. |

A ten-day “memorial holiday”
began to-day for 475,000 coal min- °
ers on the orders of John L
Lewis, their Union President. ‘
Lewis ordered the men out of
the pits in tribute to fellow min-
ers who had died or been maimed
in mine disasters during the past

ten years.

The short lay-off was not ext
pected to deliver a paralyzing blow
to the industry. Since two week






ends and a labour day holida; A MENDE suth Trinidad) ex
during the period eI Table Ter t which
out only five working days. Phillips ¢ won the game

000,000

Barbados won at

Sunday Advocat



BARBADOS, AUGUS'" 24, 1952



se nn ee

Suits Filed For |

DELEGATES to the third
meeting of the Regional Labour
Board: Left to Right:

Major E. H Grell (St. Kitts-
Nevis); C. C. Low-a-Chee (An-
tigua); G. H. Scott, O.B.E.
(Jamaica); C. Greaves Hill
(Central Labour Organization) ;
F. C. Catchpole, O.B.E, (Dep.
Chairman); Sir George Seel,
K.C.M.G. (Chairman); R. G.
Roe (Sec.); 8S. .Hochoy, O.B.E
(Trinidad); N. Pearson (W.
Islands); R. N. Jack (Barba-
dos).



RED CONGRESS
WILL INDICATE

RuUSSIA’S POLICY| {J} K Unkind |

By DONALD J. GONZALES
WASHINGTON, Aug, 23.
High diplomatic officials said on
Saturday, that by October 11th
the world should have some hints

_of the future course of Russia’s

internal and foreign policies. They
believe the nineteenth Commun-
ist Party Congress, opening in

| Moscow on October 5, will indi-

cate changes for pe@ace or war
with Communism and who even
tually will take over Josef Stalin's
all powerful mantle.

The first party congress in thir.

te@n years also may see some of!
Stalin’s old line comrades retired!

or shifted to minor jobs, they said
to make way for younger and
more agysressive officials. The
200,000,000 Russian people
themselves will be
moves that will affect their daily
lives in years ahead. One thing
they can expect for sure is more
overtime work to meet new pro-
duction goals set by Kremlin lead-
ers in the name of 6,000,000 party
members,

Alter the meeting opens tha
party faithful in satellite coun-
tries will be tuned into radio Mos-
cow to get reports on speeches
that will develop a new code to
the Communist law. A statement
of some of the new measures that
will be rubber stamped by some
2,000 congress delegates already
have been released by the Soviet
hierarchy.

DEA{H DUE TO
NATURAL CAUSES

Dr. K. B. Simon who perform-
ed a post mortem examination on



the body of Lulia Brathwaite of
Dalkeith, Christ Church,

at the
Public Mortuary yesterday morn-
ing, attributed death to natural
causes, namely gastro enteritis.

Brathwaite was taken to the
Mortuary from her home where
she died suddenly.

FORE-HAND SMASH

ecuting a forehand smash in hi



19—21



looking for ,





REGIONAL LABOUR HOARD

:



U.N.’ INFANTRY DIG
INTO “BUNKER HILL”? \Begin Landing

SEOUL, KOREA, Aug. 23.

United Nations infantrymen dug in deeper on their
hard-won prize “Bunker Hill” as an ominous quiet hung
over most of the Korean battlefront.
who sacrificed more than 3,000 men in futile attempts to

Chinese Communists,

take the hill last week, showed no signs of making another

costly assault.
movement toward “Bunke
quickly thrown back.

To U.S. On
Mid-East

NEW YORK, Aug. 23.

Neéwspapers’ editorialized on
Saturday that “it is understand-
able if our British friends con-
cluded their military activities in
the Middle East because it became
too much of a drain upon their
overburden treasury. But they
are being less than kind when
they seek to unload these liabili-
ties on good old Uncle Sam by
labelling them “Middle Eastern
Command”.

That is what Field Marshal Sir
William Slim, Chief of Staff of
the British Army is trying to do.
On his visit tc General Ridgway’s
headquarters in Paris, Marshal
Slim said that there has been a
Mid East Command for the past
fifty years and “not a bad one
either.” But said it should now
become an allied command be-
cause “we don’t want to carry the
baby all the time”.






is trying to switch the labels on
his babies, Britain’s Mid East
Command consists of British gar-
risons in the Suez, Sudan, Malta,
Cyprus, Iraq and the British sub-
sidized Arab legion in Jordan,
But this is one time the bulwark
of British colonialism cannot be
made the Middle Eastern Com-
mand simply by changing its name
and having Unele Sam pick up
the cheque instead of Britain,

To most people, the Mid East
colonialism is a greater evil than
Communism, The Middle Eastern
Command which did not represen.
governments of the Middle East
would be regarded. therq as no-
thing more than the re-inforce-

ment of colonialism —U.P.



against R. Phillips in the third

The trouble is that Sir wits.

the Tehachapi

Their last thrust yesterday, the first Red

r Hill” in several days; was

B -ewhere ) rain, end clouds

covered of the battlefront
limiting to minor patrol
clashes. ited States Sabre jets

damaged o Communist MIG
15 « late yesterday in a ten-minute
deg fight south of Suiho reservoir
ir North Korea, Six Sabres had
| , waked ten MIGs near Sinuiju
@trliiee but made no claims.
| The Sth Airforce announced in

, its weekly summary, that three|

Communist MIGs were destroyed



seven days. The toll pushed Red
| jet casualties to 62 planes for the]
month, They said that the Rus-
sian-made jets have knorked!
down only one United States jet
in August. However, ground fire
and “unknown causes” cest the
| Allies six war planes this week.
{ Meanwhile United Nations
| planes kept pressure on th Com-
; munists with day and night raid

| on both coasts of North Korea,
Tha airforce said that the week's

| biggest strike along the 155-mile United Electrical Worker

| front was the destruction of oa
munitions factory at Nakwon,
near the Yalu River. During four
| days of the week these typhoons
‘didn’t slow down operations. in
| Korea, Allied planes from fields
and carriers hurled 4,120 separate
sorties at Communist targets.



'

{

From Recent — !

B.N.A. Flag Day |

The Babados Nurses Associa- |
tion collected $595.26 from their
recent Flag Day, Of. this $402.58
was collected in St. Michael,
$170.83 in Christ Church and
$22.26 from other receipts,

Flag Day expenses
$37.82. Miss E. Gibson
Association told the
that if they had had more collec-
tors, more would have been re-
ceived.



totalled
of

In Broad Street, $139.88 was
collected, $74.38 in offices, and
$66.50 from passersby along the

Street,





nn

Oil Companies Said To Have Overcharged

and six damaged during the past|

uP.|

($595.26 Collected

the;
Advocate |



U.S. Troops

“ e
ad ‘al ‘
Exercises
LA ROCHELLE, France
Aug. 23,

U.S. troops began a week-long
exercise in landing and disem-
barking men and material nlong

France’s Atlantic coast. Simul-
taneously Regional Communist
Party officials sent out instruc-

tions to waterfront workers to

refuse to handle any cargoes or
equipment used in the mano-
euvres, United States army am-

phibious craft and shallow draft
vessels were taking part in the
exercise which will employ newly
worked out methods for fast load-
ing and unloading of cargoes.
The manoeuvres will simulate
conditions that would be carried
out by the emergency arrival of
men and supplies to help defend
Europe tn case of aggression, as
well as disembarkment, Although
it was a United States show, staff
officers from other North Atlantic
Pact forces were prasent
ervers,—f



ws ob-



Utzion Officials

ry So End Strike
CHICAGO, Aug

International H
Farm

23.

rvester
Equipment
Inde-
moved in
the strike

The
Company and
pendent Union official:
an attempt to end
which has idled about 25,000 in
three State Federal Concilia-
tor Jay Oliver said that the union
and the management have agreed
to méet Wednesday in an
attempt to reach a contract agree-
ment,

It will be the first meeting since

on

union member walked out at
eight plants after their contract
expired at midnight on Wednes-
day. The Union has been
indapendent ince its expulsion
from the CIO because of its al-|
ledged le‘tist” leadings.—U.P. |
Kk am * ") |

rance To Import |

Meat From Uruguay |

PARIS, Aug, 23. |
France will import 5,000 tons |
of frozen beef from Uruguay and

an equal amount of fresh beef
from other Europ@an countries |
during three months of 1952. The

decision was taken

an Inter-ministerial
at which Premier
presided. The
imports, were

ordered for
August and

yesterday by
conference,
Antoine Pinay |
amounts of beef
the ame as those
the period of July,
September.—wU.P.

West Protest Killer's Body Found

1 ‘ e
To Russia
BERLIN, Aug. 23.
| The Western Allies in_ three

| Similar notes to General Vassily
Chuikov. Soviet C ommander
Eastern Germany, charged Russia
| with obstructing inter-zonal trade

| to divide Germany completely.
| Allied notes rejected Chuikov’s

STOCKHOLM, Aug. 23.
Tha body of Tore Hedin, 25, a
former policeman wanted for

| questioning in the death of eight

| persons in southern Sweden, was
found at the bottom of Bosarp
Lakq@ in Seania County. Police
Superintendent Alf Eliason said
that the body of Hedin was found
about 25 yards from the spot
his boat, which

| with a load of

' July 30 charge that the West waa!

violating the New York and Paris

! agreements for lifting the block-!

| ade of West Berlin,
| —U-P.



; and communications in an attermpt/ where the police yesterday found\
had been sunk
stones

had combed the

|
Earthquake Shakes
|. Celifornia

| DAKERSFIELD, California, |
Aug. 23.
| Another earthquake rattled

Southern California on Saturday
| as Bakersfield listed its dead at 2
and its damage at $100,000,000 dug
;out of the wreckage left by
| Priday’s bomb-like tremor
Southern California was shaken
at 10.10 a.m. G.M.T. another
of series of “after shocks” which
have occurred at inter Is sinc

quake three day

by



ago,
—U,P

j #erk killer chopped four
» to death with an axe and set fires

The
wooded
Seania all

police
wuthery
yesterday

province’ of
after a ber-
persons

in which four others died,
The crime was described by the
police as one of the bloodiest in

modern European history. As the

news of the gory rampage pread
through the towns and villages
af Scania, many parents refused
to allow their children to go to
school and many doors were lock-
ed and barred.—UwU.P.



Argentine Central Bank
May Grant





Import Licences
BUENOS AIRES, Aug !
The Argentir Cer | j
said it will consider
censes ¢ nport fa)
shemic
ly signed by anti U.P

eats aoeneaiecastiie A

CEOS SSO SSS S












PRICE : SIX CENTS

.

W.L Workers
Succeed In U.S.

SATISFACTORY reports on the efficiency
duct of the West Indian agricultural workers
United States were among the matters Hrought to tl
tention of the Regional Labour Board which m:
the past week at Hastings House, Barbacd
chairmanship of Sir George Seel, K.C.M.G., Comptroll
for Development and Welfare.

In the course of its discussions, the Board }





detail the existing arrangements for the well-be I
West Indian agricultural workers Among rece sReLO
ments in this direction has been the setting uj hole

centre in Miami early in the year under the direction o!
Mr. Anstey Jacques of Grenada.

The Board confirr
Karthquake






centre has been of great
to West Indians in trans © ar
from the United States 1









jally approved its establis nt
e F | The statement regarding ttt
~~ gener: success of West ind
Buries Four eves, ss.e, Wet nae
e o ed in report by Mr ¢
In California [oe 088 oe 3
viser to the Comptrolle ind My
S. Hochoy, 0.B.} I our Con
BAKERSFIELD, California, missioner for Trinidad i
Aug. 23. spected the headquarters of the
Searching parties poked through] Central Liaison Officer Wash-
the rubble of shattered buildings|ington at the beginnir the yea
for four persons beli¢ved buried} and also visited sore e camps
by a bomb-like earthquake that|of West Indian workers in dilfer-
crumbled Bakersfield business/ent parts of the United States
district, Another earthquake rip-
pled across Southern California Changes Recommended
early today, shaking some resi- In the course of its report, this
dents of Los Angeles out of their]/two-man committee expressed it
sleep. satisfaction with the work of the
The second tremor was much]joOrganisation, and re‘ommended
lightdr than the devastating jolt|that certain changes hould be
th whip-eracked through Bak-| made with a view to improving Its

ersield yesterday afternoon, rip-
ping

co

hospital facilities.
hit Los Angeles at 3.10 am. It





effectiveness: In particular, it was
proposed that the post of Deputy
Chief Liaison Officer should be
filled on a permanent basis as
as possible, and that, in view of
the great distances that have to be
traversed by the Liaison Officers



the
llepsing

fronts
roofs

from buildings,
and = crippling
Today’s quake

soon

+ felt as a series of small shakes





over a period of about 30 seconds. |!

The tremor was not felt here al-| in visiting the various camps, their

though it was noticed 60 miles;MuUmber should be inereased dur-

away in Lancaster, There were] ing the crop seasons, —

no reports of damage from the eee auopred th ea Art

second earthquake, mendations and reeorded fu

“ confidence in Mr, Herb -Mac-

Hospital Damaged donald, O.B.E Chief ,Liaison

Authorities said that 18 build-

@ on page 16

ings would have to be rebuilt in-

el
eri

000, and a hotel.
the latest in a long series of trem- ;
ors following in the wake of a

k

in nearby Arvin and. Tehchapi|

ig 26, Kern County Gen- m
vl Hospital, yelaad st 690,000. Caradian War
Veterans Parade

ier” quake that took 13 lives!





‘ h- TORONTO, Aug. 2°
and caused Considerable damage! poer War veteFans “old
re last July 21, from the first big one” seriousls

One of the worst problems fac<}),\nded younger men of the |
ing the city was the shortage of, and

ho
qu

Kern
containing
$3,000,000 worth of damage. Yes-

ter
ott
ad
ho
50
an
Jo.

32,807 population,

Sa
er
in

south, tore huge cracks in walls)" more planned to watch
and tumbled tons of bricks, plast-

er,

Wuch of the damage wag to bulld-
ings damaged in the July 21 shoe, | “Canada Year” |

CSS

6696S CPO OSSS

LLCS

44,4
-

GOSS

SOSOF

4,

POSSSSOS96S

1
youngster fresh
Korea shined medals and squar
shoulders on Saturday to take
pert in the Warriors Bay Parac
at the Canadian National Exhib!-
tion

spital

facilities, The July 21!
ake

knocked out part of the
County General Hospital,
400 beds, and did



w



day quake demolished
ler wing of the hospital, In] The
dition to quake injuries the wing through the city nd
spital Is caring for more than { 10 exhit ition on Saturd ter
victims of sldeping sickness, | oon and w nd up t th gran
illness now crippling San! & . aedias Sonor

f re : n ind where Brigadier J i M
aquin Valley, The city hag ®/ Rockingham the fir t Canad:

Commander in Korea, waited to
The tremor which was telt in| #ke the salute
cramento 250 miles north cf} Seme 10,000 veterans
‘e, but passed almost unnoticed |“ 4 regular forces were e>
Los Angeles only 100 miles! take part. Another thousand
from
stands in wheel-chai in hospital
streets, | cots or shakily on canes,
One of the biggest ex

the
annual parade



militia
pected

, and debris into the



hibit
oftici





rmed Forces of Canada
—UP.

as the “A
u.P.|

999949 9906566666666660464 O53 O66,.66 606 66664 COS
% 4 ; * eres
PPOLPDLPGPP PPC OOOO ILL X OLeeS >>

WINE can give x
so much pleasure to %
dining and entertaining %

but it isn’t any more
complicated than servings ¢

| tea or coffee. %






® QUALITY %
® DISTINCTION 3
® FLAVOUR %

Try serving Sherry to your guests $>
before dinner — slightly chilled. And %
add this K.W.V. Paarl to your -soups %
and other food for a new and distinct $$
| flavour, You will be delighted with %

| the results! §
>
rey 8
}

oJ

>

&

>

>

@ ® e x

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j ° ” x
“The Wine of All Jime ¥
K.W.V. Sherry, Brandy, and Table Wines %

LLL ESSSSS SS SSSSSS SSS SSS SSS SS OSS SSSI FOS OOPS
SUNDAY ADVOCATE

















So i ee | M" GEORGE AMOS, formerly

MAKE THES A BR. 4 VE f | i Private Seevetars to Sur

’ , Pea Y ro aed 4 Sovernay of

} arbados, returned from England

SATURDAY OCTOBER 4th esterday in the Golffte where he
| | spent a holiday.

| He met Sir Hilary and Lady

rad } Blood in London and had dinner

with them and Sir Hilary said

c th he hopes to have a Iéok at

+ Barbados in the near future.
|

































































Preston FOSTER &

“WHIRLWIND RAIDERS”
Charles STARRETT

‘he Modern Dress Shoppe

Broad Street.

UNION STATION
a Ontong Friday

INSIDE THE WALLS
OF FOLSOM PRISON



Recital of Sacred Music
On Surday. 24th August 5
At 4.30 p.m.



xon Charm
Coming Fri:

RETREAT | HELL

=





fa
poUBT See
PPSPSPESSPDDVSSOD SOSES AS SECOSSS OO Oe



ot

Fo

' 1 rm FOR SUNDAY, AUGUST 24, 1952 | Leuble Wedding At
I tae icc ee a i | St. Matthias
10 he n which yo irtuday ¢ os a * —
ee a ee ie accordiah oie we, T. MATTHIAS CHURCH was
y ——— ¥ . . the seene of a double wed-
| HP { * ARIES : ibrations from most planets t + ding yesterday afternoon af 4.00
ut j Bie) i? ' March 2?—April 2¢ oul trike’ a responsive chord i o'clock. The parties were ‘he
i charitable nature, urge you to aid Misses Fleurette Kinch and Bar-
@ JAZZ BANDS ' neighbour and the unfortunate + bara Kinch daughters of Mr. and
FRAME, - 2965 { * * Mrs. Ernest Kinch of “Marlow”
{ I oss a is ee widest ite Hastings.
@ STEEL BANDs j * ee E : ; eee Bho tad: ee Oa The ceremony which was fully
e : i. = { Bey SY es vine t6 dak ae dane eae aaa choral was performed by the
® SIDE SHOWS i x ee shane ee Rev. Canon Harvey Reed. Mr.
: i , , { “s ie Alister Anthony Lee, son of the
You can’t afford to miss 4 : + * ¥ late Brigadier Ernest Alister Lee
this Shaw j GEMINI! Yeu born on the borderline nf the two R.A., and Mrs. E. A, Lee cf 3020
% stay 2i--tune 1 & faurus and Caneer (on either side o Foul Bay Road. Victoria, B.C.,
Admission by Ticket oniy ’ * * ini) bad better think wice before you Canada took as his bride Miss
; H+ a ‘as woe ee. . Gomini ean Barbara Kinch, elder sister, and
~ PQS "ORY Wty Wore.» she wore a dress of bridal satin,
ain * * eut on princess style with a
xo °PLLL®RPPEPPE LCE PPP APA CANCER This is a most auspicious time in which to chantilly lace yoke, sleeves and
R ~ ~ ¥ | * June 22—July 23 do things you have wanted to for ame 7s a long flowing train. Her finger
$ THE B (RBADOS 9 | time, But fit things in amicably for tip veil of nylon net was held in
% ik& - ¥ | Avoid personal friction. place by a lace i cap a
: ‘ med with flowers. e carri a
HOTEI - : % ¥% * * * * * Seniand of white orchids and
~ “hu f [ LEO Generally fine vibrations, but so have many tube reses,
* invit } July 24—Aug. 22 others.now,—and there will likely be ny Miss Fleurette Kinch was mar-
invites you to the suggestions on what to, and what N to, . oar a Proverbs, son of
‘ BE “4 me ‘On B 3) do, Be your congenial self; careful too! * by ag An oe eS
— “* WY,
* “Marathon”, Rockley Terrace and
. ad ‘ : i j ara i ji
x ERS : BALL ¥ Stop, look, listen—eonsider well all pro- a she wore a on of mee ones
* at PARADISE BEACH CLU ; VIRGO positions. Don’t be hasty making up your with a close fitting bodice, long
% on SATURDAY September 6, es - til } Aug. 23—Sept. 23 mind; note in what direction others lean. sleeves and an appliqued neck-~-
° BEACHCOMBER DRESS p.m. until—? * In pastimes, co-operate; in duties, the same, line and very full skirt ending in
‘ R 0: Tickets $1.50 a flowing train, Her finger tip
‘ | This day ealls for—some work, rest, travel, veil of nylon net was he in
A One-Week holiday for sept ee g3 something non-routine. Conserve ener * place by a juliet cap trimmed
adi "these days; be relaxed in mind, too, Don with daisies. She carried a bou-
2 People at the - - - | forget church. F quet of white orchids and tube
ah mM - roses.
o ; : They were attended by Miss
SANTA MARIA HOTEL % * Don’t tax mind and body with too many Nanette Kinch and Miss Sheila
: ei SCORPIO iffairs; on other hand, remember carefully Tryhane as_ bridesmaids and
GRENADA % * Oct. 244--Nov. ?2 your obligations. Church seivices and they wore similar dresses of nile
FREE Air Ticket x fonahly _S FIRST list. green ballerina length i ee
ir licKets — % eyelet organdy over a
%
’ = >) RIU ‘Tomorrow’s excellent aspect of your Jupi- skirt of nylon sheer featuring a
Courtesy of B.W.LA. X% * ars a ter urges you get some minor details out + ight bodice with neck and sleever
FREE A i % “9 . of the way for the coming ‘week’s bigger embroidered with seokoent et
EE ecommodation » * matters. dering. They ‘carr white
x * * * + lambs 1 ffs with daisie
Q ambs wool muiis
and Meals x 4 Be prompt and neat without being finicky ind headdresses to match.
M > oth vonderful % x waa be happy, albeit serene and serious about + The duties of ee bo
amy ower W ~ ec, 23-— Jan. Whose affairs that call for such, verformed by Mr. ar’ oor
Prizes : * * * eee nee ce nen
' x espectively ose 0
Â¥ * AQUARIUS Your planet Uranus suggests looking over tor tc Dr, Eyre Kinch, Mr. Davirl
GSSS “ot PPPOE ‘ Jan. 22 — Feb. 20 nice again that _plann pd schedule; trip or Reed, Dr. Malcolm Proverbs, and
fc tt ttt tan atev¢ : “aim have in mind. Pray, smile Mr. Harrold Nicholls. east ;
oe cheertu “| i e a
ba it A Tt £ y \* A reception was —
RO 0 i Rn * * * ‘Beverley’, The Garrison ant
Please take hint to Aquarius to-day. Your Mr. and Mrs. Lee left for Sam
PISCES inelination and configurations 7 i tle for their honey-
oxy | 4 é é gurations urge like Lord’s Cas €
EMPIRE OLYMPIC RORY ROYAL * Feb. 21—March 20 (roatment of day and affairs * moon while Mr, and Mrs, Prov-
To-Day to Wed. (To- Day & Tomerrow) To-Day ty | Last . ey ree | erbs are at the Crane Hatel.
1.45 & 8.90 4.20 & 8.15 netrad be ; ead mhieta, whalandne | YOU BORN TODAY are big of mind and heart, but often *
ow twine 4.45 onl¥ | pred Mac acne | Prese Presents XK disor pointed at the seeming negligence of yothers who disre- Assistant Medical
a sney's claire TREVO THE MOB i ie .
STORY OF Sali en THE GOLDEN Brodatiek * Craw ford ot a onan es 4 beatin eosaet hee vain sania aera Superintendent
IN HOOD and Richard Kile sirthdate of: Robert Herrick, English poet; Aubrey Beards- * © NTRANSIT from England ye's-
ROBII A DANGEROUS SALAMANDER er is ley, artist. terday by the Golfite weet
Color by Technicolor; ~ GAME Starring short: —K ing rehot : and Mrs. L, F. E Lewis and their
Starring Starring [ Peer ret) MARAE A ARRAY | ee a Re a a % |iwo children Leonard and Sylvia
Richard TODD Richard ARLEN “extra, Columbia's Whok g trom Trinidad
Joan Be And” DEVINE | possmmount, Beltish ‘Serial | Dr. Lewis who is Assistant
Sees | Tee 2 ews Se Tihourn POLELEEEE LEO PLP PLAS EL LOE LP LAE ALE LA PLP LSA LPLLAD Medical Supenntendent at the
U rsa e 4 8 | j HE | ‘
wie oe | ween | Se wi, § PANETTA DRESS SHOP § vee) rege! tes, xe
Opening Ceremony | hole § - | ek .’e Double Vietor JORY — 4 ‘ up to the on 0
of the = AIL SEIN TOMMY} beers TO KILL \“Wea. & Thurs end vacation leave ——— inna
Thursdsy =| Nonh BEERY fr Bred we vir re Glenn BORD \ (Next Door to Singer's) . Fo welts on ou goyeiaieey at the
at 8.90 Bm. Biv ch. at 4.80 only) Craunctte Corbert | Nina FOCH :
| ! 3 ndéie-aideoa Royal Infirmary.
The Barbados UNDERCOVER | in in Manchester
yYOMAN FAMILY ‘UNDERCOVER MAN a
welght-Litting mn HONEYMOON _ and EVENING BAGS—f » dost Rack From UK.
Association and Coming Soon ADVENTURES IN RV ENENG BAUS——irom $4.95
Presents The YRAFFIC IN CRIME) THE CRVERADO RS. DEREK FOWLES whose
WEIGHT - LIFTING) ~~ 3° rad a on oF William BISHOP ACQMAR HANDKERCHIEFS—freom ....... $13.86 husband is’ English qnd Hie
CHAMPIONS ABACAS yone a OUTLAW Gloria HENRY tory Master at Harrison College
COR TEE = z g : . re returned from England yesterdoy
= OLE OLIE || > Desses Made to Order for ail Geeasions by the Golfito after an absence of
PLAZA 1 Hi A i BRE cece ereercnarnntecacnst ta Ae pe
i EE - compa ° ,
4) |) | Andrew.
= —, a Xi Ta’ ’ ~ y ee =~
BRIDGELOW “ b. Dine ae (Dial 8404) 1 j fa & 7 OL EN aL) GA 1 E Ty
» Last = Shows
— ge LODAY & TOMORROW |] voday i & 8.0 PM The _Eaapiten— St ares
TODAY to mt solosoal Technicole sKoWs TO
erecta |e! ee peers} NEW rot eat
1o SPECIAL Shows on oa ‘oy URDER
won. a rues: 6.0 am. |] gk BASH Var Stiean ; ’ 9 t yf Much Talked About aEFLIN : HAYWARD I < d 2S Hi: ts $4. 32 i ‘ EK of the WEST” (Coles)
RON. BERD | GuTPasTy ws AHS aCe " ave wrae ote Ween ees
2 was at oo a Nera > 7 & TUES. 8.0 De
(Six Men On A Raft) anonels eta é Aue Lad 1€s Dx esses $518.00 aes he Bred: Pina ¥poO”"
Ali Speelal Added SS wa SARONG Dae Wt ewae “WARREN
Attraction ! Next Attraction H i d b > ‘
” td ABBOTT & 1 . LA av
na hoapenocs’ | EAGLE AND pyd ABBOTTS randbags BS 13 WW ct ee '
Charles oa ~ _————————
; MeGRAW & DIXON ‘ THE HAWK as . 4 SSS
WHURS, Specfal 1 = PM and ST. STEPHEN’ N CHURCH
“PHUNDERHOOF”

SSS




> oonommoennnsenommnnnnnscccomnnntcrtéC| IST OPENED .... I$ proceeds in Aid of | &

G 1 OBE \¢ NT : ] r Choir Funds

THIS EVENING 8.30 P.M. LAST SHOW AN ASSORTMENT Ok PAN BOOKS 21, 8, 52—2n.

SCARAMOUCHTIE AT ADVOCATE STATICNERY |
TO-MORROW AND TUESDAY 4.45 & 8.30 crc SEM ee
RIDERS OF TEIE PURPLE %AGi C ie ,
(George MONTGOMERY) ‘ A R ON CLUB
THE BEGINNING OR mk ib ' i j l ,





Tree

_ Br ian DONLEVY — Robert WALKER — Tom DRAKE

WEDNESDAY AND THURSDAY 445 & 8.30 ?.M
Johnny WEISMULLER — Maureen © ‘SULLIVAN

PROUDLY ANNOUNCES
THE OPENING DANCE AT THEIR

=



VARZAN IME APE SAN
BELLE STARR'S DAUGHTER : NEW CLUB BUILDING — BLACK ROCK

- ROMAN ON
SATURDAY IST. NOVEMBER

IN TRUE

MONTGOMERY — CAMERON — RYAN
OPENING FRIDAY AUG. 29TH 5 & 5 39 P.M.



1952

.

+ * WALLOWEEN

TRADITION
WITCHES-FLOOR
SHOW
SPOT & BALL DANCES

BEWITCHING TUNES BY CURWEN'S ORCHESTRA
DANCING 9.00 P.M. DRESS OPTIONAL

ADMISSION BY TICKET $1.00



starring
RORY viD THE

avi. CALHOUN: vii. Rl i

hese TOIT»

fog the Screen
nd Produced by



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male . cone
OEE LEE LPPEPL PCCP PPP LAA APPL ALS SESE

6656166
PGF LLLP FLL OES

i

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“4 <4
CSG PPPOE LOSO






SUNDAY, AUGUST 24, 1952

—

re et



Caub Calling



Mr. & Mrs. ALISTER A. LEE and Mr, & Mrs. ROY PROVERBS
Wedding At St. Leonard's Qualified In Nursing

while those of ushers fell to Mr.

ESTERDAY afternoon at 4.30 William Watson, Terrence Gill, ISS GUISE FODERINGHAM

; Mr. Teddy Davis and Mr. Harold :
- at St. Leonard’s Church, Ramsay, The reception was held of Grenada arrived here
Miss Dorrien Mitchinson Watson, 5+ Regan Lodge, St. Michael and Yesterday by the Golfite from Eng_

daughter of Mrs. Tris Watson and
the late John M. Watson of
“Walwyn”, Worthing was married
to Mr. Eustace Hutson Davis, son
of the late Mr. and Mrs. T. H.
Davis of Chelsea Road. .

The ceremony which was fully

land where she spent alr‘ost five
years,

Miss Foderingham who did
nursing at Sir Charles Hospital
after being awarded a C.D. and
W. Scholarshir. practised mid-

the honeymoon is being spent at

Powell Spring Hotel, Bathsheba.
1 Party -

PARTY was given by the

Adelphi Table Tennis Team

on Thursday night at “Parade

° , View,” Hastings in the honour of wifery for six months at Weir
fo HA Delete rn witae Mr, Christie Smith, Secretary of Bae santas eee after
was given in marriage by her the Tabe Tennis Association dite Ras a —— ery and as a
brother Mr. Ralph Watson and Who was married yesterday She fee eaten Lge oe
she wore a dress of ivory slipper afternoon. The visiting Trinidad in Secu. Ping: ga : ree iday
satin with a close fitting bodice Table Tennis Team, at present ("Goa The p Ran 5 eaton-
outtoned right through the high touring Barbados, were also in- tureieg +0 eundan ore re-
neck, Her long sleeves were —o — they —_ “erg = -

trimmed wit shantilly. lace a tending best wishes to Mr, anc : zs bs

the front ot Cod diet tidteese Mrs. Smith for health and happi- Birthday Party

panel % 4 spay lace frills. "&S5S. Oo” THURSDAY last Master
e long flowing train was of re Bria 5
slipper satin and her fall was einen TH og Mak Cae Meee Gk
kept in place by a lace cap and M* NEVILLE Francis, a Cus- Forest esate Trinidad “oalp-
orange blossoms, Her bouquet toms officer of Antigua ar- |-rated his fourth birthday at
was shell pink and white rose rived on a _ business visit on “Abingdon” St. Michael, the
buds with Michaelmas daisies and Friday and is a guest of Mrs. S. residence of his grandparents
maiden hair fern. Codrington, at Brittons X Road. yy, and Mrs. Louis Gale -
Her sole attendant was Miss Mr. Francis also served in the Among those present “at the
Rosemary Watson who wore @ last World War in the R.A.F. and party were:— David Allan. K
ballerina length dress of orchid has recently established a danc- Barnes, John and Helen Bowen.
organza with a tight fitting bodice ing school. He expects to be . :

with flowers at the neck to match Celine, Susan and Timothy Gale;

leaving the island soon to be in Gpyi. 7 A 3
the flowers in the dutch bonnet Antigua for his first big show. oe va oe Sade Canes:
headdress, She carried a bouquet He is Principal of the Antigua Rupert and Bernard Hunte:
of assorted ground orchids. Cultural Dancing Class which Felicity, Marilyn, Elizabeth, and

The duties of bestman were stages their show at the Happy pjiana Jones; Barbara and Dotty
performed by Mr. Basil Davis Acre Hotel on September 1.

Lee,



BRIAN “feeding” the cake to Marilyn, four-year-old daugiiter or mr. and Mrs. Harry vones and grand
daughter of Mr. aud irs. P. A. Lynch, with whom he cut the cake.

(Carib would appreciate similar pictures from parents which MUST be suitable prints for reproduc-
tion for this column.)

IMPORTANT

NOTICE

A. ob. Stuart's School
of Dancing

Presents to

REVUEDEVILLE 1952

under the distinguished patronage of His Excellency
The Governor Sir WILLIAM and Lady SAVAGE

Members
and
Friends

CLUB
MORGAN

WAS CLOSED
LAST NIGHT

DECEMBER

|

at

EMPIRE THEATRE

on Wed. 3rd, Thurs. 4th & Friday 5th Sept. — 8.30 p.m.
MATINEE: Friday 5th — 5 p.m.

BOOKING OFFICE OPENS - - -

LADIES “ARCOLA” SHOES

LOW CUT COURTS. Navy, Brown,

Black Suedes $13.69
White Nubuek .......0......... ds $14.50
VARIOUS STYLES Of BLACK & BROWN SUEDES
Backless & Toeless ....... $14.79
White Nubuck—Backless & Toeless $15.04

T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS

YOUR SHOE STORES

DIAL 4220 DIAL 4606
SUNDAY, AUGUST 24,

At The Cinema

—-





1952

Men Against The Sea
iy G.H.

A FEW years back, a young Norwegian scientist named
Thor Heyderdah| worked out the theory that the inhabit-
ants of the Polynesian Islands in the South Pacific had
originally come from the continent of South America and
not from the Asiatic Continent as other ethnologists
thought. Tc try to prove his theory, he and five other in-
trepid Scandinavians set out on a forty foot balsa raft built

precisely as ancient Spanish

craft used twelve hundred years ago.

records described the primitive
On this raft, they

sailed 4,300 miles from Callao in Peru to the Polynesian
Islands, following the course, believed by Heyderdahl, to
have been taken by pre- Inca people in ancient times.

KON-TIKI showing at the Plaza
Bridgetown is the actual day-by-
day record of this amazing
Odyssey across the Pacific, when
six men pitted their strength and
knowledge against the forces of
nature and emerged the winners.

The whole key-note of the
film is simplicity and all the
glossy finish of studio effects are
lacking, which emphasises all the
more, the stark authenticity of
the. picture, and the elements

against which the men had to be
constantly on guard, for survival.
Naturally, the moments of greatest
danger are not seen in the film.

















—& The Bible,
' p.m. Composer of The Week, 5.45 p.m

RHONDA FLEMING

The five day storm that nearly
wrecked the Kon-tiki can only be
imagined in the mind’s eye, but
if one has read the book and then
seeh the actual size of the raft on
which the men battled for days
through a storm of hurricane pro-
portions, it se¢ms impossible that
they should have survived such an

ordeal, However there are other
adventures that we do see—and
share in. The harpooning of
sharks has its moments, when the
men have to move nimbly on the
slippery “deck” to avoid being
bitten; the discovery of a living

snake mackerel, never before sen
by man and one of the uglies. fish
in the sea, and a whale shark that
measures forty-five to sixty fee,
with three thousand teeth in each
jaw, which decided to investigrie
the ¥aft at close quarters to the
fearful consternation of the ad-
venturers; flying fish, dolphin and
small squids or sea-cats 4s we call
them were daily visitors on the

raft and it was found that the
ink in the octopus was fine for any
correspondence! And last, but by
no means liast, the dramatic pile-
up of the Kon-tiki on a coral reef.

Throughcut the film there jis a
delightful commentary by Mr
tleyderdah! that is witty as well
as informative and once you

becom? accustomed to his lilting
Norwegian accent, you will find it
fascinating.

The film’s chief apreal lies in
the fact that this incredible story
actually happened and was re-
corded; in so far as possible, by
a 16-m. camera, and though at

timés, it is not too easy on the
eyes; since the images forever
move on a restless sea, it stands,
real and dramatic, as an heroic

record of men against the sea,



use Palmolive Soap as Doctors advised
for a Brighter, Fresher Complexion!

Doctors prove that Palmolive Soap can improve complexions
remarkably in many ways. Oily skin looks less oily—dull, drab
skin wonderfully brighter. Coarse-looking skin appears finer.
















The Last Outpost

At the Plaza Barbarees, we have
TH® LAST OUTFOST starring
Ronald Reagan and Rhonda Flem-
ing in a somewhat pretentious
Civil War eWestern presented in
Technicclor. The plot is a bit
thin—the characters stereotyped—
and we have two brothers fighting
on opposi:t sidet in the war be-
tween the States, but who join
forces to defend an outpost against
the Apaches. Though there is no
atterapt at any historieal signifi-
eance, there is plenty of action,
particularly in the final battle with
the Indians which is exciting if a
oit gory! The scenic backgrounds
are, of course, impressive and
there is some fast riding by soldier
and Apache alike.
Directed with a light tough
there are several humourous
sequences and one gets the impres-
sion that the director dixtn’t take
this one very seriously. Charac-
terizations are adequate with Mr.
Reagan and Miss Fleming indulg-
ing in an on-and-off romance in
which love finally triumphs.

LISTENING
HOURS

SUNDAY, AUGUST, 24
400 — 7.15 pm. '...... 19.76M 2% 59M



p.m. The N
lude, 4.15 p.m, The C
p.m. Sunday Half-Hour, 5.00 p.m. From
5.10 p.m. Interlude, 5.15

Arthur's Inn, 6.45 p.m. Programme
Parade & Interlude, 7.00 p.m. The News,
7.10 p.m. Home News From Britain.
71 — 1045 p.m. .. 2.58 M 31 32M
7.15 p.m. Caribbean Voices, 7.45 p.m
Sunday Service, 8.15 p.m. Radio News-
reel, 8.30 p.m. Spotlight on Central
Asia, 8.45 p.m Interlude, 8.55 p.m.
From The Editorials, 9.00 p.m. From
The Promenade Concerts, 10.00 p.m
The News, 10.10 p.m, News Talk, 10.15
p.m. London Forum, 10.45 p.m. Why 1

believe
MONDAY, AUGUST 25

4m) — 7.15 pom, 19.76 M 25 53M

4.00 p.m, The News, 4.10 p.m. The
Daily Service, 4.15 p.m, The Case of the
Night-Watchman's Friend,
Memory Lane, 5.00
5.0 p.m. Interlude,
venirs of Music, 6.00 p.m Welsh
Miscellany, 6.15 p.m. Listeners’ Choice,
645 p.m. Sports Round-up and Pro-
grarame Parade, 7.00 p.m. The News
Pregramme Parade, 7.00 p.m. The News,
7.140 p.m, Home News From Britain.
7.15 — 10.20 p.m, 23 538M 31.2 ™M

7.15 p.m. Books To Read & Theatre
Talk, 7.45 p.m, Ballads & Songs, 8.15
p.m. Radio Newsreel, 8.30 p.m. Euro-
pean Survey, 8.45 p.m. Interlude, 8.55
p.m. From the Editorials, 9.00 p,m.
Justice Comes Late, 9.35 p.m. Twen-
tieth Centuny Serenaders, 10.00 p.m.
The News, 10.10 p.m, News Talk, 10.15
p.m. The Health of Man, 10,30 p.m.
Tip Top Tunes.

Egyptian Doctors

e
Tour Minnesota
INDIANAPOLIS, Indiana, Aug.
20.

4.45 p.m
Cricket,
5.15 p.m. Sou-

m



Nineteen Egyptian doctors,
faculty members of Cairo medital
schools, went to the Mayo clinic
in Rochester Minnesota Wednes-
day in a 380 day professional
tour.

The ,group, headed by Dr.
Mohammed El Ayadi spent three
days here inspecting the Indiana
University, medical centre, and
the Eli Lilly medica] plant and
laboratories. They will visit
drug manufacturing plants and
hospitals in Michigan and ‘upper
New York after their Minnesota
visit. —UP.



1

advised:

huge









So, do as 36 skin specialists For 60 seconds,
f 2 massage with

3 Le eres

Everyone’s talking about this NEW
STORE for Mr. & Mrs. Public; for
Master & Miss Public too, with its

NEEDS — Mum and Dad are
interested
ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT, and
Dad has already selected from the
complete range of OFFICE FURNI-
TURE and TYPEWRITERS.



POULTRY
NOTES

FOR most poultry keepers in
Barbados the answer to which
comes first the or the chicken
ought to be the chicken.

This year for example thou-
sande of young oS hatched
ocelly or imported have been
bought by long-established poul-
try-keepers or by newcomers to
the business who have decided to
“grow their own eggs”.

The decision to buy chickens
rather than hatch eggs is wise be-
omnes pene you ‘Niesly
egg-hatching you are not to
be too successful with your incu-

to be
recommended.

You must decide the type of
poultry Rye! want to keep because
some chicks inherit a greater abil-
ity to lay more eggs than other
chicks and if it’s eggs, more =
and still more eggs you are r
then -buy chicks ith a strong

hereditary ability to lay.



Decide too whether you are
going to keep poultry for mea
hatching or breeding stock. [I
you try and combine one or more
of those activities you ape going
to have a lot of headaches,

Having decided (let us say that
you are going in eggs) your
next thought must be for equip-
ment,

Don’t rush off to the nearest
chick farm or chick im: and
buy week old chicks without hav-
ing obtained a house for your
chicks. You will have to build or
have made a wire-floored pen (not
more than 4” mesh) with a cover

and stan on raised legs (one
foot from the sho! be
afiequate). Opinions may vary

about the size of the wire or
shape or size of the pen Dut most
puny iewece ty Decades ee
at chicks ht to be off

th da
yt. yt un au ‘ween

If you are going in for chick
raising on a grand scale you can
allow a square foot for every two
chicks during the first six weeks.

That’s plenty of room.

Feed and water must be avail-
able at all times. Water is one of
the easiest methods of transmit-
ting disease germs and it is im-
possible to too much care to
ensure that water containers are
kept clean. Small chicks can
drown easily so be certain that
your containers ate safe. One of
the safety home made varieties
is an inverted bottle stfapped and
gradually emptying into a narrow

asin.

Each chick requires 2 Ibs. of
startena before a change to a
growing ration is made,

Wherever you Gecide to trans-
fer chicks from the raised wire-
floored pens to a brooder house or
pen, disinfect the pen before you
put the chicks in. When the =
is dry cover the floor with two
inches of megasse (3 bags of me-
gasse will cover the floor of a
6ft x 4ft pen.

Should you decide not to use the
wire-floored pens but to transfer
your chicks straight from the
hatchway to the pen, cover the
megasse with newspapers and
keep covered for four days until
the chicks have grown accustomed
to eat their feed from the feeders.

You must use feeders to avoid
waste of feed right from the be-
ginning. When chicks are -three
weeks old it is time to place low
roosts protected by wire. Each
chick should have three inches of
roosting space.





Wash with Palmolive Soap. | ~

"s soft, lovely lather,
Rinse!

choice of TOYS & SCHOOL





in the quantities of






Lower Bruad St.

the look well against such









SUNDAY

FarmA
iy

LAST week we considered the use of weter in relation
lants and indicated the need for its more efficient)

to
application, having regard

growth, To-day, it may be of interest to discuss the ques:
tion briefly in relation to livestock and, in this connection, ||
requirements have been more aecueniay

one authority in Britain gives the foll

ap
animal listed :

GARDENING HINTS.
FOR AMATEURS

(—Flower Arrangements—)

One of the greatest joys derived
from toiling in the garden is to
have fiowers to pick for the house.
Even the dullest room is trans-
formed by the addition of flow-
er, and a bowl or vase of well
arranged flowers is a joy,

So often people are heard to
say “oh I love flowers but I sim-
ply can’t arrange them” but, what
a defeatest attitude to take!

True, flower arrangement does
seem to come naturally to a
lucky few who are able to arrange
them beautifully without any
effort. But with most people it is
a matter of practice, and famili-
arity with the different kinds of
flowers.

All flowers, whether in a bowl
or vase look better for the addition
of some green, It may be their
own leaves, fern, asparagus, or
grasses, but the greenery seems to
form a background to them, and
bring out their colouring and
beauty.

Never pack flowers too closely,
or put too many in one vase, bui
space them, well intermixed with
green, so that they can be seen
to advanfige.

Choose your flowers with taste
too to suit the colouring of ths
room where they are to be used.
Most rooms in these days are
tinted in some soft pastel shade,
and against such a background
no descrimination of flower col-
our need be made, as any flowers
a back-
ground, But if the room is of some
dark shade, more choice must b?
given to the flowers, for it would
be fata] to arrange say a bowl of
marigolds against a deep red or
blue wall, they just would not
harmonise, and other similar
harsh contrasts must also be
avoided.

Almost as important as the
flowers are the bowls, and vases
in which they are put. It :s
useless to expect long stemmed
flowers to arrange wel] in a
receptacle that is too small or
short for them, or to expect much
from a bunch of short stemmed
flowers balanced on the top of
a tall vase. The receptacle must
suit the flowers they are to re-
ceive in size and shade, or the
arrangement cannot show to the
best advantage.

It pays too not to be too con-
servative in the choice of the
receptacle for the flowers as a
study of illustrations of flower
arrangements by famous people
will show.

A look at Constant Spry’s
beautiful book of flower arrange-
ment shows that the flowers ar®
by no means always arranged in
the conventional vase or bowl,
but are often put in such things
as a charming old-fashioned
soup-tureen, tankard, or some
other lovely, but unorthodox
receptacle.

Altogether flower arrangement
is not only fascinating for the
home, but it can develop into
lucrative work. Competent people
are always in demand to arrange
flowers for Hotel, parties, wed-
dings, Christenings, to make
bouquets, wreaths, corsages etc.
and what more charming way
could there be of earning?







from the Ground Coat up.

» We stock ‘FLATS’ and ‘GLOSSES’ to keep your
Home the finest investment you can own... .
will pay you to INCREASE ITS VALUE!

Paints . Varnishes

Snowcem « Wood-

BARBADOS CO-OP.
COTTON FACTORY LTD.

| erect



nd Garden |

Agricola

WATER AND LIVESTOCK

The higher prices go, the more your HOME is
worth — ONLY if you keep it in first class condi-

tion ! That means using the best of Paint materials



ADVOCATE

|
|
|
|




to the requirements of plant

measured. Thus | }
owing figures as|

ximate, daily, summer requirements for each class Of | 68$¢0~7O00090000000000000"

5

6 gallons
10 gallons

Horse at pasture :
Horse at work

Bullocs at pasture 6 gallons | >}

Cow in milk . 10 gallons} ,

Sheep } gallon | ‘
14 gallons |

depending on the wetness or dry-
ness of the weather, the amount
of exercise, temperature of the
air and so on. The food supplied
also influences the requirements
some extent. The same authority
states that, in general, a horse
requires 3lb. of water to every
pound of dry food, an ox 4 to 1
a sheep 2 to 1 and a pig 7 to 1
From this, it is reasoned that, in
ordinar? © circumstances, sheep
might be fed with dry food, cow:
with food which has been moist-
ened and pigs with sloppy food.

Let us examine in a little more
detail the case of the milking
cow, which requires a very liberal
supply of water. Not only has the
demands of her body to be met,
but water is essential for the
production of milk. It will be
readily understood, therefore, that
the modern, heavy yieldi dairy
cow is a_ tremendou of
water. Further, whe. ided
with water constantly, the evi-
dence suggests that a milk.og cow
will give a slightly larger yield
than if watered twice daily.
This observation has led to the}
installation of troughs or bowls in
cow stables immediately in front
of the animals. A fresh, piped in
water supply and suitable auto-
matic equipment. ensures that
purée drinking water is always at
their disposal.

i
'
These figures will vary somewhat



|



Some work at the Imperial
College, Trinidad, in regard to
the water requirements of dairy
gattle may be noted, Water con-
sumption in ration, pounds per
head per day per 1,000 lb. weight
of animal, for maintenance:

(a) Half-bred Holstein-Ze bu
cow — 99 lb. water per head per
day; made up of 34 Ib. in drinking
water, 56.5 lb, in the forage and
8.5 Ib. in wet grain.

(b) Pure-bred Holstein cow
137.5 lb. water per head per day;
made up of 72.25 Ib. in drinking
water, 57.5 Ib. in the forage and
7.75 |b. in wet grain. |

(ce) Pure-bred Zebu cow — 78
lb. water per head per day; made
up of 23.5 lb. in drinking water,
48 lb. in the forage and 6.5 lb. |
in wet grain.

In addition, for milk production |
per gallon of milk, average re-
quirement is two gallons of water
per day; less than this average,
however, if the milk yield is four
or more gallons per day, but
more than two gallons if a poor
milker giving say only one gallon
milk per day.

The very interesting point which
emerges from the above is the
outstanding difference in I
water requirements of the Zebu
and Holstein breeds, the former
requiring much less. The hardi-
ness of the Zebu for tropical con-|
ditions is thus exemplified. }

!



Finally, in addition to wate
actually consumed in the ration,
large quantities are required foi
animal and byre hygiene, wash-|
ing of equipment, utensils and so |
on, Figures for such purposes Fah |
to as much as 290 Ibs. per head
per day. (For practical purposes,
one gallon of water or milk may
be taken as weighing 10 Ib.)



J









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as i
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|}MASTER OF CEREMONIES

PAGE THREE



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PAGE FOUR



SUNDAY ADVOCATE








TENNIS RUBBER

College Old Boys Basketbali Champs
By O. S. COPPIN

GQ NONGRATULATIONS are in order for the Bar-

; bados Table Tennis Association for having

won the rubber in their fixtures with the South
Zone team of the Trinidad Table Tennis Associa-
tion.
| The results of the third and final Test are not
yet to hand as I write bu¥ the fact that Barbados
has won the first two is sufficient for the purposes
Gy of winning the rubber and justification for any
praise in the circumstances,

Before the visitors commenced their official fixtures with the
local team I hailed the series as a commendable step in the righ
direction of fostering friendly intercolonial rivalry.

NOT ALL TRINIDAD

The visitors did not constitute an All Trinidad team but it did
number among its ranks, players like Dr. Noble Sarkar who had
played representative International table tennis and Carl Williams
ihe present South Trinidad champion and Fenwick Debysingh, a
former South Trinidad champion who undoubtedly formed the

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| HOW D.D.D. ACTS SO QUICKLY

nucleus of a combination that from the beginning called forth
the best that we could put in the field against them.
They defeated Pelican, the senior division champions and a

strong combined team on each oceasion in convincing style and

there were few ot us who would have given Barbados the edge in

the Tests to come.
MAKING HISTORY

However. Barbados won the rubber and I think that this
uchievement is a new high in the history of organised table tennis
in the colony. There has been a decided complex and rank defeatism
in the ranks of local table tennis for some years now and it appeared
to me to have been the fashion to sponsor the idea that Barbados
table tennis was behind the rest of the entire world far less the
West Indies.

In spite of this, those with vision have stuck with the Barbados
Table Tennis Association and they have not given up their arms.

I would be the last te place this victory out of its correct perspec-
tive and complacently declare that Barbados Table Tennis had
arrived but on the other hand I challenge anyone, even the most
despicable detractors among us to classify this victory as something
less than a handsome indication that we have localised talent
capable of greater things in the Intercolonial table tennis arena and
that Barbados table tennis, with this added experience to their credit
can go forward to greater things.

H.C.0.B. BASKETBALL CHAMPS
ARRISON COLLEGE OLD BOYS are also in line for congratu-
Jations on having won the Basketball Knockout competition
this week. They beat Y.M.P.C, by the considerable margin of 35
to 21 points.

Y.MP.C, who had disposed of the powerful Carlton and College
teams earlier in the competition were expected to secure the edge
on Harrison College Old Boys but this was not to be, Y.M.P.C. con-
centrated on a tight zone defence and H.C.O.B. comprised of tail
players throughout maneouvred cleverly and penetrated their
defence.

Tall Algy Symmonds scored 19 of the 35 goals while the res:
of the team was made up of Noel Symmonds his brother another
six footer, K. Hall, J. Best and C. Forde.

His Excellency the Governor is due to present the trophies
at a presentation match next Thursday but I understand that the
Barbados Basketball Association will organise weekly practices in
preparation for the proposed tour of the Carib Bears in October,

CRICKET AVERAGES INTERESTING

HE fourth series of First Division games opened yesterday, ‘This

means that the 1952 cricket season is nearly halfway through
and so it is high time that we reviewed the figures returned in the
First Division games so far,

First of all it does seem certain that at least two batsmen should
reach the five hundred mark this season and two bowlers capture the
individual fifty wickets.

Both the batting as well as the bowling figures are in keeping
with those returned in satisfactory years for corresponding periods
and if this standard is maintained, I see no reason why the 1952
season should not be rated as a “¢

good local one,

DENIS HEADS
BATSMEN

ENIS ATKINSON heads the
batting averages with 9375
runs scored in four innings and
the excellent average of 93.75 and
is seventh in the list of bowlerg
having taken 19 wickets at a cost
of 16 runs each,



Reece errno

But for sheer all round excel-
lence I must yield the palm to
C “Boogles” Williams, West
Indies and Carlton all round
cricketer.

: “Boogles” has scored 209 runs
in five innings and he has been
undefeated in two of these, He
is second in the batting averages
with the good figures of 69.66 per

innings, and heads the bowling

averages with 31 wickets taken 3 |

at @ cost of 9.12 runs each in 95.5 °

overs, DENIS ATKINSON
GOOD ALSO

THER good batting figuras returned up to the end of the third

series include N. S. Lucas 236 runs in five innings (once not

out) average 59.00, C. Atkins 171 runs in three innings, average 57.00,

G. Proverbs 170 runs in five innings (twice not out) average 56.66,

G. Hutchinson 156 runs in five innings (twice not out) average 52.00,
C. Hunte 195 in six innings.

Bowlers besides “Boogles” Williams who have done well are
Fred Phillips, Spartan medium paced bowler who is second in thea
bowling averages having taken 15 wickets at a cost of 9.93 runs, Twa
other pace bowlers, Eric Atkinson of Wanderers and Barker of Empire
follow in the order mentioned. Atkinson has taken 13 wickets at a
cost of 10.15 runs in 55.1 overs while Barker in 106.2 overs has taken
24 wickets at a cost .of 10.33 runs. Keith Bowen. Spartan
slow spin bowler is fifth with 13 wickets taken at a cost of
14.53 in 65 overs while Frank King, Spartan pace bowler is next
with 10 wickets taken at a cost of 14.60 runs Gach in 58 overs.

POLICE CLUB SPORTS

taking part.

ME. BoT
TOORING “THE
“FOUNTAIN

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PRESCRIPTION |

- for Carlton were C.



WVE Recon
& Seews

IN SEARCH OF 1KE

—

POLICE vs. WANDERERS
Police ist Innings 156
Wanderers ist Innings (without

POF i av eedty +e hoes

Bowling for Wanderers, Louis

St. Hill and Denis Atkinson
skittled out the Police team in
the Police—Wanderers First

Division cricket match at the Bay
yesterday.

Police made 156 in their first
finmnings. Wanderers have so far
scored 95 without loss.

Capt. W. Farmer topscored for
the Constables with 59, C. Black-
man, who made 46, was the only
other batsman to score over 20
runs.

Denis Atkinson. was the most
successful bowler for Wanderers.
He sent down 24 overs, of which
seven were maidens, and took
five wickets for 64 runs. Louis
St. Hill also gave a good perform.
ance. He bowled 13 overs and
took four wickets for 27 runs,

W. Knowles and D. Evelyn

opened _ the Wanderers’ first
innings. When stumps were
drawn, the Wanderers’ total
was 95 without loss, Knowles,

who attacked the bowling of
Mullins and Bradshaw with suc-
cess, had 72 not out to his credit.
Evelyn is 17 not out.

PICKWICK vs. AEATAE
Spartan (for 1 wkt.) ...... 16

Pickwick were at the wicket
nearly five hours to score 242 runs
on the first day of their First
Division cricket match against
Spartan at Queen’s. Park yester-
day. Of this skipper John God-
dard had an undefeated knock
for 71,

In their half an hour’s spell at
the wicket, Spartan have lost 1
wicket for 16 runs.

Goddard was given a chance
off Frank King while in his thir-
ties. The fieldsman was E. Cave
But for this chance, Goddard
batted confidently and well, and
took eight fours.

Other batsmen who batted well
were T. S. Birkett, J. Greenidge
and M. Foster who respectively
seored 38, 32 and 31.

Pace bowler Frank King took
four wickes for 54 runs in 15
overs, and A. Atkins two for 40
in nine. King sent down quite a
number of bouncers and made
batsmen dodge them.

L. F. Harris bowled 14 overs
off which 59 runs were scored,
but he failed to secure a wicket.

With just over half an hour
more for play, Spartan opened
with Atkins and L, F. Harris,
Harris taking the place of the
other usual opening bat, Grif-
fith. The batsmen started cau-
tiously, but with the score only
four, Atkins was tempted to hit
at a ball outside the wicket from
E. L. G. Hoad, and sent it straight
to the lone slip field, Jordan.

Wicket keeper Evelyn soon
after dropped a catch from Har-
ris off J, Greenidge.

When stumps were drawn,
Spartan were 16 for the loss of
1 wicket.

CARLTON vs. EMPIRE

+ Empire .... 6 cece tee eles 232
; Carlton (for two wkts.) .. 39
A fine innings of 81 by

C. Depeiza and good supporting
knocks by E, A, V. Williams (40),
O. M. Robinson (30) and S. Rud-
der (24) he'ped Empire to boost
their tota] to 232 in their first
innings against Carlton as their
first division cricket game got
underway at Black Rock yester-
day afternoon.

By the drawing of stumps,
Carlton had registered 39 for the
jcss of two wickets.

The most successful bowlers
B. Williams
for 86 with his
flows in 24.4 overs and K. B.
Warren, their medium pacer,
who captured 3 for 64 in 15 overs.

The wicket was perfect when
Empire opened their innings with
Robinson and Hunte. They how-
ever, lost their first wicket with
only 17 on the board, but Willi-
ams became associated wita
Robinson in a_ second wicket
partnership which was productive
of 45 runs. Williams who was
missed at the unlucky 13, went
on to score a useful 40 which
included three boundaries before
he was bowled by Warren. /

Robinson who was batting
patiently, had his stumps knockecd

who bagged 5

BARBADOS WIN TABLE YESTERDAY’S GRICKET

back by Warren after
contributed 30 which
one boundary.

Quick Wickets

Empire lost some quick wickets,
but Depeiza and Rudder in a
seventh-wicket partnership, the
highest of the innings which was
productive of 52 runs, saved the
day for them.

Depeiza who had played a very
gocd innings during his stay at
the wicket, was missed once
when he had scored 21. He even-
tually lost his wicket when he
got his pad in front of one from
“Boogles” Williams and ws
adjudged 1|.b.w. His score was 81
including 11 boundaries.

Holder got a useful 19 inclu-
ding two boundaries while H. A.
King carried his bat for ten
including the only six of the day.

In the remaining minutes of
play, Carlton les* their opening
batsmen McKenzie after he had
contributed 11 and also Lucas
before he had scored. The Hutch-
inson brothers Reynold and
Geoffrey were together when
stumps were drawn with the total
at 39 fer the loss of two wickets.
Reynold is 25 includine three
boundaries end Geoffrey 3.

HARRISON COLLEGE vs,
LODGE

he had
included

Harrison College (for 7 wkts.) 293

Michael Worme who went at
number seven in the College bat-
ting order scored 108 not out in
the College first innings against
Lodge at College yesterday. He
hit 14 fours and gave one chance.
His score enabled College to score
a total of 293 runs for the loss of
seven wickets in their first innings
after batting the whole of the day.

College won the toss and batted
on a fine wicket, but had a shaky
start when they lost their first
wicket for one run. C, Blackman
who went at number four, scored
the next best score of 47 and Mr.
S. Headley made an attractive 43
before he was bowled by Riley.

S. Hewitt who is not out with
Worme, has 42 runs to his credit.

K, Riley who bowled at medium
pace was the most successful
bowler and took three of tha
College wickets for 57 runs. J.
Farmer—a slow right arm bowl-
er — took two for 52 in 12 overs.

The Lodge fast bowler K.
Brookes did not bowl as steadily
as in his last match and although
he bowled 17 overs he took one.
wicket. At times he was a bit
erratic. The other wicket was
taken by G. Wilkie. Me

The fielding vr the Lodge boys
was good but at times they gave
away runs when they threw in
badly.

STANDARD BRIDGE

By M. Harrison-Gray
Dealer: East
aa game ‘
KQ5
OkR3
git,
P E
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&

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= Bey

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on

Jil
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K

&KQ

ya tense closing stages of

a needle match often
peogeee incongruous results.
final,
eading
advantage

with some wild overbidding ;

OSD
u

7154
10 3

n the 1952 Gold Cu

the team that were

with a few boards to

by their North-South pair in
Room 1

celebrated this

Special measures being
Spade, “South, passed. West f

U1 |. Wes
bid Two Hearts and North
Two _No-Trumps, :
should show 21 points. East
courageously bid Three
Hearts and _ South, th
visions of a slam, made a cue
nine ithe aioe: wala i

est’s double was

round to South, whose Five 3
Diamonds was also doubled.
Suspecting East's bids, North
redoubled with the obvious
hope of scaring him into &
Five Hearts, but to no avail.
The play will be given in
‘o-morrow’s feature.
\cancedonendieeseestenouvisetunnipenpeemiad

London Express Service.



There has been considerable interest evinced in the preparations
for thdse sports and the finals should be a day of keen rivalry.

Heats have been run off at each of the clubs and the finalists
: 4 Ss represent (the cream of the contestants from each club. Who knows?
HE Police Boys’ and Girls’ Clubs will hold their first Annual Talent scouts from the,Amateur Athletic Association of Barbados

Athletic Sports at Kensington on Monday, August 25, Repre~ should be on hand not only to give the Meet their moral support
sentatives from thirteen Boys’ Clubs and three Girls’ Clubs will be but should have little difficulty in discovering potential talent among
these youngsters for senior athletics.

—-_

HELLO JOE /sceuse

‘ Witt :

has. You
SAY IN THIS
COUNTRY” DE
FEED WAS



SUNDAY, AUGUST
RACING NOTES
By Ben Battle

OW that the Barbados Turf Club August Meeting is a matter of
history it is possible for us to indulge in that pleasant pastime

of being wise after the event. With the excitement and bustle of
the Races safely behind us, it is surprising how consistent. a picture
can be made of the form which at the time appeared so baffling.

Beginning at the top with the A Class we find that the only one
so classified to score was Harroween. This however, cannot be attrib-
uted to lack of opportunity but ,rather to the fact that the A) class
for this Meeting was weak both in numbers and quality. Rebate was
manifested below her best and it is probably not a well mare. The
same can be said of Notonite whose form was many pounds below
what we know he is capable of,, Harroween herself started four times
for her only victory which she achieved in the last race of the meet-
ing when she carried 118 lbs. She has never been much of a weight
carrier, but I could not help being somewhat disappointed at her
showing.

The B class was evenly matched and some of the best racing was
seen amongst them. The performance of Landmark who won the
Champion Stakes carrying top-weight was of course outstanding and
Mr. Chase’s mare undoubtedly merits promotion. Of the three new-
comers Mrs. Bear, from the same stable. shows every likelihood of
following in Landmark's footsteps, and possesses a devastating late
run which will stand her in good stead in distance races. The form
showed by Vectis and Spear Grass on the other hand was extremely
disappointing. Those consistent and hardworking campaigners Lun-
ways, Red Cheeks and Pepperwine, between them started no less than
fifteen times earning money on ten occasions. It is astonishing how
much work the highly strung Lunways can get through without any
apparent ill-effect. She has proved a good servant to Mr. Tommy
Edwards, Castle in the Air most surprisingly seemed to improve in
his behaviour as the meeting went on, Had his rider been able to
keep him balanced I thought, he might have just won the final-race.
By contrast Flying Dragon did nothing to redeem the run of bad
luck which has dogged his stable recently.

The C class winners in spite of havidig every opportunity only
managed to win two races between them. One of these went to
Bright Light who will be lucky to avoid promotion; the other to score
was Dashing Princess. She like most of Mr. Gill’s string was very
fit early and put in her best work during the first two days.

In C2, as we have already noticed, Abu Ali was the “find” of
the meeting. Aim Low was perhaps a little fortunate to be bracket-
ed with Magic Gaye in the first race, but thereafter the Handicappers
took a rather more enthusiastic view of her abilities than I did, and
she failed to place. Darham Jane is one for whom we are always
hearing excuses. The probability is that she is moderate. Devil’s
Symphony on the other hand may yet improve. Of the remainder
Test Match showed that it is possible even under our conditions for
a stayer almost totally devoid of pace to win races. His future will
depend to some extent on the number of long distance races which
may be framed, The Thing appears to be consistent but quite mod-
erate, while the less said about Embers the better. Trimbrook light-
ly framed but fluent in action showed good speed while Magic Gaye’s
performance was a triumph of ability over adversity.

The breakdown of Watercress before races appeared to leave the
Class at the mercy of Mary Ann but in actual fact, it was Top
Flight who dominated. A most attractive Bay Filly by Flotsam out
of that outstanding mare Meads, Mr. Wong’s entry had two firsts and
two seconds for her four starts; and it is to be hoped that her success
will encourage others to make the trip in the future, In defence of
Mary Ann it should be said that the tactics pursued in her last start
were such as to minimise her chances. In actual fact the duel for
early position in which she and Top Flight (the two top weights)
indulged resulted inevitably in the race going to that old sluggard
Cross Bow whom Holder rightly drove from flag fall to finish.

A.nong the F Class winners, the most significant development was
the emergence of Seedling, who after his rather disappointing show-
ing in the Derby came back to win two nice races. He is a useful
type of horse who should continue to improve. The very speedy
Miracle won her first start as she liked in brilliant time, but five
and a half is as far as she gets at present. First Admiral apparently
felt the effects of his Trinidad campaign. Cardinal a little “short”.
to begin with came on as the meeting progressed and credited his
owner breeder, with two wins. He will never be a world beater
but he is honest, consistent and likely to improve. March Winds
also lost his Maiden Certificate and Rambler Rose who earned money
in each of her four appearances was unlucky not to do the same.

The complete domination of the two year olds by Apple Sam is
I hope, a temporary phase. This must not be taken to mean that
I do not wish Mr. Goddard's splendid colt well, but in the interest
of racing I should like to see him with a bit more to do, Possibly
stiffer opposition will be forthcoming from among those who did
not face the starter this time, but I am confident that Apple Sam will
take a bit of beating no matter who he has to face.

Comment on the G class is almost unnecessary. The standard
prevailing is best assessed from the performance of Gavotte who, after
being left half a furlong, won the last race for her class comfortably
with top-weight.

SCOREBOARD’ —

24, 1952



POLICE vs, WANDERERS T S Birkett c Bowen b Atkins 38
Police First Innings J. Greenidge 1.b.w.. b Atkins . 32
F Taylor b D. Atkinson aa 41 J; Goddard’ not. Outs iscsi ee eee ee M8
Cc, Blackman c Mayers b D. C. Evelyn b Phillips ‘ ‘ 5
Atkinson Sind 46 M. Foster c L, E. Harris b N. Harris 31
C. Amey ¢ Toppin b D. Atkinson .. 5 W. Greenidge b_ Walcott bake tha
Vv’. Farmer c D. Lawless b D E, L, G. Hoad c Phillips b King 1
Atkinson bs 59 TT. Hoad 1.b.w., b King ae 17
J. Byer c D. Atkinson b St. Hill .. 14 4. R. Jordan b King 8
A, Blenman not out 3 Extras: b. 4, 15. 3 os JF 7
G. Sobers stpd. wkpr. Knowles, Sa
b St, Hill oe 0 Total . ‘ . 242
B. Dodson c wkpr, Knowles, b be aes
gt. Ai. + 0 Fall of wickets: 1—0, 2—14, 3—85, 4
Cc. Springer b D. Atkinson .. 9 —86, 5—91, 6—159, 7—199, 8—202, 9—228.
C. Mullins b St. Hill .. ; 0 BOWLING ANALYSIS
C. Bradshaw run out . 1 Oo M R w
Extras 8 @, King ... 18) ke BA, 4
— F. Phillips 13 3 38 1
Total - ssc. 1656 «4, F, Harris 14 1 59 0
— «,. Bowen oe 7 0 33 0
Fall of wickets: 1—24 2—48, 3—84, A Atkins . cece 0 40 2
4-135, 5—135, 6—135, 7—135, '8—144, N. Harris ...... 3 2 8 1
9—145, kK Walcott 3 1 7 1
BOWLING ANALYSIS Spartan — Hirst Innings
2: te. R w A. Atkins c Jordan bE. L, G. Hoad 4
, Atkinson . 24 a 64 5 LL. F. Harris not out .......... a
G. Skeete i 3 0 6 0 E. Cave not out Hastie Ss
R. Lawless 4 0 29 oO —_—
H. Toppin - 8 0 21 0 Total (for 1 wkt.) . 16
L, St. Hill 13 1 27 4 ame
EK. Ramsay 1 0 1 0 Fall of wickets: 1—11.
Wanderers — First Innings BOWLING ANALYSIS
W. Knowles not out tweed oe ae Oo M R w
D. Evelyn not out ........65. cee eee 17. «+H. R. Jordan its 1 6 0
Extras ........45 6 J, Greenidge . 3 1 4 0
— &. LL, G. Hoad .... 2 0 6 1
Total (without Joss) 95 CARLTON vs. EMPIRE
—— EMPTRE — IST INNINGS
BOWLING ANALYSIS O. M. Robinson b Warren .. ,, 30
oO M R w C. Hunte c. Wk, (Marshall) b G.
Cc, Bradshaw oa by ME A inc Edghill .....+. te eben Riu oe
Cc, Mullins ....... : “2s 0 27 0 E. A* V. Williams b Warren Ww
F. Taylor . diem 2 0 12 0 C. Depeiza ibw C. B. Williams .. 81
G, Sobers ..c-scinee & 0 20 0 E. W. Grant c wk. (Marshall
J. Byer... ond 1 0 5 9 WATE ees rictecedseeeeens a
PICKWICK vs. SPARTAN W. A. Drayton ¢ & bC. B.
Pickwick att ensengreresbee & 242 Williams =... ..+--5 Bids ‘ 1
Spartan (for 1 wkt.) ........... 16 O Fields run out ...........- rie 1
Pickwick — First Innings S. Rudder c G. Edghill b C. B
A, M. Taylor l.b.w., b F, King vin D WHAM Live ceecvceesessitboeses 4
E. Edwards run out ................ 9 e On Page 5

YES SIR/ THEYVE EVEN BOTTLED’
THE STUFF, AND CALLED IT “ex?

CARIB LAGER 2, THE FINEST BJ
a nV SEER BREWwEDY
Yi) ;
SUNDAY, AUGUST 24,
Olympic
Sports

Quiz

LONDON.
How closely did you follow the

Olympic Games? “Here are 20

questions on some of the high-

lights of the Helsinki fortnight.
1. Who won the first Olympic

Gold medal ever obtained

by a Luxembourger?

. In. only one of the follow-
ing events was the old
Qlympic record not broken.
Can you spot which one:
Throwing the nammer, 400
metres hurdles, 100 metres
and Hop step and jump.

3. Which female competitor

nm

won two individual gold
medals in the swimming
events?

4. Who was the only boxer

to win a gold medal at
Wembley in 1948 and at
5 pelaiay!? ¥
. Hungary beat Yugoslavia
in the Soccer final. © What
was the score?

6. In one of the boxing finals
a competitor was disquali-
fied for not entering suffici-
ently into the contest.
Which divisien was this
and what was the boxer’s
name?

7. Great Britain won only
one gold medal, in the Prix
Des Nation. Can you name
the three persons who made
up the British team?

8. In one of the swimming
events the father of the
winning competitor jumped
fully clothed into the pool
to congratulate his son.
Can you name the son and
the event?

9. Who did the United States
beat in the final of the
basketball?

10, Which athlete finished

runner-up in both the 100
metres and the 400.

11, Zatopek broke the Olympic
record each time in winning

the 5,000 metres, 10,000
metres and Marathon.
Right or wrong?

12. Who was the only com-
petitor to win two gold
medals in the cycling
events?

13. Which event did Mrs. Zat-
opek win?

14. How many gold medals did
the United States win in
the boxing events?

15. In the three stages of the
weight-lifting, press, snatch
and jerk, he lifted a total of
1,013}lbs and established a
new Olympic record. Who

is he?

16. Which country won the
Olympics Water Polo.

17. Which country won the
Olympics hockey?

18. Which was the only coun-
try to win two gold medals
in the Olympic yachting?

19. Which was the last track
and fleld event to be staged?

20. With a time of 8 minutes

12:8 seconds J .Tjukalov of
Russia won which event?

ANSWERS :

1. J. Barthel in the 1,500
metres.

2. 100 metres.

8. Bich Racne ek DSA)

ing and Spring-

board diving.

4. L. Papp of H who

won a gold medal at Wem-

bley in 1948, won the final

of the Light middleweight

contest. -

2—0

6. Johansson of Sweden in the
final of the heavyweight
division.

7. Colonel H. M. Llewellyn,
Colonel D. N. Stewart .and
Mr W. H. White.

8. J. Boiteux (France) 400

. metres free-style.

9. U.S.S.R. The score was
36—25.

10. N. McKenley (Jamaica).
11. Right. His times were 14
min. 6.6 secs, 29 mins. 17

secs and 2 hrs, 23 mins. 19.2

secs.

R. Mockridge (Australia) .

He won the 1,000 metres

time trial and with L. Cox

the 2,000 metres tanden.

The women javelin throw--

ing. She set a a new Olym-

pic record with a distance
of 165 ft. 7 ins.
The United States won 5
Gold medals for boxing.
They were fly-weight, light-

12,
13.

14.

1952



Junior Tennis
Championships

Held In Canada

OTTAWA, Aug. 21.

Rideau Lawn Tennis Club as-
‘sumed an international air on
Wednesday as racquet swingers
from the United States, Trinidad,
Cuba, and Switzerland joined
their Canadian counterparts for
the Canadian Junior Tennis
Championships.

The pick of the junior tennis
world, 200 strong, will start their
week-long tournament on Thurs-
day on the courts of the clut
nestled on the shore of the Rideau
River. A new entry this year is
Paul Karman, top junior ball
chaser from Havana, Cuba. The
carrier of the Trinidad colours

Penner of Port-of-Spain,
was here last year, but missed out
on the titles.—OC.P.

Basket Ball

H.C.O.B. Win Knock
Out Gompetition

Harrison College Old Boys
beat Y.M.P.C. on Friday night
35—21 to win the Basketball
Knock Out Competition. Algy

Symmonds scored 19 for College
Old Boys.

The senii-finals for the Knock
Out Compétition were played on
Tuesday when College Old Boys
won from Boys’ Club, and
Y.M.P.C. beat Harrison College.
A record number of spectators
turned up for the semi- finals.

The College—Y.M.P.C. semi-
fina! was a good match, but Col-
lege who won the Championship
Cup earlier in the season, allowed
Y:M.P.C. to direct the course the
game took and this helped to a
great extent in their defeat.

Ih the final College Old Boys
were een at their best and em-
ployed some skilful tactics to
out-manoeuvre their opponents.
Their team were A. Symmonds,
N. Symmonds, K. Hall, J. Best
and C. Forde. These five played
through, but P. Haynes was pres-
ent in case a substitute was called
for.

A pregentation Match will be
played on Thursday night at 8
pm. when His Excellency Sir

Alfred Savage is
present the trophies,

Following this, there will be
weekly practice matches in prep-
aration for the coming tour of
the Trinidad team, Carib-Bears
in October,

John Cobb Begins

“yy..2 Re

Trials Tuesday

LONDON.

John Cobb, hoider of the land
speed record of $94.20 m.p,i:.
begins trials August 26 at Loca
Ness, Scotland, with his Jei-
powered speed boat Crusader.

if they are successful, Cobb
will make an immediate attempt
on the water speed record, cur-
rently held by the American F.
Sayres, who reached 178.49. five
weeks ago,

The Super-Streamlined Crusa
der embodies a revolutionary
hull design and power plant.
From a birdseye view i, iooks
like some needle-pointed futur-
istic racing car with jet intakes
forward of the cockpit.

It will be shown publicly for
the first time August 22 at Kings-
ton-on-Thames, London’s boating
suburb, and then be hauled 500
miles to famous Loch Ness in the
Scottish Highlands.

Powered by a Ghost jet engine,
similar to those fitted in Comet
airliners, the Crusader has beeli
built with two _ pencil-shaped
outriggers each fitted to the hull
by twin spars to give high latern!
stability. The design was based
on an idea given Cobb by Reid
Railton who worked on Cobb's
record-breaking car. Aerodynn-
mic as much as hydraulic factors
were considered,

The 31ft speed boat is built of

expected to



ply and aluminium alloy, spa!
13 feet and, in running trim,
weighs just over three tons. For

possible emergency braking at
high speed, an experiment”!
form of parachute drogue h»
been fitted. —L.E.S.

weight, middleweight, light

heavyweight and heavy-
weight. a ge
15. J. Davis .\U.S.A.) in the
heavyweight S dtghtifting
16. Hungary.
17. India.

18. The United States of Amer-





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SUNDAY



JAMAICA OLYMPIC TEAM

ADVOCATE

THE TEAM which ‘represented Jamaica at the Olympic Games in’ Holsink.

(Back row)

La Beach, McKenley,

Parnum, Laing.

(Front row) Miles, Wint, MacDonald (Managor), Yancey (Coach), Davis.

Champ at Work



~

BITING his tongue, Frankie Sy-

mons displays the form that
brought him the junior marbles
championship at the Illinois State
Fair in Springfield. Frank won
over a large field of contestants.

, 43 Enter For
Canadian Long

Distance Swim

TORONTO, Aug. 20.

An impressive list of 43 men
from Canada, the United States,
Sweden and Egypt was drawn up
on Wednesday for the world’s
championship long distance swim
at the Canadian National Exhiii-
tion on Friday.

An early favourite, on the baisia
of practice workouts, was George
Gevan of Etobicoke, Ontario,
who is reported to have beaten
unofficialy by about three min-
utes, the fifteen-year-old record
of 4 hours 19 mins. 28 secs,

Another top contender was
Lars Bertil Waerle, Swedish dis-
tance champion who finished
sixth in the London Daily Mail
English Channel swim last year.

A competitive swimmer for 18
years. Waerle is being trained by
Georges Michele, veteran who
finished second in the inaugural
21-mile swim in 1921, Other en-

ants included the ‘three-man

gyptian team of Hassan Abou
Bakr, Abdel Latif and Said El
Araby.—U.P.
ica, They won the Inter-
national 6 metre class and
the International 5.5 metres
class.

19. The women’s_ high jump
won by Mrs. Ester Bran
of South Africa,

20. The single sculls ‘rowing.



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Table Tennis ‘

BARBADOS BEAT TRINIDAD 3—2

BARBADOS won

last night.

the th
from South Trinidad by thr:
A fair crowd of t

‘d and final table tennis tes
games to two at the Y.M.C.A
ble tennis fans saw the Sout}

Trinidad team fight hard to win this test but the local bov

were on their toes.



Shooting

Milton Tucker
Topscores

Miltos Tucker top-scored with
100 3* the Small Bore Rifle Shoot
at the miniature range at the Dri
Hall yesterday evening. T. A. I
Roberts was second with 99.

Due to the competitions which
vill’ be held from September 21
to September 27, the attendance
has greatly improved and some
members are hoping that it will
continue to improve.

The next practice shoot will take
part on Wednesday night, August

27

The eignt pest scores were as
follows: M. G. Tucker 100, T, A, L
Roberts 99, A. S. Warren 99, L, W.
Hassell 98, P. Chase 97, P. A, D.
Johnson 95, G. E. Martin 95 and
R. D, Edghill 95.

SCOREBOARD

@ From Page 4

\. Holder ¢ F. Edghill b ¢ B
Williams 19

iM. A. King not out l

H Barter b C. B. Williams 4

Extras: b. 13,w.1 .. 4

Total . ae

Fall of wickets:— 1—17, 2—62, 3—109

4+115, 5-120, 6~—196, 7—188,° 9-212:
9—229

BOWLING ANALYSIS

o M : 4
G. Edghill 7 3 16 1
J. A, Williams 6 31
Cc. B, Williams 24.4 3 86
K. B. Warren 16 1 Oh
F. B. Edghill . 5 21

CARLTON — 18T INNINGS
C. MeKenzie ¢ Grant b. William
R. St. C. Hutchinson not out
N. 8S. Laicas lbw Barker
G. Hutchinson not out

Total (for 2 wkts)



Fall of wkts: 1—17, 2—22
BOWLING ANAL
°o R
H. Barker 6 22

E A. V. Williams 6 3 16
H. A. King . 3 2
HARRISON COLLEGE vs.
AT COLLEGE

HARRISON COLLEGE LST INNINGS
E. Hope lbw b Brookes z

LODGE

FE, Tudor ec Brookes b Wilkie 10
c Smith stpd. (wk. Grant) b

Farmer )
C. Blackman b Riley 47

A. Alleyne b Farmer 9
Mr. S. Headley b Riley 4
M. Worme not out ... vy
M. Simmons ¢ Mr. Wilkes b Riley

S. Hewitt not out 42
Extras ’ it
Total (for 7 wkts) 2

Fall of wickets: 12, 2-42, 3

4—-48; 5106, 6—191, 7191.
BOWLING ANALYSIS
oO M R Y

K. Brookes 17 6 38
G. Outram 10 - 54
G. Wilkie 12 2 49
J. Farmer 12 1 52
K. Riley joer 28 1 57
R. Goddard . 3 = 21

L. Murray 2 - 7



Building Contractors,



Doctor N. Sarkar and A. Mool-

won their games for South
av while play-
‘ on the
occasionally de-



was



efensive and
ghted the fans

with a spectacular

mash while Murray at the other

1 ; doing all the attacking

) Sarkar won 21—-15, 21-15.
8--2T and 21—15

A. Mootchan who is another

lefensive player won his gami

I—18, 19—2] 21—18, 21—16

‘;00ding who played against him
und difficulty in returning hi
ackhand chops.

For Barbados N. Gill, R

Phillips and C. Shields won thei
sames in fine style and gave a
od exhibition of anticipation
nd control.
Perhaps the most exciting
ime was the one in which A
lendes met R. Phillips, Mende
south Trinidad) was the
tacker but every time hx
mashed, Phillips was there to
t the ball back. Phillips is a
rt stocky player who had a
trong back hand ehop and he
ide most of this in the last |

me against his rival, The game
ended 19—21, 15—21, 21—17, 21

19 ang 25—27 in favour of
Phillips.

After the last game was played
Mr. H. H. Williams, Secretary of
the Y.M.C.A. presented prizes
to the South Trinidad team,
The results were:—A. Moolchan
at C, Gooding, 21—19, 19—21,
18, 21—6, K. Assing lost to N
Gill 21—18, 16—21, 14 —21, 20—22,
Dr. N, Sarkar beat B, Murray
21-15, 2115, 18—21, 21-15, A.
Mendes lost to R. Phillips, 19—21,
15-—21, 21—17, 2i—19, 25—27, Cc



Williams lost to C. Shields 10~-21,
16—21

21—19, 102°







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|
j
|
}
|
|
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j
}
topped to ponder 1
just by the way" i
And we view island |
Lou asked; Joe what to sav? |
beach a party
mantic mood
ci ing and possessing (?) |
\nd eating all the food |
|
day Wednesday, Thursday
Was spree from rise of gun |
t d the lorries
ist for fun |
= |
I ttle rice in Bridgetown |

oO went on
f you war
Go down

the spree
t to see rice
by “Cherry tree {

was a mis
Phat Lou
And when sh

ion outing
‘went out to see

|
e saw the menu |
She eried “Good Lord help me
The rice was in a small tayehe
\ lighter full of duck
\ full of gravy
we trike luck
. -
ow bananas |
f Canada Dr |
perch of lettuce
were passing by
.
that wa t
And bovs when lunch time came
|
!

Lnother basket rolled out
With exactly the same

rly breakfast

.
Tr



ind Louw and Robert
to change their host

An



most

|
rhis time this little sister |
Said she was half-way through |
\nd said to Lou girl come on

And try and make this de.

she gave LOU @ small Dasket
And this contained a goat
Beside the other cargo
1 load « Harrison boat |
" i pea rice od string b
Tr iniding and the pie

Eat ] wif

then Robert remembered
thousands without bread
ho at endure starvatio
na a til the dead !

met
1 eader too

vd Robert

wage to Lou \

» brother



We rildre Il, these outing

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PAGE SIX







| Pe
| :
ee Grandmothers
7 =
~\ For 1952
° a B By A GRANNIE
£ eS THE JQB o1 being a grand-
k iS ome;»n parent in these days is a strange
£ y\ he? und exciling one, consisting of a
j * wy number of shocks and surprises,
of adventuring as it does--for gran-
4 INS ;nie—into strange and unknown
A% / 4 | e2rritory.
Nir’. hi Gone are the days when grand-
a sof We mother can proudly hand over the
> family Christening robe, and say
i/ “Of course dear he will be called
Jeremiah, after dear old uncle
No place for School Marm did you say? Oh but it is! Heres |Jerry.” 3
catcindd el i a Shea re aid could be a lesson for you, too She will be told cheerfully, but
Always use 2 SPA my parents used to say. SPA TOOTHBRUSHES | fondly to put the robe away, as
were the finest in her day, and they’re the finest now babies don’t wear “those things”
Well, folks, heré’s a spot of scientific these gays. And, that anyway
knowledge 1 didn’t Jearn at School the child won't be Christened be-
CHLOROPHYLL is nature’s .deodorant— fore he’s five or six months, when
mine too, This is “the morning after the a robe would look ridiculous.
night before.” I take an AMPLEX As to the name, the idea of
TABLET a day and you can’t smell a ealling the child (if its a boy)
drop the morning after. But you must “Jeremiah” is greeted with peals
INSIST ON AMPLEX—there is NQ of laughter. What will it be

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odours.

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that you get it.

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I'm the one who used to

called? They haven’t an idea.
When grannie enquires why the
delay in christening the child—-
five- weeks was the time in her
day—she is asked “what’s the
hurry?” And, on the spur of the
mement can think of no suitable
answer, All this of course takes

lier clear off familiar ground,
and, mentally floundering, she
tries to dismiss from her mind

the picture of a sweetly sleeping
infant looking like a Cherub in
a long lace robe, and replace it
with the vision of a_ bawling
struggling five months child, as
he tries to. beat off the strange
man who is attempting to pour
cold water en his head!
Preparation too for the expec-
ted baby bring more shocks to
grandmother, for they are, in her
opinion almost non existent.

The idea of everything ready
by the seventh month has “gone
with the wind.” No longer do
dozens of finest linen garments
hand tucked and embroidered
grow in piles, no longer is the

cot decked in satin bows and the
Baby Basket, nursery, and pram
all prepared weeks ahead in
readiness as fit for a little prince
or princess,

No. No. All that in the view of
the young couple is “fuss” and
a “Waste of money” and say
they “what does a baby want
with clothes in this climate”
Once again grandmother finds
herself at a loss and has to give
herself a mental shake as her
day-dreams of a dainty clad
baby plus bonnet and matinee
Jacket are replaced shudderingly
by those of a naked infant clad
fashionably in nething but a blue
spotted nappy, while visions of
the child dying painfully of
pneumonia haunt her.

When the baby actually does
arrive grannie’s mental condition
is such that she is prepared for
almost anything, and her baby
jcy and re.ief is great when she
sces that in appearance at any
rate, the child is just like the old
fashioned ones. Something famil-
iar at last,

But granaie’s shocks are by no
means ever. In her day, milk
was considered the proper food
for a baby up to a year,

Not so in 1952.

At five months her precious
grandchild is being fed strained
vegetables, and at a year old

c extraordinary food as

cheese, bacon unscraped meat,
mango, paWw-paw and goodness
knows what else goes down his
throat.

He is put to sleep alone in a
dark nursery—night lights are
old-fashioned—no rocking or pat-
ting. His hours are different, his
parents attitude to him is differ-
ent, end grandmother hears about
such things as “mether and
father complexes”, ‘possessive
»arents,’ “frustration” “fixa-
tion” ete. until her poor old brain
s in a whirl of confusion and
uncertainty.

The old ways are dead, Long
live the new,







,

, ob
| anyone with a delicate stomach.
yourself and your family,




cuckoo
CT eens

BNO” and “ FRUI





T SALT” are Registered 7

SUNDAY



ADVOCATE



It’s Called The ‘Windbag’ Line

LONDON.

Yet another suggestion of the
way you can look this season igs
given by up-and-coming Scottish
designer Ronald Paterson, He
calls his new look tha ‘“Windbag”
Line because it features “an in=
flated jacket which touches the
choulder blades and fits closely
over the hips.” He teams this
jacket with straight skirts as well
as full skirts,

He concentrates on “storm”
colours, suggesting misty grey,
copper or tan combined with
black. Colour acc@nts are piper
green, peacock blue, wild violet,
and midnight blue.

Fabrics include doeskin (for
suits and evening wraps), long-
haired shiny coatings (“silver
blue”, or platignum grey” in
colour), and chiffon jersey (draped
in Grecian lines for evening
dresses).

His coats have giant collars.
They could be phantom beaver
or piper green wool, or midnight
~— squirrel on copger coloured
wool,

And he continues to show th@



And, when it is all summed up
what is the answer?

The old ways are gone. Wil
these new ways produce safer,
happier and better balanced men
and women?

It is too soon for the whole
answer to be known, Certainly
the babies and young children
are healthier. Grandmother finds
in spite of the dark and lonely
nursery, and no rocking to sleep,
that the baby sleeps through the
night—an unknown thing in her
day. Far from dying of pneu-
monia from the lack of clothes
the little beggar does not even
catch cold as her babies did.

And the strange hours and diet
seem to suit him, for he grows
‘strong and sturdy. But what of
this new parental attitude, the
strange new alocf, almost
detached relation of the modern
parent to the child, will it
develop these children in some
untried way for the better? It is
too soon to tell, only time can
answer that.

But, in spite of all the shocks
and surprises grandmother fee.s
a slow growing confidence in
these new ways. The old ways
are gone, and as she watches her
sturdy healthy grandchild she
knews that the new ways in spiie
of their strangeness have much
to recommend them, and she
looks forward full of hope to the
child’s future.

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short evening dress which does
double duty as a cocktail dress
He uses such materials as blue
satin striped with black, black
faille, and black tulle embroid-
ered with chenille. A particularly
striking short evening dress in the
collection was in midnight blue
taffeta, Halter-necked, full skirt-
ed, it was draped with coral red
taffeta.

Evening dresses ar@ extrava-
gant, richly coloured and lavishly
embroidered, A mother-of-pearl
satin dress embroidé@red with dia-
mante arid pearl drops ... a tur-
quoise and gold brocade dress
draped with black velvet ...a
peacock blue satin dress with a
new season’s touch in its single
shoulder strap.

Star of the evening materials
in the collection was the new
white chiffon Jersey. Intricately
draped on a crinoline and worn
over 50 yards of starched petti-
coats, it was topped magnificently
by a “wild violet” doeskin wrap
cut on the same generots lines as
a bishop’s robes, with deep fox
cuffs dyed to tona.

New details noted: outsize
kooks (some two inches long) on
dresses and suits, always more
decorative than functional; little
topknot” hats made of feathers
punctuated with jewels, and the
“Leaf” Mmeckline, which offered
an interesting variation on the
traditional collar-line of suits and
cocktail dresses, Revers fanned
out across the bodice in the shape

of a leaf,

The Grasshopper Look

By way of contrast with this
London line, comes the “Grass-
hopper” look from Mme, Schis-
parelli in Paris. She has trans-
ferred the shapes and forms of
grasshoppers into fashion. Suit
revers jut forward to form ’wings
and coats and suits have pointed
tail panels. Curious hoods and
hars are formed from deep cow)
collars. Crowning touch is the
wide-winged cap—said to be in-
spired by that of an “amorous
grasshopper,’—whatever that may
be.

Unfortunately all photographs
of London’s new couture models
are embargoed until the end cf
this month. But here are two
new season’s dresses from the
collection designed by Pierre
Balmain for Rembrandt. Right: a
tailored cocktail dress in black
grosgrain. Smooth shouldered,
high necked, it has unusual tab-
buttoning. Left: a day dress in
amerald green wool. It has gath~
ered corages, and folded skirt
panelled over a_ sheath-tight
underskirt.

On silver-headed, pink noter
paper, Elizabeth Arden announces
that “Bath mits” are back on the
market for the first time since
the war. These are made of soft
towelling lined with creamed soap,
blended with soothing cosmetic
ingredients. Used as bath gloves,
and dipped in water, they give a
good lather even in*hard water,

The impossible happens and, oh, what a row

Woman

From R. M. MacCOLL
WASHINGTON,

IN Harrisburg, capital of the
State of Pennsylvania, a horren-
dous uproar breaks forth.

Politics, of course?

But no. The unbelievable, the
unmentionable, the impossible has
happened — a woman player has
been signed up to play for “an
officially accepted men’s baseball
team,

And what an eyeful she makes,
does Mrs. Eleanor Engle, brunette,
24-year-old stenographer with a
flashing smile and graceful figure.

*

IT’S the Harrisburg “Senators”
team, a minor league side, which
has thus smashed precedent and
precipitated a splintering row.

Now, although there have been
all-women teams playing against
each other more or less as a stunt
since the war, that had nothing to
do with the real thing.

And even in this land where
woman so often rules the roost,
it seems that the traditionalists

IPANA

IS THE ANSWER

Joins The

are not at all ready for “Mom”
to appear. with bat in hand.
* *

FIRST to signify his disapproval
is the club’s manager, gruff Clar-
ence Etchison, who didn’t know
the dreadful surprise about to be
sprung on him by the 24-man
board of goVernors,

“She'll play when hell freezes
over,” opines Etchison. “I'll have
no gals in my team.”

But the governors say that Mrs,
Engle has already been practising
with her male colleagues and
“looks real good.”

cs * e

BEFORE she can appear in a
match, however, her contra¢t must
be approved by the “Czar” of the
minor leagues, George Trautman,
over in Columbus, Ohio, And
Trautman is already muttering
that he “takes a dim view.”

Pretty Eleanor’s contract says
that she will get £1,200 for play-
ing through the remainder of the
current season.





Protect your gums and you protect your

teeth, for gum troubles cause over 50 per cent. of tooth-
losses. To promote firm, healthy gums, use Ipana tooth paste —

Ipana and Massage. Use Ipana,

also, to brush your teeth extra-

white and reduce acid-forming bacteria that cause decay. This
is the way to keep your whole mouth healthy; the way you will
find “refreshingly different”? because of Ipana’s mint flavour.

REFRESHIN



THE TOOTH PASTE..
GLY DIFFERENT ,

A PRODUCT OF BRISTOL-MYERS, LONDON AND NEW YORK

3

SUNDAY, AUGUST 24,

- Anglo-American Babies

1952



Mothers ‘Fingerprints, Babies Footprints Are

Filed at the Hospital

(By VIVIEN BATCHELOR)

BURDEROP PARK, (Wilts.)

The swing doors leading to the
delivery room at the end of the
corridor opened. We heard a lusty
yell. Then a British nurse walked
cut carrying the latest British-
American to be born at Burderop

“It’s a boy,” she said through her
mask, “Isn’t he beautiful?”

The baby, name of Willis, was
the 16lst British-American to be
born at Burderop Park since the

. OB. section opened on January 8.

“O.B.” is the hospital nick-name

Southern England come to have
their babies. :

The babies are British-Ameri-
cans. Under British law they have
British nationality because they are
born here: by American law they
are American since their parents
are American citizens.

They are being born at the rate
of nearly 40 a month, When a new
wing now nearing completion is
opened, the hospital will be able
to take up to 75 a month.

The specialist in charge of the
section is Captain G. R. McNear,
of the U.S. Air Force Medical
Corps. ;

Head nurse in the section is
Captain Claire Egan, of the wo-
men’s section of the United States
Air Force nursing service. She
comes from Newport, Rhode Island.
She has a staff of three American
Air Force nurses, and four British
civilian’ nurses. ,

One of the British nurses is
Sister Barbara Cannings, whose
home is at Chisledon, near Swin-
don, She looks after the babies in
the glass-lined germ-proof nursery
where they are kept for five days,

Another British nurse, Miss O.
Foster,. looks after the babies at
night. I found both nurses talk-
ing proudly of young 3lb, 1loz.
Susan Gennigan, who was being
carefully reared in an incubator,
but was doing “mighty well”.

If babies are premature or
under weight they are kept in
incubators until they reach 5lb.
Then they are allowed to go home,

If the birth is normal the

mother is discharged from the

hospital after five days and is
collected by the father. I watched
Staff Sergeant D. McInturff, who
is stationed at Bassingbourne, and
his wife, Delia, climb into their
car with
Alan, Said Mrs, MclInturff:

and can be used over and over
again. They come in two fra-
grances—“Original”

five-day-old Thomas

(an almond

for Air Force Wives

“I never thought our first baby
would be born anywhere but in
America. I've been over here four
months and was going to stay back
home in El Paso, Texas, for him
to be born, but I’m glad I did not.”

Her husband had taken out the
front seat of the car and organised
a full-length bed for his wife. “I

Park American Air Force Hospital, couldn’t get an ambulance and I
near Swindon, Wilts.

did not expect to see her walking.
It’s grand,” he said, as he arranged
the cot,

Technical. Sergeant William
Fuller and his wife Elzina, whose
home is in Maine but who live at
Manston in Kent over here, took
out their baby daughter Lorraine.
thought I’d have a
well as an American
baby.” Said Mrs. Fuller.

The mothers-to-be come to
Swindon about a week before
their babies are expected (they
have to book months ahead.)
ey find it very difficult to
get into hotels.” Captain McNear
said.

“There are not many in the neigh-
bourhood,” i

Six weeks after the mother
leaves Burderop Park she is asked
to return for an examination of
herself and her baby. She also
makes a visit to see Captain
MecNear at least six months before
her baby is due.

There is no charge to the mothers
for medical or surgical service but
they pay for their food while they
are in hospital, and pay for their
own transport and hotel accommo-
dation.

I met one mother who had come
from Paris to have her baby—a
girl named Marie, She was Mrs.
D. K, Edwards, wife of the United
States Defence Minister in Paris.

Everything to do with having
a baby is made absolutely. normal
at Burderop Park. Within eight
hours of the birth the mother is
up on her feet.

Captain McNear says this makes
post-natal complications less likely,
As soon as a baby is due a neck-
lace is made of blue beads and let-
tered beads spelling out the moth-

’ er’s name. The beads are always

blue—I thought at first all the
babies were boys.

While the birth is taking place
the necklace is sterilised. As soon
as the nurse carries the infant out
the “label” is placed around its
neck and sealed with a lead bead.
The necklace is never removed
while the baby is in hospital.

A further identification check
is made by taking the mother’s
fingerprints and the baby’s foot-
prints. Both sets of prints are

_ filed. Since they never change

they can be checked years later
if necessary.
WORLD COPYRIGHT RESERVED



scent), ang “Blue Grass.” —L.E.S
“BING’S IN.” In millions of the dangers of helping hitch-hik-

American homes—and, more im-
portant, in the offices of the cool-
eyed men who wield the advertis-
ing dollars — the accolade is ac-
corded to “old groaner” Crosby,
after his TV debut on a 14-hour
non-stop programme designed to
raise money for America’s Olym-
pics team. There'll be plenty of
Bing on the little screens from
now on. Incidentally his “tele-
thon” — with Bob Hope — raised
£357,000.

POOR Gloria Swanson, Her lat-
est film, “Three For Bedroom C,”
has had one of the most merciless
“pannings” that I can recall from
America’s critics. Typical sample
(Baltimore Sun): “ ‘Sunset Boule-
vard’ delivered Gloria from the
obscure status of a has-been and
re-established her as a star of the
first magnitude, ‘Three For Bed-
room C’ may well send her back
to the museum.”

ALTHOUGH American motor-
ists are regularly warned about

In Paris
London

New York..

women are

buying perfume
this new way

INEXPENSIVE HANDBAG PHIALS

There is no finer
cost so little,
the same as that

ers, 25-year-old Charles Murphy,
of New. York, heeded the outstuck
thumbs of two youths as he was
driving his new car in Long Island.

After all, Murphy recalled it
was the kindness of other drivers
which had enabled him to hitch-
hike all the way from Los Angeles
hack to New York when he’d been
demobbed from the Navy.

But he was soon ordered to
“pull over and stop, bud.” The
youths handed him his bag and
drove away in his car,

Then came the unkindest cut
of all. For two hours the strand-
ed Murphy tried to thumb a ride
himself—but other motorists “trod
on the gas” when they saw him
signalling from the roadside.

AN advertisement in a New
York newspaper says there’s a job
going for a qualified stenographer
at a whopping 255 dollars a week
(about £91). Only snag—it’s in
Iceland,

“She looks real good.”




OF A COSTLY PERFUME
perfume made than Goya—yet it neea

The perfume in Goya handbag phials is

in Goya’s world-famous costly bottles—

there is simply less of it, These phials were introduced by

Goya so that a woman could carry perfume about with her,

in her handbag ;
matter where she
fragrance. Get a

Handbag Phials by

eova’s HEATHER, Like a breeze from
the moors, sharp, clean and refreshing.
GOovA's vismation, Gay and vital,
4s sparkling as crystal.

In seven fragrances +

% Decision, Vibration, Goya Heather.

Gardenia, Great
Expectations, Pink Mimosa, * No. 5,

so that at any moment of the day, no
was, she could renew and refresh her
handbag phial of Goya perfume to-day !

a.

PAR»
LONDON

NEW YORK

.

MADE IN ENGLAND

Sole Distributors :

L. M. B. Meyers & Co. Lid, P.O. Box 171, Bridgetown





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\

{
},
oe


SUNDAY, AUGUST 24, 1952 SUNDAY ADVOCATE

This Look—And No Other—Sums

PAGE SEVEN

p Man About Toun







———————

U dreamed I was a



OPENED DAILY SOLD OUT & :mous ‘Father Brown| well-rounded figure in
DAILY and no wonder at these Stwric The recently eceived
tonishing price ‘Tror 8c to ‘Low’ Company aricatures
Fa ny on Over a dollar per yar Low and verse by Helen # @ °
| ; these are DRESS MATERIALS Spalding and L, A. G. Strong is| Ae ‘
ae FROM _N E. WILSON & CO. on ; veryone’s reading. And I vasten NAW CH, OTS
S 7 | Swan St. the result of a Norti av——so is ‘Cricket Crusaders’ | Ye
1 / ‘American and European glean- bi Harold Dale |
ing by Mr. Wilson himself — ' . Allegro
newly returned from an extend- z

NEW SPACE, NEW ‘COMFORT,
NEW LIGHTING typify the re-
nodelled MILLINERY DEPT. of
the MODERN DRESS SHOPPE
n Broag St. Complementing the

jed buying tour in far places
; Superb qualities and in colours
| and patterns that are NEW from
| leading manufacturers for YOU

BELLE...



By PHYLLIS DIGBY MORTON yy 5 E. WILSON’S. Rate f new decor, the inimitable
j aed is terrific on these lines and Kreindler technique provides
IN a hundred years’ time, when ; ftiendly advice is to get in truly beautiful millinery from
historians thumb through the | serty while tha wrappings are Canada and the United States.
fashion books to find out what the Bae ng off. : rhis captivating headwear is of
girls looked like in the first ’ Velvet, Felt and Straw and quite
Cropped hairstyle | as the ray are reign of Elizabeth \ Gavan, a nit 1B-0 @ last word, in any earn
Poodle it. , how will the act? haa — y ow? Yer dedly the accent for a
Will they ara this 1952 Le 1“. bave added to Wedding or Cocktail party.
Summer Belle as she appear | e eservedly popular *
ona weduchiiie * dlonoreult lavours with JAMAICA DR 3 MORE THAN A MATCH FOR
Grail) she strike thers os qualns |GINGER ALE — an absolute {LLS8 & CHILLS — should in-
as this glamour girl of 1558, the | Winner from the start, my friend. crest you, you'd think?, It’s
year the First Blizabeth ascended | With the same assurance of ASPRO, the ready-to-hand de-
the throne? purity, quality and distinctive tenca against Colds, Headaches,

We might imagine our historian | flavour as the famous Ju-C Bev- .oothache, and just plain Nervi-



a - erages, this JAMAICA D , et all lots saan: a on
trying t - % , = é RY wess and lots of other comm
the 1952 aeae ea rey GINGER ALE is what Ginger ‘complaints too, Hygienically
int 2 meee Se ee Ale really should be, It’s on rapped in individual waxed-
ee = Se St tlsyes's mays sale everywhere. iper compartments, ASPRO
fe at the new Aericl - ° * n be taken safely by old and

FOR FISHER MEN—Plantation
Ltd. have received a new ship-
) ment of MESH WIRE—18”, 24”
$6", 48” by one inch, and it’s the
real McCoy for the coming Fish

ot Season. For the POULTRY

vung. Costing only 6c. for a
nall size packet, ASPRO can be
ith you at all times -— and
1ould be in this weather!

“ .

His research would show a slim,
curvaceous girl whose curves were
offen produced artificially. This
was achieved -by accentuating the
hips with horse-hair stiffening or



Â¥RIAD COLOURS JAM-PACK

pads stitched on the hips under MAN, there is two and three-foot (HESE GROANING SHELVES
the skirt, and petticoats lined with xy 3” netting. and with thoughts end if anything drops, it’s
Extra revealing bodice called the coarse net and trimmed with frills f fish again, mention should be NEVER quality. GEORGE!

Deep Plunge of lace,
Tortoise—Shell Effect

Her skin was sun-tanned, and

made of the very complete rance
1! FISHING LINES and HOOKS

‘arried by Plantations Ltd

SAHELY & CO. and their float-
ing stock (literally in and out’
ive offering SHEERS in Lemon,



often deliberately glossed with oil ‘ink; Peach, Blue, Orchid and
Her hair was cropped as casually A WHOLE LINE OF MORRIS White at $1.39. And TAFFETA

TiCoAt

as € boy's, but very carefully AUTOS have arrived at’ Wort VANTASIA in rich Gold, Royal f
streaked with contrasting colours las Royal Garage Ltd. Interested it re aan Po oy Have the shapely young figure
to give a tortojse-shell effect. The 5-ton MB Té CTA at $2.31 anc

fRUCKS? Morris \OIRE TAFFETA at $1.72 — all you've dreamed of! Let Al
first in its field with the Morris ¢) which have ial perfec-
She used a paint brush to make Vans and Pick-ups coasnie een f which have the usual perfec

es
‘

legro’s superb control mold

her mouth any shape she fancied. avourites. As for CARS! the Otay AMERICAN your curves to perfection. lift
She darkened and pencilled her Morris Minors (2 and 4-doors) are a . beautifully, cive you a
eyelids to give them a feline took hy you bea uid

In again in new colours and guar-
anteed to loosen the purse string
while the big 6-cylinder Oxford
ie ready
They will,
snough!

and then blanked them out with
dark glasses of fantastic shape and
colour.
Exposed—And Outlined

She wore in the street as well as
on the dan¢e-floor, a revealing
bodice—it exposed as well as out-
lined. .

In previous periods, such as tne

IF ANYONE SHOULD KNOW
HOW TO SOLVE IT — Courtesy |
Garage should. In fact they do!
What’s this? Your grass cutting
problems when the answer rests
with a HEAVY-DUTY 5’ TRAIL-|
ER TYPE MOWER. This new!
irvival accompanies Side-deliv-|
cry Rakes, Self-lifting Rakes and |

really fashionable bustline. See

Allegro® now. in your favoi
fabrics.

Genuine Maidenforin Bra si
eres are made only inthe tn

States of America.

to glide off
teo, if

floo;
lon

the

you look

17)



ADVOCATE BOND WRITING
PAPER & ENVELOPES—respec-
Full skirt, over crinoline petticoats, tively 66c 48¢. both

and offer

> Crop Colleetor: Ss ders).

a la Ballerina Napoleonic and Victorian eras, xcellent value in fine quality euethes on ee | ‘ bey, ,
where fashion had decreed a dar- Stationery, The Advocate Book Massey-Harris. and Ferguson| Taereisa 4d7d eiifotie
ingly low neckline the tendency Jept. as alway rovicde scel- Wheel Tractors & Farm Equip- ; rab
was to hold the bosom high, .tight- ent teadling’ ana’ to itch “nent — ahd they should kpaw! for every type of figure.

ly compressed. For the first tame







| ) ! the eye is G K Chester- ph, 4616.

in history, in 1952 fashion em- siinsesppucinssnininenteniningieatenaminatatsinsinaneginpeaapaannaigiired a pennibeiiie's |
phasised the division of a woman's

bosom. The brassiere of 1952 was - Th: ‘ pd mew,

designed to produce this effect. euoroomarue sy eanuven Ins {s tne eee yy

This was the summer that
the craze for dieting reached its
climax and was featured in every
newspaper and magazine or tele-
vision and radio. So her diaph-

industry, who said it, would ruin
their trade,

Well, there she is, our Summer
Belle of 1952, the first year of the

neo-Elizabethan era. As you sit on

| Happy RELIEF
FROMBACKACHE

Neighbour said “Take Doan’s Pills”

Her accessories might seem to
our historian an interesting mix-
ture, Outsize pearls in her ears
and round her throat. Short, white
cotton gloves on bare, brown arms,

the promenade and watch her -
swing past, judge her with the
coldly critical eye of the research
student of 2052,

Carton for

macy = Vi











—L, E. 8. , y P wil
tagm was fiat, her waist tiny, three or four clanking chain Ts = ae 2 . We cei Hoke tabckocaa
a its earn are OAttE by a bracelets. i - rheumatic pains, lumbago, stiff,
wide, wide belt tightly pulled in. What kind of hat? Our historian Ww >, T ; —— iI aching muscles apd joints or the
She swung her hips to show found to his surprise that more hat 8 Cooking In The Kitchen houks nt. ra Cr yy Sorted urinary disorders due to
off her ruffled petticoats under often than not she wore none. * de Sat sluggish kidney action when you
her full skirts. On her feet she This, he wrote in a marginal SALADS Cut in small slices the pine- COUGH MIXTU DE j might get happy relief. -
E bad. nofhing but @ nih te wad note, soma from the contemporary NEAPOLITAN SALAD apple, the bananas, 1 peeled This new chteha tei Utantel Bhd bles come a See, ee
High-heeled, strip-toed oes; sole boun er foot with a few records ve aroused a gi Smalj cauliflowers 2, Salt, Oil, orange ..® stolen if i wins VENO'S COUGH MIXTURE yple bless the y they te
painted toenails. thin thongs, deal of hostility from the millinery vinegar, Pepper, inahinian = pws 2 seems Se pa ogee ' ine VaRG + FOpel + ee pa Broan's Backache Kidney Pills.
tia ge ey "be oc ae YFP T ITT ee: Ce PUN " Green or black olives, Capers. pawpaw). Add 3 nuts in small medicine inside the bettle is the s ime pen Se tie ae ont
® This is the traditional salad picées of course. Cut the lettuce onderful remedy for stopping coughing kidneys forealey out their function
oO e irts et nger which is served in Neapolitan also in very small pieces. Mix pact. CsLiNg Sit. Bioetan, OOH of ridding the blood of excess
eee homes fo Christmas Eve. Cook with cream, 1 pingh of salt, 1 grease ia aes ondontra it ee acid and other impurities
re the cauliflowers « when read) ote sae d , lh ng chestand lungs. | Vié. Sis good fo . G ry-
By EILEEN ASCROFT pang og renee} foe, cowl nam hair is cropped very short, fluffed (they must not gn soft) cut ine Pee ae See: ee the whole family, Get some immedia‘ely, whan pound con's Pills to

PARIS
Aum clothes, according to
i the fashion designers, will be
two inches longer for day wear.
This tendency, seen in London
earlier this week, was confirmed

by the first of the Paris shows.
The Little Dressmaker’s dream
of the 1930's is launched again by
Jacques Fath. He plays the theme
of the jumper suit with loose cowl
neckline, hip-length waisted
jumper and tightly pleated skirt,
BY DAY it appears in flecked
wool jersey in tones of black and
cinnamon and donkey grey. FOR
©COCKTAILS he keeps the same

There is this loose-fitting look
about the whole of M, Fath’s col-
lection. A woman’s figure re-
mains her own secret.

Shoulders are still sloping with
low-set or Magyar sleeves.

Top coats are loose and straight,
with flat tailored collars and large
revers,

* * * *

Evening gowns have the same
cowl collar or draped, rounded
bust line, very loosely fitted.

Colours are black and white,
and brilliant shades of electric
violet and canasta red.

up at the sides and back. They
wear head-hugging turbans of
jersey off the forehead but well

down on the neck. Makeup is
pale, with concentration on the
eyes.

# * * *

RUYERE preserves thé natural
shoulder and waistline. The
skirt hangs softly, with fulness
drawn to the front, back or sides.
The Magyar sleeves remain, also
the big draped sleeves set in low.
The poncho cape, Mexican-
inspired, is worn over dresses and
suits.
Another version of the cape is

them in pieces, Season them with
salt, pepper, oil and vinegar. Add
the anchovies, a handful of black
or green olives, a handful of
capers. Mix everything and serve.
You can add some tinned salmon
or tunna fish.
FRUIT SALAD

For 6 people: Pineapple 3 o2z.,
Bananas 2, Orange 1, Apples,
Nuts, Lettuce, Cream % glass,
Salt, Sugar, Lime Juice.



shoulder cape in hand-knitted
flecked wool.

Materials are figure moulding
silky looking for day clothes, with

SALAD PROVENCAL

Beetroots 3, Onions 2, Ancho-
vies 8, Mustard, Vinegar | table-
spoonful, Pepper, Salt, Olive oil
3 or 4 tablespoonsful.

Bake 3 beetroots in the oven,
When cooked peel them and cut
them in small squares. Cook ir
the oven 2 onions, let them cook
for quite a long time, when ready
mash them and sift them, Collec
the purée in a bowl, then add
the 3 anchovies also sifted, the
mustard, 1 tablespoonful of vine-
gar, 1 pinch of pepper, a tiny bit
of salt and 3 or 4 tablespoonsful

ee ee er ae



$7OPS CoUo;is



QUICKLY /



their friends and neighbours. ®

si"? DOAN’S }*

Prater for

Your Now Tyres will have

The golden-haired M. Fath has
chosen auburn shades for his
models’ autumn hair styles. Their

of olive oil. Mix this sauce with
& fork by beating it thoroughly.
Add the beetroots and serve cold.

jersey top and adds a _ pleated
skirt,of needle run lace of chiffon.
Dresses confirm the new longer

three-quarter-length over a slim
skirt,
Yet a third known is a tiny

watered silk and gleaming satin
featured for the cocktail hour.
—L.E.S.







EVERYTHING |

IN MILEAGE

Wider, flatter, dewper tread
with a pattern that persists
to the end.






IW SAFETY

Serrated ribs an‘i knife
cuts to stop skidadiug on
wet surfaces.








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p |
a cottons that make lip so (] beautifully mito clothes

af











for your children and yourself,

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choose carefully . .

use Faithfully . . vardicy make the right preparation

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For deep-down cleanliness use a Yardley Cleansing Cream.

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PAGE EIGHT

BARBADOS etl ADVOCAT,

aaa Sea See Bet
Printed by the Advecate Co., Lté., Bre-* #1. Bridsstewn

Sunday, August 24, 1952

Party Government

DURING an address to the Chamber of
Commerce on Wednesday the Hon. H. A.
Cuke referred to the passing late at night
of an address on which only seven’ out of
24 members of the House of Assembly
voted in favour.

The passing of that address is note-
worthy for several reasons.

Firstly it is remarkable for showing how
real is the cleavage which exists within
the Barbados Labour Party on matters of
policy. Of seven members of the Barba-
dos Labour Party who voted on the address
six voted against the official government
attitude to the address which had been
eloquently presented by a member of the
Executive Committee, Mr. F. L. Walcott.

Voting against the address and therefore
voting against the official party decision
which had been outlined by Mr. Walcott
were Messrs. Miller, Mapp, Barrow, Talma,
Holder and Brancker.

Mr. Cuke was concerned with the effect
which a resolution in favour of national-
ising the wire broadcast service system in
Barbados might have on prospective in-
vestors of capital in Barbados,

But so was Mr. F. L. Walcott. Speaking
with the responsibility of a member of the
Executive Committee and as spokesman
for the official view of his party, Mr. Wal-
cott warned: “We are in a subtle way
making this island of Barbados the one
island which people who want to invest
capital would avoid”. Yet in the voting
which took place on the address Mr. Wal-
cott was the only representative of the
Barbados Labour Party, for which he had
spoken officially, to cast his vote against
the address.

No clearer illustration could be given
of the difficulties which the leaders of the
Labour Party are experiencing in formu-
lating a rigid policy which is acceptable
to a majority of the Party.

The voting on the address in favour of
nationalisation of Rediffusion was not an
instance of individual party members re-
fusing to toe the party line as has hap-
pened on several occasions during the
present parliamentary session,

“Tt was an instance of the official and
responsible party representative, who
holds one of the four “ministerial” posts
being voted against by a numerical major-
ity of his own party. This is a strange
manifestation of party disunity and is an
outstanding example of the variance of
views existing among members of the
same political party.

Mr. Walcott was reported at the time
of the debate as having counselled mem-
bers to “devote their energies to the basic
needs of the community and stop all the
talk about nationalisation of Rediffusion
which would only tend to make outside
private investors avoid Barbados.”

Yet the only two members who voted
with him against the passing of the ad-
dress were not members of the Barbados
Labour Party on whose behalf Mr. Wal-

cott was entitled to speak with authority.

Besides the divergence of cpinion which
exists in the Labour Party, the inability
of the Government party to secure suffi-
cient votes to support its own official par-
ty decision on a matter of public import-
ance is worthy of note.

The suggestion has been made before
in the columns of this newspaper and by
private observers that there seems no
need for the House of Assembly to debate
matters of great importance to the com-
munity after dinner.

Members of the House of Assembly are
each paid $1,000 per year for their services
rendered as politicians. In addition the
following salaries are paid annually: to
the Speaker of the’ House of Assembly
$1,900, the Deputy Speaker of the House
of Assembly $1,450; Chairman of Commit-
tees $1,450, Leader of the House of As-
sembly $1,650. Members of the Executive
Committee receive a total remuneration
of $8,400.

Before the introduction of payment of
members of the House of Assembly, poli-
tical service was a_ particular form of
service which certain individuals elected
to give to the remainder of the community.
Today no one would attempt to disparage
the political service which is rendered
to the community by the paid elected
members of the House of Assembly yet
the fact that they are paid does give the
taxpayers a special interest in their poli-
tical activities.

And whereas it would have seemed un-
gracious in the days when members of
the House of Assembly gave their time
freely to discuss the affairs of state for
which they bore an especial responsibility

to suggest that the business of the House
should be conducted at any special hours,
today there is every reason ‘why the tax-
payers should be interested in the time
at which member to whose

of day

remun¢ ntribute conduct

their

ition they

SUNDAY

ADVOCATE



If the House of Assembly were in the
habit of meeting for more than one day
a week during the periods when the House
is in session the public would appreciate
the desire of members to expedite business
of the House by means of occasional late-
night sittings. But since the House rarely
meets more than one day per week in
full Assembly lateness of the commence-
ment of the business of the House and the
frequent extension of that business after
the hours of dinner has often caused
surprise.

The development of party government
in Barbados in recent years and the emer-
gence after the last elections of a political
party with an overwhelming majority in
the House of Assembly has accentuated
the obvious disadvantages of late night
sittings.

The climate of Barbados is such that no
man can be expected to give of his best
after a day spent in exercising a trade
or profession. Yet members of the House
of Assembly because of the habit of late
night sittings are expected to express
points of view and to contribute to de-
cisions affecting the whole community
after full day’s work very often in the
heat of the City.

The development of party government
has also resulted in diminution of the
administrative importance of the Civil
Service. It would be much more conveni-
ent and certainly much more efficient if
the House of Assembly could arrange for
18 meetings to be held during normal
working hours so that files on all subjects
could be made easily ‘available through-
cut the discussions of the House’s business.

Any visitor to the House of Assembly
during the hours before noon will have
noticed the much lower temperature
which prevails in that chamber at that
time of the day.

There may be reasons why it would be
impossible for the House of Assembly to
1evise its hours of meeting, but from the
point of view of climate, administrative
convenience, and greater efficiency the
case for commencing in the morning hours
reems a good one, And the remuneration
which members receive ought to compen-

ate them against loss of a day’s private
earnings.



On Names

THE importance of a name has perhaps
never been more vividly presented to the
man-in-the-street, or more correctly to
-he man in the theatre or easy chair than
by Oscar Wilde,

‘here are persons to whom the exact
spelling of a name or the correct pro-
neunciation of a surname or its precise
enunciation distinguish the man of refine-
iment from the brute beast.

Barbados as an island has never been
fortunate in receiving the homage of men
of refinement. From the beginning of its
arrival as a place name on the lips and
maps of civilised man it has experienced a

variety of nomenclatures. In English

literature the island is best known as “the
Barbadoes” and this picturesque spelling
wes adopted by the press-gangs who helped
to recruit’ English labour for the planta-
ticns in the high-handed fashion which is
more frequently associated in the minds of
readers of romantic novels with the verb
shanghai,”

On maps of the world Barbados has been
spelled in many ways, or has been
associated with several place names,
4smongst these are “Barbudos”, and “St.
Bernard.” On one unusual! map which
hangs on the wall of a well known Barba-
dian seaside home Barbados is situated
somewhere in the mid Pacitic. Scholars
and historians could no doubt add to the
list of spellings by which the island has
been remembered during the hundreds of
years which have elapsed since it first
came to the notice of seafaring men.
Mention ought to be made of the Letters
Patent with its quaint reference to “the
island of Barbados and its dependencies”
and to the habit common among so many
of its sons and daughters of pronouncing
it as if spelt “Buhbadus”, And if the name
of the island has undergone many trans-
formations of spelling and geographical
setting at the hands of learned men and
women from across the Seas, the names
of its towns, villages and inhabitants are
at the constant mercy of the publishers
of newspapers and especially of their em-
ployees. :

English sub-editors on the infrequent
occasions when they consider any news
emanating from Barbados as suitable for
the Empire-ignorant masses of the United
Kingdom are not averse to spelling our
ancient and venerable city of Bridgetown
older than Montreal forsooth as
Bridgton. Worse horrors have occurred.

But the newest and strangest of all the
alterations which have befallen our historic
names was perpetrated by no less an organ
of august opinion than — we chronicle it
with humility and as an example of the
pitfalls which daily best the publishers
of the printed word—The Times of London.
On August 14, 1952 subscribers of the
Times of: London reading of a conference
opening on September 9 to discuss
Canadian trade with, the West Indies were
told that “Dr. Grantley Adams and Mr.
Coke” were coming over from Barbados,
By contrast the names and styles of the
Jamaican and Trinidadian representatives
were correctly printed Barbadhs, it seems,
is not as well known in London circles as
we sometimes fondly imagine,

S foreign hot
net appear io be oilering thc
same sycopnantic we.come to ex-
hing rurouk now ‘he has been
|de-wironed 1 wonder if the piay-
jboy of the Near Sastern word
would care to stay with his Uncle
Nat tor a while?

Aithough we could not offer
him luxury in the Sea Nest, wé
could at least offer him a glimpse
of life he has never seen before,
and would proebab.y never want
to see again.

Of course, he would have to be
disciplined after a life of self-
indulgence. At first, he might
sulk over his breakfast kipper,
aud would, no doubt, fly into an
ex-reyal rage when he under-
stood that his ration card enti-
tled him to one stale egg a week.

Mad with hunger at his first
Sunday lunch, he might try to
snatch the entire joint off the
dish, though a sharp rap with
a carving knife over fat knuckles
woud teach him that his Uncle’s
life partner, the Plucky Little
Woman, is a_ strict believer in
fair shares and has no respect
whatever for V.I.Ps.

* x £

}




















At tea, having already wolfed
his butter ration, he would have
margarine toast, bloater paste
and sticky buns, but if he tried
to sake tne jot, another rap with
a teaspocn would keep his
hands in his pockets.

By supper-time he would be
too nervous of a crack from the
bread knife to reach for his
share of beans cn toast. After
supper, despite his love of the
gaming tables, his fingers would
be too sore to deal a hand at
ha’penny nap, the only card
game hig Uncle Nat can under-
stand,

Empty and weary, he would
then be put to bed in his Uncle’s
dressing-rcomh. As the bed there
is known as the Hog’s Back,
because the worn mattress
springs make it rise in the mid-
dle and slope sharply at either
side, he would spend most of the
night falling out of it.

Even if he dropped off to sleep,
he woud soon be awakened by
Lottie the Devil Cat, who jumps
through the open window soon
after midnight, like Cinderella

FOR

THE Y.M.C.A. came to Barba-
dos 35 years after its formation
in London. Last week the 72nd
annual general meeting was held
at the new headquarters in Pinfold
Street,

Writing about the Y.M.C.A, to
people of Barbados might well
stem to be teaching grandmother
what she has long forgot.

I myself am old enough to re-
member the Y.M.LC.A, as the place
where about sixteen years ago I
first learned how to throw a fout-
call into a hoop on a lawn
where now. stands a luxurious
motor car in a show window.
Today the Y.M.C.A, has crossed
the road and now owns acres of
playing fields around which a
nigh wall is being built.

In 1930 the Y.M.C.A, had 373
members. Today there are 657,
Mlembers pay 36 cents a month.
fhe premises are always open
and an old slogan “join the
Y.M.C.A, and say goodbye to
lonely evenings” seems aptly
phrased. Whether it’s billiards,
basket ball, table tennis, reading,
writing, debates, religious study
or light conversation on a cool
well-lit verandah that meets the
young man’s fancy in August
1952, he'll find it at the Pinfold
Street Headquarters of the “Y”.

Barbadians, people are fond of
saying (I sometimes say it my-
self) are a “cliquey” crowd; they
never mix, but oscillate in their
own circles. The truth of course
is never as simple as that and the
cliques of Barbades are nowhere
so sharply defined that they
don’t rub shoulders willy-nilly
on some day of the 265. At the
“Y” however there are 10 cliques

Members come from almost all
classes of Barbadian society, The

‘| Genera]. Secretary, whose enthu-

siasm and undaunted faith in the
*y” makes him perhaps its most
valuable asset, keeps a list ot
callings of members. The list
exceeds 600 but the following
cross section of members’ call-
ings indicates the absence of
‘liques. Today's “Y" members
include barmen,-chemists, aythars,
motor mechanics, merchants,
pedlars, electricians, tailors, cab-
inet makers, draughtsmen, cash
boys, parochial treasurers, mes-
-engers, planters, bookbinders,
bicycle repairers, overseers,
teachers, chauffeurs, clerks, stu-
dents, bookkeepers, telegraphists,
ministers of religion, jewellers,
civil servants, ‘welders, butlers
and salesmen. You could hardly
find a more mixed bag anywhere
else in the island or a collection





FENCE
ify NATHANIEL
GUBEINS

the ball, to sieep on the
ped or its Occupant.

eicer

It is said of the tough training
ut the brigade of Guards aepot
at Caternam that aller six weeks
mere, hey eltner make a recru:t
into the worid’s best soldier or
break his heart,

Much the sume could be said
of raining at the sea WNesi,
except that we could break Far-
ouk’s heart in haif the time.

NOTE TO ABOVE.—According
to a gossip column, and a possib.e
musprint, Farouk’s favourite
companion at all-night gambling
parues was a courtier called
Abdul El Ahmed Bey Bey.

He was also the origin of the
song ... “I Wonder Where My
Bey Bey is Tonight.”

Uops, Pardon Me

ROM a newspaper cooking

recipe:—

Salad Loaf:
from sandwich
length-wise into

. Margarine top
siices. Margarine other two
slices on both sides. Spread
bottom slice with mayonnaise,
top with chopped watercress
and lettuce. Cover with slice
that is margarined on both
sides. Spread with cream
cheese seasoned with chopped
onions, Cover with other slice
margarined on both sides.

Remove
loaf,
four _ slices.
and bottom

crust
Cut

Repeat mayonnaise spread
and salad layer. Cover with top
slice, margarine side down.

Coat top of loaf with mayon-
naise. Cut at table into one-
inch thick slices.
* oe * *
You can have my slice.
In Darkest London
N his arrival at Victoria
Station, Mr. Andrei Gromy-
ko, the new Russian Ambassador,
said: “I wish to be acquainted
with the British people.”

If he has been foxed by
Russian propaganda, he has a lot
to. learn.

For instance, he may believe
in the English boy who is the
chief character in “The Ballad



“of Oxford-street,”

SITTING ON THE

written by
the Russian poet Kostyrev and
recently broadcast, according to
the B.U.P., on Moscow’s radio.
Here is a‘ translation of two
of the verses:— ,
In Oxford-street a youngster
stands
' Aged twelve, with bright red
hair, .
He only dreams of food
becat

use
No food is ever there.
ae ae a doll, a pretty

That can both laugh and cry,
One 4. a smile, two tugs,

a .
“For a penny, sir, you try.”
According to Kostyrev, the
hard-faceqd men who are ignor-
ing the starving boy in Oxford-
street and letting “his consump-
tive mother lie on. a bed of rot-

ting straw,” are stockbrokers
walking to Thread-needle-street.
* a * *

When Gromyko knows more
about the geography of London,
he will also Know that the stock-~
brokers must not only be hard-
hearted but pretty jhard-up if
they have to walk all that way
when the piace is crawling with
buses and taxis.

When he has read the facts
and figures of juvenile delin-
quency in Britain, he will under-
stand that the prostrate woman
on the straw was probably
somebody else’s mother who was
as fit as a flea until the red-

haired boy hit her with a
home-made cosh,

* * * *
Later, when Gromyko has

become acquainted with Giles’s
cartoons, he will appreciate that
the following is a truer pictur?
of British youth today:—

In Oxford-street a. youngster
stands
Aged eight, with’ bright blue

eye,

He holds a cosh in either
hand ;

To sock the passers-by.

Sometimes he has a_ hand.
grenade

For aunts he cannot bear,

One tug, a pause, and then a

bang—
And auntie isn’t there.



MEN

of individuals less worthy of the
description of cliques,

Yet despite the apparent com-
prehensiveness of the list above
tnere is q notable absence of
dockworkers, street sweepers,
warehouse porters and other
manual workers. Since the
Y.M.C.A. is open to all men ot
good moral character and the
subscription is within the reach
of every worker the absence of
port workers: from its member~-
ship is «particularly noticeable,
especially when the work that
the “Y” does for the Navy and
Merchant Marine is remembered

While I was chatting to Mr,
Williams, the General Secretary
ast week, a seaman arrived with
a note from a steamship agent,
He and another seaman had been
left behind when their — ship
sailed. So they were sent along
to the “Y". Where else? Upstairs
in some of the seven bedrooms
were billetted visiting table~
tennis players. And in these same
bedrooms not. long ago lived
Trade Unionists who attended «#
course arranged by the C.D. & W
Organisation.

Each person living in the
Y.M.C.A. rooms pays $3.00 per
day for bed and full board.

Meals are served thoughout the
day at the Y.M.C.A. from 7.30 in
the morning until 7 at night and
the only break in cooking seems
to be between 2 p.m, and 3.30
om.

On special occasions the can-
teen downstairs is opened for th2
sale of light refreshments until
quite late, ° ;

One of the facilities offered by
the Y.M.C.A. is of especial value
to cash boys. These pay only 10
cents for a large Barbadian
breakfast which would cost other
members 60 cents. The difference
is made up by a special cash boy
fund.

Other boys make use of the
Y.M.C.A. to play table tennis
without paying membership fees,
although they_have to rent the bats
and balls, The “Y” has at least
three table tennis tables and they
are in use from dawn to late at
night.

Provisions for resident and visit-
ing guests have to be bought and
stored and more than $22,000 in
purchases were made for this pur-
pose laat year. Cooking is done
on gas stoves and gas rings and
there is a large refrigerator,

The “Y” also offers laundry
service on the premises.



Our Readers Say

Local Dramatic Films
= ae -
To the Editor, the Advocate,
SIR,—In the island to-day there
are many shows presented by
wmall groups such as the efforts
of the Barbados Players formerly
the Bridgetown Payers and the
Barbados Dramatic Club before
amalgamation. Then there is Mrs,
A. L. Stuart’s Revuedeville School
of Dancing which started in 1939
and for the last three years has
been” staging an annual show
with crowning success, Shows like
these are needed to show the out-
side world exactly what we can
do in stage performances and the



only means of so doing is the
Barbados Film Unit,
“The Barbados Film Unit which
is connected to the Education
Branch is run by the Government,
I do not know what is their limit
of production, but I do know that
t would really be considered
e financial ground
The Film Unit can make money

uetion ‘Give “Your

for itself, It started its work in
1950 and released its first pro-
Child A
Chance’ in January °51 to both the
local commercial cinema and the
Colonial Empire. Now this is a
documentary film and no doubt
there has not been any financial
receipts by the unit. It also has
filmed other documentary shorts
like ‘Better Pottery’, ‘Cotton In-
dustry’, Musical Ride’ in the Police
Department, the ‘Elections under
Adult Suffrage’ and the opening
of the House etc. I feel that in-
stead of filming all productions
of this type, the unit could use
a few thousand feet of film on
some of the local shows mentioned
previously, and with my sug-
gested scheme, the unit would
benefit financially and give oppor-
tunity to local talent to be known
outside of Barbados,

All the productions by the Bar-

bados Film Unit have met with
n favourable comment. How much
more W se shows of art



acting?

nd dramatic





ONLY

Cleanliness is easily practised in
buildings so generously equipped
with showers toilets and flush
latrines, The spacious verandah
looking on to the large playing
fields compare favourably with
many Barbadian clubs and is
almost as large as the downstairs
of the Trinidad Yacht Club,

Upstairs a large room is avail-
able for indoor table _ tennis.
lectures, musical performances,
amateur theatricals or religious
services,

Behind this room, is a reading
room and plans are now being
made for the establishment there
of the library which is presently
housed in another room near the
front of the building.

The “Y” offers several
rooms for use by Barbadian
organisations. The Chess Club
has permanent premises at the
“Y” and so has the Clerks Union,
Downstairs the front of the
building is reserved for the St.
John Ambulance Association.
Other organisations which have
made use of the Y building are
the British and Foreign Bible
Society, the S.P.C.A., the Foot-
ball Association, the Referees
Association, the Royal Navy and
Merchant League, the Elementary
Teachers Association, the Phar-
maceutical Society and the Extra-
Mural Department of the Uni-
versity College of the West Indies.

John Harrison who did so much
for West Indian painting that his
recall by the British Council was
everywhere regretted and whose
absence is still felt, made the ““Y”
his headquarters when in Barba-
dos. Everybody makes use of
the Y and even members of the
juries are “locked up” in “Y”
bedrooms until the ending of their
cases,

A catalogue of what goes on at
the “Y” or what the Y has done
for Barbadian young and older
men would fill more than a year’s
issue of Sunday Advocates.

small

The important thing to remem-
ber is that their work has been
made possible only by the devot-
ed service and support of genera-
tions of Barbadians. What the
Y is today: what it-has achieved:
and what Barbados owes to it
was all done by public-spirited
citizens of this island who laid
sound foundations in days which
are too often represented nowa-
days to have been without any
social conscience at all. After
completing seventy-two years of
service, the Y.M.C.A,. stands full
of vigour, proof against such
slanders and prepared to expand
still further its service to the men
of Barbados,



The Film Unit should devise
a scheme to go into operation in
the Suggested way. In a few weeks
time, Mrs. A. L, Stuart’s Revue-
deville of 1952 is coming up and
they could start off by using a
few thousand feet of film on this.
When this production is ready,
a print either 16MM or, 35MM
could be given to a Branch of
the Local cinemas or all of them,
if possible, and an agreement made
for part of the Box Office takings.
Not forgetting the fact that a film
made in Barbidos with Barbadian
actors and actresses would attract
more attention in general than the
regular film from overseas. This
would be a drawing card and
would build up box office takings
immensely.

The cut-for the local produc-
tion would be paid to the Barba-
Film Unit and help to de-
fray expenses incurred. It would
be a kind of ‘help yourself’ system,

dos

V. Cc.

SUNDAY, AUGUST 24, 1952



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SUNDAY, AUGUST 34,

1952

SUNDAY



ROGUES OF THE SEA—1
Francois Lolonois: Most Ferocious

Francois Loionois, ag his
would suggest, was born in France,
When he was still a youth, how-
ever, he was -transported to the
Caribbee iskands-as an indentured
servant, and when he had served
his time he went to Hispaniola
where he teamed up with some of
the hunters.

These hunters were called buc-
rs, their name coming from
their peculiar method of curing
beef by laying it/out in the sun,
which was called buchanning.
The beef so cured was itself
from wild or half wild cattle,
stolen from the Spaniards in His-
paniola — the island known today
as Haiti and San Domingo.

The headquarters of these
nomadic robber-hunters was the
little island of Tortuga de Mar, so
called from its supposed resem-
blance to a turtle. This island and
the meeting place of the pirates
in Jamaica, Port Royal, were
known as “the common refuge of
all sorts of wickedness, and the
seminary, as it were, of pirates and
thieves.”

Lolonois’s career as a pirate be-
gan in Tortuga. He started from
the bottom as an ordinary seaman
but behaved so courageously that
after three voyages he was put in
command of a ship by the Gov-
ernor of the island. His reputa-
tion for cruelty did not take long
to spread, and soon the Spaniards
in the Caribbean preferred to die
fighting rather than surrender to
him, for they knew he was with-
out mercy.

Bad Luck

He was successful at first and
amassed a small fortune. But then
his luck changed: he Jost his ship
in a storm off the coast of Cam-
pechy and although all the men
got to land they were pursued by
the Spaniards who killed most of
‘them and wounded Lolonois, He
was lucky to get away alive but
he was a crafty fellow and he
fooled the Spaniards by mixing
Sand with the blood from his
wounds, smearing it all over his
body, and then lying quietly
among thé dead until the enemy
had departed.

Although he was now literally
helpless he determined to get
even with the Spaniards who,
thinking he was dead, were cele-
brating his death with bonfires in
Campechy. He entered the city
in disguise and managed to per-
suade some slaves to join him.
With their aid he eventually got
back to Tortuga ina canoe and
there fitted out another ship,

In this small ship, which was
little bigger than.a canoe, he took
twenty men and sailed to the coast
of Cuba, Here he expected to find
rich booty, but some fishermen
sighted his shi d. jptommed the
Governor in H vast it “Lolonois
had come to roy them.”

‘

The Governor immediately de-
spatched. ship of ten guns and
ninety ~who had orders “not

to return “into; his, pre: with-
out having Tails destroyed those
Pirates.” To ‘assist them in this he

Sent along. 4. negroe ~ hangman
whose job was. “to hang immedi-
ately every one of the pirates ex-
cept Lolonois, ‘who. should be
brought alive to Havana.”

No rT

But events did ‘turn out as
the Governor expected. Lolonois
and his men-captured the Spanish
ship and cut off the heads of all
the crew—including the hangman
—except one man. This man
Lolonois sent back to the Governor
with a written message: “I shall
never henceforward give quarter
to any Spaniard whatsoever; and
I have great hopes I shall execute
on your own person the very
same punishment I have done upon
them you sent against me. Thus
I have retaliated the kindness you
designed to me and my compan-
ions.”

Luck was now in favour of
Lolonois.. With the good ship
under him again he soon captured
a merchantman laden with plate
and other merchandise, This
prize he took to Torfuga and after
dividing the booty started to
equip a fleet to harass the Span-
iards in the area. .

He went into partnership with
another pirate, Michael de Basco,
and soon they had a fleet of eight
ships ready for sea. And so
Lolonois set off “with intent to
rob, sack, and burn. whatsoever
he met with.” Within a short time
he had taken two valuable ships
and had sent them back to Tor-
tuga to be unloaded. Being en-
couraged by this success Lolonois
and his men set out to capture
Maracaibo, Venezuela. f

Their first task was to €apture
the fortresses on the bar which
protected the town of Maracaibo.
This they did after fierce fighting
and then t the following day
demolis the fortresses. In the
meantime the people of Maracaibo,



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et & FRANCOIS LOLONOTS.,
Fe ; eren wt Olonne ia 2" ok
ae Ceneraad van de Fra
~
having been informed that “the for Nicaragua but running into

pirates will presently be here with
two thousand men,” fled with as
much of their belongings as they
could take to the neighbouring
city of Gibraltar, or hid in the
woods,

When the pirates landed in
Maracaibo they were surprised to
find the city deserted, however
they soon made themselves at
home, occupying the best houses
and making the great church their
main guard.

The next day a large party of
pirates went out to bring in any
of the inhabitants they could find,
They returned in the evening with
20,000 pieces of eight and twenty
prisoners—men, women and child-
ren,

Some of these prisoners were
put on the rack to make them con-
fess where the rest of the goods
were hidden, but they refused,
Lolonois, drew his cutlass, how-
ever, and hacked one of the
Spaniards to pieces before the rest
saying, “If you do not confess and
declare where you have hidden
the rest of your goods, I will do
the like to all your companions,”
After this, one man confessed and
showed the pirates where the
goods were buried in the forest

No Fear »

After about a fortnight in Mara-
caibo the pirates set out to ravage
Gibraltar. That town was weil
prepared, however, and as the
pirates approached they saw an
army of 400 well armed soldiers
drawn up. Lolonois held a hasty
council of war, pointing out to the
men that they would gain much
riches from the city, and they all
promised to follow him. “Know
ye withal” Lolonois warned “that
the first man who shall show any
fear, or the least apprehension
thereof, I will pistol him with my
own hands.”

It was a desperate struggle. At
one time it looked as though the
Spaniards would win and Lolonois
called off his men suddenly and
pretended to retreat, “They flee,
they flee” shouted the Spaniards
and leaving their batteries
rushed after the pirates in wild
disorder. They had fallen into the
trap. The pirates wheeled around
and cut down some two hundred
men with their cutlasses, losing
only forty of their own men, After
this the town was theirs.

The pirates spent a month in
Gibraltar, a month of debauchery,
torture and robbery. After they had
collected all the booty they could
they threatened to burn the city
unleas a ransom of 10,000 pieces
of eight was paid in two days.
They visited Maracaibo again after
collecting the ransom and made a
similar threat, collecting another
large sum of money,

They then sailed to Hispaniola
where the spoil wis divided, and
then they went to Tortuga where
they spent it on debauchery,

Another Venture

Lolonois did not let much time
elapse before he organised another
venture. This time he planned to
visit Niearagua and pillage as
many towns there as he could.

ALolonois and his fleet—there
were six shins this time—set sail

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calms and adverse currents they
were forced after a while to put
into the river Xagua to search
for provisions, They took the town
of Puerto Cavallo and burned the
storehouses and then marched
on to capture San Pedro, When

LOLONOIS “grew outrageously p
iard’s heart,

they drew close to the town they
ran into an ambush, but after a
fierce skirmish they put the Span-
iards to flight. There were a few
unwounded prisoners and Lolo-
nois had them brought before him
for questioning. He wanted to
know whether any more Spaniards
were lying in ambush for him
further on, They refused to
answer, and growing outrageously
passionate Lolonois drew his cut-
lass, cut open the breast of one of
the Spaniards, pulled out the
heart began to bite and gnaw
with his teeth, like a ravenous
wolf, saying to the rest, “I will
serve you all alike, if you show
me not another way.”

another
hard

He was shown
Eventually, after a

way.
fight





Lolonois took the town, and after
pillaging it reduced it to ashes.

After this the pirates decided to
eareen their ships and clean the
bottoms, So leaving one ship in
the Guatemala river to await an
expected Spanish ship they sailed
away to some nearby islands and
set to work cleaning and painting.
Another reason for going to the
islands was the fact that the
fishing there was good—especially
turtle fishing—and the buccaneers
were running out of supplies,

They spent three months in
the islands and then hearing that
the Spanish ship had come hurried
back and captured it, They were
in for a disappointment, how-
ever, for instead of pieces of eight
ill they got from the ship was
fifty bars of iron, a small parcel of
peper and some earthenware jars
of wine

Pirates Discontented

Lolonoi ealled a council of

war and told them that he decided

te go to Guatemala, but his men
were becoming discontented be-
eause of lack of success and they
sailed for Tortuga leaving Lolo-

nois with only one ship.

Fortune had now turned her
back on Lolonois, and shortly
after the others had left, his ship
stuck on a sandbank off the
islands De las Pertas and it was
impossible to get her off again.
There was nothing left to do but
to break her up and make a long-
boat from her timbers and _ this
the pirates set to work to do.

When it was finished Lolonois
set out to the river of Nicaragua
and was again assailed by ill
fortune since he met with a com-
bined band of Spaniards and
Indians who killed off most of his
men, However, he and the few
remaining men got away in the
boat and Lolonois determined to
go to the coast of Carthagena to
capture some ships.

But it was the Indians of Darien
who were destined to prevent

assionate” and tore out the Span-

Lolonois frem
other ship.

As soon as he landed the sav-
age Indians—-called by the Span-
iards bravoes—took him prisoner
and tore him to pieces alive,
throwing his body limb by limb
into the fire, and his ashes into
the air that no trace should re-
main of so infamous a human
creature,

ever robbing an-



“Thus” writes Esquemeling, the
historian of the buccaneers, “ends
the history, the life and the mis-
erable death of that © infernal
wretch Lolonois, who full of hor-
rid, execrable, and enormous
deeds, and debtor to so much in-
nocent blood, died by cruel and
butcherly hands, such as his own
were in the course of his life.”

Botanists Study Pre-Historic
Age Of Tennessee

KNOXVILLE, Tennessee,

Aug’ 22.

Two botanists from the Univer-
sity of Tennessee left here on Fri-
day for a trek into the wild hin-
.erland of Mexico to preserve and
study living plant life that once
grew in West Tennessee's pre-
historic age of sixty or seventy
million years ago.

Botanists Dr. Aron Sharp and
Dr. Royal Shanks will explore
the rugged eastern slopes of Mex-
ico’s Sierras mountains where they
say tropical palm trees and tem-
perate maples and oaks now exist
together and once fed before the



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man age beasts that roamed west-
ern Tennessee.

Both scientists have spent the
last ten years examining fossil and
plant life of Tennessee’s 96
counties and this trip will provide
them with living tropical and tem-
perate plants that once lived side
by side in the State.

Two years ago Dr. Sharp visit-
ed. the site and brought back pre-
liminary reports on the resem-
blance of Tennessee's plant fossils
to that of plant life living in
Mexico's south west Tamaulipas,

‘ —U-P.

Your Co-operation

ADVOCATE

oa





By IAN GALE

Of The Pirates



The People Of B’dos (XX)

“SLAVERY”

Ky John Prideaux

In spite of all the opposition to slave owner was down £26. 17. 3

the abolition of slavery, ‘the
teachings of the clurgy was having
its effect, for it is recorded in
1823, that a marriage took place
at St. George’s Church by the
Rev. Mr. Went; one Robert Jor-
dan was married to Christian
Griffith, both slaves on Windsor
Ploniuon Chere ts an account
o& this wedding, which stated that



the couple had a Phaeton and a
pair of norses, while their friends
had three gigs and five horses,
and all the plantation gangs at-
tended the wedding. On _ the
return of the wedding party to
the house of the bridegroom in
the plantation yard, where tasty
dejeune was served. Then there
were rural ports until fou
o'clock when the party sat down
to sumptuous dinner of turkey
roast beef and pork, bridal cake,
gold and silver eaf and sugar
plums, besides fruit and wines,
and they danced until a late
hour. (1)

The Act passed by the House

of Commons, by which the state
of slavery was to be ‘utterly and
forever abohsheyl) and declared
unlawful throughout the British
Colonies,’ received royal assent
on the 28th day of August, 1833;
but it did not take effect in the
British Colonies until the first day

of August, 1834, This act arrived,
in Barbados on the Sth day o:
October, 1833, and was immedi-

ately made public by the Gover-
nor, Sir Lionel Smith, After this

a system of apprenticeship for
nonpraedial labourers was es-
tablished, and was to last until

August 1840,

‘he Act liberating the slaves,
often referred to as the ‘Magna
Charta’ of the Negro Race in the
British Dominions and Colonies,
awarded the sum of £20,000,000
as compensation to slave-owners
througnout the Empire. Of this
amount the sum of £1,721,345.
19. 7. fell to Barbados, This was
to be dealt with by a Com-
mission, The Governor appointed

the Honourable Ren Ham-
den, the Honourable J. W.
Clarke, the Honourabie _ the

Speaker, William Oxley, and Fors-
ter Clarke, Esqrs., to be auxiliary
commissioners, with himself and
the Attorney-General.) Then
began the necessary consequential
re-adjustments in political and
social institutions. These changes
were carried through chiefly by
the wise statesmanship and dis<
cretion of Sir Robert Bowcher
Clarke, the _ Solicitor-General.
One of his most valuable services
was the leading part he took in
the creation of the Assistant Court
of Appeal, a tribunal which has
proved to be a safety-valve for
the discharge of the passions
aggrieved by magisterial decisions.

The effect of the Christian
teachings and educational pro-
visions supplied by the Bishop and
Clergy were clearly shown at this
period, for instead of the freed
slaves celebrating their freedom
in riotous acts, the last hours of

nlavery and the first hours of
freedom were spent in the
churehes and chapels. The new

centres round which the emanci-
pated rallied were neither ignorant

agitators nor fire-brand orators, tation One historian writing of
but the Missionaries, the deacons, this system refers to how i

pastors and class-leaders of the worked in Antigua and Barbad
Christian Congregation under a He states that it ‘worked fairly
great leader—Bishop Coleridge. wel cn the basis of a reasonably |
The former masters were, how- well-assured supply of labour the
ever, still afraid of the planters, especially those in Bar-
freed slaves, and the bados, were able to effect very |
marked improvements in the |

fresh in their mindé, even al-
though the actual period of tree-
com had passed quietly into his-
tory. The Merchants in Bridge-
town, who had the most to lose
should these freed persons be-
come unruly, used their influence
in having a police force formed,
This was done in 1835; it is stated
to have been the first attempt in
the British West India Colonies to
establish a force of this descrip-
tion,

In August of the same year,
there was published a return of
the valuation of the slaves, so as
to be able to pay each slave owner
the correct amount. It was found
that there was a total of 83,146
slaves which was 339 more than
the Commissioners in London had
‘assumed, causing a slight deduc-



newly
actions of
Haiti and San Domingo were still

tion of 1/8%, per slave or £20.*

4. 0%.
set up for sale under the follow-
ing headings, and ‘were bringing
the prices quoted against them:

Fieid labourers, interior
Tradeamen and first

class inferior people £2 o%
Iiead people, tradesmen,

head domestics £38.17. Sy
toferior field labourers

and second class

people P £18.10.11'%
Inferior domestics £19. 8. BY
Second class £ 7.15. 5%
Caildren under six years

of age £& 3.17. 8%

Aged, diseased, etc., £ 1.13.10%

The general average of classi-,

fled valuation was £53. 5. 1% and
the average for actual sales over
the eight year period ending
December 1830 was £47. 1, 3%.
Thus it will be seen that each

NOTICE





Stock

10. 11,12 & 13) Broad Street.

At this period slaves pees

|
|
|
|





| Cave Shepherd & Co. Lid...
{



on the average for each slave
freed. This was a commercial loss
of approximately £ 2,250,000 that
the merchants and plantation
owners paid towards the freeing
of 83,146 persons. These figures
alone show why there was such
oppesition to the abolition of
slavery.(%)

The Apprenticeship
which was to have lasted until
1840, came to an end on_ the
Estates of the S.P.G. on the 30th
day of May, 1838. The Bishop
went to the Attorney’s residence,
Thomas G. King Esq at 12
o'clock, where people assembled
before the house and the Bishop

System,

explained the matter to them
The Bishop and Mr. King then
signed an agreement for the pur-

pose of securing to them all the

freedom ind privileges which
they would have enjoyed had
their freedom, been conferred by
Act. This agreement was signed

in the presence of Captain Cuy

page, Special Magistrate of tne
District, and witnessed by th

Archdeacon, the Rector of the |
Parish, the Principal and Tutor:
of Codrington College, and the
Chaplain of the Estates. The!
number of persons freed, wei

288 besides.7 infirm and 13 aged
persons. The Bishop's action was
followed by William Matson
Jarrow Esq., of Sterling Planta-
ion, who legally discharged his
sabourers on the following Thurs
day. Mr. Barrow freed 112
sons, These acts preceded
general Emancipation of
by a couple of months,
did not take place until
August, 1838

per
the
Slaves

for this}
Ist of |

The abolition of Slavery caused
many new problems, for in Barba-
dos where all the land was already |
occupied and cultivated by the!
former Masters, there was none |
available for the freed Slave, so]
the slaves were in the undesirable
position of having to work for |
their former owners, The Colo-
nial Office foresaw this, and in ;
memorandum they summed it uy
as trying to find ‘the best mod
of procuring a fair share of labour
for the Slave without using cruel
or unjustifiable means on the part
of the master.’ There was also the
problem that scme of the slaves
finding themselves free would not

be induced to work, thus th:
whole economy of the Islanc |
would be upset. The plantation
Systtm had been a

community
which bought heavily of imported |
goods, thus paying the taxes on |
these goods which supported the |
Government of the Island; but the |
freed slave, having to earn his own
living and support himself and
family, was not likely to be/able
to purchase the quantily of im-
ported goods as was done by the
plantation system

Thus, in Barbados, the ‘located
labour’ system was introduced
(and lasted until 1937) the fre:
slaves being collected in little vil-
lages or tenantries on each plan-
tation; the head of each hou
was granted a certain quantity of |
land which he worked as his
but he was under
work for the owner

ow!
obligation to |
of the plan





urowing and to a lesser extent i

of his life. He would have made}
the manufacture of sugar, Th
result was that in each of the

Islands the production of sugar im
the years 1842-5 exceeded chat

@ On Page 2
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PAGE TEN





eee

Love And Mr. Douglas

Postscript To A Happy Pagan

_. Who Helped To

Make Capri The Most Notorious !sland

NEW BOOKS me

By George Malcolm Thomson
FOOTNOTE ON CAPRI. By Nor-

man Dorglas. Sidgwick and
Jackson. 10s. Gd. 46 pages 48
photographs.

Not long before his death Nor-
man Douglas-broke a good reso-

jution——as was his custom—and,
taking up his pen, wrote a last
brief book on Capri, which he

had loved so tong and whieh he
—with his fellow-Scot, Sir Comp-
ton Mackenzie and the blind
Swede, Axel Munthe—had made
the most fanrous island “in the
world, or at least the most noto
rious. emotes

The little*bouk, excuse for som:
handsome photographs, may . bi
regarded as 4 footnote to Doug
las. If that-ds so, it is a gentle
postscript to a tempestttous-story,
in which theuthree guidiig star
were literature, love and lizards

The Aristocrats

The literature—like the love—
was wayward. As for the lizards
it was the search for a rare blur
lizard ‘that first took Déuglas 1
Capri. Curiosity about “anoth*)
lizard made him, as a boy, lear:
Russian, an accomplishment that
became. of critical importance,

George Norman . Douglass (2

s’s) was born in Austria In 1868
mother, an Austrian aristocrat;
father, Douglass of .Tilquhillie

(Deeside). The
Tilquhillie
old lands
And_ the
there.
No longer there. The castle i
a farmhouse. The Douglasses ar:
gone. Theit Raeburn portrait

are disper
Young an was sent to

schoo] at Uppingham; at 15 went
to Karlsruhe, where he stayed!
until he was 20 and where’ hc
set up an dyreeable little haren

rhyme. uns:
stands on te old,

name of Douglass

for four, He also began to write:
first work, an article,for Thx
Zoo!logist on the colour of crow



athers.

Like any other young man wit!
mere talent than industry he en
tered the British Diplomatic Ser-



vice in 1893. Soon there was an
opening fer a third secretary
the St. Petersburg Embassy,
notably unpopular post, ever in
Tsarist times. Douglas — whe

dropped one § for the purposes
of writing—astounded his stip°ri-
or by volunteering for the job.

Scandal

He did not, however, devote al!
his time to making treaties wit!
the Tsar or studying natural
history. He had a delirious love
affair with an aristocratic Ru:
sior woman whem he call
“Helen”, This high-toned amou
he was able to’ combine’ with
parallel activities on a lower
pane, e

A Russian friend was in the
habit of purchasing young girls
from their parents: later moarry-
ing ‘them off with a generou

portion. The simplicity of tha
system® made an irresistible ap-
peal to the young Scot, But i
was the affair with “Helen” th:

threatened to blow up into scan-
dal.

At this point, Douglas wrote
to the Foreign Office pointing ou
that Joe Chamberlain’s advocacy
of Imperial Preference necessi-
tated an on-the-spot investiga
tion of the tariff systems of thx
Dominions: he suggested himseli
for t¥is duty. Lord Salisbur
agreed#by sending him on a se-
cret mission to Afghanistan,

That. was the end of this caree
as a diplomat, although for 35
years after, Douglas was still o1
the Foreign Office list, receiviny
£100 a year,

Limericks, Too

He married his cousin,
Fiizgibbon; had two sons; was
divorced; lost his money = and
thereafter had to support himse!
by writing. He wrote enough 1t>
live om would have thought i
unintelligent.to write more,

He wrote, one fine novel
Wind, . some» charming trave!
books, ‘especially Siren Land, H
had a ‘weakness for byways ¢
scholarship; was learned abo.
London children’s street games;
composed a volume of imprope:
Limericks, this work was prose-
cuted by th vernment of that
eminem puritan Mussolini__and
was widely read when the Allied






Elsa

Sout

troops reached P-ris in 1944,
He had an imposing array cf
crabbed prejudices — against

English life; the English land
seape (“like living in a lettuce’’);
the Christian religion in any of
eruelty; conventional

j forms:




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atic pains, lumbago, sciatica, bladder

Th trouble starts when the kidneys grow

slugs ish and fail to perform their natural
bd ‘on of filtering away impurities from
ne

vstem. You can réstore these vital
orge..s lo normal activity as many others
s Pils.

plc effect on the kidneys and you will
ried and trusted medicine has broug’

you need, Get a supply from your chemist.

He liked the
of Ouida; fine manners
pany of youth.

With all his talent, it might be
thought he could have made more
of his life. H would §* have
rejected the criticism. “I no long-
er complain of haw I squander-
ed my days; my one regret
that =f have not more of them
to sqaunder.”

It is said to be hard for a mod-
ern pagan to be happy Douglas
found it possible. A ‘Caledonian
Silenus, he presided lucid and
untroubled, over many strange
frolies ih Capri, where he settled
He was generous with money
(when he had it); veady with
bad advice was never too old t
set a bad example. He died at
‘apri, aged 82, impenitent.

CHE BELOVED VAGABOND. By

ality



writings
the com-

William J. Locke. The Bodley
Head. 1s. 6d. 310 pages.
There was a tacit understand-

ng bétween W. J. Locke and his
imirers that his stories shcul

epresent a slight, but decisiv
mprovement on life, and that h
Mardcters should be made _ of
e@me richer substance than flesh
nd blood. They were more dar

ing wittier and at the same time
both Wiser and more foolish than
we art

They dwelt noi on this earth
but inf’ some golden clime usual!
called “France” Not the Franc:
of grasping waiters but Franc

glimpsed by & myopic senti
mentalist travelling on a fas
train to the Riviera

How did this recipe work ou
in practice? While Locke lived
eminently well. Of his 30 book:
he sold over 10 million copies;
was a best-seller in Britain, the
United States and Russia. It en
abled him (a poor scholarship
boy. from Badgbados, ‘where the
was born in 1863, language mas-
Glenalmond, finally secre-
iry ff the Royal Institute of
British Architects) to become
the owner of a fine villa at
tour the vineyards
onee a year at vintage time and
to pursue his hobby—study of
famous criminal trials.

But the life of this tall, whim-
sical man “a Don Quixote in pa-
tent boots and a fancy waistcoat”,
was not wholly a matter of plod-
ding industry, well rewaraed. He
had his own private romance.

One day, in a French circus, he

Cannes, to

fell in love with a pretty circus
rider. She became his mistress;
for two years Locke travelled

everywhere with the circus, do-

ing any odd job that offered. Af-
ter that all his romances were
written ones. He married a

strong-minded woman and adop-
ted—in all but legal fact—tw
hildren, the survivor of whon
Mr. Leslie Mitchell, the broad
caster is present owner of th
Locke copyrights.
After 46 Years
How does the Locke formul
for success wear, as seen in Th
Beloved Vagabond, now in a ne.
ediuon 46 years. after its _ fir:
appearance?
The story has a frail structure
a light wit and no pretension:
Tne adventures it recounts ma
be unlikely; their implausibilit
is gracefully carried off, The cen
ral character, the Vagabond him
self, is an amusing charlatan t
whose frothy charm and bogu
‘philosophy” we succumb will
ingky enough.
Locke, in short, writes to pleas«
a rare quality which ought t
ensure Leslie Mitchell a sub !
stantial unearned income in 195:
World Copyright Reserved
—LES :
Library List |
THE BALLAD OF THE SAI
CAFE. By Carson McCuller: |
Cresset, 153., 433 pages. In he
thirties, Carson McCullers leaa:!
the poetic school of America,
fiction, The strange intensity o
her work, its obsession with th
macabre, emerges im the tith
story of this collection whici
presents the tragedy of Mis.

the hunchback who haunts boti.|
of them. A triumph of “atmos-
phere,” t

THE WATCH. By Carlo Levi,
Cassell, 15s., 296 pages. The best
post-war Italian writer — for
sreadth of humanity and depth

understanding—gathers togeth-

r in this volume (hardly a
\ovel) episodes of Rome, Na-
ples, Florence, from the end-of-
the-war period, Not another
“Christ Stopped at Eboli,” it
could only have been written by
the author of that masterpiece.

—L.E.S.






















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The Last



Hitler

One lesson above all others to
be learnt from the life of Adoli
Hitler is the importance of poli-
ties in the destiny of a nation.

Hitler controlled German pol-
itieal life and thereby controlled
Germany. Nowadays in the Brit-
ish Caribbean, dabblers of all types
who glory in the name of experts
profess to analyse, dissect and
find ready-made answers for al!
the ills of West Indian society.
Whenever it is suggested by ptr-
sons less gullible that this kind of
well-paid exercise is almost value-
less and has little bearing on West
Indian problems because politi-
cians are busily engaged in en-
trenching themselves and are
themselves propounding all the
inswers the experts withdraw like
snails into their insulated shells
and make purring noises of dis-
approval against the Siudacity of
those unfit to breathe their rare-
fied air.

For all such experts who have
uissed The Last Days of Hitler by
Trevor Roper, its availability in
a Pan edition gives them an oppor
tunity to see how important it ir
that they should not dither in
i political vacuum, What happened
in Germany could not happen in
Barbados nor in the British Carib-
bean on quite the same scale, but
the political apathy of those whc
vught to be playing the leading
role in West Indian politics and
the stupid pretence among the so-
called experts to be above poli-
tics makes it very possible thai
in miniature the Hitler story
could be re-enacted in these ter-
ritories, The Last Days of Hitler
exciting as the liveliest thriller, is
a challenge to all peoples to watel
and see that politicians do not be-

come dictators. It also squashes
all the fanciful stories about
Hitler which the Nazi mytholo-

‘ists have been so keen to foster

Pan hag recently published
Murder in Mesopotamia by Agatha
Christie and The Body on the
Beam by Anthony Gilbert. Agatha
needs no introduction to readers
of detective stories and Murder in
Mesopotamia gives Poirot a per-
fect background for the exercise
of his talents. The Body is found
on the beam of a house of ill-
repute in a London, street wher
xzentlemen prefer not to be rec
ognised. The evidence is over-
whelming against one man until
even more overwhelming evidenc>
is piled up against the real mur
derer. A taxi plays a key role in
the story,

og * *
Some people think that Margery
deserves a Place with
{ickens, Thackeray, Galsworthy
id other word painters of th
»glish character. Brittania New
»rtainly supports that contention

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Days Of

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has recently published, Margery
Sharp writes in alighter almost
kittenish vein and this story is full
of the holiday mood which som¢
English people achieve when visit-
ing the Continent. Even in thi
lighthearted novel, however, he:
skill at characterisation is alway
evident

What sort of person is the suc-
cessful author? In providing Clues
to Christabel, Mary Fitt attempts
to answer that question in the
highly charged atmosphere of a
murder story. A detective novel
that is certainly different.

Fans of the Saint, Leslie Char-
teris’ modern Robin Hood can
read of his exploits in London in
a recently published Pan.

It is interesting to compare
Edgar Wallace with the modern
detective writers and The India
Rubber Men, a new Pan publica-
tion. shows that when it comes to
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”

Two other new
special mention

In Father Malachy’s Miracle,
Bruce Marshall deals with the sub-
ject matter of the parable in
which the refusal of sinners to be-}
lieve iS said to be-proof against
testimony from the dead. Father
Malachy is a Roman Catholi¢
priest—a good Roman Catholic
priest who performs a miracle in
Edinburgh, He moves a dance hall
containing among others the Ro-
man Catholic Bishop's Big Bad
Brother to a rock in the ocean,
What follows is a brilliant satire
on contemporary man.

The bo incidentally contains
a factual account of what Roman
Catholics believe and details a
large number of popular Prostes-
tant supersitions about what Ro-
man Catholics believe. You must
not miss Father Malachy‘s Miracle.

Cc. §. Lewis, Fellow of Mag-
dalen College Oxtord drifted away
from Christianity as a young man,
but has since been active in its de-
fence. The Screwtape letters and
Problem of Pain are deservedly
read in all parts of the world,
and enjoy a special reputation
among Christians. In Out of the
Sent Planet, the author sees the
Earth in novel form from Malacan-
dva, a planet where there is more
harmony and peace and greater
respect for God’s Law than on
earth.

As in Father Malachy’s Miracle
the story always grips the reader’s
attention. Out of the Silent Planet
and other Pans 4qre obtainable
through the Advocate ae

H

Pans deserve







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ADVOCATE



SUNDAY, AUGUST 24, 1952



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A Se
9

SUNDAY,

HU

=

AUGUST 24, 1952 SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAGE ELEVEN





OWS BODY OF EVA PERON

:

+





through the

Building where it will remain for a year. It will be permanently preserved and ultimately transferred : le y ig
to a monumental tomb in the heart of the Argentine capital. (International Soundphoto) ae ae ceabiisaadl Ge oan HEARING ?
2 $$ $$. er’s” and “Belle-Plain;” where

GE CORTEGE FOLL

=

B ye

a

HERE 1S A NEW VIEW of the impressive scene in Buenos Aires as the body of Eva Peron was drawn
streets hich atop a gun carriage. The body was taken to the General Labor Confederation



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ARE YOU

I HAVE often regretted that I
never had the nerve to get my
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SCARED TO SEE YOUR DOCTOR?

A doctor speaks to those
who secretly fear a pain in
the back.

Doctors do not all agree on the
effects of high heels—but I know
that the Service women I once

The People
Of Barbados

@ from page 9

of the last six years of slavery.’

On Wednesday ith of July,
1838. there was a disturbance =
Walker’s Plantation’ in the parish
of St. Andrew. This arose through
Colonel Richard Morris, who as
a “Magistrate, put some of the
labourers of this estate in the
charge of a white constable and
two or three of the Estate con-
stables, and ordered that they be
carried to the Station-House of
District F. The Magistrate and the
other gentlemen then left and
proceeded to “Jeeve’s” where they
had some business. While they
were partaking of dinner, the
white constable arrived and stated
that “the people of the Estate had
risen in a body upon him and the
others, and rescued the prisoners
after very roughly handling the
constables; he had himself received
several blows, and one Estate con-
stable very narrowly escaped with
his life; indeed would have per-
rish but for timely succor.” The
following morning Colonel Morris
came up to Bridgetown, where he
interviewed the President — the
Governor being absent — and im-
pressed on him the situation ex-
isting in the Parish of St. Andrew.
The President gave him an order
vn the Inspector of Police, who on
Friday} the 13th, despatched a

some twenty or more idlers and
vagrants were seized and com-
mitted, but there was no trace of
the

swearing his life against one la-
bourer, who had threatened him.
It was also reported that the peo-
ple of “Belle-Plain” and “Bruce
Vale” Estates were also showing
themselves very insolent and un-







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t ' ruly. There were t y i : Made ssor
eae t Manor on my (By GEORGE SCOTT) treated by the nissen-hutful ;.. tances whare +B. tendon awe an At tn somali oe wie asen Se ee See our New and Beautiful Assortment of
” His was a joke; my retort winnings * didn't Bet the backaches my lenged the Managers of Estates to Marhill Street, Sisush; Buek ; These, in Designs you'll love.

o 2 e : super-high-heel patients complain fight it out with them, as the BRIDGETOWN ough, Bucks ’ a
would have been serious. I could “I can hardly sit down, and spout today. laimed that the ar, ; vy) =
have chalked Backache Building then I find it hard to get up. If claume: a y were as free as } y=

on the door of his modern house
in the cul-de-sac nearby.

I bend my back then—oh—the
pain. I’m sure it’s something

Maybe that had something to

do with their sergeant-major’s

the Managers, so they could fight
it out ever any matter. (6) These





FOR SPOT CASH we are giving 12%2%

DISCOUNT, Don’t Delay! Come Today! And

For many modern homes—-and serious, doctor. tw your Se isha UP» former slaves and servants had Make your selection where you can be sure of
gardens of any age—are perfectly I was equally sure it wasn’t. “‘Tha trouble, of course, comes Peen accustomed to seeing the a GOOD DIAMOND, and that is at - - -

designed to encourage backache.

Have you ever thought just
how much your back has to put
up with during every day? Next
to your feet, it works harder than
any other part of your body, At

And yet, with so many simple
explanations, patients dream up
endless frightening diagnoses for
themselves,



He had just pitched into his
gardening, digging, hoaing, weed-
ing far too many hours—and too
suddenly—for a man of his age
and style of life.

For years he had sat in his car.

to ease up, to take things more
gently. He did so, and his back~

ache went,
Just—drill

if you wear low heels all day at
home, and then suddenly in the
evening expect your body to
welcome high heels,

The majority of
back cases are classed by doctors

pain-in-the

plywood between the mattress
and the springs of the bed. This
—or a hard mattress—takes some
of the wave out of the backbone,

landed gentlemen fight their duels
over love affairs or for some
small slight offered one to the
other, so this attitude was nothing
new to them; therefore, consider-
ing that they were as free as the

(To be continued)
The Barbadian Newspaper
20th, 1833.
Schomburgk’s History of Barbadgs,

March

re)

ROSES








‘
{.

)

ecu



LOUIS L. BAYLEY

the wok, * the ironing-board, dota , puoaenly, ek ee as “mechanical backache,” gentlemen themselves, they could .
even at the always-too-low dress- flabby back-muscles of his had to It is not serious—but it should avenge themselves for any insult ic Club Boot
ing table, life for women is back- do the work of a navvy. not be neglected. It. can often offered to them by their former f Bolton Lane & SS 4897
breaking. Result: they rebelled. I told him be helped by pushing a sheet of Masters. = Phone 3909 &





It is absurd, I assure you, to be SIMILAR pains can come from Five to ten minutes in a hot Pp 460. : a j ;

scared to go to a doctor with a taking up golf in later life, or bath before bedtime—followed, if ° The Barbadian Newspaper — April ies ; Cooling and Refreshing

pain in your back, In a majority ev@n from wielding a distemper possible, by some local heat and 4. ‘The’ Barbadian Newspaper June ;

of cases there is a simple, un- brush above your head while massage, is often a recommended 2nd, 1838. ' 1a MPO VY

alarming explanation. decorating a room, extra. 5+: (ee rumitmettga wean. poten. OF W. Ue GENT WE VTAND BETW REN YOU AND L

‘ Now most of what I have said And then — here it comes !— har ' ~ — AGENTS — F
{ Just—digging boils down to faulty posture—or exercises. Try these:— * oth, — Se odes ‘
‘ viet ae ‘Sao eee a the atcain put upon the body by (A) Lie flat on your back—on
, ’ e J—a unusua ture—so let’s look the fi :
commercial traveller, who had more closely at the Business of i aha i Seana’ bocaee A challenging statement? Yet true! And serves to

driven his small car round the
country for years.

how to sit and how to stand,
Over-fat people are in more

neck. Breathe deeply and slowly
without letting the lower part of

MAIL NOTICE

Last seaso; z e § Mails for Dominica, Antigua, Montser-
pool ‘and, at te ie. . trouble than most of us. Their your back lift off the floor or the rat, Nevis and St. Kitts by the M.V

ah oe » me retired—s surplus _ weight — which their stoniach bulge. Moneka will be closed at the General
least 20 years too soon. frame isn’t designad to stand— Post Office as under:

But he had longed always to
have his own garden, so he bought

pulls them into unnatural stances.
So their first job is to get

a house and a half-acre on his support, or a diet.

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Cases and Cases of Goods are held

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_(B) Lie on your back, hands at
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Registered
at

Parcel Mail at 12 (noon),
Mail at 2 p.m. and Ordinary Mail

@ On Page 12

THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LID.

White Park Road, Bridgetown
aiaseergyanimaeircsnemageate
ENGINEERS, BRASS and IRON FOUNDERS
Works contain rnodern appliances for the execution of

first-class work of all kinds, and especially to
SUGAR MACHINERY and STEAMSHIPS

in AGRICULTURAL MACHINERY and
GENERAL ENGINE ROOM STORES
of all Description

IRRIGATION PROJECTS, PUMPING EQUIPMENT
and ELECTRICAL INSTALLATIONS A SPECIALTY

2.30 p.m. on the 25th August, 1952



Dealers

THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LID.

Phone : 4546, 4650 Workshop
Phone 4522 Stores Dept:



BARBADOS
NUMERICAL



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JUST PUBLISHED FOR THE FIRST TIME

Any Telephone Number Left on Your Desk Pad
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NOTICE



We the undermentioned Grocers beg to draw to the
attention of our Customers that, owing to the in-
creased:—

(1) High cost of Goods,

(2) Continually rising operating expenses,

we will no longer be able to extend credit over thirty
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We very much regret having to take this step, but
after several months careful consideration, we find
we have no other choice and will have'to enforce same
as from lst October, 1952.

J. N. Goddard & Sons Ltd.
Stansfeld Scott & Co., Ltd.,
D. V. Seott & Co., Ltd.
Alleyne, Arthur & Co., Ltd.
W. A. Medford & Co,
Johnson & Redman

Ince & Co., Ltd.

Perkins & Co., Ltd.

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STARTS ee
S | (444040O6-0600-606000044004


PAGE TWELVE

. &§5. INSON

By







HOPK

“We must st Clostly to-
gether. We must not iet narrow
il and petty-ming ed sel-
hsnness qgiviade us Ver sine
fustory first vegan lor us, ever
since our Islands were formed as
tne savage haunts of pirates. or

rich evergreen estates, we have
enclosed ourselves in the tiny

confines of a few hundred square
miles, never iooking at al] to our
neighbour islanders except as
envious protiteers regard their
competitors for market and
wealth; scamps and masters of
every deceitful art of glutton
commercialism who must be done
down at all costs. We have all
been Trinidadians or Jamaicans
or St. Lucians or Barbadians, that
is, s@parate and self sufficing
communities who want to share
nothing with anybody else, least
of ali trade, and who have de-
veloped socially, economically,
and politically without co-opera-
tion or sympathy, all looking in-
dividually to the mother country
for recruits for the business and
professional classes, and for
sympathy and even condescension
when we wanted our own politi-
cal liberties increased. When, for
instance, Cromwell cut off King
Charles’ head, Barbados refused
to recognise the authority of the

new dictator’s set, while the
other islands made no such dar-
ing comment in their ass¢mblies.
But the time for all that is over.
We must look on. ourselves as
brothers and sisters fighting 1
the common cause, as courageous
and capable pioneers of the West
India nation, as the peopie to
whom our descendants will be
able to lock back with pride ahd
say: “It is to them that-we owe
our self-respect and our ability
to stand up to the rest of the

’

nations of the world as equals.

Moreover, the mothet country
has bequeathed to us one of the
richest literatures and most
healthy cultures on the face of
the earth. Let us go on from
there, not in slavish imitation of
what has been so generously
handed on to us, but by using our
own individuality to build upon
the foundation that has been laid
for us. We must express every-
thing that is truly West Indian.
Our painters and playwrighte,

novelists and poets must present

to us aspects-of our own ° life,
ideas and feelings which we can
love and cherish, They must

bring out the sparkling beauty of
these enchanting islands witn
their silver beaches and perpetual
summer, their fresh breezes and
bright blue skies. We must cling
to these things as our very own
and from them build a new cui-
ture. Indeed our culture has
already been born, and it is now
adolescing. It is for us to foster
it, so that it will eventually flour-
ish in all its virile maturity.”
School-Made Culture

If I were to go on talking like
this, no one will attempt to con-
tradict me, far less to castigate in
impolite and scurrilously uncriti-
eal terms an author who, with
unquestionable goodwill, has set

down his innocent thoughts on
paper to the benefit of everyone
who chooses to read them.

Critics will applaud me for having
searched out the most dazzlingly
profound truths. The politicians
will tell me that I have hit the
nail on the head and that the
true reasons why we have not

yet attained federation and ulti-
mate national stat is pithiiy
ummed up in he proverp
‘United we stand; divided we
fall’! The poets will cheer me
for rediscovering the beauty of
our islands. The West Indians,
if they really accept such idea,
try to produce modern versions
of Constable and Turner by
simply referring to the works of
these artists and giving a West
Indian application (perhaps) .o
their theories of art; and Betore
long we will havé reconstructed
superficial, cheap,

a empty,
machine-made culture thor-
oughly and desperately fca-
demic in its approach and
totally respectale in” point
of ideals and doctrines, but none-
the-less inconsiderable and un-

attractively worthless because it
has been made in schools and
through the assistance of teachers’
notes and codes, and because the
people Who’ have produced it
have not lived a full-blooded life
but rather an idealised and fic-
tionised version of it, gleaned
from books and printed matter of
all” sorts. Besides, had IT ‘con-
tinued in the above strain, no one
would be so abominably concei-
.ted as to call me abominably
conceited for not caring to have
his approval, far less to pander
myself condescendingly to his
particular grades of taste and in-
telligence, whatever those might
be,

There are unpleasant and even
revolting things to be said. There
ure certain facts which — every-
body know to be facts, and which
some people deplore privately,
but which, particularly in Barba-
dos, polite people must pretend
to be ignorafit of and be sure

hot to mention in society, The
innocence of facial expression
which is s€en everywhere de-

ceives only the absolute foreignec,
and not even him for very long.
What is more, all these unpleas-
ant facts, together with some
others which are so prosaic as to
be neither pleasant nor unpleas-
ant, will have a direct and pro-
found influence on «the West
Indian ‘culture’ when it emerges.
The disheartening thing is that
the school-made

is now being consciously
structed at present and foisted
upon unthinking people. asa

SUNDAY



sult of so-small a number can
make life most nauseous to any-
one wh, Raving already had a
bre and more varied exper-
jence, find himself in this new
‘climate’ of opinion’, But there
are certain facts about the race
question Which are interesting to
the artistically minded person
and which, as they are not par-
ticularly distasteful, can he
minutely dissected and examined
without giving offence to anfiyone.
And the bearing of the race qués-
tion upon cultute no’ ‘one: will
attempt to question.

The Races Oi The West
Indies

A culture evoives after a people
has been living to long in ihe
game place, and has for so long
faced common problems that they
have developed a common and
original attitude to life. To speak
after Nietzsche’s manner, they
have long since evolved their owa
good and their own bad. They
have already arrived at an in-
dependant set of moral values,
caing whatever is advantageous

der

to them good and whatever
hinders their aims bad. And 4
people must without question

have the courage to make moral
valuations of this sort, or they
will never become great. No
true stateman can acknowledge
Kant's standard of moral values
applicable by every human being,
and called the Categorical Im-
perative. In short, there must
be something settled and mature
about a people before they can
hope to become a_ nation or
develop a culture for themselves.

Now, looking at the people of
the West Indies, can we really
eall them settled and mature?
They are quite the contrary; in
reality, a medley of races, each
with a different history and a
slightly different character. The
West Indian iy mottley-celoured.
There is hardly any place in the
world where all the races are so
evenly represented. This archi-
pelago is perhaps the most. truly
cosmopolitan spot to be found
unywhere. But the ideas and
mental atmosphere of each one
of the units have been thoroughly
disturbed by this uprooting and
transplanting, and it will take
centuries for us to become settled
into anything resembling psycho-
logical balance. But, most im-

‘culture’ which» portant of all, the poprennt ates
con* of the various races

rought here
were hardly of the best type and
in the one case (that of the

genuine and immortal product of*African) where the type was as

curs, escapes from the true West
Indian life, preferring to make
its own tentative and romanti-
cally uncertain attempt to find a
new and different sort of ‘beauty.’

Take, for instance, the question
of the races of the West Indies.
Nobody will deny that there are
some unpleasant aspects attached
to this matter, such as the occas-
ional nationalistic rivalry and the
respectable snobbishneéss that is
only too’ well known in these
islands. Also, in those places
(Barbados is the chief example)
where the races are few (in this
particular case, two) the mental
narrowness that is the direct re-



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gdod ag any that could be found
in his country, the race could
make no claim to genuine ad-
vanced ‘civilisation. The Negro,
culturally speaking, represents a
vague and terrifying memory of
primitive ritualistic | polytheism
and polydemonism, mingled with
the splendid tyranny of the
African Chiefs and all the reck-
less adventure and_ exciting
horror of native tribal wars,
strangely conditioned into meek
servility by the unscrupulous
slave-raiding Europeans who
purchased hosts of Negroes at the





A Mother of

Told Us This.





price of a few strings of brightly
coloured beads or a few’ pieces
of ammunition. All these things
he still remembers, but With un-

peakable revulsion and religious
feay rather than with pride. The
indian, for the mO8t part of the
lower castes, and deprived any-
way of caste when he crossed
the sea, can make claim to a sort
of mystical civilisation which he
has absorbed as religious train-
ing since the day he was born,
but a civilisation so scientifically
ignorant and set apart. from
reality that it cannot be thought
of as an advantage to anyone who
is foreed to live real life. This
type has for the past two genera-
tions been becoming anglicised in
point of habits, but still retains
a narrow fundamental national-
iam and, quaintly enough, would
like to regard as its home a coun-
try of which it khows nothing at
first ‘hand. The Portugese and
Chinese brought to these parts
as indentured servants after the
emancipation of the Negro slaves,
were also originally of the lowest
classes and consequently cons-
scious of no true civilisation and
culture at all except so much as
they could gather at a distance
from the upper classes, with
whom they could not mix socially.
Of these two races the Chinese

were probably the steadier
und more refined, fhough hardly
superior in any other ways.
Then there are the Aboriginal
Indians, few enough as _ it
is, and who can be set aside
as, in their original state,

the least civilised of all the West
Indian elements. Finally there
are the North Europeans, mostly
British, who were the masters of
all the rest. These were well
,epresented in their upper ‘classes,
which is natural since they were
the conquerors, and _ therefore
were the one powerful civilised
ahd civilising influence, But this
is the point: that in spite of the
conscious North European pre-
dominance, the other ¢élements
still retained; and retain, sub-
conscious or second-hand mem-
ories of the lands from = which
they came and the people from
whom they were descended.
A New Race

The people who talk’so coh-
fidently of the West Indian Nation
and the West Indian Culture do
not seem to realise all this. We
will hardly become a nation or
dévelop a culture until we have,
by a provess of intermarriage and
slow maturing, made a new race
cut of this medley of races.
When this has happened we can
hope to extract what is best in
every race and weld it together
into something thoroughly new
and unprecedented. The Hitlerian
theory of race’ cannot be taken by

us to be true, In fact, “we are
forced for our own good to accept
the very reverse as true. it is

here that our new moral valua-
tions must begin. It is a stupen-
dous task, and will take centuries
in the accomplishing, but that
only goea to show how abortive
and amusingly pretentious are
the efforts of the West Indian
Culture Maniacs,



a



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This West Indian Culture (4)





: A Shorthand Literatu
— The Speightstown Library is Bodictcceping Englich Subjects Mathematics
‘ ‘ f ew Commercial Arithmetic General Education Public Speaking
3 pe Ss a s in bel Costing Geography Subjects
i books is week. ey wi : Economi Journalism Short Story Writing
Are You Scared put imto circulation shortly after one , a
To See Your Doctor 3, oo sher potidays have in- Bichicecsire fasiessiaag Orie ECan wont
" s cre intenamce achine Beri m neering
; Page 11 creased readers at that library Building ee Mechanical Gapinesring Surveying
@ From Page and so there is a demand for new Serpentry Moco? Enid veering \elecommuntcations
the straighten out the leg, Pooks. i Clvit Eng) ? Engineecing Wireless Telegraphy
then lower it slowly, keeping ven The Shortage of Food in the ¢ = Workshon Penedes
back flattened against the floor Leeward es is getting more § aeveyiog
4 the st h tucked in. Do 20d more severe. ' Etettric ¥ ae OVERSEAS SCHOOL
the same with the other leg and . When the shortage of rice was | y Ainecolaee ee ‘ ~ wee ns eg CERTIFICATE
repeat ten times. first “felt, breadfruit trees were | Fades BENMETY CO. 1.) GNEPAIECD, EROLANO CENERAL
gin) land with heels four’ to full, English potatoes were esion | Bhs! wr | cenriricare oF
rom a wall.
the lower part of the back hgainet could be had. irom ' =
the wall keeping the head and Breadfruits are becoming scarce | ‘ que Me
shoulders touching it. pow and ground provisions are of |. appre: ’ ; ©NO TODAY
Wit: chin in, hands on hips, ‘4e past, leaving English potatoe: | [for a sxe prospectus on
bepatte decsty raising the cheat, "it Ua dwives sep being rationca| | wy ows li
1 = Pious gic : ree Kia.
ding im the stomach, and keep. in thelr supply of rice. ave eek TD coupon: anid pose at

SUNDAY, AUGUST 24, 1952

PBoart count ts

can help you to success
through personal postal tuition

Terns OF MEN in important positions were once students of
The Bennett College. They owe their success to Personal Postal
Tuition — The Bennett College way. Yow have the same chance w
qualify for a fine career, higher pay and social standing.

One of these courses will lead to your advancement
Modern Business Methods Languages







SPEIGHTSTQWN ROLIND-.UP

“Herdsman Empties Sugar”
Bonds At Speightstown _

THE HARRISON LINER Herdsman anchored at!
Speightstown early yesterday morning to take the last of |
the sugar stored in bonds in St. Petertothe U.K. .

The Herdsman makes six ships that have called at
Speightstown during this year to load sugar. She is ex-
pected to get a load of about 1,500 tons.

Shortly after the Herdsman anchored, loading began.
She is expected to complete loading on Monday.

Accountancy









ing the back pressed to the wall.
Just poise

PUTTING your posture right
ean rapidly improve your mental
outlook and strengthen your re-
sistance to illness.

It really does help to keep you
alert, producing an invigorating
sense of well-being.

And, please, for your back’s

|



getting a few pints as their week's |
supply and are by their | '

told
dealers “not sure if you ‘will get ior ST BB RN han g on Bron hi |
U 0 ° cilia

next week.” Tinned soups are
selling.
, AND





Planters of the Leeward parishes
are getting worried over their}
crops. Weeks of steady sunshine
are withering their young can
crops and making the ground
hard and, in some places, crusty.





Rocce

sake, never lift anything heavy Rain is what they are hoping 7
off the floor without bending your for, A planter said that if the

knees, rainy season would step in nov.

the withery appearance of the
canes would vanish soon after.

° —L.E.S.

LL






A POH -
——_>eo eo





Kitchen garden keepers have * pe
S.S. “Seafarer” job keeping their vegetables and ;
8 greens looking fresh in_ their PosK q ,
gardens. They have to do quite THERE $ NOTHING
Sails F or Santos a bit of watering. | i
The SS. P. . ad The Police Band under Sgt. C.
for Santos Suse beware sailed Archer entertained the inmates of o 0 CURES AS SWIFTLY
loading a quantity of Douglas fir the St. Peter’s Almshouse ani {
and shingles. She arrived last TSidents of the parish to popular | Se
week from San Juan, Puerto “ance tunes and light music on | al (Ss ee AS
ico, and is also consigned to Wednesday night, | +i

The band was gladly receivea
by their audience after they had
not visited Speightstown for
few months.

For about an hour and a half

essrs. DaCosta & Co. Ltd.

The M.V. Canadian Cruiser
artived yesterday morning and
Pegi eas tons of general
cargo, e then loaded 550 car- ;
tons of rum for Trinidad. ‘She they played while they got hearty |
left yesterday evening for Gren- applause from the crowd. |
ada, Trinidad and Georgetown, |
British Guiana. |

' Yesterday afternoon t h e New Political Party |

Schooner Henry D. Wallace, under

the command of Capt, Wallace, A NEW political party has been
sailed for Trinidad. She was in formed by Grafton Clarke of Two |
port for over three weeks. Her Mile Hill, St. Michael. A meeting |
trip was delayed because she will be held later to decide the |
could not get sufficient cargo. name of th< party. }

_ FIRST
AGAIN! .



CANADA'S LARGEST
SELLING COUGH
AND COLD REMEDY

BUCKLEY'S

MIXTUR

ite Ae. Sak





*


































(By Cable)

ILLE MIGLIA

(General Classification}

First: BRACCO driving FERRARI

Third: FAGIOLI driving LACIA AURELIA
BOTH USED

.





ES cs a ee
SUNDAY, AUGUST 24, 1952 SUNDAY ADVOCATE





BY CARL ANDERSON |

|

HENRY

WHAT DOES “THAT MEAN -
HENRY ?





FLINT OF THE FLYING SQUAD.... BY ALAN STRANKS & GEORGE DAVIES

' :
| NUMBER FIVE CALLING
| AMVMIELAR ONE... WE





BRA. ck on eden elles tele

| CAUGHT THE CANA’ i Po (ie :
| BEFORE 17 SANG.. ,



ee CUTTING IN ON OUFT
Pn eS we

THERE'S THAT
PIRATE AGAIN...









WHAT NOW,
NUMBER ONE;
b OVER...

tae

*

BY CHIC YOUNG



HOW ABOUT THE SS]
TWO OF YOU COMING /7=+
OVER FOR DINNER y40 iLL Give N Ii
TONIGHT 2? roel DAGWOOD A} ||














ane eo APPLES—Fresh Red ...0..... 005.005. 45
\ oe aug PHONE BIRDS DE LUXE TABLE JELLIES .22
en a eS sit APRICEE DANE oiscsscccsdevaysessesssdnseisestveais 56
OC sees iulicicAkecssedessesipansersenns $1.40
CAMPBELL’S CR. OF CHICKEN

PN? > (ilu vcacespwsessssigsi db swhedisvassiosaapentes 46

CAMPBELL’S, MUSHROOM SOUP |
LUX FLAKES—Large Boxes ...... 45












Fe Paswones) Be > | | SPECIAL OFFERS AVAILABLE MONDAY TO WEDNESDAY AT ALL BRANCHES

Usually Now



PAGE THIRTEEN







By Appointment
Gin Distillers
to the Late
King George VI

IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE



ANCHOR TABLE BUTTER 1-!b pkgs. . $1.03
40 ” » ” 1- tins ..... 1.08
‘ és EVAPORATED MILK . 30
20 KRAFT CHEESE 14-I) pkgs, 44
KOLO TONIC ........ 144
50 = BUCKFAST TONIC WINE ...... 2.66
$1.25 PHOSPHERINE TONIC WINE ................-.-- 2.40
GORDON’S GIN .. 2.75
PIMMS NO. 1 CUP ...........ccccc cece cee uses 3.38
42 SCHWEPPES TONIC WATER ..._... 30
CANADIAN CLUB WHISKY ............. 5.50
SEGRAM’S WHISKY ........................ d 5.50

40 Just received small, shipment of FRESH FROZEN FRUIT



es

PRINCE GARL /
BENEATH uS/
THE KRAKEN'S
CHAMBER IS £
SPLITTING
OPEN!

DOUBLE BACK A BIT/

WE MUST HAVE TAKEN

WE'VE GOT TO FIN? THE A SIDE ROUTE /
OPENING THAT CAT USED TO
GET IN HERE... AN? HOPE
(T'S BIG ENOUGH FOR Ug
TO SQUEEZE THROUGH!







NT




HELLO- 1S THIS MRS JIGGS? \ AT THE NORTH POLE- ’ “a | ee ~
WELL-THIS IS STATION J-U-R-K- \74 |) WHAT ANIMALS DRAW THAT 1S CORRECT! “| Si XI WON! X
YOU WILL WIN $2000 IF you ||| THE SLEIGH OF A
CAN ANSWER THIS QUESTION - ( CHARACTER WHOSE ‘










WE'RE GOING 7 SUCH A SHAME! YOUR
, > CAR IS A COMPLETE W
THERE ARE SO





&



WE CAN'T HELP |
eK, FOLLOW ME /



ee

DEER ARE THE y WHAT'S BUT FOR \ HAPPENED?
ANIMALS | THE THE LIFR DID yYOuR
NOW ARE YOU READYP _— ) INITIALG ARE SS. | ) . ; ee || MATTER? Ios ME -T sf HUSBAND
tani HERE GOES- == ana ao ei aX ee —~s, DON'T , HIT YOU?
f KH pT ( > | 17 I Kies, ( KNOW ~ ey
UL » lay “7 1 Qtr eS . WHY? SZ
ab A ty OH- \I \Y @ Po / i} | “| ff Y,
f (25> | \ OEAR--)} | - / . | Tt BO
4 ‘ Mew a, Se ait eT d : Bd 7
A fu mi Hl og $2 ¥ f : Ost x. # of
y 6 I Yd a { - y See, a
a= Se | Y\nh \ } ae Jf
ten hy L - Hm AQ
»\ Be / VN

ALOT OF THe

AREN'T THEREF





D. 'V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street

COME, FLASH !|











HiM NOW!

THE WONDER BOOK OF HOW IT’S DONE

Most of us take too much for granted. We do not bother very
much about how the necessities, luxuries and amenities of life
are provided, so long as we receive them when we want them,
But supposing we are suddenly called upon to make and do
What then?

How would you organise the delivery of millions of letters
the production of a daily newspaper, or the feeding
great city like London?

for ourselves,

or
arrangements for

This fascinating yolume, packed with hundreds of inter-
esting pictures, will open your eyes to the many processes
involved in the creation of all kinds of everyday goods and
services, It also shows how many adventurous and far from
everyday tasks are performed

ADVOCATE

ON SALE -

AT THE STATIONERY











GUINNESS

STOUT
FOR STRENGTH




WHAT



= ARE |

OF THEM,

Ss



BY LEE FALK

WISE GUY! HE SHOOTS } ANYHOW, HE Dk WILY TOTHAT 3“)
AINT SEEN _WELLF -
THE TOY DOG



IF YOURE SO SMAP
MYSTERY MAN, / YOU KIDNAPPED THE
FIGURE THE ~, BOY FIX-THE





C. F. HARRISON & CO. (Barsapos) Ltd.
P.O. BOX 304
BARBADOS


PAGE FOURTEEN snieininatinpainnni SUNDAY ADVOCATE - SUNDAY, AUGUST 24, 1952





SEAoolrlED ADS. ee ae




















































High School| SHIPPING NOTICES





|
















- sainatciasemtaidein 1 shennan isiieinienhaiuctiicat eal he | Ry i
TELEPHONE 2508 PROFESSIONAL NOTICE REAL ESTATE px RESULTS OF ENTRANCE ROY NE ene | J OH
2x, 8, SCHOOL YEAR AL THERLANDS
oer ent ee B. O'NEALE pen Piet Our Recognized, Way- 1953,
‘> as to infofm his Patients & |Side and Private Agents — if Presentiy The M/V “MONEKA” will
JED FO SALE General Public that his office, will be |dt is a Buyer's or Seller's Market! D. F. The undermentioned pupils have gained STEAMSHIP co. accept and Passenger:
nn D tal R — for wae as. from Saturday ie pg a tenons Auctioneer & Real et ena te ane My a will be se a, Seen "
SIMPSON At hy Superlative sahenati vd Aug -opening Monday 24th Aug. tate Broker, Must and Will always Lead | 4m ie school year accord- G FROM EUROPE - ” sail Sica.
St Csoree. Yesterday, Extelle simp- | : 2.8.52—4n | with Attractive Prices, Re-Sale Values and | iN” as accommodation is provided. | M.S. R 22nd August, 1952 day 2 —_
sop. Age 10 years. The funeral will -— + + | Satistaction. Beat These Seven —1. AT] TREY must all present ives at the | M.S. A 1952. .
Seen, eee nase oak: Whe AUTOMOTIVE 5 NOTICE HAYSWATER, NEAR SEA—Almost New | Sool at.9 a.m. on Monday 8th Septem- $5. Sth tember, 1962 The MV * will :
St George Parish Church to-day at] “CAR See iy 8 HP. Standard Motor| AS from the 25th August to the 6th Ainnineee Mae, © Tommie Bilder hates : 7 ge 2 cecept Cargo and Passengers for es c@
"B a Simpson, ‘Bus Owner, |C@ in good condition. Phone . 4334., Sebtember both days inclusive the office |& Servant’s Room, about 7,000 sq. ft.,| 3- ALLDER, Anael Athena ~ ze Dominica, Antique, Mentesest, e
(Widower), George, Elliott (sons), 24.8.52—3n, | of the ee eee will be opened | Going for about £2,200. 2 AT WORTH-|, 2 Aaa, eee SATLING TO TRINIDAD, P wie se = ee ee AFS., F.V.A.
‘ ’ Da etre a —— ane on Ba y y ING MAIN RD.—Facing Sea, Right-of-|* 3- azel Odessa : ° =:
cae and Daphne Lowe |" CAR—Armstrong Siddeiy, 12 h.p. new N.S. FRASER, Way to Sea, A 3 Bedroom Bungalow Type.|/ 4- ALLEYNE, Marita vs : re
N.Y. Papers please copy atteries and tyrés, Very suitable for Pereenies. Carey Very Good Condition, Garage & Ser- #3 yo 5 al Mes. <3th August, 1953 oes ! Extensive Listings of Good
8 52—1 s or hired cars. Apply: Swan Store, vant’s Room, over 6,000 ft., Going , Hazel ora 2 ASSOCIATIO: . lass Pro; Land
Rem mR eS 2 oe = Swan Strect, or phone 3121 24.8.52—3n. |for about £22003. NEAR’ NAVY|, 7- BABB, Glyne Othniel SAILING TO AD & CURACAO snc anand c ‘Al aay hom
' KS 24.8.52—In nn GARDENS — A 3 Bedroom (with Basins|| 8- BARROW, Clairmonte 8 8. 17th August, 1952. Consignee Tele. No. 4047 ways. Av:
THANKS c — re NOTICE & Cupboards) Stone Bungalow, about in ier KLES, qeney Ararninthn M.S. 15th September,
oe CAR Morris G condition: tmen yes. Old, vertte Roof, 2 T Ad . » Una ‘bi!
NICHOLS—Mrs. J. R. Nichols and | Owner secured bigger car. Phone bs loses hone tae te aa Meccano Garage /& Servant’s Room, about 008 uh. BECRLES, Verlander 8. P. MUSSON, SON & CO., LTD. FOR SALE’
sampty bes oe Semnaoty siete oe ap- | or 4682. 21.8.52--3n. | both days inclusive, for_gronaal vacation. «a fee Going for about £3,100, 4. AT if. BELGRAVE, Dorothy Agents
preciation an gratitude ‘or JB cetead nape GOVT: lL, — Almost Ni 3 Be iB. Patrici:
Gedutitul Sowers-and the many tributes} CAR—One (1) 1061 Alain 90, tn very] ores are indy See ‘St room | 14. BEST, ‘Irene F roar
of affection paid by friends, known] good condition, done 8,000 miles, price 15. BISPHAM, Avril .
and unknown, to a much loved servant] $9200. Craig Garage, Roebuck Street. Robert Thom Limited. |1.000 sq. ft., Going for about £1,200. i. B |, James RESIDENCE, THE GARDEN,
of God, the Rev. J. R. Nichols, who} Dial 4553. 22.8.52—3n.| nial 4616—Office ‘le IN BELLEVILLE—One-Storey (Partly} 7. B , Judy Yvonne WORTHING — Modern coral stone
was called to higher service on August ; 23.8.52—2n. | Stone) 3 Bedroom, all Modern Conveni.| 18. BOXILL, thony Clodius a n ePaMms bungalow on corner site with
2nd. 24.8.52—-In] CAR—One (1) 60 H.P. Canadian 5 Z ~_! | erees, Very Good Condition, Going about| 19. ‘aple wide frontages. Pleasant garden
a ~|ecater Sedan Ford in good order. Price N 2. 2,000. BY CULLODEN RD., on , Everil Evoyne ; with flower beds, lawn, conerete
easonable. Apply: N. L. Seale & Co. OTILE Govt. land —-2 Roofs & Kitchen W patio, sad Sumber of bearing Erut
IN MEMORIAM Ltd. 21.8.52—2n,|_ The WOMEN’S SELF HELP ASSOCIA-| situched (1 Galvd: Roof 9) x 12 New. 1 BRATHWAITE, Betty Annette trees, |. Acgommodation' comprises

SPENCER—In loving memory of Inez





















— Verandahs — From September

re
Telephone 2949. 16.8. 52—t.f



CARS—One (1) i936 Master Chevrolet
‘iso (1) 1940 Dodge, both to be solid in















ELECTRIC DRILL PRESS Machines

Dial 4391. 23.8.52--6n

TYON will be closed on Wednesday 27th

end Thursday 28th August 1952,

for

Stock-taking. As from Ist September







ensemble The Modern Dress Shoppe,
Broad Street. 24.8.52—3n

this and arrange. their. dingly. | (Partly Stone) Bungalow, Stone Garage. }.
ue jnelt eens Enclosure, Conveniences, about

Roof 16 x 9 Almost New), Enclosed,

Going about $1,400. 7. OFF COUNTRY

KD,, — 2 Bedroom House with Land,












The above parcel of land will be st
up for sale by Public Competition st our
Friday 29th

BRATHWAITE. Ira Elain
BRATHWASPTE, Norma %
BRICE. Frenchie Randolpe
BRIDGEMAN.







ADMISSION — 1/6

Mr. CECIL SKEETE'S CHOIR







large living room, covered gallery,
3 bedrooms with built-in ward-
robes, well fittec kitchen, garage

grounds of about 1/5 acre, is not
overlooked and has unobstructed

20.
21.
22
2
vs.
arts. Apply: Warner's Garage, Villa] the subscription will be $1.20 per year.|£hop attached, Good Condition, Yields 28, , June CANADIAN CONSTRUCTOR with covered way to house, ser~
Groth Gass, long OF ta cne bore he ) tad, Britons Hill. 23.8.52—2n,| The “BOWER”, situated at the Gar-|§:4.00 p.m., Going about $1,500 IN| 27. BRITTON, Benjamin Abia > —— - = vants’ quarters and. all aaush
wae rison standing on over seven’ thousand ||,1GHTFOOT’S X LANE — A Desirable| 8. B . Gregston CAN. CHALLENGER 12 Sept. offices. All public utility services.
pe ‘or cure but all in vain CARS—Prefect Ford late 1950 very good|*4. ft. of land, contains gallery, 2/2 bedroom Cottage, Light, Water, Going| 28. BRYAN, Brenda Dolores LADY +53 na 22 Sept. in our opinion this property is
Until God Himself saw what was ‘endition, also one Austin A-70 1951 very} bedrooms, Drawing Room, Dining Room for Under $2,300 AT HASTINGS —| ™. BURKE. Hugh Gregory one of the most attractive homes
ood condition too, both cars going very| nd other modern conveniences. Phone |SfASIDE — “OLIVE BOUGE.” IN} 31. BURROWES, Noreen Odessa NORTHBOUND now available in a.
Aind tock our dear with Him to rest." | “asonable, Dial 95251. 4533. 15.8.52-3n | TUDOR ST.—Business Premises & Resi-| 32. BYNOE, Inez Albertha aaeteds range. : di
Remembered always by Isabel Jemmot' 13:9. 3.9. aa. ed Gee oN NELAON or. — A. 3 Bedeomed GAME, Bt Barbsdes MODERN HOME, St, Petec
3 aa ‘ottage, also a Business emises : A adene CANADIAN CHALLENGER toy L eal.
and Elmina Evelyn. 24.8.52—In CARS—One A-40 “Somerset” owner Applications NOTICE ar ih ark Residence. Please C Me when U require} 35. CATWELL, Barry Eunta LADY NELSON a os 28 Aug. BD ge chard: oo Pain. yg tg gee
mr aoe _ | artven — done only 1330 miles — Mke| time post of Clerk to Gi stlonere of | Muiost Anything in-Real Estate and Near- | 26. CLARKE, Elise Eleanor CANADIAN CRUISER .. 5 Sept. rooms with hot and cold, butler's
oe FOO, OWS 10F — 3,300] Health St. Lucy, at a salaay of $22.06 | Auvwhere. DIAL 3111 Call at “Olive) $f. GLARE, Rreite Agusta CANADIAN CONSTRUCTOR 25 Sep. pantry, kitchen, storerooms, 2
piles — condition perfect $2,400.00, One| per month . aay 6} Bough,” Hastings, Near Pavilion Court. | 58 CLARIKE, Gesele LADY RODNEY ... __.. 30 Sept. gerages. The grounds are experts
FOR RENT 3 1500 Singer — tyres, battery and) © 2 Applicants should possess an edu-| “00K FOR MY SIGN. 39. CLARKE, John Edward iGER 6 Oct. ly laid out with a profusion of
ondition excellent §2,500.00 Apply! cational qualification equivalent to the} i | SEES, Dee echeaals LADY NELSON ve ae 19 Oct. flowering shrubs, Own right of
‘helsea Garage 1980 Ltd.” Phone 4949. | Combridge School Certificate: a knowl-|9'!) BOARD AND SHINGLE HOUS i ECG Kekona way to sea,
|. 8.52—Bn. - x w room ir an i 2
——— eee eee ee ud bison touts kitehen attached painted in and out{ 43. CRICHLOW, Monica Schmegilow RESIDENCE, BLACK ROCK —
HOUSES MORRIS § ton Trucks with aasitiary| oniais, and be required to assume duty | #0 With glass windows. Price $1,000.00 44. CUMMINS. Lionel, McDonald For further partioulars, apply 1o— Sumndiy cobetiuted gunatty. Wis
‘ tear box. orris ewt, ‘ani . “ | or nearest offer pply Cuthbert Rogers, P Norma “
APARTMENT at Berwick Guest House | Pick-Ups, Two ang Four Door, Minors 4s, {OR plications ‘will, be ‘received in) Near Rices, St. Philip, 22.8.62—mn. | 4: BA vantey ofivia ia GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD. —Agents. sour and pallery. to tnd ot tee
ial 8133. 8 n | Morris lords, rom stoc! ; namin | ae . Alista! py
isan No. waiting. Fort Royal Garage Lia, | writing by the Chairman up to 15th) “CLARENDON—Black Rock, St. Michael,} 48- Grrthie Jeserene POTS Oe: aa rahe
BUNGALOW — To An Approved Ter | Telephone 4504. 8.682.) . H. YEARWOoD, | 9pposite St. Stephen's Church. Standing} 49. Eildica BUILDING LAND, ST. LAW-
ant, Bungalow Modern Sea-Side, full Chairman, Commissioners of Health,}@! 1 acre of land. Laid out for good| 59. » Megan Undine FOO", RENCE COAST — Excellent plot
furnished Bungalow, Excellent sea-| USED CARS—Available from stock; St. Lucy. wiry Farm or Residence, Possibilities 4 ELLIS, Golda Delcina m good ‘padiion wih wite: aes
bathing. For further particulars Apps | cod assortment of bargains ineludin 24.8.52—In. | £0F agé can be arranged. Apply:| 5% EVANS, Shirley Yvonne frontage. Ideal site for sea-sidé
to No. 6 Coral Sands, Worthing Morris Oxford, Austin A-40,, Vauxhall} 0] NN. Hutchinson or Dial 4803. 53, EVELYN, Trevor Almenston EA VIEW GUEST bungalow. One of the’ few vacant
24.8.52—8n | Velox. Courtesy Garage. Dial 4616. FOR SALE 21,8.52—Tn, z ove Thelma Agatha lots javailable on this popular
hide eee ea 23.8.52—6n. 6 ——____________________| £§. EVERSLEY, Shirley Ernestine SERVICE OF SONGS cons
LUNGALOW—Small Bungalow at Boy ictiite ia. Le at dee Mt. FIREBRAGE, David Lloyd
fiel€ Beach, St. Peter. Comfortably fur- \ DRESSES—. adjoining lots. n t. each, with} °f + ¥ will be given by
SE er ee ery ELECTRICAL { Oreses =n We Neve :iumh ened the| Water. Gas and Biectricity. “E. P.| 2) FOREML James Avia HASTINGS, BARBADOS MR. GEORGE PARRIS _h worst coteh dome house Hh
rvant's room. jarage etc nT chia —. finest assortment of dressy Dresses for : ‘ 60. (Shopkeeper) 3 bedrooms, dining and living
Sept, — Dee. ‘Phone 2383, %4.8.00—1N.| “AMERICAN ELECTRIC DEEP FREEZE: | cocktally and weddings also the stnartest $1,6.98—t0. | oF OA ee re Daily and Longterm Rates ae wie saathantee room, verandah & kitchenette up-
GALOW—On oat, eee a — SNomet fo’ states i Feleph Soa Velvets, Felts and frawe dlp, Hand- fe ee pats oe ot lang situste & c PL on nae Seeeeanh d cn request. CHURCH VILLAGE, St. PHILIP quartet ina. lannany, below. This
ii very comfortably furnished, Eng- F ; ¥ a » St. . the . . - ’ ‘ :
nae areey a artery nt ee .$,52—6n. thogs of stmilar materials to match any|‘: the late Eleanor Lacey, dec property v4. On SUNDAY, Sist AUGUST, 1252 house is set well back in its
66.
67
68.
69.
















































a a a view seawards. Open to offers in
‘ Office, James Street, on : Barbara Anita i
ie TDERED 7" : ¥ , arranged. i ;
HOUSE — Small, new, Stone, One floor | SUSE -ARRIVEDCA Tew JIFFY ALL: [superior Guality, Just the thing tor ‘not | AVEUS, 1982, at 2 pin. GOODRIDGE, Franklin Winfe J. H, BUCKLAND ‘diene Gok | Tee eT
2 | JUST ARRIVED—A few JIFFY ALL- . ing ot) For furth ieul + ms Please Invite Your Friends
Afouse Completely and comfortably fur er particulars apply to Mr. &
Purpose Electrical Hand Sprayers and | Season only $3.11 a yd. At Thani Bros. 7”. G * Proprietor. 16.8.52—3n. INCH MARLOW HOUSE = A
nit . Good residential district. Very Pr A. W. Harper, Lakes Folly, . 4 Delvine . 8.
Electrical Hand Drills. ices 24.8,52—In. 7 well placed house always kept
Auitaple for one, ge, O8e | reasonable, “Get vours to-day from. J. | ZED BEETS ; a, 72. GREAVES, ‘Elvira Selina "OOOOOOOSNSS890659S%:." | $999959S9S9995 FOSSSSOGS™ ||] cool by constant sea breezes
Adniite, Phone 4042. __ MERI |Homel-Smith & Co, Limited. Bridge) GALVAN = Henttea 20.8.82-mn. | 73. GR ret Amelia %S000900000006000000000005900055090 SSS S STS SSOOOS! ||| ilered for sale with approx: 4
MORECAMBE—The desirable residence | St"eet. Phone 4748 24.8.59--tn, [Shed théete 26 eduee ect low prices | Tr 4. . ill Rc Ma
“hlerecambe” Worthing next to yal ® no ~ | Dial Auta Tyre Co. "| NEW BUNGALOW-Situated at Blue 75. HAREWOOD, Jeanette Yvonne Seven sizes of scope for renovation and remodel-
‘Thamage ry + Bedeootns See ne weeme REFRIGERATOR — One tor , Wk tn | atee Sesece. 8 Bedrooms 9, Seles | 5 u OOD’ Monica Adelle ling.
wu ‘irs, Downstairs: Drawing room, unit 8, arage . Available . 1st “ Iistia e rev: ww
Foo em, 5 a Se sae Feice 400.00 or seleed th ee For life and last- September. BF. Mdghill. Phene tig 7: HARRIS,’ Marlene Unilds P ‘S BLO TORCHES LAND, TWEEDSIDE ROAD—On
ere et, large ga’ . * 4559 a 5 beau OHN- e ; .8.52—4n. , : . a d it wv f c
For particulars, apply: Manager, Empire ‘ rhe af. i86 | “api ard ® We . gue RED ard cet, qu AtMMnNG: * Wo-tenyed Mperall| 1° HEADER Mure ve S| ine! HOS anal a
| ;
OR'—Ist Avenue, Belleville. | Ft ager three oa” A Pe ik PK. J Hemel-gnntty co ttd,,| STRATHCLYDE, St. Michael, standing} 3. HERBERT, Wendy Dorlene $17.40 to $46.76 § BUSINESS PREMISES—DWELL-
A ble from Sept. ist, 3 Bedrooms | Cnaneer 7. lottrols Operated one unit |Eridge Street. Phone 4748 ;*¥@lon 7,068 square feet of ‘and, and con-| %- HINDS, Orene Odessa ‘ ING HOUSE, ROEBUCK STREET
with running water in each, Garage ete. | 0°") divigually. Foster Phone , * 91.8.52—4n. | taining open and closed verandahs, draw-| £3. HINDS. Myrta Matilda TRE Goud: titiatiod Ben setail. cael te
Dint 8680. m4.8.52—1n. |" 1 - Fron lmen. | meet" | an ining rooms, 3 bedrooms. aaah} 0 HOLDER, Barbara Resets CENTRAL EMPORIUM = = )\) oe Pie ee.
fi + , a :| IOUSEWIVES—Do you have Fioor|With running water,’ kitchen &c., 87. HOLDER, Cordean Clerine ‘ Core eroy
RADIOGRAM—Separate unite, R. 107| Problems which you do not seem to be| {ual conveniences. Water and Electric %- HOM Marva Gloreta | Corner Broad & Tudor Streets ; SWEETFIELD, St. Peter — An
WANTED Receiver. & watt amplifier. Collaro, 3 | able to overcome! Forget those troubles ig gueigiied. “Garage and Servants’ Soom) 9)’ OwWEES, Paylls Valseta : Opis ee Bayes, Dene Se Shain
- speed turntable. long a re- one 4748, . . jamel-Smi oO ee a Oe ee eee eee . - ad ontains large ving room wi
cords, $180.00. ‘Telephone or 4430, | Ltd., Street, and they wilt be|,,Jespection on application to Miss Bree} 9}. HOWE, Greta Patricia S SSS SSSSSSSS French windows leading — onto
24.8.52--In }orly too pleased to give Wice at no| Parkinson, Strathelyde. Dial 2452. 5 . re SS9SS9S9S9999999999995 6 SSSSSOSS*: covered verandahs with view of
HELP _ obligation’ whatsoever. Advice direct|, The property will be set up for sale} 9. 4 p Clarence ‘ sea. 3 bedrooms, kitchen, store-
ota FURNITURE from Bxperts. at the’ Uitsa-modern |, one "Betvctowns Su" Beldey'| $9. INNIS Johee Ponine BOROUGH OF SAN FERNANDO = &jj) vie, cna usvin | cotinaings,
STENOTYPIST with knowledge Bvsenrch tent of 5. C. akneon & Son [2th August at 2 4 xe ba a) og JA : Siciet Ashalin ‘ jarage of K-keeping and previous office = ” 5 0) » U.S.A. 7 Wo at 5A bean x 4“ acres we ou
@ mee. Apply "C.A." ¢/o Advocate eee tee Prog po Pa wes “ 20.8,52—5r. | prey cote Bonciors, 9%. JONES, Garmen Eileen VACANT POST—TOWN ENGINEER room with right of “way over
I.» . fi ’ . * ns 17.8.529n | 99. JONES, Budolphin e >
. 24.8.52—3n | Credle, mattress, folder pram. boys| “Have you bought wour JOHNSON’S 8. +
: _____- | bisycle. All Brat rate, condition. Furniture Waxep lately? not, do so] —>>aciepon on TTEr.| 101, JORDAN, Charles Chewstopher Applications igen te Graduates, Corporate Mem- COVE SPRING HOUSE, ST
ION. required by responsibic|“¥P\y: Mra. Clarke 8245 without delay, The renowned JOHN-| “THU! C On the sea at Max-| 13° KENNEDY iP! bers of Institutions of Civil or Municipal Engineers or equiva- JAMES — One of the few’ prop-
Young man with knowledue of Ate and 28.0-52—On. | SON'S Eurritire (Cream ae eel ae ge dh besches of land, “Ganaie for | 108. KING, Anthony. 8. Cals lent—10 years’ experience~Usual Borough E Ser- erties on, this popular ‘coast, with
Acetelyne Welding and Electrical Appar- Paste and Liquid Waxes are available at\) roods 18 perches of land. Garage for} oa: ie Velma Arlene vices—Population 35,000—Knowledge of ity an asset— a completely private and secluded
atus. So. arrangs Interview | reply LIVESTOCK your Dealers. 21.8.52-—4n (2 cars. Se ne areas So Sere Me ae Oe Wilbert Andateon D . bathing beach, The grounds of









‘Part-time for mini-



ANNOUNCEMENTS





HORSES—Three

ear old jhorougeneed
Aliy ‘Fluffy Ruffles" by Pink Flower







caesarean tenses
FERGUSON AGRICULTURAL EQUIP-

HOUSEWIVES—Don't slave on your

Flonrs in the old-fashioned way, buy. 'a
Tin of JOHNSON’'S Floor Cleaver, and



Always ask for “STUK."
‘ 22,8.52- Jn.



the tenant Mrs. Roach. Dial 8461 108.
The above will be set up for sale at| 107
public competition at our office, James 108.



would be sold as a whole or in not mor? | 127.

than four lots. All enquiries should be 12.





Dotteen Mabel
TLOYD, Marcia Juanita
LLOYD, Monica Yvonne

MOORE, Yvonne Glendora
MORGAN, Maurice Rudolph

$4,800—$240—$5,760 per annum—Starting
experience—Passage, leave, car allowance, Pension—
Quarters at 10% of Salary—For full details

salary sub-
ject





(with the distinctive flavour)

about 1% acres are well wooded
and could readily be converted

into one of the show places ot

Lately occupied by U.S. Consul,
LYNCHBURY, BELLEVILLE —

apply to Town
. lary | 25 a the Island. The house 1% of 2
mi ese Rane Fee 1B a gre: x Golden Die Wy gon Bridce Agte see how easily it gives you a clean, | Street, on Friday the 29th August 1952 1p. a Sitio, Raton Clerk, San Fernando, Trinidad, B.W.I, Applications close 30th storeys and ipobeaves noteeable
Pp: development whole time job | ‘sweet Violet” by Full Bloom ex Fair| #erm-free Floor. Obtainable at all lead- at 2.00 p.m : eo September, 1952. character.
a HUTCHINSON & BANFYELD, |!11. McCLBAN, Victor St. Clair
A — by letter only Business Pro-| Araby by Fairway £800 landed, Apply: | "2 Stores. 31.8.52-—4n, 17.8.52—émn.| 112. MALONEY, Denis Rudolph L. McD. CHRISTIAN,
motidn Syndicate, 53 Swan St, Srd Floor. | J, 1%. Edwards. Phone 2590. “INTERNATIONAL TORNADO K. | 115. MANIFOLD, Roland Stephen Town Clerk. NEW BUNGALOW, ROCKLEY—-
+4 : 23.8.52—2n 22.8.52—6n INTERNATSONAL TORNADO K.30./ — lls. MANNING, Myrtle Effiet: Commodious home with 3 bed-
5 ists ‘| 3450.00 nearest. Owner leaving Island. VALLAMBROSA” — Constitution Rd. | 1is- TA ELD va eal = , 1952. vooms, large living room, ‘wide
' ELLANEOUS PUPS—2) Bull-Terrier Pups; no reas-|F#auiries Yacht Club or Telephone 4430. Cypésite Queen's Park, All modern H MAPP. Dorial ne ames verandah with good view, kitchen,
- MISC. 0 mable offer refused Apphy | Cuthbert 24. 8.52—-1n eee Ors For full aia iW MAPP. ee te a pantry, servants' quarters and
; Rte jone ‘ -8,52—8n. P storerooms. Good situation near
% . Near Rices, St. Philip. , 1!6. MAP, Ophaniel Alphonso ¥
DIGS Fn lish Bachelor desires digs | ‘?#°r* LANTERNS, Primus, Veritas, Optimus, | ———-—__— ; Golf Course £4,300.
with aaxtant and evening meal. Box 28.8, Spare Parts Glass and Mita chimneys. ie oy eae ek Mts. Siw: im. Pe SN A PLEASURE AT ALL TIMES
‘Rr : 5 r" aynes o r s Cottage, 0. ‘
eRe ocne Ge, 93.§.89-2% |_.TWO LARGE, MULES. Apply: The | Specialist in, Pressure bamps. Chandler's | hilt, to offer for sale about 86,000 square | 121. MAYERS, Ernest Glenfield Se ee es
3 2 Ma’ Hann Hurdware, Reed an udor Streets A sq MAYERS. M " COAST Solidly constructed
—— = - ¢ eer, ele 23.8.59-—3n. %4.8.52—2n | {eet of land forming part of her prop- | 122. MA » Monica Feleta eas stone house containing enclosed
i COAT— “Coat” size | Ghureh. ns | erty known as Brittons Cottage. This | 139. MAYERS, Dalrymple, Clarevavep Salleries, spacious Grawing’ room
c/o Advocate Advts. ers 5 STUK GLUE—The 2 in 1 adhesive with ao us Baclosed on three sides with a tm STAs RATA, baa eiaiite e e e and dining room, ahd brealcfast
= -8.52—t.f.n the 1 uses. A powerful glue] substantial stone wall an ere is_a : a , - bi : 4
MECHANICAL for ee foe Office, aba Workshop | fine view over the harbovr. The laid 186 MILLAR, Keith Reynold room, 3 bedrooms, 2 garages ete


























































MENT, — includii Tractors, PI =~ |addressed to the undersigned. 19, MURRELL, Clive Leighton Pieasantly situated 2 storey house
—— Geass ‘stlawnes: ears. scope, sett] STUK GLAUJE—"Stuk” is colourless an CARRINGTON & SEALY, 180. PAYNE, Cecil Maureen Satisfies the most Fastidious Drinker ith wood erousie’ Gt’! aeout
1$:. PHILLIPS, Dorothy Patricia
CAREER—Be trained as a Newspaper | boxes, Cane carts and Hydraulic tip}ccourless, powerful and economical. If Lucas Street. 132, PILGRIM. Lynda hosehare 12,500 sq. ft., 3 galleries, large
r or a Feature Writer, Get de-|irsilers, Ete. © Dial 4616—Courtesy | it's * it Sticks. 14.8.52—Sn. : RIM: Robert Allan TRY THIS BLEND drawing room, dining room, stu@y,
tails of scheme from Barbados Press Club | Garage, 28.8.52—6n. 22.8,52-3n, | 13. PILGRIM, Ro} . well fitted kitchen, 3 double bed-
FKeadquarters No. 53 Swan Street. i ee tan AUCTION Eatin Nevin ere _ rooms, garage and usual offices,
34.6 ,52—3n MASSEY-HARRIS AGRICULTURAL | TURKISH TOWELS — Five Smart- . R Anita ‘itso’ = Blend led | Offers _ required, under £3,000
—_— FQUIPMENT — ineluding TRAC looking stripes $1.44. At Thani Bros FTE EEE Tae Re ae — Blended & Bottled by — would be considered.
Grass cutters, Rakes, Loaders, knife 24.8,.52—1In STREET ag TUESDA 6 138. SCANTLEBURY, Esmee
Whe BACK lade sharpeners, ete.’ Dial 461¢ Cour- | -—— eatahiitas iar ari idl an MA ese querts 1311S esate Senet. Thkoders 50 BEMERSYDE, ST. LAWRMNCE
‘esy Garage. .8.52—in. ‘OOLS— Suction , + At 0 a fe
n your pede rion” emtewarivers; “Gabinet_ bags] fort, 4, inch gnuge th is sapped) |W. BEAL, Marie Caagee HIN D. TAYLOR & SONS LTD. catow spacious sry sooma “and
n om! - a Z -
MACHINERY—One (1) 9” x 7” Robey,| screwdrivers, Slipjoint pliers, Combing. | io saition. electric. kettle, Per-| ia. SHEFMERD, Rawle Edw RHerIeN: | Roce neers Cat
2 nelosed, forced lubricated steam Engine | tion pliers, Hacksaws, Tappet spanners | ene aee oe etn ee eod oa andl ie REY, Phylli ‘sunita. Roebuck Street | ‘ine Dial 4335 prises:— separate drawing and
ec3e o run at 470 r.p.m, developing about|etc. Get your requirements at Chelsea} °\"¢ Salieri : ot Se ane iy. SOLER howd fet eons dining rooms, 3 double betirooms,
v L.H.P. at 100 Ibs, pressure. Two (2) | Gurage (1950) ed Phone 4949. Singer’ Treadle machines, Radios Mixing | :@. 2 ee, ee large kitchen- and pantry, 3 ser-
is caused by lazy kidneys. mali cold starting Diesel Engines, 10 19.8.52—6n Machines, bread slicer, Rubber floor] 45. SMALL, Aramintha vanta’ fooms af
‘are the blood’s filters. When 1S HLP. One (1) 22” x 36” 5 roller aes carpet and other useful items. TERMS| 46. SMITH, Gilbert Halioy. This eh eas, ate on ae
‘get out of order, excess acids and | <:)1 complete with C.S. Gearing, steam STAMPS FOR SALE Sieere ss 2 SO TOn ACME 5 eg 3 Foainth Yvonne bat batting beach ot Bi, awe
wastes in the system. angine, and Hydraulic Pressure Regu-| THE STAMP COLLECTION of a : -|is’ Sf HULL,’ Winston Archibald rence, is within easy reach of
: be " ating Equipment. Apply: D. M. Simp- | ceceased client will be set up for sale TASTT, Hamilton Whitfield Town by bus or car, and in our
backache, rheumatism, on & Co, 20.8,52—6n. | ‘1 lots at our office, James Street, Bridge- Under the Diamond Hammer TAIRT’ Prince stephen opinion would be very suitable
rest or that ‘tired out’ = t on TUESDAY 26th August a : . Prince { t atten Anite n
- own, I have been instructed "hy the Insur-| 1§2. TAYLOR, Coral Anita ) ‘or conversion into a small guest
follow. To make your kidneys POULTRY 2m. oop & BOYCE urce Co. to sell at Messrs. Fort Roya’ |}§,. TAYLOR, Coral Yvonne house.
—and to them in good order — ——_————— YEARW 2 ; Garage on Thursday next the 28th Aug |}s4. TAYLOR, Owen Clairmonte
use 's Kidney Dodd's Kidney COCKERELS—-New Hampshire Cocker- = f a as 8 pete y Se ie slightly M5. TAYLOR, Sarnuel j ~ ‘ ‘aie ealaebe 4 SP ee oe
iy 8 ths old. $3.00. Ker, British Daily | (amaged in acciden so One 5-pas-| 156. RNE, Gloria Eulinda ( : . d P. y re-mo 0
Pills quickly rid your over-burdened blood xe unetls ne © oa 8.52—1n, SUBSCRIBE a ma ook News. |8enser Dodge and one 1948 Vauxhali e. Aue Kenrick Peter . an offer YOu Goo To erties on one of the most ites
of acids and wastes so that pure, Sere Be en lal ca Telegraph, England's leading Datly Terms Cash. Inspection on the morn- rtrude in this increasingly popular area.
' in Barbados by Air 158. TROTMAN, Agnes Gertru e
blood flows to every nerve and muscle. POULTRY-—120 Leghorn Pullets iv to pape eee “ayes after ‘publication in |'n¢ of sale. D'Aray A, Scott, {uction- 139. WALCOTT, Carmen Gloria Beautiful coral and sand beach
. a ? from 4.30 p.m. eer, 8. n.|:80, WALCOTT, Derine Marjorie ‘ . and calm, safe bathing.
you feel better—look better —work months old can be seen Lphdon, Jan Gale, C/o. Advo- . *
better and you are ready to dance with | ‘"», *ftemoon. Phone Fred Earmichael | Te Go, Lidy ‘Local Hepresentative UNDER THE SILVER a. WATeOm, gesper wee at Sensible fFrices room, Jeune, verandah 98
ee te ae ae ; Tel, 3118. Aaa HAMMER VE ee Marguerite and servant's quarters. oer-
rs @. WEEKES, Buland Chesterfield =e. a
a 4 MISCELLAN ON TUESDAY 26th by order of Mrs. | if. WE! URN, Esme Maureen
re eS aus GOVERNMENT NOTICE | ocN re hoe erate | ABS! WECLINGTON Monica Yvonne IN ALL THE BEST RESIDENTIAL PROPERTY, WHITE PARK
‘Ocean Spray” Rockley, which includes | 166. Weare, Jennetns a pee, Sheet pane * eeay
TTRATIED a? averw danazint e ; Roekers, Upright and Corner Chairs, 14/) YARDE, Hyacin' ola ‘ bedr U
ANTIQUES of every description, Glass, . li f Wa M , reception roo d- dining room;
auggon, Plant stools, Ornament Tables | 163. YARDE, Marva ption rooms an & ;
eet ee Meher thule PPR Hurricane Re fe ulin Mahog. Painted Tables, Divan and | 169. YARDE, Selina Carmeta, AREAS. a = snes ee
ete., at Gorringes Antique Shop adjoining ae . Cushions, Mirrors, Curtains, Rush nd a for conversion to flats, guest
Royal Yacht Club. 8.2.58-—tE.n. Organisation sa etal Gia an cae Goring | > On the focus of the Betirence Beash- GENT house, school or offices.
DED SHEETS —Very superior quality | Deep Sleep Mattresses; Mahog. Linen | ination (a) Oe Ree a card ee es REAL ESTATE AG Ss, MALTA, ST. PETER—Exten-
‘ouble $6.21 single $4.01 24.8.52—1n. PPLY Press; Chest at, Drawers: Ceder and » years and carryin: a - A sively re-modelled house of mas-
- | RABOUR SUPPLY [sini Pra ex in Congeums MU, have cee eta, eee AUCTIONEERS, VALUERS and oa ee” eee a
BARKER 148 Cénecert Speaker in. se In the event of hurricane] Famus Stoves. Elec. 2-Burner Hot Plate wen tb) tuition for five years to - approx. ™% acre flower gardens,
flex cabinet, $50.00. Telephone 3274 or | : Ttenail fee" a Cots. 5) Merle. Hurley N lawns and young fruit trees,
ws 8.52—1n | striking Barbados Labour Forevs) Mitenen tend other tems a ac Bie wt) ‘Orlando Crichlow INSURANCE AGE ITS. There are spacious verandahs on
ADE LB aleaciive mae. | NU Lee, Sem ot relief work.) Pre ie'11.80 o'clock. Terms cash \) Henry ‘Bowen (c) Enabling Seholar- two sides with views over beach,
AUCTI BED SPREADS oy Otte e NG “tango, | AS #00n as possible after the hur-) BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO,, | :hips for five years to (9) Sylvia Alleyne large living room, 3 double bed-
(ONEER AND REAL a loy- Jones rooms, 2 bathrooms (both with
vgle $4.26, double $5.75 at ‘Thani Bros. }ricane, ap! its for employ 0) Beulah Bowen (11) Coretta 152 Roebuck Street .
“ESTATE AGENT NES Sh arty 24.8.52—In. | ment. are to report ‘at Auctioneers Ny syivan Brathwaite (@) House Schol- 151/152 Roebuc , tubs) ‘modern kitchen. ahd butler's
Off oe hedbainnains ormane sm , rk where the staff of veal th ___-2.8.52—2n | nips awarded on the results of the Phone 4900 pantry, downstairs is the laundry, ,
ers real estate of all de- LLOCK STONESA tt, 3 tt, 4 ft Block g Queen’s Park. where Annual Examination 1982 go to (13) Clau- y good servants’ accommodation for
scriptions including seaside CK oe ber it. Delivered. Contact} the Labour Department, will be] DER THE SILVER dine Forde (14) Colin dine (18) Bridgetown & 3 garages and Moretaeme. yu
posees. See him before buy- he Manager, Mount Brevitor Plantation] stationed, HAMMER Beane meerte (16) Sylvia Inniss (37) Sd Gath elactis “pure, “Sieet
you are having trou- t, Peter. Phone 91-34. * of way over beach with superb
‘ble*with the collection of al saps . cy i weleea Shere eietriai on iiiaead 28th by order of Mr. Idris | .§.99@@@6O00O0OSOSOS0OOOO, batting rere for a dis-
our t; S . L ns 5 ng, M. Mills we will sell his Furniture at r a uyer.
then ey oe as ae BASRA Pees eae bs at Barbados Academy and Press “rlythe’, Maxwell, which includes — .
vi wre yousand assorted Covinucaway price 6f@ CUD Building, commence Ist }| Very good Square Tip Top Table, Up- ROUMAIKA, DAYRELL’S ROAD

)
;



eharge 10%. Call in at his
office Middle Street where



ents each,

The Modern Dress Shoppe,
troad Street.

September. 36 cents per lesson.
Registration closes August 29 at





richt Chairs, Writing Table, Elec. Stand-



ard Lampy Ornament Tables, Double end

. DANCE

—Imposing property with 3 recep-
tion rooms, 6 bedrooms, kitchen,

5 Press Club Building 53 Swan Settee, Arm and Morris Chairs, alk in pantry, large verandahs, garage
cee see PP a eee 2n 2o. pied papery where particulars Mz hogany: Murphy Radio (Perfect, BY and store-rooms, Could be con-
« .8.52—2n. an obtaine:



«The Officers - Members
oO
the Advocate Social Club



——
CAR ACCESSORIES—Rubber Matting,
‘attery lads, Bulbs, Polishes, Chamois,
dusters, Cheese cloth,

ow and High tension wire,

yedalions are all things that car
ray need. May be obtained from Chel-
ea Garage (1950) Limited Phone 4949.













Whisk brooms, | °
Bonnet

‘ £$00460000000000006000" LSOSSSO ST SOSSOSSS SS SHOOE






23.8.52—2n

Boys. Clubs’, All Island

7%



J:maican Floor Mats, Rush Arm Chairs
and Rockers, Folding Card Table, book-
shelves, Coolerator, Militanr Chest ot
Drawers Pine Single

(good) Bedsteads,

Springs and Deep Sleep Mattresses,
Dressing and Bedside Tables, Press, all
i) mahogany: Canvas Cots; White Painted

Berstead and bed; Blue Painted Bedstead













QUEEN'S COLLEGE NETBALL
TEAM

AT
QUEEN'S COLLEGE

On FRIDAY, AUG. 29TH
at 8.30 p.m.



)}, WE CAN OFFER YOU - - -



verted into Guest House or Club.

RENTALS

WHITEHALL © PLATS — Cod-

Hin: ice of 4 unfur-
. > and Spring, Dressing Table, Desk and To defray expenses of recent tour aed ad oy fate”
request th le COOPS for Chickens .and_ Rabbits Championship ‘twy Cupboard: Glass and China Set of ADMISSION BY TICKETS mi 7
q e pleasure ninde of hale h meshwire. Dial 3162. Crystal Table Glass (45 pieces), Electri¢ BRIGH ‘St. Lawrence
of your company eT cae) tee len and Hot Plate; Seales, '2-Burner|@® obtainable from the members of Gap Conaabe Paptusncd bangs:
S f =) ; \ f | Stove; Larder, Kitchen Utensils, The T pn a rane
to their soars en i I I ee an ry Sige 3 mais Boon t low ae ise, ftom Sept. Ist.
Painied ‘able i a a Own sea frontage.
ICE Hoover and other items of interest.
DANCE $2 FO9OOOOO0000O0O9 Eaik SEER orclock Terms Cash. | 1, GRAEMEHALL TERRACE-
Under the Patronage of MR. CRCIL LUCAS KENSINGTON OVAI BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO., |} Furnished from Sept. 1st.
the Hon. V. C. Gale. MLC invites you to his yi apres 58-—2n } any eau y po $ 0 e S an NEWTON LC
. + ©. Gale, he é 2 pon LODGE, MAXWELL’S
1"
at 3.00 p.m. COAST — Furnished fur-
at E ANNUAL DANCE P == | nished with mwanediate DOSRaSIGE.
the Volunteer Drill Hail tcl se! eae SSR AT MONDAY, | FOR THE IST. TIME HINT No. 9 We can also do your AUCTIONEERING for you, so e
u in many years
on Monday night oie you can choose c .
: m on : ‘ontact your Real Estate Agents and Auctioneers.
6th October, 1952 MONDAY NIGHT 25th August, 1952
(Bank-holiday) IST SEPTEMBER, 1952 A GAS COOKER Joan i Biadeon
ADMISHION / Admissi | from 0 zee WARNINGS °
sea g a ADMISHION — 2/- Admission — —_ ES
Music by sekas te FUN aincanorekn 3) , REALTORS LIMITED & ce.
Percy Green's Orchestra Refre Adults -o- 1/- After a hurricane — °
Subscription -0- 3 c " alt re: ; beware of héulies. and tees ft} | Auctioneers
Formal Dress Optional c @ % | Children -o- 6d. > Te ae that have not completely {}}/ 151/152 Roebuck Street, Bridgetown, Barbados Plantations Building
Tickets not Transferable M.8.52—In © 21.8.52—2n. OP ar sikias collapsed. 24.8.52—2n. | *Phone 4900 Phone 4640

.







=


Sie tet, — anal. x
mips ~ cong RRNA ARS SDSS SS Pang J



SUNDAY, AUGUST 24,

CHURCH
SERVICES

ST. LEONARD'S
St. Bartholomew, Apestic & Martyr
TRINITY XI
: Holy Communjon. 9 »o.m
Matins & Sermon, 3 P.m. Sunday Schoo!
& Bible Classes, 7 p.m. Evensong &
Sermon
THE ST. JAMES NATIONAL BAPTIUs
11 a.m. Matins and Sermon, Preacher
Rev. J. B. Grant L.Th., Minister-in-
5 pm Monday: Wednesde.’; Friday:
Charge
training for youths
ducted by the
(Assistant
Browne



& am.

This wilt be con-
Rey I Bruc>-Clatke,
Pastor) ond
The Anniversary
the B'dos Youth Movement takes place
on Sunday Augest Qist ot. 7.15 pm
Preacher. the Rev. J. B. Grant. L.Th
COLLYMORE ROCK A.M.E. CHURCH
1! a.m. EXPOSITION -—- EXODOS: IX,

Mr Olga

Service of

3.20 p.m Sunday School. 7.15 p.m.
Evangelistic Service. All are cordially
invited. Minister.—Rev. FE. A. Gilkes.

BETHEL METHODIST CIRCUIT
Preaching Appointments for Sunday;

uso
BETHEL; 11 am. Rev. F. Clarke
7 p.m. Rev. K. E.: Towers, M.A., B.D.
DALKEs1¢; 9 a.m, Rev. T. J. Fur
ley. 7 p.m. Mr, J. Lovell.

BELMONT: 1la.m. Mr. G. BascomLe
7 p.m. Rev. T. J. Furley

so’ DISTRICT: 9 a.m. Mr. G
Brewster. 3.20 p.m. Missionrry Meeting.
7 p.m. Mr. T. Callender

BROVIDENCE: 11 a.m. Mr D.
Griffith, 7 p.m. Mr. L. Mayers.
VAUXHALL: lk a.m. Mr. D. White
7 p.m. Mr. C. Brathwaite.

EB ZER: 11 a.m. Mr. C. G. Reid,
7 pm, Rev. S.W. C. Crosse

BEULAH: 9 am, Rev. 8S. W. C. Crosse,
7 p.m. Mr. A. Bolder.
SHREWSBURY: 11 a.m. Mr. E. €al-
lender, 7 p.m. Mr. E. Brathwaite

RICES: 11 a.m. Rev. S$. W. C. Crosse
be m. Mr. G. Forde. Sunday School at
pm

THE SALVATION ARMY
BRIDGETOWN CENTRAL

11 a.m. Holiness Meeting, 3 p.m
Company Meeting, 7 p.m. Salvation
Meeting.

Sr. Major W, Morris Divisional Com-
mander.

WELLINGTON STREET
‘ll am. Holiness Meeting, 3 p.m
Sroomes Meeting, 7 p.m. Salvatior,

Major C. Levene.

SPEIGHTSTOWN

il am. Holiness Meeting, 3 p.m
Company Meeting, 7 p.m. Salvation
Meeting.
Sr. Captain S. Worrell

OISTIN
11 am. Holiness Meeting, 3 p.m
Company Meeting, 7 p.m ~ Salvation
Meeting.
Lieutenant K, Gibbons.

UR ROADS
11 am. Holiness Meeting, 3 p.m
Company Meeting, 7 p.m Salvation
Meeting.
Major L. Rawlins.

PIE CORNER

11 am. Holiness Meeting, 3. p.m
Company Meeting, 7 p.m. Salvation
Meeting.
Sr. Major J. Hollingsworth.

CARLTON -
ll am. Holiness Meeting, 3 p.m
Company Meeting, 7 p.m, Salvation

2

M b
Captain E. Bourne

EGOLF BAPTIST CHURCH
Tudor Street
Rev. K. P. Hansen — pastor
Sunday—10.00 Quarterly and farewell
in honour of our visiting evangelists,
Rev. Parker and ev. Starling, at

Queen's Park. Afternoon session begins
at 1.00. You are eordially invited to
be with us.

Sunday evening — 7.30 Evangelistic ser-~
vice at Egolf Baptist Church.

Monday evéning—Baptist Young Peo-
ple'’s Union.

Monday evening—Prayer
service.

Listen to “Echoes of Heaven" every
Tuesday and Thursday at 9.00 p.m. You
are cordially invited to attend an; of
the Fundamental Baptist Churches on the
Is.and,

THE ST, NICHOLAS EPISCOPAL
ORTHODOX

Welches Road
Matins and Sermon, Preacher
Barrow. 7 p.m.
Preacher: Rev

and Prajse

1L a.m.
Rev. Deaconess C
Evensong and Sermon,
J. B. Grant, L.Th.

7,30 p.m. Tuesday; Evening Prayers
and address, Freache.; Fev. L. Bruce-
Clarke. The Subject will be, ‘The

Lord’s Supper” (Corinthians 10th v. 16)

MORAVIAN
ROEBUCK ST.—1l1_ a.m. Revd. E. E,

New, 7 p.m. Revd. E. E. New.
GRACEHILL—ll a.m. O. R. Lewis.
7 p.m, W. Hayde

F'ULNECK—ll a.m. O. Weekes. 7 p.m.

Exg. Service. }
DUNSCOMBE—7 p.m. A. Alleyne.
MONTGOMERY—7 p.m. D. Culpepper. |
SHOPHILL—7 p.m. W. S. Arthur.

———————
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE |
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, SCHENTIST

Bridgetown, “Upper Bay Street
Sundays: 11 am. and 7 p.m. "
Wednesdays 8 p.m. A Service which

includes Testimonies of Christian Science
Healing.

SUNDAY, AUGUST &, 15%. 1
Subject of Lesson — S€rmen: MIND,
Goldew Text: Psalms 67 : 3. 4, Let the

people praise thee, O God: ... . For
thou shalt judge the people righteousl
and govern the nations upon earth.
The folowing Citations are included in |
the Lesson-Sermon; The Bible: Por th
cometh knowledge andn understanding.
Lord giveth wisdom: out of his mouth
EOveES Re o
Science and Health with ey ie
Scriptpres by MARY BAKER EDDY.
gasse will cover the floor of a
God is not separate trom the wisdor
The talents He gives we

He bestows.







ltch Germs
Killed in 7 Minutes

Your skin has nearly 50 million tiny
seams and oe Tee hide
and cause terrib Tening, cking,
Eczema, Peeling, Burning, Acre,

Ri Psoriasis, ckh

Pimples.” Poot ‘ten and other eet
ishes. nary treatments give only
temporary relief because they do not

kill the germ cause. The new discov-
ery, Nissan. kills the germs in 7
minutes is guaranteed to give you
a soft, clear, attractive, smooth skin
&% one neeek, of mana, yee on return
ee from. chemist

remoye the
Nixoderma ssi ciuse
Ter Skin Treubles trouble.

The Truth in
Your Horoscope

Would you like to know without

cost What the Stars eas

of your past experiences,
weak points, etc? Bage
to test FREE the skill of

India’s most fam-
ous Astrologer,
who by applying
the ancient sci-
ence to useful
urposes has
uilt up an envi-
able reputation?
The aceuyracy of
his predictions
and the sound
practical advice
contained in his
Horoscope on
Business, Specu-
Tatton, Finances,
Love. -_ affairs,
Friends, Enemies,
Lotteries, Trav-
els, Changes, Lit-
igation, Lucky
Times Sickness .
etc., have astounded educated ple the
world over. GEORGE MACKEY of New
York believes that Tabore must possess
some sort of second-sight.

To popularise his system Tabore will







































send wou FREE your Astral Interpreta- |

by: if you forward him your full name
(Mr.
birth all clearly written by yourself. No
money wanted for Astrological work,
postage etc., but send 1/- in B.P.O. (No
Stamps or Coins) for stationery,

monials and other intetesting /iterature. |
You will be amazed at the remarkable |

” of bis statements about you
affaits. Write now as this offer

be made again Address
PUNDIT TABORE, (Dept. 213-E), Upper
Forjett Street, Bombay 26., India. Postage
to India is 4 cents

Mrs. or Miss, addresses and date of |

testi- |





1952



BOYS ON

Pengeors es



2 :



THE TRACK OF A REWARD

ae eS SE Be





SIDING HIGH in the cab of a New York Central locomotive, Brandt

Rostohar (left)

and Charles M. Santmire, of Mohawk, N.Y., enjoy one

of their rewards for averting a serious train wreck last week. The quick
action of the puir in reporting @ “frozen” wheel on the Pacemaker as
the crack train thundered toward Chicago from New York paid off well
tor the young railroad enthusiasts.

$50 savings bonds by the railroa

The boys were also presented with

a’s superintendent. (International)



PACIFIC ISLAND HAS
TWENTY SCOUTS

LONDON, Aug.

_ The Scout movement is strong
in many of Britain’s overseas ter-
ritories. Few groups however, are
so isolated as that on Pitcairn
Island, lonely Pacific outpost of
“Mutiny on the Bounty” fame.

There, of the total population
of 130, twenty children. all those
eligible, are in the movement.

All the inhabitants of the three
square mile island are descendants
of the Bounty’s mutineers. And
the Patrol Leader of the Scout
Patrol is Thomas Christian, di--
rect descendant of Fletcher Chris-
tian, famous first officer of the
ship,

There are no shops, cinemas or
other amenities. However, the cost
of living is insignificant. There
is no rent to pay: wood for fuel
is plentiful, and there is plenty
of fruit available. The inhabi-
tants grow their own vegetables
and keep goats and poultry. And
Scouting and Guiding fill q great
need felt by the young people for
instruction and recreation of this
kind,

A hike of fourteen miles is one
of the tests for the Scouting First






giving vitamins and minerals
of YEAST-PHOS. Enjoy life
to the full! You'll feel

stronger, healthier witb . .

© VEAST-PHOS

GENERAL TONI



en nnvwe 1 OL $1,920; 1,920 x 120 — 2,880 x 144
| mencing salary above the minimum may be paid to the candidate}
| elected if his experience and qualifications warrant it.

j 3. Appointment will be on probaffon for two years in the first

Setting Up Nights
Makes Men Old

Getting up xlghts, ourning sensa-
tion of organs, whitish discharge,
oa ache at base of spine, groin
leg pains, nervousness, weak-
ness and loss of manly ur are

used by a disease of the Prostate

land (a most important sex gland
in men), To overcome these troubles
in 24 hours and quickly restore
and take the new
tific called Rogena.
No matter how long you have euf-
fered Rogena is guaranteed wet
you right, reinvigorate your =
te G and make you feel 10 to
years vounger or money back.
jogens ‘rom your chemist
@uarantee protects you. a 4

ASTHMA MUCUS -

Dissolved First Day

Choking, gasping, wheezin
Asthma and Bronchitls Dolson
eur system, sap your energy, ruin
a health and weaken your heart.
n 3 minutes MENDACO—the pre-
tion of & ous doctor—circu-

tes through the blood, quickly curb-
ing the attacks, The very first day the
strangling mucus is dissolved, thus
ving free, easy breathing and rest-

I sleep. No dopes, no smokes, no
frdections, Just take pleasant, taste-
less MENDACO tablets at meals and
Brose nthe 4 free Peo pare and
mchitis in next to no time, even
though you may have suffered for
years. NENDA ‘O is so successful
that it is guaranteed to give you free,
easy breathing in 24 hours and to
completely stop veut Asthma - 8 days
or money bac! urn of empty
ckage. Get SEN from your
Shemist The guarantee protects yow
e Cc



LEARN TO EARN
Thousands of L.S.C. Students
the British Empire
have increased the’ salaries
through studying our ea

in BOOK- a

SHIF, BUSINESS oOn-

ATION, COMMERCIAL

, ECONOMICS, ete. Reduced

fees to overseas students. Diplo-

mes awarded. Prospectus free.—

LONDON SCHOOL OF
COMMERCE

(Dept B.A.5) 116, High Holborn

London, W.C.I. England.

Postal
G, SEC-





WE HAVE



WAS

Class Badge. Although no Pit-
cairn Scout has yet reached this
standard, the former Scoutmaster,
Mr, A. Moverly, a New Zealander
who spent three years as school-
master on the tiny island, has
worked out a route covering this
distance.

First, the Scout will make a
complete circuit of the island on
foot. Then he will eirele it by

eanoe, go ashore again and cross

it on foot, and finally, make a
circuit by a different route.



GOVERNMENT NOTICES

WIRELESS AND REDIFFUSION LICENCES !
ELECTRICAL INTERFERENCE
1. The public is again reminded that, im accordance with the
provisions of the Wireless Telegraphy Act 1940 and the Regulations | friday
made thereunder, it is illegal to use or operate wireless apparatus of
ANY KIND (including Rediffusion loudspeakers) or to sell or deliver
any wireless apparatus unless the appropriate licence has first been
Also that no such licence is valid unless oll fees and sums
due in respect thereof have been paid,
2. Holders of licences for WIRELESS BROADCAST RECEIVERS
| are reminded that these licences expire on the 3lst day of July and
are renewable during the month of AUGUST by presentation of the
| licences at the Public Treasury and the payment thereinto of the sum



obtained.

|of TEN SHILLINGS,

3. The attention of the public is also invited to Section 14 of the



SUNDAY

SEA AND AIR

ADVOCATE



ARRIVALS —BY B.W.LA. THE BARBADOS REGIMENT SERIAL NO. 27







GOVERNMENT NOTICES

PAGE FIFTEEN





q —_
1 of Drug afd Patent







The Governor-in-Exeeutive Commitiee, pursuant to section 3. (2)

PART ONE ORDERS Attention is drawn to the Defence (Coni
’ and Proprietary Medicine Price Order, 1952, No. 8 whieh will be
TRAFFI Major 0. F i ALCOTT. &-D. published in the Official Gazett« Mouday 25th August, 1952,
ai Commanding. ; 2. Under this Order the maximum retail selling paises of “Sul-
{ Issue No. 20 ee ee 6 Avs. 88 |phur Bitters (Kings)”, “Morse Indien Rov Pills" °Chakes Pills,”
2 ee aa ie _— : ee 7 — ia “DBode's 4. hen
In Carlisle Bay GUSSAEEE BABOER BR COMMIDGIEN CARIDNEAN BURA Chases Paradol,” “Serubbs Ammonia” ax Dodd's "Keineg & L-vex
The following extract from a report by the Commander, Caribbean Area. dircete: | Pills” are as follows: na
Sch. May Olive, Sch. Emeline, Sch, to His Excellency the Governor as a result of his Annual Inspection, is published
Fsso Aruba, Sch. Lydia A., Sch, Phil for the information of all ranks. ; ; MAXIE RETAIL
Davidson, Seh. Everdene, Sch. “I have much pleasure in informing Your Excellency that | wea impressed by | x .
Sch D'Ortac, Sch. Lucien M. Smith the bearing and turn owt of the troops on parade and consider thelr standard to, ITEM UNI OF SALE PRICE
ue V. Moneka, M.V. Daerwood, Sch eae the Famtoanding Officer and his subordinates,” ts és ‘qingesiananiaeatiptitnn ‘
ary M. Lewis, Sch. Ui 5° ea lanng } m= i
Sch Laudelpha, S.8 ‘oa Pilgrim, an ranks will parade at Regt, HQ at 1700 hours on Thursday 26 Aue. 62 Cos | Sulphur Bitters (Kings) bottle $1.62
ARRIVALS y continue their weapon training with a view to their firing the A.M.C. under | Mop n ) ls
MV. Canadian Cruiser, 3,985 tong, the direction of their Coy Commanders. HQ Coy is allotted the open anal wes lodia Reet FS 3
Capt. Bird, from Dominica, Agents: miniature ranges. i Chases Pills 50
Messrs. Gardiner Austin & Co’, Ltd. Band ; | Paradol 52.
Schooner Rainbow M., 35 tons, Capt Band tices will be held on Mon, 25, Wed, 27 and Thurs, 28 Aug, 52. | =. ’ Scan
Marks, from Trinidad, Agents: Schooner [® ORDERLY OFFICER & ORDERLY SERJEANT FOR WEEK ENDING 1 SEP., 52. |forubbs Ammonia . iarge sized bottle 42
Owners’ Association Orderly Officer ; 2/Lt. H. A. Husbands ‘Ty * :
DEPARTURES Orderly Sergeant 381 Sjt. Robinson, V. N. | Dede Wikiney Sliver Pills battle 64
pat B's. Melaer tur bens okeee M. L. BD. SKEWES-COx, M 352
ss s arer ites. Sc! . ob Dd, at . ajor, 12
er Henry D. Wallace pe Trinidad, S.O.L.F. & Adiutags, ” | ind August, 1952. 24.8.5 In.
The Barbados Regiment
Seawell Sanita enhatee | THE PIONEER INDUSTRIES (ENCOURAGEMENT)
ACT, 1951

ON FRIDAY sensei ssteitllhahdianapadicneanensmamens-—vostgetiinil ncihanreialhagttvannenneesectit
Frem Antigo: STRENGTH DECREASE (a) of the Pi r a sour
_ William Thompson, Basil Pestaina, 578 Pte. Guiler, A. W. Permit to resign from the Regiment} . “ we manner Industries (Bneouragement) Act, 1951, hereby
Conetance Martin, Neville Francis, Gene w.e.f. 1@ Aug., 82. , causes this notice to be published of his intention to make the Order
Christopher, ernon topher, , sx , i Z ture ef © y
onica Christopher, Fiteroy Christ ok + eevee - gut below declaring the manufacture of clay products for the

oleridge Jarnes.
frem Jamaica:
Roy Burnham.
Tom Puerte Rico;

409 Sit. Reid, N. F. Qggated 3 weeks’ S/Leave w.e.f. 11 Aue

3. LEAVE—Privilege





_ Edgar Pollard, M. V_ Proverbs, Errol 495 Pte, Phillips, C Granted 6 months’ P/Leave with per
iit, Ernest Greaves? Maude Greaves, mission to leave the colony wef, 20
DEPARTURES — BY BWHLA Aug., 52
ON FRIDAY
Por Trinidad;
Selwen Clarke, Halm Goodridge, Ron- M, L. D. SKEWES-COX, Major,

ald Gilkes, Leon Senhouse, Hugh Seale; S$.0.L.P. & Adjutant,

Kite Holder; Rex Allamby; Aldric Joseph; | The Barbados Regiment

Soloman Hochoy; Thelma Hochoy; Ron«!

aid MecDavid-John; — Charles Ford; | | NOTICE

“herles Greaves-Hill; Arthur Shenfe : | ST ~ i
1 will be a Mess Meeting of the Officers’ Mess at 2015 hours on Sat. 30 Aug

52. Honorary Members may attend at 2045 hours. |
see meet









iene Pam eetee % HOUSECRAFT CENTRE, BAY STREET

ati = noe at The following programme of Day and Evening Classes will open
Use A.l. White Liniment. | 2 the Housecraft Centre, Bay Street from Monday 15th September to
Rub it on.and let the magic | Friday 28th November, 1952.

of its warmth do the rest. M . 6. ed
Buy A.1, today! onday 16.00 am,—12 Noon

eRe

WUT aa

Cake and Pastry Making,

Simple Cutting and Sewing.
2.00 p.m.— 4,00 p.m.— Preserves.

” Simple Dress Cutting.








{ 4.30 p.m.— 6.00 p.m.— Assorted Dishes.
rig Smocking.
Tuesday ., 4,30 p.m.— 6.00 p.m.— Cake and Pastry Making. ‘
Elementary Dressmaking.
| Wednesday 4.30 p.m.— 6.00 p.m.— Caribbean Cookery.
Simple Dressmaking.
| Thursday 4.30 p.m.— 6.00 p.m.— Advanced Cake Icing.

Advanced Dressmaking.
Advanced Butlering. |
> Simple Handicrafts.
Registration for all classes will take ie at the Housecra/i
Centre, Bay Street, between 10.00 a.m. and 12 Noon, and between 2.00 }
p.m. and 5.00 p.m. on Wednesday 10th and Thursday 11th September, |
1952.
Fees for all classes must be paid in advance for the term at the |
time of registering. '
5/- for each course in Sewing, Pattern Drafting, Smocking, and |
Handicrafts,
15/- fo reach course in Cake and Pastry Making, Cake Icing,
Assorted Dishes, Caribbean Cookery, Butlering and Preserves.
2/- will be refunded at the end of the term to all students who

4.30 p.m.— 6.00 p.m.—

we



|} Act which makes it illegal to use any vehicle, apparatus, motor, ete. i

| causing electrical interference with wireless reception.
4. Any inquiries on this subject should be addressed to the Gove

lernment Electric Inspector, Geddes Grant Building, Bolton

| Bridgetown.

| vehicle for use in the performance of his duties.
ence will be paid in accordance with the provisions of the Travelling

}

WHY PAY MORE?





Vacast Post of Assistant Engineer, Public Works Department

Applications are invited by the Government of Barbados for the
post of Assistant Engineer, Public Works Department.
2. The post is pensionable and the salary will be in the Stale

instance,

4. The appointment will be subject to Colonial Regulations anc
Service Regulations
, expenses not exceeding $1,440 will be payable on first appointment.
Service on a basic salary of $2,160 will count as qualifying service
for leave passages in terms of the Civil Establishment (Leave Pass-

the local. Civil

ages) Order, 1952.

5. The duties attaching to the post are to assist with all works

attend 75% of their classes.
Department of Education, |

13th Augus), 1952. 17,8.52—2n,

Lane,





24.8.52—2n, |
OF TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO OFFER |

FOR SALE j
The Auxiliary MOTOR Ketch Yacht i
“ARGOSY” f

about 63 tons gross |
about 49 tons net i

)

Said to have been built mainly of teak at Bruges in 1903, copper |
sheathed, Fitted with CUMMINGS DIESEL Motor ‘age unknown) 6!
cylinders, about 84 H.P. (registered), estimated to give a speed of |
approximately 8 knots on about 18 gals, fuel per hour. Three fuel |
tanks total capacity about 1,400/1,800 gals, ACCOMMODATION |
One large double cabin with W.C. attached, two single cabins, one |
used as Radio Operator’s cabin, one large saloon with sleeping accom-
modation, forecastle, galley with AGA stove and electric refrigerator.
Electric light ang radio transmitter and receiver, Certain varts of,
engine are missing, including self starting equipmen: |

THE GOVERNMENT

— $3,456 per annum, A com-}

Instructions,

and Passage



DIMENSIONS :— approximately 66ft. x 22ft. x 10ft. gins. draft

f maintenance, design and construction of buildings and wharf walls nspectable at Trinidad by arrangement, |

of the Department, the technical, administrative, financial and discip-
linary contyol of the department; also to perform such other duties
es the Colonial Engineer may require from time to time,

6. Candidates should preferably possess a Diploma or a Degree
exempting from Sections A and B of the Associate Membership
| Examination of the Institution of Civil Engineers with some experi-
ence in the construction and design of buildings.

7. The successful candidate will be required to keep a moto:

Allowance Regulations.

8. The successful candidate will be required to pass a medical
He may also be required to serve and reside anywhere
|in the Colony at the Governor's discretion.

9. Applications should be submitted to the Colonial Secretary,
Public Buildings, Bridgetown, to reach him not later than 31st August,
| 1952.

examination.

ge) FSM

BUY A



PEACOCK and BUCKAN’S
FOREST GREEN PAINT

(Specially made for the Tropics)

at $8.29 per gallon
GENERAL FTA RD W ARE Stretirs

RICKETT STREET (Opposite Post Office)







10. Certified copies (not originals)
; submitted ¥



FOR STYLE COMFORT AND VALUE

RELIANCE SHIRT

OBTAINABLE AT ALL LEADING



PHONE 4918 }
f

Best offers are invited “as she now lies.”
For orders to view, etc., apply to |

THE COMPTROLLER OF CUSTOMS AND EXCISE, |
PORT OF SPAIN, TRINIDAD, B.W.I,
16.8.52-—51, |



DEPARTMENT OF SCIENCE AND AGRICULTURE |

The Department of Science and Agriculture will have a limited ;
quantity of planting material of the variety B.45151 available for dis-
tribution later in the year. ‘

2. This variety has relatively thin canes, but is capable of giving |
very heavy vields of plant and ratoon cane, and has an excellent
juice, It is recommended for trial on a commercial seale in the high
rainfall areas only. ,

3. Those persons desirous of obtaining planting material of this
variety should apply in writing to the Director of Agriculture not
later than Tuesday, 30th September, 1952. Applicants will be in-
‘ormed in due course when they should send for pianting material

24.8.52—2n.

Travelling allow-



of testimonials should be

3.8.52—2n,



STORES

NOTICE

We regrei having to cause our
customers any inconvenience, but
we are forced to close our busi-
ness, as from Monday after-noon
until further notice. We cannot
obtain flour and we have no other
alternative.









oO

BARBADOS BAKERIES _ |

below

Building Industry to be a pioneer industry and clay tiles, hollow
tiles, reof tiles, floor tiles, clay briciss, hollow clay, pipes and building
blocks to be pioneer predicts of that industry.

2. Any person who- objects to the making of the Order set out
is hereby imvited to give writing ef his objection
and of the grounds on which he relies uppert \her¢ef to the Clerk
to the Executive Committee on or before the twenty-seventh day of
August, one thousand nine hundred and fifty-two, so that due con-
sideration may be given to any objections received pursuant to this

notice,
ORDER
THE PIONEER TAD URTAIES (SNCOURAREMTNT)
The Pioneer Industries (Clay roducts for the Building
Industry) Ord , 1952. ,

The Governor-in-Bxecutive Cormmittee, in exercise of the powers

netiee un
nm

conferred on him by section 3 (1) of *he Pioneer Industries (Encour-

agement) Act, 1951, hereby makes the following Order: —

1. This Order may be cited as the Pioneer Industry (Clay Pro-
Juets for the Building Industry) Order, 1992.

2. The manufacture of clay vreducts for the Building Industry

is hereby declared to be a pioneer industry and the following articles

are hereby declared, to be pioneer products of that industry: —
clay tiles, hollow tiles, roof tiles, floor tiles, clay bricks, hollow
clay pipes, building blocks
Made by the Governor-in-Executive Committee this
lay of one thousand nine hundred an: fifty-two,
By Command,
Clerk, Executive Committee.

DIAMONDS

ORC E

ma

als:




You can make your dull,
dey, hard-to-manage hair
sparkle like diamonds! Use
Piuko Hair Dressing and sce
howit brings out highlights.
With Pluko your hair looks
softer, longer, silkier—be-
comes so easy to arrange.












LooK
SMARTI

Always
use Pluko,

Just ask
for Piuko.

Treas URE ERM

Obtainable at. . .

RETAIL

rinight’s Ltd,
Bruce Weatherhead
Ad,

John Gill & Co,
Walkes’ Drug Store

PRICK Hinds’ Drug Store Nelson Pharmacy
' H. . Harris’ Drug &. C, Gall
Store P. A. Clarke
Stoute’s Drug Store (ALPHA PHARMACY)

3] - H. E. Pilgrim
and BOOKERS (P’°DOS Broad Street and Hastings

SOLE AGENTS

oe

N.E. WILSON & CO.

Dear Customers, please be advised that in order
to avoid disappointment in sharing of the numerous
bargains which Mr. Wilson, selected for you on his
recent visit to the U.K., Europe and America which
are being opened up for sale daily, it is necessary that
you SHOP DAILY at WILSON’S and do not wait for
special announcements in Newspapers or Rediffusion,
for in quite a number of instances, we find that before
we can advertise the stuff opened, it is sold out, often















|

HERE’S THE
LATEST
BULLETIN











in the same day on which it was opened,
We are now breaking own record by offering
“eet Quality Merchandise at prices which are causing

much comment
intended to avoid any seeniing Trait
’ WILSON'S desire that every

should share alike.

This advice i





m oof “curry-favout being

one of their customers

Merchandise at. very

& CO.

Dial 3676

Therefore, for Quality

Best prices, call early at

N.E. WILSON





















Jamaica.

PAGE

FO

SIXTEEN

TARE



ee



MR. AND MKS. H. A. DAVIS

APPOINTMENTS

who arrived here recently from

England to take up appointments on the staff of Harrison College.

They are both graduates of Leicester College.

ours B.A. English and his wife,
Sec ay of the West India
Henours B.A. in Geography.

SLA.



Adopt

Mr. Davis is an Hon-

a niece of Mr. A. E. V. Barton,
Committee now in Barbados, is an

W.1. Workers

Health Education Sycceed In U.S.

Committee Repori

THE Sanitary Inspectors’ As-
sociation at a mGeting at Queen’s
Park yesterday, adopted a report
of the Health Education Commit-
tee,. Members from St, Michael,
St. Philip,’ Christ Church, St.
Joseph, St. Janigs and St. George
attended this meeting.

The Report stated that the
Committee proposed an _ island-
wid@® campaign against tubercul-
osis. Medical practitioners will
be asked to lecture on this sub-
ject in the various parishes.

The Committee appointed Mr.
H. I. Bell, Presidénit of the Asso-
ciation, as Health Education Offi-
cer.

Mr. Bruce Maycock said he felt
the Committee had made an ex-
cellent choice in appointing Mr.
Bet as Health Education Officer.
Mr. Bell held three certificates of
the Royal Sanitary Institute and
had public health training in
Ile had been privileged
to work with Mr, Bell from time
to time and knew that he spared
no pains in passing on the benefits
of his training.

Health Centre

Mr. Bell thanked Mr,

Maycotk
(for his remarks

aud said that the

Public Health Campaign would
open with a conterence at Queen
Park early ngxt month. At this
conference, Mr. C, Gittens, Chief
Sanitary Inspector of St. Josepa,
will read @ paper on “Health
Edueaticn”, and there will he
talks on “The Functions of ‘a
Health Centre”, “The Impor: ance
of Meat Inspection”, and
March of Public Health in



bados” by other speukers.

The Campsign will begin on the
day following the conrerence,

The Committee plans publish-
ing .a quarterly pamoplet in
which mé@mbers will writé articles
on Health Education,

Within a few weeks members
of the Association will be work-
ing in conjunction with the Edu-
cation Department, ‘giving run-
ning commentaries on Health
Films to be shown by the Mobile
Cinema.



LECTURE ON

CO—OPERATION

Mr. Clive A, Beckles, Co-opera~
tive Officer, will lecture to mem-

bers and friends of the St. John’s ~

Cultural Association at the St.
John’s Mixed School on Thursday,
28th August, at 7.45 p.m

The topic which will be on “Co-
operation” should be of great in-
terest to the general public.



thi







JUST TAKE






UL NOT

i { DOLDRUM Is
44 TEACHING THE
KIO T BE A

@® from page 1
Officer, and his staff, and its ap-
preciation of the valuable services
rendered by Mr. Macdonald since
1943.

As evidence of the good opinion
of West Indian workers held by
American employers, Mr. Catch-
pole and Mr. Hochoy stated that
portunities. for advancement
were being increasingly offered to
West Indians—for example, to
posts as camp supervisers, though
these posts were formerly held by
American nationals, On their
side, a large number of West
Indians had renewed their con-
tracts

The Board devoted a good deal
of attention to the terms, of the
contracts signed between employ-
ers and workers, and discussed
means for improving them as
opportunity offered.

Among other decisions of the
Board was one to the effect that
2 pamphlet should be _ prepared,
for use in all the colonies con-
eerned, which should explain
fully and simply to each candidate
for employment the terms and
conditions under which he would
be workirz in the United States.

It was noted that the number
of West Indians now employed in

the United States was equal to
that of last vear. It was obvious-
ly not possible to make forecasts
for the future, since climatic and
manv other conditions which
ced not be predicted were in-

volved. Meanwhile, there was no
reason to suppose that hopes for
the continuance of the scheme
would prove to be unjustified.



Yisterday’s Weather

Report

Rainfall from Codrington: nil
Total rainfall for month to

date: 1.41 ins.
Temperature: 73.5 °F
Wid Velocity: 7 miles per hour
Barometer (9 a.m.) 29.954
(t1 a.m.) 29.953
TODAY
Sunrise: 5.48 a.m.

Sunset: 6.15 p.m.

Noon: New, August 20
Lighting: 7.00 p.m.

High Tide: 5.55 a.m., 6.17 p.m.
Low Tide; 11.54 a.m.





REMANDED

His Worship Mr. E, A. McLeod
Police Magistrate of District “A”
yesterday remanded 20-year-old
Harold Clayton Clarke, a tailor of
Wharton Gap, St. Michael, until
August 30 on a charge of stealing
iM Humber bicycle valued at
£9 7/6 the property of Gladstone
Willianis of Rock Hall, St. George
on August 16,



Kegiviered US Potent Ofce




ZZ
Z
Sg

IT EASY WORK BALLPLAYER AN’ \77 GIVE HIM BLISTERS
THE OL’ARM IN ARG. COLORUM AN’ HE COULDN'T
GRADUALLY JUST TO BE A WORK | BAT++-+
= GOTTA HORSE: he



. = =
V7/ it \VOULDN'T 00 TO
HAVE THE KIO CUT
THE GRASS:-+IT MIGHT,

SUNDAY ADVOCATE





~SUNDAY, AUGUST 24, 1952



W.1. Committee

Secretary Visits Here

@ from page t

He said that one of the chief
reasons for his visit to the West
India Committee’s members here
was to find out everything he
could that might help them. He
wanted to get local view points
and all possible background to
problems which the West India
Committee might help to solve.
He hoped that anyone who wanted
help, would take this opportunity
to come forward and ask for it.

Information

Mr, Barton is also nere to give
infatmation about the work of
tire Committee in London, He said
that everyone had heard how
the West India Committee and the
Britith West Indies Sugar Asso-
ciation had got together and
stecred the Commonwealth Sugar
Agreement to its triur nphant con-
clusion, That, of course, was
only onc, though a big item, with
whch the Committee had recently
becn contending.

“The tourist authorilies here
in Barbados are well aware of
the continuous efforts which the
Wert India Committee is putting
forth to stimulate interest in
Barbados and it would be an
extraordinary day on which I
went to my office and failed to
find several enquiries fram peo~-
ple wanting to know more about
this island as a health resort. But
again, I want to emphasise that
it is not only these big things
which take up our time. We want
to let it be widely known, thai
the serviecs of the West. Indi»
Committee are at the disposal of
all in the West Indies who require
them.

Primary Ov ject

“One of the primary objects of
the West India Committee to-day
as the Chairman reminded mem-
bers at the Annual General Meet-
ing last May, is to represent and
help the local man whether en-
gaged in minor industries or
playing his part in a larger sphere
as faithfully and effectively as jt
attends to the needs of the larg-
est m ‘mber companies.

On that. oceasion he said that

Mr. Campbell referred to the
establichment of a Trade Com-
missioner Service in the U.K.,

saying that they welcomed it and
agreed that it would perform a
most useful function. At the
same time, it would relieve the
West India Committee of much
routine work and thus place the
Cemmittee in a position, not only
to give the fullest attention to
important matters of policy and
those larger issues in which it
could employ its unquestioned
authority, but also to those impor-
tant details which daily called
for the assistance of an independ-
bnt investigator, negotiator or
advocate untied to any political
or government machine.

Happy Relations

“The West India Committee
continued Mr. Barton “has of
course for many years, had the
happiest relations with all de-
partments of H.M. Government in
the U.K., as well as with many
independent bodies and interests,
both public and private which,had
enabled it to exert effective in-
fluence in the right quarters at the
right time and as often as neces-
sary.

“A very important part of my
missicn is eonnected with the
question of increasing our mem-
bership obviously, the prestige
and influence of the Committee
must be linked to the strength of
its membership as regards both
qualify and quantity. If people in
the West Indies would realise the
importance of the part which the
West India Committee can play
in their interests, I feel there
would be no need to stress the

value of strengthening our mem-
bership. Let them try to imagine
how different the outlook for The
West Indies would be if there
were no such thing as a West In-
dia Committee ready to offer help
in any crisis or on any occasion,

» ~ntifully endowed with the
connections, prestige, information
and experience acquired in two

~Aturies of independent services.”

More Members

He said that he would like to
cppeal to the Barbados members
to make it their business to see
that each of them during the next
week would secure, at least one
additional member for the West
India Committee,

Asked about the replacement of
the “Lady Boats” in the West In-
dies, Mr. Barton said that Booker
Bros. were making investigations
into the possibilities of an inter-
island service in the Eastern Car-
ibbean with the full knowledge
and approval of the Colonial
Office, but he did not know of any
other proposal at the moment.
However, 'the West India Com-
mittee was losing no opportunity

By Jimmy Hatlo |
















, F JUNIOR DON’T
MAKE THE BiG LEAGUE,
MRS, COLDRUM CAN
ALWAYS GET A. JOB
AS GROUNDS KEEPER,










“a| Phay-By-PLAY DESCRIP-
TION OF THE eo
ATHLETE NEXT DOOR
ms x
THANX AND A TIP OF
THE HATLO CAP 7D
BRUCE WINTERS,
ALEXANDRIA , VA.













dl

«f stressing in official quarters, the }
importance of sea communication |
in this area. He said that it was|
quite ridiculous for the British
Government to talk of Federation
at one moment end the next, to
turn a deaf ear to one of the first
essentials of any federation. L

Mr, e& pressed delight
at being in the West Indies onde
again if only for a_ brief visi}.
Nowhere in this world, he said,
did he feel so completely at hom}.
Nowhere did he know people :«
friendly. To be here looking out
over the sparkling waters a

Barton

made him wonder whether he w
in fact back in the lands whic
had given him so much happiness
in the old days or whether he was
not just happily dreaming.

Former Posts

Prior to taking up his present
post, Mr. Barton held
posts in the West Indies and in
wast and West Africa, He was
formerly Comptroller of Customs
and Excise in Trinidad, Comp-+
woller of Customs, British Guiana
and Collector Ge sneral in Jamaica

In 1949 when Mr. _ Robert!
Gavin was appointed head of the
1on Metropolitan territories’
tion of the International Labour
Office at Geneva, it was necessary
for The West India Committee to
fin!* someone who had some
knowledge of the West Indies to

take his place aad so he gave up
his job as Managing Director of |
Booker Bros. McConnell & Co.,|
Ltd., in British Guiana to take up}

the appointment which he held
for two years and in which he has |
now decided to continue for just}
as long as his services are con-
sidered useful,

Seas SS

Remember the big date:

SATURDAY NIGHT
30th August, 1952
The GRAND OPENING of The
“20TH CENTURY SOCIAL CLUB"
Under the Patronage of
CANADA DRY BOTTLING
Ph, 5110

co. LTD.

James Smart's Caracas Night's
Orch. of B.G, in attendance
ADMISSION: by Invitation
A Free Portrait

Chez Marcel”

Sensational:
taken by *









SOSSSOSSOOS GOSO
A GRAND
wil be given by
MR. FRANK SPRINGER
(Better known as Selasie)
- at —
QUEEN'S PARK HOUSE
— on —
TUESDAY NIGHT
26th August, 152
ADMISSION 2/-
x Music by Percy Green’s Orchestra
BAP. SOLID
Bring along your friends
Prizes given for jitterbug and
slow fox trot dancers
Steel Band at intermission
24.8.52—1n




BARN DANCE & SOUCE
PARTY

KENNETH §&t.



Mr, & Mrs JOUN



Request the pieasure o:
Your Company
At their residence,
NEW STEAD, ST. PETER
ON SATURDAY NIGHT,
0th August, 1952
Music by a Popular Orchestra



Dancing Commencing at 9 pm
ADMISSION 3/6

Keep this date open
for

The Annual Leeward
BALL

on the 15th November
at

Paradise Beach Club

and watch this space.

Tickets -0- $1.00

24.8.52—T.F.N.









ee

HALLOWEE'N DANCE
fens Sante
November Ist, 1952

9 p.m, — 3 a.m.
in aid of

Royal & Merchant Navy
Welfare League Funds

A night of fun and
merriment
Keep this Date open and
watch for further details
Tickets — $1.00 each

obtainable from
League Members
24.8.52—1n.







The
Barbados Regiment

Sports Club
ANNUAL
DANCE

SATURDAY, SEPT.

27TH, 1952

2

FOO9S GOSS GO 99S SO OO9S

Y POSCDOSSSSSS9VSOETGFSDO SFOS SODEOOOS IOS SOGB TAGS.

FSF

{

SPOS SSS

several |

secs |






ions; also for London University
exams. Distanc> is no disadvanmge.
Successes, 1930-5}.

WOLSEY HALL,





Does your Roof



|
GOES FARTHEST

|

‘Phone 4456, 4267.

















|





a Silver Cup, and $25.00 in cash,

Souvenir Gifts.

itns of Cow & Gate Milk Food.

final judges.

+ 1959,



posteard size picture.

1 certify that

enclose lids taken
COW & GATE Milk Food
tee and Judges

Baby’s Name

Bern on baie a
Weight at Birth
Parents ....
Address
Sig.ature of Patent or Guardian
Date

< 4



HOME-STUDY COURSES FOR

GENERAL CERTIFICATE of EDUCATION
CAMBRIDGE SCHOOL & HIGHER SCH. CERT.

Wolsey Hall, Oxford, can successiuliy prepare

Beerees: Ac

Ae Stal? of over 100 'Greduaic Tutors. 22,000
rate Fees, instalments. Prospect!

examination) free from C.D. Purker MA LL.D, Di-ector or Su









Consider ali the

I hereby enter my baby for Barbados’ Bonniest Baby Contest,

I agree to abide











for the above examina
R.S.A.; Bar, and other

yon

se mention
ies. Dept DLY,

OXFORD exciano





need Painting ?

THEN BOWRANITE 17

and Forget it

For the best protection against Rust and Corrosion use

BOWRANITE Anti-Corrosive PAINT

LASTS LONGEST

One Gallon will cover 700—1,000 sq. ft.
Stocked in RED, GREY, BLACK.

BOWRANITE is supplied ready-mixed and
should be well stirred before use.

If required, a Special Thinners can be supplied
at $2.40 per gallon.

Wilkinson & Haynes Co., Ltd.

=

Sa









Features
We offer!

STYLE
WORKMANSHIP

QUALITY
SUITINGS

You Surely Must
Decide on

P.C. 5. MAPEFEL
& CO. LID.

as the “TOP” SCORERS
IN TAILORING.

PRIZES :

presented by Cow & Gate, Ltd,

RULES:

1. Al babies must be under 2 years of ase on October Sist, 1952,
2. A postcard size photograph of baby must be sent in together with 24 lids from





ENTRY FORM

J. B. LESLIE & CO., LTD., Representative COW & GATE LTD.,
P.O, Box 216, Collins’ Building, Bridgetown.





The tweive (12) leading babies will be selected by a Board of Judges for) final





FIRST PRIZE—The Cow and Gate Silver Challenge Bowl to keep for one (1) year,

SECOND PRIZE--S10.00 and a Plated Silver Cup, presented by Cow & Gate. .
THIRD PRIZE—S5.00 and a Plated Silver Cup, presented by Cow & Gate a

8. Parents agree to abide by the selections of the Special Committee and the

Jade.
The names of the selected twelve will appear in the “Sunday nhvenbet ier

November 9th and the final judging will take place on Saturday, 22nd November,



1952, and enclose


















‘lastic Tumblers Natural, Peach &

Bias. @ ...... .. $0.21 Each
» Pepper & Sali Shakers @ a soe
» Jelley Moulds & Pastry

Cutters @ ......... EP
» Measuring Cups @ ..... 15 Per Set
» Drawer Pulls @ e 12 Each
» Tumbler Holders @ ...... AAs
» Toailet Paper Holders @ .. 32" »
» Robe Hooks @ ........ St ae
» Saucepan Cover Knobs @ OC i»
» Funnels @ ...........5+: 7) aa

» Children’s Napkin Rings @ 60 Per Set
Enamel Jugs @ .... .91, 1.16, 1.24 & 1.36 Each
» Saucepans (Jury Brand) @ 3.40 & 3.77 Each

» Saucepans (Vollrath) @ 136
Fly Swatters @ ; & Be. 5,

CAVE

SHEPHERD
‘& CO. LTD

10, 11,12 & 13
Broad Street







There is such
a thing..!









When tailored
in our
MOYGASHEL
TROPICALS
GABARDINES
—and even
TWEEDS

C.B. Rice & Go.

of Boiton Lane





Nm Oe OO SEES FY
BEGEELGSGEGGEAGS A GLGGGG G BRA

Who is Barbados’

Bonniest Baby
of 1932 ?

The search for Barbados’ Bonniest Baby of 1952 is on,
and mothers are invited to enter their babies for
Barbados’ Bonniest Baby Contest of 1952 Barbados’
Bonniest Babies are of course Cow & Gate Babies
and this compefifion is open to all babies fed on
Cow & Gate Milk Food; the Food of Royal Babies
and the Best Milk for Babies when Natural Feeding fails.

ENTRIES CLOSE

ON SEPTEMBER

3O-

1952.



is a Cow & Gate Baby, and I

from



THIS IS YOUR ENTRY FORM—CUT IT OUT

..tins of



J. B. Leslie & Co.,

i

THE COW & GATE SILVER CHALLENGE BOWL

by the decision of the Special Commit- «

If you are not yet using Cow & Gate for your Baby, don't
delay. Get a tin from your nearest dealer and put baby on
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Natural Feeding Fails. Cow & Gate Milk Food is free from

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Ltd Sole Agents ZS PA$FAFAFAFAF FPA FF

5




PAGE 1

PAGE lot'* MM1AV ADVOCATE SUNDAY, vi OUST SI. IKS •SfSSBSf ..soft, lustrous handsome and healthy \ n you Hr.Iirecm your hair, you notice ar once how luttrou* J by a glow and vitality that pu< you right on top! Vou feel better becaute you look imutcri you (eel mm. ;onti.kn(. too, hecaiwe you know your Itsir will rcm-iin well-groomed all through the day. Day-long smart net*, and bump hur health — : llrykrccm. And the pur in HryUTccm arc emulsified fur than grwming — y %  ••„£ Quick Wkkeis ""atcTit the Bay hl hMl f • ,,1 "' 9 <** *" -ten at toe Bay prnduc|ive ^ M run-> |aved ,„,. Pol.ce made 156 In their first 0i 'v tor them. Aseoelainnings. Wanderers have %  cored 95 without lots. RACING NOTES By Ben Hat tie N OW that the Barbados. Turl Club August Meeting is a matter of history it Is possible Tor us to indulge in that pleasant pastime RriesMt, Capt. W. Farmer topscorod for the the Constables with . C. Blackwhen he had scored 21. He even__ man. who made . was the only tually lost his wicket when he "."J'^T^/nr^ > urtmcaUon ,or n other batsman to score over 20 got his pad in front of one from of being wise altar the event With .t and bustle of the Races safely behind us. it Is surprising how consistent a picture can be made of the form which at the tune appeared to baffling. Beginning at the top with the A Class wc find that the only one so classified to score was Harroween. This however, cannot be attributed to lack of uppurluuily but .rather to the fact that the A class Depeiza who had played a very tor this Meeting was weak both In numbers and quality. Rabat gocd innings during his stay at manifested below her best and it is probably not a well mare. The %  commenced their official fixtures with in. riled the aeries as a commendable step in the right .mcctioii Mindly inU-rcokmial rivalry. NOT ALL TRINIDAD Xn Ul ite an All Trinidad team but it dbj .,like Dr. Noble Sarkar lauve International table tennis and Carl WilliamnampkN and Ptnwkk Dpbvsingn. imoton who undoubtedly runs. "Boogies" Williams and Denis Atkinson was the moat adjudged l.b.w. HI* score was 81 luccessful bowler for Wanderers, including 11 boundaries. keta for 64 runs. Louis St Hill alia gave a good performance. He bowled 13 overs and _, took four wickets lor 27 runs. formed th. W Kiiuwlea and D. Evelyn i anblnatlon that from the beginning called forth opened the Wanderers' first %  thai aw could put in the field uguuist them. Innings, When stumps were '!".in. the seoko nempkms and a drawn, the Wanderera' total casion in convincing style and wa 95 without loss. Knowlaa, vho would have given Barbados the rdge In MAKING HISTORY %  the Teats to come. MAKING IHSTUK* 1 rar Barbados won the rubber and 1 think that this ..cluevemenl u a new high in ihe history of orgaiuaed table taffkttU i-d complex and rank drfeattMu in the rank rat tool t.'blc tennis for some years now and it appeared ,,, ham 1 sponsor the idea that Barbados nd :i>rest of ttoa entire maid m % %  %  lie*. attacked the bowling MldUni nd Bradshaw cess, had 72 not out to his Evelyn 15 17 not out. ral 1 the final race. the run of bad 1 AST IKON RESISTS THE WE AT HI Ii llmidlmrsts, scorching sunshine, exposure to all the winds tliat blow—they make no difference to a roof painted with Lastikon. For galvanised, asbestos or shingled roofs Lastikon is ideal ; it never fades, cracks or peels off. Economical and long-lasting Lastikon is available in various colours—ask your dealer about it. .rtsT oiw.xin BIRKMYRE CANVAS It' WIDE—FOR BUS TOPS and SIDES INNER HOOD LINING 56" WIDE. FAWN AND GREY LIONIDE LEATHERETTE 30" WIDE. ATTRACTIVE SHADES BLACK MIRACLE ADHESIVE li-OZ. or 5-OZ. TUBES &f ECKSTEIN BROTHERS BAY STREET DIAL 4269 ~l missed once same can be said of Nolonite whose form was many pounds below what we know he is capable of. Harroween herself started four times ,„ JOT her only victory which she achieved in the last race of the meet(TT\ ^ oj wtaftn* tha rubber and justification for an. batsman to score over 20 got his pad In front of one from g when she carried 118 lbs She has never been much of a weight carrier, but I could not help being somewhat disappointed at her showing. The B class was evenly matched and some of the best racing was nt down 24 overs, of which ii,.id int~ a „ w |„i .0 inrlu***" among'* them. The performance of Landma-k who won the um m^t* !" \nd tAnk *^*Tr 5 , J, 5~I Champion Stakes carrying top-weight was of course outstanding and 22 n ? a !: 1 e, ^_" nd .25 £ n ,w boundaries while HA. Mt f.^., ^.^ undoubtedly mefits promotion. Of the three newKing carried his bat Tor ten ,. ornrrs Mrs Bear, from the same stable, shows every likelihood of unhiding the only six of the davfollowing in Landmark's footsteps, and possesses a devastating late In the remaining minutes of run w hich will stand her in good stead in distanee races. The form play. Carlton lev their opening showed by Vcctls and Spear Grass on the other hand was extremeh batsmen McKenzirafter he ha i disappointing Those consistent and hardworking campaigners Luncontribuled II and also Lucas ways. Red Cheeks and Pepper wine, between them started no less than %  HBMI earning money on ten OC C aatO lU It Is aS l OO l a n l tU J how Insnn brothers Rcvnold and much work the highly strung Lunways can get through without any Oeoflray were together when apparent ill-effect. She has proved a good servant to Mr. Tomm> iih'sucetumpa wT drawn with thtot..I Edwards Castle in the Air most surprisingly seemed to improve in tr t at 39 frr the 1~ ,.r %  wickaf hU behaviour as the meeting went on. Had his rider been able to Hevenld l. InelldTn* three *"* h,m %  '• c <* thought, he might have just tirleJ ..net rtl^ftii 1 Uv contrast Flying Dragon did nothing to redeen ••"•inriariM end Ceoro-ev a lurk whlch has dogged his stable r. HARRISON COLLEGE v The C daai winners in spite of having every opportunity only LODGE managed to win two races between them. One of these went to Bright Light who will be lucky to avoid promotion; the other to score HarrUan Callege (for 7 wkta.) 1*1 Wiis Dashing Princess. She like most of Mr. Gills string was very Michael Wormc who went at fit early and put in her best work during the first two days. .umber seven in the College bitin C2, as we have already noticed. Abu All was the "find" of tins order scored 108 not out in the meeting. Aim Low was perhaps a little fortunate to be bracketIhe College first innings against c d with Mimic Gave in the iirsl race, but thereafter Ihe Handicapped John wLodge .d College yesterday H t.-k a rather more enthusinstuview of her abuttlai than I did. and undefeated knock nl ^ i, nil an ,i e )lV e one chance. he failed to place. Darham Jana is one for whom we are always (her hand 1 challenge anyone, even the most fo -, lta to acora hearing excuses. The probabllltj Is that she Is moderate. Devil's fig us to classify this victory as someinini. ln Micir h(1 if un h-mr's spell at J uUl lf 293 runs for the loss of Symphotu on the other hand may yet Improve. Of the remainder itum that %  have localised talent |h( w i,Het, Spartan have lost 1 s V en wickets in their first Innings Te>t Mutch .showed that It Is possible even under our conditions for apabie of hs> Intan OsOtdal table tennis arena and w t f |( e t for 16 runs. >fter batting the whole of the day. a stayer almost totally darVflid uf pact t" wifl ncaa. His future will hat Barbados table tennis. With this added expectance 10 then cr*dtl QejdjdlVd was ahfao B chance depend to some extent on the numlier el long distance races which things, off Frank King while in his thirCollege won the toss and batted may ^ f, a med. The Tiling appears to be consistent but quite modII C t II II VSKI-'TB \l.l. CHAMPS ties. The fieldsman was E. Cave on a fine wicket, but had a sh-iky cra Ci while the less said about Embers the better. Trimbrook llghtH AUHISON COLLRGK OLD BOYS are also in line Cor congratuBut for this chance. Goddard start when they lo*t their first lv f ramwl but fluent In action showed good speed while Magic Oaye's A ."T,,,,;, ,,, utskctball Knock.ut comDetitlon batted confidently and well, and wicket for one run. C Blackman performance was a triumph of ability over adversity. UUons on hsrvmi wort Uu li-sKctiu rtnoeK<.ui cnmpuKiou ^ fours who wtnt at number four, scored The breakdown of Watercress before race*, appeared to leave the Th. beat V M i'< 6) tha considerable margin of oft ^JpL* balHncn who i^.tted well the ntxt be^l score of 4J and Mi. cias s at the mercy of Mary Ann but in actual fact, it was Top lo SI DObti ...,. j ^ ,1 w^r*. T S Birkelt J Grccnidgo S. Headley made an attractive 43 Flight who dominated. A most attiarlive U a v Filly by Flotsam out Y MP.C fb< had dlipnaad "' tlie in.weiful t arlton and College • !" spec i iv( .| v before he was bowled by RiUy. 0 f that outstanding mure Meads. Mr. Wong's entry had two firsts and warej expected to secure the erig' ^'",^,0 2 and II s H. witt who is not out with lwo seconds for her four starts: and It is to be hooad that her success on Harrison College < id Boys but this was not to be. Y.M.P.C. conp h-L.i-sv an k King took Worme, has 42 runs to his credit, will encourage others to make the trip in the future. In defence of n %  tmht rone defence nnd H.C.O.B. comprised of tail *.. k f ,„ .. „,„, n u K. Riley who bowled at medium Mary Ann it should be said that the tactics pursued in her last start maneouvred cleverly and penetrated their ll,r Wl *;* %  *..,,,_, tv n tlir AQ pace was the mct successful were such as to minimise her chances. In actual fact the duel for i"n nme King sent down quite a bowler and took three if Uha] ,w ,x,sUion ,n which she and Top Flight (the two top weights) ,„L. ,.r Liman and made College wickets for 57 runs. J. ," l'l( KWll K vs. SPARTAN Pirkwlrk * Spartan dor I M.) Itckwick were at the wicket nearlv five hours to score 242 runs .„ on the first day of their First la of that, those with vision have stuck with the Barbados D i V i 9 i on cricket match against L they I **• "' P wn U P ln<,,r *?"" %  Spun Q Park yester~ WOUld be th* Laat to I toej out or its correct perspsc(iilv 0( lhls %  and cotm: ,|l "i Barbadi^ Tat* IVIM.I, had ^^ na( —, even the most Tab!. 11 I \ nl 19 of the 35 goal:, while ttV Tall Algv Syminonds scorea m 01 me JJ goae, won.uw i.-.. -^ UD mi made up of Noel Symmonds his brother another jj, |1|( n L. .,( indulged resulted inevitably in the nee going to that old sluggard footer. .. K. Hall. J. Best and C. Forde. His Excellency the Governor is due to present the trophies ff whlch at a presentation match next Thursday but I understand that trs bul ^ ^,1,^ to secure •1 will organise weekly practices — preparation fur tha proposed tour of tha Caaib B aars In October. CRICKET AVEBAGB8 INTKRKSTINC T HE V I I'M DIVI ion K-mia opened yesterday. TltM u arT s taking the place of the crj means | charl season U nearly halfway through other usual opening bat Gru|aKen 0 y G. Wilklc dodge them. Harris bowled 14 overs eon d ( wicket. With just over half an hour ore for play. Spartan opened ith Atkina and L. F nd so It is high Un* that wa reviewed the figures returned in the Mb, The batsmen smarted caui tiously. but with the score only I t of all It does astm eartaln that M least tw. rwitsmc-n sliould [„„,.. Atkins was u-inpted to hit Farmer—a slow right arm bowlCross Bow whom Holder rightly drove from flag fall to finish. *r — took two for 52 In 12 overs. A.nong the F Class winners, the most significant development was „ the emergence of Seedling, who after his rather disappointing showThe Lodge fast bowler K. |ng in | he Derby came back to win two nice races. He is a useful Brookes did not bowl as steadily tvpe ot horse who should continue to improve. The very speedy us in his last match and although Miracle won her first start as she liked in brilliant time, but five he bowled 17 overs he took one Bn(1 a ha jf j s i(J( f nr oa sne gets at present. First Admiral apparently wickel. At times he was a bit (e u lhe effects of his Trinidad campaign. Cardinal a little "short". erratic. The other wicket was lo begin with came on as the meeting progressed and credited his owner breeder, with two wins. He will never be a world beater The fielding o; the Lodge boys Du t ha iV"honest,"consistent and likely to improve. March Winds good but at times they give nlso lopl his Maiden Certificate and Ramhlcr Rose who earned money 1 1 BHd tWO bowlers capture tile odlvidual iifn 1 well as the bowling figures arc in keeping with those retUTI > t>ry years for corrosponding periods ind If this standard is maintained. I see no reason why the 1B52 I* rated as a H^H good local DENIS HEADS BATSMEN D ENIS batt u ATKINSON heads tha /v rages with 375 four Innlns %  '13.75 and in tha hi of Dowttia having taken 111 wickets ai a cost Hist for sheer ail rota lance 1 must yield tha pahs %  • C "Boogli W 111 %  West ; I round oor* in flva innlnga and ba haa baan I n two of the %  Ha 1 A the battlni with the good figures of 69.66 par Innlnga, and heads lhe bowling With 31 wickets taken ch In 05.5 .. ball outside tha artehei from E 1. Q Road %  to the lofl Jordan. keeper Bvelyn soon after dropped a catch from Harris off J. Greenidge. When stumps were drawn. afttra 16 for the luas of 1 \icki-t. (ARLTON SB, EMPWK Empire Cariton lor two wkU.) A line innings of 81 bv Dein i'a and Rood sUpportln { knocks bv E A. V Williams (10), -• V itohinson <3U> nnd S. Rudder (24) he'pod Empire to boost their total to 232 In their Btat innings against Carlton as their first division cricket game got , ;,t BUCK Hock yesterday aft* 1 l i-.v tha da wing of stump-. Carlton had registered 39 for the lc of two wickets. The most successful bowlers for Carlton 1 i< C B. Williams who bagged "> for 86 with his 24.4 overs and K. H. Warren, their medium pacer, who captured 3 for 64 in 15 overr. The wicket was parfoct whan Empue opened their innings with Boblnson and llunte. They howaway run b,.ll. when tlu-y thr. DIMS ATKINSON <;<(>! AI-SO a VUEU good Ixitting llguias returned up to the end of the third ever, lost their Urst wieket with LM include N. S. Lucas 236 runs in five innings (once not only I" on the board, but Wllll<-utl avuage 59.00 f C. Atkins 171 runs In three innings, average 57.00, B nu became associated wito c;. i*roverbs 170 nms in ftvo innings (twice not out) average 66.88, Robinson In B sacond wicket C, Hutehinson 156 runs in live innings (twice not out 1 average 32.00, paxtnarthlp wbi.li was productive C Hunt.IN bl ."X innings. Howlers besides "Boogies" Williams who have done w*l are Fred Phillips, Spartan medium paced bowler WHO is seoOBd m I < %  11: Inkcn 15 wickets nt a cosl of 9.93 tUBS, TWO rWl ars and Barker of Empire follow In the order menUoned, Atkinson has taken 13 wickets at coal nf 10.18 runs in U 1 ovars prhlla Barker in 106.2 overs has taken %  Jl .-1.1. %  of 10 33 runs Keith Bowen. Spartan In bowtof is fifth with 13 wickets taken at a eost of of 45 runs. Williams whe missed at the unlucky 13 we:-.t on to score a useful 40 which Included three boundaries before he was bowled by Warren. Robinson who was batting patiently, had his stumps knocked STANDARD BRIDGE By M. Harrison-Cray Dealer: East Merth-South tame N. &E31 OAKJ 6 a 3 w.* A "". 8 63 QA9B43 Q ID 78308143 0 A Q 6 3 0 10 4 J 8 v 7 6 0 J 10*7 0 5 O K J 754 '; %  K Q 10 3 rpHX tense closing stages ot •* %  a needle match often produce incongnioiis results. In the 1952 Gold Cup final, the team that were leading with a few boards to play r^ebrnted this adrantage :ih some wild overbidding by their Nort h-Soutli pair ln Boom I. BpacJaJ Pa6Baori 1 iajna indieaied. East opened One Spade South paasid. West bid Two Hearb and North Two No-Trumps, which should show Jl points. Bast imirageously bid Thres Hearts and South, with visions of a slam, made a cue bid of Four Hearts. West's double was passed round to Uoutli, whose Five Diamonds was also doubled. %  1 %  -. redoubled with the obvious hope of scaring him Into Pue Hearts, but to no avail. The plav will be given In o-morrows feature. ..1 each of her four appearances Wl unlucky not to do the sai The complete domination of the two year olds by Apple Sam Is I hope, a temporary phase This must not be taken to mean that I do not wish Mr. Goddards splendid colt well, but in the interest of racing I should like to see him with a bit more to do. Possibly stiffer opposition will be forthcoming from among those who did not face the starter this time, but I am confident that Apple Sam will take a bit of beating no matter who he has to face. Comment on the G class Is almost unnecessary The standard pn vailing Is best assessed from the performance of Gavotte who, after Iwing left half a furlong, won the last race for her class comfortably with top-weight. SCOREBOARD roiicr. v WANDERBII riir. rim in..in. Tavkir b D. AtkWuon Blackman C Mayrr* b D Atkinson ASM* t Tnppln b D Alkln.ion Farmer c l> Uit<-.< i> D Ilyer \ b st inn D. Atklmuwkpp Knowtev Kmtwln. b %  b St Hill Dodaon c wkpi Si Kill Kprlnaer b D A'kiti-on Mulllni b SI Hill llt.il.haw tun on! annna ToUl BOWI.INO ANALYSIS K.. rt< 1 Kvclyn no< r.nra1 — Flral l-inlm. ;.. %  ] IN 1 ii" T.aal %  wiihoJt lol UUWLINO ANALYSIS %  inkena Mullina Tajlor Soban Then has been considerable interest evinced in the preparations 14.53 in 88 1 Prank Kmu, Spartan pace bowler is next tu[ lhcfie f vnTtSl n „d the finals should be a day of keen rivalry, with 10 arlcto M >'f 1460 runs oach n 58 overs. HQI h.ve lieen run off at ach of the clubs and the finalists I'OLK I; (I.I'll Sl'OKTS represent the cream f the contestants from each club. Who knows? T OT PoUea Boys' and Girls* Clubs will hold iheir first Annual TaUim -he .Amateur Athletic Association of Barbados Athlatk SpotN a) Konalngton On MofkdaV, August 25. Represhould be on hand not only to give the Meet their moral support itatlvaa froni thirteen Boys' Clubs and throe Girls' Clubs will bo but should have 1-ttle difficulty in discovering potential talent among A. M Tart taking part. these youngsters foi senior athletics. t Wwardf riiKnicK ra. *rATA; lekwltk M'laa %  •' %  wkl.i Plrkwltk llt-i l-l-i. b r Kins 1 .i Bukrll c R-.w#n b AlklnSS J. OrMiudse lb. b Atklna 3S J 'il 11 M 1! It B Jordan I 1 I Gr*rnldBc 3 14 g. U O. Hoad .... 3 0 I i AMI.ION .i xnai ivnm i. T nrprnsoa O H K*in"i l> Waricn u .. M .i-i.il. ii n EdShlll r A" V William* b WJ.HU V DrpoifIbw C B Willl-n E W Oranl c wk. tM.ltahalU Warren . W A Drnylon e*C n Wllli.m. II Hatai MII out ,.., lti.de*. o G EdBhlll 1i B Willlami # On fagc 6 •^S. 3o7 I'Vc INI SeftRCH OF \K2JdB0SS£j FOUNTftir,' OUTH'c t ; .-HELP ME/ Drive away UGLY SKIN diseases now! Ajhjmc.i I aaa 1'iinpkM r %  vu rctllo i ii loiuhlc ar— %  ram and fmKin.iiti(ni once and tor all •hi iht .|a*. ccruin actton of opt urn HOW ODD. ACTS SO QUICKLY p |)i>. yaafai adaSf n i-jina toss Jeer 1 pom ->l DM *km i •>:" D.D.D PRESCRIPTION KOAT WAS GOOO G^ BOSS? AMD NO. 4 FOH OE eeL Tu^cYsav IN TJIS V>pojyo-JNCaea|AStVcww/ Bb )3? J&L*^ %  ^>


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-I \ll\\ ADVOCATE S| \l>\\ \l (1 ST 14, 19J2 BATE! SATURDAY OCTOBER 4th PIRATES DANCE PARADISE BEACH am i^ STARS a „*YX>Ur % %  MO \v \i (.1ST Look m ihe KCIU J \/v. B u nSTt.Kl. i:\-.t SIDE SHOWS THE BARBADOS HOTEL ASSOCIATION invites v>u to U' III \i IH4MIHI HV IIAI I .ii l\\l.\l>l>. BEACH C'M'Ii >.i. SATURDAY. September G. from !l p.m. unlU—? MKSa s. iifh n -, %  OEV1N* M %  t4>CEK Iiino 3" July 23 BEACHCOMBER DR'S A On,> Week iiolidiiY fi 2 People at the SANTA MARIA HOTEL GRENADA EKEE Air TickelCourtesy of B.W.l.A. FREE Accommodation .ii.l Meals Many other wonderful Prizes 1 'tffceta $1.5U -HTO! ROODAI I HE 4 IRIS %  m la W • an II....1 Ml '• Wall Diana) %  STORY OF ROBIN HOOD r ,., i, Technlcnlot; Pi chard TODP Joan nil t. Ultra i rt.va>i>4l Neva I %  howUf ihv | C 1*" OUi-a* %  *->• %  rkr*a. M . -.Tc %  **•**•• U wui v\,ighi-l.min* I *...* mllO* ri'utii* Tfca i 1 AiK.Hi %  urnwoi 1H Ml-ION* i "MI" OI.VMIH I V* .... . i-marm-i '• '"• L %  THE GOLDtN in which VOW bj • %  ''KS matt (Jnn u. %  torlunate. * %  aMMh Hi (J.I I .'rvinj. * I %  %  .-hili • • This U a most aui which to you ban WaUiMd to for Mine d tonal friction * • ibrut.ons. out 'liliwi ju i. what do. B, your congenial * 11 ail proDon'! be hasty making up your mind: note In what direction < I In pastimes, co-operate: in duties, the same. * daj ealls for—some work, rest, travel -.— ,,„, „ % %  %  non-routlni Conswrv* energy "•** " %  b relaxed in min. laAPV • "flii.v lo, and N# : %  lal s,.[t. %  > ui'.r.A scouno HA'ttTTARlUa Mov -3 Deo. W CAPHICORN '). Jan. n,. • it withOUl l*4'ini! fliiieky %  wraiM u tor such. * AQUARitm :.i-i Uranus suggests loot Jsn W r>l> W %  %  that planned icbedule. trip o %  %  %  I %  • • ,• •• I'U-Jtsr Like hint in Aq Your r h !" ( ,„ | %  ,M:, -;,:,-... P r like SALAMANDER -i.,,.. i HC .1 | INI kuc f.i.iH. -nl I*. It'll Mr t %  lhr ^ *< ODAY arc bi| .f mind und heart, but often ^ ^ ho dim!" l ol raatrol avat Md and &f •tkable achievement. poat: Aubr<". Beards I.-, art i %  > a i %  If FAMU-I KIM. •'" • • ,CAVE OF THE OUTLAW *' l • IN a "i Nl>. '• IKIMaTOVI HAD JANETTA IIIII-SS SHOP ||\/\ IIII41KIS ( Ne\i lliinr to Sinner's) • I SG B '.(.^ -from H 1NDKI lt(HIEES_fn.m .< %  --., M.,<|.;,, Order for ;.ll t)v '-.'.-,-'.-,-,-, '.,*.' -.-.-.'.-..-.-.*,*.-,*,-,-,-,. DRlIK.fclO ^ .iiiai isiai iou\* • was. %  i %  11'' Thr Much T-lVrO Atot.1 kSNIIkl (Six Mai Alltarllri iinai sirai IOBAV a IOMOHH> IHI I t%l UUIPIItl %  u* itooi*| 1 f *IIN s, SVIIWS*. 1 .11 St OPEtfEB 'i N E W i Ladies' Hats $4.32 ( Ladies' Dresses SI 8.00 j Handbags $5.13 %he f/Hodern ZDress Shoppe Broad Street. •,-.',',',',','.-.',-,-.-.'.-,',','V-'.-.-. '-'.--•,',','.'.-.'.'•''***-*.*.**-.'.-*-'.-.V^ M 'lief: AMOS, formerlv Ui S : Hil.i %  aUood. frv 1 %  tk (-*> \whete he l*iii ,i holiday He met s md ij| dy Blood In London and had dinner %  that he hopes to have I tutnra l.uuhUUr-Minj? II >/ Mallhinm S T MATTKIAJ nuiRCH *..> .ne ..f %  double wodfternooa a, i.ou o'clock Thr parlies were "ie MUM Fleorelle Km. Ii and Barbara Kin b dauebb I I of Marlow", : %  The cer*mon> choral was parl \ %  t tnthon Late Brigadier Ernest ALt-W Le Mrs. E A. Lroul \li.\ lti*aii Vktor.*. B-CCanad.t took as his b,, Barbara Kineh. ekler sistvr. and he wore a dtats of bn cut on prineeas style witti a h.uiiiiiv bice ykc sleeves and a long Bowing train. Her finger tip vail of nvton not wu held in mliel cap trlsnII IK i .1 4 white orchids and nibt roaes. '* r i Iloverbs. son of Mr and Hrs. Harold Proverbs of ft", Roekley Terrace and Jie wore a dress or satin ,pr./-jn with .i close ntting bodi'-e, long sleeve^ and an a^pliqued neckline and very full skirt ending m a flowing train. Her linger lip vul Of nylon n* wa "^^ in alaca by a Juhet cap Inmiiktd with daisies. She carried a bouquet of white orchids and tube Triev were attended by Mis! N..nette Kineh and Mi s Sheila Tryhane as bridesmaids and they wore similar dr os s es of ntle paan ballerina length dresses Of >\elet organdy over a bouflanl arloo ibaar featuring a ight bodice with neck and sleeve.-d with scolloped borieriaf. They carried while lambs wool muffs with daisie md headdresses to match. The duties of hestman were •crinr-ried by Mr. Chnrles McKen^ie and Mr Freddy proverbs. -enwcUvaly. Those of U*CP'ell to Dr. Evre Klnch, Mr. David Heed. Dr. Malcolm Proverbs, and Mr. Harrold NichoUs. A reception was held a•Bevvler**, The Garrison anil Laa left for Sam Lord-i < ^stUfor therr hone>Mrs. Proverba are at the Crane H^el. imimimmi V'/i>' Su/irrinli'intrnl f NTRANSIT from Englnnd yV*bi tba r.olflte vere Dr. IFF Lew,Hldttiat/ Iwo children Leonard and Sylvia Irnm Trinidad 1), Lewiv. HO is AssisUnMedical Superi-i>ndent at the Mental Hospital. Trinidad, went P to 'he I' 14 on one year's studv %  ml vacaUM leave during which i lime he did post graduate work n neurology and psvehiatry at Ine [HIIWVMMI Hoyai Inrtrmary. 0arl From t h. M RS. DEREK FOWI.ES whose i! is Knghsli ""I HJaItorv Master If Harrison College, returned from England hv the i.oittlo tfl t bou) Ui monlhShe was ac.,^'ip.ni." by their it I %  Andrew. Cwiib gaUinq A Mrs. M Il I i; A LEE and Mr. A Mm. ROY PttOVECBS H.-////i A AX St. t.runur.l V f^TfcsUJAY afHrmoo at 4 30 at St. Leonard's Church, Miss Dorrien Mitchinson W..:>. daughter of MrIns Watson and the late John M. Watson of "Walwyn". Worthing was married la Mi Eustace HutMin Davis, "ui of (he late Mr UK) Mrs. T. H. Uavis of PkaaakM Ko.id. The ceremony which was fully choral was performed by the It** II A. Melville. The bride was given in marriage by her brother Mr Ralph Watson and lie wage a dress of ivors shppei utin with %  dee* iiiiuiK bootea 'Uttujied nghl through the hml. reek. Her long sleeves wi re trimmed with chaaUlly ince and Vic funl of the skill u K iel of chantilly lace frills. e long flowing train was of .slipper satin and hei r.ill wag kept in place b> a IfCC Mp and orange blossoms. Her bouquet was shell pink and Wbil buds with Michaelmas daisies and maiden hair r>-i n Her sole attendant was Miss Rosemary Watson who wore %  ballerina length dresj, of avcbkl %  I'Kiiri.M with a tight fitting bodice with (lowers at ihc neck t-< match Vic flowers in the dutch bonnet She carried a bouquet of assorted ground orchids. The dutus of bestman were performed hv Hi '!:. il DavU while those or Uafagfa lell to Mr WlUlaro Wataon, Tbr r an e a GilL Mr. Teddy Davis and Mr Harold Ramsay The reception was held L'-Ur. st Mn bat) and the hi.r>". of spent at Powell Spun* Hotel. Itathshtba. 1 1'iirty A PARTY was g'lven by the Adelphi Table Tennis Team on rtiuis.i:iy alow ai i tings in the honour of H i rotary of the Tab c Tennis A .. %  D i married The visiting Trinidad H present louring v, re also inBed in extending ( %  Mi"M( % %  fot haasth ind bappllUtnuirHs Trifi M H. NEVIl.l.E h'ran.i %  of Antik'u.i arrived on a b I ind Is a guest of Mrs. S. CodrlnRton. at BrtMOM X Road, dao served in the last World War in the R.A.F. and .'.ly established .i dan Ing school Re axpeeti to be leaving the island soon to be in Antigua for hiIn I big show. He is Prinetpa] Of thl Antigua Cultural Dancitn! Class which stages khelr show ,i' U I fv r i!'.:<-i on Saptembei 1. 'Jau I,jit 11 In \ in -/>(_' M ISS GUISE FODERINGHAM of Grenada arrived here yesterday by the GelBfe from Eng_ land where she pent alr-ost flve years. M Kndenngham *ho did nursing a' Sir Charles Hospital ttftcr being awarded a C.D. and W. Scholarship practised midsix months nt Weir Midwifery liosp.tal. Balara. after qualifying In midwifery and as a State Registered Nurse. She is spending a short holidav In Barbados as a guest at "l-eatonon-Sea. 1 The Stream before returning to Grenada. tUrthiiuy Party O N THURSOAY Last Master Brian McCartney, son of Mr. and Mis. 'Jeeil MeCai'n. if Forest Reserve. Trinidad, cela1 rated his fourth WrthUav at "Abingdon", St. Michael, the residence of his grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Louis Gale. Among those present at the : %  — David Allan. Kay J.>hn and Helen Uowcn. Celine. Susan and Timothy Gale; Chris. John, and Judy Gibbs: Robert and Mark Grannum; Rupert and Bernard Hunte; reflclty. Marilyn. Elizabeth, and Diana Jones. Barbara and Dotty CM THIS EVENING R.30 P.M. LAM SHOW H€ AMA3i9MJCBE TOMORROW AND Tt'KSltAY CM A *30 HIDING 41 PUKI'll riM IfJraoqR MONTGOMERY) %  III IIM.klN. OH IHI I Nil Unon DONLEVY HolH-rl WALKBR Tom DRAKE WEDNESDAY AMI TIHRSIIAV 4 11 a .!• juhiuiv Wr:is\ui i.KH Maurstn obi ...UA.N l*.H#\N llll An •*> Mini siviui-s ovucii %  lit Rufta ROMAN JUST OPENED AN ASSORTMENT OF PAiN BOOKS AT ADVOCATE STATIONERY SI. aTiniCiVa ClWliH | Recital "I Sacred Music 5 On Suiyiay 2* ,h AuaiBl j; At 4-J* P. Proceed. 1 in Aid of ^ Choir Fund* 21. 8. 52—2n I r uauan p aiananan n nii mi "' BfflAN 'fMdlna" to. til' to Marilyn, four yo.r old daUKiiUT 01 Sr. ana ra. narry SOD*. ..IIQ" ffFCtT.i d..uttiiai of Mr ajj tin l" A Lynch, with whom be <-ul Uio cake. tOarlb would appiaclat. -imilai pictuoa from parent, which MU*T bo aolUbl. prlnta for raprodur Uon for till* column ) Wits. tR. X. Stuarts School of Shncing Presents CARLTON CLUB PROUDLY ANN0UHC& THE OPENING DANCE AT THEIR NEW CLUB BUILDING BLACK ROCK ON SATURDAY 1ST. NOVEMBER 1952 IN TRUB M|fa HALLOWEEN TRADITION CHES-FLOOR SHOW 4^ SPOT & BALL DANCES BEWITCHING TUNES BY CURWENS ORCHESTRA DANCING 9.O0 P.M. DRISS OPTIONAL ADMISSION BY TICKET $1.00 •,-,',*,-,. ;%',;;: vv>w '-*',',*#',*,*..'.•*,-.',',*, *--v REVUEDEVILLE 1952 under the Histinviushetl patronage of His Excellency The Governor Sir WILLIAM and Lady SAVAGE at EMPIRE THEATRE OH Wed. :trd. Ttiurs. lib & l'rida> 3th Sept. — o.:lll p.m. MATINEE: l-ridn)Mh — 3 p.m. BOOKING viKflCE QPSMS t'ri. Mtk Aua;.. *.M a-in.—12 Neon; l.:iti p.m —J.:lll ua. LADIES "ARCOLA" SHOES I IIW (IT COUWIS. V,iii. llrouu. Bbik Sued.'$13.9 White N'ubtick I4.S VAKIIII S STYI.KS (IK BLACK & BIMIWN St I III s Backless 4 Twins JI4.71 White Nuhiitk—Backless &• Ta*BM SUM T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS (Oea SMOK STORES DIAL Ot DIAL 4W*



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SINUU U <.l ST 24. 1352 SUNDAY ADYUCAIK iliKrX Al The (iiirmii Men Against The Sea POULTRY NOTES FOR most poultry keepers in %  I* la. H. Barbados the answer to which comet tint the ru or the chicken A FEW years back, a young Norwegian scientist named e. te .>*% g !g*... ,. Thor H.yderdahl worked out the truw> that the inhabitaJSaJ^aS^^HSS^hMSS^ ants of the Polynesian Islands in the South Pacific had iooally ur imported have been nr.Rir.allv come from the continent of South America and bought by long-established poulnot from the Asiatic Continent as other ethnologists trj-kecp.^ or^by_ "gweoaa-trs to thought Tc try to prove his theory, he >nd five other hv .^w^^ownegg?* d ci precisely as ancient Spanish records describe*, the primitive rather than hatch egg* is wipe becraft used twelve hundred years ago. On this raft, they c u * ""^ > ou "PteiaUae in sail*I 4.300; mite, bom C.lf.o In. Heru I.. I|,, Polynesian & %  £?*& "$£$£&£ Islands following the course, believed by Heyderdahl, to btor at a rft „ nd ^laln,-htcks have been taken bv preInca people in ancient tiroes. by setting hens Is not naDy to be recommended KON-TIK1 showing at the Plaza The Last OutpoM You must decide the type of Bridgetown i* the actual riny-byAl il.e Pla/a Barbarees, w* haw poultry you wint to keep because % %  •cord of this amaatng THB I.AST OUTPOST Marring *on* chicks inherit a greater abilOdysatr across the Pucillc. when Honnlii itv.aii and Khoitda Flemity to lay more eggs than other ia ifd pitted their strength ami >n g in a omewhai i>: in'." 'hicks nnd If it's eggs, more egg* knowledge Bgataat lhCggegg of ,ivii Wn .W'siem presented in and still more eggs you are after nature and emerged the winners, Trvhim-: lor. The plot is a bit then buy chicks with a strong The wnoie key-not,ol the hu. the charaeters stereotvped hereditary ability to lay film is simplicity and ..11 th< and we haee two brothers righting gloney finish of studio effects are on opposi.cuter in tne war bclacklng. whit* (tnphasi.s .ill th twnn ihe State*, but who join more, the stark authenticity of ft TIPS to defend an outpost against the picture, and the elementihe Apaches Though there is no f.galnat which the men h,td to be attnipt m anv httnrH-l stgnirlconsUntly on guard, for survival. ggflHaV there is plenty of action. Naturally, the moments of greatest particularly in the Bug] baltle with ii.ingrr HIT not seen in the film, the Indians which Is exciting A a oH grey' The scenic backgrounds are. of count %  we and (hcr i* come l.tsl riding by soldier and Apache alike. Directed with a light Una*, :•• several humourous sequences and one gets the Impref•ion that the director (Meant take this one very %  grlguggf. Characterizations are adequate with Mr Reagan and Miss Fleming indulging in an on-and-off romance in vhich love flnully triumphs Farm And Garden W> Attraralu WATER AND LIVESTOCK LAST week we considered th use of water in relatio 1 to plants and indicated the need tor ila more aflWen! application, hartal regard to th. requireinonts of plant growth. To-dav. it may be ol interest to discuss the ques tion briefly in relation to livestock and. in this connection requirements have been more accurately mcMurad Thui %  %  ne authority >n Britain gives he following licures at approximate, daily, summer requirements for each class of animal listed : I,ARDi-MM. HINTS FOII AMATEURS Hat • llu I Cow i She.i Pig nt pasture B gallon.' at mark 10 gallon* i) milk 10 g-lion; } gallon I I] galtor i* i lillnMM II IMIM. BIB* Inn. 8 %  > %  < % %  > Ai Inlvilnd 1 p m Home II I-I. ,Decide too whether you are going to keep poultry for meat, hatching or breeding slock. If you try and combine one or mere of those activities you aae going to have a lot of headaches. Having decided (let us say that you arc going In for eggs) your next thought must be for equipment. Dont rush off to the nearest u w chick farm or chick importer and buy week old chicks without hnv!" 'T^cJUL, P o^".*ai ln ""' obt^ned a house for your "tuV^TTtS p,w.„" chicksYou will have to build M ia m htottud*. s is have made a wire-floored pen (not rnore than 4" mesh) with a cover LISTENING HOURS SUNDAY. AUGUST. M i ThUr**. I I I ThT8m an<1 standing on raised legs (one The five day storm that nearly wrecked the Kon-tiK; can only be : IS %  -, saga. rsrtbbron a i> t u i St-.i.'.c h.tr i-Lidv in the mind's eye. but from T** caiiorun. t • pm if onhas read th< book indthtn JJ* pwnrn.-^ concr... seen the actual tlge of the nfl which layn b*n. foot from the ground should be fji dgtcquate)'. Opinions may vary ^_ about the aiae of the wire or the > sh:ire kn Tin harpooning nl (,h;n k n llu vrnliB of Uusle. men have to move >.imbly on the W ff*hw • dlppan % %  oeek' w l£*a%agXi bitten; tindi living r-n^mmm* prj snake mackerel, never baton %  H "" v by man and oOl ol UW Uglii '\7 ,*• in th* sea. and a whale shark that y,,, M D m<*asure* forty-i'.vt t> with three thou>.ni i teeth In each t*"" *££*• "*' J'III><* Cnina-B the raft at close qnarlers *." rhi fc ,ih c#..iu. (. ,,,-fu! of |fi Sd. Thr Nr. IS 10 p venturers: flying fish, dolphin nnd >• onsllaq call (hem %  %  > Ihc r.iil und il *s Imnil thai the ink in the octon ne for illy INDIANAPOLIS, If you are going In for chick raising on a grand scale you can allow a square foot for every two chicks during the flrst six weeks. That's plenty of room. Feed and water must be available at all times. Water Is one of the easiest methods of transmitting disease germs and it U Impossible to take too much care to ensure that water containers are m v M kept clean. Small chlcka can Tto Raad Tn**u drown easily so be certain that your containers are safe. One of the safety home ma de varieties is an Inverted bottle stripped and Eradually emptying into a narrow basin. K.u-h flu, k requires 2 lbs. of startena before a change to a gTOwlag rutlon Is made. Whenever you decide to transfer chicks from the raised wirefloored pens to a brooder house or pen, disinfect the pen before you put the chick* in. When the pen is dry cover the floor with two inches of megasse (3 bags of meNinetean EgypUan doctor*, mae will cover the floor of a f.uulty members of Cairo medical eft x 4ft pen. schools, went to the Mayo clinic Should you decide not to use thi TliC,.w of in* f-ii 4 tft p m p m Ciwkvl. Ill p ii is VO p in Wriih rh"i p in Thr Nrws noon. in aMIIadi •> SoaiS*. I %  •( %  %  !'• %  1 SD p.m Euro%  44 u HI Intrrlud*. • SB the Editorial., t OS p In \l ITI T*rnl Talk. 10 IS Egyptian Doctors Tour Minnesota Indiana, Aug. .-i. !" ^. m hJ. liiiine m Rochester Minneaota Weitaeswire-floored pern but u Uansfer IdiTS ,;%y m n 30 day professional vour chicks straight from the Kan accent, you wu IKI .t * hatchway to the pen, cover the with pen, cover the newspapers and deltfhtlul bj Mr %  i ctafofingUve aw l ueoofn Norwejil... i i. lour \hlaboratories -They will vi^.i ^^^ W hcn chicks are three tince the lma| rug manufacturing plants md wr€ ki old it I* time to place low move on a restless sea. it stands, hospital* In Michigan and uppri roosts protected by wire. Each at and dramatic, ns an h. MO New York after thei, Minnesol.1 chick should have three inches of record of men again.". I visit. —v.r. roosting space. < Furwrr Arrangements> One of the greatest joys derived frOm lolling In the garden is to have flowers to pick for the house Even the dullest room is transformed by the addition of flow ers. and a bowl or vase al well arranged flowers is a joy. So often people are heard to say "oh I love flowers but I .simply can't arrange them' but. what ,i defcuteot attitude to take* True, flower arrangement doe* icem to come naturally u> %  lucky few who ; ,re able to arrange ihem beautifully without anv effort. But with most people It hn matter of practice, and famtll.irity with the different kinds of flowers All flowers, whether in %  howl or vase look better for the uddiUon of some green. II may be their own leave*, fern, asparagus, or grasses, but the greenery seems to form a background to them, and bring out their colouring and beauty. Never pack flowers bio closely, or put too many in one vase, biu space them, well intermixed With green, so that they can be seen to advantage. Choose your flowers with taaie too to suit the colouring of in >oom where they sre to be u^eii Most rooms in these days are tinted in some soft pastel shad?, and agairut such a background no descrimination of Aower colour need be made, as any flowo look well agalnxt uch a background. But if the room Is of some dark shade, more choice must '>• given to the flowers, for It would be fatal to arrange say a bowl jf marigolds against a deep red or blue wall, they Just would not tun-mom'v. and other slmil >r harsh contrasts must also he avoided Almost as important as the Bowers are the bowls, and vase*In which they are put. It n useless to expect long stemme 1 flowers to arrange well in a receptacle that is too small or Short for them, or to expect rnucn from a bunch of short stemmed flowers balanced on the lop of s tall vase. The receptacle mut suit the flowers they are to receive m size and shade, or lit I mrangernent cannot show to ihe be-1 advantage. It pays too not to be too conservative In ihe choice of tne receptacle for the flowers an a study of illustrations of flower arrangements by famous peopti will show. A look nl Constant Spry hcauuful book of (lower arrangement shows lhat the flowers ir by no means always arranged in the conventional vase or bowl, but are often put In sucb thing: as a charming old-fashioned soup-tureen, tankard, or some other lovely, but unorthodox receptacle. Altogether flower arrangement Is not only fascinating for the home, but it can develop into lucrative work. Competent people are always in demand tn arrange flowers for Hotel, parties, weddings, Christenings, to make bouquets, wreaths, corsages etc and what more charming way could there be of earning'' These figures will vary somewh il depetKiing on Ihe wetne neea of the weather, the amount I %  lie, temperature of the air aid MI an, The food supplied JISO I'lfluences the requirements t< -ome %  xtgfn' The same authority state* that. In general, a hors* require-, 31b. of water to cvci pound of dry food, an ox 4 to 1 a sheep 1 to 1 and a pig 7 to 1 Is, it is resssonert that. In ordlnar* ctreumstaneea, stseep might le fed with dry food, cow: with food which has been motsteiu-d and pms with -loppy food. iet ii.examine In a little more r'etiiil the case of the milking cow. which requires a ver> Uggfsu supply of water. Nut only hM llu demand-rsf her body to be met. but water is essential for the production of milk. It will iicudiK vindenrtUod, therefonv Qstf the modern, heavy irtel U lair] cow is a Insmendou of water Further, whi Ided with water const,mil eel dgnce suggests that a HI a slightly UU than if watei-rd twic* dioiThis observation has lei to *lu Installation of troughs a cow stables immediately in front of the animals. A fresh pftpwl it water supply and suitable automatic equipment ensures tliat pure drinking water ii always at then .iltposaT. Simp work at the lni|H'iial OHaUegOi Irinidad, in regard to the watar requirementa of dalr% rattle may lie noted. WaUsr CIHIstimption in rutlon. pounds per head per day per 1.000 lb. weight of animal, for maintenance (a) Half-bred Hoi-', eou 99 lb. water per heed ie' !•> up of 34 lb. In dt Inking water, 56.5 lb. m tinrorgua ,l R fl |l> in wet grain. (bl furr-brcd HOtafehl COW 1I7.B lb water pei head per dsv made up of 72 25 lb. In drinklns wafer. STJ lb In the forage and 7.7ft lb, In wet gram. (c) fiire-bred Zebu cou7P lb. water per heed per day; made up of 23.5 lb. In drinking water. %  ill Ii In the forage and 6.5 lb in wi t grsln. In addition, for milk p, DOT g.ill.m "f milk, %  vorggag r*> fiulrement is two gallons of water S IT day; less than thin average, invever, if the milk yield Is fruit •a more gallons per more than two giilloni rf • i- milker giving say only one giill'-n milk per .lay. Ihe van interesting point which emerges from the nbove is the • nitst.'indinf! difference in the water requirement? of the /.< b U %  nd Hol-tein breeds, the fflrnu %  rei|iuring much less. The henU I.. of th" Zebu foi tiopical conditions is thus exemplified Finally. In addition t.> watei actually consumed in the ration. large quantities ure nquired to) animal and byie bvghmi • I it.4 >f cqu pinent, OR Figures for such piirpooOs run to as much as 290 lbs. per head per day. (For piacticd purpose .me gallon of water or milk mi. be taken an weighing 10 lb.) KNOCKS OUT PAIN ON SAL* AI . KNIGHTS LTD. ALL BRANCHES and ensutv rf/jr/g/if. e/ean£ hea/f/iyhome Monsion Polish FOR FLOORS. FURNITURE & LINOLEUM Agent: ASS Bryden & Sons Lid, Barbados "KEEP EM FLYING' use Palmolive Soap as Doctors advised lor a Brighter, Fresher Complexion! Oo.t.M p.o>. Ihol Polm.l... IM con ii-e'O.o cl..lo romeckobl. %  man, a .t Oil. .hi. looki kit •.! — 4.11. OVab Ik,. •onoVH.il, b-ahi*. (..,„ I.OL.-O ,fc,. P p. 0(l | w So, do ai 36 ikin i r oc,al,iii 2 rWWooioiiojL^ •'•""* %  ** %  *. % %  -W>. %  > I..., 3 K~.Ji—.,l.l. rifivraip'i talking about this NEW STORE for Mr. A MrPublic; lor Master & MiPublic too. with Its huce choice of TOYS & SCHOOL NEEDS — Mum and Dad are interested in the quantities of ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT, and Dad has already selected from the complete range of OFFICE FURNITURE and TYPEWRITERS. k. It. HunCe If < o.„ ltd. Lower Broad St. INVEST IN IT • Wt3W • The higher prices go, the more your HOME is worth — ONLY if you keep it in first class condition That means using the heal of Paint muleriuls from the Ground Coat up. We stock 'FLATS' and 'GLOSSES' lo keep your Home the fines! Investment you can own .... it will pay you lo INCREASE ITS VALUE Paints Varnishes Enamels Snowcem • Wood-Preservatives HA MIA IfOS CO-OP. iHITH.X FACTORY CTO. DANCE AT THE CRANE HOTEL SAT. 30th August TO THE TUNES OF "KEITH CAMPBELL" and HIS "SOCIETY SIX" and THE JUMPING JACKS STEEL BAND" featuring oui own awe / ih.. iiii/iHif.i.v PAUL WUMMN8 "A iflBI 15 MINUTE FLIGHT IN "BIM*' TO ONE IN EVERY M PERSONS" ENTERING THE DANCE DAHCIhlC from 6.30 pm. Supper included Dress Optional ADMITTANCE — $2.00 lit,. In. HOI II v. SKIRT nil HOTTEST NBB1 I .DIES WA.KI.MANS PEN I'&NCIl. ** > ,,.atl by T. Ucdde* Grant Ltd. "4711" TO&i x ill i"i MK Dmiutad by J Manoo Ii Boo, IM. Ml ; 1 H Ii l>uiialra by It Huntv IM. HUM Donuted by J. N. fituirtanl A Sons. BICYI I iLAMP Donated by C. F. Hiiirison* & Son. 1 by MIKIMH Dres Sboppe aad ninny othrrs for men nnd women. BE VOll. OWN MASTER OF CEREMONIES SI 1.1 It I Ol It PHOOHA M3ICS i now \ woiti.it or VAHIECY SHOWS OX A PHILIPS Variety RADIO-PLAYER Once again PHILIPS oifers a variety of models with a variety oi Features at a Variety of Prices. YOUR DEALERS MI ON MANNING & CO. LTD. PIERHEAD. oaaaaatBtataBBtaaaVBB



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SINDAY. AUGUST 24. 1932 SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAGE ELEVEN HUGE CORTEGE FOLLOWS BODY OF EVA PERON HERE 15 A K'EW VIEW i-t the lmpr*lve tcene in Buenoa Aires as the body of Ev Peron was drawn thruugh Hi. I t .top a sun carriage. The body was taken to the General Labor Confederation Building where it win remain for a year. It will be permanently preserved and ultimately transferred •n a monumental tomb in the heart of the Argentine capital. ( International Soundpholoj You Want A Sgt.-Major — Not A Doctor, If . ARE YOU SCARED TO SEE VOIR DOCTOR? I HAVE often regretted that I never had thu nerve to get my revenge on the small boy who chalked Bedside Manor on my garage gates. H)s was a joke; my rqtort would have been serious. I could have chalked Backache liu ldlng on the door of his nibdern houia In the cul-de-sac nearby. For many modern home*—nd gardens of any age—arc perfectly designed to encourage backache. Have you ever thought Just how much your back has to put up with during every day? Next to your feet, it .works harder than any other part of your body. At the sink, .it the ironing-board. even at the n I way*-loo-low dressing table. IrTe for women Is backbreak ng. And yet. with so many simple explanations, patients dream up endless frightening diagnoses for themselves. It Is absurd. I assure you. to bo scared to go to a doctor with a pain in your back. In a majority of cases there Is a simple, unolarming explanation. Jllkt— di-:::iiu E was. for inst patient of mine. George J—a commercial traveller, whu had driven his small car round the country for years. Last season h* won a football pool. and. at 50. he retired—at least 20 years too soon. But he had longed always to have his own garden, so he bought a house and a half-acre on his % %  •• %  •>•• &f% %  *>*••••• &f A doctor speaks to these who secretly fer a pain In the bach. (By GCOKGF SCOTT) winnings. "I can hardly sit down, and then I find It hard to get up. if 1 bend my back then—oh—the pain. I'm sure it's something serious, doctor. I was equally sure It wasn't. He had Just pitched Into hU gardening, digging, hoatng. weeding far too many hours—and too suddenly—for a man of his ago and style of life. For years he had sat In his car. Then, suddenly, those slack, flabby back-muscles of his had to it" the work of a navvy. Result: they rebelled. I told him to ease up. to take things more gently. He did so, and his backache went Just—drill SIMILAR pains can come from taking up golf in later life, or evQn from wielding a distemper brush above your bead while decorating a room. Now most of what I have said boils down to faulty posture—or the strain put upon the body by unusual posture—so let's look more closely at the business of how to sit and how to stand. Over-'at people are lij more trouble than most of us. Their surplus weight — which their it designed to stand — pulls th*m Into unnatm.,: So the*nr*t job is to get n mppor'. or a diet. Doctors do not all agree on the effects of high heels—but I know that the Service women I once treated by the nissen-hutful didn't get" the backache* my *uper-high-heel patients complain .ibout today. Maybe that had something to do with their sergeant-major's shouts of "Keep your hea<| up. girl—and your tummy In* The trouble, of course, comes if you wear low heels all day at home, and then suddenly in the evening expect your body to %  uelcomo high heels. The majority of patn-ln-the back cases arc classed by doctor* ns "mechanical backache" It is not serious—but it should not be neglected. It can often ba helped by pushing a sheet of plywood between the mattrttss and the springs of the bed. This —or a hard mattress—takes some of the wavo out of the backbone. Five to ten minutes In a hot bath before bedtime—followed. If possible, by some local host and massage, is often a recommended extra. And then — here i'. comes 1— exercises. Try these:— (A) Lie Rat en your hark—on the MOM, or on a Lihlr—ullh rhln In and hands clasped behind neck, nrralhe deeply and lwl> without Irltln* the lower part of your i % %  k hii off the floor or th storrMrh hulce. (Bl Lie on your bark, hands at tide*. It. ml nn Wednesday lith of July. IMS ihere was a disturbance on Walker | PUrtatlon' in the parish of St. Andrew. This trose through Colonel Richard Morris, who as i Magistrate, put some of the labour* rs of this estate in ihe charge of a whn. coml •"<• two or three ot the Estate constables, and mured that thev be carried to the Statioh-Hous.? ol District F. The Magistrate and the other gentlemen then left and proceeded to "JeeveV where thev had some business. While ihev were partaking of dinner tht white -..nstablc arrived and stated t.iai 'ihe people of the Estate had nsen in a body upon hun and the OttMn, and rescued the prisoners after very roughly handling thr c cnstnblc*; he had himself rece several blows, and one Estate stable very narrowly escaped with his life: indeed would have parran but for timelv succor" Thi following morning Colonel Morn came up tn Bridgetown, where hintcrviewed the President — the Governor being absent — and impreased on him the situation e; iNting in the Parish of St Andrei The President gave him an ord 'j\ tht Inspector of Police, whn c Friday the 13th, despatched strong body of Pol .•cour the negro-yards of "Walker's" and "Belle-Plo in;" wher tvmc twenty or more Idlers am vagrants were seized and com mitted, but there was no trace ot the ringleaders. Special writ weie then obtain for these 'three.' ll was also reported that tht Manager of 'Walker's" Estate, a Mr. Hoi lings worth. intended | his life against one labourer, who had thrtatened him. It was also reported that the ptopla i f • -Belle-Plain" and "Bruce % %  ites were also showing themselves very insolent and ruly. There were reported two instances where labourers challenged the Managers of Estate fight It out with thenj, as they i laimed that they were as free as the Managers, so they could tight it out ever any matter. (6) Th> former slaves and servants had been accustomed to seeing the landed gentlemen light Ihrlr duels over love affairs or for some small slight offered one to Iho other, so this ttxttudf mi nothing new to them; therefore, consideiIng that they were as free as the gentlemen themselves, they could avenge themselves for M DCOnd \<> them by their former M %  tii %  (To be continued) 1 The ItarbadiBii Newap* xtih. isn 3 Brhomb-trik'. Hlitorv When you buy 'ASPRO' you get a MODERN medicine that gives you maximum quick action with NO harmful after-effects. 'ASPRO' hits rapidly home at colds, dispels feverishness. stops pain and soothes the nerves. "ASPRO" is made for RESULTS—it gives Nature the opportunity it needs to put you right without loss of time. Always keep— ASPRO Made as purely at a perfect process CAN make it. Made with infinite care under exacting supervision. Each tablet sealed individually so that it comes to you untouched and unharmed. 'ASPRO* WILL HELP YOU—USE IT! PRICES WITHIN THE REACH OF ALL MM) If d t JV*„ L J HUTCMINION 4 CO. ii. rhassai *•< eeassM ism Mi Mrwtpaiirr Writ Indira. 7.1.1. iron Thr Britlih Bum. p in. 3Mh. 18*T MAIL NOTICE Mall* for Dominica. AafMM rat, NPVI. and at Kltu b Monrka -HI b rin.nl -t i li-I OiTW M uiuiir PERMMXS A CO.. LTD. Roebuck Street — Dial 2072 & 4502 M IHI Put These FOOD BUYS On Your Shopping List RAM SAUSAGE lib Tins ORAPES „ PEARS m PEACHES COD ROES UriLLIT BISCUITS 2 lb Tins CUP CHOCOLATE m PLUM PUDDING „ TOMATOE BAUOE .,. Bots. OOOSEBERRIBS „ PEANUT BUTTER DATES P kfs. MANOOE CHUTNEY SAUCE „ OELATINE Tins GOLDEN ARROW RUM ROSE'S LIME J rici: — Bots. OX TONOUEfl ... 2lb Tins CHICKEN HADDIES .. „ I H ..>>. TUE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LTD. White Park Road, Bridgetown ENGINEERS, BRASS and IRON FOUNDERS Works contain, modern appliances for the execution o! first-class work of all kinds, and especially to SUGAR MACHINERY and STEAMSHIPS Dealers in AGRICULTURAL MACHINERY and GENERAL ENGINE ROOM STORES of all Description IRRIGATION PROJECTS, PUMPING EQUIPMENT and ELECTRICAL INSTALLATIONS A SPECIALTY For Satisfaction, Quality and Sank* Contact THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LTD. ASPRO LIMITED. Sloufh Buck. ROSE'S ORANGE JUICE Cooling and Refreshing — AGENTS L. M. B. MEYERS & CO.. LTD. Phone : 4546, 4650 Workshop Phone 452P Storef DeptDO YOU RIDF TRIUMPH. AMBASSADOR OR SILVER KINCi TMo shipment of Ambassadors Is sold out at sight but you could book now for next shipment. Tho floating-ride Silver King bikes A. BARNES & CO.. LTD. Prepare ye the Way! It is Coming! OUR BIG ANNUAL SALE FROM .SAT. 30.li Uii. THOUSANDS HAVE BEEN ASKINGWHAT IS THE MODEL STORE DOING? Cases and Cases of Goods are held back for the BIG EVENT When the MODEL STORE SALE STARTS 1 FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE! BARBADOS NUMERICAL TELEPHONE GUIDE II n vi in i.-iiKit nut Tin: rntsr run: I ., Ttl4pktm Vmil r l.'ll M Your link Pad t'i Call ""> Eat ' %  Tnctd It tin PHrfy '" Whom it %  Available at ADVOCATK STATIONERY, Broad Street COLTS PRINTKRV. Victoria Street JOHNSONS STATIONERY, Broad Street WO W ta & CO., H,l: Street — OR — COLONIAL ADVKRTISINti CO.. (BIK)S) I.TI). Jumps Str.-.-t I'lllll •/ %  Per lup %  ' %  ••>aa>aa t a t a > aae>a>aaaaata>aaae* > < NOTICE We the undermentioned Grocers bcK to draw to the attention of our Customers that. 0WU to the increased:— (1) llitfh cost of Goods, (2) Continually risinK operating expenses, A'e will no loniicr be able to extend credit over thirty '30) days and accounts will be payable when rendered. We very much regret having to take this step, but after several months careful consideration, we find >ve have no other choice and will have to enforce same as from 1st October. 1952. J N. Goddard & Sons Ltd. Stansfeld Scott & Co., Ltd., D. V. Scott & Co., Ltd. Alleyne. Arthur & Co., Ltd. W. A. Medford & Co. Johnson & Redman Ince & Co., Ltd. Perkins & Co., Ltd. Stuart & Sampson Ltd. S. E. Cole & Co., Ltd., John I) Taylor & Sona Ltd. James A. Tudor & Co. Mc Donald Sealy W. M. rorde N. S. Sainsbury H M I M mmiii i m i A.KK THOSE WEDDING BELLS YOUTH HEARING ? I lien it's lime to visit your Jewellers BLUM! 21 ^ DIAMOND RINGS YES-NEW ARRIVALS See our New and Beautiful Assortment of Th*M, In Designs you'll love. FOR SPOT CASH we are jiving lH% DISJOINT. Don't Delay! Come Today! And Make MM M-I.iliim where you coil be sure ot n GOOD DIAMOND, and that is at %  LOUIS L. BAYLEY Billion l.nne & l-lioiie :iwi Aquntir Club Booth Phone 4887 Wl STAND BETWEEN YOU AND LOSS A rlwIIWIghlg stiiiVmrnl .' Yrt true I And serves to inlroiluie In Ihe Itjrbadi.s I'ubtic. one of the INSURANCE COMPANY OF NORTH AMERICA Companies, Philadelphia Thrmh oar Annex, IHE iNStKANCK COMPANY (H SOUTH AMERICA Cnrnpanien. maken thb sugRstinn: 'I'ruteri uhnt you have, hy tukini; full udviintage of rovernue for: mu; ACCIDENT THEFT BUSINESS INTERRUPTION KlKiiLARY YACHTS OF ALL TYPES MOTOR WORKMEN'S mill mu ni Miiliible for ill I.11M ix hundred different kinds of rink. UIIUICI CMMtTM \0KTH AMI RICA Ph..,.,HABOLD l>. KIONEY — 5W7 K. II. II....I. l< Lid.



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SUNDAY. AUGUST :!l. 152 ••1 M1\V ADVOCATE 1111.: 11 i \ HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON WHAT OOES THAT MEAN HENHV 5 FLINT OF THE FLYING SQUAD BY ALAN STRANKS & GEORGE DAVIES •M0CM %  C**e %  wy7X Jf tVviV. BLONDIE BY CHIC YOUNG HOW *; a THE TWO OF VOU CCMlNCyT 1 ^'~*S OVEO FCC DiNNcR r>L |\i. GIVE t TONKXI ? ~-TJ£{ P*Qw*XOA T *^—-*~* ^ %  •v?" ff'^G ON ( DAG WOOD. FLASH GORDON BY DAN BARRY JOHNNY HAZARD BY FRANK ROBBINS i OPENING TKftT CAT oEP TO GET IN hE*E .. AN7 HOEt ITU 0& IN0U6M ECS y£ TO SCUEEZE -TTOJSH.' BRINGING UP FATHER BY GEORGE MC. MANUS .. ..JIT (iuT>oc \MAPPKN*D /'"B Lt=H / OO H.XS? /OS -L.--I y ••U^BA.JQ -*. i ^^C tJ'T <-\"'T OU* RIP KIRBY BY ALEX RAYMOND THE PHANTOM >£i>mir^s MII.K KRAET 1'1IKE:SE: -rh phi*. i.. il ii TONIC Ill CKE'AKT TONIC WINE I'linsrmiRiNt: TONK' WINK OOHDON'S UIN I'IMMS NO. 1 CTT' KCHWKI'PKS TONIC VVATF.K CANADIAN IT.IH WHISKY M:IKAM'S WIIISKV ln.t Mrrtvrd in.ll slilpnirnt <•! I III ~H I llll/l \ .SO .44 1.44 J. !4 S.JS 3.311 JO i.50 sso ERITT D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street llll WOMM II HOOK Ol HOW IIS IIO> Mont of ui lake too much for granted. We do not butlm \.i. much nboul how the necessities, luxuries and amenities of life ate provided, so long as we receive thrm when we want (hem. But supposing we are MUMI-HU MlM it|>on to make UDJ do for ourselves. Whul then'' llnw would you organise thf drlivrry of millions I or In* production <>f dally newspaper. Of lhr feeding irraiigrmi'iils tm Biv.tt < H %  This fascinating volume, packed with hundreds of interesting picture*, will open your eyes In the many processes involved in the creation of all kinds of everyday goods and MIVioM II also shows how man> adventurous and far from mryday (asks are performed n\ 9AMM VI un ADVQ4 ATI: si \IIOM m GUINNKSS STOUT FOR STKENCTH c. F. HARRISON & CO. (BARBADOS) P.O. BOX 304 BARBADOS Ltd.



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•-I Ml \i \l l.l ST 24. 1H2 SUNDAY ADVOCATE l'\(.I -IVIA This Look—And No Other—Sums Up /H*A6out%wn .U'lMl. H\IH -v* H l • in i F-.tl.vi I Cropped hairstyle Full skirt, over cnoobne petticoats, a U Ballerina High healed, atrip-toad shoes; painted tor nail*. THE 1952 SUMMER H.hLLl\ . By PHYLLIS DiGBY MORTON IN .1 bundled years' time, when thumb throuKh the fashion books to find out wh.it the looked likein the M the NUmiiM-i Of tli.niin of BBl II. ho* wi(l they react: Will they regarn mis 19*2 Summer (idle * the :ipp. %  ..-., Q Ui will she t. ikthem J> quaint o lhi glamour cirl of ISM. lh* for the opening ;it the i.I • nrrb would show a slmi. nivi'ins >;iil "IliW CU1 %  i.fR-n pnM %  11 v. This an*, aaMaved bj acrspraVaassng I %  %  tiffenlpg ... bed on the hipunder the skirt, and petticoats line.1 w. h and trimmed with frlllg of lace. Tortoise—Shell KfTeit i, WM1 SUn-Util,-'.! I II. deliberately Kloed with oil M. : was cropi>ed u us a boy's, but vei> carefully streaked wit!: cqntfastlng colours to pvg a torto p ja th el! effect She used a point brush to make her month aou shave she fancied. She darki-fwtf ana pencilled h*rr eyelids to gtvc thein a /'line too", and fheti blanked them out u-ith dark ulosre-s of fanUistir shape and colour. Exposed—And Outlined S:i. (TOM In the street us well it* on Lite dance-fl or. i> revealing bodlfifl it exposed us well a* outlinedIn previous periods, such m tne Napoleonic and Victorian .mi, where fasnion had docroed a daringly lou neckline the tendency was to hold the bottom high, tightly compressed For the Hrst tirm%  lory, in 11)52 fashion emI phuued toe division of .. women's I bosom. The brassiere of 19*2 wf designed to produce tin-. effect. This MM the summer that |i P amwiriBi might aMQ U> iiiuusti>. who atid II would ruin the the erase for dieting reached it* our historian an interesting mixtheir trade. swim: climax and was featured in every ture. Outsize pearls in her cant Well, thenshe is. our Summer cokfb newspaper and magazine or teleand round h*r throat. Short, white llellc of 1K52, the first year of thj vision and radio. So her diaphcotton gloves on bare, brown arms. nae-Dlxabethan era. As you sit ou ri,gtn was flat, heT waist Uny, three or four clanking chain and its smallness accented by a bracelets wide, wide bolt tightly pulled In. What kind of haf Our historian U/fc^ia*'* C u*s*ts*e*J mi* ••d her ruffled petticoats under often than not she wore none. her full skirts. On her feet she This, he wrote in a marginal SALADS r u had nothing but a high-heel and note, seems from the contemporary NtAroM'l'AN SALAD (0U ifoot with a few iceords to have aroused a good Small cauliflowers 2. Salt Oil, rJZn** deal of hostility from the rnllUnery Vmcgi ir. Pepper. Anchov.es, !" m Green or black oaves. Capci 11 PI M |> :i\ll %  nishi rtMM are IHtrSS MATEHIA LS Brown I Low and verie by Helen Idmg and L A. G, Strong And I hasten %  best r-ltOM N E WILSON A v the reault of a North Ainsaic.111 and Kurooaan gleaning by Mr WiUo,, Craself — DOWl) i.-turned from as i %  %  N vv UkAfSj M \\ niMHiKl. Z bu >'"* t V UI '" *->• tftacti SKW uomiNG the requalities and „ ,„,, UliXlNBfe^ DIPl uf -ms that are NEW from !hl MODERN DRESS SHOPPB ..uuig ir^nufacturvra tor tO\ BTOM SI ..mpiemeimng the j l %  E. W1LS.)N> ,,., |he iiumttaWe !" %  Mrritle on these lines a providM liendly .advice U to get < luUTul miUlnerj from I dreamed I wa* a wtuJ-roiiinlcl tium 5 mai(kn/v/w's r. £/• 'Mrty while lha nmuplna, I cift • %  ?,w.S INO R ,s A OMI CI "P,dU you know Yc ii Bottlers Ltd. haw addad l>i i .itPBM of deaen'rdlv popiihn llh JAMAH \ DP (.INOElt AI.E „, .baolul.winn.-r from Ihr Hart, i, 0 fr.cna wiin the tnme amuranee of lu.ihtj ..u.i flavour a* the famous Ju C II rfSSn "l 1 ? JAMAICA DRY G SOfcR ALB I, h.t Gmg,-, Ale really .l,„„ u t. „•, "^, n ... Miywhere. rot i—im i • received . i„' -Ii... MM mi. i". "','. w l-\ and ifti I v% h two and ihn netting and with Ui | >t nsh again, mention %  hould i| 'rad<. uf id,I PI8RING LINKS HOOKS | trried bi PtanUtioi i I V \MIOI I | IM ,|| \toKK10 *ITOS i,.,,. arrived at Fun lim -' 1 '"' I ' Inti iMIihs inst in it.s held uith the Morn. Vans ami Ptck-upi ceounercl I \ %  -I CARS 1 |l %  Morris Minors (:.'.,. 'f agaia In new eotoun and guminteed to loosen the pui i irli while lha big li-cyiind.i Oxaorti ie ui-. In elide .'il th> lltm. i 0| a I, Leo, if you look Ion nougbl -jnada and the United States. Uvatlng hoadwt .i and Straw emble i. %  • .I (01 a Wrddbig or Cocktail party. vnKI II1AN A MATCH FOR .1 l.S A CHILLS -noul.i in%  u, you'd tnink:. U'a Sl'lttv the i.-atty-U.-hand de.IU u .igtuit c okb>, lleadaene %  and just plain N' 1 ^ '.t l..is or otiiri i ,npUnit tou. 11) IL. ii.uiv.ilu.tl waiieUipaT compat tmcnt. ASI'Ht II be taken saf rx? iih >ou ..i all tune* — and i .iilcj \tin this weather I:I Mi i ui Dl K> I \M I'M K : Hi:SI OKOAMNU SHELVfcS id if anythliig drops. it** \LVKii .(ualily. lihXiKCilfl iARrXY .V CO -nd lhU Uoating stock (literally m and out' torn M1KKHS In Lemon. -ii, Blue, Orchid and .Vhite al $1.39. And TAFFF.TA ANTAS1A in rich Oold, Royal Mm' .mil Turquosc al (2 BI \ME TAFFETA .t I olllK rAFFETA at 1.T1 — all .vhl.h have the usual perfection — they're 1ALS! Have ih i usual perlerAMFJIICAN IF ANYONE nnopiJI KNOW HOW TO SOLVF IT Courtesy hould In fact they do' %  V!, ,i's ihw? Your graj^ cultin^ 'tilems when the answer rests ith i HF^VY-DUTY 5* TRAIL. %  •'-.I%  ... IN.. J7 !" s usussr. I'.Ptll a. I SMI .IMS—raavc llnk.. Self-llfllni, Hake. JM,I l|vU OK and in p Collectors (Grans Loaders). Kcelarnl lualll) ..urteny GaraRe %  the hon.e ..f %  Hi.rrls and KerKusol. 1 i I.H> A rrn> Equlp.tit — and Ihov should know' K Chaxta i 481B , U V ,l,,.„,..l ..!' l.l U 14I"'< —ui-r I. ..1.I1..I in..1,1 yoaii i-uivrIn pertecliun. lift TOO beaulitiil 1 ~all> la-l Rrn Canulnr M.n.l. I. ana are mad. I. in • aSMsn iar t.ny ii l-ianeiu.de and walch her llh UV Itleal u %  f ma. .The kitchen sole bound to her thin thongs. ..So The Skirts Get Longer By fcll-EFN ASCROFT hem line, repeat the cowl neck, hair is cropped vory short, fluffc-J PARIS r "how n loose rounded bustilne. up at the sides and backTin UTUMN clothes, according to There is this '^-""imi look wear the fashion denigners. Will be •*** ,hp whole ' M ^ath %  coljersey two inchelonger for d;y This tendency, seen in This which homes on Christinas the cauliflowers and ui small slice* tinpnu'Uie bananas, 1 psaled and i apple(in Barbados might use mammy apples or ,...|.ai. Add 3 nuts In small the tradlUuoai aaland some lime A v they must nut be too soft) them in pieces. Season then wear 'action. A woman's figure reLondon "wj"' her own ""o 0 "* 1 r : T —K ."iii oi Lintra. on.'i'ii mi in v.ii'1 head-hugging turbum of -u AdJ off the forehead but well ||w .^hov^, a nandful of blai k irUer this week. by the first of the Parts shows. confirmed Shoulders are still sloping with *-ye: down on the neck. Makeup is pale, with ioncentretiuu on the green olives, a handful of capers. Mix everything and seive. You can add some tinned salmon Of fbsna fish low-set or Magya* sleeves. The Little Dressmaker's dream TK^IVIJ 00 *?, and ""V**"' 'DRUYERE preserves th# natural FRIIIT'' SALAD of the 1930's is launched again by Wlth at tailored colUrs and large JJ) snould#r and walsUlne. The For 6 people. Pineapple 3 aa., Jacques Fath. He plays the theme JX Vcrs skirt hangs softly, with fulness uannnas 2 ( Orange 1. Apples, of the jumper suit with loose cowl • ' drawn to the front, back or sides, efobl, Lsjuuce, Croam Vs glass. neckline, hip-length waistcd Evening gowns have the same The Magyar sleeves remain, also $ ;) | t sugar, Lime Juice, jumper and tightly pleated skirt cowl collar or draped, rounded the_big draped sleeves set in low. BY DAY il appears in flecked bust line, very loosely fitted. hand-knitted wool jersey In tones of black and cinnamon and donkey grey. FOR i orKTAILS he keeps the same jersey top ,md adds n pleated I klrt Of needle run lace of chiffon. Colours are black and white, and brilliant shades of electric violet and canasta red. The golden-hiiired M. Fath has chosen auburn shades for hi Dresses confirm the new longer models'autumn hair styles. Their The poncho cape, Mexicanshoulder cape inspired, is worn over dresses and flecked wool, suits. Materials are 'igun Another version of the cape Is silky looking for day clothes, wil three-quarter-length over a slim watered silk and gleaming sat skirt. featured for the cocktail hour. Yet a third known is a tiny —L.R.8. :u' ,uic SALAD PROVENCAL Iteetroob, 3, Onions 2. Ain.ii>>:i M.i MI.I. Vlnajtii I tabl.'poonful Peppar, s.olf v luAfti, itmhikl, voilti, any wvkm%ei through FERGUSON FABRICS %  >iof I'Y all I'tr£us*'>i I'ahui — r %  avaeFrrs UMI u/. ii \ \i: n STOCK . TFKKA/./.O lOffMa <:hips tTERNTTl Marble Flnhhed BaVaaai fhlMDAD Cedar Ba-ard-. At.CMIMI M ( ormgaled Sheet* M I HIM! M *iutterlnB — 18". 24' t" 3d" C.VLVAN1SED Corrucited SherlRIRRFI. U1RF This is the rtfiV7 Carton for YENQ'5 COUGH MIXTUi mi \| MI s LOI i.li MIX I .1 t uti... i. i tht ,,.. BBJi %  lodihru M \ i . i' %  STOPS COUOKS QUICKLY f HAPPY RELIEF FROM BACKACHE Hmlghb^t' MM "laku Doan'i PiJk" \Y,'HV PIT! UF ii nccdk-M dltcnaifArt lri> "rv oiii iheir lunctma of nd.liiig iltc hlood ol apaw ugfe %  id .md other impuritio luri-iraa to henlth (irateful people, esrrfwhere. n-.oiiiii.cnd Doan'i Pills te their fncn.Ii xnA neighbours. % Jl-DOAN'SI* ^W r^V 7*WX#if6 rW tmmiM ItM and MA(.A/IM I INI ll^O r Ur a ruing Cream. far lha a.qatty aansaajaj |rW i w ("insoft and Mi). i \ %  :!'y Night-H-rraaB. And for the radiaoc "f -kin i pjt'l firm and fin^-texiured •ip win 1 % %  '"* Lotian. ID icbi pM %  ad -. > -.'1 y* days. Skin Care YARDLEY OLD 101 IN MUFAC Widar, tUlter, de with a pattern lh..i pe to the end. /eV SAFETY Serrated