Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
a Rtn nett Ann

WHAT'S QN TODAY

ane of ent oem 10.00 a.m ay 7
Meeting , o hilip Vestry 11.00 a.m Reinfall from © Y
Meeting of Commissioners of Health, §t ; Total rainfall t¢ ith to date: 1.41 #
Michael 1.00 p.m / i” Highest Tempe ‘ y
Meeting of St. Thomas Vestry 1,30 I owest De â„¢o
p.m. Vv f " tes od: hour
Annual General Meeting of the Y M.C.A . Barom ’ r "2 ose 2pm
— 5.00 p.m. ‘ < ; 29.890
Police Band Concert at Bay Street \ TO-DAY
Esplanade — 7.45 p.m 4 Sunrise: 5.48 ar
teense Sunset: 6.16 p.m.-








For the cause that lacks assistance Mooh: Nev August 2

‘Gainst the wrongs that need resistance % Lighting: 7.00 p.m

For the future in the distance itn THURSDAY, AuGus 21. 1952 PRICE : FIVE CENTS High Tide 2.43, a.m,










7 as : a ‘ e | GENERAL CLARK ON HAND FOR RHEE’S !° A
- Stalin Calls Congress Of Soviet ~~ jg

Communist Party For October
Politburo May —— |
Be Abolished |

By HENRY SAPIRO,

| Curfew Imposed In
franian Capital



Run This Way
If Atom Bomb
Hits Congress

Premier Josef Stalin on

|
MOSCOW, Aug.20. |
Wednesday called for the first |

Soviet Communist Party Congress in 13 years for October
5 to consider a new constitution abolishing the powerful |
politburo. The announcement of the meeting of the Soviet

a general 70 per cént. increas

the publication of a Soviet new five year plan, calling for

e in industrial production.

FRANK ELEAZER

WASHINGTON, Aug. 20.
Should an atom bomb
fail on the next Congress,
members will at least know
which way to run. Signs

Capitol and architect David
Lynn said that they li

‘4°* “TEHERAN, Aug. 20,

An emergency cabinet meeting decided on Wednesday!

night to impose martial law/i>

effort to curb the growing un
‘adio Teheran, makin;
cast, said that the decision \
Wednesday, and that a eur!
one week from 11 p.m. te 5
that Brigadier Geza Azimi_h
srnor of the strife-ridden cap

Teheran for one week in an}
est, {
n announcement in a broad |
ill be effective at 11 p.m. on}

will be enforced daily for}
m. The announcement said
s been named Military Gov-
tal

The five year plan for 1951-55 it is said, “is one of} should be done by January.

The first of the red-

|

|

}

|

}

j

|

i

|

|

at
Communist Party’s supreme body was made jointly with are going up around we |!
| Chief of Police, Brigadier Shei-

peaceful civilian and cultural construction demonstrating lettered = “Sheltér Area
the superiority of the Soviet over the capitalist systems. It wienis’ Set Rees nnandieen. ‘an
promised to develop and expand economic ties with all | the walls of the subway
countries wishing to do so. corridor in the new house
| The party Congress announce- No Official Leader | office .building. Others will
ment said that the Communist} There is no official leader of | follow as fast as workmen

leaders will consider a new con-|the party, and supreme power is;] can get to them.
stitution similar to the one]vested in the 12 member polit- | Lynn said that _— civil
adopted in 1939, but replacing}buro and the creation of a new) | defence engineers had fin-
the political bureau with the|“presidium” or administrative|] ished their survey of the
“présidium of the central com-|committee may have a_ bearing!| safest site in the Capitol



UNITED NATIONS SUPREME COMMANDER Gen. Mark W. Clark (right) waves to a friend as he lands in
Seoul from Tokyo to witness the insuguration of President Syngman Rivec for a secoyd térm, Mrs, Clark

a ; e hani is yes day to have resigned °

nd to have been succeeded by : }

UN. Adanaid 3.8.2," eae ir,

eo e As Premier Mohammed Mossa-

V iolatin. degh called Ministers into the

Ss 1eeting, Communist mobs demon-

|--rated in the a shouting: | ( tat) obat ith dontihed dat om Get = ' a Fleet, ; :

} [ |’ Down with ossadegh!” ‘and center) chats with an unidentified staff officer (left) and Gen. James A. Van Flee! (International)

Neutral Zone \° Down with the Shah!” Sources s * “ —— ce

5 se he Government said that r . , â„¢

PANMUNJON, Aug. 20¢ |, 098 to the Governn A j 7 3

The United Nations admitted United States Military Mission | ’ : J ean Team lo



mittee.". The constitution defines|on determining the eventual suc-|] months ago, but his men one violation of the Panimuniqn |eutorities lodged a eo. I

the function of the proposed|cessor to Stalin. }} are only now finding time neutral zone and denied anoth en ng moves tsade' ie ee sabe! oy ] f "7 A : Aid L I
presidium as “leadership in the; The exact significance of any || to get up. He said that no | ]}in the only contact between Kor Oe ee ee ilitary person. DISA GREE OVER ID I ynmoul 1
work of the central committee} change, however, depends on the|] grgent international devel- ean armistice delegations, Tie) 2) in the last two days. — : 4.

makeup of the proposed presi-
dium, what executive powers it

Most Powerful Body will hold as compared to the
The Congress politically is the} politburo’s total power, and what

between plenary sessions.” pme} rompte . talks are in a seven-day’ recess Bx FaxigiF ; 5

ann ee sete amened we the fourth in as many weeks. | the Resin ‘greet in te conta S
Colonel Charles W. MeCarthy, |, StS ER MS COpsees

defence precautions. Uniteg. Nations Liaison Officer Wednesday night. The latest in-

c ene “tat * cident involving American person-

Flood Victims

By MICHAEL J. O'NEILL
WASHINGTON, Aug. 20,

From Our Own Correspondent





; ryt saints iti rj Lynn minimized the fears ' ;

most powerful body in the Com-]Stalin’s personal position will be : delivered two notes to his Com-)° 5°)" OE ee ft = ; : 7 E eS
munist party and since all other! under the reorganization. voiced by Truman from |} unist counterpart, North Ker-| 0°) ne ‘ ea dinar Wa, The Western powers’ relations with Communist Yugo- LONDON, Aug, 20
parties are banned, it exerts a] The party Congress is supposed a to time that the main ean Colonel Chang Chun Sa) c5)jne1 was ied by the crowd lavia have taken a slight turn for the worse because of a] Jamaica is anxious to repay
strong influence on Government.|to meet every three years. But] Portion of the Capitol build this morning. One admitted that)... Colonel and the driver escap-. dispute over.economic and military aid, it was learned on} Britain for the assistance received
It has power to change the Party|its last meeting was in 1939. The ing is likely to colaps« a United Nations plane “did inat- |, indidry Wadnesday Informed source: revealed that the United when the colony suffered hurri-
constitution, make decisions on|Scheduled meetings were post- some day — bombs or no vertently” pass over the confer-| s.clier it was disclosed that! aro ake Sites: ro y avi me 0 000,000 | 522° devastation last year. The
five year plans and elect party} poned because of World War II bombs because of the evee zone on Augus 16. The Reds iy. jig Speaker ‘Ayatllah Kashani} ates secretly agreed to give ugoslavia nearly $80,000, Jamaican four by 400 metre Olym-
— " is sunered to pro-|@nd special postwar sonaieane. creas + Be big cass qonnaine ae a \tald United States Ambassado: in new aid. Britain and France are ready to put up another pa Pig oar sega ine enpcome
vide whatever democratic pro- Eee dome. The modelling ae , i vt} Henderson that the United! 621,000,000 Oe 8 eas to run at a meet-

i i ; W . as \ 2 ade as e that ; tm i ae ’ ‘ ‘ _ 4 a RY is-
are Sr a a es eee Sine cae ar eee oa | totadione be th PT hate ik a. Cares, — ee interfere at In a note last month the Big Three laid down theit ee eee food. dis
ear: the 1984 Cotigress . the n : ~ 11 ‘ouritée archi Sues oceur in future.” rp hes oi pane ip Hi Stes + Pp terms. But Yugoslavia hypersensitive to any suggestion! “When the team were presented

; £ 1s oods ourite architectural projects. rioration in the latter's relations ; §

The secand note rejected the |,’
Communist protest of August 1%
that United Nations planes had
flown over the area. However
it conceded that a United Nations

ground work for the great party! to Mr. Oliver Lyttelton this after-

He says that the portico
purge and treason trials which) e o.— should be built out farther,
followed was laid. The =o-|Claim Al Liv es net only to give better sup-

port to the dome, but to

h the Soviet Union. | of interference in their domestic affairs, balked.
UP.! ; Fa gas

’ lhe setback came just as Allied
}velations with the former Russian
‘partner appeared to be warming

- noon at the Colonial Office Arthur
é Wint, Jamaican captain, told the
Jamaica Gets Cclonial Secretary how grateful

teenth Congress in 1939 com- Jamaicans .were for the aid they

pleted the purges and Russia

entered a period of isolation LYNN, England, Aug. 20. make — the Capitol look | Investigating Officer had said *he| Drakes Passes |p. Western diplomats are work- New Part pee tT Week aeabina fos rethnens

During the past 13 years the|, The toll of dead and missing in gn sited in i : foes that, possibly one plane jing feverishly tq prevent differ- - y leagues ee a to ac

: od dil 43 was true |) had flown over the area at 15) 000 ‘ , e : ences from developing into ' caig and, would gladly give their

party doubled numerically. It are = os tans nites that the dome overhangs the |}. feet,” However, McCarthy. wag) SCe Examination \Spen rift. ‘That Wee one purpose, (rom Que Own Correspondents — | assistance on behalf of Jamaica to

” ed war di (forold, MacMilian prepared to|| portico by about 15 feet || the check showed no signs’ that) > i was believed, for the meeting} ~~.» KINGSTON, Ady, 20, the. nemalam peoples of Lynmouth
mately a fifth’ y the party report to the Cabinet what aid|| But he said that it was sup- planes had been over the area,| ‘from Our Own Correspondent) — 4r the Big Three ambassadors hel Ken Hill Trade Union Council) “Tt is possible that as a 'tesult o

| be h tered since lasy|Government should extend to the|| ported by its own cirewhir |} 2nd that~in any case at 15,000 ft KINGSTON, Aug. 20. |with Yugoslav Dictator’ Marshal} President who was recently ousted / this offer a special meeting may
mem nik <=. ente: oe vi wr siticken ‘rosart ‘alee. masonry wall which couid || Observation would be “extreme-| Four first class and seven second Tito on Monday. There was still}With his brother Frank — Hill,! be arranged by floodlight at White

eee, - 7 ee 7 ee A Oth) Biineteen bodies have bear twice the dome’s || l¥Y_ unreliable”. The note said:!class honours at the-B.Se. General’a chance for a compromise, in-}Richard Mart and Arthur Henry | City This would be the last

oe cae Commntane lohg have been recovered so far from the weight. He said that ¢he “We cannot recognize the validity|London University Examination formants said. from membership of the People’s|chance for the sporting public to

ruins of communities on England's

overhanging lip of the dome of your protest, and we therefore held at the University College of It was most important, they|Netional Party announced today|see Jamaica’s famous quartet of
south-east coast and from neigh-

7 consider the matter closed.” the West Indies in June were ob- | said, for Yugoslavia to get its in-|the formation of a new political} runners, for Arthur Wint confirm-

Uttt’ tirectine ~~ et U.r. tained by the first graduating ternational trade balaness as soon|party based on T.U.C. organisa-/ed to me that he is retiring this
7 ; and not class of the University College.|as possible through more exports |tion and policies. The inaugural} season from athletics

by the portico, 3 First class honours were alland fewer imports. They also|meeting will be held next month Mr. Lyttelton who followed the
, Congress started worry Fi k P, ‘Jamaicans while the second class;urged that Yugoslavia put less|when a decision will be taken to} Jamaicans’ activities in Helsinki
ing about its civil defence arourk ays honours include Wilfred Chan into their pet industrial develop-|oame the party either the| with great interest and sent them
plans about the time the eye . o* B.G.), Eugene Bertrand (T'dad),| ment plan so that more cash would | Jamaica United Labour Party, the|a telegram of congratulations on
Korean war began. One Like A King Kenneth Tam (T’dad), John be available for imports. The note | Jamaica Socialist Labour Party or | thelr four by 400 success,
member complained that, if ‘ Whittingham (B.G.) Passing also; also urged more emphasis on agri-|the Jamaica National Labour|shook hands with every member
a bomb fell on the Capitoi, ISLE OF CAPRI, Aug. 20 | were Joseph L, C. Drakes (B’dos) cultural production, now befig| Paty of the team personally. He had
Nicalo Farace, manager of the} on Talib Omardeen (T’dad) been so anxious to see them that

m under iron discipline and

the practice of obedience to the
; : bouring waters. Twenty-two per-
+ aod eee controls: them sons are officially listed missing.

The main address will be de-| MacMillan and Field Marshal
livered by the Party Secretary|Sir William Slim of the Imperial
George M. Malenkov rather than|General Staff spent yesterday
Secretary General Stalin. This|picking their way through debris
was taken by some observers herejleft by rain-swollen streams
to mean a_ strengthening of|which raged through Lynmouth
Malenkov’s position as Stalin’s}and adjoining villages last week-













TS ES a

members wouldn't know |slighted because of the industrial
heir. end.—U.P. whith way t n. Hf luxurious hotel Eden Paradise | programme, ne cut short his work at the Colo-
area arene aera eLearn eet that gg ae eee nee ga has been Z ff They called on Yugoslavia to MORE SUGAR FOR ea nn a ie tn ot
~ Amra.s r “ te SSABDEG i” bua my $ HIEFT Ali Wwe wa — oe Wednesday reports of an alleged J naica posal "for an international “Credi- PUER D eeheette Santnes. Seer



dispute with Farouk over a hote) , * 4s . tors’ ’ Conference to settle its for- we : ‘
bil. Farace said “Farouk is a KF lood Victims Aid eign debts at one time rather than The 1952 sugar quota for local;

good client and is treated as such. iecemeal The Big Three are |c2osumption in Puerto Rico has
There never has been any dis- ‘From Our Own Correspondent soebelie to eee debt pay- been increased by 10,000 tons, SCHUMACHER DIES

pute over hotel bills which were KINGSTON, Aug. 20 |ments for at least a year, and they |announces the U.S, Department

handed over to his acting secre-| The Jamaica Seer todey | suggested that eee On ae w# Agriculture. Sugar distribution BONN, Aug. 20.

tary Pier Busheti (Italian travel} ¢@bled the Ministry of Food In (7 intiiee he asked to do the same.]in Puerto Rico has increased; The death has been announced

agent) every Saturday anl paid| London offering on the island's) sinee the initial 100,000-ton|of Herr Kurt Schumacher ‘bé

regularly without discussion.” behalf to despatch ten tons sugar, = The note also insisted that the | ji uota for local uge was fixed, West German Democratic Pav‘;
Jacob Blaustein, President of} His Majesty drinks only large] ten tons bananas and one ton Ajlies be Kept fully informed of B.U.P.\ Leader.

the American Jewish Committee,! quantities of iced mineral water] coftee to assist flood sufferers of Yugoslavia’s economic condition

discussed with Truman on Wed-| and never touches alcohol, bu; his} Lynmouth, England, The Gov- and what steps it takes to scale | --———

nesday, the possibilities of the) Italian and foreign guests do,jeriment is considering further down its investment Programme. | tide a ee IE IRE.)

United States Occupation Com-] On top of this, we have tossed in| @ssistance. 'It reminded Yugoslavia that aid

missioner vetoging the so-called| free of charge, a luxurious root} Meanwhile, on the suggestion of|this year would be less than last

“Neo-Nazi” law passed by the| garden which is one floor over] ‘he House of Representatives sup- | year, and that it would have to

; Austrian Government last month.| the monarch’s apartment. Al-] ported by the Bishop of Jamaica, | gear itself for a steady reduction

Blaustein said that Truman| though he is not favoured and is{ 4 fund has beem opened for public|as time goes on, —UP.

showed “interest” in the matter.| treated like any other guest of} assistance to the people of Lyn-|

the hotel, Farouk pays like aj mouth.
| Japan Barred

U.P.’ king.”—U.P.
Tunisian Police 2

U.N. P lanes Bomb Clash With Strikers|! rom G.A.T.T,

LONDON, Aug. 20.

Communist Base TUNIS, Aug. 20. ._| Japan's application’ for ‘mem-



U.S. May Veto
Neo-Nazi Law

WASHINGTON, Aug. 20















Police clashed briefly on Wed- he-chip in the General Agreement
nesday with longshoremen, strik-| >, ‘Tariffs and Trade has been re-
ing since Tuesday, to protest the ja ted by postal ballot authorlta-




























’ U SEOUL, KOREA, Aug. 20 {ciring ‘ oe —— — tive sources said Wednesday.
nited Nations fig s rarrie ; , | Police had to use tear gas to clear ; E
planes struck & en poe and carrier based navy the harbour and during a short The Financial Times said it was
N ae 8g ommunist troops and supply base at | struggle a few dockers were in-,urderstood that Britain and two
Namyang on the Korean west coast leaving 300 buildings a | jured. ‘otier Commonwealth countries
mass of flame and explosions. Quiet was restored and 60 new | vo'ed against Japan’s membership
BAREHEADED PREMIER Mohammed Mossadegh, clad in the traditional \ Navy planes from United States carriers. cruising off | Seckers were able to resume work|ard three negative votes were
robe of the Mullas, an Iranian religious sect, confers with a group of the East Coast, were the first ‘0 swoop down on the target tegether with about 100 part-time |suiTicient to constitute a veto.
religious chieftains in Teheran. Shortly after, Mossadegh created a with bombs, napalm, rockets and machine gunfire They pore encores ver ew. Ot Tare Japan's application for member-
furore in the Iranian House of Deputies when he sent them for con- were followed by F 84 Thunderjets, F 58 Shooti Sta d ' Meantime Tunisian terrorists|%"'P made last month, had been
sideration a decree he intends to issue. It would take 20 per cent of the marine and A aig fich -t ; on ooting rs an churned wiih. th aa ibility |® hotly discussed subject in the
landlord’s share of future harvests and distribute the proceeds among i Ustrahan lighter bombers. for ienb ain of the Gast pri ‘correspondents’ column of the te
fo ‘S ;
voverty-stricken Iranian peasants, _—(International Radiovhoto) _ US. Sabrejets fought five bat-| For eight straight days Com-]| months, were arrested here on|Bitish Press, perry by
e ? : ise swith Communist M.I.G. 15 jets|munists kept their M.LG. 15 jet! Wednesday and will face trial be- jee cene ane eae lent
Saudi-Arabian U N Can Ss e uring the day and claimed one| planes out of the skies and fighter j fore a military court. {oe ee \ rr idland lig
Dear. ee une yasinn buts fighters shot b mbers and United Nations Sabre The group was led by two young |&â„¢Ssineering trades, '
ce 7 . “ae “tiner destroyed or dam-|jcis and fighters swept unopposed | ‘Tunisians, Mohammed Kilani, 20,! Britain's action in rejecting
Prince Visits Landing Anywhere need. claims awaited confirmation.|over North Korea in an eight | «nd Salah Cheriki, 21, and special- Japan's application to” join
Ss Be I N h K ea oe Dambe slammed Ld ime day spell which ended_ yesterday | ized in attacks on street cars in{G.A.T.T. appears aimed at retain-
ardinia ze F ase at Namyang, miles}when United States Sabre jets, bombing, police said. ing the right of discrimination : P
n Nort orea menmwinet of _Sukchon. Partialj}fought a battle with two Red jets.| Police also arrested Hamadilagainst Japanese goods, to’be used Whenever you want a ci gare tte-
ROME, Aug. 20 TOKYO, Aug. 20 edved pte ig oe > os des- | but no claims were made. M.I.G’s| Ben Hassini, who on January 1%igs a weapon held in reserve 2
: ME, Ns . . : zy. 2 ‘ a ive damaged. were part of a seventeen-planej during a demonstration, snatched! during the probationar. riod to
Prince Talal Aziz, gp ae Vice Admiral Robert Briscoe Communist Broadcast forination sighted’ over North|a submachine gun from a police’ test Japenese trading methods. remember -
son af King Ibn Saud of Saudi: Commander of Far East naval} Pyongyang Radio in a special| Korea —U.P. guarde—U.P. —U.P.
Arabia, agrived Wednesday by| forces said on Wednesday that]10,000 word broadeast early to-
plane from Cagliari, after a On€-| the United Nations could stage} day complained of Allied ‘page meni irometitl ? : | It’s the TOBACCO that counts
day visit to the island of Sardinia.) an amphibious landing “any-|baric bombings” and called “on : s is See
; ink where” in North Korea despite|freedom loving ; s Ik . B . O U Ss I d st *y D “ ;
Italian press reports said ne stepped up Communist fire power] world” to mat Jue tot nae i a he] egin ver ee n us ry a ispules
row Ate rags a ven Damian at major points. ‘We certainly|The broadcast came 24 hours after x |
‘i 10 oa oe niini irl eit have the capabilities to do it and|B.29 Superfortresses blasted the NEW YORK, Aug. 20. {| hopeful of a break in the dis-; workers in six of ten Harvester |
ine the eked to ieee tei. certainly know how” the Admiral/huge Red munition plant where| Negotiators will sit down to try) pute between the line and the! plants had voted to strike unless
bd fol almoet-orie watts: iri two said in a National Broadcasting|an estimated 2,000 workers turn-| to work out agreements in two! brotherhood of Locomotive F ré-; contract demands were met,
way Soaaeanil The maine of the Company interview with Irvine}ed out anti-tank and hand gren-| railroad disputes and hard coal} men, the Brotherhood of Loco- The union which represents
irl w Soin as Maria Marke Leving. ades. contract talks. Another major motive Engineers, and the Order; 26,000 workers is demandir
ee Was given aS Maria Maré Allies have “hit the beach”| Red propagandists particularly | labour news item was being made) of Railway Conductors fifteen cent hourly wage’ iner
Italian newspapers speculate; tw ice in sotceetul amphibious bitter charged that Presidént Tru-| across the conference table ar d a! : “fringe” benefits and “frozen’|
that ; ane have aeaie assaults against Reds sincé the|man ordered a tep up in the, not on the picket line, but strike The hard coal industry served| twenty-one cent hourly escala-}
nd betwee tha ~ aes ats start of the Korean war t) Uni od Nations air war last May!loomed in the farm equipment,! notice on United Mine workers! to sine
eee 2 ac ieaaans ae wae the Inchon Faas on th | d June. They said he unleash-| shipbuilding, and meat packing| that more coal must be dug if Tall vere broken off last week |
ae aa 8 ae a “| wes coast on September 15th,}ed more atrocities than Hitler ndustries workers are to receive a raise.' ar the inior begs tak eo, 2
rr ' } i A c a Ye -| al inion began taking a
prince asked to comment ose the! 1950, and the second was tt e| The tone of the Communist} A Federal Mediation Board; Unconfirmed report indicated | strike vote which should be com-|
reports referred all inquiries to san le gs on t : st | broadcast mz t an'4 I . . |
the Saudi Atobis or i Wonsan landing on the east coast| broadcast made it clear that North | summoned representatives of the if miners want jaily wage) pleted tod A, trike by CIO
facitiens ia ave cg eigen oe oe in late October, 1950 | Ko e eing hurt by incessant! New York Central Railroad andi boost of about $1.65 and six hour) Unite Rubber Workers has al
iy at eg ia eae ae : }Allied air atta It w mpie ' three rail brotherhoods to Was! ortal to portal r la re lose ight B. F. Good-:
} wa hat Talal } CCT Briscoe 4 proof that Ck ( 5 fter t
| » dinia yesterday but s rs A aera seebeelaeel a ‘ n' after the conference epender inimed ; planta at
reports f possible romance: it least 100 per cent dive tu stepeks tr ¢ 0 bring im agre worke edule eting wit
P age 6 de “PP e x 58 t ‘ ernat Harveste iT . : \ ;
t @ On page 6. it ike ‘ ate } e | y fter nnouncing that few UP CEC DOIN
, }

oe ee








PAGE TWO



OR fhe first time i
the Colonial
who intro
Seetion (yell
the official Telephone
has pUBlished a
ct Telephone Sut Hi
NUMERICAL TELEPHON 1
GUIDE"
In..this bo
not ‘Ysted in

Ltd

fied



klet subscriber
alphabetical or
but according to their telephone
numbers, All the telephones
use are.listed in numerical orde
that the name of any
cen easily be found, if his tele
phone number is known

This little bocklet should preve

so party

very useful and convenient
budiness men and private sub-
scribers ‘alike, Any caller wh

leaves his number, can easily be
identified by its use; any phone
number” hastily scribbled down
can be traced to its correspond-
ing party.’

From Venezuela
R. AND MRS. S. D, PRATT
and their two daughters
from Venezuela, arrived here
recently by B.W.1.A. for tw
weeks’, holiday and are guests at
Maresot- Beach Flats, St. Law-
rence Gap.
They told Carib that they are
enjoying their stay very much

and are pleasantly surprised with
the many attractions of Barbados.

Mr. Pratt who is a keen golfer,
is employed with the Venezuelan
Atlantic Transmission Corporation
in Caracas,

Back Home

ISS MAY SAMPSON of

Cheapside, returned home on
Sunday- evening by B.W.LA.
from the U.S.A, via Puerto Rico,
She was away for about two
months which she spent in New
York and Chicago. She thoroughly
enjoyed her holiday but is glad
to be back home.

After Thirty-one Years

R- CARLOS BOCCARDO was
an arrival on Sunday by
L.A.V. from Venezuela for two
weeks* holiday. He was accom-
panied by his wife and their three
grandchildren Elsa, Umberto and
Carlos and they are guests at the
Hastings Hotel.
Mr. Boccardo is Manager of H.
and J, Boccardo and Co., mer-
chants of Caracas, La Guaira and

Cuidad. Bolivar. He said that
he first visited Barbados in 1905
and .then again in 1921 but on

those oecasions he only spent
day or two. He however missed
the wind mills which were a
special “sight, but was impressed
with the wonderful roads and the
brisk business which was _ being
done in-the city shops,

a

Feacher Leaves

I EAVING yesterday by
4 BIW.1LA. for Trinidad was
Mr. - George Thomas, French
Master at Francois, a secondary
school in Martinique. He spent
a few days’ holiday here as a
guest “at Silver Beach Hotel,
Rockley and will also stay in
Trinidad for some time before
returning to Martinique.

Jamaican Wife Joins
Husband

RS. PHYLLIS MORDECAI,

wife of Mr. J. S. Mordecai,
Executive Secretary of the Re-
gional Economic Committee, ar-
rived from Jamaica by B.W.1A,
Jast evening to join her husband
whose -office is situated at Hast-
ings ise here.

Mrs. “Mordecai was accompan-
ied by, her infant son Bryan and
the family has taken up residence
at “Tfigrid’, Navy Gardens.

CROSSWORD

de ee
tel bd
2 ae Se





Across

h. A venicie drawn by another. (7),
7. To make music, a tittle work
takes an age, (5) /
tu. Lt’s that fellow frum Aden. (4
ll Terminate your ability to under
go pain (6) |
iz Size of muted gain (ty)
t¢@ and 20 Down How tirades ao
away with meals (4 4)
16. Made when you ¥. (4)
18. Habituai meeting place, (5)
2). Did this bird 17? (4)
22. Wood, (3)
28. It has feathery fronds. (4)
24. How stormy they are. (5)
Down
1. Trade, (8)
2. Obvious, take the pen apart, (8)
8. This cream despite tts epithet
is popular, (9) 4. Tot (3)
5. Playing visiting. race or post
(5) .
6. It’s a nasty expression, (5)
8. Contrive. (B)
9. Do it to get 16. (4)
13. Customary. (5)
15. Speed upsets an anagram of
9. (4)
17. Change direction. (4)
19 Entitle. (4)
20. See 14. (4)

————$————— arr
Sotution of yesterday s puzzle, —.Acrosss

1, Ferocious; 7
Jl Bratse); 15, Seer; 14
2° Anna: 17. Cave; 19. fre:
D

Trembling,

20. Sew:
1. Natfative: 2? Scribbler Down: |
Fountaifs; % Error; 5 Ottoman: 4
Coal: 5” iris: 6, Stargazer: 8, Bee; 10),
Opener. ‘12 Renew: 15. Last: J7 Crab
im veil

SR ST IS fener ARREST I,

70 CENTS

36 in.

| te
band.





MR. AND MRS. GEOFFREY MAINGOT

For Trinidad
MONG the passengers leaving

Married at St. Patrick





BARBADOS

BY THE

‘WO men are pushing wheel-





ADVOCATE

WA...

umes the guise of a rajah










| barrows full of cement the or a i ajah whe courting
}600 miles from Sydney to Mel- ic He i paging -s
|}bourne. This news ought to make elephant is the only
|r any a heart beat faster—espe-. anin € ’ ride habitually
ially the hearts of the two men without becoming bow-legged. It
| But I regret that they are not has such vi ie back “But ”
jdoing this to break a reeord, or , lied ahaa a “4 you surely
even because they like doing it. n't ide eler vants 2 tride, like
| They are trying to prove that they , ae ce Tons Sa al a ne : es
jean perform the job more quick-®)).\ Dae ae nr caeae

ly than the State railway. I abashed, immediately started kk
would like to see their faces i" the lady. “It is much too fine
|when, having beaten the railway, @ day,” he said, rather incon-
they are congratulated and told sequently, “to talk about
to take their wheelbarrows back elephants.”

to Sydney for more cement. “You

ean do the job so quickly,” a rail- té the ballet

way official will say maliciously, “FYUWAH DRONG,” tne first
} that We wouldn't dr@am of com- Papuan ballet to be pro-
peting with you.” If the two men duced in this country, may be
are cunning, they will fit small described as a tour-de-force. It

jmotors to their barrows.

faternational good will

LL the slimy stuff written

about international good will
at Helsinki was justified when a
| Czech, during a race, “in his
| effort to help the Russian, put his
jarm round him and gave him a
hearty push ferward,’ according
}to a correspondent who was there.
|Naturally .there was no question
of disqualifying either runner.
|The judges were probably blink-



is based on the Melanesian folk-
tale of the magician -who tattooed
a yam on the son of Queen Kava,
and died of eating raw sago. The
dance movements are formalised
into’a kind of static rhythm, and
mime is used to convey the styl-
ised enchevetrement of the mise-
en-seene. The climax, a master-
piece of artistic integrity, comes
when Kava, dressed as a_ fish,
lurés the magician into her canoe,
The suggestion of atavistic rata-
touille is admirably conveyed in a

ng through a mist of happy tears. ¢series of passeplats, and the final

But if one
jother surely one runner
/up another or push him off the
jtrack—if his universal good will
| falters for a moment.
|
|
le
i

can tip



Rajah Ramdamdhurtipore

*. , NOT JUST a rajah, mind
* That

you, but a maharajah.
fragment of conversation over-
heard made me think of Foul-

runner can help an- pas de carabe is something new in

jardinage.

In passing
inquiry into the collapse

N
A of a bridge reminds me of

William McGonagall’s closing

lines or the Tay Bridge disaster:

I must now conclude my lay

3, telling the world fearlessly
without the teast dismay,







By Beachcomber

At least many sensible men do
say,

Had they been supported on each
side with buttresses,

At least many a_ sensible
confesses,

‘ '
For the stronger we our houses, *

do build,
The less chance we
killed.

have of being

_— uncompromising feminist
says that when men propose
marriage they should make it
clear that they do not regard the
girl as their inferior,

“Will you be mine?”
the masterful male. But if the
man says, “ May I be yours?” it
suggests the masterful female.
“Let us be ours” might be a better
formula.

“Am I to understand that you
have~ refused me?” asked a lad
who had just been thrown across
the room by a_ policewoman.
Dusting her gigantic hands, the
girl said, “You'd better ask Mum-
sie.” Alas! Mumsie was a Ser-
geant, end the lad was pitched
into the hen-run before he could
open’ his mouth. Convinced that
life in such a fami
be his idea of marriage, he
reached for his hat, and passed
out of their lives with nothing but

a sprained wrist to remember
them by.
City Notes
HE third annual report of

the International Monetary
Fund makes it quite clear that
the system of barter recommend-
ed by some economists, would
automatically disallow any claims
made for foreign currency to set

enough, Such talk always makes That your: central girders would against balance-of-payments loss-

me think of him, because he so

: HE marriage between Miss

m on Tuesday by B.W.LA. for Barbara St. Clair Hutchinsor

Trinidad was Miss Jean Phillips, daughter of Mrs B. Re Hutchin. gn oO ODA bE

daughter of Mrs. Robertine Phil- son of “Bayswater”, Deacon's ~~ EMPIRE OLYMPIC

lips of Maxwell, Christ Church. Road, and the late Mr. Hutchin- ian ly To-Day Onl
Jean who is a Trinidadian, has ion, and Mr. Geoffrey J Main- $30 2 830° 430 & $13

been residing in Barbados for the
past twelve years. She has now
gone to Trinidad for a short stay
prior to leaving for the U.S.A. to
settle.

late

Mr.

got son of Mrs. Lucy Maingot of
Pointe-a Pierre, Trinidad and th
Maingot, took
place on August 9th at 4.30 p.m.

Raymond

Lon MacCaliister
Preston Foster
in

Tim HOLT
Kichard MARTIN



n

GUN SMUGGLERS

THE BIG CAT & | “and NOCTURNE



at St. Patrick’s Roman Catholic DISHONORED
‘nah re Home Church, WADE Starring
ss E HOAD, da sr «=ds The: scer as . a“ Starring George RAFT
ae ae, daught« T ee 1e ceremony was per formed Stes CARL ASUN See nT
of Mr. and Mrs. E. L, G. »y Father Parkinson, S, J. The| Dennis OKEEFE |

Hoad of Vaucluse Plantation, St,

Thomas, returned home on Sun- by her brother Mr. R 5 a 4 |
D . re = on § - . Reynold St. 2 & 8.30 Richard BASEHART
day by B.W.LA. from Trinidad C. Hutchinson, wore a dress of Wall Disney's Marilyn MAXWELL
where she spent two weeks’ Chantilly lace over eggshell satin 2
vacation. Anne is an employee of Her lace bodice had a nylon yolk STORY OF
the Royal Bank of Canada. and tight fitting sleeves, The lace GUT aE ee
. } I a g itting sleeves. The lace} ROBIN HOOD
tor St. Lucia skirt came to a point in the front WALL
ISS MARJORIE. ESTWICK, “4 formed a full train in the R rae ig
, Assistant Teacher, left the b ick. Her headdress was a beaded ‘Joan RICE BORDERLINE
island yesterday morning for St Gara and long nylon veil. She Satuirday
Lucia where she will spend a “so carried Eucharist lilies and at 1.30 p.m, Starring
short holiday. During her stay #4rdenias, sou ITY SUE a) Ghine SHEVOR.
vn will represent the Female Her attendants were Mrs WOMin 1H WARY SS
schanic Order ; . _ > : oo. Baa f Mid-Nite
pencesets Order of which she is Reynold St. C. Hutchinson, | “Saturday Mida-Nite Saturday Night
Secretary, at the opening of the â„¢atron-of-honour, Miss Daphne
Sister Lodge there. St. C, Hutchinson Maid-of-honour| 5 OF DANGER) LIGHTS OF OLD
and Miss “E a 7 1 and SANTE FE &
Will Come Awai and Miss “Ruth Goddard brides-
some Again maid, They wore similar dresses WHISPERING ROLL ON TEXAS

RS. JAMES BRAITHWAITE,

bride who was given in marriage

of blue french tulle appliqued in

; who has been holidaying in white flowers and wore head-
the island for the last four weeks dresses of the same material
returned to Boston this morning They carried red rose garlands
by Pan-American. Airways. Her down both sides of their dresses
husband is a brother of the late and carried white muffs with
Mr, C. A, Braithwaite, J.P. rosebuds,

This is her third visit in twenty- The flower girl Miss Janet
seven years and she will be re- Atwell wore white nylon "end
membered chiefly by those in carried a posy of forget-me-nots
musical circles. : _. Master Richard Hutchinson, the

Mrs. Braithwaite was organist page boy wore a white shar
: a St. Peter’s Parish Chureh gkin suit. . a
or fourteen years and ob- The duties of bestman :
: 3 Ste iM I astme were
feeecs ie eee ns performed by Mr, Geoffrey

y College of Music in Lon Alston of Vancouver. B.C. ;
don. She plays the violin, and\thosa of Sans fell et a
piano in addition to the organ. Geoffrey St. C. H tohi oe ae
She. now holds the position of DeVere Cole. Mr Sate eat t ee
Organist at the Trinity Lutheran dard and Mr. Will “hh ae
Church ‘in Boston, Massachusette reception was held ae ‘ay The
She is also a pupil teacher in water”, Desecn’s Road. and "hes

the piano and violin.

To her friends and relatives s ,
Ss é atives st se . . "

she says au revoir and she told JoqeGh Sor the honeymoon.

Carib that Barbados has changed Engineer Holidaying Here

in amany ways for the better : - " ‘

jand she was indeed glad to be M*: EO ROBINSON, engineer

lback after so many yedrs.. She sesend’ Wie of Robinson’s En-

| thoroughly enjoyed the hospital- Spain Pacer te ee Ae
Spain, ¢ Pr Oo uesday

| ity of the home folk, And hopes
be back later with her hus-

Two Babies In
| Six Months

R aa ,, LONDON The amazing saga of six men who
teports from Kingston of a THURSDAY, AUGUST 21 deliberately risked their lives to prove
| Jamaican woman who gave birth 4% — 7-15 p.m rstehtidiond oe isto a theory! On a primitive-type raft
\te a boy only six months after “4% p 4 t 4 i

, E oO p.m. The News, 4.10 p Th log:
her last baby have caused con- D Service, 4.15 tn The Sortratt 7 thee hat eet ee



as

bem

siderable interests among London



doctors, who believe that such Schumann, 5.15 p.m. Listeners’ | 101 days and 4,300 miles without
aoe ass \ Choice, 6.00 p.m. Welsh Diary, 6.15 p.m. | £ ‘

a thing, although unugual, is just Variel? Road Show, 6.45 pm. Sports| contacé with civilization, exerting
conceivably possible Round-Up and Programme Parade, 7,00] superhuman efforts to keep afloat
ty p.m. The News, 7.10 Home News From and alive!

A famous gynac log Britain
amous gynacologist told one 7.415 — 15.59 p.m 25 59M 31. 92M |
London newspaper GUY by ob; i gyepd gs capa eeebecialha aie 2 | SOL LESSER
cence would have to be examined 7.15 p.m. We See Britain, 7.45 p.m. |
most carefully and it id be Championship Bands, 8.15 p.m. Radio | presents
ost carefully and it would be Newsreel, 8.30. p.m. Special Despatch, |
| necessary to produce the X-rays 6.45 p.m. Interlude, 8.55 p.m. From the |
for study, Theoretically, it is not itorials, 9.00 p.m. From the Promen- |
4 - eee oe * ade Concerts, 10.00 p.m. The News,
impossible, but I have never my- p.m. News Talk, 10.15 p.m. A Day tr

self known of

: whe 1
pm

GEOB

TO-DAY 3 SHOWS 1.30

such a case.’



—

ady, 4.45 p.m

sife



left for High Winds, Cattlewash,

morning by. B.W.1LA, for about a
month's holiday and is a guest at
Indramer Guest House, Worthing

LISTENING

HOURS

Sporting Record, 5






of the Lord Chancellor,
The Portrait of a Lady

, 5 & 8.30 P.M,

SCABAMOUCHE

Stewart Janet Mel
GRANGER — LEIGH — FERRER

Eleanor Henry

— PARKER — WILCOXON

| THE YEAR’S OUTSTANDING PRODUCTION OF FRANCE

terday » pusie. Acros | GREATEST SWORDSMAN

PIT 24 — HOUSE 48 — BAL, 72 — BOX $1.00 KIDS 4 PRICE

SPECIAL PRICE KIDS 1.30 p.m.





a ee,

FIRST CLASS UTILITY CLOTH

RAYON PONGEE SILK

White, Rose, Royal Blue, Green, Grey,
Chocolate, Sky Blue, Gunpowder Blue

-: For :-

HOUSE 1l8e., BAL, 30c.



70 CENTS
70c.

DRESSES, UNDERWEAR, SHIRTS, PYJAMAS, ETC.

AT

70 cents

WHITTIELDS

YOUR
DIAL

SHOE STORE

4220.

ONLY

70 cents

of
oo

10.10 |

1

10.30
iene |
|
|



Opening Tomorrow

Opening Tomorrow 4.30 & 8.15

FOOTSTEPS MOON



not have given way,

THEATRES —

ROXY ROYAL
To-Day 4.30 & 8.15 Last 2 Shows To-Day
Tomorrow 4.30 only 4.30 & 8.15

THE SECRET OF
ST. IVES Ceasar ROMERO
and June HAVOC
cr les STARRETT

ruiey BURNETT it in
«TWO FISTED ONCE: A anes

STRANGER
Tomorrow Night and
at S20
Madam O'’Lindy & Too LATE FOR

Her Troupe in
CARACAS NIGHTS

TEARS



OF 19% Starring
Doors Open at
7 p.m Lizabeth SCOTT
Opening Saturday Dan DURYEA
445 & 8.15 ‘a
Univers: Pictures Tomorrow Only
Presents 430 & 8.15

THE GOLDEN | Lloyd BRIGGS in
SALAMANDER . |rHREE STEPS

Starring NORTH &

Trevor HOWARD |npoxen JOURNEY
ANOUK

Mid-Nite with Phyllis Calvert

anew

Saturday Night Saturday & Suussy

5 & 815
Gene AUTRY in
SOUIX CITY SUE Proderick Crawford
Richard Kiley
and

WOMEN IN WARK in THE MOB









“OUTLAWS of TEXAS"
Whip WILSON &
“TRAIL’S END"

Johnny Mack BROWN

4.20 pom. (only)
“SHADOWS ON
BEACON HILL”

Roddy McDOWALL &

‘NIGHT BOAT

Zane
NEV
Robert
4.20 p.

Carol
'

to

DUBLIN’ Stewar

Robert N TON

4.20 pom. Contly)
“CRIMSON CIRCLE”
Noah BEERY &

‘COURTNEYS of
CURZON S8T:'
(Color)

Sat, Special 0.40 & 1.30
“SPORT OF KINGS”
Paul CAMPBELL &

“BLAZING ACROSS THE



|

#0 p

Tim
“LEGION

PECOS”

YOU'VE NEVER BEFORE
A PICTURE LIKE THIS!

Produced by OLLE NORDEMAR
Music by SUNE WALDIMIR
An Artfilm A.B. ®

Told by THOR HEYERDAHL
author of the best-selling book



| ____ BRIDGETOWN
| “RON—TIRI” Play



SESS
~ BRIDGETOWN | BARBAREES |} OISTIN ~
(Dial 2310) (Dial 5170) (Dial 8404)
3 Different Shows 3 Different Shows Last 2 Shows TO-DAY
TO-DAY TODAY 4.45 & 8.30 pom
Special — 1.30 p.m. Special — 1.30 p.m “MONEY MADNESS” &

THE OUTLAW
Jane RUSSELL





“SPRING SONG”

“WATERLOO ROAD’



“ROOM FOR TWO"

“HILLS CF DONEGAL’
Dingh SHERIDAN





Sat. Spee al 1.40 pm.
“THUNDER
MOUNTAIN"



to the isles where the hula girls wait!

AT LAST ON YOU

| PLAZA -—Starting Friday














“FOR YOU I DIE"

& Catht Downs



GREY'S
FRI Q
145 & 8.30 pom,
“TAP ROOT" (Color)
Van Heflin &
“PARDON MY
SARONG’
Bud ABBOTT &
Lou COSTELLO

ADA
MIrrcHuM



m. (only)

RAYE &

t Granger

Sat. Special 1.30 p.m
“THUNDERHOOF™
Preston FOSTER &

“WHIRLWIND

RAIDERS’
Charles STARRETT _

Midnite SAT.
“OUTLAW BRAND"
Jimmy WAKELEY

“WEST of
EL DORADO”
Johnny MACK BROWN

=

m. (only)

&

HOLT &

of the
LAWLESS"
BR









SEEN



es. The reason for this is that in

ja system of barter speed is often
essential. Lf I offer 300,000 tons
of soft fruits in exchange for
cisterns, the fruit must be deliv-
ered before it goes bad. This
puts a premium on what is called
retroactive disbursements in kind.
That has nothing to do with free-
ing the £.

GAIETY

The Garden—St, James
TO-DAY (only) 8.30 P.M.
“KINGS ROW"
Ronald REAGAN-—Ann SHERIDAN
“SUGARFOOT” (Color)
Randolph SCOTT | atten
~ Midnite Sat.
SILVER CITY
BONANZA

Friday & Sat. (

8.30 p.m. |
“CRY MURDER’
Carol Mathews



Rex ALLEN &

“DAUGHTER
of the WEST’ GUNMEN of
(Color) ABILENE

Rocky LANE

ae

§

Philip Reed





SPECTACULAR
TECHNICOLOR
ADVENTURE !

IT’S THE LAST WORD IN
WESTERN
EXCITEMENT!

Paramount presents

The LAST
OUTPOST

starring
Ronald Rhonda
REAGAN @ FLEMING
with

Bruce BENNETT, Bill WIL-
LIAMS, Noah BEERY

At the
BARBAREES (Dial 5170)

PLAZA

FRIDAY 22nd
4.45 & 8.30 p.m.
& continuing Daily
Blazing Action
“THE LAST OUTPOST”




















Photographed by the
men who lived itl

R SCREEN!

with the ‘Action Packed '

rama!





oO

A WOMAN CAN
MAKE OR BREAK
A MAN

Vv cnarus
NicGRAW - DIXON
















and HIS
and




|
man





|

|

suggests x







DANCE AT THE

CRANE HOTEL
NAT. 30th August

TO THE TUNES OF

“KEITH CAMPBELL"
“SOCIETY SIX”

‘

rc abt
nd f
\/ - ONE IN EVERY 30 PERSONS”
\y

*

*«
*
*«

ly would not «x

*
*

*«

* — sacrrranrs
*

|x Dec. 23 — Jan. 21

*

| 4 Tan. 22 — Feb. 20

*

*

THURSDAY, AUGUST 21, 1952





»

ARIES Can obtain good results by real effort. To-
March 21—April 20 day’s influences are generally positive, but *
will need extreme care in following,

FOR THURSDAY, AUGUST 21, 1952

Look in the section in which your birthday comes and
find what your outlook is, according to the stars.

Avoid needless risk, getting into compro-
mising position; don’t overforce your hand.
Lean toward a safe policy. Don't be over-

sure! *

On the very practical side, yet can also be
most productive day. Heed sane tenden-
cies, do not go headlong into anything
without being well informed, aware of pit-
falls.

TAURUS
April 21—May 20

GEMINI
May 21—June 21

*

CANCER

High quality, performance needed to get
June 22—July 23 :

some of day’s good possibilities. Not neces-
sary merely to force things; go along in
calm, dignified way; you'll achieve goal.

Prime your work with wise study first,
know what you want, what you can Randle.
Have system; centre on reasonable wants.

¥ * ¥

You natives inherently lean toward qual-
ity rather than quantity, as it should be.
Hold up your end; deficiency in vital issues
can discredit good. x

Be in harmony with those around you,
don’t argue or quickly criticize, You then
get more out of life including holding
friends; you will bridge rough spots better.

-M

Influences say to be wisely on guard all
the time for possible slip-ups, misunder-
standings that could be troublesome. News
may tend to confuse, but don’t fret.

%
*
*

LEO
July 24—Aug. 22

VIRGO
Ang. 23—Sept. 23

+

LIBRA
Sept. 24—Oct. 23

*
+
*

Vigorous activities, keen thinking will best
weather this likely dull, perhaps mixed
day. Pitch your effort on safe side; do +
what you do well,

PISCES Not all stimulating day. Intricate matters
Feb. 21—March 20 may confuse; don't let this stymie effort. *
Heart interests rate.
YOU BORN TODAY: generally can do wonders when you

SCORPIO
Oct. 24—Nov. 22

Nov. 23—Dec. 22

General business, professional and personal
affairs need close attention, Look to the
right and left before acting. Don’t go into

risky deals. *

Fortunate rays. Open up your bag of tricks
and improved ideas; push_ them sensibly
for good gains possible. Personal affairs
can be much what you make them: take
course firmly.

CAPRICORN

AQUARIUS

want to accomplish much or quickly. Spare yourself exhaus-
tion from overdoing. Fine outlook; properly manage your
affairs and hold patience as a virtue. Birthdate: Samuel s.
Paquin, editor; Frank A. Munsey, merchant, publisher.

pS

MMM MH 4 4 *



DISTEMPER
IN ALL SHADES
14lbs. $3.08
28 lbs. $5.79
aneat HARD WARE Sonus

PHONE 4918





RICKETT STREET (Opposite Post Office)



——S











“THE JUMPING JACKS STEEL BAND”
featuring our own

BING of the CARIBBEAN PAUL WILKINS

“A FREE 15 MINUTE FLIGHT

IN “BIM” TO

ENTERING THE DANCE >
DANCING from 8.30 p.m.

Supper included Dress Optional

ADMITTANCE — $2.00

LADIES’ WATERMAN'S PEN & PENCIL'SET—-Donated by T. Geddes Grant Ltd.
“4711” TOSCA PERFUME—Donated by J. A. Marson & Son, Ltd
2 Cases HEINEKEN’S

BEER K. R. Hunte Ltd

women.

Donated by







THURSDAY, AUGUST 21,

West Indian Hopes © cean oF inventors stut at it

1952

Pinned On 5B.G.

LONDON

The shortage of rice, staple food of 60 per cent. of the
earth’s population, is one of the most serious food problems

facing world food authorities today and is likely

so for some little time.

remain

This year’s crop prospects indicate no greater supply

of rice on the world markets than last year.

Thailand is

the only rice-producing country that has materially in-

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Little Hope For End Of Rice

creased its output since last year

1d crops in China,

Burma, India and Indo-China have shown big declines from

pre-war levels.

Experts are giving most of
their attention to overcoming the
grave rice shortage in the Far
East. For the peoples of the
West Indies who are also largely
dependent on rice, hopes are
pinned on expansion of the big
rice scheme in British Guiana,
which is rapidly becoming an
increasingly important factor in
‘the world rice picture.

The Food and Agriculture
Organisation of the United
Nations has been concerned for
some time with measures to

alleviate the rice shortage and
has now proposed to call an inter-
national conference to deal with
the best means of overcoming it.

Before the war, some 8,000,000
tons of rice a year were handled
in international trade. With the
increase in the world’s popula-
tion that has taken place since
then, some 9,000,000 tons a year
are needed to supply current de-
mands at the same rate. But
only 4,800,000 tons a year have
gone into international trade
since the war.

Stop-Gap

Countries of the Far East have
made up their rice shortages to
some extent by importing grain
from the Western world. But
this, although preventing famine,
is nothing more than a stop-gap.
For one thing, most rice-eating
people of the Far East are not
willing to accept other grains as
a substitute. For another thing,
grain costs dollars which most of
these countries can ill afford.

One of the main reasons for the
rice shortage is the post-war
political strife in Burma and
Indo-China, two of the most im-
portant rice-exporting nations
before the war. Its repercussions
have been particularly severe in
India and other Commonwealth
countries,

Before the war, exports of rice
from these two countries and
Thailand stotalled about 6,300,000

tons a year, of Which 4,500,000
tons went to other Far Eastern
nations and the rest went to

Europe and the West Indies. Last
year, rice exports from these
three countries totalled only
2,150,000 tons, of which 2,980,000
tons remained in. the Far East,
leaving little enolgh for Europe
and the West Indies.

Professor G. vu. Allen, a politi-
cal economist of the University of
London and an expert on Japan-
ese economic problems, is one of
the advisers to the F.A.O. Com-
mittee on Commodity Problems.

“The wartime destruction of
transport equipment (rice fields
are often scattered and isolated)
took a heavy toll of rice produc-
tion,” he says. “The destruction
of irrigation works and the deple-
tion of farm capital were also
catastrophic, and producers and
traders today lack the necessary
security to undertake reconstruc-
tion.”

These changes in the supply
picture have increased the bar-
gaining power of rice-producers
with any supplies to export and
have put the world price up.
Since rice is now much dearer
than wheat, the paradoxical posi-
tion arises that the poorer half of

the world now eats the more
expensive cereal.

Before the war, there was
hardly any competition to buy
rice on the world market. Today,
all consuming countries are
vigorously competing with each

other, desperate to buy as much
ag they can of the rice which
Burma and Thailand have to
offer.
Shoriage In Asia

Immediate prospects, « believe
F.A.O. officials, are for a shortage
of rice in Asia that must essential-
ly be overcome by the Asiatic
countries themselves. There will
therefore be fewer exportable
supplies from Asia in 1952 than



Keep your
children.

Your children will always be full of fun

—full of energy... have a
for work or play... if you
HALIBO GE
in the body-building

grand for adults too

give them
every day. It is rich
and protective vita-
mins A & D—ensures strong bones and
muscles, increases resistance to illness.

Children love taking Haliborange —
the pure halibut oil is blended with
orange juice to make it extra delicious. Iv’s

ast yeer. Continuing demand
will therefore widen the gap be-
tween export prices and Govern-

ment-controlled domestic prices
in these countries.

As far as the Colonia! Empire
is concerned, expansion of rice

production is being pushed ahead
as rapidly as possible. Produc-
tion in British Guiana has risen
to 65,000 tons a year, as against
45,000 tons before the war, of
which some 30,000 tons are for
export to other West Indian
islands—a small but importan
contribution to world supplies,
helping to relieve the export
pressure on the Far Eastern pro-
ducers,

For the last tive years, the
F.A.O, has sponsored technical
studies on the breeding and fer-
tilisation of rice. Three confer-
ences have been held on breeding
improved, varieties to combine
higher yield with greater resist-

ance to disease and some _ pro-
gress has been made in this
direction. Some of the methods

of improving rice production are
listed by the F.A.O. as follows:

Free distribution or distribution
at reduced cost of fertilisers and
other ‘requisites; preparation of
lands by tractors at nominal cost;
provision of irrigation water free
of charge; Government subsidies
for improved practices; guaran-
tees of fixed price; short and long-
term Government loans for
technical improvements includ-
ing the financing of harvesting;
the settlement of farmers in new
or abandoned areas; the organisa-
tion of co-operative facilities to
take over the function of middle-
men and to provide credit; and
the decentralisation of rice mills.

—B.U.P.



“Gioria Maria’”’
On Dock

Work is progressing — satis-
factorily on the Steamship Gloria
Maria Which has been on dock
for about three’ weeks under-
going extensive refitting. Her
hull plates and all the structural
members of the frame are being
renewed.

The Gloria Maria which is a
double bottomed vessel with a
twin screw hag a net tonnage of
364 tons and’ is own@€d by the
firm of C. A. Maritima Delta of
Caracas, Venezula, and her
ag here are R, M, Jones &
Co.” Ltd.

The Maria is used by the Com-
pany for transporting gypsum, a
type of stone and also has roor
for general cargo. She was raised
on the dock on July 30 and is
expected to come off in approxi-
mately two weeks’ time,

In 1948 the Motor vessel Julia
—sister shf) of the Gloria Maria
and owned by the same Company
—was refitted on the same dock.



66 Ay 99
‘A thelbrook
? e
Arrives
.

The Steamship Athelbrook
arrived in the Careenage yester-
day morning from Trinidad and
was loaded with a cargo of
molasses, This 206-ton Steamship

under Capt. W. Cook left the
same day for Trinidad.

She is consigned to Jason Jone
& Co., Ltd.

The Steamship Canadian Chai-
lenger which arrived in Carlisle
Bay on August 16 from Trini-

dad left yesterday for Montrea!. th

While here she was loaded with
sugar.








real zest



IN LO§ ANGELES, Dr. Lee DeForest (left), 79, shows his latest invention
to Dr. Robert Milliken of the California Institute of Technology. The
inventor’s problem was to turn heat into electricity. This is done by
pumping air out of a metal pot. Then a five-inch disk is heated to in-
candescence to throw off electrons, This idea resembles the common
vacuum tube for radio invented by Dr. DeForest. It would require no

outside voltage to accelerate electrons.

(International Soundphoto)



Cross-Examination

Of Clerk Today

THE TRIAL OF KEITH SQUIRES, a 26-year-old clerk,
for falsification of accounts on or about August 31, last year,

while an employee of D. V.

Scott & Co., Ltd., entered its

third day’s hearing yesterday at the Court of Grand Sessions
before Mr. Justice J. W. B. Chenery, and has been adjourn-

ed until today.

Defence Counsel Mr. E. W. Barrow who cross-examined
Mr. Cuthbert King, Supervisor of the Excise Department
of Customs on Tuesday, for about two and a quarter hours,
continued his cross-examination of this witness for about

the same time yesterday.

One other witness gave evi-
dence, Mr. Clayton Thorpe, former
Customs Officer in charge of the
Cheapside Rum Bond, and this
has brought the number to five.
He will be cross-examined today.

Mr. Barrow is associated with
Mr. F. G. Smith,

Hon. C, Wylie, Attorney General,
and Mr. F. E. Field, Assistant to
him, are prosecuting for the
Crown

Squires is charged with having
on or about 3lst August, 1951,
while he was a clerk or servant
of D. V. Scott & Co., Ltd., with
intent to defraud, made or con-
curred in making a false entry in
a stock book belonging to or in
the possession of D. V. Scott, his
employer, purporting to show
that on August 31, rum vats 1, 2
and 3, the property of D, V. Scoit
& Co., Ltd., at Cheapside, Bridge-
town, contained respectively 2,796,
1,380 and 2,820 proof wine gallons.

Office Records

Cross-examined, Mr, King said
that he did not discover sometime
in February that 50 casks of rum
had actually been shipped and not
entered in the Government books
ht the Customs, nor was he at any
time aware that rum had been
shipped and not entered in the
books. If such had occurred, he
would have a record of it in the
office records.

His Lordship asked him to
check his records during the
luncheon interval, and after he

had done so, he said that he had
discovered a document in which
Mr. Neblett, an officer of the
Cheapside Rum Bond had ex-
plained why 50 cartons of rum
had been omitted to be entered
in the Cheapside book.

Before he had made this check,
he said that if a mistake had been
made and 50 casks of rum had
been shipped and it was not
entered in the books of the rum
bond, 2,500 would not be in the
bond but would appear as being

ere,
There had been rumours about

rum being carried through the
back door, and on some occasions

tr Baby loo!

choose
extra mild, extra soothing

Bath Size
PALMOLIVE

SOOTHES BABY’S TENDER SKIN

people were prosecuted. Reports
had been made to the Police, but
he personally had not made any
report,

There was one occasion when
he had heard of a mule cart being
seen at the back door of the bond
and he had asked that it be check-
ed up, but he had never heard the
driver's name.

Duplicate Keys

He kept duplicate keys for the in lots at
did not and Ovington, in the parish of St. returned a

various bonds, but he

Health Board Seeks





Shortage

More Information

MEMBERS OF THE GENERAL BOARD OF HEALTH
at their meeting yesterday acreed to the suggestion by Mr
J. M. Kidney that the Clerk of the General Board of Health

hould inform the Commisiorers of Health of the various
rishes of all plans of development approved by the Board

Mr. Kidney felt that thi Dealing with this matter, the

!

thod would facilitate the exe-

cuti of the Commissioners
duties under the Public Health
Ai the previous meeting of the

Board, members discussed the
ggestion and it was decided
rat it should be placed on the
\genda for the following meeting.



joard of Health

ing

The f approved

f the







lividing and letting land in

at Savannah Re Bush Hall,

Sit.. Michael, by Mr, J. G. Nurse.
Dividing off 4 Acres 1 Rood
13 3/10 Perches of land from
lands of “Bosvigo”, Eagle Hal!

Read, St. Michael by Mrs. Muriel
Hanschell,

Division and sale of 684,291
sq. ft. of land at Thorpes Planta-
tion, St. James, by the Barbados
Co-operative Bank Ltd.

Division and sale of 132,896 sq.
ft. of land in lots at Derricks, St.
James, by J. B, Clarke, Esq.

Dividing off and _ selling 60
acres 11 Perches of land at New
Castle Plantation, St. John, by
New Castle Estates, Ltd, (B.4131)

The Board considered an appli-
cation for the division and sale
in lots of 238,142 sq. ft. of land at
Pine Hill, St. Michael, by Mr.
Neville W. M. Carter. It was
decided that this matter be post-
poned until the Board was satis-
fied as to the water supply.

It was also decided to adjourn
the consideration of the applica-
tion for the division and sale of
411,693 sq, ft. of land in lots at
Deighton Road, St. Michael, by
W. T. Gooding, Esq, et al. until
the Board was satisfied as to the
water supply.

The Board did not approve of
the application by the Barbados
Co-operative Bank Ltd., for ap-
proval of lots numbered 35, 36,
37, 48, 50, 51 and 52 as set out
in the plan of 157, 281 square feet
of land at Howell’s Cross Road,
St. Michael.

An application was received
from Messrs. Haynes & Griffith
on behalf of the Joes River Sugar

Estates Ltd., for the return of
plans submitted in connection
with the division and sale of lanc

Vaughan’s Plantation

have keys for the compara Joseph.

at the Cheapside bond.

‘was an occasion when a merchant | ——

wanted to get out rum for a ship}

and he
vith him a night, but he could
not remember the details of it.
They did not stay for more than
Yen minutes, and he was accom-
panied by Mr. Thorpe. That was
an unusual case, and the normal
permit would have been made
out the following day.

The books _ produced, the
merchant’s book etc., might have
been in arrears about September
last year. Occasionally Mr, Thorpe
would allow merchants to blend
rum without getting a permission
straight away.

In some respects, if those books
were in arrears, those at his office
would be.

There had been a recent disap-
pearance of rum from Wakefield,
but it was decided that it was
due to an abnormal evaporation.
This was about 200 proof wine
gallons. The usual amount allow-
ed for evaporation was two or
one per cent., but this was about
ten per cent.

It was true that the Cheapside
bond was hotter than at Wake-
field.

Re-Examined

Re-examined, he said that when
rum was being taken from one
bond to another it would be in
the merchant’s custody,

Mr. Clayton Me. C, Thorpe said
he was first at the Bond in Cheap-
side in January, 1950. About 15
or 16 merchants kept rum at the
bond of which about 10 or 11 had
compartments for storing.

On page 6.






| Palmolive—made of the fines! ingredients—gives a creamy-
j smooth extro-mild lather tha! soothes away irritotion as it gently

aliborange

THE NICEST WAY OF TAKING
HALIBUT OIL






Made in tngland by:

ALLEN & HANBURYS LTD LONDON, E.2

floats away dirt. A daily Palmolive bath will keep your baby
comfortable . . . refreshed . . dainty. Remember, Palmolive is
extra-mild . . . extra soothing!

PALM OUVE
GOOD FOR BABY
iS ESPECIALLY
BOOD FOR You!



Fer Loveless YU Créer wwy GAT SIZE PALMOLIVE



went down to the bond |





Che Pride ae the inithe

Here she comes—the new Baby from No. 10!

Oh, do let me have

simply lovely—and how like her Daddy!
No, no, she’s Mummy’s girl—look at her

eyes!

. . . Baby Joan doesn

ard decided to seek the advice
f the Atterney General. The
“halrman instructed the Clerk to
torward the correspondence to
the- Attorney General.

The Board received the reports




for the months of May and June,
1842, by the Government Chief
Sanitary Inspector.

Members present were: Dr. E
Be. Carter,—Chairman; Mr. A. E.
S Lewis, M.C.P., Hon. V. C. Gale,
M.L.C., Mr. J. M. Kidney, Dr. J.
P. O’Mahony and _Dr. F. N
jrannum,



Painter Died Ry
Natural Causes

A nine-man jury yesterday re-
turned a _ verdict of death by
natural causes to His Worship

Mr. E. A, MeLead, Police Coronei
of District “A”, in the inquest
into the circumstances surround-
ing the death of 60-year-old
painter Goulbourne Gittens.

Goulbourne
sided at

Gittens,
Bullen’s

who
Alley, St.
Michael, was found dead in a
eanefield at Bullen’s Alley on
August 7, and his body was re-
moved to the Public Mortuary
for a post mortem examination,

Dr. A. S, Cato who performed
the examination, told the court
yesterday that the deceased was
dead for 18 hours and the vessels
of the heart and brain were
diseased, In his opinion death
was due to natural causes, namely
heart disease

re-







Bertie Tull of Bullen's Alley
St. Michael, said that the de-
ceased was his step-father and
used to live with him. Some-
time on August 6 the deceased
left the house for eanefield
where he had stocks.

He never returned home that
dey. The next morning he was
told something and went to the
Publie Mortuary where he iden-

ufled

lo Dr,

the body of his
A. S. Cato,

tep-father

At this stage His Worship
Mr, BE. A. McLeod summed up
the facts of the inquest to the

jury and after a deliberation they
verdict of death by
natural causes,

a peep... . isn’t she

‘t worry—she has her

happy contented smile for everyone, but is

longing to get home again for another warm,

comforting drink of the Cow & Gate Milk

Food that is doing her so much good.




Nhe FOOD of”

COW é GATE ass

4714



ROYAL BABIES

NOW IN STOCK

Petroleum Jelly (White)

Household Wax



} HOW AMAZING, MARY!



Petroleum Jelly (Brown) isso Lighter Fuel

Esso Handy Oil
Paraffin Oil

Flit in gls., ars., pts, & % pts. })

Nujol Mistol Flit Powder

Further Particulars, Apply:

R. M. JONES & (O.,

ROPE









Protect your gums and you protect your

teeth, for gum troubles cause over 50 per cent. of tooth-
losses. To promote firm, healthy gums, use Ipana tooth paste —
Tpana and Massage. Use Ipana, also, to brush your teeth extra-
white and reduce acid-forming bacteria that cause decay. This
is the way to keep your whole mouth healthy; the way you will
find “refreshingly different”? because of Ipana’s mint flavour.

| THE TOOTH PASTE..
o4 57 REFRESHINGLY DIFFERENT

A PRODUCT OF BRISTOL-MYFRS, LONDON AND NIW YORK
ene

Pn Rene rm

°» dll be cavelul- thats
Aismsueys new radio set,Jon (

Deere Pp LT
ees DONT WORRY, JEAN











/






Y (T$ NOT A RADIO f &
wn SET AY ALL. ITS
Wy REDIFFUGION ~ UST




A LOUDSPEAKER WITH
A WIRE DIRECT TO
The sTUbO




THERE YOU ARE, BILL. RELAYED
STRAIGHT FROM THE STUY.
By wike. iTS PERFECT
LISTENING AND WONDERFULLY
CHEAP TQ RUN.
ITS AMAZING!
REDIFFUSION IS JUST
THE JOB FOR US MARY.









VE NEVER HEARD A
PROGRAMME 50 CLEARLY,
BILL AND | WOULD Love
IT~ BuT WEVE GOT
NO ELECTRICITY,

——









—
YOu DON'T NEFO Ii
JEAN. REDIFRUSION
SUPPLIES ITS OWN
CURRENT! WHY DONY
YOU BING BILL IN
ONE Nout? HE

CAN HEA (T FoR
HIMSELF ¢





PMO, AB Ae

Je sdeebire "Etter -

HIGH VALUES!
LOW PRICES!

5 SON ir



SON



SS





OIL STOVES to suit
every Budge:......

ONE BURNER
(Cotton Wick)
from $7.36

TWO BURNER
(Asbestos Wick)
from $22.87



THREE BURNER
from $49.24

...-.- And OVENS
to fit all Stoves

(Spare Parts:
We carry them !)

Barbados Co-op
Cotton
Factory Ltd. yf l,

SSS

x







PAGE FCUR

BARBADOS ett ADVOCAT

Cra ere ea Se oe es Bs ee





































































































Whats I

My dictionary defines accident
as, ‘an event which was unexpect-
ed,.or the cause of which was un-
foreseen; a contingency, casualty,
or mishap’, and so on. Perhaps a
more practical definition, with
special reference to traffic acci-
dents, would be something that
should not be allowed to happen,
and the number of which would
be very much reduced if all vehi-
cle owners and drivers felt even
slightly more responsible.

Nearly all visitors to Barbados
are impressed by the extensive
network of paved roads in the
island, and simultaneously but
unfavourably impressed by the
amount of extremely irresponsi-
ble’ driving on these roads. I
have myself driven and been
driven in many different countries,
but nowhere else have [ had the
same feeling of taking my life in
my hand by merely venturing on
a public highway, either on foot
or in 4 car.

Printed by the Advocate Co., Lid., Bre-* ¢t_ Bridgetewn



21, 1952

Thursday, August

——— ee =



CANE FIRES

THERE were 48 more cane fires in 1951
than in 1950 and six hundred and thirteen

mere acres of cane were burnt in 1951
than in 1950.

Yet of the 220 cane fires which were in-
vestigated by the Police only two were
supposed to be acts of incendiarism, 13
were accidental and 205 uyknown.

My house is on a main road and
when pottering in the garden I
see a constant volume of cars,
buses and lorries go careening past
at speeds far too high for safety
on roads where the view ahead
is usually limited to two or three
hundred yards, and is often less

Som es it seems quite sbvi-
ous that the drivers of two or more
lorries are racing each other, a
most dangerous practice where
the loryies are so wide and the
roads s@ narrow. Even the buses
seem to race occasionally the most
flagrant case I have seen being
an ‘outing’ party of nine or ten
buses returning from an expedi-
tion that was obviously not that
of a Temperance Society.

If I were asked to give in a few
plain words what I believe to be
the outstanding cause of danger-
ous driving here, I would say it is
what strikes newcomers to the
island as a remarkable difference
in mental attitude toward respon-
sibility for accidents of all kinds
and not only traffic accidents .

I often wish we could have

St. Philip held the record for 53 cane
fires in 1951, but these were widespread
in other parishes, 48 in Christ Church, 29
in St. George, 21 in St. Joseph, 20 each in
St. Thomas and St. Michael and 15 in St.
John, There were only 5 in St. Peter, 4
in St. Andrew, 2 in St. Lucy and two in
St. James.

This increase in the number of cane fires
is alarming not only because of the heavy
losses which are borne by the insurance
companies, the damage to young crops anc
the loss in sucrose content of the cane, bu:
because of the fatalistic attitude to canc
fires which has developed in the commu
nity.

After commenting that Barbados wa:
“fortunately free from any major fire” in
1951 and regretting the death of one femal~
infant in a fire on the 22nd December
1951 the Fire Officer in his report on the
Barbados Fire Brigade adds. “in additio:
to the above there were 220 cane fire:
in the Colony involving approximately
1,450. acres of cane. Of this number it wa:
only possible to arrive at a probable causc
for twelve of them, the causes for the re-
mainder being returned as unknown.”



WASHINGTON.

Americans are saving—saving
hard.

New York City, one of the
sreatest aggregations of wealth in
he world, is putting more and
money away in savings accounts
and bank deposit boxes all the
time.

In the first six months of this
year the city’s bank deposits
showed a gain of £103 million,
compared with £6,400,000 for the
irst half of TPL

*

The Fire Brigade atténded only 66 fires
in 1951 and of these it was not possible t»
suggest a cause for sixteen. Commentin::
on this the Fire Officer writes “there doe:
seem a diffidence on the part of some

*

people who could help in giving informz.- How can people do it, with
tion after a fire that would lead to a fair ae and taxes as they are
assessment of the cause.” One way appears to be that

hey have largely stopped buying
household appliances, furniture,
radio, and TV sets for the time
veing. As one expert puts it:
‘How many refrigerators can a
family use? How many cars can
you drive at one time?”

But, as usual, the experts are
livided into two schools of thought
over the underlying reason for the
hrift. '

One group says people are
building up nest eggs because they
are jittery about the future and
what it may hold,

No, say the others—if people
think there will be war tomorrow
-hey spend lavishly on the “eat,
irink, and be merry” principle.
Chey are saving because they have
sonfidence in a serene and peace-
ful future.

Paper dollars are known as
‘greenbacks” in America and
sounsel for Martin Olsen, a Brook-
lyn bank teller who “went to
lunch” taking 38,000 — dollars
(£13,500) with him, pleads to
the judge: “Hitherto Olsen had

Throughout Barbados there seems to b>
atendency for fires to occur without known
causes. As for cane fires the fact that «
probable cause is suggested for only twelv =
of 220 cane fires shows that the preven-
tion of cane fires is not regarded with an,
great seriousness locally.

It is ironical to read in the report of
the Fire Officer for 1951 that “the best
way to deal with a fire is to prevent it”
when cane fires are increasing in frequency
and hardly anyone knows how the major-
ity start.

In an island where the number of cane
fires exceeds by far more than one hundred
the number of ordinary fires it is remark-
able to find that the prevention of cane
fires is not,in the forefront of the Fire
Brigade’s activities and that so far as the
Police are concerned the origin of cane
fires remains in most instances a mystery
to them. If cane fires are to be extermin-
ated from the island (and Barbados can
little afford the annual financial drain
and the damage to young crops and mulch
grasses) the Police and the Fire Brigade
cught, it seems, to be conducting an all
aut campaign to abolish cane fires in
cooperation with the plantation owners.



A’ New Name For Capitalism

To the Editor, The Advocate;

SIR; — The Reverend Francis

Godson is, I suggest seeking a
name for something that is fast
disappearing—I mean Capitalism,
in the old sense of the word.
. The private “Capitalist” is in
fact being abolished, although,
paradoxically, his numbers are in-
creasing enormously,

Almost everyone nowadays is a
Capitalist to some extent. Every-
body with a current bank account,
a savings bank deposit account, a
life insurance policy, or interest
ina Pension Fund or in Govern-
ment or municipal loans is a Cap-
italist and, indirectly, a share-
holder in innumerable enterprises
over which he exercises no author-
ity or power.

Even persons who directly own
shares in banks, investment tausts
and industrial and other com-
mercial enterprises have little or
no power: authority or even effec-
tive responsibility for them, Fewer
and fewer “Capitalists” directly
operate or effectively control the
enterprises in which their capital
is invested. Even landlords are
finding it impossible to carry on
since the introduction of Death
Duties. and the big estates are
constantly being compulsorily

ee
big banks and leading cor-

porations, industrial and commer-
cial enterprises are more and more
being managed and directed by
mere salaried employees—profes-
sional administrators, technicians
etc. who themselves are frequently
not even shareholders except to
a very limited extent. The old
eartoons of the bloated Capitalist
with his silk hat and big cigar
bear no resemblance to present
realities.

The biggest ‘shareholder today
in every profit-making concern
is the Government—which takes
a big slice of the profits (if there
are any) in taxation (direct and
indirect and in sales and purchase
taxes) but which does not share
the risks or the losses. Any prac-
tical socialist should ask why any
State would bother to own (even
with the taxpayers own money)
or operate any undertaking when
it can regulate rates and prices
and tax profits :

The man and woman wht
urgently needs protection nowa-

The suggestion has already been made
in this newspaper that fire watchers should
be employed throughout the crop season
on all plantations and that factories should
pay considerably less for burnt canes than
is now paid (the money thus saved to be
paid into a Labour Welfare Fund).

Neither of these suggestions have been -
followed in Barbados although such poli-
cies are adopted in neighbouring West
Indian territories, Meanwhile cane fires
occur with increasing frequency and are
recorded by the Police. Clearly the pres-
ent policy of laissez-bruler applied to’cane
fires must cease, and a concerted drive
against cane fires must be started by the
Police, the Fire Brigade and the Sugar
Producers’ Association. In the United
Kingdom a report on Fire Research in
1951 listed fires caused by children with
matches and by smokers materials as
responsible for 5,800 of 43,000 fires in build-
ings during the year.

They concluded that the prevalence of
certain types of outbreak could only be
controlled by greater care.

It seems that cane fires in Barbados
come under the category of fires which
can only be controlled by greater care.

If the prevention of cane fires became
the chief responsibility of the Barbados

Fire Brigade, some headway might be
towards their reduction and final
elimination.

made



regarded greenbacks as nothing
$9 ethene haleneninitnteainancenene "

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



s Am Ae

Hy RE. SMV THIES

more of the aimosphere of the
Royal Navy in this respect, name-
ly that “Mistakes are not allowed,
and excuses are not accepted.” It
is a stern code but there is an ob-
vious connection between it and
the well-known efficiency of the
Navy in the job it has to do. It
is hard to see how there can be
efficiency in traffic control or any-
thing else so long as evasion of
responsibility and flimsy excuses
are the order of the day, and find
general acceptance.

Certainly it is a very common
experience now, when something
goes wrong or is lost or broken
or anything happens that should
not be allowéd to happen, to meet
with what seems to be regarded
as a completely satisfactory an-
swer, that it was not done on pur-
pose, therefore it was an accident,
therefore no one is to blame. The
fact that if just a little more care
had been exercised the mishap
would not have occurred, does not
seem to be considered at all.

I do not mean to imply that
this modern, inconsequential at-
titude toward responsibility is
peculiar to Barbados, because that
is by no means the case, but it
does seem to be very marked
here, and is specially noticeable
in connection with the wild driv-
ing that is seen every day on the
public roads. Perhaps it is mere-
ly another symptom of the gen-
eral slackening of discipline and
failure to distinguish between
liberty and licence,

In North America the altitude
of the general public andthe
Courts is that both owner and
driver of a vehicle are responsi-
ble for any damage done by ft.
The plea that it was not done on
purpose and therefore no respon-
sibility attaches, is never heard,
and would not be entertained by
any responsible authority for one
moment.

Here in Barbados man eople
seem to think that detect brakes

Saving Money Is The Big
New Craze

more than so many green vege-
tables. But suddenly the thought
of all the good things those
vegetables would buy and he took
the money,” :

The court, unimpressed,
tenced Olsen to 30 months,

A drink called .the “Adlai
Sour” has made its appearance in
Washington’s cocltail bars.

And the divorced Adlai Stev-
enson, Democratic choice for the

{

sen-



presidency, has caused smiles by
his remark, when tackled by
newsmen om whether he is

about to marry one of a number
of famous ladies: “The plural of
spouse appears to be spice.”

The “summer theatre” —
mainly in rustic barns—is a great
institution when the hot weather
hits Broadway.

But because the audience is
apt to get ravaged by flies it is
becoming familiarly known as
“Tine Citronella Circuit.” People
spray themselves with lemon juice
to try to keep the flies away,

In Kansas City, President Tru-
man, enjoying a “‘loafing” holi-
day, has lunch with old friend
Eddie Jacobson. Edie was the
man with whorn Truman entered
into an ill-fated partnership in
the haberdashery business long,
long ago,

Headline: “Bulky pelt and
huge pelf. intact, Farouk says
the’s coming here.” Pelf=wealth.

Down in West Palm Beach,
inner sanctum of money and
high society, there is great activi-
ty among the estate agents.
Reason: They are all hoping to
sell a mansion to Farouk.

Warning that the tense situa-
tion in Persia may require armed
American intervention to thwart





Our Readers Say:

days is (I submit) the ordinary
consumer, for whom “Socialism
for Consumers” would be an in-
telligent political slogan. He and
she are the political babes in the
wood, the orphans out in the econ-
omic storm.

Intelligently run and well-
organised Trade Unions of pro-
ducers in collaboration with well-
organised and effectively managed
Federations of Employers may
well be regarded as an open con-
spiracy against the consumer, They
can arrange hours, wage scales
and prices to suit themselves, an
charge the public anything they
like, in reason, provided they don’t
price themselves out of the mar-
ket. They are the modern mon-
opoltsts.

Socialism in the old sense of the
word is also obsolete. As the
Times Educational Supplement of
July 4, 1952 mentions, New Fabian
Essays reject the old definitions
of Socialism which have been the
shibboleth of the British Labour
Party for the last 50 years. The
collectivism of the early Fabians
and the nationalisation of the
means of productions, distribution
and exchange are recognised as
inadequate and have lost their
appeal and attraction,

Professor G, D, H. Cole now de-
fines Socialism as gq classless Soci-
ety in which no one is so much
richer or poorer than his neigh-
bourg as to prevent them from
mixing freely on equal terms.

Bernard Shaw argued on sim-
ilar lines that equality of inome
was desirable, and even essential,
purely on biological and eugenics
grounds—in order to widen the
choice of young people of the
opposite sexes who were likely to
produce healthy and _ intelligent
off-spring. In-equality of income
artificially restricts the marriage
market. The welfare state obvi-
vusly invites control of mating and
parenthood.

Mr. John’ Strachey regards
Socialism as merély a method of
restoring ownership of the means

vf production, distribution and
exchange to those persons who
operate them—the workers by
hand and brain,

Collectivism and nationalisation
have certainly not achieved Mr.
Strachey’s aims.

The Tim Educ
nt re that





tional Supple-
ul social

nas an



ists should regard sc



|

cident?

'
should be regarded as an accept-|
1bie ¢€xcuse for an accident, but
elsewhere in my experience it is |
ygainst the rules to operate any
vehicle with mechanical defects |
that make it prone to accident, and |
this applies especially to the |
brakes. sai

I have driven om many days in
the winter months when the roads
were covered with ice, and have
seen many accidents. In a case.
of collision when one vehicle is
skidding out of control and the
other is either stationary or under
control, it is always the one out of
eontrol that is responsible. The
underlying principle is that the
driver must at all times keep his
vehicle under control, and if he
drives on a slippery road it is his
responsibility, beyond argument.
At least that is my understanding,
and it seems only common sense
and equity.

I cannot help feeling that a
more general understanding and
acceptance of this principle of re-
sponsibility would have a benefi-
cial effect here, and so long as the
present tendency toward a facile
acceptance of excuses is counten-
anced by vehicle owners arid the
general public the efforts of the
authorities to improve conditions
are largely nullified.

Of course I know th the toll
of traffic accidents in North
America is far too high, mainly
because many people drive at
speeds up to 80 miles an hour or
more on the wide, straight high-
ways, mainly for the thrill of
moving at such high d. In
far too many of the accidents the
driver is too young and immature
to be at large on the public roads
in control of a powerful engine of
destruction.

That does not alter the fact
‘however that when damage is
dong, both owner and driver are
held responsible, and the general
attitude which is backed up by
the Courts, is the good old Navy
principle, ‘Excuses are not ac-
cepted.’ '











a Communist seizure of power

the columnists Joseph and
Stewart Alsop write: —
“It is believed in Washington

that a Communist takeover in
Persia must be avoided at what-
ever cost, even the cost of a break
with Britain on Middle Easter:
policies, This in itself is a
measure of the danger to the
Western alliance of the crisis now
reaching the boiling point in
Persia.”

Dead in New York at 86 is a
man of whom you almost cer-
tainly never heard—but you have
watched his “products” times
(without number, His name is
Charles Jehliger. His name is
Charles Jehlinger. He taught
acting and his pupils included
Spencer Tracy, Rosalind Russell,

William. Powell, *"and Lauren
Bacall.

In Detroit, Mrs. Margaret
Kelch is suing for divorce.
Indignantly she tells the judge
that her husband said to her:

“You remind me of my sergeant
in the Army.”

The Knights of Pythias, one
of ‘the many “brotherly” organi-
sations in America, urge Gov-
ernor Dewey, of New York, to
make it illegal for any club to bar
Negroes.

All those mystery “blips” on
the Washington radar screens,
said to be caused by flying
saucers, have inspired the wise-
crack: “Britain may have her
Colonel Blimp, but we have our
General Blip.”

Smash hit on the radio just now
is a song, put over with great
gusto by basso profundo Marlene
Dietrich, entitled:: “Too old to
pass he mustard any more.”





+

ideal (for a classless Society)
and choose the means by which
this ideal can be realised on purely
empirical grounds, and not trou-
ble themselves or their con-
sciences whether there is any
authority for such methods in the
writings of dead and gone Social-
ists and Marxists.

If Karl Marx were writing his
book on Capitalism today it would
be a very difficult: work. He
preached that Socialism would be
the inevitable successor of a highly
developed industrial Capitalism;
but the. only country. that has
adopted his ideas,is Russja—the
most backward country from the
Marx view-point; and Russia
seems to be afraid of letting
anyone know the true state of
affairs behind the Iron Cuftain.
One can only deduce that the pud-
ding is not up to expectation.

Yours,
G, F. SHARP.

Exhibition At Museum

To the Editor, The Advocate,
SIR,-—It is proposed to hold an
Exhibition at the Museum next
month of Views of Barbados—
drawings, watercolours and oils.
I would be glad to hear from any-
one willing to lend pictures for
this exhibition, especially the
work of Messrs, Ernest Bowen,
Poyer, Felix Haynes or earlier
artists. The work of living ar
is not required,
Yours faithfully,
NEVILLE CONNELL.
Director & Secretary
Barbados Museum & Historical
Society

My Admiration
To the Editor, The Advocate;

R, — I crave the indulgence
of your widely read columns just
to extend my admiration to Mrs.

B. Smith, widow of ‘the late
Mr. Howard Smith for the dona-
tion of £10,000 to the © Chil-
dren’s Ward at the St. Philip’s
Almshouse according to a report







T had seen in your. columns
recently.

If there were more public
spirited persons in this com-}
munity who would endeavour to
act and act wisely too, instead
of offering so much talk, cheap|
fibre anc gh sounding promises, |
I an Barbados would be z
litle paradise to live in i

L. B. CLARKE,

THURSDAY, AUGUST 21, 1952 -



CANASTA PLAYING CARDS

DEVELOP MENT OF NEW | (Complete with Instructions)
RICE-LANDS: A TOP PRIORITY Cie Oe
PROJECT | es Tontdaske

LONDON.

NO single commodity is more important
than rice, writes Mr. Bernard Brain, Con-
servative M.P., in the current issue of ‘Tory
Challenge.’

“Clearly we must produce more rice. But
how is this to be done?”

Mr. Brain then goes on to suggest that rice
growing products should be pushed ahead
in the Commonwealth. j

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“Our duty then is plain,” he states. “We in Sizes 3’ and
must develop new sources of rice within the 3” 6",
Colonial Empire, preferably in areas remote . . :
from the world’s trouble spots and do so C. S. PI TCHER & co.
with the utmost speed. { Ph, 4472

“Something on these lines is already being
done — but we are in danger of it being
too little and too late. For although rice is
grown in many colonies,and production is
inereasing steadily, the total is still only a
fraction of one per cent, of the world’s output.

“Yet there is enormous scope for expan-
sion. For Tanganyika — where there are
extensive areas of suitable land — a number
of pilot schemes devoted to partially mechan-
ized and fully mechanized production are
giving encouraging results. The yield is sat-
isfactory. But progress has been slow, pos-
sibly because in that part of the world mem-
cries of the indecent haste and foolish
optimism of the groundnut fiasco are still
fresh, and also — let it be frankly admitted
~— there are still a good many questions un-
answered.

“Thus, the Colonial Development Corpora-
tion’s scheme for mechanized cultivation of
rice under swamp conditions in neighbour-
ing Nyasaland has shown that mechanization
there is less economical than traditional
peasant cultivation.

“This year should see more rice grown
in Northern Rhodesia, Zanzibar, Nigeria,
Sierra Leone, Jamaica and Trinidad. But
of all the Colonial territories British Guiana
offers the best prospects.

“At the moment she produces only 65,000
tons a year, of which 25,000 tons are exported
to nearby Caribbean territories. But succes-
sive expert investigations have confirmed
that, providing extensive schemes of water
control are undertaken in the flat wasted
belt, production could be increased five-fold
in a relatively few years.

“If this could be achieved a substantiai
contribution would be made to Common-
wealth rice supplies, If it is to be achieved
the British Guiana Government must. bé
‘given help now.

“Of course, there are difficulties and they
must be faced. Rice can be grown in a wide
variety of climates and conditions — it is
not exclusively a product of the tropics —
but it is a sensitive crop, and what favours
it in one part of the world may not suit else
where.

“That is why mechanization is not a uni-
versal answer. In the United States ané
Australia where it is used to prepare th
fields, sow the seed, and harvest the crop
it has been an outstanding success.

“But not so in the tropics, where soil ccn-
ditions are different, where rice cultivatior
from time immemorial has been bound ur
with a complex of social and economic
factors. Here there is a case for partia.
mechanization, for finding the right balance
between machines and the men they serve

“But whatever the problems one thing i:
crystal clear. From now on, research or ex
periment, extension of successful ric
schemes, the opening-up of new rice-lands
should be a top priority throughout th:
Colonial Empire.

“For it will be of little avail to make thc
world safe from aggression if we fail to mak
it safe from hunger.”

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_—_

A MILLIONAIRE TAKES STOCK
AFTER HIS PARTY

By SAM WHITE

PARIS.
HEAVY-WEIGHT contenders for Parisia:

party honours have just taken a drubbin;
from a sparrow of a man: Chilean millio:
aire, Arturo Lopez-Willshaw.

_ Lopez-Willshaw—an inch over 5ft., takin;
size fives in shoes—spent more than £ 25,00.
on what he called “a surprise party give:
by my wife for my 51st birthday.”

For a surprise party it must have inter
fered with three weeks of siestas as work
men directed by France’s top interior decor
ator, M. Jacques Frank, built a ballroom fo
500 people, laid down flowerbeds, made ;
second dance floor and staircase. Down thi:
guests walked to be presented to their host.

Was this a Chilean challenge to Argen

VEGETABLES

FIRST QUALITY MEATS



; Foozon Haddock ‘Turkeys
tina’s Carlos (“Party of the Century”) Smoked Kippers Ducks . ;
Beistegui, with his Venice ball of last year’ oe oe

“Please do not say that,” pleads Mr. Lopez Hurttaes Fillet
Willshaw. “Carlos and I are old frisads, } Mackerel Kidneys
should hate him to think that I am tryine Pjichards Sweet Breads
to outshine him. His party was unique.” Lobster Hams

Another worry: “Please do not write to: Lobster Paste Bacon’
much about my ball. It is that kind of thing a RRS ROME 2 Corned, Beet: ty tine
which makes Communists.” ENJOY THE FINEST —



Mr. Lopez-Willshaw, who looks like : Gold Braid Rum FRESH VEGETABLES



beautifully tailored kewpie with his greyine 2 y=, Old ‘
hair carefully brushed back into a long wave $1.44 per Bottle ak ey en tb
derives his second generation fortune fror BREAD Beef Suet 36c. per Ib
Chilean nitrates and a rare type of Chilean J. & R Sandwich N. Zealand Cheese
manure, Bread — Frésh 73c. per Ib

The spender j Daily 3 Pkgs. Cheese 44c.



He is married to his cousin Patricia, a}}
petite and exquisite figure. They have ni
children and live in a monastic-like house!
in the Paris suburb of Neuilly.—L.E.S, |!

GODDARDS

FOR SERVICE.











THURSDAY, AUGUST, 21,
Sa ae

Cuke Addresses C.C. On Fiseal Survey

Better

1952

BARBADOS



Trade

Conditions Wanted

HON’BLE H. A. CUKE, addressing members of the

Chamber of Commerce at the Quarter]
y Genera!
yesterday afternoon, advised them not to accept

meeting
the in-

evitability of the st, but to pre
favourable ciadinenas in the ‘ieee ie ey iaeus
__ He said that the Chamber of Commerce in associxtion
with other Chambers of Commerce of the B.W.I. was the
only agency which could achieve any results in that direc-
tion, He warned them not to depend on political represent-
ations on that question as the majority of present-day
politicians, however sincere they might be, did not have the
knowledge to deal with that aspect of the matter.

Hon’ble Mr. Cuke was speak-
ing on the “Eic-al Survey” by
Professor C. G. Beasley, Economic
Adviser to the Comptroller for
Development and Welfare.

Among those present at the
meeting were the Hon'ble the
Colonial Secretary, Mr, C. C.
Skeete, Director of Agriculture,
Mr. D. A. Percival, Assistant Eco-
nomic Adviser to the Comptroller
for Development and Welfare, Mr.
G, H. King, President of the
Chamber, Mr, D. A. Lucie-Smith
and Mr, S. H. Kinch, Vice-Presi-
dents, Mr. J. H. Wilkinson, Mr.
F. C. Goddard, M.C.P., Mr. E.
D. Mottley, M.C.P., Mr. F. A,
Bishop, Controller of Supplies,

At the conclusion of the talk,
Mr. G. H. King, President of the
Chamber, expressed thanks to Mr,
Cuke on behalf of members of the
Chamber for a very interesting

talk.
Addressing the Chamber Mr.
Cuke said:

Mr, President,

In accepting the invitation to
address this Chamber on the sub-
ject of the fiscal survey of Bar-
bados which has been presented
to the Island by Professor Beas-
ley, I realize that I have under-
t a rather difficult task. The
survey is very comprehensive and
covers some 107 pages of printed
matter with a vast array of sta-
tisties which require a great deal
of study, and which could not be
adequately dealt with in one ad-
dress. I shall not enter into a dis-
cussion of all the various details
eovered by the survey but shall
deal only with the principal con-
ciusions at which Professor Beas-
ley has arrived and my observa-
tions thereon,

The first general observation
which the Professor has made is
that the Island cannot be re-

hae ag. an. under-developed
sland. With the exception of Oil,
which or may not be found

in commercial quantities, the land
resources are fully developed and
have been so for many decades.
The productivity.of the land has
been raised to a very high stand-
ard, and it is doubtful whether
eny very great improvement, ex-
cept by irrigation, can be made on
the present output. The crop year
1951 reached a peak of 187,000
tons sugar, but what has perhaps
been overlooked. is that due to
three good years of raihfall the
percentage of acres reaped in the
black soil area of the Island has
increased from about 58% to 68%
of the total arable acres. The first
drought year that occurs means
two low succeeding crops, since
replanting will be heavier. Pro-
fessor Beasley’s warning about
the shortness of the public mem-
ory is therefore timely.
Second Observation
The second general observation
which has been made is_ that
while. the Island cannot be re-
arded as an _ under-developed
sland, it nevertheless is a de-
endant territory, This fact has
well recognised by the
thoughtful people in the commun-
ity for a very long time, and is
responsible for the cautious ap-
proach to any financial commit-
ments which have been advocated
by the less thoughtful. It was sole-
ly due to the realization of this
fact of dependency that the Bar-
bados Sugar Producers’ Associa-
tion joined with the other sugar
producing Islands of the B.W.I.
in pressing for the long term

sugar agreement with the Minis-
try of Food,
The sugar producers, whose

awareness of the serious conse-
quences which can arise from

th prices in one period fol-
lowed by depressed prices in a
succeeding period, fought vali-
antly for this agreement which
was concluded last year. Under
the terms of this agreement
they have sacrificed existing
high world market prices in re-
turn for a guaranteed price in
future years.

As the financial adviser of
that Association and who was
honoured by them in being se-
lected to take part in those long
drawn out negotiations which
necessitated four visits to the
United I should like
pu to k the members
of the Chamber of Commerce
for the strong moral and active
support which was accorded us
during those anxious days.
Your sympathy and understand-
ing of the issues involved were
a great source of help and gave
us confidence to pursue the
negotia*ions. 3



So handy in the Home!!

So delightful at the table!!

STEWED GUAVAS—Onhlly 0.000000 oo.

GUAVA JELLY .......... hace

PRP REIS nse scsdncisis pcictccsecrsesiene
PEPPER SAUCE .............

SALTED PEANUTS

i a ae





HON. H. A. CUKE

This agreement however cov-
ers only 70% of our output,
there still remains 30% which
has to_be sola on the world
price, With the huge production
which Cuba has achieved, the
outlook is not very promising,
so that although the agreement
will be of great value there is
no room for complacency.

Dependenc

In connection with this question
of dependency, Professor Beasley
has also drawn attention to our
difficult position’ in regard to the
terms of trade.

He writes:—"A small country is a
small scale supplier in a large
scale market, and a small scale
buyer of large scale products.
It is seldom in a position to im-
pose terms on its partners in
trade, and is therefore depend-
ent on them and is obliged,
whether it wishes to do so or
not to follow policies which will
enable it to compete with rivals
all over“the world.”

This statement very pointedly
illustrates the difficulties with
which we have had to contend in
past years, In the pre-war years
we were compelled by force of
circumstances to purchase our re-
quirements, in competition it is
true from three main markets,
ie. United Kingdom, U.S.A., and
Canada, all countries with a high
standard of living whose products
were therefore high costing, and
sell our sugar at dumped prices,
thus providing a low standard of
living for the workers in this Col-
ony. The long term sugar agree-

ment will partly overcome one
part of this difficulty.
Competition
The hard currency issue with

its cumbersome and unnecessary
controls and the bungling which
accompanies artificial controls re-
moves the element of competition
which formerly existed; as a re-
sult we are purchasing our re-
quirements at the present time at
exorbitant prices; but in the same
way the Sugar Producers have
been able to achieve some relief
from the low price technique of
former years, it is up to the
Chamber of Commerce to move in
the matter of high costing imports.
the British people can be very
stubborn, but in fairness to them
it can be said that they have an
inherent desire to be just and if
you can convince them, and I am
sure you can, that they cannot
expect to purchase colonial pro-
ducts at reasonable prices, which
is the basis of the long term agree-
ment, unless they in turn sell us
their products at reasonable, as
against exorbitant prices, their
natural reaction will be to meet
your just demands, They can
drive a hard bargain, it is true,
but which of us don’t? Neverthe-
less, my advice is do not accept
the inevitability of the past, but
press forward for more favourable
conditions in the terms of trade.
Politics

Your Chamber in association
with the other Chambers of Com-
merce of the B.W.I. is the only
agency which can achieve any re-
sults in this direction. Do not de-
pend on political representations
on this question. The majority of
the present day politicians, how-
ever sincere they may be, have
not the knowledge to deal with
this t of the matter. While
they appear to be distressed at
the high cost of living, their out-
look reaches only to the mark-
ups of the local ictailers.

The real cause of the high cost

of living which is brought about
by being forced by cumbersome
controls to purchase our require-
ments in the dearest market has
not yet been reaiized by them.
You will appreciate the fact that
it is no use obtaining satisfactory
prices for your exports if at the
same time you huve to pay un-
satisfactory prices for your im-
ports. You need rot be worried
about derogatory remarks thai
you are looking after your own
interest. Your interest is the public
interest.

it is the duty of importing
firms to purchase the Island’s
requirements on the most favour-
able terms, and any obsiruction
to this end must be attacked ani
attacked vigorously. There ave
far too many shackles piaced on
the business men cf the Colony
and you must agitate tor their
removal. You have the know-
-edge, the technique and the
butiness experience to purchas?
in competition with each other
the consumer goods required by
+he community, and you should
be allowed to dc¢ your business
wiihout undue interference from
officials. f

Third Observation

The third general observation
of Professor Beasley around which
most of our difficulty of the future
will centre is the rise in the pop-
ulation which he estimates at
18% per annum. Thus each
year there are just under 4,000
more people to be provided for
out of our present resources,
This question of the growth of
population is the biggest issue we
have to face in the future.

Professor Beasley very wisely
points out that with the growth
of population Government ex-
penditure must inevitably in-
crease, even although all services
are held at the present levei,
Government and Parochial ®x-
penditure hes already exceeded
21% of the national income which
clearly indicates that the limit of
taxation has been reached. The
cnly possible answer therefore to
our problem is increased prodiuc-
tivity.

An analysis of the Budget
1952—53 will indicate that with
ithe exception of the item of sub-
sidization of which he entirely
disapproves, there is not a single
item of Government expenditure
which can in the future years be
removed from the Budget, and
as the population increases this
expenditure even on_ existing
standards must inevitably rise.
Take the item of Education which
now consumes 20,6% of the Bud-
get expenditure, can any one ex-
pect that if each year there are
more children reaching school age
the expenditure on this head can
be held at the existing level? Or
again, take the item medical, re-
presenting 12.9% of the Budget,
how can this expenditure be held
at existing levels even though
there is no improvement in the
standard at present provided? Or
yet again take the third item on
the Budget, “Law and Order and
the Administration of Justice”,
with an increase in the population
how can this expenditure be held
down? These three items comprise
45% of the expenditure of Gov-
ernment, all of which must in-
crease as the population rises.

If therefore there will be an in-
evitable increase in certain Gov-
ernment expenditure, if the limit
of taxation has been reached, it is
obvious that the standards of liv-
ing must fall unless the national
income can be increased.

Gov't Expenditure

It is true that during the past
ten years Government expenditure
has not received that cureful scru-
tiny which it had formerly been
subjected to, as a consequence
there has been a certain amount
of extravagant expenditure which
could have been avoided, but on
the whole, however much more
eare is devoted to public ex-
penditure, in the future, it is the
need to increase the national
wealth which should be the key-
note of the future. This can only
be done by paying more attention
to the Tourist Industry and by the
creation of new industries and by
reducing the cost of our imports.

With regard to the first there is
little or no likelihood of any new
modern hotels being built in this
island, The opportunity which
offered somé years ago to have a
new 60 room modern hotel was
defeated by the short sightedness
of those to whom the long term
interest of the island was a sec-
ondary consideration. While there-
fore we cannot expect any new
hotels to be built there can be re-
constructions, improvements and
extensions to existing ones which
will to some extent meet the needs
of the industry. There is to my
mind great possibilities in increas-
ing our tourist industry if. the
right approach to the problem is
made.

New Industries

With regard to the question of
new industries I agree with Prof.
Arthur Lewis that much can be
done in this direction. I do not
believe that this island or indeed
the West Indies can ever become
highly industrialized areas, but
certainly many new _ industrie:

ean be established if the right at-
mosphere is created and herein

can afford it but whether we can
afford not to have it. I know that

ADVOCATE

Holidays With |
Pay Records
Are Important |



lies our greatest source of weak- many of my colleagues do not D. A. Laucie~Smith’ at the}
ness. The atmosphere in this share my views but nevertheless ely Ge sl Mecting of the
island at the present time is am in agreement with Prof, © arn ro mmerce yesterday
against the creation of new in- Beasley on this point, drew to the antion of mem-!

dustries.

Thoughtless and_ irresponsible
talk of “soaking the rich” and
“nationalization” has created an:

The million dollars a

would be well devoted to this ex-
penditure. After all, a great deai the



year we bers,

subsidization proper records
} i

lioltiday

sity

i of keepin
spending in in connection wit
4 Pay as drafted by)
Labour Department.









is continuing to create an atmos- of the expenditure is on labour He pointed out that this wa
phere which is preventing new costs which would be circulated in pecuired by law and te Se
industries from being established. the island and we would have a a dispute over holidays by «
Only a week ago we had an illus- valuable asset t» show for our ¢mployee, an emplove. chould|
tration of an address being passed money. h ta Se wi eee, ee
by the Hous: of Assembly to na- Irrigation Ree tee ee ee *
tionalize the Rediffusion Service, BODES oreroanas, Neri, Svenane

that this address was passed late
at night with only 7 members out
of 24 voting for it, may not be
known to the outside world, The
bald statement goes forward to
the world at large that the House
of Assembly has passed an ad-
dress to the Governor asking that

‘ ; f sugar to Canada during the
steps be taken tu nationalize the °..* 5 5 ; . ry j |
sei : . years 1950—52 and the proposal yf) ' > m \
Rediffusion Service. has been made that 4 of this — a Prepare Meals |

I have reason to believe that
one of the large factories which
has been erected in a neighbour-

: b roduction due to droughts Severt pac M 5

ing island and which will be giv- Guan: nae seriously affect “the domes “ maa at eee 4
ing reek to & Seen whole island, it is the Black Soil the Women’s Auxiliary of the|
num ie of people could have been grea which is mostly affected If Caribbean Union of Teacher
pigeon S Saag gek for the atmosphere irrigation can bridge the gep be- this week, bemoaned the absence:
© which I have referred. One of tween high rainfall and low rain- of a centre where children could

the Directors of this concern in-
formed me that the climatic con-
ditions, and water supply of this
island were of the best, and that
he was impressed by the high
standard of the workers, but thar
we were reluctant to grant pioneer
concessions and he did not like the

With regard to irrigation there
is no absolute knowledge that irri-
gation can bring up the average
of the Black Soil Estates which
represent 60°

the refund ef the profit made by
the Ministry of Food on shipments

amount should be devoted to ex-
periment on this subject, The fell

fall years and thus raise the aver-
age production of the area a con-
siderable increase in national in-
come can be achieved. The sur-
vey clearly indicates the need to
push ahead with productivity in
one form or another and this is

sure to call on him in connection
with the matter.

Children Should
Be Taught How



of the land area.

have a windfell in

ts N

(Yrom Gur Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Aug. 15.

be taught to peepare meals ¢s
fiat it would be of benefit to them
in their homes. |
Other teachers emphasised thi
domestic science, as a subject i
the curriculum, should take int
consideration the question ©



“ the whole theme of the report. ailowing sufficient time ta teach
ee that was why they Unless this fact is realized by the jt, as a great deal of time wa
went eisewhere. Community, ‘ and A eerie being wasted to get the meal

oa: . parties work towards a realization prepared for children and no
nen aisttude of this the report: will just be an- enough time left to teach how
part e political i vd ; : m
aisntanhare there ts) labled i other document on record. they were prepared,
reas ere ts sacking im ~My advice to the Members of The conference of the Carib

this island a full realization by
the general public of the need
to assist new industries. We are
too prone to be critical of pro-
ducts produced in the West In-
dies and to extol the merits of
items imported from far afield,
little realizing that by so do
we are creating conditi
which can prevent new ventures
from being established here or
in the West Indies,

This question of creating em-
ployment is our major concern
in the future. It cannot be
accomplished by any one agency
alone. The commercial com-
munity must be prepared to ex-
hibit personal initiative and
take risks, the officials of the
Government must endeavour to
be helpful ang not obstructive
in their dealings with business
people, the trade Union while
endeavouring to obtain fair

the Chamber of Commerce and to
the community at large is this, do
not pay too much attention to the
many details but catch the theme
of the report which is production
and yet more production,

. '
Former T’dad And
’ e
Tobago Director
* . .

Of Education Dies
(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, August 15._
News reached the Colony this
week of the death of Capt. J. O.
Cutteridge,
Education of Trinidad and Tobago,
He died at his home at the Isie
of Man early this month where during your stay.”
he had been living in retirement,

al the age of 65,

bean Union of Teachers, opener
here last Saturday, has not bee
attended by the Hon. Roy Joseph
Minister of Education and Social
Services or by any member ©: |
his ministry or of the Eduecatio |

|



Department.

In a letter to Mr. H, S, Jackson
of British Guiana, president ¢
the Union, Mr. Joseph said in
part: “I regret that circumstance
over which I have no control pre
vent prominent persons of th
Ministry and the Department o
Education from taking part il
the conference held in honour o!
your visit,

“But IT would like to assure you
that the Department of Education
and my own Ministry would be
only too glad to render an)
assistance that you may require

former Director of



wages and reasonable condi- on ‘ % .

tioae of employment must be Capt. Cutteridge was well 25 Gain Shorthand
prepared to insist that the work- known in Barbados where he re- ed

ers give a good day’s work, and sided for some time after re- Certificates

the politician must develop a tiring from the post of Directo: |
greater sense of responsibility of Education of this Colony in Nineteen candidates gained ||

in his public utterances. If all
sections play their part I am
confident that the future can be
faced with some confidence. On

In my view the two biggest

1942. He was the Colony’s Educu-
tion Chief eight years,

Capt. i
perhaps be best remembered tor
the contrary unless a change in jis
the atmosphere takes place the jexthooks—‘West
future is indeed a gloomy. ene. \e;s," textbooks on geography and
arithmetic—which are ip use in

Shorthand Theory Certificates
and six, Speed Certificates, from |’
the Pitman’s Institute in the
examination held on April 5,
Following are the results :
Speed—90 words a minute
Lorna Jackman, 70 words a minut)
Richard Reid, 60, Barbara Harris

Cutteridge, who will
Indian

preparation of West
Read-

Indian







PACE

Build up their
future heaith

FIVE






bee We)
y GIVE THEM MARMITE

So EVERY DAY

i's the vitamins in Marmite that help, children to grow

strong and sturdy. Health-building Wornne Is = tee ba
-veryone needs every day to maintain fitness and strengthen
the body's resistance to diseases. Both young and
old love Marinice's rich, appetising taste—so
delicious in soups, meat dishes, savouries —
ond in sandwiches too! Cooks also like
Marmite because a jar lasts such a long time.

MARMITE

THE VITAMIN B FOOD
FOR FAMILY FITNESS





















It's NEW!
It's Extremely

Useful !!

A SUPER ABSORBENT CELLULOSE SPONGE
(Not Rubber)

in a variety of delightful colours and for every purpose.



For your Baby—For your Household
It massages the skin
It lathers soap into foam
It is Hygienic — can be cleaned by boiling

For your Bath — For your Toilet
j
1

Always Fresh and Clean



KNIGHTS DRUG STORES.

7
—<
S
Seas
wo
cs
es
oa 3
=_
nm
=
a |
s



issues with which we are faced at jinary ¢ inte diat® schools aan

ime i primary and intermediate sc * and 50 Rudolph Warner, Keiti
Soe eee eee be ee eee < find j, this Colony, first came Ww Harding and ‘Keith Archer, thi %
employment | for the increasing ‘Trinidad in 1921 to be the first 1. ttor three being pupils of Com-|%
population and to purchase our Principal of the Government joer ee tol %
imports on more satisfactory ;. i sare later bermere School. a

ile all i ¢ Training College. Two years late Theory :-— (Girl#” Industri: THE

terms. And while all sections o ge ‘omoted to the post of l ine t i
the community must play their he Was prom ated p Union) Carmen Deane, Joye:
part in a solution of these prob- Senior Inspector of Schools and ying Bdna Hinds, Audrey Cox |¢
lems it is the members of this had to wait five years before Norma Franklyn; (Comberme
Chamber which must take the getting the appointment of As Centre) Dolores Rouse, Pe
lead, ‘The politicians and the offi. tant Director of Education and +1 Marjorie Franklyn, Viim
cials can help or hinder the crea- Senior Inspector of Schcols, He Kennedy, Pearl Grant, ‘heim:
tion of new industries and new was awarded the M.B.E, for his Archer, Joyce Nicholls, Courtn
sources of employment but neith- \ervices to the Colony in the Meld Harris, ‘Irma Skeete, Thovs
er can initiate measures to this of education, Moore: (Others) Doreen Thera,

effect, that is your function.
Conclusion

The conclusions that I
drawn from Prof. Beasley’s sur-
vey are:—

1, That Government so far as
the Current Budget is con-
cerned cannot undertake
any extensions of the ser-
vices to which we are al-
ready committed,

2. That through tne growth of
population an increase in
the cost of existing services
must be faced.

3. That every care should be
taken to examine thit ex-
penditure for economies
where necessary.

4. That any new financial

commitments of Govern-
ment should be directed to-
wards the increase in pro-
ductivity as against the
expansion of existing ser-
vices.
That new sources of na-
tional ‘wealth must be cre-
ated to meet the growth of
population. This can only
be achieved by creating
new industries and by an
expansion of the tourist,
industry,

With regard to the Capital pro-
gramme as outlined in paragraphs
51—58 of part II there are two
items on which some differences
of opinion may exist, these are
the “Provision of a Deep Wate?!
Harhour,” and “Irrigation to
maintain higher average

oa

er I have always held the opinion
that it is an essential item in our
future planning. I realize that the
high cost is rather alarming but
the question is not whether we

_









+



48c 2 bottle
; asliy siesta see 44c. a bottle
Latte 72¢., 60c. & 48c. per bottle
vue o0c, per bottle
paastteloncsia 40c. & 20c. per bottle
84e. per bottle
44c. per bottle

nave XM C A Meet Today

Hon.

Secretary, will preside over the
Seventy-Second Annual General
Meeting of the Y.M.C.A. which
will be held at the Y.M.C.A. at
5.00 pan. today.
The Annual Revort and Finan-
cial Statement will be presented
by the President and an Auditor
ill we appointed,

Pe ea



son, Eulalie Burke, Evena Alleyne
and Delana Morris,



“MONEKA” ARRIVES

The motor vessel Moneka, 100
tons, arrived in Carlisle Bay yes-
terday afternoon from Dominica
with 19 bags of copra, 16 cark
of fresh fruit and a carton oi
machines.

This vessel is consigned to th:
Schooner Owners’ Association,

R. N. Turner, Colonia!

IN A FINE
READY-MADE

SUIT

GENTS’ SUITS
in Worsteds, Tropicals,
Tweeds and Linens
Full American Drape
Style

e
SPORTS JACKETS
2 and 3 Button Styles,
with Patch Pockets
in Brown, Blue, Grey
and Fawn }
Prices from $18.50 up
@

TROUSERS
in Worsted, Grey Flannel,
Linen, White and
Khaki Drill

e
DRESSING GOWNS
in Flowered Designs and
Plain Colours

e
TOWELLING BATH ROBES
in Checked and Striped
Patterns

| |

LOOK yi

\

|

ne

se Se ee ee
SS SS




per
——



!
sugar
output.” With regard to the form-
i
|
|
|
|
{
|





Obtainable at our Home Products Dept.

CAVE SHEPHERD & CO., LTD.

10, 11, 12, and 13 Broad St.







HARRISON'S



We are the Sole Stockists, locally |
} for the Famous

“K” SHOE





Broad St.





! GUAVA JELLY—per Jar ....
DANISH HAM SAUSAGE—per 2 Ib. t)

TELEPHONE GUIDE

JUST PUBLISHED FOR THE FIRST TIME

Any Telephone Number Left on Your Desk Pad
to Call can Easily be Traced to the Party to Whom it
Belongs.

Available at - - - -

ALL LEADING STATIONERY STORES
— ALSO —
AT THE PUBLISHERS ,

COLONIAL ADVERTISING C0.
(B08) LTD:

PRICK 3/. Per Copy

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OLLI LCL LLB GSLLEL FLIES

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INE FOODS

DANISH GORGONZOLA CHEESE—per Ib, ...
NEW ZEALAND APPLES —perib. ...
DRIED FRUIT SALAD—per 4} Ib.
PITTED DATES—per 1 Ib. pkt. ...........
DANISH CAMEMBERT CHEESE.—per tin ....
ITALIAN ANCHOVEY FILLETS IN




















OLIVE OL
per tim .......... i
ITALIAN CHILI SAUCE—pér bottle
ICING SUGAR—per pkt.
CHIVERS RHUBARB—per tin
GROUND ALMONDS—per Ib. .....
SALISBURY CORNED BEEF—per tin
HOT SAUCE—per bottle ...,

ENJOY THESE

DUTCH CELERY HEARTS—per tin ...
DUTCH CUT CELERY—per tin
LION GROUND WHITE PEPPER—per tin .
LION GROUND BLACK PEPPER—per tin .
HEINZ IDEAL SAUCE—per bottle ...
NECLSONS NUT ROLL—per bar ....
NEILSON NUT ROLL—per box ...,



COCKADE FINE RUM

STANSFELD SCOTT & Co., Lid.





=





nA
Bae te
SRRRSERRERREBeHe kekee
alee eae ei Se a
- Z



PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE


















an isis igs THURSDAY, AUGUST 21, 1952
CLASSIFIED ADS. | {| Clerk Will Be |l4 TOUCH WITH BARBADGS GDASTAL STATION

SOSS

Sea And Air




















































































































































rt e communicate | Samana, s.s. Urania, « Mataufa, s.s
TELEPHONE 2508 Cross-Examined hips through their | Hermion, s.s. Colombie, s.s. Kern Hills,
. T ffi Parba a rcs Alcoa Pennant, s.s. S ae ey 5.8
repens a, | Corona, s.s. Ariadne, s.s. Tankland, s.8
Form Page 3 S.s terprise FP. and 1. | Rosario; s.s. Spurt; s.s. Monteurouiola;
a DD | 8=6FOR SALE eater Squire® was in charge of D. V.| Sx fan, +s, Tain: |5.8 Meee Cormeen U2. eee oe |
CARTEE—Qn Nusuxt 20, Charles Christo- poo ibd one ae one magi s. Sallust, s.s | ¥.s. Southern ‘Counties. ss. Aleoa Part-
r Mage. S itinemenear geocesneaentnine testes eR 4 . ginning to work a e vi Sanlorenzo, }ner, s.s. Lady Nelson, s.s. Sunwalt,
Wilkinwoh '& ‘Maynes; Rest Manure met in Carlisle Bay ~ he had instituted a means where-}\ ’ ven) ah. Ae lms. Pema. 9-8, Slovene oe halve een ar
Weeki? Wunnetal sin ieawe ti ove AUTOMOTIVE pach, May Olive. Sch Emeline, Sch-| hy a check could be made on the s+. * “Gueenston 08. eet. Sere aay. 8.4 5 We the undermentioned Grocers beg to draw to the
: Pee de a ey ee Bi i DB, Wallace: Sch. ‘Philip it Davidess,|Tum, in the vats. This was aj- : attention of our Customers that, owing to the in-
; De eRe vite), Chailes Carter| CAR — 1961 Austin Aad, Milenge|s;%,,2”crsene: Sch. Rosarene,» Sch. | system in which returns had to be } creased:—
j 7 DOrtac, Sch. Lucien M Smith, M.V E. 2
(son) Allgyne, Ermine Barker | 17,000. In good condition. Qwner leav- | faqs, > made to the Officer in charge of | i ;
‘ tar, Sch, Eunicia, Sch. hi a : H ds
Winifred. Taylor, Pauline Watson ani [ing Island. Price $1,700. | Bing W.|s.s Athelbrook; Sch” United Pligum’|the Excise Department. He used | Ki (1) ‘High coat of Goods,
Bostic and Gre os Sag gage bp meee Sees ARNIVALS SS |to get monthly returns from the!
a srandehildren — * u a —_—~----- . Sat ;
21,8,52—in ocAF _ are 10. Good pocoeiine : trem: SRAM Redo lake Oaciow accused for D. V. Scott. | KONIRGAL, AUSTRALIT, NEW | 46660004. 2996690060000 (2) Continually rising operating expenses,
ee wner secure igger car one 2467. o : r : 1 ZEALAND TL’ LIMITED, + %
TOR Hee “rr or 4682. 21.8 3—Sn: i a DEPARTURES SS Soe dts eet the, Woo ‘On. x a ake : i< Th M/V “CARIBBEE” will x } ‘ rill lo b ble t xtend credit over thirty
aan tater Beden Ford in good order’ Price | Montteal.” 88. Athelbrook for" Prnidad| vat No, $490, Net and; 35 ~chovcnemn 1s seneaule vol} sett, Canes, ne Femcager ir ‘ Fae) dag sink eeooanhs will be payable when rendered.
7 tater § rder ©} with molasses. vat No. : sil from Port Pirie May 3iet, Devonport} 5) Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat,
— OO “Sd reasonable. Apply: N. L. Seale & Co.! 94 rer a . Bari PP . ve fe bh a . a i ™
HO SES ta 18 saan. i M.V Caribbee “with cargo for St Handwriting Identified a cae ms oe ape . Sydney | € Nevis and St. Kitts, Sailing Wed- $
<= oo He identified the hand g | Uarheder 'obout Auguel #2 a ee : wi h t 1 to take this step, but
ee er one f writing | Garbsder about A e very much regre raving to take is step,
BUNGALOW —On Sea, Main Road Hast | CAR—One Ford “Zepher, as good as . The M/V “MONEKA” will accept > |
ings, very comfortably furnished, Eny-|"°W,,, done 2,000 miles. Phone 4435, | Seaweli in certain exhibits to be that of In «dition to general cargo tls veasel |} Cori and Passengers “or Dom- %| after several months careful consideration, we find
lush bath: — 2 bedrooms — Servants EDMAN & TAYLOR'S GARAGE LTD. | the accused. See See eee ee inica, Antigua, Montserrat, Nevis h h h d will have t nforce same
rooms —~ Verapaahe — From September 20,8.52——3n ARRIVALS — BY BW ILA Checking from the rum which Tian” conde cn ‘throush Pitty of {2nd St: Kitts,’ Saiting riday 22nd >) pee Re hig fay * oh = roe will have to €
2949 a—t.f. i a in | .
Sages Fe ari hala lie : pep ee () 1946 Mercury eer Ford,| From Trimidad: had _ vee nn = bond, it Lading for transhipmen: at Trinidad to . a} 9° 5 ¢ ets
CHANDOS, 2nd Avenue, Belleville, | “"cchanieally sound. “Yon B.A-Simp| M. Davia, D, ware, 2. ward, t, | Was discovered. that there were} drttish Guiana, Leeward and Windward B.W.I. SCHOONER OWNERS yo
Fully furnished. Available 1st Septem* . ‘ottage, St Robertson; KE, Foncette; R. Foncette, W.) 102 casks short. islands. ASSOCIATION (INC.) % J. N. Goddard & Sons Ltd
ber. Phone 9926 or 2450 19.8.52—2n 2 ae Santitced,, M. Baveek- 2.) mettaeh 2 He had been shown a letier the| For further particulars apply-— A La 2 .
— a. erbert; . u
aE” weanancen sai Sauaee: “CARS—One A-40 “Somerset” owner ) 3 ‘+ M.|accused had written Jones (a|rURNESS WITHY & ©0., UTD Consignee Tele. No. 4047
> MONARCS” -— Prosmert, St. James herbert, A. Herbert, L. Hutchinson, M. “ . ne ie . * at
Fe Saikabinecn roses ; ame driven see only 1330 miles — like| Josepn; E. Johnson; L. Mestier:. §. | Witness), making a statement of TKINIDAD. Stansfeld Scott & Co., Lid.,
2 20.8.02—2n. , “°° .00, One 1951 A-40 — 3,300 | ‘Taylor, C. Taylor, L. Marshall. being in a bad situation with! owe :
are re niles — condition Darkest $2,400 00. se DE Te ee WA affairs at the bond DA COSTA & CO. LTD, LLL OES
RECAMB! ° irable residence Singer Ss . .
“Mordiabe® Werteitk nest te fene’ | condition excellent $2,500.00 so 8.so—6n, | PY, Tented: When the case continues today, ! D. Vv. Scott & Co., Ltd.
Theatre, 4 Bedrooms Toilet .nd Bat! 9.8. nh. Augusta Herrada, Nicholas WHerrada, Mr. Thorpe will be cross-examined ‘ 2
} upetutrs.-"Dewnetalrs: Drawing room | auguste Herrada, John Simpson, Eileen Fe : O.
| Diets Room,Hall, 2 extra rooms, Bat! ELECTRICAL | "Belen: een Hutson; | Ceetita eg ¥ ‘agg AAD . Alleyne, Arthur & Co., Ltd.
: and Toilet,slarge garage, servants’ roon > “ook; Dorothy Yearwood; Russell Ireland,
| Fe ea deere.) —_BLBCTRICAL, __| sasig tiger amore fomgce| U.N. Cam Stage | ES g.
eaire. 21,8,52—Or AMERIC. 4c i dea ‘hillips; ‘ .
hs : count “AN ELECTIUC DEEP FREEZE: ; Sweeney; Jean Sweeney; Maurice Habib; i an i In Korea { W. A. Medford & Co.
MOON tna ae ‘ window | regurbed to States. Telephone 95-296. teen Redman. ; CANADIAN SERVICE
opposite the t Clu pply on pren %1.8.52— ae are
ines at No. 4 Flat, Cliston, Bay strce —- + RATES OF EXCHANGE @ From page 1. A shu vaROUND Johnson & Redman
ye 20.9.52—2n| RE it — Mullard 9 tube double AUG. 20, 1952 three or four months fearing a omer Sails Sails Arrives
are a Lelenaaey irae eek ee Teo NEW YORK Buying} possible Allied amphibious land-| pvp, Montreal Halifax Barbados
“WANTED gg rE | 1 Vib Pr. Chedues on Ing. He saiq 42 known firingy ica “ranoni> ©. * Ruut ap Aut 20 gent’ saci seats
PMR RY Rae individually, Foster Phone ; bane fs Sela ce 71 5/10% Pr. | weapons ; are c@ncentrated inj “Kim” Mente ‘August 29 Bept. 3 Bent, Bb
21,8,52—8n. | Demand Drafts 71 3/10% Pr.| the ee Bay area of the east}"ARNPTA Be aes mi ah + ee a8; Pes. 1G “Sept = Perkins & Co., Ltd
i dai appre eeaeicieneinn me amenities (198 1/3000. Sy, CHR Cece van slie > 5 ee " ;
cK ledy Clerk for a Commis- MECHANICAL 71 G/10% Pr. commences pi .) Pe os He said “they are pretty well WUReReCUNe
gion, OMe, ‘ath “w Senowiede” of "Short. Sésg BT Coupe Or B/W Pe. satiated that 2 x ae ert at A STEAMER . & +» Due, Barbados September 11th, for St. Stuart & Sampson Ltd.
woik. Previous experience» required.) CANADA are ia ver Ports.
Apply i pox xvzZ, Go Advoeate Adver.| , re err SEXYCLE Ge girl er AN 3/10% Pr. ooenaes on om sea oe oneresen ye it at
sing Dept. Stating Qualificattons. Ap-| 9s cart for a el J, nkers i ey are tryin; - ‘ :
plications treated birietly confidential.” Fields, Braeman, Cheapside. “Telephone . Demand Drafts 78 .35%Pr, te A built s =n ol Apply :—DA COSTA & CO, LTD.—CANADIAN SERVICE S. E: Cole & Co., Ltd.,
17,8.52—sn | 2210. 19.8.53 Sight Drafts 78 2/10% Pr es up around possible .
een oe prcable places where we can land to do
Sides ielitiat hs eeetnases chan ere. ETT eta Lins eas « iatea
s EXPERIENCED ACCOUNTANT te eines a a8 WOK Pe. Currency z ae, a them ‘more damage. ** NEW YORK SERVICE John D. Taylor & Sons Ltd.
‘esponsible for coun extensive cr tT ve i Bris “ 7
firm. Salary $200 right man. Appa’ ty Vaid NEOUS Silver @ Pr. al bio weg ial stage Pras os: tree reaaen aie Pym August — arrives 20th August
oe wre oes oa ean and CAR ACCESSORIE ‘s. Rubber Matting. TR MOUNCEMENTS ae ove ap ding = vent Ss. Vv sails Sep tember — arrives 17th September James A. Tudor & Co.
aperience. -Box No. K.J. ¢/o Advocate| | uitery leads, Bulb: :
Ge. 20,8.52-In | busters, "theese “cloth, Whisk ‘brooms; | CEME io “and. ra “id oe NEW ORLEANS SERVICE
JUNIOR OVERSEER — For Spencer’: medations jueh,, tension wire, Bonnet | CAREERBe trained as a Newspaper ti : ‘in forein is moa <_| A STEAMER sails 17th July, — arrives 3nd August Mc Donald Sealy
Plantation. Apply in person’ with Testl-) may need. May be ohtnised 4 your car|teporter or a Feature Writer. Get de-| Wons g a landing any-| 4 STEAMER, sails 3ist July '— arrives 16th August
monigls to Manager 0,8.53—2n. | pea’ Garage (1960) Liaited Phe dean” | tills of echeme from Barbados Press Club where that we are required to! A STEAMER sails 14th August — arrives 30th August
tence nonriag li hone 4049. _ | Headquarters No. 53 Swan Street. do it. We certainly have the cap-! A STEAMER sails 26th August — arrives 13th September i W. M. Forde
POSITION roauired | a copeaemre OTT’ cHEC. 29; "- Jabilities to do it and certainly! A STEAMER sails lith September —arrives 27th September i$
_ ; a
Acetelyne Welding and Biectrical Appar- sates say eras ae ae ae know how.”—U.P. | h N. 8S. Sainsb:
otek. A ee KIRPALANI TAKE NCTICE ROBERT THOM LTD.—NEW YORK & GULF SERVICE |: eb leat nice é
on +B. 182, eet. 21.8.52—In ‘ j ‘
ee . }
; INSTANTINA Jj Wants i
MISCELLANEOUS - GRAIN IVE Poe Le Ue cad lant |. acs wenetne akonmoes nema apan Sugar 1 | 2° COCOOCOOCSOS0S9990 900909209 O9O9 PSDP OPOOOOOOOOO®
}



‘ng beauty of your Floors, use JOHN-| NATYONAL INCORPORATED, a cor-
SON'S WAX Products. Phone your|pcrstion organized and existing under |

inet teirlitnainennlplliphlascelenhse tain ctenatincitibitorar
LADIFS COAT-—Write ‘Coat’ size .
tiardware Store TO-DAY and_ order! ie laws of the State of Delaware, United |

340 c/o Advocate Advtg. Dept.
1

From Australia



|

<

GSES PGOOOD $9 S959 ORT SOSSOD OO PVSI OTE GEE 4


































, 8,52—t.f.n !QHINSON'S Paste or Liquid Waxes. | states of America, whose trade or busi- | |
pineal reat - eae foot Co, Ltd., | ress eddress is 1450 Broadway, New TOKYO | :
SITIO: NTE - ’ Sork, New York, U.S.A., Manufacturers, Japz missi j
NUNSH DORIS VENNER a guslified 21,8,52—4n. | j;:5 applied for’ the registration of al; Sar, has ee we in to| CANADIAN SERVICE |
fidwile, is willing to aseist anyone WOE Tolar cas bse cohomowa (tice mock in Part “A” of Register ir fe ae oe Qaeee i, Hs \
1s in mecd of a nurse, Address; Chap- ene Y ought jour 4 SON'S spect of pharmaceuticals, ard will be| 1s learned in Lokyo. egotiations > Q i
i:an's Lane, C/o Miso Gladys Bert, UPARS wading Tt ta uw meh eae entitled to regiser same after one month jare going on tn an ecient From Montreal, Halifax and St. John }
16.2, §2-—t : c delay he renowned OHN-!i{yom the ist day of Augusi, 1952, 1 — ——
oon SON'S Furniture Cream as well 5) Unless some person shall in the mean- | mission in Japan for sugar and! Expected Arrival
2 BEL ES VOVITEs Paste eae Liquid Waxes are available at time give notice in duplicate to me at|iron ore in exchange for dollars | Montreal Haltiax St. John Dates |
Cant L ‘A our Dealers 21,8.52—4n. | yey ge of seoreee of seh registra-| fost of Australia’s sugar is ex- SUNDIAL i. a > Bridgetown, Barbados
ATT ee tiee Gann pierre net S xe trade mark can be seen on "Ss Be usgust 19 A 4 ae 9 '
TOUSEWIVES—Dont slave on your|gpplication at. my office. ported to Britain at the equiv- ‘SUNWEHIT” |. 20 Aug. 4 Sept. ~ 16 Sementer |
‘lonrs in the old-fashioned way, bu Dated this 20th day of August, 1952. |alent of $96 a ton. Japan is offer- “BRUNO .. 1 Sept. 16 Sept. 18 Sept 30 September
NOTICE Tin of JOHNSON’S Floor Cleaner H. WILLIAMS, ing to pay $120 a ton for 50,000
PARISH OF ST, PTULIP ne how easily it gives you & Registrar of Trade Marks. ‘ U.K. SERVI
Applications for the Post of Nurse at merm-free Floor. Obtainable at ai 21.8.52—an. ‘OnS a year, om. CE

the St. Philip's A’mshouse will be r 14 Stores 21.8
ceived by the unriersigned up to Satur-
day sCth August 1452.

Applicants must be qualified as a
Nurse and Midwife, and must forward
with their applications thelr Baptism







“MACHINERY —One a rere From South Wales, Liverpool and Glasgow

oa hg se GOVERNMENT NOTICE a ers
tw run at 47 T.p.m,. developing about 4
uv 14.H.P. at 100 Ibs. % Expected Arrival

pressure. Two (2 South Dates Bridgetown,







Certificates: a: ll ag their Certificat mall cold starting Diesel Engines, 10 Wales Liverpool Glasgow Barbados
an lee | nd 18H. One (1) 22” x 46" & roller $.8. “STUGARD" ... ,.i5 Aug. 21 August 26 August 9 September
‘The #uéeoesful candidate will be re-) ‘Hi complete with CS, Gearing, steam S&S. “SEARREEZE” ..Early September. Mid Sept. Mid October
guired to assume duties on the 25th Engine, and Hydraulic Preasure Regu Attention is drawn to the Control of Prices (Defence Amend- i eed
September, 1952. ating Equipment. Apply: D. M. Simp
ény further. particulars may be: ob on & Co. 20.8, 52--6n. ment) Order, 1952, No. 29 which will be p@blished in the Official U.K. AND CONTINENTAL SERVICE
path fram the Parochial Treasurer's | Sr ypg—The tamous “Florence” Stove: | Gazette of Thursday, 21st August, 1952.
Pp. §. W. SCOTT. n @ and 9 Burner Models are outalnabic 2. Under this Order the maximum wholesale and retail selling From Antwerp, Rotterdam and Londen
io a re “ O., \c' ‘s . ‘ . ;
Pee: 10 the Roged st Guaraients | gone 006, dor Street. | brices of “Butter—Table” and “Milk—Evaporated Other Brands” are peetee ae aerien
pinot eecanenmammannintmettmtmassmnesmmaetineens tf Fonts a
16.8.62—T™. | “Soescnish now. to the Dany! °° follows: , Antwerp = Rotterdam London Dates







.
Telegraph, England's leading Dally News- Bridgetown, B'dos














DENS ’ oaper now arriving in Barbados by Air ARTICLE | WHOLESALE PRICE | RETAIL PRICE . Ra a ante sare Ba beck. 2 Aus: sat et, & Seplamhar
PHILA SALES ny Soy daze, after publication in (not more than) (not more than) * me:
Re Bia) eas ig Co., Lid. 1 a O° | caesarean | epee SS b a
REAL ESTAYE ate Co, bid. Local Represents’ |Butter—Table: In Tins| $100.20 per case of 100 Agents : PLANTATIONS LIMITED. ‘Phone 4703
ws é us





pe enn

-Dlack Roek; St. Michn vel



ues ee ene neh RT
STOVES—“Falks" 2 Burner Table Ibs, in 1-Ib tins ..|$1.08 per 1 Ib. tin] $9969066996-6606995969-999SCOOOG DI PPE PT DIS PIGIOS

Model Wickless Cookers, and Twis
















i In Prints | $95.20 per case of 100 » &
ephm's Chureh, Stand 3 . “Beatrice” Oi yes, Lauria We ig ; é 3 < |
ot. ian. Lald out [Senigtenie Dash oe Co., Tudor Rirest, hone 50¢1 Tbs. in 1-lb prints os $1.03 per 1 lb print 2 Sorea ty Farm or. Re 8: aoe. moariitle 17,8, 52—4n. Ps z 4 is $ PRIMUS BLOW TORCHES $ raha) Sells ery t A

i lor a con “> WETS * » —+- —+ -—. —_-+ o > i ov g st ; tet
L. N. Hutehinson or Dial 4803. s TOOLS Stock:—Suction tools,| (Canadian Maple Leaf) | $140.20 per case of 100 3 ‘ Odhner Adding Machine. . "They tical Wapunted a ras will
i SS sent, ee TO SIS ORO sea Gcinbined Ibs. in 1-lb prints ..|$148 , ,, » | for you to select from, prices range from ‘ make you think of sleek young thoroughbreds hurtling over
LAND At Graeme hal Terrace: ‘ion pliers, Hacksaws, Tappet spanners (Canadian Olive) ..| $131.20 per case of 100 $17 40 ¢ $ 46.76 ¢ the turf with effortless ease. You will love them more and
Wetit, Gag and | Bicetrguy. 8." P GSvage "(1980)" Limited Phone 4949. Ibs. in 1-lb prints ..|$1.39 , 5 Soo eetiietebad Sim woare O yout th sad yeereus-the drudgery is Gime, oF
Bdghiil. Phone 8178 or 8367, k

19,8.52—6n

ee

STAMPS FOR SALE
THE STAMP COLLECTION of 4%
eceased client will be set up for sale
n lots at our office, James Street, Bridg: -
town, on TUESDAY 26th August
ipm

Milk—-Evaporated

‘oY vw
(Okie Reaside) (SIRE per cape. of TRE CENTRAL EMPORIUM
48 x 144 oz, tins ..|29c. per tin Corner Broad & Tudor Streets *

$13.17 per case of SOOO OOOH LOCOROCO $9060680040006 560600007)
48 x 16 oz, tins ..|30c. per tin

your every day work,
21,8.52—4n





LAND-—1,820 square feet of land situat
at Reed Street, St. Michael, the propert
of the late Bleanor Lacey, deceased.

Phe above parcel of land wil be +
up “for sal e by Public Competition at ou
Offce, James Street, on Friday 2%!
August, 1952,

For furt M
A. W. Harper, Lakes Folly.

YEARWOOD & BOYCR,
Solicitors
20.8.52--To

Visit our show rooms and we will show you the various
models most suited to your particular requirements.

Every Friday we have a
“Dollar” Sale of Decca
Records.

This week we have some
specially attractive numbers.
To add to your comfort
light refreshments are ob-
tainable while you are



YEARWOOD & BOYCE,




to Mi



VACANT POST—TOWN ENGINEER

STAMP COLLECTIONS

“Situated at bia
sah PI E send 200 used B.W.t.

Applications invited—University Graduates, Corporate Mem-










28 82--5n. 20th August, 1952. TIT SET! I Gusaasensaseeptonnsanemsnrorannsstettteptaaite
ar
bch e a sea BOROUGH OF SAN FERNANDO
4 » bers of Institutions of Civil or Municipal Engineers or equiva- :
Nvaavle ara ie a lent—10 years’ ex rience. Usual, Borough inert Ser- einai our shopping in this
a.8.52—4n DRIAN DE vices—Population OW! e ectri — .
Seat ee a soe ctarcood tana wal: f Soe Salary $4, 300—$240——$5, 760 per annum—Starting salary su
aaahinerariea ‘in “rice, Se yenic Jamaica, B.W.1 ject to experience—Passage, leave, car aliaw etre Penaion— DEANNA Les Filles De Cadiz
ss | eameteteceenall|} Site Oe tae Pt opel pm datgee BIg bua iy Own
tnining’ enen, ond ¢ sed a he, dtats September, 1952.
manda *ieltchen, aes “ane 0 I Y Ivs the ADVOCATE r L. McD. CHRISTIAN, | MILLS Ment Me Tonight in Dangaland
usual cor De and Eleetrici ‘own y ;
ty installe Garage and Servants’ room Mi Pp I C 12th August, 1952. My Gal Sal
1 Ee en on application to Miss Bree Ell eanallehett Son. cama sts b000 BOOKS |? f :6:55655066556G995G9059 9 9S9SSSBO SOOO SOOO OO IOS Just a Dream of You Dear

Parkinson, Strathclyde. Dial 2452.
“fhe property will -be—set-up—for—sale
; by public competition at our office,
: James Street, Bridgetown, on Frida
2th. August at 2 p.m

Can’t You Hear Me Calling Caroline
COMFORT Se,

M. V.

JUDY On the Sunny Side of the Street



YEARWOUD & BOYCE, ‘ GARLAND
e.. JUST OPENED DAERWOOD zing Wet in, Stings ot My Heqr

“s
a Ea. : Fascinati hm

“THE HERMITAGE” situate at the inthe Bot :
ret of White Patis and Compre ct st
sto.ding on about 125.040 square tee ;
land. The Louse contains Gallery, heue i : |
ling rooms, dining room, eight pee 4 Ea aie

rooms, three fressing rooms, w@ter © om
electric light Inspection any day t HAYME

een ten and four,

The above "will be set up for sale wv
public compétition at our Office Tues
Street, on Fr aay the 22nd day t Aveurt
1953-at 2.30 p.7
CARRINGTON a Ay ict ee

4.8

will be arriving at Barbados
on THURSDAY, August 24th

and will be sailing on MON-
DAY, August 28th for St. Lu-
cia, St. Vincent, Grenada,
Aruba, accepting Passen-
gers and Freight.

DUNLOPILLO

Fintand
is contributing

BIRKMYRE CANVAS

72” WIDE—FOR BUS TOPS and SIDES

INNER HOOD LINING

56” WIDE. FAWN AND GREY





“VALLAMBROSA Constitution Tie
Cpposite Queen's ark, All mou
conveniences . For full Particu
Fhone 9327. 16.8.52—8

AUCTION f
entice
UNDER THE IVORY HAMME:

By instrucitons received from th
Insurance Co, I will sell on Frida
August 22nd at Messrs. Chelsea Garac
Pinfold Street, (1) 1951 “Mayfiows
Triumph” Car (only done 8,000 mi!
Demaged in accident) (1) 1847 14 I
$ i; in perfect working order

to the complete

well-being of the
‘Games’ competitors

by providing the LIONIDE LEATHERETTE :
supreme comfort of

DUNLOPILLO



ek rare alata ect ah onean eee
~*~ 4
SGOSOOSSO SOP POSS SOOO SFG,

50” WIDE. ATTRACTIVE SHADES















‘ Uitte Ckurrnis, %

er a ety _ mattresses BLACK MIRACLE ADHESIVE |)

SORRECPPEOOLOT oe in the athletes | 1%4-0Z. or 5-OZ, TUBES 3

ST. STEPHEN'S CHURCL ¢ living quarters eS ‘. i

g 101 § d I _ | Dunlopilio mativocses, cushions and Hl ‘

ecita acre y HSiC $ | upholstery for your home are available at } ix

$ i) IR

on Sunday, 24th August, ¢ oes eee D.&.CO., LTD. Hl ECKSTEIN BROTHERS 3

: 1 “roceeds in | ‘ M. ‘OGAR’ ° (pidoe vo | 8
gm to boo Prossede 1 3) |i) Bacabtn eco, us | BAY STREET — DIAL 4269 |!/8 CARS TRUCKS & BUSES

> aid of Choir Funds g 111] 3
| We ‘ NH SIE S pc daetc Hii | s CITY GARAGE TRADING CO. LTD. — Vicforia Street

196 € 298 OOEOPOCOOOEOOEES | TTY | jLeceeeeeeseoeeetoeeeseeee





POPOL FOLLIES SSOOOMEOO vou’





ee ae ee ee eee ett cary te eta as
ena —







THURSDAY, AUGUST 21,

1952

HENRY

BY CARL ANDERSON

9 FLINT OF THE FLYING SowaD by Alan Stranks, drawn by George Davies

Vas TING IN Fa
PARK FOR A'NaAR

THE SPRING POE
~“WHAT ALARK! J

EM, HOPELESS? IF
THAT LITTLE ‘SNOUT’ })'
TOADY LEECH GIVES
US A LEAD ON WHO'S
RUNNING THIS DOPE RACKET
(“HE'S WORTH WAITING FOF! 4

IN LONOON
RIGHT ENOUGH,



BY CHIC ‘(OUNG



OOK “WHAT oy HAVE 2
eat YOU. DAISY --THI

DELICIOUS DISH OF
{_ CARROTS: YUMMY ‘

yo

Ss : coe A GOOD THING )|
r DAISY CAN'T <

444] COT SUD pea LL
SEE IF SH
a ( Ee IF onett | | Me

|








| HUNGRY, CARROTS WE eee Me cas ot Hp a, spent Taner
‘AND WE re ) & AD LEFT OVER ieee Pld dhs
| OUT OF «< ~~, FROM . |

IDO Foon iq ; ( LUNCH J ! si

















BY DAN BARRY
NO! THE THERMA |
QUAKES ARE |

COMING ¢

(LISTEN! ALL OF You! you EXPECT
PR. CARSON TO RETURN TODAY! YOU
EXPECT HIM TO BRING THE TANIUM THAT
WiLL PREVENT THE THERMAL QUAKE...

WELL, OR. CARSON /S LOST! YOU

HEAR? HE (SN‘'T COMING
r BACK... EVER /



PeNuys :
Faibesy «y 2 PEOPLE /
THERE 15

MITE SOMETHING ©

= —, TELL







WE war's W
he a
y

re






DON'T TAKE MY WORD THERE! TAKE A







SWELL POOR, UMLAUT “rd |
195 NOT FOR IT! LOOK AT THAT GOOP LOOK, RAT, STOPS BULL LIKE A od
OFFHAND. HERR UMLAUT, TRUE! I BUILT ROLLER — IT'S COMING Hi \ REAM | pop =
I'? SAY YOU HAVE ATERRIFIC ] DER PRESS...LOOK ; s) \| Le
LAYOUT...EXCEPT FOR THAT J HOW CLEAN 155 DER 4 - sl
CONSTRUCTION! \ = Ng \ ‘
Sa < ‘a . <<
(J ’ D if
LY a “3 Yr rae AN
— u ‘ P
3 ~ Bs, \\ ba . Ys earl
. as 4, os — ‘ee |
Sen 3
( hae We al ae



BRINGING UP FATHER GEORGE MC. MANUS








YES -MOTHER - WE'LL HAVE

SUCH A WONDERFUL VISIT /

JUST THINK-- TWO WHOLE
WEEKS TOGETHER J

I COULDN'T eres iT
HERE FOR TWO WEEKS
WITH MAGGIE'S MOTHER ! y

YEG - MOTHER WILL BE
AwAsy FOR TWO WEEKS -
SHE'S GOING TO VISIT

GRANDMOTHER -- GO
I THINK I'LL TAKE A
LITTLE TRIP MYSELF /

AND TLL BE TAKING

LITTLE TRIPS MYSELF

EVERY DAY FOR THE

NEXT TWO WEEKS --

BACK AND FORTH TO
Ty's!










“MISS LEE! IT'S FINGERS
MORAY! HE'S GOING

ROUGH STUFF'S OUTTA

WY LINE..BUT IT'S ME
OR PAGAN.. IF SHE

Bat GETS TO THE CASIS,







KEEP YOUR tops ay
FELLAS. THEY SPOTT



US. WE'RE INA

SHOOTING Wart

LET'IM HAVE (T/

SOMEBODY BLASTED) OVER BEHIND
ALL OUR TIRES THAT BOULDER!
NO “THERES THE
HIGHWAY! fe " {







BARBADOS ADVOCATE

PAGE

sé
ze r «6Don't neglect a ~—
seated cough! Rub
r

chest with A.l. White

SEVEN





NN



Liniment. The penetrating
beat stimulates blood circu-
sticn and promptly relieves
congestion. Thousands have
ound d relief with A.!.

ee vt “ig not you

s oh a

ies a



ponT NEGLECT”
your Kt

ee ee
Take SWAMP-ROOT! Mi-
raculous SWAMP-ROOT
helps your kidneys purify the
blood, get rid of poi-
sons that make you
feel tired and mis-

erable!

‘
‘
1
{






















AND NOW

+ « you can have
A GAS COOKER
like those you have admired in
the magazines
SEE THEM TO-DAY
At Your Gas

Team good looks tell you they're just right,

You know, too, when you look at the price
tag, that you can’t get finer value. Illustrated
is a Full Brogue Oxford. ‘Tied to every pair is
the John White Guarantee Shield—the sign
which means ‘ just right’! Look for it in
leading stores in Barbados.

JOHN WHITE

means made just right

Showroom.
. Bay. Street.



WONDERFUL ASSORT-
MENT OF

Walking Sticks
Just received by

JOHNSON'S
STATIONERY


























HURRICANE
PRECAUTION
HINT No. 7

WARNINGS.

If you are going to take

Â¥ cover during a Hurricane in

a public shelter, take with
you:



JUST ARRIVED!)

BEDFORD

3 & 5 TON





COURTESY

1 Bucket containing:—

M) Food for yourself and family
1 cup per person

GARAGE

TRUCKS f} 1 bottle of fresh drinking
Robert Thom Limited 1 fet of dltional clothes
Whitepark Road WITH AND WITHOUT w wiih ett (to'te Tit howe

with oil. (to be lit how-
ever only on the instruc-
tions of the Shelter War-

Dial 4616 EATON TWO-SPEED AXLE







“SPECIAL _OFFERS “AVAILABLE “THURSDAY TO”

SATURDAY AT ALL BRANCHES









Usually oo BLUE CHEESE per f .”......................... 1.12

BIRD'S JELLY DESSERTS .. § .20 16 CREAM CHEDDER CHEESE per tb .,.............. 23

HORLICK’S MALTED MILK RS 16 PINEAPPLE CHUNKS Tins ...................... 51

MEAT LUNCH ............ 45 42s RASPBERRIKG Tine =

“a Ps RASPBERRIES Tins .................... 93

tte tees eee e tans AS A5 RASPBERRIES Tins .................... 11

TABLE SALT '4-Ib Tins 36 30 WA MWR eligi i cis servis seeds cis 3.60

HEL BEER ......:........... 28 122 US. OP, BRANDY . a on
simi ete elermcet a iiatin invetidinns dss. skeaescamrce cau BE )

FRESH RED APPLES per tb $ 45 ‘odhnk teh esielne iene tone ear a

GORGONZOLA CHEESE per Ib 1.21 BEEF SUET per ID .................5.. 30





PAN BOOKS ©

YOU SPECIALLY ENQUIRED
ABOUT ARE NOW IN STOCK

ENGLAND.
THE FOUNTAIN OF
THE LAST DAYS OF

THEIR ENGLAND

LIFE
MATLER







STATIONERY

Greystone

ADVOCATE

Broad St. and ee

as SSIS

£

TO-DAY'S NEWS FLASH



IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE |

ao
oNners/!

~4






PAGE EIGHT













=

fi

Know You
LAW

By O. S.

TO-DAY we deal with one of
the key laws of_the game, if I
may so term it and that is Law
35 dealing with the circumstances
under which a batsman is dismiss-
ed “caught”

LAW 35 CAUGHT
The striker is out “caught”—if

the ball, from a stroke off the bat «

or off the hand holding the bat,
but not the wrist, be held by 4
fieldsman before it touch th
ground, although it be hugged to
the body of the catcher, or be
accidentally lodged in his dress,
The Fieldsman must have both
his feet entirely within the play-
ing area at the instant the catch
is completed,

This law has caused so much
controversy that even at the risk
of providing too much detail I
shall point out some of the in-
stances which lead to confusion
and give the ruling which the
M.C.C. have had to make when
they occur.

The first is this—the hand hold-
ing the ball may touch the ground
in bringing off the catch but if
the ball touches the ground as
well then no catch has been made

Touching The Ground

The M.C.C. have ruled that
the umpire is justified in disre-
garding the fact that the ball has
touched the ground or has been
carried over the boundary provid-
ed that a catch has in fact been
completed prior to such occur-
rence.

It is still a catch if the ball has
touched the striker’s person before
or after touching his bat, In
other words a ball can cannon off
a batsman’s pads, touch the edge
of his bat and then be caught in
the slip or on the other hand he
can edge it on to his pad and then
be caught in the slip.

The striker can still be dismiss-
ed “caught” even if the fieldsman
has not touched the ball with his
hand and this of course includes
the case of a ball lodging in the
wicket-keeper’s pads.

Painful

There have been painful in-
stances like the one in which a
striker drove the ball straight into
a fieldsman’s mid-riff. It knock-

= the

Striker is out
fieldsman's hand but not the ball,
has touched the

The picture on the left shows
Striker being “caught.” The
all is over the boundary but the
eldsman is within

In the picture on the right the
“eaught” since the

ground,

ut Cricket
VAXV
COPPIN

ed the wind out of him but con-

tracted
ell

It is still a ecateh if the fields-
ran .standing within the playing
area leans against the boundary

catch a ball and it is still a
eatch even if the ball has passed
er the boundary.

If the striker lawfully hits the
ball a second time, that is for the
sole purpose of guarding his
wicket, he can be caught as long
as the ball has not struck the
ground before he strikes it a sec-

ynd time
Tricky

The M’C.C. have ruled that a

itech has been “made” at the in-

tant a fieldsman has complete
control over the further disposal
of the ball.

However a fieldsman may jug-
gle a ball for a few-seconds and
then drop it whereas the holding
of a hot return might be an in-
stantaneous movement,

A special case of “catch” that
d to have an M.C.C, ruling and

and held the “catch” as

which stumped me years ago
when I used to invite cricket fans
to “Quizz” me, is that of a ball

hit back to the bowler who just
touches it before it breaks the
wicket at his end, with the non-
striker out of his ground. If
nothing further happens, on
appeal the non-striker is out “run
out” but if the ball is caught by
a fileldsman beyond the broken
wieket without its having touch-
ed the ground at anv time after
beine struck, the striker is
“caught”.
Not Caught

It is important to note that the
striker is not “caught” if a ball
strikes a hand which is no lon
holding the handle of the bat, For
example the striker may have
taken a hand off to guard his face
against a bouncer,

Of ‘course he is not allowed to
stop the ball with his hand, I
shall discuss “Handling the Ball”
in my next article in t series.

Remember that the striker may
be caught off any obstruction with-
in the playing area provided it
has not previously been decided
on as a boundary.



Table Tennis:

FRANK Willoughby gav
to defeat
Table Tennis Test Match b
from the San Fernando Zcu
Amateur Table Tennis As

Y.M.C:A. Naval Hall last night

Arnold Mendes o
‘tween Barbados and the team

B’dos Wins The Rubber

ro an outstanding performance

f Trinidad when the Second
e of the Trinidad and Tobago
ociation was played at the
Barbados defeated Trini-

dad four—one thereby winning the rubber in this 3-test

series.

Willoughby gave a grand exhi-
bition of defensive play, The
attacking Mendes found it practi-
cably impossible to penetrate
Willoughby’s defence, The first two
games were won by the Trinidad-
ian but Willoughby took the other
three in fine style.

In the First Test, played last
Monday night, ‘Trinidad were
peaten to the tune of four—one,

Carl Williams is the only member
of the visiting team who has play-
ed undefeated throughout the tour,
Last night he again won the lone

player by defeating Dr.
Sarkar three—one last night,

Barbados took the lead by two
sets when Norman Gill met Fen-
wick Debysingh of Trinidad, Gill
ored a convincing win to put the
ue beyond doubt.

In the next match Carl Williams
beat Rawle Phillips, making the
core three—one. Willoughby in-
ereased the score for Barbados
when he beat Arnold Mendes, one
of the beat players on the Trinidad
team,

better

is

The results were as follows:





Sports

BARBADOS ADVOCATE





lVinoo Mankad

MANY years ago from |
Western India, came one of the’

Round-up |

LON VOW.

cricket’s
|Sahib”, the famous Ranjitsinhji.

|
|

j
i

wR FLAG li, afver
ali, at Cec Park At. al
specida mecting of te scotiisn
rvctbail Association Council Carly
ihis mont, the Association re

versea their decision, made at the

beginning Gi the year, that the
green, white and gola national
a i gure should be Danned,
they tnace this ruling following
ine rowdyism which broke out
juring Cxltic’s New Year's day
match against Rangers. Thus
began a bitter dispute which at
one time threatened Celtic’s sus-



immortals — the “Jam |
From Nawanagar, too, came!
Ranji’s nephew, K. S. Duleep-!
sinhji, who played in 12 Tests for!
England and scored 173 against
the Australians at Lord’s in 1930
And now a third in the great
Nawanagar tradition is the eric~)
keter of the year—Vinoo Mankad,
hero of the Lord’s Test with his |
nen-stop batting and bowling,
pe rformance.
Snap Decision i
“Duleep” who first mod-,



it wat

telled Mankad the batsman, Man-

pension from the League, and
nearly became a_ court issue.
Ceitic based their protests on *..c

grounds that the club had an

irish foundation and that since,
its inception had flown the Eire

flag at Ceitic Park, The amenc-

ment rescinding the previous}
decision was seconded by th»:

Rangers’ representative Mr, Wii-

son.

CRICKET
REV. G. L. O. JESSOP. son of

the famous Gloucestershire anid
Englang batsman Gilbert Jessop,
is carrying on the true Jessopian |
approach to cricket. Playing for

Dorchester against Wi.tshire
minor counties’ fixture, he

no oa
hit a

|
|

century in 67 minutes. The name!

Gilbert Jessop is now legenda:y

in English cricket. With hi

famous crouched stance he
brought fear into the hearts of
bowlers of fifty years ago. He
was the most consistent fast

scorer the game has ever known.
On one occasion for the Gent!le-
men of the South against the
Players of the South at Hastinys
in 1906, he scored 191 out of 234
in ninety minutes,
MOTOR RACING
STIRLING MOSS

ear-racing experts, will compete
in the Scottish Daily Express
National Trophy meeting at Turn-
berry on August 23. Hawthorn
“erashed"’ on to the racing scene
this year and quickly established
himself as ong of Britain's best.
In his first race at the Grand
Prix of Europe 4
finished fourth

scene,
SOCCER
LADISLAV TRPISOVSKY,

26 year old outside-right who
was a professional with a club in
Prague, may be seen in English
League football this season. A
month ago he arrived in Britain
from Czechoslovakia with only
the clothes he was wearing. He
asked Queens Park Rangers ‘or
» trial. Rangers were extremely
impressed with the Czech’s show-
ing, end have applied to the
Football Association for permis-
sion to sign him as a professional.

against the world



Cricket:

Belgium he |

|
|

i
|

|
}

casually and remarked: “I’m
ing to make you into an opei
bat.” .«

ed: “But I can’t become an open-
jing batsman in a month or two.”
and MIKE|Retorted ‘Duleep’:
HAWTHORN, Britain’s two young} You listen to me.”

| pretty closely at that!

|

Mankad was groomed by a suc-|
cession of Sussex coaches brought
out by Ranjitsinhji and: “Duleep”
as a result of their playing asso-
ciation with the county.

| Jeft-arm



Dodds, Brown
Score Centuries

‘From Our Own Correspondent)

LONDON, Aug. 20,

After the heavy rain of the pre-
vious two days, the grounds were
slow and low scoring was the order
of the day. The only two century
makers were Dodds who made
exactly 100 for Essex against
Middlesex and F, R. Brown,
former England skipper, whose
118 not out enabled Northants to
reeover against Glamorgan.

SCOREBOARD:—
Surrey vs. Derby
BUGS riers ects 150 for 8.
Middlesex vs. Essex
NE Ee re es 199 for 7.
Sussex vs. India
TYPOS Sd eo Ak 60 ope eee 186.
SWPMON eke oh e aes 110 for 4,
Somerset vs. Hants
Somerset .. 256 for 9 declared.
pS ee area ere a Aree 4 for 1.
Worcester vs, Lancashire
WOPCGRter asic see yes cio are aye 104
Lancashire ........ 184 for 5.
Northants vs. Glamorgan
Northants ...5:..5)- 275 for 7.
Leicester vs. Gloucester
Leicester 2... ees cans 78.)
Gloucester 27 for 2.



GRENADA BEAT



On Friday night the visitors will
play a Combined Everton-Â¥.M.C.A,
when Trinidad played a combined (¢am and the Third Test will be
Barna-Y.M.P.C. team, Dr, Sarkar. played on Saturday night when
defeated Greenidge there will alao be an exhibition

Greenidge however was able to of Ladies Singles and Doubles.

bell Greenidge for the third time
in the series. On the first occasion

set for Trinidad when, after a G. Yawching (T) lost to B. Murray TOBAGO
brilliant battle, he beat Rawle 22—20; 19—21; 13—21; 14—21. (From Our Own Correspondent) i
Phillips three—one, Dr. N. Sarkar lost to C, Green- ST. GEORGE'S, Aug. 20. |
if idge 21—23; 15—21; 21—-19; 6+21. A Grenada picked team defeat-| )
The first set of the night was F. Debysingh lost to N. Gill ed Tobago by an innings in aj
between Guy Yawching of Trini- 9) "12; 19—21; 16—21; 12—21. cricket match _ played today. | |)
dad and Blair Murray, Yawehing ~ ¢, Williams beat R. Phillips Tobago scored 55 and 58 andj}
won the first game by a close 4;_16 18-21, 21-14, 211% Grenada 183 Vy
margin but Murray took the next A. Mendes lost to F, Willoughby ; I
three to open the account for 9;17, 21—16, 17-21, 21—23, |!
Barbados, 9 '
Dr, Noble Sarkar drew Camp- a FOOTBALL RESULTS |
1
‘

LONDON, Aug. 19.

The football results for Tues
day follow: The Glasgow cup—
First Round; Celtic



Ballymena 4, Glentoran 2;

defeat Dr, Sarkar in the First Test.
Greenidge showed that he is the

[They Do I

~





ty

y
i



~

Z, nse
i LOOKA HERE ae



a he AIN'T GATISFIED LIKE WALICING GOING ON (THE

ROUNDS 2 TOOK OFF, Pye An HE TOOK GOME 7 DEATH, > ME” V WAGON'“THEY MUST
| PEEL GREAT! Boy! | oi Sonmua A WEIGHT OFF =, { ANC THE tcey 77 GE LONESOME

YOU GOTTA DO SOME-/ Realty Go |/ HES GOT_TO wuCS Don't HELE Tay wer
L THING ABOUT THAT A ON A DIET MAKE LIFE NY's oA, MAKE IT A MASS
ly BOT OF YOURS ONE OF < MISERABLE > TNE DOC PRODUCTION *++
|\ BEFORE IT's Too he / {CARED THE
LATE **- [-—+/ LARD OFF HIM~
fin ser SAID IT WAS
| @EDUCE OR A

SIX-HANOLE /



ery

The Trinidad team is expected

to return to Trinidad on Sunday.

Vime









Regisiered U, 5, Patent Omics



















CRUDNEY








___ By Jimmy Hatlo |








tillery 2, Bangor 0; Glenavon
Ards 1,. tie —C.P,








‘IT'S LIKE A GUY












EX-FATSO SPREAD THE
GO-LIGHT GOSPEL.

_———





|
|

0, Queen’s}}
Park 0, scoreless tie. Ulster Cup; |
Dis- |

1

kad was then batting number nine
for the Nawanagar High School.



VINOO MANK®D

One day “Duleep” came along

Rather scared, Mankad protest-

“You can if
1

Mankad must ave listened

Changed Style
It was in Nawanagar, too, that |



But for Bert Wensley, in fact,

|he might have been just another

bowler.

Wensley, way back in 1936, con-
vinced Mankad that his future
was in left-arm show bowling and
not the fast-medium stuff he fan-
vied. How right he was) Mankad
is just about the best left-arm
slow bowler in the world today.

There is something fascinating
in Mankad the bowler. His shirt
billows gently in the breeze as
he starts that easy, deliberate run-

up.

His perfectly relaxed, almost
soothing action hides the venom
of those carefully flighted left-arm
leg-spinners,

Relentless

Did you watch Len Hutton bat-
ting against him in the Test? His
face a study of strained intensity,
he knew Mankad for a tireless,
relentless worrier,

Oh yes, Hutton has a great re-
spect for Vinoo Mankad,

Mankad the batsman has some-
thing of the impish, quick-silver
of Compton and something, too,
of the concentration of Hutton.

Aggressive, supremely confident,
he “offers” the bowlers chances
by his audacity.

Then he dashes hopes as his
dancing feet answer the razor-
sharp reflex of the born cricketer
to produce one of his favourite
wristy cover drives,

He’s a crowd pleaser, whether
pegging down the batsmen or
flaying bowlers.

That’s why Haslingden paid
him around £1,500, one of the
highest fees ever offered to a

Lancashire League professional,
Exuberance
The reason for his success is
simple enough. Mankad_ gives

everything he’s got, whether he

is
)



o.

PEPE LEELA APPL ALO PSPS

4

C9DSS SSO VOSS PPOOPOOOSS

Yes, the very
!

y



CON

FISSSOSOOSSSIGSS SG SG OSS S SOS SS OOS

a Ity

qt Ww" -
eG ae
$= SS a> - Mn)

The great
Lord Lonsdale

..+ AND WHAT A _ KING’S

JOCKEY SAYS
By JAMES PARK

For years and years the
late Lord Lonsdale was
Britain’s No. 1 Sportsman
He was a steward of thx
Jockey Club: he was the donor
of those Lonsdale Belts that are
still the most coveted prizes in
British boxing: he was a per
sonage in the Roval Enclosuré
at Ascot. in the private stand at
oi His yellow coach
was one S
of Coed wood ¢ of the sights
e lived in Corinthian splen-
dour., He gave his name o the
iong ci; known as the Lons-
dale. He was bluff. heariy. open
handed, lordly—at least” peopie
thought he was :

Now comes Joe Childs
Geotge V's jockey, to debunk
Lord Lonsdale. Childs has just
ublished his autobiography (My

, Racing Reminiscences: Hutehin-
son. 153.) and this is what he

says about the
Lonsdale : rw, Srey, Bae

; ” yg sane eae haa
he tion of being blutt
and hearty ana popular :n
Sporting circles, I regretfully
must say that

pening

King

manner there
Was, in my
Opinion a
touch of arro-
gance, and 1.
per een ily
ve very
little use for
that trait in
the character
of anyone.”
Childs tells
& good dea
adout Lord
Lonsdale
Once at New
market Childs
was reported
to the stewards
by the owner
of a filly for
disobeying instructions about the
use of the whip
In the course of the inquiry
Lord Lonsdale. who -was 4
Seward said: “You gave Most



OE CHILDS
’ No my lord



is playing in club cricket or in
Tests.

He plays for the love of it, for
he-sheer exuberance of gaining
mastery over batsman or bowler.

He has never lost the enthusi-
asm of the boy who determined
as soon as he was big enough to
hold a bat that he was going to
be not just a good cricketer, but

For any boy who is fired by the
ambition to copy Mankad here are
a great one,

his rules: —
1. Good coaching at the be-
ginning.
2. Hours of practice.
3. Maintain 190 per cent. fit-
ness.
4. Keep your love of the game.

As a boy Mankad practised 11
hours a day. A Test star at 19—
he topped the averages, batting
and bowling against Tennyson's
eleven in 1938—he still practised |
hour after hour,

This will be Mankad’s last sea- |
scn of Test cricket. “I’ve had a)

good run,” he told me, eee

years is a long time. I feel I should
let someone younger have a chance, |
“One day a week in the Lan-

ceshire League is a nice rest af-|

‘er years of non-stop cricket.
“But it isn’t a push-over, They

pay you well and they are en-

titled to expect good results.

Modesty |

Vinoo Mankad modestly belit-
“ his achievements in the Lord’s

est.

“T am supposed to be an all-
rcunder, so I should be able to
bet or bowl whenever I’m _ re-
quired”, he said, |

So far as he knows, he is the
only member of his family who |
ever played cricket. But that is
all changed now.

& R BREAD & CAKES

Just those Toothsome Delicacies for the
Regular Picnic Parties and
J&R SANDWICH BREAD
for the Bus Excursions.

latest and what a selection!—The new K. R. Hunte Store on Lower Broad St. is de-|
signed to cater to Mr, & Mrs, Public and that entails variety of stock.
ems are variety in themselves—they are so numerous! Won't you come in and see?

»

tl

ABOUT HIM

Beauufui a good hiding and nit
her with the whip many times.
I know because | was down
Per aes Saw it.”
i immediatel, toi
or Eennds le that his
ments were totally untrue
Said Chiids: “You were not at
the starting gate, my lord, on
hig occasion. and therefore you
ould not have seen the incident
vou have stated you did
“I know quite well you do
frequently go down on your nack
to the start. as on severai
occasions I have seen you there.



‘ THURSDAY,

AUGUST 21, 1952



At 60 He Plans Th
Next Olympics

LONDON.

;} At the age of 60. Mr. Arthur
| Coles has taken on a job for 1956.
| While other people are talking
labout the just-ended Helsinki
{Olympic Games, Mr, Coles is
|} organising the next Olympics, to
be held at Melbourne in four
years time.

This Australian business man
|-~father of six, grandfather of 11
|~-has a mililon-pound job on his

thands. “A tough assignment,”
|he said at his London hotel last
| week,

He and his wife flew from
| Australia to Helsinki and from
|Helsinki to London, Mr. Coles

yaid the fare.

“Don’t assume any particular

virtues in that,” he said. “I had
to come to England to talk over
a child immigration ‘scheme I’m
interested in. Anyway, I want
to pay my own way on this job.
I feel I can work more effectively
if I am free to do my own think-
ing.”

What qualifications are needed

for a job like this? Well, Mr.
Coles built up a chain of 150
shops from a capital of £500
(£1lvu borrowed), organised two
post-war airlines and made ;
profit within two years, and

arranged the payment of £8,500,-
0GO war damage in New Guinea
for the Australian Government.
The Olympics job is unpaid.
—L.E.S.

- that Donoghue made his own



f

K. BR. Hunmte
i Ce.. Ltd.



But you were not at the start
thn

n this outspoken book Childs
gives his own verdicts on the
turf personalities of nis time
He an “T shall always con-
sider that Alec Taylor was ‘he
finest trainer in the world during
my career of race-riding.” Taylor
fied a bachelor in 194: He did
not bet, but he left £595,670.









vow



Scotch Whisky

On Steve Donoghue: Childs

ee his ae thinks

ne A remarkably Th i i

fortune too—Epsom was a ninony ¢ rd pepo. of ene Fred tes tell
ourse for Donoghue. Some without words. Here is a sym-

veople think—1 am one of them bol that tells, plainer than any

nck at Epsom ah sas words, of whisky at its finest...
es Childs i i =

tld’ Meas Sodter “ae aie ae lovingly blended, long matured,

petween Danniv Maher and until it is as noble a Scotch

, k ootton. Childs plu S 5s eV f

oF oot rineae eae ee as ever came out of

without dispute the most bril- Scotland.
lant jockeys of their day But
noi everybody wil! agree with
Childs. Not so long ago Lord
Rosebery saic to me: “I nave
aiways chought Danny Maner
was the best fockev I ever saw
out now | am beginnin;
sane my tune. {[ am inclinea
to think Gordon tichards
to the honour ”

ali soe jockeys still
wno code against both
sna Wootton award the
Madtlier {ft must ve
read that Maher had a
xperience behind him
Weotton was only a
Gordon Richards
‘ampare with Frank
mre e of 16,

: T RESERVED
rrice

1s Sole Distributors :
FRANK B.

ARMSTRONG LTD.

entitled
Neariy
uving
Maher
palm
re
We
and
poy






CRICKET
BATS

Auto-graphed by

that
Even

could not

Wootton ar t



aS
WORLD CO ta]
Lond



His two sons, Atool, aged six, |!
and Ashock, aged four, are crick-
et mad. Their spare moments
are spent bowling spinners to
each other.

So maybe one day the Mankad |
family will add to the record |
books with not the three but the}
five great cricketers of Nawana- |
gar. |



Netball:

\i’dad Beat Grenada

(From Our Own Correspondent)

ST. GEORGE'S, Aug. 20
Trinidad defeated Grenada 19
goals to 13 in the Ladies’ netball
match this afternoon, On Friday
Trinidad will play St. Vincent a

return match,

Famous Players including

CLYDE WALCOTT
FRANKIE WORRELL
LESLIE AMES
LEN HUTTON





Boys Gubs’, Ail Island
Championship
SPORTS MEETING
KENSINGTON OVAL

at 3,00 p.m.

MONDAY,
25th August, 1952



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Full Text

PAGE 1

PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY, AUGUST tl, lt CLASSIFIED ADS. IELCPHONC 2S08 DIED f*nfk in ol Matin ir Oeorg*. late head porter o! MMrt f Hanu. %  %  • iiurch 1 Wmillrl Ta? lut Paul'"Walann ai MM %  i | :i la Oku iih.vr BOOSS* bL'NUALOW—On See. Main Ituid llMl trigs, ver; eeimfortably fimtihed, Erv l^h bath rc-ma — Verandah* %  riom SepUrnto* Telephone *• >• m-ii CHANDOB. 2(i4l A%enu.i. Beltevl... .Iicd AsalUbie 1.1 V(nnbar Pnon or ,. 5.(1. A-9 IOJt SALE AUTOMOTIVE uitton Ownvi la*. si.rot. ftMn w If • SS—an. CAR — Mom10 i wrier wrurftl blg*ai Qosd condition ear ph.i.e 34a: I so %  sa4a ^ Sea And Air Traffic In Carlisle Bay %  rli May Olive Sen Imelinr Srb r.-o Aruaa. ar< i.vtiu. A U Wallace: Belt Philip H David.n. K.I. r.v.rd.n. Sen Floaerefic, Bch I) Ortac, Sen Luc ten TA I %  Ath-Ibrook Sen United Pll#-rta ARHIVALS S a AthehMook under Cepl. Coo* iUMMe with cargo for Bt LueiSeatcell CAR--One I IMS Mnruiy f tt3 %  \n;eCAMnS—-.-hui.b .ceidene ":.iorcambt'*' i-oiUUng next to Ro>. Tneatro. 4 Bedroomi Toil-t nd B-i upaiatn Dowr-uiiiF, Diawiis roan Imirn ib-..v.l...l.. 1 Mn rooms, 8*1 i.d To>L.Uit" oamff wniinu I.KH DMUruiar.. apply BUrutaW. aaHn The. %  %  CM %  [jut* seal %  i.e. .1 No 4TH CU i-in 4 wi~iou Apply on B* II n. Cliff Cottage. 81 CARS-On* A-4* ".an done onle !" •s.aoo oo up* I flea condition ferlact BL400 00 One •Ud 1500 Singer — tjrea. batter, %  ** %  .naltlon ru'lfr.l f2 500 00 It I at-dr. I Davlo. D. Von), P Ward, L Iron: t Poncett.. R pom-rile. W k>ro. 1.' Hewn*. C Herbert. O Herbert. C Herbert. M bait. A Herbert. 1. Hutaainann. H rph; r Johnson; L Meatier B lo.. C Ta.lor. L. Slerehall i I II K£* — flT H W I A ON TIRBKAT I. >Ul Bta HaTCTUCAL AMOUCAN RIXCTRK" IHEP ranzt i--ninl lui rr.iiit'n w m'.h" i %  .!. Lathanno Abbott-. Latt, Crewh; Jean t'till %  (>•; Rnbat S>aan*>. J.an swaonay; Mauflca Haalb WANTKB nn,p I Commi' of KSvt md and Irpowrritng .in (-Mtil ofApply In po* XV7. Ailv-e.-.W Wrt t.-mr Dcpt atalln* Ou*i nnimllal i: i.aai: 1 KPVniSKCKD At Dl NYAHT K. fr-ponalbJc ler Account* Drat riWnM fim. aalor] lull dH"l I M IBi.., ,i i I tiv,dually PoaKf PIMMI* Vlil W.l*. MKCIIANICAL nitYCi.r i. %  r..aW MlKCrUJ ANBOVS JUNIOR \; %  % %  aI POamoN reojulrrri a) raa-maiib' Yii'M n.;m with knowlmlgf of A our rar "Bjr na II I/J0 K P DrafUTI 1-10* P I m s/io". Pt r Biltar CAMAA DPr 0!r|Ua. ->n BenKera TO 5/10 i Demand Di-ifu 1C W* . Mibt Draft. in 3.10 a Pr Currency ffBJ l v r Coupona 70J.I0'AXINOIXCE.MKXTS OOTTON cmc K HI A ID — In four ci lour. 3" wide ....... %  •aa>| \ 70 ten I >> KIKPALANl ::.. BWan Stri-al J1 !. M I I.W—t I ION %  %  tii auiiife i i on-orv*i T I lane. C/o N • •I WM< >'Tf1>^ NOTICE %  "t*ii rnu.ir : H I dp to B*i\ i di] A % %  laltted an Nuiw n^l Mtdv-lfa. .ind iinul lo.e." v If. i %  aa their CartlBOfli' I ..ill !•<• i. Quired to axume d-tiaa on lUe BHI Mr. 1MJ. i * %  i. %  .: Traaatnoi' i W aCOTT. Ci.ilt lo 1 a Board a* Ouard'anSt. Pini.rIt C.tS— Tn IM r.i-r \.\l.LN 1VIS—Pnr tuna lit* and lart %  beautyof eour Plooic, uae JOHN •Ws WAX Prod.vtt PHane you/ .> i.. %  •.. % %  • %  T. Tn.riAv .i .i arfi JIINBOIJ'S Paate or Liquid Wane* > .ENTS: K J Hamel-Bmith al Co. Ltd H N llpM !'! %  : •-* %  11 l&3-4n r J'lllNSONT, %  rthnut dtbty The MI %  I u ivell >. M aM i ItJaW fa • re tivallable a ur Daalri. II M ** .'. £S--Dont ilavp lo-t< In the ..ld-f. d In ol JOKhaON'S Floor Ci. -e how carllu gnei w,u • rlnlnFloor Obtainable nl %  S'..:.S| CARIZn—Be trained > >poit*i or n Feature 1 Hi of.. h.me from Bart TAKE NOTICE INSTA.NTINA Thai BT&HLU.'tI PRODUCTS %  INTXR.' % %  ATioKAI. INCORPORATED, a eorK.nlred and elat.ru( under v* law. of the Bute ol Delaware. United tJlaa nl An.u.ca. whoa* trnde or btiaie*a rddraaa U I4t0 Broao. %  a. i YorK. U.9.A.. MBI ll %  i .1 "A .il H '• .i will Clerk Will Be Cross-Examine*] da Farm Pat* X S|uirt*-; waa in charge of D. V. Scotia bond thaw. On bit beginning lo work al thr Bond. ho had instituted a meant whoatby a check could be mode or the rum In the vats. Thkt wa* a i lyatem in which returns had to bo | ni.dito the Onit-er in etktfai '' Ihe Excise Departmt-nt. He used [ '•i pM munthly returns from the i accused for D, V. Scott. On September 1, returns by the j iccusad showed that vat No. 1 con* UiJned 2.400. vat No. 2. nil. anc! vitt No. S. 2.490. H..I..I AII'..I. : lil-Miit.. il Eta idrnttAcx! the hondwritiur: • in ccrt-ln exhibits to be that ofi the accused. Checking from the rum which had been brought to the bond, it was discovered that there were 102 casks short. II' hud been shown J letter th*cused had written Jones la witness), making a statement of being in a bad situation with i affairs at the bond. When the case continues today, I .Ii ftkaTSdj will bt cross-examined U.N. Can Stage Landing in Korea dh Froos page 1. Uixee or lour months tearing a LOdaMble Allied amphib.ous landing. He said] 42 known tiring vvx.'4tK>iui | ate oalnceninilcd In the Wonsan Bay area of the east coast. lie said "they are pretty well satisfied that if we do start the drive we are going to have amphibious operations with it and they arc trying lo net shore butteries built up around possible placat where we can land to do them more damage." Biiscoe said U.N. can stage an .imphibious landing "anywhere *e make up our mind.* we want .o land." He said "I'd have no compunctions in forcing a landing anywhere thai we are required U. do It. We certainly have Ihe capabilities to do it and cerlainly know how."—U^. IN TOUCH WITH BARBADOS COASTAL STATION Lfl i %  i. a %  mm U. fcnUrptue I'. ..._ 1 Roea. a.a gea%  • laltuat • %  R-mkalenri' i a Alcoa Penn-r.1 Corona, a %  Artadna. a.i T Roaarto: a> Spurt. % %  M %  a Resent Cariboo, %  a Crofter, • • L.vria. a* Noril < houittem Cojntlea. %  a. nor. a a l-dN a. Ulovant Chrtb-ntN \l„ %  d I Akxe Peril Sunwall. I aadi SHIPPING NOTICES LAND %  m LutrrtB. 51 A .'. *,*•%  *,'. 04*] IQdoS about ae'iedulad to "•• ll't. Oevonp^ri Sr*.-. Jily Ma. .mviad • ruM BU. Careo ^.-copied en thj ladira for tranaTlpowni si I I'.rtiiah OtiDiaa, leeouid and Wndward UaBadl pas hj %  .( DirW-Un appt) INM smi a to., LTB.. TbiNiiiAa. The M/V %  I : CdBgl \evli and S H I X' The M V • (ABIDIlEg" aaH %  It thai j PKftl •MONEKA" wl pABaenson %  >• nnm1 mica. AnUfua, MonlaarraL Novit > aad Bl. KHb, Saill.-t "day Una J IK I. aCROONKR "MIAUOCIATION fJMC.) rftocdao naa>eaaa>Cd*lr>f^-,*,'x^* ',&*a. Statwi&hip fa. Qnr. CANADIAN 8EIV1CF sotruBOUND TVHA" lA I'ARODl" 'KIM" "ARNETA" NnaTRaouND A 'TFAMER Mealreal I il> > Auau.1 II AU|U>I aa Sept II Auauil Bopt. Sept. -Vpt llth. lor Sr Apply :—DA COSTA a* CO. LTD.—CANADIAN .1.1:MM NEW YORK SERVICE NEW ORLEANS SERVICE A 8TTAMKR aalla 17th July. — arrleoa Tnd Auuat A HTKAMtJ ulli Slat July — arrive* ISth Augual A aTRAMER aalU 14Ui Auau.t arrlvea SOU. A tutu it \ STIAMEH .alU litb Aiutu.l %  arrives llth September \ -TTAMEIt aalla llth aeptember — .rrlvea S7th September i.T-oAi; 1 3Ut day of Aue ; 1 %  1 STATE .1.1 1 er.-e al la, 1 1 I 1 for X rotsib UH u A, 1 Dial 4in i..aa-f(i IAMH Ai Oraotao Hail Terrace -ach. Wll \ .-.>. .1 r Ictty E 1 i.nre 1171 or I3t7 MACtlfNERY-Ona (II •" t 1R-*eV. I labrlcal %  iiin Knain10 r p m d*veloplTie abon. 11 It I-I 100 lb' preaaure Two 5 HJ 1 One Hi 3t 3dt toll-eta will. <* C. %  .nslne. and H'.liaulkPi %  ware rtta" ...' Aypt 11 M Simp j I ,„ • 5J-*. L,TOVE3t-io famoua "Florence" Stovr limner Modali ar" obtnlnaM .111 IJiune Daih a Co., Tudor Street hone NS-I It • M—an. 1 R new to the UoUy a'.it.aa LnSland-a lead it .f now arrivlnc m Rotnadot t>T An f*re daya >ir v 1' Coniaet In Oala. C/O. Adeo> Co id Ieal HepieeenUtlv Silt. %  • %  1 • 1 of apportion ^1 MB I tiade mark Can %  1 at my office. in tath day of A... )• WILLIAMS. Hintt'r of Trade Marhi 11 a as—ai Jupan Wants Sugar From Australia TOKYO t Japan has asked permission lo, import sug.ir from An I is learned tn Tokyo. Negotiations Conic nil wun an Australian 1 ^:;mlasion In Japan for tnajai and* Iron ore in exchange for dolln % %  SioUla'a KOBKKT I MOM LTD.—NFW YORK Ai GIXF SERVICE CANADIAN SERVICE From Montreal, Holifax and St. John NOTICE We Ihe undermentioned Grocers beg lo draw to the %  ttaattoa of uur Customers that, oiriaa to the incrcased:— (1) High cost of Goods. (2) Continually rising operating expenses, we will no longer be able lo extend credit over thirty (M) days and accounts will be payable when rendered. We very much regret having to lake this step, but after several months careful consideration, we find we have no other choice and will have to enforce same as from 1st October, 1952. J N. Goddard & Sons Ltd. Stunsfeld Scott & Co., Ltd., D. V. Scott & Co., Ltd. AUeync. Arthur & Co., Ltd. W. A. Medford & Co. Johnson & Redman Ince & Co., Ltd. Perkins & Co., Ltd. Stuart & Sampson Ltd. S. E. Cole & Co., Ltd., John D. Taylor & Sons Ltd. James A Tudor & Co. Mc Donald Sealy W. M. Forde N. S. Sainsbury • %  % %  >< %  MMMM .I Moat ol Australia': rugu nnrted to Britain al the ,-qulv.icin of 196 a ton. Jupan Is offerbag to pay $120 a ton for 50.000 toot n yea GOVERNMENT NOTICE lUNWHtl i %  t AH'I 1 Se[,t I iept.fi.ber II BaalBBlDS i. Rrp-eoinai U.K. SERVICE From Soulh Wales, Liverpool and Glasfiuw AllenUon is drawn lo the Control of Prices (Defence) (Amendment) Order, 1952, No. 29 which will be published in the Official (iazette of Thursday, 21st August 2. Under this Order the HUB prices of "Butter—Table" and "Milk is follows:— holesale and retail selling Evaporated Other Brands" ate %  per n STOVES-%  XalaV S Burner Table ..iid 1*.. lurnei "Beatric"" On J S OVBI • Co., Tudor Blrcet. II I 55—4.1 Bulter—Table: In Tin*) S1U0.20 par case of 100 lbs. In 1-lb tint .. In Prints 195.20 per case of 100 lbs. in 1-lb printB .. Stock:Ruction loo a, 1 lulltp* M-rewdrtvcr*. Cabinet Madu %  creo driven. Sllplolnl pllara. Comblnaion pllrri. Ilictux Tappet %  pannei U Oel your requlreroenta at Chela ri.rage ilaMi Limited Phone B4t IB H Bi 1.ANU-1JS0 'Otiare l-i I da *I.IO. Lacci the | decraaed nd Will be I %  1. Pi bile Competltlen at c oetfr -' % %  Itlday And I ''. "IP" . roll! HOYCR. %  s a '. < AlT"l i in.. J i.edrootna. aaeli a. an. I •' -vd Beieanta* toon lo Mia. Bre. The r"" v •" %  be aa4 up Sa? aai our OR'* %  .'iiroe* Slim iHdltawB, on Flld. A i • : I>.B ID ft HOVCIT. *ol.elt-.-. n.t.ia-t-, •'THE xiner 'if Whibi •* %  >* %  r 1 Co naiuUBd o-i a""-i laoeo N 1 • •*' t.p tn public eo"-; • SlreaL on r'U!*v the Und dae ik&s at 3 So p %  tan i al: r day i STAMPS rOR HAH. TH STAMP rotLFTTtos' .1 eeeaaed client will be act up for i n Iota at our office. Jatnea Blreel. Rrn wn. on TUESDAY Sfltl. WHOLESAI-E PRICE (not more than) (Canadian Maple LeaD (Canadian Olive) Milk—Evaporated (Other Brands) $140.20 par case of. 100 lbs. In I-lb prints $131.20 i>or case of 100 lb*. In 1-lb prints RETAIL PRICE (not more than) $1.08 per 1 lb. $1.03 per 1 lb print $1.48 $1.39 $12.69 per case of 48 x 141 ox. tins $13.17 per case of I 48 x 16 ox. tins .. Hik29c. per tin per tin 20th August, 1952 Malta tlecrpa"! Gleaaew .13 A.ig. I AugTUki t ,.EarlS Sc-Jtembat. Mil Sept U.K. AND CONTINENTAL SERVICE From Antwerp, Rotterdam und London fltlaietewa. A-, uls : PLANTATIONS LIMITED. Phone 470^ OLYMPIC COMFORT HI UJCTION JN0ER THE IVORY HAM/V y Irudrueiii-ni received from i •„iimce ro l wM "H %  *" \KUH nd .1 Uaaara. < helfea Coia" %  BMd Btraet, <)' MI "Mayfl.f • %  %  ... m Salt *l 1 pnt Terma ran— UPTITH. iT.t.Ba.*a*A*J.^t' ri.snpflifrsciui : Recital Of Sacred Musit |] day, 21lh Aucu.1. t ; at 4.30 p.m. Proceeds in • : aid of Choir Funds. Finland is contributing to the complete well-being of the 'Games' competitors by providrng the supreme comfort of DUNLOPILLO mati. esses in the I hletes living quarters D.ni./.,/.,, MII Mi MHMaaa *<*4 mph*UfryJrym, kmmm mr* .t^iUbU M CAVl: ... CO.. LTD. I F. HAHRISON i CO.. IBdos.) LTD. UrTV 'Jos.1 LTD DA COSTA a CO LTD. IW,I*.CL. (Da. mw (Ol.lFCTIONs AOK1AN DE P,V Its the UIVIIi: VIT. For GOOD BOnKfi v Seven siaes of rmatm BLOW TOMMIES S for you lo HflMl fr..m. prlcM rante from $17,40 lo $46.76 niK eEISYHAL E&IJPOHMVM Cororr Broad a To*r 8tr*at, Vy^^Miy^.oa>v>v>'.'-'-aaaaa owgaaaaov^%  I ^ BOROUGH OF SAN FERNANDO VACANT POST—TOWN ENGINEER a Application* invited—Untversily Graduates, Corporate Member, of InstliulioM of Civil or Municipal Etudneart or QUlvattiu—to years' eapcriencc—Usual Borou.li Biuflnaerin. sertneea—Poputoilon S5.000— Kn.ra-ledge of elecu-lclly an aaaat— Salary J4.800 $240^$5.70 pt annum—StarUn. salary subject io epiTicncc—Passae, leave, car allowance Pension— Quarter, al 10-i of Salary-for full details apply o Town Clerk. San Fernando, Trinidad, B.W.I. Appllcatfoiia close Ml* September. 1952. L McD CHRISTIAN, Town Clerk. 12lh August, 1952. JUST oi-t:\i:if BIRKMYRE CANVAS If WIDE—FOR BUS TOPS and SIDES INNER HOOD LINING 56" WIDE, rAWN AND GREY LIONIDE LEATHERETTE 50" WIDE. ATTRACTIVE SHADES BLACK MIRACLE ADHESIVE l'.-OZ. or S-OZ. TUBES ECKSTEIN BAY STREET BROTHERS DIAL 4269 You will fall in love at firs, light with the Original Odhncr Adding Machine. The;.' an beautiful. Thi-y will make you think of sleek young thoroughbreds hurtling over the turf with effortlfss ease. You will love them more and more as year In and year out the drudgery is taken out of your every day work. Visit our show rooms and wo will show you the various models most suited to your particular requirements. Every Friday we have a -Dollar" Sale of Decca Records. This week we have some sprctally attr.icttvr rr'nbcrs. To add to your comfort light refreshments nre obtainable while you are doing your chopping in this department. Meet Me To-night in Dreamland Asleep in the Deep My Gal Sol Just J Dream of You Dear Ctn't You Hear .Me Calling Caroline Love's Old Sweet Song On '.he Sunny Side of the Street I never knew Zing—Went the Strings of My Heott Fascinating Rythm JUDY GARLAND HICK ilAVMr.S Home If You Were the Only Girl M. V. DAERWOOD will be arriving at Barbadoa on THURSDAY. Aaguat 24th and will be Bailing on MONI DAY, Angaat 38th far St. Laeta, St. Vaaeeaa, Grenada, Araba. tiiepllag gera aad lYatght. I* oaaaaa oo o o o t #* nr***i o* fMM t ^ *.AVaV*vuv',vv^v'.x.o*^^^ BRADSHAW & COMPANY "•"""^ %  TiaCBATTrtY laaaaoi FOR"V*CARS TRUCKS & BUSES CITY GARAGE TRADING CO. LTD. — Victoria Street WMtWAWvH %  --.,-.





PAGE 1

WHAT'S ON TODAY Curt nl Orand fc W Kn UttsMSBS ,.l p .'. rual Cvnrral MrM.n* „ t M p m Tullr* rr th. NUN Uui MM-k* iMiMun (laln.i Ihe *rom. thai nvrd M S U Saatt ro, in* fulu,, i„ ife, dtaUiw. And ih. good uim 1 ran do ESTABLISHED 1895 nu'Ksi, PRICE FIVE CENTS YESTERDAY'S WlATHER RePO*T no m-oss Stalin Calls Congress Of Soviet Communist Party For October GENERAL ClARK CN HAND FOR RHEE'S INAUGURATION Politburo May Be Abolished B> HENRY KAPIRU. Moscow. AugJD. Premier Josel Staltn on Wednesday called for the first t Soviet Communist Party Congress m 13 yei n 101 October 5 t<> (unsuli'i a IH'W oinstitution abolishing the powerful polltburo. The unnouncemerH of the meeting of the Soviet Comrnunisi Party's supreme body was made jointly with the publication of a Soviet new five year pian, calling for a general 70 per cent, increase in Industrial production. The five year plan Tor 1951-55 it is said, "is one of peaceful civilian and cultural construction demonstrating, the superiority of the Soviet over the capitalist systems. It 1 promised to develop and expand economu Uea with all i countries wishing to do so. No Official Leader There is no official \> the party, and supreme power is vented in ino i? member DOtu> buro and Ihe rreation of a new •presidium" CM administrative I committee mas have on determining the eventual sue' ressor to Stalin. The exact significance of any' change, however, depends on the makeup of the proposed presidium, what executive pswsi'i 11 will bold as compared to the politburo's total power, and what Stalin's parsons! positio n will be under the reorganization. The paii! I'i'ii-i' to meet evi But scheduled ere i-r-iponed because of Wo Lnd special postwar condition The party Congress announcement said that the Communist leaders will consider n new constitution Mmllar to Ihe one adopted in 1930. but replacing the political bureau with the "presidium of the central com* mlttee." The constitution defines the function of the proposed presidium as "leadership in the work of the central committee between plenum sessions .*' Most Powerful Body The Congress politically is the most powerful body in the Communist party and since .ill other parties are banned, it exerts a strong influence on Government. It has power to change the Party constitution. make decisions on five year plans and elect party leaders. It is supposed to provide whatever democratic process there !• in the Communist party. At the 1934 Congres* the ground work for the great party purge and treason trials which followed was laid. The eighteenth Congress in 1939 completed the purges and Russia entered a period of kaH During the past 13 years the party doubled numerically It Mo-sjj-olseW wax II casualties, so Shot tasM.v apprmtimateiy a fifth person of the party members hjve entered since last congress. The> may try to rejuvenate the top posts of the C rty but Communists long hove m under iron discipline and the practice 'if obedience to the little group which controls them from the lop. The main nddress will be delivered by the Party Secretary George M Malenkov rather than Secretary (k>neral Stalin. This Was taken by some observers here to mean a strengthening of Malenkov'i position as Stalin's heir. UP English Floods Claim 41 Lives LYNN. England, Aug 20. The toll of dead and missing in Lynn out of the flood disaster stood at 4*1 is Housing Minister Harold MacMiUan prepared to report to the Cabinet what aid Government should extend to the stricken resort area. A total of nineteen bodies have been recovered su far from the ruins of communities on England's" south-east coast and from neighbouring waters Twenty-two persons are officially listed missing MacMillan and Field Marshal Sir William Slim nf the Imperial OSBsBral Staff spent yesterday picking their way through debris left by rain-swollen streams which raged through Lynmouth and adjoining villages last weekend.—UP. MCSSAiBECH ... ST5 CiJIEFTAi; Rtin This May If Atom I Sum 11 Hits Congress IK \NK II I \/lK N IMIIM.JON, Att|. :. Mtuulu SO aioin i...in.i 1411 SSI Uie i,.vi BUgS) %  on mi., is „i„ 4i Isosl has* wliuli sill l run. tUM ancoin* up ari> mm UM Capitol and architect Davnl i -1.ii Mid uiai mi. 'ill '".uinl be done by Janu i. I... Iiri ol ihe red leuerrd Mi'-IU-r Are* signs has br>u stinrUiu vn the u .Iiol Uie Miin. %  corridor in the new IIUUM mil. %  i. II. in ... osMrs iii follow as fast ss workmc.i eau i..i to llnm. Lynn said thai civil defence crut lucent had llnished their survf) ol th" safest stir In Uie ( 'jpiiol month* no, but hinun are -uly now ondimt Urn to set ii(i He said that no niK.it nu-rn.ai.iii.il iln.l •psoestU prompter Uie mevr — hisl standard .nil defence precaution*, Lynn minimised the fear* voiced by Tmman from %  'me to timthai Ihe main portion i.l th. f'apltol hullil ins Is llkol) to OSIBBJW *>me dit Immhs gf no ti.Nili. bsSOSsM nf the swfksag i Ik i>u i %  iron dome The naedeUIr of Ihe < j pi tot's BStHoS I"" seas ssw of Truman* '>• I'uritc jr.liili. tural proJ-rU BS -a). Dial (he pofUu •houlj he built out farilur. iot .ml. |o |tn heller suppart to the dome, but I" mak. the i .,itl h.,,\> ssssor, l.*nn sild II .. %  in,, that the dome overhaul* ths portico 01 about tl I'ei Hot he *ld that It ... -ni> ported by iiown elrruh' masonry uall whldi cout'l bear twice the dome. ..kn. inosM that Ui*' overhaniiiti Up of the Uom Ik supported by 4 steel eautllever structure ,n.| nol by Hie portico. t'oncrcu started worr> ins aboot Ik civil defrnr" plans .ii.inii Ihe limr the Korean >ur l>.r..i. n, nn ml" r complained that. *1 a bomb tell un Uu(apitvi, mcmbi rs wouldn'l know which way to run. lie kairl that nobody knew whkh ,! %  •.were safe and whirl weren't —U.P. Curfew Imposed In Iranian Capital 20. An emergency cabinet n ided n Wedi impose martial law^l reherai -k in un rb ihe '.Him Teheran, mafci ths 'i' i"' effective at 11 p.m on V*ed 1 .nid thai a tin %  will inenforced daJ The announcemenl said that Brlgadii ml < %  lamed Military Goi A the sirlfe-rfdden t %  • Police, Mrigadler SheiUJV. Ulmil Violating Veu tral Zone i'ANMUNJtiN An; The United Nations one violation of the PSAgaunlOfii neuUal rone and defiled .ina.* 11 tinonl> cotilSiCt l>etweon Ko .11 .irmi Dos. T 1 t. Iks are in .. the fourth In ,is many weeks. Cdonei Ch irle W MrCarthj; in llvored %  hit Corn! munlst count, rp irl. North K*.r1 n CotOBOl tiiang Chun San. 11,hi morning One admitted that . United Nstlonn ; I rtently' pesi ovci Ihi 1 .1 -.un ..., Aug) 18 i I I'implalned of lfi .,v The note Hid thai 1 Ton wil: be .1 1-S-UT in future.'• %  t ommunlst prices! of August 18 thai united Nations plann ho. (town over the .: eonccded that a Untied Nation.' DSJ Otfiis-r hud said -lie thought t), I Hsd flown over the .iren at \SnQQ foot" Rosrovsr, McCarth back showed BS plants had heeii over ihe ml that Jn any CSSO at 13.000 ft • bservation would be "sattj iinrcli.ihle". Thi' note nut 1 have rostgnsd icreeded by %  have hs-i ingadiei Kemal I nis r Mohaniined MossaItad Ministers into the .' %  cling. Coiiniuinist mobs demoiiratod In Ihe streets shouting ; Dr>wn iih Mossadegh!" and I Down with the Shah'" Sources) se In ihe Government said that | ntted ssatej neTrltsr) "*' a protest withi Irj over threalide hy the mobs 11 lean millt.11 m the last two days. 'ulice riot squads patrolled all %  1 mam streets In the capital on night The latest In* >d*nt involving American person%  1 in 1 |n the •!. %  I 1 11 th, letp of I United States 1 a anel /ai stsoi •lie driver escap• %  injun I. I -fcer Av.itllah Kashum United Ststes Ambassadm 11. T derson that the United ites should not interfere In M'S internal affairs or cause de%  .i.itiMii in Ihe latter's relations %  1 rnlon 1 r ONITIU NS1I0NK SUStlMI COMMANDS* OoS Mar* W Clark (right) • s In a friend as he lands In Seoul from Tokyo to wftnoss the b isrurstion ol Pn Ment Svngman it n 1 r •ccoodtcrm. Mrs. Clark (center) clmts with an uoldeosified rli Irofiiier tlefti and Gen James A. .'an I'laet, flsiernafiortalt YUGOSLAVIA AND WEST DISAGREE OVER AID > Mil H.U.I. .' tiNKILI. WASHINGTON. AlU Tht Western powers relsl with Communist Yueo havt 1 iken a ilighl tain (w the worse bscauss "i .1 %  iisputi iiver .fiMiomit' und mi'ilary aid. il was learned on Wednesday Informed source reveoJed thai the I it lh agreed to pive v da^oejavls Dearly $KO.IK)0,OOO ..IT Britain and fre ire ready topul up anomer m.000,000, [n %  nots laai month the iiin Three l-m down then 1 in Hut Yugoslsvia hyi nsittve to any su %  ce in Iheii don i iffalri hntked v tback came just as Allied BsSf HiiHSlan partner ape) lit 1 bs warming ., v. un diphmiai* are working bsvertshly U| pnrveni differ//.SV. Examination ,' ,' l "'" %  *• Drake* /*#* %  •V n un That wai MM purpose. s l>elifveil f"i tin meeting '"" m ""' "" '•• %  •—'•-i ,| |„. Hi. Ihi.. .irnbossadors held KIN(;.sTON. Aug. 20 |lv (,h Yugoslav IMrtalor Marshal on Monday There was still 1,, ,I„, ( ,I ,i %  '„ %  11 Be Osnoral ban i ret %  on pnnu8i s> We cannot reentmire the valid It] mdon Ul tomiants said. f your protest, and we therefor?, held al Ul UhlVSTSltj CoUesjr 01 it WiU most Important. Ihey %  the mnttep closed %  said, for Yugoslavia tn get its InI't' talnsd b> the first gmduMr ,... „ son,, 1 1 it. CollSf) 1 posslbls through more exports > • weie all m,1 fowei im|-.rts They also uiai. .11 %  YUSO 1st 1 I put lots ineludtWilfred Chan Into linu |-l nulu-trlal di \elopIIG.), Euicenc Bsrtrsad (T'dinil 1, i.t pi.m -.i that more cash would nneth Tnm tT'dod). John be available for Imports. The note ham (B.Q.) Passing also %lso urged mure emphasis on agrl. ii 1. r brakes (B'd TMad % %  i'aroak Pays "Like A king" lf,S. Hay Veto Neo-Nazi Law WASHINGTON. Aug. 20 I Jacob Ulauste : Ike American Jewish CotnmlUee. dscussed with Truman on Wednesday, the possibilities of tho United Stales Occupation Commissioner vetoeing the so-called 'Neo-Nazi" law passe*! bj IBs) \u-.iri,u, Oovsrnrnenl last month. said that Truman -.(lowed "intereM" in the matter. U.P ISLE OF CAI'UI Aug. .W Nicalo Fa race, manager ol th. luxurious hotel Luvn P.na-ir. where vx-Klug Farnuk has been Using, sainllSlll allj denied on Wednesday reports of un allvgetl OsSMlte with Farouk over u hotel bill. Fa race said "Psrouk to ;< giHxi client and Is treated as such There never has been any dispute over hotel bills which wore tiandesi over |o hi actta| leerS" tnry Pier Busheti (Italian travel agent) every Saturday anl paid regularly without discussion.' 1 Ilr M ijesty drinks only larRt %  Of Iced mineral w..tei and never touches alcohol, bui Ins Italian and foreign guests do. On top of this, we have tossed in harge. a luxurious roof one floor over the monarch's apartment Although he is not favoured and is Healed like any other guest if the hotel. Farouk MB/l hk,„ kinf."-JD P SAIIHEADCD PHWIER Mohammed Mo^.ideah. clad in Ihe traditional robe of the Mutlas. an Iranian religious sect, confers with a group of religious chieftains In Teheran. Shortly after. Mossadegh created a furore In the Iranian House of Deputies when he sent them I%  : Bldtration a decree he intends to Issue. It would take 20 per cent of the landlord's share of future harvests a'nd distribute Ihe proceeds among '-stricken Iranian peasants. fInternalloxal Radinohoto) JumuH'a Offers Hood Victims Aid -aed more emphasis on agrlI cultural production, now heing vliihted becnuK.* of the Industrial programme. .died on Tugoalavia to BCree to support the Allied propo al'foi ;IM inlerriatlonal "Creditors' Conference to settle its for. elgn debts at one time rather than piecemeal The Tils; Three sre mireelng to postpone OSM pSS* rneatg for nt least n year, and they siirjre-'ed that other creditor i'.untilehe asked to do Ihe same. KINGSTON. Aus. M The Jam.h 1 OoverDJI l tabled, the Ministry Of Food in l..>ndon offoring on Uie tSuuHTl behsU is d espeleti tn lent uar. The note also insisted that the %  11 ofn Ml,.bt Res4 'nll.v Informed of . oeoootnlc condition I. .MI, .... fbe G .1 what steps it lakes to scale ernatent I OOW daring fUrthSI town lti~ investment programme III reminded Yugoslavia that aid •lull on the jtl i;n would lie less than last l of Representatives suptbe sssshop of J .. fund has i-"n opened for puhiir assistance l-> the I*-TOIC of I.vriinouth. 1 iad thst it would have to r Itself for a stesdy reduction tune noes on. -fJ.P. Saudi-Arabian Prince Visits Sardinia ROME Aug. 2uPrince Talsl Ariz. 22-yesr-old *on of King Ibn Saud of Saudi Arabia, asrived Wednesday by plane from Cagliari. after a oneday rtgfl to the island of Sardinia. Italian press report* said the young prince, who is an amateur radio operator, went to Cagliari to meet the Sardinian sirl with whom he Is reported i" I ed for almost one >car in two-j way broadcasts The name of the girl was given as Marm Man 34. Italian new*spaperthat a romance might I ed, between the two young radlc r.mateurs A spokesman for the prince asked to comment on tho reports referred all in the Saudi Arabian legs legation said all thnt vras km wss that Talal h;^l t%  dinia yesterday but discounted reports of a pomible n l P L..N. Can ^CagtLanding AMfyvrhtoTG In North Kor<-u TOKYO. Aun 20 View Admiral Robert Briscoe Commander of Far Eait naval forces su I m | the Unitea Netions cou an amphibious landing "anywhere" in North Korea despite stepped up C'oi m unu] lire power at mslor potnts. W. have the eaBSbtUUe know bosr" Uv said in a National Broadcasting Companv Leving. UBM batn twice in successful amphibious assaults ... start of the Korean m was the Inchon landtn* 1^1 tho west coast on September 15th. ISM, and the second Wonsan landing on the east coast in late October. 1950. % % %  have Increased their coastal guns "at least 100 per # On pose S. U.N. Planes Bomb Communist Base SEOUL, BORXA AUK. M united Nations lighter bombers and carr-er baed navy planei struck n htue Commur,it trfwps and supply i....s. ... rfamyan| on th*ckers wenUi lureX Quiet war restored and 00 new v il>'< keir. were able to reaume work I ith about 100 part-time j -crults % %  'on tho pot. Meantime Tunisian terronsU j' (ranged wild the responsibility^ 1 a Iximb oulragea m the past few months, were V. educsdav Lind will f,e trial lrout of the skies and flghter i '"•' %  • • n.il.iii. cOUrl ".i b> u IIM Tunisians Itohanunad Kllai %  Balah CTiertt .Hacks on street police said. Police alto arrested Hamadl Bi'. Hi I bo on Jaouarj it" during a demonstration. snatched ,i submachine gun from a police %  uarde—m. Japan Barred From (i.A.T. T. Jamaica (H-IK A CM" Party J can Team To Aid I. MI II n ml h Flood Victims ., mbersh H IKNIBI Parly KINGSTON, Aus. *" Mill Tii.de I 1 ideut who was rseenth ousted brothfi Flank Hill. :;. %  %  %  Hart an I Arthur Henry hip of Ihe I', nil, miuunrcd lodsy lation of a new poldii.,1 p..iiv based on T.U.C orgsnlH %  nd policies. The ineugursj log will be bald next sneota when a decision will be taken to the partv rilhri the Jamaica United Labour Party, lh. Jamaica Socialist laiboui Put. 01 the Jamaica National Laibnur MORE SUGAR FOR PUERTO RICO WASHINGTON ihe i52 Hugsjisti En sea al iiumption in Puerto Rico has en increased by 10,000 tuns, nouncea the US Dsp Agriculture Bstaai %  I Puerto Hieo has ineraswcd • DM initial 100.000-ton| of ocsl n*' snu fixed. Ill I' IX>NDON, Aug. 20 a repay Britain foi tl.. when the i-ulonv seJrered hurrlna devastation ..,,• year The J.i .nan four bj too ,,,n, Ulyml'i .'.oW Medal team has eaproased ns wlllliutness to run at a BsBStIIIK III aid of I.nimoiitM fli^ni disi vn Urns. When Ihe learn were prrsented lo Mi Oiivei raytteMcsa tdis afterBCH n at the Colonial Office Arthur Wmt. Jam.'i told the t. I'niiai lecretary bow grateful aid thc% on in-half -.( Jamaica to I." nomelrsf i--.i : li is poioT.fc tfiiit as a rrsult br •ii oAsi meowl meeting may he ...ranged hy floodlight at White Q1 riu srould b4the last i ihe sporting pUSik to see Jamaica's Cans runners, for Arthur Wlnl i-onOrmed to me thai be i retains. Utti %  %  Mi l,>tte|toi, who followed the BCUvltsM W Helsinki witti great interest and sent them a leasgram of • ongratulaUons on i | f. ui bs *00 .uecess. shook hands with every member of ihe team personally. He had been so anxious 11 In ut abort his work at the Colom .1 Office for a 20-mlnute talk will, them before going on to a Cil.inrl meeting SCHUMACHER DIES BONN. Aug The death has bi i Herr Kurt 9 West German %  der. LONIX>N. Aug. 20. 'apan's %  ppUesuon ns ssss hip in the QeSsVeJ AKreement i Tariffs and Trade has been rel ted by postal ballot aulhorlta., sources said Wednesday. The rtnam-ifll Times said it was l that Urltaln and two CoanmonsrSslta countries vo ed sgslnst Japan's membership negative votes were to conatitutv a veto. ..ppllcation for membersn p made last month, had been iiscussed subject in the %  ii. respondent-' column of the Hisiiih Press, particularly by lUreri and traders In LanKUli sad Midland llaht I 11ung trades. action in rejecting I :.n': application to Join (• \ II appears aimed at retaining the right of dleerlmsnaUoi %  galnsl Japanese goods, to be need .is a weapon held in r s serve during the probationary period Id test Japa Talks Begin Over U.S. Inriiislry Disputes Vhenever you want a cigarettereraemberIt's the TOBACCO that counts NEW YORK AUK 20 >.peful of Negotiators will it down to try ;, -.xr t*-\\\ the dlsi six of ten Harvester assrh out sgysMiusuU In 'wo brotherhood of Locoassthn I r. Ilroad disputes and hard coali men. ihe Brotherhood of Icocoutrarl talks. Another ma i gtneers. and tl i l.'bour news item was lielng made, of Itailwav Conduetors. .i m the picko | Industry served United \ .. | a ,i May' loomed in the farm eo workers and June. They said he unleashI uilrUng. and meat packing that morr coal must I*td more MrociUes than Rltlet | %  The tone nf the Communist A Federal Mediation Board broadcast made It clear that North 1 summoned mpresentatives of trie < Allied air attacks It was ample Ihioe rail biolherhoods proof that China-based Corrrr.MnIngton aftar the conferc InefTecterday failed to bring an jgreeUve in stopping United Nation-: ment over 98 union griovanrcg. sad DM planl oted to strike unless .i raise. The union which re p resents demanding I Ij wage increase %  %  %  hotirty eseala • Talks srere D taking ( The mediators said thai wincing that few hud hnulrl IKcomi • a gat i ; y Goodpsny plants and trtss have been itional 1 l P I



PAGE 1

TAC.I I C.VK BARBADOS AUVOCATE TllUUsDAV AUGUST 21, 1*51 BAT^AD^|A.ADVOCATE rrMMtf h* th. 4IIMU e. Thursday. AuguM 21. 1X2 dictionary defines uccidenl %  %  a*, 'an event which was unexpeclIf > ||. |-,. %> %  1 k flll.N. ed. or .the cause nf which wan unforeseen; a contingency, casualty, more of Ihc lUiMNBlun ut Qw mishap', and so on. Perhaps a Roy rotpect, BUnCWhat Is An Atritlent? -riouM be regarded as an accept-; %  -•• lor an accident, but. tls*where in my experience it 1" acaloat the rules In opt h mechanical dsfects CANE FIRES THEI1E were 43 more cane tires in 1951 than in 1950 and six hundred and thirteen more acres of cane were burnt in 1951 than in 1930. Yet of the 220 cane tires which were investigated by the Police only two were supposed to be acts of incendiarism, 19 were accidental and 205 uoVnowri. St. Philip held the record for 53 cane fires in 1051, but these were widespread In other parishes, 48 in Christ Church. 29 IB St. GftOfffc 21 in St. Joseph, 20 each in St Thomas and St. Michael and 15 in St John. There were only 5 in St Peter. 4 in St. Andrew, 2 in St. Lucy and two in St. James. This increase in the number of cane tire;; is alarming not only because of the heavj losses which are borne by the insurance companies, the damage to young crops ai. ; the loss in sucrose content of the cane, bu because of the fatalistic attitude to can-lires which has developed in the commu nity. After commenting that Barbados wa "fortunately free from any major fire" In 1951 and regretting the death of one femal infant in a fire on the 22nd Decemh 1951 the Fire Officer in his report on tbo Barbados Fire Brigade adds "in additio: to the above there were 220 cane fire in the Colony involving approximate!; 1.450 acres of cane. Of this number it wa only possible to arrive at a probable caus %  for twelve of them, the causes for the i mainder being returned as unknown." The Fire Brigade attended only 66 fire in 1951 and of these it was not possible 1 > suggest a cause for sixteen. Comment in %  on this the Fire Officer writes "there doe; seem a diffidence on the part of som i people who could help in giving inform, tion after a fire that would lead to a fat assessment of the cause." Throughout Barbados there seems to h a tendency tar fires to occur without know causes. As for cane fires the fact that probable cause is suggested for only twelv • of 220 cane fires shows that the prevei tion of cane fires is not regarded with an gnat seriousness locally. It is ironical to read in the report <<* Uli Fire Officer for 1951 that "the best way to deal with a fire is to prevent it" when cane fires arc increasing in frequency and hardly anyone knows how the majority start In an island where the number of can<> fires exceeds by far more than one hundred the number of ordinary fires it is remarkable to find that the prevention of cane fires is not.in the forefront of the FinBrigade's activities and that so far as thPolice are concerned the origin of camfires remains in most instances a mystery to them. If cane fires are to be exterminated from the island (and Barbados can little afford the annual financial dxair. and the damage to young crops and mulch grasses) the Police and the Fire Brigade ought, it seems, to be conducting an all orut campaign to abolish cane fires in cooperation with the plantation owners. The suggestion has already been made in this newspaper that fire watchers should be employed throughout the crop %  •MQf) on ;il! plantations and that factories should pay considerably less for burnt canes than is now paid (the money thus saved to be paid into a Labour Welfare Fund). Neither of those suggestions have been followed in Barbados although such poliotOJ are adopted in neighbouring West Indian territories. Meanwhile cane fires occur with increasing frequency and arcrecorded by the Police. Clearly the present policy of laisscT-brulcr applied to cane fires must cease, and a concerted drive against cane fires must be started by the Police, the Fire Brigade and the Sugar Producers' Association. In the United Kingdom a report on Fire Research in 1951 listed fires caused by children with matches and by smokers materials as responsible for 5,800 of 43.000 fires in buildings during the year. They concluded that the prevalence ol a tain types of outbreak could only be controlled by greater care. It seems that cane fires in Barbados come under the category of fires which can only be controlled by greater care. If the prevention ol cane fires became the chief responsibility of the Barbados Fire Bti.:;ii allowed, -.hat make it prone to accident, and special reference to traffic acciand excuses are not accepted. It this applies especially to tig dents, would be something that >* a stern code but there is an obWakes J • I should no* be aUowed to happen, VtOOl connection between it an i and the number of which would '.he well-known efficiency of the have driven on many days In be vary much reduced If all vehiNavy in the )ob il haa tb do It the winter months when the road* cle owners and drivers felt even i* hard to see bow there can i-? were covered with ice. and have lightly more responsible. efficiency in traffic control or any•*•" warty accidents. In a case Nearly all visitors to Barbados thing else so long as evasion at ol collision when one vehicle i* are impressed by the extensive responsibility alkl flimsy excuses ikiddinn out of control and the twork of paved roads in the arc the order M he day, and find other is either stationary or under island, and *imultancou*y but general acceptance. control, it is always the one out of itn/avourubly Impressed by the control that is responsible. The amount of extremely iiresponslCertainly It is a very common underlying principle is that the ule driving on these roads I experience now, when something driver must at ail times keep his have myself driven and been 8oes ^ronf •" %  loat or broken vehicle under control, and if he driven in many different countries, or anything hapi>ens that should drive* on a slippery road It Is his but nowhere else have I had the no1 h* allowed l happen, to meet responsibility, beyond argument, same feeling of taking my life in l,n % %  atf seem.* to be regarded At least that is my understanding, my hand by merely venturing on ** • completely satisfactory anand It seems only common sense I public highway. MlMr OH toot swr. tlial it w.is not done on purand niuity or in l car. pose, therefore it was an accident, I cannot hpip feeling that a therefore no one is tn blame. The more general understanding and My house Is on a main road and tact that i: just n little more care acceptance of this principle of rewhen pottering in the garden I had been sjMrcuMd the mish;,sponsibility wpuld have a benefl•ee a constant volume of cars, would not have >".*eurrcd. does not rial effect here, and so long as the buses and lorries go careening past Beam to l*c considered at all. present tendency toward a facile at speeds far too high for safet> ' l( ""' turn* to imply that acceptance of excuses Is countenon roads where the view ahead 'his modem, inconsequential atunced by vehicle owner* and the is usually limited to two or three litude toward responsibility is gansral public the efforts of the hundred yards, and is often less pc-uliar to Barbados, because that iiuthoriUes to improve conditions Sometime* it seems quite ibvlis by no memr the case, hut It are largely nullified. 'His that the drivers of two or more does seem to be very marked lorries arc racing each other. | %  ind tl i .11. DOtkssbla Of course I know thJJg Uie toU most dangerous practice where ' connection with the wild driv,.f traffic accidents In North th lorries are so wide and the "> %  : 'hat Is seen every day on the America is far too high, mainly roads 5* narrow. Even the bttll PU • haps It is merebecause many people drive at •em to r.ice occasionally the mo %  '• and om ol the urnspeeds up to 80 miles an hour or flagrant case I have seen beiiut CT 11 lUelwning %  discipline and more on the wide, straight highan 'outing' party of nine or ten ttllure eon ways, mainly for the thrill of buses returning from an expedinbertj ind b moving at such high speed. In tion that was obviously not th.,' rlca the altitude far too many of the accidents the of a Temperance Society. "f 'he ge n e r a l public and the driver is too young and Immature ,. ,.._, Courts is that bulh owner and IO be at large on the public road;. iHJ A % ? &\? In 'I* dr,vu f ; •**•*• arf nwonalin control of a powerful engine o! .lain words what I believe to be hie for u dan an done by tl i auction. Ihe outstanding cause of denierThe pica that it was not done on That does not alter the fact I would say it is purpose and therefore no responhowever that when damage is hlh'y %  i heard, don.-, both owner and driver are id wculd not be entertained by held responsible, and the general iy responsible authority for one attitude which ii backed up by loment -, *h Courts, is th* good old Navv 'Barbados many people principle, 'Excuses are not acnus driving hen what strikes newcomers tb the lmd as a remarkable difference n mental attitude toward responibility for accidents of all kinds ind not only traffic accidents 1 often wish we could have wm to think that defeeffw brakes ceptcd." the rii'-. BOW point in Saving Money Is The Big New (ruw WASHINGTON. more than so many ;.i Communist seizure of powei Americans are saving—saving uuies. Bu I ;ht the columnists Joseph and hard. of aj] the goo those Stewart Alsop write: — New York City, one of the vegetables wt.uM buy and he look "It is believed in Washington ;rcatest aggregations of width In that a Communist takeover in hi world. Is putting moic an.i The 601 senPsmla must be avoided at what.noney away in savings account* fenced Olsen to 30 months. ever cot, even trie cost of a break Hid bank deposit boxes all the A drink called Uv [th Britain on Muldk I lime. Sour" be In policies. This in itself '• In Ihe lirst six months of this Watfalngton'e cocktail bars. measure of the dancer ear the city's bank de ( > rood Adlai StevWestern alliance of the showed a gain or £ 103 million, onaon ; < choice IOC the nachiiig the boiling 'ompared with £6,400,000 foi the pre i. IVrs.a." .ist half of 1951. bJ i .,.) |D N ew York at 86 is a ii. on wheiher he is man of whom yo u almost cerHow can people do i.. v. lib au.iii i.. ,, f ., ,.unber tainlv never heard—but you hav* trices and taxes as Iney an ol Eai ou Ladteei "The oii.:..l of iratened his "products" times •*>?*' %  Pousc appears to be spice." (without number. Mis name is One way appears to be that The "summer theatre" — Charles Jehliger. His name is hey have largely stopped buying n hnnu—Is a great Charles Jehlinaei. He taught lousctinld appliances, furniture, institution when the hot weather acting and his pupils included adio. and TV set* for the time hits Broadway. Spencer Tracv. Rosalind RusselL M^ing. As one expert puts it: But because '.he audience is William Powell end I auren %  Hctw many refrigerators enn a apt to get ravaged hv flics i: is Baeall. famUy uscV How many cars can becoming familiarly known as you drive nt one time?" "Trie Cllronella Circuit." People * Del roll, Mrs. Margaret But, an usual, the expert* are jpray ihemsrlve with IIMIUMI juice Kelch is suing for divorce livldcd inti> two schools of thought to try to keep the flies away. Indignantly she tells the judge iver the underlying reason for the In Kansas City. Pnsddeerf Tin1not her husband said to her: huft. nan, enjogrlsi I "kxtOni" hoU" Y,Hi remind me cf my sergeant One group says people are day, has lunch with old friend '" Ihc Army.* mlldlng up nest eggs because they Eddie Jucobson. Edie was the 'fhe Knights of Pythias, on? ere Jittery about the future and man with whon Truman entered ' ,nc "nony "brotherly" *hot it mny hold. into an ill-fated partnership In snfons in America, ursa QovNo, say the others—if |>eop)e the li.iberdashery DUaUtesS long, wnor I>ewcy, of New York, to hink there will be war lomonuu long aj-o. make it illegHl fjr ai.v eluh t> bar hey spend lavishly on the 'rat. Negroes. irink, and be merry" principle. Headline: "Bulky pelt and All those mystery "blips" on They are lavuij becaus.they have huge pelf intact, Fnrouk says the Washington radar screens. onfldcnce in a serene and iwaceties coming here." Pell wealth. IBM to be caused by Hying 'Ul future. Down in West Palm Beach, saucers, have inspired the wise^ Paper dollars are known as inner sanctum of money and crack: "Britain may have her •greenbacks" in America and high society, there Is great aclivlColonel Blimp, but we have ou.ounsel fv.r Martin Olson, a Brookty among the estate agents. General Blip." lyn bank teller who "went to Reason: They are all hoping to Smash hit on the radio lust now .unch" taking 38.0(H) dollars sell a mansion to Farouk. Is a song, put over with great (£13,500) with him, pleads to Warning thai the tense :.l!uagusto by basso profundo Marlene he lUdfOi Hitherto Olsen had tion in Persia nay require armed Dietrich, entitled: "Too old to regarded greenbacks a., nothing American IntervenUon to thwart pass he mustard any more." Our Headers Say; 4 JYPW Xumr for CunitnlUm days is <1 submit) the ordinary ideal (for n classless Society) consumer, for whom "Socialism and choose the means by which > the Editor, The Adi-cnate; 'or Consumers" would be an inthis ideal can be realised on purely SIR. — The Reverend Francis telligcnt political slogan. He and empirical grounds, and not trouGodson Is, I suggest seeking a % %  '"' %  '" l, 'o pohiical babes in the 1.1c themselves or their conie for something that is fast Wi,od the orphans out in the cconsciences whether there is any ppearing—-I mean Capitalism, omic storm. authority for such methods In the HI the old sense of the word. Intelligently run and wellwritings of dead and gone SocialThe private "Capitalist" is in organised Trade Unions of proists and Marxists. fact being abolished, although, ducers in collaboration with welllt Kil| ., M wriiinr his paradoxically, his numbers are innrgantsed j managed booK on Capitalunt today I \vould creasing enormously. Federations of Employers may u „ v.rv 'iimuilf wo.k He Almost everyone nowadays Is a well b,regarded as an open con, rr iChcd ,| utl SodaBtm would Int Capitalis to some extent. Everyspiracy against the consult toavliabta wSSEnid nhSbh body with a oumnt bank account, can arrange hours, wan Mlai dt V eloped industrial CaplUlTsm .savings bank depos.t ocemint. a and prices to lu themselves and bul )no on] gJp^TETB life Insurance policy, or interest charge the public anything they ilsl bnekward country from the merit or BlUDlCtMl UkUM is a Capprice tin mselvos out uf the marM.,|X view-poinf and Russia itallst and. indirectly, a shareket. They are the modern mnnisjnnsj to be afraid of letting nolder in Innumerable enterprises nnohsU. „„. know tnc lrU(V slaU o! &*$£$£? CXCrC 105 " Socialism tn the old sense of the gj" W*id (he Iron Curtain. y ^ word is also obsolete. As the m t:in •> %  >'>' deduce that the pudEven persons who directly own Tunes K <... plemeM of ding is not up to expectation, shores in banks, investment tsusts July 4, 1952 mentions, New Fabian I Yours. and Industrial and other comEssays reject the old definitions G'• SHARP. mercud enterprises have little or of Socialism which have been the ,, , no power authority or even effecshibboleth of the British Labour r~vnibiliim M Mu—'iim live responsibility for them. Fewer Party for thelast 30 years. The To the Editor, The Advocate and fewer "Capitalists" directly collectivumi of the early Fabians SIR.--II Is proposed to hold an operate c.r elTeetively control the and the nationalisation of the Exhibition at the Museum next enterprises in which their capital means of productions, distribution month of Views of Barbados— la invested. Even landlords arc* and exchange are recognised as drawings, watercolours and oils, finding it impossible to carry on inadequate and have lost their I would be glad to hear from anysince the introduction of Deoth appeal and attraction. one w:l!.tn> to lend pictures for Dutiesand the big estates are „„,,„. l111 exhibition, especially the constantly being compulsortly iwessor O. D. H. Cole now de^-o,^ of M, Uowen, Uquidatcd. fines Socialism sj a classless Socip uye r. Felix Hayncs or earlier Th*. big banks and leading corr '>' l wlilch o one U so much ar tists. The work of living artists porations, industrial and coromerncnec or poorer than his neighj s „ ot required. cUl enU-rprlscs are inore and more oour s as to prevent them from Yours faithfullv. beini managed and directed by mixing freely on equal terms. NF.VII.UC CONNFJ.l.. mere salaried employees—profosiwrnard Snaw argued on simslonal administrators, technicians >h>r lines thai I p llitj of inome etc. who themselves are frequently* was desirable, nd even essential. not even shareholders except to purely on biological and eugenics a very limited extent. The old grounds—-in order !o widen the cartoons of the bloated Capitalist choice of young people Of the with his silk hat and big cigar Opposite aWOBl who were likely to bear no resemblance to present produce healthy and intelligent SJR. %  'JJ^"'JCmnTuiBt ng, In-equaUtar of income "' >""' \ ,ia ">„*,* „ u !" i .rt.itciallv restrlotl the marriage J? -? 1 nn my adn nratlon to Mrs. DEVELOPMENT OF NEW RICE-LANDS: A TOP PRIORITY PROJECT LONDON. NO single commodity is more important than rice, writes Mr. BernarJ Brain, Conservative M.P., in the current toRH of 'Tory Challenge.' "Clearly we must produce more rice. Bu'. how is this to be done?" Mr. Brain then goes on to suggest that rice growing products should be pushed ahea-t in the Commonwealth. "Our duty then is plain," he states. "We must develop new sources of rice within the Colonial Empire, preferably in areas remote [ from the world's trouble spots and do so with the utmost speed. "Something on these lines i? already beini; done — but we are in danger of it bein^ to 0 little and too late. For although rice h Urown in many colonies and production is ricreasinj; steadily, the total is still only a fraction of one per cent, of the world's output. "Yet there is enormous scope for expanl on, For Tanganyika — where there are extensive areas of suitable land — a number of pilot schemes devoted to partially mechan-! ized and fully mechanized production are (living encouraging results. The yield is sati factory. But progress has been slow, posbibly because in that part of the world memt ries of the indecent haste and foolish optimism of the groundnut fiasco ar.' still fresh, and also — let it be frankly admitted — there are still a good many questions unanswered. "Thus, the Colonial Development Corporation's scheme for mechanized cultivation of rice under swamp conditions in neighbouring Nyasaland has shown that mechanization there is less economical than traditional peasant cultivation. "This year should see more rice grown in Northern Rhodesia, Zanzibar, Nigeria. Sierra Leone, Jamaica and Irinidad. But Of all the Colonial territories British Guian.i offers the best prospects. "At the moment she produces only 65,000 tons a year, of which 25,000 tons are exported to nearby Caribbean territories. But successive expert investigations have confirmed that, providing extensive schemes of watei control are undertaken in the flat wasted belt, production could be increased live-foli in a relatively few years. "If this could be achieved a substanti;. contribution would be made to Common wealth rice supplies. If it is to be achieved the British Guiana Government must b. given help now. "Of course, there are difficulties and the> must be faced. Rice can be grown in a wiuc variety of climates and conditions — it fa not exclusively a product of the tropics — but it is a sensitive crop, and what favoun it in one part of the world may not suit else where. "That is why mechanization is not a um versal answer. In the United States an Australia where it is used to prepare th. lields, sow the seed, and harvest the crop it has been an outstanding success. "But not so in the tropics, where soil con ditions are different, where rice cultivator from time immemorial has been bound ui with a complex of social and economi* factors. Here there is a case for partia. mechanization, for finding the right balanct between machines and the men they serve "But whatever the problems one thing i crystal clear. From now on, research or ex periment, extension of successful ric schemes, the opening-up of new rice-lands should be a top priority throughout th. Colonial Empire. "For it will be of little avail to make tin world safe from aggression if we fail to mak it safe from hunger." Director & Secretary Uarbados Museum Bt Historical Society \ tint trillion The Advoesse; My To Ihr Edil mlUtes. The Wg05l shan-holdcr tgdy martnt. The welfare Male obvlf, B ;, Smith, widow of the late lit every unilil-making concern jusly invites control of matins and fv r Mowar .? m iy i for „^,V 11 the Government—which lakes parenthood. '' !" of 110.000 lo tlw Chll> big slice of the profits (if there Mr. John Strachey rcna.ds ; r !" w rd at the St Philip s are any) in taxation (direct and Socialism at merely a method of Almshouw aecordln, to a report Indirect and in sales and purchase reslorinB ownership of the means %  "*"", fC *' n ln 1 !" columns taxesl but which does not share ,,f production, distribution and !" * >H T. the riaka or the losses. Any pracMehariga to thine persona who ?• there wen. more n.,hH* tlcnl socialist should ask why any operate: them—the workers by n „ lied nersons uThi. c,m. State would bother to own (even n.,,,,, and bndn. £,£=? v. I. %  ul,i en -ou—o with the taxpayers own money) Collectivism and nationalisation act i^d I.'-t wl-rlv ",vf Instead or operate any undertaklna when I..„, ,,.. v ;„i v no i, chlcV e d M r. nf offerlna so m... It can Wlata rate, and prices St niche v'a alma and tax proms. The Times Kducatior Ifarbados v The man and woman a ,| sociallittle urgently needs protection nowaists should regard socialism as an L. B. CLARKE. A MILLIONAIRE TAKES STOCK AFTER HIS PARTY By SAM WHITE HEAVY-WEIGHT contenders fofpahsia parly honours have just taken a drubbin lrom a sparrow of a man: Chilean millio,, aire, Arturo Lopez-Willshaw. Lopez-Willshaw-an inch over 5ft takin size lives in shoes-spent more than £25,00 nn what he called "a surprise party cive by my wife for my 51st birthday." For a surprise party it must have inter fered with three weeks of siestas as work men directed by Frances top interior decot ator. M. Jacques Frank, built a ballroom fo 500 people, laid down flowerbeds, made second dance floor and staircase Down thi Kuests walked tn be presented to their host Was this a Chilean challenge to Argei Unas Carlos ("Party of the Century" Beuleeui, with his Venice ball of last vear 'Please do not say that," pleads Mr. Lope/ Willshaw. "Carlos and I are old fri.:ids should hate him to think that I am trytni to outshine him. His party was unique." Another worry: "Please do not write tl much about my ball. It is that kind of thin. which makes Communists." Mr. Ixipez-Willshaw, who looks lOte beautifully tailored kewpie with his creyim hair carefully brushed back into a long wavi derives his second generation fortune fron Chilean nitrates and a rare type of Chilean manure. The spender He is married to his courin Patricia, a petite and exquisite figure. Thev have no children and live in in the Paris suburb of Neuilly.—L.t.S. CANASTA PLAYING CARDS (Complete with Instructions) M.2S per M PATIENCE PLAYING CARDS 72c. per Set ODB ADVOCATE STATIONERY Stardy Benlwood and Hardwood Chairs tn three patterns (an* with Cane Seatl. Bedsteads with or without Mattresses In 8hwa 3' and J' •'. .$, PITCHER & CO. Rich Draperies... Crotons and Tapestries in lnrge variety—choose from our new shipment Linen and Cotton Sheets and Pillowcases. Also coloured Linen Sheeting 72" and W I HIST QUALITY Praam Haddock smoked Kippera Cad Rora Sardines Herrings Mackerel IMrharda I-okater lathater Paata RI'M KNJOV Tilt: riNKST CJold Hrald Rum yr. Old 1.41 per Untile AND FRESH VEGETABLES FIRST QVAUT1' MCATJ Turkey* Ducks KabbiU Liver < Flllft %  TMsSSji SHI^I Breads llsms Bacon Corned Beef fa tlas BREAD J A R Sanduirh Bread Fr*sh Dsll* FRESH VEGETABLES Ruilrr Beins lc. per tb ('jrrof. tic. prr lb Beef Suet 36c. per Tb N. Zealand Cltonse 7Se. per lb | I'ktv Cnosse 44R SERVICE.



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PAca ncun BARBADOS ADVOCATE TlllKSh W \K.IST 21, 1*52 If* "11 the Irfl N..s Blrikai brine "eia*hi l h. the txundar> 1ml Ihe i thr rlsht Ihe ">it i i Inshirr Onl*WI Baa* l.,.i ul Ihr lull I UM miwnil Sports Kound-up Know Your Cricket LAW \\V IU a > < OPI>I\ TO-DAY wt deal wiih am < %  > %  %  %  bat In L-iw* 3.1 dealing with l La dlsmlssI. \\\ || I U (.11 I Mk.r I<>ul "raUKhr—II ihr khD, from %  stroke off the l>. %  of i.fl thr hind imliliif thr r>. but not MM irflBt, lhrld hv I lleldoman hrforr It touch th (round, although It be hussed I i thr body or thr ratrhrr. or h arr I den tally loded in his In Thr I M-Minm muni have tali hh feet entirely within thr pit) inc. area ti Ihr H--I.HU BM I Ml la completed. This law has caused so much controversy thai even nt the risk 1 -lint' too much MUil I shall poinl oul some of UM instances which 1CP .ue at the tmi ti I %  %  ii i .... "m ihe LeaKUc, Hid %  %  Kfunds that the club had an Ml Me) %  .%  mei reai %  ... I Mb C'KK'KKT [. U 0 IBM) %  %  t.i.;. md i>.ii man i,. %  %  i .1, %  %  ro crickel. J'la.ving fjr Vinoo Mankad MANY >eai> ago from OM ot the immortals — the "Jam • famous lianjiulnhjl. From Nawanagar, too. came' nephew. K S Duleep-' .<_ %  *! in 12 Teat* for I %  tiM Austruiiun.s at Lord's in 1930 And no* a third in the greut SdiUon u> the cr.; ihe year—Vinoo Mankad, the Lord's Test with uowllaaj, Sini|i |>ei isiuii i. ... %  numbej nine The great Lord Lonsdale . AND WHAT A KINGS JOCKEY SAYS ABOUT HIM By JAMES PARK It is sllil a catch if the fields^aU has pa^. ^ If th,itriker lawfully hits the '" English cricket. With 1-. .all a second time, that Is f01 11 rouched siance nfl DOM of guarding his '"ought fear Into thr nr.ni 1 icket. he can be caught ai long bowler* of fifty year.ago. He :h. ball has not struck the arM the mo-t consistent fast ground before he strikes It a seescorer tho game has ever known. On one occasion for the Gen'VTrirlty men of the South against BM ThnfC C have ruled that a Players of the South al H I fOU yeart and .ear* the late Lord Lonsu Britain's No 1 Spoil He M n -vwvro a aa thr u.mo. in Mtos.l.n*d:.:r Brc *dl u> moM .uvrwd pra-em wna g in the i< at Aacot in he private ".ana *• Newmarket rlu yellow coacn and lour was one Q,' |j.. (it 'toodwo-id He l.v-d in COJ aour He gave nK nan%  ong nnr fcnpwi H" t uled * bhjji "•ought he was Now comea Joe Child*. K.nn published hi. "';. i&a.i and great Lord 1 <-rd Lonsdale naa Hal and •W* about ich h.i been "made" at the in. 1 ant a fieldsman has complete onfarol over the further dtspocnl ball. ,1 fieldsman may jug1 1 i-unds and %  it whereas the holding -.' ji hot retun mlghl \>o an InUl movement. 1006, he scored ninetv mtnutea. MOTOR RACING %  eejaj calrh" a sriHLINO MOSS ..nd MIK£ HAWTHORN, Britain's two younz %  ; xp'Tl:, N II In thr BcotUah Dglh; Bauraa* N t Ofial Trophy mertlng .il Tu VINOO MANKAD OM day Duleep" came along casually and remarked: "I'm go-, ing lo make you Into an opening %  bat." . I f nt Rather scared, Mankad protestled"But 1 can't become an openling batsman in a month or two." 'You can if! August 23. Hawthiv n lo Ihi racing scene h slumped me years ago this yciir and quickly established %  ..ket fans himself as oni of Britainb M Ouln '• "f a ball |n his Urst race at the OniKI 10 UM liowler who Just p t :,.f E ur ,,pe t Belgium hi The M.C C. have ruled lhal toucbti H before It breaks the, 1[ll:npd f,„ ll1n agamal % %  the umpire Is Justified In disrcwukc. at his end. with thr gardlng the fact that the h.-ill h:i %  iM-r wn^g ^Ma^grppBea. SOCCFR 'run I-ADISLAV TRPISOVSKY hail U'raught In l-right ing the ball may touch the groumi in atC.C ruling and in bringinK off the catch but if the ball touches the ground ai well then no catch has been made Touching Thr (.round '. |HI .! ana hearty a Of sirclea must sav Uiat nrntnd that bluff ana n e a r t manner i was. 'ii mv opinion n (ouch ol jr. 1 itaace. and 1. personali v have verv itUe use for that trait m r he charwu-r 31 anvone" Child* telts 1 nood dea: • 0 o u t Lord o o a g 4 jue Once at New %  iiarket GnlMi a s reoo! :rd %  .'".T/'-.'weV V M : ,Q ? >f a niiv for mv iimimctions about tne use ot tlie u:.ip In thr cour.e of tt\* inquirv l-ird Lonsdale. *h-> bewaro. wd -Tou ^ a good n.o.-m tna nu ier a-iiii ,ue wlnii many .imct I Know becauar 1 was dawn -aw it Child* immediately loivj Lord Lonifla i thai his wneajanut wer* *otji* untrue Ha-d Ch'o> You acre not at 'he varting ou do irequentiy go down on your na-'ic •o the siari. as on several occasions I have seen you mere ui vou were not at the sun it-day' In this outsposen oooR Child? *ives iiu own vrrdlcta on the urf oersonalr.ias of nis lime 'le naya : *'1 UuUI always con-ider tnat Alec Taylor was 'he %  meat trainer in the world durum r it rare--idln([' Taylor i*d a oai hetor in IM3 He dirt 01 Ort. out hr Itft CM6.670 Cg) Steve Uonognue: Child" rscotn.wi. nu aotli;y. DII >t nad remarkably noon : w;iy. I want al-nit the just-ended II. Ismki to nj own way on this job Olvmpie Came*. Mi I Ml I can work more effectIveh <. ; nnisir.ii the • TO if I am free lo do mv own think1 %  tieiti .it Ifajbotirnc m to timo, wtaai quaainaMlinw are nepdeiThis AuHr.ilian busineas man for a job like this" Well. Ml Ihei of 11 • % %  !'faolrl up %  eatstai IMon-pound i< on bis hope "n,m a capital of £500 h;inda \ '.iKnmcu:." ( Imi borrowed), oreanised Mm liotel Ust p..and made .. *^-k. vMihin two years, and UM pa.M'.rnt of 18.500 0 ..r QaWMgi %  %  OlM f.>r ihe AU • I t-rnment i .id the fare. Taw OI*ing4ea j"> is unpaid. "Don't assume any particulir —L.K.S. playing ,hil> -Ticket or in out of hi* ground touched the ground or has hern Bothlng further tuppeni, carried over the boundai-. %  "! the non-ylnker U out cd that a catch has In fact been "'it" hut if m heldstnan oevond ihe broken % %  a pica*Maloiial with ;> club in ! his pad and then be caught in tinslip. I dismissed "caught" even it the fieldsman has no' %  111 with his hand and Uua ot course Includes ,., M1 lhr baU with hia hand. I Crirkrt : Ihe COM of %  ball lodging in Ihe j,.,:| ducuaa Hvindling the Ball" neper's pads. m mv m vt article In tnTS iiilgg. I'.iu.hii Remember Ihnt Ihe striker may btofl anj obstruction withstanccs like the one in which a n the phvrinl aTM provided it striker
  • ..-n derlderl a fleldsmnn's rnul-iiff 1' knocki n M I Imundary. Not Cuuijhl pintanl U> note that the not "caught'' if a ball l? be handle ol the hut For the striker may have oid of lo guard his fac against n bouncer. r he Is noi aijowed to aa th gga ba % % %  %  hoslovakla with 'iril> the clothes he was wearing. He nsk"d Queens Park Raj -> ttial Rnneerv were eltlwliiel) Imptagatd wit* thr CMch'g ahown ( ti.ive ai'plied to Ihe Foo'hnll Arteintlen for i--rnv. luMulunal ihxhis. Brawn Score Centimes Tubh T-tini*: B'dos Wins r riie Rubber FRANK Wil ivo nn outstanding pen < Trinidad whin th* Second %  th* te>an from the San Fernarv v IMnldad and Tobafo scoaEBOAED i II LONDON. Aug 20, ^fler thr hr.vv i f the previous two days, the grounds were llOW and low irorlng ;is the order of the day. The only two eanturjj era Dodds who mad exactly 100 for Kssex v and F. It. Brown, former Englnnd skipper, wh 118 not out enabled Northant* rar against Glamorgan. .-i "Duleep" you batan to me." Mankad must have listened! !.*ely at that* Chanced Style p WM in Nawanagur. too, that i mi groomed by a sue-, • Sui ,. v coachai brought out b) RaaJltaUlhJI and Duleep". .. reault of Iheir playing asso-l rial ion with the county. But for Bert WVn-Iry, in fact. he might have bacn Ju1 anoUM* bowlar, Wenalay, waj back in lM. con.-IIwed Mankad that bil futur • ivai In kapVarm How (-.wllng and nol Ihe f.i8t-mciiiim stuff he fnnk >lad How Hght he wan', Mankad i luat about the bewt left-arm .i in the world today. gNrwi H ihln euUy in the braaaa aa %  %  :itr Up. i. almoat | kk ihe venom ataU] rtighted |rft-am lcg-piinH'r. aUlajatMoa Did you waUh I*n Hutton bal %  ting against him In the Test? His nou f ., tody of strained intensity, • knew Mankad for a tireless, %  ii iiti. %  won baa Oh ves, Hutton haa a great pgel for Vinoo Mankad. JMf wj „ M MilMkiU |' s |, trie barman haa someM o( Tf _. x ,. rtckin rv c had a thing of the impish, qi.uk-silver ^ K| |Un .. h) to (l |T1( Sixteen %  •-.mplon and something, too, v a „ 5 a long lime. I feel I ahould 00 thus N. %  tune l am incli!.r,i Oordon *ichard* Utt 'lonoiit : -Keys still against coin %  f tward -be it musi oe %  .' .Maher had a %  hUM nio. • r\ ..^ onK .. BOl ti (in-hard* witti Prank ol 16. • ihvui Hu two sons, Alool. aged six, I nd Ashock. aged four, are crick-! mad Their .sparemoments' v spent bowling spinners to! %  He plays for the love of it. ft* he-sheer exuberance of gaining ninlagj over batsman or bowler. He has never lost the cnthusilis • of the bov who determined Si> maylKone day the Mankad oon .is ba waal bit; enough to ramlly will add to the record hold a but thai hi WM antalg UJ ooki sith not the three but the ..: just ,i gu.xl crlekataV, but I W gieat cricketers of NawanaFof any boy who is llred by tha gar. %  Mankad here are \,tlmll: Goi comhinc al the bei • 'ice. ni. AtMl Keep your love of the game. a boy Mankad practised 11 i day. A Test star at 19— topped the average*, batting ml bowling ngalnst Tennyson's In 1938—he still practised after hour. i dad BealGrenadu ST OEOIHIK'S Aug. 20 Trinidad defeated Grenada 19 ::i in the Ladles* netball match this afternoon. On Friday T .inidud will play St. VUMaatl > n turn match. Amateur Tab waa played .ii ttM Y.M.C.A Naval Hal Joi defaatad Trtnl the rubber In tbii a-teal %  Wllloui %  %  ighl. bitiou of d< The cably unpo %  games 1 I Ian but Willougbby took lh< yle. Haihndos look Ihr lead b) Iwc '..•iin.ni tlill met 1 in n.: of I'linul %  Oil I II %  nil; win h, put tin in 1 bayond iii>ui>t In the next maU-h Carl William %  Rgwle Phillips, making the In the I .,. tbjM 'OPa. Willoimhl.v n. H M.e score for B gaatan to the tune ..f fou* -on* ,.,.. ..M M,-,,.ir on %  CarlWI .• platan on tho Triiudad • >f the visitin. lour Last night ba again won tha low fha % %  ng (T) lost to B afurraj ba boat Ri b—Hi II Ilj 14—11Sarrev v. Datwj Surrey 150 for H Middlesex vEsaex Kssex 1M for 7 Saaaex vs. India Indin 188. Sussex 110 for 4. Somerset vs. Hinta 236 for 8 declared Hants tot i. vVorrriler aa, I %  >, i tur. Worcester 1 04. l^incnshire 184 for 5. Nerthanta vs. (llamorgan Northanla 215 for 7. Leicester ffB, niaacr.trr %  AM %  '! ITS. Cloucestcr 21 for 2. ii i %  omeone younger have a chance. One day a week in the Lani inU-agUi' %  .. nli an M .•i. years Of non-stop cricket. But i! isn't a pu.sh-over. They i, > you well and ihey are enii.. cxpei'l good result*. and -aimething, too, oncentralion of Hutton. gressive, supremely confident, OCtai i bOWtari chances I s audacity. Then he bago scored r GRENADA BEAT TOBAGO roai Oar Owa (.IIIIM !" II ST. GEORGE'S. Aug. 20. A Grenada picked team defeat. ircnada 183. nings played today I and 58 and I tli Hi—21; 16—21; 12—21 C Williams bgat H. Phillips :i-lfl, 13—21. 21—14. 21 — 17 \ M ndaa lost to F. WUlmighby 17. -'1 Id IT 21. 21—23. On th. visltora v. ill LONDON, Aug. 19 %  %  \ %  ^-Y.MlA Thr f, H-1 ,.,n ra o am and the Third i> t tvUI > %  •• day EoUow: Tin id when ',,"., Hound; Celtic u. Queen'than will alaO ba BO exhibition |'ark 0. scoreless le llstrr Cup l>oubles hall.nnena 4. Glentran 2; Di lie Trinidad team is exptvled tilery 2. llangor 0; Glenavon in to Tiinldud on Sunda' FOOTBALL RESULTS 2. Banfor 0; Ardi 1. Mr—C.r. CROWEV LCX5KS UKB MfriUI I (XATU, x> M6DUDS DO T HELP. Sj WE DOC *-^ED THE .dTOOPPW* 1 UO IT WAS JTCJCE OR A S X-.MN0L.E — By Jimmy Hatlo rf US LIKE A OOY £ <30irJO ON .THE .V4SOM-1HeV MUST 8E LONESOME—TUEV WAHT TD MAKE IT A MASi, RICH TASTY PURE J&R BREAD & CAKES Just those Toothsome Delicacies for the Regular Picnic Parties and J A H S1VWIIHH BREAD for the Bus Excursions. Ml (Wj*—. num I. MIV-TI1U-. .Ill WHITE HORSE Scotch Whisky The purpose ot' signs without words. Mere ii a symbol (hat IcIU. plainer than am words, of "lii-k\ at hi hiu-st . luvinglv Mended, long matured, until ir is as nnhle a See*) l as ever came out ol Scotland. CRICKET BATS Auto-graphcd by Famous Players including CLYDE WALCOTT FRANKIE WORRELL LESLIE AMES LEN HUTTON PRICED FROM $12.00 to $19.52 LESS 10% DISCOUNT FOR CASH CAVE SHEPIIEKD & CO., LTD. 10. 11, 12 & 13, Broad Street iff. LISTENING TO THE • EX-WTSO SPRE4D THE SO-LIGHT GOSPEL— / THE MA-T-3 octn ib ElECftt : mW Yes. the very latest and what .. selecUon!—The DO* K. II Hunt; lened to enter to Mr. a Mrs. Public and that entails variety Store stock. an Lower Broad St. is deThese superb Electrical lhainMlH hlaj are so numerous* Won-t you come In and see? Tiles and woodwork gleam and sparkle after a quick ruh with Vim on J damp cloih. Vim cleans quickly, smoothly lOH bright and polished, without J scratch. Use Vim for pots and pans, sinks and hath 1 — all your cleaning. Waahrr* Frigid* Ire* -V rHrp Freeses: Craehs: Hot Platea r*ter A Fans. Hoover Home II mini ( li'in-rs A • k. R. Hunte & Co.. Ltd. VIM cleans sve-yt> smoothly and sne^dily



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    THIKSUAV, AUGUST. 21, lS2 BARBADOS ADVOCATE l'\: I 1\F. iiiCiike Addresses C.C. On Fiscal Survey ^^S Better Trade J a yKctord Conditions Wanted U living whi.h ,s bnrnihl about ran be eartabli-hwl U the right at, u „ affw.1 .t I..,' Oft***** * .-n by UVIIIK fenod D) cuoib. .souVe mospner* 15 created and lime., afford not to h*v.It I kno* that controls to DUl raquirolies our greatest wunr of weakmany of my co'leu*... %  ments 111 tha dearest market has new. The atmoaphcrc in 11 anon tvorthelcoa not > b> them, island at the present time li I ai You wiU appreciate IBO fact tha; against the creation of MM inBeaslov on this point. n, H 2, N B L ? h CUK S dr8in K members ol the 'tAi'^^SSS^TS^. *?£5 Arc Important %  %  %  Thoughtless and ri tpendtni n vpfitprdav gftornnn" ^A7.\.'^A .r~—" '.—""-' '"""" %  •i -• %  •= • % %  ' • • o pay un. talk of "soaking th, -VL.uld DO WOU devou-il to this exp L,; a ". er " n dved them not to accept the inrow im"naUonalizai.oir baa ci tmcTi evitabiiity of the past, but to press forward for more B rls ; Y lU ewI ol "" wrwi u continuing to create an atmoi of the expenditure La on labour ,i favourable conditions in thy terms of trade scout wragMorr noirfci IN.,, phere which fa nou coaU which would be cm ulau.l %  only agency which could achieve any results in that direction. He warned them not to depend on political representations on that question as the majority of present-dav __ politicians, however sincere they miRht be. did not have the knowledge to deal with that a*j*ct of the matter. Hon'ble Mi Cuke was speaking on the "FrWl" 1 Sutvcy" by Professor C. G. beasley. Economic Adviser to the Comptroller for Development and Welfare. Among those present at the meeting were the Hon'ble the Colonial Secretary. Mr. C. C. Skeete. Director of Agriculture, Mr D. A. Percival. Assistant Economic Adviser to the Comptroller for Development and Welfan.-, Mr. G. H. King. President of the Chamber. Mr. D. A. Lucie-Smith and Mr. S. H. Kinch, Vice-presidents, Mr. J. H. Wilkinson. Mr F C. Ooddard. M.C.P., Mr. E D. MotUey, M.C P., Mr. F\ A Bishop. Controller of Supplies. At the conclusion of the talk, Mr. G. H. King. President of the Chamber, expressed thanks to Mr. Cuke on behalf of members of the Chamber for a very interesting talk. Addressing the Chamber Mr. Cuke said: Mr. President, In accepting the invitation to address this Chamber on the subject of the fiscal survey of Barbados which has been presented to the Island by Professor Beasley, I realise that I have undertaken a rather difficult task. The survey Is very comprehensive and covers some 107 pages of printed matter with a vast array of statistics which require a great deal of study, and which could not be adequately dealt with in one r.ddress. I shall not enter Into a discussion of all th. covered by the survey but shall „_ deal only with the principal condifficult position turns I %  %  able terms, a ked vigorously, %  %  far too many shackles placed on the business men cf the Colony and you must agitate ior i. removal. You have the know d rea * the Covet i he technique and :he bu'UiCfcS experience to purohai In competitor: u,ili the consumer good* required by imUBI y. and j, i i ., bu im i wi.nout undue ml rfai %  Third Observation 1 u. un tn %  %  kOOa the Island's uonaltse the Re.h(fusion : %  *" -"""'"• %  %  M J,t w 1 > *?£ !" \ W -" """^ ** U l* no absolute knewligi> I I ,i d any obsumct., at mght with on', 7 mombors out gatlon „ n Drmi up f hf avcli4(( ,. "" H of 24 voting for it may not be of lnv Blsek Soil fcatatM which known to the ouuide world The Tfy: bald statement oes forward I | H ( ^ ( Hi* W ^1HML'TK UJ lhal f. HoUk '* nio by of Assembly_has psw rood on shipments x .." of suwr U Car,llna duiniK th,years iso -v> unii the p I has been mads that !> f th.s amount should bt devoU I .p tion due tn can on bin M .teps be taken to naUonallM th. n S-ivice. I ha v.i one of the huge inetork has been erected in a i Children Shoiild Be Taught How To Prepart' M*;ils ;land and which v. ,U l>e glv. JJl"" %  mploynicnt to • considerable PORT-' ; • „ %  %  ..u whole Island. '• B >iBlseli Sod a ^ n Au number of people could have been ,„ a „..„,,.,, fel ,., ; ) %  : '. irrigation ean btt to which I have leferred. Cn* of ^^n high rainfall and I >w r.-iu ..,the Directors of this concern inf a n Yi ar 8 „d thus raise the av. •ty> taught to w ^S,rdm1;L"S d M Ch Jr^ m V h *V ,H (lll V--"*;^ age pr.,iuct,on of I :< Jowl, b,'o. ; J'SSZ xh ,i uv ?' ,OI i s • and ^T i upply i .^'! slderable IncrM o In nati nal ^^ti^J^r*; S"lrg^LS ^etfsS come .can be achieved. Th, jur. other te.he , which he estimategl he was impressed he did not Uks tl %  atmosphere and thnt WSJ \> hv thewhore 1 MON. II A. CUKE Thli acreement however cov' en only 7" of our output, there slUl renulns Vt% which ; baa to be aolg un the world price. With Unbugr prodoctlun Critical Attitude Even apart rrom the political almntpherc Ihere l larklnc In thU lolind a full rr.dl?.itirm 1-8% j-year thv more p.* ; out of our I This question of the growth of population hi it;.blgSM laaaa m ] have to face in the fuluic I'rofi %  Hi i try very wisely points out that with the grown of population Government expcndituumust Inevitably increase, even a'though all lervicet held at tha pr aa aai ; Government and Parothi.'il \,— e en dlt v x"". nlr f ady cxce ^! which Cuba haa achieved, the 2 1 '.. of the national r,come which outlook h. not very prom King, Nearly Indicates that the limit of so that aithontn the .fireement taxation has b-eu teached. The will be of great value there Is cnlv Pr^fess'or"'Bea.: crms '" d *„ ltllP5rS hCrC t 0t iSS? ley has arrived and my observaHe wl lra; T A 8n,a11 counlr y ta a "IT. ^nment cxpenditur.small scale supplier in a large which can in the fuhire years be scale market, and a small scale removed from the Budget, and buyer of large scale products, as the population increases th.s It is seldom in a position to imexpenditure even on existing pose terms on its partners in standards must inevitably rise. trade, and is therefore dependTake the item of Education which ent on them and is obliged, now consumes 20.6% of the Budwhether it wishes to do so or get expenditure, can any one exnot to follow policies which will pect that if each year there are enable it to compete with rivals more children reaching school ag all over^he world." the expenditure on this head can This statement very pointedly be held at the existing level? Or been raised to a very high standillustrates the difficulties with oRaln. take the Item medical, reord, and it Is doubtful whether which we have had to contend in presenting 12.9% of the Budget, eny very great improvement, expast years. In the pre-war years how can this expenditure be held cept by irrigation, can be made on we were compelled by force of at existing levels even though the present output. The crop year circumstances to purchase our rethere is no improvement in the 1S51 reached a peak of 187,000 quiremcnls, tn competition it is standard at present provided? Or tons sugar, but what has perhaps true from threw main markets, yet again take the third item on been overlooked is that due to i.e. United Kingdom. U.S.A., and the Budget, "Law and Order and three good yeans of raihfatl the Canada, all countries with a high the Administration of Justlci percentage of acres reaped in the standard of living whose products with an increase in the population — black soil area of the Island has were therefore nigh costing, and how can this expenditure be held employment for the increasing increased from about 58% to 68% sell our sugar at dumped prices, down? These three items comprise population and to purchase our of the total arabl; acres. The first thus providing a low standard of 45% of the expenditure of Govimports on u mor *„ Ba ""* artorv p drought year th.it occurs means living for the woikers in this Colernment, all of which must interms. And while all sections c. two low succeeding crops, since ony. The Ions term susar asreeerau> % %  th nnnulation Hae*. w community rr vev clearly Indicates the need to dome push ahead with productivity m ,(,, one form or another and this is con tion < the whole theme of the rep %  > %  I Unless this fact il realized by the it, u a iima d l ol Un* Community, and nil interested beiii.; wasted to Ml tin parties work tow-n-ds .. ndi/.it ion ,„,,.., ,. ., of this the icpor. will jusi ba ananouga tuns Ml to leach no* other document n record. ths> wcrr prepared. My advice to the Members of i _. the Chamber of Commerce and to he-,,, i-,., ., ,, f r fPJSSfStjSSLJ^U'Si 'he community at large Is this do hm Ust Salt I ** not pay too much attention to the attended bv the Hon I many details but catch the them D Minister of Education and PJoeial of the report which Is production Services or by any mfinhrr i and yet more production. his ministry or of the MucaUo —— — Depart men t. _. ,„. .. 4 in .i lath i to Ma H v rorillir I *Ia*l .AilCl of aMtlsh Oulana praakisnt the Union, Mr. Jnwph said h ToliiMrat Iiir<^'t(tr ,art; "' rewet tiiat elreumstanes lir p r ,• !-*• — vent promlnen] rnt)tn 0| U Ol hlllai'UllOIl UlCq Mmisits and the Danaitmanl Educallcn from tal iitmn Our on Cm'i*"o*n"liitt **nconference rOKT-OK-SPAIN. August 15. lions thereon. The first general observation which the Professor has made is that the Island cannot be regarded as an under-developed Island. Wltn the exception of Oil. which mask or may not be found in commercial quantities, the land resources are fully developed and have been so for many decades. The productivity of the land has to aubtl new lnduntrics W too prone to be critical of pro ducta produced In the West In dlea and to extol the merits Of Hem* Imported from far alteld, mil.realisms; that by o tl.mi we are < <• ii tondltionk which can prevent uew V.IUUTM Trom bebu esUblishrd here or in the Weal Indies. ThU qurstloo of creallng rov ploymenl la our m-i... concern In the future. It cannot l"' aceompllshed by any one agenri alone. The commercial community must be prrpared to exhibit pemonal Initiative and take risks, thr officials of th Government youi News reached the Colony Um "Uut I would III waafc of the death of Cspt. J. O. that IK. ut'ei^eavour"to Ctteridge. former Dlrsctor of an d my own Ministry would b* mlv too glad t.ui o that you during: yur stay." render may rcqulrt 2.1 Gain Shorthuml CfTlifiialrs be helpful an d not obstructive tducation of TrUndad and roU go. In their dealing with business ! %  died at his home ttttj) 1 people, the trade Tnlon while "I Man early Udl month whe.e endeavouring to obuin fair > %  < had been living In retirement, wages and reasonable condl' the age of 65. tltsna of emploTment must be Capt CutK-ndge .' prepared to Insist that the workknown in Borbndi.. whenh em give a gooil day's work, and ded f..i some i the politician must develop a tiring [TORI the DOtl Of Dlraetoi rre^ter sense of r^ponslblllty .i Kducation ol %  • > i" mnatatO candidates la his pohlie utu-ranrea. If all |04t Hv a the Colony's BdUCastH-rtlum! Theory CerUficate' sertloni play their part I am UOB Chief eight years. „,„, v s .., ,. | CsrtlflOBtSS, from eonfidenl that the future ran be Capt. Culteridge, WOO WiU |ni i', lmiM s |, v titute m fdM faced with some confidence On perhaps bo imlostlon hold on April 5. the eonlrary unless a change In hls preparation of West |,U.,n y ltil .^ llu the atmosphere takes place the ;,.„!„, k s--We,t Indian BS>kds ,, mitUXW fatare Is Indeed a gloomy Wr ,.,„." textbooks on geograj-l.y OBd ^J ., ( ?fl wonU nilwl my Issues witl the present time I loaat faced at ithmcUc— whi. h are l UOg n md intermedi.it' i,, aJU I'rimary and intormeoiaie senoou 1|U so Ku ,|,,| p h 9/$ a r. needtoflnd.. xuti ( olony „,,, dlnf sod Kefth Arok BJehord %  aro Han tli ng term sugar agreecrease as the population rise "r over ulty. ^' i.iiutiiK •••I'M ^"- ,, (| ((( m ((UplL 0 f ^, Ol the Governmen ||(io| %  C Ms i Two roars 1st. Tli( .,„ | ,. p he was p-omoted to the past^ oi lJnllin( ,„„,„„ ptu Ser I replanting will_ be heavier. Proment will partly overcome one If therefore there will be an InP"* *?, ^T.T.n" !" ,^ bad to wait live years befoi and fessor Beasley"s warning about port of this'difflculty. evitnbie" mcVease In certain GovJfJ^s it the shortness of the public mem_ ernment expenditure, if the limit p ham t ^" ory is therefore timely. Competition of taxation has been reached, it is %  w< lli Second Observation The hard currency issue with obvious that the standards of livdais eat The second general observation ill cumbersome and unnecessary ing must fell unless the national I |on " which has been made is that controls and the bungling which income can l>e inei eased, while the Island cannot be reaccompanies artificial controls re( arded as an under-developed moves the element of competition Gov I Expenditure effect, that iland, it nevertheless is a dewhich formerly existed; as a reIt is true that during the past pendant territory. This fact has suit we are purchasing our reten years Government vxpcnditure The conclusion %  altlng the appotataont ol A I ,. ; Direct ol Kdu \ "' %  choole. lit rded the Mil F. ffr hi: been well recognised by the quirements at the present time at has not received that careful serudrawn from Prof. Beaslcy'n thoughtful people in the communexorbitant prices;_but in the same tiny which it had formerly been yey araj— is the menilKwhich must take tin l poIiticiaiM and the ofl help or Undo* the CrOO' %  II' 'i %  sources of employment but neithservice* to th er can Initiate measures to the. i %  %  !> %  % % %  your fuii'titm. ^— ~~~~ Conclusion ^ ^ y W £ M< ,,,, TdaV King, Edj ii i v Hi I u FYankl %  lull. ICarJorlo Prank Poo i Grant, %  n Tl %  Ihilalls i i %  Dslana Morris. Colony In the Bold ; %  -.,_.._ ,; m. . a A i-a IJJUAI. If 11,^* A. paa a & 1 I aavAuA ra 1 %  .' neeessiUted four vislU to the suits in this direiti.m. D not doing our tourist industry If United Kingdom. I should >lke pend on political representations right approach to the problem i* publicly to thank the memBers on this question. The majority of made. of the Chamber of Commerce the present day politicians, howNew Industrie* for the strong mural and active ever sincere they may be. have With regard to the question %  f support which was accorded as not the knowledge to deal with new industries I agree with Prof during those anxious 4*y*. this aspect of th-j nutter. While Arthur Lewis that much can K* Tour sympathy and understandthey all appear to be di.strcs-ed r.l done in this direction. I do not Ing of the tsanes Involved were the high cost of living, their outbelieve that this iidand or indeed a great eearee of help and gave look reaches only to the markthe West Indies can ever become future planning. I realize thnt the us confidence to pursue the ups of the local .ctailers. highly industrialised areas, bus high cost Is rather alarming but negetis'-twa. The real cause of the high cost certainly many new Industrie the question is not whether we 51—58 of part II there are t Items on which some differences of opinion may exist, these are the "Provision ol a Deep Wat-r Harbour." and "Irrigation 19 maintain higher average sugar output." With regard to In %  formasI have always held the opinion thai it Is an essential Item in our So handy in the Home!! So delightful at the table STEWKD GUAVAS—Only 48c a boltlc 1,1'AVA JIII.V 14c. a boltlc MANGO CHUTNEY 72c. 60c. & 48c. per boltlc PEPPKRS ii Mc. per bollle PEPPER SAUCE 40c. & 20c. per bollle SALTED PEANUTS 81c. per bollle HONEY 'ii 44c. per bollle Obtainable al our Home Products Depl. CAVE SHEPHERD & CO.. LTD. 10.11, 12. ami 13 Broad SI. LOOK tf*\ FEEL V X IN A FINE READY-MADE SUIT GENTS" SUITS in Worsteds., Tropicals, Tweeds and Linens Full American Drape Style • SPORTS JACKETS 2 and 3 Button Styles, with Patch Pockets In Brown. Blue, CJrey and Fawn Prices from $18.50 up • TKOlSFRS in Worsted. Grey Flannel, Linen. White and Kh;.ki Drill DRESSING GOWNS in Flowered Designs and Plain Colours • TOWI I UNO BATH ROBES in Checked and Striped Patterns Build up their 2**^ future health GIVE THEM MARMITE EVERY DAY *,n)n>ini Kirr.(• |u( htlp <.hil<)rn to trow proof, and iiurdr HtMldvttu.ItJini n*rtnits H %  food wansw n t di .mrr d.. ro nuwuln Ainou and re*h4.n "it aodr ratinir.ee to d.*Mui Both /oun^ and otil tov Mir nttt'i r.... laoOttsfM tai't—fdndout tn to-jpt. rntat di.lsM. wvourut — .<.ijwi(hi too! Cookt alto like M*rmlt btcaui*a pr luu tweh a lonjtlmt. MARMIT.. THE VITAMIN B FOOD FOR FAMILY FITNESS It's NEW! It's Extremely Useful!! A SJm ABSORBENT CELLILOSE SPONGE (Not Rubber) in a variety of delightful colours and for every purpose. For your llulh — Fur JPOUI TUM For your Baby—For your Household It rruiuiairi the skin 11 I.Hue -n i.i Into l-irn It U Hriienlr — ran be rlraned by boiling Always Fresh and Clean See Them and Oel Yours To-day KNIGHT'S DRUG STORES. toWMMaai ^•XJO'**-^^V->-XX>00000000<'. ) FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE! BARBADOS NUMERICAL TELEPHONE GLIDE Itm I'UBI.ISHKU FOR Till: FIRST TIME Any Telephone Number Left on Your Desk Pad l Call can Easily be Traced to the Parly lu Whom it BalMfa. Available at ALL LEADING STATIONERY STORES — ALSO — AT THE PUBLISHERS COLONIAL ADVERTISING CO. (B'Dos) LTD. E JAMES STREET l>lll<>: :/Per t'opv I I o VV'c are the Sole StoCUata, locally for (he Famous "K" SHOE HARRISON'S B,oods,. ENJOY THESE FINE TOOBS DeuciousAWWWTK DANISH (;<>R'>ON/OLA CIIEESF per lb. >W. NEW ZEAXAND APPLES —perlb . PBIBD Fit I'IT M.%I.AD—per (lb. • PITTEI) I>ATEH— prr I lb. pkt . IMM-II (AMDIHFBf CHF.EHK— per Un 1.29 ITALIAN ANCIIOVEV FILLETS IN i n i %  i OIL p-r Uo • ITALIAN r-HILI SAKE—PT bMIle -71 KIN*; S|.'(*AR—prr pat -S9 I IIIVIKS RMI'HAnil—per Un -SO GBOITlfO ALMONDS—per lb, LU SAIJSRI'RV CORNKII BEEF—per Un .5!. iir>T SAi't'E—par boUlc 3J OCAVA JELLYper Jar .38 PAKWB HAM RAfgAOK p ot Us, Ibj I" IM'TCH n-TERV HEARTS—per lin M D1 I* II I T CELERY—per Un .41 I ION OltOI'NO WHITE I*UPPER—pr lin .39 LION OHOI'ND BLACK PEPPER—prr tin .32 HRIN1 HUM. SAI< E—per bottle . M IL0ON8 M T ROLL—per bar -IS NULtON NIT ROLL—prr box tM COCKADE FINE RUM STANSFBMM SiOTT A Co.. f.*t.



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    PAGE TWO BARBADOS \DVOCATF THURSDAY. AUGUST 21. 1952 Ccudb Catling i Bnibadov F OB ttc find time %  %  Hie ofl i Teh-pl : n'inK" In tl not listen in I lnhl 11'. •phone %  +r* All *hr U • i re are II ited In nume U I • his Itttlr b %  vi ry useful and eon' i l uiinesa men unri pi s, itbers alike. Ans l nnber, can easily LM Identified by its uee; numlH (.MI !• tr a ced to Iti oerreepond bg pa. mm PRPIHf /.i M R. AND MRS. S. D. PRATT 'heir two from \'i nemela. BI l> B W I A fa tw %  < .. lold Cm lb enjoying their and are pleejantly Mirpi .directions of Barbed is. Mr PlWtl whi. is a It* is employed with the VenexiM l Atlantic Tr.-iiwiw^irm Corporation In Caracas. B\ THE WAY .... By Beachcomber 'I' ttm are pushing wheel A bat IOWS full of c.i (ten assumej the guise of %  He once ael awi ought to make la I. i abltualb %  ggwl. It regret that they are n< : "But" ,1ag toll surely en because they |,ke doing I orove that t i h too fine a day." he said, ratlM wiuently. 'to e l ep ha nta." ... o boun U lh,l*,ll,-t pUWAli DUONG." fill, riuiHimul iimul II ill Hark llonir MB AND MBH Csr.OFFRKY MA1NOOT M ISS Ch ISS MAY SAMPSON Cheapside, returned hon Sunday evening b) ll W I ,'\ from the USA. via She was ;tway for for Triniiluil A MOM; ti,.' Hmrrfcd .,/ si. Potrit I, Li "T*HE I .. .1 I., i; W I f..i %  11.. %  I They are 1 can perform the • toe state railway, i would like to see their faces when. havinK beaten the railway, %  J rid told ( rir wheelbarrowB buck %  can do the |nb no quickly,* a railway official will sav maliciously. %  QHWAII DRONO mfirst •ttt.it . .v.ml.lnt drgam .if comJ^ Papuan ballet to be proix-ting with jrou. K 'h. rOtTr, may lie jre euirnrru, tb*y will tit small d vliff.rt to help iha Russian, put hi the mlar* arm rOUBd him a nil gave hlfl The climax, a masterhearty push litu.i I, 1 oaa of .irti.it ic Integrity, comes to a correspondent who was thin when K.iv.i. dressed as a fish. Naturally .there was no quaatkn lures the magician Into her canoe, of" disqualifying either runnel atavistic "ifoMie judgeit wan ig through a mist of ban t tears r %  ,.,''i''. and the final Hut if om runner can help trebr It wmetrttnf new In jthcr surely one runner can I l another or push him off the .1 good will In /MlfMlllf: falters for a moment. .* \ aqutn '"'" *** H„juh R„m,l,.m l lh„r,.,..r, £V ,.;, %  %$££$** Xl.nl . NOT JUST a rajah, mind | MI Bridge disaster: you. but a maharajah. Th.it j %  (flu fragment of conversation overI 1 %  feUattg Iha UNSetd /eorleaslu heard made me think of FoullotthOfH the 'erformed Parfcbuon, s ,i TM %  by her brotbai \i Reynold si ""n, wore a dress of laoa war eggshell satin. I dice I ad i ru Ion v] i ami tight mtin %  jnavea. Th.. laoa petal in the front d a full train in the b H k llii ra a beuded lonfl nylon veil, she with the wonderful road brisk busine>s which Wl clon, m aha dty shops. nd the l-ing gj, IpeclaTXhr'b'ut a-nJSW^-S ^^ — — "* h.. but was impres-M. rlaynold St. c. Hu.chinson, Secretary, at the epanli | thi ibroOMil-lionour, Mlaa Daphne %  there. St r Ilu'.chinson Maid-of-hoiv and Mhu Ruth Ooddard l *"i d.esses n.s JAMV_s RKAITHWAM *h tuikappUqued I EAVING yeaterday i>v 1T who has i>een rasUdaytng in "'' %  %  '' • tnara haadJ BW.LA. for Trinidad was the % %  last four weeks draasflB of the lama fnatarlal Mi Oearrnj Thoma V aturned to Boston thirted red rose Pan--\mii-an Airways Ifai '""-u both of ilielr dreaaes Tvitvlivr I •„,,W Will Ccewe school >n Martinique a few days' holiday here as a S iest at Silver Beach Hotel, jckley and will also stay in Trinidad for some time before returning to Martinique. Jamaican H/'/ %  /(* llushainf |RS. PHYUUI aifa i>f Mi Executive Secretary "f the Regional Economic Co mm lt t an arrived from Jamaica by B.W.I.A. last vnJte muffij lent husband Is a brothi HB a Mr. C A Brfllthwalte. J P. This is her third visit in twi r. ill IHineinlH'ied chiefly b) IJwai Irelea. Mrs Bralthwaite was organist at the St. Peter's Parish Chun-ii for foui and obtained her degree from (be M RS. PHYLLIS MORDECAI. IjJ" 1 ^ 01 ^!! "'. %  I"' and w,fe of Mr. J. B Mo.doca,. ; *mj* J* II to Mr. piano in addition to th. r | Iu i r unsori Mr %  •" of DeVere c3o it? Snrt^ r!i S W.I, Nu'Se' ening to Join her husband < %  'tirch in Boeton. M^a. I ,.-,„, u:i ,„. lt A u.,% •;•,. i,„. oft".' i. situated el HaatJ" %  PHPU U obi I .,. % %  lh .,,„.. 1; ,, M| iN(t inga House here Ml tor (Ugh Winds, Mordecni was accompon, '" ""' friends and led by her infant son Bryan and Mit says „„ „ the faoiTlv has taken up residence *• %  "_ that Barbados has at "DCgrtd", Navy Gardens. IMIIM'I The flower girl Mis* Jan Atwetl amra white nylon ar i cexriad a poay of forget-me-nots. rUchard Htrtcninaott, the boy w a white (hark %  The duties of bestman ; iK'ifonned by Mr. Geoffrey FOR TIH'RSDAY. AUGUST 21 152 which your birthday comas and Look in the sectioi find what your outlook TAtntoa April 21—May 20 May 21 21 i HOVSUOIUf (or the raaneymoon. I'nuim.r lli.li,laving II,-,,M H I.B> ROBINSON, englu r of Robinsons I m~ %  I' %  m ap "1 l_ %  | | %  -r r 1 In in.'iiv waya fa the aettej and she was indeed glUi lo I back after•> n %  thorouthiy anjoyed the bospiuis'."';.."",*;,. !" y It, of the home folk. And h .ISSLflM "" be bock Inter with h< ftneefhll Works nd Enluesn.n morning hy B.W.l.A. for about month"! holiday and is a guest at! Ouaal (fouaa, Wi.rihmn LISTENING HOURS • IUN n air. iu lt> mat IPUO* iiiun 11 rerminLitr your tmn gir pain *nacolngi % %  : London %  The pvimoat cattfiill.. and II %  for itudy Theorel ceJJj i'i|". Mlile. t;ut 1 I wn ol UCB %  %  RrllalM T.IS — i. i p -i 'i 1 IS p III Wr *r Bill.. I ..!(. Band*, a 13 p m V M p HI Sr -1 1. S SA ii m FVon y, i,.., %  ix. |. m PVOP i %  Prt .... -ii N Tolfc. 10 llpm A Da %  < II. I cl I '. Parb-on l a l*dv 0 11 a nal !onUlv tfti it ui art ia S ONLY 70 cents YOUR SH0F STORE 70 cents DIAL 4220. is. according to th* a*ars. AJLTM Can obtain good rcults by real effort. ToMarch 11—April M day's influences are generally positive, but JV wlll need/ extreme care in following.* • • • Avoid needles* risk, getting Into comprojamislng position; don't overforce your hand. I.ean toward a safe policy. Dont be over— ^ * On the very practical side, yet can also be most productive day. Heed sane tendrn) %  cies, do not go headlong Into anything without being well informed, aware of pit**. ^ # ^ High quality performance needed to get some of day's good possibilities. Not necesaV sary merely to force things; go along %  calm, dignified way; you'll achieve goal. Prime your work with wise study first, know what you want, what you canTlandle. Have ayteni; centre on reasonable wants td> * w You na.ives inherently lean toward qualItjf rather than quantity, as it should be jL, Hold up your end. deficiency in vital Issues ^ can discredit good. * * Be in harmony with those around you. don't argue or quickly criticize. You then get more out of life including holding friends; you will bridge rough spots better. *r if. * Influences say to be wisely on guard all the tune for possible slip-ups. mlsunder"jL. standings that could be troublesome. News "* mav tend to confuse, but don't fret. • • if Vigorous activities, keen thinking will best weather this likely dull, perhaps mixed day. Pitch your effort on safe side; do j4. what you do well. ^ General business, professional and personal )gV affairs need close attention. I-ook to the ^ right and left before acting. Dont go Into risky deals. ]4_ • * A QUARTOS Fortunate rays. Open up your bag of tricks Jan. 28 — Fab. M and improved ideas; push them sensibly jj, for good gains possible. Personal affairs T can be much what you make them: take '""•'"' • • PlaOEB Not all itlmulatlna day. '" tri !" w m 2{?2 rb. 81—March 90 may contuse; dont let this stymie enort. ja Heart interests rate. YOU BORN TODAY: generally can do wonders when you want to accomplish much or quickly. Spare J" 0 "'"" h ;"": *. •fctlon Iron, overdoing. Fine outlook; properly manage your *^ an-olrs and hold patience as a virtue. Birthdate % %  "> %  S Paouin, editor; Frank A. Munsey, merchant, publlsner^ BELMURA DISTEMPER IN ALL SHADES 14 lbs. $3.08 28 lbs. $5.79 Jjf OAMCEK Jnn 23—July 23 LBO July 24—Aug. 22 VIKOO Aog. 25—aWjpt I LIBRA %  apt24—Oct. 1 BOORPIO Oct. 24 Nor 1* RAOITTARIUlt Nov. as—Dee. 22 &f CAPRICORN I).M23 —Jan. 81 The amaiina >aaa of -n .1, l,li. r,n.l. -i -V, ,1 their Urea lo ptot %  ihcr. On a primiliir-Kperafl of balu laaa .he* Hriflrd from (Vro l. Ihr i.lr.li. rr l!.. I.nl i :,: %  . ,1' 101 days and 4.300 miln rinag .iMt.lfJ I ll %  > I I. I %  %  II |<< lilllTII.II %  II .T %  || andali-r! aJ.O^T'S*' Produtad by OtIF NOBD i •/At MwtkbySUNFWAlDWia AnArtf)lAB. %  — Photographed by the men who lived itl AT LAST ON YOUR SCREEN! PL 4/4-Starting Friday BRIDGETOWN hiiv-ilhi Plan .mil iha Ida* i'.iii.ini llruuiii! \ WOMAN CAN HAKE OS IIKKAK A MAN TO THt TUNES OF "KEITH CAMPBELL" and HIS "SOCIETY SIX" and "THE JUMPING JACKS STEEL BAND" featuring our own m\,. of ik* ".i//•;.i.v PAUL WMLtKMIVS •A nSK 15 MINUTE FLIGHT IN "BIM" TO ONE IN EVERY SO PERSONS" ENTERING THE DANCE DANCING from 8.30 p.m. Supper included Dress Optional ADMITTANCE — $2.00 LADIES' WATERMAN'S I'EN 4 PENCIL SET—Donated by T. Geddes Grant Ltd. "4711" TOSCA PERFL"ME—Donated by J. A. Marson It Son. Ltd. 2 Cases Hr.iNKKr:\s BUR—Donated by K R Hunte Ltd. and many others for men and women.



    PAGE 1

    im-KSDAV. AUGUST M, 1*52 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE llUtk* Little Hope For End Of Rice Shortage West Indian Hopes Pinned On B.G. LONDON The shortage of rice, staple food of 60 per r.irths population, i" one Of the BMpt m r* facing world food authorities tod so for some little time. Tin; year's crop prospects indl Ripply Dl vice on 0 % %  I tl the only rice-producinicountry that has poaterii id its output sirLttl %  crops tn China. Burma. India and Iri'l'-Chir-.i, n;. %  I pre-war levels Export;irt> giving mo*! of la I \i.r. ContlnuUM demand •heir attention :.. overcoming UN will rap bet:rave rice shortage In the F.r. tWJ i East. For the people; ( UM nwnt-eoaUrolled domestic West Indies who are also largely la vies, dependent on rice, hopes are OfAN OF INVENTORS STILL AT IT %  Empire is concerned, cxnanslo i production Is beta as rapidly as possible. Production In British Guiana has risen to 65,000 tOM I thC UniVcd 45O0 ,ons b ,ore ,no pinned on expansion of the bis 1 :c in British Guiana. which ii rapidly becoming an i k l y important factor in the world vie* picture Organisation of the a* been rorcerned for some tim< %  ... awaaiim to alleviate the rloa shortage and has now proposed to call an international conference to deal with the best means of overcoming it. Before the war. some 8.000.000 ions of rice ,i year were handled in international trade. With the Increase In the world's population that has taken place since before which some 30.000 t.>ns are U expert to other Went Indi.ii. Islands—a small but importan contribution to world supplies!. helping to relieve the expo'' pressure on the Far Eastern producers. For the last live years, the F.A.O. has sponsored technical studies on the breeding and fertilisation of rice. Three confer_„ ences have been held on brcedin.. Then, wme 9,000.000 tons a year i_,„„„,i „,„^~t,-_ i„ ^„,h*ii S ..ceded r. J at 3a' O M Di F. N %  i mini Dividing lift 4 Acres 1 Hooe. %  % % %  --• 13 3 -in perches of land from l.inds of "Hosvigo". Eagle UnP i ... i b> Mrs Muriel RanaehelL n and sale of 684.291 <,. ft. of land at Thorpes Plantation, St. .' % %  I Haibadn. vi Bank Ltd. >u. ..i ..! % %  .t mi.aini ft. of land in lots ut Derricks. St. J.lines, '.v J. B. Clarke, Esq. Painter Diet/ Hy \aturai flausi's i limed %  natural i au at u> iii %  w %  *h v Mr. E. A. MeLaod, r i of District "A", in the mqui *\ into the Ing the daata "( BO-yaar-okl .. ir.t.i Goulboume Gltttns. Dividing off and selling to • I Perrhe* of land at New Cast* I'l.ot.itkHi. SI. John, by t*mlbuurnc UUlen.s. who icNew Castlo Estates. Ltd (B.4131) 1'ded at Bullens Alley, SI I inHoard considered an appllMichael, was found dead in cation for the division and sah c:uiencld at Bullens Alley en r 238.142 aa. ft. of land at August 7. and hibody *a > %  Pine Hill. St. Michael, by Mr. maved to the Public Mortuary T,iori€i Maria" On Dock tons n vear. of which 4.500.000 — 5Sa^U gS ,r n5"^S s* K Pro.— &*fvhi2rF Europe and the Vaat Indies Last fadoiily on the Steamship Gloria and Mr. F. E. Field, Assistant to year, rice exports from these Mnrla which has been on dock nun. are prosecuting for the three rountries totnlled only for about three weeks Waft*Crown 8150.000 tons, of which 2,980.000 going extensive refitting Her Squires is charged with having tqns remninqji LB thfj FIT East, hull plates and all the slruclui.il "" or about 31st August. IBJI. loaving little enough f.r Europe member*, of the frame are IH-::IB IvhUi %  Od the West Inch .\eviiie w. M. Carter, it divided Ui'it this mntler be postponed until the Board ami THE TRIAL OF KEITH SQUIHES. a 26-yvar-oldclL-ik upoix for falsification of accounts un or about August 31, last year. „ witf ^ dcc)uctl i| ., u1 „ while an employee of D. \ Scnlt c\Co.. Ltd. ant canatdaratlon of the applicaof th Ihird day's hearing yeaterdav at the Court of (irand Sessions uon for the division and bffora Mr. Justice J. \V. B. Chenerv, and has been adjourn*}\6 ? 3 i1 .of land m lot nA until t.uiav Deighton Road, St Mieh...-1 b) ed until today. ..,„...„ wn ^ W. T. Gooding. Cs,, M ,d. until Defence Counsel Mr. tj. VV. Barrow who cross-examined Mr. Cuthbert King, Supervisor of the Excise Department of Customs on Tuesday, for about two and a quarter hours, n iilmued his cross-examination of this witness for about the same lime yesterday. One other witness gave evipeople were prosecuted. Reports dence, Mr. Clayton Thorpe, former had been made to the Police, bui Customs Officer ' charge of the he personally had not made any Cheapside Rum Bond, and this report. lias brought the number to five. There was one occasion when ; ,t Michael : %  .< II he cross-cxarmnid today, he had heard of a mule cart being An application ami I Mr. Barrow is associated with wen at the back door of UM bond i ,.,,, liaasra, Hayncs & Griffith nnd he had asked that it he cheek,. lt (n-half of the Joes River Sug.u cd up. but he had never heard the | %  i f,,i MM ratum 0* driver's name. aubailttad Ln eona Dtiplirate Keyi with the division and sale of land < He kept duplicate keys for the In l>ts .it Vaughan's Plantainvarious bonds, but he did not ; nd Ovlngton, In the parish of St i" "Kutein examination Di. A. S. C'alo who performed exanxlnatton. toi.i the courl Uie deeoased was IH honiK and the vessel* in nt an \ m..in iran laaed. In his opinion death %  due tn u.itui i i. Board was satislled as to the d>ply The Board did not approve of :i%  ppUeattoa by tbe Barbados I opanmve Bank Lad tar u i nival of U'ls miinlH-red 3S. 3H. I. 48. SO, 51 and S2 as set out i the plan of lf.7. 281 square feet laud at Howell's Cross Road. Professor G. i_. Allen, a polilieal economist of the 1/niverSty of $%%;?£ London and an expert on Japan" etc economic problems, is one of en to the F.A.O. Committee on Commodity Problems, "The antrttma daatrucitoa of transport equipment (rl keys for |he mpartmenl* Joseph. the Cha*p-loV bund. Ttiave' tenewed. ^ r D. V. Scott &Co.. utd., witn was an occasion when a merchant The Gloria Maria which Is a Intent U> defraud, made or conwanted to get out rum for a ship double bottomed vessel with a curred n nuUttoJ |b hWOW down to the bond net tonnage ol s!,,< ; %  uit b. longing to or in with him a night, but he could llertie Tull nf Bulk SI Mieh.nl ceased was his step-fadiei .nd %  im rum Boaaa* . %  i.'ft iba hooaa I had stock* turnisd botna IhaJ 1 li He faas %  %  ba the %  ba iden%  (0 Dr. A. S. Cato. At this ptan Ml %  i I p Q i \ UeL i .1 %  %  tbi and afl on they %  %  1 death by frame are be-irig while he was a clerk or servant ait U. V. Scott ft Co.. Ud.. with %  often scattered nnd isolated took a heavy toll of rice produc. „, tion." he says. "The destruction ,,; **P !" -, W^M^bZ^totSi ther^sessronof D V-S,o,v hl not remendx, the det.,1. of I ""• nf SrmTc. A. Sarmm? Delta ol %  *** purp..rtlng to *OW They did not stay for more than Caraeai Veiuvuli and her tha ' August i\. run. vai lOD minutes, and h. 'he-e fl^R M Janet nrll, th properly of D. V. BeOlt paniad by M. Thorpe. That was ft Co.. Ud.. at Cheapside, Bridgenn unusual case, and the normal town, contained respectively 2.796, permit would have Ixen made fields Co.TLtd. I Maria Is used by the Com(JM %  '-' 2.HHU proof '' 1" .lL a spo r i ". F y ~L v '* u K %  Oflice Kecorda Dl h -gallon works ;.n.l the deple&** ***** and also has roo nontill vuere nlo 1 r gene, al CBXgO. St [ cargo. She was raided The Maria Is used by the Coin1.380 and 2.820 proof wine R-dlons. out the following dav. The It o o k s produced, trie lerchaot'a book etc. rnjghl lion of farm capital %vere also Ior general cargo, fine was nusea cntsa-examined Mr. King said been in arrears about September catastrophic, and producers and on the dock on July 30 and is ( i,,; |,e did not discover sometime !ast year. Occasionally Mr. Thorpe traders today lack the necessary expected to come off in opproxi(l| scbruarv that 50 casks of rum would illOw merchants to blend security to undertake roconstmcmalcly two weeks ilme. u irj .„., un | iv [^.p,, snipped and not lum without getting a permission tion." in 1MB the Motor vessel Julie ,. n (TPd m the Government books : trsighl away These changes in the supply —sister shsb of the Gloria Maria u llie Customs, nor was he at any In some respects, if those loks picture have increased the barand owned by the same Company „ mc BWtre nat runi hBd been were in arrears, those at his office gaining power of ricc-produccis —was refitted on the same dock, shipped and not entered in the would be. boaka. If such had occurred, he There had been a raoanl disaiwlth any supplies to export and have uul the world price up. Since rice Is now much dearer than wheat, the paradoxical position arises that tho poorer half of ide world now eats the more expensive cereal. Before tho war, there was "Athclbrook" Arrives %  Hid have n rrcord of ft In Ihi' pearancr of rum from WakefMkl. tturds. but It wms decided lh..l il wu I! U.rdship nskod him In due lo an abnormal evaporation, %  heck his records dining th* This was about 200 proof wir.v luncheon Interval, and after he il-.llons. The usual amount ajlow* had done so. ha said that ha had d for evaporation wai two or ,„ The Steamship /.1/iellirook discovered a document In which %  per cent., but this was about r£?on fh wSTnCirkit Tft? "•*> '" lh Careenaro vestcrMr. Nebl.lt. an ofllcer of thUn per cent rice on the world market Today, ^..—in,. fro Trinidad and fhcapsldc Bum Bond had •I' "as true that the Cheapsldo vLrour'comuetin'rwUh' t£h -S !" S a caTo of Plained why 50 carton, of run, bond was hotter than a, Wakeo£ac Derate lobuv as trZh m,lacs. This SOO-ton steamsl,i ba,l been omitted to be enterW Held aTthe) .a P „T he rtce whlcK under Capt. W. Cook Ml ,,,. u. the Cheapaid. book. Re-Ex.mlnd Blirrna and Thailand have to same day for Trinidad. Il-fo.c he had made'this cheeky Re-examined, he said that whr, ofter 'uii.-ou asnv " ^ he aald that If a mistake had bean rum was belnf taken from on.HlnUl.i In Aii. Sh* Is eonsljned to Jason Joni J"ade and SO casks of rum had I ond to another It would be in nnoriage in s " r t ri • been shipped and it was not ihe merchant's custody. ImmeoUilu proapeeul. believe < %  y< ""• ,.,,., entered in the books of the rum Mr Clayton Mc. C. Thorpe an id WSKTial BRJBST* Bar-a i r~* countries emselna. There w ft ^""JJ^J*^,;, U T "ere h M been rumour, about I therefore be fewer exportable While supplies from Asia In 1952 than suga-. Keep your children... being carried through th hack door, and on some occasion* 16 merchants kept rum at the nd of which about 10 or 11 had ompartments for sta # Oa page a. FIT AND STRONG Your chuaieu *iil always be lull ol .uu —full oi energy bave a real /CM for work or pfiry ... il you give them HAJ-IBORANGE every day. It is ncfa in the body-building and proteaive vitamins A & D—ensures strong bones and muscles, increase* res^ance vo illnesv Children love taking rlahborangc — the pure halibut oil %  bknded with OHaaae i'cc to make it extra delicious, h' grand for adult!, too Haliborange THE NICfSl WAY Of TAKING HALIBUT OIL TdrDdybof dlOOM extra mild, extra •oothlng Bath Size PAUA0UVE Here lhe comes—lhe new Baby from No. 10! Oh, do let me have a peep . isn't she simply lovely—and how like her Daddy! No, no, she's Mummy's girl—look at her eyes! . Baby Joan doesn't worry—she has her happy contented smile for everyone, but is longing to get home aptln for another warm, comforting drink oi chc Cow & Gate Milk Food that is doing her so much good. OU FOOD o/ [FT ^ ROYAL BABIES Ifts&s Ataj. at aasfJaW v ALLEN HANBURYS LTD LONDON. E.2 tXtm-m!M SAUNOUVE 'SOOTHES BASY'S TENDER SKIN folrrioti v mode of •*• r>.iff %  ttflredier.hv—flivn o creamy tmooth mitro mild lolti*i Tha' iw"i owor •rrrtohon at *t gen" flooh owgy dirt. A doily p 'noli bath will deep rour baby comfortable %  . refrettod uomty. Remember. Pomol. m •mtro oolt>mgl ML* .'VI GOOD I Jt SAST is ISP. lAitr •iooo / %  roui fefacfressdf&Gr bay MTM am FALMOUVI raruser *%*\\ uUrm. Apply: R. M. JONES & CO., LTD. IS THE AKSWER m|B % %  Protect your gumi 1.1.d you protstt your teeth, foe gum troubles cause over ja per CCTL. oi' tooihkMies To promote firm, healthy gums, use Iranu Moth paste — Ipaiu and Massaget'*c Ipana. aaW) PB DfWfl vour teeth extrawhite sod reduce acid-forming bj--cna tluc mse decay. This is the way to keep your whosl BW baa wv |OU will bnd "rcfickJiingry differeni" haiauie oi Ipana'* mint rlavour THE TOOTH PASTE.. REFRESHINGLY DIFFERENT raooxrCT o saniOL^"-'*i ic-wvi *" i.. > Rr^r, taw *c>ii_;y -, ONLY 7f %  .rSkV >•--. HIGH VALUES! LOW PRICES! OIL STOVES lo ault every Budgt. ONE lil %  ll\KIC (Coltoti Wick) from S7.:tn TWO BURNER (Aaboltos Wlck) from 18.87 THREE BURNER from SI'I 21 And OVENS to It all Stove* (Spare Parti: We carry them !) Barbados Co-op Cotton Factory Ltd.


    a Rtn nett Ann

    WHAT'S QN TODAY

    ane of ent oem 10.00 a.m ay 7
    Meeting , o hilip Vestry 11.00 a.m Reinfall from © Y
    Meeting of Commissioners of Health, §t ; Total rainfall t¢ ith to date: 1.41 #
    Michael 1.00 p.m / i” Highest Tempe ‘ y
    Meeting of St. Thomas Vestry 1,30 I owest De â„¢o
    p.m. Vv f " tes od: hour
    Annual General Meeting of the Y M.C.A . Barom ’ r "2 ose 2pm
    — 5.00 p.m. ‘ < ; 29.890
    Police Band Concert at Bay Street \ TO-DAY
    Esplanade — 7.45 p.m 4 Sunrise: 5.48 ar
    teense Sunset: 6.16 p.m.-








    For the cause that lacks assistance Mooh: Nev August 2

    ‘Gainst the wrongs that need resistance % Lighting: 7.00 p.m

    For the future in the distance itn THURSDAY, AuGus 21. 1952 PRICE : FIVE CENTS High Tide 2.43, a.m,










    7 as : a ‘ e | GENERAL CLARK ON HAND FOR RHEE’S !° A
    - Stalin Calls Congress Of Soviet ~~ jg

    Communist Party For October
    Politburo May —— |
    Be Abolished |

    By HENRY SAPIRO,

    | Curfew Imposed In
    franian Capital



    Run This Way
    If Atom Bomb
    Hits Congress

    Premier Josef Stalin on

    |
    MOSCOW, Aug.20. |
    Wednesday called for the first |

    Soviet Communist Party Congress in 13 years for October
    5 to consider a new constitution abolishing the powerful |
    politburo. The announcement of the meeting of the Soviet

    a general 70 per cént. increas

    the publication of a Soviet new five year plan, calling for

    e in industrial production.

    FRANK ELEAZER

    WASHINGTON, Aug. 20.
    Should an atom bomb
    fail on the next Congress,
    members will at least know
    which way to run. Signs

    Capitol and architect David
    Lynn said that they li

    ‘4°* “TEHERAN, Aug. 20,

    An emergency cabinet meeting decided on Wednesday!

    night to impose martial law/i>

    effort to curb the growing un
    ‘adio Teheran, makin;
    cast, said that the decision \
    Wednesday, and that a eur!
    one week from 11 p.m. te 5
    that Brigadier Geza Azimi_h
    srnor of the strife-ridden cap

    Teheran for one week in an}
    est, {
    n announcement in a broad |
    ill be effective at 11 p.m. on}

    will be enforced daily for}
    m. The announcement said
    s been named Military Gov-
    tal

    The five year plan for 1951-55 it is said, “is one of} should be done by January.

    The first of the red-

    |

    |

    }

    |

    }

    j

    |

    i

    |

    |

    at
    Communist Party’s supreme body was made jointly with are going up around we |!
    | Chief of Police, Brigadier Shei-

    peaceful civilian and cultural construction demonstrating lettered = “Sheltér Area
    the superiority of the Soviet over the capitalist systems. It wienis’ Set Rees nnandieen. ‘an
    promised to develop and expand economic ties with all | the walls of the subway
    countries wishing to do so. corridor in the new house
    | The party Congress announce- No Official Leader | office .building. Others will
    ment said that the Communist} There is no official leader of | follow as fast as workmen

    leaders will consider a new con-|the party, and supreme power is;] can get to them.
    stitution similar to the one]vested in the 12 member polit- | Lynn said that _— civil
    adopted in 1939, but replacing}buro and the creation of a new) | defence engineers had fin-
    the political bureau with the|“presidium” or administrative|] ished their survey of the
    “présidium of the central com-|committee may have a_ bearing!| safest site in the Capitol



    UNITED NATIONS SUPREME COMMANDER Gen. Mark W. Clark (right) waves to a friend as he lands in
    Seoul from Tokyo to witness the insuguration of President Syngman Rivec for a secoyd térm, Mrs, Clark

    a ; e hani is yes day to have resigned °

    nd to have been succeeded by : }

    UN. Adanaid 3.8.2," eae ir,

    eo e As Premier Mohammed Mossa-

    V iolatin. degh called Ministers into the

    Ss 1eeting, Communist mobs demon-

    |--rated in the a shouting: | ( tat) obat ith dontihed dat om Get = ' a Fleet, ; :

    } [ |’ Down with ossadegh!” ‘and center) chats with an unidentified staff officer (left) and Gen. James A. Van Flee! (International)

    Neutral Zone \° Down with the Shah!” Sources s * “ —— ce

    5 se he Government said that r . , â„¢

    PANMUNJON, Aug. 20¢ |, 098 to the Governn A j 7 3

    The United Nations admitted United States Military Mission | ’ : J ean Team lo



    mittee.". The constitution defines|on determining the eventual suc-|] months ago, but his men one violation of the Panimuniqn |eutorities lodged a eo. I

    the function of the proposed|cessor to Stalin. }} are only now finding time neutral zone and denied anoth en ng moves tsade' ie ee sabe! oy ] f "7 A : Aid L I
    presidium as “leadership in the; The exact significance of any || to get up. He said that no | ]}in the only contact between Kor Oe ee ee ilitary person. DISA GREE OVER ID I ynmoul 1
    work of the central committee} change, however, depends on the|] grgent international devel- ean armistice delegations, Tie) 2) in the last two days. — : 4.

    makeup of the proposed presi-
    dium, what executive powers it

    Most Powerful Body will hold as compared to the
    The Congress politically is the} politburo’s total power, and what

    between plenary sessions.” pme} rompte . talks are in a seven-day’ recess Bx FaxigiF ; 5

    ann ee sete amened we the fourth in as many weeks. | the Resin ‘greet in te conta S
    Colonel Charles W. MeCarthy, |, StS ER MS COpsees

    defence precautions. Uniteg. Nations Liaison Officer Wednesday night. The latest in-

    c ene “tat * cident involving American person-

    Flood Victims

    By MICHAEL J. O'NEILL
    WASHINGTON, Aug. 20,

    From Our Own Correspondent





    ; ryt saints iti rj Lynn minimized the fears ' ;

    most powerful body in the Com-]Stalin’s personal position will be : delivered two notes to his Com-)° 5°)" OE ee ft = ; : 7 E eS
    munist party and since all other! under the reorganization. voiced by Truman from |} unist counterpart, North Ker-| 0°) ne ‘ ea dinar Wa, The Western powers’ relations with Communist Yugo- LONDON, Aug, 20
    parties are banned, it exerts a] The party Congress is supposed a to time that the main ean Colonel Chang Chun Sa) c5)jne1 was ied by the crowd lavia have taken a slight turn for the worse because of a] Jamaica is anxious to repay
    strong influence on Government.|to meet every three years. But] Portion of the Capitol build this morning. One admitted that)... Colonel and the driver escap-. dispute over.economic and military aid, it was learned on} Britain for the assistance received
    It has power to change the Party|its last meeting was in 1939. The ing is likely to colaps« a United Nations plane “did inat- |, indidry Wadnesday Informed source: revealed that the United when the colony suffered hurri-
    constitution, make decisions on|Scheduled meetings were post- some day — bombs or no vertently” pass over the confer-| s.clier it was disclosed that! aro ake Sites: ro y avi me 0 000,000 | 522° devastation last year. The
    five year plans and elect party} poned because of World War II bombs because of the evee zone on Augus 16. The Reds iy. jig Speaker ‘Ayatllah Kashani} ates secretly agreed to give ugoslavia nearly $80,000, Jamaican four by 400 metre Olym-
    — " is sunered to pro-|@nd special postwar sonaieane. creas + Be big cass qonnaine ae a \tald United States Ambassado: in new aid. Britain and France are ready to put up another pa Pig oar sega ine enpcome
    vide whatever democratic pro- Eee dome. The modelling ae , i vt} Henderson that the United! 621,000,000 Oe 8 eas to run at a meet-

    i i ; W . as \ 2 ade as e that ; tm i ae ’ ‘ ‘ _ 4 a RY is-
    are Sr a a es eee Sine cae ar eee oa | totadione be th PT hate ik a. Cares, — ee interfere at In a note last month the Big Three laid down theit ee eee food. dis
    ear: the 1984 Cotigress . the n : ~ 11 ‘ouritée archi Sues oceur in future.” rp hes oi pane ip Hi Stes + Pp terms. But Yugoslavia hypersensitive to any suggestion! “When the team were presented

    ; £ 1s oods ourite architectural projects. rioration in the latter's relations ; §

    The secand note rejected the |,’
    Communist protest of August 1%
    that United Nations planes had
    flown over the area. However
    it conceded that a United Nations

    ground work for the great party! to Mr. Oliver Lyttelton this after-

    He says that the portico
    purge and treason trials which) e o.— should be built out farther,
    followed was laid. The =o-|Claim Al Liv es net only to give better sup-

    port to the dome, but to

    h the Soviet Union. | of interference in their domestic affairs, balked.
    UP.! ; Fa gas

    ’ lhe setback came just as Allied
    }velations with the former Russian
    ‘partner appeared to be warming

    - noon at the Colonial Office Arthur
    é Wint, Jamaican captain, told the
    Jamaica Gets Cclonial Secretary how grateful

    teenth Congress in 1939 com- Jamaicans .were for the aid they

    pleted the purges and Russia

    entered a period of isolation LYNN, England, Aug. 20. make — the Capitol look | Investigating Officer had said *he| Drakes Passes |p. Western diplomats are work- New Part pee tT Week aeabina fos rethnens

    During the past 13 years the|, The toll of dead and missing in gn sited in i : foes that, possibly one plane jing feverishly tq prevent differ- - y leagues ee a to ac

    : od dil 43 was true |) had flown over the area at 15) 000 ‘ , e : ences from developing into ' caig and, would gladly give their

    party doubled numerically. It are = os tans nites that the dome overhangs the |}. feet,” However, McCarthy. wag) SCe Examination \Spen rift. ‘That Wee one purpose, (rom Que Own Correspondents — | assistance on behalf of Jamaica to

    ” ed war di (forold, MacMilian prepared to|| portico by about 15 feet || the check showed no signs’ that) > i was believed, for the meeting} ~~.» KINGSTON, Ady, 20, the. nemalam peoples of Lynmouth
    mately a fifth’ y the party report to the Cabinet what aid|| But he said that it was sup- planes had been over the area,| ‘from Our Own Correspondent) — 4r the Big Three ambassadors hel Ken Hill Trade Union Council) “Tt is possible that as a 'tesult o

    | be h tered since lasy|Government should extend to the|| ported by its own cirewhir |} 2nd that~in any case at 15,000 ft KINGSTON, Aug. 20. |with Yugoslav Dictator’ Marshal} President who was recently ousted / this offer a special meeting may
    mem nik <=. ente: oe vi wr siticken ‘rosart ‘alee. masonry wall which couid || Observation would be “extreme-| Four first class and seven second Tito on Monday. There was still}With his brother Frank — Hill,! be arranged by floodlight at White

    eee, - 7 ee 7 ee A Oth) Biineteen bodies have bear twice the dome’s || l¥Y_ unreliable”. The note said:!class honours at the-B.Se. General’a chance for a compromise, in-}Richard Mart and Arthur Henry | City This would be the last

    oe cae Commntane lohg have been recovered so far from the weight. He said that ¢he “We cannot recognize the validity|London University Examination formants said. from membership of the People’s|chance for the sporting public to

    ruins of communities on England's

    overhanging lip of the dome of your protest, and we therefore held at the University College of It was most important, they|Netional Party announced today|see Jamaica’s famous quartet of
    south-east coast and from neigh-

    7 consider the matter closed.” the West Indies in June were ob- | said, for Yugoslavia to get its in-|the formation of a new political} runners, for Arthur Wint confirm-

    Uttt’ tirectine ~~ et U.r. tained by the first graduating ternational trade balaness as soon|party based on T.U.C. organisa-/ed to me that he is retiring this
    7 ; and not class of the University College.|as possible through more exports |tion and policies. The inaugural} season from athletics

    by the portico, 3 First class honours were alland fewer imports. They also|meeting will be held next month Mr. Lyttelton who followed the
    , Congress started worry Fi k P, ‘Jamaicans while the second class;urged that Yugoslavia put less|when a decision will be taken to} Jamaicans’ activities in Helsinki
    ing about its civil defence arourk ays honours include Wilfred Chan into their pet industrial develop-|oame the party either the| with great interest and sent them
    plans about the time the eye . o* B.G.), Eugene Bertrand (T'dad),| ment plan so that more cash would | Jamaica United Labour Party, the|a telegram of congratulations on
    Korean war began. One Like A King Kenneth Tam (T’dad), John be available for imports. The note | Jamaica Socialist Labour Party or | thelr four by 400 success,
    member complained that, if ‘ Whittingham (B.G.) Passing also; also urged more emphasis on agri-|the Jamaica National Labour|shook hands with every member
    a bomb fell on the Capitoi, ISLE OF CAPRI, Aug. 20 | were Joseph L, C. Drakes (B’dos) cultural production, now befig| Paty of the team personally. He had
    Nicalo Farace, manager of the} on Talib Omardeen (T’dad) been so anxious to see them that

    m under iron discipline and

    the practice of obedience to the
    ; : bouring waters. Twenty-two per-
    + aod eee controls: them sons are officially listed missing.

    The main address will be de-| MacMillan and Field Marshal
    livered by the Party Secretary|Sir William Slim of the Imperial
    George M. Malenkov rather than|General Staff spent yesterday
    Secretary General Stalin. This|picking their way through debris
    was taken by some observers herejleft by rain-swollen streams
    to mean a_ strengthening of|which raged through Lynmouth
    Malenkov’s position as Stalin’s}and adjoining villages last week-













    TS ES a

    members wouldn't know |slighted because of the industrial
    heir. end.—U.P. whith way t n. Hf luxurious hotel Eden Paradise | programme, ne cut short his work at the Colo-
    area arene aera eLearn eet that gg ae eee nee ga has been Z ff They called on Yugoslavia to MORE SUGAR FOR ea nn a ie tn ot
    ~ Amra.s r “ te SSABDEG i” bua my $ HIEFT Ali Wwe wa — oe Wednesday reports of an alleged J naica posal "for an international “Credi- PUER D eeheette Santnes. Seer



    dispute with Farouk over a hote) , * 4s . tors’ ’ Conference to settle its for- we : ‘
    bil. Farace said “Farouk is a KF lood Victims Aid eign debts at one time rather than The 1952 sugar quota for local;

    good client and is treated as such. iecemeal The Big Three are |c2osumption in Puerto Rico has
    There never has been any dis- ‘From Our Own Correspondent soebelie to eee debt pay- been increased by 10,000 tons, SCHUMACHER DIES

    pute over hotel bills which were KINGSTON, Aug. 20 |ments for at least a year, and they |announces the U.S, Department

    handed over to his acting secre-| The Jamaica Seer todey | suggested that eee On ae w# Agriculture. Sugar distribution BONN, Aug. 20.

    tary Pier Busheti (Italian travel} ¢@bled the Ministry of Food In (7 intiiee he asked to do the same.]in Puerto Rico has increased; The death has been announced

    agent) every Saturday anl paid| London offering on the island's) sinee the initial 100,000-ton|of Herr Kurt Schumacher ‘bé

    regularly without discussion.” behalf to despatch ten tons sugar, = The note also insisted that the | ji uota for local uge was fixed, West German Democratic Pav‘;
    Jacob Blaustein, President of} His Majesty drinks only large] ten tons bananas and one ton Ajlies be Kept fully informed of B.U.P.\ Leader.

    the American Jewish Committee,! quantities of iced mineral water] coftee to assist flood sufferers of Yugoslavia’s economic condition

    discussed with Truman on Wed-| and never touches alcohol, bu; his} Lynmouth, England, The Gov- and what steps it takes to scale | --———

    nesday, the possibilities of the) Italian and foreign guests do,jeriment is considering further down its investment Programme. | tide a ee IE IRE.)

    United States Occupation Com-] On top of this, we have tossed in| @ssistance. 'It reminded Yugoslavia that aid

    missioner vetoging the so-called| free of charge, a luxurious root} Meanwhile, on the suggestion of|this year would be less than last

    “Neo-Nazi” law passed by the| garden which is one floor over] ‘he House of Representatives sup- | year, and that it would have to

    ; Austrian Government last month.| the monarch’s apartment. Al-] ported by the Bishop of Jamaica, | gear itself for a steady reduction

    Blaustein said that Truman| though he is not favoured and is{ 4 fund has beem opened for public|as time goes on, —UP.

    showed “interest” in the matter.| treated like any other guest of} assistance to the people of Lyn-|

    the hotel, Farouk pays like aj mouth.
    | Japan Barred

    U.P.’ king.”—U.P.
    Tunisian Police 2

    U.N. P lanes Bomb Clash With Strikers|! rom G.A.T.T,

    LONDON, Aug. 20.

    Communist Base TUNIS, Aug. 20. ._| Japan's application’ for ‘mem-



    U.S. May Veto
    Neo-Nazi Law

    WASHINGTON, Aug. 20















    Police clashed briefly on Wed- he-chip in the General Agreement
    nesday with longshoremen, strik-| >, ‘Tariffs and Trade has been re-
    ing since Tuesday, to protest the ja ted by postal ballot authorlta-




























    ’ U SEOUL, KOREA, Aug. 20 {ciring ‘ oe —— — tive sources said Wednesday.
    nited Nations fig s rarrie ; , | Police had to use tear gas to clear ; E
    planes struck & en poe and carrier based navy the harbour and during a short The Financial Times said it was
    N ae 8g ommunist troops and supply base at | struggle a few dockers were in-,urderstood that Britain and two
    Namyang on the Korean west coast leaving 300 buildings a | jured. ‘otier Commonwealth countries
    mass of flame and explosions. Quiet was restored and 60 new | vo'ed against Japan’s membership
    BAREHEADED PREMIER Mohammed Mossadegh, clad in the traditional \ Navy planes from United States carriers. cruising off | Seckers were able to resume work|ard three negative votes were
    robe of the Mullas, an Iranian religious sect, confers with a group of the East Coast, were the first ‘0 swoop down on the target tegether with about 100 part-time |suiTicient to constitute a veto.
    religious chieftains in Teheran. Shortly after, Mossadegh created a with bombs, napalm, rockets and machine gunfire They pore encores ver ew. Ot Tare Japan's application for member-
    furore in the Iranian House of Deputies when he sent them for con- were followed by F 84 Thunderjets, F 58 Shooti Sta d ' Meantime Tunisian terrorists|%"'P made last month, had been
    sideration a decree he intends to issue. It would take 20 per cent of the marine and A aig fich -t ; on ooting rs an churned wiih. th aa ibility |® hotly discussed subject in the
    landlord’s share of future harvests and distribute the proceeds among i Ustrahan lighter bombers. for ienb ain of the Gast pri ‘correspondents’ column of the te
    fo ‘S ;
    voverty-stricken Iranian peasants, _—(International Radiovhoto) _ US. Sabrejets fought five bat-| For eight straight days Com-]| months, were arrested here on|Bitish Press, perry by
    e ? : ise swith Communist M.I.G. 15 jets|munists kept their M.LG. 15 jet! Wednesday and will face trial be- jee cene ane eae lent
    Saudi-Arabian U N Can Ss e uring the day and claimed one| planes out of the skies and fighter j fore a military court. {oe ee \ rr idland lig
    Dear. ee une yasinn buts fighters shot b mbers and United Nations Sabre The group was led by two young |&â„¢Ssineering trades, '
    ce 7 . “ae “tiner destroyed or dam-|jcis and fighters swept unopposed | ‘Tunisians, Mohammed Kilani, 20,! Britain's action in rejecting
    Prince Visits Landing Anywhere need. claims awaited confirmation.|over North Korea in an eight | «nd Salah Cheriki, 21, and special- Japan's application to” join
    Ss Be I N h K ea oe Dambe slammed Ld ime day spell which ended_ yesterday | ized in attacks on street cars in{G.A.T.T. appears aimed at retain-
    ardinia ze F ase at Namyang, miles}when United States Sabre jets, bombing, police said. ing the right of discrimination : P
    n Nort orea menmwinet of _Sukchon. Partialj}fought a battle with two Red jets.| Police also arrested Hamadilagainst Japanese goods, to’be used Whenever you want a ci gare tte-
    ROME, Aug. 20 TOKYO, Aug. 20 edved pte ig oe > os des- | but no claims were made. M.I.G’s| Ben Hassini, who on January 1%igs a weapon held in reserve 2
    : ME, Ns . . : zy. 2 ‘ a ive damaged. were part of a seventeen-planej during a demonstration, snatched! during the probationar. riod to
    Prince Talal Aziz, gp ae Vice Admiral Robert Briscoe Communist Broadcast forination sighted’ over North|a submachine gun from a police’ test Japenese trading methods. remember -
    son af King Ibn Saud of Saudi: Commander of Far East naval} Pyongyang Radio in a special| Korea —U.P. guarde—U.P. —U.P.
    Arabia, agrived Wednesday by| forces said on Wednesday that]10,000 word broadeast early to-
    plane from Cagliari, after a On€-| the United Nations could stage} day complained of Allied ‘page meni irometitl ? : | It’s the TOBACCO that counts
    day visit to the island of Sardinia.) an amphibious landing “any-|baric bombings” and called “on : s is See
    ; ink where” in North Korea despite|freedom loving ; s Ik . B . O U Ss I d st *y D “ ;
    Italian press reports said ne stepped up Communist fire power] world” to mat Jue tot nae i a he] egin ver ee n us ry a ispules
    row Ate rags a ven Damian at major points. ‘We certainly|The broadcast came 24 hours after x |
    ‘i 10 oa oe niini irl eit have the capabilities to do it and|B.29 Superfortresses blasted the NEW YORK, Aug. 20. {| hopeful of a break in the dis-; workers in six of ten Harvester |
    ine the eked to ieee tei. certainly know how” the Admiral/huge Red munition plant where| Negotiators will sit down to try) pute between the line and the! plants had voted to strike unless
    bd fol almoet-orie watts: iri two said in a National Broadcasting|an estimated 2,000 workers turn-| to work out agreements in two! brotherhood of Locomotive F ré-; contract demands were met,
    way Soaaeanil The maine of the Company interview with Irvine}ed out anti-tank and hand gren-| railroad disputes and hard coal} men, the Brotherhood of Loco- The union which represents
    irl w Soin as Maria Marke Leving. ades. contract talks. Another major motive Engineers, and the Order; 26,000 workers is demandir
    ee Was given aS Maria Maré Allies have “hit the beach”| Red propagandists particularly | labour news item was being made) of Railway Conductors fifteen cent hourly wage’ iner
    Italian newspapers speculate; tw ice in sotceetul amphibious bitter charged that Presidént Tru-| across the conference table ar d a! : “fringe” benefits and “frozen’|
    that ; ane have aeaie assaults against Reds sincé the|man ordered a tep up in the, not on the picket line, but strike The hard coal industry served| twenty-one cent hourly escala-}
    nd betwee tha ~ aes ats start of the Korean war t) Uni od Nations air war last May!loomed in the farm equipment,! notice on United Mine workers! to sine
    eee 2 ac ieaaans ae wae the Inchon Faas on th | d June. They said he unleash-| shipbuilding, and meat packing| that more coal must be dug if Tall vere broken off last week |
    ae aa 8 ae a “| wes coast on September 15th,}ed more atrocities than Hitler ndustries workers are to receive a raise.' ar the inior begs tak eo, 2
    rr ' } i A c a Ye -| al inion began taking a
    prince asked to comment ose the! 1950, and the second was tt e| The tone of the Communist} A Federal Mediation Board; Unconfirmed report indicated | strike vote which should be com-|
    reports referred all inquiries to san le gs on t : st | broadcast mz t an'4 I . . |
    the Saudi Atobis or i Wonsan landing on the east coast| broadcast made it clear that North | summoned representatives of the if miners want jaily wage) pleted tod A, trike by CIO
    facitiens ia ave cg eigen oe oe in late October, 1950 | Ko e eing hurt by incessant! New York Central Railroad andi boost of about $1.65 and six hour) Unite Rubber Workers has al
    iy at eg ia eae ae : }Allied air atta It w mpie ' three rail brotherhoods to Was! ortal to portal r la re lose ight B. F. Good-:
    } wa hat Talal } CCT Briscoe 4 proof that Ck ( 5 fter t
    | » dinia yesterday but s rs A aera seebeelaeel a ‘ n' after the conference epender inimed ; planta at
    reports f possible romance: it least 100 per cent dive tu stepeks tr ¢ 0 bring im agre worke edule eting wit
    P age 6 de “PP e x 58 t ‘ ernat Harveste iT . : \ ;
    t @ On page 6. it ike ‘ ate } e | y fter nnouncing that few UP CEC DOIN
    , }

    oe ee





    PAGE TWO



    OR fhe first time i
    the Colonial
    who intro
    Seetion (yell
    the official Telephone
    has pUBlished a
    ct Telephone Sut Hi
    NUMERICAL TELEPHON 1
    GUIDE"
    In..this bo
    not ‘Ysted in

    Ltd

    fied



    klet subscriber
    alphabetical or
    but according to their telephone
    numbers, All the telephones
    use are.listed in numerical orde
    that the name of any
    cen easily be found, if his tele
    phone number is known

    This little bocklet should preve

    so party

    very useful and convenient
    budiness men and private sub-
    scribers ‘alike, Any caller wh

    leaves his number, can easily be
    identified by its use; any phone
    number” hastily scribbled down
    can be traced to its correspond-
    ing party.’

    From Venezuela
    R. AND MRS. S. D, PRATT
    and their two daughters
    from Venezuela, arrived here
    recently by B.W.1.A. for tw
    weeks’, holiday and are guests at
    Maresot- Beach Flats, St. Law-
    rence Gap.
    They told Carib that they are
    enjoying their stay very much

    and are pleasantly surprised with
    the many attractions of Barbados.

    Mr. Pratt who is a keen golfer,
    is employed with the Venezuelan
    Atlantic Transmission Corporation
    in Caracas,

    Back Home

    ISS MAY SAMPSON of

    Cheapside, returned home on
    Sunday- evening by B.W.LA.
    from the U.S.A, via Puerto Rico,
    She was away for about two
    months which she spent in New
    York and Chicago. She thoroughly
    enjoyed her holiday but is glad
    to be back home.

    After Thirty-one Years

    R- CARLOS BOCCARDO was
    an arrival on Sunday by
    L.A.V. from Venezuela for two
    weeks* holiday. He was accom-
    panied by his wife and their three
    grandchildren Elsa, Umberto and
    Carlos and they are guests at the
    Hastings Hotel.
    Mr. Boccardo is Manager of H.
    and J, Boccardo and Co., mer-
    chants of Caracas, La Guaira and

    Cuidad. Bolivar. He said that
    he first visited Barbados in 1905
    and .then again in 1921 but on

    those oecasions he only spent
    day or two. He however missed
    the wind mills which were a
    special “sight, but was impressed
    with the wonderful roads and the
    brisk business which was _ being
    done in-the city shops,

    a

    Feacher Leaves

    I EAVING yesterday by
    4 BIW.1LA. for Trinidad was
    Mr. - George Thomas, French
    Master at Francois, a secondary
    school in Martinique. He spent
    a few days’ holiday here as a
    guest “at Silver Beach Hotel,
    Rockley and will also stay in
    Trinidad for some time before
    returning to Martinique.

    Jamaican Wife Joins
    Husband

    RS. PHYLLIS MORDECAI,

    wife of Mr. J. S. Mordecai,
    Executive Secretary of the Re-
    gional Economic Committee, ar-
    rived from Jamaica by B.W.1A,
    Jast evening to join her husband
    whose -office is situated at Hast-
    ings ise here.

    Mrs. “Mordecai was accompan-
    ied by, her infant son Bryan and
    the family has taken up residence
    at “Tfigrid’, Navy Gardens.

    CROSSWORD

    de ee
    tel bd
    2 ae Se





    Across

    h. A venicie drawn by another. (7),
    7. To make music, a tittle work
    takes an age, (5) /
    tu. Lt’s that fellow frum Aden. (4
    ll Terminate your ability to under
    go pain (6) |
    iz Size of muted gain (ty)
    t¢@ and 20 Down How tirades ao
    away with meals (4 4)
    16. Made when you ¥. (4)
    18. Habituai meeting place, (5)
    2). Did this bird 17? (4)
    22. Wood, (3)
    28. It has feathery fronds. (4)
    24. How stormy they are. (5)
    Down
    1. Trade, (8)
    2. Obvious, take the pen apart, (8)
    8. This cream despite tts epithet
    is popular, (9) 4. Tot (3)
    5. Playing visiting. race or post
    (5) .
    6. It’s a nasty expression, (5)
    8. Contrive. (B)
    9. Do it to get 16. (4)
    13. Customary. (5)
    15. Speed upsets an anagram of
    9. (4)
    17. Change direction. (4)
    19 Entitle. (4)
    20. See 14. (4)

    ————$————— arr
    Sotution of yesterday s puzzle, —.Acrosss

    1, Ferocious; 7
    Jl Bratse); 15, Seer; 14
    2° Anna: 17. Cave; 19. fre:
    D

    Trembling,

    20. Sew:
    1. Natfative: 2? Scribbler Down: |
    Fountaifs; % Error; 5 Ottoman: 4
    Coal: 5” iris: 6, Stargazer: 8, Bee; 10),
    Opener. ‘12 Renew: 15. Last: J7 Crab
    im veil

    SR ST IS fener ARREST I,

    70 CENTS

    36 in.

    | te
    band.





    MR. AND MRS. GEOFFREY MAINGOT

    For Trinidad
    MONG the passengers leaving

    Married at St. Patrick





    BARBADOS

    BY THE

    ‘WO men are pushing wheel-





    ADVOCATE

    WA...

    umes the guise of a rajah










    | barrows full of cement the or a i ajah whe courting
    }600 miles from Sydney to Mel- ic He i paging -s
    |}bourne. This news ought to make elephant is the only
    |r any a heart beat faster—espe-. anin € ’ ride habitually
    ially the hearts of the two men without becoming bow-legged. It
    | But I regret that they are not has such vi ie back “But ”
    jdoing this to break a reeord, or , lied ahaa a “4 you surely
    even because they like doing it. n't ide eler vants 2 tride, like
    | They are trying to prove that they , ae ce Tons Sa al a ne : es
    jean perform the job more quick-®)).\ Dae ae nr caeae

    ly than the State railway. I abashed, immediately started kk
    would like to see their faces i" the lady. “It is much too fine
    |when, having beaten the railway, @ day,” he said, rather incon-
    they are congratulated and told sequently, “to talk about
    to take their wheelbarrows back elephants.”

    to Sydney for more cement. “You

    ean do the job so quickly,” a rail- té the ballet

    way official will say maliciously, “FYUWAH DRONG,” tne first
    } that We wouldn't dr@am of com- Papuan ballet to be pro-
    peting with you.” If the two men duced in this country, may be
    are cunning, they will fit small described as a tour-de-force. It

    jmotors to their barrows.

    faternational good will

    LL the slimy stuff written

    about international good will
    at Helsinki was justified when a
    | Czech, during a race, “in his
    | effort to help the Russian, put his
    jarm round him and gave him a
    hearty push ferward,’ according
    }to a correspondent who was there.
    |Naturally .there was no question
    of disqualifying either runner.
    |The judges were probably blink-



    is based on the Melanesian folk-
    tale of the magician -who tattooed
    a yam on the son of Queen Kava,
    and died of eating raw sago. The
    dance movements are formalised
    into’a kind of static rhythm, and
    mime is used to convey the styl-
    ised enchevetrement of the mise-
    en-seene. The climax, a master-
    piece of artistic integrity, comes
    when Kava, dressed as a_ fish,
    lurés the magician into her canoe,
    The suggestion of atavistic rata-
    touille is admirably conveyed in a

    ng through a mist of happy tears. ¢series of passeplats, and the final

    But if one
    jother surely one runner
    /up another or push him off the
    jtrack—if his universal good will
    | falters for a moment.
    |
    |
    le
    i

    can tip



    Rajah Ramdamdhurtipore

    *. , NOT JUST a rajah, mind
    * That

    you, but a maharajah.
    fragment of conversation over-
    heard made me think of Foul-

    runner can help an- pas de carabe is something new in

    jardinage.

    In passing
    inquiry into the collapse

    N
    A of a bridge reminds me of

    William McGonagall’s closing

    lines or the Tay Bridge disaster:

    I must now conclude my lay

    3, telling the world fearlessly
    without the teast dismay,







    By Beachcomber

    At least many sensible men do
    say,

    Had they been supported on each
    side with buttresses,

    At least many a_ sensible
    confesses,

    ‘ '
    For the stronger we our houses, *

    do build,
    The less chance we
    killed.

    have of being

    _— uncompromising feminist
    says that when men propose
    marriage they should make it
    clear that they do not regard the
    girl as their inferior,

    “Will you be mine?”
    the masterful male. But if the
    man says, “ May I be yours?” it
    suggests the masterful female.
    “Let us be ours” might be a better
    formula.

    “Am I to understand that you
    have~ refused me?” asked a lad
    who had just been thrown across
    the room by a_ policewoman.
    Dusting her gigantic hands, the
    girl said, “You'd better ask Mum-
    sie.” Alas! Mumsie was a Ser-
    geant, end the lad was pitched
    into the hen-run before he could
    open’ his mouth. Convinced that
    life in such a fami
    be his idea of marriage, he
    reached for his hat, and passed
    out of their lives with nothing but

    a sprained wrist to remember
    them by.
    City Notes
    HE third annual report of

    the International Monetary
    Fund makes it quite clear that
    the system of barter recommend-
    ed by some economists, would
    automatically disallow any claims
    made for foreign currency to set

    enough, Such talk always makes That your: central girders would against balance-of-payments loss-

    me think of him, because he so

    : HE marriage between Miss

    m on Tuesday by B.W.LA. for Barbara St. Clair Hutchinsor

    Trinidad was Miss Jean Phillips, daughter of Mrs B. Re Hutchin. gn oO ODA bE

    daughter of Mrs. Robertine Phil- son of “Bayswater”, Deacon's ~~ EMPIRE OLYMPIC

    lips of Maxwell, Christ Church. Road, and the late Mr. Hutchin- ian ly To-Day Onl
    Jean who is a Trinidadian, has ion, and Mr. Geoffrey J Main- $30 2 830° 430 & $13

    been residing in Barbados for the
    past twelve years. She has now
    gone to Trinidad for a short stay
    prior to leaving for the U.S.A. to
    settle.

    late

    Mr.

    got son of Mrs. Lucy Maingot of
    Pointe-a Pierre, Trinidad and th
    Maingot, took
    place on August 9th at 4.30 p.m.

    Raymond

    Lon MacCaliister
    Preston Foster
    in

    Tim HOLT
    Kichard MARTIN



    n

    GUN SMUGGLERS

    THE BIG CAT & | “and NOCTURNE



    at St. Patrick’s Roman Catholic DISHONORED
    ‘nah re Home Church, WADE Starring
    ss E HOAD, da sr «=ds The: scer as . a“ Starring George RAFT
    ae ae, daught« T ee 1e ceremony was per formed Stes CARL ASUN See nT
    of Mr. and Mrs. E. L, G. »y Father Parkinson, S, J. The| Dennis OKEEFE |

    Hoad of Vaucluse Plantation, St,

    Thomas, returned home on Sun- by her brother Mr. R 5 a 4 |
    D . re = on § - . Reynold St. 2 & 8.30 Richard BASEHART
    day by B.W.LA. from Trinidad C. Hutchinson, wore a dress of Wall Disney's Marilyn MAXWELL
    where she spent two weeks’ Chantilly lace over eggshell satin 2
    vacation. Anne is an employee of Her lace bodice had a nylon yolk STORY OF
    the Royal Bank of Canada. and tight fitting sleeves, The lace GUT aE ee
    . } I a g itting sleeves. The lace} ROBIN HOOD
    tor St. Lucia skirt came to a point in the front WALL
    ISS MARJORIE. ESTWICK, “4 formed a full train in the R rae ig
    , Assistant Teacher, left the b ick. Her headdress was a beaded ‘Joan RICE BORDERLINE
    island yesterday morning for St Gara and long nylon veil. She Satuirday
    Lucia where she will spend a “so carried Eucharist lilies and at 1.30 p.m, Starring
    short holiday. During her stay #4rdenias, sou ITY SUE a) Ghine SHEVOR.
    vn will represent the Female Her attendants were Mrs WOMin 1H WARY SS
    schanic Order ; . _ > : oo. Baa f Mid-Nite
    pencesets Order of which she is Reynold St. C. Hutchinson, | “Saturday Mida-Nite Saturday Night
    Secretary, at the opening of the â„¢atron-of-honour, Miss Daphne
    Sister Lodge there. St. C, Hutchinson Maid-of-honour| 5 OF DANGER) LIGHTS OF OLD
    and Miss “E a 7 1 and SANTE FE &
    Will Come Awai and Miss “Ruth Goddard brides-
    some Again maid, They wore similar dresses WHISPERING ROLL ON TEXAS

    RS. JAMES BRAITHWAITE,

    bride who was given in marriage

    of blue french tulle appliqued in

    ; who has been holidaying in white flowers and wore head-
    the island for the last four weeks dresses of the same material
    returned to Boston this morning They carried red rose garlands
    by Pan-American. Airways. Her down both sides of their dresses
    husband is a brother of the late and carried white muffs with
    Mr, C. A, Braithwaite, J.P. rosebuds,

    This is her third visit in twenty- The flower girl Miss Janet
    seven years and she will be re- Atwell wore white nylon "end
    membered chiefly by those in carried a posy of forget-me-nots
    musical circles. : _. Master Richard Hutchinson, the

    Mrs. Braithwaite was organist page boy wore a white shar
    : a St. Peter’s Parish Chureh gkin suit. . a
    or fourteen years and ob- The duties of bestman :
    : 3 Ste iM I astme were
    feeecs ie eee ns performed by Mr, Geoffrey

    y College of Music in Lon Alston of Vancouver. B.C. ;
    don. She plays the violin, and\thosa of Sans fell et a
    piano in addition to the organ. Geoffrey St. C. H tohi oe ae
    She. now holds the position of DeVere Cole. Mr Sate eat t ee
    Organist at the Trinity Lutheran dard and Mr. Will “hh ae
    Church ‘in Boston, Massachusette reception was held ae ‘ay The
    She is also a pupil teacher in water”, Desecn’s Road. and "hes

    the piano and violin.

    To her friends and relatives s ,
    Ss é atives st se . . "

    she says au revoir and she told JoqeGh Sor the honeymoon.

    Carib that Barbados has changed Engineer Holidaying Here

    in amany ways for the better : - " ‘

    jand she was indeed glad to be M*: EO ROBINSON, engineer

    lback after so many yedrs.. She sesend’ Wie of Robinson’s En-

    | thoroughly enjoyed the hospital- Spain Pacer te ee Ae
    Spain, ¢ Pr Oo uesday

    | ity of the home folk, And hopes
    be back later with her hus-

    Two Babies In
    | Six Months

    R aa ,, LONDON The amazing saga of six men who
    teports from Kingston of a THURSDAY, AUGUST 21 deliberately risked their lives to prove
    | Jamaican woman who gave birth 4% — 7-15 p.m rstehtidiond oe isto a theory! On a primitive-type raft
    \te a boy only six months after “4% p 4 t 4 i

    , E oO p.m. The News, 4.10 p Th log:
    her last baby have caused con- D Service, 4.15 tn The Sortratt 7 thee hat eet ee



    as

    bem

    siderable interests among London



    doctors, who believe that such Schumann, 5.15 p.m. Listeners’ | 101 days and 4,300 miles without
    aoe ass \ Choice, 6.00 p.m. Welsh Diary, 6.15 p.m. | £ ‘

    a thing, although unugual, is just Variel? Road Show, 6.45 pm. Sports| contacé with civilization, exerting
    conceivably possible Round-Up and Programme Parade, 7,00] superhuman efforts to keep afloat
    ty p.m. The News, 7.10 Home News From and alive!

    A famous gynac log Britain
    amous gynacologist told one 7.415 — 15.59 p.m 25 59M 31. 92M |
    London newspaper GUY by ob; i gyepd gs capa eeebecialha aie 2 | SOL LESSER
    cence would have to be examined 7.15 p.m. We See Britain, 7.45 p.m. |
    most carefully and it id be Championship Bands, 8.15 p.m. Radio | presents
    ost carefully and it would be Newsreel, 8.30. p.m. Special Despatch, |
    | necessary to produce the X-rays 6.45 p.m. Interlude, 8.55 p.m. From the |
    for study, Theoretically, it is not itorials, 9.00 p.m. From the Promen- |
    4 - eee oe * ade Concerts, 10.00 p.m. The News,
    impossible, but I have never my- p.m. News Talk, 10.15 p.m. A Day tr

    self known of

    : whe 1
    pm

    GEOB

    TO-DAY 3 SHOWS 1.30

    such a case.’



    —

    ady, 4.45 p.m

    sife



    left for High Winds, Cattlewash,

    morning by. B.W.1LA, for about a
    month's holiday and is a guest at
    Indramer Guest House, Worthing

    LISTENING

    HOURS

    Sporting Record, 5






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    The Portrait of a Lady

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    Opening Tomorrow 4.30 & 8.15

    FOOTSTEPS MOON



    not have given way,

    THEATRES —

    ROXY ROYAL
    To-Day 4.30 & 8.15 Last 2 Shows To-Day
    Tomorrow 4.30 only 4.30 & 8.15

    THE SECRET OF
    ST. IVES Ceasar ROMERO
    and June HAVOC
    cr les STARRETT

    ruiey BURNETT it in
    «TWO FISTED ONCE: A anes

    STRANGER
    Tomorrow Night and
    at S20
    Madam O'’Lindy & Too LATE FOR

    Her Troupe in
    CARACAS NIGHTS

    TEARS



    OF 19% Starring
    Doors Open at
    7 p.m Lizabeth SCOTT
    Opening Saturday Dan DURYEA
    445 & 8.15 ‘a
    Univers: Pictures Tomorrow Only
    Presents 430 & 8.15

    THE GOLDEN | Lloyd BRIGGS in
    SALAMANDER . |rHREE STEPS

    Starring NORTH &

    Trevor HOWARD |npoxen JOURNEY
    ANOUK

    Mid-Nite with Phyllis Calvert

    anew

    Saturday Night Saturday & Suussy

    5 & 815
    Gene AUTRY in
    SOUIX CITY SUE Proderick Crawford
    Richard Kiley
    and

    WOMEN IN WARK in THE MOB









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    Whip WILSON &
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    Johnny Mack BROWN

    4.20 pom. (only)
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    4.20 pom. Contly)
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    Sat, Special 0.40 & 1.30
    “SPORT OF KINGS”
    Paul CAMPBELL &

    “BLAZING ACROSS THE



    |

    #0 p

    Tim
    “LEGION

    PECOS”

    YOU'VE NEVER BEFORE
    A PICTURE LIKE THIS!

    Produced by OLLE NORDEMAR
    Music by SUNE WALDIMIR
    An Artfilm A.B. ®

    Told by THOR HEYERDAHL
    author of the best-selling book



    | ____ BRIDGETOWN
    | “RON—TIRI” Play



    SESS
    ~ BRIDGETOWN | BARBAREES |} OISTIN ~
    (Dial 2310) (Dial 5170) (Dial 8404)
    3 Different Shows 3 Different Shows Last 2 Shows TO-DAY
    TO-DAY TODAY 4.45 & 8.30 pom
    Special — 1.30 p.m. Special — 1.30 p.m “MONEY MADNESS” &

    THE OUTLAW
    Jane RUSSELL





    “SPRING SONG”

    “WATERLOO ROAD’



    “ROOM FOR TWO"

    “HILLS CF DONEGAL’
    Dingh SHERIDAN





    Sat. Spee al 1.40 pm.
    “THUNDER
    MOUNTAIN"



    to the isles where the hula girls wait!

    AT LAST ON YOU

    | PLAZA -—Starting Friday














    “FOR YOU I DIE"

    & Catht Downs



    GREY'S
    FRI Q
    145 & 8.30 pom,
    “TAP ROOT" (Color)
    Van Heflin &
    “PARDON MY
    SARONG’
    Bud ABBOTT &
    Lou COSTELLO

    ADA
    MIrrcHuM



    m. (only)

    RAYE &

    t Granger

    Sat. Special 1.30 p.m
    “THUNDERHOOF™
    Preston FOSTER &

    “WHIRLWIND

    RAIDERS’
    Charles STARRETT _

    Midnite SAT.
    “OUTLAW BRAND"
    Jimmy WAKELEY

    “WEST of
    EL DORADO”
    Johnny MACK BROWN

    =

    m. (only)

    &

    HOLT &

    of the
    LAWLESS"
    BR









    SEEN



    es. The reason for this is that in

    ja system of barter speed is often
    essential. Lf I offer 300,000 tons
    of soft fruits in exchange for
    cisterns, the fruit must be deliv-
    ered before it goes bad. This
    puts a premium on what is called
    retroactive disbursements in kind.
    That has nothing to do with free-
    ing the £.

    GAIETY

    The Garden—St, James
    TO-DAY (only) 8.30 P.M.
    “KINGS ROW"
    Ronald REAGAN-—Ann SHERIDAN
    “SUGARFOOT” (Color)
    Randolph SCOTT | atten
    ~ Midnite Sat.
    SILVER CITY
    BONANZA

    Friday & Sat. (

    8.30 p.m. |
    “CRY MURDER’
    Carol Mathews



    Rex ALLEN &

    “DAUGHTER
    of the WEST’ GUNMEN of
    (Color) ABILENE

    Rocky LANE

    ae

    §

    Philip Reed





    SPECTACULAR
    TECHNICOLOR
    ADVENTURE !

    IT’S THE LAST WORD IN
    WESTERN
    EXCITEMENT!

    Paramount presents

    The LAST
    OUTPOST

    starring
    Ronald Rhonda
    REAGAN @ FLEMING
    with

    Bruce BENNETT, Bill WIL-
    LIAMS, Noah BEERY

    At the
    BARBAREES (Dial 5170)

    PLAZA

    FRIDAY 22nd
    4.45 & 8.30 p.m.
    & continuing Daily
    Blazing Action
    “THE LAST OUTPOST”




















    Photographed by the
    men who lived itl

    R SCREEN!

    with the ‘Action Packed '

    rama!





    oO

    A WOMAN CAN
    MAKE OR BREAK
    A MAN

    Vv cnarus
    NicGRAW - DIXON
















    and HIS
    and




    |
    man





    |

    |

    suggests x







    DANCE AT THE

    CRANE HOTEL
    NAT. 30th August

    TO THE TUNES OF

    “KEITH CAMPBELL"
    “SOCIETY SIX”

    ‘

    rc abt
    nd f
    \/ - ONE IN EVERY 30 PERSONS”
    \y

    *

    *«
    *
    *«

    ly would not «x

    *
    *

    *«

    * — sacrrranrs
    *

    |x Dec. 23 — Jan. 21

    *

    | 4 Tan. 22 — Feb. 20

    *

    *

    THURSDAY, AUGUST 21, 1952





    »

    ARIES Can obtain good results by real effort. To-
    March 21—April 20 day’s influences are generally positive, but *
    will need extreme care in following,

    FOR THURSDAY, AUGUST 21, 1952

    Look in the section in which your birthday comes and
    find what your outlook is, according to the stars.

    Avoid needless risk, getting into compro-
    mising position; don’t overforce your hand.
    Lean toward a safe policy. Don't be over-

    sure! *

    On the very practical side, yet can also be
    most productive day. Heed sane tenden-
    cies, do not go headlong into anything
    without being well informed, aware of pit-
    falls.

    TAURUS
    April 21—May 20

    GEMINI
    May 21—June 21

    *

    CANCER

    High quality, performance needed to get
    June 22—July 23 :

    some of day’s good possibilities. Not neces-
    sary merely to force things; go along in
    calm, dignified way; you'll achieve goal.

    Prime your work with wise study first,
    know what you want, what you can Randle.
    Have system; centre on reasonable wants.

    ¥ * ¥

    You natives inherently lean toward qual-
    ity rather than quantity, as it should be.
    Hold up your end; deficiency in vital issues
    can discredit good. x

    Be in harmony with those around you,
    don’t argue or quickly criticize, You then
    get more out of life including holding
    friends; you will bridge rough spots better.

    -M

    Influences say to be wisely on guard all
    the time for possible slip-ups, misunder-
    standings that could be troublesome. News
    may tend to confuse, but don’t fret.

    %
    *
    *

    LEO
    July 24—Aug. 22

    VIRGO
    Ang. 23—Sept. 23

    +

    LIBRA
    Sept. 24—Oct. 23

    *
    +
    *

    Vigorous activities, keen thinking will best
    weather this likely dull, perhaps mixed
    day. Pitch your effort on safe side; do +
    what you do well,

    PISCES Not all stimulating day. Intricate matters
    Feb. 21—March 20 may confuse; don't let this stymie effort. *
    Heart interests rate.
    YOU BORN TODAY: generally can do wonders when you

    SCORPIO
    Oct. 24—Nov. 22

    Nov. 23—Dec. 22

    General business, professional and personal
    affairs need close attention, Look to the
    right and left before acting. Don’t go into

    risky deals. *

    Fortunate rays. Open up your bag of tricks
    and improved ideas; push_ them sensibly
    for good gains possible. Personal affairs
    can be much what you make them: take
    course firmly.

    CAPRICORN

    AQUARIUS

    want to accomplish much or quickly. Spare yourself exhaus-
    tion from overdoing. Fine outlook; properly manage your
    affairs and hold patience as a virtue. Birthdate: Samuel s.
    Paquin, editor; Frank A. Munsey, merchant, publisher.

    pS

    MMM MH 4 4 *



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    “THE JUMPING JACKS STEEL BAND”
    featuring our own

    BING of the CARIBBEAN PAUL WILKINS

    “A FREE 15 MINUTE FLIGHT

    IN “BIM” TO

    ENTERING THE DANCE >
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    2 Cases HEINEKEN’S

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    women.

    Donated by




    THURSDAY, AUGUST 21,

    West Indian Hopes © cean oF inventors stut at it

    1952

    Pinned On 5B.G.

    LONDON

    The shortage of rice, staple food of 60 per cent. of the
    earth’s population, is one of the most serious food problems

    facing world food authorities today and is likely

    so for some little time.

    remain

    This year’s crop prospects indicate no greater supply

    of rice on the world markets than last year.

    Thailand is

    the only rice-producing country that has materially in-

    BARBADOS ADVOCATE

    Little Hope For End Of Rice

    creased its output since last year

    1d crops in China,

    Burma, India and Indo-China have shown big declines from

    pre-war levels.

    Experts are giving most of
    their attention to overcoming the
    grave rice shortage in the Far
    East. For the peoples of the
    West Indies who are also largely
    dependent on rice, hopes are
    pinned on expansion of the big
    rice scheme in British Guiana,
    which is rapidly becoming an
    increasingly important factor in
    ‘the world rice picture.

    The Food and Agriculture
    Organisation of the United
    Nations has been concerned for
    some time with measures to

    alleviate the rice shortage and
    has now proposed to call an inter-
    national conference to deal with
    the best means of overcoming it.

    Before the war, some 8,000,000
    tons of rice a year were handled
    in international trade. With the
    increase in the world’s popula-
    tion that has taken place since
    then, some 9,000,000 tons a year
    are needed to supply current de-
    mands at the same rate. But
    only 4,800,000 tons a year have
    gone into international trade
    since the war.

    Stop-Gap

    Countries of the Far East have
    made up their rice shortages to
    some extent by importing grain
    from the Western world. But
    this, although preventing famine,
    is nothing more than a stop-gap.
    For one thing, most rice-eating
    people of the Far East are not
    willing to accept other grains as
    a substitute. For another thing,
    grain costs dollars which most of
    these countries can ill afford.

    One of the main reasons for the
    rice shortage is the post-war
    political strife in Burma and
    Indo-China, two of the most im-
    portant rice-exporting nations
    before the war. Its repercussions
    have been particularly severe in
    India and other Commonwealth
    countries,

    Before the war, exports of rice
    from these two countries and
    Thailand stotalled about 6,300,000

    tons a year, of Which 4,500,000
    tons went to other Far Eastern
    nations and the rest went to

    Europe and the West Indies. Last
    year, rice exports from these
    three countries totalled only
    2,150,000 tons, of which 2,980,000
    tons remained in. the Far East,
    leaving little enolgh for Europe
    and the West Indies.

    Professor G. vu. Allen, a politi-
    cal economist of the University of
    London and an expert on Japan-
    ese economic problems, is one of
    the advisers to the F.A.O. Com-
    mittee on Commodity Problems.

    “The wartime destruction of
    transport equipment (rice fields
    are often scattered and isolated)
    took a heavy toll of rice produc-
    tion,” he says. “The destruction
    of irrigation works and the deple-
    tion of farm capital were also
    catastrophic, and producers and
    traders today lack the necessary
    security to undertake reconstruc-
    tion.”

    These changes in the supply
    picture have increased the bar-
    gaining power of rice-producers
    with any supplies to export and
    have put the world price up.
    Since rice is now much dearer
    than wheat, the paradoxical posi-
    tion arises that the poorer half of

    the world now eats the more
    expensive cereal.

    Before the war, there was
    hardly any competition to buy
    rice on the world market. Today,
    all consuming countries are
    vigorously competing with each

    other, desperate to buy as much
    ag they can of the rice which
    Burma and Thailand have to
    offer.
    Shoriage In Asia

    Immediate prospects, « believe
    F.A.O. officials, are for a shortage
    of rice in Asia that must essential-
    ly be overcome by the Asiatic
    countries themselves. There will
    therefore be fewer exportable
    supplies from Asia in 1952 than



    Keep your
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    HALIBO GE
    in the body-building

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    Children love taking Haliborange —
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    ast yeer. Continuing demand
    will therefore widen the gap be-
    tween export prices and Govern-

    ment-controlled domestic prices
    in these countries.

    As far as the Colonia! Empire
    is concerned, expansion of rice

    production is being pushed ahead
    as rapidly as possible. Produc-
    tion in British Guiana has risen
    to 65,000 tons a year, as against
    45,000 tons before the war, of
    which some 30,000 tons are for
    export to other West Indian
    islands—a small but importan
    contribution to world supplies,
    helping to relieve the export
    pressure on the Far Eastern pro-
    ducers,

    For the last tive years, the
    F.A.O, has sponsored technical
    studies on the breeding and fer-
    tilisation of rice. Three confer-
    ences have been held on breeding
    improved, varieties to combine
    higher yield with greater resist-

    ance to disease and some _ pro-
    gress has been made in this
    direction. Some of the methods

    of improving rice production are
    listed by the F.A.O. as follows:

    Free distribution or distribution
    at reduced cost of fertilisers and
    other ‘requisites; preparation of
    lands by tractors at nominal cost;
    provision of irrigation water free
    of charge; Government subsidies
    for improved practices; guaran-
    tees of fixed price; short and long-
    term Government loans for
    technical improvements includ-
    ing the financing of harvesting;
    the settlement of farmers in new
    or abandoned areas; the organisa-
    tion of co-operative facilities to
    take over the function of middle-
    men and to provide credit; and
    the decentralisation of rice mills.

    —B.U.P.



    “Gioria Maria’”’
    On Dock

    Work is progressing — satis-
    factorily on the Steamship Gloria
    Maria Which has been on dock
    for about three’ weeks under-
    going extensive refitting. Her
    hull plates and all the structural
    members of the frame are being
    renewed.

    The Gloria Maria which is a
    double bottomed vessel with a
    twin screw hag a net tonnage of
    364 tons and’ is own@€d by the
    firm of C. A. Maritima Delta of
    Caracas, Venezula, and her
    ag here are R, M, Jones &
    Co.” Ltd.

    The Maria is used by the Com-
    pany for transporting gypsum, a
    type of stone and also has roor
    for general cargo. She was raised
    on the dock on July 30 and is
    expected to come off in approxi-
    mately two weeks’ time,

    In 1948 the Motor vessel Julia
    —sister shf) of the Gloria Maria
    and owned by the same Company
    —was refitted on the same dock.



    66 Ay 99
    ‘A thelbrook
    ? e
    Arrives
    .

    The Steamship Athelbrook
    arrived in the Careenage yester-
    day morning from Trinidad and
    was loaded with a cargo of
    molasses, This 206-ton Steamship

    under Capt. W. Cook left the
    same day for Trinidad.

    She is consigned to Jason Jone
    & Co., Ltd.

    The Steamship Canadian Chai-
    lenger which arrived in Carlisle
    Bay on August 16 from Trini-

    dad left yesterday for Montrea!. th

    While here she was loaded with
    sugar.








    real zest



    IN LO§ ANGELES, Dr. Lee DeForest (left), 79, shows his latest invention
    to Dr. Robert Milliken of the California Institute of Technology. The
    inventor’s problem was to turn heat into electricity. This is done by
    pumping air out of a metal pot. Then a five-inch disk is heated to in-
    candescence to throw off electrons, This idea resembles the common
    vacuum tube for radio invented by Dr. DeForest. It would require no

    outside voltage to accelerate electrons.

    (International Soundphoto)



    Cross-Examination

    Of Clerk Today

    THE TRIAL OF KEITH SQUIRES, a 26-year-old clerk,
    for falsification of accounts on or about August 31, last year,

    while an employee of D. V.

    Scott & Co., Ltd., entered its

    third day’s hearing yesterday at the Court of Grand Sessions
    before Mr. Justice J. W. B. Chenery, and has been adjourn-

    ed until today.

    Defence Counsel Mr. E. W. Barrow who cross-examined
    Mr. Cuthbert King, Supervisor of the Excise Department
    of Customs on Tuesday, for about two and a quarter hours,
    continued his cross-examination of this witness for about

    the same time yesterday.

    One other witness gave evi-
    dence, Mr. Clayton Thorpe, former
    Customs Officer in charge of the
    Cheapside Rum Bond, and this
    has brought the number to five.
    He will be cross-examined today.

    Mr. Barrow is associated with
    Mr. F. G. Smith,

    Hon. C, Wylie, Attorney General,
    and Mr. F. E. Field, Assistant to
    him, are prosecuting for the
    Crown

    Squires is charged with having
    on or about 3lst August, 1951,
    while he was a clerk or servant
    of D. V. Scott & Co., Ltd., with
    intent to defraud, made or con-
    curred in making a false entry in
    a stock book belonging to or in
    the possession of D. V. Scott, his
    employer, purporting to show
    that on August 31, rum vats 1, 2
    and 3, the property of D, V. Scoit
    & Co., Ltd., at Cheapside, Bridge-
    town, contained respectively 2,796,
    1,380 and 2,820 proof wine gallons.

    Office Records

    Cross-examined, Mr, King said
    that he did not discover sometime
    in February that 50 casks of rum
    had actually been shipped and not
    entered in the Government books
    ht the Customs, nor was he at any
    time aware that rum had been
    shipped and not entered in the
    books. If such had occurred, he
    would have a record of it in the
    office records.

    His Lordship asked him to
    check his records during the
    luncheon interval, and after he

    had done so, he said that he had
    discovered a document in which
    Mr. Neblett, an officer of the
    Cheapside Rum Bond had ex-
    plained why 50 cartons of rum
    had been omitted to be entered
    in the Cheapside book.

    Before he had made this check,
    he said that if a mistake had been
    made and 50 casks of rum had
    been shipped and it was not
    entered in the books of the rum
    bond, 2,500 would not be in the
    bond but would appear as being

    ere,
    There had been rumours about

    rum being carried through the
    back door, and on some occasions

    tr Baby loo!

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    people were prosecuted. Reports
    had been made to the Police, but
    he personally had not made any
    report,

    There was one occasion when
    he had heard of a mule cart being
    seen at the back door of the bond
    and he had asked that it be check-
    ed up, but he had never heard the
    driver's name.

    Duplicate Keys

    He kept duplicate keys for the in lots at
    did not and Ovington, in the parish of St. returned a

    various bonds, but he

    Health Board Seeks





    Shortage

    More Information

    MEMBERS OF THE GENERAL BOARD OF HEALTH
    at their meeting yesterday acreed to the suggestion by Mr
    J. M. Kidney that the Clerk of the General Board of Health

    hould inform the Commisiorers of Health of the various
    rishes of all plans of development approved by the Board

    Mr. Kidney felt that thi Dealing with this matter, the

    !

    thod would facilitate the exe-

    cuti of the Commissioners
    duties under the Public Health
    Ai the previous meeting of the

    Board, members discussed the
    ggestion and it was decided
    rat it should be placed on the
    \genda for the following meeting.



    joard of Health

    ing

    The f approved

    f the







    lividing and letting land in

    at Savannah Re Bush Hall,

    Sit.. Michael, by Mr, J. G. Nurse.
    Dividing off 4 Acres 1 Rood
    13 3/10 Perches of land from
    lands of “Bosvigo”, Eagle Hal!

    Read, St. Michael by Mrs. Muriel
    Hanschell,

    Division and sale of 684,291
    sq. ft. of land at Thorpes Planta-
    tion, St. James, by the Barbados
    Co-operative Bank Ltd.

    Division and sale of 132,896 sq.
    ft. of land in lots at Derricks, St.
    James, by J. B, Clarke, Esq.

    Dividing off and _ selling 60
    acres 11 Perches of land at New
    Castle Plantation, St. John, by
    New Castle Estates, Ltd, (B.4131)

    The Board considered an appli-
    cation for the division and sale
    in lots of 238,142 sq. ft. of land at
    Pine Hill, St. Michael, by Mr.
    Neville W. M. Carter. It was
    decided that this matter be post-
    poned until the Board was satis-
    fied as to the water supply.

    It was also decided to adjourn
    the consideration of the applica-
    tion for the division and sale of
    411,693 sq, ft. of land in lots at
    Deighton Road, St. Michael, by
    W. T. Gooding, Esq, et al. until
    the Board was satisfied as to the
    water supply.

    The Board did not approve of
    the application by the Barbados
    Co-operative Bank Ltd., for ap-
    proval of lots numbered 35, 36,
    37, 48, 50, 51 and 52 as set out
    in the plan of 157, 281 square feet
    of land at Howell’s Cross Road,
    St. Michael.

    An application was received
    from Messrs. Haynes & Griffith
    on behalf of the Joes River Sugar

    Estates Ltd., for the return of
    plans submitted in connection
    with the division and sale of lanc

    Vaughan’s Plantation

    have keys for the compara Joseph.

    at the Cheapside bond.

    ‘was an occasion when a merchant | ——

    wanted to get out rum for a ship}

    and he
    vith him a night, but he could
    not remember the details of it.
    They did not stay for more than
    Yen minutes, and he was accom-
    panied by Mr. Thorpe. That was
    an unusual case, and the normal
    permit would have been made
    out the following day.

    The books _ produced, the
    merchant’s book etc., might have
    been in arrears about September
    last year. Occasionally Mr, Thorpe
    would allow merchants to blend
    rum without getting a permission
    straight away.

    In some respects, if those books
    were in arrears, those at his office
    would be.

    There had been a recent disap-
    pearance of rum from Wakefield,
    but it was decided that it was
    due to an abnormal evaporation.
    This was about 200 proof wine
    gallons. The usual amount allow-
    ed for evaporation was two or
    one per cent., but this was about
    ten per cent.

    It was true that the Cheapside
    bond was hotter than at Wake-
    field.

    Re-Examined

    Re-examined, he said that when
    rum was being taken from one
    bond to another it would be in
    the merchant’s custody,

    Mr. Clayton Me. C, Thorpe said
    he was first at the Bond in Cheap-
    side in January, 1950. About 15
    or 16 merchants kept rum at the
    bond of which about 10 or 11 had
    compartments for storing.

    On page 6.






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    went down to the bond |





    Che Pride ae the inithe

    Here she comes—the new Baby from No. 10!

    Oh, do let me have

    simply lovely—and how like her Daddy!
    No, no, she’s Mummy’s girl—look at her

    eyes!

    . . . Baby Joan doesn

    ard decided to seek the advice
    f the Atterney General. The
    “halrman instructed the Clerk to
    torward the correspondence to
    the- Attorney General.

    The Board received the reports




    for the months of May and June,
    1842, by the Government Chief
    Sanitary Inspector.

    Members present were: Dr. E
    Be. Carter,—Chairman; Mr. A. E.
    S Lewis, M.C.P., Hon. V. C. Gale,
    M.L.C., Mr. J. M. Kidney, Dr. J.
    P. O’Mahony and _Dr. F. N
    jrannum,



    Painter Died Ry
    Natural Causes

    A nine-man jury yesterday re-
    turned a _ verdict of death by
    natural causes to His Worship

    Mr. E. A, MeLead, Police Coronei
    of District “A”, in the inquest
    into the circumstances surround-
    ing the death of 60-year-old
    painter Goulbourne Gittens.

    Goulbourne
    sided at

    Gittens,
    Bullen’s

    who
    Alley, St.
    Michael, was found dead in a
    eanefield at Bullen’s Alley on
    August 7, and his body was re-
    moved to the Public Mortuary
    for a post mortem examination,

    Dr. A. S, Cato who performed
    the examination, told the court
    yesterday that the deceased was
    dead for 18 hours and the vessels
    of the heart and brain were
    diseased, In his opinion death
    was due to natural causes, namely
    heart disease

    re-







    Bertie Tull of Bullen's Alley
    St. Michael, said that the de-
    ceased was his step-father and
    used to live with him. Some-
    time on August 6 the deceased
    left the house for eanefield
    where he had stocks.

    He never returned home that
    dey. The next morning he was
    told something and went to the
    Publie Mortuary where he iden-

    ufled

    lo Dr,

    the body of his
    A. S. Cato,

    tep-father

    At this stage His Worship
    Mr, BE. A. McLeod summed up
    the facts of the inquest to the

    jury and after a deliberation they
    verdict of death by
    natural causes,

    a peep... . isn’t she

    ‘t worry—she has her

    happy contented smile for everyone, but is

    longing to get home again for another warm,

    comforting drink of the Cow & Gate Milk

    Food that is doing her so much good.




    Nhe FOOD of”

    COW é GATE ass

    4714



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    teeth, for gum troubles cause over 50 per cent. of tooth-
    losses. To promote firm, healthy gums, use Ipana tooth paste —
    Tpana and Massage. Use Ipana, also, to brush your teeth extra-
    white and reduce acid-forming bacteria that cause decay. This
    is the way to keep your whole mouth healthy; the way you will
    find “refreshingly different”? because of Ipana’s mint flavour.

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    x




    PAGE FCUR

    BARBADOS ett ADVOCAT

    Cra ere ea Se oe es Bs ee





































































































    Whats I

    My dictionary defines accident
    as, ‘an event which was unexpect-
    ed,.or the cause of which was un-
    foreseen; a contingency, casualty,
    or mishap’, and so on. Perhaps a
    more practical definition, with
    special reference to traffic acci-
    dents, would be something that
    should not be allowed to happen,
    and the number of which would
    be very much reduced if all vehi-
    cle owners and drivers felt even
    slightly more responsible.

    Nearly all visitors to Barbados
    are impressed by the extensive
    network of paved roads in the
    island, and simultaneously but
    unfavourably impressed by the
    amount of extremely irresponsi-
    ble’ driving on these roads. I
    have myself driven and been
    driven in many different countries,
    but nowhere else have [ had the
    same feeling of taking my life in
    my hand by merely venturing on
    a public highway, either on foot
    or in 4 car.

    Printed by the Advocate Co., Lid., Bre-* ¢t_ Bridgetewn



    21, 1952

    Thursday, August

    ——— ee =



    CANE FIRES

    THERE were 48 more cane fires in 1951
    than in 1950 and six hundred and thirteen

    mere acres of cane were burnt in 1951
    than in 1950.

    Yet of the 220 cane fires which were in-
    vestigated by the Police only two were
    supposed to be acts of incendiarism, 13
    were accidental and 205 uyknown.

    My house is on a main road and
    when pottering in the garden I
    see a constant volume of cars,
    buses and lorries go careening past
    at speeds far too high for safety
    on roads where the view ahead
    is usually limited to two or three
    hundred yards, and is often less

    Som es it seems quite sbvi-
    ous that the drivers of two or more
    lorries are racing each other, a
    most dangerous practice where
    the loryies are so wide and the
    roads s@ narrow. Even the buses
    seem to race occasionally the most
    flagrant case I have seen being
    an ‘outing’ party of nine or ten
    buses returning from an expedi-
    tion that was obviously not that
    of a Temperance Society.

    If I were asked to give in a few
    plain words what I believe to be
    the outstanding cause of danger-
    ous driving here, I would say it is
    what strikes newcomers to the
    island as a remarkable difference
    in mental attitude toward respon-
    sibility for accidents of all kinds
    and not only traffic accidents .

    I often wish we could have

    St. Philip held the record for 53 cane
    fires in 1951, but these were widespread
    in other parishes, 48 in Christ Church, 29
    in St. George, 21 in St. Joseph, 20 each in
    St. Thomas and St. Michael and 15 in St.
    John, There were only 5 in St. Peter, 4
    in St. Andrew, 2 in St. Lucy and two in
    St. James.

    This increase in the number of cane fires
    is alarming not only because of the heavy
    losses which are borne by the insurance
    companies, the damage to young crops anc
    the loss in sucrose content of the cane, bu:
    because of the fatalistic attitude to canc
    fires which has developed in the commu
    nity.

    After commenting that Barbados wa:
    “fortunately free from any major fire” in
    1951 and regretting the death of one femal~
    infant in a fire on the 22nd December
    1951 the Fire Officer in his report on the
    Barbados Fire Brigade adds. “in additio:
    to the above there were 220 cane fire:
    in the Colony involving approximately
    1,450. acres of cane. Of this number it wa:
    only possible to arrive at a probable causc
    for twelve of them, the causes for the re-
    mainder being returned as unknown.”



    WASHINGTON.

    Americans are saving—saving
    hard.

    New York City, one of the
    sreatest aggregations of wealth in
    he world, is putting more and
    money away in savings accounts
    and bank deposit boxes all the
    time.

    In the first six months of this
    year the city’s bank deposits
    showed a gain of £103 million,
    compared with £6,400,000 for the
    irst half of TPL

    *

    The Fire Brigade atténded only 66 fires
    in 1951 and of these it was not possible t»
    suggest a cause for sixteen. Commentin::
    on this the Fire Officer writes “there doe:
    seem a diffidence on the part of some

    *

    people who could help in giving informz.- How can people do it, with
    tion after a fire that would lead to a fair ae and taxes as they are
    assessment of the cause.” One way appears to be that

    hey have largely stopped buying
    household appliances, furniture,
    radio, and TV sets for the time
    veing. As one expert puts it:
    ‘How many refrigerators can a
    family use? How many cars can
    you drive at one time?”

    But, as usual, the experts are
    livided into two schools of thought
    over the underlying reason for the
    hrift. '

    One group says people are
    building up nest eggs because they
    are jittery about the future and
    what it may hold,

    No, say the others—if people
    think there will be war tomorrow
    -hey spend lavishly on the “eat,
    irink, and be merry” principle.
    Chey are saving because they have
    sonfidence in a serene and peace-
    ful future.

    Paper dollars are known as
    ‘greenbacks” in America and
    sounsel for Martin Olsen, a Brook-
    lyn bank teller who “went to
    lunch” taking 38,000 — dollars
    (£13,500) with him, pleads to
    the judge: “Hitherto Olsen had

    Throughout Barbados there seems to b>
    atendency for fires to occur without known
    causes. As for cane fires the fact that «
    probable cause is suggested for only twelv =
    of 220 cane fires shows that the preven-
    tion of cane fires is not regarded with an,
    great seriousness locally.

    It is ironical to read in the report of
    the Fire Officer for 1951 that “the best
    way to deal with a fire is to prevent it”
    when cane fires are increasing in frequency
    and hardly anyone knows how the major-
    ity start.

    In an island where the number of cane
    fires exceeds by far more than one hundred
    the number of ordinary fires it is remark-
    able to find that the prevention of cane
    fires is not,in the forefront of the Fire
    Brigade’s activities and that so far as the
    Police are concerned the origin of cane
    fires remains in most instances a mystery
    to them. If cane fires are to be extermin-
    ated from the island (and Barbados can
    little afford the annual financial drain
    and the damage to young crops and mulch
    grasses) the Police and the Fire Brigade
    cught, it seems, to be conducting an all
    aut campaign to abolish cane fires in
    cooperation with the plantation owners.



    A’ New Name For Capitalism

    To the Editor, The Advocate;

    SIR; — The Reverend Francis

    Godson is, I suggest seeking a
    name for something that is fast
    disappearing—I mean Capitalism,
    in the old sense of the word.
    . The private “Capitalist” is in
    fact being abolished, although,
    paradoxically, his numbers are in-
    creasing enormously,

    Almost everyone nowadays is a
    Capitalist to some extent. Every-
    body with a current bank account,
    a savings bank deposit account, a
    life insurance policy, or interest
    ina Pension Fund or in Govern-
    ment or municipal loans is a Cap-
    italist and, indirectly, a share-
    holder in innumerable enterprises
    over which he exercises no author-
    ity or power.

    Even persons who directly own
    shares in banks, investment tausts
    and industrial and other com-
    mercial enterprises have little or
    no power: authority or even effec-
    tive responsibility for them, Fewer
    and fewer “Capitalists” directly
    operate or effectively control the
    enterprises in which their capital
    is invested. Even landlords are
    finding it impossible to carry on
    since the introduction of Death
    Duties. and the big estates are
    constantly being compulsorily

    ee
    big banks and leading cor-

    porations, industrial and commer-
    cial enterprises are more and more
    being managed and directed by
    mere salaried employees—profes-
    sional administrators, technicians
    etc. who themselves are frequently
    not even shareholders except to
    a very limited extent. The old
    eartoons of the bloated Capitalist
    with his silk hat and big cigar
    bear no resemblance to present
    realities.

    The biggest ‘shareholder today
    in every profit-making concern
    is the Government—which takes
    a big slice of the profits (if there
    are any) in taxation (direct and
    indirect and in sales and purchase
    taxes) but which does not share
    the risks or the losses. Any prac-
    tical socialist should ask why any
    State would bother to own (even
    with the taxpayers own money)
    or operate any undertaking when
    it can regulate rates and prices
    and tax profits :

    The man and woman wht
    urgently needs protection nowa-

    The suggestion has already been made
    in this newspaper that fire watchers should
    be employed throughout the crop season
    on all plantations and that factories should
    pay considerably less for burnt canes than
    is now paid (the money thus saved to be
    paid into a Labour Welfare Fund).

    Neither of these suggestions have been -
    followed in Barbados although such poli-
    cies are adopted in neighbouring West
    Indian territories, Meanwhile cane fires
    occur with increasing frequency and are
    recorded by the Police. Clearly the pres-
    ent policy of laissez-bruler applied to’cane
    fires must cease, and a concerted drive
    against cane fires must be started by the
    Police, the Fire Brigade and the Sugar
    Producers’ Association. In the United
    Kingdom a report on Fire Research in
    1951 listed fires caused by children with
    matches and by smokers materials as
    responsible for 5,800 of 43,000 fires in build-
    ings during the year.

    They concluded that the prevalence of
    certain types of outbreak could only be
    controlled by greater care.

    It seems that cane fires in Barbados
    come under the category of fires which
    can only be controlled by greater care.

    If the prevention of cane fires became
    the chief responsibility of the Barbados

    Fire Brigade, some headway might be
    towards their reduction and final
    elimination.

    made



    regarded greenbacks as nothing
    $9 ethene haleneninitnteainancenene "

    BARBADOS ADVOCATE



    s Am Ae

    Hy RE. SMV THIES

    more of the aimosphere of the
    Royal Navy in this respect, name-
    ly that “Mistakes are not allowed,
    and excuses are not accepted.” It
    is a stern code but there is an ob-
    vious connection between it and
    the well-known efficiency of the
    Navy in the job it has to do. It
    is hard to see how there can be
    efficiency in traffic control or any-
    thing else so long as evasion of
    responsibility and flimsy excuses
    are the order of the day, and find
    general acceptance.

    Certainly it is a very common
    experience now, when something
    goes wrong or is lost or broken
    or anything happens that should
    not be allowéd to happen, to meet
    with what seems to be regarded
    as a completely satisfactory an-
    swer, that it was not done on pur-
    pose, therefore it was an accident,
    therefore no one is to blame. The
    fact that if just a little more care
    had been exercised the mishap
    would not have occurred, does not
    seem to be considered at all.

    I do not mean to imply that
    this modern, inconsequential at-
    titude toward responsibility is
    peculiar to Barbados, because that
    is by no means the case, but it
    does seem to be very marked
    here, and is specially noticeable
    in connection with the wild driv-
    ing that is seen every day on the
    public roads. Perhaps it is mere-
    ly another symptom of the gen-
    eral slackening of discipline and
    failure to distinguish between
    liberty and licence,

    In North America the altitude
    of the general public andthe
    Courts is that both owner and
    driver of a vehicle are responsi-
    ble for any damage done by ft.
    The plea that it was not done on
    purpose and therefore no respon-
    sibility attaches, is never heard,
    and would not be entertained by
    any responsible authority for one
    moment.

    Here in Barbados man eople
    seem to think that detect brakes

    Saving Money Is The Big
    New Craze

    more than so many green vege-
    tables. But suddenly the thought
    of all the good things those
    vegetables would buy and he took
    the money,” :

    The court, unimpressed,
    tenced Olsen to 30 months,

    A drink called .the “Adlai
    Sour” has made its appearance in
    Washington’s cocltail bars.

    And the divorced Adlai Stev-
    enson, Democratic choice for the

    {

    sen-



    presidency, has caused smiles by
    his remark, when tackled by
    newsmen om whether he is

    about to marry one of a number
    of famous ladies: “The plural of
    spouse appears to be spice.”

    The “summer theatre” —
    mainly in rustic barns—is a great
    institution when the hot weather
    hits Broadway.

    But because the audience is
    apt to get ravaged by flies it is
    becoming familiarly known as
    “Tine Citronella Circuit.” People
    spray themselves with lemon juice
    to try to keep the flies away,

    In Kansas City, President Tru-
    man, enjoying a “‘loafing” holi-
    day, has lunch with old friend
    Eddie Jacobson. Edie was the
    man with whorn Truman entered
    into an ill-fated partnership in
    the haberdashery business long,
    long ago,

    Headline: “Bulky pelt and
    huge pelf. intact, Farouk says
    the’s coming here.” Pelf=wealth.

    Down in West Palm Beach,
    inner sanctum of money and
    high society, there is great activi-
    ty among the estate agents.
    Reason: They are all hoping to
    sell a mansion to Farouk.

    Warning that the tense situa-
    tion in Persia may require armed
    American intervention to thwart





    Our Readers Say:

    days is (I submit) the ordinary
    consumer, for whom “Socialism
    for Consumers” would be an in-
    telligent political slogan. He and
    she are the political babes in the
    wood, the orphans out in the econ-
    omic storm.

    Intelligently run and well-
    organised Trade Unions of pro-
    ducers in collaboration with well-
    organised and effectively managed
    Federations of Employers may
    well be regarded as an open con-
    spiracy against the consumer, They
    can arrange hours, wage scales
    and prices to suit themselves, an
    charge the public anything they
    like, in reason, provided they don’t
    price themselves out of the mar-
    ket. They are the modern mon-
    opoltsts.

    Socialism in the old sense of the
    word is also obsolete. As the
    Times Educational Supplement of
    July 4, 1952 mentions, New Fabian
    Essays reject the old definitions
    of Socialism which have been the
    shibboleth of the British Labour
    Party for the last 50 years. The
    collectivism of the early Fabians
    and the nationalisation of the
    means of productions, distribution
    and exchange are recognised as
    inadequate and have lost their
    appeal and attraction,

    Professor G, D, H. Cole now de-
    fines Socialism as gq classless Soci-
    ety in which no one is so much
    richer or poorer than his neigh-
    bourg as to prevent them from
    mixing freely on equal terms.

    Bernard Shaw argued on sim-
    ilar lines that equality of inome
    was desirable, and even essential,
    purely on biological and eugenics
    grounds—in order to widen the
    choice of young people of the
    opposite sexes who were likely to
    produce healthy and _ intelligent
    off-spring. In-equality of income
    artificially restricts the marriage
    market. The welfare state obvi-
    vusly invites control of mating and
    parenthood.

    Mr. John’ Strachey regards
    Socialism as merély a method of
    restoring ownership of the means

    vf production, distribution and
    exchange to those persons who
    operate them—the workers by
    hand and brain,

    Collectivism and nationalisation
    have certainly not achieved Mr.
    Strachey’s aims.

    The Tim Educ
    nt re that





    tional Supple-
    ul social

    nas an



    ists should regard sc



    |

    cident?

    '
    should be regarded as an accept-|
    1bie ¢€xcuse for an accident, but
    elsewhere in my experience it is |
    ygainst the rules to operate any
    vehicle with mechanical defects |
    that make it prone to accident, and |
    this applies especially to the |
    brakes. sai

    I have driven om many days in
    the winter months when the roads
    were covered with ice, and have
    seen many accidents. In a case.
    of collision when one vehicle is
    skidding out of control and the
    other is either stationary or under
    control, it is always the one out of
    eontrol that is responsible. The
    underlying principle is that the
    driver must at all times keep his
    vehicle under control, and if he
    drives on a slippery road it is his
    responsibility, beyond argument.
    At least that is my understanding,
    and it seems only common sense
    and equity.

    I cannot help feeling that a
    more general understanding and
    acceptance of this principle of re-
    sponsibility would have a benefi-
    cial effect here, and so long as the
    present tendency toward a facile
    acceptance of excuses is counten-
    anced by vehicle owners arid the
    general public the efforts of the
    authorities to improve conditions
    are largely nullified.

    Of course I know th the toll
    of traffic accidents in North
    America is far too high, mainly
    because many people drive at
    speeds up to 80 miles an hour or
    more on the wide, straight high-
    ways, mainly for the thrill of
    moving at such high d. In
    far too many of the accidents the
    driver is too young and immature
    to be at large on the public roads
    in control of a powerful engine of
    destruction.

    That does not alter the fact
    ‘however that when damage is
    dong, both owner and driver are
    held responsible, and the general
    attitude which is backed up by
    the Courts, is the good old Navy
    principle, ‘Excuses are not ac-
    cepted.’ '











    a Communist seizure of power

    the columnists Joseph and
    Stewart Alsop write: —
    “It is believed in Washington

    that a Communist takeover in
    Persia must be avoided at what-
    ever cost, even the cost of a break
    with Britain on Middle Easter:
    policies, This in itself is a
    measure of the danger to the
    Western alliance of the crisis now
    reaching the boiling point in
    Persia.”

    Dead in New York at 86 is a
    man of whom you almost cer-
    tainly never heard—but you have
    watched his “products” times
    (without number, His name is
    Charles Jehliger. His name is
    Charles Jehlinger. He taught
    acting and his pupils included
    Spencer Tracy, Rosalind Russell,

    William. Powell, *"and Lauren
    Bacall.

    In Detroit, Mrs. Margaret
    Kelch is suing for divorce.
    Indignantly she tells the judge
    that her husband said to her:

    “You remind me of my sergeant
    in the Army.”

    The Knights of Pythias, one
    of ‘the many “brotherly” organi-
    sations in America, urge Gov-
    ernor Dewey, of New York, to
    make it illegal for any club to bar
    Negroes.

    All those mystery “blips” on
    the Washington radar screens,
    said to be caused by flying
    saucers, have inspired the wise-
    crack: “Britain may have her
    Colonel Blimp, but we have our
    General Blip.”

    Smash hit on the radio just now
    is a song, put over with great
    gusto by basso profundo Marlene
    Dietrich, entitled:: “Too old to
    pass he mustard any more.”





    +

    ideal (for a classless Society)
    and choose the means by which
    this ideal can be realised on purely
    empirical grounds, and not trou-
    ble themselves or their con-
    sciences whether there is any
    authority for such methods in the
    writings of dead and gone Social-
    ists and Marxists.

    If Karl Marx were writing his
    book on Capitalism today it would
    be a very difficult: work. He
    preached that Socialism would be
    the inevitable successor of a highly
    developed industrial Capitalism;
    but the. only country. that has
    adopted his ideas,is Russja—the
    most backward country from the
    Marx view-point; and Russia
    seems to be afraid of letting
    anyone know the true state of
    affairs behind the Iron Cuftain.
    One can only deduce that the pud-
    ding is not up to expectation.

    Yours,
    G, F. SHARP.

    Exhibition At Museum

    To the Editor, The Advocate,
    SIR,-—It is proposed to hold an
    Exhibition at the Museum next
    month of Views of Barbados—
    drawings, watercolours and oils.
    I would be glad to hear from any-
    one willing to lend pictures for
    this exhibition, especially the
    work of Messrs, Ernest Bowen,
    Poyer, Felix Haynes or earlier
    artists. The work of living ar
    is not required,
    Yours faithfully,
    NEVILLE CONNELL.
    Director & Secretary
    Barbados Museum & Historical
    Society

    My Admiration
    To the Editor, The Advocate;

    R, — I crave the indulgence
    of your widely read columns just
    to extend my admiration to Mrs.

    B. Smith, widow of ‘the late
    Mr. Howard Smith for the dona-
    tion of £10,000 to the © Chil-
    dren’s Ward at the St. Philip’s
    Almshouse according to a report







    T had seen in your. columns
    recently.

    If there were more public
    spirited persons in this com-}
    munity who would endeavour to
    act and act wisely too, instead
    of offering so much talk, cheap|
    fibre anc gh sounding promises, |
    I an Barbados would be z
    litle paradise to live in i

    L. B. CLARKE,

    THURSDAY, AUGUST 21, 1952 -



    CANASTA PLAYING CARDS

    DEVELOP MENT OF NEW | (Complete with Instructions)
    RICE-LANDS: A TOP PRIORITY Cie Oe
    PROJECT | es Tontdaske

    LONDON.

    NO single commodity is more important
    than rice, writes Mr. Bernard Brain, Con-
    servative M.P., in the current issue of ‘Tory
    Challenge.’

    “Clearly we must produce more rice. But
    how is this to be done?”

    Mr. Brain then goes on to suggest that rice
    growing products should be pushed ahead
    in the Commonwealth. j

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    “Our duty then is plain,” he states. “We in Sizes 3’ and
    must develop new sources of rice within the 3” 6",
    Colonial Empire, preferably in areas remote . . :
    from the world’s trouble spots and do so C. S. PI TCHER & co.
    with the utmost speed. { Ph, 4472

    “Something on these lines is already being
    done — but we are in danger of it being
    too little and too late. For although rice is
    grown in many colonies,and production is
    inereasing steadily, the total is still only a
    fraction of one per cent, of the world’s output.

    “Yet there is enormous scope for expan-
    sion. For Tanganyika — where there are
    extensive areas of suitable land — a number
    of pilot schemes devoted to partially mechan-
    ized and fully mechanized production are
    giving encouraging results. The yield is sat-
    isfactory. But progress has been slow, pos-
    sibly because in that part of the world mem-
    cries of the indecent haste and foolish
    optimism of the groundnut fiasco are still
    fresh, and also — let it be frankly admitted
    ~— there are still a good many questions un-
    answered.

    “Thus, the Colonial Development Corpora-
    tion’s scheme for mechanized cultivation of
    rice under swamp conditions in neighbour-
    ing Nyasaland has shown that mechanization
    there is less economical than traditional
    peasant cultivation.

    “This year should see more rice grown
    in Northern Rhodesia, Zanzibar, Nigeria,
    Sierra Leone, Jamaica and Trinidad. But
    of all the Colonial territories British Guiana
    offers the best prospects.

    “At the moment she produces only 65,000
    tons a year, of which 25,000 tons are exported
    to nearby Caribbean territories. But succes-
    sive expert investigations have confirmed
    that, providing extensive schemes of water
    control are undertaken in the flat wasted
    belt, production could be increased five-fold
    in a relatively few years.

    “If this could be achieved a substantiai
    contribution would be made to Common-
    wealth rice supplies, If it is to be achieved
    the British Guiana Government must. bé
    ‘given help now.

    “Of course, there are difficulties and they
    must be faced. Rice can be grown in a wide
    variety of climates and conditions — it is
    not exclusively a product of the tropics —
    but it is a sensitive crop, and what favours
    it in one part of the world may not suit else
    where.

    “That is why mechanization is not a uni-
    versal answer. In the United States ané
    Australia where it is used to prepare th
    fields, sow the seed, and harvest the crop
    it has been an outstanding success.

    “But not so in the tropics, where soil ccn-
    ditions are different, where rice cultivatior
    from time immemorial has been bound ur
    with a complex of social and economic
    factors. Here there is a case for partia.
    mechanization, for finding the right balance
    between machines and the men they serve

    “But whatever the problems one thing i:
    crystal clear. From now on, research or ex
    periment, extension of successful ric
    schemes, the opening-up of new rice-lands
    should be a top priority throughout th:
    Colonial Empire.

    “For it will be of little avail to make thc
    world safe from aggression if we fail to mak
    it safe from hunger.”

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    _—_

    A MILLIONAIRE TAKES STOCK
    AFTER HIS PARTY

    By SAM WHITE

    PARIS.
    HEAVY-WEIGHT contenders for Parisia:

    party honours have just taken a drubbin;
    from a sparrow of a man: Chilean millio:
    aire, Arturo Lopez-Willshaw.

    _ Lopez-Willshaw—an inch over 5ft., takin;
    size fives in shoes—spent more than £ 25,00.
    on what he called “a surprise party give:
    by my wife for my 51st birthday.”

    For a surprise party it must have inter
    fered with three weeks of siestas as work
    men directed by France’s top interior decor
    ator, M. Jacques Frank, built a ballroom fo
    500 people, laid down flowerbeds, made ;
    second dance floor and staircase. Down thi:
    guests walked to be presented to their host.

    Was this a Chilean challenge to Argen

    VEGETABLES

    FIRST QUALITY MEATS



    ; Foozon Haddock ‘Turkeys
    tina’s Carlos (“Party of the Century”) Smoked Kippers Ducks . ;
    Beistegui, with his Venice ball of last year’ oe oe

    “Please do not say that,” pleads Mr. Lopez Hurttaes Fillet
    Willshaw. “Carlos and I are old frisads, } Mackerel Kidneys
    should hate him to think that I am tryine Pjichards Sweet Breads
    to outshine him. His party was unique.” Lobster Hams

    Another worry: “Please do not write to: Lobster Paste Bacon’
    much about my ball. It is that kind of thing a RRS ROME 2 Corned, Beet: ty tine
    which makes Communists.” ENJOY THE FINEST —



    Mr. Lopez-Willshaw, who looks like : Gold Braid Rum FRESH VEGETABLES



    beautifully tailored kewpie with his greyine 2 y=, Old ‘
    hair carefully brushed back into a long wave $1.44 per Bottle ak ey en tb
    derives his second generation fortune fror BREAD Beef Suet 36c. per Ib
    Chilean nitrates and a rare type of Chilean J. & R Sandwich N. Zealand Cheese
    manure, Bread — Frésh 73c. per Ib

    The spender j Daily 3 Pkgs. Cheese 44c.



    He is married to his cousin Patricia, a}}
    petite and exquisite figure. They have ni
    children and live in a monastic-like house!
    in the Paris suburb of Neuilly.—L.E.S, |!

    GODDARDS

    FOR SERVICE.








    THURSDAY, AUGUST, 21,
    Sa ae

    Cuke Addresses C.C. On Fiseal Survey

    Better

    1952

    BARBADOS



    Trade

    Conditions Wanted

    HON’BLE H. A. CUKE, addressing members of the

    Chamber of Commerce at the Quarter]
    y Genera!
    yesterday afternoon, advised them not to accept

    meeting
    the in-

    evitability of the st, but to pre
    favourable ciadinenas in the ‘ieee ie ey iaeus
    __ He said that the Chamber of Commerce in associxtion
    with other Chambers of Commerce of the B.W.I. was the
    only agency which could achieve any results in that direc-
    tion, He warned them not to depend on political represent-
    ations on that question as the majority of present-day
    politicians, however sincere they might be, did not have the
    knowledge to deal with that aspect of the matter.

    Hon’ble Mr. Cuke was speak-
    ing on the “Eic-al Survey” by
    Professor C. G. Beasley, Economic
    Adviser to the Comptroller for
    Development and Welfare.

    Among those present at the
    meeting were the Hon'ble the
    Colonial Secretary, Mr, C. C.
    Skeete, Director of Agriculture,
    Mr. D. A. Percival, Assistant Eco-
    nomic Adviser to the Comptroller
    for Development and Welfare, Mr.
    G, H. King, President of the
    Chamber, Mr, D. A. Lucie-Smith
    and Mr, S. H. Kinch, Vice-Presi-
    dents, Mr. J. H. Wilkinson, Mr.
    F. C. Goddard, M.C.P., Mr. E.
    D. Mottley, M.C.P., Mr. F. A,
    Bishop, Controller of Supplies,

    At the conclusion of the talk,
    Mr. G. H. King, President of the
    Chamber, expressed thanks to Mr,
    Cuke on behalf of members of the
    Chamber for a very interesting

    talk.
    Addressing the Chamber Mr.
    Cuke said:

    Mr, President,

    In accepting the invitation to
    address this Chamber on the sub-
    ject of the fiscal survey of Bar-
    bados which has been presented
    to the Island by Professor Beas-
    ley, I realize that I have under-
    t a rather difficult task. The
    survey is very comprehensive and
    covers some 107 pages of printed
    matter with a vast array of sta-
    tisties which require a great deal
    of study, and which could not be
    adequately dealt with in one ad-
    dress. I shall not enter into a dis-
    cussion of all the various details
    eovered by the survey but shall
    deal only with the principal con-
    ciusions at which Professor Beas-
    ley has arrived and my observa-
    tions thereon,

    The first general observation
    which the Professor has made is
    that the Island cannot be re-

    hae ag. an. under-developed
    sland. With the exception of Oil,
    which or may not be found

    in commercial quantities, the land
    resources are fully developed and
    have been so for many decades.
    The productivity.of the land has
    been raised to a very high stand-
    ard, and it is doubtful whether
    eny very great improvement, ex-
    cept by irrigation, can be made on
    the present output. The crop year
    1951 reached a peak of 187,000
    tons sugar, but what has perhaps
    been overlooked. is that due to
    three good years of raihfall the
    percentage of acres reaped in the
    black soil area of the Island has
    increased from about 58% to 68%
    of the total arable acres. The first
    drought year that occurs means
    two low succeeding crops, since
    replanting will be heavier. Pro-
    fessor Beasley’s warning about
    the shortness of the public mem-
    ory is therefore timely.
    Second Observation
    The second general observation
    which has been made is_ that
    while. the Island cannot be re-
    arded as an _ under-developed
    sland, it nevertheless is a de-
    endant territory, This fact has
    well recognised by the
    thoughtful people in the commun-
    ity for a very long time, and is
    responsible for the cautious ap-
    proach to any financial commit-
    ments which have been advocated
    by the less thoughtful. It was sole-
    ly due to the realization of this
    fact of dependency that the Bar-
    bados Sugar Producers’ Associa-
    tion joined with the other sugar
    producing Islands of the B.W.I.
    in pressing for the long term

    sugar agreement with the Minis-
    try of Food,
    The sugar producers, whose

    awareness of the serious conse-
    quences which can arise from

    th prices in one period fol-
    lowed by depressed prices in a
    succeeding period, fought vali-
    antly for this agreement which
    was concluded last year. Under
    the terms of this agreement
    they have sacrificed existing
    high world market prices in re-
    turn for a guaranteed price in
    future years.

    As the financial adviser of
    that Association and who was
    honoured by them in being se-
    lected to take part in those long
    drawn out negotiations which
    necessitated four visits to the
    United I should like
    pu to k the members
    of the Chamber of Commerce
    for the strong moral and active
    support which was accorded us
    during those anxious days.
    Your sympathy and understand-
    ing of the issues involved were
    a great source of help and gave
    us confidence to pursue the
    negotia*ions. 3



    So handy in the Home!!

    So delightful at the table!!

    STEWED GUAVAS—Onhlly 0.000000 oo.

    GUAVA JELLY .......... hace

    PRP REIS nse scsdncisis pcictccsecrsesiene
    PEPPER SAUCE .............

    SALTED PEANUTS

    i a ae





    HON. H. A. CUKE

    This agreement however cov-
    ers only 70% of our output,
    there still remains 30% which
    has to_be sola on the world
    price, With the huge production
    which Cuba has achieved, the
    outlook is not very promising,
    so that although the agreement
    will be of great value there is
    no room for complacency.

    Dependenc

    In connection with this question
    of dependency, Professor Beasley
    has also drawn attention to our
    difficult position’ in regard to the
    terms of trade.

    He writes:—"A small country is a
    small scale supplier in a large
    scale market, and a small scale
    buyer of large scale products.
    It is seldom in a position to im-
    pose terms on its partners in
    trade, and is therefore depend-
    ent on them and is obliged,
    whether it wishes to do so or
    not to follow policies which will
    enable it to compete with rivals
    all over“the world.”

    This statement very pointedly
    illustrates the difficulties with
    which we have had to contend in
    past years, In the pre-war years
    we were compelled by force of
    circumstances to purchase our re-
    quirements, in competition it is
    true from three main markets,
    ie. United Kingdom, U.S.A., and
    Canada, all countries with a high
    standard of living whose products
    were therefore high costing, and
    sell our sugar at dumped prices,
    thus providing a low standard of
    living for the workers in this Col-
    ony. The long term sugar agree-

    ment will partly overcome one
    part of this difficulty.
    Competition
    The hard currency issue with

    its cumbersome and unnecessary
    controls and the bungling which
    accompanies artificial controls re-
    moves the element of competition
    which formerly existed; as a re-
    sult we are purchasing our re-
    quirements at the present time at
    exorbitant prices; but in the same
    way the Sugar Producers have
    been able to achieve some relief
    from the low price technique of
    former years, it is up to the
    Chamber of Commerce to move in
    the matter of high costing imports.
    the British people can be very
    stubborn, but in fairness to them
    it can be said that they have an
    inherent desire to be just and if
    you can convince them, and I am
    sure you can, that they cannot
    expect to purchase colonial pro-
    ducts at reasonable prices, which
    is the basis of the long term agree-
    ment, unless they in turn sell us
    their products at reasonable, as
    against exorbitant prices, their
    natural reaction will be to meet
    your just demands, They can
    drive a hard bargain, it is true,
    but which of us don’t? Neverthe-
    less, my advice is do not accept
    the inevitability of the past, but
    press forward for more favourable
    conditions in the terms of trade.
    Politics

    Your Chamber in association
    with the other Chambers of Com-
    merce of the B.W.I. is the only
    agency which can achieve any re-
    sults in this direction. Do not de-
    pend on political representations
    on this question. The majority of
    the present day politicians, how-
    ever sincere they may be, have
    not the knowledge to deal with
    this t of the matter. While
    they appear to be distressed at
    the high cost of living, their out-
    look reaches only to the mark-
    ups of the local ictailers.

    The real cause of the high cost

    of living which is brought about
    by being forced by cumbersome
    controls to purchase our require-
    ments in the dearest market has
    not yet been reaiized by them.
    You will appreciate the fact that
    it is no use obtaining satisfactory
    prices for your exports if at the
    same time you huve to pay un-
    satisfactory prices for your im-
    ports. You need rot be worried
    about derogatory remarks thai
    you are looking after your own
    interest. Your interest is the public
    interest.

    it is the duty of importing
    firms to purchase the Island’s
    requirements on the most favour-
    able terms, and any obsiruction
    to this end must be attacked ani
    attacked vigorously. There ave
    far too many shackles piaced on
    the business men cf the Colony
    and you must agitate tor their
    removal. You have the know-
    -edge, the technique and the
    butiness experience to purchas?
    in competition with each other
    the consumer goods required by
    +he community, and you should
    be allowed to dc¢ your business
    wiihout undue interference from
    officials. f

    Third Observation

    The third general observation
    of Professor Beasley around which
    most of our difficulty of the future
    will centre is the rise in the pop-
    ulation which he estimates at
    18% per annum. Thus each
    year there are just under 4,000
    more people to be provided for
    out of our present resources,
    This question of the growth of
    population is the biggest issue we
    have to face in the future.

    Professor Beasley very wisely
    points out that with the growth
    of population Government ex-
    penditure must inevitably in-
    crease, even although all services
    are held at the present levei,
    Government and Parochial ®x-
    penditure hes already exceeded
    21% of the national income which
    clearly indicates that the limit of
    taxation has been reached. The
    cnly possible answer therefore to
    our problem is increased prodiuc-
    tivity.

    An analysis of the Budget
    1952—53 will indicate that with
    ithe exception of the item of sub-
    sidization of which he entirely
    disapproves, there is not a single
    item of Government expenditure
    which can in the future years be
    removed from the Budget, and
    as the population increases this
    expenditure even on_ existing
    standards must inevitably rise.
    Take the item of Education which
    now consumes 20,6% of the Bud-
    get expenditure, can any one ex-
    pect that if each year there are
    more children reaching school age
    the expenditure on this head can
    be held at the existing level? Or
    again, take the item medical, re-
    presenting 12.9% of the Budget,
    how can this expenditure be held
    at existing levels even though
    there is no improvement in the
    standard at present provided? Or
    yet again take the third item on
    the Budget, “Law and Order and
    the Administration of Justice”,
    with an increase in the population
    how can this expenditure be held
    down? These three items comprise
    45% of the expenditure of Gov-
    ernment, all of which must in-
    crease as the population rises.

    If therefore there will be an in-
    evitable increase in certain Gov-
    ernment expenditure, if the limit
    of taxation has been reached, it is
    obvious that the standards of liv-
    ing must fall unless the national
    income can be increased.

    Gov't Expenditure

    It is true that during the past
    ten years Government expenditure
    has not received that cureful scru-
    tiny which it had formerly been
    subjected to, as a consequence
    there has been a certain amount
    of extravagant expenditure which
    could have been avoided, but on
    the whole, however much more
    eare is devoted to public ex-
    penditure, in the future, it is the
    need to increase the national
    wealth which should be the key-
    note of the future. This can only
    be done by paying more attention
    to the Tourist Industry and by the
    creation of new industries and by
    reducing the cost of our imports.

    With regard to the first there is
    little or no likelihood of any new
    modern hotels being built in this
    island, The opportunity which
    offered somé years ago to have a
    new 60 room modern hotel was
    defeated by the short sightedness
    of those to whom the long term
    interest of the island was a sec-
    ondary consideration. While there-
    fore we cannot expect any new
    hotels to be built there can be re-
    constructions, improvements and
    extensions to existing ones which
    will to some extent meet the needs
    of the industry. There is to my
    mind great possibilities in increas-
    ing our tourist industry if. the
    right approach to the problem is
    made.

    New Industries

    With regard to the question of
    new industries I agree with Prof.
    Arthur Lewis that much can be
    done in this direction. I do not
    believe that this island or indeed
    the West Indies can ever become
    highly industrialized areas, but
    certainly many new _ industrie:

    ean be established if the right at-
    mosphere is created and herein

    can afford it but whether we can
    afford not to have it. I know that

    ADVOCATE

    Holidays With |
    Pay Records
    Are Important |



    lies our greatest source of weak- many of my colleagues do not D. A. Laucie~Smith’ at the}
    ness. The atmosphere in this share my views but nevertheless ely Ge sl Mecting of the
    island at the present time is am in agreement with Prof, © arn ro mmerce yesterday
    against the creation of new in- Beasley on this point, drew to the antion of mem-!

    dustries.

    Thoughtless and_ irresponsible
    talk of “soaking the rich” and
    “nationalization” has created an:

    The million dollars a

    would be well devoted to this ex-
    penditure. After all, a great deai the



    year we bers,

    subsidization proper records
    } i

    lioltiday

    sity

    i of keepin
    spending in in connection wit
    4 Pay as drafted by)
    Labour Department.









    is continuing to create an atmos- of the expenditure is on labour He pointed out that this wa
    phere which is preventing new costs which would be circulated in pecuired by law and te Se
    industries from being established. the island and we would have a a dispute over holidays by «
    Only a week ago we had an illus- valuable asset t» show for our ¢mployee, an emplove. chould|
    tration of an address being passed money. h ta Se wi eee, ee
    by the Hous: of Assembly to na- Irrigation Ree tee ee ee *
    tionalize the Rediffusion Service, BODES oreroanas, Neri, Svenane

    that this address was passed late
    at night with only 7 members out
    of 24 voting for it, may not be
    known to the outside world, The
    bald statement goes forward to
    the world at large that the House
    of Assembly has passed an ad-
    dress to the Governor asking that

    ‘ ; f sugar to Canada during the
    steps be taken tu nationalize the °..* 5 5 ; . ry j |
    sei : . years 1950—52 and the proposal yf) ' > m \
    Rediffusion Service. has been made that 4 of this — a Prepare Meals |

    I have reason to believe that
    one of the large factories which
    has been erected in a neighbour-

    : b roduction due to droughts Severt pac M 5

    ing island and which will be giv- Guan: nae seriously affect “the domes “ maa at eee 4
    ing reek to & Seen whole island, it is the Black Soil the Women’s Auxiliary of the|
    num ie of people could have been grea which is mostly affected If Caribbean Union of Teacher
    pigeon S Saag gek for the atmosphere irrigation can bridge the gep be- this week, bemoaned the absence:
    © which I have referred. One of tween high rainfall and low rain- of a centre where children could

    the Directors of this concern in-
    formed me that the climatic con-
    ditions, and water supply of this
    island were of the best, and that
    he was impressed by the high
    standard of the workers, but thar
    we were reluctant to grant pioneer
    concessions and he did not like the

    With regard to irrigation there
    is no absolute knowledge that irri-
    gation can bring up the average
    of the Black Soil Estates which
    represent 60°

    the refund ef the profit made by
    the Ministry of Food on shipments

    amount should be devoted to ex-
    periment on this subject, The fell

    fall years and thus raise the aver-
    age production of the area a con-
    siderable increase in national in-
    come can be achieved. The sur-
    vey clearly indicates the need to
    push ahead with productivity in
    one form or another and this is

    sure to call on him in connection
    with the matter.

    Children Should
    Be Taught How



    of the land area.

    have a windfell in

    ts N

    (Yrom Gur Own Correspondent)
    PORT-OF-SPAIN, Aug. 15.

    be taught to peepare meals ¢s
    fiat it would be of benefit to them
    in their homes. |
    Other teachers emphasised thi
    domestic science, as a subject i
    the curriculum, should take int
    consideration the question ©



    “ the whole theme of the report. ailowing sufficient time ta teach
    ee that was why they Unless this fact is realized by the jt, as a great deal of time wa
    went eisewhere. Community, ‘ and A eerie being wasted to get the meal

    oa: . parties work towards a realization prepared for children and no
    nen aisttude of this the report: will just be an- enough time left to teach how
    part e political i vd ; : m
    aisntanhare there ts) labled i other document on record. they were prepared,
    reas ere ts sacking im ~My advice to the Members of The conference of the Carib

    this island a full realization by
    the general public of the need
    to assist new industries. We are
    too prone to be critical of pro-
    ducts produced in the West In-
    dies and to extol the merits of
    items imported from far afield,
    little realizing that by so do
    we are creating conditi
    which can prevent new ventures
    from being established here or
    in the West Indies,

    This question of creating em-
    ployment is our major concern
    in the future. It cannot be
    accomplished by any one agency
    alone. The commercial com-
    munity must be prepared to ex-
    hibit personal initiative and
    take risks, the officials of the
    Government must endeavour to
    be helpful ang not obstructive
    in their dealings with business
    people, the trade Union while
    endeavouring to obtain fair

    the Chamber of Commerce and to
    the community at large is this, do
    not pay too much attention to the
    many details but catch the theme
    of the report which is production
    and yet more production,

    . '
    Former T’dad And
    ’ e
    Tobago Director
    * . .

    Of Education Dies
    (From Our Own Correspondent)
    PORT-OF-SPAIN, August 15._
    News reached the Colony this
    week of the death of Capt. J. O.
    Cutteridge,
    Education of Trinidad and Tobago,
    He died at his home at the Isie
    of Man early this month where during your stay.”
    he had been living in retirement,

    al the age of 65,

    bean Union of Teachers, opener
    here last Saturday, has not bee
    attended by the Hon. Roy Joseph
    Minister of Education and Social
    Services or by any member ©: |
    his ministry or of the Eduecatio |

    |



    Department.

    In a letter to Mr. H, S, Jackson
    of British Guiana, president ¢
    the Union, Mr. Joseph said in
    part: “I regret that circumstance
    over which I have no control pre
    vent prominent persons of th
    Ministry and the Department o
    Education from taking part il
    the conference held in honour o!
    your visit,

    “But IT would like to assure you
    that the Department of Education
    and my own Ministry would be
    only too glad to render an)
    assistance that you may require

    former Director of



    wages and reasonable condi- on ‘ % .

    tioae of employment must be Capt. Cutteridge was well 25 Gain Shorthand
    prepared to insist that the work- known in Barbados where he re- ed

    ers give a good day’s work, and sided for some time after re- Certificates

    the politician must develop a tiring from the post of Directo: |
    greater sense of responsibility of Education of this Colony in Nineteen candidates gained ||

    in his public utterances. If all
    sections play their part I am
    confident that the future can be
    faced with some confidence. On

    In my view the two biggest

    1942. He was the Colony’s Educu-
    tion Chief eight years,

    Capt. i
    perhaps be best remembered tor
    the contrary unless a change in jis
    the atmosphere takes place the jexthooks—‘West
    future is indeed a gloomy. ene. \e;s," textbooks on geography and
    arithmetic—which are ip use in

    Shorthand Theory Certificates
    and six, Speed Certificates, from |’
    the Pitman’s Institute in the
    examination held on April 5,
    Following are the results :
    Speed—90 words a minute
    Lorna Jackman, 70 words a minut)
    Richard Reid, 60, Barbara Harris

    Cutteridge, who will
    Indian

    preparation of West
    Read-

    Indian







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    KNIGHTS DRUG STORES.

    7
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    issues with which we are faced at jinary ¢ inte diat® schools aan

    ime i primary and intermediate sc * and 50 Rudolph Warner, Keiti
    Soe eee eee be ee eee < find j, this Colony, first came Ww Harding and ‘Keith Archer, thi %
    employment | for the increasing ‘Trinidad in 1921 to be the first 1. ttor three being pupils of Com-|%
    population and to purchase our Principal of the Government joer ee tol %
    imports on more satisfactory ;. i sare later bermere School. a

    ile all i ¢ Training College. Two years late Theory :-— (Girl#” Industri: THE

    terms. And while all sections o ge ‘omoted to the post of l ine t i
    the community must play their he Was prom ated p Union) Carmen Deane, Joye:
    part in a solution of these prob- Senior Inspector of Schools and ying Bdna Hinds, Audrey Cox |¢
    lems it is the members of this had to wait five years before Norma Franklyn; (Comberme
    Chamber which must take the getting the appointment of As Centre) Dolores Rouse, Pe
    lead, ‘The politicians and the offi. tant Director of Education and +1 Marjorie Franklyn, Viim
    cials can help or hinder the crea- Senior Inspector of Schcols, He Kennedy, Pearl Grant, ‘heim:
    tion of new industries and new was awarded the M.B.E, for his Archer, Joyce Nicholls, Courtn
    sources of employment but neith- \ervices to the Colony in the Meld Harris, ‘Irma Skeete, Thovs
    er can initiate measures to this of education, Moore: (Others) Doreen Thera,

    effect, that is your function.
    Conclusion

    The conclusions that I
    drawn from Prof. Beasley’s sur-
    vey are:—

    1, That Government so far as
    the Current Budget is con-
    cerned cannot undertake
    any extensions of the ser-
    vices to which we are al-
    ready committed,

    2. That through tne growth of
    population an increase in
    the cost of existing services
    must be faced.

    3. That every care should be
    taken to examine thit ex-
    penditure for economies
    where necessary.

    4. That any new financial

    commitments of Govern-
    ment should be directed to-
    wards the increase in pro-
    ductivity as against the
    expansion of existing ser-
    vices.
    That new sources of na-
    tional ‘wealth must be cre-
    ated to meet the growth of
    population. This can only
    be achieved by creating
    new industries and by an
    expansion of the tourist,
    industry,

    With regard to the Capital pro-
    gramme as outlined in paragraphs
    51—58 of part II there are two
    items on which some differences
    of opinion may exist, these are
    the “Provision of a Deep Wate?!
    Harhour,” and “Irrigation to
    maintain higher average

    oa

    er I have always held the opinion
    that it is an essential item in our
    future planning. I realize that the
    high cost is rather alarming but
    the question is not whether we

    _









    +



    48c 2 bottle
    ; asliy siesta see 44c. a bottle
    Latte 72¢., 60c. & 48c. per bottle
    vue o0c, per bottle
    paastteloncsia 40c. & 20c. per bottle
    84e. per bottle
    44c. per bottle

    nave XM C A Meet Today

    Hon.

    Secretary, will preside over the
    Seventy-Second Annual General
    Meeting of the Y.M.C.A. which
    will be held at the Y.M.C.A. at
    5.00 pan. today.
    The Annual Revort and Finan-
    cial Statement will be presented
    by the President and an Auditor
    ill we appointed,

    Pe ea



    son, Eulalie Burke, Evena Alleyne
    and Delana Morris,



    “MONEKA” ARRIVES

    The motor vessel Moneka, 100
    tons, arrived in Carlisle Bay yes-
    terday afternoon from Dominica
    with 19 bags of copra, 16 cark
    of fresh fruit and a carton oi
    machines.

    This vessel is consigned to th:
    Schooner Owners’ Association,

    R. N. Turner, Colonia!

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    NEW ZEALAND APPLES —perib. ...
    DRIED FRUIT SALAD—per 4} Ib.
    PITTED DATES—per 1 Ib. pkt. ...........
    DANISH CAMEMBERT CHEESE.—per tin ....
    ITALIAN ANCHOVEY FILLETS IN




















    OLIVE OL
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    ITALIAN CHILI SAUCE—pér bottle
    ICING SUGAR—per pkt.
    CHIVERS RHUBARB—per tin
    GROUND ALMONDS—per Ib. .....
    SALISBURY CORNED BEEF—per tin
    HOT SAUCE—per bottle ...,

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    DUTCH CELERY HEARTS—per tin ...
    DUTCH CUT CELERY—per tin
    LION GROUND WHITE PEPPER—per tin .
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    nA
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    SRRRSERRERREBeHe kekee
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    - Z
    PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE


















    an isis igs THURSDAY, AUGUST 21, 1952
    CLASSIFIED ADS. | {| Clerk Will Be |l4 TOUCH WITH BARBADGS GDASTAL STATION

    SOSS

    Sea And Air




















































































































































    rt e communicate | Samana, s.s. Urania, « Mataufa, s.s
    TELEPHONE 2508 Cross-Examined hips through their | Hermion, s.s. Colombie, s.s. Kern Hills,
    . T ffi Parba a rcs Alcoa Pennant, s.s. S ae ey 5.8
    repens a, | Corona, s.s. Ariadne, s.s. Tankland, s.8
    Form Page 3 S.s terprise FP. and 1. | Rosario; s.s. Spurt; s.s. Monteurouiola;
    a DD | 8=6FOR SALE eater Squire® was in charge of D. V.| Sx fan, +s, Tain: |5.8 Meee Cormeen U2. eee oe |
    CARTEE—Qn Nusuxt 20, Charles Christo- poo ibd one ae one magi s. Sallust, s.s | ¥.s. Southern ‘Counties. ss. Aleoa Part-
    r Mage. S itinemenear geocesneaentnine testes eR 4 . ginning to work a e vi Sanlorenzo, }ner, s.s. Lady Nelson, s.s. Sunwalt,
    Wilkinwoh '& ‘Maynes; Rest Manure met in Carlisle Bay ~ he had instituted a means where-}\ ’ ven) ah. Ae lms. Pema. 9-8, Slovene oe halve een ar
    Weeki? Wunnetal sin ieawe ti ove AUTOMOTIVE pach, May Olive. Sch Emeline, Sch-| hy a check could be made on the s+. * “Gueenston 08. eet. Sere aay. 8.4 5 We the undermentioned Grocers beg to draw to the
    : Pee de a ey ee Bi i DB, Wallace: Sch. ‘Philip it Davidess,|Tum, in the vats. This was aj- : attention of our Customers that, owing to the in-
    ; De eRe vite), Chailes Carter| CAR — 1961 Austin Aad, Milenge|s;%,,2”crsene: Sch. Rosarene,» Sch. | system in which returns had to be } creased:—
    j 7 DOrtac, Sch. Lucien M Smith, M.V E. 2
    (son) Allgyne, Ermine Barker | 17,000. In good condition. Qwner leav- | faqs, > made to the Officer in charge of | i ;
    ‘ tar, Sch, Eunicia, Sch. hi a : H ds
    Winifred. Taylor, Pauline Watson ani [ing Island. Price $1,700. | Bing W.|s.s Athelbrook; Sch” United Pligum’|the Excise Department. He used | Ki (1) ‘High coat of Goods,
    Bostic and Gre os Sag gage bp meee Sees ARNIVALS SS |to get monthly returns from the!
    a srandehildren — * u a —_—~----- . Sat ;
    21,8,52—in ocAF _ are 10. Good pocoeiine : trem: SRAM Redo lake Oaciow accused for D. V. Scott. | KONIRGAL, AUSTRALIT, NEW | 46660004. 2996690060000 (2) Continually rising operating expenses,
    ee wner secure igger car one 2467. o : r : 1 ZEALAND TL’ LIMITED, + %
    TOR Hee “rr or 4682. 21.8 3—Sn: i a DEPARTURES SS Soe dts eet the, Woo ‘On. x a ake : i< Th M/V “CARIBBEE” will x } ‘ rill lo b ble t xtend credit over thirty
    aan tater Beden Ford in good order’ Price | Montteal.” 88. Athelbrook for" Prnidad| vat No, $490, Net and; 35 ~chovcnemn 1s seneaule vol} sett, Canes, ne Femcager ir ‘ Fae) dag sink eeooanhs will be payable when rendered.
    7 tater § rder ©} with molasses. vat No. : sil from Port Pirie May 3iet, Devonport} 5) Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat,
    — OO “Sd reasonable. Apply: N. L. Seale & Co.! 94 rer a . Bari PP . ve fe bh a . a i ™
    HO SES ta 18 saan. i M.V Caribbee “with cargo for St Handwriting Identified a cae ms oe ape . Sydney | € Nevis and St. Kitts, Sailing Wed- $
    <= oo He identified the hand g | Uarheder 'obout Auguel #2 a ee : wi h t 1 to take this step, but
    ee er one f writing | Garbsder about A e very much regre raving to take is step,
    BUNGALOW —On Sea, Main Road Hast | CAR—One Ford “Zepher, as good as . The M/V “MONEKA” will accept > |
    ings, very comfortably furnished, Eny-|"°W,,, done 2,000 miles. Phone 4435, | Seaweli in certain exhibits to be that of In «dition to general cargo tls veasel |} Cori and Passengers “or Dom- %| after several months careful consideration, we find
    lush bath: — 2 bedrooms — Servants EDMAN & TAYLOR'S GARAGE LTD. | the accused. See See eee ee inica, Antigua, Montserrat, Nevis h h h d will have t nforce same
    rooms —~ Verapaahe — From September 20,8.52——3n ARRIVALS — BY BW ILA Checking from the rum which Tian” conde cn ‘throush Pitty of {2nd St: Kitts,’ Saiting riday 22nd >) pee Re hig fay * oh = roe will have to €
    2949 a—t.f. i a in | .
    Sages Fe ari hala lie : pep ee () 1946 Mercury eer Ford,| From Trimidad: had _ vee nn = bond, it Lading for transhipmen: at Trinidad to . a} 9° 5 ¢ ets
    CHANDOS, 2nd Avenue, Belleville, | “"cchanieally sound. “Yon B.A-Simp| M. Davia, D, ware, 2. ward, t, | Was discovered. that there were} drttish Guiana, Leeward and Windward B.W.I. SCHOONER OWNERS yo
    Fully furnished. Available 1st Septem* . ‘ottage, St Robertson; KE, Foncette; R. Foncette, W.) 102 casks short. islands. ASSOCIATION (INC.) % J. N. Goddard & Sons Ltd
    ber. Phone 9926 or 2450 19.8.52—2n 2 ae Santitced,, M. Baveek- 2.) mettaeh 2 He had been shown a letier the| For further particulars apply-— A La 2 .
    — a. erbert; . u
    aE” weanancen sai Sauaee: “CARS—One A-40 “Somerset” owner ) 3 ‘+ M.|accused had written Jones (a|rURNESS WITHY & ©0., UTD Consignee Tele. No. 4047
    > MONARCS” -— Prosmert, St. James herbert, A. Herbert, L. Hutchinson, M. “ . ne ie . * at
    Fe Saikabinecn roses ; ame driven see only 1330 miles — like| Josepn; E. Johnson; L. Mestier:. §. | Witness), making a statement of TKINIDAD. Stansfeld Scott & Co., Lid.,
    2 20.8.02—2n. , “°° .00, One 1951 A-40 — 3,300 | ‘Taylor, C. Taylor, L. Marshall. being in a bad situation with! owe :
    are re niles — condition Darkest $2,400 00. se DE Te ee WA affairs at the bond DA COSTA & CO. LTD, LLL OES
    RECAMB! ° irable residence Singer Ss . .
    “Mordiabe® Werteitk nest te fene’ | condition excellent $2,500.00 so 8.so—6n, | PY, Tented: When the case continues today, ! D. Vv. Scott & Co., Ltd.
    Theatre, 4 Bedrooms Toilet .nd Bat! 9.8. nh. Augusta Herrada, Nicholas WHerrada, Mr. Thorpe will be cross-examined ‘ 2
    } upetutrs.-"Dewnetalrs: Drawing room | auguste Herrada, John Simpson, Eileen Fe : O.
    | Diets Room,Hall, 2 extra rooms, Bat! ELECTRICAL | "Belen: een Hutson; | Ceetita eg ¥ ‘agg AAD . Alleyne, Arthur & Co., Ltd.
    : and Toilet,slarge garage, servants’ roon > “ook; Dorothy Yearwood; Russell Ireland,
    | Fe ea deere.) —_BLBCTRICAL, __| sasig tiger amore fomgce| U.N. Cam Stage | ES g.
    eaire. 21,8,52—Or AMERIC. 4c i dea ‘hillips; ‘ .
    hs : count “AN ELECTIUC DEEP FREEZE: ; Sweeney; Jean Sweeney; Maurice Habib; i an i In Korea { W. A. Medford & Co.
    MOON tna ae ‘ window | regurbed to States. Telephone 95-296. teen Redman. ; CANADIAN SERVICE
    opposite the t Clu pply on pren %1.8.52— ae are
    ines at No. 4 Flat, Cliston, Bay strce —- + RATES OF EXCHANGE @ From page 1. A shu vaROUND Johnson & Redman
    ye 20.9.52—2n| RE it — Mullard 9 tube double AUG. 20, 1952 three or four months fearing a omer Sails Sails Arrives
    are a Lelenaaey irae eek ee Teo NEW YORK Buying} possible Allied amphibious land-| pvp, Montreal Halifax Barbados
    “WANTED gg rE | 1 Vib Pr. Chedues on Ing. He saiq 42 known firingy ica “ranoni> ©. * Ruut ap Aut 20 gent’ saci seats
    PMR RY Rae individually, Foster Phone ; bane fs Sela ce 71 5/10% Pr. | weapons ; are c@ncentrated inj “Kim” Mente ‘August 29 Bept. 3 Bent, Bb
    21,8,52—8n. | Demand Drafts 71 3/10% Pr.| the ee Bay area of the east}"ARNPTA Be aes mi ah + ee a8; Pes. 1G “Sept = Perkins & Co., Ltd
    i dai appre eeaeicieneinn me amenities (198 1/3000. Sy, CHR Cece van slie > 5 ee " ;
    cK ledy Clerk for a Commis- MECHANICAL 71 G/10% Pr. commences pi .) Pe os He said “they are pretty well WUReReCUNe
    gion, OMe, ‘ath “w Senowiede” of "Short. Sésg BT Coupe Or B/W Pe. satiated that 2 x ae ert at A STEAMER . & +» Due, Barbados September 11th, for St. Stuart & Sampson Ltd.
    woik. Previous experience» required.) CANADA are ia ver Ports.
    Apply i pox xvzZ, Go Advoeate Adver.| , re err SEXYCLE Ge girl er AN 3/10% Pr. ooenaes on om sea oe oneresen ye it at
    sing Dept. Stating Qualificattons. Ap-| 9s cart for a el J, nkers i ey are tryin; - ‘ :
    plications treated birietly confidential.” Fields, Braeman, Cheapside. “Telephone . Demand Drafts 78 .35%Pr, te A built s =n ol Apply :—DA COSTA & CO, LTD.—CANADIAN SERVICE S. E: Cole & Co., Ltd.,
    17,8.52—sn | 2210. 19.8.53 Sight Drafts 78 2/10% Pr es up around possible .
    een oe prcable places where we can land to do
    Sides ielitiat hs eeetnases chan ere. ETT eta Lins eas « iatea
    s EXPERIENCED ACCOUNTANT te eines a a8 WOK Pe. Currency z ae, a them ‘more damage. ** NEW YORK SERVICE John D. Taylor & Sons Ltd.
    ‘esponsible for coun extensive cr tT ve i Bris “ 7
    firm. Salary $200 right man. Appa’ ty Vaid NEOUS Silver @ Pr. al bio weg ial stage Pras os: tree reaaen aie Pym August — arrives 20th August
    oe wre oes oa ean and CAR ACCESSORIE ‘s. Rubber Matting. TR MOUNCEMENTS ae ove ap ding = vent Ss. Vv sails Sep tember — arrives 17th September James A. Tudor & Co.
    aperience. -Box No. K.J. ¢/o Advocate| | uitery leads, Bulb: :
    Ge. 20,8.52-In | busters, "theese “cloth, Whisk ‘brooms; | CEME io “and. ra “id oe NEW ORLEANS SERVICE
    JUNIOR OVERSEER — For Spencer’: medations jueh,, tension wire, Bonnet | CAREERBe trained as a Newspaper ti : ‘in forein is moa <_| A STEAMER sails 17th July, — arrives 3nd August Mc Donald Sealy
    Plantation. Apply in person’ with Testl-) may need. May be ohtnised 4 your car|teporter or a Feature Writer. Get de-| Wons g a landing any-| 4 STEAMER, sails 3ist July '— arrives 16th August
    monigls to Manager 0,8.53—2n. | pea’ Garage (1960) Liaited Phe dean” | tills of echeme from Barbados Press Club where that we are required to! A STEAMER sails 14th August — arrives 30th August
    tence nonriag li hone 4049. _ | Headquarters No. 53 Swan Street. do it. We certainly have the cap-! A STEAMER sails 26th August — arrives 13th September i W. M. Forde
    POSITION roauired | a copeaemre OTT’ cHEC. 29; "- Jabilities to do it and certainly! A STEAMER sails lith September —arrives 27th September i$
    _ ; a
    Acetelyne Welding and Biectrical Appar- sates say eras ae ae ae know how.”—U.P. | h N. 8S. Sainsb:
    otek. A ee KIRPALANI TAKE NCTICE ROBERT THOM LTD.—NEW YORK & GULF SERVICE |: eb leat nice é
    on +B. 182, eet. 21.8.52—In ‘ j ‘
    ee . }
    ; INSTANTINA Jj Wants i
    MISCELLANEOUS - GRAIN IVE Poe Le Ue cad lant |. acs wenetne akonmoes nema apan Sugar 1 | 2° COCOOCOOCSOS0S9990 900909209 O9O9 PSDP OPOOOOOOOOO®
    }



    ‘ng beauty of your Floors, use JOHN-| NATYONAL INCORPORATED, a cor-
    SON'S WAX Products. Phone your|pcrstion organized and existing under |

    inet teirlitnainennlplliphlascelenhse tain ctenatincitibitorar
    LADIFS COAT-—Write ‘Coat’ size .
    tiardware Store TO-DAY and_ order! ie laws of the State of Delaware, United |

    340 c/o Advocate Advtg. Dept.
    1

    From Australia



    |

    <

    GSES PGOOOD $9 S959 ORT SOSSOD OO PVSI OTE GEE 4


































    , 8,52—t.f.n !QHINSON'S Paste or Liquid Waxes. | states of America, whose trade or busi- | |
    pineal reat - eae foot Co, Ltd., | ress eddress is 1450 Broadway, New TOKYO | :
    SITIO: NTE - ’ Sork, New York, U.S.A., Manufacturers, Japz missi j
    NUNSH DORIS VENNER a guslified 21,8,52—4n. | j;:5 applied for’ the registration of al; Sar, has ee we in to| CANADIAN SERVICE |
    fidwile, is willing to aseist anyone WOE Tolar cas bse cohomowa (tice mock in Part “A” of Register ir fe ae oe Qaeee i, Hs \
    1s in mecd of a nurse, Address; Chap- ene Y ought jour 4 SON'S spect of pharmaceuticals, ard will be| 1s learned in Lokyo. egotiations > Q i
    i:an's Lane, C/o Miso Gladys Bert, UPARS wading Tt ta uw meh eae entitled to regiser same after one month jare going on tn an ecient From Montreal, Halifax and St. John }
    16.2, §2-—t : c delay he renowned OHN-!i{yom the ist day of Augusi, 1952, 1 — ——
    oon SON'S Furniture Cream as well 5) Unless some person shall in the mean- | mission in Japan for sugar and! Expected Arrival
    2 BEL ES VOVITEs Paste eae Liquid Waxes are available at time give notice in duplicate to me at|iron ore in exchange for dollars | Montreal Haltiax St. John Dates |
    Cant L ‘A our Dealers 21,8.52—4n. | yey ge of seoreee of seh registra-| fost of Australia’s sugar is ex- SUNDIAL i. a > Bridgetown, Barbados
    ATT ee tiee Gann pierre net S xe trade mark can be seen on "Ss Be usgust 19 A 4 ae 9 '
    TOUSEWIVES—Dont slave on your|gpplication at. my office. ported to Britain at the equiv- ‘SUNWEHIT” |. 20 Aug. 4 Sept. ~ 16 Sementer |
    ‘lonrs in the old-fashioned way, bu Dated this 20th day of August, 1952. |alent of $96 a ton. Japan is offer- “BRUNO .. 1 Sept. 16 Sept. 18 Sept 30 September
    NOTICE Tin of JOHNSON’S Floor Cleaner H. WILLIAMS, ing to pay $120 a ton for 50,000
    PARISH OF ST, PTULIP ne how easily it gives you & Registrar of Trade Marks. ‘ U.K. SERVI
    Applications for the Post of Nurse at merm-free Floor. Obtainable at ai 21.8.52—an. ‘OnS a year, om. CE

    the St. Philip's A’mshouse will be r 14 Stores 21.8
    ceived by the unriersigned up to Satur-
    day sCth August 1452.

    Applicants must be qualified as a
    Nurse and Midwife, and must forward
    with their applications thelr Baptism







    “MACHINERY —One a rere From South Wales, Liverpool and Glasgow

    oa hg se GOVERNMENT NOTICE a ers
    tw run at 47 T.p.m,. developing about 4
    uv 14.H.P. at 100 Ibs. % Expected Arrival

    pressure. Two (2 South Dates Bridgetown,







    Certificates: a: ll ag their Certificat mall cold starting Diesel Engines, 10 Wales Liverpool Glasgow Barbados
    an lee | nd 18H. One (1) 22” x 46" & roller $.8. “STUGARD" ... ,.i5 Aug. 21 August 26 August 9 September
    ‘The #uéeoesful candidate will be re-) ‘Hi complete with CS, Gearing, steam S&S. “SEARREEZE” ..Early September. Mid Sept. Mid October
    guired to assume duties on the 25th Engine, and Hydraulic Preasure Regu Attention is drawn to the Control of Prices (Defence Amend- i eed
    September, 1952. ating Equipment. Apply: D. M. Simp
    ény further. particulars may be: ob on & Co. 20.8, 52--6n. ment) Order, 1952, No. 29 which will be p@blished in the Official U.K. AND CONTINENTAL SERVICE
    path fram the Parochial Treasurer's | Sr ypg—The tamous “Florence” Stove: | Gazette of Thursday, 21st August, 1952.
    Pp. §. W. SCOTT. n @ and 9 Burner Models are outalnabic 2. Under this Order the maximum wholesale and retail selling From Antwerp, Rotterdam and Londen
    io a re “ O., \c' ‘s . ‘ . ;
    Pee: 10 the Roged st Guaraients | gone 006, dor Street. | brices of “Butter—Table” and “Milk—Evaporated Other Brands” are peetee ae aerien
    pinot eecanenmammannintmettmtmassmnesmmaetineens tf Fonts a
    16.8.62—T™. | “Soescnish now. to the Dany! °° follows: , Antwerp = Rotterdam London Dates







    .
    Telegraph, England's leading Dally News- Bridgetown, B'dos














    DENS ’ oaper now arriving in Barbados by Air ARTICLE | WHOLESALE PRICE | RETAIL PRICE . Ra a ante sare Ba beck. 2 Aus: sat et, & Seplamhar
    PHILA SALES ny Soy daze, after publication in (not more than) (not more than) * me:
    Re Bia) eas ig Co., Lid. 1 a O° | caesarean | epee SS b a
    REAL ESTAYE ate Co, bid. Local Represents’ |Butter—Table: In Tins| $100.20 per case of 100 Agents : PLANTATIONS LIMITED. ‘Phone 4703
    ws é us





    pe enn

    -Dlack Roek; St. Michn vel



    ues ee ene neh RT
    STOVES—“Falks" 2 Burner Table Ibs, in 1-Ib tins ..|$1.08 per 1 Ib. tin] $9969066996-6606995969-999SCOOOG DI PPE PT DIS PIGIOS

    Model Wickless Cookers, and Twis
















    i In Prints | $95.20 per case of 100 » &
    ephm's Chureh, Stand 3 . “Beatrice” Oi yes, Lauria We ig ; é 3 < |
    ot. ian. Lald out [Senigtenie Dash oe Co., Tudor Rirest, hone 50¢1 Tbs. in 1-lb prints os $1.03 per 1 lb print 2 Sorea ty Farm or. Re 8: aoe. moariitle 17,8, 52—4n. Ps z 4 is $ PRIMUS BLOW TORCHES $ raha) Sells ery t A

    i lor a con “> WETS * » —+- —+ -—. —_-+ o > i ov g st ; tet
    L. N. Hutehinson or Dial 4803. s TOOLS Stock:—Suction tools,| (Canadian Maple Leaf) | $140.20 per case of 100 3 ‘ Odhner Adding Machine. . "They tical Wapunted a ras will
    i SS sent, ee TO SIS ORO sea Gcinbined Ibs. in 1-lb prints ..|$148 , ,, » | for you to select from, prices range from ‘ make you think of sleek young thoroughbreds hurtling over
    LAND At Graeme hal Terrace: ‘ion pliers, Hacksaws, Tappet spanners (Canadian Olive) ..| $131.20 per case of 100 $17 40 ¢ $ 46.76 ¢ the turf with effortless ease. You will love them more and
    Wetit, Gag and | Bicetrguy. 8." P GSvage "(1980)" Limited Phone 4949. Ibs. in 1-lb prints ..|$1.39 , 5 Soo eetiietebad Sim woare O yout th sad yeereus-the drudgery is Gime, oF
    Bdghiil. Phone 8178 or 8367, k

    19,8.52—6n

    ee

    STAMPS FOR SALE
    THE STAMP COLLECTION of 4%
    eceased client will be set up for sale
    n lots at our office, James Street, Bridg: -
    town, on TUESDAY 26th August
    ipm

    Milk—-Evaporated

    ‘oY vw
    (Okie Reaside) (SIRE per cape. of TRE CENTRAL EMPORIUM
    48 x 144 oz, tins ..|29c. per tin Corner Broad & Tudor Streets *

    $13.17 per case of SOOO OOOH LOCOROCO $9060680040006 560600007)
    48 x 16 oz, tins ..|30c. per tin

    your every day work,
    21,8.52—4n





    LAND-—1,820 square feet of land situat
    at Reed Street, St. Michael, the propert
    of the late Bleanor Lacey, deceased.

    Phe above parcel of land wil be +
    up “for sal e by Public Competition at ou
    Offce, James Street, on Friday 2%!
    August, 1952,

    For furt M
    A. W. Harper, Lakes Folly.

    YEARWOOD & BOYCR,
    Solicitors
    20.8.52--To

    Visit our show rooms and we will show you the various
    models most suited to your particular requirements.

    Every Friday we have a
    “Dollar” Sale of Decca
    Records.

    This week we have some
    specially attractive numbers.
    To add to your comfort
    light refreshments are ob-
    tainable while you are



    YEARWOOD & BOYCE,




    to Mi



    VACANT POST—TOWN ENGINEER

    STAMP COLLECTIONS

    “Situated at bia
    sah PI E send 200 used B.W.t.

    Applications invited—University Graduates, Corporate Mem-










    28 82--5n. 20th August, 1952. TIT SET! I Gusaasensaseeptonnsanemsnrorannsstettteptaaite
    ar
    bch e a sea BOROUGH OF SAN FERNANDO
    4 » bers of Institutions of Civil or Municipal Engineers or equiva- :
    Nvaavle ara ie a lent—10 years’ ex rience. Usual, Borough inert Ser- einai our shopping in this
    a.8.52—4n DRIAN DE vices—Population OW! e ectri — .
    Seat ee a soe ctarcood tana wal: f Soe Salary $4, 300—$240——$5, 760 per annum—Starting salary su
    aaahinerariea ‘in “rice, Se yenic Jamaica, B.W.1 ject to experience—Passage, leave, car aliaw etre Penaion— DEANNA Les Filles De Cadiz
    ss | eameteteceenall|} Site Oe tae Pt opel pm datgee BIg bua iy Own
    tnining’ enen, ond ¢ sed a he, dtats September, 1952.
    manda *ieltchen, aes “ane 0 I Y Ivs the ADVOCATE r L. McD. CHRISTIAN, | MILLS Ment Me Tonight in Dangaland
    usual cor De and Eleetrici ‘own y ;
    ty installe Garage and Servants’ room Mi Pp I C 12th August, 1952. My Gal Sal
    1 Ee en on application to Miss Bree Ell eanallehett Son. cama sts b000 BOOKS |? f :6:55655066556G995G9059 9 9S9SSSBO SOOO SOOO OO IOS Just a Dream of You Dear

    Parkinson, Strathclyde. Dial 2452.
    “fhe property will -be—set-up—for—sale
    ; by public competition at our office,
    : James Street, Bridgetown, on Frida
    2th. August at 2 p.m

    Can’t You Hear Me Calling Caroline
    COMFORT Se,

    M. V.

    JUDY On the Sunny Side of the Street



    YEARWOUD & BOYCE, ‘ GARLAND
    e.. JUST OPENED DAERWOOD zing Wet in, Stings ot My Heqr

    “s
    a Ea. : Fascinati hm

    “THE HERMITAGE” situate at the inthe Bot :
    ret of White Patis and Compre ct st
    sto.ding on about 125.040 square tee ;
    land. The Louse contains Gallery, heue i : |
    ling rooms, dining room, eight pee 4 Ea aie

    rooms, three fressing rooms, w@ter © om
    electric light Inspection any day t HAYME

    een ten and four,

    The above "will be set up for sale wv
    public compétition at our Office Tues
    Street, on Fr aay the 22nd day t Aveurt
    1953-at 2.30 p.7
    CARRINGTON a Ay ict ee

    4.8

    will be arriving at Barbados
    on THURSDAY, August 24th

    and will be sailing on MON-
    DAY, August 28th for St. Lu-
    cia, St. Vincent, Grenada,
    Aruba, accepting Passen-
    gers and Freight.

    DUNLOPILLO

    Fintand
    is contributing

    BIRKMYRE CANVAS

    72” WIDE—FOR BUS TOPS and SIDES

    INNER HOOD LINING

    56” WIDE. FAWN AND GREY





    “VALLAMBROSA Constitution Tie
    Cpposite Queen's ark, All mou
    conveniences . For full Particu
    Fhone 9327. 16.8.52—8

    AUCTION f
    entice
    UNDER THE IVORY HAMME:

    By instrucitons received from th
    Insurance Co, I will sell on Frida
    August 22nd at Messrs. Chelsea Garac
    Pinfold Street, (1) 1951 “Mayfiows
    Triumph” Car (only done 8,000 mi!
    Demaged in accident) (1) 1847 14 I
    $ i; in perfect working order

    to the complete

    well-being of the
    ‘Games’ competitors

    by providing the LIONIDE LEATHERETTE :
    supreme comfort of

    DUNLOPILLO



    ek rare alata ect ah onean eee
    ~*~ 4
    SGOSOOSSO SOP POSS SOOO SFG,

    50” WIDE. ATTRACTIVE SHADES















    ‘ Uitte Ckurrnis, %

    er a ety _ mattresses BLACK MIRACLE ADHESIVE |)

    SORRECPPEOOLOT oe in the athletes | 1%4-0Z. or 5-OZ, TUBES 3

    ST. STEPHEN'S CHURCL ¢ living quarters eS ‘. i

    g 101 § d I _ | Dunlopilio mativocses, cushions and Hl ‘

    ecita acre y HSiC $ | upholstery for your home are available at } ix

    $ i) IR

    on Sunday, 24th August, ¢ oes eee D.&.CO., LTD. Hl ECKSTEIN BROTHERS 3

    : 1 “roceeds in | ‘ M. ‘OGAR’ ° (pidoe vo | 8
    gm to boo Prossede 1 3) |i) Bacabtn eco, us | BAY STREET — DIAL 4269 |!/8 CARS TRUCKS & BUSES

    > aid of Choir Funds g 111] 3
    | We ‘ NH SIE S pc daetc Hii | s CITY GARAGE TRADING CO. LTD. — Vicforia Street

    196 € 298 OOEOPOCOOOEOOEES | TTY | jLeceeeeeeseoeeetoeeeseeee





    POPOL FOLLIES SSOOOMEOO vou’





    ee ae ee ee eee ett cary te eta as
    ena —




    THURSDAY, AUGUST 21,

    1952

    HENRY

    BY CARL ANDERSON

    9 FLINT OF THE FLYING SowaD by Alan Stranks, drawn by George Davies

    Vas TING IN Fa
    PARK FOR A'NaAR

    THE SPRING POE
    ~“WHAT ALARK! J

    EM, HOPELESS? IF
    THAT LITTLE ‘SNOUT’ })'
    TOADY LEECH GIVES
    US A LEAD ON WHO'S
    RUNNING THIS DOPE RACKET
    (“HE'S WORTH WAITING FOF! 4

    IN LONOON
    RIGHT ENOUGH,



    BY CHIC ‘(OUNG



    OOK “WHAT oy HAVE 2
    eat YOU. DAISY --THI

    DELICIOUS DISH OF
    {_ CARROTS: YUMMY ‘

    yo

    Ss : coe A GOOD THING )|
    r DAISY CAN'T <

    444] COT SUD pea LL
    SEE IF SH
    a ( Ee IF onett | | Me

    |








    | HUNGRY, CARROTS WE eee Me cas ot Hp a, spent Taner
    ‘AND WE re ) & AD LEFT OVER ieee Pld dhs
    | OUT OF «< ~~, FROM . |

    IDO Foon iq ; ( LUNCH J ! si

















    BY DAN BARRY
    NO! THE THERMA |
    QUAKES ARE |

    COMING ¢

    (LISTEN! ALL OF You! you EXPECT
    PR. CARSON TO RETURN TODAY! YOU
    EXPECT HIM TO BRING THE TANIUM THAT
    WiLL PREVENT THE THERMAL QUAKE...

    WELL, OR. CARSON /S LOST! YOU

    HEAR? HE (SN‘'T COMING
    r BACK... EVER /



    PeNuys :
    Faibesy «y 2 PEOPLE /
    THERE 15

    MITE SOMETHING ©

    = —, TELL







    WE war's W
    he a
    y

    re






    DON'T TAKE MY WORD THERE! TAKE A







    SWELL POOR, UMLAUT “rd |
    195 NOT FOR IT! LOOK AT THAT GOOP LOOK, RAT, STOPS BULL LIKE A od
    OFFHAND. HERR UMLAUT, TRUE! I BUILT ROLLER — IT'S COMING Hi \ REAM | pop =
    I'? SAY YOU HAVE ATERRIFIC ] DER PRESS...LOOK ; s) \| Le
    LAYOUT...EXCEPT FOR THAT J HOW CLEAN 155 DER 4 - sl
    CONSTRUCTION! \ = Ng \ ‘
    Sa < ‘a . <<
    (J ’ D if
    LY a “3 Yr rae AN
    — u ‘ P
    3 ~ Bs, \\ ba . Ys earl
    . as 4, os — ‘ee |
    Sen 3
    ( hae We al ae



    BRINGING UP FATHER GEORGE MC. MANUS








    YES -MOTHER - WE'LL HAVE

    SUCH A WONDERFUL VISIT /

    JUST THINK-- TWO WHOLE
    WEEKS TOGETHER J

    I COULDN'T eres iT
    HERE FOR TWO WEEKS
    WITH MAGGIE'S MOTHER ! y

    YEG - MOTHER WILL BE
    AwAsy FOR TWO WEEKS -
    SHE'S GOING TO VISIT

    GRANDMOTHER -- GO
    I THINK I'LL TAKE A
    LITTLE TRIP MYSELF /

    AND TLL BE TAKING

    LITTLE TRIPS MYSELF

    EVERY DAY FOR THE

    NEXT TWO WEEKS --

    BACK AND FORTH TO
    Ty's!










    “MISS LEE! IT'S FINGERS
    MORAY! HE'S GOING

    ROUGH STUFF'S OUTTA

    WY LINE..BUT IT'S ME
    OR PAGAN.. IF SHE

    Bat GETS TO THE CASIS,







    KEEP YOUR tops ay
    FELLAS. THEY SPOTT



    US. WE'RE INA

    SHOOTING Wart

    LET'IM HAVE (T/

    SOMEBODY BLASTED) OVER BEHIND
    ALL OUR TIRES THAT BOULDER!
    NO “THERES THE
    HIGHWAY! fe " {







    BARBADOS ADVOCATE

    PAGE

    sé
    ze r «6Don't neglect a ~—
    seated cough! Rub
    r

    chest with A.l. White

    SEVEN





    NN



    Liniment. The penetrating
    beat stimulates blood circu-
    sticn and promptly relieves
    congestion. Thousands have
    ound d relief with A.!.

    ee vt “ig not you

    s oh a

    ies a



    ponT NEGLECT”
    your Kt

    ee ee
    Take SWAMP-ROOT! Mi-
    raculous SWAMP-ROOT
    helps your kidneys purify the
    blood, get rid of poi-
    sons that make you
    feel tired and mis-

    erable!

    ‘
    ‘
    1
    {






















    AND NOW

    + « you can have
    A GAS COOKER
    like those you have admired in
    the magazines
    SEE THEM TO-DAY
    At Your Gas

    Team good looks tell you they're just right,

    You know, too, when you look at the price
    tag, that you can’t get finer value. Illustrated
    is a Full Brogue Oxford. ‘Tied to every pair is
    the John White Guarantee Shield—the sign
    which means ‘ just right’! Look for it in
    leading stores in Barbados.

    JOHN WHITE

    means made just right

    Showroom.
    . Bay. Street.



    WONDERFUL ASSORT-
    MENT OF

    Walking Sticks
    Just received by

    JOHNSON'S
    STATIONERY


























    HURRICANE
    PRECAUTION
    HINT No. 7

    WARNINGS.

    If you are going to take

    ¥ cover during a Hurricane in

    a public shelter, take with
    you:



    JUST ARRIVED!)

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    PAGE EIGHT













    =

    fi

    Know You
    LAW

    By O. S.

    TO-DAY we deal with one of
    the key laws of_the game, if I
    may so term it and that is Law
    35 dealing with the circumstances
    under which a batsman is dismiss-
    ed “caught”

    LAW 35 CAUGHT
    The striker is out “caught”—if

    the ball, from a stroke off the bat «

    or off the hand holding the bat,
    but not the wrist, be held by 4
    fieldsman before it touch th
    ground, although it be hugged to
    the body of the catcher, or be
    accidentally lodged in his dress,
    The Fieldsman must have both
    his feet entirely within the play-
    ing area at the instant the catch
    is completed,

    This law has caused so much
    controversy that even at the risk
    of providing too much detail I
    shall point out some of the in-
    stances which lead to confusion
    and give the ruling which the
    M.C.C. have had to make when
    they occur.

    The first is this—the hand hold-
    ing the ball may touch the ground
    in bringing off the catch but if
    the ball touches the ground as
    well then no catch has been made

    Touching The Ground

    The M.C.C. have ruled that
    the umpire is justified in disre-
    garding the fact that the ball has
    touched the ground or has been
    carried over the boundary provid-
    ed that a catch has in fact been
    completed prior to such occur-
    rence.

    It is still a catch if the ball has
    touched the striker’s person before
    or after touching his bat, In
    other words a ball can cannon off
    a batsman’s pads, touch the edge
    of his bat and then be caught in
    the slip or on the other hand he
    can edge it on to his pad and then
    be caught in the slip.

    The striker can still be dismiss-
    ed “caught” even if the fieldsman
    has not touched the ball with his
    hand and this of course includes
    the case of a ball lodging in the
    wicket-keeper’s pads.

    Painful

    There have been painful in-
    stances like the one in which a
    striker drove the ball straight into
    a fieldsman’s mid-riff. It knock-

    = the

    Striker is out
    fieldsman's hand but not the ball,
    has touched the

    The picture on the left shows
    Striker being “caught.” The
    all is over the boundary but the
    eldsman is within

    In the picture on the right the
    “eaught” since the

    ground,

    ut Cricket
    VAXV
    COPPIN

    ed the wind out of him but con-

    tracted
    ell

    It is still a ecateh if the fields-
    ran .standing within the playing
    area leans against the boundary

    catch a ball and it is still a
    eatch even if the ball has passed
    er the boundary.

    If the striker lawfully hits the
    ball a second time, that is for the
    sole purpose of guarding his
    wicket, he can be caught as long
    as the ball has not struck the
    ground before he strikes it a sec-

    ynd time
    Tricky

    The M’C.C. have ruled that a

    itech has been “made” at the in-

    tant a fieldsman has complete
    control over the further disposal
    of the ball.

    However a fieldsman may jug-
    gle a ball for a few-seconds and
    then drop it whereas the holding
    of a hot return might be an in-
    stantaneous movement,

    A special case of “catch” that
    d to have an M.C.C, ruling and

    and held the “catch” as

    which stumped me years ago
    when I used to invite cricket fans
    to “Quizz” me, is that of a ball

    hit back to the bowler who just
    touches it before it breaks the
    wicket at his end, with the non-
    striker out of his ground. If
    nothing further happens, on
    appeal the non-striker is out “run
    out” but if the ball is caught by
    a fileldsman beyond the broken
    wieket without its having touch-
    ed the ground at anv time after
    beine struck, the striker is
    “caught”.
    Not Caught

    It is important to note that the
    striker is not “caught” if a ball
    strikes a hand which is no lon
    holding the handle of the bat, For
    example the striker may have
    taken a hand off to guard his face
    against a bouncer,

    Of ‘course he is not allowed to
    stop the ball with his hand, I
    shall discuss “Handling the Ball”
    in my next article in t series.

    Remember that the striker may
    be caught off any obstruction with-
    in the playing area provided it
    has not previously been decided
    on as a boundary.



    Table Tennis:

    FRANK Willoughby gav
    to defeat
    Table Tennis Test Match b
    from the San Fernando Zcu
    Amateur Table Tennis As

    Y.M.C:A. Naval Hall last night

    Arnold Mendes o
    ‘tween Barbados and the team

    B’dos Wins The Rubber

    ro an outstanding performance

    f Trinidad when the Second
    e of the Trinidad and Tobago
    ociation was played at the
    Barbados defeated Trini-

    dad four—one thereby winning the rubber in this 3-test

    series.

    Willoughby gave a grand exhi-
    bition of defensive play, The
    attacking Mendes found it practi-
    cably impossible to penetrate
    Willoughby’s defence, The first two
    games were won by the Trinidad-
    ian but Willoughby took the other
    three in fine style.

    In the First Test, played last
    Monday night, ‘Trinidad were
    peaten to the tune of four—one,

    Carl Williams is the only member
    of the visiting team who has play-
    ed undefeated throughout the tour,
    Last night he again won the lone

    player by defeating Dr.
    Sarkar three—one last night,

    Barbados took the lead by two
    sets when Norman Gill met Fen-
    wick Debysingh of Trinidad, Gill
    ored a convincing win to put the
    ue beyond doubt.

    In the next match Carl Williams
    beat Rawle Phillips, making the
    core three—one. Willoughby in-
    ereased the score for Barbados
    when he beat Arnold Mendes, one
    of the beat players on the Trinidad
    team,

    better

    is

    The results were as follows:





    Sports

    BARBADOS ADVOCATE





    lVinoo Mankad

    MANY years ago from |
    Western India, came one of the’

    Round-up |

    LON VOW.

    cricket’s
    |Sahib”, the famous Ranjitsinhji.

    |
    |

    j
    i

    wR FLAG li, afver
    ali, at Cec Park At. al
    specida mecting of te scotiisn
    rvctbail Association Council Carly
    ihis mont, the Association re

    versea their decision, made at the

    beginning Gi the year, that the
    green, white and gola national
    a i gure should be Danned,
    they tnace this ruling following
    ine rowdyism which broke out
    juring Cxltic’s New Year's day
    match against Rangers. Thus
    began a bitter dispute which at
    one time threatened Celtic’s sus-



    immortals — the “Jam |
    From Nawanagar, too, came!
    Ranji’s nephew, K. S. Duleep-!
    sinhji, who played in 12 Tests for!
    England and scored 173 against
    the Australians at Lord’s in 1930
    And now a third in the great
    Nawanagar tradition is the eric~)
    keter of the year—Vinoo Mankad,
    hero of the Lord’s Test with his |
    nen-stop batting and bowling,
    pe rformance.
    Snap Decision i
    “Duleep” who first mod-,



    it wat

    telled Mankad the batsman, Man-

    pension from the League, and
    nearly became a_ court issue.
    Ceitic based their protests on *..c

    grounds that the club had an

    irish foundation and that since,
    its inception had flown the Eire

    flag at Ceitic Park, The amenc-

    ment rescinding the previous}
    decision was seconded by th»:

    Rangers’ representative Mr, Wii-

    son.

    CRICKET
    REV. G. L. O. JESSOP. son of

    the famous Gloucestershire anid
    Englang batsman Gilbert Jessop,
    is carrying on the true Jessopian |
    approach to cricket. Playing for

    Dorchester against Wi.tshire
    minor counties’ fixture, he

    no oa
    hit a

    |
    |

    century in 67 minutes. The name!

    Gilbert Jessop is now legenda:y

    in English cricket. With hi

    famous crouched stance he
    brought fear into the hearts of
    bowlers of fifty years ago. He
    was the most consistent fast

    scorer the game has ever known.
    On one occasion for the Gent!le-
    men of the South against the
    Players of the South at Hastinys
    in 1906, he scored 191 out of 234
    in ninety minutes,
    MOTOR RACING
    STIRLING MOSS

    ear-racing experts, will compete
    in the Scottish Daily Express
    National Trophy meeting at Turn-
    berry on August 23. Hawthorn
    “erashed"’ on to the racing scene
    this year and quickly established
    himself as ong of Britain's best.
    In his first race at the Grand
    Prix of Europe 4
    finished fourth

    scene,
    SOCCER
    LADISLAV TRPISOVSKY,

    26 year old outside-right who
    was a professional with a club in
    Prague, may be seen in English
    League football this season. A
    month ago he arrived in Britain
    from Czechoslovakia with only
    the clothes he was wearing. He
    asked Queens Park Rangers ‘or
    » trial. Rangers were extremely
    impressed with the Czech’s show-
    ing, end have applied to the
    Football Association for permis-
    sion to sign him as a professional.

    against the world



    Cricket:

    Belgium he |

    |
    |

    i
    |

    |
    }

    casually and remarked: “I’m
    ing to make you into an opei
    bat.” .«

    ed: “But I can’t become an open-
    jing batsman in a month or two.”
    and MIKE|Retorted ‘Duleep’:
    HAWTHORN, Britain’s two young} You listen to me.”

    | pretty closely at that!

    |

    Mankad was groomed by a suc-|
    cession of Sussex coaches brought
    out by Ranjitsinhji and: “Duleep”
    as a result of their playing asso-
    ciation with the county.

    | Jeft-arm



    Dodds, Brown
    Score Centuries

    ‘From Our Own Correspondent)

    LONDON, Aug. 20,

    After the heavy rain of the pre-
    vious two days, the grounds were
    slow and low scoring was the order
    of the day. The only two century
    makers were Dodds who made
    exactly 100 for Essex against
    Middlesex and F, R. Brown,
    former England skipper, whose
    118 not out enabled Northants to
    reeover against Glamorgan.

    SCOREBOARD:—
    Surrey vs. Derby
    BUGS riers ects 150 for 8.
    Middlesex vs. Essex
    NE Ee re es 199 for 7.
    Sussex vs. India
    TYPOS Sd eo Ak 60 ope eee 186.
    SWPMON eke oh e aes 110 for 4,
    Somerset vs. Hants
    Somerset .. 256 for 9 declared.
    pS ee area ere a Aree 4 for 1.
    Worcester vs, Lancashire
    WOPCGRter asic see yes cio are aye 104
    Lancashire ........ 184 for 5.
    Northants vs. Glamorgan
    Northants ...5:..5)- 275 for 7.
    Leicester vs. Gloucester
    Leicester 2... ees cans 78.)
    Gloucester 27 for 2.



    GRENADA BEAT



    On Friday night the visitors will
    play a Combined Everton-Â¥.M.C.A,
    when Trinidad played a combined (¢am and the Third Test will be
    Barna-Y.M.P.C. team, Dr, Sarkar. played on Saturday night when
    defeated Greenidge there will alao be an exhibition

    Greenidge however was able to of Ladies Singles and Doubles.

    bell Greenidge for the third time
    in the series. On the first occasion

    set for Trinidad when, after a G. Yawching (T) lost to B. Murray TOBAGO
    brilliant battle, he beat Rawle 22—20; 19—21; 13—21; 14—21. (From Our Own Correspondent) i
    Phillips three—one, Dr. N. Sarkar lost to C, Green- ST. GEORGE'S, Aug. 20. |
    if idge 21—23; 15—21; 21—-19; 6+21. A Grenada picked team defeat-| )
    The first set of the night was F. Debysingh lost to N. Gill ed Tobago by an innings in aj
    between Guy Yawching of Trini- 9) "12; 19—21; 16—21; 12—21. cricket match _ played today. | |)
    dad and Blair Murray, Yawehing ~ ¢, Williams beat R. Phillips Tobago scored 55 and 58 andj}
    won the first game by a close 4;_16 18-21, 21-14, 211% Grenada 183 Vy
    margin but Murray took the next A. Mendes lost to F, Willoughby ; I
    three to open the account for 9;17, 21—16, 17-21, 21—23, |!
    Barbados, 9 '
    Dr, Noble Sarkar drew Camp- a FOOTBALL RESULTS |
    1
    ‘

    LONDON, Aug. 19.

    The football results for Tues
    day follow: The Glasgow cup—
    First Round; Celtic



    Ballymena 4, Glentoran 2;

    defeat Dr, Sarkar in the First Test.
    Greenidge showed that he is the

    [They Do I

    ~





    ty

    y
    i



    ~

    Z, nse
    i LOOKA HERE ae



    a he AIN'T GATISFIED LIKE WALICING GOING ON (THE

    ROUNDS 2 TOOK OFF, Pye An HE TOOK GOME 7 DEATH, > ME” V WAGON'“THEY MUST
    | PEEL GREAT! Boy! | oi Sonmua A WEIGHT OFF =, { ANC THE tcey 77 GE LONESOME

    YOU GOTTA DO SOME-/ Realty Go |/ HES GOT_TO wuCS Don't HELE Tay wer
    L THING ABOUT THAT A ON A DIET MAKE LIFE NY's oA, MAKE IT A MASS
    ly BOT OF YOURS ONE OF < MISERABLE > TNE DOC PRODUCTION *++
    |\ BEFORE IT's Too he / {CARED THE
    LATE **- [-—+/ LARD OFF HIM~
    fin ser SAID IT WAS
    | @EDUCE OR A

    SIX-HANOLE /



    ery

    The Trinidad team is expected

    to return to Trinidad on Sunday.

    Vime









    Regisiered U, 5, Patent Omics



















    CRUDNEY








    ___ By Jimmy Hatlo |








    tillery 2, Bangor 0; Glenavon
    Ards 1,. tie —C.P,








    ‘IT'S LIKE A GUY












    EX-FATSO SPREAD THE
    GO-LIGHT GOSPEL.

    _———





    |
    |

    0, Queen’s}}
    Park 0, scoreless tie. Ulster Cup; |
    Dis- |

    1

    kad was then batting number nine
    for the Nawanagar High School.



    VINOO MANK®D

    One day “Duleep” came along

    Rather scared, Mankad protest-

    “You can if
    1

    Mankad must ave listened

    Changed Style
    It was in Nawanagar, too, that |



    But for Bert Wensley, in fact,

    |he might have been just another

    bowler.

    Wensley, way back in 1936, con-
    vinced Mankad that his future
    was in left-arm show bowling and
    not the fast-medium stuff he fan-
    vied. How right he was) Mankad
    is just about the best left-arm
    slow bowler in the world today.

    There is something fascinating
    in Mankad the bowler. His shirt
    billows gently in the breeze as
    he starts that easy, deliberate run-

    up.

    His perfectly relaxed, almost
    soothing action hides the venom
    of those carefully flighted left-arm
    leg-spinners,

    Relentless

    Did you watch Len Hutton bat-
    ting against him in the Test? His
    face a study of strained intensity,
    he knew Mankad for a tireless,
    relentless worrier,

    Oh yes, Hutton has a great re-
    spect for Vinoo Mankad,

    Mankad the batsman has some-
    thing of the impish, quick-silver
    of Compton and something, too,
    of the concentration of Hutton.

    Aggressive, supremely confident,
    he “offers” the bowlers chances
    by his audacity.

    Then he dashes hopes as his
    dancing feet answer the razor-
    sharp reflex of the born cricketer
    to produce one of his favourite
    wristy cover drives,

    He’s a crowd pleaser, whether
    pegging down the batsmen or
    flaying bowlers.

    That’s why Haslingden paid
    him around £1,500, one of the
    highest fees ever offered to a

    Lancashire League professional,
    Exuberance
    The reason for his success is
    simple enough. Mankad_ gives

    everything he’s got, whether he

    is
    )



    o.

    PEPE LEELA APPL ALO PSPS

    4

    C9DSS SSO VOSS PPOOPOOOSS

    Yes, the very
    !

    y



    CON

    FISSSOSOOSSSIGSS SG SG OSS S SOS SS OOS

    a Ity

    qt Ww" -
    eG ae
    $= SS a> - Mn)

    The great
    Lord Lonsdale

    ..+ AND WHAT A _ KING’S

    JOCKEY SAYS
    By JAMES PARK

    For years and years the
    late Lord Lonsdale was
    Britain’s No. 1 Sportsman
    He was a steward of thx
    Jockey Club: he was the donor
    of those Lonsdale Belts that are
    still the most coveted prizes in
    British boxing: he was a per
    sonage in the Roval Enclosuré
    at Ascot. in the private stand at
    oi His yellow coach
    was one S
    of Coed wood ¢ of the sights
    e lived in Corinthian splen-
    dour., He gave his name o the
    iong ci; known as the Lons-
    dale. He was bluff. heariy. open
    handed, lordly—at least” peopie
    thought he was :

    Now comes Joe Childs
    Geotge V's jockey, to debunk
    Lord Lonsdale. Childs has just
    ublished his autobiography (My

    , Racing Reminiscences: Hutehin-
    son. 153.) and this is what he

    says about the
    Lonsdale : rw, Srey, Bae

    ; ” yg sane eae haa
    he tion of being blutt
    and hearty ana popular :n
    Sporting circles, I regretfully
    must say that

    pening

    King

    manner there
    Was, in my
    Opinion a
    touch of arro-
    gance, and 1.
    per een ily
    ve very
    little use for
    that trait in
    the character
    of anyone.”
    Childs tells
    & good dea
    adout Lord
    Lonsdale
    Once at New
    market Childs
    was reported
    to the stewards
    by the owner
    of a filly for
    disobeying instructions about the
    use of the whip
    In the course of the inquiry
    Lord Lonsdale. who -was 4
    Seward said: “You gave Most



    OE CHILDS
    ’ No my lord



    is playing in club cricket or in
    Tests.

    He plays for the love of it, for
    he-sheer exuberance of gaining
    mastery over batsman or bowler.

    He has never lost the enthusi-
    asm of the boy who determined
    as soon as he was big enough to
    hold a bat that he was going to
    be not just a good cricketer, but

    For any boy who is fired by the
    ambition to copy Mankad here are
    a great one,

    his rules: —
    1. Good coaching at the be-
    ginning.
    2. Hours of practice.
    3. Maintain 190 per cent. fit-
    ness.
    4. Keep your love of the game.

    As a boy Mankad practised 11
    hours a day. A Test star at 19—
    he topped the averages, batting
    and bowling against Tennyson's
    eleven in 1938—he still practised |
    hour after hour,

    This will be Mankad’s last sea- |
    scn of Test cricket. “I’ve had a)

    good run,” he told me, eee

    years is a long time. I feel I should
    let someone younger have a chance, |
    “One day a week in the Lan-

    ceshire League is a nice rest af-|

    ‘er years of non-stop cricket.
    “But it isn’t a push-over, They

    pay you well and they are en-

    titled to expect good results.

    Modesty |

    Vinoo Mankad modestly belit-
    “ his achievements in the Lord’s

    est.

    “T am supposed to be an all-
    rcunder, so I should be able to
    bet or bowl whenever I’m _ re-
    quired”, he said, |

    So far as he knows, he is the
    only member of his family who |
    ever played cricket. But that is
    all changed now.

    & R BREAD & CAKES

    Just those Toothsome Delicacies for the
    Regular Picnic Parties and
    J&R SANDWICH BREAD
    for the Bus Excursions.

    latest and what a selection!—The new K. R. Hunte Store on Lower Broad St. is de-|
    signed to cater to Mr, & Mrs, Public and that entails variety of stock.
    ems are variety in themselves—they are so numerous! Won't you come in and see?

    »

    tl

    ABOUT HIM

    Beauufui a good hiding and nit
    her with the whip many times.
    I know because | was down
    Per aes Saw it.”
    i immediatel, toi
    or Eennds le that his
    ments were totally untrue
    Said Chiids: “You were not at
    the starting gate, my lord, on
    hig occasion. and therefore you
    ould not have seen the incident
    vou have stated you did
    “I know quite well you do
    frequently go down on your nack
    to the start. as on severai
    occasions I have seen you there.



    ‘ THURSDAY,

    AUGUST 21, 1952



    At 60 He Plans Th
    Next Olympics

    LONDON.

    ;} At the age of 60. Mr. Arthur
    | Coles has taken on a job for 1956.
    | While other people are talking
    labout the just-ended Helsinki
    {Olympic Games, Mr, Coles is
    |} organising the next Olympics, to
    be held at Melbourne in four
    years time.

    This Australian business man
    |-~father of six, grandfather of 11
    |~-has a mililon-pound job on his

    thands. “A tough assignment,”
    |he said at his London hotel last
    | week,

    He and his wife flew from
    | Australia to Helsinki and from
    |Helsinki to London, Mr. Coles

    yaid the fare.

    “Don’t assume any particular

    virtues in that,” he said. “I had
    to come to England to talk over
    a child immigration ‘scheme I’m
    interested in. Anyway, I want
    to pay my own way on this job.
    I feel I can work more effectively
    if I am free to do my own think-
    ing.”

    What qualifications are needed

    for a job like this? Well, Mr.
    Coles built up a chain of 150
    shops from a capital of £500
    (£1lvu borrowed), organised two
    post-war airlines and made ;
    profit within two years, and

    arranged the payment of £8,500,-
    0GO war damage in New Guinea
    for the Australian Government.
    The Olympics job is unpaid.
    —L.E.S.

    - that Donoghue made his own



    f

    K. BR. Hunmte
    i Ce.. Ltd.



    But you were not at the start
    thn

    n this outspoken book Childs
    gives his own verdicts on the
    turf personalities of nis time
    He an “T shall always con-
    sider that Alec Taylor was ‘he
    finest trainer in the world during
    my career of race-riding.” Taylor
    fied a bachelor in 194: He did
    not bet, but he left £595,670.









    vow



    Scotch Whisky

    On Steve Donoghue: Childs

    ee his ae thinks

    ne A remarkably Th i i

    fortune too—Epsom was a ninony ¢ rd pepo. of ene Fred tes tell
    ourse for Donoghue. Some without words. Here is a sym-

    veople think—1 am one of them bol that tells, plainer than any

    nck at Epsom ah sas words, of whisky at its finest...
    es Childs i i =

    tld’ Meas Sodter “ae aie ae lovingly blended, long matured,

    petween Danniv Maher and until it is as noble a Scotch

    , k ootton. Childs plu S 5s eV f

    oF oot rineae eae ee as ever came out of

    without dispute the most bril- Scotland.
    lant jockeys of their day But
    noi everybody wil! agree with
    Childs. Not so long ago Lord
    Rosebery saic to me: “I nave
    aiways chought Danny Maner
    was the best fockev I ever saw
    out now | am beginnin;
    sane my tune. {[ am inclinea
    to think Gordon tichards
    to the honour ”

    ali soe jockeys still
    wno code against both
    sna Wootton award the
    Madtlier {ft must ve
    read that Maher had a
    xperience behind him
    Weotton was only a
    Gordon Richards
    ‘ampare with Frank
    mre e of 16,

    : T RESERVED
    rrice

    1s Sole Distributors :
    FRANK B.

    ARMSTRONG LTD.

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    Wootton ar t



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    His two sons, Atool, aged six, |!
    and Ashock, aged four, are crick-
    et mad. Their spare moments
    are spent bowling spinners to
    each other.

    So maybe one day the Mankad |
    family will add to the record |
    books with not the three but the}
    five great cricketers of Nawana- |
    gar. |



    Netball:

    \i’dad Beat Grenada

    (From Our Own Correspondent)

    ST. GEORGE'S, Aug. 20
    Trinidad defeated Grenada 19
    goals to 13 in the Ladies’ netball
    match this afternoon, On Friday
    Trinidad will play St. Vincent a

    return match,

    Famous Players including

    CLYDE WALCOTT
    FRANKIE WORRELL
    LESLIE AMES
    LEN HUTTON





    Boys Gubs’, Ail Island
    Championship
    SPORTS MEETING
    KENSINGTON OVAL

    at 3,00 p.m.

    MONDAY,
    25th August, 1952



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