Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text




ESTABLISHED 1895



Better Days For U.S.A. Predicted By

IKE PROMISES MORE AID FOR OLD |
STEVENSON: LQGWER TAXES BY 1954

By ROY

Republican Presidential
promised the old folks Satu

CALVIN

WASH:NGTON, Aug. 10
candidate Dwight Eisenhower
rday he would help them and

the Democratic nominee Adlai Stevenson was portrayed
as looking forward to reduced Federal spending by 1954

although neither candidate n

1entioned any precise amounts.

From his Denver headquarters after a Conterence with the
Republican Congressional Tax Experts, Eisenhower issued
a statement saying the needy aged should receive more

Federal help in meeting the high cost of living.

He held

out the same offer to “support and press for the adoption of
legislation” toward more financial help for blind persons,
disabled workers and dependent children

Associates of Stevenson elab-
orating on same of his recent
statements said the Governor be-
lieves the American people musi
bear the burden of a heavy Fed-
eral Budget for two more: years, |
but he expects the military build- |
up to. reach a point where a sub-;
stantial cut in government spend- |
ing may be possible by mid 1954. |
These spokesmen added that Stev-/
enson also believes Congress
should not start to’ reduce the
present tax burden until a transi-|
tion to smaller spending is achiev-|
ed, They said he has no opinion |

‘as yet on the amount of tax re-

ductions that might then reason-
ably be expected.

Within the next week Eisen-
hower is expected to be oriented
on farm problems and he and his
lieutenants are also expected to}
make a decision on whether to
make a serious campaign bid in
the South. As for the South. the}
heayy influence of tradition and]
some conciliatory moves by Stev-
enson appeared to have damaged
the optimism once felt by Eisen-
hower advisers that their man
could carry several southern
states in Novengber. Nineteen Re-
publican leaders from nine south-
ern states, will meet with Eisen-
hower at Denver on Monday to
discuss the outlook in this usually!
democratic section:—U.P.





Britain And

U.S.A. Consult
On Tran |

By K. C. THALER

LONDON, Aug. 9.

The British Foreign Office stated
on Saturday that it is in close con-
sultation with the United States
State Department on the Iranian
situation and officials disclosed)
that a new approach to Premier:
Mohamed Mossadegh is under con-!
sideration.

But Britain and the United
States have been unable to agree
among themselves on thé nature
of their joint approach to Teheran
and on terms of a proposal to help
Iran avert a complete economic
collapse. Britain is not prepared
to sanction economic aid unless it!
is coupled with a ‘reasonable’:
settlement of the ill-fated oil aie
pute, because oil is the foundation
of her economy.

The United States seemingly
favours speedy measures and Brit-
ish concession to tide over Mossa- |
degh’s regime until a more solid)



Naguib Wants
Police Force
Overhauled

CAIRO, Aug. 9.

The Egyptian Commander in
Chief, General Mohammed Naguib,
called for a general overhaul of
Egypt's police force, Naguib who
came to power by a coup a few
days ago, stressed the desirability
of filling security posts with police
officials, not government officials
from other departments. He said
that all city provincial governors
should be chosen from _ police
ranks and pointed out that: the
present governers are mostly mer
from the Ministry of Justice. He
also urged that high Interior
Ministry Posts be given policemen
rather than to Ministry of Jus-
ties officials lacking police experi-
ence. Naguib prceposed that the
police pension age be the same as
thet of the armed forces, or 55
years. —U.P.





Ne Compersation
Until Debts Paid

To Iranian Govi.

TEHERAN, Aug. 9.

Tran will not consider the pay-
ment of compensation to the
Anglo-Iranian Oil Company until
the company pays up $137,200,000
which Iran claims is ewed to the
government, according to semi-
official sources. It was pointed out
that national front deputies have
repeatedly charged in the past that
Iran owes nothing to the com-
pany for the expropriation of its
property, and that on the contrary
the A.I.0.C. is in debt to Iran for
the vast prefits from oil transac-
tions made during the past half
century.



42-Hour Mourning
Period For Eva Peron

All business, industrial and social activity came to aj,



| field, Massachusetts for passing u

| Italian Crowd |

BARBADOS, AUGUSF.'%0, 196%,



From All Quarters: |
Set :

Attack False |
King Farouk |

Rome.—A fat Italian comedian, |
Foldo Macocchi, disguised him-|
self as Farouk and caused a 4
motion at Porto Ceresio near |
Varese in North Italy. The joke}
was carriéd out on a grand scale
The comedian was preceded by @
nining American saloon — car,
driven by a Negro and full or)
luggage, with the royal coat ot|
arms. When the hoax was dis= |
covered the 2,000 crowd took it
very badly and tried to attack the|
comedian. Police took him under
their protection and escorted him |
to safety. {

New York.—A_ guitar-playing |
detective posing as a blind beg-
gar. a woman tec posing as a

*

a labourer anq drunk toured

New York district for ten days}
to gather evidence against a drug)
suspect, who was finally accused
of having $112,500 (£40,172),

worth of heroin. The money in| ‘ ‘
the cup was given to the poties | Results Af
pension fund.

Milan,—Under Italy’s land re-}|
form plan 2.250 acres of unculti-! A Glance
vated land have been given fre~: O H DAY
to peasants near Pisa. j A
Washington—A drive-in c'nema) FOURT





Cincinnati,

near Ohio, offers a) TWENTY-FOURTH RACE
sunset to sunrise programms 1. Apple Sam—Thirkell
showing one cartoon and seven;| 9 Paerie Queene—Holder
different full-length features, | 3. Super Jet—Yvonet
Rome.—Italian. Air Force ace! “TWENTY- RACE
Mario de Bernardi has invented 1. Seedling—Lutchman
a one-seater plane which is a 2. Betsam—Newman
cross between a normal plane and 3. First Admiral—Yvonet

a helicopter and which will use
a motor cycle engine of 10 h.p
If the engine fails the pilot will
start pedalling and will be able
to go at a speed of about 30 m.p.h.
Bernardi has promised to demon-

TWENTY-SIXTH RACE
1. Lunways—Newman
2. Landmark—Holder

3. Firelady—Quested
TWENTY-SEVENTH RACE

strate his» plane flying over 1. Gavotte—Wilder

Rome without the engine. Esti- 2. Blue Diamond

mated cost is £250. —Lutchman
Washington. —One of the most 3. Joan Star—Yvonet

abstinate strikes on record in
America has ended at Whippany,
New York. Just five days short of
one yeat the 800 workers at
a cardboard factory went on
strike demanding a 60-cents an
hour wage increase. Now they
are back at work—with 10 cents

TWENTY-EIGHTH RACE
1. Cross Bow—Holder
2. Top Flight—Lutchman
2. Mary Ann-—Vvonet ,
TWENTY-NINTH RACE
1. Abu-Ali—Yvonet
2. Doldrum—Holder
3. Darham Jane—Crossley
THIRTIETH RACE
1 March Winds—Quested
2. Rambler Rose—Holder
3. Cardinal—Crossley
THIRTY-FIRST RACE
1 Harroween—Quested
2. Red Cheeks—O'Neil
3. Castle In The Air
—J. Belle

an hour more,

New York — Stanley Mislak
paid a five-dollar fine in Green-

stop sign. His job: erecting stop
signs.



Teachers Leave
For Conference

The Barbados Delegates attend-
1g the Biennial Conference of

BUENOS AIRES, Aug. 9.

standstill throughout Argentina in memory of Senora Eva ,the Caribbean Union of Teachers
Peron as a 42-hour mourning period for Argentina’s first |to be held in Trinidad, left yes-

and comprehensive settlement can}

1ady who died two weeks ago begna at 6 a.m.

terday by B.W.1.A., for Trinidad



The end of the 27th race, Gavotte winning from Biue Diamond by a length.



_—
*



GAVOTTE WINS



Eder atta nang L OOD Flight Wins Big Sw eep

Field Sweep Tops $1,000
Mark On Five Occasion:

‘> MR. L. J. WONG’S five-year-old mare Top Flight out
i. ‘ef Tlotsam-Meads won the Big Sweep of the B.T.C, four-
day Summer meet which ended at the Garrison Savannah
yesterday. She finished the meeting with a total of 12
points, and brought to the holder of ticket No. XX 1397
$52,360.

It was another day of keen racing and the ctowd was
the biggest seen at the Garrison throughout the meeting.
This was reflected in the amounts paid in the Field Sweep
which went, past the $1,000 mark on five occasions.

‘ = Most successful owners for the
; meeting were Mr, Cyril Barnard
‘and Mr, I, EB. C, Bethell who got
four winners each.

Lutchman finished ag the most

| s dy
Farouk Joins
‘successful jockey for the meet

° |
Band Of Care- |«: |
with six wins while Yvonet and

1 : E ve }Holder each straddled five win-
4 -K im ners.
I ree X Ings { The Police Band under Captain
; . {C. BE. Raison was again in attend-
4 LONDON, Aug.0% 'anee; and rendered andther pro-
ae King Farouk sailed into | gramme of entertaining music, in-
€ St jnonth on his yaeht he jcluding many of the
automatically became the newest} jog
member of the most exclusive
and carefree set known to history
Never before have so many have~-
been and would-te monarchs liv-;
ed in tranquility and luxury, = |
Many of the ex-kings now live;
in Portugual’s sunny resort of
Estorig Ex-King Umberto of Italy |
|} the most active of Portugal's ex-
| iled monarchs, occupies a com-,
paratively modest

OO terrae ab Sow mp celine tates an

@ Details on page 4



Treasure Stolen

By U.S. Officers

TOKYO, Aug. 9.



annenntignsatlliitatens imal Teas

ocean-front} pe n ents swspaper

flin end ts woling on a histoty\y 1 en ee
of Italy begun by his father, King yar US. eine fae” a ay
,2 al) a S ie Set | ee 5. army officers on two
| Victor Emmanuel, Ex-King Carol | cccasions had removed a total of
j of Romania lives quietly nearby | one billion yen—$2,800,000—
feats eg Aa sony _ worth of diamoncs and platinum
married when she was thought to pe Hig. Custody of -Jepenese
a celne officials during occupation,

Leopold of Belgium is one of! The myatery . officers were de-
i és iscribed as Major H of the
the few kings who does notlM i. Prefecture Militar G
bother to leave his own country,! cient" and an officer who
although he is frequently abroad eetiad h mac “Gaptain Keri ‘n
with his commoner , ov : ;

wife, Princess

De Rethy. He is given an allow-|>2@nders

Yomiuri based its story

latest hit)

SCREAMING Chinese
United Nations troops off a
Panmunjom.
it had changed hands three

|





Candidates

Chinese Push U.N.
Troops From Hill

SEOUL, Aug. 9.
Reds pushed the stubborn
hill east of the truce village of

The Reds finally captured the height after

times. The Communists show-

ered 4,000 rounds of artillery and mortar tire on United
Nations infantrymen during the daylong fight.

| Heavy fighting also broke out early to-day west of the

Pukhan River, where



| WINDSOR’S
HEALTH
IMPROVING

i MONTECATINI, Italy.

‘ Aug. 9.

| The condition of the Duke
of Windsor was describec

jj a “excellent” Saturday

! night by Professor Sante
Pisani who visited him, An
official bulletin said: “His
Highness the Duke of
Windsor is progressively
improving. His fever has

completely disappeared. His

}] general condition was excel-
lent. Signed, Professor Sante

Pisani”,
Pisani told the United
that he had nothing

| Press
|} to add to his medical bul-
{ letin but said he released it

“for the benefit of news-
men.”
Asked about the sche-

duled arrival by air of Sir
Daniel Davies, former con-
sultant to late King George
VI, to attend the Duke,
Pisani said “Sir Daniel is
coming here to visit the
Duke as a personal friend
and nothing more.”

Sir Daniel Davies arrived

in Rome and left immediate-

ly for Montecatini in a

diplomatic car. He carried

'] asmall brown valise thought

| to contain medical equip-
ment,

When told that the Duke
ate steak heartily at dinner
Sir Donald said “ that is a
very good-sign”. He said
he had no idea of the Duke's
ailment.-—-U.P,



Dicsel-Powered

Prain On Trial Run
VIENNA, Aug. 9.

An Austrian - manufactured
powered train, made for a
Uruguayan railroad, started for a
1,250 mile trail run through Au*«
tria according to Federal

order of seven trains, was built
by tha simmering Graz Pauker
plant in Styria in the © British
zone, Officials said that the train
having two Diesel motors with
500 horsepower each, is 80 yards

| two
| attacked South Kore*n troops

Rail- |
road officials. The train, one of the |

Chinese companies counter-
holding “Capitol Hill”.

United Nations soldiers beat the
|raiding Communists to their
| knees in the Reds’ latest and most
| desperate attempt to take the bit-

terly contested hill which has
| changed hands six times this
week.

| U.N. Counter Attacks

} The battle for the hill east of
|/Panmunjom started at 3.50 a.m.
iwhen a reinforced Red platoon
}hit the United Nations’ advance
|position. The allied defenders
}withdrew, but ten minutes later
| counter-attacked.

The United Nations’ assault
was unstccessful however and
allied infantrymen waited for air
support to come in and soften up
the Communists.

Shortly before 10 a.m, United
Nations fighter-bombers hit the
Reds with napalm and rockets
and ground troops followed up
with their second attack, This
time they were successful and re-
‘aptured the hill. But fifteen
minutes later the Communists
came back in force and again the
Allies were forced to withdraw,

In the battle for “Capitol Hill”
it wag estimated trat 300 Chinese
infantrymen hurling hand gren-
ades and firing sub-machine guns
and rifles rushed the height in
force,

United States sabre jet pilots
shot down another Communist
MIG 15 to-day to carry their
streak ,of a@rial victories into the
ninth straight day while fighter-
bombers ht Red frontline posi-
tions and supply lines.
—U-P.

Truce Talks

Resume
Tomorrow

PANMUNJOM, Aug. 9.
Korean truce negotiations are
scheduled to be resumed next
Monday, following a week-long
| recess, but Major General Wil-
liam K. Harrison, Chief United
Nations delegate, mewy immediate-
ly call another respite.
He warned the Reds at the last
truce meeting that he will not
condone the revival of Commun-
ist propaganda charges which is
; just what the Chinese and North
Korean Reds are oe to do if
| broadcasts from their capitals are
| any indication, Peiping Radio led
off the latest blast by claiming
that the United States war planes
| few across the Yalu River into
| Manchuria seyenty-nine times
during the first week of August,
They charged that a total of 398
sarties were made during the
week and said that one Uniteu



long. Maximum speed is 75 m.p,h, | States plane dropped 21 bombs

be reached, according to an official |

source, {
Some British reports warned \
Mossadegh that the situation is

gravely undermined and the in-
fluential Times said on Saturday
that to sanction immediate aid
would in effect amount only to
keeping alive for a’ few more
months a ship that is already sure
to founder.

Both London «and Washington}
agreed that the situation in Iran!
is dangerous in the extreme and if
allowed to drift on might lead to!
a communist move. They also
agree that if this is allowed to
happen the West would be con-
fronted with the gravest peril
since the war,

A Foreign Office spokesman said
Britain and the United States are
keeping the situation in Iran under
“constant review", but declined to
comment on reports of the alleged
American propgsal that Britain
shall allow Iran to sell oil on
world markets and pay part of the
proceeds to the United Kingdom
as compensation for nationalized
oil properties. Leading British
quarters said such a solution would
hardly be acceptable to Britain,
i UP

The mourning period will last until 12.01 a.m. on
Monday.

hundreds of thousands of grieving Argentines from the
Labour Ministry to the Congressional building in a civil}
and military cortege such as normally is reserved for a
President who has died in office. f

Scheduled to take part are hoeaven ya :
NATO Asks UK,

officers and men of the third,

Those

Secreta
Mr.
r3’

Union, Mr.

leaving were
Jordan, President of the Barbados
The Senora’s body was to be borne at 10 a.m. past | Teachers’ Association, Mr. F.

arker,
Osborne, President of the Women’s
Auxiliary,
|Fresident of the Assistant Teach-
Cc, W.
| batch, Mr. C. F, Broomeé and Miss
Mildred Taitt,

ary,

F.

Mr.

Miss

G,

Cur



A. G

H.
Ereil

Downes,

iber-

army a battalion of mounted San | The Conference begins tomor-
Martin Grenadiers, Congressional eed Ab row
; j }
leaders, supreme court justices, France out i
labour union officials, provincial |

Defence Goals

governors, caaets,
members of tin

nurses, and)
Women’s Peron-

(Corn meal Expected

ance by the Belgian Government
and at one time was said to exert
considerable influence over King
Baudouin,

Both Don the
pretender, and the Count of Paris
who claims the throne of France
maintain establishments in Por-

tugal. Don Juan kept si

Juan, Spanish

with General Franco for a num-
ber of years, but so far there is
no indication that he will be re-
stored.

Peter of Yugoslavia lives mod-
erately in Venice with
Helen Marie of Greece Kihg
Zoog of Albania, who fled his

his wife,

prefecture government at Sendai,
Northern Japan, to the Diet com-
mittee investigating
disappearance of gold and jewels
from the Bank of Japan vaults
whieh had been in the custody of
American oecupalion officials for
sevom, years, '

Yomiuri said that the
government in its report
two officers appeared separately
on October 23, 1975 and June 5,
1947. In each case they signed re-
ceipts in pencil and left with
treesure valued according to
Yomiuri at one billion yen.—U.P.

the alleged

Miyagi
said that



on a report made by the =

ist party.
The body
an artillery

was to be carried on

caisson drawn by
three columns of Workers with
her husband, President Peron,
relatives and Cabinet
following immediately — behind.
The body will lie in state in the
Congressional building.

Only public transport and
mewspapers will operate during
the 42 hours’ mourning period,
but workers will hold a_ brief
token stoppage. Restaurants and
other eating places will be open
only for lunch and dinner fox

@ On page 11

PART OF THE HUGE CROWD AT YESTERDAY'S KACES

ministers |

PARIS, Aug. 9. Thirteen thousand bags of

Informed sources said that the | finely ground cornmeal are due
North Atlantic Council bluntly; to arrive in the colony between
asked Britain and France if the|the latter half of this month and

two nations plan to abandon their |ear!y December



promises of defence goals for

1952, and expect an answer by The Controller of Supplies on

August 20. Friday informed importers that
A NATO source said that the |the ceiling price for this com-

Council was worried that other |modity must not exceed $9.16 per

Atlantic Pact nations will follow)|bag of 98 Ib (B.W.L, Currency)



the “potentionally dangerous | This will inelude duty paid landed
precedent” set by Britain without /cost including freight, instance,
prior consulation with their fel-|exchange based at 72.7%, dut)
low allies. It expects the replies to} Bank Charges and all othe:
be in Paris in time for discussion | cHarges.

at the next meeting of the coun-, Applications for

for
cil in Paris, August 20.—U.P. this item close

Tuesday,

licences
on

country in 1939, during the Italian
invasion, is in Alexandrin, Egypt, ce
ad so is this claimant to the Bul- (Moree HAS BETTER
garian throne.—wU.P. »

; ROADS THAN EGYPT

tABAT, Aug 9.



APPOINTED ASSOCIATE
MEMBERS R.S.I.

The Freneh Reeideney General's
Mr. Jack Sealy, Government|Oflice eslimaced on S ‘turday thut
Assistant. Chief Sanitary Inspec-|Morocco now has a better high-

tor and Mr, Samuel Gibbons, Vis-| way system than Egypt. A month-





wing Officer, Seawell Airport,|ly news bulletin said that Moroces
hav been appointed Associate | had 8,565 miles of roads and 19,77(
Members of the Royal Sanitary|miles of all weather secondary
Institute, routes compared with Egypt:
Mr. Sealy is at present on 90 total of 4,375 miles, with only
days’ leave, and Mr, Walwyn Best!375 miles asphalted and main-
is acting Assistant Chief Sanitary | tained,
Inspector.

—U.P.



A SECTION of the crowd which attended the final day of the

Barbados Turf Club



Drawing of horses on page 6.

—U.P.



CASUAL WINE

WINE can give so much pleasure to dining and
entertaining—-but it isn’t any more complicated
than serving tea or coffee.

Try serving
dinner—-slightly chilled.

Paarl to your soups and other food for a new and
You will be delighted with the

distinct flavour.
results!

When its time for Wine
It’s time for
K.W.V.

“The Wine of All Time.”

Check your list for:

K.W.V. Sherry, Brandy, and Table Wines.
LOOPS SPECS SOSSSSS SOS SOS SSS OSS SS SSS SOOO SOLA

y POSS GODS FO SG 09D FOOPO POOF 9OTO9 SO FOC P SSO GOOF

Renoused for Distinction and Flavour

K. W. V.

Sherry to your guests before

|on a Manchurian town, seriously
injuring two persons.—U.P.



FACTS (sHerry)

And add this K.W.V.



PAGE TWO





SUNDAY
GLOBE
THIS EVENING 8.30 P.M. |

MONDAY & TUESDAY i
5 amd 8.20 p.m. By
20th. CENTURY FOK



P ARD WICKSTEED
i — ITH DAY MENU
i
























RIDG ' A ES OISTIN aa

ec Se RBARE s= (CAMBINE WEEESANS!| BREAKFAST.
) PAY te i ‘ESDAY TODAY te TUESDAY 6-an o-morrow = . | O ill sugar

} ty ‘to as a0 > pm “ea pm : ren - ato » sh Jenies STARRING Jean Qin en toast with

ar a 9?'2 Feehainnior ihe mi MARLENE Errol} STEWART HAGEN “~ of honey or —

Pees UIE cht oie |The True Story of the Convict malade. *
ial Added THE PRINCE who made History’s most famous Tea or coffee with milk

‘Bie 4 ERE & 4 AND Gon (no sugar).

\ » “DESTINATION : LUNCH.

Hs munpen'|]| THE (PAUPER _ om as

Ny - : 5 Stanley ee a = vt 9

\K W seca : ote ae ei ea | and

fim'cncken = Pll vax cow ate || "Sint user Bl (aressing, ne’ mayMinaies)

JREV'S ae x : Williar ole r “ no

i HUNDER MOUNTAIN " come ae ee es Nee One roll, eseeing of butter,
( aN ie r — large 2)
i LEGION of vagus = = Thurs ‘only) | Cotes ie milk UR cugar)
jeer] «TNE RACKET Cup of clear vegetable soup.
) ming PREDAY One trout of large gu
{i RAPTURE VENDETTA , waned .

PFs

THREAT Rn ES
ROXY

To-day to Wed.

HOOD. ae







EMPIRE ate
Tit
ISNEY

|
|

|

i

|

SDAY 145 & S50 445 & B15 |
COLUMBIA PICTURES Presents |

Louis HAYWARD—Patricla MEDINA

“RANTASIA’ in
|

{

|

Technicolor



“THE LADY AND THE BANDIT"

xtra
Shorts:—DIVING ACROBATS

Atk HOSTESS





———_—___—___ -_ _
THURS & FRIDAY 1% & 8.15 }

TO-DAY re
ALT D
I B
With §
r Ho A
OLYMPIC Glenn FORD |
fO-DAY & TOMORROW 4.30 & 4.15 “UNDERCOVER MAN" |
‘TRE AMAZING MR. SEROMMAN" ‘ato eaihttestiaae ae fmt

ADVENTURES IN SILVERADO
Cecile PARKER Starring
< OC Pas est William BISHOP—

and

Gloria HENRY



work before or a



1
; ROYAL ee RO
Ae ee oalatt 2 Shows TO-DAY 5 & 8.15 ' OF 6 ¢
PARAMOUD Presen '
ee Meee, scorr |] PRESONER OF SHARK ISLAND re on
57 BED MOUNTAIN” GLORIOUSLY

TUESDAY & WED. 4.30 & 4 15

Color by Teehnicolor For 4—6 people, pass a popes
of lean meat through the mincing.
machine with 4% pound bacon
trimmings, if you can get them,
or 1—2 rashers of fat bocon. Adc
4% pound breadcrumbs ao level
small teaspoon of gratec nutmeg,
pepper and salt to taste (remem-
bering the bacon) and bind witn
@ beaten egg. If you like garlic
add a finely chopped clove.

Form into a roll and place on a
clean cloth, wrung out of hot

RAFAEL SABATINI'S |

| | water and dusted with flour. Roll
j . Jjup securely and tie the ends.
} Stand on « iv ili

}

| ,

} M

OPENING FRIDAY

Ex
“BROKEN 2 Reel Short:

i
|

tra
JOURNEY" SLE OF TABU

Starring: Phyllis CALVERT

$icapapeitilg lengte in dit
MONDAY & TUESDAY 4. & 81h
Fred

Astaire — Betéy Hutton

and in
LET'S DANCE”

SALT TO THE DEVIL’ and

‘tT WALK ALONE”

W

ith

Starring
Burt LANCASTER— Lizmbeth






scott

SINGER SEWING MACHINE
C0.

a trivet above boiling
water, cover and steam for 2%-
8 hours, Or
| boiling water

STARRING

dro)
sawn rop the roll into

i and keep it sim-
mering for 2% hours. Or you can
pack the mixture in

ELEANOR

. n t greasec|
ANNOUNCES THAT ; A ilarge straight-sided tins, and
J | ;stand them in boiling water to

cook,; Remove. tighten the cloth,
place a lightly weighted board on
tcp and leave to become cold.
femove and dust with browne:
bread-crumbs,; That roll will cut
like butter. With it, serve a mixed
vegetable salad (cooked peas,
beans, carrots, turnip and pota-
toes, chopped parsjey and chives),

HENRY WILCOXON: NINA FOCH
dressed with oil and vinegar, with

_ LEWIS STONE: sa eS eee ee
| Seren Play by RONALD MILLAR : it well. Dish each plate
|

DRESSMAEING
CLASSES iP

WILL COMMENCE

MONDAY, August 18th

ON

and GEORGE FROESCHEL

| Based on the Novel by Rafael Sabarini + Directed by

| Vroduced by CAREY WILSON
Enrolments should be confirmed os |i

Early as Possible! GLOBE

indoors and carry out on a tray.

Drain It

If lettuce is prepared and stood
to drain, cut ends down, in a larg-
ish bowl covered with a dinner
plate, it will be fresh for several
days. If you have a refrigerator,
store it, drained, in the vegetable

\ Soneee or ina and it
LECLELOLSAEEECV EL OOP COE ERESOM SOM OTT eer otet | vere 1 ; ;
§ PR iE ery The Garden—St. James Cc It
To-day & To-morrow 8.30 p.m, Instead of those lovely hot

Mat, Yo-day 4.40 p.m

fruit pies, why not a cold one?
DOMERGE)

Or «cold mince pies, which taste
even better, cold, than they do a'
Christmas, hot. Or why not fresh
fintit salad, which requires no
cooking whatever?

“VENDETTA (Faith
and
“SPANISH MAIN" (Color)

Peul HENREID & Maureen O'HARA

_ FT BERGOUGNAN

~~ peiisy | FOR GREATEST |
| Kae

Tues. & Wed. 4.50 pm
“MAD WEDNESDAY"

Haro’'d LLOYD &
“REAL GLORY

4 A,B4,.656
SSSI ASOT

*
t eo eo oo tate







































ADVOCATE

IS Exeellency ;the Governor
and Lady Savage accompan-
ied by Major Dennis Vaughan,
Private Secretary, attended the
fourth and final day's races of the
B.T.C. Summer Meeting at the
Garrison Savannah yesterday.
In the Governor’s box were Mr.
R. C. Mae Innes, Public Relations
Officer of Trans-Canada Airlines,
Mrs, Mac Innes, Mr. G. H. Adams,
C.M.G, and Mr, D. H. L. Ward.

To U.K. For Medical

Treatment
RROFESSOR C. G. BEASLEY,
Economic Adviser to the Comp-

troller for Development and Wel-
fare, left on Friday by B.W.1A.
via Trinidad and Jamaica on his
way the United Kingdom for
medical treatment.

Professor Beasley will stop in
Jamaica for a couple of days = the
guest of Sir Hugh and Lady Foot
at King’s House before going on

to England

ind.

Dp
Make It A Picnic PLUS
ee eee ie to pack, no

sandwiches (which can be wearisome to prepare),
vacuum flasks to RP and fill. And there is no dining-room

no

Garden foods,.for preference, should be fork-and-
spoon foods. Meats therefore, should be easy to handle.
t of these is a meat roll.
it Scene the meat ration.

It ig very simple to

juice is the best marin-
adér because, if you cut into it
pears, apples (if you must have
apples in fruit salads), bananas
er peaches or any fruits which
turn an ugly colour when cur
and exposed to air, it will keep
them their natural colour,

Then there are table jellies ana
creams——no trouble to make. If
you cannot buy table jellies just
when you want them, make them
with fruit juices or squashes and
gelatine, sweetened to taste,
allowing (in hot weather) 1 oz.
powdered gelatine to one pint
liquid.

If you have never made a corn-
flour mould with fruit juice, try
it. Simply have the fruit juice
strong and sweet enough and
use it as the liquid.

Mix It

Some snacks are very quickly
made. One of my newest ones is
simply cold cooked rice mixed
with chicken and ham or turkey
or lobster or, indeed, with any of
the sieved meat or fish mixtures
we get in those small, convenient
jars. | add chopped chives and
garlic. If you use garlic, let it
vest in the mixture just long
nough to impart its pleasant
aroma, then remove it on the
principle that enough is as good
as a feast.

Cut tomatoes with vandyked
edges this way: With a sharp-
pointed knife cut zig-zag cuts all
round the centre of the tomatoes.
then just lift the two halves apart.
Remove the flesh, sprikle a little
sait in the halves and invert
them to drain. Beat the tomato
flesh into the other mixture and
pile all into the halved tomatoes.
Sprinkle with paprika.

A large tomato, treated like

this, with plenty of salad on each
plate, makes a good outdoor snack,
WORLD COPYRIGHT RESERVED
—l. E. 5.













SUNDAY,

AUGUST 10, 1952



Carub Calling

On Routine Visit

R. G. M. GORDON, Engin-

eering Adviser to the Comp-
roller for Development and Wel-
fare, left on Friday night by the
Lady Rodney for the “Leeward
Islands on a routine visit. He will
make stops at Montserrat, Antigua,
and St. Kitts before returning
here about the end of the month.

Intransit

ISS ELEANOR CABEY who

has been residing in Curacao
for the past two and a half years,
arrived here on Wednesday by the
French S.S. De Grasse intransit
for her native Montserrat to spend
about six weeks’ holiday with her
relatives. She is a guest of Mr.
and Mrs, Harlow of “Medway”
Government Hill.

For Trinidad Holiday
EAVING during the week by
B.W.LA. for Trinidad were
Miss Ivy Alleyne, Organiser of the
Housecraft Centre and her two
sisters, Miss Effie Alleyne, Head-
teacher of Grace Hill Girls’ School
and Miss Ermine Alleyne, dress-
maker of “Carls Villa”, Station
Hill. They have gone on holiday
and will be away for-about four
weeks,
Agricultural Adviser
R. A. deK, FRAMPTON, Agri-
cultural Adviser to the Comp-
troller for Development and Wel-
fare. left for Trinidad on Thursday
by B.W.1.A. on a short visit. He
was accompanied hy his wife.
While in Trinidad, Mr. Framp-
tom will have talks on technical
matters with the Director of Agri-

‘culture, the Professor of Agricul-

ture of the Imperial College of
Tropical Agriculture and the
Principal of the Eastern Carib-

bean Farm Institute.

Polo Club Ball
HE POLO CLUB BALL which
is one of the outstanding social
attractions each year takes place
at the Marine Hotel on Saturday,
August 16,

Many sport lovers will recall
the excellent entertainment pro-
vided by the Shipwreck Ball of
1951 and will be glad to know that
the sponsors expect the function
to maintain its high standard of
entertainment this year.

Regiona! Engineer

R. GEORGE RODDAM, Re-

gional Engineer of C.D.C, left
for Jamaica by B.W.I.A. yesterday
morning after a short visit.

SPCA Photo Competiticen
HE S.P.C.A., in order to raise
funds, will stage a Photo Com-

petition within the next few
weeks. There will be a small
charge for entry to cover the cost
of the prizes to be awarded to the
first three exhibited.

The entries which must be con-
cerned with animals will be in
black and white and no colour
prints will be eligible for compe-
tition and will be collected at tha
Headquarters, Y.M.C.A., Pinfold
Street. P

The terms and conditions of the
competition, the prize money and
the date of closing will be an-
nounced at a later date.

For Third Visit
RRIVING in the colony during
the week by B.W.1LA. from

Trinidad was Miss Margot Lagal-
cok who has come over to spend
two weeks’ holiday here. Miss
Lagaldera is employed with the
Control Board, Trinidad and dur-
ing her stay here will be a guest
at “Stony Croft”, Worthing. This
is her third visit to the island.



Annual Visit
RRIVING in the colony dur-
ing the week by B.W.I1.A. from

Trinidad were Mr, and Mrs.
Albett Thomas and their daughter
Sheila. They will be spending
two weeks here and will be stay-
ing at Worthing, Christ Church.

For Canada
R. WILLIAM WHITING left
for Puerto Rico on Thursday

by B.W.LA, intransit for U.S.A.
and Canada.
He was an employee of Bar-

clays Bank but has resigned to
join his brother in Canada.

Visited Their Son

AJOR and Mrs. D, Lenagan 8
returned from Trinidad by
B.W.1.A. on Friday after visiting

their son John who was recently
involved in a plane accident of the
Light Aeroplane Club in Trinidad.
Their son who was a patient at
Hospital in Trinidad has left the
institution and has gone to the
U.K. for medical treatment.
Leaving Today
EAVING the island to-day js
Miss Maud La Porte who has

been spending three weeks’ holi-

day in Barbados. Miss La Porte
is from Castries, St. Lucia and
during her stay here was a guest
at “Savoy”, Bay Street.

Wedding At St. Matthias
N THURSDAY last at St.
Matthias Church, Miss Phyllis

Seale and Mr. Andrew Gittens of
Industry Road, Bush Hall were
married, The bride who was given
in marriage by Mr. 8. Barker,

looked charming in an embroid-
ered bodice with a skirt of nylon
sheer. A coronet of wax buds
kept her headdress in place and
she carried a bouquet of anthu-

rium lilies and snapdragons. The
officiating clergyman was Rev.
Ripper.

She was-attended by Mrs. Doro-
thy Harding as Matron-of-Honovr
and Misses Richardine Devonish,
Sonja Humphrey and Monica Tay-
lor as flower girls who wore dress-
es of similar material and design.

The duties of bestman fell to
Mr. C. Lord and the reception was
held at the home of the bride’s
mother, Bush Yall.



Mr. and Mrs. E. L. BANFIELD

Wedding At St. Cyprians
ESTERDAY afternoon at 4.30
o’clock at St. Cyprian’s Church,
Miss Peggy Arthur Deane, daugh-
ter of Mr. and Mrs, ur-
eee of “Iriston”, st
yap, was married ‘to Mr. aren
E. L. Banfield, son of Mrs, J
Banfield and the late Mr. z tL
Banfield of “Wilsbury”, Hasti

The ceremony which was fully
choral was performed by the Very
Reverend Dean Hazlewood. The
bride who was giyen in marriage
by her father, wore a dress 7 all-
over lace with long, tlose —
sleeves and bodice featuring
@igh neckline. Her skirt was fully

gathered with made-in train, ie
wore a headdress of seed pearls
with a finger-tip veil and carried
a bouquet of Michaelmas daisies
and pink radiance rose buds.

She was attended by Miss Elza
Deane as Maid of Honour, Misses
Heather Deane and oT
Atherly as Bridesmaids, and Miss
Natalie Deane as Flower Girl. The
Maid of Honour wore a s of
lilac organza with close fitting
sleeves, and off-the-shoulder
podice. Her full flair skirt with
frills was three quarter length and
her headdress was flowers and
organza. She carried a posy of
snap dragon?

The bridesmaids and flower girl
wore gold and white organza re-
spectively cut on similar lines to
that of the Maid of Honour with
similar headdresses and they car-
ried posies of snapdragons, The
Flower Girl carried a silver basket
of forget-me-nots.

The duties of bestman were per-
formed by Mr. Leonard Banfield
while those of ushers fell to Mr.
Pat Deane, and Mr. Geoffrey
Archer, A reception was held at
the home of the bride’s uncle,
“Normandy”, Pr James
and the honeymoon is ‘being spent

at Bathsheba. j
aiagete
Ce Cc. A. —- of
A Gun Hill, St. an-

nounce the engagement ae their
daughter Patricia Margaret to Mr.
Edward Geoffrey Watson, son of
Mr. and Mrs, Herbert Watson of
Welches Road, St. Michael.





Nous a NS JANETTA DRESS SHOP 4 Wo Meet To Plan
* BERGOUGNAN ss : omen e€ect . |
S | AND NOW (Next Doox to Singer’s) Y. N Y 9 j
| | aa r f Year's race
‘ T Y R FE S 1S . you can have Ou CX
$ A ‘GAS COOKER COLOURED SHORTS .................. from $5.98 :
‘‘i— s oneness es . oe ee women: are meeting in By EILEEN ASCROFT with walsvoos’ wits his com-
. like those you have admired in e . ond Street this week to discuss anion is comfor e in a summer
* HEAVY DUTY * Mind aan ELASTIC SWIM SUITS ....08...00.5.... from $10.00 ithe beauty problems of three tones, but with more depth than frock.
x an ee ng oe cs BAGS ly Red d eunents. summer shades, Foundations a a Mayfair eagle wit —
> , ITALIAN BASKETS & eatly uce rom America comes dark-haired will be designed for the natural only one man wore a Ww! uxedo
% GIANTS. rinsed ++ + + + Bay ‘Street. A o Mrs. Kay Brown, with shor! look, with a youthful bloom. He was Jon Pertwee, looking —
Py 6000000 9O0O0F0OHOO9O9O~' > > GGS9 SO PSSSSSSS OSS SESE SSS OCS SSS haircut and sun-tanned skin, No, 3... that eye make-up is be- as iced champagne among
‘ you buy the HEST Mgt One Om A sine, comity ake, Soames SNe ean
; rap a . . . "
% SILENT SAFETY “ a ae pink fleecy Jacket . shick ee ll agree i ae Shopping statistics prove that
y and gold chunky jewellery, she ¢Ta@, which they all ag is 1
P Whe ou bu g yj y; they ‘
% ¥ y looks the typical career woman ead. But it did focus attention only 20 per cent. of men do their
& CAR TYRES : that New York produces with 0 the eyes. These four wise own buying. So it seems that
g . RERGOUGNAN x gleaming efficiency, , beauticians forecast more mas- wives, mothers and girl friends
Sy : The Canadian representative at cara, more eye-shadow and are to blame for the hot-faced
‘ Let us supply your y | this all-woman beauty confer- Sierer eyebrows, more clearly Sena freaks in Lendon
* TU BES g ‘ ence on dry skins and the new ‘English Are So Fresh to-day. ‘
‘ . REQUIREMENTS | “ ’ ” ae ne is Small, slight wat do think of English Fashion Meniix
% ; from Toronto arrived in a biotin complexions?” I acted the confer- ONE out of 10 dresses will be red
x x é dupion suit, mink wrap and tiny nee: Three pairs of blue eyes — this autumn is the latest fashion
w . son ah eo , and one of brown considered my flash from New York,
x % straw cap like a flan tin trimmed juestion, Miss Grant: “They look Pari of the
. % r-when Telota Pomade and Creme will restore with. bronze beags. 60. fresh, never sallow.” eeanstalkc “pest on winter rty
© atonal soto 3 pour Ralrso vice satrginal Solent (WH in - neeirel |Mrs. Molly Usherwood attends on “°° O°Sthtee we prefer the ounce. tt io Wller-aak inert
wh SEIS t, Sr aden manner in about 14 days if used daily. The behalf of Australia, She is tall suin-tantied Toole. nik: eutnene it Se cee tote half ,
oe } Darkening Creme is a fixative type of product with greying hair dressed in a \eather and central heating are The foot sock is something new
and is non-greasy, whilst the Pomade is a bun, and wears an elegant black }..74 on our skins,” says Mrs, Kay in Britain for children’s wear. It
dressing type of product which does, not set | /Ravathea suit, unrelieved by Brown ‘Dry skins trouble about has a special fouk whieh allows
wellery, e has ¢ e : ’ iy ; :
THE 1952 oe ee of oil; thus_it is ee : Sedeey y Bh ane e —— iy 85 per cent of our women. extra cman for developing
su ine ary hair ' f . eee Australian view is that the feet
, daughter une re ; .
TA e “a ¥ .. English complexion is still the
HAIR DARKENING , ae drone mA iw best in the world Thumbs Down
a ia Wah teal cree Men In The Sun WHICH male would you least
appearance, who loves the quiet TDAP i
i j grey tones that flatter blonde . HEAT wave temperatures of 80 like to find as a companion on a
i» 7 hair and a milk and roses com- degrees make the English male desert island?
‘} ; . a plexion re 7 ~ look silly. I put this question to 50 women
\ BY Not for him the sensible tropical this ee, married, single house-
* suiting: or" r ¢ tinen- wives and career
\ | Agents: H. P. CHEESMAN & Co., Léd — Middle Street ee hey Agreed Bs eultings, warn by he Came ee ee ee etic
THE BARBADOS POLO CLUB two years brought three im- short sleeved sports shirts, light Harding with six votes him.
| portant points of agreement tuxedos and featherlight socks Next comes the Red with
AT | " ” * chosen by the ene. it ve. bie weenen. pee
} ‘ ‘ . See him sitting. in Trafalgar Pickles, three Aneurin Bevan, .
| ia [ier sje ON ee ae Square mopping his se at Spc names on ie a
rey 7 ’ 7 my { lunch-time complete wi races are Alastair Sim, Dr. es
THE NIARINE HOTEL | ata i ae -up for the and thick wool socks. Webster Booth and Richard
11 : twa coming winter (summer in Aus- Watch him at the theatre— Dimbleby.
ONCE AGAIN OFFERS YOU TOPS IN a _traiia) wilt still be in the pink suffering in ‘his thick GArk sult, WeRh> copeancer amamkven.
AN EVENING’S ENTERTAINMENT || J :
} ON aan e
| SATURDAY, 16H AUGUST, AT 9.00 P.M. || y ( LARK ES { I iT] ‘DS S] IOES
———0——_— |
. : w% eee eee ee ee ee
® Dancing to the Police Band Orchestra ‘ WHITE & TAN 3s to 1% ..... $4.23, $4.84 .
@ 4 Flight in “Miss Bim” on Auction || ANYTHING IS NEWS that is to the benefit of ‘ TRU-FORM CHILD'S SHOES
\ @ DP.nces by our pepular Ballerina \ Sir: “shin soln :
—Miss J Rans -R.A.D. Z FS, e~-thavs why K. R.
{ ee ae 1 mene en WHITE BUCK & BLACK PATENT KID
@ Spot Dance, Bridge, Ete., Ete. | Store is news — good news because of th ‘
| @ Enjoyment Galore ! | © OE Ne OR UE S's, coe Soe $5.07 & 5.37
i ans 5 | selection of Electrical items, Office items, Jewellery 7s to 10s ........... S682 & 620
Tables can be Reserved through items, Stati lls to Is $7.04 & 7.92
s, ot ite Se eee he clehcigtiigad i f
Mrs. M. M. PARKER (Dial 8322) ee eee mae
RT HU ° MAN ditec-All-Sizes ...........-.6.-- . $4.76, $6.07, $7.1
For B ride Parties through K. R. NTE & CO., LTD. 1 : 3 -
Mrs. J. W. CHANDLER (Dial 95-211) | Lower Broad St. MEN’S “PRETTY” ANKLETS . 53 & 71 cts.
cna es
? | ;
} TICKETS $1.00 from any Polo Club Member i a R. E\ TANS & WHITFIELDS
y} or at the Door re)
)») Dress Optional |
i 1 DIAL 4220 YOUR ‘SHOE STORES DIAL 4606





SUNDAY, AUGUST 1),

At The Cinema

1952

A True Story

IN MARCH last year,

the Reader’s Digest

liams. ‘Since then, a film has been made based on this
sketch. Playing at the Globe theatre, Carbine Williams

is something different and

absorbing in prison dramas.

Marsh Williams—ineidentally he is still very much alive—
was a rebellious young man, a rugged individualist who Henry Wood Promenade Concerts.

ardiess of anyone else.

thougies he could live his life the way he wanted to, re- For
School wasn’t to his liking, sv

quit and joined the Navy.

t career fell shorf of his ex-
, so he rewurned home
to: take over his share of his
father’s farm. However, his father
told him that not unt! he has
worked the land for two years,
would it be his, To Marsh, who
wanted to get married, two years
was too Much, so he got himself
a job and against his family:
wishes, married his childhood
sweetheart. Unknown to his wife,
he ‘becomes a “moonshiner” and
ome a group of illicit stil:s
whiskey. But the Revenue
edie! up with him and during
a ih one of them is killea.
Marsh as owner of the still, is
eonvicted of second-degree mur-
der and though there is no proof
that he actually killed the man,
he is sentenced to thirty years
with hard labour. His spirit still
‘unbroken after months on a chain-
gang and a punishment of thirty
days solitary confinement, he wins
fhe respect and understanding et
the Warden, who allows him to
work on a 30 mi. carbine, the de-
sign of which came to Marsh
during “solitary,” and which has
singe been perfected and adopted
by the U.S: Army, After eight
years in jail, Marshall was pa:-
doned. by the Governor of hi
state and returned home to his
wife and son.

» The .story is told to young
David Marshall by the warden,
played by Wendell Corey, whose
faith in. the lad’s father enableu
Marshall Williams to complete his
invention. In moving and human
terms, it tells of the regenerating

fluence of a single creative idea
‘on a hitherto incorrigible hostile
‘convict and it is interesting to
hote that emphasis is placed on
xehabilitation instead of atone-
ment. Prison discipline of a bygone
day is presented in harsh and
ivealistic strokes. but for all this,
the warden emerges as an honest
man, doing his job to the best of
his ability and giving a man a
chance whom he thought worthy
of his trust.

u James Stewart, as Marshail Wi!-
Hams, gives another fine, charac-
terization through a. masterful
piece of acting. The scenes of his
prison life and particularly those
“with Wendell Corey, reveal that
Mr, Stewart is one of the finest
‘sereen actors, A splendid protray-
al~of Maggie, Marsh’s wife, is
_Biven by Jean Hagen, whose love
r and loyalty to her husband
never waver ana her performance
is both spirited and sensitive. Wen-
dell Corey ig strong and persuasive
as Captain Peoples, the warden,
“who turns out to be William’s best
friend, while Carl Benton Reid is
warm and sympathetic in the role
of Marsh’s father who, though he
‘quarrels with his son, never fails
in his devotion to him.

A good script with fine direc-
tion and acting make CARBINE
WILLIAMS an absorbing and en-
tertaining film.

Showing at the
Plaza Bridge-
town, THE BIG
TREES is a turn-
jot - the - century
melodrama
P-awhose chief
-components seem
to be cheating
and fighting. The
“hero-heel”, for
that’s all I can
call him, is an
unseruptu-
lous logger who
attempts to swindle a religious
sect out of their valuable Cali*
fornia Redwood timberlands. His
sordidly, unethical machinations
are almost incredible, but for-
tunately they are dwarfed by tne
Technicolor shots of the magnifi-
cent sequoias. There is plenty of
action, mostly of a pretty violent
‘nature, and the logger’s eleventh-
hour reform and marriage to a
pretty member of the religious
sect, whose father’s death had
been directly caused by an order
given by her husband, left me
singularly unimpressed.














|

es =
SOS LEE LCP PEEP LE FLEET EOS

PINFOLD ST.

5554, 565695 . 54
POCO E EPP POPP EPP PPPS OTSSES



TRIUMPH MAYFLOWER
$2500.00



od

JAMES STEWART

Kirk Dougias, Eve Miller and
Patrice Wymore have the prin-
cipal roles in this uninspiring, but
scenically beautiful film,

Comet Girls
Attend
Jet School

SO that they can answer
passengers intelligently when they
ask: “How does the jet engine
week?” BOAC Stewardesses
selected for the eight-miles-a-
minute Comet airliners are now
receiving technical training.



They go to “school” at the
Hatfield, Herts, factory of the
de Havilland Aircraft Company,

where the Comets are built.

The training lasts only two or
three days, but with the aid of
a sectionalised “Ghost” jet engine
and a mock-up of a Comet’s
eockpit, they learn how the
engine works and what the pilot
does to make the Comet fly

All the girls now flying on the
Comet service to Johannesburg
bave been through the de Havil-
land “school.” Others are follow-
ing in readiness for the London
and Singapore service.

The Men, Too

Men stewards of the Comet
flight have the same training.

The three stewardesses to take
the latest course were 28-year-~
old Miss Patricia Hollister, of
Cromwell Road, South Kensington
Miss Vivian Oliver, '27, of
Wargrave Road, Twyford, Berks;
and Miss Irene Rennie, 23, of

Gledwood Gardens, Hayes,
Middlesix.

Miss Hollister, a former

Richmond County School girl,

was in the WRNS during the
war. cs
Miss Oliver was a_ wartime
nurse, and joined Vickers-Super-
marine, builders of the Swift jet
fighters, as a draughts-woman.
Miss Rennie joined the BOAC
two years ago after
secretary.—L.E.S.

rinted a
biographical sketch of a man called David Marshall Wil-

Symphony

B.B.C. Radio Notes

Promenade
Concerts

Recordings From London

In the coming week the BBC
will continue to broadcast record-
ings from the 58th Season of the

listeners in this area
these recordings will be on
the air at three convenient times—
Sunday, 10th and Thursday, 14th
¢ ro p.m. and ; to 12th at
bi p.m. In the broad-
cast Raymond Nilsson, the

Australian tenor, will make his
‘Prom’ debut with the London

Orchesti

Symphony ra, conductor
Basil Cameron, with ‘ with
Orchestra: Adelaide’ by

in a coneert which includes

Dvorak’s ‘Symphony No, 4 in G.’
On Tuesday there will be another
first appearance with Gina
Bachauer, the Greek pianist, who
will play the ‘Pianoforte Concerto
in A Minor’ by Greig with the
BBC Symphony Orc » con-
ductor Sir Maleolm Sargent. In
the Thursday broadeast Victoria
Lendon’s most

FARM AND GARDEN

Hy Agricola

Some time ago we tried in thig types or varieties of crop plants
column to define what was meant which can be relied on to survive

by hardiness in plants. We point-
ed out that its significance varied,
depending on climatic conditions;
but that, in general, we common-
ly apply the term hardy kinds,

~ GARDENING
HINTS. FOR
AMATEURS

This is Zinnia time, and these
useful wet season flowers will
prove to be our great standbys for
the next few months.

Many gardens are gay with these
Sowers now, but it is not too late
to plant zinnia seeds if you have
not already done so.

There are several varieties Of
zinnias to choose from but the large

dis- Dalia type is the general favourite.
smaller

gam one of

nguished operatic sopranos, will
be heard in the ‘Recitative and
Aria: Ma dall’ arido stelo’ from
‘Un Ballo in Maschera’ by Verdi.
She will appear with the London
Orchestra, conducted
by Basil Cameron.

The Function Of A Prime
Minister

On_ Thursday nekt, 14th inst.,
the Rt. Hon. Clement Attlee will
speak on ‘A Day in the Life of a

rime Minister,’ the second talk
in the series of programmes about
the day-to-day role and responsi-
bilities of the great offices of State
in Britain. In this talk Mr. Attlee
will describe some of the functions
whieh fall to the Prime Minister in
his various capacities as the Sov-
ereign’s First Minister, the Leader
of his Party, and the First Lord of
the Treasury. He will speak at
19.15 p.m, and can be heard in the
25 and 31 mé@tre bands—Thursday,
14th inst.

India And Pakistan’s
Independence Days

b tet un tndepe di Days in
rate the ndence

the coming wor, the fifth anni-
versary of the transfer of power to
these two states—India on the 15th
and Pakistan on the 14th, The
BBC will mark both of these days
with special programmes, The
programmes for India Day will not
be beamed to us but at 7.45 p.m,
on Tihursday there will be a
special broadcast entitled ‘Pakis~
tan Day.’

Malthus On Population

In the coming week the BBC
will begin a group of three talks
with the title ‘Reconsidering
Malthus’ which are in effect a
corollary to ‘The Health of Man’
series which is now being given on
Fridays at 10.30 pm. Thomas
Robert Malthus (1766-1834) t
forward the idea that the mena
tion tended to increase faster than
the means of subsistence.
pessimism was influential in the
first part of the nineteenth cen-
tury, but later his doctrines came
to be regarded as out of date.
Today when the dangers of over-
population are generally recog-
nised, Malthus is coming into
own. The first talk “The Paradox
of Progress’ is to be given on Fri-
day next at 10.30 pam. by 4H, Li.
Beales, Lecturer in Economic His-
tory at London University. The

being a talks will be broadcast as ‘From

the Third Programme.’



Baby With Green Wings

Sets Neighbours Arguing

By CRAVEN HILL

THERE is trouble among the
London Zoo’s parakeets, And
trouble, it is said, which looks
suspiciously like jealously on the
part of, one mother,

It happened like this: Two
“nurseries’ were set up at the
same time in the parakeet aviary,

In one nest-box a green-winged
King parakeet was hatched. In
another there was hatched a
Stanley parakeet,

Everything was quiet until the
King baby made his first public
appearance. Seeing the young-
ster trying to balance itself on a
twig outside the nest-box, the
female Stanley attacked him

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viciously, drove him back into his
box, and kept him there despite
loud protest from the parent

Kings.
Better Baby

Keepers gaw the trouble and
separated the two families.

Said a Zoo official: “Why the
female Stanley should have
attacked hen, neighbour’s baby
is not clear—although the two
species hail from different parts
of the Antipodes they have
hitherto agreed well here.

“It leoks suspiciously
jealousy. Possibly the Stanley
thought her neighbour’s child a
better specimen than her es

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There are o kinds,
graduating in size down to the
little Button Zinnias so useful as
borders. Besides these there is a
curly kind called “Fantacy” very
uncommon and attractive.

Altogether zinnias are a lovely
addition to the garden, and they
have the advantage of being quick
growers. Six weeks after the
seeds are planted the plants should
Start to flower.

Preparation Of The Bed

_ When preparing the bed for
zinnias fork in a good supply of
well rotted pen manure, making it
rich but not heavy. Zinnia seed-
lings do not stand transplanting
well, so. the seeds are better plant-
ed straight into the prepared. bed,
But beware of Ants, many a bad
spring is caused by Ants eating
the seeds. When the seedlings
come up a little rearrangement is
sometimes found necessary in
order to get them evenly spaced.

Zinnias require a lot of Water
that is why they do so well in the
rainy weather, In between the
rains, be sure to keep the bed
well watered.

Chrysanthemums

No doubt many gardens are al-
ready planted up with chrysanthe-
mum suckers with the hope of a
good crop of flowers at the end
of the year. June, July and August
are the recognised months for
zlanting Chrysanthemum suckers
and up to the end of August this
job. can be done,

Of the different kinds, the. large
yellow seem to be the favourite
judging by the quantities of this
flower seen about Christmas time.
But the large pure white and the
bronze are just as easily grown
and they make a nice change from

more commonly knovn yellow,

Then there are the small border
Chrysanthemums white with yel-
low centre and small yellow, both
easily grow and needing less at-
tention than the taller large bushes
which require staking,

The large Chrysanthemum
should be staked from the time
they are about 2 feet high.

Preparation Of The Bed

Prepare the Chrysanthemum bed
by forking in plenty of well rotted
pen-manure and if possible some
humus from the Compost Heap.
Tf the bed is at all inelin
heavy, lighten it by the addition
of some charcoal, When finishéd
the soil should be rich, but light
and friable.

In the case of the large Chry-
santhemums, plant the suckers two
or three feet apart, But when
planting the border kind they

{should be placed much closer,

especially if a continuous border
is wanted,

Chrysanthemums do not require
a great deal of water, moderate
watering suits them best. They
like an open sunny position.

ned to. be

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

and be of value where for one
reason or another—goil, climate Ov |
disease liability—others give un-

i results. Keen

against heavy odds to establish
traps of particular choice

r tions which make suc- |
cess ost impossible. Usually. |
every has been taken that is)
numanly but, in the long

run, it is often the case that resort |
must be. made to hardier |
though less appreciated (depend-
ing on cv’e uredilections) sorts. |

|
In this connection, to-day we
want to draw attention to the
merits of certain fruits which tend
to be ne: because they may |
be k upon as wild growths |
not comparable with the more)
commercial types in general de-|
mand. In spite of this not infre-
os attitude, we venture to
nk that a number of ordinary |
kinds deserve a place in Tovah
horticulture since they are not only
har but extremely pleasant to
the taste, can be used in a variety
of ways and have health giving

qualities as well. At one time,
some of fruits were freely
obtained vendors’ trays but

come }
emphasiz® the imported and the
tourist tions. Here are &
few of sorts we have in mind:

Soursop: almost too well known
to need deseription; a small, ever—
green tree, with dark eg
shiny leaves; arge,
green, heart-shaped, with numer-
ous fleshy spines; the white cot-
tony pulp has a peculiar flavour,

being both sweet and acid—
delicious in ices and c irinks
{n the French islands jt. fevoured

as an early morning fruit, espe-
cially by the ladies who -cgard it
as excellent for the complexion.
Propagated by seeds.

Sugar Apple: a near relative ot!
the soursop; a small tree, with
thin, dull green le, ves, of some-
what irregular growth; the fruits
are rounded reaching about three
to four inches in diameter, with
fleshy tubercles and a glaucous
bloom, liable to fall apart when
ripe and should be picked when
full but hard; thrives best near
the sea; a very good desert fruit
in spite of its seediness,
from seed.

Belle Apple or Water Lemon: a
climbing plant of the Passion
Flower family and a close relative
of the purple variety sometimes
seen in markets; the
fruit is orange coloured when rip,
about the size of a lemon and con—
tains a delicious pulp; the vine is
propagated by seeds or cuttings, is |.
hardy and soon accomodates itself
over a fence; it seems to fruit
almost continuously; needs watech-
ing for a spiny caterpillar that can
be very destructive to the foliage.
A near relative is the granadilla
which needs. an arbour to run on,

Barbados Cherry: a small tree,
generally ree as a valuable
hedge plant and also for its cherry
like, j(i>y fruits; makes a flavour—
ful dessert, delicious in preserves
and in ices, Ideal for a small
garden,

The above is just a eross
section, so to of local hardy
plants (not f the guava

to which we gave an entire
column) which are often over-
looked as useful food fruits be-
cause, being common or ordinary,
they lack tl of sorts we
have to import. ‘et, in many
countries to-day (increasingly so
in Britain), more and more atten-
tion is being paid to the wild
plants and fruits of the country-
side for their health giving prop-
erties. In this connection, we can
learn much from the French who
have long atttached great impor-
tance to their tizenes or diet
drinks made from nitive growths,
Let us start now to develop a
livelier interest in the possibilities
of nature’s foods about and
around us.















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: ‘
MR. SMALL MAN

TAGE THREE |



BARBADOS AQUATIC
OLUB.
(Members Only).

SATURDAY, 16th August,
1952, at 8.30 p.m.

WATER POLO by Filood-
light and DANCE

KNOCK-OUT FINALS.
SNAPPERS v. SWORD
FISH

POLICE v. BONITAS.

Music by Anthony Menezes
and his Caribbean
Troubadours

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SUNDAY



PAGE FOUR
This is the NEW 3
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W.I. BOARD STILL
BUNGLING

Congrats Queen’s College

By O. S. COPPIN
MAKE no apology for referring at once, again to-day to
the question of the forthcoming tour of India to the West
Indies next year.

I expressed the hope that the West Indies Cricket Board
of Control would not try to usher in a false Utopia on the Me
of the visit of the Indian team, In other words attempt to
implement the fantastic scheme of paying professionals and
amateurs the same for their services in the Indian tour. _.

I understand on reliable authority that They have and
in the absence of any reliable information to the contrary we
are entitled to entertain the view in the circumstances,

PROFESSIONALS ALREADY INVITED

HE Board have already invited the professionals and we
should have been told the terms and conditions undér
which they were invited. The M.C.C, publish these before they
embark on overseas tours or entertain Imperial cricket teams

at home. Why cannot the West Indies do the same ?
I have always deprecated the smugness and complacency
of certain West Indies Cricket Board officials but it seems as
if there has now been a complete reorientation of values and

of their responsibility to the West Indian cricket public and
to West Indian Cricket itself,

THE TOUR WILL FLOP

F the West Indies Cricket Board of Control do not obtain
the services of the professionals the tour is going to be a
flop whether they are bargaining on the support of the Trini-
dad Indians, the B.G, Indians or the Saskatchewan Red Indians.
If it is the intention of the new Board to set up a Trinidad
Kremlin and to issue important information by means of on-
the-spot interviews as they are now, let. them be warned that
they are ariding for a fall and they are other people like my-
self who will move heaven and earth to see that they are fired
Where are the minutes of the last meeting in B.G.? Where
is the manager’s report on the last tour of Australia? Why has

not the captain been appointed? ,

QUEEN’S COLLEGE SCORE NETBALL WINS

Y congratulations this week include the Queen's College
Netball team at present on tour of Trinidad. So far they
have won all their fixturés having already defeated Tacarigua
Orphanage 16—8, Bishop Anstey’s High School 16—8, St.
Joseph Convent 21—20, Eton Club 17—10, Holy Name Convent

13—-4, Bishop Anstey’s High School Olq Girls 17—3.
Pat Browne's consistent shooting has been the outstanding
feature from the point of view of individual performances and

that of Yvonne Smith was only slightly less brilliant.

CONGRATS MRS. WOTTON

UT what consideration must exclude all others, is that the

tremendous success achieved by the girls mirrors in
magnificent reflection the vision, industry ond foresight of
Muriel Wotton, Games Mistress of the College who trained
and moulded the team into the match winning force it has
turned out so handsomely to be.

They met Trinidad in a Test last night and the results
have not yet come to hand. Whatever the result the overall
performance of the team is a source of deep gatisfaction in
local sporting circles and the tour itself constitutes another
step in the commendable direction of an unofficial West Indies
Sporting Federation.

TRINIDAD TABLE TENNIS TEAM COMING

N this same vein we greet the arrival of a table tennis team

that is due from Trinidad this week-end

The visitors represent the San Fernando Zone of the
Trinidad and Tobago Amateur Table Tennis Association.

It will be remembered that an All Trinidad team visited
Barbados in 1949 and displayed a standard of tennis nowhere
within the reach or negotiation of the local tennis players,

However this visit was a blessing in disguise for it obvi-
ously gave us a means of judging our strength by relative
values and at the same time pointed out the crying need for
considerable improvement if we were to compete on anything
like a comfortable basis.

STRONG TEAM
FTAHIS team is reputedly a strong and well balanced team.

Even in the unlikely absence of its living up to the repu-
tation that has preceded it yet the tournament will have pro-
vided the scope whereby our local players can complete against
players whose styles will be unknown to the majority of them
and at least shed some light on our form from the point of
view of the forthcoming Caribbean Table Tennis Champion-
ships that include Trinidad, Jamaica and British Guiana.

THE CAPTAIN

Dr, Noble Sarkar who captains the team
has made a name in table tennis for himself.

He brings with him experie.ce of this SaMNe ress
in world circles for he has already repre- sj
sented Trinidad at the World games in 1948, hae. BS

He has played while he was a medical stu-; 9) 7
dent in England and one of his achievements) ~~
is his retaining the championship of the
county of Yorkshire for three ‘years.

Carl Williams, the present South Trinidad
champion and Fenwick Debysingh a former,
South Trinidad champion will. fogm with Dr.'
Sarkar a trio of experience and skill that
should ensure some very entertaining table

tennis,
SUPPORT

It is hoped that the public will turn out
in force to lend their moral and _ financial
support to this venture since public support~
alone will decide whether or not Barbados
should take a decent place in the Interco-
lonial sport line-up,

The news that Ken Farnum will take part in the World
Games in Paris this month should be gratifying to local sports-
men since it means in effect that he will be furthering his
knowledge of International Amateur Cycling
FARNUM FOR PARIS

He has not been disgraced in the Olympic Games just
concluded although he did not win any medals. His placing
in one of the heats has more than established his bona fides
and there will be little disagreement with the view expressed
in Helsinki that experience in individual effort and lack of
teamwork on the level required for this type competition were
the chiei factors that militated against his chances of a greater
showing. r

We are all hoping that Farnum will be given the oppor-
tunity to pass on his knowledge to other West Indian candi-
dates and more so be able to train our local cyclists along the
finer lines which he himself must have had to develop at com-
paratively short notice and which he mu&t of necessity con-
tinue to develop,



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Racing

TWENTY-FOURTH RACE
Juvenile Handicap

Mr. J. R. Goddard’s bay yelding
Apple Sam who won the Juvenile
Stakes on ‘Thursday was again
piloted to victory in the Juvenile
Handicap, over 542 furlongs yes-
terday.

Carrying a top weight of 126lb
he won from a field of five, beat-

ing Faerie Queene into 2nd
place by a clear 3 lengths.
When the gate flew, they all

get off to a good start, and for the
first furlong or so were closely
bunched.

At the four, however, Thirkel
pushed Apple Sam to the front,
and striding beautifully, he grad-
ually increased his lead, main-
teining it alj the way down the
back stretch, around the turn by
the clock and up the home stretch.

This left Super Jet who had
been second and Faerie Queene
to battle for the second place.

There were brisk exchanges of
position between the two, but
Faerie Queene caught the judges
€yes a neck ahead of Super Jet.

TWENTY-FIFTH RACE

Victoria Handicap

Three faced the starter for this
event over nine furlongs. There
were Betsam, Newman up, 124 %b,
First Admiral, Yvonet up, 123lb,
and Seédiing, Lutchman_ up,
with a top weight of 126lb.

It was another good start, but
immediately Seedling went to the
front and stayed there. He was

followed by Betsam with First
Admiral. lying third when they
passed the judges for the first
time,

Seedling made every pole a
winning one and each time he

was challenged, he shook off the
others,

Betsam and First Admiral vied
between each other for the sec-
ond position, and while they
fought it out up the home stretch,
they close the gap between Seed-
ling and themselves.

Betsam however finished second
a head behind Seediing, while
First Admiral was third 4% a
length behind Betsam.

It was indeed a slow race, and
the distance was covered in 2
minutes 63/5 seconds.

TWENTY-SIXTH RACE

August Handicap

This event, another 9 furlong
race, featured seven horses with
Landmark carrying a top weight
of 1341b and ridden by Holder.
Slainte and Belle Surprise were
scratched. ~

Flying Dragon failed to get off
with the others once more, but
soon caught up with the bunch.
The first time past the judges, it
was Fire Lady, Lunways, Fleuxce
and Dashing Princess in that
order, with Pepper Wine, Land
Mark and Flying Dragon in close
pursuit.

Firelady kept the lead down
the far stretch, and in the mean-
time, Holder pushed Land Mark
up into the leading company, posi-
tioning himself at number four.

Around by the 9 furlong gate
and down the back stretgh, there
owere some quick exchanges: with
Lundways taking over the pre-
mier position from Fire Lady
who was now hotly pursued by
Land Mark and Pepper Wine.

Newman kept Lunways in the
lead all the way up the home
stretch, and a keen tustle was
witnessed between Fire Lady and
Land Mark.

Lunways finished the winner by
a length in front of Land Mark
who, had overtaken Fire Lady to
finish 2nd a length ahead of the
latter,

TWENTY-SEVENTH RACE
Turner Hall Handicap

Four horses faced the starter in
this 7% furlong, one being scratch-
ed, Joan’s Star, Yvonet up got off
first and was still leading when the
field passed the stands for the first
time. Blue Diamond ridden by
Lutchman was second, Cottage
piloted by Blades third with
Gavotte, (Wilder) bringing up the
rear,

As they passed the bend going
towards the five furlong pole
Gavotte took took over from Cot-
tage and the field strung out with
Joan’s Star still in the lead with
Blue Diamond second,

On nearing the four furlong pole
Cottage moved up a bit but failed
to overtake Gavotte who was still
lying in the third position. The
field raced past the two furlong
pole in this position and it was not
until they reached the bend that
things began to happen, Coming
up the straight, Gavotte came from
the outside in a driving finish to



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win by a length from Blue Da-
mond who had also beaten Joan’s
Star into second place by three
lengths.

TWENTY-EIGHTH RACE

Beckwith Handicap

Five were scratched in this event
another 744, leaving a field of
four—Mary*Ann (Yvonet), Top
Flight (Lutchman), Cross Bow
(Holder), and Apollo (P. Fletch-
er).

After a false start, the field
eventually got off to a good one
and passed up the stands for the
first time at a gruelling pace with
Top Flight slightly in the lead
followed by Mary Ann on the rails
Apollo and Cross Bow bringing up
the rear.

Top Flight was now definitely
in the lead when they reached the
three furlong pole with Mary Ann
second, The pace was still very
warm but the field slowed up con-
siderably by the time they got to
the four.

At the three furlongs pole
Lutchman still had Top Flight in
the lead but Holder had moved up
to third position with Cross Bow
and was close on the heels of Mary
Ann who was still second.

Cross Bow now started to come
through from the outside and com-
ing up the straight overtook both
Top Flight and Mary Ann to win
by alength. Top Flight was second
one and a half lengths in front of
Mary Ann,

TWENTY-NINTH RACE

North Gate Handicap _

Eight horses were seratched in
this event over 7% furlongs leav-
ing a field of eleven, Of these.
The Thing ridden by Newman and
Darham Jane ridden by Crossley
each carried 4 a 6 lbs. over-
veight respectively.
. They a ae off to a good start
and Yvonet pushed Abu-Ali to the
fore and was followed by Aim Low
and Careful Annie as they passed
the stands for the first time.

Abu-Ali in the meantime began
to inerease the lead and at the
four furlong pole was still leading
by about four lengths. The re-
mainder soon bunched as_ they
tried to decrease the lead ‘Yvonet
however kept Abu Ali well in front
making every pole a winning one,

There were some exchanges
coming around by the two furlong
pole when the field closed a bit on
Abu Ali but Yvonet still kept the
colt in front and eventually raced
up the straight a comfortable
winner by two lengths ahead of
Doldrum who had moved away
from the bunch to finish second
three lengths in front of Darham
Jane. ¥

THIRTIETH RACE
Planters Handicap

Six entrants having been
scratched from this event, five
horses faced the starter for the
54 furlong distance. 7
** cardinal was given a top weight
of 127 lb., and Caprice, an extra
7 lbs.
The field was off to a good start,
and immediately Quested hustled
March Winds into the premier

sition.
Pomme semainder of the field fol-
lowed in close pursuit, with
Cardinal, Rambler Rose and Bet-
sam in that order. There were
some quick exchanges as they
raced down the back stretch, but
March Winds maintained his lead
on the field to finish a length and
a half ahead of Rambler Rose,
Holder up. Third was Cardinal,
ridden by Crossley, 2 lengths be~-
hind, Rambler Rose.

THIRTY-FIRST RACE
Carlisle Handicap

Ten horses faced the starter in
this race, the last of the meeting
run over the 7} furlong distance.

Red Cheeks was given a top
weight of 126 Ibs., while Mrs.
Bear carried the next highest

weight of 124 lbs.

The field was off to a good start,
and when they passed the judges
for the first time Sweet Rocket
was in the lead followed by
Castle In The Air.

Bellé moved Castle In The Air
to the fore by the 51% furlong gate,
and raced him in this position
down the far stretch and up the
old polo hill.

Down the back stretch, how-
ever, Harroween, Quested up, re-
duced the lead which Castle In
The Air had, and whole field
came together in a bunch,

Angling the curve to come into
the home stretch, ft was. still
Castle In The Air on the rail, but
Harroween, coming with a great
burst of speed, overtook him and
finished first 1, lengths in front.

Red Cheeks also finished well
and stole the 2nd place from
Castle In The Air by half a length.





e
8

Overstrain!

AT Ry ea EE Ne

Ly PR Spats. eae sk

Ae wy







SUNDAY,

RACING

HE CURTAIN WAS RUN

the Carlisle Handicap.
Handicap—produced a field of

In a sense this was the key note of the meeting—exceptionally
high class and interesting races alternating with extremely
In the latter category, those of the m+
Class, hardly ever rose above the
reliable starters and a hopeless case in a field of four.
against this, fields for the A. B. and C class Maiden Races were
usually good and produced excellenteracing,

THE CHAMPION STAKES

Without doubt the most noteworthy race of the Meeting,
not even excepting the Derby was the Champion Stakes. This
innovation made, one must suppose with some trepidation,
It is fair to state that as t
turned into the straight for the last time, almost every horse
had a chance, and it was especially gratifying when that good
genuine campaigner Landmark, trained to a hair, and in her
best possible form, came away from the field

disappointing ones.

was brilliantly successful.

hundred yards or so.

out of those who contested it,

the light of subsequent events.
well Until the emd ef the Meeting although she had gone a
little too high in the Handicap to score again, Fire Lady won
a Race subsequently and Red Cheeks also showed no ill effects.
In fact the only two horses who really disappointed after their
running in the Champion Stakes were Doldrum and Flieuxce,
but I have never been satisfied that this pair is a hundred per
cent genuine at the best of times,

NEWCOMERS

Always one of the most interesting aspects of a Race

Meeting is the debut of those
champions,

and he was never threatened.
a good horse perform,

of the Meeting, but there are at
special mention.

a |

very little is also undeniable.
With regard to Mr, Bethel I

to look on him as a sort of magician, I am sure that the odds
which could have been obtained against Test Match’s winning
a race at this Meeting two weeks prior to the first day would
Yet the thing was done, and there
was Mr. Bethel with the air of having known about it all along
watching his horse in the winner’s enclosure,
apparently a fortunate person,
fortune favours the brave and there is a good deal of pluck in

have been astronomical.

Mr. Bethel’s luck.

IN CONCLUSION



By BEN BATTLE

mer Meeting in traditional style, with a brilliant race for
The race before

That good stayer Doldrum overcame a
certain amount of bad luck in the running to be second, while
Fire Lady, looking the picture of health did not in my opinion
quite last home and was third.
racing spectacle, nothing could have been more _ satisfying,
while the criticism that a mile and a half would take too much

This August we saw a very large class of C class
Maidens and one at least of these bids fair to becoming one
of the great horses of the Caribbean.
Fred Bethel’s Abu Ali whose performance on the second and
final days appeared to me to be quite outstanding.
argued by some that he was in a trifle “light” in the North
Gate Handicap, and I would be the last to deny this, but the
manner in which he accomplished his task should leave no
doubt that here is a colt with a very bright future. On a slow
track he was able to go to the front of a big field on the bit,

and I
Classically bred, strong, compact colt, is not all of that,

SUCCESSFUL STABLES
I have not had the time to work out in detail the statistics

I shall not put Mr. Bethel first this time for
fair of repetition and so the honour goes most deservingly to

ir. Sam Rock who with a string of three, including the most
moderate Joan’s Star and a backward two year old—Jim La
Rue—nevertheless won no fewer than four races. That he
was favoured by fortune and the misbehaviour of his rivals
at the gates in the G Class Races I am sure he would readily
admit, but that few can have accomplished so much with so

AUGUST 10, 1952



NOTES





DOWN on the Barbados Sum-

this—the Planter’s
five rather moderate horses.

with two un-
As

ludicrous,

field

in the. last

From the point of view of a

appeared to be ill founded in
Landmark continued to run

who may make the future

I refer of course to Mr.

It may be

It is the way that I like to see
should be surprised if this

least two trainers who deserves

am afraid that I am beginning

That he is
most of us will agree, but

Space and time forbid that we should go into the Meet-
ing in any more detail at present, but it would be as well to
conclude with a word of praise for those normally much

abused men, the Handicappers.

I seldom recall a Meeting in

which there was less talk of horses being “given” races, and
the finishes and odds paid out on the last two days bore ample
testimony to the skill of Messrs, Gill and Field,



Rain Upsets County

(From Our Own Correspondent)

LONDON, Aug. 9.
Rain again caused havoc with
the County Cricket
and in two matches, those be-
tween Surrey and Midfiesex and
Notts and Worcester, no play at
all was possible. Both will com-
mence on Monday under the two-

day rule,

The day’s only century was
scored by Northampton’s Austra~
lian left hander Jock Livingston
who made 106 before being bowl~
ed by Smith of Derby, Thanks
to Livingston’s effort. Northants
recovered after being four for two
and finished the day 173 for four.

Only a couple of hours’ play
was possible in the Indians’ game
with Gloucester at Cheltenham.
During that time Emmett and
Young scored 96 without being
separated.

Lancashire ran into trouble at
Portsmouth where Hampshire dis-
missed them on a damp wicket for
133. Only Cyril Washbrook, back
in the side after missing five
games and batting in his unusual





programme ton



Cricket Programme

position of number five faced the
Hampshire bowlers with any
confidence. He made 45. Shackle-
finished with four for 26.
But Lancashire are still in there
fighting for before close they had
captured three wickets for 47.

SCOREBOARD

Kent versus Leicester

Keen ty, ciniva cy 74 for four (rain),
Hants versus Lancs

TORRE sis ocagrtkesccalelaiuastn teontieal 135

TEROOE wrssosanstahintsions 47 for three

Yorkshire versus Sussex
Yorkshire 87 for three
(rain),
Gloucester versus The Indians
Gloucester « 96 for no
wicket (rain).

Essex versus Warwickshire
Warwickshire ., bia

(Dollery ......
Essex

Northants versus Derby
Northants ................ 173 for four
(rain.
Somerset versus Glamorgan
Glamorgan oo. . 115 for 5







ene

Steet aes
ee

“

en 2
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Se

| economical protection with splendid decorative finish.

| Sugar Estate Managers, Engineers, Building Contractors,
| Architects, specify

ATLAS TROPICAL GRADE (FUNGUS RESISTANT) PAINTS

| PRODUCED IN ENGLAND BY THE MAKERS OF
{ “ATLAS A” WOOD PRESERVATIVE

Details available from
JASON JONES & CO. LTD., P.O. Box

H.



TROPICAL
GRADE

141, Barbados.




I
if



ATLAS PRESERVATIVE CO. LTD., ERITH, KENT, ENGLAND

'

TAS/A

=



SUNDAY, AUGUST 16, 1952

Racing Results





SUNDAY



Results Of 2”-

Field Sweep Janae



ADVOCATE

In Best

League Cricket Form



AT GARRISON SAVANNAH, SATURDAY, AUGUST 8, 1952 FOURTH DAY
see oe — By ROY MARSHALL
-FOURTH RACE
2th Race: JUVENILE HANDICAP, Class “F2” and Lower (2 y.0.) ?" Ticket No. y
$700, ($235, $115, $40)—5} Furlongs ana 538 | The sun shone in Lancashire on Saturday. As a result |
or 2621 139.56
1. APPLE SAM: bg. Jetsam-Battle Doll, 126 Ibs, Mr. J. R. God= ip sig 0-78 elu wanda bo ee ee
ard (Thirk oS .
2. — be er b.f. Burning Bow-Chivalry, 123 lbs., Mr. te. 1S See gon ne. og ia Such waewee) plus fast outhelts Sie _ have pro-
. Barnard older TWENTY-FIFTH RACE orgy n-getting, smen by no means
3. SUPER JET: ch.c. jetantn- Wedding Gift, 113 + 2 Ibs, Mr. fx" ee. Aone puced an Sear cee wl
7. +o Be ” + ist 1699 had matters all their own way.
thell (¥vonet) . 2nd our 431 mip ———————-_ _Indeed three of the professionals |
ALSO 7" foe (100 + 3 Ibs., Lutechman); Jim La Rue (103 aS = eS Records Broke yp the Lancashire League, all re- |
+ ny J fe). ; ; n cognised batsmen, were out for
qe: 4,13 1698, 1700, OxT aac se —{ f~-J ducks, Roy Marshall, Indian Test
; Win: $2.46. Place $1.24, $1.24. T = RACE A White Gi hero Vinco Mankad, and Austra-
4 p 72. Prise cst Ne. f uty lian Bill Alley.
orate ar FINISH: Comfortable: 3 lengths, neck. 354 ae Alley, bowled first ball, was one
R. Goddard. = = iat (From Our Own Correspondent) of _ cight Eaine batsmen to =
25th Race: VICTORIA HANDICAP, Class “F" and “F2" Only, 100 1h 8 Oe a eee oak
6th ; ae. 10,00" r Lindwall, who achieved his best
e ($235, $115, $40)—9 Furlongs WBS os si .. S805 ua Barge were broken at vorformance in League cricket.
the City
1. > b.g. O-T.C.-Linseed, 126 lbs, Mr. S. J. Rock. ,,8500 sarh te ok Miewete: ne His eight wickets cost 35 runs.
( ). OS MEWENTY SEVENTR RARE et Shoe meee, Gegplte periodic “To Clyde Walcott fell the dubi-
2. BETSAM: ‘an b.g. Flotsam-Betty Green, 124 lbs., Mr. John a renee? No. Amonnt wi "tune becig oot oer oar the unlucki-
e ; ’ * ae
3. FIRST ADS MURAL: b.g. Admiral Fig-Flak, 128 lbs., Mr. ot z oa footy Mi ar Nils ie Me tei oe set “For nfield against Bacup, he
tid E. C. Bethell. (Yvonet) . ath 4431 «i 156.10 a new ay te best for the 440 a. virtually carried both batting and
: ale teal i? ght ares. of ed Nos hurdles with the = bowling on his shoulders. His 50
FOREC $7.20. eon RDS TwenTt-eigmrin RACE of 51.6 seconds. Not only did ihe Tank: ah eoouh -geebimones
inaae airs a. Rock, FINISH: Close: head, % length. iat toa rs sient sean cM: Same, HO | SOGRY ct the day, but it did not prevent
AINER: _ S.J. * an Lacup winning by three wickets.
tees 2 3rd ag had j from a week's é
26th Race: AUGUST HANDICAP, Class “B” and Lower, $900 (8300, "tay sson 1 oe ‘isan M2? tour of Britain with his wife in a (oi| quickly, ‘Bverpthing. depend.
$150, $55)—9 Furlongs 104%, 4046, ‘aoas, aga5, Dred car and had done no train- 44 on Clyde, and he was thus
1. LUNWAYS: b.f: Kingsways-Lundy; 117 Ibs. Mr. K. D. Ed- prize TWENTY Ni NTH RACE aiiihed ing at er Salih a more er tok te Ro His:
wards: ( ; Ist 4755 $1,011.60 ga ak wee io half-cent 00) s and |
: a) 2nd 6865 ineluded five fours. Just how
2. rn ch.m. Pylon II-Esperance, 134 Ibs., Mr. V. Chase. sr sa ° ot United $ won the mile relay sreat was his responsibility can be
‘ mins, secs. beating - seen m e fac a e other
3 a is, Quer) The Phoenix-Dido, 121 lbs. Mr. S. A. sth Sed 1.00 maica by a yard. ten batsmen totalled only 29 be- |
ALSO lying Dragon 13 Ibs, O'Neil); Dashing Princess (116 jt - 1903 The Jamaicans who won at pyeot them. The collection for |
Ibe., Lutichinan)* Pepper Wine (180 lbs, Crossley) Flieuxce (111 it st doo Helsinki were up against a differ- “1pd® amounted to £7.
rie ¥ ). vn oa ao ent American and were the 30, g beagbes an ers
w L $5.00 each to holders of tickets Nos “ever able to head the streamline pe nite Clyde’s efforts, they got
FORECASTS 92 2 Win: $8.24. Place: $2.18, $1.86, $1.66. oo 1706, tol” att iil fie 328, wee, Yanks, lathenatians, afimes tell them with three wickets and 70
START: Fair. FINISH: Easy: 1 length, 1 length. Prise Tieket No, Amount who ran the first 440 yards beat [Us to spare. He received
TRAINER: Mr. K. D. Edwards. ist 604 . $1,070.79 yi little help from the pitch but was
and ‘an aun-se a fading Arthur Wint by a clear virtually unplayable, Amongst
®th Race: TURNER HALL HANDIOAP, Class “G” and Lower, $500 ‘in vers ISROT Ceeie fee ant ens Was indesd an his victims was Everton Weekes,
($185, $80, $40)—73 Furlongs on tou &xit for Wint who was who scored a quick 24 and looked

1. GAVOTTE: hb. b.m. O.T.C.-Marionette, 126 lbs., Mr. V. E.
Cox: (Wilder).

BLUE DIAMOND: h.b. b.g. O.T.C.-Call Girl, 126 Ibs., Mr.

R, E. Gill. (Lutchman).

Rock, CY Teena h.b. b.f. Dunusk-Colleen, 121 lbs., Mr. S. J.

Hans Cott Bakes (86 lbs., Blades) .

P, Moret: Win: $1.78. Place: $1.54, $1.54.

AST: $4.80
START: Fair. FINISH: Easy: 1 length, 3 lengths

TRAINER: Mr. P. B. Walker.

—eeene hata iadiptanataticaeaeetiaeitiimrtrenentitaiaile ereneecsine inten ALTE Sil TS Delica
28th Race: BECKWITH HANDICAP, Class “D” and Lower,, $800
($265, $135, $45)—74 Furlongs.

1. CROSS BOW: b.g. Burning Bow-Chivalry, 123 lbs. Mr. C.
arnard. (Holder).
2. TOP FLIGHT: b m. Flotsam-Meads, 130 lbs., Mr. L, J. Wong.

3. MARY ANN: b.m. O.T.C.-Flak, 133 lbs., Mr. F. E. C, Bethell.
Yvonet) .
RAN: Apollo (114 lbs., P. Fletcher).
Feat tt Win: $3.82. Place: $1.46, $1.48.
” Tiuisy: Comfortable: 1 1 1% lengths.
TRAINER: Hon. V. - Gal —

cera MMSE i
29th Race: NORTH GATE HANDICAP, Class “C” and “C2” Only,
$800 ($265, $135, $50)—74 Furlongs

ch.c. Persian Gulf-Fair Witness, 125 lbs., Mr.
(Yvonet) .

Wyndham-Serenity, 126 lbs., Mr. N. M.
wan eee Bairn, 105 lbs., Mr.
104 lbs., Blades); Aim Low (125
Ibs., Newman); Test Match (126
ae er); Trimbrook (111 lbs., James) ; High And Low

Lutchman) ; Embers (108 lbs., J. Belle).

Win: $5.84. Place: $1.92, $1.92, $3.60.
20.72.

ree: Easy: 2 lengths, 3 lengths.
Mr. F. E. C. Bethell

30th Race: PLANTERS’ HANDICAP; Class “F” and “F2”
(3 y.o. and Over) $700 ($235, $115, $40)—5} Furlongs

1. ABU-ALI:
2.
i Stesle, (C sie. (Gro
: l’s promities

Ibs., Onell) The Thing (1 od ib
lbs., P

Only,

$5.00 each io holders; ot tekew Nee

4690, 4692, 6271, 6273, , 6072, 6074. letics meeting. Mashburn; num-
THIRTY-FIRST RACE ber two, American was held by

Prize Tieket No. time Laing but to every %,

tnd ‘t3a spo. recor Rhoden World’s 400 metre

ard Sage 800.20 holder could eran pass

at a "9 Pearman — despite desperate

un Las 19.09 OE sitet Ree aa And

itn sete 10.90 to Seaton elas Mal

ro 20 Beem catrese tp ioe Whitheld in the final 440 yards,

$5.00 each i” panes 2H of ise ame, Nos
0458, 0460, 4562, 4726, 4728. @ On page il



B.T.C. Summer Meeting

HORSES DRAWN

No. Horse Pts, Place Amount runs.
Some ike "Sets Central Lancash
180 entra neashire League
DD 0600 Cardinal 10 3rd 13,860 .
DD 9756 Abu-Ali 9 4th & 5th A_ fine all-round performance
AAA 4342 Joan’s Star 9 divide 6,160 by Frank Worrell earned Radcliffe
U 3397 Apple Sam 8 6th, 7th, 8th a victory over Middleton, He dis- |
N 5903 Bright Light 8 and 9th 3,080 missed six of the Middleton bats-
5678 Seedling 8 divide men for 59 runs but despite this,
JJ 8155 March Winds 8) the side fotalled 165. Batting

66 other horses divide $466.66 each
B 7356 Apronusk; 6999 Vectis.
E 1833 Jealousy
8059 Howitzer

F 7220 Dim View;
3338 Sheet Arrow; 5648 Stirling Flush

H 1494 Flieuxce;
M 8842 Watercress
N 5903 Bright Light; 2586 Magic Gaye; 3967 Colleton.
P 9716 Slainte; 2487 Faerie Queene; 5678 Seedling
1520 po ge 5476 May Day
Q 0210 6686 Notonite.
S 3921 Spear ee cite
U 3397 Apple Sam.
V 2601 Gavatte; 1144 Miracle.
W 0621 Rambler Rose.
X 8837 Doldrum; 2642 First Admiral.
BB 9811 Flying Dragon.
CC 0098 Landmark.

DD 0600 Cardinal; 1135 Fire Lady; 4070 Mary Ann; 9756 Abu-

1. MARCH WINDS: b.g. O.T.C.-April 11th, 111 lbs. Mr. U. J. Ali; 3575 The Thing.
Parravicirio, ar es: EE 0167 Baby Girl
2. RAMBLER ROSE: b.f. Burning Bow-Rose, 115 lbs. Mr. V. GG 0573 Tiberian Lady.
Chase. CHolder) HH 4906 Viceroy,
3. CARDINAL: br. g. O.T.C.-April 11th, 127 lbs., Mr. J. W. JJ 8155. March Winds.
Chandler. (Crossley) . LL 9235 Demure.
ALSO RAN: Caprice (96 + 7 Ibs., Lutchman); Betsam (121 lbs., MM 8385 Soprano; 5543 Careful Annie; 5933 Racton
Newman) . NN 3506 Red Cheeks.
TIME: 1.11. OO 0619 Dashing Princess; 7596 Pe Wine.
a byt tae i $4.58. Place: $1.48, $1.44. PP 8068 Darham Jane; 6128 Belle Surprise,
FORECAST: 44. SS 7665 WHarroween; 6447 Rebate.
START: FINISH: Comfortable: 1% lengths, 2 lengths TT 4901 Mrs. Bear.
TRAINER: Mr. R. H. Mayers. UU 2211 Lunways; 1183 Sweet Rocket; 3622 Apollo;
3ist Race: CARLISLE HANDICAP, Class “A” and “B” Only $1,000 vy 996; eat Caprice.
($335, $165, $60)—74 Furlongs WW 0271 Cross Bow; 0052 Betsam.
1 BARREN: grf. Harroway-Thyine Wood, 118 lbs., Mr. XX 1397 Top Flight
Scott. (Quested) . YY 4569 Aim Low.
3, Rep CHEEKS: b.f. Linklater-Golden Carp, 126 lbs., Mr. E. C. ZZ 7221 Meerschaum
Jones. (O'Neil). AAA 6493 Test Match; 4342 Joan’s Star.
3. CASTLE IN THE AIR: b.c., Windsor Slipper-Aero-Comet, 113 BBB 5034 April Flowers
lbs. Mr. M. E, R. Bourne. (O'Neil) . CCC 3442 Devil’s Symphony.
ALSO RAN: Demure (117 lbs., Wilder); Mrs. Bear (124 lbs., Cross- DDD 0257 Sea Foam
ley); Spear Grass os Ibs., Holder); Lunways (123 lbs., New- FFF 1871 Embers,
man); Firelady (123 lbs., Yvonet); Notonite (116 lbs P. GGG 9367 Castle in the Air.
Fletcher) ;sSweet Rocket (118 Ibs., Lutchman) . III 3853 Columbus.
PART. MUTOEL. Wi $ Pl $4.48, $2.30, $2.78 KK Stas: Sion Seo ie Rae
I- n: $10.22. ace . 48, . 30, . 78.
FORECAST: $84.48. LLL 6273 a ae ie Low; 8464 Super Jet; 9738 Pues.
START: Good. FINISH: Comfortable: 1% lengths, % length. OOO 9302 a 3512 Will o’the Wisp; 5625 Blue ond,
Mr. R. H. Mayers. ‘ RRR 8497













ee

Mem set when Clyde clean-bowled
him,

In Enfield’s innings Everton con-
tinued to show good form with the
ball and took three wickets for 33.

Lowerhouse vs. Rishton

Lowerhouse won a keenly con-
test@d game by 12 runs. atting
first they scored 168 and dismissed
Rishton for 156.

For the first time this season Roy

Marshall failed to score. He played
over a yorker from the young
RNishton bowler Kenyon and was
clean bowled. He thus still needs
29 runs to beat the individual bat-
ting record for a season for a}
Lowerhouse professional.

However, Roy rendered his side |
good service with the ball, captur-
ing four Rishton wickets for 41

against the clock, Radcliffe knock~
ed off the runs for victory and
scored 170 for three, of which Wor-
rell scored a stylish hard-hitting
84 not out, including 12 fours.

Royton vs. Crompton

Sonny Ramadhin’s side (Cromp- |
ton, were heavily defeated by Roy- |
ton. Royton batted first and in
2% hours scored 167 for seven
declared,

Sonny toiled manfully on a bats-
man’s wicket and took three wick- |
ets for 57 in 25 overs, six of which
were maidens, Crompton were all
out in an hour and three quarters
for 71 runs, Sonny scored 13,

Ramadhin narrowly failed in |
the race to become the first bowler |
to take 100 wickets this season.
He was beaten by Eric Price, who
took his hundredth for Middleton
against Radcliffe. Ramadhin has |
now taken 99,

A benefit match has been ar-
ranged for Ramadhin on August
10th. He is leading a West Indian
team against Walsall.

Owing to the new ruling, no
Lancashire League professionals
will be playing, as the League has
banned Sunday cricket,

Ramadhin will still have a
strong side, however, including
such players as Frank Worrell,
C. 8S. Nayudu. and Charlie Bar-
nett, former Gloucestershire and
England opening bat, and seam

Clyde Walcott mee a great
future for R. Dickinson, a 17-
year-old wicket-keeper whom he
is coaching at Enfield.

“Dickinson takes the ball very





PAGE FIVE



-

ROSES

| AUG. NO. 236

The Topic
of

Last Week |

OR

Gin &



sw
ime

AND

Rum & Lime

AGENTS:

L. M. B. MEYERS & (CO. LTD.

“Soapin ~ iulls hair_
Halo glo-ifies itt

—-



The races are now over
Somebody ain't get none
Well boys don’t be

You had four days of fun,
. : .

You saw that girl with “Red Cheeks”
And “Careful Annie” too

Both posing with “Columbus”
And his friend “Jim La Rue.”



j
|
|
}

disgruntled {
|
|

“Mrs. Bear’ and “Flying Dragon”
Met under a “Bright Light”
There they saw a great “First Admiral”

One those boys from the “Top Flight.”

Then behind him tcabven the “Viceroy”
With a “Dashing Princess’ too
And like many malicious people





They only got a very “Dim View.”
: . .



Joe and Robert joined the party
Up stepped their friend “Mary Ann”

HALO leaves your

With her boy friend in a “Bow Tie! hair wonderfully soft
Then the “Jealousy” began | and easy to manage

Ma ma let me join this party | ’
Cried her three-year “Baby. Girl"

Get a car drive round bY “Colleton” | HALO makes your

Let me see Barbados World
: . .

i









permanents take
It is dark the sta all “Twinkle”
You'll miss @ glorious sight better — last longer!

Wait my dear the mother whispered |

But the irl cried “No-to-Nite.” HALO REVEALS
*. . |

In the darkness they went speeding THE HIDDEN BEAUTY
With the Taxis stern “Aim Low.” |

And when they all reached home safely | OF YOUR HAIR

What a “Miracle? whispered Joe.

A new conversation started
On the “Test Match" then ‘The Thing’
And a boy-——a great “Soprano”
Hummed a tune-—then start to sing.
. *

You could hear him from the “Cottage’
Singing at times, “High and Low”

While the crowd around excited
He possessed his own “Demure.”

They all left for eaeaper th “Landmark” |
Opposite they had a

"T hear steel bands” cried oa pat Robert |

Playing the “Devil's Sympthony |

|

|

!

It was music! ius music!
Hear the sound inside the wall?

Rut the musie and our marching
Could not shake Glendairy wall

YOU CAN TASTE
THE CREAM ®

For the host of mischief makers
Who build ‘“Cagtles in the Ajr’
Can be sure theif music sweeter
To the boys outside; don’t fear
. . .
For the bays who saw the races
With the girls from near and far
Could enjoy one consolation
A large bottle of J. & R.
. .
Joe is broke ahd Robert stranded
Not a cent is left behind
Robert is one big free agent
Joe must drink Lou's * ‘Pepper Wine”
Home ities went together singing
Not a cent to buy a light

Lou cried “Robert you're a bachelor
Joe can't sleep in here to-night

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| he story of the name
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THE HERC TD., BIRMING

Tr. GEDDES BRIDGETOWN

£AS/1 4/74











PAGE SIX






“For Women 4

Only!” * aA
e
’
> Vo
“Sure I love you, Mummy, and especially when you give me
WOODWARD'S.” ;
WOODWARD'S GRIPE WATER, mothers, IS the best remedy

for baby’s aches and pains. WOUDWARD’S is known the world over
--time and the comfort of millions of babies surely prove its worth,

Here are two parents ready to prove
the worth of another well-known health-
aid. Users of SPA TOOTH BRUSHES for
yeors, Mr. and Mrs. John Smith can
afford to smile. Their sparkling, white
teeth pay no small tribute to SPA—the
finest toothbrush out, in either nylon or
bristle



As for June, here, no wonder
she looks so gay. June believes
in BANDBOX preparations for
healthy, hair beauty. BANDBOX
ALMOND OTL SHAMPOO con-
tains active oil-ingredients that
soften the hair and help its growth.

COLAIRE, another Bandhox
beauty-aid, puts those gleaming
starlight’s in June’s hair. COL- :

is a powder the miracle f .
dressing you can brush in and out at will. Colaire comes in shades of
Auburn, Gold, Champagne and many other tints, also silver for the
white-haired. On sale at most drug stores.

: This little lady is very HOUSE-
PROUD—and no wonder! Every-
where in her home you will find
AIR.WICK. It’s the ‘wick that
does the trick.’ Raise it from the
liquid in the bottle and all un-
pleasant smells will be absorbed.

Kitchen odours, stale tobacco
fumes, all are completely dis-
pelled by AIR-WICK. Try a bot-
ue, you'll never ever after be
without it.



This fellow’s an ugly customer,
and doesn’t he look frustrated.
The VAMOOSE-PUFFER in the
handy puffer tin, is the reason
why. One or two puffs-of the
VAMOOSE-PUFTER tin quickly
exterminates all such pests. Con-
‘taining -D.D.T., one or two quick
puffs in cupboards or rooms
will rid your home of all insect
discomforts .



A “slim and lovely” lady steps
out —~- confident, poised, not only
because she’s welldressed, but in
the knowledge that her perfect
figure carries off everything she
wears. By using SILF, one tablet
night and morning, you too can
possess her sylph-like figure. No
dieting, no exercise, just two
tablets of SILF a day, take all
that ugly fat away.



Mom’s just

“Am I happy!
given me a SCROLL pen. It
writes im both red and blue. Get
my homework done in half the

time, now. Dad bought one right
away—so did Sis—after borrow-
ing mine. Now all the family
write with SCROLL BALLPOINT
PENS, in either blue, red or both.
Easy to refill, SCROLL is a pen
for all. Don’t lend yours out-—
you*might not get it back.”



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SUNDAY

ADVOCATE



MAKE IT YOURSELF

A CHILD’S SUN-DRESS Gai'\ \
Aes \
+

Sizes 2-4, 4—6, 6—8 Years
Here is a sweet little dress for
warm days on the beach or in the
country, with lattice-work of ric-
rac braid. It is extremely simple
to make, buttoning down the
back, with plain ice, extended
shoulders, and full gathered skirt.
The ric-rac is repeated on the
Dorothy bag pockets. Use any
plain pastel cotton or linen, with
crisp white ric-rac braiq to look
as cool as an ice cream, Your
daughter. will love to wear it.
This pattern is obtainable in
sizes 2—4, 4—6, and 6—8 years.
There are six pattern pieces.
You will require one yard of
36-inch material for 2—4 years,
One and a quarter yards for 4—6
years, or one and a half yards for

6—8 years.

REMEMBER to fit the pattern
carefully, and if necessary adjust
the pattern before cutiting the
material. Allow half -an-inch on
all turnings. Mark notches, but
do not cut.

TO CUT: Cut one width 18,
14, or 10 inches long, according
to size, and one piece to the fold
9 inches wide and 18, 14, or 19
inches long. Cut pockets as placed
on diagram, and enough crossway
one and a half inches wide to
bind back and armtholeg, also
pockets. Cut centre front to fold,
and centre back to selvedge, Cut
one width two and a half inches
wide for the belt.

_ TO MAKE: Sew ric-rac braid
in lines diagonally across the
front bodice, then join shoulder
and side seams, and press. Bind
arms and neck with crossway.
Join the two pieces of skirt to-
gether at one seam and press
Gather the straight edge of each
pocket to about 4% inches, and
bind with crossway, then sew
ric-rac braid along the top. Gath-
er the top of skirt, and fold in half






lo find the centre foi the centre
front; stitch rounded edge ~of
pockets to each side of centre
front. Join skirt to waist, then
turn the centre backs in two
inches, and press, Make button-
holes in the right-hand side of
back, half-an-inch from the edge,
and sew buttons to the left side.
Bind, the neck and armholes with
crossway. Turn up two-inch
hem of skirt. Fold belt length in
haif lengthwise, right sides facing,
and join across end and along
edges. Turn through to the right
side, close open end, and press.
Make belt loops and press.

Why not make your little girl
the gift of this smart dress. The
patterns can be had in three sizes
from the Advocate Stationery at
only 6d, per pattern,

ebbicieeinsinineiese



ee rrerenemery -erpeen marae sameeren ene





xlvedge . : ye
, ey vr ee ee
Le Ae ij
Ae "A
got yo i Lait
Oe 74 -
IF 18" a a

{ a7 ee we 94
eos

Fold

be
i Er eas ann a ako naa lla LEE ak ws

And Now The “Swan Look”

LONDON

Ccuture week opened to-day
with the collection of John Cay-
anagh, the newest recruit to the
exclusive ranks of the Incor-
porated Society of Fashion De-
signers, With this collection—his
first as a member of the society,
and one that was full of sur-
prises—he makes a dramatic en-
trance into the world of “haule
couture”,

Cavanagh made it clear from
the start that he is a disciple
in the Cult of the Unusual. First
evidence of this came with the
somewhat starling announcement

op 20"

tweed, green wool jersey, green
and black flecked tweed, green
linings to short jackets and coats,
a green rose on a biack evening
dress, and green violets and veil-
ing on a black hat.

Cavanagh had unusual ideas,
too, about the use of materials,
and suggested bright blue tweed,
embroidered with black jet, for
a cocktail suit, gold wool-lame
for suits and a casual day dress,
and again, qa cocktail shirt in
emerald-embroidered green tweed.

Then came little hats for wear
with full-length é€vening dresses
—miniature boaters, with bouff-

that next season we are to look ant veilings, and plumage dyed
like swans. to match. :
“Collars cut in one with bodices The collection ineluded sev-
give a long-necked look”, says eral dresses of the kind that
Cavanagh. “Skirts blow gently make those at the back of the

back with a new curved seaming
which gives fullness at the bac's,
straightness at the front.” This
silhouette was shown for suits,
dresses, cocktail dresses, and
most effective of all, for full-
length evening dresses. Swan
feather caps and swan-headed
umbrellas provided further sem-

audience stand on their little gilt
chairs to obtain a better view. A
full-length ball dress in pale
pink satin had _ starfish em-
broidery on its full skirt, a short
dress in black taffeta rose em-
broidery; a short dinner dress
was in red lace over green tulle,

and a tailored suit in black
blance of reality”. honey-comb velvet was worn
Then came surprising colours ; with a blouse in gold embroid-

Hyacinth mauve-blue (for a woul

ered gold silk,
jacket, lined with green faille!),

The final impression was that

Boulevard Red, Connemara Green, Cavanagh had used in this one
and oddly enough, not a speck collection ideas another designer
of grey. This season, it is Green might have spread over three

fon Fashion.

Green Donegal collections.

EVA

mink,



SUNDAY, AUGUST 10, 1952



The death of a Joan of Arc in

leaves Peron's ‘shirtless

ones with realities instead of

rainbows ...

By MILTON

EVA PERON’S declared ambition was simple enough. 4x
She wanted to be a footnote.

phrasing.
“There was hy the side of

SHULMAN

She had even suggested its

Peron, a woman who dedicated 5 4

herself to bring to the President the hopes of the people—hopes
which he could convert into realities,” she wrote in her autobio-

graphy, La Razon de Mi_ Vida.

fully repaid if the footnote would end like this:

“And I would feel proparly and
‘Of that woman

we only know that the people used to call her, caressingly, Evita.’”

Historians may surprise Eva
and take her at her word. They
may even deny General Peron a
complete chapter. For in the tur-
bulent firmament of South Ameri-
can politics dictators blaze and
die with the quixotic incandes-
cence of comets. Will the regime
of Juan Domingo Peron be re-
membered as much different from
the others?

Perhaps Eva did make the dif-
ference. She helped to transform
a military coup into a_ crusade.
She set herself up as a Joan of
Are wearing armour by Dior and
brandishing a microphone as her
weapon. Her Dauphin was Peron.
P Circuses, Too
IT was a muddled crusade com-
pounded of a hatred of poverty,
love of the workers, revenge
against the rich, driving envy,
personal ambition and a simple
faith in the destiny of her man.
{t was a patchwork philosophy,
more conscious of the verbiage
than the aims of Fascism, Syndi-
calism, Socialism, Beveridgism,
and Nationalism. Through it all
ran a broad. streak of Latin-
American emotionalism.

It promised not bread or cir-
cuses, but bread and circuses, with
the spotlight on the beautiful be-
spangled Eva riding barebacked
around the ring handing out the
loaves,

It undoubtedly gave to the
workers a share in the govern-
ment, inereased pay, womidn’s
suffrage, and a measure of social
welfare unknown before. It de-
manded in return a- subservient
electorate, a docile parliamentary
opposition, a puppet Press, obedi-
ent labour leaders and the whole-
sale surrender of liberty.

For his survival Peron has had
to rely upon the tolerance of the
army and the active support of
the workers. His own career has
equipped him for handling sold-

iers. Eva solidified his bond with
the descamisados (the shirtless
ones),

Disc Jockey

MARIA EVA DUARTE came of
the people, most authorities agree,
on May 7, 1919. She herself pug-
naciously femiriine, fnsisted that
her birth was at least three years
later.

Eva's father, a small land-owner,
died when she was a child. At
16, she left her mother’s boarding
house in the provincial city of
Junin to seek her fortune as an
actress in Buenos Aires. Neither
the theatre nor films welcomed
her decidedly limited talents.

But her sympathetic, vibrant
voice was made for radio where,
as a disc jockey, commentator
and heroine of soap operas, she
became known to factory girls,
slaughter-house workers and
gauchos as Senorita Radio,

First Meeting

LIKE so much of Evita’s life,
her first meeting with Peron is
wrapped in an exasperating tissue
of speculation and romanticism,
It seems, however, they met
sometime late in 1943 while rais-
ing funds for earthquake victims,
at a cocktail party, or while Eva

was broadcasting a eulogy of
Peroy’s activities. Take your
choice.

Colonel Peron was then Secre-
tary of Labour and Social Welfare
in the government of pro-Axis
army officers who had overthrown
the discredited Conservative re-
gime,of President Castillo on June
4, 1943. The Colonel was 48 years
old, handsome, a champion fencer,
a respected military Strategist, an
admirer of Franco and Mussolini,
and very ambitious,

He understood that reliance

upon the wealth of absentee land-
lords and the high-handed mea-
sures of generals was a shaky
foundation for the establishment
of power. His regime needed a
popular base and he sought it by
courting the country’s leading
trade unionists.

In this work of flattery and
persuasion Eva was an invaluable
aid. She dramatised his work
over the air with her purring, fer-
vent oratory; afd while Peron
worked on the labour leaders Eva
was building up a mass following
of the poor and the dispossessed.

Marriage

WHEN in 1945 the landlord and
army officers arrested Peron on
one of those shifts of allegiance
that makes South American poli-
tics so incomprehensible to the
foreign observer, it was Eva who
exhorted, rallied and organised
the protest march of 50,000 work-
erg on the capital. After five days’
imprisonment, on October 17, the
frightened leaders of the revolt
released Peron. Four days later
he married Eva.

A resounding electoral victory
in February 1946 made the Colo-
nel a President and the small-time
actress a First Lady.

But the careful coiffure and the
skilful good looks camouflaged
the hard will and the boundless
ambition that motivated Eva
Peron. She took over at the Min-
istry of Labour the work that had
been started by her husband.

Draping herself in. Mink and
diamonds she went down to the
factories and farms offering her-
self as unassailable proof of the
promise and opportunities in the
new Argentine. “You will all
have clothes like these some day,”
she assured them,

At her thrice-weekly audiences
she dispensed favours, jobs and
money like some bountiful Mrs.
Roosevelt, who: looked like Cin-
derella, But she could sting, too,
and labour leaders or Ministers
who disagreed with her were ouf.

It was a social snub by the
Argentine’s socjal dowagers who
refused to ask her to be the hon-
orary president of their charity
organisation that led to Eva’s set-
ting up of her huge Social Aid
Foundation.

It is now the country’s biggest
organisation which, in its declar-
ed aim of distributing food, medi~
clne and money to the needy, has
come to own HKkospitals, ware-
houses, retail shops, homes for
working girls, old people and
indigent mothers. There is even
an entire Children’s Village built
o> See after 1,000 poor children
a day.

The desire of Eva'$ good wil)
stimulated the flow of money inte
ae Teena with trade unions
and business supplying the larg-
est share, Its
exceed £35 million a year, which
Eva spent as she liked without
troubling to keep accounts.| “I
just use the money for the poor,”
she explained, “I can’t stop to
count it.”

When, however, last year Eva
set her cap for the Vice-Presi-
dency she had gone too far in a4
land where women were practi-
eally unknown in public life and
only voted for the first time in
1951. The army firmly said no.
The Perons made a_ humiliating
retreat and Eva was given a large
medal and the title “Spiritual
— of the Nation” as compensa-

on.

Suspicion
BUT oratory and emotion were
© match for econonfe gales,
eckless spending and the loss of
markets through extortionate

@ On Page 11







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Fruit Salt’

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IS THE ANSWER





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Protect your

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Ipana and Massage. Use Ipana, also, to brush your teeth extra-
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income is said to 1g



’ The STARS: *x*

and YoU i fi iy,



FOR SUNDAY, AUGUST 10, 1952

Look in the section in which your birthday comes and
find what your outlook is, according to the stars.

*

ARIES vm and Sun, senacs commend delicate
aa handling of family and home interests, en-
March 21—April 90 courage more aid to worthy causes, ree
ligious interests, '

Grand influences from your own venus
should give a boost to personal desires.
Be of good cheer, attend your church, *
Your Mercury and Mars positions now
recommend a most genial and co-Opete= 34.
tive attitude to gain ‘the blessings and ad-
vantages indicated for private interests.

*
*«
*

TAURUS
April 21—May 20

*

GEMINI
May 21—June 21

*

Moon and Venus combine to-day to sus
CANCER tain ileasantriee, | Saee vist Pieee as
22—J ment that comes from ve
am “> God, country, family, good fri i *

*

A beneficent outlook for you with gaiety,
sports outdoor activities of which are
fond all favoured in moderation. of

all think of God, *
Though to-day’s vibrations encourage ac-,
tivity, essential work, wholesome plea- 4
sures, it is advised to abstain from any,
mental and physical strain.

have a happy day. ¥ *
Read Taurus and Cancer; your indications
similar. Whatever your duties, make ee at

pleasant; enjoy free hours fully, Healthy
fun, sports sponsored.

LEO
July 24—Aug. 22

VIRGO
Ang. 23—Sept. 23
You

LIBRA
Sept. 24—Oct. 23
’

Mars’ inauspicious configuration ae
9g kindliness, mild temper; then you can

truly enjoy benefit from the wonderful *
rays of other planets this grand Sunday.

SCORPIO
Oct. 24—Nov.

Jupiter among the major planets backing
activity this Sunday; Church, healthful re-
creation, ete. After services, relax with

family, friends. +
Saturn nil in tendency all to the good,
because this is God’s Day and laborious 94,

work (unless essential) should give way
to other things.
matters.

SAGITTARIUS
Nov. 23—Dec. 22

Dec. 23— Jan. 21
CAPRICORN

Fine day for wholesome

Same as Capicorn to-day. You can have
pleasant, interesting and purposeful sais 4,
if you help make them so. Just avoid sud-
den changes, decisfons, carelessness. Pray,
rest,

AQUARIUS
Jan. 22 — Feb. 20

Kaew KeKe KK KK KKK KK

Many grand influences for building mind
and hcalth, for nourishing soul’s ne
Essentials, recreations, hobbies AND
PRAYER favoured.
YOU BORN TODAY are clever, ingenious, courteous but
not always tactful. May have unusual artistic talent, perhaps
XK tor stage, screen, or playwriting. Watch that conceit not be ~«
-eouraged, nor arrogance, Study, aim constantly to improve
ane yuu wil. Don’t be averse to constructive criticism.
Birthdate ot: Herpert Clark rioover, 3ist U.S. Presi;
Norma Shearer, actress.

x eee HH HHH *F
prices for, meat and wheat have B ALD HE AD.

resulted in inflation, the fall of
the peso and a rising cost of liv- Nn a cunning attempt to antici-

pate sponsored television, Snibbo
Ltd. commissioned a dramatist to

PISCES
Feb. 21—March 20

The fresh bloom of love be-
tween Peron and the trade unions

has faded into suspicion. Recent mat whose head shines like te?
eee have been ruthlessly sun after four applications of a

nameless tonic.

His wife uses the tonic to pol-
ish furniture, and their baby’s
whooping-cough is cured by it.
Never once is Snibbo mentioned
by name, but in the last lines of
the play the bald man says to his
wife; “Clara what is the name of
this magic stuff?” “Need I tell
you?” replies the wife. “Ah, well,
perhaps not, says the husband,
with a smug smile. Rather subtle,
rather sophisticated?

Talking Point
A solemn and religious regard
to spiritual and eternal things
is an indispensable element of
all true greatness,
—Danial Webster

With the Army brooding and
restless over a revolt that mis-
fired only last year, with the in-
tellectuals fretting in the gloom
of a darkening totalitarianism,
and with the workers fin the
cost of living overtaking their in-
creased wages can Peron remain
in power?

And who will delight and dazzle
the descamisados now that Evita’s
gone? And will they stick by
Peron when they have to accept
realities instead of rainbows? Or
will Peron follow the long parade
of little dictators into obscurity?
But even if he does, Evita should
get her wish. She should, at least,
make a footnote.

WORLD COPYRIGHT RESERVED








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write a one-act play about a bald...





SUNDAY; AUGUST



WOMEN AT WORK:

Southern

Northern

When bachelor girls in Montreal
forégather to gossip and play
calypso recordings, it is probably
the British West Indian colony
now living in Canada and em-
ployed by Trans-Canada Air Lines
A —— knit community of eight
girls and one young man from



EMPLOYEE relations expert, Ma-
rion Nichols, at her typewriter in
the International Aviation Building
in Montreal.

Trinidad and Barpados live and
work in the metropolitan area,
and share the pleasures of
Canada’s constantly c haneine
seasons, with a peppering of the
more blase diversions of the
theatre, ballet, symphony, opera,
and the occasional “creole fete.”

. As many of the girls share ac-
commodation, the creole fetes
have developed a “down home”
atmosphere.. Three Trinidadian
representatives, Dora and. Gloria
Lovrenco, with room-mate Joan
de La BaSstide, are the centre. of
much activity. Joan and Gloria
are both employed in the public
relations department of the air-
line, and Dora is. with the flight
operations. group.

Joan de La Bastide is training
to be a dancing teacher, with a
plan to eventually establish a
dancing school in Trinidad, where-
as the Lourenco girls are both
matrimonial bound. Dora will
settle in Toronto and Gloria in
Montreal with their future hus-
bands.

Another section of the colony
occasionally in attendance at the
creole fetes is the Barbadian,

10,

1952



Belles In
Climes

Sheila and
lone male
passenger

Joan. Lewis and the
representative, a TCA
agent at the Interna-
tional terminal, Vere Brooks.
Pretty Sheila Lewis is employed
at the International airport as a

teletype operator, a trade she
learned while serving with the
A.T.S, during the war, and later

with the Cable & Wireless Com-

pany in Barbados. Joan, her
sister, id employed with the
Reyal Bank of Canada. One

staunch new Canadian, and an-
other former. resident of Barbados
and ex-employee of the Cable &
Wireless, is Marion Nichols, a
veteran of several trans-contin-
ental transfers before settling in
the labor relations department of
the airline in Montreal,

Honor Heath, daughtey of Mrs.
Ida Heath of Rockley near Has-
tings, is also a TCA'’er and at-
tended Queen's College, Barbados,
and Bishop Anstey High School
in Port of Spain. The attractive
18-year-old Barbadian is presently
attending night school to qualify
as a beautician, and recreation-
ally ‘is becoming proficient in
tennis, daneing and skiing in the
Laurentians.

The British West Indian colony
is gradually swelling its. ranks
in Canada, as Adrienne de Ver-
June Austen (Toronto) and the
teuil, Zita Rodriques, June Minion,
others promise to continue en-

livening the Canadian scene with
“jump-up.”

the occasional



TELETYPIST. . . The nimble fin-
gers of Sheila Lewis at work on
messages to Trans-Canada Air Lines’
afty-two stations,



FOUR PRETTY GIRLS from Trinidad and Barbados gather for tea

and gossip. Left to right:

Adrienne de Verteuil, Honor Heath, Joan

de La Bastide and Gloria Lourenco.



the fashiinable woman wears



hs AY % L Re nylon stockings

JUST RECEIVED

SIMMONS

BEDSTEADS

4 Feet 6 inches

ONLY A LEMITED QUANTITY SO CALI
AND G®T YOURS EARLY
Incorporated

T. HERBERT LID.

10 & 11 Roe

Established

buck Street



FASHION







[Dp IN LONDON

SUNDAY ADVOCATE



By DOROTHY

HRARKLEY



Coronation Year “Look’’
THE TOP ELEVEN GET BUSY

By DOROTHY BARKLEY

LONDON, July 17th, 1952.

Will London’s Top Eleven de-
signers, due to show their collec-
tions in a fortnight’s time, estab~
lish a new look or Coronation
Year? What will follow the
“romantic revival” of last year,
which brought back full skirts
billowing out over crinoline petti-

coats, and the “Middy” look this
year, which echoes the low,
yound-the-hip waistline and

straight skirtline of the 1920's?

Hint of future fashion comes
this week from Peter Russell, wh«
was one of the first to re-intro-
duce those Edwardian petticoats,
He declares that styles will be
“sleek,” possibly with a return
to reed-slim skirts, sheath dresses
and crisp tailoring.

Whatever the style to
launched, overs@€as buyers ars
regarding "Fashion Week” this
July with more than usual inter-
est. They consider these collec-
tions an important preliminary tc
Coronation Year, Special social
events have been arranged for
them. Foremost among these. is
the garden party to be given .by
Lady Kenneth Clark, President oi
the Incorporated Society of Lon-
don Fashion Designers, at her
house in Hampstead, the home of
artists.

be

This is the first garden party
for overs®as buyers to be given
by the Incorporated Society. Here
they will meet not only tne Top
Eleven designers but the heads of
Britain’s wool, rayon, cotton,
linen and, silk industries, and
such modern artists as Graham
Sutherland and Henry Moore,
who both take considerable int>r-

est in contemporary industrial
design.
Lady Clark, wife of Sir Ken-

neth Clark chairman of the
Arts Council — hopes to stimulate

interest in fabric design and
colour.
Waiting for the Top Eleven

collections, overseas buyers have
watched the signpost shows of the
London Model House Group (the
second-in-command to the Incor-
porated Society).

Typical were Dorville who heli
a preview of their new styles thi
week. Last year’s full skiris *
replaced by straight skirts, usual!
with an inverted or wrap-
pleat at the back. On the
occasion when fullness appea!
had none of last season’s bc:

petticoated effect. Full skirts



no time.
and safely.

nor upset the stomach.

ae ene p- anne semen igotniiattacetndaitisastiiateymssttenante

PHENSIC tablets clear the head and dispel
tightness and pain behind. the eyes, They
bring down high temperature, relieve stuffy,
congested feelings, at tht same time soothing
the nerves and counteracting depression.
The aches and pains of ’Flu disappear in
PHENSIC tablets act quickly
They neither harm the heart

PHENSIC tablets by you always.

Phensic

FOR ’FLU, COLDS & CHILLS, RHEUMATIC PAINS,
LUMBAGO, NERVE PAINS, HEADACHES, NEURALGIA

were of the all-round, accordion
pleated, variety with the pleats
cut so finely that they gave a
straight, flat appearance. And
square, paddeq shoulders have,
regrettably replaced the feminine
rounded line,

Suits were in grey worsted
flannel black hopstack, navy vel-
veteen, and stone barathea. Tweed
mixtures had unusual effects —
parma violet striped with white,
tan with grey, rust with bottle
green, Most of the suits had
their own individual blouse, clev-
erly inked with the jacket lining,
A black hopstaek suit had the
jacket lined, with black-spotted
orange. silk, and a blouse to match,
(See illustration). A steel grey
West of England flannel hada
colourful Paisley silk blouse and
jacket lining.

Black was chosen for all types
of outfits, and offset each time

with a different colour, A black
serge dress, with square neck and
sheath slim skirt was teamed with
a yellow duches satin bolero
over these went a three-quarter

length black corduroy coat with
raglan sleeves, A dinner dress in
black silk jersey and matching

tole lined with white silk jersey,
and a contrasting red silk jerse;

cummerbund. An@ a black-and-
white check velveteen jacket,
with check placed diagonally on



pocket and cuff facings, was worn |}

over a straight black skirt.
Cocktail dresses in silk with a
polka dot pattern looked effective,

Illustrated ig one in sherry slk
with a black velvet spot, The
swathed belt with its floating
“chou” is detachable,

New. season's details noted:
light grey worsted shawl collar
on dark grey worsteds suits
dresses with matching cardigan
searves, with six-inch fringes ;at

either end, accompanying sult
and néw shades of old colours
“blueberry” and “green grass.”



What’s Cooking In
The Kitchen

Steamed Snapper
Snapper 2. Ibs., sait,
onion, carrot, celery, unyme,
parsiey, butter 3 oz, white wine,
40r @ DIT Ol frum, Meur, 4 lable-
Spoontul, cream ow @Vvaporaved

muik,

Bone fish, cut it in a few parts
and season inside and out. Chip
the onion, the parsiey, thyme,
carrot and celery and put every-
thing at the bottom. ol a pyrex
dish. Put the fish on top after
buttering it and put it in the oven,
Let it cook for 10, minutes, then
take the dish out and pour the
2 glasses of white wine over it.an
a tiny bit more of melted butter,
Let everything cook now until
the fish is quite ready. Take it
out of the oven then, if the sauce
is thick enough you’ can serve it
on the fish but if it is still thin
add a tiny bit more butter with
the 4 tablespoonful of flour and
let it cook for about 3 minutes
until thick. Add the cream then
or evaporated milk (about 4
glass) and whip the sauce always
on the fire until quite smooth,

If you cannot use white wine
with this recipe you can use a bit
of rum with water.

Snapper with Tomat» Sauce

You can use snapper or mullets
or even pot fish with this very easy
and tasty recipe,

Snapper or other fish.
olive oil, salt, pepper,

pepper,

Flour,

onion,

Keep a supply of

d fat

parsley,
sauce.
After
pass it
or the

garlic, thyme, tomato
cleaning the fish, dry it
in flour and put the fish
filets of snapper in a
saucepan or pyrex dish so that
they rest in the bottom. Add
some olive oil and let the oil get
hot. As soon as one side is cook-
ed turn it over on the other side,
season with salt, pepper, chipped
onion, parsley, a tiny bit of gar-
lic, thyme. Let it fry for a few
more minutes, then add a thin
tomato sauce (about 4 table-
spoonsful). Let everything boil
another two minutes and
serve hot,
>Steamed Snapper

Another recipe for
snapper.

Snapper, olive oil, onion,
parsley, whole tomatoes or tomato
sauce, salt and pepper,

Cut some fillets, wash and dry.

Put some oil in a saucepan with |

the chipped onion. As soon as
the onion starts to fry add a tiny
piece of chipped garlic, and some
chipped parsley. Let the garlic
fry for a very short time, then
add the whole tomatoes or tomato
sauce, 1 tablespoonful of water,
ealt and pepper.

Add the fish then and let the
fish cook for about 10 minutes or
a quarter of an hour.

Serve hot and finish with a few
pieces of chipped parsley.

TWO TABLETS <—
BRING QUICK

—

RELIEF ~ \



exciting,

steamed |

garlic, |



Man About Town

MATERNITY DRESSES — yes,

ind beautifully made by LE
CHATEAU DRESS SHOP. This
newly opened Salon in Country

Road offers a delightful stock of
dresses and gowns—the prices ar
styled for your purse

| Designs, too, are highly individual
| (you must see the Harlequin
2-piecé with reversible Bolero

Swim Suits and Cocktail Dresses
| (you definitely must see these)
| are so wonderfully priced, I wish
| I could tell you.....

+

ORIENTAL CHARM in the form
of MOONSTONE veweiry ‘
eparking array of Bracelets
wiese Ceylonese holiday gifts in-
ciude Necklaces that are mos(
attractive and NOt expensive;
.rom Bompay for the first timc
a baroOuagus comes NEW prtAcs

| WAN designed in Lamps, Vases
and Bowis — realy dillerent and
jinagicaily of the bast, you'll fina
mem in THE ORIBNTAL SHOP
}ecorner of Magn Bi, (pn. 4404), .
branch of Surti United

ROBERTS & CO. FOR OFFIC:
| SPALAUNERY really means wha

t says. Smart office desk ac.
cessories imiciude RPBBER
STAMPS, ROLLER DAMPEKS

and STAMP KACKS. An indis-
pensable item is an {nk stand for
31.92 and the neat Letter Scales
for $8.50 and most of us need a
Stapling Machine (from $4.60)
among an almost endless variety
ot otice fequisites on saie a
-Roberts & Co., Dial 3301,

you HAVE NEVER SEEN A
| STORE LIKE THIS ONE—in a
long, long time. At GEORG:
;SAHELY & CO. on Swan Si.
/there’s a near daily habit tne
} opening ol new stock, And the
values, whew.......! Look at this
CHAMBNAY, 36° wade in choice
of six colours for (Gc. a yard and
volling out of its wrapping paper

sttaignt into eager snoppiny
oaskets, is yours one of them,
seller hurry along, new stock

never waits at GEORGE SAHELY
| & CO,

j ‘ ® \

| THIS BAKERY HAS THE
!ONLY MACHINE of its kind on
the Island. That’s why BARBA-
;YOS BAKERIES LTD, (ph. 4758;
}can size and shape any kind of
toaf; why, too, they can produce
| the ideal hot-dog ROLL—the rea!

}mMcCoy; and FRENCH BREAU
jand the enriched WRAPPEL
LOAF that are but three in &

| range of ten distinctive varieties.
| Deliveries are made to your doot
4nd with each order you’re assurea
of a

modern plant behind your
every purcliase.
|; ‘TALKING OF STATIONER}

AND OFFICE ACCESSORIES let's
take a look at OFFICE FITTINGS
~Desks and Chairs and 4-drawer
Filing Cabinets (letter or fools-
) cap) and TYPEWRITERS. These
ire American and English
Remingtons both portable and
standard and with the 18” carriage
| us well, Now this is a clipped ac-
count of a very wide selection,
jincluding Gestetner Duplicator:

| The distributors are A.S. Bryden
& Sons (B’dos) Lid. and the
phone 4675,

J. DT.



Dial 4335







—10%- -












5
PAGE SEVEN —_
Keep t DARK with 23>

WHEN FP’S A QUESTION OF Permanent, washable
. _— and harmless. All
SORE FEET on ho account stand natural date. S@yenrs”
en ceremony CAVE SHEP. reputation. Ask your chemist to ob
HERD’S have the very complete tain some for you from his Wholesaler.
answer to foot comfort with Di THE SHADEINE. COMPANY
Scholl's Appliances. These in «@ Churchfield @oad, Acton, Leaden,
clude Arch Supports, Zino Pads ENGLAND. a
(for corns ete.) Pedicreme (to | ia
soothe and refresh), Solvex (fo: |
Athlete’s Foot, and irritation) an) § ff
for the _ my-feet-are_killing-m-*'! e ng p q a:
groaner, FOOT BALM is you: i

answer—and mine. | Dr, Sehoil | M k

is the name: Cave Shepherd Ltd | a es en ld

me eR * * * | oes up aighte pares sensa-

s jon organs, whitish

SEWING THE EASY WAY i. | = ena base of spine,
easy to you but not as easy as i:! nes, rvousness, o
looks. To those who linger lon eaused by disease ef the — Pp
and look and thereby get nowhere, | (@ most it sex =.
allow me to introduce the com-| {f SY erarnes 52% :
mencement of thé new term at th vigous Sam health, take new

SINGER SEWING ACADEMY ON ;

AUGUST 18th. These popula
classes will get underway witi|
the imparting of you-can-do-i

instruction in dtess designing and |
pattern-making. “And with Mrs,
Mildred, Watkins and staff you
really can! Dial 4927.

t
USUALLY BESIDE JIMM) |
HATLO is a 3-column ad featuring |
the new K, R, Hunte & Co., Ltd. |
Store. Seer it? Been in it? For
Mr. & Mrs. Public, this attractive-
ly stocked Store has most things
Electrical and virtually all pune
‘plicable to-an Office including



Stationery. Don’t hang around
»utside, come on in! Look at the
Clocks, the Toys, the Leather

Goods—above all, the astonishing

variety! Or phone 5!36,
+ > *

SO YOU WANT A MIRROK

FOR YOUR BATHROOM WAL!

among other things? This is
where to get almost every typ?
of CHROME BATHROOM FIT-
TING you've been looking for.
At Bdos Co-op Cotton Factory
ixe Shower Roses, Towel Rails,
fumbler Holders and screw-on
‘ittings. Mirrors measure 12” and
16” and are priced from. $8.50
(fittings extra). No use listing
all the items — there are many
more—drop in and take a look.
® +

TROUBLE IS WHEN YOU ASK

FOR BEER—you get Lager! Now
men (and ladies) gather round
while .f tell you of what I’ve
found; A HOME BREWED BEER
IN A TEN-OUNCE BOTTLE and
—hola it—selling. for 24, Can
you believe it? You will when
‘ou ask for Hull’s Home Brewed
Beer in the attractive dumpy
little 10 oz. bottle. It’s a Simeon
Hunte & Son distribution, diai
2547; a best seller and it should
be on your dealer’s shelf,....... if
not sold out!

* *

POWERFUL, ROOMY AND
ECONOMICAL TO RUN — inter-
ested? At 3,100 thirtyJone hun-
dred dollars) ‘the new STANDARD
VANGUARD at Chelsea Garage
Ltd, in slick new colours is one
of the few cars to suit everybody
did you know it is a 6-passenger

car? And the lighter, smaller
MAYFLOWER $2,500 (twenty-
five hundred dollars) will give

you one of the most comfortable

power-plus rides of any car in its
class—at Chelsea Garage Ltd. now,







SPECIAL: RUM |

(With the Distinctive Flavour)
IS WELCOME O?}. ALL OCCASIONS
START USING THIS BLEND

+

Blended & Bottled By
John BD. Taylor & Sons, Ltd.

Roebuck Street.



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ogena ‘rom your Sbemiae

Gunrantee protects you. ‘



Blinding pain, con-
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clear out trouble-making poisons and excess ~

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work better, Get Dodd’s today. 442".

Dodds Kidney Pills...

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ITCHING STOPS
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Thousands § of
former sufferers
bless D.D.D, Pre * *
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from Eczemay Itch-

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BoNDOS



PAGE. RIGHT

BARBADOS etl ADVOCATE

i a as eae Reel sae se Poca «
Printed by the Advocate Co., Ltd., Bre-* ¢t. Bridsetewn

_—



Sunday, August 10, 1952

Everybody's Business





IN 1951 Barbados imported goods val-
ued at $51,918,327. The same year the
island exported goods valued at $35,464,166.
The apparent deficit in 1951 of the island’s
balance of trade was therefore $16,454,161.
In fact Barbados balances its trade by in-
visible exports such as tourism, remit-
tances from emigrants, interest on capital
investment abroad and by attracting over-
seas capital to Barbados,

Of all these invisible expoits the great-
est is tourism, Statistics are not kept in
Barbados which would permit an investi-
gator of the island’s economy to express
net receipts from tourism as so much per
head of population. But such statistics as
do exist prove beyond all possible doubt
that tourism is after agriculture the is-
land’s principal export.

Figures provided by the banks operating
in Barbados show that in the eleven-
month period ended in July Barbados
earned from tourists arriving from hard
currency countries the equivalent of
$2,433,392 (B.W.1.) These figures make no
allowances for the earnings of hard cur-
reney which are hoarded by private per-
sons and which do not reach the banks.
But it would be wrong to suppose that
earnings from hard currency sources re-
present the major earnings of the tourist
industry in Barbados. The Barbados Pub-
licity Committee has recently published
tourist statistics for the year ended on 31st
March, 1952.

During that year 30,856 air and sea pas-
sengers disembarked in Barbados, Of that
number 4,860 were residents returning,
319 were immigrants, 645 were students
and 1,166 were intransit.

No Jess than 10,986 were on holiday and
2,930 were on business.

Omitting the 4,409 permanent residents,
the 1,059'who stay indefinitely and the 222
who remain between one and six years,
the remaining 15,166 visitors to Barbados
during 1951 provide interesting material
for speculation as to probable earnings
from. tourism.

Of these 15,166 basic tourists, 5,279 or
more than one third remained for periods
exceeding one month, A total of 5,819 re-
mained for periods between over one week
and up to three, and 4,068 stayed for peri-
ods of one week and under.

If it were possible to arrive at an aver-
age daily figure of what each tourist spends
during a stay in Barbados it would be a
simple matter. to calculate the total value
of the tourist industry to Barbados and to
subtract therefrom the total hard currency
earnings.

Unfortunately such a figure would be
most difficult to obtain. Some tourists
might spend three hundred dollars in one
day others might spend the same amount
in three weeks.

But it ought to be possible for the Bar-
bados Publicity Committee with the assist-
ance of the banks and the hotel industry to
try and arrive at an estimated figure per
head of-tourists which might be used to
indicate something of the value of tour-
ism in the island’s economy.

How valuable that calculation would be
is suggested by a very simple sum based
on the approximate length of stay noted
by the Publicity Committee in its latest
report. If the minimum daily expenditure
of the 15,166 basic tourists who visited Bar-
bados during the tourist year ended on
March 31st, 1952 was estimated at $10 per
tourist the island would have received
from tourists during that year more than

four and three quarter million dollars.
A more profitable line of enquiry might

be the deduction from the total number of
15,166 basic tourists the 5,356 Venezuelans,
Americans and Canadians who arrived
during the year ended in March 1952.

If 5,356 visitors from hard. currency
countries spent sums exceeding $2,000,000
(B.W.I.) in the last tourist year 9,810 vis-
itors from other-countries- could hardly
have spent much less than twice that
amount, and may well have spent more.

Even with the very scanty information
which is available it seems that the tour-
ist industry of Barbados cannot have been
worth less than six million dollars to the
island in the tourist year ended in March.
1952. This would mean that Barbados
would have earned from tourism approx-
imately $30 per head of population. Any
considerable decrease

depressing effect on the island’s economy.

The sooner everyone realises the essen-
tial truth that Barbados depends on the
tourist industry to increase the benefits
obtained from the sugar industry the
greater the income Which will be earned
annually per head of population, Tourism
—as they say in Ireland—is everybody’s
business.



University College

VERY soon tne Executive Committee of
the Fegional Economic Committee is to
meet in Jamaica to review the arrange.

ments for obtaining the current annual

in the volume of .
tourist traffic would have an immediate |



expenditure of the University College of
the West Indies: to scrutinise current ex-
penditure in relation to original estimates
and to draw up a programme to be fol-
lowed in the five-year period 1953-58,

For some time the financial position of
the University College of the West Indies
has been a subject for grave concern and
the attendance at a meeting of the Regional
Economic Committee in Barbados earlier
this year of the Registrar Mr. H.’ W.
Springer was preparatory to the confer-
ence which is soon to take place in Kings-
ton,

Few among those interested in education
realise how the University College meets
its current expenditure and hardly anyone
is aware of the vast sums of money which
have been and continue to be spent by the
British taxpayer on the capital cost of con-
struction of the University College. The
money for capital costs is allotted under
the Colonial Development and Welfare
Act but it is not administered through the
Colonial Development and Welfare Organ-
isation but is drawn from the account re-
served for Higher Education in the Col-
onies. This account is kept in London and
grants to the University College of the
West Indies are made direct from London.
From a series of published statements
over a period of years it is possible to
piece together an approximate figure of
expenditure already made towards the
capital cost of the University College of
the West Indies from the account reserved
for Higher Education in the Colonies.

This approximate figure exceeds by a
large amount two million pounds. It is
right that the generosity of the British
taxpayer towards the cost of West Indian
University education should be publicly
recognised by West Indians. It is also
right that the West Indian community
should realise that the capital cost of con-
structing the University College is not
ended and that further contributions will
be made by the British taxpayer.

West Indians must realise how much
they are indebted to the British taxpayer
for their only University College.

At the same time they need to realise
that the capital cost of the University Col-
lege is not the end of the tale of expendi-
ture,

It is no secret that the current annual
expenditure of the University College ex-
ceeds the contributions made by the Brit-
ish Caribbean governments for this pur-
pose.

Seventy-six per cent. of these contribu-
tions are made by Jamaica, Trinidad and
British Guiana in that order and the re-
maining 24 per cent. is contributed by the
Windward Islands, Barbados, the Leeward
Islands and British Honduras jn a de-
scending scale of payment.

One of the major occupations of the
Executive Committee of the Regional Eco-
nomic Committee at the forthcoming con-
ference will be to discover a means of ob-
taining greater revenue from British Car-
ibbean governments. At present contri-
butions for the current expenditure of the
University College are made on a popula-
tion basis. This explains why Trinidad
only pays 18 per cent. of the total contri-
butions as’ compared with Jamaica’s 45
per cent. No doubt much will be made of
this apparent disparity of assessment at
the forthcoming conference,

In their search to discover a formula
which will ensure that contributions to-
wards the running expenses of the College
are equitably shared throughout the area
the Executive Committee of the Economic
Committee will, it is expected, examine in
great detail the current expenditure of the
College.

In the original enthusiasm of the first
five-year period of its existence the Uni-
versity College may have attempted to
speed up its activities beyond a prudent
limit. The activities of its extra-mural
department for example might have been
undertaken too soon and in too many
places. On the other hand too little atten-
tion might have been paid to extra-mural
activities in some regions.

Should early: enthusiasm have led the
young College to undertake more than was
financially prudent the West Indian pub-
lie will be sympathetic towards the re-
sponsible authorities, since the inaugural
period of a University College catering for
such a widely scattered collection of ter-
ritories and dependent on the British tax-
payer for ifs capital cost could not be sim-
ple. On the other, hand the University
College must expect the voters of the
British Caribbean to show increasing inter-
est in its activities,

The splendid gesture of the British tax-
payer in contributing millions of pounds
towards the University College of the West
Indies and the willingness of British Car-
ibbean governments to bear the cost of
current expenditure are worthy of public
recognition.

But in the last resort the important fac-
tor about University Training in the West
Indies is that it should cost no more and
preferably less than it costs in Canada or
the United Kingdom. And it is stated in
well-informed quarters that it costs much
more to train a medical student in Kings-
ton than it would at British or Canadian
University Colleges. Why?

| mentionin

SUNDAY . ADVOCATE

The man who

keeps all

|

|

| Barbados laughing
| on Sundays

NATHANIEL GUBBINS



JN re a reader’s request

or a_ half-year: hhec:
from Old Moore Gubbing, the
imbecile sage offers the follow-
ing: —

AUGUST: As the full moon falls
in the Eleventh House «and
many people on August Bank
Holiday will be falling out ‘of
the public house, there will be
increased police activity at the
beginning of the month,

Eggs will be ir short supply,
particularly in seaside guest
houses, where egg allocations, if
any, will be eaten by the pro-
prietors and their relatives.

Middle-aged pessimists wil] cause
great depression among holiday~
makers in hotels by pointing out
that the fine summer of 1952 re-
minds them of the fine summevrs
and harvests of 1914 and 1939
both of which ended in world
wars.

Further misery will be caused \vy
warnings of impending national!
bankruptcy made by pouiticians
on the eve of their expensive
holidays abroad,

SEPTEMBER: Autumn
manoeuvres in Eastern Germany
will give military experts a
chance to tel] us ehee more how
many divisions we need to stop
the Russians. ‘They will- then
frighten everybody by pointing
out that we shall never ‘have
enough divisions to stop ‘thém,
except on paper,

* * °

Eggs will still be in short supply,
and bronzed and fit politicians,
full of foreign eggs, wil) return
from their holidays abroad to
predict national bankruptcy if
we don’t work harder, ;

OCTOBER : Politicians will ‘still
be telling people to work harder,
but as people will know harder
work means more income tax,

with one egg a week, they
won't.
NOVEMBER : Ruin. still just

round the corner. Fogs for all.
Influenza for most. Eggs for no-

body.

DECEMBER ; Ruin, and us, just
about to meet at the corner,
Happiest Christmas will be en-
joyed by turkeys, who won't
have to face the New Year.

Dream Encounter

a cricket match between

England and The Rest Was
being played at Helsinki,” “**
e Red Dean was batting at

one end, the Bishop of Narking
Creek at the other.

Dr. Mossadeg, fielding at silly
mid-off, was crying because he
had just stopped a hot one with
his stomach. The fast bowler
was Joe Stalin, smoking a pipe,
the wicket keeper ex-King
Farouk, who had two black eyes
from a couple of bumpers, and
the square leg umpire was a bear
in Russian uniform.

Despite his age, Stalin took a
run of four miles before he
delivered the ball. This meaat
running round the boundary
several times, and made an over
last about an hour.

As he approached the wicket
from the nursery end, tshu-tshu-
tshuing like a train and puffiing
clouds of smoke from his pipe, a
piece of paper 34 feet long blew
across the pitch.

“Somebody’s had a good feed
of sandwiches,”’ observed a witty
radio commentator.

J . *

The Red Dean picked up the
piece of paper.

“It’s a Chinese scroll,” shouted
the excited dean,

“Get back to your crease, you
clot, yelled the bishop.

“They're not grease spots,” the
dean shouted. back. “They're
Chinese characters.”

When. Stalin. arrived at the
wicket,:he collided with the dean
and knocked him flat on his face
without delivering the ball.

“How’s lat?” asked a Chinese
ag who ‘was fielding at first
slip.

“Out?’ said the umpire.

“I’m not out,” foared the bishop

“No, but the dean is,” said the
umpire.

“That's not. cricket,”
bishop.

“Don’t argue with the umpire,”
said the bear.

said the

* * ae
At that moment an aircraft
flew overhead. The Red Dean
made a speéch about germ war-
fare. Farouk shouted : “Down
with England,” and hit the bishop
on the head with a stump. Stalin
started his run round the bound-
ary to deliver the next ball, Mos-
sadeg handed in his resignation to
the umpire and fainted.
“Tea interval,” said the umpire.
It’s not tea time yet, you stupid
bear,” said the bishop. |
“Any time is tea time,” said



“Girls Of A Feather”

Union activities. My purpose iy
this series of articles on social
services of Barbados is to bring
to, public attention the achieve-
ments of public-spirited citizens
whose long years of unselfish
cevotion to doing good for others

The more one probes into the
social services of the island of
Barbados the more one is amazed
at ‘the ignorance which is dis-
played by those who accuse Bar-
badians of having no social con-
science, Yet this ignorance is to

.| some extent explained by the fact

that very few Barbadians know
anything of the social services
which exist in their midst.

They are. therefore poorly
equipped to take up the cudgels
in defence of those whose: lives
though little known to the outsider
testify to the desire of Barbadians
to help one another.

How many Barbadians for jn-
stance have ever heard of Adah
Evelyn, the Foundress of the Girls
Industrial Union? How many for
that matter know anything about
the Union beyond the fact that_it
has a building facing the dry lake
of Queen’s Park and that it holds
socials and an annual fete?

Yet the Girls Industrial Union
has played no small part in the
efter school education of Barba-
dian girls for forty years and is
perhaps the ‘most important
women's agency in the island for
bridging the gulf which exists
between the fifty or more
different social grades which com-
pose Barbadian society.

The most staggering fact about
the Girls’ Industrial Union in my
opinion is the multiplicity of
social groups or clubs which oper-

ate within the Union, There are,_

as I was told, 18 clubs in the
Union and each club is composed
of girls drawn from similar trades
,or professions, Girls of a feather
fiock together would be the easiest
way of explaining this social
phenomenon. I think it worth
because so much non-
sense is talked in Barbados about
racial co-operation that the start-
ling sub-divisions of Barbadian
society in which shop assistants
have precedence over knitting-
mill operatives and typists repre-
sent the aristocracy of girlhood
are overlooked in the general
froth-blowing,

The Union’s Club system is the
nearest attempt to even out this,
social malaise — the gaps between
the sub-units of the social strata
—- that I have seen in Barbados,
These gaps ‘it is most important
to note have nothing to do with
race, They are the logical out-
come of an education system
which has encouraged girls espe-
cially to regard climbing up the
social ladder as one of the most
worthy of objectives.

At the same time no other sys-
tem would have produced such
worthwhile results. By refusing
to be wooly-minded and up® i
the clouds, and by encouraging
formation of separate clubs, the
Committee ot the Girls Industri
Union have brought together ti
der one roof girls from many of
the varying social levels of Barba-
dian society. And inevitably due
to close proximity some of the
standoffishness and aloofness of

the superior social groups has
been rubbed off. The Girls
Industrial Union therefore repre+
sents a long standing achieve-

ment in the social history of

‘suitable for

Barbados. It weuld be impossible
to praise too highly the vision
and enthusiasm of its Foundress
and it would be churlish and
unfair not to applaud the devo-
tion and service of those ladies of
Barbados. who continue today to
build on the foundations laid by
Adah Evelyn.

Yet the question must be asked:
has the Girls’ Industrial Union
today reached a turning of the
ways or has it many more years
of service to fulfil in its traditional
groove? .. c

By
George Hunte -



————

That i8.a question which I am
not equipped to answer. But it is
a question. which can only be
asked by. someone’ with ‘some
Knowledge of what: the Girls’ In-
dustrial Union dces.

Basically the Union is comprised
of clubs the members of. which
are drawn from similar social
classes. These clubs have two
functions — utilitarian and social.
The utilitarian role of the club is
expressed in the organisation of
classes. Union girls engage in a
wide range of activities. They
manufacture — attractive baskets
made from reed grass: they make
sisal-table mats and ethereal look-
ing “loofah” hats.. They engage
in manifold knitting, crocheting,
and cloth weaving activities.
Slippers, shoes, net-sandals and
smocks are .produced. in their
Jarge Club-Hall Cakes and pas-
try making occupy girls in the
kitchen. And when I visited the
Union’s Hall last week I was de-
lighted to find three enthusiastic
jadies making children’s toys
under the supervision of a male
amateur carpenter,

I have often been told by the
welfare experts that Barbadians
have fio native skill at handicrafts,
This may be true:; I) am not a:
welfare expert nor an expert of’
any kind. But I wonder whether
the experts are not missing the)
point. |

Barbadians do not produce the
kind of work which is representa-
tive of. individual cultures such
‘as the Amerindian, the Indian or
the African because their culture
is predominantly Europeah. They
therefore make with their hands
the designs. and patterns which
they have been taught to make
by those who instruct.them. This
explains perhaps why Barbadian
girls at the Union continue to
make knitted woolly garments
babies born in
eolder climates. A _ similar
explanation might be given for
what seems a strange practice in
the Union kitchen. Girls dressed
in the height of local fashion
operate with pastry, icing materi-
als, and stoves without any kitchen
aprons.

I would not like anyone to
think that by these remarks I am
attempting to be critical of the



the bear,.who was fond of buns. |

Glorious Twelfth
K= disappointment will be

felt among their many
friends at the “news that Lora
and Lady Gubbins will not be
in Scotland for grouse shooting
on what is known as The Glorious
Twelfth of August.

As the winged insect season
reaches its peak at about the
same time, this popular pair
will be enjoying a Glorious
Twelfth of their own, shooting
down wasps and moths with their
insecticide guns, while-Lottie the
Devil Cat plays the dual role
of beater and retriever.

=

Lord and Lady Gubbins wil!
not wear anything special for
the occasion, though Lord Gub-
bins may wear his famous tweed
jacket, Moth’s. Relish, if the
weather is not too hot. Nor will
they open picnic hampers full of
cold chicken, duck, ham and
caviare, which appears to be the
normul fare on the Scottish moors.

Income tax being what it is,
Lady Gubbins will spare ten
minutes out of an exciting day to
bring in fish and chips from a
local restaurant.

Last.year Lord Gubbins, who

moths, which he laughingly called
“four engine jobs.”

Lady Gubbins, though not quite
so successful with the gun,
wrought havoc with a fish slice
in the garden and while wash-
ing-up at the sink. At tea time
she was able to point proudly to
a pile of victims which included
two butterflies which had been
laying their eggs on the curly
kale.

Although enthusiastic ana
agile, Lottie’s chief fault as a
retriever is that she is inclined
to eat the game instead of bring-
ing it back to the butts.

She caused consternation on
one occasion when it was thought
she had swallowed a wasp. But
as she came’ to no harm, it is be-
lieved that the buzzing in her
stomach, heard by an anxious

is one of the finest shots in the
country with a spray gun, brought
down a record bag of 18 wasps
during the morning’s shoot. Later
in the day he bagged seven large





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Lord Gubbins, must have been |

the last conyulsions of a. dyin
bluebottle. oom

—L.E.S.

have been too often overlooked
and sometimes denigrated by
bromoters of an anti-Barbadian
faction.

But in my opinion the Girls’
Industrial Uion has been so suc-
cessful and has contributed so
much of real value to Barbadian
xirls that it ought not to be re-
garded as a pioneer service which
has served a useful life and ought
bow to be pensioned off,

The function of the Union as an
adult evening institute for girls is
so important that so far from
ceasing to exist the Union ought
to be rebuilt and re-modelled to
cope with the needs of a new
generation. It is no criticism of
the Union to say that it still looks
to its older brigade of ladies to
provide much of its drive and
enthusiasm. It is no disparage-
ment of the Union to say that the
building in Constitution is some-
what out dated and in need of
renovation,

But the fact remains that under
modern conditions of living old
fashioned buildings do not help
girls to feel at home in modern
offices and that typewriting taught
in a room under the fierce blaze
of the rays of the evening sun is
typewriting learnt an unnecessari-
\y hard way. 4

These comments in no way de-
tract from the achievements of the
Union. The bringing together
under one roof on different eve-
nings of the week girls drawn
from many classes and coming
from all parishes of the island
must be regarded as a major
achievement in an island with so
many social rungs.

The training and tuition which
the girls receive at the Union for
payment of one shiliing a term is

best appreciated by those who have
seen the output of the girls,
The proper approach to the work

of the Union is perhaps ‘to answer
the question what would Barba-
dos be like without the Girls’ In-
Gustrial Union? Five hundred
girls to whom the Unisn today
means a centre of training and
good comradeship could. only
answer that question only, in one
way. But there must be thousands
alive today in Barbados in neigh-
bouring West Indian islands and
even in North America and the
United Kingdom to whom the
Union represents the first step to-
wards a life which is full and
useful,

Whether or not the Union be-
comes the centre of an adult eve-
ning institute for girls is a ques-
tion for their Committee and the
Government to decide. But what-
ever its future the vision of its
Foundress and the devoted work
of its present Secretary and Com-
mittee have made a distinctive
contribution to the most important
work which has to be done in Bar-
bados today — the raising of the
moral standards of women.

aT
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SUNDAY,

AUGUST. 10, 1952



The Tremendous Things That

AN ENGLISH

Sitting at a typewriter in a

Southampton office in
YVONNE BASEDEN, a
aged 17.

Over this girl’s life came a most
extraordinary transformation.
joined the W.A.A.F.; became a British

agent; was taught the ar
and how to shoot to kill.

Then came the night when she was
dropped into German-occupied France.

*

E were parachuted into
France on March 18, 1944.

“ Lucien,” my
ing officer,
greeted by French

workers and hurried to
security of a lonely farmhouse.
From there we made our

hundreds of miles overland
vijon.

Our task was to
reorganise a Maquis

which had been wrecked
by the Gestapo—

and myself

THE

1939 was
pretty girl,

She

t of sabotage

command-
were
Resistance
ihe

way
to Ddle, near



SUNDAY ADVOCATE



Happened To Yvo

igth July, 1944+

nne Baseden

ECRETARY MEETS
GESTAPO

threw nim w the floor and
kicked him.
“How many are there ot

you?” they shouted. He said !
am the only one and so j
got staves and beat him.

DRAGGED OUT
We are caught

THEN they moved the

cover from the hole
here Jules and I were hiding,
Ae was very fr.ghtened.

I whispered to him that dark-
ness would be soon with us and
we would be “safe. But they
found him.

As I squeezed further into
the shadows I saw his distorted
face as he was .dragged out.
L heard him thrown, nine feet
down on to the floor I ho

they wouldn't, see me, but they
{

iid
“Come
snouted. 1
German pointed
ne, The flash as it
the darkness. But

out,” «a German
stayed still. The
a revolver at
was fired
he

it ap

missed. I don't know how,
They had seen 1 was &
women. I flung up my arms.

Bui they grab me by
my hair and dragged me
up. The German.punche¢
me in the face and’ fell
to the floor
As Robert. Jules. and
t lay there in the dust
with our hands raised
we heard. the searchers

f - der, and

this radlo-operator Dear Sir, 1 have to inform you upsta:rs firing mat
1 went straight to a It is with much regrot ong on active services rides: , They | dined

; tro We chy
Se OT aan” pesca O Y. Baseden is missire Soon I could see ins
for me. The wife wa; | that S/ . information that can a, spilers in the ceil

: 6 in ; e a
pati tint Seutue. | there te not much more APS couht you would} sdcea ree et
Now I was busy. 1 went jven at the esen o giti On. ee seeped-over th:
trom house to house with t : i Was“ Lucien's” blood

my radio set in a suitcase
i would put up a temporary
indoor aerial and_ then
would start. transmitting to
England. Or receiving.

ach evening with
neadphones on, I would sit
listening, sometimes for a couple
of hours.

Disunited

MEANWHILE “Lucien
was uctive. The morale ot
the local Resistance was low
The last British leaders had
been caught and I believe
killed. ie movement had
been crushed
In the surrounding area were
other Maquis. Some kad poli-
tical motives, some were led by
French Army officers,

They had not ail fot a deep
affection for each other. Anc
some had no love for the
British

It. was hard work encouraging
healthy aggression.

Sometimes supplies promisea
did not come, sometimes they
were small and late. Some
Frenchmen felt that they were
forgotten by London.

LONDON CALLS
Raid is planned

r) ONE evening in June
I got a message that
was to change all that. We
were told to pick out a lonely
spot where a large amount of
equipment—and perhaps men—
could be dropped.

It had to be flat, free from
slectric cables and pylons,

“Lucien” and I found the
ideal site about 12 miles from
e.

I tapped the news to London
by morse key in the ill-lit sitting-
room of a French household.

“Lucien” had to arrange for
a defence of our new landing-
space. -

We appealed to the Maquis
around and got 800 armed men.
We also got 30 lorries and
horse-drawn carts. For we had
been told that this was a day-
light “drop.”

In a deserted, crumbling house

o call and discuss the

ER Yvon ne's
advent

THE LETT

I was in direct contact with the
aircraft. They were three
squadrons of American bor bers
with a strong fighter es
It was a Sunday morn!
was very still and 1
recall the church bells cn
As-I lay in the suns

remember think.ng “There






ter are
a lot of Frenchmen who are not
in church today.”

Over the horizon the atr-rad
sirens wailed

The bombers took u big circle

and came in low Over them
the wings of a fighter tw.nkled
in the sun as it did-an immacu-
late victory roll.

Then the containers started
dropping. There were 300 of
them all filled with arms and
upplies

REJOICING NOW
Down come the guns

1 COULDN'T lie in

that hedge bottom. 1
got to my feet and danced in
the sunlight.

The French round me went
mad. They sang and waved
their rifles and lots of them
escaped death very narrowly as

@ containers came crashing
lown around them.

Some burst as they hit the
Grae Sten guns and rifles spilt
out.

Each container needed four
men to carry it. Quickly they
were loaded on to our transport

T ran to the deserted house
and made a signal. I ended
with the “ V-sign "—di di di ;
daa It was wrong. It was
against the regulations and it
was the last signal I ever made

I hurried to the car in which
“Lucien” waited. A short dis-
tance away was the main road.
Along that road a German
armoured car passed on patrol.
We waited with rifles and
machine guns.

Its crew never knew how nea!

sather

ure she desert



one month after

yeceived
articles

hes in’ this

CELEBRATING
With a bee,-steak

®@ THEN “Lucien' wskcc

ra volunwer ta car,
ti suiicase to Dole. Tarec
Soved forward. One Ww.
year-old student, He wa
pale-faced, shock haired and hi:
name was Paul.

“Lucien” chose him

We cycled back to our H.W
the careiaker's flat in a chees¢
warehouse. There a wonder.u
celebration meal was waiting {c:
us, There was beef-steak, choco
late mousse. and
cheese.



of course

Discovered

SOON “Lucien started to
worry. Paul had not arrived

In fact he had been stopped by
a German. His suitcase nad

been Opened and he had been *

quickly “ interrogated.” That
meant a swift and brutal beat-
ing-up. They had knocked out
one of his eyes,

Paul told them our address.
The first we knew was when
the caretaker’s wife, Gaby
Mayor saw a police car arrive.
We fled to hiding places.

Her husband Freddie
down_to the basement. Three of
us, Dr. Robert Morel.*a man
called Jules and myself hid up-
Stairs in a great pile of round
large wooden discs used to
separate the cheeses.

Over our heads “ Lucien” ana
his French lieutenant Charles
crawled between the double
floors of the attic.

WOMAN BEATEN
Searching the house

THE Germans knocked

on the door. They
asked Gaby when her husband
would be back, 1 could hear
the mumble of their voices.
More clearly I could hear them
beating Gaby. I heard her cries

Tan

the He an} Charles
were thrown down the
ten-foot space to oul
floor Tnen we were all dragged
to the floor below. There we las
handeuffed and face down.

He was dead

THE Germans were furious.

They thought they had
rushed the Resistance in the
dole area,

As I was pushed down the stairs
. saw “Lucien” lying there.
somehow I knew he was dead

Charles whispered to me us
we were on the floor, “* Lucien’
took the pill.” I knew that pill
—the one Headquarters gave
you in case things got too tough. *

As we lay we were: kicked
orutally by the Germans .as
they passed us. I was at the
head of the stairs. They all
kicked me in the stomach and

in the side I don't remember
crying. But I wished I was
unconscious.

Then they pushed us down-
stairs, out into the night.

ON OUR WAY
The journey begins

e GUARDING ‘the low
carts which nad come
to take us away were men on
horseback, savage-looking men
with yellow faces and slit eyes.
They were White Russians. As
I started to struggle into the
cart, handcuffed to young Paul
with his bloody face. I looked
round,

At the end of the thin line
of bruised, wounded and
moaning men. handcuffed to
Charles the body of “Lucien”
was being dragged along.

We_were on our way'to meet
the Gestapo !

(World Copyright)
NEXT WEEK

The torture in Cell Ill:
“There'll always be an

nearby I set up my radio set, I
mdon we were waiting

told
. and that the Germans did
suspect.
Three squadrons
THEN came the dawn

the day of the raid. Soon

they were to death as they
roared past.

Now our arms convoy started.
We had two miles of main road
to travel before we turned off
and headed for a secret forest
glade.

In the glade we shared out
our spoils.

not

of

and her sobs.

Soon more arrived and they
started to seara@) the building,

At one time a German sat
only a few feet from me.
watched his jackboots danglin,
in space through a crac
between the discs.

They found Robert first They



England.” ;

London Express Service



OTHER FATS AND OILS

By ECONOMIST

This subject has received a fair
amount of publicity in the Press
recently and the importance of
the coconut in this connection has
Been stressed. It may be of in-
terest to review briefly some of
the other sources of supply, such
as the whale, the West African
oil palm ang the olive.

Whale Oil

This is no fish story literally or
figuratively since the whale is a
giant mammal. Some opinions
from literature in regard to its
size: “If we compare land mam-
“mals in respect to magnitude
“with those that take up_ their
“abode in the deep, we shall find
“they will appear contemptible
“in the compasses whale is
“doubtless the largest animal in
“creation;” again, “the aorta of a
“whale is larger in the bore than
“the main pipe of the waterworks
“at London bridge,” and again,






“the whale’s liver was two cart-
“loads.” The great mammal has
attracted attention from the be-
inning of history. The Books of
Genes, Job, Jonah, the Psalms
and Isaiah seem to carry the earl-
iest references and the word Lev-
dathan is often used to describe its
greatmess and size. Historians
poets and prose writers down to
the present day have derived a
certain enchantment from _ the
whale. Whale lore at its best
is probably to be found in the
story of Moby Dick by Herman
Melville.

Cetology, that branch of zoo-
logy concerned with the whale,
has assumed an increased inter-
est in recent years as a result of
the importance attached to whale
oil and the intense competition
among nations which has ¢evelop-
ed in the polar regions in the pur-
suit of the mammal, Modern
whaling ships are really floating

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of the carcases. Even the meat
may find more general use as
a substitute for beef than in the
recent past when, in the main, it
was dried and ground and used
partly as manure and partly for
mixing with cattle foods. It is
on record that whale meat was
eaten by the ancient Romans, the
‘Saxons and the Normans. In the
thirteenth and fourteenth cen-
turies in England, whale meat not
infrequently figured on the Royal
table and at civic feasts. It is
indeed considered very palatable
by those who have eaten it and
when whaling was carried on in
the West Indies, the meat was
certainly: used and relished as
food.

Originally, whale oil was best
known as an illuminant and lub-
jricator, and before the introduc-

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‘tion of gas light was used in the
lighting of towns and in light-
houses; as a lubricant it found its
way into heavy machinery and
even in the more delicate works
‘of watches. To-day, among its
other uses, it: forms a valuable
component of culinary fats and
related compounds,

Students of West Indian history
and economics—the older heads
at any rate—will recall the visit
of Dr. Louis Sambon to these
parts on a medical research mis-
sion. In the ‘Empire Review’
(1913), Sambon contributed an
interesting article on West Indian
whaling based on a visit to the
Station then in existence in
Speightstown, The article des-
cribes the methods used and the
species of whale involved. He
writes: “The- whale which visits
“Barbados is the Humpbacked
‘Whale (Me€aptera Versabilis),

@ One'page 11.






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PAGE NINE



Let's Leave. Politics Behind For A While |
Let The Cynics Smile— |

Ameriea Has
Message

By JOHN GORDON

CHICAGO, Saturday.

I fimd Americans very in-
terested in Britain, very fair io
Britain, very friend.y to Britain,
but a little puzzled about us.

A surprising number of them
claim that their ancestry is En-
@lish, and they are proud of it.

The hall porter at one hotel
said to me, with evident relish:
“In a way I'm English, tco. I wis
born here, but my father was
from England, and I have a sister
in Wales.” Then he added; “See
that girl,’ pointing to a woman
sitting at a desk in the hotel office.

“She comes from lowa.”
This merning I found an Iowa
paper, which a visior had ‘elt

{ took it to her and said: “You're
an Iowan. Would you like this?”

It’s A Bond

She looked at me and said:
“lewan be biusverea, I’m Nnglish.
Now that makes a bona be-
tween these people and us which
is of immense value not only to
us but to all the world, in its
present wobbly state.
They are Americans,
sively confident,
ricans, But
kinship with us.
They want to wa:k with us.
Are we making the best of that
invaluable cement? I doubt it.
I think we could sell iritain
much better to the Americans
than we do, They know too
little about us. Therefore, the
differences between us are in-
clined to be magnified unduly,
and our ‘common interests taken
for granted. We cou'd do the
better job of public relations.

What puzzies them about us?
Well, for one thing they cannot
understand why we fell tor
Socialism. Or those stories one
hears too often now all over the
world that the British have lost
the will to work,

This is a land where men prefer
freedom above all things. Free-
dom ef the individual is a fun-
damental principle of their life.

There are no class distinctions
as we know them. A mans
success does not depend on the
bed in which he is born but on
the qualities that are in him and
the efforts he puts into life.

He sets to work to raise him-

, Self, not to depress others. Most
men in America have qa burning
ambition to rise in the world. And
they are prepared ta work with

aggres-
proud of being
they like their

every ounce of initiative and
energy to make that possible.
No Barriers

The mechanic to-day can be the
garage owner next year, the shop
assistant of to-day 1s ine snop
ewner of tomorrow, There are no
barriers across the road to for-
tune—if you have the urge, tne
creative ability, and the wail 1o
make the effort.

Every step a man takes up-
wards is reflected immediately in
a better house, a better car, more
gadgets and luxuries in his home,
more clothes, and a fuller, easier,
better life for his wife.

Believe me, the wives here like
that, and spur their men on,

Of course, the theorists, who
now have too much power in the
shaping of our lives in Britain,
will hold up their hands in horror,
cry “How wrong it is to put sa
niuch emphasis in life on money.”

An Ideal

But is it? The mere accumula-
tion of money may not perhaps
be the highest ideal in life.

But isn't the establishment of
your family on a higher standard
of life an ideal of some value?
Isn’t it a worth-while thing to
work for?

Isn’t it better to use your brains
and energy to lift yourself to
greater comfort and the happiness
that goes with it than to be con-
tent to stick in the sludge, taking
orders from an all - powerfu:
bureaucracy, which is the life
that is held up to us as ideal?

Do you remember the old
song
“Silver and gold, silver and gold,
“Everyone’s searching for silver

and gold,
“But if peer alone when you are

; old,

“You'll never find comfort in silver
and gold,”

Do you believe that it is better
to be old and poor than old and
eomfortably cushioned? Ameri-
eans don't, and neither do I,

ft am certain beyond all doubt
that if we could capture some of
the ambition of Americans to lift
themselves as swiftly as they can
fo a higher standard of life and
the determination with which
they put their backs into the
job of doing it, we could pull our
grand old countr# out of the me«s
it is in before many years have

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passed, and begin to taste a life
that we would enjoy far better
than our present one.

Grit, Courage

In the streets of American
towus, large and small aiike, Wc
crewa renects a prosperity” that
our youn at home uniortufateiy
nas never known.

It may be a superficial pros-
perity. irade recession mughl;
sweep it away and Americas
Muy oe right to be a iitt.e nervous
«i wae years just ahead.

iput it is a prosperity worth
figuung to preserve, and tMey
Will ignt (oO preserve it and even
iecrease it with grit and courage.

How 15 tl réficced mi lie every-


























































































day lves of the women?

Young and old, they are far
bettey dressed than british
women, There are two reasons
for that dresses are cheaper
here, and they can be bought

olf the peg in a range of mode!s
and sizes far beyond anything
cbtainable in Britain.

A cotton frock that can bt
bought here for £3 would, I am
toid, cost £8 in Londen, And the
style here is far, far better.

With clothes so cheap, the
working girl of America accu-
mulates a wardrobe far larger
than her sisters in Britain eve:
dream of having.

As one girl, with a knowledge
of both countries, described 1)
to me “In England you can
separate girls into classes by the
amount of clothes they have. Bu

in America all women have
enc¢rmous wardrobes, and thei
clothes are much more original

and daring in cut and colour thay
the clothes of British girls.”

Cost of Beauty

On a scale far beyond the
British girl, the American. gir!
buys accessories, She spends, too
far more on cosmetics and beaut,
treatments genera:ly, and looky
infinitely the better for it.

It costs the American typist
just under £3 to have her hair
cut, shampooed, and set, bu
as her salary runs from £2i
upwards, it isn’t a very heavy;
burden on her.

I rarely see women here repali
their make-up in public, as they
do so often in Britain,

And the “Pewer Room” t
which they retire to do it is now
renamed the “Gossip Room.”

Food is very expensive,
should say that the working gir)
here spends far more than the
entire weekly wage of a compar-
able British girl on her food,

But she gets far more attrac-
tive foods. There is a much
greater variety in cooking here
than in England,

Diet Slimmers

We are inclined to regare
America as a land of steaks, which
it is. But it is far more ; land o!
wenderful |ight salad meals, mors
origina] and attractive than any-
thing we know at home,

And women here, I should adc
are just as slimming-diet con-
scious as British women.

The American woman's home
~—in which she spends much less:
iime than an English woman-—
has everything in it to make life
easy.

The kitchens are
beautiful, with
freeze boxes, washing and iron-
ing machines, which take the
drudgery out of house work anc
leave the housewife time to find
more joy in life,

The domestic help problem is

modern and
refrigerators,

of course, even more difficult
here than in England, but the
tnodernisation of the homes

makes it of less concern.
A living-in maid expects abou
£30 a month, with food.

And Manners
There is far less drinking in

America than .in Britain. Onl
twice have I heard wine
ordered in a_ restaurant, ane

the number of men who drink
milk with their meals is astonish-
ing to a British visitor,

Manners, too, are strikingly dif-
ferent. A British reporter tells me
that when he was in a crowded
suburban train and offered his
seat to an elderly woman, the
people in the compartment seemed
astonished, The woman increased
his confusion by saying: “How
nice it is to meet a real English
gentleman,”

Another British visitor tells me
that when he sat down at a table
in an hotel tap room, and, to as-
gist the busy barman, lifted a few
empty glasses from the table to
the bar as he could normally have
done in England, the barman said
with surprise; “In 20 years here,
this is the first time that has hap-
pened to me.”

The Americans like us, but cer-
tainly think we are an odd lot in

e ways.
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PAGE TEN

This West Indian ThePeople Of Barbados

Culture (i)

: By A. S. HOPKINSON

There igsa-tertain fact of such
great importance that it. iv almost
a measure of a person’s maturity
how fully he appreciates it, Those
who realise this fact are alread)
half on the way to developing th«
greatest strength of soul that :
is possible toimagine; and those
who do not realise it will neve
achieve anything important. It 1s
this; that if you want somethin;
for your very own, you. mus
either make it yourself, or failing
that, fight and win it-from some-
body else. You can né€ver realty
own af mere gift. You must be ve! .
careful of taking things from othe
people withéut having done any
thing to earn them because yo.
will never make them fit you; the
will never become part of yor
That which belongs to you mu
become yours because it has cause:
you pain and sweat in the getting
Only when you have suffered, an
suffered deeply for it will yo
really possess it and believe your-
self deserving of the possession,

Gifts To Be Scorned

All finer minds scorn a gil\.
But :they can feel proud of th
thing they have built for them»
selves because their labour has
gone into it; there is something
of themselves in it, They can als:
feel proud of the prize they have
taken away from somebody else,
because it has cost them toil, ana
they feel themselyés more worthy
of it than the weak person who
had it before them. But the mai
who hes atcepted a present wi'i
always feel indebted to the give.
He will always a that he owe
him something, if it bé only grati-
tude, and this will take away fro.)
his own self-respect, He will fee!
ashamed of himself for havin
been forced to accept a gift. H
will never tHink himself worthy
of it, because he had done nothing
to prove that-he deserved it, And
what Will tilke his indebtedness
all the more-uncomfortable is the
fact that hi#-present will not fit
him, for it was not adapted to him,
not made for him, not built to his
own requirements, and will there-
fore be useléss to him. He is none
the richer f6i’ the gift; he is rather
poorer, for he has had to pay the
debt away in gratitude. The person
who is not thoroughly ashamed 0!
himself when he is in debt certain-
ly does not deserve to be left
alive.

And if this is #6 true of indivi-
duals; how much more true it
must be of peoples, nations and
civilizations, And what can illus-
trate this more fully than the
well-knownefact that when 4
civilization has inherited qualities
from.a former civilization, it is
forced to excuse its shame in its
own eyed by ane ee out that it
is a relative of the giver, a son or
a brdfher! (or sister) cousin ov
descendant of some sort? These
pople-feel quite comfortable about
— ng something from a rela-

ve

co) nm property. But they ca:

bearâ„¢the thought of aceeptii;,
someshing from an utter stranger.
And $0, to make up for their own
secret discomfort and onee morc
regaifi their sc¢if-respect, they

make-themselves believe that tho
stranger is really related to them.
To suth self-deceiving baseness is
the receiver reduced;
Taken Everything

But, this is the exact position | 1
which we West Indians are placer
We have taken every thing froin
somebody else. We have accepted
sé mueh from foreign sources thit
we can now think of nothing but
our own gratitude, Is this not ti
tue explanation of our servility
towards our benefactors? What

have we done to deserve the gifts

cause they look on .4ttay* stint
laws of virtuous conduct,

made for others. One could at
least feel some respect. for us if
we were truly ashamed of this
pettiness of heart.

The West Indian’s Shame

But they really are ashamed
of themselves, these West Indians,
Let no one be so foolishly over-
confident as to su that they
do not feel the agonising
revulsion when they turn. away
from the pleasurable side of their
character to a cold analysis of it
jn all its aspects. As soon as they
feel disposed to look at them-
selves as they usually are, all
that gaiety and sportfulness whici:
we know only. too well vanishes.
And it is really lucky for them
that they are so seldom disposed
to look at themselves; they could
not save their mental balance from
peing hopelessly upset by the
constant shame that would be the
result of too close an examina-
tion. The West Indian is ashamed
of everything that really belongs
to him and marks him out as
different from anybody else, He
is ashamed of his nee delightful
and attractive qui es as well as
of his more revoltingly monkeyish
ones, None too seldom he is even
ashamed of his virtues, and when
one comes to such a pass, suicide
is the only course left which
would be charitable to oneself as
well as to humanity, When you
try to shut your eyes to your
virtues as well as to your vices,
it is high time you do your neigh-

bours, not to civ: itself,
the simple kifidness of dying. And
this is the only co IT can

. dvise the present day West Indian
to take. He is ashamed of the
black or brown. or yellow is
ertistically less interesting and
eppealing
ashamed of the poverty and com-
parative resourcelessness of most
of the islands that are his home.
He is ashamed of his lack of
mannefs and polite bearing. He is
»snamed of the social and politi-
eal conditions that are typical of
this archipelago. He is ashamed
of his weakness and cowardliness,
end so utterly ashamed of his
absolute lack of fighting spirit
that to save himself from breaking
down and becoming a_ hopeless
ease of psychological frustration
he has to console himself with
the thought that his misery is
nothing but the lot dished out to
him by Nature’s eternally immu-
table law: is'nt he a living ex-
ample of .the shallow and idiotic
proverb that patience is a virtue?

Ashamed

He is ashamed of that baseness
and loathesomeness of character
Which makes him infinitely cap.
able of suffering. And, most fool-
ishly of all, he is ashamed of the
spasmodic noble instinct which
prompts him to hate everything
that blocks his own path, believ-
ing it to be a devilishly evil in-
and -totally contrary bs the

e@ is
ashamed of his own _ servility;
ashamed of those grotesque ani-
mal gestures and apish chatter-
ings that he sometimes sees as a
fit mode of expression; and so
utterly ashamed of his own. lack
of original civilisation and of the
shame that drives him to believe
he ought to be worthy of ‘culture’,
that he either on.) one hand
cultivates an assemblage of ludic-
rous crazy freakish abortive mod-
ern- poe literary
idios asies ani believes that
he is qrolvins the choicest most
magical and profound literature
when he is really only mirroring
his own heart-breaking lack of
creativeness, or he fiercely
and desperately sets about edu-
cating himself beyond all recog

we have accepted? What have we nition, thinking himself the more

done

stra

to deserve the | habits,
literature, art, religion, manners,
fashions, morals, political institu- closer he
tiong and modes of thought that pseudo-Europeanism, His
We hive gratefully acceptéd from lectually

rs? Have we made theyn most part

successful the farther he leaves
his native land behind and the
approaches to sterile
intel-
nent men are for the
insufferable carica-

for ourselves? Of course not: how tures who believe they are think-

could we have the skill to make

anything fof ourselves? Have we

fought anybody for them? cf
coursé not; how could we have
the stvength, courage, and virtue
to fight anybody for anything?
But worse .of all, these presents
of ours, these wholesome presents
that we have taken with such
cravenly base gratitude and
politeness, and indeed we had to
take them simply or do without,
—they. do not fit us. They were



“We wish to

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Â¥

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advise our customer's
that our Workshop Department will be
closed from Tucsday 5th August to
~ust, 1952, both days

ing when they are merely mark-
ing time in a monotonous and
long exhausted round of mental
habits, West Indian elementary
school children can tell you all
about spring and summer and
autumn and winter, and prim-
roses and robins but hardly any-
thing about armadillos or alliga-
tors.or hurricanes or coral insects
or sponges. And when the total

mental burden of all his shame
accumulated, what do we
@ On page 15

has

to give our Work-

than pink, He is were

XVII
“SLAVERY”

By JOHN ?RIDEAUX

What Thomas Briggs, Esq., had
advocated in 1894 and had lest
his seat in the House of Assem-
poly over, became law in 1817
when the privilege of giving sworn
testimony in the Courts of this
Island was. granted to Free Col-
oured people,

Lord Combermere, the Gov-
ernor of Barbados, imbibed with
the ideas of Wilberforce and
Clarkson, and being of a pro-
gressive mind, founded his char-
ity school for free coloured chil-
dren in Bridgetown in 1818.
Thirty-two of the scholars were
the children of slaves. This school
is still in existence but it is no
longer a charity school; although
there are a number of schol-
arships granted by the Vestries:
but the sehool fees are very
moderate and this school is a con-
siderable help to the not very
wealthy parents. Also this school
is not confined to coloured
children alone, for many white
men in this community own
Combermere as their ‘alma mater.’

Lord Combermere was one of
those ame yootions that the —
were nging changing fast,
and that the old order was giving
way to a new, In 1819, he brought
the wrath of the Conservatives
upon his head; in order to patron-
ise ‘The Barbados Society for
Promoting Christian Knowledge,
he appointed a day for Divine Ser-
vice, afd commanded the attend-
ance of the Militia, Mr. Michae!
Ryan, Editor of the ‘Barbados
Globe’, condemned this in severe
terms, stating that to order the
attendance of the Militia was
‘Petty Tyranny. Because Lord
Combermere as Commander in
Chief of the Island could order
the attendance of these men even
against their will, Ryan was pro-
secuted for libel and sedition, but
the jury brought in a verdict of
‘Not Guilty.’ Public opinion waxed
high, Ryan and his supporters
known @s the ‘Salmagun-
dies’, while the Governor and his
ee referred to as the ‘Pump-

ns.’

oon ae owners became ae
ous a’ mere eH 3
out-spoken militant esleyans;
then conduattng wofship at a
single Chapel in Bridgetown; that
all men are brethren entitled to
equal consideration, The Mis-
sionary in charge of this Chapel
was William James Schrewsbury,
who by his strong character and
eloquent preac' exasperated
the opposition; ch launched
an organised attack on the con-
gregation on Sunday 5th of Octo-
ber 1823, with bottles filled with

Sunday October 19th, the Chapel
was demolished by an angry mob
of young men of the upper classes.
To show the ba ese young
men received from the owners of
slaves, a reward off for
information as to *

tors of this deed, but it was never
claimed.

On. the 25th of January
the House of puke a
resolution that a Petition be pre-
sented to His Majesty the 2,
asking him to remove the Hon,
J. B, Skeete from the Office of
President of Barbados and from
duet pik BAVIIE teieeed 6
ue eved a
slave after his conviction and
sentence to death for “commit-
ting rape on a white woman.”
_ On the 13th of July, the same
year, the Editor of the ‘Barbadian
Newspaper,’ commented editorial-
ly that the news of the resolution
passed by the House of Commons
in Great Britain, that Colonial
Slavery should altogether cease in
12 years from the passing of an
Act of Parliament as regards those
slaves from six years of age and
upwards; but those uni six
of age, it was to end imm tely.
It was also stated in this editorial
that on the llth of June, four
resolutions had passed the House
of Commons for £20,000,000 to
be paid as compensation to the
slave owners on the release of
their slaves, }

There was still a terrific amount
amount of propaganda on the sub-
ject of slavery those who were
faced with a terrific financial loss
due to the release of the slaves
were using all within their power
fu op are egua"a shochd be

are equal_an

free’ An {ele ‘Plan of t=








ment of e on the
Estates in —e los, a, ‘9 re-
co 3 lent in-
terest that i ould be best to

quote it ‘in

{



SUNDAY ADVOCATE

“The Negroes have all Sun-
day to themselves, except now
and then when prevented by
the weather the day before;
they may be ordered on Sunday
Morning to litter the Pens and
Stables, and bring up fodder
for the Horses

In the Week they are set to
work about six o'clock in the
morning and work until nine,
when they have an hour allow-
ed for Breakfast time—they then
work from Ten until One o'clock
when they knock-off and come
home to Dinner, which meal is
provided for every Negro on
the Estate, with an allowance
of half a pint of Punch; — at
Three o’Clock in the afternoon

they again set to work and re-

main until six in the evening being
never actually at work more
than Three Houre at a time, and
only Nine Hours altogether in
a Day.—Out of Crop they have
every. other Saturday After-
noon, and sometimes the whole
day to themselves,

The Children from Nine to
Fifteen years of age never worl
with the Hoe, and are only em~
ployed in cutting Grass and
Green Fodder for the Stock.

The Infants when weaned,
are put under the care of elder-
ly Women as Nurses, and are
kept at the Nursery, (a Build-
ing purpose! erected for
them), until they are fit to go
into the Grass Gang — these
have three wholesome meals @
day which are served up te
them under the eye of the Man-

ager.

The Breeding Women from
the time they report themselves
pregnant, are withdrawn from
the Gang, and are employed ir
any very light occupation, with
a view of keeping them at
home, and to prevent their go-
ing to Market with heavy loads
which they frequently ‘carry for
themselves and which with
long Journeys, &c. often prove
hurtful to oe are’ al-
ways allowed a Month to Lie-
in and when put to Bed, (he-
sides 2 proper Midwife), they
have a Nurse of their own chvice
to attend them during their
Confinement,

Baby Linens Candles. and al}
other necessaries are like

rovidég for them, ana they
Rave during that time, an in-
creased allowance of Provisions.
——At the end of the Month the
children are brought to the Nur-
sery about Bight o’Clock every
Morning and the Mothers for
the first three months, do little
else than attend to them when
the Children get older and
stronger, the Mothers bring
them to the Nursery at Seven
in the Morning, where they
leave them, and go to work —
they come home to Breakfast at
Nine o’clock and go out again
at ten they come home at twelve
and go out at three in the after-
noon, and at Five o’Clock they

again come home and take their
Children to their Houses,

Every grown Negro is allow~
ed haif a pint of Guinea, or
a quart of Indian Corn and four
pounds and a half of Potatoes,
or four pounds of other Roots
per day, besides a _ plentiful
meal, ready dressed and per-
pared for their Dinner; they are
also allewed sufficient quantity
of Mo » Rum, Salt and
Salted Fish per week. — The
young Negroes have dressed
meals provided for them.—

The Men are allowed a full
Suit of Pennistone or Osna-

burgs, with a Monmouth Hat
or Cap every year; the Women
the same, with the addition of
a Check Shift or Handkerchief.
—A comfortable House is built
at the expense of the Estate, for
every Negro with a family, and
frequently for the Single ones
where the Families are large.
—Every Negro has a small spot
of Land which he cultivates for
himself, and ~which affords him
not, only many eomforts, but
from the sale of its produce, he
derives the means of indulging
himself in dress and other grat-
ifications.

A Practitioner vislts the Estate
every day, and a Physician and
Surgeon called whenever either
is required. There is a comfort-
able Hospital on the Estate,
and the Sick are allowed every
necessary and when ordered
by the Doctors, have Madeira
or Port Wine, as may be requis-
ite;Animal food, Broths, Flour
or Starch Spices, &c.

The Negroes are never called
on to do any work at night, ex-
cept in Crop time, when Men
who are attached to the Boil-
ing-house are sometimes detain-
ed until Eight or Nine o’Clock,
and come out in_the morning
when the other Negroes go to
work,

A Man of religious habits at-

tend the Negroes for the pur+





I WAS minded to head this
eolumn today “Now We Know”,
but I well remember that the last
journalist who headed this column
Went on to show that what he had
neen thinking in the past about
amaica and the war was now
justified. He served six months
In prison.

I could well appreciate his feel-
ings when I read the facetious dis-
course by the Director of Educa-
tion in the Advocate of Saturday.
4 was amazed to find that an officer
in a responsible position realising
that almost everyone in this island
was dissatisfied with some aspect
of education and its administration
could find it in his soul to treat
the matter jovially. It is either
that-Mr. Reed does not realise the
extent of the public dissatisfaction
or he thinks the matter too trifling
to merit serious attention by him.
As far as I am concerned he can
choose either predicament.

I can hardly trust myself to ex-
amine in detail all the statements
made in his article, and I hope
that it is really his and has not
been mangled by any other hand,
for fear that I might divert read-
ers from the goal to which I have
pointed them: an Enquiry into the
administration of education in this
island. It is by this that I hope
the failures of the system will be
diagnosed and corrective measures
adopted.

This matter of education of a
people is certainly too serious for
any light hearted diversion, even
if Major Reed in his army career
could be gay in the face of death
and danger. There is a point at
which even bravery becomes fool-
hardy; facetiousness in this case
is almost unforgivable. But I sup-
pose that I must not be too
severe in my judgment of the
Director’s attitude.

Idle Reference
And as if to indicate his entire
attitude to the question of educa-
tion in Barbados, he cites from
several authorities and makes the
same idle reference that Amateur
and others did to the Education

wise Act of 1944 and Our Changing

Schools, 1950. These are English
publications dealing with the
theory. of practical and administra-
tive education in England, but Mr.
Reed refuses to face the problem
which is besetting us in this
island: Are these new theories now
the subject of controversy in
Great Britain good enough for us
in our stage of development? If
in Great Britain with its centuries
of tradition and development,
(both culturally and education-
ally) there are stiJl people, emin-
ent authorities at that, who are not
satisfied that some of these ultra-
modern educational theories give
the best results why should they
be toyed with in Barbados? What
several other simple souls and TI
would like to know from the Gal-
lant Major is what is the future of
education, in this island and what
can be done to justify the huge ex-
penditure of two and a half mil-
lion dollars out of a total revenue
of twelve million dollars and what
can be done to improve the defects.

Let me tell him that the Moham-
medan form of education might be
the best in the world but if it is
not what we want and what we
pay for and if we are satisfied that
it does not suit us, it is a waste of
time to attempt to force it on us.

Best Opportunities

Any educetional system proper-
ly. administered aims ategiving the
people whom it is intended to
benefit the best opportunities to
contribute to the society in which
they live. It must fit them for
work and living in the community

im which they live by learning and -

technical training. This is the
basis and the intellectually bright
ones will then be fitted for the
arts, science and the humanities.

To tell this community that an
Education Act demands that
“ghildren must be taught accord-
ing to Age, Ability, and Aptitude,
‘Le. Chronological Age, Capability
and Special talents” is, in good
American, so much baloney. How
doés all this apply to the small
boy in Harrison College who hav-
ing gone to the Elementary School
finds that he is ahead of the other
pupils in the three R’s and could
be removed up one form, When he
{s refused then he comes to feel



of giving them Religious
Rnstructions, and much may be
done by means of a safe and
efficient plan of Religious In-
struction towards the moral
improvement of the Negroes.

(1).
edandthe nsim-n.
1. The Journal of the Barbados
Museum and Historical Society
Vol. Il, pages 29-30.












Education
Laughing Matter



No

that it is no use worrying and later
when he becomes sufficiently dis-
interested and fails to catch up he
is super-annuated. He can't step
up but he can be turned out, char-
acterised as a duffer and has diffi-
culty in getting a job. An early
remove might have given him an
extra chancé at one of the many
Barbados Scholarships and he
would have become one of those
of whom Barbados would be
proud.
Congratulations

But if I have been critical of
the Director let me cpngratulate
him on the wisdom of mak-
ing the two St. Leonard’s Schools
Boys’ and Girls’ Secondary Schools
instead of filling one school with
700 children without leaving room
for any intake at the end of a
year, It only remains for him now
to press for an extension of the
school leaving age from 14 to 16
If not let the Schools be known as
“Secondary” without this restric-
tion on age. It is a waste of time
to give a child two and a half
years’ training at these schools.

I suggest that when next the
Director comes from his ivory
cloisters of intellectuality, he
migit deign to tell us lesser mor-~
tals in the lowlands what are thesc
schools and exactly where they fit
in with the local scheme of ele-
mentary and Grammar (Second-
ary) Schools.

—J.E.B.

St. Joseph Round-up

. ~
Film Show At
we e
Girls’ School
Through the courtesy of the
British Council, there will be a
Free Film Show at the St. Jos-
eph’s Girls’ School on Tuesday
next beginning at 4.30 p.m. For
sometime past, the British Coun-
cil representatives have been
kind enough as to give Shows in
St. Joseph. Residents are hoping
now that they will be kind

enough as to give a Film Show
with hints on health.





Roads Undergoing
Repairs

Roads in St, Joseph’s now be-

ing repaired are Springfield, Co~-

coanut Grove and Cambridge. |

Work on Springfield Road is ex-
pected to be completed during
this month, while the Cocoanut
Grove Road may not be complet-
ed this year, it was learnt yester-
day. At present there are approx-
imately 22 workers and a_ road
roller on the Cambridge Road.
Work on this road should be com-
pleted early next month, it was
reported.

Patronal Festival
At Saint Aidan’s

St. Aidan’s Patronal Festiva!
will be celebrated on Sunday
August 31. Po mark the occasion,
the following services will be
held: —

Choral Eucharist 5 a.m.; Festal
Evensong and a Cantata, 4.30 p.m.

Forty candidates are at present
being prepared for Confirmation
at the St. Joseph’s Parish Church,
by Rev. Edward Gatherer, As-
sistant Curate attached to this
Church. he
*



ae *

The Baths at the Social Centre
at Bathsheba were opened to the
public on Sunday last at 6 a.m.
Immediately on the opening 4
rr went in to get the first

ath,













SUND



AY, AUGUST 10, 1952

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SUNDAY,

—

CHURCH
SERVICES

ST. LEONARD'S

AUGUST 19,

Holy Communion, 9 a.m. Mat-
ins & Sermon, 3 p.m. Sunday School
& Bible Classes, 7 p.m. Evonson and

Sermon.
ST. MARY'S
TRINITY [Xx
7.30 a.m. Matins, 8.00 a.m. Solemn
7.30 a.m. Matins, 8.00 a.m. Low Mass,
9.00 am. Solemn Mass & Sermon, 3.30
Sunday School. 4.00 p.m. Children’« Ves-
pers, 7.00 p.m. Solemn Evensong & Ser-
mon,

ST. PAUL'S

y. Communion,
a.m, Solemn Mass & Sermon, 3.00 p.m.
Sunday School & CHKildren’s Service. 7
p.m. Solemn Evensong, Sermon & Pro-

cession,
MORAVIAN ‘
ROEBUCK STREET: 11 a.m. Morning
Bervice, preacher: Rev. E. FE. New: 7

gm Evening Service, Preacher: Rev
*. E. New.
GRACE HELL: 11 a.m. Morning Ser-

vice, preacher: Mr. W. Swire, (followed
by Holy Communion); 7 p.m. Evening
Service, Preacher: Mr. W. S. Arthur.
FULNECK: 11 a.m. Morning Service,
Preacher: Mr. W. St. Hill, 7 p.m. Eve-
oe Service, preacher: Mr. S. Weekes,
Y: 7 p.m, Evening Ser-

vice, Preacher: Mr. D. Culpepper.
DUNSCOMBE: 7 p.m. Evening Ser-

vice, preacher: Mr. G. Francis.
SHOP HILL: 7 p.m. Evening Service,
preacher: Mr. W. A. Deane,

METHODIST

JAMES ST. il a.m. — Rev. K. E.
Towers, B.A.. B.D. 7 p.m. Mr, K. E
Towers, B.A., B.D.

PAYNES BAY 9.30 am. Mrs.

Phillips, 7 p.m. Mr. P. Deane.
WHITE HALL: 9,30 a.m. Mr. M. Hall,
7 p.m. Miss G, Oxley.
GILL MEMORIAL: 9.30 a.m. Rev.
p.m. Mr. D. V.

F. Lawrence (S) 7

Roach, .
HOLETOWN: 8.30 a.m. Rev. K. E.

Towers, B.A., B.D. 7 p.m. Mr. G. L.

.McCalister.
BANK HALL: 9.30 am. Mr. R. A.
Crawford; 7 p.m. Mr. G. Sinckler.
SPEIGHTSTOWN: 11 a.m. Mr. G.
L. Bannister.

Harper, 7 ‘p.m. Mr. EB.
SELAH: 11 a.m, Mr. H.
BPETHESADA:

man.

8.30 a.m. Enrollment of Boy's Brigade
at Holetown,
BETHEL CIRCUIT
Preaching Appointments, Sunday,
August 1th,
BETHFL: 11 a.m. Mr

b.m. Rev. T. J. Purley.
DALKEITH: 11 a.m. Mr. J. Griffith,

7 p.m. Mr. G. Harper.

BELMONT: 11 a.m. Mr. G, McAlilis-
ter, 7 p.m. Mr. F. Moore

SOUTH DISTRICT: 9 a.m, Mr. D.

Griffith, 7 p.m. Mr. G. Jones.
PROVIDENCE: 11 a.m. Rev. T: J.

Furly, Holy Communion. 7 p.m. Mr.

Tt. Blackman.
VAUXHALL: 9.00 a.m. Rev. T. J.

Furley, Holy Communion, 7 p.m. Mr. V.

Cooke.
EBENEZER CIRCUIT

EBENEZER: 11 a.m. Mr. V M.
Pilgrim, 7 p.m. Mr. O. H,. Miller.

BEULAH: 11 a.m. Mr. E. Pilgrim, 7
p.m. Mr. E. Toppin.

SHREWSBURY: 11 a.m. Mr. 4H,
Sargeant, 7 .m, Mr. A. Clarke. .

RICES: 11 a.m, Mr. G. Forde, 7 p.m.
Mr. J. C. Mottlay, M.C.P., i

Sunday Schools at 3.00 p.m.

THE SALVATION AEMY

BRIDGETOWN CENTRAL: 11 a.m.
Moliness Meeting, 3 p.m. Company Meet-
ing, 7 p.m. Salvation Meeting. Sr.
Captain W. Bishop.

WELLINGTON STRFET: 11 a.m,
Holiness Meeting, 3 p.m. Company
Meeting, 7 p.m. Salvation Meeting.

Senior Major T. Gibbs

SPEIGHTSTOWN: 11 a.m. Holiness
Meeting, 3 pm. Company Meeting, 7 Pm,
Welcome Service for Sr. Captain S.
Worrell.

CARLTON: 11 a.m. Holiness Meeting,
3 p.m, Company Meeting, 7 p.m. Salva-
tion Meeting. Captain E. Bourne.

SEA VIEW: 11 a.m. Holiness Meeting,
3 p.m. Company Meeting, 7 p/m. Salva-
tion Meeting. Lieutenant C. Hinds.

PIE CORNER: 11 a.m. Holiness Meet-
ig, 3 p.m. Company Meeting, 7 p.m.
Salvation Meeting. Sr. Major J. Hol-
lingsworth.

DIAMOND CORNER: 11 a.m,‘ Holiness
Meeting, 3 p.m. Company Meeting, 7

Husbands.
11 a.m. Mr. M, B'ack

P. Deane, 7

p.m. Salvation Meeting. Captain L.
Moore.

BAPTIST
The ST. JAMES NATIONAL BAP-

TIST: 11 a.m. Matins and Sermon, 7
p.m, Evensong and Sermon, Preacher
for both Services the Rev. J. B. Grant,
1,.Th., Minister in charge.

5 p.m. Monday; Wednesday; Friday;
training for youths. This will be con-

ducted by the Rev. L. Bruce-Clarke
(Assistant Pastor) and Mrs Oiga
Browne

ST. NICHOLAS EPISCOPAL
ORTHODOX
; WELCHES ROAD Y
11 a.m. Matins and Sermon, preacher:
Rev. Deaconess Barrow, 7 p.m. Even-
song and Sermon, preacher: Rev. Dea-
coness Barrow.
TUESDAY 7.30 p.m. Evening Prayer
end Sermon, preacher: Rev. L. Bruce-
Clarke.

LLE_
GZ
UH-LOOK, |
PESTWELL>* YOU'VE
BEEN VERY KIND,
COMING TO SEE ME
EVERY DAyY=:-I FEEL
GUILTY; TAKING UP
YOUR TIME 5 POMS

NEWS FOR
SHOPKEEPERS
HERE AGAIN





1952



B. G. Rice
Industry

LONDON

In the House of Commons on
July 30, Mr. Roland Robinson
(Conservative, Blackpool) asked
the Secretary of State for the
Colonies whether agreement has
yet been reached for the participa-
tion of the Colonial Development
Corporation in the development
of the rice industry of British
Guiana,

Mr. Oliver Lyttelton, the
Colonial Secretary, replied: “No,
but I have now had from the
Corporation a proposal for
financial participation on which
I hope to take a decision very
soon.”—B.U.P.



Acheson Returning
To Washington

SAN FRANCISCO, Aug. 9.

Secretary of State, Dean Ache-
son returning from a meeting in
Honolulu with Foreign Ministers
of Australia and New Zealand
took off from San Francisco in-
ternational airport at 4.16 p.m.
G.M.T. on Saturday for Wash-
ington.

In an airport interview Acne-
son expressed doubts that any
permaindat Anzus headquarters
would be ‘set up in Hawaii. He
said Anzus nations would prob-
ably meet in various member
eapitols in future —U.P.

t

Cow Eall On Car :
Passengers Hurt

DENEVER, Colorado, Aug. 8

Mr. and Mrs. Milo Ewing, suf-
fered head and back injuries on
Thursday night when a cow fell
on their automobile. Ewing and
his wife were driving beneath an
underpass near the stockyards, A
1,300-pound cow broke loose dur-
ing the unloading of a cattle car,
tumbled and crushed the top of
Ewing's car. The animal stagger-
ed away and died.—U.P.





In Touch With Barbadcs
Coastal Station

CABLE & WIRELESS (West Indics)
Ltd. advise that they can now communi-
cate with the following ships through
thelr Barbados Coast Station:—

S.S. Tista, s.s. Samana, s.s. Sirena,
5.8. Sirocco, s.s. Inazua Shipper, s.s.
Velhall, s.s. Forester, s.s. Millais, s.s,.

Marore, s.s. Rane, s.s. Giulia, s.s.
Scholar, s.s. Athelcrest, s.s. Pontoporos,
8.8. Biographer, s.s, Livadia, s.s. Alcoa
Patriot, s.s. Tweedbank, s.s. Trigonose-

mus, s.s. Nestor, Lady Rodney, s.s.
Quilmes, s.s. Dalhem, s.s. Colombie,
s.s. City of Fly, s.s. Arakaka, s.s.

Alcoa Polaris, s.s. Cape Vinof, s.s. Kent,
s.s. Fidra, s.s. Riojachal, s.s. Artillero,
8.8. Bayano, s,s. Ocean’ Ranger, s.s,
Nueva Andalucia, s.s. Maria De Larrin-
aga, s.s. Isfonn, s,s. Dolores, s.s.
Oberon, s.s. Mormackite, s.s, Manistee.

CE

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
First Church of Christ, Scientist,
Bridgetown, Upper Bay Street
Sundays 11 a.m. and 7 p.m,
Wednesdays @ p.m. A Service which
includes Testimonies of Christian Heal-

ing.
SUNDAY, AUGUST 10, 1952

Subject of Lesson-Sermon: SPIRIT.

Golden Text: 1 John 4; 6, 13. We are
of God: . . . Hereby know we that we
dwell in Him, and He in us, because He
hath given us of His Spirit

The following Citations are included

in the Lesson-Sermon; The Bible: Now
we have received, the Spirit which
is cf God; that we might know the
things that are freely given to us ot
God.

God. 1 Cor. 2. 12.

Science and Health with Key to the
Scriptures, by Mary Baker Eddy.

Spirit, God, is heard when the senses
are silent. Page 89. ‘

THE LITTLE GUY

SHOULD'VE

IN INCOGNITO +++



ACOBS

PATTERN
COUNTER

SCA

$36.4

LES

9 at

GENERAL HARDWARE SUPPLIES

RICKETT STREET (Opposite Post Office) "PHONE 4918



PAGE ELEVEN

SUNDAY ADVOCATE
| 39835995999999905595500"









Visas For ArabsNotColunibus § Listening Hours TH,

West Indian Viscovered The SEA AND AIR § | emo wm co

. . : : L lew x 4.00 p The News 4.10 p.m. Entyr -
Subjects ew World iS TRAFFIC 3 EEE can help you to success



$



A leading South African an-|4 5 p.m. Eric Coates, 5.45 p.m. Arthur's t °,¢
Inn, 6.15 English Magazine, 6.45
LONDON thropologist says Arabs, _not| In Carlisle B pin. ‘Programme ferede, a Interhibe rough person post tuition
In the House of Commons on Christopher Columbus, discovered| _ n riisie Day 7.00 p.m. The News, 7.10 p.m. Home aos a
July 30, Miss Irene Ward (Con- America. The Arabs scored a beat | ,, S¢"goner May Olive, Schooner, Eme- News From Britain ee hana ot Shas Te OF MEN in important positions were once students of
- wi =: } line, Schoon Cyr . $s Sch aD . ™. ‘ M 91.3%
servative, Tynemouth) asked the of nearly 500 years on Columbus} Laudaipha Schoone aaa ease, ,

Schooner Augustus B. Comp-

The Benactt College. They owe their success to Personal Postal
Aruba,

Secretary of State for the Colonies ‘Tuition — The Bennett College way. You have the same chance to

if he will take steps to give the

according to Schooner Esso Schooner 7.15 p.m. Caribbean Voices, 7.45 ry

Sunday Service, 8.15 p.m. Radio News.

Dr. Jeffreys, seniox Pe D
lecturer in social anthropology at | ‘““'¥* A., Schooner Henry D. Wallace



ere ie : : s Pr ot ‘ r reel, 8.30 p.m. Spotlight on Ast, 8.45 qualify for a fine career, higher pay and social standing.
same facilities for British subjects the Witwatersrand University.|Everdene, Schooner Enterprise S., > m. Interlude, 8.55 p.m. From the Edi-
as United States subjects in Jeffreys based his claim on the Rebsboet Meron arle Wolfe, Schooner torials, 9.00 p.m, From The Promenade One of these courses will lead to your advancement
" ; : ; 2 josarene, Schooner ‘Ortac, S& soncerts, «10.00 The News, 10.10
respect of visas in Bermuda and discovery 18 months ago of negro |Sinshine R., Schooner At Last, Schoon. Sm News Talk i01s pn London Accountaney Modern Business Methods Languages
the West Indies. hamitic skulls in the Rio Grande | er Wonderful Seuauatior, Schooner Lady Forum, 10.45 p.m. Religious Talk. Serta Bechet Boblects poreeere.
. : sa. 4 Silver, otor Vessel T.B. Radar Motor MONDAY, AUGUST Ll, 1952 i :
Mr. Oliver Lyttelton, the River. The Professor said: “The |}ien Motor Maria, Motor Vessel Mone- 400 — 2.18 6 ta. 26M 25,59 M Commercial Arithmetic General Education Public
Colonial Secretary, replied: “Visas puzzling things, seemingly previ- ka, Schoener Lucille M. Smith, Schoon : Costing | Geography colies Sobios
are not required for British sub- Ously inexplicable, suddenly made |e: Harriett Whittaker, S.S. Nestor. 4.00 p.m. The News, 4.10 p.m, Th Economics Journa’isen Shore Story Writing
j i + pense an te i a jigsaw ARRIVALS daily Service, 4.15 p.m. A Tale of Two 2 4 ‘
Losin’ teovtincy. Meee kk’ oe Dussie” Ried RE NY stoner dase Me elt, M6 fone, DOL” 443 p.m, Make Mine Countrs Soe eae Sheet Metal Werk
- 7 Capt. Hassell, fr British i P oa: oO 5.15 ae rehitecture . Engines oe je!
Bahamas. I am looking into the _ Jeffreys thinks athat by 1,000| Agents: ‘Messrs, Robert Thag® Gulana Fae hale ie, mineiode, 6.08 on Airccatt Maintenance Machine Design Steam Engineering
questions which the hon, Lady A-D., Arabs were established on cathooner Harriett Whittaker, 50 tons, Welsh’ Miscellany, 6,15 Listeiters’ Choice Senet, eeeeies: i Te a
has already brought to my notice the west coast of Africa and had |Schoones Owners Ann niaue. Agents: 5.45 p.m. Sports Rene Up, ain Be Chemistry Plumbing Television
: . - : ; J 3 . « a 7 ews, mie ‘ ‘
in this connection."°—B.U.P. settled in America. Columbus] 8.8. Nestor, 1,075 tons, Capt, Reitsina, SAMs Parade, 7.00 pom. The new Slee Basie Fetigaven Woe
— —. me a negroes | from nee aoe Messrs, S. P. 7.45 — 10.90 p.m. . 53M se M By aughesmans’p Quantity Sw: vering Workshop Practice
- who, according to Jeffreys, were Ss : : an — -_ 2 setrical Engineering dio &: yincering
BASKETBALL the descendants of Arab slaves. SS. Lady ee teen tons, Capt. 7.15 p.m. Books To Read & The Arts, Electric Wiring Road making OVERSEAS SCHOOL
cerca att He said the discovxery of hamitic | LeBlanc. for St. Lucia, Agents; Messrs. 7,45, P-m. Ballads, & Songs, 215 pin. CoS ee me re ene | om oy CTE
+ ‘ 1G » $ -, adio Newsreel, 1 pea *
wae skulls in caves in the Bahamu bas * ea heathy et 40 tons, Survey, 8.45 p.m. Interlude, 8.55 p.m TO 1HE BENNETT COLLEGE, CEPT. 1c, SHEFFIELD, EMGLAND y GENERAL
Carib-Bears Islands and African root crops in | capt. Roberts, for Fishing Banks. Agents? From the Editorials, 9.00 'p.m. The a ae

free your prospect '

Mont-

the Caribbean lends credence tc News

his theory.—U.P.

cE

Voice of Michael Vane, 9.45 p.m RTIFICATE OF
martre Players, 10.00 p.m. The

v.10 p.m. News Talk, 10.15 p.m

ARRIVALS BY B.W.LA. Health Of Tip Top

i EDUCATION
i
ON SATURDAY Tunes

B ! ADDRESS . SEND TODAY
From Trinidad: i

t

\

Schooner Owners’ Association.

Seawell The ee

Expected Here
In October



Man, 10.30 p.m

Madame Chiang



for a free prospectus on
A. Graham, B. Weatherhead, H. Young, : : Fi





oO {+ Trinidad’s leading , J; Collymore, J. Collymore, W. Leung, jie cke ive 4 Se cena ete
me of + Trinidad’s a K Sh A eung, R. Leung, J. Leung, T. Lee : F shied :
Basketball teams, the Carib- at é Has Yuen, G. Lee Yuen J. Lee Yuen, 8. YESTERDAY’S On enw we eee com ee 10.8.52 mm 5 and post it

Taylor, H Gonsalez, &. Suarez, J. Len-
agan, J. Lenagan, D. Lenagan, C. Lee
Ghin, K. Rees, J, Evans, C. Johnson, ¥.
Johnson, J. Johnson, M, Johnson, J.

Bears, are expected to tour Bar-
bados in early October, the secre-
tary of the Barbados Basketball





Skin Disorder WEATHER REPORT

















oo. Carr, M. Singh, E. Cornelliac, C. Cor- > &
Association, Mr. Noel Symmonds, HONOLULU, Aug. 9. nelise, G Cornelliac, T. Corneltiac. M. — from Codrington A BLESSING TO
said yesterday. He received cor- It was announced that Madame} deHiaudu, T, Cornellide, G. Matthews, E. sal varietal i's
respondence to that effect from Chiang Kai Shek will arrive in/Maitnews, M. Jemilo, M. Felamar, D. | Total rainfall for mo MOTHERS!
the Carib-Bears during the week. a oe Saturday night to re- got, FE. Meaden, W, Wiiliams, E, Marcelle, Seammadibtenres 74.5° F

This tour was expected*to come ceive medical treatment for a skin|J. ‘Alieroft, A. /Alleroft, Nurse, L. . Sr .
off same time ago, but no approx- disorder. K. W. Yu a press adviser | Plates. S- Gun To - Baee O Be ie Velocity: 7 miles per JACK and JILL
imate date had been fixed. to the Chinese Nationalists United|tagrenade, S$. Davis, P.Connell, D- spaice

The Carib-Bears were runners- Nations delegation said the Gen-! Winter, ©. Boxill, C. Awal, R. Hinds, R. Barometer (9 a.m.); 29.975; COUGH SYRUP
up in the Division “A” Basket eralissimo’s wife would enter hos-| "i's. 7 AE Eh Auer ke cae (iL am.) 29.969,
ball Competition in Ditapde, this pital soon after arrival, pr¥bably | \. Archer are Tn ck ; TO-DAY With Vitamin C
Season, losing to the U.S. team the Army’s Tripler Hospital, DEPARTURES Be S.WL8, Sunrise: 5.46 a.m
there, He came here from New York| poy y a 8 , ear ee } STOPS KIDDIES

: Sunset; 6.21 p.m,

Knock Out matches were be- to take charge of arrangements. Mt ‘Arthur ‘Nathan, Mr. Rodolfo Mol. Moon: Full cect 5.
gun here this week, Four have He said Madame Chiang has been|!, Mr. Pascal Monraka, Mr, Andre Lighting: 7.00 p.m. COUGHS & COLDS
been played, and of them the most suffering in varying degrees for Eicken hte heme Paerice, Mees cate High Tide: 8.15 a.m, 8.20 i
eS Nok. oe of ree ten years from skin condition coer Fieuereday Par, Aubando Sreenaries, p.m. In a Jiffy

r : : ‘ remarias 3. 80! q
ree. aes Aa be ahaa tot eet te, gPhee siae’ ~~ Ponalecks,” Master Michiel Podolecka. Low Tide: 2.02 a.m., 2.00
Sa er condition became worse} Master Zbigniov Podolecka, Miss Zina, p.m.

fore the first round ends. recently because she is aBiceie to| Podolecka, ‘Mr. George’ Roddam, Prof. — AND TASTES SO GOOD THEY BEG FOR MORE!





Cyril Beasley.

OTHER FATS AND OILS

From Page 9.
“the ‘Gibbar’ of the Basques, pur-
“sued of cold by the Phoenicians

drugs used in the treatment.

Physicians advised her that she
might be benefited by temporarily
leaving Formosa’s hot humid cli-
mate. Yu said the visits was
“purely private and purely for
medical treatment”. He said
Madame Chiang



Mothers, you'll bless the day this amazing cough syrup, made especially
for little folks, came down from Canada to save kiddies—your kiddies

from the menace of coughs and colds that hang on and lead to
dangerous complications, With JACK and JILL these nasty, sniffy
colds and bad coughs go faster than you would believe possible, And
how they love the pleasant taste of JACK and JILL.

IT’S NEW, DIFFERENT SAFE

U.C,W.I. GIFT FROM
THE LOYAL BROTHERS
OF THE STAR

“small, flat head, wide mouth,
“vast fluted expansible throat and

The Registrar of the University “immense flippers curiously scal-

College of the West Indies has apoard a Philippine ~—e ties “not only in Mediterranean waters ‘‘loped ¢ the i nent aeebeee JACK and JILL is new but thoroughly tested in thousands of cases
i . Tas 4 $ - “states that ¢ ar, specimen and is guaranteed to relieve kiddies’ coughs and colds faster than
recently acknowledged the receipt plane due at Honolulu Airport at but beyond the ‘Gates of Her- “states 4 ge spe

of £50, a gift from the Loyal
Brothers of the Star, to be added
to a Loan Fund for needy Barba-
dian students at the University.

The Society of the Loyal Bro-
thers of the Star, donated £20
last year, and this formed the
nucleus of the Fund.

RECORDS BROKEN

@ On page 5

But Herb who did 144.6 seconds
leg of the 400 metres relay in
Helsinki could not match the
classic effortless and beautiful
running of Whitefield,

So Jamaica were beaten but
not disgraced for they also broke
the world record with three
minutes nine point two seconds.

In the 100 yards Remigino
again conquered McDonald Bailey
in the comparatively slow time of
9.8 seconds, Bailey recorded the
same time just beating the United
States negro Gathers, The mile
run in fantastic conditions of
torrential rain with thunder rolling
in the distance was won by the
United States Wes Santee in good
time for the day of 4 mins, 12
secs,

anything you have ever tried, and most
and JILL is SAFE for the tiniest toddler,

“pives an average of 90 barrels important of all JACK
“of oil, each containing 380 gal-
lons; the smallest, from eight to
10 barrels; and that as many as
14 whales have been killed in a
season giving a yield of 870 bar-
rels of oil,

“akles’, and across the Sargasso
“drifts to the Azores, the Ber-
“mudas, the Caribbees. It may
“be seen, during the early months
“of the year, in the coast waters
“of Barhados, St. Vincent and the
gainst Mili mace whertver the. siuhiton 1s
“face wherever @ plankton is
Agains itary “rich, or darting after shoals of

“pelagic fishes. It is a mighty longer extant to par out our

es!

. >
Conscription “monster 45 to 50 feet long with local fats and oils suppl

BRUSSELS, Aug. 9. | Bide SSE. —_ SE CLE On, SE ES Tis EP ET CE ET a
Fifteen thousand Belgian strik- ~--

ers paraded in pouring rain
through the streets of Brussels in
a protest against the two-year-old
military conscription, while
strikes paralyzed the industrial
basin of Liege and other areas.
The strikers, carrying umbrellas
and dressed in raincoats, sent
Shouts of “down with the 24
months!” hurling through the
streets as they marched ten
abreast led by the Committee of
the Socialist controlled Genera!
Federation of Labour.

8.45 a.m. G.M.T. on Sunday.
—U.P.



Another famous Buckley Product

JACK and JILL

” ° S .
Belgians strike is a product of the famous Buckley Laboratories
that gave you Buckley's Mixture, Canada's largest selling cough and
cold remedy, and is as fast and effective for kiddies’ colds as Buckley's
Mixture !s for your own. Get a bottle of JACK and JILL TODAY
and have it handy.



What a pity this industry is no

A large percentage of the de-
monstrators were youths of mili-
tary age wearing gilt badges in
their lapels reading “non twenty-
four” intimating their unwilling-

Britain’s Nankeville pulled up ness to serve in the Belgian Army
at the three-quarter mark suffer- for the required 24 months,
ing from sciatica. * —U-P.



Mourning For

I KNOW HOW TO GET 4 Eva Peron

RID OF LOUDMOUTH =
ASK HIM TO GIVE THE

2G

IF HE STAYS

@ From page 1
the benefit of out of town mourn-
ers,
The Buenos Aires province leg-
COME islature approved a bill yesterday
to rename La Plato, the political
HOME WITH Hig | | capital, Eva Peron,
AFAMILY, THEY'LL | | A group of legislators in San
Sy HAVE THE Luis province introduced a sim-
ilar bill in their legislature to
rename San Luis also Eva Peron.
In Buenos Aires, municipal!
workers asked the Roman Catho-
lic Archbishop of Santiago, Car-
dinal Copello, to begin beatifica-
tion proceedings to make Senora
| Peron a Saint.



RR

—UP.



Life to
YOW CLOUT @
ea Sight Drafts TI 4/10% Pr.
79 6/10% Pr. Cable Vee h eas ‘
78 1/10% Pr, Faas 16 2/10% Pr “ . ”
, “AGE P,
dik” SR SEARS 1. “Special Detergent” that

—fights carbon and varnish deposits;

2. “Oxidation Inhibitor’ that
-rediies oxidation of lubricant:

RATES OF EXCHANGE

AUG. 9, 1952
NEW YORK
Cheques on
Bankers

Selling Buyin
72 6/10% Pr oe
70 8/10% Pr
Sight or
Demand Drafts 70 6/10% Pr
Cable
Currency
Coupons
Silver
CANADA
Cheques on
Bankers

GIVES MORE

Esso Extra Motor Oil
y lengthens the life of your
car because it contains:

72 6/10% Pr,
TL 1A/O% Pr.

60% Pr.

69 3/10% Pr
68 6/10% Pr
20% Pr

TRYING To EASE OuT
THE FRIEND WHO

79 6/10% Pr. 11 1/10% Pr
THANX AND A “TIP Tl 1/107 Px
OF THE HATLO HAT



Demand Drafts 77.55% Pr



GALVANISED
MESH WIRE

3. “Special Ingridient’ that
—prevents corrosion of alloys;
4. and due to its unequalled

High Viscosity Index it maintains

adequate body at any motor
operating temperature.

Your fsi0 Dealer, oda, !

ESSO STANDARD ©}.

all sizés and guages
in best quality
e
SPECIAL LOW PRICES

BARNES & CO., LTD.









aestivum

PAG



E TWELVE

tt

this series.

literally “ worrying
ick.”

that a family or

rt nT



















THe DAILY EXPRESS has sought

the collaboration of doctors in
The hope is that it
may bring relief te the thousands
of men and women who are
themselves

HIGH MOTIVES—usually the fear
career will

show, symptoms can be mislead-

SUNDAY

“Let's take a
patient we'll call Jim Smith,” he

the case of

said. “You know Jim. He's
the foreman at the local cement
works and he looks as strong as
a bull. He is as strong as a
bull, too, but nowadays he gets
insulted if you tell him so.”

His pain

cricket for his local team, was



ADVOCATE

a
gL ORYURNEDERECUERONRE OU NPREBORTUALICQEDSEDEOOG ON FUNTDECETD UEC EFUETEEYDEUETEEPEUREEE AT ESUETEROEETFETESERETEUTOOEDOS OUT TDCOOTEETGUUEVOEYOROUD GATOR GEO SEQEGGEQEOSOUEDOSULLUPEEGEL EGA LED OC GOEEOE BREOEEOEYESGOCUSCH UE TEITETDDADERESERS LEE PECEEEGED AERERVORESUEDETENG A FTHEED ET PEL ULERYTETLETLOVELE NOL EOP EPERLEEPR ASTD EDUTL UCT EREUEEETELE STOLL OEREN AO PEEEL PEOD POT EAEREPEELLU ERY EYER EO OPE

O SEE. YOUR)

jalists in the country say
that. physically he's as sonnd
as a bell.

“The difference vevween Jini
Smith and another. patient,
Mrs. Bell,” said the doctor, “is
that Jim sometimes showed out-
ward signs of something wrong
He had a rash, all right, though
we couldn’t discover why it
started and why «t went.

business man who works in the



most of the day washing.

They are terrified of clothes
they have not laundered them-
Selves, and liké to go around the
house wearing gloves.

There are the Acidity Hypos.
These ty; imagine that every-
thing they eat turns ini
crystals inside their bodies, and
worry themselves into

when their









SUNDAY,





Wine is especially valuable after illness.

AUGUST 10,

1952



if you feel worn out, depressed, oF
generally run down a glass or two a day of

3 Buckf: ic WH iil quick! ti h
suffer—are making these people shes . Bell doesn't show any ee rheumatism or fibrositis. Geral ntodn

i beep sgeret the oot. See At all began Une all She tust /eels bad.” Near” ‘a Sen are ee ; Gore new reeling it ters go. ng —
Ss s § t e and exhaust! remember, Buckfast Tonic
iliness. But, as the doctors will that time Jim played Mrs. Bell is the wife of a ny the world gr, by their jobs.

a

the proud father of a couple of City. She is 38 and still very doctors explain that it is
ing. . bonnie daughters, and downed oretty, She dresses well, and probably a state of mind, and a
FIRST, however, the series deals his pint. on Sunday with tie When she tries she can be as_ little mental therapy would cure.
; with one other fear that may best of them. cha as @ pet antelope. But For it is an odd thing that
make the conscientious mother Then suddeniy ne pégan y, “ot latel fy many ondriacs not
and the ambitious husband worry about his health. Heé Nowadays her two iain pre- want to cured. They onthe
keep silent. It is *~ came to the doctor and com- occupations in life are the pains living with thelr imaginary ;
§ \ rained that he. was no longer Se s ges which, pe Mi li ; ’
sleeping at nights because he reven' ir from sleeping, ——
Th had a terrible pain in his back, 2nd the fear that she is losing tons ,
A thorough examinution fafled 4%¢r sight. N FORTUNATELY 3
c to discover anything wrong with When asked about it; she can Uw though nfost doctors
him. No rheumatism. No sien never quite define her pains. understand and have
ee of any special acidity “its @ of cramp I a she @ ceriuin sympathy for hypo-
But the vain kept oh, and it 8° ’S, “atid @ terrible dull_ache chondria, there is not the time
ear did nobshift until Jiny had taken at the base of my back. Some- to do much about it nowadays.
& course ‘at the local hospital of “18 I lie rigid in torment. Once. doctors could give these
oe electric massage and vraan fancied pains some high-
fea “tthe wee ne Se ae Dozens— sounding name and charge

again — fee for a harmless opiate a MM Bak RR alae

BELL 1s con-

} 4 RS made the hypoch
a7. Vinced. that one day ,

feel important, and happier. |

ac —_—_—,,












Then he devéloped a cough.





“Not a deep-seated cough.” said he wil] weke up to But now that most medicine
the doctor ‘T exam'nec. hig» find nerss.i completely, sexitehads is channelled through the KIDDIES ORDIN-
chest and there was nathine Bit 1. ore i- sot a si that she National Health Service there
ca e there. not even when we X-raved wil f= be anything. but is not the willingness or the " ; .
him. ho althy opportunity to waste precious ARILY “NOT ’
“Th Was a constant. infuriating Her eyes? They ate normal Working hours on it, so that most :
little irritation-!he sor: of thine hypochondriacs today pot



bil she wears deep, dark Since

that drives you crazy when vou i day, even get_their ration of sym-





even indoors; a . } sf V
en phi pes Nemes i hear it at the cinema or theatre werries her husband to distrac. Pathy. They just get the pains KEEN ON MILK
‘ or a concert, Jt went on and on usa by asking whether he will 4nd the es and rush to the

and Jim's

I lustrated by ROBB





bathroom started be kind to her when she has Medicine cabinet. -s
Alling up with gum-drops and ae blind, . There are 5.000000 of ns —ACTUALLY HELP
SB fa ‘ “ §yTups and throat-spravs.” those are ofily aw couple ot ‘Acidity Hypo. me) in =
Jim's cough lasted for five’ cdes. Go. into any doctor's country. ce upon a time
‘ months, during which oa. Vi Ling-r g you will find ODly, important le were
; aIMaetors tor THEE incre Qegpe room: and vou'wih find a. ates. owadays we THEMSELVES TO
: became a nag to his family, and CHere até the Food Hypo- come from all walks of |'fe ane
i was convinced that he was.in chondriaes; who believe they 9%é Dot necessarily impor an: o' Oo A K
a ; : " the first stages of galloping . wii be il if they eat cértain. @. Typical example utat
ven pant 1H news Beep them ignorant that W¢/osnown American wisoorsck. ,
the, dish they have just eaten i, OMe: ARES hee hate fol : :
And Mrs. Bell (anaes forbidden t i oh a ceueral pone, Aen ee We personally know of kiddies who normally refuse milk
the ey Oe mirc uraut sople omatoes mushrooms, an F : 2
pee pid ane nner ai was You are © Ask ‘any domo pew amass. ol HE cough stoppea: "O!Aing happens to them Nh ON UG aaNe uaM Net ge en er actually help themselves to Qak or ask for it, Oak has a fresh
c eative ao . ‘ = his regular patients suffer from JI Jim smiled again— Mention what was in the dish, cow’s milk flavour when just swizzled in warm water.
dictators, millionaires, amd a few gneif— = “fake” ilness and he will for a couple of 4nd. they immediately get a s
thwarted ‘types living out lives Of Sélf- iyou a you = OODAbIY answer that a litte 1a ag wena ea ets atomieer apne ateml u Worth A Tram Oak is not’ only sold, at a
‘a ‘= a six o 8 Hst are feeling ash, a violen: ere are the Cl iness 5 i ord to :
inflicted ‘solitude. ee, wtih = “proper poorly” when they paimin his heart, anda migraine A¥pos. These Poot tae a were s y ciate iuulibicriie™ od
Nowadays about one-sixth of the British dont, iP do not need to headache; he's lost a couple of morbid horror of touching door- 12 oz, Tin 80c, each
ni

stone in






Of Hospital

population over the age of 30 suffer from it, weight and looks knobs or breathi



had . : f athing the same air Pa
The Oxford Dictionary defines nypo- inaloe’ Take Jim... verrible, Yet some of the best as other people, They send HAMBURO, Aug. 5. Such A Saving! 3 Ib. Tin $3.38 each
chondria as “a morbid state of depression {Ff vu us ss Tae , saad
either causeless or due to (unnecessary), an exouse ‘to’ call The former Iranian Vice Premii but, you use far less Oak to

to call
anxiety about health.” Woe ee eee

James Boswell, author of the famous “Life of 1F YOY thing
Johnson,” was one of the worst hypochondriacs in fhe "3% ot

Dr. Hussein Fatemi, wounded in
an assassination plot against him
in Teheran last February, was

get a glass of milk (0: 1
heaped tablespoon per glass
instead of 2 or 3).

OAK

OW, that means that
about 5,000,000
Britons are either
feeling ill when there is nothing
the matter with them, or have

Renison Opens New Leasehiolds Plant



ital
history. Every time a draught blew on him nothing . aa . released from a German hospi’
through a window he retired to his bed with a py¥s jay” faker ae eas De or"alenoe (From Our Owh Cortespondent) here on Friday. Fatemi, Nation-

alist Front member of the Iran-
ian Parliament, and chief editor
of the Teheran Daily, has com-



purely imaginary case of pneumonia, and each
time got a stye on his eye he feared he was
in for a grisly death from leprosy.

PORT-OF-SPAIN, August 1.
Mr, P. M. Renison said at

They over-work doctors and
clutter up hospitals with thefr

Ss

= be expended and every modern
= di

3 fantastic. imaginations. Their

levice must be employed.

en struck
the goinoide

ne — wed a lifetime with a fictitious ame? symptom , fictitious ches and) pains can ‘Tyinidag Leaseholds, Pointeas The modernisation scheme has pletely recovered from his injur-
the office

turn. @ normal home
mansion of misery

into a A - jes, but is still weak from long}
At a party in the Chancellery in Berlin in 5 Pierre, last week, that he was been undertaken because the com- hospitalization.







1937 I once looked in Hitler's bathroom cabinet; (F YOU always : not one of those Jonahs who be- P&any found it necessary to produce . :

it contained six kinds of smelling salts, 42 different tne better a's dite Pap ee of typical lieved that ‘the oil in- * es ‘ye eyed a nlidhtae ak tere remier told || THE BEST MILK IN THE WORLD
XS y th ; are—wors “ i w their place in " stl )

boxes of drugs, b Birtne"autber @ fYpOChOndriacs who are—worse dustry was GYing. OF Rave 00 NS meter piace in in Burope for another three weeks AT A PRICE YOU CAN AFFORD

powders, four NA men. who manage it and the tech- before returning to Teheran. He

eyewashes. and today. As a result of this competi-

TO PAY



; r au AuUA
; He is an ordinary gefieral nical and other experts whom tion two gasoline now Plans_to visit Vienna, Copenhagen =e
seven ear ca bel a ‘ 4 a ~~ e
syringes. and LEONARD MOSLEY cen 8 na ms they employ,” he added. do the work three gallons did 25 and Feo with the United L. J. WILLIAMS MARKETING
three are is & semi-urban area) everyone Thibed. sthtétnestill sire i wy years ago. » Press, Dr. Fatemi said: “My coun- CO., LTD., Sole Agents..
doctors permanently on the — Now the morbid teat of dis factory unre Wide’ty (2. Mir. Renison in his capacity as _ In the wotds of Mr, Renison: '¥ wet Gee cca” dione
aremises. Case has started laying ts write Acting Governor, when formally “This s24:000n00 manos Trinidad’s ai ite sal a. thas Premier
Pacer iets se cervenre=s 7 ——~ opening Leaseholds Catalytic refining e equal of its : $
ROAD COURTESY WEEK OBSERVED IN GRENADA ‘aises 40 per cent., showing what cracking plant with ancillary units Competitors in any part of the Mohammed Mossadegh and hi

‘ance C lon ; overnment are supported by a
(From Our Own Correspondent) the Insurance Companies thought jin the eaiortty r Parligment ack “ean



east last Sunday afternoon, Bri- $24,000,000 refinery world, The completion of this cat-

For STRENGTH

ST. GEORGE'S, Aug.2, gadier P. J. T. Pickthall pointed of the probability of accident. He modernisation scheme. cracker is an event of industrial je sure of the support of the peo-
Motorists here have enn ob- out that, taking into account appealed for co-operation with and strategie importance not only pie, All Wisaberes taiten by ten and ENERGY
serving “Road Courtesy Week,” Grenada’s relative population, the police through greater road Mr. Renison also expressed the to Trinidad and the West Indies, ’

sadegh were done for patriotic

sponsored by the Police Depart- More people were killed. on the care and warned that, after polite view that ifemore oil reserves are but to the British Commonwealth reasons. from Iran reach-











ment, roads of the island last year than warnings during the “Courtesy to be found and exploited, whether as_a whole; It Gn: arene ae Oe Te eee ewe -
i i in any West Indian colony. This Week,” the police would be very they be under the sea or under the Trinidad’s importance in the world ly interwoven with British pro-
Opening the week with a broad- year, too, insurance rates had been strict about the regulations. land, immense capital or, ly interwoven ) ole
TRLTIiGp “A'iGDDnRAA T Ti mee | VE STOUT
‘ H EK G E R , (THE VITAMIN STOUT)
, } f : . : : " : )

An Ideal Tonic



Beverage after a

EXPLAINS HOW TO
SPOT THE FAKE
THE RED DEAN
HAS ADOPTED...

Hot and Tiring Day



ACTS and photographs 5
Fe f gf Bove Counted it is no Heavier than a Lager
Nations forces are using Tm but contains Real Food value
weapons im Korea and Ghine

i besides being a Delicious Drink,
convince me that the charge is

















entirely false THE SORT OF PICTURE ° EVIDENCE” THE DEAN FOUND ACCEPTABLE AS PROOF =
This eonvietion was strengthened 1, Gewm-earrying insects (they are loci! stone flivs). 2. On the sp ot bomb inquiry /icafiet bombs!) 3. Anti-germ masks ( worn jor anti-dust), ie T @ U) 1
yesterday when [I |————— Difficult Ronee apt bitten by a centipede in any back garden 1 coulda = result. :
uestioned Dr. Hewlett poor that the method was or & Spider ? shdw the dean a scoré of odd- (viTAMiN STOU 7
Jonson, the 78-year-old a ONSIDER the possi: What would be the purpose igouiig i he has never Lepers BREWED SPECALLY POR NOT CLIMATES
“Red” Dean of Canter- | wed_out for use in weapons, » ia crit Eethee he {releasing a few thousand jjofiéed before. SS A: ig even more fan-
Me i ifected bluebottles ina country 7 tastic to suggest, as i 5 -
bury, who has returned releasing the “infected insects” “feeted _bluebottles in a country “Tho” Gommunists nave. laid the Russians did ON SALE AT ALL GROCERS
from 4 one-man investiga- For defence awn in the first photograph which has such primitive sani- greai stress on. the reports of ast wevx, that Britain has re- i
tion of the gert. -warfare sea powers Fiver insects “which ‘make ‘Om that it is already swarm: | Ob/tCtIve ‘qbservers" who Have soried io germ watfare by —— ——
estern owers : eo \ . ie) ie rear _-
charges in Chine. have never concealed 800d bait for trout. ‘ng_with them ? tions of the germ charges. of the People's Army in Korea.” SIMEON HUNTE & SON LTD — Agents

Dr. Johnson, fingering his
crucifix, reaffirmed the mats
Communist charges that tie

: withstand the heat and shock are “i and irrefutable.” He is willing to accept without
oT LA +r Puen Nor have they hidden their of small explosive charge OP te hes was cereals Yet h itted that he saw investigation North” Korean
bombs containing insects, eonviction thai the Russians are which opens the bomb. They impressed by Chinese 90 evidence whatever at first claims that “the Americans
spiders, and centipedes in- . doing the same must survive the weather and ciergymen who had found insects md t from propaganda have repeatedly used war
Teceec With CISREN® SeeTHe, It is beeause the West has dis» natural enemies. a Winter when'they are no: ¢Xhibitions in Peking and prisoners and civilians as

These creatures are supposed ooyered so much about the possi- Then to be effective they must ormally about. Mukden. He admitted that ne subjects for experiments in
to pass on the infections 'o pilities and tie uncertainties of fly to a water supply used for Dr. Johnson argued thar the &¢cepted ev ing the Chinese biological weapons.

humans by biting them or by
contaminating food or water



the fact that they
are carrying out germ weapon
researci; as a defence measure.

germ weapons in the last 12
years that the Communist
evidence can be dismissed.



drinking and effectively
taminate it,

con-
Finally, “someonc

Their fate

natural insects were a
because they had been killed or:

Dr. Johnson's admissions show
+ ag value of these reports. He
convinced that the charges

scientists said without question.
On their word he believes that
whut are clearly U.S. leaflet



. Nor am I impressed by the
views of the Communist ato
scientist Professor Joliot-Curie.

The Communists who run the

Daily Worker, which has Dr



“FOLB





ATE”



3 susceptible to the disease must riven underground by the cold.’ : oe Hewlett Johnson on its editorial
tao aan re fen Oe eta atink unbolled water. He had not realised that this fe nae really insect-carry- hoard, quoted me a3 On authority
efence research in Britain an Ei Dageriat weapons ate, ever There. are far too many “Uld also quickly the fate ‘8 Domds. on germ warfare when they
the U.S. proved that the used they will deliver concen- musts im this chain of events to °! ena ra dropped from The ‘U.S. has probably spent ;eprinted caret chosen
acees - appeal: tO vany, military. com. iGo not doubt that Chineses Ore than 200 million dollars on — excerpts from a technical article
chanees_of_delierately_spread- trated _germs _4s_fine _misif mandery It would be more cer ..\..ytmen and peasamts scared eri weapon research... Only a of mine three months ago. _ |
‘ng human infections by insects intended to infect people ‘@ln tO contaminate the water |) Continual germ waffare pro- ible would be hope they will attach” equal
*. ee «= «Wit germs. directly ganda have fagna tnfamiliar Se Heve that









authority to this rebuttal.

er_any other go-between agents directly. How often does a North ‘cts when they wenr looking. Sich crude weapons could be the London Express Serwice

acorerslits leet itseieeiiceeeins gale

THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LTD.

White Park Road, Bridgetown

sop ont cn nD

DODO ODGH HHH HHGGHH0HHHHOHHHHHHGHHHOOHHOHHOOHHHHGH HG

For:—
Convalescence after Illness:
. TAKE

VINERGY TONIC WINE —









A Masterpiece of
British Craftsmanship








AFTER THE RACES











ENGINEERS, BRASS and IRON FOUNDERS we.
THIS TONIC WINE contains sodium Glycerophos- ; 5 2
phate, Acid Glycerophos acid, and is ideally suited to Works contain rnodern appliances for the execution of © T BISCUITS.....Tins f) GIN .......00..005.. Bots.
tone up tired nerves, enabling you to sleep well and first-class work of all kinds, and eer to wn nienalivals ixainiinn
wale ip feeling verve’. SUGAR MACHINERY and S$ S . GREEN CHARTREUSE ,,
Remember it’s a Tonic Wine Dealers in AGRICULTURAL MACHINERY and ee ee ear e maa
; GENERAL ENGINE ROOM STORES 31% sautep Nuts ..... ‘ a ”
VINERGY of all Description ; C. T. ONIONS CREME DE MENTHE ,,
Obtainable of IRRIGATION PROJECTS, PUMPING EQUIPMENT $18 wusrarD ......... s SONERROY oF esstannn
Gece » UNEP LING BQ EE WEN. FID MUSTARD ......... »
a and ELECTRICAL INSTALLATIONS A SPECIALTY care ee ae Bee se "
, ee s
BOOKER’S (b'p0s) DRUG STORES LTD. For ae ge ee crnokt: < shia te
BROAD STREET AND ear (ALPHA PHARMACY) Satisfaction, Quality and Service wie % Gdtsine hae ath” oe é — RELIABLE
Contact aie
- NOTICE Keep your Lawns in fine trim with
Please note that as from AUGUST Ist, 1952, our AR UND ; a
DISPENSARY in Bridgetown will not be opened for THE BARBADOS FO RY LTD. PERKINS & CO., LTD. ‘FOLBATE” LAWN MOWER

Business on “Sunday Mornings”. Phone : 4546, 4650 Workshop

For Urgent Prescriptions Dial 8289 {
|
@V®POOHOHHF-OHHGHOFGHOHOGHOFHHOGHHOOHOHOHOOOHOGHGHGOD |S

Roebuck Street Dial 2072 & 4502

Phone 4528 Stores Dept:









SUNDAY, AUGUST 10, 1952













f WATER
Z:\ TEMPERATURE]!

FLINT OF THE FLYING SQUAD....







THEN WHOSE PRINT >

4S THAT ON THE
SAAS tT








THE SAME
CRESCENT SCAR!



2488S SHOW LP )
THIS TIME.



1 LIFTED rus N
» aa LIPSTICK FROM
MAS. DE LAZLON'S
DRESSING TABLE.
















- 1LL GIVE YOU EACH *~

A HALF-DOLLAR IF YOU CUT }

WO". THE GRASS FOR ME j;~
Paez, SP lia aa
& ! te =< Oe eee al

3 ib (CoKay POP WE'LL DO

} |

IT RIGHT AWAY



Don’T SiZE uP YOUR MAN
TOO QUICKLY, FLASH /
GARL HAS A PHYSIQUE
LIKE A GORILLA /

o
I GUESS yOu'D BETTER
HOLD MY SHIRT, MARLAS
THIS LITTLE FELLER

WANTS TO FIGHT!

WE WILL SEE, FLASH

GORDON, WHICH ONE IS

THE STRONG LEADER MY
PEOPLE NEED/ A

Pt

:



a
i
AAI

BY FRANK ROBBINS







OKAY! FIRST, A :
CUCKOO CLOCK WITH
A PHOTO-ELECTRIC










be SUT-A POOR 15
Sel’ MADE TO BE OPENED!
LET'S CHECK EVERY-
THING QUEER ABOUT
er THIS SETUP!

POOR WITH A KEEP-OUT
SIGN AN? NO DOCK
HANGLE TO OPEN IT
ANYWAY, CAN THEY TIE
TOGETHER SOMEHOW <

bs rl EA he 4
teh:
:

LOOKS LIKE WE'RE
STYMIED, PARADISE !
NO KNOB ON THIS IRON }
DOOR-AN? I LEFT MY

ACETYLENE TORCH



wags?




GOIN'
GITTIN' TIRED

BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES




BUT WHAT HAPPENED
TOTHE KID+ AND THE

r WHO COULDA







KILLED THIS BIG



TOY DOS+AND OUR }._ LION ++BARE- "TM | \apeatHe weap)
JEWELS? : HANDED? ri | ;



Pane



sil

.

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

BY CARL ANDERSON |

- YW, THE \ BUT THIS GUN AIN'T, |
| > Ses i o
UE Sead , ee
= | Ph! YOu.. O37 cE
‘ u Wilts ai. COMES OFF ; ay
\* f 4° :) ° ne ’ eS
¢ > ee 4 P i 4 i
BS SYNDICATE, ine WORLD RIGUTS REALRYR a » ~1 aah
TIATED LALIT MIIGTA LIADDENED? TUE BLADE DE TLE GUANO? |
HE {OT A MARK ON iT+ Hly s+} . .
NO+T 4 MARY «« f
NHAT IS f s
E
Af" ee eae " a
ca al | 7
UE eee | 3
Let EE a ees Me , pe* i
inka aizied WER tee te







PAGE THIRTEEN









FOR STYLE COMFORT AND
BUY A

VALUE

RELIANCE SHIRT

OBTAINABLE AT ALL LEADING
STORES







By Appointment
Gin Distillers

to the Late
King George V1









SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers re Thursday to Saturday only

eee ——————T—T—T——E
SPECIAL OFFERS are now available at our Branches White Park,

Tweedside, Speightstown and Swan Street
HADDOCK
KIPPERS
BACON

SLICED HAM

SALAMI SAUSAGES
SAUSAGES

ANCHOVIES
ANCHOVIES
PATE-DE-FOIE — Tins

Usually NOW

Corn Flakes

Blue Mountain Coffee—
SA PRRs i inne

Custard Powder

Lobster — Tins

35 32. BAGON eee eee eee eee teen eee t oneness

1.55 1.44

48

.64 per Tin






Mayonnaise

__IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE



GUINNESS

STOUT
FOR STRENGTH









C. F. HARRISON & CO. (BARBADOS) Ltd. :
P.O. BOX 304
BARBADOS



PAGE FOURTEEN

CLASSIFIED ADS.

TELEPHONE 2508



WANTED
HELP

———-——.
COOK-GENERAL to live in







$$

References


































HANK home. Apply stating references and
T Ss FOR SALE Wendover, Abbeville Gardens, Roekley.
—————$$ P
{BURROWES—The Burrowes family bee 10,868
through ‘this medium to véeturn thanks | oes EXPRRIEN.
to those kind trie nds who. sent with "good ro te eee
wreaths, letters of condolence, or in > atte |

> any, way expressed their sympathy in AUTOMOTIVE eae anions eee 2 etter 0
our recent bereavernent Ee a a Re B ‘orporation

: 7 10.8, 82—I1n BEDFORD. TRUCKS—3 ton and 5 ton | C#eridge Street, ridgetown, &

I with and without Eaton tw ‘rear ‘ 6.8.52-—n.

* GITTENS—.We the undersigned degire to| axle, new. Courtesy Garage. Dial 4616. HOUSEKEEPER j
thank all those friends who a bre | 6.8.52—6n hoe ani ponte
thes funeral af Goulbourne, an@ sent | ——————— aul ‘ 2 wey, otios sence a
us cards, letters of: aympathy, eaths CAR—1947 Standard 8 H.P. Sedan B ee 10. s: we Se

\ and in any other way exgressed | $800. Phone 5021 10.8.52—3n i? n.

© condolence With Us in Our GUT Of |
borrow. ¢ CAR—Austin A-40 8500 miles Excel- MISCELLANEOUS

Ena.Gittens (wife), Daisy Hard, May|Jent condition, $1,900. :

Payne, “Reiley Gordon (sisters), "Dessa ] oF 4430. 10.8.52—In. CHA’ — Respect-

‘Durant (daughter), Bertie Tulle (st@pson) ‘bi 1 (Whi

10.8 in CAR-1950 Vauxhall Wyvern ($1,880.00) | Would Tohdies their *Gnetifleur-Gar-
Owner driven, in excellent condition. dener to any decent Family uiring
\MUNTE—Through this medium Gdrtrud Apply Williams, ‘Williams’ Court”,| 4 good honest servant. Write ‘e
» (widow) Dennis, Nevitt and Dori ‘pposite Sayes Court, Government Farm, Gardener” c/o Advocate
* wish to thank their many friend “hrist Church. (Bus Stop in front). Department. in.
who attended the funeral, ser 10.8.52—1n
wreaths, letters, cards, visited, or i







“any way expressed sympathy wit! CAR—Morris 8 H.P. in good working ERSON

* them in the recent bereavement causec } order. Price $390.00. Ring 4774. P AL
By the death of Clarence Herber 9.8.52—2n
Hunte (painter) late of Thimble Lodge a
St. Philip 10.6,.52—Ip CARS—An assortment of second The public are hereby warned

1950 Va rd $1,900.00, 90, ipo

ars — nguard —

layflower — $2,000.00, 1947 Staudard 14

p. — $1,400.00, 1951 Austin A-40 —
Prefect

‘inst
INA
as I do not
hold myself Seapenslie nor’ for baw or anyone

LEGALL—We beg to thank all those wh tar

attended the funeral and in other way

|





ed sympathy to us in our recer 2,400.00 1946 Ford — else contracting any di or debts in
Borens:, 939 Vauxhall 12 h.p. — $700.00. name unless by a wee order signed
Legall’s Family, Dayrell’s Road vlorris “8 — $700.00, May be seen at} by me.
; 10.8. 52—1n Jhelsea Garage (1950) Ltd., Pinfold St., MORRIS,
—m hone . 7.8.52—4n Fitz Village,
PHILLIPS—The family of Alice Phillip St. James.
tender grateful thanks to ali wh USED CARS—We have an assortment 9.8, 52—2n

attended the funeral, or sent wreath
and other tokens of sympathy.
10.8.52—1n

f really good bargains including Vaux-
all Velox, Austin a4. Wolseley 12 h.p.,

AG Sedan, Chrysler. oe a

The public are hereby warned
giving credit to my ‘ ADEN.





| ee 18. FORD (nee SO) i I s hold
, IN MEMORIAM VAN—10 H.P. Fordson Van passed rset responsible Moe or ages ms
BULLEN—in loving memory of Christin’ | [ransPort Board Test and Licensed.) name unless by a weitten order signed

Bullen who died on August 10th, 1947

Royal Si No. 12,
God takes our beloved ones from our Y a 6 then!

LINGWOOD THEOPHILUS















> 8.5: .
ee fligh Street 9.8.52—6n MEDFORD,
But_never from a hearts. a se
Elaine Smith, Joan Smith, Bunnie Smith. Andrew.
10.8.52—1n ELECTRICAL 10.8.52—2n
CONYERS—in ever tender memory of
dearly beloved elder son, Brucc] G.E.C. REFRIGERATOR, 4 cubic ft. PUBLIC SALES
mond Convers on the 8th anniver-]| First class condition, attractive bargain
aoe his death 10th August 1944, oe < Ag thea ‘es L. & H.
rnal rest grant unto him, O Lord,| Millar, Reed Street. ja.
and. let ‘perpetual light shine upon 10.8.52—In REAL ESTATE
im I. =
His; ever sarrowing mother, C. G, Con-]| REFRIGERATOR — Small Westing-

ASK THEM — Our Recognized; Way-
side and Private Agents — if Presently
it is a Buyer's or Seller's Market! D, F.
de Abreu, a Trained tioneer & Real
Estate Broker, Must and Will always Lead
with Attractive Prices, Re-Bale Values

house Refrigerator
condition.
Phone 3900.
REFRIGERATOR — One second-hand
Electrolux (Lamp) A-1 condition, price
to catch. Apply: lL. & H. Millar,
Street. Dial 2791. 10, 8,521

in perfect working
Owner buying larger one,
10. 8.52—In.

yers. Mark A. Conyers (brother).
10.8.52—1n,

Oe
FSTWICK—In loving memory of a dear
hiisband and father Richmond Estwick
fell asleep on 6th August, 1950.

Gone but can never be forgotten by
Beatrice Estwick (wife) Estwick





SUNDAY
PUHLIC SALES |PURELIC ers





AUCTION





-————
By ipatructions of various Clients I will |)

sell at my MART VICTORIA ST. TUES-
DAY 12th at 12 noon;
material,
cases CEYLON

loose & package Tea,

velor 2 burner and single oil stoves, }
Raleigh Bicycle, Hercules Carrier Bicycle, |

Frerich Powder, Canvas Cot & Frame,

G.E. Refrigerator, Singer Treadle
Machine with Motor & Light, Small
4% HP: Gasolene Engine,

lathe,
magneto ignition, Floor & Bath Tiles,

at 2.30 SENGER 10 H.P. Car in good |)

working order & other

Cash

items. Terms

R. ARCHER McKENZIE.
9.8.52—3n.

UNDER THE SILVER
HAMMER

On Tuesday 12th by order of Capt.
L.. F. Nourse we will sell his Furniture



at Ashbury, St. George, which includes [,

\ery Nice Dining Table (Seat 10), Carved
Hall Tables and Chair (Jacobean),
tight Chairs, Wegson, Liquor Case, M.
Serving Tabie, uble and Single End
Couches and Settees; Pembroke Table,
Bookease (glass Doors), Chairs, Rockers,
Ornament and Kidnay Tables; Flat Top
Desk, Revolving Desk Chair, Cheffonier
all in Mahogany: Berbice Chair; Glass
and China, Brass Candlesticks, Set
Scorpion Spoons; French Marble Clock,
Pictures and Old Prints; Brass Standard
Lamp; Large Cyp. Bookshelf; Pine Press,
Plated and Silver Ware, Brass Bow!s, S.P.
Hot Water Dish and Cover, Lacqueer
Tea Set: Large Telescope and stand with

night lenses, Single Mahog. ad, Bed
and Spring, Screens, Me Washetanae
Lad Desk.
all< in

Mir’d Press, Linen Press,

Hepple. White Chest of Drawe

Mahogany: White Painted Cedar Press,

Child's Press; Chamber Ware; Kitchen

Utensils; Tables; Larder,
ment Pots, Palms; Geographical Maga-



nes and other items Sale 11,30

Terms CASH.

BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.,
Auctioneers

8.8.52—2n
aT
UNDER. THE SILVER

On Thursday 14th by order of The
Executors to the Estate of the late Rev.
S. A. Esterbrook we will sell the Furni-
ture which is both modern and antique
at Alexandrian Court, White Park Road.

It includes Old Colonial Pedestal Din-
ing Table, upright Chairs, Mir’d and
other Sideboards, China Cabinet, Side,
Ornament & Pembroke Tables; Round
Tip Top Table: Large Rockers, Uphols:
Sofa & Prie - Dieu Chairs; Flat Top
Desk, Canterbury Sheraton Book Case
with glass Doors & Eseritoire; Small
Antique Sofas all in old Mahogany: Car-
pets & Rugs, Some good Glass, did
China, Sheffield & Plated Ware, Dish



10. pieces white |};
6 lodse leaf LEDGER Binders, |




Scales Linen, } inek

ADVOCATE



NOTICE

We beg to notify our friends
customers that we will be closed for
oliday the Sth of August. Ke-opening
he ist of September.
Wm. RICHARDS & SON'S,
MeGregor Street, City.
9.8.52-—2

IMPERIAL OPTICAL CO., LTD.
Bridgetown, Barbados



3.8.52—2n.
NOTICS.

The WOMEN’S SELF HELP <
Thureday aah Coe 1952, for

ugui .

Stock-taking. As from Ist

the subscription will be $1.20 ner

0.8.52—3n





NOTICE
PARISH OF ST. THOMAS
ae Office will be closed
y Sth August and Tuesday 12th
August.
Fare So
Parochial ‘
2,8.52—3n.
NOTICE

FERGUSSON’S DEUG STORE
@, Tudor Street

friends and the that our
business will be as from *
10th August to Sunday th ‘erst

lusive.
ae An IE ES,
9.
NOTICE

eae So ar ccger on es
APPLICATIONS for Post

keeper, ; (Marked
“Applications”’)
Mrs. F. A. Talma,

Welches, Ch. Ch. up to 3 p.m. the 18th
August, 1952.

the



‘arochial Office.



LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

un application of Cleopatra Springer

Rout ind-the-Town, St. Peter, the

of edaser of Liquor License No. 805 of

1952, granted in respect of a board and

shingle shop with everite roof and shed

tached to Round-the-Town, St. ee
a License to a board and



and |



SUNDAY, AUGUST 1,

“Every Picture talls.e Story?”

De washing, sweeping,
i, Souping bring nagging pammer




-

IS OF TEN SURPRISING

oan and discomfort are the
trequent results.
joan’s Backache:Kidney Pills

veing bappy re relief by neping,

WA oo oe oe p Pager {
ou can upoa ,

i.

bow quickly backache, stiff, |
aching muscles or joints, |
lumbago, rheumatic pains aod |

common urinary troubles due
to. impurities in the blood can
be, overcome.
Strong, active kidneys safe-
yaaa your health by straining
purities and harmful wastes

diuretic and urinary
Many thousands of
they ve the S healtk
e ones taking

ee to filter the blood properly, | Doan

<. DOANS.:

antisepti

38







The M.V. “MONEKA” will ac-
cept Sie and Te for

s.s BoBsROOF, ist Set 1062, Nevis and St. nits, sailing Mon-

M.S. BONAIRE, 8th August, 1968. day 1th inst.

M.S x

The M.V. “CARIBBEE" will ac-
cept Cargo and ‘Passengers for
ica, Antigua, Montserrat,
Nevis and St. Kitts, Sailing
Saturday 16th inst.

and conditions available from|mM.s. NESTOR, 9th August, 1952.
9.8.52—4n.

M.S. BONAGSRE, 25th August,, 1952.
M.S. nn Sth September, 1952.
SAILING TO TRINIDAD & CURACAO
S.S. BOSKOOP, 18th meen, 1952.
M.S. HERA, 15th September, 1:

S. FP. MUSSON, SON & CO., LTD.

Canadian National memes

B.W.1, SCHOONER OWNERS’
ASSOCIATION
Consignee.

(INC,)

Telephone No. 4047





Amy n | Sto! Bungalow, minum Roof. ‘overs; Tea Services; Good Tapestrys le with everite roof and shed
(sister) Alfred Estwick (som) Marjorie Tollets, Sleke Grae a Servant's eee oom Ola-Windsor & Cherry Tree | © d at Round-the-Town, St. Peter.
| pe. Gooding, Rollins ra aor LIVESTOCK about 7,000 sq. ft., AT BAYSWATER —|Chairs. Dinner Service (70 pieces) and to use it at such last described
jarmily . -8,52—in, NEAR SEA i bout! Lamp; premises. SOUTHBOUND
| - 4 £2,200.. 2 AT routine MAIN ea euliie oe _ le Tall Post & Spindle] Dated this 6th day of August, 1952. Sails Sails Sails Arfives Sails
FORDE—in loving memony of my dear] CoW—one Guernsey Cow fresh in _ — Facing Sea, Right-of-Way | Carved old mahog; Bedsteads, Springs (Saa.) EDW: n Montreal Halifax Boston Barbados Barbsdes
er Helena Forde, late local preach-| miik 2nd calf). Apply: Dodridge Harper] to Sea, A 3 Bedroom Bungalow Type, | & Mattresses, Hepplewhite & other Chest for CLEOPATRA 7 LADY NELSON 1 Aug. 4Aug. 6 Aug. 15 Aug. 16 Aug.
et Methodist Church, who fell asleep] ear Club Morgan Gap, Clapham, Christ] Very Good Condition, Garage & Ser-|of Drawers, Berbice Chairs; old Mahog: Applicant. | CANADIAN 12 Aug. 15 Aug. — MAug. 2 Aug.
on August 10, 1951 Chureh 10.8. ‘ss 3h, ant’s Room, over 6,000 sq. ft., Going4 Linen he! Militany Chest of Drawers;| 7,5 G. B. GRIFFITH, Esqa., s CANADIAN CONSTRUCTOR 22 Aug. 26 Aug, osm 3 Sept. 4 Sep..
Asleep in God's beautiful Garden Away from sorrow and pain DACHSHUNDS—Lovely pedigree pup- — A 3 Bedroom (with Basins | Birch Pedateads, Springs .—This_ applica' will be con-| CANADIAN CHALLENGER 1g Sept. 15 Sept. — Sept. 25 Sept.
Some day when life's journey is pies. Champion strain. Phone 8690. & Cupboards) ae Bes soe about Honging. Presses aoe ae Shelves, Electric | cigered at a Licensing ae ae ager NELSON e * 23 Sept. 25 Sept. 27 Sept. 6 Oct. 7 Oct.
ended \ yrs. Qld, Cake xer, ‘on Wednesday, 20th August,
* eutrees ge _— mother again. ee Garage & ay Room, about otto items of interest. Sale 11.30 cloaks | 8 eves a.m, at Police Courts, NOkTHBOUND Arth Arrt Arrives
jurse er and relatives. ft. Going bout > Cash. om Arrives Sails rives ives
10.¢;21n. |, [UPS Five (5) Alsatian Pups. 3 males) cover: HILL Almost New 3. istics BRANKER TROTMAN & CO. vote ian. Barbados Barbados Boston Halifax Montreal
; Ah ‘ \Partl; ‘Stame hemes, Gara Ag. gistrate, IDNEY 7 Aug. 8th Aug. ug. .
WARNER—In loving memory of our] |“ntation, St Andrew. Sind SP etone ieeiteun Conveniences, “shent Ane ame, 10.8.52—In. CANADIAN CHALLENGER 15 Aug. 20 Aug — 0 Aug. 2 Sept.
dear daughter and sister Norma Warner 4,000 sq. ft., Going for about £1,290. ied LADY NELSO! 28 Aug. 30 Aug 9Sept. 11 Sept. 14 Sept.
who departed this life on August 10th POULTRY 5. IN MAHOGANY LANE — A 2 Bed- 'OME-STUDY we FOR _ 23 Sept.
1988 at the tender age of ten. room Cottage with Land, Drawing & " Sept, 2
Fond in the link which is broken Breakfast




































Shedroof & Kitchen
Good Co

Dear to the one who is gone Condition, Yields

DUCKLINGS at 50c, each, Mrs. Harold] attached, Very















In memory we will never forget her] Veatherhead, Fontabelle, ye: 00 p. m., Going for about $2,000,
Brera long as the years roll on. 10,8,52—2n, | IN BELLEVILLE — Two Bungalow Type
er to we remembered by her loving Residences (one has 2 Bedrooms, the

h

George W Warner (Seeeales ee MECHANICAL ieee fanny tien moth the Demos

(mi 7 ‘ean, tricta, athleen | ———_————————————————_] “olive TUDO
(sisters), Gearge. jnr. (brother), Arthu: | CAMBRA—Ensign Selfix 16-20. complete Sout oa Busineas Premises euidee:
and Fyare Prescod (uncles), ‘ase filters: $85. Phone $021. IN NELSON 3 Bedroom Cot-
10,8. 52-—Ln. 10.8, cam, ‘are. so) 8 Business "Premises & Resi-
MACHINE—One (1) Electric Singer} Sence of BRCTI-
FOR BRENT ‘ewing Machine in ggod, condition. | [NDE AND. TIME SWINGS SHAENTILY
\pply to” West Gate, Navy, oem, | INEXORABLY. Plense C Me but leave
‘ ‘| your Barometer and Corkscrew at. Home

HOUSES open and Do Not be , if and when’ U
nr rt leben MISCELLANEOUS re A hes an ae oats
A ive seas: lat main road Ha» ani ear! ere an nywhen
comfortably furnished, Englis: BY THE VERY LIGHT YO! UR RETINA
G Verandah facing sea. Suitabi ALCOCINE—We have in stock} WILL SEE TO DAL im Call at
one (or couple). From August 1 ALCOCINE” a concentrated. Chill “Olive Bough,” Hastings, Near Pavilion

Te! e 2949, 18.6,52—t.f.n | ever Drink for Horses, Cattle, — Court. Look for My Sign.
and Goats. Price

‘as. She “BUNGALOW—Upper Gollymore Rock : ‘NIGHT'S LTD. Yb.02 38 CANAAN — Cattle Wash, Bathsteba.































hedroo: i Electricity and running water, Refrigera-
F pyres, SAA, ED! at 62—2n ANTIQUES of re description, Glass,/ tor, furnished. What offers! Mrs. Gib-
’ te Seiden SL rr bons. Telephone 0117. 6.8.52—2:.,
COURT—Hastings, furnished J olours. oa utogri <7,
a mon COUR stastings,turniahed | it Gorrie Ansiaus biog GREENWICH — tne Avena, Belie~
10,8,52—in ] — ——— ~ | land; = 2, a send « = ee
ractive stone bunga BULL RINGS—Self-Piercing ie ing Kitchenette,
Club, St. James aif ‘rongly made Ta Pres WB. and Washroom, Serva’ oh Garage,
summer rate, Containing tw | 'zes 2% and 3 ins. Wide open wn. and.
bedrooms and all convenience: J sch, Harrison, Dial 2364 small arden. Cy yebater, Phone
M with onyioe ane ied. Apply t 8,.8.52—3n 5134 or 7.8.52—4n
nageress 0172, —
acta. of, Phone 7.8,528) | BOAT—One (1) Fishing Boat 19 ft: | items snipes
~ © ong by 5 i wide. All gear. Apply to! 317 Knights Ltd.
fron 1st’ Sept |. Cheeks, Ventnor ‘Christ ’ *
At Sheringham geen Maxwell rG. L. Taylor, Eagle Hall, ee Gap, aaa

0.8,52—In, | 333 W.3. Biscuit Co: Ltd.

Coast. Attractive wall Bungalow, 3 bed t. Michael.





d Servants’ room ~~ 130 Plantations Ltd.
G daa Cetaine Phone Ss. Daniel FOUR second hand engines, generators, 142 B'dos Shipping & Trading Co. Ltd.
4161 | appointment. 3.8.52—t.f.n arburettors, differentials and other parts The above shares will be set up for
o five - ton Austin Taree. Apply nee bad by oe eee at Fe ea oo}
7 . Mi: ‘he Manager, Todds Estate, St. John, ‘ames town, on
randon, "Lyndhurst" Bookie he “y 9,8,52—3n | August, 1952 at 2 p.m.

3.8 52—2n
hate tee Flats, one 2 bedroom anc

YEARWOOD & BOYCE.
INTERNATIONAL TORNADO K_ 39 Soli!
$375.00 nearest. Owner leaving Island.













8.52—2n. } 0590.

10.8/52—1n..



1 will offer for sale by public. Compe
tition at my office Victoria, Street an

UBSCRIBE now the.

g {table for to the Daily
08 ne he apes a nb rctereph England's leading Daily News: | "Thursday 14th from 1p.

apply Barbados Bakeries Ltd.,

.



8.52—3n.]| paper now arriving in Barbados Air Palanan:
ae Pais a few days after Dublieatign sin | Ciey wi all fittings and tc
ROOSEVELT MANOR--On the sea, |.ondon, Contact Inn Gale, C/o. natalations situated at corner of Con-
Court Avenue, Hastings. Three} cste Co. Ltd, esentative | stitution and Martindales Road. Also
bed: 3 and all modern conveniences. | Tel, 3118, 17.4,52—t.fm. | the. Cottage adjoining co open
Apem “Blise Court”, Fantiog $3 gallery, drawing, dining, ms,
27.7.52—t.f.n, SILVER BALLS—Silver Balls for orna-| W.C. & Bath Hiectrig - oa Water
menting Cakes have now arrived at) standing on Martindale's
‘ANSEA" -—- from Ist. Sept. Fully Griffith's Rockley. Come and get them.| Road. Land Tan 50 per quarter.
tur Siren neg Bungalow at Worthing, Coral] Dial 4514. 8.8.52—2n Inspection any day on tion on
Avenue. Garage inclusive. Ph on ee cee, Tw 7 the _ipernlee, conde a Ser from R.
on 10.8.5: in. ade to orde er Mc ei
Se a AU metal ey 2 ra All tae all ae 10,8.52—4n.
TFRED—Lan: End 2 store, house | colours, immediate delivery. . per
ween an and—dinin Ss, | oq. tt. Write, ompany The C
ba’ toilet, kitchen, light and, water. | c/o Barbados q HALL RO.
A 7 “Stanie;" Land's =e. Phone :
31 0,8.52—2n. WELDING MATERIALS — are with 33,
a for Electr welding also. and









{or neck fae. Acstviane welding, AUTO ait







TYRE CO,, — Dial 2606.
oe 8.8,52—t.f.n.
: HOUSE on long lease by October
on Sea Coast ng Mh bemigg eae cor
- Large verandah, edrooms, Usui
es, vicinity Hastings, — St. LOST & "FOUND mia
wrence, Worthing, bong or i
Rock. Preferably unfur-
mhed and enclosed. Call K. D. LOST oes
wards 4145 or 2375. 4 fal Public
31,7.52—t.t.n. James Strest, a
= KEYS for Car, at Raees on Thursday. | DAY 14th s Be ¥
Medford, D & BOYCE,

‘inder return same to Neville .
‘onstitution Ra, Dial 4420.

ante 2 drawing and dining rooms,
running water in each,
-| kitchen, n tollet. and bath.
Garage, 2° rooms, storeroom





eresting spare-time POSTAL
with expert tutors, GUARANT!
SOURSES in English, Commercial an
Law subjects, London Chamber
Commerce R.S,A., Institute of Con
merce, Ete. For FREE B00!)





inspection by. appointment. Dial 3010.
The above will be set up for sale at
ublic tion at our office in Lucas
Etreet on. ¥, 22nd August, 1952, at
2 p.m.

CARRINGTON & SEALY,
Solicitors.
10.8.52—Tn







ROCKLEY GOLF CLUB

ANNUAL IELD. DAY

Sunday, Aug. 10th,
’ at 2 p.m.
Presentation of Prizes
Competitions and

ECLAIRS

6 ¢ each

Oc
PB Aneanos |
| Wt EBakenres B10.

Refreshments
Dial 4758 JOHNSON'S Sinindiien' seid Sate Remade
JAMES STREET STATIONERY invited



WONDERFUL ASSORT-
MENT oF

Walking Sticks

Just received by

3.8.52—3n,
19 DSHOGOG9GHHOG9H9909H9OH4



M SLES SSSSSOION

a







GENERAL CERTIFICATE of EDUCATION

ee er, SCHOOL &

rolsey Hall, Oxfo'
rss leg fr for

Whether you

: or simp } aaed'2 a
onbals health building tonic

KEEP THIS DATE OPEN—

SEPTEMBER

t Brandon, Deacon: | Snquiries Yaeht Club, i"
fo Phone 218 between 800 a. am an 10.882—1n. | “BR ‘ooD" on the seaside 13t
10.8 in — ‘Lawrence, Christ. ureh, stand-
—— Kwell for We ‘1 ‘eventi of" au forms | ‘Saning Ae i
ey f wells” for pr jon E
16 "ea “anuaiga ara Rvenie Daltevilie le | of travel sickness when journeying, by and” sere and living room, garage FOR THE GALA DANCE
ing SS otranivth. Living Room.|Sea, Air, or Car, Price 3/- box. rooms with electric light :
eis path, Toilet with Front and KNIGHT'S LTD. 8.8. | sirouRhou, howe n a & FLOOR SHOW
Verandahs. Garage, Washroom.| - , 8250. een
gfe ge deg a eet one tthe Aiton Cad ot ee PS eae MY be set for sale ai TO BE HELD
4 sas .
is fe Bir SAT Culare pane and Keeps it well groomed. Obtainable | Public ‘Competition on Friday, the 15th
fat KNIGHT'S L’ 8,.8.52—an soy EO ad P.m,, at the) % ae ee
OCF Y--Flat No, 3, on the ce %
Fea, Reitis I tradorst conveniences in- PRAM—High tivpe black perambulator, GTON & SEALY, "
Muding ‘Telephone. Dial 2560 for par-| lined cream with mattress, sun canopy Lucas Street. om 4% M Pp ¢
tioula@rs. Available from Sarees lst.} ond harness, Offers around $25 Phone 752 ° e e e e

in aid of

HOLBORN CYCLE &
ATHLETIC CLUB

Watch this Space for

VEGETABLE & FLOWER
— AT ae

WEATHERHEAD 'S

VEGETABLE

Cabbage, Carrot, Beet,
Lettuce. Squash, Tomato,
Cress, Thyme, Celery, Mus-
tard, Chinese Cabbage,
Parsley, Cucumber, Onion;
Leek, Brocolli, Swiss Chard,
Kohl Rabi, Turnip, Pepper,
Spinach, Vegetable Marrow

. and.

BEANS, Pole, Lima, String-
Jess, Bountiful and Ken-
tucky Wonder.

FLOWER.
ZINNIA (Giant Mixed),
Snapdragons, Marigold,
Dahlia, Petunia, Carnations,
Pink, Candytuft, Aster,
Phlox, Verbena, Salvia,
Chrysanthemum, Sweet
William, Forget-me-not,
Calliopsis, Nasturtrum, Lu-

, pim, Coreopsis, Balsam,
Cosmos, etc.,

Bruce
Weatherhead Ltd.

HEAD OF BROAD ST.

p Hee SCH. CERT.

OFFERS

SWEET FIELD

Lovely Stone House, comprising
upstairs three bedrooms, large liv~
ing room, dining room, 2 toilets and.
baths, one with tub bath and hot
and cold water, gallery. Down-
stairs: spare rooms, kitchen, and
shower room, Standing on ap-
proximately 2% aeres of land
about 100 yatds from Gibbs beach.

Inspection biy appointment only.

BUNGALOW

At Rockley New’ Road on ap-

_ proximately 19,000 square feet of
Jand. Magnificent view of golf
| course. Three bedrooms, drawing
' and living rooms, kitchen. Down-
stairs; Garage, servant's room

| with bath and toilet, and enough
room for laundry and workshop,

BUNGALOW

, At "RBthiey New Road. Three
bedrooms, drawing and living
| room, modern kitchen, toilet and

| bath. All built-in cupboards.
Very close to the Golf coca
The last available spot at is
very residential area Immediate
possession

CHURCHILL

At Maxwells Coast Road, Three

bedrooms combination living and

' dining room, modern kitchen,,

toilet and bath. Good Residen-

timl area. Excellent sea bathing.

A sound investment at the very
Jew reserve price.

WYNDAL

Situate on the Rockley Coast
road. Purtly stone and. lath and
plaster comprising three bedrooms,

| dining and living room, toilet and
bath, and a large gallery. The
out buildings comprise servant's
room, and garage. Stanging on

_ approximately 10,000 square feet
of land, This house is very close
to the famous Rockley beach.

BLUE VISTA

At Rockley New Road. Modern
3 bedroom bungalow with com-
bination dining and living room.
Lovely open galleny offering mag-
nificent view of the Golf Course
and coast-line. All built-in cup-
boards Garage and servants’ room
downstairs. Going cheap.

WYNDOVER

At Mile and a Quarte
Peter. Another lovely r e
| house. 3 ms, dining and
living room, modern toilets and
baths, hot and cold water. Large
ena, Outstanding view of sea
ive oul di
Sis gavage: ngs including
» lnundry,

COVE SPRING COTTAGE

Situate on the a St. James

Jand, ‘having ‘its cae Private <
5

i h. bath

study, open galle:
on two. sides, private bath and
toilet to: main bedroom, general
wi notin Sak ate noe
wal
up to date hen, partion hy
appointment only.

EVANTON

Lovely stone Bungalow, situate
at Graeme Hall, on app. 20,000
' sa. feet of land with a magnifi-
eent view trom all sides, com-
prised of Three Bedrooms with
adjoining toilet and bath, living
and dining rooms, spare room that
can be used as breakfast room or
Chi.dren Nursery, Kitchen, Sepa-
rate Toilet and bath with hot and
cold water, Verandah to the
gouth and Patio to the north. The
out buildings sre Servants’ Room,
Garage

REALTORS Limited

REAL ESTATE AGENTS
AUCTIONEERS
VALUERS

161/82 Robbuck Street,
Bridgetown Phone 4900

SHOP-KEEPERS !

The Annual Review of the Shop~
keepers’ Association takes place
en Thursday 14th August at 2 p.m.
at Queen’s Park Shed. All Shop-
keepers are cordially invited to
attend.

Intereolonial
Table Tennis
South Trinidad
VS.
Barbados

AGENDA

Review of Past Year's. Work.
* Nomination and. Election of
Officers .

D. R. HOLDER,
Secretary.

August :
Mon. 11 vs. Pelican.

Wednesday 13 vs Barna-
Y.M.P.C.

Friday 15 vs. Colony.
Monday 18 vs. Everton,
Wednesday 20 vs. Colony.
Friday 22 vs, Y.M.C.A.
Monday 25 vs. Colony.
ADMISSION :
Club Matches 2/-
Test Matches 3/-
Season Tickets 12/6

Get in extra food,
especially things that
will require little cook-

ing or preparation.

WE HAVE —
RED ROOFING PAINT

at $4.50 per Gallon
THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM

Corner Broad and Tudor Sts.

We wish to notify our Customers that
‘our Workshop Department will be
closed from Monday lith August to
Saturday 23rd August, 1952, both days
inclusive, ‘:: order to give our Work-
shop Staff their Annual vacation. There
will be a skeleton staff on duty for any
Our Office, Parts Depart-
ment and Petrol Station will be open
as usual,

emergencies,

COLE & CO.. LTD.

PHONE 4316

G999$9SSS6S99609














—.

|



1952

AF.S., F.V.A.

Extensive Listings of Good
Class Property and Land
Always’ Available

FOR SALE

—_——_

LAND, TWEEDSIDE ROAD—On
main road with 101/ ‘frontage.
idéal_ situation for business
premises. Total area 18,738 sq. ft.

BUSINESS PREMISES—DWELL,
ING HOUSE, ROEBUCK STREET.
Good situation for retail shop in
this busy part of town. £2,000.

SWEETFIELD, St: Peter — An
estate type house built of stone.
Contains large living room with
French windows © leading” onto
covered verandahs with view..of
sea. 3% bed kitchen, store-
rooms — usual outbuildings,
garage an servants’ So.
Approx 2% acres well id out
grounds with right of way over
beach.

VILLA VICQUE, St. VENCENT
—Beautifully situated eebieae eee
of lecal stone with
view, onhy 3%, miles
town, 100 yards “from hae ie eon
Beach with excellent swimming.
3—4 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, large
lounge (233 x 15), Verandah
20 x 18), and usual outbuildings
etc.

COVE SPRING HOUSE, ST.
JAMES — One of the few prop-
erties on this popular coast with
a completely private and secluded
bathing beach, The grounds of
about 1% acres are well wooded
and could readily be converted
into one of the show places of
the Island The house is of 2
storeys and possesses noticeable
character.

SEA FORT, ST. JAMES — Care-
‘fully re-modelled 2 storey hoyse
on one of the most attractive sites
in this increasingly popular area.
Beautiful be 74 basins papa

ete cee ee
csr ibes

Shen's Gabo
NEW BUNGALOW, ROCKLEY—

Commodious home with 3 bed-
rooms, large living room, wide
verandah with good view, kitehen;~
pantry, servants’ quarters ‘and
(storerooms. Good situation near
Golf Course £4,300.

NEWTON LODGE, MAXWELL
COAST Solidiy constricted
stone house eontaining enclésed
galleries, spacious drawing room
aud dining room, and breakfast
room, 3 bedrooms, 2 garages etc.,
Lately occupied by U.S. Consul.
£6,000.

RESIDENCE, THE GARDEN,
WORTHING -— Modern coral stone
bungalow on corner site with
wide frontages. Pleasant garden,
with flower beds, lawn, concrete
terrace, pnd number of” bearing
fruit trees. Accommodation com-
prises large living room, covered
gallery, 3 bedrooms with built-in
wardrobes, well fitted
Garage with covered way to. house,--
servants’ quarters and all. usual
offices: All public . utility ser-
vices. This property carries our
highest recommendation £4,400.~

IN CHANCERY & INCH MAR-
LOW, CHRIST CHURCH — These
two well constructed properties
together with approx. 4 acrés of
coastland are open to offers either
as a whole or. separately,



LYNCHBURX, -
Pleasantly situated 2 si house
with good grounds ~ about
12,500 sq. ft., 3 galleries, large

drawing room, dining room, study,
well fitted kitchen, 3 double bed-
rooms, garage and usual offices.
Offers required, under £3,000
would be considered,

ce oe ST. LAWRENCE
—-Strongly built coral stone bun-
galow spacious airy rooms ane
galleries. A¢commodatio;
prises: separate dra’
dining rooms, 3 double
jarge kitchen and pantry, 3
vants' rooms, “ey and fernery,
This property is ae on the
best bathing. hesis at Ss Law-
rence, is within easy of
Town by bus or caf, Nest tee in
opinion would be very suitable
for conversion intd a
house.

BEACH PROPERTY, ST. LAW-
RENCE — Well placed house with
4 bedrooms, large living room and
galleries. Excellent sandy beach
and good bathing. Full details
on application.

WYNDOVER, St PETER
This country home with over 4%
acres containing productive vege-
tabie and flower gardens, also a ©
large orchard has been completely
modernised by the present owner.
There are 2 wide

»
ser-

Seenne, and Ss rooms, 3 dou...
le bedrooms |w wi
va kitcheh,
rooms and .
ory of distinction. es
WINDY wins aoe, mace’
St. JAMES — Soundly construct-
afore ae ie erat
iving room, ge and 1,
bedrooms, exc

= meee ane,

MODERN BUNGALOW,
GRAEME HALL E— A

ee
sithated. ston

wakner cae “eet beeaom,
living reom, dining room, veran-
dah, kitehen, detached.

aoa servants harps plgacaa.

ona octore of flowering shrubs.
£3.750.

COAST LAND, 5t. James.—
S@veral select plots’ of land are
available im price from
foot upwards,

WwW, MAIN

With good
3. rooms with

toilet and
. servant's
room. Excellent

‘# popular and

22 cents per



MALTA, ST. PETER—Exten-

. Sively re-modelled house of mas-
‘onstruction

sive stone c with
approx, %% acre flower gardens,
lawns and young -fruit trees.
There are spacious verandahs. on
two sides with views over beach,

Jarge livi room, 3 double —

rooms, 2 ms (both Y

tubs) e and butier’s ©
pantry, is the.

good servants’ a ition for

7 2 garages and Pui

puaye services plus own deep
with electric pump. it
on ae over beach with =e
bathing. Opportunity: for “a
eriminating buyer.

ROUMAIKA, DAYRELL’S
—Imposing property with 3
tion rooms, 6 bedrooms, kitchen,
pantry, large verandalts, garage
and store-rooms. Could -be con-
verted into Guest House or Club.
PROPERTY, WHITE PARK
ROAD — Solidly built 2 storey
house with 7 bedrooms, spacious
reeeption rooms and dining room;
also detached annex with living
room and 2. bedrooms. Suitable
for conversion “to flats, guest
house, school or offices. m

RENTALS

WHITEHALL FLATS, CODRING-

TON HILL—Cholce of # une
furnished, self-contained flats.
eS
Plantations
Phone





-

a



i ae

SUNDAY, AUGUST 106,

“GOVERNMENT NOTICES

1932 SUNDAY ADVOCATE

Open Day At St.



PAGE FIFTREN





a





7
|

-POBGDDDEOFO-OOOOSGOH-P + +-1- bbe Dt Or dr R DOM

es

|scor 1 NOTES:









.
ee =.4a Blemishes ‘ze
3 A I 7 Mark’s Girls School ad ' CLOCKS
HUULSING BOARD NOTICE e ° Cleared :
Due to» false rumours circulating that it is necessary to offer Open Day at St. Mark's Girls’ Do you have a skin
money to members ofthe staff before the rental of a house spot, o: ~ Sehocl, held on Tuesday 29th July, 2 Just try a
u& pew house can be obtained, the Housing Board desires to draw to 15 i H Al GUS | met with hearty response from ‘ cs COME AND SEE Our Bie Assortment of...

the attention of the public that any,attempt at bribery would dis-
qualify such applicant from consideration by the~ Board.

All applications are dealt with on their merit, but due to the
darge number, it is inevitable that many who would qualify for assist-

the parents, pupils, ald scholars
and friends ef the school. |
Among the distinguished visitors



DESCRIPTIONS
DESK CLOCKS

CLOCKS OF ALL

The St. SMALL CLOCKS, BIG CLOCKS

Michael—South

Local




Troops were in Camp together ai

29490 OOOOH EE HEHE IY



s Association will meet at 8.15 p.ra. St. James’ Mixed Senool grounas were Majer Glindon Reed Direc- | fee — "TRAVELLING LOCKS
“nce, have to wait for some time. _ ‘ on Friday, the 15th of August, at trom Ist to’ 6th August. ‘welve’ tor of Education. Inspector’ Messrs re Susnent and Teun pee na er ce LLING CLOCKS
By Order of the Housing Agnes. HLEY Sccut Headquarters, Beckles Roau, members of eagh Troop attende: Jordan and Jarvis, and Misses E. : ALAR! :
(Sed.) T. 5 LAs Pp eteatiiy to consider and adopt bye-laws, and were divided into four Patrcis Murray and G. Denny, Rey. Brath- | = | Cc aa °
anage aOe. Bain ete. viz: Raleigh Whales, Beavers ana Wéite, Chairman of Managers, Mrs. | uth “ura wo Also Just Opened .

It might mot be widely known Squirrels..The Camp was run oa Peebles, Mr. and Mrs. D.S. Payne |







Vacant post of MEDICAL OFFICER OF HEALTH. Department of
; Medical Services, Barbados, B.W.I.

Applications are invited for the post of Medical Officer of Health,
Department of Medicai Services, Barbados.

2, The post is pensionable and the salary is in the scale $5,280 x
240 — $6,240 per annum (B.W.I. dollars). The initial salary will be
determined in the light of official qualifications and experience. Under
the Widows and Orphans Pension Act the successful candidate will
be required to pay contributions of 4 per cent. of salary unless wholly
or partially exempt by membership of a Widows and Orphans Pen-
sion scheme of another Government.

3, Passages up to a maximium of $1,440 are paid on first appoint-
ment, Leave conditions are in accordance with local Leave Regula-
tions and leave passages are paid in accordance with the Civil Estab-
Ushment (Leave Passages) Order, 1952.

4. Quarters are not provided.

5. Travelling allowance is payable.

6. Candidates must hold a graduate medical degree registerable
in the United Kingdom and must possess a Diploma in Public Health
cr other equal qualifications. Experience in Public Health Practice is
desirable.

7. Duties of the office broadly include Port Health and Quaran-
tine Services, School Health, Public Health Education, Maternal and
Child Welfare ‘Clinics and communicable diseases Clinics and other
clinics appropriate to Health Centre Services and cc-operating with
Local Government Bodies on health problems with special relation

_ to, Sanitation and Hygiene.

'” “8. ‘The Medical Officer of Health will be expected to take up
cuty at the earliest possible date and applications should reach the
Colonial Secretary, Public Buildings, Bridgetown, Barbados (from
whom further details may be obtained on request) not later than
August 15th, 1952. 13.7,52—3n.



FOR SALE

Tenders are invited for the condemned Tug and Water Boat “Ida”.

2. Length 76’, Beam 16’, Draught 8’ 6”—130 B.H.P., Coal burning
two cylinder reciprocating engine.

3. Tenders should be forwarded in” sealed envelopes addressed
to the Colonial Secretary (and not to any officer by name) so ws to
teach the Colonial Secretary’s Office not later than 4 p.m. on Friday
the 15th of August, 1952. The envelope should be clearly marked—
“Tender for Ida”. ;

4. The sale of the craft will be conditional on its removal from
the Careenage within such period of time as shall be decided upen
by the Harbour | and Shipping Master.

5. Further information is obtainable from the Harbour and
Shipping Master.

6. The Government does not bind itself to accept the highest
or any tender. 2

27.7,52—2n,

PART ONE ORDERS

By
Lieat.-C#l. J. CONNELL, 0.B.E.. E.D ,
Commanding,
The Barbados Regiment,

Issue No, 28

1. PARADES
All ranks will parade at Regt. H.Q. at 1700 hours on Thursday 14 Aug. 52.
All Coys will carny out weapon training with a view to firing the Annual
Musketry Course under the direction of their Coy Comds. “B" Coy is allotted
the oben, and miniature ranges.

8 Aug. BR.

practices will be held on Monday 11, Wednesday 13 and Thursday

Fe . §2,
a. v4 BLY | OFICER & QRDERLY SERJEANT FOR WEEK ENDING

Orderly Officer Lieut. C. G. Peterkin
Ord iy Serj 517 L/S Springer, W.

leant
xt for duty
‘er Lieut. FE. R. Goddard
407 Sit. Quintyne, L. G.

M. L. D. SKEWES-COX, Major,
8.0.L.F. & Adjutant,
The Barbados Regiment.
NOTICE

There will be a Mess Meeting of the W.O’s and Serjeants’ Mess at 2000 hours
on Saturday 16 Aug. 52.

BARBADOS REGIMENT

PART 11 ORDERS
SERIAL NO. 25

F: IN E
He rte wal oo ) Atiested and TOS Regiment wef. 22 July
m9 ,, sree: ) 32
2. STRENGTH DECREASE

562 Pte. Outram, J. G. ya
s » Greaves, C. 8. )

» Clarke, N, H )
oi .. Reid, EB.

SPAR Pavilege
ajor H. BE. Skeete, OB E., ED.

Permitted to resign frem the Regiment
wef 7 Aug. 52

Granted 7 months’ Leave with permission
to leave the colony wef 1 July

. T. A. Gittens Gtd leave with permission to leave the
init r eolony wef 2 July to 9 Nov. 52
Gtd 1 month leave wef 2 July 52
Gtd 12 days’ Leave wef 11 July 82.
~ Gta 6 weeks’ leave wef 2 Aug. 52.

$87 Pte. Williams, G.
421 ,, Yearwood, H. M.
706 .3.M.

ALWAYS
SOCIALLY

mig

Transferred to Reserve wef 23 July 52
M. L. D. SKEWES-COX, Major,
8.0.L.F. & Adjutant,
The Barbados Regiment



FOR HOT-HOT DAYS
USE COOL-COOL TALC

Soothing fresh and fragrant,

keeps you dainty and com-
fortable, adorned in the





gt tn

that a Local Association is the
administrative body for a num-
ber of Scout Groups. Its functions
are as follows;—

{1) To safeguard and encourage
the Movement within its ares
with the least possible inter-
ference with the independence
and initiative of the Groups.
To deal, as laid gown, with
all matters allotted to it under
P.O.R., and in particular with
—Warrants under Part III.
Non-executive and Honorary

ranks under Rules 155—16?.
Grow registrations under

Rules 177—196.
Membership of Scouts under

Rules 197—200,
Decorations and

under Part X.

To supervise Group finance,
the appointment of Group
Committees in accordance
with Rules 202—203. and the
establishment of proper trusts
of group property in accord-
an¢e with Rules 204—206.
To be responsible for the
Grant of al badges and to
arrange examinations for pro-
ficiency badges.

The general functions of the
L.A. are carried out by an Execu-
tive Committee in accordance with
the Policy, Organisation and Rules
of the Boy Scouts Association,

Scouters, parents or guardians
of cubs, scouts, senior scouts or
rovers, rovers, old scouts and per-
sons interested in the Scout Move-
ment can become members of the
Association.

The Local Association is con-
eerned with the welfare of the
Movement.

Badges—Method oi Examin-
ation, Award and Issue

@

7

Awards

(3)

Following are the recommenda-
tions of the Badge Sub-Commit-
tee which have been approved by
the Executive Committee of the
Island Scout Council.

1. All Badges are and remain
the property of the Boy Scouts
Association. The first issue of any
Badge will be FREE. Subsequent
issues, through loss or damage,
will be on payment—payment be-
ing for the Badge lost or amagded
and not for the new issue.

2. Badges of General Pro-
ficiency are mainly the domestic
concern of the Group. The 2nd
Class and Ist Class Badges are
granted by the L.A. on the recom-
mendation of the Scoutmaster in
the case of the 2nd Class and of
the A.C. in the case of the Ist
Class. The L.A. does this through
its A.C. Secretary or Badge
Committee.

8. Badges of Special Pro-
ficiency will be dealt with as fol-
lows:—

(a) Normally there will be two
periods for Badge Exam-
inations —- months of May
and November. The Badge
Secretary may, however, ar-
range for other examina-
tions at any time at his
discretion and in the light
of attendant circumstances,
Scoutmasters will submit to
their Assistant Commission-
ers by the 15th of Apri
and October the names of
Scouts and Badges for which
examinations are to be ar-

ranged.

pe li Commissioners
will forward these applica-
tions to the Badge Secretary
who will make the neces-
sary arrangements and in-
form those concerned,
Successful candidates will
receive a Certificate en-
titling them to issue of
Badge.

Assistant Commissioners
must satisfy themselves as
to the financial status of
Scouts and/or their Groups
before submitting names to
the Badge Secretary.

4. The Quartermaster will issue
all Badges on presentation of Cer-
tificate of Award.

5. These conditions also apply
to Wolf Cub Badges.

Scouts of the St. Patrick’s (R.C.)
Troop are in Camp at Codrington
College over the week-end. The
Camp is in charge of Scoutmaster
S. J. Flemming.

The let St. Michael (First Sea
Scouts) Troop will be going into
camp at Gun Hill on Wednesday,
13th instant. The Camp is sqhed-
uled to continue until Saturday
23rd August.

The ist St. Peter
Scouts)

(b>

~

(d

-

(e

(Third Ser
College

and Harrison





a competitive basis, points being
awarded each day for ortierly
duties ete. Central cooking was
used and ship’s time was kept
throughout camp. Out of a total
of 100 points the ve
Patrols were placed as fotlows:
Raleigh—82%; Beavers—79 1/6%;
Whales—79%; and Squirrels—
6212%. Other Scout work carried
out including Tracking, and
Rescue. Drill in the Sea.

On Tuesday night there was a
Camp Fire and again points were
awarded. Each Patrol had to pro-
duce a Song, a Yell and a Stunt
for which they could earn a total
of 15 points. Judges were selected
from among the spectators and
the result was as follows: 1st
Raleigh's; 2nd Whale’s; 3rd Beay-
er's; 4th Squirrel’s.

There were many visitors, among
whom were Major Griffith, M:.
L. B. Waithe (Commissioner for
St. Peter); Mr. C. R. C. Springer,
(Commissioner for Training), Mr.

Mordecai of Jamaica, Mr. J. “.
Hammond, Mrs. Matthews and
Miss Weston.

Obituary

We regret having to record the
death of Patrol Second Graham
Sobers of the Third Sea Scouts
Troop, Speightstown. Graham had
been ill for about ten days and
it was not until recently that it
was realised that he was suffering
from Peneumonia. He died on
Friday morning last and was
buried the same afternoon at St.
Lucy’s-Church where he was borne
to his grave by Brother Scouts of

his Troop.

Grae was a keen swimmer
and those who attended the
Marine Display and Aquatic Sports
at the Aquatic Club last April
will remember him helping his
Troop to carry off the Trophy. He
was only 16 yea’
on the last ro’
inne his First Class Badge.

Association begs to tender prattle suggests the Studebaker
to his relatives Company talking about the 1953

sineere sympathy
and Brother Scouts of Speights-
town,



Stowaways Mistake

Charleston For N.Y. Your Horoscope

CHARLESTON, South
Carolina, August 9,
Two South Americans were

en-route to Ellis Island Saturday
for deporation after mistaking
Charleston for New York. M.,
Berocal 22, of Colombia and Jose

Alba 25, of Peru stowed away,

aboard the
“Gerda Dan”,

They came
the vessel's number one hold
on Friday hungry and _ thirsty
They told the vessel's first mate
that they stowed themselves.
They had two loaved of bread and
half a gallon of water when they
stowed away. The last three
days of voyage they were without
food or drink.

When Gerda Dan _ reached
Charleston the two were sure they
had reached the port of their
dreams, New York. They came
out of hiding only to
sad news. broken to them by the
immigration, officer, Their
reason why they wanted to get
to New York was so they could
ship out on an American Ship.
OP.

Danish Freighter

out hiding in’



OBITUARY
Mrs. A. E. Lewis

THE death occurred on Thurs-
day 31st July last of Mrs. Evelyn
Lewis of Cave Hill, St. Michael.
Mrs. Lewis better known as (Bve-
lyn) to her friends as (mamie) to
the younger generation was of a
quiet and gentee] nature. She
found her greatest pleasure in
ministering to the sick and needy
with her prayers and words of
consolation and advice.



Many were the nights which
she spent by the bed-side of those
‘about to pass from this life. She
survived her last husband by ex-
actly 29 years. She was the last
grand daughter alive of the laic
Captain Joshua White former
schooner owner-captain of Bay 5:
St. Michael.





Visit the beauty spot of the island

Rooms with or without
private bath.

We specialise in Fish 4
and Lobster ff
Luncheons,

Dinners.









age and was) are going to make a culture!
towards ¢om- Ang most amusing of all, they are

|

have the }#¢"¢ vou FREE your Astral Interpteta-

only| birth all clearly written by wourself, No

|

of Harrow, Mr. D. D. Garner, Miss | oo) shad LADIES’ WRIST WATCHES















































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:
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LOUIS L.. BAYLEY

Philip and the neighbouring |
schools in St, John. }

The programme consisted 0!






1 Of
—. — py a a BOLTON LANE -0O- AgQuatic C.uB Girt Bootu
Chairman of Managers, the Disttict | Phone 3909 & Phone 4897
Inspector Mr. J. Jarvis, parenis | dei 2 Oo





Mr. §. Wedderburn and Mr.
Edwin Belle the Head Teacher’:
Report, and the distribution of
prizes and certificates by Mrs. M..
Peebles, and was brought to a close
by the singing of Hymn 657 A.M.

After this refreshments were
served and the work of the pupils
inspected.

Everyone went away with ex-
pressions of “T spent a fine after-
noon.”

Sr
Pimples Go

Cause Killed in 3 Days

The very first application of Nixo
@erm begins to clear away phuples
like magic. Use Nixederm tonight
and you will soon see your skin he-

a

PLL LA SSSSESOE I PEPPECSOOO



‘The new fe oven Seventy-A

VEwee





> 7 coming soft, smooth and clear, Nixe-
W I OULTURE derm is a new discovery that kills
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shuse Frwy me. Boils, Ryo Blotches

cezema, Ringworth, and Eriiptions

@ from page 10 You can't get vid of your skin Lroubles

until you reinove the germs that hide

in the tiny pores of your skin. So
get Nixederm from your chemist to-
day under the positive guarantee that
Nixoderm will banish pimples and
clear your akin soft and smooth or

Nixoderm °:;',"

back
empts
for Skin Troubles package.

Floor Sanding
and Polishing

NU-FLOOR WAY

Let us make you proud of
your floors. No job too smal)
or too jarge

We operate both Gasoline and
Electric Machines. Call:
EVELYN ROACH & -CO,, LTD
3584-5 10,8, 52--3n

find? A cringing slovenly insect
who has not even got the pride
(or the right) to hold up his head
and inhale the fresh air as though
nis lungs deserved it. And what
is most significant is not that he
generally has reason to be
ashamed of himself, but that he
has so little reason to pride and
respect himself: that there is su
little in him to compel a sense
of inferiority and awe in the
small-minded man when he
tooks at him,

And these are the people who
are always talking of culture!
They who can't even ee com-
mon reverence, much less awe,



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SEA VIEW GUEST
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HASTINGS, BARBADOS
Daily and Longterm Rates

e

New Shipment of these Famous. Cars

Would you like to know without an
cost what the Stars indicate for you, sor .
of your past experiences, your strong ard
weak points, etc ? re is your chance

of Pundit Tahore,

arriving shortly.






He
to test FREB the skill
India’s most fam-~-
ous Astrologer,
who by applying
the ancient sei-
ence to useful
purposes has
built up an enyi-
al reputation?

aocuracy of
his predictions
and the sound
practical advice
contained in his
Horoscope on
Business, Specu-
Jation,, Finances
Love affairs,
Friends, Enemies,
Lotteries, Tray-
els, Changes, Lit-

°

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Near Cathedral



JUST RECEIVED

283




























igation, Lucky FERROZONE
Times Sickness
te., have astounded educated le the CATARRHZONE

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seme sort of second-sight,

To popularise his system Tabore will

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(. CARLTON BROWNE

Wholesale & Retail
Druggist

136 Roebuck St. Dial 2813

money wanted for Astrological work,
postage etc., but send 1/- in B.P.O. (No
Stamps or Coins) for stationery, testi-
monials and other interesting literature
You will be amazed at the remarkable
securacy of his statements about you
and yous FERS, Write now as this offer
uay not e made again. Address:
“UNDIT TABORE, (Dept. 213-E), Upper
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NOTICE

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TO THE GENERAL PUBLIC

OUR AUCTIONEERING DEPARTMENT IS NOW
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SO FRIENDS

DON’T FORGET TO CONTACT YOUR
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PAGE SIXTEEN

ee



~ Colonial System In The West Indies

DR. E. V. GOVEIA, Ph.D., B.A., lecturer in Caribbean
History at the University College of the West Indies,
addressed a large audience including many of the island’s
leading historians in the Harrison College Library Friday
night on the subject of “The Old Colonial System in the
West Indies”

Among the audience was Mr.Goveia said that they were being

Colonies Grow changing cver of
With the help of the proprie-

tors, and to some extent,

chants, the colonies were growing ment of
in the years after the settlement help of slave
The p.oprietors gave to the col- demand
eniey the protection which was Product in

G. H. Adams, C.M.G., M.C.P., a made by fairly small men, and normally given by Government, during the 18th century, explain-
member of the Council of the that was one of the reasons why ana in ,eturn, the proprietor was ing as she did so, the effect this
University Collere of the West pat onige and heip were sought allcwed to tax the colonies, but economic and pclitical develop-

Indies, who at the conclusion of ircm England. They were being in many cases, with their (the ment had o1

the lecture moved a vote of made by men who proposed to colonies) consent. The proprie- tem in the 18th Century.
thanks to Dr. Goveia, and des- grow here in these parts, food tor was allowed to levy duties on She then dealt with the regurn
eribed her lecture as a “most in- for themselves, and also some aj]l trade with the colonies. He ©f the proprietors :to Busing
teructive, most interesting and cro;s which’they could sell abroad «o¢-ope ated with the English Where they could best

most useful” cne. for cash returns and also for the Government, and with the Eng-

The Chai man was Mr, Justice 1eturn trade in necessities. For jish merchants who were interes- ment, the emancipation of slaves With everything for men, the selection
J. W. B. Chenery, himself a that :eason they were interested ted in the colonies in keeping im 1833, and the consequences this covers both inside and out!; The quality
historian. in attracting patronage and help that trade as far as possible on 4d other relevant factors had on ot course, will long outlast the A

Dr. Goveia said that the fouri- of merchants. because with the lines similar to the Mother the Colonial System in these memory of your vacation!

Cations of Colonial System in the help of me chants, trade which Country. parts.

Fritish Colonies of the West was part of their very subsistence, .Qut of that relationship with In conelusion, she said that

Inde; were laid in the 17th not only could be established and the proprietor, out of that rela- When the time came to- Shirts
Century. In the following cen- extended, but in England at that tionship of taxation in theory Wards the close of the 19th Pyjamas
tury—the 18th century, they time, it was not enough to get with consent, and encouragement Century, when the Old Colonial Socks
wer: beng elabo ated and the mecely patronage and help of the of trade with the Mother Coun- System disappeared from the Ties etc.

system itse’f way being extended, merchants, in order to get Gov- try, they got the very first roots Folitical Scene in
and in ths 19th century, the
syste o collapsed. She explained
that its history t>erefore covered
a large portion of the history of
the West Indies up to the present
day, and added that it was inter-

svt of protection from Govern- the Weet Indies. ~ Structure of society,
ment, but it was necessary t9 Because that
have some sort of Court patron- ceveloped, developed along those
age and help«which could be won lines the. colonies found that “t
only through the aristocracy,

present

estiig that here in Barbados, 4 Covernment o; Government in :
pert of the steucture of the old , That fact brougat ner back tO poeland, and be consulted about Century
Colonial System survived the 19th the Story of Barbados because the way in which the coloay was i? the present

what happened was that the

hi “ ; : ; related to a set of social changes
ct ee sere Seraed eh a Captain of the ship which re- pera aes caer era aie which reached back to the past
House of Assembly and Legisla- 2iscovered Barbados, and the i121 their freedom of trade was When Old Structure, itself col-

Head of the Settlement in St.
Kitts were both interested in the
possibility of settlement, but the
Captain of the ship represented
an Anglo-Dutch firm of merchants,
while the Head of the Settlement
in St. Kitts represented settlers
olready in the West Indies.

Both of them tried to get help
in England, the Anglo-Dutch firm
— the firm of the Courteens —
tried to get one set of aristocrats
to help them, while Sir Thomas
Warner app®aled to another set
of aristocrats. Warner got the
help eventually of the fe\nily of
Carlisles, and the Courteens got
the help of Montgomery, later the
= of Pembroke, and because
the help of.two. different aristo- r Hy ;
cratic famflies had been sought by, they were left for a perlod ot
and obtained, a dispute over the Y¢* © to (Tun — own affairs
proprietorship of the is'and of ™9* °F lege. at..s01,

Parbados arose, and that dispute gressi
was only settled after a Neter Ag sive Attitude
series of litigations, after strug- That period, the period of the
gles im the island involving open Civil War, waa marked by the
violence, and after an appeal by development of a very aggressive.
the settlers to the Imperial Gov- very self-confident ‘attitude on
ernment itself. the part of the settlers in the
The. story, she said, was an in- ee bar te Seas tare ae
teresting one, and it was signifi- ,overnment, and they were being
cant that it was not sufficient for trained in| way of developing
the small men in the island to the island in which they lived
set up for themselves —. to found ‘without constant reference back
colonies and make settlements, jo the Mother Country, but with
That needed the help of powerful constant reference, only to their
rersonay in England, politically own ‘wishes.
and economically, The economic In that period, another great
help from merchants, political development, not political, but
help from the proprietor, and economic, also took place, and
when the disputed claim was the coincidence of those twce
settled in favour of the Carlisles, developments within the same
the Carlisles became the prop- p¢riod of time was of the greatest

the japsed.

tive Council, They

rot an absolute one, that
development of the colony was
linked to the development of the
Mother Country, and the colonies
could trade first and foremost
with England.

That was the state of affairs up
to the time of the Civil War when
the proprietors were still the
ruling Governors of Barbados,
and when the Civil War broke
out in England, the parties
engaged in the war were so ab-
sorbed in ~ gd own. difficulties “ .
England that they had very iitti ‘ 2
time for the government of Bar- Purchase
bados or the Leeward Islands,
there was a further step in the
development of the islands where-

were

That structure, she said, went
right back to the early days of
the 17th century, and it was there
that she proposed to begin
her story. In those days, when
the foundations of the system
were belng laid, the people who
were doing the work of pioneer-
ing were settlers who had
already tried to found a colony
cn.the mainland in the te ritor-
ies which have since become the
Guianas. ;

She related how in the 1620's
some of those settlers moved
from the Mainland where Eng-
lish and. International colonies
had been set up to the centrel
chain of islands and began a
settlement in St. Kitts which
became the first British Col-
eny to he founded in the
chain of the West Indian
Islands, .and which. was soon
linked in its history with the
newly re-discovered island f
Barbados,

Barbados Rediscovered

Dr. Geveia said thet when
Barbados, was_ re-discovered by
Captain owell in an English
Ship, he visited St. Kitts and
carried news of the discovery of
Barbados, and after the news nad
reached St, Kitts, the settlers of
the first colony began to take ar
interest in the possibility of de-
veloping a colony in Barbados.
Breause they were interested,
they appealed for spotronnse and
help from England, and out of
that appeal, the very interesting

of questions,

LONDON—In the

ael Foot (Labour,

Mr.

Government was

dissuade the

question,

story which formed the back- 1ietors of the so-called Caribbee significance in explaining the the Minister of Food hopes very
ground of Barbadian history Islands — the Leeward Islands greater evolution of the Colonial shortly to discuss the matter of
arose. end Barbados, the first British System in the West Indies, © the marketing of bananas with

Explaining how
tlements were

the new set-

colonies in the Chain of the West
being made, Dr.

Dr. Goveia described at 1
Indies. e

the growth of the colonies, interests.”——B.U.P.



TAR-RA-BOOM !
BOOM-DE-AY !

IT'S A CELEBRATION OF STUPENDOUS
VALUES AT —

WM. FOGARTY (80s) LID.

ANNUAL AUGUST SALE
COMMENCING ON MONDAY, 1th AUGUST

SILK DEPARTMENT ECONOMY CRTS DRESS GOODS DEPT.

Flowered Voile .. Now $1.20 per yd. Fld. Voile Now $1.00 & $1.20 per-yd.

























Plaid Taffeta ... __,, 1.20, Striped Linens Now $1.60 per yd.
Flowered Celanese ,, 1.20 ,,_ ,, PRIORITY Fld, Spuns Now 85c., 92c., $1.00 and
Check Taffeta... , 100, , HERE ! $1.20 per yd.

Art Silk Check .. ,, 132 , » ’ Fld. Linen Now $1.35 per yd.

Plaid Shantung. ,,. 144, , Seersucker Now 96c, per yd.

Fig. Crepe Reduced irom $2.88 to Moygashel Linen Now $1.80 per yd.

$1.44 per yd.

Plaid Art Silk, Flowered Taffetas
Now $1.44 per yd. 2

Flowered Crepes, Bembergs and Silk .
Plaids—Reduced from 14/- to 9/-
per yd.

Taffetas; Fig. Crepes and Romaines—

White Linen Now $1.32 per yd.

MANCHESTER DEPT.

36” American Print Now 84c. per yd.
60c

A SAVING EVENT
YOU MUST. ATTEND !

Reduced from 15/- to 9/- per yd. e 27” Haircord ..... . ae ae
Spotted Taffeta—Reduced from $4.01 36” Casement .... ,, 60c. ,, ,,
to $3.00 per yd. The most exciting | 29” Fugiette ..... “ie “ag uated
COL. JERSEY CREPE & MORA- Money-Saving news for | 27” Poplinette .... ., 48c. 4
CAINE—Reduced from $2.16 to years! 36” Kurupung Cotton ,, 72c. ,, 5
$1.80 per yd. 36” U.S.A. Domestic ,, 60¢. ,, ,,

LINEN DEPT.
Now

52 x 52 Plaid Table Cloths $2.00 ea.
54 x 54 Wht. Damask

COL. ROMAINE, MORACAINE &
CREPE de CHENE—Reduced from
$2.28 to $1.50 per yd.

SUEDE CREPE—Reduced from $2.64
to $2.16 per yd.

COL.’ COURTAULD & CORDED’
CREPE—Reduced from $1.49 to

THE
SALE

that’s an all

$1.32 per yd. Table Cloths ............ 15/- ea.
A pat Bon at 84c. per yd. ; B ARBADOS 54 x 70 Wht. Damask "
“PE (White) Now 96c. ; Table Cloths ............ $5.50 ea
per yd. 54 x 70 Col. Damask Tabl
TINSEL GEORGETTE, WHITE F A V0 U R IT E Cloths . Dy; ore es . . 4.32 ea
eae Sa alte ee e 58 x 58 Wht. Damask Table
SPE Now $1.20 per yd. CpGie oS... 52 Cauiites 4.32 ea.
SILK LOCKNIT JERSEY Now $1.00 Highlights of our 38 x 38 Flowered Table
per yd. : oan Collection Se See here 1.50 ea.
‘ollow! 54 x 54 Linen Table Cloths 3.25 ea.
ae ene a acaenn, TRADE e 54 x 54 Rayon & Cotton
: SE E DROP IN Table Cloths ............ 4.50 ea.
co are poets i gaa Cotaanae Read all about this 50 x 50 Emb. T. Cleths &
> E y JOSS Napkin Set ............ 5.00 set
LOSS, SO BUY NOW, BECAUSE SAVINGS 31” Reversible Cretonne .. $2.00 yd.
q THESE GOODS CANNOT BE MAN- 48” Fig. Cretonne 1.50 yd
UFACTURED AT THESE PRICES 20 x 30 Linen Glass Cloths 84 ea.
ONCE MANCHESTER STOCKS JAMBOREE ! 36” Dotted Muslin f ’ " $1.00 7
HAVE BEEN CLEARED. Feather Pillows . $3.60 ea. |
«
EEGEEELLDEDLGDL LD DGD LGD DGG LGD GGG OGD OGDOGGDGGOG:

Pa

moving

holdings
white peasants and small plan-
with ters .to the proprietors, the intro-
some resistance against the mer- Cuction of sugar and the develop-
the industry
labour, and
for protection
the English Market

the Colonial Sys-

the West
ernment h°lp, in order to get any cf the great Colonial System o: Indies, it was because the whole
a structure
system when it shaped in the time of slavery, was
being changed and the fact that

struct hin” nedged “ir }

, j ,’ Structure which eme in the
they were ruled by 8: proprietors. os tndies at the end OF the 19th
is itself being changed
day, was



House
Commons on July 30, Mr, Mich-
Devonport),
brother of Sir Hugh Foot, Gov-
ernor of Jamaica, asked the Sec-
retary of State for the Colonies
whether he has considered the re-
quest from the Jamaica Agricul-
tural Society to send a delegation
to Jamaica to discuss the future
of the buik» purchase contracts.
Mr. Oliver Lyttelton, the Colo-
nial Secretary, replied :
received no such request.”
Foot: “Is the right hon.
Gentloman aware that the an-
nouncement of the request was
printed in the agricultural Press
in Jamaica ang that the proposal
for such a delegation arose be-
cause of the fear that the British
to
longterm bulk purchase contracts
with the banana industry?
he do everything in his power te
Ministry of Food
from taking any such course?”
Mr. Lyttelton : “That is anothe:
but I might add that

representatives of the Jamaican

\

»

SW

with the

now Tto-
wads the position where repre-
sentative institutions were being
restored in the West Indies, and
t weuld be for some One else,
ph ps 50 years hence to tell o
the significance of that.

Dr, Goveia answered a number
and Mr.
moved the Vote of Thanks,

Jamaican Bulk
Queried

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

by

the
of this




At this time of the
year we specialize
in filling

Vacation Bags!

on the Govern-

alse






BOO04~/ 9OSS

Adams



of

“T have

abandon
Will

LADIES HATS

White Crinoline Hats from $2.35 to
$1.75 ea.
White Straw Hats from $4.42 to $3.60

ea,

White Felt Hats from $4.59 to $3.60 ea.

CHILDREN’S Straw & Felts @ 9/-
and 10/- ea.

FANCY DEPT.

Children’s Bags Now 48c., 60c., and
72c. ea,

Ladies Col, Hankies Now 12c. ea.
» Wht. Hankies Now 9c. ea,
, » | Hankies Now 9c. ea. .
» Woollen Jumpers Now $5.00 ea.
» Aprons Now $1.00 ea,

Boys Woollen Pull-overs now $5.00 ea.

LADIES’ HOSIERY and
UNDERWEAR DEPT.

Ladies Ballito, Klingsil and Blue Bird
Nylon Hose—Now—$2.00 per pair.
Lace Net Hose Now 97c.’per pr.
Boys Khaki Hose Now 1.20 per pr.
Children’s Anklets (Large assort-
ment) Now 40c. per pr.
Ladies Nightdresses Now $3.00 ea.
Ladies Tricot Rayon Nightdresses
—<"Now $6.00-ea. oer a
Ladies Opera Top Jersey Slips—
Reduced from $2.94 to $1.80 ea.
Ladies Half Slips (Jersey) Now
$1.80 ea.
Ladies Nylon Tricot
$5.00 ea.”
Ladies Nylon Panties Now $1.80 ea.
Ladies Cotton Vests Now 60c. ea.



Slips Now



LADIES’ SWIMSUITS

Lastex, Velvet and Wool

All ot
Elastic Girdles Now ....
Rayon Parasols Now ....

$10.00 ea.
$ 4.50 ea.
$ 4.50 ea.



~ LADIES’ READYMADE
DRESSES

Linen Dresses Reduced from $30.00





to $20.00
Silk Dresses . » $21.00
to 615.00
Silk Blouses . ay $14.00
to 9.00
Silk Blouses % ¥s $12.00
to 7.20
ENTS SHOES
Large Assortment of Gents Shoes

now .clearing at—
$5.00, and $9.00 per pair.

ee
FF

+

Zs Fe ee ae a
A ZEAEEY

4
FA. FFAF


















\C.B. Rice & Co.

of Bolten Lane ;





(wasider all the

WORKMANSHIP

P.C. 8. MAPFEI

as. the “TOP” SCORERS



ZEFEEEASES
” oor

We offer!

Features

NIYLE




PERSONAL
EXQUISITE
STATIONERY

CAVE
SHEPHERD
& CO. LTD

10, 11,12 & 13
Broad Street

SUNDAY, AUGUST

10,

ES a

@ @

Writing Cases in Leather—
$9.89; $8.29 & $4.59

Writing Cases in Plastic —
$5.45; $3.60 and $2.52.

Photograph Albums—$3.45.
Autograph Albums—42 & 72

WITH

FLOOR TILES in Your Verandah and Kitchen
Red, White, and two shades of
Speckled Cream 6 x 6, 4x 4, 3 x 3.

GLAZED WALL TILES for Bathrooms & Kitchens :
White Black and Blue.





























AND

QUALITY
SUITINGS

You Surely Must y
Decide on é



& (CO. LTD.

IN TAILORING.

SHOE DEPT.

Ladies Arcola Shoes—Reduced from
$15.00 to $10.00 and $11.00 pr.

Ladies Durstyle Shoes in Black, Grey
and Blue Suede—Reduced from
$13.00 to $10.00 pr.

Ladies Brown Suede, Diamond Blue
Suede, Nerrida White Nu-Buck,
Norwich Black Suede, All reduced

- from $12.00 to $9.00 pr.

Ladies Primrose Brown Suede

Ladies Primrose Black Suede

Ladies Primrose Black Reptile
All reduced from $9.!.0 to $7.00 pr.

Ladies Black Glace Ccurt, Hygrade
White and Black. All reduced from
$7.00 to $5.00 pr.

Ladies Gold and Silver Sandals Now
$3.00 pr. - rt

Large assortment of Ladies and
Children’s Sandals—Now marked
$3.00, $5.00 and $6.00



TWEED DEPT.

56” Plain Serge From $8.22 to $6.50 yd.

56” Herringbone Serge from $7.98 to
$6.50 yd.

56” Cream Tropical Now $4.00 per yd.

56” Cream Flannel Now $4.32 per yd.

56” Honey-comb Doeskin from $9.22
to $8.00 per. yd.

56” ee Tweed Now $3.00 per
yd.

56” Tropical Suiting from $6.72 to
$5.50 yd.

56” Tropical Suiting from $7.24 to
$6.00 yd.

56” Tweed from $10.57 to $8.00 yd.

Herringbone Tweed now $5.50 per yd.
28” Irish Linen from $2.88 to $2.00

per yd.
56” Tropical Now $3.00 per yd.



_ SPECIAL. OFFER

6-Valve A.C. Marconi Radios Now

$100.00
Ensign Florescent Lights (4-ft.) Now
$30.00

Ensign Florescent Lights (2-ft.) Dou- i

ble Now $30.00

3-Deck Aluminium Food Carriers
Now 10/- ea.

Goblin Washing Machines (Without
wringer) $150.00 ea.

Gelbin. Washing Machines
wringer) $200.00 ea.

Aluminium Jelly Moulds Rabbit de-
sign Now 2/- ea,

4-pt. Aluminium Kettles Now $1.80 ea.

Fish Friers Now $2,50 ea.

Bicycle Mirrors Now 2/- ea.

Plastic Bread Boards Now 60c. ea.

Plastic Napkin Rings Now 206c. ea.

22 ems Enamel Baths Now $5.50 ea.

20 ems Enamel Baths Now $5.00 ea.

(with

Sse
AAFSF

|

or

Phone 4267

; ‘* /
i ee ae I nt ey enema atalino teeeeaesoneneypeiemse sesh Sacer,
: =

ae eee Sr SOS
BEBAEEFEFEE SEES FF

ALUMINIUM MOULDING for counter edges

TEMPERED HARDBOARD for partitions, door panels §
and counter tops.

RED HAND ‘S’ GLOSS PAINTS

RED HAND MATINTO FLAT WALL PAINTS for %
walls and furniture. 2


















Metropole Shirts from $5.50 to $5.00

each

Consulate Shirts (L/S) from $6.91 to
$6.00 ea.

Consulate Shirts (S/S) from $6.03 to
$5.50 ea.

Regal Shirts (plain colours) Detach-
able collars, now $7.50 ea.

Regal Shirts (White) Detachable col-
lars, Now $5.00 ea. .

Regal Stripe Detachable collars from
$6.95 to $5.00 ea.

Bee-kay Shirts Detachable collars
from $7.45 to $6.00 ea.

Stella Crewneck Now $2.00 ea.

Shepherd Wool Sport Shirts Now
$4.00 ea.

Stellatex Shirts Now $2.50 ea,

Pullovers Now $2.00 ea.

Boys Pullovers Now $1.80 ea.

L/S Scuthsea Shrits Now $3.96 ea.

S/S Southsea Shirts Now $3.60 ea. ~

Pegasus Vests Now $1.00 ea.

a Shorts Now $1.00 ea.
Invicta Sport Shirts Now $3.00 ea.
Mercerised Cotton Anklets Now 84c.

r.
Marvelle Hose Now 72c. pr. a
Penmans Shirts Now $1.80 ea.
Tailored Shirts Now $3.60 ea.
Tropic Superlite New $2.32 ea:
Gents Bath Trunks from $5.00 to
$3.60 pr.
Slumbertyme Pyjamas Now $5.00 pr.



GENTS’ HATS
Wilson Hats (Large sizes) Now $6.00

ea.

White Straws Now $4.00 ea.

McQueen Hats Now $3.60 ea.

Job Felts Now $1.80, $2.00 & $2.50: ea.

Straws Now $1.44 ea,

Gents Gaberdine Spring Coats Now
$15.00 ea.

Rain Capes Now $2.00 ea.

ELECTRICAL & HARDWARE

ll Torches Now,5/- each
x 34% x 1 White Blocks (wood)
‘iow 30c. ea,
3% x 44 Round Walnut Blocks Now
Ic. ea.
Aluminium Chambers Reduced from
$3.50 to 60c,
Heavy Saucepans (5-pts.)
Brand) Now 6/- ea.
Heavy Saucepans (3% pts.) Now
5/- ea. "
Grafton Electric Irons Now $5.00 ea.
Melas Elec. Bicycle Lights Now $7.60
ea.



(Goat

Heavy Enamel Perringers (2-):1s.)
Now $2.50 ea.

Heavy Enamel Porringers (3-pts.)
Now $3.00 ea.

oF
FF

SS

-














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}
Q
‘
‘

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GLZAAFOA





Full Text

PAGE 1

PAGE SIXTEEN SUNDAY ADVOC \ fl SUNDA1 Ml.IsT III. 1952 Colonial System I n The West Indies DR. E V GOVHA. PhD., HA lectur.T in Caribbean at tht University College of ihe West Indies. .sod a large audience Including many of the island's Colonies Gro\\ • rumKln* Mop by With UM li'-lp '•! the provr.c•*• pe*snU and .fmall plantnrs. and to some extent, with '*rs to the proprietors, the intro%  onw resistance assunrt the mett'uction uf sugar itui the developI in tht Harrison College Library Friday (hjnU thr ro!onl „wore growing ment ol the indwtry WHO the nil-1. 1 TiltOM Colonial System in the ,„ ,,,. yt ar alter the settlement help ol slave labour, and the West Indies" The p op.trtor gave lo the coldemand for p otection of this Among the audience wan Mr.Goveia said that they were being <-i.ie* lh c [ r tectiun which was product in Ihe Eiutl h MaiM G. H Adam* CMC. M.C.P., a m.'de by fairly small men, and normally given by Government, &urlr,g the lBth centuiy. expUin%  Council n.* thr that was one of the reaaona why ana in letum. the proprietor was ma • he did so. the efleci ihjr ..i on.ge and he.p were sought nil wei to tax the colonies, but economic and p liUcal develop%  1 the conclusiHand. They were being m many eases, with their (the .ent had 01 the Colonial Syttrf made by man wh propoae.i to colonies^ consent. The propila,cm n ,h '" lfltn Cat tl.anka to Mr (lvm. and desgrow here in theac parU. food tor w, alt Sh then dealt with the return tiibed her Uctuii as a "mj.t infor thtanselves. and also some j)i tiade with the colonies. He of ">< %  proprietors \U> Bnaiautl most IntartaUng and i ro i wbJeb they .ouid eli abroad ,, -ope mod with the Kngibih wbanj they could beat exercise rvl • Da. *r cash ietu;ns and also for the Oove.nment. and with the Engtheir lnfl lie sic on the Qoesrniclurn tiade in necessities. F<. ,i. Ml nhants who were interesmen!, tne emanciualion or Havel thai IMWD they were Interested led in the eo'onles in kesjjtn* * '833. and the consequences th .ting p-itronage and help tJ.at trade as far aa pos ibie on *""' ith*r relevant factors had on ( merchants because with the Hue, MMIIUU to the Mother tr Colonial System in these r'ationt o COtOBlsl System in UM help t • ctaaats, trade which C4 paits. Colonies of the West was part %  ' their very subsistence. Out of that relationship with J n conclusion, she aald that Inde: were laid in the 17th no' only c uld be established and ihe proprietor, out of that reinwhen the time eame toCentury In the following cenr it i. Tided, but in England at that t K nhip of taxation in theory w r <* )l the rinse "j,,." 1 19"i iun -the 18th century, i • %  i B was not enough to get w h consent, nnl encouragement en "" v when the Old Colonial be ng elabo ated and the me.x-ly patronage and help of fie c / trade with the Mother Counr/* !" 1 c T Hxl. merchants. In order to get GOTt > they go* the very Brat rd and i:> th i 19th century, the ernment hip, in order to gel any | the Mat Colonial System Shfl explained sit of protect! m from Governt^e We-t IndlM m Chal M: JUsa* • J. w M bbai himself ;i historian. Dr <..... i n that the founhistor;. I eief.-re covered ment. but It was necessary a large p.rti>n of the history of have some 8 rt of Court patr Ihe W< up In the present .ge and help which could be i th >t it was interonly through ihe aristocracy. :o Barbados, %  he St uctarc ol ttM old Colonial Syste.-n survived the ,9th Political Scene in the West Indie!', it WM because the whole simcture of society, a structure ti Because that system when it hP^ n the time of slavery. wa8 favetopad. developed along thostr bcin ehanged and the fart tliat linoi. the colonies found thai "J P'*^"t the new poUUcal they were .uled by a proprietor. £"" l, ," r whl ch t merged m the cm-e nment o.Government ut the end of the 10th That fact b:oug*u ner bacg to Ellg | JIK | and be consulted -bout c entu.y is Itself being changed the Mary Of Barbados because lne ^ |n wh|cn h(l ro|o % wa in the present day. wa, Jao what happened was that the c mury wWch accounte.1 for the ^"'"TZ. JuTT i e % *>• deNcl lad that Barbados still had As Captain of the rhip which re, u rich t 4 Aas.-mbly and LtfJgU' !' l w "^ .. Ba ^, M "^ ,h f lhat Uialr fr House ol Assembly That struct. M back ti the .Hi %  %  hi the Settlr rent both interested in the possibility of aettlrment. but the ciiiK de\eloped. and In th" was iing leedoi an absolute one. that %  it of the colon v i.-nUiiy. and it was there : .,.. i i to begin i v. In tho>e days, when I ttdaUona of the system i ng laid ihr DM w. re doing the work of ploiee of Captain of the uemenr. rn TO Jink ^ |h dcwIo|JIIWnl „, hc • %  ^hip riie*,,l ; -,l y]olhr r CoumrVi -Twl th t coionie" !" 2J^ with England. Anglo-Dutch firm of merchants, ihili* the Head of the Settlement n St Kttta represented settlen l;eady in the West Indies BOI i' England, the Anglo-Dutch tl ware w Wo ra who hud — the lirm of the Courteen. — %  lad to found a colonv tried to get one set of artstcK-nds i n the mainland In the te rtto r to help them, while Sir Thomas !" ". 4l TJhe related to a set of -rial changes khlch i-eiched bock to the past of trade" was when Old Structure it*clf collapsed. TtM) :r nwvll ds the posit lo \ whennp-emstltutio.is were being the was -ie first and foremost to.ed In the West indies, and I w. uld be for >o i e ne else, SflR..o., u, R-.-ASLSTJIE ''""' the time of the Civil Wa .hen *-nirh ha since become the Warner appealed _to another set Gulanaa She related how in ih rome of those settlers moved Carliales. and the Courteen' f" in the Mainland !lh and International had been set up to the rentrrl chain of Wanda and o'c. settlement m St Kitt< which and obtained, a dispute over the thy tint British Colpinprietnrahlp of the is and of I:I 'ho L'arbedos arose, and that dispu;-1'viiiin was only settled after a KHI^' Islands, and which was soon serns of rfti^aMotsl, after strugoMhnt,IM __h.lP 1 1 U pl ^,rior rc H1 luting Governors of Barbados, and when the Civil War broke out In England, the parties war were so absorbed In their own difficulties in tl.e significance of that. DT <'. rveta answered a number of questions, and Mr. Adams mnved the Vote o( Thanks, Jamaitaii Bulk -~ "; .•''''. ~ ~"~"Z' T1 ^rbed in their own dimcumos in •*•— - SS &£^iS!&2 SS X %^\'Z fe Purchase Queried th. %  & In X iCl Xo. *" '" '>" l"Kl wher*„, root (Labour. D.vonport). crallc rm(lli" M I InShi >W. KS were >(1 for • period o( brother of Sir Hugh Fool. Covmor~ or less a: will. Aff^ressive Attitude Al tin. time of the year we specialise in nillnc \ I. ill.": K-lbs 1 With r very thing for mea. the seleeUea eavan both Inside and out:; The qnslit). ol rovne. will long oatlaat the memory of vour varatlorT PERSONAL EXQUISITE STATIONERY M I MMMr etarv of State for the Colon. whether he has considered the re,ue*r from the Jamaica Agricul_. tural Society to send u delegation That pe lod. the period ot t^ie to j amalca lo discuss the future glea hi the Island involving open civil Wa", wa* marked by the o( th e ^n purcri-M contracu* VlOhmca, and after an appeal by development of a very aggressive. Mr Oliver Lyttelton, tne doloihe settlers to thr Imperial Go 1 very self-confident attitude on a fa\ secretary, replied : "I hav %  nunant itself the p^rt of the settlers in th** received no such request." __ Irlands. They were being trained Mr. Foot: "U the righl hon. l-he sto >. she add, was an inm the ^y ot running their own Gentleman aware that the an" testing_< ; ne. and it was sign ingovernment, and they were being nouncement of the request wai it that It waa no. sufflcient for ttB | n ed in way of developing printed In the acricullural Press the island In which they lived ) n Jamaica and lhat the proposal .til the Mand tiin its history with V t newly re-dlrcovered Island if Barbados. Barbados Rediscovered Di Grveia said th"t when Darliados was re-dlteovered by Captain Tov-e'l in an English Ship, he rMtad St Kills and the carried news of th.. tl, r el up for themsetvoe — to found without constant reference back for such" a delegation arose' beli.irbado*. and utter the news ndd colonies and make settlements, to the Mother Country, but wltii cause of the fear that the Mush icached St. Kltts, the settlers of That nerded the help of powerful rnnstent reference, only to their Government was to abandon the firW colony began to take ar *r-, ni In Knglond. politically own wishes. longterm bulk purchase contracts Ir.tereat In the possibility of dcand wonomlrally. The economic In that peiiod, another great with the banana industry* Will Vdoplbf a colo->y in Barbados, helj) fiom menhanb*. politic il developm'nt. not political, but he do everything in his power to n cause they we're interested, hasp from the proprietor, and economic, also took place, and dissuade the Ministry of Food they appealed for patronage and when the disputed claim ws the coincidence of those two from taking any such couise?" help from England, end out of w tiled In favour of the Caillsles, developments within the same Mr. Lyttelton: That is anothei that appeal, the very interesting the Carlisle! became the propperiod of time was of the greatest question, but I might add lhat story which formed the bachiletors uf the so-called Carlbbee significance In explaining the the Minister of Food hopes very g'ound of Barbadian history Islnnds — the Leeward Islands gicatcr evolution of the Colonial shortly to discuss the matter of %  ro'e. ind B.irbadoa, the flint British System In the West indies. the marketing ot bananas with Explaining how the new setcolonies In the Chain ol the West Dr. Ooveu dtacrlbcd at length representatives of the Jamaican the rnlonlM. the. interests. —B.U.P. tlements were being made. Dr. Indie: Ihe growth of the colonies, the interests.". IT'S A .m:vr SALE! # 1 li-itl -HOO # BOOM-DE-AY! IT'S A CELEBRATION OF STUPENDOUS VALUES AT WM. FOGARTY (ma LTD. ANNUAL AUGUST SALE COMMENCING ON MONDAY. 11th AUGUST da?asSfras> Your Home WITH FLOOR TILES in Your Verandah and Kitchen Red. While, and two shades of Speckled Cream 6 x 6, 4x 4, 3 x 3. GLAZED WALL TILES for Bathrooms & Kitchens White Black and Blue. ALUMINIUM MOULDING for counter edges TEMPERED HARDBOARD for partitions, door panels and counter tops. RED HAND 'S' GLOSS PAINTS RED HAND MATINTO FLAT WALL PAINTS for walls and furniture. Phone 4267 SILK DEPARTMENT Now S1.2II per yd. 1.211 „ .. 1.20 .. .. I-IMI „ ,. 1.32 ., ,. 1.44 .. .. Irom $2.88 to Flowered Voile Plaid TuflcU Flowered Celane%e Check TatTcta An Silk Cheek .. Plaid Shantung Ms Cri-pe Reduced Sl.41 per yd. Plaid Art Silk. Flowered Taffetas Now $1.4-1 per yd. Flowered Crepes. Bcmberss and Silk Plaids—Reduced from 14 to /per yd. T.ilTctas. Fig. Crepes and Rnmaines— Reduced from IS to $/per yd. Spotted Taffeta—Reduced from $4.01 to $3.00 per yd. (111.. JKRSF.V CREPE & MORACAINE— Reduced from $2.1$ lo $1.80 per yd. • ol KOMAINE. MORACAINE & CBEPE de CHENE—Reduced from 52.28 to S1.50 per yd. SfKIlK CREPE—Reduced from $2.4 to 82.16 per yd. COf. COURTAIII.il & CORDED CREPE—Reduced from S1.4I to $1.12 per yd. PLAIN ART SILK Now 84c. per yd. PANAMA CREPE (White) Now Se. per yd. TINSEL GEORGETTE. WHITE CORK El) & COl'RTAll.DS CREPE Now ILK ner vd. SILK I.OCKMT JERSEY Now $1.00 per yd. THE WORLDS TEXTILE TRADE HAS RUDE A SEVERE DROP IN PRICES AND STOCKS HAVE TO BE CLEARED AT A COLOSSAL loss SO lit Y NOW. IIKIAISI: THESE GOODS CANNOT BE MAN FFACTL'RED AT THESE PRICKS ONCE MANCHESTER STOCKS IMVF BEEN CLEARED ECONOMY (JETS PRIORITY HERE! • A SAVING EVENT YOl MIST AntND! Tin* oWM rxiilini; Honey-Saving news for yenrs! THE SALE Ihnl's an all BARBADOS FAVOURITE llichlighis of mix Mammoth OmVctum follow' Kviul ;il| nhiiut this DRESS GOODS DEPT. Fid. Voile Now $1.00 & $1.20 per yd. Striped Linens Now $1.60 per yd. Fid. Spun. Now 8Sc. Tji $1,011 and $1.20 per yd. Fid. Linen Now $1.35 per yd. Seersucker Now 90c. per yd. Moyifashel Linen Now $1.80 per vd. While Linen Now $1.32 per yd. MANCHESTER DEPT. 30" American Print Vow 84c. per yd. 27" llaircord 36" Casement .... 2" Fudiette .. 27" Poplinelte 30" Kunipung Cotton 36" U.S.A. Domestic 60c. 60c. 48c. 48c. 72c. 60c. LINEN DEPT. Now 52 x 52 Plaid Table Cloths S2.IHI ca 51 x 51 WhI. Il.ii • ,.!. Table Cloths IS %  ea. 34 x 70 Wht. Damask Table Cloths $5.50 ea. 54 x 70 Col. Damask Table Cloths 1.32 ea. 58 x S8 Wht. Damask Table CkXbj I !" ,a. 38 x 38 Flowered Table Ctdka 1.50 ea. 51 X 54 Linen Table Cloths 3.25 en. 54 x 54 Rayon & I I .hi.Cloths 4.50 ea. .".II \ H Einb. T (loth. & N ipkiu Sol 5.110 set 31 Reversible Cretonne S2.IHI vd. 48' Fig, Cretonne . 1.50 yd. .'tl \ ::o Linen Gins. Cloths SI ,-;.. 36" Dotted Muslin $ 1.06 yd. Feather Pillows $ 3.66 ea. LADIES HATS White Crinoline Hats from $2.35 to $1.75 ea. White Straw Hats from $4.42 to $3.60 ca. White Felt Hats from $4.59 to $3.66 ea. CHILDREN'S Straw tc Felts Co? 9 and 10/. ea. FANCY DEPT. Children's Bags Now 48c., 60c.. and 72c. ea. Ladies Col. Hankies Now 12c. ea. Wht. Hankies Now 9c. ea. ,i .. Hankies Now 9c. ea. ., Woollen Jumpers Now $5.06 ea. .. Aprons Now $1.00 ea. Boys Woollen Pull-overs now $S.06 ea. SHOE DEPT. LADIES HOSIERY and I UNDERWEAR DEPT. Ladies Ballito. KlinRsil and Blue Bird Nylon Hose—Now—$2.00 per pair. I ii.r Net Hose Now 97c. per pr. Boys Khaki Hose Now 1.20 per pr. Children's Anklets tl .ir;:.assortment) Now 40c. per pr. Ladies Nightdresses Now $3.00 ea. Ladies Tricot Rayon Nightdresses Now $6.00 ea. Ladies Opera Top Jersey SlipsReduced from $2.94 to $1.86 ea. Ladies Half Slips (Jersey) Now $1,811 t*i Ladles Nylon Trirol Slips Now $5.00 ea. Ladies Nylon Panties Now $1.80 ea. Ladies Cotton Vests Now 60c. ea. LADIES' SWIMSUITS Laslex. Velvet and Wool All M $10.00 ea. Elude Girdles Now 8 4.50 ea. r.uvon Parasols Now $ 4.56 ea. LADIES' READYMADE DRESSES Linen Dresses Reduced from S30.00 to $20.00 Silk Dresses $21,011 to 15.60 Sill lllouses „ $14.00 to 9.00 Silk tUatntei $1200 to 7.20 GENTS' SHOES Large Assortment of Gents Shoes now.clearing at— $5.00. and $9.00 per pair. Ladies Arcola Shoe:*—Reduced from S15.00 to $10.00 and $11.00 pr. Ladles Durstyle Shoes in Black. Grey and Blue Suedes—Reduced from $13.00 to $10.00 pr. Ladies Brown Suede. Diamond Blue Suede, Nerrida White Nu-Buck. Norwich Black Suede. All reduced from $12.00 to $9.00 pr. Ladies Primrose Brown Suede Ladles Primrose Black Suede Ladies Primrose Black Reptile All reduced from $9. 0 to $7.00 pr. Ladies Black Glace C< urt, Hygrade White and Black. All reduced from $7.00 to $5.00 pr. Ladies Gold and Silver Sandals Now $3.00 pr. Large assortment of Ladies and Children's Sandals—Now marked $3.00. $5.00 and $6.00 TWEED DEPT. 58" Plain Serse From $8.22 to $6.56 yd. 56" Herringbone Serge from $7.98 to $6.56 yd. 56" Cream Tropical Now $4.60 per yd. 56" Cream Flannel Now 84.32 per yd. 56" Honey-comb Doeskin from $9.22 to $8.00 per yd. 56" Heathdale Tweed Now $3.00 per yd. 56" Tropical Suiting from $6.72 to $5.50 yd. 56" Tropical Suiting from $7.24 to $6.60 yd. 56" Tweed from $10.57 to S8.06 yd. Herringbone Tweed now $5.50 per yd. 28" Irish Linen from $2.88 to $2.00 per yd. 56" Tropical Now $3.00 per yd. SPECIAL OFFER 6 Valve A.C. Marconi Radios Now $ia*.6 Ensign Florescent Lights (4-lt.) Now $30.80 Ensign Florescent Lights (2-ft.) Double Now $30.00 3-Deck Aluminium Food Carriers N.iw 10/ea. Goblin Washing Machines (Without wringer) S15O.0II ea. Oolbin Washing Machines (with wringer) $2011.00 ea. Aluminium Jelly Moulds Rabbit design Now 2 • ea. -pt. Aluminium Kettles Now $1.80 ea. 1 ish Friers Now $2.50 ea. Bicycle Mirrors Now 2/ea. Plastic Bread Boards Now 66c. ea. Plastic Napkin Rings Now 20c. ea. 22 cms Enamel Baths Now $5.50 ea. 20 mis Enamel Baths Now $5.00 ea. WILKINSON & HAYNES CO., LTD. READYMADE DEPT. Metropolc Shirts from $5.50 to $5.00 each Consulate Shirts (L S) from $6.91 to $6.00 ea. Consulate Shirts (S/S) from $6.03 to $5.50 ea. Regal Shirts (plain colours) Detachable collars, now $7.50 ea. Regal Shirts (White) Detachable collars. Now $5.00 ea. Regal Stripe Detachable collars from $6.95 to $5.00 ea. Bee-kay Shirts Detachable collars from $7.45 to $6.00 ea. Stella Crcwneck Now $2.00 ea. Shepherd Wool Sport Shirts Now $4.4* ea. Stellatex Shirts Now $2.50 ea, Pullovers Now $2.00 ea. Boys Pullovers Now $1.80 ea. L/S Southsea Shrits Now $3.96 ea. S S Southsea Shirts Now $3.60 ea. Pegasus Vests Now $1.60 ea. Shorts Now $1.00 ea. Invicta Sport Shirts Now $3.00 ea. Mercerised Cotton Anklets Now 84c. pr. Marvelle Hose Now 72c. pr. Penmans Shirts Now $1.80 ea. Tailored Shirts Now $3.66 ca. Tropic Superlite Now 82.32 ea: Gents Bath Trunks from $5.00 to $3.60 pr. Slumbertyme Pyjamas Now $5.00 pr. GENTS' HATS Wilson Hats (Large sizes) Now $6.00 ea. White Straws Now $4.60 ea. McQueen Hats Now $3.60 ea. Job Felts Now $1.86. $2.60 & $2.50 en. Straws Now $1.44 ea. Gents Gaberdine Spring fonts NW $15.06 ea. Rain Capes Now $2.00 ea. ELECTRICAL & HARDWARE 2-Cell Torches Now.5 each V, x 3'/j x 1 White Blocks (wood) Now 30c. ea. 3'/i X '/> Round Walnut Blocks Ni.w 12c. ea. Aluminium Chambers Reduced MB $3.50 to 66c. Heavy Saucepans (5-pts.) (Goat Brand) Now fl ea. Heavy Saucepans (3i pts.) Now 5/ea. Grafton Electric Irons Now $5.00 ca. Melas Elec. Bicycle Lights Now S7.-II ea. Heavy Enamel Porringers (2',-ts.) Now $2.50 ea. Heavy Enamel Porringers (3-pts.) NOW S3.00 en. p ill



PAGE 1

PACE TWELVE SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY U'Ct'ST 18. 15J MwnnBnHiiiiNm. ARE YOU SCARED TO SEE YOUR DOCTOR ? in. i'Ui p:\PKi the < ll.ibw*l,n of rlolors in thi>ene* The hope U UM tt mat Mini: .. in-i to Ihr thousands of men .ind women whs -irt I Hera 11% iirtmf sertoas lllne*. Hul AS Ihr doctor!, will show. vmploinran OP mivlcadioc. FIBM. however, the •tenet deal-. with onp ntlirr fear thai may make thp i-utiM-irnlloU'* mother and ihr amUCleua im.hi.nl kppp ^Jlenl II l %  The fear of being called Lttl take UM cm of patient well rail Jiai bm'th *' n%  aid. "YOB kaow Jim. Il*i UM foreman ai u*e local cement works and he look* as strong a* a bull. He Is aa strong aa a bat nc BBWI a H -. m I His pain A BOUT iwo veer* ,*.,ii all besn. Until %  hi.! Imp J:m played cnck) (or his toral team wan %  ') rather if ; %  eou bonnic dauahiers, and dos-n rt his pint im tundan m heat of (hem Than awdC.nu At ocean i. -orrv nbrmf ntt health He : %  to* -nil coov ill neu -hai tie ai no longer rbta because he 'tad a terrible nain in his hart ram examination raited r*r anyrhlnff *ron H lth "i ii Vi mil'Pai'ni V" "'m of anv spee'sl aeMtif lid not thin a our** a! *he local hoaMuf of n c ma wage .md for •ha* he %  v ir ..A HYPOCHONDRIAC I N the old days uy-pocnondria was almost confined to rreutWe artists, dictators, millionaires, and a few thwarted types living out lives of selfInflicted solitude Nowadays about one -ixm of tbe British population over the agt ot 30 sutler 1mm It, The Oxford Diet km define.. <>vpochondrla ai "a murb.n li ^resslon either causeleu or due to t uiiucces*ary>. anxiety about health." James BoaweU. author of Ihe famous Ufa ol jonnson," wa* one of lhe aurai rivpucJioiiunatfa IB history. Every time a draught blew on him through a window be retired to bU bed with it purely Imaginary caaa ol pneumonia, and each Usne ba got a atya an h' rw 1M(pared he wan tn (or a grtaly death Imm leprosyMine with a (let 11 You arc z one ifS "•,.*:;. r r !i B xMIM) • U t (> % %  • Wo (atMfl KOMI by mm* n,„, •nan -ho A*K anv oocior now many ol In-. reguUr pttii'iilh -ulft-r Irom lake* illneae .mn lirobablv nawe: (hat Htm o h o( h hat ar.r (rellrm "proper poorly" whei 'Jake Jim ... Nl arain Tlipn ne dveinped a cougn %  Not i deen-"-"' %  % %  'hTe not x raved nlm It wai d con "vw vnii crn^v wh*n emi bear it at 'hicne-v.* ir -hitr< nr a eoneer %  went and JlnVn bft'h-^n, nning up :tji guni-d%  Jim's rouirh norifru dur'nn whu-h ne cui •' all doctor* (-.r *hPlr unoranre T^came a nan to his familv jtiid *aa convlneed that he wai n :h (Irs! stages or nalton'Mir oorwufii-)' n And Mr*. Bell % %  lor a cottpt* laontha. Then tn ante* *ue' *lon he got a rash violent PMB I la hu haan and a migrglne headache: hex loit couuie of •'on<. In weight *nd loolu terrUaW. Vet nome of Unbeat cough topped smiled Againclahsu US Lhe counip _jtphy as a bell %  The dillerenc* oei-. 8m .'j\ and anoUMr patMnt, atra Ben." said 'he doctor, %  li Uiat Jim sometimes mowed ouward atrna ol *omithb>g '.mn lir naa a rash, -a ngni. UMugh we wuldn'-. dlacover why It i'jtr-.ad and why .r went. Mra loeaiil .slioa MV aign at nil Shp in** "h bad."' Mrs. Bell u Ae wife of a Tu l oaai man who works in the Citv. She is 31 jretty. She dreaaea well and Then ahe trie* ahe can be aa •harming . a or' %  n'--li'iv nut not later/, Nowadays tier io uioin preoccupations In lile are the pains 4 %  %  -* BE1.U %  eony, vimed mat one day he mu woke up • %  • •pletell paralyspd. "' %  l -:h that sh1 'line bu: h or mushrooms and no'iuasj happens to ihem Icnuon what wai in ihe diati. %  li t '.hev immedtatAiv get %  violent stomach -ache There arc ii:i." k-.nl iness lltpw These people have a morbid horror ot loncaing doorOiobs or oreathln* ihe same air as other OSODW. Thav spead moat of the day wanning Tbei are temned or clothe* may have not laundered UMQV selvea. and like to go around 'hhouse aeailug gloves. There are tbe Acidity Hypoa. Iheae type* imagine thai evary:i ng 'he)eat turns into crystals OSJOP 'h-.r iodip* sod worry themselves mto rhsumwtlam or dbroslUs. Many ot then) are taetotaJta. Nearly all of them are worried by UM world or by their jobs. They all get furious when fhetr doctors explain that it la probnhly a .tair of mind, and a little mental therapv would cure. tor ii is an odd thing that man.ivypoob and rial* do not u>ant to be cured They like living with Uielr imaainarv ilia -3ff/OM* ( TN i ;K ruNvraxr hough nfbg' docurs understand and have oer ., %  •) sympathv for bypocnondr a tnere is not the time to do much about it nowaday*. | ioctors could give 'hev %  i pains some highaounJ tig name and charge a This made me h. pochqpdna.' f*l .mponant and happier. Bur now that most medicine is channelled through the National Health Service theris not UM wtll.ngnasa or thp oppprtUfUty 'a waste prrn^ouworkmg hour.i on K so 'hat moat hvpoc-hoodnaos today do not even itl quKLly rwttoca leal energy and toa* ua th# who< nervoui lyitem. i| new vitality II (ortiflss you agalnu lewwr and **h.union and timrmMt. Bucknat Teatkt Wine H eapacially valuabls srtar iiinau. r.***-^.fcpnii BllKFAST TONirWINE ow Uiat n, about. 6.000 0(10 Unions an> feeling ill when there is notn:ng UM matter with them, or haw worried UMsBseives gng ssnly into sonte kind of diseair. They overwork dociors and cluMrr up hopiralt with fantastic imur naUona nctrtloua gehrs und pains can turn a normal home m'o a mansion pi I asked a doctor 1 anuw to define lor me u cuupuof ivpical luck tor nil U.iiison Opens Mew Ucasiholds Plant he expended and every mode" device must be employed. At a party in the CiMncellery m Berlin In 101" I once looked in Hldi-r bathroom cabinet It contained six kinds of sim-lling sails. 43 different boxpa of drugs 18 siomarh powders, (our rvewaAhea and fBW .wj LEONARD MOSLEY UP N..W -hn ,1-., „ ., ,r0ni PrOfeSBSOBal IllPtl ) n ""* 'he (iiorniri tent ol ills* ordinary genetal ROAD COURTESY WEEK OBSERVED IN GRENADA %  "-"• P" >'"'. Hwwlni wi. ifrom Our Own Corrapomieni> cast lasl Sunday afternoon, Brilrie Irmurance Companies Ihought (Krom Our Own Correspondent) PORT-OF-SPAIN. August I Mr. P. M. Ranlson said) ai Trinidad Ltiaieholds, Potnte-aThe modernisation scheme bat Pierre, last week, that he was ,>cen undertaken because the con.. not one of those Jonahs who be"""-v" found it necessary to produce Heved thsi the Trinidad oil in%  ! !" cuiar high quality ga-olme dustry was dying. "I have too ,f ,hc y would keep their place in much faith in tbe quality of the 'ha highly competitive market of men who manage? it and the techtoday. As a result of this competinical and other experts whom tlon two gallons of gasoline now they employ," he added. do the work thice gallons did 25 years* ago. These statements were made by Mr. Kenison in his capacity as ia too words of Mr. Rt-nison Acting Governor, when formally This $24,000,000 keeps Trliudad's penin-g leaseholds Catalytic leflning industry Hie equal -f it: Fatemi Out Of Hospital HAMBURG. Aug. B Jne former Iranian Vice Premier Dr. Hussein Fatemi, wounded in an assassination plot against him in Teheran last February, was released from a German hospital here on Friday. Fatemi Nationalist Front member of the Ifanisn Parliament, and chief editor of the Teheran Daily, has completely recovered from his injuries, but is still weak from long hotp itallza t ion. The one-time Vice Pxamlsg told newsmen here that he will remain in Europe for .mother three week* before returning to Teheran. He plans to visit Vienna, Copenhagen ..mi Stockholm. In an Interview with the United I'rass, Dr. Fatemi said: "My couniry will find a good solution to its present difficult economic situation." He kaid Unit Premie cracking p.anV^Uh"Hilary ^1^ -npoUlor* in 'any pit of the *g£% It^^iT^ in I h e $24,000,000 refinery world. The completion of this catf^Z^ \, ,, Kusrrtfnt and 'can ST. GEORGETS. Aug. 2. gadler P. J. T. Plckthall pointed of the probability of accident, lit modernisation scheme. cracker is an event ot industrial beiure of the support of the peoMotorists here have been ob""t that, taking into account appealed for co-op-ration with and strategic importance not only u \ v All measures taken by Mscrving "Road Courtesy Week," Grenada's relative population, the police through greater road Mr ReruBon also expressed the to Trinidad and the West Indies, wivah were done for patnolic sponsored by ths Police Departmor f people were killed on \he t are and warned that, after polite yiow thHtjf.morr oil ^reserves are but to the British Commonwealth reasons. Reports from Iran reachment. Opening the tads of the inland last year than uarnlngs e> capital >unai raust of oU." whole. It greatly increase^ mg u,e Western world are ma'.nmportance in the world ly interwoven with British propassrada."-SJJ' THE GERM LIE A -" %  — EXPLAINS HOW TO SPOT THE FAKE THE RED DEAN HAS ADOPTED.. F ACTS and photographs published by lhe Communists as proof that tbe United Nations forces art 1 using germ weapons in Korexi and Cnina .onvince me that the charge it entirely false. Thai oaivVt yesterday wtoerI questioned Dr. Hew.; .'uiiiu-.i the 78-year-uld "Red" Dean of Canterbury, who has returned from a one-man i:iveslii-.i*.ion of the mrn, wart,ire charges in ChUM.. Dc Johnaon. Dngeruiif has raaad Ml far aae in %  •i""'crucifix, reaffirmed Uie Communist charges that the Americans are droppnv bombs containing insects, spiders, and centipedes Infected with disease germs These creature* are supt*>s*d to pass on the iniectlons 'o numans by ouing them or by contaminating food or water Merp than two year* aga reteitrrri in rtrlliin and UM Us preved that Hie haiM'F. of ii. ; .' %  i .1. I> -II. ii • nc tioti.in inlaetiesai i>* •r ant oll.rr >u lirlwrpn u< tls For defence T HE WawMTn POWj I Keg Dawat BO n oss l ei UM fact Uiat Un-i are carrytog out germ weapon rsaearci gg a delrnce measure Nor nave 'Hi' iudden mm coovicuoa Uuti -Ju Russians are doing the same It is because *.he Weal has div cot'ared so a.uch about 11 biliues u: . un. I--. ..II germ weapons in the last IS years that the Com:runiii evidence can be dismissed If haetenal weapenar r %  < u.rj tlipf will gpllver iTAtril iP'mj llin tulriided M ISfttl l.re.ii) kg aasacaa -fieg are /ordf atone fl Difficult jSriONSlDER the poasl %  uility of contani'iia: ^ nx human betnxs bj rsaiasing be infected insect-. shown in the Mrs; pho The creatures arc %  01 river ntsect.s which maktgood bait for trout First they must be mfectea with some disease norm which doss not kill them. Thry must withstand the heat anri .shock of UM small explosive charge which opens the bomb, rhes must survive the wealher ami nn'ural vnemles. Then to be effective n By to a water .supply used for drinking and effectively contaminate it. Finally. **sotiicuii< susceptible to the disease muti %  tringnbo '. (i > %  There are Tar too manj ;, thu chain of e ..pieal to anv miUUU Hinder. It would ite more cer %  nn to contamlnati with gcrm^ %  N lion i North HMM I t. (in the a# o* borab tnuukry Matipede .*N POtUD ACClPrABLL \s riinoi leaflet bo--ibs I X. Anil tvoraan set bilten t >r a spider .' What Mnald be thp purposr i reteaalng few thousand led bluebottle* In a rountn inch has such primitive aanition_that It is Already %  warm HI wtth Ihpm ? Their fofc T H ir 111. g.i.u-:, .1 dean tola me he ivas greath impressed by chuieei < >vrgynK-n who had found uisect> n winter wlten ihev are nr About Dr. Job IL. .in .ugufd that eet-err, re tiombs. rhS _0 J. Saa prubabl. tp.ni aoie th an gag million dallam on germ weapon n-iinh Unit .i cullitilr man x'ltihl helteir lli.tt •ch .'rude weapons uld IKIhr mvk. trawl 1 L*l>*rs %  i Bj even more fan H %  : 10 iiKtfea!. a. %  he Russians did las; < iha: Un'am has re sorted to germ warfare bv droppiim lepers In UM rem ol '.lie Peoples Army in Korea. Nor am I Impressed by the UM Communist atogi MMBtuI Professor JolKH-Curi* He is uilluiK to accept without inves'lg^lion North Korean claims Uiat the Americans have repeatedly used war prlAOiier.1 and civilians as •ubjec's tor experiments in UiOKMlcal wcui rfc* twnniunnf> uko run ihr li.it/v IVorkcr. whith km* Of. Heulett /onwasei on at) •wilotMl beSrw, gaoled me as an eafhorff* on 04-im warfare when they i e p r i n 11 d care/alay ctosew excerpts rrorn a teehntcal article ol mine thiee monlht ago. I hope theii it ill attach SSBM' authnrttu to thtt rebuttal l >ndon Express SerSace For:— Convalescence after Illness: TAKE VINERGY TONIC WINE THIS TONIC WINK contains sodium Glycorophoephate, Acid Glycerophos acid, and is ideally suited to tone up tired nerves, enabling you to sleep well and wake up feeling refreshed. Remember It's a Tonic Wine VINERGY Obtainable at . BOOKER'S (BDos) DRUG STORES LTD. BoD SlBfET AND HSTINC,s (ALPHA PHARMACY) • NOTICE I'l, ..„ note that as from AUGUST 1st. 152, our DISPENSARY in Bridgetown ill not be opened lor Business on "Sunday Morninfrs". For Urgent Prescriptions Dial 8289 ! m n THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LTD. While Park Road, Bridgetown ENGINEERS. 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SUNDAT, AUGUST U, 1S* SUNDAY ADVOCATE run rivr Racing Results AT QABM 8QN SAVANNAH. SATURDAY, AUGUST 9. 1SS3 WATHER: Fin.. TRACK: Sprlnp Z4ISI Ran: JUVENILE HANDICAP. Class "It" .lid lam-rr iJ J.O.> I'H. iias. sns. mi—it FurUm. 1. APPLE SAM: li.|. Jetsam-Haul. DQU. 126 lb.. Mr J. R Ood(tard (Thirtem 2. FAERIE QTEENE: b.f Burning Bow-Chivalry 123 lbs. Mr C. Ba rnard iHolder). 3 SUPER JET. ch.c. Jeuam-WMdlnj Gilt. Ill 2 lb... Mr. F. E. C BttMIl (Yvonwi ALSO RAN: Sen Poam 1 100 3 [bs Lulrhman), Jim La Rue 110S t 2 lb.., J Belle I TIME: 1.13 PARI-MUTL'EL. Win $2.46 Plan SI 24,31.24. FORECAST: S3 72 START: Good. FINISH Comfortable 3 lengths, neck. TRAINER: Mr J R Oodda rd IMh Rao: VICTORIA lIANDICAr. Claaa "F" 7ml Ft" Oi>l>. S103 I333S, 3113, 3431—> FBrloan 1 SEEDUNG: b|. O.T.C-UOHM. 123 lbs, Mr S J Rock (Lutclrman) 2. BETSAM: hb b.f. Flotsam-Betty Green. 124 lbi., Mr. John D IfllL (Newman) 3 FIRST ADMIRAL: b.M. Admiral rig-Flak, 123 lbs Mr. F. E C. Be-.lietl cYvoneti TIME: 2.061 PARI-MUTUEL Win: |2 M FORECAST: S? 20. START: Fair. FINISH. Close: bead, V, length THAIWER: Mr S J Rock 23th Race: Al'Gl'ST HANDICAP. Claaa "B" and Lower. 3960 13300, fU3. 3331—3 FurU.no I. LUNWAYS: b.f. Klrufiwajs-Lunde; 117 It*, air K. D. Edwards. (Newman). 2 LANDMARK: rh.m. Prlon ll-Esperante. 134 lbs., Mr. V. Chase, (Holder). 3 FIRE LADY: b.f. The Phoenix-Dido. 121 lbs. Mr 9. A. Blanchetle. (Qucstad). ALSO RAN: Fljing Dragon (1 IS Ito, O'Nell), Dashing Princes (116 lbs.. Lutthman): Pepper Win.(120 lb... Crosaley); Flieuxce (111 lbs., Wilder) TIME: 2.001 PARI-IJUTUEL: Win: 33.24 Place: 12.18, 31 S3, 31.36. FORECAST: 332.78. START Parr. FINISH: Easy: 1 length. I length. TRAINER Mr. K D. Edward.. !7th Race: TI'KNER HALL HANDICAP. Cla "G" and Lower. SS03 (3133. 333. 140)—7) Purloins 1 OAVOTTE: hb. bin. OTC-Maa-lonette, 126 lbs., Mr. V. E. Cox. (Wilder). 2 BLUE DIAMOND: h.b b I O.T.C.-Call Girl, 128 lbs., Mr. R. E. GUL (Lutchman). S. JOAN'S STAR: h.b. h f Dunusk-Colleen, 121 lb*,, Mr. S. J. Rock. (Yvowt). ALSO RAN: Cottage (86 lbs Blades) TIME: 1.481. PArU-MUTirEL: Win: 81 78 Place: 31. S4. 31.34. FORECAST: 34 80. START: Fair. FINISH: Easy: 1 length, 3 lengths TRAINER: Mr P. B. Walker 28th Race: BF( KWITII HANDICAP. Claaa "D" and Lower.. S806 (3183. 3133. $451-11 Furlonis 1. CROSS BOW: b.g. Burning Bow-Chivalry, 123 lbs. Mr. C. Barnard. (Holder). 2. TOP 1UOHT: b m. Flotsam-Meads, 130 lbs, Mr L J Wong. (Lutchman). 3 MART ANN: b.m. O T.C.-FIak, 13S lbs, Mr. P. I. C, Bethell. (Yvonel). ALSO RAN: Apollo (114 lbs P Fletcher) TIME: 1.381. PARI-MUTUEL: Win: $3-82. Place: 11.46, 31.43. FORECAST: 37 44. START: Good. FINISH: Comfortable 1 length, I Vi lengths TRAINER: Hon V. C. Oale. ResultsOfrLindwali i„ Best League Cricket rorm FOURTH DAY •sts a St. 1 MM %  f llckr.. HM "- % % %  •* %  , %  • %  I, SaSfan %  TwrviTucriVTi 11. l.l rfa By ROY MARSHALL The sun shone in Lancashire on Saturday. As a result League cricket was played on turn, true wickets instead ot the damp lifeless ones of the previous week. Such wickets plus fast < %  uUlelds mini.! well have produced an orgy of run-Retting, but batsmen bv no meana had matters all their own way. ..— ... . Indeed three of lh* profrtsiofi.il> jn thv LsiMMtaira ix-ague, all re.ognlscd batsmen, were out for lucks. Roy Marshall. Indian Tesi • pro Vinow Mankad. and Austrai...n Bill Alley Alle\. bowled first ball, was one f the eight Colne batsmen lo fall to the Australian speed ace Ray l ..1 who achieved his best •erf ut mane e in League cricket, eight wicket* cost 55 runs. AUG. 10 NO. 236 The Topic of Last Week Records Broken At White City 2r! IsS. LONDON. An* t. %  • World records were broken i it*..'.. 1*W *"* wWt# City British m. i*u mi Ibis iifurnoon despite psrlodii %  *cs showers which dotted the track *-£ %  with puddles. %  u Olympic champion, Charlie Sii Moore n*nnUig in the rain set up i u '? new wortd best for the 440 yard* na MM Sm hurtles with the slaginring time %  Art of 316 seconds Not only did %  *£"' Moore roar around the sogjt> :•*. !£*• t,a **in the outside lane but he H4S itsTt* had )ust returned from a wissfs fc *TSL ..... ,B f !" ,our of Britain witb his wife in a •Tsss*fMrL "ill i ml fu,Trf cmr and *** *** no tnin TurVTi-NivTM' tAi't in* at all! •van %  SM ...h M k.td... %  >xa. , Mt TWfMlllOil PtIM Tit-hat Na til IMt 1 1M1 TIs-liH Na %  •• Another world record waa sen"VIZ Mdonally mushed whan thtifu United States won the mile rehv To Clyde Walcott feU the dubious honour of being the unlucki<-t rl.s*r of the day. Fir Enfleld against lineup, he virtually carried both batting and bowling on hi* shoulders. His 3D runs and live wickets for 12, wa* 'he finest all-round performance f the day, but it did not prevent. ."Up winning h> three wickets. Enfleld batted first and wicket, j •11 quickly. Everything depend| %  t on Clyde, and he was thn< "tore restrained than usual. Hi* • %  atf-century took 103 minute* and ; locluded five four* Just how treat was his responsibility can lie You *aw thai girl with Hut Ch. And -Cs-rMUl Annis-" l*. H..II. poaina with "Columbw" And hi* filand "Jtm l Riw" "Mr BSMT" and FV inf Draaon" Ual i.n.l4-t > P.iglit ljhl" %  * a Kii-i.i "Find Adnuial" <.,BMM bayi heai ^^>' fas ni>t %  Tiitm Isahlnd rilii. nistrchM ina ItaRhina Itlnc-aa" ia And IIK* ru suv mali.au iH-trpla Thp. .l* <>! n irery rum vir* %  sSoapir. -lulls hair. Halo glo.-iftes it! i># and Hoban IsHnaS IHP pariv Tlis-n lha Jcilnunv' bagan naica by a yard. en batsmen totalled only 19 be' iween them. The collection for i %  it: nSSJ^S JZ. ."^a '• %  "• nt American team and wer\ UM ,„n u haw-,, .i ijcfcM. N„ 2W hie to hrad the v-treamlin. I:M I;M -U. saw MM SMT. TTM, ISM. lanas. tntcrmeaiale Uutes n. THISTIVTH SACS their own story. George Col. M" TW . M iVlnVVi no ran the first 440 yards beatad mu III-I %  fnding Arthur Wint by a cleai w MM SSSM three yarda This wss indeed Ul lu. M 'tals, PXti tor Wtn1 who ww ninnlng li ..— —L' .— .^ kJ -:. probably his Uat big-time Athu e |i letics meeting. Msshborn, numi.jm. MM. na: cni. errs, ASM aui. asm, M: THIRTT-riaST IIACa Prlia Ilvkat Na *MaBacup were left H hours to gel '.lie 80 runs required tor victory Clyde's efforts, they ST them with three wickets and ~ minutes' to spare. He recelvsfi little help from the pitch but Was virtually unplayable. Amongs'. his vicllms was Everton Weekcs. ho scored a quick 24 and lookrai %  I when Clyde clean-bowled ..i UrfcaU N. bar two. AmiTicaii was held by L.TiTig but to everyone's surprbie ieor Rsioden World's 400 metre • ecoro holder could never paw Pearman despite a desperate surge round the last bend. And It was left to Herb McKcnley to beat America's fp^at Mai Whltfleld in the final 440 yard". on i I n B.T.C. Summer Meeting f HORSES DRAWN 2lh Rac*: NORTH GATE HANDICAP, Class "C" and "CS" Onb. 3333 , lengths, l, length TRAINER: Mr. R. H. Mayers. No. XX 1397 CC 0098 DD 0600 DD 9756 AAA 4342 U 3397 N 5908 P 5678 JJ 81S8 Horse Pti Place Aracajnt Top Flight 12 1st 883.840 Laodmsrk II 2nd 38.130 Cardinal 1(1 3rd 13,36" Abu-Ali 8 4th ft 3th Joan's Star 9 divide 6,160 Apple Sam 8 6th. 7tn, th Rnght Light Seedling S a and 8th divide 3.080 March Winds 66 other horses divide $460.60 each Apronusk; 69M Vectls. Jealousy Dim View. 8059 Howitzer FUeuxce; 333ft Shi %  Arrow; 5646 Stirling Flush Watercress N 5903 Bright Light; 2586 Magic Gaye; SM? Colleton P 0716 Slalnte. 2407 Faerie Qucene; 5678 Seedling 1520 Cantuquiaine: 5476 May Day Q 0210 Cottage. 0086 Notontte. Spear Grass. Apple Sam. Gavotte; 1144 Miracle. Rambler Rose. Do.drum; 2642 Fti %  t Admiral Flying Dragon Landmark. fnrdlnal; 1IS3 Fir. Lsdy. 4070 Mary Ann; U7S0 AbsiAli; 3575 The Thing Baby Girl Tilierian Lady. Viceroy. March Winds Demure. Soprano; 5543 Careful Annie; 5033 Itacton Red Cheeks. Dashing Princess; 7580 Pepper WhvDarham Jane; 6I2'I Belie Surprise, llarroween; 6447 Rebate. Mrs. Bear, Lunways; 1183 Swiet Rocket; 3822 Apollo, 5874 Cs price W 2261 Twinkle. WW 0271 Cross Bow; 0052 Betssm. XX 1397 Tuu Flight YY 4M Aim Low. LL 7221 Meerschaum. AAA 649S Test Match; 4342 Joans Star. HBU 5084 April Flowers CCC 3442 Devil's Symphony. DDD 0307 Sea Foam FFF 1871 Embers. QOa 9367 Castle In the Air III 3853 Columbus. JJJ 6746 (Cons.) Hlghlyn KKK 9480 Jim La Roe. LLL 6173 High and Low; 8464 Super Jet; 9738 rwnqusrqjue OOO 9302 Trimbrook; 3312 Will othe Wisp; 5025 Blue Diamond. RRR 8497 Bow Tie. B 7356 E 1833 F 7220 li 1494 M 8842 S 3921 V 3397 V 2601 W 0021 X 8837 HB 9811 CC 0098 DD 0600 EE 0167 GC 0573 HH 4906 JJ 8155 LL 9235 MM 8385 NN 3500 OO 0619 PP 8008 SS 7605 TT 4901 UU 2211 Tn Enfleld's Innings Everton con' Unued to show good form with the i l nil and look three wickets for 33 Lowerhnusc vv Kishton Lowcrhmise wor n keenly con'iited game by 12 runs. Batting l-st they scored 168 and disml^SfV! Hishton for 156. For the first time this season Rov \farshall failed to score. He played %  ver s yorker from the youni; Mshtnn bowler Kenyon and wa^ lean bowled. He thuo still need* 39 runs to beat the individual b*li for a s.-i.-m fir ;. ; I.owcr)inuse professional. However. Roy rendered his sidr .od service with the ball, capturing four Rlshton wiekets for 41 runs Central .Lancashire I^eaguc A One all-round pprformanr i ty Frank Worrell earned Rsrk-1IITn victory over Middletnn He dls3,060 missed six of the Middleton bat*"ien for 59 runs but despite this. I he -idr totalled 165. Bart In c : igainst the < lork, Rnd^lilte knock' i^d off the runs for victory and ) %  rored 170 for three, of whirl. Wor%  ell scared a stylish hard-hitting ft4 not out. including 12 fours Roytnn vs. C'rompton Sonny Ramsdhin's side Cromitmn, were heavily defeated by Royinri Itoyton batted first and In 2V* hours scored 167 for seven declared. Sonny lolled manfully on a batsman's wicket and took three wick, atfl for 57 in 25 overs, six of which < wer.maidens C'rompton were nil out in an hour and three quartern for 71 runs. Sonny scored 13. Ramndhln narrowly failed in the race to become the first bowler •o take 100 wickets this season. He was beaten by Eric Price, who look his hundredth for Middle*..-n ..gainst Kadcliffe. Ramndhln has now taken 99. A benefit match has been nrinnged for Ramadhln on August 10th. He i leading a West Indian learn against Walssll. Owing to the new ruling, no Lancashire League professionals will be playing, as the League has banned Sundav crickcl Ramadhln will still have a strong side, however. IncludliiK suesh players as Prank Worrell, C. S. Nayudu. and Charlie Barnett, former Gloucestershire and Kngland opening bat, and seam bowler. Clyde Walcott predicts a pest future for R. Dickinson, s 17year-old wicket-keeper whom h<> is coaching al EuAeld. "Dickinson takes the ball verv i cleanly, especially on the leg side says Clyde, "and is ever alert fen stumping chances". Ma mi Iri a> jam UMt par* Cl-trc. her thr*->aat "B-b> Olfl" Ort a far drlvr rnnp.i I" ("0IT4H1M1 1*1 mr %  &f BafhaSoi Wwls. 1MB all "Ti.inklaV-mll mlam a lrru.m sight VS sit m> gsisBf lha intMhai Mi p wW I'll lh siil rilii. "No-t.> Nil*" \ n*rmallim •Urlad 1..I M.I.I1 lh*n ThfThi Anst a beea swal "Bopraaa^ HiMMi i. waa tlwa .ujri M na You could hair him dom UM "Coitaa*" in.sinf at iinvaa Itmh ami !-.>" Whll* 1h* trormd aro4ind aadiad %  -*d mi own -namurr TIM-T all left tor culpiM* 'I*nsamaili ., ..... L.,1 .,„.r%  r haar iiaal bands" cHad oul IK.Iwrl ci.Miia ih.' l>avU'. avnipthony Hear lha aound lnn| iVia run* A i-isr botUa of J K Jor U broka and Unbar! %  Uandart N..I a .-id %  • Mt bahind KnbsjTt is on* bis fraa a|anl JOB null dnnk I^u'a Pappai Win* Jaa~aSBl slaap in hara |..-nlhi •pongord by j & R BAKERIES maker* of HALO leovei your hair wonderfully 10M and eaiy fo manage HALO mokes your permanent, toko better — last long* liMfEU j-SBf : ENRICHED BREAD and Ih.blenders of J A R RUM ASTHMA MUCUS loosened FirsfDay DZcu lull >..i-l< %  CADBURY'S DIIT NILS CHOCOLATE -WONDEH WHECIS N IThe story of the name Hercules '.The very name Hercules stands for STRENGTH ot all the hcroe* ol olden nines, the


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PACK SIX -.IMMY ADVOCATE MMM) \l i-l >l I". IS2 "For Women Only!" MAKE IT YOURSELF "Sure I love vou. Mummy, and espei WOODWARDS HOCIUW.\Hi> CiRIFl WATt*. mother*. W the best rmedy for babV, aches and pail • WtMHtWAKD'H I. known the world — time and the comfort of mUUoM of babies sure* prove It* ortfc >I,I, m% two parent* ready to prove Ihr worth of another well-known heallhf SPA TOOTH Mt'MfEK f.i mm, Mr. and Mrs John Smith can • flora to smile. Their sparkling*, whi'i teeth pay no small tribute to SPA—'he finest toothbrush out. in cither nylon or britl<* As for June. here, no wonder she looks *o gay. June believe* in BANDBOX preparation* for healthy, hair beauty. BANDBOX ALMOND OIL SHAMPOO contain* active oil-ingredient* that soften the hair and help Its growth CO LAI RE. another Bandbox beauty-aid. puts those gleaming starlight's in June's hair. COLA1RB is a powder the miracle ill ruling you can brush In and out at will. Colaire come* in shades of Auburn. Gold. Champagne and many other tint*, also silver for the white-haired. On sale af moat drug* store*. Thi* little lady is very HOI'SKPBOL'D—and no wonder! Everywhere in her home you will find MR. WICK It's the wick that doc* the trick.' Raise it from the liuuid in the bottle and all unpleasant smells will be absorbed. Kitchen odour*, stale tobacco fume*, all are completely dispelled by AIR-WICK. Try a botiw, you'll never ever after be without IIThis fellow's an ugly customer, and doesn't he look frustrated. The YAMOOSE-Pt'FFER in th" handy puffer tin, is the re.--.un whv. One or two puffs of the VAMOOSE-PIT**?* tin quickly exterminates all such pest*. Contaming DDT., one r two quick puff* in cupboards or rooni.; will rid your itoma of all insert discomforts. A CHILD'S BUN-OKI BS Size-. 2—4. 4—ft, 6— ft Year* Here s a *weet little drea* for warm days on the beach or in the country, with lattice-work of ncrac braid. It is extremely simple to make, buttoning down the back, with plain bodice, extended shoulder*, and full gathered skirl. The ric-rac i* repeated on the Dorothy bag pockets. Use any plain pastel cotton or 1 nen. wita crisp white rlc-rac braid l l<* as cool a* an ice cream. Your daughter will love to wear it. This pattern is obtainable in %  ires 2—4, 4—6, and - year-. There are six pattern pieces. You w'll require one yard of 36-inch material for 2—4 y*a, on* and a quarter yard* for 4—0 years, or one and a half yards for REMEMBER to fit the pattern carefully, and if necessary adjust tinpattern before cutting tho material. Allow half -an-inch on all turning*. Mark notches, but do not cut. TO CUT: Cut one width 18. 14, or 10 Inches long, according EVA The death of a Joan of Arc in mink leaves Peron's 'shirtless ones with realities instead of rainbows . Bv MILTON SHULMAN EVA PERON'S declared ambition was >lmple enough. ^J She wanted to be a footnote. She had even suggested its plua-iing. "There ..-as ay the wide of Peron. a woman who dedicated yi herself (o briny to the President the hope* of the people—hopes mutd concert Into realities." she wrote in her autobiography, U. RajOfl Grand influences from your own Venus ^ should five a boost to personal desires. Be of good cheer, attend your church. ,- JV TAURUS ^ April 21-afay 20 ORMIH1 May 21—Jane 21 e\neh n w\de C *n^B ,0 is h L f m io Hn the CCntrc ( l lhe !" lXn b !" nd '* h I? aerophone as her Marriage LiffiLsT^rLl**^ 1 *. Z. J5 front: stitch rounded edge of weapon HfOaMCHft JDD* 22—July 23 "Am 1 happy' Mom's just given me ii SCROLL pen. It writes in both pad and blue. Get my homework dune in half the time, now. Dad bought one right away—so did Sis—RAM borrowing mine, Now all the family write with SCROLL BALLPOINT PENS, in either blue, red or both. Easy to refill. SCROLL Is a pen for all. Don't lend your* out— you might not get it back." Sole Agents covering INTERNATIONAL TRADING Coleridge Street. A "slim and lovely" lady steps out — confident, poised, not only ne's welldressed. but in the knowledge that her perfect figure carries off everything she wears. By using StLF. otic tablet night and morning, you too cai possess her sylph-like figure. If dieting, no exercise. Just two tablets of 8ILF a day. take all that ugly fat away. Her Dauphin wa* Peron WHEN In IMS the landlord ami -,. army officers arrested Peron on ront Join skirt to waist, ther Circuses, loo one 0 f those shifts of allegiance turn the centre back* in two IT was a muddlisd crusade comthat makes South American poll-K inches, and pre**. Make buttonpounded of a hatred of poverty. u ci „> incomprehensible to the right-hand side of love of the workers, revenge foreign obaerver, it was Eva who %  inch from the edge, against the rich, driving envy, exhorted, rallied and ur|u>i<*d __—on* to the loft Side, personal ambition and a simple the protest march of 50,000 work^t Bind, the neck and armholcs with faith HI the destiny of her man. er| „n the capital. After five days' rossway. Turn up two-inch K w * %  patchwork philosophy, imprisonment, on October 17, the this column. CORPORATION LTD. Telephone 5009. 4J86 BARBADOS 8 x 3 3-4 No. 712 RA2776 Feel when you stop pur headache! GET A PACKET OF ASPROW TJtat you've got tie Ql//CX uuw#i to ASPRO" loses no t.me—it ACTS —quickly, effectively, yet leaves you fresh and fret from harmful ifter-effects. More than ever, in these high-pressure times, you -.hould insist on using 'ASPRO' because of Its SAFE action. W. S. HUTCHINSON ft CO. MARHILL STREET, BRIDGETOWN HEADACHE NERVE PAINS NEURITIS NEURALGIA FtVERISHNESS SORE THROAT COLDS 'FLU PRICES WITHIM THE REACH OF All cm ami %  vcsrSHitf pocket to bind with crossway, then sow patterns can be had in three sli •~H**-****Q a,on ue top. Oathirom tho Advocate Stationery ily 6d. per pattern. er the top of skirl, and, fold in h,.ll long Cut pocket, a* placed "Xts on diagram and enough crossway one and a half inches wule |o b*n" and crnire back to wivedir Cut Q£r XW.,,,. ont width two and a hill mchn „,„ ,. w bul ,,; wide lor the hell „ TO MAKE : Sew ric-rac bl fr..ia n SUi !" "K^" y ,„i"' rn S" ,'. h nVm oT'sklrt.'Fold bTlt lmith~i. "<" ""•f lo '",' "l' "'i^£ "frlihtened ieaderj o( tho revolt M front bodice, then join shoulder hM | ran a broad itreak ol Latinln February 1946 made the Coloretner at on* aeam and pre*, ||u, h,,!, i„.„ s nd pre>s American emotionalism. nel a President and the small-time (•atner the straight edge of e.ith Why not make your little girl xt promised not bread or ciractress a First Lady. bout 41, inches, and the gift ot this smart dress. Th. •>"•• %  bul br * a " d circuses, with B ut lhe careful coiffure and the •he snotllght on the beautiful be( h|if u l good looks camouflaged spangled Eva riding barebacked lhc h „ rd w ,n and lh boundles. %  round the ring handing out the tm bltion that motivated Eva loaves. peron she took over at the MinIt undoubtedly gave to the U t r of Ijtbour the work that had workers a share In the govern„,.,„ UlM( | by her husband, ment. Increased pay, woman s Draping herself In mink and suffrage, and a measure of social diamonds she went down to the welfare unknown before. It dofactories and farms offering hermanded in return a subservient fe i f „, unassailable proof of the electorate, a docile parliamentary promise and opportunities In the opposition, a puppet Press, obedinew Argentine. "You mill oil ent labour leaders and the whole,,„„, clothes like these some don," aale surrender of liberty. . she assured them. For his survival Peron has had Al her thrice-weekly audiences to rely upon the tolerance of the lne dispensed favours, jobs and army and the active support of mon ey like some bountiful Mrs. th. workers. His own career has Roosevelt, who looked like Cin% %  uuipped nun for handling soldj cr ella. But she could sting, too, let 1*1 solidified his bond with „ n< | i nb our leaders or Ministers the deacamisotlos (the shirtless wh o disagreed with her were out. oh**'It was a social snub by the llivc luckcv Argentine's social dowagers who And Now The "Swan T it" 0 ?S2£.*£. V 2£5&2Z£ !" v £&r"tSSfOSS Ana WOW in. ^an Look *tt&JG!mH&. SW^'W^ L10 July 24—Aug. S3 Your Mercury and M>rs positions now lecommend a most genial end co-opera^ <*|. tlve attitude to gain the blessing* and ad-' vantages indicated for private interests. Moon and Venus combine to-day to sus-^ tain pleasantries, happiness, the contentment that comes from right living, love of ^ Cod, country, family, good friends. ^ • • • A beneficent outlook far you with gaiety, *L. sports outdoor activities of which you are^ fond all favoured ln moderation. First of II think of God. ji delve-** I ia" ft • 10 ,r. or 10" Fold * Though to-day's vibrations encourage activity, (,-i,k(-titi;il work, wholesome plca--^ sure*. It is advlsfci to >b*taln from any^^ mental and physical strain. You should have a happy day. * * LIMA Read Taurus and Cancer; your Indications Sept. 4—Oct. 83 similar. Whatever your duties, make them .a pleasant; enjoy free hours fully. Healthy % fun, sports sponsored. * * Mars' inauspicious configuration urges^ kindliness, mild temper; then you can truly enjoy benefit from the wonderful ^ rays of other planets this grand Sunday. ~ * Jupiter among the major planets backing-gL activity this Sunday; Church, healthful rc-^ creation, etc. After services, relax with family, friends. %  .**_. * * Saturn nil in tendency all to the good, because this is God's Day and laborious-gL work (unless essential) should live way^ to other things. Fine day for wholesome matters. ,J • • • *" Same as Capicorn to-day. You can have 1 pleasant. Interesting and purposeful hour* .u If you help make them so. Just avoid sud" den changes, decisions, carelessness. Pray, • • * Many grand Influences for building mind v i u-iu At**;. 23—aeat. 23 SCORPIO Oct. 24—*Tev. BAOITTARTU8 HOT. 23—Dec. 22 Dec. 23— Jan. 21 0APK1COC.N AQUARITJg Jan. 22 — Ftb. I PISCES Feb. 21—March I C'I uturc week and hmlth. for nourishing soul's need''. ^ PRAYER favoured. Essentials. recreations, hobbies AND p.! aim nf distributing food, medicine and money to the needy, has come to own hospitals, warehouses, retail shops, homes for working girls, old people and indlgcn' mothers. There Is even an entire Children's Village built to look after l.OOfl poor children a day. The desire of Eva*< good will rtlmulated the flow of money into YOU BORN TODAY are clever, ingenious, courteous but w not always tactful. May have unusual artistic talent, perhaps Jf* T^for stage." screen, or playwritlng. Watch that conceit not be --"ouraged, nor arrogance. Study, aim constantly to Improve nnr vuu win. Don't be averse to constructive criticism. 4t Birthdate ot: rieroort ClarK Hoover, 31st U.S. Presi; ^ Norma Snearer, actress. ^ s * * prices for. meat and wbeet have a di.cu.le cmtrald-embroideicl giecn Iwccd. !" ".'?"'.' to ?M,orv MlrlJ "<; Foundation, with trade unions -J-"""*. "'."'""& Jolt O^UvIhe Cult of the Unusual, first Th !" came little hat. for wea. S u Stor.house worker? and '"' business supplying the larg• P* 'o %  rttu, COB OI uv videnco of this came with lb.,„tn full-leti U ib cvenln. dr~u-. !" u g .. h er ". 0 o"„,. !" 'SSR "* eat share. Its Income Is said to l*, * * BALD HEAD LONDON twecd. green wool je !" ,, green gf'S IZ^wJ !"!" -,'*", Found.Uon open..! I nUck Hecbd iweeo gVcn uSL *!"* %  commentator the sun that he is a dlscple cnnrald-embroidcrcd green Iwced. !_?..„ l__ .„. ,„ cunnlng atUmiH o gnUci pate sponsored television, Snlbbo The fresh bloom of love beUd comTOisloncd a dramatist to irat Meetlne R V ,pe„t „ ,|„ |i Ke d without leen Peron and the trade unions wnw m on| ""• "Ah, well, umbrella. Jrovlded further senand a tailored sudin black ?'*j:ZV^ h J?<£S£2l Xt$J8& SS.J&.lXS!!' 'he de.cVml.odo. now InaTEvS, perhaps not, say. the husband, somewhat stalling aunounccmci.t —miniature boaters, with bouflthat next *ea*on we are lo ln..k nt veiling', and pluin.i like swans. to match. "Collars cut in one wilh bodiceTho collection included full-length evening dresseo,, uc bQ# as Senorila lladio. Inllipn l.ii-.lAes ...ItW k.n..tV __ .. blance of reality". Then camo surprising colour Hyacinth mauve-blue (for a w Jacket, lined with green t-.il! jrti.-Ks.-i, iirn-ii wiin umi i.iiiiir, me nn.ii impr*'."iuri *a* IIUH Q i,i handsome n cnamDion fencer < V i •£ %  -* %  *•>*•"— '<• %  ; ~m %  "•''"•• Boulevard Red. ComiemiiniGu-en. Cavunagh h.-id used in this one I reMctod military SlTMeiSstnn 1 J?* a,ch i ccono, 5 c ," olCB ; *>t little dictators Into obscurity and oddly enough, not spevk rollectioV ideas another deigntBS?s*?rr^ar5^S5lS KSSST i| lSSu-^^sKaSJ Si!Sl^M£a\S^ial\i of grey. This season, it iC.icn might havt KTtad ova ''" % %  • and very amblUous. marketthrough extortionate gel her wish She should, at least, honey-comb vilvc" with a blon-e in gold ,L — KO i d llk *. 1*3. The Colonel was 48 ye The final impression was that o]d> handsome, n champion fencer, pro-Axis „ army olh.ers who had^overthrown Chief of the Nation" as compensathe discredited Conservative reu on Klme.of President Castillo on June Kone? And will they stick by Peron when they have to accept Suspicion realities Instead" of rainbows? Or UT oratory and emotion were will Peron follow the long parade grey, fon Fashion. light oiled and very ambitious. He understood that m On l'ace 11 Tiake a footnote. WOBLD COPYRIGHT RKSESVED i smug smile. Rather subllo, ather sophisticated? Talking Point A solemn and religious regard to spiritual and eternal thing* 1* an uidlspansable element of all true greatness —Danlal Webstar •; To keep .,: regular jake EHO'S '.\ V .i.'./ IS THE ANSWER Sparkling ENO'S Fruit Salt" first thing in the morning freshens you up both mentally ami phy-tically. It clean the head, cleanse, and refreshes the mouth, removes all symptoms of liverishnos. ENO'S contain-. no har>h purgatives. It*, gentle laxative action is non-hal>it-fornuiig. ENO'S is suitable for delicate stomachs, sale for children and invalids. Keep your ITUU Salt" handy. Eno's Fruit Salt* SPECIALLY HLCOMME.SDKD \ h IBUClI AS ACTIOX sirii Hi uuaiK, SlUUl-iNKSS, IN :vi.rsr:o. ••*. Sold i/t bottle B for lusting freabneiB. He ear* "asssee* "lawi UM an (^......j ir^ aasras S3S \0 Protect your gums and you protect your teeth, for gum troubles cause over ;o per cent, of toothlosses. To promote firm, healthy gums, use Ipana tooth paste — I pan* and Massage. Use Ipana, also, to brush your teeth extrawhite and reduce acid-forming bacteria that cause decay. This is the way to keep your whole mouth healthy; the way you will find "rrf-reibingry different" because of Ipana's mint flavour. THE TOOTH PASTE.. REFRESHINGLY DIFFERENT eaooocT of aajsrcx-Mrtai. IOMOON AND NIW •IHI ci'ARAVTir r-a-nVa' hy all Fefguten Febrks — satafitttitm anunJ or lhc material will be rcplanJ. Alweyi hot for the name Ferguson on lhe selivage. ROBERTS & CO., M i M 11 i; i i S" - O It D S" "CoMcn Hours" Photograph "'I""' < ?*?-I n n,u u, e ask ^_ ,, .. lesuwT and plastic, complete Albums beautifully bound lvilh wr ,„ n ub | tt anrt In soft brown leatherette. envelops*. Your Stationers No. 9 High St. Dial SMI


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SUNDAY, Al'CCST 1(1. 1W2 SUNDAY ADVOCATF. I'A.I rirtgtN GOVERNMENT NOTICES Ho, SIV<. IMIARI> NO'tltl Dur lu fa be rumoun urtulatific that It u niwMij to off* 1 money to me-r.bei* of the staff before the rental of %  hmiac spot, o b e-* hpuae can be obtained, the Housing Board dire* to draw t the aiientitX) of the oublir that w, attempt at bribery would disqualify such applicant from consideration b> the Board. All application* are dealt with on their merit, but due to the '.ilk* number, tl u inevitable that many who would qualify for assist-fiee, have *o wait for tome time. By Order of the Housing Board iSgd. T O. LASItLEY Mansser-Secretary. 10.8 52— In. \SCftl 1 VOTES Varaal smut ef MIliK AI. OFFICES OF HEALTH. DeaartweMt ml Medleal Service.. Barbados. B.W I Applications are invited for the post of Medical Officer of Health. Department of Medicai Services, Barbados. 2. The post is pensionable and the salary in the scale $5,380 x 240 — •0.240 per annum (B.W.I, dollars). The Initial salary will be determined in the lighl of official qualifications and experience. Under the Widows and Orphans Pension Act the successful candidate will t or partially exempt by membership of a Widows and Orphans Pennon scheme of another Government. 3. Passages up to a maximum of $1,440 are paid on first appointment. Leave conditions are In accordance with local Leave Regulations and lfave passages are paid in accordance with the Civil EttabI shment (Leave Passages) Order. 1952 4. Quarters arc not provided. 3. Travelling allowance is payable. • Candidates must hold a graduate medical degree register? blri> SarjaaM MM far Sait Or*Wly OftWr 0*a>riv Serlcani Inlatura ranees held an Monday II Wednesday 13 and Thuraday OIDTOI.Y SgfUEANT TOP SVFEK ENDING r R Godaard i HK EWES-COX. Ma|or. BO I. P ft AdluUm. The RarlmdiM Haslmenl line, of the W O'and Srriranii f\m II oallFSHi I * i.. SEH:AI. NO as srrrN(JTH rNClUTA^r IIS Pie eflll. O IIS .. Trolman t ns .. gacees. r P ITRTNOTII nrfnaEAsr ass Pta Oulrsm. J O as*. Qraawt*. • a Clarke. I AUOlrd ft'id TO? I!f|imil I m A. t Cap! T A OMUn I I'lWill,am/, O 1 „ Yesiwood, n M Humlray. J M Ihr He* ci merit OKI I month leave wsf 7 Jly M UU II d>>~ Leave wef II Jul> M Old S weeks leave wal 1 Aii* Treruaeired le Reserve wef S3 July I 1, D SKEWES-COX. M..;oi The llarl-Uo1 ALWAYS SOCIALLY CORRECT TIM 9L illchaaa-ScuAssovialion, will meet at 8.15 put on Friday, the t5Ui of August, .it .irjuerteis, Becklcs Boo \ to conaider and adopt bye-law.. etc 1. mmlit iu| be widely know-i mat j Local Association is the jdministrative body for a numi>fT of Scout Oroups. Its functions .1'* -s follow*.— ,1) To safeguard and encourage the Movement within Its arc:' with the least paaa l ble interference with the indt'prndcnr.' .rid Initiative of the Group%. (2) To deal, ns laid gown, with JII matter-i allotted to u under P.O.H and In particuUu with —Warrant*, under Pnrt III. Nun-executiw and HonorJt v ranks under Rules 155—16.. Group regi*trations umi r Rules 177—IfM. Membership of Scoutunj. i Rules 197—200. Decorations and AA.H. under Part X. '31 T> supervise Group linamr. the appointment of Gnm;. Committees in accordantv with Rules 202—203. and the establishment of proper trusts of grouf) property In .me.' with Rules 204-WW. (4) To be repon*lblc for the Grant of ell badges and to arrange examinations for prottetatw) budges. Tin* general funcliun* of the L.A. are carried out by an Kxecue Committee In accordance with the Policy, Organisation and Rules of the Boy Scouts Association. Scouters, parents or guardians of cubs, scouts, senior scouts or rovers, rovers, old scouts and pertons interested in the Scout Movement can become members of the Association. The Lociil Association is concerned with the wolf are of the Movement. i;.ui:; %  U.-iiu." oi Examination. Award and Issue Following are Uie recojnmeiui*tions of the Badse Sub-Conuultlee which have been approved by the Executive Committee of the Island Scout Council. 1. All Badges are and remain the property of the Boy Scouts Association. The first issue of any Badge will be FREE. Subsequent Issues, through loss or damage, will be on payment—payment bving for the Badge lost or anuigdfti and not for the new issue. 2. Badges of General Proficiency are mainly the domes'ic concern of thp G/oup. The 2nd Class iiiirl 1st Class Madges are granted by the L.A. IMI the recoi*>mcndalion of the Scoutmaster in the case of the 2nd Class and of the AC. In the case of the lit Class. The UA. does this through Its A.C.. Secretary or Badge Committee. 3. B a d g e s of Special Proficiency will be dealt with as follows:— (n)" Normally there will be two periods for Badge Examinations — months of May and November. The Badge Secretary may, however, arrange for other examinations M rtlly tattM .it big discretion and in the light of attendant circumstances. lb) Scoutmasters will submit to their Assistant Comm, KMers by the 15th of Apnl and October the names of Scouts and Badges [or whio examinations are to be arranged. (cj Assistant Commissioners will forward these RDDI tions to the Badge Secret: y who will make th. ;i, arrangement* ami to' form those concerned. id Successful candidates wUI receive a Certificate entitling them to issue of Badge. (c) Assistant Commissioners must satisfy themselves as to the financial status of Scouts and. or their Groups before submitting name* to the Badge Secretary. i. The Quartermaster will issue all Badges on pre*entation of Certificate of Award. 6. These conditions also apply ( Wolf Cub Badges. Seoul'; of the St. Patrick'(H.C i Troop are in Camp ,it Codlington (.'ollege over the wgajfc sad Thr Camp is In charge at Scoutmaster S. J. Flcmming. The 1.-1 St. Michael (First Sei Scruts) Troop will be going into "mp at Gun Hill n Wadsktsalav, 13th Instant. The Camp is sejiedned to continue until Saturday 23rd August. The 1st St. Peter 'Third Sei Scouts) and Harrison College Troops were in Camp togethrt n St. James' Mixed Scnooi grouni. iiotn 1st to Vth August, i wrlvv* members ot each Troop attenae i and were divided into tout PatrrM vlx; Raleigh Whales. Heaver, and Squirrels Hiv CajagB was run oa i D Tnju'iitive basis, points being awarded each day fet duties etc. Central cooking wa. used and ship's time was kept throughout camp. Out of a toUl of 100 points the respective Patrols were placed afollow Raleigh—*2t ; Beaver*—7t l'ff*.: •id Squirrels-S2>1%. Other Scout work carrnii out including Tracking, ajgd Heacuo Drtll in the Sea. On Tuesday night there wa* a lamp Fire and again points were %  warded. Each Petrol had to produce a Song, a Yell and a ftuol for which they could earn a tot.'.l of 15 points. Judges were select*.! from among the spectators ami the result was as follows: is> Raleigh's; 2nd Whale's: 3rd Beev • is. *:h Syu.M There were many visitors. amon: whom were Major Orimth. M L. IV W.nthc (Commissioner lor S1 PMjr); Mr. c R. C spnngcr (Commissioner for Training). Mr. Mordecsi of Jamaica. Mr. J. '*. Mamnkond. Mrs. Matthews ami MisWest on Obituary We regret having to record lh< death of Patrol Second Grahain Sobers of the Third Sea Scouts Troop, Spelghtstown. Graham had been 111 for about ten Jay.s and It was not until recently that II was realised that he was suffering from Peneumonia He died n Friday morning last and was buried the same afternoon at St Lucy's Church where he was bornto hts grave by Brother Scout* his 0|**i. r>a\ VI Si. Vlarks GMi S-IKM.I Open Day at St Mgfa. Schocl. held on Tuesday ZPth Jul%. :i.et with hearty response from the paretiu. pupils, aid scholar' and frienJi ef Uu school. Among the listinguuhed vuito-were MsMf Ollndon Reed Director of Education, inspector Mess** Jordan and Jervis. and Miaaes EMurray and G. Denny. Rev BrashaVsitte, Chairman of Managers, Mrs Peebles. Mr. and Mrs. O. S Payne Off Harrow. Mr. D D. Garner. Mi. M. H'ackman Social Wdfai tVflcer. Mrs. E Dove Mr. K. Slmnatrii of Use Government Industrial atassoats. tiaad tsssorsara Misa*. M. Clarke. M Moore. D. Mayers and Meaars R Murrel) and J Maxwell and many other assistants from the other schools in St Philip and the neighbour-in. school* in St. John. The programme consisted BJ aongs. I'layets and a play Cln dereUa, short addresses by the Chairman of Managers, the District Inspector Mr. J. JorvU, paren.s Mr S. Wedderburn and Mr Edwin Belle the Head Teacher'. Report, and the distribution %  < priini and certificates by Mrs. M Peebles, and was brought to s do%  oy the singina of Hymn 657 A.M Alter this refreshments we-served and the work of the pupils injpected. Everyone went away with repression* of "I spent a fine afternoon." __ Was aaa a— asaduy %  rtllafWena*lio*MOM.<^*< M-ai y * ,*4aOT wiif ClMkura OievaaM ana .lap ii u< > a— f T ?• CMIKaai la-SM ... (uticura .'.-.' A' OINTMSMT Graham was a keen swimmci % % %  id those who attended the Marine Display and Aquatic Spor'.it the Aquatic Club last AIM will remember him helping hi Troop to .urrj off the Trophy. H was only 16 years pf age and was on the last round towards completing his First Clas> Badge The Association begs to tender sincere sympathy to h.^ relative and Brother Scout-, of Spelgh'* town. Stowaways Misiukc Charleston ForN.Y. CHARLESTON. South Carolina, August 0, Two South Americans were P U u, Ellis island S.-iturda> for deporatlon aftev mistakluft Charleston tor New York M Berocal 22. of Colombia and Jose Alba 25, of Peru stowed away aboard the Danish Freighter "Gerda Dan 1 They uifin' out liuliiifc In Ihe vessel's numbei "lie hul ; on Filda.v hungry and thirsty They '"id the vessel's first mill that they stowed themselvc The} >i"d two loavee of bread and half a gallon of water when they %  tOMffjd uw.i> Tlilast three days of voyage they WIT without food or drink. Win,, Ofmla Dan reached the two were so., thev had reached the port of their rireams. New York They came out of hiding only to have the .'.nt news broken to them |>y the immlKrallon orllecr. Their only reason why they wanted to get to New York was so they could shin out on an American Ship -cr. W.I. CULTURE • frem page 19 Sod'' A cringing slovenly insect who has not even got the pride tor the right) to hold up his head and inhale the fresh air as though nis lungs deserved it And what II most Mgiuikani is not that he generally has reason to be j ashamed of himself, but that he < has so little reason to pride and respect himself, that there is %. %  tittle In him to compel a MMSC nf inferiority and awe in the -mall-minded man when (• looks at him And Ihese are Ihe people wii > ire always talking of culture I They who can't even inspire common reverence, much less awe. are going to make u culture' And most amusing of nil, they are going to nuke it 1 This sort of prattle suggests the Btudebakcr Company talking snout the 1953. model The Truth in Your Horoscope Wwi.l.l MV • (a hitvw HI.oil -ii ,-•4 u t-1 ihr StarinaM.lr (IN yaw. aan 01 iir pad •(parlenra.. yosir %  irons ai d aak imtnu rtc t Kara la your iliamea !• lr-l rmtf, il*r vKllI ol Pundll TaOSia. India mo.) (.in. IIUI Arttolmrr who bv applying llw aiiHr.t acl THllll M| %  bi* raawlsi TIM *....! hi.edai and It Pimples Go Cause Killed in 3 Days l.'.. -1^1. I''.. NlKH^ Ii. %  i .km I". I. .i i.l rlrai Mn • ara> [ %  ,. ... .... t-i... -n.l (-irn. in <>t. 11., -hii. mm r 1" i:inr-oriii. aaa I i t .HI • a II I < I ,,JI i u „r ..,, u %  Mil i..| ii *er Ihr arti". th.'l li.ttr I'I iha Hay paras r |oar shin So a.I N.aada'm rrrin ttm lir,.,,.t i... •la) undri Itir I"" %  Niiodarm Hill IUIM.1I iimpbo and (test your aaln ao aid Nlxoderm s"er Skla rrena>les gassags. H(ior Sanding and Polishing NU-FLOOR WAY Wr npaiat. both (.molmr -n.l H SEA VIEW GUEST HOUSE 1IA.STLNUS. BAKAl>OS Daily and Longtcrm Rale? guoted on request. t Pensumi-at *OBITUARY Mrs. A. E. 1^'v.is THE death -occurred on Thiu day 31st July last of Mrs Bvelvn Ixwls of Cav Hill. St Michael. Mrs. Lewis better known .is (*weiyill to her friends as linamic) la the younger generation was of i. quiet and Kenlcel nature. She found her greatest pleasure In ministering to the siek and need> with her prayer* and word.* Of <-II--I. Ti.. •la, Oianiir>. I.i K ile.Ii I ,., I I*.. Iiavs .••II.IUKIKI nliiiaird MWlc Ihr >' % %  %  %  t.DH.l. VIA! KKV ..( N. ..it. basTtaw iimi Taksn mu.i yo... "•" %  > %  "( 1 1 %  .. sail sigh I T. p.ipi>|..rlac hi. .yiicin Taliot*|jl I in>: ysw Astral tssstptsi i ISftf Mi""n,Ma!. a^dtaasfV'and.'da'lr'i'il I.Ml, .|| ,1,^,1, *,HUa o> ..our-ir ff """*>' wailaH IAI AatiuloKlral surb I'vrtsga air but tand I %  H B.PO -lamp.IT Cainai *.,, , lanti nionlala and ollirp irH-'iealififf lilnallil* ^o.i HIM ba aniaud at ih> raasarkaWs -cvurar of rl%  Ulrnvatna ..buul you i rew seHrs Wnu now as thi* offar tlNnrr^TABOHE. 10*0 fUVBl Up^Jt I SI,, %  MSB] Pa DUoer and CsckUIl ; rsrtass srrsngsd. 1 J. H &UCKLAND Proprietor. ; I Eft ft OZONE t AlAIUtll/llSr Hit HAMILTON I'll l s NKKVERLINF I. (ARLTON HIWNI Wlutleaale S. Rslail Druggist I in Roebvek Si *a*'.C NOTICE TO nil I.I \KK \i IM -lii.il OUS AUCTIONKKHISG DKPARTMKNT IK NOW rTJLLY OPENED SO I KIIMIS DON'T FORGET TO CONTACT YOl'R AUCTIONEERS REALTORS LIMITED. 151 1S2 Roebuck Street Bridnetuwn or Phonr 4900 fa46>a>tc fj\ LANI -OHlumc 3909 &f&f&f&f ••eeeeeeeeee>*e.e>4) Agi \ r if in., tin i Koo-ui | Phi.nc 4S97 %•%•••*%**•% /////.V//.V/,V//////A'-'/.VV/>V////.V/////,'/,','/ • UUe Htw /scfrt <~>evtnttj-<=^tvt , • '$ . tlu laltsl .•/ '-iiluin'i <=J'mi Coo • More Economical • More Comfortable • More Powerful &f "A far >..i!i nil dlir -IvxtriiM* vun'll alcairr." a New Shipment of these Famous Cars arriving shortly. Redman & Taylor's Garage Nc.ir Cathedral '.*+'*;: •*:*,'*.;'ss** s?\ THE MEW SHAPE GALVANISM) NAILS (?> Me. Per ft %  JUT" Shop Now and Save! HARDWARE CO. LTD. (The Mouse For Bargains) N*. It Swan Street Phane : M0i. 210*. 3531 NO TUG AT IBB SHOULDERS NO TAPE! AT THE WAIST M TIGHTNESS AT THE HIP You've never owned o suit like it' Its New .Shape is designed on a revolutionary, new "cone" principle. Its lines dip straight and true from broad, handset shoulders to the hips. No old-feshioned taper at the waist! Try on THE NEW SHAPE. In new dynamic, DeepTones ... Let your mirror be the judge '. A. E. TAYLOR LTD. CLOTHES CREATORS & CRAFTSMEN.



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Better Days For U.S.A. Predicted By Candidates IKE PROMISES MORE AID FOR OLD STEVEXSOX: LOWER TAXES BY 1954 <..%'OTTK Wl.V* IK ROY CALVIN WASHINGTON, Aug. in Republican l*i evidential candidate Dwip,ht Eisenhower promised the old (oiks Saturday he would help them and the Democratic norninrv vtraved as looking forward to reduced Federal spending by 1954 although neither candidate mentioned any precise amounts. From his Denver headquarters after a Conleronce wit!) the Republican Congretsianft) Tux Experts, Eisenhower issued a statement saying the needy atfed should receive more Federal help in meeting the high cost of living He held ou! tinnow •; % part and press i..r th '" ll of filling security posts with police officials, not gnv< from Other departments Ha Btld \v provincial governors vboilld aa chosen from police ltd pointed out thai UK present governor! are mostly mar from the Mlnistr:if justice. He 1 appeared :o hare damaaad the optimism once felt | hearer edvveri that thenman could can? %  even] smuhern states in Novenjbcr. Nineteen I to. : 1 south ern states will meet with E'senhoe/er el Denver on Monday to discuss the outlook in this usually dan ocratlc aactloiii i t, rued th:tt h:*h Interim dry Posts b" fciven JHI i.rm"' Britain \nl U.S.A. Consult On Iran By K. C. THALER LONDON, Aug. 9. The British Foreign Office stateo on Saturday that it Is In close consultation with the United States State Department on the Ir.im.m situation nnd officials disclosed that a new approach to Premier the Mohamed Mossadegh is under ajflai ittan But Britain and the United States have been unable to agree among themselves on the nature of their joint approach to Teheran I and on terms of a proposal to help, Iran a\ei'. ;i complete economic, collapse. Britain Is not prepared to sanction economic aid unless it Is coupled with a "reasonable" settlement of the ill-futed oil dis-i pute. becaufcc oil is the foundation' of her rnther than to Ministry of Juelic nffici iis lacking. poU < Fffasrufb prepooed that the police pension age be the name a* Ihr-l of the armCd force, or M years. —F.P. No Compensation Until Debts Paul To Iranian GovL TEHERAN. Aug. 9. Iran will not consider Ike peasant i>( cotnpansatton to the Anglo-Iranian Oil Company until pany pays up $137,20O.OIKI which Iran claims is cwtd to the government, according to official sources. It was potfttad out that national front deputies nave repeatedly charged In the pasf that thing to the comaangr lot tba ascproprtatlon of pti party, and that on the contrary the A.I.O.C. is In debt to Ira* 't i" n "Field. Ms"oserhus*iu"'foi j luring the paa) half stop sign. Hll lob: erect*ng jtor I'mm Ml Ouarhm: Italian Crowd Attack False king Farouk Kome. A tal Italian CO Toldo Macoccni disguised hun-1 %  sal and causa %  ... i>i 1 North Italy. The joke out on -i v.' %  .' Milan was precede.) I nuilnf American saloon car. drtffaa bj %  Negro and tui: -: with the rov.il M i.,n the hoax was sj covarad the 2.000 crowd Mel I \-ery badly and tried to attack ucomevilan. Police took hit nd eacortad] IUPI Hem York.—A guitar-playuuil detective posing as a blind bei,g.ir. ., *"ii..-i Kuide carrying a cup with a box. I dog, 'ither detectives posing M %  labourai Ud drunk tourod a I New York district (of Hl fw evidence itgunst a drug] suspect, who was tlnally %  ecuaea of having SI 12.500 (£40 172) WOrtn •>( BSBratll The money in the cup was given to the pohe* panatori fund. Milan.—Under Italy's land reform plan 2.250 ncres ol voted l.ind have l>een gtvaa fW td paaaanfei nasu PI %  Wasliington A drive 1 ma: Cincinnati. Ohio. OfM BUBSSrt to sunrtaa programme showing one cartoon and *e\'eu: dUTerent full-leuglh faotum RW.-Italian Air I* B irdl has lavantad tar plane weroai between a noniuil plane and ; tar and which will lias a motor cycle engine of 10 h.p ir iha anganc faua the p.int will start pedalling and will be abln to go at a speed of about 3d rn.p.b. Bernard) hus promised to demonrtrate his plane flying over Rome without the en/: coat Is £250. WajJitnslAB.—One of the twi*l %  l| ike.. .111 Amacica has Mtdfd at Wblppany, New York. Just five days shmt of idisrs beat the raiding Communut* to their knees in the Hed* latent -nd most desperate attempt to take the bitterly contested lull which has changed hands six time.this week. U.N. Counter Attacks lie far the hill east ftf Panmunjom started at 3.50 a.ijl when a reinfoned Rey a lengtb Top Flight 9 Wins Big Sweep Field Suvep Tops $1,000 Mark On Five Occasion antur atgajM 42-Hour Mourning Period For Eva Peron Results At A Glance FOURTH DAY IUI MY-K1I RTH feACI 1 Apple Ham— Thlrkell 2 Faerlr Queene—Holder i Super Jei—Yvonei TtVr.NTY-KIPTM RACK 1 -. dhni: I 11ul.1n.11 2 Itetsanv-NcHnun 3 First Admiral Vv.ul TWENTY-SIXTH RACE 1 Lanways -Newfaan I l-indm-tk— ll'iider :i KirelAih — (Juolrd TWENTY-SEVENTH RACE I Oavotlr—Wltder Blue lllamond —I 'i'.. hni 1M I Joan Star—Yvonet IUI N'rY-EKiHTH RACE I 1 ro Bow —Holder 2. Top Eltiiht—l.ulrhman '! Mr> An YvonM TWENTY-NINTH RACK 1 Aba-All— Yvanei ? l>oldrum—Holder 3 Harhant .lane—frowley IMP: 1 1, 1 11 it u 1 1 March Hind*— Qurateil t Rambler Rose—Holder : I4rdin.1l I ru--li 1 THIRTY-FIRST RACE 1 II.M..U -. (JU.-l-.l 2 Red Check* O'Nrll 3 Castle In The Air —J. Belle > MR L .' WONG'S live-year-ul.l mare Top FliRhl mil • am Meads won the Big Swoop of the B.T.C, loui d.v SUP met meet which endad nt the Ganiaon Siivannah rdoj She finished the meeting with a total ol 12 I p-M.K and bmuqht to the holder of ticket No. XX 1397 1 $52,360. It was another day of kern rat ing and the crowd was ihe hiiifiesl seen at the Garrison throughout the niretmi Tins was relleeted in the amounts paid in the Field Swatp which went past the $1,000 murk on live occasions. hil owners for the meellnu wan Mi fvril II > larouk Joins who got Band Of CureFree I'.x-Kings Ad Mi I' I t'. Helhell f.>ui ayuusaia MM h I Luh-hman finished Ks Ihe "i" 1 |ocke) r.>r the mee. 1 inarhOa Yvonet am' Mulder eavti ^ttndilled live wm1.<>N1 >:. 1 he Pi II RB llrnul uncli Captain attandAn*. ,,.,t another pro*>C-n Kma I'"".UK %  %  ,Mteiiatnlii mualc, m ..I>P^-M i.iunlli on litiin> ,,Hi I.iil01 pail4 The United Stales seemingly j favours speedy measures and Brit! tsh concession to tide over Mossa-' degh's regime until a more solid and comprehensive settlement can; be reached, according to ,in offleipl | source. { Some British reports warned Mossadegh thai the sitnntmn is gravely undermined and the influential Times said on Saturday that lo sanction immediate aid would In effect amount only to Xeepng alive far a few more month. 1 ship that is already sure to founder Both Unulon and Washington agreed that the situation In Iran Toachers LAUW lor Conference %  UtVlly became the m !" talM memner of the most ex. I i.ini carsnfffaa set known tol \. si 1 bafan nava aa DUUQ hav 1 %  t| in tnuiquilitv and luxurv %  1 noa ii" in ri'ilugiial's sunny res.n t (<: iMorik Ba-Kuif Umbarto of Italy 1 the mifcd aeuva <>f PortucaTfl aa ( iled mon^rehs. TOKYO Aug tf i-.i.nv-ly modest ocean-front | TJl( r) |uential newspsper OH Saturday %  ther.King ... %  I '• ' ... total MI %  ,,,r; :1 aa ti;oo,ooo" WOTtl and platinum Mom the i u-lcxly of J a panes* ifflelab during oerupiilinn WINDSOR'S HEALTH l\ll>ROVI\G MONTECnTINI. Ill\ Aug. 0. Tha eunditlon of ihe l>uke VTbtdaoi .1 %  •xeellen; night by I'lofej.wn S..ii*. Ptsanl whn afaftad htm. An ofncial bullatln add 111 Highness the Duki .f Windsoi 1I'logiessivrly loipron uu Mis [am 1 ti 1. completely disappeared U general condition was excellent. Signet). Professor Saute Pfaanl taU the United that ha had aothtni to add lo his medical bulletin bill said he lelenseit it "for the benelll of newsmen Asked about the schedulad arrival •% sjj of sir Danlal Havles, former eon%  ultanl to late King Oaarga VI, to attend the Duk< PI sol MM %  sit Daniel Is bars tv vast) tae Duke as a personal frieml and nothing more" S:i IIHMI-1 Davie* .1111M11 in Roma nnd left n ,li.,'. Iy for Monteeatlni In g diplomatic car. He carried a small brown valise thought t" e com* in *nd soften up the Comn %  1 Shortly before 10 a.m. United UnUoai light'!-!mbeis hit the napalm and rockets %  nd Found troops followed up with their second attack This iMceeaful and reIne h I' Hut fifteen minutes latei the Communists 11 force and again the to withdraw. In the battle t Capitol HiU" tlmatad trat 300 CiH aaai mtantivinen hurling hand grenades and tiring sub-machine guns and rifles ruaaed the height in foret United States ai>re let pilots abeg .t.iwn nf Taachers b> be held in Trinidad, left w terday by B.W.1A., fi Trinidad BUENOS AIRES. AUR. 9. All buejneaa, Utduatrlal and social activity came to a slandstiil thniuKhnut ArRCMma in memory of Senora Eva Peron as a 42-hour mourning period /or Arkienttna's lirsl lady who died two weeks a^o be^na at 6 a.m. The mourning period will last until 12 01 a.m. on' Those leg Mr. A. G Monday. I Jordan. President of the Barbados The Senora's body was to be borne al 10 a.m. past j Teachers* AeeoctaUoo, Mr. F. If. hundreds of thousands of ijrievintf Argentines (rum tha ] Ml Erc .' 1 Labou; Mmi-t.y to the Congressional building In a civil IASIIV 'M! F G Downey and r. ilit iry cortege such as normally is reserved for ? \\ randenl ol the Assistant Tvachiont who has died in office, .iled to uke pan are ofllcers and met. of tba thin uriny it battalion of mnuntvd San Martin Grenadiers. Con] leaders, supreme court tusticcs, memberB of The I.,. an artillery c tnree columns her hu I lives and Women'' 1'eronlo be carrit ii'sou drawn by Of workers with President %  t dangerous in II.. extreme and if i a bour union omci.ds. :>n>vmrial allowed tn drift on might lead toigovernors, caoets. nurses, ano a MinirnunW move They aIwl mpmberH agree that tf this is allowed to happen the West wnuld be confronted with the gr.i\> since the war. A Foreign Office spokesman said Bntnin and the United States are : he situation in Iran under out declined to comment on report' of the alleged Amecicn proposal that Britain shall allow Iran to sell oU world markets and pay part of the proceeds to the United KJnadom us compensation for nationalised oil properties. Leading BrlUsh ((uarters said such n solution would hardly be acceptable to Britain. VV NATO Asks UK, Trance About Defence Goals 1. Mr. C. W. Cumberbutch. Mr. c F liroofn* and Miss Mildred T..IH. aea begins tomorPARIS, Aug. 0. 1 that the North Atlantic Council bluntly d Britain and Innca if ttsB nations plan lo abandon their mlaas %  -i defence goal* for foUosrloj immediately behind. wz Hnd Bacl W -niwrr by Th body will lie DM August 20. ,-nnl building. A NATO source said that the Ouh public transport n>l Council w.ts woir.cd Ih-t OtsWl newspapers will operate during Atlantic Pact nations will follow the At hours* mourning period. ,h <" "potenttonally oangtrou, but worker* will hold ., brief Precedent set b) ISntJin with token stoppage Rostaurants BnJ p r >ther eating places will be opCi lunch On ulation with their felI excfinnx'' based It expects the replies tojl!.. k and dinner tot n l ''"" '" lime for discussion j charge*, at the next meeting of the eoun1 Appl 1 swge II ell In Par's. AiyuM 2i> I'.P. 'thin Hem ciri Cornmftal Expectal u>and liags a I are due lo anivi In lbs %  half of this month ember. introUar of supplWa oe I prio foi %  0t I xceed S9.I6 pei Q.W.I,, Curranryi id lande-. idlng freight. Usebganee, '..*:.. %  mid all othei tell Ith his IT . the f.i ou* Magdu llusi-ti whom hu Uwuajht '" l dying beoiMild of Belgium '• 000 I I Mguaj whn | l-nther lo leave hie OWTI i-"iiili v ..ithough he i(i>T|ueiiilv abroad with hu common, i wife, PrincesDe n< II v Re i given an elUrw iinee by the Belgian Government was sold to %  ver King Don Juan, itir BpanJab t< r ,icr. and Iha Count of P irli bo < laun Ihe lalntain establishments m iv>rtugal. Don J i.. with General Frt so far tnei, i i .it !-• n Pater of r ratal j in Wntco with lus wife. Helen afai Klb| Albania srho fled ha ISStf. during the Italian l I !" I tO I .' I' llgangn throne —t'.p. APPOINTED ASSOCIATE MEMBERS R.S.I. c En licences foi ii Tuesday. la u-nbed as "Major II. of the Military Government" and an on called hu Kennaita Yon.mil based its story %  %  .' report made bv the Miyug. arefeeture govarnmani ;.i lendal Horthem Japan, lo tha Dial eaca< i mtee mveatufatina Uu aDapad 'i.i lewali from ihi Bank ^f Japan vaults which nad %  ustody >r of! eiab for ears,' Yomlurl said %  il In 'i report id thai %  %  Oi ton r id June I, 194 J. In each c Mncli and left with trersure MIHIX lo romluri nt one bill yet i r MOROCCO HAS BETTER ROADS THAN EGYPT RABAT, Aug P. 1 %  %  ; %  i, better Ugh' way iytem than Knypt. A rnatithly news bulletin naid that ICeroct had 8.36H a gnd W.771 all weather seeundary writh la>p DirwI-PoHf^rt'd liuin On Trial Hun VIENNA, Aug. 9. An Austrian %  manuLu tun-.i lowered tram, made fm I'ruguaynn railroad, started f"i %  I :"Hi mile trail run through Au n.i according to Federal Kailroiid offlelals. The train, one of the l'i ol seven trains, was built bf the simmering Gra/ Paultei lant in Styrla In the British /one. (inieia:-. aaid that the trail) bavtaa] two Diesvl motors with 100 horsapoerer each, ts 80 y.ird.. KMaximum upeed Is 75 m.p.lv —UP. In [ % %  %  %  asal c;ibboiis. Visttmp Ollici". Seawi'll Airport. '*v been appointed Aaan >f llti Roj %  Institute. mutn Mr. Sealy u at PT'tent >" IH total Ol 1.37.'i mile*, wit] we, and Mr. Ws ., t mnini / Assistant Chs .nted. Ini.pe.STKIII>.\IS it.vns A SECTION of Uu crowd whltt •tua4 Uu lul djr I Uu Barbado. Tuif Cluf. Summfi Mfttlng Drawloc of horiM na p| &. ALL TIME" CASUAL WINE FACTS S HERRY WJNI : cjn gi\e so much patatUN to dining and enicriaimng -but it isn't an> more comphcatcil lii.m ^rving tc:i or cnlTcc li> MAfebj Sherrv in yom fuests bejorc dinner —slightly chilled. And add this K.W.^ Paarl i* vnak gnups and other food for a new and dislinct BaVOtsT, VOO *tll DC delighted vvilh the raanktl When ils lime for Witu It's tune U" K.W.V. 'Tne hVinr of AH Timer dm K your HR for. K.W.V. Sherr>-. Brmtdv .1 I .. WlpffX. >.'. •.'.; ;;*, ',-,'.-,','.-,". aaoooo //////////


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M M>\> AUGUST IB. IpM SL'NDAi ADVOc 1i1 PAGE NINE The Tremendous Things That Happened To Yvonne Baseden AN ENGLISH SECRETARY MEETS THE GESTAPO Sitting at a typewriter in a Southampton office in 1939 was YVONNE BASEDEN. a pretty girl, aged I" Over this girl's lite came a most extraordinary transformation. She joined the W A AT ; became a Brittah agent; was taught the art ot sabotage and hoic to shout to kill Then came the night when she was dropped into German-occupied France W! r K wore parachuted into France on March 18,1944. "Luefen," my commanding officer, and myself were greeted by French Resistance workers and hurried to (he security of a lonely farmhouse. Prom there we made our way hundreds of miles overland to Dole, near uijou Our taas was tu r.'jrganlse a Maquis A-hlch had been wrecked ay ihe Oeitapo— 'tucien.' as leader, and I his radio-operator 1 wen: siraight to nouse where accutnmoda non Dad oeen arranged (or me The wife wa. supposed to be a friend ol a flcUUom auni of mine Now 1 nA. busy. 1 wem rrotn House u> house with mv isd.o set in a suitcase l >*-ild put up a temporary l aerial and then ooatJ start transmuting to England Or receiving. Each evening with my neadphones on. 1 would ait li-i'.enlng sometimes for a couple uf hour* ;nrr rum to the floor and kicked him. Hj many are there ol eou T the* AIKHH4. He aaWl I am the only owe and ao then tot staves and beat him. DRAGGED OUT We are caught • rhEN jie} moved We cove: from the note : %  Jules and I wera H'Oiw u. very fr.ghtened. li.spered to him :0a: usrs, would be soon with us ojtf would be safe Bur ifff" id him. M 1 *queeard lunnei into ihadvAi I u' his distorted *-, be wa dragged out. ard him thrown nine fs i uo. io the floor 1 hooed wouldn't are me. out tne> Ci'ine out.' a Uenitan iou'.pd 1 s;ayed *till rhe larman pointed a revolver at i.e The flash at it way "red I op he darkness Bui tit' nissed I don'i know Bow. rtad seen I was a I Muiut up my arms Ju; il-v gratified me b* m\ hivf and dragged m up. rheOprman>punch*f %  pm the face and I fH" re th* floor •,. Rober JUia* aM Isv there in lie >W with ou: band* ru.*eC n heard ths searcher! tieuani firing then -.ile*. They tired t-irough the floor low 1 could see 'h iptniera in the cu I saw Dlood. too eepea over Wl LtTTEU .Jventn %  Disunited MEANWHILE Lucicn was uct.ve. The morale o: ihe local Resistance was low The laji Br;;,:i lenders had been caught and I believe killed. The movement bad been cmsbed In the surrounding area wenother Uaquti. 9cm!llcal motives. goUW were led bv French Army officers. They ,iad not all got a deep BfTect:on (or each other An.. some had no love for the British It was nara worn encouragir* nealthv acgrssaion. Sometimes supplies promisee did not come, sometimes the> were small and late. Some Frenchmen felt that they were forgotten by London LONDON CALLS Raid is planned UNB rven.ng in June I got a message that was to change all that We were told to pick out a lonely spot wnere a large' amount ol muipmeni—and perhaps men— could be dropped It had to be flat, free from electric cables and pylons. "Luewn"' and I found ttic ideal site about 12 miles from Dole I tapped the news to LonOan by morse key in the ill-lit aittuutroom of a French household. Luc.n had to arrange lot ii defence of our new landinaspaee. We appealed to the Maquis around and got 800 armed men We also got 30 lorrlea and home-drawn carts For we, had been told that this was a daylight drop In a deserted, crumbling nouse nearby I set up my radio set. I told London we were wilting and that the Germans did not suspectThree squadrons THEN came the dawn of •he day of the raid Soon 1 was in direct contact air-raft. They were three Muadrons of Amer.csti 0 with a s'.rcng hunt. It was %  (sttndw was very still HHJ i the chureti uell AS l lay in the MUM -emember IhJU Df "11 a lot of Frenchmen who are nat n church today Over fhe iiorlson the atr-ro d *;reni waned The bombers tooR %  D:g circle and came in low Over I ihe tuna* ol tlgh'er tw.nkled n in. IUII it. %  late victory roll. Then ihe container, started -iropplng There were 300 nf •hem all tilled Mto rms snd upplles REJOICING NOW Down come the guns • l COULDN1 Bt in thai hedge bottom. 1 got to my teet and danced in ihe suniighi The French round nu *<%  mad They sang and waved their rifles and lots ot them escaped death very narrowly ** the continent cacnerHsiimn dusn around theni Borne burs*, as Un-v ni ih Paul. •• Luc>en ctMM n in We cycled back io oui HL Oai n ehee* aarehouse inert a wonder.u Dewonttoil meal %  an iu* : js There nas becf-steaK c:ui i late mousse and of i cheene. Discovered SOON "LUCIID started ii warty. Paul bad njt rr vs-o In lacs lie iiHd been stopped b) D ill His *ultcas* r (a ncen opened ana ne na oes-u quickly •interrogated." That :neant a gwln and brutal beatng-up. Thev had knocked out one of his eves. Paul told them our address i % %  wg iif caretaker's wife Oabv Uayor TIW a police car arrive We fled to hiding ptnres Her husrnnd Freddie ran down to tlie tiasemeni. Thre* of Robert Moral 1' ilii ... deb celling I< was Lucten's blood He ant Ch-rlet were thrown down lh< ten-foot space to oui Tnen we were all dragfeC to the floor below There we ias liandcuded and face down. He was dead THE Oennans were furious They thought thev had ushed tne Resistance IB the i tie area. As I was pushed down the stair* saw Luclen" lying there Somehow 1 knew ne was dead Charles whispered to me a* e were on 'he floor '• %  Luclen • ik -hp'll." 1 knew that pill —the one Headquarters gave v>u in case things got too tough. As we % %  % %  wc were kicked orurally ov the Oermans aa thev passed us I was at the nead of the stairs Thev all kicked me in the stomach and in the side 1 doo'l remember 'fv.ru But 1 w.shed I was uiconicious Then they pushed us downitalrs out into the night ON OUt WAY The journey begins • OUAKDINO the low caru which nad come to take us away were men on norseoack. savaje-tookina men with yellow faces and sill eyes They aere White Russians Am pr Room Morel a man "' r ^J",!!/*"* nl V h called Jules snd myiself hid upCB tf n fi '*f* 1 - loun P,u ii n,ie or round '"" n ,,l rtrt, looked kaff* nooden discs used to the cheeses Over our hearls Luclen ano his French lieutenant Charles crawled between the double floors of the attic. WOMAN BEATEN Searching the house • THE German* Knocked on the door. They nked Ofcby a hen her husband Mould be back. 1 could hear the mumble of the r voices More clearly I could hei them oeating Gaby. 1 heard her cries and her sobs. Soon more arrived and they ttarted U sraruh the build.u*. At one time a Oerman sal only a few feet from me. I hutched his Inckboou dangling in space through a crack between *he discs. Thev found Roben first Thei ith his bloody lace 'ound. At the end ot (he thin line of brutsed. wounded and moan.nn men handcuffed '0 Charles ihe bodv of Luclen was beina dragged along We aere on our wav to meet the Oestapo I (World Copyright/ NEXT WEEK The torture in Cell III: "There'll always be an England." London Express 8err.ee OTHER FATS AND OILS Let's Leave. Politics Behind For A While Let The Cvnies Smile— a* America Has An Inspiring Message For Us By JOHN GORDON CHICAGO. Saturday. Qnd Americans < %  taresied in llritnni vtvj I u Britain, very (rlend > lo Britain, bttt a little puzzle^ about u A surprising number ot them laim lhat then g^lsh, and they are proud of it. The hall porter at one honl said lo mo. with evident relish: "In a way I m English, too. I w. s born here, but mv IkuaM v.is from higlaiMl. and I have a aiat.r in Wales" Th.:. that k'.rl.' pointmt; to a woman sitting at a desk in the hold office. "She COna 1 from low.i." This morning I found ftta |Oswl paper, which n vlsior h.nl ga| 1 took it to htr and gaU "You IW in lowan Would you Ilk.ttm"" Ilii A Bornt She look.d ut me gd "lowan be IHIMSM.O, I ID i that makes a uonu i-tw-s'ii these people and us which is ol immense value not only i > us but to all the world, in III preavnt wobbly stale. They tn Amtrlaing. agnic*:i:ids*nt. proud of beiug Amencdns. But they like their kinanip with us. Ibej waul to wa.k with us. Are we making Ihe best of th..t Vuiuable cement? I doubt it. I think we could s,il MrtUin much belter to Ihe Americans than we do. They know IsM little about u. Therefotv, the difference* between as arc inclined lo be magnified unduly. and our common interests taken for granted. We cou'd do Ihe better job of public relations. What puzzies them about IMf Weil, for one thing they cannot understand why we fell lor bocmllam. Or those stones one heart too often now all over the world that the British have Icgft the will to work. Thia is u .aitd where men pfftCgi freedom above all Ihing*. Frei'dom of the individual is a fundamental principle ot their life. There are no class distinctions es we know thnn. A man a success does not depend on the bed in which he is born but on the qualities that are In him an I ihe efforts he puts into life. Ho swt to work to raise himself, not to depress others. Most men in America have a burnin.. ambition tu rise in the world. And they are prepared tr> work with every ounce of Initiative and cnj-igy n make thai possible. No Barrier. The mechanic to-uay can be the garage owner next year. Ute shuu assistant of to-day is HM aft u owner of tomorrow. There are no barriers across the roaU to loituna—If you have the uiae, tne creative ability, and the wil> io make Ihe effort. Kvci y ^tep u nunt takes upwards is reflected immediately a be tier h<-u". u belter car, mure gadgets and luxuries in his horn-!, more clothes, and t fuller, easier, betler life for his wife. Believe me. the wives here liki that, and spur then men on. Of course, the theorists, who now have too much power In the shaping of our lives in Britain, will hold p ihoir hands in horror. cry "How wrong It is to put *< much emphasis in life on money An Ideal But Is it? The mere accumulation of money may not perhaps oe the highest ideal in life. Bui isn I the establishment of your family on a higher standard of life an Ideal of some value: Isn't it a worth-while thing to work for? Isn't ll better to use your brains and energy lo lift yourself to greater comfort and the happmesthat goes with il than lo be conItnt lo stick in the sludge, taking By ECONOMIST This subject has received a fair amount of publicity In the Press recently and the importance of the coconut tn this connection hag been stressed. It may be of Interest to review briefly some of the other sources of supply, such BS the whale, the West African oil palm and the olive. Whale Oil This Is no flsh story literally or figuratively since the whale is a giant mammal. Some opinions from literature in regard lo Us size: "If we compare land mam"mals in respect to magnitude • %  with those that take up their "abode in the deep, we shall find "they will appear contemptible "In the comparison—the whale Is doubtless the largest animal in "creation;" again, "the aorta of a "whale is larger In the bore lhan "the main pipe of the waterworks "at London bridge," and again, "the whale's l.ver was two rart"loads." The great mammul has attracted attention from the beginning of history. The Books of Genesis, Job, Jonah, the Psalms and Isaiah seem to carry the earliest references and Ihe word Leviathan is often used to describe its greatness and size. Historians poets and prose writers down to the present daj have derived %  certain enchantment from the whale. Who' lore :t its Ix^t Is probably to be found in the story of Moby Ulrk by Herman Melville. Ceiology. lhat branch ol HOlogv concerned with Ihe whale. has assumed on Increased interest in recent years as a result of the importance attached to whale oil and the intense competition among nations which has developed In the polar regions in Ihe pursuit of the mammal. Modern whaling ships are really floating factories designed for the application of the most efficient methods in the catching and disposjl of the carcases. Even the meat may find more general use as a substitute for beef than In the roeanl past when, in the main, it was dried and ground and used partly as manure and partly for mixing wllh cuttle foods. It is on record that whale meat was eaten by the ancient Romans, the Saxons and the Normans. In the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries in England, whale meat not infrequently figured on the Royal table and at civic feasts. It is • l very palatable iy those who have euten It and whcii whaling was carried on In the West IndH-". Ihe meat was trtaifdl USWd and relished as food. Originally, whale oil was besi known as an Ulumlnant and lubricator, and before Ihe introduction of gag light was used in the lighting of towns and in lighthouses; as a lubricant it found its %  way into heavy machinery and even In the more delicate work* of watches. To-day. among its other uses. tl> forms a valuable component of culinary fats and related compounds. Students of West Indian history and economics—the older heads at any rate—will recall the visit of Dr. Louis Sambon to these. parts on a medical research mission. In the 'Empire Review' (1913). Sambon contributed an interesting article on West Indian whaling based on a visit tn the Station then in exlhtenee In Speightstowti. The article describes the methods used and the r>pecles of whale involved. He writes: "The whale which srlsitg Barbados is the Humpbacked Whale (Metapsexa Veemabilb , m Ono* %  •• 11. orders from an all powerfu bureaucracy, which is the life that is held up to us as ideal? Do you remember the ol I song :— %  '.Vllivr and pold. stleer and oo'd, "EVcryones searrMna; for stiver and i/old. 'Buf ff uou're alone u>h<-n you are "You'll never flnd eotriforl in silver and poid." Do ycu believe thai it Is better lo be old and poor than old and comfortably cushioned? Amcif ie dont. and neither do I. I am certain beyond all doubl thai if *e could raplure some of the antbitlon of Amssiong to Hit themselves OK swiftly as they can to a higher standard of life and ihe determination with which UVy put their backs into Ihe job of doing it, we could pull our grs.'id old country* out of the me i it is In before many years have passed, and begin to taste a lite thai we would enjoy far better than our present one. Grit. Courage In the streets of AAsSsrsOaB lOWisf. istrssj a,,a gSJIftll gusts), la* Prove lajgwcy a prosperity UMI uui you.ii ->t DOOM ssjsjggiuojrtsu) .,js iHvii known. It Okay be a superficial BtO> parity, uuue recession 104111 •wees it away and AIIU-IK%  IsVai os' rsgAI to be a iill.c nervoub U sM ySJSsTI ju>| -ne.ul. i.ui a is a gsTOajjgggji worm hguiing tu preserve, and utvy w.u u B nt 10 preserve it and even II with grit and courage. Moss 1 it nu-i.1,1 in tia ,.., eg) UVM ol ma %  young and oiu, Usty are far beAU#> Oresseu Ulan British women. There are two rOsssBSM IW thai uresses aie tu...,,., ..fie. ..mi tney can bg tMHMghl oil ItUj peg in a range of inour" and sizes far beyond anything obtainable in Hut.111. A cotton frock that can bt bought here for £3 would. I am loid, coal £8 in London. And the style here is far, far better. With dollies so cheap, the working girl of America accumulates a wardrobe far largei than her sisters in Britain eve; dream of having. As one gir., with a kl of bolh countries, described ll to mo : "In England you car •tparate girls Into classe* by thi amount of clothes they have. Ilu in America all women turn encimous wardrobes, and then clothes ire much more original and daring In cut and colour tha 1 Uie clothes of British girls." Cowl ol Beauty On a scale far beyond the British girl, the American glil buys accessories. She spends, toe far more on cosmetics and beiul. treatments genera. Iy. and lookinfinitely the better for It. It costs the American typl.t Jus', under £3 to have her bun rut, shampooed, and net. bu as her salary runs from £2 : upwards, It isn't a very heuv: bin den mi her. I rarely see women here gOpOll their make-up 111 public. .1He do so often in Britain. And the 'Tower Hoom" l< which they retire '<> do It is DOW renamed the "Gossip Room." Food Is very expensive should say that the working gin here spends far more lhan tlir entire weekly wage of a comparable British girl on her food. But she grls far more attractive foods. There is s mut* greater variety In cooking her. than in England. Diet Sliinmers We are inclined to rcgar. Ami rloj an a land of atcuk*. wiiiil it is. But 11 is far more 1 land 0 nrogtdsshfUl light salad meals, mor> original and attractive lhan anything we know at home. And women here. I should g l |f*j just as sliinniing-diel OOfl •clous as British women. The American woman's hotm -ID which she spends much loo than .111 English woman '.1 lytlllng III ll to make HO easy. Tbc kitchens are modern Ml beautiful, with refrigerator* freeze IMIXCS. washing and iron ing machine-, whuh lake tkfei drudgery out of house work am '.iiv the housewife lime to tin more Joy In life. The domestic help problem 1 of course, even more dtfftcul Mr* ban in England, but th ^nodes-nisation of the home makes it of less concern. A llvlng-in maid expects aboi £30 a month, with food. And Manner* There Is far less drinking in America than in Britain. Onl twice have I heard wliv ordered In a restaurant, and Ihe number of men who drink milk with their meals is astonishing to a British visitor. Manners, too. are strikingly different. A British reporter tells me lhat when he was In a crowded Miburban train and offered hi: neat to an elderly woman, thi people in the compartment seemed astonished. The woman increase his confusion by saying: "Hov nice It Is to meet a real English •.•nth-man." Another British visitor tells m that when he sat down at a tabl m an hotel tap room, and, to as%  Ist the busy barman, lifted a few empty glasses from the table to the bar as he could normally have done in England, the barman said with surprise; "In 20 years here. this is the first lime thai has happened to me." The Americans like us. but certainly think we arc an odd lot In tome ways. I-E.S' LA PARISETTE SHOES FOR INFANTS in Whit*. Pink. Blue. Black Patent many attractive styles CHILDREN'S SLIPPERS in Blue~& Red from K.59 to -.:::" CAVE SHEPHERD & CO., LTD. 10: 11, 12, & 13, Bioad Street. AUTOBRITE" (NEW SILICONE PROCESS) CAR POLISH This entirely new product contains 4% Sllicones which impart a glass-hard Polish impervious to torrential rain, blistering sun and corrosive salt air. One application will give your car a Kleaminp; mirror-like surface which will last for months. It's easy to use too! Just spread it on—then wipe it off. "AUTOBRITE IS GUARANTEED TO OUT-SHINE AND OUT-LAST ANY CAR POLISH YOU EVER USED. BUY A BOTTLE (5/6) TODAY! OBTAINABLE ONLY FROM— HARRISONS SOLE LOCAL DISTRIBUTORS DIAL 3142 or 2364 1 For relief/hm ASTHMA -one small tablet acts quickly and e ffectively !. '"THE Kph+r"K crcstmni for Asrhoas it as sunplr, to qua*, so cmxnyc All you do is rwaUow one small ubkt, and relief starts almost atnmediately. Ephaxooc contains several nesltog agents which sre rdessed OD reaching the Horn sob and start to dissolve die germ-laden sccumuUuoos which congest tbc bronchial tubes. This Kicntilnjlly bslsBCcd preparation brings the boon of easy breathing, and has the additional advantage of safeguarding the mknd from the dread of those sudden nerve-racking onUsughts. There a nothing to fear when Hphasone tablets arc to hand I There is iMKhing to iniect, nothing u> inhale Hphazonc has succeeded In cases of Asthma, Bronchitis and Bronchial Catserh which previously seemed hopeless. Waal a has done for others, ft can do for you I FOR ASTHMA AND BRONCHITIS TAKE tU k| ill n|utfM eh,",t. If %  ,, Jiffaull,. >,n, UI ft. s HtDtM. ft UftS LTD. P.O. BM *ftl. ft.il IV due 10 IruIigcttioQ. iry jut ONE IHSI-. .>( MAt IJ AN BRAND STOMACH POWDER' Tim Kirntili.olly balanced formula gives you really qua.*, rebel' It also available in TABLET' fossa. MACLEAH BRAND Stomach Powder (OLE 1GENTS t ****— co "BrlJrrlon.—Bjrb.iLEAiDERS in QUALITY DRUGS and LEADERS IN SERVICE. When rvcrv miriule If precious . Whrn factor is them


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TACT FOIRTFXV SINDAV ADVOCATE SIN'DAY. AUGUST 1. 1152 CLASSIFIED ADS. TFLEPHONt 2501 THANKS I wnr* T-. v AUTOMOTIVE I <> %  < SAI.I: irrortrRn TRUCKS 1 ton and 3 ten nth and without Baton lm ap s ed' now Courtesy Garage Dial U jfilH t*ll< 1J-.Kll.t.iliod, w-o •. Ml.. life rofc lu. I'anr. MONT*. Through Oil. fWldow Drnnl.. Wish to Ihank III im In the trer asus* death Hum* ipalntrr. 91 Philip I 31 J UMLU-Wt bra to thank all that* wh attended it.. I moral aim in other i) gfcowrd mpathy to m In our r*oei OtlMvrilKMl Lrgali*. Family. De,.rella Road ia a u in rHCI-I-11*The l.mil. of MM linilii, ,k> lo all li %  Hm.lr.1 ot aenl wrealh •nd atkai token* <>I %  10 %  33in IN MKMOUAM •ITJ-SN In kmn| memory of Clirirt %  Miilrn -ho died on AMt aw .i i %  •ar* Bum and h Augu.t unto him, Hah, -hi 1690 Vaunhall Wvvrrn <>l)M.0D> driven. II i William.. William. Court". 1 Sayea Courl. GOvctnirnni Faint, Church iBua Slop 10 %  I in inert I of .econd hand -rd — ii aaaoo. it a.ou. 1341 BUu.dard It l*tl AuiUD A-40 1 lrelect tVOM. lip 1700 00. 1MB Ltd, Plm I hi WAVTIII COOK-OENERAI 'o li homt Appl< Mating Wwdiv-r. Abb*.ill* G I'IKf.ir HALES AUCTION %  iwatruuna or vwrseu* client* I wlb %  II at m MART VICTORIA ST TUTS. BBtatlal • looa* laaf LJt lljJtjl, Binders. %  •* %  looer Or package CBTLON Tea. %  Mi 1 burnrr and alnglr all atovra EXPSSUENCED SHORTHAND TYHBT RttMrigh Ulrvcir Harcult. Carrier Bicycle, '.'h -I .peed rrqiitred *b*e to pet Fiwrtrh Puadn. Canvai Cot A Fra'tie. on own IMUativr Apply or tetter to G E Refrigerator. Singer Trwadl. International Trading Corporation Ltd Machine with Motor at IJftal. Small Cateridge Street. %  ridgetesgm. I lath*. 4', II F Gasolene Enji NOTICE Wi baj U esrUfy owr Irsanda end uagomer* thai wa will a* closed aw .Hobday tha tU, of Anfun Re-opening e.e.MV an a aajwete ignMlaw. Fine*a, Haiti Tlkta. at TM SBVCER II HP Car In food -ja^ MISCELLANEOUS H OAROFNEB — rW>n iwnnai inn i lie* their Inauffeiu I decrnl Fa mil* Requirii. %  erven t Write ~t~ a Advooala A I'ERMf.Vtl. Ti.e aMaj r warned J id .ig I • ... ntxriN' MORRIS 4*n, Chryalar. Dial 4a Ml*. VAN-10 II I' roadaon Van paaaad liur.iporl Board Tail and Uranaad. Na Batkarj and la par fact lunnlnd ndar Dial 3M>. Royai Slora No. IS HiCh < ATI'D Thr public are Brrrbv . OKI rtr.ln to rn> WIU ADA Mill roKD mar SOaVJUti aa I do not n-,id "|>U rr-ponalbla for har or adyonr plaa coMrBTting n v dobt or datou In m namr unloaa by a wrlttari order . I.INOH'OnD Tlir.orHM.I'^ Capt I T nounr wa win am n i.i"ili at Aahbury. SI. Ororar. which include! \ try Niro Oininir Tnblr iRaat 10), CarVM Hall Taalri and Chair iJacoaoan ifhl Chan. Waaaron. liquor Caar. Seivin*. T.Lle. Double and Single and Courhoo and laptaaa. Pembroke Table, r.ook*aae al-aa Door.. Chalra. Rnekert. ornaaaaul and KMn*' Table., flat Top Peak. RaooWlna Drak Choir. ChrrTonwr • il in Mahan> BribUr Chair: Olaaa and China. Braaa CandlralKka. Art Srorplon 9or>na. Ftrnch Maiblr Clock. PVrturaa and old ITvnU: Braaa %  tandard Imo. Ian* C>p Bnokahalf: Pin* Preaa. ; laird -i.d fttlv.r Wi.rr. Braaa BawM. IP Hot Water Diah and Cover. Laaauaar Taa Bar lai|r Trlratvpo and itand with aM Iraaaa. ftmalr Mahoff Bedatead. Bad 4 SprlnK Kcrreii. M T Waahatanda. Ir'd Praaa. l.inrn Piraa. I_1> > Dot* Hrpplr White Chaal of Drawrra all In Mahocan*: While Palnlrd Cedar Prrta -mid. Prrra: raafdhii War* Kltchon Jlrnaila. T-blr.: l-aidrr. Scale* Unrn. >OVant Pota. Palm*, biographical Haga%  naa and other Itrina SaW 11. M rtarajj CAJB1 BKANKEE. TROTMAN g. CO. Auflloncem ELECTRICAL If) pprBMli RIP %  arroatng mother. C. G an ibrotna*' r*rWrl'H Ii, hning mrmc of .. deal fgpabarld ..i>d l.lhrr Pirhininc! Eat* Irk Who fell ...ir.p on n Auguat. M Oonr but can nevrr br fn got ten l>) Baatrtcf..ink iwilei Amy BMwttk i Mater i AKrrd Eatwlrk ..en MarlvrW CtWIck. Gooding. RolUn* and Noldai fafrpl} 10 fl 51—In lOllil In loving inrmotT Molhrr Mrlrr,.. PVrdr. late Ft Mclhodlat Church, all OS Augu.l 10. 1091 Aateep in God. beautiful Gai Away l/oru auirow ..nd pain -tome da* when llf-'a pmimei radnl Wa/11 rr.r*t vnu dear mother Nurte Carter and relatlvea 10.1. my. deai il preach•II atlrep RFTKIcritATOB. t %  .ondilli.n. ullractlvr a houaawlfr Appl> c.o Street Dial TTOl M 1 In RrrBK.ICRATrm Small Wwllngh. !" n. Refrtgorator in perfect working ndiilnn Owner buying larger one. Phone BMW IP I 3S" PITBLIC SALES REAL ESTATE nrpeuraM con Tlartroliia iLampi io ralrh Apply. U Hirtai Dial Htl. Hppi %  ( pawd i..Mi..n. prtei Millar. Reed 10 I U—In LIVESTOCK COW—One Ouernaev Cow ti mlk Ind calf. Apply Dodrldge i*-r Club Morgan Gap. Clapham. !"• WARNER—In l.,vn„ moo dear daughter and -later > who depnrtrd thu life oj 1MB at the tendrr age ot ten Fond in tna link which It br.uean Door to Hi* one who I* gone an memory we will nrvrr forget Aa long a the yeari roll on Kver lo ba iniinnbared by hei knrlna parant. Genre,' W.nnrr i lathri Ilia Wain* imoihri'. Jean. Patrieia. Kalhlrei lllatara'. Ormgr jiu ibrotbrri. Arlhu •nd Rrate Prateod -unain' 10 S U—Jn Ml It HtM HOUSES AtVecuvr raaaide Flat main toad lla. Rnga, romfarialily furnuiied. Kngli. Baih. Open verandah facing a SulUPi ore prraon lor couplei. From Auguit i Trlephone 1MB IB 0 SS--I f r toll-, i I HtKk p .-Nag 130 to € io a.iu BUfVOAliiW -Attractive fma Burtgt low at the Coral Baal Club, BtJfunaa al aprrtai rummrr rate. Containing tw double bedroom, and all conventrnci Mcall wllh arrvlra auppllrd Apply Ialanagriaaa or Phone 0IT1 ^^ —Unfuintthad. fraui lat Bapt At Bharlngham Gardent. Magwrll Coaat Attractive wall Bungalow. 1 be-' rocrna. Oaragr and Batvanla' roorr Cood Sea bathing Phone 8. Daniel 4101 lor appointmrnt. > %  9a— 1 f n et Apply MlBecklM Rd. 3 %  : % %  : %  >< %  FIJKTS Two FtaU. ana X badroomi at Road, Phone l bet 10 I --LAS CAMI'ANAS runil.hed frfi IS Abg *ltiia1ri1 Irrt Avmur ll-II-vll rpntatnlng 1 Brdi-nm*. Living Beoi KlMBm, Bath. Tollal with Fronl ai Back Varandaha Oarage. Woahi— SarvgntaDoom Wllh Balh In yard. For Particular, pi nd Toll, 3TSS i as-Bi OGF*N SPBAV Flat No 3. on i pea with all inodrrn conventencea tlndlng T'lrphonr Dial 1MB for 'Ivr (il AlaaUan lh.pa 3 r a. O C. Bnthwaiic HagaotU St. Aridlew. 9 H S3* POULTRY III KLJMOl ..i n iih. Mr. Harold MECHANICAL CAMERA En.l i BUI jnw-i,' S081 MACHINE—One ewlng Machine ipply to Weet O I'-l. .IT %  good • Navy MISCEJJ^NEOUS Al.COCINB-Wilnvr Itl Mock At/iiCINf it concenualad Chill uU rrar Drink for lionet. Catllr. Stieai.. iga and Ooatl Price Vbog iSKHITfl LTD .'n IMIqll. of draft drarrlptlon, GUM. nlna. old JaweU. flna Silver WaterASK TIIBM Our R, %  Ida and Private Agenta II lr a Buyer', or Seller' o* Abreu. a Trained Auctlanrer A R-al 1-ti.Ie Brokrr Mutt and Will alwava ld wllh Atti — uve PTlcaa. Re-Sale Value. r.nd Batlafactlon %  awl Three Five — I Almoal Saw i Hedroom iwlth Rn-a. Slona Bungalow. Alumutum Hoof, Trallete. Slor.r flaracA Srrvant • Room. about 7.000 ao. fl AT HAVSWATER NEAR a: IBM I AT WORTHING MAIN BW. — Facing Sea. Rlght-of-Wav lo Sea. A 1 Bedroom Bungak Good tot Roon flleakfai flJOO a NEAR NAVV OABDINR A 3 Bedroom iwlth Baaina A rupboardgl l ong Bungalow, about d ii Old. Brerlte Bouf. t Totlate •erage A Servant t Room, about 11,000 u ft Goutg far -bout gl.ioo . AT iiiVT IMU. AlPioat New 3 Redio.-m Partly Stone. BdMaMrw. st,.r,.Gang*. Ilona Encloaora. Convrnirnota, about .000 arj. ft.. Going for ..W.I £IP IN MAHOGANY LANE A I Badage wllh Land. Drawing A Room.. Shrdroof A Kitchen attacbM, Vary Good Condition, Yield. II'. oo P m Going for aboui |30t IN HKlXCVILLX Two Bungalow Typo Ha.ldrnrra ion* haa t Bedroom*, HI* other haa . both Open to Reasonable inter. AT HASTING* SFAStPr OIJVE BOUGH IN TUDOR ST Bu.lnaa* Framlae* A Re-iU.mr IN NE3.SON T — A 1 Bedroom rotUge alto a BualnaM Prrmme. A Re.ldan,^ THB BBJHDU1-UM of RECII TCIlE AND Tnn SWINGS S.LZNTI V AND SIOJW1.Y BUT SURH>Y AND INEXORABLY Pleaaa C M* but leave Baromrtrr and Corkarrrw at Ilomr Io Not bo Tidal, If and whea U re Almoal Anything in Real Eatate Nearlr Anywhere and Anywhrn BY THE VFRY LIGHT YOUR RETINA SEC TO DIAL 3111 Call ut Rough.' Ha.tlnga. Ne.tr Pnvlllo, Look for My Sign UNDER THE SILVER HAMMER n Thuraday Uth by ordai Ear-otoia lo Ihr Eitate of the S A Eatrrbrouk r will wll the Furnltuiw '.lrh I* both modern and antique ,1 Alexandrian Court. White Part Road II includes Old Colonial Pedealal Dining Table, ,.prlght Chair.. Mlr'd and DBBM Sideboard.. China Cabinet, Red. Ornament A Pembroke Table.; Round Tip TOP Tat..l*rgr fc^kara. UpnoB tot* A Pir Dlru Chum; Flat Toj Desk. Contrrbnr> Shrrnloo Booh Caal .H. gtea. Door. A E*crlli>lrr: Small Antique Sofa* all in old Mahogany: CarSri Rug.. Some ..d tlU. Md Cnliia. Sliefflrld A Plated Ware. Diah CoverTpa Service. Good T.peMry. Clock Old-WlndMi A enrrry Tro* Chair.. Dinner Service .To oleeetl n SyW| n *' lnl Tall Po.t A Splndl* Carved old mahog Re dot end.. Spnrrga A Mattr*—r. Ilepplrw of Th< Pt T BH-M' i\9TH v ES "firnry Pirturw twHa • 1 NOTICE IMPERIAL OFTR-AL gwiggrtaera. annual haBdA-. from A .f..'t to Saturday 3* ~" Type* of teaaUa. Era' I 31 li. NOTlCw. The WOMEN S SELF HKLe> AASOCIATiOM will bo cloaed on Wrdneaday ITth end Th..rday 3fRh AutTual IBM, for Si.*k-taaimg. Aa flom lrt SapUpabar Ihr •.ibaciipuon will ba U B Rag y*U 10 %  SB Jn NOTICE FABIIB OF T TBOMAB Ttte Parochial OfBre will be caoaad on Tue*da> 3th Auguat and Tucaday ITth AuBUwt r r. PILGRIM. parochial Troaaurer. NOTICE STUB ITRGIaeVON'g DBI' at lager Hi Wa beg lo notify ... friend, -nd ti gouaral public that our buMbeaa will be cloood aa from Sunday, loth Auguat Id Sunday 1*U •••-• InclUalvr Pleatr ."agi *oar ah ap pm DAISY FBBiaUfl NOTICE FAB1SB OF l-BBIST CHITM B APFTOCATTONs for the port of Storekeeper. Ch Ch Alm.bou** .MarNed •Appllcationa*'! will ba received %  W.lrhe.. Ch Ch. up AiupjX. IMS Tarma and condltl the Parochial Office Churrhwaiden. plS 1)1 rUN SURTKISlNv. tauw quKSBJ haKka.faa. itiH. nhini muiciod or toinit. rtuabotjo. rtwugnAUc paint BTMI CDmrann urinary munie* lue !o irnpunriaja in the blood <*r> b* caraycuene Strun,. wlivr kadeatya la%  uorij your hawlth by nmnuus bnpuritin and tuiroful wsiic* OPJ Of IBB lyatan. WtRrD tUncv action 11 'ni.lequgir iml failto nlier the bloovt properly, • in and dRMSBBBBB in caucnl toiilu '-—• BBctocLeKiJi.c; -rw JwHS M. Itl \H4ffS r •. A.r^.. F.VJL BEW-DBIVC Ltatlnio of GBOXI CIABB PriHM-rly sad Land Alwgyi AvaiUblr Pub i'tina bsppy rruc/ by hc.pina i.i ilea-ite the kidney film and ao aumulaiin, tbdr action. Vou OAD fT-ly upon thai aroil nuaiB diuretic and ttrt naaTy a:i:ic[*ii. Many tnoutanda of gniilil men and women tare ii-itine.t io !hg good baaldt %  hcT have regained by lafcin* IXwn't Pilki. DAckAchg KidaavPUUl SHIPPING NOTICES LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE Th* application of Cleopatra Springer of Round-the-Town. 91 Polar. the ptirrrtaaer of Lvaiiot IJrenar No 000 of ROYAL NETHERLANDS STEAMSHIP CO. %  AlUKIi FROM EISOFE S S BORKOOP, lat Augutt. ltal M S BONAIRE. Sth Auguat. laSt. M S STENTOR llnd Augu.t. 1RW M R HERA. BUh Augual. 1M1 SAiUM, TO BCBOFE MS WDJJCMSTAD. 13th August. 1NJ •A1UN4 TO TBJNIOAD. FARAMAKItH AND BRITISH GUANA M S NESTOR. Bth Aiiguat. IMI M S BONAHIE. IMh Auguat.. ltal M S STENTOR, Mh September. IBS! -HUM. TO TRINIDAD A CI-BACAC S BOSKOO*\ lath August. IBU. I S. HERA. ISth Saplerubrr. IM3 I. F. MCMON. ROM A CO.. LTD L Presa, MillUav Ch* 'A'aiiis t a fid. Single Bed.te-d. SpHnl aM : %  bad) Flrctrli -•ot* BR A Sfc t R TROTMAN AaU %  hlna>r .hap with ..Itached at Rount and lo UM il al premise* Dalrd Ihlr — August. 1033 Sgfl.i ROLAND ITTWARDS. for CLBOPATTtA SPRTNGtR ApplKsnt Ag. JMHee MaglstrL._. N B —Thi. appUcatiod will ftldrred Ut S U.en.lng Courl li on Wedrwaosw. th August. II o'rlock am be hold _.. I0M. at Court., District HOHMTUDT COURSn -OR GENERAL CERTinCATl of T OJ' CAMBRIDGE SCHOOL HIGHH SCH. CERT. Wobwy H.H. CKfordjan t V^^SS^T^fT<^£ -teT^-SS WOLSEY HALL, OXFORD 'a.h. ItathiHebii ir.'i.-M,. <,', %  copper in lw -. m 0-4 -c %  ANAAN Cattle %  lertrlclly and tunning; fiirmaheil What i Tclephon* 0117 OKX3LNWICH tad Avanud, BBla*le. Two itoray heuaa on 4,103 Bg. ft. d. with I large algy bodrooma, drawJ and dlnrng roorns. Kltchanelta. Waahioom, Servants Boom and Oarage. Wide open gallery lacing nice lawn and .mall garden. Apply Q. Webster Phone SIM or 4TM. ling Boat I* ft 1 gear Apply to __ Uai. CMld Criardi Eagle Hall. Alklnt Oap irtlora. differantlala ton Austin lorrii lanager. Todda Eats ia. generators, ind other parts • Apply to— a, st John. INTITINATIONAL TORNADO K M nsoii neareat Owner leaving ULand nqulrkM YaabS Club. IMW lai Kwri.LB"—W. ksrr* la -lock Kwclla" for the pre-rentlon of all forma .f Iravel aicknraa when rouineylog by *ea. Air, o* Car Prksa SVBOB. KNIGHT'S LTD. %  • 33—3* "OIMENTAI, TOUnO-—For th* RalrK.pari* a ailkllk* soflncM and hrtl!Ianf?v nd kaeps II well groomed ObtainabU i KKiGHTS LTD • %  .W-3n PRAM High .pr black perambuli net! i iram wllh maltresa. tun Car mesa. Offers around MS at) P Blni %  ALB 3IT Knights Ltd *U B'doa lea Co: LU. 303 Central Foundry Ltd. 13-1 W 1 Biscuit Co; Ltd. nil Plantation. Ltd 141 B'doa Shipping A Trading Co. Ltd. The above (haree will ba set up lor sals by public carnpeUtion al our OaRae, Jane. Street, Bridgetown, on Friday 3th Auguat, IH1 at 1 p in YXARWOOD A DOYCE SolKlUira I will offar for %  %  HRIGHTWOOD" alluaU On th* .eaSlate ut st. Lawrenc*. Chiut Church, minding 0B W.Oat asHiar* feel of land. The llouaa oantatna Ihree aWbBRaaMna. drawing, dining and living room, gan and isrvanta rooms with electric Hi and water ihroughoul Inspection awpaw^ataaant. pAana RMS brvws.n hems of t and II a.m. Th* above will ba aet up lor sale Public Competition on Friday, the lain dav of Auguat litol. at 3 p m at OtTr* &f thr undersigned CABBING TON HEALT. Laaaa Stern JT.7 331J svrtXKaHT 00 %  n..g and SteriTK al cornet of obuilding called Ihi EKY wllh all i.Ulatloiia aatuala lion and Mar Cottage adjon W.C. il Bath %  rcliic light and *-indins on Delam.r.Band. Marimd.:Road lnd rent III 10 par quail, ipectlon any day on aaftsteaUon preailaes .ondRloni Kriislo Dl. Tha Coltsg* called "V1SBY" flALL ROAD lobllqualy "P nirance to •'Waterloo-*'. Rl with 13.OT3 aguare fact ol 1*1 1 which about 34BB) aquar miitabta for Kitchen Gardan ilktel drawing and dln>r*e askaaraaraa lane wtUi Tig room I. RJtehan ate u. and Governraant Watei UUaal, li.rpartlon on applleanar. Tha above prnperay will be tet .ia h. paabUo OaBBBaBatten al our o-Hc. RUwrt. BrlAap^wn. on -THURSDAY loth August at 3 p ia YRABWUOI) A BOYCB, %  aaajBN 3.R.33 That drsliabl* reardenre callad "! DAIAYalluate In Abbovlll* I Worthing, 'near Rockier Bench, on 11*11 square feel of land. H built of atone and conta gallar.. drawing .md dining bedrooms, running woiar i kitchen, toilet and balh. Oarage. aervania* room* .ind wrvanU' toilet In yard. Sevrral fruH tr*e* InapacUon by appoinlm*>u I Tn* abov* will bas aat up io public lorn petit ion at our omc. Street on Frtday. **nd Augu.t. CAHRTNOTON A SEALY. tOBsBBBI 10 %  33— ECLAIRS i> tf each AHB/VIIU'JY AKERIES I 11 li. Dial 4758 JAMES STREET ttltt aocsisx GOLF CLUB ANNUAL ntsLD DAY Sunday, Aug. lOlh. at 2 p.m. PrtNtenlation of Prizes Compsplttions and Re>fTCshmpnts Members and thei invited The M V cepl Cargo Dominic*. Antigua. NWa and St. Kltts • day llth loan The M "CAKIbBEJt" win .<•o -nd Pnaaangwr* for AnUg-ua. Montaerral. d St. Kitta. Muling B W.I. 0CBOONRR OWNIM' ASSOCIATION flNCl t'.ntlni" Teleybsae Ne M1 FOR SALE Canadian National Steamships LADY NXLBON CANADLSN CRU1SEK CANADIAN CONSTIU5CTO* LADY BjaDHBT CANADIAN CHAL.LXNGER LADY NXLSON NORTHBOUND I-ADY RODNBY CANADIAN CHAIJ-ENGER IJUJY NBLB OW CANADIAN CBAJISBTH CANADIAN CONSTRUCTOR IADY RODNEY . _.. CANADIAN CHALXXNGER LADY NELBON Satts %  Alls Raits Arflsee %  alia l.atreal B.llfa. aUkade. 1 Aug4 Aug • Aug 11 Aug. 13 Aug. 11 Au 11 Aug. M A-.g M Aug. n Aug. IS Aug. SSop.t 4 Sap. 3S*pt • Sept • Bapt IT Sept. IS Sept. 11 Sept It Sept 34 Sept 13S*pt 33 Sept Sept 17 Sept • Oct. I OCI. Arrlrc %  alia Arrives Arrive. Afrtrra Raabagaa Beataa Bsllfas Meolre.l 1 Aug. Ml Aug. 13 Aug 11 Aug M Aug. 1 atept ..i AsM 30 Aug. t Sept. 11 flept ltftept 10 Sent 30S*Pt33 ttepl IB Sepi l*Sept I.TR f Of 30 Sept. 11 Oct. %  HI 91 Oet14 Oct M Oct. 31 Oct. M Oct. 31 Oct. Nov. LAND. TWO-DBIDE ROAD On main road wllh 101' frontage Ideal altuallon for bin mew. premise*. Total area 11.133 ao> IL BUSINFJIB ITrrMlaTsBV -DWejt.V* IM; KOI SI: IUIFIICCK STREET Good alluauon foe retail shop In thta busv pan of town. C3.000 swFJCTt-IXLJ). St. Feter — An estate t>pr house built of alow*. Contains large living room with FretMh windows leading; onto covered trraiidaha with view at %  ra 3 bedroorna. kilrhrn. store loom* and usual il lB i glH aR gl garage and acivanl.* nuartcr. Appro-. 1*. acre* w*ll laid *Aat ground* "itli nghl of way over vl*w. oaup. 3Vj miles I cam Kiau*>town. 100 yard. ARuatle Club Iteach wllh enceUenl %  wlrosnteg. 3-4 bed looms. I baihrooma. large loung* iB) a Itl. Verandah %  F lv.. adRaj COVE SPRING HOUSE. ST. JAMES One of the tew propit completely private and aeclilded bathing bearb The grounds of about II. arrca are well wooded and could readily be converted lnlo one of the .how place* ot the Istond Th* hotiar Is of 3 storey* and p oaata n i noticeable SEA FORT. ST JAMES Cur. 'fully te-nv>delled 3 ito.t. Iiouae on on* of tha most attractive aite* rar.dab* OB both | AJliatrF*r farBaar parHawlars, agalr '%  GARDINER AUSTIN & CO Intercolonial Table Tennis South Trinidad vs. Barbados F l > % %  II and •arrant %  • quartan. eBSSh NEW BUNGALOW, HOCKXEY— Commotlioua home wllh 3 bedloom.. Urge living room, wide verandah with good view, kitaban. pantry, aervanu' quarters and %  tofrroomaOood iituaUon near Golf Count fct.JOt' NEWTON LODGE. MAXWELL COAST — Solidlv lon.lKtrted atone House rontalnlrag *nrlosed Builrrir.. ap^oou. ilt.ti.uig login I.I.U diiiina room, and birakia.t loom. J Uouiownuk 3 aaragc *tc Lately occupied by U.S. Consul. A 8.000. RESIDENCE. THE GARDEN. WORTHING -Modern bungalow on corner aite with wide frontages I'lr.unt garden, in .i.. lawn. number of bearing ilt tro**. Accommodation %  gf living room, covered gallery. 3 bedrooms with built-in 4rob*a, well filled kiieben. laiage with covered, i. rvanta' quarlen and all usual .meat All public utility eerUce*. Thla proprrtv llghesl rrtummauUm Augutt : Mon. 11 vs. Pelican. VYednesdsy 13 Y.M.P.C. UarnnFrlday 15 vs. Colony. Monday 18 vs. Everton. Wedneiitlav 20 vg. Colony. Friday 33 vs. V.MC'.A. Monday 2S vs. Colony. ADMISSION : (lub Matches I/Test Matches :i •reason TlckeU 13/6 /////^ivVe


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si NDAY, u CUM lu. 1*2 [DAY ADVOCATE PACF TiilRTFX.V HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON FLINT OF THE FLYING SQUAD BY ALAN STRANKS & GEORGE DAVIES BLONDIE BY CHIC iWJNG FLASH GORDON KY DAN BARRY [I%  .* llir JOHNNY HAZARD BY FRANK ROBBINS BRINGING UP FATHER BY GEORGE MC. MANUS w,7 CUPB l 1 our eEHG A**3VBy Bv <.XI> RIP KIRBY BY ALEX RAYMOND / V'O^-TA 5OH a ^. ^ / TU*N TO 93 -<5 T C ^ r \\ T**I IT TO •< OCLLVBIIN'A \ Vroess's BOOM! J A-,..I-< T-E \ e^-r i iix i* tw*r*t y f sr *^ 7 -.; SSTI*! SOT A t3E Tiu. Pft&AH /tJJ* coves c" THE PHANTOM BY LEE FALK ft RAY MOORES % %  AND %  • %  'OIAMAtitfONiIAPEATMHI FIMI STYLE 10MHHII A AD VALUE BUYA RELIANCE SHIRT OltlAiX \ltl i: AT ALL LEAHLVG STORES is is tkfeft to the Lale Kin* G*rr* VI oidonV Stands SuptetHO. IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Thursday to Saturday only SPECIAL Oil I.HS arc now available al our Hranrhrw WhinPark. I n. IISMI. SHi|liliown and Kvoan Strrrt Corn Klakrc Hlue MminlHin C'ofTe*— I lb. Pkgo I IM.IKI Powder Lohsler — Tins Mayonnaior GiiHva Jelly — Tim I'sually M 1.5.1 .SI .74 .32 1.44 ,4K U .4K .24 IIADIMM'K KII-I'KIH BACON SLII'KIl HAM SALAMI .SAUSAGE* HACSAfiES ANCHOVIES ANCHOVIES TUBES PATE-DC-rOllt — TIM KRAFT < in I SI rkd 1 .M .44 IIS pot lb. 111 110 .00 .44 ooo Till .! prr Tube 11.40 10.10 S.15 .43 per P>C. D.'V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad,Street GUINNESS STOUT FOR STRENGTH "**u3KOto& C F. HARRISON & CO. (BARBADOS) Ltd. P.O. BOX 304 BARBADOS





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PAGI SUNDAY ADVOCATE M NDAV, AUGUST 1*. IW VI s/4 llll ilKIS BKmoirrowN . HD1 11 a sao p.m. %  in 8IC. I III I I > Ihr BARBAUn LILLI MARLENE i i .1 Add-d .l • %  I'HIk t.VKMNt. J PH. MOMIAV A II £*!>*. aa* 1U .i CINTUKY FOX 4 VMBISI nillKWt STARNIN'; JMMI )-M. I ART IIAOEN The True Rlory ol the Cenvici I wYut made History', most famous Con tutait t #. i in: \ t H t:s oi mnc dM an in' IIM w • I 1 — 4 B# I•. II 111 i %  VWAHtl -P.litci4 HEUINi 1*1 I \\<\ AM. i III HANDII EllTH iHVlW ACIIOBATS 'I'NBIBCXIVKB MAN' Bag lltVIrl II I't IS .11 \ I tin HOYAI %  ."..-. m II •.. I MU r.t.-b.( Hubby Tubby B> KMIN4BD WI4 KSfTKUi UTII DA) HKM BKCAKFAST. Half gTaatafralt (no aaurar. One grtllaa n kt. UtM lilt* <•*•* with NTIfIng .f r rr-.-. wUd in-tytmiiAlwi I" or coffee with milk ino "Utifl l.l'NCII. Twt bard boiled twg* l^ituor, bieSTeaa, Mkft, and watareeeaa ilewtan lake drvMinc. %  • '<"' %  roll, ^ ripjnt of dull" On* lirif 'Dpli < oflf with milk im uc>r IHNNKII Cup "f rlt-.ir vegetable -nip One u*nt i large trilled herring, wrved with lemon. Two small new pefateai. plenty af leaf tvbuch. One baited *sl, sweetened wllh few riWav Black rofT*-*inn aaurar), %  I W*. Qahib Qaliinq H IS Exeeilenry Ihr Got I .idy Savage accompanWd bv Major Denni" Vaugnan, Private Secretary. attendee aas fourth anrt loal day's races of the ., r,,,!".> B.T.C Slimmer Meeting ar the }•£• a od n Garrison Savannah yesterday. In the Governor', box were Mr. ft. C. Mac Innes. Publh Relation* Officer of Tr;.n--Canad-i Airlines, Mr* Mac Innes. Mr. G 11. Adams, C KG. and Mr. D. H. L Ward Tu U.K. For Medical Treatment P ROFESSOR C G BEASLEY. arrived her. on Wednesday by the Economic Adviser to the CotnpFrench S.S. De Grmsae intransit Irollcr tor Development and Weifor her native Montsrrrat to spend fare, left on Friday by B.W.I.A. about six weeks' holiday with her via Trinidad and Jamaica on Ms relative* She is a guest of Mr. w% lo the United Kingdom for and Mrs Mario* of "Medway" medical treatment Professor Beasley will stop in Jamaica for g couple of days as the guest of Sir Hugh and Lady Foot to England On Routine Visit M l KHtDON, Entfii,' to the ConipDevelopment night by the thti^eewaril Islands on a routine visi*. He will make stops at Moiitaerrat, Antlgu.i. returning here about the end of use month. Intransit M ISS ELEANOR CABEY who %  %  D residing in Curacoo for the past two and a half years. Hr'.I.r.N Bl'UKI TAI.K1NC. FOOD Make It A Picnic PLUS nt Hill For Trinidad Holiday EAVING during the week b> t King's House" befoVe going on --f. 8 ; WJ A for Trinidad wefc Miss Ivy Allcync, Organiser of the Housecraft Centre and her two -liters. Miss Efflc Allcync, Headteacher of Grace Hill Girls' School and MUM Ermine rpaker of "Carl? Villa", Station Hill They have gone on holiday and wjll be away for about four weeks. Agricultural Adviser 1 St v. I Ii —TlllfKS. 4.45 St IN MAHK OF /.OKRfi ami I'KISDNEK Of SHARK IHLAUO GLORIOUSLY OPENING FRIDAY AUG. 15th M R. A. dcK FRAMFTON. Agricultural Adviser to the Comptroller for Development Jiru! Wtle. left for Trinidad on Thursdny Mr. and Mrs. E. L. BANFIELD Annual Visit Wedding At St. Cyprians Why not eat in the garden'' It is better than a picnic from the housL w ifi*a point of view No baskt-Ls t. pack, no sandwiches (which can be wearisome to prepare), no vacuum flasks to wash and AH. And there is no dining-room work before or after b"yB.'wi'A onaVnort' vls'lt !" !..A I'HiviNt; in the colony durWESTER DAY afleraoon"st 4"J0 Garden fooda. tor preference should be fork-amiwai acPompiinlp( h y his wife /Vln. the week by B.WXA. tram To-ciock at St. Cyprian's Church spoon foods. Meats therefore, should be easy to nanuie. While m Trinidad, Mr. Frarogtrlrgcuul were Mr. and Mrs. Miss Pcggj^ Arthur Deane, daughOiif '.if the best of these is a meat roll It is* very simple to toa will have talks on technical Albert Thomas and their daughter **r of Mr. arid Mrs. A. Arthurprepare and it stretch*, tlio meat ration -natters with the^Director of AgriShaUa. They will be spending £ % %  •** *>' !" ". St Matthias -ulture. Ihe Professor of Agncullwp wee ks here and will be stayc,ap wtti married lo Mr. Lionel ture of th, Imperial College o' tn a Worthing. CTirTst Church' E* L Banfl 'd, son of Mrs. J. L. Tropical Agriculture and thi SINGER SEWING MACHINE CO. ANNOUNCES THAT CMJISSES WILL COMMENCE ON MOXn.W. Xuf/UHl if tit, Enrolments should be confirmed OB Early as Possible! y^.-.'.'.-.-.'.'.'.-.W^-^.-. '.•,-. -''-'''-"''.-. %  >-,V,'-.-,-,-.-.-.-.-,-. .SCARAMOUCH! trtmn IUSHOI GRANGER-PARKER JUII Mil LEIGHFERHER HEXIVWILTOXWNINAFOCH Lfwis STON E • RICHARD AnWsnt %  KONMII MILLAR n.i OK'.I PROE8CHEL lm — itNaid fc. .*%  l**,i—. O'i.t-1 1 CABU WIIAON AT Is I O IE I .Mince It Foi 4—6 people, pass a pound tit lean meat through the mlncuik machine with '4 pound baco*' trimmings, if you can net them, or 1—2 rashers Ol fat I ran Adu l i pound btesdcri in' levil small teaspoon or grain 1 nutmeg pepper and salt 'o taste (rememliering thf bacon) and bind witli B beaicii egg. if you like g.-rl < arid a finely rhoppe*S."•• <-' '"'-y i eo. a -' i " S W 1 b8 *M M f; lor com Pftltlon and will he coUectC I Head^|u:lrteI^. Y.M.C A Pinfold ndyked Street. and conditions of the *" the Hanfleld and the late Mr. J, L Uanlleld of "Wllsbury". Hastings. LL1AM WHITING left The ceremony which was fuRv 'uerto Rico on Thursday choral was performed by Ihe Verv l... B.WXA intransit for U.S.A. Reverend Dean Haslewood. The tnd Cinada. bride who was given in marriage He was an employee of Barby her father, wore a dress of allclays Bank but has resigned to over lace with long!, close fitting join his hrother in Canada sleeves and bodice featuring a Visited Their Son %  1 h ntekline. Her skirt was fully AJOH and Mrs. U Lenegan gtfhered with made-ln train. She idari hv woro a headdress of ated pearls lEtts a rs^aTiwaS.affi involved iii t Ligbl Aeroplane Club in Trinidad. H^'.TT^.^K Pa .-5. n, .i!l He'alhe, Deane and Roaemary ^"ffiKfi 1 T 2 n L dBd ^ S! Athcrlv as Bridesmaids, and Miss institution and has,gone-to the %  „ Qi Tn I K for medical treatment. M-1(| of Honyur wore a ^ rf Leaving Today mac organza with close fitting L EAVING the island to-day |s sleeves. and off-the-shoulder Miss Maud La Porte who has Dodlco. Her full flair skirt with %  linK three weeks' noli'rills was three quarter length and Miss La Porte her h< address was flowers and lea, St. Lucia and organza. She tarried a posy of guest map dragon.* Savoy" Bay Street. The bridesmaids and flower girl THURSDAY l..t rt SV JJ „, ,, u Ma d „ f Honour w „ h Church. Mliu Ph>lli. „ m || ar heddresse and they mHi Andrew Oltteni of r l*d posies of snapdragons. The Hosd Hush Hall were Hower Girl curried a silver basket [Til brldOWboWM Riven ,( forcet-meHlots. O N THU1 m.rrl.fe by Mr 8. Barker. The dull., of beslm.n were perUBkad ejurmlni In an embroldf„ rm cd by Mr. Leon.rd Banfleld with • skirt of nylon while tho of ufhers fell lo Mr. orooel ,.r wnx buds Pu De un e, and Mr. GaofTrev and carry out on a tra>. prinriule tliat enough Drain II .is %  feast. // lelltuv is prepared and slood Cut tomatoes wUb drain, cur ends down, in a tarn, edges this way: With a sharp* The .en iDI boiol coaerrd wuh t dinner ..oiutcd knife cut -l-ag cuts nil competition, the prlie money ami K^' *"', 5 c t,d rM! '" P 1 "" • %  "< Archer. A reception was held at plolr. II u-HI be irert (or -eeral round the centre of the tomatoe,. the date of closing wlll be an* "',!," L^£S£^L2n£l Sf hul "; .?'J!" SPB 85= dais. l| uot, Ii..,a rfHeTOIor. ihen Just lift the two halves apart, nounced at a later date. """' '£''*?„' IhH " !" arid.v Prospact. St. James rtore it. drained, (n the vegeublr Rrmove rhe flesh, sprikle a litllc F or TU: r J yiait nt T ^T* ""*"""" "*" "" and the honeymoon Is being .pent '" ^'iiHI *'"'" T "•' %, "•'£., rS oSffi A n, v N(1 " -'"' i"'"^ K -n '• -w " ">B h hrt *' Hum to dral.r Beat the wrnal.. _/\, hc k „ B W .,. A Iom lh) ||„ r ,i,„g ... M.,i,..,.-..f-Hono..F„...rl flesh nto the other mixture and Trlnld rt „,., m i, M>1|(0 L.,.,. ,„„, M1 „,., ni,li..,,lin. Devonian. _.„ TS"% m m %  Pile al into the halved tomatoe-. .,„„ who „ ns J£J (0 ,^. nd j^j, H^,,,,,,,,,., ,,„, M „„|e i Ta> pAPT. and Mr.. C. %  Kalaon of Sprinkle with papnkn. i wo weckl hoSSj here. Miss lor as flow. ....redressV-Gun Hill SI. George, anA large tomato, treated like tag.ldera I, employed with the H ..f ^i .ilar material and design nounce the engagement of their ihls. wllh plenty of salad on each Control Board. Trinidad and durThe duties of bestman fell'to danghtir Patricia Margaret to Mr. ..kc a Krd and the reception W.S Edward Geoffrey Watson, ton of "Stonv Croft". Worthing. This bald at UM horno .'I 'he bride's her third visit to the Island. mother. II;,sh Will and Mrs. Herbert Watson of Welches Road. St Michael. 4 Women Meet To Plan Your Next Year's Face .TOUR womenarc mcc;iii k In Bond Street rh.week lo dlscusjIhe beauty problems of three continents. From America comeriark-haircii Mrs. Kay Brown, with sh..t'. haircut and sun-tanned skin. In a slim-fltti!iii "shocking" pink fleet and nold chunky Jewellery, ihe looks the typical career womi-n Ihut New York produces with gleaming efficiency. The Canadian representative al this all-woman beauty co.if.-: anos OH dry skins and the nev long; in make-up hsmall, slighl nnd Mr, Miss Owen Grant from Toronto arrived in a brow dupion suit, i ip like a Ban tin irtmmed "th bronze beads. with waistcoat while his comIKtnlon Is comfortable in a summer frtM-k. At a Mayfair party last night only one man wore a white tuxedo He was Jon Pert wee. looking cool as ieed champagne among hi black-coated fellows. Shopping stati--tics prove that dead. Bid if did foeas oifenfion only 20 per cent, of men do their Fl • me. These lour wise own buying So It seems that In .i'..iciihadou; and jre to blame for the hot-faced %  Meker ageereeas, more rlearli. masculine freaks in London de/ined. to-day. EngJUh Are So Fresh BBBBDB. think of English By EILEEN ASCROFT %  iit uiiii Dtore d"pfh tiiati jruiiimer sfiarfes. Pfiindarions trill be desipned for the unturol .'.i a i/outri/al bloom. JVo, J . tliaf eye ":ake-up is beeotnlno more intpoltant. This the|| .Mlriliiilr lo the doe-eyed era. (.-hieli Ihei* all ayree [l UN WHAT "!P %  . S-oiJTbrCwn eonxlttered m, They i.-ii. l-.i-.hn.il Kound-up Hiked the conferQ NE 0|| of ,„ ^r e$aeg ^[J be red of blue eyes Mrs. Molly Usherwood attends on behalf of Australia. She |g tall : "In the States we prefer Ihe sun-. i,m extreme Brown Wry skins trouble about nas 8S per ecu! of our women." ,., That th'lct -. Ii still th" le-t m the world Men In Tlw Sun WHICH male would you least mperettsrea of 8" like to find as a companion on a suit, unrelieved by %  M. i ts B home in and an tl*ys I MKfRer: Sydney daughter. .nndiHi delegate Is Mr^.. Olive Cnto. charming nnd motherly in appearance, who loves the quiet g.-ey tone* Hint flatter btondt fhisautuinn is fhe lolesf fashion ffa.fi /ram New York. From Paris comes news of Ihe beanstalk heel on winter party ..topers. It is taller and thinner. j nun* shadow of its former aelf. The foot sock is something new Britain for children's wear. It special foot, which allows loe-room for developing Thumbs Down hair plexion illk and r.>s i They Agreed THEIR first days meeting two years brought three I portant points of agreement Wo I . thai 1 et'iry woman's postwar problt'7'i. rruard'-.ss of cHm* ate, is a dry skin. So2 . thai make-up for rjv eondnt/ icinler fsumoier in Australia) irtll Mill be in fhe ptnl.Ihi Knulish mnl' lesett island? look si IKI put this queation to 50 women Not tori M. lc tropical ibil week, marriad. single taouseuitings woi-n bv the Continenwive.* nnd career girls. He scorns as "auary" the Top of the poll Is Gilbert sleeved sports shirts, light Harding with atx votes against him. hjXedrOf and featherllght socks Next comes the Red Dean with chosen hv the Americans. live. Two women bar WlbYed See Kim silting In Trafalgar Pickles, three Aneurin Bevan. Square mopping his brow at other names on the black list Uineh-iime complete with braces are Alastalr Sim. Dr. Charles Hill. WOOl socks. Webster Booth. and Richard Watch him at the theatre— Dimblebv. In thi> thiek dark suit. WOSLO corvaicHT BgasavED. CLARKES CHILDS SHOES WHITE TAN U to Hi TKl-H(KM CHILD'S SHOES $4.2.-1. $4.W WHITE BUCK & BLACK PATENT Kill 3. lo 6a *5.07 at 5J7 7. In Ills M.32 & 6.811 IK to Is S7.III Si T.K TAN UN AH nto" MEN S lMMTTV • WKLETS S1.76. $.07, $7.1* . . 53"* 71 . T. R. EVANS Sc WHITFIELDS DIAL '710 YOUR SHOF STORF.S OIAL &f <>> ..



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MCI TINSI NDAV ADVOCATE -i i>\. u (.1 st i". !•'•: This West Indian The People Of Barbados Education No Culture (II) By \. S. IIOPh/\SO\ rMn H %  vi at I great ImpwrUiixv that it i almost %  measure ot i persons maiuni.how fullrtc* II Thos* lit* this fail half on Hi** uy M developing il>> %  crenleM strength ol nB in possibu u imagine; -nil thusi who do not realise ii achieve anything lmporta thla: that if \ earn Qwm because >o. will never nun* 1 ihor.i tit you; thi .vill lu-vex become part pf pot j ii belongs to you inn ocvomo yours bee* you pain n'ld event In the getiin Only when you have suffered, ... suffered deeply tor ii will ye really piMM-'X it and believe your self deserving of tho posseasi'M Gifts TO Be Scnrnr.l All finer mind? scorn a gi( .id of tru Thing Ir. ; have buill fr them•elves becnu-c then labou. has done into it; there is somethnua It. They ran at:feel aroud of the prise they havi taken away fn.ni somebody HM because ii hut cost tin. of IT than thrweak ,eron wht had it before them. But the mi who he* nc< % %  ] %  > 'i .1 presctu always fefcl indebted lo the giv< leel lhat he uv.c him eomcihmg. If It be only gr.v tudc. and this will take away tot his own iclf-respect. He will fa ^shamed of himself for h,iv:t been forced to accept a gift. I 1 .vill never Ittink himself worn.. On MH feel M H3DM respni faa. : % %  d of I e*n The Weal Indian*. Shame tint th-> I'MIIV are ashamcn ,>( themselves, the*..Weal Indian l^-t no one be so foolishly „v|i nl aa to aupsjpae that the most i XVUI mlfami" > JOHN .'K.UtM X What Thomas Briggs. Esq., had advocated in 18fl and had lest his seat in the House of Assam,uly over, bacame law in 181" when the privilege of giving sworn lestln.ony io the Courts of this Inland was Krantexi to Free <*<•!%  Hired aaopai I ."I .i ('.THIi mm IIM < %  ••niur of Barbados, imbibed will* the ideas of Wilberforce and Clarkson, and being of a progressive mind, founded hi* charity school for free coloured ehllm.t real the most agonltfnic d^ ^ Bridgetown in 1818. when they -urn away Thirty-two of the scholars were ...m the pleasurable ride of then u, e children of slaves. This school hiiracter to a cold analysis of u ,, stt) | in rK (,tence but it is no n nM iu aspects As soon as th. > longer a charity school, although i •! disposed to look at themthere are a good number of seholclve* aa they usually are, all jrship* granted by the Vestrte* hat gaiety and spoitfulneas whu-.. but the school fees are ver> know only tmi well vanishe-. moderate and this achool is a considerable help to the not very wealthy parents. Also this achool is nol confined to coloured children alone, for many whir men in this community own Combermere as their 'alma mater Lord Combermere was on* of those who realised that the timewere changing and changing fa-' and that the old order was giving way to a new. In 1819, he brought the wrath of the Conservativeupon his head. In order to patron'The Barbados Society La ugh ing Ma tte r really lucky for Ihaui •o look at thiTtwelves; they could not sivelheir mental balance from oeing hopelessly upset by the L'.nslam shame lhat would be the K-sult of too close an examination. The West Indian 1* aahamni lung that really beloni .1. him anil marks him ou> %  different Irorn anyiody eu. He 19 ashamed of hit mote dellgnrfui m 1 attractive qualities as well u. .f hi* more re\oltingly monkcyn" .nee None too seldom he is even Promoting Christian Knowledge shamed "f hivirtues, and When he appointed a day for Divine S*i i4ii> comes to such a paas, sulcin.* vice, and commanded the attend only course left whhii ance of the Militia. Mr. Michs' would be charitable to efleaelf as Ryan. Editor of the Barbado. vrli .IN t. humanity When you Globe* condemned this in severr try to shu' your eyea to your terms, stating that to order thvirtues as well as to your vicee, attendance of the Militia wait is high t me you do your neighWty Tyranny BMuicLoro Umn, not lo say civilisation iiaelf. Combermere us Commander ..• kindness of ylng. AIM Chief of the Island could ot-dei Ihe enly coune I ca the attendance of these men eve dvtse the present day West Indian .gainst hh will. "7*0*** pvI luke He i* ashamasl of tho wcuted for libel and sedition on' 4 Ml skin, aa though the Jury brought In a verdict of l lack or brown or yellow it Ttot OttUty. 1 Public opinion fffdwd ruatlcallv less Intereatlng an>t ^*h Ryan and his ?upporti>T ..ppoaling" than pink. He is •"* known aa the •SelmagunMLUWI of the poverty and comdies, whlfcthe Governor and hi of It. te ause ho had drmc not) i-sourrelessness of moM were rererred to as me r-umpto p ove that he deserved it Ano of thi lands that nre his horn'*, kina. his bidahtedheaf He is ashamed of his lack of xho slave owners became fuxin!l the more-uncomfortable is tht manners and polite bearing. He is 0UM m i t^, mere suggestion bj fact that his present will not i .-.lamed or the **lal and poUtiwu t_^poken militant Wesley an, him for It Was not adapted t*> lum. cat conditions that are typical of ghen conduqUnsj wurahip at a •tils archipelago. He Is ashamed ningd* chapel in Bridgetown; thai l hia weetness and cowardline*-. a u men um bretbren entitled '<* ; nd so utterly ashamed of hi^ equal consideration. The M"*,.l>solute lack of fighting (plr.1 sionary in charge of this Chapct ihat lo save himself from breaking waH William James Schrewsbur> .'own and becoming a hopelens w ho by his strong character and of psychological frustration eloquent preaching cxasperai The Negroes have all Sunday to themselves except nov. and than when prcven'ed by the weather the day before, they may be ordered on Sunday Morning lo litter the Pensjand t WAS minotd to h^j u^ th al it Is n* use worrying and laUStables, and bring up fodder tMumn today -Now We Know", when he becomes sufBciemly 41aHorse-. r^, wr -| remember that the last inieresled and falls to catch up ha In lite Ween lliey are --t lo ,#urnali-i ,vho headed this column '" super-annuated He cant stc|i *uik %  show that what he had up but he can be turned out. chat oik unlil nuie, ,^ CI( thinking in '!"• past about acU-rlsed as a duffer and liat. difli war vraa now cwlu w gelUng a jol. An eei l .d toil • llr -^rvesl six niont. M^u.ove might haVt sfssssg work fii'tn Ten until X extra chance at one of lh< when they knock-ff and conn his feelUarbados Scholarships and he home to Dinner, which meal ,„ i rea d the facetious dlswould have become one of th<*> the Director of Educa"f whom Barbados would ' the Estate, with an allowance tlon in the Advx-mtr of Saturday, proud. of half a pint of i-unch; at i raa amazed to find that aa officer C'oncralulation\ Thre,. o'clock in the afternoon in a responsible position realising Bui If I have been critical of they again set to work and rethat almost everyone In this islai •< the Director let me cpngratula'.' main until six in the evening being was dissatisfied with some aspc> t him on seeing the wisdom of maknever actually at work more of education and Its administration ing the two St. Leonard's School: than Three Houre at a time, ami could find in his wul to treat Boys' and Olrls' Secondary Schools only Nine Hours altogether in Ihe matter Jovially. It ieither instead of filling one school with a Day -Out ..f crop they have that-Mr Reed does not realise the 700 children without leaving room every other Saturday AfterMttent of the publh dissatisfaction tot any intake at the end of a noon, and sometime* the whole or he thinks the matter too trifling year. It only remains for I day to themselves, U merit serious attention by him. to press for an extension of I The Children fioin N no lo A fsa ^ I am rnnccrned he ran school leaving age from 14 to It Fifteen years of age never work noose either predicament. if not let the Schools be k' with the Hoe. and are only mI trust myself to ex"Secondary" without this reatrlcployed In cutting Grass and gflnhw In detail all the statements tlon on age. It Is a waste of Ham Green Fodder for the Stock. made In his article, and 1 hope to give a child two and a hnl' The Infants when weaned, that it is really his and has not years' training at these schools, are put under the care of elderbeen mangled by any other hand, I suggest that when next thly Women as Nurses and are tor fear that I might divert readDirector comes from bis Ivor, kept at the Nursery, (a Builders from the goal to which I have cloisters of intellectuality. M Ing uurposely erected fo: pointr-d Ihei an Enquiry Into the mlglft deign to tell us lesser mor ihem) until they are fit to go administration of education In this tals in the lowlands what are these nto the Grass Gong — thev* island. It is by this that I hope schools and exa.tly where they fit have three whoh-some meals the failures of the system will be in with the local ch^n* ett jledav which are served up te diagnosed and corrective measures mentary and Orammar (aeconnthem under ihe <^e of the Manadopted aryl Schools. 3M This matter of education of a The Breeding Women fron people is ,ertainl> too serious for the t'me thev report themselvcany light hearted dlveriion. even pregnant are withdrawn fronIf Major Reed in his army career the Gang, and are employed lr could be gay in the face of death any very light occupation wit! and danger. There I* a point at a view nf keeping 'hem 81 which even bravery beromes fonlhome. and to pr. vent their ghardy: facetlousness In this case Ing to Market witn heavy load? i* almost unforgivable But I supwh'ich thev frequently 'carry for nose that 1 must not be too ere in my Judgment of the Director's attitude JFK St h'X'-ph gfl W Mga f .a u > Film Show At Girls' School themselves a n d wnleh with long Journeys, *c. often prove hurtful to them;—they are al —•ys allowed a Month to Uand when put to Bed (benot made for him, not bull: to hi own requirements, and will \\ %  : %  fore be uielas. to him. He is nin.e the richer Mr*the gift; he is rathe. poorer, for he has had debt away in gratitude not Ihoruughly ashamed • hiriself wiiin he i: :n debt certainne has to'console himself with the" opposition; which launchc-. 1> dot BOt owearva to be left the thought that his _mlaery la an organised attack on the con allvi mple of the shallow and Idiot n irm'erb that patience is a virtue' 1 Ashamed .. %  And If this la so true of individuals, how much more Hue must be of peoples, rut! rlvllJMtio"• And what i in Uhj %  tratc lhl^ more fully than IIwell-known*fact thid nviii/Miion baa Inbetltad qualities from a former civillTatlon. Ii i. and louthesomenes forced to excuse IU shame In II ..wn ayes' by making out that i b %  igjattrr of the giver, II son %  .<. .II lousln o desceqdant of Nome ami'' Then poplw feel quite omfnrtable abou accenting something from a rel nothing but the lot dished out tu gregation on Sunday 5th of Oclo him by Nature's eternally Immuoer 1823. with bottles rtlled witn •:\Ao law: l.i'nt he a living exdisgusting mixtures which wero Through the courtesy ol DM British Council, there • Free Film Show at the Si JO* Idle Reference cphs Girls' School on Tuesdaj And as if to indicate his entire next beginning at 4.30 p.m. F* %  %  ol •iprrlnn. .o-i i( -o> Inrl >: .' .1" •'.' I '• •' "' %  ' *' SS.^JTla .\"u^ l tai3Ma j£ i2ni %  > r-r MSs. pwucdatlr m ih. m IUIMI Tfc %  — %  Ina IMBI I*!*! o* 'H"iT AasaE has tsa • % %  > %  '%  *> %  f*ft#4 ft C*aiSSSSlw* •' MVH ii Hull.' %  mm *w*U tat MiT-io.i.iUkM m sUl ( %  %  rni. smmi. i>h • %  *> %  •. %  T-* •• •""" dl with.i> H noii's thi. i !" '**"'?! .*U MB* imUMri •^/*2_* ~^ ST T ^a .•^^•^.'•.rtw'CiCrt ,*',,'„., .... .. M E Don't he • Week Mem ah keasr X %  w IT ••* r"" • •' S J jSSS7 : iB. s. S3ras ErtfewJraasS %  uti i •->* '"*• "•"•."T-'SiH; Doctor ProlMt Vi-Tob O lanMlMKI' i-nil-l r,d phyii. MB. rmnUf HalaS Wh*ri |UnS pawir l.min.!-** R l> n, 0Bi-ilMm IMI lb. •( %  •IIM iur MSiMs y TM %  _.n •uRtrl nd fim|y and -lUilKf •( %  ID>*II4 ftPd UKit M • rkrf iMstM *>-P In an in* Mdj p i ni aw ul %  -.. **T r~ • *..i.*, n*aa •M prarUM, (t I. mr WH>I ihl Brd.ol larir.ul. "naB M VJ-TStja %  ••• I iraalawM f ali*.aUi_M aa*l UwraliM IM ilaiMU iM ifl. U4a t* ..IIlatiiMal vifoni *D4 •ilalilr ' in* Feel Results in 1 D*y Brtauaf Vl-T**. •>• MMMIBaaBa earn".* lo Kl i""l apon in* |la>d. d mm in.ifour.i. IM bloM iM ta..ipt.i* IM M3|. in. I* M a* last "aiuns M i null. Maal 11.11 it pail u MBV K liia knproxai.nl aHUiln M 1 1* %  SM) '">* TtJm^TiiT'^s'l'^lKl ""*"* Hop* at .HI Cam. atroni a.U. anS ReswlH Guaranteed i* MUUMiini MI MM IM mm n m mt ss isj^a-JSs ssnsz (Hill iMHIarlo'T In *.*IT "aT 0*1 VITaa. rram a-r .n.mul uoStr the vrHlva .....r.U. Il Mini Mil *•• P —" ttroncar. (-11 W .if and .HjSifTaii .ol. ia .1.joy IM ptMinraa •! laTia wall at in o>d IUH r>u aai* la r•*'J|" %  •• aa/iM' nai ranhaaf prHa •iifM ttliiaad aiiiiaui *JVIUB M airaaniai Dan I .-ft.r anatMi d- lrIMI ran do.n. old-b.Tai.j !" i-U-*. *tMMI*d ,ond>llen O.I Vi-T-M IraT*-' M-IH pTrMJUM thiousooiil !-•' TM s-aiawr* prataru TU Vi-Tabl • Guaranteed Was36 a 3S Bt ivith hints on health Kouds Ujidcrgoiitg Repairs f that basenc* df characte \Vhich makes him inflnitel.s cap able of suffering. And. most foolishly of all. he is ashamed of the spasmodic noble Instinct whu i prompt', him to hate everything that blocks his own path. belle\ ing it to be a devilishly evil in"Srcause they look i -ttnrt nnd totally contrary to the cOlMatfe propertj Hui tiny caiui law.. <•! virtuous conduct, >!< %  th'/iiKid of .xceptl'i italuunvd of his own ervilit>; %  omaUnni; from mi uiicr stmtiffr, ashamed of those grotesque aniAnd fo. to make up loi ti %  .. i mal gestures and apish chattel Iscomfort und once nn mga thai he sometimes see* as J then > %  < %  f-respVct, I| thai I cravenly base gratitude and poll t anaa i and indeed we had in take them simply or do without. -they do not fit us. They v.ution. thmking himself the moie succeBsful the faither he leaves hli unlive land behind and the .i ha apprnaenna to vterile f eii.lo-Kuropeanlsm. His intelletuaUy emlneni men are for th< ituitl part insufferable caricature* who believe they are think ing when they are merely mark ing time in a monotonous anil long exhaustad round of mental habits. West Indian elemental— school children can tell you all about spring and summer Newspaper.' commented editorially that the news of the reeolut'or passed by the House of Commons In Great Britain, that Colonial Slavery should altogether cease in 12 years from the passing of an Act of Parliament aa regards those lavea from six yean of age ami upwards; but those under six of age. It waa to end immediately It waa also stated In this editor.ai that on the 1 lth of June, four resolutions had passed the lions.of Commons for £20.000.000 to be paid as compensation to the tlave owners on the release of their slaves. There was still a terrific amount nmount of propaganda on the subject of slavery those who weft* faced with a terrific financial Ios.s due to the release of the slaves were using all within their powi autumn and winter, and primto oppose those who advocated rose* nnd robins but hardly any'all men are equal and should be •lung about armadillos or alllgaf r## . An article "Plan of Treatu>rs or hurricanes or coral insects ment of the Negroes on the or sponges. And when the total Estates in Barbados. 1819' la remenlal burden of all his shame corded; and this la sufficient Inhnf accumulated, what do we tercet that It would be best to t> On pace 15 quote it 'in toto.' Roads in St. JosephMat Ir ing repaired are SprlngtieUI. Co"*" voanut Grove andi CrtmbridBi" Work on Springfield Road Is expected w be completed during leave them, and go to work— ally) there are still pconle. eminlhW mon u 1( w hde the Cocoanut they come home lo Breakfast at ent authorities at that who are not Grove Road may not be complc'Nine o'clock and go out again satisfied *hat ome of these ultra^ thU ear lt was \ caTni yestcrat ten they come home at twelve, modern educiitlonnl theories give day< A pre gent there arc appro* and go out at three in the afterthe best results why %  r tmiid they imalrly 2 2 worken and a roa. noou, and at Five o'clock they be toyed with In Barbados? What roIler ^ ^ Cambridge R'>-"i again come home and take thrlr aeveTal other simple souls and I Work on thls road o, oxi id bo cornChildren to their Houses. would like to know from the (.atp | ett d earlv next month, it wa: Even grown Negro is allowUnt Major Is what is the future of rcporw>fl ed half a pint of Guinea or education m this isli.nd and what •" a quart of Indian Corn and four can be done to justify the huge exanundl and a half of Potatoes, nenditure of two and a half mllot four pounds of other Roar* lion dollars out of a total revenue per day. beside, a plentiful of twelve million dollars and What m"al ready dressed and per^an be done to i-nprm-e the defects. pared for their D'nner; they am 1ft ma tell him that the Mohamntao Vt-.wed sumcient quantity tnedan form of education mtsht be ... of Vlasses, Rum Salt nii "* lest in the world but ir it is WI JJ be celebralod Salted ltsh per week. Th.r '>ot what we want and what we August 3-1"Po mark Ihe young Negroes have dreaaed oay for and If we are satisfied that ihe following services meal" provided for them'J does not suit us. It Is a waste of The Men are allowed a full time to nttemnt to force it on us. Choral Eucharist 6 a.m Suit of Penmstonc or OsnnBest Onportiimtici I'^'LUIIK and a Cantata, 4J0 DJV hurgs with %  Monmouth Hal Any educetlonal system properForty candidates arc al or Cap every year; the Women i v administered aims at-glvlng the being prepaied f"r Conflrmauoi the same, with the addition of people whom it Is intended to at the St. Joseph's Parish Church. n Check Shift or Handkerchief, benefit the best opportunities to by Ucv. Edw..nt Gatlicrer. As-A comfortable House is buill contribute to the society in whleh sistanl Curate attached to th.s at the expanse of the Estate for they live. It must fit them for Church. every Negro w.th a family, and work and living In the rommunlty frequently for the Single one* in which they live by learning nnd The Bnth. ;.t the Social Centr: where the Families are large technical training. This Is the at liathshcba were opened to the —Every Negro has a small spot basis and the intellectually bright public on Sunday la*t at 6 aJS of Land which he cultivates for ones will then be fitted for the, Immediately on the opvniiiK himself and-which affords him arts, science and the humanities, j resident went in to get the fh-al not only many eomloriN. bul To tell this community that an | bath, from the sole of tta produce he Education Act demands that derives the means of indulging -children must be taught accordImnself in dress and other gratIng to Age, Ability, and Aptitude ificationa. i.e. Chronologic! Age. Capability A Practitioner visitthe Estate and Special talents" Is. In good every Jay. und a Physician and \merlcan. so much baloney. How Surgcoi. called Wl*en*ver elth* doiai all this apply to the smrill is require.,. ThenIs a comfortboy In Harrison College who hal able Hotp lal on Oie Estat'-. Ing gone to the Elementary School and the Sick are allowed every iinds that he Is ahead of the oth. r necessary and when order" I pupils In the three R's and eould by the Doc ton, have Madeira be removed up one form. When he or Port Wine, aa may be requisi* refused then he comes to fe-1 ite;Aiiniiii food. Broths, Flour ^ or Starch Spices, esc. The Negroes are nevei calliM on to do any work at night, ja cent In Crop time, when Mci> who are attached to tha Boiling-house are sometimes dctal' ed until Eight or Nine o'clock, and corn* out in the morning when the other Negroes go io A Man of religious habits attend the Negroes for the pui Oh JM, 6e catvfulthat's Mummy's newrad/o S*tfp> pose of giving them Religious Insu-uctions. and much may le done by means of a safe ana efficient plan of Religious Instruction towards the aftoral Improvement of the Nasjroea.'' (1). cdandthe nsim-n. I The Journal of the Barbados Museum and Historical Society Vol. 11, pages 29-30. \ %  *#*•* %  ,•••,Wi-aWWi .',5-V* pp 9W NOTICE "We wisli to -i Ivise our custotneri that our Worksl p Department will l>e ilu'fd fn*m Tt lelaT* 5th August to Monday I8lh "*t, I15?, both days itulusive. in ori i to nive our WorkBJSSSB Staff theii 'Hiual vacation. There will IM ;I small i 'icf atnff on duty for iiv rniergcncii". Our Office, Part* Ml nnrl 'Virol Stntiim \vill be>' V i M usuu!." Each day the planes ol British West Indian Airways trace invisible lines between the islands of the Caribbean. Though they cannot be seen, these lined represent a remarkable service to vacationers, business men and shippers of Air Cargoa service unparalleled by any other lirst class means of transportation in ihe Caribbean. For further information call 4SSS. I 3 BRITISH WEST INDIAN AIRWAYS awer Broad Si., Bridgetown. 'Phone l.iS.i .vvvA^^vvvvcssvvyv* ECKSTEIN BROTHERS i BAY STRFET DIAL 4269 | || ClldrlCS MC £^1681116}^ ^ CO., Ltd. BWIH t I 1 %  %  %  %  .• %  -.t'.VA-.W ^f D IH I



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Tl' SUNDAY, AUGUST 10. 1IU MVIIU MIMU Ml PACI I I EVEN CHURCH B. G. Rice SERVICES Industry IT. UONUll *" SUNDAY ATTIB TRINITY %  am HBly Communion. Bam Matin* 4> 1^ !" *. 3pm Sunday School Bible CTMN, T pra CvtHM ud Man ST. HAAT-f TBINITV IX 'in\ Matin.. %  00 %  m Solemn ijo am Matin.. fM am Low MM, •" ol#nm Ma.. Sern.on. j*, %  unlay Srhosl 400 |m Childtei Vr> par*, loo pm Solemn Even-i.e flatar. r\\ i HH *-m. %  oN im a Maw at Sermon jgO pi """• flthaal A Children Service, p.m. Solemn Iveneona, Sermon Pr ceaeton. MORAVIAN ItOEBUCK STREET II m Mornl. Service, preachrr Rev E g Haw, P m c US ^. AM £ GRACE HB-L: ll am Morning LONDON In the House of Commons on July 30. Mr. Roland Robinson (Conservative. Blackpool! asked lhe Secreury or SUte for tha Colontes whether agreement has 1 yet been reached for the participa; tion of the Colonial Development Corporation in the development of the rice industry Of %  MM Guiana. Mr. Oliver Lyttelton. t h e 1 Colonial Secretary, replied: "No, but I have now had from ihn Corporation a proposal for financial participation on which I hope to take a decision very soon"—aVt'.P. vbea. preacher toy Holy Communioni: 7 p i Sarrlra. P fa a. hw Mr W rVLMBCK: Ham Momi Preavcher Mr W SI Hill, 7 rung Service, prracfier Ml %  (.mo 1 %  saj ba| s.r. v ia*. Prea tehar: Mr. D CuL„,„ DUnmMMBM: 7pm Evening SerT fcBf. pr ea c her; Mr O Franrla an OP HILL: 7pm Evening Service. praachrr Mr W A Daan*. •i H.ii JAMIS ST Ham -Rev K C Toweei. BA. ID 7 p m Mr K E Towar.. B A B D PAYNES BAY t M am Ml*, Phillip.. T p m Mr P Daan* WHITE HAIaL 30 a n. Ml SI Mall. 7 p.m. Mtaa O. Oile, GUX MEMOH1AL 0 30 a m Rev T Lawrence) V K r Tonere HA. II II T p in Mr. a. r. MeCa Inter I RANK HALL: tSS am Mr R A Crawford. 7 pm Mr O Binckler SPBBSJillUTOWN 11 ., ,, Ml C. Harper. 7pm Mr E L BannUUr SE1.AH Ham Ml II rl.oend. FrTHIHAIlAII am Mr M B'atck V-li.'.-ou Returning To Washington SAN rRANClSCO. Aug 9. Secretary of SUte. Dean Acheson returning from a meeting in Honolulu with Foreign Minister* of Australia and New Zealand took off. from San Francisco International airport at 4 16 p.m G.M.T. on Saturday for Washington. In an airport Interview Ac.ieson expressed doubts that any poryni*Hjir Anzus headquarters would be set up in Hawaii. He said Anzus nations would probably meet in various member capit"ls in future—U.P. •3S am enrollment of at atss*SS*M in r:n i day I Preaching Apaelalmrnl Hria-ade iW.i. I., .,:. BFTlin.: II a m t m Bjaa T. J Purk. DALKCITH. 11 a m Mr. J Orlfnth. torn Mr (i Harp*,. BDAICaNT 11 a ii. Mr. O. M.Aiiiter. Mr Hi SOUTH DISTRICT flam Mr D. ClfiSlih. 7 pm. Mr. O Jonee JftOVIDENCB: II am Rev T J. Purly. Holy Communion 7 p.m. Mr. I Black man VAIXHAI.I 9 00 am Rev T. J Purler. Holy Communion. 7 p m Mr V. Casks IBCNIZIR CIBCI IT EBEXEZER: II a m Mr V M P.lsrlm. 7 p m Mr O II Miller BFVI-AII Ham Mr r Pilgrim 7 P m Mr E Toppln SILHEWSBURY U a m. Mr H S-raaaxL T .m Mr V Clarke RICES II am Mr G Ford*. 7 p.m. Mr J. C. Moltasy. M C P Sunday School, al S.OO p-m. TBS SALTATION ABUV UHIDCETOWN CENTIfAL: II a m. Iloiinein Meetlns. J p m Company MeetI'f, 7pm Salvation Martins Sr. Captain W Bltnup WEM.INGTOK STRFIT: II s Rl, llollneaa Meat Inf. S p in Company Meeting;. 7 pm. Salvation Mrrtlns Senkn Ma|or T Glbb. SPE:.a. TwaMbank. a.a. Trigonoaamua. a Nnlor. Lady Rodney, %  a. Qullmai. • 1 Dalhrm. a a Colombia. %  City of Fly. 1 a Anhaha. a %  Alcoa Polaria-. %  • Capo VInof. • • Kant, a %  FWra. 11 Rlolachal. a A1IILI.10. • a Bayano. % %  ocean Ranger. %  a. NUSVS Aivdahrfia. %  • Maria Da Larrlnaga. ii lafonn. • %  Dolorea. 1a UKaeoai. at MormarHlle. a %  Manutrr. CBRISTIAN Bt UNI t. lira* ik.nh d < hrl.l SeleeilUl. BrlggaMwr.. Ipprr Bay Streal Bundaya II a m. and 7 p m Waalnooaaya %  p m. A Service which Include* TeMlmonlee of ChrUtian UralVi8€£8 For West Indian Subjects LONDON In the House of Commons on July 311. Miss Irene Ward (Conservjtlve. Tynemouth) asked the of State for the Colonie> if he will take steps to give the same facilities fur British subjectn .is I'nited States subjects in respect of visas in Bermuda and the West Indie*. Mr. Oliver Lyttelton. t h I Colonial Secretary, replied: "Visas an not required for British subjects entering any British Wes*. Indian territory. Bermuda or the Bahamas. I am looking Into the questions which the hon. Lady has already brought to my notice in this connection. v —^.l\P. Carib-Hears Expecied Here In October One of • I'nmdad's leading Basketball teams, the CarlbBenrs, nre expected to tour Barbados in early October, me secrelarjp .,f the BarUidos Basketball Association. Mr. Noel Symmonds, %  aid raflcarday. He received correspondence to that effect from the Carib-Beais during the week. This tour was expected'to come off some time ago, but no approximate date had been fixed. The Carlo-Bears were runnersup in the Division "A" Basketball Competition in Trinidad this season, losing to the U.S. team there. Knotk Out matches were begun here this week. Four havo been played, and of them the most iK.tow.uihv win is that of Carlto.i over Pickwick. There are two more matches to be played before the first round ends. Bag SL'KU ACGCST I & p.m Monday. Wane*da> Friday: Babjert ar Laaaan-Sermaa: SPIH1T. naming GblSen Teal: 1 John • a, 13 We ar ,'.,. '..1 . the Rev L Uiurc-Clarke of Ood: lleiebknow we that . A....I/. 1 Pa.tor. and Mr. Oiga dwell In Him and He In IN, become 11 Riowne hath given ua <4 III. Spirit lar lolUK.n! I.I.I,,... at* larlaile ST NICROIAS KriM-OPtl. In lhe llioag tieilSl the Bible NoORTHODOX H*'HPI ROAD Malm, and Salmon preacher Hav D <;..i God. 1 Cor. ?. 17 Tl'l.SDAY 7 JO p m EvtnlnJ Prairr end Sa Clarke are Hlenl. Pagr Ml U.C.W.I GIFT FROM THE LOYAL BROTHERS OF THE STAR The Registrar of the University College of the West Indies has %  ecently acknowledged the receipt of £50. a gl/i from the Loyal Brothers of thy Star, to be added to a Loan Fund for needy Barbadian students at the University. The Society of the Loyal Brothers of the Star, donated £20 last year, and this formed the nucleus of the Fund. RECORDS BROKEN • On page 5 But Herb who did 144.6 seconds leg of the 400 metres relay in Helsinki could not match the classic effortless and beautiful miming of Whitencld. So Jamaica were beaten but not disgraced for they also broke the world record with three minutes nine point two seconds. In the 100 yards Remtgino again conquered McDonald Bailey in the comparatively slow time of 98 seconds. Bailey recorded the same time Just beating the United States negro Gathers. The milt* run in fantastic conditions Of torrential rain with thunder rolling in the distance was won by the United States Wes Santee in good time for the day of 4 mins. 12 bees. Britain's Nankeville pulled up at the three-quarter mark suffering from sciatica. Arabs Not Columbus Discovered The Ni'v* World JOHANNESBURG. Aug 9. A leading South African anthropologist says Arabs, not Christopher Columbus, discovered America. The Arabs scored a beat S00 vears on Columbus according 10 llr. Jeffreys, senlo, lecturer m social anthropology ..1 the Wttwatenrand i Jeffreys based his claim on i,i II;M>'M-II 18 months ago of negro kulta in the Rio Grande River. The Professor said: "The puzzlingthings MtsaUtafJQr previously inexplicable. sud'i< sense and fitted like a jigsaw puzzle." Jeffreys thinks a that by 1.0OO A.D., Arabs were established on the west coast of Africa and hod settled in America. Columbu found small colonies of negroes who. according to Jeffreys, ware •lidSflcendan 1 ..f Ar..b slavi • He said lhe dlscovxery of hmn skulls In caves in the Baham;* Islands and African root crops in the Caribbean lends credence t. his theory.—U^. i\fadame Chiang Kai Shek Has Skin Disorder HONOLULU, Aug. V. It was announced that Madame Chiang Kai Shek will arrive in Hawaii on Saturday night to receive medical treatment for a gkm disorder. K. W. Yu a press advi_-ci meso Notionalists United Nations delegation said the Qcfl eralirimo's wife would enter hospital soon after arrival, pr'oablv the Army's Tripler Hospital. He came here from New York* tO taltB chain.of inr..ngi'nu'iits. He said Madame Chiang has been suffering In v.irying degrees for ten years from skin condition know medically as uticaria. He said her condition became, worse recently because she is allergic to drugs used in the treatment. Physicians advised her tbat she might be benefited by temporarily leaving Formosa's hoi humid climate. Yu said the visits w.ig "purely private and purely for medical treatment". He laid Madame Chiang is flying here aboard a Philippine Air LAM plane due at Honolulu Airport at 8.45 a.m. G.M.T. on Sunday. —U-F. SEA AND AIR TRAFFIC Listening Hours SVMDAY AUOl'a aa — : 11 p ra 4 at 1 i:. * -1 -l In Carlisle Bay —ner Erne. Lanalph. s. lu-ioei Augixl.i. M ton. Schooawr Earn Aruba. Schooner Lvdaaa A.. SrAoaner Henry D Wallace Kvetdeno Sch.-.neKnleeptUa S. Sine. ier Kiiun Re.I* Wnlfe. Schoonee Baasaaaa, MbasoaaM i>mtac. ighoopot %  uaaaias H. loaaaeai AI I.I Scoo.mI .1 Counaeller. Schemer Lady Siliet. Motr Veaael T R Radar Motor Veaaal Gloria Maria. Moles Verl V..n. lia. S-hooner Lucille M Smllh. aVhuoiv U HI WhUtal ARRIVALS 1 tactile M Smith. 74 loo.. i-pi llauall. from Brm.h Quiana. Agent. Mea.1. Robe.I Th,.m Sch-mer Harriett hit taker. W lom Capt. CaaSSSr, from Martinique. AgrnK; S*neoi.OT Owner.Auoculktn S Hoa*Or. l.tTS tone. Capt Kr.t.m. froan MMnu AS Wi r U Mraara, S. P. Muoan, Sam. OS 01 r\i, 1 1 BBS SB. LASS Rodney. 4.BBS I It'l1. PM •> t %  AgaSMfl M...i> U otasaa w AuMIn a Co. Ud. Srh.ar.rr Plornr rmmanuel. 00 ton-. Capt Roberu. for Fi.hiia Bank. Agent*' seBtaa Sc.wcll ASaiVALH BV *• I % ON SATl'RPAY %  reaa Trlaldad A t.ral.an. B Wrethrrhead. II Yotma. W leuna C la-ung. K Le.ma. J. leuna. T. Lea Yuen a Lee Yuen J. Lea Yuan S II Goneale*. A Buan 1 Las —... J Lanaean. D. Lrnaawr, C lee 04UM. K. Bar.. J Evan.. C John.on Y J.rnoUkM M Haudu. T Cornell Matlhr*. M Jr.mli. M Irl.lma. II FVIdn^r. E Skerle, l( lit own. I. Mamr. Meadi-n. W William. K Marcelle, ktltreft, A Allnofl. I> Nurar. I. r.. S AlUmhy. H. Allamby, It K 1. tui .' Bolgran v Da p CoamstL n iir.. t Uo.ul, C Awai, R. Hinda. Jl HI., T Bun>on, V H..-her J Anlirr V Aieh.r t: Ar.hr. \ • 01 1 in 1 .1BT BR I A ; 1 %  t'XII'll I. Allhur NntlMn. Ml U—\Mi Pascal M .make. Mr. Andre I Mi. Matroetila Rrli. M rke, Mr. Aura r.meir.1.. Mr. Car.._s naueredo. Mr. Aimando TiemaiUa. Mi. Tulade T.emariaa, Mi. laobal I'odol-ika Matin Michael PcaSoktcka, Mr i;..irge Knddam. Prol. Oril Heaaloy The Nrwa. 10 p Mv In'^'iI S p m Sundn. Half Hour, lapm S II pm Eik CoAtea. S U pm Arthur Inn. alt pm EnglUli Maguine. 0 44 unme Parade A 7 1*1 p m The New*. 7 IS pm Ham* New. Pram Britain 7 IS NUpaa. SBBHSM 7 IS p m Cant.be." Vnbraa 7 *^ Sunday Sen lee a IS p ... R-du. Na> m Interlude. S.M pm From the sftU. Mrial. • 00 p m rrom The Ptonirn...!. N St • The Nw. la If 1. m Nrw. Talk. IS IS p m. Lo.,d.ai Tftrum. 10 45 p m RVIWIama Talk MONDAY At'OVST 11 ISM I SB — Lit p aa IB.7SM M MM 4 oo p in The New.. 4 IS p an The I..in SeivHC. 4 I) i> m A 1 %  < itic 4 4* p in Make MBM Slvle SOD Brh Co-lea. 1 II Yorkc. J S p m Interlude 4 OS p n' M.lah Macallans 4 IS U.I' 0 43 p m Sport. Round-Up and P. %  ,,..iiin,r 1'ardd*. 7 00 p m The New.. 7 lo p m Horn* Mew* Prom 7 11 IBM pa*. SUailBI 7 IS p in Book. To Bead A The Art>. 7 A p an. Ballade A Song%  IS p Radio Newueel. I S.irw> t 4S p in Interlude. %  P m Pmn lhe Editorial., BOO p m The Voice of Michael Vane. ISpn MontO-BTS, 10 0B p it. The New. I.i IS p m New. Talk, IB 1ft p m The Health IH Man. 10 M p in Tip To,. Tuxee Belgian^ Slrikc Against Mililaix Conscription BRUSSELS. Aug. 9. Fifteen thousand Belgian strikers paraded in pouring rain through the streets of Brussels in a protest against the two-year-old military conscription, while strikes paralyzed the industrial basin of Liege and other areao The strikers, carrying umbrellwand dressed in raincoats, sen' shotitB of "down with the 24 months!" hurling through (histreets as they marched tan abreast led by the Committee of the Socialist controlled Qeneral Federation of Labour. A large percentage of llio fjgt%  aVNaTtntors w iii. fliirlnt ""' i arly months 'of the year, in the coast waters 'of llarbadns. St. Vincent and the 'Grenadines, feeding at the sur'fsce wherever the plankton Ii 'rich or darting after shoals of "pelagic fishes. It Is a mighty "monster 45 to 50 feet long with "small. Hat head, wide mouth. "vast ttuttii expansible thio.il .win %  iiiwiK'iiMUpptn I'liiiirusly scal"loped at the edges." Bamboo "st.it. -. Uiat .i larga %  I •vagaga of tin barrali "of oil, eat-h containing :in galIons; the snialle"t. front eight to 10 barrets; and that as many as 14 whales navg baistl killed ui I MM sot i giving ii viel.l of ii.o I. .II ,.-: oi mi Wh • pity this industry kg no longer extant to help out our local fata and oils tuppliev' can help you to success through personal postal tuition %  I*BSRAVtMbg ov MEN n imnortant nrauttom were ones aTudenai of The Bcitacn C>llcgc. Ihe> owe their sue t eas to Personal Poseat I uituxi — The Ben net ( College way V-ai have ihc tame rhajani m qumlif* for B fine career, higher pay and tonal Handing. One of these courses will lead to your advancement gaastaaat a^arataiaS Uia^a<^t '""*>'l % % %  tl.b Sb:*rl. Mlltaauliai tom.(iii.rl(~.(t O.M-.I la.oli*a Coaling Ce ( .. B H. AgrlruHaea A.. Ml'l.l. A"i.alt Hn-li-ir.i a %  c..-..-... C* ira -—ir t Ola..l Bnflm OiH,(llllnil-, ,p Rnfl-.• '... art* v>.-. a %  j III.HW.T %  I ""' %  I C.liUCl nil UI t-i'Mt.O irglAMl %  C'HtPIl ... M.MI tVarai • m %  *'•< i-g .. -.. — ,.,... ooviMM if itoot —I URTinun f'RIIHCAIIOf I v -at* CDUCATION m. 10BM SI NO TODAY ) '** *• areiferras aa a M „. ~i. l~m ,Aea A BLESSING TO MOTHERS! JACK and JILL COUGH SYRUP With Vitamin C STOPS KIDDIES COUGHS & COLDS In a Jiffy AND TASTES SO GOOD THEY BEG FOR MORE! lor IlltW I..I... .am. daw. f'"tn <'..i.l. lo tav. hlouin>ou. ,lddi item tl*. mr.,ac l cou.li. ai.u >id. that nan, on and trad lo n. .tlh JACK and JII.L llw> nn.ly. anln> .Old. ud bad cuudhi ,o fa.tar Ihan >oo ..uld balicv. powlblo. And how UWy love In. plouanl laila of JACK and JILL. rrs New. DIFFERENT SAFE JACK an.l JltJ. la new but thoroughly U.ted In Ihouaand. of caaea and Ii guaranteeil to rellrve kiddle*' rough* ami old. la-, anything you have aver turd, and moat Important of al JACK and JILL i. gAtl I ON ISBlWI t.-t.ll^r Another famous Buckley Product >ii Iluekla^'l Mill l>, and la sa fa-t an. i for >our own. Q moui Buckley Laboratoriee %  largeal %  ailing cough and r kiddle-.' 4. aBur k ley'a if JACK and JILL TODAY Mom-niii-i For Eva Peron • i r..r-i page I the benefit of out of town mourners. The Buenos Aires province legislature approved a bill yesterday to rename 1-a Plato, the politicil capital, Eva Peron. A group of legislators In S.in 1-uis province introduced a simDat hill in their legislature to rename San Luis also Eva Peron. In Buenos Aires, municipal workers asked the Roman Catholic Archbishop of Santiago. Cardinal Copello, to begin beatiih-iition proceedings to make Senoru Peron a Saint. —UJ. RATES nr EXCHANGE sighi or rtemand Draft. Tat/14-. I-, c <'i 11 I/I0'. rr. Currency I %  %  Coupona I BB-. PT. Bllvrr J CAN All A Tl BVI4-. Pr Cheque. „n 1 llankrr. Demand Diafi. High! IHafl. 7 Pi Cable %  l I lo Pt Cuirenq, 1 t 10** Pr i j inI-, NEWS FOR SUOMiEKPERS IIKIII. ..,..1.\ JACOB'S PATTKH.X till Vllll SCALES S36.IB al GENERAL HARDWARE SUPPLIES %  iCatrrr STBEET iOpiw.lt. r onif-) -PHONE dill fm\ DIAL 4684 4723 GALVANISED MESH WIRE a all sizes and gu.fei in belt quality a SPECIAL LOW PRICES A. BARNES & CO.. LTD. GIVES MOR! Esso Extra Molor Oil lengthens the life of your tar because it contains: lifcLJb jyaWL XML I 1. "Special Detergent" that -fights carbon and varnish deposits; 2. "Oxidatio.1 Inhibitor that -redi!;e5 oxidation of lubricant: 3. Special Ingridient" that -prevent; corrosion of alloys; 4 and duo to its unequalled High Viscosity Index it iirintains adequate body at any motor operating temperatu;?. ESSO STANDARD OI.



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PACE FOI K M \ll\\ \II1IH Ml 81 MDA1 U LIST III. 1932 This is the NEW Carton for YENOS COUGH MIXTURE ^^-55 it. i> B-. C ndl' I VENO S in GH MI\M RE, but although itae can mcdni'it instd* ihc boltk is the wmc %  vondcrful u %  coughing MUdi. rating Ihc brrjltuna. MU t H | \1 N.iSuieonlfor i STOPS COUGHS QtitCKLY f that grooms and feeds your hair! SilvilnnLolionwiih Oil is a complete hail MMnWM imisrll 11 supplies the natural oils which dry hair Licks; ii acts M .1 dBS* ln| as well asj health -giving lotion %  n COM f '.tin; hait' natural food, A few minutes" daily manage *ilh SilwLnn lotion with Oil will bring new lilc. health JIIJ ui-iln. to yotU hair, and will keep it pcrfcctlv proomed In rC Ua JtOOt the .1 IJ Silvikrin LOTION WITH OIL %  Mfcta. ItSr IWtl—>*i WMiWliMMMM<*^whMlMifek i>t (ooHeKrrtMa'fd-nOiai'foW. Doctors Prove ... A Lovelier Complexion in 14 Days />f**Sk AS*)* For a Brighter, Fresher Complexion, use Palmohve Soap as Doctors Advised ttedinsj skin ipttioliit* proved that u. *• M M ..H ,..IBIN •-...•* Folaiolive Soap can improve com%  *-*—* *--*• *-* ptoxiom in many woyi. Oily shin looks *Mn'i Mb, -•'. — %  >•• *-' lots o'.ly-dull, drab skin wonderfully I %  ** ***"• • * M ** briftittr. Ceertt-leoking skin appears finer. HumaM Gfvl vi"ir family 1 ili..-< -with deliAm racisttbatctfli hrac&baKl IM ix.ir*. Vbornrrorit. d.slusar. irkfa ... %  .., il.rt. n...rt gsfag Srid. KIIM -and KLIM nirm and ii (0 n nixirisiinicni — xti M IM| 1. KLIM it par*, soft miia 2. KLIM ktep. without !••*; %  iqr*tlc 3. KLIM quality is always ualferm 4. KLIM isaicallont far growir.f tl '.).* 3 KIIM AM| NryaisMvwr 10 cocwa DIJWJ 6. KLIM li rccoTnmcndcd fr infant frcdia j 7. KLIM It iaf In nse spocloll/-packce1 Ho 8. KLIM Is prod.-.J yndir itris. nt eenlrU Toko y~—-^ pure woter, ^ add KIIM, slir <, you have pure, safe milk KLIM s MILK NUT IN rHIFIItNC: THE WOLD QVt* i W.I. BOARD STILL BUNGLING Congrats Queen** College By ". S toi'i'i\ 1 toning .it enee, agam t^-day u. •ithroming tour of India to the Weal I expressed the hope that the Weit Indie t<> usher in a false Utopia on the #V in loam. In other words at* 1 .1: o few ion all and the same foi their eorvtcofl In tho Indian tour. I understand on reliable authority thai Thev have and in the abachce of anv 1 ..liable information to the contrary we Ucd to entertain tho view in the circumstanced. PROFESSIONALS ALREADY INVITED *T*IIE Board have already Invited the professionals and we ttad conditions undei which thev were Invited. The M.'M'. pubUtll these before they embark on overseas torn n Impend cricket tew at home. Why cannot the West Indies do the Mime ? 1 have always deprecated the smugness and complacency of certain West h %  Hoard officials but it seems as if (here has now been .< comp .11 of values and of their responsibility to the West Indian cn.ket public and to Wc-l Indian Cricket lUelf. TIIK TOl'R WILL FM>P I''' ft* Wl h < A k. I l; LTd ol Control do not obtiim %  > the serviti-s of the p u to be %  pi rt *'f the Trimdad Indians, the U.C.. Indiana or the Saskatchewan Red IndlMU. If it is the intention of the new Board to set up a Trtnidad Kremlin and to issue important information bv means of onnt.iviews as they are now. let them be warned that 1 to like) bayMil WhO Will move heav.n and earth to see thai tln-v Wnon • nwatliii In B.O.T wire Why hdS ii"' tt pi .in bean %  ppointad OUEElVS COLLEGE SCOKK NBTBALL WINS M gTB tu l at lQBJ Ihll week include the Queen's CQaHga Hatball team i s. far they 1 rrs havinif a!i< %  T.iearlgua Orphanagi ifi H. HL-.II T( ANSI* %  High Bchool 16. si il tub 17—10, Kol', Name Convent IS—4. Bishop Anstey's High School Old Girli 1, 3 Pat BroWtWl 1 t a) 1 nting has been the outstanding feature from the point of view of Individual performance* and e Smith was only slightly less brlilii CONGRATS MRS. WOTTON Uon must exclude nil others. U that the Moved by the girls mirrors in eflecUon the vtaun, mooBtry and foresight of into the match winn.ng force it has that of Yv B UT whal ini! 1 :ii reflect) .V.'tnll. fla 'he t turned out so handsomely to be. t night and the %  >et come to hand. Whatever the result the overall performance of the tear %  .. % %  > aa OiP be tl OO In another %  top In tho commendable dm-vtion >f an unofficial West Indle< SportinK Federation. TRINIDAD TABLE TIA'.NIS TKAM COMING I N this aame vein wa tpntt tho anlvn| of a table tennis team that is due frooo Trinidad thai mok-ood. The vi.itnrs repreaent the San Pernan % %  Zone of the Trinidad Unateui Til k :.iiion. a will be reanombered thai an AH Trlnktad looni Barbados in 1!M"> nov/hon withm the reoich 01 negotiation ol tho local tennis pit 1 %  In in galea a* it obviof judging our Jai Brl1 Q TIIK CAPTAIN Dr. Nohir sot 1 n thi town has made n name in table tennis for hinisell He brings with hint egperie'-ee of this game t I1..1 !v rOBKOrinldnd at tinWorld gamea m 184B. ini'du :d :lu 1 England and on< ulna ibe championship uf th. Carl Williams, the present South Trinidad champion and raowlch Debytbigh ^ formal Mnldad Ohampl a will fogm with i)r. 1 bio "f experience and skin that IU table %  SUPPORT n< ped then the publ.c will turn out i' to lend their moral and financial enture ilnce pubUc %  upporl alone will deekle •rrMther or not Barbados should take a decent place in the Intcrcol)R N X K K \II lonlal sport Un Tne newi tii.it Ken Farnum will take part in the World Games in Paris this month ehoiU. to lOT kl sportsi-if.i t that he a .11 be turthi anal Amateui C PARS! M I (HI PARIS llr i. In thi ('h 11 roOClUded although he did not win .' in one ot the heati ha more than established bis bona fides and there will ! %  little ilisanreement with the view exprewed In Helalnkl thai experience In individual effort and lack ol teamwork on the level required foi this type competition were %  %  %  showings We are all hoping that rarnum will ti^ given the opiwrtunlty to peas on his knowledge to other Wn.t Indian candimorO BO be able to train our local cyclists along the liner lines Which he himself must have had to develop at enmparetlvetj snort notice nnd which he must ol tinue tn develop. Racing Details 1 WI.NI \ I t>l KIM R \( i. length from Blue DaJini-iiile Ham,!! aji d who had also beaten Joan*Mi J t*rnnA place by three %  %  1 IVI NTY-I H.1ITII K \< B Itrckwith Handicap %  1 . reached In terday. —another 1\%, leaving a Held of M i.l 12616 fLur—Mary Aim lYvonet). Top he won from a Beld o* five, beatFlight (Lutchman), Cross Bow ing Facrle Quoone into | sad Apollo (P. Fletoh%  a dear 3 lengths. ite Hew, they all After a false start, the field %  a good start, and for the centually got off to a good >no : passed up the stands for BM lirs* time at a gruelling pace with At the four, however. Thttkell TOO Flight slightly in the lead Apple Bern to the frotW, f"uwed by Mary Ann on the rails and striding beautifu.lv. he ayodA '"' 11 !" Cross Bow bringing up ually fncrea^ed his lead, mainu "„ Fe,r A.. ., „ all the way down the Top night w-* now dellnitely when they reached the the Clock a"d up the home stretch. Uiree furlong pole with Mary Ann HUB left Super Jet who had ^""\ T ,"* g"* "!* ft* TS? for the second place. gygf bv thp llme "^ "* t0 There were brisk exchanges of .. !" h h f„r1on mle !" ^ir.'; 8 W. '<""'< VmtUoa ilh rro.^ Bo. rWENTY-nVTH RACE i >, „, i..s.!" i.-heel, 0/Mar> Yirloriji llHlldimp Ann who wu .--Till neond --^-—1 u. loni-r noil over nine furlongs. There Ihroimh Inn tne outuae and i-orauoUMr ood lUti. but M '",i %  ,"'':,.,, ...,,„ „ .,.. %  %  1., TWl.STV NINTH KA( E taut and itaytd than. He ^ Nnrlh ,> Air I m was second. Cottage ( ""' '" ThC A .'. r ',. ThD A ir piloted by BledOa third with BfU* mover ( as le In The Air %  Wild,,, bringing up the t;;; \. i.iev ,... %  ed the band anhig l "' ,ri ,* ll V ,'." ""' 1 '' 1 ' '" 1 "'" '''"' towards the live furlong pole *"'<1 polo hill Gavotte look took over from Cot^^ *• Lack Wretch, bowl strung out with "VOT, llarrowcen, Qutcd up. reJoan's Star still m the lead with jUsted" the lead which Castle In Blue Diemond second. The A.r had. and whole field On nearing the four furlong pole came together in a bunch. ..i> a bit but failed Angling the curve to come Into to overtake Gavotte who vvas still the home stretch, ft was still lying in the third position. Tho Castle In The Air on the rail, but field raced past the two furlong llarrowcen, coming with a great 1 biS position and it was not burst of .speed, overtook bun and until they reached tho bend that finished first 11 lengths in front. thing* began to happen. Coming Ken Cheeka also finished well up the straight, Gavotte came fnuu and stole the 2nd place from the outside in a driving finish to Castle In The Air by half a length. iFiuiii Oar Ov*i LONDON. Aug. 9. Rain again caused havoc with the County Cricket programme i d in two matches, those between Surrey nnd Midi|.esex and Notts and Worcester, no play at all was possible. Both will commence on Monday under the twoday rule. The day's only century was j.cored by Northampton's Australian left hander Jock Livingston who made 106 before being bowled by Smith of Derby. Thanks to Livingston':effort. Northerns recovered after being four for two and finished the day 173 for four. Only a couple of hours' play was possible in the Indians' game with Gloucester at Cheltenham. During that time Emmett and Young scored 96 without being .. p.n atetl. Lancashire ran into trouble at Portsmouth where Hampshire dismissed them on a damp wicket for 133. Only Cyril Washbrook. back in the side after missing five games and batting in his unusual position of number five faced tho lure bowlers with any confidence. He made 45. Shaekleton finished with four for 26. Hut Lancashire are still in there lighting for before close they had captured three wickets for 47. SCOREBOARD Kent versus Leicester Kent 74 for four (rain). Hants versus Lanes Lanes .., IM Hal 4 7 for three Yorkshire versus Suaaex Yorkshire 87 for three (rain). cHouctwler vrrsva The Indian* Gloucester 06 for no wicket (rain). Essex vrnia Warwickshire Warwickshire 228 (Dollcry 76 Essex 28 for no wicket NarthanU versus Derby Northants 173 for fout (rain. Somerset versus Glamorgan Glamorgan 115 for 5 h MUG forge Jan od handy Tsts %  Rheumatism. Aches, Sprains, Insect Bites & Stings Apply healng. toothing THERMOGENE Medicated Rub where the pain it. Its penetrating medicated warmth relieve* thi congemon and charrt" away the pain. Rub wel In except when app!/m,to bites and stmgt Wu-.t-l.f P..rl "33P! DOUBLE-ACTION THERMOGENE MEDICATED RUB In big glass jars and handy Tins over-forty overstrain! HiMd.Li'hes, Indigestion, lank if energy. Inability to to nop titrate, are often the consequences of the physical and nervous strain caused by overwork and worry. To restore your digestive and metabolic tone, strong-then your nerves and Inorauo your energy, start taking Phyllosan taWcts to-day I Just two tablet* three times a day before meals, but If you take the tablets regularly, the ^ results will astonish you. PHYLUM fortifies the over-forties ATLAS PAINTS combine robust and economical protection with splendid decorative finish. Sugar Ettate Managers. Engineers. Building Contractors. Architects, tpeclfy ATLAS TROPICAL CRAOC dUNCUi RISISTAN'l PAINTS PRODUCED IN ENGLAND BY THE MAKERS OF "ATLAS A" WOOD PRESERVATIVE Ovtadi ovmtoblt ftorr H. JASON JONES a CO. LTD.. P.O. Box 141. Barbados. ATLAS TROPICAL GRADE ATLAS PRESERVATIVE CO. LTD.. ERITH. KENT. ENGLAND (agas



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SCNDAT ur.rsT m liti SUNDAY AI>V(M ATI PACE SEVEN "V/;\ ir nottk Southern Belles In Northern Climes I ISIIIUMII IX lMON IK IMIIIOI II* ll\IIH3 I 1 Wttcn uaeheU* glilin Montreal foresjathrr to up aivd play cnlspao recording*, it is probably the British West Indian colony now living in Canada and employed by Trans-Canada Air linn A closely knit community of eight girl* and one young man from %  ml Joan IdFWta and the >!JV<. a TCA temational terminal, Ven Bra Sheila Lewis iamg4 .Hi-port ai a %  the A.T.S. during the war. and with ihe Cable Wireteas Company In Barhodos. Joan, her %  later, id employed with the HUJJI I lank of Canada One uiuiK-ti new Canadian, and another former resident ut Barbados the Cable k il Marion NlchoU, a of several iians-contint settling in .lions department of Ilmiot llealli. daughtei ul Mi-. [da Heulli of Kuckiev OW Ha.tings, is also . TCA'e: 1 and itlanded Queen's College. Barbados, and Bishop Anstey High School In Port of Spain. The attractive 18-year-old Barbadian Is present I > Ltasj nifcht %  chOOl lo qualify i^autlclan, und recreotinnr.lly hi beeomlng proficient in tennis, dmiring and skiing in DM LniPMlUaM, Man Mvut%wn MWMMi, HKISSE8 — ye*. WHEN ITH A Ql MTION Ol illfullj made by latOI sirT on no as unit slU'i (-HATEAU MUSS SHOP Th* ^"^Si, ""tAvTsSS. ,l> ,*n,„i ktolin Coulr> „ EBD S h .v,. tn. %  ) complei Hod o Bn a Ualiihtful Hoc* .„„.. ,.,„ r „,,,, ,,. dFW SJ. ••ETtr *""** "" HfKoll-i Appliaaco. Th. m .tylpd li.r your pur* . 4^ Suww.rU. Woo Pad-1 could tell you.. okii.Mu. t IIVKM in me tan dsjvi ,i li.ialMasi mjr of liracek'ir holiday gifu m1 I inat are mo>. Itractm und Nui cxp*iu>iv>. rom uni.[>.i, fOJ. tin mat tn, .. fMaffnaal m Lamp*, and ttowu paaj 1 >0U 11 Do.. ,UMI 111 TM| oKlavNTAl* Slid I cornel ol Hign i. tpn. 4fAHJ, 1 branch of burn i niteo answer—*nd Dr. Scho.. the name: Cave Shepherd Ltd 1.1 Bkm ^1 vu\<. mi i vsv \. %  0*1 but nut as easy as i looks To those who linger Ion •nd look and (hereby get no when ..llov. me to Introduce the com [ the new term at th %  ilNGKK SEWVO ACADEMY OI. Vase* AUGUST 18th. These popula rlaato will get underway wit.. .he Imparting of you* T.htru.tioo HI draw designing .mil dtlng, And with Mn U.ldred Walkins and >taff you i %  .11. can Dial 4M7 TMI tH"3i.N"t'?OHCANT %  el !" .,**** *-•'-. *%  *•. * %  *—. (MONO Selling Up Nights Makes Men Old nttitnf u p ljr.f^ saralng atnaa Uon ol V (**ni -Milan <1UV liara> •all Mb* ai t.. or '"•. frWa%  ana Mas of atanlr < *• with the flight operations group. Joan de La Baslide Ul training; to be a dancing teacher, with a plan to eventually establish a dancing school In Trinidad, whereas the Louxenco girls are both matrimonial bound. Dora will settle in Toronto and Gloria In Montreal with their future husbands TELETYPlgT The nimble an Another section of the colony gen of Sbeua Lewis at work on occasionally hj attendance at the massages to Trans-Canada Air Unas' creole fetes Is the Ba>badla:i, fifty-two stations. 1U1 a different colour. A blark rge dress, wtth square neck an < %  %  Mow duches satin boNtu B* DOROTHY BARKLFY *rrr of the all-round, accordion ovei 'hjaea went a shrer-quartrr iriet) with ihr pleats lengtu black corduroy coat with LONDON, July 17th, 1952 iU[ M nnely that thta \ %  Will lajndon's Top Eleven deshraighL nor. A "'' igners. due to show Iheir colletsquare, padded shoulders have, lole lined with while -ilk KOIU.K1.S CO. FOR Uttll. • 1 iiioMKt realii meena whs .> sajrs, sni.iH of&ee deeh acisMUie) UL) ii BaYM lH.HJ.tK DAftirU*.and nYTAMP HACKfcV An inois'.•'iii is ,,11 ink atafht iov LU2 and Uic ueal LetbM Hceiei 101 SS.JU and 1110.-1 ..1 Brtantasaj ,i-chuu (from }4.bU %  ainong^ an almost Midi> '•1 otnee fequiaftas on sen • .Kobei-U Co.. Dial 3Sol. 1 St ALIA BRKinF. J1MM\ (I \ n.O is a s.eolumn ad feeturing .he new K. R. Hunte 8t Co. Ltd Been it' Been tn it" Fbi Mr. & Mis. Public, this aUractivsiore has modt thinttA %  irtually all things ippllcable to an OAcc including Stationery. Don't hang annum 1 In! Ix>ok at the • 'locks, the Toys, thi Coods— %  above all. the aatonlshin^ Or phone 5' M. SO YOC WANT A MIRROI. the fortnight's time, estabrP|r r e ttably replaced the fern n .: Ptd silk Jem Coronation lounded line cummerbund. And %  black-and,,l wniUf check velveteen jacket. Banosjl black hopstack. navy velwHJ chk placed diagonally an ksAasgi and stone barathea rweed i*"-ket ami curt facings, was worn t ovoi a straight black skirt. %  let striped with white. Cocktail drw-i In silk with a tan with grey, rust with bottle polka do! pattern looked i [ the suita h.ad Illustiaied Is one in sherry lions lish a new look Vear? What will follow romantic revival" of last year, which brought back full skirl I billowing out over crinoline p<-m coats, and the "Middy" look this year, whu h echoes the low. round-lhe-hip w-ilstllno a n d straight skirtltne <-f thf 1920's? VOL' IIAVt; NtVLR SFt-N SIOKK 1.1 hi llll> ONh—Liv long, long lime At GtOUUt H>* YOIR BATHROOM WALL >.\uKI.^ & CO. oil Bw*n Si, -*nnoiig other tilings' ThLs tthere's a near daily nbn where to get almost everv typ%  P"""* 4 • %  MlltiMF. BATHROOM FITvaiues. whew Look at Uus r|NG you've been looking for. UAMlltlAY, Ml WKW in nhoMM \! u/dus Co-op Cotton Factory of ix colours foi , ., yard an< .,, %  Shower Roses, Tov. Bl .olluig oui of its wiappuig paper their > Hint of future fashion comt Ms week from Peter Itussell. \nv one of the first to rc-mi i with the Jacket lining. A black hupsuck suit had the Jacket lined with bui %  %  .tifd was one oi uif ursi 10 n-imiu ,ir-inim silk and u ulnust 1 due. tt,o Urdl;n ptkl. Sg^SlfeX,,. iTrt ^ JUL f 9 v 6 N B> % % % % % %  X i: i %  tsvr 1 1* Si K *^~ fl %  leek," possibly with a retun to reed-slim skirts, sheath dresses and crisp tailoring Whatever the style to b launched, overseas buyers ar regarding "Fashion Week' Ifn July with more than usual interest. They consider these collections an important preliminary u Coronation Year. Special social events have been arranged for them. Foremost among these "I* the garden party to be glvtn JJj Lady Kenneth Clark, President ol Ihe Incorporated Society of Loodon Fashion Designers, at her house In Hampstcad. the home light gtuy worsted siiawi collari on i ok grej eroratedi suits Ith to .(thing cardigin -\-IIH1I fimges-a: i-Hhor end. nccompanyina su sn for all types and new ha old cotoura ffset each time "blueWrry" and "green grass" What's Cooking In The Kitchen suaigni into vagvi siioppint; oaskeu. i> yours one ol IAIBI, deUnr hurry along, new stock level wain ..i lii.umit SAIILLI CO. HUN BAKKRV MAS THr ONLY MAI IIINk „f its kiua oi, I he Inland. Tnat's wuy HAiUiA UOS UAKKJUES LTD. (ph. 47S. can size and atiape any kind ol toaf; why, too. uiey can produoi i the ideal hot-dog HULL—the real InacCoy, and tiitMii Bl(LAi> and the %  nn^ii.il WHAPl-ti' 1 .UK that are but iiukj h | range of ten difttliictui %  kj .ne Iii.ide to your dooi ruinblrr Holders and sctcw-on dltlngs. Mirrors measure 12' an %  16 and are priced from $U.JJ innings CXtril). No UM listing all tho Items — ther*' are mam mure—drop in and take a look. i i:••. i •lanl Ihral.l.Hi* auk.Ua a mk \l.n.hr.d..'n W tmmri b th UJ1 w al IU kafeMis hi pvtlwm lKir IHIIHI .!„ %  ,.i :.-.,< aaV NMU • %  ••• and •!' bWd. |(fcha>Tslsaas4psaMr-ssasiBi tha KiUn. Krada.hr>. taWucas. f4a*nulH saaM, dadwasa %  nsa* lhn *•. law. D-drf. K-W. P.ll. kWla. -ur Uaetye' / ibu sul trMbtV-awhmi pnina and oeaaa scidaiarkaiyaali>Uaw raaltWaf •ari bain. Get OeSd's tods,. |M/. Oodds Kidney Pills ITCHiNG STOPS QUICKLY Tbouisndi af farmer %  uffereri blew D.D.D, Prt* vnpfloti fer rebef fhun I .irnu, lihin; Toes aal Bad Leg. llthiag M ohed br die Irs %  ouch ami toon e" •.km I^P**M Spou, pimplct sndother ui'iA knd v.:r....,huidtr you're aasureo ; M7 a Kt seller and U should rn plant briimu JOUI ,^ „, your dealer's shelf if itarllc, thyme, tomnt SU'iimcd Snapper | an* -Sjuippt-i I ll>s., sail, peppci. %  BU *S onion, ognrot celery, in.ii.i, After cleaning ihe flsh, dry It parsjaa/, bBIMr J OL, MfeUj) W ui, UilS5 m our nd P ul u "' n h .or a on oi ituii. Hour, -i taon "' *'"' I'H'tr of ennpnog in spoi,iiiui. in.mi og • ueapen or pyre*, dish so thai DUlg, !''•'>' rest in Ihe bottom. Add Hab< cut ii n. .i lew pails %  OfOg olive oil und let tho oil ger and .seaaun Luaade and out. cu>p ''"' ^s soon us one side is cook • parsley, IhygOS, ' ,ur " over on the other Mile. carrot and oaltrj and ^ut evegy%  eneon with salt, pepper, chippee unng at the bottom ol Pyrtt onion, parsley, a tiny bit of gari ui UM lisu on lop alter thyme. I^t It frv for n few such modern artists as Graham buttering it and put It in the oven. BMButes. -hen ad.i thin Sutherland and Henry Mo-ni-et u oook lor lu muiutex, Uicn ""n.iio sauce (al>ut tablewho both lk< coi aM thai dish out and pour the siwonsful) I^>t everything boll cat in contemporary industrial 2 gtaase* ol white wine over it aud n# mother two minutes and design. a liny bit more of melted butter. *wve hot Lady Clark, wife of Sir KenLet everything cook now until >Slemed Snapper neth Clark — chairman of the ihe fish Is qiuto ready. Take it Another recipe for steamed Arts Council — hopes to stimulate nut of the oven then, if Ihe sauce snapper. interest In fabric design and is thick enough you can serve it Supper, olive oil, oOlon, garlic, colour. on tho flsh but if it is still thin pj i ley, whale tlMBfitrrti n ttmgho Waiting for the Top Eleven add a tiny bit more butter with ,n ,md pepper, collections, overseas buyers have ihe tablespoonful of flour and Cut some fllleU, wash and dn. watched the signpost shows of the let it cook for about 3 minute* PU i tsucepan with London Model House Croup (the until thick. Add the cream then the chipped onion. As soon as or evaporated milk (about 1 the onion starts to fry add a tiny glass) and whip the suucklWBVi piece "f chipped garlic, and some nn_the fire until quite smooth. i hipped parsley. Let the nail •very jWJreHhw. 1ALKINO OF TAT10NLki AMI OFF1CI At i I --MIRU.S let %  .ioh t U I. MT(IN(;> l>isks and Chuus and 4-Uiartn Filing Cabinet* (leltei or fool, cap. and TYl'EWHITEItS. Thes ..ii/Miiericui and English Remliurtopj both portuble ami .standard and with the m" carrlag. fed well. Nuw this IN a i/lipped feO* count of a very wide selection. anlud.ng <;. .i -u %  i liuplicatoi. The ilisuibutors are A.S. Brydun Uilnl'' Son (U'doa) L.U1. and the phono 4675. .iot sold out' POWEHrt'L, ROOMY AND ECONOMICAL TO KI'N — mtcioaUni' At 3.10 thiily-nue hun.hed dollars) the new 9TANUAHP VANGUARD at Chelsea Oarage Ltd. in slick new colours is one .f the few cars to suit everybodj did you know it is a 6-pa*sengei ear'/ And Uie lighter, smaller MAYFLOWER S2.bW ttweiilylive hundred dollars) will giw vou one of ule in S.IIIS. Rorback sitrrl I.I.I. rr—^—tesa%nt\. '''"noubio LAdffl^a'I.fSl o^i PA MX mm WITH '.' %  fl/lF.V SACROOL KNOCKS OUT PAIN ON SAlf AT . KNIGHTS LTD. ALL BRANCHES %  Milll nmr I finrnn nn i Phensic thr /VIO/I I...-i•''•'• I >> SI I •fffi trrttr.i iifflwn HtnrlelngB PHENSIC tablets cleat the had and dispel tightness and pain behind the eyes. They bring down high tempc.irure, relieve stuffy, congested feelings, at the same time soothing the nerves and counteracting depression. The aches and pains of 'Flu disappear in no time. PHENSIC tablets act quickly and safely. They neither harm the heart nor upset the stomac h. Keep a supply of PHENSIC tablets by vou always. %  r^-: &n%ic TWO TABLETS •* BRING QUICK X RELIEF -J~ FOR FLU, COLDS & CHILLS, RHEUMATIC PAINS, LUMBAGO,NERVE PAINS, HEADACHES, NEURALGIA Ther" inothing in ilw world to *lfut and NtVwfaiag . YAROLiY(^KWliNDrR the world's moat famous Lavender a.. p./*~J mm th. /—. r.div Immmtmi w -***.o-* *-*> Ito •"< S J '" '" VSHOLBT %  b %  • %  %  • %  %  # *.•• % 



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r MI 11. HI M SI1AV AOVIM AM Sl'NDAl M 1.1 ST 10. 1M2 MipDOSssst ADVOCATE riUHt kr Ik* A**rU C#.. LM. %  % % %  *l %  %  ! Sundav. August Hi. 1952 Evrr>bod>\ lliisiiie** IN 1951 Barbados Imported uoods valued at $51,918,327. The same year the island exjHirted tioods valued at $35,464,166. The apparent deficit in 1951 of the island's balance of trade was therefore $16,454,161. In fact Barbados balances its trade by invisible exports such as tourism, remittances from emigrants, interest on capital investment abroad and by attracting overseas capital to Barbados. Of all these invisible expoits the greatest is tourism. Statistics are not kept in Barbados which would permit an investigator of the island's economy to express net receipts from tourism as so much per head of population. But such statistics as do exist prove beyond all possible doubt that tourism is after agriculture the island's principal export. Figures provided by the banks operating in Barbados show that in the elevenmonth period ended in July Barbados earned from tourists arriving from hard currency countries the equivalent of $2,433,392 (B.W.I.) These figures make no allowances for the earnings of hard currency which are hoarded by private persons and which do not reach the banks. But it would be wrong to suppose that earnings from hard currency sources represent the major earnings of the tourist industry in Barbados. The Barbados Publicity Committee has recently published tourist statistics for the year ended on 31st March. 1952. During that year 30,856 air and sea passengers disembarked in Barbados. Of that number 4,860 were resident;: returning, 319 were immigrants, 645 were students and 1,166 were intransit. No less than 10,936 were on holiday and 2,930 were on business. Omitting the 4,409 permanent residents, the 1,059'who stay indefinitely and the 222 who remain between one and six years, the remaining 15,166 visitors to Barbados during 1951 provide interesting material for speculation as to probable earnings from tourism. Of these 15,166 basic tourists, 5,279 or more than one third remained for periods exceeding one month. A total of 5,819 remained for periods between over one week and up to three, and 4.068 staved for periods of one week and under. If it were possible to arrive at an average daily injure of what each tourist spends during a stay in Barbados it would be a simple matter to calculate the total value of the tourist industry to Barbados and to subtract therefrom the total hard currency earnings. Unfortunately such a figure would be most difficult to obtain. Some tourists might spend three hundred dollars in one day others might spend the same amount in three weeks. But it ought lo be possible for the Barbados Publicity Committee with the assist ance of the banks and the hotel industry lo try and arrive at an estimated figure per head of tourists which might be used to indicate something of the value of tourism in the island's economy. How valuable that calculation would be is suggested by a very simple sum based on the approximate length of stay noted by the Publicity Committee in its latest report. If the minimum daily expenditure of the 15.166 basic tourists who visited Bar bados during the tourist year ended on March 31st, 1952 was estimated at $10 per tourist the island would hove received from tourists during that year more than four and three quarter million dollars. A more profitable line of enquiry might be the deduction from the total number of 15,166 basic tourists the 5,356 Venezuelans, Americans and Canadians who arrived during the year ended in March 1952. If 6.356 visitors from hard currency countries spent sums exceeding $2,000,000 (B.W.I.) Th the last tourist year 9.810 visitors from other countries could hardly have spent much less than twice that amount, and may well have spent more. Even with the very scanty information which is available it seems that the tourist industry of Barbados cannot have been worth less than six million dollars to the island in the tourist year cijued in March 1952. This would mean that Barbados would have earned from tourism approximately $30 per head of population. Any considerable decrease in the volume of tourist traffic would have an immediate depressing elreel on the island's economy. The sooner everyone realises the essential truth that Barbados depends on the tourist industry to increase the benefits obtained from the sugar industry the greater the income w*hich w.ll be earned annually per head of popuUv. on. Tourism —as they say in Ireland—is everybody's business. expenditure of the University College of the West Indies: to 3crutinisc current expenditure in relation to original estimates and to draw up a programme to be followed in the five-year period 1953-58. For some lime the financial position of the University College of the West Indies has been a subject for grave concern and the attendance at a meeting of the Regional Economic Committee in Barbados earlier this year of the Registrar Mr. H. W. Springer was preparatory to the eoofln ence which is soon to take place in Kingston. F'ew among those interested in education realise how the University College meets its current expenditure and hardly anyone is aware of the vast sums of money which have been and continue to be spent by the British taxpayer on the capital cost of construction of the University College. The money for capital costs is allotted under the Colonial Development and Welfare Act but it is not administered through the Colonial Development and Welfare Organisation but is drawn from the account reserved for Higher Education in the Colonies. This account is kept in London and grants to the University College of the West Indies are made direct lrom London. From a series of published statements over a period of years it is possible to piece together an approximate figure of expenditure already made towards the capital cost of the University College of the West Indies from the account reserved for Higher Education in the Colonies. This approximate figure exceeds by a large amount two million pounds. It is right that the generosity ot the British taxpayer towards the cost oi West Indian University education should be publicly recognised by West Indians. It is also ri)!ht that the West Indian community should realise that the capital cost of constructing the University College is not ended and that further contributions will be made by the British taxpayer. West Indians must realise how much they are indebted to the British taxpayer (or their only University College. At the same time they need to realise that the capital cost of the University College Is not the end of the tale of expenditure. It Is no secret that the current annual expenditure of the University College exr eils the contributions made by the British Caribbean governments lor this purpose. Seventy-six per cent, of these contributions are made by Jamaica, Trinidad and British Guiana in that order and the remaining 24 per cent. Is contributed by the Windward Islands, Barbados, the I^eeward Islands and British Honduras in a deI -ending scale of payment. One of the major occupations of the executive Committee of the Regional Economic Committee at the forthcoming conference will be to discover a means of obtaining greater revenue from British Caribbean governments. At present contributions for the current expenditure of the University College are made on a population basis. This explains why Trinidad only pays 18 per cent, of the total contributions as compared with Jamaica's 45 per cent. No doubt much will be made of this apparent disparity of assessment at the forthcoming conference. In their search to discover a formula which will ensure that contributions towards the running expenses of the College are equitably shared throughout the area the Executive Committee of the Economic Committee will, it is expected, examine in great detail the current expenditure of the College. In the original enthusiasm of the first live-year period of its existence the University College may have attempted to speed up its activities beyond a prudent limit. The activities of its extra-mural department for example might have been undertaken too soon and m too many places. On the other hand too little attention might have been paid to extra-mural nctivities in some regions. Should early enthusiasm have led the young College to undertake more than was financially prudent the West Indian public will be sympathetic towards the responsible authorities, since the inaugural period of a University College catering for such a widely scattered collection of territories and dependent on the British taxpayer for its capital cost could not be simple. On the other hand the University College must expect the voters of the British Caribbean to show increasing inter[ est in its activities. I niversiti College VERY soon tne Executive Committee of the Regional Economic Committee is to meet in Jamaica to review the arrangement for obtaining the current annual The man who keeps all Barbados laughing on Sundays NATHANIEL GUBBINS CANASTA PLAYING CARDS Complete with Instructions $2.28 per Set PATIENCE PLAYING CARDS 72? per Set &f ADVOCATE STATIONERY $ t t*&&tX&SS+'''*'**>'''~ r *'''^''''S''-''*^^ $ The splendid gvsture of the British taxpayer in contributing millions of pounds towards the University College of the West Indies and the willingness ot British Caribbean governments to bear the cost of current expenditure are wo'ihy of public recognition. But in the last resort the important factor about University Training in the West Indies is that it should cost no more and preferably less than it costs in Canada or the United Kingdom. And it is stated in well-informed quarters that it costs much more to train a medical student jn Kingston than it would at British or Canadian %  y College?. Why? IN response tu a reader's request for a half-yearly prophet v f'om Old Moore Gubbins, the imbecile sage offers the following:— AUGUST: As the full moon falls In the Eleventh House and many people on August Bank Holiday will be falling out of the public house, there will be in reased police activity at the beginning of the month. Eggs will be li short suppl>. particularly In seaside guest house*, where egg allocations, if any, will be eaten by the proprietor* and their relatives. Middle-aged pessimists will cause great depression among holiday' makers in hotels by pointing out that the line summer of IMS reminds them of the fine gumim*i> and harvests of 1914 and I93J both of which ended in world wars. further misery uiil be caused 3> warnings of impending national bankruptcy maue by po-ltlcians on the eve of Uieir expensive holidays abroad. HfcPTEMBEK: Autumn manoeuvres In Eastern Germany will give military experts a chance to tell us once more how many divisions we need to stop Ihe Russianti. They will then frighten everybody by pointing out that we shall never have enough divisions to ritop them, except <>n paper. • • e Rggs will still be In short *upply, and bronzed and (It politician-, full of foreign egg-*., will return from ihelr holidays abroad >o predict national bankruptcy if we don't work harder. K TOKER : Politicians will still l.iIdling pvople to work harde.'. but as people will know harder work me.ms more income lax. with one egg a week. thc> won't. SOVKMBI-Jt : Ruin still just round the corner. Fogs for all. Influenza for most. Eggs for nobody. DECEMBER : Ruin, and us, Jus! about to meet at the corner. Happiest Christmas will be enJoyed by turkey, who won i have lo face the New Year. Dream Kncounter T IE cricket match between Rnglaiid and The Rest Was %  Ing played at Helsinki. The Red Dean was batting at one end. the Bishop of Narking Creek at the other. Dr. Mossadeg. fielding at silly mid-off, was crying because ne had just stopped a hot one with his slomach. The fast bowler was Joe Stalin, smoking a pipe. the wicket keeper ex-Kins Farouk, who had two black eye* from a couple of bumpers, and the square leg umpire was a bear in Russian uniform. Despite his age Stalin took a run of four miles before undelivered the bau. This meant running round the boundary several limes, and made an over last about an hour. As he approached the wicket from the nursery end, tshu-tshutshuing like a tram and puffiir>.{ clouds of smoke from his pipe, a piece of paper 34 feet long blew across the pitch. "Somebody's had a good feed af sandwiches," observed a witty radio commentator. The Red Dean picked up the piece of paper. "It's a Chinese scroll," shouted the excited dean. "Get back to your crease, yoj clot, yelled the bishop. "They're not grease spots," the dean shouted back. "They're Chinese characters." When Stalin arrived at the wicket he collided with the dean t.nd knocked him flat on his face without delivering the ball. "How's 1st?" asked a Chinese grocer, who was fielding at first slip. %  Out," said the umpire. "I'm not Out," (Oared the bishop "No, but the dean is." said the umpire. "That's not cricket,' 1 said the bishop. "Don't argue with the umpire," said the bear. • • • At mat moment an aircraft flew overhead. The Red Dean made a speech about germ warfare. Farouk shouted "Dnwn with England." and hit the bishop on the head with a stump. Stalin started his run round the boundary to deliver the next ball, Mossadeg handed In his resignation • %  the umpire and fainted. 'Tea interval," said the umpire. It's not lea time yet, you stupid bear," said Ihe bishop. "Any time Is tea time," said the bear, who was fond of bun. Ulorious Twelfth If JSEN disappointment will be ** felt among their many friends at the news that J-ora and Lady Gubbins will not be lit Scotland for grouse shooUng on what it known as The Glorious Twelfth of August. As the winged insect season reaches its peak at about the same tune, this popular pair will be enjoying a Glorious rw-lfiii of their own, shooting down wasps and moths with then insecticide guns, while I-ottie the Duvll Cat plays the dual role of beater and retriever. • • • Lord and Lady Gubbins wil! DIM wear anything special for the occasion, though Lord Gubbins may wear his famous tweed Jacket. Moth's Relish, If the weather is not too hot. Nor will they open picnic hampers full uf .-old chicken, duck, ham and caviare, which appears to be the normul fare on the Scottish moors. Income lax being what it is. Lady Gubbins wUl spare ten minutes out of an exciting day to bring In fish and chips from l local restaurant. Last year Lord Gubbins. who is one of the finest shots in th. country with a spray gun, brought down a record bag of 18 wasp during the morning's shoot. Latei in the day he bagged seven large moths, which he laughingly called "four engine Jobs." Lady Gubbins, though not quite so successful with the gun, wrought havoc with a ash slice in the garden and while washing-up at the sink. At tea time she was able to point proudly to u pile of victims which included two butterflies which had beer. laying their eggs on the curly kale. Although enthusiasUc and sgile, Lottie's chief fault as a retriever Is that she is Inclined to cat the game Instead of bringing it back to the butts. She caused consternation on one occasion when It was thought she had swallowed a wa^p. But as she came to no harm. It is believed that the buzzing In h?i stomach, heard by an anxious Lord Gubbins, must have been the last convulsions of a dying bluebottle. —I.B.S "Girls Of A Feather" The more one probes into the social services of the island of Barbados the more one is amazed •it 'the ignorance which is displayed by those who accuse Barbadians of having no social conscience. Yet this Ignorance is to •ome extent explained by the fact •hat very few Barbadians know unylhlng of the social services* which exist in their midst. They are therefore poorly equipped to take up the cudgels in defence of those whose lives though little known to the outsider testify tu the desire of Barbadians to help one another. How many Barbadians for idstance have ever heard of Adah Evelyn, the Foundress of the Girls Industrial Union? How many for that matter know anything about ihe Union beyond the f.ict that it has a building facing the dry Like of Queen's Park and th;it it holds socials and on annual fete? Yet the Girls Industrial Union has playtd no small part In the •tier school education of Barbadian Kills fur forty years and is perhaps the most Important women's agency In the Island for bridging the gulf which exists between the fifty or more different social grades which compose Barbadian society. he moat staggering fact about Girl? Industrial Union in my lion is the multiplicity of i] groups or clubs which operwithin the Union. There sre, I was told, 18 clubs In the Union and each club is composed Of glrll drawn from similar trades professions. Girls of a feather Hock together would be the easiest way of explaining this social phenomenon. I think it worth mentioning because so much nonsense Is talked in Barbados about tueial co-operation that the startlint! sul.-ciivlt.lons or Barbadian society In which shop assistants have precedence over kniUlrigmill operatives and typists represent the aristocracy of girlhood an overlooked in the general lioth-blowlng. The Union's Club system is the nearest attempt to even out this. social malaise — the gaps beta I en the sub-units cf the social strati — that 1 have seen in Barbados. These gaps It Is matt important lo not* have nothing to do w.th race. They are the logical outcome of an education system which has encouraged girls especially to regard climbing up the social ladder as one of the most worthy of objectives. At the same time no other system would have produced such worthwhile results. By refusing to be wooly-minded und up In the clouds, and by encouragi'igj formation of separate clubs, tne Committee oi the Girls Industrial Union have brought together under one rocf girls from many of as social levels of Barbadian society. And inevitably due to close proximity some of Uie itandofrUhnesa and aloofness of the superior social groups has been rubbed off. The Girls Industrial Union therefore represents a long standing r.chicvement in the social history t,| Barbados. It would be impossible to praise too highly the vision and enthusiasm of its Foundress and it would be churlish and unfair not lo applaud the devotion and service of those ladles of Barbados who continue today to build on the foundations laid by Adah Evelyn. Yet the question must be risked: has the Girls' Industrial Union today reached a turning of tho ways or has it many more years ef service to fulfil in its traditional groove? By George Hunte That ts a question which I am not equipped to answer But it is a question which can only be asked by someone with some knowledge of what the Girls' Industrial Union d^es. Basically the Union is comprised of clubs the members of which ere drawn from similar social classes. These clubs have two functions — utilitarian ond social. The utilitarian role of the club is expressed in the organisation of classes. Union girls engage in a wide range of activities. Thiy manufacture attractive baskets made from reed grass: they make s.sal table mats and ethereal looking "loofah" hats. They engage in manifold knitting, crocheting, and cloth weaving activities. Slippers, shoes, net-sandals and ymocks are produced in thtir large Club-Hall Cakes and pastry making occupy girls in the kitchen. And when I visited the Union's Hall last week I was delighted to find three enthusiastic ladies making children's toys under the supervision of a male i.mateur carpenter. I have often been told by the welfare experts that Barbadians have rio native skill at handicrafts. This may be true., i am not * welfare expert nor an expert of any kind. But I wonder whether the experts arc not missing the I'•' and Fittings in Gnlviinisc and Copper Galvanise Water Heads, Down Pipes and Eave Gutters. C. S. PITCHER & CO. . 4472 TO OCR PLANTER AND TRADER FRIENDS You ran now obtain A MONEY INSURANCE POLICY which will afford you cover against loss of money whilst intransit between your premises and Uie Bank (or other destination), or vice %-ersa; also whilst in locked safes. • Our Agents will be pleased lo give you full particulars and advtre. DA COSTA & CO.. LTD AGENTS DANBOLINE roofing.paint;' Ideal for the protection of iron, steel and galvanised roofing under the most arduous service conditions. Maae with fast-to-light pigments In Red, Tropical Green and Aluminium. Danbolinc dries with a flexible gloss/ surface. Ask our agents for particulars. fefttertd 7roe> Murk <~l%$/rrMff/**'#**f ( J /&/m& tjjqnorfJ -$(/ DACOSTA & CO., LTD. COMMISSION DEPARTMENT. WIN OR LOSE YOUR REMAINING CONSOLATION IS GODDARDS GOLD RRAW RUM



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SVVDAY. AIT.I'ST 1" ItSl SINDAY AOVOrATE r-\CE TIIREX Al II.. 4 •• K.B.C. Km,lin \ol r A True Story Promenade Concerts KtMordiajt* From London IN MAKCH lul year, the Reader's Digest printed a biographical sketch 1 a man called David Marshall Williams. Since then, a Him has been made based on this sketch. Playing at the Cllulx:, ne WQUama is something different and absorbinu in .ruon dramas ,Jj r |S.n^t^bradl?aiJetSrtMarsh William* incidentally he is still ver\ much alivem gn from the Mnh Sca*on uf the was a rebellious yountf dualist who H.nry Wood Promenade Concerts. thought he could live his life the way he vanied to. re*""' lartanan in this ares *" <* -"yon. -.sc 9 > S&SmmBL Sn^ be quit and joined the Nv. Sunday. 10th and Thuraday. 14th at 9.00 p.m and Tuesday. 12th at 3 15 p.m. In the Sunday broadcast Raymond Milswm. the voung Australian tenor, will make hi* %  Prum" debut with the London Swnphony Orchestra, conductor Basil Cameron, with Son* with Orchestra: Adelaide* by BeeiWen in a concert whuti include* Dvorak's 'Symphony No. 4 In G.* That career fell stunt • %  jjactalions. so tie relumed hum* to take ovei his snare ul ms father's farm, llow.vi., HU father told him that not until ba n< worked tne land for two year?--, would It be his. To Marsh. wn ni* wife, ha becomes a nioonsiiir.n | I oderalas a group ol ilii.u siil i iiUikiuK whiskey Bui tbf inca catch up with huii ..iid during a skiTBUsh one of Uiein is killwi. Marsh as owner of t: convicted of second-degree murder and though I h a m If % %  •> *****4 that ha actually lulled the man, he is sentenced to thirty year* with hard labour. His spirit still unbroken after month*, a gang and a punishment of thirl;. days solitary confinement, he wins (he respect and understanding al the Warden, who allows him to work ine. the design of which came to Murth duritiK "solitary." and which Ir %  since been perfected and adopted by the U.S. Army. After eight years in jail, Marshall was pa'doited by the Governor of M state and returned home to hi wife and son. The story ut told io younu David Marshall by the warden, played by Wendell Corey, whose faith in the* lads father enable.. Marshall Williams to complete hiInvention. In movlnc '""I hi FARM AND GARDEN H> Attrif-ola Some Urn* ago we triad in this, upe* or varieties of crop plants column to dea\ii what was meant which can be relied on to survive b> hardiness in plant*. W* pointand t* of value where for one ed out that us significance varied, reason M nr.,.:n*r—*otl, climate o. iKpendina; on climatic condition*; disease liability—others give un but thai, in general, we commoneconomic or poor results. Keen ly apply the term hardy kind*, gardener-, often find thenu*we against hearry odds to eatamiart fruits eg thasr particular choke under conditions which make sue ceu ajRpst impoaslhle Usually i verv c*c ha* bean takcu that i* humanly poaatbla but. In the long rui. it la often the case that resort must be made to the hardier hough less appreciated (depend ing on c-*'nredilecUoos) sorts. GARDENING HINTS FOR AMATEURS 8S§ Zinnias This is Zinnia Ume, and the* Kful wet season flowers will JAMKK STCIVART Kirk Douglas Kve Miller :,iiii lava Ihe principal rolos in Ihil uiiii)>piiing bul scenically beautiful film. Comet Girls Attend Jet School SO that tin paKsengers intelligently when the; In this connection, to-day we want to draw attention to the l menu of certain fruits which Ian I to be neglected because they may be looked upon as wild growths not comparable with the more imereial type* in general de nd. In spite of this not infrrOn Tuesday'there will be another prove to be our great standby* for quent attitude, we venture to first appearance with Gin:. ,hl n '" 1 few months think that a number of ordinal-• BachauoT. the Greek pianist, who Many gardens are ua> with thee* kinds deserve a place in local Will play the 'Pianoforte Concerto Bowers now. but It is not too late horticulture since they are uol only J ti A Minor* by Crelg with the lo olnnt /innl* seeds If you have hardy but extremely pleasant t>' BBC Svmphonv Otvheatra, con""' already done so. the taste, can be used In a variety duclor Sir Malcolm Sargent. In There are several varieties of of ways and have health giving the Thursday broadcast Victoria "'>ias to choose from but thelaige qualities a* well. At on* time SJadvn. on* at i^nrinn's most dut"'"• is the general favourite. >ome of these fruit* were freely Hngulshed operatic sopranos will There are other smaller kinds, .btainod -from vendor* 1 trays but be heard in the 'Recitative and graduauiut in size down to the niwadava they are not so easily Ana: Ma dalT arido stelo' from ,11 Button Zinnias so uaaful as tome by—Unfashion being '. tin Balln In Maschera' by Verdi, borders. Besides these there is a •mphasite tho Imported and th'| curly kind called "Fantacy" very jurist Inciinattotu. Here are a] uncommon and attractive few of the sorts we have In mind: Altogether zinnias are a lovely ,_ %  -— ___, I iddlUon to the garden, and the, *" %  r fTJlE"* U, H ,*^'' oave the advantage of being quick %  *** description; a small, ewr growers Six weeks after the *£*"" '"*• *"> dar £ %  *" %  eeds are planted the plants should !nm > 1** !" '. ***** W* ar '* rtart to flower O^*" nearmhaped, with numci, On Thumda.v next. 14th inst.. ous fleshy spine*; the white cot[ the B1 Hon. Clement Attleo will Preparation Of The Bed '""* ^ U 'P %  %  l^euliar flavour I speak on 'A Day In the Life of a acing both *weet ind Prime Minister/ the second talk When preparing the bed tor lelicious in Iceg an. in tho serlea of programmes about zinnias fork in a good supply of (n the French islands the day-to-day role and reaponsiwell rolled pen manure, making it ian early mornii n \RH\IHIS AQCATIC i M n (Members Only' -\MKltAV. lgeh Aagvat. I95Z. ai g. p.m. WATER POLO b> Fle** llshl and DANCE KMH K til 1 IIWI.S SNAPPERK v SWORD KISH Mtiic by AnUway Meaearand hiCarlbhean I r.mh.iiliMirs M) MISSION WATER POLO ... 5VDANCI 1/10 8.52—4n y-' /. .••ill appear with the London Symphony Orchestra, conducted h\ Btgea Cameron. The Function Of A Prime Minister —and itc antiseptic properties ensure a [BriqhtfiHralthyHomei JAgcnt: A Barbados! THE IDEAL TOILET LOTION FOR EVERY DAY OK THE YEAR THAT'S L1MACOL Refresh when its hot with UMACOI. |\ Soothe %  headache with M UMACOI, Relieve sunburn, prickly heat with LIMACOL "The Kie.sluifss of a Breeze in a Bottle" witi terms, it tells or the logenerotin; WM s K -" BOAC Stewardess** ,., h ln Influence of .. Un|l creaUva Idea .,-U-cted for the *ight-mliea-go.n a hitherto incorrigible raaatlM mi M1 i r Coanei al liner* are now India And PakitUn'" convict mid it is inUTcsling Jo ,v^lvlni technical training. . __ ftote that emphasis is placed un They go to school" at the Independence Dayg rehabilitation Instead of uton. Hattleld. Horts. factory of the y,^ Jndla an0 paxugan celement. Prison discipline of* bygone de IlHVilliind An craft Company. br|( c thc r i, K |epi'ndenee Day* in day i preaented in harsh and whcn the Comets arc built. the conung week, the fifth anni, realistic stroke-*, but for all th' agld Irinks •oure* I e*po bilitteg of trie grent offices of State rich but iMt heavy. Zinnia seeddally by the ladtes s/hv in Britain. In this talk Mr. Attle* ungs do not stand transplanUng as excellent for the complexion will describe some of the functions well, so the seeds are bettor plantPropagated by seed*. winch f-ill 'o the Prime Minister In ed straight into the prepared bed. ,__, his various capaciUea as the SowBut beware of -t.iht. many a bad *uar Appic; .i near iwlatnw or eielgn's First Minister, the Leader pring is caused by Ants eating lhe soursop; a small tree of nil Partv. and the First Lord of the seeds. When the seedlings ln,n d yii %  "* k /e*. of the Treasury. He will apeak at come up a little rearrangement Ts *'* %  * wregular growth; the fruit 1 ft IS p,m. and can be heard in the sometimes found necessary In are rounded reaching lUout thre order to get them evenly spaced. to four inchek in diameter wit Zinnisi require a lot of water Aeahv tuber. Ie* and a glaucou that is why they do so well In the bloom, liable to fall apart atsM rainy weather. In between the r 'P" ;ill d should bo picked whei rains, be sure to keep the bed ,ul1 ,% ot hard: thrives beat near well watered. the sea. a very good daaart rruJ m apite of Its seedlnem. ltaiae-l I hi > s.iiiihemiMiis from seed No doubt many garden* are atBelle Apple or Water Lrrnon. ..,,,1 „vork-u|. .,< %  Cornel-. BBC will mark boll, of the du,. *fiL !" l r j u '' !" j'f v ilJ A„M wn m SreJStSmfcS" uK .. Mrin ud -h.l Ihr pil-v. f'("- lor India DiyvrtU^not .,,.„ un chrjunlhomu.n jkor. .!.! tho . %  .* %  Um, U ul corv I Wll no * ' v k '' """ ,mcl 0y %  Si'"^ VJ ~ Si? hf "" d u l> ' "•• "> d ' AiHUM Ullt lain, .i (WlMoui pulp: the vine l ( the warden ajQg man, doing his job to the best of his ability and gtvlng I m:m ch.uHe whom he thought worth of >n> trust. been through the de Havlltan v*y. yellow seem to be the favourite over a fence; it seems to fruit land "school" Others are follow—-...— ^-—-% %  — J^udgtag by Uie quantities of this almost continuously, need* watch as time. Ing for a spiny caterpillar that can and the lie very destructive to the foliage. elutive m the granadllln *-ith the trtle" Itecxsuadcring fj 1 ."^"*? ^*5? '..? lc e t hBn e f*<" n which m-eds an arbour to tenaatlon through > man>rfni piece of BoUna, The scene* of hi. pt-isou life ,nd particularly ..-.itUlarJall r~ ••*? ..HVal 1K11I "**. *ff. *" nd Singai'iore service. The Men. T ff-wa. and needing lea. athi,: %  > frulta; make, n tlavourdell Corey i* strong aavi pern ( ,. ell Koud, South Kensington .._' ,^""^,'" 'I'V^l wL.S*tention Ihan the (aller large bushes nil de***rt. deUcious In preserveas Captain People*, the warden. Mim Vivian E. Oliver. 27. of V,?,n ^,,ie^ to mereaL fastor^Sn which require staking. and in ice-. Ideal for a small •who turnout to b*W.ll..uo\b.,t argni. Rend, Twyford, Berks; gf ?ggf* t_ ir.iTir*^ Um* tnjp Tno fl chry M nthemum ganlen. friend, while Carl Benton Raid la .,„, M i* Irene Ronnie. 23, of ^"sn^w-uT SSSS In the hnilld be staked from the time „ warm and symp,.thet „, ;h t rola oiedwnod O.rdens. Hayes. |^ JLmS oTThe nUtfteenth conthev r bout 2 '* "' %  >. flh" -'hove is just a raeaof Marsh's father who. though he M inrtl,i. Z 1 *?. ^i ^Z.^ !" ^. -. sectlfm, so to apeak, of local hardy quarrels with his .son. never faM"'"E Holhs.cr, former ^ *££%& ^ 'XF'o? date Preparation r^ Oliver by forking in plenty of well rotted ^'timn) which are often ovorA good script with hne d.rec* '" tht WBNS durtn ,he poiml-non are aWmUy. recog,„,,.,„,„*„. a J po5ilb T. l l ftn S looked . uaaful food frulta notion a n d acting make CARBINE f^ _ .4 !" n, ^ d 'iU 1 1 ^ r?,^rffi? £%£! humus from the Compost Heap uae. being e<.mmon or ordinary, k the appaal of sort* wo Miss Oliver wart: Tho firat talk -'The Paradox WILLIAMS an absorbing .,nd enM,w nvc r *^. „ J *|,V"r TIL hP > \ "w? J. .L ^ ivi The bed is at all inclined to be they lack tertainmu film ***** Jn d joined Vicken-Superof ProgTeas' is to be given on Fit, lehUm h „ rtii,i r „ l have u. tertaining film IKES i tun. heavy, lighten it by the addition have to import. Yet, in man. ghowini M UN E*£5 '""'"''i !u .^ l> ^^^.V^n P 'alUnmie rli uf Mmr *rcoal. When hnl.hed co.uitries to-day -,i u a d ^*^f"^"nmr U ^ 1 l T!,d iintapraflv TK *• s "" sho,,If ^ lcn " l ''abt in Hntoin), more and ...ore attenTHE So Wm l ** nme J ,ncd lh l BOAC to ? **h a f££j££ f lr5PI-S aiul rrl blc " 3 being paid to lh •did iw year* ago after being a lalks win he^oadcaat a* Proni In the ca*e of lhe large Chryplanu and frulU of tho country•letary.—L.E.S. the Thii-d J-rogramme. santhemuina. plant thosuckers lw,> si.le for their health giving propor three feet apart. But when eitles. In this connection, we can planUng the border kind they learn much from the French who tliould be placed much closer, have lang aUtoched great imp-" especially if .1 continuous border tanee to their ti* ies M d.*t is wanted. drinks made from n .live grov.tha. Chrysanthemums do not require Let us start now to develop 11 a great deal of water, moderate livelier interest in the ponD-illtie*. vv.iterins suits them best They o' aaturr"foods NbOUl BBHI like an open sunny poajuon. oiound u> gJaX OOUOU* chief heating [and fighting. The "hero-heel' f.>. (ha**! all I can V-ali him, 1* an e r u p ulous Baby With Green Wings Sets Neighbours Arguing By CRAVEN HILL \ ;elou*ly. drove him back into fcM THERE is trouble among the 1 ox. ,md kept hun there doaptte logger who London Zo,,\ parakeet*. And loud protest from the proot attempt* to swindle a religious „ou i,le, u 1. said, which looks Kings, sect out of their valuable Calia M15 pi flous ly like jealously on the Belter BabA forma Redwood timberlands. His ,,;,,, <> t olie rao uier. Keepers aw the trouble and sordidly, unethical machinations u happened like this; Two separated the two families. are almost incredible, but for..urserlea" were set up at the Said a Zoo official: "Why the tunately they are dwarfed by ,. m lhe parakeet aviary. Umale Stanley should have Technicolor shots of the magnifif n onc , •en-wtnaajd attacked he~. neig*ibour's oab: vent sequoias. There is plenty ol Knu parakeet *nui hatched. In tb not clear—although the tw action, mostly of a pretty violent nnother thouwas hatched ;• species hall from different parts nature, gad tho logger's eleventhStanley parakeet. the Antipodes they have hour reform and marriage to .1 Rverythinf was quiet until the itthcilo agreed well here, pretty member of the religious King baby made his first public It look* suspiciously like sect, whose father's death had i-pponranee. Seotng the young)p B lou*y Posatbly the Stanley been directly caused by an order >ler trying to balance itself on thought her neighbour's child ft peep by her husband, left me twig ootslde the nest-box. the Letter specimen than her own!" singularly unimpressed. female Stanley attacked him L.E.B. VWssss,'.*.',',','.*,',:;',;;','.',',*, -,•.-,-,-,',*-,-, -, -.-.',-,',',-,',',-,-,',',',','.. WVWW' ^flv^^vJ^ r 'KEEP EM FLYING*' DANCE AT THE CRANE HOTEL SAT. 30th August TO THE TUNES OF "KEITH CAMPBELL" and HIS 'SOCIETY SIX" and "THE JUMPING JACKS STEEL BAND' ieatuiing our own HI.XV 0/ at* *!##:iv #*.l#X M##.A/.W A r*KK 15 MINUTE FLIGHT IN "BIM" TO ONE IN EVERY .t PERSONSENTERING THE DANCE DANCING from 8.30 p.m. Z. ,ier included Dress Optional ADMITT.VM E — 92.00 IS mil ANY UTTER WAV (IF INVESTING VOl'R WINNINGS? TRIUMPH MAYFLOWER $2500 00 PSWOLD ST. —' w.v.v.w/.'/ / r i '-n o—o < MR. SMALL MAIS WHY RENT WITH NO ULTIMATE GAIN? tmvesT iwow #.v A .PHILIPS Variety RADIO-PLAYER STKCIAMlfV ion VMKB SKIS WITH Hit. SKI FEATVRES CHELSEA GARAGE (UN) LTD. AlCrarlivr im-lol liui>licd Pluslii( jliincl • ftllMillhlllg M I ri'ltKiiluclioil • hi. Kin.l.i.k nYtm lr hWt **ll5ltivlly • All ilimulp proof • tti'illltiflll ) ttui.ri • I intubrs • Sh.irl. nirdioin ft Ions *• rnnges etc. .Ol It UEAI.KHSMANNING A <€.. Ltd. DIAL 4284 PIER HEAD \






ESTABLISHED 1895



Better Days For U.S.A. Predicted By

IKE PROMISES MORE AID FOR OLD |
STEVENSON: LQGWER TAXES BY 1954

By ROY

Republican Presidential
promised the old folks Satu

CALVIN

WASH:NGTON, Aug. 10
candidate Dwight Eisenhower
rday he would help them and

the Democratic nominee Adlai Stevenson was portrayed
as looking forward to reduced Federal spending by 1954

although neither candidate n

1entioned any precise amounts.

From his Denver headquarters after a Conterence with the
Republican Congressional Tax Experts, Eisenhower issued
a statement saying the needy aged should receive more

Federal help in meeting the high cost of living.

He held

out the same offer to “support and press for the adoption of
legislation” toward more financial help for blind persons,
disabled workers and dependent children

Associates of Stevenson elab-
orating on same of his recent
statements said the Governor be-
lieves the American people musi
bear the burden of a heavy Fed-
eral Budget for two more: years, |
but he expects the military build- |
up to. reach a point where a sub-;
stantial cut in government spend- |
ing may be possible by mid 1954. |
These spokesmen added that Stev-/
enson also believes Congress
should not start to’ reduce the
present tax burden until a transi-|
tion to smaller spending is achiev-|
ed, They said he has no opinion |

‘as yet on the amount of tax re-

ductions that might then reason-
ably be expected.

Within the next week Eisen-
hower is expected to be oriented
on farm problems and he and his
lieutenants are also expected to}
make a decision on whether to
make a serious campaign bid in
the South. As for the South. the}
heayy influence of tradition and]
some conciliatory moves by Stev-
enson appeared to have damaged
the optimism once felt by Eisen-
hower advisers that their man
could carry several southern
states in Novengber. Nineteen Re-
publican leaders from nine south-
ern states, will meet with Eisen-
hower at Denver on Monday to
discuss the outlook in this usually!
democratic section:—U.P.





Britain And

U.S.A. Consult
On Tran |

By K. C. THALER

LONDON, Aug. 9.

The British Foreign Office stated
on Saturday that it is in close con-
sultation with the United States
State Department on the Iranian
situation and officials disclosed)
that a new approach to Premier:
Mohamed Mossadegh is under con-!
sideration.

But Britain and the United
States have been unable to agree
among themselves on thé nature
of their joint approach to Teheran
and on terms of a proposal to help
Iran avert a complete economic
collapse. Britain is not prepared
to sanction economic aid unless it!
is coupled with a ‘reasonable’:
settlement of the ill-fated oil aie
pute, because oil is the foundation
of her economy.

The United States seemingly
favours speedy measures and Brit-
ish concession to tide over Mossa- |
degh’s regime until a more solid)



Naguib Wants
Police Force
Overhauled

CAIRO, Aug. 9.

The Egyptian Commander in
Chief, General Mohammed Naguib,
called for a general overhaul of
Egypt's police force, Naguib who
came to power by a coup a few
days ago, stressed the desirability
of filling security posts with police
officials, not government officials
from other departments. He said
that all city provincial governors
should be chosen from _ police
ranks and pointed out that: the
present governers are mostly mer
from the Ministry of Justice. He
also urged that high Interior
Ministry Posts be given policemen
rather than to Ministry of Jus-
ties officials lacking police experi-
ence. Naguib prceposed that the
police pension age be the same as
thet of the armed forces, or 55
years. —U.P.





Ne Compersation
Until Debts Paid

To Iranian Govi.

TEHERAN, Aug. 9.

Tran will not consider the pay-
ment of compensation to the
Anglo-Iranian Oil Company until
the company pays up $137,200,000
which Iran claims is ewed to the
government, according to semi-
official sources. It was pointed out
that national front deputies have
repeatedly charged in the past that
Iran owes nothing to the com-
pany for the expropriation of its
property, and that on the contrary
the A.I.0.C. is in debt to Iran for
the vast prefits from oil transac-
tions made during the past half
century.



42-Hour Mourning
Period For Eva Peron

All business, industrial and social activity came to aj,



| field, Massachusetts for passing u

| Italian Crowd |

BARBADOS, AUGUSF.'%0, 196%,



From All Quarters: |
Set :

Attack False |
King Farouk |

Rome.—A fat Italian comedian, |
Foldo Macocchi, disguised him-|
self as Farouk and caused a 4
motion at Porto Ceresio near |
Varese in North Italy. The joke}
was carriéd out on a grand scale
The comedian was preceded by @
nining American saloon — car,
driven by a Negro and full or)
luggage, with the royal coat ot|
arms. When the hoax was dis= |
covered the 2,000 crowd took it
very badly and tried to attack the|
comedian. Police took him under
their protection and escorted him |
to safety. {

New York.—A_ guitar-playing |
detective posing as a blind beg-
gar. a woman tec posing as a

*

a labourer anq drunk toured

New York district for ten days}
to gather evidence against a drug)
suspect, who was finally accused
of having $112,500 (£40,172),

worth of heroin. The money in| ‘ ‘
the cup was given to the poties | Results Af
pension fund.

Milan,—Under Italy’s land re-}|
form plan 2.250 acres of unculti-! A Glance
vated land have been given fre~: O H DAY
to peasants near Pisa. j A
Washington—A drive-in c'nema) FOURT





Cincinnati,

near Ohio, offers a) TWENTY-FOURTH RACE
sunset to sunrise programms 1. Apple Sam—Thirkell
showing one cartoon and seven;| 9 Paerie Queene—Holder
different full-length features, | 3. Super Jet—Yvonet
Rome.—Italian. Air Force ace! “TWENTY- RACE
Mario de Bernardi has invented 1. Seedling—Lutchman
a one-seater plane which is a 2. Betsam—Newman
cross between a normal plane and 3. First Admiral—Yvonet

a helicopter and which will use
a motor cycle engine of 10 h.p
If the engine fails the pilot will
start pedalling and will be able
to go at a speed of about 30 m.p.h.
Bernardi has promised to demon-

TWENTY-SIXTH RACE
1. Lunways—Newman
2. Landmark—Holder

3. Firelady—Quested
TWENTY-SEVENTH RACE

strate his» plane flying over 1. Gavotte—Wilder

Rome without the engine. Esti- 2. Blue Diamond

mated cost is £250. —Lutchman
Washington. —One of the most 3. Joan Star—Yvonet

abstinate strikes on record in
America has ended at Whippany,
New York. Just five days short of
one yeat the 800 workers at
a cardboard factory went on
strike demanding a 60-cents an
hour wage increase. Now they
are back at work—with 10 cents

TWENTY-EIGHTH RACE
1. Cross Bow—Holder
2. Top Flight—Lutchman
2. Mary Ann-—Vvonet ,
TWENTY-NINTH RACE
1. Abu-Ali—Yvonet
2. Doldrum—Holder
3. Darham Jane—Crossley
THIRTIETH RACE
1 March Winds—Quested
2. Rambler Rose—Holder
3. Cardinal—Crossley
THIRTY-FIRST RACE
1 Harroween—Quested
2. Red Cheeks—O'Neil
3. Castle In The Air
—J. Belle

an hour more,

New York — Stanley Mislak
paid a five-dollar fine in Green-

stop sign. His job: erecting stop
signs.



Teachers Leave
For Conference

The Barbados Delegates attend-
1g the Biennial Conference of

BUENOS AIRES, Aug. 9.

standstill throughout Argentina in memory of Senora Eva ,the Caribbean Union of Teachers
Peron as a 42-hour mourning period for Argentina’s first |to be held in Trinidad, left yes-

and comprehensive settlement can}

1ady who died two weeks ago begna at 6 a.m.

terday by B.W.1.A., for Trinidad



The end of the 27th race, Gavotte winning from Biue Diamond by a length.



_—
*



GAVOTTE WINS



Eder atta nang L OOD Flight Wins Big Sw eep

Field Sweep Tops $1,000
Mark On Five Occasion:

‘> MR. L. J. WONG’S five-year-old mare Top Flight out
i. ‘ef Tlotsam-Meads won the Big Sweep of the B.T.C, four-
day Summer meet which ended at the Garrison Savannah
yesterday. She finished the meeting with a total of 12
points, and brought to the holder of ticket No. XX 1397
$52,360.

It was another day of keen racing and the ctowd was
the biggest seen at the Garrison throughout the meeting.
This was reflected in the amounts paid in the Field Sweep
which went, past the $1,000 mark on five occasions.

‘ = Most successful owners for the
; meeting were Mr, Cyril Barnard
‘and Mr, I, EB. C, Bethell who got
four winners each.

Lutchman finished ag the most

| s dy
Farouk Joins
‘successful jockey for the meet

° |
Band Of Care- |«: |
with six wins while Yvonet and

1 : E ve }Holder each straddled five win-
4 -K im ners.
I ree X Ings { The Police Band under Captain
; . {C. BE. Raison was again in attend-
4 LONDON, Aug.0% 'anee; and rendered andther pro-
ae King Farouk sailed into | gramme of entertaining music, in-
€ St jnonth on his yaeht he jcluding many of the
automatically became the newest} jog
member of the most exclusive
and carefree set known to history
Never before have so many have~-
been and would-te monarchs liv-;
ed in tranquility and luxury, = |
Many of the ex-kings now live;
in Portugual’s sunny resort of
Estorig Ex-King Umberto of Italy |
|} the most active of Portugal's ex-
| iled monarchs, occupies a com-,
paratively modest

OO terrae ab Sow mp celine tates an

@ Details on page 4



Treasure Stolen

By U.S. Officers

TOKYO, Aug. 9.



annenntignsatlliitatens imal Teas

ocean-front} pe n ents swspaper

flin end ts woling on a histoty\y 1 en ee
of Italy begun by his father, King yar US. eine fae” a ay
,2 al) a S ie Set | ee 5. army officers on two
| Victor Emmanuel, Ex-King Carol | cccasions had removed a total of
j of Romania lives quietly nearby | one billion yen—$2,800,000—
feats eg Aa sony _ worth of diamoncs and platinum
married when she was thought to pe Hig. Custody of -Jepenese
a celne officials during occupation,

Leopold of Belgium is one of! The myatery . officers were de-
i és iscribed as Major H of the
the few kings who does notlM i. Prefecture Militar G
bother to leave his own country,! cient" and an officer who
although he is frequently abroad eetiad h mac “Gaptain Keri ‘n
with his commoner , ov : ;

wife, Princess

De Rethy. He is given an allow-|>2@nders

Yomiuri based its story

latest hit)

SCREAMING Chinese
United Nations troops off a
Panmunjom.
it had changed hands three

|





Candidates

Chinese Push U.N.
Troops From Hill

SEOUL, Aug. 9.
Reds pushed the stubborn
hill east of the truce village of

The Reds finally captured the height after

times. The Communists show-

ered 4,000 rounds of artillery and mortar tire on United
Nations infantrymen during the daylong fight.

| Heavy fighting also broke out early to-day west of the

Pukhan River, where



| WINDSOR’S
HEALTH
IMPROVING

i MONTECATINI, Italy.

‘ Aug. 9.

| The condition of the Duke
of Windsor was describec

jj a “excellent” Saturday

! night by Professor Sante
Pisani who visited him, An
official bulletin said: “His
Highness the Duke of
Windsor is progressively
improving. His fever has

completely disappeared. His

}] general condition was excel-
lent. Signed, Professor Sante

Pisani”,
Pisani told the United
that he had nothing

| Press
|} to add to his medical bul-
{ letin but said he released it

“for the benefit of news-
men.”
Asked about the sche-

duled arrival by air of Sir
Daniel Davies, former con-
sultant to late King George
VI, to attend the Duke,
Pisani said “Sir Daniel is
coming here to visit the
Duke as a personal friend
and nothing more.”

Sir Daniel Davies arrived

in Rome and left immediate-

ly for Montecatini in a

diplomatic car. He carried

'] asmall brown valise thought

| to contain medical equip-
ment,

When told that the Duke
ate steak heartily at dinner
Sir Donald said “ that is a
very good-sign”. He said
he had no idea of the Duke's
ailment.-—-U.P,



Dicsel-Powered

Prain On Trial Run
VIENNA, Aug. 9.

An Austrian - manufactured
powered train, made for a
Uruguayan railroad, started for a
1,250 mile trail run through Au*«
tria according to Federal

order of seven trains, was built
by tha simmering Graz Pauker
plant in Styria in the © British
zone, Officials said that the train
having two Diesel motors with
500 horsepower each, is 80 yards

| two
| attacked South Kore*n troops

Rail- |
road officials. The train, one of the |

Chinese companies counter-
holding “Capitol Hill”.

United Nations soldiers beat the
|raiding Communists to their
| knees in the Reds’ latest and most
| desperate attempt to take the bit-

terly contested hill which has
| changed hands six times this
week.

| U.N. Counter Attacks

} The battle for the hill east of
|/Panmunjom started at 3.50 a.m.
iwhen a reinforced Red platoon
}hit the United Nations’ advance
|position. The allied defenders
}withdrew, but ten minutes later
| counter-attacked.

The United Nations’ assault
was unstccessful however and
allied infantrymen waited for air
support to come in and soften up
the Communists.

Shortly before 10 a.m, United
Nations fighter-bombers hit the
Reds with napalm and rockets
and ground troops followed up
with their second attack, This
time they were successful and re-
‘aptured the hill. But fifteen
minutes later the Communists
came back in force and again the
Allies were forced to withdraw,

In the battle for “Capitol Hill”
it wag estimated trat 300 Chinese
infantrymen hurling hand gren-
ades and firing sub-machine guns
and rifles rushed the height in
force,

United States sabre jet pilots
shot down another Communist
MIG 15 to-day to carry their
streak ,of a@rial victories into the
ninth straight day while fighter-
bombers ht Red frontline posi-
tions and supply lines.
—U-P.

Truce Talks

Resume
Tomorrow

PANMUNJOM, Aug. 9.
Korean truce negotiations are
scheduled to be resumed next
Monday, following a week-long
| recess, but Major General Wil-
liam K. Harrison, Chief United
Nations delegate, mewy immediate-
ly call another respite.
He warned the Reds at the last
truce meeting that he will not
condone the revival of Commun-
ist propaganda charges which is
; just what the Chinese and North
Korean Reds are oe to do if
| broadcasts from their capitals are
| any indication, Peiping Radio led
off the latest blast by claiming
that the United States war planes
| few across the Yalu River into
| Manchuria seyenty-nine times
during the first week of August,
They charged that a total of 398
sarties were made during the
week and said that one Uniteu



long. Maximum speed is 75 m.p,h, | States plane dropped 21 bombs

be reached, according to an official |

source, {
Some British reports warned \
Mossadegh that the situation is

gravely undermined and the in-
fluential Times said on Saturday
that to sanction immediate aid
would in effect amount only to
keeping alive for a’ few more
months a ship that is already sure
to founder.

Both London «and Washington}
agreed that the situation in Iran!
is dangerous in the extreme and if
allowed to drift on might lead to!
a communist move. They also
agree that if this is allowed to
happen the West would be con-
fronted with the gravest peril
since the war,

A Foreign Office spokesman said
Britain and the United States are
keeping the situation in Iran under
“constant review", but declined to
comment on reports of the alleged
American propgsal that Britain
shall allow Iran to sell oil on
world markets and pay part of the
proceeds to the United Kingdom
as compensation for nationalized
oil properties. Leading British
quarters said such a solution would
hardly be acceptable to Britain,
i UP

The mourning period will last until 12.01 a.m. on
Monday.

hundreds of thousands of grieving Argentines from the
Labour Ministry to the Congressional building in a civil}
and military cortege such as normally is reserved for a
President who has died in office. f

Scheduled to take part are hoeaven ya :
NATO Asks UK,

officers and men of the third,

Those

Secreta
Mr.
r3’

Union, Mr.

leaving were
Jordan, President of the Barbados
The Senora’s body was to be borne at 10 a.m. past | Teachers’ Association, Mr. F.

arker,
Osborne, President of the Women’s
Auxiliary,
|Fresident of the Assistant Teach-
Cc, W.
| batch, Mr. C. F, Broomeé and Miss
Mildred Taitt,

ary,

F.

Mr.

Miss

G,

Cur



A. G

H.
Ereil

Downes,

iber-

army a battalion of mounted San | The Conference begins tomor-
Martin Grenadiers, Congressional eed Ab row
; j }
leaders, supreme court justices, France out i
labour union officials, provincial |

Defence Goals

governors, caaets,
members of tin

nurses, and)
Women’s Peron-

(Corn meal Expected

ance by the Belgian Government
and at one time was said to exert
considerable influence over King
Baudouin,

Both Don the
pretender, and the Count of Paris
who claims the throne of France
maintain establishments in Por-

tugal. Don Juan kept si

Juan, Spanish

with General Franco for a num-
ber of years, but so far there is
no indication that he will be re-
stored.

Peter of Yugoslavia lives mod-
erately in Venice with
Helen Marie of Greece Kihg
Zoog of Albania, who fled his

his wife,

prefecture government at Sendai,
Northern Japan, to the Diet com-
mittee investigating
disappearance of gold and jewels
from the Bank of Japan vaults
whieh had been in the custody of
American oecupalion officials for
sevom, years, '

Yomiuri said that the
government in its report
two officers appeared separately
on October 23, 1975 and June 5,
1947. In each case they signed re-
ceipts in pencil and left with
treesure valued according to
Yomiuri at one billion yen.—U.P.

the alleged

Miyagi
said that



on a report made by the =

ist party.
The body
an artillery

was to be carried on

caisson drawn by
three columns of Workers with
her husband, President Peron,
relatives and Cabinet
following immediately — behind.
The body will lie in state in the
Congressional building.

Only public transport and
mewspapers will operate during
the 42 hours’ mourning period,
but workers will hold a_ brief
token stoppage. Restaurants and
other eating places will be open
only for lunch and dinner fox

@ On page 11

PART OF THE HUGE CROWD AT YESTERDAY'S KACES

ministers |

PARIS, Aug. 9. Thirteen thousand bags of

Informed sources said that the | finely ground cornmeal are due
North Atlantic Council bluntly; to arrive in the colony between
asked Britain and France if the|the latter half of this month and

two nations plan to abandon their |ear!y December



promises of defence goals for

1952, and expect an answer by The Controller of Supplies on

August 20. Friday informed importers that
A NATO source said that the |the ceiling price for this com-

Council was worried that other |modity must not exceed $9.16 per

Atlantic Pact nations will follow)|bag of 98 Ib (B.W.L, Currency)



the “potentionally dangerous | This will inelude duty paid landed
precedent” set by Britain without /cost including freight, instance,
prior consulation with their fel-|exchange based at 72.7%, dut)
low allies. It expects the replies to} Bank Charges and all othe:
be in Paris in time for discussion | cHarges.

at the next meeting of the coun-, Applications for

for
cil in Paris, August 20.—U.P. this item close

Tuesday,

licences
on

country in 1939, during the Italian
invasion, is in Alexandrin, Egypt, ce
ad so is this claimant to the Bul- (Moree HAS BETTER
garian throne.—wU.P. »

; ROADS THAN EGYPT

tABAT, Aug 9.



APPOINTED ASSOCIATE
MEMBERS R.S.I.

The Freneh Reeideney General's
Mr. Jack Sealy, Government|Oflice eslimaced on S ‘turday thut
Assistant. Chief Sanitary Inspec-|Morocco now has a better high-

tor and Mr, Samuel Gibbons, Vis-| way system than Egypt. A month-





wing Officer, Seawell Airport,|ly news bulletin said that Moroces
hav been appointed Associate | had 8,565 miles of roads and 19,77(
Members of the Royal Sanitary|miles of all weather secondary
Institute, routes compared with Egypt:
Mr. Sealy is at present on 90 total of 4,375 miles, with only
days’ leave, and Mr, Walwyn Best!375 miles asphalted and main-
is acting Assistant Chief Sanitary | tained,
Inspector.

—U.P.



A SECTION of the crowd which attended the final day of the

Barbados Turf Club



Drawing of horses on page 6.

—U.P.



CASUAL WINE

WINE can give so much pleasure to dining and
entertaining—-but it isn’t any more complicated
than serving tea or coffee.

Try serving
dinner—-slightly chilled.

Paarl to your soups and other food for a new and
You will be delighted with the

distinct flavour.
results!

When its time for Wine
It’s time for
K.W.V.

“The Wine of All Time.”

Check your list for:

K.W.V. Sherry, Brandy, and Table Wines.
LOOPS SPECS SOSSSSS SOS SOS SSS OSS SS SSS SOOO SOLA

y POSS GODS FO SG 09D FOOPO POOF 9OTO9 SO FOC P SSO GOOF

Renoused for Distinction and Flavour

K. W. V.

Sherry to your guests before

|on a Manchurian town, seriously
injuring two persons.—U.P.



FACTS (sHerry)

And add this K.W.V.
PAGE TWO





SUNDAY
GLOBE
THIS EVENING 8.30 P.M. |

MONDAY & TUESDAY i
5 amd 8.20 p.m. By
20th. CENTURY FOK



P ARD WICKSTEED
i — ITH DAY MENU
i
























RIDG ' A ES OISTIN aa

ec Se RBARE s= (CAMBINE WEEESANS!| BREAKFAST.
) PAY te i ‘ESDAY TODAY te TUESDAY 6-an o-morrow = . | O ill sugar

} ty ‘to as a0 > pm “ea pm : ren - ato » sh Jenies STARRING Jean Qin en toast with

ar a 9?'2 Feehainnior ihe mi MARLENE Errol} STEWART HAGEN “~ of honey or —

Pees UIE cht oie |The True Story of the Convict malade. *
ial Added THE PRINCE who made History’s most famous Tea or coffee with milk

‘Bie 4 ERE & 4 AND Gon (no sugar).

\ » “DESTINATION : LUNCH.

Hs munpen'|]| THE (PAUPER _ om as

Ny - : 5 Stanley ee a = vt 9

\K W seca : ote ae ei ea | and

fim'cncken = Pll vax cow ate || "Sint user Bl (aressing, ne’ mayMinaies)

JREV'S ae x : Williar ole r “ no

i HUNDER MOUNTAIN " come ae ee es Nee One roll, eseeing of butter,
( aN ie r — large 2)
i LEGION of vagus = = Thurs ‘only) | Cotes ie milk UR cugar)
jeer] «TNE RACKET Cup of clear vegetable soup.
) ming PREDAY One trout of large gu
{i RAPTURE VENDETTA , waned .

PFs

THREAT Rn ES
ROXY

To-day to Wed.

HOOD. ae







EMPIRE ate
Tit
ISNEY

|
|

|

i

|

SDAY 145 & S50 445 & B15 |
COLUMBIA PICTURES Presents |

Louis HAYWARD—Patricla MEDINA

“RANTASIA’ in
|

{

|

Technicolor



“THE LADY AND THE BANDIT"

xtra
Shorts:—DIVING ACROBATS

Atk HOSTESS





———_—___—___ -_ _
THURS & FRIDAY 1% & 8.15 }

TO-DAY re
ALT D
I B
With §
r Ho A
OLYMPIC Glenn FORD |
fO-DAY & TOMORROW 4.30 & 4.15 “UNDERCOVER MAN" |
‘TRE AMAZING MR. SEROMMAN" ‘ato eaihttestiaae ae fmt

ADVENTURES IN SILVERADO
Cecile PARKER Starring
< OC Pas est William BISHOP—

and

Gloria HENRY



work before or a



1
; ROYAL ee RO
Ae ee oalatt 2 Shows TO-DAY 5 & 8.15 ' OF 6 ¢
PARAMOUD Presen '
ee Meee, scorr |] PRESONER OF SHARK ISLAND re on
57 BED MOUNTAIN” GLORIOUSLY

TUESDAY & WED. 4.30 & 4 15

Color by Teehnicolor For 4—6 people, pass a popes
of lean meat through the mincing.
machine with 4% pound bacon
trimmings, if you can get them,
or 1—2 rashers of fat bocon. Adc
4% pound breadcrumbs ao level
small teaspoon of gratec nutmeg,
pepper and salt to taste (remem-
bering the bacon) and bind witn
@ beaten egg. If you like garlic
add a finely chopped clove.

Form into a roll and place on a
clean cloth, wrung out of hot

RAFAEL SABATINI'S |

| | water and dusted with flour. Roll
j . Jjup securely and tie the ends.
} Stand on « iv ili

}

| ,

} M

OPENING FRIDAY

Ex
“BROKEN 2 Reel Short:

i
|

tra
JOURNEY" SLE OF TABU

Starring: Phyllis CALVERT

$icapapeitilg lengte in dit
MONDAY & TUESDAY 4. & 81h
Fred

Astaire — Betéy Hutton

and in
LET'S DANCE”

SALT TO THE DEVIL’ and

‘tT WALK ALONE”

W

ith

Starring
Burt LANCASTER— Lizmbeth






scott

SINGER SEWING MACHINE
C0.

a trivet above boiling
water, cover and steam for 2%-
8 hours, Or
| boiling water

STARRING

dro)
sawn rop the roll into

i and keep it sim-
mering for 2% hours. Or you can
pack the mixture in

ELEANOR

. n t greasec|
ANNOUNCES THAT ; A ilarge straight-sided tins, and
J | ;stand them in boiling water to

cook,; Remove. tighten the cloth,
place a lightly weighted board on
tcp and leave to become cold.
femove and dust with browne:
bread-crumbs,; That roll will cut
like butter. With it, serve a mixed
vegetable salad (cooked peas,
beans, carrots, turnip and pota-
toes, chopped parsjey and chives),

HENRY WILCOXON: NINA FOCH
dressed with oil and vinegar, with

_ LEWIS STONE: sa eS eee ee
| Seren Play by RONALD MILLAR : it well. Dish each plate
|

DRESSMAEING
CLASSES iP

WILL COMMENCE

MONDAY, August 18th

ON

and GEORGE FROESCHEL

| Based on the Novel by Rafael Sabarini + Directed by

| Vroduced by CAREY WILSON
Enrolments should be confirmed os |i

Early as Possible! GLOBE

indoors and carry out on a tray.

Drain It

If lettuce is prepared and stood
to drain, cut ends down, in a larg-
ish bowl covered with a dinner
plate, it will be fresh for several
days. If you have a refrigerator,
store it, drained, in the vegetable

\ Soneee or ina and it
LECLELOLSAEEECV EL OOP COE ERESOM SOM OTT eer otet | vere 1 ; ;
§ PR iE ery The Garden—St. James Cc It
To-day & To-morrow 8.30 p.m, Instead of those lovely hot

Mat, Yo-day 4.40 p.m

fruit pies, why not a cold one?
DOMERGE)

Or «cold mince pies, which taste
even better, cold, than they do a'
Christmas, hot. Or why not fresh
fintit salad, which requires no
cooking whatever?

“VENDETTA (Faith
and
“SPANISH MAIN" (Color)

Peul HENREID & Maureen O'HARA

_ FT BERGOUGNAN

~~ peiisy | FOR GREATEST |
| Kae

Tues. & Wed. 4.50 pm
“MAD WEDNESDAY"

Haro’'d LLOYD &
“REAL GLORY

4 A,B4,.656
SSSI ASOT

*
t eo eo oo tate







































ADVOCATE

IS Exeellency ;the Governor
and Lady Savage accompan-
ied by Major Dennis Vaughan,
Private Secretary, attended the
fourth and final day's races of the
B.T.C. Summer Meeting at the
Garrison Savannah yesterday.
In the Governor’s box were Mr.
R. C. Mae Innes, Public Relations
Officer of Trans-Canada Airlines,
Mrs, Mac Innes, Mr. G. H. Adams,
C.M.G, and Mr, D. H. L. Ward.

To U.K. For Medical

Treatment
RROFESSOR C. G. BEASLEY,
Economic Adviser to the Comp-

troller for Development and Wel-
fare, left on Friday by B.W.1A.
via Trinidad and Jamaica on his
way the United Kingdom for
medical treatment.

Professor Beasley will stop in
Jamaica for a couple of days = the
guest of Sir Hugh and Lady Foot
at King’s House before going on

to England

ind.

Dp
Make It A Picnic PLUS
ee eee ie to pack, no

sandwiches (which can be wearisome to prepare),
vacuum flasks to RP and fill. And there is no dining-room

no

Garden foods,.for preference, should be fork-and-
spoon foods. Meats therefore, should be easy to handle.
t of these is a meat roll.
it Scene the meat ration.

It ig very simple to

juice is the best marin-
adér because, if you cut into it
pears, apples (if you must have
apples in fruit salads), bananas
er peaches or any fruits which
turn an ugly colour when cur
and exposed to air, it will keep
them their natural colour,

Then there are table jellies ana
creams——no trouble to make. If
you cannot buy table jellies just
when you want them, make them
with fruit juices or squashes and
gelatine, sweetened to taste,
allowing (in hot weather) 1 oz.
powdered gelatine to one pint
liquid.

If you have never made a corn-
flour mould with fruit juice, try
it. Simply have the fruit juice
strong and sweet enough and
use it as the liquid.

Mix It

Some snacks are very quickly
made. One of my newest ones is
simply cold cooked rice mixed
with chicken and ham or turkey
or lobster or, indeed, with any of
the sieved meat or fish mixtures
we get in those small, convenient
jars. | add chopped chives and
garlic. If you use garlic, let it
vest in the mixture just long
nough to impart its pleasant
aroma, then remove it on the
principle that enough is as good
as a feast.

Cut tomatoes with vandyked
edges this way: With a sharp-
pointed knife cut zig-zag cuts all
round the centre of the tomatoes.
then just lift the two halves apart.
Remove the flesh, sprikle a little
sait in the halves and invert
them to drain. Beat the tomato
flesh into the other mixture and
pile all into the halved tomatoes.
Sprinkle with paprika.

A large tomato, treated like

this, with plenty of salad on each
plate, makes a good outdoor snack,
WORLD COPYRIGHT RESERVED
—l. E. 5.













SUNDAY,

AUGUST 10, 1952



Carub Calling

On Routine Visit

R. G. M. GORDON, Engin-

eering Adviser to the Comp-
roller for Development and Wel-
fare, left on Friday night by the
Lady Rodney for the “Leeward
Islands on a routine visit. He will
make stops at Montserrat, Antigua,
and St. Kitts before returning
here about the end of the month.

Intransit

ISS ELEANOR CABEY who

has been residing in Curacao
for the past two and a half years,
arrived here on Wednesday by the
French S.S. De Grasse intransit
for her native Montserrat to spend
about six weeks’ holiday with her
relatives. She is a guest of Mr.
and Mrs, Harlow of “Medway”
Government Hill.

For Trinidad Holiday
EAVING during the week by
B.W.LA. for Trinidad were
Miss Ivy Alleyne, Organiser of the
Housecraft Centre and her two
sisters, Miss Effie Alleyne, Head-
teacher of Grace Hill Girls’ School
and Miss Ermine Alleyne, dress-
maker of “Carls Villa”, Station
Hill. They have gone on holiday
and will be away for-about four
weeks,
Agricultural Adviser
R. A. deK, FRAMPTON, Agri-
cultural Adviser to the Comp-
troller for Development and Wel-
fare. left for Trinidad on Thursday
by B.W.1.A. on a short visit. He
was accompanied hy his wife.
While in Trinidad, Mr. Framp-
tom will have talks on technical
matters with the Director of Agri-

‘culture, the Professor of Agricul-

ture of the Imperial College of
Tropical Agriculture and the
Principal of the Eastern Carib-

bean Farm Institute.

Polo Club Ball
HE POLO CLUB BALL which
is one of the outstanding social
attractions each year takes place
at the Marine Hotel on Saturday,
August 16,

Many sport lovers will recall
the excellent entertainment pro-
vided by the Shipwreck Ball of
1951 and will be glad to know that
the sponsors expect the function
to maintain its high standard of
entertainment this year.

Regiona! Engineer

R. GEORGE RODDAM, Re-

gional Engineer of C.D.C, left
for Jamaica by B.W.I.A. yesterday
morning after a short visit.

SPCA Photo Competiticen
HE S.P.C.A., in order to raise
funds, will stage a Photo Com-

petition within the next few
weeks. There will be a small
charge for entry to cover the cost
of the prizes to be awarded to the
first three exhibited.

The entries which must be con-
cerned with animals will be in
black and white and no colour
prints will be eligible for compe-
tition and will be collected at tha
Headquarters, Y.M.C.A., Pinfold
Street. P

The terms and conditions of the
competition, the prize money and
the date of closing will be an-
nounced at a later date.

For Third Visit
RRIVING in the colony during
the week by B.W.1LA. from

Trinidad was Miss Margot Lagal-
cok who has come over to spend
two weeks’ holiday here. Miss
Lagaldera is employed with the
Control Board, Trinidad and dur-
ing her stay here will be a guest
at “Stony Croft”, Worthing. This
is her third visit to the island.



Annual Visit
RRIVING in the colony dur-
ing the week by B.W.I1.A. from

Trinidad were Mr, and Mrs.
Albett Thomas and their daughter
Sheila. They will be spending
two weeks here and will be stay-
ing at Worthing, Christ Church.

For Canada
R. WILLIAM WHITING left
for Puerto Rico on Thursday

by B.W.LA, intransit for U.S.A.
and Canada.
He was an employee of Bar-

clays Bank but has resigned to
join his brother in Canada.

Visited Their Son

AJOR and Mrs. D, Lenagan 8
returned from Trinidad by
B.W.1.A. on Friday after visiting

their son John who was recently
involved in a plane accident of the
Light Aeroplane Club in Trinidad.
Their son who was a patient at
Hospital in Trinidad has left the
institution and has gone to the
U.K. for medical treatment.
Leaving Today
EAVING the island to-day js
Miss Maud La Porte who has

been spending three weeks’ holi-

day in Barbados. Miss La Porte
is from Castries, St. Lucia and
during her stay here was a guest
at “Savoy”, Bay Street.

Wedding At St. Matthias
N THURSDAY last at St.
Matthias Church, Miss Phyllis

Seale and Mr. Andrew Gittens of
Industry Road, Bush Hall were
married, The bride who was given
in marriage by Mr. 8. Barker,

looked charming in an embroid-
ered bodice with a skirt of nylon
sheer. A coronet of wax buds
kept her headdress in place and
she carried a bouquet of anthu-

rium lilies and snapdragons. The
officiating clergyman was Rev.
Ripper.

She was-attended by Mrs. Doro-
thy Harding as Matron-of-Honovr
and Misses Richardine Devonish,
Sonja Humphrey and Monica Tay-
lor as flower girls who wore dress-
es of similar material and design.

The duties of bestman fell to
Mr. C. Lord and the reception was
held at the home of the bride’s
mother, Bush Yall.



Mr. and Mrs. E. L. BANFIELD

Wedding At St. Cyprians
ESTERDAY afternoon at 4.30
o’clock at St. Cyprian’s Church,
Miss Peggy Arthur Deane, daugh-
ter of Mr. and Mrs, ur-
eee of “Iriston”, st
yap, was married ‘to Mr. aren
E. L. Banfield, son of Mrs, J
Banfield and the late Mr. z tL
Banfield of “Wilsbury”, Hasti

The ceremony which was fully
choral was performed by the Very
Reverend Dean Hazlewood. The
bride who was giyen in marriage
by her father, wore a dress 7 all-
over lace with long, tlose —
sleeves and bodice featuring
@igh neckline. Her skirt was fully

gathered with made-in train, ie
wore a headdress of seed pearls
with a finger-tip veil and carried
a bouquet of Michaelmas daisies
and pink radiance rose buds.

She was attended by Miss Elza
Deane as Maid of Honour, Misses
Heather Deane and oT
Atherly as Bridesmaids, and Miss
Natalie Deane as Flower Girl. The
Maid of Honour wore a s of
lilac organza with close fitting
sleeves, and off-the-shoulder
podice. Her full flair skirt with
frills was three quarter length and
her headdress was flowers and
organza. She carried a posy of
snap dragon?

The bridesmaids and flower girl
wore gold and white organza re-
spectively cut on similar lines to
that of the Maid of Honour with
similar headdresses and they car-
ried posies of snapdragons, The
Flower Girl carried a silver basket
of forget-me-nots.

The duties of bestman were per-
formed by Mr. Leonard Banfield
while those of ushers fell to Mr.
Pat Deane, and Mr. Geoffrey
Archer, A reception was held at
the home of the bride’s uncle,
“Normandy”, Pr James
and the honeymoon is ‘being spent

at Bathsheba. j
aiagete
Ce Cc. A. —- of
A Gun Hill, St. an-

nounce the engagement ae their
daughter Patricia Margaret to Mr.
Edward Geoffrey Watson, son of
Mr. and Mrs, Herbert Watson of
Welches Road, St. Michael.





Nous a NS JANETTA DRESS SHOP 4 Wo Meet To Plan
* BERGOUGNAN ss : omen e€ect . |
S | AND NOW (Next Doox to Singer’s) Y. N Y 9 j
| | aa r f Year's race
‘ T Y R FE S 1S . you can have Ou CX
$ A ‘GAS COOKER COLOURED SHORTS .................. from $5.98 :
‘‘i— s oneness es . oe ee women: are meeting in By EILEEN ASCROFT with walsvoos’ wits his com-
. like those you have admired in e . ond Street this week to discuss anion is comfor e in a summer
* HEAVY DUTY * Mind aan ELASTIC SWIM SUITS ....08...00.5.... from $10.00 ithe beauty problems of three tones, but with more depth than frock.
x an ee ng oe cs BAGS ly Red d eunents. summer shades, Foundations a a Mayfair eagle wit —
> , ITALIAN BASKETS & eatly uce rom America comes dark-haired will be designed for the natural only one man wore a Ww! uxedo
% GIANTS. rinsed ++ + + + Bay ‘Street. A o Mrs. Kay Brown, with shor! look, with a youthful bloom. He was Jon Pertwee, looking —
Py 6000000 9O0O0F0OHOO9O9O~' > > GGS9 SO PSSSSSSS OSS SESE SSS OCS SSS haircut and sun-tanned skin, No, 3... that eye make-up is be- as iced champagne among
‘ you buy the HEST Mgt One Om A sine, comity ake, Soames SNe ean
; rap a . . . "
% SILENT SAFETY “ a ae pink fleecy Jacket . shick ee ll agree i ae Shopping statistics prove that
y and gold chunky jewellery, she ¢Ta@, which they all ag is 1
P Whe ou bu g yj y; they ‘
% ¥ y looks the typical career woman ead. But it did focus attention only 20 per cent. of men do their
& CAR TYRES : that New York produces with 0 the eyes. These four wise own buying. So it seems that
g . RERGOUGNAN x gleaming efficiency, , beauticians forecast more mas- wives, mothers and girl friends
Sy : The Canadian representative at cara, more eye-shadow and are to blame for the hot-faced
‘ Let us supply your y | this all-woman beauty confer- Sierer eyebrows, more clearly Sena freaks in Lendon
* TU BES g ‘ ence on dry skins and the new ‘English Are So Fresh to-day. ‘
‘ . REQUIREMENTS | “ ’ ” ae ne is Small, slight wat do think of English Fashion Meniix
% ; from Toronto arrived in a biotin complexions?” I acted the confer- ONE out of 10 dresses will be red
x x é dupion suit, mink wrap and tiny nee: Three pairs of blue eyes — this autumn is the latest fashion
w . son ah eo , and one of brown considered my flash from New York,
x % straw cap like a flan tin trimmed juestion, Miss Grant: “They look Pari of the
. % r-when Telota Pomade and Creme will restore with. bronze beags. 60. fresh, never sallow.” eeanstalkc “pest on winter rty
© atonal soto 3 pour Ralrso vice satrginal Solent (WH in - neeirel |Mrs. Molly Usherwood attends on “°° O°Sthtee we prefer the ounce. tt io Wller-aak inert
wh SEIS t, Sr aden manner in about 14 days if used daily. The behalf of Australia, She is tall suin-tantied Toole. nik: eutnene it Se cee tote half ,
oe } Darkening Creme is a fixative type of product with greying hair dressed in a \eather and central heating are The foot sock is something new
and is non-greasy, whilst the Pomade is a bun, and wears an elegant black }..74 on our skins,” says Mrs, Kay in Britain for children’s wear. It
dressing type of product which does, not set | /Ravathea suit, unrelieved by Brown ‘Dry skins trouble about has a special fouk whieh allows
wellery, e has ¢ e : ’ iy ; :
THE 1952 oe ee of oil; thus_it is ee : Sedeey y Bh ane e —— iy 85 per cent of our women. extra cman for developing
su ine ary hair ' f . eee Australian view is that the feet
, daughter une re ; .
TA e “a ¥ .. English complexion is still the
HAIR DARKENING , ae drone mA iw best in the world Thumbs Down
a ia Wah teal cree Men In The Sun WHICH male would you least
appearance, who loves the quiet TDAP i
i j grey tones that flatter blonde . HEAT wave temperatures of 80 like to find as a companion on a
i» 7 hair and a milk and roses com- degrees make the English male desert island?
‘} ; . a plexion re 7 ~ look silly. I put this question to 50 women
\ BY Not for him the sensible tropical this ee, married, single house-
* suiting: or" r ¢ tinen- wives and career
\ | Agents: H. P. CHEESMAN & Co., Léd — Middle Street ee hey Agreed Bs eultings, warn by he Came ee ee ee etic
THE BARBADOS POLO CLUB two years brought three im- short sleeved sports shirts, light Harding with six votes him.
| portant points of agreement tuxedos and featherlight socks Next comes the Red with
AT | " ” * chosen by the ene. it ve. bie weenen. pee
} ‘ ‘ . See him sitting. in Trafalgar Pickles, three Aneurin Bevan, .
| ia [ier sje ON ee ae Square mopping his se at Spc names on ie a
rey 7 ’ 7 my { lunch-time complete wi races are Alastair Sim, Dr. es
THE NIARINE HOTEL | ata i ae -up for the and thick wool socks. Webster Booth and Richard
11 : twa coming winter (summer in Aus- Watch him at the theatre— Dimbleby.
ONCE AGAIN OFFERS YOU TOPS IN a _traiia) wilt still be in the pink suffering in ‘his thick GArk sult, WeRh> copeancer amamkven.
AN EVENING’S ENTERTAINMENT || J :
} ON aan e
| SATURDAY, 16H AUGUST, AT 9.00 P.M. || y ( LARK ES { I iT] ‘DS S] IOES
———0——_— |
. : w% eee eee ee ee ee
® Dancing to the Police Band Orchestra ‘ WHITE & TAN 3s to 1% ..... $4.23, $4.84 .
@ 4 Flight in “Miss Bim” on Auction || ANYTHING IS NEWS that is to the benefit of ‘ TRU-FORM CHILD'S SHOES
\ @ DP.nces by our pepular Ballerina \ Sir: “shin soln :
—Miss J Rans -R.A.D. Z FS, e~-thavs why K. R.
{ ee ae 1 mene en WHITE BUCK & BLACK PATENT KID
@ Spot Dance, Bridge, Ete., Ete. | Store is news — good news because of th ‘
| @ Enjoyment Galore ! | © OE Ne OR UE S's, coe Soe $5.07 & 5.37
i ans 5 | selection of Electrical items, Office items, Jewellery 7s to 10s ........... S682 & 620
Tables can be Reserved through items, Stati lls to Is $7.04 & 7.92
s, ot ite Se eee he clehcigtiigad i f
Mrs. M. M. PARKER (Dial 8322) ee eee mae
RT HU ° MAN ditec-All-Sizes ...........-.6.-- . $4.76, $6.07, $7.1
For B ride Parties through K. R. NTE & CO., LTD. 1 : 3 -
Mrs. J. W. CHANDLER (Dial 95-211) | Lower Broad St. MEN’S “PRETTY” ANKLETS . 53 & 71 cts.
cna es
? | ;
} TICKETS $1.00 from any Polo Club Member i a R. E\ TANS & WHITFIELDS
y} or at the Door re)
)») Dress Optional |
i 1 DIAL 4220 YOUR ‘SHOE STORES DIAL 4606


SUNDAY, AUGUST 1),

At The Cinema

1952

A True Story

IN MARCH last year,

the Reader’s Digest

liams. ‘Since then, a film has been made based on this
sketch. Playing at the Globe theatre, Carbine Williams

is something different and

absorbing in prison dramas.

Marsh Williams—ineidentally he is still very much alive—
was a rebellious young man, a rugged individualist who Henry Wood Promenade Concerts.

ardiess of anyone else.

thougies he could live his life the way he wanted to, re- For
School wasn’t to his liking, sv

quit and joined the Navy.

t career fell shorf of his ex-
, so he rewurned home
to: take over his share of his
father’s farm. However, his father
told him that not unt! he has
worked the land for two years,
would it be his, To Marsh, who
wanted to get married, two years
was too Much, so he got himself
a job and against his family:
wishes, married his childhood
sweetheart. Unknown to his wife,
he ‘becomes a “moonshiner” and
ome a group of illicit stil:s
whiskey. But the Revenue
edie! up with him and during
a ih one of them is killea.
Marsh as owner of the still, is
eonvicted of second-degree mur-
der and though there is no proof
that he actually killed the man,
he is sentenced to thirty years
with hard labour. His spirit still
‘unbroken after months on a chain-
gang and a punishment of thirty
days solitary confinement, he wins
fhe respect and understanding et
the Warden, who allows him to
work on a 30 mi. carbine, the de-
sign of which came to Marsh
during “solitary,” and which has
singe been perfected and adopted
by the U.S: Army, After eight
years in jail, Marshall was pa:-
doned. by the Governor of hi
state and returned home to his
wife and son.

» The .story is told to young
David Marshall by the warden,
played by Wendell Corey, whose
faith in. the lad’s father enableu
Marshall Williams to complete his
invention. In moving and human
terms, it tells of the regenerating

fluence of a single creative idea
‘on a hitherto incorrigible hostile
‘convict and it is interesting to
hote that emphasis is placed on
xehabilitation instead of atone-
ment. Prison discipline of a bygone
day is presented in harsh and
ivealistic strokes. but for all this,
the warden emerges as an honest
man, doing his job to the best of
his ability and giving a man a
chance whom he thought worthy
of his trust.

u James Stewart, as Marshail Wi!-
Hams, gives another fine, charac-
terization through a. masterful
piece of acting. The scenes of his
prison life and particularly those
“with Wendell Corey, reveal that
Mr, Stewart is one of the finest
‘sereen actors, A splendid protray-
al~of Maggie, Marsh’s wife, is
_Biven by Jean Hagen, whose love
r and loyalty to her husband
never waver ana her performance
is both spirited and sensitive. Wen-
dell Corey ig strong and persuasive
as Captain Peoples, the warden,
“who turns out to be William’s best
friend, while Carl Benton Reid is
warm and sympathetic in the role
of Marsh’s father who, though he
‘quarrels with his son, never fails
in his devotion to him.

A good script with fine direc-
tion and acting make CARBINE
WILLIAMS an absorbing and en-
tertaining film.

Showing at the
Plaza Bridge-
town, THE BIG
TREES is a turn-
jot - the - century
melodrama
P-awhose chief
-components seem
to be cheating
and fighting. The
“hero-heel”, for
that’s all I can
call him, is an
unseruptu-
lous logger who
attempts to swindle a religious
sect out of their valuable Cali*
fornia Redwood timberlands. His
sordidly, unethical machinations
are almost incredible, but for-
tunately they are dwarfed by tne
Technicolor shots of the magnifi-
cent sequoias. There is plenty of
action, mostly of a pretty violent
‘nature, and the logger’s eleventh-
hour reform and marriage to a
pretty member of the religious
sect, whose father’s death had
been directly caused by an order
given by her husband, left me
singularly unimpressed.














|

es =
SOS LEE LCP PEEP LE FLEET EOS

PINFOLD ST.

5554, 565695 . 54
POCO E EPP POPP EPP PPPS OTSSES



TRIUMPH MAYFLOWER
$2500.00



od

JAMES STEWART

Kirk Dougias, Eve Miller and
Patrice Wymore have the prin-
cipal roles in this uninspiring, but
scenically beautiful film,

Comet Girls
Attend
Jet School

SO that they can answer
passengers intelligently when they
ask: “How does the jet engine
week?” BOAC Stewardesses
selected for the eight-miles-a-
minute Comet airliners are now
receiving technical training.



They go to “school” at the
Hatfield, Herts, factory of the
de Havilland Aircraft Company,

where the Comets are built.

The training lasts only two or
three days, but with the aid of
a sectionalised “Ghost” jet engine
and a mock-up of a Comet’s
eockpit, they learn how the
engine works and what the pilot
does to make the Comet fly

All the girls now flying on the
Comet service to Johannesburg
bave been through the de Havil-
land “school.” Others are follow-
ing in readiness for the London
and Singapore service.

The Men, Too

Men stewards of the Comet
flight have the same training.

The three stewardesses to take
the latest course were 28-year-~
old Miss Patricia Hollister, of
Cromwell Road, South Kensington
Miss Vivian Oliver, '27, of
Wargrave Road, Twyford, Berks;
and Miss Irene Rennie, 23, of

Gledwood Gardens, Hayes,
Middlesix.

Miss Hollister, a former

Richmond County School girl,

was in the WRNS during the
war. cs
Miss Oliver was a_ wartime
nurse, and joined Vickers-Super-
marine, builders of the Swift jet
fighters, as a draughts-woman.
Miss Rennie joined the BOAC
two years ago after
secretary.—L.E.S.

rinted a
biographical sketch of a man called David Marshall Wil-

Symphony

B.B.C. Radio Notes

Promenade
Concerts

Recordings From London

In the coming week the BBC
will continue to broadcast record-
ings from the 58th Season of the

listeners in this area
these recordings will be on
the air at three convenient times—
Sunday, 10th and Thursday, 14th
¢ ro p.m. and ; to 12th at
bi p.m. In the broad-
cast Raymond Nilsson, the

Australian tenor, will make his
‘Prom’ debut with the London

Orchesti

Symphony ra, conductor
Basil Cameron, with ‘ with
Orchestra: Adelaide’ by

in a coneert which includes

Dvorak’s ‘Symphony No, 4 in G.’
On Tuesday there will be another
first appearance with Gina
Bachauer, the Greek pianist, who
will play the ‘Pianoforte Concerto
in A Minor’ by Greig with the
BBC Symphony Orc » con-
ductor Sir Maleolm Sargent. In
the Thursday broadeast Victoria
Lendon’s most

FARM AND GARDEN

Hy Agricola

Some time ago we tried in thig types or varieties of crop plants
column to define what was meant which can be relied on to survive

by hardiness in plants. We point-
ed out that its significance varied,
depending on climatic conditions;
but that, in general, we common-
ly apply the term hardy kinds,

~ GARDENING
HINTS. FOR
AMATEURS

This is Zinnia time, and these
useful wet season flowers will
prove to be our great standbys for
the next few months.

Many gardens are gay with these
Sowers now, but it is not too late
to plant zinnia seeds if you have
not already done so.

There are several varieties Of
zinnias to choose from but the large

dis- Dalia type is the general favourite.
smaller

gam one of

nguished operatic sopranos, will
be heard in the ‘Recitative and
Aria: Ma dall’ arido stelo’ from
‘Un Ballo in Maschera’ by Verdi.
She will appear with the London
Orchestra, conducted
by Basil Cameron.

The Function Of A Prime
Minister

On_ Thursday nekt, 14th inst.,
the Rt. Hon. Clement Attlee will
speak on ‘A Day in the Life of a

rime Minister,’ the second talk
in the series of programmes about
the day-to-day role and responsi-
bilities of the great offices of State
in Britain. In this talk Mr. Attlee
will describe some of the functions
whieh fall to the Prime Minister in
his various capacities as the Sov-
ereign’s First Minister, the Leader
of his Party, and the First Lord of
the Treasury. He will speak at
19.15 p.m, and can be heard in the
25 and 31 mé@tre bands—Thursday,
14th inst.

India And Pakistan’s
Independence Days

b tet un tndepe di Days in
rate the ndence

the coming wor, the fifth anni-
versary of the transfer of power to
these two states—India on the 15th
and Pakistan on the 14th, The
BBC will mark both of these days
with special programmes, The
programmes for India Day will not
be beamed to us but at 7.45 p.m,
on Tihursday there will be a
special broadcast entitled ‘Pakis~
tan Day.’

Malthus On Population

In the coming week the BBC
will begin a group of three talks
with the title ‘Reconsidering
Malthus’ which are in effect a
corollary to ‘The Health of Man’
series which is now being given on
Fridays at 10.30 pm. Thomas
Robert Malthus (1766-1834) t
forward the idea that the mena
tion tended to increase faster than
the means of subsistence.
pessimism was influential in the
first part of the nineteenth cen-
tury, but later his doctrines came
to be regarded as out of date.
Today when the dangers of over-
population are generally recog-
nised, Malthus is coming into
own. The first talk “The Paradox
of Progress’ is to be given on Fri-
day next at 10.30 pam. by 4H, Li.
Beales, Lecturer in Economic His-
tory at London University. The

being a talks will be broadcast as ‘From

the Third Programme.’



Baby With Green Wings

Sets Neighbours Arguing

By CRAVEN HILL

THERE is trouble among the
London Zoo’s parakeets, And
trouble, it is said, which looks
suspiciously like jealously on the
part of, one mother,

It happened like this: Two
“nurseries’ were set up at the
same time in the parakeet aviary,

In one nest-box a green-winged
King parakeet was hatched. In
another there was hatched a
Stanley parakeet,

Everything was quiet until the
King baby made his first public
appearance. Seeing the young-
ster trying to balance itself on a
twig outside the nest-box, the
female Stanley attacked him

IS THERE ANY BETTER WAY OF INVESTING YOUR WINNINGS?

—oO-~-

POPOV POSSESSES OSPSOSSSSSSO,

STANDARD VANGUARD



viciously, drove him back into his
box, and kept him there despite
loud protest from the parent

Kings.
Better Baby

Keepers gaw the trouble and
separated the two families.

Said a Zoo official: “Why the
female Stanley should have
attacked hen, neighbour’s baby
is not clear—although the two
species hail from different parts
of the Antipodes they have
hitherto agreed well here.

“It leoks suspiciously
jealousy. Possibly the Stanley
thought her neighbour’s child a
better specimen than her es

$3100.00

CHELSEA GARAGE (1950) LTD.

PHONE 4949

like |



There are o kinds,
graduating in size down to the
little Button Zinnias so useful as
borders. Besides these there is a
curly kind called “Fantacy” very
uncommon and attractive.

Altogether zinnias are a lovely
addition to the garden, and they
have the advantage of being quick
growers. Six weeks after the
seeds are planted the plants should
Start to flower.

Preparation Of The Bed

_ When preparing the bed for
zinnias fork in a good supply of
well rotted pen manure, making it
rich but not heavy. Zinnia seed-
lings do not stand transplanting
well, so. the seeds are better plant-
ed straight into the prepared. bed,
But beware of Ants, many a bad
spring is caused by Ants eating
the seeds. When the seedlings
come up a little rearrangement is
sometimes found necessary in
order to get them evenly spaced.

Zinnias require a lot of Water
that is why they do so well in the
rainy weather, In between the
rains, be sure to keep the bed
well watered.

Chrysanthemums

No doubt many gardens are al-
ready planted up with chrysanthe-
mum suckers with the hope of a
good crop of flowers at the end
of the year. June, July and August
are the recognised months for
zlanting Chrysanthemum suckers
and up to the end of August this
job. can be done,

Of the different kinds, the. large
yellow seem to be the favourite
judging by the quantities of this
flower seen about Christmas time.
But the large pure white and the
bronze are just as easily grown
and they make a nice change from

more commonly knovn yellow,

Then there are the small border
Chrysanthemums white with yel-
low centre and small yellow, both
easily grow and needing less at-
tention than the taller large bushes
which require staking,

The large Chrysanthemum
should be staked from the time
they are about 2 feet high.

Preparation Of The Bed

Prepare the Chrysanthemum bed
by forking in plenty of well rotted
pen-manure and if possible some
humus from the Compost Heap.
Tf the bed is at all inelin
heavy, lighten it by the addition
of some charcoal, When finishéd
the soil should be rich, but light
and friable.

In the case of the large Chry-
santhemums, plant the suckers two
or three feet apart, But when
planting the border kind they

{should be placed much closer,

especially if a continuous border
is wanted,

Chrysanthemums do not require
a great deal of water, moderate
watering suits them best. They
like an open sunny position.

ned to. be

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

and be of value where for one
reason or another—goil, climate Ov |
disease liability—others give un-

i results. Keen

against heavy odds to establish
traps of particular choice

r tions which make suc- |
cess ost impossible. Usually. |
every has been taken that is)
numanly but, in the long

run, it is often the case that resort |
must be. made to hardier |
though less appreciated (depend-
ing on cv’e uredilections) sorts. |

|
In this connection, to-day we
want to draw attention to the
merits of certain fruits which tend
to be ne: because they may |
be k upon as wild growths |
not comparable with the more)
commercial types in general de-|
mand. In spite of this not infre-
os attitude, we venture to
nk that a number of ordinary |
kinds deserve a place in Tovah
horticulture since they are not only
har but extremely pleasant to
the taste, can be used in a variety
of ways and have health giving

qualities as well. At one time,
some of fruits were freely
obtained vendors’ trays but

come }
emphasiz® the imported and the
tourist tions. Here are &
few of sorts we have in mind:

Soursop: almost too well known
to need deseription; a small, ever—
green tree, with dark eg
shiny leaves; arge,
green, heart-shaped, with numer-
ous fleshy spines; the white cot-
tony pulp has a peculiar flavour,

being both sweet and acid—
delicious in ices and c irinks
{n the French islands jt. fevoured

as an early morning fruit, espe-
cially by the ladies who -cgard it
as excellent for the complexion.
Propagated by seeds.

Sugar Apple: a near relative ot!
the soursop; a small tree, with
thin, dull green le, ves, of some-
what irregular growth; the fruits
are rounded reaching about three
to four inches in diameter, with
fleshy tubercles and a glaucous
bloom, liable to fall apart when
ripe and should be picked when
full but hard; thrives best near
the sea; a very good desert fruit
in spite of its seediness,
from seed.

Belle Apple or Water Lemon: a
climbing plant of the Passion
Flower family and a close relative
of the purple variety sometimes
seen in markets; the
fruit is orange coloured when rip,
about the size of a lemon and con—
tains a delicious pulp; the vine is
propagated by seeds or cuttings, is |.
hardy and soon accomodates itself
over a fence; it seems to fruit
almost continuously; needs watech-
ing for a spiny caterpillar that can
be very destructive to the foliage.
A near relative is the granadilla
which needs. an arbour to run on,

Barbados Cherry: a small tree,
generally ree as a valuable
hedge plant and also for its cherry
like, j(i>y fruits; makes a flavour—
ful dessert, delicious in preserves
and in ices, Ideal for a small
garden,

The above is just a eross
section, so to of local hardy
plants (not f the guava

to which we gave an entire
column) which are often over-
looked as useful food fruits be-
cause, being common or ordinary,
they lack tl of sorts we
have to import. ‘et, in many
countries to-day (increasingly so
in Britain), more and more atten-
tion is being paid to the wild
plants and fruits of the country-
side for their health giving prop-
erties. In this connection, we can
learn much from the French who
have long atttached great impor-
tance to their tizenes or diet
drinks made from nitive growths,
Let us start now to develop a
livelier interest in the possibilities
of nature’s foods about and
around us.















are

\

Including the recently
received

MYSTO

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SPRAYER
A time & labour saver
for any garden
We carry a full range of
parts

ee os an OES

ARDEN

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: ‘
MR. SMALL MAN

TAGE THREE |



BARBADOS AQUATIC
OLUB.
(Members Only).

SATURDAY, 16th August,
1952, at 8.30 p.m.

WATER POLO by Filood-
light and DANCE

KNOCK-OUT FINALS.
SNAPPERS v. SWORD
FISH

POLICE v. BONITAS.

Music by Anthony Menezes
and his Caribbean
Troubadours

ADMISSION:
WATER POL ......
DANCE (codengteps eee



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“KEEP EM FLYING

DANCE AT THE

CRANE HOTEL .
SAT. 30th August

TO THE TUNES OF

“KEITH CAMPBELL"
and HIS “SOCIETY SIX"

and
“THE JUMPING JACKS STEEL BAND"

featuring our own



BING of the CAMIBREAN PAUL WILKINS

“A REE 15 MINUTE FLIGHT
IN “BIM” TO

" ONE IN EVERY 30 PERSONS”
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SUNDAY



PAGE FOUR
This is the NEW 3
Carton for

hag hleitng

COUGH
MIXTURE

ENO'S

COUGH MIXTURE

‘This new carton in orange and blue con-
tans VENO’S COUGH MIXTURE,
but although the carton is different the
medicine inside the bottle is the same
wonderful remedy for stopping coughing
attacks, easing the breathing, soothing
soreness in chest and throat, and protect-
ingchestandlungs. VENO S is good for
the whole family. Get some immediately.

FOR COUGHS - Cots I
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BRONCHIAL ANO

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that grooms and feeds your hair!

Silvikrin Lotion with Oil is a complete hair treatment in itself. It
supplies the natural oils which dry hair lacks; it acts as a dressing
as well as a health-giving lotion; it contains Pure Silyitrin, the
hair’s natural food. A few minutes’ daily massage with Silvikrin
Lotion with Oil will bring new life, health and vitality to your

hair, and will keep it perfectly groomed throughout the day.

Silvikrin |

LOTION WITH OIL

Silvikrin Hair Tonic Lotion is also available with~
out off for naturally oily hair, For thinning hair
and severe cases of dandruff use Pure Silvikrin,
the concentrated organic hair food.





Doctors Prove :
= YoulooMay Wa

A Lovelier Complexion in 14 Days

For’a Brighter, Fresher
Complexion, use Palmolive
Soap as Doctors Advised

Leading skin specialists proved that
Palmolive Soap can improve com-
plexions in many ways. Oily skin looks
less oily—dull, drab skin wonderfully
brighter. Coarse-looking skin oppears
Mee

So, do as 36 skin specialists adviseds
1 Wash with Palmolive Soop,

2 For 60 seconds, massage with
Polmolive’s soft, lovely lother. Rinse!

@ Do this 3 times o doy for 14 doys








PALMOLIVE F

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2. KLIM keeps without refrigeration

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4. KLIM is excetiont for growing children
5 KLIM anos nourisunent to cooxe DisHEs
6. KLIM is recommended for infant feeding
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W.I. BOARD STILL
BUNGLING

Congrats Queen’s College

By O. S. COPPIN
MAKE no apology for referring at once, again to-day to
the question of the forthcoming tour of India to the West
Indies next year.

I expressed the hope that the West Indies Cricket Board
of Control would not try to usher in a false Utopia on the Me
of the visit of the Indian team, In other words attempt to
implement the fantastic scheme of paying professionals and
amateurs the same for their services in the Indian tour. _.

I understand on reliable authority that They have and
in the absence of any reliable information to the contrary we
are entitled to entertain the view in the circumstances,

PROFESSIONALS ALREADY INVITED

HE Board have already invited the professionals and we
should have been told the terms and conditions undér
which they were invited. The M.C.C, publish these before they
embark on overseas tours or entertain Imperial cricket teams

at home. Why cannot the West Indies do the same ?
I have always deprecated the smugness and complacency
of certain West Indies Cricket Board officials but it seems as
if there has now been a complete reorientation of values and

of their responsibility to the West Indian cricket public and
to West Indian Cricket itself,

THE TOUR WILL FLOP

F the West Indies Cricket Board of Control do not obtain
the services of the professionals the tour is going to be a
flop whether they are bargaining on the support of the Trini-
dad Indians, the B.G, Indians or the Saskatchewan Red Indians.
If it is the intention of the new Board to set up a Trinidad
Kremlin and to issue important information by means of on-
the-spot interviews as they are now, let. them be warned that
they are ariding for a fall and they are other people like my-
self who will move heaven and earth to see that they are fired
Where are the minutes of the last meeting in B.G.? Where
is the manager’s report on the last tour of Australia? Why has

not the captain been appointed? ,

QUEEN’S COLLEGE SCORE NETBALL WINS

Y congratulations this week include the Queen's College
Netball team at present on tour of Trinidad. So far they
have won all their fixturés having already defeated Tacarigua
Orphanage 16—8, Bishop Anstey’s High School 16—8, St.
Joseph Convent 21—20, Eton Club 17—10, Holy Name Convent

13—-4, Bishop Anstey’s High School Olq Girls 17—3.
Pat Browne's consistent shooting has been the outstanding
feature from the point of view of individual performances and

that of Yvonne Smith was only slightly less brilliant.

CONGRATS MRS. WOTTON

UT what consideration must exclude all others, is that the

tremendous success achieved by the girls mirrors in
magnificent reflection the vision, industry ond foresight of
Muriel Wotton, Games Mistress of the College who trained
and moulded the team into the match winning force it has
turned out so handsomely to be.

They met Trinidad in a Test last night and the results
have not yet come to hand. Whatever the result the overall
performance of the team is a source of deep gatisfaction in
local sporting circles and the tour itself constitutes another
step in the commendable direction of an unofficial West Indies
Sporting Federation.

TRINIDAD TABLE TENNIS TEAM COMING

N this same vein we greet the arrival of a table tennis team

that is due from Trinidad this week-end

The visitors represent the San Fernando Zone of the
Trinidad and Tobago Amateur Table Tennis Association.

It will be remembered that an All Trinidad team visited
Barbados in 1949 and displayed a standard of tennis nowhere
within the reach or negotiation of the local tennis players,

However this visit was a blessing in disguise for it obvi-
ously gave us a means of judging our strength by relative
values and at the same time pointed out the crying need for
considerable improvement if we were to compete on anything
like a comfortable basis.

STRONG TEAM
FTAHIS team is reputedly a strong and well balanced team.

Even in the unlikely absence of its living up to the repu-
tation that has preceded it yet the tournament will have pro-
vided the scope whereby our local players can complete against
players whose styles will be unknown to the majority of them
and at least shed some light on our form from the point of
view of the forthcoming Caribbean Table Tennis Champion-
ships that include Trinidad, Jamaica and British Guiana.

THE CAPTAIN

Dr, Noble Sarkar who captains the team
has made a name in table tennis for himself.

He brings with him experie.ce of this SaMNe ress
in world circles for he has already repre- sj
sented Trinidad at the World games in 1948, hae. BS

He has played while he was a medical stu-; 9) 7
dent in England and one of his achievements) ~~
is his retaining the championship of the
county of Yorkshire for three ‘years.

Carl Williams, the present South Trinidad
champion and Fenwick Debysingh a former,
South Trinidad champion will. fogm with Dr.'
Sarkar a trio of experience and skill that
should ensure some very entertaining table

tennis,
SUPPORT

It is hoped that the public will turn out
in force to lend their moral and _ financial
support to this venture since public support~
alone will decide whether or not Barbados
should take a decent place in the Interco-
lonial sport line-up,

The news that Ken Farnum will take part in the World
Games in Paris this month should be gratifying to local sports-
men since it means in effect that he will be furthering his
knowledge of International Amateur Cycling
FARNUM FOR PARIS

He has not been disgraced in the Olympic Games just
concluded although he did not win any medals. His placing
in one of the heats has more than established his bona fides
and there will be little disagreement with the view expressed
in Helsinki that experience in individual effort and lack of
teamwork on the level required for this type competition were
the chiei factors that militated against his chances of a greater
showing. r

We are all hoping that Farnum will be given the oppor-
tunity to pass on his knowledge to other West Indian candi-
dates and more so be able to train our local cyclists along the
finer lines which he himself must have had to develop at com-
paratively short notice and which he mu&t of necessity con-
tinue to develop,



DR, N. SARKAR



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Racing

TWENTY-FOURTH RACE
Juvenile Handicap

Mr. J. R. Goddard’s bay yelding
Apple Sam who won the Juvenile
Stakes on ‘Thursday was again
piloted to victory in the Juvenile
Handicap, over 542 furlongs yes-
terday.

Carrying a top weight of 126lb
he won from a field of five, beat-

ing Faerie Queene into 2nd
place by a clear 3 lengths.
When the gate flew, they all

get off to a good start, and for the
first furlong or so were closely
bunched.

At the four, however, Thirkel
pushed Apple Sam to the front,
and striding beautifully, he grad-
ually increased his lead, main-
teining it alj the way down the
back stretch, around the turn by
the clock and up the home stretch.

This left Super Jet who had
been second and Faerie Queene
to battle for the second place.

There were brisk exchanges of
position between the two, but
Faerie Queene caught the judges
€yes a neck ahead of Super Jet.

TWENTY-FIFTH RACE

Victoria Handicap

Three faced the starter for this
event over nine furlongs. There
were Betsam, Newman up, 124 %b,
First Admiral, Yvonet up, 123lb,
and Seédiing, Lutchman_ up,
with a top weight of 126lb.

It was another good start, but
immediately Seedling went to the
front and stayed there. He was

followed by Betsam with First
Admiral. lying third when they
passed the judges for the first
time,

Seedling made every pole a
winning one and each time he

was challenged, he shook off the
others,

Betsam and First Admiral vied
between each other for the sec-
ond position, and while they
fought it out up the home stretch,
they close the gap between Seed-
ling and themselves.

Betsam however finished second
a head behind Seediing, while
First Admiral was third 4% a
length behind Betsam.

It was indeed a slow race, and
the distance was covered in 2
minutes 63/5 seconds.

TWENTY-SIXTH RACE

August Handicap

This event, another 9 furlong
race, featured seven horses with
Landmark carrying a top weight
of 1341b and ridden by Holder.
Slainte and Belle Surprise were
scratched. ~

Flying Dragon failed to get off
with the others once more, but
soon caught up with the bunch.
The first time past the judges, it
was Fire Lady, Lunways, Fleuxce
and Dashing Princess in that
order, with Pepper Wine, Land
Mark and Flying Dragon in close
pursuit.

Firelady kept the lead down
the far stretch, and in the mean-
time, Holder pushed Land Mark
up into the leading company, posi-
tioning himself at number four.

Around by the 9 furlong gate
and down the back stretgh, there
owere some quick exchanges: with
Lundways taking over the pre-
mier position from Fire Lady
who was now hotly pursued by
Land Mark and Pepper Wine.

Newman kept Lunways in the
lead all the way up the home
stretch, and a keen tustle was
witnessed between Fire Lady and
Land Mark.

Lunways finished the winner by
a length in front of Land Mark
who, had overtaken Fire Lady to
finish 2nd a length ahead of the
latter,

TWENTY-SEVENTH RACE
Turner Hall Handicap

Four horses faced the starter in
this 7% furlong, one being scratch-
ed, Joan’s Star, Yvonet up got off
first and was still leading when the
field passed the stands for the first
time. Blue Diamond ridden by
Lutchman was second, Cottage
piloted by Blades third with
Gavotte, (Wilder) bringing up the
rear,

As they passed the bend going
towards the five furlong pole
Gavotte took took over from Cot-
tage and the field strung out with
Joan’s Star still in the lead with
Blue Diamond second,

On nearing the four furlong pole
Cottage moved up a bit but failed
to overtake Gavotte who was still
lying in the third position. The
field raced past the two furlong
pole in this position and it was not
until they reached the bend that
things began to happen, Coming
up the straight, Gavotte came from
the outside in a driving finish to



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Details

win by a length from Blue Da-
mond who had also beaten Joan’s
Star into second place by three
lengths.

TWENTY-EIGHTH RACE

Beckwith Handicap

Five were scratched in this event
another 744, leaving a field of
four—Mary*Ann (Yvonet), Top
Flight (Lutchman), Cross Bow
(Holder), and Apollo (P. Fletch-
er).

After a false start, the field
eventually got off to a good one
and passed up the stands for the
first time at a gruelling pace with
Top Flight slightly in the lead
followed by Mary Ann on the rails
Apollo and Cross Bow bringing up
the rear.

Top Flight was now definitely
in the lead when they reached the
three furlong pole with Mary Ann
second, The pace was still very
warm but the field slowed up con-
siderably by the time they got to
the four.

At the three furlongs pole
Lutchman still had Top Flight in
the lead but Holder had moved up
to third position with Cross Bow
and was close on the heels of Mary
Ann who was still second.

Cross Bow now started to come
through from the outside and com-
ing up the straight overtook both
Top Flight and Mary Ann to win
by alength. Top Flight was second
one and a half lengths in front of
Mary Ann,

TWENTY-NINTH RACE

North Gate Handicap _

Eight horses were seratched in
this event over 7% furlongs leav-
ing a field of eleven, Of these.
The Thing ridden by Newman and
Darham Jane ridden by Crossley
each carried 4 a 6 lbs. over-
veight respectively.
. They a ae off to a good start
and Yvonet pushed Abu-Ali to the
fore and was followed by Aim Low
and Careful Annie as they passed
the stands for the first time.

Abu-Ali in the meantime began
to inerease the lead and at the
four furlong pole was still leading
by about four lengths. The re-
mainder soon bunched as_ they
tried to decrease the lead ‘Yvonet
however kept Abu Ali well in front
making every pole a winning one,

There were some exchanges
coming around by the two furlong
pole when the field closed a bit on
Abu Ali but Yvonet still kept the
colt in front and eventually raced
up the straight a comfortable
winner by two lengths ahead of
Doldrum who had moved away
from the bunch to finish second
three lengths in front of Darham
Jane. ¥

THIRTIETH RACE
Planters Handicap

Six entrants having been
scratched from this event, five
horses faced the starter for the
54 furlong distance. 7
** cardinal was given a top weight
of 127 lb., and Caprice, an extra
7 lbs.
The field was off to a good start,
and immediately Quested hustled
March Winds into the premier

sition.
Pomme semainder of the field fol-
lowed in close pursuit, with
Cardinal, Rambler Rose and Bet-
sam in that order. There were
some quick exchanges as they
raced down the back stretch, but
March Winds maintained his lead
on the field to finish a length and
a half ahead of Rambler Rose,
Holder up. Third was Cardinal,
ridden by Crossley, 2 lengths be~-
hind, Rambler Rose.

THIRTY-FIRST RACE
Carlisle Handicap

Ten horses faced the starter in
this race, the last of the meeting
run over the 7} furlong distance.

Red Cheeks was given a top
weight of 126 Ibs., while Mrs.
Bear carried the next highest

weight of 124 lbs.

The field was off to a good start,
and when they passed the judges
for the first time Sweet Rocket
was in the lead followed by
Castle In The Air.

Bellé moved Castle In The Air
to the fore by the 51% furlong gate,
and raced him in this position
down the far stretch and up the
old polo hill.

Down the back stretch, how-
ever, Harroween, Quested up, re-
duced the lead which Castle In
The Air had, and whole field
came together in a bunch,

Angling the curve to come into
the home stretch, ft was. still
Castle In The Air on the rail, but
Harroween, coming with a great
burst of speed, overtook him and
finished first 1, lengths in front.

Red Cheeks also finished well
and stole the 2nd place from
Castle In The Air by half a length.





e
8

Overstrain!

AT Ry ea EE Ne

Ly PR Spats. eae sk

Ae wy







SUNDAY,

RACING

HE CURTAIN WAS RUN

the Carlisle Handicap.
Handicap—produced a field of

In a sense this was the key note of the meeting—exceptionally
high class and interesting races alternating with extremely
In the latter category, those of the m+
Class, hardly ever rose above the
reliable starters and a hopeless case in a field of four.
against this, fields for the A. B. and C class Maiden Races were
usually good and produced excellenteracing,

THE CHAMPION STAKES

Without doubt the most noteworthy race of the Meeting,
not even excepting the Derby was the Champion Stakes. This
innovation made, one must suppose with some trepidation,
It is fair to state that as t
turned into the straight for the last time, almost every horse
had a chance, and it was especially gratifying when that good
genuine campaigner Landmark, trained to a hair, and in her
best possible form, came away from the field

disappointing ones.

was brilliantly successful.

hundred yards or so.

out of those who contested it,

the light of subsequent events.
well Until the emd ef the Meeting although she had gone a
little too high in the Handicap to score again, Fire Lady won
a Race subsequently and Red Cheeks also showed no ill effects.
In fact the only two horses who really disappointed after their
running in the Champion Stakes were Doldrum and Flieuxce,
but I have never been satisfied that this pair is a hundred per
cent genuine at the best of times,

NEWCOMERS

Always one of the most interesting aspects of a Race

Meeting is the debut of those
champions,

and he was never threatened.
a good horse perform,

of the Meeting, but there are at
special mention.

a |

very little is also undeniable.
With regard to Mr, Bethel I

to look on him as a sort of magician, I am sure that the odds
which could have been obtained against Test Match’s winning
a race at this Meeting two weeks prior to the first day would
Yet the thing was done, and there
was Mr. Bethel with the air of having known about it all along
watching his horse in the winner’s enclosure,
apparently a fortunate person,
fortune favours the brave and there is a good deal of pluck in

have been astronomical.

Mr. Bethel’s luck.

IN CONCLUSION



By BEN BATTLE

mer Meeting in traditional style, with a brilliant race for
The race before

That good stayer Doldrum overcame a
certain amount of bad luck in the running to be second, while
Fire Lady, looking the picture of health did not in my opinion
quite last home and was third.
racing spectacle, nothing could have been more _ satisfying,
while the criticism that a mile and a half would take too much

This August we saw a very large class of C class
Maidens and one at least of these bids fair to becoming one
of the great horses of the Caribbean.
Fred Bethel’s Abu Ali whose performance on the second and
final days appeared to me to be quite outstanding.
argued by some that he was in a trifle “light” in the North
Gate Handicap, and I would be the last to deny this, but the
manner in which he accomplished his task should leave no
doubt that here is a colt with a very bright future. On a slow
track he was able to go to the front of a big field on the bit,

and I
Classically bred, strong, compact colt, is not all of that,

SUCCESSFUL STABLES
I have not had the time to work out in detail the statistics

I shall not put Mr. Bethel first this time for
fair of repetition and so the honour goes most deservingly to

ir. Sam Rock who with a string of three, including the most
moderate Joan’s Star and a backward two year old—Jim La
Rue—nevertheless won no fewer than four races. That he
was favoured by fortune and the misbehaviour of his rivals
at the gates in the G Class Races I am sure he would readily
admit, but that few can have accomplished so much with so

AUGUST 10, 1952



NOTES





DOWN on the Barbados Sum-

this—the Planter’s
five rather moderate horses.

with two un-
As

ludicrous,

field

in the. last

From the point of view of a

appeared to be ill founded in
Landmark continued to run

who may make the future

I refer of course to Mr.

It may be

It is the way that I like to see
should be surprised if this

least two trainers who deserves

am afraid that I am beginning

That he is
most of us will agree, but

Space and time forbid that we should go into the Meet-
ing in any more detail at present, but it would be as well to
conclude with a word of praise for those normally much

abused men, the Handicappers.

I seldom recall a Meeting in

which there was less talk of horses being “given” races, and
the finishes and odds paid out on the last two days bore ample
testimony to the skill of Messrs, Gill and Field,



Rain Upsets County

(From Our Own Correspondent)

LONDON, Aug. 9.
Rain again caused havoc with
the County Cricket
and in two matches, those be-
tween Surrey and Midfiesex and
Notts and Worcester, no play at
all was possible. Both will com-
mence on Monday under the two-

day rule,

The day’s only century was
scored by Northampton’s Austra~
lian left hander Jock Livingston
who made 106 before being bowl~
ed by Smith of Derby, Thanks
to Livingston’s effort. Northants
recovered after being four for two
and finished the day 173 for four.

Only a couple of hours’ play
was possible in the Indians’ game
with Gloucester at Cheltenham.
During that time Emmett and
Young scored 96 without being
separated.

Lancashire ran into trouble at
Portsmouth where Hampshire dis-
missed them on a damp wicket for
133. Only Cyril Washbrook, back
in the side after missing five
games and batting in his unusual





programme ton



Cricket Programme

position of number five faced the
Hampshire bowlers with any
confidence. He made 45. Shackle-
finished with four for 26.
But Lancashire are still in there
fighting for before close they had
captured three wickets for 47.

SCOREBOARD

Kent versus Leicester

Keen ty, ciniva cy 74 for four (rain),
Hants versus Lancs

TORRE sis ocagrtkesccalelaiuastn teontieal 135

TEROOE wrssosanstahintsions 47 for three

Yorkshire versus Sussex
Yorkshire 87 for three
(rain),
Gloucester versus The Indians
Gloucester « 96 for no
wicket (rain).

Essex versus Warwickshire
Warwickshire ., bia

(Dollery ......
Essex

Northants versus Derby
Northants ................ 173 for four
(rain.
Somerset versus Glamorgan
Glamorgan oo. . 115 for 5







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ATLAS PRESERVATIVE CO. LTD., ERITH, KENT, ENGLAND

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=
SUNDAY, AUGUST 16, 1952

Racing Results





SUNDAY



Results Of 2”-

Field Sweep Janae



ADVOCATE

In Best

League Cricket Form



AT GARRISON SAVANNAH, SATURDAY, AUGUST 8, 1952 FOURTH DAY
see oe — By ROY MARSHALL
-FOURTH RACE
2th Race: JUVENILE HANDICAP, Class “F2” and Lower (2 y.0.) ?" Ticket No. y
$700, ($235, $115, $40)—5} Furlongs ana 538 | The sun shone in Lancashire on Saturday. As a result |
or 2621 139.56
1. APPLE SAM: bg. Jetsam-Battle Doll, 126 Ibs, Mr. J. R. God= ip sig 0-78 elu wanda bo ee ee
ard (Thirk oS .
2. — be er b.f. Burning Bow-Chivalry, 123 lbs., Mr. te. 1S See gon ne. og ia Such waewee) plus fast outhelts Sie _ have pro-
. Barnard older TWENTY-FIFTH RACE orgy n-getting, smen by no means
3. SUPER JET: ch.c. jetantn- Wedding Gift, 113 + 2 Ibs, Mr. fx" ee. Aone puced an Sear cee wl
7. +o Be ” + ist 1699 had matters all their own way.
thell (¥vonet) . 2nd our 431 mip ———————-_ _Indeed three of the professionals |
ALSO 7" foe (100 + 3 Ibs., Lutechman); Jim La Rue (103 aS = eS Records Broke yp the Lancashire League, all re- |
+ ny J fe). ; ; n cognised batsmen, were out for
qe: 4,13 1698, 1700, OxT aac se —{ f~-J ducks, Roy Marshall, Indian Test
; Win: $2.46. Place $1.24, $1.24. T = RACE A White Gi hero Vinco Mankad, and Austra-
4 p 72. Prise cst Ne. f uty lian Bill Alley.
orate ar FINISH: Comfortable: 3 lengths, neck. 354 ae Alley, bowled first ball, was one
R. Goddard. = = iat (From Our Own Correspondent) of _ cight Eaine batsmen to =
25th Race: VICTORIA HANDICAP, Class “F" and “F2" Only, 100 1h 8 Oe a eee oak
6th ; ae. 10,00" r Lindwall, who achieved his best
e ($235, $115, $40)—9 Furlongs WBS os si .. S805 ua Barge were broken at vorformance in League cricket.
the City
1. > b.g. O-T.C.-Linseed, 126 lbs, Mr. S. J. Rock. ,,8500 sarh te ok Miewete: ne His eight wickets cost 35 runs.
( ). OS MEWENTY SEVENTR RARE et Shoe meee, Gegplte periodic “To Clyde Walcott fell the dubi-
2. BETSAM: ‘an b.g. Flotsam-Betty Green, 124 lbs., Mr. John a renee? No. Amonnt wi "tune becig oot oer oar the unlucki-
e ; ’ * ae
3. FIRST ADS MURAL: b.g. Admiral Fig-Flak, 128 lbs., Mr. ot z oa footy Mi ar Nils ie Me tei oe set “For nfield against Bacup, he
tid E. C. Bethell. (Yvonet) . ath 4431 «i 156.10 a new ay te best for the 440 a. virtually carried both batting and
: ale teal i? ght ares. of ed Nos hurdles with the = bowling on his shoulders. His 50
FOREC $7.20. eon RDS TwenTt-eigmrin RACE of 51.6 seconds. Not only did ihe Tank: ah eoouh -geebimones
inaae airs a. Rock, FINISH: Close: head, % length. iat toa rs sient sean cM: Same, HO | SOGRY ct the day, but it did not prevent
AINER: _ S.J. * an Lacup winning by three wickets.
tees 2 3rd ag had j from a week's é
26th Race: AUGUST HANDICAP, Class “B” and Lower, $900 (8300, "tay sson 1 oe ‘isan M2? tour of Britain with his wife in a (oi| quickly, ‘Bverpthing. depend.
$150, $55)—9 Furlongs 104%, 4046, ‘aoas, aga5, Dred car and had done no train- 44 on Clyde, and he was thus
1. LUNWAYS: b.f: Kingsways-Lundy; 117 Ibs. Mr. K. D. Ed- prize TWENTY Ni NTH RACE aiiihed ing at er Salih a more er tok te Ro His:
wards: ( ; Ist 4755 $1,011.60 ga ak wee io half-cent 00) s and |
: a) 2nd 6865 ineluded five fours. Just how
2. rn ch.m. Pylon II-Esperance, 134 Ibs., Mr. V. Chase. sr sa ° ot United $ won the mile relay sreat was his responsibility can be
‘ mins, secs. beating - seen m e fac a e other
3 a is, Quer) The Phoenix-Dido, 121 lbs. Mr. S. A. sth Sed 1.00 maica by a yard. ten batsmen totalled only 29 be- |
ALSO lying Dragon 13 Ibs, O'Neil); Dashing Princess (116 jt - 1903 The Jamaicans who won at pyeot them. The collection for |
Ibe., Lutichinan)* Pepper Wine (180 lbs, Crossley) Flieuxce (111 it st doo Helsinki were up against a differ- “1pd® amounted to £7.
rie ¥ ). vn oa ao ent American and were the 30, g beagbes an ers
w L $5.00 each to holders of tickets Nos “ever able to head the streamline pe nite Clyde’s efforts, they got
FORECASTS 92 2 Win: $8.24. Place: $2.18, $1.86, $1.66. oo 1706, tol” att iil fie 328, wee, Yanks, lathenatians, afimes tell them with three wickets and 70
START: Fair. FINISH: Easy: 1 length, 1 length. Prise Tieket No, Amount who ran the first 440 yards beat [Us to spare. He received
TRAINER: Mr. K. D. Edwards. ist 604 . $1,070.79 yi little help from the pitch but was
and ‘an aun-se a fading Arthur Wint by a clear virtually unplayable, Amongst
®th Race: TURNER HALL HANDIOAP, Class “G” and Lower, $500 ‘in vers ISROT Ceeie fee ant ens Was indesd an his victims was Everton Weekes,
($185, $80, $40)—73 Furlongs on tou &xit for Wint who was who scored a quick 24 and looked

1. GAVOTTE: hb. b.m. O.T.C.-Marionette, 126 lbs., Mr. V. E.
Cox: (Wilder).

BLUE DIAMOND: h.b. b.g. O.T.C.-Call Girl, 126 Ibs., Mr.

R, E. Gill. (Lutchman).

Rock, CY Teena h.b. b.f. Dunusk-Colleen, 121 lbs., Mr. S. J.

Hans Cott Bakes (86 lbs., Blades) .

P, Moret: Win: $1.78. Place: $1.54, $1.54.

AST: $4.80
START: Fair. FINISH: Easy: 1 length, 3 lengths

TRAINER: Mr. P. B. Walker.

—eeene hata iadiptanataticaeaeetiaeitiimrtrenentitaiaile ereneecsine inten ALTE Sil TS Delica
28th Race: BECKWITH HANDICAP, Class “D” and Lower,, $800
($265, $135, $45)—74 Furlongs.

1. CROSS BOW: b.g. Burning Bow-Chivalry, 123 lbs. Mr. C.
arnard. (Holder).
2. TOP FLIGHT: b m. Flotsam-Meads, 130 lbs., Mr. L, J. Wong.

3. MARY ANN: b.m. O.T.C.-Flak, 133 lbs., Mr. F. E. C, Bethell.
Yvonet) .
RAN: Apollo (114 lbs., P. Fletcher).
Feat tt Win: $3.82. Place: $1.46, $1.48.
” Tiuisy: Comfortable: 1 1 1% lengths.
TRAINER: Hon. V. - Gal —

cera MMSE i
29th Race: NORTH GATE HANDICAP, Class “C” and “C2” Only,
$800 ($265, $135, $50)—74 Furlongs

ch.c. Persian Gulf-Fair Witness, 125 lbs., Mr.
(Yvonet) .

Wyndham-Serenity, 126 lbs., Mr. N. M.
wan eee Bairn, 105 lbs., Mr.
104 lbs., Blades); Aim Low (125
Ibs., Newman); Test Match (126
ae er); Trimbrook (111 lbs., James) ; High And Low

Lutchman) ; Embers (108 lbs., J. Belle).

Win: $5.84. Place: $1.92, $1.92, $3.60.
20.72.

ree: Easy: 2 lengths, 3 lengths.
Mr. F. E. C. Bethell

30th Race: PLANTERS’ HANDICAP; Class “F” and “F2”
(3 y.o. and Over) $700 ($235, $115, $40)—5} Furlongs

1. ABU-ALI:
2.
i Stesle, (C sie. (Gro
: l’s promities

Ibs., Onell) The Thing (1 od ib
lbs., P

Only,

$5.00 each io holders; ot tekew Nee

4690, 4692, 6271, 6273, , 6072, 6074. letics meeting. Mashburn; num-
THIRTY-FIRST RACE ber two, American was held by

Prize Tieket No. time Laing but to every %,

tnd ‘t3a spo. recor Rhoden World’s 400 metre

ard Sage 800.20 holder could eran pass

at a "9 Pearman — despite desperate

un Las 19.09 OE sitet Ree aa And

itn sete 10.90 to Seaton elas Mal

ro 20 Beem catrese tp ioe Whitheld in the final 440 yards,

$5.00 each i” panes 2H of ise ame, Nos
0458, 0460, 4562, 4726, 4728. @ On page il



B.T.C. Summer Meeting

HORSES DRAWN

No. Horse Pts, Place Amount runs.
Some ike "Sets Central Lancash
180 entra neashire League
DD 0600 Cardinal 10 3rd 13,860 .
DD 9756 Abu-Ali 9 4th & 5th A_ fine all-round performance
AAA 4342 Joan’s Star 9 divide 6,160 by Frank Worrell earned Radcliffe
U 3397 Apple Sam 8 6th, 7th, 8th a victory over Middleton, He dis- |
N 5903 Bright Light 8 and 9th 3,080 missed six of the Middleton bats-
5678 Seedling 8 divide men for 59 runs but despite this,
JJ 8155 March Winds 8) the side fotalled 165. Batting

66 other horses divide $466.66 each
B 7356 Apronusk; 6999 Vectis.
E 1833 Jealousy
8059 Howitzer

F 7220 Dim View;
3338 Sheet Arrow; 5648 Stirling Flush

H 1494 Flieuxce;
M 8842 Watercress
N 5903 Bright Light; 2586 Magic Gaye; 3967 Colleton.
P 9716 Slainte; 2487 Faerie Queene; 5678 Seedling
1520 po ge 5476 May Day
Q 0210 6686 Notonite.
S 3921 Spear ee cite
U 3397 Apple Sam.
V 2601 Gavatte; 1144 Miracle.
W 0621 Rambler Rose.
X 8837 Doldrum; 2642 First Admiral.
BB 9811 Flying Dragon.
CC 0098 Landmark.

DD 0600 Cardinal; 1135 Fire Lady; 4070 Mary Ann; 9756 Abu-

1. MARCH WINDS: b.g. O.T.C.-April 11th, 111 lbs. Mr. U. J. Ali; 3575 The Thing.
Parravicirio, ar es: EE 0167 Baby Girl
2. RAMBLER ROSE: b.f. Burning Bow-Rose, 115 lbs. Mr. V. GG 0573 Tiberian Lady.
Chase. CHolder) HH 4906 Viceroy,
3. CARDINAL: br. g. O.T.C.-April 11th, 127 lbs., Mr. J. W. JJ 8155. March Winds.
Chandler. (Crossley) . LL 9235 Demure.
ALSO RAN: Caprice (96 + 7 Ibs., Lutchman); Betsam (121 lbs., MM 8385 Soprano; 5543 Careful Annie; 5933 Racton
Newman) . NN 3506 Red Cheeks.
TIME: 1.11. OO 0619 Dashing Princess; 7596 Pe Wine.
a byt tae i $4.58. Place: $1.48, $1.44. PP 8068 Darham Jane; 6128 Belle Surprise,
FORECAST: 44. SS 7665 WHarroween; 6447 Rebate.
START: FINISH: Comfortable: 1% lengths, 2 lengths TT 4901 Mrs. Bear.
TRAINER: Mr. R. H. Mayers. UU 2211 Lunways; 1183 Sweet Rocket; 3622 Apollo;
3ist Race: CARLISLE HANDICAP, Class “A” and “B” Only $1,000 vy 996; eat Caprice.
($335, $165, $60)—74 Furlongs WW 0271 Cross Bow; 0052 Betsam.
1 BARREN: grf. Harroway-Thyine Wood, 118 lbs., Mr. XX 1397 Top Flight
Scott. (Quested) . YY 4569 Aim Low.
3, Rep CHEEKS: b.f. Linklater-Golden Carp, 126 lbs., Mr. E. C. ZZ 7221 Meerschaum
Jones. (O'Neil). AAA 6493 Test Match; 4342 Joan’s Star.
3. CASTLE IN THE AIR: b.c., Windsor Slipper-Aero-Comet, 113 BBB 5034 April Flowers
lbs. Mr. M. E, R. Bourne. (O'Neil) . CCC 3442 Devil’s Symphony.
ALSO RAN: Demure (117 lbs., Wilder); Mrs. Bear (124 lbs., Cross- DDD 0257 Sea Foam
ley); Spear Grass os Ibs., Holder); Lunways (123 lbs., New- FFF 1871 Embers,
man); Firelady (123 lbs., Yvonet); Notonite (116 lbs P. GGG 9367 Castle in the Air.
Fletcher) ;sSweet Rocket (118 Ibs., Lutchman) . III 3853 Columbus.
PART. MUTOEL. Wi $ Pl $4.48, $2.30, $2.78 KK Stas: Sion Seo ie Rae
I- n: $10.22. ace . 48, . 30, . 78.
FORECAST: $84.48. LLL 6273 a ae ie Low; 8464 Super Jet; 9738 Pues.
START: Good. FINISH: Comfortable: 1% lengths, % length. OOO 9302 a 3512 Will o’the Wisp; 5625 Blue ond,
Mr. R. H. Mayers. ‘ RRR 8497













ee

Mem set when Clyde clean-bowled
him,

In Enfield’s innings Everton con-
tinued to show good form with the
ball and took three wickets for 33.

Lowerhouse vs. Rishton

Lowerhouse won a keenly con-
test@d game by 12 runs. atting
first they scored 168 and dismissed
Rishton for 156.

For the first time this season Roy

Marshall failed to score. He played
over a yorker from the young
RNishton bowler Kenyon and was
clean bowled. He thus still needs
29 runs to beat the individual bat-
ting record for a season for a}
Lowerhouse professional.

However, Roy rendered his side |
good service with the ball, captur-
ing four Rishton wickets for 41

against the clock, Radcliffe knock~
ed off the runs for victory and
scored 170 for three, of which Wor-
rell scored a stylish hard-hitting
84 not out, including 12 fours.

Royton vs. Crompton

Sonny Ramadhin’s side (Cromp- |
ton, were heavily defeated by Roy- |
ton. Royton batted first and in
2% hours scored 167 for seven
declared,

Sonny toiled manfully on a bats-
man’s wicket and took three wick- |
ets for 57 in 25 overs, six of which
were maidens, Crompton were all
out in an hour and three quarters
for 71 runs, Sonny scored 13,

Ramadhin narrowly failed in |
the race to become the first bowler |
to take 100 wickets this season.
He was beaten by Eric Price, who
took his hundredth for Middleton
against Radcliffe. Ramadhin has |
now taken 99,

A benefit match has been ar-
ranged for Ramadhin on August
10th. He is leading a West Indian
team against Walsall.

Owing to the new ruling, no
Lancashire League professionals
will be playing, as the League has
banned Sunday cricket,

Ramadhin will still have a
strong side, however, including
such players as Frank Worrell,
C. 8S. Nayudu. and Charlie Bar-
nett, former Gloucestershire and
England opening bat, and seam

Clyde Walcott mee a great
future for R. Dickinson, a 17-
year-old wicket-keeper whom he
is coaching at Enfield.

“Dickinson takes the ball very





PAGE FIVE



-

ROSES

| AUG. NO. 236

The Topic
of

Last Week |

OR

Gin &



sw
ime

AND

Rum & Lime

AGENTS:

L. M. B. MEYERS & (CO. LTD.

“Soapin ~ iulls hair_
Halo glo-ifies itt

—-



The races are now over
Somebody ain't get none
Well boys don’t be

You had four days of fun,
. : .

You saw that girl with “Red Cheeks”
And “Careful Annie” too

Both posing with “Columbus”
And his friend “Jim La Rue.”



j
|
|
}

disgruntled {
|
|

“Mrs. Bear’ and “Flying Dragon”
Met under a “Bright Light”
There they saw a great “First Admiral”

One those boys from the “Top Flight.”

Then behind him tcabven the “Viceroy”
With a “Dashing Princess’ too
And like many malicious people





They only got a very “Dim View.”
: . .



Joe and Robert joined the party
Up stepped their friend “Mary Ann”

HALO leaves your

With her boy friend in a “Bow Tie! hair wonderfully soft
Then the “Jealousy” began | and easy to manage

Ma ma let me join this party | ’
Cried her three-year “Baby. Girl"

Get a car drive round bY “Colleton” | HALO makes your

Let me see Barbados World
: . .

i









permanents take
It is dark the sta all “Twinkle”
You'll miss @ glorious sight better — last longer!

Wait my dear the mother whispered |

But the irl cried “No-to-Nite.” HALO REVEALS
*. . |

In the darkness they went speeding THE HIDDEN BEAUTY
With the Taxis stern “Aim Low.” |

And when they all reached home safely | OF YOUR HAIR

What a “Miracle? whispered Joe.

A new conversation started
On the “Test Match" then ‘The Thing’
And a boy-——a great “Soprano”
Hummed a tune-—then start to sing.
. *

You could hear him from the “Cottage’
Singing at times, “High and Low”

While the crowd around excited
He possessed his own “Demure.”

They all left for eaeaper th “Landmark” |
Opposite they had a

"T hear steel bands” cried oa pat Robert |

Playing the “Devil's Sympthony |

|

|

!

It was music! ius music!
Hear the sound inside the wall?

Rut the musie and our marching
Could not shake Glendairy wall

YOU CAN TASTE
THE CREAM ®

For the host of mischief makers
Who build ‘“Cagtles in the Ajr’
Can be sure theif music sweeter
To the boys outside; don’t fear
. . .
For the bays who saw the races
With the girls from near and far
Could enjoy one consolation
A large bottle of J. & R.
. .
Joe is broke ahd Robert stranded
Not a cent is left behind
Robert is one big free agent
Joe must drink Lou's * ‘Pepper Wine”
Home ities went together singing
Not a cent to buy a light

Lou cried “Robert you're a bachelor
Joe can't sleep in here to-night

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£AS/1 4/74








PAGE SIX






“For Women 4

Only!” * aA
e
’
> Vo
“Sure I love you, Mummy, and especially when you give me
WOODWARD'S.” ;
WOODWARD'S GRIPE WATER, mothers, IS the best remedy

for baby’s aches and pains. WOUDWARD’S is known the world over
--time and the comfort of millions of babies surely prove its worth,

Here are two parents ready to prove
the worth of another well-known health-
aid. Users of SPA TOOTH BRUSHES for
yeors, Mr. and Mrs. John Smith can
afford to smile. Their sparkling, white
teeth pay no small tribute to SPA—the
finest toothbrush out, in either nylon or
bristle



As for June, here, no wonder
she looks so gay. June believes
in BANDBOX preparations for
healthy, hair beauty. BANDBOX
ALMOND OTL SHAMPOO con-
tains active oil-ingredients that
soften the hair and help its growth.

COLAIRE, another Bandhox
beauty-aid, puts those gleaming
starlight’s in June’s hair. COL- :

is a powder the miracle f .
dressing you can brush in and out at will. Colaire comes in shades of
Auburn, Gold, Champagne and many other tints, also silver for the
white-haired. On sale at most drug stores.

: This little lady is very HOUSE-
PROUD—and no wonder! Every-
where in her home you will find
AIR.WICK. It’s the ‘wick that
does the trick.’ Raise it from the
liquid in the bottle and all un-
pleasant smells will be absorbed.

Kitchen odours, stale tobacco
fumes, all are completely dis-
pelled by AIR-WICK. Try a bot-
ue, you'll never ever after be
without it.



This fellow’s an ugly customer,
and doesn’t he look frustrated.
The VAMOOSE-PUFFER in the
handy puffer tin, is the reason
why. One or two puffs-of the
VAMOOSE-PUFTER tin quickly
exterminates all such pests. Con-
‘taining -D.D.T., one or two quick
puffs in cupboards or rooms
will rid your home of all insect
discomforts .



A “slim and lovely” lady steps
out —~- confident, poised, not only
because she’s welldressed, but in
the knowledge that her perfect
figure carries off everything she
wears. By using SILF, one tablet
night and morning, you too can
possess her sylph-like figure. No
dieting, no exercise, just two
tablets of SILF a day, take all
that ugly fat away.



Mom’s just

“Am I happy!
given me a SCROLL pen. It
writes im both red and blue. Get
my homework done in half the

time, now. Dad bought one right
away—so did Sis—after borrow-
ing mine. Now all the family
write with SCROLL BALLPOINT
PENS, in either blue, red or both.
Easy to refill, SCROLL is a pen
for all. Don’t lend yours out-—
you*might not get it back.”



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SUNDAY

ADVOCATE



MAKE IT YOURSELF

A CHILD’S SUN-DRESS Gai'\ \
Aes \
+

Sizes 2-4, 4—6, 6—8 Years
Here is a sweet little dress for
warm days on the beach or in the
country, with lattice-work of ric-
rac braid. It is extremely simple
to make, buttoning down the
back, with plain ice, extended
shoulders, and full gathered skirt.
The ric-rac is repeated on the
Dorothy bag pockets. Use any
plain pastel cotton or linen, with
crisp white ric-rac braiq to look
as cool as an ice cream, Your
daughter. will love to wear it.
This pattern is obtainable in
sizes 2—4, 4—6, and 6—8 years.
There are six pattern pieces.
You will require one yard of
36-inch material for 2—4 years,
One and a quarter yards for 4—6
years, or one and a half yards for

6—8 years.

REMEMBER to fit the pattern
carefully, and if necessary adjust
the pattern before cutiting the
material. Allow half -an-inch on
all turnings. Mark notches, but
do not cut.

TO CUT: Cut one width 18,
14, or 10 inches long, according
to size, and one piece to the fold
9 inches wide and 18, 14, or 19
inches long. Cut pockets as placed
on diagram, and enough crossway
one and a half inches wide to
bind back and armtholeg, also
pockets. Cut centre front to fold,
and centre back to selvedge, Cut
one width two and a half inches
wide for the belt.

_ TO MAKE: Sew ric-rac braid
in lines diagonally across the
front bodice, then join shoulder
and side seams, and press. Bind
arms and neck with crossway.
Join the two pieces of skirt to-
gether at one seam and press
Gather the straight edge of each
pocket to about 4% inches, and
bind with crossway, then sew
ric-rac braid along the top. Gath-
er the top of skirt, and fold in half






lo find the centre foi the centre
front; stitch rounded edge ~of
pockets to each side of centre
front. Join skirt to waist, then
turn the centre backs in two
inches, and press, Make button-
holes in the right-hand side of
back, half-an-inch from the edge,
and sew buttons to the left side.
Bind, the neck and armholes with
crossway. Turn up two-inch
hem of skirt. Fold belt length in
haif lengthwise, right sides facing,
and join across end and along
edges. Turn through to the right
side, close open end, and press.
Make belt loops and press.

Why not make your little girl
the gift of this smart dress. The
patterns can be had in three sizes
from the Advocate Stationery at
only 6d, per pattern,

ebbicieeinsinineiese



ee rrerenemery -erpeen marae sameeren ene





xlvedge . : ye
, ey vr ee ee
Le Ae ij
Ae "A
got yo i Lait
Oe 74 -
IF 18" a a

{ a7 ee we 94
eos

Fold

be
i Er eas ann a ako naa lla LEE ak ws

And Now The “Swan Look”

LONDON

Ccuture week opened to-day
with the collection of John Cay-
anagh, the newest recruit to the
exclusive ranks of the Incor-
porated Society of Fashion De-
signers, With this collection—his
first as a member of the society,
and one that was full of sur-
prises—he makes a dramatic en-
trance into the world of “haule
couture”,

Cavanagh made it clear from
the start that he is a disciple
in the Cult of the Unusual. First
evidence of this came with the
somewhat starling announcement

op 20"

tweed, green wool jersey, green
and black flecked tweed, green
linings to short jackets and coats,
a green rose on a biack evening
dress, and green violets and veil-
ing on a black hat.

Cavanagh had unusual ideas,
too, about the use of materials,
and suggested bright blue tweed,
embroidered with black jet, for
a cocktail suit, gold wool-lame
for suits and a casual day dress,
and again, qa cocktail shirt in
emerald-embroidered green tweed.

Then came little hats for wear
with full-length é€vening dresses
—miniature boaters, with bouff-

that next season we are to look ant veilings, and plumage dyed
like swans. to match. :
“Collars cut in one with bodices The collection ineluded sev-
give a long-necked look”, says eral dresses of the kind that
Cavanagh. “Skirts blow gently make those at the back of the

back with a new curved seaming
which gives fullness at the bac's,
straightness at the front.” This
silhouette was shown for suits,
dresses, cocktail dresses, and
most effective of all, for full-
length evening dresses. Swan
feather caps and swan-headed
umbrellas provided further sem-

audience stand on their little gilt
chairs to obtain a better view. A
full-length ball dress in pale
pink satin had _ starfish em-
broidery on its full skirt, a short
dress in black taffeta rose em-
broidery; a short dinner dress
was in red lace over green tulle,

and a tailored suit in black
blance of reality”. honey-comb velvet was worn
Then came surprising colours ; with a blouse in gold embroid-

Hyacinth mauve-blue (for a woul

ered gold silk,
jacket, lined with green faille!),

The final impression was that

Boulevard Red, Connemara Green, Cavanagh had used in this one
and oddly enough, not a speck collection ideas another designer
of grey. This season, it is Green might have spread over three

fon Fashion.

Green Donegal collections.

EVA

mink,



SUNDAY, AUGUST 10, 1952



The death of a Joan of Arc in

leaves Peron's ‘shirtless

ones with realities instead of

rainbows ...

By MILTON

EVA PERON’S declared ambition was simple enough. 4x
She wanted to be a footnote.

phrasing.
“There was hy the side of

SHULMAN

She had even suggested its

Peron, a woman who dedicated 5 4

herself to bring to the President the hopes of the people—hopes
which he could convert into realities,” she wrote in her autobio-

graphy, La Razon de Mi_ Vida.

fully repaid if the footnote would end like this:

“And I would feel proparly and
‘Of that woman

we only know that the people used to call her, caressingly, Evita.’”

Historians may surprise Eva
and take her at her word. They
may even deny General Peron a
complete chapter. For in the tur-
bulent firmament of South Ameri-
can politics dictators blaze and
die with the quixotic incandes-
cence of comets. Will the regime
of Juan Domingo Peron be re-
membered as much different from
the others?

Perhaps Eva did make the dif-
ference. She helped to transform
a military coup into a_ crusade.
She set herself up as a Joan of
Are wearing armour by Dior and
brandishing a microphone as her
weapon. Her Dauphin was Peron.
P Circuses, Too
IT was a muddled crusade com-
pounded of a hatred of poverty,
love of the workers, revenge
against the rich, driving envy,
personal ambition and a simple
faith in the destiny of her man.
{t was a patchwork philosophy,
more conscious of the verbiage
than the aims of Fascism, Syndi-
calism, Socialism, Beveridgism,
and Nationalism. Through it all
ran a broad. streak of Latin-
American emotionalism.

It promised not bread or cir-
cuses, but bread and circuses, with
the spotlight on the beautiful be-
spangled Eva riding barebacked
around the ring handing out the
loaves,

It undoubtedly gave to the
workers a share in the govern-
ment, inereased pay, womidn’s
suffrage, and a measure of social
welfare unknown before. It de-
manded in return a- subservient
electorate, a docile parliamentary
opposition, a puppet Press, obedi-
ent labour leaders and the whole-
sale surrender of liberty.

For his survival Peron has had
to rely upon the tolerance of the
army and the active support of
the workers. His own career has
equipped him for handling sold-

iers. Eva solidified his bond with
the descamisados (the shirtless
ones),

Disc Jockey

MARIA EVA DUARTE came of
the people, most authorities agree,
on May 7, 1919. She herself pug-
naciously femiriine, fnsisted that
her birth was at least three years
later.

Eva's father, a small land-owner,
died when she was a child. At
16, she left her mother’s boarding
house in the provincial city of
Junin to seek her fortune as an
actress in Buenos Aires. Neither
the theatre nor films welcomed
her decidedly limited talents.

But her sympathetic, vibrant
voice was made for radio where,
as a disc jockey, commentator
and heroine of soap operas, she
became known to factory girls,
slaughter-house workers and
gauchos as Senorita Radio,

First Meeting

LIKE so much of Evita’s life,
her first meeting with Peron is
wrapped in an exasperating tissue
of speculation and romanticism,
It seems, however, they met
sometime late in 1943 while rais-
ing funds for earthquake victims,
at a cocktail party, or while Eva

was broadcasting a eulogy of
Peroy’s activities. Take your
choice.

Colonel Peron was then Secre-
tary of Labour and Social Welfare
in the government of pro-Axis
army officers who had overthrown
the discredited Conservative re-
gime,of President Castillo on June
4, 1943. The Colonel was 48 years
old, handsome, a champion fencer,
a respected military Strategist, an
admirer of Franco and Mussolini,
and very ambitious,

He understood that reliance

upon the wealth of absentee land-
lords and the high-handed mea-
sures of generals was a shaky
foundation for the establishment
of power. His regime needed a
popular base and he sought it by
courting the country’s leading
trade unionists.

In this work of flattery and
persuasion Eva was an invaluable
aid. She dramatised his work
over the air with her purring, fer-
vent oratory; afd while Peron
worked on the labour leaders Eva
was building up a mass following
of the poor and the dispossessed.

Marriage

WHEN in 1945 the landlord and
army officers arrested Peron on
one of those shifts of allegiance
that makes South American poli-
tics so incomprehensible to the
foreign observer, it was Eva who
exhorted, rallied and organised
the protest march of 50,000 work-
erg on the capital. After five days’
imprisonment, on October 17, the
frightened leaders of the revolt
released Peron. Four days later
he married Eva.

A resounding electoral victory
in February 1946 made the Colo-
nel a President and the small-time
actress a First Lady.

But the careful coiffure and the
skilful good looks camouflaged
the hard will and the boundless
ambition that motivated Eva
Peron. She took over at the Min-
istry of Labour the work that had
been started by her husband.

Draping herself in. Mink and
diamonds she went down to the
factories and farms offering her-
self as unassailable proof of the
promise and opportunities in the
new Argentine. “You will all
have clothes like these some day,”
she assured them,

At her thrice-weekly audiences
she dispensed favours, jobs and
money like some bountiful Mrs.
Roosevelt, who: looked like Cin-
derella, But she could sting, too,
and labour leaders or Ministers
who disagreed with her were ouf.

It was a social snub by the
Argentine’s socjal dowagers who
refused to ask her to be the hon-
orary president of their charity
organisation that led to Eva’s set-
ting up of her huge Social Aid
Foundation.

It is now the country’s biggest
organisation which, in its declar-
ed aim of distributing food, medi~
clne and money to the needy, has
come to own HKkospitals, ware-
houses, retail shops, homes for
working girls, old people and
indigent mothers. There is even
an entire Children’s Village built
o> See after 1,000 poor children
a day.

The desire of Eva'$ good wil)
stimulated the flow of money inte
ae Teena with trade unions
and business supplying the larg-
est share, Its
exceed £35 million a year, which
Eva spent as she liked without
troubling to keep accounts.| “I
just use the money for the poor,”
she explained, “I can’t stop to
count it.”

When, however, last year Eva
set her cap for the Vice-Presi-
dency she had gone too far in a4
land where women were practi-
eally unknown in public life and
only voted for the first time in
1951. The army firmly said no.
The Perons made a_ humiliating
retreat and Eva was given a large
medal and the title “Spiritual
— of the Nation” as compensa-

on.

Suspicion
BUT oratory and emotion were
© match for econonfe gales,
eckless spending and the loss of
markets through extortionate

@ On Page 11







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losses. To promote firm, healthy gums, use Ipana tooth paste —
Ipana and Massage. Use Ipana, also, to brush your teeth extra-
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’ The STARS: *x*

and YoU i fi iy,



FOR SUNDAY, AUGUST 10, 1952

Look in the section in which your birthday comes and
find what your outlook is, according to the stars.

*

ARIES vm and Sun, senacs commend delicate
aa handling of family and home interests, en-
March 21—April 90 courage more aid to worthy causes, ree
ligious interests, '

Grand influences from your own venus
should give a boost to personal desires.
Be of good cheer, attend your church, *
Your Mercury and Mars positions now
recommend a most genial and co-Opete= 34.
tive attitude to gain ‘the blessings and ad-
vantages indicated for private interests.

*
*«
*

TAURUS
April 21—May 20

*

GEMINI
May 21—June 21

*

Moon and Venus combine to-day to sus
CANCER tain ileasantriee, | Saee vist Pieee as
22—J ment that comes from ve
am “> God, country, family, good fri i *

*

A beneficent outlook for you with gaiety,
sports outdoor activities of which are
fond all favoured in moderation. of

all think of God, *
Though to-day’s vibrations encourage ac-,
tivity, essential work, wholesome plea- 4
sures, it is advised to abstain from any,
mental and physical strain.

have a happy day. ¥ *
Read Taurus and Cancer; your indications
similar. Whatever your duties, make ee at

pleasant; enjoy free hours fully, Healthy
fun, sports sponsored.

LEO
July 24—Aug. 22

VIRGO
Ang. 23—Sept. 23
You

LIBRA
Sept. 24—Oct. 23
’

Mars’ inauspicious configuration ae
9g kindliness, mild temper; then you can

truly enjoy benefit from the wonderful *
rays of other planets this grand Sunday.

SCORPIO
Oct. 24—Nov.

Jupiter among the major planets backing
activity this Sunday; Church, healthful re-
creation, ete. After services, relax with

family, friends. +
Saturn nil in tendency all to the good,
because this is God’s Day and laborious 94,

work (unless essential) should give way
to other things.
matters.

SAGITTARIUS
Nov. 23—Dec. 22

Dec. 23— Jan. 21
CAPRICORN

Fine day for wholesome

Same as Capicorn to-day. You can have
pleasant, interesting and purposeful sais 4,
if you help make them so. Just avoid sud-
den changes, decisfons, carelessness. Pray,
rest,

AQUARIUS
Jan. 22 — Feb. 20

Kaew KeKe KK KK KKK KK

Many grand influences for building mind
and hcalth, for nourishing soul’s ne
Essentials, recreations, hobbies AND
PRAYER favoured.
YOU BORN TODAY are clever, ingenious, courteous but
not always tactful. May have unusual artistic talent, perhaps
XK tor stage, screen, or playwriting. Watch that conceit not be ~«
-eouraged, nor arrogance, Study, aim constantly to improve
ane yuu wil. Don’t be averse to constructive criticism.
Birthdate ot: Herpert Clark rioover, 3ist U.S. Presi;
Norma Shearer, actress.

x eee HH HHH *F
prices for, meat and wheat have B ALD HE AD.

resulted in inflation, the fall of
the peso and a rising cost of liv- Nn a cunning attempt to antici-

pate sponsored television, Snibbo
Ltd. commissioned a dramatist to

PISCES
Feb. 21—March 20

The fresh bloom of love be-
tween Peron and the trade unions

has faded into suspicion. Recent mat whose head shines like te?
eee have been ruthlessly sun after four applications of a

nameless tonic.

His wife uses the tonic to pol-
ish furniture, and their baby’s
whooping-cough is cured by it.
Never once is Snibbo mentioned
by name, but in the last lines of
the play the bald man says to his
wife; “Clara what is the name of
this magic stuff?” “Need I tell
you?” replies the wife. “Ah, well,
perhaps not, says the husband,
with a smug smile. Rather subtle,
rather sophisticated?

Talking Point
A solemn and religious regard
to spiritual and eternal things
is an indispensable element of
all true greatness,
—Danial Webster

With the Army brooding and
restless over a revolt that mis-
fired only last year, with the in-
tellectuals fretting in the gloom
of a darkening totalitarianism,
and with the workers fin the
cost of living overtaking their in-
creased wages can Peron remain
in power?

And who will delight and dazzle
the descamisados now that Evita’s
gone? And will they stick by
Peron when they have to accept
realities instead of rainbows? Or
will Peron follow the long parade
of little dictators into obscurity?
But even if he does, Evita should
get her wish. She should, at least,
make a footnote.

WORLD COPYRIGHT RESERVED








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SUNDAY; AUGUST



WOMEN AT WORK:

Southern

Northern

When bachelor girls in Montreal
forégather to gossip and play
calypso recordings, it is probably
the British West Indian colony
now living in Canada and em-
ployed by Trans-Canada Air Lines
A —— knit community of eight
girls and one young man from



EMPLOYEE relations expert, Ma-
rion Nichols, at her typewriter in
the International Aviation Building
in Montreal.

Trinidad and Barpados live and
work in the metropolitan area,
and share the pleasures of
Canada’s constantly c haneine
seasons, with a peppering of the
more blase diversions of the
theatre, ballet, symphony, opera,
and the occasional “creole fete.”

. As many of the girls share ac-
commodation, the creole fetes
have developed a “down home”
atmosphere.. Three Trinidadian
representatives, Dora and. Gloria
Lovrenco, with room-mate Joan
de La BaSstide, are the centre. of
much activity. Joan and Gloria
are both employed in the public
relations department of the air-
line, and Dora is. with the flight
operations. group.

Joan de La Bastide is training
to be a dancing teacher, with a
plan to eventually establish a
dancing school in Trinidad, where-
as the Lourenco girls are both
matrimonial bound. Dora will
settle in Toronto and Gloria in
Montreal with their future hus-
bands.

Another section of the colony
occasionally in attendance at the
creole fetes is the Barbadian,

10,

1952



Belles In
Climes

Sheila and
lone male
passenger

Joan. Lewis and the
representative, a TCA
agent at the Interna-
tional terminal, Vere Brooks.
Pretty Sheila Lewis is employed
at the International airport as a

teletype operator, a trade she
learned while serving with the
A.T.S, during the war, and later

with the Cable & Wireless Com-

pany in Barbados. Joan, her
sister, id employed with the
Reyal Bank of Canada. One

staunch new Canadian, and an-
other former. resident of Barbados
and ex-employee of the Cable &
Wireless, is Marion Nichols, a
veteran of several trans-contin-
ental transfers before settling in
the labor relations department of
the airline in Montreal,

Honor Heath, daughtey of Mrs.
Ida Heath of Rockley near Has-
tings, is also a TCA'’er and at-
tended Queen's College, Barbados,
and Bishop Anstey High School
in Port of Spain. The attractive
18-year-old Barbadian is presently
attending night school to qualify
as a beautician, and recreation-
ally ‘is becoming proficient in
tennis, daneing and skiing in the
Laurentians.

The British West Indian colony
is gradually swelling its. ranks
in Canada, as Adrienne de Ver-
June Austen (Toronto) and the
teuil, Zita Rodriques, June Minion,
others promise to continue en-

livening the Canadian scene with
“jump-up.”

the occasional



TELETYPIST. . . The nimble fin-
gers of Sheila Lewis at work on
messages to Trans-Canada Air Lines’
afty-two stations,



FOUR PRETTY GIRLS from Trinidad and Barbados gather for tea

and gossip. Left to right:

Adrienne de Verteuil, Honor Heath, Joan

de La Bastide and Gloria Lourenco.



the fashiinable woman wears



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JUST RECEIVED

SIMMONS

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FASHION







[Dp IN LONDON

SUNDAY ADVOCATE



By DOROTHY

HRARKLEY



Coronation Year “Look’’
THE TOP ELEVEN GET BUSY

By DOROTHY BARKLEY

LONDON, July 17th, 1952.

Will London’s Top Eleven de-
signers, due to show their collec-
tions in a fortnight’s time, estab~
lish a new look or Coronation
Year? What will follow the
“romantic revival” of last year,
which brought back full skirts
billowing out over crinoline petti-

coats, and the “Middy” look this
year, which echoes the low,
yound-the-hip waistline and

straight skirtline of the 1920's?

Hint of future fashion comes
this week from Peter Russell, wh«
was one of the first to re-intro-
duce those Edwardian petticoats,
He declares that styles will be
“sleek,” possibly with a return
to reed-slim skirts, sheath dresses
and crisp tailoring.

Whatever the style to
launched, overs@€as buyers ars
regarding "Fashion Week” this
July with more than usual inter-
est. They consider these collec-
tions an important preliminary tc
Coronation Year, Special social
events have been arranged for
them. Foremost among these. is
the garden party to be given .by
Lady Kenneth Clark, President oi
the Incorporated Society of Lon-
don Fashion Designers, at her
house in Hampstead, the home of
artists.

be

This is the first garden party
for overs®as buyers to be given
by the Incorporated Society. Here
they will meet not only tne Top
Eleven designers but the heads of
Britain’s wool, rayon, cotton,
linen and, silk industries, and
such modern artists as Graham
Sutherland and Henry Moore,
who both take considerable int>r-

est in contemporary industrial
design.
Lady Clark, wife of Sir Ken-

neth Clark chairman of the
Arts Council — hopes to stimulate

interest in fabric design and
colour.
Waiting for the Top Eleven

collections, overseas buyers have
watched the signpost shows of the
London Model House Group (the
second-in-command to the Incor-
porated Society).

Typical were Dorville who heli
a preview of their new styles thi
week. Last year’s full skiris *
replaced by straight skirts, usual!
with an inverted or wrap-
pleat at the back. On the
occasion when fullness appea!
had none of last season’s bc:

petticoated effect. Full skirts



no time.
and safely.

nor upset the stomach.

ae ene p- anne semen igotniiattacetndaitisastiiateymssttenante

PHENSIC tablets clear the head and dispel
tightness and pain behind. the eyes, They
bring down high temperature, relieve stuffy,
congested feelings, at tht same time soothing
the nerves and counteracting depression.
The aches and pains of ’Flu disappear in
PHENSIC tablets act quickly
They neither harm the heart

PHENSIC tablets by you always.

Phensic

FOR ’FLU, COLDS & CHILLS, RHEUMATIC PAINS,
LUMBAGO, NERVE PAINS, HEADACHES, NEURALGIA

were of the all-round, accordion
pleated, variety with the pleats
cut so finely that they gave a
straight, flat appearance. And
square, paddeq shoulders have,
regrettably replaced the feminine
rounded line,

Suits were in grey worsted
flannel black hopstack, navy vel-
veteen, and stone barathea. Tweed
mixtures had unusual effects —
parma violet striped with white,
tan with grey, rust with bottle
green, Most of the suits had
their own individual blouse, clev-
erly inked with the jacket lining,
A black hopstaek suit had the
jacket lined, with black-spotted
orange. silk, and a blouse to match,
(See illustration). A steel grey
West of England flannel hada
colourful Paisley silk blouse and
jacket lining.

Black was chosen for all types
of outfits, and offset each time

with a different colour, A black
serge dress, with square neck and
sheath slim skirt was teamed with
a yellow duches satin bolero
over these went a three-quarter

length black corduroy coat with
raglan sleeves, A dinner dress in
black silk jersey and matching

tole lined with white silk jersey,
and a contrasting red silk jerse;

cummerbund. An@ a black-and-
white check velveteen jacket,
with check placed diagonally on



pocket and cuff facings, was worn |}

over a straight black skirt.
Cocktail dresses in silk with a
polka dot pattern looked effective,

Illustrated ig one in sherry slk
with a black velvet spot, The
swathed belt with its floating
“chou” is detachable,

New. season's details noted:
light grey worsted shawl collar
on dark grey worsteds suits
dresses with matching cardigan
searves, with six-inch fringes ;at

either end, accompanying sult
and néw shades of old colours
“blueberry” and “green grass.”



What’s Cooking In
The Kitchen

Steamed Snapper
Snapper 2. Ibs., sait,
onion, carrot, celery, unyme,
parsiey, butter 3 oz, white wine,
40r @ DIT Ol frum, Meur, 4 lable-
Spoontul, cream ow @Vvaporaved

muik,

Bone fish, cut it in a few parts
and season inside and out. Chip
the onion, the parsiey, thyme,
carrot and celery and put every-
thing at the bottom. ol a pyrex
dish. Put the fish on top after
buttering it and put it in the oven,
Let it cook for 10, minutes, then
take the dish out and pour the
2 glasses of white wine over it.an
a tiny bit more of melted butter,
Let everything cook now until
the fish is quite ready. Take it
out of the oven then, if the sauce
is thick enough you’ can serve it
on the fish but if it is still thin
add a tiny bit more butter with
the 4 tablespoonful of flour and
let it cook for about 3 minutes
until thick. Add the cream then
or evaporated milk (about 4
glass) and whip the sauce always
on the fire until quite smooth,

If you cannot use white wine
with this recipe you can use a bit
of rum with water.

Snapper with Tomat» Sauce

You can use snapper or mullets
or even pot fish with this very easy
and tasty recipe,

Snapper or other fish.
olive oil, salt, pepper,

pepper,

Flour,

onion,

Keep a supply of

d fat

parsley,
sauce.
After
pass it
or the

garlic, thyme, tomato
cleaning the fish, dry it
in flour and put the fish
filets of snapper in a
saucepan or pyrex dish so that
they rest in the bottom. Add
some olive oil and let the oil get
hot. As soon as one side is cook-
ed turn it over on the other side,
season with salt, pepper, chipped
onion, parsley, a tiny bit of gar-
lic, thyme. Let it fry for a few
more minutes, then add a thin
tomato sauce (about 4 table-
spoonsful). Let everything boil
another two minutes and
serve hot,
>Steamed Snapper

Another recipe for
snapper.

Snapper, olive oil, onion,
parsley, whole tomatoes or tomato
sauce, salt and pepper,

Cut some fillets, wash and dry.

Put some oil in a saucepan with |

the chipped onion. As soon as
the onion starts to fry add a tiny
piece of chipped garlic, and some
chipped parsley. Let the garlic
fry for a very short time, then
add the whole tomatoes or tomato
sauce, 1 tablespoonful of water,
ealt and pepper.

Add the fish then and let the
fish cook for about 10 minutes or
a quarter of an hour.

Serve hot and finish with a few
pieces of chipped parsley.

TWO TABLETS <—
BRING QUICK

—

RELIEF ~ \



exciting,

steamed |

garlic, |



Man About Town

MATERNITY DRESSES — yes,

ind beautifully made by LE
CHATEAU DRESS SHOP. This
newly opened Salon in Country

Road offers a delightful stock of
dresses and gowns—the prices ar
styled for your purse

| Designs, too, are highly individual
| (you must see the Harlequin
2-piecé with reversible Bolero

Swim Suits and Cocktail Dresses
| (you definitely must see these)
| are so wonderfully priced, I wish
| I could tell you.....

+

ORIENTAL CHARM in the form
of MOONSTONE veweiry ‘
eparking array of Bracelets
wiese Ceylonese holiday gifts in-
ciude Necklaces that are mos(
attractive and NOt expensive;
.rom Bompay for the first timc
a baroOuagus comes NEW prtAcs

| WAN designed in Lamps, Vases
and Bowis — realy dillerent and
jinagicaily of the bast, you'll fina
mem in THE ORIBNTAL SHOP
}ecorner of Magn Bi, (pn. 4404), .
branch of Surti United

ROBERTS & CO. FOR OFFIC:
| SPALAUNERY really means wha

t says. Smart office desk ac.
cessories imiciude RPBBER
STAMPS, ROLLER DAMPEKS

and STAMP KACKS. An indis-
pensable item is an {nk stand for
31.92 and the neat Letter Scales
for $8.50 and most of us need a
Stapling Machine (from $4.60)
among an almost endless variety
ot otice fequisites on saie a
-Roberts & Co., Dial 3301,

you HAVE NEVER SEEN A
| STORE LIKE THIS ONE—in a
long, long time. At GEORG:
;SAHELY & CO. on Swan Si.
/there’s a near daily habit tne
} opening ol new stock, And the
values, whew.......! Look at this
CHAMBNAY, 36° wade in choice
of six colours for (Gc. a yard and
volling out of its wrapping paper

sttaignt into eager snoppiny
oaskets, is yours one of them,
seller hurry along, new stock

never waits at GEORGE SAHELY
| & CO,

j ‘ ® \

| THIS BAKERY HAS THE
!ONLY MACHINE of its kind on
the Island. That’s why BARBA-
;YOS BAKERIES LTD, (ph. 4758;
}can size and shape any kind of
toaf; why, too, they can produce
| the ideal hot-dog ROLL—the rea!

}mMcCoy; and FRENCH BREAU
jand the enriched WRAPPEL
LOAF that are but three in &

| range of ten distinctive varieties.
| Deliveries are made to your doot
4nd with each order you’re assurea
of a

modern plant behind your
every purcliase.
|; ‘TALKING OF STATIONER}

AND OFFICE ACCESSORIES let's
take a look at OFFICE FITTINGS
~Desks and Chairs and 4-drawer
Filing Cabinets (letter or fools-
) cap) and TYPEWRITERS. These
ire American and English
Remingtons both portable and
standard and with the 18” carriage
| us well, Now this is a clipped ac-
count of a very wide selection,
jincluding Gestetner Duplicator:

| The distributors are A.S. Bryden
& Sons (B’dos) Lid. and the
phone 4675,

J. DT.



Dial 4335







—10%- -












5
PAGE SEVEN —_
Keep t DARK with 23>

WHEN FP’S A QUESTION OF Permanent, washable
. _— and harmless. All
SORE FEET on ho account stand natural date. S@yenrs”
en ceremony CAVE SHEP. reputation. Ask your chemist to ob
HERD’S have the very complete tain some for you from his Wholesaler.
answer to foot comfort with Di THE SHADEINE. COMPANY
Scholl's Appliances. These in «@ Churchfield @oad, Acton, Leaden,
clude Arch Supports, Zino Pads ENGLAND. a
(for corns ete.) Pedicreme (to | ia
soothe and refresh), Solvex (fo: |
Athlete’s Foot, and irritation) an) § ff
for the _ my-feet-are_killing-m-*'! e ng p q a:
groaner, FOOT BALM is you: i

answer—and mine. | Dr, Sehoil | M k

is the name: Cave Shepherd Ltd | a es en ld

me eR * * * | oes up aighte pares sensa-

s jon organs, whitish

SEWING THE EASY WAY i. | = ena base of spine,
easy to you but not as easy as i:! nes, rvousness, o
looks. To those who linger lon eaused by disease ef the — Pp
and look and thereby get nowhere, | (@ most it sex =.
allow me to introduce the com-| {f SY erarnes 52% :
mencement of thé new term at th vigous Sam health, take new

SINGER SEWING ACADEMY ON ;

AUGUST 18th. These popula
classes will get underway witi|
the imparting of you-can-do-i

instruction in dtess designing and |
pattern-making. “And with Mrs,
Mildred, Watkins and staff you
really can! Dial 4927.

t
USUALLY BESIDE JIMM) |
HATLO is a 3-column ad featuring |
the new K, R, Hunte & Co., Ltd. |
Store. Seer it? Been in it? For
Mr. & Mrs. Public, this attractive-
ly stocked Store has most things
Electrical and virtually all pune
‘plicable to-an Office including



Stationery. Don’t hang around
»utside, come on in! Look at the
Clocks, the Toys, the Leather

Goods—above all, the astonishing

variety! Or phone 5!36,
+ > *

SO YOU WANT A MIRROK

FOR YOUR BATHROOM WAL!

among other things? This is
where to get almost every typ?
of CHROME BATHROOM FIT-
TING you've been looking for.
At Bdos Co-op Cotton Factory
ixe Shower Roses, Towel Rails,
fumbler Holders and screw-on
‘ittings. Mirrors measure 12” and
16” and are priced from. $8.50
(fittings extra). No use listing
all the items — there are many
more—drop in and take a look.
® +

TROUBLE IS WHEN YOU ASK

FOR BEER—you get Lager! Now
men (and ladies) gather round
while .f tell you of what I’ve
found; A HOME BREWED BEER
IN A TEN-OUNCE BOTTLE and
—hola it—selling. for 24, Can
you believe it? You will when
‘ou ask for Hull’s Home Brewed
Beer in the attractive dumpy
little 10 oz. bottle. It’s a Simeon
Hunte & Son distribution, diai
2547; a best seller and it should
be on your dealer’s shelf,....... if
not sold out!

* *

POWERFUL, ROOMY AND
ECONOMICAL TO RUN — inter-
ested? At 3,100 thirtyJone hun-
dred dollars) ‘the new STANDARD
VANGUARD at Chelsea Garage
Ltd, in slick new colours is one
of the few cars to suit everybody
did you know it is a 6-passenger

car? And the lighter, smaller
MAYFLOWER $2,500 (twenty-
five hundred dollars) will give

you one of the most comfortable

power-plus rides of any car in its
class—at Chelsea Garage Ltd. now,







SPECIAL: RUM |

(With the Distinctive Flavour)
IS WELCOME O?}. ALL OCCASIONS
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BoNDOS
PAGE. RIGHT

BARBADOS etl ADVOCATE

i a as eae Reel sae se Poca «
Printed by the Advocate Co., Ltd., Bre-* ¢t. Bridsetewn

_—



Sunday, August 10, 1952

Everybody's Business





IN 1951 Barbados imported goods val-
ued at $51,918,327. The same year the
island exported goods valued at $35,464,166.
The apparent deficit in 1951 of the island’s
balance of trade was therefore $16,454,161.
In fact Barbados balances its trade by in-
visible exports such as tourism, remit-
tances from emigrants, interest on capital
investment abroad and by attracting over-
seas capital to Barbados,

Of all these invisible expoits the great-
est is tourism, Statistics are not kept in
Barbados which would permit an investi-
gator of the island’s economy to express
net receipts from tourism as so much per
head of population. But such statistics as
do exist prove beyond all possible doubt
that tourism is after agriculture the is-
land’s principal export.

Figures provided by the banks operating
in Barbados show that in the eleven-
month period ended in July Barbados
earned from tourists arriving from hard
currency countries the equivalent of
$2,433,392 (B.W.1.) These figures make no
allowances for the earnings of hard cur-
reney which are hoarded by private per-
sons and which do not reach the banks.
But it would be wrong to suppose that
earnings from hard currency sources re-
present the major earnings of the tourist
industry in Barbados. The Barbados Pub-
licity Committee has recently published
tourist statistics for the year ended on 31st
March, 1952.

During that year 30,856 air and sea pas-
sengers disembarked in Barbados, Of that
number 4,860 were residents returning,
319 were immigrants, 645 were students
and 1,166 were intransit.

No Jess than 10,986 were on holiday and
2,930 were on business.

Omitting the 4,409 permanent residents,
the 1,059'who stay indefinitely and the 222
who remain between one and six years,
the remaining 15,166 visitors to Barbados
during 1951 provide interesting material
for speculation as to probable earnings
from. tourism.

Of these 15,166 basic tourists, 5,279 or
more than one third remained for periods
exceeding one month, A total of 5,819 re-
mained for periods between over one week
and up to three, and 4,068 stayed for peri-
ods of one week and under.

If it were possible to arrive at an aver-
age daily figure of what each tourist spends
during a stay in Barbados it would be a
simple matter. to calculate the total value
of the tourist industry to Barbados and to
subtract therefrom the total hard currency
earnings.

Unfortunately such a figure would be
most difficult to obtain. Some tourists
might spend three hundred dollars in one
day others might spend the same amount
in three weeks.

But it ought to be possible for the Bar-
bados Publicity Committee with the assist-
ance of the banks and the hotel industry to
try and arrive at an estimated figure per
head of-tourists which might be used to
indicate something of the value of tour-
ism in the island’s economy.

How valuable that calculation would be
is suggested by a very simple sum based
on the approximate length of stay noted
by the Publicity Committee in its latest
report. If the minimum daily expenditure
of the 15,166 basic tourists who visited Bar-
bados during the tourist year ended on
March 31st, 1952 was estimated at $10 per
tourist the island would have received
from tourists during that year more than

four and three quarter million dollars.
A more profitable line of enquiry might

be the deduction from the total number of
15,166 basic tourists the 5,356 Venezuelans,
Americans and Canadians who arrived
during the year ended in March 1952.

If 5,356 visitors from hard. currency
countries spent sums exceeding $2,000,000
(B.W.I.) in the last tourist year 9,810 vis-
itors from other-countries- could hardly
have spent much less than twice that
amount, and may well have spent more.

Even with the very scanty information
which is available it seems that the tour-
ist industry of Barbados cannot have been
worth less than six million dollars to the
island in the tourist year ended in March.
1952. This would mean that Barbados
would have earned from tourism approx-
imately $30 per head of population. Any
considerable decrease

depressing effect on the island’s economy.

The sooner everyone realises the essen-
tial truth that Barbados depends on the
tourist industry to increase the benefits
obtained from the sugar industry the
greater the income Which will be earned
annually per head of population, Tourism
—as they say in Ireland—is everybody’s
business.



University College

VERY soon tne Executive Committee of
the Fegional Economic Committee is to
meet in Jamaica to review the arrange.

ments for obtaining the current annual

in the volume of .
tourist traffic would have an immediate |



expenditure of the University College of
the West Indies: to scrutinise current ex-
penditure in relation to original estimates
and to draw up a programme to be fol-
lowed in the five-year period 1953-58,

For some time the financial position of
the University College of the West Indies
has been a subject for grave concern and
the attendance at a meeting of the Regional
Economic Committee in Barbados earlier
this year of the Registrar Mr. H.’ W.
Springer was preparatory to the confer-
ence which is soon to take place in Kings-
ton,

Few among those interested in education
realise how the University College meets
its current expenditure and hardly anyone
is aware of the vast sums of money which
have been and continue to be spent by the
British taxpayer on the capital cost of con-
struction of the University College. The
money for capital costs is allotted under
the Colonial Development and Welfare
Act but it is not administered through the
Colonial Development and Welfare Organ-
isation but is drawn from the account re-
served for Higher Education in the Col-
onies. This account is kept in London and
grants to the University College of the
West Indies are made direct from London.
From a series of published statements
over a period of years it is possible to
piece together an approximate figure of
expenditure already made towards the
capital cost of the University College of
the West Indies from the account reserved
for Higher Education in the Colonies.

This approximate figure exceeds by a
large amount two million pounds. It is
right that the generosity of the British
taxpayer towards the cost of West Indian
University education should be publicly
recognised by West Indians. It is also
right that the West Indian community
should realise that the capital cost of con-
structing the University College is not
ended and that further contributions will
be made by the British taxpayer.

West Indians must realise how much
they are indebted to the British taxpayer
for their only University College.

At the same time they need to realise
that the capital cost of the University Col-
lege is not the end of the tale of expendi-
ture,

It is no secret that the current annual
expenditure of the University College ex-
ceeds the contributions made by the Brit-
ish Caribbean governments for this pur-
pose.

Seventy-six per cent. of these contribu-
tions are made by Jamaica, Trinidad and
British Guiana in that order and the re-
maining 24 per cent. is contributed by the
Windward Islands, Barbados, the Leeward
Islands and British Honduras jn a de-
scending scale of payment.

One of the major occupations of the
Executive Committee of the Regional Eco-
nomic Committee at the forthcoming con-
ference will be to discover a means of ob-
taining greater revenue from British Car-
ibbean governments. At present contri-
butions for the current expenditure of the
University College are made on a popula-
tion basis. This explains why Trinidad
only pays 18 per cent. of the total contri-
butions as’ compared with Jamaica’s 45
per cent. No doubt much will be made of
this apparent disparity of assessment at
the forthcoming conference,

In their search to discover a formula
which will ensure that contributions to-
wards the running expenses of the College
are equitably shared throughout the area
the Executive Committee of the Economic
Committee will, it is expected, examine in
great detail the current expenditure of the
College.

In the original enthusiasm of the first
five-year period of its existence the Uni-
versity College may have attempted to
speed up its activities beyond a prudent
limit. The activities of its extra-mural
department for example might have been
undertaken too soon and in too many
places. On the other hand too little atten-
tion might have been paid to extra-mural
activities in some regions.

Should early: enthusiasm have led the
young College to undertake more than was
financially prudent the West Indian pub-
lie will be sympathetic towards the re-
sponsible authorities, since the inaugural
period of a University College catering for
such a widely scattered collection of ter-
ritories and dependent on the British tax-
payer for ifs capital cost could not be sim-
ple. On the other, hand the University
College must expect the voters of the
British Caribbean to show increasing inter-
est in its activities,

The splendid gesture of the British tax-
payer in contributing millions of pounds
towards the University College of the West
Indies and the willingness of British Car-
ibbean governments to bear the cost of
current expenditure are worthy of public
recognition.

But in the last resort the important fac-
tor about University Training in the West
Indies is that it should cost no more and
preferably less than it costs in Canada or
the United Kingdom. And it is stated in
well-informed quarters that it costs much
more to train a medical student in Kings-
ton than it would at British or Canadian
University Colleges. Why?

| mentionin

SUNDAY . ADVOCATE

The man who

keeps all

|

|

| Barbados laughing
| on Sundays

NATHANIEL GUBBINS



JN re a reader’s request

or a_ half-year: hhec:
from Old Moore Gubbing, the
imbecile sage offers the follow-
ing: —

AUGUST: As the full moon falls
in the Eleventh House «and
many people on August Bank
Holiday will be falling out ‘of
the public house, there will be
increased police activity at the
beginning of the month,

Eggs will be ir short supply,
particularly in seaside guest
houses, where egg allocations, if
any, will be eaten by the pro-
prietors and their relatives.

Middle-aged pessimists wil] cause
great depression among holiday~
makers in hotels by pointing out
that the fine summer of 1952 re-
minds them of the fine summevrs
and harvests of 1914 and 1939
both of which ended in world
wars.

Further misery will be caused \vy
warnings of impending national!
bankruptcy made by pouiticians
on the eve of their expensive
holidays abroad,

SEPTEMBER: Autumn
manoeuvres in Eastern Germany
will give military experts a
chance to tel] us ehee more how
many divisions we need to stop
the Russians. ‘They will- then
frighten everybody by pointing
out that we shall never ‘have
enough divisions to stop ‘thém,
except on paper,

* * °

Eggs will still be in short supply,
and bronzed and fit politicians,
full of foreign eggs, wil) return
from their holidays abroad to
predict national bankruptcy if
we don’t work harder, ;

OCTOBER : Politicians will ‘still
be telling people to work harder,
but as people will know harder
work means more income tax,

with one egg a week, they
won't.
NOVEMBER : Ruin. still just

round the corner. Fogs for all.
Influenza for most. Eggs for no-

body.

DECEMBER ; Ruin, and us, just
about to meet at the corner,
Happiest Christmas will be en-
joyed by turkeys, who won't
have to face the New Year.

Dream Encounter

a cricket match between

England and The Rest Was
being played at Helsinki,” “**
e Red Dean was batting at

one end, the Bishop of Narking
Creek at the other.

Dr. Mossadeg, fielding at silly
mid-off, was crying because he
had just stopped a hot one with
his stomach. The fast bowler
was Joe Stalin, smoking a pipe,
the wicket keeper ex-King
Farouk, who had two black eyes
from a couple of bumpers, and
the square leg umpire was a bear
in Russian uniform.

Despite his age, Stalin took a
run of four miles before he
delivered the ball. This meaat
running round the boundary
several times, and made an over
last about an hour.

As he approached the wicket
from the nursery end, tshu-tshu-
tshuing like a train and puffiing
clouds of smoke from his pipe, a
piece of paper 34 feet long blew
across the pitch.

“Somebody’s had a good feed
of sandwiches,”’ observed a witty
radio commentator.

J . *

The Red Dean picked up the
piece of paper.

“It’s a Chinese scroll,” shouted
the excited dean,

“Get back to your crease, you
clot, yelled the bishop.

“They're not grease spots,” the
dean shouted. back. “They're
Chinese characters.”

When. Stalin. arrived at the
wicket,:he collided with the dean
and knocked him flat on his face
without delivering the ball.

“How’s lat?” asked a Chinese
ag who ‘was fielding at first
slip.

“Out?’ said the umpire.

“I’m not out,” foared the bishop

“No, but the dean is,” said the
umpire.

“That's not. cricket,”
bishop.

“Don’t argue with the umpire,”
said the bear.

said the

* * ae
At that moment an aircraft
flew overhead. The Red Dean
made a speéch about germ war-
fare. Farouk shouted : “Down
with England,” and hit the bishop
on the head with a stump. Stalin
started his run round the bound-
ary to deliver the next ball, Mos-
sadeg handed in his resignation to
the umpire and fainted.
“Tea interval,” said the umpire.
It’s not tea time yet, you stupid
bear,” said the bishop. |
“Any time is tea time,” said



“Girls Of A Feather”

Union activities. My purpose iy
this series of articles on social
services of Barbados is to bring
to, public attention the achieve-
ments of public-spirited citizens
whose long years of unselfish
cevotion to doing good for others

The more one probes into the
social services of the island of
Barbados the more one is amazed
at ‘the ignorance which is dis-
played by those who accuse Bar-
badians of having no social con-
science, Yet this ignorance is to

.| some extent explained by the fact

that very few Barbadians know
anything of the social services
which exist in their midst.

They are. therefore poorly
equipped to take up the cudgels
in defence of those whose: lives
though little known to the outsider
testify to the desire of Barbadians
to help one another.

How many Barbadians for jn-
stance have ever heard of Adah
Evelyn, the Foundress of the Girls
Industrial Union? How many for
that matter know anything about
the Union beyond the fact that_it
has a building facing the dry lake
of Queen’s Park and that it holds
socials and an annual fete?

Yet the Girls Industrial Union
has played no small part in the
efter school education of Barba-
dian girls for forty years and is
perhaps the ‘most important
women's agency in the island for
bridging the gulf which exists
between the fifty or more
different social grades which com-
pose Barbadian society.

The most staggering fact about
the Girls’ Industrial Union in my
opinion is the multiplicity of
social groups or clubs which oper-

ate within the Union, There are,_

as I was told, 18 clubs in the
Union and each club is composed
of girls drawn from similar trades
,or professions, Girls of a feather
fiock together would be the easiest
way of explaining this social
phenomenon. I think it worth
because so much non-
sense is talked in Barbados about
racial co-operation that the start-
ling sub-divisions of Barbadian
society in which shop assistants
have precedence over knitting-
mill operatives and typists repre-
sent the aristocracy of girlhood
are overlooked in the general
froth-blowing,

The Union’s Club system is the
nearest attempt to even out this,
social malaise — the gaps between
the sub-units of the social strata
—- that I have seen in Barbados,
These gaps ‘it is most important
to note have nothing to do with
race, They are the logical out-
come of an education system
which has encouraged girls espe-
cially to regard climbing up the
social ladder as one of the most
worthy of objectives.

At the same time no other sys-
tem would have produced such
worthwhile results. By refusing
to be wooly-minded and up® i
the clouds, and by encouraging
formation of separate clubs, the
Committee ot the Girls Industri
Union have brought together ti
der one roof girls from many of
the varying social levels of Barba-
dian society. And inevitably due
to close proximity some of the
standoffishness and aloofness of

the superior social groups has
been rubbed off. The Girls
Industrial Union therefore repre+
sents a long standing achieve-

ment in the social history of

‘suitable for

Barbados. It weuld be impossible
to praise too highly the vision
and enthusiasm of its Foundress
and it would be churlish and
unfair not to applaud the devo-
tion and service of those ladies of
Barbados. who continue today to
build on the foundations laid by
Adah Evelyn.

Yet the question must be asked:
has the Girls’ Industrial Union
today reached a turning of the
ways or has it many more years
of service to fulfil in its traditional
groove? .. c

By
George Hunte -



————

That i8.a question which I am
not equipped to answer. But it is
a question. which can only be
asked by. someone’ with ‘some
Knowledge of what: the Girls’ In-
dustrial Union dces.

Basically the Union is comprised
of clubs the members of. which
are drawn from similar social
classes. These clubs have two
functions — utilitarian and social.
The utilitarian role of the club is
expressed in the organisation of
classes. Union girls engage in a
wide range of activities. They
manufacture — attractive baskets
made from reed grass: they make
sisal-table mats and ethereal look-
ing “loofah” hats.. They engage
in manifold knitting, crocheting,
and cloth weaving activities.
Slippers, shoes, net-sandals and
smocks are .produced. in their
Jarge Club-Hall Cakes and pas-
try making occupy girls in the
kitchen. And when I visited the
Union’s Hall last week I was de-
lighted to find three enthusiastic
jadies making children’s toys
under the supervision of a male
amateur carpenter,

I have often been told by the
welfare experts that Barbadians
have fio native skill at handicrafts,
This may be true:; I) am not a:
welfare expert nor an expert of’
any kind. But I wonder whether
the experts are not missing the)
point. |

Barbadians do not produce the
kind of work which is representa-
tive of. individual cultures such
‘as the Amerindian, the Indian or
the African because their culture
is predominantly Europeah. They
therefore make with their hands
the designs. and patterns which
they have been taught to make
by those who instruct.them. This
explains perhaps why Barbadian
girls at the Union continue to
make knitted woolly garments
babies born in
eolder climates. A _ similar
explanation might be given for
what seems a strange practice in
the Union kitchen. Girls dressed
in the height of local fashion
operate with pastry, icing materi-
als, and stoves without any kitchen
aprons.

I would not like anyone to
think that by these remarks I am
attempting to be critical of the



the bear,.who was fond of buns. |

Glorious Twelfth
K= disappointment will be

felt among their many
friends at the “news that Lora
and Lady Gubbins will not be
in Scotland for grouse shooting
on what is known as The Glorious
Twelfth of August.

As the winged insect season
reaches its peak at about the
same time, this popular pair
will be enjoying a Glorious
Twelfth of their own, shooting
down wasps and moths with their
insecticide guns, while-Lottie the
Devil Cat plays the dual role
of beater and retriever.

=

Lord and Lady Gubbins wil!
not wear anything special for
the occasion, though Lord Gub-
bins may wear his famous tweed
jacket, Moth’s. Relish, if the
weather is not too hot. Nor will
they open picnic hampers full of
cold chicken, duck, ham and
caviare, which appears to be the
normul fare on the Scottish moors.

Income tax being what it is,
Lady Gubbins will spare ten
minutes out of an exciting day to
bring in fish and chips from a
local restaurant.

Last.year Lord Gubbins, who

moths, which he laughingly called
“four engine jobs.”

Lady Gubbins, though not quite
so successful with the gun,
wrought havoc with a fish slice
in the garden and while wash-
ing-up at the sink. At tea time
she was able to point proudly to
a pile of victims which included
two butterflies which had been
laying their eggs on the curly
kale.

Although enthusiastic ana
agile, Lottie’s chief fault as a
retriever is that she is inclined
to eat the game instead of bring-
ing it back to the butts.

She caused consternation on
one occasion when it was thought
she had swallowed a wasp. But
as she came’ to no harm, it is be-
lieved that the buzzing in her
stomach, heard by an anxious

is one of the finest shots in the
country with a spray gun, brought
down a record bag of 18 wasps
during the morning’s shoot. Later
in the day he bagged seven large





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Lord Gubbins, must have been |

the last conyulsions of a. dyin
bluebottle. oom

—L.E.S.

have been too often overlooked
and sometimes denigrated by
bromoters of an anti-Barbadian
faction.

But in my opinion the Girls’
Industrial Uion has been so suc-
cessful and has contributed so
much of real value to Barbadian
xirls that it ought not to be re-
garded as a pioneer service which
has served a useful life and ought
bow to be pensioned off,

The function of the Union as an
adult evening institute for girls is
so important that so far from
ceasing to exist the Union ought
to be rebuilt and re-modelled to
cope with the needs of a new
generation. It is no criticism of
the Union to say that it still looks
to its older brigade of ladies to
provide much of its drive and
enthusiasm. It is no disparage-
ment of the Union to say that the
building in Constitution is some-
what out dated and in need of
renovation,

But the fact remains that under
modern conditions of living old
fashioned buildings do not help
girls to feel at home in modern
offices and that typewriting taught
in a room under the fierce blaze
of the rays of the evening sun is
typewriting learnt an unnecessari-
\y hard way. 4

These comments in no way de-
tract from the achievements of the
Union. The bringing together
under one roof on different eve-
nings of the week girls drawn
from many classes and coming
from all parishes of the island
must be regarded as a major
achievement in an island with so
many social rungs.

The training and tuition which
the girls receive at the Union for
payment of one shiliing a term is

best appreciated by those who have
seen the output of the girls,
The proper approach to the work

of the Union is perhaps ‘to answer
the question what would Barba-
dos be like without the Girls’ In-
Gustrial Union? Five hundred
girls to whom the Unisn today
means a centre of training and
good comradeship could. only
answer that question only, in one
way. But there must be thousands
alive today in Barbados in neigh-
bouring West Indian islands and
even in North America and the
United Kingdom to whom the
Union represents the first step to-
wards a life which is full and
useful,

Whether or not the Union be-
comes the centre of an adult eve-
ning institute for girls is a ques-
tion for their Committee and the
Government to decide. But what-
ever its future the vision of its
Foundress and the devoted work
of its present Secretary and Com-
mittee have made a distinctive
contribution to the most important
work which has to be done in Bar-
bados today — the raising of the
moral standards of women.

aT
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SUNDAY,

AUGUST. 10, 1952



The Tremendous Things That

AN ENGLISH

Sitting at a typewriter in a

Southampton office in
YVONNE BASEDEN, a
aged 17.

Over this girl’s life came a most
extraordinary transformation.
joined the W.A.A.F.; became a British

agent; was taught the ar
and how to shoot to kill.

Then came the night when she was
dropped into German-occupied France.

*

E were parachuted into
France on March 18, 1944.

“ Lucien,” my
ing officer,
greeted by French

workers and hurried to
security of a lonely farmhouse.
From there we made our

hundreds of miles overland
vijon.

Our task was to
reorganise a Maquis

which had been wrecked
by the Gestapo—

and myself

THE

1939 was
pretty girl,

She

t of sabotage

command-
were
Resistance
ihe

way
to Ddle, near



SUNDAY ADVOCATE



Happened To Yvo

igth July, 1944+

nne Baseden

ECRETARY MEETS
GESTAPO

threw nim w the floor and
kicked him.
“How many are there ot

you?” they shouted. He said !
am the only one and so j
got staves and beat him.

DRAGGED OUT
We are caught

THEN they moved the

cover from the hole
here Jules and I were hiding,
Ae was very fr.ghtened.

I whispered to him that dark-
ness would be soon with us and
we would be “safe. But they
found him.

As I squeezed further into
the shadows I saw his distorted
face as he was .dragged out.
L heard him thrown, nine feet
down on to the floor I ho

they wouldn't, see me, but they
{

iid
“Come
snouted. 1
German pointed
ne, The flash as it
the darkness. But

out,” «a German
stayed still. The
a revolver at
was fired
he

it ap

missed. I don't know how,
They had seen 1 was &
women. I flung up my arms.

Bui they grab me by
my hair and dragged me
up. The German.punche¢
me in the face and’ fell
to the floor
As Robert. Jules. and
t lay there in the dust
with our hands raised
we heard. the searchers

f - der, and

this radlo-operator Dear Sir, 1 have to inform you upsta:rs firing mat
1 went straight to a It is with much regrot ong on active services rides: , They | dined

; tro We chy
Se OT aan” pesca O Y. Baseden is missire Soon I could see ins
for me. The wife wa; | that S/ . information that can a, spilers in the ceil

: 6 in ; e a
pati tint Seutue. | there te not much more APS couht you would} sdcea ree et
Now I was busy. 1 went jven at the esen o giti On. ee seeped-over th:
trom house to house with t : i Was“ Lucien's” blood

my radio set in a suitcase
i would put up a temporary
indoor aerial and_ then
would start. transmitting to
England. Or receiving.

ach evening with
neadphones on, I would sit
listening, sometimes for a couple
of hours.

Disunited

MEANWHILE “Lucien
was uctive. The morale ot
the local Resistance was low
The last British leaders had
been caught and I believe
killed. ie movement had
been crushed
In the surrounding area were
other Maquis. Some kad poli-
tical motives, some were led by
French Army officers,

They had not ail fot a deep
affection for each other. Anc
some had no love for the
British

It. was hard work encouraging
healthy aggression.

Sometimes supplies promisea
did not come, sometimes they
were small and late. Some
Frenchmen felt that they were
forgotten by London.

LONDON CALLS
Raid is planned

r) ONE evening in June
I got a message that
was to change all that. We
were told to pick out a lonely
spot where a large amount of
equipment—and perhaps men—
could be dropped.

It had to be flat, free from
slectric cables and pylons,

“Lucien” and I found the
ideal site about 12 miles from
e.

I tapped the news to London
by morse key in the ill-lit sitting-
room of a French household.

“Lucien” had to arrange for
a defence of our new landing-
space. -

We appealed to the Maquis
around and got 800 armed men.
We also got 30 lorries and
horse-drawn carts. For we had
been told that this was a day-
light “drop.”

In a deserted, crumbling house

o call and discuss the

ER Yvon ne's
advent

THE LETT

I was in direct contact with the
aircraft. They were three
squadrons of American bor bers
with a strong fighter es
It was a Sunday morn!
was very still and 1
recall the church bells cn
As-I lay in the suns

remember think.ng “There






ter are
a lot of Frenchmen who are not
in church today.”

Over the horizon the atr-rad
sirens wailed

The bombers took u big circle

and came in low Over them
the wings of a fighter tw.nkled
in the sun as it did-an immacu-
late victory roll.

Then the containers started
dropping. There were 300 of
them all filled with arms and
upplies

REJOICING NOW
Down come the guns

1 COULDN'T lie in

that hedge bottom. 1
got to my feet and danced in
the sunlight.

The French round me went
mad. They sang and waved
their rifles and lots of them
escaped death very narrowly as

@ containers came crashing
lown around them.

Some burst as they hit the
Grae Sten guns and rifles spilt
out.

Each container needed four
men to carry it. Quickly they
were loaded on to our transport

T ran to the deserted house
and made a signal. I ended
with the “ V-sign "—di di di ;
daa It was wrong. It was
against the regulations and it
was the last signal I ever made

I hurried to the car in which
“Lucien” waited. A short dis-
tance away was the main road.
Along that road a German
armoured car passed on patrol.
We waited with rifles and
machine guns.

Its crew never knew how nea!

sather

ure she desert



one month after

yeceived
articles

hes in’ this

CELEBRATING
With a bee,-steak

®@ THEN “Lucien' wskcc

ra volunwer ta car,
ti suiicase to Dole. Tarec
Soved forward. One Ww.
year-old student, He wa
pale-faced, shock haired and hi:
name was Paul.

“Lucien” chose him

We cycled back to our H.W
the careiaker's flat in a chees¢
warehouse. There a wonder.u
celebration meal was waiting {c:
us, There was beef-steak, choco
late mousse. and
cheese.



of course

Discovered

SOON “Lucien started to
worry. Paul had not arrived

In fact he had been stopped by
a German. His suitcase nad

been Opened and he had been *

quickly “ interrogated.” That
meant a swift and brutal beat-
ing-up. They had knocked out
one of his eyes,

Paul told them our address.
The first we knew was when
the caretaker’s wife, Gaby
Mayor saw a police car arrive.
We fled to hiding places.

Her husband Freddie
down_to the basement. Three of
us, Dr. Robert Morel.*a man
called Jules and myself hid up-
Stairs in a great pile of round
large wooden discs used to
separate the cheeses.

Over our heads “ Lucien” ana
his French lieutenant Charles
crawled between the double
floors of the attic.

WOMAN BEATEN
Searching the house

THE Germans knocked

on the door. They
asked Gaby when her husband
would be back, 1 could hear
the mumble of their voices.
More clearly I could hear them
beating Gaby. I heard her cries

Tan

the He an} Charles
were thrown down the
ten-foot space to oul
floor Tnen we were all dragged
to the floor below. There we las
handeuffed and face down.

He was dead

THE Germans were furious.

They thought they had
rushed the Resistance in the
dole area,

As I was pushed down the stairs
. saw “Lucien” lying there.
somehow I knew he was dead

Charles whispered to me us
we were on the floor, “* Lucien’
took the pill.” I knew that pill
—the one Headquarters gave
you in case things got too tough. *

As we lay we were: kicked
orutally by the Germans .as
they passed us. I was at the
head of the stairs. They all
kicked me in the stomach and

in the side I don't remember
crying. But I wished I was
unconscious.

Then they pushed us down-
stairs, out into the night.

ON OUR WAY
The journey begins

e GUARDING ‘the low
carts which nad come
to take us away were men on
horseback, savage-looking men
with yellow faces and slit eyes.
They were White Russians. As
I started to struggle into the
cart, handcuffed to young Paul
with his bloody face. I looked
round,

At the end of the thin line
of bruised, wounded and
moaning men. handcuffed to
Charles the body of “Lucien”
was being dragged along.

We_were on our way'to meet
the Gestapo !

(World Copyright)
NEXT WEEK

The torture in Cell Ill:
“There'll always be an

nearby I set up my radio set, I
mdon we were waiting

told
. and that the Germans did
suspect.
Three squadrons
THEN came the dawn

the day of the raid. Soon

they were to death as they
roared past.

Now our arms convoy started.
We had two miles of main road
to travel before we turned off
and headed for a secret forest
glade.

In the glade we shared out
our spoils.

not

of

and her sobs.

Soon more arrived and they
started to seara@) the building,

At one time a German sat
only a few feet from me.
watched his jackboots danglin,
in space through a crac
between the discs.

They found Robert first They



England.” ;

London Express Service



OTHER FATS AND OILS

By ECONOMIST

This subject has received a fair
amount of publicity in the Press
recently and the importance of
the coconut in this connection has
Been stressed. It may be of in-
terest to review briefly some of
the other sources of supply, such
as the whale, the West African
oil palm ang the olive.

Whale Oil

This is no fish story literally or
figuratively since the whale is a
giant mammal. Some opinions
from literature in regard to its
size: “If we compare land mam-
“mals in respect to magnitude
“with those that take up_ their
“abode in the deep, we shall find
“they will appear contemptible
“in the compasses whale is
“doubtless the largest animal in
“creation;” again, “the aorta of a
“whale is larger in the bore than
“the main pipe of the waterworks
“at London bridge,” and again,






“the whale’s liver was two cart-
“loads.” The great mammal has
attracted attention from the be-
inning of history. The Books of
Genes, Job, Jonah, the Psalms
and Isaiah seem to carry the earl-
iest references and the word Lev-
dathan is often used to describe its
greatmess and size. Historians
poets and prose writers down to
the present day have derived a
certain enchantment from _ the
whale. Whale lore at its best
is probably to be found in the
story of Moby Dick by Herman
Melville.

Cetology, that branch of zoo-
logy concerned with the whale,
has assumed an increased inter-
est in recent years as a result of
the importance attached to whale
oil and the intense competition
among nations which has ¢evelop-
ed in the polar regions in the pur-
suit of the mammal, Modern
whaling ships are really floating

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of the carcases. Even the meat
may find more general use as
a substitute for beef than in the
recent past when, in the main, it
was dried and ground and used
partly as manure and partly for
mixing with cattle foods. It is
on record that whale meat was
eaten by the ancient Romans, the
‘Saxons and the Normans. In the
thirteenth and fourteenth cen-
turies in England, whale meat not
infrequently figured on the Royal
table and at civic feasts. It is
indeed considered very palatable
by those who have eaten it and
when whaling was carried on in
the West Indies, the meat was
certainly: used and relished as
food.

Originally, whale oil was best
known as an illuminant and lub-
jricator, and before the introduc-

————



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‘tion of gas light was used in the
lighting of towns and in light-
houses; as a lubricant it found its
way into heavy machinery and
even in the more delicate works
‘of watches. To-day, among its
other uses, it: forms a valuable
component of culinary fats and
related compounds,

Students of West Indian history
and economics—the older heads
at any rate—will recall the visit
of Dr. Louis Sambon to these
parts on a medical research mis-
sion. In the ‘Empire Review’
(1913), Sambon contributed an
interesting article on West Indian
whaling based on a visit to the
Station then in existence in
Speightstown, The article des-
cribes the methods used and the
species of whale involved. He
writes: “The- whale which visits
“Barbados is the Humpbacked
‘Whale (Me€aptera Versabilis),

@ One'page 11.






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OBTAINABLE ONLY

HARRISONS

PAGE NINE



Let's Leave. Politics Behind For A While |
Let The Cynics Smile— |

Ameriea Has
Message

By JOHN GORDON

CHICAGO, Saturday.

I fimd Americans very in-
terested in Britain, very fair io
Britain, very friend.y to Britain,
but a little puzzled about us.

A surprising number of them
claim that their ancestry is En-
@lish, and they are proud of it.

The hall porter at one hotel
said to me, with evident relish:
“In a way I'm English, tco. I wis
born here, but my father was
from England, and I have a sister
in Wales.” Then he added; “See
that girl,’ pointing to a woman
sitting at a desk in the hotel office.

“She comes from lowa.”
This merning I found an Iowa
paper, which a visior had ‘elt

{ took it to her and said: “You're
an Iowan. Would you like this?”

It’s A Bond

She looked at me and said:
“lewan be biusverea, I’m Nnglish.
Now that makes a bona be-
tween these people and us which
is of immense value not only to
us but to all the world, in its
present wobbly state.
They are Americans,
sively confident,
ricans, But
kinship with us.
They want to wa:k with us.
Are we making the best of that
invaluable cement? I doubt it.
I think we could sell iritain
much better to the Americans
than we do, They know too
little about us. Therefore, the
differences between us are in-
clined to be magnified unduly,
and our ‘common interests taken
for granted. We cou'd do the
better job of public relations.

What puzzies them about us?
Well, for one thing they cannot
understand why we fell tor
Socialism. Or those stories one
hears too often now all over the
world that the British have lost
the will to work,

This is a land where men prefer
freedom above all things. Free-
dom ef the individual is a fun-
damental principle of their life.

There are no class distinctions
as we know them. A mans
success does not depend on the
bed in which he is born but on
the qualities that are in him and
the efforts he puts into life.

He sets to work to raise him-

, Self, not to depress others. Most
men in America have qa burning
ambition to rise in the world. And
they are prepared ta work with

aggres-
proud of being
they like their

every ounce of initiative and
energy to make that possible.
No Barriers

The mechanic to-day can be the
garage owner next year, the shop
assistant of to-day 1s ine snop
ewner of tomorrow, There are no
barriers across the road to for-
tune—if you have the urge, tne
creative ability, and the wail 1o
make the effort.

Every step a man takes up-
wards is reflected immediately in
a better house, a better car, more
gadgets and luxuries in his home,
more clothes, and a fuller, easier,
better life for his wife.

Believe me, the wives here like
that, and spur their men on,

Of course, the theorists, who
now have too much power in the
shaping of our lives in Britain,
will hold up their hands in horror,
cry “How wrong it is to put sa
niuch emphasis in life on money.”

An Ideal

But is it? The mere accumula-
tion of money may not perhaps
be the highest ideal in life.

But isn't the establishment of
your family on a higher standard
of life an ideal of some value?
Isn’t it a worth-while thing to
work for?

Isn’t it better to use your brains
and energy to lift yourself to
greater comfort and the happiness
that goes with it than to be con-
tent to stick in the sludge, taking
orders from an all - powerfu:
bureaucracy, which is the life
that is held up to us as ideal?

Do you remember the old
song
“Silver and gold, silver and gold,
“Everyone’s searching for silver

and gold,
“But if peer alone when you are

; old,

“You'll never find comfort in silver
and gold,”

Do you believe that it is better
to be old and poor than old and
eomfortably cushioned? Ameri-
eans don't, and neither do I,

ft am certain beyond all doubt
that if we could capture some of
the ambition of Americans to lift
themselves as swiftly as they can
fo a higher standard of life and
the determination with which
they put their backs into the
job of doing it, we could pull our
grand old countr# out of the me«s
it is in before many years have

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passed, and begin to taste a life
that we would enjoy far better
than our present one.

Grit, Courage

In the streets of American
towus, large and small aiike, Wc
crewa renects a prosperity” that
our youn at home uniortufateiy
nas never known.

It may be a superficial pros-
perity. irade recession mughl;
sweep it away and Americas
Muy oe right to be a iitt.e nervous
«i wae years just ahead.

iput it is a prosperity worth
figuung to preserve, and tMey
Will ignt (oO preserve it and even
iecrease it with grit and courage.

How 15 tl réficced mi lie every-


























































































day lves of the women?

Young and old, they are far
bettey dressed than british
women, There are two reasons
for that dresses are cheaper
here, and they can be bought

olf the peg in a range of mode!s
and sizes far beyond anything
cbtainable in Britain.

A cotton frock that can bt
bought here for £3 would, I am
toid, cost £8 in Londen, And the
style here is far, far better.

With clothes so cheap, the
working girl of America accu-
mulates a wardrobe far larger
than her sisters in Britain eve:
dream of having.

As one girl, with a knowledge
of both countries, described 1)
to me “In England you can
separate girls into classes by the
amount of clothes they have. Bu

in America all women have
enc¢rmous wardrobes, and thei
clothes are much more original

and daring in cut and colour thay
the clothes of British girls.”

Cost of Beauty

On a scale far beyond the
British girl, the American. gir!
buys accessories, She spends, too
far more on cosmetics and beaut,
treatments genera:ly, and looky
infinitely the better for it.

It costs the American typist
just under £3 to have her hair
cut, shampooed, and set, bu
as her salary runs from £2i
upwards, it isn’t a very heavy;
burden on her.

I rarely see women here repali
their make-up in public, as they
do so often in Britain,

And the “Pewer Room” t
which they retire to do it is now
renamed the “Gossip Room.”

Food is very expensive,
should say that the working gir)
here spends far more than the
entire weekly wage of a compar-
able British girl on her food,

But she gets far more attrac-
tive foods. There is a much
greater variety in cooking here
than in England,

Diet Slimmers

We are inclined to regare
America as a land of steaks, which
it is. But it is far more ; land o!
wenderful |ight salad meals, mors
origina] and attractive than any-
thing we know at home,

And women here, I should adc
are just as slimming-diet con-
scious as British women.

The American woman's home
~—in which she spends much less:
iime than an English woman-—
has everything in it to make life
easy.

The kitchens are
beautiful, with
freeze boxes, washing and iron-
ing machines, which take the
drudgery out of house work anc
leave the housewife time to find
more joy in life,

The domestic help problem is

modern and
refrigerators,

of course, even more difficult
here than in England, but the
tnodernisation of the homes

makes it of less concern.
A living-in maid expects abou
£30 a month, with food.

And Manners
There is far less drinking in

America than .in Britain. Onl
twice have I heard wine
ordered in a_ restaurant, ane

the number of men who drink
milk with their meals is astonish-
ing to a British visitor,

Manners, too, are strikingly dif-
ferent. A British reporter tells me
that when he was in a crowded
suburban train and offered his
seat to an elderly woman, the
people in the compartment seemed
astonished, The woman increased
his confusion by saying: “How
nice it is to meet a real English
gentleman,”

Another British visitor tells me
that when he sat down at a table
in an hotel tap room, and, to as-
gist the busy barman, lifted a few
empty glasses from the table to
the bar as he could normally have
done in England, the barman said
with surprise; “In 20 years here,
this is the first time that has hap-
pened to me.”

The Americans like us, but cer-
tainly think we are an odd lot in

e ways.
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PAGE TEN

This West Indian ThePeople Of Barbados

Culture (i)

: By A. S. HOPKINSON

There igsa-tertain fact of such
great importance that it. iv almost
a measure of a person’s maturity
how fully he appreciates it, Those
who realise this fact are alread)
half on the way to developing th«
greatest strength of soul that :
is possible toimagine; and those
who do not realise it will neve
achieve anything important. It 1s
this; that if you want somethin;
for your very own, you. mus
either make it yourself, or failing
that, fight and win it-from some-
body else. You can né€ver realty
own af mere gift. You must be ve! .
careful of taking things from othe
people withéut having done any
thing to earn them because yo.
will never make them fit you; the
will never become part of yor
That which belongs to you mu
become yours because it has cause:
you pain and sweat in the getting
Only when you have suffered, an
suffered deeply for it will yo
really possess it and believe your-
self deserving of the possession,

Gifts To Be Scorned

All finer minds scorn a gil\.
But :they can feel proud of th
thing they have built for them»
selves because their labour has
gone into it; there is something
of themselves in it, They can als:
feel proud of the prize they have
taken away from somebody else,
because it has cost them toil, ana
they feel themselyés more worthy
of it than the weak person who
had it before them. But the mai
who hes atcepted a present wi'i
always feel indebted to the give.
He will always a that he owe
him something, if it bé only grati-
tude, and this will take away fro.)
his own self-respect, He will fee!
ashamed of himself for havin
been forced to accept a gift. H
will never tHink himself worthy
of it, because he had done nothing
to prove that-he deserved it, And
what Will tilke his indebtedness
all the more-uncomfortable is the
fact that hi#-present will not fit
him, for it was not adapted to him,
not made for him, not built to his
own requirements, and will there-
fore be useléss to him. He is none
the richer f6i’ the gift; he is rather
poorer, for he has had to pay the
debt away in gratitude. The person
who is not thoroughly ashamed 0!
himself when he is in debt certain-
ly does not deserve to be left
alive.

And if this is #6 true of indivi-
duals; how much more true it
must be of peoples, nations and
civilizations, And what can illus-
trate this more fully than the
well-knownefact that when 4
civilization has inherited qualities
from.a former civilization, it is
forced to excuse its shame in its
own eyed by ane ee out that it
is a relative of the giver, a son or
a brdfher! (or sister) cousin ov
descendant of some sort? These
pople-feel quite comfortable about
— ng something from a rela-

ve

co) nm property. But they ca:

bearâ„¢the thought of aceeptii;,
someshing from an utter stranger.
And $0, to make up for their own
secret discomfort and onee morc
regaifi their sc¢if-respect, they

make-themselves believe that tho
stranger is really related to them.
To suth self-deceiving baseness is
the receiver reduced;
Taken Everything

But, this is the exact position | 1
which we West Indians are placer
We have taken every thing froin
somebody else. We have accepted
sé mueh from foreign sources thit
we can now think of nothing but
our own gratitude, Is this not ti
tue explanation of our servility
towards our benefactors? What

have we done to deserve the gifts

cause they look on .4ttay* stint
laws of virtuous conduct,

made for others. One could at
least feel some respect. for us if
we were truly ashamed of this
pettiness of heart.

The West Indian’s Shame

But they really are ashamed
of themselves, these West Indians,
Let no one be so foolishly over-
confident as to su that they
do not feel the agonising
revulsion when they turn. away
from the pleasurable side of their
character to a cold analysis of it
jn all its aspects. As soon as they
feel disposed to look at them-
selves as they usually are, all
that gaiety and sportfulness whici:
we know only. too well vanishes.
And it is really lucky for them
that they are so seldom disposed
to look at themselves; they could
not save their mental balance from
peing hopelessly upset by the
constant shame that would be the
result of too close an examina-
tion. The West Indian is ashamed
of everything that really belongs
to him and marks him out as
different from anybody else, He
is ashamed of his nee delightful
and attractive qui es as well as
of his more revoltingly monkeyish
ones, None too seldom he is even
ashamed of his virtues, and when
one comes to such a pass, suicide
is the only course left which
would be charitable to oneself as
well as to humanity, When you
try to shut your eyes to your
virtues as well as to your vices,
it is high time you do your neigh-

bours, not to civ: itself,
the simple kifidness of dying. And
this is the only co IT can

. dvise the present day West Indian
to take. He is ashamed of the
black or brown. or yellow is
ertistically less interesting and
eppealing
ashamed of the poverty and com-
parative resourcelessness of most
of the islands that are his home.
He is ashamed of his lack of
mannefs and polite bearing. He is
»snamed of the social and politi-
eal conditions that are typical of
this archipelago. He is ashamed
of his weakness and cowardliness,
end so utterly ashamed of his
absolute lack of fighting spirit
that to save himself from breaking
down and becoming a_ hopeless
ease of psychological frustration
he has to console himself with
the thought that his misery is
nothing but the lot dished out to
him by Nature’s eternally immu-
table law: is'nt he a living ex-
ample of .the shallow and idiotic
proverb that patience is a virtue?

Ashamed

He is ashamed of that baseness
and loathesomeness of character
Which makes him infinitely cap.
able of suffering. And, most fool-
ishly of all, he is ashamed of the
spasmodic noble instinct which
prompts him to hate everything
that blocks his own path, believ-
ing it to be a devilishly evil in-
and -totally contrary bs the

e@ is
ashamed of his own _ servility;
ashamed of those grotesque ani-
mal gestures and apish chatter-
ings that he sometimes sees as a
fit mode of expression; and so
utterly ashamed of his own. lack
of original civilisation and of the
shame that drives him to believe
he ought to be worthy of ‘culture’,
that he either on.) one hand
cultivates an assemblage of ludic-
rous crazy freakish abortive mod-
ern- poe literary
idios asies ani believes that
he is qrolvins the choicest most
magical and profound literature
when he is really only mirroring
his own heart-breaking lack of
creativeness, or he fiercely
and desperately sets about edu-
cating himself beyond all recog

we have accepted? What have we nition, thinking himself the more

done

stra

to deserve the | habits,
literature, art, religion, manners,
fashions, morals, political institu- closer he
tiong and modes of thought that pseudo-Europeanism, His
We hive gratefully acceptéd from lectually

rs? Have we made theyn most part

successful the farther he leaves
his native land behind and the
approaches to sterile
intel-
nent men are for the
insufferable carica-

for ourselves? Of course not: how tures who believe they are think-

could we have the skill to make

anything fof ourselves? Have we

fought anybody for them? cf
coursé not; how could we have
the stvength, courage, and virtue
to fight anybody for anything?
But worse .of all, these presents
of ours, these wholesome presents
that we have taken with such
cravenly base gratitude and
politeness, and indeed we had to
take them simply or do without,
—they. do not fit us. They were



“We wish to

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Â¥

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advise our customer's
that our Workshop Department will be
closed from Tucsday 5th August to
~ust, 1952, both days

ing when they are merely mark-
ing time in a monotonous and
long exhausted round of mental
habits, West Indian elementary
school children can tell you all
about spring and summer and
autumn and winter, and prim-
roses and robins but hardly any-
thing about armadillos or alliga-
tors.or hurricanes or coral insects
or sponges. And when the total

mental burden of all his shame
accumulated, what do we
@ On page 15

has

to give our Work-

than pink, He is were

XVII
“SLAVERY”

By JOHN ?RIDEAUX

What Thomas Briggs, Esq., had
advocated in 1894 and had lest
his seat in the House of Assem-
poly over, became law in 1817
when the privilege of giving sworn
testimony in the Courts of this
Island was. granted to Free Col-
oured people,

Lord Combermere, the Gov-
ernor of Barbados, imbibed with
the ideas of Wilberforce and
Clarkson, and being of a pro-
gressive mind, founded his char-
ity school for free coloured chil-
dren in Bridgetown in 1818.
Thirty-two of the scholars were
the children of slaves. This school
is still in existence but it is no
longer a charity school; although
there are a number of schol-
arships granted by the Vestries:
but the sehool fees are very
moderate and this school is a con-
siderable help to the not very
wealthy parents. Also this school
is not confined to coloured
children alone, for many white
men in this community own
Combermere as their ‘alma mater.’

Lord Combermere was one of
those ame yootions that the —
were nging changing fast,
and that the old order was giving
way to a new, In 1819, he brought
the wrath of the Conservatives
upon his head; in order to patron-
ise ‘The Barbados Society for
Promoting Christian Knowledge,
he appointed a day for Divine Ser-
vice, afd commanded the attend-
ance of the Militia, Mr. Michae!
Ryan, Editor of the ‘Barbados
Globe’, condemned this in severe
terms, stating that to order the
attendance of the Militia was
‘Petty Tyranny. Because Lord
Combermere as Commander in
Chief of the Island could order
the attendance of these men even
against their will, Ryan was pro-
secuted for libel and sedition, but
the jury brought in a verdict of
‘Not Guilty.’ Public opinion waxed
high, Ryan and his supporters
known @s the ‘Salmagun-
dies’, while the Governor and his
ee referred to as the ‘Pump-

ns.’

oon ae owners became ae
ous a’ mere eH 3
out-spoken militant esleyans;
then conduattng wofship at a
single Chapel in Bridgetown; that
all men are brethren entitled to
equal consideration, The Mis-
sionary in charge of this Chapel
was William James Schrewsbury,
who by his strong character and
eloquent preac' exasperated
the opposition; ch launched
an organised attack on the con-
gregation on Sunday 5th of Octo-
ber 1823, with bottles filled with

Sunday October 19th, the Chapel
was demolished by an angry mob
of young men of the upper classes.
To show the ba ese young
men received from the owners of
slaves, a reward off for
information as to *

tors of this deed, but it was never
claimed.

On. the 25th of January
the House of puke a
resolution that a Petition be pre-
sented to His Majesty the 2,
asking him to remove the Hon,
J. B, Skeete from the Office of
President of Barbados and from
duet pik BAVIIE teieeed 6
ue eved a
slave after his conviction and
sentence to death for “commit-
ting rape on a white woman.”
_ On the 13th of July, the same
year, the Editor of the ‘Barbadian
Newspaper,’ commented editorial-
ly that the news of the resolution
passed by the House of Commons
in Great Britain, that Colonial
Slavery should altogether cease in
12 years from the passing of an
Act of Parliament as regards those
slaves from six years of age and
upwards; but those uni six
of age, it was to end imm tely.
It was also stated in this editorial
that on the llth of June, four
resolutions had passed the House
of Commons for £20,000,000 to
be paid as compensation to the
slave owners on the release of
their slaves, }

There was still a terrific amount
amount of propaganda on the sub-
ject of slavery those who were
faced with a terrific financial loss
due to the release of the slaves
were using all within their power
fu op are egua"a shochd be

are equal_an

free’ An {ele ‘Plan of t=








ment of e on the
Estates in —e los, a, ‘9 re-
co 3 lent in-
terest that i ould be best to

quote it ‘in

{



SUNDAY ADVOCATE

“The Negroes have all Sun-
day to themselves, except now
and then when prevented by
the weather the day before;
they may be ordered on Sunday
Morning to litter the Pens and
Stables, and bring up fodder
for the Horses

In the Week they are set to
work about six o'clock in the
morning and work until nine,
when they have an hour allow-
ed for Breakfast time—they then
work from Ten until One o'clock
when they knock-off and come
home to Dinner, which meal is
provided for every Negro on
the Estate, with an allowance
of half a pint of Punch; — at
Three o’Clock in the afternoon

they again set to work and re-

main until six in the evening being
never actually at work more
than Three Houre at a time, and
only Nine Hours altogether in
a Day.—Out of Crop they have
every. other Saturday After-
noon, and sometimes the whole
day to themselves,

The Children from Nine to
Fifteen years of age never worl
with the Hoe, and are only em~
ployed in cutting Grass and
Green Fodder for the Stock.

The Infants when weaned,
are put under the care of elder-
ly Women as Nurses, and are
kept at the Nursery, (a Build-
ing purpose! erected for
them), until they are fit to go
into the Grass Gang — these
have three wholesome meals @
day which are served up te
them under the eye of the Man-

ager.

The Breeding Women from
the time they report themselves
pregnant, are withdrawn from
the Gang, and are employed ir
any very light occupation, with
a view of keeping them at
home, and to prevent their go-
ing to Market with heavy loads
which they frequently ‘carry for
themselves and which with
long Journeys, &c. often prove
hurtful to oe are’ al-
ways allowed a Month to Lie-
in and when put to Bed, (he-
sides 2 proper Midwife), they
have a Nurse of their own chvice
to attend them during their
Confinement,

Baby Linens Candles. and al}
other necessaries are like

rovidég for them, ana they
Rave during that time, an in-
creased allowance of Provisions.
——At the end of the Month the
children are brought to the Nur-
sery about Bight o’Clock every
Morning and the Mothers for
the first three months, do little
else than attend to them when
the Children get older and
stronger, the Mothers bring
them to the Nursery at Seven
in the Morning, where they
leave them, and go to work —
they come home to Breakfast at
Nine o’clock and go out again
at ten they come home at twelve
and go out at three in the after-
noon, and at Five o’Clock they

again come home and take their
Children to their Houses,

Every grown Negro is allow~
ed haif a pint of Guinea, or
a quart of Indian Corn and four
pounds and a half of Potatoes,
or four pounds of other Roots
per day, besides a _ plentiful
meal, ready dressed and per-
pared for their Dinner; they are
also allewed sufficient quantity
of Mo » Rum, Salt and
Salted Fish per week. — The
young Negroes have dressed
meals provided for them.—

The Men are allowed a full
Suit of Pennistone or Osna-

burgs, with a Monmouth Hat
or Cap every year; the Women
the same, with the addition of
a Check Shift or Handkerchief.
—A comfortable House is built
at the expense of the Estate, for
every Negro with a family, and
frequently for the Single ones
where the Families are large.
—Every Negro has a small spot
of Land which he cultivates for
himself, and ~which affords him
not, only many eomforts, but
from the sale of its produce, he
derives the means of indulging
himself in dress and other grat-
ifications.

A Practitioner vislts the Estate
every day, and a Physician and
Surgeon called whenever either
is required. There is a comfort-
able Hospital on the Estate,
and the Sick are allowed every
necessary and when ordered
by the Doctors, have Madeira
or Port Wine, as may be requis-
ite;Animal food, Broths, Flour
or Starch Spices, &c.

The Negroes are never called
on to do any work at night, ex-
cept in Crop time, when Men
who are attached to the Boil-
ing-house are sometimes detain-
ed until Eight or Nine o’Clock,
and come out in_the morning
when the other Negroes go to
work,

A Man of religious habits at-

tend the Negroes for the pur+





I WAS minded to head this
eolumn today “Now We Know”,
but I well remember that the last
journalist who headed this column
Went on to show that what he had
neen thinking in the past about
amaica and the war was now
justified. He served six months
In prison.

I could well appreciate his feel-
ings when I read the facetious dis-
course by the Director of Educa-
tion in the Advocate of Saturday.
4 was amazed to find that an officer
in a responsible position realising
that almost everyone in this island
was dissatisfied with some aspect
of education and its administration
could find it in his soul to treat
the matter jovially. It is either
that-Mr. Reed does not realise the
extent of the public dissatisfaction
or he thinks the matter too trifling
to merit serious attention by him.
As far as I am concerned he can
choose either predicament.

I can hardly trust myself to ex-
amine in detail all the statements
made in his article, and I hope
that it is really his and has not
been mangled by any other hand,
for fear that I might divert read-
ers from the goal to which I have
pointed them: an Enquiry into the
administration of education in this
island. It is by this that I hope
the failures of the system will be
diagnosed and corrective measures
adopted.

This matter of education of a
people is certainly too serious for
any light hearted diversion, even
if Major Reed in his army career
could be gay in the face of death
and danger. There is a point at
which even bravery becomes fool-
hardy; facetiousness in this case
is almost unforgivable. But I sup-
pose that I must not be too
severe in my judgment of the
Director’s attitude.

Idle Reference
And as if to indicate his entire
attitude to the question of educa-
tion in Barbados, he cites from
several authorities and makes the
same idle reference that Amateur
and others did to the Education

wise Act of 1944 and Our Changing

Schools, 1950. These are English
publications dealing with the
theory. of practical and administra-
tive education in England, but Mr.
Reed refuses to face the problem
which is besetting us in this
island: Are these new theories now
the subject of controversy in
Great Britain good enough for us
in our stage of development? If
in Great Britain with its centuries
of tradition and development,
(both culturally and education-
ally) there are stiJl people, emin-
ent authorities at that, who are not
satisfied that some of these ultra-
modern educational theories give
the best results why should they
be toyed with in Barbados? What
several other simple souls and TI
would like to know from the Gal-
lant Major is what is the future of
education, in this island and what
can be done to justify the huge ex-
penditure of two and a half mil-
lion dollars out of a total revenue
of twelve million dollars and what
can be done to improve the defects.

Let me tell him that the Moham-
medan form of education might be
the best in the world but if it is
not what we want and what we
pay for and if we are satisfied that
it does not suit us, it is a waste of
time to attempt to force it on us.

Best Opportunities

Any educetional system proper-
ly. administered aims ategiving the
people whom it is intended to
benefit the best opportunities to
contribute to the society in which
they live. It must fit them for
work and living in the community

im which they live by learning and -

technical training. This is the
basis and the intellectually bright
ones will then be fitted for the
arts, science and the humanities.

To tell this community that an
Education Act demands that
“ghildren must be taught accord-
ing to Age, Ability, and Aptitude,
‘Le. Chronological Age, Capability
and Special talents” is, in good
American, so much baloney. How
doés all this apply to the small
boy in Harrison College who hav-
ing gone to the Elementary School
finds that he is ahead of the other
pupils in the three R’s and could
be removed up one form, When he
{s refused then he comes to feel



of giving them Religious
Rnstructions, and much may be
done by means of a safe and
efficient plan of Religious In-
struction towards the moral
improvement of the Negroes.

(1).
edandthe nsim-n.
1. The Journal of the Barbados
Museum and Historical Society
Vol. Il, pages 29-30.












Education
Laughing Matter



No

that it is no use worrying and later
when he becomes sufficiently dis-
interested and fails to catch up he
is super-annuated. He can't step
up but he can be turned out, char-
acterised as a duffer and has diffi-
culty in getting a job. An early
remove might have given him an
extra chancé at one of the many
Barbados Scholarships and he
would have become one of those
of whom Barbados would be
proud.
Congratulations

But if I have been critical of
the Director let me cpngratulate
him on the wisdom of mak-
ing the two St. Leonard’s Schools
Boys’ and Girls’ Secondary Schools
instead of filling one school with
700 children without leaving room
for any intake at the end of a
year, It only remains for him now
to press for an extension of the
school leaving age from 14 to 16
If not let the Schools be known as
“Secondary” without this restric-
tion on age. It is a waste of time
to give a child two and a half
years’ training at these schools.

I suggest that when next the
Director comes from his ivory
cloisters of intellectuality, he
migit deign to tell us lesser mor-~
tals in the lowlands what are thesc
schools and exactly where they fit
in with the local scheme of ele-
mentary and Grammar (Second-
ary) Schools.

—J.E.B.

St. Joseph Round-up

. ~
Film Show At
we e
Girls’ School
Through the courtesy of the
British Council, there will be a
Free Film Show at the St. Jos-
eph’s Girls’ School on Tuesday
next beginning at 4.30 p.m. For
sometime past, the British Coun-
cil representatives have been
kind enough as to give Shows in
St. Joseph. Residents are hoping
now that they will be kind

enough as to give a Film Show
with hints on health.





Roads Undergoing
Repairs

Roads in St, Joseph’s now be-

ing repaired are Springfield, Co~-

coanut Grove and Cambridge. |

Work on Springfield Road is ex-
pected to be completed during
this month, while the Cocoanut
Grove Road may not be complet-
ed this year, it was learnt yester-
day. At present there are approx-
imately 22 workers and a_ road
roller on the Cambridge Road.
Work on this road should be com-
pleted early next month, it was
reported.

Patronal Festival
At Saint Aidan’s

St. Aidan’s Patronal Festiva!
will be celebrated on Sunday
August 31. Po mark the occasion,
the following services will be
held: —

Choral Eucharist 5 a.m.; Festal
Evensong and a Cantata, 4.30 p.m.

Forty candidates are at present
being prepared for Confirmation
at the St. Joseph’s Parish Church,
by Rev. Edward Gatherer, As-
sistant Curate attached to this
Church. he
*



ae *

The Baths at the Social Centre
at Bathsheba were opened to the
public on Sunday last at 6 a.m.
Immediately on the opening 4
rr went in to get the first

ath,













SUND



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