Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text


Sunday

BARBADOS



—

AU@UST 17, 1952

SR

FLOODS DROWN 3-SCOUTS IN ENGLAND

Villages Cut Off ——

253 | Stains ee _ Lady Savage Opens
1,000 Homeless , C—llLrae )
LONDON, August ‘16. Ch

PRICE: SIX CENTS





E





STABLISHED 1895

; :



NB °@ 5 ie 7 d
Children’s War
FLOODS from freak summer storms across south and

LADY SAVAGE yesterday afternoon formally opened
southwest England in the last 24 hours left death and de-;

| the Evelyna Smith Children’s Ward at the St. Philip’s
vastation to-day in Exmoore districts of Devon and Somer- Alnishouse costing £10,000, a gift donated by Mrs. E. B.





set. Three boy scouts were drowned when their camp on Smith, widow of the late Mr. Howard Smith of Thicket
shore of the River Bray was washed away when the banks Plantation a, :
broke. fhe ward whic} o the east of the mvin building of
. Another boy is reported missing. The police said that the Almshouse is situated in cool and airy rroundings.,
“the situation is so confused that we can’t confirm the five r ") It has been designed by Messrs.
missing yet”. iuettcet Ts \ | Cla and Tuckey and Has aceom-
The twin Devon-Bristol channel resorts of Lynmouth Britain Will Not | tion for 0) eote fee infants
and Lynton were cut off from road contact and then de- 1 : i j from one to three yeats, as well
vastated. About 1,000 were homeless. Be Bamboozled ii s accommodation for four cots
. a ae a for boys ranging from three to

éleven years. There is also a girls
room with four cots for children
from three to eleven years of age

Soldiers went over Exmoore (the!
home of the famous midget ponies |
exported all over the world for,

In Oil Dispute |

Chinese General HAROLD GUARD.

By

children’s pets) to build an emer-' ’ in addition to a dining room, a
gency bridge across the River! Charged With LONDON, Aug. 16. |sick room for either babies or
Lyne to get help to 2,000 maroon- | eee reply to Iran’s note of j older children, a maternity room

ial beds which have
England,

ugust 7 making new proposal

for negotiations in the oil industry

ed, An official said: “I have never
this

with three spe
imported

Fimbezzling $25m

Been anything like before. been from a

|

ri

village. At least two people had| the nationalist government “fails to
been drowned.

Swollen rivers were full of stock
and cattle. The body of one of

Secretary, were met by the Chair.
.
of

Daughter Swallows |
Sleeping Pills

The text of the British note wa

approved by a meeting of Mir
whose departments were di-

tly concerned with the Anglo-

prove its accusation,”

, . +
Examine Status
Lt. Gen, P. T. Mow who ski 4 ; . |
across the border when Genereus-| Of Plastiras’ Govt. |

three Boy Scouts swept away when| Simo Chiang Kai Shek’s govern-

man the Vestry, Rev. H, V.
Armstrong, Rector of St. Philip
and the Churchwarden, Mr, D. D.

Bombing has nothing on -this.” THE EVELYNA SMITH Children’s Ward at St. Philip's Almshouse which was a gift donated by Mrs. BE. B. Smith, widow of the late Mr may reach Teheran this week-]jqpour room with a specie z
Floods nearly itcnaneaes several By ROBERT PRESCOTT. Howard Smith of Thicket Plantation. Mrs. Smith is seen chatting with His Excellency the Governor, Sir Alfred Savage. eal ial HARE, backs hice bate ae ted aa 2 fees ae
West England villages after violent) MEXICO CITY, Aug. 16. i ‘on Saturday that it should con- separate baths and toilets, one for
rainstorms last night. A Chinese General charged with) —_— Peer. 9 | RE . a enters a ee vince Iran’s wild Premier Moham-j sch section
Police at Combe Martin five! embezzling $25,000,000 said on | . > jmed. Mossadegh that Britain can- On arrival, The Governor and
miles from Tlfracombe reported| Saturday that he huped Mexico wilJ Parlianzent To e Rita Hay v orth S ne i bamboozled by promise Lady. Savage accompanied by
“complete devastation” in the grant him a political asylum after ; 5 , OoOmmun tis Ss e Of nets oe for its lost oll as-| Waigs Dennis Vaughan, Private

jx
{Ir

y Egyptian Police

















, eas 2 ‘ ani il dispute Tuesday. | Garner,
flood waters from the river Bray, ™ent discovered the huge shortage Athens, Aug. 16, | HOLL WORD, Aus. 16 | omicials eaid Mist Beitain’ Wools Lady Savage after receiving a
envoloped their tent was found|in military funds, said he “was _ Parliament will meet in a spe-| Prince Aly Khan and his) tice no obstacles in the way cf] basket of flowers from one of the
today. Firemen were assisting] “innocent” and that “he will never cial session on Monday to deter- | CAIRO, August 16. gatranged wife sereen star Rifa ' ro-opening negotiations, but would] little girls who will live in the new
police in search for others, be extradited to China, mine the status of | , Premier | EGYPTIAN POLICE announced they had smashed a Hayworth, rushed last night to ne stand firm in insisting ‘that sho}|ward, was presented along with
_ {ie said his blond American| Nicholas Plastira’s coalition gov-' (xn munist cell and arrested ten workers and students for| POspital where their two and a) ould not “sacrifice her principles |the Governor to Mrs, E. B, Smith
About 50 houses in Exford, West| Secretary Agnes Kelley, 31 off@tpment. ee allesed Communist activitics in the Sayeda district of half year old daughter Yasmin} and interests” to offers of mone-| and Mr. and Mrs. N. G. Daysh,
Somerset were swamped when a| New York, and Oliver Kisich, 53, ..1W° Deputies of Vice Premier} alles’ st a f ayeda ‘ was trezted after swal owing} tary compensation.—U.P. Mr. Garner then extended a
“solid wall of water” bore down] of Berkley, California are both im- Sophocles Venizelos Liberal Party | Cairo early to-day, ‘ x _ sleeping pills. welcome to the Governor and
on the village from surrounding! prisoned with the former Chinese mantel ne ee | Police action followed an inquiry attended by Hussein, The Sinks end the act ‘ Lady Savage and expressed thanks
hills, The centre of the village was| Airforce procurement officer and|G@uysenment wiieo. dnaiandontt | Raafat, Under Secretary of State, Ministry of the Interior,; 1 i eduerate cats Sachets G Iner. Gable to Mrs Smith for her gift, Mr.
a —. ca Daw. are also sure to be freed soon, Deputies on Friday declared their! and the Cairo City Police Commandant. | at least for » moment their marital | siragier, Gable Daysh replied briefly on behalf of

" 1 § vere He said in a prison i : allegiance to Plastiras. Reports - nm linn The Egyptian Government this} 4imjeoutties. The actrees to tne | (79 y 7 Mrs. Smith

rescue residents through their bed-).446 Chinese Natlotialiet ‘Govern Were circulated that other defec- p+ ~ i 4 week set up a “State and Secre- at aun eat ine aia ae Will Go-star he Rector, Rev. H. V, Armstrong
room windows and pump buildings ment will’never be able t “ove{tions in party alignment were in | U.S. Will Conisider | tary Department” to combat k ; ry r the: child who has been said qa short prayer and blessed
dry. The local hotel, crowded with] i+. sscusation of misapprog prove {the making. If the Government Communist and Zionist activities SPOW DOW Me cilia, wita Aas een | HOLLYWOOD, Aug, 16. {the building after which Lady
visitors, was flooded to a depth of} (5 eek yt Nae pagina ol apf loses the vote of confidence next J + pP ol and an “Anti-spying section” to iN with whooping cough, obtain Ava Gardner and Clark Gable|Savage spoke and opened the

four and a half feet. iy Sak eithubed titer ace week, new elections will be called, apanese arode “ face the special branch of po-, ed the pills. {will co-star er Mogambo”, | building

: ; roe are * ‘Us y car . oy a non-party Government could * é itical police recent established. ah a 7 . a romantic adventure story to .be 7 s Cover -§ a Save

Fioodwaters from the river. am sure we will be able to remain |ceek parliamentary support, Applicatiotis , 7 After her tom a h was pumpt d | filmed in Africa late autumn, with eee -_ > ad saree,
Barle invaded parts of Dulverton.| in Mexico which has granted mea coll A special military court trying OUt the chi'd appeared to be none | jonny word directing and 8, M P.M.O., of the parish Miss M. E.
also in Somerset, County fire] humanitarian asylum.” ori ervey eas | cotton mill rioters here-is expect-|the worse for her experience. She | Gimpalist producing. Ford will| hve. ‘Matron oe My et Ph tip’s
brigade headquarters reported that] Mow remained in the dusty files}__ U G , Aug. 16." led to pass. sentence to-day on] was in hospital for about 15! leave for Africa on, October 1 to Al ast aie vp iM 7. 'D. ve a
all roads to Dulverton were im-} room of the General’s office with The U.S. has promised Japan Mustafa Khamis named as chief} minutes.—U.P. imake final preparations. The lo- msnouse and r. D. D, Garner,

j .
Y ugoslavia Accuses | ane it will give early considera- the Churehwarden then inspected













-ellars and drenching thousands of} intervene in Mexican justice ~ sinGic tri number of Japanese prisoners eli-
cellars and g ANCS xican justice pro-|JYugoslavia between Arlril 30th Dp of the Almshouse, it was finally

gible for clemency and parole is [and strengthening of the relations Repelled On Jolo Is°
















i Mis Kelly. They have been held oe 7 mappa ia by the pegeetuver who ation unit will cover 15,000 miles the ward
a ede : vere| there pending the start of extradi- : . mt ency and pi ap i ande s execution. during the shooting. > ward, :
senate, tenga cate tion proceedings by the Chinese Bulgaria Of plications of Japanese war crimi- he Court, trying workers after Ja nese Goodwill Garcnet must still complete} Lady Savage before declaring
supplies and evacuate isolated, Mbassy, Kisich, a foreign affairs . . {6 jnals. A State Department spokes-|Wednesday’s riots sent its findings pa i*Vaquero” and Gable put the fin- the woe oo Seas
residents. Floodwaters rose so)@*Pert, is in custody in another Infiltrating Spies man said the Japahese embagey}0n Mustafa Khamis, 20 year old i) ae ‘ ishing touches to “Never Let Me| It was with very great pleasure
fst tat many awe had to ran|?00M Of Corte Palace ere "PICS |csoressed. hope, on Tmant eataing womens aden Go| Mission Bids |o)'n'vtiud inmud ih Kongon| tt ay husband ahd kcaped
: ? S - he. y—tha’ eo ate: ’ a 2 y re ) Db ON locallo 1 Ti- u , ‘ 1e
from their beds, Cars were over- , , ‘ $i N, Aug. 16. ‘cons er in Chief, for confirmation es-| Ti r ra for “Mogi ft hare ¢ ye
tanned: -and:-cattip-drowned. Light-| ant J6.npipey, .Gangialis pesiate) ally” chargea | Would esnBlder applications pre-|Tviay 1 Paovrewell To India. ei bag--vequero”,) ne sprivitoge nor oneRtoe tee
ning killed one man, and injured Rosales, said there was tng -hur- en ero ee Serene Dent andes its pase Ge Two ‘focal .police chiefs have . . . [Gardner will get a week's vaca- Children’s Ward, whieh has been
ta el ie ry” to hold the hearing, He said bendé to verilieas the ‘Tito re-| The spokesman said “a Japan- mee puspendee from duty by or- A ead a. pa vel tion and join crooner Frank Sina} nade possible by the public
—U.P. | they would be held under guard gime. Belgrade Tadio nid. ° The ese embassy representative was ao "Ge pernor Ge orale Wee ae Gor will Missic nt on “Saturday tra in Nevada where he will fulfil) spirited generosity of Mrs. Evelyna
i “ ; : 4 : . . - ary Governor General of Egypt, © 00¢ $810) ms 4Yla singing engagement, Sinatr ; ta’ tae sat
oe ee a ny BEE en cn ahd dates sueotay Foreign Ministry said: |assured that the United States following the riots. They are’ visited the Indian Council of Agri- ; arediy Bhing (OC eigene- re nee a on a
[ ht wialhe an trent tell S|“such activities of Bulgarian or- | government is continuing to give|Superintendent Naaman Ei Ash- culture Research and the National] monty in England and Burope sol... 2 Cention of d%ease among
ig ning Mow GArAltted he had ey ganizations are nothing but a spe- |the matter careful consideration |mary of the Kafr El Dawar Police, Physical Laboratory before leav-1 hat he ean accompany Gardnet om ‘ a oe which is very dear
e ’ amount of the money ir “saf Cat ren Cf aaa eee that | with a view to early evtablish-]and Colonel Saleh Mohamed: ing for Karachi, In a farewell] aypoad, Atter “Mogambo” is|‘°,™* ea! : }
K l B ; place.” He said ne id b wile seriously threatens peace and se-/ment of the machinery for con-|Khafegy, Inspector of Police for message the delegation said: “Wel completed, Gardner and Sinatra The Smith family have lived in
“is Oy F to return it to the Chines, | mty of the Balkans and the |sideration of guch applications.”| Behera province.—U.P, will cherish the memory of the} ptan a six-month European vace-|'%s parish for many years, and
people but ‘not ‘i ‘Chian ereneet “ ae He pointed out that,prior to !cordial welcome, co-operation and | tion,—U.P | believe it was Mrs. Daysh’s
i eae 2 ) SS hey court xtend ou orever eae" ovigi “a ~Tpe
PRUSSELS, Belgium, Aug. 16, | "Clea Sines ‘Binbaseyomciasl vista Natta elses” ett Jabaase pace treaty, 8 war cota, erie ‘eet ein ee oe
At least one person was killed} said they are following the case] Trygvie Lie, It narrated nine al-|¢Timinals were: sentenced by the hoon Strikes ‘that the hospitality, co-operation s ° ictical: while. 1 ane ok ae ia
by a pee en ee aan en = ensure the welfare of\leged cases of infiltration of Bul- ameny Pope os - - P land facilities extended to us will) Moro Bandits that, after discussion: with ner
along the coast yesterday flooding} the two Americans, but could not}|garian spies,and diversionists into |‘©"™S Of ¥89 were shortened. The Oki result in the further. developing that, # Scuss
‘ imnawa Island , , , Mother and Miss Byer, the Matron
Belgians enjoying the annual deat interrane is and the end of July.—U.P. between our countries, shee s y f
holiday: net immediately known but it is TOKYO, Aug. 16. | nt. | e a decided to offer to’ build a
While playing on the beach at believed to be about 821. Typhoon screaming across the : MANILA, Aug, 16 Children 5 Ward, ‘
Heist Sur Mer a youth of sixteen ‘. Under the Peac@ Treaty, Japan Pacific. at more than 100 miles an eee ae, roe ‘ soe aa ae paged “oe
was struck by lightning and killed agreed to accept the ¢ | trenated “Mora bandit: counte ence, the work already being done
instantly. The accident was wit- e bs aln e u se imposed on Japanese prisoners by |Force installations on the island Memorial j ublic | ta kk in fighting on Jolo island in| by Mrs. Daysh among the Mothers
nessed by hundreds of people. the International Military Tribu-,of Okinawa yesterday, causing ex- ‘i he Southern Philippine tel and Babies, not only in St. Philip,
’ nal for the Far East a other oes damage, United States Far Meetings Banned UP. @ On page 15.
ae j s Allied war crimes cdifees UP | aS mmand said here today. | : aa a Se
‘ in taly! From Bunker Hill (rte Reman report ont
Heat Wave In Italy | ' ‘dicted an earlier statement by the!
: | |Far East Air Force which assesse 'minda refused a permit for public

9,
ROME, Aug. 16. SEOUL, Aug. 16. Harvesters 8 |the damage as “not great". No}, eetings to-day

More than

HAVANA, Aug, 164
Interior Minister Ramon Her-|
‘ 3 Fe ess i commemorating |
-UNITED STATES’ marines hurl thodox party leader}































































150 people were j ed back t ’ . ,lives were lost, though buildings |»)
yee all I " wo more ° ‘e j ; , ’ f the death of or
eres EArt ieaeetee ta the fanatical Communist assaults against corpse strewn along Strike Likely pe Tae and much equip- Fduardo Chibas who committed!
FOr ee oreo eave contiwued, A| “Bunker Hill” by the light of searchlights. Allied artillery, CHICAGO, Aug, 16 A stroyed, suicide August 16 last year while|
tecord exodus from sweltering machineguns and grenades cut screaming Red attackers to A strike threat locmed in the] The typhoon passed 50 miles pe , hia " " 2 | 7 ee 3 i nt | LL StGH—Makers of the
cities yesterday marked Ferragos pieces and sent survivors fleeing for their lives. It was|tnternational Harvesters’ huge in- ae ee Or ss of A ‘|| speech to Cuba in a C.M.O. radio! WORLD'S CHAMPION
to holiday—Italy’s, ge oo the eighth time in five days the Reds have tried vainly to]dustrial empire and packinghouse| i) oi, sae dice soca ae ah station studio,
eenere Peseta “al Detach t5-1 wrest the strategic western front height from grimly |Wo'kers called a strategy meeting) Weather experts expected it tol 63
“ . as * i ines ; cas ne : * «ito discuss sta . ‘ P| ae a sg ler ndé cifically refused to
iy, was 104 degrees Fahrenheit | determined marines. The hill is only five miles east of ae stalled contract negotia-bit most of Japan's islands about | iow a. ieeatng sveduled fal "
r j S. i ; § ek al é 1 , sched }
Se LS ten eaies eee eee .)Panmunjom. Spaces Fiv. - ‘ Employees of the International midnight tonight UP | Havana’s Central Pa to-day at}
J th aa hundred Communi ts Sp@ar- | tarvester tractor works in Chicago =? | ) p.m, However it is believed that
DECOY. REDS WITH DUCK TRAP (eoaieeta hoc ane ee = S voted 2,854 to 433 in favour: of {9 permit will be granted for aj
. ees st attack shortly aftetithe strike after contract negotia- } University students federation!
ms ns - r | midnight under cover of a thun-Jijons covering 26,000 harvester No Comment In jprocession —fror University,
o us artillery and mortar bar- employees were broken off yester- M Papers | ground to Chit om m=}
j tage. day MOSCOW | 8 bus cemetery
| But as the Reds crawled past Meanwhi } ited Pack- :
,decaying bodies of Communist: ‘aan mie Oe auee tere 14 MOSCOW, Aug. 16. | Herminda ued an order that
killed in previous assaults Marines] | © GUSe ah eng re Moscow newspapers this morn-j all armed foices must prevent any
t i gi li : member executive board to meetling aid hot comment on the pub- bl i str
, Fumnec giant searchlights on them |} j;, Chieago Sunday to discuss cOn-| hiched te Se ; public demonstrations.
and circling Allied planes d sed . : vei, | lished text of the Soviet note on U.P
lagtHial fares I *s drop tract negotiations with the “BirlAustria to the three Western: R P.
\ ” No Red Jets ub aed ra fren: powers. The text appeared in the; __ s ; '
ite canoe | Vaien have dragged on for a "Kl usual second page position re- 2 : big |
{eee ietoen ae Neat heii nee with no progress. served for communications by the | Y oshida Asks I or |
‘Selde te Rien bult’ fensers —UP. |Ministry. It gave Soviet readers yy. i ion Trad
dinyen te Hed China Seve se their first news that there was a Ore oreign irade | ,
stay : na beyonc 1€ three-power note of March 1%
biangp edie East Alviree oni Grerada Gets and a reminder on May 9, but did TOKYO, Aug. 15. || |
shterbombers were lost this not mention the second reminder prime Minister Shigeru Yorhida |
Wwask ‘0 a pope fire 0 one Cold Storage Plant of August 11—U.P. ft rged’ premotion of fo fap: Ti
3 g 20mber was lost to ‘loularty with & ° |
i ia bsg er ) (heitin OGD ied ‘Gasrensontent : 'P ‘ticularly with South Ez |
j oat Ne aid Sab ts dest DOMINICA, Aug, 15 17 ear old I * Tib f nations in a written me ’ ii} ‘
ticrce caid Sabre PS - A : : oT tog - a * { ~ j : oe
sd one MIC and teabatiy Sar First fruits in the Colonial De- y Ii 1 et weet ne Na ; conference ||j |} You are ona 3
ed two more aaditi y oy velopment Corporation were ap- See « ¢ on Friday wo hundred govern-'| s\ 2
peller driven. Sen Furies from tne| arent on Monday when the C.D.C Chirrese Establish res'omeiay, tna busines Yeuders | WINNER when you ride a Raleigh! ;
British Mrriay” H.MS “Oe fl! opened a cold storage ice plant ji os attended the informal parley}! yo e eig s
wate lost. in pape tC Plr iomeagy relieving a year’s old shortage of Duthie oe ot hp hen, ~ sponsored by the Japan Fereign ,
ro ° P oe ce by providing furthe id unese Communist pilppet Fan-|reade Association. Guerts of hon- |} oj io E : y
f ge ag ea e. other uro.tehen Lama assumed the adminis- ‘ pat oes rai oa eat A Raleigh vo ye cHcice Of Reg Seadioner eer
United Nations in a broade: rage facilities. The other pro ; ; jour were Indian Ambassador | Professional S Cha he sec e
‘er Radio Seoul warned Nostt|Ject a hydro-¢lectric plant suipply-[tfation of Western Tibet, accord-|k K, Chettur, Jose P. Melenchio || Fe ee te eatin
over _Radlo Seoul warned Nortt a. Cneeet ta ea Rea, area is} if to reports received on Satur- ih 4 ‘of the Philippine Missto } succession. Here is proof of the wisdom of buying
eo one at aoe a south ‘Aer under congtsuction, +? day. Panchen Lama was en'iiron~|rokey Pakist oe hantie dow Minett your bicycle from a Company with such great
o id pe: he yg rag ‘ie Noniea Beginning trom September, the | ed in the Tasilimpo monastery in| 7iaud Din and first secretarie technical experience and knowledge that designed
followed the ae ae myagers|-éntral government takes ove: ithe town of Shlgnise from which hie Embaxy and. the. Indones wo bal the ssort-beghing RAL-EIC,
ved the ¢ with strikes on age 7 . fire fighting | am SCESSO sd to exile at
the supply areas, - i eras ee ene China in 1923 following a dispute Mission. UP * ~~
Two waves of F84 Thunderjeis| 4, l ey “i “| with Dalai Lama, :
bombed and strafed a Communist} ~?U"* | The present 15 year old Pan-
coastal defence base on the east ,;chen Laima was brought back to ° a" a 79
coast, north of Koson and des- The Wav Is O en Whetth fee morthe ago by Army M ay PeCUZE
treyed 30 buildings, F - « Pp | Red Chine-e. He is under the con-| Pe i ~ \ | ‘ THE ALL-STEEL BICYCLE
| —U.P. SHINGTON. Aug. 15 | trol of the senior Chinese Com-| Owe?! Ih: epndanon ‘,
} WASHINGTON, Aug, 15 munist General in Tibet A Product of Raleigh Industries Limued, Nottingham, England.
- “ + ia ea The Government on Friday re~ "+ gm, : U CAIRO . i As ae ie
, 2 “Seg Furies Last opened the way for shipments rs —UP. ne pant Al Mi we
—_ | va" inplate to foreign countries after f ? ety 2 CAVE, SHEPHERD
A BUCK-SHOOTING TECHNIQUE perfected by these Marines in Korea | tyiteq Naticne Havel joe one tote en en eeTicted because 6 Terrorists Killed | ected I 4 & CO., LTD.
worked wonderfully 1a company com: er decided the scheme | cd i are eee eer T re aa Wie ns a. N ho | jfo tf 6 * ‘ 2 & 13 Broad Sircet
involved too gr . It seems that Pvt A. Friday (right), of oe a i ca eee that two Ba : me, Veal re & ee SINGAPORE, Aug. 16 jin t 10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Sircet.
Mikoosa, Wis., who played the role of a decoy, would b Ser tek. ine ia aa pea Six terrorists were killed, one; peper, ca
Sa +t’ a a aah a ea 2 rom the British carrier H.MLS. |same it revoked the ord°r captured and one wounded when/the Le«
from a slit-trench to aw enemy fire. As ! Ocean hav> bev lost th 106: ferf f tin cans for food . |
Sgt. John E. Boitnott, of Comfort, N.C r , +, would open a b n lo his week ers of tin cans for combined pelice and a military | opmen ,
Set. i. Bo ile a wpepebad : , - die. in non-combat accidents. The fate! obtaining tin plat nairol engaged gz of thirty | corrupti ! ri ennacihener RIENCE
ee . of t pilots has not been | terrorists in Tangkak the ea | seal mR. 18a. (2)
y have ac ond e ed.—U.P. —U.P of Johore on Sat UP. j forn UY = Sete!









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easy-ta-take t form nds
who have w: it Le it is fer better
than any other method.
“Works in 24 Hours
This n y Sections . known 4
America and has ach results that

seem almost miraculous Tt has conquered
obstinate cases that had all other

id age and debi has
made older men as good as new. It has
brought happiness beyond all price to thou-
sands who believed that Epox were ol}
worn-out, and finished with the ey

if the ye ad his re~
able discovery is that
it brings results so

nd
mark






‘ f you can see and feel
P 1h) 8 tremendous im.
wh one week 7 wit Mera
ly make you a new man
Vi-Tabs

Doctors Praise
N@ , Doctors in America end
im many countries



rgeney. \

4, ee ,7
PROOFS EEE KS






ee

os





DESEO POSOSSSSSE SSS SSSE OOS
‘

THE FORTA2PSS CLUB
TAY een
ANNUAL DANCE
Under the Patronage of %
Mr. ERNEST D. MOTTLEY
M.C.P %
At QUEEN'S PARK x
on Saturday, 30th Aug. i952 %
Subseriptivn %/-. Daneng 9 p.m »
Music by MY. Clevie Gittens y
and His Orchestra
Admission By Ir

vitation Only

SPEED.



gut, niu Pruken :
e a et ste C
of this system building influence
effec
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Viet are not an experiment
sirypie hom te weed
wi
of an
success!
ity, and energy to millions in America Re-
cause
are now distributed by chemists here
der a poerenuee of complete satis!
Ln A t t
with questionable drugs which ma: be
drastic and irritatt
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t ni wre
reatment. It has rescued biltey. , ree millions of sufferers, but are guaranteed in
pd own particular case Put

r it

T, stronger. w
294 | feet

Tobs must bring you a new feeling
ergy, and vitality, and be entirely satistac

tory or You simply return the empty pack -

ts pac and it costs n

faction
bottle of 48 vi.
eight days A» the guarantee fully protects
4 you should get your treatment imme-
im

Vi © year
-T b and full of vigour
Be 2 ADS psn

ts upon the bicod, glands, neives and
aan ores appetite,



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too say that the Vi-Tebs
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before their time, Run-
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. wi
For tnstance,
Ellis, of

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Qn ® widely known Italian doctor Dr

“Tired

Giannini, nt wrote
odies sorely need

formula, which works its splendid

brings greater

weak, nefvous, run-down
e

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¢ treatment, which can be used
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soperican doctor It ts amazingly
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n-





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i-Tobs not only have
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with this doctor's Preseription. Vi~
of @¢n-

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A

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Robert NEWTON
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Richard KILEY
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SUNDAY









‘Non, Non” To Shorts
At the Matisse Chapel :

ADVOCATE

t IS Excellency the Governor

énd Lady Savage accom-
panied by Major Dennis Vaughan,
“- Private Secretary, attended the
opening of the Evelyna Smijth
CANNES From EVELYN IRONS. Bi ost expensive materials coud Children’s Ward at St. Philip yes-

A WOMAN in shorts, brassiere ; ¢%be worthy of the design.” terday afternoon.
and iridescent grcen-psinted- toc- formations and debasements of Mutisse gave his design free, Among those present were Mr.
nails stepped out of the sizzling S8pe€ art ; ne still comes occasionally from and Mrs. H. A. Ta'ms, Mr. and
heat down the cool, white stair- ‘Faith, Piety © his fat near Nice to supervise. Mrs. N. G. Daysh, Mrs. EB. B.
case leading to the world’s stran¢- The instruction said that 4 put the nuns are responsible for Smith, Rev. and Mrs. BH. V. Arm-
est religious sanctuary - the New styles were adopted the +); money for the construction. strong, Dr. and Mrs. C. L. Hutson,
Chapel of the Rosary designed by —— a ss ves nae Silent Garbo Hon’ble V.C. Gale M.L.C.. De
83-year-old French artist Mai's%e made similar to a profane ™*bulld- saa * “ oe
for the Dominican nuns of Vence, ing,” and insisted on “a sincere ANOTHER curiosity of the and Mrs. J. P. O'Mahony, Miss



ane faith and piety in the artists.”

in the hills between Cannes



Nice Matisse has been called at

A greve-faced sister in white different times an ctheist and a
and black Dominican habit raise’ Communist. His werk is believed
a shocked hand. “Non Non, to be one target of the instruc-
Madame,” she whivpered. tion.

Presently the visitor re-appear-
ed from her car in skirt and
jacket. The little nun allowed the
green toenails to get by.

‘Outrageous’

They are very strict now at the
Chapel of the Rosary. Only on
two days a week—Tuesday ana
Thursday — for two rigidly :imii-
d hours in the morning and two
hours in the afterncon are the
public allowed in.

Fixed on the severe, white out-
side wall of the squat building
is a framed edict from Arch-
bishop Remond of Nice. Warns
ihe Archbishop; “Those not pre-
senting themselves in decent
clothes will be forbidden to enter.
All loud conversation and any
display of ar
will mean the expulsion of the
visitors concerned.”

The Mother Supcrior

she said:
He
bo "vy but a Catholic
created this chapel.”

etreamed in
a grey-haired taxi-driver.
care to judge it.

Michelangelo’s Sistine
pretty odd at the tim>.”

They

life of work.”

and postcards and

(paper covered souvenir

who rules the 12 nuns and the 35
girl conyalescents (paid for by
the French Social Security) under
her care at the convent

“They looked on the chapel as
1 side show They showed no
reverence. They made loud and
vulgar jokes about it.”

Recently the Holy Office in
Rome issued a 5,000-word instruc-
tion on sacred art. This devlored

from one point in the
terned chasubles for
A squad of workmen marched

as soon as the gates
locked behind the tourists.

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a

did not
comment on the Ppl edict, But
“Matisse is ne atheist.
is a believing Cathclic. No-
could have

A charabanc load of sight-seers
when I wes there.
Most tolerant comment came frota
“Tt ic
bizarre,” he said, “but 1 wodlid ne
thought
Chapel

Matisse’s own view: “This chapel
is for me the flower of ” wole

Meanwhile, the visitors are puy-
ing an average of 2s, 6d. each intor
the offertory plate. And they are
incorrect attitude spending many pounds on books
reproductions
boow«

“People behaved in such 11 18%. 6d.; one Matisse lithograph
outrageous way that we had ‘o £4 10s.) to benefit the building
stop the daily visits,” said the fund.
plump, brusque Mother Superior The chapel is still unfinished.

A tangle of electric wires hangs
ceiling.
Matisse designed five vividly pat-
the priest;
only two of them have been made.

in

had been

The foreman agreed when the now,
Mother Superior told me: “These |
men are not béing paid. We still

“images and styles lately intro- have to find many millions of
duced” which seemed to be “de- francs. None but the best _anr
CELLO DLL LLL LCL LEE LLL LPL LAI

LLL LOSE LOLOL PEPE LLL ELLA
Oe anc nen mene ane ennse
diehicoceomsattdiierenensicas








































your hair to its original colour in a natural
‘ manner in about 14 days if used daily.
[ k . Darkening Creme is a fixative type of product

4 and is non-greasy, whilst the Pomade is a
dressing type of product which does not set
the hair and contains a lot of oil; thus it is
suitable for fine dry hair.

WS
TELOTAHar DARKENING
POMADE CCREME

Agents: H. P. CHEESMAN & Co., Ltd — Middle Street

|
Hippo’s Tooth
|








‘the first Zoo hippopotamus had to




Riviera is the ex-film star who Betty Arne, Mr. W. A. Crawford,
shuns publicity. M.C.P., Mr. J. C. Mottlev, M.C.P.,
In -her distinctive uniform »f Mrs. H. W. Peebles, Mr. R. B.
mushroom-shaped straw hat, tied Skeete, Mr. W. A. Yearwood,
under the chin, black sun-glasses, Mrs. V. Chandler, Mrs. M: F. Byer,
fi shoes and bulging brown Mr. K. Sandiford, Capt. E. §Sim-
tandbag. Greta Garbo stalks mons, Rev. O. BE. Jones. Mr. and
mysteriously past other visitors Mrs. J. S. Wi ) mr. DB. BD.
in the foyer of the Cariton Hotel, Garner, Mr. E. Greenidge, Mr.
walks upstairs to her room for Allen Francis, Mr, and Mrs.
fear of meeting anyone in the Arthur Skecte, Mr.-and Mrs, R.
lift and turns her head away Jordan, Mrs. I. Jones, Mr. W. M.
ebruptly and silently if spoken to. Woodhouse, Mr. P. Scott and Miss
It is difficult to recognise her E. Lashley.

without the dis Governor Returns Home

guises.
Hatless, the long sleek hair of
the old romantic days is seen ‘9 IR KENNETH BLACKBURNE,
he short and frizzy. Nobody ‘* Governor of the Leeward
noticed when Garbo drove bare- oe a ee eae
headed through the town in her ~~
big blue — convertible to “a to Ao by B.W.LA.
board the Afifa, 18}-ton stream- seal ar ait a
line? motor vacht belonging to y ;

Sir iuncan Orr- Civil Aviation Chief

The yacht is being used thi: ING COMMANDER L. A
month by Garbo after Existen- EGGLESFIELD, Director
lialist cabaret singer Jubiette General of Civil Aviation in the
Greece, recovering from an opera- Caribbean area, left the island on
tion which has changed the shape Thursday by B.W.1.A. for Jamaica
of her nose to a straight Grecian, where he will take B.O.A.C. for
had finished with it as a retreat the United Kingdom.

from the world. On Holiday

On a shopping expedition it 4 ic. GENEVIEVE GARDNER
Cannes with her constant com- from Antigua ervived here

panion George Schlee, Garbo recently by B.W.I,A. for three

rtopped to look at the Bikinis in . -
the shop windows, but bought sane ee rath wd i:
none. The girl. who served her in politan Guest co Soe
: tobacconist’s did not recognis? “Miss Gardner, an’ employee of

r. . Geo x t son
“The French used to call Garbo ces Lta, was | Barbados
“La Divine.” I don’t notice that in 1948 when she spent six weeks’

wa 3
SNe Son and Heir

It’s No Fi un Ulett entre oeiked aatniane
Pulling Out A

of a son and heir. The happy

event took place on Friday r-

noon and mother and babe are

doing fine. Mrs. Austin is the

former Miss Sheila Clarke, daugh-

to the Noah’s ter t, Mr. and Mrs. L. M. Clarke,
ames.

Third Visit

RRIVING in the colony by

Are you going St
Society this week-end? You may
not recognise it by this name, but
it was what the London Zoo was
called while it was being planned.

It wae opened in 168%. B.W.1.A. on Thursday last

Its first inmates were a deer, @ trom Trinidad was Mr Eldric E.
white-headed eagle and a vulture. Joseph, a retired Civil Servant.
But real excitement came when pyr, Joseph has come over to spend
|the Zoo's first four giraffes, which two weeks’ holfday.
cost £700 arrived in 1836. This is his third visit to the

Giraffes

colony the first was in 1943 when

dad were Mr.
Maraj who had been spending
two weeks’ holiday in the island,
Mr. Maraj is a Civil Servant and
during their stay here they were
guests at Crystal Waters, Worth-
ing.

SUNI

‘cocci iceman {Ye tte

Carib Calling



MR, & MRS. DOUGLAS GILL

Returned Honie

Bega ienty = the island on Thurs-

day by B.W.1.A. for Trini-

and Mrs. Rann



Miss MANUERITA ZEPHIRIN.

President, H.E.S.
EWS has been received that
Miss Manuerito Zephirin,

They left the London Docks at he spent four and a half months; daughter of Mrs. Stella Zephirin

i * i hen he stayed

three in the morning, and while the second in 1948 w! yi

they walked the 8% miles to the — —. eal ee
in side Car a ar

Zoo, all traffic Was ele UP cd “to favoursbly with other islands in

de- the Caribbean and thinks it the

i righten ideal spot for a real holiday. He
ns ade mat WARS hopes to be returning later. Dur-

he will be a guest
But a cow mooed at them and ing his stay here
‘they took a lot of coaxing to car- at Silver Beach Guest House.

ry on quietly after that. Camera Club

There was excitement too when HE following are the awards
have a woth out. Mr. Bartlett, the made to Members of the
superintendent, used a two-foot Camera Club for photographs
pair of forceps, and stood behind Now on exhibition at the Barbados
‘a barrier to pull, Museum:—ist Prize, J. Lomer,
| Twice he got ghe forceps round 2nd Prize, Lt. Col. J. Connell, 3rd
|the tooth and the hippo tore them Prize J. Lomer. Honours awards
jaway. But at the third effort, are as follows:—A. E. Hughes
‘with a keeper holding on to Mr. (4), R, Daniel (3), Lt. Col. J.
| Bartlett's waist the tooth came out. Connell, J. Lomer and M. W. Git-
| The first Zoo keeper was paid tens (1) each.
one guinea a week and his uni-
form was a top shat, striped waist-
coat, tall-coat, breeches, wellington
| boots with painted tops—and side-
| whiskers, .
| Goat Milk HARLIE SUET. speaking at
| One bit of fun you will miss Uttoxeter yesterday, outlined
| that you would have had in those DiS scheme for dealing with the
‘early days. The Zoo did not offer Weekly disappearance of 43,728,984
a refreshment service, but small ©888 in shell. He advocated the
flocks 6f goats and asses toured the Setting up of collecting stations
neighbourhood, and visitors could for laying birds, .so that the birds
{ buy their milk on the “stop me could be brought to these centres.
}and buy one” principle. Their eggs would then be laid

For this Zoo story in full, see ©n the spot, and the transport of







1} “The Zoo Story,” by L. R. Bright- €88s from farm to collecting sta-

tion would be done away with.
After laying, the birds would be
taken back to the farms. Each
farm would have a collecting sta-
en within ny nee Eggs laid
in transit woul dealt with b;
Hollywood: Hollywood Police mobile packing centres, reine
are studying a Who’s Who of the fast vans, and each attached to the
movies compiled by two burglary|nearest collecting and stamping
suspects, It lists addresses of Jane | centre.
Wyman, robbed of nearly £20,000) Nocturne
of furs and jewels, and Barbara HAT .
Sees a Turner, ‘ Fred ahin, Chie eet pees
Astaire, ary ooper, onald t , e
| bs turbulent waters lies at her moor-
Colman—not yet visited. ings under a tranquil sky? Her

aa viding light—a stub of candle

GAIETY stuck in a jam-tin—is feebl

“The -Garden—St, James flected in the muddy ooze, ‘om

TODAY & TOMORROW 4.30 P.M somewhere amidships comes a
Mat, TO-DAY 5 pm. mournful song of the sea:—

Mark TWATN’S .

Ow, take me orf this ’orrid
it
PRINCE & THE PAUPER oc
Errol FLYNN : The MAUCH TWINS

Tues, & Wed. 8.30 P.M.
FORCE of ARMS”
Wiliam HOLDEN and

“FORT WORTH" (Color)

well. >
(Museum Press, 16s.)

WHO’S WHO





I feel I’m slowly goin’ daft,
And which is fore and which is

aft
ru be ‘anged if I can tell, I
} can't.
(Rollin’ ’ome from Rio! )
: Lor! What a -utk!
Thus sings Mrs. Withersedge,
aboard the Saucy Mrs. Flobster.

Rigmarole

A






a river upside down on a

70 CENTS





The



Feces acme



70 cents







BY THE WAY...

Te-°

(Way O, Rio!) 2

PICTURE of a man crossing

motor-bicycle, on a wire stretched

of “Savoy”, Bay Street and the
late Mr. Zephirin, has won the
Sarah J. Manning Bursary for the
coming year at the Victoria Gen-
eral Hospital and has also been
made President of the Home Eco-
mic Society. The Bursary is
awarded on the recommendation
of the Staff in Home Economics.

Mano has just completed her
third year at the Acadia Univer-
sity, Nova Scotia in Home Econo-
mies. This is the highest honour

that has been conferred on any
Home Economic Student and she
has also been invited to one
the

an Assistant next year in
Home Economie IV Nutrition to
instruct the girls in Dietary
Studies.

This summer Mano has been
working at the Victoria General
Hospital, Halifax, N.S.

200 feet above the water would
seem to prove—

Chorus: If proof were needed—
—that there are more ways than
one of crossing a river. Not long
ago a man set out to eat a pud-
ding made of waterproof suet
while standing on his head in a
tub on the bed of the River Ouse
above Lewes. His mother arrived
just as he was going into the
water, ang took him home,

Prodnose; Is that all?

Myself: It’s all I can_ think
of at the moment. Oh—nhis
mother’s name was Mrs. Sud-
deley, if that helps at all.

PROPHET said the other day

' that it is possible mankind

will end by eating grass, in order
to solve all feeding problems.

The gloomy Ephesian philo-

sopher Heraclitus lived for

while on grass, and got dropsy for





minutes before a2
making a quick of -
tion, scuttles over a In a

fb te oa
Rupert stumbles and falls, He
gets up as fast as he can and
stands on the bank, but the other

FIRST CLASS UTIATY CLOTH

-: For :-

AT

YOUR SHOE STOR
DIAL 4220.

Rupert ’s Spring Adven ture—10

DAY, 1952

——

AUGUST 17,

Married at St. Leonard’s ‘
A Gece ttgrn 3 at 4.30 p.m. at

St. Leonard’s Church Miss
Clemie Medford daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Frederick Medford of
Paul Over, St. Vincent was mar-
ried to Mr. Douglas M. Gill, ‘son
of the late Mr. C. O. B. Gill and
Mrs Gill of Hove, Brighton, Black
Rock.

The ceremony which was fully
choial was conducted by the
Rev. H. A. Melville. The bride
who was given in marriage by Mr.
Clyde A. Field wore a dress of
lace and nylon cut in Victorian
lines with train. Her headdress
was of finger tip illusion lace and
a halo of orange blossoms. She
carried a bouquet of pink radiance
and gerberas in crescent shape.

She was attended by Miss Gloria
Gibson _as bridesmaid and the
Misses Roseann Gill and Heather
Field as flower girls. The brides-
maid wore a pink lace bodice and
nylon skirt with lace mittens to
match &nd silver sandles. Her |
headdress was of pink crinoline
and forget-me-nots and she car~
ried a bouquet of pink radiance
and gerberas.

The flower girls wore blue
striped nylon and silver sandals.
Their headdress were of blue and
pink forget-me-nots with posies
to match.

The duties of bestman\ were
performed by Mr, Beresford O.
Gill brother of the m and
those of ushers fell to Mr. George
Marshall, Mr. Errol Marshall, Mr.
Glyne Goodridge, and Mr. Clin-
ton Gill.

A reception was held at “Rose-
ville’, Brighton, Black Rock, the
home of Mr. and Mrs, E. C. Gill
and the honeymoon is being spent
at “Sunny Caribee”, Bequia, St.

Vincent. ‘
For a Week %
R. FRANK LINCOLN who
‘had been spending a short
holiday in Barbados 1} for Ja-
maica by B.W.I.A_ on Thursday
morning. Mr. Lincoln came in on
Thursday last week and has gone
on to Jamaica where he will spend
one week before returning to
Trinidad.
Back to U.S.A.
R. ELLIOTT MARRUS of
Messrs. B, Marrus and Son,
Inc., of New York, left the colony
during the week for Trinidad by
B.W.1.A. intransit for the U.S.A.



By Beachcomber

his pains. But there is another
objection to the idea to-day. When
ait the best pasture-land has been
taken over for new towns: dirt-
tracks and airfields, there will be
a shortage of grass and we shall
not have the money to import it.
It will then be rationed and the
black marketeers will grab up
great quantities of it by night and
sell it to the West End restaurants,
Not one bite free
HE Parsian whose nose was
nipped by a lobster, imme-
diately after he had complained
that it was not fresh, got damages
from the restaurant. In England
someone would have said. “The
pretty thing was only playing,
and the man’s nose got in the
way.” And the man would have
been reprimanded for cruelty to
lobsters, and hooted through the
streets,





~ Pel



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DRESSES, UNDERWEAR, SHIRTS, PYJAMAS, ETC.

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. 70 cents





SUNDAY,

AUGUST 17, 1952



At The Cinema

B.B.C. RADIO NOTES:

A Swashbuckling Tale Disewssions On
By G.R.
BACK IN MY YOUNG DAYS, I remember being

thrilled to the core by the original production of Sabatini’s
SCARAMOUCHE, starring Ramon Novarro, whose glamour-

Culture In W.L
Programmes

Gn Wednesdays In August
Since the first Wednesday in

SUNDAY

ADVOCATE

PSGE THREE



FARM AND GARDEN

My Agricola

TiMELY

WARNING

THE WATERWORKS DEPARTMENT in its efforts
to conserve our water resources, has indicated that weather
conditions in the last few morths have not been eo
to maintenance of supplies at a level sufficient to justily
the use of the precious fluid freely and without due care.

have been frequent and seasonable,

‘TO WAKE
FEELING
TIRED











\ wers ;
ous: lo and swordplay set a lot of young female a a= Lanes = ee oe Ny speaking, no heavy downpours New rises, ‘
hearts aflutter! Now, thirty years later, MG.M. has come Qiscing under the Sain so far to replenish the water system on which we depend, fyjj of =
ees with ae oe that = —. a Fe of Wily Bichamiom an approsch Let us hope that the deficit wall goon. be ume. cage ong e@ergy: 4 |
ure is not as Casting as its predecessor and a certain of culture as a theme of life which ~ tp a the first users to be restricted,

as . 2 . they are attempting to reach but they need not be unduly :
amount — =, a tice feeling - the eee through a critical analysis of worried if the requisite precau~| 0) M's start for a
missing. Nevertheless, thoug is may be a-somewha 5

tongue-in-cheek version of
thoroughly enjoyable, light
It is one of the most elaborate

productions to come our way,
with gorgeous settings and sump-
ous: bea

a Serious, romantic tale, it is
entertainment. F

MEL FERRER



three significant books in which
the authors endeavoured to set
out their ideas in relation to such
a definition. The two books
already discusseq have beef
Matthew Arnold’s “Culture and
Anarchy” and T. S. Eliot’s “Note

HINTS FOR
AMATEURS

tions are taken by everyone toa
avoid waste. Simple as it may
seem, not very many realise, for
example, the wastage from run-
ning taps left untended and some
again are quite unmindful of the
use that can be of both




lay'’s work if you wake
up feeling tired and
istless, instead of being
brisk and full of energy.
One woman who, can
uppreciate the difference from
ner own experience, writes to
we >

costumes, the uty of towards a Definition of Culture.” bath and wash water for garden| “Before taking Kruschen, 1
whieh is further enhanced by In the broadcast -on Wednesday purposes. | slways used to wake in the ‘
QT color, The plot moves next, 20th Angust, they will dis- This showery weather is a It is surprising how much | worning speek err es. pe Ashton & Parsons Infants
swiftly along, impelled by love cuss “America and Cosmic Man” most favourable time for cutting wxter can seved in actual { Reve lost oo et er ee | Powd are Swit
and revenge, against a back- by D. B. Wyndham Lewis: The back Hibiscus. This plant can ‘watering if all practise a measure | Monee: had take me feel years | owders are wondertully
ground of pre-French Revolution discussions are set against the be cut any time, even in the,dry of restraint. It is well to remem-/ vounger. I also suffered with | soothing at teething time.
days, when the complacency of background of the realisation that months, but naturally it springs ber that plants like animéts only | rheumatic pains in my shoulders 5 5
the aristocrats was being rudely the elimination of illiteracy is by again quicker if cut in weather appreciate a dgjnk when they! and swellings round my ankles “Ask your They ensure regular easy
disturbed a patriot call- itself a negative achievement and. such as we are having at present, require it. Veteran gardeners I am now comprevely oie o “ie J ’ '
ing” himse areus Brutus and that something positive in thrf}>on’t be afraid of doing this job have long kept in view the maxim: | [hose ee came at motions, cool the bleed and
advocating Liberty, Equality .and realm of culture must fulfil asf horoughly. Cut to within a few give a plant a drimic when it is cannot speak too highly of it.” Mother to are absolutely safe. Try them
Fraternity ! This factor does im- consolidute every achievement MH nches of the ground, stir up the ‘ry. In other words, do not keep migel. , ‘ a ge aie: ,
pinge a certain seriousness in Furthermore new cultures arc& ‘oil around the plant and‘manure the soil wet but let it get thirsty | Kruschen keops you young clive you for your baby next time he is
parts, but it is never permitted emerging today in those parts offft and with the rains to help, it between drinks, You see, a good because it toues up the fiver, st ? 7 4“ ; , :
to over-shadow the all-over the world—such as the West In-Hivitl be up again im a very short 90il holds both water and air at) Sdneys and Dowels and keeps fretful when cutting his teeth.
atmosphere of fun and derring- dies—-which were formerly de- im the same time. Both are held efficiently. The reward of this
do pendent for development on the

_ In brief, the story concerns a
young French revolutionist, who
disguises himself as the actor-
clown Scaramouche, while seek-
ing to learn his own identity and
at the same time, avenge the
death of a friend at the hands of



trends- and achievements of 2@
metropolitan country. Now they
need self-expression and have e
desire to contribute. It i

e.
Should any of the cut branches
vave scale or any other blight,
is advisable to burn them.

these points in mind that theses27ound for any ants nests, or

discussion programmes now bes
ing broadcast by the BBC for the

ant trails, and deal drastically
with them, as ants are supposed

between the soil particles. If
there is an excess of water, the
air is driven out and plants suffer
for lack of it. Lack of water, on
the other hand, is equally harm-
ful so a balance between air and
water must be maintai

Further, it should be borne in

| Internal cleanliness is a freshened
and invigorated body. Poisonous |

| waste materials are expelled and |
the pains of rheumatism cease.

| And as yon continue with Kru- |

; chen, your Faole body responds |

| $o its purifying force. |

| Krusshen is obtainable froma |

ASHTON & PARSONS
INFANTS’ POWDERS’



om









res sible or ? | mists and Stores. iia. 0
‘an aristocrat who is the finest West Indies are conducted ii + responsible for spreading iq that plants’ make the best Lar)
duellist in France. During his “-* —~ George Lamming is the Barbadian! pias. ‘e difficult to rid foot growth when the sof! '> dry~
adventures, he falls in love with poet, who walk Sones 2 first novel!) got _ a a get ul ing nas stage a |
a young countess, only to discover ; i published in the autumn of this.)°™ after kettlef vant gardeners soon lei) \o ree~
she is his sister; tours with a group me Senin cate 58 Ce ens year; William Goeking, now on (boiling ae been — OR ognise. The roots reach out for}
of actors; becomes involved with j, “feet beearnitig a fme actor, Holiday in Britain, is in charge ofj‘h© ae oa 9 = water as the supply dimnishes)
a turbulent red-head and finally Fleanor Parker has a new type !2¢ Central Library Scheme irpeVivors will ea * The. ty 28d vigorous growth results, That
comes face to face with his enemy gf role and she misses no tricks Tvinidad; Willy Richardson, eg Uilding their home, e only is why too much or too little|

in what must be the most spec~
or duelling scene ever film-
ed.

The two protagonists in this
duel are Stewart Granger as
Scaramouche and Mel Ferrer ad
the Marquis de Maynes, and the
athletic agility of the two men is
ineredible. The climax of the
picture, the duel starts on the
edge of the tier of boxes where
it continues in seeming mid-air
for some time. From there, the
swordsmen continue in the foyer,
downstairs, over bannisters,
through the theatre and finally
on to the stage itself, where
scenery and props of all kinds are
brought into action. The whole
scene is remarkably exciting,
though it is done in the good old
tradition of the late Douglas Fait-
banks, with Mr, Granger swinging
in mid-air with all the assurance
of a trapeze artist, and there is
no denying the extraordinary
duelling skill of the two actors,

The cast is a first-rate one, with
Stewart Granger and Mel Ferrer
giving splendid performances. Mr.
Granger’s ability to change from
comedy and light banter to serious
acting in an instant, as well as
some of his mannerisms and tim<



JANET LEIGH

ee
——



DANCE AT

and HIS
and

featuring






SS

CRANE HOTEL
SAT. 30th August

TO THE TUNES OF

“KEITH CAMPBELL"
“SOCIETY SIX”

“THE JUMPING JACKS STEEL BAND"

ADMITTANCE — $2.00



as the fiery-tempered red-head.
In complete contrast, Janet Leigh
makes a charming yo countess
though her acdnt could have been
softened a t. Nina Foch as
Marie Antoinette and Lewis Stone
as Valmorin round out the cast.

An interesting feature in the
film is an authentic picture of the
commedia dell’ arte with all its
slapstick and buffoonery, This
form of comedy flourished in
France and Italy from the 15th
century, and some of the original
sketches have been adapted for
this film. Since humour in those
days was earthy, to say the least,
it has been toned down to suit
modern audiences, but the orig-
inal flavour is still there, along
with the ever-present pantomine.

All in all, IT found S@ARA-
MOUCHE thoroughly enjoyable
light entertainment. I hope you
do too.

Cairo Road And Rapture

A thriller and a dramatic love
story are being shown at the two
Plazas. At the Barbarees theatre,
CAIRO ROAD is something differ-
ent from the usual “cops and rob-
bers” film in that it is a blend of
fact and fiction and tells the story
of the tremendous efforts being
made to stop the drug traffie in
Egypt. The film was. actually

‘made in that country with the

assistance of the Egyptian govern-
ment and is an absorbing and
often exciting picture.

The cast is headed by one of
England’s outstanding actors, Eric
Portman, who gives a thoroughly
sound and restraimed performance
as the head of the enti-narcotics
branch of the Egyptian Police.
Outstanding in the supporting
cast is Harold Lang—a newcomer
to films, but an old hand on the
ctage—and a new type of villain,
with a cocky expression and man-
ner that belie a silky, suave voice.
More should be seen and heard of
this young actor.

In complete contrast, RAPTURE
showing in Bridgetown is defi-
nitely:sombre drama. The action
takes place in Rome and its en-
virons, and once again, we have
authentic backgrounds. Filmed
in the Eternal City and on the
ancient estate of an Italian prince,
it is scenically truly delightful,

and the photographer has made

“KEEP EM FLYING”

THE

our own

BING of the CARIBBEAN PAUL WILKINS

a

6% A FIRE

®

ENTERING

x4)

15 MINUTE FLIGHT

IN “BIM” TO
_ ONE IN EVERY 50 PERSONS”
%

DANCING from 8.30 p.m.
Supper included

Trinidadian now on the BBC's!
staff, once worked in the Trinidad
Library Service. In the broad-
cast which you can hear next
Wednesday they wili discuss th
third book of the series and on
the last Wednesday in August the
will sum up the preceding dis
cussions. ‘The broadcast on th
20th begins at 7.25 p.m., while ti
concluding ‘programme on the
27th will start at 7.15 p.m. to give

half an hour to the summing up,’ flowering plant,

Broadcasts can be heard in the 25
and 31 metre bands, 11.75 and
9.58 megocycles, respectively.

Roger Mais’s ‘Hassim’

Listeners to ‘Caribbean Voices’
may recall that on the 20th April
last the BBC broadcast a play by
the Jamaican writer, Roger Mais.
This play will be repeated on the
17th inst., and as reception is now
almost perfect from London there
should be no trouble in hearing
every word of it. Incidentally
focal playwrights who have
attempted unsuccessfully to have
a_play accepted by the BBC for
‘Caribbean’ Voices’ should note
that plays will be used provided
they are good‘enough, as ‘Hassim’
certainly is, Broadcast will begin
at 7.15 p.m,



aces!

‘the most of his excellent oppor-
tunities.

The story concerns a young
Italian sculptor with whom two
sisters fall in love. He himself is
in love with the younger girl for
whom the machinations of her de-
signing sister prove too much, and
the triangular affair turns into
tragedy.

The cast, which is practically
unknown, is headed by Glenn
Langan, a handsome young
American actor and Elsy Albiin,
a new Swedish discovery, who has
great charm and beauty. Though
the acting is, on the whole, con-
vineing, I think that both these
young people would give a better
response under different direction,
I certainly hope we see them






‘any time after which it
with

ching to do then is to repeat the
iling water treatment until all

and
most decorative plant a it is
rprising that it is not seen more
commonly in our gardens,
It has so mach to reeommend
It is as bright and gay as a
it grows vefy
easily from cuttings, it makes a
good pot plant, a shrub, or a
hedge. It can be trimmed at
will
spring
vigour,
There are numerous varieties
of the Croton, and it is most
interesting to make a collection
of the different kinds and have
— in pots or as shrubs about
e .
Crotons grow easily under
ordinary garden conditions.
like plenty of water and a sunny
and the plants genereilly
make a spurt of growth during
the rainy months. Don’t be dis-
couraged if your cuttings grow
slowly. Crotons are slow starters
+ onee they = —_ a start
ey come on q .
For grawth

and
with

rapid
there is nothing to
our common pink Coralita.

Once this vine is established in
the garden it is there for good,
seeding itself so that young ones
spring up all about. It is a most
useful vine, for it will cover the
top of a Fernery, a wall, lattice
or wire in an ineredibly short
time, providing a thick screen of
green with clusters of delicate
and graceful sprays of pink
flowers. It needs no help in the
way of training for it climbs
unaided and clings of its own
accord. All this, too, with the
minimum of garden care. Once
a year it is advisable to cut the
Coralita vine to the ground. If
this is not done there accumu-
lates a mass of dried leaves and

water are both equally preju-|
dicial; the former condition must)
be rectified either by acequate
drainage or by not over-watering
in comparatively dry periods.|
The use of soil mulch or coven to
prevent much undue loss by
evapqration in times of shortage
cannot be too strongly empha-
sised, Remember too that sprink-
ling for a brief period every day
is not only, wasteful but bad |
ractice since, in this way, only
top few inches of soil are
moistened. This encourages root
they near the surface where
ying out is rapid, It is eco-
nomical, therefore, of water to
apply it so that its duty can be
most effectively performed with-
out loss by evaporation, The
maxim should be to soak deeply!
whenever the need arises rather |
than @ daily sprinkle which is not
only harmful but wasteful.
SAVE WATER AT ALL TIMES:
IT IS PRECIOUS TO LIFE—
HUMAN, ANIMAL AND PLANT. |

Weed Control

We dealt with this subject quite
fully in one of our earlier col-
umns. In this showery weather, |
dormant weeds tend to come to}
ie with remarkable vigour, The
problem is often accentuated by
the re-seeding which follows the
use of dirty manure from un-
known sources or from compost |
hastily made by the inclusion of |
weed growth which has run to}



seed. From time immemorial,
gardeners have deyoted their

thought and energy to fighting
pernicious weeds and, from time
to time, some curious and in-
genious methods have been put
forward for their control. The
weed with a shallow root system
is easy to handle; it is the kind
with storage organs Jike nut gras*
or root-stocks like devil's grass
that are really stubborn. The
modern ‘weedicide cannot reach
effectively these
parts. Some years ago an Aus-
tralian recommended the use o!
molasses against nut grass; in our

again, along with Lorraine Miller, twigs under the green of the vine,vexperience, the nut grass thrived |
A gardener in England is
In affnow recommending the covering
lof weedy beds with two to three
|
|
!

who makes a fascinatingly pre-
datory female.

The musicc& score played by the
Symphonie Orchestra of Radio
Roma is in keeping with the

mather haunting atmd@sphere of
the film.










j

~

which is an encour
garden pests and insects,
week the vine will be up
and in a very short time it is
difficult to tell it had ever

cut down,

OIL STOVES to suit












THE DANCE

Dress Optional

,

| from $49.24

every Budget ......

ONE BURNER
(Cotton Wick)
from $7.36

TWO BURNER
(Asbestos Wick) .
from $22.87

THREE BURNER
..... And OVENS
to fit all Stoves

(Spare Parts:
We carry them !)

Barbados (Co-op
Cotton
Factory Ltd.

towon it.

HIGH VALUES!
| LOW PRICES!

‘nches of new sawdust, Will some
‘ocal
ceport?

gardener try this and





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PIER HEAD — DIAL 4284

SSS

















PAGE FOUR ADVOCATE



oo SUNDAY







W.1. PROFESSIONALS
| OFFERED £15 siditad. «, stasce.

a ae nae a Z Spartan 141 and (for 5 wkts.
Trinidad Table Tennisis Impress: yoj.0%8* a ioe 3 ea
| The Police-Spartan First Divis-
| . a Y io Cc ot ate “Te,
College Junior Basketball Champa 0%, ick! match petered out
yesterday when Police failed to
| By O. 8, COPPIN accept the challenge Spartan threw
| _ Out to them by de¢laring with five
| "WHE most recent information about West Indies cricket is that the oe — and giving Police
| professionals have been offered a fee of £15 pee Test match and jyjy, eke Se
nothing else. In other words if they happen to be in the West Indies sale <
j at the time, because there is no mention of paying their passages from wi cat ie scceee 141 and for five
| England where they all are, then they will be offered the same as 146 arid for eee See Police
[a re Stolimeyer or anyone else. Spartan’s calikeat on, 142, fect
| Most of us are familiar with Shakespeare’s Jacques “Seven ages of wioj-ot ; tH tia ate
} man” and I suppose that there have been little example of that pecu- org sii the first innings the first
liar age “turning again towards second childishness”, Sea = dei Bolt eof Suen ting
DISEASE roa‘ tioweren,

| s ; and Bradshaw. Spartan,
"WT HIS disease must be infecting some of the members of the Board were able to beep ‘hig’ toad

who could expect that in this year of Our Lord 1952 they could when the
vb ' Ss yea ) “ y bowled out Police for
| usher in this fantastic Utopia with one flourish of the pen. 146, thus, nevertheless, ceding first
| cae now that unless the member bodies of the West Indies innings lead points.
that have been taken in their ames they will be parties so'the pares Mnstors ero when Mies ee
eee tee ee ema a S oo, will be parties to the - innings score when Atkins, G, N.
ton of a nonsense that will make them the laughing stock of Grant, N. Harrison and Keith Wal-
International cricket circles, cott gave valuable individual
GROUNDSMEN GET “MORE Scores of 58, 40, 51 and 37, re-
DO not think that the groundsmen who are going to prepare the §Rectively. Harrison played a
wickets will charge less than £15 per test match, far less profes- 8t@"d innings and his wicket was
sionals who have been paid thousands in leaner days of*West Indies ‘tli intact when Spartan declared,
cricket, ’ The wicket, if anything, assist-
‘ This evil must be nipped in the bud at once before it develop ed batsmen. For Bradshaw's two
| into a Srerunner of the destruction of what we have built up in Inter- ae on ier t an onan
national cricket in a half century of years in spite of si arly s bP ee en so ene
| eenecns od geen i half century of years in spite of similarly strange 3.5 overs, Mullins claimed the
lead of discriminating met | VISITORS WID { TENNIS ee ie dees
ead o i men emia eee NAT TABLE TENNIS i From the start of Police’s second
| i visiting South Trinidad Table Tennis team have won both their innings, it was evident that th
ma tate i] matches this week in convincing style. They defeated the cham- were not accepting the chal wd
{ ee | : pions, bi my, by _ ee hes ee and dealt in a similarly firm F¥ ‘Taglor and C. Blackman wie
Fes 5 manner with a combined Barna-Y.M.P.C, team. tar ] snfi ook
ya * he These two handsome wins make them favourites for the first Test oo Rag are oir Be

ee TWO | score to 80 7

that takes place on Monday night, but the Barbadian players have who was eee cone oe
ben oe ee of peas pos pherees in action and have had time Taylor was stumped off Bowen's
| to study their individual style of play. bowlin for 52 Ta y
| In the circumstances there is no reason why they should not go score 38 before does te Mes
| sto battle tomorrow night free from pessimism and inferiority com- |. b.w. off L. F Harris’ nawiin
| plex confident in the belief that even if they fail to win they will have Cc. Amey “went one down oad

Tonic

For
Smart
and
Healthy
Hair



For hair that is always as

good as it looks . . . smart,

lustrous . obviously well

cared for follow. the

Te
TONIC
Ur

the world over . . . use



| put up a jolly good fight. played a sound innings to end not

| NETBALL GET FILIP out with 38,

| "FYHE commendable success of the Queen’s College netball team in

_ their fixtures with Trinidad should go a long way towards stimu-
lating local support and interest in this form of sport in the island.

It is true that the game is being played at Association level and ,.,. Imi iL

| the leading Girls’ Schools and some clubs are represented in the ‘Wanderers ist Liss, S48

Uh i ed, competition, Pi Ae a wkts) ...... 28
d , x OSS yr , | Interest is restricted to the members of the Association and their paese and ........ 230
The Cream of at TCS. Wigs | immediate relatives and friends but I think that this achievement oa

S.M.G. AGENCIES

the Queen's College girls entitles us to look towards the Intercolonial ‘im skipper John Goddard in
J. & R. BUILDING, PALMETTO STREET, BRIDGETOWN, BARBADOS

PICKWICK v. * WANDERERS
at Wanderers.



HAIR CREAM



Despite a brilliant 96 not out by

eb isirins te lmarigny. their second innings, Pickwick was

This in itself will constitute a filin to the teams comprising the defeated’ by Wanderers by. ten

Association to endeavour to reach a high standard. wiekets yesterday the last day in

W.L. ATHLETIC UNION? their First Division cricket match

FW HE Barbados contingent of cyclists and athletes who took part in Beck! i Mead nice see ant
the recent Meet in British Guiana have returned. ,

The detailed their second innings at 230 runs
results of the games and the part which our athletes have played in a Pickwick gave Warherers the

Meet in which competition was so keen that six records were broken, amount of 19 runs to score for
| have been set out elsewhere in this paper. victory in their second innings.
The scheme with which I propose to deal and which I think is Wanderers made 28 runs without
| pregnant with possibilities, following the visit of athletes and cyclists losing a wicket just. after lunch
from other Caribbean territories, is that of staging Annual Cycle and yesterday.
| Athletic Championships in the Caribbean Area. On the first day of play Wan-
Whilst in British Guiana, Mr, Gilmore Roachford, Honorary derers batted first and scored a
Secretary of the Amateur Athletic Association of Barbados had grand total of 343 runs in their
informal discussions with
Association and Cyclists Union of British Guiana, relative to the Atkihson 145 and _ Intercolonial
| staging of Annual Cycle and Athletic Championships in the Caribbean player G. Proverbs 117, Pickwick
Avda. in their turn at the wicket on the
IDEA IS B.G’'S second day were all out for 131
| HE idea, I am informed, was first mooted by the B.G. Union and Uns and at the end of play on that
| the suggestions are that such championships be staged at each it they oe lowe five wickets for
| participating country in turn and should be run on lines similar vith the oe as Sine Canaeen
| to the Brandon trophy and under the International rules as laid down 43 not shit Mapper, Joan ard
by the L.A.A-F, and the U.C.L,. ‘

Yesterday Pickwick carried their
F , _ WHO WILL JOIN _, Se -tvernight ‘score of 119 for five
| HE countries which are at present suggested as participants in wickets to 230 runs and John God-

| these championships are British Guiana, Trinidad, Surinam and dard who hit 14 fours was unde-
| Barbados, _ feated with 96.

Provision is to be made for other countries to join if they desire Denis Atkinson’ again took the
and prospective members must obviously include Jamaica, tne bowling honours for Wanderers in
| Leewards and Windwards. : the Pickwick second innings and

The Secretary also managed to have discussions with the Secretary @nded with an analysis of 30 overs,
| of the Trinidad and Tobago Cycling Federation, nine maidens, 66 runs, four wick-

I hope that these preliminaries talks will lead to some concrete ets. He varied his deliveries and
effort being made towards streamlining and placing on a proper moved the ball both ways and had
basis, athletics and cycling in these territories, the batsmen uncertain. When T.

The establishing of a system vf Annual athletic and cycling Birkett seemed set for big things
championships is the only answer to this need, he bowled him with what looked

COLLEGE WIN AT BASKETBALL like a yorker. At one stage he

ONGRATULATIONS are in order for the Harrison College nad John Goddard pinned down

: A and sent down a mai
| Second. Division team who have followed in the footsteps of jatsman, M. Foster a ee

their senior team and have themselves won the Second Division qymber nine in the batting order

championship,

| Like the First Division team “they have won by the vexatigus Wanderers bowling but when his

method of goal average but this is the law and they have won. score was 36 he was given out leg
Two champienships, one won by the First Division team and before the wicket to the bowling

| the other by the Second Division team is an achieyement of which of Denis Atkinson who had just

any School might justly be proud and all sport fans will join with taken the new ball,

j/me in extending the heartiest congratulations to Harrison College, Just before the hincheon inter-

| val Pickwick concluded their sec-

} ond innings at 230 runs thus giv-

; ve rs ing Wanderer: total of 19 8
Snappers, Bonitas Win K,.O. Cups tory. G. Proverbs and 1

for victory. G. Proverbs and D.
SNAPPERS scored a 92 victory player, Jones who replaced pick and when stumps were drawn
|











Evelyn easily knocked off this total
over Swordfish at the Aquatic Reece in making up the seventh Wanderers had scored 28 runs in
Club last night to win the Division man. Géoffrey Foster went in the a aes ond innings for the loss of
in = : ate ease , , Ja ‘ wicket with G. Proverbs not

A” Knock Out Competition, They back line in place of Reece, and out 23 and D. Evely t t fi

earlier in the season won the Jones played in the forward, but oa nt sete ert

Challenge Cup, In the Division gave little assistarice to his team HARRISON COLLEGE

Snappers on the other v. EMPIRE,

hand were at their dashing best, Harrison College .. 196 an@ 134
Empire 253 and 3. wick-

ot ¥
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| defeat at the hand of Bonitas,
| For Snappers, Delbert Bannistex
|}scored two, Billy Manning four The teams were:— ets) ..... os 8.35 CE eee 70
jand Malcombe Browne three, Snappers: Clarke, Billy Manning Clairmonte DePeiza made a fine
| Geoftrey Foster and Lorenzo Best Frank Menning, Delbert Bannis~ effort to clinch an outright vic-
scored for Swordfish, ier, Kenneth Ince, Malcombe tory for Empire against College
Snappers were completely Brown and George McClean. at Weymouth yesterday. Empire
masters of their opponents whom Swordfish: Albert Weatherhead, needed 78 runs for victory with
| they thoroughly routed, It can be Lorenzo Best, Gerard Jordan, 39 .minutes in which to make
|said for Swordfish, however, that Geoffrey Foster, Herbert -Portillo them, DePeiza going in first wicket
they had to play with an unskilled Nestor Portillo and Jones, down, scored at a rate of approxi-

healthy. In this way, Ipana acts as a safeguard against
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TT

RESERVATIVE




co.,



5666695

s
4%,
¢
.

Yesterday

the Secretary of the Amateur Athletic first innings with Test player D.’

put up some resistance to the ¢





’s Cricket

mately two runs a minute be-
fore te was run out for 24.

This grand display did not how-
ever benefit the Bank Hall team.
When stumps were drawn they
were eight runs short of victory.

M. Worme Saved the day for
College. Going in sixth wicket
down, he repelled the Empire
attack and made victory more
difficult for Empire. When the
College innings closed he was 24
not out,

On the first Saturday of the
match the College team batted
first and knocked up 196. Empire
replied with 253 on the follow-
ing Saturday, having a first in-
nings lead of 57 runs.

Yesterday the College side was
skittled out for 134 runs. Apart
from Worme, F. Tudor and A.
Alleyne made valuable contribu-
tions of 38 and 32 respectively.

Horace King was the most suc-
cessful bowler for Empire. He
sent down 21 overs, of which nine
were maidens, and took four wick-
ets for 27 runs,

E. Grant and S. Rudder took
two each for nine and 36 respec-
tively. Oliver Fields captured one
wicket for 13 runs and Claude
Lewis one for nine.

Empire needed 78 runs fer vic-
tory with 30 minutes of play left,
At close of play the score was 70
for three wickets. C. Hunte scored
25 not out and C. DePeiza 24 run
out. Mr. Sam Headley took the
two wickets for 40 runs.

SPARTAN vs. POLICE
Spartan 141 and (for 5 wkts.) .... 216
Police 146 and (for 4 wkts.) ........ 12
SPARTAN 2ND INNINGS
A. Atkins ec F. Taylor b C. Bradshaw 56
S. Griffith l.b.w. b Bradshaw .... 0
N. Grant ¢ Taylor b Mullins ...... 40

N_ Harrison not out ................ 51
K gy Walcott eC. Amey b F. Taylor 37

F King c Byer b Taylor .......... 15
PRONE Fo Sees dawasgh ess indrens 15
Total (for 5 wkts.) ..... “216

Fall of wickets—1 for 0, 2 for 83, 3 for
129, 4 for 186, 5 for 216
BOWLING ANALYSIS
oO.



M, R. W.
C. Mullins avid gg ae 6 69 1
C Bradshaw ... i” 3 46 2
Cc. Blackman be 3; — 43 oe
C. DeC. Springer... -4 — Mm +
DOP ce iiie 4 6 - sos —
G Sobers 2 — 19 —
¥, Taylor .. xis 35— 15 2
POLICE 2ND INNINGS
F, Taylor 1.b.w. b L. F. Harris .... 28
C. Blackman stpd. w.k. b Bowen .. 52
C. Amey Not OUE 25... .cesssesreceaes 38
G. Sobers b N. Harris ... 6
A. Blackman not out ....,...... ee
C DeC. Springer ¢ sub b Grant . 0
BRGEAB oss vey isacdeessies tected il
Total (for 4 wkts.) ...... 142

Fall of wiekets—1 for 80, 2 for 105, 3 for
125, 4 for 126,
BOWLING ANALYSIS
Oo,

§ ye
F King vce ste me 3 9 —
F. Phillips yen ghee 7 2 6 —
a eee eee | 5 40 1
L.. F. Harris .... 16 6 26 1
OS ee 3 2 1
G. Grant ve.cseeree — 20 1

HARRISON COLLEGE vs. EMPIRE
Harrison College ist Inning:
Empire Ist Innings 258
HARRISON COLLEGE 2ND INNINGS
C. Smith c Rudder, b H. King .... 11
FE. Hope |.b.w. E. Grant ....... a0 ae
A. Alleyne ¢ Holder b C. Lewis .... 32
C, Blackman c Robinson b Rudder 4
F. Tudor stpd. w.k. DePeiza b H.











H. King .
Mr. Headley 1.b.w, H. King . 1
M. Worme not out .........---s505 2A

M. Simmons c Lewis, b H. King .. 0



S. Hewitt c & b Rudder .........+++ 0
C. Reid ¢ Rudder b O. Fields . 8
G. Foster c Rudder b BE, Gra ai se
BOXtras nce veese cece sevens 10

Total ..... ‘ ar vveecs Se

Fall of wickets—1 for 8, 2 for 17, 3 for
32, 4 for 90, 5 for 91, 6 for 92, 7 for 92,
6.for 103, 9 for 112

BOWLING ANALYSIS







Or M.- Ry,
h i4 5 19 =>
E Grant * a. ae ae 9 2
S Rudder vee 14 4 36 2
H. King 21 9 27 4
©, Fields + 7 3 13 1
Al SDDIGEE a iicavscens” 8 n—
Cc Lewis .. i eG 4 1
EMPIRE 2ND INNINGS

Robinson b Mr. Headley - ‘ 2

. Hunte not out .......:6-ee eee i

o

Cc

C. DePeiza run out .. .......-.;@.

W. Drayton c Alleyne b Mr, Headley 8

A. Holder not out coc. ccccseeeseneee 0
TERCOGE Saino car mate ee il



Total (for 3 wkts.) ..

Fal! of wickets—1 for 3, 2 for 46, 3 for
4.

BOWLENG ANALYSIS
oOo M

4 et Ww.

Mr. Headley ...... . tt — 40 2

M. Simmons ........ 4 — 19 —

WANDERERS vs. PICKWICK AT
WANDERERS

Wanderers ist Innings veda meena See

Pickwick Ist Innings . mt

PICKWICK 2ND INNINGS



i, L. G, Hoad b E. Atkinson .....
E. Edwards c D. Atkinson b E
Atkinson . eokbe>s fare 33
J. D. Goddard not out ............ 96
C, White l.b.w. b L. St. Hill .... 3
K. Greenidge c Toppin b L. St. Hill 0O
C, Evelyn run out . sie gees eek s /e
W. Greenidge c Proverbs b D.
AUKINGON .. 2.2.2... sees eee sone e
T. Birkett b D. Atkinson ........ 17
M. Foster l.b.w. b D. Atkinson .. 36
T. Hoad b D. Atkinson ............. @
H. Jordan c St. Hill b R. Lawless 2
Extras enaeeQte does cee ey + Oe:
0



Total





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SUNDAY,



AUGUST : 17, 1952



The Indians Do
Not Fight

From Our Own Correspondent

LONDON, August 16.

RAIN prevented any play in the Test between England
and India at the Oval to-day. But with England having
won the first three games the rubber is already decided.
And in this specially prepared report, Jack Hobbs former
Surrey and England batsman discusses India’s team and
sums up England’s chances next year agaist the Austra-

lians,

Jack Hobbs says rain came to
the rescue of the sorely pressed
Indians and washed out al] hopes
cf play in the final test at the
Oval to-day. By early afternoon
it was obvious that the pitch
would not recover from its heavy
soaking.

Seldom in the history of the
game can a test have faced such
a hopeless third day dawn as the
Indians did this morning.

The first three matches of the
series had been lost. And in this
one they had lost five wickets on
what was described as “a pig of
an oval pitch” for 49 runs.

And they were faced inevitably
with the prospect of struggling
on to another whacking under
conditions which give them that
far from home feeling.

Where shall we place this
England eleven of 1952.

After making full allowances
for the Indians ill luck the fact
has to be set down quite bluntly
that as a team they are not good
enough to give us a real test. ‘

There are players of test matca
quality in the side. The captain,
Hazare is one of them and towards
him above all others does sym-
pathy go out in full. \most all
time he has had to fight against
the collar.

Memory will recall fer years to
come the almost unequalled per-
formance with bat and ball of
Vinoo Mankad at Lord’s, No indi-
vidual cricketer has ever done as
much for a side and yet been
among the losers at the finish.
Others have done good jobs of
cricket work too.

Apart from the obvious truth
that many members of this In-
dian party have not on our grounds
measured up to test skill and
standards either as batsmen,
bowlers or fielders there is one
prime essential quality which is
lacking—they don’t fight.

They did not fight at Old Traf-
ford. Fellows who should have
squared their shoulders and set

their teeth were in effect on the

way back to the pavilion even
as they walked to the wicket.

The fighting spirit was also
lacking at the Oval on Friday
evening.

These things must be borne in
mind to help us keep next year’s
tests against the Australians in the
true perspective,

The Australians may not be as
good as this present England
team. But first and foremost they
will fight. Their wickets won’t be
presented on a plate.

Such magnificent opening
bowlers as Alec Bedser and Fred
Trueman will have to dig the
Australians out. The test for them
will be whether they can take it
as distinct from merely giving it!

These victories over the Indians
don’t mean we can get ready to
shout—without any further pre-
liminaries—over victories against
the Australians before the tests
have been played.

We have found from this series
a skipper who can play the Aus-
tralians at their own relentless
game and maybe beat them.

It’s my opinion that we might
have made greater use of tests
this season against such ordinary
opposition in a general sense to
fit us all the better for much
more arduous tasks which the
future has in store, For instance
we've batsmen who haven’t





Fall of wickets—l for 58, 2 for 100, 3
for 103, 4 for 103, 5 for 105, 6 for 123, 7
for 164, 8 for 213, 9 for 213

BOWLING ae
a



Re W:

E. Atkinson 26 2

Db Atkinson . 66 4

G,. Proverbs .. 10 —

T. Toppin 35 —

L. Lawless ... os 54 1

Le. Bt) HE i cs sees 32 2

WANDERERS 2ND INNINGS

G. Proverbs not out ..........-.05+- 28

D Evelyn not out ........:c.ssieeee 5

Total (for no wicket) .... 26
BOWLING ANALYSIS

oO M R w.

HH, Jordan ... 2 _ 6 —

T. Birkett ...



used the opportunity to take this
Indian bowling by the scruff of
the neck. They have played for
safety when risks could have
been taken without much fear of
gerious consequences either ta

emselves or the side in general.

They hhave had a five,-day ap-
proach against opponents who
could have been finished off. in
less time. A different approach—
the Godfrey Evans approach if I
may express it thus—would have
had its value in respect of the
future.



Surrey Must

Fight Hard

(From Our Own Correspondent)

LONDON, August 16,

The struggle for the county
championship is going to be a far
more drawn out affair than seem-
ed possible a week ago. Yorkshire
can beat Surrey if they win ail
their remaining games and if the
southerners fail to: obtain ten
points from their last five games.
And to-day Yorkshire made pret-=
ty certain that Surrey would not
obtain many points from their
game at Leeds.

Norman Yardley won the toss
and had the gratification of seeing
423 on the scoreboard for the loss
of only 5 wickets at the close.
Yorkshire debutant was opening
bat Charles Less who scored 74, in
just over three hours, Wilson 121
and Lester 130 not out carried on

the good work against the Surrey’

attack weakened by the absence
of Bedser, Laker and Lock who
are playing in the Test.

There, were smiles on the faces
of Gloucester supporters when
shortly after lunch at Cheltenham
the last Warwickshire wicket fell
for 104. But those smiles had
faded away after the tea interval
when Gloucester were all out for
91,

Opening bowler Bannister
started the collapse taking four of
the first five wickets and finish-
ing with five for 36. Then
along came Eric Hollies with his
crafty leg breaks to take the other
five for eighteen,

Rain affected most of the other
games.

World Champion
Salas May Fight
Frank Johnson

By GEORGE WHITING
MANCHESTER,

Promoters who saw no merit in
his punches a year ago are now
clamouring for the services of
Manchester’s Frank Johnson—an
easy and, at time, «spectacular
winner on points here in his Brit-
ish lightweight championship fight
with the previous holder, London’s
Tommy McGovern,

Johnson is wanted at Newcastle
on August 25 and Manchester on
September 5. 7

His manager, Sam Burns, talks
optimistically of negotiations for
an overweight meeting with

Mexico’s Lauro Salas or James

Carter (U.S.A.), present and

past holders of the world title,

Meanwhile, on the sidelines,
London's Joe Lucy urges a quick
settlement of his own champion-
ship aspirations against Manches-
ter’s new champion.

Waded In

Johnson beat a fit and lively
McGovern because of his ability
either to evade or absorb right-
hand punches—and then to wade
in on his own account,

For four rounds, MeGovern’s
right hand performed mightily,
but not mightily enough. From
then on Johnson boxed with the
supreme confidence of a man who
feels the Sunday punches of his
opponent to be losing their fire.

That Johnson eased up in the
last four rounds should not be held
against him, Johnson, I think, will
be a value-for-money ~~.







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- 22b



SUNDAY, AUGUST 17,





1952





(BAOK ROW) left to right—E. McLeod, J. Skinner, Miss J. Marshall, R. Sattaur, 8. Haynes, T. Moore,

D. , D. Yarde.

ROW) D. Inniss, McD. Lloyd, T. Inniss, H. Rouse.
cyclist

¢
H Carter (Intermediate ) is

out of the picture.

The August Olympaid In B.G.
LATIN RIDERS SET NEW VOGUE

(By E. R.

McLEOD)

A TEAM of Barbadian cyclists and athletes numbering

13 returned to the island

on Friday morning by the

Canadian, Challenger after ae part if the recent British
e

Guiana Amateur Cycle and Ath

held at the Bourda track in

August 6.

Although many of them have
not come up to expectations, I
know they have gained much in
experience which will help them
in future tours. The Barbados
team of 13 left the island on July
the schooner Van Sluytman
for Georgetown and arrived there
on July 25 but due to some delay,
the team did not move into their
quarters at Camp Street, George-
town, until the next day. Thai
evening most of the boys went to
see the track which is four laps
and a half to the mile. There was
also no track practice because
water was on the ground.

The Barbadian cyclists were
“A” Class J, Skinner, D, Keizer,
D. Yarde and R. Sattaur; Inter-
mediate: M, Carter, S. Haynes;
“B” Class: E. MeLeod and T.
Moore, Lady cyclist Miss Joyce
Marshall. The athletes were D.
Inniss (Sprinter), H. Rouse
(Sprinter), McD. Lloyd and T.
Inniss (Distance Men).

The Trinidad cycle team was
“A Class veteran Compton Gon-
salves, Ferdi De Gannes; Interme-
diate: V. Facooray, R. Waithe and
M. Pierre. Beatrice Clark (Lady
cyclist).

The Venezuelan contingent was
made up of stocky Antonio
Demichelle, Franco Caccione and
Ali Cardona, all International
men. i

On both days of the meeting
the stands were crowded. Guian-
ese sport fans who went to see
how their local champions would
shape against the foreign con-
tingents and they witnessed some
keen sport despite a heavy track
on the second day.

Lindsay Gordon of British Gul-
ana showed that he still had a
good sprint when he won the One
Mile International and Nine Mile
cycle races in fine style on the
first day. On that day, three
records were smashed including
the Nine Mile which was com-
pleted in 23 minutes, 12.3 seconds.

“Hustling” Tactics

In the rive Mile International,
the Latin wheelsman Demichelle
won by sheer “hustling” tactics.
From the start of the race there
‘was grand team work on the part
of the.Latins and they kept up a
hot pace aNd so hot was the pace
that even Gonsalves was one of
the top notchers who was forced
to “drop out” of the race.

At one stage Caccione “burst
away” from the field but Gordon
carried back the company to him.
John Skinner who rode 81 in this
race came in second and Cacclone
third. Skinner worked hard in
this race for he hadn’t the help
of Yarde, Sattaur and Keizer.
The angles of the track worrled
him also and on many occasions
when he should be hugging the
angles to the line, was moving
out considerably.

tic Association Olympiad
Georgetown on August 4 and

The rhree Mile

In the “B” Class-a new record
was set up for the three Mile
which M. Robello won in seven
minutes 48.9 seconds, E. McLeod
ang T.,Moore who were in this
division also complained of the
the track, They also had to face
angles on the track. They also
had to face up to the different
style of riding employed by the
Guianese boys,

I noticed in every race the
pacers maintained a semi sprint
and many of the cyclists are always
sprinting away from the field.

Tony Moore did well to come in
second in the One Mile on the
first day but his partner McLeod
who was off to a bad start in this
race found himself pocketed in
the large field and when he found
a way out it was too late for him
to place, He finished fourth.

Heavy Track

On the second day of the meet-
ing the track was heavy due to
rain early the morning. The Vene-
zuelans rode gears in the seventies
and although the track was not the
best these Latins on their low
gears paced hard

It “was a good move by Walter
Liddell of Berbice who followed
Caccione in the Three Mile Match
race for “A” Class. Caccione
moved away from the field in a
devastating sprint. Liddell who
won the race in the record time
of seven minutes 44.3 seconds
lapped the field which included
Laddie Lewis, Gordon, Gonsalves
and Skinner—-with Caccione,

Skinner however rode brilliant-
ly in the 15 Mile Open which he
won, There were three spills in
this race in which the Venezue-
lans refused to ride due to the
large field. About 50 cyclists faced
the starter and some 9,000 saw
Skinner sprint to the finishing
line in darkness ahead of Walter
Liddell and R. Robinson of British
Guiana,

Barbados Wins

After the race Skinner was pre-
sented with a Cup anda gold
medal. Barbados got another win
that day when Moore won the Half
Mile “B” Class from L,. Robinson
in one minute 13.2 seconds, Me-
Leod was in one of the spills in
this raze.

Lack of Experience

Joyce Marshall, the Barbadian
lady cyclist rode well but lack of
experience prevented her from
beating Beatrice Clarke. Clarke
however proved that she is the
best of the bunch and won the
four cycle races for Ladies at
Bourda convincingly.

Miss Marshall came in second to
Beatrice Clarke in three of the

races,
Athletics

athletes w@e not up to the mark
and had to be contented with sec-
ond and third places.

David Inniss ran third in the
100 yards (A Class) which the
Guianese champion sprinter Maur-
ice Payne won in the good time
of 9.8 seconds. After the race In-
niss told me that he was off to a
late start due to some misunder-
standing with the starter.

Hewitt Rouse (Police Sprinter)
pulled a muscle on the first day
and was unable to run for the rest
of the meeting. D. Lloyd’ ran in
third in the Two Mile flat open
ren took place on the second

ay.

Lloyd remained in the back too
much in this race and when he
tried to take the lead he found
that those in front of him were
just as fresh as he was and in the
last lap he made another effort to
sprint but this sprint was not
strong enough.

: Under-Trained

Summing up I would say that
the Barbados team did its best.
Many of the boys did not train
sufficiently for such a big meeting
but perhaps many of them were
not sure whether they would have
been selected but as I said before
they are bound to gain much from
the experience at Bourda,

Tucker Top Scorés
In Practice Shoot

_The following are the results
of last Wednesday practice shoot
held by the Barbados Small Bore
Rifle Club, Scores were up to the
usual high standard with Mr. M.
G, Tucker top scoring with 99 out
of a possible 100 points followed
closely by Roberts, Jordan and
Hassell with 98 points each, Mem-
bers were glad to welcome Mr.
Evelyn, who is on a visit here
from St. Kitts and is one of the
founding members of the Rifle
Club recently started there, and
expressed the hope that his Club
will be able to take part in postal
shoots in the near future.

Scores
Mr. M. G, Tucker ...... ses. 98
Mr. T. A. L. Roberts ....... 98
Capt. J. R. Jordan ....... 98
Mr. J. W. Hassell .......... 98

Mr. R, D, Edgh¥l .......... 97
Mr. M. A, Tucker .......... 95
Mr. E, L. G. Hoad, Jnr. ..... 94
Mr. K, S, Yearwood ..... 91

Members will be glad to learn
that the Club has been presented
with a beautiful Silver Challenge
Cup which will be competed for,
tor the first time, at the annual
Competition .scheduled for Sept.
2ist to 27th,

Regular practices will be held
on the 2nd_and 4th Saturdays and
‘very Wednesday. Members are
reminded that to have an aver-
age for these competitions they
hould put in as many practices

Tn the flat events the Barbadian 1s possible now.




— "
O0°% 0 doice



SUNDAY ADVOCATE ‘

B.G. Olympiad

A Big

was a huge success,

Challenger on Friday morni
Mr. C said that
Schoone A, H,



seasick. Those K were,

the secon p of the

In British , the
courtesy of the B,G. Government,
the hostel the .G mt
Training oa

for
their disposal.




was at ‘ Lace
commodation was exc Thy
good. ne : A
“There is
said. “The ; ed this item
from their er".
After the in

B.G., owing to heavy rainfalls,
they were able to have. two
days track practice. Other train-
ing was done on the road and

when it is that the.
BG. reads are not _ good, this
made it more difficult for the
cyclists. ,

They were .in B.G. for eight
days before the opened in
the presence of a, _crowe

This gave them some time to re-
cover from the effects of the se:
trip. ‘

Mr. Rocheford said
Pritish Guiana erowds had great
confidence in the Barbadian cy-

cists whem they fal eeanta de-
feat the tactful Venezuelan cy+
clists. Because of this, the Bar-

hadians were well supported i
the field. »

Keizer Injured

On the Saturaay previous tv
the opening day of the Meet—
ine last day of practice foy the
Barbadians, f spills were ex-
perienced by the Barbadians, ae
handicapped them, especially
Duncan Keizer who was suffering
from an injured left leg and was
advised by a doctor not to ride at
all.

This however did not deter tle
courageous Keizer who rode on
the Fitst Day but was unfortunate
to be in a spill in the Nine Mile.
His injured leg became worse and
he was therefore inactive for the
remainder of the Meet.

He felt that Tony Moore, John
Skinner and Joyce Marshall were
the outstanding cyclists of the
Barbados contingent,

On the first day Moore was sec-
ond in the One Mile B Class
Cycle Race. He was beaten by
Robello of British Guiana in. a
gruelling race. In the Five Mile
International, John Skinner found
himself having to battle with the
two Venezuelans, Caccioni and
Demichelle. Caccioni managed to
win by about a length but Skinner
detent Demichelle to gain second
place, ;

On the same day David Inniss
was third in the 100 yards flat.
First and second positions wen!
to the British Guiana pair, Payne
and M¢Phearson, Inniss just man-
aged to get ahead of another Bar-
badian, P. C, Rouse, who suffered
a severe muscle injury and was
inactive for the remainder of th:

Mr. Rocheford said that Joyce
Marshall’s display was extreme!)
creditable but she lacked the ex
perience of the other lady cy-
clists. She impressed the British
Guiana crowd.

On the First Day she was sec
ond in the Half Mile and third i)
the Mile. He felt that her main
fault was riding too wide on the
track. However, he thinks that
the experience gained shoul
make her a Champion West In-
dian Lady Cyclists.

McD. Lloyd of Foundation
placed third in the One Mile fla.
He said that the winner of this
race, J. Doris of British Guiana
was extremely good.

Success

“We were far more successful
on the Second and final day of
the Meeting’, Mr. Rocheford
said.

John Skinner rode beautifully
to win the 15 mile cycle event
In this race there was a_ spill
which carried 20 cyclists. This
race finished at about 6.50 p.m
when the sun had already set.
Skinner’s judgment was very good.

Tony Moore also scored a vic-
tory. He won the Half Mile B
Class Cycle Event while Joyce




that the |

Success ©
THE British) Guiana ALC. aid A.A. August Olympiad | Last Week

r. Gilmore Rocheford, Manager of |
the Barbados Contingent, told the Advocate yesterday. The |
Barbados team arrived back home by the M.V. Canadian |

ng.
the trip down to B.G. by the

I . H, Vansluytman was a very pleasant |
one indeéd. Only about tive of the contingent were not)
2se seas however, walking around on |
p which lasted three days.

Marshall .placed second in the
Quarter Mile and Two Mile. McD.
Lipyd was third in the Two Mile
Flat,

Commenting on Mr.

the tour,

Rocheford said it was evident that |

the cyclists and athletes of British
Guiana took their training very
seriously, He felt that the Guianese
had a benefited immensely
from the visits of such topnotch
ae as Herb McKenley and
Ma
the team had gained a world of
experience from the tour and this
should be reflected in their future
performances,

We said that the Barbawls As-
soriation should make every effort
te invite Venezuelan cyclists to
take part in local Meets because
wy then would Barbadians be
‘ble to see cycling at its best.

There are many lady athletes

end cyclists in British Guiana and |

hey take their training as serious-

as the men. I feel that our
idies should make an all out ef-
‘ort to take part in local meetings
\nd, everything should be done

») encourage them,” he said.

“IT was unfortunate not to see
‘ean. Perry, the British Guiana
Lady Ace in action as she did not
ake part in the Meet.”

Of the British Guiana Cyclists,
Liddell and Gordon were in good
form but most outstanding was
young Paddy who comes from
Berbice with Liddell, He rode in
the Intermediate Division but on

ferm he can beat most of the
“A” class cyclists.
Of the athletes, he thought

}.G.’% Payne and McPherson to be
excellent sprinters and B Class
éthletes, Deane, was also good,
‘Phe two ladies, E. Floris and C.
Masdammer gave good perform-
ances,

_On the Sunday followin” the
Georgetown Sports, there was
another Intercolonial Sports Meet-
ing at Wales on the West Bank.
Che Barbadians did well in this
Meet. M. Carter won in the In-
termediate Division and Skinner
was second to Caccioni. “Sattaur
‘howed that he was a Guianese by
iiding well on the muddy track”
he said, In this Meet Lloyd was
second to Doris in the 880 yards
flat, » oem

He said that the Guianese

bados contingent. “On many
occasions we were invited out to
parties and many Gulanese are
looking forward to a visit from us
next year”, he ended.



Masketball :

ne cchnemestomecenaianianieg

H.C. Win Second
Div. League Cup

Harrison College Second Divi-
sion Basketball team have, like
their First Division team, won this
season's League Cup. Incidentally,
the Second Division have won it
the same way the First did, on
goal averages.

The Second Division games end-
ed last week. Boys’ Club, Police
and College were tied off on the
number of matches won, each
having lost twice, but College had
the better goal average.

During the week, Harrison Col-
lege Old Boys beat Carlton 25—18
in the Knock Out Competition, and
Y.M.P.C, in’ possibly their best
mateh ever, defeated Pirates

The Semi-finals will be played

on Tuesday this week, and the |

finals are expected to come on
Friday.

In the Semi-finals, H.C.0.B.
will meet Boys’ Club, and H.C.,-
Y.M.P.C.



B.W.I. MAY COMPETE
FOR DAVIS CUP

KINGSTON, J’ca., Aug. 13.
The British West Indies have
been given permission to enter the
Davis Cup competition. They will
do so next year,
( *—O.P.

bx tae

mens Sea
, ot. eae



itfield. The members of |

‘ were |
extremely hospitable to the Bar-|

â„¢ PAGE FIVE

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PAGE SIX



“For Women

On , 1) j ”

ell aie tao . a :
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“Silf indeed!” laughs Bill, “All I’m
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Mom doesn’t mind so long as I re-
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Mom believes in SPA 3rushes
Toothbrushes, Hair-brushes, they ure
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Mom knows a good thing when she sees it
-so do I! Just look at her now—full of beans
ag a teenager, my Mom.”

“I need to be. Until I bought VAMOOSE,
in that handy little puffer tin, I couldn’t turn
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#round One puff of VAMOOSE and its
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What does Mrs. John Doe here?
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RENDELL-FOAM, the safe con-
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| Yit’s a long way from a typewriter in a
| Southampton office when you are 17 to a ride
| in a guarded wagon through a stormy night
| when you are 22. But that is the road that
tle last war made Yvonne Baseden take.
From AC.W.2 in the W.AA.F. to an
agent in France, trained to kill and sabotage.
The day they caught her the Germans were
not gentle with their rifle butts as they
pushed her in a céll.

by YVONNE BASEDEN

HERE are three little whitewashed

i cells in the military barracks at
Dole, in France.

That is where I spent the first night as a
prisoner of the Gestapo.

I just sat stupidly on the edge of the wide
planks that did for a bed, trying to think. There
was no light.

From the next cell came the moaning of the men who
nad been arrested with me and who now lay with broken
‘ones and the marks of the first rough, unscientific torture.

The body of “Lucien.” my commanding officer, was
n that cell, too.

Gave false name

AT MIDDAY the door was thrown open. It was a

little soldier bringing potato soup. I ate mine.

Then, at two o’clock, I was pushed out of my cell to
a car, where Gestapo men in plain clothes waited.

All the time I was in the hands of the Gestapo that
was to be my way of progression . . « the blow in the back
and the stumbling shuffle.

My first interview was mild. A German asked for my

ime and address, I gave him my false ones. :

Then, to my horror, I saw on the table my false-
ottomed handbag. Inside the false bottom were codes
| denied that the handbag was mine,

AT H.Q.

A ‘fatherly’ man

@ TWO days later—early in the morning—they
took me from my cell again. Two Germans
rvived with rifles. I was sure I was going to be shot.

Instead I was put into a truck. I was on my way to
ne Gestapo H.Q, at Dijon.

The lorry stopped in front of a prison, It was like
| the prisons you have seen on the films, The cells were
n storied tiers with strong wire nets between the floors
) prevent suicides.

1 was handed over to an enormous German woman
arder and taken to the top floor to cell 111. My cell
iwprised me. Through the window I could see the light
ve blue sky, and the sunshine.

A rather fatherly looking man. called for me, _ His
ame was Mutter. He drove me to the Gestapo H.Q
Ve walked up seven flights of stairs to his office.

Politely he offered me a chair, He asked me abou!
iy arrest. I lied hard.

1 was very suspicious of his gentleness. Eventual!)

| was driven back to the prison. I stayed tbere two days

Tortured, then killed

BY NOW they had “interrogated” my companions.
Robert Morel, the young doctor, had been left for
hours hanging by a broken arm. ___

He had hoped one day to be a

But one of the arrested men did
alk. I do not know which one,
ind I never want to know. And
{cannot blame him, for they went
through hell.

ing.

Jules and Charles were clubbed
for hours,

THE

‘lights of stairs.











CELEBRITY SFOT

IN ADVANCE of the
shops, Valerie Hobson
shows off the latest
third-form collar and
cuffs worn with coat
frocks. . .

The pull-on cuffs
are kept in place
with elastic
fastened with
black links. The
tie is flowing
black chiffor

Jules was shot in Germany later.
iurgeon, That torture wrecked his Charles was shot in Dijon when
hopes. Yet he never talked, the Germans found that torture
had made him incapable of walk- We know you come from Eng-

ANGRY NOW
‘You’re From England
MUTTER called for me again
Once more I climbed those seven

THINGS THEY



SUNDAY ADVOCATE

@ In that hot summer of 1939 Yvonne
Baseden was 17 and she had just
left school. The outbreak of a war
which was to bring her months o/
frantic fear, torture and agony was only
a few,days away as she happily picked
apples in a Bedfordshire orchard.



Twelve summers later—in 1951—

Yvonne Baseden, beside the blue sea

at Arcachon in France, was happy again.

The black days were far away as she
nursed her baby boy, called Simon,

land.”

enormous jack boots.

DO.



Pans



SHOCK

SPOT
BON D-
STREET
shopper
who didall
the wrong
things...

How
many
facits can
you find
in her out-
fe? There
are eight
at least.
(See

Column 4
below.)








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.
ie



But this time he was not pole.
ne was angry. He shouted, “All
you have been saying is rubbish.

The door opened and in came a
buge blue-chinned brute of a mar
n Gestapo uniform and wearing

I dug my elbows into my sides.
{ pressed my legs tightly together. more bullet flashes,





SUNDAY, AUGUST 11,

1952



Anything to stop trembling
Shrieked

“HERE,” I thought, “comes the
torture,

Mutter shouted, “We have ways
to make people talk.”

Suddenly, the uniformed man
jumped with his jack boots on my
feet. Mutter shricked at me. .
questioning, questioning.

Then my crushed feet started
hurting. My lies got louder and
wilder. I began to sob and moan,

I saw Mutter’s face, now father-
ly again, smiling.

He must have thought he was
getting on fine.

I AM SHACKLED
While he Lunches

THEN he decided it was lunch-
time.

On my bruised feet I stumbled
down the stairs to the ground
floor, where I was handcuffed to a
radiator, while Mutter went off to

eat. ‘

When he returned, I had to
struggle up those stairs again.

For hours I lied .. . wild crazy
lies.

They got angry again. It was
eight o’clock and they wanted to
go home, Mutter said: “We will
make you talk.”

I was pushed down to the base-
ment.

There were rows of grey-paint-
ed doors. Mutter opened one and
flung me inside.

I had time to see the wooden

* bed by the wall and great dried

brown bloodstains on the wall be-
fore he put out the light.
Frantic

I WAS alone. I was weak from
lack of food, I was thirsty. I was
frantic.

I yearned for that white tablet
with which I could have commit-
ted suicide.

_I attempted suicide twice that
night. *

First I crouched on the bed and
wrapped the thin blanket round
my neck, I pulled, but each time
I grew dizzy my hands loosened.

Then, groping in the dark, I
found a bottle. I smashed it
against the wall.

With a piece of the glass I tried
to open an artery in my wrist. But
the glass was so thick and I could
not find the same cut twice in the
dark.

I sJashed my wrist in three dif-
ferent places.

Then I must have fainted...
not from injuries, but from lack
of food.

After 24 hours of lonely dark-
ness, suddenly the light was
switched on. Mutter entered with
another man and started speaking
in English. He yelled: “Fou are
going to suffer.”

They dragged me out into the
corridor and took out their revolv-
ers. I thought at last I am going
to be shot.

{t did not seem fair to die in this
foul-smelling cellar at the hands of
two angry men,

I saw the flash and I heard the
noise, but I did not feel the shot.
I saw a bullet hole in the earth
floor at my feet.

The cellar was lit up by two

... SKETCH-PAD REPORTING WITH A MAN’S EYE
THE RIGHTS AND WRONGS OF WOMEN-ABOUT-TOWN

LO EN ARTE LINCS OER E






















FUN SPOT

’
I'M ONLY asking
—but couldn't we
improve on verti-
eal stripes for
deckchairs ?



















The perfume with the donger-lasting fragrance

v BOURJOIS |

- An English secretary in_ the
torture cells of the

Gestapo

Then I had to walk up to the
seventh floor again,
MADE. FRIENDS
With Three Mice
AFTER that I was taken back to
prison, and for a long time was un-
troubled by the Gestapo. I made
friends with three mice. But the

* woman warder found their hole

and blocked it.

I unpicked it with a hairpin,
but only one came back. It didn’t
stay long, for the woman put down
poison.

With my hairpin I scratched on
the wall all the words of “There'll
Always Be An England.”

As a punishment I was left on
the top floor when everyone was
taken to the shelters during air
raids.

I hoped that the British bombs
would hit the prison. But they
never did.

‘To Die’

ONE day 1 heard prisoners
marching. I heard a German call
out: “You are going to die.” I
heard the machine guns fire. Thai
was a sign that Allied troops were
nearing the prison.

Soon I was pushed into a cattle
wagon bound for Germany. My
destination was Ravensbruck con-
centration camp.

I was there for eight months, On
a daily diet of only two bowls of
vegetable soup my face grew
bloated and my body became like
a skeleton.

The crematorium poured black,
greasy smoke as hundreds died in
it each day,

SEVEN SHOT

I Am Overlooked

THERE were seven other girls
from my Resistance service in the
camp.

One day they were shot. But
lost among women of a dozen
nationalities, I was overlooked.

I was sent to unload loot trains.
I carried out of trucks oil paint-
ings and silver. And one day a
feather pillow.

I will always remember that. If
you can imagine crying in terror
because you have split a pillow,

then you know, too, how one hv- piped

man can degrade another.

I can see that truck now. I can
see those curled feathers drifting
down,

An angry German raised a huge
spaaner over my head. That
spanner came crashing down.

It missed my head and struck
my hip. I lay on the truck floor
helpless with. pain.

Liberation

THAT moment passed. So did
the hours as a nurse in the huts
where the sick had little to eat.

Some had to live. Some had to
die. The choice was ours.

Finally, the Swedish Red Cross
liberated me, I looked back as I
left, and all I saw was the pall of
smoke from the crematorium,

I came home to England on a
Saturday afternoon,

Before me lay nine months in
hospital, a lung operation, pain.
and nights tormented by fearful
dreams,

But that afternoon shabby
King’s Cross Station looked very
much like Heaven. —L.E.S.



i









SUNSPOT
BALL E T-
SKIRT. over
bloomers—some-
thing new in
two-piece wear
for the beach.

THE

NAD ATL AP RAMP ITS

NEW AND NOTED ... for submission
to the arbiter of etiquette.



i.

First Eleven
Offer The
Big Look

By DOROTHY BARKLEY
LONDON, August 1,

Attention of the Fiist Eleven
designery has shifted away from
the “wandering” waistline and
petticoated skirtline of last season,
It fixes this season on the “Big
Top” look—a top heavy appear-
ance created by boxy jackets and
outsize sto!es, some trimmed with
fur or velvet, worn above slim,
straight skirts, (Seen at Michael
Sherard, Norman Hartnell, Peter
Russell and Michael at-Lachasse.)

Velvet is the material for coats,
suits, evening dresses, Several
new types are seen including a
black velvet with a narrow white
stripe woven through it horizont-
idily at two~irfch yotervals {at
Hartnell) and velvet embossed on
matching satin in floral designs
(at Victor Stiebel).

Green is the colour, though it
may be any one of half a doen
shades, including ilex, forest,
emerald, ‘water, duckpond and
escargot. Most popular tweed is
green woven with black, Any other
sombre colour is good; caviare,
mole, or quagmire are equally
fashionable. And just as we were
beginning to think colours had
gunk irretrievably into a slough
of despond, along came “spindle-
berry” pink, “pervanche” blue (a
bright, Van Gogh blue), ana
“plood” orange (a pinky orange).

Materials include dress-weight
Donegal tweeds, pin-check suit-
ings, Otterburn. tweeds, and
Jambswool, An element of sur-
prise comes with awning-striped
shantung for evening, shining
cellophane georgette, wool lace and
straw velvet.

Hats vary, Little-boy velvet
caps, peaked all the way round,
to match suit blouses; mob
caps in felt; tricorne berets edged
with persian lamb, skull caps,
pillboxes and hats with high
cone-shaped crowns,

Evening dresses, grand and
formal with full-crinolined skirts
giving a hint of things to come in
Coronation Year, are no longer
strapless, “ Instead, they have
halter-necks, scooped out neck-
lines, or create a cold-shoulder
look with one sleeve only.

MICHAEL AT LACHASSE, who
presented the “Masher” suit last
season, is the originator of the
“Big Top”. An outsize version of
the normal stole, it is made in
tweed to match the suit, and worn
back to front, with the tie at the
back. A second theme is the loosely
fitted Gaucho jacket inspired by
the Gauchos of Mexico. Cut with
more width than length, it is set
on a round shoulder and low yoke,
To accentuate width, sleeves are
long and full, They accompany
slim skirts and dresses,

@ On Page 12



Rrth-








OPEN transfer of morsels

from plate to plate is i
into café life - a Substitute for
ordering properly. 5

RAAT NAN Na eR. on Sn.

London Express Service



ORK ADORES ate

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SOCVSSSSEHSSSSESIOBOEN EDS

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and EAU DE COLOGNE

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Be

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ncaa

* Soft textured

® Delicately perfumed

® Cashmere Bouquet Face Powder
gives a satin smooth finish

* Clings lightly, evenly, for
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FACE POWDER BY

WITH CASHMERE BOUQUET FACE POWDER

J$47





{





SUNDAY, AUGUST 117,

® itgs

| Node 4



1952

"Gets $200000 WHATS COOKING The Field

IN THE KITCHEN



Narrows

SUNDAY



ADVOCATE



a 20:5

Man About Town






PAGE SEVEN



| dreamed of a bra

with firm support...



as i
x am recipes to make your (By Arne Edwards) es na a Zeles ei n STRAIGHT FROM LONDON ROYAL CROWN DERBY in the * e %
old supper a success J
bs upper a success HE tae ee Tad! a ve - ta TOWN to the Island's very ex- most faScinating of Broaches and SH LCV, OFTMS
COLD SALMON PURE calles oH gy clusive Bettina Ltd, The Village, Earrings—either in sets or sep- e
For 8 persons: 1 big salmon tin. imntigiie pg = ee people Hastings, Phone 4941—-wonderful arately. You'll like the sets, I
English potatoes: 1} 1b, could marry pretty well anyone FOR SUNDAY, AUGUST 17, 1952 new COCKTAIL DRESSES & think! The pieces are patterned Chansonette...
Milk: half a glass ha a : arth sane EVENING GOWNS. Already in flowers (one exquisite Wild
Butter: 1 oz. 8 oo wee as x Look in the s@ction in which Agony wea y com there has been a remarkable re- Rese) and the colourings are right
Salt ‘iho WO aame ts Laine | . find what your outlook is, aerre iiaestives ae truth, tol- SPponse, and these West End out of this world. Naturally, un-
Pepper Prin. Ma : Today's = ¥on "idliong Jeading Fashioned Garménts with their usual accessories of this sort are
Mayonnaise. be numbered on the fingers of two $C sarch ‘stage 80 forces ‘for MBhL And remember, “tho idividual a nd distinguished cbtainable at LOUIS BAYLEY'S
san anon oe a seleet all > hands. lips of many shall. bless him that iS styling (including DAY DRESSES) on Bolton Lane and mavbe Ill
S 2 nm. e : . t “ovi 2 j 7 ati sce >
potatoes, aa Mm ogmee oe , to ney nad. to be liberal.” provide elegance in combination see you there
hen

cooked, put them in a
colander, then mash them and add
1 oz. of butter, 4 glass of milk salt
and pepper. Mix the salmon to
the potatoes then pass everything
through a mincer. Put the mix-
ture in a dish and try to give i

. I a a sures the purchaser an all cost VE"yY thril]! indeed — when you
the shape of a fish. Cover with clubbed with her, and been rum- GEMINI To ee ae pn gli deal. Yes, sir! And» here’s how: tive CONSUL! It is CONSUL
a and if you like to oured to her have beén May 21-—June 21 wiueitn ‘ena ye oy energy-building Buy the COLOUR FILM from tha! gives you 5-Stay Motoring
make the dish look even more paired off with seven of the young * or tion are MUST aims now Collins Ltd., and they will develop ®"¢ that literally means: Roomi-
Fae ane, bail Some eggs, cut ladies who also went along. ae ° 7 ; a. cost through their suppliers "¢°s: Comfort; Power; Appear-
dish With them and seme aiiete Job — Quote CANCER f head hi ; clear, mind i”, the United States. The film is ance: Value, A choice of smart
St a ee A a tty "at about K june 22—July 3 \neouinest. Start Oo at church,’ pray- . Teturned tq you as a no mark-up colours can be had from Charles

EGGS IN ANCHOVIES SAUCE
Flour

or
titles or estates; and, most import-
ant of all, they had to be in the
Princess's set;
ble

The limited field of
escorts who have

young men has
taken her to the theatre, night-

x
TAURUS

*« April 21—May 20° first

anyone
Seven of the

“If he shows no tendencies

ing sincerely for guidance anc

Live and lé€t live goes well with think 3

and speak afterwards.
or any group draw you
frpm principles or good practices.

Don't let
away

1 stronger *

with beautiful materials.

~ * *

STEPPING FROM YOUR
KODAK COLOUR FILM from HOME and into your waiting car

COLLINS LTD., in Broad St. en- is, as you've doubtless read, a4



deal and’as yet further indication M¢®nearney & Co, Ltd. dial 4493,

ee,

—







of the Collins Service technique 9" I have my eye on ice-blue
+ Ib. at all we shall put him into 4 taith. Comaider your blessings. for visitors and residents alike. °° - &t $26.75.
1 industry.”
5) ee From Sunny (the Marquis of LEO We know the world through our own ps4 ee oat Ae ad Fanci eee
Milk 1 glass Blandford), who Inly 24—Aug. 22 personality, Said a famous writer. Thus
Butter 2} oz. October, oe David (Lond Outs 7 * 7 We must réalize that developing, nur- THEY'LL SELL ANYTHING, NO GREATER VARIETY OF
Olive Oil 2 tablespoonstul. who got engaged last the turing our _petsonatity, Pe eneene, oa ANYWHERE, FOR ANYONE SHIRTS than those with the
Water 1 tablespoonful list of suitable suitors has dimin- thoughts. guiding our minds is vital. or & Se ye uh el RELIANCE, The astonishing
Fillets of anchovies 1 tin ished until scarcely a house-party in fact, they're doing it right now. range is rich with colour and
Chopped parsley 1 tablespoonful. eg en Be “hot tale Man sights nor even little ae ee of a styles are ‘way ahead of most.
cou a VIRGO ize 4 , as sbue. . (dia The i . Sen \
on t in a saucepan the flour, the widening the Prinowale shealb. i Aug. 23—Sept. 9s revults too much’ fo heart. Recognise — eal’ Estate re Net Shirts are in coffee, lemon
egg, a pinch of salt and mix the 1

milk in it until it will result in a
smooth mixture. Leave every-
thing for a few minutes then add

must be galling for a young wo-
man of obvious intelligence and
charm, with ideas outside her

that the greater you are, the more you
will have to stand criticism. Pray; keep
good humor high.

Agents and Auc- »
tioneers, Regularly listing many of
the Island’s best homes for sale

beige—perfect for tourists at
$3.99. Dazzling prints emphasise
merican styling but





and rent, Realtors Ltd. offer the main at a local 1 ies a
y station, that the few men â„¢* 3 complete home se PO i ee Sebpered
the butter which you have pre- she is allowed to be frendly with LIBRA It is not a day for looking into personal He oi Cttor ints tee aoa $8.80. You's a réeliy coe Te i
viously melted. Take a small are too often not awfully Selarest. Sept. 24—Oct. 23 plans and doings for pure satisfaction. néseibed Alictioneesten. Dement 50. You must really see RELI- ;
frying pan, put the oi] in it and ing to her. Community affairs, public issues, Gov't. ment 4 ANCE SHERTS. | '
ae Sees when the oil is hot pour two table- | And with the kind of mén who issues, are firsts. Start at church. * ’ f ‘
Bes Ait i Pina a a a ene of the periers Move pitas ings to say ae is al- 4 , ° . . : | hi inds those
) ing pan so that the mixture lowed to exe e only the small- irgo: inclinations ina dad Circular stitching rounds Moses:
FORMER AGTRESS Marianne will cover the bottom of the pan. est of small talk a SOORPIO Note Bare pnd ea fois tonnay. SO 17S ENAME: ‘ . _ ¥. DE LIMA’S FOR DIAMONDS ‘ < Maditee ole vans sxe
O'Brien Reynolds ieaves the When 'ready put the omelette on @ I LIKED last week . . . Ovt. s-Wev, #9 similar as ate YOu fo conclusions; pray 2 See TSU WES 2 POOR POTEET... a tly) POO fia
Miavhi Fiau:.Cirensie CoGer alter the kitchen table. Repeat until Servies oa ¥ pow only fine head ne name, beautiful new shipment has been «poked center cup design gives
she Was granted a $2,000,000 set- yOu have quite a lot of small |THE NEW sharp-and-sweet hors ; Sosy eae aaa oad 9.99
} tlement and divorce frory Richard

J. Reynolds tobacce beir The
couple's two young sons were
awdfded t6 the mother She fe-
ceivéd a $750,000 trust fund for

omelettes and the mixture’ is
finished. Fold the omelettes like
handkerchiefs and put therg on a
big dish. Make the sauce as
follows:

ba et - = Italian réstaurant
—paper-thin slices of raw smoked
ham served with fresh green figs, ee ae

system.

SAGITTARIUS some days we don’t feel peppy. If you
don’t relax
only to rébuild energy,

sensibly to review, even

protect nervous *

unpacked and look at it! Tea and
Coffee Sets in Celadon Green an‘
White and in Shell Pink and
\White—don’t they sound gorgeous?
They are! And at Y. de Lima’s

eed in distinctive yellow tins—
dust proof and dry in TWENTY
MINUTES from a cold start, The
coating is fully cured in four hours

wonderful aecentuation; [f you >~
want a really firm lift, Chansorg:
“tte” is for you! In your favorites



and that’s. fast by any standard. ¢re “unusual wall pl: ; in th fabrics. ell
7 irs Melt 1 oz. of butter in a small “I only Ss Tdeal for indoors and out athe ‘Hote wade ter at ae seHwine Matdeiform Brash =
thet oUpORE, 2 ebeternationat) saucepan then add 2 tablespoons- the Palace Garden be- 4€ CAPRICORN people who achieve must appreciate not Blundell’s gives a lasting brilliance. Vases, Aavaaante “feuge and cake al int United
aciadbinnancaasiiialene nese tetnen ; 2Hb.Or Olive-wil; 1 tablespoonful of cause she wore the dress she Dec. 23—Jan. 21 only the big things but the little items. Try it from your dealer, Blundell's » multitude more in as ma Cte arenas Oily 1A te ine
= water, the anchovies, Stir all the had of at Astot.” And sincerely backed by humble prayer is a James Lynch & Co. Ltd., dis i cated ee States of America
ft I time and as soon as the anchovies THE SALESMANSHIP © at tee , ribution . ? * our varieties. They’re on dis- b s
or eus p are dissolved add the parsley and flower shop, en I ordered : * male pee * e play now, P
a B e pour on the omelettles. ihe the gave me a flower AQu. seeesavehe her emphasizes the great- ’ * . ‘ i Pikreie’e maridenform
) © wear—without charge. ARIUS esearc furt er er eat often not é ,
USINEeSs sg or ae one lao fae ie aft oe Se ot rive, Dont lat this bee AN ELECTRIC HOT PLATE is HERE IS THE MAGIC OF THE for every type of figure.
(From JOAN. HARRISON) Eggs 6 fait aniad a i" Bihan ge: ae oy doubt: or contention. Reason must just the grandest thing to have wesT INDIES—a Showroom of atin a ah
: PARIS. Salt (without all that tinned Tiere ir «x prevail, ‘round home, Here's one for $12.12 réative design and local craft—| e @
Christian Dior, the q - Cooked ham 5 oz. plopped into cream whipped = * and a beauty, too! At City Garage Grass Mats from Dominica ad
effacing “genius” of the = Butter 2 oz. with brandy. PISCES le to-day : do not explain there is a splendid selection of $5 any size: ie cal op Pade ied
ie cing. bette “toe ta be- caer “t table mae THE NEW, SERVICE in a big *« = 21—March 20 A goeruch. ea a couple of good hints: * Electrical Appliances including id “yagi seringy “ied
e nothing rT ream ablespoonsfu store. An attendant is rushed u :
come a monk, is setting up busi- : P

Gelatine

Be unbiased as

you review facts on both

Raffia work in Baskets thot



Toasters for $19.12; Electric

OCC
: Irons + ake shopping a pleasure! And wT

with a bath chair t a oi ‘r, listen truly tdjerantly; for $10.09 and a really sensible ss6re a ear :

— Pian mre woe Cooked chicken 5 oz. ping more fun for od Ihe x a = cam ena’ cae y * choice of ELECTRIC FANS at na ; Stas ee Casieke ie. siete JUST RECEIVED
Bare de ; nil ‘ HE CUST = i ; ; sf sunny disposition, cellent: -velive ss he RE a Ci san if i- i AYE

_ Dresses, coats and gowns bear- Break in a bowl 3 eggs. Beat vight view = eae ides YOU BORN DOBAT. a eae _ eee adversities i meg Ma aa = course, here, all under the friendly
ing the luxury tag “Dior” will be them and add 1 pinch of salt. ¢ nch), who, when I complain- goserins ot" enetey ene i will promote worthy causes with raha He i eaad, at ‘janagement of Dominica’s Miss x Dad
on sale in the “better class” shops Make an omelette wide but thin. eq that my bottle had lost its qe with sturdy resolution, ang ne comnnai? of cheery, high- ™ CITY GARAGE CO. LTD, Dangleben in the Dominica $383
in London and the main towns of You will probably need a frying geent; collected it next day for an= tremendous inner energy. Enjoy y end ree cally re
Britain and the Commonwealth as pan of at least 15 inch diameter. ;

minded people, keep busy



at usefi:! activities,





inderaft Company on Bridge St.
i reed sornsbac editor der : ‘ ‘Vial 4015. .
from next February. When the omelette is ready take b> Ate Mle new be it had, and ae strength. ye gel Hugo Gernsback, editor, foun FERROZONE
For Dior, one of the most astute it out of ~~ pan = put it on “THE NEW keep-the-kids-quiet wireless ass’n.. short wave YOU WISH YOU HAD A * * * * CATARRHZONE %
) mei of business in the French greaseproof paper and let it get idea from Vienna, where child » =x *§ x & yu FLOOR CLEANER no doubt. and
fashion world, has launched him- cold, Make another omelette. can dial a number and her * © really a ‘ HOPPER CYCLES are amone DR, HAMILTON PILLS
lf in the “off-the-peg” market Take the ham then and mince ra fairy hey realy good POLISH ss well as , ‘
“He eraRe thé news today in a it, When minced add one ounce 74 bee oe nice mtn A Late Th rants omething for Linoleum and Pur- ./\ 6." %n popes ot \oaeihasiod NERVERUINE ¥
, ae , ; ask.” liture, ate te ane Te AL OS DRY ' . "
quiet, -effacing way over a of butter and 2 tablespoonsful THE CUSTOMER - is - always- “And as to home comforts—the oes sing vin ae blonder POLISHES © in Pas JOHNSON’S 11D. there are bicycles for Ladies ons >
before-lunch drink at one of Paris’s thick white sauce. Mix every- ‘ong, view of the store (British). food, housework, and so on—why, arling, ¥ tibantnns aste Wax for -nq “Men and Boye’and Girls. | sit
luxury hotels (j Or the way thing together and finish’ with 2 n I complained that a belt if you are a good business woman - ¢very day. vs aning; Liquid Wax for furni- The re ys wis,
from his qewihieen, is all for ta sful of cream. had broken its zip inside a week, you are a good organiser, and can “Be tactful,” they warn, “when ture and Glo-Coat for Lino, Tiles, apeve ' enieee machines can be ( CARI TON BROWNE
Bi Ee Take the chicken breast (which they charged 6s, 6d. for putting in keep a businesslike eye on an effi- mee paying the bill, Look the oe ae tee As for CARS a a cncion e Gretn ae Bich as ° x
ior. J % al ” ther way.” . Johnson's CARNU . 2 8 6 ec " r ‘i -
oor Britain—“because”, said is already cooked) mince it, then * eee oes cient housekeeper. r Why Raven they heard that it twenty minutes with i "here are HOPPER TRICYCLES, | Wholesale & Retail = or
Mr, Dior, “it is so regrettable, as add one more ounce of butter, Worrying Book — Quote seldom works out like that? i} gloss. K, J, Hamel-Smith Ltd foo, in Blue or Green, and a call Druggist on .
I have said so many times before, and 1 tablespoonful of white @ IN A WEEK when most people “Tell me, what do you do?’ you phone 4748 are agents for JOHN. [0,428 Will provide details of
that English tee cannot for ee — with 2 tablespoons- were worrying over world-size (From The Critics on the Sav ata party. . . “Nothing much, , a
monetary reasons buy c '

in Paris.”

For the Empire — “because,”
continued Mr, Dior putting him-
self in the plural, ‘we have dreamt
for a long time of the possibilities
of the British Empire for the
French couture.”

Put the ham mixture on. one of
the omelettes. Cover with the
other omelette on which you ‘¢ill
put tie chicken’ mixture. rr
the two omelettes together so that
you almost make a big sausage.
Put the two omelettes in grease-



problems—Is there going to be
germ warfare one day.? WILL
they ever stop fighting in Korea?
DID the Russians get any real
secrets?—it was rather refreshing
to find some people fretting over
the oddest little worries.

radio yesterday)

“This new biography suffers
from foot and note disease.”
From Mr. Whitmey (husband of

Hazel Hammond, managing direc-
tor of a Regent-street store): “I

he replies. “What do you do?” ia
“Oh, my job is terribly dull.

‘They dive with unerring aim.

Why haven't they heard that

Why haven't they heard that |
young mén seldom ask for a kiss?

the interesting terms offered by

SON'S. POLISHES. varbados Foundry Ltd.

Â¥ 136 Roebuck St. Dial 2813
| $596%666660606600660066





endorse. tte b saeried business we when he a the bf am Pt, —— +
For Mr, Dior—who now becomes proof paper and in a napkin and LIKE Colonel Logan Home, who ™®”- , My wife does the cooking one he Bind Tah %
an international dressmaker with put 6n the ice or very near it. is pursuing (“with the help of me Ee a ~~ eg om" ch ee | 2
his Peareices originals in after about 2 hours you can cul thousands of ints”) in- ingers in the garden. ix si gs’? +
Paris, his salon in New York, and the omelettes in small slices 4 inch vestigations into the -damage “Pd rather she didn’t have a | THOUGHT politicians were ty
his off-the-peg and _made-to- thick, caused by “paper tearing by job, but I know she'd be miser- © aed characters. I thought sol-
measure models in d, Aus- a birds.” ... able without it. And it does help gjcrs were unemotional men.
tralia, Cana 7, etc., LIKE the Welsh bird research- as well as ‘foreign markets. Mr, Jeffreys said today: “For who are worr themselves \ But when the politician is de-

The two | men who will some months now we have had Silly trying to discover just how From Mr. Batty (husband cf sane, when the general resigns, ’
manufacture ‘market for the cutters and in Dier #hy bird can fly asfast as the Qhrilstinia Foyle, director of the \ jen the critic goes to a first night
British co will also séll to salons in Paris asia | we eee book firm): “I like having my wife — what happens? Why, they cry
“any other market we can methods. We shall use h Mrs. in business. She understands My |j\ke babies.
get, and we have some foreign girls too, and import French @ DO TOP businéss executives point of view about work, and she “Many of Senator Taft’s men,” Xi
buyers already lined ol materials. British materials will _make,good wives? never brings any bossiness home.” | ead last week, “were openly in :

The two men, . Coleman also be used of course, Oh yes, Last week the census revealed tears.” |
Jeffreys arid Mr. Mareel Fenez, both the British Board of Trade that nearly half the 160,000 women @ WHAT A STRANGE world at
looked the picture of two vefy and the French Government are bosses in and are mi b they live in—the ople who “When Eisenhower had finished per yar
happy men today. delighted about the whole thing,” And here, m three men who write those books on The Art of jj; speech of farewell,” said a re-

. Je sis already the married to the £5,000-a~ Being Attractive. cent report, “there were scarcely ,

director of r dress firm The dresses, coats, gowns and type of woman boss are the fase “Remember,” they advise,
“Lady in Black. will con- suits will be shown in London in band-views: —

tinue as a completely separate
business.

The new eompany, the name of
wh is i. po be se for
another w mi dresses
in England With Dior-trained
workers.

/

December. Then they will be on
sale all over Britain in February
1958. Prices’ will -range from
about £30 to £80. Mr. J s
says they will be available at
better class’”’ shops for the “upper
income groups.”

" always enjoy talking
about themselves at a party. Get
them on to the subject of their
work and they will chat quite
happily.”

"7 't worry,” they say, “if he
doesn’t kiss you goodnight. If he
is really fond of you he’s prob-

Mr. Halford (hi of
Elsie Walker, director of 4 gar-
dén-equipment firm): “T Itke hav-
ing a business woman as a wife.
She’s automatically more interest-

ing than one w stagnates at
home.





avy dry eyes among those iad

heard him.”

“And then, as Margot Fonteyn
came torward and danced,” wrote
a critic the other day, “I had to,

shake away the tears.”
Imagine that!
—LE-S.

hag - ae

POLISOL



AND NOW ?

. you en have

cee : r
Leelica. lovolioa 4 A GAS COOKER

, A e
like those you have admired in ‘ \ vf p ob 99
. the magazines. 0 7
° SEE THEM TO-DAY .... :



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a



SUNDAY, AUGUS

PAGE EIGHT

nage

BARBADOS sil ADVOCAT

Printed by the Advecate Co., Lid. Brew* ét. Aridyetews

17, 1952

Fede sal Gevernment

THE undignified, squawking which has
been reported in the Press as emanating
from leading politicians of ‘the West In
dies on the subject.of federation indicates
how far the West’Indies have travelled
from realisation of what is meant by
federal government.

When agreement was reached at Mon-
tego Bay in September 1947 as to the type
of closer political association which might
be acceptable to the individual British
Caribbean governments the essential prin-
ciple of federation was better understood,

The resolution which was responsible
for all the action which has taken place
since that date towards the formation of a
political federation speaks of a federation
in which each constituent unit retains
complete control,over all matters except
those specifically’ assigned to the federal
government,

While it is perfectly true that this phrase-
ology permits of the formation of a politi-
cal association in which so little control is
left to the constituent units that the feder-
al principle is violated ab initio, no such in-
tention, it may be thought, existed in the
minds of those responsible for drafting the
resolution.

The federal form of government and not
the unitary form of governrnent was spe-
cifically selected as the form of govern-
ment most suited to cémmunities with
their own traditions and practises of local
government.

Yet there fever has been absent from
the minds of some of the most ardent
champions of closer political association
an idea of West Indian government which
ought more properly to be described as
unitary. .

The impatience of certain types of Eng-
lishmen with the looseness and often in-
efficiency of administration 1n the British
Caribbean islands has often led them to
champion what they have trippingly de-
scribed as federation when their state-
ments make it clear that what they mos!
ardently advocate is West Indian unitary
government,

One such Englishman is on record as
having said in Barbados that the Secretary
of State should announce at a given date
and hour ‘that there would be a political
federation of the West Indies and on that
date at that hour federation: would come
into being.

The fact that that particular Englishman
was at the time seeking election to the
British Parliament ought not to blind any-
one as to the essential stupidity of his re-
mark.

By the very definition of the federal
principle it is impossible for a political
federation to be forced upon any collection
of states. A unitary government can be
forced upon states or a totalitarian gov-
érnment can be introduced against the
will of peoples but it is impossible to have
a federal government unless federal gov-
ernment is sought by the constituent units
of the proposed federation.

Professor Wheareé in his book on Feder-
al Government states that unless the com-
munities or states concerned desire to be
under a single independent government
for some purposes the question of federal
government does not arise,

Unprejudiced students of the statements
which have been made for some years and
which more recently are being made by
West Indian spokesmen on the subject of
what is called federation must have been
struck by the absence of emphasis in most
of these statements on the federal princi-
ple and of the reasons for choosing a fed-
eral rather than a unitary form of govern-
ment as a model for closer political associa-
tion of the West Indies,

There are many persons who consider
that a federal government would add to
the costs of administration without cur-
tailing the importance of iocal govern
ments and who consider that closer poli-
tical association of the British Caribbean
ought to be based on a unitary system of
government. This emphasis is illustrated
by the tendency towards actual unification
and by recommendations for the unifica-
tion of certain services and activities in
recent years. This idea’ of unification and
centralisation which has found great sup-
port from outsiders who are brought sud-
denly up against the untidy loose ends of
West Indian administration has been quite,
wrongly used since 1947 as an argument in
favour of political federation when in fact
it is an argument in favour of unitary gov-
ernment.

More recently statements of West Indian
politicians show how far the leaders of po-
litical thought have travelled away from
the federal principle of government.

Mr. Adams’ expressed distaste for any
but a socialist federation is another exam-
ple of the deviation from the federal prin-
ciple towards the unitary conception of
political association, Because in a truly
federal government socialist states can
exist quite happily under Liberal or Con-
federal governments and the

true

servative
converse is

The federal form of government makes
adequate provision for this gpparent para-
dox.

A government is federal states Profes-
sor Wheare in the work mentioned above
when it embodies predominantly “a divis-
ion of powers between general and re-
gional authorities, each of which in its
own sphere is co-ordinate with the others
and independent of them.”

The Federal form of government pre-
supposes a certain desire to unite for
specified purposes but the advantage of
federal as opposed to unitary government
is that it permits “variety and independ-
ence in matters where unity and uniform-
ity is not essential. Local politics are
among the matters where unity and uni-
formity is not essential.

There is of course even under federal
government a constant temptation to de-
viate in the direction of unitary govern-
ment and the federal principle sometimes
has to be modified by voluntery consent of
the constituent states or communities of a
federation.

But under federation there is room “for |

each region to govern itself in its own
way”.

Neither Mr. Adams insistence on social-
ist communities as prerequisites of feder-
ation nor Mr. Bustamante’s colourful bid
for West Indian leadership are reconcil-
able with the federal principle of govern-
ment.

The statements of these two leading po-
liticians seem to be prompted by a con-
ception of political association which is
closer in ideology to a totalitarian or at
best unitary form of government than to
a government based on the federal prin-
ciple of “dividing powers so that the gen-
eral and regional governments are each
within a sphere, co-ordinate and inde-
pendent.”



Outdoor Films

A SUGGESTION at this time of year
that open-air cinemas would add consider-
ably to the amenities of Barbadian recre-
ational life might be greeted by hoots of
derision from the majority of cinema go-
ers.

Yet only last week in the spacious
grounds of one of the larger Barbadian
homes a most pleasing outdcor cinema en-
tertainment was provided under a starry
sky.

Private guests in a Barbadian home are
not likely to complain should the heavens
suddenly open and precipitate the heavy
rainfalls for which the tropics are justly
renowned. Such happenings are but the
accidents of normal social intercourse and
add zest and sparkle to the excitement of
living.

But cinema fans in the “pit” sense of the
word are notoriously opposed to the civil-
izing refinements which make polite social
intercourse such a tolerable exercise: they
can employ shrieks and catcalls to express
disapproval of the most orainary lapses
which are not impossible occurrences in
local cinemas.

Under a starry sky their excitement and
noisy camaraderie might posgibly be assu-
aged to the great satisfaction of other
patrons of the cinema.

But who cannot imagine the hullaballo
and the expletives which would result
from the sudden cascade of waters from
above in the middle of some exciting west-
ern movie?

Perhaps some such prudent considera-
tion for the ears of their more refined
patrons and for the skins of their more tur-
bulent fans has prevénted the owners of
cinemas in Barbados from following other
hot countries and ‘providing open air
cinemas,

Such tender solicitude for their patrons
will no doubt be appreciated and the im-
proved standards of Barbadian cinemas
show that like all other cornmercial con-
cerns the cinema industry considers the
customers always to be right.

On the other hand how is it possible to ex-
plain the fact that Barbadians whose at-
tendance at race meetings, exhibitions,
cricket matches, athletic sports and other
outdoor functions reveals their natural lik-
ing for outdoor entertainments should be
considered by cinema proprietors as incap-
able of enjoying films except in closely
walled hot cinema houses?

The fact that rain does fall sufficiently
often in Barbados to make some type of
sliding roof essential ought riot to obscure
the other fact that on most. nights of the
year there is no rain.

It may be of course that the patronage
of cinemas by Barbadians is considered to
be so satisfactory by the cinema proprie-
tors that the introduction of so obvious an
amenity as an open air cinema is thought
an unnecessary device for attracting per-
sons to the cinema. If that is so the initia-
tive for effecting a change 1s unlikely to
come from the cinema proprietors.

Can it be therefore that most cinema
goers themselves regard open air cinemas
as undesirable and would not use the in-
fluence which their patronage of cinemas
commands to support the pleas of those
who desire to see films in open air cinemas?

Now at any rate is an opportunity for
those who consider that open air cinemas
would add to the social amenities of the
island to say so in letters to tne Press or in
any other suitable manner. Certainly
there exists a body of opinion in Barbados
favourable to the showing of films in ‘open
cinemas, If it became more vocal, the end
might be achieved.



SUNDAY ADVOCATE

SUNDAY, AUGUST 17, 1952



The man who

keeps Barbados

laughing on

According to Census re-
turns there are 1,702,000 more
women than men in Great
Britain today.

According to observation of
newspaper photographs long
before the Olympic Games
most of them appear to be
marching, running, hopping,
skipping and jumping, bang-
ing drums, blowing trumpets,
yelling at women recruits on
parade grounds and hurling
men over their shoulders in
wrestling bouts,

E are the surp:us femaies
we don’t know what to do
So we bang our drum, ta-ra-ra-
tum-tum
And we blow our trumpets, too.
We blow till our cheeks are
purple
We bang till our ears are deaf
On parade we shout till our eyes
pep out
“Lef, right, lef’, right, lef.”
We are the surplus females
We dont know what to do
We skip and hop till we fall
down, flop
We jump like a kangaroo,

{Till our lungs and heart are
bursting
We run, run, run, run, run,
On parade we yell “Wake up

that gel’ —
It’s all such jolly good fun,
;We are the surplus females
We don’t care if we’re wed
If we cant marry we'll raise
Old Harry
And bang our drums instead.
In judo and jiu-jitsu
We give the chaps what for

Over they go with an expert
throw,

Bang, bang, bang on the floor.

Blow, blow, blow went the
trumpet

Bang, bang, bang went the
drum

Jiu-jitsu, and the same to you
Rum-tiddy-tum-tum-tum,
You can chase us round Helsinki
As) we run, run,, run, rup, run,
For we are the surplus girly with
a purpose—



Some people, when they give
half a crown to an old man in the
street, wonder how far it will go
to keep him in these days of rising
costs of ‘living. Most of them, I
am sure, do not realise that for
half a crown @ man can sleep for
15 nights or half a month in a
shelter in Bridgetown which is run
especially for those who cannot
afford to pay more than 4 cents
a night for lodging.

The Shelter night service
was started four years ago by
the Salvation Army in Reed
Street.

It is part of a Hostel building
and there is accommodation for
70 men in the shelters and 25 in
the Hostel. .

The shelter beds are canvas
cots and guests have a choice of
two prices, For 6 cents a man
can sleep in a downstairs room
with a wooden floor: for 4 cents
the cot is placed on a concrete
floor, This seems to be the major
difference. In both the 6 cents
and the 4 cents rooms the men
sleep on separate cots but in the
same room. Washing and toilet
facilities are provided but no
cooking is allowed on the Hostel
or shelter premises.

Upstairs the old living rooms
of former Salvation Army Offi-
cers have been neatly divided into
two lots of cubicles.

Fifteen of these cubicles are
rented for $1.20 a week each and
ten are rented for $1.00 a week
each,

Both types are simply fur-
nished with beds, but the five
shilling cubicles are in the front
part of the building and receive
more light. I peeped into one
of each of the two types of cubi-
cles and for the price I have seen
no better accommodation any-
where in the world.

Their patrons must think the
same, and I found one pleasant
spoken mason enjoying his milk
and bread luncheon in the pri-
vacy of his own cubicle, although
there is a large room outside
where guests of the hostel can
relax, play games or listen to the
radio,

I suppose a carping person
could complain that there is an
old look about the Salvation
Army Hostel and’ Shelter in Reed
Street, that the walls and the
ceilings could do with new paint
or distemper and that the toilet
and bathrooms could be kept in
more spotless condition, I sup-
pose they could, But does the
carping person stop to think that
for less than 18 cents a night a
Man can sleep in comfort and,
alone in a grade one cubicle of
the Hostel and for less than 15
cents a night in a cubicle almost
as good? ea

How many people in days like
these when everyone complains
of the rising cost of living can
provide themselves with amen-

Sundays
















































’

We're all such jolly good fun.

Mustache In Flames

IE report that the moustache

belonging to Dr, Warren K.
Sinelair, physicist at a London
hospital, became radioactive
@fter research work, will once
R ore focus attention on Tovarich
ft de to you) the famous in-
giowing moustache belonging to
doe Stalin.

At one time, it was believed
that Tovarich, described as in-
growing because of its concave
construction, was used as a small
store for food in case of famine.

It was also faceticusly suggested
here that, as Stalin is so fond of
animals, it was used as a home
for orphaned baby mice.

It can now be revealed that
Tovarich became radioactive after
the first Russian atomic explosion,

Although any food stored there
became uneatable soon afterwards,
and any refugee baby mice must
have been killed instantly, Tova-
rich has now become Stalin’s
secret weapon No, 1 in the difficult
task of maintaining a nation-wide
belief in his divinity,

As it is always hard to believe
in a live god who marries, be-
comes a father, and smokes a pipe,

there were times when even
the, simplest Russian soldier,
peasant, or worker had _ his

doubts.

3ut when Stalin had a Geiger
counter made in the shape of a
pipe whieh ticked, crackled, and
threw off sparks when it touched
Tcovarich, doubting moujiks were
shamed into awed silence, and
even knowing comrades within
the sacred circle were impressed.

Later on Tovarich was fitted
with concealed strip lighting, the
pipe was fitted with an electric
battery, and unbelievers were
down on their knees, banging their
foolish heads on the stones of
the Red Square, when they saw the
first illuminated moustache in the
world.

At Tovarich

once burst into

R’y George Hunte

ities as good as those of the
Salvation Army Hostel in Reed
Street for as little expenditure?
Yet despite the cheapness of the
host the charity of ‘he shelter (since
the poorest begger can be assured
of 4 cents a day for his enter-
prise) I was cheered to learn that
there is no need to turn away
men from the shelters, and that
these are filled up only on special
oceasions when yisiters from the
country earry on their celebra-
tions to such a Jate hour that
they miss their last bus home.

To some extent, the Salvation
Army Hostel and Shelter pro-
vides a guide to the extent of
poverty in our midst. Many of
the patrons of the shelter are un-
employed persons looking for
work, but the fact that the shel-
ters are not overcrowded suggests
that the number of men in
Barbados with nowhere to sleep
is limited,

This of course ought not to be
a subject for facile congratula-
tions becausé you don’t have to
leave the * neighbourhood of
Reed Street to see people living
in far less pleasant surroundings
than those of the Salvation Army
Hostel upstairs, But if the ability
to find 4 cents a night is indica-
tive of the lowest social level to
which a Barbadian man can fall,
then it is hard to believe that
any man need go without shelter
in the island, thanks to the
Salvation Army,

The Barbados Government con-
tributes $720 per year to the
Salvation Army to help them
Yrith their social work, The
Government indeed owes a
special debt to the Army for the
assistance rendered by the Army
in previous years in. the-field—of
probation and juvenile delin-
quency. Quite recently Capt.
Brooks from the London Head-
quarters of the Army spent
several years in Barbados training
local © government officers _, in
probation methods and the local
government has taken over this
important social service from the
Army.

Other social work which the
Army has carried on in Barbados
in the past included a soup
kitchen at which free meals were
distributed, and the provision of
a women’s shelter with accommo-
dation for about fifty.

The Army has been operating
in Barbados since 1898 and its
present headquarters building
@vas erected in 1911,

Reed Street is the headquarters
of a division which operates in
the Leeward and Windward
Islands and extends as far north
as the British and American
Virgin Islands. Responsible for
this large area is Major Walter
Morris, a Jamaican who, until



Our Readers Say:

Major Stop Ahead
To the Editor, The Advocate;
SIR,—Last Thursday two
}gentlemen and I were engaged in
ja conversation at the sign post
}which marked Hillaby Via Dukes,
| B’town via Shop Hill and Bennetts
via Bucks (thia corner is comm@en-
ly called Wheeler Corner) A
jlorry containing a molasses tank
came up the junction

(Bennetts one of the gentlemen

BED FOR FOUR CENTS.

————————————————

CANASTA PLAYING CARDS
(Complete with Instructions)... ..



per Set
PATIENCE PLAYING CARDS ‘
72e, per Set

a»
ADVOCATE STATIONERY

flames owing to a fuse, fire extin-!
guishers are now kept handy on
Stalin's table at all banquets.

Juju For All

Now that South Africa's
witch doctors. are obliged to
qualify at a new college at
Johannesburg because leading
medicine men complained. that
‘there were quac
in the profession, we can on
wait hopefully for the day
when their services are free

under a National Heaith
Service,

When that day comes, the
witch doctor’s consulting

room will be full of people

demanéling free ¢pells cast
on undesirable relatives.

ND what can I do for you
today, Miss?

I want my aunt turned into a
wart hog,

Only last week I turned your
uncle into a wart hog.

Yes, but auntie’s lonely.

All right, I'll cast the spell this
evening,

And, doctor, You remember
you turned my pretty cousin
ee ugly witch?

oO.

Well, she’s lost her broomstick.
You want a prescription for a



new broomstick?
Yes, please, doctor, She feels
awful without it, And -can I

have some newts’ eyes to turn
my stepmother into a toad?

Newts’ eyes don't turn. step-
mothers into toads. You meun
frog’s livers.

I read somewhere that newts’
eyes are better.

People like you are the curse
of our profession. You think you're
half a witch doctor,

If yowre going to be rude I
shall go to somebody who's
more obliging,

Oh, have it your own way,
Here’s a prescription for 101
newts’ eyes. If they turn yow
stepmother into a rogue elephan
don’t blame me.


































































—LES. rrators, Bendix Automatic Washers, Vacuums, Irons snd

Bedside Lamps & Fans provides the opportunity to. create :
the Home Electric. Pie

recently was doing Salvation
Army Work in British Guiana,

Territorial Caribbean Head-
quarters of the Salvation Arm)
is in Kingston and the work done
in Barbados is only a small portior
of the work performed in thc
Caribbean.

In Kingston and Nassau fo:
example the Army has been doing
valiant work on behalf of the
Blind and not long ago the Gov-
ernor of Jamaica opened two new
wings of the Salvation Army
Institute for the Blind which haa
been built with a grant of £12,500
provided through the Colonia,
Development and Welfare Organi-
sation. In Panama and Haiti toc
the Army are assisting the blind
and in Haiti special assistance i.
being given in the medical fielc.
and with projects designed tc
promote economic development.

The excellent work being done
in Reed Street is therefore only a
small part of the social services
which the Army is conducting
throughout the whole Caribbean
region. Because of its international
organisation and because of the
vein of true Christian charity
which inspires all their work the
Salvation Army in Barbados is
able to apply knowledge ana
standards of service which have
been obtained from many year:
of practical experience in mos
countries of the world,

It is against this wide back-
ground that the social work being
done in Reed Street must be placed
and if it seems to the carping
eritic that there has been a restric-
tion of Salvation Army social
activity in the island in recent
years it must be remembered not
only that the government has
taken over one of their most im-
portant functions—probation work
and the treatment of juvenile
delinquents—but that other areas,
like Haiti for instance have need:
far greater than our own,

Meanwhile the Hostel = anc
Shelter for men in Reed Stree
remains to remind all who ar
anxious to assist their fellowme:
that there is work to be done ir
Barbados at the four cents and si?
cents level and that the mania for
expensive community halls anc
costly playing fields may not bk
our greatest need at present
however good they are.

The Hostel and Shelter in Reec
Street caters only for men, Ough
there not to be some similar insti-
tution for women? ‘

The Army tried but failec
because of lack of funds.

A casual stroller along thi
streets in the Reed Street neigh-
bourhood may well ask whethe:
some of the huge sums which arc
being spent on some of the presen”
“shop-window” types of socia)
work might not be channellec
towards the four cents portion o
the female community.



DaCosta & Co, Ltd.

| THIS IS FOLLOWED
BY AN ICE-COLD



via Bucks) at a very fast rate,
end entered the Major road with
the same speed, without having
the least thought for any vehicle
turning the Corner (Hillaby via
Dukes to B‘town) I am quite sure
that if any vehicle was turning
the corner at that time, a very
serious accident would have taken
place

About three quarters of
hour later, the lorry returned and
stopped the

an Why not?

driver and asked him, ‘Young
man do you have any respect fo:
your life? Are you aware that

this is an extremely dangerous
corner, now the canes blocked
this sight of the various roads?
He replied, ‘Sir, I admit that

was driving fairly fast on account
of being late, but on the other
hand, no majorstop is there.’

CANADA DRY GINGER

MIXED WITH A BRACING

GOLD BRAID

TO ENJOY THE FINEST VACATION
JOHN HAYWOOD,





fy

. SUNDAY, AUGUST 1

1952



Liverpool’s Little

4



By PAUL
FOSTER



“Advocate” Staff» Reporter, now
* on ae Scholarship
A England.

The City: of Liverpoo] has a
Population of 800,000 and it is
estimated that 18,000 of these are
Migrants fron frica, West Indies,
China, Indid, Arabia, Malaya and
to “a lesser tent, a fiw other
countries. Of “this number’ the
majority. are Africans, West In-

and Chinese follow in that
order, :

on < e

“Neither the Colonial, Office nor
the Home keep any sep-
arate record of the large nufn-
bers of “migrants who arrive in
Liverpool from the West Indies
vand Africa. No exact figures can
be given, for, as British subjects
they travel om British passports
It is similarly difficult to estifmate
the number of Jamaicans, Bar-.
badians etc., who have settled in
this city. f \

During the years immediately
following the war, ships brought
a large number of “free travel-
lers” to Britain. In 1948, 132 landed
in Liverpool, but the numbers
dropped to 98 in 1949 and in 1950
the gross total of stowaways into
the whole of the country was
cnly 425 and only a fraction of
these came to Liverpool. Last year,
the country’s “illegal -entrants”
numbered 176. Therefore it can be
paid that. the majority of these
people are migrants and not
stowaways, —

Most of the coloured colonial
workers of the city live in the
Upper’ Parliament Street area. In
this street and its surroundings,
a growing population is springing
up. It iS-said that their housing

‘est



Three West Indians stop for a chat along Upper Parliament Street, Liverpool

conditions are not good, but then,
neither are the conditions of their
fellow English. workers, through
the general housing shortage.

When I visited the home of a
Barbadian worker who lives on
this. street, I found that as re-
gards cleanliness the rooms were
kept just as well as other houses
I visited tenanted by English peo-
ple in a higher income bracket.
This however is not a typical ex-
ample of the general conditions
in this area; but then the houses
of their fellow workers, born in
this country are no better.

liverpool is in s-veral ways
however, endeavouring to help the
colonial workers who migrate to



. JAN I ) YOUTH (left) and two West Indian boys walk along
‘ Upper Parliament Street, Liverpool.

“IN A FINE

READY-MADE

% SUIT

GENTS’ SUITS

in Worsteds, Tropicals,

Tweeds and Linens

Full American Drape

Style
@
SPORTS JACKETS

2 and 3 Button Styles,

with Patch Pockets
in Brown, Blue, Grey

and/Fawn |;
Prices from $18.50 up
e
_, TROUSERS *

in Worsted, Grey Flannel,

Linen, White and
Khaki Drill

e
DRESSING GOWNS

in Flowered Designs and

Plain Colours

e
TOWELLING BATH ROBES
in Checked and Striped

Patterns



_ HARRISON'S © Bra st





We are the Sole Stockists, locally

for the Famous e
7”





SHOE



———



LIVINGSTONE YARD,

a Barbadian who lives in Liverpool.

England and settle in the city. So
too are they assisting colonial stu-
dents who come to study at the
university.

Stan ey House on Upper Par-
liament Street which operated as
a Social Centre during the war
and the immediate post-war years
re-opened* last month. C. W.
Mcugne, a 40-year-old Londoner
has been appointed Warden at
Stanley House after eight years
work at the British Council, Al-
ready a g¥mnatium is being fit-
ted up at their headquarters and
they have a cricket field in an-
other part of the city. I undcr-
stand that it is hoped to gâ„¢
Stanley House teams established
in the field of competitive sport
in Liverpcol. Boys Clubs, affi-iated
to the Liverpool Boys’ Associa-
tion is also to be attempted.

Another plan is the provision of
residential accommodation at Stan-
ley House, where students may
live while training in Liverpool.
or where coloured migrants may
become acclimatised to their new
country.
the city, the

of the East
Council,

is also in
Liverpool Committee
and West Friendshiy
whose representatives welcome
every Colonial and Eastern ;stu-
dent. By keeping in touch with
the university, the British Council
and the passport offices, advance

There

information that a_ student
coming over i§ often obtained and
a letter of welcome and an ex-
planation of conditions here sent
before he leaves home.

All ships, trains and ‘planes on
which students are known to be
traveling are met. Friendly ad-
vice and help is given to the new
arrivals. They are introduced to
local families and, later on, holi-
days are arranged for them,

is

Before ieaving Liverpool, I took
a walk through Upper Parliament
Street. Stanley House was not yet
open, so instead my first stop
was “George Wilkies Club,” whica
is a few yards from the Rialto
Cinema on Parliament Street—a

spot well known to any West In-
dian seaman who has visited
Liverpool.

George Wilkie is perhaps the

best known West Indian in Liver-
pool. Born in British Guiana cf
Barbados parentage, George now
runs this club at 64 Upper Parlia-
ment Street, and, it is the general
meeting place for most of the
coloured folk in Liverpool. He was

in Barbados about a year ago on
a Visit.
One of his right hand men is

Barbados born Archie Husband
who, when I asked him where he
came from said in a broad Bar-
badian accent “Man I is a Welsh-
mun.” Archie, who has been living
in England for 40 years, “sweags
allegiance’ to Wales. “I've been
up here through all the hard
dimes,” he told me, “But I've got

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

ee ecm

Indies

Archie 22-year-old
phew, John of Herh--*t
Hus! ands of Barbados) at present
in England—a law student at
Kings College Newcastle. One day,
Archie hopes to return Bar-
bados

by.” has

(son

n

to

Outside the club, I met Living-
rto:e Yard, a 33-year-old Bar-



badian, whese prrents live in
n w Lane, St. Michael, He has
two brothers and three sisters
living. at home.

Livingstone came to England
when he was 20. He worked his
way up on a Dutch boat and has
been » s€aman every since

Yurd spent most of his boy-
hood days on Burke’s Beach, Bay
Stre wher he was given the

ime of “Sandow” (becaus?
his sturdy figure). He is still

wo by this name to his friends.

Before leaving home and for a
short time after arriving in Eng-
land. h
K q his

was boxing

‘ m rr.cd an Bnglich gi
ia Occobsr 1940 and they live i
216 Upper Parliament Street, They
have no children,

Asked what he thought about
England, Yard replied he had no
comp-aints. “Providing you are
willing te work you will get on.’
He also hopes to return home on
a visit one day.

Some other Barbadians living
in Liverpool are Basil Skeete,
Basil Headley and Hilborn Gay.

Skeete who is 33 comes from
Nelson Street. He is married with
three children. He is a fitter at
Camerlairds Shipping Yards, Bir«-
enhead. Headiey is from Christ
Church while Gay's home is in
Dunlow Lane, St. Michael, Gay is
single, at present unemployed and
drawing £2. 8. 6. a week, National
Assistance Allowance. He has been
in England since 1949,

It is difficult to get a general
picture as to what a West Indian

worker thinks about conditions
in England. Each has a differeat
answer, Some like Wilkie, Hus-

bands and Yard have relatively no
complaints, while others, such as
Philip Noel a native of Trinidad,
do not advocate West Indians
coming to this country to settle.
Noel says “tell the boys to stay
at home—don’t come to England.’
Noel has been in England since
the war and is learning to be a
dispenser. While transportaticn i
expensive Noel hopes to return to
his homeland within a few year
“when I’m qualified in my job.”

Personally I’m inclined to agree
with Noel “boys stay at home”
West Indians in any walk of life
have a happier existence than
their counterparts in this coun-
try, even taking into consider -

tion Britain as a “welfare state”
handing out National Assistance,



A BLOCK OF FLATS on Upper Parliament Street (opposite the
Rialto Cinema) where many West Indians live.

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OTHER FATS

AND OIL if |
The Oi Palm |

By ECONOMIST |

rhe o.1 palm, as it is generally
alled, is not to be confused witn
the coconut palm and is indigen-
ous to West Africa. The collectic.
of the fruit and the extraction of
me ol are important activities
hose African territgries where the
Palm occurs in a natural state
Authorities think that the self-
sown palm exists at its best
the Congo with Nigeria a
second, Vense forests exist onl
the coastal regions; in other areas,
it may be found singly or in clu:-
ters on the sites of old cultivation
It occurs also in parts of Ea
Africa but transport condition
have hitherto preyented its ex-
ploitation to any extent. In th
part of the world the palm occu:
in the Amazon region but this a1
is thought unlikely to become

close

‘source of supply as the fatty mat-
& er content of the oil is lower tha
e tried his hand at boxing. he West African.



The oil palm has been introduced
vio the East Indies and is assuc-
& increasing importance in thot
gion as a plantation crop, Much

f this introductory work is credit-
ed to the Dutch, Plantations now
exist in Sumatra, Java, Cochin

China and Malaya. Many types or
varieties are recognised and breed-
ing work has been undertaken
with a view to fixing the best types. |
The question whether it were bet- |
ter to grow the palms in large |
plantations or on native owned
farms as in West Africa appears to

be a contreversial one. With the|
coconut well established in the!
West Indies, oil

may have little interest for us
although it may conceivably prov
a valuable economic addition in
neighbouring continental territor-
ies in situations where the coconut
seems unlikely to thrive. Select
strains have been introduced :

|

t

\

palm ft ea

British Guiana and experimental
results are promising. Labour for
collecting and handling may be a
problem since the fruit bunches
or ‘heads’ do not lend themselves
to the comparatively easy methods
of the coconut, are more easily
damaged with prejudicial effects
on the quality of the oil due to
fermentation and = rancidity. In
this connection too native method
of handling and oil extracting vary
with consequent lack of uniform
ity in the final product.

The fruit bunches vary from a
few pounds in weight to as much
as 150 Ib; the individual fruit
also vary in size and, in some re-
spects, resemble the olive. The
products are two: (1) palm oil
from the outer fleshy pulp or peri-
carp; (2) kernel oil from the ker-
nels proper, the lesser by volume
of the two but generally of highe:
quality, The former has to be ex- |
tracted on the spot and, since
there is a great deal of fibrous |
matter in the pulp, some difficul
ties exist. Modern machines a1 |
now available for the purpose. Th
fibrous residue has little valu
The dried kernels are usually ex-
ported for crushing and treatmen'
ir modern mills, the oil thus ex-
tracted being of a high standard
quality. The residue is used as a
feeding stuff, |



Much palm oil, that is the peri-
earp oil, is consumed in West|
Africa as food. It is, of course, also |
an important export and used,
principally in the manufacture of |
soap and candles as well as in
other ways where quality is not
vital, The kernel oil, like that of |
the coconut, is used in food pro- |
ducts, but improvement in the
preparation and quality of the pulp
oil makes it equally valuable for |
margarine and cooking fats. Both |
palm and kernel oil are important !
commodities in world trade and
industry, especially so with more;
settled post-war conditions emerg- |
ing in Europe, notably in Germany
which has always. been a large
consumer.

@ On Page 10



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PAGE NINE

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PU DIT TABORE,

PAGE TEN



nents CtiNtet ttt.

~ TALKING TURTLE

By IAN GALE

Before we get too involved let
me explain whai I mean by turtle
For me a turtle is a thing that
Swimy in the sea as distinct from
the landlubberly tortoise, or as my
Oxford Diétionary says: “A marin:
reptile emcased as tortoise and
with flippers used in swimming.

To be-more exact, the Encylo-
paedia Britannica says: “Chelo-
nidae. Marine turtles, with only
two recerit. genera, with three
widely distributed species. The

limbs are paddle-shaped,) with
only one or two claws
and ‘the shell is covered witli
horny — shields. The neck is
short .and incompletely retractil-
The. parietals, post _ frontals

squamosals, quadrato-jugals, anc
jugals are much expanded an:
form an additional false roc
over the, temporal region of th«
skull. The Cheloniaae are a high
ly specialized off shoot of th
Cryptodifa, adapted to marin
life. Fundamentally they agre
most with thé Testudinidae, an
there is nothing primitive abou.
them except that they still posses
complete series of inframargina
shields,”.....m——other words, the
Chelonidae“are sea tortoises or »:

we say, les. To confuse the
issue 1 is known a
tortoiseshell~

Having said something about
turtles in general let us turn to
turtles in particular and deal firs!
with the species that i¢ most often
caught off these shares+-the green
turtle. Without doubt the srcen
turtle is the most important oj
all turtles from an €conomi
point of view. It is the source of
the famous turtle soup, and the
species indeed is eaten as well a
drunk By man the world ove:
Tt is the basis of extensive in-
dustries and tens of thousands o/
dollars worth of specimens are
sold annually in the markets of
the large cities.

Oil is made- both the turtle
and its eggs,“but the shell has
only a low commercial value, bein,
too thin for most purposes,

The green turtle has a world
wide distribution in tropical and
subtropical seas, usually remain-
ing within 35 degrees of the
Equator. Green turtle are found
near shoals and lagoons of oc@anic
islands, especially off sand beaches,
their browsing method of feeding
off fields of s@a being also a strong
determining factor in their
habitat preference.

Just where 8 nd how this turtle
sleeps is the most interesting



the front pair throwing the sand
out by swimming movements and
then resting while the hind pair
io their work. After depressions
have been made fore and aft, the
digger revolves enough to change
the’ centre of action and thus
finally works herself into the re-
sulting bowl-shaped excavation.

Next she digs the egg pit, a far
more delicate procedure, j
secondary excavation is a cylin-
drical hole some eighteen inches
deep and twelve or more across.
The sand is removed by strokes
of the @dge of the flippers used
alternately, difficulty rapidly in-
creasing with depth. Finally the

flipper must be curled inward,
gently lowered, undercurled and
forced into the sand by skilful
pushes until a load has been dis-
lodged. Then the tip is again

curled te completely enfold the
sand and bring it out, often with
loss of scarcely a grain.

When the turtle is rgady to lay,
the hind flippers are brought to-
ucther, hiding the tail and cover~
ing the mouth of the pit, Usually
two eggs are ejected at a time.

As soon as the laying is com-
pleted the nest is filled in, the hind
flippers patting and kneading the
sand into the nest. Then she
returns to the water. This nesting
process takes an average of two
hours.”

The eggs, which resemble ping-
pong balls, take about twe months
io hateh, The mother turtle never
comes back and the hatchings
have to make their own way to

for protection, and during such
times hunters readily catch them

Fishermen in these parts find
that they catch more Hawksbi!l
turtles if they sink their nets to
the bottom rather than let therm
float on the surface. At one time
the shell brought a very good price,
but now that plastic materials
have come of age the price per
pound of shell has dropped con-
siderably.

The largest of living turtles ‘s
the Leatherback, a few of which
have been landed here from time
to time. Not 1 ago a turtle of
this species weighing 1,450 pounds
was secured near Vancouver
Island. The Leatherbaek, which a
it name suggest has its shell cov-
ered with smooth skin instead of
horny shields, is of no economic
value.

Finally to get back to the green
turtle and to Ligon, who wrote
the first History of Barbados
about 1650. He says “The green
turtle is the best food that the
sea affords but I have seen vert
few of them in Barbados,. and
those neither fat nor kindly and
the reason is, there are no sands
or shelves for them to lay their

. eggs or to rest themselves there-

on?” What happened to Barbados’
beaches three hundred years ago

Anyhow, after describing how
to kill a turtle and how the heart
will move for twelve hours after
the reptile is dead, he coneludes
on this lovely hs ae cine
enter note: “Sure i ¢
ryeaturé on Earth, or on the Seas,
that enjoys life with such sweet-
ness and delight, as the tur-
tle, nor none more icate in
taste, or more nourishing, than

he.”
Sn

OTHER FATS
AND OIL I

@ From Page 9.
has been ineluded in
by Or aatver of a few typical
sources of edible fats and oils be-

t t has been used as a food
ea from the earliest times.

the background of our develop-
ment and historical past. We know

question abglf its habits, That i: ‘%¢ sea. Many of them are eate: 115; 4 wild olive does exist but
does sleep ig-a well established Y birds while they are crawling 4; what stage of man’s progress

fact, for
relaxed ini
surface ofthe sea, Indisputable

gobbled up by fish. As the turtles

~observers have seer, 00 the beach, and after entering {he tree began to be cared and
uals floating on the ‘te sea numbers of them are jysbanded there are

of course, no

records. It seems, however, that

evidence has also been presente s'0w larger, however, their main grafting on to wild stocks ‘was

that great saumbers sleep on re-
mote Hawaligm rock ledges anti

sandy ~ a fact contradic-
tory to ‘al belief that
turtles die If stranded on..their

bellies, owing-to the lack of suffi-
cient support afforded to interna!
organs by the lower part of the
shell. Breathing is sald to be

seriously impaired and spécimen ‘\¢pth. The net is supported by |yediterranean

going to market dre always turned
gn_their backs.

The largest green turtle ever
taken by the Key West dealers
weighed.700 pounds but the West
Indian récord is 850 pounds, The
usual weight, however, in m)
experience, is seventy-five to 150
pounds,

Nestliag Process

Green turtles lay an average of .

120 eges. The nesting process i:
interesting and is described b:
Clifford Pope thus: “In ascending
the beach the female pulls herseli
along with the front flipper:
leaving a conspicuous track two
to three feet wide made up i

parallel depressions separated by
a ridge. Her progress is in stage
of six or seven steps followed by |
nauses for rest. When a site has
been chosen, she proceeds to sink
herself into a large hollow which
all four flippers,

is made with

nemies are men and sharks, The
harks biting Off their flippers ii
hey get the chance and men
eatching them in nets or turning
them illegally on the beaches
vhen they come up to lay, Turtlh
iets (1 have one) are anything
rom twenty to fifty yards in
‘ength and about four feet in
corks end is mooréd only at one
en When turtles strike th

iets they get hopelessly 2ntangled.
One enormous fellow, however,
jot entangled in my first net and
‘ook it away with him. He was

my ‘ust seen off Silver Sands, still ‘rites,

complete with net, *

The other species of turtle that
is caught off the coast of Barbados
; the Hawksbill, source of the
famous “tortoiseshell”, This pretty

* turtle—the shell is brown and
» yellow—seldom attains a size of
more than 160 Ibs. While it is

vf value because of its shell, the
neat is not so well flavoured as
that of the Green turtle.

Its habits are much like those
vf the green turtle, though it
iys about thirty more eggs and
vill eat a wider variety of things
~Babcock relates that, while eat-
ing the Portuguese man-of-war,
his turtle keeps its eyes closed



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ractised at an early time—a ref-
prence occurs in St. Paul’s epistle
to the Romans, All the early
writers, Greek and Roman, refer to
the olive in way or another.
Homer calls if ‘the sacred olives
{t is honoured im Hebrew litera-
ture and oceupies a central place
With tne Oe ida. The ancient
Palesti selected
the olive as a symbol of peace an)
civie virtues, e earliest biblical
reference oecurs in the story of
Noah’s dove returning to the ark
with the olive leaf. In addition
to its significance in religious
references to its culinary,
medical and cosmetic uses in
early literature are numerous. In
the Psalms, for example, we read
of the ‘oil that maketh man’s face
to shine’ It was too the main
iliuminant of our ancient forbears.
The olive was clearly interwoven
in their pattern of life much as
the coconut in the Far East and
the oil,palm in West Africa are
today. Even a names bear

testimony to For example,
the ‘word Gethsemane means
‘olive press’, The fruits were

crushed, as now, in that region
by a revolving stone or.sometimes
treaded with the foot. It has been
said that in her over-flowing of}
vats (mostly dug out of the rock),
Judah had not only a livelihood
but also riches for exportation
and for barter,

The olive is indigenous to the
Mediterranean basin and its pro-
duce is an important article of
commerce throughout the region,
but especially so in Italy, Spain
and Southern France in modern
times when efficient methods are
practised in the extraction of the
oil. Olive oil has been deseribed
as the edible oil par excellence as
regards flavour and its nutritive
qualities are of the highest order.
There is nothing to equal it as @
salad oil. Outside of the countries
of its provenance the oil may be
regarded as a luxury duct, It
fetches very high pric today
and, on this account, it is fre-
quay adulterated with oils more
neutral in taste such as those de-
rived from cotton seed, soya bean,
maize, groundnut and sunflower.
Efforts have been made to extend
the cultivation of olives to Cali-
fornia, Australia and
Africa, but the yield of oil
the fruits wn in non-Eur nm
countries is said to be consider-

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SUNDAY

JONSON'S VOLPONE,
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written

savage comedies ever

The product uo a turbulent
genius—Jonson was constantly in
and out of prison—and a turbulent
time, it parades a galaxy of
characters driven on by avarice,
lust, treachery, conceit and every
other vice in the calender. There

SUNDAY, AUGUST 17, 1952
Back To Lend Sir Ralph j
ac o London Sir ph pats aXe
7 ~ me Re
BEN By DAVID FARRER Funny men surround Aim, but | needs j Don't negléct a
This actor is altogether they are there for the | , “. cated cough! Rub di
He exudes a middle- Purpose of leaving him cold. } the pure, mildly medicated com fay, cee wa ant. Se
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j Corieura :

is little room in this lusty, spraw- |,

ling masterpiece for goodness,

The author's
concern is to make sport of evil.

Volpone, the Venetian magnifico,
gloats over the treasure he has
amassed and plans to amass some
more. Feigning mortal sickness,
he tempts three fellow citizens
with hints that he will make cach
oné of them his heir.

Driven nearly crazy with ava-
rice, they bring him rich presents.

One merchant’s present takes
thé shape of his young and lovely
= who has aroused Volopone’s
lust.

* * *

The ensuing complications
ivolving numerous double cross-
ings, assumed identities and
feigned death, lead at last to the
final court scene, where the sins
of all the chi eharacters are
brought home to roost. The judges
are four old dotards Jonson allows
dignity not even to the law.

Such, for what it is worth, is
the plot, But, of course, it is worth
very little. The great Elizabethan
dramatists paid scant attention to
thei plots which were frequently
absurd and rarely credible. They
trusted to their characters to im-
pose belief,

In Volpone Ben Jenson created
two characters that every actor
worth his salt must long to play.

Volpone himself is the rich rascal
revelling in subterfuge, the
deceiver rejoicing in deceit,

Mosca is his servant, oily and
outwardly obsequious, who plans
his master’s stratagems and in the
end leads him ruthlessly up the
garden path.

At Stratford Mosca
by Anthony Quayle.
play was being cast a critic told
Quayle that his ruddy countenance
and jovial temperament must pre-
clude his success in the part, He
proves his stature by subordinat-
ing face and temperament alike
to the exigencies of the play. He
is superbly the pimp and pander,
the ambitious lackey with scorn in
his heart for those he bamboozles-
and well concealed hatred for the
master he serves. This is fine
acting.

And Volpone the fox himself?
Sir Ralph Richardson makes full
use of the comic situations with
which the author's stage directions
provide him, He hides roguishly
behind curtains, He wears a night-
cap to advantage. And a false
nose that makes him look like
Groucho Marx,

But the sense of exultant evil
which is the essence of this play
escapes him altogether. This is a
very parfit gentil fox. He would,
you feel, never be unkind to a
rabbit, The impression is strong
that we are witnessing a tragedy
of miscasting.

Not so long ago, in the greatest
season the Old Vic has ever given
us, Sir Ralph was sharing the top
of the theatrical tree with Sir
Laurence Olivier. “His

is ployed
When the

was the best for many years. His” With
Bluntsehli in Arms and the Man jjons,

was the epitome of the bourgeois

accused of murder in Home At

he has seemed to go out of his
way to choose unsuitable parts.



ably inferior to that from Medil-'
erranean olives,

nuts and seeds of
sources which yield edible fats
ene oils are legion. Some are of
only

figure in cOmmerce for one pur-
pose or another. A few of the bet-
ter known ones are mentioned in
the preceding paragraph. There
are others used principally as
drugs or, as in the case of castor
ofl, as a special lubricant for air-
plane engines as well. Others
again, like » are most im-
portant in the paint industries
and in manufactures such ag lin-
oleums and related products,
There is a great and increasing
oemens. a for edible a
and oils, ang e governmen
colonial: are eee
ed to develop their production on
sound, economic lines, wherever
possible, +

>
YOUR ROOF

stock :—

Shingles

White Pine

Pitch Pine

Cement

Galvanised Sheets
Aluminum Sheets
Asbestos Everite Sheets
Aluminum Guttering
Steel Windows

single-minded +

i endidly a Hermione
soldier, And he has given great wae, as "ne ctu’s
pleasure as the ordinary chap jicensee, ignores the gallery and

goes absolutely straight, game
Seven, But at Stratford this year : mi r like

nard, Ann Wilton and David Hurst
Finally, it should be stated that .
vegetable O'Doherty, as the bewigged gor-

local importance in the the year. Glowering and pork-
countries of ‘origin, others again faced, She 100Ks like to riven

Jacabean oak.

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We can now deliver from

ADVOCATE



im venon

aim is te move suburbia
to the left. =

He has chosen, however, this
year to plunge into a maelstrom of

i m

,
*
You. remember the
habits of the African kt tee
first the males come to the water-
hate and then the et
oom, which opened
Lyric, Hammersmith, on Wedries-

day, is the alcoholic equivatent t

of that water-hole. .

Its title is a pseudonym for a
war-time drinking club on which
Rodney Ackland the author, has
decided to bestow a wry and
shabby immortality. Out of the
lives of the drinkers who flit and
stumble across its fraying carpets
he has built an intensely atmos-
pheric littke play—an attempt, I

imagine at a sort of Restoration 3

tragi-comedy,.

It runs the gamut from Scotch
to gin, embracing a_ literary
drinker, who has wife trouble, a
political drinker seeking guiltily

to forget a German friend in a La’

horrer-camp, a delirious drinker
who used to paint, an arrogant
drinker, who directs bad films;
a gas-stove-shaped lady drinker
described as a critie—and many
more all of whom are embraced
from time to time by the club’s
proprietress, a good-hearted little
shambles of a woman, perpetually
looped.

‘Mr, Ackland examines his men-
agerie of escapists sometimes with
a commiserating grin, sometimes

with an unlikeable smirk, and
sometimes with over-powering
affection.

But it takes, I am afraid, a heart
larger than his to write about
the small sins of small people
without sentimentalism or shallow
moralising. Chekhov could do it,
and in his hands The Pink Room
might have been a minor master-
piece,

But Mr. Ackland will keep on *

reminding us that his little band
of outeasts are dancing on a
voleano’s brink; and he wanders
madly off into Grand Guignol at
the climax—an apocalyptically

,over-written scene in which the

ex-painter enters drunk fires four
revolver shots into the ceiling, and
rips off the ladys critie’s

wig,
causing her to die of heart failure;

at which point a religious re-
vivalist starts to cry havoe through

the window, the Vice Squad erupts
—_ the door, and the roof
falls in, *

~

These five melodramatic min-

utes blew up the to frail
strueture beyond all of re-

ir,
one ot two grim excep-
however The Pink Room

trouper and

ley performance is a glorious dish
of tried fishwife,

This battling bantam has some’
«vere competition Heather Stan-

ire especially notable: and’ Mignon

gon, is giving what I take to be
he best supporting performance of

Although it is broken-bai .
The Pink Room has a good
om its shoulders. It is a good
nedonist’s head.

It’s A Slur
here is a rumour abowt to the

effect that Jack Benny, who has
returned to the Palladium for
three weeks,
Tis a dreadful slur on his
reputation, go let us dispose of it
at once. ~

Mr, Benny is not a clown at all;

it man or and
Docs ne rules the ary
q no J on C adit f























=
*)
oe






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Westminster Theatre last night,
and held me by the seruff of my
surprised mind for two and a half
hours. Frederick Knott's DIAL
M FOR MURDER is, once you.
have overlooked its nonsensical
title, the most intelligent crime
play I have seen, i

This is sheer, dear plot at its,
fullest streteh, with no clue with- |
held, and every pause and sylla-
ble counting in the balance.

y ’
the situation which may arise
your wife accidentally kills the
assassin. And, to torment you
further, let me suggest that Sher-
lock Holmes (who would never
have solved it) might have called
this mystery. The Third Murder-
er, or The Strange Adventure of
the Unopened Door. Aid


















Wish you
had his
ENERGY? —

It’s grand to be full of life and
energy! Inier Cleanliness is the
secret! Just take a glass of sparkling
Andrews to clear away. impurities
and tone- up the whole system.

/ Atink, toojust oné teaspoonful in
a glass of water.

DO YOU KNOW that perspiration contih robs: the
system of moistire (ih hot‘climates some 10 OF 26 ‘daiily.)?
Moisture is lost even from the alimentary tract, where it &
needed to assist digestion and elimination. Most fluids disper
rapidly, but Andrews’ sparkling saline sohition reaches ane
irrigeites the intesti

THE ROOM WITH

A SMILE



We've all sten the room that seems to smile, Gaily
patterned curtains frame the windows; and here and
thete placed jist right to catch tHe light, is a piece of
polished brass, glistening, gleaming allday long. The
floor too, sparkles with a well chosen covering that

matches the curtains, 4nd the whole atmosphere is one
of comfort and luxury. ,

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SUNDAY, AUGUST 17,



1952





SUNDAY



ADVOCATE



The People Of Barbados XIX This West Indian Culture—3,

Religious matters came to a
head in 1824, chiefly on account
cf the destruction of the Wesleyan
Chapel in Bridgetown in 1823, aad
the ‘John Smith Outrage’ in
British Guiana. The Rt. Hon.
George Canning, Foreign Secre-
tary announced that the Govern-
ment of Great Britain had decided
to strengthen the Chureh in the
West Indies, by constituting two
diocese. Accordingly, Dr. Chris-
topher Lipscomb and William
Hart Coleridge were consecrated
Bishops of Jamaica and Barba-
dos respectively. Thus the work
of Berkeley and Wilson was at
length accomplished. The Diocese
of Barbados consisted of St, Vin-
cent, Grenada, Antigua, the other
Leeward and Windward Islands,
Trinidad and British Guiana.
Prior to the appointment of these
two Bishops, the entire British
West Indies were under the con-
trol of the Bishop of London.

The first Bishop was a worthy
member of one of the most dis-
tinguished of English families,
and as one of the first Colonial
Bishops added lustre to its name,
Bishop Coleridge, then thirty-five
years of age. was the son of Luke
Herman Coleridge, a Physician
and was born at Thorverton, Dev-
onshire. Luke Coleridge died at
an early age and his son William
was brought up by his uncle Rev.
George Coleridge, Head Master of
King’s School, Ottery, St. Mary.
By training, character and outlook
William Hart Coleridge was ad-
mirably fitted for his position
First and foremost a _ zealous
Churchman, he was also a keen
administrator, From the moment
of his arrival in 1825 his influ-
ence began to be felt, and there
was a complete transformation.
The desired effect was taking
place, the Church began to exert
an intluence, both social and spir-
itual, which it had never sought
to exercise before. The work of
evangelisation and the concomit-
ant work of education were
actively undertaken. T# bishop
was also made a member of the
Legislative Council where by his
influence many changes were
made.

The Bishop did not have his
own way, for there was opposition
to the emancipation of the slaves
from certain plantérs and mer-
chants in Bridgetown. There is
recorded a published notice
signed by Messrs. John Brath-
waite and Robert Haynes of a
public meeting for su porting a
newspaper to be published in
London by Mr, James M’Queen,
and then Editor of the ‘Glasgow
Courier’,—“who has upon all
occasions so ably defended the
cause of the West Indies against
the calumnies and machinations
of their enemies.” This meeting
passed a Resolution to establish
the paper, and a subscription list
was pened; Mr, Thomas J.
Howell, the Treasurer of Barba-
dos, was appointed Treasurer of
the Fund.()

At the court of Grand Sessions
in December 1926, John G. Archer,
a white man, was indicted for the
murder of his slave. The Jury,
however, brought in a verdict of
manslaughter. The Honerable Ren
Hampden, of the Council, who pre-
sided as Chief Justice, sentenced
Archer to a year’s imprisonment,

. Mr. Hampden was the first man
who established the right of the
slave to the common protection of
the law,

The Bishop was gradually
gaining against the opposition, In
October 1827, a Sunday School
was started in Bridgetown for
coloured children, both slave and
free, under the management of
Mr. Joseph Thorne, by the Bishop
and Rev. J. H. Pinder. This school
was from 9.00—10.30 a.m. and
3.00—4,30 p.m., every Sunday (2),
This was about the first of the
schools started by Bishop Cole-
ridge, in 1825, when the Bishop
arrived at Barbados there were
only eight schools,"And by the end
of 1834 the number had increased
to 125. Thus it will be seen that a
long period of stagnation of the
Church was followed by an extra-
ordinary outburst of progressive
activities.

With reference to the question
of slovery, the Bishop admonished

© When You Feel

“TIRED”
oll the Time

i
i

“SLAVERY”
By JOHN PRIDEAUX

his clergy to take no part in the
agitation, but to devote them-
selves to pastoral work, training
aud teaching the slaves so that
ihe transition from slavery to
freedom might be easy. The Rev-

erend William Marshall Harte,
Rector of St. Lucy, opened
the Church on Sunday after-

moons for worship by the poor
people of the parish, and gave
a vsecture every Wednesday
evening to the Slaves. There
was a dispute between the Rector
and the Vestry of the Parish.
This dispute ended ip court and
there were charges against the
Rector which were placed before
the Magistrates W. H. Grant and
George J, Evelyn. These Magis-
trates held that the Complaints
against the Rector must be aban-
doned.

Reverend Harte, due to his
ardour for the improvement of
the slaves, was accused of trying
to destroy the distinction between
master and sve which was
deemed so necessary to their
safety; “more especially evinced
by his offensive sermon on Easter
Sunday, and his disgraceful co.-
duct whilst administering the Most
Holy Sacrament of the Lord’s
Supper, thereby endeavouring to
alienate their slaves from a sense
of their duty, by inculcating doc-
trines of equality inconsistent
with their obedience to their
masters and the policy of the
Island.”

In October of the same year,
the Rev. Harte was examined for
the second time on these charges;
according to the citation from
Justices Thornhill, Bascom, and
Pile, Mr. Harte attended at Sus-
anna Prescod’s Hotel, Speights-
town. He pleaded ‘Not Guilty’
after he had been taken into cus-
tody on a mittimus for not plead-
ing, and was bound over to appear
at the Court of Grand Sessions.
The Archdeacon and Rey. J. H.
Pinder, were his sureties. At the
Court of Grand Sessions, he was
found guilty of the charges
brought against him and fined
one shilling.(3) He appealed to
the King, who unconditionally
pardoned him.

The year 1831 was an eventful
one for the Free Coloured People
of this Island, for they were ad-
mitted to the political franchise.
On several occasions before this
year they had petitioned the
House of Assembly concerning
their grievances. One of these
petitions bearing the signatures
of 880 persons, complaining of the
protection—which was accorded
to the whites—against the insults
and aggression of the slaves.

It.was on the 11th of August
of 1831 that the Colony was de-
vastated by one of the worst hur-
ricanes in its history. Bishop Cole-
ridge saw most of his wonderful
achievements in multiplying
places of worship in the Island
completely destroyed, for fifteen
of his newly-built Churches and
many of the older Parish Churches
were reduced to ruins. There was
a terrific loss of life, . which
amounted to*between three and”
five thousand souls. The Bishop ©
Was one of the most active of the
Clergy in visiting the injured ana
burying the dead. The ‘Colonial
Church Chronicle’ records—

“The Bishop was to be found
moving among the dying and
the dead administering alike to
the bodily and spiritual wants
of the sufferers, visiting the
few remaining Churches, which
were converted into so many
hospitals for the wounded, ex-
ercising the public ministrations
of the Church in the open air
to crowded congregations, who
pressed to hear the Word of God
under the constraining power of
His present Judgements, and
sharing with the houseless and
destitute the only apartments of
his own »private dwelling place
which the fury of the storm
had spared.

The Bishop also saw one of his
fondest hopes laid low, that was
Codrington College, for he saw
that the Church in the West Indies
must have a supply of Clergy, and
he had been instrumental in the
rebuilding of Codrington College

This is the NEW |

Carton for

VENOS

between 1829 and 1830, when the
new building was formally open-
ed by the Governor, Sir James
Lyon, together with a large num-
ber of officials and clergymen, He
was also instrumental with hav-
ing this College affiliated with
Durham University so that the
young men of the West Indies
could obtain a University Degree
without having to voyage further
afield than Barbados.

Even with the teachings of the
Clergy, there was still strong op-
position to the abolition of slav-
ery. In January, 1833, the House
of Assembly passed a resolution
that a Petition be presented to
the King asking him to remove
the Hon, J. B. Skeete from the
Office of President of Barbados
and from the Board of Counci’.
At the Court of Grand Sessions in
December the previous year, Rob-
ert James, a slave, had been tried
and found guilty “under aggrav-
ated circumstances’ of rape upon
a poor white woman, a widow
with two children, and sentenced
to death. The inhabitants express-
ed the greatest indignation to the
reprieve issued by the Hon. J. B.
Skeete, and considered that this
was a reward for his crime, A
public meeting was held in the
Temple-yard where great num-
bers were in attendance, these
proceedings were marked by order
although there were some occa-
sions when there was a burst
of excitement. Resolutions were
framed condemning the Presi-
den’t interference with the
due course of justice, and
an address to the King was
resolved tpon, praying for
the dismissal of President Skeete
from Office. A Committee was ap-
pointed to watch over the inter-
ests of the question at issue, This
lead to the House of Assembly
taking their step against the Presi-
dent.

In May, 1833, there was held a
Public Meeting of Free coloured
and black people to pass an ad-
dress to the Governor, complain-
ing that although the ‘Brown
Privilege Bill, had been passed, yet
these people were not admitted
to public situations of honour and
profit. The Chairman of this Meet-
ing was none other than Samuel
Jackman Presecod, with Mr. F.
Thomas as Secretary.(4). The
Governor ‘replied that he ac-
knowledged that these people had

‘much to complain of, but that

there was a tone of impatience
and reproach in their language
which might rather baffle than
accelerate his means of doing
them justice. He promised to
bring the matter to the attention
of the Secretary of State.
(To be continued).
1, The Barbadian Newspaper — Sep-
tember 9th, 1825.

2. The Barbadian Newspaper — Octo-
ber 30th, 1827.

3. The Barbadian Newspaper — July
24, Aug. 7, Sept. 21st, Oct, 9th, etc., 1827,

4. B’dian Newspaper — May 11, 1833.



Labourer Placed

i On 3-Month Bond

His Worship Mr. E. A. McLeod,
Police Magistrate of District “A’
yesterday placed 22-year-old-
labourer FitzRoy Haynes of Nel-
son Street, St. Michael on a bond
for a perrod of three months in
the sum of £1 for stealing a piece
of deal board valued at 6/10 the
property of J. B. Leslie & Co.,,
Ltd. on August 15,

The prosecution called on three
witnesses to prove its case, Lloyd
Greaves a watchman said that on
the evening of August 15 he saw
the defendant with the piece of
deal board and recognised it to
be the property of J. B. Leslie &
Co., Ltd. He asked the defendant
where he was taking the board
and the defendant did not answer
him,

Cpl. Nurse who. formally charg-
ed the defendant said that he ar-
rested Haynes on_ instructions
given to him by the watchman
Greaves,

The defendant told the court
that he saw the piece of board
floating in the Careenage and took
it up “as it looked like it had no
owner.”

LSS



olay ea
clea ala eT Tee

The School Men”

I will go on reiusing to &
‘literary,’ although I know quite
well that this is what people ex
pect you to be when you ar
writing on such a dry academik
and dismally boring sybject a4
‘culture.’ There are some peopit
—they are among the misfortunes
of the earth—who expect an article
on literature, art, music or drama
to be crammed with tedious and
ludicrously unimaginative referen-
ces to the loveliness, exquisite del-
ieacy and pregnant imagery of thi
poem, or the freshness and brilli-
ance with which this artist paints
ecuntry landscapesy or the wor-
derful melodic line of this slow
movement or the skill this play
wright displays in his subtle use
of dramatic irony; in short, with
all the time-eroded vapid mean-
ingless and brainlessly persistent
tenth-hand phrases which form
the complete mental equipment of
an accepted critic. When they
don't get this sort of stuff, which
they like because it is so unpar-
ticular and so thoroughly freaked
with the cliché that has been
remorselessly drilled into them
during their school days that it
does not call upon them for the
least bit of thought, they are sin-
cerely disappointed, and immedi-
ately set about launching assaults
upon the miserable critic who is
so uncultured and unlettered as
not to be familiar with the ap-
propriate literary phrases. There
are also some people—and they
are among the calamities of the
earth—who, when they hear a
piece of great music, have an ir-
resistible and incorrigible urge to
exclaim ‘how beautiful!’ Ask
them what they think of what-
ever composer whose name first
comes into your head, and you
will be unable to extract from
them any more explanatory and
analytic observation than that he
wrote lovely or sublime or poetic
music. If, for instance, you want
to hear the last adjective repeated
with ecstatic earnestness you need
only mention the name of Brahms,
He will never fail you, It dosen't
oecur to these people that when
they make such remarks they are
saying nothing more than a piece
of wax shaped like a gramophone
record could say if properly treated
and placed on a phonograph.
They believe in art for art’s sake,
and this is exactly what ‘culture’
means to them: the recreation of
an eccentric and unendurably
useless bunch of wit-forsaken
recluses who think they are men-
tally alvanced because they enjoy
sucking spiritual confectionary all
the days of their lives,

West Indian Culture And The
“School Men”

I really can't address myself to
such people with any satisfaction,
I only mention them for a very
alarming reason; namely, that the
apostles of the West Indian cul
ture and the partisans of the group
that ought to be christened ‘the
West Indian Nation-Mongers’ be-
long to this very class. You can
tell them by their phraseology.
They don’t think; they simply re-
peat the anciently minted phrases
that their brother mongers repeat,
They talk the typical politician's
Jargon, and take special delight in
the typical forms of expression
to be found in the nearest text
book on English History by Mr,
John Smith or Mr. George Brown
or Mr, Dick Jones, They believe
that culture is an academic product
labotiously manufactured in Col-
leges and Universities, If you
told them that Bismark and
Hitler were more significant ex-
amples of the German temper and
culture than most of that nation’s
romantic poets, they will be sur-



prised. When you assure them
that Wagner was once a furiously
active revolutionary politician

and Byron a liberalist soldier, they
will be astonished. When you
assert that the West Indies can
hardly expect to-have a culture
until they have their own bible of
political and philosophical ideals,
statesmen to put them into vig-
orous practice, and soldiers to fight
for them against the opposition of
the corresponding ideals of othe:
netions, they are utterly mystified,
Where is the connection between

° Protects your gums
¢ Pights tooth decay
¢ Freshens your mouth

By
irama and dictators’
connection ‘between similes and

idiers But I confidently main-
tain that a cloistered and monkis
aestheticism -is the chief enemy
to culture and that the military
man who is willing to fight to the
death for an idea its chief friend
and architect.
Culture And The Statesman

The statesman and the soldiers
do, in fact, bear a most intimate

A. 8S. HOPKINSON
? where is the

relationship to culture. There has
heen, in the past, far too much
jishonest dealing and deliberate

ignorance in connection with this
question, and it would be well if
the West Indies could make a
frank and npw beginning. The
West Indian must relise that there
's In us a certain inexplicably
wonderful and powerful force
driving us to the pursuit of fuller
knowledge, greater and wider be-
ing, and more power over Nature
and ourselves, This force is
equally aetive in the statesman,
the poet, the painter, the scientist,
the philosopher, the naturalist and
the priest and, whether exercised
hrough the medium of very,
paint, or prose, or whether ex-
pressed as statecraft, physics, as-
tronomy, or theology, it is always
siming at the same purpose. This
force may be called the cultural
instinct or better still the religious
instinct, but, whichever or what-
ever phrase you may choose to
describe it by, its influence
is undeniable and ungovernable,
No one who has even the gentlest
Suggestion of religious feeling in
him will want to curb, divert, or
pervert this instinct in any way.
But the West Indian must also
realise that, while the poet is ver-
Sifying and the philosopher mor-
alsing and the painter sketching
and the scientist probing, the
peoplke, within which body all
these extraordinary figures are in-
cluded, have got to be governed.
The artist can stop paint ng for a
while, or the composer stop writ-
ing Symphonies for a while, the
astronomer stop tracing the path
of the comets, the priest stop
preaching and the mathematician
stop calculating for a while, but
as soon as the statesman stops ex-
ercising his particular talent for
organising a community with thor-
oughness and efficienecy for a
single day, everything relapses in-
to a state of ghastly chaos and
primitive savagery; for people who
have nobody to Obey will obey
themselves and this will, in ninety
nine per cent of tested cases, prove
to be catastrophic. You can really
no more dispense with the true
artist, dramatist, poet, or mathe-
matician than you can with the
statesman, but the stateman’s job
is a 365-days-a-year, 366-days-
a-leap year job whilst the service
of the others is only needed in-
termittently. The West Indian
must be told too that there are
basically three alternative courses
open to the statesman, who, as
anybody who has thought about
the subject knows, governs people
according to belief. In the first
place he can govern them accord-
(ng to what they already believe;
or he can persuade them to be-
lieve what he thinks would be
most beneficial for them to believe
and govern them thereby; or fin-
ally he can govern them according
to what he himself believes. But
as it is not reasopable to expect
the minds of Tom, Dick & Harry
to measure up to the mind of a
political genius, the last course is
seldom practicable. Of the re-
maining two, it is diMcult to say
which is better. Both have beert
successfully used, the first, for ex-
ample, by Napoleon and the sec-
ond by: Hitler, >

It Develops Subconsciously

No doubt many people will be
wondering what all this has to do
with West ndian Culture, but I
will be foreed to condemn all such
instantly as sufferers from the
how beautiful’ complex. ‘Those
who can’t dissociate culture from
vague and unpleasant ideas about
smiles and metaphors, and who
can't see the close connection be-
tween culture and statesmanship,
thought, and even soldiering, may
he dismissed as politically hope-
less. Besides, it would not be at
ill a bad thing if the West Indian
Culture-Maniacs and the Nation-
Mongers could be discouraged
from pontificating solemnly from
their academic chairs and be in-
duced to develop an honest atti-
tude towards this matter. I ‘will







become academic myself for the
benefit of anyone who dotlidts what
is written above All classical |
scholars know that it was chiefly ;
the militarist spirit that gave birth ;
to Homeric song, and chiefiy vio-
lent and earnest national senti-
ment that inspired Vergil. The
West Indian must be taught to be-
lieve something and then taught
to fight fiercely for his beliefs be-
fore he can develop a genuine cul-
ture. But once the belief and the
fighting spirit are instilled into
him, the rest will come subcon-
sciously and without his labour-
ing it out in the sanctuaries of a
university.



Can Yow Tell How |
Tall Your Child

Will Grow?

iby George Sava |

Is it now possible to foretell
more accurately than ever be-
fore how tall a child will grow?

Research into the relationship
of age to height has been inten-
sified both in America and Brit-
ain. Thousands of painstaking
calculations have been made.

Here a chart based on
latest results of this research—a
chart showing for both boys and
girls what percentage of even-
tual adult height should have
been reached at a given age.

Every parent will want to,
study these height-age increase’
tables, for doctors claim that the

growth of children need no
longer be a matter of chance. It
is becoming an exact medical |
science,

Main Factors

What are the main factors in
the way we grow?

Full height is reached for girls
at 18, boys at 19,

Generally, there is very little
difference in the length of torso
of adults; difference in height is
due mostly to the length of the
legs.

The height of a newly born
baby, regardless of sex, is about
30 per cent, of its ultimate ma-
turity, |
For the first year there is no |
difference between the sexes,
but the growth of the qhild will
depend slightly upon whether he
is naturally or artificially fed—
the former grows more quickly. |

From the second to the ninth |
year girls will grow more quickly |
than boys; then the process is |
reversed—the girl slows down,
the boy shoots up.

In Britain, we know the
present generation is taller than
its parents and grandparents—
due to the more rational and
hygienic life of sport, fresh air,



and unconstricting clothing, Many | >

a modern 14-year-old boy could

not get into a medieval knight’s |

suit of armour, |
New Research

Meanwhile, quite apart from
the statistical tests carried out to
create the kind of chart you see;
here, chatlenging new research |
is now going on in the actual
manipulation of height by out-
side influences,

Knowledge of the vitamins
and hormones which govern our
growth has increased rapidly.
And, today, diets can be devised
for children which will supply
missing vitamins and thus allow
the child to develop more
naturally,

The growth of the bones of the
legs is usually arrested in girls
by 18 and boys by 19—the time
full height is reached—and now
doctors can shorten or lengthen
this period by administration of
certain hormones,

In California promising expe-
riments have been made in con-
trolling children’s height by use
of thyroid drugs and hormones,

Certain hormones have been
used to inerease the predicted
height of short boys; others to
cyrtail the rate of growth of
oc expected to become over
all,

‘Bone-Age’

The drug and hormone ex-
periments to control growth are
experimental, To avoid danger
they must still be carried out

@ On Page 15

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PAGE TWELVI

Harold Webster:

_.__ SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY, AUGUST 17, ‘1952

Are You Scared To See Your Doctor?

What Tricks Your Mind







EO ast

mse es
ace) eg 3





HOME-STUDY COURSES FOR



Hite



GENERAL CERTIFICATE of EDUCATION
CAMBRIDGE SCHOOL & HIGHER SCH. CERT.

Pioneer

By Edwin Rogers

I first met Haroid Webster one
Sunday morning while taking a
walk on the beach, he was casting

a net into the sea, The thing that
struck me most was his strong
physique, his thigh muscles being
something phenomenal as com-
pared with his outstanding de-
velopment. I took the opportunity
to introduce myself and asked him
if the throwing of the heavy net
was responsible for his develop-
ment, “Of course not” he replied,
“my development came through
the lifting of weights” It was on
this first occasion of meeting Mr.
Webster that I became acquainted
with weightlifting.

Mr. Webster was appointed
Official Coach of the Amateur
Weightlifting Association of Bar-
bados at its inception a year ago
and was re-elected again this year.
In addition to which he will serve
as Manager for the team which
is expected to tour Trinidad this
year.

On asking him for an interview,
he was very —— and only
agreed when I poin' out that
there were many youngsters who oa
would be interested. oe

HAROLD

The fact that he was a good gj

athlete before he became interested o¢ 165 ae ett pees was 85.
in weightlifting but was still not jbs, and best squat 120 lbs.
satisfied with his ppysical condi- Through months af scientific
tion is in itself significant for it training his press and squat, his
again proves that other sports favourite exercise, improved
cannot compare with weightlifting rapidly to 200 Ibs. and 350 ibs re-

and the accompanying photo- spectively.

graph will clearly show what It is pus pei neeing to
benefit Harold derived from his ‘vealise pow Naael were accom-
training. plished ally being handi-

capped by sacrum trouble due to

As a school boy at Lodge he was. his football injury.

always keen on athletics, but was It is even more surprising to
considerably handicapped in the know that Mr, Webster once had
early stages suffering from a rup- «, ‘Heart Murmur., He was ad-
ture caused by a bicycle accident, vised by the doctor to give up
However, he did not let this bicycle riding which he indulged
hamper him for due to his aptitude in at that time. However, on tak-
to physical culture, he performed !"8 UP weightlifting he disregard-
abdominal exercises morning and een of the mt and on
evening religiously until he even- oo te ee oneaers Oe
tually discarded the truss which .ronesug statements which people
the doctor had preséribed. On tend to believe about welghtiitt
examination by his doctor it was ;,, ‘ 5 4
g causing one’s heart to become

weak, This is one example of
¢ to overcome a

hang sane. oquld nine Ghoe
; ieee a iire . hundreds of people who ere’
Harold hs srensenee te abl from similar trouble but who were
games such a# cricket, footabi, completely cured after exercising

found that the rupture was com-
pletely cured, hence he resumed weights helpin
playing games.

hockey, shooting and boxing, He

had tha’ amiaetion’ of being’ one scientifically with weights.

began in 1940 at the » of

of the few boys to be in all the
teams one year. He was Captain
of the Second Division Cricket
team and algo played for the First
and was Captain of the First Divi-
sion Football team. He held three
records for ‘throwing the cricket
ball’, one of which still stands,

After leaving school Harold con-
tinued playing games. He played
first class cricket and represented
the Island’s ‘B’ team in football
as goal keeper around 1940-41
versus Trinidad

It was around 1939 that Harold
took up boxing seriously, It was
his intention to turn professional.
He received most of his training
from Ben Eastman, Al Brown and
Kid Melbourne who were quite
good at that time.

I think I am correct in saying,
as I have heard many people say,
that Harold was one of the first
persons in the Island to start
underwater diving and spearing
fish aftey it was introduced by
Whiskers Blake, the wrestler, I
remember quite well the large
quantity of fish he used to bring
ashore.

Harold soon found out that the
practise of sports did not in any
way help his physical develop-
ment, although they did keep him
in good condition, It was whilst
at Lodge that he used a course of
free hand exercises. Asking him
if he derived any benefit from
this, he replied “ Apart from the
fact that it increased my appetite
slightly due to increased cireulla-
tion. I can only consider it a first
class course for girls.” I agree with

The reason why Mr. Webster
has not taken up competitive lift-
ing is on account of his back in-
jury which even today has a ten-
dency to give him trouble. This
is indeed a sad blow to anyone

who loves the sport as he does,

In 1940-41 Mr, Webster_ along
with his friends, Lloyd Gibbs and
Michael Mayers, started a small
gym at his father-in-Jaw’s home
in Belleville. Thé space for train-
ing was so limited that particular
care had to be taken not to raise
each other on the bars while ex-
ercising. I remember that place
very well for it was on_ those
grounds that my weightlifting

career began,

Harold was also a member of
Mr, George Solomon’s Gym in
Harts Gap which was much larger
and able to accommodate more
members. Many afternoons he
paid visits to Solomon’s Gym and

it was through ‘Solo’ that he learnt
a great deal about the game.

When Mr. Solomon left the

Island to take up studies in Can-

ada, Harold made every effort to
extend his club so as to accommo-

date the majority of ‘Solo’s’ boys.

This club is the present PALM

SPRINGS BARB CLUB.

Since the club's inception, many
improvements have been made.
The yard is now fully covered
with ‘colas' and-a strong platform
has been installed in the far corn-
er of the gym, ‘the demand
{or even more room, Harold made

arrangements to rent a large por-

tion of land adjacent to the club.

Palm Springs Bar ~ Club
owned and operated by . Har-

Weightlifter



WEBSTER

mention mafy other lifting cham-
pions.
_ Harold has The knack of keep-
ing@ the boys together and I have
of noticed that when he is in
the Gym everyone tries to do his
best, looking to him for encour-
agement and guidance. ‘“
As Official Coach of the Associa-
tion, it is his duty to visit the
Gyms,

_In 1948 Mr. Webster realised his
life’s ambition by visiting York,
the home of weightlifting and
physical champions, and meeting
such personalities as John Grimek,
Mr. America 1940-41 and holder of
Mr. Universe title. He also met
Steve Stanko, Mr, America and
Mr. Universe and world champion
America, ‘Frank. Spelimas, dic
merica, an. e
Harrison, Jack Elliot, Dick Batchell
and Johnny Terpak, all champion
weightlifters. Also Joe Laurino,
Mr, America Jnr., Frank Debus,
Bent Press Champion, Ray Van
Cleef, fate Editor of
“Stren; and Health”, He had
the pleasure of seeing the boys
tr in the famous York Gym
and still corresponds with John
Grimek and Ray Van Cleef who
are personal friends, Both of them
are honorary members of Palm
Springs Barbell Club, Grimek re-
cently sent three autographed
photos and.a letter of encourage-
ment to the boys of the Club.

Mr. Webster, who is a salesman
has to travel quite often to the
neighbouring Islands and while
abroad he has visited quite a num-
ber of gyms, In. Dominica he met
Ossie Charles who is considered
quite an authority on the game anc
iS a person. dulend of Hal Harper,
heavyw: E ipion of Jamaica.
Mr. ME er had the = ~
seein, ess » an
just fail Aa ais lbs, Harper
also is an honorary member of
Palm Springs Club, He has met
many others and visited their
gyms in Grenada, St. Lucia and
Antigua.

Mr. Webster is 30 years old, is
married and has three children:
Sonia 8 years, Bob (named after
Bob Hoffman)» 6% years and

a 18 months. ,

He has already started his child-
ren on exercising. Bob and Sonia
ean be seen regularly training on
afternoons, Linda who is only 18
months old often takes up the 5
lb, weight. hey are under his
expert supervision. Certainly a
weightlifting family.

I asked Mr. Webster his future
ambition to which he replied; “My
ambition is to see more youngsters
i developing their

so doing their
da obtain benefit
and they would no longer derive
pleasure from szécing how much
aleohol they can consume and
how many cigarettes they can
smoke, It. seems to me that these
misguided youngsters think that
this makes them men, but a man is
one who can resist such tempta-




Plays With A New Pain

A Dector gives a straight-from-
the-shoulder lecture on the folly
of treating the human body less
kindly than a T.V. set....

By GEORGE SCOTT

This article could be danger-

ous. But only to foplish people.
And fol.y—in so far as it concerns
fear of confiding in a doctor—is
not confined to the dimwitted,
. Brilliant people, — successful
men and women, are just as
likely as anyone else secretly to
watch their imagined illnesses
being nourished by gossip, by
hearsay—even by magazine
articles,

Listen. Let us get the philos-
ophy of this business 2
my suit is a bad fit, I do not start
reshaping it myself. I take it
immediately to the tailor re-
sponsible.

If my new TV set goes wrong,
I right away get on the phone
to the man who took good money
from me for it.

These men are experts—and
I know that the sooner I tell them
of trouble, the more likely they
are to put it right.

Now why do we—who as a

nation rush to the repair man as
soon as the car engine pinks or
the radio set crackles—so
assume that we know in advance
just what the doctor is going to
say?
The Daily Express in announc-
ing this series has spoken of the
high motives —such as “Who will
care for the children?” or “My
job will suffer’—which make
men and women keep silent
about their fear of having con-
tracted some serious ailment.

Well, maybe. But even such
high motives boil down to this:
Selfishness,

Suppose the jhusband suffers
In silence for a year and then
cracks up, Who looks after him
then? Who suffers most? The
wife, of course.

But, you may say, this series
is about imagined illness—~and
here is the doctor talking about
husbands and wives really being

Exactly. And why? ,

Well, if you imagine a disease
strongly enough, and .long
enough, your body may simulate
that disease. An illusion be-
comes a near fact through neg-
lect—and selfishness.

The power of the mind to
influence the body is an ac
medien! foaet. Tf, for one reason

5



g0 without @ mid-day meal, and
then tried jo make up for the
lack of food by a too-heavy
neal at night.

He began to lose weight
through, going without food, and
by overloading his stomach he

‘aggravated the original trouble.

As time went on the pain de-
veloped a tendency to wake him
up at night. This made him more



wife, but he did confide in a col-
league

“Ulcer old boy,” said this
wise man, There was something
smug about the way he gave his
opinion, something that sug-
fested he might know more than
his life as an accountant indi-
cated. “We all get them sooner
or later. Occupational disease,
you know. I got mine five years
ago. You'd better join me on the
milk wagon, [Eleven o'clock
every morning, And stop worry-
ing.”

FS cept started to take a glass
dt milk each mo . That was
a good thing. But could not
stop worrying. He was con-
vinced now that he had on uncer.

He told me later that he argued
this way: “If I go to a doctor,
the quack will tell me to rest,

or order an operation. I can’t =
afford to lose all that time, 1 =

shall just have to put up with
it, and inerease my life insur-
ance.”

So Joseph went on for another
six months, worrying, worry-
ing, until one day his wife saw
him doubled up with pain. She
made him come to see me.

I listened to his story, gave him

an examination. But I did not =

send Joseph to hospital, I sent
him to an eye specialist.

Joseph, who was a most effi-
cient executive, had been using
the same spectacles for the past
five years. Uncorrected * vision
hed started the stomach trouble.
Worry—and his quack colleague
~-had done the rest.

He had not got an ulcer, and
with the mew _ spectacles he
suffers now from no more serious
complaint than occasional dys-
pepsia,

Nine out of ten imagined pep-
tic uleers are no more than
nervous dyspepsia.

How to prevent that nervous

pain? It sounds rather formid- =

able, but it all amounts. to

Oya dy mT

by Cummings





“& most dangerous inven-
tion, 1 tell you—why, soon
will lose the use of





“Just another dev

tempo of our modern life.”

“It is as much as we can
di en

that’s published e
—but with this be
journals evers

sp AADAANUNDAUUNAYUDUELNEUAANCA EATEN EDL td LAT



y even travel
at 35 miles ap hour ‘—at
which speed human life—
as is medically certain—
just blacks out.”

OF DEBUNKING

tis rat coet |
|
i

or another, good or bad, yot ;‘spiritual readjustment.” A doc-
refuse to take your pains into the tor can give you reassurance,





light of the doctor’s consulting- but you must do the rest. ar

a you breed the first fears. Think of it this way. You are
ecrecy. They flourish on ip causes the nervous dyspepsia.
over tea, on old wives’ The antidote is peace of mind.
It is easy to imagine that ev Go up to your fear and look
stomach pain denotes an ulcer, at it, Fear itself is a fearfit
that a twinge in the chest is thing: it swiftly retreats, And
symptomatic of tuberculosis or you suddenly realise that you
diseased heart. have been afraid of nothing at
Let me tell you about a patient all.
of mine. IT’ll have to tell it Let me_ shatter one more
backwards as I pieced it together favourite illusion of men and
when he eventually came to women who seem to accept
see me, saloon-bar advice before going
Joseph B. .. is in his early 40’s. to a doctor.
As a working director in a firm You don’t always feel pain
of exporters, his life is full where the trouble is. If you
of strain these days, ‘did, doctors wouldn’t earn half
The first sign of trouble that ‘the money they are paid,

nbove the waistband of the yowre seared even to read
trousefs, the doctor.
.

Because of this he started vo ! +? —L.E.S.








and completely lose the use





SAAS MAMMAAMALL 0,00

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its round neckline is edged with
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also shows some-
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“loose-fitting
shapeless”, are re
amé i strai ey

those fears feed on afraid of something. That fear a ee 1 at, ‘ s
pockets and belt with black, His
evening gowns are
Starred is a black
elvet crinoline, and lime ‘yellow |’
‘with fitted
bodice and tulle skir
ETER RUSSELL a countryman
born and bred, and a huntin’
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version of country clothes, invari-
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impeccably tailored for
townwear, This season he offers



turns out to be a town cousin of
Jeseph noticed was a discomfort I will teturn to this Sams ie a vice ay a
fter a é i st } i a s is elegant, . roun
ifter food. He felt a pain just the next article un engernthansévertie ‘yeu
lum, cut-away front and inverted
pleat at the back.
“Hug-me-tight”
stole, part bolero, is Russell's sug-

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revers,



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Children’s skin ailments need the soothing

that Germolene draws out dirt from cuts,
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ulates the growth of new skin. Keep 8
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FOR INDIGESTION

y MACLEAN
q Bob >}
SS eta To INDI on

Y Try just ONE DOSE

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Stomach Pains,

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aaa llama acacia ns a all

that statement whole heartedly. old Webster now stands on approx- tions and be of some use to his
a i imately half an acre of land, is country and friends”.

It is interesting to note that after equipped with several id

having been K.O.’d in boxing he pounds of weights, including

the back, its fronts are elongated,
bands of seal, Coats have pyramid and cross over to tie in an enor-
collars emphasised with fur trim- mous bow on the waist, Starred
With this final statement Iknew ‘Starred in this collection is a mings, But on dresses, Sherard in his collection is a black paper
then realised that to become a parallel] bars, iron boots, pulleys the interview. was concluded, for cocktail suit in gold lame dolman has maintained the “roundness of taffeta dinner dress worn with
champion in any sport strength squat stands, incline boards and what further could be asked or sleeved, edged with mink. bedyline” of last season, a green séatin “hug-me-tight”
was necessary so he decided to iM- }.ag a membership of over seventy added? What further proof could _ MICHAEL SHERARD shows Starred in his collection gis a its statistics are worth noting:
prove his development, He was in- witich includes Basil Grant, Mr. be given 0: s tlifters jackets with deep batwing sleeves white velvet evening dress simpli- 32 round the hem, the skirt
troduced to weightlifting by Mr. Barbados 1951 and John Marshall. strong determination and worthy !eaching from armhole to waist, city itself, cut on princess lines, was sewn in 150 sections so that

Lloyd Gibbs, who at that time Mr. Barbados Jnr. 1952, not to example Hems are trimmed with broad with fitted waist and full skirt; it rippled with every movement.
epdaidi ssebie Secale th chore erate Ba Des eens bike a ae AS Fasc a RON cla ti pee ang lc ASS, ete Baal ae
S8DOSSOSSOSSSS SSO OOO60E7 ‘SCSSOSSSSSSSS SSIS DSSS SS OS SSSSSSOLFSEESSPOSPSOOSS.

THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LTD.

White Park Road, Bridgetown

@ From Page 6







VACATION

-IN- |
|
|





FIVE COUNTRIES

4 $1560.10


























ROUND TRIP |

ENGINEERS, BRASS and IRON FOUNDERS \ fustne- Cuor Five cbaiteea’ ait itil
Works contain raodern appliances for the execution of i : er
wen vor a an hinds, and to Dream Girl great capitals on one
s an . :
Dealers in AGRICULTURAL’ MACHINERY and Teste he en ee votinest, | ing oman y
aressable softness, * -

GENERAL ENGINE ROOM STORES a ieee Se a racationer, casual about
of all Description ves, tonight—if you wee ustre-Creme time, you stay as long as



IRRIGATION PROJECTS, PUMPING EQUIPMENT

Shampoo today!
and ELECTRICAL INSTALLATIONS A SPECIALTY F

you like in the place

Fr : that interests you most
‘or
Satisfaction, Quality and Service * where you i eS
friends to entertain you.
Contact

Your flight is swift and
sure, your service per-
fect, no extras, no tip-
ping, you get there
sooner and stay there
| longer, what a perfect
ae PARIS holiday.

| CONSULT YOUR TRAVEL AGENT OR B.W.LA.,
LOWER BROAD ST., BRIDGETOWN

THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LTD.

Phone : 4546, 4650 Workshop
Phone 4528 Stores Dept:

FNOCODOO®DODDIROOGSSOOSLOHOOG HOO OLO00-00 866965006"



. ROBERTS & CO.,











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Incorporated

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Playing Cards 48c.

Canasta Sets

Ahh for 40 al yocir jatvrle Ga ale ys

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uvB-0-A-C >

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YOUR STATIONERS

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——

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PPR OPEC FCC LLL LESS SOSSOOSOOSSSOSSS



ee





SUNDAY, AUGUST 17, 1952

HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON





THATS

COUSIN GEORGE --
HE’S

AN ACROBAT |



BY ALAN STRANKS & GEORGE DAVIES

YOU'RE MAD - ALL OF
vou}... YOULL NEVER
PROVE ANYTHING
AGAINST ME...

LAUR... THIS /S
NOT THE SORT
OF SLEEP.



























HO-HO--
| |TO READ

if WHEN I
"an \| [RINISH Joes /

ose ny :

oy.
ie.

— WAO-HO- IT'S THE FU Tt HOW DIDI GET,
(THING T EVER READ- TE INTO THIS?
\ 7

LZ ane




BY DAN BARRY


















GREETINGS, MY SUBJECTS! WE ARE GA =D f -T NOST FANTASTIC )
HERE TO CELEBRATE THE ARRIVAL Ji | An ERRIBLE oa
DR. CARSON WHO IS RETURN DAY! W ii 4c RE THAT si
ARE ALSO GOING TO RID OURSELVES OF THE CROUCHES IN THE oie
TRAITOROUS QUEEN MARLA., mle] | CHAMBER BELOW ME!












THE KRAKEN ! i
a | Pree otuee



BY ALEX RAYMOND

WHEW! MORAY, MY BOY, ) jj
My» YOU GOT TROUBLE! je








PLACE EVER! }

SZ ; r ae
DMG econ vm we:

NO« THATS

MY BOBOs




‘HE. PHANTOM :

fol thd Ee lee ine

NEVER MIND THE KID DAN.

LETS GRAB THE TOY DOG
AND GET OUTA ya
HERE! pres

Tessa <

NI fe
|

ANYBODY ELSE WANT A DOSE
OF LEAD? WE MEAN BUSINESS.
SO DON'T NOBODY. ::-=—> 41
TRY ANY FUNNY -(-> # Whe
= at STUFF \ |
oF : |



SUNDAY

!



| ADVOCATE

ADVOCATE

PAGE THIRTEEN

ne

HOW THE FROG BECAME
y A PRINCE









One day . we pd youse girl was
sweeping the steps in front of her cottage,
when suddenly she heard a cry: “Please
help me,” said a little frog.

“I'm tired and hungry,” he whimpered.
So she carried him into the house aud
set a dish of Royal Pudding before him
He took one taste—and poof

there stood a handsome F
bewitched,” he said, “until ye
me this Royal Pudding,” So the
married and lived happily ever




By Appointment
Cia Distillers
to the Late
King George VI

THE COLGATE WAY
TO COMPLETE
HOME DENTAL CARE

Â¥CLEANS YOUR TEETH
LEN

VGLEANS YOUR BREATH ( @
Risk tad Sa

Always beysh your teeth
tight after cating with ,

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SPECIAL OFFERS AVAILABLE MONDAY TO WEDNESDAY AT ALL BRANCHES

ee Usually



NOW “ASSORTED CHOCOLATE BONBONS—} Ib b






1.38
CONDENSED MILK .... a 33 31 ns CHOCOLATE BONBONS—' Ib. boxes 1.25
‘CE FER Us sii . CHOCOLATE PEPPERMINT—) Ib. boxes 1.25
0.1K, COPFEE—'2 Ib Pkgs. 0... 10 60 CHOCOLATE PEPPERMINT— |; Ib. boxes 65
VIM iiseeinsscsssnradsonsroassrorevnasensarivonnys oan 30 27 QUALITY STREET ASSORTED TOFFEE &
MACARONI WITH CHEESE—Tins 23 20 CHOCOLATE’ S—Tins ; Y ‘ 1.40
WOREE MRO es Be eee ay nh ae 32 30 RUSSEL CHOCOLATE—} Ib. boxes 12
‘ ws p x . « GLAMOUR CHOCOLATES—-\ Ib. boxes 92
GILBEY’S PORT WINE—Qrt. Bots. $3.00 $2.60 See ae ae 1139
GUAVA CHEESE oo. o.oo. ccssssssseseoseeerceseens ie 84c. per Ib. TOFFEES—} tb. tins 92
ASSORTED CHOCOLATE BONBONS—1 Ib. boxes $2.30 TOFFEES—|{ 1b, tins Al

=







TG
SILVER
SPOON

By JOHN GALSWORTHY

WHITE
MONKEY

By JOHN GALSWORTHY

The Silver Spoon is the second full novel in John

_ The white Monkey was first published in 1924. It
is the first novel of the second trilogy in the Forsyte
Chronicle which John Galsworthy named A Modern
Comedy. The story opens in 1922 and presents most
of the older Forsytes who have still their part to play,
but. Fleur and Michael and many new characters

. typical of this period after the First World War, move
forward into the limelight.

Galsworthy’s trilogy. A Modern Comedy which

triumphantly resumes the Forsyte Chronicles after the

close of the Saga. It is separated from its predecessor

The White Monkey (1924) by “an interlude” named
A Silent Wooing, and continues the story of Fleur and
The White Monkey was brilliantly successful and

assured the future of this second trilogy. the Forsytes from 1924 onwards.

ON SALE AT THE ...

STATIONERY

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- IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE



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aEIRy orrar , ?entem - “6
PAGE FOURTEEN . SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY, AUGUST 17,1952
e . ; —
GLASSIFIED ADS a eae | a
or | SHIPPING NOTICES JOHN
REAL ESTATE ;JNDER THE IVORY HAMMER | —__ shee oe an
ereren. peer CLERK—A lady Clerk for a Commis-| ~ msireceseeonls |
1. Approximately 1 acre of land (ara-| By nstructions veeelved from the|s!on Office with a knowledge of Short- ROYAL “ |
ble) situated at Venture, St. John, con-|Iweurance Co. I will sell on Friday,| end and typewriting and general office m4:
DIED FOR SALE teining a number of fruit tress and| August 2 at Messrs. Chelsea Garage,| Woik. Previous experience required = . The M.V. ‘‘CARIBBEE” will ac- -
— young canes. Price $1,100 * | Pinfold § “) «1951 =~ “Mayflower | 4Pply to box XYZ, C/o Advocate Adver- STEAMSHIP co, cept Cargo and Passengers for
P 1 ; a if a 2. Property situate at Fairfield, | Triumph’ (omly done 8,000 miles) | ting Dept. Stating Qualifications. Ap- Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat,
WILLIAMS oe ant Pensa — Sr ‘| AUTOMOTIVE Grazettes. House 18 x 9 with ined ant ‘Damaged in accident) (1) 1947 14 H.P, | Plications treated strictly confidential SAILING FROM EUROPE Nevis and St. Kitts. Saifing Tues- BLABDO™
oe ee Ane or techedinew) land 60 x 40h Price $1,500 | Stndard in perfect working order. 3t.5-Ee—-Se M.§. STENTOR 2and A 1952 Gay 39th. ingt:
Hei (wife) Verna (Daughter) One (1) 1946 } Mercury Eight Ford, De. OSCE. TUS mle ~at a.m erms cas. MISCELLANEO . HERA 29th August, i
Thelma, Parka, ‘Theora, wae | Ea ciniionta: sound. Apply: B, A. Simp ohh i ee Dial 3925 and VINCENT GRIFFITH, US s COTTICA = The M.V. “MONEKA”™ will ac- « ce. ]
Mrs. Ivy Mahon, Miss Gloria,json, Cliff Cottage, St. John. = aaa r. —— S. NESTOR copt Cages and Pinnmean, for i.
Miss locta. (nieces) Tomey 17.8.52—6n 17. 8.88—In -8.0etns ACCOMMOMADIGNS, foc, Baclietey, 1 ws J Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat, AFS. EV.A.
or. 4 \ iad aletleates aig Ze a e _, | estes | —-—-——sshenstenn nnn om i AD ‘i , f
ee ee $2—in] CARS—Frefect Ford late 1950. Very | aide eng Ponaic Sag tecnmnited, Way- UNDER THE SILVER | xmecate (x 9 S294. | SAILING TO TRINIDAD, PARAMARIBO ——a ‘
esdhebelien pan iene -++ Eood condition, also one Austin A—T0| i jp Sete, Ago, 1951. Ve od condition too, both r \LADIES COAT — Write “Coat” c/o] ™.S. 25th August, SCHOONER
THANKS aha Rb a a aauie Dial Bees) caF8) de Abreu, a Trained Auctioneer & Reali] ON THURADAY 21st by order of Rev. ao ‘Advtg. Dept. _ 16.8.58—t4.n.| MoS. Sth September, 1952 B.w.I. OWNERS’ Class Property and Land
~~ 17.8.58—t.f.n an Sonera ant Wile always Lead} sr. Lane, we will sell his Purnitire a SAILING TO PRINIDAD & CURACAO ASSOCIATION (INC) Always Available
KING _We the undersigned beg to return a : a trac ves, Sale Values and, Clovelly” corner of Pine Read and SITION WANTED S S. BOSKOOP I7th August, 1952. Consignee. Telephone No. 4047
thanks to all those in sympathy. sent! CapP—One Vauxhall 14.6 in good con- | Sétisfaction. Beat These Five —1. AT “Ave. Belleville, which includes NURSE DORIS VENNEH a qualified| M.S. HERA 16th September, 1952 —
wreaths, cards or attended, the fun cition apply M_ I. Weekes, Cliff Planta. | PAYSWATER, NEAR SEA—Almost New| p\)ing Table, Upright Chairs, Serving | Midwife, is willing to assist anyone who FOR SALE
et my dear beloved mother Im igan ticn, St. John 17.8.52—2r, | 3 Bedroom ‘with Basins) Stone Bungaiow and Ornament Tables, Morris Chairs and} is in need of a nurse. Address: Chap- 8S. P. MUSSON, SON & CO., LTD.
King (87), Indian Ground, St. Peter,} | Aluminum Roof, 2 Toilets, Stone Garage | Cushions, Long Bookshelf all in Mahog- | man’s Lane, C/o Miss Gladys Best. Agents {
which-tobdk place on August 0th 1952 ]” Gap one 10 h p. Ford in fine condi-| © Setvant's Room, about 7,000 sq. ft.,[ors; Upright and Arm Chairs in Rush; : 16.8. 5260 | _—_—_o
Clarence Jemmott icon) and family A bargain for someone. Phone Going for about £2,200. 2 AT WORTH-| Drawing Room Suite (Settee and
eerie 8.52—In. | « C. R. Applewhaite, Lakes Folly ING MAIN RD.—Facing Sea, Right-of- 2 Chairs). Ladys Roll Top Desk; Office es s VILLA VICQUE, St. VENCENT
* "17. 8.52—3n | WaY to Sea, A ¥ Bedroom Bungalow Type. | Desk and Revolving Chair: Walnut Mird. —-Brautifully situated house built
ab weenene| | - —— — Very Good Condition, Garage & Ser- Sideboard Pictures, Records; Single Bed ana a on beams of local stone with magnificent
IN MEMOKIAM CAR—One Hillman Minx 1951. Mileage Sr eee over 6,000 sq. ft., Going | tead, Simmons Spring and Bed; Press, view, only 3% miles pon Ripe
9,500. Contact Ralph Branch, Society, GARD! uw 2,200. 3. NEAR NAVY | pressing ‘Table, Towel Rail all in town, 100 yards Sgiete lee
Silat, “t. John. Phone 95,220 16.8.52—2n oe ENS — A 3 Bedroom (with Basins | 1; hogany; tron Bedstead and bed, Beach with excellent vans
BENN-In® affectionate memory of my | ———— € eae anne Bungalow, about|wnam. Washstand aud Ware: Pine Ware SOUTHBOUND 2—4 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, large
beloved grandmother Helen Albertha CAR—Prefect Ford In good working Garage a Served’ Roof, 2 Toilets. | epece- Electrolux Oil Refrigerator, Sails Sails Salle Arrives Salls lounge (23 x 15), verandah
Benn, who departed this life on August] order. Contact Ceeil Brandford, Ivy. | sq , Going for Ko Room, about, 14,000 Kitchen Tables, Larder, 3 ome Montreal ‘Halifax Beston Barbados Barbados ~ x 1%), and usual outbutldings
St. Michae 6. — » : Vv y Oil Stove ” ven; ite ete
Beier in my heart Wes a picture tea ee Cove: eee Almost New 3 Bedroom Rrranaita, "Books and other items. CANADIAN CRUISER os 12 Aug. 15 Aug. = “Aug. 2 Aug.
More precious than sliver or goid CAR—1938 Vauxhall in Good working | cione” prelnn Bungalow, Stone Garage | ‘Sate ii.30 olock. ‘Terms cash CANADIAN CONSTRUCTOR 22 Aug. 25 Aug. —- 3 4 Sep. LYNCHBURY, BELLEVILLE —
The peture of my dear grandmother | order. |New tyres. Contact Keith Hay-|4.000 a. ft. Going tor ahowt “£120 |SRANKER TROTMAN & CO. LADY ROONEY ncn | ee SS em Bie ||) Pigetaety cttunies 2 ctarer ce
Whose memory will never grow old.| side. Dial 2656. 13,8.52—6n, | .’ CANADIAN CHALLENGER Sept. “I — oi
To be remembered by~ | Soe EALEVILLE-—Almost Stone | 3 perhaps LADY NELSON ...._—s- 22 Sept. 25 Sept. 27 Sept. 6 Oct, W Oct. ||| 12,900, Saat." vgh callerscs image
Violet Worrell (grand-dayghter!, Wynell| CAR—One Wolseley 8 hp, in perfect| conont’s Room. La ao Garage, pL ge Se ye: Pat A “"": | May be rented for entertainments of all samefag roar. Riding roam, stugy
pnd — Patricia Worrell ‘great-grand-{ condition, Apply Eddie Gill C/o H | fo 000. IN LIGH Sores ag Under pect R kinds, on application to the Parochidl NORTHBOUND well fitted kitc a. $ doub le ped
daughters), William Worrell, ! Jason Jones Garage. 14,8.52—4n TOO LANE ~ UNDER THE SILVE Treasurer of St. Andrew or the Caretaker. Arrives Sails Arrives = Arrives pes rooms, intuit’, usual offices
17.8.52—1n ae * Desirable 2 Bedroom Cottage, Light, HAMMER For Picnicking and afternoon enter~, Barbados Barbados SBeston eonres 7 Offers Se £3,000
—_——————|_ LORRIES Two 5-ton Fordson lorries. | V2, exces — eee a moan | tainments $8.00 For dances $15.00, ee ea ory ane ei ab 13 = would be considerc
BREWSTER—In Loving Memory of My | Good tyres. New Batteries, low mileage|RGuGiH” IN| TUDOR oT c-Bocinse | Qn Tuesday 19th by order of Mrs, Har- | —— CANADIAN CRUISER a so 23 Sept. BEMERSYDE, sT.
Dear Daughter, Maureen Brewster, who} und good tyres. Recently overhauled.| premises & Residence. IN NELSON } 2! Cummins we will sell her House Ap- NOTICE CANADIAN CONSTRUCTOR Sept. 19 Sept. ai Smee 2 Oct. —Gmongiy bulls’ coud etooh LAWRENCE
feli asleep on 16th August, 1940 Pr ‘ced to sell. C. A. Williams Airy Hill,|gr 2" a" 3 Bp f pcintments at “Chelholme”, Chelsea PARISH OF ST. PHILIP LADY RODNEY a 30 Sept. 2 Oct, 1 Oct. 12 Oct. 16 Oct. galow spacious airy rooms and
Gone from us but leaving Memories | st. George. Phone 4081. ) Business Premises” & Residence, | 24tdens which includes: Tenders for the conveyance of Paup-|GANADIAN CHALLENGER = 6 Oct. 8 Oct. — gf Oat. 2 Oct. | Gallerics, Accoutmo@atian’ com-
Death Can never take away 16.8.52—4n | ta" PENDULUM of weeaioe Dining Table, upright Chairs, China| .../ LADY NELSON oT. tad 19 Oct. 21 Oct. 30 Oct. 31 Cet. 4 Nov, prises: separate drawing and
Memories that will always linger a ; RECTITUDE } ~ inet, Rockers, Berbice and’ Morris Paris a
Whiist upon the earth we stay _| ‘TRUCKS—One 1940 Dual Gear ¥-8/ AND SLOWLY “ROD SURE EE aut | chairs, Double End Settee; all in mahog- ta) Moone say pase We. ie oe San aan aon pee Tee
oes, an Fae Tre bain. hood: eorkine ona Sex iyren’ (ee i aoa ieee otis Ja eae des Sy cake alee tan a Bent “Wood. & tb) bons ae se neeine to the Gers] For further particulars, apply to— = rooms, oe and mene,
NN seen at Lodge Stone Works, Lodge Hill, ‘ | 2ush Ch and Rockers; Glass & China, Hoepital, " m aaa iteates -
BENTHAM—In Loving Memory of Ou st Michael, Dial 20656. Keith Rayside, | °"¢ ar eee PY casing ore re U aime & Tea Services; Congoleum and =e ee: Secale ee ar ee he GARDINER AUSTIN & Co., LTD. —Agents. pence te alge tee ee
Dear Mother Mrs. Helena Bentham who} Manager, | Purehaser will be given work eT eat te ATne in Real Estate} tugs; Single Bedstead with Box Spring; ater t — ac Son tr tease nit eee
WEMGns cacy waigenobers” ray | cncannoeteormas SAS | BY THE VERY LIGHT YOUR Nerina | Jcuble Bedstead with Vooe opr oan: | Clerk {0 the Board 9 Guatiors.| \$G09S00G0SS0S0980SS9009500969908 590093 I00OOOS® | |] opinion worlld "be “very | sultable
2 5 r ILL 3111, Call at ; .
‘pnad forget you, But neve ELECTRICAL “Olive Bough,” Hastings, Near Pavilion s Qictums Very ne ‘Cabinet atin oaie 16.8.52—3n. We have just opened a Lovely Assortment of rouse.
aa iceccoeraomal Court. Taek tor My. ees any; Simmons Folding Cot; Painted PLASTIC HOUSEHOLD ITEMS anak wenden: Nia saad
Always remembered hy, her children pethen ie? Hole Gui s/@'o Ks wr with 1. Corner property at Tweedside Ra fj Pes, Pine Waggon. Zinc Top Tables, | ; RENCE —- Well placed house with
Rieen, Chagles, George, amcor 5 Pie Drill Stands. DaCosta & Co., ‘Lta., Suitable for Grocery Business o Larders, a eeeees, ©) shaves sled we PARISH OF ST, PHILIP JAM DISHES, ICE CUBES e 4 bedrooms, large living room and
Constance King (Cousin) 17.8.52—19 { ; tensils, Gibson Refrigerator, in perfect| Applications for the Post of Nurse at : galleries. Excellent sandy beach
Electrical Dept. 14.8.52—6n Mechanic Shop. tian Blinds with Steel ii be re- ; y
‘See : 2. 1 property at Collymore Roc! condition, Vene D lis, - 2B hi M.T the Bt. Ehiie'a Amos Ss: tae REFRIGERATOR DISHES € and good bathing Full details
> G.E.C. REFRIGERATOR, 4 cubic ft. standing on 1/8 acre of land. Wate J 1's, ce, oe tie, Gus Wi-| eto ‘ on application.
FOR RENT First class Soneition, Streernve, armets installed and wired for ¢lectrieity Joey puliding Blocks, Garden Tools|“ ‘Applicants must be qualified as a and many other Useful Items for the Home. t WYN:
price for a housewife. Apply L. & H.| 3. 3,800 sq. ft. of land at Tweedsid che | Barrow, Lumber,” Plants, Rose! PP —_ Mt e; an must forward é YNDOVER, St. PETER --
—areniennsinennrenenns | Millar, Reed Syreety Disl S701 Boek Deicen ie eet. r eel Drumd and many other items of | Siar gine auataadies tek Bapuenel THE MPORIUM ¢ ‘Tite county hone wilt Over 17.8,52<2n,| 4. 1 (2) Roof boarded and shingle § "Tees in Tl 50 o'dieck. wemews with od iv Certificates: CENTRAL E : acres containing productive vege-
HOUSES House with shed and kitchen a wat Sale 11 = eee as well as the $ tahue and. flower gexdons, = 2
RADIO-GRAM—One (1) Hallicrafter Pine Gap, Collymore Rock, Pric: J “25 of competency. oe Corner Broad and Tudor Sts. : arge orchard has been completely
rn P ncio-Gram, In good condition. Apply $1,550 in’ Good Condition. Lan § BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.,/| The sooeaste auanens “will be ait: ‘ modernised by the present owner.
AN APARTMENT at “Ocetta", Bay St..fc¢ arthur Mayhew. “Wallsbrook"” River Can be Rented. Auctioneers quired : assume ere are wide verandahs,
near Woodside, suitable for a married] Roaq. Phone 4748 or 2382. 5. 1 House with Shed at Huntes Rd. 15.8.52—2n, | September, aay. on ae saa . ——— drawing and dining rooms, 3 dou-
couple or ladies. No children. Apply 16.8. 52—8n Land can be rented. Also Small further ‘particulars, ble bedrooms with washbasins,
w thin to Miss Douglas. 17.8,52—1n. House. ae bred =, Treasurer's modem —— —, ser-
——— Apply Jos. St. Hill, Real Estate . Off ] Sal ents’ rooms and garage prop-
A nice, large two-bedroom Apartme.. POULTRY Agent or Dial 4837, Tweedside Road. 1¢ dla e P. re Board of Guavdians 0 Miniat re erty of distinction.
each with running water at Ventno. net att ear eine 12.8,52—3n. Clerk to the seatlinen ak: ah inits
Christ Church. FULLEAS—Pure Br re Provost Marshal's Act . 1904 St. Philip. eter —
2 Galicries, Reception or Sitting-roon. | Pullets, just starting to lay. Excellent! 4,QUSE—One board and shingle house a rev et1904-0) ‘ 30) 8. 52—Tn. estate type house built af sine
and all conveniences, Dial 4100. aying strain. John Alleyne. Bbworth,| }iapggatt Hall X Road 14 x 9 ghedroof} On Friday the 22nd day of August 1952 to be held at Contains large living room with
15.8,52—-31. | St. Peter. Fhone 91-20. 17.8.52—2n. |i4 x 68% Galvanise. English sashes. No|at the hour of 2 o'clock in the afternoon NOTICE French windows leading onto
“eCUnE’ Man if Ausis RE” San ith yap OR BALE AT HIGHOLERE PAu | eu#0nable offer refused. 17-#.52—1n | will be sold at my office to the highest PAKISH OF CamIEE cuunon ae THE BARBADOS MUSEUM covered apenas, with Yhewt. oF
" mae es ; : : t under the a APPLICATIONS post sem d ;
a four bedroom house on the seaside,}| PUPP?ES—Two Pure Bred Bull Mastif€| jouSE—One back house 2% x 11 and ae ed ioe ane Seon oa > keeper, Ch, Ch. aioe (Marked On AUGUST 29TH from 2 — 6 p.m. rooms and usual outbuildings,
at St. Lawrence Gap. Tully furnished, Puppies, three months old. (Bitches) | sjedroof 22 x 11 and kitchen for sale All that certain piece of Land containing | “Applications”) will be received by arate, poe Ryan aged oy ty ea
telephone, Refrigerator ete, Phone #496.] four Siamese Kittens, Male and females. | Appiy Weolley Jones Fitt Gap, Westbury |by estimation 4 Acres 2 Roods 14%/}Mrs. F. A. Talma, Churchwarden, AUGUST 30TH from 12 to 6 p.m. Pete ~_ ene ae mer ee
15,8. 52—3n 17.8.53-—-3n. | Road.. 17.8.52—In |] Perches situate at Crane we an Paciee Welches, ci. Ch. up to 3 p.m. the 18th And AUGUST SIST f 2 ose gran K > a
innit ee a ates of St. Philip butting and bounding on] August, 1952. rom 2 — , ees
BENSAM— Unfurnished, Sony at Bee. LIVESTOCK LAND — Various portions of land. | lands of Clift Cottage, on lands now or| ‘Terms and conditions available from Pp.
Beasts agiresnive wall tonngalow, 6 ber. Apply to A, R, Brome, Layne’s Rd.,|late of Sarah Blades, on lands now OF} the Parochial Office. 9.8.52—4n.
* a letely private and secluded
3 ty f Mary Carter on a private road f Orchids a comp!
‘appoin' 2.8.52—t.t.n.| Sweet Cygnet. Aberford 4 year gelding | _HOUSE—One meme built board and jor late o s ANTED Th hibition will comprise a display o rehi bathing beach. The grounds of
20 panied | by Sea Sick out of Kitty Foyle. Both | Shingle house, 2a =. with shed. | 18 feet wide ee = —- re eet ine Ww e Exhib Pp Em y, m about 1% acres are weil wooded
BUNGALOW—On Sea, Main Road Hast-] Winners in England. Apply S. A. ae to Roy Williams, we eae ee One Viow® ond "Crane HOUSE on long lease by October Herbaceous border, Fernery, thuriums, aan neUih seadtin: bi. cenentien
ings, very comfortably furnished, Eng-| Watcott, Apes Hill, St (sn, vie me yo. ; Wills’ rempectivers, Bulleangs, &e,, ap- - Sea Coast a overion sea. R Garden, Rock Garden and Cacti Garden into ‘one of the thine piaeen of
Ush~bath— 2 bedsooms — Sesvante E ~“HOUSE—Unsured) and Land (4,626 sq. | praised as follows :— “Sued vee Hastings, St. ‘ oe y oe san e house is of 2
yooms ja deanten -— Fone f — fect) with kitchen garden and fruit} The whole area of land with all bulld- orcas Soothing, area et Price of Admission will be 2/- and will storeys and possesses noticeable
‘Telephaw “+ 8, phases MISCELLANEOUS bearing trees (Government water in-|igs to TWELVE THOUSAND POUNDS Top Rock. Preferably unfur- include a FREE visit to the Museum
FOR WENT FROM 181 SEPTEMBER| Ayaaqgue stalled? in St, James near bus ang. main | £12000 0. 0.) | Attached from gic {fy mished and enclosed. Call K. D. SBA FORT, ST, JAMES — Caré
‘A’ SMALL COTTAGE Gt. Lawrence.) fine tue sowie Mee cilee Ware | ic ocen Som, comtnct C. Maher 0/0 | Furnival sor Deposit to be paid on day of |i Rewards 4145 oF 2376, 1.1 $2—tn TRY AND BE THERE fully re-modelled 2 storey house
on sea, A small cottage, furnished, two] “jours, Early bouks, Maps Autographs ; ~ | puechnes. on one of the most attractive sites

























Pores Piacoa “iHollywood “St. ‘c., at Gorringes Antique Shop adjoining) “STIRLING”, a t atonewall T. T. HEADLEY,

in this increasingly popuiar arga.
17, 8.52

eet a and sand
room, verandahs on
io. Stele detached

pales. g ovat Seont Glut 3.2.68—t.t.n, | owe in Centre Avenue | ; Provest Marshal.
L = of n 7 square feet of land, and con- | Provost meranis} se, Office,

eit BLOCK STONE—A large quantity SYRATHCLYDE, St. Michael, standing| 6th August, .
Migr tnke reba seoeiine ely SS lock stone suitable for sawing purposes | taining open and closed verandahs, dvaw-~ 7.8.5%—3n
Flat for month o on fem : Bataleon aiso a quantity of machine-breken stone, | ing and dining rooms, 3 bedrooms, each
eee eee | ee Neat | Beact.| Conerete stone “4” chips %” chips 3/8”) with running water, kitchen é&c., and é
sex ‘bathing. Apply to “Shone 8496 | 2248 and dust. Contact Keith Rayside, | usual conveniences. Water and Electrici- Pabdlic Official Sale
Fi.ts, St. Lawrence Gap. sé 58--3r Manager Lodge Stone Warks (<3 , Dial) ty installed. Garage and Servants’ room u

dent 52—6n. | in yard. 5

Inspection on papplication to Miss, Bree | (The Provost Marshal's Act ot
GLASS for all purposes, show windows, Parkinson, Strathclyde, Dial 2452 (1904-6) § BO). i ali
jass cases, house windows and doors. ‘The property will be set up for sale On Friday the Sth day o' Sgn
irrors and dressing tables, wardrobes,| by public competition at our office, |iss2 at the hour of 2 o’eleck in
oon Will be sold at my office to the
52—4n, | 29th August at 2 p.m highest bidder for any sum not under

Lawrenee Gap.



















NOW IN STOCK

Petroleum Jelly (White) Household Wax
Esso Lighter Fuel

NEW BUNGALOW, ROCKLEY—
Commodious home with 3 bed~
zooms, large living room," wide
verandah With good view, kitehen,
pantry, servants’ quarters ‘and ~
storerooms. Good situation hear
Golf Course £4,300.




































SWEET FIELD

Lovely Stone House, comprising
| Upstairs three bedrooms, large liv-
in€ room, dining room, 2 toilets and
baths, one with tub bath and hot
and cold water, gallery, Down-
irs: spare rooms, kitchen, and
shower room. Standing on ap-
proximately 2% acres of land
about 100 yards ‘from Gibbs beach.

Inspection by appointment only.

FLAT—Top Fiat, Haggatt Hall, Fur-
nished. Exceedingly Cool — Availabic
jnimediately for 12 to 15 moriths — Under

3 miles Bridgetown, Apply ee sthrooms ete, All low prices. G. W.|James Street, Bridgetown, on Friday jafter
Frost, on Hremises. Putehinson & Co., Lid 17.8
noes Naina a speincnmneermaentseetiess



Petroleum Jelly (Brown)









2 pores eee * “ YEARWCUD & BOYCE, the appraised value,
FO AN APPROVED TENANT arees}| HARDWOOD POSTS in various lengths Solicitors, | All that certain piece of Land contain.
BUNGALOW, newly built in Barbarees} 14 sizes — a good selection. N. B. 17,8,52—9n Jing by admeasurement 1,524 Square Fee
Rd. Containing drawing and dinine! towell, Bay Street. 16.8.82—3n. | ee feituite at Kensington Tenantry in Parish
rooms, three bedrooms with running | ne | The “BOWER”, situated at the Gar- | of Saint Michael butting and bounding
water and electricity, Kitchenette, om INTERNATIONAL TORNADO K.30—|rison standing on over seven thousand | oy lands of Leotta Griffith, on a pr My ‘
va:its’ room and garage. Spacious yard. «60.00 nearest. Owner leaving Island.|sy. ft. of land, contains gallery, 2] road way called “Rock Gap’, on otite
Dial.4091 or 4551 sk gl sana eee a enquiries: Yacht Club or ‘Tolaphons aan. bedrooms, Drawing Room, Dining Room lands of the janie ge es
eee ‘ 17.8.52—1n, | und other modern conveniences, gne |and on another
“VENTNOR” — ist Ave. Belleville. ene. a Mmsington, New Road", oF bowever
Immediate possession. 3 Bedrooms, each 4 FOCKETED SPRING MATTRESSES. |\ te same may abut and bound, ap
with running water, Dial we ek A limited number of Patent Spring| “TyURCISDON"—On the sea at Max- | praised as follows:— wc
: —'" | ied = Mattresses. Each = individu-| well's Coast, Christ Church, standing om | The whole area of land to. Ps
Spring covered in Calecoe. Britain's} 3 yoods 18 perches of land, Garage for 2) 1\0NDRED AND EIG! a).
et manufactured type. 3 feet (single) | cars. Water and electric services in- | DOLLARS AND FIFTY CaS a
t 866.39 each. Also ilable in 4 feet | ctaiied. Inspection by appointment with | Attached from Marie Louise Hunte

\) LEARN TO EARN eee inches, Trice on application. The) the tenant Mrs. Roach. Dial 8461, ana towards satisfaction, &c.

NEWTON LODGE, MAXWELL
COAST — Solidiy constructed
stone house containing enclosed
galleries, spacious drawing room
ond dining room, and breakfast’
room, 3 bedrooms, 2 garages etc.,
Lately occupied by U.S. Consul.
£6,000.



Esso Handy Oil
Flit in gls., qrs., pts.
Nujol Mistol Flit Powder



Paraffin Oil -— $1.80 per gal.








BUNGALOW

At Rockley New Road on ap-
proximately 19,000 square feet of
land Magnificent view of goif
eourse. Three bedrooms, drawing
and living rooms, kitchen Down-
stairs; Garage, servant's room
with bath and toilet, and enough
room for laundry and workshop,




























Further Particulars, Apply : RESIDENCE, THE GARDEN,






WORTHENG — Modern coral stone
bungalow on corner site with
wide frontages. Pleasant garden,



with flower beds, lawn, concrete:



terrace, and number of bearing



fruit trees. Accommodation com-

R. M. JONES & 60., LTD.

prises large living room, covered
BUNGALOW

At Rockley New Road, Three
bedrooms, drawing and living
room, modern kitchen, toilet and
‘bath. All built-in cupboards.
‘Very close to the Golf Course.
‘The last available spot at this
very residential area. Immediate
possession,

twndard Agency (B'dos) as Ee The above will be set up a oe at] N.B ws Deposit to be paid on day

treet, Dial 3620 19.8.52—3n. | public competition at our office, James |of purchase

& reet, on Friday the 20th August 1952 at T. T. HEADLEY, *
Ube Kibe now to the Daily) 200 p.m Provost ey ptr

elegraph, England's leading Daily News- HUTCHINSON & SED

aper now arriving in Barbados by Al BE ee

only a few days after publication 1 See reas ae eee

oudon, Contact (xn Gale, C/o. Advo- “THE HERMITAGE” situate at the I

gallery, 3 bedrooms with built-i
Thousands of L.S.C. Students
te ead ape warts

ive inerease e salar,
through studying our eagy postal
courses © BOOK-KEEPING, SEC-
“RETARYSHIS, BUSINESS Of-
‘GANIWZATION, COMMERCIAL
‘LAW, ECONOMICS, ete, Reduced
fees to overseas students. Diplo-
mas awarded. bot tree.—
LONDON SC



wardrobes, well fitted kitchen,



garage with covered way to house,
servants’ quarters and all usyal

{ offices. All public utility ser-

vices. This property carries our
highest recommendation £4,500.

WINDY WILLOWS, PROSPECT,

St. JAMES — Soundly construct-

ed stone bungalow with spacious



ERSONAL



aie Co, ,Ltd., Local Representative | corner of White Park and Country Road



fet. 3118. 17.4.53-+.£.9 | stording on about 123,040 square feet of



land. The House contains Gellery, two

1
\
t
\ : ainst
a ( STOVES. The famous “Florence” Stove: | jiving rooms, dining room, eight bed~- The public are hereby arned ag
(
(
‘
(

CHURCHILL

At Maxwells Coast Road. Three
bedrooms combination living and
dining room, modern kitchen,
toilet and bath. Good Residen-
tial area, Excellent sea bathing.
A sound investment at the very
low Teserve Price.














COMMERCE
(Dept B.A.5) 116, High Holborn
f London, W.C.1. England.

‘ Louise

2 and 3 Burner Models are obtainable | rooms, three dressing rooms, water and | giving credit to my wife, Carmen

1m Laurie Dash & Co., Tudor Street. | electric light, ' Inspection amy day be-| Murrell (nee Mascoll) asi do' not hold,
‘hone 5061. 17.§.52—3n. | tween ten and four. myself responsible for es en
Sa EREa EE NERRE NDR The above will be set up for sale at) cise contracting any é at ore e' i. Pa
STOVES—Just arrived. Shipment of - | public tion at our Office, Lucas| my neme un.ess by*a_ written
nd 3 Burner Stand Models of the famous Etrest, on Friday the 22nd day of August| signed by oer CLEMENT MURRELL,
GREEN ARROW" Blue Flame Oil| 1952 at 2.30 p.m Sa

St. Philip.
sroves with the long lasting Fibre-GLASS CARRINGTON & SEALY Bader HS 52--2n

Approximately five and three quarter acres of
land, situated at Saint James, between the Colony Club
and the Coral Reef Club, with 204 feet sea frontage
will be sold as a whole or in part, at a very reasonable
price.



room, and storerooms. Offers in-
vited.

MODERN BUNGALOW,
GRAEME HALL TERRACE — A
nicely situated stone bungalow on
a corner site. Three bedrooms,
living room, dining room, veran-
dah, kitchen, detached garage
and servants’ quarters, pleasant
gerden and well laid out lawns
and borders of flowering shrubs.
£3,750.















WYNDAL

Situate on the kley
road. Purtly stann eer
plaster comprising three bed:
dining and living room, toilet and
bath, and a large gallery, The
out buildings comprise servant's
room, and garage. Stangling on
approximately 10,000 square feet
of d. This house is very close
to the famous Rockley beach,

BLUE VISTA

At Rockley New Road,
bedroom ‘bungalow Wiha

WiCKs. OBTAINABLE at all leading 14,8,52--dn
Uardware Stores, K. J Zee ee aetna ren i
& o,, Limited, Agents, Bridge ree’ OVA " — Con cece ncaa A AOI
Men was. . 16.8.52-—3n | @y, sosite Queen's Park, All modern| The public ure hereby. warnet against
= ane conveniences. For full Particulars] giving credit to my wite Pas ti ein
STOVES lks" 2 Bumer_ Table} Phone 5127. 16.8.52—-8n. | pee Worrell) as 1 do 4 antotee
Model Wickless Cookers, and TWin | oN ttEC— | reaponsible for anrone else won? te
surner “Beatrice” Oi: Stoves. Laurie] WINITFRED—Land’s End 2 storey house | any debt or debts in my apne
Yash & Co., Tudor Street, Phone 5061 |3 bedrooms, drawing and dining rooms,|9 written order signed J ea
17,8.52—4n. | bath, toilet, kitchen, light and water. Sad. ELIJAH



e
Contact Your Real Estate Agents:

REALTORS LIMITED.

151/152 Roebuck Street, = Barbados









COAST LAND, St. Sines
Several select plots of land are
available ranging in price from
22 cents per square foot upwards,



. , 2 Ashton Hall,
| Apply: “Stanley” Land’ End Phone re ’
.aBKES—For Sale at Blackman’s House | 4108, 16.8.52—2n St. TO aie



*Phone



St Joseph. Mahogany eee a pata % eas arae

yae) offers will be received up to We are instructed by Mrs STONE BUNGALOW, MAIN

FURNITURE \uguat, inspection any day, any hour./traynes of Brittons Cottage, Brittons ROAD, WORTHING—With good
\pply \

o Mrs. Jdhn Lee on the prem- | pill, to offer for sale about 86,000 square 3




COVE SPRING HOUSE, ST.
His Excellency the Governor and Lady Savage JAMES, — One df the few ‘fro
a aie Britton’s Hill, St. Michael. 6,8,52—3n plate of one Brathwaite, on lands now or h p-
poset, erage. und. fervenie moe DEXGLISH RAC HOR ES ee a NG nnn eee inte of Adriana Wilkinson on lands NOW | rescence ARRESTS will be in attendance on the 29th CTO 2 Sie OBA CORED. Wit






























living room, 2 large and 1 small
bedrooms, excellently pla ne
verandah directly overlooking

sea, downstairs kitchen, wervexits’














liv 3
es, and offers in writing made to her. | feet of land forming part of her prop- Laat ne, and living room. ing room 3 bedrooms. with
14,8.52—5n. | orty known as Brittons Cottage. The ee, galleny offering mag.
land is enclosed on three sides with a a Seaatiice se {Golf Course
substantial stone wall and there is @ ba 1 i. Cline ‘ 3
ANNOUNCEMENTS Hrelesew over the harbour, The a aomaman een a servants’ reom Say Boy! I was surprised to hear that
‘ . : . —— hole or in no Pp.
ST. MARGARET'S VICARAGE, would be sold as a Ww is ‘
more than four lots, All enquirigs shou i i ic 7 z
a een ; PHOTOGRAPHS—Exhibition of Photo-|be addressed to the undersigned | | 3) Vitamin BI is a world WENDOVER i
WEDNESDAY — 20th AUGUST, rcaphe by Barbados Camera Club at the CARRINGTON & SEALY, ne renowned @ppetice restorer. At Mile and a isleens ai z e
at 11,30 a.m Mioseum, Daily 10-6; Sundays 2, 30-6 Lucas arr iat Oe v Combined with blood-build- h ter. Another lovely
| We have received instructions 17, ~snapeeereseerammeeeeenaiaees hy ouse, 3 Ractieenna’ ye

ey ing minerals you have the
key to joyous buoyant

bs health,
2A: :

was selling 53

NAILS 37 cents per Ib.

And you know he informed me that he is giving 5%
discount. Say boy his store is ‘a real wonder.
His Customers wonder IF he has it.

He wonders WHERE it is.
His competitors wonder WHERE HE GOT IT
FROM to be ablp to undersell them and still give 5%
discount.

room, modern toil
oa hot and cold water ee
entahs. Outstanding view


















Advocate Stationery

‘Yuiple Mirror, Wardrobe ALL THE
VE IN MAHOGANY PYE
PADIO, 5 tube ins new) Cyp
Deuble Bedstead and Spring,
Double’ “Deep Sicep'’ Mattress,
Single SIMMONS Iron Bed, 6
Single Mattresses, 4 Folding Beds,
2 Bedside Tables, Hat Stand and
Drop-Leaf Table in Cyp, Occas.
Tapes tvarious), Adjustable Bed-
Lamps, Table Lamps, Writing

, Office Desk, Upright Chairs,
Children’s Furniture, Clothes Rack,
Coteand Spring, Ptd. Press, Misc.









Teu-Trojiey, Dressing Table with

tomers that I shall be away
from the Island for two
weeks from August 18, and
on my return will continue
[cing and Decorations,

table to seat 8, etx Dining Chairs,
This is to inform my Cus-
. pointment only. Inspection by ap-




COVE SPRING COTTAGE

Situate on the lov. james
Coast, on 2 pr Tee ot
ag iene ue own private bath-

omprising of three
bedrooms, separate drawing and

dining roo;
os ie m, study, open gallery








tion rooms, 6 bedrooms, kitchen,
pantry, large verandahs, garage
and store-rooms. Could be con-
verted Into Guest House or Club.

VIOLA DEGAZON,
' Pinfold Street.



CLUB

om the Rey. A. MELLOR to

t se of his Sas and

£ ‘CTS as listed below.

VIEWING MORNING OF SALE. NOTICE
3 Piece Sprung MORRIS Suite,

Oceas. Tables. Sideboard, Dining- —_—_—

PROPERTY, WHITE








—Imposing property with 3 recep-
ROAD — Solidly built 2 an
—

PAYMENT OF PRIZES
















ith hot and cold Water, modern

up to date kitchen. [| spec}
appointment only. 7 none

He sells:—



house with 7 bedrooms, spacious
Tays, Boy's Raleigh Bicycle, Ptd.

reception rooms and dining room;
Chest of Drawers, Stained Chest















































































































ash basins, separate toilet and

ath, kitchen garage, servant's
room, and store room. Excellent
bathing nearby A popular and
central district.

MALTA, ST, PETER—Exten-
sively re-modelled house of mas-
siv stone construction with
approx ‘4 acre flower gardens,
Jawns and young .fruit trees.
There are spacious verandahs on
two sides with views over beach,
large living room, 3 double bed-
rooms, 2 bathrooms {both with
tubs) modern kitehen and _ butler’s
pantry, downstairs is the laundry,
good servants’ accommodation for
3, 2 garages and storerooms. Full
public services plus own deep
well with electric pump. Right
of way over beach with superb
bathing. Opportunity for a dis-
criminating buyer.

ROUMAIKA, DAYRELL’S ROAD











Furniture, Large Dolls’ House,
e also aemened a i peine
8,
of: Drawers, Ptd Dressing. Mable EVANTON lron and Galvanize Sheets for vdgnyereion te fate, guest
Roeiied. ant ararean SEincleum, cae stone Bunerlaw. situate house, ‘school or offices.
Rush Rockers, Folding Gallery ‘ a raeme Hall, app. 20,000 ne LAND, TWEEDSIDE ROAD—O
Chairs, Screens, “Linen Basket, i. Prizes, 2/- Stand SW fa. feet of land with a magnif- for Roofs, ee etc., from $3.00 per sheet. main’ \pied..with. 1017, S¥oriteape,
Curtains, Kitchen Tables, War Ape Md eep, oites, Con Vy % inch % d I B d long ones too. Fdeal situation .. for _ business
Press, Misc Glassware and Pp Mutuel and Fore- prised of Three Bedrooms with ‘4, inc 78 an ron Bars an ig ee Total 87
Chine; Double and Single Larders, || Our Broad Street Branch ari-MuU a : adjoining toilet and bath, living Asbestos Sheets for Roofs SMENee ROS. HEGR: AMAEGE SMe: Bop
Electric en trays, an fo. 4 will be cast Competition ape a os poe. Sern room that S r ¥ BUSINESS PREMISES—DWELI
Sem erie Ol, Stove,’ @- {1 id an a mee Flat Sheets for Ceili d Partitions etc ING HOUSE, ROEBUCK STREET.
B “TURN Oil Stove, 2- TAN will be paid on Chi.dren Nursery, Kitchen, Sepa- Asbestos Flat or Ceilings an 1 .
Suber “FALKS” Oijl Stove, CLOSED FOR from Monday, 18th in- i thin ies rate Toilet and bath with hot and = pee Se retail danke. in
“VALOR” Oven large (as new), 7 uli] . colt water, Verandah to the ne ee Can
Good Kitchen Utensais Aluminum, STOCK TAKING stant. south and Patio to the north. The
i ec Lamps, Buckets, Laws + ‘a out buib ee . :
er riiver. Garden Tools, and J P Horses wryins e oy al a ¢ each Garage. =e een e A E. TA YLOR LTD. RENT. Ss
other articles 'rizes on an rom on- o lo le AL
e TUESDAY, 19TH AUGUST day 25th instant. WHITEHALL FLATS, CODRING-
AY, s : ‘ie " : TON HILL-—Choice 4
AUCTIONEERS Payment will be from ARBADOS REALTORS Limited Coleridge Street. Dial 4100. furnished, self-contained flats.
mae — 12.00 noon to 3.00 p.m. TD
Jobn ¥4. Biadon WEDNESDAY, 20TH daily. ARERIES a REAL ESTATE AGENTS a es e
§ . AuUl i
a ; sia Plantations
& ce. e G. A. LEWIS, Dial 4758 VALUERS Qualities are HIGH . Oy eiaea ae
Phone 4640 Y. DE LIMA & CO. LTD. | Secretary. TR ISI/KE Rorbuck Street, and > |
Plantations Building. “Your Jewellers” 15.8.52—3n JAMES STREET eeene Megpeceend Prices are LOW. 3!
?> £9 POOGPHOGGSGHODHOOHHHOM | OS cea Leryn
i



U jay
Called Here
Yesterday

Three hundred and eight in-
transit passengers from the S.S.
Uraguay sirolled the main streets
of Bridgetown yesterday. The
Uruguay under the command of
Capt. Hodges. arrived at 6.45 a.m.
yesterd@y from Trinidad, It is
consigned to Messrs. R. M. Jones.

The arrival of the Uruguay and
Lady Nelson brought the number
of vessels in Carlisle Bay to seven.
This is the largest number seen at
anchor for the month.

Ships in harbour were Valhall,
Arneta, Canadian Challenger,
Specialist, Crofter, Uruguay and
Lady Nelson. The Crofter, Spe-
cialist and Challenger are unload-
ang large quantities of genersl
cargo,

Only one intercolonial vessel
arrived in port: yesterday. She
was the Schooner Amanda T
which, brought 600 drums of colas
from Trinidad.

Can You Tell How
Tall Your Child
Will Grow

@From Page 11

under strict medical supervision.
The time is not yet here when
mother can bake a “shortening
cake” for junior, or buy pills
which will make him grow
taller.

What do the men and women
who are carrying on this work

AUGUST 1,







"Phiay point out that perhaps
even more important than any
treatment is the immense psy-
chological significance of the new
ability to determine in advance
the height a child may grow to.
Armed with this knowledge
parents can take steps to pre-
pare their children mentally to
being either too short or too tall.
Thus personality problems that
might arise in later life can be
partly tackled in childhood.
—L.E.S.

Australian Airmen
Spent 20 Months
In Red Prison

HONGKONG, Aug. 16.

Three Australian airmen who
were imprisoned for 20 months
by Chinese Communists after
their flying boat forced landed ia
the sea of Portuguese Macao said
to-day they had falsely confessed
to opium smuggling “just to get
back home.”

The trio who arrived here on
Tuesday, told a Press conference
to-day of “terrible experiences”
in dirty prison cells with dis-
eased Chinese political prisoners,
and the “mockery of a trial”.

“We shuddered at the thought
of having to do more time in that
jail when the People’s Court sen-
tence us to two years jail.” They
had lived on the sAme diet as
the Chinese—rice and vegetables.
Their only reading matter had
been four or five copies of the
Moscow English language news-
paper New Times.

One of the trio said that it was
on his return survey flight from
Chittagong in East Pakistan that
he was forced down off Macao.
He had intended to land at Hong-
Kong but the airport was closed
when he arrived before dawn, so
the Sun gave him permission to
go to Macao to pick up a radio
receiver to be repaired in Hong-
Kong.—v.P.

3 Die In Apartnrent

House Fire

ONTARIO, Canada, Aug. 14

Three persons were known to be
dead and at least 60 homeless fol-
lowing an apartment house fire
that threatened for a time to wipe
out a street in downtown Guelph.

Pdlice said the victims of the
$250,000 blaze were a grandmother
and two grandchildren with whom
she’ was baby sitting while their
parents went out last night. The
fire started in an auto repair shop
and spread quickly.





—U.-P.

Smyth Drowned

TAIPEH, Formosa.
Osmond Smyth, Australian mem-
ber of the United Nations Commis-
sion for the unification of Korea
was drowned here in a vain efforc
to rescue his friend, British Vice

Consul Adrian Conway Evans.
They were bathing in a moun-
tain stream yesterday at Shinku,
15 miles from Taipeh, when Evans
was caught by a rapid current and
shouted for help. Evans’ Chinese
driver said that Smyth plunged
in to rescue him and went down
with Evans, Their bodies were
brought back to Taipeh tonight by

the British Consul in Taipeh.
—UP.

U.S. Dollar Down

MONTREAL, Aug. 14.
The United States dollar Thurs-
day closed at a discount of 4 1/32
per cent in terms of the Canadiae
funds up 1/32 from Wednesday’s
close. it is, it took 95 31/32
cents Canadian to buy $1 Ameri-



can. Pound sterling was . .2.67%
do § from Wednesday.
In York the Decade dollar

was unchanged at a premium of
4} per cent in terms of United
States funds. In closing foreign
exchange dealings the pound ster-
ling Was down 3 at $2.78 uP
—(U.P.)







1952





WINDSORS IN AUDIENCE WITH POPE

€



THE DUKE AND DUCHESS of Winusor are saluted by a Swiss Guard as
they walk through the Pope’s summer palace at Castelgandolfo, Italy.
The Pontiff granted them a special audience, They were accorded
‘minor” diplomatic and protocol honors. {international Radiophoto)



Lady Savage
Opens Ward

@ From page 1.

but at the Black Rock Clinic in
St. Michael, In all her work she
has the full support of her Mother,
whd, on this occasion, has so
generously given £10,000 for the
erection and equipment of this
building.

I would hope that others will
follow Mrs. Smith’s example and
provide, in thanksgiving for the
blessings they enjoy, a Children’s
Ward in the other Almshouses in
this Island.

Finally, Mrs. Smith, on behalf
of all the people of this parish, {
thank you for this noble gift, and
have much pleasure in opening
whe Evelyna Smith Children’s
Ward, which forever will bear
your honoured name.

Mr. Garner, after extending a
welcome to the Governor and
Lady Savage said that for years it
had been a _ problem for the
Vestry to separate the children in
the Almshouse from the decrepit.
The erection of an annexe to the
main building was also suggested
for such a purpose from year to
year, but they were hindered from
doing anything owing to their
limited resources,

Mrs, Daysh then became
member of the Vestry and she
was placed on the Board of
Guardians. She saw the conditions

a

at the institution where the
children were mixed with the old
and decrepit and thought that

such a state of affairs should not
be allowed to continue. She in-
timated that something must be
done for those children and after
discussing the matter with her
mother, told the Vestry that the
fatter was willing to build and
equip a separate ward for 30
children at the Almshouse if the
Vestry would afterwards take it
over and run it, Her offer was
gladly accepted and she donated
£10,000 which was used in the
erection of the ward.

Mr. Garner thanked Mrs.
Smith on behalf of the Vestry and

the parishoners for her generosity
and said that when the history
of ‘Barbados was written, this
generous gift would not oO un-

recorded.



Former Jewish Official
Dies From Over Dose
Of Sleeping Pills

MUNICH, Germany, Aug. 16

A former high ranking Jewish
official Philip Auerbach died of
an overdose of sleéping pills here
on Saturday less than 48 hours
efter the German Court sentenced
him to imprisonment. His widow
disclosed that he left a suicide
note.

Auerbach was convicted on
Thursday of misappropriating
state funds earmarked for Jewish
concentration camp _— survivors
while heading a Bavarian restitu-
tion payments office. He was sen-
tenced to two and a half years’
imprisonment.

Munich police ordering their
experts into investigation to de-
termine if Auerbach really died
by his own hand, said Auerbach
once before attempted suicide by
taking a large amount of sleeping
pills. Auerbach was being held
in custody at a private clinic here
while awaiting trial.

~ Auerbach’s* widow, Margit, told
United Press that she is “almost
convinced” that he took his own
life. Speaking in a barely audible
voice, she said she received a
“farewell letter” from her hus-
band giving the motives for sui-
cide.

He felt “he could never get over
the verdict. The court's decision
completely took away his hon-
our”

Auerbach was
multiple counts of bribery, dis-
loyalty in office and the false use
of the title of doctor of philosophy.
Two officials of the Munich Jew-
ish community arrived at the
clinic to examine the body,
—UP.

convicted on







Nea And
Air Tratfic

In Carlisle Bay

Schooner Mnv Olive
line, Schooner Laudalpha, Schooner Esso
Aruba,+ Schooner: Lydia A., Schootier
Henry D. Wallace, Schooner Philip H.
Davidson, Schooner Everdene, Schooner
Enterprise s., Schooner Rosarene,
Schooner D’Ortac, Schooner Marion Belle
Welie, Schooner At Last, Schooner Lad)
Silver, Motor Vessel T. B. Radar, Motor
Vegse!l Gloria Maria, Schooner Laicille
M. Smith, Schooner Lady Noeleen.

ARRIVALS

Schooner Amanda T.,
Tannis, from St Vincent,
Schooner Owners’ Association

S.S. Crofter, 4,776 tons, Capt
from London, Agents: Messrs
& Co., Ltd

8.8 Uruguay, 11,003 tons,
Hodges, from Trinidad, Agents:
R. M. Jones & Co., Ltd

S.S. Lady Nelson, 4,655 tons,
Wallace, from St. Lucia, Agents:
Gardiner Austin & Co., Ltd

DEPARTURES

M.V. Cuidad Boliver for Trinidad,
Schooner Cyril E. Smith for British Gui-
ana, Schooner Belqueen for St. Vincent,

Schooner Eme-

70 tons, Capt
Agents

Diamond,

DaCosta
Capt

Messrs.

Capt
Messrs



M.V. Lady Joy for St. Lucia, Schooner
Worderful Counsellor for St. Lucia and
S.S. Bruno for Trinidad

Seawell
ARRIVALS By B.W.L.A ON FRIDAY
From Puerti Rico:

Evelyn Clark, Donna Bender, Annis
Struthers, William Field, Emma L
Springer and Eustace Branker
Prom Antigua:

Clifton Low-n-Chée and Robert
Delabastide
Frem Trinidad:

W. Thomas, E, Thomas, M. Thomas
N. Borde, M. Laurence, D. Laurence,
A. Frampton, C Horting, L. Sealy, S
Khon, C. Mohammed, S. Rampersaud,
W. Bourne, C. Knight, C> Hunte, N
Hodgkinson, M. Snerus, E. Hameman,
N. Hoyland and J. Vereker

DEPARTURES BY BW.LA ON FRIDAY

For Trinidad:
Richard Spink

Nathaniel Carmic

Glendene Thompson,
el, Michael Lambert,










Michael Clarke, She Clarke, Gordan
Munro, Ulric Parris, Reginald Reece
Rodney Smith, Kathleen Smith, Douglas
Grent, Carmen Grtant, Hugh Evelyn
Sybil Evelyn, Cleveland Drayton,
Duncan Anderson Raymond Legge
Lawrence Hutchinson, Patricia Edwards,
Jese Demont Brun, Anthon; Davenport,
Geraldine Davenport, John Davenport
Stephen Davenport, Joan Davenport and

Francis Davenport
For Bruitish Guiana:
Oswald Saul

RATES OF EX CHAD NGE



AUGUST 16, 1952
Selling NEW YORK Buying
T) 2/10% pr heques on
ankers 71 5/10 pr
Sight or
Demand Drafts 71 3/10% pr
73 2/10) pr. Cable
Ji 7/10 pr. Currency 7. pr
Coupons 68 3/10 pr
O% pr Silver 20° pr
CANADA
40 5/10 pr. Cheques on
Bankers 78 7/10 % pr
Demand Drafts 78.55%" pr
Sight Drafts 78 4/10% pr
40 5/10 > pr. Cable a
79% pr Currenc) 77 2/10 ‘e pr
Coupons 16 5/10% pr
0 } Silver 20% pr



Italian Firm: To
Build Road For
Pakistan Govt.

ROME, Aug. 15.

An Italian firm has been en-
gaged by the Pakistan Govern-
ment to build a 750-mile long
highway in eastern Bengal, the
Pakistan delegation in Rome an-
nounged on Thursday. The ne-
cessary machinery will be shipped

from italy. UP



Russia May Buy
Israel’s Oranges

MOSCOW, Aug. 15.

The three-man-delegation to
Israel Citrus Marketing Board
began negotiations on Friday wish
Soviet purchasing organizations to
éxpand citrus exports here. It is
understood that the talks wer
progressing‘ well, with a good
prospect ‘that the Russian’s will!
buy half million cases of oranges
im 1952 and an opportunity to de-
velop the steadily expanding mar-
ket here. Negotiations are also
proceeding for the sale of other
israeli products

Independently of visitors repre-
cnting the City’s Board, the
Israeli delegation has been inves-
ligating the possibilities of buying

Scviet commodities like timber,
wheat end agricultural machines
—U.P.

FOR STYLE COMFORT AND VALUE

BUY A

RELIANCE SHIRT

OBTAINABLE AT ALL LEADING



STORES





SUNDAY

Church Services

















ADVOCATE

| GOVERNMENT NOTICES







ANGLICAN
ST. MARY'S CHURCH

f TRINITY X BRITISH CARIBBEAN CURRENCY BOARD

713 am Matins 8.00 rm Le
Bu ss Ra ocession Soler a ; ; ia ; ini
ina hot Froceust ee re Persons in possession of Barbados, British Guiara and Trinidad
4 r s 7.00 pt ind Tobago Government Currency Notes are requested to exchange

; - them for British Caribbean Currency notes with as little delay as

7.30 am. Holy Communion, 9.30 a.m possible.

Soler Muss and Sermon, 3 @.m, Sune
Schoo! and Chilafens Berviees i pothe Barclays Bank (D.C. & O.), the Royal Bank of Canada and the
s Evensong, Sermon and Procession. ] Coq i rj a ,
a AnotAee Conn Canadian Bank of Commerce will exchange the currency notes on
ith Sunday After Trinity xpplication, until further notice.
a am. Holy Communion, § a.m

1 a Se e " Qo .

Teme. eee ne, Geka td Sed. H.N. ARMSTRONG, ‘
Kine ( s, 7 p.m. Evensong. and Senior Currency Officer,
Sepivilie eacher: The Pov. H. A} public Buildings, Barbadcs Centre.
JAMES STREBT: 11 a.m. Rev, $ W 12th August, 1952. 16.8.52—2n.
c ro a oe ¢ La ne
ta om =
{ et pm. Mr, 2 Reid.
HALL 30 Am Rev, F
Lewrence, 7 pm. Mr G. Perkins
lke weMORiAL am hr “ HOUSECRAFT CENTRE, BAY STREET

‘rathwaite, 7 p.m. r. 3 rimit
i HOLETOWN oo am Mr, M, Hail The following programme of Day and Evening Classes will open
7 pom. Mr st i 3 5

BANK HALL 330>ack oes | the Housecraft Centre, Bay Street from Monday 15th September to
Frailips, 7 pam Rev K. E, Towers, B.A | Friday 28th November, 1952
> eception Service, ,

i SPEIGHTSTOWN ti am. Rev. K. p | Monday 10.00 &m.—12 Noon — Cake and Pastry Making,

Towers, . B. Si i vi

ELAM ae See, Get a Simple Cutting and Sewing

Pim iuyenile Missionary Meeting. — 2.00 pm.— 4.00 p.m.— Preserves
aeeae a, or am, Rev. K. E Simple Dress Cutting.

3 . BETMeL crmrcurr 4.30 p.m.— 6.00 p.m.— Assorted Dishes.

‘ ree x a Tr T. J. Purley Smocking.
i DALKE TH: n am. Mr. A. Curwen | Cuesday 4.30 p.m.— 6.00 pam— Cake and Pastry Making.

7 pan. Mr aithe a

BELMONT. Ua an Mr. C. Forde, ? a ‘ i Elementary Dressmaking.
pom v E arke Vednesday 4, .m.— a i y

UR OM SR Sg Rg } 0 p.m 6.00 pm Caribbean Cookery,

Furey $. 7 pm. Mr, J. Clarke Simple Dressmaking.

PROVIDENCE 1 a.m. Mr. G,. Harris.) Thursday* 4.30 p.m.— 6.00 p.m.— Advanced Cake Icing.

7 a is

VAUXHALL: 01 a.m Miss Bryan, 7 Advanced Dressmaking.
pm. Mr. D. Pitt Vriday — _

SER ee PE rida 4.30 p.m.— 6.00 p.m, Advanced Butlering.

EBENEZER—9 a.m. Rev, 8. W. € Simple Handicrafts.
~BEULAK. a Br See Registration for all classes will take place at the Housecraft
7 Bm Mr. C. Bennett. ie Centre, Bay Street, between 10.00 a.m. and 12 Noon, and between 2.00

§ ‘ li a.m r. C. Brath- sday a S y E
valet ee en eee eho ».m. and 5.00 p.m. on Wednesday 10th and Thursday 11th September,
5 RICES—11 a.m. Mr. O. E. Brathwaite 1952.

TD. Me. Se uae Fees for all classes must be paid in advance for the term at the
|g BRIDGETOWN CENTRAL ime of registering.

{tive deol Meeti ’ } i i i i
eet aaenen aera, waceien, 5 - for each course in Sewing, Pattern Drafting, Smocking, and
Mecting : te Handicrafts.

or aplain tsho 2 :

EshINGTON STaORS 15/- fo reach course in Cake and Pastry Making, Cake Icing,
es 11 a.m. Holiness Meeting, 3 p.m. |Assorted Dishes, Caribbean Cookery, Butlering and Preserves.

‘ompany Meeting, 7 p.m Salvation 2 1
Meeting »/- will be refunded at the end of the term to all students who

Sr. Major T. Gibbs, atte: 15% e s

rs, GO ie. : nd 75% of their classes.

11 a.m. Holiness Meeting, 3 p.m. | Department of Education,

Company Meeting, 7 p.m. Salvation 13th August, 1952, 17.8,.52—2n.

Sr. Captain S. Worrell

OISTIN

11 a.m, Holiness Meeting, 3 p.m, ’
conoany Meeting, 7 p.m. Salvation PART ONE ORDERS

eeting

Lieutenant. K. Gibbons, By

SEA VIEW

ll a.m. Holiness Meeting, ‘ ae ‘ia’ ee
Company Meeting, 7 p.m savin | The Barbados Regiment.

Meeting. Issue No. 4.) 5 Aug. &

Lieutenant C. Hinds
CHECKER HALL

il a.m. Holiness Meeting, 3 p.m
Company Meeting, 7 p.m Salvation
Meeting

Lieutenant E. Cox.

CARLTON

}1 a.m. Holiness Meeting, 3 p.m.
Company Meeting, 7 p.m Salvation
Meeting.

Captain E. Bourne
EGOLF BAPTIST _CHURCH — Tudor
Street Rev. K. F. Hansen, pastor
Sunday Morning: 9.30 Sunday Schoo!
1.30 Morning Worship
Sunday Evening; 7.30 Evangelistic
Service with Rev. G. Starling of Winter
Haven,

Florida speaking. Music by the
Church Choir and Miss Hormosa Thomas,

Monday Night: Baptist Young Peor, “
Union, A _ service by and for young
people

Wednesday Night:
and Praise Service. Listen to “Echoes of
Heaven" on Rediffusion every Tuesday
ano Thursday at 9.15 p.m,

August 24th — Quarterly and Farewell
for Rev. Starling and Rey,, Parker at
Queen's Park. at 40.00 a.m

A cordial welcome awaits you here
and at all of the Fundamental Baptist
Caurches on_the island. Plan to come

sT NICHOLAS EPISCOPAL
ORTHODOX
Welohes Road

11 arm. Matins and Sermon, 7 p.ir
Evensong and sermon, Preacher for both
services, the Rev Deacongss C
Barrow

Tuesday 7.30 p.m
nddrees, speaker
Clark
THE ST JAMES NATIONAL BAPTIS1

il a.m, Matins and sermon, 7 p.m
Evensong and sermon, preacher for bot
services the Rev. J. B. Grant, L.Th
nminister-in-charge. 4.45 p.m. Monday;
Wédnesday; Friday; Training for youths
this will be conducted by the Rev. L
Bruce Mrs. Olga Browne. The anniversary
service for the Youth Movement léth
year will take place on Sunday August
Zist at 7.15 p.m., preacher Rev, J. B
Crant, L.Th

Mid-Week Prayer

Evening Prayers and
the Rev. L, Bruce-

CHRISTIAN SCTENCE
First Church of Christ, Seientist
Upper Bay Street, Bridgctown.
SUNDAYS 11 a.m, and 7 pan ,
WEDNESDAYS 8 p.m, A ‘Service whieh
includes Testimonies of Christian Science
Healing

SUNDAY, AUGUST 17, 1952
Subject of Lesson-Sermon: Soul.
Golden Text: Psalms 119: 174, 175. 1

have longed for thy salvation, O Lord;

and thy law is my delight. Let my soul

live, . let thy judaments help me
The following citations are included in

the Lesson-Sermon;
The Bible: For ye shall go out wit!
joy, and be led forth with peace
Isaiah 55 12
Science and Health with Key to the
Scriptures.

by Mary Baker Eddy

Soul has infinite resources with which

to bless mankind, and happiness would

be more readily attained and would be

more secure in our keeping, if sought in
Soul

—Pase60



Listening Hours

1962
26. 54M

SUNDAY, AUGUST
715 pm

19 7



400









erlude
x



The
For

News, 4.10 p.m. &
the Common Good
p Sundry’ Half Hour, § p.m Fron
the Bible, 9.10 p.m, Interlude, 5.15,p.10
Composer of the Week, 5.45 p.m Arthas
Ien, 6.15 p.m. English Magazine, 6.4
p.m. Programme Parade afd Interlude
7 p.m. The News, 7,10 p.m Home New
From Britain
715—10.45 p.m

71.15 p.m. Caribbean Voices, 7.46 p.m
A time of Devotion, 8.15 p.m Radio
Newesreel, 8.30 p.m. Spotlight on Central
Asia, 8.456 p.m Interlude, 8.55 pom
From the Editorials, 89 p.m. From the
Promenade Concerts, 10 p.m. The News
10.10 p.m. News Tolk, 10.15 p.m. London
Forum, 10 45 p.m. Why I Believe

4pm
4.15 p.m

oh 5AM, #1 wee



MONDAY, AUGUST 18, 1958
100—7 DS p.m 19 76M, 25. 58M
saan asec >

4pm. The News, 4.10 p.m. The Daily
Service, 4% pm. A tale of two Cities
445 p.m. Make Nine Country Style,
5 p.m. Cricket, 5.05 p.m Interlude,
5.15 p.m. Souvenirs of Music, 6 p.m
Welsh Miecellany, 6.15 p.m. Listeners’
Choice, 6.46 p.m. Sports Round-up and
Programme Parade, 7 p.m. The News,
i 10 p.m. Home News from Britain

T15—10.99 pom SoM, 3) 32M



jo Read and Film
Ballads and Songs,
4.15 p.m Radio Newsreel, 8.32 p.m
ropean Survey, 8.45 p.m, Inter:ude,
£.5¢ p.m. From the Editorials, 9 p.m
Listeners’ Digest, 9.30 p.m. The Majestic
Orchestra, 10 p.m. The News, 10.10 p.m.
News Talk, 10.15 p.m. The Health
Mani, 10.0 p.m, Tip Top Tunes.c¢



7.15 p.m. Books
Review, 7.45 p.m







—_—









\

OBITUARY
The Commanding Officer regrets to announce the death of 586 Drummer Walcott,
N. after an illness, He was buried at St, David's Church on the 1] Aug. 52
with full military honours

¢, COMMAND — GE OF

Major O. F. C. Walcott, E.D. is a
vice Lt.-Col. J, Connell, O.B.E.,
' 1. PARADES — TRAINING

by ny to act as O.C, Barbados Regiment
on leave wef 11 Aug. to 30 Sep. 52

{ Coys will continue their weapon training with a view to firing the Annual
' Musketry Course under the direction of their Coy. Commanders. ‘B" Coy ts
, oe alotted the open and miniature ranges.

nd

Band practices will be held on Monday 18, Wednesday 20 and Thursday 21 Aug
52. Members who have qualified will be paid on Thursday 21 Aug. 52

{| APPOINTMENT
Captain L. C. Banfield is appointed Waren Training Officer to assist Coy
Commanders in their Annual Musketry Course
ORDERLY OFFICER & ORDERLY SERJEANT FOR WEEK ENDING % AUG 52

Orderly Officer E. R. Goddard
Orderly Serjeant G
Next for Duty
Orderly Officer
Orderly Serjeant 409 Sit Reid, N
{ \. COMMAND — RESUMPTION
Captain J. Redhead O.C. “B’ Coy resumed command wef 14 Aug $2,
Captain P. L. C. Peterkin ceases to act
ANNUAL DANCE
The Regimental §
Saturday 27 Sep 582,

Lieut
407 Sit Quintyne, L

2/14. WH, A. Husbands

wnd

orts Club will hold its Annual Dance at the Drill Hall on
at 9 p.m. All ranks are invited to attend

M L. D. SKEWES-COX, Major

S.0.L.F,. & Adjutant,
The Barbados Regiment

PART 1 ORDERS









|
|
|
|





FIFTEEN



voughing,- Strangling Asihma,
Bronchitis Curbed in 3 Minutes

o you have attac Ast hma suffered cough-
i ty you ¢ strangling ever
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te work, and h ear

t to take cold s







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a ee = for b
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you were helt
fecl weak,
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MENDACO not only brings almost
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}
}

Iesuce No. % 6% Aug. we
asin naante seinen saitentantantinainaatn ean aentte
1 STRENGTH DECREASE
$86 Drmr. Walcott, N Struck off strength of Regiment havins
died on 10 Aug, 58
S60 L/C Dolphin, J. F Permitted to resign from Regiment wet
12 Au. &
2 LEAVE
i4.-Col. J, Connell, O.B.F., ED. Granted leave with permission to leave |
the colony wef ll Aug. to @ sep. 52
|. TRANSFER — RE
Major L. A. Ch Transferred to Reserve of Officers wef

1 Aug. 52

D. SKEWES-COX, Major,
O.1. FP. & Adjutant,
Barbados Regiment

ee |
8

The























96SO0999OOBONTUBDETTY
SEA VIEW GUEST
HOUSE

HASTINGS, BARBADOS
Daily and Longterm Rates
quoted on request.
Permanent Guests

WONDERFUL ASSORT-
MENT OF

Walking Sticks

Just received by

JOHNSON’S
STATIONERY

welcome.
Dinner and Cocktail
Parties arranged.
J. H, BUCKLAND
Proprietor.





i you are avi tH "HURRICANE |

_
Next Sunday evening from 4.30 PRECAUTION
to 5.30 p.m. in Queen's Park, to

listen to a talk by an thes
of seven of most glorious Cathe«



drals on the face of the earth 4
to-day and how infant St. Paul's (.
Cathetral compare with them.

Cathedril St. Peter Vatican City,

Hare Cathetrat St. Mark the

Guapeler, Venier, Maly, Cathedral

St. John the Baptist, Pisa and the

Leaning Tower, Haly. The Hor

WARNINGS.

Sepulchre, Jerusalem in the Holy
City ef lerael, The talk is given
by Professor C. N, Weekes and it

is for a deserving cause e oe After a hurricane—
tinue the gracious work ¢ ‘father ps} toi ~
Hinds of St. Mary's "Chute h Guard against Spoiled }
iat a apm food in mechanical re- })
‘e hope there are many ; : wae
Christian Colony who are inter- frigerator, if power 1s })),
ested in old Cathedrals. off for any length of (
13.8.52—2n time. 17.8.52—2n.














|



| FIRST










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generally run down a glass or twa a day of
Buckfast Tonic Wine will quickly restore lose
energy and tone up the whole nervous system,
Giving new vitality It fortifies you againss fever
and exhaustion and remember, Buckfast Tonle
Wine is especially valuable after illness,

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5

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Earrings to match, also Bracelets. These are all
the latest “Vogue” patterns and are set in Sterling
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Bolton Lane & Aquatie Club Booth
Phone 3909 & Phone 4897 |
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Stepping from your home
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~~

PAGE SIXTEEN

TABLE

TENNIS :



Trinidad Tennis Team On Top



Barbadians Have

Much To Learn’ Round-U

BARBADOS table tennis players still have much to a :
learn before they can reach the standard of play seen at the ,, I. TLOCZYNSKI former Polish

Caribbean Championships.

The visiting Trinidad Table

Tennis team, from the San Fernando Zone of the Trinidad

and ‘Tobago Amateur Table
this beyond doubt.





This team, although not a
powerful as the All Trinidad team
which visited these shores in 1949,

o far been victorious in their
encounters. Only one player on
the présent team, Carl Wi-liams,
was hire with the 1949 side.

On Thursday night the visitors

ved an cutright victory against

* Pelican, the reigning team in the
island. Peliesn, Inter-Club League
winners, had three of its players
in the Grade A Championships
Semi-Finals and the Champion-

i) eventually went to a Pelican
player, Roy Phillips.

i : r 1 Dr. Noble Sakav,

n experienced player, used his

it and guile to defeat our

Roy Philips. Very few
abl tenni enthusiasts though
iat Phillips could be defeated by
this gentleman of the Old Schoo!.
His theory was concentration’ and

whenever Phillips failed to con-
centrate the point went to the
“Doe”.

The Doctor has a forceful fore-
hend smash which he uses when
the occasion arises but he main'y
depends on his near inpenetrab]2
defence.



Misfortune

Laughton Harding, another local
player, has been out of the game
1oy some time but had the mis-
fortune in meeting Arno.d Men-
des.

Mendes’ style is reminiscent of
Raiph Gomes’ who visited Bar-
bados with the 1949 team. He hua
i consistent forehand attack wita

great percentage of accuracy,
Harding went down,

Frank Willoughby, a semi-final-
ist in the Grade A Championshi;,
won the cnly set for his team
when he defeated Guy Yawching,
This is a feather in Willoughby’s
cap when it is considered that
during the season his form was
not as good as Phillips’ or Wor-
rell’s,

Friday night the visitors re-
peated their performance when
they completely dominated play
against a combined Barna-
Y.M.P.C. side. On this occasion
Dr, Sakar found Campbell Green-
idge a stubborn opponent. The
Doctor can consider himself for-
tunate for it was in the decisive
game that seme lucky points took
him into the lead and he went
on to win the match.

Greenidge played one of the
most serious matches of his career
and has clear y shown that he is
one of the island’s best.

The five to represent Borbado
in the First Test against the visit-
ors atthe Y.M.C.A. on Monday
nieht will be chosen from Norman
Gill, Blair Murray, Campbell
Greenidge, Cedric Shields, Lin-
coln’ Worrell, Roy Phillips and
Frenk Willoughby.

Theee are about the best sevea
players the iclond can . produce
now thet Louis Stoute most likely
will not be seen in action for a
long time. Joe Hoad should how-
ever be given a try in ene of the
tests,

The
chosen
Anares

Trinided team wil he
from Fenwick Debvsingh,
» Moeolehan, Cart Williams,
Dr. Noble Sakar, Arnola Mendes,

Guy Yawrhing and Kelvin Assing,

Protest Against
B.H. Constitution

BELIZE,

The People’s United Party of
Sritish Honduras has cabled Mr,
Oliver Lyttelton, the Colonial Sec-
retary, protesting against the
Legisiature’s decision to recom-
mend a new constitution which
containg provisions for adult
suffrage for literates, an Executive
Council of four clected and six
official members, a Legislature of
nine elected and six official mem-
bers, and the power of veto vested
in ihe Governor,

he party is the only crganise-
ticn from which a protest has yet
been sent, but the General Work-
crs’ Union, representing about
one-third of the Colony’s working
population, is also . expected. to

test along similar lines,










Both the party and the union
last year advocated identical cra-t
consiitutions, suggesting an elecied
ke gic lature on the basis of unive, :-

1 ndult suffrage. It also :
ge d that only elecied membors
al ihe Governor be membe of



ihe Extcutive Council, —B.

| They'll Do It Every Time




OUT SHOPPING'GO WHILE }
I WAS IN THE NEIGHBOR-/7Z

HOOO LT TRouGHT TO /Z%










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ay

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; Australian

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E HAO THE CHILOREN WZ
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Tennis Association, has proved

Results Of Royal
Drawing Society
Examination

The Royal Drawing So/>sty’s
Examination, 1952.
The Christ Church
Foundation School.
GROUP II — STAGE I
Honours.
S. Innisg C. Hinds, D, Williams,
J, Skeete, C. Brereton, ~
GROUP II — STAGE II.
Honours.
J. Corbin, W. Gibbs, D. Williams,
O. Rudder, C, Inniss, F Leacock,

Girls’

H. Harrison, H. Whitehall, J.
Dottin, R. Ashby, C. Yarde, M
Yarde, M, Skeete, J. Gay, H.

Matthews,
Pass,
R. Dottin,
GROUP III — STAGE I
: Honours.
B. A, M. Gollop, C. B. Roberts,
C, Codogan, J. D. Storey, K. L, E.

Jackson, F. G, Reid, R, Bullen,
G, F. I, Inniss, B. C. Shorey, P.
Weekes, N, A. Harrison, C. K
Greenidge, H. L. Jones, P. R.
Estwick, C, J. Edghill, L. G.
Bourne, J. N. Simpson,
Pass.
S. Sylbercwajy. M. A, Harris,

E. M. Jackson, D, O. Smith, J. E.
Jones.
GROUP III — STAGE II
Honours.

M, M, Griffith, B. P. Belgrave,
J. M. Gollop, L. F, Alleyne, M. A.
Smith, M. M. Prescod, H. P, Clarke
M. A. Sargeant, M. G. Moseley,
8S. O. Bradshaw, F. C. Walcott,
P,. H. Hope, M. C, Phillips, V. U.
Moseley, I. Weekes, M. Prescod,
C. Ashby, E. D. Jones.

Pass,

J. L. Garnes, Y. Armstrong,
M. Y, King, A, Y. Barnes, S, M.
Hinds, O. B. Archer, A. G. V.
Coleman, E, E. Blades. J. D. R.,
Clarke, 'C, R, Archer, A. C, Corbin,
R. C. Wiggins, H, P. King, B. E.
Mayers, T. E. Barrow.

GROUP III — STAGE III
Honours.
N. E. Williams, C. I. Ashby.
Pass.

B. E. Me Conney.

GROUP IV — STAGE I
Honours.

M. I. Leacock,

GROUP IV — STAGE II
Pass.

M. I. Leacock.

Full Drawing Certificate.—

C. I. Ashby and N, E, Williams.



Three Abandon

Channel Swim

CALAIS, FRANCE, Aug. 15.

French policeman Noel Claud
of Bone, Algeria, became the third
to abandon the English Channel
grossing early today when bad
leg cramps forced him to be
hauled on the accompanying boat
within eight miles of completing
the journey after 11 hours 35 min-
utes of swimming.

Storms swept the northern coast
of France, and heavy rain pre-
vented observers on Cap Gris Nez
beaches from semang farther than
a few yards.

There was no news of other
swimmers still in iey waters. Ob-
servers here predicted that there
would be several other with-
drawals before noon, The other
two who had already given up the
attempt were Bod Paysour of U.S,

and Miss Jennie James, 24 of
Wales,
—(UP.)



Gavitt, Sedgnian
In Quarter-Fitals

NEWPORT RHODE ISLAND,
Aug, 15,
Australian ace Frank Sedgman
and American Dick Savitt won
the quarter finals victories on
Friday in the Newport Casino
invitation tennis tournament,
sedeman easily beat Herb Flam
of Beverly Hills, California 6—4;
8—6; 6—0. Savitt eliminated
American Sergeant Bernard Bart-
zen 4—6; 6—4; 6—3; 2—6; 6—0.
In Saturday's singles finals the
American Vie Seizas will oppose
Champion Ken
McGregor and Savitt will meet
Sedgman,—U.?P.

7
LOOK AT THIS
REPORT I WORKED
ALL WEEK ON’ I
TURN MY BACK, AND







D8oP IN HERE AND +~toveLy “\ MINNIE'S: DEMOLITION
GHOW THEM WHERE CHILDREN, ‘ SQUAD HAS IT
MOMMY USED MINNIE*NO LOOKING LIKE THE } MINNIE WAS
PFO WORK No, GiLAs | MINUTES OF A / A PAIN IN THE
MUSTNT TEAR [| BLACK HAND / NECK WHEN SHE
MEETING =: WORKED HEREâ„¢-S0
i SHE BRINGS THE
\ SECOND GENERATION

é
4

SHH!



OVER AT THE DUTCHMAN'S!

Sports
p

evis Cup player is a man who
refuses to acknowledge the pass-
ing years.

He has won the Northum-
berland singles title — exactly
°0 years after his first success.

Wow 41 yvears of age Tloczynski
showed all.his old skill in beat-
ng the young Australian Don
Tregonning 7—5, 7—5. And after-
wards he annouced that he would
return next year to defend his

title.
SOCCER

TED DRAKE, Chelsea’s new
manager is quickly making his
presence felt at Stanford Bridge.

He recently signed his first new
player, 26 year old John McNichol,
Brighton and Hove inside-forward
and captain. Drake was first im-
pressed by McNichol when/ he
saw him play for Brighton against
Reading, the club he had _pre-
viously managed. He is a schem-
ing type of player and could be
just the right foil to the speed and
thrust of Roy Bentley.

CRICKET

JCHN LANGRIDGE, 42 year
old Sussex opening batsman re-
cently scored his 30,000th run in
first class cricket. He did so in
the match against Hampshire. His
elder brother, James Langridge
achieved this mile-stone _ last
season and so they have completed
family achievement which 1s

unique.
BOXING

JERSEY JOE WALCOTT may
defend his world heavyweight
title against Rocky Marciano in
New York next month, Negotia-
tions have” ‘been opened by Mr.
Jim Norris, President of the In-
ternational Boxing club.

CYCLING

REG HARRIS, werld profes-
sional cycle sprint champion will
defend his title for the fourth suc-
cessive year at the World Champ-
ionships to be staged in Paris on
August 28th. Opposing Harris will
be R. Mockridge the Australian
who won the 1,000 metres time
trial at the Olympic Games. An-
other British representative will
be Cyril Bardsley who has been
training under Harris for the past

six months.
GOLF

MAX FAULKNER, former Open
Golf Champion heads a strong
list of competitors for the £1,500
Lotus Golf Tournament to be
staged at Moor Park, Hertford-
shire, on August 13, 14, 15. Other
entrants include John Panton,
former Scottish Champion who
recently claimed first prize in the
North British 2,000 guineas tour-

nament at Harrogate, and former °

Open champions Fred Daly and
R. Whitcombe. This is one lot of
prize money that will remain in
England. There are no overseas
competitors,

Tucker Wins
Spoon Shoot

Mr. M. A. Tucker won the Spoon
Shoot at the Government Range
yesterday afternoon, The condi-~
tfons were good except that at
times the wind was inclined to be
a bit tricky.

The eight best scores were:



points.
Mr. M. A. Tucker ...... 97
Major O, F. C. Walcott .. 96
Mr. M. G. Tucker ...... 95
Capt. S. Weatherhead .... 94
Myr. 8. D. Davis. .i...... 94
Capt. C. R. E. Warner .. 94
Mr. H, C, Boycee® in ss ..:. 93
‘Mr. T. A. L. Roberts .. 92



Ycsterday’s Weather
Report

Rainfall from *Codrington: nil
Total Rainfall for Month to
date: 1.18 ins.
Minimum Temperature:
Minimum Temperature:
75,0° F.
Wind Velocity: 9 miles per
hour
Barometer (9 a.m.)
(11 a.m.) 29.994
TO-DAY
Sunrise: 5.47 a.m.
Sunset: 6.18 .p.m.
Moon; Last Quarter, August 12
Lighting: 7.00 p.m.
High Tide: 1.14 a.m., 4.02 p.m.
Low Tide: 8.54 a.m., 8.40 p.m.

75.0

29.993



nt By Jimmy Hatlo

IF SHE ASKS FOR ME,
OUT OF TOWN! PLL BE












A_ HUNCH SHE WANTS,











UTTING UP WITH THE

EX-STENO WHO WANTS
TO SHOW OFF HER

= RACKET SQUAD>:.>

4 THANX AND A “TIP OF ®
THE HATLO HAT TO

*GHE'LL KNOW,” CHICAGO, ILL,



SUNDAY

SCOUT NOTES:



ADVOCATE

Troops In Camp

EIGHTEEN members of the Ist Sea Scouts Troop

went into Camp at Gun Hill

is in charge of Group Seoutmaster Major J. E. Griffith with at 4.45 p.m.
AwS.M, L. Quintyne They hope to }-

the assistance of Acting

on Thursday last. The Camp

be in Camp for ten days the first half of which will be
devoted to general training, but during the second half
they hope to trek to several interesting and historical

places in the island.

Members of the All Saints’ Boys’
School Troop under Scoutmaster
G. E. Corbin, went into Camp at
their school grounds on Thursda
last. The Camp will, last un
Monday next during which time
the S. M. hopes to train his Scouts,
who are camping for the first time,

in the elementary principles . of
Scout craft. Happy camping to
them all,

L.A. Meeting

The Local Association of the St
Michael's South Sub-Area had a
General Meeting at Scout Head-
uarters on Friday night, The
Chair was taken by the President
ef the L.A., Mr. F. J. Cole, J.P.
end there was a good turn out both
of lay members and Scouters, After
the meeting two films were shewn,
the first being a short film of Kew
Cardens in En‘land, and the sec-
cod wes a film of the Seventh
World Jamboree which was held
in Austria in August 1951. This
film is available to other Local
Associations through the Courtesy
of the British Council Representa-
tive, Secretaries who wish to make
arrangements are asked to write
the Honourary Secretary at Scouts
Headquarters,

Ten Rules For The Camp
Cook

From the Canadian Junior Leader
1. Use a convenient heat source
such as a camp stove, altar
fireplace, or good cooking
fire of coals with stead
heat.
2. Have clean utensils, proper-
ly selected for each cooking

purpose,

3. Use good grub.

4. Test your recipes in your
backyard or kitchen before
making them on a camping
trip.

5. Measure your ingredients

carefully, not by guesswork,

6. Time your meal so _ that
everything is done at the
proper time. For example
don’t have potatoes _ still
cooking an hour after the
meat is done,

7. Sample youn cooking fre-
quently for seasoning, over-
cooking, or adjustment of
ingredients.

8. Pay attention to your job,
9. Keep mental or written notes
for future reference.
Know something about the
bodily needs in respect to
vitamins, calories, minerals,
and proteins, Try to plan
your menus for maximurr
health value without dimin-
ishing their tastiness, Really,
it’s not hard to do,

Follow these rules on the road
to the Camp Cook Badge, the grat-
itude of our fellow campers, and
the real fun of being a good camp
cook,

10.

Unsuitable Scouters

From “The Scout Leader” Canada

The following is a quotation
from a British Scout publication,
which may well have some applica-
tion in Canada,

“There is, unfortunately, far
too much evidence that the Move-
ment must face up to the problem
of the unsatisfactory or inefficient
Scouter (using the term, as usual,
to cover all warranted ranks).

“If the standard of the existing
leadership is improved the Move-
ment will find it easier to recruit
more leaders of the right type in
the future, Many men of charac-
ter who are in sympathy with our

56%

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Just arrived

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EXCELLENT VALUES

SEE THEM ON DISPLAY AT---

sims and methods are ‘deterred
from offering their services by
such examples of inefficient and
unsatisfactory leadership as they
cannot but observe in our ranks,
It cannot be too frequently empha-
sized that the voluntary nature of
the Movement does not exempt
those who accept the obligations
of office from taking all possible
steps to fit themselves for the
responsibilities of the position
they hold, and from making every
effort to discharge their functions
satisfactorily. They should, more-
cver, realize that it is their duty
to resign from the Movement as
soon aS they find that they are
prevented, for any reason, from
carrying out their Scout functions
efficiently. Sometimes there may
be a more suitable form of service
in the Movement for such Scout-
ers.”

Perhaps the above quotation
also applies to Barbados!

50,000 Scouts at American
National Jamboree Next Year

Fifty thousand Scouts will attend
the 3rd National Jamboree on the
ninety thousand acre Irvine Ranch
near Santa Ana, Southern Cali-
fornia, from July 10th—17th, 1953,
Scouts of other countries will be
represented.

The Boy Scouts of America say:
“They will be pageants and cere-
monies, campfires and music,
demonstrations of all types of
campcraft and Scoutcraft, swap-
ping and friendship making-——and
a chance to see and meet our
nation’s leaders.”

Our Local Chief Scout’s
Challenge

You will remember that last year,
in October, our local Chief Scout,
Sir Alfred Savage, issued a chal-
lenge to have our Headquarters
enclosed, At the time, due to lack
of funds, it was not possible to
make a start immediately. We
are glad to say, however, that a
start has now been made and a
few Scouters ancl Scouts have been
working during tne past week
preparing the ground for this en-
closure. It’s good exercise chaps,
using a heavy drill, but I am glad
to say that stage has now been
passed. What about coming around
during this week to give a hand
with the erection of the enclosure,
and help us to answer that chal-
lenge before a year is past—and
that will be next October! Come on
chaps, Sleeves up and tackle the

job.
L.A.H,



Scouts Leave
For Grenada

Fifteen members of the James
Street Scout Troop, Fourth Bar-
bados including four Rovers and
two Cubs, left last night in the
Lady Nelson for a_ twelve-day
camp at St. George’s Grenada,

Cub Master Sydney Harris and
Assistant Scout Master Basil King.
They are expected back in Barba-
dos by the return of the Nelson.

The other members of the group
are Irvin Harris, Sylvan_ Clarke
and Duncan Parris (Rovers);
Neil Marshall, John Pilgrim, Rob-
ert Pilgrim, Lawrence Lovell, Ru-
dolph Lovell, George Alleyne and
Dennis Prescod (Scouts), Cecil

and Trevor Morris (Cubs).








Yes, the very latest and what a selection!—The new K. R. Hunte
signed. to cater to Mr, & Mrs.’ Public and: that entails varicty of stook.
items are variety in themselves—they are so nu’ crous!





FOPESOOSOIO SSS SOSO GS CIOS OOS FOS SOS SOO SOOF



The group is in charge of Rover
Leader Charles Morris assisted by







Won't you come in and see?
Hoover
Vacuum Cleaners: Frigidaires &

Deep Freezes; Clocks: Hot Plates;
Toasters & Fans.

kK. BR. Hunte
& Co.. Led.





i

}
'

At Esplanade

The Police Band conducted by
S/Sgt. C. Archer, will render the
following programme of. musi¢ at
the Bay Street Esplanade today]!

March—‘‘Father Rhine”

Pang eRe |

—Lehar
2. Overture—‘“Maritana”
—A. Wallace
3. Selection—‘Pirates of
Penzance”—Sullivan
4. 2 Ballads—“Roses of |
Picardey”’
—Haydn Wood
—“Song of Songs”
—Moya
5. Valse—“Bal Masque”~~
—Fletcher
6. Selection—“The Lightning”
—Alford
7. Suite—“L’Arlesienne No. 7”
—Bezet
8 Operatic Music—Lohengrin”
—Wagner

Hymns by special requests
448 (Methodist)—“O Love that
wilt not let thee go”
777 ms —O perfect Love”
21 (A. & M.)—*“The day is past
and over.”
GOD SAVE THE QUEEN!

Mobile Ciriema Programme

The following is the programme
for Mobile Cinema for week be-
ginning 18th August, 1952:—

Mon, 18th:—Redman’s and Hall's
Villages, St. Thomas, Bennett's
Plantation Yard.

Tues. 19th:—College Savannah
and St. Mark’s area, St. John,
College Savannah.

Wed. 20th:—Prospect & Indian
Ground area, St. Peter, Mt. Pros-
pect Plantation yard.

Thur. 2lst:—Black Rock area,
St. Michael, St. Stephen’s School
pasture.

Fri. 22nd:—Silver Sands area,
Christ Church, Round Rock pas-
ture.

Pimples Go

Cause Killed in 3 Days

The very first application of Nixo-
derm begins to clear away pimples
like magic, Use Nixoderm tonight
and you will soon see your skin he-

coming soft, smooth and clear. Nixo-

derm is a new discovery that kills

germs and parasites on the skin that
s







cause Pimples, is, Red Blotches,
Eczema, Ringworm, and Mruptions.
You can't get vid of your skin troubles
until you re:nove the germs that hide
in the tiny pores of your skin, So
get Nixoderm from your chemist to-
day under the positive guarantee that
Nixoderm will banish pimples and
clear your skin soft and smooth or

money
back on
return of
empty
package,



Nixoderm
Wor Skin Troubles





Men Made Younger |
By Treating Gland

Getting up nights, burning sensa-
tion of organs, whitish discharge
dull ache at base of spine, groin an
leg ns, nervousness, wi ess
and loss of ur are caused
by a disease of the tate Gland
(a most important sex gland in
men). To overcome these troubles
in 24 hours and quickly restore vig-
our and health, take the new sclen-
tifle discovery called Rogena. No
matter how long you have suffered
Rogena is aranteed to set you
right,” reinvigorate your Prostate
Gland and make you feel 10 to 20

years younger or money back. Get
Rogena from your chemist. The
guarantee protects you.








ST. LEONARD'S CL B

DRAWING

PRIZE No, 306

Miss ENID PILGRIM
DEACON'S ROAD

17,8.52—1n





EXCLUSIVE GRAND OPENING

DANCE

of the

“20TH CENTURY SOCIAL CLUB”
Silverton, Cheapside
Under the Patronage of
CANADA DRY BOTTLING CO.,

¢ LTD.

ADMITTANCE by Invitation

;
Special: Free Portrait taken by

CHEZ MARCEL
30.8.52—In



SERVICE OF SONGS

will be given by

MR. GEORGE PARRIS
(Shopkeeper)

At his residence,
CHURCH VILLAGE, St. PHILIP

=
On SUNDAY, Sist AUGUST, 195%
ADMISSION — 1/6

Mr. CECIL SKEETE’S CHOIR
in Attendance
Refreshments on Sale — Please
Invite Your Friends
16.8,52—3n

Store on Lower Broad, St. is de-
hese supef® Electrical

Home Washers &



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Full Text

PAGE 1

SUNDAY. AK.IST IT. IKi SVNDAV ADV4M ITI THREE Al I In< %  % %  • %  % %  %  A Swashbuckling Tale HV CUB. BACK IN MY YOUNG DAYS. I ramember being thrilled to the core by the original production of Sabatuu's SCARAMOUCHE, starring Ramon Novarro, whose glamourous love-making and swordplay set a lot of young female hearts aflutter! Now. thirty years later. MGM. has coma along with a fresh production that from art inn assa taMaVaaa*! angles, is bang up-to dais. This time, the ton.af :h picture is not as serious as its predeceiwor and a certain amount of the spirit and historic feeling of the novel are missing. Nevertheless, though this may be a-somewhat tongue-m-cheek version of a serious, romantic tale, it is thoroughly enjoyable, light entertainment. B.B.C. RADIO NOTES: Discussion** On Culture In W.L Program ntes FARM AND GARDEN By Aatrirolll TIMKI.Y W \li\i\i. THE WATERWORKS DEPARTMENT in us effort., to conserve our water resou ces, ha* indicated that we r. m the last few morlha have not been con. lo maintenance of supplwa at a level sufhcient to the use of the precloiu. uld freely and rlt* -it hope that the deficit will soon be ma.iWH FEME* It is one of the most elaborate productions in come our way. with ajargeous wttints and Mimpjuotttt roatUmes. the beauty of v utrh i> further enhanced by Tfehnlrolor. Tinpint inovcv .vini.v nhrne, i-npellr,! by love and revenue, :.Ks>nst a beckItround of pre-Frenoh Revolution day*, when the complacency ot the aristocrat* was being nidcly d.sturbed by a young patriot calling huriftrlf Marcus Brutus and ;'.wocaliiiB Liberty, aava* Fraternity This factor does impinge a certain seriousness. In part*, but it i never permitted to over-shadow the all imi atmosphere of fun and oerrinr,do. In brief, the story concerns a young French revoluUimist. who disguises himself as the actorrlown Scaramouche. while seeking to learn his own identity and i>t the same time, avenge the oeath or n friend at the hands of n aristocrat who Is the finest nuellist in Frenr*. During his *-—— adventures, he falls in love with OSSSSSt^Si Vu** !" '"• remn.lad me of the late John •"aS !" £T' ^ w,, h :I Ennip arrrvmoro. and revealed thai ho ? SSS^^TZJli^^^ S heco""ng a line actor. fiiakes a charming young countess The two protaguniiU in Ibis though her nc|nt could have been duel are Stewart Granger as softened B bit. Nina Foch as Scaramouche and Mel Fein. ;jinettc and Lewis Sl>ne the Marquis de Mnynrs. and the % %  Valmorin round out the rasi. athletic agility of the two men is An interesting feature In the incredible. The climax of the Him la an authentic picture of th picture, the duel starts on tho cairunciiri dell' nrtc wilh all Iti edge of the tier of boxes where slapstick and buffoonery. This' It continue,'m -.eemiiiif mid-air form of comedy flour..hi.i h for some time. From there, tho France and Italy from the 1Mb awardaB.cn continue in the foyer, century and some of the original downstairs. over bannisters, sketches have been adapted for through the Theatre and linaUv this film. Since humour in those on to the stage itself, where days was earthy, to sav the least, scenery and props of all kinds ore it has been toned down t next. ?th August, they will * by again nuickcr if cut in weather inpwolaks %  i*|nk when the> % %  <• achievement and U ch a> we urr having at present, equlre tt. Veteran gardenet%  thtng positive in th-Hxnl be afraid of doing tlua Job %  • kma kept in view ihc m vta horoughly Cut to within a few *.'• a plant a drink when it I ache* of the ground, stir up the dl > ln othcr *"fd. do not kcav oil -round the plant and manura "*• " * but let it v t, and with the tains to help, It ^VT^J il1 ^ '** J n *^ mm be up again in a very abort ' ££ ft ^Su Shuuki any ol the cut branchw scale or any other blight, advisable to burn them. Utcr this has been done, look ii-iuiui tor any anta nests, or trails, and daml drastically with them, as anU are supposed (iardeners mrr usually eaaong the Aral users to be raatrtrtad. but thay aaad not be undsib vx^med tf aV rasjasaiW urecaui %  .m '.kei %  .,!... • avoid waste. Simple %  seem, not very many realise, foi • vniiple. the wastage from runnirg taps left untended and some .i am are ouite unmindful of the a*a that can be made of u h..lh and wash water ftir garden purposes. %  prii ing bow mucn iactual v atai lM tf all practise a measure tralnt. II is well to ienii-i||,ni"g ""H 1 1 '' „i.li -""• !" M '' realm of culture must fulfil ... nl<.l>(*wvmry ar<> Furthermore new cultures any ruing today m those parts the world-Mich as the W. \ It.die-,—which were funnerl. rift vatoptaatn on the trends* and arhieveme' • m.-Ti<.p'iHtan rountry. Now the) oeas] elf-expreiwion ami h. niiitribiite. It is wlthl uis in mind that th (uMUssion proiBinnies now I dcast by the BBC for thi the are conducted I West IndieGeorge Lamming is the Barbadtai poet who will have a first novel? published ui the autumn erf this year: Wuhan Qncfcina now on holiday in Britain, is in charge the Central Ubran Sthartta Willy Riehiudaon, Ian now on the BBC' staff, once worked In Uw Tnnldarl Ubrary Service. In Ihc broad cast which you can heai Wednesday They will diacUN thi-. third book nf the series and onj the l*st Wednesday in August tt will stun tip the preMissions The broadiasl on SOth begins at 7.M p.m.. while cnncludinK inogrnnime OB 27ih will start at 7.15 p.m. to give half an hour In the summing OS time. Both an the soil particles If t*ere Is an excess tit water, the atf is driven out and plants suffer for lack of it. Lack of water, on the other hand, s equally hann lul so a balance between air and w.iter musl be maintained. Further, it should be borne in %  nd that plants make the l-i i-iing water has bean poured on be responsible pie.nlmg What i bad start for a %  k If yoo wake ar> feellna* tired and .. ... i>n*k a ad full of aaany. %  Mia woman who .^an .i'l>i'" lala (At difference froaa %  -r own experience, wrltas to %  a* :— "Bafore %  >!"> Kraschen. I Isrsys used to wake lo the u.ornlng reeling vry tired. Now have lost all that tiredness and I wake feolltia* full of enenty. Kruschen haa mails me feel years \ onager. I also suffered with rhsuraatlc pains lo my shoulders and %  walllfuts round my ankles 1 am now completely cared of ibeeepaJna and nweiiinas. I take kraaooan Baits vuularly and cannot apeak lea htuhly of 1^"' Kraschen a young toi-aiise It tha liver. kldnsTS and li"r!.i and keeps them all working smoothly ana efflciontly. Tha reward of this Internal claaollneas la a frashsiisd and Invigorated hody. Pr>Mnous eaate materials are oxpelled and the DAlna of rheumatism cease. And as yon continue with Krusohen. your whole body rasponda v> Us DurK.ltiK force. Krusclien is ut\ lio-iu lnr \oiir \>>\>\ ii. \l lime he i Ireittil when rutiiny his Ircth. ASHTON & PARSONS INFANTS' POWDERS" 1 Ask your Mother to give you rec.IhK* nest, a few daya latae surs will often be seen remildinic their home The only [.hing to do then Is to repeat the Iling water treatment until nil I killed. in of a trapeze artist, and than r.o denying Die extrunrdinarv duellliiK skill of the U' '•-i >ie one. with i and Mel Ferrer flying nplendJd perlormanees. Mr. Granger's ability lo change from comedy and light banter to serious lifting in an instant, as well as some of his mannerUms and llmJANET II I*. II 00 Kk Cairo Road And Rapture A thnllcr and a draiT k town a) Lhe twa Plazas. At the Barbara CAIBO R Li totnethirig different from tin usual COD .in thai it is a bland of fact and fiction and tells the story nf the tiemendoua effortbeing n.ade to stop the drug IfafBc In E*ypt. The Hint WII aetually mnie In th.ii r.iuntr. with lhe nf the KgypiLm govemmenl and is an absorbing and Hug picture. -' is headed by one of E. Miami's outstanding actors. Erie port man. who gives a thoroughly sound and lestruined performance as the head of the rnti-narcotics br.Mieh i.f the Earyptiun I^.lice. Outstanding in the supporting cast la Harold Lang—a newcomer %  -Id hand on tl:.CfaM and %  new type of villain. with %  cocky expression and manner that belie a silky, suave voter. More should be seen and heard of this v oung actor. In OOtnpMM contr-isl. HAITI Itl showing In Bridgetown Is defl%  Tihre drama. The action lakes place in Rome and its enand once again, we have authentic background*. Filmed in the Eternal City and on the undent estate of an Italian prince, it is scenically trulv delightful, and the photo :i t gardeners soon I ogmsc. The roots rrach o. ler as the snt>pl> dh ladies 1 vigorous giuwth rsjsjus ts Tt\..: whv lo.i much or too 1 it 11. ler ire both equally prvlu-' iiici.il. the former eotaSHon must be rectified either by aer Makl Iflaaaim spring again with renewed norna al, therefore, of water lo Listeners to 'Canbix*an Voice.' vigour. apply it so that its duty can be may recall thai o n the 2uth April There are numerous varietiee nvwi effect(valy performed withljuit the BBC broadcast a play b, of the Croton, and It is moat out loss by evanoraiiun. The the Jamaican writer. Roger Mali', interesting to make a collection maxim should lie to soak deeplv This play will be repeated on the of the different kinds and have whenever the need arise 17th inst.. and as reception Is now them In pots or as shrubs about than a daily sprinkle which is n.it almost perfect from London there the garden. onlv harmf ul b ut wasteful should be no trouble in hearing Crototu grow easily under SAVE WATER AT ALL TIMES • MIA word of it. Incidentally ordinary garden condlUuna They IT IS PHRCIOUS Tt) I.IFK local playwrights who have like plenty of water and a sunny '" attempted unsuccessfully to have *p,* „„d the plant-, generally ^' i* t i lct p ' 1 hr th '' n,,c r r ">ko a spurt of growth during caubbenn Voices* should note (h e rainy months. Don't be disthel Sei y .oo^lw 1 Jif* d ^H V "!. pou "'* d if you"" cultinga grow %  i-n u 8 ' ld \ p,,,m h ST** *l<*"lyCrotons are slow atartata Ift Broadcast will begin but owe they do make a start they come on quickly. For raped and hardy growth here is nothing to compare wilh >ur common pink Cnrollta. • Mice this vine is established in h Hl'MAN, ANIMAL ANI> PLANT We fui: 7.15 p.rr the_ moat f his excellent opporlUtiftlaa, The story concerns a young Italian sculptor with whom two Weed ("iiir.il dealt with this subject quite in one of our enrliei sol Umns. In this showery weather dormant weed* tend to i l. r with rasnarkabla vtga .. Fb> problem in often aiceniualeil I" M %  ling which foliowi lhe use nf duty manure fiom imice this vine is established In !" n ou ? or fmn. co.np-,.' ganlen R is there for good, h **i' ,v "" h >'^'' i lcliuio fj weed growth which has run to AS!!*J ^_" m .7l S ..rd,,„.r, haw ,!,.„„.,, ,|,,,r I U oughl and inergN lo flgldln-: pernicious weeds ani. to time, siwne curious and Inpoloua riieih.-is have i i rd for their control. The love wilh the younger girl for "P"ng up whom the machinations of her deuseful vine, for it will rover the %  hjnlna; slater prove too much, ami "P %  %  Fernery, a wall, lattice tinitiangulor affair turns Into or wire in an Incredibly short :c.i. lime, providing a thick srreen of Ti:> c.'t. which is practically aTcen with dusters of delicate f 0 ^,",' unknown, is headed by Glenn nd graceful sprnys of pink ^,^,1 vlXh i %  handsome young nDwem It needs no help in the j, W)lv ,„ ha nrft — ,t l. ii An. i in i. i.i and Elsy Albiin. way or training for it elimlx with storage organ's like i a new Swedish discovery, who has unaided and clings of Its own ,„ pint %  inrks like devil great charm and beauty. Though accord. All this, too, with the ,i, ;il jrp re allv Mubhora The Bf <*. on the whole, eonminimum of garden care. Once modern weedicide cannot' reach vincing. I think that both these a year It IN advisable to cut the ,ir... young people would give a bi'tler Coralita vine to the ground. If p ., r ts. Some years ago a under different direction. Ihis Is not done there accumutralian recommended ; ,'. ,, ,. I cerlainly hope wc see them lates a mass of dried leaves and molasses agidnst nut •gain, along wilh Lorraine Miller, twigs under the green of the vine • experience, the nut M, ho makes a fascinatingly prewhich Is an encouragement togo-. it. A gardener In Ea| |ni w ni iinimciiding the covi ring weedy beds wit I datory female. garden pests and insects. In The nMnacn score played by the week the vine will be up ..gaini Symphonic Orchestra of Radio and In a verv short tlmo it i.'T Roma is in keeping with the difficult to tell It had ever mat her baunUng atmosphere of cut down. of new sawdust. Will %  gurdener try this three ind thi "KEEP EM FLYING" DANCE AT THE CRANE HOTEL SAT. 30th August TO THE TUNES OF "KEITH CAMPBELL" and HIS "SOCIETY SIX and "THE JUMPING JACKS STEEL BAMD" featuring our own iw.o/rt,(i/iiA PAtTL n#f.j#vs • A FHKK 15 MINUTE FLIGHT IN "BIM" TO ONE IN EVERY '..O PERSONS" ENTERING THE DANCE DANCING from 8.30 pm. Supper included Dress Optional ADMITTANCE — $2.00 HIGH VALUES! LOW PRICES! OH, STOVES la .uil every Budget ONE BURNER (Cation Wick) from S7.:in TWO 111 ItNKK (Asbeilat Wick) from J2J.87 THREE BURNER from s 19.21 And OVENS lo At all Stove* (Spare Parta: We carry them I) Barbados Co-op Cotton Factory Ltd. EVERYTHING YOU NEED FOR LASTING BEAUTY (aWr wome. UI o.er the world BM proeei tfce r*la* of POIHIS baaafl ..la. i. Pond'* offer you IOOIplats rsnge of baauty altai prkss lo es* jomr pursr. Ptrat. xbr fo funow CMaasM I'oad-i (old Creai" for ileaii.inK •aal Paodi Varuahins; Cream lor %  assasaa , protaetiva. non-fteny lieaaaalfcan. lo USM up sour tlisuei, MT aatldrr astrlnrant Skin Irrthrner la in aaorablt Uvlrbeftlr fbaWstl tBUI BkUWslh J jaaasj assj !> %  "• ehaaM oUUlluoVaol I'.-ifl'. i*. i %  Ml •hs.lr • %  irntiti.alK I rnhanie lite njltn.l II.IHT.I r -I BM t ornpli'kUiii Irpe. Ami lo a.1.1 ll.e fatal (oi.. K ol lo*rtmr^. aaaaa lip.U.L. in MM thai |ui IJT un. snd mi i POND'S IVHM-H ARE YOU? A FAX OF JAZZ? A LOVER OF CEA&SMCB9 A FOLLOWER OF SPORTS? WHATEVER YOUR INTEREST A NEW PHILIPS Variety RADIO-PLAYER WILL FULFIL YOUR FONDEST DRfiAMS SEI.EtT YOIHS XOW . YOUR DEALERS MANNING & CO.. LTD. PIER HEAD — DIAL 4284



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31 MIAV. MOIST 17. 1MZ SUNDAY ADVOCATE int THE TEAM B.G. Olympiad A Big Success THE British Guiana A.C and A.A. Aueuit Olympiad was a huge success, Mr Gtlmi n lhe Barbados Contingent. 1..1.1 the Advocate yestc r i.niiiulerd. Only about live .if the O'nlmjjeni wi seasick. TTiotf M ; U.."' 1 ivever. walking around < i the second dA) 'hue days. In British. 0TKna. ihi-ough ll *. %  %  • %  the B.G HOVlTDBK-iil ihe hostel of the Goveru|Beut ^>i KLIM u *r. io<*> KLIM k. wltha| r*.r,q. ral l KLIM BJBeM| •* c:.-o T %  aifara %  Mil. nd i third in (BACK ROW) left to right—E. McLsod, J Skinner, Mi-J D. KalaK, D. Yard* (ITIONT EOW> D. Inniss. McD. Lloyd, T. Inniss. B. BOOM. H Cart*r (Intermediate cyclwt) u Ml f lb. picture Marsh& R. Sattaur. Harass. T. Moor-. Training College lor Tad: was at their disposal. Here M commodation was exceptional!?, good. 'There n a big lice shorta*. ID British Guiana", Mr. IVchefoi said. "The boars missed this itsjti from their dafiy diet". After the contingent arrived in D.G.. owing to heavy rsinMl they were Able to have only W days track practice. Other trail, nig was done on the road anl when It is considered thst tt B.G roads an not very good, thii made It more difrlcnlt for thi rvcllsW. They were In B.G. for eighl lays before the Meet opened li' i. presence of a record .row*' This gave them some time to re .-over from the effects of the w trip. Mr. Rocheford said that lh* Pritlsh Guiana crowds had great confidence in the Barb-Minn cynol up to the mark f>' h '*/" i> c.intcnled with secfeal the tactful venetue'an CT< Canadian, Challenger after taking part irt tin recent British ond an-', third places. cllata. Because of thii. the n Guiana Amateur Cycle and Athletic Association Olympiad David ionise ran third In the Mdian* treat well supported in held at the B.mrda track in Georgetown on August 4 and "*. *""** < A Class) which the the flelri August 6. tiuiaiie*e champion sprinter MaurKelxer Injured Although many of U.em have The three Mile tfittLSg*AmO^H^S n Ule **>B*9 BWVtoUJ not come up to expeeUt.ons I hl thc %  •„" cisss n new record nisi tafd me%iat £ was nlfto u *• "a*""* day of ibc alsetSp-etirS wffih^rheTp^em KA *JSf*J*J3* ^ 5*" !" "&S£ it ..!> 3 pracUc In future lours. The Barbados team of 13 left the island on July The August Olympaid In B.G. LATIN RIDERS SET NEW VOGUE (By E. R. M. I I ii! i. A TEAM of Barbadian cyclists and athletes numbering ...... _^ 13 returned to the island on Friday mrrning by the 2dl£, JJ& VViiiSiid %  for Georgetown and arrived there on July 23 but due the team did not move into theli evening; most of the boys went to nee the track which is four laps and a half to the mile. There was also no track practice because water was on the ground. The Barbadian cyclists were "A'* Class J. Skinner, D. Kelzer. D. Yardc and R. Saltaur; Inter.. U E IV,he ;h M I ,e atart "diw'tu^ bome"mlsunder" uie *** 1 <"y ** P"*uce for Uva which M. rtobclu> won in seven starHjinsj vith the starter iWrbadians, four spills were earnintlWI -.8.9 seconds. E. McLeod Hwitt Ifi^is.(PoUoc Sprinter! P'netiee.i by the Uarbadlaiu. Thfind T. .Moure who were In thta ;u lled a muscle on the ilrst day ''."dicapped them, especially livision also complained *-f t&c aid was unabla to run foi Uie res* Uuncaii Keiissr who was iulTcri: lfc lhe track. They also had to facf (lf nP ...eei.,,,, Q Uovrt ran In Uom U1 injured left leg and was ::ni[le? on lhe track They also Ullld ,„ „,,. TW| MUp „ a advised by a doctor not lo rid,at up to ftedipwit which took place on the second alL ig employed by the () lV Thu howewr a^ „ ol dtter ;. t Uoyd remained in the back loo curngeou. Kaiser who rode u uch in this rat-e and when he lhe First Day but was unfortunate 1 to luke the lead he found to be in a spl.l In the Nine Mile front of him were His injured leg became worse and '•'' r^a^-Jir^iC SKJL'SSJ 0 1 b > K On the Ann day Moore was aecIt Claa 1 3Sr-?X "'M,'" 1 ",?'" c r*l* Rce. He was Mater. b> 1 J U %  ''• %  *neeUng llobeUo of Drlu-h Guimrta ln a I noticed in every race the pacers maintained a semi sprint j",^* TP and many of the cyclists are always Uut lno se HI "'Ton^Moo'^'dJdTell'to colL in ."2 ; ,S 'l?* M he WM and ta "* hc *• therefo ln U Io -*' Moore, [i *• h ^ '""P' 1 ^'"""iins up 1 w.HUd a.v that STUM n !" lav "V. Marshall. The athlatai WOT II %  • way out ll was too late ror Mm ih.Barlmdos Mm did Ks besl J? 1 ',, th !" ?J*. i,., Iisalsa (SWI.IUII 11. Rouse %  ""-'-> %  -• vSprlnter), McD. Lloyd and T. Inniss (Distance Men). The Trinidad cycle loam was j njI the track was heavy due to not sure whether they would have •A CLus veteran Complon Gon, um early lhe mornins. Tho VenaJSMI .elerujd but as 1 salves, rerdi De Cannes; [ntcrme/m .i :U i ,.lp nan m lhe oveiili** n %  aw l...und to dialei V. Fncoorny. It. Wallhe and a „d allhoush the trnrk was not the %  axpeUsnos ll BosllSj eyefitf'*' """"" C1 rk ,U I> hesl thes? Latins .m Ihelr low The Venezuelan conlmsenl was "*|" S,. 1 '""' „""? u „.,. i I KftchX ^J^&es5S"E!S '•"""""' ftob.ee" A „'ho toUowcd Ah Cardona all International rlc( |or ,. A „ CUu ^' j..„ „# .1.1* „_.' n moved awai (roio lhe Oeld in a ~. w on the race In lhe record lime %  .^ l Wedno^ay pracUce shool J8ed to , .head ol another Ha ,, "Ttf hi h .r^SS SS. A, V"S B """ Sm 1 "• i, ? (THouse: who suffe?.. lupptti the held whim included iiulu Club. Scores were up to the tingents and they witnessed some ^^Sjf^S^tS^'"'* ?*"£ •"? ."^dard with Mr. M kocn sport despite a heavy track ""d Skinnu w.th Caccione Q. Tucker top scoring with l9 oui on the second day. skl "V"' VVT'^" 1 'V^T f po,tt,ble 10u -*>• -ohowwl Lindsay Gordon of British Gut>' '" g l5 Mll Of 0 wh, 'h h< "ly by Roberts, Jordan and ana ihowed that he still had a *on. There were three spilU m HaaseU with 98 polnU eaeii. Memgood sprint when he won the One "-ia nice in which the \enezuebers were glad to welcome Mr. MUe Internatonal and Nine Mile %  ", !" J?„ VA e ,. P „",.",. !" ? Evelyn, who is op a visit hi cycl : l it %  the tour Mr. that he cyclists and athlete of British j Guiana took then (raining very ?.""* b *J, y eriously. He felt thai lhe G wane so U.th^m^eJitsdiBiBasi. had also benellted inmenselyi rbclal *im titiul .i. a .he of such topnotch Ihletes as Herb McKenley ami, ^a'^l'.^£L-t """* .! .1 \nutftrld The members of U. 1 %  t .,,T..STi 1 "., ... mi had ftalned a world of • \oei ii-in %  %  tour and this | rt ,. |( ^^ Ul J |11 n N1: uld be reflected in their future in., 1; ma w ..*u..nh..o"iiia -iifor-,* % %  .< %  Tu >u>nl llv Wt-llwrhrx.1 e said that tit* ll*rt>au_* A*w ,. * —. v. atlon should m.ke ever, effort ?i? g£'££? £,"£?"" ti invite Venezuelan cycllati %  uik irmmMi taVe part in local Meet* becau %  -"' *""-?* 1 !y then would Barbadians he ei cycling at its beat. 1 i'im but moat outstanding was >"oung 1'addy who comes from it. ...,c* with Llddell He rode In lhe lnterine.iu.te Division but on <'in b< can heat most of the A" el >' 'in' athletes, he thought MC ind Mi J'herson to be -* client apnnten and H Class Dean*, was alsc good. lie two ladies. K Hun. and ('. ..hiBdamtncr gave good i^rformi onr ywMlMi Bui WMO %  w aw MI • i ii. %  Mi i'ui, sHsei *-l of MUM 11 .|h Stand inln.li.iii. .-j tetry to irlaia 1 a! ma motualnff Proudly chosen by world-famous people for thrmst In* . ' UM is>it> illi ITH ...nimriiWI to atak* Cone frtatVU Will lr.lrr.ilr n Imr llir Ulaal r i-iwanl to o %  Ii* KW"' it J.-nd UHI 1 sport fan? who went to see how their local champions would Pf.*** !" ., shape against the foreign con1 way out it was too late for him the Barbnd Ha tlnished fourth. Many u f the Heavy Track .-uiiicionih f.., .„ On the second day of the mattbut perhaps many of them war! ^m* racS In tne Fiv. Mtt j i? v International John Skinny found I said befoiv hlmjelf hBVlng to battIp wlln lh "' I wo Venezuelans. Caccionl and n.-nuclielle. Caccionl managed t' • win by about a length but Skinner •etK at Wale-, on %  BarbadiJiis .1 ,1 well in this ..-• won in the Inmediate Division and Skinner ..s second to Caccionl 1 WM that he was a Gulanese by %  mg well on the muddy track" • %  said. In this Meet Lloyd wan ond to Doris in the 880 yards Me said that the OuumeU we,,, itremely hospitable lo the Ilaridos contingent. "On many f.asions we mm n.vit.-d uul to itl many Gulanese are I 'king forward to a visit from us 1 hoo .-^rSJ'rSS . nd £.P S" 11 who !tuffer' severe muscle injury and w.i .nacUve for the remainder of thi Meetlnf. Mr. Rocheford said that Joyc Marshall's display wns extreme 1 1 redltable but she lacked the ex perience of the other lady cy lists. She impressed the Briti.M H.C. W in Steond %  >iv. Lt-a-iiif Cu|> first records the pleted In 23 utes. 13-3 seconds. Llddell and K. Robinson of British (luiann. "lIuf.tl.nB' Tactics ... „, Barbadoa Wlna In the rive Mile International, After the rare Skinner was prethe Latin wheelsman Demichelle .nted with a Cup and a gold won by sheer "bustling" U-ctics. medal. Barbados got another win From the start of. the race there that day whan Moore won the Half was grand team work on the part Mu* "It" Class from L. Robinson of Uie Latins and they kept up 1 ,>, one minute 13.2 -econds. Mchot pace and *o hot was the pace tjB0 ^ waa tn OIU „ t I(ll ..p,Us ,„ that even Gonsalves waa one of I(l is r*ze. the top notchers who was forced Lack o( Kxperience to "drop out' of the race j Marshall, e B-trbadian At one stage Cawlone "burrt ljdy vcU6 ritde Well but lack of away" from the field but Gordon ,.-„„,-,__,.,, jT' C Kl, b nn.r^ho 0 SS n fi y i m^ '*-" Beatrice Clarke. Clarke The angles of the track worried Miss Marshall came In waul to him also and on many occasions Beatrice Clark" in Hirer of the when he should be hugging the ">ces. angles to Uie line, was moving AlhlflKs out considerably. Hi the fat events '.he Barbadian Day she was sec ... Half Mile and third i JffiTXL?". h .? that hU cluo ">• "• H <* 11 "•* htt m 1 1 Li? ;r I 10 "^ ?". ri ln post 1 faul w ***** ^ w,do " h • iioote ln the near future. lracfc However, he thinks that Scores the experience gained shli it. D. EdghUl 97 Mr. M. A. Tucker ... 95 Mr. E. L. G. Hoad, Jnr 9 4 Mr. K. S. Yearwood .. .91 Members will be glad to learn hat the Club has been presenter \ ith a beautiful Silver Challenge j" n from '"up which will be competed for, S1 |^_ 1 the first time, at the annual joh n Skinner rode beautlfull> jinpi'titlon scheduled for Sept. u> win the 15 mile cycle event si to 27th. | n this race there was a epill Regular practices will be held which carried 20 cyclists. The 1 the 2nd and 4th Saturdays and race finished at about 6.50 p.m KINGSTON. J'ca., Aug. 13. cry Wednesday. Members are ,(,on the sun had already set The British West Indies have minded that to have an averSkinner's judgment was very goo.] ixvn given permission to eni.i the ie for these competitions they Tony Moore also .scored a vieDavis Cup competition. They will iould put In as many practices tory. He won the Half Mile ll tin so next year poesib:e now. Class Cycle Event while Joyce • _c.p. McD. Lloyd of Foundntio placed third in the One Mile fU He said that the winner of this race. J. Doris of British Guiana %  extremely good. Su..ex>. "Wc were far more success! the Second Meeting". IIariisi.ni College Second Divlliiisketball team have, like reason's League Cup. Incklenl 1 lbs Second Division have won It Hie same way lhe Find did. on | goal averages. The Second Division gan t| end ad last week. Boys' ciui. PoUci j and College weie lied oft i the 1 number of nutclies won. each [ having lost twice, but College had Hie lx>lter goal average During the week. Harrison College Old Boys beat Cailton 25IB I in the Knock Out Competition, arid I V.M.P.C. iir (>.slhh fheii match ever, defeated l The Sr1.1i-i1n.1i. will he plaved • uil Tuesday thK vt-rk .nil |hr llaaU are ...... ,. .1 |„ rmmr a „ l-rlday. In the Srml-linsU, ll.r.O.B j ind final day ol will meet Boy*' Club. ..nd H,C 1 Mr. Rocheford Y.M.P.C. I timiM boy. bad n isrosrammr | had tweomr or IhM T aasMM %  II -sain llirii. ixil %  < %  shllh i.d Uvtiw Mart IIW bif }ob .in. pantlits 1 -.Hilly ..H| lo Lou %  --ll.r.1 Hi* -Irven puh sponsored by .1 & R BAKERIES makers of ENRICHED BREAD and thd blenderi of J & R RUM Vearriaheai.of 4 %  lsjPnti Hlflc 1 unag ""I ii.' I.IIIJ %  .'.iiw uaii|i i'. HiMI an alw..). rluill— New Parker fll' is the choice ajg i-'opli' all over the 11 both for personal .Iso aa a special gift. Farnou* man, leaderin biuinees %  (inimTw, women who sat I i-liion lor the world—all ond to own and use It; wfth I'tea are signed, and famouka are siTiiten or someone whose affection due, a I'.irker 'SI' sroukl 1 nosi disivriiing present I mr own use, no oom)Mtxsbl<'rriliug in-trument haa ever been /////• Parker '51' II "i-iW'i wn*l umil'ii pen oivas *NO t'san ay riaon nwru A. S. BRYDEN & SONS (Barbados) Ltd—Afants. B.W.I. MAY COMPETE FOR DAVIS CUP YEAST-VITE H0U UP/ YF.AST-VITE Tabl;t helping you to feel be' Tablet Is a scientific cot —together with the in Vitamin Hi. Teat the effi unpleasant %  ymptrOniH l. be one more added to tin treat benefit of'' YEAHT •five you faat relief from pain and follow It up by r and brighter ai^rwardB. Each "YEAST-VITE" inatlon of analgesic — or pain-re Moving i mm t irtant stimulant, Caffeine and the valuable tonic With the next pain or cold that attacks you! As the < and you begin to feel your old self again you will countless thousands of people who have proved HIP ITa." Plck-Me-Up' TableU! c;et a bott le TO-DAY! Q tick/if tiUieves HEADACHES NEURALGIA I COLDS CHILLS FEVERISHNESS I N ERVE AND PAINS YEAST-VITE "Pick-Me-Up" Tablets


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SUNDAY, AUGUST IJ. 1J! SUNDAY ADVOCATE inn \ I Uruguay Called Here 1 esterday Three hundred and eight lull pacMtiKPT* from the SS I imgmtj %  aralfed Hi.main of Bridgetown yesterday. The Irninj under the command of ('apt. Hodges, arrived at 8.43 MM .vesterdgn from Trinidad. It li (-unsigned to Messrs. R. M. Jones Thr arrival of the l'rutru|/ and I^di/ .V'IIOK I it ought the number ill Msaatf In Carlisle Bay lo seven. This it the largest number seen at anchor for the month. Ships in harbour were Valhall. Arnefa. Canadian Challenger. Specialist, Crofter, ('ntfruav %  nd I-adu Nrlmn. The Oofler. Spei iakwi and Challeaoer are unload* ftng lavge li i I HI X ll •MA a*Mai *.fWf loajtr i'.. H ... Sam Mvtm. *.bmm FtritfhB> -ha! a'. | 1IH 1 II J.algH STI1KIT .1 am ft*, t < SSM T V •" H,% } PAYMK HAY ".* a" Mt M, p SIM %  %  JD an Rn. t I T pm Mt fl PrihtH. I ILL MK\H>RIM ll am Mr Mr .1 OrtmOi. N l .n Ml M It.-' I ANK "lip.. .till THE DUKf AND DUCHISS of WInosor arc saluted by a Swiss Guard as they walk througn the Pope s summer palaci at Castclgr.ndolfo, Italy. The Pontiff granted them a special gajggeaMM, They went accorded ''minor* diplomatic and protocol honors. fUtcrr.atton: Kaduohotoi Australian Airman Spent 2i) Months In Red Prison HONGKONG. Aug. 16. Three Australian airmen who were imprisoned for 20 montns by Chinese Communists after their flying boat forced landed 11 the sea of Portuguese Macao said to-day they had falsely confessed to opium smuggling "Just to get back home." TJe trio who arrived here on Tueaday, told a Press conference to-day of "terrible experiences" in dirty prison cells with diseased Chinese political prisoners. ;md the "mockery of a trial". "We shuddered at the thought of having to do more time in th.it jail when the People's Court sentence us to two years jail." Thev had lived on the same diet as the Chinese—rice and vegetables. Their only reading matter had been four or five ropie* of the Moscow English language newspaper New Tbnea. One of the trio said that it was on his return survey flight from Chlttagong in East Pakistan that he wax forced down off Mncao. He had intended to land at HongKong but the airport was closed when he arrived before dawn. ,o Ihe Sun gave him permission to go to Macao to pick up a radii receiver to bo repaired in HoniKi mp —I'.P. •t Die 11. V[iaiiiiri'iil House Kir.' ONTARIO. Canada. Aug. 14 Three persons were known to be dead and at least 00 homeless following an apartment house fire that threatened for a time to wipe out a street in downtown Guelph Police .aid the victims of the $250,000 blaze were a grandmothcr nd two grandchildren with whom she was baby sitting while their parents went out last night. The fire started in an auto repair shop nnd spread quickly. —TJ.p. Lady Savage Opens Ward 0 Pram Ml' L but at the Black Rock Clinic in St. Michael. In all her work shehas the full support of her Mother, who. on this occasion, has so generously given [10,000 for the erection nnd equipment of this building I would hope that othii Will follow Mrs. Smith's exampleand provide, in thanksgiving for the bleunngs they enjoy, a Children'! Ward in the other Alnishou:.es in this Island. Finally. Mrs. Smith, on behalf of all the people of this parish. '. thank you for this noble gift, and have much pleasure in opening ;he Evelyna Smith Children's Ward, which forever will bwi your honoured name. Mr. Garner, after extending %  welcome to the Governor and Lady Savage said thai for years it had been a problem for the Vestry to separate the children in the Alm.shouse from the decrepit The erection of an annexe to Ibf main building was also suggested for such a puiposjs from year to year, but they were hinderel |R)in doing anything owing to thtli limited resources. Mrs. Daysh 'hen I member of the Vestryand she was placed on the Board of Guardians. She saw the conditions at the institution where the children were mixed with the .! %  and decrrpit and ihought thai such a state of affairs should not be allowed to continue. She intimated that something must be done for those children and after discussing the matter with her mother, told the Vestry that the latlm area artfljng i build and equip n separate ward for 30 children at the Alnuhouae if the Vestry would iifterwurds take it over and run it. Her offer was gladly accepted and she donated £10,000 which was used In the erection of the wnrd. Mr. Garner thanked Mrs Smith on Iwhalf of the Vestry and the pariahoners for hci ^em'rosil. iinel .tid that when Ihe history Of ll.irbadM was written, this vn i..11srtfi would n do* Sea And Air Traffic In Cariiile Bay Henry O Wallace. SOiooorr I DdrtMnn, Srhoonar Iv-cntrf* K K Toer. n A sMriGirrsroWN u* • %  Re> K r I -n BA MII %  ii .n r Pm m. i *<-• %  111* U*.n I,I. Ml*t DA: M -m RM K .WI. a* DD MtiU il'H" i l-niri 11 a.m. **>. T J rur\rs i "i Mr H fin.ni in. ll i n. Hi i *-iti-. en MONT ii .1. MI r nii. ; On r n.rkr somn nirici s a . %  >>. T I Fur**• lam .Mi j rUikr TOVlI.S. I I H, c MarrlM M ||. \ 'IXHAIl 11 m Mia* Hr-.r. ', P n. Mi t> Fill I in NI /i %  %  ( I IT %  muK • ni hrv v ( %  ...** %  7 p tn Mr O IHtiUiwaMr II 11-Ml II • M M. H Oarn.1 p m Mr C. tK isnmwammr n ., m Mr c nniav, .in 7 p m Rn KWC f-. %  %  Rl( r It %  iv Mi II r. Ui.inwollr MT J Tu*or SALVATION ARMV > %  I % %  "> N ,IMI:U ;iam I...1UMecllns. 1pm Com|iaii\ M-rnm T p m BalvatMn St CapUin W Bathop ati4.iM.ioN siaati 11 a m IbiluiMHrrll|. 3pm CorniMn. Mtvllng. : n m Aalvalloi. B....... T Qibbt 'flll.SI.JIlSN II IB H Mi MrUnf 1 pm "lii'llliK T |i ll Snll.MI"! MM ,i.t Wl '-" %  Ud MAtar Vfl T II Rad-I. S. l-iiiiirr III.LIIP M gaum, J*ni>iii U.a> Norlrrn AIWfV At A SKhooner Ammila T owns llullura* Mccllikg, 3 111 MI-IIIIK 1pm Salvalla< Ii..i lid ma Asrnl M, UruaTbay. 11.003 MM I BM MAdfF< Irom Tiiiildad. rrn Mrar. H M Jon Co Lid S S Lady NaUon. 4.SSS tor.*. Capt Wltar#, from HI l>ii Tlinidad • ril t Smith 1.x H.HUI. Qul ana, Schooner IWIqurrii Hi Si ViniT.H %  n. BM %  Seawelt M IIUI. M, It M I ns mil I i.rrrt< *!'• %  talk. Ilunnii h>ti.ln. A nnntian, wniiam PWW, i i %  lid CiKlB.'r Hi %  •*< %  I i-,iii VnllfHB* ,1 Hoh* '. .!-.%  .1. IT". Irl..m*.l Thomti F Thoi^-. M H — Ml N i. rah on C llordina I. Msuanunad. S Fampi—%  >., M C" Hunlr A li-i.il' I W SUrnrn IfodSkinasn. m >niru> m H "I na J Vralii %  •i rAiTisr* a a.w i A ON ram far IrlnUad FHch.nl apmk. OlandP N..th.nin CannKh-i. Mi.Tvn.l Lamhari %  Mimti. IJIiH PainRrgttiakl Hrac* B-I lift. I SKA VII ff II a m MolUivu MNUPI. I p m rw>tM* Mwlinf. 1 p m Salvatioi. HariBMi LMulnvani C Hind. t MMUri nil i Ham lloluiasa Mfllnl 1 p in Companv Mwtlng. 1 p. in Salvaltori S.Mtl... %  E. Cwc. OfigM 11 a m lloilnn* Mvrlios. 3 p in ( ompaiit Mrvlinr. p m halvallnn Mlin Ciplaln C Rmirn* KCni.1' BAPTIBT CHUHCM Tudnr Mrp*t PPV K !• Hantrn pa Mot Sunda.MorningS W SmHtav Icho. I i' 30 Momlnc Worahlp Hunda* Evaiilns. 1 SB Rvanaaila'i' U Ha. a St-ilins c.| WlniM ll-.v... ri.ida .paaklns MuaV by ii'tih Ctiotr ana MWa StOf—PBI Monday Niftit B-pllat V.iuiif f-i ..| "L irrvlcr by and tin Wrdimdav Nlflht Mld-Wack m.j l'.iii BcrvM-c Luim to IA-IMM* l : n.-iiiTinioi, aver, T\ck. a in Thiii*d*y ai It p m AIISIKI Mlh t4.iarlrrlv and l'airrli it H.\ Slat Hi.( and Ncv. farkor ..I Uml Park a. IB A (irdlal .Htonif awalta ui h-rand at all of tha Piindamaiiai Bap*. < .i i ST • I. 1|,.| \. P II-, ..I'M OKTMoliii\ GOVERNMENT NOTICES nitmsH (A it IBM: AN ( IKRKNCT BOABD I'arsoiiN in posac.xiion of Ilorb-idOf., British Guiana and Trinidad inrt Tobago Government Currency Notes are requested to exchange Ihem for British Caribbean Currency notes with as little delay aa a-Mibi* Barclay* Bank (DC. ft O ). the Royal Bank of Canada and the Canadian Bank of Commerce will exchange the currency notes on lpphcaiion. until further notice. Sgd H N ARMSTRONG, Senior Currency Officer, Public Building:. BarUidis Centre. 12th August. 1952 ll.t.32-2n HOUSICRAFT CIKTRE BAY STREET of nay and Evening Classes will open Strc"t from Monday 15th September W The following progrumm • tltl Housevrsfl Centre. Bui r*riday 28th November, 1M2 Monday 10 00 i.m— 12 Noon — Cake and Pastry Making Simple Cutting and Sewing 2 00 p.m— 4.00 pm.— Preserves. Simple Dress Cutting. 4.30 pm— 6 00 p m.— Assorted Dishes. Smocking. Tuesday 4 30 p.m.— 6 00 p.m.— Cake and Pastry Making Elementary Dressmaking .Vednesday 4.30 p.m— fl 00 p m— Caribbean Cnnker> Simple Dressmaking rhursday.. 4 30 p.m— 11.00 pmAdvanced Cake Icing Advanced Dressmaking Yiday 4.30 p.m.— 8.00 p.m.— Advanced Buttering Simple Handicrafts Registration for all cUisses will take place at the Housecraft Centre. Bay Street, between 10 00 ;i.m. and 12 Noon, mid between 2 00 kgg. and 6 00 p.m on Wednesday MHh :md Thursdav llth September. MM. Fee* far all classes must he paid in ndixiHce for thp term at the ime of registering. 5, for each course In Sewing. Pattern Drafting, Smocking, ami Handicrafts. IS/fo reach i-ourte In Cake and Pastry Making. Cake Icing. Assorted Dishes. Caribbean Cookery, Butlerlng nnd Preserves. S/will be refunded at the end of the term to all students who -.ttend 7ST of their classes 'iepartment of Education, nth August. 19!>2 |7 8 52—2n PART ONE ORDERS (* HAM'OTT '.n.-.-JI., I II.I..U-. llMl'irM narri SKI Tha Commandit.|t tlffWr rrgrrt* la >nt N aflar an luna-i 11* i b.iriMl i fl Ch-vrlaiMl S Ml 1 • Di.tn-an AmSPraon, L-ivttnc* Hutrhlnaon, Pair* .'.-• n.-.i .."t Brun. Anlhor. C.mldin* UttvanpoM. J^hn Davwiport. KLphan Oavmpoit Joan Dav. 1 la. ar.au* oau— (Xtaald Baul itins or awa i wes I II A" Mot or Major ore Wakrotl. E D !• i>ppomi*d ir vie* Lt
    dlrwllon oi lha.i I aaain ak>tld thr open and niiniatur* rang*' Maad R-nd priM-tli-n Kill ba hald "n Mondav ia. Wadi.rad*' SB and THuioda; i M MrmbM* ho havr quallftM will ! %  poid on Thundai 11 Aui 51 iproiVTMBNT rapUIn I. r nanlWld i. -pj-mird Waapon Training OffAan to aaiiM Commanalor. In I*1T Annual Ma.ktr> Counw „ nn i orrtraa a oaoaai* sr.ajr.AST ros wraa rvoisio ni(i i Ordarlv OtHrrt OT4*TIV Hrtjr.ni Nail '..: Dal Orderly OnVar Ord-rly aarjaanl ( OMMAS'lt MKMrUrrlON CopUIn 1 Hni'.rad O C 1 Ve Captain P 1 C "alftkUi r*aar lo mt\ ANN! Al |.\M I Tfte a.i.maM.1 aporl. CL.to will hold M An..—I Dan; %  aturaai %  a*n St. t • n m All ranKa atr inv.tp^ I •.oughing,Strangling Asthma, Bronchitis Curbed in 3 Minutes • -1r ~grUm A.*-a iilT, URNDACO aot i. %  URNPACO not only fim," mar a uarant*< ;SJS txSi. Menaco-•• %  %  arfnHui>atim*aa aorlMtaaaa.Ur.llMI *n--i %  factlli Hir %  •** yoM laal wora out dtprauaa. r gananllr run down a |U or iar a day af BiK-lnt Ton ( Wine will q u .l r fior. loae energy and ton* up lh* ••hot* narvoui lyitatn. Giln| t.aw v.iahly It fortifiai yon againac favar and aaniuiiioo and rc-ttmbfr. BurhfMt Taakt Wlna 11 atpecuiiy %  : .ib < aftar illnaaa. Toa-A-m. BliKFAST. TONIC WINE § Kills insects Faster. Surer with the NEW Smyth Drowned TAIPEH. Formosa. Osmond Smyth, Australian member of the United Nations Commission for the unification of Korea was drowned here In a vain effort to rescue hi.-, friend, British Vi.. Consul Adrian Conway Evan>. They wort? hut lung in a mountain stream yesterday at Shinku. IS miles from Tuipeh. when Evans was caught by %  rapid current and shouted for help. Evans' Chinese rliiver said that Smyth plunged in to rescue him and went down with Evans. Their bodies were brought back to Taipch tonight by the British Consul In Taipch. -U.P. U.S. Dollar Down MONTREAL, Aug. 14. The United States dollar Thursday closed at a discount of 4 l '32 ner cent In terms of the Canadian funds up 1/32 from Wednesday's close. That Is, it took 95 31/32 %  cnts Canadian to buy SI American. Pound sterling was .2.67*h %  • %  wn. | from Wednesday. In New York the Canadian dollar ft as unchanged at a premium of *! per cent in tern of United State* funds. In cl<> nig foreign "xchang* dealings thpound sterling was down 1 at %2 78 9/16. —(C.P.) Former Jewish Official Die. From Over Dose Of Sleeping PilU MUNICH. Germany. Aug. 1 A formei high ranking JewUh official Philip Auerbnrh died Of an ovcrdow of sleeping pills here on Saturday less than 48 hours after the German Court sentenced him to Imprisonment II disclosed thnt he left .. note Auerbnrh was convicted on Thursday of misnpniopniitir c state funds earmtirketi fm Jew^li concentration camp BirVlWfl while heading a Bavarian restitution payments office. He was aentvneed to two and a hnlf vear*' imprisonment. Munich police oidt'iuiK 'hen experts into investigation to determine if Auerbech really died by his own hand, said Auerbach •IIIM> i>ef'ire attempted suicide by taking a large amount i I pills. Auerbach was !%  I in custody nt a private rlin: bar* while awaiting trial. .Auerbach's widow, M.ngit. load United Press that she is "almost rnnvinoeery. dt>lov:ilt\ 1.1 of) i false use of the title o| UiKlui nf |.!ulomph\. Two ornciab of the Munich Jewish community arm-ed at the i Imk In lAaiiiiin ;Inbody I V a gas Demand Drafu 71 a io %  ,i <-..fei 7i ; io ut Curn*ary 7S'. > CnUpMK •* J ia M"fT ajtgJM i ai .-q.^aa on Hank.r. DMnand Ural TH : i M **itl %  n in i %  %  Itulian Finn To Build Road For Pakistan Govt. HOME. Aug. 16. An iuhon flrm haa been engaged bv the Pakistan Government to build a 750-mile long highwav in eastern Bengal, the Pakistan delegation in Rome announced on Thursday. The necessary machinery will he shipped from Italy. Russia May Buy Israel's Oranges MOSCOW. Aug. 15 The thiee-mnn-delegation lo Ihe lsr;..l Cftrua Mark<-tin Board %  %  %  B vii*. pui'hasing OffOBI nations to expand citrus exports baTl %  understood that the tfjj progrecslng welt, with a good i ros pert that the Ruaaian's wll! buy hah* million cases of oranges it. 1952 and an opportunity to develop the steadfl) expantllnt marki t heii-. Negotiations are al*o !. (rf nthei -bluets. Of visitors repre• nting Ihe < Hoard, the l a rgatj delaggUoti tiRnting the poasibtlltii of baying dHk Hki Uinfaai %  -If. FOR STYLE t O Ml Oil I AJ9B VALUE BUY A RELIANCE SHIRT Olll l/VU/fl AT ALL LEADING STORES



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    -I MllV. UI.IST 17, 1M2 M MllV WiVIK'ATI'. HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON BRINGING UP FATHER BY GEORGE MC. MANUS SPECIAL OFFERS AVAILABLE MONDAY TO WEDNESDAY AT ALL BRANCHES (.1 \\ \ CHEESE Mr. pn lb ASSORTED ill(M OI.MI IHINIIIISS in. IH.X^S *• -| \VM)|;IM> ( IKM IIIMI BONBON*—1 lb box VH'IM < IIIMOI.MI ItONUONS |l> \,\r<, (HOCOLATI I'lll'linilM |b bourn CHOCOLATE I'lri'lKMIM ', ii v.(JIAI.IIV MHI.II ISSORTED Millll IIIIKOI.VIISlui. Ill HRI I l IHM ill Ml II. I..v.OLAMOVI immiiviiNn. b mm EM— I lb. Una 1(11 I I %  !:-*---. In. tlM ion EKH— ; lb. tin* Ml D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street i THE WHITE MONKEY By JOHN GALSWORTHY The whit* Monkey was first published in 1924. II is the first novel


    PAGE 1

    P.\f:i FIGHT Si M1AV ADVOCATE -IMI \Y AK.L'St 17. 1K2 BARBADOS A. ADVOCATE r.i.ws fer UM p out %  Laf, right, i.r. right, icf %  We are Iho surplus females We don I know what to do <> kip nnd hop lilt we lall down Mop We jump like a kangaroo. Till our limes and heart are burst inn We run. run. run. run, run. On paraoc we yell "Wake op Hurt gel — It's all such Jolly good fun. We .in' the surplus females We don't cane If we're wed ui marry we'll raise Old Hi And bang our drums instead. In judo and jiu-jitsu We give the chaps Over Ihey go with throw. Ham, b.uiK. ban* t Mow. blow trumpet Bans, bang, bang drum Ilu-jltsu, ami the same lo you Hiim-tii-iilv-tutn-lum-tiim. Hi can those us round H.link. As we run. run., run, run. run. For we are ihe surplus girls with a purpose— I,.,(Ot an expert *i the floor, went the went the W> re all such Jolly good fun. Mustache In Flames *T"*IE report that the moustache 1 belonging to Dr. Warren K Sinclair, physicist at a London hospital. became radioactive %  (tor research \\ ot living. MOM X lhn. 1 fi'I", 1 !" fi l!i Mnciulllur,i.m sure, do not realise tht tor J'ree for as li.tle *P !" '" U, J ,„ ll.lt • crown fm,„ ran sleep tor Yel desp.le Ihe 'boapnes of the 15 nl(hU or half • monlh in %  h. it ,.nd one mlirtl aJ.no.t w c vheller :n Rriduelown which is run Ihe eta liU 0s ,e shelter (since especially lor those who cannol lha poorest bcjgei can M aouKc. In Kingston and Nassau fo afford u> pay more Ihan 4 cents of 4 cells day tor his enter. ( ., umpll ,„ e Armv ha5 lMxn a a night for lodging. pruel I was cheered to learn that v „||ant work on behalf ot the The Shelter night service there II no need to turn away Blilld nnd no |ong ago (he Cay was started four year, ago by men from the shelter*, and thai C rnor of Jamaica opened two new the Salvation Army In Reed these are idled up only on special w | nB3 u f the Salvation Army Street. occasions wbati Visitor, from the institute f or t nP rdt n d which hau It I. part of o Hostel building c. untry carry „n their eclebra„„„, bum wlln ,,.„„, of t | 2500 .ind there is accommodation for tkms to such I late hour Iriat prov ided through the Colonia. 70 men In the shelters and 25 in thiv miss tholr last bus home. Development and Welfare Organ). the 11,,-tel. To some extent, the Salvation a „„ nj ,,, p,,,,.,^ and Haiti to, ., ,. ,^A !" ,v. *""' "" P J "" .?" .' }""'• ""• Arm •"" I'SslsUnj ihe blira. The abatttr bed. arecanv„ t vldM de ,„ n ,,„, „ ^ |n Hm ^ ^^ :ots and guests have a ..none 01 poverty in our midst. Many ot pejna = lve two price*. For 6 cents a man ^v patr.ms of the shelter are unaiu j w (n -an sdeep in a downstairs room ssT.ploY*d persons looking for ,.,-,„-,,„n with l wooden ltoor: for t cents wnrk> bul „.,. frt0[ tha lhe ghelTgn A S '' s^ i ns/mr's Vu l! the cot Is placed on a eoncrc-tc lclN ,„, not overcrowded suggest., tnf^^^u^J^^: floor. This *eems to he the major hal 1lhe numbor of men in "' '.f "" l }* '"' / \ ^. rt.ftVrci.-e In both the centr.. MbildOB wi h lm „ hf „ ,„ |p Xeh S Armv fcf^iZSS and the 4 cents rooms the men u ..„,..„. ,1 "._ .C ,my c n ,^" l, iileep on separate cots but in thd m "" throughout the whole Csribboar, LsUM mom. Washing und toilet This of tourse ought no* to be region. Because ot Us internatiomil rtctUUM urn piwided but no a subject for facile congratulaorganisation andbecause of th unking is allowed on the Hostel lions because you don't have to vein of true Chrirtlan chant} r shelter premises. leave the %  neighbourhood of wr c h inspire* all their work Ui. Upstair* the old living rooms Reed Street to seo people Uving Salvation Army In Barbados b of former Salvation Army OfflIn far less pleasant surroundings able u> apply knowledge an.. cershave lecn neallv divided into than those of the Salvation Army stundarda of service which hav two lots of cubicles. Hostel upstairs. But if the ability oeen obtained from many year: Fifteen of the* cubicle* are to find 4 cents a night is indica1 practical experience in mo nted for $1.20 a week each and live of the lowest social level to countries of the world. ten are rented for $1.00 i week whkih a Barbadian man can fall. '< is against this wide backich. then it is hard to believe that fcround that the social work beini •ny man need go without shelter done in Reed Street must be place. Both types are simply fur|r. the island, thanks to the "nd if it seems to the carpinj, she.1 with IKXIS, but the five Salvation Army. critic that there has bedi a rcstricshilling cubicle* arc in the front Tha Barbados Government contion of Salvation Army social part of the building and receive tributes $720 per year to tha activity In the island in recent more light I peeped into ono Salvation Army to help them years it must be remembered not f each <.f the two types of cul.iy.ith their social work. Tho only that the gtovernment ha* les nnd for the price I have seen Government indeed owes a taken over one of their most lmlo belter accommodation anyspecial debt to the Army fur tho portant functions—probation work there in the world. assistance rendered by the Army and the treatment ot fluventU Their patrons must think the in previous years in the held of delinquents—but that other areas •Mime, and 1 found one pleasant probation and Juvenile dellnlike Haiti for instance have needi spoken mason enjoying his milk quency. Quite recently Capt. far greater than our own. -ma bread luncheon in the prlBrooks from the London HeadI.I* .-wo cdiicle. althiiugh auartars of the Army spent Meanwhile the Hostel ,.n. the is %  large room outside several years in Barbados training Shelter for men in Reed Stree where guests of the hostel can local government officers In remains to remind all who an relax, play games or listen to the probation meth.Kis and the local anxious to assist their fellovmc; radio. government has taken over this 'hat there is work to be done u I suppose a carping person important social service from the Barbados at the four cents and si: could complain that there i u n Army. cents level and that the mania fo: old look about the Salvation Other •.octal work which the expensive community halls an. Army Hostel and'Shclter in Iteed Army has carried on in Barbados costly playing Held* may not b. Street, that the walls and the In the past included a soup cur greatest need at present ceilings could do with new paint kitchen nt which free meals were however good they are. or distemper and that the toilet distributed, and the provision of The Hostel and Shelter in Ree> and bathroom*, could be kept in a women's shelter with accommoStreet caters only for men. Ough asort %  POMM condition. 1 supdatum Tor about fifty. there not to be some similar instipose they could. But doe* the The Army has been operating tution for women'.' .-..il'iiii: |..i-..: -top t.i think thai '* EsWtjBsfcl !'.' % %  l^HH ..mi H RM Ann. \,,~i lull MM for less than 18 cents a night a present headquarters building because of lack of fund*. man can sleep in comfort and .was erected In 1811. A casual stroller along tbi itaM in a grade one cubicle of Reed Street Is the headquarters streets in the Heed Street neigh the Hostel and for less itan 15 of a division which operates in bourhood may well ask whethc cents a night in a cubicle almost the Leeward and Windward romc of the huge sums which an as (Mod" . Islands and extends as far north being spent on some of the presen How many people in days like as the British and American "shop-window'' types of socla these when everyone complains Virgin Islands, Responsible for work might not be channellci of the rising cost of living can this large area Is Major Walter towards the four cents portion o piovi.nthemselves with amenMorris, a Jamaican who. until the female community. Olir llriiclrrs iSill*; vla Burks) at a very fast rate, driver and asked him, 'Young rnd entered the Major road with. Hnjtir Sto/i l/n'diV To the Fdiror. T'IC Id SIR.—Last T h ii r d a v twt 1 snr engaged ir a conversation at the *ign post trc corner' at that time. which marked Hlllaby Via Dukes, serious accident would ha< man do you have any respect to the same >pc*d. without having %  thought for any vehicle > ox utv Are >" aw !" e tnfl turning the Corner (Hlllaby via this is an extremely dangerou Dukes to Btown) I am quite sure corner, now the canes blocked that if any vehicle was turning this sight of the various road: I admit th.it driving fairly fast on account B-town via Shop Hill and Bennetts ,,),,. o, bei n g | atc but on the other M.I Buck* (this corner n commanhand no malonrtop Is there/ ly called Wheeler Corner) A About three quarters of an Wnv no , lorry containing a molasses tank hour later, the lorry returned and cane up the junction (Bennetts one of the gentlemen stopped the JOHN HAYWOOD. together give a assssvre comfsrt. convenience | downright pleasare to home of to-day. {The DA COSTA variety of Sternelte Deep Freeaea Refrlgrator*. Rendlx Automatic Washers. Vacuum*. Irons and i ii tiM.iiLimps & l .uiprovides the opportunity to crests; he Home Electric. ow THIS IS FOLLOWED BY AN ICE-COLD CANADA DRY GINGER MIXED WITH A BRACING GOLD BRAID TO ENJOY THE FINEST VACATION



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    ;r PACE lOlR -I Ml W MlVOt i I l Sl'ND.W. W l.CsT I: in.-..' For Smart and Healthy Hair W.I. l'KOI TCSSIONALS OFFERED E15 Trinidad Table Tenmsls Impress: College Junior llaskelball Champ* Yesterday's Cricket I uirAN rOUCB. n...i.lv TWO rum minute beSfaulaa 141 and if.tr I wkt*. lure nw V4 run out for 24. %  letla I 21* This grand display did not ho* 'i, 4 „kui 14: ivcr DanMls We Bank Hall Hull. V %  r lops were drawn they kel "...ten pclcrrd oui were eighl runs short of v.. t..rv. Haw at Queen's Park 1L Worms Ikved the day ftar •<• '"* < Culhaft. Coinj in sixth wicket .uiene Spartan threw do „ „, repelled the Empire Mann, with Bve uu ck ,„. nuia e victory more, T"IK met re. , u t it li rlakM U that to. 2 .. ,.!"'.'."£_" "IE; dUUnill for Empire. When the //. 0. & I.IH'I'I\ I t t>e*n offered a fee of t IS I" %  her words if they happen 10 I" iri Ihe Wsa Indies 113 vin m juaj undei JU( I College innings closed he was 24 nei out. On the first Saturday of the match the College team batted %  red 141 and for ni J;d"h"i !" P P ~" "> "'.P"/.'* du ''?'T_lo.the I'M Saturday, having DISEASE The Indians Do Not Fight .From Our Own (in i .••.i-i.mtini LONDON, August 16. RAIN prevented any plav in the Test between England and India at the Oval to-day. But with England kit won the lirst three games the rubber is already ci. And in this specially prepared report. Jack Hobbs former .Surrey and England batsman diacuaaei Indie's team and sums up England's chances next year against the All lians. Jack HouUs says rain came to U*ed the upportututy to take tin* ,e rescue of ihe sorely weaacd Ii.iian bowling by the scruff of fact bowling of MLtai — and liTiidshaw. Spartan, however %  %  ''C O( the members of the Board were able to keep things even • r of Our l-orri 1B52 they could whin Ihry bowled out Polka for i Ilh one Nourish of QM I • 146, thus, nevertheless, ceding first : the West Indies inim.^s l< ad pom!:, of Control demand IniormaUon omrerning decisions Sp.irtan then set a good second lamea th< y will be parties to the perpeInnings score when Atkins G, N 1 lll-l %  I %  from W< AlltyM mi.de lions of 3g having a firm InIndian and wash ed out all hopes the neck They tav* ptayed f r 57 runs. „ pUv ln u.e final test at the f*£ty. w* hc \lKf, !" S*fJ? r he College side was nv.,1 baJaV Hv eariv afternoon bcc ,;ikc wtuw" 1 much few of F. Tudor v iSuable contnbuid 32 respectively that have bee ike"them the l.ughin,stock"* Or.nt. NT'H.rriimjnd sv4, W.TJ ZZTSnXnZ^ JwES J5 USZ&M& SZ^T 1K '" ul %  played a F drum %  *<* i i?..-,.,.,.. i M b and his wicket was ~ \'V'"' m J„^ nn ?, SJT-J 0 ^* when Bpartaa declare !, v v o hvri F"'H .L,m.r^^ne Icket for 13 runs and Claud* not tlnnk th.ii ihe groundsmen who are going to prepare th< Harrison played a • f-_ ..nri his wicket was two „. l( h wbebjm olWettIndn ffff d *^5! J : SSt?q ui evil must ba nlDOad ID tha hud ..l m. hstfen II damlm •. batamen. For Bradsha ; two r A '' c '". t .! nings lad of Yesterday the College side was Qvtt i to-day. B* r'v afternoon -Apart g s^ ,„,-j, Pi ,, ii;-'^ v '-:,rr':'?: & ojUd not recover from Its he.ivv Jh• 'aced gyek x aitfcreni ipp ,e a hopeless third day dawn as th. Kv|ini .pproa,..,, if i Indians did this morning. may f%ptvw t tnus—would have The nn.t three matches of the ha( j ||a v -,i uc |n r( .^,-t of the jierles had been lost. And in thi* future. one they had lost five wickets on lead t>l dfacrjotinatuv nun the worM ovtr . use JULYSIA HAIR CREAM The Cream of Jtatrdnastng/a %  %  % % %  I si S.M.G. AGENCIES J. 4kK. 1U1LDING. PALMETTO STREET, BRIDGETOWN, BARBADOS ed batsmen. For Bradsha*. ..... .C r !" MuJIins _.ENMS other for runs. T | i plona, Pi i hat wa* described pitch" foi 40 runs. And they were faced L with the prospect of ^truggllna on to another whacking under claimed the %  WW* 30 minuT-i of play lof;, ((ini)lll((ns wn cn g, V e thorn that \ iNi'idics ui\ IT T.iiii r TI-VS.IV At clo e of -* lay tne scorc v %  '* ,, 70 far from home fecliny. UII.K Ih.NMS From the start of Poliee's seeond fr three wickets. C. Hunt* scored Whrre shall we place thL. nave won both th.-ir taBingt j, wafc evident that they not out and C. DePeiaa 24 run En*!an? eleven of Tl2 %  acceptlna the challenge out. Mr. Sam Meadley took the Eng,ann c,cven of I C. Blackman opened two wickets for 40 runs"'' •-->cf uly, but confidently and took K.Hum tave-Uritea lor the first Test the score to 80 Iwfnrp niarkmat. that tak. but the Barbadian playen have wno^aT acorimt twice S faT KM LBd hive bad time TavkBT Will Stlimnerl nttnZnZiiPm "' %  •""y ''' bowMn/S S^9S-1 !„; on to In '; : why they should not go aeon 28 bforj he was adjudged into DaH ree from pe.saimlsm and inferiontv comj i, w off L F Hai-rlV Imwlma I*'? Lolio^.n they WJU BM C. Amey w.-nl one down aSd ***** y ,,\ ri ,,., .............. pl-.ved a sound innings io end not Ml It UX GET 1-IL1P out with 38. T^'"con CoU 'i .ii. Uteil v towurda atimuFH'KWH'K v. U'ANOERKIt* .11 W mil. %  %  Surrey Must Fight Hard ton* iroiideiili lating kv i .1 and Is' Schools and some clubs are repiistnUd in the Inti real the Aaaai Latlefj and lhaii la bin i think that ibis acbleven tha t->U4 en's to look towards the Intercolonial %  SCOREBOARD -i-*arAN *. rout r %  i*n I*I '-4 ttQc i wku i ;t ••-" "!' %  %  C ItractBlvaw w G.iitlU. lii. b B'BdatMw ... o N Oiant c T-vw,, b M til I In. w 1M Hdrntnn not out || K Waili at I <• C Arrif-y b r Ta>lor Jl F Km* B By*r b Taylor 13 %  .atti-ai u U .!.r. rl-l IniilngM .. ill and i for no vvkti) t> I'likwl.k 131 and SM %  i brilliant 98 not out by pper John Goddard In \ 'heir second Inning*, Pickwick was ToUl Mm S wh1i r I uu-kft*— I for •. I, 4 tor IBS. 5 f.it SIS BOWt.iNO ANALYSIS O M Muiim. as a Bradaha* II 1 Uli.-k-.u4K 3 — D*C Sprln|[r B/-r S .rol>. .. t — Taylor 3 S — r S3. J lor faajtaj Tolal o keen that six rr<."i ,m of 19 runs to BOOM for .. ham %  H. Haiiai have. be, here in this paper. -ory in their second innings, l? 1 ^ ,, !" rot k ith which I proj and which I mink Is Wanderers made 28 runs without OOM -.: a wicket just after lunch from otlu that of staging Annual Cycle and -sterday. tan A On tha first day of play WanWh i tted first and scored a Athletic Aaaoclatlon of Ban id total of 343 runs in their • inninss with Test player D. Aasoci.it i Qulana. relative to the AtkUtaOB 145 and Intere-olonlal hnthtCarlbba 0 Pra verb e 117. Pickwick An in 'heir turn at the wicket on the IIH'.A IS B.Ci'S r ,v w< '"' all "lit for 131 T HU ted by the B.O. Union ;md 1 un .-.""'^ bc >nd_of piny on that the augtfji Uoi eh ehajnplonahlpi ba I %  ould I"run i -i bin rail of xtkrl BOWLaNG ANALYSIS 1-hiiiipB lk.wrT llarrl* Marrti G. Grant %  I the Intel oaUi : i I A.F and Uw U.C.I WIHI Wll.l. JOIN they had lost five wickets foi runs In their second Innings Man.—., DM dipper John Goddard jTt-l-S laitldown 43noloul %  v Pickwick carrlej their hvermitht ^eore nf 119 fnr five LONDON. August 16, After making full allowances The jstruugle for the county leg the Indians ill luck the fact chjinim-nship U going to be a for has to be set down quite bluntly more drawn out affair than seemthat as a team they are not good ed possible a week ago. Yorkshire enough to give us a real Mat '•"> beat Surrey if they w.n all There are players of test matc.i thwr remaining games and U the fiSA&Sg = ~ BJk EH him above all others does symmMSErUmt Surrey would not pathy go out in fuU. \lmoat all lbt (ln m!(Ily ^^^ trom hei ,. nine he haa had to light again.t 8arn . at L*eds. the collar. Norman Yardlcy won tiie tos Memory will recall for years to iin d had the gratification of seeing come the almost unequalled per423 on the scoreboard for the lea* formance with bat and ball of „f „nly 5 wicketa at the close. Vinoo Mankad at Lord's. No indlYorkshire debutant was opening vldual cricketer has ever done .i bat ptiirlaaj Less who scored 74. in much for a side and yet been j Uf \ uver three hours. WUaOa IS] among the losers at the finish. IIM i Lester 130 not out a Others have done good job* ol u,,. good work against the Surrey cricket work too. attack weakened by the absence Apart from the obvious truth 01 Bedser, Laker und lck who that many members of this Inaie pLiyimi In the Teat. dian party have not on our grounds There were smiles on the tfceea measured up to test skill and of Gloucesteiasjjiaanrtei standards either as batsmen, shortly after lunch at CheUenhum bowlers or fielders there is one the last Warwiek*hiie wicket fell prime essential quality which Is for 104. But those smile had lacking—they don't fight. faded away after the tea Interval They did not fight at Old Trafw he11 0***"" %  %  111 * <'> r lleeiaaiTpr ,0rd l^i^ W J*xlO? 1 ** }"2 O^'^t bowler Bann.Kte, squared their shoulders and set ^^ ^ col| M four ot their teeth were in eOect on the h fl fl w | C kcts and ; Wa ^ baCk to .J n f Pavilion even wlm five fnr „ Thru as J hey n w J 1 :ked to w % %  ca"w Ertc BoOlm with hla The fighting spirit was1 alao n CK blT lks to l;ik( ; lacking at the Oval on Friday ftvp for PlKh i^on. evening. Rulll .,„,;.„, lM .., n( ; 1( otfjv These thing* must be borne in mind to help us keep next ye testa against the Australians ln th? aami i T HI ml suggested as participants in u'leketi to 230 runs and John Gdploiialilps .,1 lb Mi.%  h Ottl amo hn 14 fours was undeBarbadoefiatej with M. M fl,,. 1 in [.HI: if t'H-v dalajre Denis Atkinson Benin took the M include Jan JUM HI Iw.wling honours for Wanderers in S ,, ind Wnid.v the Pickwick second Innings and t The Si 1 tianagedtohavedlaetuak cidcd with an analysis of 30 overs, n of the Trinidnd and Tobago Cycling Federati r.ine msidens, 68 runs, four wick| hop' •"* %  '"' varied his deliveries and lining and placing on a proper moved the ball both way and had uncertain. When T. : Annual athli I £"*"' ,'"' }'^ ."""** a he Iwwlrn him with what looked COU.lt. I WIN \T BASKETBALL S ^''^i,tJ^ 1 S8sr l tc d a. i 1 ' %  ,!' %  %  who w.nt at „ 1 oumber Dine In the balling order o put up some resistance to the %  Like il PlXBl Division U m thej %  ;u Waiidererx ln.wling but when his l •core was 38 he was Riven out leg •i. i Lr %  Dnr "•! leant and rnenl ol whirl •.,....;. %  iii' will )oin With iDie In n Harrison College. iiAHKisoN CULLBUE SND INNINOS true perspective. I Rud^r, b H King il..p. I b w E Grant Alleyn c Iloldar b C I— i. i 111 Sir Hse %  i-'ivn. i > %  %  lbII Kum %  World Champion Solas May light Frank Johnson li. b H Kmn ill c b H. %  plai ed Mi i i i [over Swordllsh at tne Aqu %  night to u in Ihe I >'> i I i A Kiw %  ii, i Dtvlslon gave little ... t.mnto i B Km i. p II a aufft I %  ,.: m InappaTi on the other Bonltaa hand enra -it their daahlng best. Fee Si t m r>red It nlng four The t.-.n, before the wicket to the bowling U on who had juai taken the new ball. Just before the luncheon interval Pickwick concluded their second innings at 230 runs thus givk lers a total of 19 run* i Proverbs and D. lb blocked oil thk total und Whan Humpfi were drawn Wnndc-ers had scored 28 runs In of iri a 4 in not SANDISIM r. Ml KHII K lyi !" .... a— wANiir-aishtf I t* %  4. a loi 44. 1 lor BOWl BfQ A-.Ai.VsiN .ut 23 and D Kv. lyn not out fl IIARKISON (OIIII.i; r \ 1 Ml'lRK. Ilarrixtn tolli-ge 19g and 134 t Empire %  .:i and 3 wirk•*-) N fl Inn mi. IH ' IHI OiHln,, P.CKWICK IND INNINGS L. O Hoad b C A%  M w a sei C D AU.li.-on b a Atlllnaoii ... . . D Godd.iid not out While lb b L St Hill and Uali %  ItanJUng Clairmonte DePeiza made a fine K gaa m l al e Teaeaa a L at. Htit I Irani • turn..effort to clinch an outright Ho. S \ -^nw rprpv-rb. b b ombe lory for Empire against College Brow, man at w.ymuuth yesterday Emntre T "*'" b u Atkinaan . V. ...l.,..,he..d „„ dod „ „„,; ,„ r V1 Ul|v ;„„ "a"!,",,.^-",. I.I jovttsn, 3g .minutes in which lo make H J...t.„ si u.i. i, H I^WIM. said foi % %  i-.i wiek-t TO, scored at %  ,ale of avpruxl1 Jt'ST OPKXKH BIRKMYRE CANVAS 7J" WIDK—rOB Bl'S TPS and SIDES INNER HOOD LINING 56" WIDE. FAWN AND C.REY LIONIDE LEATHERETTE 511" WIDE. ATTRACTIVE SHADES BLACK MIRACLE ADHESIVE I i 11/. or 5-OZ. TUBES ECKSTEIN BROTHERS BAY STREET DIAL 4269 Itka-V-JjJSRW ratal The Australians may not be as good as this present England team. But first and foremost they will lU'ht. Their wickets won't be presented on a plate. Such magnificent opening bowlers as Alec Bedser and Kred Trueman will have to dig the Australians out. The test for them will be whether they can lake *s distinct from merely giving i Thwc victories over the Indians don't mean we can get ready to shout—without any further prejg^ Uahtwelght championship fight hminanes—over victories aaainst with the previous holder. London's tne Australians before the tents Tommy McGovcrn. have been played. Johnson is wanted at Newcastle __ . ... on August 25 and Manchester on We have found from s. ptember 5 a skipper who can play the Ausji ls man ager, Sam Burns, talks trail,ms at Hhelr own relentless game and maybe beat them. Tt'a my opinion that we might have made greater use of tests this season against such ordlnary oppositlori In a general sen*e • %  fit us nil the better for much London's Joe Lucy urges a quick more arduous tasks which the settlement of hla own championfuture has in store. For instance s hip aspirations against Manches.' %  v batsmen who haven't (STs new ehampi'ti Wuded In Johnson beat a fit and lively McGovcrn because of his ability either to evade or absorb righthand punches—and then to wade In on his own account. For four rounds, McGovern's right hand performed mightily, but not mightily enough. From then on Johnson boxed with the supreme confidence of a man who feels the Sunday punches of his opponent to be losing their fire. i it Johnson eased up in the last four rounds should not be held against him Johnson. I think, will be a value-for-money champion. —1.1-1 By GEORGE WHITING MANCHESTER. Promoters who saw no merit In his punches a year ago are now t -l.iuiouring for the services of Munchcster's Frank Johnson—an easy and, at time, spectacular i points here in his Britoptimistically of negotiations for an overweight meeting with Mexico's Lauro Saias or James Carter (U.S.A.), present and past holders of the world title. Hciinwhilc, on the sidelines, rail of wtekrW—I lor Si, J foi i 13 4 for 103. S for 106. • fa 1*4. S lor US, t for IIS BOWLING ANALYSIS Toppin ...... a — sa l-.i !" ,.,.„ IS S 54 Si Mill Hi S J2 WANOEKEBS JND INNINGS ROWLING ANALYSIS UNIVERSAL Dip or brush 'or poutivc protection ifainteWhite AMI Borers Rot a-id Fun|i. Punt oi poli.h Over trcued wood. No Odour. No fire-riik. ECONOMICAL — HitMy concfntrMed,—uvei arhate*waeoj diluted lor ue — 1* % w** tl r J,lt 'O* 1 Niaa PERMANENT Cannot lares, cou^htm the m •>t proteiuon •ih-oui or eviporate."*Combines wkh iber and mikes lc f.rc-resi.tant .For BBBBBJ the fi permi W AHoi P.eie"tft-.e Co7 Ltd.. '•... _. Dt ini.i eci(aWe from Ls This Your Problem? $ and f! and Children fussy about the taste of Milk — P re faslidious little notes, .-p-.i.,iu .,lyout milk, but we hav,actually seen UdkUe* wno noenaall) retuaa lUlh, help rea to Oak Milk. When mixed, Oak has been mistaken for fresh cow's milk by i 'niJrrn, and grown-up* .is well. WORTH A TRY — SUCH A SAVING Oak i. .,.• mil fU al ;i pctn you can aflor.l lo pay :_ l:-u.. till—Mr.. Mk. lln—II M bait jrou I4M far Ifln Oi.k lo net a glass of Milk (only 1 ht*pad j tablespoon per KI Ft or J). THE "FOLBATE" LAWN MOWER i Oetoili otpilablc from H. JASON JONES CO. LTD., P.O. Bon 14)1, I 1 :, taatas. •?e? %  r >^? -^? xj&jg OAK DRIED FULL CREAM OAK THE BEST MILK IN THE WORLD AT A PRICE YOU CAN AFFORD TO PAY A Masterpiece of British Craftsmanship STRONG STURDY RELIABLE • Keep your Lawns in fine trim with "FOLBATE" LAWN MOWER S. P. MUSSON SON ft CO.. LTD.-DISTRIBUTORS



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    r\<.r SIXTKI N SIMMY AliVOfATK SUNDAY, Ml.1ST 17. I32 71///./. TENJVIS: Trinidad Tennis Team On Barbadians Have Top COOL Sports Round-Up SCOUT NOTES: Much To Learn ii-iims ptaTCfl Mill have much lo ...dof play seen at th.V'^nwTwiw ntudad Table T c ruses to acknowledge the passfrom the San Fernando Zone <( the Trinidad obaflO Amateur Table Tennis Association, has proved thfej beyond doubt. Troops In Camp Police Hand AI F.splan < the 1.1 So. -ean after hi* first succot*. N m 41 v.-.in, of age Tl showed all his old skill in beatnK Iho vimim Australian Don Ln| 7-5. 7—5. And afterscho.,1 Troop under wards he annouced that he would "•turn next year to defend hi* title SOCCER went into Cnmp at dun Hill on Thursday la?l The Camp me Bay Street Esplsnart" trRe of C.roup ScMiimussei Major J. K. (.ninth with ut *M MB 1 March—"Father Rhine" Overture—"Mahtai TED DRAKE. Chelsea', new -.nagcr is quickly making his ( Rudder, c. lonhn r Leao h Harrtaoo 11 Whitehall. IMUin. II. A.'hby C J. Of I whenever I'll ill felt at Stanford Bridge He recently sifned his hrst new Id John MeNu-h-.l. h< !" %  %  Ltte-furward 11 . *; flrst imllcMlchot when he r iw him pl'iy for Brighton against UM dub be had pre vi-.uj.ly managed. Ha h a % %  l iKht foil to the speed nnd hair wai • Roj LMntlejr places in 'he island Members of the All Saint*' ;ioys • imi and method* are deterred 4 ScouUiKiMrt | -.in offering their services by u. E. Corbin. went into Camp at ruell I inefficient and their school grounds on Thursday rnsiit^-factory 'rariership m tatey last. The Camp will 1 ,rt but observe in our ranks. Monday next during whl< la :inot be too frequently empha5 the S. M. lopes to trmn I that the voluntary nature of i the Movement does not exempt 6 in the elei <>f those who accept the obligations Seoul craft. Happ9 c:imi>tiiK u. -if office from taking all possible 7 steps to nt themselves fur Hie ieponsfalllUes of the position 3 ': .iking every effort to discharge their function* the assistance of Acting AJ5.M. L Quint y no Thev hope to be m Cump for ten day* the first half of which will be devoted to general training, but during the second half they hope to trek t to several interesting and historical 3 Selection— 'pirate* of* Penzance"—SuILi-an j 2 Ballads—"Roses of Pleaidey" —Haiidti H'ood —"Song of Songs" —Moyaj Volse—"Bal Masque"-—Fletcher Selection—"The Lightning" —At ford Suite— '•'.•Arlesienne r. —Bean Operatic Music—'-Lob*mrrtn" —Woonrr Hymns hy -rpeciaJ requests LA. Meelini; The Local Association ofl the S Michael's South Sub \ iilisfactorily The. ..-.that it is their ,„._ 448 tMethodist)—"O !ve that duty 5* H"JUl pwj^n fnm the Movement ; ,s %  J-. " on ** xht> y lln,, ,hil1 ,hev %  *• M.itlh. eful tart%  Mis.01 HUM %  %  Mendes' style is MCnli bados whh Uic %  %  It l>ottin. t;nour 111 BTAOI1 1 A M QoO p C I CRICKET JCIIN LANGH1DCE. your %  taken bv the V %  %  > Sat ..vented, for any reason, "from ,^l there w^s a g.od turn out both mti)ri .,. i SMll) ., um s htTP m0 of lay members and Scmitcr. Ai uMc f f Mrvice the roaaUni two Bb %  WB, n (no Movement for Rich Scoutihe Hrd being a short dim of K' 1 .1 bat In I' land) apd the 1 tha Bcraaai I 1..-..' ore* which was hclc Austria in Auguxt 1951. This 5MHMI Scouls at American available to olhewilt not let thee go" 777 .. —"O perfect Love" 21 (A. a W.)— "The dav is past and over." GOD SAVE THE QUEEN • Mobile Cin?ma Programme 1'i'ih.ip. the I ; badool fitfa nan ia flrst class crtcket lb iii>( ihe match agmnj-t Hantpthiro Hi?' nain y C. Codogan, J. D. Storey. K L. E | ll( i„oth-i JaimUnaTUlf —._ — I G RaM, K. Bullen, urbityed this mile-stone last Mm ll available u> other l>x-al MataaaBal Jamhoree Next Yeai *; r. I. Utnlat, B. C. Sliorcy P. season and so they have completed Associations through the Courtesy N. A Harrison, c. K 1., rmtM which u of tha British CouncilJtipiaianta(,,,.,.. H I. Jaoaa. P, it. unur.' "" Secretaries who wish to make loc.il 1 1 j^ Eilgtull, L G. HOXING urrangemenU are asked to write J N Simpson 'he Honourary Seen-tary l Scouts '"">Put, JERSEY JOE WALCOTT may Headquarters. rortune in BMetin s s>lbe..wa)y. M. A. Harris, defend his world heavyweight i: M. Jackson, D. <> Bmnh, J. r; title Sjalnal Rocky Marciano la Jones. New York next month. NegotlaGROUP III — STAGE II HOIK have been opened by Mr. 11 oioars. run Morris. Pi evident of the InM. M. Qrlfllth. B P. BelfTave, tetnational Boxing club. J. M. OoUOp, L. V. Alleyne. M. A. „..,. ,„ Smith, M M. Prereod, H. P. Clarke I YCUNC Prink Wiluiughl>--. ,..,,,1 M (• Mo-olev . SACIU ,. KSKi. r. c. wSS "" %  ", A '"" S SSSfcTSm p ii &r, M. fc. nun,,.., v 1;. """• %  1 '' %  "''' %  • : pr "'•." %  """"" "• .1,1. I w. od "Jcfeml hi. Illi The following la Ihe programme lor Mobilo Cliifma for W€4k lbove quolalion Kmnlnl| 18th Aullu „. 1952— Mon. 18th: — Redman's and Hall's Village.. St. Thomas. H.rnv" I'lanuition Yard. Tues. lth:—College nitj thousand Scuts will attend ">* • %  <"*" area. St jorm, ,! jambOtM on the CoW SII|Mh. nlMtrthouaand acn trrln* Raneta Wed 2>h:—Prospeet b Indian ear Santa Ana, Southern CallSnm SEERSUCKER 3" wide -if . tl.M COTTON PRINTS 36" wide IS . 11.00 PRINTED LINGERIE 36" wide .i M Also CALICO CAMBRIC 36" wide 0 96e.. 3c. & Me. o COOLER PRICES %  aw I/II-III i.n fti*/i/ay ul frill! SIlHilhlilll K Hii.. I.UI. 10, II, 12 & 13 BROAD SI Ten Rules For The Camp Cook Wed Ground area. St. Peter, Mt. Proafomla. from July I0th-17th. IBM. I*** Plantation yard. Scout* of other countrie, WU, be Thur ^lst.^Black Rwk area .epresentcd. St Michael. St. Stephen's School c'. fm liinj kl a feather in M AaJ ED conaldi red Ui.it during the si-a-on his form wis not as good nx I'mili nlta. Bignt the vialtoi wh< :i fourth sucoaSShrl v(>i,r at the World Champp npt innshlps to be staged in Paris on J. L. Games. Y. Armstrong August 2Bth. Opposing Hants will WorM. Y. King. A. Y. Barnes S. M. be R. Mockridgc the Australian 0 I) Archer, A <; V. who won the l.OOC metres time (i. Icii..iii. E. E Blades. J. I). R.. trial at the Olympic Games. AnC R. Archer, A. C Coibin' Other British representative wi %  C. Wlggii ll P King. 11 E. be Cyril Bardsley who has be, f. E Barrow. V.M.P.C. aid:. On this occasion Dr. Sakar found Campb I ulge a stubborn Opponanti The 11 Mr i nseif fortunate for It '.: Ill ll I inx thai KHM lucky | lum into the lead and he went %  i the imtch. on* of the ils career i-nel Ins i %  %  I the vi .4V MCA o I be rhn-eii from Norman CnmplK-n Greet %  : %  %  in prod >: GROUP in BTAOI in Honour*. E. Williams. V 1. Ashby B E KcCormey. GROUP IV — STAGE I %  eaanan M i lUaoock, QROUP IV — STAGE II Pass. M I !.< %  Full Drawtauj OertUeatei C. I. Ashby and N. E. Williar Three Abatulon Channel Swim training under Harris for the pant fl six months. GOLF MAX FAULKNER, former Open Golf Champion heads a SMI list of competitors for the £1.500 Lotus Golf Tournament to be staged at Moor Park. Herttord:hire, on August 13. 14, 15. Other entrants include John Ponton, former Scottish Champion who raoantJy claimed first prise in the North British 2.000 gulneai tournament at Harrogate. and form.r Open champions Fred Daly and R. Whitcombe. This Is one lot "f prize money that will remain in England. There arc no overseas competitors. torn the Canadian Junior lrtidn 1. Ure a convenient hi %  such as a camp sU>. • rireplaee. or good eookli. Bra "' I* with stead heat 2. Have clean utensils, propci • ly selected for each cookin. purpose. 3. Use good grub. 4. Teat your recipes m you backyard or kitchen befbr in. iking them on a camping trip. V Measure your ingredient carefully, not by guesswork. Time your meal K) thai everything is done at the proper time. For example don't have potatoes .still cooking nn hour after the meat Is dune. The iloy Scouts of America say: They will IKpageants and ceremonies, eamptlreand music %  Honi of all types of i ampcrafl and Seoiitcrait. swaphuj ami fneiid.hip making—and cbanea to see nnd meet our rations lc St. Michael, pasture. Frl. 22nd:—Silver Sands area, Christ Church. Round Rock pesture. Our Loral Chief Scout's Challenge 7 Sample youo You will remember that last year. In October, our local Chief Scout. %  Blr Alfred Savage, issued a challenge to have our Headquarters enclosed. At the time, due to lack ronda, it ws* not possible to; n.ake n stan immediately. We are gli'd to say. however, that a start has now been mnde nnd a few Scouleis and Scouts have been working duftafl tne past week 'ooking frepreparing the ground for this en| Hueritly fi>r seasoning, overclosure. Us giod exercise chaps. cooking, or adjustment of using a heavy drill, but I am glad ingredients lo say that stage has now been Pav attention to >nnr Job. passed. What about coming around Keep mental or written notes during this week to give a hand I for future reference. with the erection of the enclosure, l Know something about the and help us to answer that rhalbodlly needs in respect to l.-nge before a year Is past—and j vitamins, cal that will be next October! Come on and proteins I t te plan shape, lueevai up and tackle the 1 your menus f"i maxn iiirr Job health trains without riiminPimples Go Cause Killed in 3 Days iiwgermi iiui hm* ,1 tha na] (-1. %  -1 > %  %  r ikiti so ii Nii0rni Ir.t 1 ,,.111 ,ti.iiul le• xmnVr llir i>i-itli en." II N .aa.-m will kS 1 clar rSur akin null and amooih or Nixoderm tar tkln Trauala. i....,,.' Men Made Younger By Treating Gland i s e M estsssssisss f see n e t s)i n se M seessssAt ih, time or the we ipcrlallie in lllllni Vacation Bags! With ever>thlu R lor men. th,< eleetlon covers both inside and out!; Thr quahtv ol muwill long outlast the mrmory of your vacation' L.A.H. ptUna. lfoiof CALAIS. FRANCE, Aug. 15. French \ %  1 Italy r u<,n e. Algeria, became the third r to abandon the English Channel ...if. today when bad : mpe forced him to I, hauled on the sccompanyunj boat , , within eight miles of completing wl 'Uu joumey lir „. r ,, hmn ulea nt iwunnung "'"" • Storms swept the northern coast tlbus Wacrc goo" the road Xf the Camp Cook Badge, the gratitude "f our fellow campers, and the renl fun of being a %  cook. SCOUIH Leave For GrenatUr ii,; up nl-fhta, burning aon. lion of orrnna. wfcttutb dlactuTEC lull ai ho KL but of aplna, gratn ami norvouinoaa. WHkn>i, tuily vlaour *ro o*aar<1 of tttoVrnatalo QIBITI (a moat Important aax Bland In • "%}. Ts ovorcomo (ha-aa troub!'" r nd boalth. lako tti* naw ael.ti. lo dlKovory rali-d Rotons, He maiMr how lom you hav* aulfcrcl C'nsuitiible Semiters %  Prilcsl Anainsl IJ.II. OdUsUtutioai 1 Cap Gris Ne* i-'iig farther than ranted obw .1 Few yards. B M no news of other UU in Icj waters. Obre predicted that there would be several other withnoun. The other two who had already gleet Kttempt were Bod Pay* ur • f i' s. and Miss Jennie Jamc.*, 21 of ers! — (UP.) 1 i/.r: d Party <>f c bled Mr. ihe Colonial Bec%  %  ll ..'ii which one for adult Executive %  .i and MX %  %  %  quartet Bnah victories Ida) in IhO .Newport Casino %  of Beverly Hula California 6—4; fi; 6—0. Sbvltt eliminated bll Irlikv. Tha viuhl best icorei were: points. Mr. M. A. Tucker 7 M.jor O. F. C\ Walcolt 96 Mr. M. G. Tuckar . .. 5 Capl. S. Wcatherhead .. M Mr s I>. Uavla ... M Capt. C. It. F. Warner M Mi. H. C. H.. %  na Mr T A 1. Roberts 92 (•pfivitt, Sc.0r> and S7.70 EXCELLENT VALUES SEE riihM o\ in KM il ir--ffltztiw n.XXVE ADMITTAXCI h, in;/. MAncri, A Grand SERVICE OF SONGS an %  > Biv.ri bv MR. i >i ri•.ll..l'.r. ;i't AI !" %  rr.islr.Hiv %  %  ii VII.I.AI;I:. si %  mi ii On"Sl'NDA. ll.t \n.isr. I-' APMISSION I/S Mr CECIL RKEOTI C1IOIB in Allr-uLmca l!.n..i i •" i*l — l*lra |n. u. .....i I i. %  >! ills s: )n Cimsitlvr ##/ /Iff f-V'sfi tfir<>s Wv offor! WORKMANSHIP QUALin SUITINGS You Surelv Must Decide on P.C.S. MAFFEI & CO. LTD. •s Ihe "TOP" SCORKKS IN TAILOHINIi. L-I-S. the very lolesl and (U I Mle.'lloi>'-Thr Da* K. II Hun-. iigne4.li, caUc lo Ml S Mrs.'Public and-thai entails .arletj "I ittrrna arc variety in Ihem i l t .ag tr gsv are so nu','r..u>' Won't you come in and see. %  i bower Broad St. is da-1 Urieac .upc0> tatelrfcalj If-llt'l "" %  •> r-. .*S ll 1 Hoover Home ,_.l ^11.. ... -*,; r 1r. -^.-.-I Vaeoon, tle.ner. vl B^^^iAmfi? PuTriris UP wiTM -rue ex-STENO WMO rV/,NTS TO SIOW OFF HER RACKET SQUAD — r$ TW4N* AHO A TIP OF& THai M*TLO MAT TO oWCLi. l01CW."O4KlfiOJlA, Wash inrrs: I rl.ldairrx Clocks: Hot Plate l-llis \ lfl^ k. II. Husate V Co.. Ltd. •.v.v.v,w,v.-,v/.v,w//.v/.v//AV/.vvxry/'/.' IT PAYS TO USE THE BEST That ix why you should buy . IIED HAND PAINTS Wt have .Vr-H Stociu -I . BPICIAt iiotst: PAINTS Orey. Dark Grev. Oak Brown. B'dos Mich llark Stone. Trnnleil While. Red. %  8' Ensmel-Flnhh MARINE PAINTS Win.-. (Tram. Tulip Green, M VIIMO I I.AT PAINTS tXhitrA tin— II CON'''*'r>'r*G+*o+'>'i'*yK.'r ^VWV'-V*..V',VWi WILKINSON & IIAYNES CO., LTD. \. lf tfS*SS*?''i'*S'*'''''V'''"' ''S'-VS.'SSA'S.VS.V.VS.-.V.'. :



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    PARE FoiT.1l I \ -I M.AY ADVOCATE SI M>VV. Al'GL'SI IT. 1PM CLASSIFIED ADS. I'l IM.H" SAM'S tucnow U'.WITD TELEPHONE 2S0. DIKD MM Junto "A. 'mm, tpm 33 I THANKS *>rralh> c*rd* *Mf" loot, place on Aui'l IN MKMCK1AM ri \\ bcto\ed iri.Mn.nlh.. IWr'l %  > %  '• %  :' %  I I 1* 1MI 'Deep in m, hear Moe pp Th* pic %  To b* IIT,",I> %  Vlotot Worrell grand-fhioaMari. Wywell MM Patricia WorfI1 .great-grand. •Ui-ghfef. William Wa.r*ll II I 13 11. Mill SAM; AUTOMOTIVE CAR On* ill IMS Mmur> Eight Ford "chanxaUvBound Apply B A Simp % %  n. CitfT Cottaaje, St Jatin IT %  M-dn l*H I refect Ford IX* IftM V-r %  .,.,. -I— on* Auetin AT ,.—1 condition la*. bath MI .1 MM IT t m < i i. REAL ESTA1-B IJNDEK THE IVORY HAMMER MELT ,-hun* a m.mber ,l fri.lt Irca* ant oun* campa Price M.IM I Proper.v .it,i*u> .t F.irttoUJ >r***tto* Houae II i I with *bcd al lh """"' i*"d •> %  * *•— at,:** No icMntiahto offer, refuted %  % %  H< Oklnteo Aaenta ir Pn %  Belief. M.,hrt %  MM i H *.. I Week. ti a ;*3 c H Ford i -,h*lt*. n iss-a. It Allrwrlt** pi.n It* Hr NEAR I It' V MSB ..I,I • I AT Al-....HSM %  as Mln 1M1 Id .. r H..!pl H...i..h. N I Joho Phon* 16.2*1 16 13 i good working Ii-ndlord. Iv>. IS I M In (AH ISM Vauahall I .rder Nrw tyre. Cc, id. Dial SfM. CK One Wolaeln%  h. __.—In Levins Memory %  >! *> -.lighter. Maureen Htcwitcr. who fell a.lcp Ml WUi AufuM. ISU Gone from ua but h-avn t Dell. Can never laka M*morl*> th.it will alwai. I bl gaji Whi.it upon the earth w* Blay Mother M rtl. fire*, .tor. BfBlh; Wolacin %  %  h.p. In perfect Apply Fddi* OUI C/a Gaiagc IM at—ir. IOHWli-Two J-lon rordaon toertoa ".rfid tyre. New Hattorta*. low mltoag* %  id good tvrea. Hecntly overhauled Pi-c*d lo Mil C A. William* Atry Hill. M Oaorgc Phon* 4*91 II %  *-*!. K-i one it*) Dual Gear %  (truck and ona IMS Cha*ratal true* IT %  U In „,*! ...rkm* orator. New tyre. Can be %  — < *vn al Lodge Hlono Work.. Lod*e Hill. BtSTWlM %  lePVtnpl Mamuat "I OUI it Michael Dear Moth.. Mr. Ik-ien* Uenllwm wli-> Uanader Pi letl aaleep n the IJlh of Aufutl. U !" ry the CompM HMwmi may -.thai. Bowora i Ala> remembeied L hi r children )i,pa. Charle*. George. Cl.rl.tlns MrCoBHalw* King ICddbtl, IT J*-It Mill lfl,M not M.S AN APArTTMrVT al "OrrtU". roar Woodalde. rulUble l-n a children A nico. large tvo-bedrix each wilh running wai i .-iiat Church > 0l.c>iea, Reception or Slltlngr-r and Oil (onvenirncoi Dial *.o? ingi. very rpm l Liifhli fianHalvad. Bn. Inn bath — 1 boeh-ioaaa — teiv.au rum. -Vorandah. From ftoplcmbe. TrlephdBTkW*. itr rTitn>k ,, SUAII l'OTTAaBi_|H | ••n aoa. A BtUll POtUfA fiir.il.hed. bedrnnma. eleitrirllv .mil Oioow. % %  !• i.^-bflthln*. API"* Hull' l..i'i-* Gap '• of -irt". Id tilt-:DM Appl % %  I....i liiMwa FLAT -Top Fill. nlnhod Exicedm.h i,. imaHHah for 11 to .1 rhlUa Bridgetown. i Ir. i .„..-. ii .ii • .i • \ n^o^rt^ Apply Mr. U C TO 4M AFPRflVtll II *> : OW, nawly built in BUM bedroom* .: (I e)clrlrll> K %  .If" ii. !" -ILII fated!" Hpoclpun Dial H1 or 4M) I1AVSW. 1 fledroam iwl : %  "'"' > T. Ml, --I. -.i A WWi Room. .•!!,t ?an — „ Going for abtut £i.M g AT WORTHINC MAIM RD Facing: hea. Hight-ot Wav M okw. A 9 Bedio un i Bungalow Tvr~' >' Good Condition, flan.*.A tar. t. Room, ova* a 000 aq ft., ' Hom PiaBgilnw abaiil Old. Fvr.n. rhM JI Totlrt. r Servaaha Hoom. abmit ii.fton '..-i.- n* .—..•. I.IIJO. f. AT t OVT If II.I, Abriao H.. 1 Red..-P.rtl* Stone %  Bwnsalo*. Krone WI.V RUT SURta-V AM 1NEXOHABI.V I'lr-..C Me but leav your Barometer and Corkacrvw al Hornand Do Not be Tidal. If and when U Almoat Anything in Re.u p>i-iI.. • . t OBI i win -i, I MOMT* f'hrl IM1 i aeddenl ajBjgggl %  %  r i.*h VINCTNT otuirrm. Aucttaneer IT g t CLTRK A L-.I UN Of wiih — rand ar.l l>p*wntM>g and general ornce • woui eiperteno required I Apply u boXYZ. C o Advocau Adver laHna Ipt stain.*; UuailAcaUona Applfctawo>. U**t*4 UrUuj coafhlentlal II I U Jr. MISCELLANEOUS llevilW which rpridhi chotea. S arliag Irnamvnt TabWa. **.... Chair* and .,n. Long Boukahelf all In Mah-.g"f Arm Chat !" ,n Ihuh: ,n> Room Sulto 'Settee and 1 Chair 11 Lodva Roll Top De.k. OtTU* it Re%oKing (Tialr. Wain .1 Mlrd .. iLite.. Record.. Single Bed lead. RWnmon. Spring and Bed. Pre... r wel Rail all In Iron B*dat-d and bed. 1*1. .e War* .. Oil H-lnrrntor. I.-. i r.ibl* f Larder. S Rurnvr V|-.r till Kitrh*n :..-*. and othor item.. •mANKKR THOTMAN \lll C i -. r %  %  %  T: • CO. ELECTRICAL ..I. .ml who 111XTKKOHUJJI-Bv Black A .h-cker '.~ HOI* Gun. % %  -.. ",-., I", wlkfe • Hill Stand. DaCuel.. A Co Ltd I-.pt It t 11—dn a E C RETRIGEBATOR. 4 cubic It Mut clan condition, attractive baigair pnec lor a houanrU*. Apply L. At H. 1T.SU—In. RAI.1UGKAM OIK 111 Halllcralter .. wJJi.m In good condition Apph C Arthur *lyhew -Wallabrook" River ft..l Phon* 4T41 „ lg g SI—dii POULTRY .._ -Pur* Bt*d Barred Rock ullet*. luat tuning to lay. Exe*llcnt *ying attain. John AUoync IHworlh. tPflor Ition* ! %  * 11 B SI—In HALS AT MIOWUl I i,e llred I upphH, three month, old IIV THE VERY 1JOIIT YOtrit IICTIN. VOX SEC TO DkAL 3111. Call %  Otlv* Bouih." Hi Court Look lot na*||iajai N*. I My Hgn 1 Corner properly at Twaocl.lde Kd Suitable lor Grocer* DutlnbM p. Mechanic Shop. 1. I pr.ip.ri...I Collymorg Roc. %  landing on l/l acre ot land Wnt. metal,I'd and Wired lot *l*Cttie't> I I'M aq ft of land at Tweed.id Road priced to aell 4 1 Hi Roof boarded and ahlnglc. Hone* with >h*d and kitchen %  Pin* (Jap, Collymur* Rock I-ric II Sod in Good Condition Can b* Rented B I Houae with Shed at Hunt*. Rd Land can bo rented AIM Small Houae Apply Jo. St HUM. Real Eatatr Aga-nt or Dial aST. TwvadMde Road (-rOMMOOATIOM for U tly ai rived from HOME I Adhor.it* II I I ITIOf WANTVO ENNBIt a aualihi-d o IUW onionr whj nura* Addrca. d Mha Gladyt Stoat II I S3—dr iM'iii.ir \orit :KS SHIPPING NOTICES ROYAL METHEXLArfDS STEAMSHIP 03. •AiiJNti FROM iinort M %  BTTENTOB tSnd Auguat. IM M S HERA Bfth Augtapt, MSB. i'.-SBSt It S ORANJaaSTAD Bth S*pternb*r ilsi VII IM, to TRINMIAK niANtllHd ANR BRIll-tH .l I VN V S %  ORAUtE lain Aiti.t. IRU S SfTEePPOR Mn Xepiamber, IfH Ml IM. TO miMli Mi A II HA. MI arOflfXOOP 17th Augu.t. IMS : HERA lath September. IMS %  P MIISON. SON A CO.. LTD. cept Cargo and P ianr t rn few Dominica. Anflgwa. latoeiteerrat. Ncvla and St STJMa Sal—ia TM*aday llth mat '-•V-.*-'..'---Canadian National Steamships NOTier. TW WOMEN'S SELF HELP ASSOCIATaOM will be tkoaod on Wednesday llth and Thursday MOa Auduat ISIS, lot "lack, la Kind Aa from id* anbarrlption will b* I UNDER THE SILVER HAMMER On Tuaaday Iftth by order of Mr* HarN . -ill -ell hrr llou** ApIK-lntmenU at "Ihelholin*". Chela** iarden. xhlch li.cludoa. Dinlnar Table, upridht Chair*. Chhta I ... kn. Barbie* and Morrla likto End S-ltec. all In mahogny: oil Pa Inline* A Ptetur*a: Pin* %  laM Donr.i Bent Wood A ...vd Rocket.: Glaaa A Chin*. A Tea Service*. Congo I en m and igto RadMead with Boa Spring. mo Spring A Gent ComNOTlCE I'MIMIMM COMMUNITY HALL ANR I-I M1M. IIMI. T ANORKW May be rented (or enlerUlnmanU C all %  Ind*. on -ppHMtton to th* Pan--hl* -rking; ,. .1 taiiwnenu (S 00 For Vonn Sprti .-. Gent . nllv Table TripicI ..t.teod w. ;*ep s.cp Main • | Nico \ Mlrrnti. Medicine Cabin. I all In mahog..,. *wMpRaMM t" Ji' Col, Painted Pteaaaa. Pin* Waggon. Zinc Top Tabl**. !,inter2 Burner Oil Stove.. Kitchen 'lanllU. Gibson Raftlgetalor. In perfect with SU*1 lot* Cirtatn*. Doll*, Book*. M T HYM T-bto. 1 i(iior C*e. Ola*. Win ilding Block*. Oi IBM* in Dtui ''' a r olhei Toolt. i, Ro* I Sit* of Paupptiah Rj NOTICE PARISH OF ST PHHaF Tardet* for th* convayi era: (al Prosa any part at th Alm.rwuae Ibi From th* Almahoua* to tho Oonrr.il Ho.pltal win ( %  received by the t.ndm.gn.d not M. ,,, u^ r m VnsSf{ . Ctork la Ihe Board d GuarlUrt. SI Philip ii %  as— NOTICE i %  -.iii-n or hi pHiur ApplUatlocu for th* Poat ol N.iraa al the St Philip* Almahoua* will be received by tha und*rtign*d up to saturdiy *"'i Auduat MS3 App —r.ta muat be qualtBed a* a Nurae Ktul Midwife, and mint forward With th*|r application, their Itaptlimal Ccrttflrat** ae well aa their CcrUflaatM t.l eonipeiappw. Tha aiKCM'tUl candbdat* will be re....r*.to aaauraa duttoa on th* lh S.pl.nbe*. ISM. Aipy (arthar paaUauiara ,.;t.*d from th. !" OEM %  OfTPtltOI Nil CANADIAN CRUIrSEH CANADIAN CONSTRICTOR IADY RODNEY CANADIAN tllALLENGEJl LADY NELBON II Aug. M Aug • Sep. IS Bept E4 Sept. a Seat ST Sept. M Aug. i. !" Arrtvea AtitwM f AN Am AN CHAXJ^ENOSM LAJJY NEIdPOM CANADIAN CRUISER CANADIAN CONSTRUCTOR LADY RODNEY .. CANADIAN CHALLENGER LADY NELSAM* SD Aug II Sepl 1 Oct • Ocl Si Oct. Far forth** parUaalaro. apply 4a— GARDINER AUSTIN A CO.. LTD.— ApenU. ieo c >ttco f >>' jaa eoiaa. ru JOHN Me III twos *f CO. AIJ., I \ \ lvl.,:-n.LUllact or ...HHI Uiu Prop^rll ftn. Land l • X. MU FOR SALE VILLA VTCQUC. St VINCENT nuiled noua* built I lor.il rtonr with magtllhcent law. ant' 3 1 auto, fraan Kl n apa nwn. 100 yarda Aquatic Club leach with i 4 bedroom*. 1 hathroopppa. latBa We hsve Just opoBrd i-.v.u \--..n im.-m of PLASTIC HOUSEHOLD ITEMS JAM DISHES. ICE CUBES REIK1GI.KAJOi; DISHES sad Euar otBdhT Useful IIPEM for the Home. CENTRAL EMMHMMMJM Oaraer fVoad sad Tndor flta. THE I Mil —IBI. BUilVILLE — P.c-w>lly ailuawd 1 Uont' bouas v. .in good ground* ot a bout dMwinc loam.' dirui* lwaaal atuAy. wall RPted htUhOf. 3 dov.bl* bad%  %  — %  , awcaoa % % %  % %  .%  .I e*ke* itrhtn raajwlrxi under l>MP would ba coraiilri.il BRMFJiAYOB RT I-AWyRMC* .in coaal etuoM kaaagalow apacn.ii airv roajaa appd gallaci.a Ai-eutian.iidauon mg. — **Y'r*te drawn, f and a doui' BEACH PROPERTY. ST LAWIllNC'i: Well placed hou. with 4 oedioonu. Urge living room aim lallerlea Elcellent undj beach and good bathing Full detail* on application. WYNIXTVER, B inm* with over 4V* • %  \r vegcalo* anal flower nardapat. alao a lai*p orchard ha. turn completely



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    PAGE TEN SUNDAY ADVCK \TI s[ su.w AUGUST II, i TALKING TURTLE Back To London Sir Ralph w* gat too involved let K explain WIMI l mean by turtle me a turtle is a thing I ha*. swim* InthrMw distinct from LoTtOU*. Ol a* iU> Oxii.iu Dicti<*iar\ say*: A wari a nile esnaaed as toi th flipper* i.sl in jwirrwrvW To bo mocp exact the XJuvy. paWdLi Britnnrn. rud*r M.iiine %  two recent genera, with thrvo widely distributed specie* Th" limb* ore rwddlc-sh.M only on or two aim the shell i covered writ! noruj shields. The neck abort and retractih The parietal*, post fniiit.ilsquarnosai*. qu.drato-Jugak. antugals anmuch expanded r form .in nddiiiMn.il i>vei the temporal mrion of Ihi skull. The Chelnmaae ore n high ly sperlaM/ Fa adapted lo m.inn life Fundamentally they agn most with th-' Teatudlnl there is nothing |>i inulivc aboi :hem except that nicy still potav: complete sefTes .if inframarRln. shleida.'' In other w ChelotiidaB laa sea lortoises or :.. *• *•*"tU*Jlfi*>To contuse •).. Issue turtUahull is known TortoismbrtT* Having aatd something aboi-t turtles m general let us turn lurtk* In pai'icular and deal inwith the species that is mast ofle .iught uff the*, turtle. Without doubt th. turtle ,. the most mi; all turtles from an econom* point of view. It la th* source ol the famous turtle soup, and the specie-, indeed Is eaten as well drunk by man the world ovei It i the beat* of extensive Industrie* -nj Urns of that dollars worth of specimen b are hold annually in 'he markets . the large Amsricau cities. CHI is mad* t rom both the lurtl. and Its eggs. but the shell h. only a low commercial value, bcu. too thin for most purposes. The grcn turtle has a worl evidence hast *lso been prevent <-• that g>eat Auaibars sloop on ie mote Hawaitn rock ledges urwi sandy beacbafa fact aontradl< tory to The gensral beh.M I,.. turtles die iTstranded on tiwi bellies, owing to the luck of u(l: ctent support afforded organs by the lower part o| th shell Breathing is said to bseriously impaired and specimen going t.. manual are a \w on their backs The largest green turtle ovei taken by the Key West ilealei %  weighed 700 pounds but I ho West Indian record Is 850 pound* Tin usual weight, iiuwevvi, in n>, % %  psffisjpfh, i*t seventy''' pounds NestH.ig Process Green turtles lay an average oi 120 eg"*. The nesting proi irt creating and ( described b. Plfford Pope thus: "In uscendlni the bench the female pull* hersel; o'onB wl'h the frorv BlppSfl living a conspicuous track two to 'hree feet wide made up .1 pirnllel depressions separated b> A ridge Her progress 1* in stage of six or seven step., follnv.e,, I.-. DOT rest When a site has i"*n chosen, she proosc he-self Into a large hollmv which it made with ill foui Blppei Vi i\\ i. \U; BEN JONSOrTS VOl-TONE, for sratecuon. and during such tn|J „„, nnil ,.*>,. Ilg frum tht tUawa hunters readily eaten them Shakespeare Memorial Theatre at Fishermen in these part* tlnu stratfoid-on-Avon, must be one of tune. Not long ago ; hartsC • %  "ils species weighing 1.450 pmin is was secured near Vanroovt l>land. The LeatherbarK. which i II name suggest has its shell covered with smooth skin msteod oi homy shields, is of no economli ,e front pan throwing the aanC fmally to get back to the ipr ut by swimming movement* and urtic and lo Ugon, who wi the tlrst History about 1050. H-iu.id. He says "The greei Anvhow, after daecnbing now Unal court mmmm^ -o k'll a turtle -nd how the hear' -f .11 the chle/ resting while the hind pai lo Iheir work. After depression i.ave been made fore and ail, the r.igger revolves enough to change the centre of action and thus ilnally works herself into the re ulting bowl-shaped excavation Next she dig> the egg pit, a far more delicate procedure This ccondary excavation is a eyllnb) Mime rlghtSBM niche 1 deep and twelve or more across i lernovcd by stroke-if the edge of the llip|iers usen w .iv. ( iifti<-uJty i.mt'ily in ^ii move for twelve hours ar'Teststng with depth, finally thtr ,e reptile is dead he concludeHipper must be curled inward. ,, % %  thh lovely Walrus and CT undereurled and penter noteSure there IgO -ti. "killut c reature on Earth, or on ihe Seapushes until a load has been dtslhat enjoys life with such we*t %  Then ihe tip is agaii. ne5 and delight, as the poor uri>letely enfold the lc ( noT none more delicate ti -.tnd und bring It out often wiHh \3&, or more nourishing. OiaV less of scarcely a grain. hat* the turtle is ready lo lay. • %  • lirouglil to %  ding the tail and coverh.g me it.ouih of the pit Usually O egJls are e;e M As soon as the laying is com%  ;iest U lilie-i III, IhSJ hind ilippers patting and kneading the nd into (he nest Then she returns to the water. This nesting pioceas takes an average of twi hours." litlen The pi-oduct u a lurbuh'itt genius—Jonann was corn I and out of prison—and a turbulent time, it parades %  galaxy of charactets driven on by avarice, lust, treac he ry, concert and every other vice In the calender There Is little room in this lusty, sprawling masterpiece for goodness The author s single-mindee" U to make sport Bg evil Voipone. the Venetian magnifko. floats tiver the %  massed and plans to amass some nore. Feigning mortal sickness, h* tempts three fellow citiren? with hints that he will make each one of them his hcii Driven nearly craey with avahring him r nil presents, "reliantpresent taker Funny men ^uiroussd hUn, ba they are there puraiy (or the purpose of leaving gun. coldHe is the duck's back; Uy rceives their tligtil* with a inaak of blaiii; gaasNt to hlnod-cnrtllmg bhse. and mwarthe itssgHtates mayhem length, adyaarJng has arnsse •Ideeed attitude toward* burrBnrl^ He isms te c he** and rob It turtle Is the best food that the the shape of his young and lovely sea affords but I have seen vert wife, who has aroused Volopone': fM of them in Barbados, and i U5 t those neither fat not kindly and a a a the reason is, there are no sandi or shelves for them to lay their eggs or to r*M themselves Jha": vn'" What hsppened to Barbjido* caches three hundred yeari u*t> This actor is altogether lackio*. r vanoa He exudea n laaa boi ..omie. He is the epitome f -deer,—cut ut, you^eeito $2*12^ .t th* .daalast i.i any pisa* th* i H Pr %  stley cares to wrfto. FBs ; .dm at to move subtsrbta sraawtiy %  %  the isf He has chosen, however, this year to iihsngi into a l tragsSy and tragt-emnedy utterly •'lien to hi* ••^n"i in*m and eyossd nk powers of i F*w aetors alistng then bmi'ations; and the lure of playing lean at Stratford econsAs .-arh ytmr more *n*istog But my advice to Sfrr Ralph Hia Hcpagr UchsMson hi to forg..t all anon; rsjjp*, bewt and .. Stratford, to return quickly to mg hfl ,, •(,,, U1 „|aifiaj dei^-ndon; and to flnd nice cosy vWt try which the btfce assy mestlc drama uddenlv and Mmu ltau ao usty be otheiv.-ise the sear of John put on hla wife his family, Wi -iielgiid and Alee GuMme-w wUl rrlenda, and the United State.main permanently in the aacenTreasury' I X p a jliu SBt. rtant. These actors have learned ajs fshedoaa rspose is shaken thenlea-on There are quite only whew he is aersssid of avssrlee. t of part they cannot pisy phi* hurts and dlagusta him, and his eyebrows tared and deprecating, start u pw ard s, nanny's who** You rctDernber th* driokina act b thag of a man fatigued with ItabltB of the African gnu' Ho proteatirfg his iruaoconce to a essart first ihe males come to the waler^W^Li" rtta -** w h %  * " Baby needs ^r! the puir.imldiv BMJHIC4 to i4 I uiicanTv Ml* — -f i Snpin||himchafr-rrran>l-^^OSLr 1 "*-* '" tm*> i mil S W WPtk-iwrwiftH Swap Gn!S assjki %  sw |SBB| -.H.S*' Hob *e *WA chest with A 1. White rhe |iriMUM>ns ...lit. blood UKIItompil> ralsna* ThouM odihave lai *ith A.I. '.. ny not you' The ensuing complication: involving numerous double crosshole, and then the females. ngs. assumed identities and Pink Ream, which opened^at the reigned death, lead at last to th* I ... here the sins taarSgdaa I VI wrought bom* to roost. Th* Judges .-ie fotir old dotard* Jonaon nllowdignity not even to the law. Such, for what it is worth, is the plot. But, of course, it ia woith little. The great Elizabethan ^tumbli' ,1th. on Wedni the alcoholle equivalent of thai watei -hole Its title l* a pseudonym for %  .eiir-Unudrinking club on which Rodney Ackl.md the authoi, has decided to bestow ,i wry and shabby immortality. Out of the of the drinkers who flit of hand. To relish him as 1 do may he an eeeentrlc -taste; he is technically a buffer-* t te a rarity in this country, whose comedians are generally mgnstns But no one with an eye for the craft of comedy abould miss the chance of studying the cuss anu timmg of his rnhnmrty rSJnWsed ad-libs. His company include* a neat of dramatist* paid scant attention to ne nas |lUl j t ?T^ V 1* naa I isiajan i inciuoe* a ne*i oi I het. plots inturd and ra trusted to the! huh frequently -ly c -edible They charicters to Imihenc imagiia iragl-c. n mtmly >mo.^^^u^u, „„ pla.v-on altom. I A ^M,,, rt soli of Hartorvtlor OTHER FATS AND OIL II In Voipone Ben Jonson orsstsd 'o characters that every actor worth his salt must long to play. Voipone himself is the rich rascal •evi-imK in subterfuge, the deceiver rejoicing in deceit. The olive has bsei tins brief survey of From Page included The eggs, which resemble pingpong balls, take about tw* monui to hatch. The mother turtle never K SOd the liatching•u.ve to make their own way to the sea. Many of them are eatc. oy birds while they arc ciswUng oa the beach, and alter entenn. the sea numbers of them sn gobbled up by llsh. As the turtle: ,-row larger, however, UtSB oal ire men .mi sharks. Th< ang lift then Bippsri it ney get the chance and mer %  Sterling Uiem in nets or turnlm -honi illegally on the beacher chen they come up 10 lay. Turtli iefj (I have one) are aiiythlnn rom twenty to fifty yard* Dn ml about four feet in u'pth. Th* net .s %  .upported by %  rks ; .i,d |g moored mily at on* nd When turtles strike these %  I hopeta ]. ntingled fmous fellow, laid in my first net and %  >'k it away with him. He sri ,st seen off SCver HPSI %  omplete with net. %  The other species ol turtUthai caught off the coast of Barbados R iwksbiU. ,-ource of the moti"tortKlsesheH". This prett% turtle—the shell ie bTOI tiers than 160 lbs. While 11 e 'f value becau'e of its shell, the neat Is not so well flavoured i liat of the Green turtle _s*d to psint, an arrogi rvant, oily and dnnk*r who directs bad Alms, '.utwardly obsequious, who plans a gafc-Btove-ahaped lady drinker his master's stratagems and in the riately starvad, called Denmedy. llla oty. It runs the gamut from Scotch M r Day genially, ventureto gin. embracing a literary for ^^ mhj^oer*4 Into i-nnker who has wife trouble, a e .y*", j* r T%** 1 ,_' political drinker aeeklng guiltily r* 0 "^ who **** „ iirartlsod at an early time—a reference occurs in St. Pauls opkUle to the Romans. AU the early writers, Greek and Roman, refai I" the olive in one way or another Homer calls i 'the sacred olives' It is honoured in Hebrew llterulure and occupSSB a central place with th* fig and th* vine umonfc Palestinian fruits. superbly the pimp the jinbltlous lackey with scorn In But it taki-;, I am ;ilr:iirt, a heart Ids heart for those lie bamboozh's larger than his to write about and well concealed hatred for the the mall Iftl "f mal] people master he servos. This Is fine without -entiineiilalism or shallow acting. moralising. Chekhov could do it, .,and in lib hands The Pink Room And Vu!p....e tl... (ox himself llUghl taTt been Sir Ralph Richardson makes full p|< ^ use of the comic situations with The* ancient .vhich th e author's -tage directions But Mi Aekl.md will keep or alssnaarrasasasTotCsdn selected i ovide him. He hides roguishly reml-idlng us that his little band j~3? Me-iiterranean P*fW** !" .^hi.,,1 ..f the green turtle, though it a revolving stone or sometimes irended with the foot. Tt has been said that In her over-flowing o". vats (mostly dug out of the rock). •ludah had not only a livelihood lo-ed i-,ut also riches for exportation and tor barter. advantage. And a false ose that makes him look like ,roucho Marx. Pnspare, now, for the Joy of igic for the ex e rc is e of attentive eyes and ears, and for some eon%  iplatinn of the p er v erse and murderous stratagems of msn. n kind. sometimes piy* actors took the stage at the "d Westminster Theatre last nlaht. powering ,,nd held me by the acrufX of my surprised mind for two and a half hours. Frederick Knoll's DIAL M FUR MURDBR la, once you h.ve overlooked its nonsensical title, the most intelligent crime play 1 have seen. This Is sheer, dear plot at it* fullest stretch, with no clue withminot masterheW and pVpry ^^ aad gy^. hie counting in the balance Its manipulators include Andrew Oruickshank, Olai Pooley, Jamd Bmrys Jones. just say hnal if you binto murder your wife. l>-t i outcasts are dancing tn ink; and he wanders ,„n.v off into clears fh,e howeU. ,. ? Trice Andrews as a refresrttns; V^gtjpf' drink, too—nrrt one tessrxyonful ift i ulaw of water. DO YOV KNOW thai perspiration etmr/mtalh ror*i r*r iVJfsM ofmnuure 'in hot climate' iomr lo or 70 /TaTi rfmr,'.) 3 Moiztwe il lost evtn from the aNmenta'y rrhrY, .:' r* r'f n needed toasmt Jigtorivt and elimination. MbM raprtUv, hit Andrem' tparklinp utline v>tntum mtcfm ar•< has seemed to go out of his way to choose unsuitable potts. World Copywrlght reserved. lANDREWSi for /Nfvfo CL *ANUNESS The olive is indigenous lo ihe Mediterranean basin and Its produce Is an important article or lunmerce throughout the region. i ut especially so in Italy, Spain and Southern France in modi limes when cttlcient method! aro Th-de live melodramstie miui"-s blew up the play's frail /'uetuie beyond all hope of ra%  df. With one or two grim exeeplions, howwsr Th* Pink Room I splendidly acted Hermlone B*dlch^ f as the dub's mmpotnt :icen*se, ignores the gallery and i es absolutely straight, gams m .i trouper and swearing like one. 1.) performance is a glorious dish : rriad flahwifs. This battling bantam has some A we competition Heather Stannod, Ann Wilton and David Hurst .. e especially notable* and Mlgno n i i-oherty, as the bewigged gor_ !" | on, is giving what I take to be Et. Some am of oent supporting performance ol """> the year. Glowering and pork1 f.eed, she looks like to riven P"*Jiicabssn osk. E AKD OAPTOH ,ibly inferior m that f uranean olives. KiiKilly. it should be stated that null ;md seeds of vsajstsbta .*ources whicli yield edible fat: and oils are legii practised in the extraction of the nnly local importance In tlio oil Olive oil has been described countries of origin, others agair as the vd.ble oil par excellence as i^urc in commerce for one purlegards flavour and, ils nutritive pu>e or another. A few of the betquallties arc of the highest order. u>r known one* are mentioned in Altai : usiaasss MIHHHJ There is nothing to equal It a* a the preceding paragraph. There *rt,e pink Room has a good head alad oil. Outside of the countries „re others used principally as „„ i te shoulders. It is a good %  its provenance the oil may bo drugs or, a* in the case of castor -doniat's hssd. • .arded as a luxury product. It o'l, is a special lubricant for air... • ct__ retches very high prices today ,,une engines as well. Others _. ^.^.J:.brft u, sha id, on this account, It Is fre.. Ka in, like Unseed, are most im, Tncr ^ u d 3P55J^Shi Z .ue.it!> adulterated with oils more „.rtant in the paint Industrie. *" 1 th "*, Jat *j"oSJlZ SaS nsuttSJ in laste such aa those de. „d in manufactures such a? Un"turned to the Pauadlumiwr i i>ed from cotton seed, soya bean, oleums and related products '' ,p week *' t a "^ iiiiiue, gioundnut and sunflowsrThere is a great and increasing This, is dreadful Kffnrt* have been made to extend demand, especially for edible fats the cultivation of olives to CallMid oils, and the government* of rornis, Australia and South colonial territories are being uigAfrtca, but the yield of oil from ed to develop their production on the fruits grown In non-European sound, •cononilr lines, wherevei possibly -he %  •euntriss Is said to be considerposslbl* Although it is broken-backed. slur on his epntntion, go let us dlspos* of It once. Mr. Benny Is not a clown at alii is a Straight man or stooga, and ibtlast hi Use aaaSory THE ROOM WITH A SMILE The Truth in Your Horoscope < Wnuhl reu law to kiow without i -I > • thHti.1. in.lK-nt our itroBa %  %  t.. •H^r %  >our eholi l 1 ;H Ifle tklll o( Pundit T-IK IndM't rnoM I.I OFFER iv-idi EtHi-N> lM*H*. Ti• '. ClutnseI H LurSs rim*. 1 Aorld ovrr. GBOKCF MAC KEY *itk b-USSM Owl Taboi> "f %  ! *f f*•< It you rorwnrd I Mr MM *r MM nddr*e and d %  N N*fl. tlll-h I -Snted lor Atoiiel : uii'M rle.. bill -rnd I/In Ol NinmBS or toinm t<*r %  -III be %  niar'd M *• -.( hi. Ka l— mitl .iid rowr aS-in. WttU no%  I not be laser again. Addr.u is-au, Upp' fottaa Sirs*! Bomba St. ln* .. %  • 4 •*fi%i GALVANISED CORRUGATED SHEETS 24 OUACK:— 8 feet Long S4.32 ptr ibMt .... # 504 ,. a .... • $5.78 .. .... 9 .4B .. ?8 Gt'AGE:— 8 feet Lone @ $5.12 per shew C.AI.VANISED NAILS @ 37c. Per Iti BBFShop Now and S.ivi! BARBADOS HARDWARE CO. LTB. (The House For Bargains.) No. 16 Swan Street Phone : 4406. 2109 3534 1'OMI HOOF NOW... mi'\ i it till It HOMES We can now deliver from stock :— Shingles White Pine Pitch Pine Cement (ialvanised Sheets Aluminum Sheets Asbestos Everlle Sheet-. Aluminum Guttering Steel Windows Nails etc.. etc. GET YOUR REQUIREMENTS NOW i i PLANTATIONS LIMITED -*ffgv j*.'X^*.-,*,<^rt*'We*''-''.'.?*.1 We've all seen the room lhat seems lo smile. Gaily patterned curtains frame the windows, and here and there plami Just right to catch the light, is a piece of polished brass, glistening, gleaming all day long. The floor too. sparkles wMh ; %  well chosen covering that matches the. curtains, snd the whole atmosphere is on* of comfort and luxury. We cur IrCip you turn your home Into such spots of beauty with our f LOVELY PATTERNB 01* PL00R COVERING "DTJRAOLIT" to keep the Brass shining "O'OEDAH POLISH" for the furniture and Unolaum, THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM Corner of Broad and Tndor Streets



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    SUNDAY, AUGUST 17. 1*S2 -I NDA1 VDVOCATE PACE ELEVEN The People Of Barbados XIX T his West Indian Culture—3 "SLAVERY" B> JOHN miiim x Religious matters camr to a head in 1024. i-niefly on account cf the destruction of the Wesle) J T I big clergy U> Uke ao pan Chapel in Bridgetown in 1823. a.i 1 Igfllation, but 10 devote in. %  -hem TWr School tfgg, 1 will jo on musing li !• 1329 and 1830. when the Uter-iy.' although I know null' %  ting was formally openwell that t BO JMM pect urn to be when vim It> A s IIOPKINSON %  !'.. %  1 nn that %  cloMtand ai"1 ni.MiKi' %  icadetnic myself for th %  n aboMAll dauk-al -now th,t it wa< chiefly | 'il ipini that gave birth to Homer) . the military [ %  "* "d earnest national enUlh,John Smith Outrage' in K.VM to paitoral work, training | HI : Lh C MIU ML Hi md AMMll) boring -uujevi a n>an who ,. willing to tight i„ the I". !" "JJ] '""J^K. i a ..JhVt.. I British Guiana. The Hi. Hon. <•. teaching the slaves so thai was aUo instrumental with havculture,' There are some people death for an idea Its chief friend if*** SSttSui and them lainrtTl Otorge Canning, Foreign Secrc .he traniiiion from slavery to ltl g this Collage affiliated with the? are a.nong the mill afc % %  %  %  • %  uTSa* tw^JhH helirfa hetary announced that the Governfreedom might be easy. The Re\Durham University so that th* of the earth—who expect an artiO Culture And The St ate* man fore he can develop a gr (1 The statesman and the soldier* lure. But omv the belief gad !l:> in fact, bear a most intimate fighting spirit are instilled into Uige numwriting on such a dry academlto cultun ment of Great Britain had decidej -rend William Marshall Harte, yOUng men of the West Indies on literature, art. music M to strengthen the Church in the Rector of St. Lucy, openeu could obtain a Un versity Degrei M be crammed with tedmu and West Indie*, by constituting two 'he Church on Sunday afterwithout having to voyage further ludicrously unlmag diocese. Accordingly. Dr. Chrisnoon* for worship by the poor arield than Barbados. ras to the loveliness exqui topher Lipseomb and William people of the parish, and g., gftth the teachings of the fcagey and Pragnant imager; oi 'hi Hart Coleridge were consecrated a tcture every Wednesday Cla-rgy. there was still strong oppoem, or the ft* -hi gnd bnlliBishopa of Jamaica and Barbaevening to the Slaves. There position to the abolition of slavance with which Ibis artist paintdos respectively. Thus the work was a dispute between the Rector cry. In January, 1833, the House ecuntry landscapes or Ktg wonof Berkeley and Wilson was at and the Vestry of the Parish, of Assembly passed a resolution darful melodic Una of this !.. length accomplished. The Dlocerm This dispute ended ip court and that a Petition be presented to movement or the skill thai play '*•* Indian must re Use that there (ill! 1 ifla 1VII ||o\\ of Barbados consisted of St. Vinthere were charges against the tne King asking him to remove wright displays In hi. subtle use '" ut *' certain Inexplicably ralaMnniMa lo outturn There has iifiri. trio rest will come subco fai too much sciouslv and without his labourtishonest dealing and deliberate (n g it out in the sanctuaries of a ignorance in connection with this university. n and it would be well if Lh. west Indies could make a ffank and n>w beginning. The I hif for.-, diivgig us to the pursuit of fuller I <*. greater and wider being, and more power over Nature .-Md ourselves. This force 1* e malty active In the statesman, '.he painter, the scientist. Ihe philosopher, the naturalist and >e priest and. whether v, ,. Iss d >ugh the raadJ Tall Your Child Will Grow? IIS 4a>ortfr %u\u If possible to foieVK ately than ever Decent. Grenada, Antigua, the other Rector which were placed before the Hon. J. B. Skeete from the of dramatic irony; in short, wtth Leeward and Windward Islands, the Magistrates W. H. Grant and Office of President of Barbados .11 the time-eroded vapid meanTrinidad and British Guiana. George J. Evelyn. These Magisand from the Bo..rd of Counc;. mgless and brainlesslv usi ilHsaji Prior lo the appointment of the**, trates held that the Complaints At the Court of Grand Sessions in :i n:.Vhand phrase* which form two Bishops, the entire British against the Rector must be abanDecember the previous year. Robthe complete mental equipment of West Indies were under Ihe condomed. ert James, a slave, had been tried an accepted critic When they trol of the Bishop of London. Reverend Harte, due to his and found guilty -under aggravdon't get this BOCI of stuff, which The first Bishop was a worthy ardour for the improvement of uud circumstances' of rape upon low* like because It member of one of the most disthe slaves, was accused of trying a poor whiij woman, a widow titular and so thoroughb fragkad tinguished of English families. U) destroy the distinction between with two children, and sentenced with the cliche that has been and as one of the first Colonial master and %.\vt which was to death. The inhabitants expressremorselessly drilled Into them „,, Bishops added lustre lo its name, deemed so necessary to then ed the greatest indignation to the during tlimr school days that It %  ronoinv or theoloav it l .tnlf.^ r "*'' lo hcl sT.t has been InlenBishop Cb atrtdsjg, then thirty-five safety; "more especial!v evinced reprieve issued bv the Hon. J. B. does not call upon : %  rnlng at the im-mirriM* Thi. med bo,n ln Americ ond Br "~ years of age. was the son of Luke by his offensive sermon on Battri Skeete. and considered that this least bit of though: rtaj u ,ailed tiu-Tullural hi Thousands of painstaking Herman C< iendge. a Physician Sunday, and his disgraceful co..was a reward for his crime. A cerely disapp.nte hart based on the OUanlnm, Ulka ('..1,-ridgc died at Holy Sacrament of the Lord'.Temple-yard where great numT 'he mincrable critic who is Pver phrase you may choose to ln "' sl "" sulL< "J Ul s f**' 4 "' 11 -• %  an e-rly age and his son William Supper, thereby endeavouring lo bers were in attendance, these * uncultured and unlettered as describe it by, its influence r,;Jlrt showing: for lxth boygMJd was brought up by him uncle Rev. alienate their slaves from a sense proceedings were marked by order lu>: '' be famlUai wtth the ap. h tmdeniahle and ungovernable. George Cob ridge. Head Master of of their duly, by inculcating docalthough Ihere were some occaproprlat,htcrarj' phrases. There "• ""*> who has even the gentlest Kings School, Ottery. St. Mary, trines of ecruallty inconsistent "inns when there was a burst ar also some people—and they JV*stlon of religious feeling in By training, character and outlook with their obedience to their of excitement. Resolutions were are among the calamities of the l,n ,VI w nt | 0 curD| divert, or William Harl Coleridge was admasters and the policy of the framed condemning the Presiearth—who. wrien they hem a P'vert this Instinct In any way. mirably fitted for his position Island." den't interference with the P**?* f grc..t music, have ,-m r"'"the West Indian must also First and foremost a zealous In October of the same year, due course of justice and ro,ul, ibIe and Incorrigible urge to r< '* ,1,5r ,nat while the port is verChurchman. he was also a keen 'he Rev. Harte was examined for an address to the King was ***cluim 'how beautiful" Ask %  ,V|n an ? 'hiphilosopher mordminls:rau>r. From the moment the second time on these charges, resolved unon uravlni for lhcm whal ,h,, >' l hink 1,f Wiat...'"'.i" 1 1 .P"" 11 ."hetchlng of hfg arrival in 1825 his Intluaccording to the citation from ihe dismissal of ITesldent Skeete ever e *> m P" whose name first ^.J^I^SM^^ "IT ence began to be felt, and there £ %  &!•£ ThomhUl. Bascom, and from Office A Committee was ap!" me *J n, *, ur "<•*""> >">u fSZ£%J5^j2^*& t fl complete transformation. Pile. Mr. Harte attended at Suspointed to watch over the inter* 1 '' u ablt > f"-"' HtM -TmlecI h"ve gi^'o S^SSi^' Hotel, SpeighU.st. of the question at. ta.uc.Tni. L^,^^^.^^'-/ * TjTrtTrln^Xf&l* -av2£. VPT! ^ '"rehow tali a child will grow* ut-ied"^SeVr'aft **!!;:;. T R !" h int P ^ !" hi roiioniy. or theology, it it alwa,mtng at the same purpnae. This may be called the cultural 'llgious what1s what percentage of eventual adult height should Mil been reached at a given age. Every parent will want IUA study these height-age increase' tahles, for doctor, claim that the gniwth of children need no lunger be n matter of rhancc. It < Is becoming an exact medical '.. ieti.e AWAY NASTY COUGHS C01DS UKE MAGIC WITH SILT MEDICAf; I BUCKLtT'S WHI1E III MoShen, no yow con rageve She %  nury of aiddlai' cold* o ssuck fatltf with She iockiay Wkita tub TWO-WAY heoi No other RUB has these 4 Important Features Mniii Factors was The desired effect was taking anna Frescod's Hotel. SpeighUesls of the * observation than that hwh.le !!r th" cumo^ieer staS wV ,,ie '"/ we grow? U.V.T JiTJlT' w* 1 y* 1 "" 1 and ip, raf L er hc had 1 b f en u en lr " !" taking their step aga.nsl the Presi!" *"** OT lubl.me or poetic Ins Sjm, hunle. fori, while the **"" "*"bt is reached for girls L^LaJStiJsJLitf 2£" OU8n, lody 1 a ml "" u for > P>dent. mu MC '• R* Instance, you want astronomer stop tracing the path '* I8 *">"* al lfl iv a V£K£?M?£ ,1 WOTh ,\ t ^,-|" was bound over to appear In May. 1833. there was held a '^ 'f r j;^l^t ad|ective ,,,,;,,,,! of the comets, the priest stop Generally, there is very little yrana ssuaut iop and the C Unrin g nl l I a^ the Court of Grand Sessions. Public Meeting of Free coloured u l i h C,M ;""-earnestness you need preaching and the mathematician ,l "terence in the length of torso and Rev. J. H. and black people to pass an ad,, n '''" llon 'he name ,f Hrahm* stop calculating for a while but "' "dulls; difference in height is dress to the Governor, complain, "JJ* 1 ,ail y u II dosent as soon as tl.e statesman stops ex fh,n fl P'" 1 oughness and efflclenecy shilling.fJ) He appealed b"> to pub&c SUimUam oVhonr^r'ar^d 2L*i* h f l ped '' ke a Kramophone King who unconditionally profit. The Chairman of this Meet^T? rt ^^ Mv P"perly treated influence made. The Bishop did not have his ,h < own way. for there was opposition Pardoned him. ing was none other than Samuel lo the emancipation of the slaves The year 1831 was an eventful Jackman Prescod from certain planters and merone for the Free Coloured People Thoma as Secretary (*) chants m Bridgetown. There is of this Island, for they were adGovernor replied that he recorded a published notice mitted to the political franchise, knowledged that these people had "" signed by Messrs. John BrathOn several occasions before this much to complain of but that %  •••* W ,M e and ., Robe T Haynes of %  17" tne / nad P*"oned the there was I tone of impatience public meeting for supporting a House of Assembly concernin,; tad reproach m th' %  ause of the West Indies against nd aSBTetsion of the sL.. the calumnies and machinations It.was on the 11th of August of their enemies." This meeting of 1331 that the Colony was depassed a Resolution to establish vastated by one of the worst hurthe paper, and a subscription list ""icanes in Its history. Bishop Colewas ppentd; Mr. Thomas .1. ""Idge saw most of his wonderful Howell. the Treasurer of Barbauchievementa in multiplying dcr, was appointed Treasurer of Places of wor.hip in the Island the Fund.(i) completely destroyed, for fifteen At the court of Grand Sessions ' his newly-built Churches and in December 1926. John G. Archer, many of the older Parish Churches i white man. was indicted for the were reduced to I Tit* Barbadla mbcr Kih i-, 1 ]%  Mm i.,.,.,. r SOIh, IB2T I Thr rUrhadia Aug. T, Sept 11 4 n-'mn Nr*.i for a baby, regaidlesa of __ %  day, i-verything relapses (nso P* r cent, of it< u l to a state of ghastly chaos ond lurtty. primitive savagery; for people who For the first year there Is m> nave nobody to obey will obev difference between the sexes, -hat 'culture' themselves nnd this will, in ninety but the growth of the ccilld will means to them: the recreation of !""'' 1 *' 1 l 1 '" 1 f tested case*, prove depend slightly upon whether he eccentric and unemlurablv 1 "* catastrophic. You can really if natuially or artificially fedbunch of wit-forsaken art.? H' dl, V* nM w " the true ihe former grows more quickly recluses who think thev are men" f. drarn ""*. !*, or matheFrom the second to the nmtl tally alvanced because'thev en,ov gBtoaSL 1 .** ?i. U T"." W,, h ? h 5 yt> sir 9 wl V !" more ^ icM > sucking spiritual confectionary .n ^"i* n b " ,he axeman's job than boyVj then the process Is the days of their lives I ',, *„'Sl^VKf^' M da v "versed the girl slow, down a-leap year job whilst the service the boy rfiout* up W, Indian Cuhurc And The I'.', ,,'V ??%*&£ p ^ t "^SSu "* *— "" EW! CUTEX : NAIL POLISH IN THE AMAZING ^ft^ BOTTLED i You'll he smjuJ by ihr WsWaastnw of %  hrjuiy ol > nrcd lo wony sboui ipuliagl A iwrotaBoaan new J '-'"" "'•' %  < %  % %  righi laassga a dour io row loUuag -n nxttuuir' i nd-lookiaf nsaicsm M gonwl Uonsl "NsilTgfaaaan ust ths ngsM imuotit ilc aurscli Sfosr iogt atanaad .11 oilier poluhc'Ak tn trr dm |hi Ncwipaprr — SapIs taller than grandparentsLabourer 'Placed IV* — SO On :{-M mil h ttoud who established the right of the slave to ihe common protection ol the law. The Bishop was gradually Wining against the opposition. In October 1827, a Sunday School was started in Bridgetown for coloured children, both slave and tree, under the management of Mr. Joseph Thome, by the Blshoo and Rev. J. H. Pinder. This school was from 9.00—10.30 a.m. and S.oo—4.30 pjn., every Sunday (). This was about the first of the schools started by Bishop Coleridge, in 1825. when the Bishop arrived at Barbados there were only eight schools "And bv the end of 1834 the number had increased to 123. Thus it will be seen that a must be told t. %  realLy can, addre. m,Cf to 3 wnC^SS S^* '~ "" SSSSSr!?* S^TO rjn=^r- ffij, tn, 'Ssfi'ff^rS i hC ,ir,,UP W !" "^ PersnadeYhern'TXl „ New Research .hat ought to be christened the llev. what he thinks would be Meanwhile, quite apart from wen Indian Nation-Monger*' bemo v. Unelkial for them \„ tx-liey.u -taiisli. „l i,.,i t „rTled out to long to this very class. You can and govern them thereby; or finereai* the kind of chart you aoe n by their phraseology, illy he can govern them according * %  ''*. ehaffonging new rasogrch U, what he himuelf believes. But '* now going un in the actual U it inot icasofable to expect """ii|i lat ion of height by outUlg minds of Tom, Dick t Harrv si'lv influences. to .I2 M J ure up to lne n "" . sH* HM < MM t l lll MtH MtH I MM I H idlcled for the w erc reduced to ruins. The.tw, n %  %  .. -* u rt „i i %  > i .:—r niurder of his slave. The Jury %  terrific loss of life, whichM *- O-iWonlll UfOUa I ey don t think: they simply however, brought In a verdict of "mounted to'between three ant." R*"*' •'""'"•"tly minted phrase manslaughter. The Honerable Ren nic thousand souls. The Bishop llls w "rsliip Mr. E. A. McLeod. "'"t their brother mongers repeat Hampden. of the Council, who prewa one of the most active of the ^ ollc e Magistrate of District A' They talk the typical poUl sided as Chief Justice, sentenced Clergy in visiting the injured and ><* s, erday placed 22->ear-oldJargon, and take special delight w Archer lo a year's imprisonment, burying the dead. The 'Colonial labourer Fit/Roy Haynes of NelIhe typical forms of expreasloi Mr. Hampden was the flrsl man c, 'urch Chronicle' records— *" Street, St. Michael on u bond [o be found in the nearest text "The Bishop was to be found for %  l**''"** ,., "ew lops Mubcon.seipul> legis usually arrostod In glrU develop supply allow more wye converted into so %  Alt three to prove Us case Lloyd lold tfiem thai Blsmaik am No doubt many people will be y ,,5 nm1 boy bv 1—he time hospitals for the wounded exOreaves a watchman said thai on Hitler were more significant exwondering what all this has to do ho, '' hl ,s reached—and now ercislng the public ministration,-. c evening of August IS he saw ample. ..f the German tgfnpa* anil >""' West ndlan Culture, but I a f' ,nrs ,' %  ft,, shorten or lengthen of the Church in the open air the defendant with Ihe piece of culture than most of that nation'" 'I! be forced to condemn all such ""* !"" r *l by administration of to crowded congregations who deal board and lecognised It to romantic poets, thev will be cur. Instantly as sufferers from the "" pressed to hear the Word of God bt lhe P r pe^y of J. B. I^.lie i, prised When you assure then. ''w beauUful' complex. Those ^ ,n Ca '''"niia prombdng expeundcr the constraining power of td ' '' sk '' ,1 ,nc derendani that Wagner was once %  hil lotul ' "" l dissociate culture from „. haVl ,M ' n nao In conwnorc he was taking the board active revolutionary politician Vl u .e *rd unpleasant ideas about ""'''"K rnildren'* height by use id the defendant did not answer fl nd Byron a liberaliM soldier, thev ltai nd metaphors, and who or th}T,.ui drugs and honnonea. be astonished. When you "" l see the close connection beCertain hormones havo been twi.-n culture and statesmanship. '' w '' u 'ncrense the predlcteii hat he arhardly expect to have a culture ,ho,, gbt. and even soldiering, may height of short boys; others to in instructions until they stave their own bible of • '" < """"*e d %  politically hopec V r a the rale of growth the watchman political and philosophical Ideal s '',f ^f'j!"* ,t 1 W0l,|d 1 I ,t b •* fin p *P n tw ' hocomo over statesmen to put them into vig,' %  n h d ,hin ,,lr "• %  Indian ,a "told the court oious practice, ond soldiers to fli'Li w 'Je. "!'i^ "i'" 1 SS N ,lon VfMat-AfW 1 p.eceof board for them against the opposition of M m ^, ri u "^^^^^7*^ T H dni a,ld hormone exfloating in the Careenage and took the corresponding Idciuof other ,E£ S? solemnly from j-.i.„e„i. t„ ,,, N ro I .ooked like it had no ^S^ff^v et>SLfC Br^^fW*|J Hi, pr<>cnt Judfemcnls, and .sharlne with Ihe houseless and dtslilule the only apartment, of hi, own private' dwellinit place ., Cpl Nuni w l> orm ll >' <-hr• rvksga Ml, it ml aaasV uair Lares I""* •> Maa,a^l/-ilalansHM. nf This is the NEW Carton for VENO'S COUCH MIXTURE l lui new canon m orange and Hue contains VENO'S COUGH MIXTURE, but slihoiigli the carton it diCcrcBI the medicine inside the bonk %  the same wonderful remedy for stopping coughing macks, essiog the breathing, oietergent FonnlOu Assures LEU ENUINE WEAR l.r.HS OIL CONRtlHED MORE MILEB PER GALLON or OABOLINE IN SENSATIONAL NEW RADIO ACTIVE TRACER TUTS rtP' ,yi fi Vne of radioactive tracers from the Oak Rldrfx atomic pile—s xtarUIng now and reliablo meUiod nioaauras the wear-rod lie lug quallUea of M0B1LOIL witli new aii|er detergent formula. Radio active pi*ton rliiRa are inatalled in teat engines. "Hot' metal particle*, worn oil the ringn luto the motor oil are then ineaamod hy Oelgor countera and electronic recording device*. Compared with other high MOBILOILS allow an almost PROVE IT VOURHUI.r quality heavy duty motor oils, inbelleveRble cat in costly engine LE88 ENUINE WEAR LESS OIL OONBUMED MORE MILES PER OALLON Or OABOLINE Tor Your Next Oil Change. INSIST ON Mobiloil "The Greatest Name in Motor Oils" OARUINER AUSTIN a CO. LTD. jV>',-,-.%',..-,.,.,...,.,...,v-,-,-,-,.,.,.,.,,v>',-.--',',-.-,-,-,-.-... healthy Put These FOOD BUYS On Your Shopping List HAM SAUSAOE CIRAPES PEARS PEACHES COD BOBS OOOSEBEBBW ... „ DATES np. BOSS'S LUIS JUI0E BoU OX TONOUES 2ta Tin, CHICKEN HADDIES .. I.TILI.IT BISCUITS 1 CUP CHOCOLATE PLUM PUDD1HO TOMATOE 8AU0B . & PEANUT BUTTER MANOOECHUTNEY SAUCE OELATIRE t OOLDEN ABBOW BUM i Tins >J& l n I'M SO GLAD ITS HERE ! RUFFLETTE TAPE FOR CURTAINS: (4 SHADES) Aluminium Curtain Rods with Fitting! 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    PAK I'M MM SINDAV AflViii \ll SUNDAY. AUGUST 17, 152 Harold Webster: Pioneer Weightlifter Plays with A \ew Pain ^S \ Duclor sives 4 KtrjUht-from* K"> Without • mid-d.iy r %  Are You Scared To See Your Doctor? What Tricks ^ our Mind %  ...'. i : %  M gaSSJ -T " INVENTIONS OF THE DEVIL ,$IR b f Cummiogi UN Tfllniit I|II>I*I-S 1 lirvt mil M Sunday moirun*: .> Idle taking a walk on Ine heach, he nu casting a Ml into the at*. The thing that rtruck mr moat wiu his trong physique, hi* thigh muscle*, i something phenomenal a* compared with I velopmenl. I look tlic opportunit> to Introduce myself and asked him if the throwing of the LaasrfS nuni4n baely leas uick of food by a too-heavy i.nnm injn %  r.V. tei . . neal at night. It, ..iiMir.i He began to loae weight = rtlela could be dangerthrough, going without food, and E ous. But only to foolish people, bv overloading his stomach ha E And fnl y—in so far oa it concern* aggravated the original trouble, a time went on the pain deI not conflned to the dlmwittad. v.Joped a tendency to wake him Brilliant people, successful up at night. This made him more I men and women, are Just as tired and nervy by day and = likely as anyone else secretly to added to hi worriea. watch their imagined kllneaaaa He did not mention it to his | being nourished by gossip, by ivasst but h* dM eonflda k hearsay--e v e n by magazine league ..ijicle*. r old boy," said this I listen. Let us get the phUoswise man. There was something £ iphy of this business right. If imug about the way he gave his g my suit la a bad At, I do not start opinion, soroethin*that sug? reshaping; it myseb*. I lake it 'jested he might know more than I immediately to the tailor rehis life as an accountant Indi= %  ponsible. rated. "We all get them sooner = If my new TV set goes wrong, ,v later. OccupaUonal dl a aaje, | I right away get on the phone .on know. I got mine five years I the man who took good money tfu \ ,.u'd better join me on the HOMMTUDV COUaSSS I GENERAL CERTIFICATE of EDUCATION CAMIHIDGE SCHOOL t HIGHER SCH CERT. w*uHw\"ii..r ( i.4iu in in -I-*I*I*R. *yp>•mm. abo It* Lao U-i.f.n, Dnm > *-C.e a A 1H. • <-! ->b^ . %  *>. OMMM m. Mini %  — %  — %  1W0-31 Mrnlng. And stop worry= mnoin WKBKTKR from me for it. These men are 1 know that the sooner 1 mi Ira j : arted to take a glass m d> milk each morning. That was I __ Now wtiv do we—who as a a n-od thing. But he could not 3 u-mt> nation rush to the repair man as atop worrying. He was con^ -.. on as the ear engine pinks or nnoad now that ho had on uncer. %  the radio sat crackles so aften He told me later that he argued -^sasscd an outstanding; phytionsj, nif-nuon many other lining chamnjemme that we know in advance ibis ..ay: if I go to a doctor. 5 Harold*!, wdghtllrtlng csreei pions. u ,, wnat tne doctor is going to the quack will tell me to rest, en In If*) at the ak of HaioW has The knars of keepj^-. or or d er an operation. I eanl Xhteen and with a iody-vreiaJit "' "'<• '*>>' r *** he '; %  n d~i bave T | ie rjady Express in announcafford to iase all that time. 1 %  • „ 1m5 ^w has spoken of the .h.,11 Just have to put up with y lb* and best squat 120 lbs. "ZS'tJM !" ? !"!" — 1 !" "'JZL.-'* h, K n niotivee — such as "Who wtll it. and Increase my life lnsurI gf for the chiWrrn?" or "My ance." ,b uHH suffer"—which make So Joseph went on for another r and women keep silent afcc months, worrying, worry; luldrm Man a .wi.h of Gcnaokm Otouneat. It 1*itasuBB.aibdasl I % %  iiliiaas arm i ro M cnaa agate si dM easrf at taanafol bacHria. Yoa iU lad, mo, UMI Grnnoknr diiwt eat tut from can, abraslaat, btimn md sorei aod^aaav ukaa t he fn>wth of 0 of Ouaolai hsodf aw saaslr aaa RM SPOTS, RUNES, SUm IRRITATIONS. AIRASKWS atpthe hoy's Together andTT have l9 lbs. His heft press" was U. "ften noticed thst when he li In ba sOd best squat 120 lbs. ,h Gvm J"eryom%  tries to >tio UN Through ,nonths .if sdentiffc '"£ %  j^" n ? '?,^ l T m a 0, mcou, tralnrag his press and squat. h!< 1,RC m 7^^ P'llZ" r ', T,K tu ^i favoorvU ewrdae. unproved A / n f U1 h Lo ".( the Aianria. cannot compare with uTlghtllfting -iipMly to 200 lbs and 350 lbs reii 00 !11 lB rus duly lo vUil tn about their fear of having coo„.,.. U nUl one day his wife saw ^ and the accompanying photospteUvely. •• vl "~ tracted aomc serious ailment. htm doubled up with pain. She I graph will clearly show what It Is surprisingly interesting to [„ UMB Mr Webster realised his Well, maybe. But even such Mada him come to see me. benefit Harold derived from his %  e.uise how ih—e lifts were accom;i&* ambition by vlaitins; York, high motives boll down to this: 1 listened to I training; utlshed especially being hand!t h e home of wclghtllfttng and Selti-hness. an examuiatlon. But I did and meeting 1 John <. -appcri by sacrum trouble due to phyatcal champlc As a school boy at Lodge he was !il* football injury. uc h personalities always keen on athletics, but was It is even more surprising to ML America 1940-41 and holder of considerably handicapped in the know that Mr. Webstar ones had Mr. Universe title. He also met early stages suffering from a rupHeart Murmur., He was adSteve Stanko, Mr. America and le acdl.nt. vKed by the doctor to giyc up Mr. Universe and world champion However, he did not let this hicyele riding which he indulge*! weight lifter. Jules Bacon. Mr hamper him for due to his aptitude '" '" '"'" .'"":, ,ow l fVF r ; M "r America, Prank SpeUman. Eddie to physical culture, he performed '-/up weightllftlng he disregardHarrison, Jack Elliot. Die* rSalchell abdominal exercise? mornliu and d'he advise of the dortor and on flIld Jonnny Terpak, all rhampiot. caanuiwtion oy nis ooitor t was (( causmK onc -, near t i become • %  &.**, found that the rupture was comwc>k Thi| u one cx§mfit ot plrtelv rurrd, henev he resumcil w l f hts helping to overcome playing games. j irar t ailment. 1 could write about ,, ,. , i ... hundreds of people who suffered Harold was Interested in manj I( m 8 i mi | ar rmib |e but who were games such a.cricket, 'ootabO, ( ITI) p]-tHv rmo Irtshness. and still corrcsponu* with John Grimek and Hay Van Chse! who are personal friends. Both of them are honorary members of Palm Springs Barbell Club. Grlri I photos and u lettei ol encouragcmenl to the boys of the Clul\ SunposM) trie husband suffers send Joseph to hospital. I sent I In silence for a year and then hbi to an eye speclsluH. -lacks up. Who looks after him sfsSh, who was a most effi= Iherw Who suffers mOBf The taunt executive, had been using N wife, Of course. lh< same spectacles for the past E year*. Uncorrrdd 'TWOO ; I* about imagined lluiesa—and i ?.\ started Hie stomach trouble. I here i the doctor talking About Worry—and his quack colleague i and wives really being ad done the rest. |Q. He had not got an ulcer, and = Exactly. And why? With the new spectacles in | Well, if you iintiyine a disease Here now from no more serious = fittingly eiiuugh iOy simulate ,,m. thnt disease. An illusion beNine out of ton Imagined pep%  "omcf a near fact throuflh nai., ulcers are no more than | of the mind to %  the md is ai nrccptcd f-.rt if. Mr %  tr renson roasj draVt*sU Mow to prevent thst nervous I aailit II sounds rather formld= . hut it all ;i "-iintb to B team sad also played for the First and was Capt-''n "f the first Division Football lean He held thn Mr. Webster, who Is a salesman has to travel quite often to the indeed a sad blow to an>one ;;;7^ ur mg' iJtandS^and records for throwing the cricket who loves the sport as he does. abroad ho has visited qalte i hair, one of which still stands. After leaving school Harold coo, vhfti ... 1940-41 Mr. Webster along ber of gyms. In Dominica ...;h Ins friends. Uoyd Gibbs and *** Chares who Is comlderen tinued playing gomes. He played Michael Mayers, suited a small *l uile Bn authority on the i flrst class cricket and represented um at his father-in-law's home ' a ouisor.al friend of Hal Harpur the Island's 'B* team in football in Belleville. The space lor trainheavyweight champion of Jamaica as goal keeper around 1940-41 ing was so limited that particular Mr Webster bad the pleasure of .are had to be taken not lo raise f**j n # Jhis giant Press Wl lbs. and each other on the bars while ex" %  • feUed with 312 lbs. Harper It was around l39 that Harold ,. rr l*ing I remember tnat place also Is an honorary member of took up i-oTing seriously. It was v ery well for It was on those <" n bpnngs Club. He has met his intention to turn pi ofesslonal. grounds that my weighOlfting rnany l ou 5J2-JSr Ived rnoM 'i hii trainlnf career began. tnm Ben Kastman Al Brown and .... L„ „. one of the ttrsi paW v ?VK^w^Bt h^Tearnl He has already sfarted 1 arsons in the Island to start was <> ^J* J? •& '-" on exerciriri Bob and Sonia underwater diving and spearing %  !" 1 doal nbout ,ne B mp ran be seen regularly training on i Is only 18 the gyms in Gr Antigua. Club visited thai ada, St. Lucia and DEPARTMENT OT DEBUNKING essaaBy aiii/hsg at Teausg atvss. • MANY 11 as irj waaassi aeBere Uaat af ttses se. Mate uv. fa ben ttsan l. be Stall rur^d by saeaii raarhrr *** %  shape afi eaotad%  praoM. -Uabbtah. •TU.E. taj a sassy taatt tf a see ar afaMMBB ilia h a n l staisaa oMitttranft • aVMCB %  waaaasa asat trightaas an <* %  hnae !" Ua a aaaeesasa saaahar, •i f issssar i aaaa uwn tbc rbiis -k* rsaea seass wlPj have a thai harr-llp KabbUh. ... .isiU to Solomon'.s Gym jari it was through 'Solo' that he learnt great deal about the game Ash after H was introduced b> When Mr. Solomon left the afternoons, Linda wr* Whiskers Ulake. the wrestler. I i s |, n d to take up studies in Cannmnths old Ottn takes up tfie 5 ibei quite well the hue wt Harold made every effort to lb. weight. They are under hi* of ish he used to bring xtend his club so at to accommoeTcperl supervision. Certainly ., ashore. ilate the majority of 'Solo's' boys welghtliftlng family. Harold soon found out that the SPRINGS BARBtsSTcLDB .^JKft!?, Mr, w ( W u't* 1 uL fU 'S e %  did not in any S ,. ambition to which he replied: "My help 1.1. physical developSince the club's Inception, many ambition is to see^raore youngsterway mSt-Mt'ou eVdidkeWnhn.mprovernenU have been made %  ntore.ted lp ,developing their 5 A -tr ji riSfs % at ivrJSjesA ^ vSa %S< b £$\ fico hand exercises. Asking Klin I cour-.rt J2*"*££S* UX"& cornand -he r would m I if he derived any benefit from this, he replied Apart from the fact that It incio.i.sed my* appetite .--lightly duo to increased circulation. I tan only consider It a first class course for gJrH I agree with that statement whole hcartcdly. .•r of the gym. Seeing the damann far even more room, Harold madi arrangements to rent a large portion of land adjacent to the club. Palm Springs Barbell Club owned and operated by Mr. Har,ld Webster now stands on approx%  mately half an acre of land, Is It is iiiterestlng to note thai .ifter .quipped with several thousand having been K.O.'d in boxing he pounds of weights, including. thai to become a parallel bars, iron boots, pulleys hatnpton In any sport strssnrth pqutt stands. Incline boards and •ry ao he decided to lma a a membership of over seventy ; rove his development. He was Ingrhwh inrludes Basil Grant Mr tioduced to we^ghtlifUng by Mr. Uarbados 1951 and John Marshall. Uoyd Glbbs. who at that time Mr Barbado s Jnr. 19 M, not to • igcr d pleasure from feeing how much itlrohol they can consume and how many cbjarettes they cai fcmoke. It seems to me that these misguided youngster's think tha* this makes them men, but a man iono who can rests! nsen Umtpla tioos and t given of this weightltfter.v -tiong determination and worthy example? >r another, good or bad, ynu Spiritual readjustment.'" A doc%  efuse to take your pains Into the tor can give you reassurance, ight of the doctor's consultingbut you must do tho rest, oon, you breed tho Hist fears. Think of it tin-; \ And those fears feed on afraid of something. That fear ecrecy. They flourish on gossip reuses the nervous dyspepsia, sfgr tea, on old wives* tales. Tn aotkiota 1-^ pence of rn ind. It is easy to imagine that every Go up to your fear and look ph'llrt. stomach pain denotes an ulcer, al It, Fear itself la .. fearful that a twinge in the cheat is thing: It swiftly retreats. And symptomatic of tuberculosis or you stuWenly realise that you u.*eased hsaut >ve been afraid or nothing at Let 111.' tell you abOUt B palienl all. • f mine. I'll have to tall It Let me shatter one more hackwarda as I pieced il together I vourite illusion nf man and -shin_on %  v.hen he eventually came to women who seem to accept 4ee me. saloon-bar advice before going Joseph B early 10V to a doctor. As a working director in a firm You don't always feel pain J %  %  "M.-.I" -^-_ M ^r~s.. offers %  raZS ha, life is full where the trouble „. If you^'^JS-.^Srt, SrE • r^the^y^ ha lurns oft ut£ a town cousin o. n-ill return to ihls poitit in e next article — unless you're seared even to read The find sign of trouble thai 'vM-ph noticed was .1 discomfort Jter food. Ho felt a ;in ju^t •ilw)ve the waistband of the Its round neckline ermine. HAKTNELI. also shows something of this top-heavy look. Boxy j.ukets, self-styled "looM.--Uiru{ and shapeless/', arc undeniably irf with straight skirts. They re trimmed on collar, buttons, ad boll with black. His inollned evening gowns are t. Starred is a black %  Uet crinoline, and lime yellow ivercoat" with fitted velvet .dice and tulle skirt PETER RUSSELL a countryman ... !" and hred, and a huntbY .hootln' type, is fond f country clothes, invnrl..blv shows tweed dresses and pain jackets impeccably tailored ^for the doctor. use of this he started u> —I..E.S. Urn! Eleven Offer The Big Look I 1. in rase 1 .. Viciorhin lady's riding; habit. It tailored, has rounded 1 ger-than-average pep.1 sty front and inverted %  the, back. "Hug-mc-tight" jacket, part stole, part bolero, is Russell's suggestion for evening. Close-flttuig at the back, its fronts are elongated, bands of seal. Coats have pyramid H r.d cross over to tie in an enorcoliars emphasised with fur trimmoua bow on the waist. Starred mines. But on dresses, Sheraml | n his collection Is a black paper has maintained the %  roundiiea* of luffcta dinner dress worn with bJ ilyUne" of last season. green ssUn "husj-me-tighf Starred in his collection h> a m statistics are worth noting white velvet evening dress simpliSS yards round the hem, the skin Ity itself, cut on princess lines. tvaji sown In 150 sections so that Mi ONLY 7t A DAY O l l ll l ll l ll IIMIH I MHHI THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LTD. While Park Road. Bridgetown ENGINEERS, BRASS and IRON FOUNDERS Works contain modern appliances lor the execution ot first-class work ol all kinds, and especially to SUGAR MACHINERY and STEAMSHIPS Dealers in AGRICULTURAL MACHINERY and GENERAL ENGINE ROOM STORES of all Description IRRIGATION PROJECTS, PUMPING EQUIPMENT and ELECTRICAL INSTALLATIONS A SPECIALTY For Satisfaction, Quality and Service Contact THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LTD. Phone: 4546, 4650 Workshop Phone 4528 Stores Dept: fceaaae*e>aesoseeeoe.o.oa>eaeosaeaa>aasa>>as* Oon || <•ckta.ll suit m gold i.ime dobnan edged with mink. MICHAEL SHKRARI) shows ikets with deep batwlng bleeves from arm hole to waist. -.. (eras are trimmed with brood with fitted waist and full skirt: ,1 rippled with every movement. f?fi VACATION rivn couvrniKs Tonighl.* Be, His lustne• DwanvGirl ROBERTS & CO., Playing Cards 48c. Canasta Sets YOUR STATIONERS hair, nit ti coiol MIU ". +>*" "" %  - % % %  ••f ^ J -? e %  —* %  p-]^the-&ttvmt c-vl-isg SHAMPOO JUST III I III i It SIMMONS BEDSTEADS 4 F-t t. BS9ISSJ ONI.l \ IIMITH11JI \\1M SO




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    ESTABLISHED 1895 BARBADO' AllAvST 17. 1S2 PRICE I SIX CENTS FLOODS DROWN 3 SCOUTS IN ENGLAND Villages Cut Off 1,000 Homeless LONDOIN. August 16. FLOODS from freak summer Storms KTOM smith and southwest England in the last 24 hours loft death and devastation io-dav i" %  Bxmoore districts ot Devon and Somer• %  Three boy scouts were drowned when their camp on shore of the River Bray was washed away when the banks broke. Another hoy is reported missing. The police said that ituation is so confused tht; we can't confirm the five missing yet". The twin Devon-Bristol ehai if Lynmouth and Lynton were cut off from road contact and then devastated. About 1,000 wore htHIHiBSS Chinese General Charged With P/nbejszling $25m 11> KOBIRT PREKTOTT. Mill IHIIXVS UAHII S.ii.1.. home of the famous midget ponies i exported all over the children*! pet*) to build on emergency bridge acmes the Hivei, Lyre to get help to 2.1W0 ed. An offtctal •aid; "I have, navar %  81 Bombing has nothing i Floods nearly submerged sevoali West Em! rtar vmleni rainstorms last night. %  I miles from llfraeomb-' "complete devastation" in |he village At toaat two paopla Had been drat s %  %  . and cattle. Thy body of one ot %  Hood waters from the 11 envoloped their lent a today. Firemen wen pottoa in search for "'hers. About 50 nOUSS Somerset were swamped when n "solid wall of water* 1 b i OB the village from surrounding hllU. The centre of the villas* wa under water. were culled to rescue resident-, through their l>edroom windows and DOBOp dry. The local hotel, crowded with visitors, wm flooded to a depth of four and %  ball Floodwatcrs from tba rival Barlfl invnded part* of Duhrerton also In WJltj lire brigade headquarters reporte %  < uUi i R by Lightning i The accident wa witnessed by hundred1 of people, I PY. Aug. It I Hsral nursed with ng S25.000.000 said 01, m giro wm Irani bin rkm after sot 'falls to M border when Generalising Kal Shah's governtba huge shortage in BklUtai Id he "was and that "he will never l American AcneKellcy. .11 .. and Olivet K i both Un. aai Qiinasa I %  •••merit officer and IT freed soon. He said view that G'lW'Ml%  %  ; of funds which its representatives %  ; am sure we will be able to [amain which has granted me a >ium." %  I In the duaty iiiej Genei Ace with They have been held • start of extradition proceedings by tha l I %  %  II •Span I, another i Cortag Palace here. ant Mi charg* of fflecase. Manuel Roaales, said there was "no hurng. Ha said l be bald under guard until the federal Judge hears formal declarations and decides to grant ball. Imitted ha bad a certain amount of the money in a "safe place. Ha said oe would be willing to return it to the Chinese people but not to Chiang United States Embassy'official] said they are following the case closely to ensure the welfare of the two Americans, but could not In He) %  m u %  r.p. Philip's AlBHfeODSe which WBS • Blft donated l.y Mrs. T. B Smith. Ii e*o chatting egta Hi-. Exrallracy the Oovtmoi air Alfred BavAKe Idow of the 1stMr Pailiaireiil T/> Exumine Slalms Of Pksliraa' Gavt. Athena, Aug. 18. Parliament will meet in a special session on Monday to dagarmine the Status of Premier Nicholas Plastlra's coidi: ernment Two Deputtsi of Vtea Praanlei 1. : %  J I'.ut. Ihi* week announet-d the with:lTawal of their support of the Qoveransent, INPO tBdapandctfi Deputies on Friday declared their allegiance to Plastlras. Reports were circulated that other defections In party alignment were in the making. If the Government es the vote of confidence next eck. new elections will be called a ni>n-party Government could -..k i..irliumcntary siiiipurt. Communists Held By Egyptian Police ISitii Bay* irths I '..i-;..:iii I Swallows Sleeping Pills CAIRO. AUKIISI 11 EGYPTIAN POLICE innounced they hid in Communisl cell and urrosttd \<-r wnrVcrs i. t stud.'in t. r %  CiinimunisI :i' nvili s in llu%  Polio acti i in Lnqufrv atiendi-d l>v llu.-i.scin :-y„]S. i .lo.M,nis..v.rth,. ,.,!,, nid the Cairo City Police Commandant. The Eayplimi BoHnm ,,, h „. HOL1 rv Ol Prlno AJj Khan i I %  %  Hasrarorth %  %  %  I hall r*ai old < i i %  %  pronoaal %  %  %  | on Satun i, i i M. Irltaln coni, Iran. 1 nitn ihe AngloI %  that iiriLiin sroul I o) : n hm • in. :. %  1 P U.S. >\ ill Consider Japanese I'arole \|i|Iieaiiinis eek set up a "Stale t.iry Department" to combat "imrruinist and Zionist activities .ind an "Anti-spying m I replace the special branch ol pi I lineal police recei i %  ill with a*l in-. I nil A special milltaij court livm, out IS dti'i the • %  • was pumped ^ ugoslavia Aeeu>st s Uidgaria Of Infiltrating Spies Yxttrmmvtn '-^*Wrmii lly ctirKt Bulgaria to-day with inllltrating Ogsaiolsa underground bands to overthrow the Tit< regtane, lielrade radio said. Tha Yugoslav Foreign Ministry said"such activities of Bulgarian ornlcaoi m are MtbJnf bM •> >v1 form of aggressive DOUoy but JtnOUtl) threatens peace ind sacurlty of the Batsntni and the world at large." A COB* of note was sen! to tinI'uitcii Nations flai rilaii General Trygvla Lie. it narrataa i leged cases of intUlratxrn of Utilitarian spies and diversionlsts Into Kuitoslavia l>etween Arlrll 30th nd the end of July.—1'.P. I \lis*itn> Mil* iv-i. ii-iiiui me vmted siavei—: "jp.-r 1 -—"' %  T*v; :; *" I .. ...nsfdar -ppik-atlon, pr.]*&**• '"' conf.rm.Uon yes/> //V s WV // J <, //„//,/ -ented by the Japniuse a.>vernM U?"'* .__.. „,.„ ^.,. i ...„ Heat Wave In Italy ROME, Aug 18. • More than ISO i%  treated in Pahnero bosplt n.r i. %  n %  ;. potaonln holldav' • • %  %  lerday market' to boUds ust Bankholiday. The yaar*i in. recorded at Bologna toItlt degreet F.ihrcnhcil —U.P. DECOY REDS WITH DUCK TRAP A BHKK-r then lives. It was the eighth time in five days the Reds hove tried vainly t- wrest the strategic western frmt height from grimly determined marines The hill is only flve miles east ol Panmunjom. Five bundled Communists spear'headed by %  platoon }ui I iltl) after mldnlaM under cover of a tl i . ., rate. j But as the I U : bodlai ->f I'ommunl't' kiile.1 m prevleau aaaaulti Marii i tunied Riant searchlich' and Circling Allied planes dropped % %  %  No lied JetS United S> I pilots ha. rth straisjht nflG %  1 v i i .''. i Mrrorei g] two nghtarcomb' i week to Red ground Are and one B2S iivfit bOBabcr was lost to %  AJrJ Btj destroy. i Brlflati .-..I ii %  H M B were iwat in nonbattle m %  llf> & el Pyongyang %  < %  air raid was coming, U-" the alert wits .uiply areas. I PR1 Thunderje*-'ed a Communisl aa < :i tii the Japanese cmbUK ;.'"" Mustafa Khamis. SO year OW l-xpreaaed hope on Thin*!* i workern l. ;, of % %  I an i api ii,. *antD %  Imposed on Jap.i the International Mililar Two IOCAI police chief* have IKM-II suspended from duty by or-1 NsTW DELHI, Aug. IS. 'der of l*re in. i Ah Mahar as m'-ll-l A Japanese Parliamentarj tan dovernor fieneral of Vsypl ' "" Saturday foil, wine the .lnt< They areVM Council of Agrlrtntendi nl Nasman El Ahi ulture H. (if the K-.ft Kl Ilawai I' I • and Colonel s.ieh Khafegy, Inspector of P Bel are p covmos wl j P; Typhoon Strikes Okinawa Island AllieH *ra Inn Ifarwsters's Strike Likely CHICAGO, Auc .-.like threat lo mod i atUinal ^aIeslers• huge In* atnptra and parklnghi .died a strategy nsM tcduruas stalled contract DSfStl *i. -i reeg • .illation* with thi pa. kinj; companl'-j •rtsten have dragged on for a week with no progress —f.P. TOKYO. Aug. IS. Typhoon mraanilnft .1*10** the Pacific at more than loo n ties how IIII|H- %  Trlhu,l Okinawa yasterdaj, eau jpii other ten-lye damage, United Stale* ^rf-. ii xrunand nud bora tod I'.iDomaMnd'l report rontra1 dieted an earlier statement by tha Far East Air Porcr whn Ii as %  i the damage : i %  %  I message the delegation .vili cherl %  tesult II%  1 f. (fiinlner. GaUe W ill Qo-ftcr HOD \ WOOD iug. Iti. n romanti i.inn. i% it i i n r i dJreetlns an i S \ i t ( ,ber 1 to The Ii .imii urnu II .. ir>.()00 mills dining the shooting. Hi. Ii i kartoa rtlmed U i in AfriM< rambe Aftei Dnlshlng "Vaquara i lion and j.nn crooner Frank Sinatra III Ni *rlll full I a singlm. lly linim: up I Gardni i %  i month Buropi i i —i r Mtii.oriul Public Met lin^s Hanned Mbro Biuditfl !*c|icl|. il On JoloIs* %  I Plltpii n I % % %  i ick in UghUni on Jolu 1 II' i-uagmg from three lo I mom with four dguns) roosa, a I aMes or %  been ini|%  %  ml beu a nurse's duty r'ioi'i and four %  i.iilhan. Private -t by the Chair. man of til sv. at V. \ r of at Philip MD I) U %  bom one of the little gul< Who will live in the new %  srd, %  i i raaeoSad itoni srlth % %  N I; Daysb. 1 • i I d thanks b> Mra s riift. Mr. K My <>n behalf of %  -nth Rao II V Armstrong •aid a short prayer and bleiswd i' b Lady i nsd tbo llUllillllg The t, >v< rnoi and Uuly Savage, I Hutson. PJtO of BM parish, MIM af. E. Uyer. Mai Philip 1 .. ihe Churchwarden Ihea uupacted 'Inw.ud laidy Savage before declaring -..ild: that my husband and I acvtyl.-( opening this %  %  %  r.i.l.' posMiile by the public of MM Rvelyiui a among %  %  family ha\. %  are, and wm Mr Day*'* %  %  rngised i"n wilt bet M Matnm 1 tinAl >s tln.illv %  %  %  i Ing dona %  -v Mi I > i i.v w Bt Phinp, Sf On paie IS. HAVANA, Aug. Iti* mlnda refue i aotl -' %  %  i nf. 'h'.ugii bulldin i,. ni u troyed TinI>,,I a pasead 'u mtun wcat of Ottlnaw ai M r blgaa t bombi about 3IKI mile Weather expettl %  tut moat "f Jap... midnight I r 14 Grenadtf Gets Gold Storage Plant i.... ., DOaCJHICA, Aug. u. Fir* frului In Ihe Col.-uial !> %  iration were ap%  h.i the D.c poned a cold Ste ii-lteving a year's old shortage of by providing I I %  SM t— t. a hj bruetioa, nber, thi ( %  nghtmg I I %  %  i %  i %  meet ad I al %  i %  i aa order that] ... N*H (ioirmeiii In \fosrou Rstpers MOSCOW. Aug. Ifl %  it comment on the pup %  xl nf the Soviet note ,• Austria to MM Ihrei WavtSfB j —________ powerThe text ar.pcnrM In, UM %  n .,, "MIIII.I \-K> I or Ministry It gave Bovh %  • %  _. rat a I news that then lol'C l l>rei<:il I I ,llc l notl 1 March 13 ~ I 7-vi,r i.l.l Ii T'ilw.1 i t-y ur-oifi II. I IIM I Chinese EMalili^l? tfj not mention the aacond lenundei of Augur' 11 c.r. Hie \\a\ Is Qpen WASHINGTON. Aug. IS %  %  tues aft "i %  %  1 %  %  Pi %  %  %  mtry. -IP i \i %  I mist puppai P m chen Lama aKHumed the admin^. — i...v Pan ben l %  %  %  blgaoM fnim which %  . Chlua in I92S followim; tl ,i,. _en ., The pn • i i was brought l>e' ;i tl %  ' 0 lenlor Chii.I I %  munist Oei in Tibet. IT 6 Terrorists killed SINGAPORE. AUK 1* raptured and ona wounded when %  %  %  rrid > %  %  %  K K Ch %  I ... %  M Vrir% Maty Seize Power Ii: Lebaaoa %  < i. KAf.grQH Makers ol ftsj WORLD'S CHAMPION CYCLE You are on a WINNER when you ride a Raleigh! A Raleigh wi the dsaki A.I V rt*n, lujMUnt, ^WM. .VMM. >M J^>rf. < \\ v r:, BHEPm in) & co, i.ri> \". 11. 12 & II



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    SUNDAY, AM.1ST It. 1K2 -I NUAV VDVUCATK r-vi.i. MM Liverpool's Little West Indies By PALL FOSTER "Advocate" Staff Reporter, n-. v on "Exchange" Scholarship tf. England. The City of Liverpool ha* a population of 800.000 and It u estimated that 18.000 of these a,o migTanta froaMfrica. West Indira, China, India. a\rabw. Malaya UMl to a less.r extent, a f;w othei countries. Of this number the majority are An-lcans, We-u i..dlans and Chine*' follow in fh,t order. Neither the Colonial (jflke n^r tae Horn* OfflosKeep any NII•rate record of the law nuftv berof migrants who arrive .rt Uverpooi from the West |ndi-f and Africa. No exact figures can be given, for. as British subjec's they travel on British purports It is similarly difficult to estimate the number of Jtmattaine. Barbadians etc.. who have .settled In this city. During the years immediately following the war, ships brought a large number of "free travellers" to Britain. Iti 1048, 132 landed In Liverpool, but the number* dropped to 08 In 1949 and in 1950 the gross total of stowaways Into the whole of the country was Only 423 and only ;, fraction rt these came tp Liverpool. Last >aai, the country's illegal entrant,' numbered 170. There for* It can be raid that the majority of these people ere migrants and not stowawnvs. Most of the coloured colon M I workers of the city live in the Upper Parliament Street area, in this street and its surround in gs. a growing popu'ntinn is springing up. It is said that their housing h> Archie ha> a 22-year-old ,f |fr>I da or Barbados) at present In Knglmd—a law student at Urge Newcastle. One day, Archie hope* to return to Barbados. OTHER FATS AND OIL II %  hi O.I %  •.ilm it% i OQMOMBtl I* the club. 1 Bk i to e Yard, a 33-year-old ItaiP'rents livo .,.. low I. two bi others at living il! li>un< ai it ik generally %  the coconut palm and I HI* to West Africa The oUectic. i of the fruit and the ex:. %  s/htre the Palm occurs in a MUlTN Michael. He ha* Authorities think that tht atlfthree titters sown palm exists .<: the Congo with Majarla I Livingstone came to KngLmd second L*en* sheet h or In clu iman avev ilnoi stfi lh< %  *' old caiiMvaltori %  bta boyI' parti <>f F... ..!, n.,. At -1. %  in<,.,,, .ii. i,, g*fg sl*en ina nsrVf hitherto pras/antad DI Bandow" (bocaui • isWssrtaoa lo sgn . %  i ij p-ure) m ft -in Mt — %  wots4UsisBlm occui %  his n ; .me to hi* friend-. '" K *'"' r.goo hut this ur .is thought unlikely lo i'i saving home and for a • source of MISSl) M bori time af,er arriving in Eiig-B>''" el his fund at b0Xbsg.|P M W V Aftu-.ih. K [1 I'HU Threr West Indians stop for a chat along Upper Parliament BUset. Liverpool Conditions are not good, ^u' then, neither are the condition?; of their fellow English v th' general housing aha When I rlattad the home of Barbadian worker who lives oi this street, I found that as regards cleanliness the rooms were kept haft as well a< other houses I vssnsd tenanted by English people IT, ;( higher InconM br a c k a t This however i< not a typical example of the general conditions in this area, but then the houses of their fellow workers, born in this country are no better. Liverpool is in swcral ways however, endeavouring to help the colonial workers who migrate tfl infoi nution that l it coming over II often obtained and a letter of welcome and un explanation of condition*, here Benl before he leaves home. All ship i planes on which students are known to I • %  TO met Friendly .. vice and help If given to the new arrivals. They are introduced I • local families and, later 0B, bol days are arranged for them. p. Dan leaving bivorpo< I, 1 took tough Upper parliament Street Stanley House sTH DjM Vel open, so Instead my tlrst atop was "George Wl'lctes Club." wh|c. ii a few yard* from the Ulal'<> Cinema on Parliament Street* .. *pot well known to any West Ir>ulnn seaman who DM Liverpool. George Wdkie is peril .p* tinbest know ,n Liverpool. Born in British Guiana rt Barbados parentage, George now IM Upper Parliament Street, and. it 1* the ggtstral a Barbadian who livss in Liverpool, meeting placV for most of the rolour.-d folk in Liverpool. He w.ilog about a year ago o-i i visit. Carte* Plai n havi no children. fSssI In Burnatra, Java, Cochin Asked What he thought about China Hid M:.l.,v., MgOJ %  najtand, Van) raalM w tocogailaed and brea d ...up .iints "FmhUllg you ar>ing work has been undertaken willing tr. work vou will get <>n with g view to living the beat types He also hopes to return home on The question whether il ware t*-t a visit one day. ter I" grow the palms in large _ .. ,, plantations or on native mvned loaJM otlie. Uarbadiaiu. Uving flt w in l.iv.rpool are Basil aMats>, |„. cantruver.1,.1 QDe With ll %  • ^llcy and Hilbon, Gay. COCOBUI Wall eatabUsluM In UlC Skeete who u 33 eome torn We i M Nelson Street. He Imarried With may have little Interest for Ui, thtaa ChlMraB. He u a litter .it although it may conceivably prov • Camerlairds Shipping Yards, Bir.;P valuable economic addition In enhead. Head.ey is from Chri 1 neighbouring conlinetiul tern'.n Church while Gay's home is m las ••.> re the coconut Dunluw Lane, St. Michael. Gay is seems unlikely to thrive. Salad single, at present unemployed and strains have been introduced into drawing £2. 8. 6. a week. National British Guiana and experiment.:) Asslstai da Allowance. He has been results are promising. Laboui LIVINGSTONE YARD, AN BNOLUH YOUTH (left) and two West Indum tioys walk along •Upper Parliament Street, Liverpool. England and arttk In H i tl By aMnstins colonial stu* (lent? who eoma t<< studv M lb UIllVCl Stan ev House on Upper Purstreet which o]>erated M Social centre during the war i'i I the immediate post-war yia.s n-'i|>encd last month. C. W. Mohhs***, a 4u-y<' i -old | has been appointed \S Stanley House after eight years work at the British Coun.il Already a gymna'ium is being it'.td up nt fhelr headqu %  they have a cricket Held in number part of the eity. I understand that It is hoped to g "t Hi UM Lamm established in The Bald Of competitive spo.-t in Liverpool Boys Clubs, affl i-fd to the Liverpool Boys' AssoclaIso to be attempted. plan is the provrlon "f residential accommodation at StantlQ % %  '. whenstuOV i RU| live while training In Liverpool. or where coloured migrants may become aCcligaatLscd to thetr new %  niiitrv. There is u)-u .-\ I he city. ih Liverpool Committee of the K*it IBd West rriendshi] CouncQ, whose represcntaiives welcome every Colonial and Eastern tUdent. Bv keeoing in touch with the university, the Mritl-ri Council and the paitport offices, advance in England since 1MB. It Is difficult to get a gener.il picture as to what a Went Indian worker thinks about conditions in England. Each has a differed answer. Some like Wilkie, llu-uands und Yard have ralaUeata a i complaints, while others, such as Philip Noel a native of Trinid l. do not advocate West Indi-n %  coming to this country to settl-. Noel says "tell the boys to rial at home—don't come to England Noel has been in England "ine the war and is learning in b i dtsaastaar. While transportation i^ xpemlve Noel hopes to return U cine of ti.s right h.md men e Husband %  rhO, "l.en I asked htm where he came from said in a broad Baioadian aeeanl Han I la a Welshmun." Archie, who h;.s been livm in EngUnil foi 4n year -iwojiai allegiance" to Wales. "I'va baan up here through all the hard umes." he told me. "But I've got in* homeland within few collecting and handling may be problem since the fruit bunch. or 'hends' do not lend thc-n-clv< to the comparatively easy methods <>t the roeonut, arc more easih damaged with pradudlcla] anal tl %  w\ the quality of the *1 due i fermentntion and raactctttj In this ciniin ftum too native inetlnxl of handling and oil extracting vai i with consequent lack of inwOtn itv in the tliuil product Tha liuit bunches vary frOgfl I few pounds in weight to as much as ISO lb, the individual fiui! also vary in sine and. In some nBBaota, raaansblB the olive. Tin productl are two' (I) palm mi from mo outer Baahj pulp or pen. i l (I kernel oil fnnn the kei i.v eolun Of the (Wo but grnenilly of bight when I'm qualified in mv Job." !>,: %  ,...ally I'm inclined to .,,.. .„ -' I bOJ Itaj il rtoww iu(t | llv The former has to be West Indians In any walk of Ufa Inu .,^t ,„, ih,. h p„, on d, sine have a happier existence thai then „ a l( „ ml ll( .„| n f fiuo, inurparu in Out eoun .,,.,,,,... m Inr pu | Pi w m e difiictii trj oven taking into conild.M(,,.„ ,. xl> t Modern machines at Britain n* a "welfare state"' n ,, w a\ .nlable for the rurpnai Tl handing out National Assistance. v.: A BLOCK OF PLATS on Upper Rial to Cinem where many W'. ] fibrous residue has littb valu I hiaVtad kernels ni-e usually ex i ortad for aniihJni and iraatraat %  n inoHern mills, the .ll thus ev traetad ("'nig of high stnndai I quaUt] The residue Is used as a feeding stuff Much palm oil. that i.s ttic MO <"l. is CO) Africa as food. Il Is, or 001 • TI unportanl export and use I principally In the manufacture oi \oap and eandlesi n.s well as in a bar tvaya whan Quality is noi \ltnj. The kernel oil. like that o. the coconut, la used In food products, but Unprovaroanl in ti km and qualfty of TO puli oil makes It equally valuabla lot margarine and DOOkJng fats. Botl> : kernd ml tl I eoinmodtUaa In world b industry, eHpeeiallv F. with more n I'age III LOOK ^ x IE EL **" IN A FINE READY-MADE SUIT GENTS' SUITS in Worsteds, Tropicals, Tweeds and Linens Full American Drspe Style • SPORTS JACKETS 2 and 3 Baton Styles, with Patch Pockets in Brown. Blue. Grey and Fawn Prices from tIK 511 up • TKOl'SERS in Worsted. Grev Flannel, I.inen, White and Khaki Drill • DRESSING GOWNS in Flowered Designs and Plain Colour* TOWELLING BATH ROBES in Checked and Striped Patterns We are the Sole Stockists, locally for the Famous K SHOE HARRISON'S Broad St. BEGIN WITH COOL GARMENTS! GENTS' COTTON SPORTS SHIRTS of very light texture lor this warm weather made by Brewster Shirt Co. of New York, with short sleeves in shades of White, Blue, Grey. Sand, Tan, Bamboo, sizes Small, Med, & Med. Large w $5 48 cach I.ASTEX BATH PANTS n shades of Royal & Navy. SUM Small, Med J^g4 p<. r pair AFTER A COOL PLUNGE-WEAR A COOL SHIRT GENTS' LEATHER BELTS by llickok si New York, Pure leather, priced from 2.l t" UM each VIYEI.LA ANKLE SOCKS with turn over ton and elastic Tops in white for Sports wear sizes 10 to ll'z ins ( pi $l.K.'l & $1.73 Pair SEA ISLAND COTTON PYJAMAS with piped collars in shades of Grey, Blue, Cream sizes 38 to 44 ins. '• %  $16.46 suit. SEA ISLAND SPORT SHIRTS short sle.ves in white only. Sizes small & med S6 74 each CAVE SHEPHERD & CO., LTD. baami %  Us! • il palm ban been int %  do the bast Indies and || I %  t hu ceasing bnnorUnea In thel m %  "" h l %  tlon as a planiali.^t ,,.., MM iney live *. aa; this Introductorj m k Arc you pmiwd for your soups ? P BBea i"jp uh Bsvowf V-iii reaM, if \ou had asm !•• .p-rt. obuin h Basaj p icr and %  • dO i tat*I.IN hens* B*am I Miuf aoi till 111 Ml Un lour aaapk <: AND H < 22 > BOMBAY I tAr j/p# tjfa yr/r/ A M, people *bo appn-i ,*t* as*d |...I kam that Ua & lames have dm %  uprrmc Worrc.dt SS1MI I rt ft P*tnnasn kpi I %  Utg KUI ih^m>iilti>r LEA&PERRINS (/At ( %  / /' /////// ///((/i/r/t////tf WORCESTfRSHIRt SAUCE -. PH0SFERINE for extra VITALITY Wherever you are, ahaiever you do, you will find PHOSI-ERINE a iplendid ionic. Keep a waichful eye for itigns of oventrain — and nuke good u* of PHOSFERINB /mf { for more CONFIDENCE Hy Uking PHOSI I KIMu+*m*t fnl ihi unit and i help lo illnctt und Il.ll'll. %  .lliil of lift rou J r i : .H .infor a better APPETITE Aa esrly iign of lowered vnslKy n lost of sppeuir . %  ngn thai rou oeedPHOSH-KINH If will help rou cai better — snd you will ilecp better for GHLATER STAMINA As you take PHOM fcRlNIi youll begin ti> feel really retourvc/ul m iace of diUkuluei. You'll have more %  lamina, feel altogether heru-r. •.vsilable in laquid or Tablet lonn. 10 drops equal i Tablen. THE BREATE8T OF *LL TONICS IT'S GOOD TO SEE THE FAMILIAR FACE OF MARTELL C&opuic BRANDY ION6 OK SHORT" THE PERFECT COMPANION AGENTS: STANSFELD, SCOT! 1 CO.. LTD. BRIDfifTOWN YOUR DRUGGIST One at the Big 4 in HEALING !! Along with your doctor, your dentist aod the registered nursing profession, your rhanaaclst U dedicated to the rheerful Uxk of keeping ysu well. avar well your doctor may prescribe, however well you nuiaa may atsand, lb. the careful, accurate dispensing of >*ur DraeiUt thai eeunle. We csrry a staff of qualltlcd Druggists that are always willing and ready to compound your prescriptions day and night. KNIGHT'S DRUG STORES.



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    PAGI TWO ~i Mill \OVOCATE M SliAV. AUGUST 1?. IsSi 6f PREPARED for Ml] rin. njMM/. Aluax ItCsM %  Knltlr MAGI i HEALING OIL in MM home. Ceo it for C II i -. flruiso Mr:iiii:*iid Sprain-.. Take ii for told*. Coughs. Cilii. S.. t iThroiii. I is vnur first aid kit in %  bolllt. m $ T: BBM i :; i.\ H J VYUAI IM.Mi %  SHr-ks, i, w. AI gi it -. I-.HI. ,n Saturday. ::ou> Aui. IS5: Ma.l. I., t .1-... ONI... and till II..he.I.. "Non, Non" To Shorts gahib Calling At the Matisse Chapel g LAN ri [AM in b< i %  and iridcscont p %  lOfWetl gad <>u' "i tl.< ieat da*. aaa lending to (hi The &^ r/AMM4W'4M' l V'///A: Glands .Made Active and -Youthful Vigour Restored in 24 Hours Arra-ricon Doctor's Diicovary Strengthens Blood, Norvo), Body, Memory, train, Moiclei, and Endurance—B-etter Than Oland Operation!. Tn.nln to IM fliKo.tr. •! %  > Amtrir.r. rv>;iot ti M n wiM < tar ihaaa .H•t. P'r*H U |. M. >.n. .r..: % %  "-"•"I"> • %  M'l**** afU. W> UvfBl •> ', : S!MM*! ES '"* -.MMlld H> St uo IMfM %  '* •" • %  ••UK]' 10 tn)a ll,i .•-" *'* U —<•-• Iraw u •( V-far and UanrMtafl, ___,J rolloto „. E •" % % % %  IS >u %  -.hi i. • iid %  *,.! %  ••it. >HHH id iiiMalir >••• vu an I%  •U.T..1Mm tmiMiii • ft. di(* and )••" B^d Oiat ic-ar *l*Mt M rtMered So at. in %  Ml Hiif Mt. r-" %  Bod (Ml •> • u ••> %  .!". a Y.U .II feMMvevA^t Ml P*Xf* %  %  *•• -lata.i ""•. Dura a TV I Mr?.. ho i)i-iM UM |g H ajS'uveaaaTal aha fcaaa awl Ii UMMI nuiu mi., ""'Worki'n 24 Hour. ThU n*> rrtdiil dMrani), r>on % %  V.-Ta~>. h.. *• MM •* in—wnii In AaMma nd in kl>rd ffnilU thai %  •a-i *li.MI miraru:m. It naa n aaair m o*allnaia cataa ii.il Md •**-* all au.tr 'rtaimant li na* rtx-.fj Hit jourj IT .re amaaiara aid aft and SrMlltr '• ha. i rn.it tldtr men ai food •> >f* 1| hi. nm,hi h.cj.m..! Htsmdailprtttt •and. .ha atlit.td IMi II. > .. III. •!. o Mdt W I,. Ml %  .* %  .r .-. i (MTTUH Gmromnd To Wortc Wwyns.," ;;•: • %  ewaaafi and t um f t-. . aad tntf. lo -.*„. ml; d*i a (uannitt .f Uiaii.il For in rtatan tea trtovld I W • %  nn aaailaaaMt draa> .h.o, i. at draaiK aad irr.taiint to i— aand >>rmi . %  • VI-I.M „ aad .iialll,. .id ar ,M„.|*i|.|. %  '•i| ar raa %  iiafli tnarn t v I^UKI u< > •Iaad II r..t. ,nhin l i,rt*r Iht aaar. ai.if raa ait it,, M!* iidit of al nnd t ilal.it €.. V.. | v | OBI /•U* (rulwr I *m PRjeSBNT THE TALK OF THE TOWN P1CTUM I SlldWS IXMMY I A 880 I'M AM) 3 SHOWS DAILY EUOM TOMORROW IJU. S *i 830 P.M. rt'ligiou* 'mnciu.u' lyle ••• doi>(' Chapel of ihe Ro :.v HOUBC of God must MWr I. 83-year-old Preoi lF 1o %  prnfdne *bul!rlfor Ihe Dominican aiHU B." ,; 'l insrtled rn '* ainrere the hilU belwetn ( nlh : %  '"! I'""'V in th>| %  A frhve-f&red gMhW Hill ponlbl nr Tftkh. Piety Inairuotu Madame." .she whi pered. PVe**ntl>the VtaltaaT re-apnear%  d from her rinin I 'ckM Th' littl' 1 : frMfl rncnnil* in gri by. 'UulruKtHtua' rory KrtCt am al tht created this chapel Chapel of tin UnMIJ Only on A charabanc load i In the construct ^ilenl ( ;arb.i ANOTHER (urionity of t h Rivleru ia the ex-nim siar whi •hun* publicity. In her distinctive uniform >f %  ,u^tiroom-shaped straw hat. ti-d rhin. black ttun-glajAes. %  Mot and bulging brow I Md Oreu (*arha> -talk' The V ly past olher visitor! romm nt on th^ p.. 'hi royr of the Car.ton Hotol. %  he -aid "Mai ., IB* upatairs to her room for He La believing t ath< No< '' " f meeting anyone in the but a Catholn could hawI'" "nd turns her head away fbmplly and silently If spoken to. ight-seetfc 1" difficult to recognise he r -_ days a week IWadiry" ani '•< ^rncd in when I wra there, wlthrtit th? dlifukaf*. rhursday — for two rigidly ikmii**ost toleront comm-in rmr frota Hatleas. the long sleek hair tf d hour* in the ny-mmc and two %  grey-haired taxi-driver "h t In* old romantic days I* seen n and frtay. Nobod* public allowed in "*re '<• ) W nllUrC *hen C.arbo drove bareTixed White OUtMi-helan*.. -...-I through the town in h~ U.ildin* Pr^ty odd at the ttmV i' a framed edic .simp R ai ia o n d not p Mii.nwhilc, Hie \i.v..ors are pnyThe yacht la being* used ftrl ni inc an average of 2d. Bd. '-.irti into inonir) l>y Garbu after KxLstenAll loud convei-aatinn Md anv the offertory plate. And ihey arc iialist cabaret singer Juhette tttfplgy of ar •pending many pound.on books Ureea, recovering from an operaI'lll mean the expulsion of the and postcards and reproductloni turn which has changed the shape irerned." covered souvenir boon %  f her nose to a straight Grecian. "People behaved In *i'ch < \ Ifta. 6d.; one Matisse lithograph had ftnishod with it as a retreat lutrageoiu. way that we had *o Ct IBs.) to beiieflt the buildink from the world. fund. On a shopping expedition rfl The chapel is still imfinished. Cannes with her constant comA tangle of eltctric wire* hangs in |on Geacge Sehlee. Garb from one point in tht Sling. < lopped to look at the Bikinis hi Matisse designed live vK ilv pit%  ir shop windows, but bought lerned chasubles for the priest: none. Ttie girl who served her in inry looked oil the cflgpfl] II Wllj two of them have been B quad of workm I Tliey nvul. I ud %  •' i a* soon AS the gates had hee" KS ibOUl ii" locked behind the U-urlsU. Recently the Hoi) on,,. ; t i The foreman agreed when the Rome Issued %  B.OOO-word LnstrucMother Superior told me: "These lion on "icrerl art Th n >r> not Wing paid, Wc -jtlM md styles lately Introha.r to BBd many millions of which -ocmed to be "defraiio. None but the tw-t nn<" N" i M Ai. hblshop: "Thone r-cnting themselves ii lothes will (x convertible iTJWaif'l rm.chape? board the ABfa. 181-ton streamtor vnrht be'onginR ID <><. %  of i">i." r iissrin Orr-l>wia. top UM il.iil, v I-.. uid the idunip. brusque gloti who rules the IS nun Kirt ccn^lesoerthe French Social Bocurltyl unde irvMl) tobacconist's did not recognit The French used to call Gorbo LB Dirln.:' 1 don'i noftce thai —L.E.8. J/BrVBTTA IIIIISS IIOI (N.xl DAOI were performed by Mr. Beresford O. GiU brother of" the groom and :nose of ushers fell to Mr. George Marshall. Mr. Errol Marshall, Mr Qlyna Goodrldge. and Mr. Clin'i>n GUI A reception was held at "Roseviile". Brighton, Black Rock, the home of Mr and Mrs. E C. Gill and the honeymoon Is being BBfflt ,it "Sunny Carlbee", Bequla, St. Vincent For a Week M R. FRANK LINCOLN who "had been spending a short holiday in Barbados left for Jamaica by B.W I.A on Thursday morning. Mr Lincoln came in on '.'I. .: lay I.* 1 week and has gumon to Jamiicn where he will spend ana week heforc returning to Trinidad. Back to U.S.A. M R ELLIOTT MARRUS of M. :is II Manus and Son. Inc.. of New York, left the colony during the week for Trinidad bv It.W.I.A lntransit for the U.S.A BY THE WAY • • By Beachcomber WHO'S WHO Hollywood: Hollywood police are studying a Who's Who of the movies compiled by two burglary suspects. It lists addresses of Jane Wyman, robbed of nearly £ 20.000 j of furs and Jewels, and Barbara Stanwyck, Lena Turner. Fred Aatattv, Gary Cooper. Ronald Colman—not yet visited C HARLIE SUET speaking at Uttnxeter yesterday, outlined Ms jrcheme for dealing with the weekly disappearance of 43.728.984 eggs in shell He advocated the setting up of collecting stations lor laying bltds, to thai the oird* c uld be brought to these centres Their eggs would then be laid en the spot, and the trancpurt of eggs from farm to collecting station would be done away with After laying, ihe birds would be '..ken back to the farms. Each farm would have a collecting taithln easy reach. Eggs laid tion CAIETV The Garden—St inni in v s /. i IIMUHI .i • a m Mai. TO.DAV %  aai Mark TWJgJN v PRINCE & THE PAUPER l l -i %  .-. Th, v u.'ll TWINSl Wrd ft I mm&titdye loti Pomada fJ Oatns will restore ro in original colour In a natural about 14 da-1 II uted dally Tba Uirkening Crcme r %  fastlvt pt of product and ii non (raair. whilit the Pomade n %  dr.-inn| IppC of product which dOdrt HOt HI thu her and contains a lot of oil; thus it it liable for Bne dry hair HAIR DARKENING POMADE &CREME Agenta: H. F. CHEESMAN & Co., Ltd — Middle Street in transit would be dealt with by mobile packing centres, usini; fast vans, and each attached to the nearest collecting j.nd stamping centre. >oWur/ir W HAT empress of the* ragim moin, what queen of the turbulent waters lies at her mooring* undei a tranquil sky? llei mini light—a stub of candl. stuck m a jam-tin—is feebly icQectcd in the muddy oose. From somewhere amidships conies a mournful song of the sea: — Ou\ take me orf this 'orrid craft. *H'ai/ O. Rio.'( / feel I'm slowl" go*"' daft And irhtch is /ore and irMch i. afr I'll be anped if COM fell. / Ml 'Rodin' oOW from Rio!) LOT.' What a aNtl Thus sings Mrs. Withersedge. iboarri the Saucy Mrs. Flobster. h'iifmurnli A PICTURE of a man crossin a river upside down on a motor-bicycle, on a wire stretched 200 feet above the watt seem to prove— Chorm: If proof were need.-d — —that thenare more ways than one of crossing a river. Not long ago a man set nut to eat a pudding made of waterproof suet while standing on his head in a tub on the bed Of the Rivet OUM above Lowea, His moth.-, arrived lust as he was going into tho water, and t""k htm home. l*rodnwa>c: Is that all My*-tf: If| nil I can think of .al the moment. Oh—hlP mother's iiHme waMi s-nideley if that helps at all. A PROPHET said the other day that it Is possible mankind will end by eating grass, m order to solve all feeding problems. The gloomy Kphesian philosopher HBrarlitus lived for a while on grass ai his pains. But there is nnother ibieetion to the idea to-day. When D r the best pasture-land has been taken over for new townsdirttracks and airllelds. there will be a shortage of grass and we shall not have the money to Import it. It will then be rationed and the black marketeers will grab up great quantities of it by night and M II it to the West End restaurants. Vof nnv bill' fr*>v T EH PeiB.an whose nose was nipped by a lobster, immediately after he had complained that it was not fresh, got damages from the restaurant. In England someone would have said. "The pretty thing was only playing. and the man's noae got In the way And the man would have been reprimanded for cruelty 'o lobsters, and hooted through the streets. Rupert's Spring Adventure—10 %¡ PTV — & mm I <" duM tor. on ror wo* l„, 4i.jpfM.Md. Than', an -ninuli MM* th. drwm. .faravMnM OHM!" h* mutMn n.ka %  *—* rh.nt. ol ii*."TwufcT hfi nnal F-M|•ion. unk, n tunk. I. Pin. thn I'd oudi ... Tk. Room .umfckt. ud l.ll,. H, bv£. M ih.-. immm, "?'A "J? ? J" ?" ?* "***• h, n %  "* " """• T* !" •iiod. on th. bitik. but th. othtt no onok. i.." 70 CENTS FIRST CLASS "TIUTY CLOTH 70 CENTS 36 in. RAYON PONGEE SILK 70c. White. Ruse, Royal Blue, Green, Grt>". Chncniate. Sky Blue. Gunpowder Blue -: For :DRESSES, UNDERWEAR, SHIRTS PYJAMAS ETT 70 tents AT lllll II I IBS YOUR SHOE STORE DIAL 4220. ONLY 70 cents I'



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    SUNDAY. AUGUST 17. ISM SUNDW WlYOCATB PAGE SEVEN Gets $? 000,000 WESTS COOKING IN THE KITCHEN The Field !\arrow9 Three recipes to make .Id -.Up,"| your I ly ^wna* Fw • %  ua t S"! HE has nev hosec. (hough moet_ people had imagine that a Prfncnr* of Rricland could marry pretty well anyone she chose. Fi 'He number of vnung men who would dare m p rrtpoee to Princess Margaret could always be numbered on the Anger* of two % el ...I Hi-hand*. They had to be young; they had rre %  %•' %  t"ro*id or wealth. ( OI.li v\l..\|,t\ l-l I;I For 8 persons. 1 big *a.ji aaatfaaw mAm%u*$ 11 lb. Milk n.lf a gigs* Butter 1 os. Salt Pepper Mayonnaise. Open the tin an*' M lean piece* of .-.linoi 1-ou.loes. cut them and boil them When cooked, put theffl in a title, or ctate*7and most importihen mash iben. and add ant of all. Ihev hud to be in the ] oz. of butter, i glass oi i.ulk *alt princess's *et unti P*PP< < The limited field at eligible or* then paaa everything WJUHK men haa narrowed rnMK through a mincei Put vha miaSeven of the escorts who hare ture in .. di*h and try to give taken her to the theatre, nlghtthe shape of ., ttih Cover with clubbed with her. and been rummayonnaise and if you like to our,.! engaged to her have barn make the dish look even morn paired off with wven of the mirr ptising. boil some eggs, cut ladle* who also in pieces and decorate the um with them and some fillet* >f anchovies arid pickles STARS' Fv* H1-NDAY. Al OUIrr 11. IMf Ma*. AitfutTZwn , Look in the seciioi ^ tSnd what your nutlimk W4 %  IK\H,II1 IRIIM lONfMIN RIIV4I. (ROHN l^kltl TI>\\ s in ihisland Lfc %  Ltd.. The Village. H ings, Phone. 4MI wonderful j^ KTA1L DKBX3ES A it fawn < %  • ties and i nup. -either In wl or epI >'i| like the seta, I iik' The pieces a"* patterned FN'KNlWfl fiOWNS. Alrc v, ,„..-,. \v,u: ln-en .. r*m;irk*ble reReM) .ind th-en imritio ate right _a •POnge, and these Wet r | world. Naturally, un, ** Fashioned Garment* with th*" usual .iccesaorir* of thisort axe lual a n a di-tingui lu*oM through their supplier '' suted Stales. Tl-• %  A choke or -mi. fuiiitii to. you as a no mark-up ^'TS can bo hud frtan Charles a* yet further indication *' %  •"'arnev A Co \jd. dial 44*1, fOIIMII ACIfttSS Marianne O'BtHet ..,*: >ldi laaVB the Miami FUa Jireuit Court ultri i anted a gB.OOu.oOn setUergant aod divorce from Rich, rd J Reynolds aslMeoc eu I"he couplet twe : tgaia *"• awdrdea re tn. ri,.r She received •> *"l n %  f't them plus lUMKhi liir.nfflll* for their .'inport f Intf ma I kmal I Dior Sets Up Business (From JOAN HARRISON. PARIS. Christian Dior, the quiet, selfeffacing "genius" of the French fashion world who says he would like rrothing bettor than to become a monk, Is setting up business in England to export to British C on .m on wealth c untms. Dresses, coats und gowns bearthing for ,. few minut.s then add station, that the few young men iiubutter which you have preshe Is allowed to bo friendly with viousiy melted. Take a small are too often not awfully Interestfrying pun, put the oil in it an-l injt to her. when the ofl la hot pour two tableAnd with the kind of men who spoonsful of the mixture Move nave big things to say she is aline frying pun io that the mixture lowed to exchange only the •mallwill cover the bottom of the pan ,, ol small talk When ready put the omelette on • I LIKED last week . Uw kitchen tahta Repeat until Service yaj have quite ft lot of small THE NEW sharp-and-sweet hor OmaMtta and the mixture is ** tlnished. Fold the nmcle'tes like hi.ndkerchiifs und put them on a big dish. Make the sauce a* follows: Melt 1 o*. of butler in a small saucepan then add 2 tablespoonsful of olive oil. 1 tablespooiiful of water, the anchovies. Stir all th> time and as soon as the anchovies d oeuvres in an Italian restaurant -paper-thin slicej of raw smoked ham served with fresh green nis. dissolve,! add the parsley and noDrc*a — Qoole "I only r a e ega l se j her at the Palaee 0\uden Party because she wore the drana stie had en at Aaeot.-' THE SALESMANSHIP pour on the omeletaW COLD OMELETTE DU BARKV For 6 Eggs 6 Salt Cooked ham 5 oz. Butter 2 oz. White sauce 2 tableipoonsful. Cream 4 tablesponnsful Gelatine Cooked chicken 5 or shop. When I ordered a i flower bunch the girl gave i to wearwithout charge THE TOOD SENSE of a Sono restaurant, which served freah fruit salad as It should be—drv (without all that tinned Juice) and plopped into cream whipped up with brandy. THE NEW SERVICE in a big rJtorr An attendant Is rushed up with a bath chair to make shopping mure fun for old ladles. THE CUSTOMER is alwaysright view of the perfume-makers (French), • THE .VaTW keep-the-klds-. business In the French greaseproof paper and let it gel id { a ,," WeiLna^rhaie^ldrael the "off-the-peg market. Take the ham then and mince tsie— n new onn iS u -**i, !-. .L_ ^—^ >-J._ i_ %  iir,-, — %  %  _JJ _^ .>__ "*ITTr "* "" e %  "-' ween:. Break in a bowl 3 eggs. B< ing the luxury U "Dior" will be U*am and add 1 pinch of sun. /fVpn-K, ,„ho ^he.. on sale in the "better class" shops Mak, an omelette wide but thin, eo that rnvhouth-HTon \u in London and the main towns of You will probably need fryuu. mnX collected h next SSv for „nBritain and the Commonwealth as pan of at least is inch diameter alysis, agreed trial it had inri from next February. When the omelette is ready tako For Dior, one of the moat astute it out of the pin and put it on *^ men of business fashli self in the He broke the news today In a it. When minced add one ounce quiet, self-effacing way over a of butter und 2 tablespoonsful u-ftnc-lunch drink at one of Paris'* thick white sauce. Mix evcryluxury hotels (just over the way thing togwther d flntsh with from his dres* salon). It Is all for tabfespooiisful of cream Britain, for the Empire—and agr. rjio^ rake the chicken breast (which For Britain—"because" said %  already cooked) mince it, then Mr. Dior, "it is so regrettable, as ;'" one more ounce of butter. I have said so many times before, and 1 tablespoonful of white that English women cannot for sauce. Finish with •_' tablespoonsnitmetary reasons buy Parta oaodels lu <•* ''ream In Paris." "" ,ni nnm mixture on one of ^_ For the Empire — oecause." the omelettes. Cover with the ,h<-i, continued Mr. Dior putting himother omelette on which you igjll DID whl< h youi birthday comes accoiding Io the asars. Today's main ob)ecii\efc are truth, (trance. ni-ytlon among leudina a— ti aa mrces (or fagot. And irn.rii.u' i. 'iho !uiTt.f aianT•*. 11 bieaa h.m that is%4, Mvlmg (.ncluding DAY DRI liberal" provide elegance m i-omhin.iti'i A ^ ^ i' heamiful mnterlaN Live anj Kt live goes well with think J^ • • nrst and speak afterwards Don't let T*rTI\0 v !" ?" J_ ~ COUJM I.TI>. ki m—t a To .,.„>•,„ „„nd coo. ItUM on %  "J* **** "J SJ wuith-wlulc -..biecU. rl.mm.tt. watU '" %  l '' %  ptt Amt 1n v > how *••' m£n d .o 'SK, SSt-buUdm,^ ; ; "" %  CajM rOJl from J. rrt.non are UUSfiino no' '' "' %  "'•• •"'" ""' wlU dovelo., ""' * &f Walk with hud high, eyes clear, mind Ions •—Jaiy M uncoolused. Start day at hurth. prayfl mg sincerely 'o* guidance and strODgn ayfaith, Conaidc. vour blessings. • • Wr know Uw "ortd lhro..n our ." prrsonalltv f id a famoua wrili-i Thus we must i^iiill* 1 that dr\rlopmt. uurluring "Ut pfflonallty. marhnllinu OUI J^ IhouKhM. uidln our tnlnd Ij vil.il t* Do not liki'aU Sfhtt nor won lillli'jf roOuff, U r.uch to hciirt K.VOKTU/O mw you aro, Iho more you .vill hava IO ^ta^id crilirism. Pray; krop j^ tiifKl hun "v liltrli It is not a duv for hmking into personal ^ plans and lloinga for puie sati-rarlton Community aff.trs, public issues. Qga I St.t.t al chuTCh* * * Note Ubra and Virgo; your uu-ln :mi similar as are VOUT admomliou.-d;iv >>. TKINK, tor d'rection. • * Somo day n donl Ml popl'v you don't rrUot -'n.lbly Io rovlow. ovon ,m\-. io rebuild anaro praucl u.-rvouii^, l'coolo -H0 achu-vo 0 nolafonlv Ihc '•!, lhltn'< bul th.Hltlr llama. And slncmoly I ai-kod 6y humble ""i make power. S* • * Ro.irrh furll.T %  W *la tm the urealness ol God and Hi! wla, bUl oflen ii"l und'eratood. ways Don't rt thl. week by doubt* or contention. Reason mum prevail. -V I ,ood rule i.l i) do nol "plain overmuch. And coupto ol god I Mb •> I nhlnaed 1vou r-lrw fart, on bo • Idea ol %  mar. Ilattn '"'ly l.|rranlly. relv on Inlth and prayer vr.il nnON TnnAV Ira eurml. ol .unny dlapoauion. with i.irdv mcCrl nd wj * "^S^'X£ for -trrnKth Hlrthoi.t-' Bu0 C> rnsback. editor, founder^ LBO aTaly at Aag M Abg. •opt. 24— Oct. S3 SCORPIO Oct. 84—Nov. K9 aAOlTTARTUa HOV. : i Dec. 33 OAniCORK Dec. 23 -Jan. tl AQUARIUS fan. 22 — Fsb. 1 PIKTBS Fab. M-Harrh fj 'i vice techmrfH' vii-itors and residents ullkv. nil i i HELL ANVTIIIN*; ANVWfir.RK. KOR ,\NYON: :i (at t. they're doing, it right now This is the business of REALTORS l.TD. 151 Hot-buck St. (dial tlHHti I il l'-'afe Axents und Aid' :;t'gularly llstlnf many •' (he Island's best homes for sale nd lent ReeJion Ltd In sM -.ervice to luiver •I i ndudlni ttaggf new b iir.Httiit.i Mic t lonee ih i nen I. i baya an ,", at $26 7S Ntl GREATER VARlFTA OF M.IRTK than HMBM with I LAN. | n l .i %  i it h with colour und s'-iee are 'way ahead of n...-' I Net shirts are in Lu fcreO letnon %  styling out i in al i itH.ii low %  /ii'i-i %  i-i Phlrt-Jarket* run bvjrn S4-BS .. M..W. You must reallv see RELIN'CE S1I1HTS SO IT'S FNAMEL TOt WANT Jld only the besl? The name. i ihlA'NDF.U.S p.,,1, I !" rd can ISntish company, will also sell to salons In Paris learning his ptimnus-puffin •any other foreign market we can met hods We shall use ^rVenrh get, and we have some foreign p r ls loo, and import French buyers ..Iready lined up." materials British materials will The iwq me.., Mr. Colernan B |BO be used of course. Oh yea. Jeflren and Mr Marcel Fenez, |,oth the British Board of Trade that looked the picture of two very and the French Government are bosses In England are married, happy men today. delighted about the whole ahlng.' And here, from three men who Mr. Jeffreys is already the art married to the £3,000-a-year Being Attractive. director of the British dress firm The dresses, coats, gowns and type of woman boss are the hun"Remember. Lady In Black."* This will consuits will be shown in London In band-views: — tinue as a completely separate December. Then they will be on From Mr Halford (husband of business. •yjle all over Britain in Februar. Elsie Walker, director of I garThe 'icw company. Ihe name of 16S. Prices will range frorr den-equipment firm): "T like havwhlch is not to be announced for about £30 to E80. Mr. Jeffrey.' nig a business woman es a wife. another week; will make dresses says they will be available at "the She's automntirslly more InTerestEnglanri With Dior-trained uetler t lass" shope for the "uppe ing than one who ••onie. k bta loo shy to ask." "OarllHS, >OU set blender every day." He fti.lfi...'' they wain, wht-n he's paylnv '"r I' 111 Look lnP othor way." Whv liarer.'f they heard thai II %  ildom leorks out Hk that? Tell me, what do you dof you say it a pa. t> "Nothing murh." "What do you do? ->h, mv job is terribly dull." H'hy laien'r they heard that .oung men seldom ask for a kiss' : I v ,lve with unerring aim. Why Ptaeen'l thej heard thai •hen he el ,he h "• ''* ten lo ne he will say: Isn't It monin>us—your potted shrimps cost v shillings"? vor WISH mi FLOOR (LEAVER ,„, good *OLrsn ometBtna tur Linoleum and Fur' """ i ihuNSOhr i POUBHJU in l',u w..s r.n %  leaning; LiqnM Wax fi OlO-COH ft* l.n... Til* ind ill Afoj i AM Johnson's CARNU goes on in twenty minutes with a tfloss. K. J. Hnmel-Smifh Ltd. plume 474B are agents for JoilNROnrS reLeaaTaua. HOI-l-*l. (V(|v nmoii' lib hing rnaa n hi thnaan ..,, nvvTsa "l w.iit-... -,." %  .-•<) %  eoln up design tiiva wontlerdil acute itlon II VM want i realh krmlifi.l h o II.' ilet ."ti! biyon* fa%.>tiie— [abrkm I lenuine MaWealnrm Bi iu-ai#liiaas iijli Inikf \ nttf' ^tstes ol \meriea. it. ,. i mtiftert/brm !.., ,-vi Ivpr ul Unun Idns. AT HAKIIAIx's FOUNDR ITI), there are bicyc as for laadJes •ul Men and Ben and Girls. These sturdy machines can be ul with or without 3-spccds and .n %  ebolca of Oreen oi Black here are HOPPER TRICYCLES, ID, m Hltie or (.n-eti, unti j call lo 432B will provide details ef ihe Inten-tting larna offertd by .rirbndoa Foundry Ltd. V/A.V.V/. '-'-'-' m wrniFD nm lt ne n k si nui ni> f "I'd rather she dll view about work, and she never brings any bossiness home m WHAT A STRANGE world they live in-the people win. write those books on The Art of S I THOUGHT politicians were ^ued characters. I thought soltii-rs were unemotional men. I %  .li.ught critics were tough. %  Jut when the politician is dete^ted. when tht general reslRn-. % %  (.en the critic goes to a first night v^hat happens'' Why. they cry %  iMM "Many of Senator Taft's men. I iead las' week, "were openly in ivorkers. income groups. they advise lieople always enjoy talklni: ibout themaelves at a party. Get hem on to the subject of thelt vork and they will chat quite lapptly •Don't leorry," they say, "If he -' dta away th. stagnates at doesn't kiss you Koodnight. If he imagine that! li really fond of you he's probWhen lasenhower had finished speech of farewell," said a rent report, %  'there were scarcely y drv eyes among those who ard him And then, as Margot Fonteyn i ] %  ne (award and danced," wrote ; critic the other dav, "I had to r STOP PAIN ^ .QUICKLY with Phcnsic... Tlal faDiom thrtrtokl adion o! I'll,-.:,iv. %  .i !,l'II I.1I.VF.S PAIN, SOOTHES NHRVKS.OiWlBRACTS DEPR % %  No manci how inlmu the pain, no mailer how wcorv Tour nervr., bowiTmi.-j'voulcd.rHKNSI. -i rcl'ff und cmnfort. quickly and safcH K m.r i i %  .. PHI VSIC lahlcu neither harm rhe heart nor upsei :.x Momach. Don't accept .ubadtuos. Keep a supply of PHENSU taklec hy !" u SuppU3 of Old CcJttajre; I.nvendr — perfume:, soap and talcum — are available at your beauty-counter Nowhere will you find truer, more exciting Lavender than thnt which comes to you direct (rum England in the famous Grossmith green bottle. (JROSSMITII Ph ensie TWO TABLETS BRIM VIC "ElKf FROM RHEUaTIC PINS,* tUailOO. KERV£ Pl, I HEAD.CHES. NEUIIRI6U. -HUFNZ". C0l* K OHtlLSV %  a. aiNjAuia LTD., P.O. VOX 97, aaiDgaruwM SOMETHING NEW at 84^ per yard IT'S . POLISOL I IMSIII li ti.OTII PINK, TUKQUOISE. BK1GE, BLUE and LIGHT MAIZE kfc POLISOL 11 it Create Bealalant Dirt BeaUlant : Shrink Reaittanl I. ..kWell And Always Wear. Well I I Waabe. Well I Obtainable Erctitsivtltf al . GEORGE SAHEI.Y & CO.—1. Swaa Street "The Store lhar alwayt offers vou a Large Variety o( NEW (.1 M ills al Astonishingly LOW PRICES and nol OLD GOODS at ... REDUCED PRICES." GEORGE SAHELY & Co. 19. SWAN STREET* The PlanWhere Thrifty People Shoa" 'PHONE 49M Li*




    Sunday

    BARBADOS



    —

    AU@UST 17, 1952

    SR

    FLOODS DROWN 3-SCOUTS IN ENGLAND

    Villages Cut Off ——

    253 | Stains ee _ Lady Savage Opens
    1,000 Homeless , C—llLrae )
    LONDON, August ‘16. Ch

    PRICE: SIX CENTS





    E





    STABLISHED 1895

    ; :



    NB °@ 5 ie 7 d
    Children’s War
    FLOODS from freak summer storms across south and

    LADY SAVAGE yesterday afternoon formally opened
    southwest England in the last 24 hours left death and de-;

    | the Evelyna Smith Children’s Ward at the St. Philip’s
    vastation to-day in Exmoore districts of Devon and Somer- Alnishouse costing £10,000, a gift donated by Mrs. E. B.





    set. Three boy scouts were drowned when their camp on Smith, widow of the late Mr. Howard Smith of Thicket
    shore of the River Bray was washed away when the banks Plantation a, :
    broke. fhe ward whic} o the east of the mvin building of
    . Another boy is reported missing. The police said that the Almshouse is situated in cool and airy rroundings.,
    “the situation is so confused that we can’t confirm the five r ") It has been designed by Messrs.
    missing yet”. iuettcet Ts \ | Cla and Tuckey and Has aceom-
    The twin Devon-Bristol channel resorts of Lynmouth Britain Will Not | tion for 0) eote fee infants
    and Lynton were cut off from road contact and then de- 1 : i j from one to three yeats, as well
    vastated. About 1,000 were homeless. Be Bamboozled ii s accommodation for four cots
    . a ae a for boys ranging from three to

    éleven years. There is also a girls
    room with four cots for children
    from three to eleven years of age

    Soldiers went over Exmoore (the!
    home of the famous midget ponies |
    exported all over the world for,

    In Oil Dispute |

    Chinese General HAROLD GUARD.

    By

    children’s pets) to build an emer-' ’ in addition to a dining room, a
    gency bridge across the River! Charged With LONDON, Aug. 16. |sick room for either babies or
    Lyne to get help to 2,000 maroon- | eee reply to Iran’s note of j older children, a maternity room

    ial beds which have
    England,

    ugust 7 making new proposal

    for negotiations in the oil industry

    ed, An official said: “I have never
    this

    with three spe
    imported

    Fimbezzling $25m

    Been anything like before. been from a

    |

    ri

    village. At least two people had| the nationalist government “fails to
    been drowned.

    Swollen rivers were full of stock
    and cattle. The body of one of

    Secretary, were met by the Chair.
    .
    of

    Daughter Swallows |
    Sleeping Pills

    The text of the British note wa

    approved by a meeting of Mir
    whose departments were di-

    tly concerned with the Anglo-

    prove its accusation,”

    , . +
    Examine Status
    Lt. Gen, P. T. Mow who ski 4 ; . |
    across the border when Genereus-| Of Plastiras’ Govt. |

    three Boy Scouts swept away when| Simo Chiang Kai Shek’s govern-

    man the Vestry, Rev. H, V.
    Armstrong, Rector of St. Philip
    and the Churchwarden, Mr, D. D.

    Bombing has nothing on -this.” THE EVELYNA SMITH Children’s Ward at St. Philip's Almshouse which was a gift donated by Mrs. BE. B. Smith, widow of the late Mr may reach Teheran this week-]jqpour room with a specie z
    Floods nearly itcnaneaes several By ROBERT PRESCOTT. Howard Smith of Thicket Plantation. Mrs. Smith is seen chatting with His Excellency the Governor, Sir Alfred Savage. eal ial HARE, backs hice bate ae ted aa 2 fees ae
    West England villages after violent) MEXICO CITY, Aug. 16. i ‘on Saturday that it should con- separate baths and toilets, one for
    rainstorms last night. A Chinese General charged with) —_— Peer. 9 | RE . a enters a ee vince Iran’s wild Premier Moham-j sch section
    Police at Combe Martin five! embezzling $25,000,000 said on | . > jmed. Mossadegh that Britain can- On arrival, The Governor and
    miles from Tlfracombe reported| Saturday that he huped Mexico wilJ Parlianzent To e Rita Hay v orth S ne i bamboozled by promise Lady. Savage accompanied by
    “complete devastation” in the grant him a political asylum after ; 5 , OoOmmun tis Ss e Of nets oe for its lost oll as-| Waigs Dennis Vaughan, Private

    jx
    {Ir

    y Egyptian Police

















    , eas 2 ‘ ani il dispute Tuesday. | Garner,
    flood waters from the river Bray, ™ent discovered the huge shortage Athens, Aug. 16, | HOLL WORD, Aus. 16 | omicials eaid Mist Beitain’ Wools Lady Savage after receiving a
    envoloped their tent was found|in military funds, said he “was _ Parliament will meet in a spe-| Prince Aly Khan and his) tice no obstacles in the way cf] basket of flowers from one of the
    today. Firemen were assisting] “innocent” and that “he will never cial session on Monday to deter- | CAIRO, August 16. gatranged wife sereen star Rifa ' ro-opening negotiations, but would] little girls who will live in the new
    police in search for others, be extradited to China, mine the status of | , Premier | EGYPTIAN POLICE announced they had smashed a Hayworth, rushed last night to ne stand firm in insisting ‘that sho}|ward, was presented along with
    _ {ie said his blond American| Nicholas Plastira’s coalition gov-' (xn munist cell and arrested ten workers and students for| POspital where their two and a) ould not “sacrifice her principles |the Governor to Mrs, E. B, Smith
    About 50 houses in Exford, West| Secretary Agnes Kelley, 31 off@tpment. ee allesed Communist activitics in the Sayeda district of half year old daughter Yasmin} and interests” to offers of mone-| and Mr. and Mrs. N. G. Daysh,
    Somerset were swamped when a| New York, and Oliver Kisich, 53, ..1W° Deputies of Vice Premier} alles’ st a f ayeda ‘ was trezted after swal owing} tary compensation.—U.P. Mr. Garner then extended a
    “solid wall of water” bore down] of Berkley, California are both im- Sophocles Venizelos Liberal Party | Cairo early to-day, ‘ x _ sleeping pills. welcome to the Governor and
    on the village from surrounding! prisoned with the former Chinese mantel ne ee | Police action followed an inquiry attended by Hussein, The Sinks end the act ‘ Lady Savage and expressed thanks
    hills, The centre of the village was| Airforce procurement officer and|G@uysenment wiieo. dnaiandontt | Raafat, Under Secretary of State, Ministry of the Interior,; 1 i eduerate cats Sachets G Iner. Gable to Mrs Smith for her gift, Mr.
    a —. ca Daw. are also sure to be freed soon, Deputies on Friday declared their! and the Cairo City Police Commandant. | at least for » moment their marital | siragier, Gable Daysh replied briefly on behalf of

    " 1 § vere He said in a prison i : allegiance to Plastiras. Reports - nm linn The Egyptian Government this} 4imjeoutties. The actrees to tne | (79 y 7 Mrs. Smith

    rescue residents through their bed-).446 Chinese Natlotialiet ‘Govern Were circulated that other defec- p+ ~ i 4 week set up a “State and Secre- at aun eat ine aia ae Will Go-star he Rector, Rev. H. V, Armstrong
    room windows and pump buildings ment will’never be able t “ove{tions in party alignment were in | U.S. Will Conisider | tary Department” to combat k ; ry r the: child who has been said qa short prayer and blessed
    dry. The local hotel, crowded with] i+. sscusation of misapprog prove {the making. If the Government Communist and Zionist activities SPOW DOW Me cilia, wita Aas een | HOLLYWOOD, Aug, 16. {the building after which Lady
    visitors, was flooded to a depth of} (5 eek yt Nae pagina ol apf loses the vote of confidence next J + pP ol and an “Anti-spying section” to iN with whooping cough, obtain Ava Gardner and Clark Gable|Savage spoke and opened the

    four and a half feet. iy Sak eithubed titer ace week, new elections will be called, apanese arode “ face the special branch of po-, ed the pills. {will co-star er Mogambo”, | building

    : ; roe are * ‘Us y car . oy a non-party Government could * é itical police recent established. ah a 7 . a romantic adventure story to .be 7 s Cover -§ a Save

    Fioodwaters from the river. am sure we will be able to remain |ceek parliamentary support, Applicatiotis , 7 After her tom a h was pumpt d | filmed in Africa late autumn, with eee -_ > ad saree,
    Barle invaded parts of Dulverton.| in Mexico which has granted mea coll A special military court trying OUt the chi'd appeared to be none | jonny word directing and 8, M P.M.O., of the parish Miss M. E.
    also in Somerset, County fire] humanitarian asylum.” ori ervey eas | cotton mill rioters here-is expect-|the worse for her experience. She | Gimpalist producing. Ford will| hve. ‘Matron oe My et Ph tip’s
    brigade headquarters reported that] Mow remained in the dusty files}__ U G , Aug. 16." led to pass. sentence to-day on] was in hospital for about 15! leave for Africa on, October 1 to Al ast aie vp iM 7. 'D. ve a
    all roads to Dulverton were im-} room of the General’s office with The U.S. has promised Japan Mustafa Khamis named as chief} minutes.—U.P. imake final preparations. The lo- msnouse and r. D. D, Garner,

    j .
    Y ugoslavia Accuses | ane it will give early considera- the Churehwarden then inspected













    -ellars and drenching thousands of} intervene in Mexican justice ~ sinGic tri number of Japanese prisoners eli-
    cellars and g ANCS xican justice pro-|JYugoslavia between Arlril 30th Dp of the Almshouse, it was finally

    gible for clemency and parole is [and strengthening of the relations Repelled On Jolo Is°
















    i Mis Kelly. They have been held oe 7 mappa ia by the pegeetuver who ation unit will cover 15,000 miles the ward
    a ede : vere| there pending the start of extradi- : . mt ency and pi ap i ande s execution. during the shooting. > ward, :
    senate, tenga cate tion proceedings by the Chinese Bulgaria Of plications of Japanese war crimi- he Court, trying workers after Ja nese Goodwill Garcnet must still complete} Lady Savage before declaring
    supplies and evacuate isolated, Mbassy, Kisich, a foreign affairs . . {6 jnals. A State Department spokes-|Wednesday’s riots sent its findings pa i*Vaquero” and Gable put the fin- the woe oo Seas
    residents. Floodwaters rose so)@*Pert, is in custody in another Infiltrating Spies man said the Japahese embagey}0n Mustafa Khamis, 20 year old i) ae ‘ ishing touches to “Never Let Me| It was with very great pleasure
    fst tat many awe had to ran|?00M Of Corte Palace ere "PICS |csoressed. hope, on Tmant eataing womens aden Go| Mission Bids |o)'n'vtiud inmud ih Kongon| tt ay husband ahd kcaped
    : ? S - he. y—tha’ eo ate: ’ a 2 y re ) Db ON locallo 1 Ti- u , ‘ 1e
    from their beds, Cars were over- , , ‘ $i N, Aug. 16. ‘cons er in Chief, for confirmation es-| Ti r ra for “Mogi ft hare ¢ ye
    tanned: -and:-cattip-drowned. Light-| ant J6.npipey, .Gangialis pesiate) ally” chargea | Would esnBlder applications pre-|Tviay 1 Paovrewell To India. ei bag--vequero”,) ne sprivitoge nor oneRtoe tee
    ning killed one man, and injured Rosales, said there was tng -hur- en ero ee Serene Dent andes its pase Ge Two ‘focal .police chiefs have . . . [Gardner will get a week's vaca- Children’s Ward, whieh has been
    ta el ie ry” to hold the hearing, He said bendé to verilieas the ‘Tito re-| The spokesman said “a Japan- mee puspendee from duty by or- A ead a. pa vel tion and join crooner Frank Sina} nade possible by the public
    —U.P. | they would be held under guard gime. Belgrade Tadio nid. ° The ese embassy representative was ao "Ge pernor Ge orale Wee ae Gor will Missic nt on “Saturday tra in Nevada where he will fulfil) spirited generosity of Mrs. Evelyna
    i “ ; : 4 : . . - ary Governor General of Egypt, © 00¢ $810) ms 4Yla singing engagement, Sinatr ; ta’ tae sat
    oe ee a ny BEE en cn ahd dates sueotay Foreign Ministry said: |assured that the United States following the riots. They are’ visited the Indian Council of Agri- ; arediy Bhing (OC eigene- re nee a on a
    [ ht wialhe an trent tell S|“such activities of Bulgarian or- | government is continuing to give|Superintendent Naaman Ei Ash- culture Research and the National] monty in England and Burope sol... 2 Cention of d%ease among
    ig ning Mow GArAltted he had ey ganizations are nothing but a spe- |the matter careful consideration |mary of the Kafr El Dawar Police, Physical Laboratory before leav-1 hat he ean accompany Gardnet om ‘ a oe which is very dear
    e ’ amount of the money ir “saf Cat ren Cf aaa eee that | with a view to early evtablish-]and Colonel Saleh Mohamed: ing for Karachi, In a farewell] aypoad, Atter “Mogambo” is|‘°,™* ea! : }
    K l B ; place.” He said ne id b wile seriously threatens peace and se-/ment of the machinery for con-|Khafegy, Inspector of Police for message the delegation said: “Wel completed, Gardner and Sinatra The Smith family have lived in
    “is Oy F to return it to the Chines, | mty of the Balkans and the |sideration of guch applications.”| Behera province.—U.P, will cherish the memory of the} ptan a six-month European vace-|'%s parish for many years, and
    people but ‘not ‘i ‘Chian ereneet “ ae He pointed out that,prior to !cordial welcome, co-operation and | tion,—U.P | believe it was Mrs. Daysh’s
    i eae 2 ) SS hey court xtend ou orever eae" ovigi “a ~Tpe
    PRUSSELS, Belgium, Aug. 16, | "Clea Sines ‘Binbaseyomciasl vista Natta elses” ett Jabaase pace treaty, 8 war cota, erie ‘eet ein ee oe
    At least one person was killed} said they are following the case] Trygvie Lie, It narrated nine al-|¢Timinals were: sentenced by the hoon Strikes ‘that the hospitality, co-operation s ° ictical: while. 1 ane ok ae ia
    by a pee en ee aan en = ensure the welfare of\leged cases of infiltration of Bul- ameny Pope os - - P land facilities extended to us will) Moro Bandits that, after discussion: with ner
    along the coast yesterday flooding} the two Americans, but could not}|garian spies,and diversionists into |‘©"™S Of ¥89 were shortened. The Oki result in the further. developing that, # Scuss
    ‘ imnawa Island , , , Mother and Miss Byer, the Matron
    Belgians enjoying the annual deat interrane is and the end of July.—U.P. between our countries, shee s y f
    holiday: net immediately known but it is TOKYO, Aug. 16. | nt. | e a decided to offer to’ build a
    While playing on the beach at believed to be about 821. Typhoon screaming across the : MANILA, Aug, 16 Children 5 Ward, ‘
    Heist Sur Mer a youth of sixteen ‘. Under the Peac@ Treaty, Japan Pacific. at more than 100 miles an eee ae, roe ‘ soe aa ae paged “oe
    was struck by lightning and killed agreed to accept the ¢ | trenated “Mora bandit: counte ence, the work already being done
    instantly. The accident was wit- e bs aln e u se imposed on Japanese prisoners by |Force installations on the island Memorial j ublic | ta kk in fighting on Jolo island in| by Mrs. Daysh among the Mothers
    nessed by hundreds of people. the International Military Tribu-,of Okinawa yesterday, causing ex- ‘i he Southern Philippine tel and Babies, not only in St. Philip,
    ’ nal for the Far East a other oes damage, United States Far Meetings Banned UP. @ On page 15.
    ae j s Allied war crimes cdifees UP | aS mmand said here today. | : aa a Se
    ‘ in taly! From Bunker Hill (rte Reman report ont
    Heat Wave In Italy | ' ‘dicted an earlier statement by the!
    : | |Far East Air Force which assesse 'minda refused a permit for public

    9,
    ROME, Aug. 16. SEOUL, Aug. 16. Harvesters 8 |the damage as “not great". No}, eetings to-day

    More than

    HAVANA, Aug, 164
    Interior Minister Ramon Her-|
    ‘ 3 Fe ess i commemorating |
    -UNITED STATES’ marines hurl thodox party leader}































































    150 people were j ed back t ’ . ,lives were lost, though buildings |»)
    yee all I " wo more ° ‘e j ; , ’ f the death of or
    eres EArt ieaeetee ta the fanatical Communist assaults against corpse strewn along Strike Likely pe Tae and much equip- Fduardo Chibas who committed!
    FOr ee oreo eave contiwued, A| “Bunker Hill” by the light of searchlights. Allied artillery, CHICAGO, Aug, 16 A stroyed, suicide August 16 last year while|
    tecord exodus from sweltering machineguns and grenades cut screaming Red attackers to A strike threat locmed in the] The typhoon passed 50 miles pe , hia " " 2 | 7 ee 3 i nt | LL StGH—Makers of the
    cities yesterday marked Ferragos pieces and sent survivors fleeing for their lives. It was|tnternational Harvesters’ huge in- ae ee Or ss of A ‘|| speech to Cuba in a C.M.O. radio! WORLD'S CHAMPION
    to holiday—Italy’s, ge oo the eighth time in five days the Reds have tried vainly to]dustrial empire and packinghouse| i) oi, sae dice soca ae ah station studio,
    eenere Peseta “al Detach t5-1 wrest the strategic western front height from grimly |Wo'kers called a strategy meeting) Weather experts expected it tol 63
    “ . as * i ines ; cas ne : * «ito discuss sta . ‘ P| ae a sg ler ndé cifically refused to
    iy, was 104 degrees Fahrenheit | determined marines. The hill is only five miles east of ae stalled contract negotia-bit most of Japan's islands about | iow a. ieeatng sveduled fal "
    r j S. i ; § ek al é 1 , sched }
    Se LS ten eaies eee eee .)Panmunjom. Spaces Fiv. - ‘ Employees of the International midnight tonight UP | Havana’s Central Pa to-day at}
    J th aa hundred Communi ts Sp@ar- | tarvester tractor works in Chicago =? | ) p.m, However it is believed that
    DECOY. REDS WITH DUCK TRAP (eoaieeta hoc ane ee = S voted 2,854 to 433 in favour: of {9 permit will be granted for aj
    . ees st attack shortly aftetithe strike after contract negotia- } University students federation!
    ms ns - r | midnight under cover of a thun-Jijons covering 26,000 harvester No Comment In jprocession —fror University,
    o us artillery and mortar bar- employees were broken off yester- M Papers | ground to Chit om m=}
    j tage. day MOSCOW | 8 bus cemetery
    | But as the Reds crawled past Meanwhi } ited Pack- :
    ,decaying bodies of Communist: ‘aan mie Oe auee tere 14 MOSCOW, Aug. 16. | Herminda ued an order that
    killed in previous assaults Marines] | © GUSe ah eng re Moscow newspapers this morn-j all armed foices must prevent any
    t i gi li : member executive board to meetling aid hot comment on the pub- bl i str
    , Fumnec giant searchlights on them |} j;, Chieago Sunday to discuss cOn-| hiched te Se ; public demonstrations.
    and circling Allied planes d sed . : vei, | lished text of the Soviet note on U.P
    lagtHial fares I *s drop tract negotiations with the “BirlAustria to the three Western: R P.
    \ ” No Red Jets ub aed ra fren: powers. The text appeared in the; __ s ; '
    ite canoe | Vaien have dragged on for a "Kl usual second page position re- 2 : big |
    {eee ietoen ae Neat heii nee with no progress. served for communications by the | Y oshida Asks I or |
    ‘Selde te Rien bult’ fensers —UP. |Ministry. It gave Soviet readers yy. i ion Trad
    dinyen te Hed China Seve se their first news that there was a Ore oreign irade | ,
    stay : na beyonc 1€ three-power note of March 1%
    biangp edie East Alviree oni Grerada Gets and a reminder on May 9, but did TOKYO, Aug. 15. || |
    shterbombers were lost this not mention the second reminder prime Minister Shigeru Yorhida |
    Wwask ‘0 a pope fire 0 one Cold Storage Plant of August 11—U.P. ft rged’ premotion of fo fap: Ti
    3 g 20mber was lost to ‘loularty with & ° |
    i ia bsg er ) (heitin OGD ied ‘Gasrensontent : 'P ‘ticularly with South Ez |
    j oat Ne aid Sab ts dest DOMINICA, Aug, 15 17 ear old I * Tib f nations in a written me ’ ii} ‘
    ticrce caid Sabre PS - A : : oT tog - a * { ~ j : oe
    sd one MIC and teabatiy Sar First fruits in the Colonial De- y Ii 1 et weet ne Na ; conference ||j |} You are ona 3
    ed two more aaditi y oy velopment Corporation were ap- See « ¢ on Friday wo hundred govern-'| s\ 2
    peller driven. Sen Furies from tne| arent on Monday when the C.D.C Chirrese Establish res'omeiay, tna busines Yeuders | WINNER when you ride a Raleigh! ;
    British Mrriay” H.MS “Oe fl! opened a cold storage ice plant ji os attended the informal parley}! yo e eig s
    wate lost. in pape tC Plr iomeagy relieving a year’s old shortage of Duthie oe ot hp hen, ~ sponsored by the Japan Fereign ,
    ro ° P oe ce by providing furthe id unese Communist pilppet Fan-|reade Association. Guerts of hon- |} oj io E : y
    f ge ag ea e. other uro.tehen Lama assumed the adminis- ‘ pat oes rai oa eat A Raleigh vo ye cHcice Of Reg Seadioner eer
    United Nations in a broade: rage facilities. The other pro ; ; jour were Indian Ambassador | Professional S Cha he sec e
    ‘er Radio Seoul warned Nostt|Ject a hydro-¢lectric plant suipply-[tfation of Western Tibet, accord-|k K, Chettur, Jose P. Melenchio || Fe ee te eatin
    over _Radlo Seoul warned Nortt a. Cneeet ta ea Rea, area is} if to reports received on Satur- ih 4 ‘of the Philippine Missto } succession. Here is proof of the wisdom of buying
    eo one at aoe a south ‘Aer under congtsuction, +? day. Panchen Lama was en'iiron~|rokey Pakist oe hantie dow Minett your bicycle from a Company with such great
    o id pe: he yg rag ‘ie Noniea Beginning trom September, the | ed in the Tasilimpo monastery in| 7iaud Din and first secretarie technical experience and knowledge that designed
    followed the ae ae myagers|-éntral government takes ove: ithe town of Shlgnise from which hie Embaxy and. the. Indones wo bal the ssort-beghing RAL-EIC,
    ved the ¢ with strikes on age 7 . fire fighting | am SCESSO sd to exile at
    the supply areas, - i eras ee ene China in 1923 following a dispute Mission. UP * ~~
    Two waves of F84 Thunderjeis| 4, l ey “i “| with Dalai Lama, :
    bombed and strafed a Communist} ~?U"* | The present 15 year old Pan-
    coastal defence base on the east ,;chen Laima was brought back to ° a" a 79
    coast, north of Koson and des- The Wav Is O en Whetth fee morthe ago by Army M ay PeCUZE
    treyed 30 buildings, F - « Pp | Red Chine-e. He is under the con-| Pe i ~ \ | ‘ THE ALL-STEEL BICYCLE
    | —U.P. SHINGTON. Aug. 15 | trol of the senior Chinese Com-| Owe?! Ih: epndanon ‘,
    } WASHINGTON, Aug, 15 munist General in Tibet A Product of Raleigh Industries Limued, Nottingham, England.
    - “ + ia ea The Government on Friday re~ "+ gm, : U CAIRO . i As ae ie
    , 2 “Seg Furies Last opened the way for shipments rs —UP. ne pant Al Mi we
    —_ | va" inplate to foreign countries after f ? ety 2 CAVE, SHEPHERD
    A BUCK-SHOOTING TECHNIQUE perfected by these Marines in Korea | tyiteq Naticne Havel joe one tote en en eeTicted because 6 Terrorists Killed | ected I 4 & CO., LTD.
    worked wonderfully 1a company com: er decided the scheme | cd i are eee eer T re aa Wie ns a. N ho | jfo tf 6 * ‘ 2 & 13 Broad Sircet
    involved too gr . It seems that Pvt A. Friday (right), of oe a i ca eee that two Ba : me, Veal re & ee SINGAPORE, Aug. 16 jin t 10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Sircet.
    Mikoosa, Wis., who played the role of a decoy, would b Ser tek. ine ia aa pea Six terrorists were killed, one; peper, ca
    Sa +t’ a a aah a ea 2 rom the British carrier H.MLS. |same it revoked the ord°r captured and one wounded when/the Le«
    from a slit-trench to aw enemy fire. As ! Ocean hav> bev lost th 106: ferf f tin cans for food . |
    Sgt. John E. Boitnott, of Comfort, N.C r , +, would open a b n lo his week ers of tin cans for combined pelice and a military | opmen ,
    Set. i. Bo ile a wpepebad : , - die. in non-combat accidents. The fate! obtaining tin plat nairol engaged gz of thirty | corrupti ! ri ennacihener RIENCE
    ee . of t pilots has not been | terrorists in Tangkak the ea | seal mR. 18a. (2)
    y have ac ond e ed.—U.P. —U.P of Johore on Sat UP. j forn UY = Sete!






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    (Dial 2310)

    Last 2 Shows TO-DAY
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    SUNDAY









    ‘Non, Non” To Shorts
    At the Matisse Chapel :

    ADVOCATE

    t IS Excellency the Governor

    énd Lady Savage accom-
    panied by Major Dennis Vaughan,
    “- Private Secretary, attended the
    opening of the Evelyna Smijth
    CANNES From EVELYN IRONS. Bi ost expensive materials coud Children’s Ward at St. Philip yes-

    A WOMAN in shorts, brassiere ; ¢%be worthy of the design.” terday afternoon.
    and iridescent grcen-psinted- toc- formations and debasements of Mutisse gave his design free, Among those present were Mr.
    nails stepped out of the sizzling S8pe€ art ; ne still comes occasionally from and Mrs. H. A. Ta'ms, Mr. and
    heat down the cool, white stair- ‘Faith, Piety © his fat near Nice to supervise. Mrs. N. G. Daysh, Mrs. EB. B.
    case leading to the world’s stran¢- The instruction said that 4 put the nuns are responsible for Smith, Rev. and Mrs. BH. V. Arm-
    est religious sanctuary - the New styles were adopted the +); money for the construction. strong, Dr. and Mrs. C. L. Hutson,
    Chapel of the Rosary designed by —— a ss ves nae Silent Garbo Hon’ble V.C. Gale M.L.C.. De
    83-year-old French artist Mai's%e made similar to a profane ™*bulld- saa * “ oe
    for the Dominican nuns of Vence, ing,” and insisted on “a sincere ANOTHER curiosity of the and Mrs. J. P. O'Mahony, Miss



    ane faith and piety in the artists.”

    in the hills between Cannes



    Nice Matisse has been called at

    A greve-faced sister in white different times an ctheist and a
    and black Dominican habit raise’ Communist. His werk is believed
    a shocked hand. “Non Non, to be one target of the instruc-
    Madame,” she whivpered. tion.

    Presently the visitor re-appear-
    ed from her car in skirt and
    jacket. The little nun allowed the
    green toenails to get by.

    ‘Outrageous’

    They are very strict now at the
    Chapel of the Rosary. Only on
    two days a week—Tuesday ana
    Thursday — for two rigidly :imii-
    d hours in the morning and two
    hours in the afterncon are the
    public allowed in.

    Fixed on the severe, white out-
    side wall of the squat building
    is a framed edict from Arch-
    bishop Remond of Nice. Warns
    ihe Archbishop; “Those not pre-
    senting themselves in decent
    clothes will be forbidden to enter.
    All loud conversation and any
    display of ar
    will mean the expulsion of the
    visitors concerned.”

    The Mother Supcrior

    she said:
    He
    bo "vy but a Catholic
    created this chapel.”

    etreamed in
    a grey-haired taxi-driver.
    care to judge it.

    Michelangelo’s Sistine
    pretty odd at the tim>.”

    They

    life of work.”

    and postcards and

    (paper covered souvenir

    who rules the 12 nuns and the 35
    girl conyalescents (paid for by
    the French Social Security) under
    her care at the convent

    “They looked on the chapel as
    1 side show They showed no
    reverence. They made loud and
    vulgar jokes about it.”

    Recently the Holy Office in
    Rome issued a 5,000-word instruc-
    tion on sacred art. This devlored

    from one point in the
    terned chasubles for
    A squad of workmen marched

    as soon as the gates
    locked behind the tourists.

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    a

    did not
    comment on the Ppl edict, But
    “Matisse is ne atheist.
    is a believing Cathclic. No-
    could have

    A charabanc load of sight-seers
    when I wes there.
    Most tolerant comment came frota
    “Tt ic
    bizarre,” he said, “but 1 wodlid ne
    thought
    Chapel

    Matisse’s own view: “This chapel
    is for me the flower of ” wole

    Meanwhile, the visitors are puy-
    ing an average of 2s, 6d. each intor
    the offertory plate. And they are
    incorrect attitude spending many pounds on books
    reproductions
    boow«

    “People behaved in such 11 18%. 6d.; one Matisse lithograph
    outrageous way that we had ‘o £4 10s.) to benefit the building
    stop the daily visits,” said the fund.
    plump, brusque Mother Superior The chapel is still unfinished.

    A tangle of electric wires hangs
    ceiling.
    Matisse designed five vividly pat-
    the priest;
    only two of them have been made.

    in

    had been

    The foreman agreed when the now,
    Mother Superior told me: “These |
    men are not béing paid. We still

    “images and styles lately intro- have to find many millions of
    duced” which seemed to be “de- francs. None but the best _anr
    CELLO DLL LLL LCL LEE LLL LPL LAI

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    |
    Hippo’s Tooth
    |








    ‘the first Zoo hippopotamus had to




    Riviera is the ex-film star who Betty Arne, Mr. W. A. Crawford,
    shuns publicity. M.C.P., Mr. J. C. Mottlev, M.C.P.,
    In -her distinctive uniform »f Mrs. H. W. Peebles, Mr. R. B.
    mushroom-shaped straw hat, tied Skeete, Mr. W. A. Yearwood,
    under the chin, black sun-glasses, Mrs. V. Chandler, Mrs. M: F. Byer,
    fi shoes and bulging brown Mr. K. Sandiford, Capt. E. §Sim-
    tandbag. Greta Garbo stalks mons, Rev. O. BE. Jones. Mr. and
    mysteriously past other visitors Mrs. J. S. Wi ) mr. DB. BD.
    in the foyer of the Cariton Hotel, Garner, Mr. E. Greenidge, Mr.
    walks upstairs to her room for Allen Francis, Mr, and Mrs.
    fear of meeting anyone in the Arthur Skecte, Mr.-and Mrs, R.
    lift and turns her head away Jordan, Mrs. I. Jones, Mr. W. M.
    ebruptly and silently if spoken to. Woodhouse, Mr. P. Scott and Miss
    It is difficult to recognise her E. Lashley.

    without the dis Governor Returns Home

    guises.
    Hatless, the long sleek hair of
    the old romantic days is seen ‘9 IR KENNETH BLACKBURNE,
    he short and frizzy. Nobody ‘* Governor of the Leeward
    noticed when Garbo drove bare- oe a ee eae
    headed through the town in her ~~
    big blue — convertible to “a to Ao by B.W.LA.
    board the Afifa, 18}-ton stream- seal ar ait a
    line? motor vacht belonging to y ;

    Sir iuncan Orr- Civil Aviation Chief

    The yacht is being used thi: ING COMMANDER L. A
    month by Garbo after Existen- EGGLESFIELD, Director
    lialist cabaret singer Jubiette General of Civil Aviation in the
    Greece, recovering from an opera- Caribbean area, left the island on
    tion which has changed the shape Thursday by B.W.1.A. for Jamaica
    of her nose to a straight Grecian, where he will take B.O.A.C. for
    had finished with it as a retreat the United Kingdom.

    from the world. On Holiday

    On a shopping expedition it 4 ic. GENEVIEVE GARDNER
    Cannes with her constant com- from Antigua ervived here

    panion George Schlee, Garbo recently by B.W.I,A. for three

    rtopped to look at the Bikinis in . -
    the shop windows, but bought sane ee rath wd i:
    none. The girl. who served her in politan Guest co Soe
    : tobacconist’s did not recognis? “Miss Gardner, an’ employee of

    r. . Geo x t son
    “The French used to call Garbo ces Lta, was | Barbados
    “La Divine.” I don’t notice that in 1948 when she spent six weeks’

    wa 3
    SNe Son and Heir

    It’s No Fi un Ulett entre oeiked aatniane
    Pulling Out A

    of a son and heir. The happy

    event took place on Friday r-

    noon and mother and babe are

    doing fine. Mrs. Austin is the

    former Miss Sheila Clarke, daugh-

    to the Noah’s ter t, Mr. and Mrs. L. M. Clarke,
    ames.

    Third Visit

    RRIVING in the colony by

    Are you going St
    Society this week-end? You may
    not recognise it by this name, but
    it was what the London Zoo was
    called while it was being planned.

    It wae opened in 168%. B.W.1.A. on Thursday last

    Its first inmates were a deer, @ trom Trinidad was Mr Eldric E.
    white-headed eagle and a vulture. Joseph, a retired Civil Servant.
    But real excitement came when pyr, Joseph has come over to spend
    |the Zoo's first four giraffes, which two weeks’ holfday.
    cost £700 arrived in 1836. This is his third visit to the

    Giraffes

    colony the first was in 1943 when

    dad were Mr.
    Maraj who had been spending
    two weeks’ holiday in the island,
    Mr. Maraj is a Civil Servant and
    during their stay here they were
    guests at Crystal Waters, Worth-
    ing.

    SUNI

    ‘cocci iceman {Ye tte

    Carib Calling



    MR, & MRS. DOUGLAS GILL

    Returned Honie

    Bega ienty = the island on Thurs-

    day by B.W.1.A. for Trini-

    and Mrs. Rann



    Miss MANUERITA ZEPHIRIN.

    President, H.E.S.
    EWS has been received that
    Miss Manuerito Zephirin,

    They left the London Docks at he spent four and a half months; daughter of Mrs. Stella Zephirin

    i * i hen he stayed

    three in the morning, and while the second in 1948 w! yi

    they walked the 8% miles to the — —. eal ee
    in side Car a ar

    Zoo, all traffic Was ele UP cd “to favoursbly with other islands in

    de- the Caribbean and thinks it the

    i righten ideal spot for a real holiday. He
    ns ade mat WARS hopes to be returning later. Dur-

    he will be a guest
    But a cow mooed at them and ing his stay here
    ‘they took a lot of coaxing to car- at Silver Beach Guest House.

    ry on quietly after that. Camera Club

    There was excitement too when HE following are the awards
    have a woth out. Mr. Bartlett, the made to Members of the
    superintendent, used a two-foot Camera Club for photographs
    pair of forceps, and stood behind Now on exhibition at the Barbados
    ‘a barrier to pull, Museum:—ist Prize, J. Lomer,
    | Twice he got ghe forceps round 2nd Prize, Lt. Col. J. Connell, 3rd
    |the tooth and the hippo tore them Prize J. Lomer. Honours awards
    jaway. But at the third effort, are as follows:—A. E. Hughes
    ‘with a keeper holding on to Mr. (4), R, Daniel (3), Lt. Col. J.
    | Bartlett's waist the tooth came out. Connell, J. Lomer and M. W. Git-
    | The first Zoo keeper was paid tens (1) each.
    one guinea a week and his uni-
    form was a top shat, striped waist-
    coat, tall-coat, breeches, wellington
    | boots with painted tops—and side-
    | whiskers, .
    | Goat Milk HARLIE SUET. speaking at
    | One bit of fun you will miss Uttoxeter yesterday, outlined
    | that you would have had in those DiS scheme for dealing with the
    ‘early days. The Zoo did not offer Weekly disappearance of 43,728,984
    a refreshment service, but small ©888 in shell. He advocated the
    flocks 6f goats and asses toured the Setting up of collecting stations
    neighbourhood, and visitors could for laying birds, .so that the birds
    { buy their milk on the “stop me could be brought to these centres.
    }and buy one” principle. Their eggs would then be laid

    For this Zoo story in full, see ©n the spot, and the transport of







    1} “The Zoo Story,” by L. R. Bright- €88s from farm to collecting sta-

    tion would be done away with.
    After laying, the birds would be
    taken back to the farms. Each
    farm would have a collecting sta-
    en within ny nee Eggs laid
    in transit woul dealt with b;
    Hollywood: Hollywood Police mobile packing centres, reine
    are studying a Who’s Who of the fast vans, and each attached to the
    movies compiled by two burglary|nearest collecting and stamping
    suspects, It lists addresses of Jane | centre.
    Wyman, robbed of nearly £20,000) Nocturne
    of furs and jewels, and Barbara HAT .
    Sees a Turner, ‘ Fred ahin, Chie eet pees
    Astaire, ary ooper, onald t , e
    | bs turbulent waters lies at her moor-
    Colman—not yet visited. ings under a tranquil sky? Her

    aa viding light—a stub of candle

    GAIETY stuck in a jam-tin—is feebl

    “The -Garden—St, James flected in the muddy ooze, ‘om

    TODAY & TOMORROW 4.30 P.M somewhere amidships comes a
    Mat, TO-DAY 5 pm. mournful song of the sea:—

    Mark TWATN’S .

    Ow, take me orf this ’orrid
    it
    PRINCE & THE PAUPER oc
    Errol FLYNN : The MAUCH TWINS

    Tues, & Wed. 8.30 P.M.
    FORCE of ARMS”
    Wiliam HOLDEN and

    “FORT WORTH" (Color)

    well. >
    (Museum Press, 16s.)

    WHO’S WHO





    I feel I’m slowly goin’ daft,
    And which is fore and which is

    aft
    ru be ‘anged if I can tell, I
    } can't.
    (Rollin’ ’ome from Rio! )
    : Lor! What a -utk!
    Thus sings Mrs. Withersedge,
    aboard the Saucy Mrs. Flobster.

    Rigmarole

    A






    a river upside down on a

    70 CENTS





    The



    Feces acme



    70 cents







    BY THE WAY...

    Te-°

    (Way O, Rio!) 2

    PICTURE of a man crossing

    motor-bicycle, on a wire stretched

    of “Savoy”, Bay Street and the
    late Mr. Zephirin, has won the
    Sarah J. Manning Bursary for the
    coming year at the Victoria Gen-
    eral Hospital and has also been
    made President of the Home Eco-
    mic Society. The Bursary is
    awarded on the recommendation
    of the Staff in Home Economics.

    Mano has just completed her
    third year at the Acadia Univer-
    sity, Nova Scotia in Home Econo-
    mies. This is the highest honour

    that has been conferred on any
    Home Economic Student and she
    has also been invited to one
    the

    an Assistant next year in
    Home Economie IV Nutrition to
    instruct the girls in Dietary
    Studies.

    This summer Mano has been
    working at the Victoria General
    Hospital, Halifax, N.S.

    200 feet above the water would
    seem to prove—

    Chorus: If proof were needed—
    —that there are more ways than
    one of crossing a river. Not long
    ago a man set out to eat a pud-
    ding made of waterproof suet
    while standing on his head in a
    tub on the bed of the River Ouse
    above Lewes. His mother arrived
    just as he was going into the
    water, ang took him home,

    Prodnose; Is that all?

    Myself: It’s all I can_ think
    of at the moment. Oh—nhis
    mother’s name was Mrs. Sud-
    deley, if that helps at all.

    PROPHET said the other day

    ' that it is possible mankind

    will end by eating grass, in order
    to solve all feeding problems.

    The gloomy Ephesian philo-

    sopher Heraclitus lived for

    while on grass, and got dropsy for





    minutes before a2
    making a quick of -
    tion, scuttles over a In a

    fb te oa
    Rupert stumbles and falls, He
    gets up as fast as he can and
    stands on the bank, but the other

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    Rupert ’s Spring Adven ture—10

    DAY, 1952

    ——

    AUGUST 17,

    Married at St. Leonard’s ‘
    A Gece ttgrn 3 at 4.30 p.m. at

    St. Leonard’s Church Miss
    Clemie Medford daughter of Mr.
    and Mrs. Frederick Medford of
    Paul Over, St. Vincent was mar-
    ried to Mr. Douglas M. Gill, ‘son
    of the late Mr. C. O. B. Gill and
    Mrs Gill of Hove, Brighton, Black
    Rock.

    The ceremony which was fully
    choial was conducted by the
    Rev. H. A. Melville. The bride
    who was given in marriage by Mr.
    Clyde A. Field wore a dress of
    lace and nylon cut in Victorian
    lines with train. Her headdress
    was of finger tip illusion lace and
    a halo of orange blossoms. She
    carried a bouquet of pink radiance
    and gerberas in crescent shape.

    She was attended by Miss Gloria
    Gibson _as bridesmaid and the
    Misses Roseann Gill and Heather
    Field as flower girls. The brides-
    maid wore a pink lace bodice and
    nylon skirt with lace mittens to
    match &nd silver sandles. Her |
    headdress was of pink crinoline
    and forget-me-nots and she car~
    ried a bouquet of pink radiance
    and gerberas.

    The flower girls wore blue
    striped nylon and silver sandals.
    Their headdress were of blue and
    pink forget-me-nots with posies
    to match.

    The duties of bestman\ were
    performed by Mr, Beresford O.
    Gill brother of the m and
    those of ushers fell to Mr. George
    Marshall, Mr. Errol Marshall, Mr.
    Glyne Goodridge, and Mr. Clin-
    ton Gill.

    A reception was held at “Rose-
    ville’, Brighton, Black Rock, the
    home of Mr. and Mrs, E. C. Gill
    and the honeymoon is being spent
    at “Sunny Caribee”, Bequia, St.

    Vincent. ‘
    For a Week %
    R. FRANK LINCOLN who
    ‘had been spending a short
    holiday in Barbados 1} for Ja-
    maica by B.W.I.A_ on Thursday
    morning. Mr. Lincoln came in on
    Thursday last week and has gone
    on to Jamaica where he will spend
    one week before returning to
    Trinidad.
    Back to U.S.A.
    R. ELLIOTT MARRUS of
    Messrs. B, Marrus and Son,
    Inc., of New York, left the colony
    during the week for Trinidad by
    B.W.1.A. intransit for the U.S.A.



    By Beachcomber

    his pains. But there is another
    objection to the idea to-day. When
    ait the best pasture-land has been
    taken over for new towns: dirt-
    tracks and airfields, there will be
    a shortage of grass and we shall
    not have the money to import it.
    It will then be rationed and the
    black marketeers will grab up
    great quantities of it by night and
    sell it to the West End restaurants,
    Not one bite free
    HE Parsian whose nose was
    nipped by a lobster, imme-
    diately after he had complained
    that it was not fresh, got damages
    from the restaurant. In England
    someone would have said. “The
    pretty thing was only playing,
    and the man’s nose got in the
    way.” And the man would have
    been reprimanded for cruelty to
    lobsters, and hooted through the
    streets,





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    SUNDAY,

    AUGUST 17, 1952



    At The Cinema

    B.B.C. RADIO NOTES:

    A Swashbuckling Tale Disewssions On
    By G.R.
    BACK IN MY YOUNG DAYS, I remember being

    thrilled to the core by the original production of Sabatini’s
    SCARAMOUCHE, starring Ramon Novarro, whose glamour-

    Culture In W.L
    Programmes

    Gn Wednesdays In August
    Since the first Wednesday in

    SUNDAY

    ADVOCATE

    PSGE THREE



    FARM AND GARDEN

    My Agricola

    TiMELY

    WARNING

    THE WATERWORKS DEPARTMENT in its efforts
    to conserve our water resources, has indicated that weather
    conditions in the last few morths have not been eo
    to maintenance of supplies at a level sufficient to justily
    the use of the precious fluid freely and without due care.

    have been frequent and seasonable,

    ‘TO WAKE
    FEELING
    TIRED











    \ wers ;
    ous: lo and swordplay set a lot of young female a a= Lanes = ee oe Ny speaking, no heavy downpours New rises, ‘
    hearts aflutter! Now, thirty years later, MG.M. has come Qiscing under the Sain so far to replenish the water system on which we depend, fyjj of =
    ees with ae oe that = —. a Fe of Wily Bichamiom an approsch Let us hope that the deficit wall goon. be ume. cage ong e@ergy: 4 |
    ure is not as Casting as its predecessor and a certain of culture as a theme of life which ~ tp a the first users to be restricted,

    as . 2 . they are attempting to reach but they need not be unduly :
    amount — =, a tice feeling - the eee through a critical analysis of worried if the requisite precau~| 0) M's start for a
    missing. Nevertheless, thoug is may be a-somewha 5

    tongue-in-cheek version of
    thoroughly enjoyable, light
    It is one of the most elaborate

    productions to come our way,
    with gorgeous settings and sump-
    ous: bea

    a Serious, romantic tale, it is
    entertainment. F

    MEL FERRER



    three significant books in which
    the authors endeavoured to set
    out their ideas in relation to such
    a definition. The two books
    already discusseq have beef
    Matthew Arnold’s “Culture and
    Anarchy” and T. S. Eliot’s “Note

    HINTS FOR
    AMATEURS

    tions are taken by everyone toa
    avoid waste. Simple as it may
    seem, not very many realise, for
    example, the wastage from run-
    ning taps left untended and some
    again are quite unmindful of the
    use that can be of both




    lay'’s work if you wake
    up feeling tired and
    istless, instead of being
    brisk and full of energy.
    One woman who, can
    uppreciate the difference from
    ner own experience, writes to
    we >

    costumes, the uty of towards a Definition of Culture.” bath and wash water for garden| “Before taking Kruschen, 1
    whieh is further enhanced by In the broadcast -on Wednesday purposes. | slways used to wake in the ‘
    QT color, The plot moves next, 20th Angust, they will dis- This showery weather is a It is surprising how much | worning speek err es. pe Ashton & Parsons Infants
    swiftly along, impelled by love cuss “America and Cosmic Man” most favourable time for cutting wxter can seved in actual { Reve lost oo et er ee | Powd are Swit
    and revenge, against a back- by D. B. Wyndham Lewis: The back Hibiscus. This plant can ‘watering if all practise a measure | Monee: had take me feel years | owders are wondertully
    ground of pre-French Revolution discussions are set against the be cut any time, even in the,dry of restraint. It is well to remem-/ vounger. I also suffered with | soothing at teething time.
    days, when the complacency of background of the realisation that months, but naturally it springs ber that plants like animéts only | rheumatic pains in my shoulders 5 5
    the aristocrats was being rudely the elimination of illiteracy is by again quicker if cut in weather appreciate a dgjnk when they! and swellings round my ankles “Ask your They ensure regular easy
    disturbed a patriot call- itself a negative achievement and. such as we are having at present, require it. Veteran gardeners I am now comprevely oie o “ie J ’ '
    ing” himse areus Brutus and that something positive in thrf}>on’t be afraid of doing this job have long kept in view the maxim: | [hose ee came at motions, cool the bleed and
    advocating Liberty, Equality .and realm of culture must fulfil asf horoughly. Cut to within a few give a plant a drimic when it is cannot speak too highly of it.” Mother to are absolutely safe. Try them
    Fraternity ! This factor does im- consolidute every achievement MH nches of the ground, stir up the ‘ry. In other words, do not keep migel. , ‘ a ge aie: ,
    pinge a certain seriousness in Furthermore new cultures arc& ‘oil around the plant and‘manure the soil wet but let it get thirsty | Kruschen keops you young clive you for your baby next time he is
    parts, but it is never permitted emerging today in those parts offft and with the rains to help, it between drinks, You see, a good because it toues up the fiver, st ? 7 4“ ; , :
    to over-shadow the all-over the world—such as the West In-Hivitl be up again im a very short 90il holds both water and air at) Sdneys and Dowels and keeps fretful when cutting his teeth.
    atmosphere of fun and derring- dies—-which were formerly de- im the same time. Both are held efficiently. The reward of this
    do pendent for development on the

    _ In brief, the story concerns a
    young French revolutionist, who
    disguises himself as the actor-
    clown Scaramouche, while seek-
    ing to learn his own identity and
    at the same time, avenge the
    death of a friend at the hands of



    trends- and achievements of 2@
    metropolitan country. Now they
    need self-expression and have e
    desire to contribute. It i

    e.
    Should any of the cut branches
    vave scale or any other blight,
    is advisable to burn them.

    these points in mind that theses27ound for any ants nests, or

    discussion programmes now bes
    ing broadcast by the BBC for the

    ant trails, and deal drastically
    with them, as ants are supposed

    between the soil particles. If
    there is an excess of water, the
    air is driven out and plants suffer
    for lack of it. Lack of water, on
    the other hand, is equally harm-
    ful so a balance between air and
    water must be maintai

    Further, it should be borne in

    | Internal cleanliness is a freshened
    and invigorated body. Poisonous |

    | waste materials are expelled and |
    the pains of rheumatism cease.

    | And as yon continue with Kru- |

    ; chen, your Faole body responds |

    | $o its purifying force. |

    | Krusshen is obtainable froma |

    ASHTON & PARSONS
    INFANTS’ POWDERS’



    om









    res sible or ? | mists and Stores. iia. 0
    ‘an aristocrat who is the finest West Indies are conducted ii + responsible for spreading iq that plants’ make the best Lar)
    duellist in France. During his “-* —~ George Lamming is the Barbadian! pias. ‘e difficult to rid foot growth when the sof! '> dry~
    adventures, he falls in love with poet, who walk Sones 2 first novel!) got _ a a get ul ing nas stage a |
    a young countess, only to discover ; i published in the autumn of this.)°™ after kettlef vant gardeners soon lei) \o ree~
    she is his sister; tours with a group me Senin cate 58 Ce ens year; William Goeking, now on (boiling ae been — OR ognise. The roots reach out for}
    of actors; becomes involved with j, “feet beearnitig a fme actor, Holiday in Britain, is in charge ofj‘h© ae oa 9 = water as the supply dimnishes)
    a turbulent red-head and finally Fleanor Parker has a new type !2¢ Central Library Scheme irpeVivors will ea * The. ty 28d vigorous growth results, That
    comes face to face with his enemy gf role and she misses no tricks Tvinidad; Willy Richardson, eg Uilding their home, e only is why too much or too little|

    in what must be the most spec~
    or duelling scene ever film-
    ed.

    The two protagonists in this
    duel are Stewart Granger as
    Scaramouche and Mel Ferrer ad
    the Marquis de Maynes, and the
    athletic agility of the two men is
    ineredible. The climax of the
    picture, the duel starts on the
    edge of the tier of boxes where
    it continues in seeming mid-air
    for some time. From there, the
    swordsmen continue in the foyer,
    downstairs, over bannisters,
    through the theatre and finally
    on to the stage itself, where
    scenery and props of all kinds are
    brought into action. The whole
    scene is remarkably exciting,
    though it is done in the good old
    tradition of the late Douglas Fait-
    banks, with Mr, Granger swinging
    in mid-air with all the assurance
    of a trapeze artist, and there is
    no denying the extraordinary
    duelling skill of the two actors,

    The cast is a first-rate one, with
    Stewart Granger and Mel Ferrer
    giving splendid performances. Mr.
    Granger’s ability to change from
    comedy and light banter to serious
    acting in an instant, as well as
    some of his mannerisms and tim<



    JANET LEIGH

    ee
    ——



    DANCE AT

    and HIS
    and

    featuring






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    SAT. 30th August

    TO THE TUNES OF

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    “SOCIETY SIX”

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    as the fiery-tempered red-head.
    In complete contrast, Janet Leigh
    makes a charming yo countess
    though her acdnt could have been
    softened a t. Nina Foch as
    Marie Antoinette and Lewis Stone
    as Valmorin round out the cast.

    An interesting feature in the
    film is an authentic picture of the
    commedia dell’ arte with all its
    slapstick and buffoonery, This
    form of comedy flourished in
    France and Italy from the 15th
    century, and some of the original
    sketches have been adapted for
    this film. Since humour in those
    days was earthy, to say the least,
    it has been toned down to suit
    modern audiences, but the orig-
    inal flavour is still there, along
    with the ever-present pantomine.

    All in all, IT found S@ARA-
    MOUCHE thoroughly enjoyable
    light entertainment. I hope you
    do too.

    Cairo Road And Rapture

    A thriller and a dramatic love
    story are being shown at the two
    Plazas. At the Barbarees theatre,
    CAIRO ROAD is something differ-
    ent from the usual “cops and rob-
    bers” film in that it is a blend of
    fact and fiction and tells the story
    of the tremendous efforts being
    made to stop the drug traffie in
    Egypt. The film was. actually

    ‘made in that country with the

    assistance of the Egyptian govern-
    ment and is an absorbing and
    often exciting picture.

    The cast is headed by one of
    England’s outstanding actors, Eric
    Portman, who gives a thoroughly
    sound and restraimed performance
    as the head of the enti-narcotics
    branch of the Egyptian Police.
    Outstanding in the supporting
    cast is Harold Lang—a newcomer
    to films, but an old hand on the
    ctage—and a new type of villain,
    with a cocky expression and man-
    ner that belie a silky, suave voice.
    More should be seen and heard of
    this young actor.

    In complete contrast, RAPTURE
    showing in Bridgetown is defi-
    nitely:sombre drama. The action
    takes place in Rome and its en-
    virons, and once again, we have
    authentic backgrounds. Filmed
    in the Eternal City and on the
    ancient estate of an Italian prince,
    it is scenically truly delightful,

    and the photographer has made

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    Trinidadian now on the BBC's!
    staff, once worked in the Trinidad
    Library Service. In the broad-
    cast which you can hear next
    Wednesday they wili discuss th
    third book of the series and on
    the last Wednesday in August the
    will sum up the preceding dis
    cussions. ‘The broadcast on th
    20th begins at 7.25 p.m., while ti
    concluding ‘programme on the
    27th will start at 7.15 p.m. to give

    half an hour to the summing up,’ flowering plant,

    Broadcasts can be heard in the 25
    and 31 metre bands, 11.75 and
    9.58 megocycles, respectively.

    Roger Mais’s ‘Hassim’

    Listeners to ‘Caribbean Voices’
    may recall that on the 20th April
    last the BBC broadcast a play by
    the Jamaican writer, Roger Mais.
    This play will be repeated on the
    17th inst., and as reception is now
    almost perfect from London there
    should be no trouble in hearing
    every word of it. Incidentally
    focal playwrights who have
    attempted unsuccessfully to have
    a_play accepted by the BBC for
    ‘Caribbean’ Voices’ should note
    that plays will be used provided
    they are good‘enough, as ‘Hassim’
    certainly is, Broadcast will begin
    at 7.15 p.m,



    aces!

    ‘the most of his excellent oppor-
    tunities.

    The story concerns a young
    Italian sculptor with whom two
    sisters fall in love. He himself is
    in love with the younger girl for
    whom the machinations of her de-
    signing sister prove too much, and
    the triangular affair turns into
    tragedy.

    The cast, which is practically
    unknown, is headed by Glenn
    Langan, a handsome young
    American actor and Elsy Albiin,
    a new Swedish discovery, who has
    great charm and beauty. Though
    the acting is, on the whole, con-
    vineing, I think that both these
    young people would give a better
    response under different direction,
    I certainly hope we see them






    ‘any time after which it
    with

    ching to do then is to repeat the
    iling water treatment until all

    and
    most decorative plant a it is
    rprising that it is not seen more
    commonly in our gardens,
    It has so mach to reeommend
    It is as bright and gay as a
    it grows vefy
    easily from cuttings, it makes a
    good pot plant, a shrub, or a
    hedge. It can be trimmed at
    will
    spring
    vigour,
    There are numerous varieties
    of the Croton, and it is most
    interesting to make a collection
    of the different kinds and have
    — in pots or as shrubs about
    e .
    Crotons grow easily under
    ordinary garden conditions.
    like plenty of water and a sunny
    and the plants genereilly
    make a spurt of growth during
    the rainy months. Don’t be dis-
    couraged if your cuttings grow
    slowly. Crotons are slow starters
    + onee they = —_ a start
    ey come on q .
    For grawth

    and
    with

    rapid
    there is nothing to
    our common pink Coralita.

    Once this vine is established in
    the garden it is there for good,
    seeding itself so that young ones
    spring up all about. It is a most
    useful vine, for it will cover the
    top of a Fernery, a wall, lattice
    or wire in an ineredibly short
    time, providing a thick screen of
    green with clusters of delicate
    and graceful sprays of pink
    flowers. It needs no help in the
    way of training for it climbs
    unaided and clings of its own
    accord. All this, too, with the
    minimum of garden care. Once
    a year it is advisable to cut the
    Coralita vine to the ground. If
    this is not done there accumu-
    lates a mass of dried leaves and

    water are both equally preju-|
    dicial; the former condition must)
    be rectified either by acequate
    drainage or by not over-watering
    in comparatively dry periods.|
    The use of soil mulch or coven to
    prevent much undue loss by
    evapqration in times of shortage
    cannot be too strongly empha-
    sised, Remember too that sprink-
    ling for a brief period every day
    is not only, wasteful but bad |
    ractice since, in this way, only
    top few inches of soil are
    moistened. This encourages root
    they near the surface where
    ying out is rapid, It is eco-
    nomical, therefore, of water to
    apply it so that its duty can be
    most effectively performed with-
    out loss by evaporation, The
    maxim should be to soak deeply!
    whenever the need arises rather |
    than @ daily sprinkle which is not
    only harmful but wasteful.
    SAVE WATER AT ALL TIMES:
    IT IS PRECIOUS TO LIFE—
    HUMAN, ANIMAL AND PLANT. |

    Weed Control

    We dealt with this subject quite
    fully in one of our earlier col-
    umns. In this showery weather, |
    dormant weeds tend to come to}
    ie with remarkable vigour, The
    problem is often accentuated by
    the re-seeding which follows the
    use of dirty manure from un-
    known sources or from compost |
    hastily made by the inclusion of |
    weed growth which has run to}



    seed. From time immemorial,
    gardeners have deyoted their

    thought and energy to fighting
    pernicious weeds and, from time
    to time, some curious and in-
    genious methods have been put
    forward for their control. The
    weed with a shallow root system
    is easy to handle; it is the kind
    with storage organs Jike nut gras*
    or root-stocks like devil's grass
    that are really stubborn. The
    modern ‘weedicide cannot reach
    effectively these
    parts. Some years ago an Aus-
    tralian recommended the use o!
    molasses against nut grass; in our

    again, along with Lorraine Miller, twigs under the green of the vine,vexperience, the nut grass thrived |
    A gardener in England is
    In affnow recommending the covering
    lof weedy beds with two to three
    |
    |
    !

    who makes a fascinatingly pre-
    datory female.

    The musicc& score played by the
    Symphonie Orchestra of Radio
    Roma is in keeping with the

    mather haunting atmd@sphere of
    the film.










    j

    ~

    which is an encour
    garden pests and insects,
    week the vine will be up
    and in a very short time it is
    difficult to tell it had ever

    cut down,

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    PIER HEAD — DIAL 4284

    SSS














    PAGE FOUR ADVOCATE



    oo SUNDAY







    W.1. PROFESSIONALS
    | OFFERED £15 siditad. «, stasce.

    a ae nae a Z Spartan 141 and (for 5 wkts.
    Trinidad Table Tennisis Impress: yoj.0%8* a ioe 3 ea
    | The Police-Spartan First Divis-
    | . a Y io Cc ot ate “Te,
    College Junior Basketball Champa 0%, ick! match petered out
    yesterday when Police failed to
    | By O. 8, COPPIN accept the challenge Spartan threw
    | _ Out to them by de¢laring with five
    | "WHE most recent information about West Indies cricket is that the oe — and giving Police
    | professionals have been offered a fee of £15 pee Test match and jyjy, eke Se
    nothing else. In other words if they happen to be in the West Indies sale <
    j at the time, because there is no mention of paying their passages from wi cat ie scceee 141 and for five
    | England where they all are, then they will be offered the same as 146 arid for eee See Police
    [a re Stolimeyer or anyone else. Spartan’s calikeat on, 142, fect
    | Most of us are familiar with Shakespeare’s Jacques “Seven ages of wioj-ot ; tH tia ate
    } man” and I suppose that there have been little example of that pecu- org sii the first innings the first
    liar age “turning again towards second childishness”, Sea = dei Bolt eof Suen ting
    DISEASE roa‘ tioweren,

    | s ; and Bradshaw. Spartan,
    "WT HIS disease must be infecting some of the members of the Board were able to beep ‘hig’ toad

    who could expect that in this year of Our Lord 1952 they could when the
    vb ' Ss yea ) “ y bowled out Police for
    | usher in this fantastic Utopia with one flourish of the pen. 146, thus, nevertheless, ceding first
    | cae now that unless the member bodies of the West Indies innings lead points.
    that have been taken in their ames they will be parties so'the pares Mnstors ero when Mies ee
    eee tee ee ema a S oo, will be parties to the - innings score when Atkins, G, N.
    ton of a nonsense that will make them the laughing stock of Grant, N. Harrison and Keith Wal-
    International cricket circles, cott gave valuable individual
    GROUNDSMEN GET “MORE Scores of 58, 40, 51 and 37, re-
    DO not think that the groundsmen who are going to prepare the §Rectively. Harrison played a
    wickets will charge less than £15 per test match, far less profes- 8t@"d innings and his wicket was
    sionals who have been paid thousands in leaner days of*West Indies ‘tli intact when Spartan declared,
    cricket, ’ The wicket, if anything, assist-
    ‘ This evil must be nipped in the bud at once before it develop ed batsmen. For Bradshaw's two
    | into a Srerunner of the destruction of what we have built up in Inter- ae on ier t an onan
    national cricket in a half century of years in spite of si arly s bP ee en so ene
    | eenecns od geen i half century of years in spite of similarly strange 3.5 overs, Mullins claimed the
    lead of discriminating met | VISITORS WID { TENNIS ee ie dees
    ead o i men emia eee NAT TABLE TENNIS i From the start of Police’s second
    | i visiting South Trinidad Table Tennis team have won both their innings, it was evident that th
    ma tate i] matches this week in convincing style. They defeated the cham- were not accepting the chal wd
    { ee | : pions, bi my, by _ ee hes ee and dealt in a similarly firm F¥ ‘Taglor and C. Blackman wie
    Fes 5 manner with a combined Barna-Y.M.P.C, team. tar ] snfi ook
    ya * he These two handsome wins make them favourites for the first Test oo Rag are oir Be

    ee TWO | score to 80 7

    that takes place on Monday night, but the Barbadian players have who was eee cone oe
    ben oe ee of peas pos pherees in action and have had time Taylor was stumped off Bowen's
    | to study their individual style of play. bowlin for 52 Ta y
    | In the circumstances there is no reason why they should not go score 38 before does te Mes
    | sto battle tomorrow night free from pessimism and inferiority com- |. b.w. off L. F Harris’ nawiin
    | plex confident in the belief that even if they fail to win they will have Cc. Amey “went one down oad

    Tonic

    For
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    | put up a jolly good fight. played a sound innings to end not

    | NETBALL GET FILIP out with 38,

    | "FYHE commendable success of the Queen’s College netball team in

    _ their fixtures with Trinidad should go a long way towards stimu-
    lating local support and interest in this form of sport in the island.

    It is true that the game is being played at Association level and ,.,. Imi iL

    | the leading Girls’ Schools and some clubs are represented in the ‘Wanderers ist Liss, S48

    Uh i ed, competition, Pi Ae a wkts) ...... 28
    d , x OSS yr , | Interest is restricted to the members of the Association and their paese and ........ 230
    The Cream of at TCS. Wigs | immediate relatives and friends but I think that this achievement oa

    S.M.G. AGENCIES

    the Queen's College girls entitles us to look towards the Intercolonial ‘im skipper John Goddard in
    J. & R. BUILDING, PALMETTO STREET, BRIDGETOWN, BARBADOS

    PICKWICK v. * WANDERERS
    at Wanderers.



    HAIR CREAM



    Despite a brilliant 96 not out by

    eb isirins te lmarigny. their second innings, Pickwick was

    This in itself will constitute a filin to the teams comprising the defeated’ by Wanderers by. ten

    Association to endeavour to reach a high standard. wiekets yesterday the last day in

    W.L. ATHLETIC UNION? their First Division cricket match

    FW HE Barbados contingent of cyclists and athletes who took part in Beck! i Mead nice see ant
    the recent Meet in British Guiana have returned. ,

    The detailed their second innings at 230 runs
    results of the games and the part which our athletes have played in a Pickwick gave Warherers the

    Meet in which competition was so keen that six records were broken, amount of 19 runs to score for
    | have been set out elsewhere in this paper. victory in their second innings.
    The scheme with which I propose to deal and which I think is Wanderers made 28 runs without
    | pregnant with possibilities, following the visit of athletes and cyclists losing a wicket just. after lunch
    from other Caribbean territories, is that of staging Annual Cycle and yesterday.
    | Athletic Championships in the Caribbean Area. On the first day of play Wan-
    Whilst in British Guiana, Mr, Gilmore Roachford, Honorary derers batted first and scored a
    Secretary of the Amateur Athletic Association of Barbados had grand total of 343 runs in their
    informal discussions with
    Association and Cyclists Union of British Guiana, relative to the Atkihson 145 and _ Intercolonial
    | staging of Annual Cycle and Athletic Championships in the Caribbean player G. Proverbs 117, Pickwick
    Avda. in their turn at the wicket on the
    IDEA IS B.G’'S second day were all out for 131
    | HE idea, I am informed, was first mooted by the B.G. Union and Uns and at the end of play on that
    | the suggestions are that such championships be staged at each it they oe lowe five wickets for
    | participating country in turn and should be run on lines similar vith the oe as Sine Canaeen
    | to the Brandon trophy and under the International rules as laid down 43 not shit Mapper, Joan ard
    by the L.A.A-F, and the U.C.L,. ‘

    Yesterday Pickwick carried their
    F , _ WHO WILL JOIN _, Se -tvernight ‘score of 119 for five
    | HE countries which are at present suggested as participants in wickets to 230 runs and John God-

    | these championships are British Guiana, Trinidad, Surinam and dard who hit 14 fours was unde-
    | Barbados, _ feated with 96.

    Provision is to be made for other countries to join if they desire Denis Atkinson’ again took the
    and prospective members must obviously include Jamaica, tne bowling honours for Wanderers in
    | Leewards and Windwards. : the Pickwick second innings and

    The Secretary also managed to have discussions with the Secretary @nded with an analysis of 30 overs,
    | of the Trinidad and Tobago Cycling Federation, nine maidens, 66 runs, four wick-

    I hope that these preliminaries talks will lead to some concrete ets. He varied his deliveries and
    effort being made towards streamlining and placing on a proper moved the ball both ways and had
    basis, athletics and cycling in these territories, the batsmen uncertain. When T.

    The establishing of a system vf Annual athletic and cycling Birkett seemed set for big things
    championships is the only answer to this need, he bowled him with what looked

    COLLEGE WIN AT BASKETBALL like a yorker. At one stage he

    ONGRATULATIONS are in order for the Harrison College nad John Goddard pinned down

    : A and sent down a mai
    | Second. Division team who have followed in the footsteps of jatsman, M. Foster a ee

    their senior team and have themselves won the Second Division qymber nine in the batting order

    championship,

    | Like the First Division team “they have won by the vexatigus Wanderers bowling but when his

    method of goal average but this is the law and they have won. score was 36 he was given out leg
    Two champienships, one won by the First Division team and before the wicket to the bowling

    | the other by the Second Division team is an achieyement of which of Denis Atkinson who had just

    any School might justly be proud and all sport fans will join with taken the new ball,

    j/me in extending the heartiest congratulations to Harrison College, Just before the hincheon inter-

    | val Pickwick concluded their sec-

    } ond innings at 230 runs thus giv-

    ; ve rs ing Wanderer: total of 19 8
    Snappers, Bonitas Win K,.O. Cups tory. G. Proverbs and 1

    for victory. G. Proverbs and D.
    SNAPPERS scored a 92 victory player, Jones who replaced pick and when stumps were drawn
    |











    Evelyn easily knocked off this total
    over Swordfish at the Aquatic Reece in making up the seventh Wanderers had scored 28 runs in
    Club last night to win the Division man. Géoffrey Foster went in the a aes ond innings for the loss of
    in = : ate ease , , Ja ‘ wicket with G. Proverbs not

    A” Knock Out Competition, They back line in place of Reece, and out 23 and D. Evely t t fi

    earlier in the season won the Jones played in the forward, but oa nt sete ert

    Challenge Cup, In the Division gave little assistarice to his team HARRISON COLLEGE

    Snappers on the other v. EMPIRE,

    hand were at their dashing best, Harrison College .. 196 an@ 134
    Empire 253 and 3. wick-

    ot ¥
    8 them extra-white. And, because of the unique formula
    underlying Ipana’s “refreshingly different” mint flavour,
    you fight decay by reducing acid-forming bacteria. Massage
    ‘ Ipana into your gums and you help keep them firm and |B” Final, Police suffered a 5—4 fellows,

    Brush your teeth with Ipana and you clean



    | defeat at the hand of Bonitas,
    | For Snappers, Delbert Bannistex
    |}scored two, Billy Manning four The teams were:— ets) ..... os 8.35 CE eee 70
    jand Malcombe Browne three, Snappers: Clarke, Billy Manning Clairmonte DePeiza made a fine
    | Geoftrey Foster and Lorenzo Best Frank Menning, Delbert Bannis~ effort to clinch an outright vic-
    scored for Swordfish, ier, Kenneth Ince, Malcombe tory for Empire against College
    Snappers were completely Brown and George McClean. at Weymouth yesterday. Empire
    masters of their opponents whom Swordfish: Albert Weatherhead, needed 78 runs for victory with
    | they thoroughly routed, It can be Lorenzo Best, Gerard Jordan, 39 .minutes in which to make
    |said for Swordfish, however, that Geoffrey Foster, Herbert -Portillo them, DePeiza going in first wicket
    they had to play with an unskilled Nestor Portillo and Jones, down, scored at a rate of approxi-

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    Yesterday

    the Secretary of the Amateur Athletic first innings with Test player D.’

    put up some resistance to the ¢





    ’s Cricket

    mately two runs a minute be-
    fore te was run out for 24.

    This grand display did not how-
    ever benefit the Bank Hall team.
    When stumps were drawn they
    were eight runs short of victory.

    M. Worme Saved the day for
    College. Going in sixth wicket
    down, he repelled the Empire
    attack and made victory more
    difficult for Empire. When the
    College innings closed he was 24
    not out,

    On the first Saturday of the
    match the College team batted
    first and knocked up 196. Empire
    replied with 253 on the follow-
    ing Saturday, having a first in-
    nings lead of 57 runs.

    Yesterday the College side was
    skittled out for 134 runs. Apart
    from Worme, F. Tudor and A.
    Alleyne made valuable contribu-
    tions of 38 and 32 respectively.

    Horace King was the most suc-
    cessful bowler for Empire. He
    sent down 21 overs, of which nine
    were maidens, and took four wick-
    ets for 27 runs,

    E. Grant and S. Rudder took
    two each for nine and 36 respec-
    tively. Oliver Fields captured one
    wicket for 13 runs and Claude
    Lewis one for nine.

    Empire needed 78 runs fer vic-
    tory with 30 minutes of play left,
    At close of play the score was 70
    for three wickets. C. Hunte scored
    25 not out and C. DePeiza 24 run
    out. Mr. Sam Headley took the
    two wickets for 40 runs.

    SPARTAN vs. POLICE
    Spartan 141 and (for 5 wkts.) .... 216
    Police 146 and (for 4 wkts.) ........ 12
    SPARTAN 2ND INNINGS
    A. Atkins ec F. Taylor b C. Bradshaw 56
    S. Griffith l.b.w. b Bradshaw .... 0
    N. Grant ¢ Taylor b Mullins ...... 40

    N_ Harrison not out ................ 51
    K gy Walcott eC. Amey b F. Taylor 37

    F King c Byer b Taylor .......... 15
    PRONE Fo Sees dawasgh ess indrens 15
    Total (for 5 wkts.) ..... “216

    Fall of wickets—1 for 0, 2 for 83, 3 for
    129, 4 for 186, 5 for 216
    BOWLING ANALYSIS
    oO.



    M, R. W.
    C. Mullins avid gg ae 6 69 1
    C Bradshaw ... i” 3 46 2
    Cc. Blackman be 3; — 43 oe
    C. DeC. Springer... -4 — Mm +
    DOP ce iiie 4 6 - sos —
    G Sobers 2 — 19 —
    ¥, Taylor .. xis 35— 15 2
    POLICE 2ND INNINGS
    F, Taylor 1.b.w. b L. F. Harris .... 28
    C. Blackman stpd. w.k. b Bowen .. 52
    C. Amey Not OUE 25... .cesssesreceaes 38
    G. Sobers b N. Harris ... 6
    A. Blackman not out ....,...... ee
    C DeC. Springer ¢ sub b Grant . 0
    BRGEAB oss vey isacdeessies tected il
    Total (for 4 wkts.) ...... 142

    Fall of wiekets—1 for 80, 2 for 105, 3 for
    125, 4 for 126,
    BOWLING ANALYSIS
    Oo,

    § ye
    F King vce ste me 3 9 —
    F. Phillips yen ghee 7 2 6 —
    a eee eee | 5 40 1
    L.. F. Harris .... 16 6 26 1
    OS ee 3 2 1
    G. Grant ve.cseeree — 20 1

    HARRISON COLLEGE vs. EMPIRE
    Harrison College ist Inning:
    Empire Ist Innings 258
    HARRISON COLLEGE 2ND INNINGS
    C. Smith c Rudder, b H. King .... 11
    FE. Hope |.b.w. E. Grant ....... a0 ae
    A. Alleyne ¢ Holder b C. Lewis .... 32
    C, Blackman c Robinson b Rudder 4
    F. Tudor stpd. w.k. DePeiza b H.











    H. King .
    Mr. Headley 1.b.w, H. King . 1
    M. Worme not out .........---s505 2A

    M. Simmons c Lewis, b H. King .. 0



    S. Hewitt c & b Rudder .........+++ 0
    C. Reid ¢ Rudder b O. Fields . 8
    G. Foster c Rudder b BE, Gra ai se
    BOXtras nce veese cece sevens 10

    Total ..... ‘ ar vveecs Se

    Fall of wickets—1 for 8, 2 for 17, 3 for
    32, 4 for 90, 5 for 91, 6 for 92, 7 for 92,
    6.for 103, 9 for 112

    BOWLING ANALYSIS







    Or M.- Ry,
    h i4 5 19 =>
    E Grant * a. ae ae 9 2
    S Rudder vee 14 4 36 2
    H. King 21 9 27 4
    ©, Fields + 7 3 13 1
    Al SDDIGEE a iicavscens” 8 n—
    Cc Lewis .. i eG 4 1
    EMPIRE 2ND INNINGS

    Robinson b Mr. Headley - ‘ 2

    . Hunte not out .......:6-ee eee i

    o

    Cc

    C. DePeiza run out .. .......-.;@.

    W. Drayton c Alleyne b Mr, Headley 8

    A. Holder not out coc. ccccseeeseneee 0
    TERCOGE Saino car mate ee il



    Total (for 3 wkts.) ..

    Fal! of wickets—1 for 3, 2 for 46, 3 for
    4.

    BOWLENG ANALYSIS
    oOo M

    4 et Ww.

    Mr. Headley ...... . tt — 40 2

    M. Simmons ........ 4 — 19 —

    WANDERERS vs. PICKWICK AT
    WANDERERS

    Wanderers ist Innings veda meena See

    Pickwick Ist Innings . mt

    PICKWICK 2ND INNINGS



    i, L. G, Hoad b E. Atkinson .....
    E. Edwards c D. Atkinson b E
    Atkinson . eokbe>s fare 33
    J. D. Goddard not out ............ 96
    C, White l.b.w. b L. St. Hill .... 3
    K. Greenidge c Toppin b L. St. Hill 0O
    C, Evelyn run out . sie gees eek s /e
    W. Greenidge c Proverbs b D.
    AUKINGON .. 2.2.2... sees eee sone e
    T. Birkett b D. Atkinson ........ 17
    M. Foster l.b.w. b D. Atkinson .. 36
    T. Hoad b D. Atkinson ............. @
    H. Jordan c St. Hill b R. Lawless 2
    Extras enaeeQte does cee ey + Oe:
    0



    Total





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    SUNDAY,



    AUGUST : 17, 1952



    The Indians Do
    Not Fight

    From Our Own Correspondent

    LONDON, August 16.

    RAIN prevented any play in the Test between England
    and India at the Oval to-day. But with England having
    won the first three games the rubber is already decided.
    And in this specially prepared report, Jack Hobbs former
    Surrey and England batsman discusses India’s team and
    sums up England’s chances next year agaist the Austra-

    lians,

    Jack Hobbs says rain came to
    the rescue of the sorely pressed
    Indians and washed out al] hopes
    cf play in the final test at the
    Oval to-day. By early afternoon
    it was obvious that the pitch
    would not recover from its heavy
    soaking.

    Seldom in the history of the
    game can a test have faced such
    a hopeless third day dawn as the
    Indians did this morning.

    The first three matches of the
    series had been lost. And in this
    one they had lost five wickets on
    what was described as “a pig of
    an oval pitch” for 49 runs.

    And they were faced inevitably
    with the prospect of struggling
    on to another whacking under
    conditions which give them that
    far from home feeling.

    Where shall we place this
    England eleven of 1952.

    After making full allowances
    for the Indians ill luck the fact
    has to be set down quite bluntly
    that as a team they are not good
    enough to give us a real test. ‘

    There are players of test matca
    quality in the side. The captain,
    Hazare is one of them and towards
    him above all others does sym-
    pathy go out in full. \most all
    time he has had to fight against
    the collar.

    Memory will recall fer years to
    come the almost unequalled per-
    formance with bat and ball of
    Vinoo Mankad at Lord’s, No indi-
    vidual cricketer has ever done as
    much for a side and yet been
    among the losers at the finish.
    Others have done good jobs of
    cricket work too.

    Apart from the obvious truth
    that many members of this In-
    dian party have not on our grounds
    measured up to test skill and
    standards either as batsmen,
    bowlers or fielders there is one
    prime essential quality which is
    lacking—they don’t fight.

    They did not fight at Old Traf-
    ford. Fellows who should have
    squared their shoulders and set

    their teeth were in effect on the

    way back to the pavilion even
    as they walked to the wicket.

    The fighting spirit was also
    lacking at the Oval on Friday
    evening.

    These things must be borne in
    mind to help us keep next year’s
    tests against the Australians in the
    true perspective,

    The Australians may not be as
    good as this present England
    team. But first and foremost they
    will fight. Their wickets won’t be
    presented on a plate.

    Such magnificent opening
    bowlers as Alec Bedser and Fred
    Trueman will have to dig the
    Australians out. The test for them
    will be whether they can take it
    as distinct from merely giving it!

    These victories over the Indians
    don’t mean we can get ready to
    shout—without any further pre-
    liminaries—over victories against
    the Australians before the tests
    have been played.

    We have found from this series
    a skipper who can play the Aus-
    tralians at their own relentless
    game and maybe beat them.

    It’s my opinion that we might
    have made greater use of tests
    this season against such ordinary
    opposition in a general sense to
    fit us all the better for much
    more arduous tasks which the
    future has in store, For instance
    we've batsmen who haven’t





    Fall of wickets—l for 58, 2 for 100, 3
    for 103, 4 for 103, 5 for 105, 6 for 123, 7
    for 164, 8 for 213, 9 for 213

    BOWLING ae
    a



    Re W:

    E. Atkinson 26 2

    Db Atkinson . 66 4

    G,. Proverbs .. 10 —

    T. Toppin 35 —

    L. Lawless ... os 54 1

    Le. Bt) HE i cs sees 32 2

    WANDERERS 2ND INNINGS

    G. Proverbs not out ..........-.05+- 28

    D Evelyn not out ........:c.ssieeee 5

    Total (for no wicket) .... 26
    BOWLING ANALYSIS

    oO M R w.

    HH, Jordan ... 2 _ 6 —

    T. Birkett ...



    used the opportunity to take this
    Indian bowling by the scruff of
    the neck. They have played for
    safety when risks could have
    been taken without much fear of
    gerious consequences either ta

    emselves or the side in general.

    They hhave had a five,-day ap-
    proach against opponents who
    could have been finished off. in
    less time. A different approach—
    the Godfrey Evans approach if I
    may express it thus—would have
    had its value in respect of the
    future.



    Surrey Must

    Fight Hard

    (From Our Own Correspondent)

    LONDON, August 16,

    The struggle for the county
    championship is going to be a far
    more drawn out affair than seem-
    ed possible a week ago. Yorkshire
    can beat Surrey if they win ail
    their remaining games and if the
    southerners fail to: obtain ten
    points from their last five games.
    And to-day Yorkshire made pret-=
    ty certain that Surrey would not
    obtain many points from their
    game at Leeds.

    Norman Yardley won the toss
    and had the gratification of seeing
    423 on the scoreboard for the loss
    of only 5 wickets at the close.
    Yorkshire debutant was opening
    bat Charles Less who scored 74, in
    just over three hours, Wilson 121
    and Lester 130 not out carried on

    the good work against the Surrey’

    attack weakened by the absence
    of Bedser, Laker and Lock who
    are playing in the Test.

    There, were smiles on the faces
    of Gloucester supporters when
    shortly after lunch at Cheltenham
    the last Warwickshire wicket fell
    for 104. But those smiles had
    faded away after the tea interval
    when Gloucester were all out for
    91,

    Opening bowler Bannister
    started the collapse taking four of
    the first five wickets and finish-
    ing with five for 36. Then
    along came Eric Hollies with his
    crafty leg breaks to take the other
    five for eighteen,

    Rain affected most of the other
    games.

    World Champion
    Salas May Fight
    Frank Johnson

    By GEORGE WHITING
    MANCHESTER,

    Promoters who saw no merit in
    his punches a year ago are now
    clamouring for the services of
    Manchester’s Frank Johnson—an
    easy and, at time, «spectacular
    winner on points here in his Brit-
    ish lightweight championship fight
    with the previous holder, London’s
    Tommy McGovern,

    Johnson is wanted at Newcastle
    on August 25 and Manchester on
    September 5. 7

    His manager, Sam Burns, talks
    optimistically of negotiations for
    an overweight meeting with

    Mexico’s Lauro Salas or James

    Carter (U.S.A.), present and

    past holders of the world title,

    Meanwhile, on the sidelines,
    London's Joe Lucy urges a quick
    settlement of his own champion-
    ship aspirations against Manches-
    ter’s new champion.

    Waded In

    Johnson beat a fit and lively
    McGovern because of his ability
    either to evade or absorb right-
    hand punches—and then to wade
    in on his own account,

    For four rounds, MeGovern’s
    right hand performed mightily,
    but not mightily enough. From
    then on Johnson boxed with the
    supreme confidence of a man who
    feels the Sunday punches of his
    opponent to be losing their fire.

    That Johnson eased up in the
    last four rounds should not be held
    against him, Johnson, I think, will
    be a value-for-money ~~.







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    - 22b



    SUNDAY, AUGUST 17,





    1952





    (BAOK ROW) left to right—E. McLeod, J. Skinner, Miss J. Marshall, R. Sattaur, 8. Haynes, T. Moore,

    D. , D. Yarde.

    ROW) D. Inniss, McD. Lloyd, T. Inniss, H. Rouse.
    cyclist

    ¢
    H Carter (Intermediate ) is

    out of the picture.

    The August Olympaid In B.G.
    LATIN RIDERS SET NEW VOGUE

    (By E. R.

    McLEOD)

    A TEAM of Barbadian cyclists and athletes numbering

    13 returned to the island

    on Friday morning by the

    Canadian, Challenger after ae part if the recent British
    e

    Guiana Amateur Cycle and Ath

    held at the Bourda track in

    August 6.

    Although many of them have
    not come up to expectations, I
    know they have gained much in
    experience which will help them
    in future tours. The Barbados
    team of 13 left the island on July
    the schooner Van Sluytman
    for Georgetown and arrived there
    on July 25 but due to some delay,
    the team did not move into their
    quarters at Camp Street, George-
    town, until the next day. Thai
    evening most of the boys went to
    see the track which is four laps
    and a half to the mile. There was
    also no track practice because
    water was on the ground.

    The Barbadian cyclists were
    “A” Class J, Skinner, D, Keizer,
    D. Yarde and R. Sattaur; Inter-
    mediate: M, Carter, S. Haynes;
    “B” Class: E. MeLeod and T.
    Moore, Lady cyclist Miss Joyce
    Marshall. The athletes were D.
    Inniss (Sprinter), H. Rouse
    (Sprinter), McD. Lloyd and T.
    Inniss (Distance Men).

    The Trinidad cycle team was
    “A Class veteran Compton Gon-
    salves, Ferdi De Gannes; Interme-
    diate: V. Facooray, R. Waithe and
    M. Pierre. Beatrice Clark (Lady
    cyclist).

    The Venezuelan contingent was
    made up of stocky Antonio
    Demichelle, Franco Caccione and
    Ali Cardona, all International
    men. i

    On both days of the meeting
    the stands were crowded. Guian-
    ese sport fans who went to see
    how their local champions would
    shape against the foreign con-
    tingents and they witnessed some
    keen sport despite a heavy track
    on the second day.

    Lindsay Gordon of British Gul-
    ana showed that he still had a
    good sprint when he won the One
    Mile International and Nine Mile
    cycle races in fine style on the
    first day. On that day, three
    records were smashed including
    the Nine Mile which was com-
    pleted in 23 minutes, 12.3 seconds.

    “Hustling” Tactics

    In the rive Mile International,
    the Latin wheelsman Demichelle
    won by sheer “hustling” tactics.
    From the start of the race there
    ‘was grand team work on the part
    of the.Latins and they kept up a
    hot pace aNd so hot was the pace
    that even Gonsalves was one of
    the top notchers who was forced
    to “drop out” of the race.

    At one stage Caccione “burst
    away” from the field but Gordon
    carried back the company to him.
    John Skinner who rode 81 in this
    race came in second and Cacclone
    third. Skinner worked hard in
    this race for he hadn’t the help
    of Yarde, Sattaur and Keizer.
    The angles of the track worrled
    him also and on many occasions
    when he should be hugging the
    angles to the line, was moving
    out considerably.

    tic Association Olympiad
    Georgetown on August 4 and

    The rhree Mile

    In the “B” Class-a new record
    was set up for the three Mile
    which M. Robello won in seven
    minutes 48.9 seconds, E. McLeod
    ang T.,Moore who were in this
    division also complained of the
    the track, They also had to face
    angles on the track. They also
    had to face up to the different
    style of riding employed by the
    Guianese boys,

    I noticed in every race the
    pacers maintained a semi sprint
    and many of the cyclists are always
    sprinting away from the field.

    Tony Moore did well to come in
    second in the One Mile on the
    first day but his partner McLeod
    who was off to a bad start in this
    race found himself pocketed in
    the large field and when he found
    a way out it was too late for him
    to place, He finished fourth.

    Heavy Track

    On the second day of the meet-
    ing the track was heavy due to
    rain early the morning. The Vene-
    zuelans rode gears in the seventies
    and although the track was not the
    best these Latins on their low
    gears paced hard

    It “was a good move by Walter
    Liddell of Berbice who followed
    Caccione in the Three Mile Match
    race for “A” Class. Caccione
    moved away from the field in a
    devastating sprint. Liddell who
    won the race in the record time
    of seven minutes 44.3 seconds
    lapped the field which included
    Laddie Lewis, Gordon, Gonsalves
    and Skinner—-with Caccione,

    Skinner however rode brilliant-
    ly in the 15 Mile Open which he
    won, There were three spills in
    this race in which the Venezue-
    lans refused to ride due to the
    large field. About 50 cyclists faced
    the starter and some 9,000 saw
    Skinner sprint to the finishing
    line in darkness ahead of Walter
    Liddell and R. Robinson of British
    Guiana,

    Barbados Wins

    After the race Skinner was pre-
    sented with a Cup anda gold
    medal. Barbados got another win
    that day when Moore won the Half
    Mile “B” Class from L,. Robinson
    in one minute 13.2 seconds, Me-
    Leod was in one of the spills in
    this raze.

    Lack of Experience

    Joyce Marshall, the Barbadian
    lady cyclist rode well but lack of
    experience prevented her from
    beating Beatrice Clarke. Clarke
    however proved that she is the
    best of the bunch and won the
    four cycle races for Ladies at
    Bourda convincingly.

    Miss Marshall came in second to
    Beatrice Clarke in three of the

    races,
    Athletics

    athletes w@e not up to the mark
    and had to be contented with sec-
    ond and third places.

    David Inniss ran third in the
    100 yards (A Class) which the
    Guianese champion sprinter Maur-
    ice Payne won in the good time
    of 9.8 seconds. After the race In-
    niss told me that he was off to a
    late start due to some misunder-
    standing with the starter.

    Hewitt Rouse (Police Sprinter)
    pulled a muscle on the first day
    and was unable to run for the rest
    of the meeting. D. Lloyd’ ran in
    third in the Two Mile flat open
    ren took place on the second

    ay.

    Lloyd remained in the back too
    much in this race and when he
    tried to take the lead he found
    that those in front of him were
    just as fresh as he was and in the
    last lap he made another effort to
    sprint but this sprint was not
    strong enough.

    : Under-Trained

    Summing up I would say that
    the Barbados team did its best.
    Many of the boys did not train
    sufficiently for such a big meeting
    but perhaps many of them were
    not sure whether they would have
    been selected but as I said before
    they are bound to gain much from
    the experience at Bourda,

    Tucker Top Scorés
    In Practice Shoot

    _The following are the results
    of last Wednesday practice shoot
    held by the Barbados Small Bore
    Rifle Club, Scores were up to the
    usual high standard with Mr. M.
    G, Tucker top scoring with 99 out
    of a possible 100 points followed
    closely by Roberts, Jordan and
    Hassell with 98 points each, Mem-
    bers were glad to welcome Mr.
    Evelyn, who is on a visit here
    from St. Kitts and is one of the
    founding members of the Rifle
    Club recently started there, and
    expressed the hope that his Club
    will be able to take part in postal
    shoots in the near future.

    Scores
    Mr. M. G, Tucker ...... ses. 98
    Mr. T. A. L. Roberts ....... 98
    Capt. J. R. Jordan ....... 98
    Mr. J. W. Hassell .......... 98

    Mr. R, D, Edgh¥l .......... 97
    Mr. M. A, Tucker .......... 95
    Mr. E, L. G. Hoad, Jnr. ..... 94
    Mr. K, S, Yearwood ..... 91

    Members will be glad to learn
    that the Club has been presented
    with a beautiful Silver Challenge
    Cup which will be competed for,
    tor the first time, at the annual
    Competition .scheduled for Sept.
    2ist to 27th,

    Regular practices will be held
    on the 2nd_and 4th Saturdays and
    ‘very Wednesday. Members are
    reminded that to have an aver-
    age for these competitions they
    hould put in as many practices

    Tn the flat events the Barbadian 1s possible now.




    — "
    O0°% 0 doice



    SUNDAY ADVOCATE ‘

    B.G. Olympiad

    A Big

    was a huge success,

    Challenger on Friday morni
    Mr. C said that
    Schoone A, H,



    seasick. Those K were,

    the secon p of the

    In British , the
    courtesy of the B,G. Government,
    the hostel the .G mt
    Training oa

    for
    their disposal.




    was at ‘ Lace
    commodation was exc Thy
    good. ne : A
    “There is
    said. “The ; ed this item
    from their er".
    After the in

    B.G., owing to heavy rainfalls,
    they were able to have. two
    days track practice. Other train-
    ing was done on the road and

    when it is that the.
    BG. reads are not _ good, this
    made it more difficult for the
    cyclists. ,

    They were .in B.G. for eight
    days before the opened in
    the presence of a, _crowe

    This gave them some time to re-
    cover from the effects of the se:
    trip. ‘

    Mr. Rocheford said
    Pritish Guiana erowds had great
    confidence in the Barbadian cy-

    cists whem they fal eeanta de-
    feat the tactful Venezuelan cy+
    clists. Because of this, the Bar-

    hadians were well supported i
    the field. »

    Keizer Injured

    On the Saturaay previous tv
    the opening day of the Meet—
    ine last day of practice foy the
    Barbadians, f spills were ex-
    perienced by the Barbadians, ae
    handicapped them, especially
    Duncan Keizer who was suffering
    from an injured left leg and was
    advised by a doctor not to ride at
    all.

    This however did not deter tle
    courageous Keizer who rode on
    the Fitst Day but was unfortunate
    to be in a spill in the Nine Mile.
    His injured leg became worse and
    he was therefore inactive for the
    remainder of the Meet.

    He felt that Tony Moore, John
    Skinner and Joyce Marshall were
    the outstanding cyclists of the
    Barbados contingent,

    On the first day Moore was sec-
    ond in the One Mile B Class
    Cycle Race. He was beaten by
    Robello of British Guiana in. a
    gruelling race. In the Five Mile
    International, John Skinner found
    himself having to battle with the
    two Venezuelans, Caccioni and
    Demichelle. Caccioni managed to
    win by about a length but Skinner
    detent Demichelle to gain second
    place, ;

    On the same day David Inniss
    was third in the 100 yards flat.
    First and second positions wen!
    to the British Guiana pair, Payne
    and M¢Phearson, Inniss just man-
    aged to get ahead of another Bar-
    badian, P. C, Rouse, who suffered
    a severe muscle injury and was
    inactive for the remainder of th:

    Mr. Rocheford said that Joyce
    Marshall’s display was extreme!)
    creditable but she lacked the ex
    perience of the other lady cy-
    clists. She impressed the British
    Guiana crowd.

    On the First Day she was sec
    ond in the Half Mile and third i)
    the Mile. He felt that her main
    fault was riding too wide on the
    track. However, he thinks that
    the experience gained shoul
    make her a Champion West In-
    dian Lady Cyclists.

    McD. Lloyd of Foundation
    placed third in the One Mile fla.
    He said that the winner of this
    race, J. Doris of British Guiana
    was extremely good.

    Success

    “We were far more successful
    on the Second and final day of
    the Meeting’, Mr. Rocheford
    said.

    John Skinner rode beautifully
    to win the 15 mile cycle event
    In this race there was a_ spill
    which carried 20 cyclists. This
    race finished at about 6.50 p.m
    when the sun had already set.
    Skinner’s judgment was very good.

    Tony Moore also scored a vic-
    tory. He won the Half Mile B
    Class Cycle Event while Joyce




    that the |

    Success ©
    THE British) Guiana ALC. aid A.A. August Olympiad | Last Week

    r. Gilmore Rocheford, Manager of |
    the Barbados Contingent, told the Advocate yesterday. The |
    Barbados team arrived back home by the M.V. Canadian |

    ng.
    the trip down to B.G. by the

    I . H, Vansluytman was a very pleasant |
    one indeéd. Only about tive of the contingent were not)
    2se seas however, walking around on |
    p which lasted three days.

    Marshall .placed second in the
    Quarter Mile and Two Mile. McD.
    Lipyd was third in the Two Mile
    Flat,

    Commenting on Mr.

    the tour,

    Rocheford said it was evident that |

    the cyclists and athletes of British
    Guiana took their training very
    seriously, He felt that the Guianese
    had a benefited immensely
    from the visits of such topnotch
    ae as Herb McKenley and
    Ma
    the team had gained a world of
    experience from the tour and this
    should be reflected in their future
    performances,

    We said that the Barbawls As-
    soriation should make every effort
    te invite Venezuelan cyclists to
    take part in local Meets because
    wy then would Barbadians be
    ‘ble to see cycling at its best.

    There are many lady athletes

    end cyclists in British Guiana and |

    hey take their training as serious-

    as the men. I feel that our
    idies should make an all out ef-
    ‘ort to take part in local meetings
    \nd, everything should be done

    ») encourage them,” he said.

    “IT was unfortunate not to see
    ‘ean. Perry, the British Guiana
    Lady Ace in action as she did not
    ake part in the Meet.”

    Of the British Guiana Cyclists,
    Liddell and Gordon were in good
    form but most outstanding was
    young Paddy who comes from
    Berbice with Liddell, He rode in
    the Intermediate Division but on

    ferm he can beat most of the
    “A” class cyclists.
    Of the athletes, he thought

    }.G.’% Payne and McPherson to be
    excellent sprinters and B Class
    éthletes, Deane, was also good,
    ‘Phe two ladies, E. Floris and C.
    Masdammer gave good perform-
    ances,

    _On the Sunday followin” the
    Georgetown Sports, there was
    another Intercolonial Sports Meet-
    ing at Wales on the West Bank.
    Che Barbadians did well in this
    Meet. M. Carter won in the In-
    termediate Division and Skinner
    was second to Caccioni. “Sattaur
    ‘howed that he was a Guianese by
    iiding well on the muddy track”
    he said, In this Meet Lloyd was
    second to Doris in the 880 yards
    flat, » oem

    He said that the Guianese

    bados contingent. “On many
    occasions we were invited out to
    parties and many Gulanese are
    looking forward to a visit from us
    next year”, he ended.



    Masketball :

    ne cchnemestomecenaianianieg

    H.C. Win Second
    Div. League Cup

    Harrison College Second Divi-
    sion Basketball team have, like
    their First Division team, won this
    season's League Cup. Incidentally,
    the Second Division have won it
    the same way the First did, on
    goal averages.

    The Second Division games end-
    ed last week. Boys’ Club, Police
    and College were tied off on the
    number of matches won, each
    having lost twice, but College had
    the better goal average.

    During the week, Harrison Col-
    lege Old Boys beat Carlton 25—18
    in the Knock Out Competition, and
    Y.M.P.C, in’ possibly their best
    mateh ever, defeated Pirates

    The Semi-finals will be played

    on Tuesday this week, and the |

    finals are expected to come on
    Friday.

    In the Semi-finals, H.C.0.B.
    will meet Boys’ Club, and H.C.,-
    Y.M.P.C.



    B.W.I. MAY COMPETE
    FOR DAVIS CUP

    KINGSTON, J’ca., Aug. 13.
    The British West Indies have
    been given permission to enter the
    Davis Cup competition. They will
    do so next year,
    ( *—O.P.

    bx tae

    mens Sea
    , ot. eae



    itfield. The members of |

    ‘ were |
    extremely hospitable to the Bar-|

    â„¢ PAGE FIVE

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    PAGE SIX



    “For Women

    On , 1) j ”

    ell aie tao . a :
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    | Yit’s a long way from a typewriter in a
    | Southampton office when you are 17 to a ride
    | in a guarded wagon through a stormy night
    | when you are 22. But that is the road that
    tle last war made Yvonne Baseden take.
    From AC.W.2 in the W.AA.F. to an
    agent in France, trained to kill and sabotage.
    The day they caught her the Germans were
    not gentle with their rifle butts as they
    pushed her in a céll.

    by YVONNE BASEDEN

    HERE are three little whitewashed

    i cells in the military barracks at
    Dole, in France.

    That is where I spent the first night as a
    prisoner of the Gestapo.

    I just sat stupidly on the edge of the wide
    planks that did for a bed, trying to think. There
    was no light.

    From the next cell came the moaning of the men who
    nad been arrested with me and who now lay with broken
    ‘ones and the marks of the first rough, unscientific torture.

    The body of “Lucien.” my commanding officer, was
    n that cell, too.

    Gave false name

    AT MIDDAY the door was thrown open. It was a

    little soldier bringing potato soup. I ate mine.

    Then, at two o’clock, I was pushed out of my cell to
    a car, where Gestapo men in plain clothes waited.

    All the time I was in the hands of the Gestapo that
    was to be my way of progression . . « the blow in the back
    and the stumbling shuffle.

    My first interview was mild. A German asked for my

    ime and address, I gave him my false ones. :

    Then, to my horror, I saw on the table my false-
    ottomed handbag. Inside the false bottom were codes
    | denied that the handbag was mine,

    AT H.Q.

    A ‘fatherly’ man

    @ TWO days later—early in the morning—they
    took me from my cell again. Two Germans
    rvived with rifles. I was sure I was going to be shot.

    Instead I was put into a truck. I was on my way to
    ne Gestapo H.Q, at Dijon.

    The lorry stopped in front of a prison, It was like
    | the prisons you have seen on the films, The cells were
    n storied tiers with strong wire nets between the floors
    ) prevent suicides.

    1 was handed over to an enormous German woman
    arder and taken to the top floor to cell 111. My cell
    iwprised me. Through the window I could see the light
    ve blue sky, and the sunshine.

    A rather fatherly looking man. called for me, _ His
    ame was Mutter. He drove me to the Gestapo H.Q
    Ve walked up seven flights of stairs to his office.

    Politely he offered me a chair, He asked me abou!
    iy arrest. I lied hard.

    1 was very suspicious of his gentleness. Eventual!)

    | was driven back to the prison. I stayed tbere two days

    Tortured, then killed

    BY NOW they had “interrogated” my companions.
    Robert Morel, the young doctor, had been left for
    hours hanging by a broken arm. ___

    He had hoped one day to be a

    But one of the arrested men did
    alk. I do not know which one,
    ind I never want to know. And
    {cannot blame him, for they went
    through hell.

    ing.

    Jules and Charles were clubbed
    for hours,

    THE

    ‘lights of stairs.











    CELEBRITY SFOT

    IN ADVANCE of the
    shops, Valerie Hobson
    shows off the latest
    third-form collar and
    cuffs worn with coat
    frocks. . .

    The pull-on cuffs
    are kept in place
    with elastic
    fastened with
    black links. The
    tie is flowing
    black chiffor

    Jules was shot in Germany later.
    iurgeon, That torture wrecked his Charles was shot in Dijon when
    hopes. Yet he never talked, the Germans found that torture
    had made him incapable of walk- We know you come from Eng-

    ANGRY NOW
    ‘You’re From England
    MUTTER called for me again
    Once more I climbed those seven

    THINGS THEY



    SUNDAY ADVOCATE

    @ In that hot summer of 1939 Yvonne
    Baseden was 17 and she had just
    left school. The outbreak of a war
    which was to bring her months o/
    frantic fear, torture and agony was only
    a few,days away as she happily picked
    apples in a Bedfordshire orchard.



    Twelve summers later—in 1951—

    Yvonne Baseden, beside the blue sea

    at Arcachon in France, was happy again.

    The black days were far away as she
    nursed her baby boy, called Simon,

    land.”

    enormous jack boots.

    DO.



    Pans



    SHOCK

    SPOT
    BON D-
    STREET
    shopper
    who didall
    the wrong
    things...

    How
    many
    facits can
    you find
    in her out-
    fe? There
    are eight
    at least.
    (See

    Column 4
    below.)








    Peeseoarere
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    ie



    But this time he was not pole.
    ne was angry. He shouted, “All
    you have been saying is rubbish.

    The door opened and in came a
    buge blue-chinned brute of a mar
    n Gestapo uniform and wearing

    I dug my elbows into my sides.
    { pressed my legs tightly together. more bullet flashes,





    SUNDAY, AUGUST 11,

    1952



    Anything to stop trembling
    Shrieked

    “HERE,” I thought, “comes the
    torture,

    Mutter shouted, “We have ways
    to make people talk.”

    Suddenly, the uniformed man
    jumped with his jack boots on my
    feet. Mutter shricked at me. .
    questioning, questioning.

    Then my crushed feet started
    hurting. My lies got louder and
    wilder. I began to sob and moan,

    I saw Mutter’s face, now father-
    ly again, smiling.

    He must have thought he was
    getting on fine.

    I AM SHACKLED
    While he Lunches

    THEN he decided it was lunch-
    time.

    On my bruised feet I stumbled
    down the stairs to the ground
    floor, where I was handcuffed to a
    radiator, while Mutter went off to

    eat. ‘

    When he returned, I had to
    struggle up those stairs again.

    For hours I lied .. . wild crazy
    lies.

    They got angry again. It was
    eight o’clock and they wanted to
    go home, Mutter said: “We will
    make you talk.”

    I was pushed down to the base-
    ment.

    There were rows of grey-paint-
    ed doors. Mutter opened one and
    flung me inside.

    I had time to see the wooden

    * bed by the wall and great dried

    brown bloodstains on the wall be-
    fore he put out the light.
    Frantic

    I WAS alone. I was weak from
    lack of food, I was thirsty. I was
    frantic.

    I yearned for that white tablet
    with which I could have commit-
    ted suicide.

    _I attempted suicide twice that
    night. *

    First I crouched on the bed and
    wrapped the thin blanket round
    my neck, I pulled, but each time
    I grew dizzy my hands loosened.

    Then, groping in the dark, I
    found a bottle. I smashed it
    against the wall.

    With a piece of the glass I tried
    to open an artery in my wrist. But
    the glass was so thick and I could
    not find the same cut twice in the
    dark.

    I sJashed my wrist in three dif-
    ferent places.

    Then I must have fainted...
    not from injuries, but from lack
    of food.

    After 24 hours of lonely dark-
    ness, suddenly the light was
    switched on. Mutter entered with
    another man and started speaking
    in English. He yelled: “Fou are
    going to suffer.”

    They dragged me out into the
    corridor and took out their revolv-
    ers. I thought at last I am going
    to be shot.

    {t did not seem fair to die in this
    foul-smelling cellar at the hands of
    two angry men,

    I saw the flash and I heard the
    noise, but I did not feel the shot.
    I saw a bullet hole in the earth
    floor at my feet.

    The cellar was lit up by two

    ... SKETCH-PAD REPORTING WITH A MAN’S EYE
    THE RIGHTS AND WRONGS OF WOMEN-ABOUT-TOWN

    LO EN ARTE LINCS OER E






















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    The perfume with the donger-lasting fragrance

    v BOURJOIS |

    - An English secretary in_ the
    torture cells of the

    Gestapo

    Then I had to walk up to the
    seventh floor again,
    MADE. FRIENDS
    With Three Mice
    AFTER that I was taken back to
    prison, and for a long time was un-
    troubled by the Gestapo. I made
    friends with three mice. But the

    * woman warder found their hole

    and blocked it.

    I unpicked it with a hairpin,
    but only one came back. It didn’t
    stay long, for the woman put down
    poison.

    With my hairpin I scratched on
    the wall all the words of “There'll
    Always Be An England.”

    As a punishment I was left on
    the top floor when everyone was
    taken to the shelters during air
    raids.

    I hoped that the British bombs
    would hit the prison. But they
    never did.

    ‘To Die’

    ONE day 1 heard prisoners
    marching. I heard a German call
    out: “You are going to die.” I
    heard the machine guns fire. Thai
    was a sign that Allied troops were
    nearing the prison.

    Soon I was pushed into a cattle
    wagon bound for Germany. My
    destination was Ravensbruck con-
    centration camp.

    I was there for eight months, On
    a daily diet of only two bowls of
    vegetable soup my face grew
    bloated and my body became like
    a skeleton.

    The crematorium poured black,
    greasy smoke as hundreds died in
    it each day,

    SEVEN SHOT

    I Am Overlooked

    THERE were seven other girls
    from my Resistance service in the
    camp.

    One day they were shot. But
    lost among women of a dozen
    nationalities, I was overlooked.

    I was sent to unload loot trains.
    I carried out of trucks oil paint-
    ings and silver. And one day a
    feather pillow.

    I will always remember that. If
    you can imagine crying in terror
    because you have split a pillow,

    then you know, too, how one hv- piped

    man can degrade another.

    I can see that truck now. I can
    see those curled feathers drifting
    down,

    An angry German raised a huge
    spaaner over my head. That
    spanner came crashing down.

    It missed my head and struck
    my hip. I lay on the truck floor
    helpless with. pain.

    Liberation

    THAT moment passed. So did
    the hours as a nurse in the huts
    where the sick had little to eat.

    Some had to live. Some had to
    die. The choice was ours.

    Finally, the Swedish Red Cross
    liberated me, I looked back as I
    left, and all I saw was the pall of
    smoke from the crematorium,

    I came home to England on a
    Saturday afternoon,

    Before me lay nine months in
    hospital, a lung operation, pain.
    and nights tormented by fearful
    dreams,

    But that afternoon shabby
    King’s Cross Station looked very
    much like Heaven. —L.E.S.



    i









    SUNSPOT
    BALL E T-
    SKIRT. over
    bloomers—some-
    thing new in
    two-piece wear
    for the beach.

    THE

    NAD ATL AP RAMP ITS

    NEW AND NOTED ... for submission
    to the arbiter of etiquette.



    i.

    First Eleven
    Offer The
    Big Look

    By DOROTHY BARKLEY
    LONDON, August 1,

    Attention of the Fiist Eleven
    designery has shifted away from
    the “wandering” waistline and
    petticoated skirtline of last season,
    It fixes this season on the “Big
    Top” look—a top heavy appear-
    ance created by boxy jackets and
    outsize sto!es, some trimmed with
    fur or velvet, worn above slim,
    straight skirts, (Seen at Michael
    Sherard, Norman Hartnell, Peter
    Russell and Michael at-Lachasse.)

    Velvet is the material for coats,
    suits, evening dresses, Several
    new types are seen including a
    black velvet with a narrow white
    stripe woven through it horizont-
    idily at two~irfch yotervals {at
    Hartnell) and velvet embossed on
    matching satin in floral designs
    (at Victor Stiebel).

    Green is the colour, though it
    may be any one of half a doen
    shades, including ilex, forest,
    emerald, ‘water, duckpond and
    escargot. Most popular tweed is
    green woven with black, Any other
    sombre colour is good; caviare,
    mole, or quagmire are equally
    fashionable. And just as we were
    beginning to think colours had
    gunk irretrievably into a slough
    of despond, along came “spindle-
    berry” pink, “pervanche” blue (a
    bright, Van Gogh blue), ana
    “plood” orange (a pinky orange).

    Materials include dress-weight
    Donegal tweeds, pin-check suit-
    ings, Otterburn. tweeds, and
    Jambswool, An element of sur-
    prise comes with awning-striped
    shantung for evening, shining
    cellophane georgette, wool lace and
    straw velvet.

    Hats vary, Little-boy velvet
    caps, peaked all the way round,
    to match suit blouses; mob
    caps in felt; tricorne berets edged
    with persian lamb, skull caps,
    pillboxes and hats with high
    cone-shaped crowns,

    Evening dresses, grand and
    formal with full-crinolined skirts
    giving a hint of things to come in
    Coronation Year, are no longer
    strapless, “ Instead, they have
    halter-necks, scooped out neck-
    lines, or create a cold-shoulder
    look with one sleeve only.

    MICHAEL AT LACHASSE, who
    presented the “Masher” suit last
    season, is the originator of the
    “Big Top”. An outsize version of
    the normal stole, it is made in
    tweed to match the suit, and worn
    back to front, with the tie at the
    back. A second theme is the loosely
    fitted Gaucho jacket inspired by
    the Gauchos of Mexico. Cut with
    more width than length, it is set
    on a round shoulder and low yoke,
    To accentuate width, sleeves are
    long and full, They accompany
    slim skirts and dresses,

    @ On Page 12



    Rrth-








    OPEN transfer of morsels

    from plate to plate is i
    into café life - a Substitute for
    ordering properly. 5

    RAAT NAN Na eR. on Sn.

    London Express Service



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    FACE POWDER BY

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    {


    SUNDAY, AUGUST 117,

    ® itgs

    | Node 4



    1952

    "Gets $200000 WHATS COOKING The Field

    IN THE KITCHEN



    Narrows

    SUNDAY



    ADVOCATE



    a 20:5

    Man About Town






    PAGE SEVEN



    | dreamed of a bra

    with firm support...



    as i
    x am recipes to make your (By Arne Edwards) es na a Zeles ei n STRAIGHT FROM LONDON ROYAL CROWN DERBY in the * e %
    old supper a success J
    bs upper a success HE tae ee Tad! a ve - ta TOWN to the Island's very ex- most faScinating of Broaches and SH LCV, OFTMS
    COLD SALMON PURE calles oH gy clusive Bettina Ltd, The Village, Earrings—either in sets or sep- e
    For 8 persons: 1 big salmon tin. imntigiie pg = ee people Hastings, Phone 4941—-wonderful arately. You'll like the sets, I
    English potatoes: 1} 1b, could marry pretty well anyone FOR SUNDAY, AUGUST 17, 1952 new COCKTAIL DRESSES & think! The pieces are patterned Chansonette...
    Milk: half a glass ha a : arth sane EVENING GOWNS. Already in flowers (one exquisite Wild
    Butter: 1 oz. 8 oo wee as x Look in the s@ction in which Agony wea y com there has been a remarkable re- Rese) and the colourings are right
    Salt ‘iho WO aame ts Laine | . find what your outlook is, aerre iiaestives ae truth, tol- SPponse, and these West End out of this world. Naturally, un-
    Pepper Prin. Ma : Today's = ¥on "idliong Jeading Fashioned Garménts with their usual accessories of this sort are
    Mayonnaise. be numbered on the fingers of two $C sarch ‘stage 80 forces ‘for MBhL And remember, “tho idividual a nd distinguished cbtainable at LOUIS BAYLEY'S
    san anon oe a seleet all > hands. lips of many shall. bless him that iS styling (including DAY DRESSES) on Bolton Lane and mavbe Ill
    S 2 nm. e : . t “ovi 2 j 7 ati sce >
    potatoes, aa Mm ogmee oe , to ney nad. to be liberal.” provide elegance in combination see you there
    hen

    cooked, put them in a
    colander, then mash them and add
    1 oz. of butter, 4 glass of milk salt
    and pepper. Mix the salmon to
    the potatoes then pass everything
    through a mincer. Put the mix-
    ture in a dish and try to give i

    . I a a sures the purchaser an all cost VE"yY thril]! indeed — when you
    the shape of a fish. Cover with clubbed with her, and been rum- GEMINI To ee ae pn gli deal. Yes, sir! And» here’s how: tive CONSUL! It is CONSUL
    a and if you like to oured to her have beén May 21-—June 21 wiueitn ‘ena ye oy energy-building Buy the COLOUR FILM from tha! gives you 5-Stay Motoring
    make the dish look even more paired off with seven of the young * or tion are MUST aims now Collins Ltd., and they will develop ®"¢ that literally means: Roomi-
    Fae ane, bail Some eggs, cut ladies who also went along. ae ° 7 ; a. cost through their suppliers "¢°s: Comfort; Power; Appear-
    dish With them and seme aiiete Job — Quote CANCER f head hi ; clear, mind i”, the United States. The film is ance: Value, A choice of smart
    St a ee A a tty "at about K june 22—July 3 \neouinest. Start Oo at church,’ pray- . Teturned tq you as a no mark-up colours can be had from Charles

    EGGS IN ANCHOVIES SAUCE
    Flour

    or
    titles or estates; and, most import-
    ant of all, they had to be in the
    Princess's set;
    ble

    The limited field of
    escorts who have

    young men has
    taken her to the theatre, night-

    x
    TAURUS

    *« April 21—May 20° first

    anyone
    Seven of the

    “If he shows no tendencies

    ing sincerely for guidance anc

    Live and lé€t live goes well with think 3

    and speak afterwards.
    or any group draw you
    frpm principles or good practices.

    Don't let
    away

    1 stronger *

    with beautiful materials.

    ~ * *

    STEPPING FROM YOUR
    KODAK COLOUR FILM from HOME and into your waiting car

    COLLINS LTD., in Broad St. en- is, as you've doubtless read, a4



    deal and’as yet further indication M¢®nearney & Co, Ltd. dial 4493,

    ee,

    —







    of the Collins Service technique 9" I have my eye on ice-blue
    + Ib. at all we shall put him into 4 taith. Comaider your blessings. for visitors and residents alike. °° - &t $26.75.
    1 industry.”
    5) ee From Sunny (the Marquis of LEO We know the world through our own ps4 ee oat Ae ad Fanci eee
    Milk 1 glass Blandford), who Inly 24—Aug. 22 personality, Said a famous writer. Thus
    Butter 2} oz. October, oe David (Lond Outs 7 * 7 We must réalize that developing, nur- THEY'LL SELL ANYTHING, NO GREATER VARIETY OF
    Olive Oil 2 tablespoonstul. who got engaged last the turing our _petsonatity, Pe eneene, oa ANYWHERE, FOR ANYONE SHIRTS than those with the
    Water 1 tablespoonful list of suitable suitors has dimin- thoughts. guiding our minds is vital. or & Se ye uh el RELIANCE, The astonishing
    Fillets of anchovies 1 tin ished until scarcely a house-party in fact, they're doing it right now. range is rich with colour and
    Chopped parsley 1 tablespoonful. eg en Be “hot tale Man sights nor even little ae ee of a styles are ‘way ahead of most.
    cou a VIRGO ize 4 , as sbue. . (dia The i . Sen \
    on t in a saucepan the flour, the widening the Prinowale shealb. i Aug. 23—Sept. 9s revults too much’ fo heart. Recognise — eal’ Estate re Net Shirts are in coffee, lemon
    egg, a pinch of salt and mix the 1

    milk in it until it will result in a
    smooth mixture. Leave every-
    thing for a few minutes then add

    must be galling for a young wo-
    man of obvious intelligence and
    charm, with ideas outside her

    that the greater you are, the more you
    will have to stand criticism. Pray; keep
    good humor high.

    Agents and Auc- »
    tioneers, Regularly listing many of
    the Island’s best homes for sale

    beige—perfect for tourists at
    $3.99. Dazzling prints emphasise
    merican styling but





    and rent, Realtors Ltd. offer the main at a local 1 ies a
    y station, that the few men â„¢* 3 complete home se PO i ee Sebpered
    the butter which you have pre- she is allowed to be frendly with LIBRA It is not a day for looking into personal He oi Cttor ints tee aoa $8.80. You's a réeliy coe Te i
    viously melted. Take a small are too often not awfully Selarest. Sept. 24—Oct. 23 plans and doings for pure satisfaction. néseibed Alictioneesten. Dement 50. You must really see RELI- ;
    frying pan, put the oi] in it and ing to her. Community affairs, public issues, Gov't. ment 4 ANCE SHERTS. | '
    ae Sees when the oil is hot pour two table- | And with the kind of mén who issues, are firsts. Start at church. * ’ f ‘
    Bes Ait i Pina a a a ene of the periers Move pitas ings to say ae is al- 4 , ° . . : | hi inds those
    ) ing pan so that the mixture lowed to exe e only the small- irgo: inclinations ina dad Circular stitching rounds Moses:
    FORMER AGTRESS Marianne will cover the bottom of the pan. est of small talk a SOORPIO Note Bare pnd ea fois tonnay. SO 17S ENAME: ‘ . _ ¥. DE LIMA’S FOR DIAMONDS ‘ < Maditee ole vans sxe
    O'Brien Reynolds ieaves the When 'ready put the omelette on @ I LIKED last week . . . Ovt. s-Wev, #9 similar as ate YOu fo conclusions; pray 2 See TSU WES 2 POOR POTEET... a tly) POO fia
    Miavhi Fiau:.Cirensie CoGer alter the kitchen table. Repeat until Servies oa ¥ pow only fine head ne name, beautiful new shipment has been «poked center cup design gives
    she Was granted a $2,000,000 set- yOu have quite a lot of small |THE NEW sharp-and-sweet hors ; Sosy eae aaa oad 9.99
    } tlement and divorce frory Richard

    J. Reynolds tobacce beir The
    couple's two young sons were
    awdfded t6 the mother She fe-
    ceivéd a $750,000 trust fund for

    omelettes and the mixture’ is
    finished. Fold the omelettes like
    handkerchiefs and put therg on a
    big dish. Make the sauce as
    follows:

    ba et - = Italian réstaurant
    —paper-thin slices of raw smoked
    ham served with fresh green figs, ee ae

    system.

    SAGITTARIUS some days we don’t feel peppy. If you
    don’t relax
    only to rébuild energy,

    sensibly to review, even

    protect nervous *

    unpacked and look at it! Tea and
    Coffee Sets in Celadon Green an‘
    White and in Shell Pink and
    \White—don’t they sound gorgeous?
    They are! And at Y. de Lima’s

    eed in distinctive yellow tins—
    dust proof and dry in TWENTY
    MINUTES from a cold start, The
    coating is fully cured in four hours

    wonderful aecentuation; [f you >~
    want a really firm lift, Chansorg:
    “tte” is for you! In your favorites



    and that’s. fast by any standard. ¢re “unusual wall pl: ; in th fabrics. ell
    7 irs Melt 1 oz. of butter in a small “I only Ss Tdeal for indoors and out athe ‘Hote wade ter at ae seHwine Matdeiform Brash =
    thet oUpORE, 2 ebeternationat) saucepan then add 2 tablespoons- the Palace Garden be- 4€ CAPRICORN people who achieve must appreciate not Blundell’s gives a lasting brilliance. Vases, Aavaaante “feuge and cake al int United
    aciadbinnancaasiiialene nese tetnen ; 2Hb.Or Olive-wil; 1 tablespoonful of cause she wore the dress she Dec. 23—Jan. 21 only the big things but the little items. Try it from your dealer, Blundell's » multitude more in as ma Cte arenas Oily 1A te ine
    = water, the anchovies, Stir all the had of at Astot.” And sincerely backed by humble prayer is a James Lynch & Co. Ltd., dis i cated ee States of America
    ft I time and as soon as the anchovies THE SALESMANSHIP © at tee , ribution . ? * our varieties. They’re on dis- b s
    or eus p are dissolved add the parsley and flower shop, en I ordered : * male pee * e play now, P
    a B e pour on the omelettles. ihe the gave me a flower AQu. seeesavehe her emphasizes the great- ’ * . ‘ i Pikreie’e maridenform
    ) © wear—without charge. ARIUS esearc furt er er eat often not é ,
    USINEeSs sg or ae one lao fae ie aft oe Se ot rive, Dont lat this bee AN ELECTRIC HOT PLATE is HERE IS THE MAGIC OF THE for every type of figure.
    (From JOAN. HARRISON) Eggs 6 fait aniad a i" Bihan ge: ae oy doubt: or contention. Reason must just the grandest thing to have wesT INDIES—a Showroom of atin a ah
    : PARIS. Salt (without all that tinned Tiere ir «x prevail, ‘round home, Here's one for $12.12 réative design and local craft—| e @
    Christian Dior, the q - Cooked ham 5 oz. plopped into cream whipped = * and a beauty, too! At City Garage Grass Mats from Dominica ad
    effacing “genius” of the = Butter 2 oz. with brandy. PISCES le to-day : do not explain there is a splendid selection of $5 any size: ie cal op Pade ied
    ie cing. bette “toe ta be- caer “t table mae THE NEW, SERVICE in a big *« = 21—March 20 A goeruch. ea a couple of good hints: * Electrical Appliances including id “yagi seringy “ied
    e nothing rT ream ablespoonsfu store. An attendant is rushed u :
    come a monk, is setting up busi- : P

    Gelatine

    Be unbiased as

    you review facts on both

    Raffia work in Baskets thot



    Toasters for $19.12; Electric

    OCC
    : Irons + ake shopping a pleasure! And wT

    with a bath chair t a oi ‘r, listen truly tdjerantly; for $10.09 and a really sensible ss6re a ear :

    — Pian mre woe Cooked chicken 5 oz. ping more fun for od Ihe x a = cam ena’ cae y * choice of ELECTRIC FANS at na ; Stas ee Casieke ie. siete JUST RECEIVED
    Bare de ; nil ‘ HE CUST = i ; ; sf sunny disposition, cellent: -velive ss he RE a Ci san if i- i AYE

    _ Dresses, coats and gowns bear- Break in a bowl 3 eggs. Beat vight view = eae ides YOU BORN DOBAT. a eae _ eee adversities i meg Ma aa = course, here, all under the friendly
    ing the luxury tag “Dior” will be them and add 1 pinch of salt. ¢ nch), who, when I complain- goserins ot" enetey ene i will promote worthy causes with raha He i eaad, at ‘janagement of Dominica’s Miss x Dad
    on sale in the “better class” shops Make an omelette wide but thin. eq that my bottle had lost its qe with sturdy resolution, ang ne comnnai? of cheery, high- ™ CITY GARAGE CO. LTD, Dangleben in the Dominica $383
    in London and the main towns of You will probably need a frying geent; collected it next day for an= tremendous inner energy. Enjoy y end ree cally re
    Britain and the Commonwealth as pan of at least 15 inch diameter. ;

    minded people, keep busy



    at usefi:! activities,





    inderaft Company on Bridge St.
    i reed sornsbac editor der : ‘ ‘Vial 4015. .
    from next February. When the omelette is ready take b> Ate Mle new be it had, and ae strength. ye gel Hugo Gernsback, editor, foun FERROZONE
    For Dior, one of the most astute it out of ~~ pan = put it on “THE NEW keep-the-kids-quiet wireless ass’n.. short wave YOU WISH YOU HAD A * * * * CATARRHZONE %
    ) mei of business in the French greaseproof paper and let it get idea from Vienna, where child » =x *§ x & yu FLOOR CLEANER no doubt. and
    fashion world, has launched him- cold, Make another omelette. can dial a number and her * © really a ‘ HOPPER CYCLES are amone DR, HAMILTON PILLS
    lf in the “off-the-peg” market Take the ham then and mince ra fairy hey realy good POLISH ss well as , ‘
    “He eraRe thé news today in a it, When minced add one ounce 74 bee oe nice mtn A Late Th rants omething for Linoleum and Pur- ./\ 6." %n popes ot \oaeihasiod NERVERUINE ¥
    , ae , ; ask.” liture, ate te ane Te AL OS DRY ' . "
    quiet, -effacing way over a of butter and 2 tablespoonsful THE CUSTOMER - is - always- “And as to home comforts—the oes sing vin ae blonder POLISHES © in Pas JOHNSON’S 11D. there are bicycles for Ladies ons >
    before-lunch drink at one of Paris’s thick white sauce. Mix every- ‘ong, view of the store (British). food, housework, and so on—why, arling, ¥ tibantnns aste Wax for -nq “Men and Boye’and Girls. | sit
    luxury hotels (j Or the way thing together and finish’ with 2 n I complained that a belt if you are a good business woman - ¢very day. vs aning; Liquid Wax for furni- The re ys wis,
    from his qewihieen, is all for ta sful of cream. had broken its zip inside a week, you are a good organiser, and can “Be tactful,” they warn, “when ture and Glo-Coat for Lino, Tiles, apeve ' enieee machines can be ( CARI TON BROWNE
    Bi Ee Take the chicken breast (which they charged 6s, 6d. for putting in keep a businesslike eye on an effi- mee paying the bill, Look the oe ae tee As for CARS a a cncion e Gretn ae Bich as ° x
    ior. J % al ” ther way.” . Johnson's CARNU . 2 8 6 ec " r ‘i -
    oor Britain—“because”, said is already cooked) mince it, then * eee oes cient housekeeper. r Why Raven they heard that it twenty minutes with i "here are HOPPER TRICYCLES, | Wholesale & Retail = or
    Mr, Dior, “it is so regrettable, as add one more ounce of butter, Worrying Book — Quote seldom works out like that? i} gloss. K, J, Hamel-Smith Ltd foo, in Blue or Green, and a call Druggist on .
    I have said so many times before, and 1 tablespoonful of white @ IN A WEEK when most people “Tell me, what do you do?’ you phone 4748 are agents for JOHN. [0,428 Will provide details of
    that English tee cannot for ee — with 2 tablespoons- were worrying over world-size (From The Critics on the Sav ata party. . . “Nothing much, , a
    monetary reasons buy c '

    in Paris.”

    For the Empire — “because,”
    continued Mr, Dior putting him-
    self in the plural, ‘we have dreamt
    for a long time of the possibilities
    of the British Empire for the
    French couture.”

    Put the ham mixture on. one of
    the omelettes. Cover with the
    other omelette on which you ‘¢ill
    put tie chicken’ mixture. rr
    the two omelettes together so that
    you almost make a big sausage.
    Put the two omelettes in grease-



    problems—Is there going to be
    germ warfare one day.? WILL
    they ever stop fighting in Korea?
    DID the Russians get any real
    secrets?—it was rather refreshing
    to find some people fretting over
    the oddest little worries.

    radio yesterday)

    “This new biography suffers
    from foot and note disease.”
    From Mr. Whitmey (husband of

    Hazel Hammond, managing direc-
    tor of a Regent-street store): “I

    he replies. “What do you do?” ia
    “Oh, my job is terribly dull.

    ‘They dive with unerring aim.

    Why haven't they heard that

    Why haven't they heard that |
    young mén seldom ask for a kiss?

    the interesting terms offered by

    SON'S. POLISHES. varbados Foundry Ltd.

    ¥ 136 Roebuck St. Dial 2813
    | $596%666660606600660066





    endorse. tte b saeried business we when he a the bf am Pt, —— +
    For Mr, Dior—who now becomes proof paper and in a napkin and LIKE Colonel Logan Home, who ™®”- , My wife does the cooking one he Bind Tah %
    an international dressmaker with put 6n the ice or very near it. is pursuing (“with the help of me Ee a ~~ eg om" ch ee | 2
    his Peareices originals in after about 2 hours you can cul thousands of ints”) in- ingers in the garden. ix si gs’? +
    Paris, his salon in New York, and the omelettes in small slices 4 inch vestigations into the -damage “Pd rather she didn’t have a | THOUGHT politicians were ty
    his off-the-peg and _made-to- thick, caused by “paper tearing by job, but I know she'd be miser- © aed characters. I thought sol-
    measure models in d, Aus- a birds.” ... able without it. And it does help gjcrs were unemotional men.
    tralia, Cana 7, etc., LIKE the Welsh bird research- as well as ‘foreign markets. Mr, Jeffreys said today: “For who are worr themselves \ But when the politician is de-

    The two | men who will some months now we have had Silly trying to discover just how From Mr. Batty (husband cf sane, when the general resigns, ’
    manufacture ‘market for the cutters and in Dier #hy bird can fly asfast as the Qhrilstinia Foyle, director of the \ jen the critic goes to a first night
    British co will also séll to salons in Paris asia | we eee book firm): “I like having my wife — what happens? Why, they cry
    “any other market we can methods. We shall use h Mrs. in business. She understands My |j\ke babies.
    get, and we have some foreign girls too, and import French @ DO TOP businéss executives point of view about work, and she “Many of Senator Taft’s men,” Xi
    buyers already lined ol materials. British materials will _make,good wives? never brings any bossiness home.” | ead last week, “were openly in :

    The two men, . Coleman also be used of course, Oh yes, Last week the census revealed tears.” |
    Jeffreys arid Mr. Mareel Fenez, both the British Board of Trade that nearly half the 160,000 women @ WHAT A STRANGE world at
    looked the picture of two vefy and the French Government are bosses in and are mi b they live in—the ople who “When Eisenhower had finished per yar
    happy men today. delighted about the whole thing,” And here, m three men who write those books on The Art of jj; speech of farewell,” said a re-

    . Je sis already the married to the £5,000-a~ Being Attractive. cent report, “there were scarcely ,

    director of r dress firm The dresses, coats, gowns and type of woman boss are the fase “Remember,” they advise,
    “Lady in Black. will con- suits will be shown in London in band-views: —

    tinue as a completely separate
    business.

    The new eompany, the name of
    wh is i. po be se for
    another w mi dresses
    in England With Dior-trained
    workers.

    /

    December. Then they will be on
    sale all over Britain in February
    1958. Prices’ will -range from
    about £30 to £80. Mr. J s
    says they will be available at
    better class’”’ shops for the “upper
    income groups.”

    " always enjoy talking
    about themselves at a party. Get
    them on to the subject of their
    work and they will chat quite
    happily.”

    "7 't worry,” they say, “if he
    doesn’t kiss you goodnight. If he
    is really fond of you he’s prob-

    Mr. Halford (hi of
    Elsie Walker, director of 4 gar-
    dén-equipment firm): “T Itke hav-
    ing a business woman as a wife.
    She’s automatically more interest-

    ing than one w stagnates at
    home.





    avy dry eyes among those iad

    heard him.”

    “And then, as Margot Fonteyn
    came torward and danced,” wrote
    a critic the other day, “I had to,

    shake away the tears.”
    Imagine that!
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    SUNDAY, AUGUS

    PAGE EIGHT

    nage

    BARBADOS sil ADVOCAT

    Printed by the Advecate Co., Lid. Brew* ét. Aridyetews

    17, 1952

    Fede sal Gevernment

    THE undignified, squawking which has
    been reported in the Press as emanating
    from leading politicians of ‘the West In
    dies on the subject.of federation indicates
    how far the West’Indies have travelled
    from realisation of what is meant by
    federal government.

    When agreement was reached at Mon-
    tego Bay in September 1947 as to the type
    of closer political association which might
    be acceptable to the individual British
    Caribbean governments the essential prin-
    ciple of federation was better understood,

    The resolution which was responsible
    for all the action which has taken place
    since that date towards the formation of a
    political federation speaks of a federation
    in which each constituent unit retains
    complete control,over all matters except
    those specifically’ assigned to the federal
    government,

    While it is perfectly true that this phrase-
    ology permits of the formation of a politi-
    cal association in which so little control is
    left to the constituent units that the feder-
    al principle is violated ab initio, no such in-
    tention, it may be thought, existed in the
    minds of those responsible for drafting the
    resolution.

    The federal form of government and not
    the unitary form of governrnent was spe-
    cifically selected as the form of govern-
    ment most suited to cémmunities with
    their own traditions and practises of local
    government.

    Yet there fever has been absent from
    the minds of some of the most ardent
    champions of closer political association
    an idea of West Indian government which
    ought more properly to be described as
    unitary. .

    The impatience of certain types of Eng-
    lishmen with the looseness and often in-
    efficiency of administration 1n the British
    Caribbean islands has often led them to
    champion what they have trippingly de-
    scribed as federation when their state-
    ments make it clear that what they mos!
    ardently advocate is West Indian unitary
    government,

    One such Englishman is on record as
    having said in Barbados that the Secretary
    of State should announce at a given date
    and hour ‘that there would be a political
    federation of the West Indies and on that
    date at that hour federation: would come
    into being.

    The fact that that particular Englishman
    was at the time seeking election to the
    British Parliament ought not to blind any-
    one as to the essential stupidity of his re-
    mark.

    By the very definition of the federal
    principle it is impossible for a political
    federation to be forced upon any collection
    of states. A unitary government can be
    forced upon states or a totalitarian gov-
    érnment can be introduced against the
    will of peoples but it is impossible to have
    a federal government unless federal gov-
    ernment is sought by the constituent units
    of the proposed federation.

    Professor Wheareé in his book on Feder-
    al Government states that unless the com-
    munities or states concerned desire to be
    under a single independent government
    for some purposes the question of federal
    government does not arise,

    Unprejudiced students of the statements
    which have been made for some years and
    which more recently are being made by
    West Indian spokesmen on the subject of
    what is called federation must have been
    struck by the absence of emphasis in most
    of these statements on the federal princi-
    ple and of the reasons for choosing a fed-
    eral rather than a unitary form of govern-
    ment as a model for closer political associa-
    tion of the West Indies,

    There are many persons who consider
    that a federal government would add to
    the costs of administration without cur-
    tailing the importance of iocal govern
    ments and who consider that closer poli-
    tical association of the British Caribbean
    ought to be based on a unitary system of
    government. This emphasis is illustrated
    by the tendency towards actual unification
    and by recommendations for the unifica-
    tion of certain services and activities in
    recent years. This idea’ of unification and
    centralisation which has found great sup-
    port from outsiders who are brought sud-
    denly up against the untidy loose ends of
    West Indian administration has been quite,
    wrongly used since 1947 as an argument in
    favour of political federation when in fact
    it is an argument in favour of unitary gov-
    ernment.

    More recently statements of West Indian
    politicians show how far the leaders of po-
    litical thought have travelled away from
    the federal principle of government.

    Mr. Adams’ expressed distaste for any
    but a socialist federation is another exam-
    ple of the deviation from the federal prin-
    ciple towards the unitary conception of
    political association, Because in a truly
    federal government socialist states can
    exist quite happily under Liberal or Con-
    federal governments and the

    true

    servative
    converse is

    The federal form of government makes
    adequate provision for this gpparent para-
    dox.

    A government is federal states Profes-
    sor Wheare in the work mentioned above
    when it embodies predominantly “a divis-
    ion of powers between general and re-
    gional authorities, each of which in its
    own sphere is co-ordinate with the others
    and independent of them.”

    The Federal form of government pre-
    supposes a certain desire to unite for
    specified purposes but the advantage of
    federal as opposed to unitary government
    is that it permits “variety and independ-
    ence in matters where unity and uniform-
    ity is not essential. Local politics are
    among the matters where unity and uni-
    formity is not essential.

    There is of course even under federal
    government a constant temptation to de-
    viate in the direction of unitary govern-
    ment and the federal principle sometimes
    has to be modified by voluntery consent of
    the constituent states or communities of a
    federation.

    But under federation there is room “for |

    each region to govern itself in its own
    way”.

    Neither Mr. Adams insistence on social-
    ist communities as prerequisites of feder-
    ation nor Mr. Bustamante’s colourful bid
    for West Indian leadership are reconcil-
    able with the federal principle of govern-
    ment.

    The statements of these two leading po-
    liticians seem to be prompted by a con-
    ception of political association which is
    closer in ideology to a totalitarian or at
    best unitary form of government than to
    a government based on the federal prin-
    ciple of “dividing powers so that the gen-
    eral and regional governments are each
    within a sphere, co-ordinate and inde-
    pendent.”



    Outdoor Films

    A SUGGESTION at this time of year
    that open-air cinemas would add consider-
    ably to the amenities of Barbadian recre-
    ational life might be greeted by hoots of
    derision from the majority of cinema go-
    ers.

    Yet only last week in the spacious
    grounds of one of the larger Barbadian
    homes a most pleasing outdcor cinema en-
    tertainment was provided under a starry
    sky.

    Private guests in a Barbadian home are
    not likely to complain should the heavens
    suddenly open and precipitate the heavy
    rainfalls for which the tropics are justly
    renowned. Such happenings are but the
    accidents of normal social intercourse and
    add zest and sparkle to the excitement of
    living.

    But cinema fans in the “pit” sense of the
    word are notoriously opposed to the civil-
    izing refinements which make polite social
    intercourse such a tolerable exercise: they
    can employ shrieks and catcalls to express
    disapproval of the most orainary lapses
    which are not impossible occurrences in
    local cinemas.

    Under a starry sky their excitement and
    noisy camaraderie might posgibly be assu-
    aged to the great satisfaction of other
    patrons of the cinema.

    But who cannot imagine the hullaballo
    and the expletives which would result
    from the sudden cascade of waters from
    above in the middle of some exciting west-
    ern movie?

    Perhaps some such prudent considera-
    tion for the ears of their more refined
    patrons and for the skins of their more tur-
    bulent fans has prevénted the owners of
    cinemas in Barbados from following other
    hot countries and ‘providing open air
    cinemas,

    Such tender solicitude for their patrons
    will no doubt be appreciated and the im-
    proved standards of Barbadian cinemas
    show that like all other cornmercial con-
    cerns the cinema industry considers the
    customers always to be right.

    On the other hand how is it possible to ex-
    plain the fact that Barbadians whose at-
    tendance at race meetings, exhibitions,
    cricket matches, athletic sports and other
    outdoor functions reveals their natural lik-
    ing for outdoor entertainments should be
    considered by cinema proprietors as incap-
    able of enjoying films except in closely
    walled hot cinema houses?

    The fact that rain does fall sufficiently
    often in Barbados to make some type of
    sliding roof essential ought riot to obscure
    the other fact that on most. nights of the
    year there is no rain.

    It may be of course that the patronage
    of cinemas by Barbadians is considered to
    be so satisfactory by the cinema proprie-
    tors that the introduction of so obvious an
    amenity as an open air cinema is thought
    an unnecessary device for attracting per-
    sons to the cinema. If that is so the initia-
    tive for effecting a change 1s unlikely to
    come from the cinema proprietors.

    Can it be therefore that most cinema
    goers themselves regard open air cinemas
    as undesirable and would not use the in-
    fluence which their patronage of cinemas
    commands to support the pleas of those
    who desire to see films in open air cinemas?

    Now at any rate is an opportunity for
    those who consider that open air cinemas
    would add to the social amenities of the
    island to say so in letters to tne Press or in
    any other suitable manner. Certainly
    there exists a body of opinion in Barbados
    favourable to the showing of films in ‘open
    cinemas, If it became more vocal, the end
    might be achieved.



    SUNDAY ADVOCATE

    SUNDAY, AUGUST 17, 1952



    The man who

    keeps Barbados

    laughing on

    According to Census re-
    turns there are 1,702,000 more
    women than men in Great
    Britain today.

    According to observation of
    newspaper photographs long
    before the Olympic Games
    most of them appear to be
    marching, running, hopping,
    skipping and jumping, bang-
    ing drums, blowing trumpets,
    yelling at women recruits on
    parade grounds and hurling
    men over their shoulders in
    wrestling bouts,

    E are the surp:us femaies
    we don’t know what to do
    So we bang our drum, ta-ra-ra-
    tum-tum
    And we blow our trumpets, too.
    We blow till our cheeks are
    purple
    We bang till our ears are deaf
    On parade we shout till our eyes
    pep out
    “Lef, right, lef’, right, lef.”
    We are the surplus females
    We dont know what to do
    We skip and hop till we fall
    down, flop
    We jump like a kangaroo,

    {Till our lungs and heart are
    bursting
    We run, run, run, run, run,
    On parade we yell “Wake up

    that gel’ —
    It’s all such jolly good fun,
    ;We are the surplus females
    We don’t care if we’re wed
    If we cant marry we'll raise
    Old Harry
    And bang our drums instead.
    In judo and jiu-jitsu
    We give the chaps what for

    Over they go with an expert
    throw,

    Bang, bang, bang on the floor.

    Blow, blow, blow went the
    trumpet

    Bang, bang, bang went the
    drum

    Jiu-jitsu, and the same to you
    Rum-tiddy-tum-tum-tum,
    You can chase us round Helsinki
    As) we run, run,, run, rup, run,
    For we are the surplus girly with
    a purpose—



    Some people, when they give
    half a crown to an old man in the
    street, wonder how far it will go
    to keep him in these days of rising
    costs of ‘living. Most of them, I
    am sure, do not realise that for
    half a crown @ man can sleep for
    15 nights or half a month in a
    shelter in Bridgetown which is run
    especially for those who cannot
    afford to pay more than 4 cents
    a night for lodging.

    The Shelter night service
    was started four years ago by
    the Salvation Army in Reed
    Street.

    It is part of a Hostel building
    and there is accommodation for
    70 men in the shelters and 25 in
    the Hostel. .

    The shelter beds are canvas
    cots and guests have a choice of
    two prices, For 6 cents a man
    can sleep in a downstairs room
    with a wooden floor: for 4 cents
    the cot is placed on a concrete
    floor, This seems to be the major
    difference. In both the 6 cents
    and the 4 cents rooms the men
    sleep on separate cots but in the
    same room. Washing and toilet
    facilities are provided but no
    cooking is allowed on the Hostel
    or shelter premises.

    Upstairs the old living rooms
    of former Salvation Army Offi-
    cers have been neatly divided into
    two lots of cubicles.

    Fifteen of these cubicles are
    rented for $1.20 a week each and
    ten are rented for $1.00 a week
    each,

    Both types are simply fur-
    nished with beds, but the five
    shilling cubicles are in the front
    part of the building and receive
    more light. I peeped into one
    of each of the two types of cubi-
    cles and for the price I have seen
    no better accommodation any-
    where in the world.

    Their patrons must think the
    same, and I found one pleasant
    spoken mason enjoying his milk
    and bread luncheon in the pri-
    vacy of his own cubicle, although
    there is a large room outside
    where guests of the hostel can
    relax, play games or listen to the
    radio,

    I suppose a carping person
    could complain that there is an
    old look about the Salvation
    Army Hostel and’ Shelter in Reed
    Street, that the walls and the
    ceilings could do with new paint
    or distemper and that the toilet
    and bathrooms could be kept in
    more spotless condition, I sup-
    pose they could, But does the
    carping person stop to think that
    for less than 18 cents a night a
    Man can sleep in comfort and,
    alone in a grade one cubicle of
    the Hostel and for less than 15
    cents a night in a cubicle almost
    as good? ea

    How many people in days like
    these when everyone complains
    of the rising cost of living can
    provide themselves with amen-

    Sundays
















































    ’

    We're all such jolly good fun.

    Mustache In Flames

    IE report that the moustache

    belonging to Dr, Warren K.
    Sinelair, physicist at a London
    hospital, became radioactive
    @fter research work, will once
    R ore focus attention on Tovarich
    ft de to you) the famous in-
    giowing moustache belonging to
    doe Stalin.

    At one time, it was believed
    that Tovarich, described as in-
    growing because of its concave
    construction, was used as a small
    store for food in case of famine.

    It was also faceticusly suggested
    here that, as Stalin is so fond of
    animals, it was used as a home
    for orphaned baby mice.

    It can now be revealed that
    Tovarich became radioactive after
    the first Russian atomic explosion,

    Although any food stored there
    became uneatable soon afterwards,
    and any refugee baby mice must
    have been killed instantly, Tova-
    rich has now become Stalin’s
    secret weapon No, 1 in the difficult
    task of maintaining a nation-wide
    belief in his divinity,

    As it is always hard to believe
    in a live god who marries, be-
    comes a father, and smokes a pipe,

    there were times when even
    the, simplest Russian soldier,
    peasant, or worker had _ his

    doubts.

    3ut when Stalin had a Geiger
    counter made in the shape of a
    pipe whieh ticked, crackled, and
    threw off sparks when it touched
    Tcovarich, doubting moujiks were
    shamed into awed silence, and
    even knowing comrades within
    the sacred circle were impressed.

    Later on Tovarich was fitted
    with concealed strip lighting, the
    pipe was fitted with an electric
    battery, and unbelievers were
    down on their knees, banging their
    foolish heads on the stones of
    the Red Square, when they saw the
    first illuminated moustache in the
    world.

    At Tovarich

    once burst into

    R’y George Hunte

    ities as good as those of the
    Salvation Army Hostel in Reed
    Street for as little expenditure?
    Yet despite the cheapness of the
    host the charity of ‘he shelter (since
    the poorest begger can be assured
    of 4 cents a day for his enter-
    prise) I was cheered to learn that
    there is no need to turn away
    men from the shelters, and that
    these are filled up only on special
    oceasions when yisiters from the
    country earry on their celebra-
    tions to such a Jate hour that
    they miss their last bus home.

    To some extent, the Salvation
    Army Hostel and Shelter pro-
    vides a guide to the extent of
    poverty in our midst. Many of
    the patrons of the shelter are un-
    employed persons looking for
    work, but the fact that the shel-
    ters are not overcrowded suggests
    that the number of men in
    Barbados with nowhere to sleep
    is limited,

    This of course ought not to be
    a subject for facile congratula-
    tions becausé you don’t have to
    leave the * neighbourhood of
    Reed Street to see people living
    in far less pleasant surroundings
    than those of the Salvation Army
    Hostel upstairs, But if the ability
    to find 4 cents a night is indica-
    tive of the lowest social level to
    which a Barbadian man can fall,
    then it is hard to believe that
    any man need go without shelter
    in the island, thanks to the
    Salvation Army,

    The Barbados Government con-
    tributes $720 per year to the
    Salvation Army to help them
    Yrith their social work, The
    Government indeed owes a
    special debt to the Army for the
    assistance rendered by the Army
    in previous years in. the-field—of
    probation and juvenile delin-
    quency. Quite recently Capt.
    Brooks from the London Head-
    quarters of the Army spent
    several years in Barbados training
    local © government officers _, in
    probation methods and the local
    government has taken over this
    important social service from the
    Army.

    Other social work which the
    Army has carried on in Barbados
    in the past included a soup
    kitchen at which free meals were
    distributed, and the provision of
    a women’s shelter with accommo-
    dation for about fifty.

    The Army has been operating
    in Barbados since 1898 and its
    present headquarters building
    @vas erected in 1911,

    Reed Street is the headquarters
    of a division which operates in
    the Leeward and Windward
    Islands and extends as far north
    as the British and American
    Virgin Islands. Responsible for
    this large area is Major Walter
    Morris, a Jamaican who, until



    Our Readers Say:

    Major Stop Ahead
    To the Editor, The Advocate;
    SIR,—Last Thursday two
    }gentlemen and I were engaged in
    ja conversation at the sign post
    }which marked Hillaby Via Dukes,
    | B’town via Shop Hill and Bennetts
    via Bucks (thia corner is comm@en-
    ly called Wheeler Corner) A
    jlorry containing a molasses tank
    came up the junction

    (Bennetts one of the gentlemen

    BED FOR FOUR CENTS.

    ————————————————

    CANASTA PLAYING CARDS
    (Complete with Instructions)... ..



    per Set
    PATIENCE PLAYING CARDS ‘
    72e, per Set

    a»
    ADVOCATE STATIONERY

    flames owing to a fuse, fire extin-!
    guishers are now kept handy on
    Stalin's table at all banquets.

    Juju For All

    Now that South Africa's
    witch doctors. are obliged to
    qualify at a new college at
    Johannesburg because leading
    medicine men complained. that
    ‘there were quac
    in the profession, we can on
    wait hopefully for the day
    when their services are free

    under a National Heaith
    Service,

    When that day comes, the
    witch doctor’s consulting

    room will be full of people

    demanéling free ¢pells cast
    on undesirable relatives.

    ND what can I do for you
    today, Miss?

    I want my aunt turned into a
    wart hog,

    Only last week I turned your
    uncle into a wart hog.

    Yes, but auntie’s lonely.

    All right, I'll cast the spell this
    evening,

    And, doctor, You remember
    you turned my pretty cousin
    ee ugly witch?

    oO.

    Well, she’s lost her broomstick.
    You want a prescription for a



    new broomstick?
    Yes, please, doctor, She feels
    awful without it, And -can I

    have some newts’ eyes to turn
    my stepmother into a toad?

    Newts’ eyes don't turn. step-
    mothers into toads. You meun
    frog’s livers.

    I read somewhere that newts’
    eyes are better.

    People like you are the curse
    of our profession. You think you're
    half a witch doctor,

    If yowre going to be rude I
    shall go to somebody who's
    more obliging,

    Oh, have it your own way,
    Here’s a prescription for 101
    newts’ eyes. If they turn yow
    stepmother into a rogue elephan
    don’t blame me.


































































    —LES. rrators, Bendix Automatic Washers, Vacuums, Irons snd

    Bedside Lamps & Fans provides the opportunity to. create :
    the Home Electric. Pie

    recently was doing Salvation
    Army Work in British Guiana,

    Territorial Caribbean Head-
    quarters of the Salvation Arm)
    is in Kingston and the work done
    in Barbados is only a small portior
    of the work performed in thc
    Caribbean.

    In Kingston and Nassau fo:
    example the Army has been doing
    valiant work on behalf of the
    Blind and not long ago the Gov-
    ernor of Jamaica opened two new
    wings of the Salvation Army
    Institute for the Blind which haa
    been built with a grant of £12,500
    provided through the Colonia,
    Development and Welfare Organi-
    sation. In Panama and Haiti toc
    the Army are assisting the blind
    and in Haiti special assistance i.
    being given in the medical fielc.
    and with projects designed tc
    promote economic development.

    The excellent work being done
    in Reed Street is therefore only a
    small part of the social services
    which the Army is conducting
    throughout the whole Caribbean
    region. Because of its international
    organisation and because of the
    vein of true Christian charity
    which inspires all their work the
    Salvation Army in Barbados is
    able to apply knowledge ana
    standards of service which have
    been obtained from many year:
    of practical experience in mos
    countries of the world,

    It is against this wide back-
    ground that the social work being
    done in Reed Street must be placed
    and if it seems to the carping
    eritic that there has been a restric-
    tion of Salvation Army social
    activity in the island in recent
    years it must be remembered not
    only that the government has
    taken over one of their most im-
    portant functions—probation work
    and the treatment of juvenile
    delinquents—but that other areas,
    like Haiti for instance have need:
    far greater than our own,

    Meanwhile the Hostel = anc
    Shelter for men in Reed Stree
    remains to remind all who ar
    anxious to assist their fellowme:
    that there is work to be done ir
    Barbados at the four cents and si?
    cents level and that the mania for
    expensive community halls anc
    costly playing fields may not bk
    our greatest need at present
    however good they are.

    The Hostel and Shelter in Reec
    Street caters only for men, Ough
    there not to be some similar insti-
    tution for women? ‘

    The Army tried but failec
    because of lack of funds.

    A casual stroller along thi
    streets in the Reed Street neigh-
    bourhood may well ask whethe:
    some of the huge sums which arc
    being spent on some of the presen”
    “shop-window” types of socia)
    work might not be channellec
    towards the four cents portion o
    the female community.



    DaCosta & Co, Ltd.

    | THIS IS FOLLOWED
    BY AN ICE-COLD



    via Bucks) at a very fast rate,
    end entered the Major road with
    the same speed, without having
    the least thought for any vehicle
    turning the Corner (Hillaby via
    Dukes to B‘town) I am quite sure
    that if any vehicle was turning
    the corner at that time, a very
    serious accident would have taken
    place

    About three quarters of
    hour later, the lorry returned and
    stopped the

    an Why not?

    driver and asked him, ‘Young
    man do you have any respect fo:
    your life? Are you aware that

    this is an extremely dangerous
    corner, now the canes blocked
    this sight of the various roads?
    He replied, ‘Sir, I admit that

    was driving fairly fast on account
    of being late, but on the other
    hand, no majorstop is there.’

    CANADA DRY GINGER

    MIXED WITH A BRACING

    GOLD BRAID

    TO ENJOY THE FINEST VACATION
    JOHN HAYWOOD,


    fy

    . SUNDAY, AUGUST 1

    1952



    Liverpool’s Little

    4



    By PAUL
    FOSTER



    “Advocate” Staff» Reporter, now
    * on ae Scholarship
    A England.

    The City: of Liverpoo] has a
    Population of 800,000 and it is
    estimated that 18,000 of these are
    Migrants fron frica, West Indies,
    China, Indid, Arabia, Malaya and
    to “a lesser tent, a fiw other
    countries. Of “this number’ the
    majority. are Africans, West In-

    and Chinese follow in that
    order, :

    on < e

    “Neither the Colonial, Office nor
    the Home keep any sep-
    arate record of the large nufn-
    bers of “migrants who arrive in
    Liverpool from the West Indies
    vand Africa. No exact figures can
    be given, for, as British subjects
    they travel om British passports
    It is similarly difficult to estifmate
    the number of Jamaicans, Bar-.
    badians etc., who have settled in
    this city. f \

    During the years immediately
    following the war, ships brought
    a large number of “free travel-
    lers” to Britain. In 1948, 132 landed
    in Liverpool, but the numbers
    dropped to 98 in 1949 and in 1950
    the gross total of stowaways into
    the whole of the country was
    cnly 425 and only a fraction of
    these came to Liverpool. Last year,
    the country’s “illegal -entrants”
    numbered 176. Therefore it can be
    paid that. the majority of these
    people are migrants and not
    stowaways, —

    Most of the coloured colonial
    workers of the city live in the
    Upper’ Parliament Street area. In
    this street and its surroundings,
    a growing population is springing
    up. It iS-said that their housing

    ‘est



    Three West Indians stop for a chat along Upper Parliament Street, Liverpool

    conditions are not good, but then,
    neither are the conditions of their
    fellow English. workers, through
    the general housing shortage.

    When I visited the home of a
    Barbadian worker who lives on
    this. street, I found that as re-
    gards cleanliness the rooms were
    kept just as well as other houses
    I visited tenanted by English peo-
    ple in a higher income bracket.
    This however is not a typical ex-
    ample of the general conditions
    in this area; but then the houses
    of their fellow workers, born in
    this country are no better.

    liverpool is in s-veral ways
    however, endeavouring to help the
    colonial workers who migrate to



    . JAN I ) YOUTH (left) and two West Indian boys walk along
    ‘ Upper Parliament Street, Liverpool.

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    ———



    LIVINGSTONE YARD,

    a Barbadian who lives in Liverpool.

    England and settle in the city. So
    too are they assisting colonial stu-
    dents who come to study at the
    university.

    Stan ey House on Upper Par-
    liament Street which operated as
    a Social Centre during the war
    and the immediate post-war years
    re-opened* last month. C. W.
    Mcugne, a 40-year-old Londoner
    has been appointed Warden at
    Stanley House after eight years
    work at the British Council, Al-
    ready a g¥mnatium is being fit-
    ted up at their headquarters and
    they have a cricket field in an-
    other part of the city. I undcr-
    stand that it is hoped to gâ„¢
    Stanley House teams established
    in the field of competitive sport
    in Liverpcol. Boys Clubs, affi-iated
    to the Liverpool Boys’ Associa-
    tion is also to be attempted.

    Another plan is the provision of
    residential accommodation at Stan-
    ley House, where students may
    live while training in Liverpool.
    or where coloured migrants may
    become acclimatised to their new
    country.
    the city, the

    of the East
    Council,

    is also in
    Liverpool Committee
    and West Friendshiy
    whose representatives welcome
    every Colonial and Eastern ;stu-
    dent. By keeping in touch with
    the university, the British Council
    and the passport offices, advance

    There

    information that a_ student
    coming over i§ often obtained and
    a letter of welcome and an ex-
    planation of conditions here sent
    before he leaves home.

    All ships, trains and ‘planes on
    which students are known to be
    traveling are met. Friendly ad-
    vice and help is given to the new
    arrivals. They are introduced to
    local families and, later on, holi-
    days are arranged for them,

    is

    Before ieaving Liverpool, I took
    a walk through Upper Parliament
    Street. Stanley House was not yet
    open, so instead my first stop
    was “George Wilkies Club,” whica
    is a few yards from the Rialto
    Cinema on Parliament Street—a

    spot well known to any West In-
    dian seaman who has visited
    Liverpool.

    George Wilkie is perhaps the

    best known West Indian in Liver-
    pool. Born in British Guiana cf
    Barbados parentage, George now
    runs this club at 64 Upper Parlia-
    ment Street, and, it is the general
    meeting place for most of the
    coloured folk in Liverpool. He was

    in Barbados about a year ago on
    a Visit.
    One of his right hand men is

    Barbados born Archie Husband
    who, when I asked him where he
    came from said in a broad Bar-
    badian accent “Man I is a Welsh-
    mun.” Archie, who has been living
    in England for 40 years, “sweags
    allegiance’ to Wales. “I've been
    up here through all the hard
    dimes,” he told me, “But I've got

    SUNDAY ADVOCATE

    ee ecm

    Indies

    Archie 22-year-old
    phew, John of Herh--*t
    Hus! ands of Barbados) at present
    in England—a law student at
    Kings College Newcastle. One day,
    Archie hopes to return Bar-
    bados

    by.” has

    (son

    n

    to

    Outside the club, I met Living-
    rto:e Yard, a 33-year-old Bar-



    badian, whese prrents live in
    n w Lane, St. Michael, He has
    two brothers and three sisters
    living. at home.

    Livingstone came to England
    when he was 20. He worked his
    way up on a Dutch boat and has
    been » s€aman every since

    Yurd spent most of his boy-
    hood days on Burke’s Beach, Bay
    Stre wher he was given the

    ime of “Sandow” (becaus?
    his sturdy figure). He is still

    wo by this name to his friends.

    Before leaving home and for a
    short time after arriving in Eng-
    land. h
    K q his

    was boxing

    ‘ m rr.cd an Bnglich gi
    ia Occobsr 1940 and they live i
    216 Upper Parliament Street, They
    have no children,

    Asked what he thought about
    England, Yard replied he had no
    comp-aints. “Providing you are
    willing te work you will get on.’
    He also hopes to return home on
    a visit one day.

    Some other Barbadians living
    in Liverpool are Basil Skeete,
    Basil Headley and Hilborn Gay.

    Skeete who is 33 comes from
    Nelson Street. He is married with
    three children. He is a fitter at
    Camerlairds Shipping Yards, Bir«-
    enhead. Headiey is from Christ
    Church while Gay's home is in
    Dunlow Lane, St. Michael, Gay is
    single, at present unemployed and
    drawing £2. 8. 6. a week, National
    Assistance Allowance. He has been
    in England since 1949,

    It is difficult to get a general
    picture as to what a West Indian

    worker thinks about conditions
    in England. Each has a differeat
    answer, Some like Wilkie, Hus-

    bands and Yard have relatively no
    complaints, while others, such as
    Philip Noel a native of Trinidad,
    do not advocate West Indians
    coming to this country to settle.
    Noel says “tell the boys to stay
    at home—don’t come to England.’
    Noel has been in England since
    the war and is learning to be a
    dispenser. While transportaticn i
    expensive Noel hopes to return to
    his homeland within a few year
    “when I’m qualified in my job.”

    Personally I’m inclined to agree
    with Noel “boys stay at home”
    West Indians in any walk of life
    have a happier existence than
    their counterparts in this coun-
    try, even taking into consider -

    tion Britain as a “welfare state”
    handing out National Assistance,



    A BLOCK OF FLATS on Upper Parliament Street (opposite the
    Rialto Cinema) where many West Indians live.

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    OTHER FATS

    AND OIL if |
    The Oi Palm |

    By ECONOMIST |

    rhe o.1 palm, as it is generally
    alled, is not to be confused witn
    the coconut palm and is indigen-
    ous to West Africa. The collectic.
    of the fruit and the extraction of
    me ol are important activities
    hose African territgries where the
    Palm occurs in a natural state
    Authorities think that the self-
    sown palm exists at its best
    the Congo with Nigeria a
    second, Vense forests exist onl
    the coastal regions; in other areas,
    it may be found singly or in clu:-
    ters on the sites of old cultivation
    It occurs also in parts of Ea
    Africa but transport condition
    have hitherto preyented its ex-
    ploitation to any extent. In th
    part of the world the palm occu:
    in the Amazon region but this a1
    is thought unlikely to become

    close

    ‘source of supply as the fatty mat-
    & er content of the oil is lower tha
    e tried his hand at boxing. he West African.



    The oil palm has been introduced
    vio the East Indies and is assuc-
    & increasing importance in thot
    gion as a plantation crop, Much

    f this introductory work is credit-
    ed to the Dutch, Plantations now
    exist in Sumatra, Java, Cochin

    China and Malaya. Many types or
    varieties are recognised and breed-
    ing work has been undertaken
    with a view to fixing the best types. |
    The question whether it were bet- |
    ter to grow the palms in large |
    plantations or on native owned
    farms as in West Africa appears to

    be a contreversial one. With the|
    coconut well established in the!
    West Indies, oil

    may have little interest for us
    although it may conceivably prov
    a valuable economic addition in
    neighbouring continental territor-
    ies in situations where the coconut
    seems unlikely to thrive. Select
    strains have been introduced :

    |

    t

    \

    palm ft ea

    British Guiana and experimental
    results are promising. Labour for
    collecting and handling may be a
    problem since the fruit bunches
    or ‘heads’ do not lend themselves
    to the comparatively easy methods
    of the coconut, are more easily
    damaged with prejudicial effects
    on the quality of the oil due to
    fermentation and = rancidity. In
    this connection too native method
    of handling and oil extracting vary
    with consequent lack of uniform
    ity in the final product.

    The fruit bunches vary from a
    few pounds in weight to as much
    as 150 Ib; the individual fruit
    also vary in size and, in some re-
    spects, resemble the olive. The
    products are two: (1) palm oil
    from the outer fleshy pulp or peri-
    carp; (2) kernel oil from the ker-
    nels proper, the lesser by volume
    of the two but generally of highe:
    quality, The former has to be ex- |
    tracted on the spot and, since
    there is a great deal of fibrous |
    matter in the pulp, some difficul
    ties exist. Modern machines a1 |
    now available for the purpose. Th
    fibrous residue has little valu
    The dried kernels are usually ex-
    ported for crushing and treatmen'
    ir modern mills, the oil thus ex-
    tracted being of a high standard
    quality. The residue is used as a
    feeding stuff, |



    Much palm oil, that is the peri-
    earp oil, is consumed in West|
    Africa as food. It is, of course, also |
    an important export and used,
    principally in the manufacture of |
    soap and candles as well as in
    other ways where quality is not
    vital, The kernel oil, like that of |
    the coconut, is used in food pro- |
    ducts, but improvement in the
    preparation and quality of the pulp
    oil makes it equally valuable for |
    margarine and cooking fats. Both |
    palm and kernel oil are important !
    commodities in world trade and
    industry, especially so with more;
    settled post-war conditions emerg- |
    ing in Europe, notably in Germany
    which has always. been a large
    consumer.

    @ On Page 10



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    PAGE NINE

    tn ae mR



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    PU DIT TABORE,

    PAGE TEN



    nents CtiNtet ttt.

    ~ TALKING TURTLE

    By IAN GALE

    Before we get too involved let
    me explain whai I mean by turtle
    For me a turtle is a thing that
    Swimy in the sea as distinct from
    the landlubberly tortoise, or as my
    Oxford Diétionary says: “A marin:
    reptile emcased as tortoise and
    with flippers used in swimming.

    To be-more exact, the Encylo-
    paedia Britannica says: “Chelo-
    nidae. Marine turtles, with only
    two recerit. genera, with three
    widely distributed species. The

    limbs are paddle-shaped,) with
    only one or two claws
    and ‘the shell is covered witli
    horny — shields. The neck is
    short .and incompletely retractil-
    The. parietals, post _ frontals

    squamosals, quadrato-jugals, anc
    jugals are much expanded an:
    form an additional false roc
    over the, temporal region of th«
    skull. The Cheloniaae are a high
    ly specialized off shoot of th
    Cryptodifa, adapted to marin
    life. Fundamentally they agre
    most with thé Testudinidae, an
    there is nothing primitive abou.
    them except that they still posses
    complete series of inframargina
    shields,”.....m——other words, the
    Chelonidae“are sea tortoises or »:

    we say, les. To confuse the
    issue 1 is known a
    tortoiseshell~

    Having said something about
    turtles in general let us turn to
    turtles in particular and deal firs!
    with the species that i¢ most often
    caught off these shares+-the green
    turtle. Without doubt the srcen
    turtle is the most important oj
    all turtles from an €conomi
    point of view. It is the source of
    the famous turtle soup, and the
    species indeed is eaten as well a
    drunk By man the world ove:
    Tt is the basis of extensive in-
    dustries and tens of thousands o/
    dollars worth of specimens are
    sold annually in the markets of
    the large cities.

    Oil is made- both the turtle
    and its eggs,“but the shell has
    only a low commercial value, bein,
    too thin for most purposes,

    The green turtle has a world
    wide distribution in tropical and
    subtropical seas, usually remain-
    ing within 35 degrees of the
    Equator. Green turtle are found
    near shoals and lagoons of oc@anic
    islands, especially off sand beaches,
    their browsing method of feeding
    off fields of s@a being also a strong
    determining factor in their
    habitat preference.

    Just where 8 nd how this turtle
    sleeps is the most interesting



    the front pair throwing the sand
    out by swimming movements and
    then resting while the hind pair
    io their work. After depressions
    have been made fore and aft, the
    digger revolves enough to change
    the’ centre of action and thus
    finally works herself into the re-
    sulting bowl-shaped excavation.

    Next she digs the egg pit, a far
    more delicate procedure, j
    secondary excavation is a cylin-
    drical hole some eighteen inches
    deep and twelve or more across.
    The sand is removed by strokes
    of the @dge of the flippers used
    alternately, difficulty rapidly in-
    creasing with depth. Finally the

    flipper must be curled inward,
    gently lowered, undercurled and
    forced into the sand by skilful
    pushes until a load has been dis-
    lodged. Then the tip is again

    curled te completely enfold the
    sand and bring it out, often with
    loss of scarcely a grain.

    When the turtle is rgady to lay,
    the hind flippers are brought to-
    ucther, hiding the tail and cover~
    ing the mouth of the pit, Usually
    two eggs are ejected at a time.

    As soon as the laying is com-
    pleted the nest is filled in, the hind
    flippers patting and kneading the
    sand into the nest. Then she
    returns to the water. This nesting
    process takes an average of two
    hours.”

    The eggs, which resemble ping-
    pong balls, take about twe months
    io hateh, The mother turtle never
    comes back and the hatchings
    have to make their own way to

    for protection, and during such
    times hunters readily catch them

    Fishermen in these parts find
    that they catch more Hawksbi!l
    turtles if they sink their nets to
    the bottom rather than let therm
    float on the surface. At one time
    the shell brought a very good price,
    but now that plastic materials
    have come of age the price per
    pound of shell has dropped con-
    siderably.

    The largest of living turtles ‘s
    the Leatherback, a few of which
    have been landed here from time
    to time. Not 1 ago a turtle of
    this species weighing 1,450 pounds
    was secured near Vancouver
    Island. The Leatherbaek, which a
    it name suggest has its shell cov-
    ered with smooth skin instead of
    horny shields, is of no economic
    value.

    Finally to get back to the green
    turtle and to Ligon, who wrote
    the first History of Barbados
    about 1650. He says “The green
    turtle is the best food that the
    sea affords but I have seen vert
    few of them in Barbados,. and
    those neither fat nor kindly and
    the reason is, there are no sands
    or shelves for them to lay their

    . eggs or to rest themselves there-

    on?” What happened to Barbados’
    beaches three hundred years ago

    Anyhow, after describing how
    to kill a turtle and how the heart
    will move for twelve hours after
    the reptile is dead, he coneludes
    on this lovely hs ae cine
    enter note: “Sure i ¢
    ryeaturé on Earth, or on the Seas,
    that enjoys life with such sweet-
    ness and delight, as the tur-
    tle, nor none more icate in
    taste, or more nourishing, than

    he.”
    Sn

    OTHER FATS
    AND OIL I

    @ From Page 9.
    has been ineluded in
    by Or aatver of a few typical
    sources of edible fats and oils be-

    t t has been used as a food
    ea from the earliest times.

    the background of our develop-
    ment and historical past. We know

    question abglf its habits, That i: ‘%¢ sea. Many of them are eate: 115; 4 wild olive does exist but
    does sleep ig-a well established Y birds while they are crawling 4; what stage of man’s progress

    fact, for
    relaxed ini
    surface ofthe sea, Indisputable

    gobbled up by fish. As the turtles

    ~observers have seer, 00 the beach, and after entering {he tree began to be cared and
    uals floating on the ‘te sea numbers of them are jysbanded there are

    of course, no

    records. It seems, however, that

    evidence has also been presente s'0w larger, however, their main grafting on to wild stocks ‘was

    that great saumbers sleep on re-
    mote Hawaligm rock ledges anti

    sandy ~ a fact contradic-
    tory to ‘al belief that
    turtles die If stranded on..their

    bellies, owing-to the lack of suffi-
    cient support afforded to interna!
    organs by the lower part of the
    shell. Breathing is sald to be

    seriously impaired and spécimen ‘\¢pth. The net is supported by |yediterranean

    going to market dre always turned
    gn_their backs.

    The largest green turtle ever
    taken by the Key West dealers
    weighed.700 pounds but the West
    Indian récord is 850 pounds, The
    usual weight, however, in m)
    experience, is seventy-five to 150
    pounds,

    Nestliag Process

    Green turtles lay an average of .

    120 eges. The nesting process i:
    interesting and is described b:
    Clifford Pope thus: “In ascending
    the beach the female pulls herseli
    along with the front flipper:
    leaving a conspicuous track two
    to three feet wide made up i

    parallel depressions separated by
    a ridge. Her progress is in stage
    of six or seven steps followed by |
    nauses for rest. When a site has
    been chosen, she proceeds to sink
    herself into a large hollow which
    all four flippers,

    is made with

    nemies are men and sharks, The
    harks biting Off their flippers ii
    hey get the chance and men
    eatching them in nets or turning
    them illegally on the beaches
    vhen they come up to lay, Turtlh
    iets (1 have one) are anything
    rom twenty to fifty yards in
    ‘ength and about four feet in
    corks end is mooréd only at one
    en When turtles strike th

    iets they get hopelessly 2ntangled.
    One enormous fellow, however,
    jot entangled in my first net and
    ‘ook it away with him. He was

    my ‘ust seen off Silver Sands, still ‘rites,

    complete with net, *

    The other species of turtle that
    is caught off the coast of Barbados
    ; the Hawksbill, source of the
    famous “tortoiseshell”, This pretty

    * turtle—the shell is brown and
    » yellow—seldom attains a size of
    more than 160 Ibs. While it is

    vf value because of its shell, the
    neat is not so well flavoured as
    that of the Green turtle.

    Its habits are much like those
    vf the green turtle, though it
    iys about thirty more eggs and
    vill eat a wider variety of things
    ~Babcock relates that, while eat-
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    ractised at an early time—a ref-
    prence occurs in St. Paul’s epistle
    to the Romans, All the early
    writers, Greek and Roman, refer to
    the olive in way or another.
    Homer calls if ‘the sacred olives
    {t is honoured im Hebrew litera-
    ture and oceupies a central place
    With tne Oe ida. The ancient
    Palesti selected
    the olive as a symbol of peace an)
    civie virtues, e earliest biblical
    reference oecurs in the story of
    Noah’s dove returning to the ark
    with the olive leaf. In addition
    to its significance in religious
    references to its culinary,
    medical and cosmetic uses in
    early literature are numerous. In
    the Psalms, for example, we read
    of the ‘oil that maketh man’s face
    to shine’ It was too the main
    iliuminant of our ancient forbears.
    The olive was clearly interwoven
    in their pattern of life much as
    the coconut in the Far East and
    the oil,palm in West Africa are
    today. Even a names bear

    testimony to For example,
    the ‘word Gethsemane means
    ‘olive press’, The fruits were

    crushed, as now, in that region
    by a revolving stone or.sometimes
    treaded with the foot. It has been
    said that in her over-flowing of}
    vats (mostly dug out of the rock),
    Judah had not only a livelihood
    but also riches for exportation
    and for barter,

    The olive is indigenous to the
    Mediterranean basin and its pro-
    duce is an important article of
    commerce throughout the region,
    but especially so in Italy, Spain
    and Southern France in modern
    times when efficient methods are
    practised in the extraction of the
    oil. Olive oil has been deseribed
    as the edible oil par excellence as
    regards flavour and its nutritive
    qualities are of the highest order.
    There is nothing to equal it as @
    salad oil. Outside of the countries
    of its provenance the oil may be
    regarded as a luxury duct, It
    fetches very high pric today
    and, on this account, it is fre-
    quay adulterated with oils more
    neutral in taste such as those de-
    rived from cotton seed, soya bean,
    maize, groundnut and sunflower.
    Efforts have been made to extend
    the cultivation of olives to Cali-
    fornia, Australia and
    Africa, but the yield of oil
    the fruits wn in non-Eur nm
    countries is said to be consider-

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    SUNDAY

    JONSON'S VOLPONE,
    this year’s final offering from the
    Shakespeare Memorial Theatre at
    Stratford-on-Avon, must be one of
    the most
    written

    savage comedies ever

    The product uo a turbulent
    genius—Jonson was constantly in
    and out of prison—and a turbulent
    time, it parades a galaxy of
    characters driven on by avarice,
    lust, treachery, conceit and every
    other vice in the calender. There

    SUNDAY, AUGUST 17, 1952
    Back To Lend Sir Ralph j
    ac o London Sir ph pats aXe
    7 ~ me Re
    BEN By DAVID FARRER Funny men surround Aim, but | needs j Don't negléct a
    This actor is altogether they are there for the | , “. cated cough! Rub di
    He exudes a middle- Purpose of leaving him cold. } the pure, mildly medicated com fay, cee wa ant. Se
    class bonhomie. He is the epitome He is the duck’s back; they fort of Cuticura Talcum. Let this xy _ Liniment, The penetensing
    a wh \ pour the water. He os ti silk-soft, fragrant Powder soothe ea -a¢ stimulates blood circu-
    f niceness—cut out, you feel, to *: - recei of Rn | and protect your baby's precious skim on and prompuy relieves
    act the idealist in ny play Salguasbine tes jy ol epi him chate-rec and hap. Yan 1c. oa. Thousands have
    q cares a i rT found seller w =
    J. B. Pricitay & = blwe, and inward- fante. ‘Por Paes hat i Why nor you? .
    j Corieura :

    is little room in this lusty, spraw- |,

    ling masterpiece for goodness,

    The author's
    concern is to make sport of evil.

    Volpone, the Venetian magnifico,
    gloats over the treasure he has
    amassed and plans to amass some
    more. Feigning mortal sickness,
    he tempts three fellow citizens
    with hints that he will make cach
    oné of them his heir.

    Driven nearly crazy with ava-
    rice, they bring him rich presents.

    One merchant’s present takes
    thé shape of his young and lovely
    = who has aroused Volopone’s
    lust.

    * * *

    The ensuing complications
    ivolving numerous double cross-
    ings, assumed identities and
    feigned death, lead at last to the
    final court scene, where the sins
    of all the chi eharacters are
    brought home to roost. The judges
    are four old dotards Jonson allows
    dignity not even to the law.

    Such, for what it is worth, is
    the plot, But, of course, it is worth
    very little. The great Elizabethan
    dramatists paid scant attention to
    thei plots which were frequently
    absurd and rarely credible. They
    trusted to their characters to im-
    pose belief,

    In Volpone Ben Jenson created
    two characters that every actor
    worth his salt must long to play.

    Volpone himself is the rich rascal
    revelling in subterfuge, the
    deceiver rejoicing in deceit,

    Mosca is his servant, oily and
    outwardly obsequious, who plans
    his master’s stratagems and in the
    end leads him ruthlessly up the
    garden path.

    At Stratford Mosca
    by Anthony Quayle.
    play was being cast a critic told
    Quayle that his ruddy countenance
    and jovial temperament must pre-
    clude his success in the part, He
    proves his stature by subordinat-
    ing face and temperament alike
    to the exigencies of the play. He
    is superbly the pimp and pander,
    the ambitious lackey with scorn in
    his heart for those he bamboozles-
    and well concealed hatred for the
    master he serves. This is fine
    acting.

    And Volpone the fox himself?
    Sir Ralph Richardson makes full
    use of the comic situations with
    which the author's stage directions
    provide him, He hides roguishly
    behind curtains, He wears a night-
    cap to advantage. And a false
    nose that makes him look like
    Groucho Marx,

    But the sense of exultant evil
    which is the essence of this play
    escapes him altogether. This is a
    very parfit gentil fox. He would,
    you feel, never be unkind to a
    rabbit, The impression is strong
    that we are witnessing a tragedy
    of miscasting.

    Not so long ago, in the greatest
    season the Old Vic has ever given
    us, Sir Ralph was sharing the top
    of the theatrical tree with Sir
    Laurence Olivier. “His

    is ployed
    When the

    was the best for many years. His” With
    Bluntsehli in Arms and the Man jjons,

    was the epitome of the bourgeois

    accused of murder in Home At

    he has seemed to go out of his
    way to choose unsuitable parts.



    ably inferior to that from Medil-'
    erranean olives,

    nuts and seeds of
    sources which yield edible fats
    ene oils are legion. Some are of
    only

    figure in cOmmerce for one pur-
    pose or another. A few of the bet-
    ter known ones are mentioned in
    the preceding paragraph. There
    are others used principally as
    drugs or, as in the case of castor
    ofl, as a special lubricant for air-
    plane engines as well. Others
    again, like » are most im-
    portant in the paint industries
    and in manufactures such ag lin-
    oleums and related products,
    There is a great and increasing
    oemens. a for edible a
    and oils, ang e governmen
    colonial: are eee
    ed to develop their production on
    sound, economic lines, wherever
    possible, +

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    Shingles

    White Pine

    Pitch Pine

    Cement

    Galvanised Sheets
    Aluminum Sheets
    Asbestos Everite Sheets
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    single-minded +

    i endidly a Hermione
    soldier, And he has given great wae, as "ne ctu’s
    pleasure as the ordinary chap jicensee, ignores the gallery and

    goes absolutely straight, game
    Seven, But at Stratford this year : mi r like

    nard, Ann Wilton and David Hurst
    Finally, it should be stated that .
    vegetable O'Doherty, as the bewigged gor-

    local importance in the the year. Glowering and pork-
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    im venon

    aim is te move suburbia
    to the left. =

    He has chosen, however, this
    year to plunge into a maelstrom of

    i m

    ,
    *
    You. remember the
    habits of the African kt tee
    first the males come to the water-
    hate and then the et
    oom, which opened
    Lyric, Hammersmith, on Wedries-

    day, is the alcoholic equivatent t

    of that water-hole. .

    Its title is a pseudonym for a
    war-time drinking club on which
    Rodney Ackland the author, has
    decided to bestow a wry and
    shabby immortality. Out of the
    lives of the drinkers who flit and
    stumble across its fraying carpets
    he has built an intensely atmos-
    pheric littke play—an attempt, I

    imagine at a sort of Restoration 3

    tragi-comedy,.

    It runs the gamut from Scotch
    to gin, embracing a_ literary
    drinker, who has wife trouble, a
    political drinker seeking guiltily

    to forget a German friend in a La’

    horrer-camp, a delirious drinker
    who used to paint, an arrogant
    drinker, who directs bad films;
    a gas-stove-shaped lady drinker
    described as a critie—and many
    more all of whom are embraced
    from time to time by the club’s
    proprietress, a good-hearted little
    shambles of a woman, perpetually
    looped.

    ‘Mr, Ackland examines his men-
    agerie of escapists sometimes with
    a commiserating grin, sometimes

    with an unlikeable smirk, and
    sometimes with over-powering
    affection.

    But it takes, I am afraid, a heart
    larger than his to write about
    the small sins of small people
    without sentimentalism or shallow
    moralising. Chekhov could do it,
    and in his hands The Pink Room
    might have been a minor master-
    piece,

    But Mr. Ackland will keep on *

    reminding us that his little band
    of outeasts are dancing on a
    voleano’s brink; and he wanders
    madly off into Grand Guignol at
    the climax—an apocalyptically

    ,over-written scene in which the

    ex-painter enters drunk fires four
    revolver shots into the ceiling, and
    rips off the ladys critie’s

    wig,
    causing her to die of heart failure;

    at which point a religious re-
    vivalist starts to cry havoe through

    the window, the Vice Squad erupts
    —_ the door, and the roof
    falls in, *

    ~

    These five melodramatic min-

    utes blew up the to frail
    strueture beyond all of re-

    ir,
    one ot two grim excep-
    however The Pink Room

    trouper and

    ley performance is a glorious dish
    of tried fishwife,

    This battling bantam has some’
    «vere competition Heather Stan-

    ire especially notable: and’ Mignon

    gon, is giving what I take to be
    he best supporting performance of

    Although it is broken-bai .
    The Pink Room has a good
    om its shoulders. It is a good
    nedonist’s head.

    It’s A Slur
    here is a rumour abowt to the

    effect that Jack Benny, who has
    returned to the Palladium for
    three weeks,
    Tis a dreadful slur on his
    reputation, go let us dispose of it
    at once. ~

    Mr, Benny is not a clown at all;

    it man or and
    Docs ne rules the ary
    q no J on C adit f























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    Westminster Theatre last night,
    and held me by the seruff of my
    surprised mind for two and a half
    hours. Frederick Knott's DIAL
    M FOR MURDER is, once you.
    have overlooked its nonsensical
    title, the most intelligent crime
    play I have seen, i

    This is sheer, dear plot at its,
    fullest streteh, with no clue with- |
    held, and every pause and sylla-
    ble counting in the balance.

    y ’
    the situation which may arise
    your wife accidentally kills the
    assassin. And, to torment you
    further, let me suggest that Sher-
    lock Holmes (who would never
    have solved it) might have called
    this mystery. The Third Murder-
    er, or The Strange Adventure of
    the Unopened Door. Aid


















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    SUNDAY, AUGUST 17,



    1952





    SUNDAY



    ADVOCATE



    The People Of Barbados XIX This West Indian Culture—3,

    Religious matters came to a
    head in 1824, chiefly on account
    cf the destruction of the Wesleyan
    Chapel in Bridgetown in 1823, aad
    the ‘John Smith Outrage’ in
    British Guiana. The Rt. Hon.
    George Canning, Foreign Secre-
    tary announced that the Govern-
    ment of Great Britain had decided
    to strengthen the Chureh in the
    West Indies, by constituting two
    diocese. Accordingly, Dr. Chris-
    topher Lipscomb and William
    Hart Coleridge were consecrated
    Bishops of Jamaica and Barba-
    dos respectively. Thus the work
    of Berkeley and Wilson was at
    length accomplished. The Diocese
    of Barbados consisted of St, Vin-
    cent, Grenada, Antigua, the other
    Leeward and Windward Islands,
    Trinidad and British Guiana.
    Prior to the appointment of these
    two Bishops, the entire British
    West Indies were under the con-
    trol of the Bishop of London.

    The first Bishop was a worthy
    member of one of the most dis-
    tinguished of English families,
    and as one of the first Colonial
    Bishops added lustre to its name,
    Bishop Coleridge, then thirty-five
    years of age. was the son of Luke
    Herman Coleridge, a Physician
    and was born at Thorverton, Dev-
    onshire. Luke Coleridge died at
    an early age and his son William
    was brought up by his uncle Rev.
    George Coleridge, Head Master of
    King’s School, Ottery, St. Mary.
    By training, character and outlook
    William Hart Coleridge was ad-
    mirably fitted for his position
    First and foremost a _ zealous
    Churchman, he was also a keen
    administrator, From the moment
    of his arrival in 1825 his influ-
    ence began to be felt, and there
    was a complete transformation.
    The desired effect was taking
    place, the Church began to exert
    an intluence, both social and spir-
    itual, which it had never sought
    to exercise before. The work of
    evangelisation and the concomit-
    ant work of education were
    actively undertaken. T# bishop
    was also made a member of the
    Legislative Council where by his
    influence many changes were
    made.

    The Bishop did not have his
    own way, for there was opposition
    to the emancipation of the slaves
    from certain plantérs and mer-
    chants in Bridgetown. There is
    recorded a published notice
    signed by Messrs. John Brath-
    waite and Robert Haynes of a
    public meeting for su porting a
    newspaper to be published in
    London by Mr, James M’Queen,
    and then Editor of the ‘Glasgow
    Courier’,—“who has upon all
    occasions so ably defended the
    cause of the West Indies against
    the calumnies and machinations
    of their enemies.” This meeting
    passed a Resolution to establish
    the paper, and a subscription list
    was pened; Mr, Thomas J.
    Howell, the Treasurer of Barba-
    dos, was appointed Treasurer of
    the Fund.()

    At the court of Grand Sessions
    in December 1926, John G. Archer,
    a white man, was indicted for the
    murder of his slave. The Jury,
    however, brought in a verdict of
    manslaughter. The Honerable Ren
    Hampden, of the Council, who pre-
    sided as Chief Justice, sentenced
    Archer to a year’s imprisonment,

    . Mr. Hampden was the first man
    who established the right of the
    slave to the common protection of
    the law,

    The Bishop was gradually
    gaining against the opposition, In
    October 1827, a Sunday School
    was started in Bridgetown for
    coloured children, both slave and
    free, under the management of
    Mr. Joseph Thorne, by the Bishop
    and Rev. J. H. Pinder. This school
    was from 9.00—10.30 a.m. and
    3.00—4,30 p.m., every Sunday (2),
    This was about the first of the
    schools started by Bishop Cole-
    ridge, in 1825, when the Bishop
    arrived at Barbados there were
    only eight schools,"And by the end
    of 1834 the number had increased
    to 125. Thus it will be seen that a
    long period of stagnation of the
    Church was followed by an extra-
    ordinary outburst of progressive
    activities.

    With reference to the question
    of slovery, the Bishop admonished

    © When You Feel

    “TIRED”
    oll the Time

    i
    i

    “SLAVERY”
    By JOHN PRIDEAUX

    his clergy to take no part in the
    agitation, but to devote them-
    selves to pastoral work, training
    aud teaching the slaves so that
    ihe transition from slavery to
    freedom might be easy. The Rev-

    erend William Marshall Harte,
    Rector of St. Lucy, opened
    the Church on Sunday after-

    moons for worship by the poor
    people of the parish, and gave
    a vsecture every Wednesday
    evening to the Slaves. There
    was a dispute between the Rector
    and the Vestry of the Parish.
    This dispute ended ip court and
    there were charges against the
    Rector which were placed before
    the Magistrates W. H. Grant and
    George J, Evelyn. These Magis-
    trates held that the Complaints
    against the Rector must be aban-
    doned.

    Reverend Harte, due to his
    ardour for the improvement of
    the slaves, was accused of trying
    to destroy the distinction between
    master and sve which was
    deemed so necessary to their
    safety; “more especially evinced
    by his offensive sermon on Easter
    Sunday, and his disgraceful co.-
    duct whilst administering the Most
    Holy Sacrament of the Lord’s
    Supper, thereby endeavouring to
    alienate their slaves from a sense
    of their duty, by inculcating doc-
    trines of equality inconsistent
    with their obedience to their
    masters and the policy of the
    Island.”

    In October of the same year,
    the Rev. Harte was examined for
    the second time on these charges;
    according to the citation from
    Justices Thornhill, Bascom, and
    Pile, Mr. Harte attended at Sus-
    anna Prescod’s Hotel, Speights-
    town. He pleaded ‘Not Guilty’
    after he had been taken into cus-
    tody on a mittimus for not plead-
    ing, and was bound over to appear
    at the Court of Grand Sessions.
    The Archdeacon and Rey. J. H.
    Pinder, were his sureties. At the
    Court of Grand Sessions, he was
    found guilty of the charges
    brought against him and fined
    one shilling.(3) He appealed to
    the King, who unconditionally
    pardoned him.

    The year 1831 was an eventful
    one for the Free Coloured People
    of this Island, for they were ad-
    mitted to the political franchise.
    On several occasions before this
    year they had petitioned the
    House of Assembly concerning
    their grievances. One of these
    petitions bearing the signatures
    of 880 persons, complaining of the
    protection—which was accorded
    to the whites—against the insults
    and aggression of the slaves.

    It.was on the 11th of August
    of 1831 that the Colony was de-
    vastated by one of the worst hur-
    ricanes in its history. Bishop Cole-
    ridge saw most of his wonderful
    achievements in multiplying
    places of worship in the Island
    completely destroyed, for fifteen
    of his newly-built Churches and
    many of the older Parish Churches
    were reduced to ruins. There was
    a terrific loss of life, . which
    amounted to*between three and”
    five thousand souls. The Bishop ©
    Was one of the most active of the
    Clergy in visiting the injured ana
    burying the dead. The ‘Colonial
    Church Chronicle’ records—

    “The Bishop was to be found
    moving among the dying and
    the dead administering alike to
    the bodily and spiritual wants
    of the sufferers, visiting the
    few remaining Churches, which
    were converted into so many
    hospitals for the wounded, ex-
    ercising the public ministrations
    of the Church in the open air
    to crowded congregations, who
    pressed to hear the Word of God
    under the constraining power of
    His present Judgements, and
    sharing with the houseless and
    destitute the only apartments of
    his own »private dwelling place
    which the fury of the storm
    had spared.

    The Bishop also saw one of his
    fondest hopes laid low, that was
    Codrington College, for he saw
    that the Church in the West Indies
    must have a supply of Clergy, and
    he had been instrumental in the
    rebuilding of Codrington College

    This is the NEW |

    Carton for

    VENOS

    between 1829 and 1830, when the
    new building was formally open-
    ed by the Governor, Sir James
    Lyon, together with a large num-
    ber of officials and clergymen, He
    was also instrumental with hav-
    ing this College affiliated with
    Durham University so that the
    young men of the West Indies
    could obtain a University Degree
    without having to voyage further
    afield than Barbados.

    Even with the teachings of the
    Clergy, there was still strong op-
    position to the abolition of slav-
    ery. In January, 1833, the House
    of Assembly passed a resolution
    that a Petition be presented to
    the King asking him to remove
    the Hon, J. B. Skeete from the
    Office of President of Barbados
    and from the Board of Counci’.
    At the Court of Grand Sessions in
    December the previous year, Rob-
    ert James, a slave, had been tried
    and found guilty “under aggrav-
    ated circumstances’ of rape upon
    a poor white woman, a widow
    with two children, and sentenced
    to death. The inhabitants express-
    ed the greatest indignation to the
    reprieve issued by the Hon. J. B.
    Skeete, and considered that this
    was a reward for his crime, A
    public meeting was held in the
    Temple-yard where great num-
    bers were in attendance, these
    proceedings were marked by order
    although there were some occa-
    sions when there was a burst
    of excitement. Resolutions were
    framed condemning the Presi-
    den’t interference with the
    due course of justice, and
    an address to the King was
    resolved tpon, praying for
    the dismissal of President Skeete
    from Office. A Committee was ap-
    pointed to watch over the inter-
    ests of the question at issue, This
    lead to the House of Assembly
    taking their step against the Presi-
    dent.

    In May, 1833, there was held a
    Public Meeting of Free coloured
    and black people to pass an ad-
    dress to the Governor, complain-
    ing that although the ‘Brown
    Privilege Bill, had been passed, yet
    these people were not admitted
    to public situations of honour and
    profit. The Chairman of this Meet-
    ing was none other than Samuel
    Jackman Presecod, with Mr. F.
    Thomas as Secretary.(4). The
    Governor ‘replied that he ac-
    knowledged that these people had

    ‘much to complain of, but that

    there was a tone of impatience
    and reproach in their language
    which might rather baffle than
    accelerate his means of doing
    them justice. He promised to
    bring the matter to the attention
    of the Secretary of State.
    (To be continued).
    1, The Barbadian Newspaper — Sep-
    tember 9th, 1825.

    2. The Barbadian Newspaper — Octo-
    ber 30th, 1827.

    3. The Barbadian Newspaper — July
    24, Aug. 7, Sept. 21st, Oct, 9th, etc., 1827,

    4. B’dian Newspaper — May 11, 1833.



    Labourer Placed

    i On 3-Month Bond

    His Worship Mr. E. A. McLeod,
    Police Magistrate of District “A’
    yesterday placed 22-year-old-
    labourer FitzRoy Haynes of Nel-
    son Street, St. Michael on a bond
    for a perrod of three months in
    the sum of £1 for stealing a piece
    of deal board valued at 6/10 the
    property of J. B. Leslie & Co.,,
    Ltd. on August 15,

    The prosecution called on three
    witnesses to prove its case, Lloyd
    Greaves a watchman said that on
    the evening of August 15 he saw
    the defendant with the piece of
    deal board and recognised it to
    be the property of J. B. Leslie &
    Co., Ltd. He asked the defendant
    where he was taking the board
    and the defendant did not answer
    him,

    Cpl. Nurse who. formally charg-
    ed the defendant said that he ar-
    rested Haynes on_ instructions
    given to him by the watchman
    Greaves,

    The defendant told the court
    that he saw the piece of board
    floating in the Careenage and took
    it up “as it looked like it had no
    owner.”

    LSS



    olay ea
    clea ala eT Tee

    The School Men”

    I will go on reiusing to &
    ‘literary,’ although I know quite
    well that this is what people ex
    pect you to be when you ar
    writing on such a dry academik
    and dismally boring sybject a4
    ‘culture.’ There are some peopit
    —they are among the misfortunes
    of the earth—who expect an article
    on literature, art, music or drama
    to be crammed with tedious and
    ludicrously unimaginative referen-
    ces to the loveliness, exquisite del-
    ieacy and pregnant imagery of thi
    poem, or the freshness and brilli-
    ance with which this artist paints
    ecuntry landscapesy or the wor-
    derful melodic line of this slow
    movement or the skill this play
    wright displays in his subtle use
    of dramatic irony; in short, with
    all the time-eroded vapid mean-
    ingless and brainlessly persistent
    tenth-hand phrases which form
    the complete mental equipment of
    an accepted critic. When they
    don't get this sort of stuff, which
    they like because it is so unpar-
    ticular and so thoroughly freaked
    with the cliché that has been
    remorselessly drilled into them
    during their school days that it
    does not call upon them for the
    least bit of thought, they are sin-
    cerely disappointed, and immedi-
    ately set about launching assaults
    upon the miserable critic who is
    so uncultured and unlettered as
    not to be familiar with the ap-
    propriate literary phrases. There
    are also some people—and they
    are among the calamities of the
    earth—who, when they hear a
    piece of great music, have an ir-
    resistible and incorrigible urge to
    exclaim ‘how beautiful!’ Ask
    them what they think of what-
    ever composer whose name first
    comes into your head, and you
    will be unable to extract from
    them any more explanatory and
    analytic observation than that he
    wrote lovely or sublime or poetic
    music. If, for instance, you want
    to hear the last adjective repeated
    with ecstatic earnestness you need
    only mention the name of Brahms,
    He will never fail you, It dosen't
    oecur to these people that when
    they make such remarks they are
    saying nothing more than a piece
    of wax shaped like a gramophone
    record could say if properly treated
    and placed on a phonograph.
    They believe in art for art’s sake,
    and this is exactly what ‘culture’
    means to them: the recreation of
    an eccentric and unendurably
    useless bunch of wit-forsaken
    recluses who think they are men-
    tally alvanced because they enjoy
    sucking spiritual confectionary all
    the days of their lives,

    West Indian Culture And The
    “School Men”

    I really can't address myself to
    such people with any satisfaction,
    I only mention them for a very
    alarming reason; namely, that the
    apostles of the West Indian cul
    ture and the partisans of the group
    that ought to be christened ‘the
    West Indian Nation-Mongers’ be-
    long to this very class. You can
    tell them by their phraseology.
    They don’t think; they simply re-
    peat the anciently minted phrases
    that their brother mongers repeat,
    They talk the typical politician's
    Jargon, and take special delight in
    the typical forms of expression
    to be found in the nearest text
    book on English History by Mr,
    John Smith or Mr. George Brown
    or Mr, Dick Jones, They believe
    that culture is an academic product
    labotiously manufactured in Col-
    leges and Universities, If you
    told them that Bismark and
    Hitler were more significant ex-
    amples of the German temper and
    culture than most of that nation’s
    romantic poets, they will be sur-



    prised. When you assure them
    that Wagner was once a furiously
    active revolutionary politician

    and Byron a liberalist soldier, they
    will be astonished. When you
    assert that the West Indies can
    hardly expect to-have a culture
    until they have their own bible of
    political and philosophical ideals,
    statesmen to put them into vig-
    orous practice, and soldiers to fight
    for them against the opposition of
    the corresponding ideals of othe:
    netions, they are utterly mystified,
    Where is the connection between

    ° Protects your gums
    ¢ Pights tooth decay
    ¢ Freshens your mouth

    By
    irama and dictators’
    connection ‘between similes and

    idiers But I confidently main-
    tain that a cloistered and monkis
    aestheticism -is the chief enemy
    to culture and that the military
    man who is willing to fight to the
    death for an idea its chief friend
    and architect.
    Culture And The Statesman

    The statesman and the soldiers
    do, in fact, bear a most intimate

    A. 8S. HOPKINSON
    ? where is the

    relationship to culture. There has
    heen, in the past, far too much
    jishonest dealing and deliberate

    ignorance in connection with this
    question, and it would be well if
    the West Indies could make a
    frank and npw beginning. The
    West Indian must relise that there
    's In us a certain inexplicably
    wonderful and powerful force
    driving us to the pursuit of fuller
    knowledge, greater and wider be-
    ing, and more power over Nature
    and ourselves, This force is
    equally aetive in the statesman,
    the poet, the painter, the scientist,
    the philosopher, the naturalist and
    the priest and, whether exercised
    hrough the medium of very,
    paint, or prose, or whether ex-
    pressed as statecraft, physics, as-
    tronomy, or theology, it is always
    siming at the same purpose. This
    force may be called the cultural
    instinct or better still the religious
    instinct, but, whichever or what-
    ever phrase you may choose to
    describe it by, its influence
    is undeniable and ungovernable,
    No one who has even the gentlest
    Suggestion of religious feeling in
    him will want to curb, divert, or
    pervert this instinct in any way.
    But the West Indian must also
    realise that, while the poet is ver-
    Sifying and the philosopher mor-
    alsing and the painter sketching
    and the scientist probing, the
    peoplke, within which body all
    these extraordinary figures are in-
    cluded, have got to be governed.
    The artist can stop paint ng for a
    while, or the composer stop writ-
    ing Symphonies for a while, the
    astronomer stop tracing the path
    of the comets, the priest stop
    preaching and the mathematician
    stop calculating for a while, but
    as soon as the statesman stops ex-
    ercising his particular talent for
    organising a community with thor-
    oughness and efficienecy for a
    single day, everything relapses in-
    to a state of ghastly chaos and
    primitive savagery; for people who
    have nobody to Obey will obey
    themselves and this will, in ninety
    nine per cent of tested cases, prove
    to be catastrophic. You can really
    no more dispense with the true
    artist, dramatist, poet, or mathe-
    matician than you can with the
    statesman, but the stateman’s job
    is a 365-days-a-year, 366-days-
    a-leap year job whilst the service
    of the others is only needed in-
    termittently. The West Indian
    must be told too that there are
    basically three alternative courses
    open to the statesman, who, as
    anybody who has thought about
    the subject knows, governs people
    according to belief. In the first
    place he can govern them accord-
    (ng to what they already believe;
    or he can persuade them to be-
    lieve what he thinks would be
    most beneficial for them to believe
    and govern them thereby; or fin-
    ally he can govern them according
    to what he himself believes. But
    as it is not reasopable to expect
    the minds of Tom, Dick & Harry
    to measure up to the mind of a
    political genius, the last course is
    seldom practicable. Of the re-
    maining two, it is diMcult to say
    which is better. Both have beert
    successfully used, the first, for ex-
    ample, by Napoleon and the sec-
    ond by: Hitler, >

    It Develops Subconsciously

    No doubt many people will be
    wondering what all this has to do
    with West ndian Culture, but I
    will be foreed to condemn all such
    instantly as sufferers from the
    how beautiful’ complex. ‘Those
    who can’t dissociate culture from
    vague and unpleasant ideas about
    smiles and metaphors, and who
    can't see the close connection be-
    tween culture and statesmanship,
    thought, and even soldiering, may
    he dismissed as politically hope-
    less. Besides, it would not be at
    ill a bad thing if the West Indian
    Culture-Maniacs and the Nation-
    Mongers could be discouraged
    from pontificating solemnly from
    their academic chairs and be in-
    duced to develop an honest atti-
    tude towards this matter. I ‘will







    become academic myself for the
    benefit of anyone who dotlidts what
    is written above All classical |
    scholars know that it was chiefly ;
    the militarist spirit that gave birth ;
    to Homeric song, and chiefiy vio-
    lent and earnest national senti-
    ment that inspired Vergil. The
    West Indian must be taught to be-
    lieve something and then taught
    to fight fiercely for his beliefs be-
    fore he can develop a genuine cul-
    ture. But once the belief and the
    fighting spirit are instilled into
    him, the rest will come subcon-
    sciously and without his labour-
    ing it out in the sanctuaries of a
    university.



    Can Yow Tell How |
    Tall Your Child

    Will Grow?

    iby George Sava |

    Is it now possible to foretell
    more accurately than ever be-
    fore how tall a child will grow?

    Research into the relationship
    of age to height has been inten-
    sified both in America and Brit-
    ain. Thousands of painstaking
    calculations have been made.

    Here a chart based on
    latest results of this research—a
    chart showing for both boys and
    girls what percentage of even-
    tual adult height should have
    been reached at a given age.

    Every parent will want to,
    study these height-age increase’
    tables, for doctors claim that the

    growth of children need no
    longer be a matter of chance. It
    is becoming an exact medical |
    science,

    Main Factors

    What are the main factors in
    the way we grow?

    Full height is reached for girls
    at 18, boys at 19,

    Generally, there is very little
    difference in the length of torso
    of adults; difference in height is
    due mostly to the length of the
    legs.

    The height of a newly born
    baby, regardless of sex, is about
    30 per cent, of its ultimate ma-
    turity, |
    For the first year there is no |
    difference between the sexes,
    but the growth of the qhild will
    depend slightly upon whether he
    is naturally or artificially fed—
    the former grows more quickly. |

    From the second to the ninth |
    year girls will grow more quickly |
    than boys; then the process is |
    reversed—the girl slows down,
    the boy shoots up.

    In Britain, we know the
    present generation is taller than
    its parents and grandparents—
    due to the more rational and
    hygienic life of sport, fresh air,



    and unconstricting clothing, Many | >

    a modern 14-year-old boy could

    not get into a medieval knight’s |

    suit of armour, |
    New Research

    Meanwhile, quite apart from
    the statistical tests carried out to
    create the kind of chart you see;
    here, chatlenging new research |
    is now going on in the actual
    manipulation of height by out-
    side influences,

    Knowledge of the vitamins
    and hormones which govern our
    growth has increased rapidly.
    And, today, diets can be devised
    for children which will supply
    missing vitamins and thus allow
    the child to develop more
    naturally,

    The growth of the bones of the
    legs is usually arrested in girls
    by 18 and boys by 19—the time
    full height is reached—and now
    doctors can shorten or lengthen
    this period by administration of
    certain hormones,

    In California promising expe-
    riments have been made in con-
    trolling children’s height by use
    of thyroid drugs and hormones,

    Certain hormones have been
    used to inerease the predicted
    height of short boys; others to
    cyrtail the rate of growth of
    oc expected to become over
    all,

    ‘Bone-Age’

    The drug and hormone ex-
    periments to control growth are
    experimental, To avoid danger
    they must still be carried out

    @ On Page 15

    the cs



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