Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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WHAT'S ON TODAY

Court of Grand Sessions 10.00 a.m

Meeting of General Board Health
2.30 p.m. -
Mobile Cinema, Heywood's Plantation
Yard, St. Peter, 7.30 p.m
ee



For the cause that lacks assistance
‘Gainst the wrongs that need resistance
For the future in the distance

And the good that I can do

ESTABLISHED 1895



Gomes criticises statement
made in Press by Adams

FEDERATION :

EGYPT:





“Trinidad Is Bright Spot |
In Enveloping Darkness”

From Our Own Correspondent
LONDON, Aug. 12

ME. ALBERT GOMES, Trinidad Labour Minister today gave a scath-

ing reply to a recent statement made by Mr. Grantley Adams in
Barbados on the Trinidad position in the structure of West Indies Federa-
tion, Mr. Gomes made his reply in an exclusive interview after’ having
seen newspaper ¢lippings from the B.W.1. press on Mr. Adams’ reference
to Trinidad as the most backward political portion of the British Carib-
bean and saying that they alone were the cause of the go slow poliey
in federation. :

Mr. Gomes said: “Since L have been in the United Kingdom, my
pride has been nourished by the knowledge that Trinidad is regarded
here as the bright spot in the enveloping darkness of West Indian ecrack-
port polities and crazy economics.”’

Because he had regarded B.W.I. unity as of paramount
| importance, Mr. Gomes said he had consistently refrained
| from entering into verbal conflict with Mr. Adams. But
he could not allow this latest barrage to go unanswered.
Neither was this an isolated incident. Mr. Adams had
tried his best to make Trinidad the scapegoat for slow-
ness in the federation movement.

“But I répeat,” he said, “we in Trinidad intend to

develop our colony along sane and sober lines and have
on all oceasions been first to declare our intention to par-

emma

Foreign Policy
No Campaign
Issue In U.S.

By DONALD J. GONZALEZ.
WASHINGTON, Aug. 12.



Harbavros



~ GOMES AND BRYA



WEDNESDAY; UGUST



13, * 1952



New strong man’s army §
asks for new legislatién



+



%

U.S. LEADS OLYMPIC PARADE CLOSING CEREMONY



Martial law ends:

Country on quiet note

PRICE













YESTERDAY'S WEATHER REPORT

Rainfall from Codtingtoh: 06

ighest Temperature: 980° F
west Temperature: 74.5 F

nd Velocity 10 miles per how
arometer (9 a.m.) 20.005 (3



p.m.)

29.972.

TO-DAY
sorise: 5.47 a.m
unset: 6.19 p.m




: Last Quarter
ighting: 7.00 p.m.
igh Tide: 10.43 a.m., 10.09 p.m
: 4.12 a.m, 381 p.m,

Audust 12)




FIVE

JORDAN:



Boy King Hussein goirig
home to claim throne



. ATTACK ADAMS

| | Speaker Threatens
To “Name”. Mottley

TWO WAX HOT OVER
REMARKS ABOUT H#1.E.

HIS HONOUR the Speaker of the House of /sembly,
Mr. K. N. R. Husbands, censured Mr. E. D. Mottley, Senior
Member for the City, for “making irreverent references
to the Governor’s name” during the debate on a Resolu-
tion in connection with Government's leasing 2 acres, 3
roods, 34 perches of land at Bathsheba to be used as a
playing field, and warned him that if he “persisted in the
tone in which he was speaking,” he would “name” him for
a vote of censure by the House. :

Mr. Mottley, during his remarks on the Resolution,
made an observation on the remarks by His Excellency
about the Community Centres being used as Dance Halls,
and said that the Head of the Administration should
learn a little more about the customs and habits of Bar-
badians first before making such comment.

His Honour interrupted the; . a é
U.N. Admits

Rules of the House of Assembly,
which states that “no membe:

LED BY THE UNITED STATES, the flags of the 70 nations that sent 5,780 athletes to Helsinki, Finland, appear in
final parade at the Olympic Stadium, marking the closing of the 1952 Olympiad. The leading nations
were; the United States, 615; Russia, 653%4; Hungary, 308; Sweden, 267; Germany, 171; Finland, 16214;
Italy, 15834;

ticipate in any constructive efforts on behalf of B.W.I.

federation.

“One thing we want to avoid is self governing in-

solvency and subsidised self

Mr. Gomes said that Mr.
Grantley Adams signed the

S.C.A.C, report. but later repudi-
ated it. His two main reasons for
so doing said Mr. Gomes were:

1. It did not offer Barbados
The number of seats neces-
sary for the furtherance of
Adams’ B.W.1. political am-
bition and
_It suggested Trinidad
the capital.

Mr. Gomes added
Adams’ ideological arguments
were mere camouflage. The fact
that he, Gomes, was associated:
with the Government of Trinidad

9

as



that Mr.!

ment of the colony.

Senator John Sparkman con-
tended Tuesday that the Republi-
cans can’t possibly make foreign
policy a successful campaign issue
because it is too closely identified
with General Dwight Eisenhower.

Simultaneously, Secretary of
State Dean Acheson said with
some sarcasm that he is surprised;
at the recent attack levelled
against the administration policies
abroad by John Foster Dulles, Re-
publican Foreign Policy adviser.

The Alabama Senator and Dem-
ocratic Vice-Presidential nominee
told reporters that Eisenhower's
role in shaping present policy
has “been as great as that or any~
one else”,

He said he was aware that both
the Republican Presidential nom-
inee and Dulles have made clear
that they consider the conduct of
foreign affairs as legitimate issue |
in the approaching campaign. But

government.”

es



OS ree

he doubted that they could ma‘e
their criticism stick.

He said: “I cannot possibly see
how they can make a major issue
out of it. Our foreign policy has |
been based on a priority consider |
ation to the defence of Western
Europe which has meant more or!
less holding, acting and a less ag-!

was not an inconsiderable element
in Adams’ attitude to the Govern-

Public Utterances

Mr, Adams ceased to be friendly
m his attitude to me the day.
was appointed leader of the B.W.I.
Sugar Delegation in 1950. He con-
tinued, “not only did he leave
London a few days later but on
his return to the B.W.I. his public
utterances were such as to pre-
judice opinion against the West





ALBERT GOMES

the Regional Economic Commit- | fast’, He said Eisenhower “cer-
tee, Mr. Adams was in favour of



gressive programme in the Far | act
selling any part of their land or

France, 156%; Great Britain, 117, and Czechoslovakia, 113%,

NAG

UIB’S ARMY DRA

(International Radiophoto)



FTS

ANTI-FEUDAL LEGISLATION

NONE MAY QWN OVER
200 ACRES OF LAND

. MCATRO August 12.

ARMY-DRAFTED LEGISLATION to wipe out the
feudal system in Egypt by sweeping land reforms was
submitted to the Government. The proposed legislation
would eliminate the powerful jand-controlling Pashas—
whose titles were recently abolished—by setting a 200 acre
limit on land holding. The Gavernment would have power
to seize land above the 200 acre limit and redistribute it
among Egypt's thousands.of «malt landholders and dand.
less agricultural workers.
minimum holding of two acres to prevent the parcelling
out of land into tiny uneconomic plots.

Farmers owning less-than two
res would be prohibited from

Consideration Of

: ' tainly has been the spearhead” of| dividing = j , 4 j >.
Indian, cause at a time, when W€}naying Government delegates as ; ividing it up by inheritance ‘

needed the support almost des- Chairmen in rotation. But, me ee, eee —UP. ee ee ae Raone ae Customs’ Union
perately. r. Gomes, when at the next ah h ’

ae that I wen, Sepcenetly meeting it was the turn of Mr. et lee eee Postponed
chosen to represen e B.W.4.)Raatgeever as the British Guiana - : . .

abroad has in no way mitigated delegate to chair the meeting, Mr. Greeks Shell a ‘at ene anae the ga (From Our Own Correspondent)
the virulence of his attacks upon} Adams was bitterly opposed to etween rich and poor and a JAMAICA, Aug. 12.

myself.”

the principle.

Commissioner

2



2 Bulgarians

ATHENS, Aug. 12.

shifting large amounts of capital
from agriculture to industrial de-

The Jamaica Government post-

poned further consideration of a
velopment. Customs’ Union, in the B.W.I
Further Demands because of a major financial im-

| Another thing said Mr. Gomes : The Army also demanded: | plication. The decision was taken
is that I shared dismay with most The Bulgarian-Greek dispute regulation of land leases provid-| that the matter which was slated
R.E.C. ‘delegates when Mn.j°ver Gamma Island flared up|ing the distribution of profits on}as a dissension of the legislature
Adams strenuously championed] @8ain on Monday when Greek|a basis of two-thirds to a lease-];his month should be further

frontier guards fired on two Bul-
garian soldiers who tried to reach
the tiny island last week.

Greek reinforcements were sent
to the area after shots had been
exchanged when Bulgarian troops
landed on the island on Aug. 7.
After more gunfire last week the
Greeks announced that the Bul-
garians had left the island. Both
countries protested to the United
Nations alleging acts of aggression.

—C.P.

a United Kingdom official for the
post of B.W,I. Trade Commis-
sioner irt London.

“And it should not be forgotten
that Mr. Adams was the only man
who laboured assiduously to pre-
vent the B.W.I. from obtaining
more dollars for purchases from
Canada.

It was he who
dissenting report”,

“As a result of all this” he con-
tinued, “Mr. Adams has lost the

submitted the



— reer — — — — —————— — ——— — — ——— — ——————————————EEeeeSeESeSeSe

ee ca hig ene ae eM Nl



















in-
{support and goodwill of many heart of the ruling class in Egypt.|‘° 4%. (0) © ey ies tn |
. a ens ae ee “ail I Some ‘of them exercise complete] Vestisiteds (i Met con:
his chances of occupying the Mi t rl ; power over hundreds o ousands | * a a J enh aged ‘
| pivotal position in a federal B.W.I. ar ta aw of acres of land and scores of vil-| *ideration and cautious decisions. |
i have diminished, he is no longer jlages and farms. :
enthusiastic about federation and | E dd: D ti , ;
G. H. ADAMS C.M.G. lis searching for arguments with! nas m ran Full Agreement Adams, Cuke, Will
Mr. Gomes said he found it] which to justify his innate distaste‘ oe
difficult to understand Mr. Adams’| of the whole idea.” i , TEHRAN, Aug. 12. Genéral Mohammed Naguib,
attitude and that ‘difficulty he| Nothing Mr. Adams could do,- Martial law ended in Iran to-|the Egyptian Commander in Chief,
shared with other B.W.I. leaders} however, concluded Mr, Gomes{day. Premier Mohammed Mossa-~|announced here to-day that com- At Trade Talks
who hd@ affection for Mr, Adams|could deter the BWI in their sol-|degh withdrew a bill. invoking plete Wren cat me : fie
ut who were bewildered by his}emn resolve to achieve a work-]} martial law from the Majlis (lower|agreement of view existed be- a aes a
iat actions. . able federation. “The ball is now] House) in response to his. own|tween him and the gove rnment 4 appnintel Mane Gamaier Atsren
Mr. Gomes recalled that when| im his court. It’s for the govern-| National Front supporters opposi-|Aly Maher. | The * strong man” of | (PY—!' "0 athe Honourable H. A.
i wes Seen ae ante © Om Page 8, | son to litany rule Tear ae ee Cetera Bp minute meet Cuke, CBE, to represent Barbe
. been under martial law at frequent| fr with Premier Aly Maher, He. dos at the forthcoming discussions
e e intervals since the outbreak of the! oid reporters: “I called on the/in London with departments of
- oil nationalization crisis last year, Beaniter to reach an understand-|the United Kingdom Government
usselIn 1 e urn —U-P. ing concerning the details of cer-}on_ the subject of Canada-West
tain matters.” Indies Trade. thatthe
4 M Mohamed Aly Roussdi, Minis-} It is expected that the discus-
To Claim Throne ossadegh Asks ter of Justice, said that the Agra-|sions will begin on Tuesday, Sep-
* r rian reform programme reported| tember 9, at 11 a.m, ;
U.S. For A Loan \to have been submitted by mili- —
AMMAN, Jordan, August 12. I tary headquarters was om being 30 Die In Heat
KING HUSSEIN of Jordan, 17, will leave Switzerland ‘a TOARAN, sl P ccitidiec be Marieciners iB , c
next Monday for his homeland to claim the throne from Bakhtar *Deirous, Saeed’ on Gris, was sworn in this afternoon | Wave In Mexico
which his crazed father was ousted by Parliament yester-| ‘tuesday that Premier Mohammed] before the regency Council. He|
day. __|Mossadegh has asked the United) was accompanied by Aly Maher. | MEXICO CITY, Aug. 12.
ices from Lausanne, Switzerland, said Hussein] States for an immediate $50,000,- eee The newspaper Ultimas Noticias
e i i j 000 1 Th WS) r said that } ‘
will return to Amman with his mother, Queen Zein. How- as soul Gan tite the ole ‘ eae a persons pave ied in the
ever he will not take up royal duties until his eighteenth|iq states Ambassador Loy Hen- Egypt 3 Taxes Pr sive ays at a ee town
birthday next Spring. ; derson for relay to Washington. i i taal witigtes’ a]
sees ee cae ——— |He'aaia that the oan was askes] To Be Increased | iitiven and nine ile erthe!
before Parliament yesterday to . cr y . by Mos “to nelp Iran ex- c : ne ; re
act in the King’s name until he Outbreak Of Bovine port her oil, and to help combat CAIRO, Aug. 12 ig he tees re Zone ms
becomes of age. They are Ibra- B G Communism. Wihen he visited the] finance Minister Abdel Gelll ddarece Funrenhelt—U0#,.
htm Hassem, President off the Anthrax In ole United States last year, Mossadegh] Flmary said on Tuesday that the! s Fa , 3
Senate, Omoa Suliman a, Seth Gilad eran ; was turned down on his renee Egyptian government had decided |
member of Parliament, and Abdu GEORGET" WN Aug 1s for a $100,000,000 loan. —U.P.| to make slight all round tax in-| *
Rahsman Rushidad, also a mem- GEORGETOWN, Aug, 12. creases chiefly affecting those! Bodies Removed
eee scency am |tieak oF bovine antierx st the] RGdgepary For — | P08 bith income taxes,
aie : a ax a a H
) clninad on Thestay at dondane eee ghe Rotge:_ Sstension 2 sway —UP, ‘From Plane Wreck
ing Talal had been deposed by | Sugar ate on East Sea Coast. fi / Ph a ,|
“British imperialists", Comment- Demerara, Va Frankfurt Talks | vormer present or | RIO De JANEIRO, Aug. 12
j the decision of the Jordan ie area was placed under ’ , OR ANY. Brigadier Raimundo Aboim
' Parliament to confer the crown |movement restriction order and no] AR ARIS, Aug. 12, |CUBA VISITING GERMANY} ater of the official expedition
: on Prince Hussein, Tass said “this| livestock were permitted to enter} Supreme id fia a — were » 19 | investigating the wreckage of the
\ event is one of the symptoms of|or leave. Vaccination of aningiuls|General Matthew Ridgway flies HAMBURG, Germany, Aug. 12. ) ctrato-cruiser “Goodhope” reports
\ the struggle for control of Jordan| within the area is proceeding and|to Frankfurt Wednesday for con-; Ex-President of Cubs Dr. Guil-|that all the bodies of the victims
, between “Br tish and American|every precaution is being talor ferences with General Thomas T.tlermor Alonso Pujol arrived her are now being removed from the|
4 Imperialists. At present victory |egainst the spread of the disease.| Handy, his deputy Commander for, from Amsterdam for a four-day|scene of the crash and will be
has been attained by British im-| Later to-day the medical services} United States troops in Europe. | visit. He will tour Germany andifiewn to Rio De Janeiro | th
‘ perial who succeeded in re-|director in an extra ordinary issu { Headquarters said also that plans to go to Frankfurt and| week. The stratocruiser ‘Goodhope’
moving from power the supporter | of the Official Gazette ordered no! Ridgway will visit Turkey from Baden, He may travel to France|crashed in the Brazilian jungle on
of American imperialists, Talal, | milk to be taken out or remotjed September 5 to September 10 |before returning to Cuba from «/April 29 with the loss of 50 lives.
i —U.P.' from the restricted area i —U.P. ‘European pleasure trip.—U.P. j —U.P,
:
r { \
i



holder
owner,

tees including
judiciary and a representative of
the landowners,
agricultural
the questions of landleases, wag-
es, and hours of work for peasant

200 acres would affect a few hun-
dred land

and one-third to a land} studied before an official attitude
wus adopted,

Hon. Alexander Bustamante,
majority party leader, said to-day
that a “Customs’ Union must wath
for federation of the British Carib-
bean area. It will not be
Customs’ Union outside the frame-
work of federation,”

There is plenty of teeth in the
Customs’ Union and we don’t}
know who may be bitten. There

is a lot of points in it to be

Establishment of rural Commit-
a member of the

leaseholders and

workers to rule on

labourers.

Limitations of land tenure to

owners who are the



Photographer
Kidnapped By

kL. German Police

STOCKHEIM, Germany,
Aug. 12
Armed East German “Peoples
Police” charged over the West
German border near here on Sun-
day and kidnapped a 30-year-old
German photographer who was
about to ‘smap pictures, according

Bavarian der police,
Pee German Balstebs ona that!

The army also called for a|]the photographer was standing

some 25 metres inside West Ger-
man territory when grabbed, The
police said when the carbine-
carrying Communist police hauled
him across the frontier, the
photographer threw his camera to
an assistant On the West German
side of the boundary. The police
then re-crossed the border and
retrieved the camera.—U.P.



Japan Approached
About Warships

TOKYO, Aug, 12,

The business vaper “Nihon
Keizai” said the navies of Brazil,
jurma, and Pakistan have made
inquiries among shipbuilding firms
in Japan about the possibility of
having warships constructed here.

The journal said that shipbuild-
ing circles believe that because of
financial problems it will be some
time before the Japanese firms can
accept bids for construction of
warships

The paper said that the most re-,
cent enquiry was from the Brazil-1
ian navy, which approached the
Kanematau Trading ~ Company
about the possibility of buying six
3,000 ton destroyers, six 100 ton
submarines, two 400 ton troop
transports, seven 4,000 ton cargot
craft, and one 1,000 ton towing

















vesvel,



Represent Barbados |“Eva Peron”: Name

Of City Or Station?

BUENOS AIRES, Aug. 19

When the provincial legislature
decided to change the name of the
city of La Plata to Eva Peron, a
small problem arose. The Gen-
eral Roca Railway, which serves
the city, already had a station
named “Eva Peron”. The Minis-
try of Transports has solved the
problem. The station “Eva Peron”
which is on the outskirts of
Buenos Aires, has been renamed
“Siete De Mayo”—the birthday
of Eva Peron,—-U.P,



Stevenson And

Truman Confer

WASHINGTON, Aug, 12

President Truman summoned
Governor Adlai Stevenson to the
White House today for a briefing
on the world situation and a man
to man talk on the political cam-
paign for presidency,

He invited all the Press to a
Juncheon in honour of Stevenson’s

nomination
—U.P.



| Bahama Legislature
Recessed Till Nov.

NASSAU, Aug. 11.
| Acting Governor Frederick South-
worth tonight recessed the legis-
lature until November 13th after
the signing of nine bills including
a Bul authorizing the sale of But-



lin’s Grand Bahama Camp to
| William Dunn and his American
associates,

| —O.P,

may use the Governor’s Name ir-
reverently,” and said that in his
opinion the member was using
the privileges of the House to
make irreverent references to His
Excellency the Governor.

Before His Honour could re-
sume His Chair, Mr. Mottley
said he would always abide by
any ruling made by His Honour,
to which His Honour replied “I
hope when the honourable mem-
ber says he will abide by a ruling
of the Chair, it is not merely
lip service.”

Mr. Mottley attempted to re-
ply, but His Honour, rapping his
gavel several times said, “I can
assure honourable members of
this Chamber that I will enforce
to the best of my ability as long as
I remain the Speaker of this an-
cient and historic Chamber, its
dignity and rule very, very
firmly.”

The Senior member for the City
said he couli not see for one
minute that he had referred to

Senior Member for the City, drew
Red Charges

his attention to Rule 126 of the
PANMUNJON, Aug. 12.

The United Nations admitted that
“in all probability” Allied
planes entered Panmunjom neutral
zone Sunday and apologised for
the incident. In a written reply to
the Communist charge, Senior U.N
Liaison officer Charles W, McCar-
thy said: “Our side will make
continued efforts to prevent
currences of this type.”

The note was handed to the
Communists at a meeting between
liaison officers, Except for this
meeting, there was no activity at
the truce camp. The truce talks are
in another one week recess called
by the Allies, the third such in
as many weeks.

Major General William K. Har-
rison explained he proposed the
recesses becauge Reds have offered
nothing new in deadlocked dis-
cussions on prisoner exchange.

—U.P.

jet

oc-

the Governor by name, or irrever+
ently, and asked, “am I not en»
titled in this House in debate to



Eden Is “Happiest

eat ahh Macon Eke
head of any oth artment Man In The World”

not by name?”

Reaching for a copy of the Rules
of the House, Mr. Mottley said:
“if you want to go into the rule
now and gay that I cannot say the
Head of the Administration.
and in a’ much calmer tone of
voice added, “as I take the rule
‘ it is true if Your Honour
feels that however you interpret
the rule it is to be taken by mem-
bers, well then, but I am not pre-
pared to take it so, as T have not
referred to the Head of the Ad-
ministration irreverently.”

Mr, Mottley began to quote from
the relevant Rule, but His Honour
interpolated, “If the honourabl¢
member wants to ask my ruling
and then make his own. Da
you think that any Parliament or
Speaker as being intelligent, and

@ On page 5.

LONDON, Aug. 13.

Foreign Secretary Anthony
Eden, the “happiest man in Lon-
don,” will marry 32-year-old Miss
Clarissa Churchill on Thursday
morning, it announced on
Tuesday.

The ceremony will take place at
the musty old Caxton Hall regis-
try office only three days after the
announcement of their engagement
in surprised London society and
government quarters. The 55-year-
old diplomat and the blue eyed
blonde niece of Prime Minister
Winston Churchill announced their
engagement on Monday night.
The couple will fly to Portugal on
Friday morning for a short honey-
moon there,

was

—U-P.

me the flaresinongp

|





























































































iG I #226 Aa si H BARBADOS ADVOC ATE ee WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 13, 1952 ;
/ arth C, | Tubby Hubby Waists | Listening Hours ‘gm :
j - WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 15, ioae ‘ ° “ . r
C: | Lose Up To 4 Inches |= "= | ae 2 2
{Vf AOUk mw me SRR CRRRSOR] tioned Holey In 12 Days coc dct cr ef Od 6 ia |
hs has been on a

Scotti zine, 6. % m. Mi Kind of
bie for Venezuela are Mr. and tish Magazine 5 p.m

sht-sSeeing tour -with



by OSBER MA NCAST ER
¢)




Music, 6.45 p.m. Sports Round Up and

Final Report on Five-on-a-diet





}
X ; ; Mrs. Pedro Anoyo and their son Programme Vurade, 1 00» m ane New
" f his family. Pedro Junior, who have been hol- win af 3 p.m. Home News from Britain. |
san Barbados-born daying here for the past two FOUR of the five full mem- STANLEY TANNER: (weigh in)]7.15 — 10.30 Pleats oncses : somes For Wednesday, August 13, 1952 »*
Analyst of British weeks as guests of Mr. and Mrs.|bers of the Daily Express Tubby before 15st. 4ib.; mid-way 14st. 7.15 p.m. Calling the West Indies, 2 ye a . :
s from a well-knewn Vernic Knight of “Mervue,”}Hubby Club were still on q dict 1041b.; after 14st. 8lb. loss 10D. [5.45 p.m. Ali Hwle, 8.15 pum. Radio Look in the section in which your birthday comes and
indian family. He is staying tinatine — , f ” lyesterday — even though §hey JOHN JOHNSTON: (weigh in) be-[Newsreel, 8.30 p.m mtavmneik at As find what your outlook is, according to the stars. +
a nee * ? ay astings, : a , : ; f 14st. 1lb.-: midway 13st. 101b.; Joount, 8.45 p.m. Interlude, 8.55 p.m 4
iis brother—a retired judge Mr. Anoyo, a cousin of Mrs,|are now “freed” from their 12-day are a * Prom the Editorials, 9.00 p.m. Prospect ; ‘ : ;
gh Court of India. An- nana 2 ble Ae wnt He Bre : after 13st. 43ib.; loss 10}1b. Re deel ee en The News, tia Promising influences, especially where
is Sir Frank New- + Re

ry a . DONALD GLOAG: (weigh iny

The five Tubby Hubbie ave before 13st. 4)1b.; mid-way 13st.
Olb.;after 12st. 8421b.; loss 10Ib.

WALTER GRATRIX: (weigh im)

before 12st. 3ib.; mid-way 11st,

131b.; after List. 10lb.; loss Tib,

Total weight loss 46} Ib.

—L.E.S.

Boys Will Be

ernment Relations of the Mene
Grande Oil Company in Vene-flost an average of 9lb. ea and
zuela, an affiliated company of|they have lost up to 4inf, from
the Gulf Oil Corporation, He said|their waistlines.
that hig family and he had a very Here are the end -gt test
enjoyable holiday and are 100k-|quotes:— s
Harry John
It’s been fun, and I am going

ing forward to a return visit.
For Three Weeks
WILLIAM }to carry on with it for another
McCARTNEY of Trinidad|12 days. The only snag has beer

p.m, News Talk, 10.15 p.m. Mid-Week * March 21—April 20 keen judgment, good planning are needed
Talk, 1030 p.m. From the Third AND used. Authors, scientists, secretaries, 3
Programme x industrial trades favoured. *
| *

TAURUS Could be pleasant if not extrav: antly Ie
] ee Pa * April 21—May 20successful day. You should advance
(Members Only).

but don't reach for impossible heights or
insist upon immediate money returns. *
SATURDAY, 16th August, *
1952, at 8.30 p.m.



nent Under-Secretary
he Home Office.

Sings Tonight
Wr Carib dropped in at
Rediffusion yesterday morn-
Mr. Robert Jaisingh ‘was
itditioned. Mr. Winston
ickett was the accompanist.
nson and Redman are sponsor-





















AND MRS. GEMINI













-elient Mereury vibrations, is is
May 21-—June 21 ,, Excelle ip
ng a programme on which Mr were arrivals last week for Alat lunch, when I’ve sometimes WATER POLO by Flood- YOUR day not to tail the capable, ambi-
Yaisingh will Sing at 8.90 this holiday. They have come overthad to go without an item in the ° light and DANCE x tious YOU. Investigate, study, research!
aoe v sing < § s “Half measures are no for three weeks and are guests atldiet because the restaurant ae Bo s In S ite Brain workers and most physical tasks
PES Se Hi good, we must force the tne Hastings Hotel, j -OU FINALS. sponsored.
V Jaisingh, a native of British G ; Mr. McCartney i director af not supply it. . KNOCK-OUT CANCER eS 4 -M
Guiana who has been living in overnment to close the we s 6 I have been a little more tire S :
Trinidad for. some time,*has a museums entirely—they’re wie. 3 Canney and Company! but that is because I have we Oftron urtain RES SWORD * June 22—July 23Should be profitable, progressive period
rich tenor. To my mind _ this @ gross waste of public Hesegige: ll ae ihn Si doing more gardening! My wife i for iron work, plumbing, building, hand-
young artist is versatile and sings moneyand compete unfairly ea ee Bocce Ss On ral} ys that with my new figure 1 Schoolboys from behind the POLICE v. BONITAS. *« ling vehicles, tools, ete. Artistic matters
vith confidence and expression, with sponsored television | mo y- all have to buy a new suit soon. “Iron Curtain” want to know ail less stimulated but can achieve.
‘He has appeared in areranarpe: . ee Annual Vacation (Waist: before 46ins., after 42ins.) 2cut London buses and coaches. Music by Anthony Menezes 1B0 * * * *
Se age Secat bi Bre sae: ae ce RRIVING in the island on Stanley Tanner They have been sending ther and his Caribbean 0 July 24—Ang. 22 Your Sun advises caution in hazardous
right the % ill sing ‘clawinak teele Venezuelans Lixe Barbados Sunday by B.W.1.A. from| Do you know anybody wie inquiries to a Kingston - on- ‘Beeuhaaears work and dealings with superiors. Don’t
y Well-known “eontpopers apa ,. Grenada was Mr. Warren Thor; uys misfit clothing? Pm so +>ames motor firm, which makes ADMISSION: seek favours unless you feel alk are recep-3>
coh caveat aevuscts one in a oe _ Barbados for a month's holi- Con of Mr and Mrs. B C Those leased that I shall probably on Me vehicles, ever since a Hun- WATER POLO ...... 2/- tive or will not be imposed upon,
cial rendition of ““Grknada” by *& day. is Mr. Julio Chalband, 4¢ pyightpn, Black Rock. . fwith the diet. The family tell me &2%!a2 boy recently wrote for al]f DANCE .............. 2/- vino
Agus ara whie » will sing Construction engineer 0! ~~ Thorpe has c ( CaRmeue OF By ang a 23. Happy, prosperous outlook. ual to
gustin Lara which he will sing Construct gi f Messrs pe has come over to spend|I have already lost one ana C*mibaue of motors and a badge 10.8.52—4n. Ang. 23—Sept. 23 H tlook. Be eq
Spanigh Sanchez and Company of Caracas. pis annual vacation with his fam- they have been amazed to me . me badge was sent Of, : aid) : : reasonable demands, take advantage of
F Sh t Holid He arrived here recently by jj) He is an Assistant Master at cleaning the car after nday We thought that would end the new, good offerings. Venture some when
- or oliday B.W.LA,. and was accompanied by ihe Grenada Boys’ Secondary Munch nities’ * polnen att aY matter. But not a bit of it,” the you'can add to income, security, family yp
a ING in the colony on his mother Mrs, Chalband, his school in St, Gearge’s. ane * aaSe moat; batore 40 "418S-. frm said. happiness.
/ Friday last by B.W.I.A. sister, Miss Fredes Quinto and his Tae Kone Gnaeel * ina) “Things went just the same
from Trinidad was Miss Cynthia three sons Julig, Antonio and or ng 4 acation John Johnston as if it had been a query from
Leeghin who has come over to Leonora. They are guests at the EAVING the island on Mon- 3

ENGRAVING
JEWELLERY
&
REPAIRS

There’s no doubt about it, the
Hastings Hotel, day by 3B.W.1.A._ forfdiet works, But, oh! the joy of
eeghin is employed with a Ship- This is their first visit to Bar- Puerto Rico en route to the U.S.A.}those couple of beers when it
ping Association, Port-of-Spain bados which they like very much, were Mr. and Mrs. Horace Clarke fended. I’ve eaten so much lettuce
ind this is her first visit to the especially the swimming. of “Brentford”, Belleville. Mr.|too, that I feel that i've got ears
island. During her stay here she Clarke will be away for six weeks |lixe a rabbit.
vill be a guest at Leeton-on-Sea, St. Lucia Planter while his wife will remain for
Worthing. R. CHARLES LONGLY, a 4bout four months as the guest of
F M. h 7 planter of St. Lucia returned — anos a. e By Ry &
| or Two Months home on Sunday by B.W.LA, Brooklyn, New York, Mrs. Clarke



SA taco endo -y: a ” an English boy — hundreds of
spend two weeks’ holiday. Miss requests followed from the same
area, mostly worded alike.
The Hungarian boy showed the
badge to his friends, and ever
Sti ‘ ince they have been writing for
Still — even if I did get-bad- psa ay Aha 7
tempered sometimes — it was one just like it. They have even

on , “= eribbed his original letter.
good fun. (Waist: before 41 ins., “Tt ig'a pleasant thought that,

Work hard to further wise aims and ob-
Sept. 24—Oct. 23 joctives, Day not overexacting nor too
auspicious, but benefice influences prevail
and you can glean their good. Don‘t over-y

do,

SCORPIO * & *
Oct. 24—Nov. 22 Slightly restricting influences since yester-3>
day only tend to make this a better day
for brain work, conferences, industry.





«
x
x wilson * -”
x
x






ig ’ i after 39ins.) ; “ig : : 4
ISS ELAINE BLOEMEN- , \ twelve days’ holi- is the Woman Tutor at Erdiston . Tron Curtain’ notwithstanding, « SAGITTARIUS ie a i

DAAL a stenotypist ae tee ee ae wt ‘Abbeville Ttaining College. Donald Gloag boys are boys the world over.” Also Jewellery made to order Nov. 23—Dec, 22 Friendly apes Sith to of 3ooker. Brothers, “Beitish Gruket = el Sisters ' I made a terrible mistake last —LES. after midnight. ithout trying to force
Guiana, arrived in the colony on RRIVING in the colony from}W*k. 1 reported that there was | } sooscess0esesss0ss0099

e
We now have our






Wednesday last from Grenada,
where she spent part of her three-
month vacation, Miss Bloemen-

x results, use your’ best effort,
vancement to be had.

\ CAPRICORN 4 4 BS

Gains, ad-
no change in my waistline. But}

Back to Trinidad Trinidad last week were my wife checked up because she |

RS. C. WHARTON, wife of the Misses Marjorie and Nore

SEA VIEW GUEST

. oo kas ic .)was suspicious that I had been | own § skilled Jeweller * Dec. 23—Jan. 214 day for stimulating aceomplishment, 3
; Dr. Wharton af Port-of- Cherrie. Marjorie who is work r | z : ae Lae ".
laal will be spending two months Spain "prinidad, returned home ing with the Imperial College of }tubby so long that 1 could not| HOUSE working on the pre- making new, valuable contacts, AND fin
Warthts " Ol “i “Geant al yesterday morning by B.W.1A. Tropical Agriculture will be re- know where my waist was. |
orthing is is her first visit ; v 7

\ ishing tasks. Brain work, physical prowess

‘









mises which guarantees
quick deliveries and
reasonable charges.

nfter spending about two weeks’ maining for one month while her She was right.
holiday in Barbados as the guest sister Nora will be spending twoltmy waist now.
‘ and Mrs. W. F. Harewood weeks. Nora works with the Gov- The diet has left

I have found |
to the island.

Two Months Vacation

both favoured.

i* AQUARIUS * * *

HASTINGS, BARBADOS
Daily and Liuugterm Rates





me feeling









: ; ; 0) n juest. Ft E Today responsive to sincere endeavours,
és of “Camelot”, Chelsea Road, She ernment Medical Stores of Dis- fitter, more alert, than I ,ever a ned on req x Jan. 22 — Feb. 20 especially where smart thinking and plan-
RRIVING in the colony | by was accompanied by her little son pensers. During their stay here imagined possible. (Waist: before eas arte ning back it. The unusual in management
. B.W.1.A. from British Bobby. they will be guests at “Steney-|36'sins,, after 34ins.) Dinner and Cocktail WY Db LIM A ean bring fresh gain.
Guiana since 3rd July was Mrs. ~~ er bushand, her brother, Mr. croft”, Worthing. Walter Gratri ‘ = e +
Clarice Evans who has come over jyjchac] Gebriel and his daughter For Two Weeks M if alter Gratrix Parties arranged. «x i
for two months’ holiday. This nette who had “ome over with . 4 ‘ol b y wife is so delighted with | ¢ J. BH, BUCKLAND & co LTD Another fine planetary day in this should-
is Mrs. Evans’ first visit to the them. returned. last week after oN "te pe “Clrinidad ee tte slimmer husband that} § Proprietor. ¢ een * be progressive Places-anOnih, No marr
> z she wi 2 ey os , 1h. | trom shida eel like repeating the diet. * “6% (FEC. EESBBEOESOBHEYL PISCES how difficult the job, or the day’s gener
ie ioe mt Wot te spending «short holaey. quring ag a woes oo Miss I’m certainly feeling fit. For aon 20 Broad St. Phone 4644 * Feb, 21—March 20 gomands, you can make advancement.
Worthing With C.P.1L.M argaret Corbie who has come the first time in my life last GA fe Ty
‘ ee : over for two weeks’ holiday. Miss | pyjq; i 94 7 ae '
For Holiday BRIGGS COLLYMORE Corbie is Secretary to the Minis-|~â„¢C%y Dight I caught the bus by YOU BORN TODAY



















RRIVI oa Strong character. innately brave
M . ’ >
ARR VING ir he island on who has been

*« honourable, ambitious, sensitive, above pettiness. Curb tend-
ency to domineer, or to be impatient at suggestions. Keep
your naturally sunny disposition out front; pray when trou-

* bled or in doubt. Don’t heed flatterers. Birthdate: Sir Gee.
Grove, noted writer on music; Alfred J. Hitchcock, m

-—" “ % * x * x % *

JANETTA DRESS SHOP

(Next Door to Singer’s)

NEW SHIPMENT ....
BEACH DRESSES

The Garden—St. James
TO-DAY 8.30 P.M,
“MAD WEDNESDAY’
Harold LLOYD &
“REAL GLORY’
Gary COOPER—David NIVEN

Thurs. 8.30 P.M.
“HARD FAST &
BEAUTIFUL”
Sally FORREST

&
‘THE OUTLAW’
Jane RUSSELL

employed ter of Education, Trinidad, and Se aa (Waist: ‘be-
z Saturday . morning by. with C.P.1.M., in Curacao and quring her stay here will be stay- Well, that is th oe
B.W.1.A. from ‘Trinidad was who had been spending two jing at “Stoneycroft”, Worthing. on ds ~¥, ial end
Miss Joan Carr who has come over months’ vacation at home with his First Visit . * y Hubby test.
for two weeks’ holiday, Miss Carr relatives at St, Leonard’s Avenue, ISS LEAH WESTMORE- ro aacenee of families are
is a clerk at the Trinidad Turf returned to Curacao on Friday AMD. wiin fe econiowed with s using the diet at home.

Club and is a guest at Leeton-on- last. ;
a : International Aeradio came over THE SLIMMERS.
Sea, Worthing. last week by B.W.1.A. from

R a ee | EJOLIDAYING ip the island Trinidad for two weeks’ holiday |HASRY JOHN: (weigh in) before
Ce , son o

This is Miss Westmoreland’s first} 16st. 101b.; mid-way 16st. 4Ib.;

the late Mr. A. S. Husbands, 7 © a ee a. a oe visit to the colony and during 1 her after 16st. 11b.; loss 9Ib,
u *» é Ss. s w
Babe gt von es eetachen % ing is a Needlework Teacher and ee ey ee ee Sts.
gare by the Ss. Colombe to- (Hag? Be Geaaving at tevin Krom
day, ar e mg
Ore sraspainds wee reas ane on-Sea, Worthing. TD seach ina ane Se ee
was called to the bar at t - * ‘ a nada
dle Templke and will be introduced Nurse Holidaying in the colony by a ee
to the local bar later this week, RRIVING. in the island from Trinidad for two weeks vy

Trinidad on 25th July, was here.



Aavoctated Gritish Pleture Corporition ite. presence

Fri. & Sat.
8.30 p.m.
Warners’ Hit!















Second Visit

'% Setton-Baring ~ Mayflower Production

“tric PORTMAN
Laurence Harvey- Maria Mauban.
iain CAMELIA

Orginal story and screenplay by ROBERT WESTERBY

Praduced by AUBREY BARING » Directed by DAVID

MACDONALD Oiseribution by Assocuted
Britush-Parhe

PL Ad A BARBAREES








To-day and To-morrow, 4.45 and 8.30 p.m.

MARK OF ZORRO












Miss Grenada is visiting
He is a brother of Mr. Noel Hus- , rr
bands, Manager ‘of Crab Hill and Nurse Barrow who has come over Barbados for the first time and is

Woollen Twin Sets. Reduced to $13.55



















: f don Grant & Tyrone Linda Basil (DIAL 5170)
Bright Hall and Mr, Aubrey Hus- for one month’s holiday. During an employee of Gor 5 9
bands, Manager of Mount Stand- her stay here she will be a guest Co., ee wet is a guest at POWER DARNEL RATHBONE FRIDAY 4.45 & 8.30 P.M. DIRS MANS TD Oe
fast. — , at Leeton-on-Sea, Worthing. Stoneycroft”, Worthing. — AND — & continuing D5 OPES ;
PRISONER OF SHARK ISLAND oy -







BY THE WAY...

PHOTOGRAPH of an MP. officials whispered together for a that machinery with a fast work- OS 5S6OSSS9

By Beachcomber

Warner BAXTER --



John CARADINE

PLAZA THEAT





























ing~ strain on the ag iy BRIDGETOWN |; | BARBAREES OISTIN
singing “Because” at a “dem- moment, and finally smiled, and SngseaiA ene ae oak a 20th IDGETO ABBAS eee:
onstration show specially design- gave up. sae slow working-rate, and that the GOLDWYN CENTURY TODAY (ae) #30 & 801 Togay (only) 430 & te a Oa tates
cd to sell British goods in North The shocked politicians old tire more quickly than the MAYER FOX it 7 he “KING'S ROW” America reminds one that sing- ORMALLY constituted people young. For Right, Roy: ELSY ALBIN Ronald REAGAN = eatin par i ig FORC
ing M.P.s (and singing mice for i 5 s r Right, Royal Entertainment Ann SHERIDAN & William Holden &
thet matter) have played all to like to. see the youns enjoy Pres FAEI , GLENN LANCAN “SUGARFOOT" (Color) “The RACKET"
small a part in the export drive. ip& themselves while they can, CROSSWUR et ee eee Dapstine Randolph_ SCOTT Robert MereHuM || FORTH WORTH
” Whether ially nowadays, tl f lure || "+ Stem’ Be
Whether the Americans will be “Pee wi ee oe THURS. Special 2.30 p.m.1) Thurs, Speetal 120 p.m.

impressed by: the cholee of song SBectacle of the débutantes danc- SCABRAMOUCHE =

in this case is doubtful. I have
never thought of the old senti-
mental drawing-room ballads as
being full of pep, push and dy-
namism, But, anyhow, I like the

parties is too much for some of
the politicians, Grubby bohemian
orgies, if you like, but not these

débutante parties!

From Friday, August 15th, 5.00 and 8.30 p.m.









Zane GREY’S
“THUNDER MOUNTAIN’
Tim HOLT &
“LEGION of the
LAWLESS”
George O'BRIEN

“PIONEERS”
Tex RITTER &
“SIX GUN MESA”
Johnny Mack BROWN
eS

See
Thurs. (only) 430 &

Fite Curses, IRB. Thurs. (only)

445 & 8.20 p.m.
“KING'S ROW”
Ronald Reagan &
“SUGARFOOT”















N oe oe THURS. (Only) 4.80" & Bd SHADOWS 9n BEACON Randolph Scott
idea of using art and culture to The e i ; / 4 G +” oddy ee
lend dignity to a campaign for a od volution of S.prane Sa B’TOWN fn Shek Roddy Mepet Aue Opening FRIDAY
selling electric fog-horns or roller- ERE is a campaign afoot to de ( ) “WATERLOO ROAD" DUBLIN” RY MURDER”
skates to the farmers of the Middle persuade people to make ; oi DIAL 2310 Stewart GRANGER Robert NEWTO! Jack LORD &

West. If a Cabinet Minister could their own prunes by drying plums,

be induced to sing “Where My
Caravan has Rested” at an export
Thé Dansant, the potential Arab

It is, according to the Food Min-
istry, a matter of putting #e
plums in a warm place, the warmtn




FRIDAY 2.30, 4.45 & 8.30 P.M.
& continuing to SUN, 4.45 & 8.30







——SSEs
Opening FRIDAY RAVE, *F

Coming FRIDAY WEST”

RAPTURE Martha VICKERS.

|
|



CAIRO ROAD



clientele would be in the bag.



acting as a drying agent, and con-
verting what was, as it were, a
plum into a prune.

Across
1. Gear for the piquet men '
8. Put a stop to bread y
The precise 10. Denizen of the jungie, (7)
OULD not the British Council Moment at which a plum becomes !! Bow | the Wives of \
t e ei. (7)



Dk. J. Vv. HENSON PRESENTS

Let’s get together

1

.. . Y ~ ‘
MADAM O°LENDY and HER UNFORGETTABLE TROUPE
devise a scheme for sending a & Prune, exchanging plummish jy. Travelling, (9) “
choir of M.P..s to sing the “Hia- Characteristics for prunish ones, 13 gu at tne bead usually. (5 a
” : . at a pred. ‘
watha” oratorio in Japan? Sample May be ascertained by seizing a ‘iy You. find the doctor on it
boilers could be given away after Plum which is evolving into a As Daring if you take \t (4)
each performance, while Mrs, — prune, and, wringing it out. Hf 39) Te AeWi thorn Norwa
recited “Casabianca,” there is no moisture, it is a prune Down
I, . a (or else a dry plum). If there is }. Nothing could be piaintr. «8 }
Unproductive visit 3 Se 7 . Is of eight. (7)

moisture it is a plum (or else a : What the Aussies look fo
I LKLA MAW BAT AT, the wet prune), Another method is to me ae

Burmese business man, was reeze the plums, and hack off the 2 Meaning? (9)

3 - . 5. Wet way to take ease mister, (4
conducted round a large tyre fac- particles of ice with a fretsaw be- 6 Sometimes scratches for

|

|
tory yesterday, On being shown fore storing them in the prune- , Gvarebates @ light ray. (4)
an enormous lorry-tyre, he said: cupboard. ¥ The Sweet one has fragra }
In Burma we have smaller life- Dramatic revelations 11, SEROte 6b fiseta ite equa: |
elts. That one ought to save an TWHE scientists have discovered }2 The Tule about gin ? ha} |
elephant from drowing.” It was that “the hoct timing wcrc | We should ail snare the cor
explained to him that this was not i cant? nowt. timing rates |

: : mon one. (4) .: :
a lifebelt but a motor-tyre, He (in factories) “are significantly ‘ Havin® worked Tea takes 1






j . heart. (3)
replied , “Then. if the car falls Groupe!’ ‘This cermae rong, age 14 Giereaited curse, 1a) " T
int > We : 7 us sounds startlingly Sodution of yesterday's puazie. . Aerus
ty . rage A see et — *ke my own discovery that an old i ‘Batteve, w, Avenge: i ‘Spa il Ne. R ¢p ODA L HEA TR ES
t S? nter- ie Wiis, ~at Sevag. lus | 12, Gates? 15, Relish: 16 nee.
preter, Tut?Tut, confused matters [han gta, Cote. difficult pPeices 26 ‘Tamer: at

; than a y é adiuct hi Nice; 26, Tamer; 27, Area
by translating the Burmese word young man to adjust him- [* guSiet:’ a Byentual: 4 Least
ke F

self i st- i i r
for tyre as “blood-orange”” The to a fast-working machine, liteepid: 5: Bye: 6. Veal: 7 Ap










ROXY













i ¢ 4 TO-DAY at 445 ONLY TO-DAY last 2 shows 445
Further research may eve req] fasher: 10, Sting: 14. Ere: 15 Robert MONTGOMFRY Ds ee cee
a y even reveal i Arena: 19. Pram: @1 Her toners 4 in G N THE LADY AND THE BANDIT
an Aiea SSL weer RYS WIRNESS Starring
Louis HAYWARD : Patricia ME
5 VO-NIGHT & TOMORROW NiGHYT ee
at 8.30 TOMORROW & FRIDAY
FIRST CLASS UTILIT | Madam ‘OLINDY & Her Troupe 130 & 8.15
C 4 ATY CLOTH ; | in Glenn FORD — Nina FOCH

CARACAS NIGHTS OF Loe
Tickets on sale from 8 p.m

in









Se _- UNDERCOVER MAN
| TOMORROW at 4.45 ONLY and
C. | J. Arthur RANK Presents ADVENTURES IN SILVERADO

36in. RAYON PONGEE SILK sn

With William BISHOP : Gloria HENRY
White, Rose, Royal Blue, Green, Grey, | Sam WANAMAKER ROYAL
Chocolate, Sky Blue, Gunpowder Blue | OLYMPIC *

| TODAY & TOMORROW 4.30 & 8.15

~ : au
+: For :- EARS %. Shee) SE Ae NIK © “THE SECRET OF ST. IVES”
BROKEN JOURNEY



THE NEW -.- -





“CARACAS NIGHTS OF 1952”
EMPIRE THEATRE«.

WEDNESDAY, 13TH & THURSDAY 14TH AT 8.30 P.M.

and



’ With Charles Starret — Smiley Burnett
DRESSES, UNDERWEAR, SHIRTS, PYJAMAS, ETC. eee _

“TWO FISTED STRANGER"
SALT TO THE DEVIL



FRIDAY only 4.30 & 8.16



aT WHITHELDS

| - : A MAGNIFICENT CHANGE OF PROGRAMME EACH NIGHT
ONLY | a ee Robert MORAG OMY
, ere "s PRICES:—STALLS. 36c., HOUSE 60c., BALCONY 84c., BOX $1.00
: |] ° ONCE A. Taare “iho TICKETS ON SALE FROM 8 AM
: * + > { : and sis } Rica « aaa NE.
70 cents YOUR SHOE STORE 70 cents pene ne rHE a BEECHAM Chiat tn nibs ok thins Maclin ot «
DIAL 4220. Hedy LAMARR ennis O Cecille PARKER

(a

OLYMPIC, ROXY, ROYAL.





|

































WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 13

, 1652



BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Road From Caracas To Caribbean Costs

2,000 Workers Engaged in
103 Mile Road Construction

CARACAS.,

THE MOST EXPENSIVE road in the world, costing

£ 2,000,000 a mile, is being built to the Caribbean.

It will

have cost £21,000,000 by the time it is completed through

the Andean foothills of Northern Venezuela,

te link

Caracas with the Caribbean coast.

Two thousand labourers, with 200 bulldozers, tractors
and lorries, are hastening to complete the road in time
for the ‘tenth inter-American Foreign Ministers Con-
ference due to be held in Caracas i in the last quarter of 1953.

The new 10%4-mile roed wi!' be
marked with two giant tunnels,
oné of them over a mile in length

and three reinforced concrete
bridges, costing about £ 1,785,000,
built by Enterprises Campeon

Pernard, of Paris, under the direc-
tion of Mr. Robert Shama, project
manager, and the firm’s head en-
gineer.

Two Tunnels

The two tunnels, being bullt at
a cost of -£7,242,000, by the
Morrison-Knudson Co., Inc, of
Idaho, are in fact, a set of twin
tunnels with dual-lane one-way
traffic on either side.

Construction on the road began
in January 1950 after six years

of surveys and studies conducted
by the Venezuelan Ministry of
Public Works, and it is regarded
as one of the most spectacular
examples of the Government's
policy of “sowing its oil wealth

back into the land.”

Before work could commence on
the actual road itself, 36 miles of
secondary roads across the moun-
tains had to be built in order to
gain access to the principal con-
struction points along the “super-
highway”.

The roue for the new road
required the filling of a number of
mountain gaps, 13 of them, ranging
from 78 feet to 141 feet in height.
Public Works engi.«crs had to
slice off the tops nd sides. of
some of the mou..tains to get the
earth needed to fill these gaps.

Once compliete., the road will
act as a new life-line between
the Venezuelan capital of 500,004
people, and the busy airport of the
city, at Maiquetia, which handles
approximately 200 National and
International flights daily, and the
thriving seaport of La Guaira,
which handles nearly 50 per cent
of all Venezuelan imports.

In addition, it is hoped that the
road will provide a great impetus
to the development of coastal
property, and many new resorts
are now under construction in an-
ticipation of the new surge of
holiday-makers,

The present 19-mile-long road,
linking Caracas with the coast, is
situated in a 3,000 feet high valley,

a twisting road with 365 curves
precariously niched in the steep
hillsides.

Heavy Traffic

Traffic is very heavy along this
road, approximately 6,000 cars
and lorries a day, carrying passen-
gera and freight in the hours
journey between the coast and
Caraeas, The new road, with only
36 curves, is expected to cut the
journey down to 15 minutes.

The curves will have a minimum
radius of 328 yards, as compared
with the 16 yards on the present
road, and the maximum grade on
the new road ‘will be only 6 per
cent. and as iow as 3.5 per cent.
in the tunnels, as compared with
the present 12 per cent. on the
existing road.

The dual lanes on the new road
will be paved with asphalt, and
will measure 24 feet on either
side of a four-foot wide centre
island.

New telephone cable from Cara-
cas to Maiquetia and La Guaira,
will be laid by the Caracas Tele-
phone Company, in the
island of the road, which will be
illuminated along its entire length

—B.U.P

Cuba Cuts

Molasses Price

NEW YORK.

Cuba has cut the export price of
its blackstrap molasses to 12 cents
a gallon, plus 2% per cent, export
tax. Fow several months, Cuba has
been holding out for a price of 20
cents, but buyers regarded this
figure as far too high.

It is reported in New York that
the Cuban Sugar Institute has
already sold 120,000,000 gallons to
Publiecker Industries, Ine., of
Philadelphia at the new price. But
officials of Publicker refused cither
Sinetron or deny the reported

Big stocks of synthetic industrial
alcohol, of which molasses form an
important ingredient, have enabled
manufacturers to resist the Cuban
demands for 20 cents, But the
record output of some 400,000,000
gallons in Cuba, together with a
very serious storage problem,
prompted Cuba to reduce its prices
at last.

It is believed that Cuba will
now have to move 30,000,000 gal-
loms a month out of the islarid for
the next seven months in order to
provide, storage space for thé next
crop. Some 100,000,000 gallons
are reported to be already in stor-
age in the United States.

—B.U.P.



_—

Japs Pay Up

WASHINGTON, Aug. 11.

Informed sources said that Japan
on Monday paid final. gold and
ddllar commitments to the Inter-
national Bank and Monetary Fund
and will be admitted to member-
ship in those organizations
Thursday

Ambassac
sign the t I
a brief ceremony at the Bank ~
Fund headquarters on Thurs
Meg@ening. Japan’s ducta in the os
is, $250,C000,000
quartér is payable i
remainder committ





nt at

—U.P

centre





3W.1.PoliceTo

Return Home

In September

By LONDONER

LONDON
Three West Indian Policemen,
who have been attending a course
at the Police Training School af
Hendon, on the outskirts of Lon-
don. expect to return home in Sep-
tember.

They are Assistant Superinten-
dent Cromwell St. Louis, of Trini-
dad, Station Sergeant R. Mareus
ae ot St. Vincent, and Mn-
spector Edmund J, aize
Antigua. ee ae

It has been all
play for these three
tives of the

work and no

representa-
West Indian police
forces. “In fact”, Superintendent
St. Louis told me this week,
“there has been so much to take
in that we have had to study late
into the night. The lighting bills
are going to be very high!”

“But,” he added, “it has all
been very interesting. Y

For Station Sergeant Thomas,
at least, the return trip w the
West Indies cannot come ten soon.
He became the father of a baby
girl only fifteen days before leav-

ing St. Vincent ‘and is most
anxious to see her again.
* =

Off to the Caribbean shortly is
Mr. A, E. V. Barton, the A
India Committee's indefatigable
secretary. He sails from South-
ampton in the Golfito on August
he and is due in Barbados nine
days later. ‘

During his stay in ‘the West In-
dies he will visit’St. Kitts, An-
tigua, Montserrat, Dominica, St.
Lucia, St. Vincent, Grenada,
Trinidad, British Guiana, Brit-
ish Honduras and Jamaica trav-
elling by sea and air.

Mr. Barton will return home
from Kingston in the Cavina on
November 28th.

* * *

Captain E, J. Hemmings, Har-
bour Master of Port of Spain,
Trinidad who has been attached
to the British Ministry of ‘Trans-
port following his operation in this
country, will be leaving London

shortly to visit his mother in
Edinburgh.

“When I get there,” he says,
‘T am going to do nothing—
absolutely nothing”.

After Edinburgh, and a well-
deserved rest, Capt. Hemmings re-
turns to Port of Spain.

*

“Personality and Conflict in
Jamaica” is the title of a book by
Madeline Kerr, which has just
been published by Liverpool Uni-
versity Press.

For three years until 1949, Dr.
Kerr worked among the Jamai-
can peasants gathering material
for her thesis. Now comes a sum-
mary of her findings-—later to be
presented in more detailed form—
on the behaviour of Jamaican
parents and children in various
situations, on the work of the
schools and the varous religious
sects, and on the general eco-
nomic and political back-ground
of present-day Jamaica.

* a

Sir William Rook, chairman of
C. Czarnikow Ltd., is reported to
have made a good recovery from
an operation he recently under-
went in Nuffied House, Guy’s Hos-
pital, London, Sir William, who
was Director of Sugar at the
Ministry of Food for 11 years, is
now convaleseing.

Co *

Mr. D. J. Parkinson, who began
his duties as Trade Commissioner
in the U.K. for the British West
Indies only three weeks ago, has
‘already reported keen interest
among British business men who

want to trade with the West In-
Meas Until he can find his own
permanent office, Mr Parkinson is
sharing accommodation with the
West India Committee. He is on
the look out for West Indian staff,
and has already engaged Miss

tish Guiana.
Chung of British “LES.

e



New Issue O
Caroni Capital

LONDON.
Caroni, Ltd., the West Indian
planters, have ¢now announced in
London details of their new capi-
tal issue. Ordinary shareholders
are offered 4,200,000 2s. Ordinary

shares at par in the proportion of-

one for every 2s. unit held.

More. than 80 per cent. of the
Ordinary stock is held by Tate and
Lyle Investments and the United
Molasses Company, who are tak-
ing up any of the new shares not
subscribed for by the other share-
holders,

Net proceeds of the issue will be
used to repay temporary advances
in connection with the extension
of the Brechin Castle sugar factory
in Trinidad. The enlarged factory
is expected to be ready for opera-
tions at the beginning of the next
erop in January, 1953.

The company’s 1952 sugar crop
has now been complete with a
record output of 49,146 tons of
sugar. Net profit is expected to be
‘e than double that for the pre-



vious year. A substantial part of
the increase was due to the sale of
molasses at an exceptionally high
price, bu the market value of
i mol € as sinee declined sharp-
* jy and a reduction of revenue from
t duct is expected in the

icial year

—B.U.P.



Trinidad Newsletter:

‘Trinidad

Hit By Fall In Prices

(From Our Own

TRINIDAD’S OIL
recently by falling fuel’ oil

last month there was a 10 cents (U.S,) per barrel drop and | $
this week it was announced that the price per barrel had,
fallen by another 15 cents, effective August 1

This means that the ~rinidad
oil industry will suffer a revenue
loss of $5,000,000 while the Colony’s
revenue collected from the indus-
try will fall by $2,400,000—
$2,000,000 in respect of Income Tax
and $400,000 in royalties.

Trinidad Leaseholds revenue loss
alone is about $500,000; it is not
known how much is the estimated
loss of other individual companies.

It is believed that the drop in
Gulf oil prices is due to the U.S.
steel strike and that if the truce
talkd in Korea are successful pres.
ent prices will remain and might
also have the effect of causing a
reduction in the price of gasoline
to eee

But Mr. N. Foster, Govern-
ment’s eirsiewn Technologist
pointed out this week that the
present Gulf oil price for crude
oil would have no effect on the
price of gasoline,

RAFFLES

During the next session of the
Legislature which begins towards
the end of October, it is expected
that the Attorney General will
present a Government amendment
to the Colony’s Ordinance under
which raffles are conducted.

The Police are seeking an
amendment which will give ther
powers of investigations. At pres-
ent, raffles for charity, sports, or
any other suitable organisation,
are permitted by the Police De-
partment upon the application of
an organiser. Existing legislation
contains no provision for investi-
gation of drawings or for holding
an inquiry into drawing results.

The t circumstances, it is
ee lend themselves easily

to postponement of drawings from
time to time until nothing is heard
of the final results or whether
buyers of the raffle tickets have
been refunded their money.

Amendment to the Ordinance
will make provision as follows:
That a percentage fee of tickets
sold be postéd by the organisers
with the Police; that they enter
into a bond for the proper con-
duct of the raffle and this bond
will be forfeited in case of any
infringements.

Names of winners and sellers
of winning tickets must be made
public and all returns, money,
tickets sold etc.,, must be forward-
ed to the Police.

SPECIAL ASSIGNMENT

Mr. Arthur A, Shenfield, former
Economic Adviser to the Trinidad
Government arrived from ithe

United Kingdom on Sunday and
left early this week for St.
Vincent.

He is in the Caribbean again
on a special assignment—making
a survey of shipping needs and
trade prospects of the area for
Booker Brothers.

Booker Brothers have been
studying for some time past estab-
lishment of a regular inter-island
service, and they now propose to
form a company, with headquar-
ters in Trinidad, for this purpose

Mr. Shenfield ‘is making the sur-
vey in the motor vessel Mabiri
a special ship put at his disposal
by Booker Brothers, He will make
investigations in St. Lucia, Domin-
ica, Montserfat, St. Kitts, Nevis,
Antigua and Barbados, spending at
least one day in cach island

GROW MORE FOOD
Mr. J. H. Steer, Government
Statistician, who has prepared a
table of the Colony’s food con-
sumption, said this week that the
agriculture of Trinidad and Toba-
fo must be as intensive as in
Barbados and Grenada if food

ply is not to become more dillicult
than it is at present

The Colony, he said, deper
Foreign suppliers f 54 per cent



PORT-OF-SPAIN, August 8. g
INDUSTRY has been hard hit

sup- 9's

eS

ed

1

Londen Express Service



It is said here that Barbados now

undersells Trinidad in the Britis

Oil Hard

the
compound

this by dropping
price of lard
$13.65 for

fron

PPPSO2DO9OOGHHHHHHODOSOHG
Correspondent) e

prices. Towards the end of




®

ef its starchy foods and 63 per;
cent. of its proteins, Local fats,| 4
however, shows a high percentage, %
of 67. \4

Said Mr, Steer: “The popula- @
tion will certainly increase by 4g
200,000 in the next 10 years except ¢
for some unforseen disaster. So|¢
that even if all the remaining |®
lands with agricultural possibili- \%
ties can be brought into cultivation,
we face the possibility of becoming
still more dependent on imported
foodstuffs in the coming years.’

The remedy, he said, must be/¢
intensive cultivation of the soil.

* *

+
SELLING MISSION VISITS

BRITISH GUIANA

A Trinidad
prising Mr,

selling missien com-
Owen Papineau, Gov-
ernment'a Economic Adviser, Mr
Vernon Wharton and Mr. G.
Montes de Oca, of West Indian Oil
Industries, went to British Guiana
yesterday in the interest of local
coconut products. 9
British Guiana banned imports | <
of English margarine and lard)
compounds last month followin’
representations reported to have
been made by Barbados producer

~ Sea And
Air Tratfie

In Carlisle Bay

OOO4 3-300-95 O004






SIMPLICITY

‘Sehooner May Olive, Schooner Eme- |
line, Schooner Cyril E, Smith, Schoone
Laudalpha, Schooner Augustus B, Comr



erevery spadbisonabebscecicccssctecsesTeeteers : eae



ton, Schooner Esso Aruba, Schoone i y
Lydia A,, Schooner Henry D. Wallace, | It is easy to op
Schooner Philip H. Davidson, Schooner | minimum numbe
Everdene, Schooner Enterprise s.,
Schooner Marion Belle Wolfe, achootas |
Rosarene, Gehooner D’Ortae, Schooner
Sunshine R., Schooner At Last, Schooner
Wonderful ‘Counsellor, Schooner Lady | under hard wor
Suver, Motor Vesse! T.B. Radar, Motor
Vessel Gloria Maria Motor Vessel
Moneka, Schooner Lucille M, Smith, | POWER
Schooner Hariett Whittaker, SS. Nestor 7 sed
4 The Field-Marsh
S.S. Athelbrook, 260 ton Capt. W
Cook, from British Guiana, Agents: A, | aon
Jason Jones & Co, at minimum eng
SS. Sundale, 1.651 tons, Capt F tes 1 |
Kapasi, from Cuidad Truijillo, Agents: | yar pulls are oly
Plantations Ltd spee ¢
DEPARSURES ” ds.
M.V. Moneka for Dominica.
8.8. Scholar for Trinidad,
MLV. Malvin for St. Lucia MAINTENANCE
S il | A very importa
eawe | maintenance.
} Sei tnt Barth
SEAWELL — ON MONDAY | single éylinder, !
ARRIVALS — From Puerto Rico : > simplicity of des
Patrice Saxton, Albert Gregorich, Wil- | @

iams Samuels, Mirian Brathwaite, Ida hauled In a very
Peterkin, Clarence Payne, Edric Austin,
Katheleen Johnson, Perey Decaires,
From Antigua ;

Mr. Justice
Gregorich,
Burns

DEPARTURES ON MONDAY

For Trinidad :

LeRoy Gittens, Lucy Maingot,
Meaden, Leston Nenham,

UXPERTS ARE

ichard Manning, America
lemena Glover Edith



This Tractor

Elaine
Sheila Aird,





Herwald Devenish, Joan Devenish, Fran- “
cis Agostini, Monica Agostini, Harold

Bugh, Alfred Mahabir, Deoraj Samaroo,

Hayes Sampson, Thomas Lee, Edric}
Holder, Ernest Richard, Elizabeth Rich-

ard, Mertha Richard

For Puerta Rico:



Alydria Williams, Horace Clarke,



Muriel Clarke, Cuthbert Crichlow, Day
rell Johnson, Arthur Me Connel, William
Knowles Elvira Grimes, Margery
Omorundro, William Symington, Grah-
mie Bingham, Seon Bishop, Hermage |
Smith

For Antigua

>. Henr A. Dyett, L. Stanford War

ren, E. Govie
ARRIVALS YESTERDAY
from Trinidad :

590905098





I. Beale, M. Beale, J. Beale, R. Beale
D. Curtir G. Kerr, D. Hanschell, D
Aanschell Jr., D. Hanschell, L. Mayers,!
“fi. Mayers, G. Mayers, J.’ Mayers, A.|
fronside, D. Ramcheran, N. Furgus, J
Rostant, F. Pilgrim Pilgrim, B. Esca-|
tante, O. Antoni, ©. Spurrier, A. Mellor, |
A. Mellor

DEPARTURES YESTERDAY
for Trinidad
Margaret Onhfi



eid a



SDVPHO-DDOOO

’ COCSSCCOEOOOOVU TOS OOOU



Guiana market. This week local
producers made an effort to remedy
wholesale

a 30-pound tin to $12.64,

FIELD MARSHALL



IESEL

The Field-Marshall is a very simple machine

little to go wrong. The characteristic of the
Field-Marshall is exceptionally long service

flywheel, is capable of hauling heavy loads

The Field-Marslvall with its

a slight knowledge of its construction.

throughout the World, under conditions where drawbar horse-power
and economy really count.
maintainance.

We would be very pleased to demonstrate this Tractor
for you, without obligation, —we know you will be
pleased with the results.

The CITY GARAGE TRADING CO., LTD.

PAGE THREE



aS aim. |
Challenge On |

Diamonds |

LONDON’S

liamonds 1



hear-monopoly of
being challenged by

92-year-old Harry Winston - of
New York, His private collec-
tion is said to rank next biggest
to that of the Royal Family
Today Mr. Winston announced

he is

negotiating with the Portu

guese Government to buy the)
output of the diamond mines in}
Angola Portuguese West Africa, |
which produce about eight per

cent, of the world’s supply. |
In Omaha they have perfected |
in amplifier whereby a doctor |
im transmit the heart sounds |
ver the telephone to a specialist |
ind discuss the case with him at
the same time .
Cinema receipts last year were
lown 69,000,000 dollars (more
than £23,000,000) compared with
1950

JAPAN MAY BUY
CANADIAN LUMBER

VANCOUVER, B.C
Effinger, secretary of
Seaboard Lumber Sales Co



_ Ss
Says 3 Mr. “Leo King:
“you CAN RE-LION If

Claude BEING THE SWEETEST TREAT !”

she

} Lt returned from a search fo Wate

|/Far East markets with word tha

|

Japan may soon return as an in eo

zane unt buyer of Canadian lum-

| ber . :
Eftinger Ss repart Was receivea

t a time when coastal lumbe T

joperators refused to grant 32,000 ;

loggers and allied workers pa MADE IN Wy K

lincreases because of worsenin The Perfection of Confection,

jlumber markets The workers,

jmembers of the CIO-CCL Inter

(national Woodworkers of Americ:
jreturned to work with the raise

July lsd i strike that lasted JUST RECKIV ED
Six WeeKs
Effinger predicted Japan would
start purchasing “significant SIMMONS BEDSTEADS
}amounts of B.C. lumber once she

gets enough dollars.” He said this
|may take “another year or two.”

He said Japan's dollar reserves
j}would have to be built up suffi- |
jciently to ease current strain on
that country’s economy. He also
warned that British Columbia}
would have tq compete with lum- |
ber producers in the Philippines, |
1} Borneo and possibly China and}
Soviet Russia

4 Feet

} inches

ONLY A LIMITED QUANTITY 80 CALL
AND GET YOURS EARLY
Incorporated

T. HERBERT LTD.

10 & 11 Roebuck Street

bh Established

1860 1926



9209928 PDDHIOSS + DOHHH HDHD ILO DDODODODDOPDO OOD HPD FIG PDDODDODDOP DOOD DODGY,

TRACT

SPECIFICATIONS

Single Cylinder, 64” bore. 9” stroke—Valve-
less—C. A, V. Injection—Cone Cluteh—High
and Low six speed Gear Box—Front Wheels
7.50 x 18 Rear Wheels 14.00 x 30—750 R.P.M.
giving 40 B.H.P.—WEIGHT 7,640 Ibs.

ECONOMY

Our available figures show the Feld-Marshall
to be the MOST- ECONOMICAL Tractor of
its size in Barbados. One gallon of Dieseline
will give three (3) operational hours.

GENERAL

The Field-Marshall has given satisfactory
service throughout the World for many
years, and is used exclusively by many sugar
plantations in the West Indies: —Used exclu-
sively at Brechin Castle in Trinidad, there
they haul three trailers, a total of 15 tons.
Further, these Tractors operate for 120
hours per week during crop. This speaks for
itself.

erate and because it has a
+r of working parts there is

king conditions.

all, on account of the large

ine speeds. Increased draw-
tained hy decreased engine

nt factor indeed is proper

vas fewer working parts and
ign, can be thoroughly over-
short time by anyone having
NO
NECESSARY.

has been designed to satisfy the needs of heavy haulage

Its simplicity and ruggedness means low



$
SOLE DISTRIBUTORS: |

2404S 04 1040 0-994409OG4000 9004-000 009409000040 OS GOGO 9999999099 005404









PAGE FOUR

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

anyocate | Whe Federal Scheme For |

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 13, 1952









CANASTA PLAYING CARDS
(Complete with Instructions)
$2.28 per Set

Sam ifm Oe Sees et
— LS ee le J

i
=e or —



Printed by the Advocate Ce., Ltd., Brew #. Bridsetewn

ee

Leading Article reprinted from the Jamaica Daily Gleaner.

PATIENCE PLAYING CARDS





Wednesday, August 13, 1952

Barbadian Edueation

_ITIS A PITY that the Director of Educa-
tion should recommend those interested in
Education to study the Butler Education
Act of 1944 as a source of enlightenment

and in order to understand local educational
methods.



An Education system devised for a pre-
dominantly industrialised country such as
the United Kingdom can interest but ought
not to inspire educational authorities in a
dependent agricultural colony.

What Barbados and indeed all the British
Caribbean territories need is an educational
system designed to meet the requirements
of agricultural communities which rely
on a few major crops and a relatively
small number of secondary industries to
pay for their imports.

* In Sir George Seel’s Report on Develop-
ment and Welfare in the West Indies which
the Director of Education will certainly
have read the requirements of education in
the British West Indies are lucidly stated.

“It would be impossible” writes the Edu-
eation Adviser to the Comptroller for
Development and Welfare “to over-em-
phasize the need for a complete revision.
of the syllabus and of the methods of teach-
ing in the rural schools.” Since almost
four-fifths of the population of the British
West Indies is rural, this is tantamount to
saying that the greater part of the educa-
tional structure of the area needs overhaul.

Education is not just something defined
by an English Act in 1944. It is not a ques-
tion of primary or secondary, or technical
or modern. It is primarily a question of
training and equipping boys and girls to
become good citizens of the communities
in which they must live. If the products
of Barbados’ schools were going to be ab-
sorbed into the mainstream of English
economic life when they left school, there
might be some, cause for rejoicing in the
fact that the local educational system will
compare very favourably with any system
used by any Local Education authority in
England.

But since the majority of Barbadian
schoolboys and schoolgirls must look to
Barbados for a livelihood the question of
the type of education they receive is highly
relevant.

And according to Sir George Seel’s Edu-
cation Adviser West Indian schoolboys and
schoolgirls are not for the most part re-
ceiving the type of education which is best
suited to their needs.

It is quite unrealistic to talk in Barbados
about a new conception of education in
which a child must show capacity for the
education best suited to its needs. The
fact is that the level of West Indian
economic development does not permit
gaything like the same outlet for natural
alents aS do large cOuntries. Until the
West Indies can compare economically
with the United Kingdom it is absurd to
expect that a novel English educational
system is the best model to be followed by
the West Indies. ‘

Far too long have educational authorities
in the West Indies failed to tackle the heart,
of their educational problem.

“The basic problems of the rural popula-
tion’, writes Sir George Seei’s Education
Adviser, “stem from a generally deficient
agricultural production. This resplts in a
low standard of living. It is necessary
therefore to develop a school curriculum
centred round the’ teaching of improved
agricultural practises, home improvement,
techniques and the inculcation of healthy
living habits, Prominence should ac-
cordingly be given to subjects correlated
to the three major fields of agriculture,
health and homelife education.”

The Director of Education obviously has
not given prominence to these subjects in
his recent defence of the educational
system of Barbados. He talks of “highly
complex” secondary education and of “one
unified system” of education. But upo1
the major problem of rural education he
says nothing at

ler for Development and Welfare considers
that it will be necessary to give a functional
and practical orientation to the curriculum
in ruratschools, and that teaching must be
rooted in reality, the average citizen in a
rural community such as ours wants to
know what action is being taken locally
to implement the suggestion. The news
that two modern schools are to be started
_in September does not appear to have any
relevance to the major problem of the rural
schools, although any change towards a
more technical or vocational system of
education will be generally welcomed.
The Director of Education in the article
which was published in last Saturday’s
Advocate ridicules the contention that
there is anything obvious about education.
He is entitled to his opinion. Many people
are quite clear in their minds as to the
meaning of education. But
divergent opinions may be held by in-
dividuals as to the meaning or purpose 0
education it*is obvious that in an agricul-
tural community such as Barbados educa-
tion ought to be rooted in the soil.

whatever

It is also obvious that because of the lack
of a rural education giving prominence to
agriculture, health and home-life education
the speed of Barbadian progress towards
better living conditions and a life in which
higher forms of education have greater
opportunity of development has been re-
duced.

The high academic reputation which Bar-
bados has gained in the larger world of edu-
cation has been bought dearly. While the
names of Barbados’ scholars have been re-
corded for future generations to see, the
mainspring of Barbadian economy, the
asricultural. workers have been left with
the pickings of an educational system ob
viously unsuited to their needs.

all despite the very

challenging statements which have been

made on the subject in Sir George Seel’s
report.

If the Education Adviser to the Comptrol-

Cuba than it ‘must, Although
f {| sugar is still rationed in Britain,
the U.K. Government is valiantly
resisting Cuban attempts to sell

Central Africa

An Experiment In Safeguarding Interests
Of Native Races

By

HE draft scheme for Central
African Feaeration set out

in the White Paper pubushea
June 18 is the work of a Confer-
ence which met at Lancaster
House at the end ot April and
ine beginning of May. it was 2
conference of responsible repre-
sentatives of the four Goverbmen!s
concerned, those of the United
Kingdom, Southern Rhodesia.
Northern Rhodesia’ and Nyasaland.

African representatives had been
invited to attend and had peen
assured that by attending they
would not commit themselves in
any way to approval of tedera-
tion. In the end, however two
Africans from Southern Khodésia
ulone attended the conference, the
Africans from Northern Rhodesia
and Nyasaland refusing Mr. Lyttei-
ton’s offer even to attend as oo-
servers.

It is evident from the White
Paper that Mr, J. N. N. Nkomo
and Mr. J. Z. Savanhu, the two
Afrftans from Southern Rhodesia,
took an active part in the pro-
ceedings of the conference,

A Further Conference

T is to be noted that the fed-

eral scheme outlined in the
White Paper is presented for dis-
cussion and consideration at this
stage and not for acceptance or
rejection. A further conference is
projected for the latter part of the
year,

Meanwhile not only is the
scheme open to discussion but two
important aspects of it are to be
he subject of investigation and
-eport by special commissions—

uscal commission to consider the
inancial implications and prere-
juisites of federalism in Central

-asider the arrangements for fea-
sral courts and tnéir relation tu
erritoria: or provincial courts.

it will be in the light of these
aicussions and investigations, as
ioubt that the conference at the
end of the year will put the pro-
posals into the final torm in whico
ney will be submitted to the Par-
naments and peoples of the coun-
tries concerned,

Unanimous Proposals
a SECOND feature of the

White Paper ‘is that the pro-
posals it embodies are presented
unanimously by the conference.
This is a remarkable thing, for it
is no secret that there were differ-
ences of opinion between the Gov-
ernments on many important
matters.

.The unanimity now reached is
partiy the result of the very care-
ful and full exploration of the
subject which was carried out by
the earlier ¢onference of officials
neld in March, 1951, at the Com-
monwealth Relations Office and
also of the excellent preparatory
work whictt®preceded this year’s
conference at Lancaster Hous2.
Inevitably, however, unanimity
ass been the product also of com-
vomise,

The acceptance of federation in
he draft scheme means the re-
ection of other forms of closer
issociation, notably amalgamation
or the establishment of a unitary
state on the model of the Union
of South Africa) and confedera-
‘ion, on the model, say, of the Bast
Africa High Commission,

A section of opinion in Southern
Rhodesia favoured amalganmation.
federation has been chosen as a
sompromise--it is by dts nature
ind in its history the great com-
sxromise among forms of govern-
ment,

* Its value for the Central African
erritories, in the White Paper
scheme, is that it makes union
oossible in certain matters of com-
non concern like external affairs,
4efence, postal and transport ser-
vices and the like, while it pre-
erves to the individual Govern-

Gladstone Professor of Govern-
ment and Public Administration
at Oxford and Fellow of All
Souls,



ments their continued independ-
ence and individuality in regard
to the control of those matters
which closely-affect the life of the
African such as his education, his
agriculture, and the African po-
lice.

Needless to say, the drawing of
the line which divides federal
matters from territorial matters
has been very difficult, and the
presence of a considerable list of
“concurrent” subjects upon which
both federal and territorial legis-
latures may make laws—a feature
considered by many authorities on
federal Governments to be unde-
sirable—is evidenc® perhaps of the
difficulties the conference en-
countered when it tried to make
its division of powers. It may be
expected that the division will be
scrutinised very closely.

The New Legislature

OT less important than the

allocation of powers between
federal and territorial legislatures
is the composition of the proposed
new federal legislature itself.



POCKET CARTOON |
by OSBERT LANCASTER





‘ Let us eat, drink and be
merry, Sir Algernon, for its
here today and gone for
export tomorrow.”




In looking at the proposals on
this subject each reader will have
his own particular piece of arith-
metic to do, Those who are con-
cerned with the ratio of Euro-
peans tu Africans will observe
that in a total Federal Assembly
of 35 members, at least six will
be Africans (that is, two fromm
each territory) though there will
be nine members in all represent-
ing African interests. ‘

Those concerned with the ratio
between elected and appointed
members will see that 33 out of
the 35 are to be elected, the re-
maining two being members ap-
pointed to represent African in-
terests, one from Northern Rhode-
sia and one from Nyasaland, the
respective Governors.

Finaliy there is the ratio between
the representation of the three
territories — always a matter of
concern in a federal scheme. Of
the total membership of the As-
sembly, Northern Rhodesia and
Nyasaland between them have 15
members, thus giving them a
majority of one* Over Southern
Rhodesia.

African Affairs Board
HILE the allocation of pow-
ers between federal and

territorial legislatures and the
careful balancing of interests in
the federal legislature might go a
Jong way to ensuring that African
interests would be rightly safe-
guarded under a federal system,
the conference clearly thought that
this wag not enough.

Consequently a system of safe-
guards has been devised by which
any leyislation, statutory or dele-

vccscnaanpaesealinanapastinietesneraaia asa

Professor KENNETH WHEARE

gated, which appears to differ-
entiate either in terms Or if
operation between Europeans aad
Africans to the disadvantage of
the Africans will require to be
referred to her Majesty’s Govern-
ment,

The duty of keeping a watcn
over legislation arid of taking the
initiative in securing that dif-
ferentiating laws are referred to
voneon is placed upon a specially
constituted African Affairs Board,
to be composed of a chairman
and of a European and an Africao
from each of the three territories,
appointed by the Governor of
each of those territories.

It would seem that the con-
ference places great reliance upon
the efficacy of this Board, which is
entitled to make representations io
the federal Government on any
matters affecting African interests.

Much of its effectiveness wil!
depend upon the extent to which
it can work informally or by co-
operation with the federal Gov-
ernment and thus avoid head-on
collisions. It is a new experiment
in the technique of arbitration
from Whitehall—a process always
of great delicacy but of the firsi
importance and interest so far as
public opinion in this country is
concerned.

Two Useful Devices

OR the student of constitutions
the scheme of the White
Paper offers many interesting
features. Two only may be men-
tioned briefly here. First, it pro-
vides for the delegation of legis-
lative powers by the federal to
the territorial iegislatures and,
within certain limits, by the terri-
torial legislatures to the federal
legis.ature—a device which shouid
prove useful in mitigating the
rigidity inherent in a division of

powers in a federal system.

Next to rigidity, a federal sys-
tem is condemned usually for re-
quiring excessive litigation and
the draft scheme proposes a way
out of this difficulty by suggesting
that if a federal law has been
approved by all three of the ter-
ritorial legislatures within a
specified period, its validity may
not be questioned in the eouris,

The outcome of the whoie
scheme is that a common Govern-
ment Is proposed for the Rhodesias
and Nyasaland for certain agreed
matters, while the three separate
governments are to continue as in-
dependent and co-ordinate au-
thorities in the matters that are
left. These three territorial Gov-
ernments would continue after
federation under their own Gov-
ernors who would not be sub-
ordinate to the Governor-General
of the federation. ‘

Britain’s Responsibility
HE three territorial Govern-
ments would retain their
existing constitutional relationshiy
of the Government of the United
Kingdom, the Governor of the
territory of Southern Rhodesia be-
Ing akin to a constitutional mon-
arch and communicating with the
Secretary for Commonwealth Re-
lations, while the Governors of
Northern Rhodesia and Nyasaland
would continue to communicate
with the Secretary for the Colo-
nies.

The constitutional development
and political advancement of
Northern Rhodesia and Nyasaland
as territories in the federation
would remain the responsibility
of the Colonial Office, and the
direction in which they shall go
and the pace at which they shail
travel would be decided in the
last resort with the authority of
the Parliament at Westminster.
This is one important result whica
flows from the choice of the fed-
eral form of union as opposed to
amalgamation.

Britain Puts Empire Sugar

LONDON.

Just a year ago, on 10th August,
1951, Britain signed its sugar-and-
cigars agreement with Cuba,

Hotly attacked in_ the British
West Indies as the “Black Pact,”
it guaranteed a British market
for 500,000 tons of Cuban sugar
a year for three years and re-
opened the British market to
Cuban cigars.
West Indians feared it would
be prejudicial to their own sugar
and cigar interests, British Gov-
ernment spokesmen insisted that
i; would not and claimed that cuts
ir, import duties which Cuba
would grant in return would en-
able Britain to expand its exports
to this important dollar market.

This last hope, at least, has not
been justified. At present, Britain
is importing from Cuba at the
rate of some £48,500,000 a year
ind is exporting only £7,500,000
worth of goods to Cuba,

But this has made the British
Government all the more deter-
mined not to buy any more from



more sugar to Britain and has
emphasised that it will still buy
every pound of exportable sugar
(he Colonial Empire can produce.

“We are determined not to take
any steps to prejudice the inter-
ests of the British Commonwealth
says Mr. H. R.
Over-

sugar producers,”
Mackeson,
seas Trade,
A year ago, nobody could fore-
see, not even the Cubans them-

Secretary for



by BRUTE HEWES

tive-sounding offer as this be-
cause it was already buying more
sugar than it could afford under
the agreement to which it had
committed itself in August. 1951.

Anglo-Cuban trade is now in
sucha poor state that unless Cu-
ba can be persuaded to buy more
British goods, it will be difficult
for Britain to maintain its pur-
chases of Cuban sugar at the
present level, Yet the U.K. Gov-
ernment is’ still under strong
pressure from the people to de-
ration sugar, Seven years after
the war, not more than half-a-
dozen countries in the world still
maintain sugar rationing—and
Britain ig one of them.

The plain truth is that Britain
is putting the Empire sugar pro-
ducers first. The U.K. Govern-
ment knows very well that it
could easily enough acquire plen-
ty of sugar from this y@ar’s world
glut and take sugar off the ration.
But it prefers to keep its con-
sumption more closely related to
Erfpire production.

There will be no further agree-
ment With Cuba which will in-
terfere with existing arrangements
for the purchase of sugar from
the West Indies. The U.K, Gov-
ernment is adhering to the policy
laid down in the Commonwealth
Sugar Agreement to expand Em-
pire production to the highest
practical iimit—and Britain's
consumption will expand with it.

Post-war sugar production has
expanded much less quickly in the
Empire than in other,parts of the

selves, that Cuba would produce world. Supplies on the world
a record crop of some 8.000,000 market are now abundant and
tons of sugar this year and would more than ten years of short-
bave a huge unsaleable surplus. age are over. Cuba in particular
Nobody could see that as a result producing 20 per cent. of the
of this Cuba would be offering total world sugar crop, is strug-
sugar to Britain at prices report- gling with unmanageable sur-
ed to be as low as £18. 13s. 4d pluses. :
a ton—about half the price Brit- So while Empire producers are
rs for sugar from the Brit- still striving to expand their sug-
Ls indie ; ar crops to meet all Britain’s
I Nobody could foresee that Brit- needs, Cuba taking steps to
ain would reject such an -attrac- cohtrol the size of its future crops

Men First

Deficit in “Hlack Pact” Trade

so that its sugar will not become
a drug on the market.

Next year’s Cuban crop will be
controlled at 5,000,000 tons, a cut
of 3,000,000 tons from this year’s
huge crop, and 1,750,000 tons of
this year’s surplus is to be set
aside to be disposed of gradually
over the next five years, -to-aveid
dumping and a consequent slump
in world prices.

Cuban farmers and labourers
have enjoyed for the last ten
years.a prosperity unequalled in
the island’s history. They have
been fortunate in that they have
had a guaranteed market in the
United States for a huge quantity
of their export sugar. In addition
they have had eager buyers in
other countries ever since the
war for any exportable surplus
available,

But the economy of the entire
island was threatened when it
became apparent that there
would not.be enough buyers for
this year’s. crop. Emergency
measures taken by the Cuban
Governmenj to meet the situation
included the establishment of a
“single seller” system, by which
all sugar exported from Cuba is
sold by one organisation at a uni-
form price.

That this system will succeed
in checking any big decline in the

price of Cubaft sugar is by no
means a foregone conclusion.
Cuban farmers fear that other

producers with big crops will sell
on the world market at just. be-
low the price at which the Cuban
price is stabilised, causing Cuba
to lose some of the world markets
which it has built up over the

past few years,

Britain is one of these markets
and Cuba has played, and will
continue to play, an important
part in supplying Britain’s sugar
needs Yet although Cuba is
Britain’s biggest single source
of sugar, Britain will buy Cuban
sugar only to supplement supplies
from Empire sources — and only
aftes it has bought every ounce
of Emr; that is available

—B.U.P.

| THE Barbados Advocate has been discussing
| where the capital of the proposed Federal
| British Caribbean should be_ established.
Quite naturally, with the special pride of the
| Barbadian—one of the real solid contribu-
| tions of that historic little island to West
Indian pride—the Advocate plumps for
|Bridgetown, quaint and delightful city in
picturesque Barbados. No doubt the Trinidad
Guardian will be equally vigorous in sup-
porting the present recommendation of Port-
of-Spain, the most cosmopolitan city of the
British Caribbean. And if the Clarion of
British Honduras had enough courage to
face the irridentists who are trying to sell
the British Honduras heritage to Guatemala
or to the Stars and Stripes, it would demand
a reconstructed Belize to be the mainland
capital of the pearls of the Antilles. The

THE CAPITAL



Bulletin of St. Kitts has not yet declared for |

Basseterre nor the West Indian of Grenada
for beautiful Napleslike St. George’s, and
the Magnet of Antigua has not realised the
a of St. John’s as the federal capi-
tal.

For our part the Gleaner does not claim
that Kingston should be the federal capital.
Kingston is a great city in its own right, and
will remain under all predictable circum-
stances the major British city in the middle
Atlantic latitudes.

But in our view, one of the first essentials
of the federal capital—if such a broad deci-
sion should ever be made—is that in regard
to travel by air or sea it should be central
and convenient. If that is put to the test, we
can see no better choice than ancient St.
John’s, Antigua, and our second choice would
be Basseterre, St. Kitts. Antigua has the ad-
vantage of one of the finest airports in this
part of the world whereas’ St. Kitts’ airport
is not up to international. standards. But
whereas Antigua is low-lying, dry and un-
typicaLof the fertile picturesque islands of
the Caribbean, St. Kitts is famous for Brim-
stone Hill on which is a remarkable old fort;
its “wide plantations of bright green cane
stretching from the shore up the slopes of
the central mountains give the island a most
pleasant appearance .” Antigua of course, is
rich in historical associations. Nelson made
frequent use of the naval dockyard at
English Harbour; “and Clarence House, the
nearby fine old house*built for the Duke of
Clarence who became William Fourth, is
still habitable”.

Both islands offer amenities for relaxation
with lovely beaches, with fishing and gener-
ally with a pleasant trade wind climate.
They are both really in the middle of the
string of islands, so that while British Hon-
duras would still be far off, both Jamaica
and British Guiana would be approximately
the same distance away, and they are both
accessible from the international airlines
which ply through Kingston, Haiti, Santo
Domingo and Puerto Rico.



tal are quite different from those upon which
decision was taken to cite the University
College in Jamaica concerning which the
Advocate makes a point. A federal Govern-
ernment does not require a large and com-

| legislative machinery should function. In-
deed it is a disadvantage for federal politi-
cians to have to operate in political areas
with large and vocal populations. There is
far more likelihood of a truly federal outlook
| being achieved in a new city built up in the
smaller communities than if all our politi-
cians had to cope with the crowds and pres-
sure of Kingston or Port-of-Spain,

in regard to the University it was essential
that it should have its being in a community
large and diversified. The medical faculty
for instance, could hardly have a real exist-
ence in any of the smaller communities. And
in any event the travel costs of the Univer-
sity College are shared by all the territories
so that Jamaica’ does not in fact enjoy any
sreat advantage to its undergraduates in this
respect, except the enjoyment of cheaper
vacations at home.

At any rate it is interesting to see that
Barbados is thinking of itself as a part of
the future federation. Perhaps if an itiner-
ant capital could be arranged so that each
territory would in turn share the benefits of
being the federal centre—as judges move on
assizes—more of the territories would be-
come keen on this idea of federation which
is at present struggling to find some measure
of agreement.

How To Rake In £9,000 On
One Easy Lesson

From R. M. MacCOLL

: WASHINGTON

THE radio quiz programme with its many
glittering rewards and the prize essay con-
test as part of advertising campaigns have
long been a feature of American life.

But it is a considerable surprise to find that
there are earnest citizens who spend most of
their spare time tackling such matters
methodically,

_ What is more, they have formed an organ-
isation called the National Contestors Associa-
tion, with more than 1,000 members scattered
through 52 local clubs, and it is now holding
its annual meeting in Hollywood.

QUEEN of the revels by common consent
is Mrs. Nita Parks, of Pasadena. For she re-
cently won the £9,000 first prize for the
“most appreciative short essay” on a new
cleanser put out by a giant soap company.

It also comes as. sO} ing of a shock to
the amateurs to discover that such wins are
usually not the result of luck but sheer slog-
ging hard wrok.

Thus, when Mrs. Parks struck gold, she had
just completed one specialised correspondence
course (price £14) and was about to embark
on a second. ,

THESE courses provide competitors with
long lists of “suitable” words to use in their
essays. For describing soap the lists put up
such words as fragrant, fresh, sensitive, cool
and “piny.” 4

“Do’s” and “don’ts” are suggested — “Do
|; study the sponsor’s advertising and try to
juse similar phrasing.” “Don’t mention any-
| thing unfavourable about the product.”

THE musical “Top Banana” is withdrawn
from heat-struck Broadway. And that leaves









i just ten theatres still open—three “straight”

i seven musicals,





The arguments in regard to a federal capi-|

plicated society in which its political and |















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WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 13

, 1952



CLERK CHARGED WIT

Six Witnesses Give
Evidenee For Crown

THE TRIAL of Ralph Linton of Ebenezer, St. Philip,
who is charged on four counts of falsification of accounts

began before His Lordship

The Chief Justice, Sir Allan

Collymore, at the Court of Grand Sessions yesterday.
Six witnesses gave evidence for the Prosecution and

another, Sgt. K. Parris, was offered for cross examination.

No defence witnesses were called but Linton elected to

give evidence on his behalf

When the case resumes to-day, Mr. R. Bruce Skeete,
Manager and Attorney of Edgecumbe Ltd., where Linton
was employed as a cane weigher, will be recalled to pro-

duce 11 accounts books.

Linton is charged with (1) On
March 27, 1951, being a clerk or
servant of Edgecumbe Ltd., with
intent to defraud, made or. concur-
red in makirig a false entry in a
cane ticket book belonging to
Edgecumbe Ltd., as his employer,
purporting to show that on the
seme day 9,675 pounds of sugar
cane, valued $43.20, were received
from Alma Murrell,

(2) On March 28, 1951, being a
clerk or servant of Edgecumbe
Ltd., with intent to defraud, made
or concurred in making a false
entry in a cane ticket book belong-
ing to Edgecumbe Ltd., as employ-
er, purporting to show that on the
same day 9, 270 pounds of sugar
cane valued $43.40, were received
from Alma Murrell.

(3) On March 30, 1951, being
a clerk or servant of Edgecumbe
Ltd., with intent to defraud; made
or concurred in making a_ false
entry in a cane ticket book belong-
ing to Edgecumbe Ltd.; as employ-
er, purporting to show that on the
same day 10,310 pounds of sugar
cane, valued $46.03, were received
from Alma Murrell.

(4) On March 31, 1951, being a
clerk or servant of Edgecumbe
Ltd., with intent to defraud, made
or concurred in making a false
entry in a cane ticket book belong-
ing to Edgecumbe Ltd., as employ-
er, purporting to show that on the
same day 9,915 pounds of sugar
cane, valued $44.27, were received
from Sarah Holder,

Mr. W. W, Reece, Q.C., Solicitor
General, is pros*cuting on behalf
of the Crown. Linton is represent-
ed by Mr. D. H. L. Ward.

Before calling witnesses, Mr,
Reece outlined the case to the Jury.
He said that they had heard the
defendant being charged with four
counts on the indictment. Each
count was a separate offence. In
each he was charged with falsi-
fication of accounts but the falsi-
fication alleged was on different
dates. All the counts were similarly
worded except for the fourth.

First witness for the Prosecu-
tion was Mr. R. Bruce _Skeete,
Manager and Attorney of Edge-
cumbe Ltd. on

R Iph Linton, he said, was
employed at Edgecumbe since
1946. Linton was then Yard Over.
seer and would assist with the cane
weighing. Two years ago Linton
was appointed cane weigher,

Responsible for Weighing

He was responsible for receiving
canes, both from plantations and
peasants. He was on the perma-~
rent staff and received a monthly
salary.

He was also responsible for
arranging the delivery of the
peasants’ canes and he would also
arrange what days these peasants
shouia send in their canes.

If the peasant was a stranger
he would seek some higher au-
thority who would decide if this
peasant’s canes should be taken
or not,

After receiving the canes Linton
would enter in the cane ticket
book the name of the person who
brought in the canes, gross
weight, net weight of the vehicle,
registration of the vehicle and the
district from whence the canes
were brought. This entry is made
in duplicate.

He would take out the original
and give it to the driver of the
vehicle. On presentation of this
ticket the canes were paid for.

Payments were made on ac-
count, depending on the amount
of canes,

Mr. Skeete was then shown Ex-
hibits A and B. Exhibit A was
a ticket—the original. It read:
Owner: Alma Murrell and con-
tained other details.

He said that that ticket was
the original which was handed
back to the driver. He then pro-
duced the carbon copy of the
same ticket which was in the
ticket book—Exhibit B. This was
in Linton’s handwriting,

He next produced a cheque for
$92.40 to be paid to Alma Mur-
rell. It was made out by Mr.
Maynard and signed by him. The
cheque was honoured at the bank.
It was later refurned to him.

Before he made out the cheque

oe ticket was presented to him.
e

could not remember who
brought the ticket. Any person
can present 4 ticket but the

chenue is made out in the name

of the person whose name is on
the ticket.

He takes a receipt from the
person to whom he gives the
cheque. This receipt is also made
out in duplicate. That receipt book
was one. of the items stolen on
November 16, 1951.

Books Missing

On November 16, Mr. Maynard
reported to him that several
books were missing. He reported
the incident to the Police. Money
was also missing.

Mr, Skeete said that he did not
know Alma Murrell and apart
from the knowledge he got from

the books, he did not know
whether she sent canes to the
factory.

He said that some of the money,
which should have been paid out
after the 1951 crop, had not been
accounted for up to the present
date.

Mr. Skeete then produced the
other tickets and the carbon copies
in the ticket book and said that
they were in Linton’s handwrit-
ing. He also produced the ticket
made_out. to Sarah. Holder. This
was also in Linton’s handwriting.

At the time when the books and
money were stolen Linton was
still employed at the Factory. The
books and money were kept in
the factory office. The drawer in
which the money was kept was
forced open, Linton, during this
period, assisted as Yard Overseer
and helped in the Factory.

To Mr. Ward: The books
stolen were: Five factory books—
showing payments to employees,
two pay lists for employees; a
Journal; two tradesmen books;
one Factory Day Book; all books
concerning purchase and pay-
ments for peasants canes; small
holders book; purchase payings
books; the receipts. One book was
found by the Police. The originai
cane tickéts were not stolen, They
were in my office at my house.
The carbons of the tickets were
locked in a press in the planta-
tions office. There were no signs
of breaking the windows or doors
o* the factory, Out of crop season,
the keys to the factory are kept
by the senior overseer on duty, He
keeps these keys in his room.

I could not say if the factory
was properly locked on the eve-
ning before the loss of the books.
These canes may have been de-
livered. Alma Murrell’s amount
represent about 13.26 tons of canes.
This répresents about one and a
half toms o! sugar. If the canes
were not ground it would be
eflected in the juice. I did not
get my chemist to check the juice.
it was rumoured that during that
crop people were stealing other
people’s canes. It was also alleged
that they were sending in canes
in other peoples’ names. I warned
Linton about this. I told him not
to receive can®s from people unless
he knew them,

Re-examined: During March
we were receiving about 16,000
tons of canes per week. It is easy
for anyone to enter the factory
by coming through the window.

Alma Murrell of Church Vil-
lage, St. Philip, said that she
owned land. She had canes
growing on the land,

Sent Canes to Guinea

She sent her canes to Guinea
Factory and received $250. She
never sent any canes to Edge-
cumbe Factory. She knew Keith
Bishop, a lorry driver, but he did
not work for her in 1951. Bishop
has never worked for her.

To Mr. Ward: Neither Keith
Bishop nor Everton Norris has
ever drawn canes for me, I know
Norris.

Sarah Holder of Church Village,
St. Philip, the next witness for
the Prosecution, said that she
owned 1 acre, 9 perches of land
at Church Village. This land was
planted in eanes last year. She
sent her crop to Guinea Factory
‘in her husband's name. The canes
were taken by a truck from
Guinea Factory, There are plenty
Holders in her village but she is
the only one with the name,
“Sarah.” In March, 1951, she did
not receive any money from
Edgecumbe. ‘She did not know if
anyone used her rame, She did

not give anyone permission to do
so.

She said that her husband has
land at Vineyard and he sent his

ing the

canes to Three Houses Factory.
His name is Fitz Gerald Holder.

To Mr. Ward : In 1950 my canes
went to Edgecumbe. Everton
Norris drew them.

Keith Bishop of Brereton’s Vil-
lage, St. Philip, said that he was
the driver of his father’s truck.
He knew Alma Murrell but dur-
ing the 1951 crop he did not draw
any canes for her’ He took canes
to Edgecumbe: Factory for Mrs.
Hooper from Brereton’s Village,
Forde from: Church Village,
Vaughan, Parris, Sobers, Daniel
and Gooding. He never drew any
canes using the name of Alma
Murrell. He said that when he
took canes to the factory, the
persons for whom he is drawing
the canes, would give him their
names and he would give the
names to the Cane Weigher.

The factories to which he took
canes are Edgecumbe, Harrow,
Carrington and Four Square.

To Mr, Ward: I have never
taken in canes to the factory
other than in the names given by
the owners. In 1950 I did not take
in my father’s canes in Mr. Edey’s
name, As far as I can remember
I never took my tather’s canes in
Mr. Edey’s name. In 1951 some
of my father’s canes went to
Edgecumbe and some went to
Four Square. I took some to
Edgecumbe. Those which I drew
I delivered in his mame. My
father and Linton are not very
friendly. I heard it was some-
thing to do about land.

Owner of Lorry

Everton Norris of Church Vil-
lage, said that he was the owner
of a lorry which he drove. Dur-
ing the 1951 crop he carried
canes to Edgecumbe and other
factories, He took canes to Edge-
cumbe for Courtenay Watts and
Henry Haynes. He knew Alma
Murrell but has never taken canes
to any factory for her.

He also knew Sarah Holder.
In 1950 he drew canes for her
but not in 1951. He took her
eanes to Edgecumbe in 1950. He
had the 1951 job but could not
fulfil it.

To Mr. Ward: I have never
taken canes for people who I do
not know. This year I only car-
ried canes to Edgecumbe for one
person. That was Courtenay
Watts.

Lionel Harewood, a painter of
Ebenezer, St. Philip, said that he
knew Linton. One morning dur-
1951 crop he was at
Edgecumbe Factory. Linton called
him and asked him to draw some
money, for him. Linton handed
him a ticket. He tock the ticket
to Mr. Maynard who paid him the
money. He signed “Lionel Hare-
wood”—his name— and took the
money back to Linton, He then
left for his home.

Did Not Read Ticket

He said that he did not read
the ticket and did not know in
whose name it was made out. He
could not remember if the amount
was paid to him in cash or by
cheque. He had also drawn money
f y Mr. Garnett, a shopkeeper, At
this stage the luncheon period was
taken,

On the. resumption the Prose-
cution offered Sgt. K. Parris for
cross-examination.

To Mr. Ward: I made an @xam-
ination of the building at Edge-
cumbe Factory. I found no evi-
dence of it being broken. If that
building was properly closed no
one could get into it. All the
articles alleged to be stolen were
taken from the factory office.

No witnesses were called for
defence but Linton elected to
give evidence on his behalf.

Ralph Linton said that he re-
sided at Ebenezer, He was em-
ploy d as an overseer and cane-
weigher from October, 1945, to
1951. He was cane weigher from
January, 1947, to 1951.

At the beginning of the crop
the factory manager and himself
were called and given instructions
to accept as many peasants’ canes
as possible so as to boost up the
crop.

When a load of canes came to
the beam, the driver of the ve-
hicle or any of the hands who
worked on the lorry, would state
to whom the canes belonged and
from what district the canes
were brought. .

He would weigh the load and
put the gross weight on the cane
ticket. After the canes were taken
to the hoist he would weigh the
empty lorry and also record this
weight on the cane ticket. On the
eane ticket he would also write
the name of the owner of the
vehicle, the driver, the number of
the vehicle and the date. Before
the load was weighed, he inspect~-
ed it to see if it was clean enougn

» accepted.
te be. Serer during the

On November 15, !
day, he was emp!oyed in the
plantations office and on = occa-

d to go to the factory.
He finished work © at about 4.00
p.m. and ten minutes later he left
the premises for Bridgetown.

There was a regular man who
saw after the locking up of the
factory. If this man left early, he
would ack him to do the locking
up, but on that evening he was
On Page 8.

gions he ha



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BARBADOS ADVOCATE


















































The Legislative Council met at
2 p.m. yesterday, the Hon. J. D.
Chandler presided.

The Clerk informed the Council
that His Excellency the Governor
bad been pleased to grant the
Hon. Mrs. Muriel Hanechell leave
from duties as a member of that
Council from August 11 to Septem-
ber 8

The Hon'ble the Colonia! Secre-
tary presented a message from His
Excellency the Governor notify-
ing his having given assent to
certain Acts in the name and on
behalf of Her Majesty the Queen,

The Hon'ble the Colonial Secre-

tan? presented the following
documents
Report of the Comptroller of

Customs on the Customs Revenue,
Trade, Shipping and Fxcise of the
Island for the year 1951

Quarterly Return of Transac-
tions in rum to 30th June, 1952.

Statement of the sums of money
paid over to the Accountant
General by the Commissicner of
Police during the quarter ‘nded
Zist March, 1952

Hon. Robert Challenor presented
® petition from the several ves-
tries of the island expressing their
strong objection to the Maude
Report and praying the Council
not to pass the Bili implementing
it, if it be passed by The Other
Place

The Council concurred int—

General by the Commissioner of
Folice during the quarter ended
Slst March, 1952

Dr. Cummins gave notice of 4
Pesolution to place the sum of
$6,000 at the disposal of the
Governor-in-Executive Committee
to supplement the Estimates
1952-53, Part I, Current, as shown
in the Supplementary Estimate
No. 15, which forms the Schedule
to_ the Resolution.

Mr. F. C. Goddard tabled a
Petition from the Commissioners
of Highways of the Parish of
St. James to pay thelr Inspector
of Highways a higher salary

Mr. Goddard also gave notice
of a Bill which was later read a
first time to give authority to the
Vestries of St. James, St, John,
end St. Joseph to increase the
salaries of their Road inspectors

The House passed a Resolution
for $2,400 to purchase a stock of
chemical insecticide and minor
equipment to be used for the
contro! of the mea\; bug and ant
pest which may become a serious





In The Legislature Yesterday
COUNCIL

the Regional Economic Committee
for the British West Indies, British
Guiana and British Hondures and

the establishment of a British
Caribbean Trade Commissioner
Service as set out in the Schedule

to the Resolution

Resolution in the sum of $2,400
to finance measures for the control
of the mealy bug and ant pest

The Council referred i
Select Committee a resolution to
ce the sum of £305,700 at the
disposal of the Gove rnor-in-Exect



tive Com*Mitte
Estimates 1962
shown it



t vpplement the
3, Part 1, Cupital

the Suppi mentary













Estimate No. 12, which forius the
Seheaule te the Hesxolutior
The Coun postponed consid.
lion Of & resO.ut On to place the
1 of 95,947 the disposal of
Geverncr-in-Executive Com-
ilttee to Fupplernent the Estim
ates 1952-33, Part I, Current, as
hewn in the Supplementary
Estimate No. 13, which forms the
Schedule to t Resolution
The Council also postponed con
feration of bill intituled ar
Act to amend the Officers of the
Assembly Salaries) Act, 1912,
The Council passed an affirma
tive reply to His Excellency’:
Message No. 16/1952 regarding o
Scheme for the eradication from
Barbados of the Yelow fever

mosquito with the assistance of the

Resolution to approve of the Pan-American Sanitary Bureau
Instrument of Establishment of The Counc.! adjourned sine die.
The House of Assembly met at Sugar cane pest
3 p.m. yesterday Dr. Cummins, Resolution to approve the com
on, behalf of Mr. G. H. Adams, pulsory acquisition of 4,306 sq
laid the following: feet of land for the erection of
Statement of the sums of mone a fish market at the junction of
paid over to the Accountant Queen Street and Sand Street,

Speightstown

Resolution authorising
Government to lease 2 acres, 3
reods, 4 perches of land ft
Bathsheba to be used as a playing
field by the St. Joseph Vestr

A complementary Resolution
authorising the Vestry to lease
the land from the Government

Resolution to approve an
amendment to the Civil Estab-
lishment (Teachers) Order to
change the title SUPERVISOR
OF NUTRITION to Inspector of
Nutrition, to increase the number
ot female headteachers from 65
to 66, and the number of male
teachers from 305 to 306

Resolution to provide additional
staff in the Income Tax Depart-
ment, the Department of Science
and Agriculture and the Attorney
General's Office

Under Private Members’ Busi-
ness, the House passed an Address
to His Excellency the Governo
in connection with the nation
alization of the Barbados Redi!-
fusion Service Limited

the



H FALSIFICATION:

$2,400 VOTED
TO CHECK
MEALY BUG

The Director of Agriculture has
warned the Government that evi-
dence has recently been found of
the existence of an association of
a mealy bug and an ant which, if
not arrested at an early stage,
may well become a serious sugar
cane pest,

Following this warning, Gov-
ernment prepared a _ Resolution
which was agreed to by the House
of Assembly yesterday in which
they voted $2400 to procure a
stock of chemical insecticide and
such minor equipment as may be
necessary for its effective appli-
cation.

The insecticide and equipment
will be used as a trial measure
for the immediate control of the
pest.

Mr. F. L. Walcott who took
charge of the Resolution said the
matter was a simple one, and
explained that the Diractor oF
Agriculture had drawn attention
to a project of an urgent and im-
portant nature which it was not
possible to submit for inclusion
in the 1952—53 Estimates and
which it was necessary to under-
take without delay, He stressed
the danger to the igland's econo-
my if the pest were not immedi-
ately controlled, and moved that
the House pass the Resolution.
Mr. A, E. S. Lewis (L) observed

that in previous instances Gov-
ernment had always found it
necessary to send the Entomolo-

gist of the Department abroad to
Brazil or such other places to get
parasites to kill pests, but very
often the information which they
obtained was of a highly techni-
cal nature,

He congratulated Government
on the action they had taken on
this occasion.

Mr, F, £. Miller (L) emphasise
the importance of the sugar in-
dustry to the economy of thc
island, and expressed the view
that the sum was very small. He
had heard that the bug was likely
to give some difficulty, and hi
wondered whether Governmen
after four years would return tc
the House for snore money tu
spend in eradicating the pest afte;
it had spread.

The Legislative later the same
evening approved of the Resolu-
tion.

Speaker Threatens to ‘Name’ Mottley

@ From page 1.

he makes that reference to the
Head of the Administration in an
irreverent way? I will ask the
Reporter to read back his notes,
and if the honourable member
persists in making such remarks,
then I will name him, and when
I have done that, this House will
then have to make their decision.

Twice Mr, W. A, Crawford rose,
once on a point of explanation,
and again to enquire of the Chair
what was the irreverent reference
made by the member for the City,
but on each occasion, His Honour,
rapping his gavel, and in a firm
voice, ruled the member out of
order.

The member for the City once
again attempted to enquire the
nature of the irreverent reference,
and once more His Honour warned
the member that he would “name”
him if he persisted in the tone
in which he was speaking. ;

Mr. Mottley claimed his rights
as an elected member of the
Chamber, and said he would not
be “bullied or cowed”, and chal-
lenged His Honour that “you must
speak to me as a gentleman and
not in that tone. I will not be
bullied.”

His Honour said he had drawn
the attention of the House to the
behaviour of the honourable mem-
ber for the City, and said he
would “call upon this House if the
Honourable member persists in
that tone, and I will “name him,’
The honourable member will stick
to the subject of the debate.” —

Mr. Mottley suggested that “it
might be the echo of what took
olace on the last occasion when
the House met, and His Honour
again warned him to stick to the
subject of the debate, failing
which he would ask for a motion



TO-NIGHT:
At 8.05
MR. GEORGE HUNTE

will again talk over
Rediffusion on the...
subject

“THE INDUSTRIES
WE HAVE”

The topic will be on

_ Poultry as an Industry
and should prove to be
of great interest to the
general public.



|

\ corrosive salt air.



by the House to show their dis-
pleasure

Mr, Mottley rejoined that His
Honour had accused him of some-
thing, and added that he was one
of those people who could “easily
be led, but hardly be driven,” and
he khew how to conduct himself
on the flocr of the House.

Several times His Honour rap-
ped his gavel, and counselled the
mémber to speak ons the subject,
but as His Honour spoke, the
member for the City remarked in
an aside “I can fight an election
and get back in the House when-
ever he names me.”

Tension had grown high during
these few minutes, but as quickly
as it had grown, it was relaxeca,
end the member for the City con-
tinued the debats. He said if His
Honour’s warning was advice, ne
would accept it in good faith, but
surely as an elected member . of
the Chambcr, in dealing with
matter of the kind — the ayestion |
of playing fields for the benefit
of the people of this colony be!
it the Governor or anybody who
made reference to the conduct of
the people of these playing fields,
he thought he was quite in order}
to say that anyone should }earn |
more about the habits, customs
and usages of the people before
such references were made.

All he was saying was that h‘
appreciated the Governor's inter
est in these playing Fields, bu
when it came to dancing, thos
Community Halls were for the
ordinary working man, and the
‘way to encourage them would be
by first offering them what the
were accustomed to, such as
Canccs and Services of Songs, and
then branch off to other cultural
activities.

You could not expect to bring
people to the Centres of the Ay
ricultural workers type in Barba-
dos to discuss works like Shake-
speare, Virgil and the like, What
he was saying was that he thought
the Social Welfare Officer whos«
salary was just increased should
go out and mix among the people
at some of their functions, and
see how best the other cultural
activities could be interspersed,

Mr. Mottley concluded by asking



for what reason it should be
thought that he was speaking ir-
reverently of the Head of the
Administration when he was

only making reference to a remark
made by His Excellency at the
opening of the Sergeant's Village
and St. George’s Centres, as he,
Mr. Mottley did appreciate that
the cultural activities of the peo-
ple must be improved,

He was prepared to respect the
Chair and the dignity of the
Chamber. but he .would always

Just spread it on—then

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maintain his right
representative
Bridgetown,

If he said things that people
who held opposite views to him
did not like, it was a matter for
them, since he had to Listen to much
Hat he himself disliked,

as an elected
of the people of



Lorry Damaged
By Fire

The right rear tyre of the motor
lorry M—877, the property of Mr.
m. L. Harrison of Fontabelle,
was damaged when they caught
on Arthur's Hill about 1.16
p.m, The fire brigade turned out
und put out the fire,

At the time of the fire, the lorr)
woes being driven down Arthur's
Hill with a load of sugar.

oe

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Lie

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VEGETABLE

oh te

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. and .
BEANS, Pole, Lima, String-
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FLOWER. |
ZINNIA (Giant Mixed),
Snapdragons, Marigold,

Dahlia, Petunia, Carnations,
Pink, Candytuft, Aster,
Phlox, Verbena, Salvia,
Chrysanthemum, Sweet
Willian, Forget-me-not,
Calliopsis, Nasturtrum, Lu-
pim, Coreopsis, Balsam,
Cosmos, e@tc.,

Bruce
Weatherhead Ltd.





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PAGE FIVE





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PAGE SIX



Leg. Council |
Fire Brigade To Select Committee |

Members Ask For Plan
For St. Cecelia Barracks

THREE hundred an
dollars are required for t!
Bridgetown, a new Fire
equipment for the Brid
Brigade=:<

The. Legislative Cou
considéved the enabling 1

five thousand, seven hundred
erection of a new Fire Station,
Station Speightstown, and for
etown and Speightstown Fire

il at their meeting yesterday
olution but although there was
general agreement expres +d with the fact that a modern
Fire’ Brigade service wa essential to the island yet the
view. Was, expressed that the amount of money to be ex-
pendeck-was so comparatively considerable that the Coun-
cil hadto be satisfied thai the site proposed for the Bridge-

town-Rire. Station, the ¢

the begtsthat could be ob:

be expetided. i

It wasâ„¢or this considerati n
that the*Geuncil finally decid d
to send thé Fésolution to a Se:
Committee.

In moving the passing of th
resolutiorthe Hon’ble-the Colon) ul
Secretary sald: :

It will, I think, be genernaly
admitted that the preservation of
Bridgetown from a serious
flagration has been due not io
£00d management but to the me:cy
of Providence. On the .one hana,
all the factors (such as congested
buildings without adequate fire-
breaks between each other oi
within themselves, large stocks of
stores, mith of whieh is
inflammable, packed to capacity,
the preference for construction on

coil-

wood and shingled roofs), «re
present which make for a. high
fire risk. @n-the other hand, there
has for someétime been a clear

warning, I quote from the opening
words of the Report of Superin-
tendent Cox which was laid in the
Legislature in January 1949, that
“the Fire Protection of . Bridge-
town is at.a dangerously low
level”, and that “until protection
is raised to requisite standard a
wide spread conflagration is a
certainty —— time is the only. un-
known factor.”

At present the Bridgetown Fire
Brigade . is accommodated in
totally inadequate. premises at
Coleridge Street. The Fire Officer
estimates that the space -within

hich 25 men are cramped is only
dequate fé6r about 10 men, The
appliances have tobe kept very
lose to the wali and are liable
to be damaged in a quick “turn-
out.” As long ago as 1942 Sir

attan Bu he commented strongly
the utt@m'inadequacy of the
iceping and living accommoda-
at the Coleridge Street
Hea quarte’S” and in 1950, in
uswe to a question asked in the
Other Place, the reply was given
that the Government was aware
oi tive unsatis’actory condition of
the bar: acks occupied by members
of the Fire Brigade, and that the
construction of a new Fire Station
would be considered as goon as
the Five > “Officer, whom_ the
Se_retory ofState had been asked
to select, arrived,

No Facilities

Apart from the factor of accom~
modation, the seriousness of which
is “fust ated by the fact that the
Sergeants d6 in fact sleep across
the read in the Police Barracks,
the e are no facilities on the spot
tor trainf @ and, what is most im-
portant of all from the aspect of
fire protection, the existing appli-
ances, good though ‘some of them
are, do not supply anything like
the aggregate of 4,000 gallons of
water per minute which Superin-
tendent Cox and the Fire Officer,
Major Craggs, who assumed duty
in Mareh last ye r after 28 years
spent im the London Fire Brigade
«nu National Fire Service, regarc
.8 the-requiveme:t for adequate
protection to Bridgetown.

I understani that the present
eppliane¢s, which consist of a
Merry “Weather self propelled
pump bought in 1949, two Sig-
mund trailer pumps bought in
1943 and 1946, respectively, and
one of which has recently become
out of order, and one light Sig-
i und & iler pump, can between
them produce a reputed maximum
ot about 1,800 gallons minute
w.ich “is in fact, owing to the

t wwn in tne one trailer pump
an’ the age of some of the others,
likely ~to ~be more like 1,200
ge lons: Further details on the in-
adequacy of the present appliances
anu of the present premises of the
fire priyace mMeauquarters are to
te found in the Report ef Super-
intenaen.Coxsand in the Report
of the ire . Officer, which was
laid i thts" Honourable Chamber

r the 10th June.

For some yeais*the question of
a suit ble site has p esented diffi-
culty, and the e has been discus-
as to whether it wouli be

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stliest item in the scheme
aiméd for the funds propo to

as

better to have one big station or
a series of small ones, On the
latter point the considered view
of tne rire Otneer is that for pur-
poses of tra ning, on the import-
ance of which he places great
emphasis, and of discipline morale,
«pd bearing in mind the size of
the town and of the Force, one
big station is to be preferred to

several smaller ones.
Inadequate
4s regurds actual sites he jas

considered the Probyn Street site,
which was at one time earmarked
for the purpose of a Fire Station
but condiders that it is inadequate
in size and on the wrong side ot
the river from the chief fire risks.
He himself, ag he mentioned in his
Annual Report, which appeared
in the supplement to the Official
Gazette on 31st July, expressed a
preference for Jubilee Gardens,
which would allow a good turn
cut for the greatest fire risk in
the City and is in a good position
for radiating to the outskirts and
the country districts on the Lee-
ward side, It was thought to be
important that those gardens
should be preserved as one of tne
few “green spots’’ left in the City,
Temple Yard has also been con-
sidered but this would entail ex-
pensive acquisition of land. The
choice has fallen on the site in
Passage Road, now known as the
St. Cecilia Barracks, which was
bought early in 1951 on the re-
commendation of the Commissioner
of Police for the double purpose
of providing accommodation for
the Police Band and a site for a
Fire Station, and after a Sub-
Committee of Executive Committee
of which Sir Dudley Leacock was
one of the members, had expressed
the view that the site was eminent-
ly suited for these purposes, When
the property was purchased, the
Addendum to the Resolution stated
that the proposal for the transfer
of the Fire Station to this site
would await the arrival of the new
Fire Officer, In the meantime the
property hag been used for the,
other purpose for which it was:
bought. that is, the provision of
adequate accommodation for the
Police Band. It is only fair to
state that the Fire Officer himself
would have preferred a site in
the region of Cheapside, which
would have been nearer the main
fire risks and have had a better
turn-out but the decision of Exe-
cutive “Committee, after visits
paid by Members.to the various
sites, was in favour of using the
site at St. Cecilia Barracks, which
had been bought for the purpose
and which, as the Fire Officer
edmits, is adequate in size for the
proposed station. You, Sir, I
believe, assumed the role of a
fireman and compared the driving
limes to the centre of the City.
Requirements

The Fire Officer has estimated
that he needs a site of 180 feet by
120 feet for a Fire Station, and
the estimates of $219,300 set out
in the Resolution and which have
been furnished by the Colonial
Engineer provide for the necessary
offices, messes, dormitories, store
rooms, roads and yards, water
supply und accessories including
two underground tanks of 1,800
gallons each, and enclosure walls,
and also for the acquisition of
land to provide an adequate exit
from the station to King Street.
The estimate does not include
provision for a Tower which, at
the time the plans were submitted,

the Commissioner of Police re-
garded as desirable but not
essential, although provision for

this is being considered in connec-
tion with the Five-Year Develop-
ment Programme.

The sum of $69,360, when
broken down, includes the dual
purpose appliance ($18,691), two
water tenders ($23,760) 9 and
freightage on them ($7,200), a
Salvage Van ($3,720), 15,000 feet
of canvas hose ($11,040), breath-
ing apparatus ($1,944), an elec-
trieally drawn compressor ($2,040)














BARBADOS ADVOCATE



l







and Salvage Equipment ($960). In addition to that they were
Reference to all these and why raining the money on curren
they are needed is contained in the overhead expenditure and since
Report of the Fire Officer which these fire stations wouid benctit
was laid on the 10th June. In his posterity there was no reason why
Annual Report the Fite Officer they should not have raised a loan
mentions that the Reorganisation of payable within a reasonable
the water mains by the Waterworks amount of years. He agreed that
Department will improve the there should be an adequate fire
position Without solving it for service however.
fire fighting purposes. I would Hon. V. C. Gale said that the
Say a word or two in explanation puilding at St. Cecilia barracks
of this: At present some of the had been a private residence be-
hydrants in the centre of the fore it had been acquired by Goyv-
City are badly sited and so clos@ ernment. There were only about
together that full pressure cannot five bedrooms there and he could
be obtained; under the proposed not see how there could be room
reorganisation some hydrants will enough for the bandsmen of
be taken out and put in else- ehout 35 to 39 and then the mem-
where, so that when the new pers of the Fire Brigade.
appliances arrive, the water sup- With regard to the site it was
ply position will be as good as not far from the warehouses and
can be arranged. The cost of these busimess places of the town. The
adjustments is not expected to be King Street entrance Would facili-
heavy. tate an entry on to the main road
A sum of $17,040 is also pro- if it was considered that Passae
vided for the erection of a singl¢ Road would be too congested. He
appliance Fire Station in Speights. thought that the present site wo
eae be Lg 3 niger 2c also quite suitable.
rega as a high fire risks, for : .
the same r ns, on a minor scale _ Bou G. DL. Pie supported uy
as Bridgetown. It is his intention, resolution in prifcipie but ive
when the new fire appliances for wanted to be convinced that ia
Bridgetown arrive, to transfer view of the fact that tnere W.s
one of the old ones to Speights- such a considerable amount vf
town, aud as his Report shows to Money involved that the site pro-
man the Station with part-time posed Was the best site they couid
Firemen in the same was as is 8¢t- He could not see how they
done in small towns in other Could be commitied to such aa
territories. A suitable site has, [ ©*Penditure and allow .a better
understand, been found, Aj site to pass for a little more.
It would not be a matter of
The Answer “spoiling the ship for a hap’worth
Annually recurrent expenditure of tar. ‘fhe Fire officer had meii-
is dealt with in the next Resolu- tioned the Jubilee Gardens as tie
tion, but Honourable Members best site. He found himself in
should also béar in mind that, as agreement with Hon. Mr. Hutson
stated in the Fire Officer report, that they must be convinced that
it is the intention to recruit {4 that was the best site in the cir-
additional permanent staff for cumstances. ;
Bridgetown, the initial cost of Although he agreed in principle
which will be of the order of he thought that the Council should
$10,060 per annum, rising to about discuss the matter in Select Com-
$14,000 in the course of time, mittee and assure themselves that
It may be asked why these the money was being spent to the
proposals have come down in ad- best advantage.
vance of the many which are held Hon, G. B. Evelyn thought that
up for consideration with the if the Jubilee Gardens were con-
Five-Year Development Pro- sidered the best site they should
gramme, The answer is really pro- not shelter behind the suggestion
vided in the opening sentence of that they would be taking away
my speech, and in Superintendent an open space. Bridgetown was
Cox’s p , which the Fire not a town of high building and
Officer supports, that a widespread there was no scarcity of air. Fail-
conflagration in Bridgetown is ing that they could use the open
bound to come sooner or later un- spot near that chamber The Cen-
less suitable and adequate preven- tral Foundary Site) which Gov-
tative measures can be introduced ernment had already acquired at
in time, Bridgetown has traded on a considerable price and which
its luck for a long time, but luck site had been claimed useless for
has a habit of suddenly deserting building a large Government build-
those who trust in it alone, The jing because of foundation difi-
safety of a vast amount of valuable culties.
property, representing nothing less Hon. J. D. Chandler wondered
than the very heart of the Island’s who was going to pay for the
vitality, is at stake, It is in order expenditure. He had read the Fire

to prevent ee from ; i ;
suffering the fate of Castries and the Vemiy at St. “whchael. shoutd
Georgetown that this Resolution yy 2/3 of the cost of the upkeep
has been sent down. of the Fire Brigade in Bridgetown
Sir, I move that the Honourable speightstown something like £16
Council concur in the Resolution. nq Holetown £10 ? ,
Hon’ble F. C. Hutson was sorry i
that there was no plan showing _ H® thought that it was a good
how they proposed to erect the idea that tne resolution should be
station at St. Cecilia barracks, ‘emt to a Select Committee since
He agreed in principle that there there were many matters that
should be adequate fire services Should be settled in members
provided but he wanted to be â„¢unds. ;
assured that since Government _ He had been a member of the
were spending so much money on Committee that considered the
the scheme that they had taken Bite and he thought that he would
all possible steps to ensure that be of little use on the Select Com-
the site proposed was the best mittee,
passible site available in the cir- The site he thought was not a
cumstances. bad one, but there should be some
Hon'ble Dr. St. John recalled that legisiation to compel people ‘io
Government had bought the build- leave a clear path for the fire en-
ing at St. Cecilia barracks and he gine,
was wondering whether or not the He had tried it himself and ho
firemen could not be housed with had found that he could get from
the band who at present occupied St. Cecilia barracks even at peak
the existing building. days as far ds traffic is concern a
In that case Government would im good time.
only have to er€ct accommoda- Hon. V. C. Gale congratulatcd
tion for’ the fire engine and equip- the President on referring to (ie
ment. support which built up areas gave
He also wanted to know wheth- the Fire Brigade and expressed
er the Fire Officer had considered the view that there should be some
the possibility of using seawater revision since the act dated bac:
in extinguishing fires as this would to days when Bridgetown was 1!
save any undue incursion on the only built up area. He saw so
water supply. réason why Christ Church, £
Hon Robert Challenor wondered James and St. Peter should not
whether Professor Beasley’s Fiscal be brought in the scope of the avi
Survey had been read and taken as built-up areas.
to heart. They were considering The Hon. the Colonial Secretary
spending large sums of money and replied briefly to points raised,
according to the survey they could He explained that the Executive
easily go broke if their one crop had spent a great deal of time
economy failed. in investigating four sites



>

| Charles Mc Enearney

SSS SS





Probyn Street, which the Fire
Officer thought was too small,
Jubilee Gardens—an open space,
Temple Yard 40 x 272 while

Fire Officer required 120 x 180 the
adjustment of which meant the
purchasing of four small build-
ings and a part of the cooper
at a total cost of $80,000.



Send Resolution For

Captain Carlsen
Breaks Collar-bone |

“KIEL, Germany, Aug. 12
Captain Kurt Carlsen of “Flying
Enterprise fame” crashed with his
motorcycle near here last night

With regard to a station not ®td broke his collar-bone while
having been set up at Christ dtiving from his home in Denmark
Church, the Fire Officer haq as- © Rotterdam,
sured him that his engine could Carlsen spent the night in hos-
reach Oistin Town in 9! minutes, ital, and then in a special cast,

The Fire Officer would be using COMtinued his journey to Rotterdam
seawater too. There yas no ques- bY train where a new “Flying

tion of trying to put an additional
35—39 Fire Brigade at St. Cecilia

Baracks with the bandsmen with-
out tMe bitterest objection. [n
addition the firemen had to be

ealled out at night.

The resolution was finally re-
ferred to a Select Committee con-
sisting of Hons. Pile, Evelyn, Hut-

on and Gale.

B.W.1. Sugar
Pours Inte UK

Makes Up For Australian
Deficit
By BUTE HEWES

LONDON.

Huge quantities of sugar from
the British West Indies are pour-
ing into the United Kingdom this
summer. As much B.W.I, sugar
was imported in the
months of this year
whole, of 1948, latest
figures show,

It is now apparent that the
British West Indies will be the
only part of the entire Common-
wealth to come anywhere near
the sugar quotas set under the
Commonwealth Sugar Agreement.

Australia’s sugar crop has failed
and imports from Australia are
one-fifth of last year’s level
Mauritius has sent much less
sugar to Britain than last year
anc none at all is recorded as
having arrived from South Africa,
East Africa or Fiji. :

Yet 252,223 tons of sugar were
received in the United Kingdom
from the British West Indies be-
tween January and June, as com-
pared with 147,441 tons last year,
Board of Trade figures show.
Receipts from British Guiana, re-
corded separately. are up from
46,539 tons in the /irst half of last
year to 63,905 tons in the cor-
responding months of 1952.

Figures for May and June are
typical of the way sugar from the
West Indies is flowing into Brit-
ain’s larder. In May this year,
the United Kingdom received
76,837 tons of West Indian sugar,
as against 30,162 tons in May,
1951. From British Guiana, re-
ceipts rose from 9,238 to 13,473 in



as in the
available



May.

June receipts were down from
the May high level, but were
still well above last June. They
totalled 62,911 tons from the
West Indies and 7.827 tons from
British Guiana, as against 48803
tons and 5,204 tons respectively
in June, 1951.

Australian Sugar

U.K. sugar receipts from Aus-
tralia fell from 126,155 tons in the
first half of 1951 to only 20,374 in
the first half of this year, From
Mauritius, sugar receipts slumped
from 117,029 tons to 89,809 tons.
South Africa supplied 19,775 tons
in the first half of last year and
none at all this year.

In spite of all these failures,
owever, the B.W.I. effort has
xept Britafn’s total sugar supplies
from Commonwealth sources from
slumping too badly, They fell from
456,939 tons in the first half of
1951 to 426,759 tons in the first
half of this year, a moderate
decline when it is considered
that the huge burden of supplying
Empire sugar to Britain has been
shouldered almost entirely by the

’ British West Indies.

‘Indeed, in May and June, thanks
to the efforts of West Indian pro-
ducers, U.K., receipts of Empire
sugar were well above last year’s
levels. Total sugar receipts from
the Empire were up from 62,794
toris in May, 1951, to 90,610 tons

@ On page Ts



oo
_

nan
a
Sm

first six |

Enterprise II” lies at anchor.
Carlsen is a motorcycle enthusi-
ast and frequently travels on one
when his ship is ashore, '
—U.P.

¥ ° |
Canadian $ Up |
MONTREAL, Aug, 12. |
The United States dollar Mon- |
day closed at a discount of 3 29/22 |
per cent. in terms of Canadian
funds unchanged from Friday. Act |
the close it took 96 3/32 cents
Canadian to buy $1.00 Americai. |
The pound sterling, $2.68 13/15, |
was down 1/8 from Friday.

The Canadian dollar was up
1/32 cent at a premium of 4 1/32



|The Genuine “4711”

>



WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 13, 1952

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per cent, in terms of United States | to the famous and secret formula since 1792. ©

funds. In closing foreign exchange
| dealings On Monday, the pound
jsterling was up 1/16 cent at $2.79
11/16,

—e.r.|



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WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 1:

Bathsheba May Gel What M.P’s Want to Know

3, 1952

Playing Field
MAPP ASKS FOR
WELFARE WEEK

THE HOUSE OF ASSEMBLY yesterday evening pass- the jury trying the said case was
ed a Resolution authorising the Government to lease 2 ¢™panelled, keeping the gentle-

acres, 3 roods 34 perches of land at Bathsheba to be used
as a playing field by the St. Joseph Vestry.
A complementary Resolution authorising the Vestry above mentioned police witnesses

to lease the land from the
without debate.

Seek To Oust
Yellow Fever
In Barbados

With regard to a scheme for the
eradication of the Yellow Fever
Mosquito from Barbados, His Ex-
cellency the Governor sent the
following message to the Legisla-



tive Council at their meeting yes- ;

terday: —
His Excellency the Governor
has the honour to inform the Hon-

ourable the Legislative Council °'-im-Executive Committee, Gov- District “E”

that a scheme for eradication from.
Barbados of the yellow fever mos-
quito, Aedes aegypti, has been dis-
cussed with Dr. P. F, De Caires,
representative of the Pan-Ameri-
can Sanitary Bureau, which is the
regional Bureau of the World
Health Organisation for the West-
ern Hemisphere.

2, Under the terms of the
Agreement into which it would be
necessary to enter with the Bu-
reau, this Government would be
required to supply a certain
amount of insecticide and person-
nel, whilst spraying equipment,
insecticide and the services of one
medical officer and one inspector
would be supplied by the Pan-
American Sanitary Bureau, Be-
sides using a part of the existing
stock of insecticide which so far

Government was later passed

Dr. Cummins moved the pass-

ing of the Resolutions, ang speak-

ing on the first, Mr. A. E, S. J
Lewis enquired whether it was

another bit of land that was



Four Members of the House of
Assembly asked Government a
number of questions when the
House met yesterday.

They were :—

Mr. J, E. T. Brancker (L).

is it: true that on Wednesday,
23rd of July in the evening, any
police witness for the Prosecution
in a case at the Assizes that day,
was within the building where

men in question under observa-
tion?
Is it also true that any of the

travelled with the said jurors
from the place where they were
empanelled, on their return jour-
ney to the Court td complete the
suid, cane on Thursday the 24th

Is it now the practice in an in-

going gj
to be purch i out of the Jiabour dictable case, to manoeuver and

Welfare Fund.

Mr. R. G, Mapp, (L) aiso en-
it was
situated, and asked whether the

quired where exactly
opinion expressed by His Excel-
lency in connection with the use
of the Community Centres for
dance halls was the opinion of
the Governor-in-Executive Com-
mittee, or his own private opin-
ion of the Governor-in-Execuksr
ion and added that if it was the
collective opinion of the Govern-

ernment should take steps in the
matter, since there was no sense
spending money to erect places
which were not being used.

He felt that Barbados should
have a better community spirit,
and urged that there was a great-
er need for more voluntary social
welfare workers.

He suggested the institution of
a Welfare Week with a view to
fostering a better community
spirit, and said that the Welfare
Department of Government
should go out and arouse the vol-
untary support of community
leaders, and quoted the Jamaica
Welfare Limited as an example
from which to take pattern,

He felt it was time for Govern-
ment to declare some set policy
on the question of the playing

circulate around the jurors em-
panelled to try such case during
periods. when the Court is ad-
journed?

+ = *

1. Is Government aware of
the grave inconvenience suffered
by litigants at District “E” Courts
because only two writ-servers are
allocated to that particular area?

2. Will Government cause a
telephone immediately to be in-
stalled in the building where
Couris are held, as is
the case with every other Court
in the island?

If the answer to question one
is “Yes”, will an immediate and
adequate increase of such writ
servers be provided?

Mr. R. G. Mapp (L.)

Is Government satisfied that
the owners of Sugar Factories
who signed the agreement be-
tween the Barbados Workers
Union, the Executive Committee

MORE STAFF
FOR TAX
DEPARTMENT

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

and the Sugar Producers Federa-
tion, have carried out the. terms
of the agreement so far as the
price paid for peasants’ canes is
concerned,

What steps will Government
take to enforce this part of the
agreement and what is its atti-
tude towards those owners who
did not sign the agreement and
may have paid, or may pay less
for those canes than provided for
in the agreement?

* J *

1. How many tenantry roads
in the parish of St. Thomas have
been reconstructed or repaired
this year under the capital works,
improvement of tenantry roads
scheme?

2. What roads, if any,
thus been improved?

3. What other roads, if any,
are scheduled tc be improved
this year, in the said parish?

4. Is it a fact that the Depart-
ment of Highways and Transport
is ne it difficult to cope with
this work and if so. why?

have

1. Has any employee of the
Highways and Transport Depart-
ment been promised that after hav-
ing been employed for 250 “Man-
days” in any one year after em-
ployment he would be given
whole-time work and permanent
status?

2. How many casual employ-
ees since 1948 have been employed
for 250 “Man-days” in any one
year?

3. How many of
roller-drivers?

4. How many have been made
permanent employees?

these are

* % ”

1. Is Government aware that
certain buildings in Broad Street
at its narrowest point are to be
demolished remodelled and re-
built in the near future?

2. Should Government be so

Marines Take





U.S. Plans Big
Atomic Plant

WASHINGTON, Aug. 12

The Atomic Energy Commission
announced on Tuesday that it will
build. a $1,200,000,000 atomic ex-
plosives plant on a 6,500 acre site
about 22 miles north of Ports-
mouth, Ohio. The huge plant will
be the major new facility to be
built as part of the vast atomic
expansion programme, expected
to cost more than $3,500,000,600,

t in the next five years. It was
ee a ee eran oe me announced that the purpose of
loss of the fourteen thousand odd ‘he expansion project is to main-

tain and increase the United States
douers from that Department? atomic lead over Russia.

The new works will be a dif-
fusion plant to produce atomic
explosive uranium 235. It will
have more than twice the capac-
ity of a similar plant built at Oak
Ridge, Tennessee in World War

aware will Government -state
whether it is its intention to take
steps to have these buildings re-
aligned in conformity with the ex-
tensive plans for replanning
Bridgetown that were prepared
by former Town Planner and
Architect, Mr. L, M. De Syllas,

A?

.

A.R.1B
J ©
Mr. A. E. S. Lewis (L.)
What adjustments if any have
been made or are contemplated in



















Is Government aware that the

present method of training Nurses
at the Barbados General Hospital
is wasteful of public funds and
unfair and frustrating to the per-
sons under training?
_ Will the Government make an
inquiry into the method in vogue gents of the area that “the oper-
with a view to correcting the ation of the plant will involve no
faults of the present system? appreciable radiation hazard.” It
said that in the six years of oper-
ation of the Oak Ridge plant,
not a single employee has suffered
rediation injury.”

e site is in Pike County in
Southern Ohio. Its selection fol-
lowed a survey of all the poten-
tial sites in the Ohio River valley.
The AEC said that the availability
of water and of power at reason-
able costs “were Important fac-
tors in the selection af the site,”

Preliminary “designs indicate
that the. plant will cost about
#1,200,000,000. It will require up
to 400,000 kilowatts of power for
early operations. The AEC said
that the power will be supplied
by existing facilities —U.P

0.
The Commission assured resi-

e of *

Has there been recently another
loss of cash from a Cashier's cage
in the Money Order Department
of the General Post Office?

_If the answer is in the aftirma-
tive, will the Government please
give full details of the occurrence
and say what has been done in
the matter?

Mr. J. C. Mottley (©).

Is Government aware that the
wholesale liquor dealers in the
island are using ten-ounce bottles
instead of the original 12-ounce,
and still charging the same price
for the ten as for the 12 .

If the answer is in the affirma-
tive, will Government please ex-
plain why there is the change?

If the answer is in the negative,
will Government immediately in-
stitute an investigation to deter-
mine the cause and effect a
remedy?

B.W.I. Sugar

@ From page 6.

in May, 1952, and frum 55,055 tons
in June, 1951, to 70,738 tons in
June, 1952,

More From Cuba
Still, however, the .Common-
wealth is suppiying nowhere near











PAGE SEVEN

Always brush your tecth



tight after cating with

COLGATE DENTAL CREAM
TT Ua ee tt

b tty ck.



* }

Dont take chances
with your Sleep

as can be foreseen, it will be poss-
ible to replace from the current
vote, a sum estimated at $1,000
will be needed to meet this Island’s
share of the cost of the scheme,

the whole of Britain’s sugar needs.
Purchases of "03,123 tons of for-
eign sugar were made in the first
half of this year to bring total
U.K, imports up to the total of




fields, and suggested the estab-
lishment of © organisad indoor
games and libraries at the cen-
tres,

The House of Assembly yester-
day approved of an amendment to
the Civil Establishment (General)
Order which provides among

“Bunker Hill”’

SEOUL, August 12.
UNITED STATES MARINES captured “Bunker Hill”



3. It will be necessary to give
the Director of Medical Ser-
vices, his departmental officers and
the medical and technical officers
of the Pan-American Sanitary
Bureau statutory authority to
enter and spray houses and prem-
ises with an insecticide approved
by the General Board of Health
and to add larvicide approved by
the Board to water or water con-
tainers, The General Board of
Health has approved of the pro-
posed programme, and has ex-
pressed its willingness to amend
the Mosquito Regulations so as to
make it possible to carry through
the scheme effectively. 7

4. The Director of .Medical
Services has been assured of the
co-operation of the Sanitary
Authorities in the several parish-
es: This is essential for the suc-
cess of the proposed programme.

5. The Honourable the Legisla-
tive Council is invited to approve
that the scheme for the eradication
of the yellow fever mosquito with
the assistance of the Pan-Ameri-
can Sanitary Bureau should be
proceeded with and that, in ae-
oprdance with the prescribed pro-
cedure, the Secretary of State for
the Colonies may be asked to
sponsor the necessary application
for technical assistance to the
World Health Organisation,

The Council sent the following
reply: —

The Legislative Council have
the honour to refer to Your Ex-
cellency’s Message No. 15/1952 of
the 14th July, and to inform Your
Excelleney in reply that they ap-
prove that the scheme for the
eradication of the yellow fever
mosquito with the assistance of
the Pan-American Sanitary Bu~
reau should be proceeded with and
that, in accordance with the pre-
scribed procedure, the Secretary
of State for the Colonies may be
asked to sponsor the necessary
application for technical assist-
ance to the World Health Organi-
sation.



Seven Ask Radio
Nationalisation

The House of Assembly last
night by a 7—3 majority passed
an. Address to His Excellency the
Governor asking that steps be
taken to nationalise the Barbados
Rediffusion Service Ltd.

The Address reads;—

The House of Assembly beg to
inform Your Excellency that in
order to assist in promoting adult
education, to give the people of
this island an opportunity to learn
the policy of the Government, and
to promote cultural entertainment,
especially for the people in the
country districts, the Government
should take steps to nationalise
the business concern known as
Barbados Rediffusion Service Ltd.

The voting was: Ayes—Messrs.
F. E, Miller, R. G. Mapp, E. W.
Barrow, E. Holder, J. E. T.
Brancker, C. Talma, and W. A.

‘crawford.

Ose iebekie: F. L. Walcott, ¥V,
Vaughn and J. C. Mottley.

The County Chemical C

Mr. J. A. Haynes (E) supported
Mr. Mapp’s suggestions, and said
that since the establishment of
some of the centres, they were

ee A wae (L) said ,,1¢ is considered that the addi-
that it was all very well to build heating the staff of that Department
nice buildings, but then the more aera permit for carrying out
difficult question was organising © a +. th examination of returns
them, organising charity groups #4 at the same time increase the

collection of revenue by prevent-

and the like. People of the Social $
Welfare Office should try to get nee ho Oras Wee tales
net,

together with the Vestries and

get down to real organizing. ; The | Amendment also provides
Mr. F. E, Miller (L) said that fr additional staff for the Depart-
the big mistake about the play- Ment of Agriculture and the
ing fields was that they were in Attorney General’s Office.
the hands of the wrong people. , Dr G. H. Cummins who took
The people who controlled the Sarge of the Resolution pointed
playing fields were not by any Out that “The present staff of the
means concerned in improving Imcome Tax and Death Duties
the pattern of the social set up of Department is not adequate to
the working class of the island. cope with the substantial expan-
The Honourable member for Sion in the volume of work which
the City was at pains to criticise has taken place in the Department
the Welfare Depertment. But it Since its reorganisation. The in-
did not matter how much was ¢rease in the number of returns in
paid to the head of that Depart- the assessment year 1950 amount-
ment, the situation with the play- @d to 929 and in 1951 to 840, thus
ing fields would always remain Making an increase of 1,769
what is was until the Vestry and over the 1949 figure of 6,176—an
its system were destroyed. increase of approximately 29%.

other things, for an Inspector of
Income Tax, and a Long Grade
Clerk for the Income Tax De-

As an example of what could _ He said is is considered that
be done at the playing fields and the addition to the staff would
their_ buildings, they could take permit the Department to carry
the Girls’ Industrial Union, The out effective examination of re-
trouble was that the playing fields turns and at the same time to
were in the wrong hands. increase the collection of revenue

For instance, it should not be by preventing persons from
that if a group of girls learning evading the taxation net,
domestic science applied to the It provides for: One Inspector
Vestry for the use of the eae Dr Tax)—$3,120 x 144 —
hi should get a negative reply. 3,840. ‘
iad . . anys One Long Grade Clerk—$480:

Mr, F. E. Goddard (E) said he

1 . 480—624 x 172912 (E.B.)

thought the Vestries were being 1,056 x 72—1776 (E.B. 1,872
blamed wrongfully. He was a x 96—2,160.
member of the St. Michael and One Stenographer and Typist
Christ Church Vestries and a —$480 x 48—1,200,
member of the Playing Field
Committee. The Amendment also provides

The Christ Church Playing for an increase in the establish-
Field Committee alloweqd any- ment of the Department of
body with ability for organising, Science and Agriculture by one
to use the field and building free, Long Grade Clerk in order to
They aimed at culture, and that provide for the continuation of
was what they broadcast. the services of the officer respon-
«4, sible for the performance of the
The Vestry was concerned with ¢jerjcal and accounting work
the administration of the playing in connection with the Agricul-
field, but were not a body of so- ira) Development Scheme. The
cial workers, It was their duty j¢muneration of this officer was
to see that the playing field was formerly met from funds pro-
properly maintained, and for that yigeq under Colonial Develop-
reason made nominal charges for pont and Welfare Scheme D. 217,

dances, Dances were held additional Lo Grade
private individuals Nor their own Bret in 0 Atvatiay teharal’s

profit. Like the head of the Ad- Ome to meet the increase in
ministration, they were saying clerical work in that department.

that they should not only be used
V. Reid Awarded



for that purpose.
They had enclosed the field,
not from people, but from animals.
Mr. W, A. Crawford ©) a
that in the final analysis, the Ves- ‘2 8 ‘ *
tries actually controlled the Civic Scholarship
amount of money to be spent on ;
the playing field, and the Vestry Victor C. Reid of Tudor Bridge
had certain financial limitations. has been awarded the Civic
Mr. F. L. Walcott (L) also said Scholarship which is tenable for
that no one could really blame six years at Combermere.
the Social Welfare Officer if the Earlier this year, the scholar-
clubs were not run as they should ship for girls was awarded to
be Patsy J. Browne of Lakes Folly.
The Resolution was eventually Both children are already pupils
passed. of the respective schools,





KLIM is pure, safe mil
KLIM keeps without r



To hel
teeth ail goad muscles, to

KLIM quality is ciways uniform

children develop strung bones and

only five miles east of the truce village of Panmunjom in

a surprise tank assault that

ists completely off balance.

Reds by striking first at
“Siberia Hill” in a diversion
tanks.

Although the marines withdrew from “Siberia Hill”

after the raid, their capture

completely neutralized the other height, which has changed #!f-year to 237,887 tons this year.

hands five tmes in the past
In Tokyo, the United Nations
naval headquarters said that two
United States destroyers and one
British frigate were hit by Com-

munist Korean east coast shore
batteries during the past week.
Two men were killed and 15
wounded,

Came to Stay

The battling marines who cap-
tured “Bunker Hill”, so named
because it was honeycombed with
Communist bunkers and trenches,
made sure that they would stay.
(They carried with them large
prefabricated logs for immediate
construction of their own bunkers.

Marine tanks began rumbling
up “Siberia” last night, their
flamethrowers spitting fire at the
demoralized Chinese Reds crouch-
ed in their bunkers. Behind the
armour-clads came marine infan-
trymen picking off Red soldiers
who tried to escape a burning
death,

The tanks lumbered within 20
yards of “Siberia’s” crest and
suddenly stopped. Then came the
surprise move, From the ridgeline
to the rear a second armoured
column roared up and opened an
assault on “Bunker Hill”, 700
yards from “Siberia”.

The Chinese Reds, who thought
the main attack was _ against
“Siberia”, were completely con-
fused. They offered only “mod-
erate resistance” in the form of
mortar fire to the second and
heavier assaulting group. By dawn
“Bunker Hill’ was in = marine
hands and the marines could look
down upon the dead Chinese
on “Siberia”.

Forestall Attack

Airforce fighter-bomber took to
the air to forestall any possible
Communist counter-attack. Strikes
on the Red western front position
took number one priority, as no
Communist MIG 15 jets were
sighted over north west Korea, by

noon, J
* United Nations warships dam~
aged by Red shore batteries last
week were the USS J. R. Pierce,
10 men wounded, the USS Barton,
one man killed, one wounded,

and the British Frigate Mounts
Bay, one killed, four wounded
seriously.

The Pierce was hit seven times
on last Wednesday by 105 milli-
metre fire from the shore. The
Barton and the Mounts Bay were
damaged on Sunday,

The Barton, cruising offshore
near Wonsan, received about 90
rounds from Communist 75



Copr. 1950
Borden Co.
Internat’! Cove,
Roserves

ik °
efrigeration





ive them energy

10 |

There's always a clean hygienic
fragrance in every room where
this S-M-O-O-T-H Paste
cleanser is used. Pots, Pans,
and Tiles, Sinks, and Paintwork
respond quickly to its treat-
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in a mountain of Chemico.

England

o. Ltd., Birmingham,









and stamina for ool or play, and to assure
all-round good health—there is no finer milk
than KLIM. KLIM gives youngsters a gener-
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elements found in fresh cow's milk.



KLIM adds nourishment to cooked dishes
KLIM is recommended for infant feeding




KLIM is safe in the specially-pocked tin



\ KLIMZ MILK.

FIRST IN PREFERENCE THE WOLD OVER













1,129,882 tons that were needed

i for the half-year,

caught the Chinese Commun- — Cuba supplied most of this, Bri-
The marines confused the tain’s sugar receipts from Cuba

0 for the half-year were up from
the nearby hotly contested 2 Oo? tone in’ 1961 toate ea

; 3
ary attack with flamethrowing tons this year. San Domingo was
another important foreign supplier,
but receipts from this source were
of the strategic “Bunker Hill” cut from 282,297 tons in the 1951

three days. At the same time, Britain cul
her re-exports of refined sugar
mae from 393,398 tons in the first half
of 1951 to 343,135 tons in the 1952
half-year, Most notable feature of
this was the cessation of exports

e e
Television
9 to Persia, formerly Britain's larg-
Comes To J CA est sugar export customer, which

took 65,018 tons in the 1951 half-
year and only two tons in the first

half of this year,

(From Our Own Correspondent)
KINGSTON,
Television has come to Jamaica.
Last week Mr. Harold F. Soltau,

Cuban agent of General Electric »sn 2g’ * ‘
Company, Ltd., arrived in the Reinforces ments

island for a few days visit. . o
He brought with him a tele- Shipped To Macau
NEW DELHI, Aug. 12.

vision set for experimental work.
Groups of interested persons have :
% P Reinforcements for Portugal’s
up by, the tiny colony of Macau are enroute
°

seen the set in operation.

The shows picked : .
set were televised from Santiago, from Portuguese India following
Cuba, approximately 125 miles frontier clashes between Chinese
away. Mr. Soltau expressed him- and Portuguese forces there,

—B.UP.



self as being pleased and sur- @uthentic reports reaching — her¢
prised at the remarkable re- Said. e %
ception. These reports said that part of



the Portuguese garrison at Goa
had been hurriedly transferred to
Macau and that the Portuguese
motorship “India” is now enroute
to Macau loaded with extra sup-
plies and equipment for the colony
on the south-east coast of China,
—UP.

9 Successful In
Midwifery Exam.

Britain Will Pay
More For Meat

LONDON, Aug. 12.

Britain agreed last night to pay
16.6 per cent, more in the coming
year for the meat she buys from
Australia. Britain now pays about
ls. id. a pound for good quality
lightweight lamb.

The new rate, made under a
price re-opening clause in the 15- The Final Examination for Mid-
year agreement signed between wives was conducted § at the
the two countries last year, will Maternity Hospital on the 22nd
give Australian farmers 1s. 3d, @ anq 25th July, 1952.
pound, The examination Board com-

—OP, prised Dr, A, L. Stuart, Dr. W. F.
Kerr, Mrs. B. Judge and Miss 1.
Walters, with Dr. F. N. Grannum
as Chairman.

Nine candidates were examined





Studying Europe's
Housing Problems

and they reached the required
5 standard,

Aa ROAES, aes, ae e The names of the successful
chief Ste ee eek Asoaee candidates are as follows:
began a tour of Italian hospitals bieeee me pore *
in Rome and its environs, De oe Harding . torent - ae 7
is touring European cities study- ot atten

ing housing problems.
Yesterday he was received at
the Rome City Hall where he



FISH MARKET

delivered a message of solidarity
from the Mayor: of Forto oe The House of Assembly yester-
‘ ae dey approved of a Resolution
—__-_ giving Government authority to



acquire compulsorily 4,306 square
feet of iand at Speightstuwn for
the erection of a fish market,

The market will be erected at
the junction of Queen Street and
Sand Street.

105 millimetre guns. She return-
ed more than 700 five inch shells.
All three ships, although damaged,
continued to fire on the ‘oo



Holder of the all-time American Automobile Association record with
8 major racing victories im 1951, TONY BETTENHAUSEN says:

“Full-firing CHAMPIONS @%




By equipping their cars with
dependable Champions, racing
men know they will get the last ounce of power out of
every drop of fuel.

{f you’re not getting all the power you're paying for,
see your Champion dealer. Whatever make of car
Kh You own, a new set of full-firing
Champion Spark Plugs will deliver the
full power built into your engine.

First on land, on sea, in the air—






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So be guided by the experience of countless thousands who make
delicious ‘ Ovaltine’ their regular night-cap.

Taken at bedtime, ‘Ovaltine’ provides special properties derived
from Nature's best foods. These help to soothe nerves and body,
assist you to relax, and are conducive to skep of the best kind,

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OVALTINE

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Sold in airtight tina by all Chemists and Stores.
IMPORTANT —Note that the large size ‘Ovaltine’ tin contains 16 ounces.

refreshing sleep








OVALTINE BISCUITS

sy and delightfully crisp, ‘Ovaltine’ Biscuits are
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The pert Siena yous ores § Cvaleing® semember tol
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FRESH WATER TROPICAL AQUARIUM FISHES
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THE LIFE & TIMES OF KING GEORGE VI
OUR YOUNG QUEEN | (Pictorial Life Story)
A_SAILOR’S ODYSSEY: Viscount Cunningham



BOLIVAR: Salvador de Madariaga (New Publication)
THE MAROON; Cunliffe Owen (New Publication)
DOTING: Henry Green (New Publication)

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SS





PAGE EIGHT

BARBADOS ADVOCATE WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 13, 1952 ~

SHIPPING NOTICES





| Gomes And Bryan
| Attack Adams



PUBLIC SALES

CLASSIFIED ADS. [senna omer

REAL ESTATE _ Middlesex Defeats

Clerk Charged
With Falsification

TELEPHONE 2508



















“BRIGHTWOOD" situats on the seaside

From page 1.











































































































ae eee at St. Lawrence, Christ Church, stand- | ROY : N j
FOR SALE ingen 2006 square tect of and” | Mental Hogpital = [met of to declare where STEA {
The House contains three bedrooms, | they stand in the matter of fed- @ From e 5. MSHIP co, The M.V. “CARIBBEE” will ac- 2
FRERY—Mre es to] | drawing, dining and living room, garage) saiadiesex defeated Mental eration. mae 5. cept Cargo and Passengers for i
_ ane Ps s rooms wi electric light é SED - a nia +“ A 8. eu : Dominica, Antigua, * 2
thank thi AUTOMOTIVE ad water. throughout. Idspection by|Hospital (Intermediate) ericket|. 4, Adams has been stone-jtold that the regular man did ‘the|s.s BOGRDOP, tet aunt jens Nevis and gt’ kitts, Sailing
Faoaiot —— epeeaeeereme —— | appoint aa etween thelteam on Sunday by an © innin walling long enough” locking up. M.S. BON, bth August 1952. Friday 15th inst
rec ee } ee eee * af > . 10Urs & an 2 am Rare od ie Bry Trin , . :
2 CAR—i87 Standard €© HP. Secon) The above will be set up for sale aijand 196 runs when their two-dy |; Mr. Victor ae, dad Min-] Linton said that he went to work |S’ Siema sao a The M.V. “MO » will ac- ;
= em ee oy. Phan rere Tse Public. Competition on Friday, the 15th | fixture ended at the Mental Hos- ister of Agriculture who also sawjon the next m at about 7.03 SAH gen cept Cargo and Passengers for
| one sage oe 8 no Model | “@y. of August 1952, at 2 p.m. at the} — a 5~'| Adams’ h reported im alfa.m. He did not go into the factory | M.S. W * ugust, ; Dominica, An’ , Montserrat,
IN MEMORIAM iy Clan condition. five new tyres. | °MG@ Gf the undersigned. jpital ground, BWI press said Mr, Adams had|immediately. Sometime later Mr.| SA™ING TO” AD, PABAMARING | ® Nevis and St. Kitts, Sailing Friday
—— lOwner driven. Pre $750. Mr. Pre CARMINGTON @ SEALY, | Batting first Middlesex seored|made a number of state-|Miller sent and asked him if he|qs. nestOR sth Ausuat i982 prem See
FORDE dn ae neeey ots x (te fessor, Gittens Road, Gov nent Mitt A ” 97 -2.52~-19n |300 for 2 wickets declared and|ments in the past but had be-|had removed any books from the| M.S. BONAIRE, 25th August,, 1952.
Meee tell aaleep on August 18th 1982. | aseccncemeemnienpeenmnannsneemmntennneepsie| “= EERE arene ir . bowled out the Mental Hospital|lieved them to be made in the]}factory. He sent back to tell Mr.|™.S. STENTOR, Sth September, 1952. B.W1. SCHOONER OWNERS
Sweet is the word remembrance, CAN i938 Vauxhall in Good working| “CARLTON”, Fontabelle—For infor-|team for 59 and 45. For Middle-|heat of oment, Now ho Miller that he di SAILING TO TRINIDAD & CURACAO ASKOCIASION ARE.)
Heer ta tase cue GEE Bas Goan ; 3938 Vauxhall in Good ti Rast |mation apply Mrs. Lilian Drakes : heat of the moment, Now however, did not remove any|s§'s. BosK' 18th August, 1952 Consignee. Telephone No. 4047
in memony we shall one ep him | Orde? New tyres. Contact taittt Rap. ‘Karlville,” Spooner's Hill, @t. Miohacl.|8e* 4G. Sobers scared 93, H.jit appeared Mr. Adams was}books, He last saw the books men-| M.S. HERA, 15th September, i952. : me i
As the years roll ar , Feta | Dial Tee 9.8.52—3n, a 86; C. a4 46 not ones upon a definite eer tioned at about 2 p.m. on the oo. alieaia ’
Viola Bolden, Mitaiene Taylor, Laure CAR—One (1) 1946 Ford “Prefect” in| ——— eee: —— out, and Crai 5 not , aign of denigration of t ov- before. - 2”. S6ON, SON 4 CO., LTD. :
Hinds and Agneth daughters good comditin. cuener “sate to pur-| wi see top slile ‘by. public, Compe, wake cas phate at ae & Wenge he wees . dak ne ee, ood
13 hase l % P $750.00. T. | tition y office yor ia : n * . - ere eeonnitnenieniereredestnhneranmeaniah
wee ane chase @ larger oar. Trice #350) Limited. Thursday 14th from 1 p.m. the wooden |scored 21 in the first innings,| “What he expects to grin is be-}fact The ticket books are kept
MATTHEWS — In loving memory of 128.523 | building called the “SUNLIGHT GRO-|Bowling for Middlesex G. Sobers|yond my on” said Mr.|in the plantations office. No ticket ‘ i
our beloved and mother Daisy CERY” with all fittings and Electric took 4 f 19 H ; Bryan “T have expected ks . 3
Newman Matthe who was laid to] CAR—One (1) 1952 A-40 ‘‘Somerset’—| instalations situated at corner of Con- ‘00: or , arding 2 for 7, that - BWI books are missing.
rest on August 12th, 1951 1,330 miles. Condition excellent, Always | stitution and Martindales Road. Also Harewood 2 for 15 and C, Brath- as an elder statesman| Shown the cane tickets used in x :
—s Cie ts Seaciat wner driven. Frrice $2,500.00. One (1) the Cottage adjoining containing epen|waite 1 for 10. In the Mental] is attitude at this moment would|evidence, Linton said that they fe
s but to sleep 195 > jone only 3,200 mile Renson | gallery, rawing, ning, roojns, A . have been ‘u ¥ - :
Gone but not forgotten.” a aie _ Gummer bought ‘biseer car. .C. & Bath Electric light and Water Hospital’s 2nd innings, H, Brath- tical ae EE OE es pertecty corset. ‘The :
Dr. Matthews and family and grand] Price $2,400.00. For, further particulars | standing on Delamereland, Martindale’s|waite took 6 for 24, and C.] ap canes mentioned on each occasion ee {
children, 13.86.5220. T contact Chelsea Garage (1950) gmited ee. Save “ms $11.50 ner apanter Wilkie 4 for 20 e. ean eee I am sure obent were brought to Edgecumbe Ltd ;
$$$ Phone 4949 12.6.52—3n>| Ins: on any day on application an az ig the comes = j
SKEETE—In loving memory of our lov dorian the premises, conditions of sale from R. in a Sand faxtal the mest of the West Indies are ene the owners names were OUTWARD FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM ;
ing mother and grandmother Moti a TRUCKSOne 194) Dual Gear V-8| Archer Mc. Kenzie Dial 2947 a Sunday xture between aaa ti at ine 3 o him by either the driver or the
Skeete known as Aynt Till who cle }truck and one 1940 Chevrolet truck In 10.8.62—4n.| Dalton and Everglade played at Ses Eeinidad will hg roar om arr on the lorries,
on August 13, 1946. good working order. New tyres, Can be Brisban Da 0 . in’
Shall we sect vander city | seen, at Ladue Stone Work, Lage, 1 AUCTION Brisbane, Dalton scored 93 runs |W have said 80 a thousand times.| four instances of which he knew 3 ee
Vhere the towers of crystal shine St. ichael la 556 e layside, a
Where the walls of Jasper Manager” Purchaser will be given work | ~~~ ~~... | glades first innings’ score of 84. I wish Mr, Adams would stop pro-) when canes were sent by people|S.S. “SPECIALIST” -. Glasgow & ist Aug. Aug.
Built by workmanship divine by the Company 13.8.52—6n. | UNDER THE SILVER For Everglade, E. Lorde scored crastinating and say the same. in other people’s names to Edge- Liverpool
ies we sent Bapees De ee | ee HAMMER 32. For Dalton, C. Brathwaite toos cumbe Lid. He said that George|$.&- (CROT AER: ae i
set beyond the river i AN 10 > Ja assed | ‘ . a 4
Sian sae snent hapend he pt AN 0 HP, Tordson Van, Duscd,| On Thursday lth by order of Thel@ for 24 and M. Moore 2 for 29. NO PROGRESS MADE Bishop, father of Keith Bishop,| 8.S. “TROJAN STAR” _ .. Liverpool ae fo. ibth ;
Ever remembered by Oliver and Sea-! New Battery and in perfect running | Executors to the Estate of the late Rev. ; IN TALKS TO AVERT had sent his canes in 1950 in the| 8S. MERCHANT .- London . i
uurne St. John (sons), Janet daughter-] Grder. Dial 4369, Royal Store No. 12,| 5. A. Esterbrook we will sell the Furni- Batting for Dalton, G. Sobers pn Age ead He then) ees i
De). Beaulah, Norma, Myacint's} Sigh Street. 9.8 52-6n.| ture which is both modern and antique|knocked up an undefeated 59; ARMOUR MEAT STRIKE quoted three other instances and 2
(grandchildren) Te A | at Atemabcnee eee White Park Road.|‘Walls 14, F. Evelyn 7 and L. CHICAGO, Aug. 12 |eaid that these could be HOMEWARD FOR THE UNITED KINGDOM
ov vigenpalingiid ee ee | LIVESTOCK | ina Table,” upright Chairs Mira oo Craig 5 not out. United Packing House workers] if the books held by Mr. Skeete Vessel For Close
7 a } ¥ Cp ———- |other Sideboards, China binet, Side, “ oy 4 -on=
ANNOIL NCEMEN Ts; PUPS—Five (5) Alsatian Pups. 3 males | Omament & Pembroke Tables: ‘Round reported no s progress” the Ht were produced. Barbedos
2 females. G. C. Brathwaite, Haggatts| Tip Top Table: Large Rockers, Uphols: tract negotiations with the ig ‘ S.S. “BIOGRAPHER” .. .. Lendon 2ist Aug.
———| Plantation, St. Andrew. 9.8.52-3n. |Sofa & Prie - Dieu Chairs; Flat Top U S Four’ meat producers, and fed-] Received Money for Others | ss. “HERDSMAN” . Liverpool 25th Aug.
MAGE EXTRA MOM aaa Per- COWS — Heavy. te recenhy ligne gies’ toa ay mg small “ em Destroyers eral conciliators waited anxiously mo ‘ t
; or space © Sell Per 3 C eavy. in milk, recen with glass rs ; a ‘ i nev ,
Senet Christina? Cards Spanish Greetinus.| calved — Guernsay Strain. Teh 95279. | Antique Sofas all in old Mahogany: Car- . for a compromise that would avert 4 a, 4 er Pye. a ‘one For further information apply to...
25 for $1.50 — Name imprinted. Samples 12.8.52—8n.| pets & Rugs, Some good Glass, old Hit By Fire: a nation-wide strike. ce je eine ot eee Ton DA COSTA & co. LTD _ Agents
Free. Also 20 beautiful bor eefort- | China Shemeld & Fisted Wate. Dish - “We have met throughout the road on Mysrell ie money for . :
ments. Write Air Mail er MECHANICAL Covers; Tea Services; Good Tapesirys : . day with Cudhay, Swift and|him. He had received money on
15 W urc St., Buffalo. iock - s Sherry , . -
CARDS €O., 75 W. Huron St, Mien Clock. Oldswindser 2 ren Pathos One Man. Killed Armour, and are reporting “no|behalf of people who had asked
7e: ie CAMERA—Ensign Selfix 16-20 complete | for Lamp; . rogress”, said a spokesman for|him to do so for them. Some of
iran linet case filters $85. Phone $021. 9 Double é ingle ‘Tall Post & Since WASHINGTON, Aug. 11. he CIO Union early today.|these people were Ena Harewood,
ere ee old mahog edsteads, Springs - . . 5
FOR RENT . we caved ois Hepplewhite & other Chest}, TWO U.S. destroyers were hit} “Meantime contracts with the Irvin Haynes, Louisa Davis, Ger
, c GRC. PHOTO EXPOSURE METER and | o¢ Drawers, Berbice Chairs; old Mabog:|by Communist shore batteries off] “Big Four” meat packing com-|trude Davis, Frederick Davis, Sal- Qnce.
ASE Perfec 30.0 ghnson 35 3 2 : . . i > >
eee Developing Tank as new $5.00. Agfa | hE? Frees, Mitaey Goer ot eres Korea and one man was pAmes | have expired. We ite in a — . smene.
HOUSES Spring Filter Holder and Set 31 M.M. | Rit, " guainge & 3 and another wounded the navy|have a statement on the strike/ tl nese people as him to receive
DUSE: Filter in Case $8.00, Tucker. Phone 4415. | FirCh °Drettes’ Book Shelves, Electric|@nnouced Monday. today. the cane money for them and he



¥3.8,52—3n.









Attractive seaside Fiat main road Hne-















Cake Mixer, Lawn Mower ‘and ot



her

Destroyers are Barton and Jotm







Negotiators for Armour and|did so. As cane weigher,

and




CANADIAN SERVICE









































tings, fortably furnished, English litems of interest, Sale 11,30 o'’clock.|R, Pierce, Company met late into the night owing to the fact that the crop SOUTHBOUND
Bath’ Open Verandeh facing sea. Suitab!e POULTRY ‘Terms Cash. TROTMAN & ©0.| The Barton engagement occur- yesterday, and conciliators hoped|season was in progress and he was Meamer nan teont i... sony.
Telephone. A Agata From feet t.n.] COCKERELS % special pure bred BRA . Auctioneers ‘lred Sunday. The Pierce was| that a new offer by Armour might) very busy, he could not go for) «ryray 3 ni > sauet 4
aoe eee ewernecnn—emerere | Lesher Cockerels 4 months old, Dial 10.8.52—~2n, | Struck on August 6. The Pierce at least vide a basis for further|the money therefore he “ISA | PARODI" August August *
BENSAM-—Untusulshed, fron ist Sept 2974 or 3426 13.8.52—4n, | was seriously damaged. The Bar- nopetlats ne Bae Sree Core sent anyone ee staff who items anges 3 sr u S
At Sheringham Gardens, axwell’s — - : ‘ pany er has been rejected as|appeared not to busy. Some-| "ARNE c c ;
F : j 3 low, 3 bed-] FOWLS—Cornish Game, & Barred ton not_as severely. tel rts : ha
Cost” Attractive wail Bungaio, 8 Dut-f FQWIS Comin Game & Beret] BOURMLEC NO WECES |e Navy said the Barton was|"tivial” by the Union. The} times the money was brought back NORTHBOUND
Good Sea bathing. Phone S. Daniels} breed. Also a few Game and Crossbred a hit by 75 millimeter fire near| Union declined to comment when} to him in order that he could de- Sie tae ae
4161 for appointment. 9.8. 62—t.-n, pullets and Pantams Phone 3% coos | Wonsin off the east coast of Soren wines . eA oe had been pe at Sp ~~ soe oe whom | 4 STEAMER . Die, Barbados Sepa . *
ROOMS Taree 12) rooms habie fa NOTICE during an engagement with shore Se eee es he received e ticket 7 foot.
arbe erfes Lte 7 ‘ea, P. tihe person who coll eid bic tae
GEem seply Behar Pals 2-80 MISCELLANEOUS Assignment of Trade Marks bot Gd "led the money, would deliver it to| | Apply:—DA COSTA & CO, LTD.—CANADIAN SEBVICE
James Stre Stathiasliah onan a The first stack of the Barton BRAZIL vp ; 4
| ANTIQUES of every description, Glass,| ALADDIN ZIL—GERMAN TRADE \the one to whom it
ROOMS—tTwo furnished rooms for rent.

AAMOND WHITE HBADLIGHT.ow| Was hit causing a three foot hole



belonged.
China, Linton said that he knew Lionel

Worthing, opposite the Royal Theatre old Jewels, fine Stlver Water-









es * stra
Ripe, oi fewe, She Seve eae EXPEE in addition to numerous shrapnel RELATIONS FOR i
Best Sea-bathing. Garage attached.| ei at Gorringes Antique Bhop adjoining ESSO (new script style) holes. The Navy said the Barton DISCUSSION ri pittg him t: tine That was NEW YORK SERVICE
Phane 8401. 2.9.89-—t4.n-] Roval Yacht Club. Sash ten ESSO OVAL continued operations after’ being ing o draw money.
ioantenesiag ————— pee ee- hit pera’ BREMEN, Germany, Aug. 12. on a morning when Harewood was|s S. "ALCOA PEGASUS” sails 8th Aust — erring pei rag 4 rs
ach court Avene tastings. Thre piselt ciate attnckia tag abet yurpoder REGAL CHOWN The Pierce was. hit by shore] Dr. Adhemar De Varos, Presi- coming from work on his way|§.S. “ALCOA PLANTER” sails Sth September — eaphowhe:
edrooms and all modern conventence®. | hiso a quantity of machine broken, stone UNIFLO : : battery fire near Songjin August}dent of the (Progressive party of home. The money he sent Hare- NEW ORLEANS SERVICE
Apply: “Blise Court”, Mane. t.f.m, [concrete stone 4” chips 44” chips 3 8” wane nt eae ee india O1l Co.) 6th. The Pierce per aa three| Brazil conferred with Bremen wood 7 aew oo oot belong to
.7, 52-4 “ ~, Se 7 5 vithin a i - : “ 30% ‘urrell Hare- z
Ge pnd ums. | Coulis: Haye te, WICO (block letters) ; direct hits the Navy said and re-|Senate President Wilhelm Kaisen either Holder or . hin A STEAMER sails 17th July, — arrives 2nd August
Manager Lodge Stone Works Co, Dial) x Goice is HEREBY GIVEN that| tired from the area as a result of| yesterday on increasing trade rela- Wood brought the monty (0 SITS) A SHIRAI S805 Sit 2:17 — 2 ies ee ee ee
WANTED ney | SHO, Standard Oll (Antilign) SA. Of) retiree ; E tions between Brazil and Germ: 4-) and he gave it to the owner of the| A STEAMER sails 14th August — arrives 30th August
LIPTON’S TEA — The brand that due| Panama City, Panama, being the proprie- serious damage. veen Brazil a ermany.| anes, STEAMER ails 28th August — arrives rath “September ai
to maintenance of quality commands| tor of the abovementioned trade mark —U.-P. De Varos is touring West Ger- A STEAMER sails lth September —arrives ptem|
the largest sale in the world, Available|a5 assigned them with the good.



many to study the possibilities of} Linton then went on to mention



will of the business connected therewith

HELP







stg)! cuesere. | ‘Sawe ny park oe the] {) Esso Standard Oil, S.A... of Pangina expanding Brazilian German trade.}other people ‘whom he had asked ROBERT THOM LTD.—NEW YORK & GULF SERVICE
Applications ave invited for @ position) change same dor valuable gifts fram | aforesaid, ‘by instrument dated 5th pune Cuban E He will conduct talks with repre-|to draw money for him, There was
of SPENO-TYPIST at Cable and Wireless, John F, Hutson Ltd,, Agents 1952. ; ‘ xport sentatives of the German cotton|never a time when he had written
iW.) Late St Lawrence. Previous 13.8.52—2n And all persons are warned against in

Bi ace aie fringing the said marks. industry here to-day.

office experience desiroble

Apply by letter stating age and quali- Dated this Ist day of August 1952

“TiPTons Corrie — i To U.S. Raised
LIPTON’S COFFEE — The brand that A ee ee To Jee 1se

—U-P.




























































. a 5 2
fications to The Div 1 Manaer,| has won universal favour amongst con- eee ofa Taare that for afew years, C i" ati: N t : al Steamsh ps
West Indies, Cable and’ Wireless ‘W.1) | noisseurs. Fresh supply now in the hands waaks wrANDAD are (ANTILLES), WAS GTON MILITARY MEN WILL George Bishop, Keith’s father, and an all a 100 ee 1
eee wae ides te seme, UO AO |... neeo apcibhn: Cyba's 1952 sugar quota to ibe] DECIDE ON MANUS Is, |timselt, nad not been on spesiting Bix:

They are worth valuable ‘ftge aifts| and ESSO STANDARD Ol, SA. United States dea Pe, ; ™ Af + terms. On one occasion he had
MISCELLANEOUS which ‘cap be seon at the Barbados 12.8.52—3n as ra y WASHINGTON, Aug. 12. | to reject canes which were brought SOUTHBOUND
y 1 f
eee J Aquatic Club as well as at John F. Hut- 29,737 tons, to compens or) Secretary of State Dean Ache-|to the factory by Keith Sails Sails Salk — Arrives Sails
HOME for half bred Labrador for 5} son Lid, Agents an expegted déficit in home sugar|son at news conference T th) Montreal Halifax Boston Barbados Berbades
months preferably or if necessary per- 13.8.52—2n.| LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE ’ ence on Tues-|He has warned Nt more than|/;apy NELSON _.. 1 Aug. 4Aug. 6 Aug. M2 Aug. 16 Aug.
manently Very aifectionate Not a — TRANSFER & REMOVAL production, the State Deparpment day said that the military repre= | once. CANADIAN CRUISER OR ae Aus. Sue = ae: a Sen
fighter. Phone 3220, G. L, Taylor SOUR GRASS— Quantity of Sour Grass} ‘The application of Ceci! Fitzroy Scan- for Agriculture said in Washing-|sentatives of the United States,} There were some occasions when CANADIAN CONSTRUCTOR Bact oe a 4
128.62 —dn-Jfor ‘sale by weight to plantation. Crap] tlebury of Doughlin Village, St. Andrew, | ton. Australia, and New Zealand will|peasants canes were allowed to be| LARY ROONST rieNemn 12 Sept. 15 Sept — 4 Sept. 28 Sept
five Marae (St, | Fhilip's perish) apply | purchaser of Ldquor Liceng> No. We? | “The Agricultural. Departmentidecide at the September mesting|brought in without the cans! LADY ee Sb Bept. Ra. FER Fee,
LOST & FOUNE 12,8.52—2n| yespect of the ground floor of a two-|in announcing the increase »%! in Hawaii the desirability of Am~-| weigher being notified. This oc-
. Ce mally Storey wall building at Fi mers st, Cuban sugar, which brings Cuba's een weer and planes again)curred on Mondays and Saturdays NOKTHBOUND canna ee dutiaué indaties - smeateen
ow ° e ally, una ) 2e isSlon to 1 he saic v oa sing a
Sn ee eee ——~ | Telegraph, England's leading Daily News- eas - 3 eats and tle shop at total quota this year to 2,744,808 ve of New Ge Island base ae because on these days the planta ANGER a a Boston aos 2 Be
LOST paper now arriving in Barbados by Air) Houphiin's Village,, St. Andrew tons, said that total productions uinea. —U.P. | tions could not put in their quotas| CANADIAN Calan BS. PO fa P
en re “ — ‘only a few days after publication in| pated this @th day of August, 1052 of home grown sugar beet are 4 DIE: owing to labour shortage. AO DIAN CRUISER 3 S Sept. 10 Sept. —- ® 3 3
WRIST WATCH —On Saturday 9th it ner. owe Oe SMe, So teats le NV aaiat tte, Di mre not expected to exceed 1,600,000 : 17 INJURED He , em CANADIAN CONSTRUCTOR WS Sept. 19 Sept. | 9 Bech. ste
» Garrisc one i) jold. Wiis’ On LNG.. Pp Police I strate s - ” , said that day opened % . Le 4 ,
the Garrison, one 11) Lady's Gold Wisp Tel, sins. 17.4.59-—t.t.0 Signed CECH F. SCANTLEBUNY tons—about 200,000 tons below] JIN MINE EXPLOSION rainy and plantations could not LADY RODNEY Gait Mo Gept. 2 Cet. Det at Get get
municate with Gwendolyn Ifill, Sp. 2iin,| VENETIAN BLINDS—Made to order) N.B.—This application wit be consia- |e statutory figure. y LILLE, France, Aug. 12. | get in their quotas, word was sent|LADY NELSON .. ty Ost, ai Oct, 30 Oct. 31 Oct, “4 Nov.
mR # re 7 ; a metal a raey) All sao" 4)! ered at a Licensing Court to be held at bean the U. rae Sugar “8g The death toll in the Schneider |around to the who were
eolours, imi jate delivery 2 pe % » Court, strict “F”’ on Friday the rts e o>. 2 been in- $ ‘. *
®HOOGDVOOPIVOHUHOODOHOS Seeger RARTAN. Mera Compawy| ceur tase ar August, 1068 At 11 o'clock, DORM ae Pig ie Feet5.156 pit mine explosion rose to four|allowed to send in as many tonS| yor further particulars, apply to—
c/o Barbados Advocate 9,8.52—6n | am maar a ane hig oa a the ae mine exploded.|as_ they had. t ie” tha GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD
ry ea —_—--- 1. R, EDWARDS, i , Main Prod 'S, ere were burnt victi Linton said that some 9 . —Agents.
Floor Sanding BBTABIX — Frech geipeent of, this Police Magistrate, Dist, “F." 24,800 tons, and the Virgin|of whom were on the dag ist books which were stolen were in
delicious and nours nn cerea us re Pa sl e . . te + >
Ol caived, and is available from your| ._ se a ‘ Islands by 298 tons. — Three bodies were brought to|bis handwriting.
racer. | Tt can be served in many ways The Department said that the|the surface in Valenciennes early | To Mr. Reece: I know a good
> | anc with WEETABiX in the house it =

| cunpiies » mea) any tiie of the day distribution of the deficit to other| this morning after the cxplosion|™&PY Peasant proprietors. I also

and Polishing U.N. Troopship

JOHN F. HUTSON LTD producing areas does not change} shook the pit a know a good many lorry drivers.

13.8.52—2n 4 \the total amount of the sugar] were Gok cue en. BL I know Norris’ truck and I also

NU-FLOOR WAY pa wh pea Sunk quota set up under = 1948 I nbaiinabiiaiabaibnin: know the Murals rat in
et us make you proud of |Sugar Act, which remains at p recent years vig
seers iter Sah tom api LONDON, Avg. 12. | 7,980,000 tons, Also the "getion| Touch With Bar bados| jiiiic of Alma Murrell. I do not|$
or too large A North Korean communique} does not prevent the domestic Coastal Station know Sarah Holder at all, I am) ¥

both Gasoline
Call;
co.,

We operate
Electric Machines.

and

CABLE AND WIRELESS (West indies)
Limited, advise that they can now]
communicate with the following ships

claimed on Tuesduy that a United

q 5 beet area from selling more than
Nations troopship had been sunk

quite sure that Keith Bishop pod
its downward adjusted quota, in

LTD his lorry brought in M

EVELYN ROACH &









E CO, r Me dpgaet i iy ‘}.canes. All the transactions were = r= =o .
ae off the east coast, the oltcial| the event of it being able to do) ES*nicibeu kui ts anal ss | genuine. T taught George Bish-|% wage ang
ft eaid: “Nea Ree Seat’ hata our | 8° OP. Dorathy aStevensan, 8.8. Cottien,” 5s op’s son, Keith, at school. He was C G TRAN AT ‘
: e , entire, ‘a » &.8 0 ie, 8.8, casi
units sank two enemy trawlers Scholey, acs. Asokcosues sa, Reso] aa ROY Bnet hes cacnmony oe ; from So , to Martinique,
Sailings uthampton Guadeloupe,
Barbados, Trinidad, La Guaira, Curacao & Jamaica

flog him. George Bishop’s land is
next to mine, a aay, occasions
we have had qua’ about stock

ing on each other’s land. George

Rotterdam, 5.8. Regent Caribou, s.s
Ebro, s.s. Uruguay, s.s
8.8. Rio Jachal, s.s

Artillero, 5.5.
a8

and one troopship and damaged
one destroyer.” No details were
given,

U.S. PRESIDENTIAL
ELECTION TO PRECEDE
| NATO. MEETING

Lady Nelson,
Corinthic, s,s,
Cottikea. M/V Prospector,
Queen Mary/Gbtt, 5.4 St Rosa,|















HURRICANE

—(UP.)



ss. Vianna, 5.8. Alcoa Polaris, s.s shop subsequently accused me
‘ } Buceaneer, M/T Attila, ss. Hulst, ss | of belog hard on his son, Keith.
; ke Toky LONDON, Aug. 11. | Raumala. #5 Atalanta, s.s. Marina, s.s.| Whenever Norris came his truck 2 From Southampton Arrives Barbados
Quake Jars Tokyo | gyioin is coming around 10] Pes 5 Basis’. 2 maamant | Was recorded. ‘COLOMBIE” .. Sist July, 1952 ..
Sweet drenms the United States view that the|s.s. Willemstad, 9.8. Iriona, s.s. Peter At this stage the Court was *“DE GRASSE” .. 22nd Aug., 1962 ..
TOKYO, Aug. 13. | next meeting of the North Atlan- Jebsen, 5.5. S. Felix, s.s. Aleoa Ranger. | adjourned until 10.00 a.m. today.

No fuss An earthquake, described by | *Not calling at Guadeloupe

“rather strong’,

no tears

HINT No. 4.

tie C ‘ s
setamuale a ie Council must be put off until



w a is Just an- |iolted To a ee. vaieniben ES ~~ Pa ——. eee SAILING FROM BARBADOS TO EUROPE
other stage in he [jolted TOKVS fy. There were no|=icction, _ authoritative sou ; A STITCH IN TIME
clasp happy business ot | immediate reports of damage. The said on Sunday. . a 4 4“ *“DE GRASSE”

WARNINGS crowing up, when | "quake was reported centred in| Some West European nations SAVES NINE. “COLOMBIE”















YOU ARE INVITED
Next Sundiy evening from 430 {| W ATC H ES

Works contain raodern appliances for the execution of
first-class work of all kinds, and ecially to
SUGAR MACHINERY and STEAMSHIPS
Dealers in AGRICULTURAL MACHINERY and
GENERAL ENGINE ROOM STORES

This Week *s
Special

——

the magazines.
SEE THEM TO-DAY
At Your Gas Showroom.
Bay Street.
$O020-4$0000O0666000005% to 5.30 p.m. in Queen’s Park, to |

listen to a talk by an eye-witness
of seven of most glorious Cathe

Mother insistson |the Boxo peninsula, some 40 miles|haye been angling for a meeting *“DE GRASSE”
southeast of Tokyo. of the N.A.T.O. within the next few e
After a hurricane — }}, ROBINSON’S ‘patent. GROATS weeks. The United States has
Drive pee: (he soil § RATES OF EXCHANGE ee Srastiont Cesens So when your SHOES begin to wear
may e was rom SFIS, 7 *
under the paving and WANTED AUVQUET 913, 2908 — ees — pay Have them done Nicely
collapse with the weight [HOUSE on ong leae by October it] 12 6/10% Pr. Cheques on - |Ment, After an’ initial’ hesitation,
of the car. Laces varnish. 3 ‘bedre Fomual sight or De- weer | Britain was understood to have at BATA SHOE REPAIR
Poweknce, Woriog, paaswall or W/12.€/10% Br. copie vn we e™ Pro Sccented tile view. Me eee
‘Top greek Preteraay ‘ tue 71 1/10% Pr, Currency 69 4/10% Fx. | * —ve.
r ¥ enclose s . Coupons (40% 1x
Hdwards 4149 or 2375, (1 50% Pr Siver oer? A NEW SHIPMENT OF — —
81.7 .$2—t.f.n. . CANADA }
107/108 Pr. cyeanen se MASTER PADLOCKS
SSF HHP HHSOHS % : Beene ate Pie a BADOS I D ’ THE CE
ie tite be. Cate cece : . NTRAL ,
> AND NOW 78 alow Pr: Currency 16 9/165 Pr White Park Road, Bridgetown EMPORIUM
; a 50% Pr Silver. 20% Pr.
> f ; you can have &
$ A GAS COOKER S ENGINEERS, BRASS and IRON FOUNDERS
like these you have admired ja B U LO VA

















Only a few in stock as | EXCELLENT BUILDING LAND AT THE



































| drals the face of the eartl | the quota is limited. of DeMEpHee
ECLAIRS TO-DAY'S NEWS FLASH Wh {} Stucco ss an hi] BUT, YOUR BEST BET ]]/% IRRIGATION PROJECTS, PUMPING EQUIPMENT Se Hela aataay iieeie.s2 zara’
" Cathedral states vadican eis JS TO GET ONE and ELECTRICAL INSTALLATIONS A SPECIALTY sean ty: is tae
sler, | nice, aly, mat 1 ral eal i f — o je
G ¢ each WONDERFUL ASSORT-~ St"Folmn the Baptists Pies and th ot a a For Very Reasonable P ric es.
MENT OF Sepulchre, Jeruaglem, in the Hol . quality. Satisfaction, Quality and Service e
G . . by Professor C N. Weekes and it 17 Jewels Guaranteed ‘i
ieceias Lan Walking Sticks [WP tinue the Srocious wank of Wather 4H] Y. De LIMA prima Senet See Sook: ee See
. , Just received by 1h ee ee RENE SE | ° 4 y
Pea ratte ne HY Ng BQUEMA [If THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY 1D. REALTORS LIMITED.
2 M1) ested in old Cathedrals. ee : 50 Wor
STATIONERY HH] 20 Broad St. and Phone : 4546, 4650 Workshop se is i ie 151/152 Roebuck Street, Bridgetown, Barbados
: It ») | Marine Gardens |! er manne wept: "Phone 4900

‘





WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 13, 1952



HENRY



ed
ee > â„¢

i READE Oe DARL DAA

om



(LL NEVER, NEVER
TRUST A MAN



on, No. > JOE! f
YOU'RE SO
OFPPERENT.



BLONDIE














I WAS JUST FOOLING, [ Ee ood aes
(T DIDN'T COST ANYTHING -- | [TW NENTY ENTY
I MADE IT MYSELF ;—!
4 =
Vv qwWw
2



——— spicioicaen Rae

, HA, HA, V.. WAIT TILL I \ v r Ss 2am

/ HANDSOME | KICK YOUR 4 ~ » 4
H }

; EADER FLAS HANDSOME
\. GORDON! WAIT! IN!

, _
SLOW DOWN, PAR
A HAIRPIN WON'T

A BIVOTE? KIVET! SETTING
THE HANDS OF THAT RIGGED
CLOCK SWUNG IT OVER!



BY GEORGE MC. MANUS

- minis peda) eee )
WILL YOU GIT OUT WELL-THAT'S ar re | OR WOULD ~
OF MY SIGHT ? T WHERE !T ITS FODO-GOO'S ——..{ YOU PREFER
BIRTHDAY mo r) SITTING NEXT

jOOF a es?

LosT!// J YOU WANT TO ¢ ( WoC i wo HERCULES ,



1 1S THAT ANY ) GET
AY TO TR iT

AN OLD
FRIgNDt }—

MOE RILE COA PAR BO SEALED SOG

SAA SEC Cmte EY,






tL CANT FiGUR BUT ILL GET ALL THE ANSWERS SOON
p HELLO OPERATOR? POLICE HEAD=_
QUARTERS PLEASE. (———-

WHATS MY

UT WY ANYONE
D Lie THAT AND














‘ NOES SP re OUT WHE Re THE

BOOR KID.HE NEEDS) NOO% GELONGS, HIE POOR MOTHER

A.NAP. HE'S BEEN.
THRU.A LOT. STAV

ae ERE AND GUARD
HIM, DEVIL.



2 i a

BY CARL ANDERSON |







Ps

1 he

PUNU'S ~~

otter these. Beaty Hoducts

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



D°S COLD CREAN to cleanse and soften




PAGE NINE

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Sufferers from, loss of vigour, nerv-
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failing memory, ‘and who are old anc
worn-out before their ime will be de



lighted to learn of a new gland discov
| ery by an American doctor.
! This new discovery makes it poa-
sible to quickly and easily restore vi
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rich, pure blood, to strengthen your
mind and memory and feel tike a new
man in only 8 days, In fact, this dis-
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Dieasant, ¢asy-to-take tablet form,
does away with gland operations and
begins to build new vigour and energ:
in 24 hours, yet it is absolutely harm-
less and natural in aetion.
| The success of this amazing dis-
} covery, called VI-TABS, has been so
| sreat that it is now being distributed
by all chemists here under a guarantee
of complete satisfaction or money

hack. In other word I-TABS muse

your skin. rr son you feel full of vigour and

POeND’S energy | ang from 10 to 20 years young

VANISHING CREAN er, = a merely return the amory

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j : v ABS Leth id th r

to protect your skin by day and to old your L-"t ats Letle, inte prbieta
powder matt. Vi-Tabs ©



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MODERN
TABLE
TENNIS

By
JACK CARRINGTON

IN 1938, when we asked “the English Table
Tennis Association to recommend to us an
author for a new book on table tennis, they
suggested a young and comparatively unknown
player who, they said, had not only great pos-
sibilities as a player but who had studied the
game scientifically and was able to put what
he knew on paper. The result was the excel-
lent little book Modern Table Tennis which
sold out quickly in the early days of the war,
and which we have been ‘unable to reissue
until now. Meanwhile its author has become
famous. The book has been brought com-
pletely up to date and enlarged.

rs
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PAGE TEN

VINOO MANKA

Ramadhin Will Remain
In England

(By ROY MARSHALL)

I HAVE SOME rather unfortunate news for West
Indies cricket fans this week. .Vinoo Mankad, the great
Indian Test all-rounder, will not be coming out with the
Indian side to play against the West Indies. He told me
this when I met him this week.

The 35 year old Indian professional told me “First
class and Test cricket is too strenuous these days. I have
had a good innings and now I feel 1) should make way for
younger players. But I shall continue to play League
Sets tained a blow 0 india COUNTY CRICKET

for Mankad has proved again, if concen jetettidemasnperacesteniapanean
further proof were needed, in the
Tests in England what a valuable

Surrey Defeats

player he is. An attacking open- &

ul batsman and a great slow

let.-arm bowler he would ut Middlesex At Lords
\

vortn his place in any World XI.
West Indian players who will
te returning home at the end of
the English season include Wal-
cott, Weekes and Marshall who
will be sailing on the Golfito on
Seen 30th, and Alfred Val- virtually an unassailable position.
ene 7 : ney need to win but one of
aneranie Worvel is aging t0 Seeudl their remaining "six matches to
Lut will be available for the Test wae nee ; J
matehes against India if required. ,,. he heroes of their victory to-
Sonny Ramadhin is planning to at Raddy spin bowlers Laker and
remain in England,
And now to/news of the week-
end,
Games played on Saturday, Aug, 2
The weather was unkind to the cf
Laneashire holiday crowds and Victory.
also to the League cricketers, The Wickets
Nelson-Enfield game was aban- Spare. : {
done without a ball being bowled 4 peculiar thing happened at
so that Walcott and Lindwall diq Cheltenham where Gloucestershire
not come to grips. In none of the Were playing the Indians. The
games in which West Indians tourists despite a sound innings of
appeared was a definite result 80 by Adihikari were 60 behind on

(From Our Own Correspondent)
LONDON, Aug. 12.
The county cricket champion-
ship is practically all over bar
suouting. Surrey with a great win
at Lords over Middlesex are in

oth captured four wickets in
Middlesex second innings and the
home side were all out for 152,
Surrey were left to get 101 for
They did it with eight
and seven minutes. to

obtained, the first. innings, Gloucestershire
trying to ¢onsolidate their lead

BACUP vs. RISHTON went for quick runs and in doing

so lost quick wickets. Ghulam

The Bacup-Rishton game ‘was Ahmed and Phadkar kept an im-

dominated by Everton Weekes maculate length and it was impos-
who was at his brilliant best in cibjie to force them away.

recording his third century of the The county batsmen discovered
season. He batted for two hours {pis to their cost. When Bailey
making 114 not out, including 13 declared they had lost 47 for 7.
fours. Baeup declared at 180 for Needing 108 for victory the In-
5 but after Rishton had been bat- gizns were soon in trouble but
ting for an hour to make 86—5 a Umrigar 85 and Adhikari 28 not

hailstorm broke over the ground the
to prevent any further play. oe 4

EAREEANCASHIRE vs, THE SCOREBOARD midis
LOWERHOUSE erieae wen sy an wea

Gloucestershire 198 and 47 for

The powerful East Lancashire

si "om the toss : i vi .. 7 decl'd

side ae akucen tows Indians ...... 138 and 108 for 4
house batted only 45 minutes to Essex ere Warwick
make 38—1 when rain brought Mate rawn

Essex 153 and 196 for 8
Townsend 5 for 47.
Warwick 228 and 208 for 7 decl’d
Notts versus Worcester

about an early close, Marshall
needing 28 to beat the previous
best Professional aggregate for
Lowerhouse was 12 not out.



CENTRAL LANCASHIRE .
LEAGUE

The same fate that befell the
Lancashire League clubs was the
lot of the Central Lancashire
teams, >

The best performances of the
day was put up by the young
Jamaican amateur R, Tomlinson

laying for Radeliffe against
Stockport. In 1%4 hours he and
Frank Worrell dismissed Stock-

port for 61. Frank took 4—32 and
Tomlinson eclipsed this with 6—
27. Radcliffe did not have time
to bat before the rain came,

The Wallsden-Crompton game
also petered out into a draw after
Wallsden batting for 2% hours
made 126. Crompton in the ten
minutes before rain made 9—2.
This game was only noticeable
for the fact that Ramadhin who
took 6—71 became the second
bowler in the Lancashire League
to claim 100 wickets this season

MATCH PLAYED AUGUST
4TH

Lowerhouse - East Lancashire.
East Laneashire soundly defeated
T.gverhouse in this return bank
holiday fixture. Scoring 230—6
declared in 2% hours, East Lan-
cashire dismissed Lowerhouse for
80 in just under 2 hours of which
Marshall seored 10.

ITALY’S CYCLE
CHAMPION IS
RECOVERING

BOLOGNA, Italy, Aug. 12

Fausto Coppi, Italy’s “champion
of champions” cycle racer, injured
in a crash during a race in France
recently, is recovering satisfac-
torily with ‘no preoccupations”,
his doctors said,

Coppi, who fractured his collar
bone at Peppignan, was encased
ih a cast covering his right
shoulder yesterday at the Pizzoli
Clinic here,, He will remain in
the cast until September 3. After
the application of the cast, Coppi
left with his wife and daughter
for Novi Ligure for a vacation.
He intends to begin practice on
a stationary cycle soon and will
return_to racing after his recov-
ery.—U.P,



They'll Do It Every T ime me

16 SO NICE OF

YOU, FLOTILLA, TO

REMEMBER OUR

ANNIVERSARY*++
WHY, ITS IT'S

UH JUST WHAT
WE ALWAYS

A LIFE-SIZE DOLL’
WITH A CLOCK IN. \’
ITS STOMACHâ„¢+YOU
ADMIRED THE ONE
ON MY MANTEL,
AND YOU HAVE

Match Drawn
she pb tebe a bas 0% 196
Worcester ....308 for 6 decl'd.
(Kenyon 171) and 20 for 1.
Northants versus Derby
Derby won by 5 wickets
Northants ........ 219 and 172
Derby 198 and 195 for 5
Somerset versus Glamorgan
Glamorgan won by 50 runs
Somerset 171 for 9 decl’d and
114; Muncer 6 for 26,
Glamorgan 229 and 106 for 9
decl’d,
Hampshire versus Lancashire
Lancashire wou by 25 runs
Hants 150 and 166
Tattersal 6 for 71
Lanes. 133 and 208 for 8 decl’d
Yorkshire versus Sussex
Match Drawn
Yorkshire .... 197 for 4 decl’d
Sussex ............ 188 for 5
Leicestershire versus Kent
Leicestershire won by 9 wickets
Leicestershire 209 and 26 for 1
RE ees oy o'e'eis 08 182 and 102
Surrey versus Middlesex
Surrey won by 8 wickets

Notts



Surrey 4. .'s 129 for 9 decl’d
and 102 for 2 f

Middlesex . 77 and 152
CHESS:



ARGENTINA, SWEDEN
RUSSIA IN THE LEAD

HELSINKI, Aug. 12

Argentina, Sweden and Russia
were leading each a? te vac.
groups Of chess Olympics in the
preliminary tournament before
tne third round started today.
Sweden holds the highest points
of.eight after an unbroken series
of individual victories, while Ar-
gentina has seven points and
Russia six, with one game hang-
ing from the first round.

Standings after the second round
with four games hanging: Group
1; Argentina °, West Germany 6.5
(1 hanging); Denmark 6, the Saar
3, Britain 2.5, Czechoslovakia 2.5,
Cuba 0.5 (1 hanging), Luxem-
bourg 0,

Standings are: Group 2: Sweden
8 Hungary 5.5, East Germany 5.5,
Yugoslavia 5, Italy 2.5 (2 unfin-
ished), Austria 1.5 (2 unfinished)
Brazil 1.5, Norway 0.5.

Group 3:—Russia 6 (1 unfinish-

ed), U.S.A. 5.5; Holland 5, Fin-
land 4.5, Poland 3.5, Switzerland
3.5, Greece 2.5, Israel 0.5 (1 un-

finished) .—-U.P.

Registered U. 5. Potent Office

GA / RATS WHAT MOMMY
GETS FOR BEING
POLITE AND PRAISING

THE DIZZY THINGS



KID

German.

Kid German fought his first
engagement on July 11 and he
won this by a knockout in the
third round. His next contest is
due to take place on Friday,
August 15, and it is against the
American Freddie Dawson,

German writes to tell me that
he is booked for five fights in
Australia and then he expects to
return to England in November,

Returning

He then plans to return to Bar-
bados next year. He begs to be
remembered to his many friends
and followers who have supported
him staunchly through his career.

Kid German, the pocxet battle-
ship as we all knew him when
he began his southpaw career, has



BARBADOS ADVOCATE



GERMAN.

Kid German Wins

In Australia

By THE SPORTS EDITOR

SIDE BY SIDE with the report of the tragic death in
Australia of Dave Sands, British Empire Middleweight
Champion and Middleweight and Heavyweight Champion
of Australia, comes news of successful campaigning in that
country by former Barbados Lightweight Champion Kid

done much to place Barbados on

the boxing map of the_ world,
Messrs. C, B, Layne and Keith
Chandler, the former promoters
of the Yankee Stadium, had much
faith in this young battler when
he made his debut as a prelimin-
ary contender in the late 1940's.

He was given every opportun-
ity to prove himself and within
a year after his debut in profes-
sional boxing he was among the
finalists.

Hectic Fights

His hectic
lentless rival

fights with his re-
Lightfoot Kid, his

TABLE TENNIS





Trinidad Team
Arrives Tonight

The visiting Trinidad Table Ten-
nis team is expected to arrive at
Seawell Airport at 9 o’clock to-

ight. The team, representing the
San Fernando Zone of the Trini-
dad and Tobago Table Tenni:
Association, will play a series of
games against Barbados.

The first match will be o1
Thursday night at the Y.M.C.A
Naval Hall when the visitors will
meet Pelican, Inter-Club Chamr
ions for this year. On Friday nigh
Trinidad will play a combine:
sarna-Y,.M.P.C, team,

Representing Pelican are; L.
Worrell, R. Phillips, F. Willough-
Ly, M. Shocombe and P. Rice.

The Earna-Y.M,P.C. team is as
follows: C, Greenidge, L. Stoute,
A, Howard, E. Goodridge, C
Humphrey and D, Archer.

Special arrangements have been
made to accommodate the large
crowd which is expected to 9t-
tend these matehes,

THAT'LL MAKE A NICE
COMPANION PIECE FOR

SHE GAVE US LAST
CHRISTMAS *++

~ WITH FLO'S
|] TASTE SHE'D MAKE



"T’ryNG Not To
SHUDDER AS YOU LOOK
A GIFT HORSE IN
S) THE TEETH »ss.
THANX AND A HATLO
HAT TIP TS
R.WERNER LEDERER,
99 NO.6â„¢ ST.
NEWARK 7, NT.

— ———

disposing of all local opposition
here prefaced another successful
stage of his career when he
sought further laurels in the
neighbouring colony of Trinidad.

From Trinidad he ‘secured a
contract in England and has been
fighting there ever since, He has
now been engaged for five fights
in Australia the first of which he
has already won, Local sporting
fans will join with me in wishing
him every success in his engage-
ments “Down Under.”



less, imm





D WILL NOT TOUR B.W.L.

Why Trueman Has Kepi His “Devil”

By D. COMPTON.
CRITICS of the so-called lack of young talent in
county cricket often argue that it is due to National Ser-
vice taking youngsters away for two years when pt)

would be gaining first-class

Possibly many promising play-
ers are handicapped by a lack of
opportunities, but recent events
indicate that this does not apply
so much to fast bowlers,

With all the admiration jin the
world for FRED TRUEMAN, I
Suggest that service in the R.A.F.
has been anything but a disadvan-
tage to his cridéket.

Fred’s last three first-class
matches have been Tests. Each
time he has come fresh to the
g — almost bursting to let him-
self go.

..Unlike some overworked and

tired county fast bowlers, Fred

should retain the edge of his
speed to the end of the season.

INSPIRING SIGHT

The difference shown by a
“fresh” fast bowler was never
better illustrated than before the
war when, throughout August,
schoolmaster Ken FARNES regu-
larly played for Essex during his
holidays.

In that month he always seemed
yards quicker than bowlers whe
normally were not far below his
pace,

When going full sail, Trueman
is an inspiring sight, but I be-
lieve that when he resumes
first-class cricket six ‘days a
week he will need to be handled
carefully to preserve his “fire.”
ARTHUR CARR, ‘he former

Notts captain used to “nurse”

HAROLD LARWOOD like a
mother. seldom giving him more
than a few overs in a spell, even
when he was running through
a side.

I believe it to. be no bad thing
that Trueman will still be in the
R.A.F. next season, when the
Australians are here.

If he mainté@ins his present pace
and “devil” he could surprise
them, particularly if quick wick-
ets are prepared.

LEAGUE FIND

Another R.A.F. fast bowler who
has been among the wickets is
Worcestershire’s new pace man,
30-year-old KEN LOBBAN, of
Jamaica.

His is a most unusual story.
He arrived in the Midlands as a
member of the R.A.F, at the end
of the war, and until this season
achieved nothing higher than the
second division of the Birming-
ham League.

Then he burst upon the first

experience.

on him when injuries robbed them
of the services of REG
and JOHN FLAVELL.

tell me that he is very fast. Cer-|
tainly he is ideally suited for fast

bowling, and those who know
his background have no fears of
his stamina.

ergy has massive shoulders which
taper to a wasp-like waist.

at him. you might think he earn-
ed his living as a heavyweight

as a professional !
county cricket as an amateur. I

t he
fight with Don Cockell.

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 13, 1952



PERKS

BOXER TOO
Batsmen who have played Ken

This 124 stone bundle of en-
Such is his frame that, looking

boxer.
You would be right! He boxes}
But play?

wonder whether there is any pre-

cedent for this?

For years Ken has
figured on Midland boxing bills.
Among his victims are George
Dawson, Derek Alexander, and
Jack Longford. He has also
fought Don Scott and Jack
Darl

ington. :
Recently he acted as sparring
partner to Randolph Turpin when
ex-world middleweight
champion was preparing for his

TRAINING RUNS

When Ken is not boxing or play-
ing cricket he works as a civilian
lorry-driver for the R.A.F. Pre-
viously he was a steel worker at
Brierley Hill. :

As part of hi§ training then he
tran the 14 miles from home to
work.

Next move may be for gatemen
at county grounds to be instructed
to admit a heavily-built and
heavily-sweatered individual go-
ing through the _ motions of
shadow-boxing at the double.

He'll just be running to
work and limbering up, mday-
be, for a gentle 35 or 40 overs
of fast bowling.



Miller Seeks
Sands’ Title

NEW YORK, Aug. 12

Sammy Burns, manager of the
South African middleweight
Duggie Miller, announced
Tuesday that he had submitted
Miller’s name to the British Box-
ing Board as a contender for the
vacant title of
champion of the British Empire.

————e—e—e—e—e—e—e—e—e—e—e—————————e—e—e—e—e—eeeeeeaeaeaeaeaesS=SeaeaeaeaeeeOesS Ee aaaaaaa&wwnwnw anaes |



White shoes, to pass muster
in company, must be spot-

Propert’s White Renovato
or Propert’s Shuwhite. No

surer way of making sure S
that white shoes are white! F

PROPERT'S

SHUWHITE & WHITE RENOVATOR

division of the league with Kid-
derminster, :

Analyses of seven for 9 and
seven for 37 attracted the atten-
tion of Worcestershire, who called

The title was vacated on Monday
by the death of Australia’s Dave
Sands.—U.P.



aculate. Use



He Lost the Pains inhis Arms

No wonder this man dreaded
going to work, for rheumatic
pains in his arms made it torture




rheumatism very badly and had
such pains in my arms I scarcely
knew how to use them. Then I
was told to try Kruschen Salts,
and after using one bottle I
found relief. So, of course, I have
kept on with it, am now thor-
oughly better and have never felt
so fit for years. I used to feel
miserable and sluggish, but now
it is a pleasure to work ins

of a dread.’’—S.B,

The pains and stiffness of
rheumatism. are usually caused
by deposits of excess uric acid in
the muscles and joints. Kruschen
stimulates the kidneys and other
intestinal organs to regular
healthy action so that all the
excess uric acid is expelled
through the natural channels.
When that goes, aches and pains
go too. Freshness and vigour
are restored,

If you are troubled with rheu-
matism, give Kruschen a@ trial
yourself. You can get it from
all Chemists and Stores,

TE I A TS LE EE

In Cartons with Sponge a



Shirts
Pyjamas
middleweight Socks

&
them. Yet to-day he feels | 6 s
fitter than ever and work is 6 % WITH %
pleasure, as he tells in his letter : | %
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Full Text

PAGE 1

r PACE TIN BAKU UK!-. AIIVOt'ATIWEDNESDAY, M (.1-1 i VINOO MANKAD WILL NOT TOUR B.W.I. Ranuulhin Will Remain hi England (R> ROY MARSHALL) OME lather unfortunate news toi West Indies nickel ram this week. Vu.ou Mankad, it %  I all-rounder, will not be ooniiai OBI with the ,-i the West Indie* He told me hen I met him this week, The SJ year old Indian professional told me "First icket is too strenuous these days. I have had a good Inning! and now I feel I should make way for younger players But I shall continue to play League ,„ ,,.,,„. cot \/l CMHXgT sin, if further |.r.>f wen need) i valuable. \n attacking open,,,v \lulil/fit' r \l I ini< h, wouu be Mtauu8ex.iiLiOra& World XL ,„„, „., „. H n. j LJ _-| player* who will iXJNDON, Aug. 12. returning home at the end of Thr f „ unlv cricket champronSurrey Uv feats the English season include Wal.hjp u practically all over ylaraha.l who v ill b* nailing on the Gplllto on and Alfred Val< ntmc. b.ii .jtii.g. murrey with a great win ai LOTUS over Middlesex are in virtually an unassailable position in the United States .—_-_„ phmT.i7i. I planning to j^^ r the week* %  £ P" %  rtl " wllh cl hl smc ni jihan"ParrI. .,,,.,, A prcuIlM tiling happened at ,„ ,,l d |„ Clultiiihum where Gloucestershire HI In if of the%  <" % %  liliiyiiiK ill" Indians. The h WM Indians '""'"'; IS'""' J """h" ,""''"".* "' I was „ rtcnnlto result 80 by AdJiikun wire 60 behind on obtained ,nc tlI!t mnlngs. aioucesU > xhlrc trying to consolidate their lead B U IP vs. KISIITON' went for quirk runs and In doing so lost qulek wickela. Ghulam The Barup-h ,..,, phadkar kept an imt by Rverton Weekes mi(CU | a te length nnd it was Imposvho was at his I i In ...i,],. ; ,, („,<,. ,|„. n i sway. ircording hiUllrd century of the The county batsmen discovered season. Ha Kitted for two hours „„, „, men coat. When Bailey 114 nol mil. Including i „, IM 47 for ?. Baeup rlrclnred a' mo for N ,c„ig |u for victory the InII..1IS Why Trueman Has Kepi His "Devil" By I I i n Mr 11 is CRITICS of the so-called lack of young talent in county cricket often argue that it is due to National SerVice taking youngsters away for two years when they would be gaining first-class experience. Possibly many promising playon liim when injuries robbed them indicgned by > lack of of the services of Rt on anything but a dlsadvanhis background have no fears of • to hU crisket. his stamina. Freds last three first-class -rhii 12* stone bundle of cnmatches have been Tests. Each erg y has massive shoulders which he has come fresh to the laper to a wasp-like waist. ; une, almost bursting to let himU go Unlike sonu* orerujorlci-d and nred eouniu /art ootelers, fred should retain the edge of hut *fK"rJ to the end of the season. "Such is his frame that, looking at him you might think he earned his living as a heavyweight INSIMRlMi SIGHT The KID GFRMW ton i, H d Lsssn bat((1 wenjaoon in trouble but ting for M hour to make 88—S a Umrlgar 35 and Adhikari 28 no* m broke "" ... ...... over the grwind QUl pun^ t hcn. round ond *hey further play. won by „ lx Wll k , THE s six wlrkeU. Glouccftletshire 198 and 47 for dec I'd Indians 138 and 108 for 4 Fjwex vemu Warwick M.Ii h 1-r.vM. Essex 1 53 and 106 for 8 tsend 0 for 41. Warwick 228 and 208 for ded'd "i e Natla versus Worci-strr Match Drawn Notts .. 1W. W..it. -1.1 308 for 6 deel'd. IAST LANCASHIRr. vs. The powerful Eosi Lancashire i de wop the ton and in l.'v hours made U3 I Lowei I Itted 1 • I minutes to nake H — | %  i.. ,1 ra n brougbi about an early close, fcsannall ii'-edina 28 i" beat the previous "fesslonHl aguii l>iwnhnusr was 12 nol out Kid German Wins In Australia By THE SPORTS ll>l lot: SIDE BY SIDE with the report of the tragic death fin Australia of Dave Sands, British Empire Middleweight Champion and Middleweight and Heavyweight Champiot. of Australia, comes news of successful campaigning in that country by former Barbados Lightweight Champion Ki l German. first disposing of all local oppositU YCu would be right? He boxes us a professional! But plav county cricket at an amateur. I wonder whether there is any precedent for this? tor several yer Ken has llsnrsd on Midland boxing bill*. Amour; his vleUms are G-WSe lin.M.11. ivi-ch Alexander, ond Jack Loncford. He has also foimlit Don Scott and Jack Darllncton. Recently he acted as sparring below his partner to Randolph Turpm when the ex-world middieweignr champion was preparing for his BgB| with Don Cockcll. TRAINING RUNS When Ken is not boxing or playing cricket he works as a civilian lorry-driver for the RAF. Previously he was a steel worker ai llnerley Hill As part of hit train ng then he ran the 14 miles from home to workNext move may be for gnlcineii at county grounds to be insirurtert BUTTONS BUTTONS BUTTONS BUTTONS BUTTONS difference shown by a man" f Jlfl t bowler was never 1 tter Illustrated than before the *a r when, throughout August, .hiImaster Ken FARNES recu%  %  •d for Kssex during his I ilidays. In that month he always seemed irda a ukk e r than bowlers who aarmau7 were not fl When -HIM: full sail. Trueman l an 1-1 .pin.u; sUhl. but 1 believe that when 1. main'iteM-cbuss erlchet six isjass a % %  % % %  \. li will need to be handled %  in full' to pre*rrvr his "fir,-. 1 AKTIlt K I AKK. lit former Molts captain used to "nurse" HAROLD I.ARWOOD like n notocTi seldom giving him more iiian a few overs in a sp,'ll. even when he was ninon*. through I baUgftM it to be no bad thing to ~Tdmit"'a~ heavily-built and mat Trueman will still be In the beavily-sweatered individual g R A.F. next season, when the Insthrough t Australians are here. If he maintains his present pace nnd "devil" he could surprise ihem, particularly If quick wick%  < are prepared. LEAGUE FIND Another R.A.F. fast bowler who lias been among the wickets Is Worcestershire's new pace man. 30-year-old KF.N I.OBBAN. 01 ALL COLOURS ALL SIZES ALL PRICES CAVE SHEPHERD & CO., LTD. 10, 11. 12 & 13 BROAD STREET eaaesaaaee MM oaeea M saaaa o shadow-boxing at the double. He'll Just be runnhiff to tcork and limberino tip. maybe, for a gentle 35 or 40 OPCM of /art boirlini;. < KNTRAL LANCASHIRE LEAGUE The same fate that befell the %  I lie clubs ".the lot of the Central Lancashire • The best performance Of Hie 1 A put up by the Tourtsj Jamaican amateur it. Tornilnson playtna lot UiuU-tinV Stockport. In I1 hou (Kenyon 171) and 20 for I, Northanlo versss I>erby llcrhv won by I wicket* Noithonts 218 and 172 Derbv ... 108 and 195 for 5 .Somerset versus Glamorgan C.lamanan won by 50 runs 11 171 tor 9 deel'd and affjaaafll ttvlt laaBtWai > loi H. he and Glamorgan 229 and 100 for 9 Kal German fought engagement on July 11 and he here prefaced another successful Jamaica. won this by a knockout In the stage of his career when hc His is u most unusual story, third round. His next contest is sought further laurels in the H arrived in the Midlands as a due to take place on Friday, neigliboui mg colony of Trinidad, member of the H.A.F. at the end August IS. and It Is against the _ . ..(the war. and until this season American Kn-diiII.A .11 from Innidad he secured a .thieved nolhing higher than the HI writes to tell me that ^onlract in England and has been .erond division of the Birming... Is booked for five fights In fighting there ever since He has ham league. Australia and then he expectto nmv tx pn Cl a*a e d r r nve %  *£** Then he burst upon the first return to England in November ,n Australia the first ol which he .hvision of the league with Kidhas already won. Local sporting dcrminstcr. Returning. % % %  i will Join with me In wishing Analyses of seven for 9 and him every success m his engage>even for 37 attracted the attenFronk Worrell dismissed Btocfcdeel'd. port for flt. Frank took I 32 and Hamstahlre rersus Lanea-ddre Tonilinsui. aellpied this w;lh tt— Lancashire won by 25 %  n \ Rr.di'lifle did n.i l ti I al I foiv Hie run came. The WalUden-Cnmipton game • red out into a draw after batting for 2>i houra made 126. Crompton in the t**n for the fact lhal Pamadhln who tiKtk 6 -71 became the second howler *.n the Lancashire League too wickets this season MATCH PLAYED AUGUST 4TII Lowcrhouse -Baal L iw -hire I ll %  %  %  KHJ defeated CHfSS' r^r louae In thK return bank fixture. Scoring 230—6 declared In ?.' 1 hours, %  1 >. enshire dismis'erswn YoreshJro >9^ lor 4 deel'd Sussex 188 ret .' I.eicelershire versus Kent l,elrc*ler*hlre urn by wickets Leicestershire ^09 and 26 for 1 Kent 1 32 nnd 102 MIII., versus Middlesex Surrey woa by 8 wlrketa Surrey "29 for 9 deel'd and 102 for 2 Middle-ex < %  and IS* He then plans to return to Barments "Down L'ndei bedoa next year. He begs to be remembered to his many friend* ; nd followers who have supported :uhl. thiuugh his career, Kid German, the po-xet bntlie•liip OS we all knew him when he bo'ian his southuaw carver, done miirh to place Barbados on -he boxing map of the world, Mi%  ( %  r It Lav tic and Keitl; ("handler, the former promoters 04 the Yankee Stadium, had much btlth in this voung battler when he mnrie his debut as a preliminary contender in the late I940's. He was given every opportunity to prove himself and within a year after his debut in professional bOSRlfl lie wag among the finalists. Hectic Fight.. His hectic lights with Ins relentless rival I.ightfoot Kid. his tion of Worcestershire, who called TXHI.K TENNIS ITALY'S CYCLE CHAMPION IS RECOVERING ARGENTINA, SWEDEN RUSSIA IN THE LEAD llMf-llNlM. Aug. 12 AiKcniina. Sweden and llusali were leading eacli a." uie groups oi cness Olympic* preliminary tournament. Trinidad Team Arrives Tonight Tiling Trinidad Table Tennis rain Is expected to arrive at Seawell Alri>ort at 9 o'clock toIfht Tli* team, reprtsenting the in the i efori uw Uurd round %  %  "* !" W' SjH1 K .rnando Zone or the TrinihOUS lha highest pom" |;i(l j(||(| ^^ TnD e Tenm of alght altet an unoruKcr. i%  i %  Am ,.,.,,„,„. w( ,t pi.y a uries ol of individual viclones. while AT^ iltliiux ^ Dlirbado( UOLOONA. Italy, /vug. 12 gentina has seven points and Thv nrit mttt( h w| „ bc C| Pausto foppi, Italy's -eha.npion RUSSlS. llx, ith one game hangss| un id nlght nl lhp Y.M.C.A of championscycle racer, injured mg from the tint round. KwmX ,,.,„ wh. USA. 5.S. Holland 5. FinSpecial arrangements have b:en n stationary cvclc soon and w'll land 4.5, t*olau\. IP. finished) l\r\ lend these matchis. For all II hilv shoe*— White shoes, to pass musler in company, must be spotIcss, immaculate. Use Propcrt's White Renovato or Propcrt's Shuwhite, No [ ]£ ara surer way or making sure j>f; that white shoes arc while I PROPERTY Miller Seeks Sands' Title NEW YORK. Aug. 12 Sammy Burns, manager of tt South African middleweight %  higgle Miller, announced Tuesday that he had submitted Miller's name to the British Boxing Board as a contender for the vacant title of middleweight champion of the British F.mpi The tit!.' was vacated on Monday by the death of Australia's Dav Sands.—11. P. USED TO DREAD WORK SHUWHITE* WHITE RENOVATOR IK Cations milk Spomgr HEARTY ftetetneeoaar ofeorni %  Grand breakfast ssais sVsW Hare's lha "ppwse" of corn. Tastes powrfuUygoodl Crisp, sweat, fresh! Your bargain in gocKlnsss— KeuON* Coni Flakas. • *^ JjHr IwOTHM KNOW*^T %  " At this time of the year we sperlalire In tilling Vacation Ban*,! With everything for men, the selection ver* both Inside and out!; The quality. o4 course, will long outlast the memory of your vacation ^ JMoHernifw Your Ham** WITH \ FLOOR TILES in Your Verandah and Kitchen * Red. White, and two shades of > Speckled Cream 6 x 6, 4x 4. 3 x 3. J GLAZED WALL TILES for Bathrooms & Kitchens | White. Black and Blue. j ALUMINIUM MOULDING for counter edges I TEMPERED HARDBOARD for partitions, door panels 3 and counter tops. ft RED HAND 'S* GLOSS PAINTS RED HAND MATINTO FLAT WALL PAINTS for walls and furniture. r e M C t MMMMM>M4MtMMM - He Lost lb* fmkm* %  Ms alraM .v B aoaoeceooaa m ooooseoaooo o ooo o oooooooaeoooooc-:. .._ wonder this maa drea d ed going to work, for rho nm at t a pains In his arms mad* It tortors to ass thorn. Yot to-dsy bo foals fitter than ovor and work la a pleasure, as ho tolls la Us lottos i bad boon aofforing from rheumatism vary badly and had oucn pains In my arms I scaroaly know how to use them. Than I wss told to try Kruschen Salts. aod aftsr using one bottle I found rollof. Bo. of coarse, 1 have kept on with It. am now thoroughly bettor and have noor folt oo fit for years. 1 usod to fool miserable and Blagriob, bat now It Is a pleasure to work instead of a dread."—8.R The pains and stltTnsee of rheumatism are usually caused I bv deposits of oieoso uric acid la I the muocloo and ,oints. Kruschen 1 otlmulatostho kldiaoys and other I intestinal organs to regular I healtby action so that all the 1 aicoss uric acid l> expelled I through tho natural channels. When that gore, aches and pains I go too. Froshnoss snd vigour are restored. I If you are troubled with rheaI motion), give Krjschon a trial yourself. You can set it from I all Chemists sad Stores. Phone 4267 ;. WILKINSON & HAYNES CO., LTD. | G \Vh *& 1 imsiilfitill lhl> Features fVv offer! I* f> o>^ STYLE WORKMANSHIP SUITINGS You Surelv Must Decide on P.C.S. MAFFFJ & CO. LTD. aa Ihr "TOP" SCORKKS IN TAlLOhlM'..

















WHAT'S ON TODAY

Court of Grand Sessions 10.00 a.m

Meeting of General Board Health
2.30 p.m. -
Mobile Cinema, Heywood's Plantation
Yard, St. Peter, 7.30 p.m
ee



For the cause that lacks assistance
‘Gainst the wrongs that need resistance
For the future in the distance

And the good that I can do

ESTABLISHED 1895



Gomes criticises statement
made in Press by Adams

FEDERATION :

EGYPT:





“Trinidad Is Bright Spot |
In Enveloping Darkness”

From Our Own Correspondent
LONDON, Aug. 12

ME. ALBERT GOMES, Trinidad Labour Minister today gave a scath-

ing reply to a recent statement made by Mr. Grantley Adams in
Barbados on the Trinidad position in the structure of West Indies Federa-
tion, Mr. Gomes made his reply in an exclusive interview after’ having
seen newspaper ¢lippings from the B.W.1. press on Mr. Adams’ reference
to Trinidad as the most backward political portion of the British Carib-
bean and saying that they alone were the cause of the go slow poliey
in federation. :

Mr. Gomes said: “Since L have been in the United Kingdom, my
pride has been nourished by the knowledge that Trinidad is regarded
here as the bright spot in the enveloping darkness of West Indian ecrack-
port polities and crazy economics.”’

Because he had regarded B.W.I. unity as of paramount
| importance, Mr. Gomes said he had consistently refrained
| from entering into verbal conflict with Mr. Adams. But
he could not allow this latest barrage to go unanswered.
Neither was this an isolated incident. Mr. Adams had
tried his best to make Trinidad the scapegoat for slow-
ness in the federation movement.

“But I répeat,” he said, “we in Trinidad intend to

develop our colony along sane and sober lines and have
on all oceasions been first to declare our intention to par-

emma

Foreign Policy
No Campaign
Issue In U.S.

By DONALD J. GONZALEZ.
WASHINGTON, Aug. 12.



Harbavros



~ GOMES AND BRYA



WEDNESDAY; UGUST



13, * 1952



New strong man’s army §
asks for new legislatién



+



%

U.S. LEADS OLYMPIC PARADE CLOSING CEREMONY



Martial law ends:

Country on quiet note

PRICE













YESTERDAY'S WEATHER REPORT

Rainfall from Codtingtoh: 06

ighest Temperature: 980° F
west Temperature: 74.5 F

nd Velocity 10 miles per how
arometer (9 a.m.) 20.005 (3



p.m.)

29.972.

TO-DAY
sorise: 5.47 a.m
unset: 6.19 p.m




: Last Quarter
ighting: 7.00 p.m.
igh Tide: 10.43 a.m., 10.09 p.m
: 4.12 a.m, 381 p.m,

Audust 12)




FIVE

JORDAN:



Boy King Hussein goirig
home to claim throne



. ATTACK ADAMS

| | Speaker Threatens
To “Name”. Mottley

TWO WAX HOT OVER
REMARKS ABOUT H#1.E.

HIS HONOUR the Speaker of the House of /sembly,
Mr. K. N. R. Husbands, censured Mr. E. D. Mottley, Senior
Member for the City, for “making irreverent references
to the Governor’s name” during the debate on a Resolu-
tion in connection with Government's leasing 2 acres, 3
roods, 34 perches of land at Bathsheba to be used as a
playing field, and warned him that if he “persisted in the
tone in which he was speaking,” he would “name” him for
a vote of censure by the House. :

Mr. Mottley, during his remarks on the Resolution,
made an observation on the remarks by His Excellency
about the Community Centres being used as Dance Halls,
and said that the Head of the Administration should
learn a little more about the customs and habits of Bar-
badians first before making such comment.

His Honour interrupted the; . a é
U.N. Admits

Rules of the House of Assembly,
which states that “no membe:

LED BY THE UNITED STATES, the flags of the 70 nations that sent 5,780 athletes to Helsinki, Finland, appear in
final parade at the Olympic Stadium, marking the closing of the 1952 Olympiad. The leading nations
were; the United States, 615; Russia, 653%4; Hungary, 308; Sweden, 267; Germany, 171; Finland, 16214;
Italy, 15834;

ticipate in any constructive efforts on behalf of B.W.I.

federation.

“One thing we want to avoid is self governing in-

solvency and subsidised self

Mr. Gomes said that Mr.
Grantley Adams signed the

S.C.A.C, report. but later repudi-
ated it. His two main reasons for
so doing said Mr. Gomes were:

1. It did not offer Barbados
The number of seats neces-
sary for the furtherance of
Adams’ B.W.1. political am-
bition and
_It suggested Trinidad
the capital.

Mr. Gomes added
Adams’ ideological arguments
were mere camouflage. The fact
that he, Gomes, was associated:
with the Government of Trinidad

9

as



that Mr.!

ment of the colony.

Senator John Sparkman con-
tended Tuesday that the Republi-
cans can’t possibly make foreign
policy a successful campaign issue
because it is too closely identified
with General Dwight Eisenhower.

Simultaneously, Secretary of
State Dean Acheson said with
some sarcasm that he is surprised;
at the recent attack levelled
against the administration policies
abroad by John Foster Dulles, Re-
publican Foreign Policy adviser.

The Alabama Senator and Dem-
ocratic Vice-Presidential nominee
told reporters that Eisenhower's
role in shaping present policy
has “been as great as that or any~
one else”,

He said he was aware that both
the Republican Presidential nom-
inee and Dulles have made clear
that they consider the conduct of
foreign affairs as legitimate issue |
in the approaching campaign. But

government.”

es



OS ree

he doubted that they could ma‘e
their criticism stick.

He said: “I cannot possibly see
how they can make a major issue
out of it. Our foreign policy has |
been based on a priority consider |
ation to the defence of Western
Europe which has meant more or!
less holding, acting and a less ag-!

was not an inconsiderable element
in Adams’ attitude to the Govern-

Public Utterances

Mr, Adams ceased to be friendly
m his attitude to me the day.
was appointed leader of the B.W.I.
Sugar Delegation in 1950. He con-
tinued, “not only did he leave
London a few days later but on
his return to the B.W.I. his public
utterances were such as to pre-
judice opinion against the West





ALBERT GOMES

the Regional Economic Commit- | fast’, He said Eisenhower “cer-
tee, Mr. Adams was in favour of



gressive programme in the Far | act
selling any part of their land or

France, 156%; Great Britain, 117, and Czechoslovakia, 113%,

NAG

UIB’S ARMY DRA

(International Radiophoto)



FTS

ANTI-FEUDAL LEGISLATION

NONE MAY QWN OVER
200 ACRES OF LAND

. MCATRO August 12.

ARMY-DRAFTED LEGISLATION to wipe out the
feudal system in Egypt by sweeping land reforms was
submitted to the Government. The proposed legislation
would eliminate the powerful jand-controlling Pashas—
whose titles were recently abolished—by setting a 200 acre
limit on land holding. The Gavernment would have power
to seize land above the 200 acre limit and redistribute it
among Egypt's thousands.of «malt landholders and dand.
less agricultural workers.
minimum holding of two acres to prevent the parcelling
out of land into tiny uneconomic plots.

Farmers owning less-than two
res would be prohibited from

Consideration Of

: ' tainly has been the spearhead” of| dividing = j , 4 j >.
Indian, cause at a time, when W€}naying Government delegates as ; ividing it up by inheritance ‘

needed the support almost des- Chairmen in rotation. But, me ee, eee —UP. ee ee ae Raone ae Customs’ Union
perately. r. Gomes, when at the next ah h ’

ae that I wen, Sepcenetly meeting it was the turn of Mr. et lee eee Postponed
chosen to represen e B.W.4.)Raatgeever as the British Guiana - : . .

abroad has in no way mitigated delegate to chair the meeting, Mr. Greeks Shell a ‘at ene anae the ga (From Our Own Correspondent)
the virulence of his attacks upon} Adams was bitterly opposed to etween rich and poor and a JAMAICA, Aug. 12.

myself.”

the principle.

Commissioner

2



2 Bulgarians

ATHENS, Aug. 12.

shifting large amounts of capital
from agriculture to industrial de-

The Jamaica Government post-

poned further consideration of a
velopment. Customs’ Union, in the B.W.I
Further Demands because of a major financial im-

| Another thing said Mr. Gomes : The Army also demanded: | plication. The decision was taken
is that I shared dismay with most The Bulgarian-Greek dispute regulation of land leases provid-| that the matter which was slated
R.E.C. ‘delegates when Mn.j°ver Gamma Island flared up|ing the distribution of profits on}as a dissension of the legislature
Adams strenuously championed] @8ain on Monday when Greek|a basis of two-thirds to a lease-];his month should be further

frontier guards fired on two Bul-
garian soldiers who tried to reach
the tiny island last week.

Greek reinforcements were sent
to the area after shots had been
exchanged when Bulgarian troops
landed on the island on Aug. 7.
After more gunfire last week the
Greeks announced that the Bul-
garians had left the island. Both
countries protested to the United
Nations alleging acts of aggression.

—C.P.

a United Kingdom official for the
post of B.W,I. Trade Commis-
sioner irt London.

“And it should not be forgotten
that Mr. Adams was the only man
who laboured assiduously to pre-
vent the B.W.I. from obtaining
more dollars for purchases from
Canada.

It was he who
dissenting report”,

“As a result of all this” he con-
tinued, “Mr. Adams has lost the

submitted the



— reer — — — — —————— — ——— — — ——— — ——————————————EEeeeSeESeSeSe

ee ca hig ene ae eM Nl



















in-
{support and goodwill of many heart of the ruling class in Egypt.|‘° 4%. (0) © ey ies tn |
. a ens ae ee “ail I Some ‘of them exercise complete] Vestisiteds (i Met con:
his chances of occupying the Mi t rl ; power over hundreds o ousands | * a a J enh aged ‘
| pivotal position in a federal B.W.I. ar ta aw of acres of land and scores of vil-| *ideration and cautious decisions. |
i have diminished, he is no longer jlages and farms. :
enthusiastic about federation and | E dd: D ti , ;
G. H. ADAMS C.M.G. lis searching for arguments with! nas m ran Full Agreement Adams, Cuke, Will
Mr. Gomes said he found it] which to justify his innate distaste‘ oe
difficult to understand Mr. Adams’| of the whole idea.” i , TEHRAN, Aug. 12. Genéral Mohammed Naguib,
attitude and that ‘difficulty he| Nothing Mr. Adams could do,- Martial law ended in Iran to-|the Egyptian Commander in Chief,
shared with other B.W.I. leaders} however, concluded Mr, Gomes{day. Premier Mohammed Mossa-~|announced here to-day that com- At Trade Talks
who hd@ affection for Mr, Adams|could deter the BWI in their sol-|degh withdrew a bill. invoking plete Wren cat me : fie
ut who were bewildered by his}emn resolve to achieve a work-]} martial law from the Majlis (lower|agreement of view existed be- a aes a
iat actions. . able federation. “The ball is now] House) in response to his. own|tween him and the gove rnment 4 appnintel Mane Gamaier Atsren
Mr. Gomes recalled that when| im his court. It’s for the govern-| National Front supporters opposi-|Aly Maher. | The * strong man” of | (PY—!' "0 athe Honourable H. A.
i wes Seen ae ante © Om Page 8, | son to litany rule Tear ae ee Cetera Bp minute meet Cuke, CBE, to represent Barbe
. been under martial law at frequent| fr with Premier Aly Maher, He. dos at the forthcoming discussions
e e intervals since the outbreak of the! oid reporters: “I called on the/in London with departments of
- oil nationalization crisis last year, Beaniter to reach an understand-|the United Kingdom Government
usselIn 1 e urn —U-P. ing concerning the details of cer-}on_ the subject of Canada-West
tain matters.” Indies Trade. thatthe
4 M Mohamed Aly Roussdi, Minis-} It is expected that the discus-
To Claim Throne ossadegh Asks ter of Justice, said that the Agra-|sions will begin on Tuesday, Sep-
* r rian reform programme reported| tember 9, at 11 a.m, ;
U.S. For A Loan \to have been submitted by mili- —
AMMAN, Jordan, August 12. I tary headquarters was om being 30 Die In Heat
KING HUSSEIN of Jordan, 17, will leave Switzerland ‘a TOARAN, sl P ccitidiec be Marieciners iB , c
next Monday for his homeland to claim the throne from Bakhtar *Deirous, Saeed’ on Gris, was sworn in this afternoon | Wave In Mexico
which his crazed father was ousted by Parliament yester-| ‘tuesday that Premier Mohammed] before the regency Council. He|
day. __|Mossadegh has asked the United) was accompanied by Aly Maher. | MEXICO CITY, Aug. 12.
ices from Lausanne, Switzerland, said Hussein] States for an immediate $50,000,- eee The newspaper Ultimas Noticias
e i i j 000 1 Th WS) r said that } ‘
will return to Amman with his mother, Queen Zein. How- as soul Gan tite the ole ‘ eae a persons pave ied in the
ever he will not take up royal duties until his eighteenth|iq states Ambassador Loy Hen- Egypt 3 Taxes Pr sive ays at a ee town
birthday next Spring. ; derson for relay to Washington. i i taal witigtes’ a]
sees ee cae ——— |He'aaia that the oan was askes] To Be Increased | iitiven and nine ile erthe!
before Parliament yesterday to . cr y . by Mos “to nelp Iran ex- c : ne ; re
act in the King’s name until he Outbreak Of Bovine port her oil, and to help combat CAIRO, Aug. 12 ig he tees re Zone ms
becomes of age. They are Ibra- B G Communism. Wihen he visited the] finance Minister Abdel Gelll ddarece Funrenhelt—U0#,.
htm Hassem, President off the Anthrax In ole United States last year, Mossadegh] Flmary said on Tuesday that the! s Fa , 3
Senate, Omoa Suliman a, Seth Gilad eran ; was turned down on his renee Egyptian government had decided |
member of Parliament, and Abdu GEORGET" WN Aug 1s for a $100,000,000 loan. —U.P.| to make slight all round tax in-| *
Rahsman Rushidad, also a mem- GEORGETOWN, Aug, 12. creases chiefly affecting those! Bodies Removed
eee scency am |tieak oF bovine antierx st the] RGdgepary For — | P08 bith income taxes,
aie : a ax a a H
) clninad on Thestay at dondane eee ghe Rotge:_ Sstension 2 sway —UP, ‘From Plane Wreck
ing Talal had been deposed by | Sugar ate on East Sea Coast. fi / Ph a ,|
“British imperialists", Comment- Demerara, Va Frankfurt Talks | vormer present or | RIO De JANEIRO, Aug. 12
j the decision of the Jordan ie area was placed under ’ , OR ANY. Brigadier Raimundo Aboim
' Parliament to confer the crown |movement restriction order and no] AR ARIS, Aug. 12, |CUBA VISITING GERMANY} ater of the official expedition
: on Prince Hussein, Tass said “this| livestock were permitted to enter} Supreme id fia a — were » 19 | investigating the wreckage of the
\ event is one of the symptoms of|or leave. Vaccination of aningiuls|General Matthew Ridgway flies HAMBURG, Germany, Aug. 12. ) ctrato-cruiser “Goodhope” reports
\ the struggle for control of Jordan| within the area is proceeding and|to Frankfurt Wednesday for con-; Ex-President of Cubs Dr. Guil-|that all the bodies of the victims
, between “Br tish and American|every precaution is being talor ferences with General Thomas T.tlermor Alonso Pujol arrived her are now being removed from the|
4 Imperialists. At present victory |egainst the spread of the disease.| Handy, his deputy Commander for, from Amsterdam for a four-day|scene of the crash and will be
has been attained by British im-| Later to-day the medical services} United States troops in Europe. | visit. He will tour Germany andifiewn to Rio De Janeiro | th
‘ perial who succeeded in re-|director in an extra ordinary issu { Headquarters said also that plans to go to Frankfurt and| week. The stratocruiser ‘Goodhope’
moving from power the supporter | of the Official Gazette ordered no! Ridgway will visit Turkey from Baden, He may travel to France|crashed in the Brazilian jungle on
of American imperialists, Talal, | milk to be taken out or remotjed September 5 to September 10 |before returning to Cuba from «/April 29 with the loss of 50 lives.
i —U.P.' from the restricted area i —U.P. ‘European pleasure trip.—U.P. j —U.P,
:
r { \
i



holder
owner,

tees including
judiciary and a representative of
the landowners,
agricultural
the questions of landleases, wag-
es, and hours of work for peasant

200 acres would affect a few hun-
dred land

and one-third to a land} studied before an official attitude
wus adopted,

Hon. Alexander Bustamante,
majority party leader, said to-day
that a “Customs’ Union must wath
for federation of the British Carib-
bean area. It will not be
Customs’ Union outside the frame-
work of federation,”

There is plenty of teeth in the
Customs’ Union and we don’t}
know who may be bitten. There

is a lot of points in it to be

Establishment of rural Commit-
a member of the

leaseholders and

workers to rule on

labourers.

Limitations of land tenure to

owners who are the



Photographer
Kidnapped By

kL. German Police

STOCKHEIM, Germany,
Aug. 12
Armed East German “Peoples
Police” charged over the West
German border near here on Sun-
day and kidnapped a 30-year-old
German photographer who was
about to ‘smap pictures, according

Bavarian der police,
Pee German Balstebs ona that!

The army also called for a|]the photographer was standing

some 25 metres inside West Ger-
man territory when grabbed, The
police said when the carbine-
carrying Communist police hauled
him across the frontier, the
photographer threw his camera to
an assistant On the West German
side of the boundary. The police
then re-crossed the border and
retrieved the camera.—U.P.



Japan Approached
About Warships

TOKYO, Aug, 12,

The business vaper “Nihon
Keizai” said the navies of Brazil,
jurma, and Pakistan have made
inquiries among shipbuilding firms
in Japan about the possibility of
having warships constructed here.

The journal said that shipbuild-
ing circles believe that because of
financial problems it will be some
time before the Japanese firms can
accept bids for construction of
warships

The paper said that the most re-,
cent enquiry was from the Brazil-1
ian navy, which approached the
Kanematau Trading ~ Company
about the possibility of buying six
3,000 ton destroyers, six 100 ton
submarines, two 400 ton troop
transports, seven 4,000 ton cargot
craft, and one 1,000 ton towing

















vesvel,



Represent Barbados |“Eva Peron”: Name

Of City Or Station?

BUENOS AIRES, Aug. 19

When the provincial legislature
decided to change the name of the
city of La Plata to Eva Peron, a
small problem arose. The Gen-
eral Roca Railway, which serves
the city, already had a station
named “Eva Peron”. The Minis-
try of Transports has solved the
problem. The station “Eva Peron”
which is on the outskirts of
Buenos Aires, has been renamed
“Siete De Mayo”—the birthday
of Eva Peron,—-U.P,



Stevenson And

Truman Confer

WASHINGTON, Aug, 12

President Truman summoned
Governor Adlai Stevenson to the
White House today for a briefing
on the world situation and a man
to man talk on the political cam-
paign for presidency,

He invited all the Press to a
Juncheon in honour of Stevenson’s

nomination
—U.P.



| Bahama Legislature
Recessed Till Nov.

NASSAU, Aug. 11.
| Acting Governor Frederick South-
worth tonight recessed the legis-
lature until November 13th after
the signing of nine bills including
a Bul authorizing the sale of But-



lin’s Grand Bahama Camp to
| William Dunn and his American
associates,

| —O.P,

may use the Governor’s Name ir-
reverently,” and said that in his
opinion the member was using
the privileges of the House to
make irreverent references to His
Excellency the Governor.

Before His Honour could re-
sume His Chair, Mr. Mottley
said he would always abide by
any ruling made by His Honour,
to which His Honour replied “I
hope when the honourable mem-
ber says he will abide by a ruling
of the Chair, it is not merely
lip service.”

Mr. Mottley attempted to re-
ply, but His Honour, rapping his
gavel several times said, “I can
assure honourable members of
this Chamber that I will enforce
to the best of my ability as long as
I remain the Speaker of this an-
cient and historic Chamber, its
dignity and rule very, very
firmly.”

The Senior member for the City
said he couli not see for one
minute that he had referred to

Senior Member for the City, drew
Red Charges

his attention to Rule 126 of the
PANMUNJON, Aug. 12.

The United Nations admitted that
“in all probability” Allied
planes entered Panmunjom neutral
zone Sunday and apologised for
the incident. In a written reply to
the Communist charge, Senior U.N
Liaison officer Charles W, McCar-
thy said: “Our side will make
continued efforts to prevent
currences of this type.”

The note was handed to the
Communists at a meeting between
liaison officers, Except for this
meeting, there was no activity at
the truce camp. The truce talks are
in another one week recess called
by the Allies, the third such in
as many weeks.

Major General William K. Har-
rison explained he proposed the
recesses becauge Reds have offered
nothing new in deadlocked dis-
cussions on prisoner exchange.

—U.P.

jet

oc-

the Governor by name, or irrever+
ently, and asked, “am I not en»
titled in this House in debate to



Eden Is “Happiest

eat ahh Macon Eke
head of any oth artment Man In The World”

not by name?”

Reaching for a copy of the Rules
of the House, Mr. Mottley said:
“if you want to go into the rule
now and gay that I cannot say the
Head of the Administration.
and in a’ much calmer tone of
voice added, “as I take the rule
‘ it is true if Your Honour
feels that however you interpret
the rule it is to be taken by mem-
bers, well then, but I am not pre-
pared to take it so, as T have not
referred to the Head of the Ad-
ministration irreverently.”

Mr, Mottley began to quote from
the relevant Rule, but His Honour
interpolated, “If the honourabl¢
member wants to ask my ruling
and then make his own. Da
you think that any Parliament or
Speaker as being intelligent, and

@ On page 5.

LONDON, Aug. 13.

Foreign Secretary Anthony
Eden, the “happiest man in Lon-
don,” will marry 32-year-old Miss
Clarissa Churchill on Thursday
morning, it announced on
Tuesday.

The ceremony will take place at
the musty old Caxton Hall regis-
try office only three days after the
announcement of their engagement
in surprised London society and
government quarters. The 55-year-
old diplomat and the blue eyed
blonde niece of Prime Minister
Winston Churchill announced their
engagement on Monday night.
The couple will fly to Portugal on
Friday morning for a short honey-
moon there,

was

—U-P.

me the flaresinongp

|


























































































iG I #226 Aa si H BARBADOS ADVOC ATE ee WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 13, 1952 ;
/ arth C, | Tubby Hubby Waists | Listening Hours ‘gm :
j - WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 15, ioae ‘ ° “ . r
C: | Lose Up To 4 Inches |= "= | ae 2 2
{Vf AOUk mw me SRR CRRRSOR] tioned Holey In 12 Days coc dct cr ef Od 6 ia |
hs has been on a

Scotti zine, 6. % m. Mi Kind of
bie for Venezuela are Mr. and tish Magazine 5 p.m

sht-sSeeing tour -with



by OSBER MA NCAST ER
¢)




Music, 6.45 p.m. Sports Round Up and

Final Report on Five-on-a-diet





}
X ; ; Mrs. Pedro Anoyo and their son Programme Vurade, 1 00» m ane New
" f his family. Pedro Junior, who have been hol- win af 3 p.m. Home News from Britain. |
san Barbados-born daying here for the past two FOUR of the five full mem- STANLEY TANNER: (weigh in)]7.15 — 10.30 Pleats oncses : somes For Wednesday, August 13, 1952 »*
Analyst of British weeks as guests of Mr. and Mrs.|bers of the Daily Express Tubby before 15st. 4ib.; mid-way 14st. 7.15 p.m. Calling the West Indies, 2 ye a . :
s from a well-knewn Vernic Knight of “Mervue,”}Hubby Club were still on q dict 1041b.; after 14st. 8lb. loss 10D. [5.45 p.m. Ali Hwle, 8.15 pum. Radio Look in the section in which your birthday comes and
indian family. He is staying tinatine — , f ” lyesterday — even though §hey JOHN JOHNSTON: (weigh in) be-[Newsreel, 8.30 p.m mtavmneik at As find what your outlook is, according to the stars. +
a nee * ? ay astings, : a , : ; f 14st. 1lb.-: midway 13st. 101b.; Joount, 8.45 p.m. Interlude, 8.55 p.m 4
iis brother—a retired judge Mr. Anoyo, a cousin of Mrs,|are now “freed” from their 12-day are a * Prom the Editorials, 9.00 p.m. Prospect ; ‘ : ;
gh Court of India. An- nana 2 ble Ae wnt He Bre : after 13st. 43ib.; loss 10}1b. Re deel ee en The News, tia Promising influences, especially where
is Sir Frank New- + Re

ry a . DONALD GLOAG: (weigh iny

The five Tubby Hubbie ave before 13st. 4)1b.; mid-way 13st.
Olb.;after 12st. 8421b.; loss 10Ib.

WALTER GRATRIX: (weigh im)

before 12st. 3ib.; mid-way 11st,

131b.; after List. 10lb.; loss Tib,

Total weight loss 46} Ib.

—L.E.S.

Boys Will Be

ernment Relations of the Mene
Grande Oil Company in Vene-flost an average of 9lb. ea and
zuela, an affiliated company of|they have lost up to 4inf, from
the Gulf Oil Corporation, He said|their waistlines.
that hig family and he had a very Here are the end -gt test
enjoyable holiday and are 100k-|quotes:— s
Harry John
It’s been fun, and I am going

ing forward to a return visit.
For Three Weeks
WILLIAM }to carry on with it for another
McCARTNEY of Trinidad|12 days. The only snag has beer

p.m, News Talk, 10.15 p.m. Mid-Week * March 21—April 20 keen judgment, good planning are needed
Talk, 1030 p.m. From the Third AND used. Authors, scientists, secretaries, 3
Programme x industrial trades favoured. *
| *

TAURUS Could be pleasant if not extrav: antly Ie
] ee Pa * April 21—May 20successful day. You should advance
(Members Only).

but don't reach for impossible heights or
insist upon immediate money returns. *
SATURDAY, 16th August, *
1952, at 8.30 p.m.



nent Under-Secretary
he Home Office.

Sings Tonight
Wr Carib dropped in at
Rediffusion yesterday morn-
Mr. Robert Jaisingh ‘was
itditioned. Mr. Winston
ickett was the accompanist.
nson and Redman are sponsor-





















AND MRS. GEMINI













-elient Mereury vibrations, is is
May 21-—June 21 ,, Excelle ip
ng a programme on which Mr were arrivals last week for Alat lunch, when I’ve sometimes WATER POLO by Flood- YOUR day not to tail the capable, ambi-
Yaisingh will Sing at 8.90 this holiday. They have come overthad to go without an item in the ° light and DANCE x tious YOU. Investigate, study, research!
aoe v sing < § s “Half measures are no for three weeks and are guests atldiet because the restaurant ae Bo s In S ite Brain workers and most physical tasks
PES Se Hi good, we must force the tne Hastings Hotel, j -OU FINALS. sponsored.
V Jaisingh, a native of British G ; Mr. McCartney i director af not supply it. . KNOCK-OUT CANCER eS 4 -M
Guiana who has been living in overnment to close the we s 6 I have been a little more tire S :
Trinidad for. some time,*has a museums entirely—they’re wie. 3 Canney and Company! but that is because I have we Oftron urtain RES SWORD * June 22—July 23Should be profitable, progressive period
rich tenor. To my mind _ this @ gross waste of public Hesegige: ll ae ihn Si doing more gardening! My wife i for iron work, plumbing, building, hand-
young artist is versatile and sings moneyand compete unfairly ea ee Bocce Ss On ral} ys that with my new figure 1 Schoolboys from behind the POLICE v. BONITAS. *« ling vehicles, tools, ete. Artistic matters
vith confidence and expression, with sponsored television | mo y- all have to buy a new suit soon. “Iron Curtain” want to know ail less stimulated but can achieve.
‘He has appeared in areranarpe: . ee Annual Vacation (Waist: before 46ins., after 42ins.) 2cut London buses and coaches. Music by Anthony Menezes 1B0 * * * *
Se age Secat bi Bre sae: ae ce RRIVING in the island on Stanley Tanner They have been sending ther and his Caribbean 0 July 24—Ang. 22 Your Sun advises caution in hazardous
right the % ill sing ‘clawinak teele Venezuelans Lixe Barbados Sunday by B.W.1.A. from| Do you know anybody wie inquiries to a Kingston - on- ‘Beeuhaaears work and dealings with superiors. Don’t
y Well-known “eontpopers apa ,. Grenada was Mr. Warren Thor; uys misfit clothing? Pm so +>ames motor firm, which makes ADMISSION: seek favours unless you feel alk are recep-3>
coh caveat aevuscts one in a oe _ Barbados for a month's holi- Con of Mr and Mrs. B C Those leased that I shall probably on Me vehicles, ever since a Hun- WATER POLO ...... 2/- tive or will not be imposed upon,
cial rendition of ““Grknada” by *& day. is Mr. Julio Chalband, 4¢ pyightpn, Black Rock. . fwith the diet. The family tell me &2%!a2 boy recently wrote for al]f DANCE .............. 2/- vino
Agus ara whie » will sing Construction engineer 0! ~~ Thorpe has c ( CaRmeue OF By ang a 23. Happy, prosperous outlook. ual to
gustin Lara which he will sing Construct gi f Messrs pe has come over to spend|I have already lost one ana C*mibaue of motors and a badge 10.8.52—4n. Ang. 23—Sept. 23 H tlook. Be eq
Spanigh Sanchez and Company of Caracas. pis annual vacation with his fam- they have been amazed to me . me badge was sent Of, : aid) : : reasonable demands, take advantage of
F Sh t Holid He arrived here recently by jj) He is an Assistant Master at cleaning the car after nday We thought that would end the new, good offerings. Venture some when
- or oliday B.W.LA,. and was accompanied by ihe Grenada Boys’ Secondary Munch nities’ * polnen att aY matter. But not a bit of it,” the you'can add to income, security, family yp
a ING in the colony on his mother Mrs, Chalband, his school in St, Gearge’s. ane * aaSe moat; batore 40 "418S-. frm said. happiness.
/ Friday last by B.W.I.A. sister, Miss Fredes Quinto and his Tae Kone Gnaeel * ina) “Things went just the same
from Trinidad was Miss Cynthia three sons Julig, Antonio and or ng 4 acation John Johnston as if it had been a query from
Leeghin who has come over to Leonora. They are guests at the EAVING the island on Mon- 3

ENGRAVING
JEWELLERY
&
REPAIRS

There’s no doubt about it, the
Hastings Hotel, day by 3B.W.1.A._ forfdiet works, But, oh! the joy of
eeghin is employed with a Ship- This is their first visit to Bar- Puerto Rico en route to the U.S.A.}those couple of beers when it
ping Association, Port-of-Spain bados which they like very much, were Mr. and Mrs. Horace Clarke fended. I’ve eaten so much lettuce
ind this is her first visit to the especially the swimming. of “Brentford”, Belleville. Mr.|too, that I feel that i've got ears
island. During her stay here she Clarke will be away for six weeks |lixe a rabbit.
vill be a guest at Leeton-on-Sea, St. Lucia Planter while his wife will remain for
Worthing. R. CHARLES LONGLY, a 4bout four months as the guest of
F M. h 7 planter of St. Lucia returned — anos a. e By Ry &
| or Two Months home on Sunday by B.W.LA, Brooklyn, New York, Mrs. Clarke



SA taco endo -y: a ” an English boy — hundreds of
spend two weeks’ holiday. Miss requests followed from the same
area, mostly worded alike.
The Hungarian boy showed the
badge to his friends, and ever
Sti ‘ ince they have been writing for
Still — even if I did get-bad- psa ay Aha 7
tempered sometimes — it was one just like it. They have even

on , “= eribbed his original letter.
good fun. (Waist: before 41 ins., “Tt ig'a pleasant thought that,

Work hard to further wise aims and ob-
Sept. 24—Oct. 23 joctives, Day not overexacting nor too
auspicious, but benefice influences prevail
and you can glean their good. Don‘t over-y

do,

SCORPIO * & *
Oct. 24—Nov. 22 Slightly restricting influences since yester-3>
day only tend to make this a better day
for brain work, conferences, industry.





«
x
x wilson * -”
x
x






ig ’ i after 39ins.) ; “ig : : 4
ISS ELAINE BLOEMEN- , \ twelve days’ holi- is the Woman Tutor at Erdiston . Tron Curtain’ notwithstanding, « SAGITTARIUS ie a i

DAAL a stenotypist ae tee ee ae wt ‘Abbeville Ttaining College. Donald Gloag boys are boys the world over.” Also Jewellery made to order Nov. 23—Dec, 22 Friendly apes Sith to of 3ooker. Brothers, “Beitish Gruket = el Sisters ' I made a terrible mistake last —LES. after midnight. ithout trying to force
Guiana, arrived in the colony on RRIVING in the colony from}W*k. 1 reported that there was | } sooscess0esesss0ss0099

e
We now have our






Wednesday last from Grenada,
where she spent part of her three-
month vacation, Miss Bloemen-

x results, use your’ best effort,
vancement to be had.

\ CAPRICORN 4 4 BS

Gains, ad-
no change in my waistline. But}

Back to Trinidad Trinidad last week were my wife checked up because she |

RS. C. WHARTON, wife of the Misses Marjorie and Nore

SEA VIEW GUEST

. oo kas ic .)was suspicious that I had been | own § skilled Jeweller * Dec. 23—Jan. 214 day for stimulating aceomplishment, 3
; Dr. Wharton af Port-of- Cherrie. Marjorie who is work r | z : ae Lae ".
laal will be spending two months Spain "prinidad, returned home ing with the Imperial College of }tubby so long that 1 could not| HOUSE working on the pre- making new, valuable contacts, AND fin
Warthts " Ol “i “Geant al yesterday morning by B.W.1A. Tropical Agriculture will be re- know where my waist was. |
orthing is is her first visit ; v 7

\ ishing tasks. Brain work, physical prowess

‘









mises which guarantees
quick deliveries and
reasonable charges.

nfter spending about two weeks’ maining for one month while her She was right.
holiday in Barbados as the guest sister Nora will be spending twoltmy waist now.
‘ and Mrs. W. F. Harewood weeks. Nora works with the Gov- The diet has left

I have found |
to the island.

Two Months Vacation

both favoured.

i* AQUARIUS * * *

HASTINGS, BARBADOS
Daily and Liuugterm Rates





me feeling









: ; ; 0) n juest. Ft E Today responsive to sincere endeavours,
és of “Camelot”, Chelsea Road, She ernment Medical Stores of Dis- fitter, more alert, than I ,ever a ned on req x Jan. 22 — Feb. 20 especially where smart thinking and plan-
RRIVING in the colony | by was accompanied by her little son pensers. During their stay here imagined possible. (Waist: before eas arte ning back it. The unusual in management
. B.W.1.A. from British Bobby. they will be guests at “Steney-|36'sins,, after 34ins.) Dinner and Cocktail WY Db LIM A ean bring fresh gain.
Guiana since 3rd July was Mrs. ~~ er bushand, her brother, Mr. croft”, Worthing. Walter Gratri ‘ = e +
Clarice Evans who has come over jyjchac] Gebriel and his daughter For Two Weeks M if alter Gratrix Parties arranged. «x i
for two months’ holiday. This nette who had “ome over with . 4 ‘ol b y wife is so delighted with | ¢ J. BH, BUCKLAND & co LTD Another fine planetary day in this should-
is Mrs. Evans’ first visit to the them. returned. last week after oN "te pe “Clrinidad ee tte slimmer husband that} § Proprietor. ¢ een * be progressive Places-anOnih, No marr
> z she wi 2 ey os , 1h. | trom shida eel like repeating the diet. * “6% (FEC. EESBBEOESOBHEYL PISCES how difficult the job, or the day’s gener
ie ioe mt Wot te spending «short holaey. quring ag a woes oo Miss I’m certainly feeling fit. For aon 20 Broad St. Phone 4644 * Feb, 21—March 20 gomands, you can make advancement.
Worthing With C.P.1L.M argaret Corbie who has come the first time in my life last GA fe Ty
‘ ee : over for two weeks’ holiday. Miss | pyjq; i 94 7 ae '
For Holiday BRIGGS COLLYMORE Corbie is Secretary to the Minis-|~â„¢C%y Dight I caught the bus by YOU BORN TODAY



















RRIVI oa Strong character. innately brave
M . ’ >
ARR VING ir he island on who has been

*« honourable, ambitious, sensitive, above pettiness. Curb tend-
ency to domineer, or to be impatient at suggestions. Keep
your naturally sunny disposition out front; pray when trou-

* bled or in doubt. Don’t heed flatterers. Birthdate: Sir Gee.
Grove, noted writer on music; Alfred J. Hitchcock, m

-—" “ % * x * x % *

JANETTA DRESS SHOP

(Next Door to Singer’s)

NEW SHIPMENT ....
BEACH DRESSES

The Garden—St. James
TO-DAY 8.30 P.M,
“MAD WEDNESDAY’
Harold LLOYD &
“REAL GLORY’
Gary COOPER—David NIVEN

Thurs. 8.30 P.M.
“HARD FAST &
BEAUTIFUL”
Sally FORREST

&
‘THE OUTLAW’
Jane RUSSELL

employed ter of Education, Trinidad, and Se aa (Waist: ‘be-
z Saturday . morning by. with C.P.1.M., in Curacao and quring her stay here will be stay- Well, that is th oe
B.W.1.A. from ‘Trinidad was who had been spending two jing at “Stoneycroft”, Worthing. on ds ~¥, ial end
Miss Joan Carr who has come over months’ vacation at home with his First Visit . * y Hubby test.
for two weeks’ holiday, Miss Carr relatives at St, Leonard’s Avenue, ISS LEAH WESTMORE- ro aacenee of families are
is a clerk at the Trinidad Turf returned to Curacao on Friday AMD. wiin fe econiowed with s using the diet at home.

Club and is a guest at Leeton-on- last. ;
a : International Aeradio came over THE SLIMMERS.
Sea, Worthing. last week by B.W.1.A. from

R a ee | EJOLIDAYING ip the island Trinidad for two weeks’ holiday |HASRY JOHN: (weigh in) before
Ce , son o

This is Miss Westmoreland’s first} 16st. 101b.; mid-way 16st. 4Ib.;

the late Mr. A. S. Husbands, 7 © a ee a. a oe visit to the colony and during 1 her after 16st. 11b.; loss 9Ib,
u *» é Ss. s w
Babe gt von es eetachen % ing is a Needlework Teacher and ee ey ee ee Sts.
gare by the Ss. Colombe to- (Hag? Be Geaaving at tevin Krom
day, ar e mg
Ore sraspainds wee reas ane on-Sea, Worthing. TD seach ina ane Se ee
was called to the bar at t - * ‘ a nada
dle Templke and will be introduced Nurse Holidaying in the colony by a ee
to the local bar later this week, RRIVING. in the island from Trinidad for two weeks vy

Trinidad on 25th July, was here.



Aavoctated Gritish Pleture Corporition ite. presence

Fri. & Sat.
8.30 p.m.
Warners’ Hit!















Second Visit

'% Setton-Baring ~ Mayflower Production

“tric PORTMAN
Laurence Harvey- Maria Mauban.
iain CAMELIA

Orginal story and screenplay by ROBERT WESTERBY

Praduced by AUBREY BARING » Directed by DAVID

MACDONALD Oiseribution by Assocuted
Britush-Parhe

PL Ad A BARBAREES








To-day and To-morrow, 4.45 and 8.30 p.m.

MARK OF ZORRO












Miss Grenada is visiting
He is a brother of Mr. Noel Hus- , rr
bands, Manager ‘of Crab Hill and Nurse Barrow who has come over Barbados for the first time and is

Woollen Twin Sets. Reduced to $13.55



















: f don Grant & Tyrone Linda Basil (DIAL 5170)
Bright Hall and Mr, Aubrey Hus- for one month’s holiday. During an employee of Gor 5 9
bands, Manager of Mount Stand- her stay here she will be a guest Co., ee wet is a guest at POWER DARNEL RATHBONE FRIDAY 4.45 & 8.30 P.M. DIRS MANS TD Oe
fast. — , at Leeton-on-Sea, Worthing. Stoneycroft”, Worthing. — AND — & continuing D5 OPES ;
PRISONER OF SHARK ISLAND oy -







BY THE WAY...

PHOTOGRAPH of an MP. officials whispered together for a that machinery with a fast work- OS 5S6OSSS9

By Beachcomber

Warner BAXTER --



John CARADINE

PLAZA THEAT





























ing~ strain on the ag iy BRIDGETOWN |; | BARBAREES OISTIN
singing “Because” at a “dem- moment, and finally smiled, and SngseaiA ene ae oak a 20th IDGETO ABBAS eee:
onstration show specially design- gave up. sae slow working-rate, and that the GOLDWYN CENTURY TODAY (ae) #30 & 801 Togay (only) 430 & te a Oa tates
cd to sell British goods in North The shocked politicians old tire more quickly than the MAYER FOX it 7 he “KING'S ROW” America reminds one that sing- ORMALLY constituted people young. For Right, Roy: ELSY ALBIN Ronald REAGAN = eatin par i ig FORC
ing M.P.s (and singing mice for i 5 s r Right, Royal Entertainment Ann SHERIDAN & William Holden &
thet matter) have played all to like to. see the youns enjoy Pres FAEI , GLENN LANCAN “SUGARFOOT" (Color) “The RACKET"
small a part in the export drive. ip& themselves while they can, CROSSWUR et ee eee Dapstine Randolph_ SCOTT Robert MereHuM || FORTH WORTH
” Whether ially nowadays, tl f lure || "+ Stem’ Be
Whether the Americans will be “Pee wi ee oe THURS. Special 2.30 p.m.1) Thurs, Speetal 120 p.m.

impressed by: the cholee of song SBectacle of the débutantes danc- SCABRAMOUCHE =

in this case is doubtful. I have
never thought of the old senti-
mental drawing-room ballads as
being full of pep, push and dy-
namism, But, anyhow, I like the

parties is too much for some of
the politicians, Grubby bohemian
orgies, if you like, but not these

débutante parties!

From Friday, August 15th, 5.00 and 8.30 p.m.









Zane GREY’S
“THUNDER MOUNTAIN’
Tim HOLT &
“LEGION of the
LAWLESS”
George O'BRIEN

“PIONEERS”
Tex RITTER &
“SIX GUN MESA”
Johnny Mack BROWN
eS

See
Thurs. (only) 430 &

Fite Curses, IRB. Thurs. (only)

445 & 8.20 p.m.
“KING'S ROW”
Ronald Reagan &
“SUGARFOOT”















N oe oe THURS. (Only) 4.80" & Bd SHADOWS 9n BEACON Randolph Scott
idea of using art and culture to The e i ; / 4 G +” oddy ee
lend dignity to a campaign for a od volution of S.prane Sa B’TOWN fn Shek Roddy Mepet Aue Opening FRIDAY
selling electric fog-horns or roller- ERE is a campaign afoot to de ( ) “WATERLOO ROAD" DUBLIN” RY MURDER”
skates to the farmers of the Middle persuade people to make ; oi DIAL 2310 Stewart GRANGER Robert NEWTO! Jack LORD &

West. If a Cabinet Minister could their own prunes by drying plums,

be induced to sing “Where My
Caravan has Rested” at an export
Thé Dansant, the potential Arab

It is, according to the Food Min-
istry, a matter of putting #e
plums in a warm place, the warmtn




FRIDAY 2.30, 4.45 & 8.30 P.M.
& continuing to SUN, 4.45 & 8.30







——SSEs
Opening FRIDAY RAVE, *F

Coming FRIDAY WEST”

RAPTURE Martha VICKERS.

|
|



CAIRO ROAD



clientele would be in the bag.



acting as a drying agent, and con-
verting what was, as it were, a
plum into a prune.

Across
1. Gear for the piquet men '
8. Put a stop to bread y
The precise 10. Denizen of the jungie, (7)
OULD not the British Council Moment at which a plum becomes !! Bow | the Wives of \
t e ei. (7)



Dk. J. Vv. HENSON PRESENTS

Let’s get together

1

.. . Y ~ ‘
MADAM O°LENDY and HER UNFORGETTABLE TROUPE
devise a scheme for sending a & Prune, exchanging plummish jy. Travelling, (9) “
choir of M.P..s to sing the “Hia- Characteristics for prunish ones, 13 gu at tne bead usually. (5 a
” : . at a pred. ‘
watha” oratorio in Japan? Sample May be ascertained by seizing a ‘iy You. find the doctor on it
boilers could be given away after Plum which is evolving into a As Daring if you take \t (4)
each performance, while Mrs, — prune, and, wringing it out. Hf 39) Te AeWi thorn Norwa
recited “Casabianca,” there is no moisture, it is a prune Down
I, . a (or else a dry plum). If there is }. Nothing could be piaintr. «8 }
Unproductive visit 3 Se 7 . Is of eight. (7)

moisture it is a plum (or else a : What the Aussies look fo
I LKLA MAW BAT AT, the wet prune), Another method is to me ae

Burmese business man, was reeze the plums, and hack off the 2 Meaning? (9)

3 - . 5. Wet way to take ease mister, (4
conducted round a large tyre fac- particles of ice with a fretsaw be- 6 Sometimes scratches for

|

|
tory yesterday, On being shown fore storing them in the prune- , Gvarebates @ light ray. (4)
an enormous lorry-tyre, he said: cupboard. ¥ The Sweet one has fragra }
In Burma we have smaller life- Dramatic revelations 11, SEROte 6b fiseta ite equa: |
elts. That one ought to save an TWHE scientists have discovered }2 The Tule about gin ? ha} |
elephant from drowing.” It was that “the hoct timing wcrc | We should ail snare the cor
explained to him that this was not i cant? nowt. timing rates |

: : mon one. (4) .: :
a lifebelt but a motor-tyre, He (in factories) “are significantly ‘ Havin® worked Tea takes 1






j . heart. (3)
replied , “Then. if the car falls Groupe!’ ‘This cermae rong, age 14 Giereaited curse, 1a) " T
int > We : 7 us sounds startlingly Sodution of yesterday's puazie. . Aerus
ty . rage A see et — *ke my own discovery that an old i ‘Batteve, w, Avenge: i ‘Spa il Ne. R ¢p ODA L HEA TR ES
t S? nter- ie Wiis, ~at Sevag. lus | 12, Gates? 15, Relish: 16 nee.
preter, Tut?Tut, confused matters [han gta, Cote. difficult pPeices 26 ‘Tamer: at

; than a y é adiuct hi Nice; 26, Tamer; 27, Area
by translating the Burmese word young man to adjust him- [* guSiet:’ a Byentual: 4 Least
ke F

self i st- i i r
for tyre as “blood-orange”” The to a fast-working machine, liteepid: 5: Bye: 6. Veal: 7 Ap










ROXY













i ¢ 4 TO-DAY at 445 ONLY TO-DAY last 2 shows 445
Further research may eve req] fasher: 10, Sting: 14. Ere: 15 Robert MONTGOMFRY Ds ee cee
a y even reveal i Arena: 19. Pram: @1 Her toners 4 in G N THE LADY AND THE BANDIT
an Aiea SSL weer RYS WIRNESS Starring
Louis HAYWARD : Patricia ME
5 VO-NIGHT & TOMORROW NiGHYT ee
at 8.30 TOMORROW & FRIDAY
FIRST CLASS UTILIT | Madam ‘OLINDY & Her Troupe 130 & 8.15
C 4 ATY CLOTH ; | in Glenn FORD — Nina FOCH

CARACAS NIGHTS OF Loe
Tickets on sale from 8 p.m

in









Se _- UNDERCOVER MAN
| TOMORROW at 4.45 ONLY and
C. | J. Arthur RANK Presents ADVENTURES IN SILVERADO

36in. RAYON PONGEE SILK sn

With William BISHOP : Gloria HENRY
White, Rose, Royal Blue, Green, Grey, | Sam WANAMAKER ROYAL
Chocolate, Sky Blue, Gunpowder Blue | OLYMPIC *

| TODAY & TOMORROW 4.30 & 8.15

~ : au
+: For :- EARS %. Shee) SE Ae NIK © “THE SECRET OF ST. IVES”
BROKEN JOURNEY



THE NEW -.- -





“CARACAS NIGHTS OF 1952”
EMPIRE THEATRE«.

WEDNESDAY, 13TH & THURSDAY 14TH AT 8.30 P.M.

and



’ With Charles Starret — Smiley Burnett
DRESSES, UNDERWEAR, SHIRTS, PYJAMAS, ETC. eee _

“TWO FISTED STRANGER"
SALT TO THE DEVIL



FRIDAY only 4.30 & 8.16



aT WHITHELDS

| - : A MAGNIFICENT CHANGE OF PROGRAMME EACH NIGHT
ONLY | a ee Robert MORAG OMY
, ere "s PRICES:—STALLS. 36c., HOUSE 60c., BALCONY 84c., BOX $1.00
: |] ° ONCE A. Taare “iho TICKETS ON SALE FROM 8 AM
: * + > { : and sis } Rica « aaa NE.
70 cents YOUR SHOE STORE 70 cents pene ne rHE a BEECHAM Chiat tn nibs ok thins Maclin ot «
DIAL 4220. Hedy LAMARR ennis O Cecille PARKER

(a

OLYMPIC, ROXY, ROYAL.


|

































WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 13

, 1652



BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Road From Caracas To Caribbean Costs

2,000 Workers Engaged in
103 Mile Road Construction

CARACAS.,

THE MOST EXPENSIVE road in the world, costing

£ 2,000,000 a mile, is being built to the Caribbean.

It will

have cost £21,000,000 by the time it is completed through

the Andean foothills of Northern Venezuela,

te link

Caracas with the Caribbean coast.

Two thousand labourers, with 200 bulldozers, tractors
and lorries, are hastening to complete the road in time
for the ‘tenth inter-American Foreign Ministers Con-
ference due to be held in Caracas i in the last quarter of 1953.

The new 10%4-mile roed wi!' be
marked with two giant tunnels,
oné of them over a mile in length

and three reinforced concrete
bridges, costing about £ 1,785,000,
built by Enterprises Campeon

Pernard, of Paris, under the direc-
tion of Mr. Robert Shama, project
manager, and the firm’s head en-
gineer.

Two Tunnels

The two tunnels, being bullt at
a cost of -£7,242,000, by the
Morrison-Knudson Co., Inc, of
Idaho, are in fact, a set of twin
tunnels with dual-lane one-way
traffic on either side.

Construction on the road began
in January 1950 after six years

of surveys and studies conducted
by the Venezuelan Ministry of
Public Works, and it is regarded
as one of the most spectacular
examples of the Government's
policy of “sowing its oil wealth

back into the land.”

Before work could commence on
the actual road itself, 36 miles of
secondary roads across the moun-
tains had to be built in order to
gain access to the principal con-
struction points along the “super-
highway”.

The roue for the new road
required the filling of a number of
mountain gaps, 13 of them, ranging
from 78 feet to 141 feet in height.
Public Works engi.«crs had to
slice off the tops nd sides. of
some of the mou..tains to get the
earth needed to fill these gaps.

Once compliete., the road will
act as a new life-line between
the Venezuelan capital of 500,004
people, and the busy airport of the
city, at Maiquetia, which handles
approximately 200 National and
International flights daily, and the
thriving seaport of La Guaira,
which handles nearly 50 per cent
of all Venezuelan imports.

In addition, it is hoped that the
road will provide a great impetus
to the development of coastal
property, and many new resorts
are now under construction in an-
ticipation of the new surge of
holiday-makers,

The present 19-mile-long road,
linking Caracas with the coast, is
situated in a 3,000 feet high valley,

a twisting road with 365 curves
precariously niched in the steep
hillsides.

Heavy Traffic

Traffic is very heavy along this
road, approximately 6,000 cars
and lorries a day, carrying passen-
gera and freight in the hours
journey between the coast and
Caraeas, The new road, with only
36 curves, is expected to cut the
journey down to 15 minutes.

The curves will have a minimum
radius of 328 yards, as compared
with the 16 yards on the present
road, and the maximum grade on
the new road ‘will be only 6 per
cent. and as iow as 3.5 per cent.
in the tunnels, as compared with
the present 12 per cent. on the
existing road.

The dual lanes on the new road
will be paved with asphalt, and
will measure 24 feet on either
side of a four-foot wide centre
island.

New telephone cable from Cara-
cas to Maiquetia and La Guaira,
will be laid by the Caracas Tele-
phone Company, in the
island of the road, which will be
illuminated along its entire length

—B.U.P

Cuba Cuts

Molasses Price

NEW YORK.

Cuba has cut the export price of
its blackstrap molasses to 12 cents
a gallon, plus 2% per cent, export
tax. Fow several months, Cuba has
been holding out for a price of 20
cents, but buyers regarded this
figure as far too high.

It is reported in New York that
the Cuban Sugar Institute has
already sold 120,000,000 gallons to
Publiecker Industries, Ine., of
Philadelphia at the new price. But
officials of Publicker refused cither
Sinetron or deny the reported

Big stocks of synthetic industrial
alcohol, of which molasses form an
important ingredient, have enabled
manufacturers to resist the Cuban
demands for 20 cents, But the
record output of some 400,000,000
gallons in Cuba, together with a
very serious storage problem,
prompted Cuba to reduce its prices
at last.

It is believed that Cuba will
now have to move 30,000,000 gal-
loms a month out of the islarid for
the next seven months in order to
provide, storage space for thé next
crop. Some 100,000,000 gallons
are reported to be already in stor-
age in the United States.

—B.U.P.



_—

Japs Pay Up

WASHINGTON, Aug. 11.

Informed sources said that Japan
on Monday paid final. gold and
ddllar commitments to the Inter-
national Bank and Monetary Fund
and will be admitted to member-
ship in those organizations
Thursday

Ambassac
sign the t I
a brief ceremony at the Bank ~
Fund headquarters on Thurs
Meg@ening. Japan’s ducta in the os
is, $250,C000,000
quartér is payable i
remainder committ





nt at

—U.P

centre





3W.1.PoliceTo

Return Home

In September

By LONDONER

LONDON
Three West Indian Policemen,
who have been attending a course
at the Police Training School af
Hendon, on the outskirts of Lon-
don. expect to return home in Sep-
tember.

They are Assistant Superinten-
dent Cromwell St. Louis, of Trini-
dad, Station Sergeant R. Mareus
ae ot St. Vincent, and Mn-
spector Edmund J, aize
Antigua. ee ae

It has been all
play for these three
tives of the

work and no

representa-
West Indian police
forces. “In fact”, Superintendent
St. Louis told me this week,
“there has been so much to take
in that we have had to study late
into the night. The lighting bills
are going to be very high!”

“But,” he added, “it has all
been very interesting. Y

For Station Sergeant Thomas,
at least, the return trip w the
West Indies cannot come ten soon.
He became the father of a baby
girl only fifteen days before leav-

ing St. Vincent ‘and is most
anxious to see her again.
* =

Off to the Caribbean shortly is
Mr. A, E. V. Barton, the A
India Committee's indefatigable
secretary. He sails from South-
ampton in the Golfito on August
he and is due in Barbados nine
days later. ‘

During his stay in ‘the West In-
dies he will visit’St. Kitts, An-
tigua, Montserrat, Dominica, St.
Lucia, St. Vincent, Grenada,
Trinidad, British Guiana, Brit-
ish Honduras and Jamaica trav-
elling by sea and air.

Mr. Barton will return home
from Kingston in the Cavina on
November 28th.

* * *

Captain E, J. Hemmings, Har-
bour Master of Port of Spain,
Trinidad who has been attached
to the British Ministry of ‘Trans-
port following his operation in this
country, will be leaving London

shortly to visit his mother in
Edinburgh.

“When I get there,” he says,
‘T am going to do nothing—
absolutely nothing”.

After Edinburgh, and a well-
deserved rest, Capt. Hemmings re-
turns to Port of Spain.

*

“Personality and Conflict in
Jamaica” is the title of a book by
Madeline Kerr, which has just
been published by Liverpool Uni-
versity Press.

For three years until 1949, Dr.
Kerr worked among the Jamai-
can peasants gathering material
for her thesis. Now comes a sum-
mary of her findings-—later to be
presented in more detailed form—
on the behaviour of Jamaican
parents and children in various
situations, on the work of the
schools and the varous religious
sects, and on the general eco-
nomic and political back-ground
of present-day Jamaica.

* a

Sir William Rook, chairman of
C. Czarnikow Ltd., is reported to
have made a good recovery from
an operation he recently under-
went in Nuffied House, Guy’s Hos-
pital, London, Sir William, who
was Director of Sugar at the
Ministry of Food for 11 years, is
now convaleseing.

Co *

Mr. D. J. Parkinson, who began
his duties as Trade Commissioner
in the U.K. for the British West
Indies only three weeks ago, has
‘already reported keen interest
among British business men who

want to trade with the West In-
Meas Until he can find his own
permanent office, Mr Parkinson is
sharing accommodation with the
West India Committee. He is on
the look out for West Indian staff,
and has already engaged Miss

tish Guiana.
Chung of British “LES.

e



New Issue O
Caroni Capital

LONDON.
Caroni, Ltd., the West Indian
planters, have ¢now announced in
London details of their new capi-
tal issue. Ordinary shareholders
are offered 4,200,000 2s. Ordinary

shares at par in the proportion of-

one for every 2s. unit held.

More. than 80 per cent. of the
Ordinary stock is held by Tate and
Lyle Investments and the United
Molasses Company, who are tak-
ing up any of the new shares not
subscribed for by the other share-
holders,

Net proceeds of the issue will be
used to repay temporary advances
in connection with the extension
of the Brechin Castle sugar factory
in Trinidad. The enlarged factory
is expected to be ready for opera-
tions at the beginning of the next
erop in January, 1953.

The company’s 1952 sugar crop
has now been complete with a
record output of 49,146 tons of
sugar. Net profit is expected to be
‘e than double that for the pre-



vious year. A substantial part of
the increase was due to the sale of
molasses at an exceptionally high
price, bu the market value of
i mol € as sinee declined sharp-
* jy and a reduction of revenue from
t duct is expected in the

icial year

—B.U.P.



Trinidad Newsletter:

‘Trinidad

Hit By Fall In Prices

(From Our Own

TRINIDAD’S OIL
recently by falling fuel’ oil

last month there was a 10 cents (U.S,) per barrel drop and | $
this week it was announced that the price per barrel had,
fallen by another 15 cents, effective August 1

This means that the ~rinidad
oil industry will suffer a revenue
loss of $5,000,000 while the Colony’s
revenue collected from the indus-
try will fall by $2,400,000—
$2,000,000 in respect of Income Tax
and $400,000 in royalties.

Trinidad Leaseholds revenue loss
alone is about $500,000; it is not
known how much is the estimated
loss of other individual companies.

It is believed that the drop in
Gulf oil prices is due to the U.S.
steel strike and that if the truce
talkd in Korea are successful pres.
ent prices will remain and might
also have the effect of causing a
reduction in the price of gasoline
to eee

But Mr. N. Foster, Govern-
ment’s eirsiewn Technologist
pointed out this week that the
present Gulf oil price for crude
oil would have no effect on the
price of gasoline,

RAFFLES

During the next session of the
Legislature which begins towards
the end of October, it is expected
that the Attorney General will
present a Government amendment
to the Colony’s Ordinance under
which raffles are conducted.

The Police are seeking an
amendment which will give ther
powers of investigations. At pres-
ent, raffles for charity, sports, or
any other suitable organisation,
are permitted by the Police De-
partment upon the application of
an organiser. Existing legislation
contains no provision for investi-
gation of drawings or for holding
an inquiry into drawing results.

The t circumstances, it is
ee lend themselves easily

to postponement of drawings from
time to time until nothing is heard
of the final results or whether
buyers of the raffle tickets have
been refunded their money.

Amendment to the Ordinance
will make provision as follows:
That a percentage fee of tickets
sold be postéd by the organisers
with the Police; that they enter
into a bond for the proper con-
duct of the raffle and this bond
will be forfeited in case of any
infringements.

Names of winners and sellers
of winning tickets must be made
public and all returns, money,
tickets sold etc.,, must be forward-
ed to the Police.

SPECIAL ASSIGNMENT

Mr. Arthur A, Shenfield, former
Economic Adviser to the Trinidad
Government arrived from ithe

United Kingdom on Sunday and
left early this week for St.
Vincent.

He is in the Caribbean again
on a special assignment—making
a survey of shipping needs and
trade prospects of the area for
Booker Brothers.

Booker Brothers have been
studying for some time past estab-
lishment of a regular inter-island
service, and they now propose to
form a company, with headquar-
ters in Trinidad, for this purpose

Mr. Shenfield ‘is making the sur-
vey in the motor vessel Mabiri
a special ship put at his disposal
by Booker Brothers, He will make
investigations in St. Lucia, Domin-
ica, Montserfat, St. Kitts, Nevis,
Antigua and Barbados, spending at
least one day in cach island

GROW MORE FOOD
Mr. J. H. Steer, Government
Statistician, who has prepared a
table of the Colony’s food con-
sumption, said this week that the
agriculture of Trinidad and Toba-
fo must be as intensive as in
Barbados and Grenada if food

ply is not to become more dillicult
than it is at present

The Colony, he said, deper
Foreign suppliers f 54 per cent



PORT-OF-SPAIN, August 8. g
INDUSTRY has been hard hit

sup- 9's

eS

ed

1

Londen Express Service



It is said here that Barbados now

undersells Trinidad in the Britis

Oil Hard

the
compound

this by dropping
price of lard
$13.65 for

fron

PPPSO2DO9OOGHHHHHHODOSOHG
Correspondent) e

prices. Towards the end of




®

ef its starchy foods and 63 per;
cent. of its proteins, Local fats,| 4
however, shows a high percentage, %
of 67. \4

Said Mr, Steer: “The popula- @
tion will certainly increase by 4g
200,000 in the next 10 years except ¢
for some unforseen disaster. So|¢
that even if all the remaining |®
lands with agricultural possibili- \%
ties can be brought into cultivation,
we face the possibility of becoming
still more dependent on imported
foodstuffs in the coming years.’

The remedy, he said, must be/¢
intensive cultivation of the soil.

* *

+
SELLING MISSION VISITS

BRITISH GUIANA

A Trinidad
prising Mr,

selling missien com-
Owen Papineau, Gov-
ernment'a Economic Adviser, Mr
Vernon Wharton and Mr. G.
Montes de Oca, of West Indian Oil
Industries, went to British Guiana
yesterday in the interest of local
coconut products. 9
British Guiana banned imports | <
of English margarine and lard)
compounds last month followin’
representations reported to have
been made by Barbados producer

~ Sea And
Air Tratfie

In Carlisle Bay

OOO4 3-300-95 O004






SIMPLICITY

‘Sehooner May Olive, Schooner Eme- |
line, Schooner Cyril E, Smith, Schoone
Laudalpha, Schooner Augustus B, Comr



erevery spadbisonabebscecicccssctecsesTeeteers : eae



ton, Schooner Esso Aruba, Schoone i y
Lydia A,, Schooner Henry D. Wallace, | It is easy to op
Schooner Philip H. Davidson, Schooner | minimum numbe
Everdene, Schooner Enterprise s.,
Schooner Marion Belle Wolfe, achootas |
Rosarene, Gehooner D’Ortae, Schooner
Sunshine R., Schooner At Last, Schooner
Wonderful ‘Counsellor, Schooner Lady | under hard wor
Suver, Motor Vesse! T.B. Radar, Motor
Vessel Gloria Maria Motor Vessel
Moneka, Schooner Lucille M, Smith, | POWER
Schooner Hariett Whittaker, SS. Nestor 7 sed
4 The Field-Marsh
S.S. Athelbrook, 260 ton Capt. W
Cook, from British Guiana, Agents: A, | aon
Jason Jones & Co, at minimum eng
SS. Sundale, 1.651 tons, Capt F tes 1 |
Kapasi, from Cuidad Truijillo, Agents: | yar pulls are oly
Plantations Ltd spee ¢
DEPARSURES ” ds.
M.V. Moneka for Dominica.
8.8. Scholar for Trinidad,
MLV. Malvin for St. Lucia MAINTENANCE
S il | A very importa
eawe | maintenance.
} Sei tnt Barth
SEAWELL — ON MONDAY | single éylinder, !
ARRIVALS — From Puerto Rico : > simplicity of des
Patrice Saxton, Albert Gregorich, Wil- | @

iams Samuels, Mirian Brathwaite, Ida hauled In a very
Peterkin, Clarence Payne, Edric Austin,
Katheleen Johnson, Perey Decaires,
From Antigua ;

Mr. Justice
Gregorich,
Burns

DEPARTURES ON MONDAY

For Trinidad :

LeRoy Gittens, Lucy Maingot,
Meaden, Leston Nenham,

UXPERTS ARE

ichard Manning, America
lemena Glover Edith



This Tractor

Elaine
Sheila Aird,





Herwald Devenish, Joan Devenish, Fran- “
cis Agostini, Monica Agostini, Harold

Bugh, Alfred Mahabir, Deoraj Samaroo,

Hayes Sampson, Thomas Lee, Edric}
Holder, Ernest Richard, Elizabeth Rich-

ard, Mertha Richard

For Puerta Rico:



Alydria Williams, Horace Clarke,



Muriel Clarke, Cuthbert Crichlow, Day
rell Johnson, Arthur Me Connel, William
Knowles Elvira Grimes, Margery
Omorundro, William Symington, Grah-
mie Bingham, Seon Bishop, Hermage |
Smith

For Antigua

>. Henr A. Dyett, L. Stanford War

ren, E. Govie
ARRIVALS YESTERDAY
from Trinidad :

590905098





I. Beale, M. Beale, J. Beale, R. Beale
D. Curtir G. Kerr, D. Hanschell, D
Aanschell Jr., D. Hanschell, L. Mayers,!
“fi. Mayers, G. Mayers, J.’ Mayers, A.|
fronside, D. Ramcheran, N. Furgus, J
Rostant, F. Pilgrim Pilgrim, B. Esca-|
tante, O. Antoni, ©. Spurrier, A. Mellor, |
A. Mellor

DEPARTURES YESTERDAY
for Trinidad
Margaret Onhfi



eid a



SDVPHO-DDOOO

’ COCSSCCOEOOOOVU TOS OOOU



Guiana market. This week local
producers made an effort to remedy
wholesale

a 30-pound tin to $12.64,

FIELD MARSHALL



IESEL

The Field-Marshall is a very simple machine

little to go wrong. The characteristic of the
Field-Marshall is exceptionally long service

flywheel, is capable of hauling heavy loads

The Field-Marslvall with its

a slight knowledge of its construction.

throughout the World, under conditions where drawbar horse-power
and economy really count.
maintainance.

We would be very pleased to demonstrate this Tractor
for you, without obligation, —we know you will be
pleased with the results.

The CITY GARAGE TRADING CO., LTD.

PAGE THREE



aS aim. |
Challenge On |

Diamonds |

LONDON’S

liamonds 1



hear-monopoly of
being challenged by

92-year-old Harry Winston - of
New York, His private collec-
tion is said to rank next biggest
to that of the Royal Family
Today Mr. Winston announced

he is

negotiating with the Portu

guese Government to buy the)
output of the diamond mines in}
Angola Portuguese West Africa, |
which produce about eight per

cent, of the world’s supply. |
In Omaha they have perfected |
in amplifier whereby a doctor |
im transmit the heart sounds |
ver the telephone to a specialist |
ind discuss the case with him at
the same time .
Cinema receipts last year were
lown 69,000,000 dollars (more
than £23,000,000) compared with
1950

JAPAN MAY BUY
CANADIAN LUMBER

VANCOUVER, B.C
Effinger, secretary of
Seaboard Lumber Sales Co



_ Ss
Says 3 Mr. “Leo King:
“you CAN RE-LION If

Claude BEING THE SWEETEST TREAT !”

she

} Lt returned from a search fo Wate

|/Far East markets with word tha

|

Japan may soon return as an in eo

zane unt buyer of Canadian lum-

| ber . :
Eftinger Ss repart Was receivea

t a time when coastal lumbe T

joperators refused to grant 32,000 ;

loggers and allied workers pa MADE IN Wy K

lincreases because of worsenin The Perfection of Confection,

jlumber markets The workers,

jmembers of the CIO-CCL Inter

(national Woodworkers of Americ:
jreturned to work with the raise

July lsd i strike that lasted JUST RECKIV ED
Six WeeKs
Effinger predicted Japan would
start purchasing “significant SIMMONS BEDSTEADS
}amounts of B.C. lumber once she

gets enough dollars.” He said this
|may take “another year or two.”

He said Japan's dollar reserves
j}would have to be built up suffi- |
jciently to ease current strain on
that country’s economy. He also
warned that British Columbia}
would have tq compete with lum- |
ber producers in the Philippines, |
1} Borneo and possibly China and}
Soviet Russia

4 Feet

} inches

ONLY A LIMITED QUANTITY 80 CALL
AND GET YOURS EARLY
Incorporated

T. HERBERT LTD.

10 & 11 Roebuck Street

bh Established

1860 1926



9209928 PDDHIOSS + DOHHH HDHD ILO DDODODODDOPDO OOD HPD FIG PDDODDODDOP DOOD DODGY,

TRACT

SPECIFICATIONS

Single Cylinder, 64” bore. 9” stroke—Valve-
less—C. A, V. Injection—Cone Cluteh—High
and Low six speed Gear Box—Front Wheels
7.50 x 18 Rear Wheels 14.00 x 30—750 R.P.M.
giving 40 B.H.P.—WEIGHT 7,640 Ibs.

ECONOMY

Our available figures show the Feld-Marshall
to be the MOST- ECONOMICAL Tractor of
its size in Barbados. One gallon of Dieseline
will give three (3) operational hours.

GENERAL

The Field-Marshall has given satisfactory
service throughout the World for many
years, and is used exclusively by many sugar
plantations in the West Indies: —Used exclu-
sively at Brechin Castle in Trinidad, there
they haul three trailers, a total of 15 tons.
Further, these Tractors operate for 120
hours per week during crop. This speaks for
itself.

erate and because it has a
+r of working parts there is

king conditions.

all, on account of the large

ine speeds. Increased draw-
tained hy decreased engine

nt factor indeed is proper

vas fewer working parts and
ign, can be thoroughly over-
short time by anyone having
NO
NECESSARY.

has been designed to satisfy the needs of heavy haulage

Its simplicity and ruggedness means low



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PAGE FOUR

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

anyocate | Whe Federal Scheme For |

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 13, 1952









CANASTA PLAYING CARDS
(Complete with Instructions)
$2.28 per Set

Sam ifm Oe Sees et
— LS ee le J

i
=e or —



Printed by the Advocate Ce., Ltd., Brew #. Bridsetewn

ee

Leading Article reprinted from the Jamaica Daily Gleaner.

PATIENCE PLAYING CARDS





Wednesday, August 13, 1952

Barbadian Edueation

_ITIS A PITY that the Director of Educa-
tion should recommend those interested in
Education to study the Butler Education
Act of 1944 as a source of enlightenment

and in order to understand local educational
methods.



An Education system devised for a pre-
dominantly industrialised country such as
the United Kingdom can interest but ought
not to inspire educational authorities in a
dependent agricultural colony.

What Barbados and indeed all the British
Caribbean territories need is an educational
system designed to meet the requirements
of agricultural communities which rely
on a few major crops and a relatively
small number of secondary industries to
pay for their imports.

* In Sir George Seel’s Report on Develop-
ment and Welfare in the West Indies which
the Director of Education will certainly
have read the requirements of education in
the British West Indies are lucidly stated.

“It would be impossible” writes the Edu-
eation Adviser to the Comptroller for
Development and Welfare “to over-em-
phasize the need for a complete revision.
of the syllabus and of the methods of teach-
ing in the rural schools.” Since almost
four-fifths of the population of the British
West Indies is rural, this is tantamount to
saying that the greater part of the educa-
tional structure of the area needs overhaul.

Education is not just something defined
by an English Act in 1944. It is not a ques-
tion of primary or secondary, or technical
or modern. It is primarily a question of
training and equipping boys and girls to
become good citizens of the communities
in which they must live. If the products
of Barbados’ schools were going to be ab-
sorbed into the mainstream of English
economic life when they left school, there
might be some, cause for rejoicing in the
fact that the local educational system will
compare very favourably with any system
used by any Local Education authority in
England.

But since the majority of Barbadian
schoolboys and schoolgirls must look to
Barbados for a livelihood the question of
the type of education they receive is highly
relevant.

And according to Sir George Seel’s Edu-
cation Adviser West Indian schoolboys and
schoolgirls are not for the most part re-
ceiving the type of education which is best
suited to their needs.

It is quite unrealistic to talk in Barbados
about a new conception of education in
which a child must show capacity for the
education best suited to its needs. The
fact is that the level of West Indian
economic development does not permit
gaything like the same outlet for natural
alents aS do large cOuntries. Until the
West Indies can compare economically
with the United Kingdom it is absurd to
expect that a novel English educational
system is the best model to be followed by
the West Indies. ‘

Far too long have educational authorities
in the West Indies failed to tackle the heart,
of their educational problem.

“The basic problems of the rural popula-
tion’, writes Sir George Seei’s Education
Adviser, “stem from a generally deficient
agricultural production. This resplts in a
low standard of living. It is necessary
therefore to develop a school curriculum
centred round the’ teaching of improved
agricultural practises, home improvement,
techniques and the inculcation of healthy
living habits, Prominence should ac-
cordingly be given to subjects correlated
to the three major fields of agriculture,
health and homelife education.”

The Director of Education obviously has
not given prominence to these subjects in
his recent defence of the educational
system of Barbados. He talks of “highly
complex” secondary education and of “one
unified system” of education. But upo1
the major problem of rural education he
says nothing at

ler for Development and Welfare considers
that it will be necessary to give a functional
and practical orientation to the curriculum
in ruratschools, and that teaching must be
rooted in reality, the average citizen in a
rural community such as ours wants to
know what action is being taken locally
to implement the suggestion. The news
that two modern schools are to be started
_in September does not appear to have any
relevance to the major problem of the rural
schools, although any change towards a
more technical or vocational system of
education will be generally welcomed.
The Director of Education in the article
which was published in last Saturday’s
Advocate ridicules the contention that
there is anything obvious about education.
He is entitled to his opinion. Many people
are quite clear in their minds as to the
meaning of education. But
divergent opinions may be held by in-
dividuals as to the meaning or purpose 0
education it*is obvious that in an agricul-
tural community such as Barbados educa-
tion ought to be rooted in the soil.

whatever

It is also obvious that because of the lack
of a rural education giving prominence to
agriculture, health and home-life education
the speed of Barbadian progress towards
better living conditions and a life in which
higher forms of education have greater
opportunity of development has been re-
duced.

The high academic reputation which Bar-
bados has gained in the larger world of edu-
cation has been bought dearly. While the
names of Barbados’ scholars have been re-
corded for future generations to see, the
mainspring of Barbadian economy, the
asricultural. workers have been left with
the pickings of an educational system ob
viously unsuited to their needs.

all despite the very

challenging statements which have been

made on the subject in Sir George Seel’s
report.

If the Education Adviser to the Comptrol-

Cuba than it ‘must, Although
f {| sugar is still rationed in Britain,
the U.K. Government is valiantly
resisting Cuban attempts to sell

Central Africa

An Experiment In Safeguarding Interests
Of Native Races

By

HE draft scheme for Central
African Feaeration set out

in the White Paper pubushea
June 18 is the work of a Confer-
ence which met at Lancaster
House at the end ot April and
ine beginning of May. it was 2
conference of responsible repre-
sentatives of the four Goverbmen!s
concerned, those of the United
Kingdom, Southern Rhodesia.
Northern Rhodesia’ and Nyasaland.

African representatives had been
invited to attend and had peen
assured that by attending they
would not commit themselves in
any way to approval of tedera-
tion. In the end, however two
Africans from Southern Khodésia
ulone attended the conference, the
Africans from Northern Rhodesia
and Nyasaland refusing Mr. Lyttei-
ton’s offer even to attend as oo-
servers.

It is evident from the White
Paper that Mr, J. N. N. Nkomo
and Mr. J. Z. Savanhu, the two
Afrftans from Southern Rhodesia,
took an active part in the pro-
ceedings of the conference,

A Further Conference

T is to be noted that the fed-

eral scheme outlined in the
White Paper is presented for dis-
cussion and consideration at this
stage and not for acceptance or
rejection. A further conference is
projected for the latter part of the
year,

Meanwhile not only is the
scheme open to discussion but two
important aspects of it are to be
he subject of investigation and
-eport by special commissions—

uscal commission to consider the
inancial implications and prere-
juisites of federalism in Central

-asider the arrangements for fea-
sral courts and tnéir relation tu
erritoria: or provincial courts.

it will be in the light of these
aicussions and investigations, as
ioubt that the conference at the
end of the year will put the pro-
posals into the final torm in whico
ney will be submitted to the Par-
naments and peoples of the coun-
tries concerned,

Unanimous Proposals
a SECOND feature of the

White Paper ‘is that the pro-
posals it embodies are presented
unanimously by the conference.
This is a remarkable thing, for it
is no secret that there were differ-
ences of opinion between the Gov-
ernments on many important
matters.

.The unanimity now reached is
partiy the result of the very care-
ful and full exploration of the
subject which was carried out by
the earlier ¢onference of officials
neld in March, 1951, at the Com-
monwealth Relations Office and
also of the excellent preparatory
work whictt®preceded this year’s
conference at Lancaster Hous2.
Inevitably, however, unanimity
ass been the product also of com-
vomise,

The acceptance of federation in
he draft scheme means the re-
ection of other forms of closer
issociation, notably amalgamation
or the establishment of a unitary
state on the model of the Union
of South Africa) and confedera-
‘ion, on the model, say, of the Bast
Africa High Commission,

A section of opinion in Southern
Rhodesia favoured amalganmation.
federation has been chosen as a
sompromise--it is by dts nature
ind in its history the great com-
sxromise among forms of govern-
ment,

* Its value for the Central African
erritories, in the White Paper
scheme, is that it makes union
oossible in certain matters of com-
non concern like external affairs,
4efence, postal and transport ser-
vices and the like, while it pre-
erves to the individual Govern-

Gladstone Professor of Govern-
ment and Public Administration
at Oxford and Fellow of All
Souls,



ments their continued independ-
ence and individuality in regard
to the control of those matters
which closely-affect the life of the
African such as his education, his
agriculture, and the African po-
lice.

Needless to say, the drawing of
the line which divides federal
matters from territorial matters
has been very difficult, and the
presence of a considerable list of
“concurrent” subjects upon which
both federal and territorial legis-
latures may make laws—a feature
considered by many authorities on
federal Governments to be unde-
sirable—is evidenc® perhaps of the
difficulties the conference en-
countered when it tried to make
its division of powers. It may be
expected that the division will be
scrutinised very closely.

The New Legislature

OT less important than the

allocation of powers between
federal and territorial legislatures
is the composition of the proposed
new federal legislature itself.



POCKET CARTOON |
by OSBERT LANCASTER





‘ Let us eat, drink and be
merry, Sir Algernon, for its
here today and gone for
export tomorrow.”




In looking at the proposals on
this subject each reader will have
his own particular piece of arith-
metic to do, Those who are con-
cerned with the ratio of Euro-
peans tu Africans will observe
that in a total Federal Assembly
of 35 members, at least six will
be Africans (that is, two fromm
each territory) though there will
be nine members in all represent-
ing African interests. ‘

Those concerned with the ratio
between elected and appointed
members will see that 33 out of
the 35 are to be elected, the re-
maining two being members ap-
pointed to represent African in-
terests, one from Northern Rhode-
sia and one from Nyasaland, the
respective Governors.

Finaliy there is the ratio between
the representation of the three
territories — always a matter of
concern in a federal scheme. Of
the total membership of the As-
sembly, Northern Rhodesia and
Nyasaland between them have 15
members, thus giving them a
majority of one* Over Southern
Rhodesia.

African Affairs Board
HILE the allocation of pow-
ers between federal and

territorial legislatures and the
careful balancing of interests in
the federal legislature might go a
Jong way to ensuring that African
interests would be rightly safe-
guarded under a federal system,
the conference clearly thought that
this wag not enough.

Consequently a system of safe-
guards has been devised by which
any leyislation, statutory or dele-

vccscnaanpaesealinanapastinietesneraaia asa

Professor KENNETH WHEARE

gated, which appears to differ-
entiate either in terms Or if
operation between Europeans aad
Africans to the disadvantage of
the Africans will require to be
referred to her Majesty’s Govern-
ment,

The duty of keeping a watcn
over legislation arid of taking the
initiative in securing that dif-
ferentiating laws are referred to
voneon is placed upon a specially
constituted African Affairs Board,
to be composed of a chairman
and of a European and an Africao
from each of the three territories,
appointed by the Governor of
each of those territories.

It would seem that the con-
ference places great reliance upon
the efficacy of this Board, which is
entitled to make representations io
the federal Government on any
matters affecting African interests.

Much of its effectiveness wil!
depend upon the extent to which
it can work informally or by co-
operation with the federal Gov-
ernment and thus avoid head-on
collisions. It is a new experiment
in the technique of arbitration
from Whitehall—a process always
of great delicacy but of the firsi
importance and interest so far as
public opinion in this country is
concerned.

Two Useful Devices

OR the student of constitutions
the scheme of the White
Paper offers many interesting
features. Two only may be men-
tioned briefly here. First, it pro-
vides for the delegation of legis-
lative powers by the federal to
the territorial iegislatures and,
within certain limits, by the terri-
torial legislatures to the federal
legis.ature—a device which shouid
prove useful in mitigating the
rigidity inherent in a division of

powers in a federal system.

Next to rigidity, a federal sys-
tem is condemned usually for re-
quiring excessive litigation and
the draft scheme proposes a way
out of this difficulty by suggesting
that if a federal law has been
approved by all three of the ter-
ritorial legislatures within a
specified period, its validity may
not be questioned in the eouris,

The outcome of the whoie
scheme is that a common Govern-
ment Is proposed for the Rhodesias
and Nyasaland for certain agreed
matters, while the three separate
governments are to continue as in-
dependent and co-ordinate au-
thorities in the matters that are
left. These three territorial Gov-
ernments would continue after
federation under their own Gov-
ernors who would not be sub-
ordinate to the Governor-General
of the federation. ‘

Britain’s Responsibility
HE three territorial Govern-
ments would retain their
existing constitutional relationshiy
of the Government of the United
Kingdom, the Governor of the
territory of Southern Rhodesia be-
Ing akin to a constitutional mon-
arch and communicating with the
Secretary for Commonwealth Re-
lations, while the Governors of
Northern Rhodesia and Nyasaland
would continue to communicate
with the Secretary for the Colo-
nies.

The constitutional development
and political advancement of
Northern Rhodesia and Nyasaland
as territories in the federation
would remain the responsibility
of the Colonial Office, and the
direction in which they shall go
and the pace at which they shail
travel would be decided in the
last resort with the authority of
the Parliament at Westminster.
This is one important result whica
flows from the choice of the fed-
eral form of union as opposed to
amalgamation.

Britain Puts Empire Sugar

LONDON.

Just a year ago, on 10th August,
1951, Britain signed its sugar-and-
cigars agreement with Cuba,

Hotly attacked in_ the British
West Indies as the “Black Pact,”
it guaranteed a British market
for 500,000 tons of Cuban sugar
a year for three years and re-
opened the British market to
Cuban cigars.
West Indians feared it would
be prejudicial to their own sugar
and cigar interests, British Gov-
ernment spokesmen insisted that
i; would not and claimed that cuts
ir, import duties which Cuba
would grant in return would en-
able Britain to expand its exports
to this important dollar market.

This last hope, at least, has not
been justified. At present, Britain
is importing from Cuba at the
rate of some £48,500,000 a year
ind is exporting only £7,500,000
worth of goods to Cuba,

But this has made the British
Government all the more deter-
mined not to buy any more from



more sugar to Britain and has
emphasised that it will still buy
every pound of exportable sugar
(he Colonial Empire can produce.

“We are determined not to take
any steps to prejudice the inter-
ests of the British Commonwealth
says Mr. H. R.
Over-

sugar producers,”
Mackeson,
seas Trade,
A year ago, nobody could fore-
see, not even the Cubans them-

Secretary for



by BRUTE HEWES

tive-sounding offer as this be-
cause it was already buying more
sugar than it could afford under
the agreement to which it had
committed itself in August. 1951.

Anglo-Cuban trade is now in
sucha poor state that unless Cu-
ba can be persuaded to buy more
British goods, it will be difficult
for Britain to maintain its pur-
chases of Cuban sugar at the
present level, Yet the U.K. Gov-
ernment is’ still under strong
pressure from the people to de-
ration sugar, Seven years after
the war, not more than half-a-
dozen countries in the world still
maintain sugar rationing—and
Britain ig one of them.

The plain truth is that Britain
is putting the Empire sugar pro-
ducers first. The U.K. Govern-
ment knows very well that it
could easily enough acquire plen-
ty of sugar from this y@ar’s world
glut and take sugar off the ration.
But it prefers to keep its con-
sumption more closely related to
Erfpire production.

There will be no further agree-
ment With Cuba which will in-
terfere with existing arrangements
for the purchase of sugar from
the West Indies. The U.K, Gov-
ernment is adhering to the policy
laid down in the Commonwealth
Sugar Agreement to expand Em-
pire production to the highest
practical iimit—and Britain's
consumption will expand with it.

Post-war sugar production has
expanded much less quickly in the
Empire than in other,parts of the

selves, that Cuba would produce world. Supplies on the world
a record crop of some 8.000,000 market are now abundant and
tons of sugar this year and would more than ten years of short-
bave a huge unsaleable surplus. age are over. Cuba in particular
Nobody could see that as a result producing 20 per cent. of the
of this Cuba would be offering total world sugar crop, is strug-
sugar to Britain at prices report- gling with unmanageable sur-
ed to be as low as £18. 13s. 4d pluses. :
a ton—about half the price Brit- So while Empire producers are
rs for sugar from the Brit- still striving to expand their sug-
Ls indie ; ar crops to meet all Britain’s
I Nobody could foresee that Brit- needs, Cuba taking steps to
ain would reject such an -attrac- cohtrol the size of its future crops

Men First

Deficit in “Hlack Pact” Trade

so that its sugar will not become
a drug on the market.

Next year’s Cuban crop will be
controlled at 5,000,000 tons, a cut
of 3,000,000 tons from this year’s
huge crop, and 1,750,000 tons of
this year’s surplus is to be set
aside to be disposed of gradually
over the next five years, -to-aveid
dumping and a consequent slump
in world prices.

Cuban farmers and labourers
have enjoyed for the last ten
years.a prosperity unequalled in
the island’s history. They have
been fortunate in that they have
had a guaranteed market in the
United States for a huge quantity
of their export sugar. In addition
they have had eager buyers in
other countries ever since the
war for any exportable surplus
available,

But the economy of the entire
island was threatened when it
became apparent that there
would not.be enough buyers for
this year’s. crop. Emergency
measures taken by the Cuban
Governmenj to meet the situation
included the establishment of a
“single seller” system, by which
all sugar exported from Cuba is
sold by one organisation at a uni-
form price.

That this system will succeed
in checking any big decline in the

price of Cubaft sugar is by no
means a foregone conclusion.
Cuban farmers fear that other

producers with big crops will sell
on the world market at just. be-
low the price at which the Cuban
price is stabilised, causing Cuba
to lose some of the world markets
which it has built up over the

past few years,

Britain is one of these markets
and Cuba has played, and will
continue to play, an important
part in supplying Britain’s sugar
needs Yet although Cuba is
Britain’s biggest single source
of sugar, Britain will buy Cuban
sugar only to supplement supplies
from Empire sources — and only
aftes it has bought every ounce
of Emr; that is available

—B.U.P.

| THE Barbados Advocate has been discussing
| where the capital of the proposed Federal
| British Caribbean should be_ established.
Quite naturally, with the special pride of the
| Barbadian—one of the real solid contribu-
| tions of that historic little island to West
Indian pride—the Advocate plumps for
|Bridgetown, quaint and delightful city in
picturesque Barbados. No doubt the Trinidad
Guardian will be equally vigorous in sup-
porting the present recommendation of Port-
of-Spain, the most cosmopolitan city of the
British Caribbean. And if the Clarion of
British Honduras had enough courage to
face the irridentists who are trying to sell
the British Honduras heritage to Guatemala
or to the Stars and Stripes, it would demand
a reconstructed Belize to be the mainland
capital of the pearls of the Antilles. The

THE CAPITAL



Bulletin of St. Kitts has not yet declared for |

Basseterre nor the West Indian of Grenada
for beautiful Napleslike St. George’s, and
the Magnet of Antigua has not realised the
a of St. John’s as the federal capi-
tal.

For our part the Gleaner does not claim
that Kingston should be the federal capital.
Kingston is a great city in its own right, and
will remain under all predictable circum-
stances the major British city in the middle
Atlantic latitudes.

But in our view, one of the first essentials
of the federal capital—if such a broad deci-
sion should ever be made—is that in regard
to travel by air or sea it should be central
and convenient. If that is put to the test, we
can see no better choice than ancient St.
John’s, Antigua, and our second choice would
be Basseterre, St. Kitts. Antigua has the ad-
vantage of one of the finest airports in this
part of the world whereas’ St. Kitts’ airport
is not up to international. standards. But
whereas Antigua is low-lying, dry and un-
typicaLof the fertile picturesque islands of
the Caribbean, St. Kitts is famous for Brim-
stone Hill on which is a remarkable old fort;
its “wide plantations of bright green cane
stretching from the shore up the slopes of
the central mountains give the island a most
pleasant appearance .” Antigua of course, is
rich in historical associations. Nelson made
frequent use of the naval dockyard at
English Harbour; “and Clarence House, the
nearby fine old house*built for the Duke of
Clarence who became William Fourth, is
still habitable”.

Both islands offer amenities for relaxation
with lovely beaches, with fishing and gener-
ally with a pleasant trade wind climate.
They are both really in the middle of the
string of islands, so that while British Hon-
duras would still be far off, both Jamaica
and British Guiana would be approximately
the same distance away, and they are both
accessible from the international airlines
which ply through Kingston, Haiti, Santo
Domingo and Puerto Rico.



tal are quite different from those upon which
decision was taken to cite the University
College in Jamaica concerning which the
Advocate makes a point. A federal Govern-
ernment does not require a large and com-

| legislative machinery should function. In-
deed it is a disadvantage for federal politi-
cians to have to operate in political areas
with large and vocal populations. There is
far more likelihood of a truly federal outlook
| being achieved in a new city built up in the
smaller communities than if all our politi-
cians had to cope with the crowds and pres-
sure of Kingston or Port-of-Spain,

in regard to the University it was essential
that it should have its being in a community
large and diversified. The medical faculty
for instance, could hardly have a real exist-
ence in any of the smaller communities. And
in any event the travel costs of the Univer-
sity College are shared by all the territories
so that Jamaica’ does not in fact enjoy any
sreat advantage to its undergraduates in this
respect, except the enjoyment of cheaper
vacations at home.

At any rate it is interesting to see that
Barbados is thinking of itself as a part of
the future federation. Perhaps if an itiner-
ant capital could be arranged so that each
territory would in turn share the benefits of
being the federal centre—as judges move on
assizes—more of the territories would be-
come keen on this idea of federation which
is at present struggling to find some measure
of agreement.

How To Rake In £9,000 On
One Easy Lesson

From R. M. MacCOLL

: WASHINGTON

THE radio quiz programme with its many
glittering rewards and the prize essay con-
test as part of advertising campaigns have
long been a feature of American life.

But it is a considerable surprise to find that
there are earnest citizens who spend most of
their spare time tackling such matters
methodically,

_ What is more, they have formed an organ-
isation called the National Contestors Associa-
tion, with more than 1,000 members scattered
through 52 local clubs, and it is now holding
its annual meeting in Hollywood.

QUEEN of the revels by common consent
is Mrs. Nita Parks, of Pasadena. For she re-
cently won the £9,000 first prize for the
“most appreciative short essay” on a new
cleanser put out by a giant soap company.

It also comes as. sO} ing of a shock to
the amateurs to discover that such wins are
usually not the result of luck but sheer slog-
ging hard wrok.

Thus, when Mrs. Parks struck gold, she had
just completed one specialised correspondence
course (price £14) and was about to embark
on a second. ,

THESE courses provide competitors with
long lists of “suitable” words to use in their
essays. For describing soap the lists put up
such words as fragrant, fresh, sensitive, cool
and “piny.” 4

“Do’s” and “don’ts” are suggested — “Do
|; study the sponsor’s advertising and try to
juse similar phrasing.” “Don’t mention any-
| thing unfavourable about the product.”

THE musical “Top Banana” is withdrawn
from heat-struck Broadway. And that leaves









i just ten theatres still open—three “straight”

i seven musicals,





The arguments in regard to a federal capi-|

plicated society in which its political and |















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WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 13

, 1952



CLERK CHARGED WIT

Six Witnesses Give
Evidenee For Crown

THE TRIAL of Ralph Linton of Ebenezer, St. Philip,
who is charged on four counts of falsification of accounts

began before His Lordship

The Chief Justice, Sir Allan

Collymore, at the Court of Grand Sessions yesterday.
Six witnesses gave evidence for the Prosecution and

another, Sgt. K. Parris, was offered for cross examination.

No defence witnesses were called but Linton elected to

give evidence on his behalf

When the case resumes to-day, Mr. R. Bruce Skeete,
Manager and Attorney of Edgecumbe Ltd., where Linton
was employed as a cane weigher, will be recalled to pro-

duce 11 accounts books.

Linton is charged with (1) On
March 27, 1951, being a clerk or
servant of Edgecumbe Ltd., with
intent to defraud, made or. concur-
red in makirig a false entry in a
cane ticket book belonging to
Edgecumbe Ltd., as his employer,
purporting to show that on the
seme day 9,675 pounds of sugar
cane, valued $43.20, were received
from Alma Murrell,

(2) On March 28, 1951, being a
clerk or servant of Edgecumbe
Ltd., with intent to defraud, made
or concurred in making a false
entry in a cane ticket book belong-
ing to Edgecumbe Ltd., as employ-
er, purporting to show that on the
same day 9, 270 pounds of sugar
cane valued $43.40, were received
from Alma Murrell.

(3) On March 30, 1951, being
a clerk or servant of Edgecumbe
Ltd., with intent to defraud; made
or concurred in making a_ false
entry in a cane ticket book belong-
ing to Edgecumbe Ltd.; as employ-
er, purporting to show that on the
same day 10,310 pounds of sugar
cane, valued $46.03, were received
from Alma Murrell.

(4) On March 31, 1951, being a
clerk or servant of Edgecumbe
Ltd., with intent to defraud, made
or concurred in making a false
entry in a cane ticket book belong-
ing to Edgecumbe Ltd., as employ-
er, purporting to show that on the
same day 9,915 pounds of sugar
cane, valued $44.27, were received
from Sarah Holder,

Mr. W. W, Reece, Q.C., Solicitor
General, is pros*cuting on behalf
of the Crown. Linton is represent-
ed by Mr. D. H. L. Ward.

Before calling witnesses, Mr,
Reece outlined the case to the Jury.
He said that they had heard the
defendant being charged with four
counts on the indictment. Each
count was a separate offence. In
each he was charged with falsi-
fication of accounts but the falsi-
fication alleged was on different
dates. All the counts were similarly
worded except for the fourth.

First witness for the Prosecu-
tion was Mr. R. Bruce _Skeete,
Manager and Attorney of Edge-
cumbe Ltd. on

R Iph Linton, he said, was
employed at Edgecumbe since
1946. Linton was then Yard Over.
seer and would assist with the cane
weighing. Two years ago Linton
was appointed cane weigher,

Responsible for Weighing

He was responsible for receiving
canes, both from plantations and
peasants. He was on the perma-~
rent staff and received a monthly
salary.

He was also responsible for
arranging the delivery of the
peasants’ canes and he would also
arrange what days these peasants
shouia send in their canes.

If the peasant was a stranger
he would seek some higher au-
thority who would decide if this
peasant’s canes should be taken
or not,

After receiving the canes Linton
would enter in the cane ticket
book the name of the person who
brought in the canes, gross
weight, net weight of the vehicle,
registration of the vehicle and the
district from whence the canes
were brought. This entry is made
in duplicate.

He would take out the original
and give it to the driver of the
vehicle. On presentation of this
ticket the canes were paid for.

Payments were made on ac-
count, depending on the amount
of canes,

Mr. Skeete was then shown Ex-
hibits A and B. Exhibit A was
a ticket—the original. It read:
Owner: Alma Murrell and con-
tained other details.

He said that that ticket was
the original which was handed
back to the driver. He then pro-
duced the carbon copy of the
same ticket which was in the
ticket book—Exhibit B. This was
in Linton’s handwriting,

He next produced a cheque for
$92.40 to be paid to Alma Mur-
rell. It was made out by Mr.
Maynard and signed by him. The
cheque was honoured at the bank.
It was later refurned to him.

Before he made out the cheque

oe ticket was presented to him.
e

could not remember who
brought the ticket. Any person
can present 4 ticket but the

chenue is made out in the name

of the person whose name is on
the ticket.

He takes a receipt from the
person to whom he gives the
cheque. This receipt is also made
out in duplicate. That receipt book
was one. of the items stolen on
November 16, 1951.

Books Missing

On November 16, Mr. Maynard
reported to him that several
books were missing. He reported
the incident to the Police. Money
was also missing.

Mr, Skeete said that he did not
know Alma Murrell and apart
from the knowledge he got from

the books, he did not know
whether she sent canes to the
factory.

He said that some of the money,
which should have been paid out
after the 1951 crop, had not been
accounted for up to the present
date.

Mr. Skeete then produced the
other tickets and the carbon copies
in the ticket book and said that
they were in Linton’s handwrit-
ing. He also produced the ticket
made_out. to Sarah. Holder. This
was also in Linton’s handwriting.

At the time when the books and
money were stolen Linton was
still employed at the Factory. The
books and money were kept in
the factory office. The drawer in
which the money was kept was
forced open, Linton, during this
period, assisted as Yard Overseer
and helped in the Factory.

To Mr. Ward: The books
stolen were: Five factory books—
showing payments to employees,
two pay lists for employees; a
Journal; two tradesmen books;
one Factory Day Book; all books
concerning purchase and pay-
ments for peasants canes; small
holders book; purchase payings
books; the receipts. One book was
found by the Police. The originai
cane tickéts were not stolen, They
were in my office at my house.
The carbons of the tickets were
locked in a press in the planta-
tions office. There were no signs
of breaking the windows or doors
o* the factory, Out of crop season,
the keys to the factory are kept
by the senior overseer on duty, He
keeps these keys in his room.

I could not say if the factory
was properly locked on the eve-
ning before the loss of the books.
These canes may have been de-
livered. Alma Murrell’s amount
represent about 13.26 tons of canes.
This répresents about one and a
half toms o! sugar. If the canes
were not ground it would be
eflected in the juice. I did not
get my chemist to check the juice.
it was rumoured that during that
crop people were stealing other
people’s canes. It was also alleged
that they were sending in canes
in other peoples’ names. I warned
Linton about this. I told him not
to receive can®s from people unless
he knew them,

Re-examined: During March
we were receiving about 16,000
tons of canes per week. It is easy
for anyone to enter the factory
by coming through the window.

Alma Murrell of Church Vil-
lage, St. Philip, said that she
owned land. She had canes
growing on the land,

Sent Canes to Guinea

She sent her canes to Guinea
Factory and received $250. She
never sent any canes to Edge-
cumbe Factory. She knew Keith
Bishop, a lorry driver, but he did
not work for her in 1951. Bishop
has never worked for her.

To Mr. Ward: Neither Keith
Bishop nor Everton Norris has
ever drawn canes for me, I know
Norris.

Sarah Holder of Church Village,
St. Philip, the next witness for
the Prosecution, said that she
owned 1 acre, 9 perches of land
at Church Village. This land was
planted in eanes last year. She
sent her crop to Guinea Factory
‘in her husband's name. The canes
were taken by a truck from
Guinea Factory, There are plenty
Holders in her village but she is
the only one with the name,
“Sarah.” In March, 1951, she did
not receive any money from
Edgecumbe. ‘She did not know if
anyone used her rame, She did

not give anyone permission to do
so.

She said that her husband has
land at Vineyard and he sent his

ing the

canes to Three Houses Factory.
His name is Fitz Gerald Holder.

To Mr. Ward : In 1950 my canes
went to Edgecumbe. Everton
Norris drew them.

Keith Bishop of Brereton’s Vil-
lage, St. Philip, said that he was
the driver of his father’s truck.
He knew Alma Murrell but dur-
ing the 1951 crop he did not draw
any canes for her’ He took canes
to Edgecumbe: Factory for Mrs.
Hooper from Brereton’s Village,
Forde from: Church Village,
Vaughan, Parris, Sobers, Daniel
and Gooding. He never drew any
canes using the name of Alma
Murrell. He said that when he
took canes to the factory, the
persons for whom he is drawing
the canes, would give him their
names and he would give the
names to the Cane Weigher.

The factories to which he took
canes are Edgecumbe, Harrow,
Carrington and Four Square.

To Mr, Ward: I have never
taken in canes to the factory
other than in the names given by
the owners. In 1950 I did not take
in my father’s canes in Mr. Edey’s
name, As far as I can remember
I never took my tather’s canes in
Mr. Edey’s name. In 1951 some
of my father’s canes went to
Edgecumbe and some went to
Four Square. I took some to
Edgecumbe. Those which I drew
I delivered in his mame. My
father and Linton are not very
friendly. I heard it was some-
thing to do about land.

Owner of Lorry

Everton Norris of Church Vil-
lage, said that he was the owner
of a lorry which he drove. Dur-
ing the 1951 crop he carried
canes to Edgecumbe and other
factories, He took canes to Edge-
cumbe for Courtenay Watts and
Henry Haynes. He knew Alma
Murrell but has never taken canes
to any factory for her.

He also knew Sarah Holder.
In 1950 he drew canes for her
but not in 1951. He took her
eanes to Edgecumbe in 1950. He
had the 1951 job but could not
fulfil it.

To Mr. Ward: I have never
taken canes for people who I do
not know. This year I only car-
ried canes to Edgecumbe for one
person. That was Courtenay
Watts.

Lionel Harewood, a painter of
Ebenezer, St. Philip, said that he
knew Linton. One morning dur-
1951 crop he was at
Edgecumbe Factory. Linton called
him and asked him to draw some
money, for him. Linton handed
him a ticket. He tock the ticket
to Mr. Maynard who paid him the
money. He signed “Lionel Hare-
wood”—his name— and took the
money back to Linton, He then
left for his home.

Did Not Read Ticket

He said that he did not read
the ticket and did not know in
whose name it was made out. He
could not remember if the amount
was paid to him in cash or by
cheque. He had also drawn money
f y Mr. Garnett, a shopkeeper, At
this stage the luncheon period was
taken,

On the. resumption the Prose-
cution offered Sgt. K. Parris for
cross-examination.

To Mr. Ward: I made an @xam-
ination of the building at Edge-
cumbe Factory. I found no evi-
dence of it being broken. If that
building was properly closed no
one could get into it. All the
articles alleged to be stolen were
taken from the factory office.

No witnesses were called for
defence but Linton elected to
give evidence on his behalf.

Ralph Linton said that he re-
sided at Ebenezer, He was em-
ploy d as an overseer and cane-
weigher from October, 1945, to
1951. He was cane weigher from
January, 1947, to 1951.

At the beginning of the crop
the factory manager and himself
were called and given instructions
to accept as many peasants’ canes
as possible so as to boost up the
crop.

When a load of canes came to
the beam, the driver of the ve-
hicle or any of the hands who
worked on the lorry, would state
to whom the canes belonged and
from what district the canes
were brought. .

He would weigh the load and
put the gross weight on the cane
ticket. After the canes were taken
to the hoist he would weigh the
empty lorry and also record this
weight on the cane ticket. On the
eane ticket he would also write
the name of the owner of the
vehicle, the driver, the number of
the vehicle and the date. Before
the load was weighed, he inspect~-
ed it to see if it was clean enougn

» accepted.
te be. Serer during the

On November 15, !
day, he was emp!oyed in the
plantations office and on = occa-

d to go to the factory.
He finished work © at about 4.00
p.m. and ten minutes later he left
the premises for Bridgetown.

There was a regular man who
saw after the locking up of the
factory. If this man left early, he
would ack him to do the locking
up, but on that evening he was
On Page 8.

gions he ha



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WEARING IT!





BARBADOS ADVOCATE


















































The Legislative Council met at
2 p.m. yesterday, the Hon. J. D.
Chandler presided.

The Clerk informed the Council
that His Excellency the Governor
bad been pleased to grant the
Hon. Mrs. Muriel Hanechell leave
from duties as a member of that
Council from August 11 to Septem-
ber 8

The Hon'ble the Colonia! Secre-
tary presented a message from His
Excellency the Governor notify-
ing his having given assent to
certain Acts in the name and on
behalf of Her Majesty the Queen,

The Hon'ble the Colonial Secre-

tan? presented the following
documents
Report of the Comptroller of

Customs on the Customs Revenue,
Trade, Shipping and Fxcise of the
Island for the year 1951

Quarterly Return of Transac-
tions in rum to 30th June, 1952.

Statement of the sums of money
paid over to the Accountant
General by the Commissicner of
Police during the quarter ‘nded
Zist March, 1952

Hon. Robert Challenor presented
® petition from the several ves-
tries of the island expressing their
strong objection to the Maude
Report and praying the Council
not to pass the Bili implementing
it, if it be passed by The Other
Place

The Council concurred int—

General by the Commissioner of
Folice during the quarter ended
Slst March, 1952

Dr. Cummins gave notice of 4
Pesolution to place the sum of
$6,000 at the disposal of the
Governor-in-Executive Committee
to supplement the Estimates
1952-53, Part I, Current, as shown
in the Supplementary Estimate
No. 15, which forms the Schedule
to_ the Resolution.

Mr. F. C. Goddard tabled a
Petition from the Commissioners
of Highways of the Parish of
St. James to pay thelr Inspector
of Highways a higher salary

Mr. Goddard also gave notice
of a Bill which was later read a
first time to give authority to the
Vestries of St. James, St, John,
end St. Joseph to increase the
salaries of their Road inspectors

The House passed a Resolution
for $2,400 to purchase a stock of
chemical insecticide and minor
equipment to be used for the
contro! of the mea\; bug and ant
pest which may become a serious





In The Legislature Yesterday
COUNCIL

the Regional Economic Committee
for the British West Indies, British
Guiana and British Hondures and

the establishment of a British
Caribbean Trade Commissioner
Service as set out in the Schedule

to the Resolution

Resolution in the sum of $2,400
to finance measures for the control
of the mealy bug and ant pest

The Council referred i
Select Committee a resolution to
ce the sum of £305,700 at the
disposal of the Gove rnor-in-Exect



tive Com*Mitte
Estimates 1962
shown it



t vpplement the
3, Part 1, Cupital

the Suppi mentary













Estimate No. 12, which forius the
Seheaule te the Hesxolutior
The Coun postponed consid.
lion Of & resO.ut On to place the
1 of 95,947 the disposal of
Geverncr-in-Executive Com-
ilttee to Fupplernent the Estim
ates 1952-33, Part I, Current, as
hewn in the Supplementary
Estimate No. 13, which forms the
Schedule to t Resolution
The Council also postponed con
feration of bill intituled ar
Act to amend the Officers of the
Assembly Salaries) Act, 1912,
The Council passed an affirma
tive reply to His Excellency’:
Message No. 16/1952 regarding o
Scheme for the eradication from
Barbados of the Yelow fever

mosquito with the assistance of the

Resolution to approve of the Pan-American Sanitary Bureau
Instrument of Establishment of The Counc.! adjourned sine die.
The House of Assembly met at Sugar cane pest
3 p.m. yesterday Dr. Cummins, Resolution to approve the com
on, behalf of Mr. G. H. Adams, pulsory acquisition of 4,306 sq
laid the following: feet of land for the erection of
Statement of the sums of mone a fish market at the junction of
paid over to the Accountant Queen Street and Sand Street,

Speightstown

Resolution authorising
Government to lease 2 acres, 3
reods, 4 perches of land ft
Bathsheba to be used as a playing
field by the St. Joseph Vestr

A complementary Resolution
authorising the Vestry to lease
the land from the Government

Resolution to approve an
amendment to the Civil Estab-
lishment (Teachers) Order to
change the title SUPERVISOR
OF NUTRITION to Inspector of
Nutrition, to increase the number
ot female headteachers from 65
to 66, and the number of male
teachers from 305 to 306

Resolution to provide additional
staff in the Income Tax Depart-
ment, the Department of Science
and Agriculture and the Attorney
General's Office

Under Private Members’ Busi-
ness, the House passed an Address
to His Excellency the Governo
in connection with the nation
alization of the Barbados Redi!-
fusion Service Limited

the



H FALSIFICATION:

$2,400 VOTED
TO CHECK
MEALY BUG

The Director of Agriculture has
warned the Government that evi-
dence has recently been found of
the existence of an association of
a mealy bug and an ant which, if
not arrested at an early stage,
may well become a serious sugar
cane pest,

Following this warning, Gov-
ernment prepared a _ Resolution
which was agreed to by the House
of Assembly yesterday in which
they voted $2400 to procure a
stock of chemical insecticide and
such minor equipment as may be
necessary for its effective appli-
cation.

The insecticide and equipment
will be used as a trial measure
for the immediate control of the
pest.

Mr. F. L. Walcott who took
charge of the Resolution said the
matter was a simple one, and
explained that the Diractor oF
Agriculture had drawn attention
to a project of an urgent and im-
portant nature which it was not
possible to submit for inclusion
in the 1952—53 Estimates and
which it was necessary to under-
take without delay, He stressed
the danger to the igland's econo-
my if the pest were not immedi-
ately controlled, and moved that
the House pass the Resolution.
Mr. A, E. S. Lewis (L) observed

that in previous instances Gov-
ernment had always found it
necessary to send the Entomolo-

gist of the Department abroad to
Brazil or such other places to get
parasites to kill pests, but very
often the information which they
obtained was of a highly techni-
cal nature,

He congratulated Government
on the action they had taken on
this occasion.

Mr, F, £. Miller (L) emphasise
the importance of the sugar in-
dustry to the economy of thc
island, and expressed the view
that the sum was very small. He
had heard that the bug was likely
to give some difficulty, and hi
wondered whether Governmen
after four years would return tc
the House for snore money tu
spend in eradicating the pest afte;
it had spread.

The Legislative later the same
evening approved of the Resolu-
tion.

Speaker Threatens to ‘Name’ Mottley

@ From page 1.

he makes that reference to the
Head of the Administration in an
irreverent way? I will ask the
Reporter to read back his notes,
and if the honourable member
persists in making such remarks,
then I will name him, and when
I have done that, this House will
then have to make their decision.

Twice Mr, W. A, Crawford rose,
once on a point of explanation,
and again to enquire of the Chair
what was the irreverent reference
made by the member for the City,
but on each occasion, His Honour,
rapping his gavel, and in a firm
voice, ruled the member out of
order.

The member for the City once
again attempted to enquire the
nature of the irreverent reference,
and once more His Honour warned
the member that he would “name”
him if he persisted in the tone
in which he was speaking. ;

Mr. Mottley claimed his rights
as an elected member of the
Chamber, and said he would not
be “bullied or cowed”, and chal-
lenged His Honour that “you must
speak to me as a gentleman and
not in that tone. I will not be
bullied.”

His Honour said he had drawn
the attention of the House to the
behaviour of the honourable mem-
ber for the City, and said he
would “call upon this House if the
Honourable member persists in
that tone, and I will “name him,’
The honourable member will stick
to the subject of the debate.” —

Mr. Mottley suggested that “it
might be the echo of what took
olace on the last occasion when
the House met, and His Honour
again warned him to stick to the
subject of the debate, failing
which he would ask for a motion



TO-NIGHT:
At 8.05
MR. GEORGE HUNTE

will again talk over
Rediffusion on the...
subject

“THE INDUSTRIES
WE HAVE”

The topic will be on

_ Poultry as an Industry
and should prove to be
of great interest to the
general public.



|

\ corrosive salt air.



by the House to show their dis-
pleasure

Mr, Mottley rejoined that His
Honour had accused him of some-
thing, and added that he was one
of those people who could “easily
be led, but hardly be driven,” and
he khew how to conduct himself
on the flocr of the House.

Several times His Honour rap-
ped his gavel, and counselled the
mémber to speak ons the subject,
but as His Honour spoke, the
member for the City remarked in
an aside “I can fight an election
and get back in the House when-
ever he names me.”

Tension had grown high during
these few minutes, but as quickly
as it had grown, it was relaxeca,
end the member for the City con-
tinued the debats. He said if His
Honour’s warning was advice, ne
would accept it in good faith, but
surely as an elected member . of
the Chambcr, in dealing with
matter of the kind — the ayestion |
of playing fields for the benefit
of the people of this colony be!
it the Governor or anybody who
made reference to the conduct of
the people of these playing fields,
he thought he was quite in order}
to say that anyone should }earn |
more about the habits, customs
and usages of the people before
such references were made.

All he was saying was that h‘
appreciated the Governor's inter
est in these playing Fields, bu
when it came to dancing, thos
Community Halls were for the
ordinary working man, and the
‘way to encourage them would be
by first offering them what the
were accustomed to, such as
Canccs and Services of Songs, and
then branch off to other cultural
activities.

You could not expect to bring
people to the Centres of the Ay
ricultural workers type in Barba-
dos to discuss works like Shake-
speare, Virgil and the like, What
he was saying was that he thought
the Social Welfare Officer whos«
salary was just increased should
go out and mix among the people
at some of their functions, and
see how best the other cultural
activities could be interspersed,

Mr. Mottley concluded by asking



for what reason it should be
thought that he was speaking ir-
reverently of the Head of the
Administration when he was

only making reference to a remark
made by His Excellency at the
opening of the Sergeant's Village
and St. George’s Centres, as he,
Mr. Mottley did appreciate that
the cultural activities of the peo-
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PAGE SIX



Leg. Council |
Fire Brigade To Select Committee |

Members Ask For Plan
For St. Cecelia Barracks

THREE hundred an
dollars are required for t!
Bridgetown, a new Fire
equipment for the Brid
Brigade=:<

The. Legislative Cou
considéved the enabling 1

five thousand, seven hundred
erection of a new Fire Station,
Station Speightstown, and for
etown and Speightstown Fire

il at their meeting yesterday
olution but although there was
general agreement expres +d with the fact that a modern
Fire’ Brigade service wa essential to the island yet the
view. Was, expressed that the amount of money to be ex-
pendeck-was so comparatively considerable that the Coun-
cil hadto be satisfied thai the site proposed for the Bridge-

town-Rire. Station, the ¢

the begtsthat could be ob:

be expetided. i

It wasâ„¢or this considerati n
that the*Geuncil finally decid d
to send thé Fésolution to a Se:
Committee.

In moving the passing of th
resolutiorthe Hon’ble-the Colon) ul
Secretary sald: :

It will, I think, be genernaly
admitted that the preservation of
Bridgetown from a serious
flagration has been due not io
£00d management but to the me:cy
of Providence. On the .one hana,
all the factors (such as congested
buildings without adequate fire-
breaks between each other oi
within themselves, large stocks of
stores, mith of whieh is
inflammable, packed to capacity,
the preference for construction on

coil-

wood and shingled roofs), «re
present which make for a. high
fire risk. @n-the other hand, there
has for someétime been a clear

warning, I quote from the opening
words of the Report of Superin-
tendent Cox which was laid in the
Legislature in January 1949, that
“the Fire Protection of . Bridge-
town is at.a dangerously low
level”, and that “until protection
is raised to requisite standard a
wide spread conflagration is a
certainty —— time is the only. un-
known factor.”

At present the Bridgetown Fire
Brigade . is accommodated in
totally inadequate. premises at
Coleridge Street. The Fire Officer
estimates that the space -within

hich 25 men are cramped is only
dequate fé6r about 10 men, The
appliances have tobe kept very
lose to the wali and are liable
to be damaged in a quick “turn-
out.” As long ago as 1942 Sir

attan Bu he commented strongly
the utt@m'inadequacy of the
iceping and living accommoda-
at the Coleridge Street
Hea quarte’S” and in 1950, in
uswe to a question asked in the
Other Place, the reply was given
that the Government was aware
oi tive unsatis’actory condition of
the bar: acks occupied by members
of the Fire Brigade, and that the
construction of a new Fire Station
would be considered as goon as
the Five > “Officer, whom_ the
Se_retory ofState had been asked
to select, arrived,

No Facilities

Apart from the factor of accom~
modation, the seriousness of which
is “fust ated by the fact that the
Sergeants d6 in fact sleep across
the read in the Police Barracks,
the e are no facilities on the spot
tor trainf @ and, what is most im-
portant of all from the aspect of
fire protection, the existing appli-
ances, good though ‘some of them
are, do not supply anything like
the aggregate of 4,000 gallons of
water per minute which Superin-
tendent Cox and the Fire Officer,
Major Craggs, who assumed duty
in Mareh last ye r after 28 years
spent im the London Fire Brigade
«nu National Fire Service, regarc
.8 the-requiveme:t for adequate
protection to Bridgetown.

I understani that the present
eppliane¢s, which consist of a
Merry “Weather self propelled
pump bought in 1949, two Sig-
mund trailer pumps bought in
1943 and 1946, respectively, and
one of which has recently become
out of order, and one light Sig-
i und & iler pump, can between
them produce a reputed maximum
ot about 1,800 gallons minute
w.ich “is in fact, owing to the

t wwn in tne one trailer pump
an’ the age of some of the others,
likely ~to ~be more like 1,200
ge lons: Further details on the in-
adequacy of the present appliances
anu of the present premises of the
fire priyace mMeauquarters are to
te found in the Report ef Super-
intenaen.Coxsand in the Report
of the ire . Officer, which was
laid i thts" Honourable Chamber

r the 10th June.

For some yeais*the question of
a suit ble site has p esented diffi-
culty, and the e has been discus-
as to whether it wouli be

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stliest item in the scheme
aiméd for the funds propo to

as

better to have one big station or
a series of small ones, On the
latter point the considered view
of tne rire Otneer is that for pur-
poses of tra ning, on the import-
ance of which he places great
emphasis, and of discipline morale,
«pd bearing in mind the size of
the town and of the Force, one
big station is to be preferred to

several smaller ones.
Inadequate
4s regurds actual sites he jas

considered the Probyn Street site,
which was at one time earmarked
for the purpose of a Fire Station
but condiders that it is inadequate
in size and on the wrong side ot
the river from the chief fire risks.
He himself, ag he mentioned in his
Annual Report, which appeared
in the supplement to the Official
Gazette on 31st July, expressed a
preference for Jubilee Gardens,
which would allow a good turn
cut for the greatest fire risk in
the City and is in a good position
for radiating to the outskirts and
the country districts on the Lee-
ward side, It was thought to be
important that those gardens
should be preserved as one of tne
few “green spots’’ left in the City,
Temple Yard has also been con-
sidered but this would entail ex-
pensive acquisition of land. The
choice has fallen on the site in
Passage Road, now known as the
St. Cecilia Barracks, which was
bought early in 1951 on the re-
commendation of the Commissioner
of Police for the double purpose
of providing accommodation for
the Police Band and a site for a
Fire Station, and after a Sub-
Committee of Executive Committee
of which Sir Dudley Leacock was
one of the members, had expressed
the view that the site was eminent-
ly suited for these purposes, When
the property was purchased, the
Addendum to the Resolution stated
that the proposal for the transfer
of the Fire Station to this site
would await the arrival of the new
Fire Officer, In the meantime the
property hag been used for the,
other purpose for which it was:
bought. that is, the provision of
adequate accommodation for the
Police Band. It is only fair to
state that the Fire Officer himself
would have preferred a site in
the region of Cheapside, which
would have been nearer the main
fire risks and have had a better
turn-out but the decision of Exe-
cutive “Committee, after visits
paid by Members.to the various
sites, was in favour of using the
site at St. Cecilia Barracks, which
had been bought for the purpose
and which, as the Fire Officer
edmits, is adequate in size for the
proposed station. You, Sir, I
believe, assumed the role of a
fireman and compared the driving
limes to the centre of the City.
Requirements

The Fire Officer has estimated
that he needs a site of 180 feet by
120 feet for a Fire Station, and
the estimates of $219,300 set out
in the Resolution and which have
been furnished by the Colonial
Engineer provide for the necessary
offices, messes, dormitories, store
rooms, roads and yards, water
supply und accessories including
two underground tanks of 1,800
gallons each, and enclosure walls,
and also for the acquisition of
land to provide an adequate exit
from the station to King Street.
The estimate does not include
provision for a Tower which, at
the time the plans were submitted,

the Commissioner of Police re-
garded as desirable but not
essential, although provision for

this is being considered in connec-
tion with the Five-Year Develop-
ment Programme.

The sum of $69,360, when
broken down, includes the dual
purpose appliance ($18,691), two
water tenders ($23,760) 9 and
freightage on them ($7,200), a
Salvage Van ($3,720), 15,000 feet
of canvas hose ($11,040), breath-
ing apparatus ($1,944), an elec-
trieally drawn compressor ($2,040)














BARBADOS ADVOCATE



l







and Salvage Equipment ($960). In addition to that they were
Reference to all these and why raining the money on curren
they are needed is contained in the overhead expenditure and since
Report of the Fire Officer which these fire stations wouid benctit
was laid on the 10th June. In his posterity there was no reason why
Annual Report the Fite Officer they should not have raised a loan
mentions that the Reorganisation of payable within a reasonable
the water mains by the Waterworks amount of years. He agreed that
Department will improve the there should be an adequate fire
position Without solving it for service however.
fire fighting purposes. I would Hon. V. C. Gale said that the
Say a word or two in explanation puilding at St. Cecilia barracks
of this: At present some of the had been a private residence be-
hydrants in the centre of the fore it had been acquired by Goyv-
City are badly sited and so clos@ ernment. There were only about
together that full pressure cannot five bedrooms there and he could
be obtained; under the proposed not see how there could be room
reorganisation some hydrants will enough for the bandsmen of
be taken out and put in else- ehout 35 to 39 and then the mem-
where, so that when the new pers of the Fire Brigade.
appliances arrive, the water sup- With regard to the site it was
ply position will be as good as not far from the warehouses and
can be arranged. The cost of these busimess places of the town. The
adjustments is not expected to be King Street entrance Would facili-
heavy. tate an entry on to the main road
A sum of $17,040 is also pro- if it was considered that Passae
vided for the erection of a singl¢ Road would be too congested. He
appliance Fire Station in Speights. thought that the present site wo
eae be Lg 3 niger 2c also quite suitable.
rega as a high fire risks, for : .
the same r ns, on a minor scale _ Bou G. DL. Pie supported uy
as Bridgetown. It is his intention, resolution in prifcipie but ive
when the new fire appliances for wanted to be convinced that ia
Bridgetown arrive, to transfer view of the fact that tnere W.s
one of the old ones to Speights- such a considerable amount vf
town, aud as his Report shows to Money involved that the site pro-
man the Station with part-time posed Was the best site they couid
Firemen in the same was as is 8¢t- He could not see how they
done in small towns in other Could be commitied to such aa
territories. A suitable site has, [ ©*Penditure and allow .a better
understand, been found, Aj site to pass for a little more.
It would not be a matter of
The Answer “spoiling the ship for a hap’worth
Annually recurrent expenditure of tar. ‘fhe Fire officer had meii-
is dealt with in the next Resolu- tioned the Jubilee Gardens as tie
tion, but Honourable Members best site. He found himself in
should also béar in mind that, as agreement with Hon. Mr. Hutson
stated in the Fire Officer report, that they must be convinced that
it is the intention to recruit {4 that was the best site in the cir-
additional permanent staff for cumstances. ;
Bridgetown, the initial cost of Although he agreed in principle
which will be of the order of he thought that the Council should
$10,060 per annum, rising to about discuss the matter in Select Com-
$14,000 in the course of time, mittee and assure themselves that
It may be asked why these the money was being spent to the
proposals have come down in ad- best advantage.
vance of the many which are held Hon, G. B. Evelyn thought that
up for consideration with the if the Jubilee Gardens were con-
Five-Year Development Pro- sidered the best site they should
gramme, The answer is really pro- not shelter behind the suggestion
vided in the opening sentence of that they would be taking away
my speech, and in Superintendent an open space. Bridgetown was
Cox’s p , which the Fire not a town of high building and
Officer supports, that a widespread there was no scarcity of air. Fail-
conflagration in Bridgetown is ing that they could use the open
bound to come sooner or later un- spot near that chamber The Cen-
less suitable and adequate preven- tral Foundary Site) which Gov-
tative measures can be introduced ernment had already acquired at
in time, Bridgetown has traded on a considerable price and which
its luck for a long time, but luck site had been claimed useless for
has a habit of suddenly deserting building a large Government build-
those who trust in it alone, The jing because of foundation difi-
safety of a vast amount of valuable culties.
property, representing nothing less Hon. J. D. Chandler wondered
than the very heart of the Island’s who was going to pay for the
vitality, is at stake, It is in order expenditure. He had read the Fire

to prevent ee from ; i ;
suffering the fate of Castries and the Vemiy at St. “whchael. shoutd
Georgetown that this Resolution yy 2/3 of the cost of the upkeep
has been sent down. of the Fire Brigade in Bridgetown
Sir, I move that the Honourable speightstown something like £16
Council concur in the Resolution. nq Holetown £10 ? ,
Hon’ble F. C. Hutson was sorry i
that there was no plan showing _ H® thought that it was a good
how they proposed to erect the idea that tne resolution should be
station at St. Cecilia barracks, ‘emt to a Select Committee since
He agreed in principle that there there were many matters that
should be adequate fire services Should be settled in members
provided but he wanted to be â„¢unds. ;
assured that since Government _ He had been a member of the
were spending so much money on Committee that considered the
the scheme that they had taken Bite and he thought that he would
all possible steps to ensure that be of little use on the Select Com-
the site proposed was the best mittee,
passible site available in the cir- The site he thought was not a
cumstances. bad one, but there should be some
Hon'ble Dr. St. John recalled that legisiation to compel people ‘io
Government had bought the build- leave a clear path for the fire en-
ing at St. Cecilia barracks and he gine,
was wondering whether or not the He had tried it himself and ho
firemen could not be housed with had found that he could get from
the band who at present occupied St. Cecilia barracks even at peak
the existing building. days as far ds traffic is concern a
In that case Government would im good time.
only have to er€ct accommoda- Hon. V. C. Gale congratulatcd
tion for’ the fire engine and equip- the President on referring to (ie
ment. support which built up areas gave
He also wanted to know wheth- the Fire Brigade and expressed
er the Fire Officer had considered the view that there should be some
the possibility of using seawater revision since the act dated bac:
in extinguishing fires as this would to days when Bridgetown was 1!
save any undue incursion on the only built up area. He saw so
water supply. réason why Christ Church, £
Hon Robert Challenor wondered James and St. Peter should not
whether Professor Beasley’s Fiscal be brought in the scope of the avi
Survey had been read and taken as built-up areas.
to heart. They were considering The Hon. the Colonial Secretary
spending large sums of money and replied briefly to points raised,
according to the survey they could He explained that the Executive
easily go broke if their one crop had spent a great deal of time
economy failed. in investigating four sites



>

| Charles Mc Enearney

SSS SS





Probyn Street, which the Fire
Officer thought was too small,
Jubilee Gardens—an open space,
Temple Yard 40 x 272 while

Fire Officer required 120 x 180 the
adjustment of which meant the
purchasing of four small build-
ings and a part of the cooper
at a total cost of $80,000.



Send Resolution For

Captain Carlsen
Breaks Collar-bone |

“KIEL, Germany, Aug. 12
Captain Kurt Carlsen of “Flying
Enterprise fame” crashed with his
motorcycle near here last night

With regard to a station not ®td broke his collar-bone while
having been set up at Christ dtiving from his home in Denmark
Church, the Fire Officer haq as- © Rotterdam,
sured him that his engine could Carlsen spent the night in hos-
reach Oistin Town in 9! minutes, ital, and then in a special cast,

The Fire Officer would be using COMtinued his journey to Rotterdam
seawater too. There yas no ques- bY train where a new “Flying

tion of trying to put an additional
35—39 Fire Brigade at St. Cecilia

Baracks with the bandsmen with-
out tMe bitterest objection. [n
addition the firemen had to be

ealled out at night.

The resolution was finally re-
ferred to a Select Committee con-
sisting of Hons. Pile, Evelyn, Hut-

on and Gale.

B.W.1. Sugar
Pours Inte UK

Makes Up For Australian
Deficit
By BUTE HEWES

LONDON.

Huge quantities of sugar from
the British West Indies are pour-
ing into the United Kingdom this
summer. As much B.W.I, sugar
was imported in the
months of this year
whole, of 1948, latest
figures show,

It is now apparent that the
British West Indies will be the
only part of the entire Common-
wealth to come anywhere near
the sugar quotas set under the
Commonwealth Sugar Agreement.

Australia’s sugar crop has failed
and imports from Australia are
one-fifth of last year’s level
Mauritius has sent much less
sugar to Britain than last year
anc none at all is recorded as
having arrived from South Africa,
East Africa or Fiji. :

Yet 252,223 tons of sugar were
received in the United Kingdom
from the British West Indies be-
tween January and June, as com-
pared with 147,441 tons last year,
Board of Trade figures show.
Receipts from British Guiana, re-
corded separately. are up from
46,539 tons in the /irst half of last
year to 63,905 tons in the cor-
responding months of 1952.

Figures for May and June are
typical of the way sugar from the
West Indies is flowing into Brit-
ain’s larder. In May this year,
the United Kingdom received
76,837 tons of West Indian sugar,
as against 30,162 tons in May,
1951. From British Guiana, re-
ceipts rose from 9,238 to 13,473 in



as in the
available



May.

June receipts were down from
the May high level, but were
still well above last June. They
totalled 62,911 tons from the
West Indies and 7.827 tons from
British Guiana, as against 48803
tons and 5,204 tons respectively
in June, 1951.

Australian Sugar

U.K. sugar receipts from Aus-
tralia fell from 126,155 tons in the
first half of 1951 to only 20,374 in
the first half of this year, From
Mauritius, sugar receipts slumped
from 117,029 tons to 89,809 tons.
South Africa supplied 19,775 tons
in the first half of last year and
none at all this year.

In spite of all these failures,
owever, the B.W.I. effort has
xept Britafn’s total sugar supplies
from Commonwealth sources from
slumping too badly, They fell from
456,939 tons in the first half of
1951 to 426,759 tons in the first
half of this year, a moderate
decline when it is considered
that the huge burden of supplying
Empire sugar to Britain has been
shouldered almost entirely by the

’ British West Indies.

‘Indeed, in May and June, thanks
to the efforts of West Indian pro-
ducers, U.K., receipts of Empire
sugar were well above last year’s
levels. Total sugar receipts from
the Empire were up from 62,794
toris in May, 1951, to 90,610 tons

@ On page Ts



oo
_

nan
a
Sm

first six |

Enterprise II” lies at anchor.
Carlsen is a motorcycle enthusi-
ast and frequently travels on one
when his ship is ashore, '
—U.P.

¥ ° |
Canadian $ Up |
MONTREAL, Aug, 12. |
The United States dollar Mon- |
day closed at a discount of 3 29/22 |
per cent. in terms of Canadian
funds unchanged from Friday. Act |
the close it took 96 3/32 cents
Canadian to buy $1.00 Americai. |
The pound sterling, $2.68 13/15, |
was down 1/8 from Friday.

The Canadian dollar was up
1/32 cent at a premium of 4 1/32



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a day of Buckfast Tonic Wine will
quickly restore lost energy and
tone up the whole nervous system.
Giving new vitality it fortifies you
against fever and exhaustion and
remember, Buckfast Tonic Wine

is especially valuable
after illness.

oucarate



@

OTTLE TODAY



PHILIPS

long wave ranges etc.

PIER HEAD


WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 1:

Bathsheba May Gel What M.P’s Want to Know

3, 1952

Playing Field
MAPP ASKS FOR
WELFARE WEEK

THE HOUSE OF ASSEMBLY yesterday evening pass- the jury trying the said case was
ed a Resolution authorising the Government to lease 2 ¢™panelled, keeping the gentle-

acres, 3 roods 34 perches of land at Bathsheba to be used
as a playing field by the St. Joseph Vestry.
A complementary Resolution authorising the Vestry above mentioned police witnesses

to lease the land from the
without debate.

Seek To Oust
Yellow Fever
In Barbados

With regard to a scheme for the
eradication of the Yellow Fever
Mosquito from Barbados, His Ex-
cellency the Governor sent the
following message to the Legisla-



tive Council at their meeting yes- ;

terday: —
His Excellency the Governor
has the honour to inform the Hon-

ourable the Legislative Council °'-im-Executive Committee, Gov- District “E”

that a scheme for eradication from.
Barbados of the yellow fever mos-
quito, Aedes aegypti, has been dis-
cussed with Dr. P. F, De Caires,
representative of the Pan-Ameri-
can Sanitary Bureau, which is the
regional Bureau of the World
Health Organisation for the West-
ern Hemisphere.

2, Under the terms of the
Agreement into which it would be
necessary to enter with the Bu-
reau, this Government would be
required to supply a certain
amount of insecticide and person-
nel, whilst spraying equipment,
insecticide and the services of one
medical officer and one inspector
would be supplied by the Pan-
American Sanitary Bureau, Be-
sides using a part of the existing
stock of insecticide which so far

Government was later passed

Dr. Cummins moved the pass-

ing of the Resolutions, ang speak-

ing on the first, Mr. A. E, S. J
Lewis enquired whether it was

another bit of land that was



Four Members of the House of
Assembly asked Government a
number of questions when the
House met yesterday.

They were :—

Mr. J, E. T. Brancker (L).

is it: true that on Wednesday,
23rd of July in the evening, any
police witness for the Prosecution
in a case at the Assizes that day,
was within the building where

men in question under observa-
tion?
Is it also true that any of the

travelled with the said jurors
from the place where they were
empanelled, on their return jour-
ney to the Court td complete the
suid, cane on Thursday the 24th

Is it now the practice in an in-

going gj
to be purch i out of the Jiabour dictable case, to manoeuver and

Welfare Fund.

Mr. R. G, Mapp, (L) aiso en-
it was
situated, and asked whether the

quired where exactly
opinion expressed by His Excel-
lency in connection with the use
of the Community Centres for
dance halls was the opinion of
the Governor-in-Executive Com-
mittee, or his own private opin-
ion of the Governor-in-Execuksr
ion and added that if it was the
collective opinion of the Govern-

ernment should take steps in the
matter, since there was no sense
spending money to erect places
which were not being used.

He felt that Barbados should
have a better community spirit,
and urged that there was a great-
er need for more voluntary social
welfare workers.

He suggested the institution of
a Welfare Week with a view to
fostering a better community
spirit, and said that the Welfare
Department of Government
should go out and arouse the vol-
untary support of community
leaders, and quoted the Jamaica
Welfare Limited as an example
from which to take pattern,

He felt it was time for Govern-
ment to declare some set policy
on the question of the playing

circulate around the jurors em-
panelled to try such case during
periods. when the Court is ad-
journed?

+ = *

1. Is Government aware of
the grave inconvenience suffered
by litigants at District “E” Courts
because only two writ-servers are
allocated to that particular area?

2. Will Government cause a
telephone immediately to be in-
stalled in the building where
Couris are held, as is
the case with every other Court
in the island?

If the answer to question one
is “Yes”, will an immediate and
adequate increase of such writ
servers be provided?

Mr. R. G. Mapp (L.)

Is Government satisfied that
the owners of Sugar Factories
who signed the agreement be-
tween the Barbados Workers
Union, the Executive Committee

MORE STAFF
FOR TAX
DEPARTMENT

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

and the Sugar Producers Federa-
tion, have carried out the. terms
of the agreement so far as the
price paid for peasants’ canes is
concerned,

What steps will Government
take to enforce this part of the
agreement and what is its atti-
tude towards those owners who
did not sign the agreement and
may have paid, or may pay less
for those canes than provided for
in the agreement?

* J *

1. How many tenantry roads
in the parish of St. Thomas have
been reconstructed or repaired
this year under the capital works,
improvement of tenantry roads
scheme?

2. What roads, if any,
thus been improved?

3. What other roads, if any,
are scheduled tc be improved
this year, in the said parish?

4. Is it a fact that the Depart-
ment of Highways and Transport
is ne it difficult to cope with
this work and if so. why?

have

1. Has any employee of the
Highways and Transport Depart-
ment been promised that after hav-
ing been employed for 250 “Man-
days” in any one year after em-
ployment he would be given
whole-time work and permanent
status?

2. How many casual employ-
ees since 1948 have been employed
for 250 “Man-days” in any one
year?

3. How many of
roller-drivers?

4. How many have been made
permanent employees?

these are

* % ”

1. Is Government aware that
certain buildings in Broad Street
at its narrowest point are to be
demolished remodelled and re-
built in the near future?

2. Should Government be so

Marines Take





U.S. Plans Big
Atomic Plant

WASHINGTON, Aug. 12

The Atomic Energy Commission
announced on Tuesday that it will
build. a $1,200,000,000 atomic ex-
plosives plant on a 6,500 acre site
about 22 miles north of Ports-
mouth, Ohio. The huge plant will
be the major new facility to be
built as part of the vast atomic
expansion programme, expected
to cost more than $3,500,000,600,

t in the next five years. It was
ee a ee eran oe me announced that the purpose of
loss of the fourteen thousand odd ‘he expansion project is to main-

tain and increase the United States
douers from that Department? atomic lead over Russia.

The new works will be a dif-
fusion plant to produce atomic
explosive uranium 235. It will
have more than twice the capac-
ity of a similar plant built at Oak
Ridge, Tennessee in World War

aware will Government -state
whether it is its intention to take
steps to have these buildings re-
aligned in conformity with the ex-
tensive plans for replanning
Bridgetown that were prepared
by former Town Planner and
Architect, Mr. L, M. De Syllas,

A?

.

A.R.1B
J ©
Mr. A. E. S. Lewis (L.)
What adjustments if any have
been made or are contemplated in



















Is Government aware that the

present method of training Nurses
at the Barbados General Hospital
is wasteful of public funds and
unfair and frustrating to the per-
sons under training?
_ Will the Government make an
inquiry into the method in vogue gents of the area that “the oper-
with a view to correcting the ation of the plant will involve no
faults of the present system? appreciable radiation hazard.” It
said that in the six years of oper-
ation of the Oak Ridge plant,
not a single employee has suffered
rediation injury.”

e site is in Pike County in
Southern Ohio. Its selection fol-
lowed a survey of all the poten-
tial sites in the Ohio River valley.
The AEC said that the availability
of water and of power at reason-
able costs “were Important fac-
tors in the selection af the site,”

Preliminary “designs indicate
that the. plant will cost about
#1,200,000,000. It will require up
to 400,000 kilowatts of power for
early operations. The AEC said
that the power will be supplied
by existing facilities —U.P

0.
The Commission assured resi-

e of *

Has there been recently another
loss of cash from a Cashier's cage
in the Money Order Department
of the General Post Office?

_If the answer is in the aftirma-
tive, will the Government please
give full details of the occurrence
and say what has been done in
the matter?

Mr. J. C. Mottley (©).

Is Government aware that the
wholesale liquor dealers in the
island are using ten-ounce bottles
instead of the original 12-ounce,
and still charging the same price
for the ten as for the 12 .

If the answer is in the affirma-
tive, will Government please ex-
plain why there is the change?

If the answer is in the negative,
will Government immediately in-
stitute an investigation to deter-
mine the cause and effect a
remedy?

B.W.I. Sugar

@ From page 6.

in May, 1952, and frum 55,055 tons
in June, 1951, to 70,738 tons in
June, 1952,

More From Cuba
Still, however, the .Common-
wealth is suppiying nowhere near











PAGE SEVEN

Always brush your tecth



tight after cating with

COLGATE DENTAL CREAM
TT Ua ee tt

b tty ck.



* }

Dont take chances
with your Sleep

as can be foreseen, it will be poss-
ible to replace from the current
vote, a sum estimated at $1,000
will be needed to meet this Island’s
share of the cost of the scheme,

the whole of Britain’s sugar needs.
Purchases of "03,123 tons of for-
eign sugar were made in the first
half of this year to bring total
U.K, imports up to the total of




fields, and suggested the estab-
lishment of © organisad indoor
games and libraries at the cen-
tres,

The House of Assembly yester-
day approved of an amendment to
the Civil Establishment (General)
Order which provides among

“Bunker Hill”’

SEOUL, August 12.
UNITED STATES MARINES captured “Bunker Hill”



3. It will be necessary to give
the Director of Medical Ser-
vices, his departmental officers and
the medical and technical officers
of the Pan-American Sanitary
Bureau statutory authority to
enter and spray houses and prem-
ises with an insecticide approved
by the General Board of Health
and to add larvicide approved by
the Board to water or water con-
tainers, The General Board of
Health has approved of the pro-
posed programme, and has ex-
pressed its willingness to amend
the Mosquito Regulations so as to
make it possible to carry through
the scheme effectively. 7

4. The Director of .Medical
Services has been assured of the
co-operation of the Sanitary
Authorities in the several parish-
es: This is essential for the suc-
cess of the proposed programme.

5. The Honourable the Legisla-
tive Council is invited to approve
that the scheme for the eradication
of the yellow fever mosquito with
the assistance of the Pan-Ameri-
can Sanitary Bureau should be
proceeded with and that, in ae-
oprdance with the prescribed pro-
cedure, the Secretary of State for
the Colonies may be asked to
sponsor the necessary application
for technical assistance to the
World Health Organisation,

The Council sent the following
reply: —

The Legislative Council have
the honour to refer to Your Ex-
cellency’s Message No. 15/1952 of
the 14th July, and to inform Your
Excelleney in reply that they ap-
prove that the scheme for the
eradication of the yellow fever
mosquito with the assistance of
the Pan-American Sanitary Bu~
reau should be proceeded with and
that, in accordance with the pre-
scribed procedure, the Secretary
of State for the Colonies may be
asked to sponsor the necessary
application for technical assist-
ance to the World Health Organi-
sation.



Seven Ask Radio
Nationalisation

The House of Assembly last
night by a 7—3 majority passed
an. Address to His Excellency the
Governor asking that steps be
taken to nationalise the Barbados
Rediffusion Service Ltd.

The Address reads;—

The House of Assembly beg to
inform Your Excellency that in
order to assist in promoting adult
education, to give the people of
this island an opportunity to learn
the policy of the Government, and
to promote cultural entertainment,
especially for the people in the
country districts, the Government
should take steps to nationalise
the business concern known as
Barbados Rediffusion Service Ltd.

The voting was: Ayes—Messrs.
F. E, Miller, R. G. Mapp, E. W.
Barrow, E. Holder, J. E. T.
Brancker, C. Talma, and W. A.

‘crawford.

Ose iebekie: F. L. Walcott, ¥V,
Vaughn and J. C. Mottley.

The County Chemical C

Mr. J. A. Haynes (E) supported
Mr. Mapp’s suggestions, and said
that since the establishment of
some of the centres, they were

ee A wae (L) said ,,1¢ is considered that the addi-
that it was all very well to build heating the staff of that Department
nice buildings, but then the more aera permit for carrying out
difficult question was organising © a +. th examination of returns
them, organising charity groups #4 at the same time increase the

collection of revenue by prevent-

and the like. People of the Social $
Welfare Office should try to get nee ho Oras Wee tales
net,

together with the Vestries and

get down to real organizing. ; The | Amendment also provides
Mr. F. E, Miller (L) said that fr additional staff for the Depart-
the big mistake about the play- Ment of Agriculture and the
ing fields was that they were in Attorney General’s Office.
the hands of the wrong people. , Dr G. H. Cummins who took
The people who controlled the Sarge of the Resolution pointed
playing fields were not by any Out that “The present staff of the
means concerned in improving Imcome Tax and Death Duties
the pattern of the social set up of Department is not adequate to
the working class of the island. cope with the substantial expan-
The Honourable member for Sion in the volume of work which
the City was at pains to criticise has taken place in the Department
the Welfare Depertment. But it Since its reorganisation. The in-
did not matter how much was ¢rease in the number of returns in
paid to the head of that Depart- the assessment year 1950 amount-
ment, the situation with the play- @d to 929 and in 1951 to 840, thus
ing fields would always remain Making an increase of 1,769
what is was until the Vestry and over the 1949 figure of 6,176—an
its system were destroyed. increase of approximately 29%.

other things, for an Inspector of
Income Tax, and a Long Grade
Clerk for the Income Tax De-

As an example of what could _ He said is is considered that
be done at the playing fields and the addition to the staff would
their_ buildings, they could take permit the Department to carry
the Girls’ Industrial Union, The out effective examination of re-
trouble was that the playing fields turns and at the same time to
were in the wrong hands. increase the collection of revenue

For instance, it should not be by preventing persons from
that if a group of girls learning evading the taxation net,
domestic science applied to the It provides for: One Inspector
Vestry for the use of the eae Dr Tax)—$3,120 x 144 —
hi should get a negative reply. 3,840. ‘
iad . . anys One Long Grade Clerk—$480:

Mr, F. E. Goddard (E) said he

1 . 480—624 x 172912 (E.B.)

thought the Vestries were being 1,056 x 72—1776 (E.B. 1,872
blamed wrongfully. He was a x 96—2,160.
member of the St. Michael and One Stenographer and Typist
Christ Church Vestries and a —$480 x 48—1,200,
member of the Playing Field
Committee. The Amendment also provides

The Christ Church Playing for an increase in the establish-
Field Committee alloweqd any- ment of the Department of
body with ability for organising, Science and Agriculture by one
to use the field and building free, Long Grade Clerk in order to
They aimed at culture, and that provide for the continuation of
was what they broadcast. the services of the officer respon-
«4, sible for the performance of the
The Vestry was concerned with ¢jerjcal and accounting work
the administration of the playing in connection with the Agricul-
field, but were not a body of so- ira) Development Scheme. The
cial workers, It was their duty j¢muneration of this officer was
to see that the playing field was formerly met from funds pro-
properly maintained, and for that yigeq under Colonial Develop-
reason made nominal charges for pont and Welfare Scheme D. 217,

dances, Dances were held additional Lo Grade
private individuals Nor their own Bret in 0 Atvatiay teharal’s

profit. Like the head of the Ad- Ome to meet the increase in
ministration, they were saying clerical work in that department.

that they should not only be used
V. Reid Awarded



for that purpose.
They had enclosed the field,
not from people, but from animals.
Mr. W, A. Crawford ©) a
that in the final analysis, the Ves- ‘2 8 ‘ *
tries actually controlled the Civic Scholarship
amount of money to be spent on ;
the playing field, and the Vestry Victor C. Reid of Tudor Bridge
had certain financial limitations. has been awarded the Civic
Mr. F. L. Walcott (L) also said Scholarship which is tenable for
that no one could really blame six years at Combermere.
the Social Welfare Officer if the Earlier this year, the scholar-
clubs were not run as they should ship for girls was awarded to
be Patsy J. Browne of Lakes Folly.
The Resolution was eventually Both children are already pupils
passed. of the respective schools,





KLIM is pure, safe mil
KLIM keeps without r



To hel
teeth ail goad muscles, to

KLIM quality is ciways uniform

children develop strung bones and

only five miles east of the truce village of Panmunjom in

a surprise tank assault that

ists completely off balance.

Reds by striking first at
“Siberia Hill” in a diversion
tanks.

Although the marines withdrew from “Siberia Hill”

after the raid, their capture

completely neutralized the other height, which has changed #!f-year to 237,887 tons this year.

hands five tmes in the past
In Tokyo, the United Nations
naval headquarters said that two
United States destroyers and one
British frigate were hit by Com-

munist Korean east coast shore
batteries during the past week.
Two men were killed and 15
wounded,

Came to Stay

The battling marines who cap-
tured “Bunker Hill”, so named
because it was honeycombed with
Communist bunkers and trenches,
made sure that they would stay.
(They carried with them large
prefabricated logs for immediate
construction of their own bunkers.

Marine tanks began rumbling
up “Siberia” last night, their
flamethrowers spitting fire at the
demoralized Chinese Reds crouch-
ed in their bunkers. Behind the
armour-clads came marine infan-
trymen picking off Red soldiers
who tried to escape a burning
death,

The tanks lumbered within 20
yards of “Siberia’s” crest and
suddenly stopped. Then came the
surprise move, From the ridgeline
to the rear a second armoured
column roared up and opened an
assault on “Bunker Hill”, 700
yards from “Siberia”.

The Chinese Reds, who thought
the main attack was _ against
“Siberia”, were completely con-
fused. They offered only “mod-
erate resistance” in the form of
mortar fire to the second and
heavier assaulting group. By dawn
“Bunker Hill’ was in = marine
hands and the marines could look
down upon the dead Chinese
on “Siberia”.

Forestall Attack

Airforce fighter-bomber took to
the air to forestall any possible
Communist counter-attack. Strikes
on the Red western front position
took number one priority, as no
Communist MIG 15 jets were
sighted over north west Korea, by

noon, J
* United Nations warships dam~
aged by Red shore batteries last
week were the USS J. R. Pierce,
10 men wounded, the USS Barton,
one man killed, one wounded,

and the British Frigate Mounts
Bay, one killed, four wounded
seriously.

The Pierce was hit seven times
on last Wednesday by 105 milli-
metre fire from the shore. The
Barton and the Mounts Bay were
damaged on Sunday,

The Barton, cruising offshore
near Wonsan, received about 90
rounds from Communist 75



Copr. 1950
Borden Co.
Internat’! Cove,
Roserves

ik °
efrigeration





ive them energy

10 |

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and Tiles, Sinks, and Paintwork
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in a mountain of Chemico.

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KLIM adds nourishment to cooked dishes
KLIM is recommended for infant feeding




KLIM is safe in the specially-pocked tin



\ KLIMZ MILK.

FIRST IN PREFERENCE THE WOLD OVER













1,129,882 tons that were needed

i for the half-year,

caught the Chinese Commun- — Cuba supplied most of this, Bri-
The marines confused the tain’s sugar receipts from Cuba

0 for the half-year were up from
the nearby hotly contested 2 Oo? tone in’ 1961 toate ea

; 3
ary attack with flamethrowing tons this year. San Domingo was
another important foreign supplier,
but receipts from this source were
of the strategic “Bunker Hill” cut from 282,297 tons in the 1951

three days. At the same time, Britain cul
her re-exports of refined sugar
mae from 393,398 tons in the first half
of 1951 to 343,135 tons in the 1952
half-year, Most notable feature of
this was the cessation of exports

e e
Television
9 to Persia, formerly Britain's larg-
Comes To J CA est sugar export customer, which

took 65,018 tons in the 1951 half-
year and only two tons in the first

half of this year,

(From Our Own Correspondent)
KINGSTON,
Television has come to Jamaica.
Last week Mr. Harold F. Soltau,

Cuban agent of General Electric »sn 2g’ * ‘
Company, Ltd., arrived in the Reinforces ments

island for a few days visit. . o
He brought with him a tele- Shipped To Macau
NEW DELHI, Aug. 12.

vision set for experimental work.
Groups of interested persons have :
% P Reinforcements for Portugal’s
up by, the tiny colony of Macau are enroute
°

seen the set in operation.

The shows picked : .
set were televised from Santiago, from Portuguese India following
Cuba, approximately 125 miles frontier clashes between Chinese
away. Mr. Soltau expressed him- and Portuguese forces there,

—B.UP.



self as being pleased and sur- @uthentic reports reaching — her¢
prised at the remarkable re- Said. e %
ception. These reports said that part of



the Portuguese garrison at Goa
had been hurriedly transferred to
Macau and that the Portuguese
motorship “India” is now enroute
to Macau loaded with extra sup-
plies and equipment for the colony
on the south-east coast of China,
—UP.

9 Successful In
Midwifery Exam.

Britain Will Pay
More For Meat

LONDON, Aug. 12.

Britain agreed last night to pay
16.6 per cent, more in the coming
year for the meat she buys from
Australia. Britain now pays about
ls. id. a pound for good quality
lightweight lamb.

The new rate, made under a
price re-opening clause in the 15- The Final Examination for Mid-
year agreement signed between wives was conducted § at the
the two countries last year, will Maternity Hospital on the 22nd
give Australian farmers 1s. 3d, @ anq 25th July, 1952.
pound, The examination Board com-

—OP, prised Dr, A, L. Stuart, Dr. W. F.
Kerr, Mrs. B. Judge and Miss 1.
Walters, with Dr. F. N. Grannum
as Chairman.

Nine candidates were examined





Studying Europe's
Housing Problems

and they reached the required
5 standard,

Aa ROAES, aes, ae e The names of the successful
chief Ste ee eek Asoaee candidates are as follows:
began a tour of Italian hospitals bieeee me pore *
in Rome and its environs, De oe Harding . torent - ae 7
is touring European cities study- ot atten

ing housing problems.
Yesterday he was received at
the Rome City Hall where he



FISH MARKET

delivered a message of solidarity
from the Mayor: of Forto oe The House of Assembly yester-
‘ ae dey approved of a Resolution
—__-_ giving Government authority to



acquire compulsorily 4,306 square
feet of iand at Speightstuwn for
the erection of a fish market,

The market will be erected at
the junction of Queen Street and
Sand Street.

105 millimetre guns. She return-
ed more than 700 five inch shells.
All three ships, although damaged,
continued to fire on the ‘oo



Holder of the all-time American Automobile Association record with
8 major racing victories im 1951, TONY BETTENHAUSEN says:

“Full-firing CHAMPIONS @%




By equipping their cars with
dependable Champions, racing
men know they will get the last ounce of power out of
every drop of fuel.

{f you’re not getting all the power you're paying for,
see your Champion dealer. Whatever make of car
Kh You own, a new set of full-firing
Champion Spark Plugs will deliver the
full power built into your engine.

First on land, on sea, in the air—






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AY BOS





r is ene that you sen antcy Finca

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IMPORTANT —Note that the large size ‘Ovaltine’ tin contains 16 ounces.

refreshing sleep








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sy and delightfully crisp, ‘Ovaltine’ Biscuits are
fora occasions. de es

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The pert Siena yous ores § Cvaleing® semember tol
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their delicate and distingwished favour. ba ar

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THE BIG BOOK OF GARDENING: | Illustrated

SCHOOL GARDENING IN THE TROPICS

COMPLETE CANASTA: Jacoby

FAMILY COOKERY Also HOUSEHOLD
Mrs. Beeton

COMIC AND CURIOUS VERSE:

MANAGEMENT:

Penguin Poets
We specialise in Church Supplies, and orders receive our care-
ful attentions Please ask for details and lists, ,
Cards for all occasions — Birthday, 21st, Anniversary,
Congratulations ete.



We have the finest selection in town.
Tel. 4427
POPLAR LRECCLFPEROES





GALVANISED CORRUGATED
SHEETS




24 GUAGE:—
6 feet Long @ $4.32 per sheet
oe 5.04 ,, ”
8 » » @$5.76 ,, ”
Oy nm @eess , on




26 GUAGE:—
8 feet Long @ $5.12 per sheet

GALVANISED NAILS @ 37c. Per 1b
gee Shop Now and Save!

BARBADOS HARDWARE (CO. LTD.

(The House For Bargains)
No. 16 Swan Street Phone : 4406, 2109, 3534










SS


PAGE EIGHT

BARBADOS ADVOCATE WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 13, 1952 ~

SHIPPING NOTICES





| Gomes And Bryan
| Attack Adams



PUBLIC SALES

CLASSIFIED ADS. [senna omer

REAL ESTATE _ Middlesex Defeats

Clerk Charged
With Falsification

TELEPHONE 2508



















“BRIGHTWOOD" situats on the seaside

From page 1.











































































































ae eee at St. Lawrence, Christ Church, stand- | ROY : N j
FOR SALE ingen 2006 square tect of and” | Mental Hogpital = [met of to declare where STEA {
The House contains three bedrooms, | they stand in the matter of fed- @ From e 5. MSHIP co, The M.V. “CARIBBEE” will ac- 2
FRERY—Mre es to] | drawing, dining and living room, garage) saiadiesex defeated Mental eration. mae 5. cept Cargo and Passengers for i
_ ane Ps s rooms wi electric light é SED - a nia +“ A 8. eu : Dominica, Antigua, * 2
thank thi AUTOMOTIVE ad water. throughout. Idspection by|Hospital (Intermediate) ericket|. 4, Adams has been stone-jtold that the regular man did ‘the|s.s BOGRDOP, tet aunt jens Nevis and gt’ kitts, Sailing
Faoaiot —— epeeaeeereme —— | appoint aa etween thelteam on Sunday by an © innin walling long enough” locking up. M.S. BON, bth August 1952. Friday 15th inst
rec ee } ee eee * af > . 10Urs & an 2 am Rare od ie Bry Trin , . :
2 CAR—i87 Standard €© HP. Secon) The above will be set up for sale aijand 196 runs when their two-dy |; Mr. Victor ae, dad Min-] Linton said that he went to work |S’ Siema sao a The M.V. “MO » will ac- ;
= em ee oy. Phan rere Tse Public. Competition on Friday, the 15th | fixture ended at the Mental Hos- ister of Agriculture who also sawjon the next m at about 7.03 SAH gen cept Cargo and Passengers for
| one sage oe 8 no Model | “@y. of August 1952, at 2 p.m. at the} — a 5~'| Adams’ h reported im alfa.m. He did not go into the factory | M.S. W * ugust, ; Dominica, An’ , Montserrat,
IN MEMORIAM iy Clan condition. five new tyres. | °MG@ Gf the undersigned. jpital ground, BWI press said Mr, Adams had|immediately. Sometime later Mr.| SA™ING TO” AD, PABAMARING | ® Nevis and St. Kitts, Sailing Friday
—— lOwner driven. Pre $750. Mr. Pre CARMINGTON @ SEALY, | Batting first Middlesex seored|made a number of state-|Miller sent and asked him if he|qs. nestOR sth Ausuat i982 prem See
FORDE dn ae neeey ots x (te fessor, Gittens Road, Gov nent Mitt A ” 97 -2.52~-19n |300 for 2 wickets declared and|ments in the past but had be-|had removed any books from the| M.S. BONAIRE, 25th August,, 1952.
Meee tell aaleep on August 18th 1982. | aseccncemeemnienpeenmnannsneemmntennneepsie| “= EERE arene ir . bowled out the Mental Hospital|lieved them to be made in the]}factory. He sent back to tell Mr.|™.S. STENTOR, Sth September, 1952. B.W1. SCHOONER OWNERS
Sweet is the word remembrance, CAN i938 Vauxhall in Good working| “CARLTON”, Fontabelle—For infor-|team for 59 and 45. For Middle-|heat of oment, Now ho Miller that he di SAILING TO TRINIDAD & CURACAO ASKOCIASION ARE.)
Heer ta tase cue GEE Bas Goan ; 3938 Vauxhall in Good ti Rast |mation apply Mrs. Lilian Drakes : heat of the moment, Now however, did not remove any|s§'s. BosK' 18th August, 1952 Consignee. Telephone No. 4047
in memony we shall one ep him | Orde? New tyres. Contact taittt Rap. ‘Karlville,” Spooner's Hill, @t. Miohacl.|8e* 4G. Sobers scared 93, H.jit appeared Mr. Adams was}books, He last saw the books men-| M.S. HERA, 15th September, i952. : me i
As the years roll ar , Feta | Dial Tee 9.8.52—3n, a 86; C. a4 46 not ones upon a definite eer tioned at about 2 p.m. on the oo. alieaia ’
Viola Bolden, Mitaiene Taylor, Laure CAR—One (1) 1946 Ford “Prefect” in| ——— eee: —— out, and Crai 5 not , aign of denigration of t ov- before. - 2”. S6ON, SON 4 CO., LTD. :
Hinds and Agneth daughters good comditin. cuener “sate to pur-| wi see top slile ‘by. public, Compe, wake cas phate at ae & Wenge he wees . dak ne ee, ood
13 hase l % P $750.00. T. | tition y office yor ia : n * . - ere eeonnitnenieniereredestnhneranmeaniah
wee ane chase @ larger oar. Trice #350) Limited. Thursday 14th from 1 p.m. the wooden |scored 21 in the first innings,| “What he expects to grin is be-}fact The ticket books are kept
MATTHEWS — In loving memory of 128.523 | building called the “SUNLIGHT GRO-|Bowling for Middlesex G. Sobers|yond my on” said Mr.|in the plantations office. No ticket ‘ i
our beloved and mother Daisy CERY” with all fittings and Electric took 4 f 19 H ; Bryan “T have expected ks . 3
Newman Matthe who was laid to] CAR—One (1) 1952 A-40 ‘‘Somerset’—| instalations situated at corner of Con- ‘00: or , arding 2 for 7, that - BWI books are missing.
rest on August 12th, 1951 1,330 miles. Condition excellent, Always | stitution and Martindales Road. Also Harewood 2 for 15 and C, Brath- as an elder statesman| Shown the cane tickets used in x :
—s Cie ts Seaciat wner driven. Frrice $2,500.00. One (1) the Cottage adjoining containing epen|waite 1 for 10. In the Mental] is attitude at this moment would|evidence, Linton said that they fe
s but to sleep 195 > jone only 3,200 mile Renson | gallery, rawing, ning, roojns, A . have been ‘u ¥ - :
Gone but not forgotten.” a aie _ Gummer bought ‘biseer car. .C. & Bath Electric light and Water Hospital’s 2nd innings, H, Brath- tical ae EE OE es pertecty corset. ‘The :
Dr. Matthews and family and grand] Price $2,400.00. For, further particulars | standing on Delamereland, Martindale’s|waite took 6 for 24, and C.] ap canes mentioned on each occasion ee {
children, 13.86.5220. T contact Chelsea Garage (1950) gmited ee. Save “ms $11.50 ner apanter Wilkie 4 for 20 e. ean eee I am sure obent were brought to Edgecumbe Ltd ;
$$$ Phone 4949 12.6.52—3n>| Ins: on any day on application an az ig the comes = j
SKEETE—In loving memory of our lov dorian the premises, conditions of sale from R. in a Sand faxtal the mest of the West Indies are ene the owners names were OUTWARD FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM ;
ing mother and grandmother Moti a TRUCKSOne 194) Dual Gear V-8| Archer Mc. Kenzie Dial 2947 a Sunday xture between aaa ti at ine 3 o him by either the driver or the
Skeete known as Aynt Till who cle }truck and one 1940 Chevrolet truck In 10.8.62—4n.| Dalton and Everglade played at Ses Eeinidad will hg roar om arr on the lorries,
on August 13, 1946. good working order. New tyres, Can be Brisban Da 0 . in’
Shall we sect vander city | seen, at Ladue Stone Work, Lage, 1 AUCTION Brisbane, Dalton scored 93 runs |W have said 80 a thousand times.| four instances of which he knew 3 ee
Vhere the towers of crystal shine St. ichael la 556 e layside, a
Where the walls of Jasper Manager” Purchaser will be given work | ~~~ ~~... | glades first innings’ score of 84. I wish Mr, Adams would stop pro-) when canes were sent by people|S.S. “SPECIALIST” -. Glasgow & ist Aug. Aug.
Built by workmanship divine by the Company 13.8.52—6n. | UNDER THE SILVER For Everglade, E. Lorde scored crastinating and say the same. in other people’s names to Edge- Liverpool
ies we sent Bapees De ee | ee HAMMER 32. For Dalton, C. Brathwaite toos cumbe Lid. He said that George|$.&- (CROT AER: ae i
set beyond the river i AN 10 > Ja assed | ‘ . a 4
Sian sae snent hapend he pt AN 0 HP, Tordson Van, Duscd,| On Thursday lth by order of Thel@ for 24 and M. Moore 2 for 29. NO PROGRESS MADE Bishop, father of Keith Bishop,| 8.S. “TROJAN STAR” _ .. Liverpool ae fo. ibth ;
Ever remembered by Oliver and Sea-! New Battery and in perfect running | Executors to the Estate of the late Rev. ; IN TALKS TO AVERT had sent his canes in 1950 in the| 8S. MERCHANT .- London . i
uurne St. John (sons), Janet daughter-] Grder. Dial 4369, Royal Store No. 12,| 5. A. Esterbrook we will sell the Furni- Batting for Dalton, G. Sobers pn Age ead He then) ees i
De). Beaulah, Norma, Myacint's} Sigh Street. 9.8 52-6n.| ture which is both modern and antique|knocked up an undefeated 59; ARMOUR MEAT STRIKE quoted three other instances and 2
(grandchildren) Te A | at Atemabcnee eee White Park Road.|‘Walls 14, F. Evelyn 7 and L. CHICAGO, Aug. 12 |eaid that these could be HOMEWARD FOR THE UNITED KINGDOM
ov vigenpalingiid ee ee | LIVESTOCK | ina Table,” upright Chairs Mira oo Craig 5 not out. United Packing House workers] if the books held by Mr. Skeete Vessel For Close
7 a } ¥ Cp ———- |other Sideboards, China binet, Side, “ oy 4 -on=
ANNOIL NCEMEN Ts; PUPS—Five (5) Alsatian Pups. 3 males | Omament & Pembroke Tables: ‘Round reported no s progress” the Ht were produced. Barbedos
2 females. G. C. Brathwaite, Haggatts| Tip Top Table: Large Rockers, Uphols: tract negotiations with the ig ‘ S.S. “BIOGRAPHER” .. .. Lendon 2ist Aug.
———| Plantation, St. Andrew. 9.8.52-3n. |Sofa & Prie - Dieu Chairs; Flat Top U S Four’ meat producers, and fed-] Received Money for Others | ss. “HERDSMAN” . Liverpool 25th Aug.
MAGE EXTRA MOM aaa Per- COWS — Heavy. te recenhy ligne gies’ toa ay mg small “ em Destroyers eral conciliators waited anxiously mo ‘ t
; or space © Sell Per 3 C eavy. in milk, recen with glass rs ; a ‘ i nev ,
Senet Christina? Cards Spanish Greetinus.| calved — Guernsay Strain. Teh 95279. | Antique Sofas all in old Mahogany: Car- . for a compromise that would avert 4 a, 4 er Pye. a ‘one For further information apply to...
25 for $1.50 — Name imprinted. Samples 12.8.52—8n.| pets & Rugs, Some good Glass, old Hit By Fire: a nation-wide strike. ce je eine ot eee Ton DA COSTA & co. LTD _ Agents
Free. Also 20 beautiful bor eefort- | China Shemeld & Fisted Wate. Dish - “We have met throughout the road on Mysrell ie money for . :
ments. Write Air Mail er MECHANICAL Covers; Tea Services; Good Tapesirys : . day with Cudhay, Swift and|him. He had received money on
15 W urc St., Buffalo. iock - s Sherry , . -
CARDS €O., 75 W. Huron St, Mien Clock. Oldswindser 2 ren Pathos One Man. Killed Armour, and are reporting “no|behalf of people who had asked
7e: ie CAMERA—Ensign Selfix 16-20 complete | for Lamp; . rogress”, said a spokesman for|him to do so for them. Some of
iran linet case filters $85. Phone $021. 9 Double é ingle ‘Tall Post & Since WASHINGTON, Aug. 11. he CIO Union early today.|these people were Ena Harewood,
ere ee old mahog edsteads, Springs - . . 5
FOR RENT . we caved ois Hepplewhite & other Chest}, TWO U.S. destroyers were hit} “Meantime contracts with the Irvin Haynes, Louisa Davis, Ger
, c GRC. PHOTO EXPOSURE METER and | o¢ Drawers, Berbice Chairs; old Mabog:|by Communist shore batteries off] “Big Four” meat packing com-|trude Davis, Frederick Davis, Sal- Qnce.
ASE Perfec 30.0 ghnson 35 3 2 : . . i > >
eee Developing Tank as new $5.00. Agfa | hE? Frees, Mitaey Goer ot eres Korea and one man was pAmes | have expired. We ite in a — . smene.
HOUSES Spring Filter Holder and Set 31 M.M. | Rit, " guainge & 3 and another wounded the navy|have a statement on the strike/ tl nese people as him to receive
DUSE: Filter in Case $8.00, Tucker. Phone 4415. | FirCh °Drettes’ Book Shelves, Electric|@nnouced Monday. today. the cane money for them and he



¥3.8,52—3n.









Attractive seaside Fiat main road Hne-















Cake Mixer, Lawn Mower ‘and ot



her

Destroyers are Barton and Jotm







Negotiators for Armour and|did so. As cane weigher,

and




CANADIAN SERVICE









































tings, fortably furnished, English litems of interest, Sale 11,30 o'’clock.|R, Pierce, Company met late into the night owing to the fact that the crop SOUTHBOUND
Bath’ Open Verandeh facing sea. Suitab!e POULTRY ‘Terms Cash. TROTMAN & ©0.| The Barton engagement occur- yesterday, and conciliators hoped|season was in progress and he was Meamer nan teont i... sony.
Telephone. A Agata From feet t.n.] COCKERELS % special pure bred BRA . Auctioneers ‘lred Sunday. The Pierce was| that a new offer by Armour might) very busy, he could not go for) «ryray 3 ni > sauet 4
aoe eee ewernecnn—emerere | Lesher Cockerels 4 months old, Dial 10.8.52—~2n, | Struck on August 6. The Pierce at least vide a basis for further|the money therefore he “ISA | PARODI" August August *
BENSAM-—Untusulshed, fron ist Sept 2974 or 3426 13.8.52—4n, | was seriously damaged. The Bar- nopetlats ne Bae Sree Core sent anyone ee staff who items anges 3 sr u S
At Sheringham Gardens, axwell’s — - : ‘ pany er has been rejected as|appeared not to busy. Some-| "ARNE c c ;
F : j 3 low, 3 bed-] FOWLS—Cornish Game, & Barred ton not_as severely. tel rts : ha
Cost” Attractive wail Bungaio, 8 Dut-f FQWIS Comin Game & Beret] BOURMLEC NO WECES |e Navy said the Barton was|"tivial” by the Union. The} times the money was brought back NORTHBOUND
Good Sea bathing. Phone S. Daniels} breed. Also a few Game and Crossbred a hit by 75 millimeter fire near| Union declined to comment when} to him in order that he could de- Sie tae ae
4161 for appointment. 9.8. 62—t.-n, pullets and Pantams Phone 3% coos | Wonsin off the east coast of Soren wines . eA oe had been pe at Sp ~~ soe oe whom | 4 STEAMER . Die, Barbados Sepa . *
ROOMS Taree 12) rooms habie fa NOTICE during an engagement with shore Se eee es he received e ticket 7 foot.
arbe erfes Lte 7 ‘ea, P. tihe person who coll eid bic tae
GEem seply Behar Pals 2-80 MISCELLANEOUS Assignment of Trade Marks bot Gd "led the money, would deliver it to| | Apply:—DA COSTA & CO, LTD.—CANADIAN SEBVICE
James Stre Stathiasliah onan a The first stack of the Barton BRAZIL vp ; 4
| ANTIQUES of every description, Glass,| ALADDIN ZIL—GERMAN TRADE \the one to whom it
ROOMS—tTwo furnished rooms for rent.

AAMOND WHITE HBADLIGHT.ow| Was hit causing a three foot hole



belonged.
China, Linton said that he knew Lionel

Worthing, opposite the Royal Theatre old Jewels, fine Stlver Water-









es * stra
Ripe, oi fewe, She Seve eae EXPEE in addition to numerous shrapnel RELATIONS FOR i
Best Sea-bathing. Garage attached.| ei at Gorringes Antique Bhop adjoining ESSO (new script style) holes. The Navy said the Barton DISCUSSION ri pittg him t: tine That was NEW YORK SERVICE
Phane 8401. 2.9.89-—t4.n-] Roval Yacht Club. Sash ten ESSO OVAL continued operations after’ being ing o draw money.
ioantenesiag ————— pee ee- hit pera’ BREMEN, Germany, Aug. 12. on a morning when Harewood was|s S. "ALCOA PEGASUS” sails 8th Aust — erring pei rag 4 rs
ach court Avene tastings. Thre piselt ciate attnckia tag abet yurpoder REGAL CHOWN The Pierce was. hit by shore] Dr. Adhemar De Varos, Presi- coming from work on his way|§.S. “ALCOA PLANTER” sails Sth September — eaphowhe:
edrooms and all modern conventence®. | hiso a quantity of machine broken, stone UNIFLO : : battery fire near Songjin August}dent of the (Progressive party of home. The money he sent Hare- NEW ORLEANS SERVICE
Apply: “Blise Court”, Mane. t.f.m, [concrete stone 4” chips 44” chips 3 8” wane nt eae ee india O1l Co.) 6th. The Pierce per aa three| Brazil conferred with Bremen wood 7 aew oo oot belong to
.7, 52-4 “ ~, Se 7 5 vithin a i - : “ 30% ‘urrell Hare- z
Ge pnd ums. | Coulis: Haye te, WICO (block letters) ; direct hits the Navy said and re-|Senate President Wilhelm Kaisen either Holder or . hin A STEAMER sails 17th July, — arrives 2nd August
Manager Lodge Stone Works Co, Dial) x Goice is HEREBY GIVEN that| tired from the area as a result of| yesterday on increasing trade rela- Wood brought the monty (0 SITS) A SHIRAI S805 Sit 2:17 — 2 ies ee ee ee
WANTED ney | SHO, Standard Oll (Antilign) SA. Of) retiree ; E tions between Brazil and Germ: 4-) and he gave it to the owner of the| A STEAMER sails 14th August — arrives 30th August
LIPTON’S TEA — The brand that due| Panama City, Panama, being the proprie- serious damage. veen Brazil a ermany.| anes, STEAMER ails 28th August — arrives rath “September ai
to maintenance of quality commands| tor of the abovementioned trade mark —U.-P. De Varos is touring West Ger- A STEAMER sails lth September —arrives ptem|
the largest sale in the world, Available|a5 assigned them with the good.



many to study the possibilities of} Linton then went on to mention



will of the business connected therewith

HELP







stg)! cuesere. | ‘Sawe ny park oe the] {) Esso Standard Oil, S.A... of Pangina expanding Brazilian German trade.}other people ‘whom he had asked ROBERT THOM LTD.—NEW YORK & GULF SERVICE
Applications ave invited for @ position) change same dor valuable gifts fram | aforesaid, ‘by instrument dated 5th pune Cuban E He will conduct talks with repre-|to draw money for him, There was
of SPENO-TYPIST at Cable and Wireless, John F, Hutson Ltd,, Agents 1952. ; ‘ xport sentatives of the German cotton|never a time when he had written
iW.) Late St Lawrence. Previous 13.8.52—2n And all persons are warned against in

Bi ace aie fringing the said marks. industry here to-day.

office experience desiroble

Apply by letter stating age and quali- Dated this Ist day of August 1952

“TiPTons Corrie — i To U.S. Raised
LIPTON’S COFFEE — The brand that A ee ee To Jee 1se

—U-P.




























































. a 5 2
fications to The Div 1 Manaer,| has won universal favour amongst con- eee ofa Taare that for afew years, C i" ati: N t : al Steamsh ps
West Indies, Cable and’ Wireless ‘W.1) | noisseurs. Fresh supply now in the hands waaks wrANDAD are (ANTILLES), WAS GTON MILITARY MEN WILL George Bishop, Keith’s father, and an all a 100 ee 1
eee wae ides te seme, UO AO |... neeo apcibhn: Cyba's 1952 sugar quota to ibe] DECIDE ON MANUS Is, |timselt, nad not been on spesiting Bix:

They are worth valuable ‘ftge aifts| and ESSO STANDARD Ol, SA. United States dea Pe, ; ™ Af + terms. On one occasion he had
MISCELLANEOUS which ‘cap be seon at the Barbados 12.8.52—3n as ra y WASHINGTON, Aug. 12. | to reject canes which were brought SOUTHBOUND
y 1 f
eee J Aquatic Club as well as at John F. Hut- 29,737 tons, to compens or) Secretary of State Dean Ache-|to the factory by Keith Sails Sails Salk — Arrives Sails
HOME for half bred Labrador for 5} son Lid, Agents an expegted déficit in home sugar|son at news conference T th) Montreal Halifax Boston Barbados Berbades
months preferably or if necessary per- 13.8.52—2n.| LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE ’ ence on Tues-|He has warned Nt more than|/;apy NELSON _.. 1 Aug. 4Aug. 6 Aug. M2 Aug. 16 Aug.
manently Very aifectionate Not a — TRANSFER & REMOVAL production, the State Deparpment day said that the military repre= | once. CANADIAN CRUISER OR ae Aus. Sue = ae: a Sen
fighter. Phone 3220, G. L, Taylor SOUR GRASS— Quantity of Sour Grass} ‘The application of Ceci! Fitzroy Scan- for Agriculture said in Washing-|sentatives of the United States,} There were some occasions when CANADIAN CONSTRUCTOR Bact oe a 4
128.62 —dn-Jfor ‘sale by weight to plantation. Crap] tlebury of Doughlin Village, St. Andrew, | ton. Australia, and New Zealand will|peasants canes were allowed to be| LARY ROONST rieNemn 12 Sept. 15 Sept — 4 Sept. 28 Sept
five Marae (St, | Fhilip's perish) apply | purchaser of Ldquor Liceng> No. We? | “The Agricultural. Departmentidecide at the September mesting|brought in without the cans! LADY ee Sb Bept. Ra. FER Fee,
LOST & FOUNE 12,8.52—2n| yespect of the ground floor of a two-|in announcing the increase »%! in Hawaii the desirability of Am~-| weigher being notified. This oc-
. Ce mally Storey wall building at Fi mers st, Cuban sugar, which brings Cuba's een weer and planes again)curred on Mondays and Saturdays NOKTHBOUND canna ee dutiaué indaties - smeateen
ow ° e ally, una ) 2e isSlon to 1 he saic v oa sing a
Sn ee eee ——~ | Telegraph, England's leading Daily News- eas - 3 eats and tle shop at total quota this year to 2,744,808 ve of New Ge Island base ae because on these days the planta ANGER a a Boston aos 2 Be
LOST paper now arriving in Barbados by Air) Houphiin's Village,, St. Andrew tons, said that total productions uinea. —U.P. | tions could not put in their quotas| CANADIAN Calan BS. PO fa P
en re “ — ‘only a few days after publication in| pated this @th day of August, 1052 of home grown sugar beet are 4 DIE: owing to labour shortage. AO DIAN CRUISER 3 S Sept. 10 Sept. —- ® 3 3
WRIST WATCH —On Saturday 9th it ner. owe Oe SMe, So teats le NV aaiat tte, Di mre not expected to exceed 1,600,000 : 17 INJURED He , em CANADIAN CONSTRUCTOR WS Sept. 19 Sept. | 9 Bech. ste
» Garrisc one i) jold. Wiis’ On LNG.. Pp Police I strate s - ” , said that day opened % . Le 4 ,
the Garrison, one 11) Lady's Gold Wisp Tel, sins. 17.4.59-—t.t.0 Signed CECH F. SCANTLEBUNY tons—about 200,000 tons below] JIN MINE EXPLOSION rainy and plantations could not LADY RODNEY Gait Mo Gept. 2 Cet. Det at Get get
municate with Gwendolyn Ifill, Sp. 2iin,| VENETIAN BLINDS—Made to order) N.B.—This application wit be consia- |e statutory figure. y LILLE, France, Aug. 12. | get in their quotas, word was sent|LADY NELSON .. ty Ost, ai Oct, 30 Oct. 31 Oct, “4 Nov.
mR # re 7 ; a metal a raey) All sao" 4)! ered at a Licensing Court to be held at bean the U. rae Sugar “8g The death toll in the Schneider |around to the who were
eolours, imi jate delivery 2 pe % » Court, strict “F”’ on Friday the rts e o>. 2 been in- $ ‘. *
®HOOGDVOOPIVOHUHOODOHOS Seeger RARTAN. Mera Compawy| ceur tase ar August, 1068 At 11 o'clock, DORM ae Pig ie Feet5.156 pit mine explosion rose to four|allowed to send in as many tonS| yor further particulars, apply to—
c/o Barbados Advocate 9,8.52—6n | am maar a ane hig oa a the ae mine exploded.|as_ they had. t ie” tha GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD
ry ea —_—--- 1. R, EDWARDS, i , Main Prod 'S, ere were burnt victi Linton said that some 9 . —Agents.
Floor Sanding BBTABIX — Frech geipeent of, this Police Magistrate, Dist, “F." 24,800 tons, and the Virgin|of whom were on the dag ist books which were stolen were in
delicious and nours nn cerea us re Pa sl e . . te + >
Ol caived, and is available from your| ._ se a ‘ Islands by 298 tons. — Three bodies were brought to|bis handwriting.
racer. | Tt can be served in many ways The Department said that the|the surface in Valenciennes early | To Mr. Reece: I know a good
> | anc with WEETABiX in the house it =

| cunpiies » mea) any tiie of the day distribution of the deficit to other| this morning after the cxplosion|™&PY Peasant proprietors. I also

and Polishing U.N. Troopship

JOHN F. HUTSON LTD producing areas does not change} shook the pit a know a good many lorry drivers.

13.8.52—2n 4 \the total amount of the sugar] were Gok cue en. BL I know Norris’ truck and I also

NU-FLOOR WAY pa wh pea Sunk quota set up under = 1948 I nbaiinabiiaiabaibnin: know the Murals rat in
et us make you proud of |Sugar Act, which remains at p recent years vig
seers iter Sah tom api LONDON, Avg. 12. | 7,980,000 tons, Also the "getion| Touch With Bar bados| jiiiic of Alma Murrell. I do not|$
or too large A North Korean communique} does not prevent the domestic Coastal Station know Sarah Holder at all, I am) ¥

both Gasoline
Call;
co.,

We operate
Electric Machines.

and

CABLE AND WIRELESS (West indies)
Limited, advise that they can now]
communicate with the following ships

claimed on Tuesduy that a United

q 5 beet area from selling more than
Nations troopship had been sunk

quite sure that Keith Bishop pod
its downward adjusted quota, in

LTD his lorry brought in M

EVELYN ROACH &









E CO, r Me dpgaet i iy ‘}.canes. All the transactions were = r= =o .
ae off the east coast, the oltcial| the event of it being able to do) ES*nicibeu kui ts anal ss | genuine. T taught George Bish-|% wage ang
ft eaid: “Nea Ree Seat’ hata our | 8° OP. Dorathy aStevensan, 8.8. Cottien,” 5s op’s son, Keith, at school. He was C G TRAN AT ‘
: e , entire, ‘a » &.8 0 ie, 8.8, casi
units sank two enemy trawlers Scholey, acs. Asokcosues sa, Reso] aa ROY Bnet hes cacnmony oe ; from So , to Martinique,
Sailings uthampton Guadeloupe,
Barbados, Trinidad, La Guaira, Curacao & Jamaica

flog him. George Bishop’s land is
next to mine, a aay, occasions
we have had qua’ about stock

ing on each other’s land. George

Rotterdam, 5.8. Regent Caribou, s.s
Ebro, s.s. Uruguay, s.s
8.8. Rio Jachal, s.s

Artillero, 5.5.
a8

and one troopship and damaged
one destroyer.” No details were
given,

U.S. PRESIDENTIAL
ELECTION TO PRECEDE
| NATO. MEETING

Lady Nelson,
Corinthic, s,s,
Cottikea. M/V Prospector,
Queen Mary/Gbtt, 5.4 St Rosa,|















HURRICANE

—(UP.)



ss. Vianna, 5.8. Alcoa Polaris, s.s shop subsequently accused me
‘ } Buceaneer, M/T Attila, ss. Hulst, ss | of belog hard on his son, Keith.
; ke Toky LONDON, Aug. 11. | Raumala. #5 Atalanta, s.s. Marina, s.s.| Whenever Norris came his truck 2 From Southampton Arrives Barbados
Quake Jars Tokyo | gyioin is coming around 10] Pes 5 Basis’. 2 maamant | Was recorded. ‘COLOMBIE” .. Sist July, 1952 ..
Sweet drenms the United States view that the|s.s. Willemstad, 9.8. Iriona, s.s. Peter At this stage the Court was *“DE GRASSE” .. 22nd Aug., 1962 ..
TOKYO, Aug. 13. | next meeting of the North Atlan- Jebsen, 5.5. S. Felix, s.s. Aleoa Ranger. | adjourned until 10.00 a.m. today.

No fuss An earthquake, described by | *Not calling at Guadeloupe

“rather strong’,

no tears

HINT No. 4.

tie C ‘ s
setamuale a ie Council must be put off until



w a is Just an- |iolted To a ee. vaieniben ES ~~ Pa ——. eee SAILING FROM BARBADOS TO EUROPE
other stage in he [jolted TOKVS fy. There were no|=icction, _ authoritative sou ; A STITCH IN TIME
clasp happy business ot | immediate reports of damage. The said on Sunday. . a 4 4“ *“DE GRASSE”

WARNINGS crowing up, when | "quake was reported centred in| Some West European nations SAVES NINE. “COLOMBIE”















YOU ARE INVITED
Next Sundiy evening from 430 {| W ATC H ES

Works contain raodern appliances for the execution of
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SUGAR MACHINERY and STEAMSHIPS
Dealers in AGRICULTURAL MACHINERY and
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——

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southeast of Tokyo. of the N.A.T.O. within the next few e
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‘


WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 13, 1952



HENRY



ed
ee > â„¢

i READE Oe DARL DAA

om



(LL NEVER, NEVER
TRUST A MAN



on, No. > JOE! f
YOU'RE SO
OFPPERENT.



BLONDIE














I WAS JUST FOOLING, [ Ee ood aes
(T DIDN'T COST ANYTHING -- | [TW NENTY ENTY
I MADE IT MYSELF ;—!
4 =
Vv qwWw
2



——— spicioicaen Rae

, HA, HA, V.. WAIT TILL I \ v r Ss 2am

/ HANDSOME | KICK YOUR 4 ~ » 4
H }

; EADER FLAS HANDSOME
\. GORDON! WAIT! IN!

, _
SLOW DOWN, PAR
A HAIRPIN WON'T

A BIVOTE? KIVET! SETTING
THE HANDS OF THAT RIGGED
CLOCK SWUNG IT OVER!



BY GEORGE MC. MANUS

- minis peda) eee )
WILL YOU GIT OUT WELL-THAT'S ar re | OR WOULD ~
OF MY SIGHT ? T WHERE !T ITS FODO-GOO'S ——..{ YOU PREFER
BIRTHDAY mo r) SITTING NEXT

jOOF a es?

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AY TO TR iT

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tL CANT FiGUR BUT ILL GET ALL THE ANSWERS SOON
p HELLO OPERATOR? POLICE HEAD=_
QUARTERS PLEASE. (———-

WHATS MY

UT WY ANYONE
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‘ NOES SP re OUT WHE Re THE

BOOR KID.HE NEEDS) NOO% GELONGS, HIE POOR MOTHER

A.NAP. HE'S BEEN.
THRU.A LOT. STAV

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2 i a

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Ps

1 he

PUNU'S ~~

otter these. Beaty Hoducts

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



D°S COLD CREAN to cleanse and soften




PAGE NINE

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MODERN
TABLE
TENNIS

By
JACK CARRINGTON

IN 1938, when we asked “the English Table
Tennis Association to recommend to us an
author for a new book on table tennis, they
suggested a young and comparatively unknown
player who, they said, had not only great pos-
sibilities as a player but who had studied the
game scientifically and was able to put what
he knew on paper. The result was the excel-
lent little book Modern Table Tennis which
sold out quickly in the early days of the war,
and which we have been ‘unable to reissue
until now. Meanwhile its author has become
famous. The book has been brought com-
pletely up to date and enlarged.

rs
ON SALE AT

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Blue Mountain Coffee—

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Lobster — Tins ............. 4 66
Mayonnaise ................ 50 48
Guava Jelly — Tins ........ . 24

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PATE-DE-FOIE — Tins 17.60
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KRAFT CHEESE — Pkes. .63 per pkg.






PAGE TEN

VINOO MANKA

Ramadhin Will Remain
In England

(By ROY MARSHALL)

I HAVE SOME rather unfortunate news for West
Indies cricket fans this week. .Vinoo Mankad, the great
Indian Test all-rounder, will not be coming out with the
Indian side to play against the West Indies. He told me
this when I met him this week.

The 35 year old Indian professional told me “First
class and Test cricket is too strenuous these days. I have
had a good innings and now I feel 1) should make way for
younger players. But I shall continue to play League
Sets tained a blow 0 india COUNTY CRICKET

for Mankad has proved again, if concen jetettidemasnperacesteniapanean
further proof were needed, in the
Tests in England what a valuable

Surrey Defeats

player he is. An attacking open- &

ul batsman and a great slow

let.-arm bowler he would ut Middlesex At Lords
\

vortn his place in any World XI.
West Indian players who will
te returning home at the end of
the English season include Wal-
cott, Weekes and Marshall who
will be sailing on the Golfito on
Seen 30th, and Alfred Val- virtually an unassailable position.
ene 7 : ney need to win but one of
aneranie Worvel is aging t0 Seeudl their remaining "six matches to
Lut will be available for the Test wae nee ; J
matehes against India if required. ,,. he heroes of their victory to-
Sonny Ramadhin is planning to at Raddy spin bowlers Laker and
remain in England,
And now to/news of the week-
end,
Games played on Saturday, Aug, 2
The weather was unkind to the cf
Laneashire holiday crowds and Victory.
also to the League cricketers, The Wickets
Nelson-Enfield game was aban- Spare. : {
done without a ball being bowled 4 peculiar thing happened at
so that Walcott and Lindwall diq Cheltenham where Gloucestershire
not come to grips. In none of the Were playing the Indians. The
games in which West Indians tourists despite a sound innings of
appeared was a definite result 80 by Adihikari were 60 behind on

(From Our Own Correspondent)
LONDON, Aug. 12.
The county cricket champion-
ship is practically all over bar
suouting. Surrey with a great win
at Lords over Middlesex are in

oth captured four wickets in
Middlesex second innings and the
home side were all out for 152,
Surrey were left to get 101 for
They did it with eight
and seven minutes. to

obtained, the first. innings, Gloucestershire
trying to ¢onsolidate their lead

BACUP vs. RISHTON went for quick runs and in doing

so lost quick wickets. Ghulam

The Bacup-Rishton game ‘was Ahmed and Phadkar kept an im-

dominated by Everton Weekes maculate length and it was impos-
who was at his brilliant best in cibjie to force them away.

recording his third century of the The county batsmen discovered
season. He batted for two hours {pis to their cost. When Bailey
making 114 not out, including 13 declared they had lost 47 for 7.
fours. Baeup declared at 180 for Needing 108 for victory the In-
5 but after Rishton had been bat- gizns were soon in trouble but
ting for an hour to make 86—5 a Umrigar 85 and Adhikari 28 not

hailstorm broke over the ground the
to prevent any further play. oe 4

EAREEANCASHIRE vs, THE SCOREBOARD midis
LOWERHOUSE erieae wen sy an wea

Gloucestershire 198 and 47 for

The powerful East Lancashire

si "om the toss : i vi .. 7 decl'd

side ae akucen tows Indians ...... 138 and 108 for 4
house batted only 45 minutes to Essex ere Warwick
make 38—1 when rain brought Mate rawn

Essex 153 and 196 for 8
Townsend 5 for 47.
Warwick 228 and 208 for 7 decl’d
Notts versus Worcester

about an early close, Marshall
needing 28 to beat the previous
best Professional aggregate for
Lowerhouse was 12 not out.



CENTRAL LANCASHIRE .
LEAGUE

The same fate that befell the
Lancashire League clubs was the
lot of the Central Lancashire
teams, >

The best performances of the
day was put up by the young
Jamaican amateur R, Tomlinson

laying for Radeliffe against
Stockport. In 1%4 hours he and
Frank Worrell dismissed Stock-

port for 61. Frank took 4—32 and
Tomlinson eclipsed this with 6—
27. Radcliffe did not have time
to bat before the rain came,

The Wallsden-Crompton game
also petered out into a draw after
Wallsden batting for 2% hours
made 126. Crompton in the ten
minutes before rain made 9—2.
This game was only noticeable
for the fact that Ramadhin who
took 6—71 became the second
bowler in the Lancashire League
to claim 100 wickets this season

MATCH PLAYED AUGUST
4TH

Lowerhouse - East Lancashire.
East Laneashire soundly defeated
T.gverhouse in this return bank
holiday fixture. Scoring 230—6
declared in 2% hours, East Lan-
cashire dismissed Lowerhouse for
80 in just under 2 hours of which
Marshall seored 10.

ITALY’S CYCLE
CHAMPION IS
RECOVERING

BOLOGNA, Italy, Aug. 12

Fausto Coppi, Italy’s “champion
of champions” cycle racer, injured
in a crash during a race in France
recently, is recovering satisfac-
torily with ‘no preoccupations”,
his doctors said,

Coppi, who fractured his collar
bone at Peppignan, was encased
ih a cast covering his right
shoulder yesterday at the Pizzoli
Clinic here,, He will remain in
the cast until September 3. After
the application of the cast, Coppi
left with his wife and daughter
for Novi Ligure for a vacation.
He intends to begin practice on
a stationary cycle soon and will
return_to racing after his recov-
ery.—U.P,



They'll Do It Every T ime me

16 SO NICE OF

YOU, FLOTILLA, TO

REMEMBER OUR

ANNIVERSARY*++
WHY, ITS IT'S

UH JUST WHAT
WE ALWAYS

A LIFE-SIZE DOLL’
WITH A CLOCK IN. \’
ITS STOMACHâ„¢+YOU
ADMIRED THE ONE
ON MY MANTEL,
AND YOU HAVE

Match Drawn
she pb tebe a bas 0% 196
Worcester ....308 for 6 decl'd.
(Kenyon 171) and 20 for 1.
Northants versus Derby
Derby won by 5 wickets
Northants ........ 219 and 172
Derby 198 and 195 for 5
Somerset versus Glamorgan
Glamorgan won by 50 runs
Somerset 171 for 9 decl’d and
114; Muncer 6 for 26,
Glamorgan 229 and 106 for 9
decl’d,
Hampshire versus Lancashire
Lancashire wou by 25 runs
Hants 150 and 166
Tattersal 6 for 71
Lanes. 133 and 208 for 8 decl’d
Yorkshire versus Sussex
Match Drawn
Yorkshire .... 197 for 4 decl’d
Sussex ............ 188 for 5
Leicestershire versus Kent
Leicestershire won by 9 wickets
Leicestershire 209 and 26 for 1
RE ees oy o'e'eis 08 182 and 102
Surrey versus Middlesex
Surrey won by 8 wickets

Notts



Surrey 4. .'s 129 for 9 decl’d
and 102 for 2 f

Middlesex . 77 and 152
CHESS:



ARGENTINA, SWEDEN
RUSSIA IN THE LEAD

HELSINKI, Aug. 12

Argentina, Sweden and Russia
were leading each a? te vac.
groups Of chess Olympics in the
preliminary tournament before
tne third round started today.
Sweden holds the highest points
of.eight after an unbroken series
of individual victories, while Ar-
gentina has seven points and
Russia six, with one game hang-
ing from the first round.

Standings after the second round
with four games hanging: Group
1; Argentina °, West Germany 6.5
(1 hanging); Denmark 6, the Saar
3, Britain 2.5, Czechoslovakia 2.5,
Cuba 0.5 (1 hanging), Luxem-
bourg 0,

Standings are: Group 2: Sweden
8 Hungary 5.5, East Germany 5.5,
Yugoslavia 5, Italy 2.5 (2 unfin-
ished), Austria 1.5 (2 unfinished)
Brazil 1.5, Norway 0.5.

Group 3:—Russia 6 (1 unfinish-

ed), U.S.A. 5.5; Holland 5, Fin-
land 4.5, Poland 3.5, Switzerland
3.5, Greece 2.5, Israel 0.5 (1 un-

finished) .—-U.P.

Registered U. 5. Potent Office

GA / RATS WHAT MOMMY
GETS FOR BEING
POLITE AND PRAISING

THE DIZZY THINGS



KID

German.

Kid German fought his first
engagement on July 11 and he
won this by a knockout in the
third round. His next contest is
due to take place on Friday,
August 15, and it is against the
American Freddie Dawson,

German writes to tell me that
he is booked for five fights in
Australia and then he expects to
return to England in November,

Returning

He then plans to return to Bar-
bados next year. He begs to be
remembered to his many friends
and followers who have supported
him staunchly through his career.

Kid German, the pocxet battle-
ship as we all knew him when
he began his southpaw career, has



BARBADOS ADVOCATE



GERMAN.

Kid German Wins

In Australia

By THE SPORTS EDITOR

SIDE BY SIDE with the report of the tragic death in
Australia of Dave Sands, British Empire Middleweight
Champion and Middleweight and Heavyweight Champion
of Australia, comes news of successful campaigning in that
country by former Barbados Lightweight Champion Kid

done much to place Barbados on

the boxing map of the_ world,
Messrs. C, B, Layne and Keith
Chandler, the former promoters
of the Yankee Stadium, had much
faith in this young battler when
he made his debut as a prelimin-
ary contender in the late 1940's.

He was given every opportun-
ity to prove himself and within
a year after his debut in profes-
sional boxing he was among the
finalists.

Hectic Fights

His hectic
lentless rival

fights with his re-
Lightfoot Kid, his

TABLE TENNIS





Trinidad Team
Arrives Tonight

The visiting Trinidad Table Ten-
nis team is expected to arrive at
Seawell Airport at 9 o’clock to-

ight. The team, representing the
San Fernando Zone of the Trini-
dad and Tobago Table Tenni:
Association, will play a series of
games against Barbados.

The first match will be o1
Thursday night at the Y.M.C.A
Naval Hall when the visitors will
meet Pelican, Inter-Club Chamr
ions for this year. On Friday nigh
Trinidad will play a combine:
sarna-Y,.M.P.C, team,

Representing Pelican are; L.
Worrell, R. Phillips, F. Willough-
Ly, M. Shocombe and P. Rice.

The Earna-Y.M,P.C. team is as
follows: C, Greenidge, L. Stoute,
A, Howard, E. Goodridge, C
Humphrey and D, Archer.

Special arrangements have been
made to accommodate the large
crowd which is expected to 9t-
tend these matehes,

THAT'LL MAKE A NICE
COMPANION PIECE FOR

SHE GAVE US LAST
CHRISTMAS *++

~ WITH FLO'S
|] TASTE SHE'D MAKE



"T’ryNG Not To
SHUDDER AS YOU LOOK
A GIFT HORSE IN
S) THE TEETH »ss.
THANX AND A HATLO
HAT TIP TS
R.WERNER LEDERER,
99 NO.6â„¢ ST.
NEWARK 7, NT.

— ———

disposing of all local opposition
here prefaced another successful
stage of his career when he
sought further laurels in the
neighbouring colony of Trinidad.

From Trinidad he ‘secured a
contract in England and has been
fighting there ever since, He has
now been engaged for five fights
in Australia the first of which he
has already won, Local sporting
fans will join with me in wishing
him every success in his engage-
ments “Down Under.”



less, imm





D WILL NOT TOUR B.W.L.

Why Trueman Has Kepi His “Devil”

By D. COMPTON.
CRITICS of the so-called lack of young talent in
county cricket often argue that it is due to National Ser-
vice taking youngsters away for two years when pt)

would be gaining first-class

Possibly many promising play-
ers are handicapped by a lack of
opportunities, but recent events
indicate that this does not apply
so much to fast bowlers,

With all the admiration jin the
world for FRED TRUEMAN, I
Suggest that service in the R.A.F.
has been anything but a disadvan-
tage to his cridéket.

Fred’s last three first-class
matches have been Tests. Each
time he has come fresh to the
g — almost bursting to let him-
self go.

..Unlike some overworked and

tired county fast bowlers, Fred

should retain the edge of his
speed to the end of the season.

INSPIRING SIGHT

The difference shown by a
“fresh” fast bowler was never
better illustrated than before the
war when, throughout August,
schoolmaster Ken FARNES regu-
larly played for Essex during his
holidays.

In that month he always seemed
yards quicker than bowlers whe
normally were not far below his
pace,

When going full sail, Trueman
is an inspiring sight, but I be-
lieve that when he resumes
first-class cricket six ‘days a
week he will need to be handled
carefully to preserve his “fire.”
ARTHUR CARR, ‘he former

Notts captain used to “nurse”

HAROLD LARWOOD like a
mother. seldom giving him more
than a few overs in a spell, even
when he was running through
a side.

I believe it to. be no bad thing
that Trueman will still be in the
R.A.F. next season, when the
Australians are here.

If he mainté@ins his present pace
and “devil” he could surprise
them, particularly if quick wick-
ets are prepared.

LEAGUE FIND

Another R.A.F. fast bowler who
has been among the wickets is
Worcestershire’s new pace man,
30-year-old KEN LOBBAN, of
Jamaica.

His is a most unusual story.
He arrived in the Midlands as a
member of the R.A.F, at the end
of the war, and until this season
achieved nothing higher than the
second division of the Birming-
ham League.

Then he burst upon the first

experience.

on him when injuries robbed them
of the services of REG
and JOHN FLAVELL.

tell me that he is very fast. Cer-|
tainly he is ideally suited for fast

bowling, and those who know
his background have no fears of
his stamina.

ergy has massive shoulders which
taper to a wasp-like waist.

at him. you might think he earn-
ed his living as a heavyweight

as a professional !
county cricket as an amateur. I

t he
fight with Don Cockell.

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 13, 1952



PERKS

BOXER TOO
Batsmen who have played Ken

This 124 stone bundle of en-
Such is his frame that, looking

boxer.
You would be right! He boxes}
But play?

wonder whether there is any pre-

cedent for this?

For years Ken has
figured on Midland boxing bills.
Among his victims are George
Dawson, Derek Alexander, and
Jack Longford. He has also
fought Don Scott and Jack
Darl

ington. :
Recently he acted as sparring
partner to Randolph Turpin when
ex-world middleweight
champion was preparing for his

TRAINING RUNS

When Ken is not boxing or play-
ing cricket he works as a civilian
lorry-driver for the R.A.F. Pre-
viously he was a steel worker at
Brierley Hill. :

As part of hi§ training then he
tran the 14 miles from home to
work.

Next move may be for gatemen
at county grounds to be instructed
to admit a heavily-built and
heavily-sweatered individual go-
ing through the _ motions of
shadow-boxing at the double.

He'll just be running to
work and limbering up, mday-
be, for a gentle 35 or 40 overs
of fast bowling.



Miller Seeks
Sands’ Title

NEW YORK, Aug. 12

Sammy Burns, manager of the
South African middleweight
Duggie Miller, announced
Tuesday that he had submitted
Miller’s name to the British Box-
ing Board as a contender for the
vacant title of
champion of the British Empire.

————e—e—e—e—e—e—e—e—e—e—e—————————e—e—e—e—e—eeeeeeaeaeaeaeaesS=SeaeaeaeaeeeOesS Ee aaaaaaa&wwnwnw anaes |



White shoes, to pass muster
in company, must be spot-

Propert’s White Renovato
or Propert’s Shuwhite. No

surer way of making sure S
that white shoes are white! F

PROPERT'S

SHUWHITE & WHITE RENOVATOR

division of the league with Kid-
derminster, :

Analyses of seven for 9 and
seven for 37 attracted the atten-
tion of Worcestershire, who called

The title was vacated on Monday
by the death of Australia’s Dave
Sands.—U.P.



aculate. Use



He Lost the Pains inhis Arms

No wonder this man dreaded
going to work, for rheumatic
pains in his arms made it torture




rheumatism very badly and had
such pains in my arms I scarcely
knew how to use them. Then I
was told to try Kruschen Salts,
and after using one bottle I
found relief. So, of course, I have
kept on with it, am now thor-
oughly better and have never felt
so fit for years. I used to feel
miserable and sluggish, but now
it is a pleasure to work ins

of a dread.’’—S.B,

The pains and stiffness of
rheumatism. are usually caused
by deposits of excess uric acid in
the muscles and joints. Kruschen
stimulates the kidneys and other
intestinal organs to regular
healthy action so that all the
excess uric acid is expelled
through the natural channels.
When that goes, aches and pains
go too. Freshness and vigour
are restored,

If you are troubled with rheu-
matism, give Kruschen a@ trial
yourself. You can get it from
all Chemists and Stores,

TE I A TS LE EE

In Cartons with Sponge a



Shirts
Pyjamas
middleweight Socks

&
them. Yet to-day he feels | 6 s
fitter than ever and work is 6 % WITH %
pleasure, as he tells in his letter : | %
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PAGE 1

' • Ul HM Ml \\ \l Gl BT II, I %  • ._• n,\RK.\0OS ADVOCATE I'M.I SIM HENRY THE PHANTOM \o M4 bowr. to hntkl man Hi till *•< %  In r*u which %  a nmrit n ptaaaant. !" -i.,-u. tal •loaa away with (land 'ipinillnna %  blfiat'> hvji'dri'w rigour i. 1 •n*'cm i* hour.. >-•! It laaianlutalr han..leaa aaa natural In Htlon. Tha aocr*M of ftlH %  mating dli-ovary. called VI-TABS, ha* been %  >• %  real that It la now Win* diatrlbutrd all ebatnlata here under a %  uaran: ( <-mpl.te tai-farli-T! or (aur%  tr-l full "l \ narrty retail I Yi-Iabs r klMM ""..< fid V.r-Nl* #.1#.V cones nra Ml.IIX ? PtSB't %  %  l>IICR smooths 'o easily onto your lips; the rich vibrant colour stay* on and tin and mi Hero is a range ol beauty product! used by lovolj a where. Simple and inexpensive, they ..re all you need to Keep VOU i>mkn.. flawlessly lovely, feeling your very best ul all UlTlM You will lind them jt all tht> best beauty counters SACRUM KNOCKS OUT PAIN ON SAlf Al \ KNIGHTS LTD. ALL BRANCHES t% %  .< %  MODERN TABLE TENNIS ./If* I !/ W .f V IN l38, when we asked "the English Table Tennis Association to recommend to us an author for a new book 01) table tennis, they suggested a young and comparatively unknown l>l.iyer who. they said, had not only i*rea1 poslibilitiOl as a player but who had studied the game scientifically and was able to put what he knew on papci The result was the excel lent little book Modern Table* Tennis which sold out quickly in the early days of the war. and which we have been unable, to reissue until now. Meanwhile its author has become famous. The book has been brought completely up to date and enlarged *8W %  #.#; if ADVOCATE STATIONERY BROAD ST. and GREYSTONE NEW FIT! NEW FREEDOM! NEW FLATTERY! THE NEW SHAPE NO TUG AT TIIK SHOULDERS NO TAPER AT TIIK WAIST NO I1GHINF.SS AT TIIF. HIP r., You've never owned a suit like it! Its New Shape is designed on a revolutionary! new "cone" principle. Its dip straight and truo irom broad, handset shoulders to the hips. No old-fashioned taper at 'he waist! Try on THE NEW SHAPE, in new dynamic. DeepI . Let your mirror be il.e juti^e : &f A. E. TAYLOR LTD. CLOTHF.S CREATORS 8. CRAFTSMEN. BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Cust omers for Monday to Wednesday only sen I XI OFFER* are %  •*. available l ..r Irran. I..s W iTTTe iTWk Tweedaide. f|M-iiflilslun 11 and Sn.m Sr- NOW Corn Flake* Blur Mountain Coil**— I > %  PK Custard Powder Lobster — Tin* Mayonnaite Guava Jelly — Tim ,.., L'MUIIV M Li* SI .74 M IIAMIMM K ... $ ,40 p cr lb. .32 L44 .48 M .tt .24 KIPPERs am • .. I.Je .. .. 60 .. .. .64 eer Tin •X prr Tube I7. lJ LTt t'.i iM-r pkx D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street j



PAGE 1

PAGE Eir.irr BARBADOS ADVOCATE WEDNESDAY AIT.fST 13. ISM CLASSIFIED ADS. i'i in ii MILS TELtPMOKE 230* RKAL ESTATE I'. MlMCKUM KiRlii In Mr. p on Aiirt l*li it.,. -..Ml NMHW IJ (i mm*u-i beki.ed :jr J n Nrwn*n Mantle* wh,, tn MM te>t on AuguM Wit IW %  I • ; % %  :.. I.* I I Ii tgi % %  • "-*• and lairuli .jt.&a -KM Tl Aunt Tl" "i" " v i. AueuM 13. IMC. Slur .Whrif thr tower* Of CPT*tI Bbata* Built h> *..rhwi-ht*> divine Khali n* Beyond i i Shal. > F..r laenemtoeeed U-. 0* i.^unr SI John '.on. %  igrju>ih.Mien--1 MM %  H iU sir.. %  II t at L run v\i>: Al'TOMOTIVr; ihli;iiTWOt> canon ST Middlesex DefeatMeutul Hospital and If | Tha above will bt ul r 1'iaB.le Co.n#*nt.o:. un Fridey. U.i %  * "' A ' u • ,w *. •' %  P a* Ihr iiri'l. :>lgaieel (AUni(,ION .BAIT %  IH-I MM it an4. %  KarlvlaW.'tj*>aei.et > Inl.iri Lilian latakri. I.i.l it •! %  ..i t St. 3... CAM **0 I' It** """I "t'eegrcl > Inn t)..,.i waebaa kti i*i 'h# a leiaet oat Priea tWOtO Tu be ItM Ger*|. IM8P UL. •" IBM A-*ft dornnl> 3.1"" mile* Retton lot Hair Owner bm*St bafgter Mf ITica %  .*• Ot Tot. lurthar paiUc^lan —a Gataf* [amitad P.-ona 4Mft UtAJ-ae. m Ueer V-l I .1)1 Oder for >M by a-eblM ntwti M %  eerie. Victoria Kia.1 a -rt rtuBi I |*'ii U-e agoarn bAlUdlU called I i .1 Electric .n-talatioc.i alluatrd at cornet o( Tor•ntuuo-i and Marluvtale* •< Alao lhe Collate adjoiiiina. containing open r litj. diawlna. dining. I C. Bath Etectrlr light and Wafer ..,.;.,, I .1 II' %  K*d 1_ d iDt III M iiplicaUcii i < lealed a Men* •! .il M MNPXI V3. .1 Itraiifetwalto 86; C. Wukic *v not !.. Cniig SS not uui. For MenUI HotvtUl V. Tcnld kcoied ZJ ui the nr*t UIIUQIS. BUWIIIIK for Middlesex G. Sober* look 4 for 19. Harding t for 7, Hurewood 2 (or IS and C. Bratnwaite 1 lor 10 In the Mental Hoapitar* 2nd tnnlngs. H. Bri'hwalte took • for 24. and C W. k;. 4 for 20 Liki ud -I bn aaPui.li*.' AUCTION UNDER THK SILVER HAMMER I„I>IUII bVatd Tut aad M*W UatWK hitd In uaalaot ninnlm UBM Dtal 4KB Rar*l %  *•"• No. _1" ... | s... A\\i\ii:Mt;.Ms MAKt KXTBA MIlNSV %  £ I I ' %  MBtl C**rUtfna> Card* So-mut O'-aili V lor M V> N.roe ImprUtod S-aapl' %  Al'o M (x'auii'ul boa aaariri raaaai w.i* Air Hail Ctm** CAJLLie C*' %  w BUIOfl M V sr %  r'H HEVT HOUSES Atlrgctiva aaaili)Hi Ungi, lomfortalily fu Bath. Open Vorand-h tJ ore prrafi Talrplionr 2tf SHI I >AM \ ..I Coait~Allractiw -" I.unaa rounOaraga ant awvii'i Good S>a L.lhln. p HOOaH Ti.i" %  %  "-" uffAcaa. -ppi. naibadoa 1.1VESTOCK PUPS %  % % % %  %  A. %  a < lu^ti,.'. % %  fj %  III ki iS^f ^ ii"^ UuaiMU Sirain T inrr.lly MECHANICAL ) dai Wfe • "n^ r.Mutntt lo the Eataaa •• %  *• laaa lto S A EatrrbiOO* Wa WlB aatk OH PUrnllura wBJcli >• bolh modan. %  Alai.dtlan Conn Wi.ft I V ., it Iwlniar* CMd Colaaklal I', d.-tal DWing Tabla. uptiatit Chau> fciiCd and -.-p.1., n.lnC-blnr*. Sina uttiaaoant Pambrako Tablaa: Roungl IUKf-.lt. Tip Top Table: laitga Hnrhari. Upl>U S-lo *r Prie Dtau Chain; n.tt T>.|* %  ..ibutv M>a>alnji Book CBM ,th gl>a Doon ti KacrltoUa. Mull .(,. all In old Mthntauy: C.-rI lluga, Komi l|t—I Cla*. old IlllftTltll I' >' %  *• %  ,,:lli i. ....-. %  %  I,t, fitd-Wlndwr ti Chrrr, iTaa %  .u DH v UoiOkW a'atnglr Tall Po.t av apinll* %  ivad Old mahog %  lOMtaf ilxUirv be!wrn DalUtn ana Kvnl-0> DatVtjd al Brisbane. Dalton tcored 93 r irt for 2 wicketui n*piy to EVTgladtjs first Innings' score ol 84. For Everglade. E. Lorde score*! 32 For Daiton, C. Brathwalte too'-* for 24 and M Moore 2 for 29. Batting for Dalton, G. Soberknocked up an undefeated 59; Wall* 14. F Fvelvn 7 and U Crnlg 5 not out. Gomt'H And Bryan Attar k \flamm Froaa pate 1. ment of Barbados to declare where they iiand In the matter of federation. "Mr Adams has been storw%  allinc l Uered them to be made In the hct of the moment. Now however, it appeared Mr. Adam* launched upon a definite paign of denlgTitioo nf the Gov.if TTiiildad. -What he expna to gain U beyond my imagination'' said M Bryan. "I would have expected that aa an elder BW1 statesman hiattitude at this moment would have been more tolerant than critical. "But what I am aunt about is this: Whan the day come* and the rest of the West Indie* ready to go forward In a federal oulii-k. Trinidad will be na We have said so a thousand Unit's. 1 L*h Mr. Adams would stop procratinating and say the same." Clerk Charged With Falsification JK>YAL METTORLANDS STEAMSHIP CO. SHIPPING NOTICES ggjigtj • lUBg MrTKIl and i AMI JJ MM Tnr,k BI iMTt> IVOO AJta #"pnn 1'ilti-r ll^.ldpi and S#t 11 MM it IBlw Ml* Tack.i Plajna **1S II Ml In POULTRY CO* KatRBUS Pit aj n M T W.-haUnd HUiglc Ir. PUrofe BcdaUada. SprUiga A Hanging Pirana IWxV 5tl..l .T'tm Calh BKANIU TEOTMAN AaeUonreni %  %  %  A II .III-.I %  ,. CintaliMi '."SW-a. I'I HI it Minirs RQOMA—T* lutmahad roonx tor lant Worthing oppoaita tha *-! Th-air* Haat Sea-ba-tnmg Oa-aSaJa-~k*tl Phone Stni I.Hifr-M.1. iii>w< i Qoa rt K RM % %  Appl) "Baiat WAXTKII HKi.r | | l.U. %  MISCELLANEOUS LOST A FOIIIVH LOST 1VKI1T M I MISCKIXANBOUM NOTICE Alt>iimrm ..I Irri' " %  DIAMOND V.tn l i .11 ADUOHT Oil. I'TKi* Map, i.lpa -iiU dual Cmii > IH.,1 1JBS& n I.IITON-S TKA Thr liiatul thai due qitallK .orruNaidla aau in wt world Available lAal par! "( the %  ting iae weight and ea IT U val-.ahle I %  I1IH— an The b of rour croear. nk pe Save tlvaluab 51 1 MI I-id .. %  %  > %  DaMF Eeleasaaa .-inland• paper now arriving in Bin Only a law rie>a alter publnatlon I^nuton. Coataet l^n Caje. Co Advot.td Local RrpiramUtlve %  %  %  | | n \NI. I'll.AI. '-HH'.' ~ 1 Mil.' I. %  • I %  •„ | ,i^rolli Ucrai NtiTICC K. HIM i -. A . u ( (lie aboemetiU ttuet negotiations with the "Big Four" meat producers and federal conciliators waited anxiously for a compromise that would aver n nation-wide strike. "We nave met througiiout 0M day with Cudhay. Swift tfal Armour, and are reporting no progress", said a sp okesm an for the CIO Union earl;. "MeaoUme contract* wiUi tha Mm Four*' meat piteking em lnii ha vi %  %  ; %  '! %  ft'. hava a statement on ': today-* rtegotiators for Armour and Curnpanv mat late into the night and concil atari hoped thai .i saw offer by Armour might least provide a basu for further iiugolia^toiis. The previous Company offeT haf heen re|ectt\i "UIV1..1" b> the Unkltl llu: Union declined to comment Whgfj asked If ,uiy new OBaWI had Q made at bul Olght'i meet nj T I' • Fretn page S. hat the regular m*n did tht lM-king up. IJnton ssrtd that he went to work i thenext morning at about 7 03 He Hid no' go Into the factory immediately Sometime later Mr. Miller sent and asked Mm If he had removed any hooks from thv and t Kitt. sailing r-iida1Mb uatt The M V MONgKA will Bf. cap) Carge and Pitwattn lor Pomaalra. Aaliava blaatarrrat. N. %  • v. ftM Sailing ridav SSnd mil I BYW.I. SCVOOMBB OWMBBa ASBOilATlaN lINC Caat.f. Tataakaaa Ma. MT And all pera iraag %  aaeaet \NTI1 l.t> S A and Eaaio STAMAIU> "tl.. a A LIQUOR LICENSE NOTK E IHVN-ll Ii •. lit MM. M 1 %  raenea A Mayen %  %  southeast of Tokyo %  al Aiigitll. IBS, i %  ., .' %  t Al>'.'"' he eoniidered at a LiernMns Court u> iw nnd ... Di-lilcl V %  ( A.g...t IW! U.N. Troopahip Slink t* HARRISON LINE OITWARO nOH THL IN.IHP KIMOOOM S S "SPECIAUST" S.S. -CROFT1B" S,S. "TROJAN STAR" S.S. "MERCHANT" Glasgow %  Uverpool London Liverpool London in Au* 1Mb Au, 3rd Al| lMJi 5th Aut Ittli imh Auj a Cuban Sugar Export To U..S. Raiacd WASHINGTON Cuba's iiii'Z sugar tiuula lo thai UiuUxl Slates haa boen laisad by 12B.7S7 tons, lo cutupi'Uaatc f"t an expooted deucit in home SII..uar. which brings Cuba a total quota Ibis your to 2,744,308 ton*, said that total productions of home grown sugar beet are not expected to exceed 1,600,00" tons about 200.000 tons below %  he statutory figure. Other areas whose *ugar exports to the U.S. have been increased are : Puerto Rico. 4B.165 ton.. Mainland lugar Produce 24,600 tons, and the Virgin by 298 tons. The Department said that tl distribution of the deficit to oth uroducing areas does not chanty Uht tew amount of the Sugar quota net up under the IW8 Sugar Act which remains 7.700,00(1 lorn. Also the act! doas not prevent the rinmest HHA/.IL—V.FMMW TR KM Km. ITIOXS rtm IHSI ( SSIO\ IlIlKMKN, GeiTnany, Aug. I.T. Dr. Adhwii.u De Vkroi Pit U MM >*. ogressive party of Bi.uil ciHifiri red with Biemoi Btaaate rtaairttgU Wiirni>, Kaissa .. -. . UoQi btAwavn BragdJ rf iyi Qm m i De Varon is louring West Qerii.any lo study the poasihilila 4 ex|MitHling Hranlian QeSTn He uill COOdUCl talk.i Wll sentutives of the Gerinan cottindustry lvere to-dny. -IF. Received Money for Others He had never given anyone tickets in the name of either Holder or Murrel] to collect money fi him. He had received money behalf of people who had asked him to do so for them. Some of these people were Ena Harewcxi Irvln Hn>-nes. Louisa Davis, Gertrude Davii. rVederick Davis. Salfna Miller and many other; The*e people asked him to receivf the cane money for them and he dW so. As cane weigher nnd owinc to the feet that the crop seiison was in nrogrcsei and ho was very busy, he could not go for the money himself therefore he 'ent anyone of the yard staff who appeared not lo be busv Sometlmef the money wm brought back i in order that lie could deliver It to the person from whom he received the ticket but on some .ftjenns the person who collected the money, would deliver It to e one to whom it belonged Linton said that he knew Lionel Hnxewnod nnd remembered fending him to draw money. That was %  >n n morning when Harewood * :-otning from work on his way hi me The money he sent Hare>ood to draw did not belong \o either HoWer or MurreU. Harewnod brought the monev to him and he gave ii to the owner of the S.S. S.S. IIOMFWARII I Hi: ill! I MIH> KIN41BMM •'BlOGRAPllKir "HERDSMAN" I.vnpor.1 nthei InformaUon apply to . DA COSTA & CO. LTD. — Agents ^Mcoa, S i m £*&LONDON, Aug 12 A North Korean COTOn Died "n TUegdoy thai B United beet aren from nelling more thun Nations troopship ha off the atgfl < Soviet news HgeJaC) Ta It said: "Neai th easl i units sank two enemy trawwra and one troops). :, 'over." No eW I WUTAKI WEN VIU. ntXIUK OS MAM s U. WASHINGTON. Aug. 12. Secretary of State Dean A< hern MI newa iiiaifiaiiias i .. day said that the military representative*, of the United States. Australia, and New Zealand will decide at the September meeting in Hawaii the desirability of American warships and planes again using the Manus Island base Just north of New Guinea. —u.P. *DM: 17 l\JLRM) is tf/.\>; EXPLOSION LILLE. France, Aug. 12. The death toll in the Schneider pil mine explosion mat* to four when the Italian mine exploded. There were 17 burnt victims, five of whom were on the danger Uat Three bocttel t/efe brought t the surface in Valenciennes early thlt morning after the explosion shook the pit around 2 m All wire French.—U.F. Ill Touch With Barbados Coaatal Station CABLE AND WlBKJJtS.1 iWnl kidle.. te l Ul Wae Xl ad jutted quota, .-vent of It being able to do -.r.F Quake Jars Tokya TOKYO, Aug. 13. An earthquake, described by s-Lsinologists as "rather strong''. Jolted Tokyo a few minutes before 1 a.m. today. There weuno immediate reports of dan 'quake was reported centred m the Boxo peninsula, aorne 40 mllealhave been angling for a meeting OF EXCM.A VCAV AUOtiHT U, ISM NI n. i.in. r Cheajoea n 7 V 111 I %  aghi ,, ,,„i DraMi ->i>; t8 I :j ii io rt Cuble FI I It ft rwrnencv tt 4 ID' I, M 1-1 Bllvei (ANAPA 7 If. Pi Cheque* on Rank.' | %  V 1-1 I-( ..I.Vtl-iei.pt CUM. !" hJS't" Pi *i Pr YOl ARE INVITED *V.*. PKESWKVTIAL FLECTION TO PRECEDE V.4.T.O MEETING IXJNDON, Aug. 11. itriiwiii v. coming around to the United state; view that the next meeting of the North Atlan%  k Cmanoi awal be put off until i. American PreMdential Flection. authoritative sources said on Suodav. Some West Kurupoan nataotui if the NA T.O. within the neat few weeks. The United States haa ..intended that auch a meeting would eor\-e no pracUcel purpo until Anierlran foreign poUey was <*larined by the new President. After an initial hearatnni. HniaiiL was understood U have accepted thi* vie*'. moat itarloui Cauldron on the (a.r of the tarn .i t •%  Pa .i i ..iiipaMwith Utem al at Pein Vatican Cits Catbsdl .1 lUl The of I-...I Tl,r lalk K glv.i Profaaaur C M Weafcct and i in oM CaUwdiaW BULOVA WATCHES Only a few in stock as the quota is limited. BUT YOUR BEST BrT IS TO CRT ONE They are real magic when it comes to quality 17 Jewels Guaranteed Y. De LIMA A ML I/Tat. 20 Broad St and Marine Gardens *lth the folU>.n| >hi Ihrcuaji l heir IUlbado> Coakl Svalltl P 8 Rloabetli Kl. • %  HaufU • Dorulhv Stevenaon. > . Cottwa Tenure. MT TarUr. Colombia, i Stholar, a • AU>*kio.-ii %  Base KoUard-m. a.g Kafant I i.tlb-.... Bwo. • %  Uruguay. • %  I i'dv N'la.n. • Rio Jachal. • c...(iblt .a BJ Hn-. I Viaiuui. i Alcoa PoUm%  |\|.-e-.ie^r. M T AUi:. II H % %  AlalanU. Marina. • M-in.a Wuipaaiasli, '* Iniona. I • Pali.* %  navtoua. < a Cmatb.i.k %  %  Wllleni'Lul. BA It Ion >• Part, i Jel-'n • a a I'aiUt. > %  AUNNI Hai Car CANADIAN fetkalVtCI -ii iiir.ii -.1. TVRA ISA r-AKOOI'' KIM •ABNTTA' 1 -iia BaeW Ar**ee> M..i. M i aaitfaa Baeaad.* Juis a Autuat 4 Akiauat • Auauat U Ausual ID Sap* %  Ausa^t Stpt 3 •* £ Sept 11 S^t It lapt SI.BT1IBOI M> A STFAM1R .. n..e Barbado> atpfaibir llth. lor St. laiarcBcv Rieei Porta Apply :-UA COSTA A <. LTD.—t'ANAlHAN StEVHt NF-W YORK SKBVICF. %  ajaaaaeai NEW ORLEANS SERVICE gSXajgn aalla HUl Jul> •>TKAMC -Hiila ;n-t July sTEAMEk aaUa UUi Augu-l -.ITAMER Hlbl SSth Aug.; TEAMFM aalla I] ..ritva* II I gtajg .i.lvea n i Autuat Augual :h Autuat |ac4ti Bt rItlh Seiitainbei linti.ii then went on to mention -Mi. i iK-ople whom he had *kd draw money for him. There was never a time when he had written a ticket for canes which were not revived at Edgecumbe Ltd. He .aid that for a few years. GCOTKIBishop. Keith's father, and tmn-elf had not been on speaking terms. On one oecaalon he had. to reject canns which wore brought to the factory by Keith Bishop. He has warned Norris more than There were some occasions when peasants canes were allowed to be brought in without the i veigher being notified. This %  urred on Mondays and Saturdays becHuse on these days the plantations could not put in their quotas vine, to labour shortage. He .said that if a day opened rainy and plantations could not get in their quotas, word was sent around to the peasants who were llowed to send In aa many tons s they had. Linton said that some of books which were stolen were in in. hand writing To Mr. Reeer : I know u U inanv peasant proprietors. I i know -' good many lorry dnv I know Nor ITS' truck and I i Know the MurraU's truck. wars 1 have seen little Of Alma MurreU. I do know Sarah Holder at all 1 am quite sure that Keith Bishop pni his lorry brought in MurreU' canes. All the ttauisactlou* wen g.nuine. I taught George Bishop's son. Keith, at school. He war a dull >*>y and I had occasions V flog himGeorge Bishop's land next lo mine. On many occasion we have had quarrels about stock going on each other's land. Georg< Bl"hop subsequently accused nv of being hard on his son, Keith.. Whenever Norris came his truck was recorded. Al this stage the Court WH adjourned until 10.00 a.m. todny KOMIK l THOM LTD.—NFW YORK GULF SERVICE Canadian Natinnal Steamships % %  -> %  lilC > I '-I' LADY I'ANADIAN CRUiatX CAM All IAN CONSTBLXTOH I^DY BODKTY CANAOIAN CKAUfNOEK LADY NBXaON MOhTHHOCND CANADIAN CHAiJ-alNOEH l-VDY NXIiON CAMADDVN CRUIith CATJADaAN CCINSTBVCTOK 1ADV BOONEY ^ CANADIAN CllALtXNGKR LADY NELSON SalM MBBlt'Bl I Aug. II. i'i.. t Aug It Aug 18 Aug taept lSBtp' at a-pt It Aut. 30 Aug za Aut JO Aut S Sept lOSep' Its* i-i. n m i toaept. ] Oct a oct It Aut M Aut M Aug. S Boot 4 Rep. ITBept ItBept MBaoi Matga t OCI 7^Tl Aug 3 So? l 11 aa* i.aept as it*t. n sept *t sept a Oct. It Oct. at Oat. ;i Oct M Oci 31 Oct 4 Hav. larlbat aartUaUta. astir *•— GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD.—AgeaU. ;.'// / //,v^.v.v.VA'/l'.v.'.'.-.V.V,v. C ,( G U TRANSATUNTIQUE SaUIno Irem SolthampWo U liu^lclo.pr. HaMataM, Brb>dot, l rli.ld.d, l.. Oulrm. imrao a Jaaukxi A STITCH IN TIME SAVES rim. a i Sn when your SHOES beis to wear Have ilieni done Nicely at BATA SHOE REPAIR \ eaaa>< *eeeeeeteeeeet,aaa>a THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LTD. White Park Road. Bridgetown ENGINEERS. BRASS and IRON FOUNDERS Worki contain modern appliances lor the execution < %  ( rirst-ciass work of all kinds, and especially to SUGAR MACHINERY and STEAMSHIPS Dealers in AGRICULTURAL MACHINERY and GENERAL ENGINE ROOM STORES of all Description IRRIGATION PROJECTS. PUMPING EQUIPMENT and ELECTRICAL INSTALLATIONS A SPECIALTY For Satisfaction, Quality and Service THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LTD. Iroa gguthaaiatoo ArrlvM BeBSB j "COLOMBO?' .. Slit July, i52 ltth Auj., UW2 • DE r.KASSE" . 22nd Aug., 1M1 3rd Sapt, 1M3 'Not calling at Guadeloupe SAILING FROM BARBADOS TO I I'ROPI I mm Barbadw Art !" SnlauwW •"DE GBASBE" th Aug.. I9M lh Aug., 1M2 "COLOMBrC" . 24Ul Aug.. 1992 Ml Sept., 18*2 •"DE ORASSE" .. .611, Sen'. 1M2 3*ta Sapt., l52 •Sailing direct to Southampton R. M. JONES a CO.. 1.1 D..Aicnu. AT LAST WF. HAVE RECEIVED A NEW SHIPMENT OF — — MASTER PADLOCKS THE CENTRAL I UifiHil Ml Corner Broad and Tuder Sat. > &g eaaat>Cat>>fia0 B FOR SALE Phone: 4546, 4650 Workshop Phone 4528 Store* Depl Mil EXCELLENT BUILDING LAND AT THE . POPULAR SAINT JAMES COAST . a Near lo the Colony Cl*. Very Reasonable P r i c • l. a Contact Your Real Estate Agents: REALTORS LIMITED. 151 152 Roebuck Street. Bridgetown. Barbados 'Phone 49M



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WEDS ESP \V M70CST 13, 15S BAKU UK IS ADVOCATE PAGE THREE Road From Caracas To Caribbean Costs £21m. 2,000 Workers Engaged In 10i Mih* Koad Construction CARACAS. THE MOST EXPMnVX rsaftd in Ibe world, COBIIIIK £2.000,000 a mile, u. bdtag built lo the Caribbean. Il will have cost CJ1.OW.000 by the time it is completed through the Andean foothills of Northern Venezuela, in link Caiacag with the Carlbl u rim th o u aa n d labourer*, with 200 bulldoze!.*, tractors and lorries, are hastening to complete the road in time for the tenth inter-American Foreign Ministers Corilei mea due to be held In Caracas in the last quarter of 1953. na aaa ni'.-m.ie raed wO' i-.marked witn lire sjiaal lu.uitl*. *-*W/ 1 P/J!iu k T< k one of than over ., mil. n, i.-ngth •9Vv*I*Illlllt III -itd id)"rataforcad co 1 riff* co IIII about L. B5J ii.il! b} Baaanmaaa Campeon Detnard, of Pans undn BM itfavttua of Mr. Hubert Shama. project manager, and ihe Hnn s head 1 gineer. Return Home In September >^ARCHSjCL|l b US. dm -* % %  MOTTO : "" WC MEDOLtO POLITICS ^ IN Two I'nim. I The tw.. tiuir.pl.>. Iieing bull) -il Three CUM <* 7,3.ooo, by in.I..I...I .11 Triiiiilml Xomlrttrr: Bj LONDONER LONDON west h, nan i' been ..itenrtinei( coune Momaon-K.iiu.1 „l % %  tne Polirp Training School sf :%  111 fat.. ;i gat ,.( uwn %  OdOO, on the outskirts of LmilunnpU with dual-Ian *-WW """ e *Pec! lo rpliirn homp in Seuliafnc on cm., C ConilTu.il 11 leal wad beg.i'i !" *? '"' %  Assistant Superlm.-ii111 Janu.ii-. IM0 nil. " •' "'•"'• %  SS *£ 12 SS, ^ "* %  1-"^ s.-*rvyrnd?TT5S bMklatt ihp I.M.I tan •]„ fact". Superintendent Befoir i\..ik . .,n SI. Louis told nit this weck thp actual road itself. 36 miles of 'there has been so much to lake secondary road* across the m.unin that we have had to studv lato tnlns had to be built In order to 'Mo the maht. The lighting lulls sain access lo the principal conare going to be very MfV struction point!. along the "-uper•But." he added. "ft I highway". *n very interesting The rou.e for the new uad F ? r Station Sergeant Thomas, .sjuimi the filling of a numbei of X ., i, tn *'"" trip to the .r.ounuln gaps, 13 of them, ranging JJJ !" = !" rjnnM eome Irn soon, from 78 feet to HI feet ,„ neilhf J£ ffi?MlJ£l H.2TL51" i? by Public Work, enf. -M, I.u.l lo ",'.'' !" S Vinei,? ^^TT "l £S Mbe'rooT-a,-?, ItS ,h' ^^ ' "^" %  %  ' some of the mou>. urns to get the earth needed to fill these gap* • • • Once complete^, the road will Off to tile Caribbean shortly is act as a new life-line between ip. A. E. V Barton, the West 'he Venezuelan capital of 500,004 India Committee's Indefatigable people, and the busv airport of the secretary. He sails from Southcity, at Maiquetia. which handles '^P ioli '" tht Go-"! 0 on August approximately 200 National and 5Uv ? n d H due in Barbados nine International flights daily, .in.l the "jj l>wr , • • thriving seaport of I* Gun,,.,. ,,"""'"Jo? •£>' "L' h *„ !" "' '"" which handles nearly 50 pe, cent ','""" "J !" .' S A K ,"!"• An of all Venezuelan import. '*"a ^""'Cu,' !" 1 ? 0 ""^.? In .ddilion. i, Ls hoped that the ^U^'BnZSTcL.^^Srt rogtfWill provide ft great impetus ,,„ Honduras and Jamaica travto the devcl.n>ment of coastal 0 |Ung by sea and air property, and many new resorts Mr Barton will return home _.. m untlpr construction in anfrom Kingston In Ihe Cavina on loss of S3 000 000 while tho Colony's however, silo' licipulion ol the new surge of November 2th tivenue .-.illectcd from the Indusof 7. hondny-makers „. ,,„ by .j.wo.OOO— Said Mr. Steii The populaThe prespiu l-mlle-long rood. 2,000,000 in respect of Income Tas tion will eertainl) Increase by .'il.V.'S. ^1! 'H^IL, hf.^"SiZ* "P" 1 "• Jllemm.ngs. Harand MOO.OOO In royalti-t 200 000 la Ihe next 10 ^"•"ept, situated in a J.OOO faet luah valley, ,.,,„, M „,, r of Port o( Spain THnldad Leaseholds revenue• l-s !• %  disesler. So[ a t-vlsting road will. 35 curves Tr ,„,d.d who has been attached alone is about 1500,000. it is no) tl ..• prccarlou..y niched in the steep ,„ llw Brlllrtl Ministry of Transknown how much is the estimated lands with agricultural p.. hillsides. port following his operation In this loss of other Individual comp mitrl ties can be brought into cultlvauon. ,. _, _, country, will be leaving London It is Ivelieved thi.t ihe dr.... in we lace the possibility ..! la'comlng Heavy lrilUr shortly to visit his mother in culf oil prices Is due to tne us "till n lepc.i.icot on lmporte.1 Edinburgh rtclf j strike and that it the true* foodstuffs in the I Traffic is very heavy alons this "When I get there." he says, a iks in Korea are successful oresThe remedy, he said, must be road approximately .000 cars "I am going to do nothing;„,'"„, w ,„ „,,„„ .,„., „,,ght Intensive culti.ation of the soil and lorries a day. carrying p.... enabsolutely nothing". SaB5, the effect of clijguvf %  gens and freight ui the ooull After Edinburgh, and g well'„,„„,,,„, h , h ,,-.,... nf ua „,ii,,,. sl-T I IS'fi MISSKIN VISIT", betwivn the coast and deserved rest. Opt. Hemmlngt. n, "^„" h 2. ,h0 The new load, with only liinw to Port of Spain Bi t M W \ Firtc. I .It. curves. I. expected to.cut the %  • mmKt Petroleum Technologist A Ttln-ditd selling miss ..urney down to U minutes. .."PStlVZ_ ££ S*&L Si ....-.-. ..... u.week that the i Paplneau, GovChallenge (hi Diamonds "Ih t.tiir-n>onopri|y ot 1 log i hatllt'tigru l>Winstoti New York. His private -olhi mat rn-*i bigu* %  • %  %  i ...ii. %  tnfl with ihe Portuguese tiovrriiment to buy th-I Angola I'fttuauis,. West AW.. %  hii-h produce about eight !* % %  %  ild's supply. in OmaJ .thes bava perfecii'.t .it tunpUl %  i b) .< aod.ii LM hi'itrl tourHi ht < % % %  u> .i lipeciah-i i i.n hut) ..1 Hi ttl I'liit-tn.i lecelpti last yaar WPI lortit AB.000.000 dollars (mm 'MHMiiMMit compared n JAPAN N4AY BUY CANADIAN LUMBER Trinidad Oil Hard Hit By Fall In Prices (From Our Own Corrr>pondent) PORT-OF-SPAIN. Auuust H TRINIDAD'S OIL INDUSTRY hag been hard hit recently by falling fuel Oil prices Toward last month there was a 10 cents (U.S.) p.-t barn I drop and) this week it was announced that the price par barra. hM | fallen by another 15 cent>. effective August I This means thin tlw 'rlnldad l its Earthy Boodl ami 83 DPI, oil Industry will suffer revenue cent, of Us proteins. I^ctl f-ts.j high porcentage, VANClH'VKIt. H (' %  ii,.Saaboard l.umi-r L Bwab a %  in H an IIT il.ltl lltlll%  tal luinlx* Mi ifUad roi I rke< M-. t CIO i'.'l lnt< t rkan ol AHHTI'V k with Iba ral* %  I .il. would Hlort pur %  '-iiajruuc.il.! •nawnta Ol H C lumber onca -.It. 1 gets enough dollar* He ssirl Ihtl I "another year <>t two Ha said Jaaan'i itollai raters i undarsplla Trinidad in fta Brill b r.ulami market This wn-k h* British Cotumbla producers made an effort to remedy w0uW h-v ,. .,, ,„,,,„,.,,. w th i un ,.. ihis by droppingthe wholes.il.* bei produceri In UM PhlUppi BElBI %  l*rd compound fnin Bom bb t'hlnn UlS.tU tar %  30-pound tin to $12' : ...sia. | '< %  ><>> %  > %  >as>aaati &f&f&f&f <•->- %  &f&f FIELD MARSHALL KKITISM CM \S \ %  Personality and .Tnmalca" is the title Conflict ... il a book by pointed oui inu %  JS'ofa'Srt^ KaaUi ia.~tt m hmk& Present Gulf SSTUf ff^-^^lheTr^ —• P-S^ed by Liverpool Un,-JWjKroad, and the maximum gAidc on ^!? l £? a r % nM lOJ o rv l>r1w ' • fMoUnp •h, new road will bo only per Jja/SgA'tft RAFFLKS cent and as low as 3.8 per cent. fin MaMnl8 gathering material < %  iit peasants in ffTi %  era •' i Bronomic Advtaer, Mr Verm .n Wharbin and Mr. G. Monies de Oca. of West Indian Oil Ir..iii5tues. went lo llritlsh Guiana yesterday in the interest of local in the tunnels as compared with fo7 he7thesis Now comes''a"sumDuring the next ses->i..ri ol i' niithh Oolana bajuied Imports '-sent 12 per cent on the mirv of her r, n dings-later to lie Legislature which begin, towards of English margarine and lard .-xlstlnf road. ... ,. n1 ^ ln m0n detailed form— tlie end of October, ll is expect el ,.„„,,„.„„,,.. M noo h foUowtn The dual lanes en the new road on the behaviour of Jamaiciin that the Attorney General will representations rej-orted to have will be paved with asphalt, and parents and children in various piaaent a Govornnvm %  mondmflnt been made bv Barl H .,r,>ducerf "ill meisure 24 feet <,n either ,mi;tlons. on the work of the i Q the Colony's Ordinance under side of a four-foot wide centre Klwali thd 'he arous religicms which raffles aro conducted. %  %  land. an the general 0cOThe Police are seeking an New telephone cable from t.iranomlc and political back-ground Bm endment which will give them cas to Maiquetia and La Guaira, ' present-day Jamaica ^ powers of InvestigaUoiui. At pratwill be laid by the C'aiaraIV __ l ent. raffltw for charity, sports, or phone Company, in the centre,. S* William %  "•* %  th j*'""Vi ? *W *h*r "Uil-ble uiguiuiatif-ii. island of the mad. which will bt-2?SSS^! IT?!t~^?!~Y.. !" aie *rniitted by the Police 1> illuminated alone ts entire IcnRth —B.r p. applicflt|i Sea And Air Traffic Cuba Cuts Molasses Price NEW YORK. Cuba has cut the export price of In Carlisle Bay its blackstrap molasses to 12 cents among British business men who chairman of Cxamlkow Ltd., H reported to have made a good recovery from in operation he recently inidar>'; nm £ n ',!i^ m R wt s ttr ^iSan^no sa^jsttnsv^. was Director of Sugar at the atlon of drawings or for holding Ministry of Tood lor 11 yearIs an inquiry into draw-ng results now convalescing The preset clraim-itance*, It Is aiooMr stay ou belleA-ed. lend themselves easily HI#, seHfMfvn Cyril • • to postponement of drawings from J^"^*"!" K r **' Mr. D. J. Parkinson, who bc*an ,(„„. u X [ me un \n nothing Is heanl i r a,„ A 1^*^," his duties as Trade Commissioner (lf xhr nnaI ^tulls or whether ***>**i fhlllp it In the U.K. for the British West byy^, of th( , |T1| . %  ••%  ,r,ly three weeks ago.lias ^^ ^^a^ h „ lr motlPy jren>^i-at>ss?tad Ja^ j Jg* Amendmei.t to the Ordii M..I-, plus 2->i per cent export tax. Fo* several months. Cuba has v.* •asMl ,. witt make provision as follows. n And hW own That %  pcrcentekge foe of I been holding out for a price of 20 p^nananToS t, M. Parkinson is "" %jg£j*J!g ^"^ cents, but buyers regarded this during accommo.1 -.on with the ith the Police. figure ns far too high India Comnvti •nnt to %  rites. Until he %  v-aH.1 f.l-vri u %  S^hlaolHr Hflfl W's -V-ll... %  %  S r Wolff, S.Iii-sttfK Al lail. S-SboOPaTT Srhtxirarrr Laid) r B Karl i, It U reported in New York that ,he look out for West Indian tfaff. He Is on Into a bond for the proper conthe Cuban Sugar Institute has already sold 120.000.000 gallons to Puhlicker Industries, Inc. ( of Philadelphl.i at the new price. But .filei;. is of Publicker refused -ither to confirm or deny the reported Big stocks of synthetic industrial alcohol, of which molassan form an Important ingredient have enablel manufditurers to resist the Cuban demands for 20 cents. Bui the record output of some 400.0O0.000 gallons in Cuba, together with n very serious storage problem, prompted Cuba to reduce its price:: at last. ft is believed that Cuba will and has already Chung of British Guiana K.lgSd WM —UE.S. New Issue Of Caroni Capital Ltd., ss. duct of the raffle and this bond : .-' k will be forfeited In cage of any !" infringements Names of winners and sellers euntai of winning tickets must be mads v v public and all returns, mnney. s tickets sold etc, must be forward' %  ed to the Police. SPKCIAL ASSl(iNMF:M Mr Arthur A. Shenfleld, former Economic Adviser lo tin Government arrived (rOtTl United Kingdom on 8 left early this weeic fo, Sunoale, it M 'M' 1 I I"' %  .. |M noinlntn : i.nhigHi Vln for St I.iiflSeawetl %  I.HIII iBUVALS — ft tr-atr! %  Bassn. Sam the Caribbeas. I rOWDOW West Indian ve*non announced In Vincent ion details of their new caplHe n %  .< %  Ordinary shareholder'; „. .. .— „ ..offered 4 200.000 la. Oldtoarv a ur vev ol tow have to more 30.000.000 gal(-hareat par In the iiroportlon of. .*?+ urosnects of on* a tr .nth out of trie island tor one tar tvery 2s. unit held. u~*J: B^TK-.-. the next M-ven months in order to More ih.' "*.* p !" S ,i V r^ rt^—B-l'.P -oUcril-ed for by the other aossreform a company, with headqi...:*!,,„ ten In Trimdad. for this purposi %  ua will be Mr Shenfleld ls making the M.i rirjlh.. golifh, WllAuatln 'vr.,.,,, ciart-fM-e t> KaihalMa Jahnmm, V rraaa \.,tii.. Mr Jurlle* /tlrhari Mannina Amtfio Oraaorlrh, Oamana Olovvi l,th •vpocial 14-suajunaot— m-k, u£ nrrAartmss ON MONBAIsurvey of shipping, need* nd •• Tftaiass %  the area oi ,1.,^,, j^,^ „.„,,,„, „„.,„ AirBooker Brothers. Hwawi n-ni.h j .an n*v-nia.. r.a..pnrvide. torage .pare for the nexOrd.n.rv -toek Is held by Te snd *%?£ .J^Z^* J2£ "'-^^ SS& A r£T *"V.t ,rop. Some ,00.000.000 gallon.. U le Inve-t^nt, and the Unit-d ^S^^T^HSrSSLSi: B. V^^.c^^u.Cn IB£ Japtt Pay Up WASHING • Infornied aourcea gasd that Japan •tibfccrlhed for by Net proceeds of Ihe ... used to repay temporarv advances v *y in 'he motor in connection wifti the extension special ship put at his the Rr.triin Castle sugar factory by Booker Brothers. He %  %  I to be i li.i... ynfK. Clark. Murlal Cla.ka ruihb-.i r.i.Mow Dai tll Johnaon. Arlhtu Mr Cnnr-l William Vi" T""" Knowl*. ITlvira Oriit*.. l-^rsery MaOin. Oh-vorimrlrr, Will OfhdlSpOSal •** Btr.stiam. Saoe SHop HrrnMr ill -nak* ? ml,h I DIESEL TRACTORS Sar Aallaaa Stanfool investigations m St. Lucia : -~w foropsnica, Montaerrat. St Kts, : on Mond.iv paid final gold Si '' >' 'he next Antigua and Barbados, spend at ,..,. Tn (4 i 4 AI ,r T "* r noller > rs to the Inter' 'i' " ''anuary 19S3. least one da* in oach island r a.iM aval* J Bcata, a. iwir rational Bar .<..,.,>l2 sugarerop and will be admitted to member^*Jft^T r^ia'fiZ*? *, flROW MORK FOOD %  record output of 49.146 Net profit Is of srdp m those org %  S !" ^ZTZJl, -JLJSt ill Ml J Stwr Coven-mem '>"•**•. D R.m.h... n s fM.-nr.. J Th., !" tav \et profit 1 exr*ajcted to be StaUstlnari whn has nranii >.,t a "'- %  %  T • "-<. B "' Thursda> _-.. ._. ... iron* -h-in drwble thn foe tl pre.Ti,,L ~ .. P"l* r€ a mi. m A V.II. Ambo'.adnr F-ikn ,o ,„t, .1 tart of taWc ' lhr CrAort ^ K food " %  *•• %  iivrn>>a> wudiw l llwsilaof lum P tl 1 "^ h, WMk ,r ''"' ,., % % % % % %  ssnony at the Hank and „.u{lS^M anTcxOlTttLTSQ^ agriculture of Trinidad and lober r ^isiT %  * %  '•* FUT'I hwidquarters on Thursdav trt( ,, ., ,*, n,MkMwumnt *" mu t ** ** intensive si m M.-*.rt n-i-i-w MM' n.; de. .,„, *„,>. Barbr^lea and Grenada If Uon of revemue from P'X ** not to become more dillcult i^„trf nquartar i. xpected in the "• l at present ernaimv ...nal year The Colony, he said, depend, or, I' P —•fls.D.P. Foreign supplier* for 54 per twin SIMPLICITY The Tirlil M.irshiill is a very simple niadiim* II is easy to operuto and becsuse it ha*i a niiiiiiiiuiii niiinher nf workini; parN there is little to go WTCBsfjg The chariirteriHtir ot the I ii IdM.irsli ill is exceptionally IOUK servirr under hard uorkini; condilinns POWER The 1 it-Id Marshall, on ucrmuit of Ihe laaTM %  f/WasaaM, is callable of hauling heavy loads at niiiiiiiiuiii engine speeds. Increased dritwliur pulls irre ol. tinned b\




PAGE 1

I'll.I li'lK llAKH.XDlls lllllll Ml M M> w \i i.: ST la. 1S2 BARBADOS.^ ADVOCATE *•**•* ft* u MMM o.. us.. %  *.— #_ Mmii \>.ln.sm can Interest but oUi>ht iH>t tma!l number of secondary industries to pay for their imports. In -Sir George Seel s Report on Development and Welfare in the West Indies which the Director of Education will certainlv have read the requirements of education in the British West Indus are lucidly stated. OUld be impo^sihl<' writes the Edu\ i\ i BY in the Comptroller for Development and Welfare "to over-emphasize the need for a complete revision of the syllabus and of the methods oi teaching in the rural schools." Sumalmost four-tifths of the population of the British West Indies is rural, this is tantamount to saying that the greater part of the educational structure of the area neod.s overhaul Education is not just something defined by an English Act in 1944. It is not .i queg tion of primary or secondary, or technical or modern. It is primarily a question of training and equipping boys and twirls to become good citizens of the communities, in which they must live. If the products of Barbados' schools were going to be absorbed into the mainstream of English economic life when they left school, there might he s.>me cause for rejoicing in the fact that the local educational system will compute very favourably with anv lyatetll used by any Local Education authority in England But since the majority uf Barbadian schoolboys and schoolgirls must look to Barbados for a livelihood the question of the type of education they receive is highly relevant. And according to Sir George Beel'l Education Advisn West Indian schoolboys and school-iris are riot for the most part receivim; the type of education which is best suited to their needs. It is quite unrealistic U< talk in Barbados about a new conception of education m which a child must show capacity for the education itesi suited to its naeds, The fact is that the level of West Indian economic development does not permit anything like the same outlet for natural talents as do large countries. Until the yVeel [ndles can compare economically with the United Kingdom it is absurd to expect that a novel English educational svstem Li the best model to ho followed bv the West Indies. Par too Ion.: have educational authorities in the Wei I Indies faded to tackle the heart, of their educational problem. "The basic problems of the rural population", writes Sir George Seei's Education Adviser, "stem from a generally deficient agricultural production. This results in a low standard of living. It is nee therefore to develop a school curriculum centred round the teaching of improved agricultural practises, home improvement, techniques and the inculcation of healthy living habits. Prominence should ac< %  '.rdmr.iv be given to subje.ts correlated to the three major fields of agriculture. health and homelife education The Director of Education obviously has not given prominence to these subjects in his recent defence of the educational system of Barbados. He talks of "highly complex" secondary education and of "one unified system" of education. But unoi the major problem of rural education he nothing at all despite the very challenging statements which have been made on the subject in Sir Gemv.e Seels report. If the Education Adviser to the Comptroller for Development and Welfare consider! that it will be necessary to give a functional and practical orientation to the curriculum in rural schools, and that teaching must be rooted in reality, the average citizen In a rural community such as ours wants to know what action is being taken locallv to implement the suggestion. The news that two modern schools are to be started in September does not appear to have anv relevance to the major problem of the rural schools, although any change towards a more technical or vocational sv-tem of education will be generally welcomed The Director of Education in the article which was published in last Saturday's Advocate ridicules the contention that there is anvthing obvious about education He is entitled to his opinion. Many people are quite clear in their minds as to the meaning of education. But whatever divergent opinions may be held bv mdivktuali as to the meaning or pun' i education it -is obvious that in an agricultural community such as Barbados education ought to be rooted in the soil. 1' : also obvious that because of the lack of a rural education giving prominence to i i a uiane health and home-life education f Barbadian progress towards better living conditions and a life In which higha-iforms of education have uroatcr opportunity of development has been reduced. Tinhigh academic reputation which Bar. is has gained in the larger world of education ha been bought dearly. While the names of Barbados' icholars I corned fur future generations to see. the mainspring of Barbadian econonn %  I workers have been left with %  m obviously unsuited to their needs. TIW Federal Sell erne For Central Africa AH I \|nnniriii In Safeguarding IIIHII-SN Of \afivItat't-s II. hlllillW HI -Wl III Will VIII (tUdslomI'rotr^sor of dovrrn mrni j.ul I'uhlk Administrate. .1 Oxford ui-i l ii..v of \ %  asm, %  u a M beginning of May. 11 was THE CAPITAL leading Artlei* r*prinMd from UM Jamaica Dally filvaa.r 1'HK Barb* I Advocate has been discussing the capital of the proposed Federal Caribbean should be established. Quite naturally, with the special pride of the Barbadian—one of the real solid contributions of that historic little island to West Indian pride—the Advocate plumps for Biidgetown, quaint and delightful city in DU tureaque Barbados. No doubt the Trinidad Guardian will be equally vigorous in sup„ porting the present recommendation of Portindepcn,',,.,,,,,.,, ,,, (|tT nuji-siy's Governiof-Spain, the most cosmopolitan city of the veti appears -i.i M n '.. rm Or in between Luiopeam aod to Ui disadvantage •! Africans *w ill require to b* •ace "n matter* from ter.itonal matte.s aRd of ^ g^ jn d an Alrtca-i *uuid not ceattUl Uwiu,ajli m * ^ n v y difficult and the lwil to approve of icdvr-iP"><^ Of %  COpSkleraWa list of a ppo, n ted by u> %  Governor of tton. in the end, howevci lw concurrent' subjects upon which cacn uf hofe K .,, Afrtcaai frant bouiAtrn Rhodana " lh 'ww !" 1 an i wrrltorwl!o> u woU i d .ee,,, that the con• Dded tnc cotifeii-n.c, th,l"ture, may make law—a featur? f cre ,, tL places gnat rsUaace UPC* :.„!,. NOffttWrn Rbedai -i by many authorities on the cmcncy D f thi* Board, which i> and Nyssaland refusins Mr. Lytleifederul (.overnmenU 10 be undcntllled to make representations -o ion's offer even to attend as ooilrtbie—is cvidci.--.• perhaps of ihf,he federal Government on any %  It is evident from the .. N. HkDOM difn.-ulties the While eountafSg when Paper diet Mr. J. N. ami Mr. J. L. Savanhu, the t\ AfrTeaiu from Soutnern Rhode* took an aouve pan to Uu aroeecdungi oJ the conference! A further Conference I T is to be noted unit UM tadoral Wlb e in S i>ulliiied In Ihe Whilv Taper ih presented for di.sHI sion and "n^ideralion at thi* ; not for acceptance n A further conference ^ projected for the latter part of the perhaps of t tt%ra affecUng African interest.-. Much of Its eflectivenesa will f |>owers. It may '. depend upon the extant to whui. on will bj ti utinised Vat v The New legislature bap (Hani lhan ihe allocation <>' |H>*'n. iwtwee-i rtderal in i % %  %  lorlai 1< N': work btfonnaUy or b] j. irataon WIUI lb federal Govi-rnmeni and thus avoid bSad-on %  ;>erimenl m the t.-niiiKUH' of arbluraHoa Whitehall—a prow* always POCKET CAHTOOi! bi mm u i 1 *tN( ,\SIM; loaanwbile not only is the ihanM open t<> discussion but two nportant aspects Of It are lu ba w subject of investigation and i-iiort by spenal commlaijonh %  seal commission to consider h ; inancial uapUcaUoni .>i>t prarv* ol icdi-rahsm In Centre! %  jj judnial (oinniission to i ; HI u i arraaaanianta (or feuraJ oourM and UiMi ralatton u> .iritoria. or provincial court*, il wul be ui the light of ihese Siona, a nubt that Un eoataranoa at the uu of Uie year will pui the proi UM itnat form in enien i-_ luonuttad to .laments aim peonlt Ol UM coun. ( a I naniinoits I'rniHisaU \ SBI < Mi U itun 'i I n l While Papar i ihat tinpropo^ils il embodies are prcsenied jiunimou* y by tlic confeiviuc. Tins is a remarkable thing, for U I* no seer* i that there were din"*: aneeji of opinion between the ciovMimrnts on many B> : i i.animity now reached p.nty tie result of the \ iul and full exploration of the Hibject which was carried out by Ih* earlier conference of of B ciall i id li March, 1951. at the Coni.,. nwaalU) Relations Office and the roninositi'ip of the propo* t uf great delicacy but ot ih> new Meral loawl tun teeH imprtanc and interesi %  public opinion in this country tloneerned. Two I -I ml OeviccK F OR the student of consUtutio: %  the scheme of the V.h.i Paper offers many interesting rare only may be nan Honed briefly here. First, it provides for the delegation tattv* DOWaO by the federal Li 'tie t'lntorial legislature^ am 1 within certain limits, by Hie leii.liiii.il li-nislatures to the feder.n legncalure—a device which should prove useful in mitigating UM rtBldlt$ inhargiil in a division of powen in J raderaj rysteaa. Next to rigidity, a federal sy..len i eoadaninad umially for vpuring excj iiion and the drafl scheme propuves a w iy OUt Of |Ml dilti'iilly by suggest in ; that if a fedci.il law has been approved by all three of UM to ritorial legislating within a spccillcd period, its validity may not be quostn>ii< i In UM com In l.-king at the proposal^ on The outcome <>f the whole ui.;i I each i In will h.1\ heme i> that %  %  I JHOO G his own particular piece it artthmrnt Is proposed rot the R] netk i<> dO Those who are coiHIU | Nyasalan.i i T ccrtall rnad aitti the r..tir> of KummatMra. while the three peans in Africans will obsarva eavtanrnanta are to continue i mmirVru •**{ In •> "'; l Pldernl Assembly dependent and of 35 members, at least six will ihoniiev in DM i.atiers that arc t bL> Africans tthat is. two from \ c ti. Thosa three territorial Oov._ each territoryi though there will T nmenls would con'n be nine members in all representfederation under their own Govtng African interacts. crnora who would not be SUbThose oanc e rnad wltli iho ratio ordtaaM to the G^wernor-GananJ between elected and appoint"d 0 f the feder.iii.m members will see that 33 out -I Britain's Responsibility Dtenaratott ""' 35 aTC . b ? electcd lhe ''' T*" 1 "' "iw lorriloriul Clovei.iSr?pr^aaaa WyaK 1 tnents wm,M retain ih. ( Lancaster HL*t us rul. grt H ,,. si. Alg... .mil h. f... *.to i iwevar, unan P product also of onitably. i..; been tl HtMSktat. iTie acceptance o( federation in I draTl siti.ine meant the rent um ,f other forms of closer tui.itioo. notabl> amalgamation the establishment of a unitary menla %  xlsting consUtutlonal relationship of the Qovornmerrl of thr United Kingdom, the Governor of the terrllorv of BouUMlTI RJSodatta 0*tug ikin tn s constitutional monreb and conununlcatlng with the Siiiitaiy f>>r Cornrndnwaalth Re> lations. while UM Ooven Northern Rhoilesia and Kj %  mild eontlaue to communicate with UM Secretary for the Colonles. Rhodesia. 1 itlonal development African ARairs Bard and political gdvara?snMnt %  %  W Hlli ihe allcKation of powNorthern Khodeua and Nyaaaland en. betwtan raoaral i rtos in the fed territorial legislatures and the would >g^**"* Ma ^ careful balancing of Interests m of the Colonial Oih ihe federal logWalure might go S direction in which it Em0M i pointed t" represent Afn tcrcsls. one from Northern RIHKIClia and emtram Nyaialand, the .'cspective Governors. Kin.d.y there is the ratio bctwei the repwseataUon ot w larrttoriai — always a matter of concern in a federal schal me total membership of the A ., semulv, Northern EUwdastS iUU on the model of the Umun J d ^^en then, have :i 4 South Africa) and eon edera$£££ lhug KlvlnK „,,, „ ion, on the model, say. of the %  %  -.,. of one ovei Soulhen, IfriCS High Commission. 5— A section of opinion in SouUieni (hodeslu favoured amalgamation. federation has been chosen a S .nipi-cmif*—it Is by its nature Bd In UI history the great comterritorial •*] %  *-*"> -r"T t "ihe 'Cu\ >.,-.. jafeHows from the choici srhlefl aral form of union as opposed to v. tO in31, Britain signed its ugar-and. t with l uba. Holly ..UacKCd in the British ics as the "Black Pact it guaianteed a Brilisli market for 500,000 tons of Cuban sugar llrfi-il in "lliark I'arl" Tracls* that its sugar will not become drug on the market. Next year's Cuban crop will bo line %  Quisling oner as Uila becontrolled at 5,000.000 tons, a cut cause U wSS .ilicidbuying more uf 3 >tHHIiUOl lons from thl sugar than U COUld titord under hu ^. IMI[I ll(i 17JO.OOO tons of Ue agreement to which it hud ^j lig year's surplus Is to be set committed LtSCU m AltgUtV 1851. |( (de to ^ ,t, s poaed of gradually Anglo-Cuban trade is now In „ vpr In0 ncxl nve vears. (o nvoid ., real for three years and, iesuch a p^,,. sUU , nal UII u. s Cu,iuinuing and consequent Slump the British marnei iw bu can be pemuaded to buy moru jn Jorid pra c ab.m cigars. British goods, it ill be dlmcult Cuban tannerand labourers West Indians feared it would foi Hrti.nn In -IKIIIIU n it." puthay,, ,.njo\ed for the l I piejudui.d to Ihelr own sugar c |, aM s „f Cuban sugar at the ^.^ prospdrlty unequalled m and Cigar interest-, Hi tish Uuvp,,. M ni jcvel. Yet the UK Gov, h ,fUnd's hUtory. They t...\.ernrneni spokesmen InslsUd 4hat emment is*lll under sliong u ^ n f 0 Hunati in that they have 1. wiuild nid and claimed Uiatcyw pr uro from the people to dahad a guaranteed market in UV II import duties wh ch tutm mtion sugar. S*-ve years after umted States (or a huge quantity v mid grant in n*Uirn would en, h( ttll no „„,„. then half-a^ t j,elr expoi" sugar. In addition ,,le DrlUln to expand Us px P? rt dozen countries in the world still tn iy have h 1 eager DU 1, this imi>orlant dollar market. muui tain sugar rationing—and „(h,. r counties ever since the This last hops, at 1< •' h->* not Hritam is one of Uiem. _-, Ull imv exportable urulu> The plain truth is Uial Britain callable But UM economy ot the entire island was threatened snMa 1 became apparent thSt them 1 Q luattfted At uld not be enough buyers for year'* crop. faneraancy measures taken by the C\lban Qofarnrraaif 10 meet the situation Brits ...porting from Cuba at Uio ls pytu'ng the Empire sugar proi omc i: 48.5tNi.0dd •> year ducers first The U.K. Govcm| xp..rling only £7,500,000 nwm knows very well that it \'orlh of goods to Cuba. could easily enough Beoubn Hut this hns made the iiniish % y of sugar from this year's world 1 oveimuent all the more detera |„t -1H | i a Ke sugar off the ration mined not to buy any more P Om nut H prefers lo keep its eonCuba than It must. Although sumption m. %  :. %  IIL-I-U related to included "the establishment of a 'ill rationed li. Britain Kifipire production. llt [ e soller" system, by which %  (J K Oeeen u nent is valUsoUy There will be no further agreea ii sugar C xi-.rted from Cuba is 1 Cuban attempts to sell n-ent with Cub;i which will insold bv one o; ganisation at a uni1 to Britain and has terfen with existing arrangements form • i 1 1 -'% % %  ••• % %  % %  "win still in-. %  ; .!,. purenaa ..f infssr from Thai thti ifesra srin lueoeed n pOU i of 1 gpostabM sugar the West Indies. The U.K. Govm checking any big decline In the. Jonlsl Empire can produce, emment is adhering to the policy price of Cubansugar Is by no ;'Wc arcdetermined not to take laid down in the Commonwealth means a foregone conclusion. |o prejudice UM) Interftlffar Agreement to expand EmCuban farmers fear that other ests of the British Conunnnwealth plra pnKiuotion to the highest producers with big crops will sell tugar producers." says Mr. II. H. practical iimit—and Britain's uu the world market at just beMackeson, SecraU.ry for OverrOOtUmptioa will expanought evei 1 taking sU-ps to Df I %  ?s -ntr huge %  .' Nubwdv could see th.u as of this Cuba would be I ,^.ii to I' 1 1 I 1st a ton—about half the prtt for rugar fn>m tinBrltNobody could foresee that Brit-needs. Cuba „ ain would reject such an attrsceohtrol lag size of its future < CANASTA PLAYING CARDS (Complete with Instructions) S2.28 par Set PATIENCE PLAYING CARDS 72c. per Set ADVOCATE STATION ERY MmmMt British Caribbean. And if the Clarion of British Honduras had enough courage to face 111innlentisu who are trying to sell tl British Honduras heritage to Guatemala or to the Stars and Stripes, it would demand reconstructed Belize to be the mainland esptta] of the pearls of the Antilles. The Bulletin of St. Kitts has not yet declared for. Basseterre nor the West Indian of Grenada for beautiful Napleslike St. George's, and the Magnet of Antigua has not realised the advantages of St. John's as the federal capital. for our part the Gleaner does not claim tCirujStoa should be the federal capital. ''-il is a great city in its own right, and w II remain under all predictable circumstances the major British city in the middle Atlantic latitudes. But in our view, one of the first essentials of the federal capital—if such a broad decision should ever be made^—is that in regard to travel by air or sea it should be central und convenient. If that is put to the test, we ee no better choice than ancient St. John's, Antigua, and our second choice would be Basseterre, St. Kitts. Antigua has the ade of one of the finest airports in this part of the world whereas St. Kitts' airport is not up to international standards. But whereas Antigua is low-lying, dry and untvpicaL-of the fertile picturesque islands of the Caribbean, St. Kitts is famous for Brim stone Hill on which is a remarkable old fort; its "wide plantations of bright green cane stretching from the shore up the slopes of the central mountains give the island a most pleasant appearance ." Antigua of course, is rich in historical associations. Nelson made, frequent use of the naval dockyard at! English Harbour; "and Clarence House, the! nearby fine old house built for the Duke of, Clarence who became William Fourth, still habitable". Both islands offer amenities for relaxation with lovely beaches, with fishing and generally with a pleasant trade wind climate. They are both really in the middle of the of islands, so that while British Honduras would still be far off, boyi Jamaica and British Guiana would be approximately the same distance away, and they are both accessible from the international airlines which ply through Kingston, Haiti, Santo Dmingo and Puerto Rico. The arguments in regard to a federal capital are quite different from those upon which decision was taken to cite the University 1 College in Jamaica concerning which the, AiKocate makes a point. A federal Govern-! eminent does not require a large and comteo society in which its political and. Legislative machinery should function. In-j deed it is a disadvantage for federal politi1 cians to have to operate in political areas, i with large and vocal populations. There is 1 I lar more likelihood of a truly federal outlook being achieved in a new city built up in the unaUer communities than if all our politicians had to cope with the crowds and pressure Of Kingston "r Port of-Spain. 61 regard to the University it was essential thai it should have its being in a community large and diversified. The medical faculty | for instance, could hardly have a real existence in any of the smaller communities. Andj in any event the travel costs of the Univer(iollaga are shared by all the territories so that Jamaica does not in fact enjoy any greet advantage t<> its undergraduates in this respect, except the enjoyment of cheaper vacations at home. At any rate it is interesting to see that Barbados is thinking of itself as a part of the future federation. Perhaps if an Itiner1 ipital could be arranged so that each u-nit'-rv would in turn share the benefits of being the federal centre—as judges move on -more of the territories would become keen on this idea of federation which is at present struggling to find some measure 1 if agreemen t. How To Rake III £9,000 On One Easy Lesson From R. M. MacCOLL WASHINGTON THE radio quiz prAgrtfrlfne with its many giltteriiu; rewards and the prize essay conl -' tl part of advertising campaigns have long been a feature of American life. But it is H considerable surprise lo find that there are earnest citizens who spend most of their spare .time tackling such matters methodically. What is more, they hove formed an organisation called the National Contestors Association, with more than 1,000 members scattered through 52 local clubs, and it is now holding its annual meeting in Hollywood. QUEEN of the revels by common consent is Mrs. Nita Parks, of Pasadena. For she recently won the £9,000 first prize for the "most appreciative short essay" on a new leaoser put out by a giant soap company. It also comes as something of a shock to lhe amateurs to discover that such wins are usually not the result of luck but sheer slogKins hard wrok. Thus when Mrs. Parks struck gold, she had just completed one specialised correspondence course (price 114) and was about to embark OO a second. THESE courses provide competitors with long lists of "suitable" words to use in their essays. For describing soap the lists put up such words as fragrant, fresh, sensitive, cool -i\\" Do and "don'tt" are suggested — "Do study the sponsor's advertising and trv to ir nhiasing." "Don't mention anything unfavourable about the product." THE musical "Top Banana" is withdrawn from heat-struck Broadway. And that leaves 'ill open—three "straight" en musicals. YOU'LL NEED Galvanised Pipe — W H" W Copper Pipe I" l i' V W and Fittings in Galvanise and Copper Galvanise Water Heads, Down Pipes and Eave Gutter*. C. S. PITCHER & CO. P". 4472 Da Costa & Co., Ltd. FINE FOODS fa Jfanttyn* Me*MSOUPS Clam ( li.milrl I'urllc Soup Cease as Beef srUMr I'm.Ui Consomiw Mu.hn-m HAMS Prened Hams 4tb Tin S3.SS Each RICK Super Rice In pkf. Canadian Baeon Canadian Castes* Goada Cheeae Salami Bran Flakes < .1 il"Nut Flake* Mixed Fmlt In par*. inni ftalad In pkgn. Suecotaah l'< itl Barley in tins J. d. ll Sandwich Bread MEAT DEPT. Poultry Beef Kidney Sweet bread Fresh VeietsMe* (Kensington grown) BEER AND STOUT (Famous the world oven <;ulnnr- Stout12 <" IH.IV Guinness Stout—Nip* Baas Ale—12 01. Worth button—It OS. TuborsII os. EXTRA SPECIALS Just Arrived Shrimp* In Tins Oysters In Tina CYanbury Sane* %  aeat Kraut Sheet Gelatine Almond lelnt PHONE G0DDARDS WE DELIVER f



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WEDNESDAY, M GVST i IM B .KBAIHis ADVOt \Tf PAC1 FIVE CLERK CHARGED WITH FALSIFICATION Six Witnesses Give £? Evidence For Crown 2% to Thrrr Mouses Factory. njtne is Fit.*: Gerald Holder Mr Ward : In I50 I en! lo Gdfvcumbe. Evcri_n drew them. Bt*ho ol Brerelon's Village. St. Philip, said that he was the driver of his father's truck. THE TRIAL of Ralph Linton of Ebenezer. St Philip, He knew Alma Murrell but durwho is charged on four counts of falsification of accounts *"* *"* IM cr p hv „ dld ""J draw began before His Lordship The Chief Justice. Sir Allan JTlS^rX^F^r'v^Sr TR Coliymore, at the Court of Grand Sessions yesterday. Hooper from B<-eren>n's VQlaga, Six witnesses gave evidence for the Prosecution and Fordr froi i church VBaflt, another. St K Parris. was offered for cross examination. Y !" 8 ,!? an i £"* Sober*. Daniel to No defence witnesses were called but Linton elected give evidence on his behalf. Murrell." ii When the case resumes to-day. Mr. R. Bruce Skeete, took canei and Gooding. He never drew any HM of Alma lid that when he the fa. Ion M-maga and Attorney of Edcecufnbe Ltd., where Linton Pfsons for whom he i* drawing ffA employed as a cane weigher, will be recalled to pro" duct' II accounts books. Linton is charged with (I) On of the perron whose name is names and he would give the names to the Cane Weigher. The factories to which he took canes are Edgecumbe. Harrow. ma.cn */ ii. imng a cierK or me t.caei. Carrington and Four Square, servant of Edgecumbv Ltd.. with He takes a receipt from the T# Mr vt^rd i I have m Intent to defraud, nuide or concurperson to whom he gives Ilia tamp. k-, canes to the lae-tor] red In makirlg a false entry' in n cheque. This receipt is also made other than in the names g ven by cane ticket book belonging to out in duplicate. That receipt book the owners. In 19W I did not take Edgecumhe Ltd.. me his employer, wig one, ol the Itci purporting to ahow that on the November 16. 1951. irmc dav 9,673 pounds of -nigar caoie. valued $43 20, were received Books Missing from Aim i Murrell. (I) On March 28, 1951. being a n November 16. Mr. Mayn clerk or servant of Kdgecumb? reported to him that Ltd., wiih iiiten: to defraud, made hooks were missing. stolen on |n my father's canes in Mr H.. name. As far as I can remember I never took my lather Mr. Edey's name. In 1951 some my father's canes went to Edgecumbe and some went i.. several Four Square I took some to ported Edgecumbe. Thewc which I drew rd or concurred In making a false Ue incident to the i'ohce. Money I delivered In his entry in a cane ticket book belongwas also missing I*" 1 and Lintun Ing to Edgecumbe Ltd.. as employMr. Skeete said that he did nt.l friendly. name. My e not very I heard it was some* •r, punos-ttag to show*that on tha ltnow Alrni > Murrell and apart thing to do about land. same day 9, 270 pounds of sugar from the knowledge he got from cane valued 143.40. were received the books, he did not know Owner of Lorry from Alma Murn-ll whether she sent canes to th fcverton Norria or Church Vil(3) On March 30. 1951 being factory. bige. said that he wu the owner a clerk or servant of Edgecumbe He said that some of the money, of a lorry which he drove, DurLtd.. with intent to defraud, made which should have been paid out "£ the 1951 tiop he ""! or c-oncurred in making a" false after the 1951 crop, had not been cmnm 0 Mgecumbe > and other ^7^^ e I k 'Vi b00kbCl ? 18 IT""'* 11 ^ UP l cum^or^ouTen^^Wam^nd e^iurSSTsnot figfS'K "fc SI— then produced the ^ft^ !" JZ, EE_ ££. same day 10.310 pounds of sugar -iher tickets and the carbon.copies !" U !" f !" or f* f "r her ce. valued M6.03 were i^eeived lg the ticket ^* !" ££&1 He \l" knew S arnh Holder, from Alma Murrell. they were in Lmton s handwntf (4) On March 31. ,9-„. being %  ", H, a.£ £^ '£ £ £,,' !" ", n l£T. "H".^ tAt the time when the books and hail the 1951 job but could not money were stolen Linton was fulfil it. still employed at the Factory. The To Mr. Ward: I have never :••. UII><. H I ""•' !" nKM showing payments to employees, jag the 1,51 crop he wu a n....„ -„,;," u .r* w „ two pay lilts for employees; a Edgecumbe Factory. Union called cleik or servant of Edgecumbe Ltd.. with Intent to defraud, made or concurred in making a false entry In a cane ticket book belong. Ing to Edgecumbe Ltd.. as employsame day 9,915 pounds of sugar cane, valued $44.27, were received from Sarah Holder. Mr W. W. Roe e. Q.C., Solicit. General. U pros cutin on behalf In The Legislature leslerttav COINCIL i I. .-ti I.I pnstsV ii Tit* Clwli inlorn.d 1h. ll.t HW SS.fll..w > ll I Counrll (rum Aa>-. II 'o SWplrnti' %  S Tt M4-1I*.. Ih* ColonUil S*ct*< |j|-y pmpittnl iTirHjf 'ruin Ills, KKc*ii>i.-t 11.4OeeeriM %  -. %  111 to i 0M it-ni, ! on lH-K.ll ol H1 M..J4-.I. Ihr i^.-*!.. TIHHPI.01* llir (-...(mial M>. Tnttl*. Shiiii>h.| *• .1 I-.. I-. .( Ow li4inpald ov~r to in* A.., Ihc Sac %  CUM i>^ 1 % %  -n."4"'f ol %  Brin.n ; 1... 1 at bv %  c H tea %  Pglit-c limiiii U SIM March I MI %  M i:i>rirrt Cnalliror vrnanlra a nrlltiun (rufn Ihv tviri.i '-• irm ol ifw u'anii MrswaaS Itiona Ob|#clMri to III* Saudi Rrpoit ""0 p.**in* thr Council no' lo paia thr %  1 b p>-Fd b* Th* Other PUrr The rod ka %  %  Ua \m .ihr bin l!t. Th. Council ,-..rfl an ... 1 >f rrardin* a ' %  1WIM..< .1 .... i.i.. %  Pan A"H.tiaau Thrt'ounc.l .ilj ......1 .l 41, HOUSE Ti'.Hetan i .'' blr'ha'r oV Ml 11 !>i 1 il 1 %  laid th* lolloslim paid OVIT 10 th An Curial by th* Comnius f'nlH-r diinni th4qiiait MM March. !• Dt Cummin, aavc notH-r ol t reioliilloti to p'ace Hit Ml* al th* diipoM. %  ( in* aovvrnor-lii-Eaanillv* < >iniiiUt*t> to auppl*mnl th* Catimatn IH2-S3. Parl I. Ck.rt*r' aa .JMHU. 111 th* Siippl*iii4-iil-ri raltmat*No IS which rorn„ th* Sch*d.l* titht> Rraolntloti Mr. r C Oo-ddard tablad a Petition Irom th* Cmmiulonn< of Hiil<*-. -I th* Pariah ol St Jam*! to pa Ihtll tnp**tor o( lli(lii\i a iiiihri Mr GMdai.t of a Bill which wan lator iad a (Ir.t Urn* lo llva authority 10 11,* %  •t J..I... £ %  %  authorlali (lovvrnmrnt in l*aar 1 iv"*. S4 %  . r.,1.1 bi ma m. joicph .. ,.i„. Raaoh aiithciiuti* (ha V*,ir th* land Irom th* Uovn nnxnt Rraolutlvgn to appro v* art amandnxnt to th* Civil btabliahm*nt iTaachvui Ord*r to thanf* Ihr tltlr llimiVK'UI t>r NITHITIUN to Intp*ctor ol v 1 immbti • • Irinal* haadl.'BilnTi I to m. and ih, rrem ana i too Jn,. pi, lh. rtnllouar paaard .1 !•< for aa.*a0 lo porchaw .. .hcmH-al loan I Kid* and minor sQuipmvnt to be uacd lar the af ih* awa.' buf -id -m p**t which may become a aaiiota* 1 ivadditional .•if in IBM in. HI. • Tan OiparlH inrtinriil ol Vitrnt %  ra ..1 ihr Attorn*-* <.. %  ilfHrc I r*-. th* Houaa paaaad %  in Hi. , t.. $2,400 VOTED tO CHECK m:.\L\ me I AurK-ultur.BfaS WvHncd "*p OovfaiiiMDl thai evi• ) bvpt'n found i( in o| SO a>M*iaUon of 1 .it and -'n %  *iacla, li pot arrrstrxt at an fasrl) rtaj*, itcrumo a serious >uar %  11 K Hihad drawn BttanUeffl and •" % %  . %  %  %  %  in the IMS—-J rartlmataa and which 11 was take without delay. IU %  1 • %  • UMJ jaltu) r mj ir Uv %  'MIM.I"'.I.iu b contnUfad, and n tht n< Hat pan UMJ MaoluUon Mr A. K. S. LewU tLl ohnervvi-ii that in previous. UutancfN OfW tnUllli ii % %  • sand Ua Ri-l "f Iras lHpaitiifiit abroad to %  to kill pests, bul vcr> oQan t<' n.rutination wlilch the.. .vas of a highly tnchnlUna Hi. onintuiatttf) I; i tm the action they had taken on this occasion. Mr. F. r.. Miller |L) nnphaslse^ the ImporlniKt' of the augar industry to the economy Of tht island, and 'Xpressod UMJ vie* that the *uin as verv had haard thai tba bus wai IUEI IJ f" n;\,.. ,in,i ra whelhei <; %  •• %  1 linn ..fter (our yawn would raturn U tiiiMini 4'"i mora iiifiii-v ti spaful in anfJuMUfifj UM paal aflai it had spread. Hie I., o 1 five later the sam. evening approved o| 0M tion. Rrfn .< i-alllnp -,-."7.!" Mlwo P^ u !" Ior %  mploy^es; %  tdgeeiipioe raciory. iainiwi GWIMH ^~ rW\t (.mi %  m ar %  nrw:~.tiEiiih fT 1 Journ.l: two tradesmen books; him .ind asked him to draw some W^ i fko L* m r | ^h% m*>M k0 f *-s o f •** fc X^ a av% *s^ Vf--^1 a 1 1 ^ .* zr&^^&tz, syj^y SS^JS %  £ an-aA. .a-JBB speaker itireatens to IName Mottle) ^T'tl^^S^JX^lTl man 'or IH.-asvu.ts rates; m .ll to Mr, M.yn.rd „ho_pld h,n, Ih4 r „_ _. u. !" ,„ h „ w hrlr rt ,.. ,„„„„.,„ „,. „,.., „. .,„ ..,„„.. ._. peasants — w 1 liolders book; purchase payings, money. He signed "IJone; Har<"books; the receipts. One book was wood"—hi' name— and took the counts on taM indictment. Each count waa a separate offence. In ^S^Jl'L^^tJ'^ fafi' toun7o7the"oilce:fhe"ortginal money back to Unto... I Jicauon or accounts but the falsi„„„ ,,_,,-,. „„„ _„, -„,„ -,„„ ..., r ,. v (ltH fiiation alleged was on different diites. All ihe counts were similarly worded except (or the fourth. First wltne** for the Prosecucane tickets were not stolen. They left Tor his home. were in my office at my house. Did Not Read Ticket Tiie carbons of the tickets were He said that he did not read li-ckod in a press in the planlathe ticket and did not know In tiMis office. There were no signs whose name It was made out HfJ amount cash or Ii i i money lion wiv Mr II it,,,., sib.*.* '' s "' p Ihete we-r no signs wno se name it was made Man HUT and AliuimA of VAZ* "' ,,p < !" Wrw the windows or doors could not remember if the cumbS Ltd A,, 1,u > r &,Rt o' the factory. Out of cop season, *-,* paid to him in OH m the keys to the factory are kept ,-heque. He had also d '. .. .-..„ 1.,.,. U.. ., l. L by the senior overseer on duty. He i "Mr. Gornett. a shopkeeper. At this stage the luncheon per.od was taken. On the resumption the PiosecuUon offered Sgt. K. Parris for %  Mimlnation. Ta Mr. Ward: I made an examination of the building at Edg1 ibe Factory. I found no eviR Iph Union he said, employed at Edcccumbc since .1MB. Union was then Yard Over. k 01 '* tn ** kQys ln hls room icer and would aasist with the can I could no* say IT the factory weighing. Two years ago Union was p'ope.lv locked on the evewas appointed cane weigher. r.ing before the loss of the books. Responsible for Weighine These cines may have been deHe was responsible fo receiving livererL Alma Murrell's amount canes, both from plantations and represent about 13.26 tons of canes. peasi.nts^He was on th • permaThis represents about one and a d of |t ^ms broken. If th i( t rent staff and received a monthly hJ.lf tons o gug^r. If the canes bu ,i dln w -, nroperlv closed n. salary. were not g,ound it would be J !" u l(| Kct into it All the He was also rcsponsiblo for effected n the juice. 1 did not arUc i -Ucged to be itolffll WH ai ranging the nel.very of the Eet my chemist to check the juke. vk ,. „ from U .e factory office. peasants' canes and he would also it was lumoureJ th d during that N witness.-.were called f.r arrange what days these peasants c.op people were stealing other ( cf( llce bu UotCO aK shouii send In their canes. peoples canes. It was also alleged lyil ,.„ldence on his behalf. It the peasant was I stranger '"at they were sending in canes Ral h UnUm s;ild tn-t he rehe would seek sorn.. higher auin other people^ names. 1 warned M , Ebene7 c r He was emthority who would uglrt the window. reclatration of the vehicle and the A,m Murrell of Church Vildlstrict from whence th* canes lilgp Sl : Phll, P:. sa,d lnal ahe any pea.'anls canes ; to boost up the crop. When a load of canes came t- the beam, the driver of UM tffJhlce or any of the hands wno worked en Ihe lorry, would stale to whom the canes belonged and J—. were made on ac^5^SwSB were brou^t. ^ "" """ — %  ' l^ll?l£?I& t & ££ He wouSi weigh the load and has never worked lor her. cul "".f 0 ", wci h "' 'Ji' 'i nc Mr. Ward: Neither Keith t.cket. After the canes were t.ak<> Bishop nor Eve.ton Norris has to the hoist he would wigji the 1 know empty lorry and al-o record this eight on the cane ticket. On th? were brought. This entry is made ownod land. She had canes in duplicate. growing on the land. He would take out the original Sent Canes to Guinea and give It to the driver of the She sent her canes to Guinea vehicle On presentation of this factory and received 5250. She ticket the canes were paid for. never sent any canes xo EdgePayments were made on ac' From page 1. he makes that reference to the Head of the Administration In to Irreverent way? I will auk the Reporjer to read back nil notes, and if the honourable ini-mbi i persists In making such I then 1 will Mmrj him. and when I have done that, this House will then have to make their decision Twice Mr. W A. Crawford rose, once on a point of explanation, and r.nain to enquire of the Chair what was the irreverent NterfDOa made by the m.inU-i lot Uaf C'nv but on each occasion. His Honour, rapping his gavel, and in a firm voice, ruled the member out of order The member for the Cltj again attempted to *ii(|iiire tlic nature of the irreverent raff*, in >\ man His Honour warned the member that he would "nam him If he persisted in thr Mm in which he was speaking. Mr. Moll ley claimed his rlgl is as an elected mcmbri of tl t Chamber, and said he would not be "bullied or cowed", and challenged His Honour that "you mii'l speak to me as a gentleman and not in that tone. 1 will not lx bullied" His Honour said he had drawn the atlentlon of the House to tinbehaviour of the honourable member for the City, and said he would "call upon this House If the Honourable member persists In that tone, and 1 will "i is The honourable member will stick 10 the subject of th debate" Mr. Mottley suggested that "ft might be the echo of what took ilace on the last occasion whan the House met. and His Honour again warned him to stick to the subject of the debate, failing which he would ask for a motion pc.pli ,--..,.I b] the House to show theii di.maintain his right _. pleasure entaUve of the Mr. Mottley r)Olnd thai II. I d ni^.t.vu n Honour had a cf n in t d htm of someir ha said things that tiing. and add. on* who held oppordta views to tu i pa* pla win, could %  v ;.,| n ,,i iiki-. ii rol) ba diivm." .IIHI IMHO, ilnca ha had to UaMn !%  mia hO0 In to: tint t Inn >. It Ult he himself di || %  i %  Bo r of thi HOUM il times llir Honour I.ip* %  • HI' inter ti >|>i,ik Of Ltat but as Ills Honour tpolM, ths rm 'Hiii ramarkwd In an aside I CB0 and get li;ick in ih. MOUM WIIIJ.%  me "' Ttnslon had grown high dun .i %  %  %  tn. i! had frown, ii arai i %  %  %  Hv i Honour's warning was ad' would i.cre.ii it m good Faith, but of etaMn, Mr. SsMte hlbits A and rJZSfHSl M inal u I, J read: ev;7dra'm; canes' for" me wner. Alma Murrell nnd contiorra. I then shown ExExhlblt A talned other det-tils. cane ticket he would also wne He ,ald that that ticket wu Sarah Holder of Church Village, |he name of the owner of the the original which was handil St. Philip, the rext witness for vehicle, the driver, the number of back to the driver. He then pro>he Prosecution, said thai she no vehicle and the d^te, Before lies of land duccd the carbon copy of the owned e. 0 same ticket which was In the ol Church Village. This Imd was ticket book—Exhibit B ThU was P' n, ?d in canes last year. Sh in Union's band* the load i jighed. he inspectvl it to nee if it w;is clean enough sent her crop to Guinea Factory to ^ ^"^1^ 15. duruig the einp'oyed in 'he and OR <"' %  ''%JP rJsTJzM ^^^£?'" nol receive any money from Ihe premise, lor BrvlfMown He m mtul %  atW Ka '" h '""ban.!', name. The out! d % %  MAO ,0 be pal,l „. S£ M,„S^VXaNiU .iE JSS phm.a.'on. •. • 9J.4i rell, Mavnard and s IK „e,l by Mm Tha ,„, onlv on e vl,h uve name. rs. ....;. %  -~• „ c |o „ : UM bank. .. s r h ,„ „.„„. ,„,, h dm „ m. and en •"' %  ""•" %  S', !" "" n.r n >T r ","' r 1 '"him. nol receive any money from Ihe premise, for BrldiMow n. ,hl^.iT. """ hr '"">"" Edfeeuml* She did no, know ,f Then. w. a ror.lar %  •„•>• the tleket ., pre,enled lo him. ,„y„„e used her rue. She did saw after Ihe lockinl up of ,h ir." i" r, mem b'r who not give anyone permission to do f.etory. If thi. IMS left c rlv c,.r, brought Ihe tickcl Anv per..., ro would a-k him to do the lorklr," can present a tieket but the She said that her husband has up hut on that evening he wns eheone i. made out in The name land at Vineyard i.nd he sent his 4) On Page •TO-NIGHT At 8.05 Ml <.l.i:i.| lll'NTt: will again talk over Rrdlffualon on Ihe . Mibiert THE ISDt'STRlKS WK OAVE" The topic wlU be on Toultry an an Indiiatr. ^nd hould prove la be of great Intern.) to the -111, ..I llllhhr ly i ; Hfll i ii' .IIUIK with -. Uu kind Uv if playing llilds for the MMtit %  Of anybody wnoj %  ..I llieMplaying lir.ds. lithmight he was quite in OMai lo suy that any> ne should team I i .• ttu I 1" i>l< III. Mich rel.-P in i n %  All he was saying was thai h 1 ..i %  %  %  .. %  i.'l in these playing K > I i %  i. r ., % %  ,. %  %  u,. Ihoi Community 11 11ivtn < % %  iiiv.n > working man. and the .... in eneourafM lIMrn would < %  << l y first offering them what the % %  i ustomod to, I iieh ai Ear* KfM of S'IIIBI, and then Lramh off to other cultural activities. You could not < xpect to bring. people to thr Centres of th Ar itcultural workers type In 'Barbados to discuss works like Shaki .. n Virgil arm iha IUH What he was saying was that he though; the Serial Welfare Office, who* %  alary was just increased should go out and mix among at seme of their functions, ana set how b-sl the other cultural activities could be lnu Mr. Mottley concluded by asking % %  noon ii Nhmiid bt thought that he was speaking u%  %  : Ihf IIHi of the Aclinllilstrahoii Whon he was only making referent e to a nmark made by Ills Excellency at the opsnlng of the Btrgtant'i village and 8t Ooorgi D afraa, as he. Mr. MotUfn did Bi-flffCUrla 'hat UM rilltilUv) ... UvttlO "I the paople must b ihwas onpnnd to ranpnel thai Chanand the dlgnUy of Uwl CharnlH-r. but he .would always j Lorn Dumup'd II right rear tyre of the i-iotm rtj II 177. the proiK'rty of Mr I.. Hi.rrison of Fonlubelle .Lnu.gad whan lhay euugtn 0 mi Arthur's Hill about 1 11 ih luintd out ,i put out UM In, Al Lna tm.. ut uuin iha UKTJ drlvon down Arlh • %  sugar. FRESH SEEDS \ M.I l Mill A Fl.OWHt WKATIIEUIIKAUS VWOMMM r-i.ii.Ki'. i t, 9m Uttuc*. Squash. Tomato. Cress. Tliyine Celery. Mustard. Chinese Cabbage. Parsley. Cucumber. Onion; Leek. Hroeolll. Swiss Chard Kohl Rabl, Turnip. Pepper. Spinach. Vegetable Marrow and HF.ANS. Pole Una a. Stringleas, Bountiful and Kentucky Wonder. no win. /.INNIA (Ciant Mixedj. Bnapdrafons, Marigold. l.d.iia. petunia. Carnations. I'mk < andytuft, Aster, 1'hiox. Verbena. SaUla Chrysantheniuiii. S eel William. Koige: n ( iiii rpgti. Masturtrum, Lupun. I I | Brute Weatrierhcad Ltd. HtAD Of 1ROA0 SI EVERYBODY'S WEARING IT! Tat*1 Now 29 in. at 61.42, $1.56 and $1.58 Yd. PYJAMA STIIIPKS 31 in. al $1.00 Yd. Fi.Avni.i.KrrK 36 in. Blue , Pink 83c. Yd. 36 in. White al 81c. Yd. fill. SHKI'IIKHU A tO.. LTD. 10. II. 12 & 13 Broad Street. AUT0BRITE (NEW SILICONE PROCESS) CAR POLISH This ontirelv i tm prrxluct contains 4% S'i.icones which impart a Klara-hard Polish mi|>*ivious to toTToaltlau rain, blisterinj; sun and corrosive salt air. One application will ive your car a nlcaminR mirror-like surface which will last for months. It's easy to use too! Just spread it on—then wipe it off. "AUTOBRITE IS GUARANTEED TO OUT-SHINE AND OUT-LAST ANY CAR POLISH YOU EVER USED. BUY A BOTTLE (5/6) TODAY! OBTAINABLE ONLY FROM— HARRISONS SOLE LOCAL DISTRIBUTORS DIAL 3142 or 2364 FOR A SMALL PREMIUM YOUR PROPERTY HURRICANE. 1 till s II it I II f INSURANCE DEPARTMENT A.S.BRYDEN&S0NSvj AMA/INL in. i iivi HV, Alr-wtck, -ilt< unplriunt irut'-T iincll. cvm tie Mrutigrti ><*>king inicll., iialr '••lMK>. uunc ||.batl.riaarn .llirll. Il kills Hrm in ihe ir. Ii actually nukn yoor bfaflM imill (rnh ami ckan. Air-wiik <.untaiai chl'Vinflivll. (he %  vBfnajM 111 naiuir iha' keep* all gffMrtBg planii Irnh and giern 11 lui il other natural compound! loo. Air-wiik i *u iimpltHI UK. |U*' unicrrv, the cap, pull up thr wuk. plax* he boiilc >n a lug), ,hcll above the : .iiicll. Sm^lii vaiuili ai tl li • %  11 igii Mr-wick S.IIP Agents — INTERNATIONAL TRADING CORPORATION LTD. Catfttiif* Htrffl :-: Dial: 50fl EMERGENG. • •>.# Ihtit Ihf IIII, I ,4 •!,,, %  ,*4'gg.Vgg /* I///,/ .... ,/,,/!./ KlfP A HANDY . 1st VII) Ol I'FIT Oat) 9 II ,\ s-.-i ALSO II.AST,,IM AST |-|.\STKKS I I 1STOPL 1ST STRIP mil ssi\,;s J. 4 J. ("OTTOS WOOL II Wll Mils. ETC Ml._Kv.p TOK( II ll\TTI HIES "v'l'i" .-'%  rweh KMI.IIIS Dlilli STORES — All Brairhrs J


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T WHAT S ON TODAY Mtvtina „t (tairtjl Bovd 3obU* CIMM, H*>wood Tart. St. Prtrr, TJO pm Fee the MUM Owl uck. aMliunc* TJ-.njt the >ronl< (hat r-,1 r-. !.•„(-. for in(uiuta in Ihr dlat I ran do Italia ESTABLISHED 1895 YtSTfcADAY S WtATHtR HEPOjRf .lnfall from C odrlwloft M ii tainUU for month *> restart*}.M SB, II III IIA I IOV : Gom "*£•" ffy made in rresi by Adams M.YPl New stronc man's army asks for new legislation f. It" IIIW Martial law ends: Country on quiet note %  fh||h \X Boy King Hussein gtinR IU|U>1 ^ home to claim throne GOMES AND BRYAN ATTACK ADAMS 99 "Trinidad Is Bright Spot In Enveloping Darkness rrmn trur Own Correspondent LONDON, Aug. 12 jyflU. ATiBKRT I.OMKS. Trialdad Labour Minister today gave scath iiiK >'* %  ]> %  > to a recent BtatemoDl made by Mr. r th,British Caribbean and saying thai they alone were the cause of the go slow policy in federation, Mr. domes said: "Since I have been in the United Kingdom, m\ pride has been nonriahed by the knowledge that Trinidad iregarded nan :i^ the bright Bpol lit the enveloping darkness < %  .' Weal Indian crackport politics and craay economics." Because he had regarded B.W.I, unity as <>f paramount importance. Mr. Gomes said he had consistent !v refrained from entering into verbal conflict with Mr. Adams. But he could not allow this latest barrage to no unanswered. Neither was this an isolated incident. Mi. Adams had tried his best to make Trinidad the scapegoat for slowin ss In the federation movement "But I repeat," he said, "we in Trinidad intend to develop our colony along sane and sober lines and have on all occasions been first to declare our Intention to participate in any constructive efforts on behalf of B.W I. federation. "One thin* we want to avoid is self governing insolvency and subsidised self government" Mr Oumrs s.ud that U.S. LEADS OLYMPIC PARADE CLOSING CEREMONY GruUey Adams itsnad the SB SC.A.C. report but later repudiated it. Ill* two malfl reasons for to doing said Mr. Gomes were; I II did not offer n .r). ul..-. The number of Mats neeessary tor the rUrthrranir ul Adams' B.W.I, polilfral imhilion and 2. II kUKimted Trinidad M the c .in LI.I l Mr. Gomes added that Mr. Adam--' ideological arm im-i %  camouBaa*. Th. nwtl that he, Gomes with the Government of Trinidad' was not an inconsiderable element i *n Adams' attitude to the OOW IH-I nent of the ooforu Public Utterances \ Mr. AdjUB8>0SBS4 to be friendly I tSttaSa to me Ihe day il was appointed leader of the B.W.T Sugar iviegation in 1950. He continued, "not only dkt h.le.ive London a few days later but on his return to the B.W I. his publir utter.illoner in* London. "And it should not be forgotten that Mr. Adams was thi only man ho laboured assiduously to prevent the B.W.I from obtaining mote dollars for purchases from Canada. ll was he who submitted the dissenting report". "As a result of all thi*" he continued. "Mr. Aaams has lost the wpport and goodwill of many B.W.I. leaders. Knowing that his chances of occupying the pivotal position in a federal IJ.V4.I have diminished, he is no longer enthusiastic about federation and is searching for arguments with which to justify his innate distaste of the whole idea." Nothing Mr. Adams could do. however, concluded Mr. Gomes could deter the BWI in their solemn resolve to achieve a workable federation. "The ball is now In his court. It's for the governa On Page ft. Foreign Policy No Campaign Issue In L.S. By DONALD J. GONZA1.F7. WASHINGTON, Aug. 12. Senator John Sparkman contended Tuesday that the Republicans can't possibly make foreign policy n successful campaign issue because it LS too closely identified with General Dwlght Eisenhower. Simultaneously, Secretary of Bk la Dean Aehcson said with sca n s, sarcasm that he Is surprised %  1 the recent attack levelled against the administration policies 1 abroad by John Fo*ter Dulles. Republican Foreign Policy adviser. The Alabama Senator and Democratic Vice-Presidential nominee told reporters that Eisenhower's ioliin shaping present polie* has "been as great as that or anyone else". He said he was aware that both the Republican Presidential nominee and Dulles have made clear that the? consider the conduct of foreign affairs as legitm... in the approaching campaign, liui he doubted that they could mate their criticism stick. Ho said: "I cannot possibly see how they can make a major Issue mil of It. Our foreign policy has I been based on u priority consider> atlon lo Ihe defence of Western %  Europe wthlch has meant more or; less holding, acting and a less ag-' giesslve programme in the Far East"*. He said Elsenhower "certainly has been the spearhead" of the European programme. — V.T. Speaker Threatens To "Name" Moltley TWO WAX HOT OVER REMARKS XBOIJT U.K. HIS HONOUR the Speaker ul the H %  maty, Mi K N H Huobenda, censured Mr. E Bsnloc Mi-mbci tog the City, for "makinK urrsvSffSitl ran to thf tMivt'rnor's numo" during the debate OR a Resolution in connection with Govanuasnt'i roods, M perches of land at Buthtfhcba to be used a* .. playifl* We, "d warned him that if he "persisted in the tona In which he was apasking," ha aroilW "r-inie" him for a \ its 11 cansun by tfaa House. Mr. Mottley. durim; Ul remarks on the Resolution, made an observation 'ii the remarks b> His Kxceli.-ncs about the Conununltv Centres batruz used si Donee Hall-. od thai the Head ->f the Ml ihould learn a little more about the eustomi and habit-, of Bar%  .MI. ins lii -t before maklttg lueh comment. Hi Honour interrupted the 110 IY THE UNtTIO 1TATIS, the flags of Ihe 70 nations that sent (1.780 athletes to Helsinki. Finland, appear In nnal parade at the Olympic Stadiui'.. marking the tSostBg of Ihe 1932 Olympiad. The leading nations were; the United States, 615; Russia, *33\i; Hungary, 308; Sweden, 267; Germany, 171; Finland, 12'<; Italy, I5tcu: France, IMV4; Great Britain, llT.sadCtechoilovakJa, llSla. (/nlcrnotloaal Radtophoto) NAGUIBS ARMY DRAFTS ANTI-FEUDAL LEGISLATION Greeks Shell 2 Bulgarians ATHENS. Aug. 12. The Bulgarian-Greek dispute over Gamma Island flared up again on Monday when Greek frontier guards fired on two Bulgarian soldiers who tried to reach 1 be tiny island last week. 1 rmforcements were sent to ihe area after nhots had been aehanaad when Bulgarian troops landed on the Island on Aug. 7. After more gunfire last week the Qteakl IfllMtBaCad that ihe Bulgarians had left the Island. Both enuntries protested to the United Ni i:. m sllasbaa ti al iswraaatoia. Hussein Will Return To Claim Throne AMMAN. Jordan, August 12. KING HUSSEIN of Jordan, 17. will leave Switzerland next Monday for his homeland to claim the throne from which his crazed father was ousted by Parliament yesterday. Advices from Lausanne, Switzerland, said Hussein will return to Amman with his mother. Queen Zein. However he will not take up royal duties until his eighteenth birthday next Spring. %  in gents were sworn in before Parliament yesterday to aci in 'he King's name until bo becomes of age. They aie lbran: i '* %  i "I 'be Senate. Omoa Suliman Tukan. n.ember of Parliament, and Abdul Kahsnun Rushldad. also a member of Parliament. :'.. %  limit and redistribute it among Egypt'* th luaand^ of ^DaMemdhoJdera mid land I-v* .iiiurullural worker.*.. The aimy also called for a minimum holding of two acres to present the parcellini.' out of fund into liny uneconomic plots. I i %  is owning less than two ores would be prohibited from selling any part of their land or dividing It up by iiiluui.mee among their sons. Strong man General Mohammal Naguib in a communique said that the Army's land reform programm. was aimed at narrowing the wide gap between rich and poor and at shifting large amounts of capital from agriculture to industrial development. Further Demands The Army also da regulation of land \< .i I i ing the distribution of profits on ,i basil or two-thirds to a leaseii 'en.: Ui .. l.illil owner Establishment of rural Committaea including a member or the ludiriary and a represenlativr of the landowners, leaseholders and agricultural workers to rule on the questions of landleascs. wages, and hours of work for peasant IsAouran limitations of bind tenure to %  mild affect ;i few hunin .I land owners who Iff tbl heart of the ruling class in Egypt Some of them exercise complete over hundreds of thousands es of land Slid MOT 1 i Of villages and farms. Full Agreement General Mohammed Naguib. Ihe Egyptian Commander In Chief. announced here to-day that "rnmptctrunderstanding and ttii* agreement of view" existed leiwaan him and tha liov.-rnment of Aly Maher. The "strong man" of Egypt J new regime made hi ConsiuYralion CM C.iastonis* Union Postponed JAMAICA, All The Jen nent postponed further consideration of %  I osloms' Union in UV M W 1 b'-eause of a majoi financtal lmi lie iiioti The d %  tii.it the matter which was slated a.-, a dissension or the !> the month should l*e (uither %  t igjad i" h ksptiad. I ci Bustamante, %  adar, laid to-daj i ii %  i %  must wait federation or the British r.mi.,M area. It will not '" %  Customs' Union outside the framework Of fi- respondent > GEORGETOWN. Aug 12 Government confirmed the outbreak of bovine anthr-\ Plantation La Bonne antsnUon Sugar Estate on East Saa Coast. Demerara. The area was placed under movement restriction order and ne livestock were permitted to enter or leave. Vaccination M I within tba area hi proceeding and every precaution ii being tal.r %  c spread of thi i'cctor in an extra ordinary issui noving rrom po*er the supporter jol the Official <>steUw> ordered no a* Ameicsn imperialists, Talal. milk to be taken out or removed. September 5 to Septcmb —tM*. from the restricted area. J His Excellency the Governor hai ..[ipoinlcd Mr Grantley Adams CM.G. and the Honourt.il. M A Cuke. C.B.E.. to represent Baihawith Premier Aly Maher H< '•">'"'J 1 "^' 0 porter,. I Ballad OB the in 1-mdon with departmenta oj Premier to reach an underrtandthe United Kingdom Owtin^nt ing ronefrnina the demils of cer-l-n ">• %  aubjeet of Canada-West tain mailers Indies Trade. Mohamcd Aly Rousbdi. Ministrr of Ju-tire, said that the Agrarian refoim programme reported to have t>een submitted by military headquarters was now being studied by the Cabinet. The new Minister of Agriculture, Alphonse is sworn in this afternoon Ifore the regency Council He .vcompanied by Aly Mahr —If.P. It Is expected that the discusons will begin on Tuesday, Sepmber 9. at 11 a.m. Photographer Kidnapped liy E. German Pot ice STiK K1IK1M. tJermsny. Aug. 12 in.'M East German "People I'dllee'' <'*r-oid man photographer wo was about to stuip pictures according lo thi Uavariasi b*atT pohw. West U*rmn oTfleksiW eaU i*t* tinpiii'togrepher was slanding some 2a nxotn* inside West Oerman territory when granlied. Tlie Id when DM I irhnieiviiig ( %  (iiiiiiiinii i DOUa i aeroaa the frontier, the In assistant on th,. w-si Oarman of ii Tha poii 1 i-i-'c.) tin. t Mir <|>r and %  %  I J Japan ipproavshed ;\JMM;I Warships Tha Katzai B Inqulrl In .I.II bavlni IOCYO, Aug 12. Nihon ] | Hi../il %  i.i PakMtan Rave inBdi I IptsUlkUOSj uniLS jbtlil, t .i rships con 'i ii< t<.1 in •>* Member fin the City, di %  ItanUOQ to Kule 120 of the Hules of tinHouse ot Assemblv hieh stales that no meinb*.-.* may use the Governor's name irreverontly." and said that in his opinion the member was using the privileges of the House lo niakirreverent references to Mis %  ney the Governor. More His Honour could rewne His Chair. Mr. Mottl-y t.aid tM would always abide by ny ruling made by His Honour, to which ills Honour rapt* d I bopa when the honuurabl.nan l*r ays ho will abide by .. rnll'i,: of the Chair, it is not merely Up MMvlce." Ml Mottley attempted to re ply, but Ills Honour, rapping hi* i:av-I evei.il times sain. "I can assure honourable RpSanben of ihis Chamber that 1 will enforc* to the 1-csl of my ability as long a 1 remain the Speaker of this ancient and historic Chamber. Its dignity and rule very, very firmly." Tin. N, nior member for the City said he t-nuhj not see for one ninute that he had referred to InOovetOOt hy nanii'. or iriev.i rntly. and asked, "am I not en* titled in this House in debate tn efe to the Itvud ul the Adminv itrt Tatar to th tratton. as T would rater head of any aiu-r rVpartment not hy name'" I*.. %  chine i.t con of lbs Rulei Of the lion . Mr Mottley said' it 'no SMJt1 to go Into the rule BOW and ^..^ that I iiinnol i.iy tinHead of the Admini'-tratioii. and in a much calmer lone of votee added, "as I lake the rule It Is true ir Your Honour feels that however you interpret Mi.' i nlr it is t.> be taken by members, well then, hut I am not prepared to take it so ,i. I h.i\i not .. li.M'il t.. the Head of the Adninlatratlon urat erentls Mi Mottley began to quote from the lelevant Hule. but Ills Honom Interpolated, "If the honnurablf memlior wants to ask my ruling % %  ;.(! then make bis own. . Da yon think lhat any Parliament oi Speakei a> tn-lng iiiti-lllgcnt. uid A %  i "" 5U.N. Admits Red Charges PANMUNJON. Aug. 12. The United N.iti.m. admitted that •In all probability" Altn.l M %  lay and anal • Iha IfkCadent tn .i ttrtttei the Communist charge. S' Uakson officer Charles W. McCarthy said: "Our side will make < ontimied .it % %  I rba aate araa hattJad to Hi.' Cianinunisls al a moetlr. liaison officer* Exi-ept (or thi* meeting, there was no activity at the truce camp. The truce talks are In another one week recess called bj the AJltaa, KM loird auea In . ossUIJ weeks Major General trnilan K. Harrison explained he proposed the recesses because Reds have offered i...thing new in dead!.-k. i u eusslons on prisoner exchange I p Eden Is "llupuicsl Man In The? World" U0MD0K Aug. 13. Koietgu Seerclury Anthony Bdao, the hajipiest man in I-ondon," will many 32-ycar-old Miss Clarissa Churchill on Thursday ouiing. ii was ..unouncod on The earssnony will take place at Iha muat) oM Cuxlon Hall regisrv office only three days after the i.nouncement of their engagemenl MI ..I IAHKIOII society and ovrrnineiil iiu.iiteis Tha 55-yeaTkl diplomat and the blue eyed Uonda iiiei.' ,,r Prtma Wiithbm Cttunhill aiiiioumed their I c*i Monday night. Tha couple "ill Bs t" rutugal on Friday morning for ,i hurt honeywi there. —u.r. The journal >.,.wi thai shipbuildbeUaVo that l>ecausc of it will I*some ima bafora tt %  Japanai. %  %  %  i %  I that tha moat n .HI navy, which appro K inatnaiau 1 radlng Ompoj y\ "i ine poaatbUlty of buying six I "'"i lot .• 100 Ion two 400 ion troop] 4IKHI ton cargo ..ft. and ona 1,000 ton lowtng Cm jt4M Egypt's Taxes To Be Increased ( AIIlO. A Jii. 12 %  %  Emary said on i\iaaday that the Egyptian id decided to make slight all rotDKJ creases chiefly affecting iho*e igh income taxes. t r :-o EBe In Hent Vi'Hve In IfadflO MEXICO CITY, Aug. 12. The newspaper L'lUma* NeUclss ild 30 persons have died m ihe ast five dsys at the border town f Mexicall due to a aft yw. It said report* in-i hlldren and nine adults %  I the peel which pa ihermomeier as high as 118 Irgrees Fahrenheit.—UP. "Eva Reran"i Natae Of City Or Slution? i N08 AIMHS. Aug %  > When iiu provukota] laglilstiirg • h .'i;.. iha DBaa 'if UM cily of La I'lau to Eva Paron, a small orohleiii arose. Tha Oan.•r.'l IIT n ., Hallway, which serves Ihe it>. already had a station I -. Paroniha altntatry of Trnnsporta has soKeil tin problem. The station "Eva Peron which ]. on ihe outskirts o Huenoa Aires, has been renamed "Side Do Mayo"—the hlrth.iay of Eva Peron If, Stevenson And Truman Confer WASHINGTON, Au. 12 PTMldent Truman sun,;:. -. r. %  -. f '%  Adlm Sleveiuun lo the whtl.. Hoij*> today for .1 hrifHInir an Hi.world Mtuutlun and a man lo man talk oil the political caml>..iii I..' II.invitr,! ..II tho Pm to a luncheon In honour of Sti-vrnaon'a Mi.n —or. Itodies Removed from Plane Wreck Bahama tadakhfre rOKMBk PRESIDENT OF 'i no r JANEIRO, Aug. u. „ ^„, ., Iteei^bi'd I ill Nov. HAMBUHO, Germany. All* 12 '?•" • "~" dratn-erulser "Goodhope'' n-ports E *Pt I it all the bodies of the victims lermor Alonvi Pujol arriveo PARIS, Aug. 12. Supreme Allied Comnvnder C-oneral Matthew Ridgway ill, to Frankfurt Wednesday for conferences with General Thomas T. lermor Alonao Pujol arrtvan nar („, t Handy, hl-j deputy Commander forfrom Amsterdam for a four-tl i( an( j wi j| ^ States troops in Europe |visit. Jle will tour Germany ..•. Qown ll( ,„ (,,. Jan,.,,,, this Headquarteis sald_ also that plans to go to Frankfurt anO weak. Tha stratocrulsei 0 from Baden. He may travel to Francs trashed in the Brazilian jungle on 10 i before n-turnlng to Cuba from ..April 29 with the loss of 50 live*. * European plcasurv trip.—I*.P. —U.P. Ridgway will vtaft Turkey NASSAU. Aug. 11. Acting Governor Frederick Southworth tonight recesaatl the legtoJature until November 13th after the signing of nine bills Including a niil authorizing the sale of Butlln's Grand Bahama Camp Willl.ini Imrui and his American ,i ... |ata



PAGE 1

r f PAcn six BARBADOS ADVOCATE WLDNESDAV, AUGUST 13, IKS Leg. Council Send Resolution For Fire Brigade To Select Committee Members Ask For Plan For St. Cecelia Barracks TIUU;K iiui dollar tat il Bridgetoyni. .t new Fn %  -uihrsinwii and_f equipment loi the BntjadC. Thk. 1 con .ETirv-M Uv • neutral igtoflnwiM Fire B/iKade service wt ^expressed that the amount of money to be ex1^* taken %  nd Salvage Equipnwni t960). In addition to thai u.. Reference U all these and why nHUBJ ihc money en. mi..., they are needed is contained HI ihe 01 rlicatl < \, %  Report of the Fire Officer which UMBM tinrrMt-ITT ivouid twn.n' "'* 1*U1 uit the 10th June. In his pmurilv there was no reaaou why Annual Report the Fin? officer ,(„-, w.ould not have raised a loan mentions that the Reorganisation ut payable within a reasonable the water mains by the Waterworka amount of years. He agreed tha: • tha there should be an adequate nfe It for M rv iithowever. would lion v. C. (sale said that m. building a! si CaefUa barrack.', had been a nrlvW live thousand, MITM hundred %  t a new File Station, D *P". rtm,m lH **"**<> position without *ivm: Are fighting purposes, i town ..nd Speii>htstown r ire M B word or two in expi-nat... % %  I tius; At present some of thi il .it theii meeting yeatvrda) hfdrslnt m the tentr^ at tt* for* It had'hSin tequinl I <•IU1K.II hut although there WJS <•'"> •*• hedly *ued and ctnaf emmtnt. Thortwenl[el i p r m 1 To e\u cannot lve bedroom* the., and 1 "Lsential to the islnnri vet ihr** obuUnea ; ndc T t,w proposed not tee how there could be room ,e %  •eorganiaation some hydrants will enough for the bandsmen or .nd put in else, bout 35 to 39 and then the inempendedjTOs 90 Comparati iy Cnnsiderablo Inat the Counwhere, so that when the new bors of the Fire Brigadi il had to be satisfied tha he site proposed for the Bridgeappliances arrive, the water supWith regard to the site it v.as Fixe Station, the t i-Uiest item in the scheme was I* position wUi be as good aa not far from the warehouses an I Ihe bfXC&at could be <>b uncd for the funds proposed to ** n *• %  "*"**'• J"* **•/ these busyiru places of the town r •• %  be ccKptWed adjustments' ia not expected to be King Street entrance would racUiIt \v> %  %  % % %  <.**mnei\ nnally deem to BMaOlx %  1 1 It will, ( think. I e admitted 1 eaarvaUon Bridgetown fi> %  tmaTJi Inadequate heavy. tote an entry on to the main A sum of $17,040 is also pro,f lt was considers th..I M pio.'orred Road would be too congested. n> • the 1 %  Hun ; i> L, r,.. aagMlutlon In pgincipssi 0111 wan.- time is the only tinTnp'c >'" %  *• has also been conknowo 1 siaered out this would entail exAt preaant the llrideeUmn Fire "' " lv ' liisitlon of land. The Kiieade Is accommodated In \ Uo m % %  'f* 0 on the site in ".inly knadMaale premises i.'Mil. now known u Ihe vlded for the erection of a slngl appliance FinStation „, Speight, lown. which Ihe Fire Officer ..li regards as a high fire risks fa the samo reasons, on a minor sal .1* llridgetown It ihis inteniimi whwu the now fire appliances lo t.ridgefaiwn airive. to Drag) .'• .>ne of the old ones, to Spelgl, towi^ aud a his Repoit sho*s to "">> 'nvoived that the sue pr4%  nan the SUUon with part-time P<"*d w-s the b*.-' Firemen In the sain* was as %  *•' H * '"^^ OI *** ""W •**> done 111 small towns in other could be committod to such sulUble site has 1 expenditure and .iiluw a I underatand. been found. •>* > Pa*s for a uttle more. It would not bo a matter of The Answer suoi.mg ihe ship for a hap'woru> Annually recurrent expenditure of tat. i"he Fire officer had menis dealt with in the next Keeoluuont-u the Jubilee Gardens' as too tton. but Honourahle Membori best site. He lound hui^eil n should also bear In mind that, as agreement with Hon. Mi. Huts %  ; stated In the Fire Officer repoit, thai Uiey must be convinced ln.it it is the intention to recruit 14 thai was the best "it* in the u additional permanent -.taff for (umslancea. Bridgetown, the Initial coat of Although he agreed in prnoeiple which will be of the order of he thought that the Council should ,m ih.. l ... aW-OW P r aunum, rising to about discuss tha matter In Select (.:..!„ird^Sn' 1? wasthought "o oe 14 000 in lnp cour * Ume mltU and """^ ^"" M It may be asked why these the money was being span! ED come down in adbest advantage. few • %  green" suerts" left t„ ,h>ii, vance oi me many which are held Hen. O. B. Evelyn thought that v.reel. which Mniajht was too small, %  sVoiule Tgltl Fne Ofnces raajaired i^u x 180 the Bl ot which en Ball bu >ings and a pan of tha OOgt of $80,000. Witii ragagrd ha %  ssafl 1 rl up .11 Clo t Church. Ill M had a^%  senwater too. Tin .. yag no OMttioi. of trying to put an I 3* 39 Fh-e Brigade at Beracks with the bandsmen without tafe bitterest obje.'.. addition the firemen b called out at night. Tinrean hrt loii • Snail* inferred to a Select Comm %  %  Oale. %  '-J-l.llll t ..II'I. II ilnaks Coliur-boiHKIEL. Ocnnany, A-g. 12 K.ur; Carbian of 'Flying r^iterpri*e fame"" crashed with his %  r to be damaged in a quly wst al*u ihat the Go.ernment strai aware of t e un-at actory oondlUosi "f the bar ticks occupied by members %  I ire Station would be considered as soon as .he Fl e Officer, whom the bf Stale had l*en ak-d Kg, uriived. No I .1 %  .lilies orn the fact*r of accom. t'liuusnees of whi h Is "ust fttod l.y the fact that the lo in fact .-leep acroin n the Police Barrack*. : t e age no facilities on the sp-'t to trainf and, what is moat mi1 oriiint off all rro-n the :.!• protection, the existing appliances, good though some of them are. do not the aggregate water per minute which Guper.r.tendent C up for consideration with the if the Jubilee Gardens were conFive-Ycar Development Pro%  idered the best site they should gramme. The answer Is really pronot shelter behind the suggested vided in the opening sentence of that they would be taking away my speech, and In Superintendent an open space. Bridgetown w is Cox's prophecy, which the Fire not 1 h.wn of nlch bui-dlng and Officer supports, that u wideapread there was no %  carrity of air. Faillontlagration in Bridgetown ia ing that they could use the open that chamber The CenFoundary Site) which Go** tatlve measuies can be InUoduced ernment had already acquired it in time. Bridgetown baa traded on a considerable price and whkB its luck for a long time, but luck site had been claimed tit has a habit of suddenly deserting building a large Government buildthose who truat in it alone The mg because of foundation dlfllaiety of a vast amount of valuable ultler. Hen. J. D. ('handler wondced who was going to pay for tne expenditure. He had read the fit* prevent Bridgetown ... .uate"* and In 1950, to u,,^'l ,. ^,^1,^ , S vitality, at stake. It to in order m^ . ., ....HM^. —l.-a I.U.. AOin IIUUIIIIO the KCW.lUtlOn Staled juflusiLl RiMnnlnivn I. !" „ thai th. proposal lo, the transfer -i-*?^"!^. i.? fe^L .t5 Brigade Act and It provided tbgl nf t^e Fire Station to thl,s site %  n rin a ihe te of Caatrioa and h( Vestrv of St Mich | rait the arrival of the new 2-^5-^ W _L. l, 5-Li. nu Ra *' luUon DU 23 of Ihe cost of the upkeep of the fire Brigade In Br: I Speightstown somcthm" | I and Holetown £10. He thought tlial %  that Fire Officer, in the meantime the "•£.**? Mnt d ^i „ has been used fo, the ^ Sir 1 move tnal he Honou.abc Other purpose for which it was. C< 2S^!f n ? ' *Jj te ~ l u 'Ixxight. that is. tho provision uftf """^ F C Hutoon waa aorry IUI accommudaUon lar the '"*' ,he - no plan showing Band It is only fair to n0w ""V ( ,ro P ose l ;.i:. 11 '.^— n .nd compared the dri' linv dr the centre ..t tha Chj Keqiiirrtnents The Fire Ottleei tUU set U I tea i ind the File Office Major Craggs. who assumed du.y in March la ye after ZU ye.i • %  pant in the London Flro Brigade .Da Matl.,nai Fire Service, regaui % tha requl.eme.t f. r adequate protecttba to Bndgetuwn. I UTnierstan l that the present ppUanees, which consist ol a Me> ry Weather self propelled pump bought in 1040, two Sigmund trailer pumps bought in 1K43 and 1046, respectively, and on of which has recently become cut of order, and one light Ble> und t iler pump, can between j them produce a reputed maximum of about 1.800 g&lons per nunutw len is m fact, owing to tho I LutOO trailer pump M tune Ihe plateweiv submitt-i -oue of the others, i Commlasloner of l*aUcc i .ikely to be more like 1,200 I b " Furthei details on the in' "rtlal ..though provlHlon f .dequacy of the present appliances I ""'K < "**•* 'n conne ana of the present premises of ihe ^ ; ;l, c Flve-yeg, Deveto leauuuarteia are to '" Progrnmrne anJ in the Heport of SuperThe sum of $(JH,360, wh %  I'.UX and m the Report broken down, Includi i, Otnear, which waa purpoac appUanoa i$i8.6t). r (TiT* Ho-iourable Chan er Ua tanoei i (.913,700) ni :h 10th June RhUge .-., the,,, ($7,2to> F r some yea.a the queatio ot Salvage Van (3.120). 15.001) fi a suit ble ntc ha p esented dunot canvas now(tiiiwi). braath>lty, and the e has bean dis. usIng BpparayttM ($I,AI4), an itaorhethar it woul te tileaiiv drawn compressor if their one crop had .spent a great dent ol thTM imy fniled. In investigating four site B.W.L Sugar Pours lulu UK Makes Up Fo; Australian Deficit Bv BI'TK HIWBS LONDON Huge quantities of sugar from the British Weal Indies are pouring into the United Kim .•nimmer. As much B.W.I, sugar was imported in the months of this vear as in the whole of 1048. latest figures show. it is now sppareni Briusa West Indies will be the only part of the entire CommonK hith lo come anywhere near quotas set under the Commonwealth Sugar Agreement. Australia's sugar crop has failed and imports from Australia are oM'-nfth of last year's level Mauritius has sent much less sugar to Britain than last year and none at all is recorded as having arrived U Sa/t Africa or Fiji. Yet 232,223 toni of BUI :n the United Kingdom from the British West Indies between January and June E ired with 147.441 ton1 | ,: oard of Trade figures show. Receipts from British Oolana, recorded separatelyare up from 46.539 tons in the erst half of last year to 63,003 tons In responding months of 1932. Figures for May and June are typical of the way sugar from the West Indies Is flowing Into Britain's larder In May this vear, the United Kingdom received 76.837 tons of West Indian sugar. eg against 30.162 tons In Ma 1951. From British Ouiana, u • IpN rose from 9,238 to 13.473 in v I June receipts sssrsj dnw n from Ihe Miiv high level, but were still well above hW June They totalled 12.911 tons from the West Indies and 7827 tons from British Ouiana. as against 48 803 d 5.204 tons respectively In June, 1951. Australian Sugar U.K. sugar receipts from Australia fell from 126.155 tons In th iliit half of 1951 to only 20.374 in the flrtt half of this year. From Mauritius, sugar receipts slumped from 117,020 tons to 80.809 tonsSouth Africa supplied 18,775 tons U. the first half of last year and none at all this year. In spire of all these failures. however, th B.W.I. effort has lept Britain's total sugar supplies from Commonwealth sources from Jumping too badly. They fell from 156.030 tons In the ilrst half of 1B51 to 428,759 tons In the first naif of this year, a moderate decline when it Is considered that the huge burden of supplying Empire sugar to Britain has bean -houldered almost entirely by the British West Indies. Indeed, in May and June, thanks to the efforts of West Indian producers, U.K.. receipts of aanpire -ugar were well above I I levels. Total sugar receipts fri Mio Empire were up from 6Z..S4 tons In May. 1951. to 90,610 tons sj On pac Canudiun $ Up MONTREAL. Aug. 12. The United States dollar MoiiI at i discount uf 3 20/2 l-ei cant nt terms of Canadian : from Friday. /.I Ihe .lose it took 96 I H Bl B t'aiia.tiaii to buy SI.00 America". fne pound sterling. $2.68 11/1A ml/I fi n* rj The Canadian dollar was up I 32 tent at a premium of 4 1/ 'si par cant In larma of Unite.) Stai. funds. In closing foreign exchange 1 ej Monday, the poui.d %  tcrUpe was up 1/16 cent at ga^fl II 16. —C.l\ a@yTQ S C A. The Genuine "4111" EM de Cslome comes from Cologne on Rhine; II is now ae-nn obtainable in the original quality, mai'e wording to the famous and secret formula since 179?. MADE BY THE MONKS Of SUCKfAST AB: FASHIONED ^4t FITNESS *aesMr „.. Men erf action fall far ever) time. The soft. •* w.nnder-c.i*e of AertCK ipeciall> • ci for mfatumt :. Ihai i why ihit %  ali i underhody at on.. lemp-rature in heat ,l Aertensoea-ty to .. >ecpiu iaap* at all j I I uut algal %  uui.ln. Bilncka il Br"ni"li"l" or Astbm.. ruin alecjp and •nemr anoihor danifhoiit liylT.tf MF_NOAfO.Thl.lTWi. intFrnal medicine works Ihru th Mood, Ihuu Kaohlns lb* br..nohl: o.ibaaand lunfi Hlarla holplnf nat ur ImmedlaUIr l" remove chlcfc. nick) mucus, Ihuu •l!rvlilnr cuusblis ami |,rom..Mnrror broaulng aad mor r^fre.blnf -l.-p Oat SBNIur. %  rn your hotnln today. Quick aatt (aUon or mwity back fuinnlMi. Pains in Back. Nervous, Rheumatic! Wrons food, and •rtrwnrli and fiaouoiit a itrain on th? Kldn* aad Bladdor Trouhl i uma of Eirp Aclili.. ifMa nuinlii* P">-|i kli HhruniailaiTi. I'uffb>LI-U. an.1 {••llnjt eaj l.rVr. nn> ilm. M'fp jt>ukldnv, |,rlfy your blood wllh Cyl !• %  Tli* vy Sril (In" -lart hrlnlni >our kldn*>f cl.an out oxer** acldM thl* •rill qBli-blv ni-Vvon f>H Ilk!>•Under Ih. nvoiwv-l.mil (narant — C/llf ii 'j.l ulUI. (ompl'lrly or c se*fcing"o*t Cyitirrom -ear aajL ^.jCystex gfejjg flNGER-FIRE TOUCHES YOU/ diaries Mc Enearney & Co., Ltd. PHILIPS Variety RADIO-PLAYER mmmoAMAAt WMW nucm SETS WiTU HIU SET FEATURES • Atlraclivc metal finished Plastic Cabinet AMonisliing sound reproduction l-ivr Rimlock" VaarVfal for high sentftivily • All climate proof i Beautiful Cabinet • Five tubes • Short, medium Hi long wave ranges etc. YOUR DEALERS MANNING & Co.. Ltd. 4284 PIER HEAD DIAL



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R IRBADOS M)MM \ I I WEDNESDAY u (.1 ST 1.;. Mil y CA& C ft .ilive of Hriti h IM been livinn in KMM Ume.'hafb % rich tenor To my mind taalfl vensjUla tod sing; Hihas .-.pfieared In programimlad and %  lot \\ Man there To ln| classical places composers and lovers to a spclittoti of "Granada" hv AuusUn Una -hich hi Short Holiday A RRIVING In the colony on B w.r A inidad ami Miss Cynthia 'vis rome over to % % %  % % %  hoUday. Iflai a Ith a Shii n Port-of-Spain < %  • i first visit to the During her slay hrrr h< N %  %  i aj toi -on-Ba thing. For Two* Months POCKET CARTOON h. OMfl-.fc!iaA|\i \> I Enjoyed Hojiday l "l-m tod Iro Anuv.i son Mm who I.olthe past two Mi. and :.iiKnifht i %  ooata ni Mrs Knight, m section (M.,,1 C,[ \*1SS ELAINE BI.OFMKN %  Grand*Oil Company in Vene... ted imjMii> Ihc (.ul? (il Corporation. He said :..i hi. i .*& u very iv and arc looki visit. For Three Weelu fc/fN AND MRS WIIJ-IAM 1I Met AKTNEY uf Trinidad l bad Barb.ido: on several pre. iously. Annual Vacation A ..HIVING m ihc island Sunday by B W 1 A from Grenada was Mr. Wairen Thorp*, % %  •n of Mr. and Mrs. E. C Thorpe of BjiKhttin. Black Rock. Mr. I iiorpc has come over to spend 1 annual vacation with his laro. IU ... M %  '. %  i i toys' Secondary School in St. George'* For Long Vacation L EAVING Ihc island on Moo by U W.i A for Puerto Ki< v an mute to the U.S.A. %  ..-re Mr. and M; ttord", Belleville. Mr. Lit he away for Ml. will remain for about four months as the guest of • Lu> la raturnggj home on Sunday idmR twelve Tubby Hubby Waists Lose Up To 4 Inches In 12 Days Final Re/tort on Fiti'-on^iHlirl full m< 1TANLEY TANNER (weigh in) FOLK of the bars ol ute Dally Ixpreae Tubby liuLbv c.u., .,.. >cricrUay — cvi-n 'noughmhi> %  now %  freed IrOBD thU l2-,i irnming test. Thg live Tubby HuUbiesAavc ut an average of Mb. eaeft "i they have loM up lo i Here an ajn* -• quotes:— Harry John It's boon fun, and I am going carry on with it fur %  ggithsji 12 days. The only snag has b**'ilunch, when •d to go without an ;cin in the lulet because the restaurant gould lot supply it. 1 have been a Uttla more tiivJ ^ %  4TfHn ... ^.. H a-: -but that is oecau.* I have b. ill lrOU L-UTiaHl before lost. 41b mid-way list. lUilb.. after Ust. 81b. loss 101b. inilN JOHNSTON Iwttgb ID) belore l-t. lib.nustway 13sL tOlb.. altar lJt. I|(b.; leas 1011b. DONALD OLOAO iwrigli ini before 13>t. 4ilb.: midway iat. 'JlhsftT 12>t. Vjlb.; lass Wlb. WALTER lil'.ATRIX Iwcigb In) befor? l'2st. 31b.; mid-way 11A 131b.; *ftr ll I and Mr W r. Harewood i v eaa r a. Cawasaa Road She was accoiitpaiiicd hv her llttlr son Bobl I!.Ii i %  ; .. %  i'.-; Jsnette who had come ovei artth SSJSl nd Pori-ofChacral MasfoSM who Is workUTJUMl hoim in| SrMk UU lmperi.il College of morniog by IIW LA Tropical Auriculture will be rating about two weeks' mainlng for one month while hi r Barbados as the guest sister Norn will lie spending two I works with the Govt Mrdlcal Storr-of 151spenaei Daring their stay here U Ite guests al "4tency.,,n' Worthing. For Two Weeks ARRIVING in the colony by t\ flWI A. frOW TaVinlda.1 luniiK the Uet weak was Miss Uargnrct Corbie who has come iver for two waefca' holiday. Miss COMA MORE Corbie it Secretary to the Minisemployed % %  pending M this is island. Needlework Teacher her second visit to She Is staying at LeetonI location Tiinidad. and during her -.lay here will be Stay%  fMi . i roft". worthing. First Visit M ISS LEAH WESTMORELAND who Is employed with [ntdrnatfonsl JV radio %  smo oral last week by B W.l.A. from Trinidad for two weeks' holiday This Is Miss Westmoreland's first visit to the colony and during hrr i ,v hone she will be %  doing more gai says that with my new liguie %  Jiall have u buy a new SAIII apo < Waist: before M StaaUWy Tanner Do you kno buys roiaAt t.othuij; Tm pleaaad thai i .h.di ...,; %  with the diet. The '.. 1 have already lost one they have bean amazed tleanuig the car alter before 4* 1 fU-. It', Jaaa Juhnstiui There's no doubt about it. tii diet work.. Uui. oh! II thuae couple o( bfjOi ended. I've ealen tu lOD, that 1 twl that I've go; Sbjri • obit. Mifl even if I did got bad' "in. i | Vlli iiolimmei husband that I feel like repeating 'he iliel. I'm certainly u %  Brit time in my hi, i : rYiday night I c.ught Usi .printing 75 yards. (Waist: ne%  %  %  i 38ins.) Wfll. that i. Hoofficial end <>i hit Tubhv Hubby i-• Bui thousand* of famllleii ,r. -till uslna the diet at home Listening Hours sat All M*lr. • 4 (N p tn Ei I Oatfy arr>" D m SMldy <4>< % %  ar>*i ... DLTha Hvnuy W M(. • ae p >i kcotnui Mnnlm. Dn" k&' KM ' rta akxind Up . Prosrunfn* PuM*, 1 OS s • %  pm Hum* N*w> frot. I IS p m C*lUn tSf WM IndMa. I > *u itow. s ii P a-*uerl. IN pm SUi" %  it, S 4ft p m liiln i .'!. B SB p.ID r*.^r Xhm Esllorl>l>. t OS p rome over llarbady. for Ihe flr.lllme nd Mr Aubrey Hu. for one monlh'. holiday Durlnn an !" P|o>' %  '""'*" J2 at i l, of Mounl Standbar stay here .he wUl ba a mast • !" n"Ssh ' %  %  u "" at Laelon-on-Sea. Wbrthlng Sloneyrrofl", Worthlna. BY THE WAY ... By Beachcomber A PHOTOGRAPH of an M.P oaMall whlaperod logelher for a sliialnR "Because" at a "dammoment, and Anally smiled, and Miurtrntlon show specially designKnyo up ed to sell British goods in North 7~/ar nhnrki'if pnlilh'ian* I, one thai .InnS.TOBMALLV ,-onstltuled people i,,l -.Mslng mice for [\ |, kl ,„ ,ee Ihe voumf e„iovl.,ve Played all to. , ncms ,| v „ ^i w ,5 cy c ,' n ;rt,lrt !" -, PotolI nowiKtaya. But Ihe Whether Ihe Americans wUl bo „^, llclc „, „„. ^buunle. ,lanc%  ^ST* 1 b> "^ 'SS? f J""* <"S "" K" 1 "!! 'o theatre, "nd eiv^th^jT ^SS^u'JSS" %  "• S loo much for some of r.r„,r,.l nt SL !" h S.JT""' Ihe politician.. Onibby bohemlan ..^ruj-room balUd. .. ,„^ lf nk ,, m nol ,„,.,„ : ,r',:^,*cips:*f"; *£ • w "" •> %  •" %  -•• %  fog-horns or roller" I "-HKHE la .. campaign afool l> ie. r.i the fanii.TN of the Middle persuade people to mak.* Minister could their own pun. bj living pltHna. 1* induced to sing "Where My It is, according to the FiK>d MinCaravan has Rested" at an export t^try. a matter of putting |'*g Th* Dansant, trie potential Arab plums in a warm place, the warmtn .iientele would be in the bag. acting as a drying agant, and con. ( verting what was, u it WCra, l '-'''* ?• %  liigfinvr plum into a prune. The pracl %  C OULD nol the British Council moment at which a plum become* devise ., schatM for .ending .i *' prune, a a wa n gl n g plummlsh I M.P.* to sing the "Hlacharacteristics for prunish oneA, watha* 1 oraaorio in Japan*' Sample ma >' be ascertained by : oilers "nild bo given away after plum which Is evolving into .i erforn.ance-1 while Mrs — prune, .iml wringing it out. II Casabianca." there is no moisture. Ii %  prune /„_^ ,. „ (or else a dry plum). If • UmprodmcHv rilll moisture It U a plum r lifeIhiimtilir n-ii-hitiun* :; x u,S "SJK m ^r^% 24. !§tff !.-• %  : ~" replied "Then if the car falls nto the water, who throws thii that machinery with a fast working-rate Is more of a strain on th> worker than machinery with slow working-rate, and that th rid tire more quickly than th young. Suiooiboys from behind the it to know all lafiul Uauloii buses and coach.-. They have been sa n djim thci. riquirics to a Kingston onThanies iiiutor Hun, which niaXi tna vr-melcs. ever since a Hun•i-irian boy recently wrulv for %  atalogue of motors and a badge. The badge was sent off. and we thought that would end the 11.alter. But not a bit of it," 108 ni in said. Things went lust the same %  ts if it had been a query from .in English %  "> %  hundreds of requests followed from the same urea, mostly worded alike. The Hungarian boy showed Iht bodge to hi' friends, and ever since they have been writing for one just like il. They have even cribbed his original letter. "It Is a pleasant thought that. 'Iron Curtain' notwithstanding, tmys are ban 'he world over." —L.E.S. SI A VIEW GUEST HASTINGS, BARBADOS Dally and Lcigterm Rates quoted on request. Permanent Guests welroaae. Dinner and Cocktail i Hue. arrangeg. J H MUCKLAND Proprietor. The Garden—SI. Jamf> rO-HAV *jm I *4 M*0 UIDMI.SAV Marok) I.I.OVD A, %  I U, I.I.ORI BAKBADOS AUl'ATIt' CLla\ (Members Only) SATURDAY. 16th Aiigas*. ItSX. at %  p.m. WATER POLO b FloodllghS and DANCE RNOCK-OCT FINALS. SNAPPERS v SWORD FISH Mrsslc by Anthon> Henries and his Caribbean I r...il..oi..iM ADMISSION: WATER I*OLO 2DANCE I 10.8-32—4n Paw Wednesday. AfaJBaa IX 152 •>|t Look In 11 Qnd what your outlook I TiiF. SUMMI:KS HARRY JOHN: Iwelgh In) before last. 101b.: inld-way test. 41b; afUr lost, lib.; loss 91b. GLOBE I" do .nil (,i in (.45 MtRS Ol / Tyrone I'lWKIl DARNEL — AND — etmssiK Ol SHVHK W.tincr BAXTKK V,-.','.',-.-.v. CROSiWJ.lO #'E:E5 r r L. If 1 1 J* __P 1 ^L r-' JEL-ZZ _ -•'• 1. Oesjr ror tn. plqu a Pui n iiop in bi n/.'tl !•[ lllf Jlllli; %  i 11 How ths V.U*, ol 'Ml..II. I u Travsltin .1. ill.', lid VUWBIlV 111 [. IS) • nd i. .' i orm 9 .'-'. In no*[r U m UMS %  Nouiins could be [>Ulnri M .'. ioi aw yvba .,.;,, >. UMil.iitt'' 'Ml I %  I. Convrfor oi a. ililin r.iy i> i ni *^ is v.l I HO Mil *S M41IH '.'. %  .'.'JSS.:'.'. f.l OBI For Klshl. Royal KnterUInntcnt Pn-sont ItAFAKI. SABAT1NPS % C A K A ti O II C H E* From Friday. Auaunt I54h. 3.aa) and 8.30 p.m. : I W/S tlOlll.t rant sm \ all %  ).< %  '• fin differeni .... iinwilier, wno tnrowN this **w „v ... tyre to the occupants?" The Inter„*-.,,", ureter. Tut 'Tut. confused matters !" , Slating the Burmese word sc if & r tyre as "blood-orange." The Furthr r.'i dlffi %  >• nroad Tl rn Und • ra difflrult oung man to adjust hlmfast-worklng machine. search may even revest > Matins work*l T*-i '.<• H n OUciMllieo CUIM. |S| S.i V . 1 sManf.' 70 CENTS %  " %  class iTH.iTY noiH 70 CENTS 36 in. RAYON PONGEE SILK 70c. iU'* • White, Rose. Royal Blue, Green. Qrtj Chocolate, Sky Blue. Gunpowder Blin •: POT :DRESSES. UNDERWEAR. SHIRTS'. PYJAMAS. ETC tin...i the ThrllhiiK sirac from "Hrar^mourhr" AT 70 cents Will 11II INS YOUR SHOb: STORE DIAL 4220. ONLY 70 cents #i 40 on i i / /// i # # v EMPIRE ) DAI al I IB OM 1 -.,t MOR i,i srrtNgss I Mf,MI A IIIMORRO.. Ml. al SJS roi I R U VMI.H I I.T ro fsnt nevn. Wllh ^m WANAklAKKJI OLYMPIC • %  •— lot. •.! IB > IIKI'KI v IOI n\n \1 VSTtT ON. t mill DgSBIQMQI lit B I tftl ROXY III I llll I NO ni '• (Mill I. HAVWAI'l loM..I'.,,u i IRIIIM i is a %  ii (Itann rollli H • SOI to OM I <4 v-. ROYAL DAT TOSIOBBOW t m ||| •ma aacsurr or at rvrs WIUN Sl.rrrt 4mll.> Tb.niFtI i wo iiMiii -m .M.I R Sfl MR hlKSAM UarnnsT 1>.VMKBJI ENGRAVING JEWELLERY & REPAIRS Also Jewellery made to order • We now have our own skilled Jeweller working on the premises which guarantees quick deliveries and reasonable charges. Y. II. LIMA A CO. LTD. 20 Broad St. Phone 4644 a which your liuii-day comae and according lo the stars. ^ oil inrluences. ctimuakt) wsrer* HSaixa zl—Aaeal IS keen judgment, good planning are needed AND used. Author:., scientists, secretaries,JaV ajj rtrlal trades favoured. * * w. TAUKTJ1 lould be pleasant if not extravagantly^ April 21— May aOiiicn-saful day. You should advance some, but don't reach for impossible heights or insist upon immediate money returns. 3^ ^f S JSJgtSJ ^"/ '* Mm j,, !" n Exctllent Mercury vibrations. This is.* YOl'h d;.j Ml W tail th.* capable, ambi-^ ^ itous YOU. Investigate, study, research' Brain workers and most physical tasks sponsored. )•)^ OAKOBa. * T* Jons S8—Jmly sashould %  prolllable, progressive period for iron work, plumbing, building, hand-Jg" ^ ling vehicles, tools, etc Artistic matters lc*4 stimulated but can achieve. • • • aYour Sun advise, caution in hazardous .i.-i lot Don't sDil leel nil are recep-*ga* live or will nut be imposed upon. ^SVIRHO ^ %  * %  Aug. CS—Sept. 23 Happy, prosperous outlook. jBe equal toV rraoon.ibltdcii.,.nd>. take advantage of new, good offerings. Venture some when &f you can add to income, security, family *L happiness. ^^ * Work hard to further wtti aims and oLi-*aV Day not overoxactiog nor too ui. but beneflc influences prevail %  nd you can glean their good. Dont ovcr-'sf. LEO •fc July 34 Aag. 2i LXBBA Sept. 24—Oct. SOOXPIO Oct. 21 NOT. BAOITTABJUS Not. as—Dec. 22 CAPaUCORN THWUS! ROMANCE! MN6W (SaftrSC ERICPORTMAN laorenci! HarveyMvia Uauton XSSI— c A M E L I A PLAZA ^BAHEES (DIAL 5170 HtlllAV 4.45 • 8.J0 I'M A oonUnulns ttlure pa A if A BT0WN FRIDAY 2.30. 4.45 g g.30 P.M. ronUnuIng to SI'S. 4.45 4 8.30; do. * Slightly restricting influences since yester-Jfr day only tend to make this a better day for brain work, conferences, industry* * if lendly aspects going lo very beneflc one er midnight. Without trying to force -ults. use your best effort. Gains, ad-]fl> ncement to be had. M 7£ M Dee. as — Jan. 21 A ( ia. for stimulating accompliOimeni, JV • %  making new, valuable contacts. AND fln.-.hiug tasks. Brain work, physical prowess ^ both favoured. *gL AQDARIUS aa? "^ w Jan. 22 — r*b. 20 Today responsive to sincere endeavours. vspecially where smart thinking and plan-Jfc ning back It. The unusual in management can bring fresh gain. * • 4> Another fine planetary day in this shouldbe progressive Pisces-month. No matter w diffirult the job, or the day's general)^. i make advancement. PlaOES %  ft i^tt-Maaakab,,,. YOU BOBN TODAY Strong character, innately brave. ^ honourable, ambitious, sensitive, above pettiness. Curb ten