Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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Full Text


ea,



WHAT'S ON TODAY

Meeting of Regional Labour Boarc
10.00 a.m,

Court of Grand Sessions 10.00 ¢

Quarterly Meeting of Chamber «
merce — 2.00. p.m

Meeting of General Beard of Health

2.30 pom

Second Table Tennis Test Match between
Trinidad and Barbados at YÂ¥.M.C.A.

— 8.00 p.m.



For the cause that lacks assistance



‘Gainst the wrongs that need resistance

For the future in the distance
And the gogd that I can do.

ranian Nationalists Set:

ESTABLISHED 1895

PHarvbados



WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 20, 1952

ire

To Communists “Peace Club”

Arbitra

tion Of

Oil Dispute Likely

JOSEPH

MAZANDI
TEHERAN, Aug. 19.

Truckloads of armed troops were called out on Tuesday

night when Iranian Nationa
-“Peace Club”.
capital.
injured slightly earlier

lists set fire to the Communists’

It was the second incident of the day in the

United States army sergeant James Hagan was
when stoned while driving down

a street where Communists were battling the Police and
supporters of Premier Mossadegh.

Helmeted troops rushed

to the scene where the Nation-

ists set the Communist “Peace Club” afire with gasoline.

Firemen were trying to prevent the flames from

spreading

to other buildings while armed Police were stationed around

the British Embassy.

Meanwhile the Parliamentary
Mixed Oil Commission approved
a motion to arbitrate the dispute
over the compensation to be paid
to the nationalized Anglo-Iranian
Oil Company.

In London, a_ foreign Office
spokesman in guarded comment
said the .arbitration proposal if
true, was a “step in the right
direction.”

No official word however had
reached them yet through diplo-

matic channels, and it was not
known whether Iran proposed
impartial arbitrators. Several

weeks ago Britain announced that
Mossadegh proposed to Ambassa-
dor George Middleton that the
dispute be debated. Mossadegh
flatly denied he said any such
thing. ‘

The new proposal, if substan-
tiated, was regarded in official
circles in London as an effort by
Iran to meet reasonable desires
on the part of Britain.

Russia Protests
A street clash in
pdlicemen including one officer

the Soviet Union had protested in
a note to Iran delivered yester-
day against last week’s attack by

anti-Communists on a _ Soviet
“reading room”. The note de-
manded that the ‘culprits’ be
prosecuted, and called on Iran
to prevent such outbreaks in
future.

The note said that some 20

“gangsters wearing Fascist arm-

niture and breaking windows. It
alleged that a policeman aided the
attackers,

Forty Communists were arrest-
ed after this morning's clash
which started when pro-Govern-
Premier

ranged

ment supporters of
Mohammed
through thé streets shouting
“Down with Tudeh! (the Com-
munist party) Down with Stalin!

Mossadegh

The Communist gangs suddenly
turned on the pro-government
supporters ‘and members of the
Nationalist “Soumka” and pan-

which four | Iranist movements— with stones.

When the police intervened the

ANTES | uot Flag
minted On
Soil

APORE, Aug. 19.
avsriw’S Rag has been planted
or Malayan soil, United States
een’ Court Justice William

- NAGUIB WARNS EGYPTIAN

are






is on Tuesday
after a two-week tour
of Malay’s te -infested
jungles. Dougias said that the

hammer and sickle crested scarlet
* |banner of the Soviet Union,
asl | captured from guerillas last week
, 'by Ghurka soldiers, was planted
on the coast of Malaya near
Kuantan—the scene of the first
Japanese landing ten years ago
and within sight of the spot where
the ce of Wales and the
Repulse were sunk on December
TU, 1941,

Officials here say that this was
the first reported incident where-
in a Russian flag was found in the
aero possession of Communist guerillas

in this country. The sandy-haired
jurist told the United Press ex-

U.S. Minesweeper Shells iii peers os

.| and there is no mistake about it

Own Ship Off Korea > 2st arse":

that he used his own camera to
TOKYO, Aug. 19.

Photograph the flag which was
taken from terrorists surprised
hy tough professional Ghurkas.
The U.S. Navy began an official investigation into the | Pouslas, who is making a two-
accidental shelling of the navy salvage ship Grapple poe wee Se Boieeast Abia,
the American minesweeper Chief oe Kare Gr Prltade Bormosa, Japan ee Sed Boe
Two crewmen aboard the Grapple were killed and nine| day. He said: “If anyone thinks
others injured, three seriously. The Grapple arrived today | that the guerilla campaign in
at Sasebo Naval Base, escorted by the Chief.
A navy spokesman said that the burden of the respon-
sibility for the shooting appearei to rest with Lieutenant-
Commander Willard C. Hatch of the Chief, although the

Malaya. is not imspired by the
Kremlin he is crazy. This is one
investigation may disclose exter.uating circumstances,
The “Grapple”, commanded b

MAJ. GEN. MOHAMMED NAGUIB, Commander im Chiet of the Egyptian
arined forces, chats in bis Cairo office with Mme, Doria Shafik, leader
of the feminist movement in Egypt. In a strongly worded message to
the nation’s political parties, Naguib intimated that if they failed to
purge their ranks of corrupt elements they would be purged by force.



and conquest.” ,









WEATHER REPORT

Rainfall fro Podringts

Total Rainfall Jor month to date: 1.18 ir
Highest Ténerature: 87.0 °F

Lowest T ature: 72.5 °F

Wind Velo : 5 miles per how:










Barometeg (9 am.) 29.97 7 29
TO-DAY

5.48 a.m

Sunset: 6.17 p.m,

Moon ; New, August 20

Lighting :

High Tide

Low Tide:



Sunrise
7.00 p.m,

3.02 a.m,
9.52 p.m.,

41t p.m
9.53

PRICE : FIVE CENTS
| WILL RULE FOR ATJLING KING
{

i
!

pm



£1800 Offered
For Milton
King’s Murder

RT Lae a



ir Gwn Correspondent

LONDON, Aug. 19,

claiming £2,500
Africa, but “South
Africa offers only £1,800.

Early last year, Milton King,
a West Indies seaman, was beaten
up by a Capetown policeman who
was taking him to the police
station, King diedy

Barbados e¢laims £2,500 ad
compensation, “That is too
much”, says South Africa, which
admits liability. The policeman
who, killed ing was fined £10
in June last year for assault, and
a police inquiry, found him unfit
te remain in the force

But last March, the Minister
of Justice, Charles Swart, told

Barbado
from South

|
|

conviction was “only for assault”

he would re@ijmin in the force.

Why Not

Barbados?

(International) from Our ©

Red Munitions Factory
Bombed By Superforts

, ¢

ha ‘ ~ ey eh SEOUL, Aug, 19. island, It was felt that it would
Fourteen Allied Superfortresses skirtea a typhoon to] be of benefit to the region, if the
bomb Communist munitions plant in far North Korea with] team should also visit Trinidad

“excellent” results according to returning pilots ne a i
Targets in last night’s raid were against a grenade} .jp yp iment Spokesman des-
: Ms . . ing this coming visit and the
factory at Nakwon, only three miles from the Yalu River] proposal to declare a 10-year tax
which forms a boundary between North Korea and Com-} holiday for pioneer industries,
munist China. Superforts dropped 140 tons of bombs on the _ ‘i onl one phase of Gov-
factory, using “improved electronics aiming methods” due ments plan to win the .race

; against the stork.”
to overcast skies.
,sists of seventeen buildings of

sree Talks ‘teel and concrete with 1,850,000 Jamaica Gels
Recessed For 50 isi Soi" New Prison
Fourth Week ; turned o ; oot





JORDAN'S mentally ill King Talal (right) abdicated on Monday
August, 11 in favour of Crown Prince Hussein (left) who comes of
age (18) next May.

A three-man Council is now running the government for the
young King who is expected home this week from Switzerland where
he was on vacation with his mother,

JAMAICA, Aug. 12.

The team of six British Indus-
trialists visiting Jamaica in Octo-
ber to make a survey of the in-
dustrial potential of the island,
will also visit Trinidad and
British Guiana This decision
was made by the Colonial Office
when it considered Jamaica’s re-



It was the first time in the
, Korean War that this factory had
been bombed, The factory con-

(From
JAMAICA, Aug. 12.

1ades and 3,500 grenades for ship- Jeinalen hos acaew orien, Oe
Jamaica has ¢ 2w prison, e

iment to Communist front lines

parliament that as the policeman’'s

and ten Communists were injured| Communists turned on the police

coincided with the disclosure that as well. —UP.



bands” attacked the reading room
last Wednesday’ destroying fur-
|
'

" e e e
U.S. Shipbuilders Will

ta: @ ed Fi im ‘

Strike Unless Paid More
| NEW YORK, Aug. 19.

The C.I1.O. Shipbuilders’ Union served notice that its
32,000 workers in seven East Coast shipyards of the Beth-
lehem Steel Company will strike next Monday, unless they
get a “living wage.”

In other areas of the labour front federal negotiators
said that the next 48 hours should tell whether there was
going to be a strike on the New York Central Railroad, and
that the John L. Lewis United Mine-workers will open
negotiations here today for a new contract with Pennsy1-
vania’s hard coal operators covering 75,000 miners in the

anthracite industry.

A C1.O. united rubber workers and Company and Wilson and Co.,

strike has idled 83,000 workers | “may drag on” for some time
and stopped production at nine| without definite action, :
B. F. Goodrich plants in eight Independent farm equipment

workers union called a strike after
a vote by some 26,000 workers to
strengthen its hand in contract
negotiations,

states, Workers quit their jobs in
a dispute over “fringe” benefits.
C.1L.O. packinghouse workers
announced contract negotiations
with Swift and Company, Armour

Truman To Be Honoured
By Jew Brotherhood

WASHINGTON, Aug. 19. , sonal moral courage during his
Truman on Tuesday accepted) past seven years service as hon-
an invitation to receive the first | orary chairman of the Brother-
International Brotherhood Award | hood.
of the National Conference of| The conference plans to make
Christians and Jews at a lunch-| the award to Truman at a lunch-
eon here next November 11. Al-| eon in Mayflower Hotel here next
bert Greenfield of Philadelphia! Armistice Day, marking the or-
advised Truman that the confer-| ganization’s 25th anniversary of
ence selected him as a recipient) its “systematic scientific and edu-
of the award in appreciation of| cational approach to inter-group
his spiritual leadership and per-' relation problems’’.—U.P.

STEVENS

—UP.







Ey

ON AND SPARKMAN AT WHITE HOUSE PARLEY’

Manley Wants
Native Governor
For Janiaica

(From Our Own Correspondent)
KINGSTON, Ja. Aug. 12.
Mr. Norman Manley, Q.C ,
Leader of the People’s
National Party, the socialist
Opposition in the House of
representatives, has de-
clared in favour of a native
Governor in Jamaica.
Speaking at Montego Bay
this week, the — socialist
Leader told his audience:

“Would that God give me
special blessing to make me
live to sée Jamaica govern-
ed by une of its own people’,



Typhoon Headed
For Northern Japan

TOKYO, Aug. 19.

A typhooon was headed for
Northen Japan after leaving be-
hind a trail of destruction in
Korea and Okinawa that caused
ois of ten persons and virtu-
ally halted the Korean war. The
typhoon is expected to hit Hok-
kaido Island about midnight
11 a.m, EDT) but appeared to
be losing strength,

Police in Pusan, Korea’s tem-
porary capital, said seven per-
sons were drowned and 100 homes

wrecked in South-west Korea
yesterday. Other damage in
Korea was minor, On Satur-

day, the typhoon killed a woman
and two children in Okinawa.

Two inches of rain fell on the
far eastern end of the Korean
battlefront and winds of up to
90 mph were reported,—U.P.





DEMOCRATIC PRESIDENTIAL NOMINEE Gov. Adlai Stevenson (right), of Illinois, and his running mate,

Sen. John Sparkman, of Alabama, confer with President Truman at the
was escorted by Truman into the Cabinet room for a brief
ocratic standard bearer then lunched w:



( ‘rk » and t
he Chief Executive and his ©

1g on Korea and national securit)

White House. Later, Stevenson
The Dem-
abinet,_ (International)





further bit of evidence that
Lieutenant Comiam, was 0!

Malaya is another extension of
Moscow’s world plan of terrorism
Hungnam last Friday night when
the minesweeper hit her with two
three inch shells at a range of a
half mile,
A navy spokesman said the

hineswee r apparently had
ac “Gr i

béfore fring Be sata fre
yet clear whether the mine-

Sweeper tried to exchange identi-

fication signals with the “Grapple”; year.

but it was known that identifica-
tion was not completed.

The first shell fired by the
“Chief” hit and pierced the “Grap-
ple’s” smokestack, The second
hit the pilot house. The “Grap-
ple’s wounded were taken aboard
the Cruiser “Helena.”

The “Grapple”, a steel hulled
ship ,is 214 ft. long, has a beam of
41 ft. and a displacement of 1,480
tons. The “Chief” is 221 ft. long,
32 ft at the beam and displaces
690 tons. The Navy said that the
formal investigation will be held
to fix the responsibility for the
accident and recommend mea-
sures to prevent any possible re-
currence. —U,P,

Farouk Gets
Priority

NAPLES, Aug. 19:
British member of the
Judging Committee for the 12
nation “Miss Europe of 1952”
contest complained on Tuesday
that the beauty show organizers
were “in honour’ to ex-King
Farouk of Egypt—‘who is nobody
anymore.”

While 12 tired European
beauties rested in guarded hotel
suites after a hectic evening at
Capri where, they paraded before
the approving Farouk, Erie Mor-
ley sharply criticized the way
things were handled
test judge went to Capri with the
girls on Monday night and was
‘pushed around by the help” be-
cause of Farouk, he said. He said
“There was not even room for a
sick man to lie down”. He said
“at the restaurant I asked for a
place to rest and was taken to
the terrace. 1 had been there no
more than five minutes when the
manager came rushing up and
told me that I would have to
leave because King Farouk would
have to pass that way on his
way down.” Gracie Fields was
the hostess for that reception.

UP.



The



Radio Pyongyang
Appeals

TOKYO, Aug, 19.

YVhe North Korean radio early
21 Wednesday appealed to the
‘Peoples of the World” to halt
the allied bombing of North
Korean targets. Pyongyang Radio
lemanded immediate halt to what
it called “barbaric bombing” in-=
‘luding the use of napalm. It
was noted that the United Nations |
has listed 78 cities as potential)
targets, whose inhabitants were
warned to leave. —vUr.



{

DAVE SANDS’ BKOTHER |

WILL TRY FOR TITLE |

SYDNEY, Aug. 19.
Alfie Sands, brother of Dave
Sands, who was killed in a truck
accident last week, said today he
will try fo win the Australian
middleweight boxing title his;
brother held, Dave held the Brit-j
ish Empire and Australian Mid-
dleweight title and the Australian
Lightheav aight and Heavy-

eight ch ionshir —UP













The con-|

Douglas had high praise for
General Templer’s aggressive

ecampai g" against Malaya’s
‘estimated 5,000 Communist ter-
vorists, He accompanied wiry

Hi Commissioner Templer on

n inspection trip to the jungle.

who wrote a book on

that he is not sure

will write another

concerning his Asian travels this

He plans to visit the

Korean troops before returning
to Washington in September,

—U.P.

Rescue Work
Continues In

Flood Area

LYNMOUTH, ENG., Aug. 19.

Mudstained rescue-workers con-
tinued their round the clock
search in water logged debris of
England’s south-west resort coast
for 40 feared dead in the coun-
try’s worst flood disaster in re-
cent years,

Early today Devon county po-
lice announced that fifteen bodies
‘were removed from the wreckage
or pieked up floating off-shore
and that 25 persons were official-



ly missing.

Police are also investigating
cases of 60 vacationists thought
to be in the area” at the time

of the flood who were not on the
list of evacuees,

Some of the 150 residents of the
nearby village of Challacombe
are still going home after fleeing
last night following an unsubstan-
tiated) xumour that the flood-
swollen river in the valley above
had burst.—U.P.



Egypt Trying
To Attract
Foreign Capital





PANMUNJOM, Aug. 19.

lagainst United Nations troops.

; Before bombing the Allied

Korean truce negotiations were | planes had dropped leaflets warn-

recessed again for the
straight week, :
progress toward an armistice

Rinne

wiet talks in
the new recess
United Nations,
up much of a

asked by
but did not
fight against it

They had nothing new to say at
today’s meeting and were not ex-

and any hope for] area.
ap-}been doing this in an effort to
to rest with the high level
an Moscow.
The Red negotiators objected to

z the | town of Sagwanni and a Red stor-
put/age area at Kyomipo Steel Mill

fourth |ing civilians to clear out of the

The Allies have recently

spare civilians needless suffering.
Other 5 tresses bombed
a military target at the west coast

below Pyongyang.
| The ground war was virtually
stalled by weather, and only

Governor has declared Fort Au-
gusta, an old Fort in St. Cath-
erine, a prison for the imprison--
ment or detention of persons in
custody and to be known as Fort
Augusta Prison,

Work on the construction of
new buildings in the compound
will begin shortly. This is Ja-
najca’s fourth prison. There are

e¢ General Penitentiary for long
term prisoners in Kingston; the
St. Catherine District Prison; the
short-term prisoners in Spanish

pected to come up with a new minor patrol contacts took place. Town; and the Richmond Farm
approach until the Moscow talks|The Chinese Communists made a Frison for first offenders in St.
are concluded. light, short, and unsuccessful raid | Mary.

on “Bunker Hill”, A typhoon that

To-day’s 60-minute meeting was|swept over part of Korea caused

the month.
took the

the longest in
United Nations

The]temperatures to drop as much as
initia-}24 degrees along the battlefront

tive for a change in a sharp attack,Cloudy skies limited observation

on the Communists,
eral William K

Major Gen-
Harrison anger-

and activity to-day
—U-P.





CARIBBEAN LABOUR
CONGRESS PLANNED
FOR SEPTEMBER

ed North Korean General Nam aides guatb tino Rrrtrabiacs £575

Ul with a short statement in JAMAICA, Aug. 12,

ae ~ sear the es % CHAIRMAN OF The Caribbean Labour Con-
ie «6conflic arrison touchec sryess secretariat in Kingston, said

a tender spot when he accused COMMIT TEES Fin : e

the Communists of

sacrificing”

“little North Korea” in their stub-

born

insistence on the return of| ber

Mrs, E
for

FE, Bourne, Senior Mem-
St. Andrew, acted os

the Chinese volunteer” prisoners| Chairman of Committees at yes-

held by the Allies
want to return to Communism,

UP.



Manager Of Cotton
Mills Arrested By
Egyptian Arniy

By WALTER COLLINS
CAIRO, Aug. 19

The Egyptian Army
Monday sentenced a

which on
worker to

death for leading textile riots at

Kafr El

Dawar, on Tuesday ar-

rested the manager of the cotton

mills where riots began,

Manager Mohammed
El Gammal, was
El Dawar early Tuesday
to Mustaph barracks in
dria, 25
swoop on textile

top executives.

The Army on Monday arrested









Hussein
arrested at Kafr
ind sent
Alexan-
miles away in a widening

who do not} terday’s meeting of the House of

Assembly in the absence of Mr
L. E, Smith,

\ this week that plans were under-
way for the holding of a session
of the Congress in September ox
October,

It is planned to have the meet-
ing, first since 1947, when a ses-
sion was held in Jamaica, e‘ther
in Barbados or in Antigua,

O29 99DD009 9099 0O09OO9-99-O4909 98 OO9ODOOOGOFOP TODO PE

NOTICE |

We the undermentioned Grocers beg to draw to the
Customers that,



attention of
creased:—

our
(1) High cost
(2) Continual

we will no longer be able

(30) days and accounts will be payable when, rendered

We very much regret
after several months ear



*

®
;
*

owing to the in-
of Goods,
ly rising operating expenses,

to extend credit over thirty

having to take this step, but
eful consideration, we find

66:49:59 POORORLDLD LOLS ODOOQOSGOOOOHIHOHH4



Minister of Sees Bi. Amin Hatez Afifi, assistant @irec- we have no other choice and will have to enforce same
pnce Abdel Gelill said that tha| tor of accounts of the Kafr El as from lst October, 1952.
Egyptian government's policy is Dawar Company, and son of Dr.
based on industrial expansion andj Hafez Afifi, former chief of the , i , :
Seat tagilitios will be eranted 7 exiled King Farouk’s Cabinet J. N. Goddard & Sons Ltd.
eign companies to prospect for UP,
ee eam Daun et - Stansfeld Scott & Co., Ltd.,
men courages e in-
vestment of foreign capital, em- . ‘
ployment, the protection of local Bulgarians Admit D. V. Seott & Co., Ltd.
eee the facilitation of the ili T G k
ortation of raw materials, and K y f -CKS a
industrial credit, t ms wo reeks Alleyne, Arthur & Co., Ltd. 3
Too Oe special attention ATHENS, Aug. 19 2
given the development r \ $
of oil prospecting, and that facili-| The Greek General Staff com- W. A. Medford & Co. $
ties will be granted to foreign oi}} muniqued that the Bulgarian *
companies to undertake the task.| forces admitted killing two Greck ‘ on & Redman :
He said that the government’s| soldiers in a border clash They Johnsor Re +
cotton policy does not interfere}added however that the Pulgar- g
with the free market which should] ions claimed that the Greek Ince & Co., Ltd, >
be governed only by supply and soldiers were shot when they
demand. He added that Egypt is| violated Bulgarian territory. The i d 2 ;
enlisting the aid of the bank for| clash occurred over the owner- Perkins & Co., Ltd. cu
reconstruction and rehabilitation]ship of Gamma Island in the | $
to finance big irrigation projects,|Evros River which fprms part of with} o :
U.P.|the border between Bulgaria and Stuart & Sampson Ltd. >
northeastern Greece, The dis- 1 >
. pute over the island has raged} 3 E. Cole & Co.,/Ltd., Grocery Jept @
Fifteen Pass for several weeks | Rant 3
J The communique aid that} avlor & Sons Ltd. 3
B. Se. Exam Greek and Bulgarian represent- John D. T. 2
atives met on the frontier y ter-| ‘ 7
Following are the first grad-!day and that the Bulgarians | James A. Tudor & Co. &
uate results of the University} offered to return the bodies of} :
College of the West Indies which|the two Greeks in return for aj a >
were cabled by the Registrar of} written icknowledgement by Me Donald Sealy ©
the University to Mr. Aubrey} Greece that they died violating ®
Douglas-Smith last night. Bulgarian soil. The Greeks re- : ss g
: jected the offer i demanded |} W. M. Forde .
Of the 17 candidates who sat.}the bodies and rian ad-} 3
the B.Sc. examination 15 passed/ mission of borde: ie} $ co es ad :
—four with first class honours;| Bulgariar repo eal $ N. S. Sainsbury
seven with second class honours|their an 1® >
and there were four passes, | up. ' :

2DDDDOPOSPPOOS SO POPP PI DP POSH SD POH PDD DP PO OHO PO Os



“




PAGE TWO



Carub Calling

_ Delegates to the Y.W.C.A
Caribbean Area Conference

rir re entertained at
wheon at the Hotel Norman-

Barbado Delegate was



Mr D. H. L. Ward, who with
her daughter Penelope returned
home vesterday after Penelope
had spent a brief holiday with het
uncle Mr, Justice Ward, Puisne
Judge of Trinidad and Mrs. Ward

Mrs. Ward told Carib that the
Conference was a big succg and
she thought it very instructive to

delegates attending.
expressed that
that kind should
intervals it

the variou
The hope Was
Conferences of
be held at regular

arder to benefit the different
Y.W.C.A.’s of different areas

NOTHER Barbadian present

at the Conference was Mrs

A. W. Scott, of
Street who with her
ters returned home on Monday
morning. While in Trinidad thé
children witnessed the triumph of

Woodside, 3a
three daugh-

their colleagues of the Queen’t
College Netball Team.
* *
I IKE Mrs. Scott who was an
~« Observersto the Y.W.C
Conference, Mrs, F. A. 3ishop. ‘ol
“Bingen”, Howell's Cross. Road

on Monday morn-
short holiday

returned home
ing after spending <

in Trinidad.

Two Weeks Here
€>" , Wednesday Mr, George

Swanston arrived in the
island by B.W.LA, from St. Lucia.
He has come over to spend two
weeks’ holiday here as a guest at
Leaton-on-Sea, The Stream, Mr.

Swanston is attached to the
Educational Department, in St.
Lucia
Returned Home
RS. E. BARNES who had
been spending two weeks’

holiday in the island returned to
Trinidad on Sunday. This is her
periodic visit to the island and
during ther stay here she was a

guest at Leaton-on-Sea.
First Visit
iSS JOY BRATHWAITE who
came over for two weeks’
vacation here returned to Trini-
dad on Monday by B.W.LA. Miss
Brathwaite is attached to the

Control Board, Port-of-Spain and
this was her first visit here. She
was living at The Stream.
Back to Trinidad
ISS LETTICE Crouch after
paying her first visit to
Barbados as a guest at Silver
Beach Guest House returned home
yesterday by B.W.LA. to Trini-
dad. Miss Crouch is a teacher at
the Tacarigua E,. C, Sahool, She
was spending two weeks’ holiday.
Teacher Returns
ISS EILEEN O’BRIEN who
had been spending two
wecks’ holiday here as a guest at
Silver Beach Guest
the island yesterday
for Trinidad. She is a teacher at
the Newton Girls’ R.C. Schvol

B.W.LA,

by

and this was her first visit to
Barbados.
Director Returns Home
ISS C. LAI-FOOK,

of the L. J. Williams Market-

ing Co., Ltd,, of Port-of-Spain,
returned home yesterday morn-
ing by B.W.1LA,. after spending

about two weeks here on business,
She was a guest at the
Royal.

BY THE

SEE that’M. André Simon has

been defining the Gourmet

and the Gourmand, I suspect

Pierrette Brillat-Savarin, sister

of the famous Brillat-Savarin, of
being a bit of, both.

Within two months of her hun-
dredth birthday, after a heavy
meal, she shouted to her servi-
tors “Quick! Bring in the
dessert! I think I'm dying!’
Brillat-Savarin, as rnusic-hall
comedians “should know, was
born at a place called Belley,
above the Lac du Bourget. He
wrote books on political economy,
which neither you nor I have
read. But his Physiologie du
Gout (translated by Arthur
Machen) is one of the books
every decent man knows by
heart in his cradle.

Soup was invented
LEADING

before forks
A horrible food in restaurants

article about
attributes this form of progress
to the entry into the industry of
people who “hardly know a knife
from a fork.” But knowing a
knife from a fork, and a spoon
from either, would not necessar-
ily help anybody to make the pro-
cessed meat more appetising, and
in many restaurants, where no
cutlery is supplied, the guests lap
up their hash like dogs, as though

it were soup. There are, how-
ever, certain things a restaurateur
should know. For instance: —

How to make out an illegible
bill.

2. How to translate tinned
rabbit into the French for roast
chicken.

3. How to switch wine labels.

Interlude

EING a man of few words,

Decieeiie

Prodnose: Ha-ha! Ho-ho! Few
words! Why, every day you are
babbling!

Myself: It would be compara-

70 CENTS

36in. RAYON PONGEE SILK,







KON TIKI Members of the preview party leaving the Bridgetown Physical



Plaza yesterday after witnessing a

currently advertised for showing,

Spent Two Weeks
ISS STEPHNIE GRENADA
an employee of

Grant & Co,, Port-of-Spain i
turned home on Monday by
B.W.LA. to Trinidad, She
two weeks’ holiday here a
guest at “Stoneycroft”, Worthing.
This was her first Pe ORB
island.

For Two Months

MONG the arrivals Thurs-

on

day last from British Guian
were Mr. and Mrs, Dudley Hay)
and their grand-daughter June

Garrett. Mr. Haynes who



Inspector of Police in the British
Guiana Police Force is on a two-
month vacation and is the guest
of Mrs. Angela jart of River
Road, St. Michael.

Returning Next Year
R. AND MRS, NICHOLAS
L. HERRADA and _ their
daughter Martha left the island
yesterday morning by B.W.LA
on their way back to Caracas,
Venezuela They have been
spending three weeks’ holiday as
guests of Mrs. Consuele Godda
of the Garrison
Mr. Herrada is un account: =
working with the American
ternational Underwriters Co.

‘was his first visit to the island, He Mrs.

Gordon i’

spent B.W.LA,

rq dad



For Marriage

voiceless

posed matrimonial quiz is

Church of England in Canada,

tions
that
marriage.

party you intend to marry?
yeu ever a member of the chureh?

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

New Quiz

LORONTO,

Shaky-kneed bridg®grooms aad
brides May disappear
trom Anglican churches if a pre-
adopted.
finished
the proposed ques-
tionnaire, the few questions in the
marriage ceremony wili have
jost their terror.

The pre-marriage qt uestioMing
by the minister has been propgsed
by the Anglican commussiofi®oa
marriage and related* matters. It
will be considered in September
by the ge@neral syfiod of the

By the time they've

answering







The commission hopes the ques-
will turn up informatjon
will help .form a

Here are a few:
Jong have you known the
Were

How




What church? Are you entering
this marriage with é€ntire frée-
dom’? Have you your parents or *

guardians’ consent? Have you









ever before contracted a_ velig-
fous or civil marriage? With
whom, when and where? Has it
been dissolved by death, civil law
or the church?

Any children living? What
rérious iliness have you suffered
from? Have you had a gei@ral

examination recently ?
preview of the film: KON TIKI aro you consulted, a physijes-



Business V.
R. DARBY HUTCHINSON,
Manager of Cenfral Carib-
bean Distributors, returned fron
Trinidad yesterday morning by
after paying a_ short
visit to that
Engineer In Jamaica
M" MICHAEL, HUTSON,
4 of Hon'ble F. C, Hutson,
M.L.C. and Mrs Hutson of
Grand View”, Government Hill
eturned from Jamaica yesterday,
Michael who has been spending
iwo. weeks’ holiday with his par-
ents, i an engineer working at
Caymanas Sugar Factors in
Spanish Town.
1 Son
born to Mr. and
Bladon at Dr.
on the 16th
and babe are

isiness co.ony

son

SON wa
Mrs, John
Bayley’s ~ Clinic
August. Mother
joing fine
Back Home
ISS LUCIE MESTIER of the
American Consulate in
Bridgetown, returned from Trini-
yesterday morning by
B.W.1.A, after a short visit.
From U.S. Via Grenada
i M" CHARLIE TAYLOR, Man-
iger of the Hotel Royal and
Taylor are now back in

came over in order to be with his Barbados after an absence of two

Nicholas who is a student at
Lodge School now on holiday.

son
the

of Caracas, returned home. yes-

B.W.I.A. His wife and three

children who came over with him, yesterday

will be remaining in Barbados for
another four weeks.
Mr, Ireland is an accountant of s

&o. of Caracas.

WAY....

tively difficult to write a daily
column without using words.
What I was about to say
Prodnose: In your usual long-
winded fashion.
Myself: It is you also who are

making this long-winded.

Prodnose; Secretly, aren’t you
rather pleased with me for help-
ing to fill up space when
have nothing to say?

Myself: A most improper ques-
tion, which I prefer not to
answer.

you

SAM CODFORTH,
noted for his gubtlety,
enter an understaffed
yesterday, carrying his
ever his shoulder,

When questioned
was Rodent-Officer
that he had been
ferrets to clean
ment, The
to the sack. “
ferrets,” he
ill,” said

tried to
museum
large sack

he said
Debrett,
sent with his
up in the hase-
official put his ear
They are very quiet
said, “They are
Codforth. The

When he tas

recovered his
breath Willie looks around
nervously. “I've been scared,”
he quavers. An awtu] creature



i came and pufted fire and smoke at





me,"" “Why it must have
| the dragon !"" cries Rupert
chasing him. Where is he
oe eee

FIRST CLASS UTILITY CLOTH

Hotel the firm of Price, Waterhouse and Mrs. John Suares of Carlos Street,

who is not Flobster in the dusk last week.

all fell
alert marked Ma Withersedge morosely.

and a half months, They visited

several places in Canada and the

He said that he had an enjoya- U.S.A. where they had a very en-
House left ble hotiday and hoped .to return joyable holiday.
next year. Mr. and Mrs. Taylor arrived
Accountant Leaves yesterday morning via © Trinidad
FTER spending two weeks’ by BW.LA, .
holiday as a guest at “Bow- For Trinidad Holiday
den”, Hastings, Mr, R. M, lveland ISS DOROTHY YEARWOOD,

daughter of Mrs, Robert

Directo? terday morhing via Trinidad by Yearwood of My Lord's Hill and

a student of Queen’s College, left
morning by B.W.LA.,
for Trinidad to spend part of her
summer vacation. While there,
she will be the guest of Mr. and

Woodbt ook

By Beachcomber

official at once suspected some-
thing, and Codforth was refused
admission,

Falling to bits
it was so old a ship-—-who knows,
who knows?—
And yet so beautiful, I watched
in vain \
To see the mast burst open
a rose,
And the

with

whole deck put on its

leaves again,
ae lines stung me
when I saw the Saucy ag

half expected a swarthy stint
with. earrings, and a_ coloured
scarf round his head, and a cut-
lass. between his teeth, to come
bounding up from below. Instead

he of which the patient moon-face of
and Mrs,

Withersedge emerged. What
sea-tale had she to tell? Alas!
All her plaint was of the slow
disintegration of the rotting craft
Even as we conversed, a chunk
off the stern, “Slosh,” re-

- Rupert’s Spring Adventure—12



Wille points up a slope and begs
his pal not to go thar way, but
Rupert does not wait Over the
lope he runs and into a dell

beyond. There's no sign of the

{ragon,’’ he murmurs. ‘‘ |] wonder

{ that farmer has seen it. RO Ag
1 ask him.”

70 CENTS
70c.

ru



White, Rose, Royal Blue, Green, Grey,
Chocolate, ony Blue, Gunpowder Blue

-: For :-

DRESSES, UNDERWEAR, SHIRTS, PYJAMAS, ETC

AT

70 cents

WHITFIELDS

YOUR SHOE

DIAL 4220

STORE

ONLY

70 cents

(or bride) were to see your doctor
S80 as to get a report on your
health and fitness to marry? Are
you ready to’ exchange health
certificates with the other party?
If not, why not?

Do you understand that
riage is a_ life-long union



mar-
for





better or for worse? Do you
know that marriage is ordained
for the procreation of children?

Are you entering upon marria#ze
with the understanding that there
shall be no children? Have you

expressed any other condition to
your marriage?

Do you realize the importance
of a resonable budget for the
maintenance of. the home?

The Anglican commission on
marriage also proposes a jojnt
declaration to be signed by fhe

bride and groom: .
“We believe it (marriage) is
for the purpose of mutual fellow-
ship, encouragement and under-
standing, for the procreation (if
it may be) of children and their
physical and spiritual nurture, for
the safeguarding and benefit of
society.” —B.U.P



Listening Hours











WEDNESDAY, AUG. 20

100 — 7.15 p.m 1 76M 558M

400 pb The News, 4.19 p.m. The
Daily § ce, 4.15 p.m. Edinburgh In-
ternationa Festival, 5.00 p.m Sehu-
mann, 5.15 p.m. Listeners’ Choice, 6,40
p.m. The Hymns e Sing, 5.55 p.m
England vs. Australia *(Speedway), 6,00



p.m. Scottish Magazine, 6.15 p.m. My
Kind of Music, 6.45 p.m. Sports Round-
Up and Programme Parade, 7.00 p.m
The News, 7.10 p.m. Home News From
Britain

TAS — 10.30 p.m

2.58 M

31 2M








7.15 p.m, Calling the West Indje: a
pm. All Hale, 8.15 p.m. Radio New
reel, 8.30 p.m, Statement of Accouw
#.45 p.m. Interlude, 8.55 p.m.
Editorials, 9.00 p.m
10.00 p.m. The News, 10,10 p.m. News
Talk, 10.15 p.m. Mid-Week Talk, 10.30
p.m. Edward Ward Reporting on Racing
Saeed oa od

GAIETY

The Garden—St. James
LAST SHOW TO-NITE 8.30

FORCE of ARMS”
William HOLDEN and
“FoRT wo (Color

Randolph SCOTT









From. the
Twenty Questions,





































Thurs. (onty) 2.30 p.m

“KINGS ROW"
Ronald REAGAN-—Ann SHERIDAN

“SUGARFOOT”’ (Color)
Randolph SCOTT

SPECTACULAR
TECHNICOLOR

ADVENTURE !

{T’S THE LAST WORD IN
WESTERN
EXCITEMENT!

Paramount presents

The LAST
OUTPOST





starring
Ronald Rhonda
REAGAN @ FLEMING
with

Bruce BENNETT, Bill WIL-
LIAMS, Noah BEERY

At the
BARBAREES (Dial 5170)

PLAZA

FRIDAY 22nd
4.45 & 8.30 p.m.
& continuing Daily
Blazing Action
“THE LAST OUTPOST”

OPENING Fri, 22nd at
2.30 & 8.30 at

EMPIRE



Walt
Ons

STORY O

gD



XK; Look in the section in whith your birtiday tomes and
ind

K March i—April 20 personal an

*«
*

GEMINI
‘asting May 21—June 21






a psychiatrist? x
Would you mind if the groom

*«










20, 1952

a

Al QUALITY

UTLERY

BEST PRICES IN
THE ISLAND

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST















FOR WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 20, 1952




what your outlook is, according to the stars.





8 Friendly day on whole; domestic affairs,
artistie interests among top
favoured. Void unnecessary contention;

don’t aggravate others.

Should be ideal day for your interests,
Venus asp@ct. pugurs we'l for personal
aehievement, Plan for tomorrow, too.
Mild indications

ones tomorrow. nalines

going to very
Don’t overdo but

should you waste any valuable time; stress

urgent “-

CANCER Be guided Po demand of your occupation

Tune 22—July 238and home igations. Aim to get ahead,
without strain, anxiety.
have a better day.

»

















Hotels and Guest Houses

TAURUS Should take note of this

April 21—May 20

Pumpkin Pies
6 ¢ each

B ARBADOS sy |
AKERIES MoT.
Dial 4758
JAMES STREET








ee ak ot







Â¥. De LIMA
& CO. LTD.

20, Broad St. and
Marine Gardens

*









Keep cool and



Neither stimulating nor hindering aspects.
This sort of day Leoites often need to give
pause for reflection, planning, rest.

LEO
July 24—Ang. 22

















JUST RECEIVED

SIMMONS BEDSTEADS

4 Feet 6 inches

ONLY A LIMITED QUANTITY SO CALL
AND GET YOURS EARLY

VIRGO No wholly d giscouragin B elements for pur-

Aug. 23—Sept. 23 poseful, activities, hobbies, healthy shorts
or recreation. Properly allocated schedule
will relieve strain.

Venus in auspitious configuration is stimu-









LIBRA
lating, promising for private interests, deli- 2 Incorporated
Sept. 24—Oct. 28 cate matters, domestic problems and for ene -
artistic professions. ¥ T HERBERT LTD.
Suggest you take things in stride, serenely, * 1860 10 & 11 Roebuck Street 1926

SCORPIO unanxiously. Day favourable on whole but
Oct. 24—Nov. 22 you must take care to give attention to

impertant matters.
* *

SAGITTARIUS Much the same as for Scorpio now. You
Nov. 23—Dec. 22 Will save nerves and health if you heed
same advice, Creative and ingenious meth-

ods will help.
Early part of day may require more go-
getiveness, and if you keep steady, prob-
lems should vanish and things generally
grow I etter by sundown. Tomorrow prom- *
ising ih many ways.

*

Restlessness, sudden decisions tabu. To-
day will respond well to intelligent well
planned effort. Important, too, to be










THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LTD.

White Park Road, Bridgetown

*





% capricorn
Dec. 23—- Jan. 21

*
A GAnrUs
x Jan, = — Feb. 20

ENGINEERS, BRASS and IRON FOUNDERS

Works contain rnodern appliances for the A: hae tg ot
first-class work of all kinds, and especiall
SUGAR MACHINERY and STEAMSHBIPS

in AGRICULTURAL MACHINERY and
GENERAL ENGINE ROOM STORES










*

Dealers















*« Sars, aot seen Occasionally take time * - of all Description
PY 4 OR. Fa ‘del aati IRRIGATION PROJECTS, PUMPING EQUIPMENT
avoura rays li To! es-
Keer. otters t tentays foe gitecte y ook period ao * and ELECTRICAL INSTALLATIONS A ECIALTY
° planning ahead, ie up familiar mat- For
ters, spending due time a

*«

YOU BORN TODAY: are energetic, full of ambition, action,
Kiruly vibrant. Have delightful personality, as good company
and story-teller. Usually generous spender, and likeable.
Also inclined to some egotism, atveethibte to flattery, Your ~
Sign has given great military leaders, financial and business *
tycoons, noted travellers. Birthdate of: Benjamin Harrison,
23rd U.C. President; Raymond Poincare, French statesman.

routine tasks and *

vacational activities. Satisfaction, Quality and Service



Contact

THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY. LID.

Phone : 4546, 4650 Workshop
Phone 4528 Stores Dept:



x eee MRK MR HH LY



BARBAREES
nae 5170)
Last 2 Shows TO-DAY
4 90 & 8.30 p.m
BOWERY BATTALION

Leo Gorcey & The
Dead “End Kids &
CAVALRY SCOUT
{Cinecolor}
Rod
Cameron &



colt lacs

Today & Tematiow
445 & 8.30 p.m
“MONEY MADNESS” &
“FOR YOU I DIE"
Catht Downs

—
a









TODAY (Only)
4.30 & $30 PM
“BELLS of SAN
FERNANDO"
Donald WOODS &
Gloria WARE &










“Every Picture
tells a Story”


















Sat. Special 1.30 p.m
“THU NDERHOOF™
Preston FOSTER &

“WHIRLWIND

RAIDERS’

Charles STARRETT
a

Opening Fri
“TAP ROOT’

Audrey)
Long
Whip WILSON &
“TRAIL’S END"
Johnny MACK BROWN
THURSDAY:
Mat. (Only) 4.30 p.m

ene)
Thurs. Special 1.80 p.m.
THE OUTLAW
and
NEVADA

“_e é Seveciety i oe THURSDAY Van Heflin &

get happy relief by taking Doan’s Backache Roddy MeDOWALL Mat, (only) 4.30 p.m. || “PARDON MY. ‘

‘They help the kidneys to rid the blood ‘ “NIGHT BOAT. TO. “SPRING SONG" SARONG'

DUBLIN”
Robert NEWTON

aT (only) 8.80
RIMSON aa

ole Raye & Abbott & Costello

—_—————
‘WATERLOO ROAD" || =~ —saT.
art_Granger Midnite SAT.

“OUTLAW BRAND”

Kiingy Pi ‘Tey bap te dey Se ed
wise might collect in the system and cause distress.













aercetsn ease fo eet | aa ome
en “COURT? ‘ROOM FOR TWO” &jj"
toomen <2 oe be afin po vag affictent diuretic and urinary wi Naeem oS!) ceca " ae Dingh, SHERIDAN Jobnny MACK
1 fe AN eo
tok your “‘DOANS : YOU'VE NEVER BEFORE SEEN
ae “A PICTURE LIKE THIS!

‘“JANETTA DRESS eee

(Next Door to Singer’s)
















The amazing saga of six men who



BALLERINA SKIRTS in Colourful Designs
NYLON UNDERWEAR in White, Peach & Black

SWIM SUITS & BEACH ROBES
SOS SESE EE LSE SCFSON SECS SEEOP ESSEC ASSES

GLOBE
TO-DAY 3 SHOWS 1.30, 5 & 8.30 P.M,

SCARAMOUCHE

Stewart Janet Mel Eleanor
GRANGER — LEIGH — FERRER — PARKER —

IT TOWERS LIKE A GIANT
ABOVE ALL MOTION PICTURES

Pit 24c., House 48c., Bal. 72¢., Box $1.00
Kids 14 Price 1.30 p.m. Kids House 18¢, Bal.



SOL LESSER

4%s

Produced LE NORDEMAR
Music by SUNE WALDIMIR

wilcoxon
Artfilm A.B.












Photographed by the
men whe heed ta

AT LAST ON YOUR SCREEN!




ROODAL



LAST = SHOWS TO-DAY 445 & 8.30
TOM BROWN’'S SCHOOLDAYS
Starring

To-day &
TRE



morrow 4.30 & 8.15
nm}

John HOWARD DAVIES
Robert NEWTON
Extra
Paramount British News Reel
————
TOMORROW ONLY 4.30 & 8 30
Lon MacCALLISTER
Preston FOSTER

in
THE BIG CAT











an
DISHONORED LADY
Starring
Hedy LAMARR -— Dennis O'KEEFE

OLYMPIC
LAST 2 SHOWS TO-DAY 4.30 & 8.15
Robert RYAN — Robert PRESTON
in :
BEST OF THE BAD MEN &
ON THE LOOSE

Starring

Melvyn DOUGLAS




Joan EVANS



Calor by 7 ‘4 3

TOMORROW ONLY 4.30 & 8.15

TECHNICOLOR Tim HOLT — Richard MARTIN
AN ALL-LIVE ail eee |

ACTION PICTURE al N SMUGGLERS &

Starring

RICHARD TODD George RAFT tants BARI

w awe Rice reser ere ese





OPENING FRIDAY 4.30 & 48.15
OUTSIDE THE WALL &
BORDERLINE

——$—$—$—$$—





PLAZA —Starting Friday

BRIDGETOWN

“KON—TIKI” Plays with the Action Packed
Drama!

80 only
ad ST. IVES

Charles
Sins BURNETT

i
TWO FISTED STRANGER

ORROW at 1.
ads he o P OLD. SANTE Bi es &
ON TEXAS

FRIDAY at 8.40 P.M.
Madam O'LINDY & Her Troupe

in
CARACAS NIGHTS
Doors Open At 7 p.m.

Opening SATURDAY 4.45 & 8.15
Trevor HOWARD — Anouk

in
GOLDEN SALAMANDER
ROYAL
TO-DAY & TOMORROW 4.30 & 8.15
Richard BASEHART
Scott BRADY in
HE WALKED BY NIGHT & ,
TOO LATE FOR. TEARS
Starring
Lizabeth SCOTT — Dan DURYEA
"FRIDAY only 4.90 & 8.15
Lyodd BRIGGS in
THREE STEPS NORTH &
BROKEN JOURNEY
with Phyllis CALVERT































A WOMAN CAN
MAKE OR BREAK











deliberately risked their lives to prove

a theory! On a primitive-type raft -
of balsa logs they drifted from Peru ;
to the isles where the hula girls wait! i
101 days and 4,300 miles without
contact with civilization, exerting
superhuman efforts to keep afloat i







WEDNESDAY, AUGUST

VUUOUETOA DUET RODE

This plane promises to slash
the high cost of taking a car on
holiday to the Continent. The
plane itself is the familiar 55-ton
Universal Freighter, but the plan
is to adapt it as a cross-Channeél
car ferry—with three decks.

The fares will still be higher
than by sea, but cars, motor-
cycles, and passengers will cut
out the costly overnight stay
before embarking.

The plane will fly from GatWick
direct to Cormeilles, to the north-
west of Paris.

So holidays abroad will begin
sooner and be freer_from irriiating
formalities,

Here i¢ how the cars
stowed. Six to eight cars, ac-
cording to size, will be on the

will be



me

The BASIL

20, 1952

= ULUPOUTMEOETEEU TTR ETT PTET OTRAS RENOUA DET PPT TETHER UN ERLE FTEA UE ULUEU PRE CPE ATES RODE CEU EP PUET PRE REPTCT TES CRESPO ERT

NOW...CARS BY THE ‘BUS-LOAD’






first and second decks with five
motor-cycles,

On the third and
the crew will have their quar-
ters, and there will be room for
42 passengers and baggage.

Cars will be loaded through
doors at the back of the plane,
then jacked on to trolleys which
willsrun the length of the plane.

What a fine piece of enterprise
by this company which has al-
ready three times reduced its
Lympne to Le Touquet cross-
Channel car ferry rates.

How different from ship travel,
where the charge is stiH 7s. 9d.
a ferry mile for an average-size

car,
BR.M... A.D, 1954
Peep into the tuture: Raymond
Mays writes me from Bourne,

upper deck



French Minister,
Indo-Chinese King
To Confer

INDO CHINA, Aug. 18
French Minister Resident Jean
Letourneau, arrived on Monday
for conferences with King Noro-
cagom Sihanouk and the first
meéting of the newly created
Franco-Canadian military Com-
mittee. Letourneau went im-
mediately to the palace where he
was received in an atmosphere
cescribed as exceptionally under-

standing and full of goodwill.

The King released the text of
his Saturday speech, in which he
said “the coming of M. Letour-
neau constitutes an important
event for study and a solution of
the military questions which oc-
cupy a place in the foreground of
affairs of national interest.” He
said that he hoped “very much
to arrive at a happy solution with
Monsieur Letourneau on several
problems and obtain satisfaction
on a number of points on requests
which I have presented in favour
of our army.”

—UP.

Costello Sent
To Jail

NEW YORK, August.

The Government on Friday put
Frank Costello (63) in jail a place
the notorious underworld figure
had avoided for the last 37 years.
Where he will be taken from
here has not been revealed. He
will go to the Federal prison
possibly at Danbury, Connecticut
or Lewisburg, Pennsylvania
After six months he will be
eligible for parole.

Costello gambled on refusing to
tell the Senate Crime Investigators
his net worth or answer questions
about connections with political
figures including former Mayor
William O’Dwyer, present United
States Ambassador to Mexico, He
was convicted April 4, by a
Federal Court Jury on ten counts
of contempt for walking out on
the Crime Committee in March.
1951. He was sentenced on April 8,
to 18 months in prison and fined
$5,000. A U.S. Court of Appeal
reversed seven of the originai
counts and lowered- the fine to
2,000 but upheld the jail term.

—UP.





Pinay Returns
After Vacation

PARIS, Aug. 18
French Premier Antoine Pinay
faced with growing problems,
will return here to-day aifier his
vacation and is scheduled to go

into conference with ais mitis-
ters on Wednesday. After 20 days
of restful vacation in Aix Les
Bains, Pinay will piunge into
affairs of state with renewed
vigour.

The last cabinet meeting took

place in July at the President of

the French Republic Vincent
Auriol’s summer chaieay but
sinee then new important ques-

tions have arisen which will have

to be dealt with soon. They are:
the Tunisian question, the Saar
disvussions,” and the threatened
rise in cost of living. —UF.

POSITS SSO SGIUO IO IOMOO,
PAIN &
COMES WITH x

rR A # WY

Ore




}

\

' \P

ESL GLUCOOIO GOON NT OODIQOGLD LODO



60 Sets Of

Personality Test

s IT SHOWS IF THEY ARE ALIKE
'WO Canadian psychologists are carrying out a two-
year examination into heredity in twins in London.

are testing 60 sets of twins,
South London schools.

Eniigrants Sail To
Canada In A Yacht

HAMILTON, Ontario.
Six men and a woman, includ-



six or eight Ave motor-cycles, e Secretary for Overseas

en the first two tecks uj che nie . were —

lane, and stild pisin 42 passengers servative, en ol e an

oe aoe 2 ae Hythe div.): No, Sir. We are

¥ “a3? heavily in deficit with Cuba on

4 in our balance of any
ae additional of sugar

ARDEW Column

BARBADOS ADVOCATE
Britain Is In |
Deficit With

PAGE THREE







TO



SISCO!

PAINTS

|
Me. N. N. Dodds, (Labeur,
Dartford) asked the President oi
the Board of Trade, in view of
the glut of sugar in Cuba, if he
will initiate negotiations for a
ne@w wade pact with that country

Se a MONAHAN



we were to pay for them in in-
convertible sterling or not. We
already need a substantial in-








Lines: “I am most anxious that Lone Rider erease in our exports to Cuba to
we shall be in a position to build Loads of good luck: Lieut... Pay for the existing level of ou:
a car to the new (2'4-litre un- Colonel Goldie Gardner, who last Sugar purchases from that coun- ‘
supercharged) formula for 1954. year created 16 records on the ‘TY. Theres a
; ‘nak ; ‘ Utah Salt Flats in this super- yyy . . Says ; ei
My_life’s ambit $s still to

see ~ British car winning al the i nce a opecia, sails in the Gentleman aware of the state- Sts u“ ose 4 SOU CAN — oer. TREAT !”
Grand Prix events. ct gal dor igen fs ag 3 for ment made by prominent peo- Purp HERS BEING THE SW, -TE: LAT !
on sf Cuba _ ? : .
“— am convinced that the the British motor industry with = that they are pre-}] SISSONS BROT

to sell sugar at less tha!

pared & COMPANY, LTD,
2d. per Ib to this country, the

the same car. enue Ue! & LONDON ome

knowledge gained during the last
: a & & For years Gardner covered all

four years with the B.R.M, would







C i money to be spen n-] SIsco PAINTS Stocked by
enable us to do this—if only we Costs of his record attempts out try, and as ee betas Herbert Ltd., Plantations Ltd., Gare
have the facilities and a certain Of his own pocket. What enthu- cut, cannot some further efforis |...” ee a OW. tohit
amount of finance.” siasm, and what success he has p. nade t tr: tah foe a Co. Lid, T, J. Sealy, Centra
brought himself and bis country! made to get extra sugar which Foundry Ltd, Watkins & Co, Lid
My C a) ys pales My Tinder- would not have the effect of Peo yesoe wardware Co. Ltd MADE IN UK
y Comment: ou have cer y Tinder-Box ting h , J and “ ; ; ;
tainly built up experience the — Reflleetion: Yes. most women ‘ets hardship in this country: se The Perfection of Confection.
hard way. If the B.R.M.s are do drive hesitatingly on the roads. Mr. Mackeson: Yes. Sir, Both} ———— = \ ——————————————
now going to work — and their Now why? I believe they lack my right hon. Friend ‘and I have
iast Silverstone showing gave confidence in themselves should seen a re} i : ee a enemies
great hope—then you will get they find themselves in a seepage ner dh

jam. oe trouble at the moray
is that we are importing £481)
million from Cuba and only ex-
porting £7% million, and we ar:
determined not to take any step:
to prejudice the interest of the

support for 1954.”

Twins Get

*
MADE BY THE MONKS OF

What do you think?—L.E.S.

15 HOURS





“Full-firing
CHAMPIONS

BUCKFAST A

British Commonwealth sugar pro- .
T hes =| — deliver th
a Q) LEARN Mr. J. D. Profumo, * Conser- e ver t e

vative, Warwickshire, Strafford-
on-Avon div.): If the Govern-
ment cut out altogether the im-
portation of these fantastically ex-

TO SWIM full power you neesi

' ”
They merican airmen [n Britain Pemsive sugar substitutes from the t
aged between 12 and 15 from Aire to be taught to swim Continent the money saved could 0 win races
; —on a “conveyor belt” be used to buy sugar from Cuba
system. thereby achieving similar results

“We believe heredity in twins
is much more prominent than has
been realised, and we hope to
prove it,” said 28-year-old Mr.
Hugh McLeod, of Vancouver.
Working with him is Mr. Duncan
Blewett, also of Vancouver.

After 25,000 calculations, 120
interviews and months of compil-

In an intensive “Survival to that in the mind of the hoa
Swimming programme ember for Dartford (My.
instructors will teach GIs in 15 Dodds). Would not that have the
hours how to save themselves approval of the whole House?

and others. They expect that
85 out of 100 will Sais i Mr. Mackeson: That would not
course at first try. solve our balance of payment

The 15 per cent who fall will situation with Cuba, which is 'p



Nei Si

coma slic y 3ai i « ” fact almost part of the dollar
ing two Englishmen, who sailed ing facts, they hope to write a tart the conveyor belt
acroas the Atlantic from Britain thesis for thelr doctor of philoso- staining all over again. wESR.
in a 172ft. yacht, have reached phy degrees from London Univer- Idea behind the pro- 4 a. G. Bottomley, (Labour If you feel worn out, depressed, or
their journey’s end in Hamilton sity. gramme is to make every poonccter and Chatham): Wil 7
harbour, at the western end of | They interview the children American in Britain able to Rochester a m): 1 no generally run down a glass or two
Lake Ontario , (with the parents’ consent) for survive accidents im the the hon. Gentleman consider set-
Their 4000-mile voyage from five or six hours at Maudsley water ing the Cuban Government rep

Falmouth, via the Azores, Ber-
muda, New York and the St.
Lawrence River, lasted five weeks,

The yacht, Le Cheval Noir, a
60-ton converted Royal Naval har-
bour defence launch, with diesel
motors and sails, was bought at
Newhaven by Mr. Arthur Hill, of
Hamilton.

“It had belonged to a publican
at Richmond,” he said.

Staying In Canada

The English members of the
crew are Mr. Jack Johnson, a
lorry driver, former member of
the Royal Army Service Corps,
and Mr, Peter Lockwood, engineer
and draughtsman, Both expect to
settle here.

The woman member, Mrs, C,
Johnston, wife of the Canadian
first mate, acted as cook,

The navigator, Mr. Ronald
Spears, a DSC, formerly of the
Merchant Navy, steered by the
stars and dead reckoning. He
claimed he never had to aiter
course more than three degrees.

—L.E.S.



Police Tighten Dope
Guard lx Canada

TORONTO

Canadian police are intensi-
fying their watch on suspected
drug pedlars following disclosures
that a number of high-school chil-
dren in Vancouver have become
addicts.

Arrests
scores of
questioned.

Some students said pedlars ot
first gave them drugs free, But
when they asked for more, they
had to pay up to 30s, for a cap-
sule—usually of heroin,

The drug ving
when a girl of i6
street as

of heroin.

have been made, anc
Vancouver studen

was discovered
olapsed in the
in overdose

a resul

—LE.S.

Muslims Arrested

NEW DELHI, Aug. 13.
A message reports the arrest of
over 300 Muslims when they or-
ganized a protest procession at
midnight against the publication
of articles in the Alahabad, Hindu
newspaper, on the Prophet. Ac-
cording to an official announce-
jment, the situation is “well under

' control.” —UP.



a day of Buckfast Tonic Wine will
quickly restore lost energy and










resentative and suggest that it
might be to our mutual advantag '
to forgo Havana cigars this yea‘
and take more sugar?

Hospital, Camberwell, where both
work,

Five main tests, most of them
written, are given to show how
the twins get on with other people.
their strength of perso ity,
character and other facts.

A third man, a social worker,
visits the twins’ homes.

“Heredity in identical twins is
usually the same,” said Mr.
McLeod,” but different in frater-
nal twins.” They are interviewing
only twins of the same sex, see
three sets a week,

Mr. Blewett is financed by his
ex-serviceman’s education grant.
With him are his wife Irene, act-
ing as supply teacher in the local
schools, and their two children,
John, six, and Mary, two,

Through fire
They will also be tanght how
to swim through flames, and
use trousers, pillow-cases, and
MuUttresses as IeHeIS, Mr. Mackeson: That is a diff-
Several American airmeD erent question. I am only too
have been drowned in Britain, Shxious to do everything we can
hatest case was at Brige Norton ag the right hon. Gentleman say«
ee, ee ee it is our desire to help the Cubar:
ae he ee to purchase more things from
this country because, unless that
is done, it will be difficult for
us to maintain our present put~
chases.

Can't Go To
British Guiana



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Cattle Experts
Will Meet In France

LYON, France, Aug. 12.
Veterinary experts from five
nations will meet here next month



Leo he you own, a new set i 4 ,
i eae Gaiveraity cote wae to decide on weapons for an all- of full-firiag
he ° i 7 g | acer
has a part-time job as psychologist out war on aftosa cattle disease. LONDON Champion Spark



to .
complete thelr studies, ft geems Holland, Belgium, Spain and
such a waste of learning for some- Portugal’— are also expected to
one to get so far and be unable Pass a resolution making vaccina-

t

Dr, Charles Meriux, director of James Harper-Smith, 31-year- Plugs will cleliver a
at an — neg the French Institute for aftosa old civil servant in Georgetown, the full power | Y NEY BS A a
‘ ay "3 on. Ucen b research told newsmen that British Guiana, must wait another built into | | 4 Ya
ie 7S, tt offered rei best Genes “major” discussion will concern two years for his wedding to 19- your engine. | ah A Bh
cunities for our work,” Mr. Blew. what available preventative year-old Geraldine Boreham, 4 |
ett said. “The only set-back to ™ethods should be used. London typist,
‘earning in this country is that Delegates—representing France, |

Miss Boreham’s mother’s o
tions and has refused ‘her per-
mission to go to British Guiana

ETON WENE,

First on land, on



ini i jon of livestock obligatory. to marry him. Weeping, she went the air— Bere \
‘© in Cansde = mused can bor- ; A straight from the court to send sea, in : TAKE HOME A BOTTLE TODAY
row money to finish his training Meriux said that at present the off a cable, telling her fiance the) cry GARAGE TRADING CO, LTD scelablapdaseabsaniaiinanamenimalias ; decease

new serum is being produced in
ycance and Holland only. Experts
wil discuss whether to base their
aftosa campaign on this or other

and pay it back after he has quali- news,
ie uatamad cota “It looks as if I must wait until

—=AL.E.S. [ am 21”, she said. “My fiance





nue
de Sah eke
4
I

Goodrich Rubber
Workers Strike

NEW YORK, Aug. 18.

A strike paralyzed the Goodrich
Rubber Company, and a Govern-
ment proposal designed to prevent
a strike on the New York Central
Railroad was rejected by the trade
unions, Labour harmony was also
in the meat packing

threatened
industry as
Packinghouse

the
Workers’

types of vaccine. He said French
veterinarians have _ vaccinated
4,000,000 animals since the be-
ginning of the year and the figure
will mount to twice that much
about half of France’s livestock-
before next January.—U.P.

‘Lord Executor’ Dies

PORT-OF-SPALN Aug 16.
Philip Garcia, 69, known in the



CIO United calypso world as “Lord Executor’
Union died in Port Of Spain yesierday.

began one of its wars against the Garcia was a recognised “father”

“big four” meat pact.
About 18,000 rubber
in nine Goodrich plants
the United States began
today after 10 weeks of
tions. The strike began just afte
midnight on Sunday, and L.
Buckmaster, International

were “shut down or in
of being shut down.”
—UP.



workers ha
all over ties amused Trinidad and West
a strike Indian fans for half a
negotia- being able to ext

of the Trinidad calypso and per-
the greatest ever. His dit-

century
on any

subject.
The last ten years of his life

Presi- were spent in penury and want
dent of the CiO United Rubber put less than a year ago public the Premiet’s ’
Workers said that all the piants subscriptions totalling $1,000 help- Ahmer Bahar and the Premier's
process ed bring

some sort of solace to
Garela who had become blind.




A Charapion of Champions — Safety—Proved on the

is not due on leave for two years.”
—~B.U.P.

Mossadegh IIl

TEHERAN, Aug. 18.
Aging Premier Mohammed
Mossadegh, to whom the Majlis
gave dictatorial powers for six
months, cancelled all visits and
appointments on grounds of ill
health. Mossadegh fainted yester-
day and was reported to have had
a high fever,

Sources close to the Premier
said that if Mossadegh’s health
should deteriorate he had decided
to appoint a formal council to
administer state affairs for him.
This Council was said to include
the Deputy Premier and the
Finance Minister Bagey Kazemi,
Foreign Minister Hussein Navab,
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PAGE FCUR

BARBADOS eal ADYOCAT





Wednesday, August “20, 1952

Eastern Caribbean

THE. suggestion made by Mr. Albert
Gomes in London that Trimdad and the
Leeward and Windward islands should
consider “the advisability of federation
among themselves’ deserves close atten-
tion from the governments concerned.

Insufficient attention has hitherto been
paid during discussions of federation as to
the peculiar position the Leeward and
Windward Islands would hold in a federal
scheme.

Whereas British Guiana, British Hon-
duras, Barbados, Jamaica and Trinidad can
exist independently and make progress as
independent units within the British Com-
monwealth no Leeward or Windward
Island could hope to gain from individual
self-governing status much more than is
attainable under their present constitu-
tions.

The urge to become merged with a larg-
er political unit is therefore natural to the
small scattered units of the Leewards and
Windwards.

In this connection it is necessary to em-
phasise the failure of two cor attempts
to promote closer association. The Feder-
ation of the Leeward Islands which has
been in existence for more than eighty
years has not been successful and in recent
years federal administrative services have
been pruned. The ultimate result of fed-
eration of the Leewards Islands has been
the subordination of the Federal to the re-
gional governments.

In the Windward Islands political asso-
ciation has never been achieved and each
island has its own legislature sharing only
a governor and certain federal officers.

efore Montego Bay the suggestion had
been made that there should be closer
union between the Leeward and Windward
Islands. That suggestion was dropped
when proposals from the Montego Bay
conference on closer association of all the
British Caribbean territories was put for-
ward,

To-day Mr. Gomes’ suggestion seems to
be a return to the earlier suggestion of a
closer political association between the
Leewards and Windwards, and is an ad-
vance on that suggestion because of the
inclusion of Trinidad in the proposed po-
litical grouping.

Basically therefore Mr. Gomes’ sugges-
tion is realistic and deserving of consider-
ation by the governments concerned. Now
that British Guiana has turned its back on
the federation proposed by the Committee
which came into being as a consequence of
the Montego Bay conference, only Trini-
dad can offer the kind of assistance to the
Leewards and Windwards which will help
i to advance politically and economi-
cally.

The only question of importance which
these governments will have to decide is
whether federal government would_ be
more suitable to their needs than’ unitary
government. r

There is much lip-service paid in the
West Indies to-day to the ideal of West
Indian nationhood transeending local state-
hood but when it comes to time for decis-
ion, neither Barbadians, Trinidadians
nor Jamaicans seem prepared to make con-
cessions for the common good of the West
Indies. In’the Leewards and Windwards
the individual approach is less accentu-
ated and there is greater realisation in
those islands of the benefits to ke derived
from association with one or more of the
more powerful West Indian units. So far
there is a tendency for the Windwards to
throw in their votes with Trinidad and for
some of the Leewards to follow the lead of
Barbados. But neither the Leewards nor
the Windwards group attempt to stand on
their own feet at regional meetings with
the assurance displayed by Jamaica, Trini-
dad or Barbados.

Despite the tendency in the Leewards
and Windwards to-day for politicians to
seek greater powers internally yet there
seems to be a realization of the smallness of the
territory in which these powers are being exer-
cised, By contrast the sweets of poten power
in an island, as highly civilised by comparison
with the Leewards and Windwards as Barbados,
seem to give greater satisfaction to the aspirants
for political honours locally,

The desire for closer political association exists
in the Leewards and Windwards and if Trinidad
is willing to make an experiment with the Lee-
wards and Windwards, why should anyone in
Barbados or Jamaica object?

Only there seems good reason to ask whether
a-federal association is preferable to a unitary
form of government.

By joining with Trinidad, which is the richest
British West Indian island with the greatest po-
tential for industrial expansion, the L ards
and Windwards would become integral parts of
a territory of more than one million persons and
the addition of the population uf the Leewards
and Windwards to the Eastern Caribbean Gov-
ernment which Mr, Gomes has suggesteq would
help considerably to reduce the tendency for
Trinidad to become divided between Oriental
and Afro-European political groupings. An East-
ern Caribbean Government comprising Trinidad,
Tobago and the islands of the Leewards and
Windwards Would give Trinidad a position with
respect t6 Jamaica almost identical as to popu-
lation.

This is important because the greatest handi-
cap to political federation of the British Cuarib-
wean as independent units is the overwhelming
population of Jamaica, A political federation in
which Jamaica entered with a population of 114
million, an Exustern Caribbean Government with
1 million and British Guiana and Barbados with
a population of %4 million would be a federa-
tion from which most of the present obstacles to
federation would have been removed,

But if Trinidad and tee Leeward and Wind-
ward Islands were to form a federal as distinct
from a unitary government, the expenses of the
Eastern Caribbean Federal Government would
inerease and the temptation for ‘the Leeward and
Windwards governments to form blocks against
the Trinidad. government and to strengthen
their own regional governments at the expense
of the Federal Government would be always
present.

a



As provinces of Trinidad, benefiting from the

educational, medical and social services of the
larger island and from the investment of capital
which would be channelled through Trinidad,
the Leewards and Windwards would seem to
have opportunities for development which are
impossible to them as isolated island govern-
ments with semi-responsible legislatures. As po-
litical partners in a federal government combin-
ing together for what they can squeeze out of



Trinidad there seems little hope of an efficient
unit of government resulting from a federation.
But Mr. Gomes’ suggestion certainly seems
more practical and likely to succeed than many
r proposals for she long-deferred closer |

association of the ‘West Indies.

BARBADOS



THE FISCAL SURVEY
ed by the Economie Adviser

ists, is remarkable. Indeed

In its 107 pages the Survey
sontains a great deal of most
interesting information and dis-
eussion about the framework
within which a Barbadian
government must shape its
iseal and financial policies.
When one has read through it
one is left with the impression
that in such an accumulation of

hard facts there is occasion for
Gisquiet among those airy and
irresponsible members of the
community who find in the

clouds the only limits to the ex-
tension of Barbadian government
services and living standards. But
one has to read, and to think,
very carefully; for although the
Report is built around a theme,
ind although one can find in the
text a case to support the theme,
vet the author’s method of pre-
entation is in many ways un-
ortunate.
Booby Traps

His slightly inconsequential
onnecting phrases sometimes
leave one with the feeling that
he various sections were written
ncependently and then put to-
‘cher without quite enough care
eng taken to see that they fitted.
'n Part II, for example, while
most of the sections are highly
‘elevant to the subject matter,
their arrangement is most con-
fusing. The careful initial
ynalysis of the Island’s depen-
jence upon imports leads uncom-
‘ortably into several paragraphs’
werth of speculation on the
amount of the Tsland’s overseas
nvestments; thence we are taken,
‘oy way of a discussion of recent
vapital formation at home, back
‘o a wider discussion of the
valance of payments. This ten-
lency to allow stocks and flows
‘o jostle each other: — that is to
olece the capital account on all
‘ours with the income account—
leads one to suspect at several
oloces in the text that the author
195 tripped up on one of his own
»ooby traps. Incidentally the
‘ection in Part IT which discusses
‘he Tsland’s overseas assets is
yorticularly carelessly written
inl in its present form quite un-
ntelligible,

Thought Provoking

But there is less to grumble
about. than there is to think
about in this Report. The first
oroposijtion supporting the
suthor’s central theme is best put
n his own words — “So, in spite
f the tremendous increase in the
‘terling value of exports it seems
chat the community of Barbados,
nan for man, has little additional
e:| purchasing power per capita
‘nd consequently little if any
nere capacity to provide ‘real’
jovernment revenue than it had
xefore the war.” It may be a
hock to some of us to realize it,
uit the large «increase in our
‘rops and the 300% rise in the
wice of sugar had not, between
958 and 1949 done substantially
nove than mop up the increase
n the population. While there
15 been, since before the war, a
iis swing of the terms of trade
n favour.oaf those countries in
general which export raw ma-

of Barbados, recently publish-
to the C.D. & W. has the most

admirable object of informing the Barbadian public about
the trends of the public finances and “the significance of
the financial policies followed by the Government.”

And Barbadians must be very grateful to have infor-
mation from the unreadable bulk of government records
reduced to a form of moderate length and of reasonable
lucidity—for the author of the Report writes a straight-
forward sentence, chooses -his words simply, and, almost
always, makes his meaning clear. And this, among econom-

anyone who takes an intelli-

gent interest in the economic affairs of the island cannot
be too strongly advised to read this Report. .

terials and food, in our case the
rise in the price of sugar has not
done more than halance the rise
in the price of our imports.
Moreover, the author writes,
“The position has to be recorded

. that the economy has been
almost stagnant for a decade,
except in the sugar industry. In
these circumstances, while there
are no grounds for undue pessi-
mism regarding the possibility of
consolidating a standard of

aciministrative and so¢ial ser-
vices already achieved, there is
every inducement to exercise
caution in’ extending commit~-

ments of government finance =
But while there has heen no rise
in real income per head of the
population since before the war,
the Survey’s interesting analysis
of the distribution of incomes,
before and after taxation, shows
in prerise terms the changes in
distribution which have so ob-.
viously taken place in the last
fifteen years.
National Income

The proportion of the National
Income which goes into central
taxation has risen roughly from



11% to 18%. Of this 7% in-
crease in the proportion of

National Income taken in central
taxes about 5% has come from
direct taxes — income tax and
death duties, that is to say from
1,500 persons of the “high and
middle income groups.”

Now two conclusions of poli-
tical importance follow from
this. The first has been indicated
already, it is that “in a country
in which the great majority of
individuals have small personal
incomes the general level of
taxation (central and local)
which consumes nearly 21% of
National Income is already high
and is in fact considerably
higher than is generally taken
by governments of countries
with an equivalent income per
head.” The second conclusion 15
that when budgets of the order
of $12 million are contemplated,
as they are today, and the total
gross income of the 1,500 “higi
and middle income” families
amounts only to $8.2 million,
(1949) further large increases
in revenue must necessarily be
provided from the lower in-
comes, ;

Tt needs only a glance at the
figures of distribution of per-
sonal incomes before Tax to
show that the 1.500 people of the
“high and middle income group”
do not at present, and né@ver can,
provide the bulk of the govern-
ment’s revenue, no matter how
heavily they may be taxed.

Such is the author’s assessment
of the economic background,, And
the more ecific and technical
parts of the Report, which enquire
in detail into the prospective Gov-
ernment revenues and expendi-
tures of the next five years, are
based on the assumption that the
Government will think it prudent,
as does the author, “to treat the
present level of expenditure as a
basic requirement of government,



‘“Pilemunia’

LONDON.

“The prospects of possible dis-
content among a few Europeans
ind many Africans in the next
‘ew years are not so important as
the future verdict of their grand-
children,”

This comment on what is refer-
ced to as the “dilemma” of the
Central African Federation ques-

ion appears in an article by the
editor of the current issue of
“Corana,” journal of H.M. Colo-
nial Service.

‘These were certain very impor-
tant aspects of the matter which
had not been sufficiently empha-
sived “in all the premature argu-
ments before the White Paper was
published,” he says.

“First there is the argument of
venlism. All of us who have serv-
ed in West Africa since the war
know that the policy followed
there, which was condemned by a
section of British public opinion
as weak and sentimental idealism,
hos been above all things realistic,
The issue now in Central Africa is
similar except that those who fa-
voured the realistic course in the
first case are reluctant to pursue

it to its apparently different con-
clusion in the second, because
that conclusion may conflict with
tre democratic principle that the
will of the majority must, regard-
less of the consequences, prevail.
All of us share this reluctance in
varying degrees, but we must face
the facts of the. political situation
in Southern Africa just as frank-
{ly as we did those in West Africa.
‘In the face of them this scheme
‘is not put forward as a design for
|Utopia but as an inevitable com-
| promise designed to achieve a
jgreat and ‘> purpose and, in
|the process, to protect the inter-
ests and to allay the fears of both
Europeans and Africans. ,

“This federation is indeed a
|great purpose, in no way less im-
|portant than those other federa-
| tions, of Canada and Australia,



Our Readers Say

| Sunday Advocate
|To the Editor, The Advocate—



SIR, — Than the “Sunday
| Advocate”, I am sure, better
will not be found — having re-
jgard to limits of circulation
potential.

Meny of your articles are pro
voking: of the paper as a whole

®





Federation

for example, on which the foun-
dations of the great nations of the
Commonwealth were laid. It is
also urgent because, as Lord
Salisbury also’ said, this may be
the last chance we shall be given
to build up a multi-racial society
north of the Limpo based on
the British way of life.

“The formation of the Union of
South Africa itself gives strong
negative support to the historical
argument. The racial and consti-
tutional difficulties which now en-
danger it result not from the Act
of Union, which has made a pow-
erful and prosperous country out
of a collection of petty states, but
from the fact that the growth of
South Africa took place before
western thought awoke to its true
responsibilities in race relation-
ships. South Africa is entangled
in its past and is trying to solve
its difficulties with a philosophy
which is ill-attuned to that of the
rest of the free world. And these
are precisely the factors which
make the federation of Central
Africa, based on the principles of
inter-racial co-operation, so ur-
gently desirable. The prospects of
pestis discontent among a few

ropeans and many Africans in
the next few years are not so im-
portant as the future verdict of
their grandchildren, There were
similar divisions of opinion in
Canada and Australia all those
years ago, but they proved to be
ephemeral in the face of the pro-=
gress and prosperity which fed-
eration brought.

Those who are honestly trying
to face the situation as it is must
also ask themselves what may
happen, both ingmediately and in
the years to come, if federation is
abandoned or delayed? It is be-
coming increasingly clear, since
the feelings of the local Europeans
are just as sensitive as those of
the Africans, that the rejection of

a federal scheme specifically

no evident political uniformity

ean be predicated — excellent.
Hunte is at his best in apprecia-
tions (e.g. articles on Ursuline
Convent, Schools or Salvation
Army Hostels) he can be ropey.

Failing in appeat for me are
the Hopkinson i which



oducts

might seen

~oncelted



nd incon tent lm

lackir in

of Centr al

ADVOCATE

The Beasley Report: |
A Criticism

(By A Correspondent)

absorbing within the budget the
inevitable additional cost of exist-
ing commitments but exercising |
great caution im adding to their
number projects which are not |
revenue earning in the short or |

middle term.” It is ‘are



that existing central and_ local
government vices, maintained
on present ijinés, will require, for
various reasons, an annual in-
crease in revenue which the
author estimates will by 1958/9
have amounted.to about $2.4 mil-
tion, which is 23% on top of the
original estimate for 1951/2.

Present And Prospective

Revenues

The comparatively lengthy and
thorough Part III of the Report,
entitled “Survey of Present and
Prospective Government Rev-
enues”, recommends a number of
additions to revenue which amount
in total to $1:3 million; for the
rest the author suggests the aboli-
tion of the food subsidies which at
present absorb approximately $1
million, in his opinion to very
little advantage. Now this, in
some ways, is the weakest part of
the Report. The discussion of ex-
isting and ible sources of rev-
enue is inforthative and interest-
ing, but when the author makes
a specific recommendation one so
often has the feeling that a stage
in the argument has been jumped
or an assumption concealed. The
role of the “expert” in public fin-
ance is a proscribed one; in the
case of any particular tax, his job
is to point out first how much
a given change in the rate of tax
is likely to alter the total proceeds,
and secondly to indicate the gen-
eral economic implications of the
tax change, Thus, of a hypotheti-
cal increase in, say, the duty on
tobacco, the expert might say that
the consumption of cigarettes is
likely to fall so much that as a
result the total proceeds from the
duty will fall. Or, of a possible
increase in, let us say, the Com-
panies tax the expert might per-
haps say that it will stifle econo-
mic development by discouraging
the entrance of foreign capital.
But when it comes to s c Te-
commendations, the expert must
be extremely careful to show upon
what. assumptions, political and
economic, his conclusions are
based. Unfortunately the author
of this Report does not always do
so. For example his recommenda-
tion of $400,000 as the additional
amount which ‘will have to be
produced by Income and Com-
panies Tax and Death Duties”
strikes one as being arbitrary—for
all he defends this particular figure
in the text one might have been
equally convinced had one, read
$800,000 or $200,000 instead of
$400,000. The paternal tone which
is attached to most of the recom-
mendations is far less likely to
convince a legislature with a mind
and opinions of its own than an
approach which had been more
rigorously argued even if more re-
stricted in scope.

The figures themselves which
are put forward in the Survey
cannot be thoroughly followed up
without a great deal of work
upon the original sources, One
jthing which can be said, even
with this reviewer's imperfect un-
derstanding of the Barbadian
public finances, is that the Survey
suffers severely from the extraor-
dinary extended period of its ges-
tation—for while the main part
of the calculations and tables refer
specifically to 1949, estimates
which pretend to be more up to
date are slipped in unobtrusively
here and there.

This certainly does not destroy
the usefulness of the Survey, for
the estimates in it still reflect di-
rections and orders of magnitude
reasonably well—but it does not
altogether help the reader to avoid
confusions.

African




















































founded on an offer of inter-racial
partnership by the Europeans may
well be the greatest danger of all
to race-relationships and the fu-
ture happiness of both Europeans
and Africans. It is also worth
considering whether there are in
fact any greater political safe-
guards for the . Africans, at any
rate in Northern Rhodesia, under
the present constitutional arrange-
ments than those proposed in the
White Paper, and does not the
threat just mentioned give this an
additional importance?

“Some people discount this offer
of “partnership” because they did
not believe that it is genuine, or
if it is, that in the face of the
formidable difficultjes of carrying
it into the obvious practice in daily
relationships, it canno® be made
effective. But, again, there is no
tolerable alternative. The only
practical, constructive course for
responsible Buropean and African
leaders is to assume that those
who say they aecept the principle
of partnership mean what they
say and will, if given both that
opportunity and Jeadership and
this may call for some difficult and
courageous decisions. In any case
the potentialities of the present
situation in Central and Southern
Africa are surely such as to induce
any responsible son at least to
take a constructive attitude to-
wards the proposals and to try to
win African support for them.

“Meanwhile the first fence con-
franting Administrative Officers in
Central Africa is how to persuade
Africans to discuss the details of
the scheme at all. It is fair to
say that in it. an honest attempt
has been made to meet every con-
crete expression they have given
of their vague and very under-
standable fears, and it may be that
this first obstaele may prove to be
the highest of all. Let us hope that
it is even now being cleared ”

entitled ‘The People of Barbados’
and the item ‘Gardening Hints
for amateurs’ would be useful in
book form,

M. J. M. DENINGTON.
St. Martin’s Vicarage,

Ed. Note



what
like

the



abaut |



, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 20, 1952



CANASTA PLAYING CARDS
(Complete with Instructions)
$2.28 per Set

WILD BILL WINS AGAIN |

LONDON. PATIENCE PLAYING CARDS
ursia Rin gh . 72¢c. per Set
Wild Bill” Donovan, America’s picturesque | as
soldier-hero, diplomat and lawyer, has done} ADVOCATE STATIONERY

it again, Won another victory and kept
quiet about it again. |

This victory is in the Judicial Committee
of Her Britannic Majesty’s Privy Council,
where Major-General William Donovan,
fought the last round of the two-year-old,
million-pound case concerning 40 Chinese
airplanes in Hong Kong.

He represented the American airline, Civil
Air Transport Inc., which claimed them: the
Hong Kong Supreme Court had spreviously
awarded them to the Chinese Communist
Government. The final court of appeal,
though, the Privy Council, last fortnight
gave them back to C.A.T.

Sir Hartley Shawcross, Q.C., Attorney-
General in the last Labour Government, was
one of the British lawyers who pleaded the
appeal on C.A.T’s behalf. But the man who
directed it and has fought the case resolutely
since it began is the fabulous Donovan, whose
name was scarcely mentioned in the pro-
ceedings. ‘

He has just ended a two-week stay in
London, was in the thick of the case — but
out of the limelight. He worked hard, saw
few of the British political and military
leaders he knows, took little time out for
entertainment.

Few other people with a similar career
could have avoided publicity as much as he.
No one photographs the General at home
with his family; he seldom gives interviews.
Yet his record in itself is a sensational story.

I managed to meet General Donovan to-
wards the end of his visit at Claridges, the
elegant hotel favoured by Royalty.




















































He would say nothing about the case; he
had already spoken strong words to an
American Congressional committee on the
subject and he only touched on parts of his
own life history.

In the First World War, as a soldier, he
formed a bunch of tough, loud-mouthed New
York City Irish-Americans into the 69th in-
fantry brigade of the Rainbow Division. It
was the brigade which became known as the
“Fighting Sixty-Ninth”, gave its name to a
Hollywood film (with George Brent as him-
self) and was immortalised in the play “What
Price Glory”. He led it through many battles,
was wounded three times; earned a chestful
of medals from Allied nations as well as the
Congressional Medal of Honour, America’s
highest award, and the name of “Wild Bill.”

In. World War II he became a Major-
General and globe-trotting head of the cloak
and dagger intelligence organisation, the
Office of Strategic Services. The O.S.S. was
active in crushing the Axis fifth column in
America, against which he had long been
sounding the warning.

together give a measure of
comfort, convenience and
downright pleasure to the
home of to-day.

fhe DA COSTA variety of Sternette Deep Freezes & Refrig-
Bendix Automatic Washers, Irons and
Bedside Lamps & Fans provides the opportunity to create
‘the Home Electric.

»vators, Vacuums,

As a private individual with a reserve
commission in the U.S. Army and a peculiar-
ly intenge interest in his country’s welfare,
he “looked in on” every European war since
1918, — the Russian civil war, the Russo-
Polish war in 1920, Abysinnia and Spain,

Which side did you see most of in Spain,”

I coe ue saoen American Catholic.
side we had to be on guard against
The German and italian side” he said. :

This attitude was hardly likely to please
his fellow-Catholics in America, most of
whom favoured France. But Donovan did
not aim always to please people. He was
turned down for the post of Attorney-
General in Hoover's Cabinet because of
pressure by anti-Catholic, Klu Klux Klan-

led elements—-and be
Herren cause he Opposed pro-

As a diplomat he came to Europe on a
series of hush-hush missions fo i
Roosevelt in 1940, and visited jenn Ft
capital outside Hitler’s domain, from Moscow
to Madrid. He took a close look at Britain
announced that if Hitler invaded he would
be beaten, and went back to urge Roosevelt

to push through the deal givi aaa
destroyers, . al giving Britain 50

As a lawyer,

f he heads a prosperous
York law firm, has held a nine et Severe

ment posts including that of Assistant
Attorney-General, and was a member of the
eee team at the Nuremberg war crimes
trials.

VEGETABLE SALAD

y As a popular hero? The name of the Fight-
ing Sixty-ninth and the two Hollywood films
(the other is called “O.S,.S.”) account for that.

General Donovan does not at first strike
one as the “Wild Bill” type. A medium-built
man dressed in a conservatively cut suit,
with a placid, florid face and strong, spirited
blue eyes, he looks like a lawyer who knows
just what he is about. He seems too. genial
to be tough, too substantial to be wild.

He also looks twenty years younger than
his sixty-nine years.

SO DELIGHTFUL
— and —

HEINZ SALAD CREAM
HEINZ MAYONNAISE
SANDWICH RELISH in
Bottles
ITALIAN KETCHUP
ITALIAN CHILI SAUCE
FRENCH CAPERS
CINNAMON in Bottles
GINGER in Bottles
CURRY in Bottles
MADRAS CURRY in Tins
a . MIXED SPICE in Bottles
He is as friendly to newspapermen as a CELERY SALT
man can be who usually just won’t talk.

His reticence is not due to excessive ul
modesty; he admitted to me that the reaction
of ex-soldiers of the 69th to the film about



BLACK PEPPER

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CARR'S The First Name in
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the regiment was: “George Brent wasn’t
tough enough.”

At home he campaigns for Eisenhower. I
asked him if this meant that he had changed



TO-DAY’S GOOD NEWS





his political views since the days when he ANCHOR RICH to-day

worked for Roosevelt. He answered stern-

ly: “Roosevelt was my comrmander-in-chief, MILK SPECIALS

not my political leader. There’s a lot of CANADIAN BACON $1.15
difference.” ib

POWDER

on Sale Every where.

. oe
CRAVEN A 50s $1.08 each
CRAVEN A 20s 42c, each

Phone GODDARDS

We Deliver

An unswerving patriot, he is stern about
the interests of his country, and has spent a
good deal of his own time looking at other
people’s wars to see how he could best serve
it if the need arose. He warns against an
enemy fifth column today as he did before
Pearl Harbour.



216-Ib tins
16-oz. tins
16-oz. tins EVAP, MILK









WEDNESDAY, AUGUST

Second Day’s Hearing of Falsification of Accounts Case Concluded
Statement Of

20, 1952

Accused Admitted

THE SECOND DAY’S

hearing in the case in which

26-year-old clerk Keith Squires is charged with falsification
of accounts on or about August 31, 1951, while employed
by D. V. Scott & Co., Ltd., was concluded at the Court of
Grand Sessions yesterday before His Lordship Mr. Justice

J. W. B. Chenery.

The Hon. C. Wylie, Attorney General, is appearing for
the Crown while Mr. E. W. Barrow, associated with Mr.
F. G. Smith is conducting the case for the defence.

Squires is charged with having
on or about the 3ist of August,
1951, while he was a clerk of D.
Vv. Scott & Co, Ltd., with intent
to defraud, made or concurred in
making a false entry in a stock
book belonging to or in the pos-
session of D, V. Scott & Co., Ltd.,
his employer, purporting to show
that on August 31, rum vats l,
2 and 3, the property. of his em-
ployer, at Cheapside contained
respectively 2,796, 1,380 and 2,820
proof wine gallons.

When hearing resumes today
at 10 am., Mr, Cuthbert King,
Supervisor of the excise depart-
ment of the Customs, who
had been on the witness stand
during the greater part of yester-
day, will be further cross-
examined,

He was cross-examined yester-
day about the transactions in the
Government Bond. He was call-
ed on to produce books and docu-
ments,

On the resumption yesterday
morning His Lordship gave his
ruling on the admissibility of the
statement Sgt. Phillips said the
accused made, His Lordship in
admitting the statement said that
it did not go beyond the limits
laid down by the Judge’s Rule and
the conditions did not apply to
this particular statement.

After the ruling was. given
Sgt. Phillips read the statement
which he took from the accused.
He said that in March he went to
the Colonnade Stores and carried
Out a search, During tihe search
he found a red book in a drawer
and this book contained details
about the stocks of rum. A
thorough search was made.

To Mr. Barrow, Sgt. Phillips
said that Inspector Springer was
in charge of the investigations.

Before he cautioned the accus-
ed, he read a letter to him. He
knew that bottles of rum were
missing from the Bond.

During the course of the inves-
tigations many people were in-
terviewed. The accused said the
shortage occurred between June
and October, He also said that
the shortage was about 2,000
gallons of rum. The _ shortage
was reported to be about 4,000
gallons.

Mr, Cuthbert King, Supervisor
of the Excise Department of the
Oe said that Ta Scams

cocks. “rum at-t Chea;
Bond for exportation. The rum
is arranged in separate compart-
ments in the Bond. Tihere are
approximately ten firms which
use the Bond,

A merchant has to make appli-
cation if he wants to put rum in
the Bond, When the rum is
moved to the Bond a bill is made
out, The rum in the Bond is the
property of the merchants who
put it there. The representatives
of the merchants witness the
placing of the rum in the Bond.

Another application has to be
made by the merchants if they
want to blend the rum.

A Merchants’ Rum Book is kept
at the Cheapside Rum Bond and
this book shows rum_ received
from the merchants in the Cheap-
ae er

age Mr. King produced
the books containing the applica-
tions made by D, V. Scott for per-
mission to store rum in the bond
from August to September 1951.

‘Cross Examined

Cross examined by Mr. Barrov.,
Mr. King said that the Merchants’
Rum Book is kept in the Bond by
the officer in charge. The_rum
in the bond is in the custody of
the Government until the duty is
paid and the duty is paid when
the rum is needed for consump-
tion and there is also an export
duty for bottled rum.

The rum should not be removed
until it is requested by the mer-
chant concerned. The rym can
only be taken out of the Bond
when the merchant has asked
for permission.

He could not remember if Mr.
Scott made an application in
respect of the 51 casks from the
Bond. If such an application was
made, there would have been a
record and if such an application
was not made, that rum should
be in the Bond.

He could not say what had
happened to the rum,

At one time he heard rumours
about Tum being removed through
the back doors and had had
gerferal talks about the rumours
with Mr. Thorpe.

On October 2 he became aware
of a shortage of rum.

So handy in the Home!!

So delightful at the table!!

STEWED GUAVAS—Only

GUAVA JELLY .............
MANGO CHUTNEY
_PEPPERS @
PEPPER SAUCE
SALTED PEANUTS
HONEY @









$1,050 Passed For
Speaker’s Expenses
In Canada

The House of Assembly yes-
terday passed a Resolution for
$1,050 to meet the expenses of
the Speaker of the House, Hon.
K. N. R. Husbands when he goes
to represent the Barbados Branch
of the Commonwealth Parliamen-
tary Association at the Associa-
tion’s meeting in Canada in
October.

The addendum to the Resolution
states:

The Barbados Branch of the
‘Commonwealth Parliamentary
Association has been invited to
send a representative to Canada as
guest of the Canadian Branch
from the 29th August to the 5th
of October. During this time the
member of the Barbados Branch
will also attend the Common-
wealth Parliamentary Conference
and general meeting of the Asso-
ciation which will be held in
Ottawa this year,

The Canadian Branch of the
Association will meet hotel and
transportation expenses of the
Barbados representative, but it is
considered that an allowance of
fifteen (Canadian) dollars or
approximately $ B.W.I. 27 a day
should be granted to him for the
period of his visit.

This resolution is to provide
funds to allow of the payment of
the allowance,



In The House
Yesterday

The House of Assembly yester-
day met at 3.00 p.m.

Mr. Adams laid the report of
the Peasants’ Loan Bank for the
year June 1, 1950, to May 31, 1951.

Mr. dams gave notice of a
Resolution for $2,880 to cover the
expenses of Salaries Commis-
sion to go Into the salaries of the
lower branches of the Civil Ser-
vants,

Mr. Adams also gave notice of
a Resolution for $1,050 for sending
a representative to Canada as a
guest of the Canadian Branch of
the Commonwealth Parliamentary
Association,

These Resolutions were later
dealt with .

The House also passed a Resolu-
tion for $6,000 for the general
overhauling of the entire electri-
cal installations at the Barbados
General Hospital.

Mr. Adams gave notice of a
Bill to amend the Widows and
Orphans Pension Act, 1928 (1928-
3). This was later read a first
time.

Mr, F. E. Miller tabled a ques-
tion relative to the cost of natural
gas.

The House

adjourned until

Tuesday next at 4.00 p.m.



Questions Asked
About Natural Gas

Mr. F. E. Miller, Junior Mem-
ber for St. George, at yesterday’s
Meeting of the House of Assem-
bly, tabled a question relative to
the price of natural gas.

The text of the question is as
follows :

Is government aware that Nat-
ural Gas, a local heating agent,
which is distributed by the Nat-
ural Gas Corp., is sold at twice
the price of imported fuel oil,
based on equal calorific values, on
which freight rates, storages
charges etc., have been levied,

Is government further aware
that this price for Natural Gas, is

20-OUNCE



in



te Ea RI ORI eRe

SNUGLY SNOOZING AWAY in her incubator at the Queen of Angels Hospital in Los Angeles is “Miracle,”
the 20-ounce baby born to Mrs. Ear! Hope. The tot was born three months prematurely, but gives every

digg tion- that she will grow into norrnal bebyhood. Note how tiny she is by comparing her size to the
12-inch ruler beside the incubator The Hopes also have a ten-months-old boy.





BARBADOS ADVOCATE

BABY GIVEN GOOD CHANCE TO SURVIVE

(International)

Elementary Education In Jamaica

As you are aware I am_ just
back from a period of study in
Jamaica, The subject was Public
Health but I will be speaking to
you this morning for the most
part on elementary education in
that country.

However I know you would like
first to hear something in general
about the place. Jamaica is the
largest of the B.W.I. It is beau-
tiful but in a different way to the
beauty of our island; there are
mountains with clouds nestling on
them, cattle grazing in valleys
over large areas of pasture land,
trees with gorgeous red blossoms:
in fact there is an abundance of
trees and shrubs in Jamaica, and
much water; that is why itis
called the Land of Wood and
Water. There are miles and miles
of roads beautiful to drive along,
running beside the sea, almost
encircling the island, The area
is 4,411 sq. miles and the popula-
tion nearly a million and a half.
Compare that with our 166 sq.
miles and population of around
200,000.

You can see therefore that there
must be a lot of children in Ja-
maica and that providing educa
tion for them must be a more
difficult problem than with us.
Still difficulties of the sort have
been overcome in countries larger
than Jamaica so it shocked m* to
read at the beginning of the
school year that many children
had been turned back from ele-
mentary schools in Kingston, the
capital of the Island, through
lack of space. That happens with
our secondary and first grade
schools but not with elementary
sohools. Imagine that you wanted
to come to this school but could
not be admitted, that you were
denied the chance of any educa-
tion at all. But I was informed
that this was not extraordinary,
that in fact not half of the child-
ren in Kingston could hope to get
an elementary education: nor of
course, was the situation better
in the country. This information
is borne out by official figures
which show that a _ very large
number of the population cannot
read or write.

The schools are so over-crowd-
ed I was told, that very few
teachers have classes so small as
40, but many more. The new Min-
ister for Education was reported
as expressing surprise at this
state of affairs when visiting a
school. I saw an example in the
parish of St. Thomas where I vis-
ited a school of 150 with one teach-
er. This school was a shed about
10’ x 20’ with posts for uprights,
floor of mud and sides partly en-
closed with bamboo. The former
building was destroyed by the
hurricane but it did not appear to
be larger or markedly better in
other respects. I was impressed
by the enthusiasm of a member of
the school committee who was
present; she told of her activities
for the school; she had secured a
map of the island and other help-
ful things and along with two

creatisg a brake on local industry | her women on alternate days

as weil as the domestic service
rendered by the Barbados Gas’
Co., and at the same time re-)

sulting in a loss to public funds?)



TO-NIGHT

If the answer to the above is}

in the affirmative, will Govern-
ment waste no time in having the
price of Natural Gas adjusted,



MAUDE BILL TO |

BE CONSIDERED
The Leader of the House of
Assembly Mr. G. H. Adams, in-
formed members at the meeting

at 8.05
MR. GEORGE HUNTE

will again talk over
Rediffusion on the . .
subject



|| “THE INDUSTRIES

of the House yesterday that the! We HAVE

Government would like to deal|
with the Maude Bill before the|
end of the month, and the Fed-
eration Report, and the Foreign
Exchange Bill soon. He said that
members should take the oppor-
tunity to study these,

The House has been adjourned
until next Tuesday at 3 p.m,









+

48c a bottle
Mitts 440, a bottle
72c., 60c, & 48c. per bottle
30c. per bottle
40c. & 20c. per bottle
84c. per bottle
44c. per bottle





The topic will be on
“ELECTRICITY” as an

Industry and should prove
to be of great interest to
the general public.







THIS IS A LECTURE DE-
LIVERED TO THE SCHOOLS

IN 8ST. JOSEPH BY MR.
G 4L. GITTENS, CHIEF
SANITARY INSPECTOR, ST.
JOSEPH.

Lier
she supplied the materials for
hot lunch,

The nearest public school was
over 5 miles away so the teacher
had to be treated well and en-
couraged, the need for which was
apparent since the salary was not

attractive. This type of school is
known as a basic school, and
caters for children before the

school entering age of 7; this
school had however up to class
4. The government gives basic
schools, which are regarded as
supplementing public schools, a
grant of £50 a year, and the
children pay each 6 cents a week
which helps to pay the teacher.

Enlightened Jamaicans speak of
the need for tundreds more
nublic elementary schools,

iu the heart of Kingston, near
the Parsde one night I asked a
policeman what was a_ certain
building: he replied that it was
a school but he did not know the
name. This mentality I felt was
a result of school conditions,
With so many children in the
class tine child does not learn so
well, You must think too of the
many who get no learning at all.
These are a danger to the com-
munity: an unlettered person is
little above an animal.

You have to be thankful for the
different tradition and outlook on
education in this island; for a
government educationally mind-
ed. Jamaicans found it hard to
credit that two of our secondary
schools were merged and the fees
reduced, They expected the fees
to be raised in accordance with

the cost of living as in their coun-
try. Yes, you have much to be
thankful for; you can select which

school you will go to; usually
there are two or more within
reach and you pay nothing. You
are so used to this state of affairs
however that you do not vulue

your advantages. Think of your
cousins in Jamaica—children like
yourselves who must walk miles
to school if they get in at all.
When you are tempted to remain
at home the last two days of the
week or other days you should
think of these things, think of the
benefits you are apt to value
lightly and tell your parents you
must go to school all the school
days.

That is the main point I want
to impress upon you this morn-
ing; to appreciate your oppor-
tunities for education, They say
we are the most educated people
in the West Indies. You have that
tradition to maintain,

They praise also our
ture. In Jamaica you travel for
miles without seeing growing
crops; thousands of acres of land
are uncultivated. We are suffer-
ing from a rice shortage: much
could be produced in the swamp-
lands of Jamaica alone, The gov-
ernor has appointed a Corpora-
tion to go into this matter,

But persons with a knowledge
of Public Health were puzzled to
learn that we could be

agricul-



Csi TUARY

\av Horace Deighton
CHE death occurred at his resi-

dence Braddan, Belleville on Mon-
day of Mr, H, W. C. Deighton for-

merly of Barclays Bank. His
funeral took place at the West-
bury Cemetery in the presence
of a large and distinguished

uathering, Hé was 78,

Horace Deighton was the son of
the most outstanding of the Head-
masters of Harrison College whose
name he bore, Brought up in such
an atmosphere he was genteel and
hecttent in expression, Despite this
he was.” good companion and
was highly respected by all who
knew him,

Atter leaving Harrison College
he joined the staff of the Colonial
(afterwards Barclays) Bank anc
was for some time transferred to
Trinidad, He was methodical
even in his manner of living and
in his later years when he had

cutered retirement after his re-
turn to the Barbados Branch,
rany younger men enjoyed his

company and refreshing remini-
scences of the more spacious days
of a bygone century. His know-
ledge of men
Bridgetown was extensive and his
sparing use of words was supple-
mented by a contagious smile.

Horace Deighton was a man who
lived a reserved life. He had
learned to respect the confidences

and the foibles of his fellowmen
He avoided political arguments
and was never heard to ill-speak
anyone; and the stately and dig-
nifled mien made him a much re-
spected figure.

In recent year his movement
was limited by advancing age
but he Mill retained the friend-
ships to the end. His passing was
the source of deep regret to his
relatives and a wide circle of
friends,

He was married to a Miss Bor-
man of Grenada who survives him
and to whom along with his only
sister Mrs, Ballou, deepest sym-
pathy will be extended,



**“Gloucester”’
Sails For Nassaw

S.S. Gloucester, which arrived
from Australia over the weekend,
sailed for Nassau on Monday after
unloading a quantity of cargo.
The vessel is consigned to Messrs,
DaCosta & Co, Lid,

She brought chutney, spaghetti,

a c so ad- jeans, canned vegetables, sweet |
vanced in Agriculture and edu- corn, puddings and pickles for}
cation and be so backwards as the International Trading Cor-

regards health. I will be lectur-
ing you later, to, on
health subjects, Inspectors have
also been asked to assist with
lectures with the Mobile Cinema;
in these ways it is hoped to awak-
en interest in health matters.
The most infants die here in tha
whole West Indies, We do next
to nothing about that very dis-
tressing disease tuberculosis,

as I used



Jamaican
Scouls Fly
To Haiti

(From Our Own Correspondent)
KINGSTON, Aug. 12.

Thirty-three Jamaican scouts
left the island this morning by
special PAA flight to Haiti to
attend the annual Haitian Scout
Camp, at the invitation of _ the
Haitian President and the Haitian
Boy Scouts Association.

The invitation follows the visit
of Haitian scouts to the Carib-
bean Jamboree in Jamaica earlier
this year.

“Apart from the goodwill as-
pect of the visit,” the Jamaica
contingent leader said, “there are
three other aims of the visit
First, to arouse in Haiti public in-
terest in scouts, secondly to
inspire the scouts of Haiti and}
thirdly, to offer—if it is wanted |
by them—help to the executive
officers of scouts in Haiti,”

Haiti plans to hold an All-
Caribbean Jamboree in 1954. ;

The Jamaica Scouts took with
therm a message of goodwill from

the Governor, Sir Hugh Foot,
K.C.M.G., to the President of
Haiti, and a film of the’ recent

Jamboree in Jamaica.

U.S. Dollar Down

MONTREAL Aug. 19.
United States dollar Mon-



The

day closed at a discount of four!

per cent. in terms ef Canadian
funds unchanged from Friday's
close, That is, it took 96 cents
Canadian to buy $1 American, The
pound sterling was $2.674 up —
\/8 from Friday.

In New York the Canadian dol-
lar was unchanged at a premium
of 45/32 per

United States funds in closing for-
ign exchange dealings Monday.
The pound sterling was up 1/16 of
a cent at $2.78 9/16.



Obtainable at our Home Products Dept.

CAVE SHEPHERD & CO., LTD.

10, 11, 12, and 13 Broad St.









eent in terms of

Launching Of Flying
Boat Postponed

ISLE OF WIGHT, England,
Aug. 19.

The Jaunching of Britain’s larg-
est all-metal flying boat was post-
poned on Tuesday because of bad
weather. The 140 ton giant
“Princess” was run slowly out of
its hangar on a cradle before a
strong wind whipped the sea and
made conditions too dangerous.
Every vantage point was packed
with leading aircraft designers,
Ministry of Supply officials, and
thousands of vacationists for the
launching of the ten engine plane.

The “Princess” was lowered to
the water on a special launching
winch “to wet her bottom” as pe.
cials put it, and then was wince
ed back on to land to await better
weather,



IN A FINE

SUT

GENTS’ SUITS

{ in Worsteds, Tropicals,

Tweeds and Linens

Full American Drape

Style .
SPORTS JACKETS

with Patch Pockets
in Brown, Blue, Grey
and Fawn

Prices from $18.50 up

TROUSERS
in Worsted, Grey Flan
Linen, White and
Khaki Drill
e
DRESSING GOWNS

Plain Colours

READY-MADE

2 and 3 Button Styles,

in Flowered Designs and

o
TOWELLING BATH ROBES
in Checked and Striped «

poration Ltd, and currants sul-
tanas, prunes, butter, beef tails,
beef tongues and beef fillets, ‘

Schooner W. E. Eunicia which

airived yesterday from Dominica

brought 389 bags of copra, 2,000
oode cocoanuts and five bunches
and a package of fresh fruit.
S.S. Boskoop, which brought a
quantity of cargo from Amster-
dam, sailed on Monday for Nassau
while the S.S. Vathall left for St.
Johns, New Brunswick, |

PARISIANS CELEBRATE |
THEIR LIBERATION

PARIS, Aug. 19.

Parisians started on Tuesday 4
weeklong celebration commen-|
orating the liberation of their |
city from the Germans eight)
years ago, Simple ceremonies
honouring the dead who fell on

the first day of insurrection were |
held in the courtyard of the police |
headquarters and inefront of Ea ty
S.ation,

‘Liberation Day” is officially |
August 25, but it was on August |
19,
went up throughout the city
touching off a revolt and ordering
Parisians to “open the road to
Paris for the victorious allied

armies and welcome them.”




nel,







Patterns
for the Famous
“K” SHOE
HARRISON'S _ Broad st

and business in °

1944 that the French forces),





PAGE FIVE



Colonials At Japs Blamed

Guide Camp For Theft

TOKYO, Aug.

LONDON.

Girl Guides from. East Africa,
tne West Indies, Nigeria, Mauri-
tius, Hongkong and Malaya joined
representatives from over thirty
other countries, including Great
Britain, at the Guide’ International
Camp held from 11th—18th Aug-
ust in the grounds of the Hall
Harn, Beaconsfield.

Altogether, about
were in camp.

in the absence of Lady Strathe-
den and Campbell, the Citef Com-
missioner, overseas visitors were
“elcomed on August 11th by the
tion. Mrs. Geoffrey Gibbs, the
toeputy Chief Commissioner.

\ special message from Princess
‘orgaret, Commodore of the Sta
\\angers, was read at the welcom-
1f ceremony on Monday, August
Lith

And Olave Lady Baden Powell,
G.3.E., World Chief Guide, flew
from_ Norway ahr to attend
n Sunday, 17th August. She
visited the various groups in the
camp and spoke to the guides at
: campfire after supper.

a fhousand



Highlight of the camp was a

Ministry,

records.



An inquiry

The Japanese are convinced
that a fortune in precious metals
and stones has been looted from
Japan’s World War II military
treasure chest.
committee of the Japanese Diet
so tar said that the finger of guilt
should be pointed largely at Jap-
anese officials.

Sensational Japanese and ‘or-
eign news reports have given the
impression that Diet members are
accusing American
officials of stealing gold, silver,
diamonds, and platinum collect
ed by the Japanese Governmen
during the war,

The Diet Committee, has ques-
tioned fornger members af the
Munitions Ministry, the Finance
the Bank of Japan.
and persons close to the Emperor,
former Army and Naval officials,
and has investigated occupation
A preliminary report
issued on August 12,
that American occupation person-
nel had opportunity to loot the
treasure,

by a

occupation

suggested

—UP.

memmoth campfire held on visitors and excursions. Each
Wednesday, 13th August from country invited demonstrated
§.S0—10 p.m, The guides already some particularly national aspect

there were joined for the occa-
sion by 7,000 others from differ-
ent parts of Great Britain.
Other activities included group
temonstrations, an open day for

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FOR .

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lalla
Sa atm awe a

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of their guiding—national dances,
cooking, handicrafts or campcraft.
Excursions included visits to Lon-
Windsor,
trips down the Thames,

and



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=

PAGE, SIX



$6,000 Passed for Overhauling Lighting System ai Hospital

“Piece Meal” Improvement
Method- Criticised

THE House of Assembly yesterday afternoon passed a
resolution for $6,000 for the general overhauling of the en-
tire-elecirical installations, both power and lighting, at the
Barbados General Hospital.

Dr. H. G. Cummins (1) who took charge of the resolu-
tion.told the House that the electrical installations at the
Hospital had been inspected by the Emtage Electrical Co.
and the Acting Government Electrical Inspector and cer-
tain. reeommendations wcve made to have the entire
system cvestngiv’,

e Director «/ admitted as a ~

Services with the unan.. pital. ere

mous ¢eoncurtence of the it.| “All is not well at the Hospital,”

a “supported the abov- * said and oe ~ it was not
own

In vibw Of the danger involve fee ln wel eapeeas br

5 feeling which was expressed by
it was-felt that the work shou)‘ many people all over the island.
undertaken as quickly =

be c First things must be dealt with
possible. It.was considered th: first and if anything should take
there was ah urgent need for ti.

priority, it should be the Hospital;
work to be carried out and sup- it should even take precedence
apg | provision was accorc- over the increase of salaries for

ingly for it to be don Civil Servants whether he be the
Otte iheretore oo financial = ; ma Secretary or a member
joved the passin . e subordinate
of the ution. He
bee =
Pinchiensen m recommended to the Gov

ernment, not for carrying the
Hospital to Waterford, but fo:
making a general improvement
where there could be 50 or 60 beds
more,

Mr, W. A. Crawford (C) sa
that it Sppeared to him as it ther.
had beer-some carelessness some -

“Spending Spree”

wie es BY ioportest saath
~ at ~ ot posttder. ft In a community like this, men -

bers were attacked by their con-
* stituents of some “spending spree”
and they had to bow their heac\s
in sharne and to think that recor -
mendations had been made for
the improvement of the Hospits!
and yet nothing haq been done.

He hoped that the next major
Resolution to come before the
House would be for a scheme io
improve the General Hospital
where people could be given bet-
er treatment.

Mr. A, E. 8S. Lewis (L) enquired
from the member for St Thomas
in charge of the Resoiution wheth-
er the standby plant at the Hos-~
pital was known to be in good
working order, because there had
been frequent break downs at the
Electric Company. He thought it
was time for them to know
a the generator was receiv-
A e attention of the Govern -
ment Electrical Inspector so that





that h sl ok
2 not pri ¢
to refer in a gen way to th

unseseeteoter “oe tions existin .
at the hospital, but he wanted i.

let the authorities know that there
were one or two things at th
Hospital which also required som.

it attention.

number of complaints
been made with regard to the in
adequate accommodation etc. ar
it was to be hoped that tho
complaints were not falling «.
deaf ears and that in the ve:
near future appropriate action
would be taken to improve th:
condition, __

What hé“wanted to draw atten-
tion to was-the inadequate accor.
modation--in the laundry and the
ae ieee bos cnmdl ott beopie

appen o-be emp ose
places, but-ander m unsatisfac-

had

tory conditiéhs. The amount of 4 « ‘
work done there had completely ow ee
outgrown the size of the premises N Hospital
allocated to it and that work wo: ew ZOsD

Mr. V, B. Vaughan (f) said that
he had visited the Hospital quite
recently with his colleague and
the impression he brought away
was that the colony needed an er-
tirély new Hospital. There were
many things wrong with it and
“piece mealing” here and there
would eventually cost the colony

done under very distressing con-

ditions. He was sure that better

errangements could be made |

the institution for carrying ov!
that work.

Storing of Food
Mr, Crawford also sald thu
the provision made for the stor-

es * 3 seo he. ewe” a lot more money than if they hed
pier tie a eke set out to uild a hew institution.
aan Colonial Development and We!-

taken to have extra accommu-
dation provided. He hoped tht
some attention would be paid
to have the situation remedicd.
Mr. BE, D, MOTTLEY (E) said
that no one in the House cot?)
attempt to discuss every phase
the Hospital unless he bad

t three months in which ‘o

fare had offered Government
a sum of money to erect a Hos-
pital as they realised that the
present one was totally inadequate
for the colony it had to serve, but
nothing had been done.

He said that he was appalled at
the size of the ts gory tee - es
the pantry as well as that of the
do it, It was true that ina met- jaundry at the Hospital, Those
of such importance wher’ a rangements were most inade-

ere was a question of @ Vote cuate, Even in some private
for money, members would be fomes, the pantries were much

allowed seme latitude to discus’ jarger than that at the Hospital.

the matter. e felt that the money which

He said that it was alwe)s had been voted for the erection
heartening to see a Resolution be- of , new Fire Station could have

fore the House for improvement he Hospital.

of the Hospital, The addendum ‘> arate ree in
the Resolution pointed out that i. .orge of the Resolution was a
view of the danger involved, the jodical man who should have
















necessary work should be dote some idea of a modern institution
ae i Gov-
eléctrical equipment was not vo responsible member of the Gov
n' in-
were attending it for treatment. He felt that Government in
hould bring down a_ Resolution
faith in the Minister of Health, seeks . fe
the The Resolution was eventually
one coul@ resist the temptation to
ley said. It was no point offering
the suffering people of the cclony, CANSERRA, Aug. 10.
considered a right thing, “that one of the 14 copies of the
Hospital within the last few yeovs Nadonal Library. The seLer an
was going to visit it again becau.+ ter) is regarded as the backbone
Continuing, Mr. Mottley seit John of England to his barons in
viding in Some manner, a liti!e 54) refuse, or delay right or
were plans submitted for certoin
was the delay. ° °
King Feisal
colony to take priority des):
of Merit to King Feisal Il of
be the hospital, It was diffle:)
United States, the State Depait-
happening. It was sad to think +
~ at a White House luncheon on
eleven months before she could © government was being notifieci.
|
|
that sweet fresi: |
. }
|
corn—toaried to a turin! An
fresher! Your berecdin in

as quickly as possible, Everyorc tisfled as a
; tal as it
to date, it might hamper tre ernment with the Hospita i
of § f bringing down patch work
Critici stead of bringing Pp
seeking provision for the erection
the membor in charge of t e?
Chairman of the Advisory Com- passed.
offer criticisms when you come to Australia Buys Copy
destructive criticism, but when
they were doing what he and ,, Parliamentary Speaker A. G.
He said that he had been one Magna Carta known to exist has
beeause he had taken time off o the price were not disclosed.
there were too many comp!ainis of modern democratic constitu-
that he would have welcomed «@ 1215. The key chapter is that
more accommodation at the i+ jjcticess —UP.
immediate improvements at fo
Health First
WASHINGTON, Aug. i
what outlook might be, it must |
iraq for promoting friendship
really for those who had ne\.!
ment announced on Tuesday.
600 people who were waiting to
pital. He “quoted an inster:« Saturday, but the anouncement
Kellogg's keep their Corn
ness——Kellogg's

Leis Maat at & Hospital, Hf the thd Sowa not be a
patients’at that institution who Was st the moment.
“Althiagn T hate Bee enehtest Resolutions for a few works,
100g a 3
the of a new Hospital,
Resolution and_ incidentally, Or pet pit
mittee of the Huspital Board, no
deal with the Hospital,” Mr. Mot- ii
Of Magna Carta
they offered criticism on behalf of
every other member of the Hou:e Cameron announced on Tuseday
of the strongest eriticé of the been purchased by the Australia
go and inspect the institution px ‘The Magna Carta (Great Char-
made concerning that institution. tion. It wag granted by Kins
Resolution for expanding or pro- \hich states; “To no one will we
stitution. He understood that ther.
hospitai and one wondered w=: Truman Honours
If there was anything in
Tyunvan has awarded the Legion
health and the first priority mo |
between his countiy and ti:
been burnt to appreciate what v
cop ware malting ¢ Truman made the — presentation
admitted as.patients at the I!
where a\ woman had to was held up while the Iraquian
& The gweotnosa of nouriabi-
Finkes coming to you crisper,
ra Flakes,

ch f
Ah fF

Abs?
MOTHER MNOWS", ODET!

Ve Im cae a ae ae

Oa Asa Mt eR

5 Fe ware

y Hi) i"
area

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



House Pass $2,880 For

alaries Commission

THE HOUSE OF ASSEMBLY yesterday passed a
Resolution for $2,880 to cover the expenses of a Salaries

Commission, 1952.

This Commission wili make recom-

mendations concerning the salaries of Civil Servants other
than Administrative heac's, Professional and Technical

Officers.

The Commissioner wil] be Sir Errol Dos Santos, former

Colonial Secre

of Trinidad, who has been through the

ranks of the service. The Leader of the House, Mr. G. H.
Adams said that the recommendations were expected to

be ready by November.

The Addendum to the Resol. -
tion reads :

In aceordance with a Gover -
ment statement at the time «!
the implementation of the recom -
mendations of the Committce
appointed to examine the estat -
lishment of Administrative, Pr« -
fessional and Technical Officers \t

is proposed to a t a salarics

staff, ppoin:
understood that plans had Commissioner with the fotlowir ¢

terms of reference :-—

(a) To review and to make re-
commendations regardinz
the remuneration of ai!
Government servants i}
Barbados excluding thos»
covered by the Turner
Committee Report, excep!
where it is considere |
omalies still exist o:
ld be created by th:
recommendations to tt?
made, with special refei -
ence to the followin;
points:—

(i) the extent, if any, to
which the present co;!
living allowances
should be regarded ¢s
permanent and be in.
eorporated in basic sai -
aries, or as temporar,
and related to the cor!
of living index;

the general standare:
of remuneration an/
superannuation ay «
ments in the Colon),
outside the Civil Sei -
vice;

(ii)

(b) Te enquire into and repo: |
On any matters incidental \1
the foregoing which me,
appear relevant to the in-
guiry, and to make reeom-
mendations as to any conse-
quential adjustmerts ari. -
ing therefrom,

(ec) To complete the inquiry | /
the 80th November, 1952.

Purpose of Resolution

2, The purpose of this Resolu-
tion is to provide funds to cover
the costs of the Salaries Commi: -
sion on the following basis:—

(1) Fee to Salaries

Commissioner .. $1,440
(2) Subsistence Allow-
ance—45 days @
$24.00 per diem .. 1,080
(3) Passage Expenses
and Incidentals .. 3€0
Total $2,880



Mr. Adams said that as ho
promised the House when the
Government approacthéd the
Chamber for the approval of 2
Resolution regardi salaries yf
Administrative, Professional and
Technical Officers the Govern.
ment endeavoured from that very
week to engage the service of
someone acquainted with condi-
tions in the West Indies, prefer-
ably a Civil Servant or Ex-Civil
Servant.

They had found some difficulty
In getting the services of two o
threé persons whose names were
suggested, and who seemed to be
eminently suited, from their ex-
perience in the West Indies—in
some cases in the West Indies and
elsewhere—to accept the post of
Commissioner,

Sir Errol’s Career

Finally the Government nad
been able to secure the services
of the Ex-Colonial Secretary of
Trinidad, Sir Errol Dds Santos.
There was vo other ‘West Indian
as far as he could remember, W
had gone through the service from
the humblest be until he
reached the highest pos

le believed the House would
agree with him when he said that
they were fortunate in acquiring
his services. Sir Errol Dos Santos
was in the United Kingdom then
and would bé here shortly. All

the preliminary work necessary

was being done and when Sir
Errol arrived, he would begin
with such documents, Sir Errol
believed he could finish the work
by the end of November and
therefore they were incorporating
that in the Terms of Reference.
His ses were based on’ the
terms of Commissioner Adams
who made the original Adams

—
. W. A, Crawford (C) said
(hat it was apparent that there
was a fundamental difference be-
iween the appointment of the
Commission to enquire into the
salaries of the dministrative,
Professional and Technical Offic-
ers and the one appointed to en-
quire into the working conditions
of the remainder of the service.
Other Committee
we wii beanie been coim-
plaints to sal-
uvies of the ranking . 4
local commi was appointed

The World’s Greatesi |





SKIN OINTMENT }

——




Om, oe -
| gam Bu aNY)

a



reeatin

, Antiseptic



handy



under - Beene ofa yr
ernmen’ ge Colonial ~
retary. In addition to that, there
was also the Financial Secretary,
another Government Official.

Mr. Adams said that the Hon-
ourable Member was absolutely
out of order in then saying that
the Turner Committee should
never have been constituted as it
was.

Mr, Crawford said that he was
in no way criticising the work of
the previous Committee, nor the
ap} tment. He was merely
pointing out the difference of the
two, If he could not do that, they
might as well have a dictatorship.

cause of this difference in
the two Commissions, they could
expeet a fundamental difference
in the findings.

He was not ‘for one moment
suggesting that the presence of
the Colonial Secretary or the
Financial Secretery guaranteed
the best possible ireatment, but
was only saying that if only for
appearances sake, they should in-
clude one or two ol the members
of the other branches of the Ser-
vice into the Committee.

Imagine the Honourable mem-
ber agreeing to 4 Commissioner
from Trinidad! Nothing goo!
could come out of Trinidad, thai
member had said. There was the

worst place, not only in the Wes!
Indies, but the orld, by his
showing.

C.S.A’s Opinion

Mr. BR. G. Mapp (Ly said thai
whatever they might think, they
should not be prejudiced agains|
the Commission. He would, how~
ever, like to know if the Civil
Serviee Association’s opinion hac
been sought concerning the ap-
pointment,

Mr. Adams said that it would be
preposterous to go about asking
the various parisnes whether they
were satisfied with the appoint-
ment of a Chief Justice, say. li
the same way it seemed silly to go
asking “A”, “B” and “C” of the
Service whether they agreed wit)
the appointment.

It was the policy of Government,
however, to submit legislation for
the inspection of various associa-
tions it would affect and ask them

how they felt on certain points
about it; for instance, the Teach-
ers’ Association or the Weil

Servers, etc.
No riticism

The Senior Member for S'.
Philip had not criticised the ap-
pointment of Commissioner
Adams, and there was no reason
for him to criticise in this case.
That member was only speaking
for the sake of say: something.
He had never accused the Trini-
dad Government of corruption, or
even of inefficiency, It was utterly
atrocious for e Honourable
Member to stand on the floor of
the House ang accuse him o
talking in that way about a friend-
ly Government. Apart from his
views on the progressive forces,
the Government was, he should
say, efficient,

Mr. Crawford said that the
comparison of Commissioner
Adams and Commissioner Dos
Santos was not applicable. Com-
missioner Adams went into the
whole Service, while Commission
er Dos Santos was only going in-
to a section.

The Resolution was passed.



STRANDED TRAINS
REACH SAFETY

LLANDERIS, Wales, Aug. 12
Two trains with 120 holiday
makers rd rea safely
early on esday after being
stranded by a plane crash that
blocked the track’s 3500 feet up
Mount Snowdon. The plane, an
RAF cargo craft, crashed onto the
:ailway line shortly ore noon

on Monday killing all three of its
crew, ae







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Petroleum Jelly (Brown)
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Further Particulars, Apply :



R. M. JONES



There’s no neud to worry over
bottle-feediny if milk is modi-
fied with Rov!nson’s ‘ Patent’
Barley. Baby will then digest
it so easily and sleep





Questions *Motorless Sunday”
Asked Fior By
Swiss Churches

20
On A Variety
Of Subjects

LONDON.

Fe a ce gag gelical Churches has adopted

Was set up st the Open Golf tion of a “Motorless S ” each
ns oyal Lytham & month at its recent ann Con- |

0 was the golfer? gress

2. In the last year Mau-

Miss cod
reen Connelly of the United States traffic

forbidden














i
ZURICH, Switsertand, Aug. 19. |
The Association of |

a

resolution calling for the introduc- |

ad Sore . The resolution |
on one in
each month ail a eelack |

should be with |



1952

AUGUST 20,

WEDNESDAY,

——— IT

‘For
| Smart
and

Health









aas won three national lawn ten- exception emergency ser- |
nis titles. Can you name the coun- pe r
ed -» Hair
uke Seen, se aaeengs |

* I the
ee Late we] ASTHMA BAUCUS

is Te: :
say who? ares «oun 5 HMA re ie ae |
Stticer Pe 195% Derby and Beli Loosened First day
Khan’s Tulyar “The Vast time the ‘ke of Uvons bus Wr Ane For hair that is always as
double was completed was in "i od as it looks . . . smart
1939. What was the name of the| PAGO fh we 5° - ;
. the t through sn dns, lustrous . . . obviously well
. n jresen only lungs and bronciie! he fir

one golfer part from BOY | Site seare Titles re cared for . follow the
Locke yhas won the Open golf move thick stra ‘ een a lk
champions three times in four} Promotes freer Band sped lead of discriminating men
years. What is his ? ated cought Pecaee

Which cricketer has made | uct sauistiction of ines the world over use

uaranteed. Get MENUDACO f



most centuries in seasol
first-class cricket? Pr oe
a osha it the British
S team who competed in
her third Olympic Games. In
ee one re e 1948 she was
“up in the high \
be ay 2. her name? oe
. at is the O ic 1,500
om wa record and = it held
iy
9. C, Fuller was captain of one
section of the British Olympic
Games team. Can you say which
section?
. Who is the British hard
court tennis champion?
What world record is held
by J. Ljunggren of Sweden?
12, When did Britain last win

hemist today




WHEN THE

GER’ FIRE
roUCHES you

“

UNGUENTINE
QUICK

tg nich wae the 1 A MODERN ANTISEPTIC
r ch was the last horse
to win t -
a ive years? National in sue TURES or JARS
14. Joey Maxim, world cruiser-

weight champion is older than Ray
Robinson middleweight champion.
Right or wrong?

15. International footballers of
five different countries are on the
books of an English first division
elub, Which is the club and who
are the players?

16. Which club fiinished run-
ners-up to Manchester United in
the Football League championship
last season?

17. Which member of the In-
dian touring team was the first to
complete his 1,000 runs this sea-
son?

18. What is the lowest aggre-
gate score recorded in the 72-hole
Open golf championship?

19. Who captained the English
soccer care = a es match-
es aga’ 5 ustria and
Switzerland? P

speciatiy
packed fin!




20. When did women com

in the Olympic Games for the first
time?

Answers!

1. Fred Daly, Balmoral.
: Bs United Statés, England, Ire-

and.

3. Tony Lock.

4. Blue Peter.

5. James Braid in 1905, 1906 | }first in Preference the Wortd Over
and 1908. ,



Copr. 1950 Borden Co. Lnternat’l Gapr. Reser ree

6. Denis Compton, 18 in 1947. ; ana
7. Dorothy Tyler.
8. 3 min, 45.2 seconds by

Joseph Barthel, Luxembourg.
9, British Olympic soccer team.
10. J, Drobny. |
11. 60,000 metres walk.
12. 1930.

mm Reynoldstown in 1935 4nd
14, Wrong. Maxim was born

in 1922, Robinson in 1920.
15. Newcastle United. On their

books they have the following

|
}
|

Tnternationals: Robledo (Chile),
Milburn (England), Foulkes
(Wales), McMichael (Ireland),

Brennan (Scotland).
16. Tottenham Hotspur.
17. P. Umrigar. He completed
his 1,000 runs in the game against
Yorkshire before the third Test.
18. 279 by A. D. Locke in 1950.
19. Billy Wright (Wolver-
hampton).
20. London in 1908.

at



UNIVERSITY RECORDS
QUAKE SHOCKS

* NEW YORK, Aug. 18.
Fordham University reported
on Monday that its seismographs
recorded two fairly severe earth
shocks on Monday 8,000 miles
away, probably in Northern india.








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WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 20; 1952

SERGEANT RUNS



He puts democracy first
for caravan citizens

he all-American citizens of Sabre City say it is the

most demociatic city in the world.

It elects a mayor

and a city council which meet twice a month. Every
month there is a public meeting of all citizens, at which

Sabre City, says the sign



grievances may be aired.
The housewives have a
council of thelr own and they
meet to discuss such matters
as laundry arrangements, the
price of fruit and vegetables
— children’s road safety

But Sabre City ts not in
any of the 48 states.

It is near Stanton, Norfolk,
it is composed entirely of
caravans and {tt houses scores
of American alrmen
Stationed at Shepherds
Grove.

The caravans are painted
all colours. For acres round
Stretch sites which will be
occupied by more caravans
as more airmen’s families
arrive.

Mayor of Sabre City ts

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



A ‘CITY’



Master-sgt. William G. Benbow,
mayor of Sabre City, pauses for
a chat with Airman Ist Class
Charies A. Goodpaster and his
wife Gloria, The Goodpasters
come from Oklahoma.

three

ig “Bill” to everyone—walks
round the caravan city for an
interchange
views,

of news and

The mayor's wife and their
children occupy a

double-decker caravan (n one

Master-Sergeant William G.
Benbow, age 30, from Globe,
Arizona A fighter pilot
during the war, he {ts now in
the atrfield administration
branch

Freaventiv the maverhe

of the “suburbs”
mayor-sergeant:

organised ourselves on
towp
no more
the world than Sabre City.”

Said the
“We have
dig
lines—in tact there ts
democratic city in

London Avuress Sereive

Czech Farmers Legless, Armless Iraqi Agricultural PWejsql Tours

Jailed For
Sabotage

VIENNA, Aug. 19.

A Czech newspaper reported on
Tuesday that ten Czechoslovaki-
an farmers had been sentenced
to prison terms of up to ten years
for sabotage and subversion, The
official army newspaper ‘“Obrana
Lidu” said that Jesef Mastny
“Kulak” in the Pilsen region, his
wife, and three sons were con-
victed for failure to deliver beef,
milk, and pork quotas. They
drew sentences of from three to
ten years in jail, and al] their
property was confiscated.

The newspapers “Lud” and
“Pravda” said that five men were
jailed for “sabotaging supply by
failing to deliver their quotas.
One of the defendants drew an
extra penalty for “ostentatiously
and provocatively coughing’ when
a priest read a message from the
Communist World Peace Coun-
cil.” Besides jail terms they were
forbidden ever to live in the
Bratislava region again and their
property was confiscated, —U.P.

Uranium Rush
In Australia

SYDNEY, Aug. 19.

undreds of young men, re-
tured prospectors, and even WO-
men were leaving Sydney’s hustle
and bustle on Tuesday to parti-
cipate in the search for uranium
in the vast and lonely Northern
Territory. Many people were
forming syndicates and pooling
resources in order to search the
territory. Sydney stores selling
geiger counters were reported
sold out. Many New South Wales
farmers are Buying gadgets to
search their properties for signs
of uranium.

With uranium likely to become
one of Australia’s top dollar earn-
ing exports under the new deal
by



ch the nation is tied up
Br a the United States Atomic
Energy Commission, everybody
seems to want to cash in on the
boom. An official of the New
South Wales State Mines Depart-
ment said: “Everybody has goné
uranium happy. They are driv-
ing us mad with questions. Hun-
dreds of people told us that they
are deserting Sydney to take up
uranium prospecting in Northern
Territory.”—U.P.

Saldier Marries

WASHINGTON, Aug. 19.

Rebert L. Smith, 22 tne fist
quadruplet amputee of the Korean
war began his honeymoon with
his seventeen-year-old bride
whom he met while detained in
an army hospital.

Smith, a former army private,
who lost both his hands and legs
was. married last night in a tiny
Fort Lincoln cemetery chapel
here to Barbara Borm.

For Smith, marriage fulfilled
an ambition he dreamed of
months ago as he lay in the army

hospital. He told newsmen that
“some day I would like to
walk like any man down the

middle aisle and pledge vows
to the girl I love.”

After the ceremonies, Smith
drove his bride off on a wedding
trip in his own specially equipped
car, He laughingly declined to tell
newsmen where they were going
on their honeymoon.

Smith was wounded in one
arm during fighting around Chang
Jin reservoir in Korea November
1950. He suffered a severe case
of frostbite that necessitated the
amputation of both hands at
wrists and both legs below the
knee now he has hooks clampe:l
onto the stumps of his arms and
gets about with a special limb and
crutches. :

While Smith was recuperating
in hospital Miss Borm visited the
patients and the two fell in love.
Smith draws a monthly pension
of $360 from the veterans’ Ad-
ministration. In addition, people
throughout the United States sent
him contributions totalling about
$120,000 which has been placed
in a trust fund.

When Smith was discharged
from hospital July 4, U.S. Gov-
ernment presented him with a
specially equipped automobile.
When he decides to build a home
Smith also will be eligible for
$10,000 in Government assistance
te build a special house. —U.P.

Oil Sought In
Caynian Islands

(From Our Own Correspondent)
JAMAICA, Aug. 12.

Exploration now being carried
out in Jamaica aimed at locating
possible petroleum deposits, ;is
reaching out to the dependencies
of the island.

Explorers have applied for
permission to seek oil in the Cay~
man Islands and the Turks and
Caicos Islands, two dependencies
of Jamaica.



Siudents To Sperid
Part Of Tinie In U.S.

WASHINGTON, Aug. 19.

Reliable United States sources
said on Tuesday that an agree-
ment is expected to be signed
shortly between the Iragi govern-
ment and the Technical Co-oper-
ation Administration of the State
Department for students of the
College of Agriculture near Bagh-
dad to spend part of their train-
ing at the College of Agriculture
of the University of Arizona.
They said that the agreement
would be signed shortly between
TYCA Administratoy Stanley
Andrews and a representative of
the Iraqi government,

Delivs Hydri, Director of the
Iraqi Department of Agriculture,
who is at present visiting agri-
cultural colleges in the United
States, has helped, he said, to
bring this agreement to virtual
completion. He explained that
the College of Agriculture of the
University of Arizona was chosen
because Arizona’s agricultural
problems, especially those of ir-
rigation, most closely’ resemble
those of Iraq. He said that stu-
dents of Iraq’s College of Agri-
culture, which was recently in-
augurated on a 9,000 acre site
near Baghdad, will be given the
task of converting Iraq within the
next ten years into a food gran-
ary, recalling the time of classi-
cal Babylon when Iraq supplied
much grain to the Near East.

UP.
Israel Will Appeal

To U.N. About
Syrian Statement

TEL A VIV, Aug. 19.

It was learned that Israel was
declared to appeal to the United
Nations about Syria's “strong
man” Colonel Adeeb Shishakly’s
recent statement that there was
no room for Jews in the Middle
East.

Informed sources _ said the
Israeli foreign office will instruct
its permanent delegate to the
United Nations to protest to the
security council about Shishakly’s
statement. They said the Syrian
attack will bring the foreign office
demand for meeting of Israel-
Syrian mixed armistice commis-
sion,

They added that the foreign
office will also draw the attention
of the United Nations truce super-
visor Major General William
Riley to the “violation of the
armistice agreement which for-
bids the use of threats.” —U.P.





Clear bidding is needed here






i ye



IWN the early days of Con- ;
I tract it was an unheard a ME Se ay f eS E
event for a hand to be playe
\in a suit bid by an opponent, by M, HARRISON-GRAY
ias the latter had to be
\treated with respect. Heart and North has the
| Nowadays tree use is made of following :
exploratory bids in shaded four- 2
card suits. and it may well hap- ©KQI9863
m that a player holds such OAS
Renath and strength in a suit @ K 109

tion. carry the_ bidding sky-hi h in
Tihssk citia tions are fraught Spades. North should make his
with anxiety, since another intention clear with a Juinp
modern development is. the overcall of Three Hearts, which
increased use of cue bids in is reasonably safe under the
enemy suits Any confusion is Rule of Two and Three even

@pt to be disastrous, but a review
of the auction and a little ans
the

mon sense should clarify
mature of the bid.

West, for example, opens One

named by the opposition that he
feels an attempt should be made
to secure the contract in that

The one call he must avoid is
Two Hearts. South may read it
as a forcing-to-game cue bid and

though West has bid One Heart
on something better than
A 1075. Knowing that North's
suit will stand up on its own
South will raise to game o>






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hand with two or three tricks in
support,

able

A player shows an unmistak-
wish to play in an

opponent's suit if he bids it after
making a penalty double of that



uit For instance: West, One

Club; North, One Heart; East,
One Spade. South holds:
OAJI10942
0 6
oK8
@2QJ107
Any double is business once
u n has made a call
s double of One Spade will
t has

probably be taken out. but

ved to indicate a good open-

ead if West should become

rer and to warn North
nst proceeding in Hearts. If
the East-West strength seems

imited, South can confirm the

nature of his hand by bidding

a

Spades on a later round

London Ngoress Service



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Ford Plant

DETROIT, Aug. 19.

King Feisal II of Iraq arose
early on Tuesday for a tour of
Ford’s Giant River Rouge Plant
and the Greenfield Village Mus-
eum. Later he will attend a re-
ception given by loca) Iraqui.
The young monarch was greeted
by 1,000 Detroit Iraqui on Mon-
day night when he arrived by
plane from Washington. The
crowd shouted: ‘Yash jall lathye’!
Arabic for Long live His Ma~-
jesty!” when the smiling 17-year
old monarch landed,

In a bfief ceremony he was
greeted by Thomas Hakim, Jack
Pajor, and Joseph Acho repre-
senting the Iraquian American
Society of Detroit. Hakim’s five-
year-old grand daughter Patricia
presented Feisal with a bouquet
of white roses. With the King,
were his uncle Regent Abdul
Allah and Abdullah Becker, Min-
ister of Iraq. They went by
limousine to Dearborn Inn to
spend the night.—U.P.

x AND AIR





TRAFFIC

In Carlisle Bay

Schooner May Olive, Schooner Emeline,
Schooner Laudalpha, Schooner Esso
Aruba, Schooner Lydia A., Schooner
Henry D. Wallace, Schooner Philip H
Davidson, Schooner Everdene, Schooner
Enterprise S., Schooner Rosarene, Schoon-
er D'Ortac, Schooner Marion Belle Wolfe,
cane tomar Saw, Radar, Motor Vessel

3 aria, ooner Lucien M. Smi
Schooner Lady Noeleen. slike a

ARRIVALS '

Schooner W. L. Eunicia, 38 tons, Capt
Joseph, from Dominica, Agents: Schoon-
vr Owners’ Association,

Schooner

Lynsid II, 36 tons, Capt
Rarnes, from Martinique, Agents
Schooner Owners’ Association.
i DEPARTURES
8.8. Boskoop for Trinidad, s.s. Glou-
cester from Nassau and s.s. Valhall for
St Johns, New Brunswick
Seawell

ARRIVALS — BY B W.IA
ON MONDAY
Trom Trinidad:

E. Bishop, C. Lusan, M Barrow, B. H
Scott, A. Scott; G. Scott; S. Scott; B
Wood, S. Singh, C Singh, D. Singh, B
Samaroo, R. Samaroo, W. Bissell, H
St. Clair, S. Browne, D. Roett, L
riguez, R, Rodriguez, F. Scott, P
R, Scott; A. Scott

ON MONDAY
say From Puerto Rico:

James Grosvenor, Clipton Grant, Lind-
say Harewood, Oliver Johnson, Willian
Knowles, Vernal M, Jones, Roy Walton
McDonald Smithforde, May Sampson,
Maude Cox, Lawrence Redman. —
From Antigua:

Joan Farara, Gerard Farara;
Smith; Miss Joan Arthurton; Mrs, Eva
Wathey, Mstr. Albert Wathey, Mrs.
Ellen Julius, Mr, Samuel Mellor, Mr,
John Elliott, Mrs, Gweneth Davies; Mr
John Davies.

DEPARTURES — BY BWIA

ON MONDAY
From Puerto Rico:

Mr. Albert Gregorick; Mrs. A, Greg-
orick; Mrs, Florence Goddard, Mstr
Phillip Goddard; Miss Carol Goddard;
Dr. Edward Holder, Miss Ursula Miller
Mr. Harold Millington, Miss Harilynn
Chabrol, Mr. Robert Crichlow; Evelyn
Dariel; Mrs. Eileen Gomes; Miss Rita
Gomes, Miss Margaret Markham, Mr
Harold Smith, Miss Dorcas Williams.
For Trinidad:

Mr. Coleridge Blackett, John Shepherd,
Alan Shepherd, Eulalie Walcott, Ramona

Rod-
Scott;

Hilda

Amoroso; Lucy Mestier; Phyllis Heath;
Fileen Joseph; Elwin Seale; Elizabeth
Peirce; Ralph Owers, Veer Millet, Mar-




jor Embleton, Lucilla Williams, Alvin
Tucker, Joy Brathwaite, Margot Lag-
aldera, Louis Millan, Dymali Mohammed
Terence Warburton.
ON SUNDAY

For Antigua:

Margaret Dewhurst; Genivieve Gardin
er; Alice Hutson; Cecil Hunte; Marga-
ret Hunte; Cecilia Hunte



Ss





Enquiries to;

STOKES & BYNOE LTD

AGENTS



US. Suffers

From Drought

By HARRY W. FRANTZ During the twelve months endec

WASHINGTON, Aug. 19. May 31, 1952 operating revenues
Damage to crops in the United of Jamaica Public Service Com-
States through drought, estimated pany, Limited (operating sub-
thus far at about $1,250,000,000, sidiary of Jamaica Public Service
is offset in Canada by good grow- Limited) amounted to £704,992
jing weather for grains and, the an increase of £95,482 over £609,51(
expectation of an all time record shown for the preceding twelve
wheat crop. Large wheat crops months. Operating revenue deduc-
in both the United States and tions were £47,768 higher a
Canada will reduce the repercus- ¢458,066 and retirement reserve
sions of the United States drought accruals increased to £55,416 fron
on the International Conference. £40,834, Net income at £148,995
In tee no SREROSS ny was up from £121,851, After the
be eee oo ne operating subsidiary’s preference
ome: ‘dryness in Laguana . The dividend requirements and ex-
“ "or . and taxes of the parent

: : : penses
drought ‘situation in Texas and “
Oklahama is getting worse, and Company, the balance applicable
the Mexican areas in the Ria t@ the common shares of Jamaica

Grande region may be affected. Public Service Limited, converted

The Mexican cotton crop for from Sterling to Canadian dollars
this year is estimated at 225,000 @t the rate of $2,74 to the #£, was
bales less than the 1,150,000 bales $254,252, or $1.88 a share, for the
production of last year, partly latest period. In the twelve months
because of dryness in the plant- ended May 31, 1951 when Ster-
ing period, but also to credit re- ling was converted to Canadian
strictions dollars at the rate of $2.99 to the

Drought in the United States £, the comparable balance was
hit the southern section hardest, $203,908, or $1.51 per share com-
and the New England coastal mon stock of the parent company.



Janiaica Public
Service Earnings

Higher



ee —_ and cotton were

principally affected, These are

not the major areas of wheat 205 More Africans

proce et . va occurred in i

many formerly dry areas durin: . _

the ‘past two weeks, and omicial Arrested Tuesday

concern, is shifting to the situa- ‘ ,

tion in Texas aad the great PORT ELIZABETH, Aug. 19.

plains states. The second stage of the renewed
Precipitation in Texas during passive resistance campaign

the past 15 weeks has been from against South African segregation

four to eight inches below normal laws bore fruit here Monday with

at various points, and there hag 205 Africans being arrested short-

been much deterioration of cot- ly after midnight.

ton in that state. Due chiefly to The campaign went into high

the drought, the cotton crop for gear for 12 hours with well or-

the United States was forecast on ganized groups violating racial

August 11 at about 409,000 bales segregation law's regulations.
less than the 1951 crop,—U.P, Today’s arrests added to arrests
following a similar outbreak Sat-



in Port
—C.P.

urday brought the total

Elizabeth to 301.

«EXAMINE:
YOURSELF

Useful Information
For Egyptian
Agriculture

STATE COLLEGE, Pennsylvania,



Aug. 19.
A. Moursi, the Egyptian dele- ‘ ’
gate to Sixth International, Cam You Say NO -
ongress here said on Tuesda
that the World Assembly was ores All These Questions

viding information valuable to
Egyptian agriculture. Preparing
to attend the second day’s sessions
of the week-long Congress he said
that he had been particularly in-
terested in the displays of port-
able sprinkler irrigation systems.
yoo ; = mH Series URINATION? .
Attache to the Egyptian Embassy “yes”
in Washington, said that the port- " vay anaes 3 telys victim of
able sprinkler systems are valu- faulty kidneys. Don't delay. Act at once.
able in Egyptian areas where Take Dodd's Kidney Pills—the proved
water supplies are limited, remedy. For over half a millions of
He concentrated also on discus- teresa oll parts of the world have found
sions of pasture development in prompt relief and permanent benefit through

Do you suffer from
BACKACHE?



semi-arid areas, He said that is famous remedy. Dodd's
Egyptian ; aerate teas meee hasan - thn pa to buy
are far advanced in fields of plant 40 pills 2/-.

breeding, insect control, plant and easy to take. Bottle of 2 pills e

physiology, and land management.
They are eager to enlarge their
knowledge of pasture irigation he
added, because “we depend large-
ly on artificial irrigation, not on
rain, for raising crops and pas-
tures, . —UP.

Dodd's Kidney Pills





5 R.A.F. Airmen |
Killed In Crashes |

LONDON, Aug. 19. |

Five R.A.F. airmen were killed
and three aircraft destroyed in
two crashes three hours and 20
minutes apart. The



first crash “
was at Bdadnson airfield Oxford- =.
shire where three cadets died AX

when their twin engined aircraft
ploughed into the ground one
minute after takeoff on a training
flight. It exploded and disinte-
grated.

The second crash was at Stan-
hope Yorkshire where two R.A.F.
Meteor jet fighters also on a
training flight collided in thick
fog over Stanhope town. Two
crew members escaped, by para-
chute from one plane. The pilot
and navigator of the other jet
were killed, —U.P.

STASL@eccryrerrr 16ers

U.S. Economically
Sound Fior 6 Months

BOSTON, Aug. 19.
Economist Roger Babson, who
forecast the 1929 stock market
crash, took a look at the United
States economy on Tuesday and



redicted continued prosperity orb atte ar he Me as anet
or at least another six months. iets Sy yale TyateleM agents ©

Some day we will be in for a| Porn ymno8t, Varhc {TEAL 4s
bust, but it won't happen right) Cie ioe iyarly au ce
now” said the 77-year-old former eve a mr ets S10"
professor and party Presidential wv rf Ee”
candidate in an interview. “We'll] . | pase
stay right where we are for the | INTERNATIONAL TRADING
next six months or so”.—U.P. CORPORATION LTD.,

‘ Coleridge Street — Dial 5009







“You are missing
one of the best j

things in life until yow sleep on a..

DUNLOPILLO

mattress

Try one at your furnisher—you will
fealise that Dunlopillo has made a
contribution to modern living which
no one should be without. Dunlopillo
is the most comfortable, hygienic and
economical mattress in the world.
Available now in all sizes for beds and
also for baby’s cot.





STATES & TRADING CO. LTD.,

BRIDGETOWN






















PAGE SEVEN
ROUBLE

x

rata! eS en fan. 2?

%

CP rapt hon;
7" AP ae
i a







= Ce : Li

\ , in
Here’s a medicine

specially made for it!

If you suspect that there’s “something
wrong” with your kidneys it may mean
that they need a corrective medicine.
Rasen kidneys give rise to various
istress.ng symptoms such as backache,
rheumatic pains, lambago, sciatica, bladder
disorders with scalding and burning. ~
The trouble starts when the kidneys graw
sluggish anéfail to perform their’ saben
function of filtering away impurities from
the system, You can restore these vital
organs to normal activity as many others
- have done by taking De Witt's P:

They have a cleansing, soothing and
De Witt’s Pills antiseptic effect on the kidneys and you will
are specially made for




j
re)





very quickly feel the good they are doi
This tned and trusted madieiieben br

BACKACHE relief to many people like you in all parts
JOINT PAIN of the world. Why not try De Witt's Pills
Ss for your trouble? They may be just what
RHEUMATIC PAINS you need. Get a supply from your chemist.
LUMBAGO
SCIATICA

OUR GUARANTEE

De Witt’s Pills are
frees under strictly
ygienic conditions and
ingredients conform to
rigid standards of purity. ©



~

DEWITT'S PILLS

for Kidney and Bladder Troubles






processes of manufacture provide
a product of high purity and
quality.

THERE'S nothing like a
delicious, revitalizing cup of
* Ovaltine' with the mid-morning
snack to help lighten the daily
round. Away go petty cares and
domestic worries, household
duties are tackled with energy and
shopping becomes the delight it
should be.

‘Ovaltine' is made from Nature's
finest foods. The famous
‘Ovaltine' farms were established
to set the highest standards for
the malt, milk and eggs used in
its preparation and the scientific

OVALTINE

Costs so little ~it gives so much

Sold in airtight tins by all Chemists and Stores.
IMPORTANT—Note that the large size ‘ Ovaltine’ tin contains 16 ounces.

It is a sustaining and energizing
food beverage, nourishing to
body, brain and nerves.

Apart from its beneficial qualities,
you will enjoy ‘Ovaltine’ as a
pleasant, palatable drink at any
time of the day. As a night-cap
to assist healthy restorative sleep,
*Ovaltine’ has earned a favoured
place in millions of homes
throughout the world.









OVALTINE BISCUITS
Dainty and delightfully crisp, ‘Ovaltine’ Biscuits are
ideal for all cecamions. They are made from the finest

ingredients, including a proportion of ‘ Ovaltine’, and
are deliciously nourishing.

The next #ime you order ‘Ovaltine’ remember to
include a packet of ‘Ovaltine’ Biscuits as well. You
will enjoy their delicate and distinguished flavour,

In sealed airtight packages,



TF
i

MILK STOUT
C. L. Gibbs & Co. Ltd.,

P. O. Box 56
BRIDGETOWN .- Dial 2402





PAGE EIGHT

CLASSIFIED ADS.|

TELEPHON



IN ME

CARTER—In loving memory of our
son Edwin N. Carter, who died A
20th 1949

Sweet be thy rest









and peacefu

sleeping
God's way is best
keeping.
Ever.to be remembered by the r
and Atherley's famiiy 20.8 n



ee
|



ANNOUNCEMENTS

CAREER—Be trained as a Newspaper
Reporter of a Feature Writer. Get
tails of Scheme from Barbados Pres:
Headquartets No. 53 Swan Street

20.8.52-—-4n
Ee ee u

MAKE EXTRA MONEY. Big cash
profits full or spare time Sell Per
sonal Christmas Cards Spanish Greetings.
25 for $1,50 — Name imprinted, Samples





de
Club

Free. Also 2 beautiful box axsort-
ments. Write Air Mail. CYPIi0

CARDS CO., 76 W. Huron St., Butialo,
mee 30.7.52—19n



FOR RENT

HOUSES

——$— $< —
BUNGALOW--On Sea, Main Road i
ings, very comfortably furnished, Bo
Wsh bath 2 bedrooms Servan
rooms — Verandahs -— From September
Telephone 2949, 16,8 t.1
file

pptent+

food condition, also one Austin A—70] usual conveniences. Water and Electrici-
i951. Very good condition too, both ears | ty installed. Garage and Servants’ room
gcing very reasonable. Dial 95251. in yard.

17.8.52—t. fn.














CHANDOS, %nd Avenue, Be
Fully furnished. Available lst











ver. Phone 3926 or 3450 19.8.5 r
ee
FLAT & HOUSE—Fully furnished, St.
Lawrence on-Sea. Phone 3505.
29.3,52—t f.n
HOUSE—Small, new. stone, ane floor
house, completely and comfortably furn-
ished. Very cool, good distance. Su ‘table
for one or two adults. Phone 4942
20.8. 52
ence rafiores
“MONARCH” -- Prospect. St. Jom¢
Apply: Hutchinson & Banfield
20.8,52—3n,
RIPLEY-ON-SEA Maxwell Coast

fully furnished all modern conveniences

two bedrooms, refrigerator and telephone

from September on. Dial 8476
19,.8.52—2n





ROOM-——Large cool room 4 windc
opposite the Yacht Club. Apply on pi
ises at No. 4 Flat, Clifton, Bay Stree

20.8.5



ROOSEVELT MANOR—On the sea,
Beach Court Avenue, Hastings. Three
bedrooms and all modern conveniences
Apply: “Elise Court’, Hastings.

27,7. 62—t.f.n.

WANTED

HELP eee

CLERK—A lady Clerk for a Commis-
sion Office with a knowledge of Short-
hand and typewriting and general office











work. Previous experience required
Apply to box XYZ, C/o Advocate Adver-
tising Dept. Stating Qualifications. Ap
plications treated strictly confidential
17.8.52-—-3n
EXPERIENCED ACCOUNTANT to be
responsible for Accounts Dept. extensive
frm, Salary $200 right man. Apply ir
own handwriting giving full details and
experience. Box No. K.J. c/o Advocate
Co. 20.8.52—1n

Plantation.
monials to Manager

POSITION réqlired by responsible
Young man with knowledge of Are and
Acetelyne Welding and Electrical Appar-
atus. To arrange interview reply to
Advocate Box M.L 20,8, 52—5n

YOUNG LADY Willig to
vertising. Good prospects
person, Apply: P.O. Box
town.

20,8, 532—3n







learn ad-
for right
169, Bricdge-

20.8,.52—1n



MISCELLANEOUS

POSITION WANTED
NURSE DORIS VENNER a qualified
Midwife, is willing to assist anyone who
is in need of a nurse. Address: Chap-
man’s Lane, C/o Miss Gladys Best
16.8. §2—6n

nl

PERSONAL

The public are hereby warned against





giving credit to my wife, MATILDA
ROBINSON (nee Smith) as ¥ do not
held myself responsible for her or

amvone else contracting any debt or debts
im my name unless by a written order
signed by me ‘
ALFRED ROBINSON,
Drax Hail, Hope,
St. Georgt
19.8 .52-—2n.
Rf
SORES OOO POPP POOP PPPOE,
TYPING AND DUPLICATING
(RONEO) SERVICE © Circulars,
Reports, Exam. Sheets, Invitation
~~ Minimum Delay Cheap Rates,
Quality Workmanship—BUSINESS
PROMOTION SYNDICATE,
Swan Street (3rd Floor)
20.8.52—2n
SEBEL OEE
== a ,
BOOKS i
BOOKS French
available Cov
Buck les late








£45656, 26468

PSSSSESSOGSS

53,

<

FASHION
Spanish now

ered Buttons th



styles at “EBONY DRESS SHOP”
Prince William Henry Street
above Lashley's Store

and at Upper Reed Street
16.8, 52

in










OMEGA, CYMA,
ARDATH, PIERCE

and
UNO WATCHES

For Ladies and Gents



ASK FOR THESE
WATCHES BY NAME

Y. De LIMA |
& CO.,LTD. |

20, Broad St |
& Greystone Village }







tier
5062. C

RS|REDMAN & TAYLOR'S GARAGE LTD.



. om _ .
% na
j {) 4 }
They signify quality - - -
Only at Your Jewellers ||

PUBLIC SALES




























E 2508 i REAL ESTATE























‘iinidiatiemcinchii | CANAAN--Cattlewash Bathsheba, Elec-
* tricity, running water, furnished with
FOR SALE |refrigerstor. First offer of £1,300
} Accepted. Standing on nearly one acre
of land. Telephone Mrs. Gibbons 01!7
a AU M 20.8.52—In
2 ? Co el ee en a LAND Various portions of land
j Apply to A. R. Brome, Layne’s Rd.,
CAR 1951 Austin A-40, )) Dritton’s Hill, St. Michael 16.8. 52—3n
17,080 good conditio Owner leay-| *
ing, Island Price. $1,700. Ring W.|..LAND—1820 square feet of land situate
Mahon #8288 19.8.58—an, | 3t P@Pd Street, St. Michael, the property
= winglets so aoe Bleanor Lacey, deceased
CAR—One (1) 1946 Mercury Eight Ford, e above pareel of land will be se:
mechanically sound. Apply: B. A, Simp- | UB for sale by Public Competition at our
en, Cliff Cottage, St. John Office, James Street, on Friday 2th
17.8. 52—n,\| AuBUst, 1952, at 2 pom
ves meee Particulars apply to. Mr
CARS—Vauxhall 10 H.P. 1940. Vavix- | “ arper, Lakes. Folly
hail 12 H.P. 194@ Priced to sell, éontact YEARWOOD & ‘BOYCE,
irshall & Edwards 48, Roebuele Street. Solicitors
20.8. 52—-7n.



tn.

CAR—One 10 h.p. Ford in fine cof@i-
A bargain for someone. Phone
R, Applewhaite, Lakes Folly.
17.8,.52—3n









————
LAND--Pine Hill 18,909 square fret.

Telephone Mrs. Gibbons 0117
20, 8 ;53—+in,

“STIRLING”, a two-storeyed stonewall




















































~ CAR- One Ford Zepher, as good as | dwellinghouse in Centre
rew, done 2,000 miles. Phone 5,| STRATHCLYDE, St. Michael,

cn 7,068 square feet of ‘and, and caon-
20.8.52—an, | taining open and closed verandahs, draw-
ing and dining rooms, 3 bedrooms, each
with running water, kitchen &c., and



CARS—Prefect Ford

late 1950. Very



Inspection on application to Miss Bree
sd Parkinson, Strathelyde. Dial 2452
CARS—One A-40 “Somerset” owner| The property will be set up for sale
driven done only 1330 miles — like} by public competition at our office,
rew $2,500.00. One 1951 A-40. —< 3200|James Street, Bridgetown, on Friday
One | 29th August at 2 p.m





riles — conditio: 400 .00.

mares, 22, Cees Seer and YEARWOUD & BOYCE,

condition excelent $2,500.00 Solicitors.
19.8, 52—6n. 17.8.52—9n





“TORRIES—Two 5-ton Fordson logries.| “THE HERMITAGE” situate at the

Cood tyres. New Batteries, low e | corner of White Park and Country Road
and good tyres. Recently over |. p star on about 123,040 square feet of
Priced to sell. C. A. Williams Ai | land. ie House contains Gallery, two
St. George. Phone 4057. living rooms, dining room, eight bed-
16.8.5%—4n | rooms, three dressing rooms, water and
electric light. lmspection amy day be-

ELECTRICAL ee eens
The above will be set up for sale at



an An oe public competition at our Office, Lucas
DRILLS—By Bilsck &J] Street, on Friday the 22nd day of August
+ “e".. 17, with | 1952 at 2.30 p.m.
a & Co., Lid, CARRINGTON & SEALY
14 8,52—6n 14.8.52--dn
“VALLAMBROSA” — Constitution Rd.
Cyposite Queen's Park. All modern
conveniences. For full Particulars
Phone 5127. 16.8. 52—8n.

. AUCTION

UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER

received from the
sell on Friday,



ELEC
Decker, 4" Hole Gun.

CTRIC
DaCos



Drill Stands.
Electrical Dept

LIVESTOCK

ENGLISH RACEHOR FLYING
DRAGON 3 year colt by Dante out of
Sveet Cygnet, Aberford 4 year gelding
by Sea Sick out of Kitty Foylp. Both
winners in England. Apply 8s. A.
Walcott, Apes Hill, St. James

17.8,.52—3n











nn

POULTRY

FOR SALE AT HIGHOLERE
PUPPiES-——Two Pure Bred Bull Mastiff
Puppies, three months old. (Bitches)
four Siamese Kittens. Male and females,
17,8.52—-3n

MISCELLANEOUS
CAR ACCESSORIES—Rubber Matting,
Battery leads, Bulbs, Polishes, Chamois,
Dusters, Cheese cloth, Whisk brooms,
wire, Bonnet

By instructions
Insurance Co,



Triumph” Car

(Damaged a accident) (1) 1947 aie

Stendard; in perfeet working order,
Sale at 2 p.m. oe eash.





a ae
17.8. in.
—_——————
UNDER THE SILVER
Lew and High tension SILV
medalions are all things that your car

may need. May be obtained from Chei-] ON THURSDAY 2ist by order of Rev.
sea Garage (1950) Limited Phone 4949. H. Lane, we will sell his Furniture at
19.8,52—6n. | “Clovelly” corner of Pine Road and 8th
COTTON SEERSUCKER— ten Jovely } Dining Table,
check designs 36” wide usually $1,12 yard Jand Ornament Tables, Morris
clearing at 89 eents yard at KERPALANI, | Cushions, Long Bookshelf all in Mahog-
52 Swan Street 20.8.52—1n. }any; Upright and Arm Chairs in Rush;
— [Drawing Room Suite (Settee and
HOUSEWIVES—Do you have Floor]3 Chairs): Ladys Roll Top Desk; Office
Problems which you do not seem to be} Desk and Revolving Chair; Walnut Mird.
able to overcome? Forget those troubles | Sideboard Pictures, Records; Single Bed
Phone 4748, K. J. Hamel-Smith & Co [ stead, Simmons Spring an Bed; Press,
Ltd., Bridge Street, and they will be] Dressing Table, Towel Rail al in
orly too pleased to give Advice at no | Mahogany; tron
obligation whatsoever. Advice direct} Bram. Washstand and Ware;
from Experts at the Ultra-modern] Press; Electrolux Oil Refrigerator,
Research Plant of S. C. Johnsen & Son] Kitchen Tables, Larder, 3 Burner
tne., Racine, Wisconsin, U.S.A: Valor Otl Stove and Oven; Kitchen
20.8.92—5n. | Utensils, Books and other items.





Sale 11.30 0° .' Terms cash.
LADIES COAT—Write “Coat” size] BRANKER & co.
3G—40 c/o Advocate Advts. Dept. Auctioneers.
16.8. 52+-4.f.n, 17.8.52--2n.

——$_$_$_

PUBLIC NOTICES
NOTICE

PARISH OF ST. PHILIP
Applications for the Post of Nurse at

ee

MACHINERY—One (1) 9” x 7" Robey,
enclosed, forced lubricated steam Engine
to run at 470 r.p.m. developing about
4u B.H.P. at 100 Ibs, pressure, Two (2)
small cold starting Diesel Engines, 10
ava 15 Hu, One (1) 22” x 36” 5 roller
Mil complete with C.S. Gearing, steam

Engine, and Hydraulic Pressure Regu.
lating Equipment. Apply: D. M. Simp-]the St. Philip's Almshouse will be re-
son & Co 20.8,52—6n. | ceived by the undersigned up to Satur-

30th August 1952.

Applicants must be qualified as a
Nurse and Midwife, and must forward
with their applications their Baptismal

‘STOVES—The famous “Florence” Stovet
im 2 and 3 Burner Models are obtainable
from Laurfe Dash & Co., Tudor Street.







Phone 5061 17.8,52—8n. | Certificates as well as their Certificates
— a a8 ~— | of competency.

SUBSCRIBE now to the Daily The successful candidate will be re-
Telegraph, England’s leading Daily Nows-] quired to assume duties on “the 25th

arriving in Barbados by Air} September, 1952.

paper now
I in /ny further particulars

only a few days after publication may We ob-

Treasurer's



London. Contect Ion a C/o. anes tained from the Parochial
0, Ltd, Loca epresentative | Office.

Tel. aie. 17.4.52—t.o.n P, s.. W. SCOTT,

ies valine ceray ane nee ener eT. Clerk to the Boar ne Honsise?:
TOOLS—Ir Stock;—Suction tools, St. Pp.
Mhillips screwdrivers, Cabinet blade 16.8,52—7n.
screwdrivers, Slipjoint pliers, Combina-
tion pliers, Hacksaws. Tapper spine | 0O0S0OSOOO00S0 000000"
ete. Get your requirements lene
Jurage (1950) Limited Phone .
soni <—o THANKS











LOST & FOUND ohn
es I beg to return thanks to

FOUND all those including Sir Allan

, » pair of Gold and Collymore and Col. O. St. A.
Se ee an recover, sam Duke for the financial help

applying to this office and paying cost
of advertisement, 20.8,52—1n

sent to me towards my
appeal for St, Mary’s Church,
City.

Professor C. N, WEEKES.



Ys

: AND NOW

you can have

A GAS COOKER

FURNITURE
AUCTION

like those have admired tn

the
THEM TO-DAY ...-: +

At Your Gas Showroom.
Bay Street

SEA VIEW GUEST
HOUSE
HASTINGS, BARBADOS
|

you
magazines.

SEE

‘ . : ‘ See eer reeeet ST. RA seks VICARAGE,
T0-DAY'S NEWS FLASH Near St. John’s Church am
WONDERFUL ASSORT- TO-DAY
MENT OF | 11.30 a.m.
Walking Sticks {)% P"Sustea ‘on “vequest. AUCTIONEERS
Just received by | hohe gee John »4. Biadon
JOHNSON'S {8 Parvin “arranged. & ce.
STATIONERY ae J. H. 4



HURRICANE
PRECAUTION
HINT No.7

WARNINGS.

If you are going to take
cover during a Hurricane in
a public shelter, take with
your

NOTICE



Friends, Customers and
the General Publie are
‘hereby notified that due
to our inability to obtain
flour, we shall be unable

to supply



\% =
. BRE AD 1 Bucket containing:—
; we Food for yourself and family
> in the usual quantities 1 cup per person
3 1 bottle of fresh drinking
‘ water
: eee 1 set of additional clothes
: Cc. F. ZEPHIDIN, per person
° . 1 Kerosene lantern filled

“Bakers”, with oil. (to be lit how-

ever only on the instruc-
tions of the Shelter War-
den).

41 Tudor St





$5.66906666 eee,
LPPISF ECL





PODS OO GOSS





s



Rich OilField

canos,

‘}of this century and that of the

ee ee ee ne ee le ee

BARBADOS ADVOCATE





Egyptian Swimmer

Discovere d Has Ear Disease







In Mexico

ienced
Egyptian swimming team in Tor-

TORONTO, Aug. 19.
oldest and most exper-
member of the four man

The

MEXICO CITY, Aug. 19 onto to take a crack at the Can-
Senator Antotnio Bermudez,|adian National Exhibition 10 mile
Director of the Mexican Govern-|swim on Friday was taken to
ment Oil Company —— Petroleos|hospital with ear disease on
Mexicanos announced the dis-|Tuesday and will not take part in
covery of “Mexicos most import-|the swim. He is 45 year oid
ant oi! field in 50 years.” He|]Hassan Abd El Rehm, record
said that the first well was








brought in on Sunday at Tenix-
tepec, Feracxuz state, along Mexi-
- the “golden land of oil
s.

He said “we are sure that this
is coe of Mexico’s finest fields.
The new stroke rivals the dis-
coveries of the Cero Azul, the
Petrero Del Liano, and the Juan
Casiano fields in the first decade

rich Poza Rica region im 1931.

The meaning of this new dis-
covery for the prosperty of
Petroleos, Mexicanos and the

nation’s economy is appreciable.’

Bermudez said that ofl spurted
from the initial well at an ap-
proximate depth of 4,850 feet.
Geologists found that there was

that the oi] bearing soil extended |

that “the new
covery will mark the beginning
of a new era for Petroleos
Mexicanos, and we will be very
happy to announce more im-
portant discoveries
near future.—U.P.

|
In Touch With Barbados |
Coastal Station |

GABLE & WIRELESS (West Indies) |
niecate with th» following ships through
their Barbados Coast Station: Slo
8.8. Kastor, s.s. Ariandne, s.s. Brit-
ish Holly, s.s. Tyra, s.¢ Dunstgn, s.s
Walton, 5.6 *residente Dutra,
Biogtapher, s,s. Utilitas, s.s. Aristidis,
8.8. Belgian Gulf, s.s. Mormactsea, s.s
Robin Goodfellow, s.s. S. Rost, s.s
Senlorenzo, ss. Salte 54, s.s. Glouces-
ter, s.s. Enterprise, s.s. Nicolaou Georg-
fous, s.s, Johilla, s Amerigo Ves-
pucci, 8.5. Hersilia; s.s. Bruno, «.s
Christian Holm, s.s, Helder, s,s. Valhall,
8.8. Imperial Winnipeg. ss. Petter, s.s
Hornsund, s.s. Tista, 5.8. Pandt Sea-
Prospector, 8.8.
8. Rosario, s.s. %
British Power, 5.
Lgria, M/V Aster, s.s,
fito, 3.8. Jamaica Prédiucer, s.s5

eoncluded





8, 9.9.

Gol-
Buesten.

Pains in Back
Nervous, Rheumatic

eae foods ome Ee Cons
and colds en pul
&@ strain on Ne Ridnevs and Kidney
tad: Binder fro jes the true
use of Excess Acidity. Getting Up
ts, Burning Passages. Leg Pains
Nervousness, one aee Swollen —
imatiam, a, an
feating fd before your time Hel
® 8p

. Help your
tex.

your blood with Cys.
your kidnevs ciean out excess



very first dose start# hel: "i
ie

and this will quickly make you feel like

Bey. Inder the ener Ree hee or ooo

must jefy comple cost

thing Get er fro vour chem-
e

2. Cystex ::

ING, COMPANY SECRETARYSHIP,
BOOK-KEBPING.

WRITE NOW to the leading tutorial

institute for overseas stud

{DON SCHOOL OF ACCOUNTANCY,
Welbeck Street, London, W.1.





















FURNITURE
AUCTION

“BENSAM”™
SHERINGHAM GARDENS,
MANWELIYS COAST
On
WEDNESDAY, [th AUGUST
at 1190 am

We have received instructions
from Comdr. H Gartside-Tip-
pinge to dispose of his FURNE-
TURE and EFFECTS as listed
below: —

VIEWING MORNING OF SALE

Tables Oceans. & Various,

Cake Stand, Writing Des sk
Chairs, Taliboy, Bedside 1S,
Single Beds = ALL IN M ol

ANY WESTINGHOUSE Fuy
Receiver (good working ,
Tubular Armehpirs, Sinall -

chairs, Standard & Table Lamps,
(Vartous types! Cloeg Gilt
Frame with Blue Face! yood

order, Honging Mirror & . Folding
Table in Limed Oak, Dtimb
Walter (Oak), Steel & Wooden
Folding Chairs, Card Table &
Cover, Limeg Oak Chest of
Drawers, Dominican Rugs, Ptd
Wardrobe, Clothes Wack, Ptd
Prestes, Table, Desk & Chairs,

Wall Matrrors iOak & Walnut
Frantes), iding Table, Stools,
Single Mattresses. Walnut Dress-
ing Table Chair, Medicine Chests,
Lloyd Loom Chair (green), Linen
Basket, Bathroom Scales, Canvas

Cot, juito «Nets, Curtains
Pink aie emeevene Quantity of

good Table & Bed Linen, Canteen
Cutlery, Glassware & Table Ac-
cessories, Breakfast, Tea, Dinner
& Coffee Sets in « n & green
china, “FRIGIDAIRE” 7 cu ft
Quantity Mise. Chinn & Glass
ware, Cream Maker, Thernos

Flask, Hurricane Lanterns, Selec-
tion good Kitchen Utensils, Cake
Tins, Brushes, Ete., Trays, Enamet
Top Tables, 3 Burner “VALOR”

Stove, 1 “FLORENCE” Oven,
Mincer, Pans, Weighing Machine,
Refrigerator Containers, Electric
fren, “NEW WORLD” Gas Cooker
tas new) “JACKSON” Electric
Stove, & Small Electric Stove.
Alarm Clock, Books, ‘Straw
Mats, Garden Tools, Paint
Erushes, Green's Lawn Mower
Shears, Step-Ladder, Watering

& many

other inter

Can, Buckets
esting items

»
AUCTIONEERS

Bonn *4. Braden
& Co.

Phone 4640

Plantations Building



holding English Channel swimmer

who apparently picked up the in-

fection from the none too clean
waters of the Lake a few days
ago.
Mohammed Sabry said that even

The team’s coach Doctor

if Hassan was fit in time for the
race he would not take part.

The remaining trio — Hassan

Abu Bakr, 31, Sayed El Aribi 31,

and Abd Fl Lafif,
down

23, — scaled

their daily training to



short five minute periods in the|
water. They will camtinue this
routine until Friday so that they |
will not be overtired when the)
race begins. They had been spenc-|
ing about two hours each day in
chilly waters of the lakc, but had/|
not made any time trials. The}
lake’s temperature on ‘Tuesday |
was 69 degrees, 9 degrees above

that necessary for the swim on
Friday. —UP. |
RATES OF EXCHANGE
19TH AUGUST. 1952
SeNing NEW YORK Buying
wT 2/10% Pr. Cheques on
Bankers 71 5/10% Pr
Sight or
Demand Drafts 71 3/10% Fr
73 2/10% Pr. Cable
71 710% Pr. Curreney 10% Pr
Coupons 69 3/10% Pr
50% Pr. Silver 20% Pr
CANADA
@) 5/10% Pr. Cheques on
Bankers 78 7/10% Pr.
Demand Drafts 78.55¢ Pr.
‘ P Sight Drafts 78 4/10% Pr
80 S/H PF NE Tae 8
79% Pr. Currency 77 2A10Ge Pr
. Coupons 16 5/10% Pr.
50% Pr. Silver 20% Pr.



OFFICIAL NOTICE

BARBADOS.

advise that they can now commu- !

x8. |



i affecting the property hereinafter
gas only in the first 33 feet, and! before

t

for more than 4,820 feet. Bermudez ae, etete tt

IN THE COURT OF CHANCERY
. In pursuance of the Chancery Act, 1906 I do hereby give notice to all persons
having or claiming any estate, right or interest or any lien or incumbrance im or

0 be examined

- me on any Tuesday
e
before the 31st day of October,

dis- } reported on and ranked according to the nature and priority thereof res

afternoon at the Registration Office, Public Buildings,

mentioned the property of the defendant to bring
me an account of their claims with their witnesses, documents and vouchers

or Friday between the hours of 12 noon
Bridge-
be



1952 in order that sueh cle




otherwise such pefsons will be precluded from the benefits of amy decree and be
deprived of all claims on or against the said property.

in the very] property:

Plaintiff:

LINDSAY ERCIL RYEBURN GILLI.

Defendant: CLYDE HARCOURT MARSHALL

FIRST ALL THAT certain piece or parcel of land situate at Sealy Hall
in the parish of Saint John in this Island containing

by admeasure-

ment One acre ten perches or thereabouts Abutting and Bounding on
lands of Palmers Plantation on lands of E. Shepherd and on the Public
Road or however else the same may abut and bound together with the
messuage or dwellinghouse and all and singular other the buildings and

erections on the said land erected and built
AND SECONDLY ALL THAT certain piece or parcel

the appurtenances
of land also situate at Sealy

standing and being with-
Hall in the said parish of Saint John in

thia Island containing two acres or thereabouts Abutting and Bounding
on two sides on lands of Palmers Plantation on lands now or late of one
Mr. Bell and on the publie road or however else the same may abut

and bound.
Bill Filed 29th May, 1962.
Dated 18th August, 1952.

H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar-in-Chancery.
20.8.52—in

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 20, 1952

GOVERNMENT NOTICES

THE GOVERNMENT OF TRENIDAD AND TOBAGO OFFER
FOR SALE
The Auxiliary MOTOR Ketch Yacht
“ARGOSY”
about 63 tons gross
about 49 tons net
Said to have been built mainly of teak at Bruges in 1903, copper





sheathed, Fitted with CUMMINGS DIESEL Motor (age unknown) 6
cylinders, about 84 H.P. (registered), estimated to give a speed of

approximately 8 knots on about 18 gals. fuel per hour.

Three fuei

tanks total capacity about 1,400/1,800 gals). ACCOMMODATION °
One large double cabin with W.C. attached, two single cabins, one
used as Radio Operator’s cabin, one large saloon with sleeping accom-
modation, forecastle, galley with AGA stove and electric refrigerator.

Electric light and radio transmitter and receiver.

Gertain parts of

|engine are missing, including self starting equipmen:.

DIMENSIONS :— approximately 66ft. x 22ft. x 10ft. Gins. draft.

Inspectable at Trinidad by arrangement,

Best offers are invited “as she now lies.”
For orders to view, etc., apply to
THE COMPTROLLER OF CUSTOMS AND EXCISE,
PORT OF SPAIN, TRINIDAD, B.W.I,
16.8.52—5n.



Attention is drawn to the Control of Prices (Defence) (Amend-

ment) Order, 1952, No. 28 which will be published in the Official
Gazette of Thursday 21st August, 1952.

2. Under this Order the maximum wholesale and retail selling

prices of “Milk-Condensed” are as follows: —









ARTICLE WHOLESALE PRICE | RETAIL PRICE
(not more than) (not more than)
Milk—Condensed ..}$14.16 per case of



OFFICIAL NOTICE :

BARBADOS.



IN THE COURT OF CHANCERY

In pursuance of the Chancery Act, 1906 I do hereby give notice to al!
. > 2 person
wing or claiming any estate, right or interest or any lien or imeumbrance in ‘a

ting the property hereinafter mentioned the property of the defendant to bring

before me an account of their claims with their witnesses, documents and vouchers

4 be examined me on any Tuesday or Friday between the hours of 12 noon
and 3 o’clock tm the afternoon at the Registration Office, Public Buildings, Bridge-
town, before the 3st day of October, 1692 in order that such claims maw be

reported on and ranked according to the nature and priority thereof respectively,
otherwise such persons will be precluded from the benefits of any decree and be
deprived of ail claims on or against the said property

Plaintiff:

SIMON ALTMAN

Defendant: LOUIS SREISMAN

late of W B. Gall on Busby's Alley and on Swan Street aforesaid or

Property:
same more
in this ¥sland Butting and
However else the same may
Pill Filed: 18th May, 1952.

Dated 18th August, 1952



ALL THAT certain messuage or store together with the land whereon
the same stands containing by admeasurement 1,489 square feet be the
or less situate in Swan Street in the

City

Bounding on lands and premises now o

but and bound
HB, WILLIAMS,

Registrar-in-Chancery.
20.8.52—4n

OFFICIAL NOTICE

BARBADOS,
IN

to be examined b:

THE COURT OF CHANCERY

In pursuance of the Chancery Act, 1906 I do hereby give notice to al! persons
haying or claiming any estate, right or interest or any lien or incumbrance in or
affecting the property hereinafter mentioned the property of the defendant to briny
before me an account of théfr claims with their witnesses, docurments and vouchers
me on any Tuesday or Friday between the hours of 12 noon

of Bridgetown

r

19th August, 1952.

M.S. STENTOR 22nd August, 1952
M.S. HERA 29th August, 1952.

$ 8S. COTTICA 5th Septem
M.S. NESTOR 19th September,

32c. per 14 oz. tin
20.8.52—1n

48 x 14 oz tins





SHIPPING NOTICES

ROYAL NETHERLANDS
STEAMSHIP CO,

SAILING FROM EUROPE



The M/V “CARIBBEE” will

accept Cargo and Passengers for
Domini:

ica, Antigua, Montserrat,
Nevis and St. Kitts, Sailing Wed-
nesday 20th inst

The M/V “MONEKA” will accept
Cargo and Passengers for Dom-
inica, Antigua, Montserrat, Nevis
as St. Kitts, Sailing riday 22nd
inst.

B.W.1, SCHOONER OWNERS
ASSOCIATION (INC.)

Consignee Tele. No 4047

, 1992
1952
SAILING TO EUROPE

1952

& CURACAO
§ 8. BOSKOOP 17th August, 1953.
M.S."HERA 15th September, 1952

S. P. MUSSON, SON & CO., LTD.







Agents
s s .
anatian LNational Oleamships
SOUTHBOUND
Satls Sails Sail Arrives Sails
Montreal Halifax Boston Barbados Bagbados
CANADIAN CRUISER Pr 12 Aug. 15 Aug. = M Aug. 25 Aug
CANADIAN CONSTRUCTOR 22 Aug. 25 Aug. nl 3 Sept. 4Sep.
LADY RODNEY oe s 3 Sept. 6 Sept. B8Sept. 17 Sept. 18 Sept
CANADIAN CHALLENGER 12 Sept. 15 Sept. _ Sept. 25 Sept
LADY NELSON a. * 22 Sept. 25 Sept. 27 Sept. 6 Oct. 7 Oct
NOKTHBOUND
Arrives Sails Arrives Arrives ives
Barbados Barbados Halifax real
CANADIAN CHALLEN 15 Aug. 20 Aug. _ 20 Ai ept.
LADY NELSON Pay ee 28 Aug. 30 Aug. 9 Sept 11 sent. 14 Sept.
CANADIAN CRUISER <6 > Sept. 10 Sept. - 3 Sept. 23 Sept.
CANADIAN CONSTRUCTO: 15 Sept. 19 Sept. — Sept. 2 Oct.
LADY RODNEY CANADIAN CHALLENGER 6 Oct. 8 Oct. _ 21 Oct. Oct.
LADY NELSON ee we 18 Oct. 21 Oct. 30 Oct. 31 Oct. 4 Nov.





For further particulars, apply to— =



and 3 o'clock in the afternoon at the Registration Office, Public Buildings, Bridge-

town,

before the 3ist day of October,
reported on and ranked according to the nature and priority thereof respectively

1952 in order that ich claims ms



otherwise such persons will be precluded from the benefits of any decree and be
deprived of all claims on or against the said property.

Plaintiff: HUGH OWEN
Defendant: T. D.

Property:

SAINT CLAIR CUMBERBATCH
SEALY & CO.,

LIMTTED.

ALL THAT certain piece or parcel of land situate near Warners in the

parish of Christ Churchand Island aforesaid formerly supposed to con-
tain by estimation Four acres or thereabouts but found by recent survey
to contain five acres and six perches or thereabouts abutting and bound-
ing on the North on lands of Warners Plantation on the East on lands



formerly of Allen Walcott but now of E. Best, M. H. H. 6ullivan and
the estate of J. Haynes deceased on the South on lands of Graeme Hal!
Plantation on lands of T. Cox and on a road and on the West on ine
public road or however els the same may abut and bound,

Bill Filed 29th January, 1952.

Dated 18th August, 1952.

H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar-in-Chancery.
20.8.52-—1n.



aay

Sole Agents:—

In among the | crevices, cleaning every
corner, SPA gets right down to the job.
“Springy’ long-lasting NYLON tufts —
anti-soggy — here’s a toothbrush that really
will last longer and clean teeth cleaner!

THE TOUGHER TOOTHBRUSH IN

THE PACK

John Freeman & Co, Led., SPA Brush Works, Chesham, Bucks., England,

INTERNATIONAL TRADING CORPORATION LTD.







Coleridge Street tet Dial: 5009
99595595 0S 959S99SS9FO94 ———

“CAST IRON WARE such as
kaffir pots, rice bowls, and trons,
manhole covers, cisterns, etc. {)
made to highest British Stand-
ards, Enquiries invited from
wholesalers and Government De-
partments, etc., lowest prices,

cark’ shipments. Enquiries also
for other products to African Pro-
ducts Export Co. Box 2048, Dur-

ban, South Africa. Cut this ad.
vertisement out for future refer-
ence.”

_ 20.8.52—2n.

NOTICE

WE beg to notify our cus-
tomers that we very much
regret our inability to supply
our usual quantity of Bread
and Cakes, as if is impossible
to obtain Flour.

B/DOS. BAKERIES LTD.
20.8.52—1n.

ee
oe -



GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD.—Agents.

HARRISON LINE

OUTWARD FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM





Vessel From Leaves Due i
S.S. “MERCHANT” .. London 17th Aug. 30th Sept.
S.S. “TRADER” .. .. Liverpool 28rd Aug. 9th Sept.
S.S. “PLANTER” .. London 8th Sept. 21st c
S.S. “NOVELIST” .. Liverpool 16th Sept, 30th ;
HOMEWARD FOR THE UNITED KINGDOM ut
iM
Vessel For Close i
Barbados
S.S. “HERDSMAN” i .. Liverpool 21st Aug.
S.S. “BIOGRAPHER” .. .. London — Aug.

For further information apply to.. .
DA COSTA & CO. LTD. — Agents











_———o—eeEeeeeeeeeeee—

nnn

We have the following in Stock

Mixed Fruit, Tins Chase & Sanborn Coffee, Tins Sweet Corn,

Tins Heinz ae Salad, Tins
Evaporated Milk,

Tips, and Tono.

Pineapple Slices, Tins United

Tins Kraft Fish Supreme, Tins Asparagus

also

Keillers Black Currant Jam, Raspberry Jam,

ss Apricot Jam,

and Gooseberry Jam.

PLACE YOUR ORDERS: WITH US NOW

JOHN D. TAYLOR & SONS LTD.

Roebuck Street



Dial 4335







ss :
% 3
%
§ 3
$ 8
$ %
$ a i %
o.:" 6 = e <3
> -%
y Ew AAMAS A AITEALe >
CG" TRANSATLANTIQUE ;
%
Sailings from Southampton to Guadeloupe, Martinique,
% Barbados, Trinidad, La Guaira, Curacao & Jamaica %
x %
%
From Southampton Arrives Barbados %
“COLOMBIE” .. 8lst July, 1952 .. 13th Aug., 1952 ¥
*“DE GRASSE” -» 22nd Aug., 1952 .. 3rd Sept., 1952 x
y

*Not calling at Guadeloupe

SAILING FROM BARBADOS TO FUROPE
From Barbados Arrives
*““DE GRASSE” .. 6th Aug., 1952 .. J6th Aug, 1952
“COLOMBIE” .. 24th Aug, 1952 .. 5th Sept., 1952
*“DE GRASSE” .. 16th Sept, 1952 .. 26th Sept. 1952,
*Sailiing direct to Southampton (We

ie

R. M. JONES & CO., LTD.,—Agents,

ootunecuesesousiessesosesseonnaneseseeseesoote:®

SODOOSSSS SES SSSOS SOS SO SOS

he the eh FH %

Seven sizes of

PRIMUS BLOW TORCHES

for

you to select from, prices range from

$17.40 to $46.76
THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM

Corner Broad & Tudor Streets

ISDOSSUS Mo ele we

ot pt ot,

LSS ESSSSSSSSS SSS OES POPE ECP PEEL LL IPE <

BOROUGH OF SAN FERNANDO &







.
VACANT POST—TOWN ENGINEER
Applications invited—University Graduates, Corporate Mem-
bers of Institutions of Civil or Municipal Engineers or equiva- $
® lent—10 years’ experience—Usual Borough Engineering Ser- %
% vices—Population 35,000—Knowledge of electricity an asset— g
% Salary $4,800—$240—$5,760 per annum—Starting salary sub- %
# ject to experience—Passage, leave, car allowance, Pension— x
R Quarters at 10% of Salary—For full cetails apply to Town
% Clerk, San Fernando, Trinidad, B.W.t, Applications close 30th
S September, 1952.
% - L. McD. CHRISTIAN, ;
& Town Clerk. 4
@ 12th August, 1952 »
$6.695565560SSSSS ,

PSPSPS SS SES SPSS S POSSESS SESE

t











WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 20, 1952 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE NINE

a Sm ot ao eal

Glands Made Youn
—Vigour Renewe
Without Operation

If you feel old before your time «
ue So nee waar physics
veakness, you @il! find few harnine

nd health fn an American met

re which resto youthtnt +
sour vitality quicker than glx:

i perations. It ts a simple home tr-r

| oe ue ee = covered by «

i mm '. tely harm!»

' nd easy to tike, but the newes! »+
ost powerful Invigourator kno
ence, It acts directly on your «

ery and vital orrans bullt+ re
re and works so fast thet 5+
n s0@ and fee! new body power a:
sour in to 48 hours. Hecavse «

8 act on glanda ar







HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON













\BS from your chemist today. |
to test. See the big improven
24h ke the full bottle. ~!

| { vigour, energy and vitality and fo
| ) to 90 years younger or money bac.

n return of empty package.

VI-TABS costs little, and the gre

| Vi-Tabs ©“

*steres Manhood and Vit-"

AND I'M BEGINNING |e
we i. mae i e =)



Be kind to your face

USELEss TO BUY the loveliest Cold Cream to cleanse and cherisn
your complexion unless you also use the gentlest of tissues to
remove it. ,

Don't scour your delicate skin. There's no need. Pond’s soft
Tissue Hankies are so absorbent that they will quickly soak up the
cream — dust, stale make-up and all, And they never collapse into
soggy little pieces. They're strong as well as soft and absorbent.

There are so many uses for these Tissues all the time, everywhere.


























BLONDIE ' Uséd as hankies, they are softer than the finest cambric,
“S\, and save you hours of washing and ironing. Destroy in a wide Variety
CRE them once you have used them. TEA and COFFEE SETS,
LONDIE, DID YOU WELL, LET'S GET Get a packet today, and keep it handy. ,
ER RSSHBASE? at guy Wee You will wonder how you ever managed with- Was. VAS
| c~ ; out Pond’s Tissue Hankies, At all the best ORNAMENTS ete.
| oe oa on stores.
. NO, BEAR 7




I DIONT BUY

IT, BECAUSE You
SAID YOU WERE
GOING TO
GET it





SOFT x STRONG * ABSORBENT









Y. De LIMA
& CO. LTD.

20 BROAD ST., and at
MARINE GARDENS

TF PAYS YOU EAL HERE

= Se

“SPECIAL OFFERS AVAILABLE MONDAY TO WEDNESDAY AT ALL BRANCHES





~

















BAe ne Weber ice ah fis) Hor aay . «eile

ai,
saci GORDON . siti BY__DAN cae
































a THERE JS A WAY! IN THE ROYAL LABORATORY sTANOS Wl FW queen ~~ ASSORTED CHOCOLATE BONBONS—} Ib boxes... 1.33
IF YOU KNOW A MACHINE... A MATTER-TRANSMITTER THAT BEAMED ; HAVE ANYTHING TO Say CONDENSED MILK .................0.0000. i J ALPINE CHOCOLATE BONBONS-—} Ib. boxes..... 1.25
My OF A WAY OUT DR. CARSON TO ANOTHER PLANET! WE MUST BEFORE WE. RELEASE O.K, COFFEE—'% Ib Pkgs. , CHOCOLATE PEPPERMINT—+4 Ib, boxes............... 1.25
OF THIS, yOu'D GET TO THAT TRANSMITTER — IF WE CAN THE KRAKENZ -- ae . oe CHOCOLATE PEPPERMINT— 14 Ib, boxes............. 65
Lead JALK GET OuT OF HERE . my VIM peeeeges STOOP RPE R TETHER er eee r RP een ee Ahern teen ner eeee . . QUALITY STREET ASSORTED TOFFEE &
—* ra 5 P MACARONI WITH CHEESE—Tins 23 20 CHOCOLATE'’S—TINS o....cjcsscssessesessnenesneern LAO
il WEETABIR oui. csssssesssescsgeesesseetesecsssvsseess 32 80 puaces Ce Caen Onin sn rs 3
‘ 7 E—Q GLAMOUR eed BUD, BUURMRIGS scscassbeonssoeveeoes ‘
< GRBEE © FORT WINE—-Qrt. Bots. $2.00 98.00 TOFFEES—1 Ib. tin...........0.ccccessecenn iat sas 1
i inFidhasandiaescbdasebbnaaess Tanah Tish éaishsiisihianad 84e. Ib. TOFFEES—} Ib. tins....... seveesinanenenenees teesebesaeasenennnys ‘
ve ; e P88 WE MOPMR LE TRL iii ose ccccsssduisis esl ogoaleonagbiss ‘41



OBSERVE DER
OPERATION

NEW FIT!
NEW FREEDOM!
NEW FLATTERY!

THE NEW





$5 WHAT YOU VOULD CALL
DER PERFECT SETUP” AN
INNOCENT PRINTING PRESS...
IT STAMPS OUR NAME ON
LEATHER GOOPS ANP ALSO...









PRINTS UP OUR MONEY /





“ GOLLY -MAGG
S A PLEASANT
ANO WHAT A B
YOU COOKED /

Rayer ann wc us
iH TION =

FOR THE OFFICE! TM_TIRED G= EATING My
BREAKFAST OUT!’

Y joe
a

iw
LAURENCE MEYNELL

—————$—$—— ns



NO TUG
AT THE SHOULDERS

NO TAPER

AT THE WAIST

NO TIGHTNESS

AT THE HIP

Into the dry-as-dust legal chambers of Sir

Geoffry Havling young and charming Susan



Rendell-Leigh brought on that spring



morning .a breath of freshness and romance

and much less besides! She brought a story







which had an odd and evil history behind it



WAITING FOR YOU THIS EARLY, )Xf
iT MUST MEAN TROUBLE
I BO WISH You's CALL




You’ve never owned a and in whose ramifications Sir Geoffry was
suit like it! Its New
Shape is designed on a
revolutionary, new
“cone” principle. Its
lines dip straight and
true from broad, hand-
set shoulders to the hips.
No old-fashioned taper
at the waist! Try on
NEW

soon to find himself willy-nilly caught up: a



I.TOLD YOu I
CAN'T DO THAT! GET
THE CAR AND BRING story dark with tragedy and swift with




action: a story that ranges from quiet Londen

teashop to the gruesome diseovery in the



Cave of the Echoes on the lonely coast of



|
|
|
}
|
| Somerset. Excellent characterisation, and
|






BUT THE PHANTOMS WIRONS ABOUT exciting plot and good writing make The
60809 fo ee

ee
THEY CAME
BACK, TOOK





THING IS, WE GOT THB

THEY CAME FOR You, NoT
TOY DOG AND THE TEWELS




+
A. E. TAYLOR LTD.

CLOTHES CREATORS & CRAFTSMEN.

| Echo In The Cave as readable a story as has




YOUR TOY. THE NATIVES
MUST HAVE SCARED THEM
OFF. WELL FIND THEM!

BY ALEX RAYMOND
freaee PUERTO PR a
| THEY MuSTA SEEN 4, att Q
i



come from a thriller writer’s pen for many



a long day

: ON SALE AT THE

IN THE | Advocate Stationery
ADVOCATE.







i , ‘

:
!
.









P, AG aE TEN

RAIN RESTRICTS LANCASHIRE CRICKET

METRE HELAY



Clyde Walcott Has
Best Average

By ROY MARSHALL
LANCASHIRE has been a county of rain, rain and more

rain for the past two weeks.

Only one game in which a
coneerned could be played.

Saturday was no exception.
West Indian professional was
That was between Colne and

Bacup and mid-way through the match rain came to pre-

vent any decision.
lLacup won the toss and decided
bat on a wicket which was
low. Weekes, who has been in
at form with the bat recently,
was Out in the first oyer of th
caught by Alley’ the Colne
professional off
bewler Nutter. He had made one.
From then on it was a struggl?
for Bacup but finally after batting
for 2 hours they totalled 114.
A.ley finished with 5—36.
Colne, trying to force the
betore rain came along had
reached 88 fer 6 when another
downpour put an end to the game.

game

pace

Wetkes claimed three of the
wickets for 36 and for the first
time in his leegue career has
reached 50 wickets for the season.
They have cost him 20 runs
apiece,

The Lancashire League bowling
averages are headed by two
Australians. Bruce Deoland hat
taken 72 wickets at 7.95 and
Lindwall’s 70 have cost 8.98 runs

each.
In aggregate Weekes has been
by far the most successful League

professional batsman and _ has
totalled 936. But the best aver-
age is that of Clyde Walcott

whose 754 runs work out at 94.25
an innings. Marshall has scored
728 at an average of 48.53.

In the Central Lancashire
League Ramadhin is by fer the
best and most successful bowler.
He has taken 105 wickets at only
2061 runt each. Nearest approach
to this is 102 wickets of Eric

Price, former Essex professional
who is now with Middleton. His
wickets have cost 12.14 runs each.

It is a one-man story as far as
the batting averages are concern-
ed as well, Frank Worrell is

young amateursway ahead of all his rivals. He

has made 933 runs at an average
of 77.75. Next to this is Charlie
Barnett of Rochdale who has
made 811 at 40.55. Frank has
also taken 55 wickets at 13.45.
Footnote: Ramadhin’s batting
figures are 104 runs; average 8.66.



Egyptian Swims
English Channel

DOVER, England, Aug. 18.

Abdel Monem Abdu of Egypt
swam the English Channel, land-~
ng on Shakespeare Beach here at
9,30 a.m. after fifteen and a half
hours in the water,

Mone, a 27-year-old newsman
made the swim after being swept
out to sea by flood tide when with-
in a mile of the English coast. His
handler said he entered the water
near cape Gris Nez at 6 p.m. on
Sunday and was checked ashore
on the beach below Shakespeare
Cliff, Dover, at 9.30 a.m. today.

Monem was twice seasick dur-
ing the swim as he battled through
heavy seas in the latter half of the
endurance test. He overcame the
trouble to walk up the beach com-
paratively fresh in a heavy rain
and with a strong wind blowing.

.P.



England XI Can
Beat Australia

(From Our Own Correspondent)

LONDON, Aug. 19.

On Tuesday Len Hutton, a shrewd, sober character

not’ given to vain

glory or

chicken- -counting, said

that England next season would have the best chance of

beating Australia’s Test team since before the war.

“Tf we

don’t win all five Tests, I shall be very disappointed,” he
smiled with dry exaggeration.

But that even more cautious
personality, Vijay Hazare, ‘Cap-
tain of the Indian team, after
wards broke the silence that ho
has maintained throughout the
seuson to say “f won't go as far
as that. All I will venture is that
England will have a fair chance.
Don’t forget that Australia are
still the champion cricket country
which they proved once again
against the West Indies at a time
when we started having doubts.
England’s batting is strong — in
fact, we have been impressed and
confused with a great number of
good batsmen outside the Test
matehes — England's bowling is
impressive; the fielding is mag-
nificent and umpiring nearly per-
fect”,

But then he added the warning:
“The Australians are tough and
experienced. Don’t forget I had
a very young side, quite raw and
embarrassed by English — eondi-
tions. Trueman obviously has a
big future. But I wouldn't like
to say what success he will have
against the Australians.”

The two captains were giving
their views of the season’s Test
series which ended with England
being baulked of four outright
wins by the weather.

A glitter of champagne bottles
and icing cake topped with ¢érick-
eting figures and a replica of the
Oval pitch—but sweeter and less
damp — confronted England and
the Indian team in their dining
room after the anti-climatic last
Test had been abandoned as a
draw,

That was the only thing that
was “abandoned” about the ex-
changes in the five day match in
which a total of only ten and a
half hours’ play was possible out
of the scheduled thirty—-and eight
hours of that was occupied by un-
enterprising batting by England
on a good wicket before the rain
turned it sour.

Hutton, asked for his explana-
tion of slow scoring, said with a
smile; “It must be that I am get-
ting old”,

From the persone! angle True-
man had the triumph of being the
first bowler to sake as many as
20 wickets in the sirst series play-
ed in England His average was
13.13. eid





U BIG-PROGRAM BOYS ARE -
| 1 Wave ORYING FOR THE FRESH
APPROA

ACH ————>

INDUSTRY NEEOS
wa NEW FACES)

NEW FORMULAS ! SO I SAY

i6 NEW IDEAS,

we IN
OUT WITH THE OP '
wit THE New !!

‘They’ ll Do It “Every ‘Time



LEN HUTTON
—England’ s Skipper

~ Not only was Hutton foiled in
his ambition to eaptain England
to four straight wins in his first
Test captaincy, but record hunters
were deprived of another one
which they had been preparing
to hail. If India’s second innin
had totalled less than 100, it would
have been the first time in Test
history that this had happened in
four consecutive Annings.

India’s surprise solace was that
the great washout gave them
£5,000 as their share of the
£19,000 total gate,



AND HIS



4X400

BARBADOS



ADVOCATE



THE FINAL HAND OVER from McKenley to Rhoden in the 4 x 440 metre relay in which the Jamaican

team lowered the world record that had stood for twenty years:
and Charles Moore eee by McKenley.

Mal Whitefield is hidden by Rhoden
Herb McKenley was chiefly ge od for the Jamaican vic-

Finland Deserves

A Gold Medal





Yorkshire
Beat Surrey

(From Our Own Correspondent)
LONDON, Aug. 19.

Yorkshire today duly beat Sur-
rey by nine wickets, but the
victory was not gained as easily
as the previous two day’s play
indicated it would be: Resuming
at the overnight total of 133 for
7, Surrey carried their score to
306. The’ eighth-wicket _ pair
Surridge and Brazier added 101
and then followed the defiant last
wicket stand of 51 between
Brazier and Loader, which ended
when Brazier was run out for 78.
Yorkshire were left 76 to get in
just over 100 minutes, They
had made 14 when the rain held
up play for nearly half an hour,
but it cleared up sufficiently for
Yorkshire to make the runs for
the loss of one wicket.

The Yorkshire-Surrey game was
the only one in the County
Championship Programme to be
completed.

The Middlesex vs. Notts and
Sussex vs, Essex games were
abandoned without even a de-
cision on the first innings. ;

The Worcester-Glamorgan game
provided thrills with the sides
tieing on the first innings.

Surrey now have a 28 point
lead in the County Championship.
They have 224 points from 24
matches. Yorkshire have played
one game more and have 196
points, Derby are third with 152,
Tomorrow Surrey will play Derby
at the Oval, Yofkshire are with-
out a game,
SCOREBOARD ,
Yorkshire Beat Surrey

Wickets

By Nine

Yorkshire
declared and 76 for 1,

ETIAT - is esesnoessasess 192 and 306;
(Wardle 7 for 119),

Gloucester — Warwick



Gloucester . 81 and 132
for 6
Warwiche .sie-ssceersses 104 and 164

for 6 decleared.

Derby versus Han‘s—Drawn

RIOT IAY Ghisssmnstrisers 302 and 159 for
4 declared.

PEMENONE ssacadoness tides
Kent versus Northants—Drawn
Mectratsebabee 1ivkossn cen 184 for 9 de-

NOP TERI <. icsalesapedains 185 for 5

Drawn
Somerset .......
Lancashire ...
declared,
Worcester versus Glamorgan
Drawn



Worcester .
Glamorgan ,.

Test Match Tonight

The Second Tavle Tennis Test
Match between the visiting team
from the San Fernando Zone of
the Trinidad and Tobago Amateur

Table Tennis Association and Bar-



158 and 232 for |





LONDON, August 8.

IT REFLECTS great credit on Eric Von Frenckell,
Chairman of the Organising Committee and on Finland
itself that the 1952 Oly mpie Games were carried through

without any of the ‘
been so gloomily forecast,

‘international incidents” which had
For such a small nation to stage

the largest-ever Olympiad and stage it so sucessfully was

in itself a

The price Finland will have to
pay for the privilege of being host
to the nations of the world has not
yet been worked out. It will be
big, howeevr. A rough estimate
given by Von Frenckell just before
the Games closed put the figur-
in the region of £44 million.

One of the greatest of all sport-
ing nations, the Finns no douk:
consider the money well spent.
Yet such a cost could have been
partly averted had the Games »ot
been so drawn out. Towards the
middle of the second week, empty
seats at the swimming, boxing,

basket-ball and even the soccer’

reflected the falling-off in enthu-
siasm which was a natural result
of two much of a good thing.

A fortnight once in every four
years may not seem too much
time to devote to an Olympiad.
Yet the lesson of Helsinki shows
that such is the case, The Olympic
Games have become too big.

Not only from the financial bui
also from the competitive angle,
future Olympiads would be the
better for some judicious pruhing

At such a mass gathering of
nations, bringing with them dit-
ferent temperaments and different
interpretations of rules, there is
bound to be bickering and un-
pleasantness over certain decisions.
And the more the events the more
the likelihood of trouble,

In running, throwing and jump-
ing events, which were the main
attraction, filling the Stadium for





|

THE

border,





Fernery,

old medal achievement.

the first seven days, the Finns
provided their own officials, un-
doubtedly the best trained in the
world. These officials together
with their photographie apparatus
and stop-watches ensured that all
decisions were fair,

But when it came to the “side-
shows”, including boxing and
walking, the trouble began. At

these events personal opinions
entered the reckoning.
The boxing matches in par-

ticular led to enormous ill-feeling.
None of the judges seemed agreed
on what scored poimts and what
did not. The consequence was
that decisions were arrived at
which were not only totally un-
fathomable but were serenity
wrong.

The human angle caused the
breakdowns.

In the basketball this was
emphasised when the decisions of
one referee led to his being
attacked on the field, He was so
badly injured that he had to go
te hospital.

Far from encouraging the spirit
of international sportmanship and
goodwill, events which provide an
opportunity for such outbreaks
do exactly the opposite,

There can be only one logical an-
swer. Such events must be cut out
of the Olympic programme, They
occupy far too much time, They
create ill-feeling. They incur ex-
pense and pay only small divi-

OF MINIATURE

to be held at
BARBADOS

EXHIBITION



Don Cockell
May Fight
Heavyweights

By GEORGE WHITING
LONDON, Aug. 7.

The chances of Johnny Williams,
British and Empire heavyweight
champion fighting Germany’s
Heinz Neuhaus in Britain for the
European title are fading.

Football clubs approached
thought poorly of the prospects of
a boxing crowd trampling their
turf at the start of a new season;
Greyhound tracks inspected were
unsuitable.

If the fight takes place at all
it will be in Germany says
manager Ted Broadribb—w ith
Williams asking to be’paid ‘on the
gate’. rather _than accepting his
share, of an’ official purse-offer.

Opimistically, Williams thoughts
are occupied less with Herr
Neuhaus than with some ef the
“big game” Americans. Mean-
while, Johnny may like to know
that one of his rivals of four years
ago would like to punch him on
the nosé—as a strictly commer-
cial proposition, of course,

Cockell is the name—Don Cock-
ell, cruiser-weight champion in
these parts until Randolph Turpin
beat him in the 11th round last
June.

In the summer of 1948 Cockell
shared two verdicts with Williams
in the Midlands. Now, recovered
from the Turpin debacle—and
enriched to the tune of £10,750
from his last .two fights as a
champion—cocke]ll has a _ fancy
to return to tne ring as a full-
blown and unashamed heavy-
weight.

Manager John Simpson, recov-
ering slowly from the illness that
kept him out of Cockell’s corner
against Turpin, tells me that Don
still believes he has the beating of
the “Leamington Flyer” at 12st.
7lb,

But he added: “I am advising
him, however, that his future lies
with the heavy-weights, some-
whére around 13st. 7lb.. As a
heavyweight, he could train nor-
mally, without being handicapped
by the gland peculiarity that
always used to worry him when
he had to make 12st. 7Ib.

“Don could put paid to any of
the heavy-weights performing
these days. Having watched
hundreds of rounds in the gym-
nasium between him and Jack
Gardner, I can assure you that
he could hang a right hand on
Jack’s chin just when he liked.

“He has boxed with Tommy
Farr and he plastered Ray Wild-
ing’s ribs almost as he pleased.”

How would it be if Cockell be-
gan his “official” heavy-weight
campaign by meeting Frank Beil,
the tall Yorkshireman with the
“delayed action” menace at the
end of his long right arm?

—

dends at the box office.

And would any one really
worry if such oddities as clay
pigeon shooting were also removed
from the programme? Even hockey
and soccer could be thrown aside,
especially when in the latter sport
there are such differences of
opinion concerning amateur status,

GARDENS == |



MUSEUM

ON AUGUST 29TH from 2 — 6 p.m.
AUGUST 30TH from 12 to 6 p.m.
And AUGUST 31ST from 2 — 6 p.m.

The Exhibition will comprise a display of Orchids, Herbaceous

Anthuriums, Rose Garden, Rock Garden and

Cacti Garden



badoy will be played at the
Y.M.C.A, Naval Hall tonight. y
In the First Test, played on,

Menday night, Barbados scored a'
convincing’ victory. Out of five;
sets played, Barbados won four.
Trinidad will go into battle to-
night to try to bring honours even,
If they win to-night,

| ‘Gimme A Carib”

the Final}

Test on Saturday night will decide)

the issue,



By Jimmy Hatlo |

LET A NEW &
NEW IDEA G saa ars A

RECEPTIONIST, AND WHAT FLAPeonis PP

WHAT? we
GET HARRY cay

GAG

FILEP ITS A
DEA

|

: SATURDAY, 4th OCTOBER



You will hear many wise people say

this at’ the

~ PIRATES DANCE

AT

PARADISE BEACH CLUB

ON

Mr. Carib will be There.









Price of Admission will be 2/- and will include a FREE visit to the Museum












SS








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Full Text

PAGE 1

TEN BARBADOS ADVOCATE WEDNESDAY. U (.1ST 21). IHS2 RAIN RESTRICTS LANCASHIRE CRICKET Clyde Walcott Has Best Average IXIOO Ml Mil III I \i B> ROY MARSHALL LANCASHIRE has been a comity of ruin, rain and more rain for the past two weeks. Saturday was no exception Only OM gUM HI which .1 Wwl Indian pr:>feM>iorial was 1 vi That was between Colne and Bacup and midway through the match rain came to prethe toss and decide:! Price, former Esex professional I v -v%  which u who It now wilh Mu.dlrton. H'* who lus been m wickets hjve cost 12.14 run.each. '.he bat recently. Ii is a one-ni.in M) ah far M wag out in ihe im M 1 batting averages ai*e concern|ht t Allrv 'ibColM ed as well, frank Worrell M tuna ameteursway ahead of all his rivals 11 [fatter. He had made on*, ha* made 933 runs at an average Prom then ..n it WHI a ^trugfl' of 77.75. Next to thli in Charli* for Bacup but finally after hatting Barnett of Rochdale who has f<-r 2 boon tfcst* totalled I i 1. made 811 at 40.55. Prank ha'. ; with 5—3fl. i|ao taken 55 wicketat 13.45 niimarlhln'jt batttr ; ueiore rain came along had flsjure* are 104 run*, average B.tW. .1 88 (er 6 when anulhct —^^^^^^— Egyptian Swims English (ihdnncl DOVER. EnKlund. AUK. 18. Abdel Monem Abdu of Egypt .1.1111 theEnglish Channel. Ittnditt on Shakcspenre Reach her* at B 30 a.m. after tlftecn and %  half downpour put an end to the game. We*k*s claimed three >f UM wickets fo t 8 and tor the flm % % %  inched 50 wicket.* for the *eann. bare cost him 20 run %  The LaacaahlN Leans bowlin s %  verasjss ,r(i heeded by two .1 ins Bruce 1 t iken 72 wickets at 7.99 .ml noun la the water. 'S 70 have cost R.Bfi runs Monem. 11 27-year-old newsman made the swim after being swept negate Weekei hai been out to aea by floodJMe when w-ithby far the most