Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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Full Text







WHAT'S QN TODAY

1.00 a.m.
Police Band Concert, Hastings Rocks
8.00 p.m.

Basket Ball, ¥Y.M.C.A. 8.00 p.m

For the cause that lacks assistance
‘Gainst the wrongs that need resistance
For the future in the distance
And the good that I can do.




ESTABLISHED 1895

Death Sentence Demanded

Harb




\



my

FRIDAY,



\OGUST 22, 1952



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6. {6

Fex 27 Workers | Rice Board To Blame

Charged With Rioting Near Alexandria

Military Rule Of
Egypt Expected

CAIRO, Aug. 21,
The Military prosecutor Thursday asked the death sen-
tence for 27 workers charged with murder, arson and de-
struetion at Kafr El Dawar cotton mills on August 13. The
military court there completed hearings in the second trial
to grow out of the riots.
Of the 28 defendants one—an eleven-year-old boy—
‘ was ordered to be sent to a reformatory. The verdict on the
others must be sent to military headquarters here for con-
firmation. Previously the court sentenced twenty-year-old
elerk Mustapha Khamis to death for implication in the
riots. One of those in the trial was tried in absentia.

Harold Guard reports from ie 4 ———- .
eign Te cai Big Five Meet
To Diseuss UN

Membership

Biitish ob rs on Thursday
that Egypt is careering headlong
toward fe ie rule and that the
powerful Wafd party is planning
a comeback to grapple with the

Army’s “strong man’ General
Mohammed Naguib.
Rumours were current in Cairo UNITED NATIONS,
on Wednesday that Musta Nahas New York, Aug. 21.

and Seerage El Din, the two
ncipal leaders of the Wafd, had

The Big Five permanent mem-
bers of the Security Council will
meet in private today in an

at the dictate of General Naguib.| effort to solve their disagreement
On Wednesday night ahas|on United Nations membership.
denied these re} and the party The general assembly in a reso-
executive continues in session at] lution passed at Paris last Febru-
Al Cairo reports said,jary, called upon Russia, the
to “discuss reorganization”. United States, Britain, France,
: and China to attempt to find an
Military Rule agreement on the admission of

This bold front against the|new members.
purge demanded by the Army has} The five nations hold _ veto
im idle observers|powers in the Security Council
here with the strength of|which must recommend appli-

the Wafd which is said here to be
backed by a up of Egyptian
millionaires wi! aim is to re-
store the party to power. This

p is said to be known to
Soa Naguib and _ conviction
rules that in order to defeat their
ends he must resort to military

eants to the general assembly for
admission to membership. Russia
has used her veto 22 times to
block applicants from admission,

However Russia two years ago
proposed blanket admission for
14 applicants including nine
rule, Western-backed countries and five

Middle East observers here|Soviet satellites. The Western

noted th dual devel: powers contended that each
ment of military rule in a applicant should be considered on



Naguib’s declared imten-jits own merits and that there
| rage eel the army apart/should be no,pressure ‘as sug-
from polities. It was Naguib who/|gested in the Soviet “blanket
announced that general elections |admission” proposal.
would be postponed until next Authoritative sources saw

\ February. Then he announced] little hope of settlement at today’s
a long of social re-|secret session.
making any —U.P.
veference to any sort of political
organization to ned a, —
Finally, after ots a e U & tes
textile ‘mill at wo. OCES

troops straight
Naguib the

inte acta without consulting the
civil police and then appointed
a military court to judge the de-

linquents,

Middle East observers believe
that the question these actions
pose now is whether the military
trend is to continue until it rules
all aspects of the Egyptian scene.
The general belief here is that the
apparent resurgence of the Wafd
power will compel Naguib to gov-
ern the country with the army
even though it might prove only
temporary until a responsible
civilian government te

Eden To Visit

Necessity Of
Aiding ran

WASHINGTON, Aug. 21.

Usually reliable United States
sourees said on Thursday, that
the United States recognizes th¢
necessity of giving Iran financial
aid in the near future, but, so far
a way to do so has not been de
cided. However, active explor-
ation of ideas is going on in the
State Department. They said
that it is likely that Secretary of
State Dean Acheson will wait to
see the draft of the British not«
to Iran as regards the possible
resumption of oil negotiations be-



é fore he makes his own sugges~-

: 2 | tions.

: Y OS. via | They said Assistant Secretary
for Eastern Affairs, Henry

told foreign diplomats

Byroade,
By K. 0. THALER this month that the matter of fin-

Aug. 21. |ancial aid for Iraq had now be+

F ‘Anthony Eden/ come really urgent, but a way has
will Yi via in mid-|to be worked out to fdrnish it. He
tember for with Marshal| said that, while some officials
authoritative sources said{might desire to let Iran sell her

the! oil by separate contracts to near
et waraday DIE Mish Foreign eastern countries and European

Secretary since ones like Italy and Germany
slavia TF enited ca the ot. which have no big ge gat in-

omin-| terests, their own State Depart-
and was ousted from the C ment has to back the views of

The it will Big U.S. oil companies which
Ben con ie we ae made it clear that they do not
sions with Tito and his ministers| W@nt to see any agreement reach~-

ed which might give the appemr-@
ance of condoning the confisca-
tion of the Abadan oilfields.

wide range of topics
tae - . It was indicated



for some but \the final de- eh
0 SB gy Eig Mag ri
a Py mle Yugoslavia the U.K. Will Train
sources said. , .

I i Egyptian Troops

; with the ticklish, |
poe. of on which LONDON, Aug. 21.

th Britain and the United States} A Foreign Office spokesman
have been urging Yugoslavia aS/said Thursday, that Britain has
well as Italy, to come tto terms in| decided in le to nt

P princi, gra
of Pacific action of| Egypt military ieohine facilities

e
this stratagically

vital area. Aid)again in Britain. The initiative
to Yugoslavia probably will be/for the move came from Britain,
another important issue under} fgypt so far has not asked for

discussion. The see et meeting
with Tito of Big Toree Western
Ambassadors last week, i

resumption of facilities,
m added, About a score
= ee ha ows eipecwrent
aining in in ore the rift
of Yugoslavia} int Anglo-Egyptian relations late
as well as Trieste. But complete} last yaar when officers were with-/

secrecy is maintained in officialjdrawn by Egyptian Authorities.
quarters on the meeting —U.P. oF re Tr.

the



‘

SEOUL, Aug. 21.

repeated Allied ‘ -
United Nations warplanes de- eee be

ginning to hurt.

livered two smashing attacks; Yesterday was a bad day for
against the Communists on Wed-|Communists, Allied planes des-
nesday night and early Thursday |troyed three Red M.I.G. 15 jet
tate etre ti in a four-'planes, damaged two more and
hour it raid at ngyang and vily damaged a troop and
following up with a 100 plane|supply centre at Namyang and

k on a cement factory.

Fighter bombers and B. 26 light
bombers hurled bombs, bullets!of North Korea.
and napalm on the cement fac-' Thirty-eight air force B.29
tory, destroying 63 buildings and |Superfortresses from Okinawa hit
damaging 29 more, and leaving|Red manufacturing plants, troops
the entire area a mass of flames|and supply dumps in the Pyong-
and smoke. \vang raid. Communist anti-air-

Tt was the second straight day |craft fire was heavy but it stopped
cot heavy air attacks against Com-jas B.29’s flew over the city to
munists who in the same Pyong-\drop more than 350 tons of bombs
yang broadcast made it clear that Night fighters described “not

blasted two targets in a four-hour
night raid on Pyongyang, Capital

| KING OF IRAQ

te





|

ARRIVES IN U.S. —

POINTING TO NEW YORK’S SKYLINE, King Feisal II of Lraq is pictured

as he arrived aboard the Queen Ma

his uncle, stands beside the 17-year-old monarch

igation systems and inspect oil r
e will meet President Truman o



Introduction Of Cometh In

ry. Prince Regent Emir Abdul Ilah,
Feisai will study
efineries during his visit to the U S.
1 Saturday. (International)

W.L Will Take 18 Months

(From Our Own

Correspondent)
LONDON, Aug. 21,

It will be at least eighteen months before B.O.A.C

introduces Comets on the N

ew York—Nassau service.

Recent decisions to expand Comet services on the far
eastern route to Tokyo early next year leave no room for a
switch to jet liners on the dollar earning Caribbean net-

work for B.O.A.C. will have only nine series
will be unable to spare even one for the New

run

Schumacher’s |
Death May |
Split Party

; LONDON, Aug. 21.
The death on Wednesday night!
of the 56 year old Socialist!
opposition leader Kurt Sehuma-
cher touched off a wild scramble



for party leadership—a struggle |
which may split the patti
seriously, '
Twice since the war double!
amputee Schumacher ruled the'
party with an iron hand from’
his sick bed, each time for

a
year. But no one knows whether}
he can rule from the grave too,
Schumacher made his political)
testament when he told a “March
of Time” interviewer on Wednes-
day a scant six hours - before he
died: “The partition of Germany|
is the greatest source of strength}
of Soviet foreign policy. In the)
opinion of Social Democracy the
reunification of Germany is , an
aim more pressing and more im-,
portant for the pacification and
reconstruction of Europe than
any other form of integration of

one portion of Germany with)
other European countries.” -
That has’ been Sehumacher’s

policy since 1945, and that of the
parliamentary Socialist party. But
a large group of Socialists outside
the parliamentary party, and in
particular the “Three Mayors”’—
Ernest Reuter cf West Berlin,
Max Brauer of Hamburg, and
Wilhelm Kaisen of Bremen—have
long sought to modify this policy
which boiled down to unbending
opposition of all attempts by the
government to bring a rearmed
West Germany into the European
Atlantic Community. Schuma-
cher’s death may mean the re-
moval of the handcuffs from this
moderate group which has been
unable to date to sway the party
one degree away from Schuma-
cher’s line.
—U-P.





Russian Congress Is
Not Truman’s “Business”

WASHINGTON, Aug. 21.

At his news conference on
Thursday, Truman declined to
comment on the Russian an-

nouncement calling for the Party
Congress to replace the Politburo
on the grounds that it was none
of his business. A reporter ask-
ed Truman if he had any com-
ment or views to express on this
announcement, He answered as
above, adding only that it was a
matter for the Russians —vU.P.

U.N. Planes Blast Cement



Factory

very aggressive,” made only one
firing pass during the four-hour
strike. All the Superforts return-
ed safely to their base.

Civilians living in the Pyong-
yang area had been warned to
leave the area the previous night
by leaflets dropped by other B.29’s,

More than 200 air foree fighter
bombers and Navy carrier based
planes hit clusters of troop billets,
storage buildings and a factory |
at Namyang, ten miles southwest}
of Sukchon in Western Korea.

| government.

of Comets and
, York—Nassau

“We had hopes of taking
Comet into the Caribbean early
next year subject to operational
and commercial conditions, but
we are now heavily committed
on South African
routes”, said a
cial today,

It is now apparent that B.O.A.C.

corporation offi-

| will have to wait for delivery in
about eighteen months of a series jJnsurance

the

and Eastern

KOREAN WAR AVERTED
‘NOTHER WORLD WAR

Dwight

KANSAS CITY, Aug. 21,

isenhower, Republican presidential candidate.

i Thursday that United States may have averted “far

re serious” war by goin
Eisenha®we
nid-western states that

acbrteak of war in Korea.

into Korea when it did.

told a group of republicans from seven
“terrible blunders” preceded the
“But once those conditions oc
curred how you could have stayed out I do not know,” the
former five-star General said,

He said if the United States had not “reacted” to this
attack by the communists “we might have been involved in
1 far more Serious. thing (now)” He said there are “some
people” who have advocated going into ali-out war with
China, but added “no one I know of has presented any

feasible plan for attacking ¢
from All Quarters:
Physicist
Makes Flying
Saucers

Washington: An army physicist,

ho is also an amateur astrono-
mer, makes flying saucers in a
4g bell-shaped jar. He does 1
4y somizing very thin air within
Me glass jar through exposure to
siauc electricity supplied at the
base of the jar. A.l to show that
those objects which come up o2
radar screens may be merely
ionized clouds,

New Delhi: [n some villages of
Assam, where the crops are with-
ering, frogs (always associated
with rain), are daily married to
propitiate the Rain God. Frog
weddings are expected to evoke
‘ gilt of rain on the wedding day.

Kome: A 78-year-old Italian and

41s





79-year-old

wile went to
Naples to light a candle in hon-
our of Safht Gennaro. He was

blind and she was deaf. Separa-
itd by the crowds, they wandered
about the town til finally the
blind man recognised his witfe’s
footsteps, because “the pace was
“amiliar.”

Washington: In Seattle an ex-
GI had two of his Governmeni
cheques stolen by

of two Avon powered Comet: jthieves who forged+his name to
before making the changeover on cach them. It happened while
the New York-Nassau_ service the G.l. was himself in prison
The corporation will then start serving a sentence for stealing
ae et jetliner service jand forging Government cheques.
1 _ bi a wees be] Wellington: A group of boarders
ded to the Caribbean. t a college have formed an ua-
W.L Not Forgotten registered loan company to help

other boys “temporarily out of

“B.O.A.C, has definitely notjfunds.” They charge threepene¢

forgotten the Caribbean”, said a

|
spokesman,

The eighteen months will give
the Bahamas government time t«
settle its airport needs,

The Governor of the Bahamas
Major-General Sir Robert. Neville
at present in London, has had
talks With the British government
about moving the main airport
from Oaks Field to Windsor Field
and has discussed also the pur-
ehase of both from the British
Air Ministry by the

“The Bahamas has to face up
to this airport question and must
buy at least one of the fields”
said Sir Robert today. “I have
discussed the prices with the
British government and I think
that negotiations which will be
continued after the
government has worked out a
full scheme should be satisfac-
tory to both sides.”

Sir Robert has just had a long
consultation with B.O.A.C, Chair-
man Sir Miles Thomas and wa:
brought up to date on the cor
poration’s plans for the Carib-
bean, He'll advise the Bahamas
government when he returns to
Nassau next week, He _ leaves
London by air next Monday.



W.I. Worried About
Sugar Exports

LONDON, Aug. 21.
The “Times” commenting edi-
torially on the forthcoming Lon-

Canada and the West Indies, say
today that West Indian leader
are ‘worried about sugar exports
noting that Canada now has &
large adverse trade balance with
the West Indies. The newspaper
says that at the root of West In-
dian anxiety is lest the Canadians
may seek to balance their account
by curtailing sugar purchases in
the West Indies.

The “Times” says that the
West Indies are peculiarly sensi-
tive to any trade tendency-which
appears to threaten their sugar

Bahamas!

Bahamas;



sales, such as Canada’s purchase}
last year of a quantity from Cubs.) igh Commander in Korea read the!

The London trade conference! message in the presence of Maj, |
will be held in the second wees) General Berre, Commander of the;
of September. Only British and) new Korean communications zone
West Indian officials will tak | and Brigadier Nick Tassanis,! y

part. Canada is not participatir
even to the extent of an observe!
but will take an academic inter-
est in the proceedings, a Cana-
dian trade official said —cC.P.



BUSTA GIVES £50





i

'

Preliminary réports which did
not ificlude Navy destruction} KINGSTON, Jamaica, Aug. 20
credited Allied pilots with 60) An Island fund was started for;
buildings destroved and five dam-ithe Lynmouth flood suffers
| aged, i mante headed the list t
—~U.P. h £50-—
1 week interest on every shilling
~- equal to 1,300 per cent, a year.

A “strong-arm squad” sees there
we no bad debts.
Madrid: A Spanish Civil War

cripple, won the Madrid regional
beer-drinking championship this
week by drinking 8% litres
(about 15 pints) of beer in 50
minutes. He beat ‘five others and
won a silver cup and 1,000 pese-
tas (about £10) cash.

Baltie Sea-Port
To Be Closed

To Sweden

BERLIN, Aug.’ 21
Germany’ will close



East the

Baltic Sea port of Sassnitz to the

Swedish ferry from Trelleborg,
effective from October 5, the
Swedish Consulate in Berlin an-
nounced on Thursday. A Swedish
spokesman said that in five days,
talks between a Swedish delega-
tion from Stockholm and East
Zone railway officials, it was
agreed that the Swedish ferry
will go to Warndmunde on the
Baltic Sea after October 5. The
spokesman said that the Swedish
delegation consisting of four rail-
way experts had bean told by the
East Germans that Sassnitz har-
bour would be used only for fish-
ing purposes in future —U.P.

“Terrible Turks”



Replaced In Korea

don conference on trade between)

PUSAN, Korea, Aug. 21

A fresh Turkish brigade sent
fo replace the famed “Terrible
Turks” of the Korean fighting, ar-
rived in Pusan on Thursday as
replacements for the unit of tw
other United Nations forces,
Greece and Holland. The U5



o
navy troopship “General Nelson
M. Walker” disembarked 3,640
Turks to replace the North Brigade
which hea for home last Sat-
urday.

They were welcomed along the
Toute together with 250 Greek
replacements and 60 Hollanders.

Brigadier Namik Arguc, Turk-



+; Greek liaison officer to the United!

Nations Command. !

U.P.!

FRENCH FORCES
AMBUSHED La

SAIGON, Aug. 21. |

French sources who were rush-|

ng to the rescue of the outpost at

Trapang Phlong, besieged by Red

rebels, 45 miles west of Mimot in

astern Cambodia, fell into a

etminh ambush 1 lost 15 kill-

] 13 wounded U.P !

“hina.”

This may have been a reference
General Douglas MacArthur's
outspoken advocacy of hitting
China from the air. But Eisen-
hower mentioned no names. He
said he did not believe China was
a country that could successfully
be bombarded. He'said it has no
major industrial centres,

lo

“Attack on China,” Eisenhower |
Conference, ,

‘told the Republican

“would be starting another far

more difficult one (war) to stop |

than the one we are in now.”
The Republican Presidential nom-
‘nee in a general discussion of.
Foreign Policy said he
thought it “indefensible for any
member of the executive branch
to go up and down the land criti-
cizing Congress.”

This apparently was a_ refer-
ence to Truman’s 1948 campaign

attacks on Republican controlled |

Eighth Congress. But again Eis-
enhower mentioned no names.
Eisenhower's exposition of his

Foreign Policy views was made oft
the cuff. They were made in an-
swer to a question of K. B. Cor-
nell, Republican candidate for
Congress for the Sixth District of
Oklahama Eisenhower arrived
here early Thursday from Boise,
Idaho, where he spoke on Wednes-
day before a crowd of 19,000 from
the State House steps
—UP.





PRINCESS MARGARET
.
Princess Margaret
*
Spends Birthday
*
Quietly

3ALMORAL, Seotland, Aug. 21.

Princess Margaret is 22 on
Chursday, and, like many anothe:
jritish little sister, she’s spending
ier birthday quietly with her fam-
ly The petite Princess, one of
he gayest leaders of ndon’s
mart set until the death of her
ather the King, donned tweeds
ind sensible low-heeled shoes to
vienic on the grouse moors near
rere. The Queen, the Duke of
Edinburgh and the Queen Mother
Elizabeth were to be there to-
wether with friends of the Royal
Family’ A small family birthday
party was to be held on Thurs-
day in the droughty Balmoral
Castle, but n6 official celebrations
have been planned. Royal_birth-
days are regarded as strictly pri-

vate affairs and little fuss is made
about ther in British a
ACP)



Truman Firm
On Repatriation

PANMUNJOM, Aug, 21
The United Nations stand on
exchanging prisoners of war was
trengthened by President Tru-
nar promise that yo prisoner
held by the Allies would be sent
k to Communism against his





ick

Ut Truman’s reaffirmation of
the Alllied stand was the only
evelopment in truce negotia-

t
ior

The talks were in the midst of

nother recess, the fourth in as
veek Not even liaison

cer met today
The President published the
letter he wrote Captain Charles
FEquing, who had expressed the
hope th the United Nations
t back down on. their
ist repatriation of pris-



also |

|















Tree

»

reese

an

a
r



Sunset

Moon: New, August
Lighting: 7.00 p.m.
High Tide: 4.2% a.m., 5.11 p.m
Low Tide: 10.49 a.m., 11.06 p,m



29

PRICE : FIVE CENTS



For B.G. Rice Shortage

(From Our Own Correspondent)

Georgetown, Aug.13. crops than would be suili-
Hon. John Fernandes, cient to meet the entire
Chairman of the B.G. Rice needs and leave a Surplus.
Marketing Board told the There were two things the

Georgetown Chamber
Commerce on Friday that
there was no question that
the Board was to blame
for the shortage of rice in
the Colony, and gave the
Chamber the assurance that
measures are being taken
to prevent another shortage.

of the Board
Abary Mill had

completely milled out its
crop and therefore had
nothing to mill in the wet
season... Normally, this mil
would have given the Board
about 1,000 bags &® month

which woulgd have been

Discussion on the rive sufficient to enable the
situation opened when the Board to carry on without
President of the Chamber, any serious inconvenience;
Lt, Col, E, J. BE . wood, (b) that it now suited cer-

M.B.E., 'T.D., said the Cham-
ber had written to the
Board asking (a) how long
the shortage was likely to
exist; (b) when conditions
will return te normal and
(c) whether in the light of
experience, steps can and
will be taken to “prevent a
similar occurrence next year

tain private millers to see
that, time tike this
when there was a shortage
of rice, the shortage was
prolonged...He referred to
the recently introduced rice
cess and pointed out that it
peid such millers to sell
their rice through the “back
door” as they collected an

and in the years to com. extra 90 cents on every
Hon. John Fernandes told bag sold.

the Chamber that there As to the future Mr

were several interpretations Fernandes said the Board

of the term “shortage” as
used in the Press. There
‘| was the statement made
| that there was a shortage
|
'

would keep stocks in reserve
to ensure there was no
shortage, The present short-
age he added could be con-

of padi in the Colony, sidered as over since good
therefore the shortage of distributions were — beine
rice would not cease until made by the Board ond
the receipt of padi from the further, the Mehateony-
new crop. This he said, is Abary mill wold be ‘out
incorrect as there is more into oneration on the new

than enough padi from past crop in September.

25.000 More U.S. Farm
Workers Go On Strike

NEW YORK, Aug. 21,

A strike by some 25,000 international Harvester Com-
pany of Farm Implement workers brought a new crisis in
the already turbulent United States labour scene and the
possibility of a crippling strike by 100,000 non-ferrous metal
workers. This became cleer after the International Union
of Mine and Smelter workeis asked members for a strike
vote, but the results will not be announced until September
2 or 3.

The Independent Farm Equip-
ment Workers Union called a
strike against 12 Harvester plants
in three states after negotiations
for a new work contract broke
dewn, The strike began at 12.0)
a.m, to-day,

In Washington the Chairman of
the National Mediation Board had
some cheerful news when he said
voth sides in New York central
railroad dispute have assured the
Board that they hope to settle
differences without a strike. The
lispute revolves around 58 unset-





Chinese Reds
And Soviels
| Open Talks

MOSCOW, Aug. 21.
Stalin received the Chinese
Communist Premier and Foreign
Minister Chou En Lai last night
io open Soviet—Chinese talks on

i mutual military, aconomie and
tled union grievances. production problems.
Federal Mediation chief Cyrus Chou was accompanied by

Deputy Premier Chen Yung and
other ranking members of the 15-
man Red Chinese delegation which
arrived in Moscow on Sunday.
Also present at the Kremlin meet-
ing ‘were Soviet Vieq Premier
Vyach Estav M. Molotov, Foreign

S,. Ching pleaded with some 23,000
A.F.L, machinists not to strike
against Lockheed Aircraft Corpor-
ation Plants in Southern Califor-
nia because the walkout “would
seriously affect our national de-
fence effort.”

Minister Andrei Vishinsky and
He summoned representatives | other Soviet Foreign Office ex-
of machinists and Lockheed to a | perts.

meeting in Washington next week
in an effort to settle the dispute.
The Union whose contract expires
on Friday authorized a strike but
bas set no date for it.

-—U.P.

«Gilbey

EMPIRE RED WINE

The Chinese delegation includ-
ed Deputy Chief of the Chinese
General Staff Su Yu and Vice
Chairman of Finance and Econo-
mic Committee Li Fu Chun.

‘ ..P

Maintains

the same high
Standard
of Qualityas
shipped to the
West Indies
for the past
hifty years

©
EY

hight
yn

i e118:

on el

GARDINER AUSTING CL?
Slant MOONE





OS









PAGE TWO

BARBADOS ADVOCATE









MRS, H. STOUTE presenting a gift to a mother at the Christ Church Baby Welfare League yesterday

IR» -ROSERT ARUNDELL
Governor of the Windward

A Party Visitors To League

Islands"Who spent a few days.in N Wednesday evening last ] RS. NORMA GOODING and
Barbados“ intransit from Domini- Mr. and Mrs. H., A. Talma Mrs. Herman Stoute, visitors
ca, left for Grenada on Wednes- entertained guests to a cocktail to the island who are at present
day by’B.W.1A. He was a guest party held | at their residence holidaying here, are taking a keen
of Sir George and Lady Seel at Travondor”’, Welches. The party interest in social activities. On

was given in the honour of Judge
end Mrs, H. Stoute of the U.S.A,
and Mrs, Nerma Gooding also of
the U.S.A.

The evening was an enjoyable

Wednesday Mrs, H. Stoute visit-
ed Madame Ifill’s Baby League at
St. John’s and spent some time
there watching the routine check-
up of the babies and the general

“Bemersyde”, Christ Church.

From Olympics
R. KEN FARNUM, Barbados

Ace Cyclist, arrived home on one and among those present activities of the League.
Wednesday by B.W.LA, from were: Dr, and Mrs. E. L. Ward, Yesterday at the Christ Church
Trinidad, Ken, Jamaica repre- Dr, and Mrs, A. W. Scott, Mr. Baby Welfare League, Mrs.
sentative in cycling, attended and Mrs. D, H, L. Ward, Mr, J. Stoute presented poor mothers of

the Olympic Games at Helsinki. ©. Tudor, Snr., Mr. and Mrs. J. O. the parish with items of cloth-

| week aboard the Queen Mary was
| Sir William Wiseman, who for 30

lyears has been a Wall Stgeet
Banker. Sir William has a the:
Fifth Avenue and a house at

tego Bay, Jamaica.
;man of the American c
|of the Dollar Exports Council

ha s i son?
the Counaltr” ee = “Is there?” asked Knarf.
William Rootes “Well,” said Mr. Punch; “if there
3 .. | isn’t, then I’ve been wrong for many
New Book i | years. Mind you, I’m not saying that |





ae ‘Ju-t Who Is Jack Frost?
West Indian ’ --Punch Tells the Shadows About Him—
Table Talk

By MAX TRELL
“] WONDER,” Knari was saying
By LONDONER
LONDON

to Hanid, “whether there really is
' such @ person as Jack Frost. | mean,

is there anyone who goes around |

; » ba . ner making everybody cold?” |

oe Oe Se bets fe eee Hanid was just about to reply
that she was sure Jack Frost was |
just somebody imaginary like drag-
ons and unicorns and horses with
» wings, when Mr. Punch said in a
“| loud voice: “What's thic about Jack
74 Frost? Did i hear somebody say he
didn’t think there was such a per-

ow









1 ever saw Jack Frost. But that
George Lammings, well known doesn’t mean that there isn’t any |
Barbadian-born author recently such person. There are lots of things |
gave readings from his latest novel. that we know about but that we
as yet unpublished, at the Insti- can’t ever see. The Wind, for ‘in-
tute of Cuntemporary Artists in stance. Has anyone ever seen the
London, He does not want to re- Wind?” .
veal the title of the work at the Both Knarf and Hanid agreed
moment, But he tells me that that no one had ever seen the Wind
ean mee hee paveed to pear Like the Wind
ish it an e will appear . a 2 i
e “ ka 4s é “But there’s a Wind just the
next February. “It has taken me .. nw »Now Jack Frost is like the

about nine months to complete”| $3! i : is
he added “afd I am at preser(| Wind. He’s around. We're absolute

working on another book”; ‘The| ly positive he’s around. But he takes |

novel deals with nine years in the| teat care that no one should eve

‘ise ss ashe fi Alle .{ see him.”
lives of some Barbadian villagers “Why does he do that?” Hanid

who are connected with an estate, :

and tells of the effect upon tem | wanted - eee ked

of the changing political climate; , Mr. Punch looke
“Can’t you guess?

in the, colnsy. Hanid shook her head. tind te
i i 5 “Because, my dear,” replie r
Teaching Appointment Punch, “if anyone ever saw Jack |
I hear that Mr. Maurice R.| Frost—and if anyone ever caught
Bamfield of Birmingham has been| him, that would be the end of Jack
appointed to a teaching post at! Frost. Oh no, he’s not so foolish as
Queen’s College Nassau, Mr, Bam-| to let himself be seen.”
field who has studied at the school’ Knarf asked why it would be the
of Medieval and Modern History end of Jack Frost if he were ever
at Birmingham University gained: caught.
a B.A, (honours) degree in July “Why? I'll tell you why. Not too
1950, For a while afterwards ke many people like Jack Frost, He
studied at the Institute of Educa-| goes around pinching noses. He
tion, London University and was) makes toes and fingers tingle. Late |
awarded a post-graduate teaching! at night he creeps in through open
certificate in 1951. Until his windows and makes everything as
appointment in the Bahamas he’ cold as ice. He keeps grass and flow-

Jack Frost at work.





Jack Frost does another .awful
thing: He scatters snow around~ all
around—all over the streets and
fields and especially over the hills.”

“That’s wonderful!” cried Hanid.
“That's how everybody can go
sleigh-riding!”

Worst Thing

Mr. Punch frowned and said
\h’mn again. “But the very worst
thing he does is this. He finds a little
pond somewhere. It’s a lovely tittle
| pond, as pretty as a picture. The
sunbeams dance on the water. The
dragon-flies dart over it. The water-
lilies bloom on it. The fish swim in
it. And then what happens? Jack
Frost touches this pond with the tip
of his little finger and—-whoosh!—
the whole top is covered with ice!
Ice, my dears; hard, cold ice! The
dragon-flies don’t dart over this
| nond any more. The sunbeams don’t
dance on the water. The water-lilies
disappear at once. And you can’t
see a single one of the fish, The only
thing this pond is good for when
Jack Frost gets through freezing it,
is—”

“Ice skating!” Hanid and Knarf
shouted joyously.

Mr. Punch shook his head sadly.
“And that’s why no one likes Jack
Frost, and why it’s dangerous for

surprised. |



‘His many friends are glad to Tudor, Mr. and Mrs. R. A. Sealy, ing. These ‘were sent by Mrs.
welcome him home once more Mr, and Mrs, 8S. R. Taylor, Mrs. |. Lowe an overseas donor, also
and wish him better luck next B. Hynam, Mr. and Mrs. G. Cox, interested in social welfare.
time! Well done! Mr. Lisle Ward, Mr. C, G. Ward, ‘Those present were: Mrs.
To Read For Degree and Miss Daphne Ward, Norma Gooding, Madame Ifill,

R,. JOHN HUMFREY, a form-

er Science Master at Lodge
School, and for about a year past
Private Secretary and Aide de wife of Mr. DeVere Archer,
Camp .to His Excéllency Sir Headmaster of Montserrat Sec-
Robert Arundell, recently left ondary School, is spending a
Grenada by the H.L.S. “Herds- short holiday in the island with
man” for England where he will her sisters-in-law, Mrs. Clarke
enter St. John’s College, Cam- and Miss Archer of Brittons Hill
bridge, to read for a Natural and Mrs. Crosse of Ebenezer
Science degree. Manse,

Mr. Humfrey, Grenada-born,
is a son of Major B, B, Humfrey,
Assistant Superintendent of
Police, and Mrs, Humfrey.

. ° re oie reek-end fro. tsegrat
Holidaying With Relatives — anne dee’ daa. ve
RS. STELLA SINGH and her Horner, formerly an employee of
two children, Carol and Don, the Bauxite Co. in British Guiana
came in on Monday by B.W.1.A. is on his way to Vancouver to
from Trinidad to spend a holiday take up an appointment with the
with their relatives, Mrs. Singh Bauxite Co., there, They are
is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. guests at Abbeville Guest House.
A. Pragnell, Chelsea Road.

Mr. C, D, Ramsay, Mrs, C. Storey,
and Mrs. H, A. Talma.

One of the children of the
League presented bouquets to Mrs.
Gooding and Mrs. Stoute and
they both replied congratulating
Madame Ifill (Foundress) on the
good work that she was doing for
whe benefit of the poor. They
were very impressed with the
restful atmosphere and the hap-
py little faces around them,

They had heard quite a lot of
the League in the U.S.A. and
expressed their joy at being there
in person, “We shall take back
word to New York to that effect”.
Mrs. Stoute said, “and it has been
indeed a great pleasure to be with
you all,”

For Holiday
RS, CLARKE who - arrived
here from England on the

From Montserrat
RS. CHRISTINE ARCHER,

For Vancouver
R. AND MRS, HORNER
arrived in the colony over

5 ‘ To Join Husband Ist August for a short holiday
Entertainment R. D. A. PRIOR of Mara- with her two sons, will be re-
HE Harrow Sports Club will caibo who has been holiday- â„¢aining for about two more
give an entertainment in ing in Barbados for the past Weeks before returning to Eng-
honour of the visiting Table three weeks as a guest of Maresol land. Mrs. Clarke is living at
Tennis Team of San Fernando, Beach Flats, St. Lawrence Gap, Enmore Hotel. ”
Trinidad which arrived here last will be remaining for another C.J. Arrives
week, The dance will be held at two weeks before rejoining her R. R. J. MANNING, Chief
the Drill Hall tomorrow night husband who is Sales Manager Justice of St Vincent
23rd August, and Mr, Keith employed with Messrs. John arrived in the island on Wednes-
Campbell and his Society Six will Henderson in Maracaibo, day last for a short holiday her
be the Music Makers, Also holidaying with Mrs. He was accompanied by Mrs.
With C.PIM. Prior are her three children, Manning and 1 at

r ; they are guests at
HAROLD CARRINGTON oe SAE ROE:

CPIM. plorgs Stay
Curacao, came in on Friday last RS. M. WINTER who ‘has
for six ‘weeks’ holiday. During been holidaying in the
that time he will be getting mar- island for the last few months as
ried to Miss Gwendolyn Roberts, a guest at Enmore Hotel is en-

R.
who works with

Enmore Hotel.
Yor Honeymoon
M* AND MRS. B. SAMAROO

arrived here on Monday
morning by B.W.LA. from Trini-

ag dad where the we rec
daughter of Mr, Charles Roberts, joying her stay so much that she married, They War tie “Sena
The Ivy. Mr, Carrington is a has decided to stay on for a few mooning here for about three

Barbadian and is holidaying with more months,

f ! Mrs, Winter is from
his relatives,

weeks at Indra BS 5
Michigan, U.S.A. poe Ea eee

Worthing.



“BY THE WAY... ty seochoamer

MAGINE, idiot reader, Foule- ment. On misses an index, as, is
nough’s astonishment when in the case of a book which con-

a laborious business; especially
when there has been no attempt



a customer stood entranced before ‘tains nothing but names, the to place the nz i i
1 . e names in alphabetical
a Degas, and cried: “That's a tracing of, say, Barbauld, H.R.S., order, as was done "in earlier
beauty. paar sh. ee ve a edition’. In fact it seems thab
genuine Degas of the best period.” the editor of this new edition was
“I see you are a connoisseur,” CROSSWORD : an

governed solely by a desire to
confuse and irritate the reader.
How else is one to explain the
omission of a list of contents at

said the puzzled Captain. “No-
body could mistake that treat-
ment of light,” replied the cus-







tomer, “and look at the drawing the begi ?
tr tie ‘aitlig ost) eee e beginning of the book?
Foulenough added a_ couple of

pounds to the price, and the buyer
seemed to think he had got the
picture cheap. Later Foulenough
rang up Sam Codforth, and told
him that some fool had taken one
of his things for a genuine Degas.

LISTENING
HOURS







“Tt was genuine} all right,” replied Seb co i ee ee ace
Sam. “Nobby unloaded it on ate lal tA RPDS ed Maen abah
me after” the robbery at that 4.00 p.m. The News, 4.10 p.m. The
country place.” “Imbecile!” Daily Service, 6 15 p.m. Steve Race &
roared the Captain, “I let it go “ Across aleolm Lockyer, 4 p.m. Twenty
fox ‘tin iat ont? vou hiv 1, Recall it was about an M.P. (y, Questions, 6.00 p.m, Schumann, 6.15 p.m,
t : , it. 9. The Emir’s economist. (5) Variety Bandbox, 6.15 p.m. Merchant
sending the genuine stuff without 10. Not customary for9 todo it. (4) Navy 4 ' +» 8.50 pom ‘
letting me know.” 11 Rupert Bear's home wood. (3) Mine Country Style, 6.45 p.m. Sports
13 aoe of the day's FPS, (4) Round-up & Programme Parade, 7.0
. J. § dro) as PS y a ' e $ ‘a
Marginal note 14° Rose type, (1) we eR — 1080 Pm e a5.58 Me BL ae
© “er : . ss 17. Stain of sorts, (4) Sn oe aa ae packing
free from vibration is the 19 Startle a broken marl. (5) 7.15 p.m. West Indian Diany, 7.45 p.m
United States that a passen- 2! Makes him warn his nomad. (8) a ‘Tale of Two Cite Ae ip & tio
. 22, Volcanic export. (4) Reese i % Pog or
ger balanced a glass of beer on 93. Pins of Pate ’ Newsreel, 8.30 p.m) World Affairs, 8.45
: 23. Pins can be made to, (4) t
the rudder when the ship left 24 Enrapture. (9) Pistia BOO pete; mone Ot Vienta, 10,00
New York. On arrival at South- Down Saat “Whe News 10.10 p a News Talk.
ampton the glass was still there, 1. King, emperor. or dictator ? (5) {10.18 p.m. Portraits From Memory, 10,30
and only 15 drops of beer were = Mere 1nd, Dus a jewel, (7) jp.in. From The Third Programme
issing. i : "nt wie, ee nn Fe
missing. They had not spilled, sa Po. a. e Tieauede solutio
but had been drunk by a caddish 4 Bracnyen of 7. (4) GAIETY
member of the .crew. England 3° Beastly to rebut like this, (5)
F . . 6. You do this t > berry
now build a bigger, faster, and 7. Synonym of e ey ares The Garden—St, James
even steadier ship—but I forget 8 A portion intended tor TODAY & TOMORROW 8.30 P.M.
shy bs 7 ) —w , —
why. 15. Laid out for 24, perhaps. (3 f “CRY MURDER”
‘ 16. See 6. (4) {7 Ser ist Carol MATHEWS
Book review 38. Colour (4)
20. A slip of the tongue? (4)

. ae ; Martha VICKERS — Philip REED
NEW omnibus edition of the Solution of yesterday's pustie Acres =





OT je 4 1. Caravan. 7. Ope ( =

Cheakat the cet ene Endure 12 Maxnitude "Ya Ont od “di ne neces nee s
ard work en Rent. 18. Haunt @1. Tern, 2 SILVER CITY BONANZA

the stibject—contains much new ne eee ae yon 1 nt Rex ALLEN (The Arizona Cowboy)

matter, in the shape of names of ards: 6 Sheer. B. Eneincer: “GUNMEN of ABILENE”

veteran cabmen living in retire- net +5: Retertears 17 Tur Allan ROCKY LANE











LADIES “ARCOLA” SHOES

LOW CUT COURTS. Navy, Brown, Black Suedes $13.69



Jack LORD &

“DAUGHTER of the WEST" (Color)
'
}

OUTPOST

him to let himself be seen.”

But when Knarf and Hanid looked
at Mr. Punch they saw that he was
really smiling. They knew that he
didn’t mean a single thing that he
said about people not liking Jack
Frost, if there was a Jack Frost.

has been teaching in Grimsby. | ers from growing. He hangs icicles
from window-sills and around the
edges of roofs.”

“Oh, they’re pretty!” Kuarf ex-

Going Going.......

onSclogel Pobin, Starts ote! aut sBversbudy like to ste
Jamaica is likely to be sold very} *'<8% ‘ Pm
soon I hear. Negotiations with an| _ “2mm,” said’Mr. Punch, “Aud
interested party are “far 7 als a-iy
advanced”, The Colonel is asking} Rupe
about £100,000 for the hotel to-|

gether with 25 acres and a pri-! z ,
vate beach. Included is the Villa 2a
Flora where the Duchess of Kent} ,
stayed on her honeymoon in 1934. |
The hotel has suites for 60 guests, |
a swimming pool and terraced
tropical gardens, ' |

Mr. Bumstead \

With regret I record the death |
of Mr. Roy Bumstead a member
of the West Indies section of the
Colonial office. Mr. Bumstead was
killed in a mountaineering acci-}
dent on Mont Blanc last fortnight. |
He was 31 years of age and a














The young farmer seems very ** 1 was watch-
interested in something and does

not move as Rupert runs across

he says gravely.
ing something queer here. | think
one of my trees has got a five in

9 Tw ; ‘ a i the dell. ‘Please, I’m looking its roots.’ He points to a hole
Se Ciasaee tent’ pease ane for a little dragon,” says Rupert. at the base of the tree and in
aoe ue, 3 “Have you seen ite’ he great excitement Rupert sees that
war, served as a captain in the farmer looks startled. ** There another wisp of smoke is fazily
R.A.C. in West Africa and Burma, are no such things as dragons,"" curling up from it.

and was mentioned in dispatches. |
He joined the Colonial Office as
Acting Principal in 1948 and was
transferred from the Communica-
tions department to the West [n-
dies section in 1949. In May 1951)
he was promoted to /Principal. No
buecessor’ has yet been named,



EMPIRE

TO-DAY 2.30 and 8.30 p.m. and Continuing Daily 4.45 & 8.30
“poem

TO-MORROW




, The flashing exploits and
rs dashing courage of the
r 4 world’s best-loved rogue!

RoBIN Hoop.,

Color by TECHNICOLOR
ff seems RICHARD TODD ws JOAN RICE. 4 Ut

* ¥ J P cs i
eT ule eh a eH
XK ers cil PPC }

: ies el Ly Por as t
oh He

EAST © Welt Disney Productions
by PERCE PEARCE - Directed by KENNETH ANNAKIN + Screenplay by LAWRENCE E. WATKIN

3 EXTRA
Universal News Reel Showing the Opening Ceremony of the
1952 Olympic Games

ROODAL THEATRES



————; 4

a hi

i 5"
=

Is
LAST NIGHT
AT

THE by



















Meena
CLUB EMPIRE | OLYMPIC ROXY ROYAL
To-Day 7.30 & 830\ To-Day to Monday) To-day 4.30 only To-Day only
MORGAN Geter | aT a
i" b s . 4
mem | Pred MacMURRAY and |
Walt Disney's Claire TREVOR | Charles STARRETT | Lloyd BRIGGS in
. \Smiley BURNETT in}
in | TWO FISTED | THREE STEPS
before closing STORY OF | WO FISTED | Now &
until December ROBIN HOOD | BORDERLINE | Fe-Night at 8:39 lanoxen souentY
Color by Technicolo: | oar jenagans rai: & Starring
, | Starring ORR MAS SOee Phyllis CALVERT
heneoaeenaes
Richard TODD | DANGEROUS Doors Open at
i a \Toemorrow & Sunday
(| Joan RICE | 7 p.m | 15
Extra GAMES “Opening ] aeulutns
SPECTACULAR =} universti News nee! | tumerrey | columbia Pitures
TECHNICOLOR | Opening Ceremony Mid-Nite } ; Hrenents
| of the 1952 Olympte Universal Pictures
cana ymp' Tomorrow Night Presents THE MOB
DVENTURE i | ee THE GOLDEN
A é Tomorrow Roy Rogers Double! sALAMANDER
at 1.30 p.m, Starring
IT’S THE LAST WORD IN {i | sourx erry sue « LIGHTS OF OLD} trevor HOWARD |Proderick Crawford
WESTERN WOMEN IN WAR | ANOUK Richard Kiley
| ~~ Mid-Nite | 2 — a ee eg
! 5
EXCITEMENT! romorron wat | SANTA FE Siem | On Etat?
Paramount presents w : and 4.20 & 8.15
EB OF DANGER Gene AUTRY te een abie
- oO E
Th L A ST and ROLL ON TEXAS) * SUE | Whole Serial
e WHISPERING ang \ |, THE GREEN
FOOTSTEPS | MOON | WOMEN IN WAR! ARCHER








ON ITS 2nd FLAMING WEEK
“GLOBE

CONTINUES TO-DAY 5 & 8.30 P.M. AND CONTINUING

starring
Rhonda
REAGAN FLEMING
with

Bruce BENNETT, Bill WIL-
LIAMS, Noah BEERY

Ronald










Wa PURINE i ince csi ess $14.50 At the —
VARIOUS STYLES OF BLACK & BROWN SUEDES if PARBGREES (Dial $170) The Ghint of Maties Plotures - + - -
Backless & Toeless .0.00.. ccc. sie $14.79 sg’
White Nubuck—Backless & Toeless....... $15.04 P i A Z A Ss € A RA MO UCHE
Jane Stewar Me , El
T R EVANS f i TO-DAY (FRIDAY) LEIGH - GRANGER — FERRER — WILCOXON _ PARKER
» WK. & WHITFIELDS iacbawem fy OPENING SOON—20th Century Fox
YOUR SHOE STORES * Ruby eae “WITH A SONG IN MY HEART”
DIAL 4220 DIAL 4606 MN “THE LAST OUTPOST” } Susan HAYWARD — Rory CALHOUN
i = ——— moo
































1952

—

FRIDAY, AUGUST 22,

ry

Saga 4/7. V4
and YoU a f a



FOR FRIDAY, AUGUST 22, 1952

4
Look inthe section in which your birthday comes and
x find what y6ur outlook is, according to the stars.

ARIES Aggressively favourable day for military,
March 21—April 20 humanitarian crusades, all worthy Causes,
Day advises sensible care in hazardous

work, handling tools, water activities.

TAURUS * *

April 21—May 20 Mildly favourable for your especial inter-
ests and desires. The armed services of
our country should be inspired to go for-
ward. A good day generally.

*
%
+
*

You are indeed favoured with your Moon
and Mars in excellent aspects. But there
is a warning not to over-reach to gain
objectives.

May 2i—June 21 Not all stimulating for brain work, but—

for the usual daily routine, familiar work
—day can be gainful, pleasant. Don’t over-
do!

*«
ae
«
x

*

CANCER
June 22—July 23

Your planet suggests doing things in a
quietly efficient way, without being too ex-
acting or arbitrary. Real benefits to be
had in useful trade, business, family affairs. *
urgent obligations how hard you dee
work, what tempo you should keep this
generally auspicious day. Extra care
stressed on dangerous jobs. *

LEO
July 24—Aug. 22

VIRGO ly i i
ans: 23 Mostly up to demands of your position and

LIBRA
Sept. 24—Oct. 23 Favourable indications, going to still bet-
ter ones for tomorrow. Fine time for per-
sonal and artistic matters.

-M

SCORPIO Mars’ excellent as f
pect and the Moon’s

Oct. 24—Nov. 22 favourable influences promise a day of in-
terest, gain and personal satisfaction. IF,

of course you think honourably, act wel.

*
Influences indifferent to some money mat--
ters and selfish interests, but honest intent
and objectivity can achieve in a big way.
Due recreation should not be neglected.

-

Your Saturn position stresses need for
serenity. Have hope, look forward as you
take good care of day’s obligations.

*

Mild rays from Uranus, but rightful ag-
20 gressiveness (such'as in military and gov-
ernment activities) will bring surprising

results,
*

Neither hindering nor too invigorating +
aspects. Mostly up to you and what your
programme calls for. Don’t strain, but +
keep anead with urgent matters.

*

*

SAGITTARIUS
Nov. 23—Dec. 22

«
*«
«
x
*«
*«
«
*
*«
*«

*
+

CAPRICORN
Dec, 23-— Jan. 21

*
AQUARIUS
‘Jan. 22 — Feb.

PISCES
Feb. 21—March 20

YOU BORN TO-DAY: Splendid mental and mechanical
ability; pride, ambition, but sometimes dislike for small de-
tails and irritating routine. Watch that you don’t tend ta
domineer, disregard others’ desire or opinions. You can really
achieve in profession, trade, in a religious life, or other course

once you set your mind and heart sturdily to it. Birthdate:
Claude Achille Debussy, great Fr, composer; Samuel Pierpont
Langley, air pioneer, astronomer.

x se hee Me HM KM MH MK ¥

YOU'VE NEVER BEFORE SEEN
A PICTURE LIKE THIS!

*















The amazing saga of six men who
deliberately risked their lives to prove
a theory! On a primitive-type raft
of balsa logs they drifted from Peru
to the isles where the hula girls wait!
101 days and 4,300 miles without
contacs with civilization, exerting
superhuman efforts to keep afloat
and alive!

ow:

Produced by OLLE NORDEMAR
Music by SUNE WALDIMIR =;
An Artfilm A.B.



Told by THOR HEYERDAHL

author of the best-selling book

AU aN AN , Photographed by the
ere : * men who lived itt

AT LAST ON YOUR SCREEN!

2 AZA—Opening TO-DAY





BRIDGETOWN
N.B.—Two Special Shows on MON. & TUES. —,
“RON—TIKI” Plays with the Action Packed

Drama!



A WOMAN CAN
MAKE OR BREAK





~~ BRIDGETOWN BARBAREES

sin







(Dial 2310) (Dial 5170) (Dial 8404)
OPENING TO-DAY ||TOPAY 4-45: 8.90 p.m. “DAY, to SUN.









& Continuing Daily
Colossal Technicolot
Adventure !

THE LAST
OUTPOST

45 & 8.30 p.m.
TAP ROOTS
(Technicolor)
Van Susan

HEFLIN : HAYWARD
and

PARDON








2.30 — 445 & 8.30 pm.
& Continuing Daily
4.45°& 2.30 p.m




Two SPECIAL Shows on
MON. & TUES.: 8.30 a.m.
The Much Talked About

KON-TIKE














° Ronald Rhonda
(Six Men oo A Raft) REAGAN ::: FLEMING
Also Special Added —— ——-
Attraction ! SAT. Special 1.30 p.m. MY SARONG
“ROADBLOCK” Zane Grey’s Bud ABBOTT &
Charles Joan ||THUNDER MOUNTAIN Lou COSTELLO
McGRAW __&__ Tim HOLT & Bal, Special 1.20 p.m

Tony MARTIN
and

“LEGION of the
LAWL
George O’BR

Sat. Special 9.30 & 1.30
“SPORT OF KINGS”
Paul CAMPBELL &

“BLAZING ACROSS THE
PECOS”

Char'es STARRETT
Midnite Special Sat
“BUCKAROO SHERIFF

OF TEXAS” &
TIMBER TRAILS” (Color) “RANGE JUSTICE”
Monte HALE Johnny Mack BROWN
== SESE

“THUNDERHOOF"’

Preston FOSTER &
“WHIRLWIND

RAIDERS’

Charles STARRETT

Midnite Special §
“OUTL













Mid-Nite Special Sat.
“WESTWARD BOUND’
Kun MAYNARD &




EL DORADO"
MACK

BROWN




Johnn







FRIDAY, AUGUST 22, 1952
SS na een

ACCORDING to

rainfall returns received from 32

stations situated in the various rainfall categories of the

island, the rainfall for the
inches below the average.

month of July, 1952 was 0.85
In the majority of districts

light moderate showers fell on approximately 18 days of
the month and widely distributed rains fell on the 6th, 7th,
10th and 27th, writes C. C. Skeete, Director of Agriculture
in his report for the month of July.

The northern part of the island
received little or no rain on the
10th and 27th. The average total
rainfall for the month was 5.66
inches, the average total for July

tne nercially. The work is being, car-
1951 was 6.03 inches and the ore ‘olen of. Res co iy es oa : ee | ried out wades Dr. L.A Senin. 4
average for July for the past 105 round of judging of school gardens tane Borm ; | chemist on the staff of the Pacific {
yon wae 6.51 inches. The ap- entered for the annual competi- siostaeate feniber to ssenraia te an Ge ret j orous | Experimental ‘nen a the Fish- Ou
proximate total rainfall for the tion. ; sons light-proof house arrived during marketing society b ised in jeries Research Board in Van-
island for the seven months — — The usual .routine operations the month. Construction i : that district Furthe “meetin of —— ot ge Se ee
January to July 1952, was 20.62 were carried out at all Stations mediately started, and ‘no 7: fits Grous ate oma ngs 0} : | The fisheries department said *
inches, the total for the cor- during the month. The planting i cteq that it will be completed No societies were registered the market for fish oil since 1932 | Togp ot
responding period for 1951 was of food crops was continued. The and ready for use by th iddle during the month The ‘Sayes ee e n anac a | wag based upon the existence of .
43.07 inches, cropping programmes at some of Or August. ‘This is bose ee Court. Co-operative Producers’ | Vitamins A and D in the oll | funinthe day. Thenis

The highest total rainfall for the Stations have been handicap- eo. jater than had been plan- 2894 Marketing Society which was : 1 | After vitamin D beeame a syn+ Hon a
July 1952, at any of the above 32 Ped through inadequacies of the neq but if successful will) still registered in June was formally Vigorous salesmanst . LONDON |thetic preduct, the oil found a | Dedd’s
stations, was 7.62 inches, record- irrigation units, and in the case give arrows with which some Presented its certificate of regis- , eorous salesmanship is needed to enable British ex.‘ market only because of the pres-| For Dedd’s Ki
ed at a station in the parish ot Of “Jerusalem” through the fail- chocses can be made. tration at a ceremony which took porters to capture Canadian orders in face of U.S. competi- | «nce of vitamin A. Pills contain essential oils and medicinal
St. Philip and the lowest was 3.33 Ure of the irrigation water supply. ~ visits were paid to severa: Plaee at the Sayes Court Agricul- tion, says the British Treasury, in the August issue of its| “Over the past few years vit- | ingredients that act directly on the kidneys
inches, measured at a station in Livestock _ maize plantations during the ‘zal Station on July 15th. “Bulletin for Industry”. | min A has been synthetisized by | s¢ that within 1 hour they start draining
the parish of St. Lucy. The total number of livestock month, and requests made for OMe application for registration This advice, although directed primarily to British | *¢ve™@! methods,” the department | jitet ogity “a wate tom

Sugar Cane. The young cane at the Stations at the end of July small quantities of selected cor “48 received from a consumers’ sdrtersy i& Of g en rere ce ee ern Be The procedures are much | the Your is then clear, You
crop in the majority of the dis- Was 117, comprising stud animals, seed, This seed will be collectea Society in St. Michael. sis exporters, is of great importance to the British West Indices | {6,6 difficult than those involved | telax. You look and feel years .
tricts of the island is in good con- cattle, pigs, goats, sheep and from all over the island, bulked, Veins coteiceren. Anoilet bovany,. a8 well, for two reasons: » (1) Because prosperity of the | in the manufacture of vitamin D, Be sure to insist en Dodd's Kiddy Pil,
dition and is tillering well, The equines. Three hundred and planted out at Codrington and we ee eS ene vital B.W.I-Canadian trade largely depends upon the / but they have been accomplished. the gags gerd for over =
crop in the northern and some forty-seven gallons of milk were mass seleeted when ripe. In two pending its application for tegis- â„¢aititenance of a satisfactory balance of trade between} The net result is that interest in aoe natal =
coastal areas is showing signs of Produced, 8 head of livestock or three y it j 8 Pplic . fans = aia! i iis is iy | eure Only 2/- at all drug stores. 422
coat Sees ee nee te ae iree years, it is hoped that a tration, has submitted its draft Canada and the U.K.; and (2) Because the West Indian; Vitamin A in fish oils is greatly

wilted appearance.

st p ’ * 3 There are vast o tunities fo

Tor thy past 23 seosons the Stations were a follows:—bulls munity Observance Of Co-operators opportunities for |
© | eae 5 the export of goods of all kinds -

fiona Rave copefice with ts boars 4, taking otal ot $8 pining GROPETAMM wy, cy. The Corpor, Dey cacys- (CAMs cutee etter: Chauffeur’s Inquest,
Department in voluntarily furnish- for the month. operative Officer attended 1¢ tions, sponsored this year by the now the fourth largest importer |

ing crop yield returns giving the
acreages and tonnages of cane
harvested during the season, This
year returns have been received
covering an acreage of 32,003.29

acres, out of a total of 36,239.63 bred so far this year to 368,177,- meetings of societies in process of § "Canada’s population has in- mans, St. Michael, was further THE ¢
acres papas. ‘by plantations of Boe eon’ Bumber liberated to formation. In addition, the Co- dis tat tee ou ee Saree iat hae Tae ere Since adjourned by His Worship Mr. | TRUCK & BUS TYRE THAT WAS
more than ten acres. Telthal walk 48 Saka dnevection operative Officer attended a meet- tion, The six co-operative socie- ; E McLeod, until Monday.

The average tonnage of cane

er f and experimental plot work was - ties represented at the celebra- of living of her people has increas- “A” Police C

for “all Sune Seine cant carried out during the month. Geanenstien Wiaiteetin watches, tions presented reports on their ed by more than half. The vol- Cecil Hope died some hours | Sixty years of leadership in tyre-making have taught Dunlop
mitted returns was 33.88 tons, the " Food Crops a meeting convensd for the eee ahh wethudae Mi, ume oe yo imports has after he was taken to the General | that thete is no standing still—even the most successful pre
average for 1951 was 40.17 tons, Spraying of sweet potato fields purpose of presenting the gether, the function produced a aoe een ra an eeeee Hospital on August 3. Fi be Derraged. That ‘ pes whe has been dome to the Dunlop
The recovery for 1952 was slight- at Codrington was carried out for certificate of registration to the most stimulating effect on all those jmports. f e ryre. Dunlop Getigters have developed trom

ly better than that for 1951, be-

: 5 a cree : 3
ing 8.98 tons of cane per ton of present cost per acre of spraying. ducers’ and Marketing Society; The propaganda effect of the What are the prospects of in- Barbados Scouts wt FOR rae? tn ab ok PY We Dag Re sn Re cele: one teeny
sugar as compared with 9.01 for A new form of wettable lead and the Co-operators’ Day cele- Co-operators’ Day celebrations creasing U.K, exports to Canada’ Vr mae dated didescy, bate re
1951, arsenate without molasses was brations which were held during has resulted in renewed enthusi- Says the Treasury: “Supplies and Reach Grenada mi A % ms are
Peasant Agriculture found preferable to ordinary lead the month. asm among existing societies and delivery dates of capital goods AM 4, =

The main food crops generally ®rsenate used with molasses as a At a well attended meeting applications for assistance in the should improve with the cuts in (From Our Own Correspondent) — | ) §
have germinated well and are ‘sticker. : . convened in Hillaby, St. Andrew, establishing of new groups. home investment, the higher GRENADA. Aug. 19. S 2
making satisfactory progress. Examinations made in an area 5 d

Peasants have planted more food

P , : : E tities of steel that are in prospect. . "

crops this year than last year, 294 their larvae were prevalent D a party of eighteen Barbados |

bapetilitio: aay 2° failed to show any parasitism of But none of these factors will help goouts w ‘a > campi at!
D y eet potatoes, Indian these larvae by Apanteles glomer- couts who are now camping at

corn, peas and beans. Good crops
of beans were reaped during the
month. The supply of this pro-
duct reaching the market from
peasants’ gardens was consider-
ably augmented by good “catch”
crops produced on a field scale
by peasants as well as estates.
Other vegetables were in moderate
supply,

Both plant and ratoon canes,
especially in the sea-coast areas
of Christ Church, St. Philip and
St. Lucy, are in need ef rain.

A large number of peasants’
plots has been planted to cotton
in the St. Philip area. The crop
has germinated very well,

A few plots of groundnuts have
been planted, mainly in St. Philip
and St. Lucy. THese are making
satisfactory progress.

Coeonuts, mangoes and bread-
fruit were in good supply during
the month. Other fruits avail-
able included limes, papaws and

special arrangements have to be Faire” that the Y.M.C.A. was rison College and I would like to basa. on the-aide AUGUST 21, 1982
a few pears. made with plantations in order to founded, largely by the efforts of place on record our a preciation of Aan. ad £m ett tee 4 Selling = - NEW YORK Buying
Pests And Diseases secure the necessary mechanical Mr. George Williams, in the mid- of the great service this gentle- Canada’s economy has developed 73 9/10% Pr Cheauae Fae teen he
equipment required, and to fit dle of the “Hungry Forties.” man is giving the “Y”. along lines very similar to her Sight or

Green leaf hoppers i beans treatment in with prevailing | Its ideal, which it imparted to Finan neighbour's. Many Canadian tech- ,., . so. Severe eonntae: Bh) AAD F
and leaf-spotting fungi in toma- Weather conditions, its offshoot in Barbados some 35 ce niclans are American-trained and 77 9/\00 br Garrency 90 ijio% P
toes were among the chief pests Six inspections and treatments years later, was to fulfil the social On referring to Revenue and Qivineering standards and practice Coupons 69 4/10% P
reported attacking peasants’ crops. of Government buildings and four needs of "Young Men in accord- sapepdiore Account page St are similar. American films, radio 0% Pr Silver 20% Pr
The Peasant Agricultural In- of private buildings and ware- ance with Christian principles. It be seen that our gross = programmes and magazines have OAMADA |
structors. continue to advocate houses were carried out in July. is because the initial “C” is so from the Buffet Account for the aq @ marked influence on the gp 3/10) Pr Cheques on
control measures Examinations of cane fields for vital.a part of the whole group year 1952 amounts to $22,152.33 tastes and habits of the Canadian Bonkers 78 6/10% P

ia naetee be iach green wood ants were also carried out “Y.M.C.A.” that he was disap- 48 against 1951 $13,595.40. On se consumer, ols Demand Dratts % 18% Pr |
fodder was in short supply in at four plantations. pointed to read in the Annual Re- debit side of this account it wi “But the dice are by no means 4) 4)j)/ py cone peat Onpete end Dtetrtbatere throughout the Wortd

at y .distes Geta te port that so small a proportion of be seen that it ectually tales in a1) loaded against us,” the article 79 g/10% Mm Currency 77 i/10%o Pr cue
feed, bowed ae ia Rae OGnae. Botanical the members of the Barbados the vicinity of $12,000.00 a year goes on. “U.K. goods gent to... Coupons 84/10 Pr ECKSTEIN BROS — BAY STREET

The Peasant ‘Agcicuttutal *2- First year seedling nursery and ¥-M.C.A, participates in the spir- to run the “Y”, it is also to be Western Canada via the Panama)” ?! Silver 20% Pr B E

structors visited 926 peasant
holdings and 84 school gardens
during the month. Eleven mango
trees were top-worked.

Members of the extension staff
assisted the Co-operative Officer



at 12 meetings of co-operative
groups held in July.

During the month the Plant
Diseases Inspector and the acting
Senior Peasant Agricultural In-

Stud services paid for at the

The number of moth borer egg
parasites bred in June was
57,630,000 and the number dis-
tributed to the planters was
50,429,274. This brings the total

pest control and to determine

where cabbage white butterflies

atus though this introduced para-
site had been found in this area
for the last three years and it was
hoped that this parasite had be-
come effectively established.
Further evidence of damage to
ratoons by root borer Diaprepes
and root mealy bug Neorhizoecus
was obtained during July. More
field experiments were laid down
on plantations during the month
and from experience gained some

changes in method and rate of

application of the gamma isomer
of B.H.C. will be necessary in the
future.

Owing to the necessity of fitting
in this soil treatment with normal
plantation routine, and avoiding
where possible, treating fields
which are to be planted in “pro-
visions” or which are to be
“thrown out”, the scope for ex-
perimental soil treatment is not
only very limited each year, but

multiplication plots. Due’ to a
shortage of rainfall during the
month, thése plots received two
applications of irrigation wate
They continue to make satisfac-
tory growth. .







NT 1 £ 0 v ? 1 ‘ : A major research programme have Pyorrhea, Trench Mouth
i$ HE Vi W LOWER cee? tute trace Came = has been launched by fishery ny Pee pawl



better strain of seed will be avail-

able fer use by the planting com-

general meetings of co-operative
groups; 8 of these were meetings
of registered societies, 4 were
meetings of established but un-
registered groups, and 2 were

ing of the committee of manage-

Sayes Court Co-operative Pro-



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

JULY RAINFALL WAS BELOW AVERAGE
Cane Crop In — IR alee deed
Good Condition

THE GAMBULLS

TIDY







Bvti





by-laws for consideration.

Shamrock Credit Union, took place
at Queen’s Park on Saturday, July
19th. The arrangements for the
c@lebrations were excellent and
the attendance satisfactory. Mr.
D, A. Wiles, Assistant Colonial

who attended.

Importance Of
Spiritual Section

Of YMCA Stressed

THAT the spiritual section of the Young Men’s Chris-
tian Association is the lifeline of the whole movement, was
one of the points stressed by the Hon, R. N. Turner, B.A.,
Colonial Secretary when he spoke to members of the
Y.M.C.A. yesterday afternoon at their Seventy-second
Annual General Meeting of which he was Chairman.

He went on to say that gradu-
ally during the first half of the
Nineteenth Century the conscience
of England was stirring against
the evils attendant on the Indus-
trial Revolution, and it was as a
part of the growing reaction
against the abuses of “Laissez-

itual section of the Associations’
activities. It is the lifeline of the
whole Movement,

Secretary’s Work
The community is apt to take
the manifold activities of the As-
sociation for granted and to over-

why our Membership should not
be increased to 1,000,

During the current year the
Extra-Mural Department books
have been housed in our Library
and Mr. R, C. Murty has kindly
consented to be our Librarian. Mr.
Murty is a Physic Master at Har-

seen on the credit side that of this
sum only $1,726.22 is received
from Members for Sybscriptions,
the balance being obtained from
various other sources. I specially

make mention of this as it goes

to show the necessity for increased
Membershi

colonies must also build up #

in the world and exporters who
gain a firm foothold now in this
market will find it a valuable one
in years to come,

tion has double®’ The standard

priority now peod axen to dollar

exports, and the increased quan-

if British prices are uncompeti-
tive.”

It points out that there are some
powerful forces working agains!
the entry of British goods into
Canada, but at the same time there
are also some strong favourable
factors.

Capital From U.K.

“Up to 1914,” the Treasury ar-
ticle continues, “Britain provided
most of the capital which flowed
into Canada from outside, but two
world wars cost us much of this
investment and heavily reduced
the flow of new capital,

“It is estimated that by 1950
American investments in Cana-
dian business were about three
times those held by Britain. This
affects our visible exports to Can-
ada as well as our invisible in-
come, for an American-controlled
company is naturally inclined to
‘buy American.’ "

Canal often have the advantage
over U.S. (and even Canadian)
products sent from the Eastern
manufacturing areas by rail.
Many British goods enjoy a tariff
preference also.

“There are powerful Canadian



HOLIDAY HERE
WE'VE TAKEN

2ALOW CG

ya

heir direct exports to Canada.



Again Adjourned

The inquest into the circum-
stances surrounding the death of
Cecil Hope, a chauffeur of Jack-

August 25, at 10 a.m. at District



ARRIVING by the “Lady Nel-
son” last Sunday afternoon were

Tanteen, They widen the repre-
sentation of West Indians to whom
Grenada is now host—Y.W.C.A
girls from British Guiana, Trini-
dad and St. Vincent lady netball-
ers, two Trinidad groups of Scouts
and a Tobago cricket team.



£5 FOR OVERLOADING

Deighton Howard, conductor,
was fined yesterday by His Wor-
ship Mr. G. B, Griffith, Acting

Police Magistrate of District “A’*|

£5 and 1/- costs, payable by
monthly instalments, or 2 months’
imprisonment, for overloading
the bus J.129 along Roebuck
Street on July 16th.

Howard has 12
victions.

previous



RATES OF EXCHANGE

con- |

New Research |

On Fish Oils |

By JOHN E. BIRD
OTTAWA

scientists to find new commercial
| products in fish oils, following the |
| near-complete loss of the indus-
tyw’s market of oils for thelr |
| vitamin content,

The market for oils containing
| vitamin A and D has practically
| disapp@aréed becausé both vitamins
now can be produced synthetically
at less cost. Produetion reached
|its peak in 1944 and netted
| Canadian fishermen nearly $3,500,
000,
The research programme was

started in an effort to leart
| whether any other products in the
| fish oils could be marketec com-

diminished,” —B.U.P

ALREADY MORE POPULAR THAN ANY OTHER

this fine basic pattern

}

Pt rant









Improved 4



PAGE THREE

Jeeth Loose

Loose Teeth mean that

Sore Mouth and
ou may

or cause
out and y
matism

your
ma: cause
the
pac

wey kage.
from your chemist t len

maranteé protects you



a ‘tyre that is entirely NEW and

exporting interests which see in|
an increase of British exports tc
Canada the only hope of reviving |
the pre-war volume of sales to}
Britain, There is the ready sym- |
pathy of a country where every |
other person is of British birth or!
ancestry—not that this will over-|
come uncompetitive prices or de-|
livery dates. |

“Finally, if U.K, exporters suf-
fered virtual exclusion from the
Canadian market during the war
they were at least partly compen-
sated by Canadian restrictions on
imports from the U.S. between
1947 and 1950, But Canada har
been able to lift these restrictions
thanks to a big increase in her
exports to the U;S. and to the in-
flow of U.S. investment funds.”

B.U.P

I will now refer you to the Bal-
ance Sheet page 12. It will be
seen on the credit side that addi-
tions to Building during the year
under review have cost $17,497.69.
To enable us to pay our bills we
have found it necessary to ar-
range with Barclays Bank to give
us a temporary Overdraft which
at present stands at $8,651.46.

look the immense amount of un-
obtrusive work that has to be put
in by the General Secretary and
the Board of Directors if those
activities are to be succ
carried out.

As a Government servant he
can say for certain that their
efforts are genuinely appreciated
by the ratings of Her Majesty's
Ships which visit Barbados from
time to time, and the Harbour and
Shipping Master told him that he
would not know where he would
turn if the Association were to
cease keeping “open house” for
seafaring men who, for one reas-
;on or another, are temporarily
‘paruate in Barbados,

He thought that the Barbados
|Â¥.M.C.A. is singularly fortunate
in having such a selfless and en-
| terprising General Secretary as
Captain H. H. Williams, worthy
namesake oi the chief founder of
the Movement, who never spares
himself in his efforts to make

BE A PROUD OWNER



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RU THAT PAIN

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Aches and Pains so quickly that
it seems almost like magic. You
can feel its cooling, soothing touch
begin at once to ease the painful
throb. Aad * Mentholatum ’ is so
easy to use. You just RUB IT
ON. Rub it where the Pain is and
the Pain goes. That is all you have
to do to bring immediate relief
from Aches and'Pains. The sooner



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Mortgages
















The present Mortgages against
our property amount to $11,040.00.
Against this the book value of our
ore stands at $61,397.41. It is

intention of your Directors to
raise an increase Mortgage to en-
able us to pay off our Bank Loan
and extend our Hostel accommo-
dation, but before doing so efforts
are being made to get financial
assistance.



A considerable sum was spent
in levelling your’ grounds but this
is only the first step in preparing
Cricket and Football

After the report was presented,
it was adopted by Mr. J. Brome.
A vote of thanks was moved by



: , proper '

you get ‘Mentholatum’” the other people happy. didune, 1 ito M ¢ Mr, John Beckles, M.B.E. and a
sooner you will get relief, “gag 2 wished the YMCA. the Sround. I appeal to, b cre tenal Teply was given by Mr. O, A. Pil-
get a jar or tin to-day. It is the
finest Rub ever made,

GET QUICK
ELIEF

best of fortune for the fttute and
hope that its dreams of expansion
come true.

| Col. Sec. Welcomed

interest in this work, If Members #"!â„¢-

would realise what can be achiev-
ed if everyone would do his bit
in a short while we would have
a Cricket and Football Field
ba would be a credit to the

Appointed Auditor

Mr, Frances nm. Fite was again
appointed Auditor and this ap-
pointment was moved by Mr. E. C.
Hewitt and seconded by Mr,
Campbell. i

Another vote of thanks was
moved by Rev. A. E, Armstrong,
M.A. who said that very few
mernbers really realised what al
privilege they have in being mem-
bers of the Y.M.C.A. He said that
they are part of a brotherhood in
all parts of the world and all sorts
of denominations,

The Hon, R. N. Turner was
welcomed to the Chair by Mr. A.
'Del. Inniss, President of the
Y.M.C.A. who said that it was a
pleasure and honour for them to
j have him as Chairman of the
Meeting. ‘

The minutes of the Seventy-
first Meeting were read by Au.
H. H. Williams, Secretary of the
Association, and the President of
the Association, Mr. A. DeL. In-
niss, presented the Annual Report
and Financial Statement.

Mr, Inniss then referred briefly
to certain iterns on the report.
| He said:
| The Membership this year as
| will be seen by the Report is 657

Naval Work

Since the closing down of the
Admiral Grant Sailors’ Rest in
1946 the Harbour Master and
steamship Agents look to the As-
sociation for housing men of the
Royal Navy and Merchant Marine
who are awaiting transportation
to their destinations.

A General Meeting is being held
on 28th August, ai 4.30 p.c:. when
Members will be asked to nom-
inate Members for Committees
etc. to serve on various branches
of the work of the Association. At





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He has seen the progress of the
Y.MLC.A. in the island and the
AssOtiation hag made two move-
ments and everytime a movement
was made it was for the good of
the community.









|
. n; , jas against 618 in the previous this Meeting an opportunity will 1 >| ; ‘ alii
(Est. 1889) Slough, England. lyear. Now that we have a new be given Members to por any They must realise that the spir-| YOUR DEALERS
Hostel and are in a position to do points they may desire in con- jtual side is the lifeline of the
more extensive development I nection with the future of the Y.M.C.A. and he was disappoint-
must appeal to Members to do Association, I sincerely trust that ed to see how small was the mem- DIAL 4284 n ‘
ev ing possible to canvas Members will turn out and that bership in this section. He hoped{
their friends to join the Associa- the discussion which will take that more young men would join|
tion, if they do so I see no reason place will produce useful results.” that section, a SSS









PAGE FOUR

BARBADOS ea ADYOCAT
fivw Sue eee es ee wee Bg.
Printed by the Advecate Co., Lté., Brow #1. Bridsetewn

econ

Come Along To 1 The_Ends |
| Of The Earth Club

Friday, August 22, 1952

Appeal For Beauty

THIS month the Times of London pub-
lished a picture of a small pre-fabricated
house and garden which had won a prize
presented by local branch of the
Women’s Voluntary Service somewhere in
England.

Not long ago this newspaper suggested
that associations especially interested in
promoting the tourist trade of Barbados
ought to offer prizes for the best kept
wayside gardens in city or parish.

Barbados is fortunate in possessing a
fair number of garden lovers and even in
the heart of the City opposite the most
untidy looking premises flowers can be
seen by the observant passer-by.

But the love of flowers is not so wide-
spread that it conceals the unloveliness
of many Barbadian huts and homes.

There is ample opportunity for the
encouragement of gardens in Barbados as
there is for the encouragement of beauty
altogether.

Yet too often those who ought to be in
the vanguard encouraging beauty are the -
first to stifle its birth. Only quite recent-
ly two instances of the readiness to extin-
guish some of the little local beauty we
have may have been noticed by the watch-
ful.

The Fire Officer in a report on the Bar-
badian Fire Brigade for the period 1st
January to 3lst December 1951 selected
Jubilee Gardens as “the most promising
site” for a Bridgetown Fire Station. And
the Fountain in Trafalgar Square has
been turned off only a short period after
the decision to keep it playing for the
benefit of all who visit Bridgetown on
weekdays. No one would suggest that
the Fire Officer or the officials responsi-
ble for turning off the fountain in Trafal-
gar Square were consciously ‘expressing
disapproval of efforts to beautify the capi-
tal city of the island, but the fact remains
that consideration of beauty does not
appear to rate very highly in Barbados
as against questions of utility.

Government which through its political
and official representatives boasts fre-
quently of progress which is claimed to
have been made in many fields during the
past decade shows remarkable lack of;
support for any suggestions designed to
promote beauty and to preserve what
earlier generations enjoyed with respect to
open spaces, parks and noble buildings.

The lessons which ought to have been
learnt from the experiences of other coun-
tries whose uncontrolled building and
freedom of design has been permitted by
indifferent governments have not been
learnt in Barbados,

Daily buildings continue to be made more
permanent along the sea coasts of the
island, although the authorities in Barba-
dos must realise the harm which is being
thereby done to the iSland’s tourist attrac-
tions not to mention the suppression of
natural amenities available to the Barba-
dian public.

On the St. James Coast it has been left
almost exclusively to the private propri-
etors of lands which once were principally
composed of sand, crab holes and sea bush
to demonstrate how beauty can be attract-
éd to the very borders of the sea-shore.
Well-tended gardens, groves of flowering
trees and above all, shade-producing trees
have been planted; wateréd and encourag-
ed by private persons, Whereas the major-
ity of typically Barbadian coastal houses
look ragged and unkept by comparison.

At Holetown especially where for tradi-
tional reasons it might have been thought
that a special effort might have been made
to erect_a_model-village, the primitiveness
of the Barbadian hovel is exposed for all
to see.

By pleasant contrast certain of the
modern government-built houses at the
Pine are surrounded with gardens and can
compare favourably with housing estates
of similar size m most modern countries.
In Bay Street on the other hand the im-
pression which is gained by the observant
passer-by is that the rate of erection of
walls and wall houses exceeds the plant-
ing’ of flowering or shade trees on the
Government Bay Estate,

Barbados still possesses many unspoilt
natural beauties: there remain in the
island much that have been built by earlier
and more recent generations: efforts con-
tinue to be made by individual lovers of
beauty and by organisations like the Civic
Circle to promote beauty in all its forms.

But the priority of treatment which
beauty receives in an island so small as
this, which is being built upon as rapidly
as this, is inadequate to prevent serious
deterioration of the legacy of beauty which
belongs not only to our generation but to
millions of Barbadians yet unborn. Unless
greater popular support is forthcoming
from those who champion beauty and
unless officials, government and commer-
cial circles give greater assistance than is

a

now being given to the small circle of those
engaged in promoting and .- preserving
beauty much of the little beauty which
remains to us willbe lost.

| some



It was a remarkable evening
and we were a pretty distinguish-
jed gathering. If there was no
jone from the Court, there were
jplenty from the camp and the
jsenate. Admirals, generals, peers,
and Ministers of State crowded
the banquet hall,
| Let me commend the Ends of
jthe Earth Club which exists to
|promote Anglo-American friend-
|ship and only dines when it has
guest it wants to hear,
which means about once a year.
Having belonged to it for some
25 years I was much pleased to



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

By Weverley Baxter

tremendous personality with one

f the finest military minds of
this century.

The general dealt only with the
military situation in Europe, leav-
ing politics to the politicians, A
boy could have grasped it, a
field-marshal could have learned
from it. Never have I seen the
power of incisive clarity more
ably demonstrated.

* * 4

What he said is off the record,

discover on the list of guests that 4nd must be so, but I assure you

I am a member of the committee.
One-Man Show
The odd thing is that I have

|never attended a committee meet-

ing or been notified of such an
event, which is admirable.

The club is, in fact, a one-man
show, The guiding and control-
ling spirit is Colonel Johnny

Dodge, the American-born Briton
| who is a cousin of Mr. Churchili

oy marriage, who commanded
his battalion at 22 years of age in
the first war, who fought again
in the last war and is ready for



the next.
+ * *

| He is perhaps the most eminent
jail-bird of my acquaintance. In
1919 he made a friendly visit to
Russia and was imprisoned for
| his pains, but escaped. In 1940
}he was captured by the Germans
and helped to organise the tragic
breakout of the airmen who were
\so brutally shot. He is, in fact,





the reincarnation of Dumas’
/Porthos in “The Three Mus-
| ceteers.”

|

|

‘AV Speaks

But now I must introduce to
you the star turn of this “hush-
jush” dinner — ‘Al’ Gruenther,

xtherwise General Gruenther,
Chief of staff of the Allied Forces
in Europe.

“Al”? wore no medals or dec-
yrations at the dinner. Instead
of speaking from the top table
ne did so from the bottom table
and put aside the microphone,
Qn first appearance he looked
ike a shortish, ordinary, efficient
juarter-master-sergeant who had
won his commission by slogging
horoughness, but when he had
finished speaking he seemed a
|

|



|
;
| ON ISTANBUL-ANKARA _

| @ld :von Papen is at it again.
l(t is just 12% years ago that I
‘limbed on to this train to travel
up to Ankara to report what this
iblest and most polished of Hit-
ler’'s agents was plotting against
us in his new~Trole as Hitler’s
ambassador to Turkey.

Here I am now on my way up
to Ankara once more on a very
different mission, But lo! von
Papen is with me again,

As the last glimpses
3ea of Marmara flash by my
window T am studying the old
| ntriguer’s last sting — his
nemoirs.*

Although the book is not being
oublished in Britain until tomor-
cow it is already selling fast here.

The most poisonous sting is for
Sir Hughe Knatchbull-Hugessen,
Papen’s’ British) adversary in
Turkey. With a superb show of
jog-don’t-bite-dog chivalry Papen
‘ells how unwilling he was to
nave the ‘story told of how a
Serman agent removed a_ safe
cey from the sleeping ambassa-
dys ‘trouser pocket and then
shotographed top secret docu-
nents in this safe.

“f wanted to spare (him) any
»mbarrassment,”’

Censorship?

HE tried to “have the Operation
cicero manuscript suppressed.”
‘How? Does this mean Ger-
yany’s former espionage service
till has a_ security censorship
yver its members?)

“However,” says Papen, tears
rickling down his honest old
cheeks, “as Moyzisch agreed to
ubmit his manuscript to me, I
yas able to prove to my satis-
action that he had described the
as2 with complete fairness,”
Then he really sets to work.
‘What I do reject most emphati-
ally is Moyzisch’s assertion in
1is book that practically no use
vas made of the information ob-
; ained. During the period of the
“oreign Ministers’ meetings in
“oscow, of the Teheran and Cairo
tonferences, and, indeed, right
tp to February 1944, the flow of
icero’s information was of price-
‘ess. value.”

Cicero says Papen, kept the
yerman Government fully in-
crmed of the Moscow decision
o compel Turkey to declare war
yy the end of 1943, of Cairo con-
rersations between the Turkish
vesident, Churchill and Roose-
velt.

of the







Our Readers Say

The Middle Class

fo the Editor, The Advocate;

SIR,—When the present Gov-
ernment was climbing into power,
it promised great things for every-
body. and more or less ‘everybody
helped. It was |feit then that
every mother’s son would be given
a fair break, Performance is not
matching up to this promise, If
you have any doubt ask the Mid-
dle Class—not one section of it.

Who are the Middle Class? The

!
I am well aware that the Middle
Class has been its greatest enemy,
They took a leaf from Spartan or
Spartan took a leaf from them.
Let us forgive. Today Innocent
and Guilty are suffering alike,
and as Sir Herbert used to say—
it's better that 99 Guilty should
escape than that, one Innocent
should suffer.

The cost of living is higher in
this little island —I am merely
stating a fact—than, I-believe, in
any other British Caribbean poss-
ession, nearly as high as in Bermu-
In British Guiana beef stili sells
at thirty-six cents a pound, Brit-

ish Guiana is, not a tourist resort
although tourists love to visit far-
famed Eldorado

Barbados is q three-legged stool

sleep and
there is no harm in quoting these



- Shatter The Lies

old Papen right—and I have ha
nseamcilalinenteaaeY tenets: vi

it was no lullaby to waft us to
Sweet dreams, But

three aphorisms since they belong
to the realm of philosophy and

cannot aid the potential enemy —

“War is a continued succession

of mistakes.”

“Clemenceau said that war is

too dangerous to leave to the

generals.”

“There are two kinds of gen-
+ erals—those I would like to fight
with and those I would like to
fight against.”

Marshal of the R.A.F. Lord
Tedder, Colonial Secretary Oliver
Lyttelton, and Lord Swinton all
seemed to be speaking with En-
glish accents, so tuned did our
ears become to the resonant
quality of our guest's voice,

A remarkable night! “As a mem-
ber of the committee I look for-
ward to hearing when the next
dinner will take place,

Magic Beat
I am delighted to learn that
the young Italian conductor

Signor Cantelli is coming to con-
duct six concerts at the Festival
Hall. Hardly out of his twenties
he is in the first three of the
world’s great conductors and will
almost assuredly become the first.
Of all human activities open

to the male of the species the
conducting of an orchestra
the most exhibitionist, He has
to be a first-rate actor since he

must visually interpret the
drama of the composition. He
has to be a ballet dancer so

that his movements can convey
both to the audience and. the
orchestra the rhythmic poetry
of the music. He must also be
a complete disciplinarian so

Valet-spy!

THE SPY CICERO, played by
James Mason in the film, ‘Five
Fingers,’ gave D-Day secrets to
Hitler’s agent, Papen. Were the
British fooled?

To-day, Papen tells his story,
SEFTON DELMER demands @
sequel—



One Threat
He quotes telegrams verbatim,

giving their numbers, And he
says:—
“We also learned that the

possibility of an Allied attack on
the Balkans through Salonika
could be ruled out. The Supreme
Command now realised that the
only real threat with which it
had to contend. was the invasion
of Fravcée. . .°«

“We were thus able to appre-
eiate the intentions of our ene-
mies in a way that can hardly
have a parallel in military his-
tory.”

Now this allegation of Papen’s
is*going to have considerable re-
percussions in the United States,
particularly in the isolationist
camp, which is always accusing
the British of hopeless incompe-;

tence and insecurity, and ureinel) ary of this society he and his

the President not to share secrets
with such allies,

This I believe is exactly what
Papen wants—to discredit the
British in American eyes.

The whole book tends to repre-
sent Germans, and particularly
Papen, as good Europeans whose
noble attempts at European un-
derstanding and unification have
been. constantly frustrated by
Britain’s “divide and rule” pol-
icy.

He accuses Britain of having
made the 1914 war inevitable by
her alliance with Russia, He says
that ‘when he was. on the fringe
of a wide understanding with
France in 1932, Ramsay MacDon-
ald stepped in and stopped it.

He says that in 1940 Sir Staf-
ford Cripps in Moscow offered
Molotov the Dardanelles and a
free hand in the Balkans—at the
expense of our Turkish and
Balkan allies—if Russia would
come in against Germany.

He says Churchill’s famous
plan for invading the Balkans in
1944, far from keeping the Rus-
sians out would inevitably have
brought them in.

‘Only Allies’
All stuff designed, if I read my

~~Top, Middle and Bottom.
the present time government is
trying hard to get the stool to
stand on two legs. Once Barbados
tried to get the stool to stand on
one leg. Both in.possible tasks!
No one class has a brain monopoly,
Why stand ye there idle, Middle
Class!

Make no mistake, every man in
this country has a tight’ to live.
(Some of us are not living.) I be-
lieve that everybody more or less
believes this nowadays. The few
that don’t—let us spew them out
of our mouths. Those few must
have originated in the darkest
part of the world, South Africa,
they or their forebearers. Remem-
ber, Sir Conrad fought for all.

Cc. B. ROCK,
“Rockcerest,” Oistin Hill.

Confusing
-
To the Editor, The Advocate;

SIR,—The letter entitled
day Advocate in your

Sun-
paper on

Wednesday by the Rev, M. L. M.
Denington seems to be most con-
fusing. If ‘y the letter the Rey.
Gent'eman meant criticism, only
he can understand it.

i arn the last to say that all is
well with the way the Advocate
presents its ne I surely,
the Advocate a the same

lopted

is

About The

Baier

At confusing attitude

that his players fear him,
Above all he must be able
to seize the moment when, by
his magnetism, he inspires the
orchestra to play better than
it can,
s *

When Cantelli comes here there
will be many conductors in the
audience asKing “What has he
got that I haven't?” That question
is as old a$ the caves when the
first two blondes met face to face.

e Call

I have before me a _ postcard
which shows a Carthusian mon-
astery set in a lovely Sussex
countryside, Those who enter it
never see the outside world again.

He was a handsome young Aus-
tralian priest and last winter in
the Austrian village of Lech he
joined in the ski-ing and the
general fun of a snow-bound
holiday. He was full of gaiety
and life, and was the most pop-
ular visitor in that district. In
this farewell postcard from the
monastery he writes to my
family :

“It is true that contact in

the world can influence for],

good, but after 13 years as a
priest Il am more than sure
vhat much More can be done by
prayer, This is a life of prayer,
work, and penance consisting
of night vigils, etc, Many of
the men here and in these
monasteries in Europe are of
the same conviction after hav-
ing held very high office in the

world . . . This farewell card
must be my last carrespou-
dence. Good-bye. When you

are asleep between 12 and 2
aim. I may say a prayer for
you sometimes. Please do the
same for me. Good-bye, Good
luck.” j

IT is a moving story, not

without pity, and yet one won-
ders why. the prayers of a man
withdrawn from the world should
be placed above those who fight
the battle of existence in the
open,

There are mysteries of the
human spirit which defy fogic.
He had so much to give to the
world from which he has wito-
drawn.

—LES.

many years of experience of his
methods—to prove to the Ameri-
cans that the only really com-
petent, reliable, and truly anti-
Communist allies for them in
Europe are the Germans:

What I admire particularly in
this smooth mixture of truth,
falsehood, surprise revelations,
and distortion is the way in which
Papen tries to rid himself of all
complicity in Hitler’s advent to
power.

Papen pictures Papen as the
perfect, gentle Knight who tag-
ged along with Hitler from a
high sense of duty to Germany.
Europe, and Western civilization
in order to exercise a_restrain-
ing influence on the mad _ prole-
tarian dictator.

Never once a picture of Papen
the ambitious baron, who haying
tasted power wanted to stay
with it,

As evidence of his devotion to
Western civilisation Papen men-
tions that he was in 1929 “in-
strumental in founding the As-
sociation for the Maintenance of
Western Culture.” What he does
‘not mention was that As secre-
riends appointed one Werner
von Alvensleben,

A Boast

The day after Hitler had seiz-
ed power this same Alvensleben,
sitting in the offices of the asso-
ciation which Papen had found-
ed, boasted to me how it was he
who had put Hitler into power,
“It was I who spread the story
that Schleicher had ordered tht
Potsdam garrison to march on
Berlin, a story which rushed
Hindenburg into making Hitler
Chancellor.”

Look it up in the
cuttings, Herr von
Papen.

May I also give a word of ad-
vice to Sir Hughe and the For-
eign Office? From what I have
heard about Operation Cicero
here in Turkey and elsewhere,
you have got a shattering reply
to Papen’s accusations,

You may not want to use it
because ‘it involves revealing a
secret, You would rather go down
to history as fools than do that.
I admire this self-sacrifice. But
—snap out of it. Let’s have the
truth. ~ i

* Memoirs of Franz von Papen,
André Deutsch, 25s.

i —L.E.S.

as the Rev.
Gentleman, I would not care to
read it.

L. B. BRATHWAITE.

“‘Ropey”’

To the Editor, The Advocate,

SIR,—I too would like to express
my appreciation of your attempt
to improve your paper,

There are certain features
which I like such as Henry in
the Daily and Sporting Sam in
the Evening Edition,

I do not like the style of Rev.
Mr. Denington, but I do not know
that Hopkinson. is conceited nor
that Hunte is ‘ropey.’

l am a Barbadian and the only
things the term, ‘ropey’ can be
applied to are Corn Pone, Con-
kies and Ginger Beer; and when
they become ropey, even the dog
and the hog pags them up. If
Mr. Denington wants to introduce
some type of English used some-
where in the Leeward Islands,
then let him have a_ special
volume printed at the Advocate
Printery; he seems to think that
this can be easily done, but to
characterise people’s writings as
‘ropey’ to invite your news- |

per libet actions,

SIMPLETON, '



is



with














FRIDAY, AUGUST . 22, 1952

eS eee

SHOPPERS SWITCH OVER | = cagasta._z1gexe, camps
TO LITTLE MEN

$2.28 per Set
By JAMES COOPER

NEW YORK.
THE little trader of America is taking

business from the big department store.
So reports the business management ser-
vice of the University of Illinois, which

decided to find out why.

Teams questioned people in areas served
by five Mid-West stores. Why had they
taken their custom from the big stores to



| PATIENCE PLAYING

} 72c. per Set
»

| ADVOCATE “STATIONERY

eee

eee nnn UU E Enna

CARDS) =>

SEE

Sturdy Bentwood and Hardwood
Chairs in three patterns (one
with Cane Seat ).

teads with or















































the local dress shop and tailor, the shoe without Mattresses
store, and the draper? : or yen

The four’ main answers: ‘1, Too difficult : Ce ree
to park the car near the bigger shops; 2, Cc. S, PITCHER & co.
slow service there; 3, poor sales staff; and : con't
4, higher prices.




Ph, 4472"

IN NEW YORK there has been an epi-
demic of women slapping policemen. Four
have been arrested on this charge in a
week.

ALGER HISS failed tonight in his appeal
for a new trial.

He is the former State Department high
official jailed in 1950 for five years for perjury
because he swore he had not passed secrets
to Communist Whitaker Chambers.

Vital piece of evidence against him was a
battered old typewriter on which it was
alleged that secret documents were copied.
He now said he had evidence it was possible
to fake the typewriter.

But Federal Judge Henry Goddard rules
there is nothing to suggest a jury would now
acquit Hiss,

LAST MONTH has been the hottest July
on record in New York.

But New Yorkers are more worried about}:
a plague of what they call gnats.

Dr. Charles Currac, the insect curator at
the Natural History Museum, explains that
the green insects, less than one tenth of an
inch long are really aphids or plant lice that
grow through several generations before
sprouting wings,

For two days now they have been taking
off in millions. The green clouds are likely to
stop even the city’s baseball games.

WHEN Brooklyn police arrested a cat bur-
glar they found he carried a compass—to
steer back to his escape ladder in darkened
buildings.

UNITED NATIONS delegates are losing
“pin-money” because of the American elec-
tions,

Their agents are not booking them for
lectures for fear that anything they say would.
have political implications.

It is said that the Philippines Ambassador,
Brigadier-General Carlos P. Romulo, will
drop 10,000 dollars (£3,570) this year.

ONLY half the observation posts are so
far manned for the anti-aircraft watch that
was to have begun last Monday. There is a
suspicion that even these are not manned all
the time,

Draperies...

Cretons and Tapestries in large variety—choose from







our new shipment - - - -

FIFTY-ONE Frenchmen, to paraphrase the
saying, can’t all be wrong.

Fifty-one dentists visiting America to study
dental equipment all had the same thing to
say about New York today:—

“Why does everybody rush?”

FOR the first time since pre-war, American
newspaper circulations have fallen.

Increased prices are blamed—35 cents (2s.
6d.) a week for the daily newspaper delivered
at home, and up to 20 cents (1s. 5d.) for the
Sunday newspaper.



Linen and Cotton Sheets and Pillowcases.
Also coloured Linen Sheeting 72” and 90”







Cotton TeaCloths in
Gay Colours With
Napkins to Match «

Da Costa
& O0., Ltd.

THE garden that “grew” in a night kept
American society talking about the wedding
of a British Navy lieutenant and a million-
aire’s daughter.

It was the marriage between Lieutenant
John R. Symonds-Tayler, R.N., of the frigate
Snipe, son of Admiral Sir Richard and Lady
Symonds-Tayler, and 19-year-old Dorothy
Neal.

At the Neal home Chestnut Hill, Massachu-
setts, the night before an army of landscape
artists dug up the trees and turf and staked
down in their stead 4ft. potted Easter lilies,
gladioli, and cedar trees.

Here, in this fabulous background, 400
guests drank champagne and ate caviare and
turkey. F

Lieutenant Symonds-Tayler and his wife
met last autumn when Snipe, accompanying
the cruiser Superb, in which Sir Richard was
then flying his flag, came to Boston for “Brit-
ish Week,” and Miss Neal was a member of
the Debutantes’ Welcoming Committee.

The cost of making the wedding garden
was about £4,260, and now the old garden is
being put back.




















FRE ;
VEGETABLES |

FIRST QUALITY’ MEATS |

AND

Frozen Headeck an
j = k ‘ui Ae
NEWEST hot weather drink: “The chloro-]||_ Gm “Raes PP™ Rabbits
phyll cocktail”—gin and tonic spiced with Sardines saver arin: |
créme de menthe, ° pope Kidneys
IN 90 degree temperatures, New York Pilchards | Act Bhng or
salesmen are gathering to discuss Christmas . Paste Hams a
selling lines, SC Bacon
For Father: 1953 cars with built-in dictat- ENJOY THE FINEST Onened. Bert dose



ing machihes; air coolers for next year’s heat- Gold Braid Rum

FRESH VEGETABLES

wave traffic jams, and tyres in red, yellow, aa a aoe Butter Beans 16c. per tb
blue, green, and—wait for it—chartreuse. BREAD Suet. ent, Sin er” ib
For Mother: New rayons that are com- t

J & R Sandwich
Bread — Fresh
Daily

N. Zealand Cheese
73c. per tb
+ Pkgs. Cheese 44c.

GODDARDS ror SERVICE.

pletely washable.
For daughter: Dolls that walk, not by wind-
ing, but by just taking hold of their hand.
For junior: Guns that fire three different
colours of “paralysing rays.”











tre

FRIDAY, AUGUST 22,

EX-CUSTO

Falsifica

1952



tion Case

Continues Today

DEFENCE COUNSEL, Mr.

E. W. Barrow, cross-exam-

ined Mr, Clayton Thorpe, former Customs Officer in charge

of the Cheapside Rum Bond,

all yesterday, the fourth day’s

hearing of the charge against Keith Squires, a 26-year-old

clerk, for falsifying accounts on or about
year, while an employee of D. V. Scott &

August 31, last
Co., Ltd. Mr.

Justice J. W. B. Chenery adjourned the Court until today
when ctoss-examination of Mr. Thorpe will be continued.
Squires unknow:

used to work at D. V.
Scott’s compartments at Cheapside
when the al offence was
commit

ted.

He ‘is-eharged with having on
or about’ August, 1951, while he
was a clerk or servant of D. V.
— 4, Co. Ltd., with intent to

lefraud, made concurred in

“de filde entry in 2

stock bi to or in
the possession of D, V.
employer, purporting to

show that on August 31, rum vats
1, 2, and 3, the property of D, V.
Scott & Co. Ltd., at Cheapside,
Brid contained respectively
ate 1,380 and 2,820 proof wine

ions.
Mr. Barrow is associated with
ME a pao

ion, C, le, Gen-
eral, and Mr, F, E. Field Assis-
tant to him, are prosecuting for
the Crown.

ents -
Cross-examined, Mr. Thorpe
said about 15 or 16 merchants
= _ var ge A Cheapside, but

or 11 had compartments.
Those without compartments put
their casks of rum in any available
spot, and in some cases, a mer-
chant would allow another wha
did not have a compartment to
use his, There was the possibility
that three merchants could have
rum in the same compartment.
The number of merchants who had
rum “in any compartment would
all have access to the key of the

| particular compartment.

The vats were not locked, Casks
were usually outside compartments
along the corridor, and in such
cases, any! going into the
bond had access to them.

When rum was being: moved
from bond to bond, it was con-
side: to be in Government’s cus-
tody, and a merchant could not,
or should not interfere with it.

With every movement of the rum, y

the casks should be regauged and
ret but this was not always
done, due to the inadequate staff.

Adequate provision was not
placed by the authorities for super-
vising rum. There was supposed
to be a quarterly check, but this
was not always done.

Blen Rum

‘Permission to blend rum used to
be given by him, It was not be-
ing done so now. When the appli-
cation had gone on to the Excise
Department he would sometimes
give permission,

If any officer signed the form
while the blending was going on,
it would be an-inaccurate fecord.
It wad not the duty of a mer-
chant’s clerk to regauge and re-
test casks of rum, but the Gov-
ernment officers’, If a form for
blending was signed without a re-

or a rétesting being done,
a bieach might be said to be com-
mitted,

When he went to the Cheapside
Bond to work in 1950, he found
the books hopelessly in arrears,
and at the time of the alleged
offence, the books were still in
arrears, though not as much, En-
tries which should have been made
were not made. Therefore the
books did not show a true picture
of the state of the bond. Mr.
Scott’s books were also in arrears.
To put it mildly, the Government
books were unreliable. The author-
ities were notified of the in-
adequate staff, but nothing was
done.

A

ugust Returns

When he made a check on the
returns for August, behind Squires
he ‘had discovered that he was in-
accurate, but it could have been
that the figures were accurate to
the best of his knowledge, and
‘tthe rum had been ‘subsequently
stolen. There could be other
reasons.

At one time he discovered that
rum was being. shipped without
application being made to him. As
‘Chief Officer of the bond, he had
the key, but he subsequently dis-
covered that rum was delivered
out of the bond without his know-
ledge, and that there was a dupli-
cate key. With the knowledge
that there was a duplicate key,
he felt that anything was liable
to happen.

Controller of Excise, Mr, King,
had this duplicate key, and ex-
‘plained to him that a merchant
had wanted to ship rum urgently
and had been looking for him,
but he was not at home.

' He had never visited the bond
‘a night with Mr, King,

Gauging and testing was to be
done by Government Officers, and
it was not necessarily the duty of
a merchant’s clerk.

It might happen that casks might

cdtves.
be put by, and might be empty the

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n to the merchant's clerk,
and he would only discover this
when blending operations were to
be commenced. There were sup-
posed to have been 64 casks which
would hold approximately 3,000
gallons of rum but there was the
possibility that they might have
contained none.

He discovered that the rum
was missing as a result of the per-
mit to blend. There should have
been 50 odd casks. Two thousand
wine gallons should have been in
the vat, The rum was not to go
into the vat until it was regauged
and retested, but he did not know
whether the officer had done that.

There had been an _ occasion
when a duplicate, not in the sense
of a carbon copy, permit form,
had been made out. He did not
know whether it was cancelled,
but a duplicate would have meant
that probably two different offi-
cers had signed a form purporting
that a regauging and a retesting
of specific casks had been made.
It would have meant that one had
taken wrong casks or something
of the kind, meanwhile the book
at the Excise Department would
be wrong.

It had been drawn to ‘his atten-
tion that work was being done at
night at country bonds,

When hearing of the case re-
sumes ‘to-day, Mr. Barrow will
continue his cross-examination,



Flour, Glassware
Copra Arrive

Two Steamships, one schooner
and a motor vessel anchored in
Carlisle Bay yesterday morning.
They were the S.S. Alcoa Pegasus,
3,931 tons, from New York, S.S.
Trya, 4,360 tons, from Montreal,
Motor Vessel Daerwood, 94 tons,
from St. Lucia and the Schooner
ary Lewis from British
Guiana,

The Pegasus which is consign-
ed to Robert Thom & Co., Ltd.
rought 1,000 bags of wheat flour,
4 cartons of glassware, 31 bags
of vegetable seeds, four cartons
of tractor parts, 21 cartons of
shoes and 15 cartons of cotton
twine.

Twenty-four bags of starch, 90
bags of copra, 11 bags of peanuts,
and 85 packages of fresh fruit
arrived by the Daerwood under
Capt. Wells while the Mary M.
Lewis brought coals from British
Guiana,

These two vessels are consigned
to the gech er Owners’ Associa-
tion. e Norwegian ship Trya
is now being loaded with cargo.
Her agents are DaCosta & Co., Ltd.

First Boys’ Clubs’
Sports Meeting

Over 100 athletes from the
Boys’ and Girls’ Clubs of the
island will take part in the first
Championship Sports Meeting for
Boys’ and Girls’ Clubs ever to be
held in the island. The meeting
takes place at Kensington Oval
on Monday August 25, starting at
3.00 p.m.

There are 13 Boys’ Clubs, two
Girls’ and one Club which is for
both koys and girls. So far
District C Boys’ Club at St. Philip
has topped the list of entries.
Thirteen boys will represent this
Club.

Of the others, Bay Street Boys’
has entered 12, St. Cecilia Club,
Passage Road 11, District A Club
12, Worthings six, Garden—St.
James 9, Speightstown six, Four
Roads seven, Cliff Cottage eight
and Charnocks Boys eight.

Each of the Girls’ Clubs, Bay
Street, Clevers Hill and Char-
nocks, have submitted four
entries.

A member of the Organising
Committee told the Advocate
yesterday; “A good afternoon’s
sport is anticipated and some
hidden talent will no doubt
come to light.”

The Police Band will be in
attendance.

NO QUORUM

The meeting of the Sanitary
Commissioners of St, Michael,
which should have taken place at
the Parochial Buildings yesterday
afternoon, had to be postponed
until Monday next because there
was no quorum,

Only tages meen ey, 2. M.
Kidney, Chairman, r. 4 .
Mottley, M.C.P., and Mr. Victor
Goddard, were present.

One of the iterns on the agenda
was to appoint a Sub-Sanitary
Inspector.

Members would also have re-
lans and ‘ifications for

ct Market.



SHEETS







MS OFFICER CRO

taney, ee ete

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

SS-EXAMINED

Experiences In The J’ca Hurricane Of 1951

By CLIVE BECKLES,—Co-operative Officer

MR. CLIVE A. E. BECKLES, Co-operative Officer, last
night made the following broadcast over Rediffusion:

When I returned from

Jamaica three days after the

hurricane I gave an account of my experience which was

published in the Barbados Advocate.

Some of my listeners,

therefore, will be famiiiar with much of what I am about

to relate.

It is felt, however, that repeating the story at

this time when the hurricane season is once more upon us
should help to focus publie attention on the serious nature
of these tropical storms, the grave danger they are to life

and property, and the need

caution at this period.

I arrived in Janvaica about 9
days before the hurricane passed
Over the island, and was in
residence at the University College
of the West Indies, where I was
attending a summer school in Co-
operatives, This school ended on
Thursday, August 16, and I was
due to leave for Barbados two
days later, On Friday, 17th, the
hurricane in all its fury struck,
destroying all hope of my leaving
the island on the following day.

The official forecast of the hur-
ricane was accurate, and the
warnings issued as timely as could
be expected. At intervals through-
out the day announcements were
broadcast over Radio Jamaica,
warning the public of the ap-
proaching storm, and advising on
security measures.

Heavy Showers

That fatal Friday morning
opened with very heavy showers
of rain which continued for the
greater part of the morning. By
about 10 a.m. the rain had abated
and the intense heat which had
enveloped St. Andrew and other
low-lying parts of the island for
many days previously, was at its
worst. Everyone sweltered in
the oppressive heat. Masses of
heavy black clouds floated over-~
head.

By about 2 o’clock in the after-
noon most of the business places
in Kingston were closed, and
sensible people headed homeward.
Shortly before sunset an unusual
purplish glow could be seen light-
fing up the otherwise leaden sky.
One seemed to breathe an at-
mosphere of tenseness and ex-
pectancy.

Lights Off
That evening after dinner in
Irvine Hall I went over to the
Nunnery, another collegg building
situated about 150 yards away. I
remained chatting with some of
the lecturers of the University
who occupied quarters there. At
about 8.30 the electric powers was
cut off, As there was no ap-
parent change in the weather, this
did not alarm us. Candles were
produced and the conversation
continued. About half-an-hour
later the rain began to fall and
a strong breeze sprang up. I felt
it was then time to cover the
short distance which separated
the Nunnery from Irvine Hall.
It was pitch dark outside. 1
set off in the darkness for what
I thought was Irvine Hall, I
soon discovered that I was go-
ing in the wrong direction and
tried to retrace my steps. By
that time, what, with the dark -
ness, the gusty wind and the
rain, I had lost all sense of
direction, and as I later dis-
covered, was heading away from
my intended destination. Where
I would have ended up, Provi-
dence only knows. Fortunately
I was saved from disaster by
the lights of an on-coming car,
and was able, panting and
gasping, to reach the Hall. it
was then about 9.15.

An Occasional Lull

for taking every possible pre-








POCKET CARTOON
by OSBERT LANCASTER





“And THIS YEAR we're
adopting the trone system,

_which means that all tips
go into the kitty! See?"

ener semen





seeking to devour everything in
hheir path.

Safest Position

The safest position for my
companion and me was on the
landing of an inner staircase half-
way between the top and bottom
floors. This was in a corner more
or less sheltered from the violent
wind,

By about 2 a.m. on Saturday,
the wind had dropped considera-
bly. The rain, however, continued
tg fall, while occasional flashes of
lightning pierced the darkness
outside. At last I was able‘o turn
my mattress over and get some
much needed sleep. For thoysands
of survivors of that awful storm,
however, there was no sleep what-
ever that night.

At daybreak on Saturday, a
seene of desolation and destruc-
tion greeted the eye. The col-
lege surroundings, formerly a
thing of beauty, were now
forlorn in their nakedness,
Massive trees were shorn of
their leaves and most of their
branches while the trunks stood
with broken limbs raised te-
werds the sky. In many cases
the trees themselves had been
torn up from their roots and
lay stretched out across the
lawns and roadways,

Broken Lumber
Where once stood some build-
ing, one saw broken paces of
lumber and_ twisted galvanized
fron sheets littering the place for
yards around. Roofs with gaping

holes or merely with rafters
standing could be seen. They
were like skeletons. The huge

gymnasium which was to have
been used as a rescue centre after
the hurricane was itself levelled
with the ground,

With no electric power, we
faced the dismal prospect of hav-

ing to go without breakfast that

Securing a storm lantern, I
went up to my. do! ry, the
only other occupant_of which was
a student from British Honduras,
These dormitories are strong, flat-
roofed, concrete buildings of two
floors and stood up stoutly to the
hurricane, Even so, one could
feel the terrific force of the gale
without, and the violence of the
wind as it whistled and roared
down the corridors. Through
every opening and crevice in the
building the rain beat in with
tremendous force. Within a short
time the floor was under 2 inches
of water and everything in the
room, including myself, was wet.
Ocedsionally, there would be a
lull for a few seconds, only to be
followed by winds of greater
violence.

By about 11 p.m., the storm
seemed to be at its worst. At
this stage Yistinguishable above
the roar of the winds, falling of
rain, and the noises attending the
destruction of buildings and trees,
a terrific crash of thunder was
heard, The wind seemed to whip
itself into a fury unknown be-
fore. The indescribable sounds

produced by the splintering of
glass, the uprooting of trees, the
looping off of brariches and the
blowing about of bits of masonry,
wood and galvanized iron, gave
the impression that a thousand
devils had been let loose and were



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morning. A party of us set out
for the college laundry to obtain
coal pots and charcoal. When we
eventually got there we found that
the coal pots had been buried

under a mass of ruins and the bags ©

of coal were coer water-
soaked. A wood-burning stove
was finally obtained, for which
there was no lack of fuel, fhough
most of it was wet.

Transportation
All means of transportation and
telephone communication being

cut off, I spent Saturday at the
College, except for a walk which
I took to the nearby village of
Papine. Here damage was ex-
tensive, Several of the houses
had been wooden structures and
must have been reduced to ruin
within a very short time. At one



GET THEM READY

ccna ee



SCHOOL



QUEEN’S COLLEGE—Blue & Green

shop in the village, which had
been partly damaged, there was
a lone queue of people waiting to
purchase articles of food stuffs
which were being sold through a
window. Had these unfortunate
people. despite repeated warnings,
failed to make provision for such
an event or had they lost their
stores of food during the storm?

By Sunday morning the roads
had been cleared sufficiently to
enable me to go to Kingston,
about 5 miles away, to make in-
quiries about my return passage
to Barbados.

Signs of destruction were to be
seen on every hand. One section
of the city—South Camp and Ray
Town districts— appeared to have
suffered most. Many houses here
had been completely destroyed,
and in some cases large portions
of buildings had been swept half-
way across the street. Walls had
been blown down and the roof of
nearly every house was damaged
A secondar¥ girls’ school which,
I was told, had been completed
only about six weeks previously,
had its roof completely ripped
off. Te add to the miseries of the
people. the domestic water supply
in some areas had been cut off.

Relief Centres

I visited two schools which had
been turned, into relief centres.
Together these housed about 900
homeless men, women and chil-
dren,

Despite the absence of telephone
communications and the chaos
which reigned everywhere, a
‘plane did eventualy leave at
about 4, o'clock that afternoon,

During the journey to the
Palisadoes airport, several coastal
steamers as well as other vessels,
could be seen listing at various
angles. They had been loosened
from their anchorages and car-
ried above the high tide line

where they were left high and
dry when the sea receded.

At the airport itself the huge
Adminis ration buildinyy was
a mass of twisted iron and steel.
Most unfortunate of all for
many of the passengers who
had eaten nothing since break-
fast that morning, the canteen
had been destroyed and there
was nothing for us to eat. To
make matters worse, when we
boarded the ‘plane we were
told that the stock of food
abeard had not been replenish-
ed. as government had com-
mandecred all foodstuffs in the
city. All that we had to share
among us during that 4-hour
journey were two packages of
wafer biscuits.

25,000 Homeless

When it is’ recalled that this
hurricane, the biggest in the
history of Jamaica, resulted in
155 dead, about 2,000 injured,
some 25,000 rendered homeless,
and damage te buildings, crops

and services estimated at about
$80,000,000 it will be appreciated
that this description of the

damage, observed in a com-
paratively small section of the
devastated area, is no exaggera-
tion,

It is to be hoped that this brief
account of my experiences will
strve to remind listeners of the
importance of carrying out the
advice on hurricane precautions
issued by the local Hurricane Re-
lief Organisation.
too obvious to need emphasizing
how destructive could be the
force ef winds of over 125 m.p.h.
velocity, and torrential rains of
17 inches within a period of only
5 hours. That is what occurred in
Jamaica on August 17
could happen here in Barbados.
If it does,—which heaven forbid

—let us not be found unprepared, °

Rats And Flies Being

Obliterated

Protection from two ¢
carriers may soon be a prob

In Montreat

MONTREAL
of the world’s worst disease
lem of the past.

Dr. Henri Groulx, Montreal health officer, says in-

creased vigilance and bet

ter preventive measures are

rapidly obliterating hated rats and houseflies.
Regular spraying of city garbage dumps with prepara-
tions of D.D.T. and chloride of lime has checked the favourite

breeding place of the housefly,

In Montreal, all eight

dumps are sprayed every ten days. Since flies, cockroaches,
bed-bugs, and other disease-carrying insects require three
weeks to grow from the egg to adult, the pests have little

chance of survival.

But city workers can only
check the insects outside the home,
the health officer pointed out,
Education is helping to complete
the task with the householder,
Window screens, covered garbage
pails and careful food disposal are
spelling the end for the once
prevalent pest.

By appealing to the delicate
tastes of rats, their number is
being cut. A connoisseur of food,
the rodent fancies such tasty items
as out-of-season fruit and fresh
bread.. Armed with this know-
ledge, city exterminators are put-
ting poison to good use.

The rats can avoid the poison
by moving from the open spaces
where it is effective, If used in
a house the rat may climb within
the walls and contami#ate the
home after its death,

The only acuon tne nouseholder
can take is part of man’s growing
education in cleanliness, says Dr,
Groulx. By keeping the premises
clean and covering all garbage
and food, he soon forces the rat
into the open again wniere he is
a victim of the poisoned senenees.



GOAT STOLEN

A goat valued $60 was stolen
from a cellar at the residence of
Richard Daniel of Hindsbury Road
St. Michael, Daniel reported the
incident to the Police.

He stated that the goat was
removed sometime between 9.00
pm. on Tuesday and 2,30 a.m, on
Wednesday. .

Millicent Walker of Villa
Brittons Hill, St. Michael, re-
ported to the Police that her
house was broken and_ entered
sometime between 12.30 p.m. and
5.30 p.m. on Wednesday and a
auantity of articles stolen,

Road,

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Butcher Hanged \—

Thirty-six - year - old butcher,
Valmar Small yesterday morning

paid the.extreme penalty at Glen- |

dairy Prison for the killing of his
former common law wife Gwen-
dolyn Small on February. A
jury found him guilty of murder
on July 28 at the Court of Grand
Sessions,

The execution took place at 7
a.m. and afterwards a nine-mah
jury returned a verdict of death

| by judicial hanging.

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OPENED AT
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10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad St.

It should be

1951. It °



PAGE FIVE

Cuffley Appointed Organist
Of St. Thomas Parish Chureh

THE St. Thomas Vestry at their meeting yesterday
appointed Mr. Chester Cuffley, Assistant Teacher of St.
Matthew's Boys’ School as organist of the Parish Church
in place of Mr. Harold Cummins.

Mr. Cummins who is at present in Canada, informed
the Vestry through the Chairman that he had accepted a
post in Montreal and would be taking up permanent resi-

dence there.

He also expressed thanks to the Vestry for

having employed him for several years as organist. at the

church.

Police Band At
Rocks Tonight

The Police Band under the
e'reetion of Capt. C. E. Raison,
A.R.C.M., will give a musical
concert at the Hastings Rock,
beginning at 8 o'clock tonight.

The programme is as follows :—
l. QUICK MARCH —

The light Infantry — By Placer
Captain Denis Placer L.R.A.M.,

A.RC.M., the composer of the Light

Infantny March died in June this year

His death was no doubt accelerated by
the extensive wounds and gas which
be received during his service in the
1914-18 war, He held the position
of Director of Music to tie newly
formed R.E.M.E, Regiment up to the
t me of his death, and was one of the
most popular graduates of the Royal
School of Music
© ONCERT OVERTURE — By Weber
CLASSIC —
Chorale and Fugue tn G. Minor —
ry J. &, Bach

SYNOPSIS — The Chorale is ar-
ranged for the brass section of {he
band and follows the style of the old
German Hymn tunes The term
+UGUE ts said to be derived from
the Latin Fuga meaning flight, be-
cause as the parts enter in succession,
trere ts the appearance of flight aiid
pursuit among the parts. The points
to be noted in the Fugue are, the
subject, answer, counter-subject,
episodes, and stretto, For the present

‘ork the Chorale is used as a back
ground for the Fugue

SELECTION —

Vienese Memories of Franz Lehar

(bly request),

CHARACTERISTICS —

La Voix Ves Cloches — by Luigini

FOLK SONG MEDLEY —

ur Wee Scottie — by Mac Kenna

voT POURRI —

Fifty Years of Song — by Kennett

8. DANCE MUSIC —

Irving Berlin Hit Parade — by Dut-

hoit

RYTHMIC -

“ore More Mamba — by Murrell
GOD SAVE THE QUEEN





Oritain’s Bananes

LONDON
Fresh talks on banana-buying
ae to be opened in London by
Jamaican delegation, now on
i; way to Britain, The delegates
w. 1 be joined later by Mr, Alex-
ander Bustamante, Observers in
London believe that the Jamai-
cous will press for a guarantee

to buy their banana’ exports.
Britain has been turning recently
to other sources, notably the
Atviean colonies, for its banana
supplies,

—B.U.P.

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The Chairman then nominated
Mr. Cuffley who has been acting
during the absence of Mr, Cum-
mins, In daing so he said that Mr.
Cuffley had done excellent work.
He took a keen interest in what
he was doing and was highly
appreciated by the choir and con-
gregation,

Mr. Reeves then moved, sec-
onded by Mr. Sandiford that Mr.
Cuffley be appointed organist and
this was agreed to.

Scholarship

The Vestry on the motion of
Mr, K, S. Sandiford seconded by
Mr. S. A. Walcott, awarded a
Vestry Scholarship tenable at
Combermere School te Horace
Reed of Bennetts Tenantry, Reed
is at present a student of Com-
bermere School.

The Chairman informed the
Vestry that Mr. S. Howell,
Manager of Bagatelle Plantation,
St. Thomas, had offered to assist
in the cleaning up of the church-
yard, provided that he was allowed
to take away the grass.

The Vestry, on the motion. of
Mr, S. A. Walcoit instructed the
clerk to write Mr. Howell thank-
ing him for his kind offey.and
appointed a Committee compris-
ing the Chairman and the Church-
warden to meet Mr, Howell and
make the necessary arrangements
in connection with the matter,
Present at the meeting were; —
Rev. H, C. Shepherd—Chairman,
Mr. K. S. Sandiford—Church-
warden, Mr. S, A. Walcott, Mr.
L. D. Gill, Mr. C. M. Collins and
Mr, V. E. Reeves,



Driver Fined 20/-

His Worship Mr. G. B, Griffith,
Acting Police Magistrate of Dis-
trict “A” yesterday fined Theo-
philus Fenty of Road View, St.
Peter 20/- and 2/- costs in 14 days
or one month's imprisonment with
hard labour for driving the motor
lorry E.35 along Black Rock, St.
Michael, at just over 28 miles per
hour.

The speed limit on that road is
20 miles per hour, The offence
Was committed on May 25 about
6.10 p.m, The case was brought
oy Cpl. Jones and Police Consta-
ble Lashley who are attached to
the Traffic Branch of the Central
Station.

Sgt. Alleyne prosecuted for the
Police,





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tablet slipped in the mouth cases the
strain quickly and effectively. Remem-

ber, it is this strain on the system which
constitutes the biggest danger from 4

Wee

i)

ff




Ge

Bronchitis and Bronchial Catarrh

always keep a supply of Ephazone tablets handy !

FOR ASTHMA AND BRONCHITIS TAKE

BEDSTEADS

6 inches

{Incorporated



| 1926
| DRASTIC
REDUCTIONS
IN
» GUERLAIN'S
» 7

ante gah sche ies = s2t.00 WORLD
Sous le ae a al 5 )e!
Chimps de tyson foe tooo] FAME

| ‘ol, rome .. . 5. A

Hf ety Trower ooo 888 PERFUME
Vague Souvenir ...... ; 30.06 10.00 ”
eh. Ge ae

] SoawetBror cc a 8g] BU NOW

| Pour Troubler 17.00 6.00 FOR

{| Dawamesk ... 17.00 6.00

||] Quand Vient Léte . 17.00 6.00

| KNIGHT'S _ LTD. f

Phoenix Pharmacy. mi

'

= ———— SS







PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY, AUGUST 22, 1952
Feinstein








































































































































































































































































































] |
>t ie ’ ‘ '? ’ - TICES ——
cS LA S S I F I i D AD S ee ee ie ees | eee | SHIPPING NOTICES
. ’
| —~-— sand - ee Mails for Grenada, Trinidad, and Brit-
eek | eeoeeeenee NOTICE SEA AND AIR Sraiogh Wl BC nea “ai ine Svea | —_
| a he ne :
ee CLARENDON—Black Rock, St. Michael, | Pest Office as under — | Al THERLANDS
DIED z | opposite St. Stephen's Chureh. Standing | PARISH OF ST. PHILIP . Parcel and Registered Mails at 3 pgn ROY NE
FOR SALE jon 1 aere of land. Laid out for good| Applications for the Post of Nurse at . : on the 22nd August, and Ordinary Mail STEAMSHIP co,
Goud Age: Goes. Her funeral . 4 |Datry Farm or Residence. Possibilities|the St. Philip's Almshouse will be re- at 8.30 a.m. on the 23rd Augusi, 198% jecept
will, Jeave Strong Hope Plantatior |{or Mortgage can be arranged. Apply: | ceived by the undersigned up to Satur- se, Sa See Se Antigua, _ Memseerst,
St. Thomes at 4 p.m. for St. Philip's| “—— |L. N. Hutehinson or Dial os. ate Pee ae no heageme ae. “ = he ee eatetana at CR | “Rs SAILING from EUROPE. a a Kitts, Sailing -
-52—Tn ieants mus’ e qualified as a I ie the G ral Post Offi md 3
Ringlen, Beryl Gill, Ruk AUTOMOTI eee aee tea renern . ———-—— | Nurse and Midwife, and must forward n Carlisle Bay . ae st Office as winter _ M.S. HERA 29th August, 1952.
Watson, Cavell Sehuiz, Grace Ber yoR + sae MC TIVE ae i ieee ae = ay moore ae See | with their applications their Baptismal tar eed mat Gaptenes Mail {% 5S. COTTICA 5th September, 1992 The M/V
George, Gooding. Lise, “Gooding:| CAR—=One Ford Zepher. as good as lly kn! gamit, Beazoum. Shedroot | Certificates as well as their Certificates] Sch May Olive, Sch. Emeline, Sch. | at g dum. ‘on the ard August, logs |M.S. Si a Sa ae .
Haig Gooding 22.8.52—1n.]rew, done 2,000 miles.’ Phone 4435,| oui on » pa 1 amd) of competency. Esso Aruba, Seh. Lydia A, Sth. Henry ‘Mails tor Doriitilea, Antigua, Montser- minica, Antigua, Montserrat,
REDMAN & TAYLOR'S G. aS also with glass windows. Prjew| The successful candidate will "be re-}2 Wallace, Sch. Philip Davidson, Sch.| gat, Nevis and St. Kitts by the M.V M.S. oan 9th September, 1952 Nevis and St. Kitts, Sailing Friday
BEWITT—On August 21, 1952, Evans . a een Ere ge To ggg Cuthbert quiet. te assume duties on the 25th Everdene Sch. Rosarene, Sch. D'Ortac.| Meneka will be closed at the Generali cAtLaee 2 Teese, Fhe easine 29th inst
Hewitt, (better known as Hughie) Joo a ; P | September, 1952. Sch Lucien M. Smith. M.V. Moneka, a
late mason Public Works Department CAR-—One (1) 1946 Mereury Eight Ford ot ies Any further particulars may be ob-|™V. Daerwood, Seh. Mary M Lewin, Poet oat Baal ‘as (noon), Registered | M8. SreeTOR och fee aw age ARs reeeEe a
Puneral leaves his late residence | mechanically sound. Apply: B. A. Simp-| j tained from the Parochi:} Treasurer's}£ceh. United Pilgrim, Seh, .laudalpha, Mail at 2 p.m, and Ordinary Mail at aS Sth, Sep J ASSOCIATION (IN
Fair View. Beckles Road, Bay Lana. | iecchanically sound. Apply: B.A. Simp-| | “THE HERMITAGE" situate at_ the | Office. $$ Tnya 2.50 pw. on thesSoad August. 1902 SAILING TO TRINIDAD & CURACAO
at 430 pm, today for St. Paul's : , n. corner of White Park and Country Road P. S._ W. scorTT, = ARRIVALS ve ‘i ; ss OOP August, 1952. 1
Chyureh, sthence to the Westbury 17.8.52—6n. | :tarding on about 123,040 square feet cf Clit 46 the Rants af Donntiansst = V. Docrwood, $4. tons, 1 M.S. HERA 1 ‘ember, 1952 Consignee Tele. No 4047
Caer: nae os WA re land. The House contains Gallery, two | St. Philip. Luecic under Capt. Wells Moiaiprieht te :
Mis. Kelcran Hewitt (wife), Rev i¥ooas: Be ahea Eee 3 Mileage living rooms, dining room, eight bed- 52—Tn | Be Schooner Owners’ Association. Sch.| ¢ 8, P. MUSSON, SON & CO., LTD.
Lionel Smith (brother-in-law) a ner leay-/rooms, three dressing rooms, wqter anc! ——_—_—__——_— - - - M. Lewi 7 : .
’ 23.8.82—in | o% Island Price 700. W. | clectric light. ‘Inspection any be ‘wis, @9 tons, from British Agents
8.52—in | Manon 8268 8 Ol y suits eantiianen Ubinas” Gn ee Cant. Marshall. Con-
iat a aad, Th fi . . E a ae o the coner Owners’ Asso-
IN MEMORIAM CAR—One (1) 1981 Adstin 70, In very | public PS Shon st cur Cine, Ted s | Asner Foucr Taieota’ Hobess eee’ mm New York.
good eondition, done 8,000 miles, price| Street, on Friday the 22nd day of Augue: | fe ee dino 8.9. Trys S50 .
NICHOLS—In loving memory ol ou |$?200. Craig Garage, Roebuck Street. | 1952 at 2.30 p.t. Kathleen Bratthwaite, the Executrix of & Co, Lid. “BEMIS DaCosta s s a
dear ositer. Blorence Nichols, who} Dial 4553 22.8.52-——3n CARRINGTON & SEALY (the late Christopher Augustus Braith- eae : ation te S
departed this life on August 22nd 195 siaslibe 14.8.69—-#h | waite, having mage — dapiettian Faas. 21 DEPARTURE What need are the life-
Gone but not forgotten CARS—Prefect Ford late 1950 veny good | - that Pollay No. 14,400 om the life of the . coa Pegasus for Trinidad. you
Ever to be remembered condition, also one Austin A-70 1951 very| LAND — At Graeme Hall Terrace 2| said Christopher Augustus Braithwaite 5; giving vitamins and minerals ; ; ;
Mrs. E. Thornhill, Mrs. Clarke an | 00d condition too, both cars going véry| adjoining lots. 11,000 ft. each, witir| has been lost, and having made applica- Seawell 6f YEAST-PHOS. Enjoy life - ah
far: dky 22.8,52—1n |reasonable. Dial 95251 Water and ‘Electrigity. E. P | tion to the Directors for the payment of . SOUTHBOUND
a 17.8.52—t.f.n. | Beaghilt. one 8178 or a the monies due urlder the same Arrivals by B W.I.A. on Wednesda to the full! You ll feel Salis Sails Sail Arrives Sats
LOST & FOUND : x 21.86.5240, | NOTICF is hereby given that unless) fom TRINIDAD Y healthier with Montres! Halifax Boston Barbados Barbados
Spor! CARS—One A-40 “Somerset” owner | ————————_________________. | anv objection is raised within one month! ~#. Rapier, D. Johnson, W. Bolah, © - a 2 ap
a ns | driven — done only: 1330 miles — like] LAND—1,820 square feet of land situat~ | of the cate hereof, the said Policy monies| Roach, L Burr, A. Burr, G, Burr, A. >) ' CAMADIAN CRUISER... 12 Aug, 15 Aug. em » 25 Aug.
LOST ew $2,500.00, One 1951 A-40 — 3,300! at Reed Street, St. Michael, the property | asked for will be pad } Burr, J. Burr, C,-Purguson, A. Lenae, re c IAN CONSTRUCTOR = 22 Aug. 25 Aug. < "
niles — condition perfect 32,400.00. One| of the late Eleanor Lacey, deceased. | By Order 2. Procope, L. Sealy, G. Goda =e 43 A se ale LADY RODNEY as eae 3Sept. 6 8 Sept.
— SM 1500 Singer — tyres, battery and| The above parcel of land will be s* Cc. K. BROWNE, Outcalt, R. Allamby, F. W wen, A. Tal CAN. CHALLENGER ft. 35 t. — Cy
SWEEPSTAKE TICKET BOOK condition excellent $2,500.00 Apply |up for sale by Public Competition st our . Secretary . Gooding, L. Peters, K, Pe rigiey, G. GENERA TONIC LADY - ee 7 27 Sept. € 7 Ovi.
B.7330-—7339. Finder please return samc | Chelsea Garage 1950 Ltd. Phone 4949 Office, James Street, on Friday 29ti. 15.8,52—4n,| ers, G. Horstord, B. M ters, M. Pet- GE L tTONIC x
to Lioyd Mapp, Edgecliff, St. Joh 19.8.52—6n. | August, 1952, at 2 p.m ’ ee , P. Mordecai, B. Mor- ; NOKTHBOUND
29,8 .52- ‘orf ‘ in oe 4 Da-Silva, W. Belgrave, A ” asriv
For further particulars apply to Mr Saade, N. Saade, A. Saade, K. ¥ uiuaies Sails Artives aie
ELECTRICAL A. W. Harper, Lakes Folly. i NOTiIC: : P, Bolullo, B. Benn Bennett. “D” Barbados Boston 1
FOR RENT “parent pres ses anigaaetiadie) Ny —_ Yearwood, G. Finlayson. ennett: D- CANADIAN CHALLENGER = 15 Aug. 20 Aug.
AMERICAN ELECTRIC DEEP FREEZE 08.8—in. | Re Extate of a Dee Digestive CRUISER |g Sept. jo Sept. z
Discount for 4 months use. Owner ha: ha EDMUND LAWRENCE DEAR [g acco, G FElelds. (R. Augustine, CONSTRUCTOR 1 . 19 Sept. —
— ——_- + | returned to States. Telephone 95.206 NEW BUNGALOW—Situated at Bia| Deceased — Seigoret, A. Seigoret, Upsets te a 30 Sept. 2 Oct. 11 Oct. 12 Oct.
HOUSES 21.8.52 Oct. = St a0 Oct. * Oct. % :
RECEIVER —- Mullard’ 9 tube doubic| 2°, Baths, Garage etc. Available ist] one having any debt Or claim! wecsceie’ Ochi wea emo, Gehos, r
BUNGALOW—On Sea, Main Road Hast | cuperhet receiver. Mullard Auitotnasie September: E, P. Edghill. Phone 617 aaeinat or afrecting ‘the estate of Edmund’ eae Ochoa, Beatriz Ochoa, Diana :
ings, very comfortably furnished, Ens | changer, three speed. Amplifier—bass | ° 8367 21.8.52—4n. [@ealnst or affecting the estate ot ends. Ochoa, Jorge Hernandez, Gisela Hernan- research,
lish bath 2 bedrooms Servants |'treble controls, Operated one unit or} ~w Wie Tuan |bury Road in the parish of Saint | 4¢% Jorge Hernandez, Raul Hernandez, have for further particulars, apply 1o—
Seer oe Sanane — From SeptemPes | individually. Foster Phone 2676 “THURCISDON” on. the sea at aax | Michael in this Island, who died in Ser. Hermandes, Janine | Hernandes, Antacid
ele ne 5 §2— well's Coast, ris! urch, standing on ; vet a ernandez, Jesus Alvarez, i § 2
sassodgiet oe idan cl -h 21, 0.52 aes * roods 18 perches of land. Garage fo anne ead sy Hence of their | Dominguez, Gaylor Wumberger, ee ablets, new , Companion- , GARDINER AUSTIN & Cco., LTD. —Agents.
MORECAMBE—The desirable residenc 2 cara. Water and electric services in- | QU¢t a etaaiod ihe undersigned | 207es, Consuelo Caudeira, Sally Stubbs, roduct to their renowned
“Moreeambé"' Worthing next to Royal LIVESTOCK stalled, Inspection by appointment with ae JOYCE FOSTER. “dministratrix sal0mon Wahrman, ‘owder. They are the most
Theatre, 4 Bedrooms Toilet nd Bat — -——-——_ — —_—— t.e tenant Mrs, Roach. Dial #461 t th id estate, C/o R, S. Nicholls From St. Lueia: convenient way of checkin
upstairs.. Downstairs: Drawing room,| _HORSES—Three year old thoroughbret| The above will be set up for sale 4 1S the SSiticitors, No. 151/182 Roebuck , Mr. Justice Richard Manning, Mrs, digesti: disords f €
Dining Room,Hall, 2 extra rooms, Bat)| filly “F'uffy Ruffles" by Pink Flowe«r|rublie competition at our office, Jame: | °c, O-, titan oe before the Margaret Manning, Mr. Donald Palmer, gestive lers away from
are Net, large garage, servants roon’.|ex Golden Fairy by Gold Bridge £650] Street, on Friday the 29th August 1952 | 57 na ie Mctabe. ves after which Mts. Joyce Palmer, Mstr. Angus Palmer. home. No water required—
For particulars, apply: Manager, Empire|'anded—2 wear old thoroughbred filly| at 2.00 p.m. fate T aint pecpeed ce distribute the | Mis Janet Palmer. just dissolve one or two on the
Theatre. ; 21.6.52—6n. | “Sweet Violet’ by Full Bloom ex Fair HUTCHINSON & BANFYELD scents of the eeceneed, among the pertiss ARRIVALS — BY BW.LA. tongue for pt relief
oN > -| Araby by Fairway £800 lande@. Apply: 17-8.52—-6" | entitled thereto having regard only to Se TROD AY anywhere. Prenat tasting ;
IONARCH” — Prospect, St. James,|J. RB. Edwards. Phone 2520 ———————————_—— ———_ h t ¢ which 1 shall then have from Trinidad; mag
Apply: Hutchinson & Banfield. 22,8.59—-8n. | _“VALLAMBROSA” — Constitution Ra. | stch claims of which 1 shay Miable for |, J: Wilson, R. Kinney; C. Durant; F De Witt's Antacid Tablets
20.8.52—3n Cyposite Queen's Park. All modern | (WO BOUee One ny part thereof so dis-|0rdan; E. Johnson; Johnson; M. are separately cel/-sealed for
PUPS—Two (2) Bull Terrier Pups, no|conveniences. For full Particulars) jotted to any person of whose debt Johnson; H. D, Johnson; A. De Lima; J. freshness. In ti
i reasonable offer refused. Apply: Cut»-| Phone 5127. 16,8.52—8n . cr claim I shall not then have had Thomas; A. Thomas; R. Thomas; O. strips for pocket or bag.
WANTED bert Rogers, Near Rices, St. Philfp. notice Thomas; W. Thomas; C. Thomas; V . .
' 92.8.83--2n,|_ We are instructed by Mrs. C. W.|MOG: 1 cone indebted ta the said| Tomas; A. Stevens. Standard Size, 24 Tablets. ————————————— SS OOM.
. ——_— — Haynes of Brittons Cottage, Britton’) ii. are requested to settle thei DEPARTURES — BY B.W.LA. Economy Size, 60 Tablets.
RELP FURNITURE Hill, to Offer for sale about 86,000 squard | [NS JAI | Uithout delay ON WEDNESDAY ’ ; Le
elie feet of land forming part of her prop: | "Dated this 20th day of August, 1952. | Per, Trinidad:
CLERK—A lady Ciork for a Commi--|” FURNITURE K. B Natin-are erty known a Brittons worneer: nee ° LELLA JOYCE FOSTER, eae: Agostini; Hector Perez-Marques, tts
ote a i URE - tadio-gram |land is enclosed on three sides with ; yaad Emilda erez-Mi ) ~
kn oe ef knowledge of Short-| rrigignire, large sova, cover, baby's substantial stone wall and there is | ¢ ‘ Administratrix ee oa of J Marques, Berane peskiante, aiseeeen i Sailings from Southampton to Guadeloupe, Martinique,
pane an ‘eg erifing oe general offic’ feradle, mattress, folder pram and bovse|fine view over the harbovr. ‘The lair Eémurd Lawrence Dear, geceese in | Miquclera,e Adalia Miquelera, Prospero eC & Jamaica
Apply to box XYZ Oe nines beaks bt syele. All first rate condition. Bargains | would be sold as a whole or in not mar eS" | Dominguez, Morela Dominguez, Monica Barbados, Trinidad, La Guaira, Curacao
tithe Bitke. Siadae Gpialifcatiods. Ap. vply: Mre. Clarke 8243 ea than Sue ioe Ae ear ONG IS acai a Agonne, ‘aa Martin, Roderick ANTAC ID
plications treated strictly confidential, sept edidressed to iNGeO! oe ‘SEALY - = ne veer 7 er, Alan Hurstfield, Hubert Burke,
Bidston lb Ree MISCELLANKOT CAN basen treet. Public Official Sale [Sti simge' vemos, Manto! koe] TAB L ‘From Arriv
tiie 2 § 1 h on atheus, Manuel Mturbe, ‘ : Southampton Barbados
UNIOR R I Ree = 1S 14,8.52—-5u Albertiaha Iturbe, A. Iturbé, Suis Iturbe. A ETS =
JUN OVERSEER For Spencers meeenemeeneieriitiartieaseserieeihitssinseeme—ine saber . “COLOMBIE” 5:
nantation. Apply In parson with Testi. | COTTON PRINTS — Canadian (The Provost Marshal's Act iwi |G tute, Victoria Synister, Atie Yussiuf, No water needed .. B81st July, 1952 .. 18th Aug., 1952
onials to Manager. 20.8,52—3n, | English, over hundred beautiful AUCTION . (1904-6) § 30) Phils Mec eee, Mehammed: | Easily carried anywhere — Cell-sealed *“DE GRASSE” .. 22nd Aug., 1952 .. 8rd Sept., 1952








z
ee % inches wide, usual'y 72c. reduced to
POSITION “required by responsible} 4%. yard at KIRPALANS 52, Swan

Young man With knowledge of Are and | Street. 22.8.52—1n
Acetelyne Welding and Evectrical Appar- | —-—



*Not calling at Guadeloupe
SAILING FROM BARBADOS TO EUROPE

On Friday the 22nd day of August 19524 274 Hannibal, Muriel Odle, John Scriven,
JNDER THE IVORY HAMMER | at the hour of 2 o’cloek in the afternoon| Teeresa Meorish, Trevor Corniiliac, John

i 80! t| Boll, George Thomas, Taufic Nichols,
By instructions received from. th | Will be sold at my office to the highest) ei, wonseur, Cline Reed, Kerina Reed,

@ For home use—
Here's the family standby
































atus. To arrange interview reply t& CAR ACCESSORIES — = rg - 1 Friday, | bidder for any sum not under the ap- ; TT’
Advocate Box M.L. 20.8 Bao. Pattery ‘ends, Buby Roe Chareue: Ruaunt aed $9 ‘acaare. ‘Chelona Gar ae Prat chat caseat i L d containing Eg © Ceichiy soothes DeWl 5 From Barbados Arrives Southampton
Dusters, Cheese cloth, Whisk brooms} Pinfold Street, (1) 190} a er Bowe | uy Se eet iceroe a Roods 14%, | Sit R. Arundel, Mcintyre Conrad, LeRoy and settles = ANTACID *““DE GRASSE” .. 6th Aug, 1952 .. J6th Aug., 1952
MISCELLANEOUS me lor en ee ee... Renae sis Sr stau a 1947 14 ?. Perches situate at Crane Gap in Parish | Foster, Clarice Capsura, Peter Jordan, upset stomach “COLOMBIE” 24th Au 1952 5th Sept. 1952
: a ce 3 ings that vour car t amaged in accident a a of St. Philip butting and bounding on Verona Roberts, Harry Roberts, Patricia @ Lastin effects POWDER o* B+, ee .
LADIES ee “Coat” sire aad Garage (1980) L eee Samer Tiata ana . con ee a 4) veka lands of Cliff Cottage, on lands pow or Basets, se Field Mary Field, asting ; *“DE GRASSE” .. 16th Sept., 1952 .. 26th Sept., 1952
“%—40 c/o Advocate Advtg. Dept. . 1 NC - late of Sarah Blades, on lands now or eorge Field. * * ;
16.8.52—t.{.n 19,6,52—6p. VINCENT tenes late of one Brathwaite, on lands now or| For St. Lucia: Sailing direct to Southampton
: Margot Lang, William Lang, Alan Lang, ’





11.8.52--4n | late of Adriana Wilkinson on lands now

GLASS—Giass for all purposes. Show or late of Mary Carter on a private road | Marjorie Estwick, Marvin Skeete, Dun-



















POSITION WANTED ;
NURSE DORIS NER a qualified | Windows, Glass Cases, House windows | —--s-ss—s——aam > ——~ 118 feet wide and on the Public Read to-) Stan Curtin. So = ae R. M. JONE LTD.,—Agents.
Midwife, ia willing to assist anyone who | 74 doors. Mirrors for Dressing Tables. UNDER THE SILVER gether with the messuages or Dwelling} DEPARTURES — BY B.W.1LA ) : —h 2699696 665555 59S$S8669SSSS999OSSS6 os

HAMMER Houses, called “Crane View" and “Crane ON THURSDAY a

is in need of a nurse. Address: Chap-| prices G. W. Hutchinson & Co. Ltd Fee, ieee Gr lands dibs, op) Fer Antieons

man’s Lane, C/o Miss Gladys Best. 17.8.52—4n









































HEADLEY,
Provost Marshal. ster; Miss Angella Armstrong; Mr. Cedric
; Mr. James Branch; Mr. Ralph

NATIONAL INCORPORATED, 8 cor-|ohligation ‘whatsoever. Advice direct
pcration organized and existing unde: |from Experts. at the Uitra-modern
the laws of the State of Delaware, United | Research P’ant of S. C. Johneon & Son
States of America, whose trade or busi- | tie., Raeine, Wisconsin, U.S.A.

Servide; Singlé fron Bedstead’, Springs
Deep Sleep Mattresses; Mahog. Liner
Press; Chest of Drawers; Ced and
Painted Presses; Crex Mats; Congoleum

16.8, 62—8n ON TURSDAY 20: Py orget a Mrs, praised as follows :— Alexandor St, Clair, ignatius King,
~ | SROUBEWIVES—Do ou have Fl oy fackley, rhioh tnchade: | yA RON Sree Sf mad, its all Bulle. | Pee verte: Rises
TAKE NCTICE aT elektro nuk thee Coe Sere Lig Gorner ake "i 12,000 0. rib Taeetas Cae han Mr. Jabish Holmes, Mr. Winfield Lucas,
? 2 fe b a i .
a 1 Oe a eae Se CO | iE ria hae Seka Divan and (Fummival sor end towards satigiaction, Bc, | Mi. TieGeie soan Grithth. Mis. “AD MENT OF ,
ine INSTANTINA Ltd., Bridge Street, and they will be? Cushions, Mirrors, Curtains, Rush no oe Fa talc nl tonette Weekes: Mrs. Ine Brathwaite, Mr . .
iat STERLING PRODUCTS INTER-|orly too pleased to giygt Advice at no) Arm C¥aire: Glas” and China Ten : T. -T, Clarence Carrington; Mr, Vernon Brew- Walking Sticks











Provost Marshal's Office, Eversh

6th August, 1952 Just received by

Best; . Marjorie Best; Mrs. Georgy
7°8.52—8n | PoMiard; Mr. Charles Field.



ress address is 1450 Broadway, New 20,8.52—5r | ironing Board; Elec, Toaster and Kettle ,

Mork, New Kerk, U.S.A... Manutactaier | oben, | Timus Stoves, Elec. 2 Burner Hot F1te; | JOHNSON’S

173 + > a CHINERY— KE ils, Books, Canvas Cots, wi ivi

oie TRMIE tn Part OA" OF Reniviar inl enuidced, Eitced Wattle ted aiecmn nem’ Kitchen Utens | BOOks, STATIONERY The T.S.S. GOLFITO will be arriving from

GOVERNMENT NOTICE

respect of pharmaceuticals, and will be|]to run at 470 r.p.m. developing sbout
entitled to register same after one month | 4. 4-H. P. at 100 Ibs. pressure. Two (2
from the 2st day of August, 195.,|/ small cold starting Diesel Engines, 10

Sale 11.30 o'clock, Terms cash

BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.,




Southampton on Saturday 23rd August, at
































unless some person shall in the mean | and 15 HP. One (1) 22” x 36” 5 rollet ie é 3 Auctioneers
Sune ae neue mn eovareen. vt oe Mill complete with C.S. Gearing, arent 78 22,8.52—2n ,
my ice. of opposition of such registr’-} engine, and Hydraulic Pressure Regu | —>—-———————————~~ . $ : ei :
ton. tae tenderers: Can be seen on|jating Equipment. Appky: D. M._ Simp LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE Attention is drawn to the Control of Prices (Defence) (Amend- | p.¢64 B$$9S996SSS965S" ‘ noon, and will be sailing the same evening for
a a v a y ol . i2—68n .
“Dated this 20th’ day of August, 1952 won, ee: as ies sats, application of Gitta Semuaie. poe a th aa yd Pe which oe be published in the Official
H. WILLIAMS, STUK GLUE—The 2 in 1 adhesive with | Shopkeeper of Roepe a gr azette 0! ursday, 21st August, i Trinidad
ails * . ( Liqlor License No. 649 of 1952, granted ’ inidada.
Registrar of Trade Marks. | she 1,000 and 1 uses. A powerful glue} icharg Henry in respect of a wal! 2. Under this Order the maximum wholesale and retail selling

Lt : oe ae hee Reroke a WwPPREHeP ond everite shop near residence at Eller-
Peet 22,8.82- gn | ton, St. George, for permission to use
a naielpeemeee ens | BOE SRE, Renae at Marie Vale; top
STOVES—The famous “Florence” Stover
i 2 and 3 Burner Models are obtainable
from Laurie Dash & Co,, Tudor Street.

and bottom floors of a wall building at

prices of “Beef—Salted” and “Meat—Fresh & Frozen—Veal” are as
follows: —~

DAERWOOD



















ROE eT eee Téth aay of August, 1082 ARTICLE WHOLESALE PRICE | RETAIL PRICE |% arrived | at Barbados 8
Phone 8061, 17.8.52—3n_ | ‘To. G. B, GRIFFITH, Esq (not more than) (not more than) and will be . oo aun

y
Ag. Police Magistrate, Dist. “A.”
MARIA SAMUELS.
for Applicant
N.B.—This application will be con-
‘ered at a Licensing Court to be held






































2 DAY, August 24th for St.
-Lucia, St.. Vincent, Grenada,
Aruba, accepting Passen-










SUFSCRIBF now to the Dally
Telegraph, England's leading Dativ New
per now arriving in Barbados by Alr

Beef—Salted:
(a) Extra Family, Navel | $88.10 per bri. of 200



SOO

















niy a few days after publication in PNA Mandas Plate, Ro Bris- Ibs. or 47 r lb. in
London. tact Ion Gale C/o, Advo- |"! Police Court, District “A” on y, ; junds, Ye 'c. pe BS
endo s. Tat Local Representative Moe deh Gay ae September, 1952, at ket lots. of not lesa than gers and Freight.

| re a ey ce G. B. GRIFFITH, 25 lbs. FE .. |62c, per Ib. 22.8.52—2n.,
FURNITURE i K GLUE—"St ee colourless anf Ag, Police Magister, Or. 3! (b) Flank or Boneless|$84.40 per bri. of 200 =

} oak irle s, power!) and economil: al Flank tos, on 466 Ib. in

it's “STUK’—it Sticks ee hy. . per e

. | 22.0 2» | LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE lots of not less than
or es a slice On oll,
TOOLS—in Stock:—Suction —_ tools, sinttiant eo ET.C.O., Coleridge St., 25 lbs. be +. |50c. per Ib.

Phillips screwdrivers, Cabinet blade! iy for permission to sell Spirits, Mat} Meat—Fresh & Frozen:

AUCTION



screwdrivers, Sliploint pliers, Combina-| rb icilors &c., at ground floor of Johnson's te a
won pier Hackeawe. Tappet *erriven Stationery. Building, Broad Street, City. Veal: — way
ate. Get vour requirements & Dated this 2ist day of August, ‘ eo
“BENSAM™ Gurage (1980) Limited Phone 4949. Tor. B. GRIFFITH Beg, (a) Cutlets (without =
19.8.52—6n | “"\¢ Police Magistrate, Dist. ‘A’. bone) a Ms i me .. |60c. per Ib.
SHEMNGHAM GARDENS, | I. F. PACHEO, (b) er cuts 54c. lb
MAXWETAI'S COAST | STAMPS FOR SALF for Applicant. All oth ne if ay a . per Ib.
On THRE STAMP COLLECTION of & N.B.—This application will be consid-
| coessed client will be ect up for sale] Oi" ot a Licensing Court to be held at 2ist August, 1952. 22.8.52—1n

WEDNESDAY, ib AUGUBT s at our office, James Street, Bridge- | oiice Court, District “A” on Tuesday the













































Cover, Limed Oak Chest -.of
Drawers, Dominicon Rugs Ptd
Wardrobe, Glothes Rack, Ptr
Twesses, BRable, Desk & Chairs,
Wa M (Qak & Waat
Mrotes! Félding ‘Tabig, Stcels.
Single Mattresscs, Walnut Dress-
e¢ TableeChair, Medicine Chests
‘deya Lott Chair (green). Lint
‘asket. Bathrcom Scelss, Canyo
Cot.. Mosquite Nets, Curtains
Pink’ Silk Bedeove:s» Quantity «of
good Table &@ Bed Linen C "
Cutlery, Glawsware & Table Ac
cessories, Breakfast, Tea, Dinne
« Coffee Sets in cream & gree



| ee EN
; at 11.50 a m i\| TUESDAY %th Aveust © | 54 Gay of September, 1952 at 11 o'clock, \$655$55900609599099900006 55555995999 99SS90900999006 :
from ‘Comdr. Ht ton iy } YEARWOOD & BOYCE see G. B. GRIFFITH,
Inge. to. dispone et, fis PORN | 21.8.52—5n, Ag. Police Magistrate, Dist, “A”. Seven sizes of
T ) EFFECTS as listed — a a
ts BNeG | | pre De a deeeoerie PRIMUS BLOW TORCHES e
VISWING MORNING OF SALE 1h FOR THE 1ST, TIME ‘
% any ars BOBSOSSSSSSSSS SOOO OOS
eTmtsen,. Monta ean ee i ag ioe eneeen cg x for you to select from, prices range from ;
Stend, titing Des’ Josh
nt, Taliboy, Bedside. Tables A GAS COOKER 3 ; i % 17 76 ’ $
ure, Taliboy, Redsi tH Ad § Vy 3 $17.40 to $46. ¢
gH. Teds — ALL IN MAHCG. from a gartety of = $ vocate tationer % ; :
teceiver ighod working ord . 7m. j : ee ?
oo alg srt /$ ror BOOKS TEE CENTRAL Garon i
irg, Standard Table Lj
iranian eat.” “chong “anit || it ee! geet unas for cont Hh posites ime
F A ug ee Pie F — good | ) at Your ! &
der, Hanging Mirre: Folding x. . : ’
Table in’ Limed Oak, Dumb |}|\ GAS SHOWROOM 8 — | xO0SNNSS $9999S9SS5 ease SOOO > %
Waiter (Oak), Steel & | Wooden \ Bay Street { x
Folding Chairs, Card Table & " BOROUGH OF SAN FERNANDO %
: +





FURNITURE
AUCTION

Ne oe
ACCOUNTANCY COST ACCOUNT-
ING, CUMPANY SECRETARYSHIP
\OU6-KEEPING, An “Intensiv

Course (for award of Diplo

a a Associate or Fellow) will

jualify you for higher status by in-

cresting spare-time POSTAL ST y

with expert tutors, GUARANT y

/RCOURSES in English, Commercial and

aw subjects, London Chamber 0:
eiiicCommerce RSA. Institute of Com

}

|

| VACANT POST—TOWN ENGINEER
Applications invited—University Graduates, Corporate Mem-
bers of Institutions of Civil or Municipal Engineers or equiva-
lent—10 years’ experience— Usual Borough Engineering Ser-
vices—-Population 35,000—Knowledge of electricity an asset—
Salary $4,800—$240—$5,760 per annum—Starting salary sub-
ject to experience Passage, leave, car allowance, Pension—
Quarters at 10% of Salary—For full details apply to Town
Clerk, San Fernando, Trinidad, B.W.I, Applications close 30th
September, 1952.





SOOOCOOOL

LLE,
on TUESDAY, %th AUGUST,
ot 1180 a.m.
We hay eceived ingtructions
fram og “ epee Ba , to
qapoe JRNITURE and



merce, Ete, For FREE BOOKLET
WRITE NOW to the leading tutoria)
| (institute for overseas students: LON
DON SCHOOL OF ACCOUNTANCY





ching. “FRIGADATRE" 7 cu. it 53. Welbeck Street, London, W.1 as listed below:— HR AN,
Caantity China: & Gings- Rs England. a VIEWING MORNING OF SALE i Mee. S ane Clerk.
ware, @veam Maker, Thermo > SaaS MORRIS Chairs. Rerbice Chair, 2th >

Plast, ne Lanterns, Selec —— SSS Armchair, Diring Table, 4 Dining 12t 2. ,





Chairs, Sideboard, Occas. Tables
Nouble Bed and Spring, Dressing
Table with Lorg Mirror and Stool,
Wardrobe, Nivht Chair, ALL THE
ABOVEIN MAHOGANY. 4 cubit
= Electric Frig Phillips (6
tebe) Battery Set RADIO, China
Cabinet, Telephone Table, Larder
Kitehen Tebles, 2 Burner Table
Model GAS Range, Painted

tinn Pod§Kitchen Utensils, Cake
Ti vanes Ete., Trays, Fname
3 Burner ALGR”
“FLORENCE”. Oven
burner Fialkes Stove, Minger,
Pans, Weighing Machine. Refrig-
crater Containers,, Electric Iron,
‘NEW WORLD" Gas Cooker. as
new), “JACKSON” Evectric Steve,
& Small Electric Stove... Algrm




















Stovi,

| FURNISH 10-DAY

THE

FOR SALE

—















{
\} MAHOGANY & CEDAR WAY





lock, Latties’ “Sports Bicy®le, ' NEW & Renewed A’) Mahogany Cradle, Child's Chair, Children’s UO
Table Tennig- Table, Arm Chair, & All Cedar or Mahogany and ne | Painted Furniture (Dining Table L Y N Cc ill B RG
Berbice Chair & Day Bed, Books Vanities, Stools, Simpler Dr R Wardrobe, ete.,) 2 Simmons fron
Straw Mats. Garden Tools, | aint Tables, Full panelled and other Beds and Springs, Iron Bed and
Prushes, ‘Green's. Lawn _ Mower Bedsteads, Wardrobe, Washstands Spring (single), 3 Single Mattress-

5th Avenue. — SHelleville.

Shears, Step-Ladder, Watering
Can, Buekets-& many other, inter
esting iter:

TABLES for Dining; Cocktalls, es, Rocker, Rugs, Mise. China and

Radio & Decoration, Trolleys.
Plant Stools, Cabinets for China



Glass Ware, Kerosene Lamps,




Metal Swing chair, Pictures, Ca



penters’ Tools, 2 box Cameras,





& Bedroom, Waggons, Sideboards . ; A tr ti , i
aiteeciiiciinine SpHAWAG “ROOM Atoms. one WH) lf Childrens, oie, awn, gtawe on a corner site of 12,000 square feet, Contains 8 galleres (1
ERS Scttees, Armchaira, Upright: (| Pe enclosed), large drawing room, dining room, study, modern
Dot on 4. Biadon BUY Tn ae OMONEY-SAV AUCTIONEERS kitchen, 3 bedrooms, garage, ete. Offers gonsidered.
NG PRICES
& Ce. ment John M4. Biadon JOHN M. BLADON & CO. |
iiloie wads L.S. WILSON ee ‘AL ESTATE AG t Passe
{ Plantations Building SPRY STREET. DIAL 4009 Phone onas ae pa Ee REAL ESTATE AGENTS :
j E i antations Building. Phone 4640 ~~ Plantations Building }}) | CITY GARAGE TRADING CO., LTD
)





SEE Re ES EE ee

















FRIDAY, AUGUST 22, 1952 BARBAOOS ADVOCATE PAGE SEVEN
fine cree an otomatntnte atin danienns nn et dent ro imine AES MOCO Re OTe ney een liane sng AR me Se eR ARAN RRNA SR RRR AN NRT IEE ORI awa ham
" Ae nn wenn ecm 1S SS OM ESTs ELSES OASIS SOE,
HENRY
Swift's Sausages

N .
BY CARL ANDERSO : We can Supply
- Tves Cream ot Wheat
- Macaroni
Rice
x . Starct
>. j Y a Luncheon Beef Loaf
’ Palethorpe’s Sausages



Moe

So

Veal Loaf
Hamburger Stake
Meat Lunch
Vienna Sausages
Macaroni & Cheese
Spaghetti & Cheese
Cooking Butter 1's.
Cooking Butter 5's
Hams 5 to 16 Ibs
Cheese per Ib

|

@
STUART & SAMPSON
(1938) LTD.

Headquarters for Best Rum

Taste

THE DIFFERENCE!

|

ger ohm ai aa!
ee ee CMe 6 eee] ae oe eel ey
SURE? HE'S GOINGS
FOR A NICE RIDE
WITH A COUPLE OF



i



USE

KOO BAKED BEANS
Oy ERE ss pastedere beeen $ .28

K.L.B. PEARS in

K.L.B, PEARS _,,
K.L.B, SWEET
CORD fine

IMPERIAL SAU-
SAGES

BEEF LOAF... _,,

COCOA MALT

TONO

And for The BEST to Drink
Our Popular
FIVE STAR RUM

will



FOR NICE
THINGS TO

BLONDIE BY CHIC YOUNG

WML IL! Foo
a ~ DONT 7
BUT, pagwooo WORRY, DEAR,

IT MIGHT BE (1 CAN MAKE
REAL LATE WHEN )> MY OWN




[IX WIVES THINK THEIR 22
(HUSBANDS ARE SO HELPLESS
WHEN THEY'RE NOT AROUND

Ne eee Sake
a -












THE DOGS

WILL HAVE

TO BE FED,
T

COOK --1LL T* F:
TAKE CARE OF porte
EVERYTHING WE HAVE 2








































































WE GET BACK SUPPER | : $1.20 per Britle
. T PAYS YO T ) Ee
ay PAN BABY |] “SPECIAL OFFERS AVAILABLE THURSDAY TO SATURDAY AT ALL BRANCHES
nacioie = ~ a —————————________ _____
1 f aa a we UT ME ST oe Usuall Now BLUE CHEESE per 1 ...... 0.00 c cece ee cea 1.12
THE THE GROUND )... IT'S THIS WHOLE “\I/ FLASH! CUT Mé ‘ y ow ee . eer erase LDS i
A sHAOOW LIKE A SHROUD ECLIPSE (A THERMAL Y PLACE HAS , sOose! THis 1S Tae BIRD’S JELLY DESSERTS .. §$ .20 $ .16 CREAM CHEDDER CHEESE per t ................ 13
OF DOOM CRAWLS /s Bo QUAKES B GONE CRAZY! JA SUR CHANCE TO . HORLICK’S MALTED MILK 85 16 PINEAPPLE CMUNKS Tins ..................... -51
ACROSS GANYMEDE / COMING! 4 co : a\. GET Away / | 4 f : STRAWBERRIES Tins ..........0.06.0.5 00000 segues 89
; iS { a A. MEAT LUNCH .............. 45 42 RASPBERRIES Tins .........-.-.-..-.--.- +s sees 98
ms mY Seedhee ED Sse iintska eve wcedseres 49 45 RASPBERRIES Tins .............6sscccesccaeeeees 11
‘ TABLE SALT %-1Ib Tins .... 36 .30 PG ARR aRRnR Sar Pay re 4 Ae negara araaperc og 3.60
V ee o! \ é HEIL BEER 28 22 U.S. O.P, BRANDY ...... RAC Gane Tbe moe La ye 8.00
¢ EE.” emai ee tS © stead ilcietuoe BRANDY .. NNW RE Ree heb ae ga ea hace 6.25
<—¢ oN FRESH RED APPLES per tb ..................--: $ .45 kk
RN a ey f GORGONZOLA CHEESE per ID ...............55- 1.21 BO, Ura OR: WPF es cies cas vba thoy eed Gireses -30
I=?
a / I Li
CN te n
Tire }
BY FRANK ROBBINS iiialeana
$$$ $$$ gg——__$______—_ ——— mg? y
WHAT HAPPENS NOW? FINE THING! WE THERE MUST CE. & UMLAUT'S CAT / \
COME TO MAMA, i BULLY BOYS OUT \ GOT THE COUNTERFEIT] | SOME WAY...WHAT'S BS JOHNNY — TABBY ‘
YOU SWEET HUNKS THERE WILL POP US OFF PLATES...NOW WE . ‘ HERE JUST GAVE US |
| LIKE CLAY PIGEONS IF WE | CAN/TGET OUT OF | ot ae A FIGHTING
| | STICK OUR NOSES OUT’ { HERE WITH THEM! } CHANCE / OF
Most of us take too much for granted. We do not
bother very much about how the necessities, luxuries
and amenities of life are provided, so long as we
receive them when we want them. But supposing we
are suddenly called upon to make and do for ourselves,
What then ?
REALIZED HOW LONESOME wise HER =VLL LONESOME FOR MOTHER - COME BACK How would you organise the delive ry of millions
IT 1S AROUND THE HOUSE BE GLAD WHEN 'M_ GOING TO PUT SOME HERE --1/M of letters, or the production of a daily newspaper, or
wie ee = J ne ae acre, iano i the feeding arrangements for a great city like London ?
bs PLAYER / Maal
ly, aS This fascinating volume, packed with hundreds of
Jab /) hr ‘4 interesting pictures, will open your eyes to the many
fi _ oP rocesses involved in the creation of all kinds of every-
a Pp 4 x
LAG) oY day goods and services. It also shows how many
a de ‘ adventurous and far from everyday task are performed.
/ |e)
ae | ADVOCATE STATIONERY
2, King Features Syndicate, tne, Warld nghes veverved }

BY ALEX RAYMOND Broad St. and Greystone, Hastings.
mm | |)





‘


















THROUGH THE FENCE! & PLLC LLDPE PLPLLLPPB ELL PPPOPLLAE ALAA LPBARRPPPPP PPP PPPLLLPET

Saree] | FRESH
APPLES
HAM

AWAY FROM THAT
ONE! BUT WHAT
ELSE COULD
I 00? IT
WAS PAGAN'S
LIFE OR MINE! |
THAT DIRTY





DODO S TSS GOGO CGOC



B99





















%
:
&
: ROLL
> WHAT A FINE VARIETY y
S Were ara ae, $ FOR A BREAKFAST SPREAD in 2b. tins :
THE PHANTOM BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES |+ {URBAN MIXED NUTS in '% and 1-I pk. bea : 3
é % PITTED DATES in 1-M pk. z
‘ ANCHOVIE FILLETS in tins >
4 7 1 > .
1 7 THEY VE GOT HIGH-POWERED THEY'RE STILL SHOOTING AT THE BOULDER) | WHOEVER'S MAYBE ITS JUSTA x MUSHROOMS in tins x
aw My es RIFLES 2-100 MUCH FIRE- <@X gy HAVEN T NOTICED BEHIND THAT TRICK TO MAKE US $ ITALIAN KETCHUP >
TL WIME:-| POWER FORUS, FELLAS. ge ME YET+~ |ROCK HAS GHOW OURSELVES! } 18 CROSSE & BLACKWELL'S TABLE SALT in 2-Ib bots. $
WAIT HERE,’ 7» IsTOPPED SHooTIN. STAY HERE! % SYMINGTON’S PEA FLOUR in 1-1 tins x
2M Ui ¢ MORTON’S DRIED MIXED HERBS in 4-07, bots. y
Doe l N ieee Vil Ab % MORTON’S DRIED SAGE in 4-07, bots. x
‘ ' = 4 . $ MORTON’S DRIED PARSLEY in 4-02. bots.
â„¢ fie Wn 2 iD YB. V\ome is MORTON'S DRIED MINT in 4-07, bots. 3
c fare = H & GROUND WHITE PEPPER in 2-02. pkgs. Pa
Yt FY > y $ PURE FRENCH OLIVE OIL in 16-02. bots. wt
mn)" 1} x DEMERARA CASARREEP in bots, if
\ “a ee % ———— #Gorganzola Cheese
AP? « x
7 Y % ALLEYNE ARTHUR & Co Ltd » New Zealand Cheese in 5 lb tins
i “Your Grocers” — High Street New Zealand Cheese in 8 oz. pk. g
i Le eal %
ere nenve Fn Worry tr jt | FSSC 0 0999999999999 99 999099990995 9590999999 995559555648 6565000000000 SOOSSOOCSOSOOOOOOA
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:
4



PAGE EIGHT BARBADOS ADVOCATE

FAR Sag! RETURNS FROM FINLAND
A\ A | ust Get
A Banked -Track



FRIDAY, AUGUST 22, 1952







79090006966000006000000 | (REE
|

+ BARBADOS HURRICANE

PRECAUTION
HINT NO. 8



AQUATIC CLUB

(Members Only)



OF THE

WEEK:





Big Cycle |

Sports Window



: *
Y.M.P.C, play Harrison R 3 Toda On Satur . 195
College Old Boys in the 7 ace Ly we ee '

KEN FARNUM, Barbadian Chk ree cyclist, told the finals match of the Basket- f
Advocate yesterday that it was very essential that the a we games at Britain’s bi a t DANCE WARNINGS.
West Indies should have at least one anked track. “Riding aa Poca nt. ns Gand When in 1946 English ericket resumed after the war iepetion content the Dell Meee : If your house is secure-
oe p perked track is far different from riding on a, flat anttele iat the Seabevitiall years, the first touring team to visit this country was India, press Tour of Britain begins to-|@ Musie by Anthony Menezes ly anchored to the
rac

Farnum returned to the island on Wednesday | season and should be excit- captained by that great sportsman, the late Nawab of

aay. This mass cycling race, now and



: ; ; : mae : foundation, with a good
night after taking part in the Olympic Games at Helsinki. | ing, for these teams are Pataudi. being held for the second year,|@ His Caribbean Troubadours roof securely fastened
Farnum, who went to Finland evenly matched. A Series of three Test matches were played; Engl has attracted an entny of 79 com- * t

with the Jamaican team, ‘said ..In the first round of the won one and the remaifing ¢ rs B gland pared with 55 twelve months ago. From 9 p.m. — 1 am. |}}) and properly shuttered i

that cycle racing at the Olympics first Division games Y.M.P.C. : t th Engl oan Seen eae ut More ‘Aiso it will last longer and cover e is the best place to

was quite different from that in defeated H.C.O.B. but important than Eng’angds tirst post-war victory was the more miles. ADMISSION -o- FREE weather the storm.

Barbados. He felt that the var- H.C.O.B. reversed the deeis- appearance for the first time upon the Test scene of a play- 22.8.52—2n. 22.8.52—-2n.

ious Associations of the West ion in the return match, er, who with Len Hutton, was destined to keep England’s There are 1,470 miles to be

Indies should concentrate on . This match therefore not flag flying in the years that lay ahead. covered by the cyclists instead of PSE III

having more events at local



meetings which were similar to
those held at the Olympics.
Before reaching Helsinki, Far-
num fell at Paddington track
England. He said that the in
jury he suffered handicapped hi
training but on the day of the
race at Helsinki he was fit
He was very much impressed
with the way in which the games
were organised. He found éh
cement track, which carried a 40 @
degrees angle, terrific. ‘After 9
you get accustomed to the track,
it is beautiful to ride on,” he said.
“It is definitely better to rice
as a team. The results are
better.” He thought that Italy
and Australia were the most im- -_ =
pressive countries and each was KEN FARNUM
represented by about six cycli a pint Renae nibs, es
“The riding was clean - th
lenty manoeuvring,” he sal Gi s
, Farnum felt that the Jamaic tumcrac
team was very popular at He'-

sinki and were very well treated.
Accommodation at Olympic Vil-
lage was magnificent.

“T have gained much exper-
jence from riding at the 1952
Olympics and this T intend ‘o

pass on to local cyclists, " Farnum
ended.

Racing Notes
From B.G.

Own Correspondent)
Aug. 13.

The Luckhoo Brothers have
urchased the recently imported
Thoroughbred “Kindle”, a-bay 2-
year-old filly by “Lighthouse 11”
a highly successful sire which was
bred in France by the late Lord
Derby. The filly was imported
by the Demerara Turf Club.

The club’s previous buy was
the bay 3-year-old filly ‘‘Bileek-
an” by “Birikan’ a son of the Aga
Khan’s unbeaten “Bahram” out
of the speedy daughter of “Sir
Cosme”. This horse was sold to
Mr. A. Sankar before it arrived in
the Colony.

Already .the winner of two
races, » 5-furlong seller and a
better class race over 6 furlongs,
“Bileekan” is nicely rated in Eng-
land. Small and compact she
does not stand over much ground
but is nicely balanced and a good
walker. The neck is medium but
light, especially where it joins
the head—legs well shaped—pas-
terns longish but good, both in
front and behind. She has the
app@arance of being a trifle want-
ing in depth at the flank, The
quarters are plain but muscular
and gaskin fairly broad. Of
good disposition she is the ideal
type for these tracks.

County Cricket:



(From Our



Stakes Won By

‘Bebe Grande’

(From Our Own Correspondent!

LONDON, Aug. 21,
Mr. J. S. Gerber's ‘Bebe Grande’
at seven to two won a fine race
for the Gimcrack Stakes here this
aftarnoon when beating ‘Whistler’
11 to 8, the favourite, by a length
and a half, These two had the
race to themselves throughout,
‘Bebe Grande’ jumped off in
front and kept to the rails and
led until nearing two furlongs
from home. ‘Whistler’, in the
centre of the course, had not been
far behind and came to pass her
with one and a half furlongs ta
go,
‘Whistler’



could not stay on

only decides the winner of
the Knock Out Cup, but
Should also settle any doubts
about the relative merits of
these two teams.

What Does The
New Soccer
Season Hold?

By DENNIS HART
LONDON, Aug.



Football returns to the Eng-
bish sporting scene. It Bb
just over three months since

the curtain was drawn on last
season with that epic Cup Final
which ended with thousands of
the Wembley crowd cheering
Neweastle’s second successive
victory, but still more thousands
cheering the wonderful fight put
up by the gallant Arsenal ten.
Can Neweastle do it again?
Will Arsenal; who came within
an ace of the elusive ‘double’
last season clinch one of the
major honours this ‘time? These
are but two of the questions pro-
viding fans with eve-of-the-
season talking points.
Newcastle are truly a team of
ell talents. “Their football is based
on attack, attack and yet more
attack, And ‘with forwards of
the calibre of Milburn, Foulkes,
Mitchell, Walker and Chilean-born
George Robledo, they have just
the men to earry out this style.
There are also top-class reserves
in Keeble Hannah and Davies.
(Given normal luck, the first
jSaturday in May might well see

however, and when ‘Bebe Grande’..them engaged in their third suc-

came at him again he had no re

serve, In the last 100 yards
‘Bebe Grande’ gradually forged °
ahead, readily outstaying him in

a fine race,
‘Libator’ who had always been
in the third position, kept going

for that place, but was four
lengths behind ‘Whistler’
‘Stan’ was fourth and ‘Empire

Honey’, who was putting in his
best work at the finish, was fifth,
The last place was fillect by ‘Four
Commando’,

It was a fine performance on,
the part of ‘Bebe Grande’, for her
trip to Deauville and back last
week-end could not have done her
any good, This is no, a filly’s
race and the last filly to win it
was in 1933.

Both at Sandown and Good-
‘wood, she had prova@d herself a
classic two-year-old, and this has
now been confirmed for it was the
first defeat for ‘Whistler’ and
‘Stan’ who between them had
won eleven races

Surrey In Good Position
For County C hampionship:

From Our Own Correspondent
LONDON, Aug. 21.
Surrey who need one more
victory to clinch the County

Championship are now four points

yarer their goal,

Outstanding bowling by ‘Tony
cock back from Test duty,
gained them the first inning

points against
Oval today. Lock took 6 for
and Derby facing a totai of
were all out for 107. In addition
to his fine bowling, Lock took
two brilliant catches to dismiss
Derbyshire’s opening pair Elliott
and Hamer.

Steady batting in their
innings put
manding

Derbyshire at th

13
156

secon
Surrey in the com-
position by close of
play. With six wickets in hand
they lead by 307 runs.

Despite fine bowling by Rarn-
chand who took six for 67 the
Indian touring team were lead
by 34 runs on the first innings
in their match against Sussex.
Batting again, the tourists lost
quick wickets but once more
skipper Hazare came to the res-
cue with a gallant 52. At the
close the Indians were 191 for °%

England’s Test batsmen tos
Graveney celébrated his return
to the Gloucestershire side with
a classic 166 which enabled his
team to gain a first innings lead

’
They'll Do It Ever +f



Berore HE opeRATION
YOURE TENDERLY

TAKEN TO THE HOSPITAL
IN A SLOW-MOVING ,
SOFT-SPRINGED,
SPONGE- RUBBER,
BALLOON-TIRED
AMBULANCE==:+

eA

} AFTER THE
: WHEN YOUR NSIDES
WOULD APPRECIATE
AN EASY RIDE»
WHAT DO yOu ¢
GIVE A LOOK





\ Ccimrenmnn

be

of 174 against Leicestershire.
SCOREBOARD
Essex versus Middlesex

ESS@X .isscccscseeeee, 800 for 9 de-
clared, (Dodds 100).

Middlesex pntdsanits. AO SO: Or
Worcestershire versus Lancashire

Lancashire won by ten wickets;
Worcestershire ...... . 104 and 195

Lancashire ... ; sore Ee
(kin 108, Jenkius 5 ‘for. 115) and
23 for 0.

Somerset versus Hampshire

Somerset ..........0..3. 256 for 9 de-
elared and 17 for 2.

FEPATUIEIBPAEE Ori ss peace scas cates caadests

Surrey versus Derpy



Surrey saaitisbboachtokarch.. | San eae

win § for 44) and 258 for 4.

Derb *yshire ... 107 (Lock

6 for 16),

Leicestershire versus Gloucester-
. shire
Leicestershire .........,....... 178 and

32 for 2.

Gloucestershir¢ 356 for

8 declared, (Graveney 116).
Indians versus Sussex
Indians 186 (Wood
» for 34 and 191 for 8,
SuUssOK fi. csscsves 220 (Ramchand
5 for 67).
Northamptonshire versus

Glamorgan
Northamptonshire ........ 356
(Brown 145).
Glamorgan .......0....... 154 for 4



‘Time














Scessive

Final,

Arsenal *

What of the Arsenal? How

‘long can veterans like Joe Mercer

and George Swindin carry on?
This question has been posed at
the beginning of the past five
seasons, but still these grand old
slagers not only manage to hold
their places in the side, but con-
tinue to delight the crowds with
fine displays. Indeed Joe Mercer
played as well, if not better, last
season than he did when he cap-
tained England ten years ago.

Arsenal's worries lie not in
defence, but “for’ard.” Last
season the whole of the attack

rested almost entirely on the wee
Jimmy Logie at inside right.
Players like Roper, Lishman, Cox
and Holton were good enough on
their days, but those days did not
occur sufficiently frequently for
the supporters’ liking.

Arthur Milton, the young out-
side right who lost form after
being prematurely rushed into
the England side against Austria
1 November, regained confidence
toward the end of the season, and
should soon earn a regular place
in the side,

League champions Manchester
United, having won the honour
after being second four times in
live seasons, will be all out for
further triumphs. Manager Matt
Busby thas a judicious blend of
youth and experience at his com-
mand and, in skipper Johnny
Carey, one of the shrewdest tacti-
cians in the game! It was the
switching of Carey from right
back to right half which was the
turning point in United's success
last season. At half back he was
able to “general’ both defence and
attack. Hesdid both with the
utmost efficiency.

Tottenham

Tottenham, seeking their second
League championship in

seasons are full of confidence and |

good spirits after their close-
season tour of Canada during
which they twice defeated Man-
chester United.

Their strength lies in no part:-
cular sphere. They are strong
all-round, and play as a team, and
not eleven individuals, Their
quick short-passing game is seen
to best advantage on firm
grounds. This was the reason for
their lapse mid-way through last
season, when heavy rain made
pitches slow and heavy.

During the summer the White
Hart Lane pftch has been relaid
and an extensive draining system
installed. If this succeeds in
keeping the ground
the mid-winter

By Jimmy Hatlo |



three | Season

|
|
|

firm during |
months Spurs



ALEC BEDSER

TABLE TENN. ‘NIS:

‘’dad Team To Meet
Everton—Y.M.C.A.

The visiting Table Tennis team
from the San Fernando Zone of
the Trinidad and Tobago Amateur
Table Tennis Association wilt
meet a combined Everton-
YÂ¥.M.C.A. side at the Y.M.C.A.
Naval Hall tonight. The match
begins at 8.00 o’clock.

The visitors have so far de-
feated all the club teams they met,
but lost the First and Second
Tests. Tomorrow night the Final
Test will be played and there will
also be an exhibition of Ladies’
Doubles and Singles.



CYCLING

FAUSTO COPPI, the Italian
cycling ace who twice won the
Tour de France, in 1949 and
again this year, has had second
thoughts on retiring. Riding at
Perpignan, France, last week, he
collided with the Spanish rider
Bernado Ruiz, and fractured his
left shoulder-blade and _ collar-
bone. After the accident Coppi
ennounced his intention to retire.
He has since changed his mina,
and says he hopes to race aga‘n
this year.

»

will be a good
for like

Cup proposition,
Newcastle, they have
excellent reserve strength,

In the past, Portsmouth have
not had the wealth of reserve
talent at Fratton Park that there
is at White Hart Lane. But with
the advent last season of such
youngsters as right back Gunter,
centre-forward Henderson and
goal-keeper Dore, things should
be different this season, :

So much for the ‘big five’. What
of the others? Can they end the
monopoly of honours so long en-
joyed by Arsenal, Tottenham
Manchester United, Newcastle and
Portsmouth—-since the war these
clubs between them, have won
the League Championship five
times, and the F.A. Cup four,

If good football brings its
reward, Bolton, Preston and
Wolves are sides which will be
well in the running for honours,

All play attacking football,’
and have three of the best for-
ward lines in the country, Wolves
being strengthened by the close-
signing of Taylor, the
England ‘B’ international former-
ly with Luton,

Of the three Preston appear to
be the best bet, For they have
a sound defence to back up their
excellent attack in which the in-
somparable Tom Finney at out-
side-right, is always a _ potential
match-winner,






Consider all the





the 1,403 miles in last year’s race.
which was won by 23-year-old Ian
Steel,
Wolverhampton,

Alee Bedser, the burly Surrey
giant with the size 12 boots and
a heart to match. burst upon the
cricketing world with a vengeance.
One of identical twins, he cap-
tured 22 Indian wickets in his
first two Tests and in the final
game, added another couple to
bring his bag for the series up to
24 at an average of just over 12
runs apiece.

| tne first Indian innings Bedser
claimed seven wickets, which un-
til Valentine of the West Indies
came along in 1950, was the best-
ever performance by a bowler in
his first Test. Valentine at Old
Trafford took 8 wickets, which
was a magnificent achievement
notwithstanding that the wicket
was taking spin.

After Bedser’s early success
there was great confidence in
the England team which left for
the first post-war visit to Aus-
tralia. But things did not work
out as planned. The English-
men met batsmen such as Brad~
man, Hassett, Barnes, Brown,
Harvey and Morris who were in
their finest form and the bowling
was severely punished.

Rough Treatment

Bedser came in for his share of
rough treatment, and although he
captured 16 Test wickets, they
worked out at over 54 runs each.

The fond hopes of the British
public were rudely shattered.
Bedser was written off as just a
flash in the pan. But what was
overlooked by the stay-at-home
critics was the reason for Bedser’s
lack of success. Although a pace
bowler, he bowled more overs
than any other member of the

side and nearly two hundred more ¢

than the other two pace men,
Edrich and Voce combined,

The difference that adequate,
bowling support could have made|
te his figures was illustrated when
the next M.C.C. team went to
Australia in 1950. With Trevor



Railey providing an-admirable foil, | $

at just over 16 runs each,
Own Style

he captured 30 Australian ay y

His great hearted bowling

a No. 1 favourite wherever he
goes. Some liken his style to
Maurice Tate but Bedser owes
allegiance to no-one. He developed
his own style and, with a run up
which is short for a bowler of his
pace, is able to conserve his energy
and keep going for long periods
without a break.

Last week at the Oval, Alec
epened a new chapter in his
already fine career when against
Nottingham he became the first
bowler to complete 1,000 wickets
in post-war cricket, In this match
he also achieved his own personal
best figures, taking 8 wickets for
18 runs. Nottingham, who re-
quired 131 runs to save an innings
defeat. were all out for 51. Bedser’s
match analysis was 13 for 46.

It is strange to recall, now that
he is firmly established as Eng-
jand’s opening bowler, that, just as
easily, his twin brother Eric might

were medium-paced bowlers when
they joined the Surrey staff but
deciding that there was not much
future for the two of them in this
department, Eric changed to off-
spinners. Since then he has blos-
somed out as a batsman also and
this season has played an equal
_part with his brother in Surrey's
successful bid for the Crampion-
ship.

—L.E.S.



Soccer Results

LONDON, Aug. 21.
Soccer results for Wednesday:
Glasgow Cup, First Round—Pat~
ick 2, Clyde 0. Ulstar Cup; Col-
Crusaders 1.—C.P.

eraine 1,

Features
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this time,
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the cyclists in 14 staging towns—
some
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ganisation of marshals, stewards,
timekeepers, masseurs, mechanics,
service vans; and cars for officials
linked by radio.
te

roadside
even more are expected.

and goes to Southsea,
and north to Weston-super-Mare.

ing,

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have filled the bill, Both of /











a 6ft Scot who works in

There are 16 days for the tour
against last year’s 14

















There are 2,000 beds booked for
in schoolrooms or church

And behind all this is an or-

Last year millions are estimated
have watched the Tour from
‘galleries’, This year

The course startg from Hastings,
Weymouth,

After an overnight ferry cross-
the competitors begin their
fourth stage at Cardiff, go on via
Aberystwyth, Blackpool, and Car.
lisle to Glasgow,

The Scots will aee them striking
north-east to Dundee, then south
to Edinburgh and Newcastle,

Through England, the cyclists
will stage at Scarborough, Not-
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finishing at Alexandra Palace.

The winner will get the biggest
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prize money.

But each day there will be races
within the race; prizes for each

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Full Text

PAGE 1

FRIDAY. AUGUST 22. 1*52 HARHAIMIN ADVOCATE PAGP FIVE EX-CUSTOMS OFFICER CROSS-EXAMINED ^t^^^^Z falsification Case Experiences In The J'ca Hurricane Of 1951 Continues Today By CLIWZ BECKLES,—Co-op4>rt,tir,0//i,, r DEFENCE COUNSEL, Mr. E W. Barrow, cro^-exanv lT lx. L Cln >^ on Thorpe, former Customs Officer in charm* ol Ihe Cneapside Rum Bond, all yesterday, the fourth day's hearing of the charge against Keith Squires, a 26-vcar-old clerk, for falsifying accounts on or about August 31, last year, while an employee of D V. Scott & Co., Ltd. Mr. Justice J. W. B Chenery adjourned the Court until today when ctoss-examination of Mr. Thorpe will be continued. Squires used lo work at D. V. unknown lo the merchant s clerk. Scott's compartments at Chsapside and he would only discover this when Uw alleged offence was when blending operations wee to committed. be commenced There were supHe is rharced with having on posed to have been 64 casks which or about August, i5i, while he would hold approximately 3,000 was a clerk or servant o* D. V. gallons of rum but there was the Scott & Co. Ltd.. with Intent to piwlbillty that they might have defraud, made og concurred in contained none. making false entry in a He discovered that the rum stock book belonging lo or In was missing as a result of the pertto* possession of D. V. nut to blend. There should have Scott, his employer, purporting to been 50 odd caJut. Two thousand show that on August 31. rum vats wine gallons should have been in 1. 2, and 3, the property of D. V. the vat. The rum was not to go Scott A Co. Ltd., at Cheapaidt. Into the vat until it m rcgauged Uridjfetown, contained respectively and retested. but he did not know 2.796, 1,380 and 2,820 proof wine whether the officer had done that. gallons. There had been an occasion Mr. Barrow is associated with when a duplicate, not in the sense Mr H. C c S ?J"^. Anon*, c„iL'b^.d'^.'TrL'-S £% !" ml. and Mr. F. E Field. Amisknow whether il was cancelled. „ IJ? H ****** "" %  %  • 1UJ have SB ELdca^UriSr^Tc" warning the public of the ,ipproaching storm, and advising on security measures. Heavy Showers only 10 or 11 had compartmems. taken wrong casks or something !" * %  %  Fti *** morning Thce without compartments put of the kind, meanwhile the book "_*"?„ 3&T2LJEK ",-*£* their cask, of rum in any avadable at the EXCLSC Department would "jg !" 3**2*2J* Sv spot, and in some cases, a merbe wrong. *£•f r .^"l "JKJLS I^!P*. *. chant would allow another who It had been drawn to h* alienn T h( mE" !" .,? S £">1 1 did not have i compartment to lion that work was being done at g j^ to g ^_^ !" h _* use his. There was thV possibility night at country bond*. fnveto] that three merchants could have When hearing of the case rerum In the same compartm<*nt. sumes to-day, Mr. Barrow will The number of merchants who had continue his cross-examination. rum In any compartment would %  ill have access to the key of the particular compartment. The vats were not locked. Casks were usually outside compartments along the corridor, and In such coses, anybody going Into the bond had access to them. When rum was from bond to bond, MB r-i nm A c ocr-LTi co r. ^^ i a """ ^ueue o1 people waiting to NIL C1..VLA L. BbCKI.Ef.. to-operatrve Officer, last pawohaa* ..itiv.es of food sturTfj night mad: the following broadcast over RedilTusion: which were being sold through a When I returned from Jamaica three davs after the wuxi-m. Hid these unfortunate hufrkWM I gave an account of mv experience which was SKT.^Sl! ££ warmn published in the Barbados Advocate Some of mv listeners. thru-fun.-, will be familiar with much of what I am about lu relate. It is felt, however, that repealing the stmv Jl tbia UBM when the hurricane season is once more upon us should help to focus public attention on the serious nature of these tropical storms, the grave danger they % %  ** to hfe and property, and the need rat takin caution at this period. in the village, which I i WWW left high and lUmaged, there was drj rhen the sea receded \t i aU| I MM 1 the husr I arrived in Jamaica about days before the hurricane passed over the island, and was in residence at the University College of the West Indies, where I wa:, attending a summer school in Cooperatives. This school ended on Thursday, August 16, and I wa.' due to leave for Barbados two days later. On Friday. 17th. the hurricane In all its fury struck, destroying all hope of my leaving the Island on the following day. The official forecast of the hurricane was accurate, and the rarnlngs issued as timely as could the Cr. Compartments Cross-examined, Mr. i duplicate would have meAnt that probably two different officers had signed a form purporting Thorpe lhal a regauifing and a reteslinii said about 15 or 16 merchants of specific cask* had been made. used the bond at Chcapslde. but It would have meant that one had uch had Kiev lost their :.KHI during 'f st.mi %  11* Sunday morning Ihe roads 13d been cleared sufficiently to liable me to n OSBf.RT LANCASTER v., AdnuNM .-attssi I**ldlr:j • mis. til lv> Islrtl Irnll *nd %lrrl. *! % %  urn Mm ii. of all for mill* .il 'I:, |i..-n(cr* whi 'iid r.itm it..'liine -MII. breakfast thai mornim. the canteen had been desUn>ed and Ihrre was notlilni for u U> ral. make mailer' told u. >ln.ird li.ul nut been replnuoli ed. aa Rwvernment had roni'ii null. i. it .ill loml.-iinIn Ihi rll. All thai UP had In lu.(.iti .: it,-,, ,.,,.;, In some areas had been cut Osf, Kelief (.mi.. %  i tWO %  ttlOOls Wfekd had ie-n turnad Into raUsi centres. %  those houssd aboul stini liomelesr men. women and chilTHF. Si Thomas Vestry at their meetins yesterday appointed Mr Chester Cufflcy. Assistant Teacher of St. Matthew's Boys' School as organist of the Parish Church in place of Mr Harold Cummins. Mi Cummins who is at pres*?n' in Canada, informed tinVrstry through the Chairman that he had accepted a post in Kfontreal and would be taking up permanent residence then He also expressed thanks to the Veatrv for (Employed him for several years as organist i church. The Chmi'iiiii Bjkssj nominated Mr. Cuffley who has been actirut during Ihe absence of Mr. Cummins. In doing 30 he said that Mr. Cuffley had dons excellent work. He took a keen interest In what he waj doing and was htjtiiy appreciated by the choir and conThe Polic.* Band utMer ttu gregaUon. 01 Capt. C, E. RaUor., Mr. Reeves then moAed. *ec\ R C M will give a musical onded by Mr. Sandlford that Mr. M the (tastings Rock. Cuffley be appointed organist and ,tt rt n'clock tonight, this was agreed to. Scholarship The Vestry on the motion of Mr. K S Sandlford %  OCQI Mr S A. Walcott. awarded a Vostrj Scliol.irsl.iltenable at Comhermare School to Horac- heed wf Dennetts Tenantry. Reed is at present a student of Corobeimeic School. The Chairman Vestry thai Mi I'' T.unu a. follows %  — ; brief Flour, Glassware Copra Axrive Steamships, one scb motor vessel anchored %  going into the Two Steamships one schooner Shortly before sunset an unusual '"mpanion t to thsm. %  md ,. a m ^ ,or vessel anchored In punili-h glow could b~ seen lishllanding of ra. being moved ^ t ^^/^ f ^S M n ffSS! ) : i up the otherwise leaden sky. W 8*55 nd. it was conJjJ> " from Net Yor?^' n w ""' d '" b "-"""' " 'fl ?*T „ h 'l low-lying parts of the island for many days previously, was at its worst. Everyone sweltered In the oppressive heat. Masses of heavy black clouds floated overhead, seeking to devour everything By about 2 o'clock in the after"heir path, noon most of the business places in Kingston were closed, and Safest Position ble people headed homeward. The safest position for Shortly before sunset an unusual companion ami me was on th could b" seen lightlanding of an Inner staircase halfway between the top and bottom "a was in a corner more Itered from the violent nd. By about 2 a.m. on Saturday, Lights Off ne w,n d had dropped consideraThat evening after dinner in ">: .The "'<' %  however continued Irvine Hall I went over to the J .""• wnilc occasional flash.% %  !! i-. U lie Imped thnt this icenunt of my sK PSr k a j c— i*r\-e to remind uMonon of the %  "".'" .... sdvice on hu DBflplM Ih* absence Of telephone Issued l 'he local Mum, coromunieaOons and tlw chaos lief Orginlsation. It ihould b 3 MM nslgOOd everywhere, a to-, obvious to mm | empl, plane did eventualy leave .,• how destructive could I shout 4 oclock that afternoon. force of wind* of over 125 mini ituring the journey lo the vsiocjty, I..I lorrsotta] rain i Pallsadoes airport, several coaat.il IT in.hewithin I period iimn u wen .is ..Mici vessel-.. %  ii mis Th,.: is what occurred n could be seen listing at various Jamaica on August 1? 1931 It angles. They had been loosened could happen here in Barhadoi B their anchorages and csrIf it doe..—which heaven forbid t"e high tide Una ie-. m n a %%  Bound un| .,1 II H MASCH — Ik. i(i,i Inlmi-, IWlil. p ( %  M-i\-h died in Juti. I HU .lp.ilh %  • d doubl aces • ir-ivr,i durlni hi u-rvk* In Ih. 1-14II war H' hurt ii...I niiwl.T i>f MIMIC lo IU iwly %  ••ntMd R r M K SbMlrMnl up lo th i m* of hi. itMlh. and lu ont i I the l popular nxlii'iii "1 ihr Banal School ol Musk "Mill OVISTHI D. Wrlwi I I —I. — ( ralr tad I I J S llach %  tsfsjssag i >naed lor Ihe %  II. I .11 .1 t. | .... 1 liia I the IT gSttvaS H "i aninc Hi|hi. bt> I I e lUim iii. riuw — ,nmt Mi-uMi r i gd fbor sldered to be in Govenu lody. and a merchant could naC Sg?TtrrnrVt^y^^ ^S^f^^ irc t, !" ,K ft ,iJ ^, • (,>.-_...-„ LmMa. i. Motor Vessel Daeru'ood, 94 tons, i>r should nut inteilcre wit; it. *___ c> i,„j, „_J ,u_ c*u* Wllh every^ov^on, o, Ihe ,urn SBJ "ifVliS* £S."^Suh the casks should be refuged and Guiana. retnjted. but this wns not always The P>>fiAua U-HI.-K ia -muiD •** % &f%  • •• • % %  -m u>vi i" '< %  <• .,*_.. done, die lo .he ImidequaW flS! , ,„ HoTr? Thorn 4 Co !" Ud. "unner,-. nnolher colleU buOdtel O'JX'AI^TW.S SbleToV~ Adcquale pro.-ls.on wa. not brouhl 1.000 bags of wheat flour, u.tcd about 150 yarda away. I ^'„ n \, !" "l, "„,, „; !" placed by Ihe authorities tor .uper. M eartonn of glasiware, 31 ban remained ehat.mil wlUi aome of ' ,-,, ,,.,.„ >„r llmujand. Wain* rum. There was supposed of vegetable seeds, four cartons "• lecturers of the University ,.""'"'.„,,,,,,,,i„^ "l lo be a quarterly check, but this of tractor parts. 21 cartons of who occupied quarters there At however there was hn sleep'wtialver thai night. At daybreak Rats And Flies Being Obliterated In Montreal MONTREAL Protection from two of the world's worst disease carriers may soon be a problem of the past informed the S llowcll. Manager of Bagatelle plantation. is., io MI... Sl< Thomas, had offered I —. ~. In the cleaning up ( ibf yard, provided that he was allowed %  to take away the glass. The Vestry, on the m..tior. 01 Mi S A U.,,.,, clerk lo write Mi-. Ho*el ing him for his kind appointed a Committee comprising the Chaiirnan and the Churchws den ,,. m,-,-. M. \\. ..,, make the nsceasao in comiec'.ion with ttu ^"" Present at the meeting were — Uev. II. c Shepherd-Ciiali-man. %  "" Mr. K. S. Sandifo:d -Churchwarden. .Mr. S. A Walcott. Mr h D „ G 'J J Mr c w Coll Mr. V. E. Reeves. i .i i Uta Lalm r|a i MUSS M th. paitt %  • i. IBS app.av.ni-r .'I fliBhl an. arsus iinaai in. p*ru Th. pomn U) b. nolod in in. ru-.ii. — md alr.tlo r... Hi .[,;,. %  I iMCh ii\sa< riaisncs — a VtNk Vra CloelWa | ill K IOIHI MlliltV Wo. Sreiu. — ut M >r POl urn — nj \..an U l sons by K.iMi.n '" HI SIC — vint SV.i-n Hu P.rad. bv DutK...M llriUiin*!* Buiiunr.6 LONDON IVaafa lalkg on banana-buy lug or one month Driver Fined 20/His Worship Mr. G U. Grifllth, Acting Police Magistrate of District "A" yesterday lined Theoohilus Fenty of Road View. St Pelcr 20/and 2/costs in 14 days imprisonment with Dr. Henri Ciroulx, Montreal rwaith Ofllctf, s.iv. in %  '. be ..pciuM m i^.ndo,, i,> hard labour for driving the motor. tractor was not always done. shoes and 15 cartons of cotton about B.30 the electric powers Blending Rum tw ^>, h „„ cul ". As .< wa "•> PPermission to blend rum used to Twenty-four bags of starch. 90 parent change In the weather, this be given by him It was not beDa8 ' c l a a U *>& oT peanuts, did not alarm us. Candles were ing done .> now When the aoulland M P' ,cko l[ o' fresh fruit produced ind the conversation caUon had gone on to the Excise j !" ^. lhe P^ !" 'op<* "* Department he would sometimes JS,^ Ku give permission. ifi !" X tT 0 ^. ig led "*? ron "These two vessels are consigned while the blending was going on. to the Schooner Owners' Assocla, h „ KimiT^ri fii irii !" I It would be an InaceuraQrecord. n">' E 35 along Illack Rock, St. ^ay to HHtain. The delegattv Michael, at just over 28 miles per I lie joined later by Mr. Ales,lo "r lei HuNtamante. Observers in -„ Tne ,. speed mit on ,hal ru '* d is nidon believe that Ihe Jaiuai* m "* s r*f hour The ofTence will press for a guarantee *" ~ mm, -S£ d ^ M y 2 ? abn I" buy tliolr banana exports. *?* $ m i !" \ SP *" brought lUln ha* been turnin K reeeiill> XJ r a J" ",?. nd ? r ,. C Z "^V "•'an eol for IK l.,.it.in.i station ssiiss I'l'l'wsgt Alleyne prosecuted for the —B.V.P. Police. emment ofllcers'. If a form for blending was signed without t regauging or a retesting being done, a b.earn might be said to be committed. When he went to the Cheipside First Boys* Clubs" Sports Meeting Ov tin100 athletes from Bond to work in 1950, he found Boys' and Girls' Clubs of Ihe books hopelessly in arrears, island will take part In the first and at the time of the alleged Championship Sports Mil Ins for offence, the books were still in Boys' and Girls' Clubs ever to be arrears, though not as much. Enheld In the Island. The meeting tries which should have been made takes place at Kensington Oval were not made. Therefore Ihe on Monday August 25. starting at books did not show a true picture 3 -'*. Pm of the state of the bond. Mr. There are 13 Boys' Clubs, two Scott's books were also in arrears. Girls' and one Club wriieh i* for To put it mildly, the Government ?? th Lo v ana \, S'rU So far books were unreliable. The authorDwtrlct C Boys' Club at St. Philip Hies were notified of the InJ"! to W* ,he sl of !" '' adequate staff, but nothing was T h, C wn boys W,U re l ,reserit U* done. C,ub August Re4tirtu h When he made a cheek on the p njHW igp Rod d n Di B trict A Club returns for August, behind Squires 12 It was pitch dark outside. I set off In the darkne Tor what I thoufht was Irvine Hall. I M>on discovered that 1 was i:> inr In the wronjr direction and tried to i i-u ii i my step*. Bv thai lime, uhal. with the darknras, the rmty wind and lhe rain, I had lost all sense of direction, and a. I later dUiumbe? and twisierf covered, was heading away from i ron sheets littering lhe place fur my intended destlnsUon. Where vards around. Roofs with gaping I would have ended up. Proviholes <>' merely with rafters denee only knows. Fortunately standing could be seen. They I was saved from disaster by were like skeletons. The huge the lights of an on-romlng ear. gymnaaium which was to have and wu able, panting and been used as a rescue centre after • -Miiiie. to reach the Hall. It . then about 9.15. with the ground. With no electric power, we An Occasional Lull faced the dismal prospect of having lo go without breakfast thai Securing a storm lantcm. I morning. A parly of us set out went up to my dormitory, the for the college laundry to obtain only other oceup;i-il Of which WU coal pots and charcoal. When we iT^s?' lT y .4?rSr 7$ y Z %  st "dent from British Honduras, eventually got there wc found thai m eiitere-i i£ &t Cecilia Club. These dormltorle^ aro strong, flatthe coal nets had Tliirtv--i.. V .in.... Small paid lh e.lie Prix Masslvo trees were shorn of he task with the houscholdei their leaves and most of their Window screens, covered garbagi branche* while the trunks stood P"Hs and careful food disposal an with broken limbs raised i*Spslllnu the end for the one wrrds the iky. In many case* prevalent pest. th. trees themselves had bee.. Bv appealing lo the delicate T !" r !" torn up from th.u rool snd n f r **** %  th ir number i* lav stretehsd out scross ,,,,. >'-'n cut A conn<.lsiir of food, l.viiand roadw'tv rodenl fancies such tasty items as out-of-season fruit and fresh BSH-I i % %  %  broad. Armed with this know.,., Kr k,,n l.nmber ^^ lIv ^Kir.minators are putWhere once stood some buildIin( volton u good u^ Ing, one saw broken is9aces of Thc r ., g „ n BV old the nptsnn >' %  ".Y"!! 1 !" by movlnn from the open sj .,., where it is effedive. If used in ,i bOUM 'he rat may climK within the walls and contaminate the home after Its death. The only acuon me Householder sag L.ke Is part of man's growing education in cleanliness, says Dr Groulx By kre|>itui the premises clean and covering all garbage and food, he soon forces the m\ Into 'i i open again wnere be i* a victim of the poisoned delicacies HI r Butcher Hangt'd ulchei old I i-rday morning i i-nalty at Ob n e killing of hi w wife fiwni diilm Smull on February. A : Jury found him guilty of murdei I on July 2K at the Court of Grand Sessions. %  I., assjeutton '""-* placs ^.i 1 a.m. and aftrrwards a nine-man j lurv returned ,i V.'l'lnt i.f death |Udll Igl lianglnil. \ NEW ARiUVALS ;• < FROM BOOTS. :J COAT STOLEN fc goat valued $00 i cellar at the iiidsirfg itorie* are strong, UBIlhe coal pots had been burled net A *-'*> roofed, concrete buildings of two under a mass of ruins and the bags he bad discovered that he was InJiVnes B Speightflown six "poTir •"*""" a,,J s t V od up toulIy lo % VlS !" T J^t^L^T STS' #££ SS accuraiTto l^SS ^ ^^^^^ ^^ !" ^ !" Sft f^ R.chard Daniel of Hindsbury oa (1 down the corridors. Through Transportation He stated that the goat was every opening and crevice in the All means of transportation and removed sometime between 9.00 bui'ding the rain beat in with telephone communication being pm on Tuesday and 2.30 a.m on tremendous force. Within a shor: cut off. I spent Saturday at the Wednesday. tune the floor was under 2 inchec College, exe.pi for a walk which *' %  jon^ of water and everything in the took to the nearby village of Mlllicent Walker of Villa the rum had been subsequently Street, elevens Hill and Charstolen. There could be other nocks, have submitted four reasons. entries. At one time he discovered that A member of the Organising rum was being shipped without Committee told the Adrocolc sppUcatlon being made to him. As yesterday: "A good aft* Chief Officer of the bond, he had sport is anticipated and the key, but he subsequently dlsHidden talent covered that rum was delivered come to light.' out of the bond without his knowThe Police Band ledge, and that there was a dupllattendance^ rate key. With the knowledge hi room, including myself, was wet. Ppme. Here damage was exBriltons Hill, St Michael, re' a UD Occasionally, there would be l ten. fve. Several of the house, ported to ihe police thai hat i n lull for a few seconds, only to bo had been wooden structures ard house was broken and entered followed by winds of greater mu8 %  %  *• been reduced lo —' lolem By about II p.m., the storm seemed to be at Its worst. At this stage Vistinguishable above the roar of the winds, falling of id the noises attending thc within that there was a duplicate key, NO QUORUM he felt that anything was liable The meeting of the Sanitary lo happen. Commissioners of St. Michael. Controller of Excise. Mr. King, which should havo taken place at had this duplicate kqy. and ex'he Parochial Buildings yesterday plained to him that a merchant afternoon had to be postponed w rurtion of b"''^^f^W hiid wanted to ship mm urgently until Monday next because there a terrific crash of_(bunder was UN • %  ;* * %  *"•* *""* '* !" "J iiuorum heard. The wind seemed to whip E lifiaJ'Ss t?S2. O""? "ee^nembers. Mr. J. M. itself into a fury unknown be-J but he |va* not at home. Kldnt?v> chairman, Mr. E. D. fore. The indescribable sounds J? ..w il r vV; J Mottley. M C.P., and Mr. Victor produc d by the splintering of a night with Mr King. Goddard. were present. slsss. the uprooting of trees, the Gauging and testing was to be 0ne of tnr ltems on lhe agenda looping off of branches and the done by Government Officers, and was ^ appoint a Sub-Sanitary blowing about of bits of masonry. It was not necessarily the duly of inspector. wood and galvanijed Iron, gave a merchant's clerk. Members would also have reihe impression that a thousano It might happen that casks might reived plans and specifications for devils had been lei Ux-se and* were be put by. and might I..mpiy :* %  < %  Hi-ln--t Market short time. At I sometime between 12.30 p.m. and 5.30 ntity on Wednesday of articles stolen. id mi.I M SIUM \l II uer AnlaelU — AtMMirluid >J —For niilui -linn %  aVffOstl *. \eli'il>. relieve* pain and *J. ili— < %  int.il I lit iifn. Tome \ t'erni'iiU and r'lloren a|O petite. also BOOTS Children'-. Worm S>rup i.iMi. ii i , .. Syrup soda Btrarblnate %  Ih Aiaplrin i II.IM. IDV tamll) l.lnlmeni |f/| rvr.eent mouth waah Table., J I' K Tablet* IIUHMI Purifier lablet Chlorophyll We hulili l(r< .illlllI'Mll potrrs V:AST TABLETS MIUI VlUmln l, 100 Tablet., fur 72c. RKlii: WEATH.KII):\I> Limited Helllni V %  i. %  for Bat-ilPure llrm lu ASTHMA am to ease (he strain in 30 seconds I WpUH cla*im A.lhma nukci , gatp for hresih, one I'plnronc tsMri ilipprd m tinmouiti g ihe % %  rain qukkly and efftMivtly Krmcmbct, li 11 ihi* iiramon ihe tyiicm which "nitiiuti tinbiggest danger frura Attluiu I l-!plus.air con I •ins severs! healing %  gents wlikh il.'-ilir die itTsUudinil, scrni uulcn aciumulaiiuni in the bronchial tubei, and in (hit way promote The llpliasonr trcstmeni it M> simple tool midiinc to inhale. No miner how swifily or uncipccredlv uV allatk ( %  •met, iherc M alwayi lime to cacck Aithms wu Ii Por rapid rrbef from Aiihms, ltron(h.tis JHJ Hrunclual Caurrh dwsyi keep a supply of liphsionr labUti handy! FOR ASTHMA AND BRONCHITIS TAKE •| •" PSSjMMd SfeSShStB If 111, i .i,. ', IMU. s eniDis a wm no. CO Bft (11. i>lal|tSSS. ,'.*,',*.','.','.'*•.• 26G GALVANISED CORRUGATED SHEETS — iin — LIMITED STOCKS-BUY TO-DAY CAST IRON BATHS WHITE PORCELAIN ENAMELLLN • V OVERALL—COMPLETE WITH ALL NECESSARY FITTING.* $127.43 EACH. GALVANISED BARBED WIRE 4 POINT BARBS-J INCHES WART M POL'NO ROLLS EACH < OV1MNIM. A MINIMI M OF 267 YARDS $16.80 PER ROLL ALL METAL WHEEL BARROWS 3 CUBIC FEET CAPACITY Suitable Tor isl II ll i:CONTRACTORS and OOME8TIC Use $16.82 EACH. IIIKKISOSS IIARDWARF I1EPARTMENT TELS: 3142 and 2344 GET THEM READY FLAXENE SCHOOL COLOURS QUEEN'S COLLEGE—Blue 4 OriMn AI.KXANDRA—Blue ST. WINIFRED'S—Orcen LYNCH'S SCHOOI Green All :t6 ins wide at SI .13 per vd. Also Beige. Mauve. Grey He Rose $1.13 vd. A BEAUTY MOIRE SPOT TAFFETA in Powder. Battli ship. Feu. Black. Emera.d. Calamine. Ivory. Lt Navy, Hydrant-fa. Gold. Spectrum & Uutra 36 inches wide $2.43 per yd. JUST OPENED AT CAVE SHEPHERD Ik ( %  <).. LTD. 1*. 11. 12 A 13 Broad St. JIST itni ix i it SIMMONS BEDSTEADS 4 Fe*t 6 inches ONLY A I I Ml I i n QI'ANTITY SO ( \l 1. ANI OET YOl'RS EARLY F.ktabll*hed Incorporate i T. HERBERT LTD. I860 10 II Roebuck Sirtei Orltlnil Now L Jjimln .." OH Mil.nii S-.U. IF Vrnl 44.SS 15.M J 10.00 1 10 00 V*s 400 1 % %  iri.i-. dr I I. %  IU.04 35 M four Troubler 35.00 it.oo I J\cky 30 00 30 0(1 10.00 1 \ iftsa %  'uinnilr 10.00 Kur de Ii Pals 30.00 10.00 ( illr dr Ru-Mlr 30 00 It" 'Ml L. ...I. 3000 10.00 1 .-iur Ilor ZI.M IH Pour Troublrr 11 M 6.00 17 00 6.00 QlUIld VIPI1 Lrlr 11.00 6 00, KNIGHT'S LTD. Phoenix Pharmacy. DRASTIC MDUCTIOiYS (ilEKI AIN S Ullli'lll i'nil nuon &f BIV NOW FOR XMAS I'RESfMS


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iwr.t. KM; in \ HAKKADOS ADVOCATE HtliiU AUGUST n. 1SJ FARNUM RETURNS FROM FINLAND >oeaeeooo*e W.I. Musi Gel A Banked Track I Champion cyclist, told the ntieJ thui the "Riding i banked track la far different from ndinu on %  Hal track." r'aruuin return iland OH Wednesday mtfht after taking pan in this Oiympie Games at Hi kink: Parnum, whu awM I with %  said lag i the CHyi was quite different from lhat In Barbados. He left that the various Associations of Ihe W i should concentrate on having mon i local aw lings winch wart tfcmllar to H -.ptr%  '• %  reaching Helsinki. K num fell -' i Big and. lie said thai the I I i I : but on the • %  11. i i van muth with %  %  cenaani degree'*''' you net aecu % %  as a team Tin le au te are %  V %  re l nrc< maimiflrenl. lenco from riding Olvmpic nnd this 1 Inti nn ^n In r.rnuii %  Sports 11 i nflow I HI'l. i.t... lUrrivn I attage UHd Hoys In the lili.il* niiUh of thr hU-hrl lull kntxk-uiit rimr> at Ml 1 t..ri| E nt. I heIk SIMI II. < III. x %  II i i li ul thr llMhr|(Mll -. %  son *nd -IntulJ be runInjr. f.r Utcwteaaaa are evrnlj mil hed In Ihe flrM round of ihe linn IMi-btMi same* &*aUM defeated lll.il.lt bul H C.OB, reversed thr derision In the return match. Thh ni.I. h therefore noi onlv decide* the winner id "< Knock (hit fup. bul should .-IM> M-ltlr nit doqbb. about the relative meHU of Ihesr two Warns SPOJtTSMAA OF Tin: WBBKi ALEC BEDSER Big Cycle Race Today IXHfDON : Britain's biggest and ron***l aportiaj contest, the Dully Express Tour of Britain begins to-' oay. This mass cycling: race, now being held for the second year When ckal lesumed alter Ihe war e first toi >• % % % % % %  %  i< > visa this country was India, captained by that fCfeal MKiilsman, the late Nawab aj Pataudi, A series of three Teat matches were plaved; England %  %  attracted an entry of 79 cornwon one and the remaaaintt twu were drawn. But more 1 K ml wlth s 5 tw f lve montna ago. important than England's lint post-war victor* waj UgB ^'LJ-, 1 ^ ]0ngrr nd ""^ apj earanci roi the Brat timupon the Test scene of a player, who with Len Mutton, was destined to keep England's ears that lav ahead. hi v iMINI >t Gimcrack Stakes W on By •Behe Grande' -'.. AUK21, What Does The New Soccer Season Hold? lt> IIINMS ||\RT LONDON. Aug. Football returns to trie Enp%  an -porting scene. II |* %  nths since teason with lhat epic Cup tun,. h thousands of UW Wembley crowd Nawoaatla'a aa c o n d successive ad --tilt more ihousan* r hearing tha waodarful ilghi put up by tii. oai ten. Can Newcastle do it again? Win AraanaL anno ama wnhlB ..ri nea <>f the atuarva 'doable* last season clinch one oi the BCdser. the barly Suney with the size 12 boot* and There are 1,470 miles to be covered by the cyclist* instead oi the 1.403 mile* in last rear's race. which was won by 23-year-old ln ^ Staet, a 6ft Scot who works in rt lo match, burst upon "it. l'on. ticketing world with -i vengeance therf uri ,8 dfly5 f01 ,h< l ar >ne of Tdcnucol twins, ho cap'Us time, agninat lat year 1 uic-d 22 Indian wtckels in his <"**• irsl two Tests and in the Una! _. j.m added another couple % % %  2.000 bco* booked for "•'.. his bag for the series up to lh **'** Jn sUglng towns— al an average of Just over 12 ^" in *' m %  choolrooms or church halls at crowded seaside resort And behind all thai is an orIndian innings Bedser gunlsatlon of marshals, stewards, n wickets, which unt %  mekeepera. rnaaaeurs, mechanics, of the West Indies service van*, and curs for officials D 1850, was the bestti„ked by radio. performance by a bowler in LJ^ year millions arc estimated Irst Test. Valentine at Old l( bav* watched the Tour from %  I. aui eamc along BAKBADOS AQIATK (III; (Member* <>nl> i On Saturday 23rd Aug. l.i: DANCE MauOc by Anthony Menesr-. and, Hb Caribbean TToubadoan Prom 9 p.Ds. — I am ADMISSION -aw FBE£ II.1.53—2n. aaoaaaaaaa •••••*••*• HIRRKAiNE PRR'AUIIUN HINT NO. 8 WARNINGS. II your house is secure ly anchored to the foundation, with a tfood roof securely fattened and properly shuttered it 13 the best place to weather the storm, 22.8.52—2n Trifford took 8 wirkets, which was a magnificent achievement notwiihMauding that Uwaa taenngj nb Afler B I succc."; there Wi,s great conndence in the England team which left for Ihe first post-war visit lo AustraUj Thii •galleries'. %  AI.EC BKIkSl.K I Ull.F TSNM& Mr. J. S I honours ihi. OBM? These Racing Notes From B.G. I" % % % % %  Mill* ••(1-1 14II11I (ICh. ^^ — in bui nn ..f Oa IIUMUC M BTOdad IVaM loMl'f't ,, Evertoii—Y.M.C.A. tafgad ,is v 'dl_ Her* %  % %  ''! lalklng points. ii to H. ii.c ravourlta, i ; length Kawearaye are truly a Eha 1 uuann I haar football rgo* to ti. KlgBOUt '"i attack, attack and ye. 'Babe (.Tun). Limped oil In "Mack, And with forwards of from lha San Fernando Zone >f "he fond hopes of the British ..more of Milburn. Foulkcf, the Trinidad and Tobago Amatour public were rudely shattered led until Hearing | 'lUhi-M, Wiilkcr and Chilean-born Table Tennis Association will Bedser was written oft* as Just a tgaajM Whi'U'i, In the Oeorge Itobledo. they have just meet %  cvribined Evertonlash in the pan But what wai Tho buckhoo Brothers of the course, had not t-een Ihe men to carry out Utls style. V.M.C.A. side at tin Y.M.C V overlooked by the stay-at-honi'purchased tin to pass her here are also lop-class reserves Naval Hall tonight The mat -h en i ic* was tho reason for Bedser'* ,-hbr^d "Kindle" arun one and .< half liirlonK' u, t i Kaable Hannah and Davies. begins at 8.00 o'clock. lack of success. Although a pace yenr-nld tllU b) 1 IghUl UBt l %  K. the llrsl The rintom have so far debowler, he bowled more overs a highly successful M" 'rfBlBtla* 1 could not slay on,-Mgrdaa in May might well see feated all the club teams they mei. than any other member of thebred in Pranca by 'he late I^trd howevii. and when 'Belie Cirandc' .inem engnged in their third suehut lost_the First Thr ail) % %  %  'imported ,. arm a t him again he had ne r*1 h In the last 100 yardsp The eotll I Hastings. and goes lo Southsea. V/eymouth, %  nd north lo Weston-supei-\I.i;r After an pvanlflht 1'T ig the c-nnpetiU>rs begin their Md The EnglishAberystwyth, Blackpool, and (Carmen met batsmen such as Bradh| (i GU ,.w OW ^ ^^ man. Hassett, Barnes. Brown. u "* w Harvey and Morris who wer,. in ni) scots will see them striking their finest form and the bowling north-cost to Dundee, then south was severely punished ,„ Ed.nburgh and Newcastle. U„....l. — %  Through England, lha cycUatt RntiKh Treatment W| „ £g al Jea rgoroug h, N,ABedser came in for his share of in Kham. and Norwich before rough treatment, and although he ,ll,lsh ing at Alexandra Palac*. captured IS Teat wickebt. Usey The w.nne,will get the biggest worked out at over 54" runs each iUlile Btaan of C1.000 rfrered H i/c money. But ejich diiy there will Ix; races SLEEP IS PRECIOUS thin tha PBcej p rla ai for etage. and prizes for short up-hill bursts at pre—selected points known as primes. bv the Demcrara Tnif Club The club'.pn Hie by 3-yenr-old flllv "Blleekan'" by "Blfikan' .i son of ihe AR-< Khmrt unhi'iitcn "B.ii i of the speedy daughti : Cn-ino". This bOJM was sold to Mr. A. Sankar hefort* II arrived In loop. Already tho winurr of (v.. i 5-furlong seller and % %  %  attar class race over 8 furlongs The last pli "Blleekan" Is nicely rated in EngC.irnmando Second 'de and nearly two hundred more Tests. Tomorrow night the Final than the other two pace men. Test will be played and there will %  drtcn and Voccombine.1 exhibition <>f LadleN 1 d Singles. CYCLING Beba OteaaV gradually forged' Arsenal ring him In What ul Ihe Arsenal.' How Dou' r race. l"tig can veterans like Joo Meaaa who had alwa> beei Suindin carry onV ae I'IOII hap' I TttiM question haa been posed at for thai place, but was tout tha beginning of ihe past five -..,— Oaf scaaofiN but still these grand old PAt.^ro c oil l. thr%  Stan' was fourth and 'Empire stagers not only manage to hold cycling ace who i*ice wan Ul hngj in hlH their placos in Ihe ltd*, but conTour '•*• Frnnce. m 1949 and beat work at ihe timsh. w;s tiltii bous U> daUgh) lha omedj "iiti again U (illc-l by Four line displays. Indeed Joe Mercer thought* on retiring. Riding ul ... well, if not better, last Perpignan. Prance, last week, !• The difference thai adequate DDwllngj support could have made lu tratad when J lha nexl M.L'C Main went to Australi-i In 1830. w.th Trevor 'Viilev i-.i-vl ling ..ii-ndininible foil | lUluiM he captured 30 Auhtialian wickets at just over ifi runs eeeh, Own Style A Grand SERVICE OF SONGS OlOltOl 1-ABRIlSh.phrrp.fi Al kin n-lOrncr, 111 H VII.UAUK. SI % %  IIIIJIOt'NIIAT) SIM AtOI'Sr, ISS't ADMISSION — If* t crcn. sK-rrrs CMOIH land. Small and compact she ft WSj) a OB* perrorraanca on season than he did when he capcollided with the Spanish does not stand over much ground the parl of *B< k> i her laJnad Fngland ten years ago. Eern.tdo Ruiz, and fractured li i |OOd trip to Deauville and back last Ai-senal's worries lie not in Irft <-hoi)l'ler-blndr and coll walker %  i muld not have done her defence, but "for'ard." Las', bone. Afte light, especially whet 11 By good. This it noi a lllly's at'iison Ihe whole of the attach %  iinauiced die head leg well shaped paslast filly to win it raa t ad almost anfJreb on the woo \j c nas 5 j, lcc chanired hi* ml lingi.sh but goo.i. both |0 was in 1833. Jimmy I-"giat inside right. nd ,. v „hones" to r-ice nn front and behind Khe hsi the Both at Sandnwn and GoodPlayers like Roper. Ushman, Cox Twi" JJJ *^ appearance of IM-IIM: a b ood, he had provm herself a .uid Hollon were good enough on ng in depth at the flank p bid A this baa theu* days, but Ihosa days did no< — quartetare plain but musculsi in t I'CII confirmed for ii was the occur sufficiently frequently f. and gnskin fairly broad. •• fan 'Whistler 1 likjnc. good disposition he Ait'iur lAtan, Ihe young slavai His great hearted bowling at homo and abroad has made Bedser S No. 1 favourite \vh.'.'. % %  ( res. Some liken hi* style lo taurlca Tale but Bedser owes •""""'' %  ' IM|1 neglanca to IHMH* He tleveloped en I ion to retne. nls own glyle und> with a run „ ( "huh u short for s bojaisi el hi %  pace, is able lo consci ve his energy jind keep going for long periods without a break. All.. lo-nd. V/*V//r'*V/*'//*V. I.mint\ Crivkvl: Surrey In Good Position For County Championship I.ast week at the Oval, Alec K ned a new chapter m his >ady fine career when against Nottingham he became the (lr.-l bow'u'r lo cumplcle 1.000 wlcket.In post-war cricket in tag ... at While Hurt l.ane. But With *• > achieved his own pcr"'-' ... of such best figures, taking 8 wickets foi ... right buck Gunler. '*. """•_. Nottingham, w (.ntre-forward Henderson and quued 131 v ill be .i good Cup proposition. for like Newcastle, they have ve -i rength. In the p P0 OUta have noi had the wfeattti %  i ig, ii. I victory to clineta the County fllhlp arc now lou %  OuUttanduig bowling bj TOM. Lock back from Teat duly, gained them the t:r.t iiiniiig %  points againsl D Oval today. I'" and Darfat of were all out t\ lo bis IHI. iwo brilliant catchSS to daBBUI ;ie's opening pair EllloK and lluinci batting In Iht • i innings put Burraj na a n di n g iiosilion byplay. With IUI wicket tags land by Mrl run Despite line bowlm, chand who took M\ for 67 the % %  by 34 runs on the lirst Uutlngs in their in.iti li against Sussex. Batting again, the totti •junk wickets bul M skipper Hazun* came to Ihe re cue with | pUaal Nt At tli l dose ihe Indians went %  %  %  .ited his retui i Ul the Gloucestershire a classic i. io Bate a %  %  I. M out BOABD K—rv vi mils Mlddh-M'X —^ Jt , J* V, .f n n U Mancheslc. ,,, M i. k „ ,>,,„. „,,„,,, ^, n ld defeatwere all out for 51. Bedjr %  d rrerenl this mso match analysis was 13 for 48. So mot b foi the W| liie'. What )t i8 strange to recall, now ihnl Of the others? Can they end ihe j le i, Urmly establishe.1 as Engpob of honours so long eojaiui's opening bowler, lhal, just joyed by Arsenal. Tottenham easily, his twin brother Eric might ManchcM. i. and lttvc n Ued the bill. Both ol them tbeta vvere m edium -paced bow I c, wher ide right who li-st form after SSa toward the snd ol Iht aaaoo, and a tegular place In the side, %  champion Irntei: having won the hOnOUT fter being seeoful four times || r | II be all OUt fo Imthci triumphs. M,i Busby has a judicious blend .'], and experieia e at hll COfl b>iex ti loi ^i damand .nd, In skipper Johnny PoddO 100). i .oe' ana Oi Ihe shiewdest tactil*ortsm.iuth ips for 6. dans in the gumc: It was ihe 'hibs between them, have won „, ey joined the Surrey staff but u ..n r.lershlre vrnms Laneu-hue witching of Carey from r; I '"'}' deciding thai there WM n-rt mu.' bv tan wlefcets; back n ught half which was the dea, and ihe FA Cup four. (uture ^ tno lWo (rf ^^ in ln 104 and 195 turning point in United's SUOCSSS good n u '' 1 bH rJ '"'"** ,j department. F.n, change.! to <-fT\: half back he w. II.V' '• '' '' ', .. -UllUin-s Since then he has buyable to 'general' bath defence ... %  hh* wffl bj JgJ out as a bataman ak_ Ile.dul both wtth Ihe ,"' £v ''"" -king fZbaS' "" -aaaon • P*.vl %  > equal %  ft"?-oltaa bl-frori i-t with hi. broujer toSurray. Tottenham iccessful bid for the Chsmplonim, seeking their second l > ein ' -•"cngthened by the close-hip. League plonshl] In Ihree f 'fgfta of Twlar. ihe seasons are Tull ol ronndon. e ." %  ' "K'"'id 'B IntcrnaUonal formergood spirits after their ciose" w,,h -uton. > 'M B ? ISH T 0t C a'S! 1 !Li rm 'i Of the trux-e i'resion appear to twice defeated ManK, he b ,,, ,„., K ,„ hl y h; Vl oiind ilefencc to back up their %  the them. I roi ii U and hire I hire i tab) liU. Jenki •i for Sota-rsel vrntus llampnhlie i, %  el 2A8 for 9 de %  r,d 17 for 2. Suin > versus Hera> i5 (Olada r 44) and 258 for 4. 107 (Loc* for i>. ..< Irctershlre versus (H.urrl-r shire LelceaU rahlra 178 and ri for 2. asc for ) 116) Indian* vrraea nuaaex Indians 186 (Wood ..nd li>l for 8. —L.E.S. BE PREPARED for any emergency. Always keep AND FINE U.NENS ADD TO VOIiR (0MF0K1 WE OFFER: LIMA SHKKT1NG M In*. wMr f.U rd 72 Ins. Mldp r<> 15.H9 yrd I.INKS sill.I IS 12 X 108 Si f 1882 rich II.S UNEN l'll.l.OW CASKS 18 x IS 9 S3.17 mch 18 x 28 .. USI li U.S. AMBUCAN BA(i TOP 21 3J '• %  SS.Jl net us. man HUCKABACK TOWELS Hi. septng tha ground tirm durlri rgan \h\ foi i ha mid-winter months Spuis U1NDON. Aug. 21. ...•lint attack in "huh the inSoccer results for Wednesda* iomparable Tom Flnney at outGlasgow Cup. First Round—Pa*.it, is always a potential ck 2. Clyde 0. Ulst* Cup: COtnner. eralne 1. Crusaders I.—C.P. 1 imsiili'v all thv Features far* offer! STYLE WORKMANSHIP AND QUALIH SUITINGS You Surelv Must Isecide on P.C.S. MAFFE! & CO. LTD. as Ihe -TOP" SCORERS IN TAILORING. laMa Week's Speeial Puiu|ikin I ii'.s 8 f each B xitn \niir. I AKERIES 1J Diil 4758 JAMES STREET fill ENGINEERS, BRASS and IRON FOUNDERS Works contain modern appliances lor the execution of tirst-class work of all kinds, and especially to SUGAR MACHINERY and STEAMSHIPS Dealers in AGRICULTURAL MACHINERY GENERAL ENGINE ROOM STORES of all Description IRRIGATION THOJECTS, PUMPING EQUIPMENT ..n I ELECTRICAL INSTALLATIONS A SPECIALTY Satisfaction. Quality and Service Contact THK BARBADOS FOUNDRY LTD. Phone : 4546, 4650 Workshop Phone 452P Stores Dept%  U I H I I IIIII I Illll ll U I IH I HH



PAGE 1

WHAT'S QN TODAY MM that tack. —tiioc WIW| Oil MM inntM for the futui* m th ai.ur.cc And Ci. (QO<1 (Mi 1 can 1o ESTABLISHED 1895 KKIDAY PRICE : FIVE CENTS row Aut IJ|Mln( I OS p I Hish Tfcc 4 m a Death Sentence Demanded Fw 27 Workers Charged With Rioting Near Alexandria Military Rule Of Egypt Expected KING OF fRAQ ARRIVES IN U.S. CAIRO. Aug 21. The Military prosecutor Thursday asked the death sentence for 27 workers charged with murder, arson and destruction at Kafr El Dawar cotton mills on August 13. Thfl military court there completed hearing* in thesecond trial 1o grow out ol the riots. Of the* 28 defendants one—an eleven-ycar-oln boy was ordered to be sent to a reformatory. The verdict on the others must be sent to military headquarters here for confirmation. Previously the court HDtOnced twenty-y< clerk Mustapha Khamis to death for implication in the riots. One of those in the trial was tried in rttantlr Harold Guard reports from London that all reports from Cairo prompted the belief among ft ;;:?•• observer? on Thursday that Egyp*. is careering headlong toward military rule and that the powerful Wafd party Is planning a comeback to grapple with the Army'* "strong man" General Mohammed Naguib. Rumours were current In Cairo on Wednesday that Musta Nahas and Seeraga El Din, the two principal leaders of the Wafd. had resigned from the party eiecutive at the dictate of General Naguib. On Wednesday ntgfnt Nahas denied these reports and the party executive continues in session at Alexandria. Cairo reporta said, to "*sruss reorganlnation". Military Rule This bold front against the purge demanded by the Army has impressed Middle East observers here with the latent strength of the Wald which is said here to be backed by a group of Egyptian millionaires whose aim is to re*tore the party to power. Tttfs group Is said to be known to General Naguib and conviction rules that In order to defeat their ends he must resort to military rule. Middle East observers here have noted the gradual development Of military rule in Egypt despite Naguib's declared intention of keeping the army apart from politics. It was Naguib who announced that general elections would be postponed until next February. Then he annawncacl a long programme of social reforms without making any reference to any sort of political organization to carry them out. Finally, after the riots at the textile mill at Kafr EL Dawar, Naguib put she troopa straight into action without consulting the civil police and then appointed a military court to Judge the deli nquents. Middle East observers believe that the question those actions pose now it whether the military trend is to continue until it rules all aspects of the Egyptian scene. The general belief here is that the apparent resurgence of the Wafd power will compel Naguib to govern Hi" country wtfih the nrsny even though It might prove only temporary until a responsible civilian government emerges^ Big Five Meet To Discuss UN Membership UNITED NATIONS, New York, Aug. II, The Big Five permanent men.bers of the Security Council will meet in private today in an effort U> solve their disagreement on United Nations membership. The general assembly lution passed at Pans last February, called upon Russia, the United States. Britain, FrtUhOt and China to attempt to And agreement on the admission new members. Its* live nations hold veto powers in the Security Council which must recommend applicants to the general assembly for admission to membership. Russia has used her veto 22 time* to Mock applicants from admission. However Russia two years ago proposed blanket admissuHi tor 14 applicants including nine Western-hacked countries and live Soviet satellites The W> !e powers contended that each applicant should be considered on its own merits and that there should be no pressure as suggested tn the Soviet "blanket admission" proposal Authoritative sources saw little hope of settlement at today* secret session —u.r. KOREANS WAR AVERTED [MOTHER WORLD WAR KANSAS CITY. Aug. 21. k tn pre ud< %  ted "far A hen it did of republic,. i %  %  "ins prccejuVsd UM l i i if the Urn i not "reacted" to this i Involved in i '• %  %  thing I % %  i" Ffa mid iiieu m "some 0 *Ji %  m war with h;is presented an .easihle plan for attacking China." <<• have been a reference gbsj MacAuhuradvocaey „f hitting 'i' Hut Risen Sd no names. HVsaid Indal not believe China was couotrj Hi it i-ould successfully H-'.II,1 it has no ajnr industrial centre:,. • M Ml IJiutrtrr* : POINTING TO NEW YORK'S SKVUN:. King Felsal 11 of Iraq is ptftUN I as he arrived aboard the Queen Mary, Prince Regent Emir Audi I I 'mete, stands beside the 17-year-oM monarch !• %  cries during In* visit t ihr I' S i flub "loltosali Introduction Of Comets In W.I. Will Take 18 Months Pliysicisl Makes Flying Saucers Rice Board To Blame For B.G. Rice Shortage (From Oar (lii Cerrespondriiii U.S. Sees Necessity Of Aiding Iran Eden To Visit Yugoslavia BT K. C THALER LONDON. Aug. 21 Foreign Secretary Anthony Ed will VUUI Yugoslavia in mldSeptsmber for talks with Msrshal Tito, authoritative sources nw on Thursday night. It will be the first visit of a British Foreign Secretary to Belgrade since Yugoslavia defaulted on the Kremlin and was ousted from the Comlnform. The official visit will give Eden an opportunity for overall discus%  ions with Tito and his ministers on a wide range of topics Ihe sources said. It was indicated that the visit bad been envisaged (or some time, but the final decision was taken only recently when it was agreed that Eden should go to Yugoslavia the c< urces saidIt was expected that Eden would discuss with Tito the ticklish, K )blom of Trieste, on which Ih Britain and the United States have been urging Yugoslavia well as Italy, to come to term: the Interest of Pacific action ihii strategically vital area Aid lo Yugoslav^ probably will be another important issue under discussion The see et meeting with Tito of Big T. ree West Ambassadors last week. It understood, det.lt with the problem of assistance to Yugoslavia as well as Trieste. But complete secrecy is maintained in official quarters on the meeting.—U.F. WASHINGTON. Aug. 21 Usually reliable UnitedStates sources said on Thursday, thai the Uulted States recognizes t'i* necessity c,f giving Iran financial near future, b ut, so far. s way to do no has not been d"ctded. However, active ss atlon of ideas is going on In the State Department. Tb> that It is Likely that Secretary of State Dean Acbcsun will wait tn sss the draft of the British not* to Iran as regards the possible resumption of oil negotiations before he makes his own suggeI tions. i They gfjd Assistant Secretai > for Near Eastern Affair H. a Byroade. told foreign diplomat' this month that the matter of lit I andsl aid for Iraq had now bEdenlcome really urgent, but a way has to be worked out to furnish it. He ssld that, while inme officialf night desire to let Iran sell her dl by separate eoptrae ti astern countries and BuTOpeSfl mes like Italy and Germany t'hich have no big petroleum Interests, their own State Department has to hock the rtsrsn 0| Big U.S. oil companies which made It dear that they do not ant to see any agreement reached which m'ght give the appen ance of condomnii the tlon of the Abadsn oilfields. t v (From Our Own Correspondent) LONDON. AUK 21. h will bo ;it IIMM sighteor) months before B.OJLC issau service. i KMnd COOMI sen li 11 on tha hi ii i T.ikyu e;irly next year leav.no room for a switch to jet liners on the dollar aarnlng Crfbb#sui net II hav. only nine series of Com. will he un.ib!. i one tor the Nev York N im. w, had hope. ,i utJdu $ %  Conn* Into the Carl %  .ind corumsrclgj conditionbut %  %  <>n South African and Eastern routes", nM .. corpontiari u" 1 It is now apparent ihat B.O.A (.'. %  .-ill hjive to wail for delivery in about eighteen mmilhs of ;t serla 'rf two Avon powered Com l?fore makng Ihe changeover Vnk-Nassau service %  ,. Schumacher^ Death May Split Party 0 i" 'N. Aug. II. %  t jpl>-sition leader Kurt Schui' ener tmirh.-*! otr a wild seraml I '' w^'iet Attack on China. Eisenhower old thr Hepublican Conference "would he starting another f.n more difficult one (war) to stop Hasluuiiuu. An mni plusicu ,; 1 ""' "tie wc are In now !Miu is „, gj %  Mronorhi "•"PubllMii Presidential nomin a Kcneral discussion ot „ Foreign Policy said he alia. UUgTvt U • %  IndefenMble fur snv member of Ihe executive branch Ucorgeiown. Aug-Lj. lion John I %  MI.JM. Chalraun ef the B.G. Ki. %  Hsrketlns Beard told thr (ieergetawn Chamber of t.imniTi on Friday that iin-i-r was no question that the Boanl M la blamfor the short i se of rice in the Colony, and lavi* HM Cksmher the UUTUK# that measurrs are brtns taken M prevent anathrr shorUs' l>|M'U*vlun %  < %  thr rk*e situation oprned when lie |-fsi.t.-.,i of Ih* CHsrobrr. II I l K. J. I. woo.1 M Bl Tit. saM Use Chamb.r had wrttsen te UV Kojr.1 asking tal h*< kMM the shortase was llkei* lo .s-i ib) hen esfldUlorn will return to normal and '<•> whether In the H*M of exnerlrnee. step !" ran and wilt he taken to prevent •imilir Mlf g— %  ne*l SSM *m\ In Ihe yearn *o com' MM. John reman.l> lln> thamb'r thai there were several InlervrrlaUoti* of the term "stiorUe* aased In Ihe freiis. Thcr< was Use statemenl nude thai there was a shortage ef padl in the Oalswy, therrfore the short ice uf rice would nut cease until the receipt of nadl from th. new rrop. This he BSeaj I incorrect as there is m,< than enouih iiadl from pi-l crvps aun would be suuti-ieiil U* m>e| the lUUn sssassi and leave a sarpiu. There were two thmss UK nunaienssBi ef the Baard lost sight ef c Ih i ;.. Mahairehy-Abarj Mill had complewit nun' l S4M ll crop and ihrrefoj. ooUuni to mill m like w.l season. Normally, .nt* m >l would have given thr Boaid about 1.SSS bags a mou>h which weald luv been sufllrtrnl to MasMi Hoard to carr> on I any sertons inronvenlrnc. th) Ihat It now •iif tain prtsati .iii.ii H | I when there w •• .1 •hertaK' 1 of rice. Uie %  hjBgSjsjg] prolonieit llr referrrd *o Hi reeentl> lalraslu i and pelnleri oui thai H >,i III 1 to :t their rice Innm-li ihe I" door" a. ihr% snOasasd < %  extra M em' bac sold. \to Ihe hghi H r>rnandrs saht thr woulS keep .|..ni the iirave too. when Ive told B Wednihlch will ancloubtedrj •ded to the Caribb--..n W.I. No! Forgotten "B.O.AC, has ileiiiincly not Lhs Caribbean", said .1 %  %  The eighteen months will g.\ %  tinBahamai gprarninant time << .11 port needs. I Major-Genera I Sir Rot>ert Neville nay a scant six hours before he a r person I In I^MIUOII. has had .Mod: "The parlltlon of f.ernianv Islks vvl ih the British govemmem Is the greatest source of strength; about moving the nf Soviet foreign policy. In the from Oaks Held I .pinion of Social bemoency the',,,,,, nn M discussed also the pur• ''" I '-' '' ; %  4 % % %  rrOBI thS Hritl li aim more pressing and more 1 ., v by ^^ Bahsmas jH>riant for the pacification and| government ,econstruelion of Europe than, "The Bahamas has to face up ..nv other form of Integration of. to this airport question and must one portion "f > %  'nh,i H v at least one of the fields other European cmnri | Sir Robert today. "I havThat has been Schumacher, ditcussed the prices with the policy since IMV and that of tho British government and I think thai negotiations which will I%  oiiiiMni-i sflar tha Bahami government has worked out %  full scheme should U•orv to both nides." Sir Robert LuM just had n loni: consultation with B.O.A.C. Chan Thomai and HfSl brought up to date on the COT oorations plans for the Carii>bean. I!a Bahama* %  turns to Nassau next STSSBV He leave, London by air next Monday. AC glass jar through cauo>uie lo Ltod at thtf ji^so objcila whS 1011 iced cloud*. N'-v IMnl: In soDM vlllsajBI of an, whsn tha cropi srll %  aaoeiawrd murssd I Qod, IY %  ktaggfl .,!•• BXpei :i\l lo nu%  : "' i on UM mddLruj daj i.jme: A 78-ycar-ulu Italian and wile wi m in .u boa* %  ..ft 1 *,. 1,11.1 11. A %  he Wus de.j Ad by ih %  wandV d town 11 i nnall) UM .notsleps. because "the pace w Waahingtan: In Seattle an ex(ij had two of his Oovi H stolen by Mho forged -hu name 'o 1 happened while 1 %  chciiu Wrlliiigton: A |lim nf lliminsll 1 1 'I un ualoan lompsin %  ... ;.:e HIM %  prat* s/ech intsrasl on every shilling %  H %  %  Mailnil ivll War ipple, on IBS M trtd renional iK"'r-*irinking otentplon 1 b] dnnkinii 8'v llhPP ibosrl IS pints) of beer in SO MRlDsS Ha haatlBva others and won a "liver eap and i.no'i p* l to go up and down the land critli/.ing Congress." This apparently was a rrferncc to Truman's 1948 campaign attacks on Republican controlled Eighth Congress. But again Els%  nhower mentioned no names. Elsenhower's exposition of hit PoUn view, was made off lhs cuff They were made In ann to .1 gusstton of K. B Cor1 nail. Republican candidate fori Congress for the Sixth District of 1 Eisenhower arrived, Thursday from llobe. I %  I era hi v|ske on Wcdn dav before 4 crowd of 19.000 from 1 •; %  —r.p. 25,000 More U.S. Farm Workers Go On Strike NKW VOHK. Aun IJ. AHIHUI>\ ^^>ni< 46,00 nternational Hareetawf C pany of FtsTin 'implenient > rkers brought new insis in the already turbulent Unit *| Stssssl labour aesms and the i ht\ ni ,1 cTtpplinl iti I 0 i>v lOO.Otio non-lerro workers Tins became eh. after the International Union I Mine .iii.l Smelter WOI H .iskrd 11 .-mhi'i s fur n strike irote, IHII the result! ill % %  .mnntineed until Sn 2 or S U.K. Wilt Train Egyptian Troops LONDON. Aug. 21 | A Foreign Office spokrun..: said Thun>'iay, that Bnt decided in principle lo ggftnl Egypt military !l again in Britain. The Infltatlvi for tht move came from Britain. Egypt so far has not asked for resumption of rsctllthss, itic spokesman added. About S score of Egyptian officers underwent training in Britain before the rift in Anglo-Egypt)an relations late last year when officers were withdrawn by Egyptian Authorities. u.r. parliamentary Socialist party. But a large group of Socialists outside! •Ii<|MII..-IHII.I' i'-r'v. .nid in particular the "Three Mayors'*— Erne". I M Berlin. Mnx Brau<*r of Hamburg, and Wilhchn K 1 man—have long sought to modify this poli< > whirh boiled down to unbandlnfi of all attempts by the gDvenunent to bring a reanned to the 1 Atlantic Coinmunltv. Schuina%  fth may mean lhs i%  adettffi from this aoup which has been .i.it. to wv the party one degrae SWB) from Schuma-,r Rufiian Congr€ts Is Not Truman's "Business" WASHINGTON, Aug. II, At his news conference OB Thursday. Truman 'iccllned to comment on the Husslan announcement calling for the Party Politburo that it was none %  Inoss A reporter asked Truman f fie had any eom%  ••xpress on this announcement. He answered ss above, adding only that it was a matter for the Rucslsns.—ffj.l*. U.N. Planes Blast Cement Factory IT... A .P* 0 1 *. Aug. SL 1 repeated Allied attacks are beCmted Nations warplsnes de-ininnlng tn hurt. Uvsred two smashing attacks T*S1*rda\ was a bad dav for igalnst the Communists on Wedfommunlst^. Allu-d MM nesday night and early Thursday iroved three Red %  M.I.G 15 iet blasting two targets in a fourplanes, damaged two more and hour night raid at Pyongyang and j heavily damaged %  troop and following up with a 100 plane centre at Namvang and attack on a cement factory. blasted two targets in a four-hour Fighter bombers and B 2fl light night raid on Pyongyang, Capital bombers hurled bombs, bullets f North Korea, and napalm on the cement facThirty-eight air 'orce B 20 tors-, destroying S3 buildings and! Superfortresses from Okinawa hit damaging 20 more, and leaving Red manufacturing plants, troops the entire area a mass of flames l and supply dumps in the Pyongand smoke. jfsng raid. Communist anti-ilrTt was the second straight day craft Are was heavv but It slipped of heavy air attacks against Comas B 20's flew over the city to munlsts who in the same Pyong-idrop more than 350 tons of bombs yang broadcast made it clear that "light fighters descrlherl eery aggressive." made only one firing pass during the four-hour •tiikc. All the BuPSnOrl to their base. Lhs Pyongyang area had boon warned to leave the area the previous right by leaflc %  ,-, 11 29 More than MO air force tighter bombers and Navy carrier based planes hit clusters of troop billets. storage bui'dlni" at Namvang ten miles southwest : Prellrr.inary reports not include Navy i credited Allied pilots with 00 lu;:i!r.,' iftSSsTSQ^d nSd !' %  ', daiaged. W.I. WorriedAhouI Sugar Esparto LONDON. Aug. 21. The "Times' commenting ed tonally on the forthcoming 1• %  j(.n Kini'i-iii' 'in trad, bat ana Csnsda and the West Indies, sa> I today thai wt Indian hiadi' are worried aboul sugar vxpoi' notmg that large sjdws. tra-le Italance wi'M th. West Indlos. The n says that at tTie root of West Indian anxiety is lest the Canadia 11 mny seek to bsuafa ther account by curtailing sugar purchases In The "Times" says tha t UM %  1. trade tendo. 1 appears to Uireaten their sugur sales, such as Canada's purchase hist year of a quantity from Cuba. The London trade Baltic Sea-Port To 00 Closed To Sweden I'.Kill.IN. Aug. 21 East Oermuny will 1 Halt S< %  ix.i-t of Saasnr ferry from Tn er 5, 'he Swedish Consul ite In B< roumed on Tliur'd.iv. spokesman said 1 1 Ckholm and Essl It was Ufh fenv unde "ii %  after October V The in said that UM %  lelcgation COnsurtUU Of four r;ilt v.,.v experts had beOn told by th %  lid be used only for fishing purposes In future.—I'.P. •Terribh' Turks itVpLiccii In Korea Pt.'SAN. Koie... Aug. 21 A fresh Turk! %  %  I'nilfoi the nt of tv .-mijer. Only PM West Indian officials will lak part. Canada is 1 even |o the e*irnt of an observei. but will lake ai. • % %  •dingv. ;, Cana0S nhV:isl said— C.r. DSSW Uaitsd N..ti.-. faro nd Hollsnd. Tl f' navy troopsh p "General Nelson M Walker** dlsemhaikTurks to replace the North Brigade rhlofe liead/*! for home last Saturday. They were WSlSOnssd along the route toRtther with :'' 't'1 ' men! %  .-n I " Moll., rl< t Brigadier Namik Argue. Turkish Commander In Korea read the %  nessage In the presence of M;i Th* Independent Farm Equip nent Workers Union caUsd a 1 '. %  ike against 12 Harvester plant.-' n three states after negoUntion: jior a new work contract brokiUnVfl The sliikw began al 12.01 "L to-day. In Washington the Chairman t LhO NaUonal Mediation Board had %  oine cheerful news when he said -.th sides In New York MBS '1 • ilrnad dispute havo assured the Hoard that they hope to Kittle tUffsraoosg without a strike Tha I ulvcs around 38 unsetM union grievances. Federal Mediation chief Cyrus 1 Clung pleaded with some 23,000 \ V I., machinists not to strike igalnst Lockheed Aircraft CorpoilUon Plants ui Southern Calif orHi because the walkout "would %  riously affect our national dndon'mart set until the death of her athsjf Hie King, donned tweeds • nd sensible low-heeled shoes to neSk on the grouse moors neat i.-re. The Queen, the Duke of Kdlnhurgh and thr Queen Mother EUzsbetti were to be there together with friends of the Royal Family A small family blrlhdav uurtv was to be held 00 ThursIhs droughty Balmoral < asile, but no official celebration* have been planned. Royal biilh1 d as strictly privatS affairs and little fuss Is made %  boul thelP in British newspapers Chinese Reds And Soviets Open Talks MOSCOW. Aug. 21. Stalin received th. OocmBUBlsl PrsnUar an4 Foreign Minister Chou En Lai last night .. o| M >n S" mutual nubtary, econu1 rodurtion pro) Ciiou was accompanied by Dapurj runnel 'i • uSar ranking rnsmhsn of the Ionian Red • nrrlvad n Moscow on Su"'t;iv %  %  Vvnrh Mas U IgoletoT, Foreign Minister Amirei Vi>hmsky and other Soviet Foreign Office exp| i'. The Chinese dele Sd Oepu'v Chief of tha General BUfl Su Vu I 1 %  J IBM ("innnltei Li tSt Ciiuu Gilbey's EMPIRE RED WINE BUSTA GIVES £50 KlNCffTOtf. Jamslca. Aug 20 An Island fund was started fa suffer": Bustama-.' with EH Truman Firm On Repatriation PANMCNJOM. Aug. 21 ted Nations stand "r %  prisoner* of war win pr sonei %  klllM would be sent intStn against hl Trun. %  in k| WOTS m the midst of %  irtfa in as : %  i ... ''harlee Imlong besteg' ng. who had expreeaed tha i Cambodia, fell Into a. would not hack Virtmlnh ambu" ed and 13 wounded —I'.F \ V ral Ilerre, Commander i %  I R .'ommunicationg gone i, iirxi Fir .giiilier Nick Tsssan! AlUled Command. II" FRENCH FORCES AMBUSHED SMCON. Aug 21 I Maintains thesamehiyh Standard ofQualityas shipped to the West Indies for the past fiftyyears (iARDMERAlSm'AOl?! Ajeitf* — % 





PAGE 1

FRIDAY AUGUST ii. 1M2 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE JULY RAINFALL WAS BELOW AVERAGE <£&%£ Cane Crop In Good Condition ACCORDING to rainfall returns received from 32 .stations situated in the various rainfall categories of the island, the rainfall for the month of July, 1952 was 0.85 inches below the average. In the majority of district* light moderate showers fell on approximately 18 days of the month and widely distributed rains fell on the 6th. 7th, 10th and 27th. writes C. C Skeete. Director of Agriculture in his report for the month of July. The northern part of th* Island at 12 meetings of co-operativ.ict-ctvcd hltle or no rain on Ibe groups held in July 10th and 27th. The average total During the month the Plant rainfall for the month was 5.W Diseases Inspector and the acting Inches, the average total tor July Senior Peasant Agricultural ln1951 was •-03 Inches and the structor conducted tne second average for July for the past 106 round of judging of school garden* years wan 8.51 inches. The apit "red for the annual rompeliprosimale total rainfall for th'.' lion, island for the seven months Thr usual routine operations A£L>+&^~_ *. spMitSMSM. Rwrtaa. The It was unanimously agreed by necessary lumber to construct the resolution that a co-operative light-proof house arrived during marketing society he organised in i I Ihe month. Construction was Irothat district. Further meetings of January to July 1932. was 20.62 were earned out at all Station, mod(aW %taTttd and it Is exthis group are proposed. iiK-hss, the total for the corduring the month. The ! %  """ peeled that it win be completed No societies were registered responding period for 1651 was of food crops was continued. The flnd readv for „ b thc ^^ durini{ he mon th The Bays* 41117 inches. cropping pro^minej at some f of Aufnj ;, --*,,. £ „„, two Court Co-operative Producers The highest lotal rainfall for the Stations have been handicap. veek ,. iU r lh-n htd bfen ^ an and Marketing Societ> which wa July 1952. at any of the above 32 P> itm>usn inadequacies of tho nml but lf utcessfu ^ wU ^n lagH t a y a il in JuM wan formalh stations, was 7.82 Inches, record"7 i a,,cn J !" • and i J "* e £"" give arrows with which some P r *£ en,cd tts certincateof reused at a station in the parish o ">' %  Jerusalem' ihrough the fail cro$ar% can ^ made (ration at a ceremony sMch took St. Philip and the lowest was 3.M ur •* < h "]*on water supply ViJ|u wrre ^ |Q Mveru place atl the Saves Court Agrtculmches, measured at a station tn Livestock maise plantations during the lu J?! taiion on July istn the pariah of St. Lucy. The total number of livestock month. nd reouests made foi „ 9 !" application for registrafi. sgsr Cane The young canat the Stations at the end of July smn „ quanunM of selected con. *' crop in the majority of the dis"*as 7 ComprUing stud animal .. rt ,< ( T(ll ^^ WH | „, collected iricts of the island is in good eoncattle, pigs, goals, sheep and from all over ihe island, bulked. dition and is tillering well The equines. Three hundred and p i*nted out at Codrtngton and crop in the northern and some forty-seven gallons of milk were mu „ 8 ad-ried when ripe. roa*tal areas la showing signs of produced. R head of livesUHk were sold. Ilir lack of moisture wilted appearance. For the past 2 great majority of plant island have co-operated nd has .. Stud services paid for at trie the Stations were as fellows:—bulls the l59 bucks. 152, rams 90 and it'li' this ooars 84. making a total of 4). i COOSUII\ci society in St. Michael This ll being considered Another society, also situated in th. St. Mirha. I area, this lime a Credit Union. In two -.ending II* application for repl r* three years, it is hoped that i (ration, has submitted * draft better itrain of seed will he availhy-law for consideration able for use by the planting comobservance Of Cn-operatorDay nlty. Department In voluntarily furnish' or the month. ing crop yield returns giving the "he number of moth borer agg acreages and tonnages of cane Parasites bred in June wa: harvested during the season. This ol.63o.OM and the number dlsyear returns have been received H !" 1 !" W _.V 1 P 1 *" 1 *" *"? meetings of established but covering an acreage of 32,003.29 3.4.!9.2i4. This brings the total .-e-istered groups, and % ocres, out of a total of 36.239.63 bred * lar nl y** T to 368.17..aeres reaped by pUntations of !" > ,V d e number liberated U more than ten acres. 322,154,000. The average tonnage ol cane Normal work of field Inapcrtior per acre for plant canes or ratoons, B,,d experimental plot work wui for all plantations which subrried out duringthc month milled return* was 83.88 tons, the Food Crops erase for 1951 was 40.17 tons. Spraying of sweet potato Held Corn-opera I Ion Duriug the month the operative Officer attended general meetings of co-opcratlvi groups; 8 of these were meeting if registered societies. lies : the v gain %  t market < in year? rid and exporters who rni foothold now In this ill find it a valuable oni to come. The Co-operators' Day celebrations. ^ponso^ed this year by the Shamrock Credit Union, took place at Queens Park on Saturday, July 19th. The arrangements for thi celebrations were excellent and the attendance satisfactory. Mr. I groups, and 2 were D( A W1)es< Assistant Colonial tings of societies In process of Secretary gave an Inspiring adformation. in addition the Colirtta on lh „ Talue of Co-operabefore the' w operative Officer attended " Ing of the committee of menage„ c8 represented at" the celebraof "living of her people has Increacment of the St. B*rnaba> IJMI presented reports on their ed by more than half. The volCo-opemUvc Marketing Society, respective activities These were um e of Canadian imports has %  meeting convened for the received with enthusiasm. AHomot9 i oa „ doubled. A Canada purpose of presenting the gcther, the function produced a conUnuer to grow so will lici The recovery for 1952 was slightat Codrtngton was carried out for certificate of registration to th> most stimulating effect on all those inpori ly better than that for 1951, bepest control and to determine Sayes Court Co-operative Prowho attended. ing 8.98 tons of cane per ton of present cost per acre of spraying, ducer*' an-l Marketing Society; The propaganda effect of the Whni are the prospects of Insugar as compared with 9.01 for A new form of wettable lead and the Co-operators' Day celeCo-operators' Day celebrations rreasing U.K. exports to Canada* 1951, arsenate without molasses was brat!-.ns which were held durlni: has resulted in renewed enthusiSan the Treasury: "Supplies aim found prefemble to ordinary lead the month. asm among existing societies and delivery dates of capital good Vigorous Salesmanship Needed In Canada I (INDON Humus ulesmansnip ^ naadtfd t> gftauMs Britlah ••. i to rapture Canadian ordm in ton 'i l' S COI lion, says tha British Traasury, In th* August issue DI it^ "Bulletin for Industry". This IKIVUT. ahhough lincted primarily to Brltlat tmpottmt*, is of yrpfit imn.'it met la tfaa Britlah Waal mdtpa ..well, for two reasons: i.I) Because proaperit) of the vital KW.I.-Canadtan trad* targa]) daftanasi upon tha maintenance of a satisfactory balancr ot I C anada and tha U.K.; and r.'i Because tin colonjrs must also build up their direct exports to Canada. Thei. gr vast opportunities for — %  —the export of goods of all kind^,# loCan,.,. although the chief hop.' < liailTf CII I' S l|lllllt'>t in capital goods Canada is fourth largest importr By JOHN k IIIK11 OTTAWA A major rest arch progrgnune has been launched b\ tlsher> i to find new commercial .lowing the Batata lo" ot the toistaomarket of oil. f< -"nSent. %  i K4tt.uning| i vitamin A and D has practically I i--are • %  -I in as effort t.i lean I .the, pradutta at tin i .i..t \tmarketi ,.Hy The work Is baaSJ I i! under 1M L. A. 8 I.T.II station • %  ( she r*ta*> |cnes Hesearc'i fV-ard in Ven%  Ika market for Bah oil j .as based apstl the exlsl Mtamlns A and l> in tne OU \fter vitaniin l> %  | batti pjadsjgt, thr nil market only because ••' 4 vitamin A. i "Ovei the paxl fevs years vit| ridn A hai basfl *yntheUM/dl b\ everal methods." the depi.rtrnent jaid Tin proaaaurai in naygsi nor* difficult than thnw [DVOlVsd niufaeluie of vitamin D. nf :hc\ hanbean BoesoipUanad r M am reauU la laat interest in kitaaaja A in Bah otal at graetiy lied." —It I .!• Teeth Loose Gums Bleed BlM4 l r. %  M* PTOITBM, Ir-nlt MouU) < %  MSan SSM tl "-in* that will Wr-rttur r-*- -oor I.-Ui to lasTeaS aaf tmr ajf aawja S*ea—•thwa aa4 Haart Trtsbi*. *• F-aTUST^ia'a^-^: %  MBS* asssa a-aha r**tf mouih *.ll s\ SBW raw/ *M NERVES 0WW .• ttwt wsKto I haw ilwj Marl Sraa-asg rx-M aoSt tmd iiliiaiai vaMM kwa ikshUg Ttor bUtf .. Hwa (IMI. YMI i-Jsa. fIM4 .-a l M l -MTI ssssgar %  a s-pa to -asasl — D-aVi Klsslr Pflk. tht wa a f i laa s s h hi -wUi %  -MSWT. OaaVi armmk %  <*MV a—. W2 .1 Ml -V-, -S-. M m Canada's population has increased by nearly a yuarter since %  — before the war Her total prndurmTC 'tion. The six co-operative soclen on hndoubled* The standard \'_'.iiu Atljourmxl Th* inquaat into tha clrcumtsncea surrounding the death ol Cecil Hop*' a chauffeur of Jackmans, St Michael, was furthei adjourned by Ills Worship Mi P A. McLeod. until Mbiid.i> August 2V at 10 am at Iilstri. i "A" Police Court. Cecil Hope dloi some houi I after he raa taken u> the Ooneni Hospital on August 3. faprc aa SSTHE TRUCI; i ^ Sif / ALREADY TRUCK & BUS TYRT THAT WAS MME POPULAR THAN ANY OTN^R OS hThe Peasant Agriculture food crops generally !" nat< : ""-^ wllh nwlagges have germinated well making satisfactory progress. Peasants have planted more food crops this year than last year. especially sweet potatoes. Indian corn, peas and beans. Good crops of beans were reaped during the month. The supply of this product reaching the market from pc.i-ants' gardens was considerably augmented by good "catch" crops produced on a field scale up ply Hotb plain and raloun cane*. ipaelally in the sea-coast areas ol Christ Church. St. Philip and St. Lucy, are in need of rain. A Inrge number 'sticker.' Examinations made In an area where cnbbage white butterflies and their larvae were pravasant f.Pled to show any parasitism of these larvae by A pan lei r* ilom-ratua though this introduced parasite had been found in this area for the last three years and It w^ hoped that this parasite had become effectively established. Further evidence of damage ratoons by root borer Diaprepc* At a well attended meeting applications for assistance in the should improve with the cutIn convened in RUIaby, Bt Andrew, establishing of new groups. was obtained during July. Mi ueld experiments were laid down ..ii plantations during the month and from experience gamed some changes in method and rate of application of the gamma Isomer Importance Of Spiritual Section S Of YMCA Stressed home priority exports. Investment. the high* being given to dollail the Increased quan%  number of peasants' ^'C'" !" , ^JSLV?" '.TH been planted to cotton rj !" 3, wl "* n cw,Sflr >' '" " In the St. "Phil' "-—" crop area. Thi l-as germinated very well. A few plots of groundnuts have been planted, mainly in St. Philip lind St. Lucy. These are making iti"Bactorjr progress. CatonUH, mangoes and breadOwlng to the necessity of flttinc n this soil treatment with normal teel that are In prospect. But none nf these factors will hel|. if British prices are uncompetillve." It points out that there are some powerful forces working agalns the entrv nf British goods into Canad.i. hut at the same time there are also some strong favourabl factors Capital From V.K. THAT the spiritual section of the Yountf Men's Chris<1Jp )o I9M ,. the TreaBurv ar tian Association is the lifeline of the whole movement, w.u urie -antinttea, "nrltain provided one uf the points stressed by the Hon. R. N. Turner. B.A.. moat ol the capital which flow.., CoUai.-l &Ti -hen he afok. to mjmbjJJ. J "SUS^St^^^ Y.M.C.A voslorday afternoon at their Seventy-second lin ,,„ mPI „ .„,, hc „ii y reduc.1 Annual General Meetinu of which he was Chairman. the flow of new capital. "It U ei.tiim.ted that by 1050 Hi ItarlKidori 9oottts lleiieli Granada FVoni <>iir Owi GRENADA. Aug. It. AHUIVINi; I. th. f.ody Wetton" last Sunduy afteinoon were 1 11 parti of eighteen Barbado[ SeouU who are now camping at Tantoan Thev widen the repregantatlon ot We-t Indians to whom Grenada Is no-./ host V.W C A rtrls from Ilrlti.-h fluiann, Trim dad and St. Vincent lady netball•rg, two Trinidad groups of Seoul* %  M a Tobago cricket team Sisiy v-arof trader-hip that ihcrr it n -i.n.hn> can he hciicrcd. |1HI' tut Truik and Ihe Tyre Du thrt fine bsiv pan-rn IMI'KlH'I'l) Ihii.rr. ihe hrtfll* A" *1 M I> •*< up lre%h rn ad l ii r* "T*fa •"-*v*d -nhi-my. ar tot yuui.ell-I HN, a ?Knt*i £5 FOR OVERLOADING IMfghton How Sid, ( nnduelor. i iltle D) monthly Instalments, or 2 month.*' inprlsonment. for overloadlni wen, on to_ M y that radu-h__our Memberjhtp .hould no, Ara^rlc.n ln~-m.nl.; In Cjnj",„, ,•' %  '' """'• plantation routine, and avoiding ally dut.ng the (lr.t hall of the ba Inrreaaed to 1,000. dlan bualnn. "ere about th whan poattble, Ireatlna field. Nineteenth Century thr eonaciance Dunn the current year the timeth.. held by Britain. Till whkh ar,' 10 be planted in "•*. ol Enalund was .lining .iguinst Extra-Muial Department b-mk. .fleet, our vii.lt.lr .•xportj '" <-<< eudonror which are to V Ihe evils attendant on the Induahave been hou,eJ m our library A aa. wU a. out ltt.HIM.Jn; special arrangementr have to r* Faire" that the YJI.CA. *as rison College and I would like to GMftaph> i% t,^ om lh ude made with plantations In order tfounded, largely by the efforts of place on record our appreciation o| |ne yg ( x -irl( ri t continue* %  secure the necessary mechanical Mr. George Williams, in the midof the great sci-vlce^ this gentleCiMd.. ,-rono-ny has devclope-l Street on July lth. Howard DM 12 prevnnr \ ictlons. th" month. Other fruits available included limes, papawand .1 few pears. Pests And Diseases equipment required, and to leaf hoppcis in beans treatment In with prevailing i nd leaf-spotting fungi in tomaweather conditions. toes were among the chief pests Six Inspections and treatment reported attacking peasants' crops, of Government buildings nnd Bur The Peasant Agricultural inof private buildings and wan.-tructors continue to advocate houses were carried out In Julj .-introl measure*. Examinations of cane fields for As might be expected, green wood ants were also carried out .odder was in short supply In at four plantations, m II v districts. Concentrated leed, however, was in free supply. Botanical The Peasant Agricultural ln.siruc'ors visited fl2l peasant multiplication plots. Due to > holdlnyi and 34 school gardens shnrtage of rainfall during the SSl^gwlsiB* duiing the month. Eleven mango month, these plots received two wnow trees were top-worked. applications of Irrigation wat< r. Members of the extension staff They continue to make satlsfaci<-*isted the Co-operative Ofncer tory growth. die of the "Hungry forties." "%  i B' v n ,h "*" Its ideal, which it imparted to P. its offshoot in Barbados some 35 „ ,, ears later, was to fulfil the social On referring to Revet along lines very similar to her nettfhbour'H Many Canadian technicians are American-trained and ., engineering standards and practiei needs of Young Men in accordExpenditure Account page 14 it arr ., m i lar American films, radio ance with Christian principles. It •"" * aeen that our g-o*s saies pro-rpm-nea and mlgazlnes hav^ is because the initial "C* Is so "om Kf8 !" ... ?. r 'I.). 0 r * had a marked influence on th< itual Secretary's Work The community is apt to take RUB vital a part of th. whole group Jear 1052 amounts '? IIIIMJJ ,.„ c ., lnd h blu 0 tb Canadian •YMCA." thai h. wa. Ji.apjJ*J~" s ' J 5 5 40 ; " '"' con.umar. pointed to r.ad In th. Annual it.d.blt aide of thi. account It will BM ln dlc# „, by no m „ n port that so .mall a proportion of b. ajan that It " n l ; H| ' l c '" all loaded aialntt us," the arllc e th. members of the Barbado. 'he vicinity of SI2,0u0.O0 a year ,„., „ ~ u K g^g, „„, ln .„„.,,.,, participate. In the .pir> !" n th. "Y", It i. also to be fc,..lerii Canada via th. Panama Flrat year vedllnr nuraerr and ..." .Icitanol ihe Association.' >*-" on *• l,ed " d '" %  "' 0,l> Canal oflen have Ihe advantage It IS the lifethS of the '"m only JI.726.J2 I. IKtlvM „,, US (and even Canadian! Irom Member, f.r Subscription', product, senl from the Eastern the balance being obtained from manufacturing ar.aa by rail, various othT sources. I specially Many British goods en|oy a tariff make mention of this a. it goes prpfrnce also to ahow thc necessity for Increased ii...^^i me iii.iii.ma -,,..,,... . .... ..-M. m K. r .hin There are laiwerful t snadl.^n socjatlon for granl.d and to ;v.r, S n „^ „,„ lo „,„ BBI cp^rtlng l,,t,re. which e Uj look the immense amount or un__„ sh##.i naa 12 It will be a" increase of Bnti gJJ, .fj,,'^,, ddl Cnnad. the only hop. of rcri.lnr in by th. CeMral Secretary and , nullding during the ar the PT-" ,0 um C "' 5?U: th. Board of Directors If those d „ ZJSSm have colt 17 41 tt Hi'tain. There is the ready aym-, - —went stands a' $8,051.46. liv ry rt t Kirinllv. If U.K. exporters $ufMactgafafl HATKS Ot EXCMAWK awssf < AM AS. A ,.'.. Ml M-itk-r. D-manS Di-H 71 *S". ei siht i>in; %  I i"' i Pi CtMa i*Carra. 1 1 *" l/io* l'r Cauponi sihe, w: Pi TRUCK AND BUS TYRE ECKSTElh BROS BAY STREET AWAY THAT PAIN %  Mentholatum' Balm relievei \che* aod Pains o quickly that H seems almost like tMgk Von ianfccl iucooling. soothing touch begin at once to ease the nninful throb. Aad MenlhoLaium is so easy to use. Yoa just RUB IT ON. Ruh it where the Pain h and the Pain gocv That is all you have to do lo bring immediaic relief from Aches and P.iins. Thc sooner you get Mentholatum thc sooner you wilt get relief. Quick get a jar or tin to-day. It is the linest Rub ever made. at presen GET RELIEF QUICK carried out. As a Government servant he ran sar for certain that their efforts are nenulnely appr hy the ratings of Her Majesty'! Ships which visit Barbados from tlms to time, and the Harbour and Shipping Master told him that he would not know where he would turn if the Association were to cease keeping "open house" for seafaring men who, for one reasy,, mtntion of you on or another, arc temporarl stranded In Barbados. The present Mortgages ngam-t our property amount to $11.040 00. Against this the book value of oar property stand., at $61,397.41. It iDlrectors lo bis us to pay off our Bank I. H L and extend our Hostel accommoHc thought that the BarDacio J „--, -,,.• K*-, r dnina - -rt. ri rtunatc **££* SS" £^ %*ffi sslstance. uch .. selfless and enterprlsing General Secretary Captain H. H William-, worth nnmesnke oi the the __. hlmserf In his efforts to ma* other people happy. He wished thY.M.f A. th. fersd virtual exclusion from th* f'.iiiadlan market during the war Ihev were it least partl> compeniftled by i nnadlsn restrictions or tmttorts'from Uie US. I>etween 1047 and 1660. But Canada ha? been able to lift these restricUon% "itg .... ipnrls la the U.S. and to the iniw of t'S investment funds" aver .. considerable sum was spetit esake or the chief founder of n le-^Hm-o Ur .pounds but this Movement. Who nt VSf spares lB on)y he flrft lt p n p r e par nE a proper Cricket and Fr>otbBll ground. I appeal to Members of the Association to take a personi lie naai^i.ivil 1U inp.e 0 oeiaviiBi besi of fortune for the future and mterest in thU work. If Member. %  After the i-|" Waa piesente*! It was adopted hy Mr. J. Bromr • thank* was moved by Mr John Beckles. M.B.E. and "j icplv araa given by Mr. O. A. PIIASK FOR REAL MCN-THO-LAY-TUM hope that its dreams of expnmli come true. Col. See. We Iron-pa" The Hon. B. N Turner wo* welcomed to the Chair by Mr. A !Del. Innln, President of tht iYMCA who taid that It was I pleasure and honour for them t>. have him aa Chairman of th* Meeting. The minutes of the Seven'vfi-st Me"rinB were read by ... H H. William*. Secretary of Ass. ••1A 11 tatftAppalnted Auditor would realise what can be achieved If everyone would do his bit in a short while we would havo Ur Frances n. rue was again a Cricket and Football Field appointed Auditor and this apu-hieb would be a credit to the pomtment Was moved by Mr E < %  nd seconded by Mr,_l-. Naval Work Since the closing down ol th Admiral Orant Sailors' Rest in IMfl the Harbour Master and 1. oissunship Agent* look to the A'ic sort at ion for housing men of the the President of Royal Navy and Merchant Marin< DeL. lnwho are awaiting transportation .1 mp bell. ia1*Hr AnoUier vote of thanks wai nr.ved by Rev. A, E. Armstrona, M A. who said that very marabsn really realised wh pi v-.leg-they have in being n (he YMCA. He said • hcv are part of a brother hot til. part* ol the world and all -,I Jenomination* BE A PROUD OWNER BE A PLEASED OWNER BE A PHILIPS OWNER SELECT tOf/ i\EW PHILIPS Variety RADIO-PLAYER AND ItKAK IW.de Onlr m, Tht Mantao'aivm CoLtd., (t$t. ISBSiSlougli.Cniltfid. ld.Hi!Mf>illi'J _. iresented the Annual fie, nt to their destlnstlon: land Financial Statement. A General Meeting is being h*l J Mr. Innt-s then raferrsd brlr-Ay on 28th Augufct. ,.\ 4 JO p.i. when to certsin items on the rep-ri Mstnbsrs will be asaed tn nomine said: inate Members for Committc. The Membership this year a etc. to terve on various branches will be seen bv the Report is W57 of the work of the Association. At as against B18 In the ptavioui this Meeting an opportunity will vtar. Now that we have a it m be given Members to raise any Hostel and are In a position t. do points they may desire in eonmore extensive devetipmeni I nection wRh tho future of the Y H.C A and he wadisappointmust anneal to Memberto do Association I sincsrely trust that ••








WHAT'S QN TODAY

1.00 a.m.
Police Band Concert, Hastings Rocks
8.00 p.m.

Basket Ball, ¥Y.M.C.A. 8.00 p.m

For the cause that lacks assistance
‘Gainst the wrongs that need resistance
For the future in the distance
And the good that I can do.




ESTABLISHED 1895

Death Sentence Demanded

Harb




\



my

FRIDAY,



\OGUST 22, 1952



fi .
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tell fr ngpon : :
Tainfafl d
Temperata® LS 4
ext. Temperature: 775 *
Wg Velocity # miles 7
hy im ter (9 ama 29.9tR
° ¥ } 2 fan
" TOY
Sunrise: 4â„¢4@. 7 m
6. {6

Fex 27 Workers | Rice Board To Blame

Charged With Rioting Near Alexandria

Military Rule Of
Egypt Expected

CAIRO, Aug. 21,
The Military prosecutor Thursday asked the death sen-
tence for 27 workers charged with murder, arson and de-
struetion at Kafr El Dawar cotton mills on August 13. The
military court there completed hearings in the second trial
to grow out of the riots.
Of the 28 defendants one—an eleven-year-old boy—
‘ was ordered to be sent to a reformatory. The verdict on the
others must be sent to military headquarters here for con-
firmation. Previously the court sentenced twenty-year-old
elerk Mustapha Khamis to death for implication in the
riots. One of those in the trial was tried in absentia.

Harold Guard reports from ie 4 ———- .
eign Te cai Big Five Meet
To Diseuss UN

Membership

Biitish ob rs on Thursday
that Egypt is careering headlong
toward fe ie rule and that the
powerful Wafd party is planning
a comeback to grapple with the

Army’s “strong man’ General
Mohammed Naguib.
Rumours were current in Cairo UNITED NATIONS,
on Wednesday that Musta Nahas New York, Aug. 21.

and Seerage El Din, the two
ncipal leaders of the Wafd, had

The Big Five permanent mem-
bers of the Security Council will
meet in private today in an

at the dictate of General Naguib.| effort to solve their disagreement
On Wednesday night ahas|on United Nations membership.
denied these re} and the party The general assembly in a reso-
executive continues in session at] lution passed at Paris last Febru-
Al Cairo reports said,jary, called upon Russia, the
to “discuss reorganization”. United States, Britain, France,
: and China to attempt to find an
Military Rule agreement on the admission of

This bold front against the|new members.
purge demanded by the Army has} The five nations hold _ veto
im idle observers|powers in the Security Council
here with the strength of|which must recommend appli-

the Wafd which is said here to be
backed by a up of Egyptian
millionaires wi! aim is to re-
store the party to power. This

p is said to be known to
Soa Naguib and _ conviction
rules that in order to defeat their
ends he must resort to military

eants to the general assembly for
admission to membership. Russia
has used her veto 22 times to
block applicants from admission,

However Russia two years ago
proposed blanket admission for
14 applicants including nine
rule, Western-backed countries and five

Middle East observers here|Soviet satellites. The Western

noted th dual devel: powers contended that each
ment of military rule in a applicant should be considered on



Naguib’s declared imten-jits own merits and that there
| rage eel the army apart/should be no,pressure ‘as sug-
from polities. It was Naguib who/|gested in the Soviet “blanket
announced that general elections |admission” proposal.
would be postponed until next Authoritative sources saw

\ February. Then he announced] little hope of settlement at today’s
a long of social re-|secret session.
making any —U.P.
veference to any sort of political
organization to ned a, —
Finally, after ots a e U & tes
textile ‘mill at wo. OCES

troops straight
Naguib the

inte acta without consulting the
civil police and then appointed
a military court to judge the de-

linquents,

Middle East observers believe
that the question these actions
pose now is whether the military
trend is to continue until it rules
all aspects of the Egyptian scene.
The general belief here is that the
apparent resurgence of the Wafd
power will compel Naguib to gov-
ern the country with the army
even though it might prove only
temporary until a responsible
civilian government te

Eden To Visit

Necessity Of
Aiding ran

WASHINGTON, Aug. 21.

Usually reliable United States
sourees said on Thursday, that
the United States recognizes th¢
necessity of giving Iran financial
aid in the near future, but, so far
a way to do so has not been de
cided. However, active explor-
ation of ideas is going on in the
State Department. They said
that it is likely that Secretary of
State Dean Acheson will wait to
see the draft of the British not«
to Iran as regards the possible
resumption of oil negotiations be-



é fore he makes his own sugges~-

: 2 | tions.

: Y OS. via | They said Assistant Secretary
for Eastern Affairs, Henry

told foreign diplomats

Byroade,
By K. 0. THALER this month that the matter of fin-

Aug. 21. |ancial aid for Iraq had now be+

F ‘Anthony Eden/ come really urgent, but a way has
will Yi via in mid-|to be worked out to fdrnish it. He
tember for with Marshal| said that, while some officials
authoritative sources said{might desire to let Iran sell her

the! oil by separate contracts to near
et waraday DIE Mish Foreign eastern countries and European

Secretary since ones like Italy and Germany
slavia TF enited ca the ot. which have no big ge gat in-

omin-| terests, their own State Depart-
and was ousted from the C ment has to back the views of

The it will Big U.S. oil companies which
Ben con ie we ae made it clear that they do not
sions with Tito and his ministers| W@nt to see any agreement reach~-

ed which might give the appemr-@
ance of condoning the confisca-
tion of the Abadan oilfields.

wide range of topics
tae - . It was indicated



for some but \the final de- eh
0 SB gy Eig Mag ri
a Py mle Yugoslavia the U.K. Will Train
sources said. , .

I i Egyptian Troops

; with the ticklish, |
poe. of on which LONDON, Aug. 21.

th Britain and the United States} A Foreign Office spokesman
have been urging Yugoslavia aS/said Thursday, that Britain has
well as Italy, to come tto terms in| decided in le to nt

P princi, gra
of Pacific action of| Egypt military ieohine facilities

e
this stratagically

vital area. Aid)again in Britain. The initiative
to Yugoslavia probably will be/for the move came from Britain,
another important issue under} fgypt so far has not asked for

discussion. The see et meeting
with Tito of Big Toree Western
Ambassadors last week, i

resumption of facilities,
m added, About a score
= ee ha ows eipecwrent
aining in in ore the rift
of Yugoslavia} int Anglo-Egyptian relations late
as well as Trieste. But complete} last yaar when officers were with-/

secrecy is maintained in officialjdrawn by Egyptian Authorities.
quarters on the meeting —U.P. oF re Tr.

the



‘

SEOUL, Aug. 21.

repeated Allied ‘ -
United Nations warplanes de- eee be

ginning to hurt.

livered two smashing attacks; Yesterday was a bad day for
against the Communists on Wed-|Communists, Allied planes des-
nesday night and early Thursday |troyed three Red M.I.G. 15 jet
tate etre ti in a four-'planes, damaged two more and
hour it raid at ngyang and vily damaged a troop and
following up with a 100 plane|supply centre at Namyang and

k on a cement factory.

Fighter bombers and B. 26 light
bombers hurled bombs, bullets!of North Korea.
and napalm on the cement fac-' Thirty-eight air force B.29
tory, destroying 63 buildings and |Superfortresses from Okinawa hit
damaging 29 more, and leaving|Red manufacturing plants, troops
the entire area a mass of flames|and supply dumps in the Pyong-
and smoke. \vang raid. Communist anti-air-

Tt was the second straight day |craft fire was heavy but it stopped
cot heavy air attacks against Com-jas B.29’s flew over the city to
munists who in the same Pyong-\drop more than 350 tons of bombs
yang broadcast made it clear that Night fighters described “not

blasted two targets in a four-hour
night raid on Pyongyang, Capital

| KING OF IRAQ

te





|

ARRIVES IN U.S. —

POINTING TO NEW YORK’S SKYLINE, King Feisal II of Lraq is pictured

as he arrived aboard the Queen Ma

his uncle, stands beside the 17-year-old monarch

igation systems and inspect oil r
e will meet President Truman o



Introduction Of Cometh In

ry. Prince Regent Emir Abdul Ilah,
Feisai will study
efineries during his visit to the U S.
1 Saturday. (International)

W.L Will Take 18 Months

(From Our Own

Correspondent)
LONDON, Aug. 21,

It will be at least eighteen months before B.O.A.C

introduces Comets on the N

ew York—Nassau service.

Recent decisions to expand Comet services on the far
eastern route to Tokyo early next year leave no room for a
switch to jet liners on the dollar earning Caribbean net-

work for B.O.A.C. will have only nine series
will be unable to spare even one for the New

run

Schumacher’s |
Death May |
Split Party

; LONDON, Aug. 21.
The death on Wednesday night!
of the 56 year old Socialist!
opposition leader Kurt Sehuma-
cher touched off a wild scramble



for party leadership—a struggle |
which may split the patti
seriously, '
Twice since the war double!
amputee Schumacher ruled the'
party with an iron hand from’
his sick bed, each time for

a
year. But no one knows whether}
he can rule from the grave too,
Schumacher made his political)
testament when he told a “March
of Time” interviewer on Wednes-
day a scant six hours - before he
died: “The partition of Germany|
is the greatest source of strength}
of Soviet foreign policy. In the)
opinion of Social Democracy the
reunification of Germany is , an
aim more pressing and more im-,
portant for the pacification and
reconstruction of Europe than
any other form of integration of

one portion of Germany with)
other European countries.” -
That has’ been Sehumacher’s

policy since 1945, and that of the
parliamentary Socialist party. But
a large group of Socialists outside
the parliamentary party, and in
particular the “Three Mayors”’—
Ernest Reuter cf West Berlin,
Max Brauer of Hamburg, and
Wilhelm Kaisen of Bremen—have
long sought to modify this policy
which boiled down to unbending
opposition of all attempts by the
government to bring a rearmed
West Germany into the European
Atlantic Community. Schuma-
cher’s death may mean the re-
moval of the handcuffs from this
moderate group which has been
unable to date to sway the party
one degree away from Schuma-
cher’s line.
—U-P.





Russian Congress Is
Not Truman’s “Business”

WASHINGTON, Aug. 21.

At his news conference on
Thursday, Truman declined to
comment on the Russian an-

nouncement calling for the Party
Congress to replace the Politburo
on the grounds that it was none
of his business. A reporter ask-
ed Truman if he had any com-
ment or views to express on this
announcement, He answered as
above, adding only that it was a
matter for the Russians —vU.P.

U.N. Planes Blast Cement



Factory

very aggressive,” made only one
firing pass during the four-hour
strike. All the Superforts return-
ed safely to their base.

Civilians living in the Pyong-
yang area had been warned to
leave the area the previous night
by leaflets dropped by other B.29’s,

More than 200 air foree fighter
bombers and Navy carrier based
planes hit clusters of troop billets,
storage buildings and a factory |
at Namyang, ten miles southwest}
of Sukchon in Western Korea.

| government.

of Comets and
, York—Nassau

“We had hopes of taking
Comet into the Caribbean early
next year subject to operational
and commercial conditions, but
we are now heavily committed
on South African
routes”, said a
cial today,

It is now apparent that B.O.A.C.

corporation offi-

| will have to wait for delivery in
about eighteen months of a series jJnsurance

the

and Eastern

KOREAN WAR AVERTED
‘NOTHER WORLD WAR

Dwight

KANSAS CITY, Aug. 21,

isenhower, Republican presidential candidate.

i Thursday that United States may have averted “far

re serious” war by goin
Eisenha®we
nid-western states that

acbrteak of war in Korea.

into Korea when it did.

told a group of republicans from seven
“terrible blunders” preceded the
“But once those conditions oc
curred how you could have stayed out I do not know,” the
former five-star General said,

He said if the United States had not “reacted” to this
attack by the communists “we might have been involved in
1 far more Serious. thing (now)” He said there are “some
people” who have advocated going into ali-out war with
China, but added “no one I know of has presented any

feasible plan for attacking ¢
from All Quarters:
Physicist
Makes Flying
Saucers

Washington: An army physicist,

ho is also an amateur astrono-
mer, makes flying saucers in a
4g bell-shaped jar. He does 1
4y somizing very thin air within
Me glass jar through exposure to
siauc electricity supplied at the
base of the jar. A.l to show that
those objects which come up o2
radar screens may be merely
ionized clouds,

New Delhi: [n some villages of
Assam, where the crops are with-
ering, frogs (always associated
with rain), are daily married to
propitiate the Rain God. Frog
weddings are expected to evoke
‘ gilt of rain on the wedding day.

Kome: A 78-year-old Italian and

41s





79-year-old

wile went to
Naples to light a candle in hon-
our of Safht Gennaro. He was

blind and she was deaf. Separa-
itd by the crowds, they wandered
about the town til finally the
blind man recognised his witfe’s
footsteps, because “the pace was
“amiliar.”

Washington: In Seattle an ex-
GI had two of his Governmeni
cheques stolen by

of two Avon powered Comet: jthieves who forged+his name to
before making the changeover on cach them. It happened while
the New York-Nassau_ service the G.l. was himself in prison
The corporation will then start serving a sentence for stealing
ae et jetliner service jand forging Government cheques.
1 _ bi a wees be] Wellington: A group of boarders
ded to the Caribbean. t a college have formed an ua-
W.L Not Forgotten registered loan company to help

other boys “temporarily out of

“B.O.A.C, has definitely notjfunds.” They charge threepene¢

forgotten the Caribbean”, said a

|
spokesman,

The eighteen months will give
the Bahamas government time t«
settle its airport needs,

The Governor of the Bahamas
Major-General Sir Robert. Neville
at present in London, has had
talks With the British government
about moving the main airport
from Oaks Field to Windsor Field
and has discussed also the pur-
ehase of both from the British
Air Ministry by the

“The Bahamas has to face up
to this airport question and must
buy at least one of the fields”
said Sir Robert today. “I have
discussed the prices with the
British government and I think
that negotiations which will be
continued after the
government has worked out a
full scheme should be satisfac-
tory to both sides.”

Sir Robert has just had a long
consultation with B.O.A.C, Chair-
man Sir Miles Thomas and wa:
brought up to date on the cor
poration’s plans for the Carib-
bean, He'll advise the Bahamas
government when he returns to
Nassau next week, He _ leaves
London by air next Monday.



W.I. Worried About
Sugar Exports

LONDON, Aug. 21.
The “Times” commenting edi-
torially on the forthcoming Lon-

Canada and the West Indies, say
today that West Indian leader
are ‘worried about sugar exports
noting that Canada now has &
large adverse trade balance with
the West Indies. The newspaper
says that at the root of West In-
dian anxiety is lest the Canadians
may seek to balance their account
by curtailing sugar purchases in
the West Indies.

The “Times” says that the
West Indies are peculiarly sensi-
tive to any trade tendency-which
appears to threaten their sugar

Bahamas!

Bahamas;



sales, such as Canada’s purchase}
last year of a quantity from Cubs.) igh Commander in Korea read the!

The London trade conference! message in the presence of Maj, |
will be held in the second wees) General Berre, Commander of the;
of September. Only British and) new Korean communications zone
West Indian officials will tak | and Brigadier Nick Tassanis,! y

part. Canada is not participatir
even to the extent of an observe!
but will take an academic inter-
est in the proceedings, a Cana-
dian trade official said —cC.P.



BUSTA GIVES £50





i

'

Preliminary réports which did
not ificlude Navy destruction} KINGSTON, Jamaica, Aug. 20
credited Allied pilots with 60) An Island fund was started for;
buildings destroved and five dam-ithe Lynmouth flood suffers
| aged, i mante headed the list t
—~U.P. h £50-—
1 week interest on every shilling
~- equal to 1,300 per cent, a year.

A “strong-arm squad” sees there
we no bad debts.
Madrid: A Spanish Civil War

cripple, won the Madrid regional
beer-drinking championship this
week by drinking 8% litres
(about 15 pints) of beer in 50
minutes. He beat ‘five others and
won a silver cup and 1,000 pese-
tas (about £10) cash.

Baltie Sea-Port
To Be Closed

To Sweden

BERLIN, Aug.’ 21
Germany’ will close



East the

Baltic Sea port of Sassnitz to the

Swedish ferry from Trelleborg,
effective from October 5, the
Swedish Consulate in Berlin an-
nounced on Thursday. A Swedish
spokesman said that in five days,
talks between a Swedish delega-
tion from Stockholm and East
Zone railway officials, it was
agreed that the Swedish ferry
will go to Warndmunde on the
Baltic Sea after October 5. The
spokesman said that the Swedish
delegation consisting of four rail-
way experts had bean told by the
East Germans that Sassnitz har-
bour would be used only for fish-
ing purposes in future —U.P.

“Terrible Turks”



Replaced In Korea

don conference on trade between)

PUSAN, Korea, Aug. 21

A fresh Turkish brigade sent
fo replace the famed “Terrible
Turks” of the Korean fighting, ar-
rived in Pusan on Thursday as
replacements for the unit of tw
other United Nations forces,
Greece and Holland. The U5



o
navy troopship “General Nelson
M. Walker” disembarked 3,640
Turks to replace the North Brigade
which hea for home last Sat-
urday.

They were welcomed along the
Toute together with 250 Greek
replacements and 60 Hollanders.

Brigadier Namik Arguc, Turk-



+; Greek liaison officer to the United!

Nations Command. !

U.P.!

FRENCH FORCES
AMBUSHED La

SAIGON, Aug. 21. |

French sources who were rush-|

ng to the rescue of the outpost at

Trapang Phlong, besieged by Red

rebels, 45 miles west of Mimot in

astern Cambodia, fell into a

etminh ambush 1 lost 15 kill-

] 13 wounded U.P !

“hina.”

This may have been a reference
General Douglas MacArthur's
outspoken advocacy of hitting
China from the air. But Eisen-
hower mentioned no names. He
said he did not believe China was
a country that could successfully
be bombarded. He'said it has no
major industrial centres,

lo

“Attack on China,” Eisenhower |
Conference, ,

‘told the Republican

“would be starting another far

more difficult one (war) to stop |

than the one we are in now.”
The Republican Presidential nom-
‘nee in a general discussion of.
Foreign Policy said he
thought it “indefensible for any
member of the executive branch
to go up and down the land criti-
cizing Congress.”

This apparently was a_ refer-
ence to Truman’s 1948 campaign

attacks on Republican controlled |

Eighth Congress. But again Eis-
enhower mentioned no names.
Eisenhower's exposition of his

Foreign Policy views was made oft
the cuff. They were made in an-
swer to a question of K. B. Cor-
nell, Republican candidate for
Congress for the Sixth District of
Oklahama Eisenhower arrived
here early Thursday from Boise,
Idaho, where he spoke on Wednes-
day before a crowd of 19,000 from
the State House steps
—UP.





PRINCESS MARGARET
.
Princess Margaret
*
Spends Birthday
*
Quietly

3ALMORAL, Seotland, Aug. 21.

Princess Margaret is 22 on
Chursday, and, like many anothe:
jritish little sister, she’s spending
ier birthday quietly with her fam-
ly The petite Princess, one of
he gayest leaders of ndon’s
mart set until the death of her
ather the King, donned tweeds
ind sensible low-heeled shoes to
vienic on the grouse moors near
rere. The Queen, the Duke of
Edinburgh and the Queen Mother
Elizabeth were to be there to-
wether with friends of the Royal
Family’ A small family birthday
party was to be held on Thurs-
day in the droughty Balmoral
Castle, but n6 official celebrations
have been planned. Royal_birth-
days are regarded as strictly pri-

vate affairs and little fuss is made
about ther in British a
ACP)



Truman Firm
On Repatriation

PANMUNJOM, Aug, 21
The United Nations stand on
exchanging prisoners of war was
trengthened by President Tru-
nar promise that yo prisoner
held by the Allies would be sent
k to Communism against his





ick

Ut Truman’s reaffirmation of
the Alllied stand was the only
evelopment in truce negotia-

t
ior

The talks were in the midst of

nother recess, the fourth in as
veek Not even liaison

cer met today
The President published the
letter he wrote Captain Charles
FEquing, who had expressed the
hope th the United Nations
t back down on. their
ist repatriation of pris-



also |

|















Tree

»

reese

an

a
r



Sunset

Moon: New, August
Lighting: 7.00 p.m.
High Tide: 4.2% a.m., 5.11 p.m
Low Tide: 10.49 a.m., 11.06 p,m



29

PRICE : FIVE CENTS



For B.G. Rice Shortage

(From Our Own Correspondent)

Georgetown, Aug.13. crops than would be suili-
Hon. John Fernandes, cient to meet the entire
Chairman of the B.G. Rice needs and leave a Surplus.
Marketing Board told the There were two things the

Georgetown Chamber
Commerce on Friday that
there was no question that
the Board was to blame
for the shortage of rice in
the Colony, and gave the
Chamber the assurance that
measures are being taken
to prevent another shortage.

of the Board
Abary Mill had

completely milled out its
crop and therefore had
nothing to mill in the wet
season... Normally, this mil
would have given the Board
about 1,000 bags &® month

which woulgd have been

Discussion on the rive sufficient to enable the
situation opened when the Board to carry on without
President of the Chamber, any serious inconvenience;
Lt, Col, E, J. BE . wood, (b) that it now suited cer-

M.B.E., 'T.D., said the Cham-
ber had written to the
Board asking (a) how long
the shortage was likely to
exist; (b) when conditions
will return te normal and
(c) whether in the light of
experience, steps can and
will be taken to “prevent a
similar occurrence next year

tain private millers to see
that, time tike this
when there was a shortage
of rice, the shortage was
prolonged...He referred to
the recently introduced rice
cess and pointed out that it
peid such millers to sell
their rice through the “back
door” as they collected an

and in the years to com. extra 90 cents on every
Hon. John Fernandes told bag sold.

the Chamber that there As to the future Mr

were several interpretations Fernandes said the Board

of the term “shortage” as
used in the Press. There
‘| was the statement made
| that there was a shortage
|
'

would keep stocks in reserve
to ensure there was no
shortage, The present short-
age he added could be con-

of padi in the Colony, sidered as over since good
therefore the shortage of distributions were — beine
rice would not cease until made by the Board ond
the receipt of padi from the further, the Mehateony-
new crop. This he said, is Abary mill wold be ‘out
incorrect as there is more into oneration on the new

than enough padi from past crop in September.

25.000 More U.S. Farm
Workers Go On Strike

NEW YORK, Aug. 21,

A strike by some 25,000 international Harvester Com-
pany of Farm Implement workers brought a new crisis in
the already turbulent United States labour scene and the
possibility of a crippling strike by 100,000 non-ferrous metal
workers. This became cleer after the International Union
of Mine and Smelter workeis asked members for a strike
vote, but the results will not be announced until September
2 or 3.

The Independent Farm Equip-
ment Workers Union called a
strike against 12 Harvester plants
in three states after negotiations
for a new work contract broke
dewn, The strike began at 12.0)
a.m, to-day,

In Washington the Chairman of
the National Mediation Board had
some cheerful news when he said
voth sides in New York central
railroad dispute have assured the
Board that they hope to settle
differences without a strike. The
lispute revolves around 58 unset-





Chinese Reds
And Soviels
| Open Talks

MOSCOW, Aug. 21.
Stalin received the Chinese
Communist Premier and Foreign
Minister Chou En Lai last night
io open Soviet—Chinese talks on

i mutual military, aconomie and
tled union grievances. production problems.
Federal Mediation chief Cyrus Chou was accompanied by

Deputy Premier Chen Yung and
other ranking members of the 15-
man Red Chinese delegation which
arrived in Moscow on Sunday.
Also present at the Kremlin meet-
ing ‘were Soviet Vieq Premier
Vyach Estav M. Molotov, Foreign

S,. Ching pleaded with some 23,000
A.F.L, machinists not to strike
against Lockheed Aircraft Corpor-
ation Plants in Southern Califor-
nia because the walkout “would
seriously affect our national de-
fence effort.”

Minister Andrei Vishinsky and
He summoned representatives | other Soviet Foreign Office ex-
of machinists and Lockheed to a | perts.

meeting in Washington next week
in an effort to settle the dispute.
The Union whose contract expires
on Friday authorized a strike but
bas set no date for it.

-—U.P.

«Gilbey

EMPIRE RED WINE

The Chinese delegation includ-
ed Deputy Chief of the Chinese
General Staff Su Yu and Vice
Chairman of Finance and Econo-
mic Committee Li Fu Chun.

‘ ..P

Maintains

the same high
Standard
of Qualityas
shipped to the
West Indies
for the past
hifty years

©
EY

hight
yn

i e118:

on el

GARDINER AUSTING CL?
Slant MOONE





OS






PAGE TWO

BARBADOS ADVOCATE









MRS, H. STOUTE presenting a gift to a mother at the Christ Church Baby Welfare League yesterday

IR» -ROSERT ARUNDELL
Governor of the Windward

A Party Visitors To League

Islands"Who spent a few days.in N Wednesday evening last ] RS. NORMA GOODING and
Barbados“ intransit from Domini- Mr. and Mrs. H., A. Talma Mrs. Herman Stoute, visitors
ca, left for Grenada on Wednes- entertained guests to a cocktail to the island who are at present
day by’B.W.1A. He was a guest party held | at their residence holidaying here, are taking a keen
of Sir George and Lady Seel at Travondor”’, Welches. The party interest in social activities. On

was given in the honour of Judge
end Mrs, H. Stoute of the U.S.A,
and Mrs, Nerma Gooding also of
the U.S.A.

The evening was an enjoyable

Wednesday Mrs, H. Stoute visit-
ed Madame Ifill’s Baby League at
St. John’s and spent some time
there watching the routine check-
up of the babies and the general

“Bemersyde”, Christ Church.

From Olympics
R. KEN FARNUM, Barbados

Ace Cyclist, arrived home on one and among those present activities of the League.
Wednesday by B.W.LA, from were: Dr, and Mrs. E. L. Ward, Yesterday at the Christ Church
Trinidad, Ken, Jamaica repre- Dr, and Mrs, A. W. Scott, Mr. Baby Welfare League, Mrs.
sentative in cycling, attended and Mrs. D, H, L. Ward, Mr, J. Stoute presented poor mothers of

the Olympic Games at Helsinki. ©. Tudor, Snr., Mr. and Mrs. J. O. the parish with items of cloth-

| week aboard the Queen Mary was
| Sir William Wiseman, who for 30

lyears has been a Wall Stgeet
Banker. Sir William has a the:
Fifth Avenue and a house at

tego Bay, Jamaica.
;man of the American c
|of the Dollar Exports Council

ha s i son?
the Counaltr” ee = “Is there?” asked Knarf.
William Rootes “Well,” said Mr. Punch; “if there
3 .. | isn’t, then I’ve been wrong for many
New Book i | years. Mind you, I’m not saying that |





ae ‘Ju-t Who Is Jack Frost?
West Indian ’ --Punch Tells the Shadows About Him—
Table Talk

By MAX TRELL
“] WONDER,” Knari was saying
By LONDONER
LONDON

to Hanid, “whether there really is
' such @ person as Jack Frost. | mean,

is there anyone who goes around |

; » ba . ner making everybody cold?” |

oe Oe Se bets fe eee Hanid was just about to reply
that she was sure Jack Frost was |
just somebody imaginary like drag-
ons and unicorns and horses with
» wings, when Mr. Punch said in a
“| loud voice: “What's thic about Jack
74 Frost? Did i hear somebody say he
didn’t think there was such a per-

ow









1 ever saw Jack Frost. But that
George Lammings, well known doesn’t mean that there isn’t any |
Barbadian-born author recently such person. There are lots of things |
gave readings from his latest novel. that we know about but that we
as yet unpublished, at the Insti- can’t ever see. The Wind, for ‘in-
tute of Cuntemporary Artists in stance. Has anyone ever seen the
London, He does not want to re- Wind?” .
veal the title of the work at the Both Knarf and Hanid agreed
moment, But he tells me that that no one had ever seen the Wind
ean mee hee paveed to pear Like the Wind
ish it an e will appear . a 2 i
e “ ka 4s é “But there’s a Wind just the
next February. “It has taken me .. nw »Now Jack Frost is like the

about nine months to complete”| $3! i : is
he added “afd I am at preser(| Wind. He’s around. We're absolute

working on another book”; ‘The| ly positive he’s around. But he takes |

novel deals with nine years in the| teat care that no one should eve

‘ise ss ashe fi Alle .{ see him.”
lives of some Barbadian villagers “Why does he do that?” Hanid

who are connected with an estate, :

and tells of the effect upon tem | wanted - eee ked

of the changing political climate; , Mr. Punch looke
“Can’t you guess?

in the, colnsy. Hanid shook her head. tind te
i i 5 “Because, my dear,” replie r
Teaching Appointment Punch, “if anyone ever saw Jack |
I hear that Mr. Maurice R.| Frost—and if anyone ever caught
Bamfield of Birmingham has been| him, that would be the end of Jack
appointed to a teaching post at! Frost. Oh no, he’s not so foolish as
Queen’s College Nassau, Mr, Bam-| to let himself be seen.”
field who has studied at the school’ Knarf asked why it would be the
of Medieval and Modern History end of Jack Frost if he were ever
at Birmingham University gained: caught.
a B.A, (honours) degree in July “Why? I'll tell you why. Not too
1950, For a while afterwards ke many people like Jack Frost, He
studied at the Institute of Educa-| goes around pinching noses. He
tion, London University and was) makes toes and fingers tingle. Late |
awarded a post-graduate teaching! at night he creeps in through open
certificate in 1951. Until his windows and makes everything as
appointment in the Bahamas he’ cold as ice. He keeps grass and flow-

Jack Frost at work.





Jack Frost does another .awful
thing: He scatters snow around~ all
around—all over the streets and
fields and especially over the hills.”

“That’s wonderful!” cried Hanid.
“That's how everybody can go
sleigh-riding!”

Worst Thing

Mr. Punch frowned and said
\h’mn again. “But the very worst
thing he does is this. He finds a little
pond somewhere. It’s a lovely tittle
| pond, as pretty as a picture. The
sunbeams dance on the water. The
dragon-flies dart over it. The water-
lilies bloom on it. The fish swim in
it. And then what happens? Jack
Frost touches this pond with the tip
of his little finger and—-whoosh!—
the whole top is covered with ice!
Ice, my dears; hard, cold ice! The
dragon-flies don’t dart over this
| nond any more. The sunbeams don’t
dance on the water. The water-lilies
disappear at once. And you can’t
see a single one of the fish, The only
thing this pond is good for when
Jack Frost gets through freezing it,
is—”

“Ice skating!” Hanid and Knarf
shouted joyously.

Mr. Punch shook his head sadly.
“And that’s why no one likes Jack
Frost, and why it’s dangerous for

surprised. |



‘His many friends are glad to Tudor, Mr. and Mrs. R. A. Sealy, ing. These ‘were sent by Mrs.
welcome him home once more Mr, and Mrs, 8S. R. Taylor, Mrs. |. Lowe an overseas donor, also
and wish him better luck next B. Hynam, Mr. and Mrs. G. Cox, interested in social welfare.
time! Well done! Mr. Lisle Ward, Mr. C, G. Ward, ‘Those present were: Mrs.
To Read For Degree and Miss Daphne Ward, Norma Gooding, Madame Ifill,

R,. JOHN HUMFREY, a form-

er Science Master at Lodge
School, and for about a year past
Private Secretary and Aide de wife of Mr. DeVere Archer,
Camp .to His Excéllency Sir Headmaster of Montserrat Sec-
Robert Arundell, recently left ondary School, is spending a
Grenada by the H.L.S. “Herds- short holiday in the island with
man” for England where he will her sisters-in-law, Mrs. Clarke
enter St. John’s College, Cam- and Miss Archer of Brittons Hill
bridge, to read for a Natural and Mrs. Crosse of Ebenezer
Science degree. Manse,

Mr. Humfrey, Grenada-born,
is a son of Major B, B, Humfrey,
Assistant Superintendent of
Police, and Mrs, Humfrey.

. ° re oie reek-end fro. tsegrat
Holidaying With Relatives — anne dee’ daa. ve
RS. STELLA SINGH and her Horner, formerly an employee of
two children, Carol and Don, the Bauxite Co. in British Guiana
came in on Monday by B.W.1.A. is on his way to Vancouver to
from Trinidad to spend a holiday take up an appointment with the
with their relatives, Mrs. Singh Bauxite Co., there, They are
is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. guests at Abbeville Guest House.
A. Pragnell, Chelsea Road.

Mr. C, D, Ramsay, Mrs, C. Storey,
and Mrs. H, A. Talma.

One of the children of the
League presented bouquets to Mrs.
Gooding and Mrs. Stoute and
they both replied congratulating
Madame Ifill (Foundress) on the
good work that she was doing for
whe benefit of the poor. They
were very impressed with the
restful atmosphere and the hap-
py little faces around them,

They had heard quite a lot of
the League in the U.S.A. and
expressed their joy at being there
in person, “We shall take back
word to New York to that effect”.
Mrs. Stoute said, “and it has been
indeed a great pleasure to be with
you all,”

For Holiday
RS, CLARKE who - arrived
here from England on the

From Montserrat
RS. CHRISTINE ARCHER,

For Vancouver
R. AND MRS, HORNER
arrived in the colony over

5 ‘ To Join Husband Ist August for a short holiday
Entertainment R. D. A. PRIOR of Mara- with her two sons, will be re-
HE Harrow Sports Club will caibo who has been holiday- â„¢aining for about two more
give an entertainment in ing in Barbados for the past Weeks before returning to Eng-
honour of the visiting Table three weeks as a guest of Maresol land. Mrs. Clarke is living at
Tennis Team of San Fernando, Beach Flats, St. Lawrence Gap, Enmore Hotel. ”
Trinidad which arrived here last will be remaining for another C.J. Arrives
week, The dance will be held at two weeks before rejoining her R. R. J. MANNING, Chief
the Drill Hall tomorrow night husband who is Sales Manager Justice of St Vincent
23rd August, and Mr, Keith employed with Messrs. John arrived in the island on Wednes-
Campbell and his Society Six will Henderson in Maracaibo, day last for a short holiday her
be the Music Makers, Also holidaying with Mrs. He was accompanied by Mrs.
With C.PIM. Prior are her three children, Manning and 1 at

r ; they are guests at
HAROLD CARRINGTON oe SAE ROE:

CPIM. plorgs Stay
Curacao, came in on Friday last RS. M. WINTER who ‘has
for six ‘weeks’ holiday. During been holidaying in the
that time he will be getting mar- island for the last few months as
ried to Miss Gwendolyn Roberts, a guest at Enmore Hotel is en-

R.
who works with

Enmore Hotel.
Yor Honeymoon
M* AND MRS. B. SAMAROO

arrived here on Monday
morning by B.W.LA. from Trini-

ag dad where the we rec
daughter of Mr, Charles Roberts, joying her stay so much that she married, They War tie “Sena
The Ivy. Mr, Carrington is a has decided to stay on for a few mooning here for about three

Barbadian and is holidaying with more months,

f ! Mrs, Winter is from
his relatives,

weeks at Indra BS 5
Michigan, U.S.A. poe Ea eee

Worthing.



“BY THE WAY... ty seochoamer

MAGINE, idiot reader, Foule- ment. On misses an index, as, is
nough’s astonishment when in the case of a book which con-

a laborious business; especially
when there has been no attempt



a customer stood entranced before ‘tains nothing but names, the to place the nz i i
1 . e names in alphabetical
a Degas, and cried: “That's a tracing of, say, Barbauld, H.R.S., order, as was done "in earlier
beauty. paar sh. ee ve a edition’. In fact it seems thab
genuine Degas of the best period.” the editor of this new edition was
“I see you are a connoisseur,” CROSSWORD : an

governed solely by a desire to
confuse and irritate the reader.
How else is one to explain the
omission of a list of contents at

said the puzzled Captain. “No-
body could mistake that treat-
ment of light,” replied the cus-







tomer, “and look at the drawing the begi ?
tr tie ‘aitlig ost) eee e beginning of the book?
Foulenough added a_ couple of

pounds to the price, and the buyer
seemed to think he had got the
picture cheap. Later Foulenough
rang up Sam Codforth, and told
him that some fool had taken one
of his things for a genuine Degas.

LISTENING
HOURS







“Tt was genuine} all right,” replied Seb co i ee ee ace
Sam. “Nobby unloaded it on ate lal tA RPDS ed Maen abah
me after” the robbery at that 4.00 p.m. The News, 4.10 p.m. The
country place.” “Imbecile!” Daily Service, 6 15 p.m. Steve Race &
roared the Captain, “I let it go “ Across aleolm Lockyer, 4 p.m. Twenty
fox ‘tin iat ont? vou hiv 1, Recall it was about an M.P. (y, Questions, 6.00 p.m, Schumann, 6.15 p.m,
t : , it. 9. The Emir’s economist. (5) Variety Bandbox, 6.15 p.m. Merchant
sending the genuine stuff without 10. Not customary for9 todo it. (4) Navy 4 ' +» 8.50 pom ‘
letting me know.” 11 Rupert Bear's home wood. (3) Mine Country Style, 6.45 p.m. Sports
13 aoe of the day's FPS, (4) Round-up & Programme Parade, 7.0
. J. § dro) as PS y a ' e $ ‘a
Marginal note 14° Rose type, (1) we eR — 1080 Pm e a5.58 Me BL ae
© “er : . ss 17. Stain of sorts, (4) Sn oe aa ae packing
free from vibration is the 19 Startle a broken marl. (5) 7.15 p.m. West Indian Diany, 7.45 p.m
United States that a passen- 2! Makes him warn his nomad. (8) a ‘Tale of Two Cite Ae ip & tio
. 22, Volcanic export. (4) Reese i % Pog or
ger balanced a glass of beer on 93. Pins of Pate ’ Newsreel, 8.30 p.m) World Affairs, 8.45
: 23. Pins can be made to, (4) t
the rudder when the ship left 24 Enrapture. (9) Pistia BOO pete; mone Ot Vienta, 10,00
New York. On arrival at South- Down Saat “Whe News 10.10 p a News Talk.
ampton the glass was still there, 1. King, emperor. or dictator ? (5) {10.18 p.m. Portraits From Memory, 10,30
and only 15 drops of beer were = Mere 1nd, Dus a jewel, (7) jp.in. From The Third Programme
issing. i : "nt wie, ee nn Fe
missing. They had not spilled, sa Po. a. e Tieauede solutio
but had been drunk by a caddish 4 Bracnyen of 7. (4) GAIETY
member of the .crew. England 3° Beastly to rebut like this, (5)
F . . 6. You do this t > berry
now build a bigger, faster, and 7. Synonym of e ey ares The Garden—St, James
even steadier ship—but I forget 8 A portion intended tor TODAY & TOMORROW 8.30 P.M.
shy bs 7 ) —w , —
why. 15. Laid out for 24, perhaps. (3 f “CRY MURDER”
‘ 16. See 6. (4) {7 Ser ist Carol MATHEWS
Book review 38. Colour (4)
20. A slip of the tongue? (4)

. ae ; Martha VICKERS — Philip REED
NEW omnibus edition of the Solution of yesterday's pustie Acres =





OT je 4 1. Caravan. 7. Ope ( =

Cheakat the cet ene Endure 12 Maxnitude "Ya Ont od “di ne neces nee s
ard work en Rent. 18. Haunt @1. Tern, 2 SILVER CITY BONANZA

the stibject—contains much new ne eee ae yon 1 nt Rex ALLEN (The Arizona Cowboy)

matter, in the shape of names of ards: 6 Sheer. B. Eneincer: “GUNMEN of ABILENE”

veteran cabmen living in retire- net +5: Retertears 17 Tur Allan ROCKY LANE











LADIES “ARCOLA” SHOES

LOW CUT COURTS. Navy, Brown, Black Suedes $13.69



Jack LORD &

“DAUGHTER of the WEST" (Color)
'
}

OUTPOST

him to let himself be seen.”

But when Knarf and Hanid looked
at Mr. Punch they saw that he was
really smiling. They knew that he
didn’t mean a single thing that he
said about people not liking Jack
Frost, if there was a Jack Frost.

has been teaching in Grimsby. | ers from growing. He hangs icicles
from window-sills and around the
edges of roofs.”

“Oh, they’re pretty!” Kuarf ex-

Going Going.......

onSclogel Pobin, Starts ote! aut sBversbudy like to ste
Jamaica is likely to be sold very} *'<8% ‘ Pm
soon I hear. Negotiations with an| _ “2mm,” said’Mr. Punch, “Aud
interested party are “far 7 als a-iy
advanced”, The Colonel is asking} Rupe
about £100,000 for the hotel to-|

gether with 25 acres and a pri-! z ,
vate beach. Included is the Villa 2a
Flora where the Duchess of Kent} ,
stayed on her honeymoon in 1934. |
The hotel has suites for 60 guests, |
a swimming pool and terraced
tropical gardens, ' |

Mr. Bumstead \

With regret I record the death |
of Mr. Roy Bumstead a member
of the West Indies section of the
Colonial office. Mr. Bumstead was
killed in a mountaineering acci-}
dent on Mont Blanc last fortnight. |
He was 31 years of age and a














The young farmer seems very ** 1 was watch-
interested in something and does

not move as Rupert runs across

he says gravely.
ing something queer here. | think
one of my trees has got a five in

9 Tw ; ‘ a i the dell. ‘Please, I’m looking its roots.’ He points to a hole
Se Ciasaee tent’ pease ane for a little dragon,” says Rupert. at the base of the tree and in
aoe ue, 3 “Have you seen ite’ he great excitement Rupert sees that
war, served as a captain in the farmer looks startled. ** There another wisp of smoke is fazily
R.A.C. in West Africa and Burma, are no such things as dragons,"" curling up from it.

and was mentioned in dispatches. |
He joined the Colonial Office as
Acting Principal in 1948 and was
transferred from the Communica-
tions department to the West [n-
dies section in 1949. In May 1951)
he was promoted to /Principal. No
buecessor’ has yet been named,



EMPIRE

TO-DAY 2.30 and 8.30 p.m. and Continuing Daily 4.45 & 8.30
“poem

TO-MORROW




, The flashing exploits and
rs dashing courage of the
r 4 world’s best-loved rogue!

RoBIN Hoop.,

Color by TECHNICOLOR
ff seems RICHARD TODD ws JOAN RICE. 4 Ut

* ¥ J P cs i
eT ule eh a eH
XK ers cil PPC }

: ies el Ly Por as t
oh He

EAST © Welt Disney Productions
by PERCE PEARCE - Directed by KENNETH ANNAKIN + Screenplay by LAWRENCE E. WATKIN

3 EXTRA
Universal News Reel Showing the Opening Ceremony of the
1952 Olympic Games

ROODAL THEATRES



————; 4

a hi

i 5"
=

Is
LAST NIGHT
AT

THE by



















Meena
CLUB EMPIRE | OLYMPIC ROXY ROYAL
To-Day 7.30 & 830\ To-Day to Monday) To-day 4.30 only To-Day only
MORGAN Geter | aT a
i" b s . 4
mem | Pred MacMURRAY and |
Walt Disney's Claire TREVOR | Charles STARRETT | Lloyd BRIGGS in
. \Smiley BURNETT in}
in | TWO FISTED | THREE STEPS
before closing STORY OF | WO FISTED | Now &
until December ROBIN HOOD | BORDERLINE | Fe-Night at 8:39 lanoxen souentY
Color by Technicolo: | oar jenagans rai: & Starring
, | Starring ORR MAS SOee Phyllis CALVERT
heneoaeenaes
Richard TODD | DANGEROUS Doors Open at
i a \Toemorrow & Sunday
(| Joan RICE | 7 p.m | 15
Extra GAMES “Opening ] aeulutns
SPECTACULAR =} universti News nee! | tumerrey | columbia Pitures
TECHNICOLOR | Opening Ceremony Mid-Nite } ; Hrenents
| of the 1952 Olympte Universal Pictures
cana ymp' Tomorrow Night Presents THE MOB
DVENTURE i | ee THE GOLDEN
A é Tomorrow Roy Rogers Double! sALAMANDER
at 1.30 p.m, Starring
IT’S THE LAST WORD IN {i | sourx erry sue « LIGHTS OF OLD} trevor HOWARD |Proderick Crawford
WESTERN WOMEN IN WAR | ANOUK Richard Kiley
| ~~ Mid-Nite | 2 — a ee eg
! 5
EXCITEMENT! romorron wat | SANTA FE Siem | On Etat?
Paramount presents w : and 4.20 & 8.15
EB OF DANGER Gene AUTRY te een abie
- oO E
Th L A ST and ROLL ON TEXAS) * SUE | Whole Serial
e WHISPERING ang \ |, THE GREEN
FOOTSTEPS | MOON | WOMEN IN WAR! ARCHER








ON ITS 2nd FLAMING WEEK
“GLOBE

CONTINUES TO-DAY 5 & 8.30 P.M. AND CONTINUING

starring
Rhonda
REAGAN FLEMING
with

Bruce BENNETT, Bill WIL-
LIAMS, Noah BEERY

Ronald










Wa PURINE i ince csi ess $14.50 At the —
VARIOUS STYLES OF BLACK & BROWN SUEDES if PARBGREES (Dial $170) The Ghint of Maties Plotures - + - -
Backless & Toeless .0.00.. ccc. sie $14.79 sg’
White Nubuck—Backless & Toeless....... $15.04 P i A Z A Ss € A RA MO UCHE
Jane Stewar Me , El
T R EVANS f i TO-DAY (FRIDAY) LEIGH - GRANGER — FERRER — WILCOXON _ PARKER
» WK. & WHITFIELDS iacbawem fy OPENING SOON—20th Century Fox
YOUR SHOE STORES * Ruby eae “WITH A SONG IN MY HEART”
DIAL 4220 DIAL 4606 MN “THE LAST OUTPOST” } Susan HAYWARD — Rory CALHOUN
i = ——— moo
































1952

—

FRIDAY, AUGUST 22,

ry

Saga 4/7. V4
and YoU a f a



FOR FRIDAY, AUGUST 22, 1952

4
Look inthe section in which your birthday comes and
x find what y6ur outlook is, according to the stars.

ARIES Aggressively favourable day for military,
March 21—April 20 humanitarian crusades, all worthy Causes,
Day advises sensible care in hazardous

work, handling tools, water activities.

TAURUS * *

April 21—May 20 Mildly favourable for your especial inter-
ests and desires. The armed services of
our country should be inspired to go for-
ward. A good day generally.

*
%
+
*

You are indeed favoured with your Moon
and Mars in excellent aspects. But there
is a warning not to over-reach to gain
objectives.

May 2i—June 21 Not all stimulating for brain work, but—

for the usual daily routine, familiar work
—day can be gainful, pleasant. Don’t over-
do!

*«
ae
«
x

*

CANCER
June 22—July 23

Your planet suggests doing things in a
quietly efficient way, without being too ex-
acting or arbitrary. Real benefits to be
had in useful trade, business, family affairs. *
urgent obligations how hard you dee
work, what tempo you should keep this
generally auspicious day. Extra care
stressed on dangerous jobs. *

LEO
July 24—Aug. 22

VIRGO ly i i
ans: 23 Mostly up to demands of your position and

LIBRA
Sept. 24—Oct. 23 Favourable indications, going to still bet-
ter ones for tomorrow. Fine time for per-
sonal and artistic matters.

-M

SCORPIO Mars’ excellent as f
pect and the Moon’s

Oct. 24—Nov. 22 favourable influences promise a day of in-
terest, gain and personal satisfaction. IF,

of course you think honourably, act wel.

*
Influences indifferent to some money mat--
ters and selfish interests, but honest intent
and objectivity can achieve in a big way.
Due recreation should not be neglected.

-

Your Saturn position stresses need for
serenity. Have hope, look forward as you
take good care of day’s obligations.

*

Mild rays from Uranus, but rightful ag-
20 gressiveness (such'as in military and gov-
ernment activities) will bring surprising

results,
*

Neither hindering nor too invigorating +
aspects. Mostly up to you and what your
programme calls for. Don’t strain, but +
keep anead with urgent matters.

*

*

SAGITTARIUS
Nov. 23—Dec. 22

«
*«
«
x
*«
*«
«
*
*«
*«

*
+

CAPRICORN
Dec, 23-— Jan. 21

*
AQUARIUS
‘Jan. 22 — Feb.

PISCES
Feb. 21—March 20

YOU BORN TO-DAY: Splendid mental and mechanical
ability; pride, ambition, but sometimes dislike for small de-
tails and irritating routine. Watch that you don’t tend ta
domineer, disregard others’ desire or opinions. You can really
achieve in profession, trade, in a religious life, or other course

once you set your mind and heart sturdily to it. Birthdate:
Claude Achille Debussy, great Fr, composer; Samuel Pierpont
Langley, air pioneer, astronomer.

x se hee Me HM KM MH MK ¥

YOU'VE NEVER BEFORE SEEN
A PICTURE LIKE THIS!

*















The amazing saga of six men who
deliberately risked their lives to prove
a theory! On a primitive-type raft
of balsa logs they drifted from Peru
to the isles where the hula girls wait!
101 days and 4,300 miles without
contacs with civilization, exerting
superhuman efforts to keep afloat
and alive!

ow:

Produced by OLLE NORDEMAR
Music by SUNE WALDIMIR =;
An Artfilm A.B.



Told by THOR HEYERDAHL

author of the best-selling book

AU aN AN , Photographed by the
ere : * men who lived itt

AT LAST ON YOUR SCREEN!

2 AZA—Opening TO-DAY





BRIDGETOWN
N.B.—Two Special Shows on MON. & TUES. —,
“RON—TIKI” Plays with the Action Packed

Drama!



A WOMAN CAN
MAKE OR BREAK





~~ BRIDGETOWN BARBAREES

sin







(Dial 2310) (Dial 5170) (Dial 8404)
OPENING TO-DAY ||TOPAY 4-45: 8.90 p.m. “DAY, to SUN.









& Continuing Daily
Colossal Technicolot
Adventure !

THE LAST
OUTPOST

45 & 8.30 p.m.
TAP ROOTS
(Technicolor)
Van Susan

HEFLIN : HAYWARD
and

PARDON








2.30 — 445 & 8.30 pm.
& Continuing Daily
4.45°& 2.30 p.m




Two SPECIAL Shows on
MON. & TUES.: 8.30 a.m.
The Much Talked About

KON-TIKE














° Ronald Rhonda
(Six Men oo A Raft) REAGAN ::: FLEMING
Also Special Added —— ——-
Attraction ! SAT. Special 1.30 p.m. MY SARONG
“ROADBLOCK” Zane Grey’s Bud ABBOTT &
Charles Joan ||THUNDER MOUNTAIN Lou COSTELLO
McGRAW __&__ Tim HOLT & Bal, Special 1.20 p.m

Tony MARTIN
and

“LEGION of the
LAWL
George O’BR

Sat. Special 9.30 & 1.30
“SPORT OF KINGS”
Paul CAMPBELL &

“BLAZING ACROSS THE
PECOS”

Char'es STARRETT
Midnite Special Sat
“BUCKAROO SHERIFF

OF TEXAS” &
TIMBER TRAILS” (Color) “RANGE JUSTICE”
Monte HALE Johnny Mack BROWN
== SESE

“THUNDERHOOF"’

Preston FOSTER &
“WHIRLWIND

RAIDERS’

Charles STARRETT

Midnite Special §
“OUTL













Mid-Nite Special Sat.
“WESTWARD BOUND’
Kun MAYNARD &




EL DORADO"
MACK

BROWN




Johnn




FRIDAY, AUGUST 22, 1952
SS na een

ACCORDING to

rainfall returns received from 32

stations situated in the various rainfall categories of the

island, the rainfall for the
inches below the average.

month of July, 1952 was 0.85
In the majority of districts

light moderate showers fell on approximately 18 days of
the month and widely distributed rains fell on the 6th, 7th,
10th and 27th, writes C. C. Skeete, Director of Agriculture
in his report for the month of July.

The northern part of the island
received little or no rain on the
10th and 27th. The average total
rainfall for the month was 5.66
inches, the average total for July

tne nercially. The work is being, car-
1951 was 6.03 inches and the ore ‘olen of. Res co iy es oa : ee | ried out wades Dr. L.A Senin. 4
average for July for the past 105 round of judging of school gardens tane Borm ; | chemist on the staff of the Pacific {
yon wae 6.51 inches. The ap- entered for the annual competi- siostaeate feniber to ssenraia te an Ge ret j orous | Experimental ‘nen a the Fish- Ou
proximate total rainfall for the tion. ; sons light-proof house arrived during marketing society b ised in jeries Research Board in Van-
island for the seven months — — The usual .routine operations the month. Construction i : that district Furthe “meetin of —— ot ge Se ee
January to July 1952, was 20.62 were carried out at all Stations mediately started, and ‘no 7: fits Grous ate oma ngs 0} : | The fisheries department said *
inches, the total for the cor- during the month. The planting i cteq that it will be completed No societies were registered the market for fish oil since 1932 | Togp ot
responding period for 1951 was of food crops was continued. The and ready for use by th iddle during the month The ‘Sayes ee e n anac a | wag based upon the existence of .
43.07 inches, cropping programmes at some of Or August. ‘This is bose ee Court. Co-operative Producers’ | Vitamins A and D in the oll | funinthe day. Thenis

The highest total rainfall for the Stations have been handicap- eo. jater than had been plan- 2894 Marketing Society which was : 1 | After vitamin D beeame a syn+ Hon a
July 1952, at any of the above 32 Ped through inadequacies of the neq but if successful will) still registered in June was formally Vigorous salesmanst . LONDON |thetic preduct, the oil found a | Dedd’s
stations, was 7.62 inches, record- irrigation units, and in the case give arrows with which some Presented its certificate of regis- , eorous salesmanship is needed to enable British ex.‘ market only because of the pres-| For Dedd’s Ki
ed at a station in the parish ot Of “Jerusalem” through the fail- chocses can be made. tration at a ceremony which took porters to capture Canadian orders in face of U.S. competi- | «nce of vitamin A. Pills contain essential oils and medicinal
St. Philip and the lowest was 3.33 Ure of the irrigation water supply. ~ visits were paid to severa: Plaee at the Sayes Court Agricul- tion, says the British Treasury, in the August issue of its| “Over the past few years vit- | ingredients that act directly on the kidneys
inches, measured at a station in Livestock _ maize plantations during the ‘zal Station on July 15th. “Bulletin for Industry”. | min A has been synthetisized by | s¢ that within 1 hour they start draining
the parish of St. Lucy. The total number of livestock month, and requests made for OMe application for registration This advice, although directed primarily to British | *¢ve™@! methods,” the department | jitet ogity “a wate tom

Sugar Cane. The young cane at the Stations at the end of July small quantities of selected cor “48 received from a consumers’ sdrtersy i& Of g en rere ce ee ern Be The procedures are much | the Your is then clear, You
crop in the majority of the dis- Was 117, comprising stud animals, seed, This seed will be collectea Society in St. Michael. sis exporters, is of great importance to the British West Indices | {6,6 difficult than those involved | telax. You look and feel years .
tricts of the island is in good con- cattle, pigs, goats, sheep and from all over the island, bulked, Veins coteiceren. Anoilet bovany,. a8 well, for two reasons: » (1) Because prosperity of the | in the manufacture of vitamin D, Be sure to insist en Dodd's Kiddy Pil,
dition and is tillering well, The equines. Three hundred and planted out at Codrington and we ee eS ene vital B.W.I-Canadian trade largely depends upon the / but they have been accomplished. the gags gerd for over =
crop in the northern and some forty-seven gallons of milk were mass seleeted when ripe. In two pending its application for tegis- â„¢aititenance of a satisfactory balance of trade between} The net result is that interest in aoe natal =
coastal areas is showing signs of Produced, 8 head of livestock or three y it j 8 Pplic . fans = aia! i iis is iy | eure Only 2/- at all drug stores. 422
coat Sees ee nee te ae iree years, it is hoped that a tration, has submitted its draft Canada and the U.K.; and (2) Because the West Indian; Vitamin A in fish oils is greatly

wilted appearance.

st p ’ * 3 There are vast o tunities fo

Tor thy past 23 seosons the Stations were a follows:—bulls munity Observance Of Co-operators opportunities for |
© | eae 5 the export of goods of all kinds -

fiona Rave copefice with ts boars 4, taking otal ot $8 pining GROPETAMM wy, cy. The Corpor, Dey cacys- (CAMs cutee etter: Chauffeur’s Inquest,
Department in voluntarily furnish- for the month. operative Officer attended 1¢ tions, sponsored this year by the now the fourth largest importer |

ing crop yield returns giving the
acreages and tonnages of cane
harvested during the season, This
year returns have been received
covering an acreage of 32,003.29

acres, out of a total of 36,239.63 bred so far this year to 368,177,- meetings of societies in process of § "Canada’s population has in- mans, St. Michael, was further THE ¢
acres papas. ‘by plantations of Boe eon’ Bumber liberated to formation. In addition, the Co- dis tat tee ou ee Saree iat hae Tae ere Since adjourned by His Worship Mr. | TRUCK & BUS TYRE THAT WAS
more than ten acres. Telthal walk 48 Saka dnevection operative Officer attended a meet- tion, The six co-operative socie- ; E McLeod, until Monday.

The average tonnage of cane

er f and experimental plot work was - ties represented at the celebra- of living of her people has increas- “A” Police C

for “all Sune Seine cant carried out during the month. Geanenstien Wiaiteetin watches, tions presented reports on their ed by more than half. The vol- Cecil Hope died some hours | Sixty years of leadership in tyre-making have taught Dunlop
mitted returns was 33.88 tons, the " Food Crops a meeting convensd for the eee ahh wethudae Mi, ume oe yo imports has after he was taken to the General | that thete is no standing still—even the most successful pre
average for 1951 was 40.17 tons, Spraying of sweet potato fields purpose of presenting the gether, the function produced a aoe een ra an eeeee Hospital on August 3. Fi be Derraged. That ‘ pes whe has been dome to the Dunlop
The recovery for 1952 was slight- at Codrington was carried out for certificate of registration to the most stimulating effect on all those jmports. f e ryre. Dunlop Getigters have developed trom

ly better than that for 1951, be-

: 5 a cree : 3
ing 8.98 tons of cane per ton of present cost per acre of spraying. ducers’ and Marketing Society; The propaganda effect of the What are the prospects of in- Barbados Scouts wt FOR rae? tn ab ok PY We Dag Re sn Re cele: one teeny
sugar as compared with 9.01 for A new form of wettable lead and the Co-operators’ Day cele- Co-operators’ Day celebrations creasing U.K, exports to Canada’ Vr mae dated didescy, bate re
1951, arsenate without molasses was brations which were held during has resulted in renewed enthusi- Says the Treasury: “Supplies and Reach Grenada mi A % ms are
Peasant Agriculture found preferable to ordinary lead the month. asm among existing societies and delivery dates of capital goods AM 4, =

The main food crops generally ®rsenate used with molasses as a At a well attended meeting applications for assistance in the should improve with the cuts in (From Our Own Correspondent) — | ) §
have germinated well and are ‘sticker. : . convened in Hillaby, St. Andrew, establishing of new groups. home investment, the higher GRENADA. Aug. 19. S 2
making satisfactory progress. Examinations made in an area 5 d

Peasants have planted more food

P , : : E tities of steel that are in prospect. . "

crops this year than last year, 294 their larvae were prevalent D a party of eighteen Barbados |

bapetilitio: aay 2° failed to show any parasitism of But none of these factors will help goouts w ‘a > campi at!
D y eet potatoes, Indian these larvae by Apanteles glomer- couts who are now camping at

corn, peas and beans. Good crops
of beans were reaped during the
month. The supply of this pro-
duct reaching the market from
peasants’ gardens was consider-
ably augmented by good “catch”
crops produced on a field scale
by peasants as well as estates.
Other vegetables were in moderate
supply,

Both plant and ratoon canes,
especially in the sea-coast areas
of Christ Church, St. Philip and
St. Lucy, are in need ef rain.

A large number of peasants’
plots has been planted to cotton
in the St. Philip area. The crop
has germinated very well,

A few plots of groundnuts have
been planted, mainly in St. Philip
and St. Lucy. THese are making
satisfactory progress.

Coeonuts, mangoes and bread-
fruit were in good supply during
the month. Other fruits avail-
able included limes, papaws and

special arrangements have to be Faire” that the Y.M.C.A. was rison College and I would like to basa. on the-aide AUGUST 21, 1982
a few pears. made with plantations in order to founded, largely by the efforts of place on record our a preciation of Aan. ad £m ett tee 4 Selling = - NEW YORK Buying
Pests And Diseases secure the necessary mechanical Mr. George Williams, in the mid- of the great service this gentle- Canada’s economy has developed 73 9/10% Pr Cheauae Fae teen he
equipment required, and to fit dle of the “Hungry Forties.” man is giving the “Y”. along lines very similar to her Sight or

Green leaf hoppers i beans treatment in with prevailing | Its ideal, which it imparted to Finan neighbour's. Many Canadian tech- ,., . so. Severe eonntae: Bh) AAD F
and leaf-spotting fungi in toma- Weather conditions, its offshoot in Barbados some 35 ce niclans are American-trained and 77 9/\00 br Garrency 90 ijio% P
toes were among the chief pests Six inspections and treatments years later, was to fulfil the social On referring to Revenue and Qivineering standards and practice Coupons 69 4/10% P
reported attacking peasants’ crops. of Government buildings and four needs of "Young Men in accord- sapepdiore Account page St are similar. American films, radio 0% Pr Silver 20% Pr
The Peasant Agricultural In- of private buildings and ware- ance with Christian principles. It be seen that our gross = programmes and magazines have OAMADA |
structors. continue to advocate houses were carried out in July. is because the initial “C” is so from the Buffet Account for the aq @ marked influence on the gp 3/10) Pr Cheques on
control measures Examinations of cane fields for vital.a part of the whole group year 1952 amounts to $22,152.33 tastes and habits of the Canadian Bonkers 78 6/10% P

ia naetee be iach green wood ants were also carried out “Y.M.C.A.” that he was disap- 48 against 1951 $13,595.40. On se consumer, ols Demand Dratts % 18% Pr |
fodder was in short supply in at four plantations. pointed to read in the Annual Re- debit side of this account it wi “But the dice are by no means 4) 4)j)/ py cone peat Onpete end Dtetrtbatere throughout the Wortd

at y .distes Geta te port that so small a proportion of be seen that it ectually tales in a1) loaded against us,” the article 79 g/10% Mm Currency 77 i/10%o Pr cue
feed, bowed ae ia Rae OGnae. Botanical the members of the Barbados the vicinity of $12,000.00 a year goes on. “U.K. goods gent to... Coupons 84/10 Pr ECKSTEIN BROS — BAY STREET

The Peasant ‘Agcicuttutal *2- First year seedling nursery and ¥-M.C.A, participates in the spir- to run the “Y”, it is also to be Western Canada via the Panama)” ?! Silver 20% Pr B E

structors visited 926 peasant
holdings and 84 school gardens
during the month. Eleven mango
trees were top-worked.

Members of the extension staff
assisted the Co-operative Officer



at 12 meetings of co-operative
groups held in July.

During the month the Plant
Diseases Inspector and the acting
Senior Peasant Agricultural In-

Stud services paid for at the

The number of moth borer egg
parasites bred in June was
57,630,000 and the number dis-
tributed to the planters was
50,429,274. This brings the total

pest control and to determine

where cabbage white butterflies

atus though this introduced para-
site had been found in this area
for the last three years and it was
hoped that this parasite had be-
come effectively established.
Further evidence of damage to
ratoons by root borer Diaprepes
and root mealy bug Neorhizoecus
was obtained during July. More
field experiments were laid down
on plantations during the month
and from experience gained some

changes in method and rate of

application of the gamma isomer
of B.H.C. will be necessary in the
future.

Owing to the necessity of fitting
in this soil treatment with normal
plantation routine, and avoiding
where possible, treating fields
which are to be planted in “pro-
visions” or which are to be
“thrown out”, the scope for ex-
perimental soil treatment is not
only very limited each year, but

multiplication plots. Due’ to a
shortage of rainfall during the
month, thése plots received two
applications of irrigation wate
They continue to make satisfac-
tory growth. .







NT 1 £ 0 v ? 1 ‘ : A major research programme have Pyorrhea, Trench Mouth
i$ HE Vi W LOWER cee? tute trace Came = has been launched by fishery ny Pee pawl



better strain of seed will be avail-

able fer use by the planting com-

general meetings of co-operative
groups; 8 of these were meetings
of registered societies, 4 were
meetings of established but un-
registered groups, and 2 were

ing of the committee of manage-

Sayes Court Co-operative Pro-



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

JULY RAINFALL WAS BELOW AVERAGE
Cane Crop In — IR alee deed
Good Condition

THE GAMBULLS

TIDY







Bvti





by-laws for consideration.

Shamrock Credit Union, took place
at Queen’s Park on Saturday, July
19th. The arrangements for the
c@lebrations were excellent and
the attendance satisfactory. Mr.
D, A. Wiles, Assistant Colonial

who attended.

Importance Of
Spiritual Section

Of YMCA Stressed

THAT the spiritual section of the Young Men’s Chris-
tian Association is the lifeline of the whole movement, was
one of the points stressed by the Hon, R. N. Turner, B.A.,
Colonial Secretary when he spoke to members of the
Y.M.C.A. yesterday afternoon at their Seventy-second
Annual General Meeting of which he was Chairman.

He went on to say that gradu-
ally during the first half of the
Nineteenth Century the conscience
of England was stirring against
the evils attendant on the Indus-
trial Revolution, and it was as a
part of the growing reaction
against the abuses of “Laissez-

itual section of the Associations’
activities. It is the lifeline of the
whole Movement,

Secretary’s Work
The community is apt to take
the manifold activities of the As-
sociation for granted and to over-

why our Membership should not
be increased to 1,000,

During the current year the
Extra-Mural Department books
have been housed in our Library
and Mr. R, C. Murty has kindly
consented to be our Librarian. Mr.
Murty is a Physic Master at Har-

seen on the credit side that of this
sum only $1,726.22 is received
from Members for Sybscriptions,
the balance being obtained from
various other sources. I specially

make mention of this as it goes

to show the necessity for increased
Membershi

colonies must also build up #

in the world and exporters who
gain a firm foothold now in this
market will find it a valuable one
in years to come,

tion has double®’ The standard

priority now peod axen to dollar

exports, and the increased quan-

if British prices are uncompeti-
tive.”

It points out that there are some
powerful forces working agains!
the entry of British goods into
Canada, but at the same time there
are also some strong favourable
factors.

Capital From U.K.

“Up to 1914,” the Treasury ar-
ticle continues, “Britain provided
most of the capital which flowed
into Canada from outside, but two
world wars cost us much of this
investment and heavily reduced
the flow of new capital,

“It is estimated that by 1950
American investments in Cana-
dian business were about three
times those held by Britain. This
affects our visible exports to Can-
ada as well as our invisible in-
come, for an American-controlled
company is naturally inclined to
‘buy American.’ "

Canal often have the advantage
over U.S. (and even Canadian)
products sent from the Eastern
manufacturing areas by rail.
Many British goods enjoy a tariff
preference also.

“There are powerful Canadian



HOLIDAY HERE
WE'VE TAKEN

2ALOW CG

ya

heir direct exports to Canada.



Again Adjourned

The inquest into the circum-
stances surrounding the death of
Cecil Hope, a chauffeur of Jack-

August 25, at 10 a.m. at District



ARRIVING by the “Lady Nel-
son” last Sunday afternoon were

Tanteen, They widen the repre-
sentation of West Indians to whom
Grenada is now host—Y.W.C.A
girls from British Guiana, Trini-
dad and St. Vincent lady netball-
ers, two Trinidad groups of Scouts
and a Tobago cricket team.



£5 FOR OVERLOADING

Deighton Howard, conductor,
was fined yesterday by His Wor-
ship Mr. G. B, Griffith, Acting

Police Magistrate of District “A’*|

£5 and 1/- costs, payable by
monthly instalments, or 2 months’
imprisonment, for overloading
the bus J.129 along Roebuck
Street on July 16th.

Howard has 12
victions.

previous



RATES OF EXCHANGE

con- |

New Research |

On Fish Oils |

By JOHN E. BIRD
OTTAWA

scientists to find new commercial
| products in fish oils, following the |
| near-complete loss of the indus-
tyw’s market of oils for thelr |
| vitamin content,

The market for oils containing
| vitamin A and D has practically
| disapp@aréed becausé both vitamins
now can be produced synthetically
at less cost. Produetion reached
|its peak in 1944 and netted
| Canadian fishermen nearly $3,500,
000,
The research programme was

started in an effort to leart
| whether any other products in the
| fish oils could be marketec com-

diminished,” —B.U.P

ALREADY MORE POPULAR THAN ANY OTHER

this fine basic pattern

}

Pt rant









Improved 4



PAGE THREE

Jeeth Loose

Loose Teeth mean that

Sore Mouth and
ou may

or cause
out and y
matism

your
ma: cause
the
pac

wey kage.
from your chemist t len

maranteé protects you



a ‘tyre that is entirely NEW and

exporting interests which see in|
an increase of British exports tc
Canada the only hope of reviving |
the pre-war volume of sales to}
Britain, There is the ready sym- |
pathy of a country where every |
other person is of British birth or!
ancestry—not that this will over-|
come uncompetitive prices or de-|
livery dates. |

“Finally, if U.K, exporters suf-
fered virtual exclusion from the
Canadian market during the war
they were at least partly compen-
sated by Canadian restrictions on
imports from the U.S. between
1947 and 1950, But Canada har
been able to lift these restrictions
thanks to a big increase in her
exports to the U;S. and to the in-
flow of U.S. investment funds.”

B.U.P

I will now refer you to the Bal-
ance Sheet page 12. It will be
seen on the credit side that addi-
tions to Building during the year
under review have cost $17,497.69.
To enable us to pay our bills we
have found it necessary to ar-
range with Barclays Bank to give
us a temporary Overdraft which
at present stands at $8,651.46.

look the immense amount of un-
obtrusive work that has to be put
in by the General Secretary and
the Board of Directors if those
activities are to be succ
carried out.

As a Government servant he
can say for certain that their
efforts are genuinely appreciated
by the ratings of Her Majesty's
Ships which visit Barbados from
time to time, and the Harbour and
Shipping Master told him that he
would not know where he would
turn if the Association were to
cease keeping “open house” for
seafaring men who, for one reas-
;on or another, are temporarily
‘paruate in Barbados,

He thought that the Barbados
|Â¥.M.C.A. is singularly fortunate
in having such a selfless and en-
| terprising General Secretary as
Captain H. H. Williams, worthy
namesake oi the chief founder of
the Movement, who never spares
himself in his efforts to make

BE A PROUD OWNER



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RU THAT PAIN

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Aches and Pains so quickly that
it seems almost like magic. You
can feel its cooling, soothing touch
begin at once to ease the painful
throb. Aad * Mentholatum ’ is so
easy to use. You just RUB IT
ON. Rub it where the Pain is and
the Pain goes. That is all you have
to do to bring immediate relief
from Aches and'Pains. The sooner



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Mortgages
















The present Mortgages against
our property amount to $11,040.00.
Against this the book value of our
ore stands at $61,397.41. It is

intention of your Directors to
raise an increase Mortgage to en-
able us to pay off our Bank Loan
and extend our Hostel accommo-
dation, but before doing so efforts
are being made to get financial
assistance.



A considerable sum was spent
in levelling your’ grounds but this
is only the first step in preparing
Cricket and Football

After the report was presented,
it was adopted by Mr. J. Brome.
A vote of thanks was moved by



: , proper '

you get ‘Mentholatum’” the other people happy. didune, 1 ito M ¢ Mr, John Beckles, M.B.E. and a
sooner you will get relief, “gag 2 wished the YMCA. the Sround. I appeal to, b cre tenal Teply was given by Mr. O, A. Pil-
get a jar or tin to-day. It is the
finest Rub ever made,

GET QUICK
ELIEF

best of fortune for the fttute and
hope that its dreams of expansion
come true.

| Col. Sec. Welcomed

interest in this work, If Members #"!â„¢-

would realise what can be achiev-
ed if everyone would do his bit
in a short while we would have
a Cricket and Football Field
ba would be a credit to the

Appointed Auditor

Mr, Frances nm. Fite was again
appointed Auditor and this ap-
pointment was moved by Mr. E. C.
Hewitt and seconded by Mr,
Campbell. i

Another vote of thanks was
moved by Rev. A. E, Armstrong,
M.A. who said that very few
mernbers really realised what al
privilege they have in being mem-
bers of the Y.M.C.A. He said that
they are part of a brotherhood in
all parts of the world and all sorts
of denominations,

The Hon, R. N. Turner was
welcomed to the Chair by Mr. A.
'Del. Inniss, President of the
Y.M.C.A. who said that it was a
pleasure and honour for them to
j have him as Chairman of the
Meeting. ‘

The minutes of the Seventy-
first Meeting were read by Au.
H. H. Williams, Secretary of the
Association, and the President of
the Association, Mr. A. DeL. In-
niss, presented the Annual Report
and Financial Statement.

Mr, Inniss then referred briefly
to certain iterns on the report.
| He said:
| The Membership this year as
| will be seen by the Report is 657

Naval Work

Since the closing down of the
Admiral Grant Sailors’ Rest in
1946 the Harbour Master and
steamship Agents look to the As-
sociation for housing men of the
Royal Navy and Merchant Marine
who are awaiting transportation
to their destinations.

A General Meeting is being held
on 28th August, ai 4.30 p.c:. when
Members will be asked to nom-
inate Members for Committees
etc. to serve on various branches
of the work of the Association. At





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He has seen the progress of the
Y.MLC.A. in the island and the
AssOtiation hag made two move-
ments and everytime a movement
was made it was for the good of
the community.









|
. n; , jas against 618 in the previous this Meeting an opportunity will 1 >| ; ‘ alii
(Est. 1889) Slough, England. lyear. Now that we have a new be given Members to por any They must realise that the spir-| YOUR DEALERS
Hostel and are in a position to do points they may desire in con- jtual side is the lifeline of the
more extensive development I nection with the future of the Y.M.C.A. and he was disappoint-
must appeal to Members to do Association, I sincerely trust that ed to see how small was the mem- DIAL 4284 n ‘
ev ing possible to canvas Members will turn out and that bership in this section. He hoped{
their friends to join the Associa- the discussion which will take that more young men would join|
tion, if they do so I see no reason place will produce useful results.” that section, a SSS






PAGE FOUR

BARBADOS ea ADYOCAT
fivw Sue eee es ee wee Bg.
Printed by the Advecate Co., Lté., Brow #1. Bridsetewn

econ

Come Along To 1 The_Ends |
| Of The Earth Club

Friday, August 22, 1952

Appeal For Beauty

THIS month the Times of London pub-
lished a picture of a small pre-fabricated
house and garden which had won a prize
presented by local branch of the
Women’s Voluntary Service somewhere in
England.

Not long ago this newspaper suggested
that associations especially interested in
promoting the tourist trade of Barbados
ought to offer prizes for the best kept
wayside gardens in city or parish.

Barbados is fortunate in possessing a
fair number of garden lovers and even in
the heart of the City opposite the most
untidy looking premises flowers can be
seen by the observant passer-by.

But the love of flowers is not so wide-
spread that it conceals the unloveliness
of many Barbadian huts and homes.

There is ample opportunity for the
encouragement of gardens in Barbados as
there is for the encouragement of beauty
altogether.

Yet too often those who ought to be in
the vanguard encouraging beauty are the -
first to stifle its birth. Only quite recent-
ly two instances of the readiness to extin-
guish some of the little local beauty we
have may have been noticed by the watch-
ful.

The Fire Officer in a report on the Bar-
badian Fire Brigade for the period 1st
January to 3lst December 1951 selected
Jubilee Gardens as “the most promising
site” for a Bridgetown Fire Station. And
the Fountain in Trafalgar Square has
been turned off only a short period after
the decision to keep it playing for the
benefit of all who visit Bridgetown on
weekdays. No one would suggest that
the Fire Officer or the officials responsi-
ble for turning off the fountain in Trafal-
gar Square were consciously ‘expressing
disapproval of efforts to beautify the capi-
tal city of the island, but the fact remains
that consideration of beauty does not
appear to rate very highly in Barbados
as against questions of utility.

Government which through its political
and official representatives boasts fre-
quently of progress which is claimed to
have been made in many fields during the
past decade shows remarkable lack of;
support for any suggestions designed to
promote beauty and to preserve what
earlier generations enjoyed with respect to
open spaces, parks and noble buildings.

The lessons which ought to have been
learnt from the experiences of other coun-
tries whose uncontrolled building and
freedom of design has been permitted by
indifferent governments have not been
learnt in Barbados,

Daily buildings continue to be made more
permanent along the sea coasts of the
island, although the authorities in Barba-
dos must realise the harm which is being
thereby done to the iSland’s tourist attrac-
tions not to mention the suppression of
natural amenities available to the Barba-
dian public.

On the St. James Coast it has been left
almost exclusively to the private propri-
etors of lands which once were principally
composed of sand, crab holes and sea bush
to demonstrate how beauty can be attract-
éd to the very borders of the sea-shore.
Well-tended gardens, groves of flowering
trees and above all, shade-producing trees
have been planted; wateréd and encourag-
ed by private persons, Whereas the major-
ity of typically Barbadian coastal houses
look ragged and unkept by comparison.

At Holetown especially where for tradi-
tional reasons it might have been thought
that a special effort might have been made
to erect_a_model-village, the primitiveness
of the Barbadian hovel is exposed for all
to see.

By pleasant contrast certain of the
modern government-built houses at the
Pine are surrounded with gardens and can
compare favourably with housing estates
of similar size m most modern countries.
In Bay Street on the other hand the im-
pression which is gained by the observant
passer-by is that the rate of erection of
walls and wall houses exceeds the plant-
ing’ of flowering or shade trees on the
Government Bay Estate,

Barbados still possesses many unspoilt
natural beauties: there remain in the
island much that have been built by earlier
and more recent generations: efforts con-
tinue to be made by individual lovers of
beauty and by organisations like the Civic
Circle to promote beauty in all its forms.

But the priority of treatment which
beauty receives in an island so small as
this, which is being built upon as rapidly
as this, is inadequate to prevent serious
deterioration of the legacy of beauty which
belongs not only to our generation but to
millions of Barbadians yet unborn. Unless
greater popular support is forthcoming
from those who champion beauty and
unless officials, government and commer-
cial circles give greater assistance than is

a

now being given to the small circle of those
engaged in promoting and .- preserving
beauty much of the little beauty which
remains to us willbe lost.

| some



It was a remarkable evening
and we were a pretty distinguish-
jed gathering. If there was no
jone from the Court, there were
jplenty from the camp and the
jsenate. Admirals, generals, peers,
and Ministers of State crowded
the banquet hall,
| Let me commend the Ends of
jthe Earth Club which exists to
|promote Anglo-American friend-
|ship and only dines when it has
guest it wants to hear,
which means about once a year.
Having belonged to it for some
25 years I was much pleased to



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

By Weverley Baxter

tremendous personality with one

f the finest military minds of
this century.

The general dealt only with the
military situation in Europe, leav-
ing politics to the politicians, A
boy could have grasped it, a
field-marshal could have learned
from it. Never have I seen the
power of incisive clarity more
ably demonstrated.

* * 4

What he said is off the record,

discover on the list of guests that 4nd must be so, but I assure you

I am a member of the committee.
One-Man Show
The odd thing is that I have

|never attended a committee meet-

ing or been notified of such an
event, which is admirable.

The club is, in fact, a one-man
show, The guiding and control-
ling spirit is Colonel Johnny

Dodge, the American-born Briton
| who is a cousin of Mr. Churchili

oy marriage, who commanded
his battalion at 22 years of age in
the first war, who fought again
in the last war and is ready for



the next.
+ * *

| He is perhaps the most eminent
jail-bird of my acquaintance. In
1919 he made a friendly visit to
Russia and was imprisoned for
| his pains, but escaped. In 1940
}he was captured by the Germans
and helped to organise the tragic
breakout of the airmen who were
\so brutally shot. He is, in fact,





the reincarnation of Dumas’
/Porthos in “The Three Mus-
| ceteers.”

|

|

‘AV Speaks

But now I must introduce to
you the star turn of this “hush-
jush” dinner — ‘Al’ Gruenther,

xtherwise General Gruenther,
Chief of staff of the Allied Forces
in Europe.

“Al”? wore no medals or dec-
yrations at the dinner. Instead
of speaking from the top table
ne did so from the bottom table
and put aside the microphone,
Qn first appearance he looked
ike a shortish, ordinary, efficient
juarter-master-sergeant who had
won his commission by slogging
horoughness, but when he had
finished speaking he seemed a
|

|



|
;
| ON ISTANBUL-ANKARA _

| @ld :von Papen is at it again.
l(t is just 12% years ago that I
‘limbed on to this train to travel
up to Ankara to report what this
iblest and most polished of Hit-
ler’'s agents was plotting against
us in his new~Trole as Hitler’s
ambassador to Turkey.

Here I am now on my way up
to Ankara once more on a very
different mission, But lo! von
Papen is with me again,

As the last glimpses
3ea of Marmara flash by my
window T am studying the old
| ntriguer’s last sting — his
nemoirs.*

Although the book is not being
oublished in Britain until tomor-
cow it is already selling fast here.

The most poisonous sting is for
Sir Hughe Knatchbull-Hugessen,
Papen’s’ British) adversary in
Turkey. With a superb show of
jog-don’t-bite-dog chivalry Papen
‘ells how unwilling he was to
nave the ‘story told of how a
Serman agent removed a_ safe
cey from the sleeping ambassa-
dys ‘trouser pocket and then
shotographed top secret docu-
nents in this safe.

“f wanted to spare (him) any
»mbarrassment,”’

Censorship?

HE tried to “have the Operation
cicero manuscript suppressed.”
‘How? Does this mean Ger-
yany’s former espionage service
till has a_ security censorship
yver its members?)

“However,” says Papen, tears
rickling down his honest old
cheeks, “as Moyzisch agreed to
ubmit his manuscript to me, I
yas able to prove to my satis-
action that he had described the
as2 with complete fairness,”
Then he really sets to work.
‘What I do reject most emphati-
ally is Moyzisch’s assertion in
1is book that practically no use
vas made of the information ob-
; ained. During the period of the
“oreign Ministers’ meetings in
“oscow, of the Teheran and Cairo
tonferences, and, indeed, right
tp to February 1944, the flow of
icero’s information was of price-
‘ess. value.”

Cicero says Papen, kept the
yerman Government fully in-
crmed of the Moscow decision
o compel Turkey to declare war
yy the end of 1943, of Cairo con-
rersations between the Turkish
vesident, Churchill and Roose-
velt.

of the







Our Readers Say

The Middle Class

fo the Editor, The Advocate;

SIR,—When the present Gov-
ernment was climbing into power,
it promised great things for every-
body. and more or less ‘everybody
helped. It was |feit then that
every mother’s son would be given
a fair break, Performance is not
matching up to this promise, If
you have any doubt ask the Mid-
dle Class—not one section of it.

Who are the Middle Class? The

!
I am well aware that the Middle
Class has been its greatest enemy,
They took a leaf from Spartan or
Spartan took a leaf from them.
Let us forgive. Today Innocent
and Guilty are suffering alike,
and as Sir Herbert used to say—
it's better that 99 Guilty should
escape than that, one Innocent
should suffer.

The cost of living is higher in
this little island —I am merely
stating a fact—than, I-believe, in
any other British Caribbean poss-
ession, nearly as high as in Bermu-
In British Guiana beef stili sells
at thirty-six cents a pound, Brit-

ish Guiana is, not a tourist resort
although tourists love to visit far-
famed Eldorado

Barbados is q three-legged stool

sleep and
there is no harm in quoting these



- Shatter The Lies

old Papen right—and I have ha
nseamcilalinenteaaeY tenets: vi

it was no lullaby to waft us to
Sweet dreams, But

three aphorisms since they belong
to the realm of philosophy and

cannot aid the potential enemy —

“War is a continued succession

of mistakes.”

“Clemenceau said that war is

too dangerous to leave to the

generals.”

“There are two kinds of gen-
+ erals—those I would like to fight
with and those I would like to
fight against.”

Marshal of the R.A.F. Lord
Tedder, Colonial Secretary Oliver
Lyttelton, and Lord Swinton all
seemed to be speaking with En-
glish accents, so tuned did our
ears become to the resonant
quality of our guest's voice,

A remarkable night! “As a mem-
ber of the committee I look for-
ward to hearing when the next
dinner will take place,

Magic Beat
I am delighted to learn that
the young Italian conductor

Signor Cantelli is coming to con-
duct six concerts at the Festival
Hall. Hardly out of his twenties
he is in the first three of the
world’s great conductors and will
almost assuredly become the first.
Of all human activities open

to the male of the species the
conducting of an orchestra
the most exhibitionist, He has
to be a first-rate actor since he

must visually interpret the
drama of the composition. He
has to be a ballet dancer so

that his movements can convey
both to the audience and. the
orchestra the rhythmic poetry
of the music. He must also be
a complete disciplinarian so

Valet-spy!

THE SPY CICERO, played by
James Mason in the film, ‘Five
Fingers,’ gave D-Day secrets to
Hitler’s agent, Papen. Were the
British fooled?

To-day, Papen tells his story,
SEFTON DELMER demands @
sequel—



One Threat
He quotes telegrams verbatim,

giving their numbers, And he
says:—
“We also learned that the

possibility of an Allied attack on
the Balkans through Salonika
could be ruled out. The Supreme
Command now realised that the
only real threat with which it
had to contend. was the invasion
of Fravcée. . .°«

“We were thus able to appre-
eiate the intentions of our ene-
mies in a way that can hardly
have a parallel in military his-
tory.”

Now this allegation of Papen’s
is*going to have considerable re-
percussions in the United States,
particularly in the isolationist
camp, which is always accusing
the British of hopeless incompe-;

tence and insecurity, and ureinel) ary of this society he and his

the President not to share secrets
with such allies,

This I believe is exactly what
Papen wants—to discredit the
British in American eyes.

The whole book tends to repre-
sent Germans, and particularly
Papen, as good Europeans whose
noble attempts at European un-
derstanding and unification have
been. constantly frustrated by
Britain’s “divide and rule” pol-
icy.

He accuses Britain of having
made the 1914 war inevitable by
her alliance with Russia, He says
that ‘when he was. on the fringe
of a wide understanding with
France in 1932, Ramsay MacDon-
ald stepped in and stopped it.

He says that in 1940 Sir Staf-
ford Cripps in Moscow offered
Molotov the Dardanelles and a
free hand in the Balkans—at the
expense of our Turkish and
Balkan allies—if Russia would
come in against Germany.

He says Churchill’s famous
plan for invading the Balkans in
1944, far from keeping the Rus-
sians out would inevitably have
brought them in.

‘Only Allies’
All stuff designed, if I read my

~~Top, Middle and Bottom.
the present time government is
trying hard to get the stool to
stand on two legs. Once Barbados
tried to get the stool to stand on
one leg. Both in.possible tasks!
No one class has a brain monopoly,
Why stand ye there idle, Middle
Class!

Make no mistake, every man in
this country has a tight’ to live.
(Some of us are not living.) I be-
lieve that everybody more or less
believes this nowadays. The few
that don’t—let us spew them out
of our mouths. Those few must
have originated in the darkest
part of the world, South Africa,
they or their forebearers. Remem-
ber, Sir Conrad fought for all.

Cc. B. ROCK,
“Rockcerest,” Oistin Hill.

Confusing
-
To the Editor, The Advocate;

SIR,—The letter entitled
day Advocate in your

Sun-
paper on

Wednesday by the Rev, M. L. M.
Denington seems to be most con-
fusing. If ‘y the letter the Rey.
Gent'eman meant criticism, only
he can understand it.

i arn the last to say that all is
well with the way the Advocate
presents its ne I surely,
the Advocate a the same

lopted

is

About The

Baier

At confusing attitude

that his players fear him,
Above all he must be able
to seize the moment when, by
his magnetism, he inspires the
orchestra to play better than
it can,
s *

When Cantelli comes here there
will be many conductors in the
audience asKing “What has he
got that I haven't?” That question
is as old a$ the caves when the
first two blondes met face to face.

e Call

I have before me a _ postcard
which shows a Carthusian mon-
astery set in a lovely Sussex
countryside, Those who enter it
never see the outside world again.

He was a handsome young Aus-
tralian priest and last winter in
the Austrian village of Lech he
joined in the ski-ing and the
general fun of a snow-bound
holiday. He was full of gaiety
and life, and was the most pop-
ular visitor in that district. In
this farewell postcard from the
monastery he writes to my
family :

“It is true that contact in

the world can influence for],

good, but after 13 years as a
priest Il am more than sure
vhat much More can be done by
prayer, This is a life of prayer,
work, and penance consisting
of night vigils, etc, Many of
the men here and in these
monasteries in Europe are of
the same conviction after hav-
ing held very high office in the

world . . . This farewell card
must be my last carrespou-
dence. Good-bye. When you

are asleep between 12 and 2
aim. I may say a prayer for
you sometimes. Please do the
same for me. Good-bye, Good
luck.” j

IT is a moving story, not

without pity, and yet one won-
ders why. the prayers of a man
withdrawn from the world should
be placed above those who fight
the battle of existence in the
open,

There are mysteries of the
human spirit which defy fogic.
He had so much to give to the
world from which he has wito-
drawn.

—LES.

many years of experience of his
methods—to prove to the Ameri-
cans that the only really com-
petent, reliable, and truly anti-
Communist allies for them in
Europe are the Germans:

What I admire particularly in
this smooth mixture of truth,
falsehood, surprise revelations,
and distortion is the way in which
Papen tries to rid himself of all
complicity in Hitler’s advent to
power.

Papen pictures Papen as the
perfect, gentle Knight who tag-
ged along with Hitler from a
high sense of duty to Germany.
Europe, and Western civilization
in order to exercise a_restrain-
ing influence on the mad _ prole-
tarian dictator.

Never once a picture of Papen
the ambitious baron, who haying
tasted power wanted to stay
with it,

As evidence of his devotion to
Western civilisation Papen men-
tions that he was in 1929 “in-
strumental in founding the As-
sociation for the Maintenance of
Western Culture.” What he does
‘not mention was that As secre-
riends appointed one Werner
von Alvensleben,

A Boast

The day after Hitler had seiz-
ed power this same Alvensleben,
sitting in the offices of the asso-
ciation which Papen had found-
ed, boasted to me how it was he
who had put Hitler into power,
“It was I who spread the story
that Schleicher had ordered tht
Potsdam garrison to march on
Berlin, a story which rushed
Hindenburg into making Hitler
Chancellor.”

Look it up in the
cuttings, Herr von
Papen.

May I also give a word of ad-
vice to Sir Hughe and the For-
eign Office? From what I have
heard about Operation Cicero
here in Turkey and elsewhere,
you have got a shattering reply
to Papen’s accusations,

You may not want to use it
because ‘it involves revealing a
secret, You would rather go down
to history as fools than do that.
I admire this self-sacrifice. But
—snap out of it. Let’s have the
truth. ~ i

* Memoirs of Franz von Papen,
André Deutsch, 25s.

i —L.E.S.

as the Rev.
Gentleman, I would not care to
read it.

L. B. BRATHWAITE.

“‘Ropey”’

To the Editor, The Advocate,

SIR,—I too would like to express
my appreciation of your attempt
to improve your paper,

There are certain features
which I like such as Henry in
the Daily and Sporting Sam in
the Evening Edition,

I do not like the style of Rev.
Mr. Denington, but I do not know
that Hopkinson. is conceited nor
that Hunte is ‘ropey.’

l am a Barbadian and the only
things the term, ‘ropey’ can be
applied to are Corn Pone, Con-
kies and Ginger Beer; and when
they become ropey, even the dog
and the hog pags them up. If
Mr. Denington wants to introduce
some type of English used some-
where in the Leeward Islands,
then let him have a_ special
volume printed at the Advocate
Printery; he seems to think that
this can be easily done, but to
characterise people’s writings as
‘ropey’ to invite your news- |

per libet actions,

SIMPLETON, '



is



with














FRIDAY, AUGUST . 22, 1952

eS eee

SHOPPERS SWITCH OVER | = cagasta._z1gexe, camps
TO LITTLE MEN

$2.28 per Set
By JAMES COOPER

NEW YORK.
THE little trader of America is taking

business from the big department store.
So reports the business management ser-
vice of the University of Illinois, which

decided to find out why.

Teams questioned people in areas served
by five Mid-West stores. Why had they
taken their custom from the big stores to



| PATIENCE PLAYING

} 72c. per Set
»

| ADVOCATE “STATIONERY

eee

eee nnn UU E Enna

CARDS) =>

SEE

Sturdy Bentwood and Hardwood
Chairs in three patterns (one
with Cane Seat ).

teads with or















































the local dress shop and tailor, the shoe without Mattresses
store, and the draper? : or yen

The four’ main answers: ‘1, Too difficult : Ce ree
to park the car near the bigger shops; 2, Cc. S, PITCHER & co.
slow service there; 3, poor sales staff; and : con't
4, higher prices.




Ph, 4472"

IN NEW YORK there has been an epi-
demic of women slapping policemen. Four
have been arrested on this charge in a
week.

ALGER HISS failed tonight in his appeal
for a new trial.

He is the former State Department high
official jailed in 1950 for five years for perjury
because he swore he had not passed secrets
to Communist Whitaker Chambers.

Vital piece of evidence against him was a
battered old typewriter on which it was
alleged that secret documents were copied.
He now said he had evidence it was possible
to fake the typewriter.

But Federal Judge Henry Goddard rules
there is nothing to suggest a jury would now
acquit Hiss,

LAST MONTH has been the hottest July
on record in New York.

But New Yorkers are more worried about}:
a plague of what they call gnats.

Dr. Charles Currac, the insect curator at
the Natural History Museum, explains that
the green insects, less than one tenth of an
inch long are really aphids or plant lice that
grow through several generations before
sprouting wings,

For two days now they have been taking
off in millions. The green clouds are likely to
stop even the city’s baseball games.

WHEN Brooklyn police arrested a cat bur-
glar they found he carried a compass—to
steer back to his escape ladder in darkened
buildings.

UNITED NATIONS delegates are losing
“pin-money” because of the American elec-
tions,

Their agents are not booking them for
lectures for fear that anything they say would.
have political implications.

It is said that the Philippines Ambassador,
Brigadier-General Carlos P. Romulo, will
drop 10,000 dollars (£3,570) this year.

ONLY half the observation posts are so
far manned for the anti-aircraft watch that
was to have begun last Monday. There is a
suspicion that even these are not manned all
the time,

Draperies...

Cretons and Tapestries in large variety—choose from







our new shipment - - - -

FIFTY-ONE Frenchmen, to paraphrase the
saying, can’t all be wrong.

Fifty-one dentists visiting America to study
dental equipment all had the same thing to
say about New York today:—

“Why does everybody rush?”

FOR the first time since pre-war, American
newspaper circulations have fallen.

Increased prices are blamed—35 cents (2s.
6d.) a week for the daily newspaper delivered
at home, and up to 20 cents (1s. 5d.) for the
Sunday newspaper.



Linen and Cotton Sheets and Pillowcases.
Also coloured Linen Sheeting 72” and 90”







Cotton TeaCloths in
Gay Colours With
Napkins to Match «

Da Costa
& O0., Ltd.

THE garden that “grew” in a night kept
American society talking about the wedding
of a British Navy lieutenant and a million-
aire’s daughter.

It was the marriage between Lieutenant
John R. Symonds-Tayler, R.N., of the frigate
Snipe, son of Admiral Sir Richard and Lady
Symonds-Tayler, and 19-year-old Dorothy
Neal.

At the Neal home Chestnut Hill, Massachu-
setts, the night before an army of landscape
artists dug up the trees and turf and staked
down in their stead 4ft. potted Easter lilies,
gladioli, and cedar trees.

Here, in this fabulous background, 400
guests drank champagne and ate caviare and
turkey. F

Lieutenant Symonds-Tayler and his wife
met last autumn when Snipe, accompanying
the cruiser Superb, in which Sir Richard was
then flying his flag, came to Boston for “Brit-
ish Week,” and Miss Neal was a member of
the Debutantes’ Welcoming Committee.

The cost of making the wedding garden
was about £4,260, and now the old garden is
being put back.




















FRE ;
VEGETABLES |

FIRST QUALITY’ MEATS |

AND

Frozen Headeck an
j = k ‘ui Ae
NEWEST hot weather drink: “The chloro-]||_ Gm “Raes PP™ Rabbits
phyll cocktail”—gin and tonic spiced with Sardines saver arin: |
créme de menthe, ° pope Kidneys
IN 90 degree temperatures, New York Pilchards | Act Bhng or
salesmen are gathering to discuss Christmas . Paste Hams a
selling lines, SC Bacon
For Father: 1953 cars with built-in dictat- ENJOY THE FINEST Onened. Bert dose



ing machihes; air coolers for next year’s heat- Gold Braid Rum

FRESH VEGETABLES

wave traffic jams, and tyres in red, yellow, aa a aoe Butter Beans 16c. per tb
blue, green, and—wait for it—chartreuse. BREAD Suet. ent, Sin er” ib
For Mother: New rayons that are com- t

J & R Sandwich
Bread — Fresh
Daily

N. Zealand Cheese
73c. per tb
+ Pkgs. Cheese 44c.

GODDARDS ror SERVICE.

pletely washable.
For daughter: Dolls that walk, not by wind-
ing, but by just taking hold of their hand.
For junior: Guns that fire three different
colours of “paralysing rays.”








tre

FRIDAY, AUGUST 22,

EX-CUSTO

Falsifica

1952



tion Case

Continues Today

DEFENCE COUNSEL, Mr.

E. W. Barrow, cross-exam-

ined Mr, Clayton Thorpe, former Customs Officer in charge

of the Cheapside Rum Bond,

all yesterday, the fourth day’s

hearing of the charge against Keith Squires, a 26-year-old

clerk, for falsifying accounts on or about
year, while an employee of D. V. Scott &

August 31, last
Co., Ltd. Mr.

Justice J. W. B. Chenery adjourned the Court until today
when ctoss-examination of Mr. Thorpe will be continued.
Squires unknow:

used to work at D. V.
Scott’s compartments at Cheapside
when the al offence was
commit

ted.

He ‘is-eharged with having on
or about’ August, 1951, while he
was a clerk or servant of D. V.
— 4, Co. Ltd., with intent to

lefraud, made concurred in

“de filde entry in 2

stock bi to or in
the possession of D, V.
employer, purporting to

show that on August 31, rum vats
1, 2, and 3, the property of D, V.
Scott & Co. Ltd., at Cheapside,
Brid contained respectively
ate 1,380 and 2,820 proof wine

ions.
Mr. Barrow is associated with
ME a pao

ion, C, le, Gen-
eral, and Mr, F, E. Field Assis-
tant to him, are prosecuting for
the Crown.

ents -
Cross-examined, Mr. Thorpe
said about 15 or 16 merchants
= _ var ge A Cheapside, but

or 11 had compartments.
Those without compartments put
their casks of rum in any available
spot, and in some cases, a mer-
chant would allow another wha
did not have a compartment to
use his, There was the possibility
that three merchants could have
rum in the same compartment.
The number of merchants who had
rum “in any compartment would
all have access to the key of the

| particular compartment.

The vats were not locked, Casks
were usually outside compartments
along the corridor, and in such
cases, any! going into the
bond had access to them.

When rum was being: moved
from bond to bond, it was con-
side: to be in Government’s cus-
tody, and a merchant could not,
or should not interfere with it.

With every movement of the rum, y

the casks should be regauged and
ret but this was not always
done, due to the inadequate staff.

Adequate provision was not
placed by the authorities for super-
vising rum. There was supposed
to be a quarterly check, but this
was not always done.

Blen Rum

‘Permission to blend rum used to
be given by him, It was not be-
ing done so now. When the appli-
cation had gone on to the Excise
Department he would sometimes
give permission,

If any officer signed the form
while the blending was going on,
it would be an-inaccurate fecord.
It wad not the duty of a mer-
chant’s clerk to regauge and re-
test casks of rum, but the Gov-
ernment officers’, If a form for
blending was signed without a re-

or a rétesting being done,
a bieach might be said to be com-
mitted,

When he went to the Cheapside
Bond to work in 1950, he found
the books hopelessly in arrears,
and at the time of the alleged
offence, the books were still in
arrears, though not as much, En-
tries which should have been made
were not made. Therefore the
books did not show a true picture
of the state of the bond. Mr.
Scott’s books were also in arrears.
To put it mildly, the Government
books were unreliable. The author-
ities were notified of the in-
adequate staff, but nothing was
done.

A

ugust Returns

When he made a check on the
returns for August, behind Squires
he ‘had discovered that he was in-
accurate, but it could have been
that the figures were accurate to
the best of his knowledge, and
‘tthe rum had been ‘subsequently
stolen. There could be other
reasons.

At one time he discovered that
rum was being. shipped without
application being made to him. As
‘Chief Officer of the bond, he had
the key, but he subsequently dis-
covered that rum was delivered
out of the bond without his know-
ledge, and that there was a dupli-
cate key. With the knowledge
that there was a duplicate key,
he felt that anything was liable
to happen.

Controller of Excise, Mr, King,
had this duplicate key, and ex-
‘plained to him that a merchant
had wanted to ship rum urgently
and had been looking for him,
but he was not at home.

' He had never visited the bond
‘a night with Mr, King,

Gauging and testing was to be
done by Government Officers, and
it was not necessarily the duty of
a merchant’s clerk.

It might happen that casks might

cdtves.
be put by, and might be empty the

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n to the merchant's clerk,
and he would only discover this
when blending operations were to
be commenced. There were sup-
posed to have been 64 casks which
would hold approximately 3,000
gallons of rum but there was the
possibility that they might have
contained none.

He discovered that the rum
was missing as a result of the per-
mit to blend. There should have
been 50 odd casks. Two thousand
wine gallons should have been in
the vat, The rum was not to go
into the vat until it was regauged
and retested, but he did not know
whether the officer had done that.

There had been an _ occasion
when a duplicate, not in the sense
of a carbon copy, permit form,
had been made out. He did not
know whether it was cancelled,
but a duplicate would have meant
that probably two different offi-
cers had signed a form purporting
that a regauging and a retesting
of specific casks had been made.
It would have meant that one had
taken wrong casks or something
of the kind, meanwhile the book
at the Excise Department would
be wrong.

It had been drawn to ‘his atten-
tion that work was being done at
night at country bonds,

When hearing of the case re-
sumes ‘to-day, Mr. Barrow will
continue his cross-examination,



Flour, Glassware
Copra Arrive

Two Steamships, one schooner
and a motor vessel anchored in
Carlisle Bay yesterday morning.
They were the S.S. Alcoa Pegasus,
3,931 tons, from New York, S.S.
Trya, 4,360 tons, from Montreal,
Motor Vessel Daerwood, 94 tons,
from St. Lucia and the Schooner
ary Lewis from British
Guiana,

The Pegasus which is consign-
ed to Robert Thom & Co., Ltd.
rought 1,000 bags of wheat flour,
4 cartons of glassware, 31 bags
of vegetable seeds, four cartons
of tractor parts, 21 cartons of
shoes and 15 cartons of cotton
twine.

Twenty-four bags of starch, 90
bags of copra, 11 bags of peanuts,
and 85 packages of fresh fruit
arrived by the Daerwood under
Capt. Wells while the Mary M.
Lewis brought coals from British
Guiana,

These two vessels are consigned
to the gech er Owners’ Associa-
tion. e Norwegian ship Trya
is now being loaded with cargo.
Her agents are DaCosta & Co., Ltd.

First Boys’ Clubs’
Sports Meeting

Over 100 athletes from the
Boys’ and Girls’ Clubs of the
island will take part in the first
Championship Sports Meeting for
Boys’ and Girls’ Clubs ever to be
held in the island. The meeting
takes place at Kensington Oval
on Monday August 25, starting at
3.00 p.m.

There are 13 Boys’ Clubs, two
Girls’ and one Club which is for
both koys and girls. So far
District C Boys’ Club at St. Philip
has topped the list of entries.
Thirteen boys will represent this
Club.

Of the others, Bay Street Boys’
has entered 12, St. Cecilia Club,
Passage Road 11, District A Club
12, Worthings six, Garden—St.
James 9, Speightstown six, Four
Roads seven, Cliff Cottage eight
and Charnocks Boys eight.

Each of the Girls’ Clubs, Bay
Street, Clevers Hill and Char-
nocks, have submitted four
entries.

A member of the Organising
Committee told the Advocate
yesterday; “A good afternoon’s
sport is anticipated and some
hidden talent will no doubt
come to light.”

The Police Band will be in
attendance.

NO QUORUM

The meeting of the Sanitary
Commissioners of St, Michael,
which should have taken place at
the Parochial Buildings yesterday
afternoon, had to be postponed
until Monday next because there
was no quorum,

Only tages meen ey, 2. M.
Kidney, Chairman, r. 4 .
Mottley, M.C.P., and Mr. Victor
Goddard, were present.

One of the iterns on the agenda
was to appoint a Sub-Sanitary
Inspector.

Members would also have re-
lans and ‘ifications for

ct Market.



SHEETS







MS OFFICER CRO

taney, ee ete

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

SS-EXAMINED

Experiences In The J’ca Hurricane Of 1951

By CLIVE BECKLES,—Co-operative Officer

MR. CLIVE A. E. BECKLES, Co-operative Officer, last
night made the following broadcast over Rediffusion:

When I returned from

Jamaica three days after the

hurricane I gave an account of my experience which was

published in the Barbados Advocate.

Some of my listeners,

therefore, will be famiiiar with much of what I am about

to relate.

It is felt, however, that repeating the story at

this time when the hurricane season is once more upon us
should help to focus publie attention on the serious nature
of these tropical storms, the grave danger they are to life

and property, and the need

caution at this period.

I arrived in Janvaica about 9
days before the hurricane passed
Over the island, and was in
residence at the University College
of the West Indies, where I was
attending a summer school in Co-
operatives, This school ended on
Thursday, August 16, and I was
due to leave for Barbados two
days later, On Friday, 17th, the
hurricane in all its fury struck,
destroying all hope of my leaving
the island on the following day.

The official forecast of the hur-
ricane was accurate, and the
warnings issued as timely as could
be expected. At intervals through-
out the day announcements were
broadcast over Radio Jamaica,
warning the public of the ap-
proaching storm, and advising on
security measures.

Heavy Showers

That fatal Friday morning
opened with very heavy showers
of rain which continued for the
greater part of the morning. By
about 10 a.m. the rain had abated
and the intense heat which had
enveloped St. Andrew and other
low-lying parts of the island for
many days previously, was at its
worst. Everyone sweltered in
the oppressive heat. Masses of
heavy black clouds floated over-~
head.

By about 2 o’clock in the after-
noon most of the business places
in Kingston were closed, and
sensible people headed homeward.
Shortly before sunset an unusual
purplish glow could be seen light-
fing up the otherwise leaden sky.
One seemed to breathe an at-
mosphere of tenseness and ex-
pectancy.

Lights Off
That evening after dinner in
Irvine Hall I went over to the
Nunnery, another collegg building
situated about 150 yards away. I
remained chatting with some of
the lecturers of the University
who occupied quarters there. At
about 8.30 the electric powers was
cut off, As there was no ap-
parent change in the weather, this
did not alarm us. Candles were
produced and the conversation
continued. About half-an-hour
later the rain began to fall and
a strong breeze sprang up. I felt
it was then time to cover the
short distance which separated
the Nunnery from Irvine Hall.
It was pitch dark outside. 1
set off in the darkness for what
I thought was Irvine Hall, I
soon discovered that I was go-
ing in the wrong direction and
tried to retrace my steps. By
that time, what, with the dark -
ness, the gusty wind and the
rain, I had lost all sense of
direction, and as I later dis-
covered, was heading away from
my intended destination. Where
I would have ended up, Provi-
dence only knows. Fortunately
I was saved from disaster by
the lights of an on-coming car,
and was able, panting and
gasping, to reach the Hall. it
was then about 9.15.

An Occasional Lull

for taking every possible pre-








POCKET CARTOON
by OSBERT LANCASTER





“And THIS YEAR we're
adopting the trone system,

_which means that all tips
go into the kitty! See?"

ener semen





seeking to devour everything in
hheir path.

Safest Position

The safest position for my
companion and me was on the
landing of an inner staircase half-
way between the top and bottom
floors. This was in a corner more
or less sheltered from the violent
wind,

By about 2 a.m. on Saturday,
the wind had dropped considera-
bly. The rain, however, continued
tg fall, while occasional flashes of
lightning pierced the darkness
outside. At last I was able‘o turn
my mattress over and get some
much needed sleep. For thoysands
of survivors of that awful storm,
however, there was no sleep what-
ever that night.

At daybreak on Saturday, a
seene of desolation and destruc-
tion greeted the eye. The col-
lege surroundings, formerly a
thing of beauty, were now
forlorn in their nakedness,
Massive trees were shorn of
their leaves and most of their
branches while the trunks stood
with broken limbs raised te-
werds the sky. In many cases
the trees themselves had been
torn up from their roots and
lay stretched out across the
lawns and roadways,

Broken Lumber
Where once stood some build-
ing, one saw broken paces of
lumber and_ twisted galvanized
fron sheets littering the place for
yards around. Roofs with gaping

holes or merely with rafters
standing could be seen. They
were like skeletons. The huge

gymnasium which was to have
been used as a rescue centre after
the hurricane was itself levelled
with the ground,

With no electric power, we
faced the dismal prospect of hav-

ing to go without breakfast that

Securing a storm lantern, I
went up to my. do! ry, the
only other occupant_of which was
a student from British Honduras,
These dormitories are strong, flat-
roofed, concrete buildings of two
floors and stood up stoutly to the
hurricane, Even so, one could
feel the terrific force of the gale
without, and the violence of the
wind as it whistled and roared
down the corridors. Through
every opening and crevice in the
building the rain beat in with
tremendous force. Within a short
time the floor was under 2 inches
of water and everything in the
room, including myself, was wet.
Ocedsionally, there would be a
lull for a few seconds, only to be
followed by winds of greater
violence.

By about 11 p.m., the storm
seemed to be at its worst. At
this stage Yistinguishable above
the roar of the winds, falling of
rain, and the noises attending the
destruction of buildings and trees,
a terrific crash of thunder was
heard, The wind seemed to whip
itself into a fury unknown be-
fore. The indescribable sounds

produced by the splintering of
glass, the uprooting of trees, the
looping off of brariches and the
blowing about of bits of masonry,
wood and galvanized iron, gave
the impression that a thousand
devils had been let loose and were



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morning. A party of us set out
for the college laundry to obtain
coal pots and charcoal. When we
eventually got there we found that
the coal pots had been buried

under a mass of ruins and the bags ©

of coal were coer water-
soaked. A wood-burning stove
was finally obtained, for which
there was no lack of fuel, fhough
most of it was wet.

Transportation
All means of transportation and
telephone communication being

cut off, I spent Saturday at the
College, except for a walk which
I took to the nearby village of
Papine. Here damage was ex-
tensive, Several of the houses
had been wooden structures and
must have been reduced to ruin
within a very short time. At one



GET THEM READY

ccna ee



SCHOOL



QUEEN’S COLLEGE—Blue & Green

shop in the village, which had
been partly damaged, there was
a lone queue of people waiting to
purchase articles of food stuffs
which were being sold through a
window. Had these unfortunate
people. despite repeated warnings,
failed to make provision for such
an event or had they lost their
stores of food during the storm?

By Sunday morning the roads
had been cleared sufficiently to
enable me to go to Kingston,
about 5 miles away, to make in-
quiries about my return passage
to Barbados.

Signs of destruction were to be
seen on every hand. One section
of the city—South Camp and Ray
Town districts— appeared to have
suffered most. Many houses here
had been completely destroyed,
and in some cases large portions
of buildings had been swept half-
way across the street. Walls had
been blown down and the roof of
nearly every house was damaged
A secondar¥ girls’ school which,
I was told, had been completed
only about six weeks previously,
had its roof completely ripped
off. Te add to the miseries of the
people. the domestic water supply
in some areas had been cut off.

Relief Centres

I visited two schools which had
been turned, into relief centres.
Together these housed about 900
homeless men, women and chil-
dren,

Despite the absence of telephone
communications and the chaos
which reigned everywhere, a
‘plane did eventualy leave at
about 4, o'clock that afternoon,

During the journey to the
Palisadoes airport, several coastal
steamers as well as other vessels,
could be seen listing at various
angles. They had been loosened
from their anchorages and car-
ried above the high tide line

where they were left high and
dry when the sea receded.

At the airport itself the huge
Adminis ration buildinyy was
a mass of twisted iron and steel.
Most unfortunate of all for
many of the passengers who
had eaten nothing since break-
fast that morning, the canteen
had been destroyed and there
was nothing for us to eat. To
make matters worse, when we
boarded the ‘plane we were
told that the stock of food
abeard had not been replenish-
ed. as government had com-
mandecred all foodstuffs in the
city. All that we had to share
among us during that 4-hour
journey were two packages of
wafer biscuits.

25,000 Homeless

When it is’ recalled that this
hurricane, the biggest in the
history of Jamaica, resulted in
155 dead, about 2,000 injured,
some 25,000 rendered homeless,
and damage te buildings, crops

and services estimated at about
$80,000,000 it will be appreciated
that this description of the

damage, observed in a com-
paratively small section of the
devastated area, is no exaggera-
tion,

It is to be hoped that this brief
account of my experiences will
strve to remind listeners of the
importance of carrying out the
advice on hurricane precautions
issued by the local Hurricane Re-
lief Organisation.
too obvious to need emphasizing
how destructive could be the
force ef winds of over 125 m.p.h.
velocity, and torrential rains of
17 inches within a period of only
5 hours. That is what occurred in
Jamaica on August 17
could happen here in Barbados.
If it does,—which heaven forbid

—let us not be found unprepared, °

Rats And Flies Being

Obliterated

Protection from two ¢
carriers may soon be a prob

In Montreat

MONTREAL
of the world’s worst disease
lem of the past.

Dr. Henri Groulx, Montreal health officer, says in-

creased vigilance and bet

ter preventive measures are

rapidly obliterating hated rats and houseflies.
Regular spraying of city garbage dumps with prepara-
tions of D.D.T. and chloride of lime has checked the favourite

breeding place of the housefly,

In Montreal, all eight

dumps are sprayed every ten days. Since flies, cockroaches,
bed-bugs, and other disease-carrying insects require three
weeks to grow from the egg to adult, the pests have little

chance of survival.

But city workers can only
check the insects outside the home,
the health officer pointed out,
Education is helping to complete
the task with the householder,
Window screens, covered garbage
pails and careful food disposal are
spelling the end for the once
prevalent pest.

By appealing to the delicate
tastes of rats, their number is
being cut. A connoisseur of food,
the rodent fancies such tasty items
as out-of-season fruit and fresh
bread.. Armed with this know-
ledge, city exterminators are put-
ting poison to good use.

The rats can avoid the poison
by moving from the open spaces
where it is effective, If used in
a house the rat may climb within
the walls and contami#ate the
home after its death,

The only acuon tne nouseholder
can take is part of man’s growing
education in cleanliness, says Dr,
Groulx. By keeping the premises
clean and covering all garbage
and food, he soon forces the rat
into the open again wniere he is
a victim of the poisoned senenees.



GOAT STOLEN

A goat valued $60 was stolen
from a cellar at the residence of
Richard Daniel of Hindsbury Road
St. Michael, Daniel reported the
incident to the Police.

He stated that the goat was
removed sometime between 9.00
pm. on Tuesday and 2,30 a.m, on
Wednesday. .

Millicent Walker of Villa
Brittons Hill, St. Michael, re-
ported to the Police that her
house was broken and_ entered
sometime between 12.30 p.m. and
5.30 p.m. on Wednesday and a
auantity of articles stolen,

Road,

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Butcher Hanged \—

Thirty-six - year - old butcher,
Valmar Small yesterday morning

paid the.extreme penalty at Glen- |

dairy Prison for the killing of his
former common law wife Gwen-
dolyn Small on February. A
jury found him guilty of murder
on July 28 at the Court of Grand
Sessions,

The execution took place at 7
a.m. and afterwards a nine-mah
jury returned a verdict of death

| by judicial hanging.

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It should be

1951. It °



PAGE FIVE

Cuffley Appointed Organist
Of St. Thomas Parish Chureh

THE St. Thomas Vestry at their meeting yesterday
appointed Mr. Chester Cuffley, Assistant Teacher of St.
Matthew's Boys’ School as organist of the Parish Church
in place of Mr. Harold Cummins.

Mr. Cummins who is at present in Canada, informed
the Vestry through the Chairman that he had accepted a
post in Montreal and would be taking up permanent resi-

dence there.

He also expressed thanks to the Vestry for

having employed him for several years as organist. at the

church.

Police Band At
Rocks Tonight

The Police Band under the
e'reetion of Capt. C. E. Raison,
A.R.C.M., will give a musical
concert at the Hastings Rock,
beginning at 8 o'clock tonight.

The programme is as follows :—
l. QUICK MARCH —

The light Infantry — By Placer
Captain Denis Placer L.R.A.M.,

A.RC.M., the composer of the Light

Infantny March died in June this year

His death was no doubt accelerated by
the extensive wounds and gas which
be received during his service in the
1914-18 war, He held the position
of Director of Music to tie newly
formed R.E.M.E, Regiment up to the
t me of his death, and was one of the
most popular graduates of the Royal
School of Music
© ONCERT OVERTURE — By Weber
CLASSIC —
Chorale and Fugue tn G. Minor —
ry J. &, Bach

SYNOPSIS — The Chorale is ar-
ranged for the brass section of {he
band and follows the style of the old
German Hymn tunes The term
+UGUE ts said to be derived from
the Latin Fuga meaning flight, be-
cause as the parts enter in succession,
trere ts the appearance of flight aiid
pursuit among the parts. The points
to be noted in the Fugue are, the
subject, answer, counter-subject,
episodes, and stretto, For the present

‘ork the Chorale is used as a back
ground for the Fugue

SELECTION —

Vienese Memories of Franz Lehar

(bly request),

CHARACTERISTICS —

La Voix Ves Cloches — by Luigini

FOLK SONG MEDLEY —

ur Wee Scottie — by Mac Kenna

voT POURRI —

Fifty Years of Song — by Kennett

8. DANCE MUSIC —

Irving Berlin Hit Parade — by Dut-

hoit

RYTHMIC -

“ore More Mamba — by Murrell
GOD SAVE THE QUEEN





Oritain’s Bananes

LONDON
Fresh talks on banana-buying
ae to be opened in London by
Jamaican delegation, now on
i; way to Britain, The delegates
w. 1 be joined later by Mr, Alex-
ander Bustamante, Observers in
London believe that the Jamai-
cous will press for a guarantee

to buy their banana’ exports.
Britain has been turning recently
to other sources, notably the
Atviean colonies, for its banana
supplies,

—B.U.P.

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The Chairman then nominated
Mr. Cuffley who has been acting
during the absence of Mr, Cum-
mins, In daing so he said that Mr.
Cuffley had done excellent work.
He took a keen interest in what
he was doing and was highly
appreciated by the choir and con-
gregation,

Mr. Reeves then moved, sec-
onded by Mr. Sandiford that Mr.
Cuffley be appointed organist and
this was agreed to.

Scholarship

The Vestry on the motion of
Mr, K, S. Sandiford seconded by
Mr. S. A. Walcott, awarded a
Vestry Scholarship tenable at
Combermere School te Horace
Reed of Bennetts Tenantry, Reed
is at present a student of Com-
bermere School.

The Chairman informed the
Vestry that Mr. S. Howell,
Manager of Bagatelle Plantation,
St. Thomas, had offered to assist
in the cleaning up of the church-
yard, provided that he was allowed
to take away the grass.

The Vestry, on the motion. of
Mr, S. A. Walcoit instructed the
clerk to write Mr. Howell thank-
ing him for his kind offey.and
appointed a Committee compris-
ing the Chairman and the Church-
warden to meet Mr, Howell and
make the necessary arrangements
in connection with the matter,
Present at the meeting were; —
Rev. H, C. Shepherd—Chairman,
Mr. K. S. Sandiford—Church-
warden, Mr. S, A. Walcott, Mr.
L. D. Gill, Mr. C. M. Collins and
Mr, V. E. Reeves,



Driver Fined 20/-

His Worship Mr. G. B, Griffith,
Acting Police Magistrate of Dis-
trict “A” yesterday fined Theo-
philus Fenty of Road View, St.
Peter 20/- and 2/- costs in 14 days
or one month's imprisonment with
hard labour for driving the motor
lorry E.35 along Black Rock, St.
Michael, at just over 28 miles per
hour.

The speed limit on that road is
20 miles per hour, The offence
Was committed on May 25 about
6.10 p.m, The case was brought
oy Cpl. Jones and Police Consta-
ble Lashley who are attached to
the Traffic Branch of the Central
Station.

Sgt. Alleyne prosecuted for the
Police,





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= ———— SS




PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY, AUGUST 22, 1952
Feinstein








































































































































































































































































































] |
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cS LA S S I F I i D AD S ee ee ie ees | eee | SHIPPING NOTICES
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| —~-— sand - ee Mails for Grenada, Trinidad, and Brit-
eek | eeoeeeenee NOTICE SEA AND AIR Sraiogh Wl BC nea “ai ine Svea | —_
| a he ne :
ee CLARENDON—Black Rock, St. Michael, | Pest Office as under — | Al THERLANDS
DIED z | opposite St. Stephen's Chureh. Standing | PARISH OF ST. PHILIP . Parcel and Registered Mails at 3 pgn ROY NE
FOR SALE jon 1 aere of land. Laid out for good| Applications for the Post of Nurse at . : on the 22nd August, and Ordinary Mail STEAMSHIP co,
Goud Age: Goes. Her funeral . 4 |Datry Farm or Residence. Possibilities|the St. Philip's Almshouse will be re- at 8.30 a.m. on the 23rd Augusi, 198% jecept
will, Jeave Strong Hope Plantatior |{or Mortgage can be arranged. Apply: | ceived by the undersigned up to Satur- se, Sa See Se Antigua, _ Memseerst,
St. Thomes at 4 p.m. for St. Philip's| “—— |L. N. Hutehinson or Dial os. ate Pee ae no heageme ae. “ = he ee eatetana at CR | “Rs SAILING from EUROPE. a a Kitts, Sailing -
-52—Tn ieants mus’ e qualified as a I ie the G ral Post Offi md 3
Ringlen, Beryl Gill, Ruk AUTOMOTI eee aee tea renern . ———-—— | Nurse and Midwife, and must forward n Carlisle Bay . ae st Office as winter _ M.S. HERA 29th August, 1952.
Watson, Cavell Sehuiz, Grace Ber yoR + sae MC TIVE ae i ieee ae = ay moore ae See | with their applications their Baptismal tar eed mat Gaptenes Mail {% 5S. COTTICA 5th September, 1992 The M/V
George, Gooding. Lise, “Gooding:| CAR—=One Ford Zepher. as good as lly kn! gamit, Beazoum. Shedroot | Certificates as well as their Certificates] Sch May Olive, Sch. Emeline, Sch. | at g dum. ‘on the ard August, logs |M.S. Si a Sa ae .
Haig Gooding 22.8.52—1n.]rew, done 2,000 miles.’ Phone 4435,| oui on » pa 1 amd) of competency. Esso Aruba, Seh. Lydia A, Sth. Henry ‘Mails tor Doriitilea, Antigua, Montser- minica, Antigua, Montserrat,
REDMAN & TAYLOR'S G. aS also with glass windows. Prjew| The successful candidate will "be re-}2 Wallace, Sch. Philip Davidson, Sch.| gat, Nevis and St. Kitts by the M.V M.S. oan 9th September, 1952 Nevis and St. Kitts, Sailing Friday
BEWITT—On August 21, 1952, Evans . a een Ere ge To ggg Cuthbert quiet. te assume duties on the 25th Everdene Sch. Rosarene, Sch. D'Ortac.| Meneka will be closed at the Generali cAtLaee 2 Teese, Fhe easine 29th inst
Hewitt, (better known as Hughie) Joo a ; P | September, 1952. Sch Lucien M. Smith. M.V. Moneka, a
late mason Public Works Department CAR-—One (1) 1946 Mereury Eight Ford ot ies Any further particulars may be ob-|™V. Daerwood, Seh. Mary M Lewin, Poet oat Baal ‘as (noon), Registered | M8. SreeTOR och fee aw age ARs reeeEe a
Puneral leaves his late residence | mechanically sound. Apply: B. A. Simp-| j tained from the Parochi:} Treasurer's}£ceh. United Pilgrim, Seh, .laudalpha, Mail at 2 p.m, and Ordinary Mail at aS Sth, Sep J ASSOCIATION (IN
Fair View. Beckles Road, Bay Lana. | iecchanically sound. Apply: B.A. Simp-| | “THE HERMITAGE" situate at_ the | Office. $$ Tnya 2.50 pw. on thesSoad August. 1902 SAILING TO TRINIDAD & CURACAO
at 430 pm, today for St. Paul's : , n. corner of White Park and Country Road P. S._ W. scorTT, = ARRIVALS ve ‘i ; ss OOP August, 1952. 1
Chyureh, sthence to the Westbury 17.8.52—6n. | :tarding on about 123,040 square feet cf Clit 46 the Rants af Donntiansst = V. Docrwood, $4. tons, 1 M.S. HERA 1 ‘ember, 1952 Consignee Tele. No 4047
Caer: nae os WA re land. The House contains Gallery, two | St. Philip. Luecic under Capt. Wells Moiaiprieht te :
Mis. Kelcran Hewitt (wife), Rev i¥ooas: Be ahea Eee 3 Mileage living rooms, dining room, eight bed- 52—Tn | Be Schooner Owners’ Association. Sch.| ¢ 8, P. MUSSON, SON & CO., LTD.
Lionel Smith (brother-in-law) a ner leay-/rooms, three dressing rooms, wqter anc! ——_—_—__——_— - - - M. Lewi 7 : .
’ 23.8.82—in | o% Island Price 700. W. | clectric light. ‘Inspection any be ‘wis, @9 tons, from British Agents
8.52—in | Manon 8268 8 Ol y suits eantiianen Ubinas” Gn ee Cant. Marshall. Con-
iat a aad, Th fi . . E a ae o the coner Owners’ Asso-
IN MEMORIAM CAR—One (1) 1981 Adstin 70, In very | public PS Shon st cur Cine, Ted s | Asner Foucr Taieota’ Hobess eee’ mm New York.
good eondition, done 8,000 miles, price| Street, on Friday the 22nd day of Augue: | fe ee dino 8.9. Trys S50 .
NICHOLS—In loving memory ol ou |$?200. Craig Garage, Roebuck Street. | 1952 at 2.30 p.t. Kathleen Bratthwaite, the Executrix of & Co, Lid. “BEMIS DaCosta s s a
dear ositer. Blorence Nichols, who} Dial 4553 22.8.52-——3n CARRINGTON & SEALY (the late Christopher Augustus Braith- eae : ation te S
departed this life on August 22nd 195 siaslibe 14.8.69—-#h | waite, having mage — dapiettian Faas. 21 DEPARTURE What need are the life-
Gone but not forgotten CARS—Prefect Ford late 1950 veny good | - that Pollay No. 14,400 om the life of the . coa Pegasus for Trinidad. you
Ever to be remembered condition, also one Austin A-70 1951 very| LAND — At Graeme Hall Terrace 2| said Christopher Augustus Braithwaite 5; giving vitamins and minerals ; ; ;
Mrs. E. Thornhill, Mrs. Clarke an | 00d condition too, both cars going véry| adjoining lots. 11,000 ft. each, witir| has been lost, and having made applica- Seawell 6f YEAST-PHOS. Enjoy life - ah
far: dky 22.8,52—1n |reasonable. Dial 95251 Water and ‘Electrigity. E. P | tion to the Directors for the payment of . SOUTHBOUND
a 17.8.52—t.f.n. | Beaghilt. one 8178 or a the monies due urlder the same Arrivals by B W.I.A. on Wednesda to the full! You ll feel Salis Sails Sail Arrives Sats
LOST & FOUND : x 21.86.5240, | NOTICF is hereby given that unless) fom TRINIDAD Y healthier with Montres! Halifax Boston Barbados Barbados
Spor! CARS—One A-40 “Somerset” owner | ————————_________________. | anv objection is raised within one month! ~#. Rapier, D. Johnson, W. Bolah, © - a 2 ap
a ns | driven — done only: 1330 miles — like] LAND—1,820 square feet of land situat~ | of the cate hereof, the said Policy monies| Roach, L Burr, A. Burr, G, Burr, A. >) ' CAMADIAN CRUISER... 12 Aug, 15 Aug. em » 25 Aug.
LOST ew $2,500.00, One 1951 A-40 — 3,300! at Reed Street, St. Michael, the property | asked for will be pad } Burr, J. Burr, C,-Purguson, A. Lenae, re c IAN CONSTRUCTOR = 22 Aug. 25 Aug. < "
niles — condition perfect 32,400.00. One| of the late Eleanor Lacey, deceased. | By Order 2. Procope, L. Sealy, G. Goda =e 43 A se ale LADY RODNEY as eae 3Sept. 6 8 Sept.
— SM 1500 Singer — tyres, battery and| The above parcel of land will be s* Cc. K. BROWNE, Outcalt, R. Allamby, F. W wen, A. Tal CAN. CHALLENGER ft. 35 t. — Cy
SWEEPSTAKE TICKET BOOK condition excellent $2,500.00 Apply |up for sale by Public Competition st our . Secretary . Gooding, L. Peters, K, Pe rigiey, G. GENERA TONIC LADY - ee 7 27 Sept. € 7 Ovi.
B.7330-—7339. Finder please return samc | Chelsea Garage 1950 Ltd. Phone 4949 Office, James Street, on Friday 29ti. 15.8,52—4n,| ers, G. Horstord, B. M ters, M. Pet- GE L tTONIC x
to Lioyd Mapp, Edgecliff, St. Joh 19.8.52—6n. | August, 1952, at 2 p.m ’ ee , P. Mordecai, B. Mor- ; NOKTHBOUND
29,8 .52- ‘orf ‘ in oe 4 Da-Silva, W. Belgrave, A ” asriv
For further particulars apply to Mr Saade, N. Saade, A. Saade, K. ¥ uiuaies Sails Artives aie
ELECTRICAL A. W. Harper, Lakes Folly. i NOTiIC: : P, Bolullo, B. Benn Bennett. “D” Barbados Boston 1
FOR RENT “parent pres ses anigaaetiadie) Ny —_ Yearwood, G. Finlayson. ennett: D- CANADIAN CHALLENGER = 15 Aug. 20 Aug.
AMERICAN ELECTRIC DEEP FREEZE 08.8—in. | Re Extate of a Dee Digestive CRUISER |g Sept. jo Sept. z
Discount for 4 months use. Owner ha: ha EDMUND LAWRENCE DEAR [g acco, G FElelds. (R. Augustine, CONSTRUCTOR 1 . 19 Sept. —
— ——_- + | returned to States. Telephone 95.206 NEW BUNGALOW—Situated at Bia| Deceased — Seigoret, A. Seigoret, Upsets te a 30 Sept. 2 Oct. 11 Oct. 12 Oct.
HOUSES 21.8.52 Oct. = St a0 Oct. * Oct. % :
RECEIVER —- Mullard’ 9 tube doubic| 2°, Baths, Garage etc. Available ist] one having any debt Or claim! wecsceie’ Ochi wea emo, Gehos, r
BUNGALOW—On Sea, Main Road Hast | cuperhet receiver. Mullard Auitotnasie September: E, P. Edghill. Phone 617 aaeinat or afrecting ‘the estate of Edmund’ eae Ochoa, Beatriz Ochoa, Diana :
ings, very comfortably furnished, Ens | changer, three speed. Amplifier—bass | ° 8367 21.8.52—4n. [@ealnst or affecting the estate ot ends. Ochoa, Jorge Hernandez, Gisela Hernan- research,
lish bath 2 bedrooms Servants |'treble controls, Operated one unit or} ~w Wie Tuan |bury Road in the parish of Saint | 4¢% Jorge Hernandez, Raul Hernandez, have for further particulars, apply 1o—
Seer oe Sanane — From SeptemPes | individually. Foster Phone 2676 “THURCISDON” on. the sea at aax | Michael in this Island, who died in Ser. Hermandes, Janine | Hernandes, Antacid
ele ne 5 §2— well's Coast, ris! urch, standing on ; vet a ernandez, Jesus Alvarez, i § 2
sassodgiet oe idan cl -h 21, 0.52 aes * roods 18 perches of land. Garage fo anne ead sy Hence of their | Dominguez, Gaylor Wumberger, ee ablets, new , Companion- , GARDINER AUSTIN & Cco., LTD. —Agents.
MORECAMBE—The desirable residenc 2 cara. Water and electric services in- | QU¢t a etaaiod ihe undersigned | 207es, Consuelo Caudeira, Sally Stubbs, roduct to their renowned
“Moreeambé"' Worthing next to Royal LIVESTOCK stalled, Inspection by appointment with ae JOYCE FOSTER. “dministratrix sal0mon Wahrman, ‘owder. They are the most
Theatre, 4 Bedrooms Toilet nd Bat — -——-——_ — —_—— t.e tenant Mrs, Roach. Dial #461 t th id estate, C/o R, S. Nicholls From St. Lueia: convenient way of checkin
upstairs.. Downstairs: Drawing room,| _HORSES—Three year old thoroughbret| The above will be set up for sale 4 1S the SSiticitors, No. 151/182 Roebuck , Mr. Justice Richard Manning, Mrs, digesti: disords f €
Dining Room,Hall, 2 extra rooms, Bat)| filly “F'uffy Ruffles" by Pink Flowe«r|rublie competition at our office, Jame: | °c, O-, titan oe before the Margaret Manning, Mr. Donald Palmer, gestive lers away from
are Net, large garage, servants roon’.|ex Golden Fairy by Gold Bridge £650] Street, on Friday the 29th August 1952 | 57 na ie Mctabe. ves after which Mts. Joyce Palmer, Mstr. Angus Palmer. home. No water required—
For particulars, apply: Manager, Empire|'anded—2 wear old thoroughbred filly| at 2.00 p.m. fate T aint pecpeed ce distribute the | Mis Janet Palmer. just dissolve one or two on the
Theatre. ; 21.6.52—6n. | “Sweet Violet’ by Full Bloom ex Fair HUTCHINSON & BANFYELD scents of the eeceneed, among the pertiss ARRIVALS — BY BW.LA. tongue for pt relief
oN > -| Araby by Fairway £800 lande@. Apply: 17-8.52—-6" | entitled thereto having regard only to Se TROD AY anywhere. Prenat tasting ;
IONARCH” — Prospect, St. James,|J. RB. Edwards. Phone 2520 ———————————_—— ———_ h t ¢ which 1 shall then have from Trinidad; mag
Apply: Hutchinson & Banfield. 22,8.59—-8n. | _“VALLAMBROSA” — Constitution Ra. | stch claims of which 1 shay Miable for |, J: Wilson, R. Kinney; C. Durant; F De Witt's Antacid Tablets
20.8.52—3n Cyposite Queen's Park. All modern | (WO BOUee One ny part thereof so dis-|0rdan; E. Johnson; Johnson; M. are separately cel/-sealed for
PUPS—Two (2) Bull Terrier Pups, no|conveniences. For full Particulars) jotted to any person of whose debt Johnson; H. D, Johnson; A. De Lima; J. freshness. In ti
i reasonable offer refused. Apply: Cut»-| Phone 5127. 16,8.52—8n . cr claim I shall not then have had Thomas; A. Thomas; R. Thomas; O. strips for pocket or bag.
WANTED bert Rogers, Near Rices, St. Philfp. notice Thomas; W. Thomas; C. Thomas; V . .
' 92.8.83--2n,|_ We are instructed by Mrs. C. W.|MOG: 1 cone indebted ta the said| Tomas; A. Stevens. Standard Size, 24 Tablets. ————————————— SS OOM.
. ——_— — Haynes of Brittons Cottage, Britton’) ii. are requested to settle thei DEPARTURES — BY B.W.LA. Economy Size, 60 Tablets.
RELP FURNITURE Hill, to Offer for sale about 86,000 squard | [NS JAI | Uithout delay ON WEDNESDAY ’ ; Le
elie feet of land forming part of her prop: | "Dated this 20th day of August, 1952. | Per, Trinidad:
CLERK—A lady Ciork for a Commi--|” FURNITURE K. B Natin-are erty known a Brittons worneer: nee ° LELLA JOYCE FOSTER, eae: Agostini; Hector Perez-Marques, tts
ote a i URE - tadio-gram |land is enclosed on three sides with ; yaad Emilda erez-Mi ) ~
kn oe ef knowledge of Short-| rrigignire, large sova, cover, baby's substantial stone wall and there is | ¢ ‘ Administratrix ee oa of J Marques, Berane peskiante, aiseeeen i Sailings from Southampton to Guadeloupe, Martinique,
pane an ‘eg erifing oe general offic’ feradle, mattress, folder pram and bovse|fine view over the harbovr. ‘The lair Eémurd Lawrence Dear, geceese in | Miquclera,e Adalia Miquelera, Prospero eC & Jamaica
Apply to box XYZ Oe nines beaks bt syele. All first rate condition. Bargains | would be sold as a whole or in not mar eS" | Dominguez, Morela Dominguez, Monica Barbados, Trinidad, La Guaira, Curacao
tithe Bitke. Siadae Gpialifcatiods. Ap. vply: Mre. Clarke 8243 ea than Sue ioe Ae ear ONG IS acai a Agonne, ‘aa Martin, Roderick ANTAC ID
plications treated strictly confidential, sept edidressed to iNGeO! oe ‘SEALY - = ne veer 7 er, Alan Hurstfield, Hubert Burke,
Bidston lb Ree MISCELLANKOT CAN basen treet. Public Official Sale [Sti simge' vemos, Manto! koe] TAB L ‘From Arriv
tiie 2 § 1 h on atheus, Manuel Mturbe, ‘ : Southampton Barbados
UNIOR R I Ree = 1S 14,8.52—-5u Albertiaha Iturbe, A. Iturbé, Suis Iturbe. A ETS =
JUN OVERSEER For Spencers meeenemeeneieriitiartieaseserieeihitssinseeme—ine saber . “COLOMBIE” 5:
nantation. Apply In parson with Testi. | COTTON PRINTS — Canadian (The Provost Marshal's Act iwi |G tute, Victoria Synister, Atie Yussiuf, No water needed .. B81st July, 1952 .. 18th Aug., 1952
onials to Manager. 20.8,52—3n, | English, over hundred beautiful AUCTION . (1904-6) § 30) Phils Mec eee, Mehammed: | Easily carried anywhere — Cell-sealed *“DE GRASSE” .. 22nd Aug., 1952 .. 8rd Sept., 1952








z
ee % inches wide, usual'y 72c. reduced to
POSITION “required by responsible} 4%. yard at KIRPALANS 52, Swan

Young man With knowledge of Are and | Street. 22.8.52—1n
Acetelyne Welding and Evectrical Appar- | —-—



*Not calling at Guadeloupe
SAILING FROM BARBADOS TO EUROPE

On Friday the 22nd day of August 19524 274 Hannibal, Muriel Odle, John Scriven,
JNDER THE IVORY HAMMER | at the hour of 2 o’cloek in the afternoon| Teeresa Meorish, Trevor Corniiliac, John

i 80! t| Boll, George Thomas, Taufic Nichols,
By instructions received from. th | Will be sold at my office to the highest) ei, wonseur, Cline Reed, Kerina Reed,

@ For home use—
Here's the family standby
































atus. To arrange interview reply t& CAR ACCESSORIES — = rg - 1 Friday, | bidder for any sum not under the ap- ; TT’
Advocate Box M.L. 20.8 Bao. Pattery ‘ends, Buby Roe Chareue: Ruaunt aed $9 ‘acaare. ‘Chelona Gar ae Prat chat caseat i L d containing Eg © Ceichiy soothes DeWl 5 From Barbados Arrives Southampton
Dusters, Cheese cloth, Whisk brooms} Pinfold Street, (1) 190} a er Bowe | uy Se eet iceroe a Roods 14%, | Sit R. Arundel, Mcintyre Conrad, LeRoy and settles = ANTACID *““DE GRASSE” .. 6th Aug, 1952 .. J6th Aug., 1952
MISCELLANEOUS me lor en ee ee... Renae sis Sr stau a 1947 14 ?. Perches situate at Crane Gap in Parish | Foster, Clarice Capsura, Peter Jordan, upset stomach “COLOMBIE” 24th Au 1952 5th Sept. 1952
: a ce 3 ings that vour car t amaged in accident a a of St. Philip butting and bounding on Verona Roberts, Harry Roberts, Patricia @ Lastin effects POWDER o* B+, ee .
LADIES ee “Coat” sire aad Garage (1980) L eee Samer Tiata ana . con ee a 4) veka lands of Cliff Cottage, on lands pow or Basets, se Field Mary Field, asting ; *“DE GRASSE” .. 16th Sept., 1952 .. 26th Sept., 1952
“%—40 c/o Advocate Advtg. Dept. . 1 NC - late of Sarah Blades, on lands now or eorge Field. * * ;
16.8.52—t.{.n 19,6,52—6p. VINCENT tenes late of one Brathwaite, on lands now or| For St. Lucia: Sailing direct to Southampton
: Margot Lang, William Lang, Alan Lang, ’





11.8.52--4n | late of Adriana Wilkinson on lands now

GLASS—Giass for all purposes. Show or late of Mary Carter on a private road | Marjorie Estwick, Marvin Skeete, Dun-



















POSITION WANTED ;
NURSE DORIS NER a qualified | Windows, Glass Cases, House windows | —--s-ss—s——aam > ——~ 118 feet wide and on the Public Read to-) Stan Curtin. So = ae R. M. JONE LTD.,—Agents.
Midwife, ia willing to assist anyone who | 74 doors. Mirrors for Dressing Tables. UNDER THE SILVER gether with the messuages or Dwelling} DEPARTURES — BY B.W.1LA ) : —h 2699696 665555 59S$S8669SSSS999OSSS6 os

HAMMER Houses, called “Crane View" and “Crane ON THURSDAY a

is in need of a nurse. Address: Chap-| prices G. W. Hutchinson & Co. Ltd Fee, ieee Gr lands dibs, op) Fer Antieons

man’s Lane, C/o Miss Gladys Best. 17.8.52—4n









































HEADLEY,
Provost Marshal. ster; Miss Angella Armstrong; Mr. Cedric
; Mr. James Branch; Mr. Ralph

NATIONAL INCORPORATED, 8 cor-|ohligation ‘whatsoever. Advice direct
pcration organized and existing unde: |from Experts. at the Uitra-modern
the laws of the State of Delaware, United | Research P’ant of S. C. Johneon & Son
States of America, whose trade or busi- | tie., Raeine, Wisconsin, U.S.A.

Servide; Singlé fron Bedstead’, Springs
Deep Sleep Mattresses; Mahog. Liner
Press; Chest of Drawers; Ced and
Painted Presses; Crex Mats; Congoleum

16.8, 62—8n ON TURSDAY 20: Py orget a Mrs, praised as follows :— Alexandor St, Clair, ignatius King,
~ | SROUBEWIVES—Do ou have Fl oy fackley, rhioh tnchade: | yA RON Sree Sf mad, its all Bulle. | Pee verte: Rises
TAKE NCTICE aT elektro nuk thee Coe Sere Lig Gorner ake "i 12,000 0. rib Taeetas Cae han Mr. Jabish Holmes, Mr. Winfield Lucas,
? 2 fe b a i .
a 1 Oe a eae Se CO | iE ria hae Seka Divan and (Fummival sor end towards satigiaction, Bc, | Mi. TieGeie soan Grithth. Mis. “AD MENT OF ,
ine INSTANTINA Ltd., Bridge Street, and they will be? Cushions, Mirrors, Curtains, Rush no oe Fa talc nl tonette Weekes: Mrs. Ine Brathwaite, Mr . .
iat STERLING PRODUCTS INTER-|orly too pleased to giygt Advice at no) Arm C¥aire: Glas” and China Ten : T. -T, Clarence Carrington; Mr, Vernon Brew- Walking Sticks











Provost Marshal's Office, Eversh

6th August, 1952 Just received by

Best; . Marjorie Best; Mrs. Georgy
7°8.52—8n | PoMiard; Mr. Charles Field.



ress address is 1450 Broadway, New 20,8.52—5r | ironing Board; Elec, Toaster and Kettle ,

Mork, New Kerk, U.S.A... Manutactaier | oben, | Timus Stoves, Elec. 2 Burner Hot F1te; | JOHNSON’S

173 + > a CHINERY— KE ils, Books, Canvas Cots, wi ivi

oie TRMIE tn Part OA" OF Reniviar inl enuidced, Eitced Wattle ted aiecmn nem’ Kitchen Utens | BOOks, STATIONERY The T.S.S. GOLFITO will be arriving from

GOVERNMENT NOTICE

respect of pharmaceuticals, and will be|]to run at 470 r.p.m. developing sbout
entitled to register same after one month | 4. 4-H. P. at 100 Ibs. pressure. Two (2
from the 2st day of August, 195.,|/ small cold starting Diesel Engines, 10

Sale 11.30 o'clock, Terms cash

BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.,




Southampton on Saturday 23rd August, at
































unless some person shall in the mean | and 15 HP. One (1) 22” x 36” 5 rollet ie é 3 Auctioneers
Sune ae neue mn eovareen. vt oe Mill complete with C.S. Gearing, arent 78 22,8.52—2n ,
my ice. of opposition of such registr’-} engine, and Hydraulic Pressure Regu | —>—-———————————~~ . $ : ei :
ton. tae tenderers: Can be seen on|jating Equipment. Appky: D. M._ Simp LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE Attention is drawn to the Control of Prices (Defence) (Amend- | p.¢64 B$$9S996SSS965S" ‘ noon, and will be sailing the same evening for
a a v a y ol . i2—68n .
“Dated this 20th’ day of August, 1952 won, ee: as ies sats, application of Gitta Semuaie. poe a th aa yd Pe which oe be published in the Official
H. WILLIAMS, STUK GLUE—The 2 in 1 adhesive with | Shopkeeper of Roepe a gr azette 0! ursday, 21st August, i Trinidad
ails * . ( Liqlor License No. 649 of 1952, granted ’ inidada.
Registrar of Trade Marks. | she 1,000 and 1 uses. A powerful glue} icharg Henry in respect of a wal! 2. Under this Order the maximum wholesale and retail selling

Lt : oe ae hee Reroke a WwPPREHeP ond everite shop near residence at Eller-
Peet 22,8.82- gn | ton, St. George, for permission to use
a naielpeemeee ens | BOE SRE, Renae at Marie Vale; top
STOVES—The famous “Florence” Stover
i 2 and 3 Burner Models are obtainable
from Laurie Dash & Co,, Tudor Street.

and bottom floors of a wall building at

prices of “Beef—Salted” and “Meat—Fresh & Frozen—Veal” are as
follows: —~

DAERWOOD



















ROE eT eee Téth aay of August, 1082 ARTICLE WHOLESALE PRICE | RETAIL PRICE |% arrived | at Barbados 8
Phone 8061, 17.8.52—3n_ | ‘To. G. B, GRIFFITH, Esq (not more than) (not more than) and will be . oo aun

y
Ag. Police Magistrate, Dist. “A.”
MARIA SAMUELS.
for Applicant
N.B.—This application will be con-
‘ered at a Licensing Court to be held






































2 DAY, August 24th for St.
-Lucia, St.. Vincent, Grenada,
Aruba, accepting Passen-










SUFSCRIBF now to the Dally
Telegraph, England's leading Dativ New
per now arriving in Barbados by Alr

Beef—Salted:
(a) Extra Family, Navel | $88.10 per bri. of 200



SOO

















niy a few days after publication in PNA Mandas Plate, Ro Bris- Ibs. or 47 r lb. in
London. tact Ion Gale C/o, Advo- |"! Police Court, District “A” on y, ; junds, Ye 'c. pe BS
endo s. Tat Local Representative Moe deh Gay ae September, 1952, at ket lots. of not lesa than gers and Freight.

| re a ey ce G. B. GRIFFITH, 25 lbs. FE .. |62c, per Ib. 22.8.52—2n.,
FURNITURE i K GLUE—"St ee colourless anf Ag, Police Magister, Or. 3! (b) Flank or Boneless|$84.40 per bri. of 200 =

} oak irle s, power!) and economil: al Flank tos, on 466 Ib. in

it's “STUK’—it Sticks ee hy. . per e

. | 22.0 2» | LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE lots of not less than
or es a slice On oll,
TOOLS—in Stock:—Suction —_ tools, sinttiant eo ET.C.O., Coleridge St., 25 lbs. be +. |50c. per Ib.

Phillips screwdrivers, Cabinet blade! iy for permission to sell Spirits, Mat} Meat—Fresh & Frozen:

AUCTION



screwdrivers, Sliploint pliers, Combina-| rb icilors &c., at ground floor of Johnson's te a
won pier Hackeawe. Tappet *erriven Stationery. Building, Broad Street, City. Veal: — way
ate. Get vour requirements & Dated this 2ist day of August, ‘ eo
“BENSAM™ Gurage (1980) Limited Phone 4949. Tor. B. GRIFFITH Beg, (a) Cutlets (without =
19.8.52—6n | “"\¢ Police Magistrate, Dist. ‘A’. bone) a Ms i me .. |60c. per Ib.
SHEMNGHAM GARDENS, | I. F. PACHEO, (b) er cuts 54c. lb
MAXWETAI'S COAST | STAMPS FOR SALF for Applicant. All oth ne if ay a . per Ib.
On THRE STAMP COLLECTION of & N.B.—This application will be consid-
| coessed client will be ect up for sale] Oi" ot a Licensing Court to be held at 2ist August, 1952. 22.8.52—1n

WEDNESDAY, ib AUGUBT s at our office, James Street, Bridge- | oiice Court, District “A” on Tuesday the













































Cover, Limed Oak Chest -.of
Drawers, Dominicon Rugs Ptd
Wardrobe, Glothes Rack, Ptr
Twesses, BRable, Desk & Chairs,
Wa M (Qak & Waat
Mrotes! Félding ‘Tabig, Stcels.
Single Mattresscs, Walnut Dress-
e¢ TableeChair, Medicine Chests
‘deya Lott Chair (green). Lint
‘asket. Bathrcom Scelss, Canyo
Cot.. Mosquite Nets, Curtains
Pink’ Silk Bedeove:s» Quantity «of
good Table &@ Bed Linen C "
Cutlery, Glawsware & Table Ac
cessories, Breakfast, Tea, Dinne
« Coffee Sets in cream & gree



| ee EN
; at 11.50 a m i\| TUESDAY %th Aveust © | 54 Gay of September, 1952 at 11 o'clock, \$655$55900609599099900006 55555995999 99SS90900999006 :
from ‘Comdr. Ht ton iy } YEARWOOD & BOYCE see G. B. GRIFFITH,
Inge. to. dispone et, fis PORN | 21.8.52—5n, Ag. Police Magistrate, Dist, “A”. Seven sizes of
T ) EFFECTS as listed — a a
ts BNeG | | pre De a deeeoerie PRIMUS BLOW TORCHES e
VISWING MORNING OF SALE 1h FOR THE 1ST, TIME ‘
% any ars BOBSOSSSSSSSSS SOOO OOS
eTmtsen,. Monta ean ee i ag ioe eneeen cg x for you to select from, prices range from ;
Stend, titing Des’ Josh
nt, Taliboy, Bedside. Tables A GAS COOKER 3 ; i % 17 76 ’ $
ure, Taliboy, Redsi tH Ad § Vy 3 $17.40 to $46. ¢
gH. Teds — ALL IN MAHCG. from a gartety of = $ vocate tationer % ; :
teceiver ighod working ord . 7m. j : ee ?
oo alg srt /$ ror BOOKS TEE CENTRAL Garon i
irg, Standard Table Lj
iranian eat.” “chong “anit || it ee! geet unas for cont Hh posites ime
F A ug ee Pie F — good | ) at Your ! &
der, Hanging Mirre: Folding x. . : ’
Table in’ Limed Oak, Dumb |}|\ GAS SHOWROOM 8 — | xO0SNNSS $9999S9SS5 ease SOOO > %
Waiter (Oak), Steel & | Wooden \ Bay Street { x
Folding Chairs, Card Table & " BOROUGH OF SAN FERNANDO %
: +





FURNITURE
AUCTION

Ne oe
ACCOUNTANCY COST ACCOUNT-
ING, CUMPANY SECRETARYSHIP
\OU6-KEEPING, An “Intensiv

Course (for award of Diplo

a a Associate or Fellow) will

jualify you for higher status by in-

cresting spare-time POSTAL ST y

with expert tutors, GUARANT y

/RCOURSES in English, Commercial and

aw subjects, London Chamber 0:
eiiicCommerce RSA. Institute of Com

}

|

| VACANT POST—TOWN ENGINEER
Applications invited—University Graduates, Corporate Mem-
bers of Institutions of Civil or Municipal Engineers or equiva-
lent—10 years’ experience— Usual Borough Engineering Ser-
vices—-Population 35,000—Knowledge of electricity an asset—
Salary $4,800—$240—$5,760 per annum—Starting salary sub-
ject to experience Passage, leave, car allowance, Pension—
Quarters at 10% of Salary—For full details apply to Town
Clerk, San Fernando, Trinidad, B.W.I, Applications close 30th
September, 1952.





SOOOCOOOL

LLE,
on TUESDAY, %th AUGUST,
ot 1180 a.m.
We hay eceived ingtructions
fram og “ epee Ba , to
qapoe JRNITURE and



merce, Ete, For FREE BOOKLET
WRITE NOW to the leading tutoria)
| (institute for overseas students: LON
DON SCHOOL OF ACCOUNTANCY





ching. “FRIGADATRE" 7 cu. it 53. Welbeck Street, London, W.1 as listed below:— HR AN,
Caantity China: & Gings- Rs England. a VIEWING MORNING OF SALE i Mee. S ane Clerk.
ware, @veam Maker, Thermo > SaaS MORRIS Chairs. Rerbice Chair, 2th >

Plast, ne Lanterns, Selec —— SSS Armchair, Diring Table, 4 Dining 12t 2. ,





Chairs, Sideboard, Occas. Tables
Nouble Bed and Spring, Dressing
Table with Lorg Mirror and Stool,
Wardrobe, Nivht Chair, ALL THE
ABOVEIN MAHOGANY. 4 cubit
= Electric Frig Phillips (6
tebe) Battery Set RADIO, China
Cabinet, Telephone Table, Larder
Kitehen Tebles, 2 Burner Table
Model GAS Range, Painted

tinn Pod§Kitchen Utensils, Cake
Ti vanes Ete., Trays, Fname
3 Burner ALGR”
“FLORENCE”. Oven
burner Fialkes Stove, Minger,
Pans, Weighing Machine. Refrig-
crater Containers,, Electric Iron,
‘NEW WORLD" Gas Cooker. as
new), “JACKSON” Evectric Steve,
& Small Electric Stove... Algrm




















Stovi,

| FURNISH 10-DAY

THE

FOR SALE

—















{
\} MAHOGANY & CEDAR WAY





lock, Latties’ “Sports Bicy®le, ' NEW & Renewed A’) Mahogany Cradle, Child's Chair, Children’s UO
Table Tennig- Table, Arm Chair, & All Cedar or Mahogany and ne | Painted Furniture (Dining Table L Y N Cc ill B RG
Berbice Chair & Day Bed, Books Vanities, Stools, Simpler Dr R Wardrobe, ete.,) 2 Simmons fron
Straw Mats. Garden Tools, | aint Tables, Full panelled and other Beds and Springs, Iron Bed and
Prushes, ‘Green's. Lawn _ Mower Bedsteads, Wardrobe, Washstands Spring (single), 3 Single Mattress-

5th Avenue. — SHelleville.

Shears, Step-Ladder, Watering
Can, Buekets-& many other, inter
esting iter:

TABLES for Dining; Cocktalls, es, Rocker, Rugs, Mise. China and

Radio & Decoration, Trolleys.
Plant Stools, Cabinets for China



Glass Ware, Kerosene Lamps,




Metal Swing chair, Pictures, Ca



penters’ Tools, 2 box Cameras,





& Bedroom, Waggons, Sideboards . ; A tr ti , i
aiteeciiiciinine SpHAWAG “ROOM Atoms. one WH) lf Childrens, oie, awn, gtawe on a corner site of 12,000 square feet, Contains 8 galleres (1
ERS Scttees, Armchaira, Upright: (| Pe enclosed), large drawing room, dining room, study, modern
Dot on 4. Biadon BUY Tn ae OMONEY-SAV AUCTIONEERS kitchen, 3 bedrooms, garage, ete. Offers gonsidered.
NG PRICES
& Ce. ment John M4. Biadon JOHN M. BLADON & CO. |
iiloie wads L.S. WILSON ee ‘AL ESTATE AG t Passe
{ Plantations Building SPRY STREET. DIAL 4009 Phone onas ae pa Ee REAL ESTATE AGENTS :
j E i antations Building. Phone 4640 ~~ Plantations Building }}) | CITY GARAGE TRADING CO., LTD
)





SEE Re ES EE ee














FRIDAY, AUGUST 22, 1952 BARBAOOS ADVOCATE PAGE SEVEN
fine cree an otomatntnte atin danienns nn et dent ro imine AES MOCO Re OTe ney een liane sng AR me Se eR ARAN RRNA SR RRR AN NRT IEE ORI awa ham
" Ae nn wenn ecm 1S SS OM ESTs ELSES OASIS SOE,
HENRY
Swift's Sausages

N .
BY CARL ANDERSO : We can Supply
- Tves Cream ot Wheat
- Macaroni
Rice
x . Starct
>. j Y a Luncheon Beef Loaf
’ Palethorpe’s Sausages



Moe

So

Veal Loaf
Hamburger Stake
Meat Lunch
Vienna Sausages
Macaroni & Cheese
Spaghetti & Cheese
Cooking Butter 1's.
Cooking Butter 5's
Hams 5 to 16 Ibs
Cheese per Ib

|

@
STUART & SAMPSON
(1938) LTD.

Headquarters for Best Rum

Taste

THE DIFFERENCE!

|

ger ohm ai aa!
ee ee CMe 6 eee] ae oe eel ey
SURE? HE'S GOINGS
FOR A NICE RIDE
WITH A COUPLE OF



i



USE

KOO BAKED BEANS
Oy ERE ss pastedere beeen $ .28

K.L.B. PEARS in

K.L.B, PEARS _,,
K.L.B, SWEET
CORD fine

IMPERIAL SAU-
SAGES

BEEF LOAF... _,,

COCOA MALT

TONO

And for The BEST to Drink
Our Popular
FIVE STAR RUM

will



FOR NICE
THINGS TO

BLONDIE BY CHIC YOUNG

WML IL! Foo
a ~ DONT 7
BUT, pagwooo WORRY, DEAR,

IT MIGHT BE (1 CAN MAKE
REAL LATE WHEN )> MY OWN




[IX WIVES THINK THEIR 22
(HUSBANDS ARE SO HELPLESS
WHEN THEY'RE NOT AROUND

Ne eee Sake
a -












THE DOGS

WILL HAVE

TO BE FED,
T

COOK --1LL T* F:
TAKE CARE OF porte
EVERYTHING WE HAVE 2








































































WE GET BACK SUPPER | : $1.20 per Britle
. T PAYS YO T ) Ee
ay PAN BABY |] “SPECIAL OFFERS AVAILABLE THURSDAY TO SATURDAY AT ALL BRANCHES
nacioie = ~ a —————————________ _____
1 f aa a we UT ME ST oe Usuall Now BLUE CHEESE per 1 ...... 0.00 c cece ee cea 1.12
THE THE GROUND )... IT'S THIS WHOLE “\I/ FLASH! CUT Mé ‘ y ow ee . eer erase LDS i
A sHAOOW LIKE A SHROUD ECLIPSE (A THERMAL Y PLACE HAS , sOose! THis 1S Tae BIRD’S JELLY DESSERTS .. §$ .20 $ .16 CREAM CHEDDER CHEESE per t ................ 13
OF DOOM CRAWLS /s Bo QUAKES B GONE CRAZY! JA SUR CHANCE TO . HORLICK’S MALTED MILK 85 16 PINEAPPLE CMUNKS Tins ..................... -51
ACROSS GANYMEDE / COMING! 4 co : a\. GET Away / | 4 f : STRAWBERRIES Tins ..........0.06.0.5 00000 segues 89
; iS { a A. MEAT LUNCH .............. 45 42 RASPBERRIES Tins .........-.-.-..-.--.- +s sees 98
ms mY Seedhee ED Sse iintska eve wcedseres 49 45 RASPBERRIES Tins .............6sscccesccaeeeees 11
‘ TABLE SALT %-1Ib Tins .... 36 .30 PG ARR aRRnR Sar Pay re 4 Ae negara araaperc og 3.60
V ee o! \ é HEIL BEER 28 22 U.S. O.P, BRANDY ...... RAC Gane Tbe moe La ye 8.00
¢ EE.” emai ee tS © stead ilcietuoe BRANDY .. NNW RE Ree heb ae ga ea hace 6.25
<—¢ oN FRESH RED APPLES per tb ..................--: $ .45 kk
RN a ey f GORGONZOLA CHEESE per ID ...............55- 1.21 BO, Ura OR: WPF es cies cas vba thoy eed Gireses -30
I=?
a / I Li
CN te n
Tire }
BY FRANK ROBBINS iiialeana
$$$ $$$ gg——__$______—_ ——— mg? y
WHAT HAPPENS NOW? FINE THING! WE THERE MUST CE. & UMLAUT'S CAT / \
COME TO MAMA, i BULLY BOYS OUT \ GOT THE COUNTERFEIT] | SOME WAY...WHAT'S BS JOHNNY — TABBY ‘
YOU SWEET HUNKS THERE WILL POP US OFF PLATES...NOW WE . ‘ HERE JUST GAVE US |
| LIKE CLAY PIGEONS IF WE | CAN/TGET OUT OF | ot ae A FIGHTING
| | STICK OUR NOSES OUT’ { HERE WITH THEM! } CHANCE / OF
Most of us take too much for granted. We do not
bother very much about how the necessities, luxuries
and amenities of life are provided, so long as we
receive them when we want them. But supposing we
are suddenly called upon to make and do for ourselves,
What then ?
REALIZED HOW LONESOME wise HER =VLL LONESOME FOR MOTHER - COME BACK How would you organise the delive ry of millions
IT 1S AROUND THE HOUSE BE GLAD WHEN 'M_ GOING TO PUT SOME HERE --1/M of letters, or the production of a daily newspaper, or
wie ee = J ne ae acre, iano i the feeding arrangements for a great city like London ?
bs PLAYER / Maal
ly, aS This fascinating volume, packed with hundreds of
Jab /) hr ‘4 interesting pictures, will open your eyes to the many
fi _ oP rocesses involved in the creation of all kinds of every-
a Pp 4 x
LAG) oY day goods and services. It also shows how many
a de ‘ adventurous and far from everyday task are performed.
/ |e)
ae | ADVOCATE STATIONERY
2, King Features Syndicate, tne, Warld nghes veverved }

BY ALEX RAYMOND Broad St. and Greystone, Hastings.
mm | |)





‘


















THROUGH THE FENCE! & PLLC LLDPE PLPLLLPPB ELL PPPOPLLAE ALAA LPBARRPPPPP PPP PPPLLLPET

Saree] | FRESH
APPLES
HAM

AWAY FROM THAT
ONE! BUT WHAT
ELSE COULD
I 00? IT
WAS PAGAN'S
LIFE OR MINE! |
THAT DIRTY





DODO S TSS GOGO CGOC



B99





















%
:
&
: ROLL
> WHAT A FINE VARIETY y
S Were ara ae, $ FOR A BREAKFAST SPREAD in 2b. tins :
THE PHANTOM BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES |+ {URBAN MIXED NUTS in '% and 1-I pk. bea : 3
é % PITTED DATES in 1-M pk. z
‘ ANCHOVIE FILLETS in tins >
4 7 1 > .
1 7 THEY VE GOT HIGH-POWERED THEY'RE STILL SHOOTING AT THE BOULDER) | WHOEVER'S MAYBE ITS JUSTA x MUSHROOMS in tins x
aw My es RIFLES 2-100 MUCH FIRE- <@X gy HAVEN T NOTICED BEHIND THAT TRICK TO MAKE US $ ITALIAN KETCHUP >
TL WIME:-| POWER FORUS, FELLAS. ge ME YET+~ |ROCK HAS GHOW OURSELVES! } 18 CROSSE & BLACKWELL'S TABLE SALT in 2-Ib bots. $
WAIT HERE,’ 7» IsTOPPED SHooTIN. STAY HERE! % SYMINGTON’S PEA FLOUR in 1-1 tins x
2M Ui ¢ MORTON’S DRIED MIXED HERBS in 4-07, bots. y
Doe l N ieee Vil Ab % MORTON’S DRIED SAGE in 4-07, bots. x
‘ ' = 4 . $ MORTON’S DRIED PARSLEY in 4-02. bots.
â„¢ fie Wn 2 iD YB. V\ome is MORTON'S DRIED MINT in 4-07, bots. 3
c fare = H & GROUND WHITE PEPPER in 2-02. pkgs. Pa
Yt FY > y $ PURE FRENCH OLIVE OIL in 16-02. bots. wt
mn)" 1} x DEMERARA CASARREEP in bots, if
\ “a ee % ———— #Gorganzola Cheese
AP? « x
7 Y % ALLEYNE ARTHUR & Co Ltd » New Zealand Cheese in 5 lb tins
i “Your Grocers” — High Street New Zealand Cheese in 8 oz. pk. g
i Le eal %
ere nenve Fn Worry tr jt | FSSC 0 0999999999999 99 999099990995 9590999999 995559555648 6565000000000 SOOSSOOCSOSOOOOOOA
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:
4
PAGE EIGHT BARBADOS ADVOCATE

FAR Sag! RETURNS FROM FINLAND
A\ A | ust Get
A Banked -Track



FRIDAY, AUGUST 22, 1952







79090006966000006000000 | (REE
|

+ BARBADOS HURRICANE

PRECAUTION
HINT NO. 8



AQUATIC CLUB

(Members Only)



OF THE

WEEK:





Big Cycle |

Sports Window



: *
Y.M.P.C, play Harrison R 3 Toda On Satur . 195
College Old Boys in the 7 ace Ly we ee '

KEN FARNUM, Barbadian Chk ree cyclist, told the finals match of the Basket- f
Advocate yesterday that it was very essential that the a we games at Britain’s bi a t DANCE WARNINGS.
West Indies should have at least one anked track. “Riding aa Poca nt. ns Gand When in 1946 English ericket resumed after the war iepetion content the Dell Meee : If your house is secure-
oe p perked track is far different from riding on a, flat anttele iat the Seabevitiall years, the first touring team to visit this country was India, press Tour of Britain begins to-|@ Musie by Anthony Menezes ly anchored to the
rac

Farnum returned to the island on Wednesday | season and should be excit- captained by that great sportsman, the late Nawab of

aay. This mass cycling race, now and



: ; ; : mae : foundation, with a good
night after taking part in the Olympic Games at Helsinki. | ing, for these teams are Pataudi. being held for the second year,|@ His Caribbean Troubadours roof securely fastened
Farnum, who went to Finland evenly matched. A Series of three Test matches were played; Engl has attracted an entny of 79 com- * t

with the Jamaican team, ‘said ..In the first round of the won one and the remaifing ¢ rs B gland pared with 55 twelve months ago. From 9 p.m. — 1 am. |}}) and properly shuttered i

that cycle racing at the Olympics first Division games Y.M.P.C. : t th Engl oan Seen eae ut More ‘Aiso it will last longer and cover e is the best place to

was quite different from that in defeated H.C.O.B. but important than Eng’angds tirst post-war victory was the more miles. ADMISSION -o- FREE weather the storm.

Barbados. He felt that the var- H.C.O.B. reversed the deeis- appearance for the first time upon the Test scene of a play- 22.8.52—2n. 22.8.52—-2n.

ious Associations of the West ion in the return match, er, who with Len Hutton, was destined to keep England’s There are 1,470 miles to be

Indies should concentrate on . This match therefore not flag flying in the years that lay ahead. covered by the cyclists instead of PSE III

having more events at local



meetings which were similar to
those held at the Olympics.
Before reaching Helsinki, Far-
num fell at Paddington track
England. He said that the in
jury he suffered handicapped hi
training but on the day of the
race at Helsinki he was fit
He was very much impressed
with the way in which the games
were organised. He found éh
cement track, which carried a 40 @
degrees angle, terrific. ‘After 9
you get accustomed to the track,
it is beautiful to ride on,” he said.
“It is definitely better to rice
as a team. The results are
better.” He thought that Italy
and Australia were the most im- -_ =
pressive countries and each was KEN FARNUM
represented by about six cycli a pint Renae nibs, es
“The riding was clean - th
lenty manoeuvring,” he sal Gi s
, Farnum felt that the Jamaic tumcrac
team was very popular at He'-

sinki and were very well treated.
Accommodation at Olympic Vil-
lage was magnificent.

“T have gained much exper-
jence from riding at the 1952
Olympics and this T intend ‘o

pass on to local cyclists, " Farnum
ended.

Racing Notes
From B.G.

Own Correspondent)
Aug. 13.

The Luckhoo Brothers have
urchased the recently imported
Thoroughbred “Kindle”, a-bay 2-
year-old filly by “Lighthouse 11”
a highly successful sire which was
bred in France by the late Lord
Derby. The filly was imported
by the Demerara Turf Club.

The club’s previous buy was
the bay 3-year-old filly ‘‘Bileek-
an” by “Birikan’ a son of the Aga
Khan’s unbeaten “Bahram” out
of the speedy daughter of “Sir
Cosme”. This horse was sold to
Mr. A. Sankar before it arrived in
the Colony.

Already .the winner of two
races, » 5-furlong seller and a
better class race over 6 furlongs,
“Bileekan” is nicely rated in Eng-
land. Small and compact she
does not stand over much ground
but is nicely balanced and a good
walker. The neck is medium but
light, especially where it joins
the head—legs well shaped—pas-
terns longish but good, both in
front and behind. She has the
app@arance of being a trifle want-
ing in depth at the flank, The
quarters are plain but muscular
and gaskin fairly broad. Of
good disposition she is the ideal
type for these tracks.

County Cricket:



(From Our



Stakes Won By

‘Bebe Grande’

(From Our Own Correspondent!

LONDON, Aug. 21,
Mr. J. S. Gerber's ‘Bebe Grande’
at seven to two won a fine race
for the Gimcrack Stakes here this
aftarnoon when beating ‘Whistler’
11 to 8, the favourite, by a length
and a half, These two had the
race to themselves throughout,
‘Bebe Grande’ jumped off in
front and kept to the rails and
led until nearing two furlongs
from home. ‘Whistler’, in the
centre of the course, had not been
far behind and came to pass her
with one and a half furlongs ta
go,
‘Whistler’



could not stay on

only decides the winner of
the Knock Out Cup, but
Should also settle any doubts
about the relative merits of
these two teams.

What Does The
New Soccer
Season Hold?

By DENNIS HART
LONDON, Aug.



Football returns to the Eng-
bish sporting scene. It Bb
just over three months since

the curtain was drawn on last
season with that epic Cup Final
which ended with thousands of
the Wembley crowd cheering
Neweastle’s second successive
victory, but still more thousands
cheering the wonderful fight put
up by the gallant Arsenal ten.
Can Neweastle do it again?
Will Arsenal; who came within
an ace of the elusive ‘double’
last season clinch one of the
major honours this ‘time? These
are but two of the questions pro-
viding fans with eve-of-the-
season talking points.
Newcastle are truly a team of
ell talents. “Their football is based
on attack, attack and yet more
attack, And ‘with forwards of
the calibre of Milburn, Foulkes,
Mitchell, Walker and Chilean-born
George Robledo, they have just
the men to earry out this style.
There are also top-class reserves
in Keeble Hannah and Davies.
(Given normal luck, the first
jSaturday in May might well see

however, and when ‘Bebe Grande’..them engaged in their third suc-

came at him again he had no re

serve, In the last 100 yards
‘Bebe Grande’ gradually forged °
ahead, readily outstaying him in

a fine race,
‘Libator’ who had always been
in the third position, kept going

for that place, but was four
lengths behind ‘Whistler’
‘Stan’ was fourth and ‘Empire

Honey’, who was putting in his
best work at the finish, was fifth,
The last place was fillect by ‘Four
Commando’,

It was a fine performance on,
the part of ‘Bebe Grande’, for her
trip to Deauville and back last
week-end could not have done her
any good, This is no, a filly’s
race and the last filly to win it
was in 1933.

Both at Sandown and Good-
‘wood, she had prova@d herself a
classic two-year-old, and this has
now been confirmed for it was the
first defeat for ‘Whistler’ and
‘Stan’ who between them had
won eleven races

Surrey In Good Position
For County C hampionship:

From Our Own Correspondent
LONDON, Aug. 21.
Surrey who need one more
victory to clinch the County

Championship are now four points

yarer their goal,

Outstanding bowling by ‘Tony
cock back from Test duty,
gained them the first inning

points against
Oval today. Lock took 6 for
and Derby facing a totai of
were all out for 107. In addition
to his fine bowling, Lock took
two brilliant catches to dismiss
Derbyshire’s opening pair Elliott
and Hamer.

Steady batting in their
innings put
manding

Derbyshire at th

13
156

secon
Surrey in the com-
position by close of
play. With six wickets in hand
they lead by 307 runs.

Despite fine bowling by Rarn-
chand who took six for 67 the
Indian touring team were lead
by 34 runs on the first innings
in their match against Sussex.
Batting again, the tourists lost
quick wickets but once more
skipper Hazare came to the res-
cue with a gallant 52. At the
close the Indians were 191 for °%

England’s Test batsmen tos
Graveney celébrated his return
to the Gloucestershire side with
a classic 166 which enabled his
team to gain a first innings lead

’
They'll Do It Ever +f



Berore HE opeRATION
YOURE TENDERLY

TAKEN TO THE HOSPITAL
IN A SLOW-MOVING ,
SOFT-SPRINGED,
SPONGE- RUBBER,
BALLOON-TIRED
AMBULANCE==:+

eA

} AFTER THE
: WHEN YOUR NSIDES
WOULD APPRECIATE
AN EASY RIDE»
WHAT DO yOu ¢
GIVE A LOOK





\ Ccimrenmnn

be

of 174 against Leicestershire.
SCOREBOARD
Essex versus Middlesex

ESS@X .isscccscseeeee, 800 for 9 de-
clared, (Dodds 100).

Middlesex pntdsanits. AO SO: Or
Worcestershire versus Lancashire

Lancashire won by ten wickets;
Worcestershire ...... . 104 and 195

Lancashire ... ; sore Ee
(kin 108, Jenkius 5 ‘for. 115) and
23 for 0.

Somerset versus Hampshire

Somerset ..........0..3. 256 for 9 de-
elared and 17 for 2.

FEPATUIEIBPAEE Ori ss peace scas cates caadests

Surrey versus Derpy



Surrey saaitisbboachtokarch.. | San eae

win § for 44) and 258 for 4.

Derb *yshire ... 107 (Lock

6 for 16),

Leicestershire versus Gloucester-
. shire
Leicestershire .........,....... 178 and

32 for 2.

Gloucestershir¢ 356 for

8 declared, (Graveney 116).
Indians versus Sussex
Indians 186 (Wood
» for 34 and 191 for 8,
SuUssOK fi. csscsves 220 (Ramchand
5 for 67).
Northamptonshire versus

Glamorgan
Northamptonshire ........ 356
(Brown 145).
Glamorgan .......0....... 154 for 4



‘Time














Scessive

Final,

Arsenal *

What of the Arsenal? How

‘long can veterans like Joe Mercer

and George Swindin carry on?
This question has been posed at
the beginning of the past five
seasons, but still these grand old
slagers not only manage to hold
their places in the side, but con-
tinue to delight the crowds with
fine displays. Indeed Joe Mercer
played as well, if not better, last
season than he did when he cap-
tained England ten years ago.

Arsenal's worries lie not in
defence, but “for’ard.” Last
season the whole of the attack

rested almost entirely on the wee
Jimmy Logie at inside right.
Players like Roper, Lishman, Cox
and Holton were good enough on
their days, but those days did not
occur sufficiently frequently for
the supporters’ liking.

Arthur Milton, the young out-
side right who lost form after
being prematurely rushed into
the England side against Austria
1 November, regained confidence
toward the end of the season, and
should soon earn a regular place
in the side,

League champions Manchester
United, having won the honour
after being second four times in
live seasons, will be all out for
further triumphs. Manager Matt
Busby thas a judicious blend of
youth and experience at his com-
mand and, in skipper Johnny
Carey, one of the shrewdest tacti-
cians in the game! It was the
switching of Carey from right
back to right half which was the
turning point in United's success
last season. At half back he was
able to “general’ both defence and
attack. Hesdid both with the
utmost efficiency.

Tottenham

Tottenham, seeking their second
League championship in

seasons are full of confidence and |

good spirits after their close-
season tour of Canada during
which they twice defeated Man-
chester United.

Their strength lies in no part:-
cular sphere. They are strong
all-round, and play as a team, and
not eleven individuals, Their
quick short-passing game is seen
to best advantage on firm
grounds. This was the reason for
their lapse mid-way through last
season, when heavy rain made
pitches slow and heavy.

During the summer the White
Hart Lane pftch has been relaid
and an extensive draining system
installed. If this succeeds in
keeping the ground
the mid-winter

By Jimmy Hatlo |



three | Season

|
|
|

firm during |
months Spurs



ALEC BEDSER

TABLE TENN. ‘NIS:

‘’dad Team To Meet
Everton—Y.M.C.A.

The visiting Table Tennis team
from the San Fernando Zone of
the Trinidad and Tobago Amateur
Table Tennis Association wilt
meet a combined Everton-
YÂ¥.M.C.A. side at the Y.M.C.A.
Naval Hall tonight. The match
begins at 8.00 o’clock.

The visitors have so far de-
feated all the club teams they met,
but lost the First and Second
Tests. Tomorrow night the Final
Test will be played and there will
also be an exhibition of Ladies’
Doubles and Singles.



CYCLING

FAUSTO COPPI, the Italian
cycling ace who twice won the
Tour de France, in 1949 and
again this year, has had second
thoughts on retiring. Riding at
Perpignan, France, last week, he
collided with the Spanish rider
Bernado Ruiz, and fractured his
left shoulder-blade and _ collar-
bone. After the accident Coppi
ennounced his intention to retire.
He has since changed his mina,
and says he hopes to race aga‘n
this year.

»

will be a good
for like

Cup proposition,
Newcastle, they have
excellent reserve strength,

In the past, Portsmouth have
not had the wealth of reserve
talent at Fratton Park that there
is at White Hart Lane. But with
the advent last season of such
youngsters as right back Gunter,
centre-forward Henderson and
goal-keeper Dore, things should
be different this season, :

So much for the ‘big five’. What
of the others? Can they end the
monopoly of honours so long en-
joyed by Arsenal, Tottenham
Manchester United, Newcastle and
Portsmouth—-since the war these
clubs between them, have won
the League Championship five
times, and the F.A. Cup four,

If good football brings its
reward, Bolton, Preston and
Wolves are sides which will be
well in the running for honours,

All play attacking football,’
and have three of the best for-
ward lines in the country, Wolves
being strengthened by the close-
signing of Taylor, the
England ‘B’ international former-
ly with Luton,

Of the three Preston appear to
be the best bet, For they have
a sound defence to back up their
excellent attack in which the in-
somparable Tom Finney at out-
side-right, is always a _ potential
match-winner,






Consider all the





the 1,403 miles in last year’s race.
which was won by 23-year-old Ian
Steel,
Wolverhampton,

Alee Bedser, the burly Surrey
giant with the size 12 boots and
a heart to match. burst upon the
cricketing world with a vengeance.
One of identical twins, he cap-
tured 22 Indian wickets in his
first two Tests and in the final
game, added another couple to
bring his bag for the series up to
24 at an average of just over 12
runs apiece.

| tne first Indian innings Bedser
claimed seven wickets, which un-
til Valentine of the West Indies
came along in 1950, was the best-
ever performance by a bowler in
his first Test. Valentine at Old
Trafford took 8 wickets, which
was a magnificent achievement
notwithstanding that the wicket
was taking spin.

After Bedser’s early success
there was great confidence in
the England team which left for
the first post-war visit to Aus-
tralia. But things did not work
out as planned. The English-
men met batsmen such as Brad~
man, Hassett, Barnes, Brown,
Harvey and Morris who were in
their finest form and the bowling
was severely punished.

Rough Treatment

Bedser came in for his share of
rough treatment, and although he
captured 16 Test wickets, they
worked out at over 54 runs each.

The fond hopes of the British
public were rudely shattered.
Bedser was written off as just a
flash in the pan. But what was
overlooked by the stay-at-home
critics was the reason for Bedser’s
lack of success. Although a pace
bowler, he bowled more overs
than any other member of the

side and nearly two hundred more ¢

than the other two pace men,
Edrich and Voce combined,

The difference that adequate,
bowling support could have made|
te his figures was illustrated when
the next M.C.C. team went to
Australia in 1950. With Trevor



Railey providing an-admirable foil, | $

at just over 16 runs each,
Own Style

he captured 30 Australian ay y

His great hearted bowling

a No. 1 favourite wherever he
goes. Some liken his style to
Maurice Tate but Bedser owes
allegiance to no-one. He developed
his own style and, with a run up
which is short for a bowler of his
pace, is able to conserve his energy
and keep going for long periods
without a break.

Last week at the Oval, Alec
epened a new chapter in his
already fine career when against
Nottingham he became the first
bowler to complete 1,000 wickets
in post-war cricket, In this match
he also achieved his own personal
best figures, taking 8 wickets for
18 runs. Nottingham, who re-
quired 131 runs to save an innings
defeat. were all out for 51. Bedser’s
match analysis was 13 for 46.

It is strange to recall, now that
he is firmly established as Eng-
jand’s opening bowler, that, just as
easily, his twin brother Eric might

were medium-paced bowlers when
they joined the Surrey staff but
deciding that there was not much
future for the two of them in this
department, Eric changed to off-
spinners. Since then he has blos-
somed out as a batsman also and
this season has played an equal
_part with his brother in Surrey's
successful bid for the Crampion-
ship.

—L.E.S.



Soccer Results

LONDON, Aug. 21.
Soccer results for Wednesday:
Glasgow Cup, First Round—Pat~
ick 2, Clyde 0. Ulstar Cup; Col-
Crusaders 1.—C.P.

eraine 1,

Features
We offer!

STYLE
WORKMANSHIP

QUALITY
SUITINGS

You Surely Must
Decide on

P.¢C. 8. MAPFEL
& (CO. LID.

as the “TOP” SCORERS
IN TAILORING.



this time,
days.

the cyclists in 14 staging towns—
some
halls at crowded seaside resorts.

ganisation of marshals, stewards,
timekeepers, masseurs, mechanics,
service vans; and cars for officials
linked by radio.
te

roadside
even more are expected.

and goes to Southsea,
and north to Weston-super-Mare.

ing,

at
home and abroad has made Bedser | ¥

have filled the bill, Both of /











a 6ft Scot who works in

There are 16 days for the tour
against last year’s 14

















There are 2,000 beds booked for
in schoolrooms or church

And behind all this is an or-

Last year millions are estimated
have watched the Tour from
‘galleries’, This year

The course startg from Hastings,
Weymouth,

After an overnight ferry cross-
the competitors begin their
fourth stage at Cardiff, go on via
Aberystwyth, Blackpool, and Car.
lisle to Glasgow,

The Scots will aee them striking
north-east to Dundee, then south
to Edinburgh and Newcastle,

Through England, the cyclists
will stage at Scarborough, Not-
tingham, and Norwich before
finishing at Alexandra Palace.

The winner will get the biggest
single share of £1,000 offered as
prize money.

But each day there will be races
within the race; prizes for each

COMFORT

AND FINE LINENS ADD TO YOUR
WE OFFER:

LINEN SHEETING

Ly,
















; : OU ths, WIE: O53 6 i ia eee ee. $7.49 yard
tage, and prizes for short up-hill
hie af pre-selartel points— RE PEM Go iiss srko av cee Us by Sp REE $5.89 yard
known as primes. LINEN SHEETS
= laa dina pa ae ana Be BOG A ka Ndi cu aNacebecaseep ees $18.82 each
$9S9S95959999599969999S;, H.S. LINEN PILLOW CASES
$ NOU AMEN iba rice s. Fok cae ip Mia so aes aw Oakes $3.77 each
% atnre te uence Be GRU or rk ee tees saa $2.24 each
sa ba eas ohoe H.S. AMERICAN BAG TOP
ME. GEORGE PARRIS Be Ms ah aie Uh Bey a eM RCL a wise k $3.31 each
(Bhapheaper) LS. WHITE HUCKABACK TOWELS
At his residence,
CHURCH VILLAGE, St. PHTLIP ee aE ic hiss ARP See come ey $1.02 each
On SUNDAY, 8ist AUGUST, 1062 WOO MMM 8d Whew hd aah eue'e, OAL Weare wowed ce ectae anes $1.11 each
ppomipats slates es Atay t ond SR OR MB cn ee tes toon cee MeNeS eae $1.12 each
oC ae WHITE TURKISH TOWELS
"Pisano ‘Invite Sour Priewas Oi it. Ot ae $2.25 each
16,8. 52—3n MN ON MEE TS ee sw ciee o qiane cd yam eau a ace $1.99 each
“rola tlh fe, _ git RAUR De War OER, faster Soe “EVM Dips. Re $1.55 each
BE PREPARED : ’
CAVE SHEPHERD & (O., LOD.
for any emergency.
Always keep a Bottle 10, 11, 12 & 13, Broad Street

MAGI

HEALING OIL

in your home. Use it
for Cuts, Bruises,
Strains and Sprains.

Take it for Colds,
Coughs, Colic, Sore
Throat. Its your first aid
kit in a bottle.










At this time of the
year we specialize
in filling

Vacation Bags!

With everything for men, the selection
cevers both inside and out!; The quality
ot course, will long outlast the Q
memory of your vacation!

POTTERY (3. | a

Pyjamas
“ore Socks
"Oe S*SS Ties ete.









in a wide Variety
TEA and COFFEE SETS,
WALL VASES,
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Y. De LIMA
& CO. LTD.

20 BROAD ST., and at
MARINE GARDENS

3
on xy

as

\C.B. Rice & Ce.

of Bolton Lane





THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LTD.

White Park Road, Bridgetown



ENGINEERS, BRASS and IRON FOUNDERS
Works contain rnodern appliances for the execution of

first-class work of all kinds, and ocperially to
. SUGAR MACHINERY and S$

Ba ARBADOS iF
ARERIES TH.

Dial 4758

THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY {TD.

Phone : 4546, 4650 Workshop

JAMES

STREET

Phone 4528 Stores Dept:

Dealers in AGRICULTURAL MACHINERY and
18 GENERAL ENGINE ROOM STORES
i F of all Description
s Sass | IRRIGATION PROJECTS, PUMPING EQUIPMENT
Pumpkin Pies $ and ELECTRICAL INSTALLATIONS A SPECIALTY
6 ¢ each 3 For
A Satisfaction, Quality and Service
Contact

9906-0








PAGE 1

PAGI. sl\ BARBADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY. AUGUST tZ. IIS. CLASSIFIED ADS. ri ijH.ii s\i>;s 1*1 m i< \om TiuraoNC 2 so* l>lrD • %  MBM •MOT*U. I Pull 11 2i. iMt. rvi. Boa*. Dtpanaw I* lat* resudencv i Roe* Bar %  "> %  • Pupnl >M< Fair View 1! • AS* II' r~i I jqt Ui*aare lo ihe weeiuui .n-n. *• Xeturan HiwIB iwlf*-. Pe> '-. a Ut IN MKMOHIAM LOVT A IOIMI LOST inn BAU AUTOMOTIVE CAJt—One Ford Zepher. a. at*! * %  *-v* •• ml-* Phc*** MM. ftCTMAK A TAYLOR-!! 'lARAOE ITT. JO •if—Jn •n ISM cit\ rigiii F..r I "e Chan leal.v injrd Apply B. A limp .- cii* cottage. Si John 17 I M—At TAB IMI ,ns IMI Anattn TO. In w] Mod condition, don* %  .••n mile, pear* 7 M* rralf Caras* Roebuck Street Bad Ml rt H w--si. CArl*I'rrfK-l Ford lata la" ^i.di tl*>n^ *r*o act* AueMo A-78 IMI W| rood roiMf itmn too. Mtn CBI• #^J*itf VCM Dial MSI .TAK1 TI.KlTt B'.K B* n TSBV—TSS Fitidei i>! H Appl Chelae* O.ir.ige 1M0 ltd Phon* MM It 8 St An IIOVSKS MORBCAUHF-The deniable rMtoent. Mor*orrb*' Worr-ilnf wit in Rov. l-r.-tre t Bediooma Toilet nd Bat ip-Utra. Do*ntUira Dianlng roo" P'n.ruf. Boom.Ha.I 1 eit.-a looina. Bai iTotal, large RTU'. eeevanta roarFat MMulin >PPh Manag**. Bmpi. Trt**tr* al %  ISr GLECTB1CAL "MWICAM ELECTRIC HTTP TfTT?> Dlecount tor 4 month, uw Owner h.i letumrd I" lUtti Telephone K-SM SI t 5*-*.. Hull %  .( %  i iv*. M .ill-nl Amplifier—hat* t.-.! MM ,irlt • Fo.le ( rWIt Jd = 1 IT i doub r.H %  UVKSTOCK SEAL ESTATE CLARENDONBlec* I ovio.il, • Stephen ( I ,iTt ii* land LB NOTICE toil**-.* I Hutchla. /) > Appl II IKKMI OBa id Stui.gi. *ti th.li .. m. Bedroorr.. Shediool i CeTtlAc>t*> ..r.-l Kikti- MIMt-M. B-tm*d in an.i mil atao iU. ajau window* P.ir splj: Cutliba*PTiIllp n i w in iu or BT II ti ii -a M> U. PMt M Nurw at ... %  A-walww.* Will br t-, 5-riM? =;rj w ut,,r M ciiaUIWd aa %  Mid.(r and mnl lorward -ppllealloni Ihrlr Bapbi.. a* wall aa BMW fmuv.wi IHBM N*ar Rl*. rut HXUMITAUB m M ic ai th i.,. d( Whlta Pa.* and Country Koad lai ilirig im atiowl IH.MO aaum* f**l ii lan.1 Th* lloua* contain. OaUM>, tw livln*iwmi. aiming room, riant bad rwMM, Ihr dfM.infl ittmi. -*r .n. abKlrM Mf.nl t Mpar M H an/ day b* >*rn ln and fawr. li.e abov* will b* Ml up lor aal* • pubhr compatHMm ai our OHU*. LucaMirat. on Fiidav tn* tlnd day o< /wruf CARfUNGTON MALV its-: n The -urc*a| u i randldat* wll quirau In aa*vm* %  rpumaat. IM / ny furlhar particular* may Mined from In* Paro-hi I Ti Clerk la Ina I %  Ml RAIBAlltK Mill tmiANii lfT POUff SEA AND AIR TRAFFIC In ( arlisltI.AND At O.nn E>IIIMA f*i.ria tTtl M %  ? USD-IW -t | Ii. .o Mm \ ~ I UM> lata Elaai VIMiai :and will be r. I (or *ai* b I'jblit CompalltMp al ati -Ac*. Jam-* Sli.e.1 on Fiidav Wi, usual. IBU. al 1 m lor further particular* apply to Mi W Harpar, Lak** Folly YFARWOOD A BOVCE. HOIKIIOT* IIB-ln K-.nl**n BfHhwaile. the IHWIITI* al he lau ChrkMophar AufurtiM WraHwnkhat, having made nwn dtp—Ulan \. 1*.*00 on the life of fhe 'ill ChrUlophet AUMMBwl Brailhwalte ia hewn lost and havingmad* applrraIon 1^ the Dl.ector* for lb* payment of )• %  fivnln due urlder Ihr lama NOTiCr ih*.bv given that unleH ,n. *MI*-tliin la ralaad */l)Mn on* month the Mid PolH-y monle<<• -n C K BROan teerela'y IS n B-n Daer-nod %  <-., United Pilgrim. M"" "'" " % % % %  •*" %  !" % %  • % %  n Brt. Mfcr, M I,--. M aana from RnU.li *• •..,:* undrt Capl Manhall Cal> [At. UPB .-IM I. | M Mkcoar, Own*.. A-, %  I*" R "-JMH from New Vk J Vvrila Roa*et Thorn S Trya gjg rroi.. Moeitreai Agent* DaCaa-i MAIL NOTICES ind IMil lanadia. Cruiaae wui M oMaad a* lh O-rneral Pr*t Ofn.. aa ua-dar and Kegt*.ed Malta al S p_ nd Drili;. vr MAIM Mt M-rtm-.i. ra, UMUw K %  • < OMkaral 1*0*1 Ofllea Panel and Ramtalarad Mall* at I P tarn ON MM Sd Auga-I, MaBi for Poininu *, MavM ant) Bt KltU b> tn M v Mraiafea will B* cloaad %  the Oanara. Pw*1 OaBra a. undar "II at II ino. %  Regiitai.. aod Ordinary Mail at Augu.1. IB) SHIPPING NOTICES .'i u Seawell Aineata f. It VI I rraai rmiNiiiAD John I Hun It... Rolah. CV NOTICE LUMtM. UWIIM I III BUNGALOWBltualad at Btu i Te.raee ) Badroot-. I Tollol ith. Garage etc Available !•< Per E P Cdghltl Phona 8H TV % U~*i> .1 HaO V.ONAHCH" — Pwpact St JameApplr Rnkrhlnaon A: BanAeM IIIUWAXTI: HORSES -Three v*ar old il'ormighht' t .me.' hv Pink Flw Ooldan rain try Oold Bridce t':i nd*d-I -ear old thn.ouphloed f So**i Vlal*t" by FU1I Bloom e F I Uaby bv Fairway EMO lardad Aprl li. Eduaid. Ftiona 1UB M %  SB-an TI1URCI5DONon lha i well* Coail. Chil*t b> appomunani n I Mra Reach Dial *M1 The above wt'l ba aat up foi aale % %  lui.iic compatitlon al our office. Jama st,.i. „n Fiidav ihe JBlh Aurxl Mi -1 M p.n KVTCHIKSOM h BANFTELD It %  S*--*' NOTICE i* har**-/ glv* that all; perwn* having an% debt n. claim: arali'Bt or aflectlng the eatale of Edmund Q h Lawtrnc* Dear, daceaaed, lat* of Hind*. A mrlHi of Balnr VinhaelBMai duh Furgutw. A Ui,,. (•" %  Odin*. L fwtara. K Peter*. M Pet -lord. *> Moed" li .M.. BMi. I Da-Rllya. w R*lpv*, A *"" n aada A. Baadt, K Farnum P. Ilolu.lo. B B a np alt, J Rcnnatl, T> Vaajwoofl. O -TMUrMMii Fraa. I.UNADA O G'oig*. O Field. .R AuduMlna C AUBuaUM C Seigorel A S*ao .et K. Lang Faeaa \ ea.aaebii Ornoa. Ouiikymio OWhaa. %  UrgartU Ochoa. HraUli Orwaa, Diana Jon. Harnarwia*. O-wla Hainan ff lla.nandei. Raul Hernandat. He.nandcr. Jantne Her.iandai. ROYAL NETHERLANDS STEAMSHIP CO. rc;. .AILIM. run* V s sTENTOR land Aug ..i itru -.' s HEilA 1Mb Ai %  ••ii-iiii f ORAJUEBTAD Plh .A||.|NC. TO TBlMIi.li FAKAMAKIRO AXD BBJTrrtM GUIANA M a BONAIRX OUt Augiial. 1M3 M 5 PlawTFQB Mh September Iff"; >\IIJNC. TO TBDfUffAD CCJBACAO i s BOBKOOP Itlb Augn.t. ISM '! S HF3IA 1Mb Bwptambar. IBM %  P MUSSOH. BON A CO LTD III MBOONIff • %  N ASSOCIATION | Tele Hi Mil Canadian National Steamships Glae.a (•land, who dl*d In H .. iB-i-i i.tiaUare re -T !" '~ ••' % % %  ---* %  %  •e^— U*B*.. IU, Wahrman PUPB— Tf. iji Bull Tarrlar Pupa, no -:t.*-hl* offer refined Air rl Roger.. Near Riee* Bt Philfp FFI.P i nJENITUU CLTRJC -A 1.4' ( *ialifi'alien* Ah ph. .itinn* ll-WXl nan in .( :.IOK ova-tBnrm"Fo"i %  .ntaHa*. Appkt in paraon wWh Taatt .rilal* lo Manage. SD 8 M-J., j | .JBrTI')N rVq.ul.ed by reapon.lbl V.i i;| man tflth knowledae nf Aif .>'' Aciti-lvne Wrldlim and EeetrXal Appi" f -rraae Inlcrvierepl I A,Krat* R<* Ml. 10 8 It—An M!SCE!.I.ANEOnS 1-ADtIB COATWrlla "Cowt" IM—M tto Advor.tr Advtg Dapl II • Ml MidvrtM, la wining \ i. In naed of a nui n.an'. Lan*. Co Ml TAKE NOTICE IN STAN TIN A .. sriHUMi PP/3DUCTS INI M)NA1 IM URrViBA'-TTt lM Ii., ...IK.. N>I ISA. MaimU.IUi Ihe irritate*! Inn of trad* i HI %  I' 1 "A'' of IteaMlei < ....! %  JIIV. aflcr one MMIM from tha ll't da> of hw i.iilea. Hinte peraon ehall %  ny ofTtca of opposition of awatl rsaaM 11... The Irade mark can ba **en n appileatton at my dfnee. Il.t.d Im. Mth day of AiiR.ial. 1M3 ii. wn I i dU Hegl.tur of Trad* Mark. M.B.8B-8B wM>-Sto-? FURNITURE AUCTION • lITBtVfllUM QABUntHI %  •• % %  i fOABY On %  I rnh Aroun -abl* in Ui 'YaiUr toakv Fcldlna Cia %  I.RM.M. %  Orca. A • MI IN -(.Ml 0 1 *d work raj all ATTn* a A T-. i i good' %  n*-l Oak. Dun.l. HWel a. W*.d* Card Table A >.* | %  %  i crtam A gi*... 1 i*-a Makkt 1 riu\ Srh.it. T.ay, .,,.. Burnar "YAlOlt Ii %  ..i.a. Weigh .'M """ BaMl mim Container*.. BlaclrkKOTI WEW WORLD" Cm Cookar IM fV.i %  JAfK'ii'V p ,. „.. si,,, A'.i !.%  laakwe ST"Tibl* Ti'inltTable A %  %  * Mat* Garden Toola. Ian. i -n't IAII MO*. I Adder. WaMHnian. H'WrtA inai.' -rtb*r InliV1TTIONEERS y €>. IBM 4640 PISBtsllaM %  FI-RNITURE roUar mum All flr*1 i" Mr' Ci i*kffMS -rUSrFT.t.ANFOTIS COTTOtj Fiiglnh -vi %  %  n,-H.n ah.1 hundi-d |H. ...tiliil dealgn' .-.. %  KIR PA LAN I 81. Rwor T7 8 \1 -Ii, CAR ACCrSRORIFR -Buhhar Matting i.H,,. i>.rt. milhl Pnl-Iie. ChanfMI hi*t*ra. ^h***p clnth. Whl.k bmean*. <" and Hlati lenalon •rffa. Bonnet I'iHlallon* are all thing, thai -n>ir r. ray naad Mav be obtained from On, -. Oataga 'IMfli Umltad Phone IBM It. a W-tD i 1 i A Co Mil tt'ifBEWlVni— Do you have Floor P-ohlami whk-li you do not warn lo B*> | .ihle lo ovarenmaF"rd-t tho.e tro.ibl— Phona Vt*B. K J Humal-Bmlth A Co i.td Buds* Str**t T and thav will %  > glM/Advice al orry loo plea 1 ohHsBtion wl Vxparfa Hewareh P'ant of S C r li.r Barm*. Wiaronaln. %  Win I BMI MACHINERY-On* tli f 1rrlnaed foned lubticat'd MaM d-yilsplf RVbe\. F"tii" h. II li i* BI IM lb. nr*Mut Two it' .mall r* Id .lartlng Dlaael Inglne. 1* ...I lit HiOne HI Ft% St" I roll-f t-i.i romple'e with C B flooring. %  *•* %  , -.'.I IBf "STUK." IXOVftB TStniTHHIl "Flo.enre 1 and Bi"-*' Modela arol %  m Utirla Da.h A Co TOdo; "VALLAMBROSA* Conttltutlon Ro C|.po*lle qu*n- Path All madai' IMYMMjM. For full Pattkrulai. lion* SltT Itl.a*—An I i:ii A ol lb* aald *.Ut*. A Co, Bolienara. No Sl.eat. Bridgetown, 11*1 dar of October ital* I ahall proceed iraet* ol tha deceaaad amonai in* parna. erllllad th*irto having r*ard only t. tveh claimi 9* which 1 .hall than have li-v. nolle* and 1 will no! ba llabla fat HernaMti. Jaau* Alvarat, Lula ir. Maurn-' ii • % %  Mi an %  I I a.la i Roebuck %  J""** rbebaid Mauuuna;. Mra. aW iJfiVMVbV Mar^.rel Manning. Mr. Oonaid Palm-. d lo Ihe iind*rBigi%td g^, JOYCTt rTkBTTR ad m mi.tr.tfi r are Inrbucted bv Mr. C W ivn*. of Brlttnn. Collage, nrllton ii. lo oB*r for Mle about MAW ajui' rt of land forming pail ol he. pio|> ly known M Brlllona ColUSe Th. id li eneloard on ihrea UaV MOM halt and II a view over lha harbovr mill i.e -old a* enq.ii i IUI i Ihe UIHI>I —-.. !" CAKHINUTori • SBAI V Sli • \UCT10N JNDER THE IVORY HAMMER KltK'UOIl* from • uguat Sand al alaaara. ( helaao Gai Plnlold Streal. Hi IMI "MaySc Trlbiiiph-Car (only don* ".(BO m Ileinaged In BCCIdenH 'li IMI I* I f t/nd.rd. In parted working ord*. '* ill pa Tetm. eah VINCENT aRlFTITII. Auction*" UNDER THE SILVER HAMMER TUESDAY Mh th* i my put thereof of di> tubutcd lo an) ci claim I .hall not Ihen nave na> nrdlc* And all paraona Indebted to the HI rJ.I.le ar* teoueatad to **tlia Ibei .u.ieblryfne*. wHhoul d*lay ,. Mth dav "' Aji 1 "'. "" 2 IAUA JOYCE FlMJTi.P. AdmuiiilratilH of Eitat* 0< Hmural Lawron.^ De-f. oacaaerd Pnklir Oflkiil Sale iThe rr...( M...I..I. Aal I—i III >•> I Ml Vnri day ol Auguit IMI o'clock in Ihe aflarrifion 81 * %  ** lo the highe.t %  Ks l-Vggoii Plat llh I>> older "I Mi .... i... i..-1 II ut H. k.. %  1,1. h nil,u.l. Ill and Comer Chau. Plant noon. Oinam-nl Table .11 In Mahog Pali.te.1 Tablaa. Divan ami 'inmi. Ciiitalna. Buh m .. chair*. OUaa and China T**ep Sleep M.iltraaaa.; MB,-> UIW I'.lni.d llaaaaa, Cr* Man. Congoleuit. oard. Eire Toa.te. .nd Belli. i nn.u, Stov*> Clac I llurnar Hot Plalr Kitchen Utan.ll.. Book.. Cam-, Co*. lie Radio and oUiar llania Hale II SO rt ork Term. eab HIANKLR, TROTMAN OO.. AactloDren ii it ti %  din On Prid*.' Ihe %  t the hour af t -111 bo Bold at hldder for any -r*i*ed value All inai certain pie,* ol LAI i Mj ritlmatlon 4 Acre. I HO-KK 14'. Pairhea iltunte at Crane Q'P In Parnh nf si Philip hi.tting and bounding "" land* of Cliff Cnliage. on landi uuw or lata of Sarab Blade*, on land* no* ol lat* of one Bralhwerl*. on landa now or lala of AdiUna Wilkln.on on land. itOvj or lat* of Mary Carter on a private mid 11 feet wide and on th* Public Rood lo. pettier with in* m'Biuas** or Dwelling llo'.n*", caTle-l "Cran* Vlee." and "C-ine 'Vll.aneepeclively. Huiidini'. Ac. np. I pralaod M foUowa i Tha whole "• of land Hi. .11 bu...l .rat lo TWELVE THOUSAND POUNDS £ II.MQ 0 • %  Allarhad from Join Mra Joyce Palrm Mi... Janet Palmi ABJUYALS — Bl B W I A ON TIIHDAT Frsa. Trinidad, lion. R Kinn* 1 . C Duiant. F E Johnson; K Johnson. M Johiuor. H D. John-on. A D* Lima; J. Thomaa. H Thoniai. O Thomn.. C Tboaria.. V Thomaa, A Stov*n. USrABTURtS Bt B.W.I.A UN HI 11M..IIAI Trinidad: 'MI Heclor Pirei-Marqu*.. .!> Kerei-More/ue*. My ma Pereaattwrd F-t*l*nie. Benriqu* | Proapem uujue.. Morol.i DejatiahMM .oa. OooBrey Martin. Bod. u k Alan ll.i.lllekl. Hubert Burke, -l.kll I.!-..**. bni/r HnUinii Manuel Hurbe, IrtlBna Hurbe. A Hurbe | lii.rlw \ k-torla Svnl-ler. All* Yuaalul. Bradeo/. Hafleed Moharam.-d, u.ly. Mohammad I %  d llnnnlbal. Muriel Odk Johp Sen.en. .1 liar. John Tannr Nichol-. FurnlvalfQt and IO.aiU. MtlBtaa X B —2&% Depo.R tn be pdld on day -i pBtaJtSB. T HEAinjeYi I.UH'OH R LICENSE NOTICI... appllc.llon of OlnrU BBBBMBk snopktvper of Roern-rk street, hold*, of i.i.aor Uciiw NO 8M ol iM. g.a.it.v lo llkhaid Henty In re-pecl of a Wai ... everlte ahop near reatdenc* al tiler Ion St Oiti'l'. lor pernitaalon lo UH ,..d Liquor UMAM at Mario Vale; tni I boti .elmek Str I flooi CM of I n ihr P*U .i-l'i-wrBr no' Trliriaek Fn. n-Hi n*r now arrtetna tn rla"'-""* Bf Bl' i. a few d>v. after mihllcallne U. Cnataet 1-n OaU Co Ade-v lateal Brpie***Btlv. ItAJS t'< Iurdon T.I SUB — K CI f II "SIJK B cnl-i-'" 'i"t lOI.S l.i S-ck S.nll'.n tool. Illpa .crewdrlve.. Cablnel hTartr di rewM Sllp'olnt pllera. Comhlnapllera, Harkuwa. Tappet epannera Oel vnur iro'ilrem-nt* ai Cn*t** *|e ilMSi Ltmlte*] Phon* *" 7 I building Augu.t. IDS? Iffth ORirriTH .wIC* M*|l*l>Ble. Dlit "A. MARIA SAMUELS. lor Applie.rit B -Thia application will be ra ,i Court to be hi Pone* Ckmrt. Dlatrlct A Mi Monday |.i di ol Seplember. IffW. a o.loek. a %  Q B aRJrrrTH AS. Polio. MBSUliale. Out 'A Liqt'OK LICENSE NOTICE The appUeaUoiI I Donal Camphi ,1 M.rckant %  • aT.C.O.. ColMl*t %  ,,. nnink.li to aall Spirit*. BtB-l I u,.o.a At "t ground Soor ol JoruiBon Mai Qncrv Building. Broad Slreei. C1I> Dstew IhU tlat day ol Augu.t. IMI To;-0. B OHirFTTM SaO^. lor Appi leant S n Thl. application will be eojitid Cllg S> .1 M i It ArundeB. Mtlntwe Conr.id. Lellny tor. Clarice j-. i Jordan. ..ilioberia. Il.ny Hcberu. I'atrtein IS. I'ddlvii Field Mirv Field. Georse Field ll'ABTI'BKS — ar B W 1 A ON III PJUAY -.aidor St flair "dfruitlu. King. .1 Biathwalt* I'.reta Blaa HtiG*rald Lawronco. Mrs Edith %  Aat*. Mr nston. Mi Vemo. BicwMl.. Aiigelln A.n.ttt.nii Mr .(of; Mr Jam*. Braoch Mr BMB8I ^le. Marlon. Ha.l. Mr, Ooorgy GOVERNMENT NOTICE Attention it drawn to the Control of Prices (Defence) (Amendment) Order, 1952. No. 30 which will be published In thr Official Gazette of Thursday, 21t August, 1952. S. Under this Order the maximum wholesale and retail leUlnii prices of "Beef—Salted" and "Mpat— Fresh & Frozen—Vesl" are at follows: — /^Dlgestlve"^ Upsets After extCBMve research, DWitt's L^boratones haee K duced Dc Witt'i Antacid blets, new companionproduct to their renowned Powder. They sre the rnost conyenient way of checking; digeative disorders awav from home No i.alrt required juii diisolve one or two on the tongue (or prompt relief %  ii-. %  • km*. Pleasanttasune; Oe Witt's Antacid TsMets are Bctarater* cell-seated tot (rcshneti. In rutnde irar-orf strips for pocket or handbag Standard Sue, 24 Tablets. EconemT Site, 60 TabJetp. SOI'TflBOtNT) ANAIllA.N tliClSEN ANATIIAN CONSTflLCTOi* 1.ADY RODNEY ANADIAN CNALLEN-OFJ; LADY MONTH IIOI II CANADIAN CHAl^LENGEB LADY MBLSON CANADIAN CftUI fUOt CANADsAN CONBTBUCTOB LADY RODNEY efaBleeal ii ABA SI Aug. Slept. llSepI MScpt %  AMI M Aug. Sept. ISSevl. r NBlAOrf It • : — m Aug. — a Sept BS-pi M SepBB Bapt. 17 Sepl SaUa rbada* to Ml IS s-^i %  SS*pl t Oeti i-1 ai Oct. u Oet so Oct. M Aug. I Sepi •fc-a S Oct. IS Oet. SI Oel SI Oct. Wm fartbar parMeolnr*. apply M— GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD.Ajcnti. ',-,-.'.-.-.-.-,-,'.-.'.-.-..-.'.'. '.'.'srsvy,^ C'G'TRANSATLANTIOUE •sailtailS freiB rM>B0iaamBOB to rtuadsloope, M*r*inlqur, Barbados, rrlnldaal. La Gnalra. Caraeao dfe JanuUra Airtvas BBvTBAdloS "COlvOMBIB" .. 31st July, 1992 .. 13th Aug., 1952 '''DC ORASSE" . 22nd Aug., 1952 . 3rd Sept, 1952 %  Not calling at Guadeloupe SAILING FROM BARBADOS TO r-UROPE From Barbadee AfTtvas SoalkaaiBieai "DE GRASSE" . 8th Aug., 1952 . )6th Aug., 1952 "COLOMRTE" .. 24th Aug., 1952 .. 5th Sept, 1952 "DE GRASSE" .. lBth Sept., 1952 .. 26th Sept, 1952 'Sailing direct to Southampton R. BL JONES A CO., LTD : eSvW'.V//*,V,W/-W.M -At en la. ww>BfrtieeI*>.'*-,VOO'^O^VV>*e'-'X FYFFES LINE T> 9 ARTICLE i WHOLESALE PRICK I RETAIL PRICE (not mots than) (not more than) lleef—Salted: (a) Extra Family, Nsvil Piste, Roundt. Brisket. (h) Flank Flank or Boneles* Meat—Fresh 4 Frozen: Veal: — (a) Cutlets (without bone) (b) All other cuti $88 1" per brl. of 200 lbs or 47c. per lb. In lots %  ? not lew than 25 lb* |84 40 per brl. of 200 lbs or 45c. per lb. In not less than 25 lbs 52c per lb. 9c. per lb. per lb. per lb. <-VVV>00O-e^^*e>r>^e*>iS*.^->-l.M. V. DAERWOOD T.S.S. GOLFITO will be arriving from thampton on Saturday 23rd August, at noon, and will be sailing the same evening for Trinidad. arrive %  Itarbnclo. on 1111 KSIIW .luiu-i Slat mil will be nillnf on SUN. DAY. Annul ttlh for St Lutli. si. Vincent. Ortud.. Arab., Reeepttn. P&jocarei a. IMtikt tl.1.92—tn. I'i WILKINSON & HAYNES CO., LTD. AgtnU. Phone 4230 padH 21it August, 1951. i i Ad.ocaic Sutiiinery ; lOlt IMMIKS ,,e^.e,e^.e.^e^Xe*i->Oaa*V'*'.*-^e^ SO0O4 Seven shtea of .. PRIMUS IIIOW TORCHES lor >.u lo lelrct from, price, rule* from $17.40 lo $46.76 raw i I:\M\I EMPORIUM Corner Broad A Tuder Street* iQaSa rsr afttta^aVjarii i^ ^ MIIVIIMI COat ACCOti* fuMrtM h*t IITAHT UluilKliriMI An lnlei A.MWiate oFell., i jnt> n.aher I rflth •:p*rt iMMre OUAIlANTM I OUBAM in Kngi.ah. Co. .mere la I and av. *uhie-iow: IllWIVii MOBNINn OF BALK 4 MORRIS Chair* Paeblea Chair A*encru.lr. Dli ln| Tabl*. 4 Dining S .let—rd. Occa. Tuble. rtaiible Bed and Spring Dreaalng Tabl* WW i'i Slool Ml Tl'F ABOVE IN MAHOGANY eubll 't FI'Hrle Frig Pr.ll ip. [| • ir .•!. % % %  Baf RADIO. China CalUnet. Telephone Tabl*. larder I Burner Tle Model GAS Range. Pnmte-1 Ctadle. Child'. Chair. ChUdran'. Painted Furniture iDlnlna Table. ma Jroti Bed. and Sprmga. Iron B-d and %  Uiglel, 1 stnlp Mattroa*. ei. i(cher. Rug.. Mlac China and Ware Raroaanr um. Metal sv.i-.ii chair, ivi panlera' Tool*. 1 boa CI %  • Tort. Lanei Mower Step Ladder and other lt*m. AiJtrrioNKriw JeslkiB V|. Dl--e.li ft Ce>. I'h.nie 4640 Plantalion. FtiiilJiii BOROUGH OF SAN FERNANDO VACANT POST-TOWN ENGINEER Applications InvitedUnivir ity Grsdugtes. Corporate Members of Institution! of Civil or Municipal Engineers or equivalent— 10 years' experience-l>u;i BorouKh Engineering Services—Population 35.000—Knowlr.lge of elcctrldty an sset— Salary $4.800—$240— $5,760 per .uinum—Starting salary tublect to astperlenrB—Pange, leave, ear illowince, PensionQuarters al 10"* of Salary—For full details apply to Town Clerk. San Fernando, Tiinldnd. B.W.I. Applications close 80th Sopu-mber. 1952. L McD CHRISTIAN, Town Clerk. 12th August. 1952. FIRST MR LASTING WEAR Kill SAI.K I Y\< Mill 111il Avenue. — Belleville. An Attractive ana Well Pro.jnitioned 2 Storey House situated on a corner site of 12.090 square fee*. Contains 2 galleries (1 enclosed), large drawing room. dtranU room, study, modern kitchen, 3 bedrooms, nsrai.Offers eawitldrred. M. Ill AIM\ 4% CO. \ I F.VJ*. REAL ESTATt: AGENTS riaiiUtl.ma Rulldliic IOII\ *0ucan~fou4t ar *-^.v. ..2+*GOOD/YEAR CITY GAIAOF DlfO I O LTD



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PACE TWO BA RBADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY, Al'Gl'ST 22, 152 CaAib galling West Indian Table Talk iv Who Is Jack Frost? --Hunch Ttlls fhf Shadows About Him — it. MAX Itfi I I I WON OCR," Knar, i By LONOONKR LONDON On hit way back to England last wwk -bo., Mary was Sir William Wiseman, who for 30 >*>ars has been a Wall Street Hanker. Sir William has a flaW Fiflh Avenue and a hmi* jt frror.'ogo Bay. Jamaica. He man of the American Dollar Export* Count*) I has had talk* In New York the Council')Chalrmiin William RootM. New Book STOUTE prmenttnc *J Governor of the Windward Islands Who spent .1 few days in Barbados Intransit from Dominita. left for Grennda on Wlnt?H W I A He W.IN .. Kiie-l of Sir G>rge ;ind Lady Seel :' "Bemcrayde Christ Church. O N Wednes.1.^ r., %  %  nt.-c,lined guests to party held at their "Truvonrior". Welches. %  Wan in the bo gift to a mother at the ChriH Church Baby Wclfart League yesterday %  \ Parly IvWfofl Tit t.vugut> nintl last fc*HS. NORM A GOODING and A *r.li l rlennan Sloutc, visitors ,i c oel tt all %  •> Hie Island who are al present mo The party mt< r. 1 [ties. On • of Judce Wednesday Mrs. II Stoute vlsltd M H SI.Kite of thr USA. ed Madame mil's Baby Leajnie at %  r. *• s— '"id Mrs. Norm a Gooding also of St John's and spent some time rrom Olympic* |he USA u,.uh.nit the routine checkVf" KKN FAHNUM, Barbados The evcnm g WM an enjoyable Up at th> MOM and tli. 1*1, Ace Cychst. arrived home on one ana among thnse present MtlViUM ><< the L Wednesday by B.WIA. Iran „,.,,.; Dr. and Mrs. E. L. Wont. • tttrday at the Christ Church Tnnidad. Ken. Jamaica repreDr. and Mrs. A. W. Scott, Mi Bftb) W.-lfiire league, Mrs. tentative in cycling. ittetHled a nd Mrs. U. H. L. Ward. Mr. J BtOstta presented poor mothers of the Olympic G.unr- at Helsinki <> Tudor. Snr.. Mr. and Mrs. J. O. ihe parish with Items of clothfi niids are glad tu Tudor, Mr. and Mrs. R. A. Seal v. In*. These Were sent by M welcome him home OHM nOTC y, .,„,! Mr?. S. R. Taylor. Mis. I. I-owe an overseas donor, also %  Od arlata him better luck next B. Hynam, Mr. and Mrs body cold?'" Hanid as juit about %  •• reft] that she was sure lark I jukt somebody imaginary like drag tM and untronm iml hones a4tfe wingl. when Mr Punch said la a louH role*: "What tldabout Jack Fro*t! Did 1 hear somebody say he didn't think there *ai -Why! Ill tell you why. Not too Mi Punch frowned and said h'm.-i again. "But the very *0t*1 thing he does is this. He hnds a little pond somewhere. It'a a lovel> little pond, as pietty as a picture The sunbeami dance on the water. The diRoit-rt(c Url ov*r ll. The wslcr> lilies bloom on it. The ftsh swim in it And then what happens? Jack Frost touches this pond with the tip „. of his little finger and-whoosh! — l!> 1. u the whole top is covered with ice! """ Jack Ice. my dear.: hard, cold Ice! The dragon-flics don't dart over this pond any more. The sunbeams don't dar.ee on the water. The water-lilies disappear at once. And you can't ilngle one of the fish. The only when /o STARS ,ould be the Jack Frost gets through freezing it. Po 1 nd u %  Hun '! %  I'ltliiluvin;\\ ilh Ki-liithi-* f |RS. STELLA SINGH and her l|orner, formerly an employ I > childr.n Ctnl and POO, the Bauxite Co. iii British Cuian.came in on Monday by B.W.I.A. is on his way to Igncouvof '< from Tnnidad lo spend a holiday take up an appointment with thi with their relatives. Mrs. Singh Bauxite Co. there. They an is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. guests al Abbeville Guest House A. Pragneii, Chelae* Road. _, ... Ta Jam IIUHIMUII Knlirluhillivnl TidR. D. A PRIOR of Marnprescnl were: Mrs. Nortna Orbing, Madame mil. Mi C ll Ramsay. Mrs. C. Storey, ami MiH A. Tali one df the 1 bildran *.r tho League presented bouquets to Mrs Gooding and afra, Btouto and 1. replied congratulating Madame mil (Foundress) on tho u> doing for poor, Ihev impressed with the rtatful atmosphere and the happy little faces around them. Tin.' bad bxMfd qulta %  lad of th Laagua In tba cs.A. and expre.siii (heir |0> at being there "We shall take back I960. For a while afterwards he muny people like Jack Frost. He studied al the Institute of EducuRI M .round pinching noses. He Oon, l-.ndon University and was makes toes and flngtis tingle. Laic awarded a post-gruduate teaching' „, n | R ht he creeps ini>by unloaded It on Ifier ihe robbery at that country pi ece\ "Imlx-ole 1 roared tho Captain. "I let It go tin tan mud' Don't you start .... the genuine (-tuff without letting me know." Wartfiiml note S O free from vibration Is the United States that a passenger balanced a glass of beer on the rudder when the ship left New York. On arrival al foutt*ampton the glass was still there, and only 15 drops of beer were missing They had not apUled, but bad been drunk by a caddish member of the .crew. England now build a bigger, faster, and even steadier ship—but I forget why. Book n-rivtr A NEW omnibus edition of tho "List of Huntingdonshire Cabmen"—the standard work on the subject—contains much new gfi in the shape of names of veteran cabmen living |n retirentsses an index. f a bo^k vsnlcb 1 Othlng but names tracing of. say, Harbauld. II.R.S. CROSSWOHD 1 1 :. 0 11 1. •3 1 r %  n ... '1 —-. n 1 .-< .-* %  laborious husini %  |j ej pa 1 imwhen there has been no attempt the to place the names in alpt %  wns done in earliei edition' In fact ft seems that editor <>f this new edition was governed sotelj by a desire confuse and Irritate the read How else Is one to explain the omission of a list of contents al the beginning of the book? LISTENING HOURS l. Recall It was about .m U 1 ". IinKmlr %  ecu %  nmi loreiodo 11 i I Ituprri Be.V* nonip wood. i3i I thr IIK) f.ini| (4) fpi..ta. of 17 Down .* l ROM type. (7) 17 Htsln of aoru, <4i I* blurtlf %  brulea nwrl. (5) 11 %  *?*,"** him warn bU ii-miad. IS Ji Volcanic export it .'i PbM % %  1 ba i ide %  %  it. Knrap'.uia '.. to rabu-. like this. I5I 6 You do 1 him to ii IK brrrv I 7 STtioiivm o[ 4. 161 1 Uilriideo I01 room urn l 9-e*. i*t f7 ~ 1H Colour 14) JO A slip of thr loneue v il ll-Mtnd-up Piemnunr P-i,lv. 1 p m Tha tirv. 7 10 p m Nr. Tul IJf — MIS BJM. gf-sVH il i? T 19 p m Writ Indian Dlan'. 7 p i A T>' of To Cilia-. I I' S p m Wnrld Affair*. S TI..4*. %  p m Fiom Uia IV %  Mini IAIEI The Garden—St. James .r Mill l vv < -"in.. .inn: Colonel Robin Stuart's hotel g| Shaw Park estate on Ocho RJos Jamaica Is likely to be sold veiy n I hear Negotiations with an! t e r e s t e d party advanced". The Colonel is asking! about £100,000 for the hotel together erfta 25 acres and a pn-' vnte bench Included is the VIII. Flora where the Duchevs ..f Kenitayed on her honeymoon in 1B3* The hit.! bag suites for 60 guest.*. 1 a swimming pool and terraced tropical gardens. Mr. Itiini-ii aH Wuh regret I record the death of Mr. (toy llumstead a member of the West Indies leeUon "I tin Colonial office. Mr. Bumstcad was killed In a mountaineering accident on Mont Blanc Last fortnight He was 31 years of age and %  native of Birkcnhead. He etudlec gl Cambridge, then, during the war, served as a captain in the 1 H.A.C. in West Africa and Burma, and waa mentioned in dispatches. HO Joined the Colonlnl Olflrr as Acting Principal in 11*48 and was tranaferrad firam the communicap i tinent to the W* D dies section in 1949. in May 19.il promoted to Painclpal No luecessor has vet been named. t ro-Moitnoii "Ice skating!" llanid and Knarf shouted Joyously. Mr. I'unch shook hi* head sadly. "And that's why no one likea Jack j Frost, and why It's dangerous for him to let himself be seen." from window-silis and around the 1 But when Knarf ar.d Hanid looked edges of roofs." at Mr. Punch they -aw that he was "Oh, they're pretty!" Kaarf exreally smiling. They knew that he claimed. "Kverybody likes to see [ didn't mean a single thing that he icicle.-!" | said about penole not liking Jack "H'mea," said Mr. Punch. "And I Frost, if there ims a Jack From Rupert's Spring Adventure—13 wgm The young farmer wemt very inicnrated m omnhinii nd doti nc* move it Rupert rum acroii %  he dell, "PIUK. I'm lookma lor a little dragon," tayi Rupert. "Have you wen it?" The farmer look* itanled, There arc no luch thmgi 11 dri||oivi." an here. I hat got a I He point* 10 i bate ol the ire* %  lire*! excitement Rupert ee another wnp ol imokt u cutUng up tram it. at the TO-DAY 2.30 alld 8.30 p.m. and Continuing Daily 4.4S & 8.30 ft*"" eLADIES 'ARC0LA SHOES LOW CUT COl'BTS. Navy. Brown. Black SW4M While Sul.ii, k VAKIOL'S STILES OF BLACK & BROWS SIMM -, Backless & Torlns While N'uhm-k—Backless & Toeles* T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS VOCR SHOE 9TOBBS DIAL 4220 DIAL 4S(I6 $13.69 *14.S0 S1I.5S $13.04 SPECTACULAR TECHNICOLOR ADVENTURE.' IT'S THE I.AST WORD IN WESTERN EXCITEMENT! Paramount preirolf The LAST OUTPOST starring Ronald tUkttodf REAGAN ft FLEMINC. with Bruce BENNETT. Bill WILLIAMS. Noah BEERY At the BARBAREES (Dial 5170) PLAZA TO-DAY (FRIDAY) 4.45 18.30 p m. Ii contlnuiiu Rlaaln* Arllaa "THE LAST *HTr0ST" Ealra ivvraal Nr.i Itrel Hhowlm the Oprnlnr i "im.i i ..I Ik* i-.:.: Olfxat* WOM MM-N MIS-Nit* T**rr>w NUkl iBa>irraw Boy BOtar 1 Oouiili" Lastran - r a LIGHTb OF OLD SANTA FE II-. a sis l'iviTil Picturaa Slarrtne („ vor HOWARD | c ANOUK |_ ROLL ON TEXAS FOR FRIDAY. AUGl'ST 22. 1952 Look in the section in which your birthday comes and find what your outlook Is. according to tba a'ars. r !" *! %  Auressively favourable day tot military, Bflarcb 21—April 20 humanitarian crusades, all worthy causes. ^ Day advises sensible care In hazardous ~ 1 work, handling tools, water activities. TAURUS W w aV r AprU 21—May aoMildly favourable for your especial inter^ etts and desires. The armed services of our country should be inspired lo go for-a ward. A good day generally. W * Not all stimulating for brain work, buf— i*L for the usual daily routine, familiar work ^ —day can be gainful, pleasant. Don't overdo' ^J • • You are Indeed favoured with your Moon and Mars In excellent aspects. Bui there ^ Is a warning not to over-reach to gain ** objectives. * aV Your planet sugRests doing things In a 1 quietly efficient way, without being too exacting or arbitrary. Real benefits lo be J, had In useful trade, business, familv affairs *• * Mostly up to demands of your position and L urgent obligations how hard you must work, what tempo you should keep this generally auspicious day. Extra care j stressed on dangerous jobs. "r * Favourable indications, going lo slill bet^ ter ones for tomorrow. Fine Unto for perf sonal and artistic matters. * Mars' excellent aspect and the Moon's jL favourable influences promise a day of In^ lerest, gain and personal satisfaction. IF. of course you think honourably, act weM. ^ • • • Influences Indifferent to some money matters and selfish interests, but honest intent ^ 1 a,nd objectivity ran achieve In a big way. ^ Due recreation should not be neglected. * * OAPKIOORK Your Saturn position stresses need for ^ Dec. 23 — Jan. 21 serenity. Have hope, look forward as you take good care of day's obligations. ^ 1 • • • !" AQUAKIUt Mild rays from Uranus, but rightful ag' Jan. 23 — afsb. 20 gressiveness (such as in military and govjL eminent activities) will bring surprising ^ results. • • • Neither hindering nor loo invigorating aspects. Mostly up to you and what your programme calls for. Don't strain, but ^ •* keep anead with urgent matters. ^ YOU BORN TO-DAY: Splendid mental and mechanical ability; pride, ambition, but sometimes dislike for small dej fi tails arm irritating routine Watch that you dont lend to *r domineer, disregard others' desire or opinions. You can reallv ochi-vw in profession, trade, in a religious life, or other course £uncpt. ii—Oct. as BCORPIO Oct. M—0. 93 SAOtTTARJUS Nov. 33—DM. 92 PISCES Tcb. 21—Much i YOU'VE NEVER BEFORE SEEK A PICTURE LIKE THIS! Itiey Chopped Down 9 Irees Jrtf Moaleil Acioss The Pacific' The gaaaag gtj „,, 0 f,,, IBrn wa4 deliWratelr risked tbelr Ilvas to prove a theory I On %  primiiir n ( ,r raft of hal.a logs Ihcy drifted f •o the Ulea where the hula gi11. .,i 1 101 days aod 4\S0O aailea wlthoot contaat with ri. ili, a i j ( .n, czenlng anperhaman effort* to keep afloat Mini SCt LESSEN Pholegraphad by the men who lived It) AT LAST ON YOUR SCREEN! PLAZA-Opening TO-DAY BRIDGETOWN N.B.—Two Special Hhow on MON. A TI'ES. "K0N-TIK1" Plays with Ihe Action Packed Drama! A WOMAN CAN P1AZA THEATRE! ON ITS 2nd FLAMING WEEK (.LOBE 0UII1UIUM TO-DAY 5 A .3 P.M. AND CONTINUING DAU.V Thr Giant of Motion I'klurn %  %  SCAMAM0VCME J;mrt Stewart Mel Henry Eleanor LEIGH — GRANGER — F ERRER — W1LCOXON — I'AHKEU OPENING SOON—2tth Century Fa* "WITH A SONG IN MY HEART" Susan HAYWARD — Rory CALHOUN BRiiMii-rrowN IDIal tSISI OPENING TO-DAY a i ."iiiMiim I KOS-I IKI %  OAOWOIR • Chiirlr* Joan |JM, CRAW.' . DIXOW Sal. Spaeial SSS a IM aaOBnT or i. IM|>| \/\---. M mi-rsi fit o. rtiar'aa 8TA1UIETT MlSalU aaearial sal ni i K tmiii -"IKIII or TXAS" a ( HMItlR TRAILS .t.l.r> atoata HAJ %  RAKRAR:I:S raad itaM rtjDAT e.u a i p. %  %  HI HU Oil I I'OS I •AT Saarial I l Zana (i ray's illi MUH MOt NTAIN al Ihe I*II I HHHIIN Mld-Nllr V|...i.l -. WI-r*t\BI) l-.in Mi K... UAYNARD A. %  I IM.I II -TU I Johnny Mar* BROUN I 41" KOOIS i Tae hn Icolof) Van Sunn HITKI IN HAYWAMJ P4BBKN *i\ S VIIOM, Bud ABBOTT At Lou COTTJ.l,0 HU Baaelal ISt % %  tMIt vi.i tuni.il pta.t.n. rosTiH a HHIRl.MIMi RAIOtBB Charln %  TA.RHBTT HUaMa -a-.l.l M -Ol II * lit: \M\KFIXY wrar %  • II. DORADO Johnnv slA i



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i-u.i I'll: BARBADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY. AUr.l'ST H. 1SS2 BARB^jAADy^CATE ril>N4 fcr Ua. A4T~* C. LM.. Be**#*I ( oiiic AIn*> To The Ends Of The I aril! I lii! p nti.i.v AUKIIM 22. 1932 \|i|M-;il lor Beauty remarkable tvnlOl __ _-, %  .fy distinguishIKy IIV Cflr* K.IXlt'r that his playt. bar him. Above all he must be able to seize the moment when, by his magnctaam, he inspires the orchestra to olay better than it ran. TH'S month the Tim** uf London published a picture of a small pre-tabriCiateJ houM and garthn which had won a prin presented by a local brunch of the Wbnwn'i VOlunttrj Service somewhere in %  nd % %  tig ago this newspaper suggested that associations especially interested in UM tourist trade of Barbados ought to oiler prizes for the best kept w.iyside gardens in city or parish. Barbados is fortunate in possessing a fair number of garden lovers and even in the heart of the City opposite the most untidy looking premises flowers can be seen by the observant passer-by. But the love of flowers is not so widespread that it conceals the unloveliness of many Barbadian huts and homes. There is ample opportunity for the rtgamtnt of gardens in Barbados as there is for the encouragement of beauty altogether. too often those who ought to be In the vanguard encouraging beauty are the first to stifle its birth. Only quite recent' ly two instances of the readiness to extin1 guish some of the little local beauty wi have may have been noticed by the watchful. The Fire Officer in a report on the Barbadian Fire Brigade for the period 1st January to 31st December 1951 selected Jubilee Gardens as "the most promising it> For ;i Bridgetown Fire Station. And the Fountain in Trafalgar Square has been turned off only a short period after the decision to keep it pitying for the benefit of all who visit Bridgetown on weekdays. No one would suggest that the File OffjOtf or the officials responsible for turning off the fountain in Trafalgar Square were consciously'expressing disapproval of efforts to beautify the capital city of tln> island, but the fact remains that consideration of beauty does not appear to rate very highly in Barbados as against questions of utility. Government which through its political and official representatives boasts frequently of progress which is claimed to have been made in many fields during the past decade shows remarkable lack of, support for any suggestions designed to promote beauty and to preserve what earlier geoorattOM enjoyed with respect to open spaces, pinks and noble buildings. The lessons which ought to have been learnt from the experiences of other counwhose uncontrolled building and (uedom of design has been permitted by indifferent governments have not been learnt in Barbados. Daily buildings continue lo be made more permanent along the sea coasts o' the island, although the authorities in Barbados must roaliM the harm which is being thereby done to the island's tourist attractions not to mention the suppression of natural amenities available to the Barbadian public. On the St Junies Coast it has been left almost exclusively to the private proprietors of lands which once were principally composed of sand, crab holes and sea bush to demonstrate how beauty can be attracted to the vary borders of the sea-shore. Well-tended gardens, groves of flowering trees and above all shade-producing trees have been planted, watered and encouraged by private persons, whereas the majority of typically Barbadian coastal houses look ragged and unkept by comparison. At Holetown especially where for traditional reasons it might have been thought that a special effort might have been made to erect a mi Kiel village, the prlmitiveness of the Barbadian hovel is exposed for all to see. By pleasant contrast certain of the modern govnjjn*lt-buiU houses at the Pine are surrounded with gardens and can compare favourably with housing estates of similar size >n most modern countries, in Bay Street on the other hand the impression which is gained by the observant pt MI hv is that the rate ol erection of walls and wall houses exceeds the plantingof flowering or shade trees on the Government Bay Estate. Barbados still possesses many unspoilt natural beauties there remain in the island much that have been built by earlier and more recent generations: efforts continue to be made by individual lovers of beauty and by organisations like the Civic Circle to promote beauty in all its forms. But the priority of treatment which beauty receives in an island so small as which Is l>eing built upon as rapidly as this, is inadequate to prevent serious i rloraUon of the legacy of beauty which belongs not only to our generation but to millions of Barbadians yet unborn I'I %  tar populat support is forthcoming from those who champion beauty and un!' government and commercial circle tanoa than is now being given to the small %  in promoting and preserving beauty much of the little beauty which I us will be lost. When Cantel'.t come* here there „ fathering. If there was ON &OBB tha Court, there were tremendous personality with one plenty from the camp and the f ">* nnest military minds of, Kcnste. Admirals, generals, peers. Ihls century. and Ministers of State crowded The general dealt only with the the banquet hall. raillUry Mtiialien in E T??' ** v —— —•-'" — — Let me commend the Ends of ">•* poiit es to the politician:. A *i|l be many conductors la the the Earth Club which exlm lo *>y could have .rasped it, u .udience aaMiig "What has he : promote Anglo-American friendneia-n.arsn.u could have learned KO t that I haven't*" That question %  hip and only dine* when it has tram %  N V T b,v •*• the ,s as old as the caves when the some jruci it wants to hear. Pp**"" incisive clarity more nnt two bloftdvs met f.ice to lace. which means about once a year. afc-iy demons!rated. js^ Ca |j H.ivlnn belonged to It for some i have liefn %  mp %  i -toa i .1 Vefr. I waTmuch pleed to Whal he said ft, oft the record. wirtSov^ci^in'mln. juwover OO the list of j.ue*t, that "d must be so. but I assure you ^^ ^ \ S sSw I .,m a member of the committee, it no lullaby to waft a. to rounlry8iae Thie wh? en£r it One-Mjui Show J*P .•* •* *" %  "t But neVer ^ ^ Mtsilie WOT ^^ in The odd thing is that I have J" !" K£H ^K^*^*" He wa • handsome young AusI '.ended a committee meet""*? •Phocisnui since theybelong [rahim riert and |flsl wlnte (n Ing or been notified of such an J Uie realm of irfulosophy and lhv Austrian village of Lech he WBt, Vhlcll Is unmirable. rannot aid the poential enemy otned in ^ kM and tho The club is. In fart, a one-man t.i ay. The guiriin,; and controlirlt is Colonel Johnny Dodfa, the American-born Briton arbo is a cousin of Mr. Chu.chili jy marriage, who commanded Ills biittalton at 22 yean, of atte in the first war, who fought again in the Ian war and i* ready for the next. "War la a n>arit>ued succrstion of mUtakwi." "Clcmrnceau said lhaf u'Of is loo danfjeroui lo ieaee to the peneroU." /iu'tl apmriff." Ol the RA.r. Lord n.it Bseretary Oliver • • • LyttelMii. and Lord Swinton all He is perhaps the most eminent %  seined t" ispwktini with Enluil-blrd of my acquaintance [a nts, *•> tuned did our I91 he made n friendly visit to oan becoms 'o the resonant Russia and was imprisoned for fuaUty ol our guest*! vi>iee. his pains, but escaped. In 1940 A remaikable night! "As a mnht was captured by the Qerroaa I I look tarjiul helped lo organb* the tragic ward U tm | when the next ,,( tha .ilintcn who were BDnST will UUU ptao 9 brutaUy shot. He is, in fact. Maieic Beat .he reincarnation of Dumas' I a m delighted to team that l',.rthoa in The Three Muthe young MaBaO conductor Kigiiiir t'intelli ai BOCnlBg to con'Al* Speaks duct six concerts at the Festival Hut now 1 must introduce to Hull. Hardly out of his twenties rou the star turn of this "hushhe Is in the Hrst three of the 1 iush" dinner — "Al" Gruenther, vrarl d leton BOd will t nherwise General Gruenlher, almost assuredly become the Hrst. I Jhief of staff of the Allied Forces Of all human activities open in Europe. l *> 'he male of the ipecfM the 'Al'' wore no medals or decconducting of an orche>1ni ji.atlons at the dinner. Instead jf apeaking from the top table n .lid sit from the bottom table %  ml put aside the mici.-photie. On fir* appearance he looked jko a ihorti-h, ordinary, enicient r j.titcr-ma.-tcr-isergeant who had ton his commission by slogging tMrauatsBass, but when bs bad .lushed speaking he seemed a geoaral fun of a snow-bound holiday He was full of gaiety -nd life, and was the most popular visitor in that district. In "There ore lu-o kinds of genthis fi "* w *" postcard from the crais—those I would like to fight monastery he writes to my teiih and those / would like to umi '3 f '• — is true that contact in rorld can influence for hut after 13 years as a 1 son more than sure "It the i Kood. priest .hot much more can be done by prayer. This is a life ot prayer, work, and penance consisting of nltfht vigils, etc. Many of the men here and in these monasteries in Europe jn of the same conviction afu-r bavmg held very high office in the world . This farewell card must be my last corrc*po'idence. Good-bye. When yr,u are asleep between 12 and 2 a.m. I may s-y a prayer fi yea sometime*. Please do the same for me. Good-bye. Good luck.' IT Is a moving story, not without pity, and yet one wonders why the prayers of a man thdrewa from the world should llnii-rnte actor since he be placed above lhove who fight interpret the the battle of existence In U"< .f the com p ositio n He open. be a ballet dancer so There sra mysteries of th< movements can convey fium..n spirit which defy logic, both io tha audie n ce sod ihe He had so much to give to the orchestra the rhythmic j-netry world from which he has witiI win i WK \i: \ (Hd von Papen Is at It again is Just r imbed on ; to Ankara to report wilut thh >lest ond most polished of HitTo-dav. Papen tells his -IOL. IS agents was plotting against 8EFTON UEI.MCK dmniidi I In his new role as Hitler's sequel— inbassador to Turkey. ___—^_— Here I am now on my way up Q np Threat He quotes telegrams verbatim. Ankara once more on htlerent mission. But very P.ipcn Is with me again. As the last glimpses of IS of Marmara flash by NrfQdoW I am studying tin nl-lguer's lost sti ng — hi: nrmoli giving their numbers. And he power. years of experience of his thods—to prove to the Amerlonly really comanUthem Eurnpe are the Germane What I admire particularly In this smooth mixture of truth, falsehood, surprise revelations, i.nd distortion is the way In which Papen tries to rid himself of all mplicity in Hitler's advent to ihttys: — raw "We also learned that the !f, posaibilitv of an Allied .iltaek on the Balkans through Salonika could be ruled out. The Bupreoaa Pniien plctiu-es Papen as the perfect, gentle kmlght who tagged along with Hitler from a iih sense of duty to German v. Europe, and Western civilization r.tmoire.* >""" ?."??? M' V "„ • Kl,r "pe. and Western civilization uthough the book Is not being Con.mand now vaI sed U* the m n „j cr tQ e „ r( lw a rpstral(1 9 ubUshed in Britain until tomotonly ti ^^' '*h h J' J mg influence on the mad proleit Is already wiling fast *iepp. 5 .,„ %  „„• w,,,.,. „.„. .,.,., %  """• contend M the invai,.„ ,. |r]nn IMaU>r The nil* puisonoub stm is (or 1 .,,, ,a .' ,J. „ llltt .„ m _„_^ Never once a picture or Papen 3'r Hughe knalclihull-lli^esscn. .^J^Z^mo^laum""" mb lm "' ^ron. who having P.PCC.1 Britbh odverwry in •! %  the Intention. ' ""' !" ta.led power wanted to stay With a superb show o( !" ' ^,> 5" l „„* n „ !" S^ "ith It. I iij-don't-bUe-dog chivalry I'apen was to •W. have a parallel ,n military hisA mUtm „, hL§ ,,„, Western civilisation Papen menNow this allegation ot Papen's lions that he was in 1929 SM.-S. keeping gi? ^^ H !" £*£ PSgLfgiSlSJi I I.-'I trousor pocket and them )liotogTaphed top secret ; its In his safe. I WBQted to spare (him) any Tibarratsment." Cenmorithip? i!F, ii i-ii to "have the Operation meottoa was that as secrej'ory of this society he and his ii riends appointed one Werner •von Alvtiisleben lls how unwilling he the story told of m.m agent removed hich "ii" ai'way.lec'Sing WMl r Cultur,.What hedoe. '.ence and insecurity, and urginsr the Pnwldent not to share secret.! with such allies. This I believe la (Maclly what A Boast > manuscript suppraied.' l*"Pen want*-to discredit the Tnc d ly „ rier Hl ter hacl Kil Kowt l>ocs this mean GcrHellish In American eyes. cd power this same Alvensleben. i iiny'. former espionage service The whole book lends to represitting ,„ the offices of the •ill has a security cen.orshlp •< Gormana. and purlicolail.v 0 ,,ii„„ wnlcn Papc „ hlld (ound r ID iiKiiibeni?) Mpeii. as goe.1 Europeans whose „,. boejled to me how it was toe %  However," aays Papen. tears loble attempts at European unwho had put Hitter Into power, n klmg down his honest old derstanding and unitieation have ..,, wn , wtl „ prc „ d ,„, .u^y I gkl "as Moyzlsch agreed to ^>een corurtantly frustrated by lnll[ Schlclclier had ordered the ubmll his manuscript to me. I Britain's "divide and rule' polPotsdam garrison to march . able to prove to my s itisicy. ^ Berlin, a atory which rushed action that he had described the He accuses Britain of having Hlndenhurg Into making Hitler ai with complele fairness." -""dc the ISM war inevitable by Chancellor." %  hen he really sets to work, ner alliance with Iluiala. He aaya 1-Mk „ „,, tn ,„, What 1 do reject most cmphatlthat when he wu on the fringe cuttings. Heir von %  lb is Moyzlsch-s assertion in of %  wide understanding with Paptn ,1s book that practically no use Flame In IS32. Ramsay Macllonu „,„, (|joe „,„,,, „, „,,. vat made of the Information obaid stepped In and 'tewed It „,„ ,„ slr H, 0 J, on d the For,,,!. Iluimg the period of the He .a%< that in 1910 Mr MatH „„ () |7ic.-' From u-hol I have I'.'oielgn Ministers' meetings in font t ripps in Moscow oiterea (l ,. arrt about Operation Cicero .-, scow, of llie Teheran and Cairo Molotov the Dardanelles and a hm in Turkev and eUeuhcre. .1,;,,,,, and, indeed, right free hand In the Balkans--at the | „ u h0 „, „„, „ ,,, a i, rHM1) „,„!„ n to Fcbiuaiy IB44. the flow of expeii-.' M OUT tuiklsn ancl |() pa,^.,,^ aeensafions. ,r.s infoini.itloii \,.,s of priceBalkan allll I RU IU WDUkd y oll llfl y nor u^nt to use il value." come in against Cierr beroiis.n lin-oloes rrvealMs a Cicero says Papen, kept the He tays chuix-hills famous secret. Vou would rafher ao dou-n I'nnan Government fullv Inplan for invading the Balkans In lo history at fools than do that. ; Mi of the Moscow decision 1944. far from keeping the BUS; admire Chia self-aaeri/lrr. Bui o compel Turkey to declare war slans out would inevitably have _..„„,, out D t ft Lc. fiore the ,v the end of 1S43. ol Cairo conbmnght them '"• fmlh. •iisationU'tween the Turkish 'Only Allies • Memoirs of Franr von Papen. Vcstdeiit. Churchill and HooseAU stuff desigiwd. if I lead my Andre Deutsch. 25s. ,n. old Patn right—and 1 have had — L.E.S. llur llc k aders Say // %  MiiUlh eiunn -Top. Middle and Bottom. At confusing attitude as the Rev. the present time government is Gentleman, I would not care to trying hard to get the stool lo r ead it. L. D. BRATHWAJTE. v stand on two legs. Once Barbados „, %  ,tried to ti' t the stool to stand on fo the Editor, The Adeocale; SIR.—When the present I %  iinni'M was climbing into po—. t promised great things for every•• lep. Both In.posslble tasks h.Kly. and more or less everybody No one class has a bra.n monoi. >. hilped. It was felt then that Wh> stand ye Iheie Idle. Middle every mother's son would be given Claasr _._, ;i fair break. Performance is not Make no niisl.ik..-very man m Idling up to thb promise. H < h s country has a fight to live rau have any doubt ask the Mid(Some of us are not living.) I bell,Class-not one section of it. eve that everybody more or less Who arc the Middle Class? The believes this nowadays. The few ^o qtsMhted of every class! w They took a_ leaf from Spartan or ^ £ JX "oSbeaSS RenSmJJ HopkinjsOO I. conceited nor s,r Oomd tadtfll for all. ^"L'^7^ '>" v C l. ROCK. I am rtarbadlan and the ony "Roekcrest." OWIn Hill. "nngs the term ropey To the Editor, The Advocate, SIR,—I too would like to express; my appreciation of your attempt to improve your paper. There are certain feature" which I like &uch as Henry i*. Dally and Sporting Sam in Spartan look a leaf from them. Let u forgive. Today legmen, ittd C.uilty are suffering alike, md as Sir Herbert used to sayit's belter that 89 Guilty should -. ipe than tha*. one Innocent i.-.uld suffer. f.n/ii.-in^MUer, The Adeocote; pulled to are Corn Pone. Cookies and Ginger Beer; and when they become ropey, even the dug i the Edlior. The Advocate; and Ihe hog pa*, them up. 11 S1K, The letter entitled SunMr. Denington wants to introduce this little island -I am nu-relv de Advoceli m your paper on some type of ErtgUsh ued some %  tiding a fact—than. 1 ^jeliev. In Wednesday by the Ban M L M. where in the leeward Islandt. ny outer Brltutl ponDenlnflon nUien l-rt him have a special r-arly as high as in Hermiinssing II >y the letter the Rev. volume printed ,,! ihe Advocate f aUU Kill Jent'emen meeBt criticism, onlj I seems to think thit a. thirty-six cents a pound Brith < in understand it. this can be easily done, b'lt tn ish Ouleng is not .i tourist report i I lo say that all 1* ChareeterlM people's writings as h tourists love to vlsll farwell witli the u to Levtvi yetn lamed KM pres. p.iper with Id-el actions. Barbados is a three-legged stool the Advocate adopted the seme SIMI'lXTON. SHOPPERS SWITCH OVER TO LITTLE MEN By JAMES ( ("in K NEW YORK. THE little trader of America is taking! business from the big department store. So reports the business management service of the University of Illinois, which decided to find out why. Teams questioned people in areas served by live Mid-West stores. Why had they taken their custom from the big stores to the local dress shop and tailor, the shoe sture, and the draper? The four main answers: 1, Too difficult to park the car near the bigger shops; 2. slow service there; 3. poor sales staff; and 4, higher prices. IN NEW YORK there has been an epidemic of women slapping policemen. Four have been arrested) on this charge in a week ALGER HISS failed tonight in his appeal fur a new trial. He is the former State Department high official jailed in 1950 for five years for perjury because he swore he had not passed secrets to Communist Whitaker Chambers. Vital piece of evidence against him was a buttered old typewriter on which it was alleged that secret documents were copied. He now said he had evidence it was possible to fake the typewriter. But Federal Judge Henry Goddard rules there is nothing to suggest a jury would now acquit Hiss. LAST MONTH has been the hottest July on record in New York. But New Yorkers are more worried about a plague of what they call gnats. Dr. Charles Currac, the insect curator at the Natural History Museum, explains that the green insects, less than one tenth of an inch long are really aphids or plant lice that grow through several generations before sprouting wings. For two days now they have been taking off in millions. The green clouds are likely to stop even the city's baseball games. WHEN Brooklyn police arrested a cat burglar they found he carried a compass—to steer back lo his escape ladder in darkened buildings. UNITED NATIONS delegates are losing "pin-money" because of the American elections. Their agents are not booking them for lectures for fear that anything they say would have political implications. It is said that the Philippines Ambassador. Brigadier-General Carlos P. Romulo, will drop 10,000 dollars (£3,570) this year. ONLY half the observation posts are so far manned for the anti-aircraft watch that was to have begun last Monday. There is a suspicion that even, these are not manned all the time. FIFTY-ONE Frenchmen, to paraphrase the saying, can't all be wrong. Fifty-one dentists visiting America to study dental equipment all had the same'thing to say about New York today:— "Why does everybody rush?" FOR the first time since pre-war, American newspaper circulations have fallen. Increased prices are blamed—35 cents (2s. 6d.> a week for the daily newspaper delivered al home, and up to 20 cents (Is. 5d.) for the Sunday newspaper. THE garden that "grew" in a night kept American society talking about the wedding of a British Navy lieutenant and a millionaire's daughter. It was the marriage between Lieutenant John R. Symonds-Tayler, R.N.. of the frigate Snipe, son of Admiral Sir Richard and Lady Symonds-Tayler, and 19-year-old Dorothy Neal. At the Neal home Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, the night before an army of landscape artists dug up the trees and turf and staked down in their stead 4ft. potted Easter lilies, gladioli, and cedar trees. Here, in this fabulous background, 400 guests drank champagne and ate caviare and turkey. Lieutenant Symonds-Tayler and his wife met last autumn when Snipe, accompanying the cruiser Superb, in which Sir Richard was then Hying his flag, came to Boston for "British Week," and Miss Neal was a member of the Debutantes' Welcoming Committee. The cost of making the wedding garden was about £4^60, and now the old garden is being put back. NEWEST hot weather drink: "The chlorophyll cocktail"—gin and tonic spiced with creme de mentho. • IN 90 degree temperatures, New York salesmen are gathering to discuss Christmas selling lines. For Father: 1953 cars with built-in dictating machines; air coolers for next year's heatwave traffic jams, and tyres in red, yellow, blue, green, and—wait for it—chartreuse. *or Mother: New rayons that are completely washable. \ r daughter: Dolls that walk, not by winding, but by just taking hold of their hand. For junior: Guns that fire three different colours of "paralysing rays." CANftSM PLATING CARDS (Complete with Instructions) 82.28 per Set PATIENCE PLAYING CARDS 72c. per Set ADVOCATE STATIONERY SEE Sturdy Bentwsod and Hardrntwd Chairs In three patterns lone with Cane Seal). BedatcuU with of without Mattresses In Mies 1' •*•! \ C. S. PITCHER & CO. •V Ph AA19 FIRST QUALITY MEATS AND FRESH VEGETABLES FIEST QUALITY Ml AT Turkeys I ;../ ii Haddock Smoked Kippers Cod Roe* Sardines II Trims Mac k<** | I' 1.1'inK l...l.sl,T I ui,.(.. Psstr RIM ENJOY THK FINEST Gold Braid Rum S *r. O'd S1.44 per BotUe m:i \n R Sandwich Bread — Fresh Dallr J A Duck* Rabbit* IffiS Kidneys Sweet Breads ltac*n


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FRIDAY. At'CLST 22, 1952 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PACE SEVEN HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON ; > I FLINT OF THE FLYING SQUAD .... BY ALAN STRANKS & GEORGE DAVIES BLONDIE 1 BY CHIC YOUNG WIVES TM1NK T-1EIR -*~^ HUSBANDS %  € SO MEIPIESS I WHfN THCVTC NOIABOUNO sa/u FLASH GORDON BY DAN BARRY ,JIJUL^!U^V^-.,' : Q JOHNNY HAZARD BY FRANK ROBBINS BRINGING UP FATHER BY GEORGE MC. MANUS THE DIFFERENCE! ; We can Supply J %  I Vh...' Swift %  liiiinn PatrlixMpv'i butl|t Vkwna hwf yiwww '— %  KptM-lll ch*("OfclnB „U.r I. SrilARf & SAMPSON (1938) LTD. li...lnu.iri. rs for li—t Run FOR NICE THINGS TO USE KOO BAKED BFANS %  I Tin* $ .28 KL.B. PEARS in tin* .43 K.L.D. PEAKS ,. ,. .70 K.L.B. SWEET CORN S IMPERIAL SAUSAGES REEF LOAF. COCOA MALT TONO And for The BEST lo Drink Our Popular FIVE STAR St*M %  L '" per B *ir INCE & Co., Ltd. IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE SPECIAL OFFERS AVAILABLE THURSDAY TO SATURDAY AT ALL BRANCHES MRUS JELLY DESSERTS IIOKI.ICK'S MALTED MII.K MEAT LUNCH PEAS TABLE SALT 'ilh Tins .... IIEI BEER $ .20 .85 .45 4 .3* n I 1:1 -M Millper Ik ooftooNsom (iitfsr „, m Now t .IS .7 .42 .45 .30 .22 > . 1.21 III.I I rilEEKK pilb i HI iM CHKDDBR CHI PDfBAPPLI rnisKs -I II Ullil mill I In. KAM'KHIKIFS Tin* KASI'HI.KKIKS I in. S.A. HK4MIV I s. <.! %  HHANIIV • • B ANUV BCCr SUET prr lb ENE prr lb TIM 1.11 .7J M M n .11 3.60 8.00 •MS D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street THE WONDER BOOR OF HOW IT'S DONE Most of us take too much for granted. We do not bother very much about how the necessities, luxuries and amenities of life aie pmvided, so long as we receive thorn when we want them. Hut supposing we are Midden I \ r.il led upon lo make anil (lo fol ourselves What then ? How would you organise the delivery of millions of letters, or the production of a daily newspaper, or the feeding arrangements for a great city like London ? This fascinating volume, packed with hundreds of Interesting pictures, will open your eyes lo the many processes involved in the creation of all Kinds of everyday goods and services. It also shows how many adventurous and far from everyday task pre peiiuirned. ADVOCATE STATIONERY Broad St. and Greystone, Hastings. •&&'**<'********&****************sss****s&**-ssss*f*ss*fr********iv**/'*fss*s***f****f*******SA*rs, FRESH APPLES HAM 11// I / .1 ViS'K i !##//# t i ott A mmmjuwAsr SHUSAB URBAN MIXED MlIn PITTED DATES In l-H pk. ANCIIOVIE FILLET* in un. % % %  li SII ROOMS In lint ITALIAN KETC IIPP (ROSS, lil.AIKWHIS TABLE SALT In 2-lb hols. KYM1NOTOVS PEA FLOI'R In I-lb tint MORTON'S ItKTI I> MIMIi HERBS In 4-OI batit. MORTON'S DRIFD SAGE la 4-oi bob NORTON'S DRIED PARHLEY In 4-ot. b.U. MORTON'S DRIED MINT In -o/ boU. f.HlHMI WHITE PEPPER In Z-oi phi*. PI RE FRENMt OI1VI OH. In It, .,/ I...U III Ml It A ft \ ( WARKt f I' HI l>"lALLEYNE ARTHUR & Co. Ltd. "Your Crocero" — High Street jGorganzola Cheese ,-New Zealand Cheese in 5 lb tins New Zealand Cheese in 8 oz. pk.