Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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Full Text


EE ee —————————————————

BOE a A teas — tn ow








WHAT'S ON TODAY

Court of Common Pleas
Court of Ordinary .
Mobile - Tenias ma, Veuenne
oe Pm

Polive Bana at Old Seholars
St. Martin's School 9.00 p.m

ene

For the cause that lacks assistance
the wrongs that need resistance

in the distance
ne The ated that I can do

10.00 a.m
11.00 am
Plantation

ESTABLISHED 1895

Greeks Shell Bulgariaus
The Disputed Gamma ‘sland

U.N. Observers

Wateh Operation | Sesion Ends

ATHENS, Aug. 7.

; The Greek Army began shelling the disputed Gamma
Island seized by. Communist Bulgaria in a raid on July 23.
A Greek General Staff communique said shelling began at
9.30 am. in the presence of United Nations observers and
after-a radio warning.

It said “so far there has been no reaction”. The com-
munigue was issued at 11.00 a.m.

Gamma Island is in the Evros River which for ten
miles forms a frontier betwen Bulgaria and Greece, The
island has always been considered Greek but Bulgarian
troops landed there on July 23 aiid seized control after
killing two Greek gendarmes and wounding three.

The Greek Government Sear i

plained to the United Nations Sy ioe eo
Railroad

agaist the incident and the Or
ganizations Balkan WW ommussion
went to the scene,

Tne Greek toreign minister W k I
Sopnocles Venizelos two days ago or ers n
demanaed the buigarians to evacu- e
ate the island. As yesterday Greek Italy St rike
and Bulgarian troops were re-
awe pean up opposite the sides ROME, August 7,

The pedis More than 100,000 communist-
island = enthesras f poh led railway workers went out on]
last night th i ret aan a 24-hour nation-wide strike,
issued , ec “4 curtailing normal schedules but
Bulgarign trometer eine uj{tailing to achieve their goal of

ulgarian troops have appeared total paralysis in the country's
2 island of yr ee » It aisolvast railway system. The govern-

at Bulgarian! ment kept more than a skeleton
troops had occupied other islands; service going throughout the
ae this 2 al country with the aid of troops
_ mwevey morning a generalling 80,000 members of non-|
ee, Sdovomad ge Communists unions which refused,
few Bulgarians were observed on |‘? Jim the walkout. |
the Isle of Gamma, Alter] a; midday the Ministry of)
that from 9.30 am. to-day we be-)r-onsport in Rome said that}
gan a cannonade of the isle after | emergency crews were operating)
a radio warning and in the'aimost twice as many trains as |
presence of United Nations ob-)had been scheduled for the dura|
servers. So far there has been n9|/tion of the strike. At Bologna, one
reaction”. A Greek press said the|of the country's biggest railway
bombardment was tne prelude ? hubs, special crews handled 21
Greek reoccupation of the island. | trains—16 passenger and five

According to press reports Greek) fyeight—during the first eight
observers saw one Bulgarian 9n|hours of the strike, Emergency
the eight aere island at 4.30 a.m.| schedules had listed only 12 tiains
po Retg a Bee — to be sure: | for the satire 24-hour period of

y’ presence the strike.
Bulgarians on the island was es-
tabiished and reported to the Gen- Special Crews
eral staff at Athens which ordered : i 9
to open fire at 9.30 a.m. Ministry ‘

ns was calm as authorities wae had hoped to run only
dssued a standby alert to gen-|about 130 trains today, said that
darmes and army units.

In Naples, Southern European}more than had been scheduled
N.A.T.O. headquarters of Admiral | during ees Te eight hours of
Robert B. Carney is “closely fol-|the walkou y
lowing” the Greek-Bulgarian dis- ;
pute over the island of Gamma in| The strike was called by the!
the river, a spokesman said 32]Communist-dominated General
Thursday. Confederation of Labour to sup-

The spokesman said reports on| port demands for pay boosts to-
the tense situation is being filed ae ava eee eee
by special teams of observers e coun non- n=
stationed in Athens. Up to now|munist Unions refused to join

however no N.A.T.O. observers} despite the fact that they support
are at the scene of the dispute!the pay demands.






Har badros



Iran House

In Uproar

TEHERAN, August, 7,

A session of the Lower House
of Iran’s (Parliament ended in an
uproar when deputies were debat-
ing the nomination of Seyed
Ayatullah Kassent, fanatical reli-
gious leader as Speaker of the)
Houde. When the session ended it
was not known whether Kassani
had accepted nomination,

Previously a group of 30,
deputies tabled the motion
demanding the release of the
assassin of, Premier Razmara who,
has been in jail since March 7,
last year, This motion started al
verbal battle between tribal;
leaderd’ on Government benches,
and brought about an uproar
which closed the session,

Meanwhile Ahmed Ghavam,
80-year-old millionaire statesman |
who was appointed Premier by the!
Shah, and held office only four}
days prior to the bloody riots of]
July 21, published the text of a!
letter he has sent to Parliament
seeking to free himself from all
blame for the incidents.

He said: “I proclaim that I was
a real martyr because I was the
one who was destroyed..” He said
he wouldn’t be blamed for military
and police actions against demon-
strators in Teheran on July 21,
because he actually resigned on
July 19.

He said, “I handed my resigna-
tion to His Imperial Majesty be-
cause of ul health on July |

|
|
|
|
|
\

therefore [| was not Prime
Minister on July 21. I informed
all deputies who called ‘on me
on July 19, that I had resigned
and had not an official position.”
—U.

Rhee Back |
In Office
PUSAN KOREA, Aug. 7.

Aging President Syngman Rhee

was swept back into office by an
overwhelming majority in
from



election of chief executives. Rhee’s

Yung, an .obseure Presbyterian
minister, piled up a commanding
lead over his eight opponents in
a returns from Tuesday’s elec-

n.

Rhee (77) puttered in his Seoul
garden as the vote count assured
his return to office for four yeacs.
He declined to make a statement
or pose for photographs. His in-
auguration is set for August 15.
the fourth anniversary of the re-



public.
—(CP)



itself.—U.P. ba bet

MacARTHUR ACCEPTS CIVIL JOB





Pacific Defence
Will Be Plotted

HONOLULU, August 7,

Armed defense against attack
in the Pacific a Commas
China or any other aggressor
be plotted by military leaders of
Australia, New Zealand and the
United States at Honolulu at a
meeting expected
within 60 days,

Admiral Arthur Radford Com-
andes -in-Coi of the Pacific
Ocean area ape Oe Fee Fleet
will represent the
Australia and New Zealand are
‘expected to name their military
planners soon,

The three will meet at Radford’s
Pearl Harbour Headquarters
map strategy which would unite
\the tanks, guns, planes and men
jof the three countries’ against
‘armed attack under the terms of
the security alliance pledging
each to come to the aid of the
| others,
| The Chinese Communist threat
‘occupied the major part of the
|Foreign Ministers’ discussion and
lit was expected to be the greatest
|concern of the military men when
ithey meet to assemble the
;machinery of defence.

Military planning will not be
|limited to defence of the
areas of the “Angus”
| their territories or island



s

sions.
Security Pact pledge the three
nations to defend armed attack
{against public vessels, aircraft and
| eemed forces of the three as well
jas each other’s metgopolitan



SHAKING HANDS in New York are General Douglas MacArthur (right)
and James H. Rand, president of the Remington Rand, Ine., after the
former had accepted the chairmanship of the corporation's board of
directors. In taking the post, MacArthur said: “I have looke” forward
to this association with interest for nearly 3 years.” (International)

to be a
















The broad terms of the},

FRIDAY





}
}

|
westigate

{

t

|



Jamaica Move
To Encourage
New Industries

(From Our Own Correspondent)
KINGSTON, Aug, 7.
. The Jamaica Government plan
mT

further incentive for investors

connection with the industriali-
sation programme, A Bill has
been prepared which offers new
investors a tax free holiday of en
years, This period has been se. |
at January 1953 to December 3), |

1963,
The new Bill will extend and
the present Pioneer Indu:



t
tries Encouragement Law in in

pose of setting a specific

portant respects and for the es

so as to give
investors’ to’ move quickly in
tablishing new industries

Manufacturers have already

special crews had run 109 trains!choice for Vice-President, Ham Tai|said that Pioneer Manufacturers

under the present law will receive
benefits from the tax holiday
period ‘except only so far as it
completes ten years for them as
for their production dates, while
long established industries, not
being run on a commercial scale
and capable of expansion will be,
granted similar concessions.

Under the present law pioneer
industries are permitted to wipe
off capital expenditure by deduc-
tions out of profits for any five
years of the first eight years of
existence.

The new Bill provides for the
wiping off of capital during ten
years and possible extension for
five years after that of capital is
hot completely deducted out of
profits. .

Argentina Sold
Cotton To Britain

BUENOS AIRES, August 7,
The Peron government announc-
ed Thursday it will buy any
amount of raw cotton offered it
by Argentine producers from the
present 1951-52 crop.





range from $398.75 per ton for
the lowest grades to $601.75 for
e highest delivered in Buenos

res,

Official Foreign Trade monopoly
(LA.P.I.) announced Wednesday
it had sold an unspecified amount
of cotton to Britain. This sale
marked the first time LAP.J
engaged in cotton trading abroad.

Crop estimates place the total
at 500,000 tons of which 50,000
will be available for er :



Fighter Explodes

8 Die In Flames

WASHINGTON, Aug. ‘.
The U.S. Navy said a jet fight-
er exploded aboard the aircraft
earrier “Boxer” off the Korean
ier lame euploded "nthe car-
ape bane setting off fire in a
below space used for storing





The Government's buying prices f

1952

On
|

AUGUST 8,

Body Set Up

HONOLULU, Aug. 7.
> Pacific Mutual Defence
freaty was off to a start
after Poreign Ministers concluded

| their three-day conference by set-

ting up a permanent military body
to plan resistance against com-
munist aggression,

Top diplomats trom the United
States, Australia and New Zealand

|formally ended the historic meet-

ing at 6.00 p.m. Honolulu Stand-

jard Time, (12.00) yesterday, and

unanimously agreed that the con-

jference had been a successi “We

have got this thing off to a good
start,”’ Secretary of State Acheson
said. “Everyone is pleasec with

‘the meeting.”

Acheson and External Affairs
Ministers of the other two coun-
tries concluded the conference de-
signed to implement the Anzus
Treaty, signed in San Francisco
last September, by agreeing not
to attempt to establish formal re-
lationships with other Pacific
states at this time

Establisrument of a military or-

ganization to function under
Council was considered a major
accomplishment. Admiral Arthur
Ww Radford, Commander-in-

Chief of the United States Pacitic
Fleet was the first member named
to the military group. Australian
and New Zealand members will be
named later because their For-
eign Ministers wanted to consult
home governments first.

In a joint communique Acheson
announced to Australia’s Richard
G. Ca: and New Zealand's T.
Clifton Webb that the military or-
ganization would have an early
meeting in Honolulu. At the first
meeting and subsequent annual
sessions, the military body will
work out in detail the machinery
which will function under the de-
fence pact binding the three great

_|English speaking nations of the

Pacifie
—U.P.

‘South Austealia To
Spend £4m On
Uranium Mining

ADELAIDE, Aug. 7.

The South Australian Govern-{
ment will spend nearly
£4,000,000 this financial year on
the development of the state's:
uranium deposits, Premier Play-
ford announced on Thursday, The
money will be spent developing
underground mining at Uranium
Hill, erecting a treatment plant
at Port Pile, and surveying new
aveas for possible location of|
additional radio-active ores, |
Playford said, Arrangements are



being made for loar advances to; West Indies Trade Commissioner |

come from overseas.—U.P.



Naguib Belongs To |
No Political Party

CAIRO, Aug. 7.

Egyptian strongman General
Naguib on Thursday declared that
the military coup which pushed
King Farouk off his throne last |
month was “purely nationalist, and |
unconnected with any partisan
considerations.” Naguib said in a
;communique that some organiza-
tions in Egypt were disseminating
alse rumours to the effect that
the coup was done in their names.
| The commuique denounced the
rumours as “absolutely unfound-
ed.” Naguib added that he never
belonged to any political party or

Advorate



ane encom

La)
YESTERDAY'S WEATHER REPORT

Rainfall; from Codrington a0 in.

Total Rainfall. for
Si int. %

Highest Teshpetature i i

Lowest Tempefaturc 45 b

Wind Velocity 12 miles per hour

Barometer (9 a.m.) 29.977 (3 p.m) 29.91A

TO-PAY

5.46 a.m -

Sunset 22 p.m

Moon: Full, August 5

Lighting: 7.00 p.m

High Tide 6.30 am., 7.56 pm

Low Tide 12.14 am WM pw.



onth t esterday:

Sunrise



Crossley ) wiping

by a head from Mins Rosemary
Bo n’s Columbus (Lutchmaa ’

up- on the third day of the

©. four-day meet. The

2 was the Merchants’ Han-



‘Mrs. Bear’ Scores

_ ’ 1 ,

CORONER BEGINS |
4
’ ay x T r
DEATH ENQUIRY |

The enquiry into the circum-
stances surrounding the death of
Cecil Hope, 28, a chauffeur ot}
Jackmans, St. Michael, was begun |
before His Worship, Mr. E. A
McLeod, Coroner of District “A’
on Wednesday and adjourned un-
til to-day after three witnesses
had given evidence.

Hope died ‘at the General Hos-
pital some hours after he had bination.
been admitted on Sunday. The weather was again beautifu. cident occurred just as the field

Dr, Z Skomoroch, a Resident }and the racing although keen, wis, was coming around the bend for
Medical Officer attached to the marred by a single mishap whe |the first time. Joseph was taken
hospital said that on August 3,| Jockey Joseph had his right les {io Hospital. Prizes in the Field
about 6.30 am, he was sumMmoONn=! fractured w ile riding Colleto. ;Sweep, allhough not ag great as
ed to the Casualty Department to the ‘second day, reached the

dle ys

see an emergency case of a ma . ; \@ naanent
person, He’ went ana found furlongs. The in-|S700 mark om one occasion, The

man in an unconscioys condition | Pari paid its highest dividend of

Upset Win
B’dos Turf Club Summer
Meet Concludes Saturday

Mr. Victor Chase’s 3-year-old filly Mrs. Bear out of
Limekiln-Smylax won the Stafford Handicap from a field
of twelve and caused the biggest upset of the third day’s
racing of the B.T.C., Summer meeting at the Garrison
Savannah yesterday.

On this occasion the Forecast reached its highest when
$250.20 was paid out on the Mrs. Bear-Red Cheeks com-





which fell in the Trafalgar Handi- jon
cap over nine



in the bed. i $12.18 on Test Match in the Sum-
After examination, he discov-| Results Al |mer Handicap. Bana wader Mak

ered that the man was sufferins |
from a serious injury to his brain |
He admitted him to the ward anc |
saw him twice afterwards but hi
never regained consciousness..
Dr. B, L. Ward, P.M.O. of Christ

y jArcher was again in attendance
ance ind, rendered another programme

f lively an dpopular tunes.
THIRD DAY “The meetin Judes to-mor-
SEVENTEENTH RACE e meeting concludes to-mor



row.

Church who performed the post 1. Apple Sam—Thirkell THIRD DAY

mortem examination at the Pub- 2. Super Jet—Yvonet > . . 9

lic Mortuary on Monday, Aug. 3. Sew Foam—Lutchman SEVENTEENTH RACE

ust 4, said that death was due to EIGHTEENTH RACE Juvenile S

shock and haemorrhage following J, Mrs, Bear—Joseph Six entrants faced the starter

multiple wounds. 2. Red Cheeks—-O'Neil for the first e f the th
Lavinia Hope, mother, of th 8. Castle In The Air— a3 atta Mauna earn

day, the Juvenile Stakes run over

+, Beir F2 and

NINETEENTH RACE
Faerie Queene—Holder
Mrerschaum-—La¢chman
TWENTIETH RACE

deceased said that he resided at
Jackmans with her. She last saw
him alive on August 2 about 3 | 1:
o'clock in the afternoon when he | 2:
left home saying he was going to

5% furlongs for Class

Lower two-year-olds.
With the exception of Sea Foam

who carried 108 lbs. the other

ag eee —

the Races, . i} 1. Top Pas totam horses, Apple Sam, Super Jet
fhe next saw him atthe Hos-\|| 2. Gross — Holder Howitzer, Bow Tie and Jim La

pital the following day aftersbeing |) 3. May Day—Orossley Rue each carried 118 Tbs.

informed by the Policu, but he TWENTY-FIRST RACE The race was off to a fair start

could not speak to her. On Mon- 1
day morning, she saw his dead 2.
body at the Public Mortuary and . March Winds—Quested

TWENTY-SECOND RACE

3
identified i,t to Dr. Ward,
11.45 p.m. 1, Test n— Y vonet
| 2 Carefu
3

W.I. Chambers Of
Commerce WillMeet |
In October

The Ninth Congress of the In-

with Apple Sam, Super Jet, Sea
Foam and Bow Tie leading the
field in that Order.

Apple Sam was able to main-

=
F
;
i



tain the lead right around the
Annie—Quested course, and won on an easy gallop
Dashing Princess— | four

lengths ahead of Super Jet
|who was two lengths away from
'Sea Foam the third horse. Bow
|Tie was fourth,
The race was slover than any
jot the previovs two days. The
On pzge 8

Lutehman
TWENTY-THIRD RACE
1. Firelady—Quested
2 Pepper Wine—Crossley
3. Landmark-—Holder







eorporated Chambers of Com-
merce will be held in British
Guiana in October, and it is ex
‘pected that Mr. Rex Stollmeyer

in Canada, will attend the meet.
ing,

The Council of the Barbados
Chamber of Commerce on Wed-
nesday decided to contribute £25
to assist in meeting the cost of
bringing Mr, Stollmeyer to the
West Indies,

The question of Canada.West
Indies Trade is high on the list
of important matters to be dis-
cussed at the Congress,

Mad Killer Statks
Through Chicago

CHICAGO, August 7,



Police



organization. Meanwhile, _politi-
cal observers here said that Egypt's
powerful may be

Wafd rae
headed for a major split as a resul!
| of its present purge.—U.P.

| ROSS SUCCEEDS
PALMER ON U.N.

COMMISSION
| WASHINGTON, Aug. 7.
John C. Ross was appointer



‘Thursday by President Truman to
|sueceed Ely E. Palmer as deputy
|U.s. representative on the U.N
| Conciliation Commission fot
| Palestine. '

Ross also wil] continue to serve
in his present job as Deputy U.S
‘representative on the U.N. Security
Council. Palmer is retiring after
42 years of government service

—v.





planes, —UP.



territory.

W.A.F.D. Party Split Likely | ptane Crashes Into Boy King Sails To U.S.
CAIRO, August 7, The Rhine River

bs neni oe ; Sd Quen split GERMANY, August 7 EVENTZEN-YEAR-OLD King Feisal of Iraq sailed today aboard
in the wake of the present purge} the Army budget by cutting Gov-| Police waid that’ a flaming the Queen Mary for the United States where he will spend a five-
political observers said here} ernment spending elsewhere _ |\United States airfo:-¢ two-engined| week educational visit at the invitation of the United States Govern-
Thursday. eres a Pag is "ote a champion |B-26 light bomber crash-landed|ment. The youthful monarch who will ascend the throne of (raq on
that dismissed party mem! aréjof a strong Egyptian army and jpn the Rhine River between the May 2, t pavtioulasix tan aa ed ice
likely to retaliate by io quickest possible rearmament. The two. main bridges in the teeming SP J letiodner dtuome a ee ee eee udy
penetrating accusations a Egyptian- Cabinet imposed Thurs-|centre of Maize this morning, Hh . ioblis ae aaa ha
Preliminary reports said that e will spend some time over the Tennessee Valley. Ac-



Mohammed Naguib’s frequent
visits to Prime Minister Aly Maher
was to make plans for increasing |

SOUTHAMPTON, England, August 7.




remaining members before the}day an extra 20 per cent import
Party’s cleanup of the Committee,}tax on automobiles, -watches, all crew members were rescued.|companied by his uncle the Prince Regent of Iraq, Colonel Ahmed

Such a jolt might result in re-| photographic apparatus, musical'An eye witness said two men}|Mohammed Yahya and other officials, young Feisal will tour the U.S
ducing WAFD to secondary im-|instruments.and articles made of parachuted out of the plane be-|from East to West.

portance in the country’s political! wool, cotton and artificial and fore it landed on the crowded Asked by a reporter whether he looked forward to ascending the
tite: 304 bringing” Sw Mates | pure ali. An additions! 30 perjriver. ‘The brotherhood to the fore as the/cent tax has been imposed on were rescued by German river ’ . . yes, bi
jeading Party, observers said. | imported wines, spirits, and

Meanwhile it is understood that! cigars and 20 per cent on beer.
one reason for strong man General | —UP.
Bh le |

in England since 1947 returns to England in September and will

jhere Their condition is ;
{ leave for Iraq in October.—-U.P.

—U.P.

boats and rushed to the hospital have not thought about it much.” King Feisal who had been studying |‘
unknown

patrol cars cruise
through the narrow streets of
Chicago's north side searchin
for the hammer killer wh«
threatened fo kill agaib ar
begged: “Stop me for God's sal
before it is too late!” A dragne
was thrown out after a mar
wearing 4 “light” suit who cor

fronted two women as a streete:

stop and gold them; “TI killed »
man with a hammer and TI kno

how to take care of mygelf.” Tr

killer had the police seurryin
all over the city last night ar

early today when he made fi,

phantom telephone calis to hea

quarters and threatened to invacd
ltwo Yashionable hotels in hi:
{quest for blood,

Officers found the battered bod
of Tom Acton, 35, of Birminghan
Alabama, in a dingy hotel roor
after a man with a voice describe
as “raspy with a whine” calle
and said they would “find some-
thing bloody” in the room.

—U.P.



{
:
Koje Refugees

| ‘ 66 7 . ”
| Start “Rice Riots
!
| PUSAN, Korea, Aug. 7.
| About 900 North Korean re-
fugees on Koje Island rai a
village in Chang Sun Po last night
tn South Korea’s first “rice riot”

A usually reliable source here
said the rice ration for 80,00
North Korean refugees near th«

village had been cut from 900 ton:
to 370 tons a month because of the



general shortage in South Korea
The source said the refugees pro-
jtested without success and last

night destroyed an office building
the village and burned docu-
One policeman was in-
jured in the riot which lasted an
‘hour, —U.P.

ments

|

|

CHINESE LOSE
‘CAPITOL’ HILL

SEOUL, Aug: 7.
Swift. United States sabrejets shot down four Commun-
ist MIG 15 jet fighters and damaged four others today,
while infantrymen pushed Chinese Red troops off the bit-
terly contested “Capitol Hill”. Four air battles between
Sabres and MIG’s took place near Sinuiju, a few miles



south of the Yalu River boundary between North Korea.

and Manchuria. The eight MIG’s, shot down or damaged

to-day brought the toll of Communist jets for August to 40.

The Republic of Korea soldiers ~ _
of the famed “capitol” division
fought a back and forth battle
for the control of the key hill wes
of Pukhan River on the centre!)
front, The hill changed hands for |
he fifth time early today as
Korean infantrymen smashed to
the top and regained control,

The fight for “capitol Hill”
famed after the veteran Korean
Nivision that held it began on
Tuesday night, when the Chinese
‘tormed the slopes and reached
the erest, The spirited “capitol”
troops won it back a few hours
later in a savage counter attack;
but the communists came back
with fresh troops at daybreak on
Wednesday to retake it.

Again the South Koreans coun-
ter attacked and won, Then the
Reds began an artillery and mor-
tar barrage and this time were
successful in taking the hill,

The South Koreans withdrew

Special Session Of
t ain line. Firin il. Te
ieon “sullen the tabese bakes ae U.S. Congr ess

o the United Nations’ main line a

“ WASHINGTON, Aug. 7
oe Be oars Soak ply ta. be Truman said to-day he was





'



PRESIDENT TRUMAN

Truman May Call

It was estimated that 200 Chin.
ese were dug in on the ridge.

Far East Airforces sent 1,105
missions against the Communists
on Wednesday. Fighters, bombers,
and navy guns hit Communist
buildings, vehicles, and supply
routes.—U.P,

KESSELRING ELECTED
PRESIDENT OF GERMAN

SOLDIER ASSOCIATION
COLOGNE, Aug, 7.

The West German Association of

frontline soldiers (Stahlerm) an-

nounced here today that it had

‘lected former

dent.
Kesselring, Hitler’s Commander

| to resign.



Field Marshal |
\lbert Kesselring as its first Presi- |

considering calling a special ses-
ion of Congress to deal with
ees, However he told a news
conference that he has made no
final decision
He declined comment on re-
ports that price stabilizer Ellis
| Arnall has resigned or is planning
Associates said Arnall
plans to quit on September Ist
Truman said the price situation
would be the only reason for
calling Congress back into special

(session if he decides to do so, He
‘gave no

of at what
the special
consider it

indication
time he might call
session should he
necesBary.
Meanwhile Arnall’s statement
on. Wednesday that Truman might

‘have to call Congress back into

in Italy toward the end of the war |5¢Ssion to deal with” the pric
s serving 20 years for a war {Situation drew a brick bath from

crimes sentence in the British con-
trolled prison at Werl, Germany
U.P.

poem houses in Congress.and his

cwn colleagues,
U.P,

es







PAGE TWO i

Caub Calling

R. G. G. MONEY new local
Director of Barclays Bank
for the British West liwies and
‘British Guiana, arrived here yes-
terday morning from Engiand via
Jamaica and Trinidad by B.W.1L.a.
He has come te succeed Mr. C. C
George, the local Director who re-
tires at the end of September.

Mr. Money was formerty stz-
tioned in Kenya. On his way w
England on leave, he spent two
months driving through the
Sahara. Before coming to Barbe-
dos, he called at Jamaica and
Trinidad where he stayed for two
days in each colony. He proposes
to spend about six weeks here
before visiting some of the other
islands.

Mr. Money has taken up resi-
dence at Buckden, St. Joseph.
To Take Up Appointment

BRUCE WHYTE of Brit-

ish Guiana arrived here yes-

terday by the Lady Rodney. He
will take up an appointment es
Assistant Colonial Engineer cf
Highways & Transport Depart-
ment.

Mr. Whyte was formerly Clerk
of Works of the Public Works De-
partment in British Guiana. As
soon as he is settled down in the
island, he will be joined by his
wife and children. “We will soon
be completing one of the largest
road schemes ever undertaken 1n
British Guiana,” Mr. Whyte said.
This scheme is in the Corentyne
district of Berbice where a 5)
mile asphalt road is being con-
structed.

Work on the Corentyne Scheme
started in 1950. It is expected to
be completed between December
1952 and March 1953.

At the Baggage Warehouse to
meet. Mr. Whyte was Mr. Pat Car-
ter, another Guianese, who ear ier
this year took up the appointment
of Surveyor at the Water Works
Department.

From Venezuela
RRIVING in the colony on
Sunday from Venezuela were

Mr. and Mrs. Rigoberto Vegas R.
and their son and daughter, Their
daughter will be entering the
Urauline Convent on its reopening
and the family will be remaining
in the island for three months,
During their stay here they will
be guests at Super Mare Guest
House, Worthing.

Dental Surgeon
R. AND MRS. G. MOYSES

and their two children

George and Claude were arrivals
recently by B.W.1.A., from Vene-
zuela fora holiday, They expect
to be here until the end of the
month and are guests at the Ocean
View Hotel,

Dr, Moyses is a Dental Surgeon
in Caracas.



Mr. K. BROODHAGEN

To Study Art
R. KARL BROODHAGEN,

Art Master, Combermere
School, left the colony on Wed-
nesday on the S.S. De Grasse for
the United Kingdom where he
will attend the Goldsmith College
of Art, London, on a Britisa
Council scholarship. The Course
will last for about one year.

Mr. Broodhagen, a native of
British Guiana, arrived in Bar-
bados many years ago, and in ad-
dition to his pursuits as a Merchant
Tailor, showed great talent in
modelling.

His works have been exhibited
both locally and in other West In-
dian colonies, as well as in the
Town Hall, New Amsterdam.

Mr, Broodhagen has also con-
ducted classes in art at the Girls’
Industrial Union, and during the
past two years, hag been on the
staff of the Combermere School.

He has just completed the
modelling of a symbolic Cane Cut-
ter which will be used as a Re-
lief on the New Public Buildings
in Castries, St. Lucia.

To Join Wife

R. GRANT PILGRIM, former-

ly Mathematical and Spanish
Master at Queen’s Royal College,
Trinidad, left on Wednesday by
the SS, De Grasse for England
to join his wife and daughter who
had been residing there for
several years.

Mr, Pilgrim spent two years in
Barbados aasisting with the teach-
ing of Mathematics at the Lodge
School. His daughter, Mary-Nell
is at Reading University doing
Modern Studies.



Quiet Wedding
Oo” TUESDAY morning
Patrick’s Roman Catholic

Church, Mr, Cleophas Drakes, son} +, I

of Mrs, Lilian Drakes of Spooner’s
Hill and the late Mr. Norman|
Drakes, headteacher of St. Mary’s |
Boys’ School, was married to Miss}
Beryl Williams daughter of Mrs.
M. C. Jemmott of Brighton and
the late Mr. L. E. Williams.

The ceremony was conducted by
Rev. Fr, Parkinson, S.J.

The bride who wore a dress of
white nylon, was given in marriage
by her mother. The duties of
bestman were performed by
Rupert Lythcott.

The couple. afterwards left for
Oistin for a reception and their
honeymoon,

The bridegroom is an Assistant
Master at Combermere School and

his bride is a first year medical
student at the University College
of the West Indies in Jamaica.
For Two Years
RS. OVIDIO GARCIA R. of
Venezuela arrived in the

colony on Sunday last to join her
husband who has been here for
some time. Mrs, Garcia was accom-
panied by her daughter who will
become a pupil of the Ursuline
Convent and the family will be
remaining for two years. During
their stay here they will be in
residence at Super Mare Cottage,
Worthing.

Transferred
R. HUGH COXE, the B.W.1.A.
Branch Manager, Kingston,
has been transferred on promotion
to North America to take part in
an intensive Caribbean Sales drive
which B.W.LA., in’’ conjunction
with its parent Corporation
B.O.A.C,, is starting at the present
time, to increase tourist traffic dur-
ing winter to all islands in the
Caribbean,

R. W. W. LLOYD JONES
who is on secondment to
B.W.LA. from B.O.A.C., has been
appointed Acting Manager, Ja-
maica, pending the appointment
of a replacement for Mr. Coxe
and will assume this position with
effect from Wednesday.

For England

ISS PATSY FORD daughter

Mr. |

at St./,

}



|

BARBADOS



| Stop Pounding

Is Cure For
Typists’ Cramp

New ways of overcoming
‘typist’s cramp”—aching fingers
and wrists—have been reported

sondon businessmen,

A report on the problem, based
on researches in Sweden, has
been circulateqd among business
chiefs by the Swedish Chamber

of Commerce in London.

“Miss Smith,” the average typ-
ist, says this report, uses enough
pressure in one day to shift 1,20)
tons of coal. This is because shi
uses a pressure of 16 Ibs. on each
key as she taps 400 times a min-
ute.

“Standard typewriters re-
quire only about 14 ounces
pressure,” says the report. “The
average typist is therefore
using 20 times more energy
than necessary,

“Doctors confirm that there is

more typists’ cramp, caused by
unnecessary, straining of wrist
and arm,”

One remedy, according to. the
report, is to train girls on a
special typewriter which flashes
a warning red bght when more

pressure than necessary is used.

Experienced typists can be
given a course to develop a light-
er touch on the new machine, the
report adds. —L. E. 8.



Request Recipe

Lemon Pie

By HELEN BURKE.

Can you please give me a recipe
for Lemon Pie?

When eggs are plentiful, this
is a good recipe. The quantities
are enough for 5-6 people.

Rub 3-3} oz, margarine or but-
ter into 6 oz. plain flour, sifted
with a pinch of salt: Bind into a
pliable dough with an egg yolk
and a teaspoon of lemon juice,
beaten together. Fit into a 6%4-
7% flan ring on.a baking sheet
and prick the bottom. Fit grease-
proof paper inside and weigh it
down with crusts, Bake for 10
minutes at 459 degrees Fahr.,
then remove the crusts and paper
and bake for a further 10-15 min-
utes.

For the filling: Sift cup
plain flour, 3-4 oz. sugar and a
pinch of salt into a small pan and,
using a whisk, stir a cup of boil-

%

of Mr, and Mrs, William|img water into them. Stir over a
Ford of “Jalna”, St, Lawrence Gap low heat until the flour is
was a passenger by the 3s. thoroughly cooked. Add a tea-
De Grasse leaving for England on} Spoon of butter, Beat two egg
Wédnesday, Miss Ford will bé yolks with the grated rind and
remaining in England for an juice of a large lemon and work
indefinite period the sauce into them, a little at a
A time to prevent cooking the yolks

Son And Heir into stringy pieces. Fill the pastry

INGRATULATIONS to Mr.jshell with the mixture.

‘4 and Mrs, Gordon Stanford of
Black Rock on the birth of a son
and heir. The happy event took
place on Tuesday and mother and
babe are doing fine.



BY THE WAY .. . » sescucomser

N Amrica they have invented
a siren which I hope they will
eall Parthenope or Leucosia. It is
described as “Loud enough to
cause permanent injury to the
unprotected human ear.”
at could be fairer than that?
But the scientists appealing to a
cultured public point out that
the noise is equal to the sound of
2,000 symphony orchestras «< fuil
blast. Fit one to your radio set
on a Wagner night, says jolly
Jack Hopkins, with a light laugh,
Mole rescued from

aquarium roof
F you wanted to have a horse
pulled out of a chimney or an
ostrich rescued from the top of a
gasworks, what would you do?
Summon the fire brigade. Last
week firemen hauled a cow out
of a 30-foot well. Next week they
will be lassoing a giraffe on the
roof of St. Pancras Station, or
loosening a singing mouse’s head
from between the railings of a
borough surveyor’s office,
Nosebags for women
OW that women’s sun-glasses
are becoming more and more
like horses’ blinkers my impas-
sioned plea for nosebags for wo-
men is being more calmly con-
sidered. ll that is heeded is for
some fashion-house in Paris to
take up the idea, Then, when
the beautiés are wearing blink-
ers, sun-hats with slits for the
ears, and nosebags, some pioneer
among the mannequins will go
down on all fours and whinny.

ren two words from a Dior or a
Fa’ will be necessary: “It’s
smart.”

Business conversation
F our Post Office follows the
example of Vienna, where
children can dial a number and
hear a fairy-tale over the tele-
phone, I foresee some fun: “Hello?

Coupton and Hynes? I want to
speak to Mr, Hynes. That you,
Hynes?” “Princess Goldilocks

weeps when the old wizard says”
...+ “Who is that?” “Hynes here.’
“I will turn you into a pumpkin
unless you answer my riddle.”
“What the devil! Listen, Hynes.
It’s about that consignment of
scrap”... “Luckily the wily elf
Gobblegobble is able to whisper
the answer.” . . . “Hynes here.
Is that Ditchley? What on earth
are you talking about?” “The
answer is Twinkum Twankum
Twaddleum, said Goldilocks.” . ,
“Get off the line.” “It's Ditchley
here.” “Hynes here” . . . “And
now you can’t turn me into a hor-
tid pumpkin.”



-CLARKES CHILDS SHOES

WHITE & TAN 3s to-7%
TRU-FORM CHILD’S SHOES
WHITE BUCK & BLACK PATENT KID

Was it the moon ?
STRABISMUS (Whom God
Preserve) of Utretch, when
formed of the message in the
Morse code sent to the moon from

lowa, and received back intact,

asked why the message had to be
sent in code, as there was nothing
secret about it. “The message,”
says the report, “covers 480,000
miles in 2% seconds. Strabismus
calculates that a rocket construc-
ted on the prinfiple of radar
pulses could deliver the message
in person, but tat the 2% sec-
onds would not allow of any time
for exploration of the moon. He
adds that there is no proof that
the message ever reached the
moon, A man in an adjoining room
could have used a pulse-reflector
to deflect the pulses in such a way
that, to anybody watching the

moon these pulses would seem to the ambiguous headline:
bounce back from the moon’s sur- And Potato Prices Collapse.”

face, because of the curve in the
stratosphere. I realise that it is a
matter for the experts to settle.

Have you blown any
good glass lately ?

F ALL the glassblowers in the
world had been placed end

to end, how long would it have
taken them to blow the Crystal
Palace? I only ask because an
article on glassblowing says that
great patience is needed, and that
‘the secret is breath-control. I
remember an epitaph that runs; —
“Whose grave is this?” the passer-

ba Boosey ask, a

A glassblower’s, who hiccoughed
at his task, “

He burst while blowing a con-

servatory;
ane path of duty is- the way to

glory.
To be sung to the air of “Kate
of Kilculen.”

In Passing

EXT to kindness to animals—
(which means kindness to

the animals you like; try asking a
cat-lover to be kind to a mouse)
—next to kindness to animals as
a social virtue comes kindness to
women's complexions. I read of
a system of amber-tinted glass
panels on a ceiling, with a net-
‘work of flurescen tlighting be-
hind them, to “show. women at
their best” (sic). Now is the mo-
ment for some “expert” to repeat

+ that if a husband is ever allowed

to see his wife’s face in a natural
light disillusionment, despair, and
the break-up of the marriage are
bound to follow swiftly.

+ "SRY a Ae $5.07 &
Is to 10s ........... $6.32 &
BES OR 18 sc ivee's $7.04 &

TAN Lace All Sizes

T. R EVANS & WHITFIELDS

DIAL 4220



YOUR SHOE STORES



$4.76, $6.07, $7.14

Wisdom of the ages

Why should the camel care if
the straw which has broken its
back shows which way the wind
is blowing?

—Sayings of Shabash-ibn
Daoul of Bagdad

Bad company

PONDEROUS article advising

the young not to play cards
with strangers prompts me to add
my own word of warning. When
the dealer says sharply to you,
“That’s not the hand I dealt you,”
it is time to remember a previous
engagement,

Tail-piece

CORRESPONDENCE sends
me a delightful example of
“M.P.



More Marry In B.G.

(From Our Own Correspondent)

GEORGETOWN, July 30.
Marriage vows were taken by
223 couples during the first half
of this year—17 more than the

corresponding period last year.
The Registration Office during
the first three months of the year
issued 3,173 birth, death and mar-
riage certificates to the public as
against 2,862 over the January-
June period last year. This in-
crease was due principally to the
jarge number of birth certificates
issued for a@ntrance to schools
and colleges. There was a drop
however during the second quar-
ter of the year. j



FRIDAY, AUGUST 8, 1952

4.00—7.15 p.m. 19. 76M, 25.53M

4 p.m. The News, 4.10 p.m. The Daily
Service, 4.15 p.m, Ivor @Moreton and
Dave Kaye, 4.380 p.m. Twenty Questions
5 p.m, Cricket, 5.05 p.m. Interlude, 5.15
pm Variety Bandbox, 6.15 p.m
Merchant Navy Programme, 6.30 p.m.
Make Mine Country Style, 6.45 p.m
Sports Round-up and Programme Parade



7 p.m, The News, 7.10 p.m, Home
News from Britain i
TAF—10,90 Pome occ eee ee 25.563M, $1.32M

in emanencomesslaeesceibi
7.15 p.m. West Indian Diary, 7.45 p.m
A Tale of two Cities, 8.15 p.m. Radio
Newsreel, 8.30 p.m. World Affairs, 8.45
p.m. Interlude, 8.55 p.m. From the
Editorials, 9 p.m. Song of Vienna
_m, The News, 10.10 p.m, News
10.15 p.m. The Debate Continues,
From the Third Programme

wp
Talk,
10.20 p.m

$4.23, $4.84

5.37
6.80
7.92

53 & 71 cts.

Listening Hours
|






DIAL 4606

Whip the three egg whites very
stifly and fold three tablespoons
icing sugar into them. Pile on
top of the pie and return to the
oven to set and colour slightly.

World Copyright Reserved
L.E.S.







renowned appetite restorer.
Combined with blood-build-
ing minerals you have the
key to joyous buoyant.
b health,

OPENING TO-DAY.
5 and 8.30 p.m,
THE STORY OF THE CONVICT],
WHO INVENTED THE WORLD'S
GREATEST GUN IN PRISON.

REE mela
PM Mba iil: |
Datla ae ils meL 8)
Pairs ste) 1d
read in top
national
bis P alate

PATRI S

os
SU se
















































ADVOCATE

THE TUBBY HUBBY DIET

BERNARD WICKSTEED., patient target of a 12-day
slimming diet, reports on the battle for his waistline
—an ordeal soon to be shared by five readers.

THEY’VE SENT ME



TO THE

PICTURES



[ 2

Mosley.

my mind off
die t—works

Hubby

instead

films
of

HAVE been seeing the

this week
Leonard

The idea—to keep

the

Tubby
well

enough with tough Westerns
when you are too busy shoot-
ing bad men to bother about
iood. Chaps like Joel McCrea
never eat, so why should 1”
But it breaks down with high

society stuff.

The sight of

ail

the champagne and those cold
buffets they're so fond of mak.
me droo! in the dark.

One great advantage is that 1

can

now

escape

from

my

boisterous friends who think it
is funny to (a) pat me on the
waistline and ask how it's going

(b) offer a

home for

my dis-

carded suits, and (ec) endeavour
to ply me with liquor and tempt



Returns to Film

ENGLAND’S LOSS is Hollywood’s
guin as lovely film actress Eliza-
beth Taylor, who expects her first
child in January, primps for the
eameras following her return to
film-making in the movie capital.
This is the star's first picture
since her marriage last winter to

Michael Wilding. (International)



MY NINTH DAY
cCMenu

Breakfast

Half grapefruit (no sugar)
Serambled egg on toast
One extra slice of toast
seraping of butter
Coffee or tea (no sugar)

Lunch

Clear chicken broth
One minced chicken open
sandwich (on one slice)

Green salad
Apple or orange
Coffee (no sugar)

Dinner

Fresh asparagus or arti-
chokes (luxury Ist course)
OR
Lettuce salad with grated
apple and dessertspoon oi
raisins (utility Ist course)
Fillets of plaice or sole
baked with mushrooms
and tomatoes
Two smail new potatoes
Spinach or cauliflower
Black coffee (no sugar)



on ee cen Reeueseeresenesresssenmeerec veel





Po

me,_to break the [Tubby Aubby
oath Of ue serious drinking

Guess what else I've had to
put up with! A girl came up to
me yesterday and said she'd had
a most insulting proposal and it
was al) my fault

A fellow who Was tubby but
not a hubby asked her to marry
him just so he could join the
Tubby Hubby Club



Operator

Has Skunk
Problem

FORT WORTH, TEXAS,
Aug. 7.

Mrs. Betty Daly, telephone
operator, has a problem. She has
examined a batch of forty skunks
to separate the scentless from the
other variety, All were mixed up
when Mrs. Daly took them into
her home during a thunderstorm.
Besides that, Mrs. Daly has other
troubles. She came out of the
ordeal with a headache, her arm
bitten by a monkey, and her room
sprayed by an excited skunk. In
addition there were three missing
skunks somewhere in the home,
They were apparently hiding be-
hind something and were reluct-
ant to come out after their terri-
fying experience in the storm,

“The operation animal” by Mrs.
Daly included the rescue of 40
skunks, 3 foxes, a monkey, a ra-
coon, 4 rabbits, 15 dogs, and 12
cats. All were taken into her
home when the wind demolished
their cages. One skunk was
crushed to death when its cage
was blown away. When the storm
began Mrs, Daly started her res-
cue etforts. The animals scurried
to the far corners of their cages,
slapped and spit and showed
their teeth. Inside the Daly home
they became even more uncom-
fortable. After the storm the
kitten Mrs. Daly rescued from
the fox turned up missing. Mrs.
Daly has her suspicions. :

To-day she was busy examin-
ing the skunks. Outside before
the stohm they were separated in
pens. But inside the house the
scentless and non-scentless ani-
mals got mixed up,—U.P.



wh



|
)
)
\
}

°
e



wot e*

PURVEYORS OF THE BEST FILMS
PRESENT FROM - - -

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‘SAT. Special 9 30

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THE BIG TREES

— Patri







& Continuing Daily 4.45 &
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WYMA

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Preston FOSTER Wiliam

BISHOP &

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Charles
Midnite

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Paul CAMPBELL

ACRKC



BRIDGETOWN , BARBAREES — OISTIN
(Dial 2310) mites ea ahinie ad om eens
5 es -m. o-day =
TO-DAY 2.30—4.45 & Continuing Daily 4 45. and 8 Opin.
& 8.30 P.M LILLI MARLENE wee s Technicolor

PLUS:
Attractio:

“DESTINATION

Joyce

MacKenzie

lioy
“THE W

2 ¥
“OUTLAW BRAND” pacer’

Jimm
‘WEST O
Johnny



Lisa DANIELY &
Hugh McDERMOTT

Sat. Special 1.30 p.m
iN OLD AMARILLO















COLT 45
Randolph Scott
Zachary Scott

Special Added

m :

MURDER"
Stanley
Clements

Sat. Special 1.30 p.m.
THUNDER MOUNTAL
Tim Holt &

“LEGION OF THE
LAWLESS’
George O’Brien
Midnite Special Sat.
SILVER CITY



Rogers &
YOMING

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Rex Allen &
GUNMEN OF



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Sun. & Mon.

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PRINCE AND THE

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FRIDAY, AUGUST .8, 1952



aay ¥.V ae

as
Bi

*
lt

3

: : and YvyoU Pa

+

FRIDAY, AUGUST 8, 1952
Look in the section in which your birthday comes and
* find what your outlook is, according to the stars.
Building, naval, maritime personal, gen-
x March 21—April 20 eral business om the sponsored list. All
TAURUS

sound endeavours of new and modern type
can expect gains. Heart interest rate. *
’
April 21—May 20

Use your talents rightly and you will i
in a fine job. You handling equipment,
machinery, mining, steel workers in mostly
favoured position, * %

Day right for your talents, promote your
work. “Let the sparks fly”, show your stuff!
Things you like in high ‘favour. 5 * £

Helpful outlook for improving your statues,
formulating plans for better efforts. Avoid’
temperamental outbursts, personalities.

en

x GEMINI
May 21—June 21

CANCER
June 22—July 23

May not be too easy a period for you of *
artistic leaning, but your innings will come.
Aim high, feel you are someorfe on the

Don’t give up easily. Professional work,
right road and others will not fail to re

Many differences between success and fail-
ure are small. Knowing this, watch how
you handle all chores, details. Stress hon-
esty always.

LEO
July 24—Aug. 22

VIRGO
Ang. 23—Sept. 23

advertising field, have good outlook.
LIBRA
Sept. 24—Oct. 23
cognize your talents. Know what you are
about, but don’t take on more than you
can handle. +
SCORPIO
Oct. 24—Nov. 22

x *« * X22 BR

Promising if you do not risk profitable ven-
tures with chance schemes or flimsy pre-
parations. Stick to the reliable; listen to

sound advice. * xz

SAGITTARIUS On favourable side, but no easy going. You
* Nov. 23—Dec. 22 will have to knuckle down to work. Be
sure of your ground before acting. Keep
domestic affairs bright. +
4 CAPRICORN *

Your particular activities and personal in-
terests are surrounded with fine prospects.
P.M. especially good for intimate, family
matters.

Dec. 23— Jan. 21

*

AQUARIUS

Strong vibrations for and against certain *
Jan. 22 — Feb, 20

activities. Select best course, concentrate
on it until you have made progress. +

Generally on urfzrade for routine problems,
duties that need daily attention. Clear
your slate early that you may devote some
time to planning. Relax.

YOU BORN TODAY: A forceful personality, you are
broadminded enough to see your own faults. Capable of
achieving high goals if you don’t be over-assertive. You dis-
like anything underhanded, deals that are not honest or would

PISCES
Feb. 21—March 20

really harm others. Make excellent manager, banker, sales-
man, artist, public speaker, military person. Avoid love of
ease, questionable companions. Birthdate of: Sir Godfrey

Kneller, Eng. portrait painter; Geoffrey F. Morgan, noted lec-
turer,

« M&M MM

x
x
*
+
*
x

uM MX
AND NOW

. you can have

A GAS COOKER

like those you have admired in
the magazines.

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GAIETY

The Garden—St. James
inteeey & To-morrow 8.30 p.m.
‘obert
MYTCHUM THE RACKET
with Robert RYAN

Midnite Special Sat.
“OUTLAWS OF TEXAS”.
(Whip WILSON)
“TRAIL'’S END”
(johnny Mack BROWN)

Sun. & Mon. 8.30 Mat. Sun. 4.30 p.m
“VENDETTA” (Faith DOMERGUE)
“SPANISH MAIN’

(Paul HENREID

PLAZA-—s’tow‘n

(DIAL 2310) a
the towering excitement of











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8.30 p.m.








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John Twist Felix Feist

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ROODAL
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Opening To-day 2.30 & 8.30 and
continuing daily 44 &@ 8.30
WALT DISNEY'S
“FANTASIA”
In Blazing Technicolor
With Stokowski
Two Hours of Glotious Music,
Color and Imagination.

THEATRES



To-day last 2 shows 4.30
Fred ASTAIRE—Betty H

& 815
in r
“LET'S DANCE”
an
“I WALK ALONE”

Starring:
Burt LANCASTER—Lizabeth SCOTT
ee.



Opening To-madrrow 4.45 & 8.15
Louls HAYWARD—Patricia MEDINA

in
“THE LADY AND THE BANDIT”
———

To-morrow at 1.30 p.m.
“WEB OF DANGER”



and
“WHISPERING FOOTSTEPS”

Midnite To- Ni
Midnite To-morrow Night morrow Night
Madam O'Lindy & Her Troupe in WEED Dr caaOk ah

“CARACAS NIGHTS OF

OLYMPIC

To-day to Monday 4.30 & 8.15
NO ORCHID FOR MISS BLANDISH
Starring: J
Jack LARUE—Linden TRAVERS

an

1952"





ROYAL
To-day 4.30 only

WHOLE SERIAL . . .
“JUNGLE GIRL”



To-night at 830 p.m.
MADAM O’LINDY & HER TROUPE

in
“CARACAS NIGHTS OF
Prices:—Pit 36c. House
No Baleony ¢r Box
will be sold.

EYE WITNESS
Robert MONTGOMERY
Patricia WAYNE



To-morrow at 1.30 p.m.
“LIGHTS OF OLD SANTA FE" &
“ROLL ON TEXAS MOON" To-morrow & Sunday 6 & 8.15
PARAMOUNT Presents

Midnite To-morrdw Night Alan LADD—Lizabeth SCOTT

“UNDERCOVER WOMAN” in
“RED MOUNTAIN”



Mack Brown PAUPER

and
“TRAFFIC IN CRIME” Color by Technicolor







FRIDAY, AUGUST 8,



Stale Lobster
Pinches Nose

(From JOAN HARRISON)

PARIS, July
A Paris restaurant keeper was
orderéd by a Paris Court to pay
a £3 fine and £100 damages to
a diner who had a piece of his
nose pinched off by a too-alive
lobster.

The characters in the drama ap-
peared before three judges of a
correctional chamber of the cen-
tral Paris courts of justice. They
were the restaurant owner, his
lawyer, Maitre Charles Marcepoil,
and the diner, with a bandaged
nose, M. Magnieu. ‘

The lobster, which had been ac-
cused of not being “fresh enough”
was, alas, no more.

M. Magnieu explained to the
judges how a few weeks ago he
had a great hunger, and a great
desire for a fresh lobster. He
went to a restaurant specialising
in sea foods, The “patron” brought
up a basket with several squirm-
ing lobsters in i> for the guest to
take his choice. (It is the custom
at the better fish restaurants in
France for the diners to choose
their fish before it is cooked.)

“I was much taken aback by
the hosters’ very strong odour,”
M. Magnieu told the judges. “I
sniffed at them, but all I said to
the patron was “I don’t think
these lobsters are very fresh.”

The restaurant keeper was an-
noyed, and said so.

“Whereupon”, continued M.
Magnieu, “he slapped the basket
on the table, got hold of the larg-
est of the lobsters and waved it
under my nose, shouting “Not
fresh. My lobsters not fresh! Here,
smell it.”

The lobster, retaliating on be-
half of the patron, seized the end
of M. Magnieu’s nose in its pincers.
M. Magnieu continued his sad
story:

“It was impossible for me to
free my nose. I must admit that
the restaurant keeper did all he
could to try to remove the lob-
ster’s pincers.” But the nose gave
way before the lobster, which re-
tired with a small ‘piece of flesh.

The restaurant keeper inter-
rupted M, Magnieu’s recital to the
judges, to comment: “It really
was not my fault. The man
his nose in my lobster basket like
a policeman. Lobsters do not like
that.”

“And in any case,” struck in M.
Marcepoil, the defending lawyer,
“Monsieur Magnieu can always
get his revenge by making his
stomach a tomb for any quahtity
of lobsters, one every night if he
wishes—a most agreeable re-
venge!”

The judges were not amused,
and awarded £100 damages. This
is the price charged in Paris by
plastic surgeons who remodel the
too-long noses of film stars into
the ‘short, tip-tilted variety.



Councillors Want
Expenses Refunded

PORT-OF-SPAIN, July 18.

The City Fathers (members of
the Port-of-Spain City Council)
are making another bid to be paid
out-of-pocket expenses. From
time to time the council have
toyed ‘with the idea of paying
themselves out - of - pocket ex-
pensés, have’ made a strong case
for such expenses.

Earlier this year the Council
even inserted provision for meet-
ing such expenses in their 1952
estimates, but Government struck
it out when considering the estim-
ates on the grounds that the inser-
tion was “premature’’.

This week the Council's Finance
Committee recommended that a
delegation of the Council should
interview the Hon. A, R. W.
Robertson, the Financial Secretary,
and Sir John Imrie, Commissioner
of Local Government, on the
question of paying out-of-pocket
expenses to members of the Coun-
cil,

Apparently the new move is
being made by the Council because
the County Councils will soon be
paid out-of-pocket expenses,



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YOUR DEALERS

“Repeat after me: ‘I, Ahmed Fuad, son of Farouk, do solemnly swear, NO DICE, NO ROULETTE, NO LATE NIGHTS... /”

_ Australian
Taxes Reduced —

CANBERRA, Aug. 6.

Federal ‘lreasurer Sir Arthur
Faaaen presented his $2,111,7o8-
uuu budget to the House of Rep-
resentatives tor 1952-53 on
Wednesday, of which $40,000,0u0
is tor aetence.

Tne budget, which estimated a
Surplus of $1,002,uU0 slasned a
wide range of taxes and pro-
vides tor in¢reased pension,

Fadden said that pensions

wowd be increased by lis. 6d. per
week and tnat a ten per cent sur-
charge on the assessrgent of indi-
vidual income tax, would be abol-
ised, He also announced a réeduc-
tion of two shillings in the rate of
tax on the first $11,000 and tax-
able incomes of public companies
and the abolition of advance tax
payments by Companies,
Fadden announced the minimum
amount of profits which private
companies would be allowed to
reap from their distributable in-
come without incurring an undis-
tributed tax would be increased
from ten to 25 per cent,

The undistributed income tax
will be at a flat rate of 56 per.
cent instead of a graduated scale.

Fadden said that the “talk or
depression in Australia is dan-
gerous nonsense, With high export
prices the pool season, growing
population, and lower taxation,
conditions have never been fav-
ourable,”—U.P.



British Cruiser
Shelled

LONDON, August 5.

The British Admiralty said Bri-
tain’s biggest cruiser, the 11,500-
ton Belfast was struck by a shell
from a Communist shore battery
while patrolling off the west eoast
of Korea.

The report said “the ship was
straddled and in subsequent sal-
voes was hit by a shell which ex-
ploded in one of the mess decks.”

Four Chinese ratings were in-
jured one of whom later died.
The date of the engagement was
not disclosed.

The Admiralty said damage to
the ship was “unimportant” and
that the Belfast resumed patrol
after silencing the Communist
battery with her six-inch ne

Tt said nearly every Allied ship
had been under fire and several
had been hit in keeping the armed
patrol vigil off the west coast of
Korea, adding that the Belfast is
the eleventh hit in the past nine
months.—U.P.

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® Yoshida And :

Chang Confer

i TOKYO, Aug. 6.

The Japanese Prime Minister,
Shigeru Yoshida, said on Wednes-
day that it is a foregone conclu.
sion “that the United States-
Japan Security Agreement wii!
develop into a Pacific alliance.
Yoshida made his observation in
the course of an hour-long con.
ference with General CHang
Chun, special envoy of General-
issimo Chiang Kai Shek, who ar-
rived here on Sunday on a good-
will visit coincident with ratifica-
tion of the Japanese Peace Treaty.

Reports said that Yoshida anc
Chang had been together at the
Premier’s summer residence in
Hakone and then discussed mutual!
and international problems for
several hours. Chang observed
that the delegates working on the
Anzus Council in Honolulu regard
the rearmament of Japan as ne-
cessary to peace and security in
the Far East, and expressed the
hope that Japan would rearm as
quickly as possible in view of the
possibility of further Communist
aggression in this area. Yoshida
coneurred, but pointed out that
early rearmament would be diffi-
cult unless the Japanese people
themselves become conscious of
the necessity for such an action.
He recalled the criticism levelled
at him today for saying that the
National Police reserve is “the
cornerstone of the new it



U.S. Plane Shot

- is .
Down Over Siberia
TOKYO, Aug. 5.

United Nations sources in Tokyo
said tonight that a U.S, navy
observation plane with five men
aboard was shot down off the
Siberian coast on Saturday by a
Soviet Fighter plane. Navy head-
quarters here refused to confirm
or deny the report. It only said:
“We are leaving this to the Chief
of Navy Information in Washing~
ton, No announcement will be
made here.”

U.N. sources said that the
plane, of an undisclosed type, was
hit as it made its routine weather
flight. Far East air force head-
quarters denied that any of its
planes had been involved in such
an incident.

Tokyo sources also said one or

more Russian submarines had
been sighted close to Japanese
shores in the last week, The

navy would neither confirm nor

deny this.—C.P.



A NEW

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



——-————

New Drug Tried
On Convicts

LONDON
AMERICAN convicts have been
human guinea pigs for a new drag



developed by British scientists.
They allowed themselves to be
bitten by mosquitoes heavily in-
fected with malaria—on promise
that their sentences would be
reduced.

THE DRUG is DARAPRIM, a
synthetic chemical made by

American chemists;

THE JAIL was a State peniten-
tiary in Georgia;

THE RESULT:
given daraprim were all right;
but more than 20 who were not
dosed went down with malaria.

Brigadier John Boyd, director
of the Wellcome Laboratories of
Tropical Medicine, gave the report

The convicts

to a meeting of doctors at the
Mansion House in London last
night, He said the trials on the
convicts were carried out after

tests in London and Nigeria

Daraprim’s anti-malaria] action
was first demonstrated in London
by Dr. I, M. Rollo

—UP.



Chinese Atttack
Chinaman

‘From Our Own Cvrrespondent

KINGSTON, Aug. 5.

Captain William Rupert Chang
B.E.M. Jamaica born Chinese,
was attacked and beaten by a
gang of local Chinese Commun-
ists on Sunday night because he
condemned the atrocities under
the Communist regime in China,
Chang with his wife and three
children returned from Hong
Kong to this island last week and
gave the press an interview in
which he told of the brutal condi-
tions for which he blamed the
Communists. He attended a gar-
den party at the Chinese Public
School and while on the premises
ten Chinese on the side of Com-
munist sympathisers, surrounded
him and told him not to give
such reports against Communist
China in future as it would break
up their underground here. They
then beat him up. He was con-
veyed under police guird to the
hospital for treatment aid then
to his home,

The C.I.D. are now searching
for the assailants who are believed
to be locked in an underground
hideout,



L.E.S8.

Manley Suggests
Dose Of Courage
lor Timid Souls

Our Own Correspontent)

PORT-OF-SPAIN, August 1,

Jamaica's Peoples’ National
Part leader, Mr, Norman W,
Manley, @.C., stopped here for
an hour on his way back home

from Barbados where he attended
a conference of the Barbados
Labour Party.



ote

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Schooner Everdene, 68 tons, Capt
Chillips, from British GuiAna, Agent
Schooner Owners’ Association
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Schooner Marion Belle Wolfe, 74 tor
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Sehooner Gita M 40 tons, C
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ARRIVALS By BWHA
WEDNESDAY

from Trinidad

B. Hayle, S$. Thomas, M. Thomas,
iturbe, A. Tturbe, A. lturbe, 1 Tturt
G. Tturbe, J, Cowie, B. Cowie, W. Nurse

D, Speed, N. Pantin, T
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Western, (5S
Western, F

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L. Newbhard, M. Nembhard
DEPARTURES By BW.LA

WEDNESDAY

Por Trinidad;

A. Fletcher, W. Anthony, P. Baloc!
J Seott, H, Latie-Smith, A. Gome
1, Hansen, A. Hansen, H. Hansen, A
Hansen, A, Walters, G. Osgood, O

Osgood, C. Osgood, S, Osgood, A, Clarke
&, Rodriguez, L. Laveati, C. Vasquez

PASSENGERS By LADY RKODNEY
YE YY

A. M. Webb, Jean Webb, Julia Webb,
Doris Venner, Thomas Venner, Hermar
Coleridge, Violet Stoute Barbare
Annechisen, Jayee §. Yisu Dus, Bruce
Whyte, Doreen Millet, Charlies Miller
Violet Jutien, Basil Julien, Letia Joh:
on, Fitzgerald Johnson, Leslie Johnson





Rona Harding, Albert Evelyn, corny
Mr. Manley who is also leader Evelyn, Wing Commander L. A, Eggles
of the Opposition in the Jamaica ‘eld, Vera DeFreitas, Sybil Moll, Flearer
House of Representatives, spoke ®°>*™ bd
freely. of British West Indic RATES OF EXCHANGE
Federation, He said among other geiing NEW YORK uy tap
things that Jamaica was now tak- 72 710% pr. Cheques on
ing a more decisive stand on the _ Bankers i 1/10" pr
West indies Federation issue and Ca Penne 6 ”
that the Jamaica Labour Party 1% 7/10% pr. Cable ‘ ‘
had at long last been committed 7! 2/10% pr. Currency 69 6/10% pr
to action * Coupons 68 9/10% pr
é 1, ‘ pr Silver 20% pr
Of the Rance report he had this CANADA
to say: “I think we are all agreed 7? 8/10 % pr. ¢ negues, a
; ankers ir
that in many redpeets the Rance Demand Pfafts 17.86% pr
Report is unsatisfactory, particu- Sight Drafts 7 T/10% pr
le ‘ly . ics i 78 8/10 pr Cable
larly in the political constitution oF orion Sc, Capen 46 BOK pe
it has devised which we do not} Coupons 18 8/10% pr
feel to be any longer, if it ever!so. or Silver 20% pr
was, an adequate instrument tor | aaa
West Indian ambition, or for anty MAIL NOTICE
effective Federal Government,” Mails for Dominica, Antigua, Mont
an , ‘ ance! serrat. Nevis and St, Kitts by the M.V
After stating that the Rance} vrneka, will be clodéd at the General

Report would not provide as much
autonomy in federal affairs a
Jamaica hoped and intended to
have in local affairs before federa . |
tion took place, he took a “dig’’,
at Trinidad’s politicians, “I advo-|
cate,” he said, “a strong dose of;
courage for timid souls, of whom
there are not a few in Trinidad,’



Duellists Unhurt

wi
SANTIAGO, Chile, Aug. 6.

Senator Salvador Allende, left-
Wing Communist-supported can- |
didate for the September Presiden. |
tial election, fought a pistol duel)
Wednesday with radical Senator |
Paul Rettig. Both came out un-
hurt.

rhe
verbal

followed a
clash between the two
legislators on the floor of the!
Senate on Tuesday, Rettig hurled |
charges which Allende took as!
personally offensive to him. He'
replied in kind, and Rettig, feel-|
ing his honour involved, chai- |
lenged Allende to a duel. Both}
contestants and their seconds ar- |
rived at the outskirts of Santiago
t seven a.m. After standing back
o back, the duellists took 25 steps |
in opposite directions, turned}
rround, and fired, Both missed. |
They remained unreconciled.—U.P.

duel violent

HSI FOR
LASTING WEAR

2.30 p.m

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Pareel Mail at 12 noon, Registered
Mail at 2 p.m. and Ordinary Mall at
on Monday, llth August, 1062



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PAGE FOUR

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



eild- ADVOCAT

tawcaee ea ee Posed:
Printed by the Advocate Co., Lid., Bro~* 6t., Bridsetewn



























The tumult and the shouting
have subsided—-not died—and the
fire and smoke of the Presidential
pre-election campaign have died
down and once more American
life approaches an atmosphere of
normalcy. Two candidates have
been nominated. Dwight Eisen-
hower for the Republicans and
Adlai Stevenson for the Democrats
But the conventions at which they
were nominated were wonderful
events, and according to the
historians, the most colorful and
keenly contested for more than a
generation, more than
12,000,000 Americans, I attended
both conventions in Chicago,~ via
TV and for me they will always
remain wnforgettable stenes of
aear riots, actual fist cuffs and
ne delegate literally starting a
ire to attract the attention he
wanted, At least that was the
opinion of the experts—that a
newspaper was actually lit, and the
ensuing rushing about in a hall
with 1,200 people produced a
situation near to pandemonium,

But it all appeared to be good
fun — at least on the surface.
called each other harsh
lames and implied evil motives to-
actions and words, but in the end
hey promised to work together
for the good of the party, and the
suntry, I, for one, am listening to
near how well they have suc-
ceeded in this praiseworthy ideal,

* ”

Friday, August 8, 1952

ROAD SAFETY

DESPITE the initiative which the Police
and the Barbados Automsbile Association
have displayed towards the promotion of
Road Safety, drivers, pedestrians and road
squatters continue to disobey the law.

Speeding on the roads has not noticeably
diminished.

Long distance buses: lorries laden with
excursionists: motor-cyclists: tank lorries
and private cars and taxis can be observed
daily exceeding the legitimate 30 miles per
hour beyond which no Barbadian vehicle
should travel. Drivers of vehicles attend-
ing weddings and funerals seem to think
that the law exempts them from the speed
limit restrictions on these special occasions.

With rare exceptions, however, the Bar-
badian road does not lend itself to exces-
sive speeding and the breakers of speed
limits do not exceed over-much. Barbados
is in this respect fortunate but because
accidents are not responsible for the loss
of human lives to anything like the extent
which makes the road statistics of the
United Kingdom and the United States the
horrifying roll call of deaths they are, we
ought not to relax our efforts to keep death
off the road.





Of course, the West Indians
ould not be entirely omitted from
uch a world event as the nomina-
ion of an American President,
and the Caribbean had a look in
vhen the roll call for voting in
he Democratic convention was in
ull swing. The states are set out

Exceeding the speed limit even by a few |» alphabetical order Alabama,
iles an hour adds to the possibility of | ‘"i%ona, Arkansas, California,
miles onnecticut, Delaware, Florida,

accident and therefore of death.

The speed limit of 80 miles per hour was
not arbitrarily imposed by individuals who
did not know what they are doing. It was
chosen because it offers a reasonable factor
of safety in an island where the roads are
not designed for higher speeds.

Constant emphasis on road safety: the
example of drivers who resist the tempta-
tion to speed and continuous propaganda
by police, automobile association, press,
radio and schools will-assist to keep death
off Barbadian roads, so far as drivers of
vehicles are concerned.

But far greater attention needs to be
paid by pedestrians than is being paid at
present.

Some pedestrians drive in cars or buses
sufficiently often to appreciate the neces-
sity for keeping off roads when traffic is
heayy. But many school children and a
number of. the older generation of road
users do not appear yet to realise that
motor vehicles have the right to use roads
which are already occupied by pedestrians.
The remark “you can’t wait” which is still
frequently addressed to motorists who
have been forced to pull up because of the
presence of squatters near shops and street,
corners “aptly describes the resentment”
which is felt by the individual, who relies
on self-propulsion for transport, against
the driver of a mechanical vehicle. Only
education can change the attitude of such
individuals but it is very doubtful whether
such individuals come within the scope of
adult educational programmes.

For the schoolchildren the teacher an
the parent must accept responsibility. If
after repeated injunctions and warnings
schoolchildren continue to rush along
major highroads cavorting and hopping
and skipping in their youthful exuberance
they ought only to be released from school
under escort of parent, guardian or teacher.

Older schoolchildren who allow their
legs to protrude onto main highways or
who congregate in roads to discuss their
juvenile programimes of fun and pleasure
ought to be caned by their parents and-
constantly punished until they drop habits
which increase the. hazards which all driv-
ers of ‘vehicles run.

' The campaign to keep death off the roads
will never end and there can never be too
much co-operation) from the* public.

‘yeorgia and so on, As each name
; called the head of the delega-
on from that state answers thus:
The Chairman Alabama

Sentucky votes............
nany of the leaders seized the
spportunity to say something
bout his or her state. For instance,
ne roll call in the Republican
onvention the answer was: ‘Mr.
“‘hairman, Pennsylvania, the state
vyhich always respects law and
der votes.......... i
So here came the West Indies
then the De) atic roll call was
in. From the Rostrum came the
all: ‘The Virgin Islands’, From
he floor came the deep throated
eply: ‘Mr, Chairman, The Virgin
slands, the playground of the
Vest Indies vote!....... " I said
Thank you’ to the TV.

- * *

I was on the road to Hyde Park,
he home of the late Franklyn D.
‘oosevelt, now a National Historic
. te, when I heard that Dwight
tisenhower had won the Republi-
an nomination, on the first ballot
gainst the strongly favoured Bob
“eft. The radio in our car picked
‘p the news, and I was tickled be-
ause, I had backed Ike, I ‘had a
wumch he would win and I have
“nother hunch that he will win
gain in November. For 20 years
here has been no Republican
ycoupant of the White House and
feel that if the change in leader-
aip, for which so many Ameri-
ans are clamouring is to come
bout, the former head of the
'A.T.O., will be the man to do
. However, politics is a danger-

You go to Holy Island off the

Jorthumberland coast by taxi at
ow tide. It can be a stirring mari-
ime adventure.
*-The drivers come of hardy sea-
‘aring stock and do not always
other to wait until the tide is out
»eforesthey make the crossing.

lL did}the trip this week, and as.
he: taxi carried no lifeboats I was
olly glad I could swim.

Right from the start you feel
ike Alice in Wonderland because
ou book your passage through a
arber in Berwick. “Aye”, said
he ticket collector when I got off
he train, “the bfirber will fix you
ip with anything from a shampoo
o a ticket to Geneva.”

Taxi ticket

to Holy Island

SO I went to the Barber of Ber-
Wick and, in between shaving his
‘ustomers he charged me a guinea
ind gave me a return ticket for
yne taxi passage to Holy Island.

“All you've got to do,” he said,
‘is to take a bus to Beale and
‘hen ask for Charlie.”

There are about ten taxis in the
toly Island fleet, and they are
nearly all 1933-4 Fords. The
islanders scour the scrap-heaps of
-he country for them, because
shey are one of the few cars that
san go to sea, :

They have more clearance than
nodermh models and the ignition
system is high up in the bonnet.
3o long as you can keep the crabs
vit of the carburetter you ‘can
irive them through anything up
co a third of a fathom of sea
vater,

They only last about a year on
he run, Then the sand gets in
heir bearings and the salt rusts
the bodywork to nothing.

Charlie’s vehicle — or vessel-—
looked as if it wouldn’t run a
mile, but he said it was good for
many more .voyages yet. He
piled six of us Into it—four in
the back and two beside him on



SEAWEED FEED

A map has recently been made of sea-
weed beds. ro

Over 100 million. tons of seaweed are
known to exist in waters where detailed
surveys have been carried out.

e announcements have followed the
meeting in Edinburgh last month. of an
international seaweed symposium.

Alginie acid which is used in the manu-
facture of cosmetics, car polishes, adhe-
sives and textiles is one of the products
derived from. seaweed, but attention is
being paid to the possibility of incorpor-
ating seaweed meal in many types of
animal feed.

the “bridge.”
According to a recent issue of the Times ° H lted
of London, Mr. Hand of Reading described y peer:
to the symposium his feeding of seaweed us below. decks

THERE was no lock on one of
the doors, so, after he had squeez-
ed us in, he bolted us below decks
with a steel pin and then crank-
ed up.

The engine made the most un-
holy island row you ever heard.
Charlie said this was because the
silencers on this model are below
sea level, so you have to take
them off.

meal to laying hens. Barbados’ seaweed
might have no vitamin content and it
might be valueless as a source of alginic
acid of potash and manure. It might have
no other function than the unpleasant one
it now performs of interfering with bathers’
pleasure. But if it did contain vitamins of
benefit to:the animal foodstuff industry a
solution to many of our livestock problems
might be found. |
It may be wishful thinking to hope that
the factory at Lancaster should turn from
what must in this period of ground pro-
vision shortage be infrequent de-hydra-
tion of surplus yams and cassava to the
active crushing of seaweed meal but if the
varieties of seaweed to be found off Bar-
bados’ coasts should have commercial
possibilities then the connection between
the international seaweed symposium and
Barbados might be less remote than it
now seems.

The Reat of the Matter

To The Editor, The Advocate—
SIR,—The .article touching on
the important subject of Educa-
tion from the pen of J.E.B. desire
the thanks of those who have the
interest of the future generation
and in Education at heart. The
writer in advocating the necessity
for the setting up of a Commission
of enquiry to go into the subject

Now Wicksteed

The first 100 yards over the



By Harney Millar

ous subject about which to pro-
phesy and I am doing no more
than recording my impressions of
events as they appear to me at

the moment.

Shortly after hearing this radio
announcement I was standing in
the Roosevelt library before a
huge picture of the late President
F. D. R. and General of the Army,
Dwight D, Eisenhower, seated in
a car on one of the many journeys
that ended in the Allied Victory
in 1945. As I gazed at the two
men I wondered
destined to occupy the important
position in World Affairs hallowed
by the inspired work of the other.
Could Eisenhower aspire to the
heights reached by Roosevelt?
Then I remembered that they





BARNEY MILLAR

were ‘from different political
camps, Franklin was.a Democrat.
Ike is a Republican. I wondered—

And as if in answer tomy pro-
blem, my eye fell on a letter
among the many enshrined in the

Roosevelt library, It was from ex-
President Hoover, a Republican,
and was written to Roosevelt
when he assumed the high office
formerly held by Hoover, The
letter was one of congratulation
to a fine public servant and a
prayer that he would succeed. It
began this way: “The fact that I
am of a different political tribe,
doeg not prevent me.........,.. os
HERE WAS GREATNESS IN
MEN DIFFERING IN POLITICAL
OUTLOOK, BUT WORKING FOR
THE COMMON GOOD OF THE
COUNTRY. THIS WAS AS IT
SHOULD BE AND I FOR ONE
HOPE THAT THERE WILL BE
MUCH OF THIS SPIRIT
ABROAD IN THE DAYS THAT
LIE AHEAD. AMERICA IS
LEADING THE WORLD AT A
CRITICAL ‘PERIOD IN THE
HISTORY OF MANKIND, AND
ONLY BROAD VIEWS—VIEWS
THAT TAKE IN A MUCH
BROADER PICTURE THAN
ONLY AMERICA, WILL SUC-
CEED IN BRINGING SUCCESS
TO THE TASK.

Another giant figure in
American life today announced



There's holiday tnspiration
for you in this Marathon
without a passport . ; al

Wicksteed OF |
The Hritish

Isles...

DOUGLAS, Isle of Man,

I have invented an entire-
ly new kind of Marathon
race. I am going to see how
many of the British Isles I
can set foot on in a week
(writes Bernard Wicksteed).

So far as I know, nothing
of the kind has ever been
attempted before. The near-
est thing to it was when |
Queen Elizabeth the First set
out to see how many British
beds she could sleep in.

Altogether there are about
5,000 islands in the British
Isles, of which 177 are in-
habited.

Elizabeth had the advan-
tage there, because Britain
has more beds than islands.
But I have better travel
facilities,

I cannot think why this
island hopping record has
never been tried before.
People go to endless trouble
and expense to reach the
North Pole or climb Mount
Everest. Yet all the time
there is this simple and at-
tractive adventure waiting
to_be done at home,

You do not need passports
for it, dollars, grants from
| the Royal Geographical

Society, porters, camels, or
Eskimo dogs.



be i a

SS a



sands is all right then the road
ends abruptly beside a notice that
says: “Unsuitable for cars.”

At this state of the tide when
we made thé crossing the notice
seemed hardly necessary, because
there was nothing ahead but sea,
But Dauntless Charlie plunged in.

Deeper and deeper we went,
fill the sea was up to the bonnet
and we were sending out a bow
wave like a torpedo boat.

“LOok out!" shouted one of the
women in the back. “The water's
coming in the door.”

“That's all right,” said Charlie,
“you don’t have to worry till it
reaches the seat.”





OUR READERS SAY:

is in my humble opinion getting at
the real root and for that reason
I plump for his proposal.

During the discussion in the
Legislative Council on the increase
of salaries for Heads of Depart-
ments etc., it was suggested that
a commission of enquiry be set up
to go into the whole matter—
Councillors what are you doing?
and I though by this time some-

thing would have been done to

if one was~



G oes To Sea

we do in the wipter.”—L.E.S.
<-ntetentsiacetillh a sienahigeiamns nee Riaiiaiahieined detains

A Visitor Im New York FOR PRAMS MEAN

that he would be taking no part
in the Republican campaign for
the election of its candidate in
November. This was General of
the Army, Douglas MacArthur.
He was a prominent personality
in the pre-convention activities.
Besides Setiasing himself strongly
for Taft, from the depth of his
wide world knowledge he advised
America not to elect a military
man as President. He called no
names, but his g was clear,
This was interes’ because Mac
himself was nearly nominated, in
1948. And it was even more
interesting when his name was put
up along with Eisenhower’s, Taft's
and oth: @ at this, the

er ca
1952 convention, ©

He made a great key-note
speech at the convention, He
placed a great deal of emphasis
on these words: ‘I am a Republi-
can as was my father........ ‘It
was a thinly veiled hit at Ike,
who has been called a Democrat
turned Republican. It appears to
be true that Ike could ‘have been

to be a very strong point in favour
of his winning the election in
November, And now Mac says he
will not be active. He is on the
inactive Army list, but he will be
active as chairman of Remington
Rand Ine., makers of business
machines. I wonder to what ex-
tent the differtnce of opinion
between these two men will go.
They can do much for the land
they love and served so well in
the Army.

Only time can tell,

* * *

A visit to the Hyde Park ‘home
of the Roosevelt family is an in-
spiration. Here in the ancestral
surroundings in which the lad
Franklin was reared, it is easily
understandable why his _ ideals
were high, and ‘his thought lofty.
On one side it overlooks the
mighty Hudson, River and the
view from F.D.R.’s room is one of
majestic. grandeur. I saw it as the
setting sun tinted the calm water
with silver and gold and cast
purplish shadows amid the almost
tropic verdure which clothed. the
gentle slope from the lawn down
to 'the water's edge, Here Franklin.
sat and played and read and wrote
and grew up to the giant in
stature and mind who left an in-
delible mark onthe life of the
Western World.'He was born
thereon January 30, 1882. He was
buried there on April 15, 1945.

And these two dates are all
that adorn a solid white marble
stone which marks his
place in the Roge garden adjacent
to the ‘house. Franklyn chose it
himself, additional evidence of the
simplicity of the man,

Inside the House there is al]
the old world grandeur of decora-
tion which mingles harmoniously
with the more modern. setting of
the outside, The towering trees
cast. ample shade for those who
like to sit in the Park during the
heat of the day after or before a
visit to the Library which stands
apart,

But here on the whole, one

feels in time »with the late
President's, thoughts when he
wrote: —“ o limit ‘to our

realisation. of tomorrow will be
our doubts of today. Let us move
ee with strong and active
‘aith.

We reached
dry sand again

OVER on the starboard quar-
ter was another taxi, and together
we ploughed the sea in convoy,
for half a mile, till the water
shallowed out and we were on
reasonably dry sand again,

“Of course, you've got to know
what you are doing,” said Charlie
at the helm, “because there are
quicksands, too.”"\ I had been
thinking the same thing when I
saw the sands were littered with
the half-buried skeletons of rust-
ing cars, ;

I thought they were the remains
of taxis that had perished on the
journey, but Charlie said they
were put there in’the war td*stop
gliders landing.

About 230 people live on Holy.
Island and support themselves
by farming, fishing, and lookin,
after holidaymakers, For this la
industry they are happily placed,
because they have four pubs and
no policeman. ‘

Recently the police tried to find.

lodgings on the island for a con-|_

stable, but, oddly enough, though
they can accommodate 200 holi-
daymakers, no one had room for
one policeman,

More publicised, though less
noisy pilgrimages than those te
the pubs are made to the ruins
of Lindisfarne Priory. It was on
this island, in . AsD. S, —
Christianity was in! ced to the
North of Rigen ~ ph:

On.-the mainlamd: they. told ‘me
that on Holy Island you must
never say “pig.” You Tate
call it “the thing” or “the ‘
It was rather hard to confirm this
without using the word. So at
lunch-time, in one of the pubs, I
asked outright: “Is it true you
mayn’t say pig?”

hey laughed

FOR a moment they looked at
me like a man in a Bateman car-
toon, then everybody burst out
laughing. It was an old ‘fishing
superstition they said, but no one
bothered about it now.

Another fishing superstition
used to be that it was unlucky. to;
meet the vicar first thing in the
moras. If you could, not oe

e vicar you did not go

The first thing visitors eok wien
they get to Holy Island is “What
do you do in the winter?”’,T con-
fess I asked the same thing, and
the answer I got was: “We talk
about all the daftefolk who come
here in the summer and ask what

\

tackle this vexed question,

Are the powers that be, aware
that there is grave dissatisfaction
among the Elementary Teachers
over their condition of work and
parents over the education of their
children? And are they prepared
{o do something to rectify such?

Continue, J.E.B., your views are
respected and your voice heard,
even if not heeded,

L, B, BRATHWAITE.











FRIDAY, AUGUST 8, 1952
SSSSSSISSSSSOOSISSSSS9SSSGSOSS*

CANASTA PLAYING

CARDS. Complete with
Instructions at a cisceceeei dataset

$2.28 Set

PATIENCE PLAYING CARDS

ADVOCATE STATIONERY

CARS...

(From HENRY LOWRIE)

WASHINGTON.
LIMITLESS America? The latest official

survey estimates there will be a population
jump of 20,000,000 in the next ten years.

That means 173 million Americans by
1962.

These additional millions (people don’t die
as young as they did) will have to be fed,
clothed, educated, and allowed the usual
necessities and luxuries.

Take cars. There are 54,000,000 vehicles
on American roads, up from 32,000,000 only
ten years ago, Think of what’s going to hap-
pen when the arriving millions get their
new Cars !

«++ would be an excellent time to select
from these GARDEN TOOLS...
1%” Garden Hose
'” & %4” Garden Bib Cocks
Watering Pots

Border Forks
Hand Forks
Wheelbarrows
V.G.M. Manure

C. S. PITCHER & CO. Ph. 4472

Pruning Shears

Driving is a nightmare now and parking
seems an impossibility.

WHEN you read about America’s self-
made millionaires you get ihe impression
that they all started as newsboys.

The newsboy is one of the great symbols
of this country, so the Government is put-
ting out a new stamp in his honour.

It will show a boy delivering newspapers,
and at the edge will be a torch held in a hand
as a mark of free enterprise.

A BIG New York dress manufacturer, big
in every way—six feet tall and 16 stone—
told the judge his wife pelted him with ash-
trays and vases, beat him with her bandbag,
clubbed him with a bottle of whisky, kicked
him and advised him to drop dead.

But the judge refused a separation order,
saying: “Go away and live happily ever
after.”

THE 29 policemen sweating out their
written examination in Hamilton, Ohio, for
promotion to detective scented a trap when
an ‘attractive blonde walked into the room.

That’s why they didn’t give her a second
look. And were they chagrined when,
tucked away at the end of their exam paper,
they found the question : “Can you describe
the lady who entered this room and tell
what she did?” ,



BIRKMYRE

This is the Canvas that Bus Owners
have been waiting for — green
Birkmyre, 72” wide, for Bus Tops

_ and Sides,

The poser was put in to test the observa-
tion powers of the would-be detectives. Fail-
ure cost them 25 out of a total of 200 points.

THE little town of Ballston Spa in New
York (pop. 5,000) is losing its only cinema—
killed by TV and “drive-in” theatres dotted
around the surrounding countryside.

ABOUT the rise of the £ here the New
York Times says to-day : “There is a feeling
that the British Government remedies are
belatedly beginning to work.





“This heavyweight and tremendously
Strong Leatherette is made
especially for Seat-Covers.

ARLINGHIDE

It is sold in two qualities for
commercial and private use,
ensuring longwearing Bus and Car
Seats.

THE Republican Convention is turning
Americans into a nation of button wearers.

They don’t all spell out Ike or Taft either,
for all sorts of firms are pushing new slo-
gans on buttons which they distribute by the
hundred thousand. .

" Slogans like “Vote for Chlorophyll Green”
and “So-and-so is everybody’s pal.”

ONE way of cutting down race prejudice
in New York: the army ferry that plies be-
tween Manhattan and Governor’s Island is
renamed Sergeant Cornelius H. Charlton.

Sergeant Charlton was a Bronx Negro G.I.,
killed in Korea and awarded the Medal of
Honour, America’s V.C.



THE songs in that Broadway and West
End hit, “Kiss Me, Kate,” are not good
enough for Hollywood producer Dore
Schary.

For his Technicolor version he is after
Cole Porter, who did the original songs, to
write some new ones... .

Clifton Webb will star in the film of the
Titanic sinking, to be named “Nearer My
God to Thee”.

—LIONIDE

And Lionide Leatherette is for the
householder — ideal for Prams, Tables
and Chairs — in fact, General
Upholstery.

Da Costa & Co., Ltd.



Double-dealer Turns Up
In A ‘Modern St. Luke’

A 68-year-old Methodist minister has spent
20 years on a new translation—from the
Greek—of the New Testament.

It is written in what is called simple
English. Few “thees” and “thous.” No long
sentences.

And, says the translator, the Rev. Charles









| i
R THE VITAMIN VALUES
Kingsley Williams: “For the sake of simplic- FO! s
ity I have sacrificed complete accuracy.” CHILDREN oo
Example: In the Authorised Version of the thats 'o bide Turkeys
Bible, St. Luke, chapter 6, verse 42 reads:— Carr's Sweet. Biscuits ar ea
Thou hypocrite, cast out first the beam out eee | Liver
of thine own eye, and then shalt thou see Apricot Jam | a, Haddock
clearly to pull out the mote that is in thy Sacer fio Smoked Kippers
», a
brother's eye. ‘ aE east g eegas | 54 R Bread
te:
FIRST TAKE THE LOG FOR THE faa
In Mr, Williams's version* this becomes:— RACES For Everybody
You double-dealer, first take the log out of 3
oe eye, and be a see clearly J & R Sandwich Bread ‘“‘GOLD BRAID
to take the dust out of your brother’s eye. Mea es \
Cowal 1p 10emoden, bor ae ie: me Pinion anes
Co : “It is 195 odern, but not slick, Almonds
alias cleved” ie Cashew Nuts eee wre gS
The new translation has been sent to all] Es PHONE —
bishops of the Churches of England and Ire- FRESH | WE DELIVER
Jand. There is no likelihood of its being
accepted as the Authorised Version. _ VEGETABLES. GODDARDS
For a committee of scholars of all denom- i

inations is already at work on one. They
started two years ago, and expect to finish
around 1960.

*Published today by the Society for Pro-

moting Christian Knowledge, Longmans,
8s. 6d.—L.E.S. \





FRIDAY, AUGUST 8, 1453

Speightstown. Round-Up:



Lord Willoughby Pays In B.G’s Half
Visit To Speightstown

The new Government water boat.“Lord Willoughby”

$1244mJump Cigarette
Smugglers
Year Exports Tracked Down

GEORGETOWN, July 31.
Customs officials here claim they

(From Our Own Correspondent)
_ GEORGETOWN, July 30.
British Guiana’s export trade

made her first visit to Speightstown yesterday morning to for the first six months of 1952 have evidence to show that 75

supply water to the Harrison Liner s.s. “Forester” which is

loading sugar there,

She was not accompanied by
(the barge. A shipping clerk told
the Advocate that it was the first
time a water boat went to
Speightstown to deliver water.

The Forester arrived ai
Speightstown over the last week-
end and sailed yesterday evening.
She took over 3,000 tons of sugar
for the U.K. ;

Last Load Of Sugar

Only one more ship is expected
to call at Speightstown this year
to load sugar. The date of its
arrival is not fixed, All the sugar
now stored at Speightstown and
Sixmen’s is expected to be ship-
ped out by that opportunity.

Canes Withering

Young cane crops in the Lee-
ward parishes are beginning to
show the effects of days of steady
sunshine.

The canes are gradually losing
their green appearance to look a
bit withered. Vegetable crops too
are showing the lack of rain.

Planters are hoping for show-
ers early this month.



WATERPOLQ

Swordfish Defeats
H.C. In Knock-out
Competition

Swordfish defeated Harrison
College 7—2 in the semi-final of
the Division “A” Knock Out
Water Polo Competition at the
Aquatic Club, Wednesday night.
- For Swordfish, Best scored three,
Nestor Portillo two, and Herbert
Portillo and Geoffrey Foster one
each. A. Taylor and C. Evelyn
scored for College.

Swordfish will meet Snappers
in the final on the 16th,

Swordfish did not play the same
team they played in the Challenge
Cup Competition as Dick Reece
is no longer available, His place
in the back line was taken by
Maurice FitzGerald who played a
fair game, but was not as out-
standing as Reece has been. The
other back, Gerard Jordan, was
the mainstay in keeping a per-
fect defence for Swordfish. He
‘was swift and troublesome always,
and greatly assisted his forwards
in getting opportunities to score.

The other. Swordfish players
all pulled their weight and the
team were always on the offen-
sive,

At the end of the first half the
game was 2—l1 in favour of
Swordfish, but the fact that they
scored five in the second half
as against two in the first was
more an indication that Sword-
fish got more into their stride
then, than that College had them
tied down in the first.

College actually combined bet-
ter in the second half than in the
first. Then, players often threw
the ball wide .of their team fel-
lows in making passes,

In the second half, Swordfish's
superiority over College was
clearly seen when College were
hard put to keep down Sword-
fish’s scoring,

Best who scored three was in
fine form, but if he had judged
his placing better and not send
‘the ball so high, he would have
scored more.

College’s second goal came after
Swordfish had already scored
their seven, and at a period when
Swordfish were playing one short
—Herbert Portillo having been
sent out of the water.

The teams were: Swordfish—
Albert Weatherhead, Gerard Jor-
dan, M, Foster, G. Foster, H. Por-
tillo, N. Portillo, and Best.

Coliege—Geoffrey Jordan, ©.
Evelyn, A. Taylor, R. Felman, A.
R. Armstrong, S, Grannum and
Chabral.



« 9

12 L.D’s
There were 12 notifications of
Infectious Diseases for the month

of July: Enteric Fever 5, Leprosy
1, Tuberculosis 6.





NYLON
SHEERS

in Plains, Stripes and
Florals.



The Finest

HARRIS ONS - « =

A wide Range





BUTCHER
LINEN —

with beautifully embroid-
ered blouses, in Grey

and Turquoise,





————







totalled $38,727,173 in value. It per cent of American cigarettes
climbed exactly $12,516,407 above used in the Colony comes through
ea ak oe the corresponding a smugg.ing spiral which nets
There has, however, aie’ this the masterminds between $500 and
first yx months of this year an
adverse trade balance of $4,726,-
712, This unfavourable external
trade position is to be watched
since es odds in the ratio of in-
crease ween exports se
ports lie with the ri im- against the racketeers and by sun
The ratio of increase in the @0wn 6,000 American cigarettes
; value of imports on the 1951 figure Were seized from a ship in port,
To-morrow a Trinidad Table shows 49.1 per cent. while that of 822d the Comptroller collected
Tennis team will arrive in the exports works out at 47.7 $935.37 in fines from 18 seamen
island to take part in a series of ceny Imports climbéd by $14,333,- of the ship. Fines were imposed
“et so eee. — og ween, te figures for the first oy the Comptroller.
goodwill visit will not only spon- six months of 1951 to.
sor better relationship between for the first six moetne ot ieee mort nibirelten Cees
players of the two islands but will year. * made a quick check-up and found
go a long way in disclosing what The Colony’s external trade for the 6,000 undeclared ™
Barkados has to offer at the next the first half of 1952 hit $82,181,- In . the, past tes. ‘
Caribbean Table Tennis Cham- 058 in value, and this is probably cases were brought before we city
pionships. a record for all time for a If: ‘ ;
The team, which is from the year of external trade to which eae and fines of $500 or six
San Fernando Zone of the Trini- the contributing factors, from the it $s were imposed. ;
dad and Tobago Amateur Table point of view of exports, are both nvestigations. provided the
Tennis Association, is the first to increased production and en- ©MPtrol.er of Customs with evi-
tour the island since 1949 when hanced prices, It is indeed, some- “ence that large quantities of
‘an All Trinidad side completely what exalting to look back to 1938 Cigarettes are let down the side
outplayed the Barbadians. to see what was the position in Of ships to ‘bomb-boats’ at the
Two players from the San Fer- that last normal year before the wate of one ‘biggie’ (a large bottle
nando Zone were on the ’49 team. great war’s outbreak, and to. com- Of Demerara rum) per carton.
They, were Errol Alleyme and pare it with today. British Gui- These boats bring the supplies
Carl Williams. They were certain- ana’s external trade in 1938 was ashore to certain points; and in
ties for the present team but un- valued only $23,739,036—not equal a whisper it all disappears in cer-
fortunately Alleyne is unable to even to the value of exports for tain channels,
make the trip due to his studies. the first six months of 1952. How Machinery fo
ay ; A y for constant watch
However, Williams will be here much more dwarfed is the posi- on every boat will be costly, de-
again.” tion in 1938 when compared with clared the Comptroller. as the
The following is a Who's Who the actual $82,181,058 in external Department lgunbhed “2 ects
of the San Fernando Zone team: trade for the first six months of weapon” against th - re
Dr. Noble Sarkar: Skipper of this year? And this figure is these cases are ree freee ant
the team. Held the championship $26,850,555 above what it was for a are first fruits of the
of the county of Yorkshire, Eng-, the comparative period of 1951, en 4 er, .
land, for three years while study- Increases Under the laws of British Gui-
ing medicine. Represented Trini- There has been increases in 908 @ny person convicted of hav-
dad at the World Games in 1948. volume or value in many of the a ig uncugtemed goods must pay a
A defensive backhand player items exported, principally sugar, ®"¢ @mounting to three times the
with an occasional attacking bauxite, rice,’ molasses, green- Value of the goods or $500 which-
stroke. An easy style but very heart, spirituous toilet ‘prepara- Ver is the higher, in default serve
difficult to defeat. Can be com- tions, balata, fish glue, wine, char- S!X months’ imprisonment with
pared with Ronnie Inniss who coal, matches, and plantains. Al- hard labour. The Ordinance allows
visited Barbados with the Trini- though there was a dé¢line in the’ the Magistrate no option of a re-
dad team in 1949. amount of rum exported—768,121 duced penalty, It is obligatory that
Carl Williams: Present South proof gallons of overproof rum, ‘the sentence must be imposed, ~
Trinidad Champion. A member of and 8,273 proof gallons of under- No licences are issued for the
the team which visited Barbaddés proof rum, together fetched importation of American cigar-
in 1949, Has greatly improved in $1,324,640. ettes and only a small quantity js
his attack since then and is now Imports statistics show indus- «jegy and pllawek 10) “tins
a more complete player. trial machinery and other goods of principally from pass a
Fenwick Debysingh: Former a more or less capital nature to ing, or-ship’ pa nes arriv-
South Trinidad Champion and have been heavy, These included 9.0" jj P's crews coming ashore
present runner-up. Played for machinery for agricultural pur- eir personal use.
Trinidad in 1948 against British poses for the sugar industry for



T’dad Team
Arrives Here

Tomorrow

Colony’s revenue of hundreds of

dollars. And most of it takes place

in Georgetown.
Customs officials



Guiana. A backhand player pus hain as well - —. ws, wt
with an attacking style somewhat trucks, vans and other ‘motor S, i ‘ Ss
similar to Laurie Bates, one of the vehicles. ; L nirver ins
members of the Trinidad team in Of. the total import trade of
1949. $43,453,885 the United Kingdom’s 9 e > }

Arnold Mendes: Most prolific share was $17,287,112 or 39.78 per Lic e
smasher in South Trinidad at ot of the ae Bue eit va

resent. Can be dubbed the Ralph ish Guiana sold to Britain ,461,-
ae of the team. With Wile 830 worth of local produce, or ieee August 7,
liams and Debysingh, represented 37.49 per cent of her total exports g rbadian wheelsman John
South Trinidad in the Exhibitions for the six-month period of the kinner won the nine mile eycle
games against the United States year. b+ ed asthe two-day August
Champion of 1951, Dick Miles. While Canada bought $16,108,- Olypmiad of the British’ Guiang.

587 worth of British Guiana goods Amateur Cycle and Athietie

Andrew Moolchan: A sound at- (41.59 per cent of total exports), Union closed after sunset today
tacking player though not as pen- she was allowed to sell us only cn the Georgetown Cricket :Club’s
etrative as Mendes, Possesses @ $5,912,869 of her goods—13.6 per grounds, Bourda today. Fearing
“body slam” that is always a cent of British Guiana’s total im- spills as a result of the large
point winner. Showed very good ports, Strangely enough the Unit- number of contestants, all three
form in the trials and defeated ed States had a better share of Venezuelans stood out and 35
Taffy Cridhlow, the present our purchases during the period competitors took the field, The
Champion of Trinidad in a North under ‘review than had Canada, pace went well until the bell
vs. South match held recently. these amounting to $7,221,791, or sprint when there le e

Kelvin Assing: An orthodox 16.6 per cent, of total imports. (70, bout ti if nae a spill in
south paw player. Can attack or British Guiana on the other hand jp 00" p. + hy the field, among
defena with equal effectiveness. sold to ihe United States only pen ae Gordon the local
The only southerner with a vic- $2,523.652 of local products, or 6.51 © a Beene were brought dewn,
tory against Ronnie Inniss in per cent of total exports. and Skinner went .on to win, with
form. Identical style of Errol Al- ———_—_——_ Walter Liddell (B.G.). second and
leyne. a L. A. ROBISON (B.G.) third. The

Guy Yawehing: The baby of 677 Candidates lap prize went to B.G. wheelsman
the team. Another penetrative ea Cc. P. Holder! The time was 40
forearm smasher, very effective For Exhibitions To minutes 40.2 seconds. Ken
when in form. Won his place on ~*- ’ ’ Farnum’s (Barbados) record of

the team with some amazing dis- : 39 minutes 7 seconds stands.

plays against more considered Secondary Schools ; :

players, ‘ Beatrice Clarke ot ‘frinidad and
Mr. Leon Leacock, a college Six hundred and seventy-seven Joyce Marshall of Barbados got

master, is the Manager of the children are at present taking first and second places respective-
team. He will be accompanied by examinations for Government ly in the quarter mile and two
Mr. W. Wilson, a member of the and Vestry Exhibitions tenable at mile ladies cycle events, Ina



Committee of Management of the Government-aided Secondary Landvreught of Surinam was
San Fernando Zone, ’ Schools. The examinations are third in the former and Truss
—T. T. C. being held at Combermere. Mak of Surinam third in the
~ Five hundred ae oa jo gh one time of the quarter
7 ef ° e boys are taking the five Govern- mile was 38.3 seconds and of
Accident Victim ment Exhibitions and ae two os two thlle six minutes." ies
7 Michael’s Vestry Exhibitions. Walter Liddell won the special
Kept In Hospital this number, 172 are taking the three miler with Franco Cancloni
Second Grade, 99 the St. Michael’s (Venezuela) secong and Lindsay
Five-year-old Yvonette Layne Senior Vestry; 81, the St. Mich- Gordon third,
of Boarded Hall Tenantry, St. ael’s Junior Vestry; 81 the Junior The time was 7 minutes 43.3
George,, was taken to the General First Grade; 79, the Senior First seconds, the track record being
Hospital on Tuesday evening and Grade; $5, the Primary First lowered by 13.3 seconds,
detained. Grade, and 14 the Renewal exam. Caccioni took the :two miles
She was involved in an acci- ination. i : International, with Liddell second
dent with motor cycle S.—245 There are 116 girls taking and Walter Mongul of British
‘owned and ridden by John Out- three examinations; 39 are taking Guiana third. The time was 5
ram of Lancaster, St. James, the Primary First Grade; 42 the minutes, 7 seconds, Gordon did
along Boardeq Hall Road at about Junior First Grade and 35 the not compete. .
3.55 p.m. the same evening, Senior First Grade, Lindsay Gordon won the three



WAFFLE
PIQUE

in Marina, Maize Emerald
and Blue.



/ "I



Ladies’ Dresses





to choose from





‘COTTON
PRINTS

in several styles including
2 pe. Separates, Baller-
inas, as well as off-the- |
shoulder blouses with {
photo print skirts. !

a es

e |



$1,000 per month and robs the! the Party will urge also, it is stated, increased facilities for

yesterday"
opened an organised campaign Party statement continues, “will be

miles International Championship



cSt

G
ns! |f



BARBADOS ADVOCATE



More Financial Help
Propased For Colonies

The

lack of adequate

LONDON.
investment in the under-

developed territories inspires a Labour Party proposal

for an extensicn of financial

assistance under the Colonial

Devolepment and Welfare Acts.

The Party’s second policy

publication since the General

Election entitled “Towards World Plenty”, issued this week
makes the proposal without going into details.

While pressing for the

C.D. and W. funds extension,

the training of craftsmen and technicians in Britain in co-
operation with Colonial Governments.

“Further assistance,” the Labour

given to the expression of techni-
cal education within the colonial
territories, and every ‘possible
effort will be made to secure for
the colonies the technical experts
they require for more rapid econo-
mic development,”

While Commonwealth countries
must be the first concern of the
British Government, the Labour
Party, it is stated, recognises the
need for international action in
this field of aid to the under-
developed areas. It offers support
for some such international effort
as the International Development
Agency, under consideration by
the United Nations as a means of
administering grants-in-aid to un-
der-developed countries for in-
vestment in public services. This
Agency, experts have forecast,
would require a fund increasing
up to 3,000 million dollars a year.

The part under-developed coun-
tries themselves should play is
summarised as follows in “To-
wards World Plenty”.

“Much of the initiative, a great
art of the work, and a share of
he financial burden must come
from the under-developed cous.
tries themselves. Their govern-

ments face tremendous tasks.

Must Win Confidence

“They must provide honest, effi-
cient and energetic administrations
which will win the confidence of
their peoples and overcome the
apathy which everywhere hinders
development. There must be will-
ingness to accept new ideas, to
adopt new techniques and to enter
into a vital partnership with the
advanced countries in an all-out
attack on poverty,” ‘

Population v. Production

“Towards World Plenty” begins
with a review of the threat “in the
present century” of a world star-
vation crisis. Food production is
not increasing as rapidly as world
population, and “the extreme pov-
erty of the peoples of Africa and
Asfa and the other under-develop-
ed areas is a challenge to the whole
world.” Development of the under-
developed areas is essential, it is
stated, if food supplies are to meet |
the needs of the world’s growing
population,

The authors of the publication
answer those who declare it is}
fruitless to raise the standard of !
living in under-developed areas!
because any increase in produc-}
tion will at once lead to a cor-
responding increase in popula-
\tion.





Disproved

“The experience of the de-
veloped regions of the world does
not bear this out,”’ says the Labour

fublication. “The Western world
had disproved the Malthusian pro-
position that it is impossible to in-

crease, production faster than
population. Populations grew
rapidly in Europe and in the

Americas in the Mineteenth Cen-



Georgetown Names
5 For Coronation
Commiittee

(From Our Own Correspondent)

GEORGETOWN, July 30.
The Georgetown Town Council
on Monday appointed a five-man
Committee headed by the Mayor
Mr. R. B. Gajraj, to decide. what
form the celebration of Her Maj-
esty’s Coronation should take in
the City next rn and what pro-
vision should be made in the 1953
Estimates to meet the cost. Other
members of the Committee are
Hon, Lionel Luckhoo (Deputy
Mayor), Councillors Percy C,
Wight, O.B.E., G. F. de Sebastiani
and E. W, Adams. The Mayor’s
Committee will collaborate with
the Central Government who is
also appointing a committee for



the arrangements in the colony
generally.
event by four lengths with N.

Mongul behind and Caccioni third
The time was 7 minutes 54.4
seconds,—(CP)

Fine Fashionable

$s DRESS GOODS

MANY

eee, vee

SAMBA



FLOWERED &
to $1.50 per

&

10, 11, 12, 13, Brond St.
9BDO0O9F4OO): |

LINES

BLACK & WHITE PIG SKIN..,.$1.10 per yd.
PLAIN SEA ISLAND COTTON for Shirts

in White, Cream and Blue....$2.30 per yd.
7 -_-~ wn? oR ie FO
SILMYRA CREPE DE CHENE, in Acra,

Brown, Pink, Rose and Green reduced

from $1.28 to $1.02"
SPUNS in 8
reduced from $1.59 to $1.20 per Go
{{FLOWERED FERGUSONS suitable’ for
i Children’s Dresses at $1.84 & $2.04 r yd.



CAVE SHEPHERD



tury, but pivuuction grew very
much faster, and the standard of
living rose substeutially.”

Dealing with further arguments
—that population can grow faster
in the 20th Century than it could
in the 19th and that production
éannot be increased as fast—the
publication goes on to point out
that-——

“Contrary to popular belief, the
white and coloured populations of
the world are at present increas-
ing at about the same rate, which
is not as rapid as that at which
the white population was increas-
ing 40 years ago.”

Question

Posing the question, whether the
standard of living can be main-
tained, or acreased, by an in-
crease of two per cent. or more in
world production during the next
20 or 30 years, it is stated that
“with no new continents to be
opened up, we have to rely upon
increasing the productivity of
lands already under cultivation.”

As to how much new land can
be brought under cultivation, it is
admitted that one of the major
obstacies “is political: the hostil-
ity to human migration.” In the
19th Century, it is recalled, the
opening up of new lands was as-,
sociated with great movements of
people out of Europe, India and
China.

“There still remain under-
populated lands in Australia, in
the islands of South East Asia and
in Africa,” the Labour statement
goes on, “but it is unlikely that
these will be settled by migration
from other countries.”

One way out of the problem
would be improved techniques of
the millions of small farmers, says.
Labour. “If the farmers of Asia
and Africa,” it is urged
helped to improve their tech-
niques, food production can be in-
creased rapidly, and in fact more
rapidly than population will
grow.”



SPECIAL
DISCOUNT



on all

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We Ta
& CO. LTD.

20 BROAD ST., and at
MARINE GARDENS







HURRICANE
PRECAUTION
HINT No. 2.

WARNINGS







After a Hurricane —
Do not touch loose or
dangling electric wires.
Report the damage to
the Police or the Com-

any.
_" 3.8.52—3n,



REDUCED

Different Designs

aA ond

PLAIN TOOLINA reduced
yd.

Co., Ltd.



“could be,















PAGE FIVE

Goodwill Missior
Visiting B.G.

(From Gur Own Correspondent:



Rain Fell In Spots
About St. Janies

Rain fell. in spots about St
James yesterday. About 1.55 p.m GEORGETOWN, July 30.
a gang of masons were erecting a 4 seven-man mission of econ-
wall near St. James Rectory (Mists, agriculturalists and legis-
when one of them noticed that !@tors from Surinam (Dutch Gui-
rain was falling 20 yards to the 8) arrived here’ on Sunda:
south of them. The others joined #fternoon to discuss agricultural,
him and watched the water run- conemic and industrial ~ prob-
ning im the gutters on each side psi The visit is of a goodwill
of the road while the sun shone "* 5
teightly where they were stand- , ernie 5 eee are Mr.
ng. Cyclists who passed told “: Ch. _Curiel, nister of pert
them that they had seen the same OMES, = econ Jenees of Fin-
thing happen further north along Myr tq Sehutz, a | of the mission,
Highway No. 1. ir. H. utz, acting Head of the
Agricultural Extension Service,
and Messrs K. Kanhai, J. S. Muri=
a, T. Soemita, R. V. W. C

agi) ts gr
Police Get Four *slius and ©. F. Pierau, members
Reports Of Theft

4
Mr. Curiel on his arrival
Georgetown said that British Gui-

Four thefts were recorded on ana is a little ahead of Dutch Gui-
the Police Reports yesterday Mil- 20a, and some of their problems
dred Aswat of Mahogany Lane, have already been solved hi
City, reported that a valise val- By informal discussions, bo
ued $4.50 and containing clothing cunery could learn from each
to value of $70.23, s stolen . '
con her an on Pyasiiay: He disclosed that this visit is
C.othing and valise are the prov- the first of a series to their South
erty of Salah Aswat. American neighbours as planned

by the Surinam Legislature sore

Lottie Holder of Bay Land, time ago. Surinam, he said, hopes
Chelsea Road, reparted that a to start on a 10-year development
cheep was stolen from the Gar- plan featuring agriculture, indus-
1ison Savannah between 6 a.m. try and economics, and it is estim-
and 7.00 p.m. on Tuesday. It was, ated they would require about 100
lier property, — million guilders to start. Surinam,

Fifty-five holes of sweet pota-| he added, hopes to get help.
toes were stolen from the lands
of Bannatyne Plantation, Christ
Church, during Tuesday. The in-
cide was reported by Mr. J.
Marsh of the same plantation.

B. Blackman of Airy Hill, St.
George, reported that a goat was
stolen from an open pen at his
vesidence between 1,00 a.m. and
5.30 a.m. On Wednesday.





For a radiant shine



4 DIE IN DISCOVERY
DAY CELEBRATIONS

PORT-OF-SPAIN, August 6.
Trinidad had a grim, violent
discovery week-end in which four
fatalities occurred. An alleged
murder, a drowning and two
other tragedies marred celebra-
tions, Thousands of persons play-
ed carnival discovery on Monday
about the streets of Port-of-Spain

to the tunes of the steelbands,
—CO.P. ea



The quality ae
Metal Polish



~~
Says Mr. Leo King:
“YOU CAN RE-LION IT
BEING THE SWEETEST TREAT !”

MADE IN U K
The Perfection of Confection.



SS — =

COOLING
Delightful
GUAVA
CREAMS

wie _ A REAL
LUNCHEON

Uy,



TO-DAY'S *

SPECIAL —( >)

KNIGHTS SODA FOUNTAINS
Phoenix and City Pharmacies

THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LTD.

White Park Road, Bridgetown



ENGINEERS, BRASS and IRON FOUNDERS

Works contain rnodern appliances for the execution of
first-class work of all kinds, and especially to
SUGAR MACHINERY and STEAMSHIPS

Dealers in AGRICULTURAL MACHINERY and
GENERAL ENGINE ROOM STCRES
of all Description

IRRIGATION PROJECTS, PUMPING EQUIPMENT
and ELECTRICAL INSTALLATIONS A SPECIALTY

For
Satisfaction, Quality and Service

Contact

THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LTD.

\@ Phone : 4546, 4650 Workshop
Phone 4528 Stores Dept:
|









PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY, AUGUST. 8, 1052








































































































“ —
(; LA S S I I I . D AD S ene TANK ENGAGES ENEMY K A France Presses SHIPPING NOTIC
a ; - Tunis To Accept |
a 2 » aineeeermrennereommats 4
see TELEPHONE 2508 REAL ESTATE ee re "y ee “unis 4 ‘P a iil ae ee lee >
FOR RENT FOR SALE GIBRALTAR—Stone wall House at Reform Plan ROYAL NETHERLANDS
* Cattlewash, Bathsheba. Apply E. H.
Farmer, Andrews Plantation. Phone TUNIS. Aug. 7 STEAMSHIP co, The M.V. “MONEKA” will ac-
ian. peated spiniiegenancibcinchsiieatinn, | eieimies | 25-267 3.9.52—4n Prané lninetied fyi es cept Cargo and Passengers for
Saat Sever | RU he re SAILING FROM EUROPE Dominica, Antigua, Moftsertat
HOUSES AUTOMOTIVE “GREENWICH” 2nd Avenue, Belle- on Thursday to try to force the ~ BOSKOOP. ist August 1952 Nevis and St. Kitts. Sailing Mon-
lane yan 2 terse aay bed ane ‘a by Bey of Tunis into speedy accept- BONATRE. 8th August, 1952 ea 1th int
Attractive seaside Flat main road Has- | ——_—— eninnnanennaic, f , WE arge algy Dedroome, Graw~ ance of the French home rule re-.M.S. STENTOR, 23nd August, 1052 ciel a
lings, comfortably furnished, English! BEDFORD TRUCKS—3 ton and § ton|i)# 2n¢ dining = rooms, Kitchenette, ; eed s M.S. HERA, 29th August, 1953 The M.V. “CAPIBBEE” will ac-
Bath, Open Verandah facing sea. Suitable | wit nd without Baten twe-aneedé. emer Washroom, Servant'’s Room and Garage. form programme. SAILING TO EUROPE cept Cargo and Passengers for
one person {or couple). From August 1.| axle, new. Courtesy Garage, Dial 4016.| Vide open gallery facing niee lawn and Jean Binoche, head of the 4s wiLLEMSTAD, 12th August, 1952, Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat,
Telephone 2949. 18.6.52—t.f.n ; 6.8.52—6n.| “™S!! garden. Apply G. Webster. Phone Foreign Ministry's Africa Levant sAlLING TO TRINIDAD, PARAMARIBG Nevis and St. Kitts, Sailing





eibpaminidnanses 5134 or 4752. 7 8.52—4n Saturday 16th inst

ne bung | CAR—Hillman Minx, 1950. First class SHARES FOR SALE





section had a one hour audience | | AND BRITISH GUIANA

BUNGALOW~= Attractive « . 8th August, 1952.






























































































an’, . . S : with the Bey to emphasize > ., RE, 5th August, 1952
apace Saeee _ aT Ceomictae tee ! Meller. St Margaret's Viceraner $1 Jon: pau ae eee: Frahce’s desire to carry forward) Ss. sTENTOR, 5th. September, 1952, B.W.1. SCHOONER OWNERS’
double bediooms and all conveniences | ies = '6.8.52--an | 233 B’dow lee Co: Lid. the project Sut he was said to SAILING TO TRINIDAD & CURACAO ASSOCIATION (INC.)
Meals with serviee supplied, Apply to | =e +3983 Central I Lid. nave rejected the possibility of 3S. BQSKOOP, 18th August, 1952. Consignee. Telephone No. 4047
Managere > “0 ; cAR- * 333 W.%. Biscuit Co: Lid. fave “rajqprvec Ine pest Y OS. HERA, 15th September, 1952
Manageress of Phone 0172. Vedat CAR--Humber Hawk in perfect condi: 130 Plantations Ltd any major alterations or counter
HS} tion. Apply E. H. Farmer, Andrew . " any m a 2 s or :
A Plantation, St. Joseph. Phone 95-267. 7 Bhp Fi gg | See on proposals from the Tunisians. S. P. MUSSON, SON & ©O., LTD.
RENSAM- Unfurnished, from. 1st Sep 3.8.52—40] i. ‘by publte eom! as aus lee, Within. a few minutes of Agents
At She sham Gardens, axweil. | ———— amen £ ‘he’ wview i 5
Coast Hiteaciite wall Einaniow, 3 be CAR—One (1) Morris Minor in pertect canes See ie m, on Friday 8th Binoche’s interview at Bey CU : st a a a
rooms, Garage und Servants room: | condition 1 year old done 11,000. miles. 0 YRARWOOD & BOYCE Mohamed Al Amin Pasha’s sum- . -
Good Sea~ bathing. Phone S. Dan Price $1,500.00. Phone 3430 immodiotely. Solicitors. mer palace in Carthage the Bey . s aa
4161 for appointment 5.8.52-11 Owner leaving tland 8.§ 20 3.8.52—6n. iso recei''e lette " the
ile . EEE Z B d 1 letter from Ts . ps
ee eae. x , 4 a + 2
CARLTON" Fontabelle—For — info CARS—An assorunent of second hand The Cottage called “VISBY” at EAGLE French Foreiyn Minister Rober! alia lal a na Bd
mation apphys “Mrs. Gilinn _ Drat be 1900 Vanguard 35 S00ee. er ALe) ee (obliquely opposite the Sehuman stressing the Frenen
Karlville,” Spéoner’s Hill, St. Michac “Mayflower — $2,000.00, 1947 Standard 14) ontrance to ‘Waterloo”), St. Michael, solidarity, behind the five-year
Dial 2075. 8.8.52 “Pp $1,400.06, 1951 Austin A-40 — with 39,078 square feet of land thereto : : : hel $
————$—_____—__ 52,400.00 1946 Ford Prefect — $400.00.1 0)" Wich about 24,290 square fect are programme which would give the SOUTHBOUND sai
OCEAN SPRAY—Flat No. 3, on tt 939 Vauxhall 12 h.p. — $700.00, 194617 iv onie for Kitchen. Garden etc Tiunisians increased responsibil- sells Sails Satis sane
sea, with All fiodern conveniences ir Morris “8” — $700.00. May be seen at} *¥ Thos (oe auelrinlg oil the dias anid whore: jobs. in. their. gov Montreal Halifax Boston Barbados Barbados
incr Mikateicind al 255 r pa Chelsea Garage (1950) Ltd., Pinfold $t., unt contains prasring ities . LADY NELSON... 1 Aug. 4Aug. 6 Aug. Aug. 16 Aug.
uding Telephone. Dial 2550 for | helsea a , ing rooms, Three bedrooms (one with er snt.—U.P. , DIAN CRUI 12 Aug. 15 Aug “a * Aug. 25 Aug.
ticulars. Available from Seotetber 1 Phone 4949. 7.8.52—4n dressing som), Kitchen ete Electricity, roment. 7 eat acres AU, & Ava. - 3 4 .
+ 8.8. 52—21 ———— —i aoe , ——— 5 LAN : fe , Sep.
USED CARS—We have an assortment she San GevarpEeny. Yee OTE J LADY RODNEY ee a Set @Sept 6 Sept Went, 18 Sept.
REYNAN--St.. Matthtas Gap, Hasting j|of really good bargains juding Vaux. ~ : leation on e R ¢ IAN . . . . ae
containing Drawing and Dining Room hall Velox, Austin Ad0, Wolseley 12 hp 5 ene on appilea’ o ALTHOUGH GROUND ACTION in Korea continues to be light, according umianian Athlete LADY NELSON ee 22 Sept. 25 Sept. 27Sept. 6 Oct Oc
bedrooms, Toilet and ath reakia jan, sie ‘ourtes; ne b will be set up for ,
Room, Bantry, Kitchen and Garay ade 4616, 38. jsale'by Pubul' Compeattion at our Gmice, | 4 eommuniques, this tank of the Second Infantry Division is shown in A 44. FO, A yy Ta | NORTHBOUND Se i cae
Phone 3980 8.9 52 \ | James Erere. Beagrie en THURS- a front line area are tiga - gaanieaee positions in the fea. i or ) un | Barbados Barbados [Boston Botts Mentresi
ay * “LR Al DAY 14th Augus a . rains have practically ende: ng in some sections, but - | LADY RODNEY o) Soe ug. ue. i Aug. .
WANTED \ sitesi __ELECTRIC iit Seen OF a ing gained territory remains a problem, (International Sowndphoto) Helsinki | CANADIAN CHALLENGER Aug. Aue | oH, =e te
= RADIO—For Car, 12 voit Im workin, $-8:52—10n. | — : es. ae a... - “a sree ! CANADIAN CRUISER ik Z Sat. ie Sant. _ 3 et ae
a order at half the cost of a new_one.| -— rates . e + ° ELS E a BAN Sep . Sept. _ 12 16 Oct.
Phone 4592 78.5231) The undersigned will offer for sale De L at se U K Cab af A member of the Romanian | LAPY RODNEY .. #0 Sept. 2 Oct. 11 Oct. Oct. Oct.
: : i 2, E 4 ; - @ 1 CHALLENGER 6 Oct 8 Oct. — 2 >
HELP - by a te Atent Rennes va u ton ebhe ine Olympic team asked Tuesday for | CANADIAN | CH INGER Sot 8 St. oie ee M ost
i ion eee te LIVESTOCK Friday, the 8th day of August 1952, at e an asylum as a political refugee. |
EXPERIENCED SHORTHAND Tree's a “ oa abd of 91.00, eacht Of France Consi ers Police said leaders of the Ro- |
, ; able to a - —--—-- See 800—Ordinars , 7 an 7
with Bor ee eo Aube bs. letter “t.| COW-—One Heavy Dairy Cow —~ Gord] in BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE BANK manian team tried to persuade the | por further particulars, apply to—
International Trading Corporation Ltd, | Wuabiv milk. Tel 4166 2.8.52—6n. | LIM ; 7 a. ° rebellious member to return home .
Coleridge Siieek, Bridgetown, OTTLE, CATFORD & CO. Expected Aid or lran and thes 6 force bi inte 2 car | GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD.—Agents.
$.8.62—; : in a downtown elsinki reet, |
—— MECHANICAL | 1,8.52—6n Th , .
. e Romanian team member
PUP —Seors Le y fally at teem =
fea ; a papowe ‘atelier. resident. GRASS MACHINE—O: PARIS, August 5, WASHINGTON, Aug. 7. whose name was not disclosed and
€ ene * : aR + 0 -—One re-conditioned ? Dipl fficial: id Th t leadérs wi |
Trinidad, willing to couch cniidren %—i?} qj; Grass Machine. Apply: The AUCTION Rumows of the impending iplomatic officials sai urs- team leaders with whom he was |
years two hours dally, Aes ee rputor. | Manager, Morwood Plantation. .G._ 1. —____.|devaluation of the French franc day that the possibility of finan- quarrelling were taken to the ||
ne le Mere. Peanidya. |p aatfors 5.8.52—3n.} By instructions of the Adshinistrato: | gained headway here as buyers cial help for Iran was considered Police station for questioning. He
, PIANO — Brimsmead Piano Steel Of the estate of Bertha Louisa Sober} rush, pushed gold and black by the British Cabinet, but such then left the station and dis-|
* as frame, excellent condition. Owner leay- | ig"! MATTetAS Nxw RoaD’ Christ}market currency prices to the Measures would ke dependent on appeared. He is believed to have |
MIS©ELLANEOUS Ue sland. _ Revd Mellor, St. Margaret's | Church a double roofed house 24x12x8,| highest levels in months. Monday strong steps being taken against gone to the western democratic

14x9x8, TERMS CASH ON FALL OF | transactions on the Paris exchange the Communist Tudeh party. legation here to seek refuge.

clearly reflected the sliding worth _ They said British Ambassador



MO Y¥—In good worki HAMMER to be removed.
condition. Me &. Seal & Co., ts

ARCHER McKENZIE, ;
MISCELLANEOUS ‘Auctioneer, lof French currency’s buying Sir Oliver Franks was expected C .
: = ” >
oF FOUN 1p BARGAIN~Limited © quantity” of | meme eee power, The wae: — sue See eee ig gh onference
& oe Db tu re é OTT brou 404 fra we “ i
LOS aS - GW Hutchinson & Co. Ltd Dial 42%,] HORSES—Two (2) Riding Horses to] week ago, the lowest point since ter’s return from Honolulu this E nds In. Hula





|



CG TRANSATLANTIQUE





SESSA SOP FPSO

















6.8.52—In. | be sold at the Paddock at 3.20 p.m. [premier Antoine Pinay launche Week-end in regard to British
ee a Saturday 9th inst. & diately after tt ? r bi n Martinique,
ALCOCINE-We have in stock |twenty seventh (if) Race. [his “gave the franc” savings loan oe CGtted British Uneree HONOLULU, Aug. 7. Sailings from Southampton to Guadeloupe,

Oe Fon o ST iy taver Dilek aay ht rap gg ee wet Tr ae three months ago. Waffaires George Middleton in Provocative rhythms, swaying Barbados, Trinidad, La Guaira, Curacao & Jamaica

PST TICKETS Series Hjl.{Pigs and Goats Price 6/- bot. | ———n calbteeses Iran cabled the British Govern- hips and hula daacers helped the ‘ ;
aid. @Q. best ana. Ile. Finder ple “NIGHT'S LTD, 8.8.02] UNDER THE DIAMOND ae vile. nena ae ment that recent riots in Tehran weary Australian and New Zea- sieaacitimoreaia
coearn ee Sgeotwe nig! ae re RINGS—Selt-Piercing Bull Rings HAMMER economic repercussions of the and other Iranian cities showed land diplomatic ministers and Southampton Arrives Barbados

seein strongly made wrought copper in two] By instructions received from the In- | yorsenin Tunisian crisis, and the national front party of Prime military advisers t@ forget the From 052

“GWEHEPSTAKE 2. 0OK of Ten Tickets |=izes 2% and 3 ins. Prices 78. and 9c |surance company I will sell by public |) 8 caked , Minister Mohammed Mossadegh, weighty problems at the Anzus “COLOMBIE” .. 83lst July, 1952 .. 13th Aug. 1
plebl or nec (Finder Whitaker Wate reece ee ee 8.8.80—n | Friday, nent the 6th, wiry ioe Socal wth late Ok eee hed lost control of crowds to the Conference now underway, Uku- *“DE GRASSE” .. 22nd Aug. 1952 .. 3rd Sept., 1952
vie a Gare eee bein, one Morris @ slightly. damaged in an} were at least partially responsi- Tudeh Party and it was this seri- leles and guitars drowned mono- *Not calling at Guadeloupe

ENGLISH POTATOES — &c. per Ib. | accident. Terms cash. D'Arey A. Scott,
Gittens ee o & Co., Ltd. Palmetto] Auctioneer. 2.8.52—4n
Street, near iblic Buildings

ble ous factor which caused Chur- tonous speeches when the confer-
: chill to summon his cabinet to a ence relaxed at the Marine
An impetus to the new infla- special meeting. Officials said Officers’ Club close to the confer-



SAILING FROM BARBADOS TO EUROPE










GOVERNMENT NOTICE 6 .52~2- 1 JNDER THE IVORY HAMMER tionary trend was also given by the Cabinet was also disturbed ence hall. ue = Barbados A ia Coe 1952
og SW ELLS"—We have in stock the Government report which by measures reportedly taken by The Aussies and New Zealand- ‘DE GRASSE .. 6th Aug, 1 ‘ Aug., 195:
ss Hee ee tne oe ot a EO (a Ons eat on Priday, |Showed the wholesale price index Mossadegh to, prevent: foreign ers were engaged on Wednesday “COLOMBIE” .. 24th Aug. 1952 .. 5th Sept., 1952

~ travel sickness when journeying by
Sea, Air, or Car. Price. 3/- box


























































BROADEAST ON THE PRO. August 8th at the Courtesy Garage | up four-fifths of one per cent. in diplomats from conferring with night in an informal serious dis-

*“DE GRASSE” .. 16th Sept., 1952 .. 26th Sept. 1952

SSS SSSSS FSF SSI SSI OS









TE RNs a UTD, 8.8.52—3n Whitepark Road, (1) 1962 A-40 Pickup,| July over June. It ‘was the first the Shah as it is believed they cussion when Iren Lum pretty «
Tr aoe oe | eas ne et OR ee cae whale, rice tnorenee eitee would benefit Communist action Hawa:ian Chinese-Spanish tele~| } piling Sheens to: Seeagees
HURRICANE DAMAGE “ORIENTAL ‘For the Hair -|preperty of the Police Boys’ Club, Pp 1 : Hone By Mr. W. M. WOODHOUSE, | iwparts o silkiie and brilliance , | Damaged in accident, Pinay became Premier last March in Iran. .,, phone ope: : 1 2
ARLABA and Keeps it well groomed, Obtainab!>; Terms cash. Sale at 2 p.m. and it sent investors scurrying They stressed that Britain dulating Hawaiian dance. Raised} R. M.
ay aY BAGS UTE), 6.62" VINCENT GRIFFITH, for hard currency insurance to Would take no action in Iran ex- eyebrows soon gave way to in-| ¥3999¢699999966690606¢ : $$$9S9965

At five minutes past eight p-m-|“Supscniam now to the Dally OSs protect themselves against chain cept in close co-operation with tense concentration on the dance.|¢ so
on Friday, 8th August, Mr. W. M. | retegraph, England's leadin; News-| — - reaction increases in retail prices the United States anq that ways Miss Lum’s impromptu hula— | $7996 9999"
Woodhouse, A.R.LBA., Building | paper now arriving in by Air UNDER THE SILVER and the cost of living index. and means of preventing Iran without grass skirt or sarong—
Development Adviser of the odes A ee Se o an in HAMMER U.P. {rom falling under Communist but with an ordinary print dress,
Development and Welfare Organi- |eate ¢o., Ltd., entative| On Tuesday 12th by order of Capt * control would have to be agreed brought broad smiles and many
a ean eer a See eae ee | eg ee
will give.a:short talk over - | “eer fo oo |S jury, St. rge, which includes atest information from Iran that the hula was one of the
fusion Service Limited on th wie Cakes have Meo neces Sar eee aie ee ieeexanenr ves BYP tian Doctors indicated that the Shah and Iran- relaxing diversions from che con-



rotection of iomes against hurri~ | Grigith’s Rockley, Come and get them.|1ight Chairs, Liquor Case, "M.'T. , ian army leaders believed the ference thus far.—U.P.
pro $5 caean| Soe ats Boutie. aud single. ind On Tour Of U.S.

‘ Dial 4614, ing Table menace of Communism to Iran to
cane damages: §.8.52—1h Couches and Settees; Pembroke Table,























bea very real one at present. :
VENETIAN BLINDS-Made to order. | Bookease (glass Doors), Chairs, Rockers e 4 (U.P.)
; Ce wae
——mees } Ail metal (aluminium) All sizes, al)} Ornament and Kidney Tables; Flat Top M Ca aa
| Sa tit ary in| Se Rating Bax Sia cheignse| Medteal Centres ae ee saa
: SF c/o Barba a n Mahogany: rbice alr; ase .
a WANTED Advocate, 1.8, 52—6n ang ching, Brass Candlesticks eet as pe gs August 7. Oil Pros ects We wish to notify our Custom t
= al SS eee Seerpion Spoons; French arble C gyptian octors are using P
nose on tons ime ne oceter {| NG, MOREA a. Bust rau oo Hak aepenp's Amerean wonder’ ant-prtan Australian Golfer Workshop Department will be
on Sea -Gonst,or overlooking sea; {| oor oae for Acetylene welding, AUTO. | lated and Silver Ware, Brass Bowls s'P.{dtugs for the widespread treat- y STEWAR - ee ares a
Large verandah, 3 bedrooms, ave \PYRE CO, Dial 2696. , Hot Water Dish and’ Ta Cactunees ment oi patients suffering from a Plays Last Game By STEW 8 BBNEES.
nd y y astings, : A a : : ry
oe SP rtaing, Maxwell or §.8.52—t.f.n, Tea Set: Large Telescope and stand with river disease, anaemias and filaria, i Miz ae ~ Aug. Go closed from Monday 11th August to
S Roek = Preferably unfur- a nm night lenses, Single Mahog. Bedstead, Bed one of Egypt's top biochemists told . . ax . etroleum on-
ried igen, cot HD. MM tings ara pada orig ee | Mier, “Cine Preer ua eest.|the United Prese today fre Brridagey sient seid Tapendey wat oes, path TaN
@ : i‘ . ls . sk, . ”
Edwards shor 2378 | oy ten, $160 or near offer.’ Ring 2222 preferabl- | tepple. White Chest of Drawers all. in pects are exeellent” for develop~ Saturday 23rd. August, 1952, both days
a Snel | before 10.30 7.8.52—2n | Mahogany: White Painted Cedar Press,| Dr. Mohamed Abdel Salem El LONDON, Aug. 6, ment of g considerable oil industry



child's Press; Chamber Ware: Kitchen |Ayadi and eighteen other visiting Norman Von Nida, Australia’s in Israel but the “only way ‘o
i PUBLIC NOTICES Samant teers Panay Greogrechions Magn: doctors from faculties of medicine leading tournament golfer has prove the potential j* by drilling.”



inclusive, in order to give our Work-



zines and ‘other items. Sale 11.30}0f Ibrahim Pasha University in played his last competitive game Ball and his son Douglas were re-

+ shen men



Yegms CASH. : Cairo were here on the first lap of |, Britain. The Aussie profes- tained by the ‘Israeli government shop Staff their Annual vacation. There
HERRICANE BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO., |their American tour of medical sional left for his home in Sydney in 1950 to study and report on the
way NOTICE ” $.0,sa--2n | Contes to study. recent discoveries after failing to place among the oil prospects of the country, They will be a skeleton staff on duty for any

and methods, op prize winners in last week's also helped in preparing the

. 2,000 guineas Test. He said he Jsraeli Petrol 311 wh mu

“The essential purpose of our ~’ y i cae owe Israe etroleum Bill which re
trip is scientific,” br. ayade states, ould not be pat ag I ae cently passed the first reading in
“We want to see your hospitals, made six trips to Britain, won 15 Knesset and is expected to win

ans ” tolirnaments and picked up 2
laboratories and research work se 6,500 in thévsBason of 1947, but final approval by the end of .this

PRECAUTION PARI3H OF ST, PHILIP
Applications for one or more Vacant

St. Philip's Vestry Exhibitions tenab:

emergencies. Our Office, Parts Depart-
ment and Petrol Station will be open

SSS OPSPOSSOSSIOF SSS SPSS SSSI PS OPPS SSS FPP



at the St. Michael's Girls’ School, wil slide

Me received by tf ; > >

HINT No a than Monday let Avmnuae nese. re RUN ; as to get a new idea back in our i can’t go on”, Von Nida ‘said month, : ;

. Candidates must be daughters of Par. DO WWN > country.” oa 4 ag Ball said Israel offered one of as usual

ishioners in straitened circumstances a But that is not. the Peet ens the best opportunities of any :

; and t b 49) nine y } : is stay a sugges : ;
inder (11) Sears on the iit Septembe re Yerk where they pre guests int heavy taxation of prize fOFelgR country for the invest- ——
1902. ‘What you need are the life |New York where they are guests inat heavy tax oe ae ment of outside capital. He said

WARNINGS. A birth Certifieato rust be forwarde: giving vitamins and minerals | of the laboratories division of the rhoney did not make it worth ;

with an application form obtained fron
the Parochial Treasurer's Office.
>; »

n >. §. W. SCOTT,
Get" Ti extra food, Clerk to the Vestry,

especially things that oy ee » healthier witb . .
The “wonder drug” is of parti-

will require little cook a EAST - ae OS cular interest because it has been
‘ Whe BACK 7 found “effective against a number
lng .or. pRgperqtem n your ATL ZONES | of diseases that for centuries have

American Cyanamid Company,}while for overseas players to at a press conference “I would

o hi: untry any more, Yather do business in Israel than ~™M « co LTD
airante ‘ee 5 err : —€CP). any place in the world outside eo e

tals, the United States and the British

of YEBAST-PHOS, Enjoy life
to the full! You'll feel

eS





re ome Commonwealth so far as the ,

. stability of the country and the
U.S. Dollar Down government is concerned.” % PHONE 4316
He said Israel has shown “abso- |

NEW YORK, Aug. 7%. jute fairness in dealing with|%





































cs
Apply +

O. P. BENNETT,
Royal Hotel,

2 oe oe oe ee oe es oe ee oe ee ee oe ee

{pont Nester GOVERNMENT NOTICE -
L

ee eee ee wee ene nd Attention is drawn to the Control of Lumber Prices (Defence)

Take SWAMP-ROOT! Mi- (Amendment) Order, 1952, No. 4 which will be published in the
raculous SWAMP-ROOT .





Also Parts such as...
‘ACCOUNTANCY COST ACCOUNT.
ING, COMPANY SECRETARYSBIP,
GOOK-KEEPING, An “Trtensive'
Method" Course (for award of Diplo
‘a as Associate or Fellow)

qualify you for higher status by in-



been a scourge in Egypt and the} The Canadian dollar was up 1/8 foreign capital,” and that the! % oa
ACHES... ° : rest of the Middle East”, —U.P. |. a cent at a ae of aS Israeli. Petroleum Bill offers X66666699959S9 566555559 CS SSS S SOO SS 9SOSS8SS
= chache caused sien < i 8 ited States ; 2
SSS 2SSS9SSSO0SOSOSSIOIVSS ——______—— {per cent in terms of ‘ni forei levelopers the fairest}, 59996 56 9S9SF90 FC SSOOOS SSS
The idea be ay Siders, funds in closing foreign exchange teiasd ot a Ganate in he Ste $6996" $6094 ‘ ¢
ys are the blood’s filters. a e dealings Wednesday. The pound 7 F —UP.
FOR SALE] guar; Sime |) AM WEBB § cms Bleed’ [ver tm touch Wik Barbed
’ ; 4 *
backache, headache, % Stockbroker URS D C63 |°-2*. n Touch With Barbados
disturbed wet - that ‘tired out” : __Bteesti (mean tat ou v ; od gpevonig she panied a ate Coastal Station
The following horses Properly—and to keep them in good order— OPEN FOR BUSINESS AS Cornet eaiteaie that ‘wil 3° 29/32 per cent in terms of , CABLE AND WINgLESS (Wi) Ltd
= ! use Dodd’s Kidney Pills. Dodd’s Kidney xt USUAL IN BARBADOS sooner or later eatise your teeth to funds. down 3/32 from ee shat they Son eer communicate
landed Barbados: Silver Pills quickly rid your over-burdened blood | >, NVESTMENTS fall out and may also cause Rhen- anadian funds, down with the following ships through their
Trail £775: True Foot of excess acids and wastes so that x I S' matism and Heart Trouble, Amosary Tuesday close. That is. It took Reeds coer ereslat Pui. Paniase
650: Sailor Bear’ £600 blood flows to cod ea e stops gum bleeding the rhe’ to6 3/82 conte @anedian to buy . P"ehaneauer ssc: Texns Trader, ss | % .
£650; Sailor Bear pa ) eresionne 33, Broad St. Pens the teeth. Iron clad i e- $1 Ameriean. / pound sterliny’ prospector, s.s, Sunwhit, s.s. Mercator
er and s ss les 8) ERT Eee [2 SAGE A fom Tues- f55 Aber Piamen 55, Momere. 32 |g
" ie Pat io Le r, $.8. Margitor’ m, § hs .
Insist : % (Over Ph ) on return of empty package. Cet day. â„¢ Kesd. Worcester, 3:5 Archangeloe. $.s A New Shipment just opened,
Bear £700. $ Dial 4796 — Hours: 9-3 8] Amosan from Your ehirnist today. OO) Hamada aie, Ariswualics
* nretidiee prote $ ou,
? —_—_—_—
*

BICYCLE FRONT FORKS

Lundy Light» £600:
Water Bird £500; Johr
REAR and FRONT BREAK a eae \



































| RASS erenting Mpare-tine BOOTLE ata ned glo ied Official Gazette of Thursday, 7th August, 1952. SHOES
SSS }}“OURSES in nalich, Commetetal Blond, get id of pais 2. Under this Order the maximum retail selling price of “Mer- BREAK STIRRUPS complete
¥ Br. ET si) hi] (icaw subjects, “ionden Chstaee at sons that make aaa chantable White Pine 1” x 6”—11”, 6’ and up is as follows: — ETC
merce te.’ Por. PREM aon B U L V A feet tired and mis- REAR and FRONT FENDERS ;
SH WRITE NOW to the leading tutorial O erable! OLUMN TWO :
} FUhiv wretute for overseas, studente: LON é ee oe PSs ch Retail Price No need to say that thesé bicycles are as the name
Y K(33 Welbeck. Street, London, Wi ATC H ES is AY ti teethie im Article (not more than) implies — Strong, Durable and are well-known.
The Money Saving Way Exigiand Pee Merchantable White Pine :
Mopular Burcavs, -Bedsteads, $f} | pcs Only a few in stock as / | 1" x 6"—11”, 6’ and up | , +
Reds. Wardrobes, We htonds #0 00 aia the quota is limited. Se doe Ge WN tecting 2) - (Basic Sizes) .. 7 $296.00 per 1,000 board feet — | ;
"ABLES for Dining. Yeitchen ana TO-DAY'S NEWS FLASH BUT YOUR BEST BET |]|$ suivation, please write for 3, _8882—m 3 4. Ee. TAYLOR LTD.
Saas tina 1 US TO GET ONE - wr
Liquor’Casrs sea0up —DRAw. SW wonpE ey are real niagic 2: aes! Geode.
inh Roo $5.50 up — DRAW - WONDERFUL ASSORT- when it comes to FREE BOOK ; 8 WE HAVE = — ‘ia Coleridg
Furniture for Little and Big Screen MENT OF quality. Which Makes 3
Sigola’in wood end fusu. Rape . . 17 Jewels Guaranteed ‘“ , si} ) : . nalities are HIGH
Mats g120 up Patras Prive r Walking Sticks GOD Ss WAY OF % | x RED ROOFING PAINT i % Qu Ana
OEP aE Just received by Y. De LIMA SALVATION PLAIN” ei at $4.50 per Gallon $ . cdi tet
| ‘ ei 21% rrces are Eee
L.S. WILSON JOHNSON'S & C@., LED. nor a Res ee |. ME CENTRAL EMPORIUM |< ies aah
SPRY STREET, DIAL 4069 } STATIONERY 20 a lines % Central Ave., Bangor, N.I. S| ‘ Corner Broad and Tudor Sts. ¥
FFAS SSS | SS %3$9999O6699596969506668" | 6



















BARBADOS

ADVOCATI PAGE SEVEN

nee a ee El




BY CARL ANDERSON





es

MUROER WILL OUT,
CAPTAIN! HAVE A








HERES A DIME >
|( FOR EACH OF YOu
FOR BEING SUCH
GOOD CHILDREN

RUN OVER TO THE
LEANERS FOR ME CE-CREAM
AND, GET DADDYS A> \, CONES WITH
se 2

(OUR DIMES |






DON'T TOUCH ME/
REMEMBER! T AM yOUR
QUEEN / TAM THE RULER
OF GANYMEDE /





YEP! IT MEANS THAT... 1F

ANYBODY IS AROUND HERE...

THEY'VE BEEN TIPPED OFF THAT
THEY'VE GOT COMPANY!’

TRSRE IT 19, PARADISE...
THiS THING 1S RIGGEP WITH | KNOW WHAT THAT
A PHOTO-ELECTRIC




MEANS, DON'T YOu,







Beccles Sree
PPINGING UP FAT!









BUT HE'S VERY



BY ALEX RAYMOND

OH, NO, MRS. ARDSLcY!) THEN HES A THIER MY DEA\



OH, MRS. AROSLEY...THE STRANGEST THING/
JUST HAPPENED...A MAN CAME IN AND
BOUGHT AN EMPTY BOX...
THEN HE.. KISSED MY HAND!

HE WAS SO CASHIN



“HE DROVE OFF IN YOUR TRUCK!

THOUGHT HE WAS





BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES



[THis IS THE PLACE WH
WE LOST THE WIP. OUR
TIRE TRACKS END HERE

TOP TUAT! DONT

.~)
PPDDODHIDHGHHHOHGHHHHOGHO GFP IIHHHHHDHHHHH HHO





OOOO

a ne $e

End Rheumatism
While You Sleep

* If you suffer sharp stabbing pains



if joints are swollen. it shows. your
blood is poisoned through faulty kid
ney action. Other symptoms of Kid-



ney Disorders are Burning, itehing
Passages, ‘Getting up Night,” Back.

|
| aches, Lumbage, Leg Pains, Nervous.
ness, Dizziness, Headaches, Colds,
a Puffy Ankles, Circles under Eyes,

| Lack of Energy. Appetite etc Ordi-

;
i wary medicines cant help moch—you
| must kill the germs ruining health.

eee | Cystex ends these troubles by re-

Moving the cause Get Cystex from

| any Chemist on Guarantee to put
| ou right or money back Act Now?

n 2# hours you will fee) better and
be completely well in one Week

e The Guar-
1 mntee
.. Cystex antes

Ger Kidneys, Rheumatism, Biadce < ow







Pociors & Nurses Recommend

| 7am-Buk

The World-famous Herbal

SKIN OINTMENT

Soothes—Purifies——Heals
—

LISTERINE
ANTISEPTIC

ge

LUSYERINE Antiseptic kills millions of
from starting serious trouble. Remem-
ber, at the first sign of cold, gargle
LISTERINE Antiseptic, full strength,
early and often!



IN TESTS OVER 4. 12-YEAR PERIOD, DAILY USERS
OF LISTERINE ANTISEPTIC HAD FEWER COLDS! ®











BECAUSE UPONTHE CONDITION
OF THE KIDNEYS RESTS HEALTH
HAPPINESS~ LIFE ITSELE,/



IN CHOOSING YOUR

TRACTOR OR FARM IM-

" EVERY EXPERIENCED DOCTOR
PLEMENTS, ALSO GIVE IN MAKING A DIAGNOSIS
! MUST FIRST FIND OUT THE
EN CONDITION OF THE KIDNEYS,

SERIOUS CONSIDERATION

~ ‘
@ TO THE SERVICE YOU ARE FOR IF THE KIDNEYS ARE
ee FAILING IN THEIR IMPORTANT
ts ‘ DUTY OF REMOVING EXCESS
vi LIKELY TO GET. ACIDS AND POISONOUS
== SM WASTES FROM THE BLOOD-

In Selecting . THEN WE ARE POWERLESS
. TO PREVENT SICKNESS.

EVEN INSURANCE COM=
or PANIES WONT INSURE A (>
PERSON WHOSE KIDNEYS a

ARE NOT RIGHT — .

|
MASSEY -HARRIS VES THEDocro
ARE RIGHT!
TRACTORS OR IMPLEMENTS Se ok aol ook fox Bee
your kidneys. Backache, headaches,
perveenirshinenesie tired Laie, maga ge my
Which Already Enjoy an Enviable Reputa- ek elle
COU RTESY cations of faulty kidney action. If you
tion, You Are Assured of TOPFLIGHT have any of these symptoms then take
GARAGE peal ae See: am
SERVICE, ‘oven kidney remedy, used A
ROBERT THOM Our Specialised Staff is Always at Your Dis- Doi Kune) "Pils od
yet ;
LIMITED posal to Take Care of Your Every Need. ebiie else. machi
White Park Road You Buy SERVICE When You Invest in —— o
Dial 4616 Equipment Offered by 3/-





Ss =

__IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE
for Thursday to Saturday only



SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers

sciipetn aa ed
SPECIAL OFFERS are now available at our branches White Park,
Tweedside, Speighistown and Swan Street









——





WHISKY Usually Now

PETER DAWSON CROWN MALT Se Shae Rees peek tn ee Cea sr

SCOTTISH CREAM .._ . $4.50 per bot. $4.00per bot. CRYSTAL STARCH pkgs. .... PASTE ALPEN
© Sa : BOX-ALL CLEANSER ... Ot ote da gale eo ae
NORTHERN _e—e., fa 46.00 per e/s Lay OWROH. cuca ten icek dees ce ad ”
* ‘ SPRINKS BT e ee: Seat reeaeeee ee
CREAM — WHEAT .. 83 80 CHEMICS PAILS ......... cepa Reged oxi ee
PRUNES 1-lb. tins... 70 60 ra’ dPRAY ice Perot 221
. . ' i FLIT GUNS 92
SARDINES es Se .20 18 FLIT Gins. Tins 3 : 4.55
TABLE RAISINS... 48 ee ree otk . “mae

BEER DRUMMER BOY 26

.20



Corydon contains the four famous dialogues
in which Gide makes his defence of homosex-
uality. It appeared originally in France in 1911, ¢
bearing neither author’s nor publisher’s name.

Though it has run through many editions of 3
France and elsewhere in'Europe, it has never 2
before been translated into English

CORYDON — By Andre Gide |

In his preface to this edition Gide wrote: “I
believe that in this book I have said almost all
that I had to say on this extremely important p
subject that has not been said before. I shall be
satisfied if it helps a little to tear down or lift the
‘hick veil of lies, convention and hypocrisy which

1 stifles an important and not contemptible
part of humanity”.

On Sale at the Advocate Stationery.

OOOO 0000F 9-909 0 0G OOP DOGO OOO LOU UOEU POU PU POVIOODPEGDLOVTODPODHOPOODDPF DODD GOODIE PHOS PODODSOPOOVIOL’?

|





PAGE. EIGHT

Racing Results

AT GARRISON SAVANNAH, THURSDAY, AUGUST 7,
WEATHER: Fine. TRACK: Firm.

1952

17th Race. JUVENILE STAKES—Class “F2” and Lower $800,

($265, $135, $40), 544 Furlongs.

1. APPLE SAM: b.g. Jetsam-Apple Fritter, 118 Ibs., Mr. J. R. God-
dard (Thirkell)

2. SUPER JET: ch.c. Jetsam-Wedding Gift, 118 lbs., Mr. F. B. C.
Bethell (Yvonet).

3. SEA FOAM: hb. ch.g. Jetsam-Battle Doll, 108 lbs., Mr. R. EB.

Gill (Lutehman).

ALSO RAN: Howitzer (118 lbs., Crossley); Bow Tie (118 lbs., P.
Fletcher); Jim La Rue (118 ibs., Joseph)
TIME: 1.11

.
PARI-MUTUEL; =a $1.64, Place: $1.66, $2.50.

FORECAST: $11.5.
START: Good FINISH: Comfortable; 4 lengths, 2 lengths.

TRAINER: Mr, J. R. Goddard.

18th Race: STAFFORD HANDICAP—Class “B” and Lower, $900,
($300, $150, $55) 744 Furlongs.
1. eit BEAR: b.c. Dante-Sweet Cygnet, 114 lbs., Mr. V. Chase
(Jo:
2. RED S CHEEKS: b.f. Linklater-Golden Carp, 124 lbs., Mr. E. C.

Jones (O'Neil).
CASTLE IN THE AIR: b.c. Windsor Slipper Hero-Comet, 114
lbs., Mr. M. E. Bourne (J. Belle).

ALSO RAN: Sweet Rocket (125 lbs., Lutchman); Pepper Wine (128
,lbs., Crossley); The Thing (102 lbs., James); Vectis (111 Ibs.,
Quested); Demure (126 lbs., Wilder); Firelady (121 lbs., Yyonet);
Belle Surprise (120 lbs., Holder); Flying Dragon (121 lbs., Rey-
nolds); Lunways (126 lbs., Newman).

TIME: 1.36.

PARI-MUTUEL: beg $9.30.

we

Place: $3.58, $6.00, $7.86.

FINISH: ” Easy; 1 len two lengths,
Mr, V. Chase. *

19th Race: NURSERY STAKES—-Class “F2” and Lower $800,
($265, $135, $40) 5% Furlongs

1. FAERIE QUEENE:
C. Barnard (Holder).

b.f. Burning Bow-Chivalry, 115 Ibs., Mr.

2. MEERSCHAUM: hb. b.f. Jetsam-Dolly, 105 Ibs., Mr. R, E. Gill
(Lutchman).

TIME: 1.153.

PARI-MUTUEL: Win $1.10.

START: Good. FINISH: Easy; 2% lengths.

TRAINER: Hon. V. C. Gale.

20th Raee: TRAFALGAR HANDICAP—Class “D” and Lower $800,
($265, $135, $45) 9 Furlongs.

1. TOP FLIGHT: b.m.,Flotsam-Meads,
Schnan)





123 Ibs., Mr. L. J. Wong
: bg. Burning Bow-Chivalry, 128 lbs, Mr. C.
Barnard (Holder).
3. MAY DAY: b.g. Debonair-Piona, 954-14 lbs, Mr, I. O. C, Perkins
yRAN? C 1
olleton (119 lbs., Joseph).
PART. Mir TUEL: a ;
in: $3.44, Place: $1.66, $1.38.
er rae 0
T: Good, FINISH: Comfortable; 3 lengths, 7 lengths.
TRAINER: Mr. R. H. Mayers. . me

21st Race: MERCHANTS’ HANDICAP—Class “F”
($235, $115, $40) 7% Furlongs.

& “F2” Only $700

1. CARDINAL: br.g. O.T.C.-Biretta, 126 Ibs, Mr. J. W. Chandler
(Crossley) .
2. COLOMBUS: br.c. Colrose-Busy Woman, 107 lbs,, Miss Rose-
maakcH wore. mae ee ‘
NDS: bg. O.T.C.-April 11th, 116 lbs, Mr, U. J.
sacha (Quested).
ALSO RAN: Rambler Rose (118 ie, Newman); Viceroy (111 lbs.,
Bees Apronusk (105+-18 lbs., P. Fletcher); Caprice (110 Ibs.,
TIME: 1.3 rer

PARLMUTUEL: Win: $3.50. Pl 1.62,

FORECAST: $22.44. ' mr § Rn si. vn
START: Fair.

TRAINER: . Mr. J. W. Chandler.

pair a aseiaterier ek endl GoM A ccna psig tniaempabetinlenittinin
22nd Race: SUMMER HANDICAP—Class “OC” & “C2” Only
$800 ($265, $135, $50) 9 Furlongs.

TEST MATCH: b.g. Valdavian-Match
E, C, Bethell (Yvonet). oh ey ary ee We

CAREFUL ANNIE: b.f. Birikan-M
Pee eed n-Movement Control, 118 lbs., Mr.

ae RINCESS; br.f. Dastur-Pr
Mr RE geet astur-Princess Regent, 130. Ibs.,
RAN: um bs., Holder); Darham Jane (101 Ibs.,
Blades); Trimbrook (108 Ibs., Crossley); Flieuxce (126 Ibs.
Wilder); Tiberian Lady (111 ibs., James); The Thing (104+-7
te jghewmen); Embers (110 lbs., Belle); Aim Low (125 Ibs.,
BARE abil, wn
g L; Win: $12.18. Place: $3.10,
FORECAST: $202.80. me tad id
START: Fair.
TRAINER: Mr, F. E. C, Bethell.

RY
28rd- Race: STEWARDS’ HANDICAP--Class “A” & “B” Only
$1,000 ($335, $165, $60) 9 Furlongs.

A
teen b#. The Phoenix-Dido, 114 lbs,, Mr. S. A, Blanchette

FINISH: Close; head, head.

mo
=

2

FINISH: Easy; 1 length, % length..

~

2. PPER WINE: b.m. O.T.C.-Condiment, 120 Ibs., Hon. J. D.
Chandler (Crossley) .
3. LANDMARK: ch.m. Pylon 11-Esperances, 136 lbss., Mr. V. Chase

Aan: Notonite (120 lbs., Fletcher); Harroween (124 lbs.,

= Di Slainte (110 lbs,, Li
“ xeon Rie" ¢ 8, utchman),

PART-MUTUEL: â„¢ 2.86,
FORECAST: $27.24. Place: $2.52, $2.60. :

START: Fair. FINISH: ; head,
TRAINER: Mr. R. H. Mayers. ideas pines Alle tama a

Gavilan To Fight Graham.

HAVANA, Aug. 7.
Kid Gavilan will risk his World
Welterweight champion-
ship against Billy Graham of New



Graham’s Manager, President
James D. Norris of the Interna-
tional, Boxing Club, and the
Cuban Sports Director, Lorenzo



York for the second time here on
October 4, When Gavilan put his
title at stake against Graham last
August 29. in New York the
Cuban emerged with the decision,
but it was so hotly disputed that
the Graham camp began calling
Graham “the uncrowned King of
the Welterweights”.

Their return bout will be an
outdoor affair in the Havana Ball
Park, according to the contracts
signed here by Fernando Balido,
Gavilan’s manager, Irving Cohen,

Nodarse.

Gavilan was to receive 35 per
cent of the proceeds, including
box office, radio, television, and
motion pictures, with Graham to
receive 25 per cent.

In addition, Graham had to
guarantee Gavilan a return bout
within sixty days should he win
the crown, and Graham _ also
promised not to appear in any





BARBADOS ADVOCATE

COMING

The 22nd race on the third day of the B.T.C. Summer Meet was won by Mr. F. E. ©. Bethell’s Test Match. Above is how the horses came |

around the bend and into the home stretch.

“Mrs. Bear” Scores Results

Upset Win

@ From Page 1
time was 1 minute 11% seconds,
% seconds slower than the Oisti
Handicap rum on the second day
over the same distance.
EIGHTEENTH RACE
Stafford Handicap

Four of the entrants of an
original field of sixteen horse
were scratched, and the Handl-
cappers placed a top weight ol
128 Ibs. on Pepper Wine.

The event was for horses classi-
fied ‘B’ and Lower, and was rub
over a distance of fur.ong

The race was off to a good start
despite the fact that Flying
Dragon failed to get off for the
fourth time this meeting.

When they passed the judges fo:
the first time, Vectis was lead-
ing the field, with Demure and
Lunways lying a close second and
third. Flying Dragon who started
late was many lengths in the
rear of the field, but at the fifth
furlong pole he went past Pepper
Wine who pulled up in her track.

Down the Hastings Stretch, th¢
company was strung out, led by
Fire Lady, Sweet Rocket and
Lunways in that order.

There were positional exchanges
as they raced up the Polo Hill,
and soon Mrs Bear took over the
premier position from Fire Lady.

She was strongly challenged by
Red Cheeks coming up the home
stretch but finished the winner a
length ahead of the challenger,
who was 2 lengths in front cf
Castle-in-the-air. The time was |
minute 36 seconds flat.

NINETEENTH RACE
Nursery Stakes

Only two horses, Meerschauin
and Faerie Queene took part in
this event run over 5% furlongs
as Jealousy and Stirling Flush
were scrat .

As the gates flew, Holder
pushed Faerie Queene to the fore
and kept the filly in that positioa
throughout the race after making
every pole a winning one. Meers-
chaum who was about one length
behind by the four furlong pote
closed the gap a bit but failed
to draw lead with Faerie Queene

Meerschaum made a challens
by the two furlong pole but Feer:e
Queene could not be overcome
and eventually raced up the
straight a comfortable 24% lengths.

TWENTIETH RACE
Trafalgar Handicap

Four were scratched in this nine
furlong event for horses classi-
fied D and Lower, leaving a field
of four with May Day carrying
14 lbs overweight.

The field got off to a good start
but coming around the bend Col-
leton fell throwing its jockey
Joseph who had to be taken to the
Hospital with an injured teg,

As they passed the stands for
the first time, Top Flight (Lutch-
‘man) was leading followed by
May Day (Crossley) and Cross
Bow (Holder).

Holder moved up from the rear
with Cross Bow by the five fur-
long pole and was closely behind
Top Flight but Lutchman kept
the mare in the lead racing in
this position all the way home.

Cross Bow made a challenge
by the two furlong pole but fail-
ed to draw level with Top Flight

7Y%

who raced up the straight an
easy wines by three lengths
Cross Bow was second seven

lengths in front of May Day.

TWENTY-FIRST RACE
Merchants Handicap

Soprano and May Day were
seratched, and six horses came
under Starter’s Orders. Cardinal

was carrying a top weight of 126



They’ il Do It Every










fight or. exhibition during that
period.—U,P.
‘Time Replvtered U. 5 Patent Office





By Jim Jimmy Hatlo

x DONT MIND IM KIDDIN’

WALKIE-TALKIE, BUT 4.
- LIKE US TO THINK
HES ALWAYS BUSY, TOO

SPERL H





IF THERES
a SCONE, :



HE TAKES iT <
EASY BUT HE
LAYS THE WHIP



Z WISH HE DID
= stocKkRoom/ / want es EAT WITH GONNA BREAK
REW? REALL THE
ene LOADING DEPART _



MENT!





Listenin Oo THE- |
OFFICE FEET-UPPER |
tig TELL THE FRAY HOW |
EAR TED UP HE IS=-+ |
THANX AND A TIP OF |




THE HATLO HAT TO
“UNANIMQUS "QUINCY ILL.

lbs., while Apronusk carrying 105,
was given an overweight’ of 8 lbs.

The event for horses classified
F and F2 was off to a fair start
and when they passed the judges
for the first time, Rambler Rose
was leading the field followeq by

“Apronusk” and Caprice.
Bunched among the others
Lutechman was forced to pull

Columbus back and going by the
five furlong gate, he was training
in the rear.

Newman kept Rambler Rose to
the fore down the Hastings
Stretch, and meanwhile Lutch-
man, forcing Columbus along, re-
covered the lost ground.

Around by the three furlong
pole and down the back stretch,
the field moved up on Rambler
Rose, and again a tussle for posi-
tions at the two furlong pole they
entered the home stretch with
Cardinal holding the premier po-

sition, and Columbus coming
hard on the outside. ;
Cardinal maintained her posi-

tion up the home streteh to the
judges’ box, and Columbus, fin-
ishing with a burst of speed, fin-
ished second a mere head behind

Cardinal,

March Winds who had been
well up in the running was. third
a head behind Columbus.

TWENTY-SECOND RACE

Summer Handicap
started in this event
over 9 furlongs. Doldrum and
Flieuxce carried top weight of
126 Ibs. each, and Test Match and
The Thing were given 3 lbs, and
7 Ips. over weight respectively.

They were off to a fair start
with the field having the jump on
Doldrum, Darham Jane, Blades
up, led the field. going ‘past the
judges for the first time, but he
conceded this position to Aim
Low when he took the bend

Eleven

wide, Careful Annie was then
second, and by the time they
reached the five, Darham Jane

had dropped back into the bunch.

Blades hustled her to number
two position down the stretch,
and around by the three, she
challenged Aim Low, but soon

dropped back to number four
again.
Down the back stretch, there

was an exchange of positions, and
Yvonet pushed Test Match along
side Careful Annie who was now
leading,

He over took Careful Annie
when about 20 yards away from
the judges and finished a length
in front.

Careful Annie was second % a
length away from Dashing Prin-

cess.

TWENTY THIRD RACE
Stewards’ Handicap

Six horses came under the
Starter’s Orders with Land Mark
carrying a top weight of 136 lbs.

The field was off to another
fair start. The other horses had
the jump on Land Mark, and
when they raced past the judges
for the first time the positions
were Fire Lady, Harroween, No-
to-Nite, Pepper Wine, Slainte and
Land Mark in that order,

They kept these positions down
the far stretch, but bunched
beautifully at” the four, furlong
pole,

SEAL EDLEEDECCLESLOGSOO

—
y
~
$
&
¢

SOSSSSSLSSSS

"ROUND THE BEND

Of 2’.
Field Sweep

THIRD DAY
SEVENTEENTH RACE
Prize Ticket No. Amount
es ee 0214 $374.29
Set sia: 2359 213.88
Wee rte aise s HE. ah ite we 106.94
4th ....... O15] ....... 54.47
Sth ..0.... MOTE i: ss 10.00
Oth .....1. 1926 ....... 10.00

$5. each to holders of tickets
Nos. 0213, 0215, 2358, 2360, 2285,
2287, 0150, 0152.
EIGHTEENTH RACE

Prize Ticket No. Amount j
now proceeding.
as ware te yY = Members of the team which is «sale os?
Sra ....... 1577.0. 153.35 Cxpectec to meet Wint, McKenley 8
aa 2985 76.67 Rhoden and Laing are Mal Whit- d
Gee eae 10.00 “eld. Reggie Pearman, Ollie Mat- I ams
6th 220s.) 1815 |... 10,06)50". and Gene Cole all of whom love y
RG as 0853 ....... 10.00} 'an, at Helsinki,
8th 1867 ....... 10,00; etctterhdaelta ihe aerate
Oth ....... WOW hes seies 10.00
10th ....... 1302 ....... 10.00 5,
llth ....... 3079 ....... 10,00 o
12th ....... 2802 ....... 10.00
PR ' £5 holders of Hekate!
os. ; , 3473, 3475, 1576,
1578, 2984, 2986. CHECKED
x NINETEENTH RACE 4g Weekly, Sundays
ize Ticket No. Amount >
Ist... 0271 tsnseie Wunsch PEPER Pot BORDERED
eee TEE ibis ws os 378.40
ae Vee eee: 0557 ....... ss MADRAS & POCKET
tiated x34 4066 ae 601 p rT
$5.00 each to holders of tickets| 4 PAKISTANI CURRIES
Nos, 0270, 0272, 2713, 2715, 0556, f
0558, 4065, 4067. Other local dishes ‘X
tege neaate Seder, Ang. HANDKERCHIEFS|
rize icket No. Amount ’ .
tna |.|..: 9809 ...... “atage]$ BARBECUE & DANCE CHIEFS
8rd ....... 3409 ....... 207.11
4th ....... SU ced 103.55 Table reservations FOR CHILDREN

1
$5.00 each to holders of tickets
Nos. 2444, 2446, 2308, 2310, 3408,
3410, 1730, 1732.
TWENTY-FIRST RACE



3246
"Ss. 00 each to holders of tickets
Nos. 3565, 3567, 0080, 0082, 4230,
4232, 0043, 0045.
TWENTY-SECOND RACE
Prize Ticket No.



$5.00 each to holders of tickets %

Nos. 0237, 0239, 2593, 2595, 2597,

2599, 1025, 1027.
‘TWENTY-THIRD RACE
Prize Ticket No. Amount
BOB esti eee WORE oes ask $665.52
2nd ......- O78 ....... 380.30
SRE ei ais Bee oe ahha. 190,15
4th ....... 2653 ....:.. 95.07
Sel. aac Ly abe Se deve 10.00
6th .....+. WOOE". oes 10.00

$5.00 each to or of tickets

2102, 2652, 2654.





There were quick exchanges up{
the back stretch and down past
the two, but still Fire Lad kept
the premier position, maintaining
it up the home stretch to win
from Pepper Wine by % length.
Land Mark was third a head be-
hind. The time was 1 minute
57 2/5 seconds,

WORKMANSHIP

AND

QUALITY
SUITINGS

You Surely Must
Decide on
a

P.¢. 8. MARFEI
& CO. LD.

as the “TOP” SCORERS
IN TAILORING.

SS LOO



Amount %






U.S. Rumners luvited
To Jamaica Meet

(From Our Ovn Correspondent)

KINGSTON, Aug. 7.

In order to pay tribute to Ja-
maica’s olympic team the Jamaica
Olympic Association and Jamaica
Amateur Athletic Association are
arranging a special meet at King-
ston early September in which a
United States quartette has been
invited to ram against Jamaica's
relay team in a special 1,600 metre
event.

Harrison Dillard, Andy Stanfield
both olympic winners have also
been invited and arrangments are



necessary





ERNIE'S |
DEMOCRACY

CLUB
?

—SSSSSESS

ERNIE PROCTOR wishes
to thank his many friends
who rolled up in great num-
bers last Friday.

He also takes this oppor-
tunity of thanking the few
who telephoned and said
they were sorry they could
not turn up owing to pre-
vious engagements being
made but will be in attend-
ance TO-NIGHT (Friday)
at 7 o'clock sharp.

MENU.

Supplied by Edgwater
Hotel, Bathsheba.
Fresh Lobster Cocktails.
Turkey and Ham.
Goddard’s Fresh Cam-
bridgeshire.
Pork Sausages.
Peach Melba.



69



KIDNEY
TROUBLE

Here's a medicine made
specially for it .

Tf you suspect that there's
“ something ” with your
kidneys it Generally means that |
they need a corrective medicine. -
Neglected give rise to
various distressing ptoms
such as backache, rheumatic
pains, lumbago, sciatica, bladder
moat th scalding and

peg ae starts Meg ae’
eys grow sluggish an
fail to perform their thek natural!












harmful impurities from the §
system. You can restore these |
_ or, to normal activity ©

act directly on the

kidneys and you will very
quickly feel = good they
are doing. Try them for
your trouble. Go to
your chemist and














conditions and the
form to rigid standards of purity.

a eee ees

ener UY meu Memes Loy

e
annie $< ——————— — ———

SSSCSSOFOSSSSES GOSS SFOS SOS SSS SOS SE

FRIDAY,



AU FRIDAY, AUGUST 8, 1952 8, 1952

————| Rain Curtails Play In

(From Our Own

Widespread rain
Cricket programme. In only

interfered with today’s

Correspondent)

LONDON, Aug. 7.
County
one match at Southen where

Essex are playing Gloucester was there no interruption.
Gloucester declared at the overnight score of 299 for eight
but on the easy paced wicket were quickly overtaken by

Essex for whom Dodds and

Avery opened with 88 in an

hour. Horsfall was dismissed when only nine short of his
century and Insole was able to declare at 377 for eight.
Before the close Gloucester had scored 32 without loss.

At Birmingham where the tour-
ists are playing Warwick only
just under two hours’ play was
possible. During that time the
tourists advanced their overnight
score of 60 for two to 152 with-
out further loss, Adhikari, the
Indian’s Vice Captain still trying
for his first century of the tour
is 84 not out.

At Canterbury, Dough Wright,
Kent and England leg spinner
took his hundredth wicket of the
season when he bowled Morgan
of Derbyshire for four.
SCOREBOARD—

Essex versus Gloucester

Gloucester............ 299 for eight
declared and 32 for no wicket.

Essex.......377 for eight declared.

Kent versus Derby

Kent............ 179 and 182 for

Derby .ccscsssees 340 (bad

- County Cricket

light

meres & play).
ants versus Middlesex
eh .. Asestbiagale 337 for nine de-

Middlesex............ 153 and 26 for
three (rain).
Leicester versus Yorkshire
Leicester............ 142 and ten for

267 (Halliday
67; Goodwin 5 for 63).
Laneashire versus Sussex

Sussex............ 325 for nine de-
clared.

Laneashire................ 23 for one
(rain).

Notts versus Glamorgan
Glamorgan 120 and 28 for no

wicket.
Notts....5..:.... 238 (Simpson 80;
Shepherd 5 for 58).
Warwick versus the Indians
The Indians............ 152 for two
(rain).



—

FLORAL

2le. each

10, 1,

















Modernise

GLAZED WALL TILES

and counter tops.

walls and furniture.

Phone 4267



only 25¢. each
"KERCHIEFS





WITH

FLOOR TILES in Your Verandah and Kitchen

Red, White, and two shades of

Speckled Cream 6 x 6, 4x 4, 3 x 3.

White Black and Blue.
ALUMINIUM MOULDING for counter edges
TEMPERED HARDBOARD for partitions, door panels

RED HAND ‘S’ GLOSS PAINTS
RED HAND MATINTO FLAT WALL PAINTS for



CAVE SHEPHERD & CO., LTD.

12 & 13 BROAD STREET

i. Home

for Bathrooms & Kitchens



OO0O00 00006,

'
function of helping to filter away j |

taking De Witt’s Pills. ‘|

WILKINSON & HAYNES €O., LTD.







$
°

j

An age-old equation on which our costing has been
consistently based. It illustrates three facts:
One is that of value.

The second, embodied in the text, is proof of
careful buying.

The third is in the expressed satisfaction of our
customers who, ‘in turn, have introduced us to
their friends.

C. B. Rice & Co.

Merchant Tailers

26.9-909890040060090600004 000000000000000000000000000009006 000006 204













Full Text

PAGE 1

BARBADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY. AfCfSf A, lMt CLASSIFIED ADS. Tfie^HOWf :not MM: HEXT HOU&KS AUIVIIV. w, .dri*t m-.-, ttK.il lleaUiuri. CO" - fiarace rj %  kNtl V > s ss—*-.! !** rim ci> ir nl-nd Kr< • l- %  %  :. I II K II \.\ •an April H-k I., perfect ruDKi. l-k>h I !...• B9-MT -, ill MeerH Mi. '..PP 1| %  %  %  I %  I, .. I Dial m Hill 81 Mlcn* %  %  n%  %  %  %  fw*i suo (or n I M-Ii MM M.ono*. IMl "bd.Kl 14 < %  p .1 *i 00. IMl Au*dn A-e >a.*uOQ 1*40 Ford I'reteet — MOO 00. H> Vaiuthall U hp POO M. 1MB rout* Ma> oa inn al .. %  %  .ISSSl LM, llnlold St. J.O \N —a nailing Hai i i. OVdlMmat TtMK-l and Sain. Plr.aau. Pan) %  *%  WAKTEII rjsCO CARS w* !> %  *• an a m itm m l .1 really <..! tiaraein. Includin* V.ut. (•all Veto*. Aiiaim A40. Wolarkry 11 h_p .. S...1 ,., .hn % %  Ii B| i ...,ie I Or—. and dinm* WM M Kitcnen'tte Uiioom. Servant'* Hootri and Garale. i Im „.-i %  II a-im Apptv fl Warcraar ""vane I or TU !••• aBABBS rn AIF MB Central r—Mdry l*d MI W ; B'eruit IT i id IM Paai.tatltBaa I M 147 Bdoe Sblpp.n* Tr.idm* CO. lAd Trip above .hare, will b( Ml yf da* BN I.pub** eem >f tpyan at our ran**. JnreStreet, %  llda f lila n, oat PUda* M it 1 p m YiMfrwoon novci i visor.,i i.n HAl I. "HAD lobrtq.K-lT oppoaHe tha ri'imr* la "WaOrrtoo-i Si Wlc' *-' *Hh MP1 eajuare (t of Urul tnerel ol .hkh about M.230 -qua re fevt ".t %  UlUiblv lu. Kltclwn Cl-rdl U Tl!a taaa poni.md..wi nl and dm m> laoaaa. Tltraa badroaaaa 'cm witt itriaa U if ra*a>. Kiun.n . Etoriricitv ... and (lovcrnnwnl WaWr aarvwaa In .i.iiad. 11 %  *<-! to" on appllotkan on Mta 'rhBbovr protyvrV/ will be art up I" ,ial b v PMbi cotnpi'tnion til OUT om.. ••< Hfldtvtown. ... THUfiS TANK ENGAGES ENEMY IN KOREA i i M i i-.ii \i HELP -nn t*i ti-—1 raoulf*" ll Tta*liiiB Corp. !:..I_"ii(du>v.r. n %  -.... J.u l-yjal'laim ~l . 7,., .. MISC-fiLLANKOUS ;.mil l/i"n v iT" ftL. Saal lOSl HMM> LOST I.IVKST1MK Irv public COBlBBBUIMti at >!>*• %  | Mo II. Mllh 9ln*t. 11rl.lf-w.wi i rrlda.it \ t : MM MECHANICAL ir r--con.lillon^l Apply: Ttr mlatWn O I. ptlnit "ondltHiti Owner k.* • Hr-.d Mrll-.r Si Maru>i HI. John o a sa-3n r.uii Oidinar Slur*, nl HOB *a. HAflltAllos CO UI'IHATIVF BANK LIMITED __ COTn-B. C'ATFOBD a CO. Mkw 11 >1 AUCTION MISCKIXANFOITS A HAROAIN Umltcd qiiantlk...( |L,bbr Oardrn Ho— M Dt par It A l| ,r. UlajM A C-> Ltd Dial 4121 • B.U—3n SWmm-KI TaUKtTI J97a Q Q IBMT -nl %  I lalurn aap.o to G>or(r Kn,*ht •**( %  %  I h Oh. IB U-ii. ITT Jl— Jld F urn to of Trn T*hpi %  GOVLR.YWST NOTUE IlltO IIICAST ON Till' I'RO. i %  TiON Ol IIOMtS AiiMNM iic^ Kir AM: DAMAOI fl> Mr. W. M. WOOIHlOrSK. VII1IU minuici pMl ciiiin u n B i Au(u, Mr. W. M !.... A.IM.W.. BuilttliiK %  .t„BritUh Wcsl lndi f < fusion Strvie** UmiVwl on lit" utiiictiut of homer t4Plni hurt enne dnnuift*. „ „ Itava In alnrM AI^CtX'INC" a rAOPrnlratad Thill and BVdT Drlnh for Horaaa. Caltla. Sherp. I ia> .ml *;.nt' Prlcr 5 bo' :taatm LTD iin-iit m'i i. niNii-i ftfi %  .'it' UP' 1', and 1 in %  U-PTBTpmt null rtinr* KiiBhl Por.p*r in In i FTICM llr and tv EN014SH POTATOES — fc. Git'anB Craawy a, Co., Lid :trpi. nnr Public Bulldlnfa -KWeiJaV—Wt h. % %  of Irnval .idem*. *h< Wm. Air. or Car KMC.MT" LTD ito ol th Admli ..I lh* ratalr Ol Bartha iwilaa MM I will -*ll on Frid ay K b at I p I UATTFITA* WaTW ROAD. I Churrh doub.r r.rd hon-p I4.X9XH. TKKMS CASH < >K PALI HAMMKR to b*< ramovad Aatcara MKUIZIK '.•MS. •AL AT AIPTIOS iK.rtSF* -TV .3' Rldlni Horva r -old .it thp I'addach al ISO p PROVrKH* a • Ba| "•a^dBJTBV 1 ^5^a3 ^^^BBpp*'^^"* Ifitni* 1 Pr*$$*M TuniH To Accvpt kffonn Plan TUNIS AUK. 7 %  %  .i.immt* Btnorha, hand Ml IN lection had a on " Be> i" *niirui>.. !,.".i the Tun a few mil B i Ha> Suli ha's mmJM II.. naj UM KM in. bttund UM nvt*-yeai pioKramrrar which would gaVf H" ... i Hif5 and more jobs in their ROVeronwul —U.P. SHIPPING NOTICES ROYAL NETHERLANDS STEAMSHIP CO. Ml IM, I ROM PI SUP) la) AlMpaat, IIU > "Ih Au(u*1, '•* JJrd A u Bull 1M1 ltrA 9th Aofuat, IMS tu. INI. in n sopr IISHiMi r\* \MAMIMi I 1,1-11 1.1 l\s \ ^tiir. jiiix Ausiurt,. %  VIUMi III IHISIIIAO a I I l< \P s i.|JK'JOP, lHh Au^iaat INT t s HlRA. IHh Sai-t ' >!• Thai MV MOHDtA" *iM rcotM Ca. and pi.—-,.ajar. U paanlr %  %  ttll ag ManIt a M v A^lBRCrwill arraw ,.nd Pv-atrr. lor Dominira, A "turn* Idoniwriat. Hawk ^-o •" RUM RaiU-al rdaj IBth Inat %  W 1 -i HIMIM n "•smA.-m i Mm-. AMC i • •• %  Hill Trlaphaaa No aMl Caiiaiiimi Naliuual Sleamships LI.K. Cabinr! ConshI< k rs \id For Iran UNDER THE DIAMOND HAMMER IV. Irartrucnoni raaalvad from the In auranra compan' I will IPII by p Bai aiirtlon at Maaara Port Royal Oar.p M Friday naal ihr llh Au|uil at 1 p in oaa Morrla I aJl|dniiy damaiird m aprldrnl TarmB eah DAM. A | 11 Aurlionppr II1-I" JN0ER THt IVORY HAMMER I KKir.HTl I r. 1UBSI 1MBB uw to M SaMr .lattaph rr-Bland'. IP.IIHK Italty Nr* r " anrMnB in lurbadoa bv A a law daya a(l-r publlpati...%  nndoa. Contact Ian Oala. C/ Ado %  ta Co.. Lid. Loral BrprrarM-i!., al. sill rt..M-|J4l Iruurane* Co., 1 will aall on Friday Au|uit Hth at tha Courtcav Uaiaa.WhltaparR Hood, ll> INS A-40 I'lck.,, lOMly dona COM mlleai. Forn.rr.v tin ...aupriv ol tha PBIMa Boy.' Club Iiarnaird in nuidrnt Term* rah Sala at 9 p.m. VINCKNT fiRIFTITH. Auctionp< i • %  %  ; ii ^ILVIR HAIll %  llvar R,.: mrntlBdJ Cabr* hava now '. ,mtV* Motklay Coma am VBflTIAN BLINDSMade to or VI i.i-lal lalnmlnlUBBi All IIMB, % %  %  % %  ' %  immprflatp dallvrry Wra>. TARTAN Mptal Company o BarbaOaM Advocate I | M" WKLDINU MATCRiALS %  < waktbiB alaa Bra *p#.| Nr-iIm Acrtvic.p waUtlng Dial MBI. md m m. \v r IHRKKANE IM5EfAlT10N HINT No. I WARNINGS. QM in extra food, especially il.n.i: thai will r'i|uire llltlr -.•!* inu or pMaanBan, The following bonai Barbados: Silver Trail £775: True Foot C50; Sailor Bear-£ WO I Water Hir-' K'OO: .1"! He... E700. Apply O. P. BEWTETT, Royal Hotel, Hasting'; YACHT *m*.l >u„d Y.fht. complrill, il.n..,, ,r. p.ddk. ..-"ln| .lc !<> % %  Ua |,,.lrr.b. T.IOI. IBM T •.•*—3, IM IM H >OII IS NOTICE PARIIB iip HI run. IP UNDER THE SILVER HAMMER On TUeaclay llln bi ordar of i.|,i 1. r Nonpar we will aell hla FUrnlMr. .it Aahlinry. St li...rr which lacludcVey Nl. Dminf. Table iReat 10 C,.IA.-, Hall Tablra and Ctialp iJacobean U,.aki Bbalra, Waaajon. IJajuor Caaa. M l Saahlna Table DaobU .ad BlnBlF..I ''iMii-ha-H and 9ettrr. pnubnikr Tabl. llnakaaM. iBlaaDutmi. Chain, Ho. *•-.. Ornarai'iit and KldnnTablea. PUI TI>Mk. RevolvlnB DaaR Ch.ilr. Cl.ert.ii ,. ,ili in Maboaany lleiblcr C"alr ain>,; Hi*.. St.,, ,i I mp; l.irfp Cj p. HonKahrll; IMic Pl#i : ..rtptl ,.nd Sliver Wale. Bra M Rowlv S I' Hid Wnter IMih and Covar. Idcqurar Ira Sat Large Trlraropr HIM %  • dlil IP.II— Mlriflla MihoK Be k MTHOUOH MOUND ACTION in Korea continue* to be light. a %  the Government report which howoxl 1 he whulesale pi Ice Index up four-hfths of one per cent, in July over June. It was tha lint holes al e price Inciease since l*may became Premier last March and It sent investo.s scurrying for hard currency insurance to protect themselves agulnst chaiii eaction inoraa s ea in retail prices nd the cost of living Index. —U.P Am 11. i I'i 1ry tahlbitmni ail Otrir hat r mulrrilBnpd %  %  Aue ..I m-I lida.^liWi. %  H atrsi i( Par 0*1 Ihe llith Reptembn i,,i..| ISU. A birth CetllAcati mnal b.I.H--..I, IUi an Bpfpllration Inrm oho-ned fpon !.. %  P-.rorh.al Trawaurar %  OPaaa %  8 W SCOTT Clark to Uia VaaU>, 81 l'hilip When your BACK ACHES... BacaarhaiauaaaU r <.*wd h, la., Uahaf 1. 1)*kal.w,*...ihrbl*oarBlBri. WKaa IS.. ,.| out at ardar. airau acpia Bad paiaanoui watlra itir in tha iTBlara Thar, aacaaraa. hBadacha. rnsaa dlurbed real ar thai tired out' saaa folaw. Ta aaaae ym kianayi p*"ppH and Ivare^tlNin in raad ardar u.e Dodd-. K.,W, IMl. Laadd • KMaPf I'Jl. auarali nd „*., o..,44--d ItfaaM "I atcaa* icxli and traalar to thai parr, HMM bload fbwl la arert oerra ang aaaaKMV Taaa paa laal BBSaa-laak Uobw -wt WWr and yon ara raadt la aW* with py In.i.l w the (ar-akta Dadd'i Kidra, hi. to UMu. packaar ilh tha rrd lasaas, 0nl| I/al ail an* Mara*. ... iri wart FlhiuSH TO-DAY Thr* ^Toll^^ a ia\inii \l'a^ 1 ll'Ml*. latino %  % %  " — K letter., and UP I P Ku.h .. and BIBtcreeii ruab. Hope I II.10 up Screen F> '. %  "I STAN. V fOBT ACX-OUNr INO. COKM1V -HKIMMI -• %  OK HIiriNO An "li.leml. CWtrta .for award of Dip' na aa Aaaociata or Fellow) wi loamy you lor hlaher atatua by II ripatliiB MWie-tlmc POSTAL STTJDV -.tli p*pert tufon. aUARAh-raaCJ ->UHKES In Knaltah. Commercial ai>d .-..w %  ubjerta. Londan Chaeaawr a. .omrncrcc H S. A Initltutr ol Com I' MIF.IC IIOOKin, .•niTB NOW i 0 Ut. leedlna tuloriaJ, rxt.iute lor nv-iirn %  mdanU. LOH-i ION SCHOOL OF ACCOUNTANCY a Welbcek Street. Lond, rO-PAY' S MWS FLASU Ptlt. ASSORTMENT OF Walking Sticks Just received by UND0W N > f What yea mm4 ate (he life[ Bivinir vttamim and mnafali ( of YfcAM -PHOS. laioy life 1 ike fall! You'll feel %  JtUss with YEAST-PHOS I.INIUAI TONIC A. M. WEBB suarkbrafcer OPKN FOR ULTSINBcIS AS USUAL IN UARBAiJOS INVESTMENTS M Broad ML. BrMgetowii. (Over riiomla Pha ra aaiy) [Mai 4196 — Hears: 9—3 Egyptian Doctors On Tour Of U.S. Medical Centres NEW YORK. August T, Egyptian doctors arc uainu American "wonder" anti-British drugs for the widespread treatment oi patients suffering from a ver disease, anaemias and fllarb one of Egypt's top biochemists u>l%  the Unllsd Prtu today. Dr. Mohamcd Abdcl Salem El Ay... 11 and eighteen other visitu.,. doctors from faculties of mcdlcln. Ibrahim Pasha University 11. Cairo were here on the flrst lap Ol their American tour of medical centres to study recent discoveries id methods. "The easential purpose of our hip is scientific." Dr. Ay/I "We warn ii> we youi laboratories and rMa i x h work t %  aa to gel a new Idea back in <>n country." During their live-day stay HI New York where they are guest N of the Inboratones division of the American Cyanamid Company, ihey will study administration of ;>ureomvcin in New York hospltals. The "wonder drug" is of particular interest because it has beer found "effective against a number nf diseases that for centuries have been a scourge in Egypt and the rest of the Middle East". —D.r. WASHINGTON, Aug. 7. Diplomatic officials said Thursttaj tlt.it MM poMih.Ut of llnanClal help for Iran wan considered hv the British Cabinet, but such measures would tjv dvpendenl on strong steps being taken against the Communist Tudeh part*. They said Brlli.*h Ambassador Sn Ohvt'i Franks was expected to confer with The Secretary of St.de Dean Acheson on the latter '< return from Honolulu this week-end in regard to Brltnh : .umnu'iidations on Iran •ported British Charge d'affaires Oorge Middleton in Iran cabled the British Government that recent riots in Tehran and other Iranla-i cities showed Ihe national iron" party of Prime Svliiuatcr Mohammed Mossadegh. bfe < lost control ol crowd*, to the Ttitieh Party and II was ibis serious factor which caused Churchill to summon his eahlnet to a special meeting. Officials said th.Cabinet Was also disturbed by measures reportedly taken by Mossadegh to prevent forciin diplomatfrom conferring with the Shah as it is believed they would benefit Communist action in Iran. They stressed that Britain would tnke no action in Iran except in close co-operation with the United States and that ways and means of preventing Iran from falling under Communist control would hare to be agreed ,>n in consultation with US. Latest information from Iran indicated that the Shah and Iraniafl army leader* believed Ihe menace of Communism to Iran to i-r. .-. vei-v reel on.. ,d present. —(O.P.) It Lilian ia 11 MliU l Au| m .J-**: i k • 8*P' laapL HScpt ANAD1AN tHALLFNOrn 11 Sept IS Sept Mftept IS Sept un nbBOM aS Be |H M Sept 71 Sept S Oct. T Or. -.oKiint.it -1. Ai.lv.. Airlraa Arrieea Plarbal.. It. I.-.1.. Baataa ataaatraal T Auu 1* An* BS Aufl SS Aitr 1 AH AD LA N is Au* •S Au* W An* BSept 2£2 .IS ANAOLAN CaaULaaUl ANAIIlAN e-OMTSU-TOH 1 sen* II Sea.*in |*M ^%  rK 1 Oet .' Sa,i 1 Oct 11 Oat. II Oct 1 AN ALU AN CHALI ENOFrl USt NaSLBO.'. IB >%  S Ori H fits 10 Oct. 11 Owt 11 oet %  }; lar larlhrr parHaBlaea. appll •*— GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD.-AenU. .'.-,'.-,->'.-.'-*.-.*,v,v.v/v///. Conference Ends In I lulu HONOLULU. Aug. 7 Provocative rhythms swaying hips and hula dancers helped th. weary Australian and New Zealand diplomatic ministers anc" military advisers ta forget th.' weighty prohloms at the Anxuo Conference now underway. Ukuleles and guitars drowned mono' %  COaafll %  once relaxed at the Marine Ofllcar*' Club clo* t lo the confei ence hall. The Aussieand Net* Zealan.1tC9 were engaged on Wednesdnnight in an Informal serious dr cusslon when lien Luin pret" Hawa.ian Chinese-Spanish lelephone operator began a slow undulating Hawaiian dance. Raise 1 eyebrowi soon gjve way to intense concentration on the dance Miss I .urn's impromptu hula— without grasi skirt or sarong— but Brian an ordinary print dress brought broad sin I lus and many encores. The spectators agreed that the hula was one of the most relaxing diversions from .he conference thus far.—U.P. tJt^^LJ^^ C E GTRANSATLANTIQUE 3 Sailings from Southampton to tluadeleape. Marttaiqae, ; Barbados. Trinidad. La Gnalra. Caracae f From Snuihampton Arrives Ba w tMiis J; "COLOMBIar .. 3l8t July, 1953 ltth Aug., 19S3 f "-DE GRASSE" 22nd Aug., 1981 3rd Sept.. 1983 I 'Not calling al Guadeloupe SAILING FROM BARBADOS TO Ml Fratn Barbadlea Arrlrea SaiTthaasaMai J • %  •DE GRASSE" 6th Aug-.. 1952 .. 16th Aujp. 1963 >; "COLOMBIE" . 24th Aug., 1982 . Sth Sept, 1962 I *'DE GRASSE" .. 16lh Sept., 1982 .. 26tb Sept., 1992 •Sailing direct to Southampton R. M. JONES CO.. I/ri)..— Agenta. NOTICE tans iiieed? 1 oat *ou %  BULOVA WATCHES Only a few in stock as the quota is limited. BUT YOUR BEST BET IS TO GET ONE They are real magic when it comes to quality. IT Jewels Goa ran teed Y. DeMMA 4% CO.. LTD. 20 Broad St. and Marine Gardens %  •"sSeJiS-Wi lake *>>* Mlr.KODI' M,. ramluus ^AMI'kOU 1 hvlpa \tiur kulntv, puril\ the hi.i.id. gel ml oi j>.„. that niak> tin ..I and mix Australian Golfer Plays Last Game In Britain LONDON. Aug. 6. Norman Von Nula. Australia's .mint tournament golfer hns i.i.ved his last competitive game 1 Britain. The Aussie profes.M.il Ip-ft f. in.bonM in Sydney ifUr failing lo place among the %  p prize winners in last week's 'IMIO guinena Test. He said he could not he hack 'In ill 1 have %  lade six trips to Britain, won IS 1 d picked up •00 In th* sen-on of 1947, but on". Von Nida said. iut that ii not the sole reason he BvMK Me suggested jial heavy taxation of prlrt^ noiiev did not make it worth rvhlle for oversees players to nmi to this country any more. —\7P*In Man 1 .1 Slate da ilar i loead gt 1 dtscou 3 29 32 pei cent U. Canadian funds, down 3 33 from Tuesday dose. That is. Ii tool. (>i 3*2 cerna Canadian to bu: ."in The pound -trilln 2.6".. down '* from I'ues Israel Has Al Oil Prospects By STLWART HENLEY WASHINGTON, Aug. 7. If Ball Petroleum Consultant said Thursday that "prospects are excellent" lor development of a considerable oil industry 111 Israel but the '-only way o prove the potential (R bv drilling Ball and his son Douglas were n-lainea by the Israeli got in 1960 to study and report on tin oil prospects of the country. Th*' also helped in preparing the tanaU Petroleum HU which rerornly passed the first reading ,n Knesset and Is expected to win final appro'.'.! i>\ the end of ihis month. Hall said Israel offered one of the best opi>ortunitle of any foreign country for Uie investment of outside capita). He said al a press conference "I would rather do business in Israel tha'i ; ny place In the world outside the United States and the British Commonwealth so far as the %  tablltt* of the country and the government l concerned." He nld Israel has shown "absolute fairness in dealing with foreign capital," and that the 1 %  %  1 Petroleum Bill offers foreign developers th.IWraal terms of anv countrv in th.wOr'rL -r.p. Wc wish lo notify our Castomen that our Workshop Department will he lo-. .1 from Monday 11th August to Saturday 23rd August. 1952, fiotnTlays inclusive, in order to give our Workshop Staff their Annual vacation. There will be a skeleton staff on duty for any emergencies. Our Office, Parts Department and Petrol Station will be open as usual. COLE A CO., LTD. PHONE 4316 In Touch With Barbados Coastal Station %  iMp rugfLgaa n 1 • %  %  ii.cn rial .hip. til lltttttttWer • • ItPl". Del PariftrTrader. %  %  ll.irfMtO, a.I • rthnn. a %  r.*r Wnrrnter. aArrli,. Skandmavln. s* Ariatntpl.. GOVERNMENT NOTICE Attention is drawn to the Control of Lumber Prices (Defence) < \mendmnt) Order, 1952, No. 4 which will be oubtlshed in the OiBcial Gaaatta of Thursday, 7th August. 1952. 2. Under this Order Ihe maximum retail selling price of "Merchantable White Pine I" x 6"—11". 6' and up Is as follows: — COLUMN ONE Article If not saved bat seeking A | BalraUon. please writ* for jj, FREE HOOK "GOD'S WAY OF | SALVATION PLAIN" J a Rot>rU. OOTpel ' Book Tncl SarttM, 30 \ .; Oratnl AT... Buior. MX V.W/.V/.V/.V.W//A-.'.' M.TChantabl. White Pine Ix -—11". ' and up (B..IC Sli.il .. COLUMN TWO Ordinary Retail Price (not more than) aaW.OO per 1,000 board t~l WF. •//.lr)WA HAVE — — III l IIOIII IM. 1'VIM at S I..'ill per l.allon Tim CKXTH.M. IMI'tntllM d and Tndor Sis. f>Caa-VV>>r.HERCULES BICYCLES A Haw Shipment just upeiMd. &f Also Parts such as . B1CYC!.E FRONT FORKS REAR and FRONT BREAK RUBBERS and SHOES BREAK STIRRUPS complete REAR and FRONT FENDERS ETC. No need lo nv that these bicycles are as the name Implies — Strong, Durable and are well-known. &f A. E. TAYM.OR M.TD. Coleridge Street Where Qualities nre HIGH And Prrr.-. are LOW '. '. '. Bine 41M.



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FRIDAY. AUGUST s BARBADOS \i>\<)< m PACK I BY CARL ANDERSON BLONDIE nc\ ~"L SE n %  .: TO THE A3£ NOW wnEOE TH6V CAM ft ft v BE HELPPUL TO THEIR PAPENTb BY CHIC YOUNG / % % %  %  //'fice-c^AM S CONES NN1TN OUR DIMES FLASH GORDON BY DAN BARRY WELL PfPN' rev NBM *w T X DON'T TOUCX ME f ^&' I? I RCMEW6EQ' I AM VOuR \i 1/ V OUEEN'XAM THE fft/LER ^T •^ ^^ O* SANVMEDE .' mm JOHNNY HAZARD BY FRANK ROBBINS festiVJ'fiflsdiJfci ""iNRiNG UP FATHER B Y GEORGE MC. M ANUS TkS >.. DUGAMS jfilf' RIP KIRBY BY ALEX RAYMOND THE PHANTOM BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES M 1041 THE kIR CUC *l£T8HNt>' %  vi.;. i'.: .••;• :.,v \ WHEN A COLD STRIKES, STRIKE BACK FAST... USTERINE ANTISEPTIC End Rheumatism While You Sleep v r*i •*"• %  •<-" •'*•"• %  <• .,. tw-n... ii a*->-a .-r • ..I M MHM4 I %  •> %  l*HJ %  • •> %  •'!** I'll" %  %  ['— l KU%  :.-,. .,. I.IK|. IU".-I ...-0** 'O.It.-l -P Ni|M." •..••hat. U^M^t. Lag Fi !" NcttwiLack • l — '9. Apt.I.I. ||i O'OImun kill til. MM '""''• *il.l Cralaa m4a tfca*. itwln. %  y ••movlrf th. .-i... C* C*'aa Horn •mr i.lwiiial i* r.uaf.n-. In .Tou- ou -HI % %  ballai anil k* eomplnaly Ml Ii — < %  •!. .:Cytex USTR1M AntiMtpflc kill, millions k(i. IKJX-ALI. CI.EANSKH } !' ii J* SI'ltlNKS * • HEMII S I'AILS ittks HY SI'HAY >-JJ n I i ii olna. Tim 4.IJ Wil^ 'tin. %  ] I'iiit Tins D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street um i im iiii im i i i mmm m i l mi % 


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ntuvw uc.rst R. i5i BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGF MVB Spi'itthl'town Rounil. I p: Lord Willoughby Pays Visit To Speightstown The new Government water boat •'Lord Willoughby" made her first visit to Speightstown yesterday morning to supply water to the Harrison Liner s.s. "Forester" which is loading sugar there. $12y 2 mJump Cigarette In B. G 's Half Smugglers Year Exports Tracked Down She was not accompanied by law barge. A shipping clerk tolil the A** vacate thai it was the first timea water boat went to Speightstown to deliver water. The Forester arrived at Speightstown over the last weekend and sailed yesterday evening. She took over 3.000 tons of sugar for the U.K. Last l-oad Of Sugar Only one more ship is expected to call at Speightstown this year to load sugar. The date of its arrival is not fixed. All the sugar now stored at Speightstown and Sixmen's is expected to be shipped out by that opportunity. Canes Withering Young cane crops in the Leeward parishes are beginning to show the effects of days of steady sunshine. The canes arc gradually losing their green appearance to look a bit withered. Vegetable crops tor are showing the lack of rain. Planters are hoping for showers early this month. T dad Team Arrives Here Tomorrow WATERPOLQ Swordflsh Defeats H.C. In Knock-out Competition Swordflsh defeated Harrison College 7—2 in the semi-final of the Division "A" Knock Ou*. Water Polo Competition at the Aquatic Club. Wednesday night. For Swordflsh. Beet scored three. Nestor Portlllo two. and Herbert Portillo und Geoffrey Foster one each. A. Taylor and C. Evelyn scored for College. Swordflsh will meet Snappers in the Anal on the 16th. Swordflsh did not play the same team they played in the Challenge Cup Competition as Dick Recce is no longer available. His place in the back line was taken by Maurice FitzGerald who played a fair game, but was not as outstanding as Reece has been. The other bock. Gerard Jordan, was the mainstay in keeping a perfect defence for Swordflsh. He was swift and troublesome always, and greatly assisted his forwards in getting opportunities to score. The other Swordflsh players all pulled their weight and tho team were always on the offensive. At the end of the first half the game was 2—1 in favour of Swordii.-Ji. but the fact that they scored five in the second half as against two In the first was more an indication that Swordfish got more into their stride then, than that College had them tied down In the first. College actually combined better in the second half than In the first. Then, players often threw the ball wide .of their team fellows in making passe*. In the second half. Swordflsh'* superiority over College KM clearly seen when College wern hard put to keep down Swordfish's scoring. Best who scored three was In fine form, but if he had judged his placing better and not send the ball so high, he would have scored more. College's second goal came after Swordflsh had already scored their seven, and at a period when Swordflsh were playing one short —Herbert Portillr, having been sent out of the water. The teams were: SwordlUh— Albert Weatherhead. Gerard Jordan. M. Foster. G. Foster. H. Portillo. N. Portillo, and Best. CoVege-Ceoffrey Jordan, C. Evelyn. A. Taylor, R. Felman. A. R. Armstrong, S. Grannum and Chabrol. 12 f.D'8 There were 12 notifications of Infectious Diseases for the month of July: Enteric Fever 5. Leprosy I. Tuberculosis 6, To-morrow a Trinidad Table TaOQ team will arrive in the island to take part in a series of games against Barbados This goodwill visit will not only sponsor better relationship between players of the two islands but will go a long way in disclosing what Barbados has to offer at the next Caribbean Table Tennts Championships. The team, which is from the San Fernando Zone of the Trinidad and Tobago Amateur Table Tennis Association, is the. first to tour the Island s:ncc 1949 when %  n All Trinidad side completely outplayed the Barbadians. Two players from the Son Fernando Zone were on the '49 team. They wore Errnl AJlcy^ie and Carl Williams. They were certainties for the present team but unfortunately AUeyne is unable to make the trip due to his studies. However. Williams will be here again. The following is a Who's Who of the San Fernando Zone team: Dr. Noble Sarfcsr: Skipper of the team. Held the championship of the county of Yorkshire, Eng-. land, for three years while studying medicine. Represented Trinidad at the World Games n 1948. A defensive backhand player with an occasional attacking stroke. An easy ityle but very difficult to defeat. Can be compared with Ronnie Inniss who visited Barbados with the Trinidad team in 1949. Carl William*,: Present South Trinidad Champion. A member of the team which visited Barbados in 1949. Has greatly Improved In bis attack since then and is now a more complete player. Fenwlek Debysingh: Former South Trinidad Champion and present runner-up. Played for Trinidad In 1948 .against" British Guiana. A backhand player but with an attacking style somewhat similar to Laurie Bates, one of tho members of the Trinidad team In 1949. Arnold Mendes: Most prolific smasher in Soulh Trinidad at 6 resent. Can be dubbed thr Ralph omes of the team. W'th Williams and Debystngh, represented South Trinidad in the Exhibition* games against the United State* Champion of 1951. Dkk Iftta*. Andrew Md*r' 'From Out GEORGETOWN. July 30. GEORGETOWN. July 31 British Guiana's export trade Customs officials here claim they for the first six months of 1952 have evidence io show that ?S :?£!£?, M7Z 7 l7 3 *n value. It per cent of American clgatetv* climber exaeUv $12,316,407 above used in the Colony come* through nLriJjrJf^o*'!" Ihr """'Ponding a smugging spiral which nets 11 • "I J .. Ih niasierminds between 1500 aii W? Thu .,!.*^tr.?S!, *i ,72 V dollars. And most of it takes ulao7lg. This unfavourable external i n Reors*tiwn trade position is to be watched £* !" g*twn. .incc the odds in the rU* rfE Cus V wn9 "l yealarday crease between exports and im"P !" ** n organised campaign ports lie with the imports. against the racketeers and by su i The ratio of increase In the down 6,00 American cigarettes value of imports on the 19Sl figure were led from a Imports climbea by $14,333.of the ship. Fines were imposed 154 over the figures for the first > %  the Comptroller. six months of 1951 to $43.433.W3 After the seamen had declared for the first six months of thu their cigarettes. Customs Officers *"££. ^-i !" .. . made a t ulck check-up and found XiWytTti'S&Z 'VZ "SITES „*. point of view of exports, are both *, lnvMll <'> provided the Increased production and en*on P'rol.cr of Customs with evihanced prices II is indeed, tomeatnc "lat Urge quantities of what exalting to look back to 1938 cigarettes are let down the side to see what was the position in * shipsto 'bomb-boats' at the that last normal year before the 'ate of one 'biggie* (a large bottl.great war's outbreak, and to comof Demcrant lum, per carton, pare it with today. British GuiThese boats bring the supplies ana's external trade in 1938 was ashore to certain points; and in valued only $23.739.036—not equal a whisper it all disappears in cereven to the value of exports for tain channels, the first six months of 1932. How Machinery for constant watch much more dwarfed is the posion everv boat will h* omtit* At lion in 1938 when compared with c i Hr ed the romntroTl-^ Si the actual 882.181.058 in external n^nwnt ISK2 .' ". J I trade for the first six months of ^"' m ,nl Uunched a "secret this year? And this figure is ^ P " against the trade mi 526.850.355 above what it was for hcse ***** !" ,rults of lho trie comparative period of 1951. "** • Increases Under the laws of British GuiThere has been increases in ?"? %  "* JE! 0 ". !" c, l or havvolume or value in many of the i"* ""cal-jmed goods must pay a items exported, principally sugar. nn f •mounting to three times thbauxlte. rice, molasses, greenva u of the goods or 8500 whichheart, spirituous toilet preparaov r s th higher, In default serve tlons. balata. fish glue. wine, char*'* months' Imprisonment with coal, matches, and plantains. Al"*rd labour. The Ordinance allows though there was a decline in the the Magistrate no option of a rcnmount of rum exported—788.121 duced penalty. It is obligatory thgt proof gallons of overproof rum. the sentence must be Imposed, ami B.273 proof gallons or underNo licences are Issued for the rS£ *A to clner "tcned Importation of American clgarS '.muo?S rtatist.es show Indus'^•"''an? .lESS ^Tt T trial machinery and other goods of -2 !" .,,. ,>* ' £?* a more or less capital nature to ?!„?*.£ fr0m paSfien eri •" 1V have been heavy. These Included '•• or fhips crews coming ashore machinery for agricultural purrcr their P !" onal use. poses for the sugar industry for ___^^^^_ mining, as well as motor cars. trucks, vans and other motor C/-J____— WaT/^* %  w*oi Oavi/i-itef* Wins Of the total import trade of h S43.4S3 885 the United Kingdom's share was $17,287,112 or 38 78 per cent of the total. In return, British Guiana sold to Britain $14,481.830 worth of local produce, or 37.49 per cent of her total exports for the six-month period of the yei Mote FinianciaJ Help Proposed For Colonies LONDON. The lack oi adquat investment in the under develnped territories inspires a Labour Party proposal for an extension ol financial assistance under the Colonial Development and Welfare Act*. The Party's second policy publication since the General Election entitled "Towards Win Ul I'lrnty". issued this week makes the proposal without KOing intu details. White praising fui the C.D ami W, funds extension, Ihe Party will ur^e also, it is stated, increased facilities for the training of craftsmen and technicians in Britain in cooperation with Colonial Governments. "Further assistance," the Labour tury. but pmumuun grew very i*arty statement continues, "will be much faster, and the standard of men to the expression of techmliving rose Mibsti .itially." -Jl education within the colonial Dealing with further arguments teiriiones. and every possible —that population can grow faster effort will be made to secure for in the 20th Century than It could the colonies the technical experts in the 19th and that production tney require for more rapid econoCannot be increased as fast—the DUC dt'velupmciit." publication goes on to point out While Commonwealth countries that— must be the first concern of the "Contrary to popular belief, the British Government, the Labour white and coloured populations of PaRy, it is staled, recognises the the world are at pre: need for international action in 'his field of aid to the underdeveloped areas It offers support for some such international eifoi' H the International Development Agency, under consWkraUon to 'li Unltad Nations as a means of %  duun^ii-t nig grunts-kn-ald to under-developed countries for InUuin Fell In Spot* VIMH.I St. Juiiirs Rain fell in spots about St James yesterday. About IM p.m P gang of masons were erecting .< *all near St James Rectory when one of them noticed that raio was falling 20 yanl oouth o| tnesn The others joined him and watched the water running in the gutter* en I >f the n>u.i while the i lightly when I | ng. Cyclists who pajl tnem that they had seen the same Hung happen further north along Higrrwuy No 1 .ng at about the same rate, which is not as rapid as that at which the white population aincreasing 40 years ago." ()tie*.tiun Posing the Question whether the ilduilanl of living can be maintained, or Increased, by an Inm public services. This crease ol tw.. i*-i cm "i BMaTa In Agency, t xperU Imve forecast, world DVOChlCtwn during Usl next would require a fund increasing 20 or 30 year*, it Is stated that up to 3.000 million dollars a year, "with nn new continents to be The part under-developed counopened up, we have to rely upon tries themselves should play Is increasing the productivity of summarised as follows in "Tolands already under cultivation" Maids World Pl< As to how much new land can Much of the initiative, a grejt l*> brought under cultivation, it is S mrt ol the work, and a share of admitted that one of the major lie financial burden must coi from the under-developed coi trial themselves. Their govei ments face tremendous tasks. obstacles "Is politicalthe hostility to human migration in the 19th Century, it U recalled, the opening up of new lands was a*-, soclated with great movements of people out of Europe, India and Police Get Four Reports Of Theft Four thefts were recorded QD the Police Reports ycMerday Milcured Aswat of Mahogany Lane, City, reported that a valise valued $4.50 and containing clothing to tho value of $70 23. was stolen from her home on Tuesday. Coining and valise are the property of Salah Aswat l.ottir Holder of Bay I...n,i I'helaeii Road, reported that a hecp was stolen from the Gari ison Savannah between 6 a ni and 7.00 p.m. on Tuesday H was l .er property. Fifty-five holes of sweet potato** were ttulvn from the lands of Bannatyne Plantation Christ Church, during Tuesday. The m' ideqt was reported by Mr. J Marsh of the same plantation H Blackman of Airy Hill. St (ieorge. reported that %  goat was •!olnn from an open pen at his residence between 1.00 a.m. and IM a.m. on Wednesday Goodwill Minaior Visiting &.G. Our Own <*orrafn4mti GEORGETOWN, /uiy 30 A seven-man mission of economists, agriculturalists and legislator* from Surinam (Doteh Guiana) arrived here on Sunday ufit.itoon to discuss agricultural. .uici industrial problems. The visit la of a goodwill of the mission are Mr. %  1. Ch. Cuiiel. Minister of Econ;n tin* Minister of Fm.oire who is head of the mission, Mr. II Schut/. tctin* Head of the Agricultural Extension Service, and Messrs K Kanhai. J. S. Murtgr... T Soemlta, R. V W. Comeallus and E. F. Pierau, members of the Legislature. Mr Curiel on his arrival at Georgetown said that British Guiana is a little ahead of Dutch Guiana, and some of their problems have already been solved here. By informal dlscu.--sicn*. boOi countries could learn from each other. He disclosed that this visit as the first of a series to their South American neighbours as planned ii> tht Surinam legislature some tun* ago. Surinam, he said, hopes to stan On a 10-year development plan featuring agriculture, industry and economics, and it Is estimated they would require about 100 million guilders to start. Surinam, he added, hopes to get help. Must Win Confidenci "They must provide honest, efflChina cient and energetic administrations "There fctill remain muterwhich will win the confidence of populated lands in Australia, In their peoples and overcome the the Islands of South East Asia and apathy which everywhere hinders In Africa," the Labour statement development. There must be willgoes on. "but it is unlikely that Ingness to accept new ideas, to These will be settled by migration adopt new techniques and to enter from other countries." Into a vital partnership with the One way out of the problem advanced countries in an all-out wouid be improved techniques of attack on poverty." Population v. Production Towards World Plenty" begins with a review of the threat "In the praaaarl century" of a srorld i valion crisis. Food production 9 Mile Race GEORGETOWN. August 7. Barbadian wheelsman John Skinner won the nine mile cycle event as the two-day August While Canada bought $16,100,Olypmiad of the British Guiana S87 worth of British Guiana goods Amateur Cycle and Athletic (41.59 per cent of total exports), Union closed after sunset today she was allowed to sail us only t n the Georgttown Cricket Club'* SS.9I2.H69 of her goods—13.6 per grounds. Bourda today. Fearing cent of British Guiana's total Imspills as a result of the large ports. Strangely enough the Unit„umbe r of contestant*, all three d States had a bolter share of Venezuelans stood out and 35 ompetllors look she field. The the millloni of small farmers, says Labour. "If the fanners of Asia and Africa." it Is urged "could be helped to improve their teeh_ niques. food production can be In\m creased rapidly, and in fact more not increasing as rapidly as world rapidly than population will population, and "the extreme povgrow. erty of the peoples of Africa and ^^—^^ A'/a and the other under-developed areas is a challenge to the whole world." Development of Ihe underdeveloped areas Is essential. It Is stated, If food supplies are to meet, the needs of the world's growing / />//: /v DiSCOVSK} /MI cMuauunom PORT-OF-SPAIN. August 0 Trinidad had a grim, violent discovery week-end in which four futilities' uccurred. An alleged murder, a drowning and two ".her tragedies marred eelebralion*. Thousands of persons played carnival discovery on Monday about the stievts of Port-of -Spain t.. the tunes of the steelbands. —CF. The quality Metal PolUh our purchases during the period under review than had Canada. these amounting to $7,221,791, oi 16.6 per cent, of total imports race went well until the bell sprint when there was a <%>ili In sold to die United States only ,hcm Lindsay Cordon ihe local -champion, were brought down, and Skinner went on to will, with Walter Liddell (B.G.I secon I und L. A. ROBISON (B.G.) third. "h lap prize went to B.G. wheelsn.an C. P. Holder. The time was 40 minutes 40.2 seconds. Ken Famum's (Barbados) record -f 39 minutes 7 seconds stands NYLON Mil I US in l-lains, gfcripes and Florals W r $2,523,652 of local products, or 6.51 per cent of total exports 677 Candidates For Exhibitions To Secondary Schools Beatrice Clarke ol irinidad nnd Six hundred and seventy-seven Joyce Marshall of Barbados got children are at present taking first and second places reepectivcexuminations for Government ly In the quarter mile and two and Vestry Exhibitions tenable at mile ladies cycle events Inn Government-aided Secondary Landvrcught of Surinam was Schools. The examinations are third in the former and Trusrbcing held at Combermere. Mak of Surinam third In the Five hundred and sixty-one latter. The time of the quarter boys are taking the five Governmile was 38.3 seconds and of the men I Exhibitions and the two jt. two milo six minute*. Michael's Vestry Exhibitions. Of Walter Uddell wo n the special this number. 172 are taking the three miler with Franco Caocionl Second Grade. 99 the St. Michael's (Venezuela) second nnd Linilsav Senior Vestry; 81. the St. MichGordon third u>>osay ael's Junior Vestry; 81 the Junior The time was 7 minute* 43 3 First Grade; 79. the Senior First seconds, the track record helmGrade; 35. the Primary Fir-t lowered by 13.3 second-* Grade, and 14 the Renewal exam. Caecionl took the two miles inatlon. International, with Liddell second There are 116 girls taking 0I d WH1I „ „ "'/" three examinations; 39 are taking Guiana third. The time wa %  he Primary F_irs. Grade; 42 the mmulP8( 7 set ur| J *£* J ..i.ii 3a me no t compete. Lindsay Gordon won Ihe three miles International Championship population. The authors of the publication answer those who declare it U fiuittess to raise the standard ol living In under-developed arssM because any increase in production will at once lead to a corresponding Increase in population. Disproved "The experience of tho developed regions of the world does not bear this out," says the Labour S Miration. "The Western world 1 disproved the Malthuslan proposition that It is imiMtsslble to Increase production faster than population. Populations grew rapidly In Europe and in the America* in the Nineteenth OnGeorgetown \um*> .1 For Coronation Committee om Our Own Corrvtpoodcnl i GEORGETOWN. July 30. The Gcorgrtown Town Council rn Monday appointed a liv^-man Committee headed by the Mayor Mr. R. B. GairaJ, to decide what form the celebration of Her Majesty's Coronation should t.ik. in the City next year, and what provision should be made In the 1953 Estimutcs to meet the cost Other members of the Committee are Hon. Lionel Lurkhoo (Deputy Mayor). Councillors Percy C Wight. O B.E.. G. F. de Sebnstinn and E. W. Adams. The Mnyor'i Committee will collaborate with the Central Government who Is also appointing a rommltter for the arrangements in the colony generally. First Grnde Senior First Grade. Tht> Finest Qjfci WAFFLE PIQUE In Marina, Malae Emerald and Blue. Ludies' IPresses HARRISONS DIAL 2352 A. aide Range 111 T III H EAZfJEN with beautifully embroidered blouses, In Grey and Turqusiar. ** chlH0S1> ffO'Vl % %  vent by four lengths with N Mongul behind nnd Cncclonl thir>i The time was 7 minutes 54.4 seconds.—SCP) SPECIAL DISCOUNT 0/ 10% PEARL NECKLACES at your Jewellers . Y. lie I l>l \ & CO. im. 20 BROAD ST.. and at MARINE CiARDENM HURRICANE PRECAUTION HI NT No. 2. H IIIM.VI.S After o Hurricane — Do not touch loose or dangling electric wires. Report the il.un.i.v to the Police or the Company. 3.8.52—3n. Say. Mr.l^n king: •YOII CAN RE-LION IT %  I.INI1 Tilt XWl.KTEHT TREAT ."' alm Toffee MAIM-: IN l'K The Perfection of Confection. C'OTTOX % %  ni.vrs In several styles Including Z pe. Separates. Ballerina*, as well aa off-theshoulder Mouses Wtfb photo print skirts. Fine Fashionable DRESS GOODS MANY M.MvS ill ill I II BLACK & WHITK FIG SKIN....$1.II) per yd. PLAW SEA ISLAMD COTTON for Shirtu in White. Cream and Blue... $2.30 per yd. SII.MYRA CHEPE DE CHENE, in Acra, Brown. Pink. Rose and Green reduced from $1.28 to $L02 SAMBA SHUNS in 8 Different Designs reduced from $1.5P to $1.20 per yd. } FLOWERED FERGUSONS suitable'" tot Children's Dresses at $1.84 & $2.04 per yd. friFLOWERED : PLAIN TOOL1NA reduced to $1 50 per yd. CAVE SHEPHERD & Co., Ltd. 10, II, 12, 13, Broad St. Ill m i l I -I*\K. f TODAYS S^JMS/-^ SPECIAL "Q^) COOLING Delightful 6UAVA CREAMS &f A REAL {LUNCHEON PLEASURE KNIGHTS SODA FOUNTAINS Phoenix and City Pharmacies THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LTD. White Park Road. Bridgetown ENGINEERS, BRASS and IRON FOUNDERS Works contain modern appliances (or the execution of lirst-class work of all kinds, and especially to SUGAR MACHINERY and STEAMSHIPS Dealers In AGRICULTURAL MACHINERY and GENERAL ENGINE ROOM STORES of all Description IRRIGATION FROJECTS, PUMPING EQUIPMENT and ELECTRICAL INSTALLATIONS A SPECIALTY For Satisfaction, Quality and Service Contact THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LTD. Phone : 4548, 4650 Workshop Phone 4528 Stores Dept: I




EE ee —————————————————

BOE a A teas — tn ow








WHAT'S ON TODAY

Court of Common Pleas
Court of Ordinary .
Mobile - Tenias ma, Veuenne
oe Pm

Polive Bana at Old Seholars
St. Martin's School 9.00 p.m

ene

For the cause that lacks assistance
the wrongs that need resistance

in the distance
ne The ated that I can do

10.00 a.m
11.00 am
Plantation

ESTABLISHED 1895

Greeks Shell Bulgariaus
The Disputed Gamma ‘sland

U.N. Observers

Wateh Operation | Sesion Ends

ATHENS, Aug. 7.

; The Greek Army began shelling the disputed Gamma
Island seized by. Communist Bulgaria in a raid on July 23.
A Greek General Staff communique said shelling began at
9.30 am. in the presence of United Nations observers and
after-a radio warning.

It said “so far there has been no reaction”. The com-
munigue was issued at 11.00 a.m.

Gamma Island is in the Evros River which for ten
miles forms a frontier betwen Bulgaria and Greece, The
island has always been considered Greek but Bulgarian
troops landed there on July 23 aiid seized control after
killing two Greek gendarmes and wounding three.

The Greek Government Sear i

plained to the United Nations Sy ioe eo
Railroad

agaist the incident and the Or
ganizations Balkan WW ommussion
went to the scene,

Tne Greek toreign minister W k I
Sopnocles Venizelos two days ago or ers n
demanaed the buigarians to evacu- e
ate the island. As yesterday Greek Italy St rike
and Bulgarian troops were re-
awe pean up opposite the sides ROME, August 7,

The pedis More than 100,000 communist-
island = enthesras f poh led railway workers went out on]
last night th i ret aan a 24-hour nation-wide strike,
issued , ec “4 curtailing normal schedules but
Bulgarign trometer eine uj{tailing to achieve their goal of

ulgarian troops have appeared total paralysis in the country's
2 island of yr ee » It aisolvast railway system. The govern-

at Bulgarian! ment kept more than a skeleton
troops had occupied other islands; service going throughout the
ae this 2 al country with the aid of troops
_ mwevey morning a generalling 80,000 members of non-|
ee, Sdovomad ge Communists unions which refused,
few Bulgarians were observed on |‘? Jim the walkout. |
the Isle of Gamma, Alter] a; midday the Ministry of)
that from 9.30 am. to-day we be-)r-onsport in Rome said that}
gan a cannonade of the isle after | emergency crews were operating)
a radio warning and in the'aimost twice as many trains as |
presence of United Nations ob-)had been scheduled for the dura|
servers. So far there has been n9|/tion of the strike. At Bologna, one
reaction”. A Greek press said the|of the country's biggest railway
bombardment was tne prelude ? hubs, special crews handled 21
Greek reoccupation of the island. | trains—16 passenger and five

According to press reports Greek) fyeight—during the first eight
observers saw one Bulgarian 9n|hours of the strike, Emergency
the eight aere island at 4.30 a.m.| schedules had listed only 12 tiains
po Retg a Bee — to be sure: | for the satire 24-hour period of

y’ presence the strike.
Bulgarians on the island was es-
tabiished and reported to the Gen- Special Crews
eral staff at Athens which ordered : i 9
to open fire at 9.30 a.m. Ministry ‘

ns was calm as authorities wae had hoped to run only
dssued a standby alert to gen-|about 130 trains today, said that
darmes and army units.

In Naples, Southern European}more than had been scheduled
N.A.T.O. headquarters of Admiral | during ees Te eight hours of
Robert B. Carney is “closely fol-|the walkou y
lowing” the Greek-Bulgarian dis- ;
pute over the island of Gamma in| The strike was called by the!
the river, a spokesman said 32]Communist-dominated General
Thursday. Confederation of Labour to sup-

The spokesman said reports on| port demands for pay boosts to-
the tense situation is being filed ae ava eee eee
by special teams of observers e coun non- n=
stationed in Athens. Up to now|munist Unions refused to join

however no N.A.T.O. observers} despite the fact that they support
are at the scene of the dispute!the pay demands.






Har badros



Iran House

In Uproar

TEHERAN, August, 7,

A session of the Lower House
of Iran’s (Parliament ended in an
uproar when deputies were debat-
ing the nomination of Seyed
Ayatullah Kassent, fanatical reli-
gious leader as Speaker of the)
Houde. When the session ended it
was not known whether Kassani
had accepted nomination,

Previously a group of 30,
deputies tabled the motion
demanding the release of the
assassin of, Premier Razmara who,
has been in jail since March 7,
last year, This motion started al
verbal battle between tribal;
leaderd’ on Government benches,
and brought about an uproar
which closed the session,

Meanwhile Ahmed Ghavam,
80-year-old millionaire statesman |
who was appointed Premier by the!
Shah, and held office only four}
days prior to the bloody riots of]
July 21, published the text of a!
letter he has sent to Parliament
seeking to free himself from all
blame for the incidents.

He said: “I proclaim that I was
a real martyr because I was the
one who was destroyed..” He said
he wouldn’t be blamed for military
and police actions against demon-
strators in Teheran on July 21,
because he actually resigned on
July 19.

He said, “I handed my resigna-
tion to His Imperial Majesty be-
cause of ul health on July |

|
|
|
|
|
\

therefore [| was not Prime
Minister on July 21. I informed
all deputies who called ‘on me
on July 19, that I had resigned
and had not an official position.”
—U.

Rhee Back |
In Office
PUSAN KOREA, Aug. 7.

Aging President Syngman Rhee

was swept back into office by an
overwhelming majority in
from



election of chief executives. Rhee’s

Yung, an .obseure Presbyterian
minister, piled up a commanding
lead over his eight opponents in
a returns from Tuesday’s elec-

n.

Rhee (77) puttered in his Seoul
garden as the vote count assured
his return to office for four yeacs.
He declined to make a statement
or pose for photographs. His in-
auguration is set for August 15.
the fourth anniversary of the re-



public.
—(CP)



itself.—U.P. ba bet

MacARTHUR ACCEPTS CIVIL JOB





Pacific Defence
Will Be Plotted

HONOLULU, August 7,

Armed defense against attack
in the Pacific a Commas
China or any other aggressor
be plotted by military leaders of
Australia, New Zealand and the
United States at Honolulu at a
meeting expected
within 60 days,

Admiral Arthur Radford Com-
andes -in-Coi of the Pacific
Ocean area ape Oe Fee Fleet
will represent the
Australia and New Zealand are
‘expected to name their military
planners soon,

The three will meet at Radford’s
Pearl Harbour Headquarters
map strategy which would unite
\the tanks, guns, planes and men
jof the three countries’ against
‘armed attack under the terms of
the security alliance pledging
each to come to the aid of the
| others,
| The Chinese Communist threat
‘occupied the major part of the
|Foreign Ministers’ discussion and
lit was expected to be the greatest
|concern of the military men when
ithey meet to assemble the
;machinery of defence.

Military planning will not be
|limited to defence of the
areas of the “Angus”
| their territories or island



s

sions.
Security Pact pledge the three
nations to defend armed attack
{against public vessels, aircraft and
| eemed forces of the three as well
jas each other’s metgopolitan



SHAKING HANDS in New York are General Douglas MacArthur (right)
and James H. Rand, president of the Remington Rand, Ine., after the
former had accepted the chairmanship of the corporation's board of
directors. In taking the post, MacArthur said: “I have looke” forward
to this association with interest for nearly 3 years.” (International)

to be a
















The broad terms of the},

FRIDAY





}
}

|
westigate

{

t

|



Jamaica Move
To Encourage
New Industries

(From Our Own Correspondent)
KINGSTON, Aug, 7.
. The Jamaica Government plan
mT

further incentive for investors

connection with the industriali-
sation programme, A Bill has
been prepared which offers new
investors a tax free holiday of en
years, This period has been se. |
at January 1953 to December 3), |

1963,
The new Bill will extend and
the present Pioneer Indu:



t
tries Encouragement Law in in

pose of setting a specific

portant respects and for the es

so as to give
investors’ to’ move quickly in
tablishing new industries

Manufacturers have already

special crews had run 109 trains!choice for Vice-President, Ham Tai|said that Pioneer Manufacturers

under the present law will receive
benefits from the tax holiday
period ‘except only so far as it
completes ten years for them as
for their production dates, while
long established industries, not
being run on a commercial scale
and capable of expansion will be,
granted similar concessions.

Under the present law pioneer
industries are permitted to wipe
off capital expenditure by deduc-
tions out of profits for any five
years of the first eight years of
existence.

The new Bill provides for the
wiping off of capital during ten
years and possible extension for
five years after that of capital is
hot completely deducted out of
profits. .

Argentina Sold
Cotton To Britain

BUENOS AIRES, August 7,
The Peron government announc-
ed Thursday it will buy any
amount of raw cotton offered it
by Argentine producers from the
present 1951-52 crop.





range from $398.75 per ton for
the lowest grades to $601.75 for
e highest delivered in Buenos

res,

Official Foreign Trade monopoly
(LA.P.I.) announced Wednesday
it had sold an unspecified amount
of cotton to Britain. This sale
marked the first time LAP.J
engaged in cotton trading abroad.

Crop estimates place the total
at 500,000 tons of which 50,000
will be available for er :



Fighter Explodes

8 Die In Flames

WASHINGTON, Aug. ‘.
The U.S. Navy said a jet fight-
er exploded aboard the aircraft
earrier “Boxer” off the Korean
ier lame euploded "nthe car-
ape bane setting off fire in a
below space used for storing





The Government's buying prices f

1952

On
|

AUGUST 8,

Body Set Up

HONOLULU, Aug. 7.
> Pacific Mutual Defence
freaty was off to a start
after Poreign Ministers concluded

| their three-day conference by set-

ting up a permanent military body
to plan resistance against com-
munist aggression,

Top diplomats trom the United
States, Australia and New Zealand

|formally ended the historic meet-

ing at 6.00 p.m. Honolulu Stand-

jard Time, (12.00) yesterday, and

unanimously agreed that the con-

jference had been a successi “We

have got this thing off to a good
start,”’ Secretary of State Acheson
said. “Everyone is pleasec with

‘the meeting.”

Acheson and External Affairs
Ministers of the other two coun-
tries concluded the conference de-
signed to implement the Anzus
Treaty, signed in San Francisco
last September, by agreeing not
to attempt to establish formal re-
lationships with other Pacific
states at this time

Establisrument of a military or-

ganization to function under
Council was considered a major
accomplishment. Admiral Arthur
Ww Radford, Commander-in-

Chief of the United States Pacitic
Fleet was the first member named
to the military group. Australian
and New Zealand members will be
named later because their For-
eign Ministers wanted to consult
home governments first.

In a joint communique Acheson
announced to Australia’s Richard
G. Ca: and New Zealand's T.
Clifton Webb that the military or-
ganization would have an early
meeting in Honolulu. At the first
meeting and subsequent annual
sessions, the military body will
work out in detail the machinery
which will function under the de-
fence pact binding the three great

_|English speaking nations of the

Pacifie
—U.P.

‘South Austealia To
Spend £4m On
Uranium Mining

ADELAIDE, Aug. 7.

The South Australian Govern-{
ment will spend nearly
£4,000,000 this financial year on
the development of the state's:
uranium deposits, Premier Play-
ford announced on Thursday, The
money will be spent developing
underground mining at Uranium
Hill, erecting a treatment plant
at Port Pile, and surveying new
aveas for possible location of|
additional radio-active ores, |
Playford said, Arrangements are



being made for loar advances to; West Indies Trade Commissioner |

come from overseas.—U.P.



Naguib Belongs To |
No Political Party

CAIRO, Aug. 7.

Egyptian strongman General
Naguib on Thursday declared that
the military coup which pushed
King Farouk off his throne last |
month was “purely nationalist, and |
unconnected with any partisan
considerations.” Naguib said in a
;communique that some organiza-
tions in Egypt were disseminating
alse rumours to the effect that
the coup was done in their names.
| The commuique denounced the
rumours as “absolutely unfound-
ed.” Naguib added that he never
belonged to any political party or

Advorate



ane encom

La)
YESTERDAY'S WEATHER REPORT

Rainfall; from Codrington a0 in.

Total Rainfall. for
Si int. %

Highest Teshpetature i i

Lowest Tempefaturc 45 b

Wind Velocity 12 miles per hour

Barometer (9 a.m.) 29.977 (3 p.m) 29.91A

TO-PAY

5.46 a.m -

Sunset 22 p.m

Moon: Full, August 5

Lighting: 7.00 p.m

High Tide 6.30 am., 7.56 pm

Low Tide 12.14 am WM pw.



onth t esterday:

Sunrise



Crossley ) wiping

by a head from Mins Rosemary
Bo n’s Columbus (Lutchmaa ’

up- on the third day of the

©. four-day meet. The

2 was the Merchants’ Han-



‘Mrs. Bear’ Scores

_ ’ 1 ,

CORONER BEGINS |
4
’ ay x T r
DEATH ENQUIRY |

The enquiry into the circum-
stances surrounding the death of
Cecil Hope, 28, a chauffeur ot}
Jackmans, St. Michael, was begun |
before His Worship, Mr. E. A
McLeod, Coroner of District “A’
on Wednesday and adjourned un-
til to-day after three witnesses
had given evidence.

Hope died ‘at the General Hos-
pital some hours after he had bination.
been admitted on Sunday. The weather was again beautifu. cident occurred just as the field

Dr, Z Skomoroch, a Resident }and the racing although keen, wis, was coming around the bend for
Medical Officer attached to the marred by a single mishap whe |the first time. Joseph was taken
hospital said that on August 3,| Jockey Joseph had his right les {io Hospital. Prizes in the Field
about 6.30 am, he was sumMmoONn=! fractured w ile riding Colleto. ;Sweep, allhough not ag great as
ed to the Casualty Department to the ‘second day, reached the

dle ys

see an emergency case of a ma . ; \@ naanent
person, He’ went ana found furlongs. The in-|S700 mark om one occasion, The

man in an unconscioys condition | Pari paid its highest dividend of

Upset Win
B’dos Turf Club Summer
Meet Concludes Saturday

Mr. Victor Chase’s 3-year-old filly Mrs. Bear out of
Limekiln-Smylax won the Stafford Handicap from a field
of twelve and caused the biggest upset of the third day’s
racing of the B.T.C., Summer meeting at the Garrison
Savannah yesterday.

On this occasion the Forecast reached its highest when
$250.20 was paid out on the Mrs. Bear-Red Cheeks com-





which fell in the Trafalgar Handi- jon
cap over nine



in the bed. i $12.18 on Test Match in the Sum-
After examination, he discov-| Results Al |mer Handicap. Bana wader Mak

ered that the man was sufferins |
from a serious injury to his brain |
He admitted him to the ward anc |
saw him twice afterwards but hi
never regained consciousness..
Dr. B, L. Ward, P.M.O. of Christ

y jArcher was again in attendance
ance ind, rendered another programme

f lively an dpopular tunes.
THIRD DAY “The meetin Judes to-mor-
SEVENTEENTH RACE e meeting concludes to-mor



row.

Church who performed the post 1. Apple Sam—Thirkell THIRD DAY

mortem examination at the Pub- 2. Super Jet—Yvonet > . . 9

lic Mortuary on Monday, Aug. 3. Sew Foam—Lutchman SEVENTEENTH RACE

ust 4, said that death was due to EIGHTEENTH RACE Juvenile S

shock and haemorrhage following J, Mrs, Bear—Joseph Six entrants faced the starter

multiple wounds. 2. Red Cheeks—-O'Neil for the first e f the th
Lavinia Hope, mother, of th 8. Castle In The Air— a3 atta Mauna earn

day, the Juvenile Stakes run over

+, Beir F2 and

NINETEENTH RACE
Faerie Queene—Holder
Mrerschaum-—La¢chman
TWENTIETH RACE

deceased said that he resided at
Jackmans with her. She last saw
him alive on August 2 about 3 | 1:
o'clock in the afternoon when he | 2:
left home saying he was going to

5% furlongs for Class

Lower two-year-olds.
With the exception of Sea Foam

who carried 108 lbs. the other

ag eee —

the Races, . i} 1. Top Pas totam horses, Apple Sam, Super Jet
fhe next saw him atthe Hos-\|| 2. Gross — Holder Howitzer, Bow Tie and Jim La

pital the following day aftersbeing |) 3. May Day—Orossley Rue each carried 118 Tbs.

informed by the Policu, but he TWENTY-FIRST RACE The race was off to a fair start

could not speak to her. On Mon- 1
day morning, she saw his dead 2.
body at the Public Mortuary and . March Winds—Quested

TWENTY-SECOND RACE

3
identified i,t to Dr. Ward,
11.45 p.m. 1, Test n— Y vonet
| 2 Carefu
3

W.I. Chambers Of
Commerce WillMeet |
In October

The Ninth Congress of the In-

with Apple Sam, Super Jet, Sea
Foam and Bow Tie leading the
field in that Order.

Apple Sam was able to main-

=
F
;
i



tain the lead right around the
Annie—Quested course, and won on an easy gallop
Dashing Princess— | four

lengths ahead of Super Jet
|who was two lengths away from
'Sea Foam the third horse. Bow
|Tie was fourth,
The race was slover than any
jot the previovs two days. The
On pzge 8

Lutehman
TWENTY-THIRD RACE
1. Firelady—Quested
2 Pepper Wine—Crossley
3. Landmark-—Holder







eorporated Chambers of Com-
merce will be held in British
Guiana in October, and it is ex
‘pected that Mr. Rex Stollmeyer

in Canada, will attend the meet.
ing,

The Council of the Barbados
Chamber of Commerce on Wed-
nesday decided to contribute £25
to assist in meeting the cost of
bringing Mr, Stollmeyer to the
West Indies,

The question of Canada.West
Indies Trade is high on the list
of important matters to be dis-
cussed at the Congress,

Mad Killer Statks
Through Chicago

CHICAGO, August 7,



Police



organization. Meanwhile, _politi-
cal observers here said that Egypt's
powerful may be

Wafd rae
headed for a major split as a resul!
| of its present purge.—U.P.

| ROSS SUCCEEDS
PALMER ON U.N.

COMMISSION
| WASHINGTON, Aug. 7.
John C. Ross was appointer



‘Thursday by President Truman to
|sueceed Ely E. Palmer as deputy
|U.s. representative on the U.N
| Conciliation Commission fot
| Palestine. '

Ross also wil] continue to serve
in his present job as Deputy U.S
‘representative on the U.N. Security
Council. Palmer is retiring after
42 years of government service

—v.





planes, —UP.



territory.

W.A.F.D. Party Split Likely | ptane Crashes Into Boy King Sails To U.S.
CAIRO, August 7, The Rhine River

bs neni oe ; Sd Quen split GERMANY, August 7 EVENTZEN-YEAR-OLD King Feisal of Iraq sailed today aboard
in the wake of the present purge} the Army budget by cutting Gov-| Police waid that’ a flaming the Queen Mary for the United States where he will spend a five-
political observers said here} ernment spending elsewhere _ |\United States airfo:-¢ two-engined| week educational visit at the invitation of the United States Govern-
Thursday. eres a Pag is "ote a champion |B-26 light bomber crash-landed|ment. The youthful monarch who will ascend the throne of (raq on
that dismissed party mem! aréjof a strong Egyptian army and jpn the Rhine River between the May 2, t pavtioulasix tan aa ed ice
likely to retaliate by io quickest possible rearmament. The two. main bridges in the teeming SP J letiodner dtuome a ee ee eee udy
penetrating accusations a Egyptian- Cabinet imposed Thurs-|centre of Maize this morning, Hh . ioblis ae aaa ha
Preliminary reports said that e will spend some time over the Tennessee Valley. Ac-



Mohammed Naguib’s frequent
visits to Prime Minister Aly Maher
was to make plans for increasing |

SOUTHAMPTON, England, August 7.




remaining members before the}day an extra 20 per cent import
Party’s cleanup of the Committee,}tax on automobiles, -watches, all crew members were rescued.|companied by his uncle the Prince Regent of Iraq, Colonel Ahmed

Such a jolt might result in re-| photographic apparatus, musical'An eye witness said two men}|Mohammed Yahya and other officials, young Feisal will tour the U.S
ducing WAFD to secondary im-|instruments.and articles made of parachuted out of the plane be-|from East to West.

portance in the country’s political! wool, cotton and artificial and fore it landed on the crowded Asked by a reporter whether he looked forward to ascending the
tite: 304 bringing” Sw Mates | pure ali. An additions! 30 perjriver. ‘The brotherhood to the fore as the/cent tax has been imposed on were rescued by German river ’ . . yes, bi
jeading Party, observers said. | imported wines, spirits, and

Meanwhile it is understood that! cigars and 20 per cent on beer.
one reason for strong man General | —UP.
Bh le |

in England since 1947 returns to England in September and will

jhere Their condition is ;
{ leave for Iraq in October.—-U.P.

—U.P.

boats and rushed to the hospital have not thought about it much.” King Feisal who had been studying |‘
unknown

patrol cars cruise
through the narrow streets of
Chicago's north side searchin
for the hammer killer wh«
threatened fo kill agaib ar
begged: “Stop me for God's sal
before it is too late!” A dragne
was thrown out after a mar
wearing 4 “light” suit who cor

fronted two women as a streete:

stop and gold them; “TI killed »
man with a hammer and TI kno

how to take care of mygelf.” Tr

killer had the police seurryin
all over the city last night ar

early today when he made fi,

phantom telephone calis to hea

quarters and threatened to invacd
ltwo Yashionable hotels in hi:
{quest for blood,

Officers found the battered bod
of Tom Acton, 35, of Birminghan
Alabama, in a dingy hotel roor
after a man with a voice describe
as “raspy with a whine” calle
and said they would “find some-
thing bloody” in the room.

—U.P.



{
:
Koje Refugees

| ‘ 66 7 . ”
| Start “Rice Riots
!
| PUSAN, Korea, Aug. 7.
| About 900 North Korean re-
fugees on Koje Island rai a
village in Chang Sun Po last night
tn South Korea’s first “rice riot”

A usually reliable source here
said the rice ration for 80,00
North Korean refugees near th«

village had been cut from 900 ton:
to 370 tons a month because of the



general shortage in South Korea
The source said the refugees pro-
jtested without success and last

night destroyed an office building
the village and burned docu-
One policeman was in-
jured in the riot which lasted an
‘hour, —U.P.

ments

|

|

CHINESE LOSE
‘CAPITOL’ HILL

SEOUL, Aug: 7.
Swift. United States sabrejets shot down four Commun-
ist MIG 15 jet fighters and damaged four others today,
while infantrymen pushed Chinese Red troops off the bit-
terly contested “Capitol Hill”. Four air battles between
Sabres and MIG’s took place near Sinuiju, a few miles



south of the Yalu River boundary between North Korea.

and Manchuria. The eight MIG’s, shot down or damaged

to-day brought the toll of Communist jets for August to 40.

The Republic of Korea soldiers ~ _
of the famed “capitol” division
fought a back and forth battle
for the control of the key hill wes
of Pukhan River on the centre!)
front, The hill changed hands for |
he fifth time early today as
Korean infantrymen smashed to
the top and regained control,

The fight for “capitol Hill”
famed after the veteran Korean
Nivision that held it began on
Tuesday night, when the Chinese
‘tormed the slopes and reached
the erest, The spirited “capitol”
troops won it back a few hours
later in a savage counter attack;
but the communists came back
with fresh troops at daybreak on
Wednesday to retake it.

Again the South Koreans coun-
ter attacked and won, Then the
Reds began an artillery and mor-
tar barrage and this time were
successful in taking the hill,

The South Koreans withdrew

Special Session Of
t ain line. Firin il. Te
ieon “sullen the tabese bakes ae U.S. Congr ess

o the United Nations’ main line a

“ WASHINGTON, Aug. 7
oe Be oars Soak ply ta. be Truman said to-day he was





'



PRESIDENT TRUMAN

Truman May Call

It was estimated that 200 Chin.
ese were dug in on the ridge.

Far East Airforces sent 1,105
missions against the Communists
on Wednesday. Fighters, bombers,
and navy guns hit Communist
buildings, vehicles, and supply
routes.—U.P,

KESSELRING ELECTED
PRESIDENT OF GERMAN

SOLDIER ASSOCIATION
COLOGNE, Aug, 7.

The West German Association of

frontline soldiers (Stahlerm) an-

nounced here today that it had

‘lected former

dent.
Kesselring, Hitler’s Commander

| to resign.



Field Marshal |
\lbert Kesselring as its first Presi- |

considering calling a special ses-
ion of Congress to deal with
ees, However he told a news
conference that he has made no
final decision
He declined comment on re-
ports that price stabilizer Ellis
| Arnall has resigned or is planning
Associates said Arnall
plans to quit on September Ist
Truman said the price situation
would be the only reason for
calling Congress back into special

(session if he decides to do so, He
‘gave no

of at what
the special
consider it

indication
time he might call
session should he
necesBary.
Meanwhile Arnall’s statement
on. Wednesday that Truman might

‘have to call Congress back into

in Italy toward the end of the war |5¢Ssion to deal with” the pric
s serving 20 years for a war {Situation drew a brick bath from

crimes sentence in the British con-
trolled prison at Werl, Germany
U.P.

poem houses in Congress.and his

cwn colleagues,
U.P,

es




PAGE TWO i

Caub Calling

R. G. G. MONEY new local
Director of Barclays Bank
for the British West liwies and
‘British Guiana, arrived here yes-
terday morning from Engiand via
Jamaica and Trinidad by B.W.1L.a.
He has come te succeed Mr. C. C
George, the local Director who re-
tires at the end of September.

Mr. Money was formerty stz-
tioned in Kenya. On his way w
England on leave, he spent two
months driving through the
Sahara. Before coming to Barbe-
dos, he called at Jamaica and
Trinidad where he stayed for two
days in each colony. He proposes
to spend about six weeks here
before visiting some of the other
islands.

Mr. Money has taken up resi-
dence at Buckden, St. Joseph.
To Take Up Appointment

BRUCE WHYTE of Brit-

ish Guiana arrived here yes-

terday by the Lady Rodney. He
will take up an appointment es
Assistant Colonial Engineer cf
Highways & Transport Depart-
ment.

Mr. Whyte was formerly Clerk
of Works of the Public Works De-
partment in British Guiana. As
soon as he is settled down in the
island, he will be joined by his
wife and children. “We will soon
be completing one of the largest
road schemes ever undertaken 1n
British Guiana,” Mr. Whyte said.
This scheme is in the Corentyne
district of Berbice where a 5)
mile asphalt road is being con-
structed.

Work on the Corentyne Scheme
started in 1950. It is expected to
be completed between December
1952 and March 1953.

At the Baggage Warehouse to
meet. Mr. Whyte was Mr. Pat Car-
ter, another Guianese, who ear ier
this year took up the appointment
of Surveyor at the Water Works
Department.

From Venezuela
RRIVING in the colony on
Sunday from Venezuela were

Mr. and Mrs. Rigoberto Vegas R.
and their son and daughter, Their
daughter will be entering the
Urauline Convent on its reopening
and the family will be remaining
in the island for three months,
During their stay here they will
be guests at Super Mare Guest
House, Worthing.

Dental Surgeon
R. AND MRS. G. MOYSES

and their two children

George and Claude were arrivals
recently by B.W.1.A., from Vene-
zuela fora holiday, They expect
to be here until the end of the
month and are guests at the Ocean
View Hotel,

Dr, Moyses is a Dental Surgeon
in Caracas.



Mr. K. BROODHAGEN

To Study Art
R. KARL BROODHAGEN,

Art Master, Combermere
School, left the colony on Wed-
nesday on the S.S. De Grasse for
the United Kingdom where he
will attend the Goldsmith College
of Art, London, on a Britisa
Council scholarship. The Course
will last for about one year.

Mr. Broodhagen, a native of
British Guiana, arrived in Bar-
bados many years ago, and in ad-
dition to his pursuits as a Merchant
Tailor, showed great talent in
modelling.

His works have been exhibited
both locally and in other West In-
dian colonies, as well as in the
Town Hall, New Amsterdam.

Mr, Broodhagen has also con-
ducted classes in art at the Girls’
Industrial Union, and during the
past two years, hag been on the
staff of the Combermere School.

He has just completed the
modelling of a symbolic Cane Cut-
ter which will be used as a Re-
lief on the New Public Buildings
in Castries, St. Lucia.

To Join Wife

R. GRANT PILGRIM, former-

ly Mathematical and Spanish
Master at Queen’s Royal College,
Trinidad, left on Wednesday by
the SS, De Grasse for England
to join his wife and daughter who
had been residing there for
several years.

Mr, Pilgrim spent two years in
Barbados aasisting with the teach-
ing of Mathematics at the Lodge
School. His daughter, Mary-Nell
is at Reading University doing
Modern Studies.



Quiet Wedding
Oo” TUESDAY morning
Patrick’s Roman Catholic

Church, Mr, Cleophas Drakes, son} +, I

of Mrs, Lilian Drakes of Spooner’s
Hill and the late Mr. Norman|
Drakes, headteacher of St. Mary’s |
Boys’ School, was married to Miss}
Beryl Williams daughter of Mrs.
M. C. Jemmott of Brighton and
the late Mr. L. E. Williams.

The ceremony was conducted by
Rev. Fr, Parkinson, S.J.

The bride who wore a dress of
white nylon, was given in marriage
by her mother. The duties of
bestman were performed by
Rupert Lythcott.

The couple. afterwards left for
Oistin for a reception and their
honeymoon,

The bridegroom is an Assistant
Master at Combermere School and

his bride is a first year medical
student at the University College
of the West Indies in Jamaica.
For Two Years
RS. OVIDIO GARCIA R. of
Venezuela arrived in the

colony on Sunday last to join her
husband who has been here for
some time. Mrs, Garcia was accom-
panied by her daughter who will
become a pupil of the Ursuline
Convent and the family will be
remaining for two years. During
their stay here they will be in
residence at Super Mare Cottage,
Worthing.

Transferred
R. HUGH COXE, the B.W.1.A.
Branch Manager, Kingston,
has been transferred on promotion
to North America to take part in
an intensive Caribbean Sales drive
which B.W.LA., in’’ conjunction
with its parent Corporation
B.O.A.C,, is starting at the present
time, to increase tourist traffic dur-
ing winter to all islands in the
Caribbean,

R. W. W. LLOYD JONES
who is on secondment to
B.W.LA. from B.O.A.C., has been
appointed Acting Manager, Ja-
maica, pending the appointment
of a replacement for Mr. Coxe
and will assume this position with
effect from Wednesday.

For England

ISS PATSY FORD daughter

Mr. |

at St./,

}



|

BARBADOS



| Stop Pounding

Is Cure For
Typists’ Cramp

New ways of overcoming
‘typist’s cramp”—aching fingers
and wrists—have been reported

sondon businessmen,

A report on the problem, based
on researches in Sweden, has
been circulateqd among business
chiefs by the Swedish Chamber

of Commerce in London.

“Miss Smith,” the average typ-
ist, says this report, uses enough
pressure in one day to shift 1,20)
tons of coal. This is because shi
uses a pressure of 16 Ibs. on each
key as she taps 400 times a min-
ute.

“Standard typewriters re-
quire only about 14 ounces
pressure,” says the report. “The
average typist is therefore
using 20 times more energy
than necessary,

“Doctors confirm that there is

more typists’ cramp, caused by
unnecessary, straining of wrist
and arm,”

One remedy, according to. the
report, is to train girls on a
special typewriter which flashes
a warning red bght when more

pressure than necessary is used.

Experienced typists can be
given a course to develop a light-
er touch on the new machine, the
report adds. —L. E. 8.



Request Recipe

Lemon Pie

By HELEN BURKE.

Can you please give me a recipe
for Lemon Pie?

When eggs are plentiful, this
is a good recipe. The quantities
are enough for 5-6 people.

Rub 3-3} oz, margarine or but-
ter into 6 oz. plain flour, sifted
with a pinch of salt: Bind into a
pliable dough with an egg yolk
and a teaspoon of lemon juice,
beaten together. Fit into a 6%4-
7% flan ring on.a baking sheet
and prick the bottom. Fit grease-
proof paper inside and weigh it
down with crusts, Bake for 10
minutes at 459 degrees Fahr.,
then remove the crusts and paper
and bake for a further 10-15 min-
utes.

For the filling: Sift cup
plain flour, 3-4 oz. sugar and a
pinch of salt into a small pan and,
using a whisk, stir a cup of boil-

%

of Mr, and Mrs, William|img water into them. Stir over a
Ford of “Jalna”, St, Lawrence Gap low heat until the flour is
was a passenger by the 3s. thoroughly cooked. Add a tea-
De Grasse leaving for England on} Spoon of butter, Beat two egg
Wédnesday, Miss Ford will bé yolks with the grated rind and
remaining in England for an juice of a large lemon and work
indefinite period the sauce into them, a little at a
A time to prevent cooking the yolks

Son And Heir into stringy pieces. Fill the pastry

INGRATULATIONS to Mr.jshell with the mixture.

‘4 and Mrs, Gordon Stanford of
Black Rock on the birth of a son
and heir. The happy event took
place on Tuesday and mother and
babe are doing fine.



BY THE WAY .. . » sescucomser

N Amrica they have invented
a siren which I hope they will
eall Parthenope or Leucosia. It is
described as “Loud enough to
cause permanent injury to the
unprotected human ear.”
at could be fairer than that?
But the scientists appealing to a
cultured public point out that
the noise is equal to the sound of
2,000 symphony orchestras «< fuil
blast. Fit one to your radio set
on a Wagner night, says jolly
Jack Hopkins, with a light laugh,
Mole rescued from

aquarium roof
F you wanted to have a horse
pulled out of a chimney or an
ostrich rescued from the top of a
gasworks, what would you do?
Summon the fire brigade. Last
week firemen hauled a cow out
of a 30-foot well. Next week they
will be lassoing a giraffe on the
roof of St. Pancras Station, or
loosening a singing mouse’s head
from between the railings of a
borough surveyor’s office,
Nosebags for women
OW that women’s sun-glasses
are becoming more and more
like horses’ blinkers my impas-
sioned plea for nosebags for wo-
men is being more calmly con-
sidered. ll that is heeded is for
some fashion-house in Paris to
take up the idea, Then, when
the beautiés are wearing blink-
ers, sun-hats with slits for the
ears, and nosebags, some pioneer
among the mannequins will go
down on all fours and whinny.

ren two words from a Dior or a
Fa’ will be necessary: “It’s
smart.”

Business conversation
F our Post Office follows the
example of Vienna, where
children can dial a number and
hear a fairy-tale over the tele-
phone, I foresee some fun: “Hello?

Coupton and Hynes? I want to
speak to Mr, Hynes. That you,
Hynes?” “Princess Goldilocks

weeps when the old wizard says”
...+ “Who is that?” “Hynes here.’
“I will turn you into a pumpkin
unless you answer my riddle.”
“What the devil! Listen, Hynes.
It’s about that consignment of
scrap”... “Luckily the wily elf
Gobblegobble is able to whisper
the answer.” . . . “Hynes here.
Is that Ditchley? What on earth
are you talking about?” “The
answer is Twinkum Twankum
Twaddleum, said Goldilocks.” . ,
“Get off the line.” “It's Ditchley
here.” “Hynes here” . . . “And
now you can’t turn me into a hor-
tid pumpkin.”



-CLARKES CHILDS SHOES

WHITE & TAN 3s to-7%
TRU-FORM CHILD’S SHOES
WHITE BUCK & BLACK PATENT KID

Was it the moon ?
STRABISMUS (Whom God
Preserve) of Utretch, when
formed of the message in the
Morse code sent to the moon from

lowa, and received back intact,

asked why the message had to be
sent in code, as there was nothing
secret about it. “The message,”
says the report, “covers 480,000
miles in 2% seconds. Strabismus
calculates that a rocket construc-
ted on the prinfiple of radar
pulses could deliver the message
in person, but tat the 2% sec-
onds would not allow of any time
for exploration of the moon. He
adds that there is no proof that
the message ever reached the
moon, A man in an adjoining room
could have used a pulse-reflector
to deflect the pulses in such a way
that, to anybody watching the

moon these pulses would seem to the ambiguous headline:
bounce back from the moon’s sur- And Potato Prices Collapse.”

face, because of the curve in the
stratosphere. I realise that it is a
matter for the experts to settle.

Have you blown any
good glass lately ?

F ALL the glassblowers in the
world had been placed end

to end, how long would it have
taken them to blow the Crystal
Palace? I only ask because an
article on glassblowing says that
great patience is needed, and that
‘the secret is breath-control. I
remember an epitaph that runs; —
“Whose grave is this?” the passer-

ba Boosey ask, a

A glassblower’s, who hiccoughed
at his task, “

He burst while blowing a con-

servatory;
ane path of duty is- the way to

glory.
To be sung to the air of “Kate
of Kilculen.”

In Passing

EXT to kindness to animals—
(which means kindness to

the animals you like; try asking a
cat-lover to be kind to a mouse)
—next to kindness to animals as
a social virtue comes kindness to
women's complexions. I read of
a system of amber-tinted glass
panels on a ceiling, with a net-
‘work of flurescen tlighting be-
hind them, to “show. women at
their best” (sic). Now is the mo-
ment for some “expert” to repeat

+ that if a husband is ever allowed

to see his wife’s face in a natural
light disillusionment, despair, and
the break-up of the marriage are
bound to follow swiftly.

+ "SRY a Ae $5.07 &
Is to 10s ........... $6.32 &
BES OR 18 sc ivee's $7.04 &

TAN Lace All Sizes

T. R EVANS & WHITFIELDS

DIAL 4220



YOUR SHOE STORES



$4.76, $6.07, $7.14

Wisdom of the ages

Why should the camel care if
the straw which has broken its
back shows which way the wind
is blowing?

—Sayings of Shabash-ibn
Daoul of Bagdad

Bad company

PONDEROUS article advising

the young not to play cards
with strangers prompts me to add
my own word of warning. When
the dealer says sharply to you,
“That’s not the hand I dealt you,”
it is time to remember a previous
engagement,

Tail-piece

CORRESPONDENCE sends
me a delightful example of
“M.P.



More Marry In B.G.

(From Our Own Correspondent)

GEORGETOWN, July 30.
Marriage vows were taken by
223 couples during the first half
of this year—17 more than the

corresponding period last year.
The Registration Office during
the first three months of the year
issued 3,173 birth, death and mar-
riage certificates to the public as
against 2,862 over the January-
June period last year. This in-
crease was due principally to the
jarge number of birth certificates
issued for a@ntrance to schools
and colleges. There was a drop
however during the second quar-
ter of the year. j



FRIDAY, AUGUST 8, 1952

4.00—7.15 p.m. 19. 76M, 25.53M

4 p.m. The News, 4.10 p.m. The Daily
Service, 4.15 p.m, Ivor @Moreton and
Dave Kaye, 4.380 p.m. Twenty Questions
5 p.m, Cricket, 5.05 p.m. Interlude, 5.15
pm Variety Bandbox, 6.15 p.m
Merchant Navy Programme, 6.30 p.m.
Make Mine Country Style, 6.45 p.m
Sports Round-up and Programme Parade



7 p.m, The News, 7.10 p.m, Home
News from Britain i
TAF—10,90 Pome occ eee ee 25.563M, $1.32M

in emanencomesslaeesceibi
7.15 p.m. West Indian Diary, 7.45 p.m
A Tale of two Cities, 8.15 p.m. Radio
Newsreel, 8.30 p.m. World Affairs, 8.45
p.m. Interlude, 8.55 p.m. From the
Editorials, 9 p.m. Song of Vienna
_m, The News, 10.10 p.m, News
10.15 p.m. The Debate Continues,
From the Third Programme

wp
Talk,
10.20 p.m

$4.23, $4.84

5.37
6.80
7.92

53 & 71 cts.

Listening Hours
|






DIAL 4606

Whip the three egg whites very
stifly and fold three tablespoons
icing sugar into them. Pile on
top of the pie and return to the
oven to set and colour slightly.

World Copyright Reserved
L.E.S.







renowned appetite restorer.
Combined with blood-build-
ing minerals you have the
key to joyous buoyant.
b health,

OPENING TO-DAY.
5 and 8.30 p.m,
THE STORY OF THE CONVICT],
WHO INVENTED THE WORLD'S
GREATEST GUN IN PRISON.

REE mela
PM Mba iil: |
Datla ae ils meL 8)
Pairs ste) 1d
read in top
national
bis P alate

PATRI S

os
SU se
















































ADVOCATE

THE TUBBY HUBBY DIET

BERNARD WICKSTEED., patient target of a 12-day
slimming diet, reports on the battle for his waistline
—an ordeal soon to be shared by five readers.

THEY’VE SENT ME



TO THE

PICTURES



[ 2

Mosley.

my mind off
die t—works

Hubby

instead

films
of

HAVE been seeing the

this week
Leonard

The idea—to keep

the

Tubby
well

enough with tough Westerns
when you are too busy shoot-
ing bad men to bother about
iood. Chaps like Joel McCrea
never eat, so why should 1”
But it breaks down with high

society stuff.

The sight of

ail

the champagne and those cold
buffets they're so fond of mak.
me droo! in the dark.

One great advantage is that 1

can

now

escape

from

my

boisterous friends who think it
is funny to (a) pat me on the
waistline and ask how it's going

(b) offer a

home for

my dis-

carded suits, and (ec) endeavour
to ply me with liquor and tempt



Returns to Film

ENGLAND’S LOSS is Hollywood’s
guin as lovely film actress Eliza-
beth Taylor, who expects her first
child in January, primps for the
eameras following her return to
film-making in the movie capital.
This is the star's first picture
since her marriage last winter to

Michael Wilding. (International)



MY NINTH DAY
cCMenu

Breakfast

Half grapefruit (no sugar)
Serambled egg on toast
One extra slice of toast
seraping of butter
Coffee or tea (no sugar)

Lunch

Clear chicken broth
One minced chicken open
sandwich (on one slice)

Green salad
Apple or orange
Coffee (no sugar)

Dinner

Fresh asparagus or arti-
chokes (luxury Ist course)
OR
Lettuce salad with grated
apple and dessertspoon oi
raisins (utility Ist course)
Fillets of plaice or sole
baked with mushrooms
and tomatoes
Two smail new potatoes
Spinach or cauliflower
Black coffee (no sugar)



on ee cen Reeueseeresenesresssenmeerec veel





Po

me,_to break the [Tubby Aubby
oath Of ue serious drinking

Guess what else I've had to
put up with! A girl came up to
me yesterday and said she'd had
a most insulting proposal and it
was al) my fault

A fellow who Was tubby but
not a hubby asked her to marry
him just so he could join the
Tubby Hubby Club



Operator

Has Skunk
Problem

FORT WORTH, TEXAS,
Aug. 7.

Mrs. Betty Daly, telephone
operator, has a problem. She has
examined a batch of forty skunks
to separate the scentless from the
other variety, All were mixed up
when Mrs. Daly took them into
her home during a thunderstorm.
Besides that, Mrs. Daly has other
troubles. She came out of the
ordeal with a headache, her arm
bitten by a monkey, and her room
sprayed by an excited skunk. In
addition there were three missing
skunks somewhere in the home,
They were apparently hiding be-
hind something and were reluct-
ant to come out after their terri-
fying experience in the storm,

“The operation animal” by Mrs.
Daly included the rescue of 40
skunks, 3 foxes, a monkey, a ra-
coon, 4 rabbits, 15 dogs, and 12
cats. All were taken into her
home when the wind demolished
their cages. One skunk was
crushed to death when its cage
was blown away. When the storm
began Mrs, Daly started her res-
cue etforts. The animals scurried
to the far corners of their cages,
slapped and spit and showed
their teeth. Inside the Daly home
they became even more uncom-
fortable. After the storm the
kitten Mrs. Daly rescued from
the fox turned up missing. Mrs.
Daly has her suspicions. :

To-day she was busy examin-
ing the skunks. Outside before
the stohm they were separated in
pens. But inside the house the
scentless and non-scentless ani-
mals got mixed up,—U.P.



wh



|
)
)
\
}

°
e



wot e*

PURVEYORS OF THE BEST FILMS
PRESENT FROM - - -

2
ai* %.
woe” GLOBE,

‘%
-¢

AUGUST 15TH — 5 & 8.30 P.M.

‘RAFAEL SABATINI’S thrilling story of the world’s greatest
swordsmen = - «

SCARAMOUCHE

with

Stewart

Henry Janet
GRANGER WILCOXON LEIGH

PLAZA THEATRES

Mel
FERRER



Kirk DOU
MILLER

‘SAT. Special 9 30

Warner’s Teehnicolor
Action Adventure !

THE BIG TREES

— Patri







& Continuing Daily 4.45 &
5.30 p.m.

s Eve

ce
WYMA

CE
30

“THUNDERHOC
Preston FOSTER Wiliam

BISHOP &

“WHIRLWIND

Charles
Midnite

RAIDERS”
STARRETT
Special §

“SPORT of K

“BLAZING

Paul CAMPBELL

ACRKC



BRIDGETOWN , BARBAREES — OISTIN
(Dial 2310) mites ea ahinie ad om eens
5 es -m. o-day =
TO-DAY 2.30—4.45 & Continuing Daily 4 45. and 8 Opin.
& 8.30 P.M LILLI MARLENE wee s Technicolor

PLUS:
Attractio:

“DESTINATION

Joyce

MacKenzie

lioy
“THE W

2 ¥
“OUTLAW BRAND” pacer’

Jimm
‘WEST O
Johnny



Lisa DANIELY &
Hugh McDERMOTT

Sat. Special 1.30 p.m
iN OLD AMARILLO















COLT 45
Randolph Scott
Zachary Scott

Special Added

m :

MURDER"
Stanley
Clements

Sat. Special 1.30 p.m.
THUNDER MOUNTAL
Tim Holt &

“LEGION OF THE
LAWLESS’
George O’Brien
Midnite Special Sat.
SILVER CITY



Rogers &
YOMING

BONANZ
Rex Allen &
GUNMEN OF



__ Rocky Lane _
Sun. & Mon.

Wakely & .
PRINCE AND THE

F EL DORADO’





FRIDAY, AUGUST .8, 1952



aay ¥.V ae

as
Bi

*
lt

3

: : and YvyoU Pa

+

FRIDAY, AUGUST 8, 1952
Look in the section in which your birthday comes and
* find what your outlook is, according to the stars.
Building, naval, maritime personal, gen-
x March 21—April 20 eral business om the sponsored list. All
TAURUS

sound endeavours of new and modern type
can expect gains. Heart interest rate. *
’
April 21—May 20

Use your talents rightly and you will i
in a fine job. You handling equipment,
machinery, mining, steel workers in mostly
favoured position, * %

Day right for your talents, promote your
work. “Let the sparks fly”, show your stuff!
Things you like in high ‘favour. 5 * £

Helpful outlook for improving your statues,
formulating plans for better efforts. Avoid’
temperamental outbursts, personalities.

en

x GEMINI
May 21—June 21

CANCER
June 22—July 23

May not be too easy a period for you of *
artistic leaning, but your innings will come.
Aim high, feel you are someorfe on the

Don’t give up easily. Professional work,
right road and others will not fail to re

Many differences between success and fail-
ure are small. Knowing this, watch how
you handle all chores, details. Stress hon-
esty always.

LEO
July 24—Aug. 22

VIRGO
Ang. 23—Sept. 23

advertising field, have good outlook.
LIBRA
Sept. 24—Oct. 23
cognize your talents. Know what you are
about, but don’t take on more than you
can handle. +
SCORPIO
Oct. 24—Nov. 22

x *« * X22 BR

Promising if you do not risk profitable ven-
tures with chance schemes or flimsy pre-
parations. Stick to the reliable; listen to

sound advice. * xz

SAGITTARIUS On favourable side, but no easy going. You
* Nov. 23—Dec. 22 will have to knuckle down to work. Be
sure of your ground before acting. Keep
domestic affairs bright. +
4 CAPRICORN *

Your particular activities and personal in-
terests are surrounded with fine prospects.
P.M. especially good for intimate, family
matters.

Dec. 23— Jan. 21

*

AQUARIUS

Strong vibrations for and against certain *
Jan. 22 — Feb, 20

activities. Select best course, concentrate
on it until you have made progress. +

Generally on urfzrade for routine problems,
duties that need daily attention. Clear
your slate early that you may devote some
time to planning. Relax.

YOU BORN TODAY: A forceful personality, you are
broadminded enough to see your own faults. Capable of
achieving high goals if you don’t be over-assertive. You dis-
like anything underhanded, deals that are not honest or would

PISCES
Feb. 21—March 20

really harm others. Make excellent manager, banker, sales-
man, artist, public speaker, military person. Avoid love of
ease, questionable companions. Birthdate of: Sir Godfrey

Kneller, Eng. portrait painter; Geoffrey F. Morgan, noted lec-
turer,

« M&M MM

x
x
*
+
*
x

uM MX
AND NOW

. you can have

A GAS COOKER

like those you have admired in
the magazines.

SEE THEM TO-DAY ...-+ >
At Your Gas Showroom.










GAIETY

The Garden—St. James
inteeey & To-morrow 8.30 p.m.
‘obert
MYTCHUM THE RACKET
with Robert RYAN

Midnite Special Sat.
“OUTLAWS OF TEXAS”.
(Whip WILSON)
“TRAIL'’S END”
(johnny Mack BROWN)

Sun. & Mon. 8.30 Mat. Sun. 4.30 p.m
“VENDETTA” (Faith DOMERGUE)
“SPANISH MAIN’

(Paul HENREID

PLAZA-—s’tow‘n

(DIAL 2310) a
the towering excitement of











se TO-DAY

. THE 2.30—4.45
& 8.30 p.m.
‘pally 445

8.30 p.m.








coeur bb
ict & James R. We
John Twist Felix Feist

omecreg BS

WARNER’S
BIG ACTION

ROODAL
EMPIRE

Opening To-day 2.30 & 8.30 and
continuing daily 44 &@ 8.30
WALT DISNEY'S
“FANTASIA”
In Blazing Technicolor
With Stokowski
Two Hours of Glotious Music,
Color and Imagination.

THEATRES



To-day last 2 shows 4.30
Fred ASTAIRE—Betty H

& 815
in r
“LET'S DANCE”
an
“I WALK ALONE”

Starring:
Burt LANCASTER—Lizabeth SCOTT
ee.



Opening To-madrrow 4.45 & 8.15
Louls HAYWARD—Patricia MEDINA

in
“THE LADY AND THE BANDIT”
———

To-morrow at 1.30 p.m.
“WEB OF DANGER”



and
“WHISPERING FOOTSTEPS”

Midnite To- Ni
Midnite To-morrow Night morrow Night
Madam O'Lindy & Her Troupe in WEED Dr caaOk ah

“CARACAS NIGHTS OF

OLYMPIC

To-day to Monday 4.30 & 8.15
NO ORCHID FOR MISS BLANDISH
Starring: J
Jack LARUE—Linden TRAVERS

an

1952"





ROYAL
To-day 4.30 only

WHOLE SERIAL . . .
“JUNGLE GIRL”



To-night at 830 p.m.
MADAM O’LINDY & HER TROUPE

in
“CARACAS NIGHTS OF
Prices:—Pit 36c. House
No Baleony ¢r Box
will be sold.

EYE WITNESS
Robert MONTGOMERY
Patricia WAYNE



To-morrow at 1.30 p.m.
“LIGHTS OF OLD SANTA FE" &
“ROLL ON TEXAS MOON" To-morrow & Sunday 6 & 8.15
PARAMOUNT Presents

Midnite To-morrdw Night Alan LADD—Lizabeth SCOTT

“UNDERCOVER WOMAN” in
“RED MOUNTAIN”



Mack Brown PAUPER

and
“TRAFFIC IN CRIME” Color by Technicolor




FRIDAY, AUGUST 8,



Stale Lobster
Pinches Nose

(From JOAN HARRISON)

PARIS, July
A Paris restaurant keeper was
orderéd by a Paris Court to pay
a £3 fine and £100 damages to
a diner who had a piece of his
nose pinched off by a too-alive
lobster.

The characters in the drama ap-
peared before three judges of a
correctional chamber of the cen-
tral Paris courts of justice. They
were the restaurant owner, his
lawyer, Maitre Charles Marcepoil,
and the diner, with a bandaged
nose, M. Magnieu. ‘

The lobster, which had been ac-
cused of not being “fresh enough”
was, alas, no more.

M. Magnieu explained to the
judges how a few weeks ago he
had a great hunger, and a great
desire for a fresh lobster. He
went to a restaurant specialising
in sea foods, The “patron” brought
up a basket with several squirm-
ing lobsters in i> for the guest to
take his choice. (It is the custom
at the better fish restaurants in
France for the diners to choose
their fish before it is cooked.)

“I was much taken aback by
the hosters’ very strong odour,”
M. Magnieu told the judges. “I
sniffed at them, but all I said to
the patron was “I don’t think
these lobsters are very fresh.”

The restaurant keeper was an-
noyed, and said so.

“Whereupon”, continued M.
Magnieu, “he slapped the basket
on the table, got hold of the larg-
est of the lobsters and waved it
under my nose, shouting “Not
fresh. My lobsters not fresh! Here,
smell it.”

The lobster, retaliating on be-
half of the patron, seized the end
of M. Magnieu’s nose in its pincers.
M. Magnieu continued his sad
story:

“It was impossible for me to
free my nose. I must admit that
the restaurant keeper did all he
could to try to remove the lob-
ster’s pincers.” But the nose gave
way before the lobster, which re-
tired with a small ‘piece of flesh.

The restaurant keeper inter-
rupted M, Magnieu’s recital to the
judges, to comment: “It really
was not my fault. The man
his nose in my lobster basket like
a policeman. Lobsters do not like
that.”

“And in any case,” struck in M.
Marcepoil, the defending lawyer,
“Monsieur Magnieu can always
get his revenge by making his
stomach a tomb for any quahtity
of lobsters, one every night if he
wishes—a most agreeable re-
venge!”

The judges were not amused,
and awarded £100 damages. This
is the price charged in Paris by
plastic surgeons who remodel the
too-long noses of film stars into
the ‘short, tip-tilted variety.



Councillors Want
Expenses Refunded

PORT-OF-SPAIN, July 18.

The City Fathers (members of
the Port-of-Spain City Council)
are making another bid to be paid
out-of-pocket expenses. From
time to time the council have
toyed ‘with the idea of paying
themselves out - of - pocket ex-
pensés, have’ made a strong case
for such expenses.

Earlier this year the Council
even inserted provision for meet-
ing such expenses in their 1952
estimates, but Government struck
it out when considering the estim-
ates on the grounds that the inser-
tion was “premature’’.

This week the Council's Finance
Committee recommended that a
delegation of the Council should
interview the Hon. A, R. W.
Robertson, the Financial Secretary,
and Sir John Imrie, Commissioner
of Local Government, on the
question of paying out-of-pocket
expenses to members of the Coun-
cil,

Apparently the new move is
being made by the Council because
the County Councils will soon be
paid out-of-pocket expenses,



* Astounding

Attractive

MANNING &

Dial 4284





YOUR DEALERS

“Repeat after me: ‘I, Ahmed Fuad, son of Farouk, do solemnly swear, NO DICE, NO ROULETTE, NO LATE NIGHTS... /”

_ Australian
Taxes Reduced —

CANBERRA, Aug. 6.

Federal ‘lreasurer Sir Arthur
Faaaen presented his $2,111,7o8-
uuu budget to the House of Rep-
resentatives tor 1952-53 on
Wednesday, of which $40,000,0u0
is tor aetence.

Tne budget, which estimated a
Surplus of $1,002,uU0 slasned a
wide range of taxes and pro-
vides tor in¢reased pension,

Fadden said that pensions

wowd be increased by lis. 6d. per
week and tnat a ten per cent sur-
charge on the assessrgent of indi-
vidual income tax, would be abol-
ised, He also announced a réeduc-
tion of two shillings in the rate of
tax on the first $11,000 and tax-
able incomes of public companies
and the abolition of advance tax
payments by Companies,
Fadden announced the minimum
amount of profits which private
companies would be allowed to
reap from their distributable in-
come without incurring an undis-
tributed tax would be increased
from ten to 25 per cent,

The undistributed income tax
will be at a flat rate of 56 per.
cent instead of a graduated scale.

Fadden said that the “talk or
depression in Australia is dan-
gerous nonsense, With high export
prices the pool season, growing
population, and lower taxation,
conditions have never been fav-
ourable,”—U.P.



British Cruiser
Shelled

LONDON, August 5.

The British Admiralty said Bri-
tain’s biggest cruiser, the 11,500-
ton Belfast was struck by a shell
from a Communist shore battery
while patrolling off the west eoast
of Korea.

The report said “the ship was
straddled and in subsequent sal-
voes was hit by a shell which ex-
ploded in one of the mess decks.”

Four Chinese ratings were in-
jured one of whom later died.
The date of the engagement was
not disclosed.

The Admiralty said damage to
the ship was “unimportant” and
that the Belfast resumed patrol
after silencing the Communist
battery with her six-inch ne

Tt said nearly every Allied ship
had been under fire and several
had been hit in keeping the armed
patrol vigil off the west coast of
Korea, adding that the Belfast is
the eleventh hit in the past nine
months.—U.P.

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® Yoshida And :

Chang Confer

i TOKYO, Aug. 6.

The Japanese Prime Minister,
Shigeru Yoshida, said on Wednes-
day that it is a foregone conclu.
sion “that the United States-
Japan Security Agreement wii!
develop into a Pacific alliance.
Yoshida made his observation in
the course of an hour-long con.
ference with General CHang
Chun, special envoy of General-
issimo Chiang Kai Shek, who ar-
rived here on Sunday on a good-
will visit coincident with ratifica-
tion of the Japanese Peace Treaty.

Reports said that Yoshida anc
Chang had been together at the
Premier’s summer residence in
Hakone and then discussed mutual!
and international problems for
several hours. Chang observed
that the delegates working on the
Anzus Council in Honolulu regard
the rearmament of Japan as ne-
cessary to peace and security in
the Far East, and expressed the
hope that Japan would rearm as
quickly as possible in view of the
possibility of further Communist
aggression in this area. Yoshida
coneurred, but pointed out that
early rearmament would be diffi-
cult unless the Japanese people
themselves become conscious of
the necessity for such an action.
He recalled the criticism levelled
at him today for saying that the
National Police reserve is “the
cornerstone of the new it



U.S. Plane Shot

- is .
Down Over Siberia
TOKYO, Aug. 5.

United Nations sources in Tokyo
said tonight that a U.S, navy
observation plane with five men
aboard was shot down off the
Siberian coast on Saturday by a
Soviet Fighter plane. Navy head-
quarters here refused to confirm
or deny the report. It only said:
“We are leaving this to the Chief
of Navy Information in Washing~
ton, No announcement will be
made here.”

U.N. sources said that the
plane, of an undisclosed type, was
hit as it made its routine weather
flight. Far East air force head-
quarters denied that any of its
planes had been involved in such
an incident.

Tokyo sources also said one or

more Russian submarines had
been sighted close to Japanese
shores in the last week, The

navy would neither confirm nor

deny this.—C.P.



A NEW

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



——-————

New Drug Tried
On Convicts

LONDON
AMERICAN convicts have been
human guinea pigs for a new drag



developed by British scientists.
They allowed themselves to be
bitten by mosquitoes heavily in-
fected with malaria—on promise
that their sentences would be
reduced.

THE DRUG is DARAPRIM, a
synthetic chemical made by

American chemists;

THE JAIL was a State peniten-
tiary in Georgia;

THE RESULT:
given daraprim were all right;
but more than 20 who were not
dosed went down with malaria.

Brigadier John Boyd, director
of the Wellcome Laboratories of
Tropical Medicine, gave the report

The convicts

to a meeting of doctors at the
Mansion House in London last
night, He said the trials on the
convicts were carried out after

tests in London and Nigeria

Daraprim’s anti-malaria] action
was first demonstrated in London
by Dr. I, M. Rollo

—UP.



Chinese Atttack
Chinaman

‘From Our Own Cvrrespondent

KINGSTON, Aug. 5.

Captain William Rupert Chang
B.E.M. Jamaica born Chinese,
was attacked and beaten by a
gang of local Chinese Commun-
ists on Sunday night because he
condemned the atrocities under
the Communist regime in China,
Chang with his wife and three
children returned from Hong
Kong to this island last week and
gave the press an interview in
which he told of the brutal condi-
tions for which he blamed the
Communists. He attended a gar-
den party at the Chinese Public
School and while on the premises
ten Chinese on the side of Com-
munist sympathisers, surrounded
him and told him not to give
such reports against Communist
China in future as it would break
up their underground here. They
then beat him up. He was con-
veyed under police guird to the
hospital for treatment aid then
to his home,

The C.I.D. are now searching
for the assailants who are believed
to be locked in an underground
hideout,



L.E.S8.

Manley Suggests
Dose Of Courage
lor Timid Souls

Our Own Correspontent)

PORT-OF-SPAIN, August 1,

Jamaica's Peoples’ National
Part leader, Mr, Norman W,
Manley, @.C., stopped here for
an hour on his way back home

from Barbados where he attended
a conference of the Barbados
Labour Party.



ote

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Schooner Everdene, 68 tons, Capt
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from Trinidad

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WEDNESDAY

Por Trinidad;

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PASSENGERS By LADY RKODNEY
YE YY

A. M. Webb, Jean Webb, Julia Webb,
Doris Venner, Thomas Venner, Hermar
Coleridge, Violet Stoute Barbare
Annechisen, Jayee §. Yisu Dus, Bruce
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Violet Jutien, Basil Julien, Letia Joh:
on, Fitzgerald Johnson, Leslie Johnson





Rona Harding, Albert Evelyn, corny
Mr. Manley who is also leader Evelyn, Wing Commander L. A, Eggles
of the Opposition in the Jamaica ‘eld, Vera DeFreitas, Sybil Moll, Flearer
House of Representatives, spoke ®°>*™ bd
freely. of British West Indic RATES OF EXCHANGE
Federation, He said among other geiing NEW YORK uy tap
things that Jamaica was now tak- 72 710% pr. Cheques on
ing a more decisive stand on the _ Bankers i 1/10" pr
West indies Federation issue and Ca Penne 6 ”
that the Jamaica Labour Party 1% 7/10% pr. Cable ‘ ‘
had at long last been committed 7! 2/10% pr. Currency 69 6/10% pr
to action * Coupons 68 9/10% pr
é 1, ‘ pr Silver 20% pr
Of the Rance report he had this CANADA
to say: “I think we are all agreed 7? 8/10 % pr. ¢ negues, a
; ankers ir
that in many redpeets the Rance Demand Pfafts 17.86% pr
Report is unsatisfactory, particu- Sight Drafts 7 T/10% pr
le ‘ly . ics i 78 8/10 pr Cable
larly in the political constitution oF orion Sc, Capen 46 BOK pe
it has devised which we do not} Coupons 18 8/10% pr
feel to be any longer, if it ever!so. or Silver 20% pr
was, an adequate instrument tor | aaa
West Indian ambition, or for anty MAIL NOTICE
effective Federal Government,” Mails for Dominica, Antigua, Mont
an , ‘ ance! serrat. Nevis and St, Kitts by the M.V
After stating that the Rance} vrneka, will be clodéd at the General

Report would not provide as much
autonomy in federal affairs a
Jamaica hoped and intended to
have in local affairs before federa . |
tion took place, he took a “dig’’,
at Trinidad’s politicians, “I advo-|
cate,” he said, “a strong dose of;
courage for timid souls, of whom
there are not a few in Trinidad,’



Duellists Unhurt

wi
SANTIAGO, Chile, Aug. 6.

Senator Salvador Allende, left-
Wing Communist-supported can- |
didate for the September Presiden. |
tial election, fought a pistol duel)
Wednesday with radical Senator |
Paul Rettig. Both came out un-
hurt.

rhe
verbal

followed a
clash between the two
legislators on the floor of the!
Senate on Tuesday, Rettig hurled |
charges which Allende took as!
personally offensive to him. He'
replied in kind, and Rettig, feel-|
ing his honour involved, chai- |
lenged Allende to a duel. Both}
contestants and their seconds ar- |
rived at the outskirts of Santiago
t seven a.m. After standing back
o back, the duellists took 25 steps |
in opposite directions, turned}
rround, and fired, Both missed. |
They remained unreconciled.—U.P.

duel violent

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2.30 p.m

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Pareel Mail at 12 noon, Registered
Mail at 2 p.m. and Ordinary Mall at
on Monday, llth August, 1062



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PAGE FOUR

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



eild- ADVOCAT

tawcaee ea ee Posed:
Printed by the Advocate Co., Lid., Bro~* 6t., Bridsetewn



























The tumult and the shouting
have subsided—-not died—and the
fire and smoke of the Presidential
pre-election campaign have died
down and once more American
life approaches an atmosphere of
normalcy. Two candidates have
been nominated. Dwight Eisen-
hower for the Republicans and
Adlai Stevenson for the Democrats
But the conventions at which they
were nominated were wonderful
events, and according to the
historians, the most colorful and
keenly contested for more than a
generation, more than
12,000,000 Americans, I attended
both conventions in Chicago,~ via
TV and for me they will always
remain wnforgettable stenes of
aear riots, actual fist cuffs and
ne delegate literally starting a
ire to attract the attention he
wanted, At least that was the
opinion of the experts—that a
newspaper was actually lit, and the
ensuing rushing about in a hall
with 1,200 people produced a
situation near to pandemonium,

But it all appeared to be good
fun — at least on the surface.
called each other harsh
lames and implied evil motives to-
actions and words, but in the end
hey promised to work together
for the good of the party, and the
suntry, I, for one, am listening to
near how well they have suc-
ceeded in this praiseworthy ideal,

* ”

Friday, August 8, 1952

ROAD SAFETY

DESPITE the initiative which the Police
and the Barbados Automsbile Association
have displayed towards the promotion of
Road Safety, drivers, pedestrians and road
squatters continue to disobey the law.

Speeding on the roads has not noticeably
diminished.

Long distance buses: lorries laden with
excursionists: motor-cyclists: tank lorries
and private cars and taxis can be observed
daily exceeding the legitimate 30 miles per
hour beyond which no Barbadian vehicle
should travel. Drivers of vehicles attend-
ing weddings and funerals seem to think
that the law exempts them from the speed
limit restrictions on these special occasions.

With rare exceptions, however, the Bar-
badian road does not lend itself to exces-
sive speeding and the breakers of speed
limits do not exceed over-much. Barbados
is in this respect fortunate but because
accidents are not responsible for the loss
of human lives to anything like the extent
which makes the road statistics of the
United Kingdom and the United States the
horrifying roll call of deaths they are, we
ought not to relax our efforts to keep death
off the road.





Of course, the West Indians
ould not be entirely omitted from
uch a world event as the nomina-
ion of an American President,
and the Caribbean had a look in
vhen the roll call for voting in
he Democratic convention was in
ull swing. The states are set out

Exceeding the speed limit even by a few |» alphabetical order Alabama,
iles an hour adds to the possibility of | ‘"i%ona, Arkansas, California,
miles onnecticut, Delaware, Florida,

accident and therefore of death.

The speed limit of 80 miles per hour was
not arbitrarily imposed by individuals who
did not know what they are doing. It was
chosen because it offers a reasonable factor
of safety in an island where the roads are
not designed for higher speeds.

Constant emphasis on road safety: the
example of drivers who resist the tempta-
tion to speed and continuous propaganda
by police, automobile association, press,
radio and schools will-assist to keep death
off Barbadian roads, so far as drivers of
vehicles are concerned.

But far greater attention needs to be
paid by pedestrians than is being paid at
present.

Some pedestrians drive in cars or buses
sufficiently often to appreciate the neces-
sity for keeping off roads when traffic is
heayy. But many school children and a
number of. the older generation of road
users do not appear yet to realise that
motor vehicles have the right to use roads
which are already occupied by pedestrians.
The remark “you can’t wait” which is still
frequently addressed to motorists who
have been forced to pull up because of the
presence of squatters near shops and street,
corners “aptly describes the resentment”
which is felt by the individual, who relies
on self-propulsion for transport, against
the driver of a mechanical vehicle. Only
education can change the attitude of such
individuals but it is very doubtful whether
such individuals come within the scope of
adult educational programmes.

For the schoolchildren the teacher an
the parent must accept responsibility. If
after repeated injunctions and warnings
schoolchildren continue to rush along
major highroads cavorting and hopping
and skipping in their youthful exuberance
they ought only to be released from school
under escort of parent, guardian or teacher.

Older schoolchildren who allow their
legs to protrude onto main highways or
who congregate in roads to discuss their
juvenile programimes of fun and pleasure
ought to be caned by their parents and-
constantly punished until they drop habits
which increase the. hazards which all driv-
ers of ‘vehicles run.

' The campaign to keep death off the roads
will never end and there can never be too
much co-operation) from the* public.

‘yeorgia and so on, As each name
; called the head of the delega-
on from that state answers thus:
The Chairman Alabama

Sentucky votes............
nany of the leaders seized the
spportunity to say something
bout his or her state. For instance,
ne roll call in the Republican
onvention the answer was: ‘Mr.
“‘hairman, Pennsylvania, the state
vyhich always respects law and
der votes.......... i
So here came the West Indies
then the De) atic roll call was
in. From the Rostrum came the
all: ‘The Virgin Islands’, From
he floor came the deep throated
eply: ‘Mr, Chairman, The Virgin
slands, the playground of the
Vest Indies vote!....... " I said
Thank you’ to the TV.

- * *

I was on the road to Hyde Park,
he home of the late Franklyn D.
‘oosevelt, now a National Historic
. te, when I heard that Dwight
tisenhower had won the Republi-
an nomination, on the first ballot
gainst the strongly favoured Bob
“eft. The radio in our car picked
‘p the news, and I was tickled be-
ause, I had backed Ike, I ‘had a
wumch he would win and I have
“nother hunch that he will win
gain in November. For 20 years
here has been no Republican
ycoupant of the White House and
feel that if the change in leader-
aip, for which so many Ameri-
ans are clamouring is to come
bout, the former head of the
'A.T.O., will be the man to do
. However, politics is a danger-

You go to Holy Island off the

Jorthumberland coast by taxi at
ow tide. It can be a stirring mari-
ime adventure.
*-The drivers come of hardy sea-
‘aring stock and do not always
other to wait until the tide is out
»eforesthey make the crossing.

lL did}the trip this week, and as.
he: taxi carried no lifeboats I was
olly glad I could swim.

Right from the start you feel
ike Alice in Wonderland because
ou book your passage through a
arber in Berwick. “Aye”, said
he ticket collector when I got off
he train, “the bfirber will fix you
ip with anything from a shampoo
o a ticket to Geneva.”

Taxi ticket

to Holy Island

SO I went to the Barber of Ber-
Wick and, in between shaving his
‘ustomers he charged me a guinea
ind gave me a return ticket for
yne taxi passage to Holy Island.

“All you've got to do,” he said,
‘is to take a bus to Beale and
‘hen ask for Charlie.”

There are about ten taxis in the
toly Island fleet, and they are
nearly all 1933-4 Fords. The
islanders scour the scrap-heaps of
-he country for them, because
shey are one of the few cars that
san go to sea, :

They have more clearance than
nodermh models and the ignition
system is high up in the bonnet.
3o long as you can keep the crabs
vit of the carburetter you ‘can
irive them through anything up
co a third of a fathom of sea
vater,

They only last about a year on
he run, Then the sand gets in
heir bearings and the salt rusts
the bodywork to nothing.

Charlie’s vehicle — or vessel-—
looked as if it wouldn’t run a
mile, but he said it was good for
many more .voyages yet. He
piled six of us Into it—four in
the back and two beside him on



SEAWEED FEED

A map has recently been made of sea-
weed beds. ro

Over 100 million. tons of seaweed are
known to exist in waters where detailed
surveys have been carried out.

e announcements have followed the
meeting in Edinburgh last month. of an
international seaweed symposium.

Alginie acid which is used in the manu-
facture of cosmetics, car polishes, adhe-
sives and textiles is one of the products
derived from. seaweed, but attention is
being paid to the possibility of incorpor-
ating seaweed meal in many types of
animal feed.

the “bridge.”
According to a recent issue of the Times ° H lted
of London, Mr. Hand of Reading described y peer:
to the symposium his feeding of seaweed us below. decks

THERE was no lock on one of
the doors, so, after he had squeez-
ed us in, he bolted us below decks
with a steel pin and then crank-
ed up.

The engine made the most un-
holy island row you ever heard.
Charlie said this was because the
silencers on this model are below
sea level, so you have to take
them off.

meal to laying hens. Barbados’ seaweed
might have no vitamin content and it
might be valueless as a source of alginic
acid of potash and manure. It might have
no other function than the unpleasant one
it now performs of interfering with bathers’
pleasure. But if it did contain vitamins of
benefit to:the animal foodstuff industry a
solution to many of our livestock problems
might be found. |
It may be wishful thinking to hope that
the factory at Lancaster should turn from
what must in this period of ground pro-
vision shortage be infrequent de-hydra-
tion of surplus yams and cassava to the
active crushing of seaweed meal but if the
varieties of seaweed to be found off Bar-
bados’ coasts should have commercial
possibilities then the connection between
the international seaweed symposium and
Barbados might be less remote than it
now seems.

The Reat of the Matter

To The Editor, The Advocate—
SIR,—The .article touching on
the important subject of Educa-
tion from the pen of J.E.B. desire
the thanks of those who have the
interest of the future generation
and in Education at heart. The
writer in advocating the necessity
for the setting up of a Commission
of enquiry to go into the subject

Now Wicksteed

The first 100 yards over the



By Harney Millar

ous subject about which to pro-
phesy and I am doing no more
than recording my impressions of
events as they appear to me at

the moment.

Shortly after hearing this radio
announcement I was standing in
the Roosevelt library before a
huge picture of the late President
F. D. R. and General of the Army,
Dwight D, Eisenhower, seated in
a car on one of the many journeys
that ended in the Allied Victory
in 1945. As I gazed at the two
men I wondered
destined to occupy the important
position in World Affairs hallowed
by the inspired work of the other.
Could Eisenhower aspire to the
heights reached by Roosevelt?
Then I remembered that they





BARNEY MILLAR

were ‘from different political
camps, Franklin was.a Democrat.
Ike is a Republican. I wondered—

And as if in answer tomy pro-
blem, my eye fell on a letter
among the many enshrined in the

Roosevelt library, It was from ex-
President Hoover, a Republican,
and was written to Roosevelt
when he assumed the high office
formerly held by Hoover, The
letter was one of congratulation
to a fine public servant and a
prayer that he would succeed. It
began this way: “The fact that I
am of a different political tribe,
doeg not prevent me.........,.. os
HERE WAS GREATNESS IN
MEN DIFFERING IN POLITICAL
OUTLOOK, BUT WORKING FOR
THE COMMON GOOD OF THE
COUNTRY. THIS WAS AS IT
SHOULD BE AND I FOR ONE
HOPE THAT THERE WILL BE
MUCH OF THIS SPIRIT
ABROAD IN THE DAYS THAT
LIE AHEAD. AMERICA IS
LEADING THE WORLD AT A
CRITICAL ‘PERIOD IN THE
HISTORY OF MANKIND, AND
ONLY BROAD VIEWS—VIEWS
THAT TAKE IN A MUCH
BROADER PICTURE THAN
ONLY AMERICA, WILL SUC-
CEED IN BRINGING SUCCESS
TO THE TASK.

Another giant figure in
American life today announced



There's holiday tnspiration
for you in this Marathon
without a passport . ; al

Wicksteed OF |
The Hritish

Isles...

DOUGLAS, Isle of Man,

I have invented an entire-
ly new kind of Marathon
race. I am going to see how
many of the British Isles I
can set foot on in a week
(writes Bernard Wicksteed).

So far as I know, nothing
of the kind has ever been
attempted before. The near-
est thing to it was when |
Queen Elizabeth the First set
out to see how many British
beds she could sleep in.

Altogether there are about
5,000 islands in the British
Isles, of which 177 are in-
habited.

Elizabeth had the advan-
tage there, because Britain
has more beds than islands.
But I have better travel
facilities,

I cannot think why this
island hopping record has
never been tried before.
People go to endless trouble
and expense to reach the
North Pole or climb Mount
Everest. Yet all the time
there is this simple and at-
tractive adventure waiting
to_be done at home,

You do not need passports
for it, dollars, grants from
| the Royal Geographical

Society, porters, camels, or
Eskimo dogs.



be i a

SS a



sands is all right then the road
ends abruptly beside a notice that
says: “Unsuitable for cars.”

At this state of the tide when
we made thé crossing the notice
seemed hardly necessary, because
there was nothing ahead but sea,
But Dauntless Charlie plunged in.

Deeper and deeper we went,
fill the sea was up to the bonnet
and we were sending out a bow
wave like a torpedo boat.

“LOok out!" shouted one of the
women in the back. “The water's
coming in the door.”

“That's all right,” said Charlie,
“you don’t have to worry till it
reaches the seat.”





OUR READERS SAY:

is in my humble opinion getting at
the real root and for that reason
I plump for his proposal.

During the discussion in the
Legislative Council on the increase
of salaries for Heads of Depart-
ments etc., it was suggested that
a commission of enquiry be set up
to go into the whole matter—
Councillors what are you doing?
and I though by this time some-

thing would have been done to

if one was~



G oes To Sea

we do in the wipter.”—L.E.S.
<-ntetentsiacetillh a sienahigeiamns nee Riaiiaiahieined detains

A Visitor Im New York FOR PRAMS MEAN

that he would be taking no part
in the Republican campaign for
the election of its candidate in
November. This was General of
the Army, Douglas MacArthur.
He was a prominent personality
in the pre-convention activities.
Besides Setiasing himself strongly
for Taft, from the depth of his
wide world knowledge he advised
America not to elect a military
man as President. He called no
names, but his g was clear,
This was interes’ because Mac
himself was nearly nominated, in
1948. And it was even more
interesting when his name was put
up along with Eisenhower’s, Taft's
and oth: @ at this, the

er ca
1952 convention, ©

He made a great key-note
speech at the convention, He
placed a great deal of emphasis
on these words: ‘I am a Republi-
can as was my father........ ‘It
was a thinly veiled hit at Ike,
who has been called a Democrat
turned Republican. It appears to
be true that Ike could ‘have been

to be a very strong point in favour
of his winning the election in
November, And now Mac says he
will not be active. He is on the
inactive Army list, but he will be
active as chairman of Remington
Rand Ine., makers of business
machines. I wonder to what ex-
tent the differtnce of opinion
between these two men will go.
They can do much for the land
they love and served so well in
the Army.

Only time can tell,

* * *

A visit to the Hyde Park ‘home
of the Roosevelt family is an in-
spiration. Here in the ancestral
surroundings in which the lad
Franklin was reared, it is easily
understandable why his _ ideals
were high, and ‘his thought lofty.
On one side it overlooks the
mighty Hudson, River and the
view from F.D.R.’s room is one of
majestic. grandeur. I saw it as the
setting sun tinted the calm water
with silver and gold and cast
purplish shadows amid the almost
tropic verdure which clothed. the
gentle slope from the lawn down
to 'the water's edge, Here Franklin.
sat and played and read and wrote
and grew up to the giant in
stature and mind who left an in-
delible mark onthe life of the
Western World.'He was born
thereon January 30, 1882. He was
buried there on April 15, 1945.

And these two dates are all
that adorn a solid white marble
stone which marks his
place in the Roge garden adjacent
to the ‘house. Franklyn chose it
himself, additional evidence of the
simplicity of the man,

Inside the House there is al]
the old world grandeur of decora-
tion which mingles harmoniously
with the more modern. setting of
the outside, The towering trees
cast. ample shade for those who
like to sit in the Park during the
heat of the day after or before a
visit to the Library which stands
apart,

But here on the whole, one

feels in time »with the late
President's, thoughts when he
wrote: —“ o limit ‘to our

realisation. of tomorrow will be
our doubts of today. Let us move
ee with strong and active
‘aith.

We reached
dry sand again

OVER on the starboard quar-
ter was another taxi, and together
we ploughed the sea in convoy,
for half a mile, till the water
shallowed out and we were on
reasonably dry sand again,

“Of course, you've got to know
what you are doing,” said Charlie
at the helm, “because there are
quicksands, too.”"\ I had been
thinking the same thing when I
saw the sands were littered with
the half-buried skeletons of rust-
ing cars, ;

I thought they were the remains
of taxis that had perished on the
journey, but Charlie said they
were put there in’the war td*stop
gliders landing.

About 230 people live on Holy.
Island and support themselves
by farming, fishing, and lookin,
after holidaymakers, For this la
industry they are happily placed,
because they have four pubs and
no policeman. ‘

Recently the police tried to find.

lodgings on the island for a con-|_

stable, but, oddly enough, though
they can accommodate 200 holi-
daymakers, no one had room for
one policeman,

More publicised, though less
noisy pilgrimages than those te
the pubs are made to the ruins
of Lindisfarne Priory. It was on
this island, in . AsD. S, —
Christianity was in! ced to the
North of Rigen ~ ph:

On.-the mainlamd: they. told ‘me
that on Holy Island you must
never say “pig.” You Tate
call it “the thing” or “the ‘
It was rather hard to confirm this
without using the word. So at
lunch-time, in one of the pubs, I
asked outright: “Is it true you
mayn’t say pig?”

hey laughed

FOR a moment they looked at
me like a man in a Bateman car-
toon, then everybody burst out
laughing. It was an old ‘fishing
superstition they said, but no one
bothered about it now.

Another fishing superstition
used to be that it was unlucky. to;
meet the vicar first thing in the
moras. If you could, not oe

e vicar you did not go

The first thing visitors eok wien
they get to Holy Island is “What
do you do in the winter?”’,T con-
fess I asked the same thing, and
the answer I got was: “We talk
about all the daftefolk who come
here in the summer and ask what

\

tackle this vexed question,

Are the powers that be, aware
that there is grave dissatisfaction
among the Elementary Teachers
over their condition of work and
parents over the education of their
children? And are they prepared
{o do something to rectify such?

Continue, J.E.B., your views are
respected and your voice heard,
even if not heeded,

L, B, BRATHWAITE.











FRIDAY, AUGUST 8, 1952
SSSSSSISSSSSOOSISSSSS9SSSGSOSS*

CANASTA PLAYING

CARDS. Complete with
Instructions at a cisceceeei dataset

$2.28 Set

PATIENCE PLAYING CARDS

ADVOCATE STATIONERY

CARS...

(From HENRY LOWRIE)

WASHINGTON.
LIMITLESS America? The latest official

survey estimates there will be a population
jump of 20,000,000 in the next ten years.

That means 173 million Americans by
1962.

These additional millions (people don’t die
as young as they did) will have to be fed,
clothed, educated, and allowed the usual
necessities and luxuries.

Take cars. There are 54,000,000 vehicles
on American roads, up from 32,000,000 only
ten years ago, Think of what’s going to hap-
pen when the arriving millions get their
new Cars !

«++ would be an excellent time to select
from these GARDEN TOOLS...
1%” Garden Hose
'” & %4” Garden Bib Cocks
Watering Pots

Border Forks
Hand Forks
Wheelbarrows
V.G.M. Manure

C. S. PITCHER & CO. Ph. 4472

Pruning Shears

Driving is a nightmare now and parking
seems an impossibility.

WHEN you read about America’s self-
made millionaires you get ihe impression
that they all started as newsboys.

The newsboy is one of the great symbols
of this country, so the Government is put-
ting out a new stamp in his honour.

It will show a boy delivering newspapers,
and at the edge will be a torch held in a hand
as a mark of free enterprise.

A BIG New York dress manufacturer, big
in every way—six feet tall and 16 stone—
told the judge his wife pelted him with ash-
trays and vases, beat him with her bandbag,
clubbed him with a bottle of whisky, kicked
him and advised him to drop dead.

But the judge refused a separation order,
saying: “Go away and live happily ever
after.”

THE 29 policemen sweating out their
written examination in Hamilton, Ohio, for
promotion to detective scented a trap when
an ‘attractive blonde walked into the room.

That’s why they didn’t give her a second
look. And were they chagrined when,
tucked away at the end of their exam paper,
they found the question : “Can you describe
the lady who entered this room and tell
what she did?” ,



BIRKMYRE

This is the Canvas that Bus Owners
have been waiting for — green
Birkmyre, 72” wide, for Bus Tops

_ and Sides,

The poser was put in to test the observa-
tion powers of the would-be detectives. Fail-
ure cost them 25 out of a total of 200 points.

THE little town of Ballston Spa in New
York (pop. 5,000) is losing its only cinema—
killed by TV and “drive-in” theatres dotted
around the surrounding countryside.

ABOUT the rise of the £ here the New
York Times says to-day : “There is a feeling
that the British Government remedies are
belatedly beginning to work.





“This heavyweight and tremendously
Strong Leatherette is made
especially for Seat-Covers.

ARLINGHIDE

It is sold in two qualities for
commercial and private use,
ensuring longwearing Bus and Car
Seats.

THE Republican Convention is turning
Americans into a nation of button wearers.

They don’t all spell out Ike or Taft either,
for all sorts of firms are pushing new slo-
gans on buttons which they distribute by the
hundred thousand. .

" Slogans like “Vote for Chlorophyll Green”
and “So-and-so is everybody’s pal.”

ONE way of cutting down race prejudice
in New York: the army ferry that plies be-
tween Manhattan and Governor’s Island is
renamed Sergeant Cornelius H. Charlton.

Sergeant Charlton was a Bronx Negro G.I.,
killed in Korea and awarded the Medal of
Honour, America’s V.C.



THE songs in that Broadway and West
End hit, “Kiss Me, Kate,” are not good
enough for Hollywood producer Dore
Schary.

For his Technicolor version he is after
Cole Porter, who did the original songs, to
write some new ones... .

Clifton Webb will star in the film of the
Titanic sinking, to be named “Nearer My
God to Thee”.

—LIONIDE

And Lionide Leatherette is for the
householder — ideal for Prams, Tables
and Chairs — in fact, General
Upholstery.

Da Costa & Co., Ltd.



Double-dealer Turns Up
In A ‘Modern St. Luke’

A 68-year-old Methodist minister has spent
20 years on a new translation—from the
Greek—of the New Testament.

It is written in what is called simple
English. Few “thees” and “thous.” No long
sentences.

And, says the translator, the Rev. Charles









| i
R THE VITAMIN VALUES
Kingsley Williams: “For the sake of simplic- FO! s
ity I have sacrificed complete accuracy.” CHILDREN oo
Example: In the Authorised Version of the thats 'o bide Turkeys
Bible, St. Luke, chapter 6, verse 42 reads:— Carr's Sweet. Biscuits ar ea
Thou hypocrite, cast out first the beam out eee | Liver
of thine own eye, and then shalt thou see Apricot Jam | a, Haddock
clearly to pull out the mote that is in thy Sacer fio Smoked Kippers
», a
brother's eye. ‘ aE east g eegas | 54 R Bread
te:
FIRST TAKE THE LOG FOR THE faa
In Mr, Williams's version* this becomes:— RACES For Everybody
You double-dealer, first take the log out of 3
oe eye, and be a see clearly J & R Sandwich Bread ‘“‘GOLD BRAID
to take the dust out of your brother’s eye. Mea es \
Cowal 1p 10emoden, bor ae ie: me Pinion anes
Co : “It is 195 odern, but not slick, Almonds
alias cleved” ie Cashew Nuts eee wre gS
The new translation has been sent to all] Es PHONE —
bishops of the Churches of England and Ire- FRESH | WE DELIVER
Jand. There is no likelihood of its being
accepted as the Authorised Version. _ VEGETABLES. GODDARDS
For a committee of scholars of all denom- i

inations is already at work on one. They
started two years ago, and expect to finish
around 1960.

*Published today by the Society for Pro-

moting Christian Knowledge, Longmans,
8s. 6d.—L.E.S. \


FRIDAY, AUGUST 8, 1453

Speightstown. Round-Up:



Lord Willoughby Pays In B.G’s Half
Visit To Speightstown

The new Government water boat.“Lord Willoughby”

$1244mJump Cigarette
Smugglers
Year Exports Tracked Down

GEORGETOWN, July 31.
Customs officials here claim they

(From Our Own Correspondent)
_ GEORGETOWN, July 30.
British Guiana’s export trade

made her first visit to Speightstown yesterday morning to for the first six months of 1952 have evidence to show that 75

supply water to the Harrison Liner s.s. “Forester” which is

loading sugar there,

She was not accompanied by
(the barge. A shipping clerk told
the Advocate that it was the first
time a water boat went to
Speightstown to deliver water.

The Forester arrived ai
Speightstown over the last week-
end and sailed yesterday evening.
She took over 3,000 tons of sugar
for the U.K. ;

Last Load Of Sugar

Only one more ship is expected
to call at Speightstown this year
to load sugar. The date of its
arrival is not fixed, All the sugar
now stored at Speightstown and
Sixmen’s is expected to be ship-
ped out by that opportunity.

Canes Withering

Young cane crops in the Lee-
ward parishes are beginning to
show the effects of days of steady
sunshine.

The canes are gradually losing
their green appearance to look a
bit withered. Vegetable crops too
are showing the lack of rain.

Planters are hoping for show-
ers early this month.



WATERPOLQ

Swordfish Defeats
H.C. In Knock-out
Competition

Swordfish defeated Harrison
College 7—2 in the semi-final of
the Division “A” Knock Out
Water Polo Competition at the
Aquatic Club, Wednesday night.
- For Swordfish, Best scored three,
Nestor Portillo two, and Herbert
Portillo and Geoffrey Foster one
each. A. Taylor and C. Evelyn
scored for College.

Swordfish will meet Snappers
in the final on the 16th,

Swordfish did not play the same
team they played in the Challenge
Cup Competition as Dick Reece
is no longer available, His place
in the back line was taken by
Maurice FitzGerald who played a
fair game, but was not as out-
standing as Reece has been. The
other back, Gerard Jordan, was
the mainstay in keeping a per-
fect defence for Swordfish. He
‘was swift and troublesome always,
and greatly assisted his forwards
in getting opportunities to score.

The other. Swordfish players
all pulled their weight and the
team were always on the offen-
sive,

At the end of the first half the
game was 2—l1 in favour of
Swordfish, but the fact that they
scored five in the second half
as against two in the first was
more an indication that Sword-
fish got more into their stride
then, than that College had them
tied down in the first.

College actually combined bet-
ter in the second half than in the
first. Then, players often threw
the ball wide .of their team fel-
lows in making passes,

In the second half, Swordfish's
superiority over College was
clearly seen when College were
hard put to keep down Sword-
fish’s scoring,

Best who scored three was in
fine form, but if he had judged
his placing better and not send
‘the ball so high, he would have
scored more.

College’s second goal came after
Swordfish had already scored
their seven, and at a period when
Swordfish were playing one short
—Herbert Portillo having been
sent out of the water.

The teams were: Swordfish—
Albert Weatherhead, Gerard Jor-
dan, M, Foster, G. Foster, H. Por-
tillo, N. Portillo, and Best.

Coliege—Geoffrey Jordan, ©.
Evelyn, A. Taylor, R. Felman, A.
R. Armstrong, S, Grannum and
Chabral.



« 9

12 L.D’s
There were 12 notifications of
Infectious Diseases for the month

of July: Enteric Fever 5, Leprosy
1, Tuberculosis 6.





NYLON
SHEERS

in Plains, Stripes and
Florals.



The Finest

HARRIS ONS - « =

A wide Range





BUTCHER
LINEN —

with beautifully embroid-
ered blouses, in Grey

and Turquoise,





————







totalled $38,727,173 in value. It per cent of American cigarettes
climbed exactly $12,516,407 above used in the Colony comes through
ea ak oe the corresponding a smugg.ing spiral which nets
There has, however, aie’ this the masterminds between $500 and
first yx months of this year an
adverse trade balance of $4,726,-
712, This unfavourable external
trade position is to be watched
since es odds in the ratio of in-
crease ween exports se
ports lie with the ri im- against the racketeers and by sun
The ratio of increase in the @0wn 6,000 American cigarettes
; value of imports on the 1951 figure Were seized from a ship in port,
To-morrow a Trinidad Table shows 49.1 per cent. while that of 822d the Comptroller collected
Tennis team will arrive in the exports works out at 47.7 $935.37 in fines from 18 seamen
island to take part in a series of ceny Imports climbéd by $14,333,- of the ship. Fines were imposed
“et so eee. — og ween, te figures for the first oy the Comptroller.
goodwill visit will not only spon- six months of 1951 to.
sor better relationship between for the first six moetne ot ieee mort nibirelten Cees
players of the two islands but will year. * made a quick check-up and found
go a long way in disclosing what The Colony’s external trade for the 6,000 undeclared ™
Barkados has to offer at the next the first half of 1952 hit $82,181,- In . the, past tes. ‘
Caribbean Table Tennis Cham- 058 in value, and this is probably cases were brought before we city
pionships. a record for all time for a If: ‘ ;
The team, which is from the year of external trade to which eae and fines of $500 or six
San Fernando Zone of the Trini- the contributing factors, from the it $s were imposed. ;
dad and Tobago Amateur Table point of view of exports, are both nvestigations. provided the
Tennis Association, is the first to increased production and en- ©MPtrol.er of Customs with evi-
tour the island since 1949 when hanced prices, It is indeed, some- “ence that large quantities of
‘an All Trinidad side completely what exalting to look back to 1938 Cigarettes are let down the side
outplayed the Barbadians. to see what was the position in Of ships to ‘bomb-boats’ at the
Two players from the San Fer- that last normal year before the wate of one ‘biggie’ (a large bottle
nando Zone were on the ’49 team. great war’s outbreak, and to. com- Of Demerara rum) per carton.
They, were Errol Alleyme and pare it with today. British Gui- These boats bring the supplies
Carl Williams. They were certain- ana’s external trade in 1938 was ashore to certain points; and in
ties for the present team but un- valued only $23,739,036—not equal a whisper it all disappears in cer-
fortunately Alleyne is unable to even to the value of exports for tain channels,
make the trip due to his studies. the first six months of 1952. How Machinery fo
ay ; A y for constant watch
However, Williams will be here much more dwarfed is the posi- on every boat will be costly, de-
again.” tion in 1938 when compared with clared the Comptroller. as the
The following is a Who's Who the actual $82,181,058 in external Department lgunbhed “2 ects
of the San Fernando Zone team: trade for the first six months of weapon” against th - re
Dr. Noble Sarkar: Skipper of this year? And this figure is these cases are ree freee ant
the team. Held the championship $26,850,555 above what it was for a are first fruits of the
of the county of Yorkshire, Eng-, the comparative period of 1951, en 4 er, .
land, for three years while study- Increases Under the laws of British Gui-
ing medicine. Represented Trini- There has been increases in 908 @ny person convicted of hav-
dad at the World Games in 1948. volume or value in many of the a ig uncugtemed goods must pay a
A defensive backhand player items exported, principally sugar, ®"¢ @mounting to three times the
with an occasional attacking bauxite, rice,’ molasses, green- Value of the goods or $500 which-
stroke. An easy style but very heart, spirituous toilet ‘prepara- Ver is the higher, in default serve
difficult to defeat. Can be com- tions, balata, fish glue, wine, char- S!X months’ imprisonment with
pared with Ronnie Inniss who coal, matches, and plantains. Al- hard labour. The Ordinance allows
visited Barbados with the Trini- though there was a dé¢line in the’ the Magistrate no option of a re-
dad team in 1949. amount of rum exported—768,121 duced penalty, It is obligatory that
Carl Williams: Present South proof gallons of overproof rum, ‘the sentence must be imposed, ~
Trinidad Champion. A member of and 8,273 proof gallons of under- No licences are issued for the
the team which visited Barbaddés proof rum, together fetched importation of American cigar-
in 1949, Has greatly improved in $1,324,640. ettes and only a small quantity js
his attack since then and is now Imports statistics show indus- «jegy and pllawek 10) “tins
a more complete player. trial machinery and other goods of principally from pass a
Fenwick Debysingh: Former a more or less capital nature to ing, or-ship’ pa nes arriv-
South Trinidad Champion and have been heavy, These included 9.0" jj P's crews coming ashore
present runner-up. Played for machinery for agricultural pur- eir personal use.
Trinidad in 1948 against British poses for the sugar industry for



T’dad Team
Arrives Here

Tomorrow

Colony’s revenue of hundreds of

dollars. And most of it takes place

in Georgetown.
Customs officials



Guiana. A backhand player pus hain as well - —. ws, wt
with an attacking style somewhat trucks, vans and other ‘motor S, i ‘ Ss
similar to Laurie Bates, one of the vehicles. ; L nirver ins
members of the Trinidad team in Of. the total import trade of
1949. $43,453,885 the United Kingdom’s 9 e > }

Arnold Mendes: Most prolific share was $17,287,112 or 39.78 per Lic e
smasher in South Trinidad at ot of the ae Bue eit va

resent. Can be dubbed the Ralph ish Guiana sold to Britain ,461,-
ae of the team. With Wile 830 worth of local produce, or ieee August 7,
liams and Debysingh, represented 37.49 per cent of her total exports g rbadian wheelsman John
South Trinidad in the Exhibitions for the six-month period of the kinner won the nine mile eycle
games against the United States year. b+ ed asthe two-day August
Champion of 1951, Dick Miles. While Canada bought $16,108,- Olypmiad of the British’ Guiang.

587 worth of British Guiana goods Amateur Cycle and Athietie

Andrew Moolchan: A sound at- (41.59 per cent of total exports), Union closed after sunset today
tacking player though not as pen- she was allowed to sell us only cn the Georgetown Cricket :Club’s
etrative as Mendes, Possesses @ $5,912,869 of her goods—13.6 per grounds, Bourda today. Fearing
“body slam” that is always a cent of British Guiana’s total im- spills as a result of the large
point winner. Showed very good ports, Strangely enough the Unit- number of contestants, all three
form in the trials and defeated ed States had a better share of Venezuelans stood out and 35
Taffy Cridhlow, the present our purchases during the period competitors took the field, The
Champion of Trinidad in a North under ‘review than had Canada, pace went well until the bell
vs. South match held recently. these amounting to $7,221,791, or sprint when there le e

Kelvin Assing: An orthodox 16.6 per cent, of total imports. (70, bout ti if nae a spill in
south paw player. Can attack or British Guiana on the other hand jp 00" p. + hy the field, among
defena with equal effectiveness. sold to ihe United States only pen ae Gordon the local
The only southerner with a vic- $2,523.652 of local products, or 6.51 © a Beene were brought dewn,
tory against Ronnie Inniss in per cent of total exports. and Skinner went .on to win, with
form. Identical style of Errol Al- ———_—_——_ Walter Liddell (B.G.). second and
leyne. a L. A. ROBISON (B.G.) third. The

Guy Yawehing: The baby of 677 Candidates lap prize went to B.G. wheelsman
the team. Another penetrative ea Cc. P. Holder! The time was 40
forearm smasher, very effective For Exhibitions To minutes 40.2 seconds. Ken
when in form. Won his place on ~*- ’ ’ Farnum’s (Barbados) record of

the team with some amazing dis- : 39 minutes 7 seconds stands.

plays against more considered Secondary Schools ; :

players, ‘ Beatrice Clarke ot ‘frinidad and
Mr. Leon Leacock, a college Six hundred and seventy-seven Joyce Marshall of Barbados got

master, is the Manager of the children are at present taking first and second places respective-
team. He will be accompanied by examinations for Government ly in the quarter mile and two
Mr. W. Wilson, a member of the and Vestry Exhibitions tenable at mile ladies cycle events, Ina



Committee of Management of the Government-aided Secondary Landvreught of Surinam was
San Fernando Zone, ’ Schools. The examinations are third in the former and Truss
—T. T. C. being held at Combermere. Mak of Surinam third in the
~ Five hundred ae oa jo gh one time of the quarter
7 ef ° e boys are taking the five Govern- mile was 38.3 seconds and of
Accident Victim ment Exhibitions and ae two os two thlle six minutes." ies
7 Michael’s Vestry Exhibitions. Walter Liddell won the special
Kept In Hospital this number, 172 are taking the three miler with Franco Cancloni
Second Grade, 99 the St. Michael’s (Venezuela) secong and Lindsay
Five-year-old Yvonette Layne Senior Vestry; 81, the St. Mich- Gordon third,
of Boarded Hall Tenantry, St. ael’s Junior Vestry; 81 the Junior The time was 7 minutes 43.3
George,, was taken to the General First Grade; 79, the Senior First seconds, the track record being
Hospital on Tuesday evening and Grade; $5, the Primary First lowered by 13.3 seconds,
detained. Grade, and 14 the Renewal exam. Caccioni took the :two miles
She was involved in an acci- ination. i : International, with Liddell second
dent with motor cycle S.—245 There are 116 girls taking and Walter Mongul of British
‘owned and ridden by John Out- three examinations; 39 are taking Guiana third. The time was 5
ram of Lancaster, St. James, the Primary First Grade; 42 the minutes, 7 seconds, Gordon did
along Boardeq Hall Road at about Junior First Grade and 35 the not compete. .
3.55 p.m. the same evening, Senior First Grade, Lindsay Gordon won the three



WAFFLE
PIQUE

in Marina, Maize Emerald
and Blue.



/ "I



Ladies’ Dresses





to choose from





‘COTTON
PRINTS

in several styles including
2 pe. Separates, Baller-
inas, as well as off-the- |
shoulder blouses with {
photo print skirts. !

a es

e |



$1,000 per month and robs the! the Party will urge also, it is stated, increased facilities for

yesterday"
opened an organised campaign Party statement continues, “will be

miles International Championship



cSt

G
ns! |f



BARBADOS ADVOCATE



More Financial Help
Propased For Colonies

The

lack of adequate

LONDON.
investment in the under-

developed territories inspires a Labour Party proposal

for an extensicn of financial

assistance under the Colonial

Devolepment and Welfare Acts.

The Party’s second policy

publication since the General

Election entitled “Towards World Plenty”, issued this week
makes the proposal without going into details.

While pressing for the

C.D. and W. funds extension,

the training of craftsmen and technicians in Britain in co-
operation with Colonial Governments.

“Further assistance,” the Labour

given to the expression of techni-
cal education within the colonial
territories, and every ‘possible
effort will be made to secure for
the colonies the technical experts
they require for more rapid econo-
mic development,”

While Commonwealth countries
must be the first concern of the
British Government, the Labour
Party, it is stated, recognises the
need for international action in
this field of aid to the under-
developed areas. It offers support
for some such international effort
as the International Development
Agency, under consideration by
the United Nations as a means of
administering grants-in-aid to un-
der-developed countries for in-
vestment in public services. This
Agency, experts have forecast,
would require a fund increasing
up to 3,000 million dollars a year.

The part under-developed coun-
tries themselves should play is
summarised as follows in “To-
wards World Plenty”.

“Much of the initiative, a great
art of the work, and a share of
he financial burden must come
from the under-developed cous.
tries themselves. Their govern-

ments face tremendous tasks.

Must Win Confidence

“They must provide honest, effi-
cient and energetic administrations
which will win the confidence of
their peoples and overcome the
apathy which everywhere hinders
development. There must be will-
ingness to accept new ideas, to
adopt new techniques and to enter
into a vital partnership with the
advanced countries in an all-out
attack on poverty,” ‘

Population v. Production

“Towards World Plenty” begins
with a review of the threat “in the
present century” of a world star-
vation crisis. Food production is
not increasing as rapidly as world
population, and “the extreme pov-
erty of the peoples of Africa and
Asfa and the other under-develop-
ed areas is a challenge to the whole
world.” Development of the under-
developed areas is essential, it is
stated, if food supplies are to meet |
the needs of the world’s growing
population,

The authors of the publication
answer those who declare it is}
fruitless to raise the standard of !
living in under-developed areas!
because any increase in produc-}
tion will at once lead to a cor-
responding increase in popula-
\tion.





Disproved

“The experience of the de-
veloped regions of the world does
not bear this out,”’ says the Labour

fublication. “The Western world
had disproved the Malthusian pro-
position that it is impossible to in-

crease, production faster than
population. Populations grew
rapidly in Europe and in the

Americas in the Mineteenth Cen-



Georgetown Names
5 For Coronation
Commiittee

(From Our Own Correspondent)

GEORGETOWN, July 30.
The Georgetown Town Council
on Monday appointed a five-man
Committee headed by the Mayor
Mr. R. B. Gajraj, to decide. what
form the celebration of Her Maj-
esty’s Coronation should take in
the City next rn and what pro-
vision should be made in the 1953
Estimates to meet the cost. Other
members of the Committee are
Hon, Lionel Luckhoo (Deputy
Mayor), Councillors Percy C,
Wight, O.B.E., G. F. de Sebastiani
and E. W, Adams. The Mayor’s
Committee will collaborate with
the Central Government who is
also appointing a committee for



the arrangements in the colony
generally.
event by four lengths with N.

Mongul behind and Caccioni third
The time was 7 minutes 54.4
seconds,—(CP)

Fine Fashionable

$s DRESS GOODS

MANY

eee, vee

SAMBA



FLOWERED &
to $1.50 per

&

10, 11, 12, 13, Brond St.
9BDO0O9F4OO): |

LINES

BLACK & WHITE PIG SKIN..,.$1.10 per yd.
PLAIN SEA ISLAND COTTON for Shirts

in White, Cream and Blue....$2.30 per yd.
7 -_-~ wn? oR ie FO
SILMYRA CREPE DE CHENE, in Acra,

Brown, Pink, Rose and Green reduced

from $1.28 to $1.02"
SPUNS in 8
reduced from $1.59 to $1.20 per Go
{{FLOWERED FERGUSONS suitable’ for
i Children’s Dresses at $1.84 & $2.04 r yd.



CAVE SHEPHERD



tury, but pivuuction grew very
much faster, and the standard of
living rose substeutially.”

Dealing with further arguments
—that population can grow faster
in the 20th Century than it could
in the 19th and that production
éannot be increased as fast—the
publication goes on to point out
that-——

“Contrary to popular belief, the
white and coloured populations of
the world are at present increas-
ing at about the same rate, which
is not as rapid as that at which
the white population was increas-
ing 40 years ago.”

Question

Posing the question, whether the
standard of living can be main-
tained, or acreased, by an in-
crease of two per cent. or more in
world production during the next
20 or 30 years, it is stated that
“with no new continents to be
opened up, we have to rely upon
increasing the productivity of
lands already under cultivation.”

As to how much new land can
be brought under cultivation, it is
admitted that one of the major
obstacies “is political: the hostil-
ity to human migration.” In the
19th Century, it is recalled, the
opening up of new lands was as-,
sociated with great movements of
people out of Europe, India and
China.

“There still remain under-
populated lands in Australia, in
the islands of South East Asia and
in Africa,” the Labour statement
goes on, “but it is unlikely that
these will be settled by migration
from other countries.”

One way out of the problem
would be improved techniques of
the millions of small farmers, says.
Labour. “If the farmers of Asia
and Africa,” it is urged
helped to improve their tech-
niques, food production can be in-
creased rapidly, and in fact more
rapidly than population will
grow.”



SPECIAL
DISCOUNT



on all

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We Ta
& CO. LTD.

20 BROAD ST., and at
MARINE GARDENS







HURRICANE
PRECAUTION
HINT No. 2.

WARNINGS







After a Hurricane —
Do not touch loose or
dangling electric wires.
Report the damage to
the Police or the Com-

any.
_" 3.8.52—3n,



REDUCED

Different Designs

aA ond

PLAIN TOOLINA reduced
yd.

Co., Ltd.



“could be,















PAGE FIVE

Goodwill Missior
Visiting B.G.

(From Gur Own Correspondent:



Rain Fell In Spots
About St. Janies

Rain fell. in spots about St
James yesterday. About 1.55 p.m GEORGETOWN, July 30.
a gang of masons were erecting a 4 seven-man mission of econ-
wall near St. James Rectory (Mists, agriculturalists and legis-
when one of them noticed that !@tors from Surinam (Dutch Gui-
rain was falling 20 yards to the 8) arrived here’ on Sunda:
south of them. The others joined #fternoon to discuss agricultural,
him and watched the water run- conemic and industrial ~ prob-
ning im the gutters on each side psi The visit is of a goodwill
of the road while the sun shone "* 5
teightly where they were stand- , ernie 5 eee are Mr.
ng. Cyclists who passed told “: Ch. _Curiel, nister of pert
them that they had seen the same OMES, = econ Jenees of Fin-
thing happen further north along Myr tq Sehutz, a | of the mission,
Highway No. 1. ir. H. utz, acting Head of the
Agricultural Extension Service,
and Messrs K. Kanhai, J. S. Muri=
a, T. Soemita, R. V. W. C

agi) ts gr
Police Get Four *slius and ©. F. Pierau, members
Reports Of Theft

4
Mr. Curiel on his arrival
Georgetown said that British Gui-

Four thefts were recorded on ana is a little ahead of Dutch Gui-
the Police Reports yesterday Mil- 20a, and some of their problems
dred Aswat of Mahogany Lane, have already been solved hi
City, reported that a valise val- By informal discussions, bo
ued $4.50 and containing clothing cunery could learn from each
to value of $70.23, s stolen . '
con her an on Pyasiiay: He disclosed that this visit is
C.othing and valise are the prov- the first of a series to their South
erty of Salah Aswat. American neighbours as planned

by the Surinam Legislature sore

Lottie Holder of Bay Land, time ago. Surinam, he said, hopes
Chelsea Road, reparted that a to start on a 10-year development
cheep was stolen from the Gar- plan featuring agriculture, indus-
1ison Savannah between 6 a.m. try and economics, and it is estim-
and 7.00 p.m. on Tuesday. It was, ated they would require about 100
lier property, — million guilders to start. Surinam,

Fifty-five holes of sweet pota-| he added, hopes to get help.
toes were stolen from the lands
of Bannatyne Plantation, Christ
Church, during Tuesday. The in-
cide was reported by Mr. J.
Marsh of the same plantation.

B. Blackman of Airy Hill, St.
George, reported that a goat was
stolen from an open pen at his
vesidence between 1,00 a.m. and
5.30 a.m. On Wednesday.





For a radiant shine



4 DIE IN DISCOVERY
DAY CELEBRATIONS

PORT-OF-SPAIN, August 6.
Trinidad had a grim, violent
discovery week-end in which four
fatalities occurred. An alleged
murder, a drowning and two
other tragedies marred celebra-
tions, Thousands of persons play-
ed carnival discovery on Monday
about the streets of Port-of-Spain

to the tunes of the steelbands,
—CO.P. ea



The quality ae
Metal Polish



~~
Says Mr. Leo King:
“YOU CAN RE-LION IT
BEING THE SWEETEST TREAT !”

MADE IN U K
The Perfection of Confection.



SS — =

COOLING
Delightful
GUAVA
CREAMS

wie _ A REAL
LUNCHEON

Uy,



TO-DAY'S *

SPECIAL —( >)

KNIGHTS SODA FOUNTAINS
Phoenix and City Pharmacies

THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LTD.

White Park Road, Bridgetown



ENGINEERS, BRASS and IRON FOUNDERS

Works contain rnodern appliances for the execution of
first-class work of all kinds, and especially to
SUGAR MACHINERY and STEAMSHIPS

Dealers in AGRICULTURAL MACHINERY and
GENERAL ENGINE ROOM STCRES
of all Description

IRRIGATION PROJECTS, PUMPING EQUIPMENT
and ELECTRICAL INSTALLATIONS A SPECIALTY

For
Satisfaction, Quality and Service

Contact

THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LTD.

\@ Phone : 4546, 4650 Workshop
Phone 4528 Stores Dept:
|






PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY, AUGUST. 8, 1052








































































































“ —
(; LA S S I I I . D AD S ene TANK ENGAGES ENEMY K A France Presses SHIPPING NOTIC
a ; - Tunis To Accept |
a 2 » aineeeermrennereommats 4
see TELEPHONE 2508 REAL ESTATE ee re "y ee “unis 4 ‘P a iil ae ee lee >
FOR RENT FOR SALE GIBRALTAR—Stone wall House at Reform Plan ROYAL NETHERLANDS
* Cattlewash, Bathsheba. Apply E. H.
Farmer, Andrews Plantation. Phone TUNIS. Aug. 7 STEAMSHIP co, The M.V. “MONEKA” will ac-
ian. peated spiniiegenancibcinchsiieatinn, | eieimies | 25-267 3.9.52—4n Prané lninetied fyi es cept Cargo and Passengers for
Saat Sever | RU he re SAILING FROM EUROPE Dominica, Antigua, Moftsertat
HOUSES AUTOMOTIVE “GREENWICH” 2nd Avenue, Belle- on Thursday to try to force the ~ BOSKOOP. ist August 1952 Nevis and St. Kitts. Sailing Mon-
lane yan 2 terse aay bed ane ‘a by Bey of Tunis into speedy accept- BONATRE. 8th August, 1952 ea 1th int
Attractive seaside Flat main road Has- | ——_—— eninnnanennaic, f , WE arge algy Dedroome, Graw~ ance of the French home rule re-.M.S. STENTOR, 23nd August, 1052 ciel a
lings, comfortably furnished, English! BEDFORD TRUCKS—3 ton and § ton|i)# 2n¢ dining = rooms, Kitchenette, ; eed s M.S. HERA, 29th August, 1953 The M.V. “CAPIBBEE” will ac-
Bath, Open Verandah facing sea. Suitable | wit nd without Baten twe-aneedé. emer Washroom, Servant'’s Room and Garage. form programme. SAILING TO EUROPE cept Cargo and Passengers for
one person {or couple). From August 1.| axle, new. Courtesy Garage, Dial 4016.| Vide open gallery facing niee lawn and Jean Binoche, head of the 4s wiLLEMSTAD, 12th August, 1952, Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat,
Telephone 2949. 18.6.52—t.f.n ; 6.8.52—6n.| “™S!! garden. Apply G. Webster. Phone Foreign Ministry's Africa Levant sAlLING TO TRINIDAD, PARAMARIBG Nevis and St. Kitts, Sailing





eibpaminidnanses 5134 or 4752. 7 8.52—4n Saturday 16th inst

ne bung | CAR—Hillman Minx, 1950. First class SHARES FOR SALE





section had a one hour audience | | AND BRITISH GUIANA

BUNGALOW~= Attractive « . 8th August, 1952.






























































































an’, . . S : with the Bey to emphasize > ., RE, 5th August, 1952
apace Saeee _ aT Ceomictae tee ! Meller. St Margaret's Viceraner $1 Jon: pau ae eee: Frahce’s desire to carry forward) Ss. sTENTOR, 5th. September, 1952, B.W.1. SCHOONER OWNERS’
double bediooms and all conveniences | ies = '6.8.52--an | 233 B’dow lee Co: Lid. the project Sut he was said to SAILING TO TRINIDAD & CURACAO ASSOCIATION (INC.)
Meals with serviee supplied, Apply to | =e +3983 Central I Lid. nave rejected the possibility of 3S. BQSKOOP, 18th August, 1952. Consignee. Telephone No. 4047
Managere > “0 ; cAR- * 333 W.%. Biscuit Co: Lid. fave “rajqprvec Ine pest Y OS. HERA, 15th September, 1952
Manageress of Phone 0172. Vedat CAR--Humber Hawk in perfect condi: 130 Plantations Ltd any major alterations or counter
HS} tion. Apply E. H. Farmer, Andrew . " any m a 2 s or :
A Plantation, St. Joseph. Phone 95-267. 7 Bhp Fi gg | See on proposals from the Tunisians. S. P. MUSSON, SON & ©O., LTD.
RENSAM- Unfurnished, from. 1st Sep 3.8.52—40] i. ‘by publte eom! as aus lee, Within. a few minutes of Agents
At She sham Gardens, axweil. | ———— amen £ ‘he’ wview i 5
Coast Hiteaciite wall Einaniow, 3 be CAR—One (1) Morris Minor in pertect canes See ie m, on Friday 8th Binoche’s interview at Bey CU : st a a a
rooms, Garage und Servants room: | condition 1 year old done 11,000. miles. 0 YRARWOOD & BOYCE Mohamed Al Amin Pasha’s sum- . -
Good Sea~ bathing. Phone S. Dan Price $1,500.00. Phone 3430 immodiotely. Solicitors. mer palace in Carthage the Bey . s aa
4161 for appointment 5.8.52-11 Owner leaving tland 8.§ 20 3.8.52—6n. iso recei''e lette " the
ile . EEE Z B d 1 letter from Ts . ps
ee eae. x , 4 a + 2
CARLTON" Fontabelle—For — info CARS—An assorunent of second hand The Cottage called “VISBY” at EAGLE French Foreiyn Minister Rober! alia lal a na Bd
mation apphys “Mrs. Gilinn _ Drat be 1900 Vanguard 35 S00ee. er ALe) ee (obliquely opposite the Sehuman stressing the Frenen
Karlville,” Spéoner’s Hill, St. Michac “Mayflower — $2,000.00, 1947 Standard 14) ontrance to ‘Waterloo”), St. Michael, solidarity, behind the five-year
Dial 2075. 8.8.52 “Pp $1,400.06, 1951 Austin A-40 — with 39,078 square feet of land thereto : : : hel $
————$—_____—__ 52,400.00 1946 Ford Prefect — $400.00.1 0)" Wich about 24,290 square fect are programme which would give the SOUTHBOUND sai
OCEAN SPRAY—Flat No. 3, on tt 939 Vauxhall 12 h.p. — $700.00, 194617 iv onie for Kitchen. Garden etc Tiunisians increased responsibil- sells Sails Satis sane
sea, with All fiodern conveniences ir Morris “8” — $700.00. May be seen at} *¥ Thos (oe auelrinlg oil the dias anid whore: jobs. in. their. gov Montreal Halifax Boston Barbados Barbados
incr Mikateicind al 255 r pa Chelsea Garage (1950) Ltd., Pinfold $t., unt contains prasring ities . LADY NELSON... 1 Aug. 4Aug. 6 Aug. Aug. 16 Aug.
uding Telephone. Dial 2550 for | helsea a , ing rooms, Three bedrooms (one with er snt.—U.P. , DIAN CRUI 12 Aug. 15 Aug “a * Aug. 25 Aug.
ticulars. Available from Seotetber 1 Phone 4949. 7.8.52—4n dressing som), Kitchen ete Electricity, roment. 7 eat acres AU, & Ava. - 3 4 .
+ 8.8. 52—21 ———— —i aoe , ——— 5 LAN : fe , Sep.
USED CARS—We have an assortment she San GevarpEeny. Yee OTE J LADY RODNEY ee a Set @Sept 6 Sept Went, 18 Sept.
REYNAN--St.. Matthtas Gap, Hasting j|of really good bargains juding Vaux. ~ : leation on e R ¢ IAN . . . . ae
containing Drawing and Dining Room hall Velox, Austin Ad0, Wolseley 12 hp 5 ene on appilea’ o ALTHOUGH GROUND ACTION in Korea continues to be light, according umianian Athlete LADY NELSON ee 22 Sept. 25 Sept. 27Sept. 6 Oct Oc
bedrooms, Toilet and ath reakia jan, sie ‘ourtes; ne b will be set up for ,
Room, Bantry, Kitchen and Garay ade 4616, 38. jsale'by Pubul' Compeattion at our Gmice, | 4 eommuniques, this tank of the Second Infantry Division is shown in A 44. FO, A yy Ta | NORTHBOUND Se i cae
Phone 3980 8.9 52 \ | James Erere. Beagrie en THURS- a front line area are tiga - gaanieaee positions in the fea. i or ) un | Barbados Barbados [Boston Botts Mentresi
ay * “LR Al DAY 14th Augus a . rains have practically ende: ng in some sections, but - | LADY RODNEY o) Soe ug. ue. i Aug. .
WANTED \ sitesi __ELECTRIC iit Seen OF a ing gained territory remains a problem, (International Sowndphoto) Helsinki | CANADIAN CHALLENGER Aug. Aue | oH, =e te
= RADIO—For Car, 12 voit Im workin, $-8:52—10n. | — : es. ae a... - “a sree ! CANADIAN CRUISER ik Z Sat. ie Sant. _ 3 et ae
a order at half the cost of a new_one.| -— rates . e + ° ELS E a BAN Sep . Sept. _ 12 16 Oct.
Phone 4592 78.5231) The undersigned will offer for sale De L at se U K Cab af A member of the Romanian | LAPY RODNEY .. #0 Sept. 2 Oct. 11 Oct. Oct. Oct.
: : i 2, E 4 ; - @ 1 CHALLENGER 6 Oct 8 Oct. — 2 >
HELP - by a te Atent Rennes va u ton ebhe ine Olympic team asked Tuesday for | CANADIAN | CH INGER Sot 8 St. oie ee M ost
i ion eee te LIVESTOCK Friday, the 8th day of August 1952, at e an asylum as a political refugee. |
EXPERIENCED SHORTHAND Tree's a “ oa abd of 91.00, eacht Of France Consi ers Police said leaders of the Ro- |
, ; able to a - —--—-- See 800—Ordinars , 7 an 7
with Bor ee eo Aube bs. letter “t.| COW-—One Heavy Dairy Cow —~ Gord] in BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE BANK manian team tried to persuade the | por further particulars, apply to—
International Trading Corporation Ltd, | Wuabiv milk. Tel 4166 2.8.52—6n. | LIM ; 7 a. ° rebellious member to return home .
Coleridge Siieek, Bridgetown, OTTLE, CATFORD & CO. Expected Aid or lran and thes 6 force bi inte 2 car | GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD.—Agents.
$.8.62—; : in a downtown elsinki reet, |
—— MECHANICAL | 1,8.52—6n Th , .
. e Romanian team member
PUP —Seors Le y fally at teem =
fea ; a papowe ‘atelier. resident. GRASS MACHINE—O: PARIS, August 5, WASHINGTON, Aug. 7. whose name was not disclosed and
€ ene * : aR + 0 -—One re-conditioned ? Dipl fficial: id Th t leadérs wi |
Trinidad, willing to couch cniidren %—i?} qj; Grass Machine. Apply: The AUCTION Rumows of the impending iplomatic officials sai urs- team leaders with whom he was |
years two hours dally, Aes ee rputor. | Manager, Morwood Plantation. .G._ 1. —____.|devaluation of the French franc day that the possibility of finan- quarrelling were taken to the ||
ne le Mere. Peanidya. |p aatfors 5.8.52—3n.} By instructions of the Adshinistrato: | gained headway here as buyers cial help for Iran was considered Police station for questioning. He
, PIANO — Brimsmead Piano Steel Of the estate of Bertha Louisa Sober} rush, pushed gold and black by the British Cabinet, but such then left the station and dis-|
* as frame, excellent condition. Owner leay- | ig"! MATTetAS Nxw RoaD’ Christ}market currency prices to the Measures would ke dependent on appeared. He is believed to have |
MIS©ELLANEOUS Ue sland. _ Revd Mellor, St. Margaret's | Church a double roofed house 24x12x8,| highest levels in months. Monday strong steps being taken against gone to the western democratic

14x9x8, TERMS CASH ON FALL OF | transactions on the Paris exchange the Communist Tudeh party. legation here to seek refuge.

clearly reflected the sliding worth _ They said British Ambassador



MO Y¥—In good worki HAMMER to be removed.
condition. Me &. Seal & Co., ts

ARCHER McKENZIE, ;
MISCELLANEOUS ‘Auctioneer, lof French currency’s buying Sir Oliver Franks was expected C .
: = ” >
oF FOUN 1p BARGAIN~Limited © quantity” of | meme eee power, The wae: — sue See eee ig gh onference
& oe Db tu re é OTT brou 404 fra we “ i
LOS aS - GW Hutchinson & Co. Ltd Dial 42%,] HORSES—Two (2) Riding Horses to] week ago, the lowest point since ter’s return from Honolulu this E nds In. Hula





|



CG TRANSATLANTIQUE





SESSA SOP FPSO

















6.8.52—In. | be sold at the Paddock at 3.20 p.m. [premier Antoine Pinay launche Week-end in regard to British
ee a Saturday 9th inst. & diately after tt ? r bi n Martinique,
ALCOCINE-We have in stock |twenty seventh (if) Race. [his “gave the franc” savings loan oe CGtted British Uneree HONOLULU, Aug. 7. Sailings from Southampton to Guadeloupe,

Oe Fon o ST iy taver Dilek aay ht rap gg ee wet Tr ae three months ago. Waffaires George Middleton in Provocative rhythms, swaying Barbados, Trinidad, La Guaira, Curacao & Jamaica

PST TICKETS Series Hjl.{Pigs and Goats Price 6/- bot. | ———n calbteeses Iran cabled the British Govern- hips and hula daacers helped the ‘ ;
aid. @Q. best ana. Ile. Finder ple “NIGHT'S LTD, 8.8.02] UNDER THE DIAMOND ae vile. nena ae ment that recent riots in Tehran weary Australian and New Zea- sieaacitimoreaia
coearn ee Sgeotwe nig! ae re RINGS—Selt-Piercing Bull Rings HAMMER economic repercussions of the and other Iranian cities showed land diplomatic ministers and Southampton Arrives Barbados

seein strongly made wrought copper in two] By instructions received from the In- | yorsenin Tunisian crisis, and the national front party of Prime military advisers t@ forget the From 052

“GWEHEPSTAKE 2. 0OK of Ten Tickets |=izes 2% and 3 ins. Prices 78. and 9c |surance company I will sell by public |) 8 caked , Minister Mohammed Mossadegh, weighty problems at the Anzus “COLOMBIE” .. 83lst July, 1952 .. 13th Aug. 1
plebl or nec (Finder Whitaker Wate reece ee ee 8.8.80—n | Friday, nent the 6th, wiry ioe Socal wth late Ok eee hed lost control of crowds to the Conference now underway, Uku- *“DE GRASSE” .. 22nd Aug. 1952 .. 3rd Sept., 1952
vie a Gare eee bein, one Morris @ slightly. damaged in an} were at least partially responsi- Tudeh Party and it was this seri- leles and guitars drowned mono- *Not calling at Guadeloupe

ENGLISH POTATOES — &c. per Ib. | accident. Terms cash. D'Arey A. Scott,
Gittens ee o & Co., Ltd. Palmetto] Auctioneer. 2.8.52—4n
Street, near iblic Buildings

ble ous factor which caused Chur- tonous speeches when the confer-
: chill to summon his cabinet to a ence relaxed at the Marine
An impetus to the new infla- special meeting. Officials said Officers’ Club close to the confer-



SAILING FROM BARBADOS TO EUROPE










GOVERNMENT NOTICE 6 .52~2- 1 JNDER THE IVORY HAMMER tionary trend was also given by the Cabinet was also disturbed ence hall. ue = Barbados A ia Coe 1952
og SW ELLS"—We have in stock the Government report which by measures reportedly taken by The Aussies and New Zealand- ‘DE GRASSE .. 6th Aug, 1 ‘ Aug., 195:
ss Hee ee tne oe ot a EO (a Ons eat on Priday, |Showed the wholesale price index Mossadegh to, prevent: foreign ers were engaged on Wednesday “COLOMBIE” .. 24th Aug. 1952 .. 5th Sept., 1952

~ travel sickness when journeying by
Sea, Air, or Car. Price. 3/- box


























































BROADEAST ON THE PRO. August 8th at the Courtesy Garage | up four-fifths of one per cent. in diplomats from conferring with night in an informal serious dis-

*“DE GRASSE” .. 16th Sept., 1952 .. 26th Sept. 1952

SSS SSSSS FSF SSI SSI OS









TE RNs a UTD, 8.8.52—3n Whitepark Road, (1) 1962 A-40 Pickup,| July over June. It ‘was the first the Shah as it is believed they cussion when Iren Lum pretty «
Tr aoe oe | eas ne et OR ee cae whale, rice tnorenee eitee would benefit Communist action Hawa:ian Chinese-Spanish tele~| } piling Sheens to: Seeagees
HURRICANE DAMAGE “ORIENTAL ‘For the Hair -|preperty of the Police Boys’ Club, Pp 1 : Hone By Mr. W. M. WOODHOUSE, | iwparts o silkiie and brilliance , | Damaged in accident, Pinay became Premier last March in Iran. .,, phone ope: : 1 2
ARLABA and Keeps it well groomed, Obtainab!>; Terms cash. Sale at 2 p.m. and it sent investors scurrying They stressed that Britain dulating Hawaiian dance. Raised} R. M.
ay aY BAGS UTE), 6.62" VINCENT GRIFFITH, for hard currency insurance to Would take no action in Iran ex- eyebrows soon gave way to in-| ¥3999¢699999966690606¢ : $$$9S9965

At five minutes past eight p-m-|“Supscniam now to the Dally OSs protect themselves against chain cept in close co-operation with tense concentration on the dance.|¢ so
on Friday, 8th August, Mr. W. M. | retegraph, England's leadin; News-| — - reaction increases in retail prices the United States anq that ways Miss Lum’s impromptu hula— | $7996 9999"
Woodhouse, A.R.LBA., Building | paper now arriving in by Air UNDER THE SILVER and the cost of living index. and means of preventing Iran without grass skirt or sarong—
Development Adviser of the odes A ee Se o an in HAMMER U.P. {rom falling under Communist but with an ordinary print dress,
Development and Welfare Organi- |eate ¢o., Ltd., entative| On Tuesday 12th by order of Capt * control would have to be agreed brought broad smiles and many
a ean eer a See eae ee | eg ee
will give.a:short talk over - | “eer fo oo |S jury, St. rge, which includes atest information from Iran that the hula was one of the
fusion Service Limited on th wie Cakes have Meo neces Sar eee aie ee ieeexanenr ves BYP tian Doctors indicated that the Shah and Iran- relaxing diversions from che con-



rotection of iomes against hurri~ | Grigith’s Rockley, Come and get them.|1ight Chairs, Liquor Case, "M.'T. , ian army leaders believed the ference thus far.—U.P.
pro $5 caean| Soe ats Boutie. aud single. ind On Tour Of U.S.

‘ Dial 4614, ing Table menace of Communism to Iran to
cane damages: §.8.52—1h Couches and Settees; Pembroke Table,























bea very real one at present. :
VENETIAN BLINDS-Made to order. | Bookease (glass Doors), Chairs, Rockers e 4 (U.P.)
; Ce wae
——mees } Ail metal (aluminium) All sizes, al)} Ornament and Kidney Tables; Flat Top M Ca aa
| Sa tit ary in| Se Rating Bax Sia cheignse| Medteal Centres ae ee saa
: SF c/o Barba a n Mahogany: rbice alr; ase .
a WANTED Advocate, 1.8, 52—6n ang ching, Brass Candlesticks eet as pe gs August 7. Oil Pros ects We wish to notify our Custom t
= al SS eee Seerpion Spoons; French arble C gyptian octors are using P
nose on tons ime ne oceter {| NG, MOREA a. Bust rau oo Hak aepenp's Amerean wonder’ ant-prtan Australian Golfer Workshop Department will be
on Sea -Gonst,or overlooking sea; {| oor oae for Acetylene welding, AUTO. | lated and Silver Ware, Brass Bowls s'P.{dtugs for the widespread treat- y STEWAR - ee ares a
Large verandah, 3 bedrooms, ave \PYRE CO, Dial 2696. , Hot Water Dish and’ Ta Cactunees ment oi patients suffering from a Plays Last Game By STEW 8 BBNEES.
nd y y astings, : A a : : ry
oe SP rtaing, Maxwell or §.8.52—t.f.n, Tea Set: Large Telescope and stand with river disease, anaemias and filaria, i Miz ae ~ Aug. Go closed from Monday 11th August to
S Roek = Preferably unfur- a nm night lenses, Single Mahog. Bedstead, Bed one of Egypt's top biochemists told . . ax . etroleum on-
ried igen, cot HD. MM tings ara pada orig ee | Mier, “Cine Preer ua eest.|the United Prese today fre Brridagey sient seid Tapendey wat oes, path TaN
@ : i‘ . ls . sk, . ”
Edwards shor 2378 | oy ten, $160 or near offer.’ Ring 2222 preferabl- | tepple. White Chest of Drawers all. in pects are exeellent” for develop~ Saturday 23rd. August, 1952, both days
a Snel | before 10.30 7.8.52—2n | Mahogany: White Painted Cedar Press,| Dr. Mohamed Abdel Salem El LONDON, Aug. 6, ment of g considerable oil industry



child's Press; Chamber Ware: Kitchen |Ayadi and eighteen other visiting Norman Von Nida, Australia’s in Israel but the “only way ‘o
i PUBLIC NOTICES Samant teers Panay Greogrechions Magn: doctors from faculties of medicine leading tournament golfer has prove the potential j* by drilling.”



inclusive, in order to give our Work-



zines and ‘other items. Sale 11.30}0f Ibrahim Pasha University in played his last competitive game Ball and his son Douglas were re-

+ shen men



Yegms CASH. : Cairo were here on the first lap of |, Britain. The Aussie profes- tained by the ‘Israeli government shop Staff their Annual vacation. There
HERRICANE BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO., |their American tour of medical sional left for his home in Sydney in 1950 to study and report on the
way NOTICE ” $.0,sa--2n | Contes to study. recent discoveries after failing to place among the oil prospects of the country, They will be a skeleton staff on duty for any

and methods, op prize winners in last week's also helped in preparing the

. 2,000 guineas Test. He said he Jsraeli Petrol 311 wh mu

“The essential purpose of our ~’ y i cae owe Israe etroleum Bill which re
trip is scientific,” br. ayade states, ould not be pat ag I ae cently passed the first reading in
“We want to see your hospitals, made six trips to Britain, won 15 Knesset and is expected to win

ans ” tolirnaments and picked up 2
laboratories and research work se 6,500 in thévsBason of 1947, but final approval by the end of .this

PRECAUTION PARI3H OF ST, PHILIP
Applications for one or more Vacant

St. Philip's Vestry Exhibitions tenab:

emergencies. Our Office, Parts Depart-
ment and Petrol Station will be open

SSS OPSPOSSOSSIOF SSS SPSS SSSI PS OPPS SSS FPP



at the St. Michael's Girls’ School, wil slide

Me received by tf ; > >

HINT No a than Monday let Avmnuae nese. re RUN ; as to get a new idea back in our i can’t go on”, Von Nida ‘said month, : ;

. Candidates must be daughters of Par. DO WWN > country.” oa 4 ag Ball said Israel offered one of as usual

ishioners in straitened circumstances a But that is not. the Peet ens the best opportunities of any :

; and t b 49) nine y } : is stay a sugges : ;
inder (11) Sears on the iit Septembe re Yerk where they pre guests int heavy taxation of prize fOFelgR country for the invest- ——
1902. ‘What you need are the life |New York where they are guests inat heavy tax oe ae ment of outside capital. He said

WARNINGS. A birth Certifieato rust be forwarde: giving vitamins and minerals | of the laboratories division of the rhoney did not make it worth ;

with an application form obtained fron
the Parochial Treasurer's Office.
>; »

n >. §. W. SCOTT,
Get" Ti extra food, Clerk to the Vestry,

especially things that oy ee » healthier witb . .
The “wonder drug” is of parti-

will require little cook a EAST - ae OS cular interest because it has been
‘ Whe BACK 7 found “effective against a number
lng .or. pRgperqtem n your ATL ZONES | of diseases that for centuries have

American Cyanamid Company,}while for overseas players to at a press conference “I would

o hi: untry any more, Yather do business in Israel than ~™M « co LTD
airante ‘ee 5 err : —€CP). any place in the world outside eo e

tals, the United States and the British

of YEBAST-PHOS, Enjoy life
to the full! You'll feel

eS





re ome Commonwealth so far as the ,

. stability of the country and the
U.S. Dollar Down government is concerned.” % PHONE 4316
He said Israel has shown “abso- |

NEW YORK, Aug. 7%. jute fairness in dealing with|%





































cs
Apply +

O. P. BENNETT,
Royal Hotel,

2 oe oe oe ee oe es oe ee oe ee ee oe ee

{pont Nester GOVERNMENT NOTICE -
L

ee eee ee wee ene nd Attention is drawn to the Control of Lumber Prices (Defence)

Take SWAMP-ROOT! Mi- (Amendment) Order, 1952, No. 4 which will be published in the
raculous SWAMP-ROOT .





Also Parts such as...
‘ACCOUNTANCY COST ACCOUNT.
ING, COMPANY SECRETARYSBIP,
GOOK-KEEPING, An “Trtensive'
Method" Course (for award of Diplo
‘a as Associate or Fellow)

qualify you for higher status by in-



been a scourge in Egypt and the} The Canadian dollar was up 1/8 foreign capital,” and that the! % oa
ACHES... ° : rest of the Middle East”, —U.P. |. a cent at a ae of aS Israeli. Petroleum Bill offers X66666699959S9 566555559 CS SSS S SOO SS 9SOSS8SS
= chache caused sien < i 8 ited States ; 2
SSS 2SSS9SSSO0SOSOSSIOIVSS ——______—— {per cent in terms of ‘ni forei levelopers the fairest}, 59996 56 9S9SF90 FC SSOOOS SSS
The idea be ay Siders, funds in closing foreign exchange teiasd ot a Ganate in he Ste $6996" $6094 ‘ ¢
ys are the blood’s filters. a e dealings Wednesday. The pound 7 F —UP.
FOR SALE] guar; Sime |) AM WEBB § cms Bleed’ [ver tm touch Wik Barbed
’ ; 4 *
backache, headache, % Stockbroker URS D C63 |°-2*. n Touch With Barbados
disturbed wet - that ‘tired out” : __Bteesti (mean tat ou v ; od gpevonig she panied a ate Coastal Station
The following horses Properly—and to keep them in good order— OPEN FOR BUSINESS AS Cornet eaiteaie that ‘wil 3° 29/32 per cent in terms of , CABLE AND WINgLESS (Wi) Ltd
= ! use Dodd’s Kidney Pills. Dodd’s Kidney xt USUAL IN BARBADOS sooner or later eatise your teeth to funds. down 3/32 from ee shat they Son eer communicate
landed Barbados: Silver Pills quickly rid your over-burdened blood | >, NVESTMENTS fall out and may also cause Rhen- anadian funds, down with the following ships through their
Trail £775: True Foot of excess acids and wastes so that x I S' matism and Heart Trouble, Amosary Tuesday close. That is. It took Reeds coer ereslat Pui. Paniase
650: Sailor Bear’ £600 blood flows to cod ea e stops gum bleeding the rhe’ to6 3/82 conte @anedian to buy . P"ehaneauer ssc: Texns Trader, ss | % .
£650; Sailor Bear pa ) eresionne 33, Broad St. Pens the teeth. Iron clad i e- $1 Ameriean. / pound sterliny’ prospector, s.s, Sunwhit, s.s. Mercator
er and s ss les 8) ERT Eee [2 SAGE A fom Tues- f55 Aber Piamen 55, Momere. 32 |g
" ie Pat io Le r, $.8. Margitor’ m, § hs .
Insist : % (Over Ph ) on return of empty package. Cet day. â„¢ Kesd. Worcester, 3:5 Archangeloe. $.s A New Shipment just opened,
Bear £700. $ Dial 4796 — Hours: 9-3 8] Amosan from Your ehirnist today. OO) Hamada aie, Ariswualics
* nretidiee prote $ ou,
? —_—_—_—
*

BICYCLE FRONT FORKS

Lundy Light» £600:
Water Bird £500; Johr
REAR and FRONT BREAK a eae \



































| RASS erenting Mpare-tine BOOTLE ata ned glo ied Official Gazette of Thursday, 7th August, 1952. SHOES
SSS }}“OURSES in nalich, Commetetal Blond, get id of pais 2. Under this Order the maximum retail selling price of “Mer- BREAK STIRRUPS complete
¥ Br. ET si) hi] (icaw subjects, “ionden Chstaee at sons that make aaa chantable White Pine 1” x 6”—11”, 6’ and up is as follows: — ETC
merce te.’ Por. PREM aon B U L V A feet tired and mis- REAR and FRONT FENDERS ;
SH WRITE NOW to the leading tutorial O erable! OLUMN TWO :
} FUhiv wretute for overseas, studente: LON é ee oe PSs ch Retail Price No need to say that thesé bicycles are as the name
Y K(33 Welbeck. Street, London, Wi ATC H ES is AY ti teethie im Article (not more than) implies — Strong, Durable and are well-known.
The Money Saving Way Exigiand Pee Merchantable White Pine :
Mopular Burcavs, -Bedsteads, $f} | pcs Only a few in stock as / | 1" x 6"—11”, 6’ and up | , +
Reds. Wardrobes, We htonds #0 00 aia the quota is limited. Se doe Ge WN tecting 2) - (Basic Sizes) .. 7 $296.00 per 1,000 board feet — | ;
"ABLES for Dining. Yeitchen ana TO-DAY'S NEWS FLASH BUT YOUR BEST BET |]|$ suivation, please write for 3, _8882—m 3 4. Ee. TAYLOR LTD.
Saas tina 1 US TO GET ONE - wr
Liquor’Casrs sea0up —DRAw. SW wonpE ey are real niagic 2: aes! Geode.
inh Roo $5.50 up — DRAW - WONDERFUL ASSORT- when it comes to FREE BOOK ; 8 WE HAVE = — ‘ia Coleridg
Furniture for Little and Big Screen MENT OF quality. Which Makes 3
Sigola’in wood end fusu. Rape . . 17 Jewels Guaranteed ‘“ , si} ) : . nalities are HIGH
Mats g120 up Patras Prive r Walking Sticks GOD Ss WAY OF % | x RED ROOFING PAINT i % Qu Ana
OEP aE Just received by Y. De LIMA SALVATION PLAIN” ei at $4.50 per Gallon $ . cdi tet
| ‘ ei 21% rrces are Eee
L.S. WILSON JOHNSON'S & C@., LED. nor a Res ee |. ME CENTRAL EMPORIUM |< ies aah
SPRY STREET, DIAL 4069 } STATIONERY 20 a lines % Central Ave., Bangor, N.I. S| ‘ Corner Broad and Tudor Sts. ¥
FFAS SSS | SS %3$9999O6699596969506668" | 6
















BARBADOS

ADVOCATI PAGE SEVEN

nee a ee El




BY CARL ANDERSON





es

MUROER WILL OUT,
CAPTAIN! HAVE A








HERES A DIME >
|( FOR EACH OF YOu
FOR BEING SUCH
GOOD CHILDREN

RUN OVER TO THE
LEANERS FOR ME CE-CREAM
AND, GET DADDYS A> \, CONES WITH
se 2

(OUR DIMES |






DON'T TOUCH ME/
REMEMBER! T AM yOUR
QUEEN / TAM THE RULER
OF GANYMEDE /





YEP! IT MEANS THAT... 1F

ANYBODY IS AROUND HERE...

THEY'VE BEEN TIPPED OFF THAT
THEY'VE GOT COMPANY!’

TRSRE IT 19, PARADISE...
THiS THING 1S RIGGEP WITH | KNOW WHAT THAT
A PHOTO-ELECTRIC




MEANS, DON'T YOu,







Beccles Sree
PPINGING UP FAT!









BUT HE'S VERY



BY ALEX RAYMOND

OH, NO, MRS. ARDSLcY!) THEN HES A THIER MY DEA\



OH, MRS. AROSLEY...THE STRANGEST THING/
JUST HAPPENED...A MAN CAME IN AND
BOUGHT AN EMPTY BOX...
THEN HE.. KISSED MY HAND!

HE WAS SO CASHIN



“HE DROVE OFF IN YOUR TRUCK!

THOUGHT HE WAS





BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES



[THis IS THE PLACE WH
WE LOST THE WIP. OUR
TIRE TRACKS END HERE

TOP TUAT! DONT

.~)
PPDDODHIDHGHHHOHGHHHHOGHO GFP IIHHHHHDHHHHH HHO





OOOO

a ne $e

End Rheumatism
While You Sleep

* If you suffer sharp stabbing pains



if joints are swollen. it shows. your
blood is poisoned through faulty kid
ney action. Other symptoms of Kid-



ney Disorders are Burning, itehing
Passages, ‘Getting up Night,” Back.

|
| aches, Lumbage, Leg Pains, Nervous.
ness, Dizziness, Headaches, Colds,
a Puffy Ankles, Circles under Eyes,

| Lack of Energy. Appetite etc Ordi-

;
i wary medicines cant help moch—you
| must kill the germs ruining health.

eee | Cystex ends these troubles by re-

Moving the cause Get Cystex from

| any Chemist on Guarantee to put
| ou right or money back Act Now?

n 2# hours you will fee) better and
be completely well in one Week

e The Guar-
1 mntee
.. Cystex antes

Ger Kidneys, Rheumatism, Biadce < ow







Pociors & Nurses Recommend

| 7am-Buk

The World-famous Herbal

SKIN OINTMENT

Soothes—Purifies——Heals
—

LISTERINE
ANTISEPTIC

ge

LUSYERINE Antiseptic kills millions of
from starting serious trouble. Remem-
ber, at the first sign of cold, gargle
LISTERINE Antiseptic, full strength,
early and often!



IN TESTS OVER 4. 12-YEAR PERIOD, DAILY USERS
OF LISTERINE ANTISEPTIC HAD FEWER COLDS! ®











BECAUSE UPONTHE CONDITION
OF THE KIDNEYS RESTS HEALTH
HAPPINESS~ LIFE ITSELE,/



IN CHOOSING YOUR

TRACTOR OR FARM IM-

" EVERY EXPERIENCED DOCTOR
PLEMENTS, ALSO GIVE IN MAKING A DIAGNOSIS
! MUST FIRST FIND OUT THE
EN CONDITION OF THE KIDNEYS,

SERIOUS CONSIDERATION

~ ‘
@ TO THE SERVICE YOU ARE FOR IF THE KIDNEYS ARE
ee FAILING IN THEIR IMPORTANT
ts ‘ DUTY OF REMOVING EXCESS
vi LIKELY TO GET. ACIDS AND POISONOUS
== SM WASTES FROM THE BLOOD-

In Selecting . THEN WE ARE POWERLESS
. TO PREVENT SICKNESS.

EVEN INSURANCE COM=
or PANIES WONT INSURE A (>
PERSON WHOSE KIDNEYS a

ARE NOT RIGHT — .

|
MASSEY -HARRIS VES THEDocro
ARE RIGHT!
TRACTORS OR IMPLEMENTS Se ok aol ook fox Bee
your kidneys. Backache, headaches,
perveenirshinenesie tired Laie, maga ge my
Which Already Enjoy an Enviable Reputa- ek elle
COU RTESY cations of faulty kidney action. If you
tion, You Are Assured of TOPFLIGHT have any of these symptoms then take
GARAGE peal ae See: am
SERVICE, ‘oven kidney remedy, used A
ROBERT THOM Our Specialised Staff is Always at Your Dis- Doi Kune) "Pils od
yet ;
LIMITED posal to Take Care of Your Every Need. ebiie else. machi
White Park Road You Buy SERVICE When You Invest in —— o
Dial 4616 Equipment Offered by 3/-





Ss =

__IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE
for Thursday to Saturday only



SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers

sciipetn aa ed
SPECIAL OFFERS are now available at our branches White Park,
Tweedside, Speighistown and Swan Street









——





WHISKY Usually Now

PETER DAWSON CROWN MALT Se Shae Rees peek tn ee Cea sr

SCOTTISH CREAM .._ . $4.50 per bot. $4.00per bot. CRYSTAL STARCH pkgs. .... PASTE ALPEN
© Sa : BOX-ALL CLEANSER ... Ot ote da gale eo ae
NORTHERN _e—e., fa 46.00 per e/s Lay OWROH. cuca ten icek dees ce ad ”
* ‘ SPRINKS BT e ee: Seat reeaeeee ee
CREAM — WHEAT .. 83 80 CHEMICS PAILS ......... cepa Reged oxi ee
PRUNES 1-lb. tins... 70 60 ra’ dPRAY ice Perot 221
. . ' i FLIT GUNS 92
SARDINES es Se .20 18 FLIT Gins. Tins 3 : 4.55
TABLE RAISINS... 48 ee ree otk . “mae

BEER DRUMMER BOY 26

.20



Corydon contains the four famous dialogues
in which Gide makes his defence of homosex-
uality. It appeared originally in France in 1911, ¢
bearing neither author’s nor publisher’s name.

Though it has run through many editions of 3
France and elsewhere in'Europe, it has never 2
before been translated into English

CORYDON — By Andre Gide |

In his preface to this edition Gide wrote: “I
believe that in this book I have said almost all
that I had to say on this extremely important p
subject that has not been said before. I shall be
satisfied if it helps a little to tear down or lift the
‘hick veil of lies, convention and hypocrisy which

1 stifles an important and not contemptible
part of humanity”.

On Sale at the Advocate Stationery.

OOOO 0000F 9-909 0 0G OOP DOGO OOO LOU UOEU POU PU POVIOODPEGDLOVTODPODHOPOODDPF DODD GOODIE PHOS PODODSOPOOVIOL’?

|


PAGE. EIGHT

Racing Results

AT GARRISON SAVANNAH, THURSDAY, AUGUST 7,
WEATHER: Fine. TRACK: Firm.

1952

17th Race. JUVENILE STAKES—Class “F2” and Lower $800,

($265, $135, $40), 544 Furlongs.

1. APPLE SAM: b.g. Jetsam-Apple Fritter, 118 Ibs., Mr. J. R. God-
dard (Thirkell)

2. SUPER JET: ch.c. Jetsam-Wedding Gift, 118 lbs., Mr. F. B. C.
Bethell (Yvonet).

3. SEA FOAM: hb. ch.g. Jetsam-Battle Doll, 108 lbs., Mr. R. EB.

Gill (Lutehman).

ALSO RAN: Howitzer (118 lbs., Crossley); Bow Tie (118 lbs., P.
Fletcher); Jim La Rue (118 ibs., Joseph)
TIME: 1.11

.
PARI-MUTUEL; =a $1.64, Place: $1.66, $2.50.

FORECAST: $11.5.
START: Good FINISH: Comfortable; 4 lengths, 2 lengths.

TRAINER: Mr, J. R. Goddard.

18th Race: STAFFORD HANDICAP—Class “B” and Lower, $900,
($300, $150, $55) 744 Furlongs.
1. eit BEAR: b.c. Dante-Sweet Cygnet, 114 lbs., Mr. V. Chase
(Jo:
2. RED S CHEEKS: b.f. Linklater-Golden Carp, 124 lbs., Mr. E. C.

Jones (O'Neil).
CASTLE IN THE AIR: b.c. Windsor Slipper Hero-Comet, 114
lbs., Mr. M. E. Bourne (J. Belle).

ALSO RAN: Sweet Rocket (125 lbs., Lutchman); Pepper Wine (128
,lbs., Crossley); The Thing (102 lbs., James); Vectis (111 Ibs.,
Quested); Demure (126 lbs., Wilder); Firelady (121 lbs., Yyonet);
Belle Surprise (120 lbs., Holder); Flying Dragon (121 lbs., Rey-
nolds); Lunways (126 lbs., Newman).

TIME: 1.36.

PARI-MUTUEL: beg $9.30.

we

Place: $3.58, $6.00, $7.86.

FINISH: ” Easy; 1 len two lengths,
Mr, V. Chase. *

19th Race: NURSERY STAKES—-Class “F2” and Lower $800,
($265, $135, $40) 5% Furlongs

1. FAERIE QUEENE:
C. Barnard (Holder).

b.f. Burning Bow-Chivalry, 115 Ibs., Mr.

2. MEERSCHAUM: hb. b.f. Jetsam-Dolly, 105 Ibs., Mr. R, E. Gill
(Lutchman).

TIME: 1.153.

PARI-MUTUEL: Win $1.10.

START: Good. FINISH: Easy; 2% lengths.

TRAINER: Hon. V. C. Gale.

20th Raee: TRAFALGAR HANDICAP—Class “D” and Lower $800,
($265, $135, $45) 9 Furlongs.

1. TOP FLIGHT: b.m.,Flotsam-Meads,
Schnan)





123 Ibs., Mr. L. J. Wong
: bg. Burning Bow-Chivalry, 128 lbs, Mr. C.
Barnard (Holder).
3. MAY DAY: b.g. Debonair-Piona, 954-14 lbs, Mr, I. O. C, Perkins
yRAN? C 1
olleton (119 lbs., Joseph).
PART. Mir TUEL: a ;
in: $3.44, Place: $1.66, $1.38.
er rae 0
T: Good, FINISH: Comfortable; 3 lengths, 7 lengths.
TRAINER: Mr. R. H. Mayers. . me

21st Race: MERCHANTS’ HANDICAP—Class “F”
($235, $115, $40) 7% Furlongs.

& “F2” Only $700

1. CARDINAL: br.g. O.T.C.-Biretta, 126 Ibs, Mr. J. W. Chandler
(Crossley) .
2. COLOMBUS: br.c. Colrose-Busy Woman, 107 lbs,, Miss Rose-
maakcH wore. mae ee ‘
NDS: bg. O.T.C.-April 11th, 116 lbs, Mr, U. J.
sacha (Quested).
ALSO RAN: Rambler Rose (118 ie, Newman); Viceroy (111 lbs.,
Bees Apronusk (105+-18 lbs., P. Fletcher); Caprice (110 Ibs.,
TIME: 1.3 rer

PARLMUTUEL: Win: $3.50. Pl 1.62,

FORECAST: $22.44. ' mr § Rn si. vn
START: Fair.

TRAINER: . Mr. J. W. Chandler.

pair a aseiaterier ek endl GoM A ccna psig tniaempabetinlenittinin
22nd Race: SUMMER HANDICAP—Class “OC” & “C2” Only
$800 ($265, $135, $50) 9 Furlongs.

TEST MATCH: b.g. Valdavian-Match
E, C, Bethell (Yvonet). oh ey ary ee We

CAREFUL ANNIE: b.f. Birikan-M
Pee eed n-Movement Control, 118 lbs., Mr.

ae RINCESS; br.f. Dastur-Pr
Mr RE geet astur-Princess Regent, 130. Ibs.,
RAN: um bs., Holder); Darham Jane (101 Ibs.,
Blades); Trimbrook (108 Ibs., Crossley); Flieuxce (126 Ibs.
Wilder); Tiberian Lady (111 ibs., James); The Thing (104+-7
te jghewmen); Embers (110 lbs., Belle); Aim Low (125 Ibs.,
BARE abil, wn
g L; Win: $12.18. Place: $3.10,
FORECAST: $202.80. me tad id
START: Fair.
TRAINER: Mr, F. E. C, Bethell.

RY
28rd- Race: STEWARDS’ HANDICAP--Class “A” & “B” Only
$1,000 ($335, $165, $60) 9 Furlongs.

A
teen b#. The Phoenix-Dido, 114 lbs,, Mr. S. A, Blanchette

FINISH: Close; head, head.

mo
=

2

FINISH: Easy; 1 length, % length..

~

2. PPER WINE: b.m. O.T.C.-Condiment, 120 Ibs., Hon. J. D.
Chandler (Crossley) .
3. LANDMARK: ch.m. Pylon 11-Esperances, 136 lbss., Mr. V. Chase

Aan: Notonite (120 lbs., Fletcher); Harroween (124 lbs.,

= Di Slainte (110 lbs,, Li
“ xeon Rie" ¢ 8, utchman),

PART-MUTUEL: â„¢ 2.86,
FORECAST: $27.24. Place: $2.52, $2.60. :

START: Fair. FINISH: ; head,
TRAINER: Mr. R. H. Mayers. ideas pines Alle tama a

Gavilan To Fight Graham.

HAVANA, Aug. 7.
Kid Gavilan will risk his World
Welterweight champion-
ship against Billy Graham of New



Graham’s Manager, President
James D. Norris of the Interna-
tional, Boxing Club, and the
Cuban Sports Director, Lorenzo



York for the second time here on
October 4, When Gavilan put his
title at stake against Graham last
August 29. in New York the
Cuban emerged with the decision,
but it was so hotly disputed that
the Graham camp began calling
Graham “the uncrowned King of
the Welterweights”.

Their return bout will be an
outdoor affair in the Havana Ball
Park, according to the contracts
signed here by Fernando Balido,
Gavilan’s manager, Irving Cohen,

Nodarse.

Gavilan was to receive 35 per
cent of the proceeds, including
box office, radio, television, and
motion pictures, with Graham to
receive 25 per cent.

In addition, Graham had to
guarantee Gavilan a return bout
within sixty days should he win
the crown, and Graham _ also
promised not to appear in any





BARBADOS ADVOCATE

COMING

The 22nd race on the third day of the B.T.C. Summer Meet was won by Mr. F. E. ©. Bethell’s Test Match. Above is how the horses came |

around the bend and into the home stretch.

“Mrs. Bear” Scores Results

Upset Win

@ From Page 1
time was 1 minute 11% seconds,
% seconds slower than the Oisti
Handicap rum on the second day
over the same distance.
EIGHTEENTH RACE
Stafford Handicap

Four of the entrants of an
original field of sixteen horse
were scratched, and the Handl-
cappers placed a top weight ol
128 Ibs. on Pepper Wine.

The event was for horses classi-
fied ‘B’ and Lower, and was rub
over a distance of fur.ong

The race was off to a good start
despite the fact that Flying
Dragon failed to get off for the
fourth time this meeting.

When they passed the judges fo:
the first time, Vectis was lead-
ing the field, with Demure and
Lunways lying a close second and
third. Flying Dragon who started
late was many lengths in the
rear of the field, but at the fifth
furlong pole he went past Pepper
Wine who pulled up in her track.

Down the Hastings Stretch, th¢
company was strung out, led by
Fire Lady, Sweet Rocket and
Lunways in that order.

There were positional exchanges
as they raced up the Polo Hill,
and soon Mrs Bear took over the
premier position from Fire Lady.

She was strongly challenged by
Red Cheeks coming up the home
stretch but finished the winner a
length ahead of the challenger,
who was 2 lengths in front cf
Castle-in-the-air. The time was |
minute 36 seconds flat.

NINETEENTH RACE
Nursery Stakes

Only two horses, Meerschauin
and Faerie Queene took part in
this event run over 5% furlongs
as Jealousy and Stirling Flush
were scrat .

As the gates flew, Holder
pushed Faerie Queene to the fore
and kept the filly in that positioa
throughout the race after making
every pole a winning one. Meers-
chaum who was about one length
behind by the four furlong pote
closed the gap a bit but failed
to draw lead with Faerie Queene

Meerschaum made a challens
by the two furlong pole but Feer:e
Queene could not be overcome
and eventually raced up the
straight a comfortable 24% lengths.

TWENTIETH RACE
Trafalgar Handicap

Four were scratched in this nine
furlong event for horses classi-
fied D and Lower, leaving a field
of four with May Day carrying
14 lbs overweight.

The field got off to a good start
but coming around the bend Col-
leton fell throwing its jockey
Joseph who had to be taken to the
Hospital with an injured teg,

As they passed the stands for
the first time, Top Flight (Lutch-
‘man) was leading followed by
May Day (Crossley) and Cross
Bow (Holder).

Holder moved up from the rear
with Cross Bow by the five fur-
long pole and was closely behind
Top Flight but Lutchman kept
the mare in the lead racing in
this position all the way home.

Cross Bow made a challenge
by the two furlong pole but fail-
ed to draw level with Top Flight

7Y%

who raced up the straight an
easy wines by three lengths
Cross Bow was second seven

lengths in front of May Day.

TWENTY-FIRST RACE
Merchants Handicap

Soprano and May Day were
seratched, and six horses came
under Starter’s Orders. Cardinal

was carrying a top weight of 126



They’ il Do It Every










fight or. exhibition during that
period.—U,P.
‘Time Replvtered U. 5 Patent Office





By Jim Jimmy Hatlo

x DONT MIND IM KIDDIN’

WALKIE-TALKIE, BUT 4.
- LIKE US TO THINK
HES ALWAYS BUSY, TOO

SPERL H





IF THERES
a SCONE, :



HE TAKES iT <
EASY BUT HE
LAYS THE WHIP



Z WISH HE DID
= stocKkRoom/ / want es EAT WITH GONNA BREAK
REW? REALL THE
ene LOADING DEPART _



MENT!





Listenin Oo THE- |
OFFICE FEET-UPPER |
tig TELL THE FRAY HOW |
EAR TED UP HE IS=-+ |
THANX AND A TIP OF |




THE HATLO HAT TO
“UNANIMQUS "QUINCY ILL.

lbs., while Apronusk carrying 105,
was given an overweight’ of 8 lbs.

The event for horses classified
F and F2 was off to a fair start
and when they passed the judges
for the first time, Rambler Rose
was leading the field followeq by

“Apronusk” and Caprice.
Bunched among the others
Lutechman was forced to pull

Columbus back and going by the
five furlong gate, he was training
in the rear.

Newman kept Rambler Rose to
the fore down the Hastings
Stretch, and meanwhile Lutch-
man, forcing Columbus along, re-
covered the lost ground.

Around by the three furlong
pole and down the back stretch,
the field moved up on Rambler
Rose, and again a tussle for posi-
tions at the two furlong pole they
entered the home stretch with
Cardinal holding the premier po-

sition, and Columbus coming
hard on the outside. ;
Cardinal maintained her posi-

tion up the home streteh to the
judges’ box, and Columbus, fin-
ishing with a burst of speed, fin-
ished second a mere head behind

Cardinal,

March Winds who had been
well up in the running was. third
a head behind Columbus.

TWENTY-SECOND RACE

Summer Handicap
started in this event
over 9 furlongs. Doldrum and
Flieuxce carried top weight of
126 Ibs. each, and Test Match and
The Thing were given 3 lbs, and
7 Ips. over weight respectively.

They were off to a fair start
with the field having the jump on
Doldrum, Darham Jane, Blades
up, led the field. going ‘past the
judges for the first time, but he
conceded this position to Aim
Low when he took the bend

Eleven

wide, Careful Annie was then
second, and by the time they
reached the five, Darham Jane

had dropped back into the bunch.

Blades hustled her to number
two position down the stretch,
and around by the three, she
challenged Aim Low, but soon

dropped back to number four
again.
Down the back stretch, there

was an exchange of positions, and
Yvonet pushed Test Match along
side Careful Annie who was now
leading,

He over took Careful Annie
when about 20 yards away from
the judges and finished a length
in front.

Careful Annie was second % a
length away from Dashing Prin-

cess.

TWENTY THIRD RACE
Stewards’ Handicap

Six horses came under the
Starter’s Orders with Land Mark
carrying a top weight of 136 lbs.

The field was off to another
fair start. The other horses had
the jump on Land Mark, and
when they raced past the judges
for the first time the positions
were Fire Lady, Harroween, No-
to-Nite, Pepper Wine, Slainte and
Land Mark in that order,

They kept these positions down
the far stretch, but bunched
beautifully at” the four, furlong
pole,

SEAL EDLEEDECCLESLOGSOO

—
y
~
$
&
¢

SOSSSSSLSSSS

"ROUND THE BEND

Of 2’.
Field Sweep

THIRD DAY
SEVENTEENTH RACE
Prize Ticket No. Amount
es ee 0214 $374.29
Set sia: 2359 213.88
Wee rte aise s HE. ah ite we 106.94
4th ....... O15] ....... 54.47
Sth ..0.... MOTE i: ss 10.00
Oth .....1. 1926 ....... 10.00

$5. each to holders of tickets
Nos. 0213, 0215, 2358, 2360, 2285,
2287, 0150, 0152.
EIGHTEENTH RACE

Prize Ticket No. Amount j
now proceeding.
as ware te yY = Members of the team which is «sale os?
Sra ....... 1577.0. 153.35 Cxpectec to meet Wint, McKenley 8
aa 2985 76.67 Rhoden and Laing are Mal Whit- d
Gee eae 10.00 “eld. Reggie Pearman, Ollie Mat- I ams
6th 220s.) 1815 |... 10,06)50". and Gene Cole all of whom love y
RG as 0853 ....... 10.00} 'an, at Helsinki,
8th 1867 ....... 10,00; etctterhdaelta ihe aerate
Oth ....... WOW hes seies 10.00
10th ....... 1302 ....... 10.00 5,
llth ....... 3079 ....... 10,00 o
12th ....... 2802 ....... 10.00
PR ' £5 holders of Hekate!
os. ; , 3473, 3475, 1576,
1578, 2984, 2986. CHECKED
x NINETEENTH RACE 4g Weekly, Sundays
ize Ticket No. Amount >
Ist... 0271 tsnseie Wunsch PEPER Pot BORDERED
eee TEE ibis ws os 378.40
ae Vee eee: 0557 ....... ss MADRAS & POCKET
tiated x34 4066 ae 601 p rT
$5.00 each to holders of tickets| 4 PAKISTANI CURRIES
Nos, 0270, 0272, 2713, 2715, 0556, f
0558, 4065, 4067. Other local dishes ‘X
tege neaate Seder, Ang. HANDKERCHIEFS|
rize icket No. Amount ’ .
tna |.|..: 9809 ...... “atage]$ BARBECUE & DANCE CHIEFS
8rd ....... 3409 ....... 207.11
4th ....... SU ced 103.55 Table reservations FOR CHILDREN

1
$5.00 each to holders of tickets
Nos. 2444, 2446, 2308, 2310, 3408,
3410, 1730, 1732.
TWENTY-FIRST RACE



3246
"Ss. 00 each to holders of tickets
Nos. 3565, 3567, 0080, 0082, 4230,
4232, 0043, 0045.
TWENTY-SECOND RACE
Prize Ticket No.



$5.00 each to holders of tickets %

Nos. 0237, 0239, 2593, 2595, 2597,

2599, 1025, 1027.
‘TWENTY-THIRD RACE
Prize Ticket No. Amount
BOB esti eee WORE oes ask $665.52
2nd ......- O78 ....... 380.30
SRE ei ais Bee oe ahha. 190,15
4th ....... 2653 ....:.. 95.07
Sel. aac Ly abe Se deve 10.00
6th .....+. WOOE". oes 10.00

$5.00 each to or of tickets

2102, 2652, 2654.





There were quick exchanges up{
the back stretch and down past
the two, but still Fire Lad kept
the premier position, maintaining
it up the home stretch to win
from Pepper Wine by % length.
Land Mark was third a head be-
hind. The time was 1 minute
57 2/5 seconds,

WORKMANSHIP

AND

QUALITY
SUITINGS

You Surely Must
Decide on
a

P.¢. 8. MARFEI
& CO. LD.

as the “TOP” SCORERS
IN TAILORING.

SS LOO



Amount %






U.S. Rumners luvited
To Jamaica Meet

(From Our Ovn Correspondent)

KINGSTON, Aug. 7.

In order to pay tribute to Ja-
maica’s olympic team the Jamaica
Olympic Association and Jamaica
Amateur Athletic Association are
arranging a special meet at King-
ston early September in which a
United States quartette has been
invited to ram against Jamaica's
relay team in a special 1,600 metre
event.

Harrison Dillard, Andy Stanfield
both olympic winners have also
been invited and arrangments are



necessary





ERNIE'S |
DEMOCRACY

CLUB
?

—SSSSSESS

ERNIE PROCTOR wishes
to thank his many friends
who rolled up in great num-
bers last Friday.

He also takes this oppor-
tunity of thanking the few
who telephoned and said
they were sorry they could
not turn up owing to pre-
vious engagements being
made but will be in attend-
ance TO-NIGHT (Friday)
at 7 o'clock sharp.

MENU.

Supplied by Edgwater
Hotel, Bathsheba.
Fresh Lobster Cocktails.
Turkey and Ham.
Goddard’s Fresh Cam-
bridgeshire.
Pork Sausages.
Peach Melba.



69



KIDNEY
TROUBLE

Here's a medicine made
specially for it .

Tf you suspect that there's
“ something ” with your
kidneys it Generally means that |
they need a corrective medicine. -
Neglected give rise to
various distressing ptoms
such as backache, rheumatic
pains, lumbago, sciatica, bladder
moat th scalding and

peg ae starts Meg ae’
eys grow sluggish an
fail to perform their thek natural!












harmful impurities from the §
system. You can restore these |
_ or, to normal activity ©

act directly on the

kidneys and you will very
quickly feel = good they
are doing. Try them for
your trouble. Go to
your chemist and














conditions and the
form to rigid standards of purity.

a eee ees

ener UY meu Memes Loy

e
annie $< ——————— — ———

SSSCSSOFOSSSSES GOSS SFOS SOS SSS SOS SE

FRIDAY,



AU FRIDAY, AUGUST 8, 1952 8, 1952

————| Rain Curtails Play In

(From Our Own

Widespread rain
Cricket programme. In only

interfered with today’s

Correspondent)

LONDON, Aug. 7.
County
one match at Southen where

Essex are playing Gloucester was there no interruption.
Gloucester declared at the overnight score of 299 for eight
but on the easy paced wicket were quickly overtaken by

Essex for whom Dodds and

Avery opened with 88 in an

hour. Horsfall was dismissed when only nine short of his
century and Insole was able to declare at 377 for eight.
Before the close Gloucester had scored 32 without loss.

At Birmingham where the tour-
ists are playing Warwick only
just under two hours’ play was
possible. During that time the
tourists advanced their overnight
score of 60 for two to 152 with-
out further loss, Adhikari, the
Indian’s Vice Captain still trying
for his first century of the tour
is 84 not out.

At Canterbury, Dough Wright,
Kent and England leg spinner
took his hundredth wicket of the
season when he bowled Morgan
of Derbyshire for four.
SCOREBOARD—

Essex versus Gloucester

Gloucester............ 299 for eight
declared and 32 for no wicket.

Essex.......377 for eight declared.

Kent versus Derby

Kent............ 179 and 182 for

Derby .ccscsssees 340 (bad

- County Cricket

light

meres & play).
ants versus Middlesex
eh .. Asestbiagale 337 for nine de-

Middlesex............ 153 and 26 for
three (rain).
Leicester versus Yorkshire
Leicester............ 142 and ten for

267 (Halliday
67; Goodwin 5 for 63).
Laneashire versus Sussex

Sussex............ 325 for nine de-
clared.

Laneashire................ 23 for one
(rain).

Notts versus Glamorgan
Glamorgan 120 and 28 for no

wicket.
Notts....5..:.... 238 (Simpson 80;
Shepherd 5 for 58).
Warwick versus the Indians
The Indians............ 152 for two
(rain).



—

FLORAL

2le. each

10, 1,

















Modernise

GLAZED WALL TILES

and counter tops.

walls and furniture.

Phone 4267



only 25¢. each
"KERCHIEFS





WITH

FLOOR TILES in Your Verandah and Kitchen

Red, White, and two shades of

Speckled Cream 6 x 6, 4x 4, 3 x 3.

White Black and Blue.
ALUMINIUM MOULDING for counter edges
TEMPERED HARDBOARD for partitions, door panels

RED HAND ‘S’ GLOSS PAINTS
RED HAND MATINTO FLAT WALL PAINTS for



CAVE SHEPHERD & CO., LTD.

12 & 13 BROAD STREET

i. Home

for Bathrooms & Kitchens



OO0O00 00006,

'
function of helping to filter away j |

taking De Witt’s Pills. ‘|

WILKINSON & HAYNES €O., LTD.







$
°

j

An age-old equation on which our costing has been
consistently based. It illustrates three facts:
One is that of value.

The second, embodied in the text, is proof of
careful buying.

The third is in the expressed satisfaction of our
customers who, ‘in turn, have introduced us to
their friends.

C. B. Rice & Co.

Merchant Tailers

26.9-909890040060090600004 000000000000000000000000000009006 000006 204














PAGE 1

PAGE EIGHT BARBADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY AUGUST H, IK2 Racing Results AT CiARRIS'lV -v\\ AW.MI. nilKsDAi. \l.IM :. 1852 WKATUkR: tint. TRACK: Hr*t. ITln R.re ICTBNaU STAKfcS—Clasa W and LMMff **•, (IMS. 8188, *40>. lit tarlaar* APPLE SAM b.g. Jetsam-Appl* Fritter. 118 lbs.. Mr. J. B Goddard (Thirkell) tVPD 1 J*Uarn-Wedding Gift, US lb*.. Mr. F E C. KMhrli i Yvonet) 3. SEA FOAM: hb ch* Jetsam-Battle Doll. 108 lb. Mr R I QLU (Lutchman). ALSO RAN Howitxei (118 lbs.. Crossley >. Bow Tie (118 lb*., P. Fletcher). Jim La Bua (118 lr*.. Joseph) TIME: 1 111. PARI-MCTUEL Win: 81.MPlace SI 68,12 50. FORECAST. $11.52. START Good. FINISH Comfortable, 4 length*. 3 lar^ib... TRAINER Mr. J H. Goddard <4MII\f. HOI Ml llll I8lh STAFFOKO HAVDK Ar—CUa* "B" and • 83M, IS8. i) M Furlong*. Dante-Sweet Cygnet. 114 lbs b.f Unklat.T-Golden Carp, 124 Mr V Chase lo*.. Mr. E C. I MRS. HE AH ( (Joatph). 2. RED CHECKS Jona* (O'Neil). 3 CASTLE IN THE AIR b.e Windsor Slipper Hero-Cosoat. 114 lbs., Mr. M. E. Bourne (J. Bella). ALSO KAN Sweet RotM (125 \v*., Lutchman); Pepper Win* (138 ,lb*., Croasley); The Thing (102 lbs., James); Vectts (111 lbs.. Quested): Demure (126 lbs. Wilder); Ftrelady (121 lbs., Yvonet 1. Belle Surprise (120 lbs, Hokl.-r); Flying Dragon (121 lb*., Reynolds); Lunwayo (126 lbs.. N-vmini TIME: l.M. PARI-MUTUEL: Win; $8 30 Place: $3 58, $6.00. $7 84). FORECAST. $250.20 START: Fair. FINISH: Easy; I length, two U>rujta*. TRAINER: Mr. V. Chase. 18th Raee. NlUSEM STAKKS—Tlaa* "Ft" and Lower $800. ($284. $13$. $40) 5' 1 Furlong* Rain Curtails Play In English County Cricket (From Our Own CorreDondent) LONDON. AUR 7 Widespread rain interfered with today's Count v Cricket programme. In only one match at Sou then where Essex are playing Gloucester was there no interruption i'i (ateallwd at the overnight score of 299 for eight but on the easy paced wicket were quickly overtaken bv Essex for whom Dodds and Avery opened with 88 in an hour. Horsfall was dismissed when only nine short of his century and Insole was able to declare at 377 for eight. Before the close Gloucester had scored 32 without loss. At Birmingham where the tour, stopped play). playing Warwick only Ta* i'iod rac* on us* thud day of to* B.T C Bummer M*t waa wn hy Mr around Ik* **iid and l&ta U b*ma .t>*tch F. E. O. Bethel)** Tent Match. Above is how the horses came "Mrs. Bear" Scores Results Of 2'VA********* Field Sweep * *•** Me* 1. FAERIE QUESNE: b f. C. Barnard (Holder i 2. MEERSCHAUM, hb b.f (Lutchman). TIME1.151. PAHI-MUTITEL: Win $1.10. START: Good. TRAINER: Hon. V C. Gale [turning Bow-Chivalry, 115 lbs. Mr n-Dolly, 105 lbs. Mr. R. E. GUI ov#r ^ Mmmu dl ,unce. I.ll.M I I I M II R \ I Stafford Handicap Upset Win *> Frasn P*ie 1 lbs., while Apronusk carrying 105, ., j ..-weight of B lb*. ** Thi event for horses classified ( MH-undi slower than tr < : U. -nd „ was off 0 d fair ^^ Handicap run on the second o-j ana wh-n tney p;iSSC< ) th Judu.s for Ihe first time, Rambler Ri THIRD DAY SFVENT** NTH RAC'F Prise Ticket Ne. 1*4 8 tl4 8374. 213". 108 ;H of the run '4lh FINISH: Easy; 2Vi lengths. original Held of Sixteen 1 — were scratched, and lh* HanuiTRAFALGAR HANDICAP—Ola** "D" and Low** 8810. c-uucrs plated a top weight ol (8285. S1SS. 545) 9 Furlong*. 12H lbs. on Pepper The event was lr horses class) TOP FLIGHT: b.m..Flotsam-Meads (Lutchman i CROSS BOW: b.g Burning Bow-Chivalrv. Barium) (Holder). 123 lbs.. Mr. L J. Wong ned 'B' and Lower, sjkd over a distance of 7 to fur ong 128 lbs.. Mr. C. The race was oft despite the (act ingood St*! that Flying 3 MAYDAY: b.g. Debonair-Fiona, 8*. 14 lbs.. Mr. I. O. C Perkins Dragon tailed lo get oil ft. (Croasley) ALSO RAN Colleton (118 lbs, Joseph TIME: t. PARI-MUTUEL Win: 83 44. Place: $1.86. $1.38. FORECAST: $7.32. START: Good FINISH Comfortable; 3 lengths, 7 lengths TRAINER Mr. R. H. Mayers. was leading the Held followed hj Apronusk" and Caprice. Bunched among theolh. Lutchman was forced Columbus hack and going by Ihe tlve furloug gate, he was training Prise m HM rear. '* u kept Rambler Rose to • the fore down the Hastings p d Strrlah. am) ni—iiwhile Luuh* l man, forcing Columbus along, recovered the lost ground Around by thr three furlong pole and down Ihe hack stretch, the field moved up on Rambler Rose, and again a tussle for positions at UM IWO furlong pole they j*Jh entered the home stretch with * 21st Raee: MERCHANTS' HANDICAP—Clasa "F" "F2" Only *700 ($235. 8U8. 846) 7M, Forlong*. 2nd 2358 3rd 2 886 4th 6151 8th 2 371 6th 1816 85 ..trh U> holders of No*. 6213, 6215. 2358. 2366. 2285 pull 2Z *7. 6156. 0152. EIGHTEENTH RACE Ticket No. 3711 3474 1577 8885 76.61 1643 16.66 1118 16.66 6683 16.66 1861 16.66 8184 16.66 1168 16.66 3078 16.66 2868 10.46 85.60 each to holder-. M ticket*. No*. 3783. 3785. 3473. 3475. 1876.1 1575. 2984. 2886 NINETEENTH RACE 5th 6th 7th "III 8th n.t), -From Our 0*n Corespondent < KINGSTON. Aug. 7. In order to pay tribute '" Jamaica'* Olympic team the Jamaica Olympic Association and Jamaica Amateur Athletic Association are arranging n special meet at Kingston early September In wh.ih 84.47 United States quartette ha* been 16.66 invited to run against Jamaica'! 16.86 relay team in a special 1 600 metre tickets <. vcnt Dillard. AmK both Olympic i mnci\ I -figments | **".Ifanbtn of UM Mean which ,„„ Mpe '*lo meet Wlnt. MrKeiilie'2* Rhoden xnd laing are Ma| Win'Held Reggie Pearman. Oil: just under two hours' play was jssihle During that time the tourists advanced their overnight %  core of 60 for two to 152 further loss. Adhikarl. lh. Indian's Vice Captain still trying rut century of the tour is 84 not our At Canterbury. Dough Wright, Kent and England leg spinner took hU hundredth wicket of the when he bowled Morgan tlared. 137 foe nine . Notl* versa* OUasmn Glamorgan 120 and 28 for no wicketNotts 8 38 (Simpson SO; Shepherd 5 for 58). Warwick vena* the Indlaa* The Indians 152 for two (rain). 1. CARDINAL (Crouley) 2 COLOMBUS: br.c. Colron-Busy Woman, 107 lbs., mary Boon (Lulchman). 3 MARCH WINDS: b.g. O.T.C.-Aprll 11th. 116 lbs.. Mr. narravicimi (Quested). ALSO RAN Rambler Rose (118 lbs., Newman); Viceroy (111 lb* Caprice (110 Ibe OT.C.-Blretta, 126 lbs., Mr ^v liinii(uiiui(-i noM' (no ips., ev.iiuuj; Blade*). Apronusk (105-U lbs.. P Fletcher) Belle) TIME: I 37j. PAIU-MUTUEL: Win: 83.50. FORECAST. $22 44. START: Fair. TRAINER: Mr. J. W. Chandler 81 52, $1.52, 81.42. NISH: Close; head, head. fourth time this meeting. When they passed the judget the first tune, Vecti!. was V ma ihe (kid, sfitn <'• %  l^iiiways lying a tk* second MM cardinal holding Ihe premier po. -hud Flying Dugon who sta: ,, C-.lumbus comin, late was many lengths in Hie ),.„.( (lT t(l .. nu tside PMtf of ihe Held, but at the fifth n ,, ,, Cardinal maintained her postPrise Wine who pulled up In her Irack Uon up the home stretch lo the 1st Down Uie Hastings Stieun, |h( nidges' IKIX, and Columou*. fln2nd eooipany was strung .ait. Lad b) hing with a bunt of |d,in. 3rd Mis. Rooeflrrii-y. £S*** -' ct?d d .n S .T 0nd ""'* h, d b-h ,d T5.06 Liniways in thai ordir March Winds who had been No* 0270. 0272. 2713. 2715 There were positional OXCllMgM running was third 4558. 4665. 4661. md sooi/Jlrf Beai-^I-.k live. l" : ; h, ud beh ld C <> lumbu > TWENTIETH RACE premTer n po.ition 4, from'Fire Lad: TWKNTY-SECOND RACK *$* ^JiJ 10 VlSSl She was strongly challenged by 2nA 3]M 414-22 Red Cheeks coming up the <• % %  Summer Handicap 3rd .. 1668 267.11 stretch but finished the winner *th 1711 163.55 length ahead "f the challenger Kleven started in thisi •vent $5.a ,h to holder* *f HekrU who was 2 lengths In front cf over S furlongs. Doldrum and Castle-in-the-air. The time wa. 1 Flieuxce rarried top vvcight •mil Gene Cole all at HrMnki. if s/horn W. Chandler U. Ticket No. 0271 2714 6887 Hl'.'i Amoun 8662.20 378.40 IR9.20 94.40 to holder* €f tlckelk in/ii; % u 22nd Race: SIMMER HANDICAP-Thus "O" S800 (8265, 8135. 850) 9 Furlong*. %  Or Only itinute 36 seconds flat. NINETKKNTII RACK Nitrnerv Slakes Only two horses. Meerschuun and Faerie Quecnu look pail 126 lbs. each, and Test Match The Thing were given 3 lb*. 7 Ins. over weight respectively. They were off to a lair start with the field having th.r jump on Doldrutn. Durham Jane, Blades TEST MATCH b.g. Valdavian-Malch P|ay, llltl lbs., Mr, F. E C. Hetlull (Yvonet). CAREFUL ANNIE; b f. Birlkan-Movemenl Control, 118 lbs., Mr. this event run over 5V? furlongs up, led the field going past the k.A i ;V.'i S!d c s i e 5Laa Jcaiousy uud Stirling Flush Judges for the first time, but ha DASHING PRINCESS: br.f. Dastur-Princes* Regent, 130 lbs., wm acrauW. COIMadad this position to Aim Mr R. E. Gill (Lutchman). A* the Beta* Be* Holder Low when he took the bend fi I ? AN: i Jolrtrum (IM lb*, Holder); Darham Jane (101 lbs., lllls ,. vii Fgerle uin.i<". the lore *ide. Careful Annie WM then BnfcV. SsWfTt Ji!^J^?_U ffi*?S&_lm.jT* SSi kipt the tlily ,n lh.. po-, lt : ^ond. ALSO RAN: Wilder); Tlbcrian Lady (111 ll.. : lb*., Newman); Embers (110 IbL ONell). TIME: l 58* PARI-MUTUEL: Win: $12.18. Place FORECAST8202.60. START: Fair. TRAINER: Mr. F. E. C. Bethell. they Jane by the time James); The Thing (1044 7 ".'h'' "o!T, t '"h^Tnx* ..Ttei makin i reached the live, Darham B.,,,,: A „„ w f,s SJ: SFSSSSS S h j h """" chaum who waa about one kngi $8.10, 83.48. 8216. FINISH: Easy; 1 length. M, length. ?3rd Rate: STEWARDS' II \\IH( \i( las* "A" 81.666 (|315, 818S. 866) 9 furlong*. mber two position down the stretch, 1 und hy the three, ihe challenged Aim Low, but soon dropped back to number four again Down the uac'.c stretch, there was an exchange of positions, and No*. 2444. 2446, 2366, 2316. 3468. !I410 1736. 1732. TWENTY-FIRST RACE Prhte Ticket No. Amount let 1886 3627.31 2nd 6661 338.58 3rd 4 211 179.28 4th %  %  6064 88.64 5th 6718 16.66 6th 1128 .... 16.06 7th 8848 . 10.86 15.66 csrh to holdrrs of tleket* Nos. 3565. 3567. 0010. 008?. 4730, 4232 6043, 0043. TWENTY-SECOND RACE behuid by the lour furlong pole cloaed the gup a bit but failc-l to draw lead with Faerie Qwn o. Meerschaum made a cbalHtl by (he two furlong pole Queene could not be OVaKOm I und eventually raced up the yvonet pushed" Test "Match along bf. The Phoenix-Dido. 114 lbs., M\ S. A. Blanchette O.T.C-Condiment. 120 lbs., Hon. J. D. straight a comfortable >% length TVVKNTIKTH RACK TrafalRar Handicap Foui ••" • %  B 1 itched in this furlonjf event for horses 1 F1RELADY (Quested). 2 PEPPER WINE: bin Chandler (Croasley). 3. LANDMARK: ch.nv Pylon I l-Eaperance*. 136 Ibss., Mr. V. Chase ^'"nVd'ToweT, leaving a field (Hotdet/. ALSO RAN: Notonite (120 lb*.. Fletcher); Ilarroween (124 lbs., rVonet); Slalnt* (110 lbs., Lulchman), TIME: l.57|. PARI-MUTUEL: Win 52 86. Place 82 52, $2.60 FORECAST: $27.24. 3TART: Fair FINISH: Close; Vi length, head. TRAINER: Mr R. H. Mayers. carrying Gavilan To Fight Graham HAVANA. Aug. 7. Graham's Manager, President Kid Gavilan will risk his World JanMM I. Norris of the Intermt'' m SS .*.", n 'I. Welterweight championtional Boxing Club, nnd the X op FI K '" .ihip against Billy Graham of New Cuban Sports Director. Lorenzo York for the second time here on Nodarse. October 4. When Gavilan put hi* title at stake against Graham last Gavilan was to receive 33 per Augmt 29. In New York the cent of the proceeds, includins Cuban emerged with the d'-ctoinn. box office, radio, television, and but it was so hotly disputed that motion pictures, with Graham to DM Graham camp began calling urelve 25 par cent. Graham "the uncrowned King of „ . the Welterweights" In addition. Graham had to guarantee Gavilan a return boul Their return bottl will !*• ;\n within sixty days should he win uutdoor affair in the Havana Ball 'he crown, and Graham also Park, according to the contracts promised not lo appear in any signed here by Fernando Balldo, r )ght or exhibition during that Oavilan's manager, Irving Cohen, period. -l.F. four with May Da 14 lbs overweight. The Held got off to %  good start but coming around the bend Colleton fell throwing its Jockey 1 Bfa WBO had to be taken to the Hospital with an injured leg. As the v passes the ; tandfoi the first flme. Top Flicht (Lutchman) was leading followed May Day (Crossley) and How (Holder). Holder moved up from the rear ith Cross Bow by the five furclosely behind Lutchjnan kept the lead racing In Ills position all Hie way home. Cross Bow made a cha llen ge M the two furlong pole hut fnild to daw level with Top Higtll ho raced up the straiitht Ml %  aty winner by three lengths >oss Bow was second seven %  •ngths in front of May Day. (nl Annie, who wa* now Lading. He over took Careful Annie when about 30 yard* away from the judge* and finished a length HI front. Careful Annie wa* second Ms a length away from Dashing PrlnTVVKNTY THIRD RACE Stewards' Handicap SIX per—6 came under the '1 San srltfa Land Mark 1 top weight of 136 lb*. "Hie field was off to another 1 tart, The other horse* had the jump on Land Mark, and hen ihi-v raced post the Judges FHie 1*4 2nd 3rd 40. Sth 4th 7th Sth 6th 16th 11th Ticket N*. 2584 tsse 1624 6721 ini 2885 8484 4883 1711 1881 Amount 8667.10 381.20 litu.1,11 86.36 10.00 10 00 10.00 10.00 10.00 16.66 16.06 f tickets 4 44 446464 6666661 COLONY CLUB Weekly. Sunduys Lunch PEPPER POT MADRAS Si I PAKISTANI CURRIES Other local dishes Saturday, Aug. Sth BARBECUE 81 DANCE Table reservations npfttisary **• I to*** 0 $5.00 each to holders Nan. 6237. 0238. 2593. 2585. 597. 2389. 1025. 1037. TWENTY-THIRD RACK Prise let 2nd 3rd Ith Mh Mai Ticket No. 2344 0738 2141 2633 0705 2284 Amstint S665..M 386.30 196.15 95.67 16.00 16.06 85.66 each to holders or ticket* No* 2343. 2345. 0737. 0739. 1100. ^142 34S2. 2654. TWBNTt-FUST BACI Merchants Ihiiuliciip Soprano -n. i M.IJ !' % %  %  rratched. and six horse-i came nder Starter's Orders. Cardinal •as carrying a top weight of 128 There •re quicx exchanges up the first time" the po'siVtons the back stretch and down past rin Lady, Harroween. Nothe two, but still Fire Lady kept Nil. PeftpM Wine. Slainte and the premwr position, maintain ng Land Ma.k m that order. H up the home stretch to*" Thev kept these positions down from Pepper Wine by '7 lengtn. he far stretch, hut bunched I-and Mark was third a BWABf beautifully at the four, furlong hind. The time l>ole. 57 2/5 seconds. minute ERNIES J DEMOCRACY | CLUB 1 I;MI 1'KOCTOR v.i-in-i to thank hb many rriends who rolled up In great uumber* hut Friday. lie also takes this opportunity of thanking the few who telephoned and aaid they were sorry they could not turn up owing to previous engagements being X made but will be in attendI TO-NIGHT (Friday) # at 7 o'clock sharp. MENl'. X Happlled by F-dgwater A Hoi.i Bathsheba. 4 Fresh Lobster Cocktails. 5 Turkejand Ham. A Goddard's Fresh Cam>; bridgeafvirc. l*ork Sausages. Peach Melba. CHECKED BORDERED POCKET HANDKERCHIEFS FOR CHILDREN only 'J.'tr. rarh FLORAL KERCHIEFS 91*. each bU CAVE SHEPHERD & CO.. LTD. 10, II, 12 & 13 BROAD SIREEI lltiilfriiisf Your ttontf WITH FLOOR TILES lo Your Verandah and Kitchen Red, White, and two shades of Speckled Cream 6 x 6, 4x 4, 3 x 3. GLAZED WALL TILES for Bathrooms & Kitchens White, Black and Blue. ALUMINIUM MOULDING for counter edges TEMPERED HARDBOARD for partitions, door panels and counter tops. RED HAND 'S' GLOSS PAINTS RED HAND MATINTO FLAT WALL PAINTS for walls and furniture. 0W*A!*W.• r* #' J** 1 STYLE WORKMANSHIP AND QUALIH SUITINGS You Surely Must Decide on P.C.S. MAFFEI & CO. ITD. KIDNEY TROUBLE Hmr%'i a med/une mad* speciai/y for It . If jo* suspect that there's "somethins; *rroos-" with yowr kidneys it irenwsJly mrsnt thai ihiy need correeuve mediciiir Neglected *jOkeT* give rise to various distressing ijmptom* such as backache, rbeum*Uc pains, lumbago, sciatica, bladder disorders with scalding and burning. The Uouble starts when the kidneys grow sluggish and fail to perform their natural function ol helpMiR to filter away harmful impurities from the system. You ran restore these vital organs to normal activity j bj taking De Witts Pills %  They act directly on the %  kidneys and yo* will very qmckly fed the good they i doing. Try them for your trouble. Co to your chemist and Phone 4267 WILKINSON & HAYNES CO., LTD. ?RICE + VALU£ OUR GUARANTEE De WUfa Pills *r* V manufactured under strictly hygienic S I condition* and the ingredient* conS form to rigid standards of purity. An ,i:. M|,| equalion on which our costing has Wen consistently based. It illustrates three laets: One is that of value. The second, embodied in the text. Is proof of tareful buying. The third is in Ihe expressed satisfaction of our en-.tinners whn. in turn, have introduced us to their friends. Ihe "TOP" SCORKKS C IN TAILORING. DE WITT'S PILLS 'or K.dnev -nd Bladder Trouble! C. B. Rice fc C o. .-,-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.'.-.•-v Mrn kaast %  % %  laaltor*



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FACE TWO ii iiimiMiimiii MI KRII.A. AUGUST s. IJ gahib Callinq w G. G. MONEY new Ioc.il I BaM for the British West 1 British Guiana, arrivtv, terday morning from Ent'kiiid vi \ Jimuri and Trinidad i He ha* CORM 10 succeed Mi < George, the local Director who r> tire* at the end of S*i • %  Mr. Money was formerly *t. lioned In Kenya. On hit way ." England on leave, he spent two months driving through i h t Sahara. Before coming to Barh.dos, he called at Jamaica an i Trinidad where he stayed (or two day* in each colony. He propose* to spend about six weeks henbefore visiting some of the other bland;. Mr. Money has taken up residence at Buckdcn. Si. Joseph. To Take Up Appointment M R. BRUCE WHYTE of British Guiana arrived here >'"-lerdsy by the Lady Wnj. Hi will take up an appointment I Assistant Colonial Engineer cf Highways & Transport Department. Mr. Whyte was formerly Cler'.< of Works of the Public Works OrM' partment in British Guiana. As goon as he is settled down in the island, he will be Joined by h wife nd children. "We will 100 be completing one of the larger ptfssKvt£sz£. sspa sssfcafttj"" %  n.1, scheme i. m D cr.ni,.,,. w 'Jl r ta, L'?^S£ rSfi. structed. Slop Pounding Is Cure For Typists' Crump Quiet Wedding O N TUESDAY morning at St. .. *''".. %  Patrick's Roman CathoUc ^'t,, -u— — and *ns-have been to London businessman Mr. K BROODIIAGEN To Study Art rh. Mr. Cleophas Drakes, son of Mrs. Lilian Drakes of Spooner s Hill and the late Mr. Norman Drake*, headteaeher of St Mary's Boys' School, was married to Miss Beryl Williams daughter of Mm. M. C Jemmott of Brighton and the | a te Mr. L. E. Williams. The ceremony was conducted by Rev FT Parkinson, SJ. The bride who wore a dress of white nylon, was given in marHage by her mother. The duties of besVnan were performed by Mr. Hupert Lytheott. The couple afterwards left for Oiitin for a reception and their honey moon. The bridegroom u an Assistant Master at Cotnbermere School and his bride Is a first year medical student at the University College of the West Indies in Jamaica. For Two Y A repoi: Own, based on resea: ,-.(en. has been circulated amon.. chiefs b> Chamber of Commerce in London. "Miss Smith." the average typist, says this report, use: pressure in 00c da) to ohifl Ij I 1. •%  .1 prai arc %  IB lbs 1 0 OMRi key avhe taps • utt. "Standard t>pewriters re-fc* quire only about 14 ounce* pressure." says the report. "The average typist \s therefore 1 saafssrj than necessary. I confirm that there is mora typists' crsgrus, caused by unnecessary strnlnmg of wrist and arm." One remedy, according to the THE TUBBY HUBBY DIET BERNARD •* iCKSTEED fattenl large. 0/ u JJJ.IV vlimininv diet, report* on the hurtle (or his ipsajsajrisl —an otdral soon to IW thared h\ /it-* readers. THEY'VE SENT ME TO THE ^^o-STARS' • *# VOtT" ,'r ort PICTURES report, is to ii.uo gnls M RS. OV1DIO GARCIA R. of special typewriter which flashes Venezuela arrived In the a warning red light when more %  olony on Sunday last to Join her pressure than necessary Ls ksaod R. KARL BROODHAGEN. Husband who has been here for] Experienced typists can Art Master, Combermere *" School, left the colony on Wed'" time. Mrs. Garcia was accomRiven a course to develop a ligh;led by her daughter who will'er touch on the new machine, th; ncaday on the Si*. De Or, the United Kingdoi will attend the Goldi of Art, London. \ for Income a pupil of the Ursuline where h C 00 **"* and the family will be ,1, ciii-.,,. remaining for two years. During 1 ,L •*"*•*— W —— %  UnW —111 W_ t_ ta'ent modelling. His works have been exhibited their slay here they will bt In 11 *i'" the lmc> to lncrPaM tourist traffic during winter to all islands in the ribboan. I udos many yea Work „n the Carenlyne Scheme ""'?"L . h '". l ^ ,ul ji", alerted in 1S0. 11 1. ngmd lo J£2&*— t •""' be completed between Decemb. 1952 and March 1953. At the BagitaKc Waretv meet Mr. Whyte wan Mr. Pat ter. another Guianese, who car icr Town Hall. New Amsterdam, thla year took up the appolntm-M Mr. Broodhagen has also conof Surveyor at the Water Works ducted classes In art at the OirlJ' Deportment. Industrial Union, and during the Tyf B W. W. LLOYD JONES p.^m V.#.Tiieh. P 5 t two years, has been on the %  *"* %  who Is on secondment to MnfTICfl ,,, tS colony on '"" of " Combermere School. B.W I.A. Irom BO.A.C. has beei A^mTvVromVmeSetawere "' l eompled Ihe appointed Acting M.nw. J.„, ~""i, !" )'"" u v'*„ w „ m.Klelllng ot a nymbollc Cane Cutmaica. pending Ihe appointment = r i S"" 2? ,'^iu. r'ih,?, tor which will be u^d u a Reof a replacement tor Mr COM TL &. wllf t ^Srfrui the "• " " N ' p bllc Buildlnc, and will uaume this position with Ur^n^Convent^nTrreopen!!;, B C-W St. Lucia. effect .ron, Wrtn^, and the family will be remaining -r„ In In Wlin ror tn f' na In the Island for three months, '" •""" "" c lvf ISS rATSY FORD i During their stay here Ihey will mH. GRANT PUXiRIM. former•"* of Ml ud Mm William be guem at Super Mare Coest in b Mathematical and Spanish '" rd ' Jaln '. SI. Lawrence Gap House Worthing. Maater at Queens Royal College. I! 1 ",. "S!TV". b i. Si. 8 * DCI.IUSKC lenvlng for EngUnd on Dental Surgeon Trinidad, left on Wednesday by will for D R. AND MRS. 0. MOYSES Ihe Si De Grasse for England "SSSSSS''I *"&•£!£ %  and their two children to Join his wife and daughter who ":! ,ailm! George and Claude were arrivals l.iul been residing there lor """ """' <' s. recently by B.W.I.A., from Venesever;.! yean. JOn And Heir luela lot a holiday They expect Mr. Pilgrim spent two yean, in <~SONGRATU1.ATIONS to be here until the end of the Barbados agsisling with the teach*~* and Mrs. Gordon Stanford of month and are guests al the Ocean log of Mathematics at the Lodge Black Rock on the birth of a son View Hotel. School. His daughter. Mary-Nell and heir. The hajipy event look Dr. Hoytes Is a Dental Surgeon is at Reading University doing place on Tuesday and mother and in Caracas. Modern Studies. babe are doing line. BY THE WAY . %  q oi i %  < %  i nV,/i,...f K,< i/HLemon Pie By HfcLCN WUWMB. Can you please pice mr a rerip? /or L-'inon Me' When ewts a." plentiful, this la a good recipe. The quant it lest e enough for b-0 people. Rub 3-3, oz. BWrfVUi Of bill tag inlii 6 oz. pldin flour, sifte• lh '''""• !" vcrs <*>. blast. Tit one to your radio set ""'•'" 2H seconds. Strabismus PONDEROUS article advising on e Wggner nlghl. says Jolly calculates that ai rocket construef\. lh0 young not to play cards Jack Hopkins, with a light laugh. ,ra on the principle of radar „.| lh Grangers prompts me to odd Mblr < %  .•.,„,.,/ from • ,U,SM coul t * %  "> message mv „„„ word „, „ niln| whc „ 1-1 „„r in person but tlftl the 2W see, n( de lc My -lar] Iy ,„ vou aquarium r.*,f „„ d% wou | d „„, „, 0 „ of ny „ me ,. nat t nol he nand f^ '^ F you wanted to have a horse for exploration of the moon. He n | g t| mc to remember a previous -apulled uut of a chimney or an adds that there Is no proof that engagement. ostrich rescued from the top of a the message ever reached the gasworks, what would you do? moon. A man In an adjoining room Tail-pipctt Summon Ihe Are brigade. Last could have u-ied a pulse-refleetor week firemen hauled a cow out to deflect the pulses in such a w.'y A CORRESPONDENCE -ends Si! h." nS ~„. Nexl Mk *?' """• ' "woody watching Ihe J\ m a delightful example >l Toof „f pL !" !. !" !" .""*"' ,h *** pulm """" d """ ' "• "tnblguou. headline: -M P roof of St. Poniros Slat on. or bounce back from the moon's surAnd Potato Price. Collansc loosening singing mouse's head ,„„. b. au!p of lhp curvc n „,„ Ana pou 0 n !" t'"lfrom between thn railings of borough surveyor s office. >...-. %  /in/.-far uvimi'fi OW that women's sun-glassee "y sfiil ask. crease was due principally to the smart" "ecesser> n i A olasiblower's, who Mccouahed large number of birth pss %  % %  % % % %  ,.„„.^„ MI at "* %  Iaj,c iseued for oyiteuncc to school.-; aunin*** f onverpalirm He burn while hlowinp a conand colleges There was a drop I F our -Post Office follows the siralory; however during the second quar•xample of Vienna, where The path of duty is (he way to ter of the year. children can dial a number *nd „ ? tor ', L „ hear a fairy-tale over the teleT Jf s u, , lo lhp alr ' Kaly phone. I foresee some fun: "Hello? r K,lcuIen Coupton and Hynes? I want to /_ p,,.„:„speak to Mr. Hynes. That you. '" """'"eT Hynes?" "Princess Goldilocks weeps when the old wizard says" ^jJ^KT lo Kindness to animals— . "Who Is that?" "Hynes here.' %  %  '^-rhich means kindness to "I will turn you into pumpkin **** animals you like; try asking a t m j^^ rirwt unlesi you answer my riddle," cat-lover to be kind to a mouse) service. 4 is .sa. Ivor s**""!"" "What the devil! listen Hynes — n, xl lo •*' ndn a s to animals as uv Kay. isptn TweaHIt's about that consignment of ,tocu, l virtue comes kindness to %  *' acrap" . "Ujcklly the wilv elf women's complexions. I read of ,„ Gobblegobble is able t 0 whisper ^JfflT!! O1 B *' l b,r lln ; i '"• M k the answer." . "Hynes heV ?* n ?* n a ce,lln with Is that "* .U keep ay %  ! %  til tood? HAVE been seeing the nlms thla week Instead of Leonard Moaley. The idea -to keep my mind oil ihe Tubbv Hubby diet— worlu well enough with tough Westerns when you are too busy shooting bad men 10 bother aboni .ood. Chaps like Joel McCre* never eat, at> vliy xiould 1 Out u bream down u society stuil The sight oi ail ihe champ^ant* -nil tli OufTela me.re so fona or ...... me drool in Ihe dark. One great advantage is that I can now %  scape mm. BM ixiinlerous (riends who ihtnk it is funny to la) pat me on the %  % %  .stline and ask how Us going tkl otTer a nome for mv di--arded suits, and lei <-ndea.oiii RH v.'h liquor and tempi MY NINTH DAY CsWenu BreakTast. Hair |TBBr(rull %  •<> -urn *i r.i.it.lc.. egg on l..-i tHlr i-ilrm %Aer of tvaat •craping of batter ( % %  ri %  .or lea (no -mn Lunch Clear ehleken broth Oiir milled rhiefcrn ndwirb ion one Orren uUd or 'H.I1HI % %  (•ri e OB S Dinner l rrh %  •p*rM., me to Break the rubbv HuSL. oath or i — %  -.II. druikuui Oueas what else I've bad (u out up with I A ttirl came up 'n me veslerdav and said shed had a most 'iisulung prooosal and It wa* al; RH tali A tellov who was tubbv out not a nubbv a.Hked her to mam him lust w be could loin achieving high goals If you don't be over-assertive. You dislike anything underhanded, deals that are not honest or would really norm others. Make excellent manager, banker, salesjC man, artist public speaker, military person. Avoid love of ~ ease, questionable companions. Btrthdate of: Sir Godfrey Kneller. Eng. portrait pointer; Geoffrey F. Morgan, noted lee. * OEM1MT 21—Jnna 21 04. MCVB VTRU0 Abg. 23—Sept. 23 SCORPIO Oct. 24— MOT. M SAGITTARIUS isNov. 23—Dec. 22 CAFRICORN Dec. 23-Jan. 31 turer. * CAM I % THE RACKET Babsfl HYA Mlil nilSpecial %  • % %  "OI'TI.AWM Or TEXAS' < Whip WU.suNi • i i wi (Nil" i.ohniiv Mack nmnvN AND NOW . you can hv A GAS COOXER Ilk* thoiM ou hv %  dmlrtrd In the magaUnM. SEE TH1M TO-DAY At Your Cai SHowroom M-> Slnel P L A I A-B'ISWN lDIAL 23,0i -.nc MC.teroent of toe W enn8 *"*— I O-DAt 2.30—4.45 A 8.3a p.m. rontlnusna Dally 446 SV 1.30 em. Listening Hours KILLER OR HERO? raiu i as—I IS m. i laltiri. •>>...!• "-nH hlnd lhcm ' show <">""" iis-i.-a-. S; xt" ••n! C ni K,' ,h " hU!b d %  cver %  0 "* 1 •—-"• -%"'•" *£'• .... f' Ils D "rhlry lo sec his wife's face in a natural p "> lasriu*. is p" rn; are you answer Twaddle "Get off here." "Hynes here now you can't turn n rid purimkin." 'And light disillusionment, despi i horthe break-up of the mi bound in follot" swiftly and g %  age are talk. CLARKES CHILDS SHOES WHITE & TAN 3. lo 7'i M.23. $4.: TRT-FORM CHILD'S SHOES WHITE BUCK & BLACK PATENT KID .Is to 6s 7i lo 10a 11s to ls $5.07 & 5.37 SS.32 & 6.M0 $7.04 & 7.92 TAN Lace All Sizes $4.7, t*.07, $7.11 MEN'S "PRETTY" ANKLETS 53 & 71 els. T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS DIAL *220 YOUR SHOE STORES DIAL 4606





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PAtSK H:l (( BARBADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY M r.l'ST s. I'|-,J BflFpDfKAAD^CATE A \ isiloi In i\ew York l %  *• AifMU eh. LU>. ••-" V. I Friday. August X. 1932 HO All SAFETY DESPITE the initiative which the Police and the Barbados Automobile Association have displayed towards the promotion of Road Safety, drivers, pedestrians and road squatters continue to disobey the law. Speeding on the roads has not noticeably diminished. Lon# distance buses: lorries laden with excursionists: motor-cyclists: tank lorries and private cars and taxis can be observed daily exceeding the legitimate 30 miles per hour beyond which no Barbadian vrhicle should travel. Drivers of vehicles attending weddings and funerals seem to think that the law exempts them from the speed limit restrictions on these special occasions. With rare exceptions, however, the Barbadian road does not lend itself to excessive speeding and the breakers of speed limits do not exceed over-much. Barbados is in this respect fortunate but because accidents are not responsible fur the loss of human lives to anything like the extent which makes the road statistics of the United Kingdom and the United States the horrifying roll call of deaths they are. we ought not to relax our efforts to keep death off the road. Exceeding the speed limit even by a few miles an hour adds to the possibility "f accident and therefore ol death. The speed limit of 30 miles per hour was not arbitrarily imposed by individuals who did not know what they are doing. It was chosen because it offers a reasonable factor of safety in an island where the roads are not designed for higher speeds Constant emphasis on road safety: the example of drivers who resist the temptation to speed and continuous propaganda by police, automobile association, press, radio and schools will assist to keep death off Barbadian roads, so far as drivers of vehicles are concerned. But far greater attention needs to be paid by pedestrians than is being paid at present. Some pedestrians drive in cars or buses sufficiently often tu appreciate the necessity for keeping off roads when traffic is heavy. But many school children and a number of the older generation of road users do not appear yet to realise that motor vehicles have the right to use roads which are already occupied by pedestrians. The remark "you can't wait" which is still frequently addressed to motorisU who have been forced to pull up because of the presence of squatters near shops and street^ corners aptly describes the resentment which is felt by the individual, who relies on self-propulsion for transport, against the driver of a mechanical vehicle. Only education can change the attitude of such individuals but It is very doubtful whether such individuals come within the scope of adult educational programmes. Fur the schoolchildren the teacher and the paren' must accept responsibility. If after repeated injunctions and warnings schoolchildren continue to rush along major highroads cavorting and hopping and skipping in their youthful exuberance they ought only to be released from school under escort of parent, guardian or teacher. Older schoolchildren who allow their legs to protrude onto main highways or who congregate in roads to discuss their juvenile programmes of fun and pleasure ought to be caned by their parents and constantly punished until they drop habits which increase the hazards which all drivers of vehicles run. The campaign to keep deatn off the roads will never end and there can never be too much co-operation from the public. The lurnalt and the shojtin* |f, |f ilrllr >|i||r lhat IKwould be t king no pat iv* iub*id*d~n id.wiht |> Eisenhower nested in names, but his meaning was clear, historians, the most colorful and a car OM nnv „, lhe „„,,;.. ourn ey. This was interest** because Mac keenly contested for more than a lhat P1Kl ,^ ,„ ttu AUlljd Victory hinueU was neaily nominated in fSnon* !" A -f'' m< ( ,re „_ ^ m ,B45 A B*"* 1 l th lwo l948 And il wa even "^ 2.000.000 Amcricms,! attended „ K n WOIU ie %  Ml*" (.Hill I. l&ii.W? ." %  £l nd C " ,d BU"how.r aspire lo th. .£ T? ,J^,*"? "" .1' Then I mn^„ W .,e,i .h.t they ned. At least that was the opinion of the experts— that a newspaper was actually lit, and the — ensuing rushing about in a hall ^g^^ with 1200 people produced, a -ituation near to pandcmouiuni But it all appeared to be gaud fun — at least on the tin ft... den called each other baa ismes and implied evil motives %  %  ('lions and words, but in the end hey promised to work together tor the good of the party, and the auitry. I, for onr. am listening to iear how well they have succeeded in this praiseworthy ideal. Ol a ursc, the West Indians Mild not be entirely otnittad. from u-.'li a world event M the nomlns. ton of an American President, lad the Caribbean had a look In vhen the roll call tor voting in he Democratic convention was In till swing. The states are set out •i alphabetical order Alabama, Ulwina, Arkansas. California. onnectlcut. Delaware. Florida. •iHirgia and so on. As each name called the head of the delegaon from that state answers thus: ThChairman Alabama "to* 'Mr. Chairman Kentucky votes And Hny of the leaden selied the Pportunity to say something were bout his or her state. For instance, cam BARNEY MILLAR ide a great kay-nota speech at the convention. He placed a great deal of emphasis OD these words: 'I am a Republican as was my father It was a thinly veiled hit at Ike, who has been called a Democrat turned Republican. It appears to be. nue that Ike could havs been nominated among; the Democrats had he so desired and this seems to be a very strong point In favour Of his" winning the election .. November. And now Mac says he -ill not lxactive He is on the inactive Army list, but he will be ..'.iv,as chairman of Remington .; %  Inc.. maker* of business jiuchines. I wonder to what ex'cnt the difference of opinion between these two men will go. They can do much for the land *rcy love and served so well In Ihe Army. Only time can telL • a a A visit to the Hyde Park home of the Roosevelt family is an inspiration Here In the ancestral i.rrutidings In which the lad Franklin was reared. It Is easily understandable why his ideals were high, and tu\ thought lofty. On one side It overlooks the mighty Hudson, River and the view from F.D.R.S room Is one of majestic grandeur. I saw it as the setting sun tinted the calm water Ifferent political w | th silver anal gold and cast Democrat. pur pHsh shadows amid the almost onvtatJotl the answer was: 'Mr. 7-V 3^,7 !ro # verdur ,f whl f' 0 *"^ ** %  I.;..m>..n. Pennsylvania, .he state M om ' ,, Vt£r" fS* slo w \ ,lom th town down rhloh always respects law .....i ^ m ' SZ.. en-hSni SaL *?*yF\*2l "^* fraakfin %  TSTa^-s. w ,. rt VS^SS^\TSTSJSSi 2**#*y*n******* tn Ine i^^.£ SfLffS" "•- iSovir a EUpubU From the e„iy v ch.mn.ivr,,,. vinon S"? ,;r;:;;;,,,"'sr,vm,' u S 0, i b uricd "" Tc .i.nd.. me p, „,.„„<, ,.r „, ^„iJ';i:,' ;:::"; v „;; 1 ;, i ;r,^ d ", And lh . two datcs .„ aU toy: "The fact that I Ut adom a solid white mnrble am of a different polktlcnl tribe, stone which mark, his resting I wa. on th. r^l i„ livd. H..W d "' ""' l "' v •' l "ie %  place In the Rose garden adlacent hi h, m ,,f ^ l.U tiSl.^n K,,K WAS OsMATllMS IN to the house. r.nlyn cho,e it ,.Z, ,„! N,7„^?, ?,,'„" P ? MKN OUr-am IN mUTlCAI. hJnuelf. oddiUon.1 evidence ol the I^XheU i ki J .K M K OUTLOOK, BUT WORKING FOR simplicity of the man. a&to£r h.5 won hcmS! TI,E C0MMOH GOOD OF THE Inside the House there I, .1) I Cni ilh r h Ku ( '" !" lliV TI,1S WAS AS IT the old world grandeur of decora*. th, %  i r",'ng? rZZ.J, ii.n SHM K AN rOR ONE m *"> lch raln le, hnrmoniously I The r, n ...,: ^ ^..L.l ol K r,IAT nlK,,K WIL1 " %  wi,h "" !" re modem setting of ;,'hJne. dlw.[„I,lnH^ MUC rll,s SPIRIT the outde. Th. towering Tees ,i I had £ cke.r' Je t hl,^; AB"O A >" !" I DAYS THAT cut ample shade for thow who nth he won dw\„ and I hive tffl AHKA il l < ls h lo sit in the Park during the .nih-r l„m'l, th h, ..lit LEADING THK WORM) AT A licat of the day .tier or before a i-.r in November S, wm ''"' TICA1 %  >' %  "">'• IN THE VdU to uie Library which stand. J." ',, 'i'", '„„ H !" .,?,;; !" HISTORY OF MANKIND, AND apt. ',m,., of il^ WM,. iS. ONLY BROAD VIF.WS— VIEWS BUI here on tiie whole, one I, ,Vt' £ c "."" '•?"' 'THAT TAKE IN A MUCH feel. In time with the late I I h.„ lithe change in leader. BRO ADER PICTURE T H A N President',, thoughts when he 1 Z. "nS. many Am.,,ONl.Y AMERICA. WIU. SUCwrote-—Th. 0^3 limit to our ar, are lamourlngin t„ come CEED IN BRINOTNO SUCCESS reslisolion of tomorrow will be Mo fToit i T " T !!? TASK ur doub ' "*>•> %  *• !" A III., will be the man lo do Another giant llgur. In forw.rd with strong and active However, politics Is o dangerAmerican life today announced faith. >>>i. ..i mi raw, rui instance, (.mo KlUllklill W is tinsdant 1, iDBatlc ,oll call m '•;•""•"' "'••;;'•' > Republican suture and mind who left ,n InTC.uu, c-'me II t "?f wl 1 "' to """H dellblo mark on the We of the Vest Indie, vote.%  I said Eg* $£' "• W '"" d • Mmt fhank you' to Hie TV. 3i'. 1882. He wi April 15. 1945. Now W icksf vvt 11, INS To Sva si: \U %  •: %  •: II i IIII A map ha?, recently been made of seaweed beds. Over 100 million Ions of seaweed an.* known to exist in waters where detailed surveys have been carried, out Thrst? announcements have followed the meeting in Edinburgh last month ol an international seaweed symposium. Alginic acid which is used in the manufacture of cosmetics, car polishes, adhesives and textiles is one of the products derived from seaweed, but attention is being paid to the possibility of incorporating seaweed meal in manv tvpes of animal feed. According to a recent issue of the Times of London, Mr. Hand of Reading described to the symposium his feedine, of seaweed meal to laying hens. Barbados' seaweed might have no vitamin content and it might be valueless as a source of alginic acid of potash and manure. It might have no other function than the unpleasant one it now performs of interfering with bathers' pleasure. But jf it did contain vitamins of benefit to the animal foodstuff industrv a solution to many of our livestock problems might be found. It may be wishful thinking to hope that the factory at Lancaster should turn from what must in this period of ground provision shortage be infrequent de-hydration of surplus yams and cassava to the active crushing of seaweed meal but if the varieties of seaweed to be found off Barbados' coasts should have commercial possibilities then the connection between the international seawcvH gympoaium and Barbados might be less remote than it now seems. You no lo Holy Island off the JorlhumrK'rland coast by taxi at ow Ude. It can be a stirring marlImr adventure The drivers come of hardy seaI .II inn stock and do not always I %  o-hcr to wait until the tide is oul I -ftfora they make the 1 crossing. I did the trip tl.is week, and as ; *ir txi Limed no lifeboats I was ofn pad l uuiit swim Bight from the.start you, feel Ike Alice In Wonderland because on book your passage through a ai ber In Berwick. "Aye", said hi ticket collector when I got off he train, "the btrber will fix von il< wllh anything from shampoo > .i ticket to CJeneva." Taxi ticket to Holy Island SO I went to the Barber of Berwick and, in between shaving his ustomcrs he charged me a guinea ind gave me a return ticket for me taxi passage to Holy Island. 'All you've got to do/' he said, 'is to take a bus to Beale and Ivn ask for Charlie." Theie are about ten taxis In the loly Island fleet, and they are warty all 1933-4 Fords. The islanders scour the scrap heaps of he country for them, because .hey are one of the few cars thai •an go lo sea. They have more clearance than nodpm models and the ignition .vslcm is high up in the bonnet. So long as you can keep the crabs HIT of the carburetter you can Inve them through anything up 0 a third of a fathom of sea vnter. They only last about a year on he run. Then the sand gets In heir bearings and the salt rusts UM bodywork to nothing. ChurUe's vehicle -— or vessel — looked as if It wouldn't run a nile. but he said It was g,ul for many more voyages yet. He piled six of us Into It—four in the back and two beside him on the •'bridge." He bolted us below decks THERE was no lock on one of the doors, so. after he had squee/<*d us In, he bolted us below decks with a steel pin and then clanked up. The engine made the most unholy island row you ever heard. Charlie said this was because the silenrers on this model are below sea level, ao you have to take ihem off. The ilrst 100 yards over the 01 K Hi:AIM IIS SAY Tho Ronl of Ihe MuMr To The Edi!or. The Aduocate— SIR,—The article touching on :he important subject of Education from the pen of JE.R desire the thanks of those who have the Interest of the future generation and in Education at heart. The writer in advocating the necessity for the setting up of a Commission, of enquiry to go into the subject Ther-r's holid'tiu fi.si*>arion /or you in rhls Marathon uHfhout a passport . WirkMinl W The Hrilish Islts . „ DOUGLAS, isle of Man. 1 have invented an entirely new kind of Marathon race. I am going to sec how many of the British Isles I can set foot on in a week (writes Bernard Wicksteed). So far as I know, nothing of the kind has ever been .ittemptcd before. The nearest thing to it was when Queen Elizabeth the First set out to see lion many British beds she could sleep In. Altogether there are about 5.000 islands in the British Isles, of which 177 are inhabited. Elizabeth had the advantage there, because Britain has more beds than Islands. But I have better travel facilities I cannot think why this island hopping record has never been tried before. People j;o to endless trouble and expense to reach the North Pole or climb Mount %  Vtrast. Yet all the time there Is this simple and attractive adventure waning to be done at home. You do not need passports for It. dollars, grants from the Royal Geographical Society, porters, camels, or Eskimo dogs. sands is all right then the road ends abruptly beMde a notice that say*: "Unsuitable for ears." At this state of the tide when we made the crossing the notice seemed hardly necessary, because there was nothing ahead but sea. But Dauntless Charlie plunged In. Deeper nnd deeper we went. till Ihe -ea was up to the bonnet and we were sending out a bow •rave like n torpedo boat. "lA>k oul!" shouted one of the women In the back. "The water's coming in the door." "That's all right." said Charlie, "you don't have to worrv till it reaches the seat." We reached dry sand again OVER on the starboard quarter was another taxi, and together we ploughed the SOB In convoy, for half a mile, till the water shallowed out and we were on reasonably dry sand again. "Of course, you've got to know what you ax doing," said Charlie at the helm, "because there arc quicksands, too." I had been thinking the same thing when I saw the sands were littered with the hali-buried skeletons of rusting cars. I thought they were the remains nf taxis that had perished on the journey, but Charlie said Jhey were put there in the war td*stop gliders landing. About 230 people live on Holy Island and support themselves by farming, fishing, and looking; after holidaymakers. For this last industry they are happily placed, because they have four pubs and no policeman. Recently' "he police tried to And lodgings on the island for a constable, but, oddly enough, though they can accommodate 200 holidaymakers, no one had room for one policeman. More publicised, though lei__ noisy pilgrimages than those to the pubs are made to the ruins of IJndisfarne Priory. It was on this island. In A.D. 635, lhat Christianity wag introduced to the North of England. On the mainland they told me that on Holv Island you roust never say "pig." Yoti have to call It -the thing" or "the article." It was rather hard to confirm this without using the word. So at lunch-time, in one of the pubs, I asked outright: "It it true you mayn't say pig?" They laughed FOR a moment they looked nt me like a man in a Bateman carloon, then everybody burst out laughing It was an old fishing fiuperstition they said, but no one %  xithered about it new. Another fishing superstition used to be that it was unlucky to meet the vicar rtrgt thing in the morning. If vou could not avoid Ihe vicar vou did not go fishing. The ilrst thing visitors ask when they get to Holy Island is "What do you do In the winter?'* 1 confess I asked the ame thing, and the nnswer I got was: "We talk about all the daft folk who come here in the summer and ask what we do In the winter."—L.E.S. FOR PRAMS MEAN CARS... (From HENRY LOWRIE) WASHINGTON. LIMITLESS America? The latest official survey estimates there will be a population jump of 20,000,000 in the next ten years. That means 173 million Americans by 1962. These additional millions (people don't die as young as they did) will have to be fed, clothed, educated, and allowed the usual necessities and luxuries. Take cars. There are 54,000.000 vehicles on American roads, up from 32.000,000 onlyten years ago. Think of what's going to hr.ppen when the arriving millions get their new cars '. Driving is a nightmare now and parking seems an impossibility. WHEN you read about America's selfmade millionaires you get Ihe impression that they all started as newsboys. The newsboy is one of the great symbols of this country, so the Government is putting out a new stamp in his honour. It will show a boy delivering newspapers, and at the edge will be a torch held in a hand as a mark of free enterprise. A BIG New York dress manufacturer, big in every way—six feet tall and 16 stone^— told the judge his wife pelted him with ashtrays and vases, beat him with her bandbag, clubbed him with a bottle of whisky, kicked him and advised him to drop dead. But the judge refused a separation order, saying: "Go away and live happily ever after." THE 29 policemen sweating out their written examination in Hamilton. Ohio, for promotion to detective scented a trap when an attractive blonde walked into the room. That's why they didn't give her a second look. And were they chagrined when, tucked away at the end of their exam paper, they found the question : "Can you describe the lady who entered this room and tell what she did?" The poser was put in to test the observation powers of the would-be detectives. Failure cost them 25 out of a total of 200 points. THE little town of Ballston Spa in New York (pop. 5,000) is losing its only cinemakilled by TV and "drive-in" theatres dotted around the surrounding countryside. ABOUT the rise of the £ here the New York Times says to-day : "There is a feeling that the British Government remedies are belatedly beginning to work. THE Republican Convention is turning Americans into a nation of button wearers. They don't all spell out Ike or Taft either, for all sorts of lirms are pushing new slogans on buttons which they distribute by the hundred thousand. Slogans like "Vote for Chlorophyll Green" and "So-and-so is everybody's pal." ONE way of cutting down race prejudice in New York : the army ferry that plies between Manhattan and Governor's Island is renamed Sergeant Cornelius H. Charlton. Sergeant Charlton was a Bronx Negro G.I.. killed in Korea and awarded the Medal of Honour, America's V.C. THE songs in that Broadway and West End hit, "Kiss Me, Kate," are not good enough for Hollywood producer Dore Senary. For his Technicolor version he is after Cole Porter, who did the original songs, to write some new ones.. .. Clifton Webb will star in the film of the Titanic sinking, to be named "Nearer My God to Thee". CANASTA PLAYING CARDS. Complete with Instruction*. $2.28 Set PATIKNCK PLAYING CARDS 72c. Set ADVOCATE STATIONERY is in my humble opinion getting at tha real root and .'or that reason I plump for his proposal. Durln the discussion in the Legislative Council ..n th, of salaries for Heads of DepartIt was Mlfgaatad that | lie set up lo go into the whole m,itter-Councillors what are you doing? and I though by this "time something would have been done to laena this vexed question. Are the powers that be. aw that there is grave dissatisfaction %  mong the Elementary Teachi Over iheir condition of work and parents over the education of thei. children? And are they prepared in do something to rectify such? Continue, J.E.B., your views are respected and your voice heard. even if not heeded. L. B. BRATHWAITE. Double-dealer Turns Up In A 'Modern St. Luke' A 68-year-old Methodist minister has spent 20 years on a new translation—from the Greek—of the New Testament. It is written in what is called simple English. Few "thees" and "thous." No long sentences. And, says the translator, the Rev. Charles Kingsley Williams: "For the sake of simplicity 1 have sacrificed complete accuracy." Example: In the Authorised Version of the Bible, St. Luke, chapter 6, verse 42 reads:— Thou hypocrite, cast out first the beam out of thine own eye, and then shalt thou see clearly to pull out the mote that is In thy brother's eye. FIRST TAKE THE LOG In Mr. WiUiams's version* this becomes:— You double-dealer, first take the log out of your own eye, and then you will see clearly to take the dust out of your brother's eye. Said Mr. Williams, who lives at Fowey, Cornwall: "It is 1952 modern, but not slick, smart, or clever." The new translation has been sent to all bishops of the Churches of England and Ireland. There is no likelihood of its being accepted as the Authorised Version. For a committee of scholars of all denominations is already at work on one. They started two years &£o, and expect to finish around 1960. 'Published today by the Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge, Longmans. 8s. Sd—L.E.S. . would be an excellent time to select from these GARDEN TOOLS . W Garden Hose W & V Garden Bib Cocks Watering Pots Pruning Shears Border Forks Hand Forks Wheelbarrows V.G.M. Manure C. S. PITCHER & CO. Ph. BIRKMYRE This is the Canvas lhat Bus Owners have bttn waiting for — green Birknyrt 72" wide, for Bus Tops and Sides. espeeiallv for Seat-Covers. ARLINGHIDE It is sold in two qualities for roaaerrial and private use. ensuring longwcaring Bus and Car Seals. LIONIDE And Lionide Leatherette is for the householder — ideal (or Prams. Tables aid Chairs — in fact. General Upholstery. Da Costa & Co., Ltd. Carr's Cream Craeker Carra Sweet Bbrult* Fit Jam Peseh Jam Aprieot Jam Canada Dry Sweet Drinks FOR THE RACES J A K Sandwich llrr.nl Meit Pastes Lobster Paste Cheese BtseuKs \!n, inid* Cashew Nats FRESH VEGETABLES. VITAMIN VALUES Chickens Dneks Turkeys K.ihliils Sueetbreaas Liver Baron Frosen Haddock Smoked Kipper* Hams JAR Bread Batter For Everybody "GOLD BRAID" The Flavour Is always right Try a Bottle f \ r ni.i GOLD BRAID To-nliht PHONE — WE DELIVER G0DDARDS c BAKERY GOODS .C*i



PAGE 1

FKIDAV \M.lsi v nv2 BARBADOS \hvOCATE PAGE THKatt Stale Lobster Pinches Nose Fruin JOAN HAHKIHONl 1'ARIS. Jul> A PHTU leaUurant keeper was orderad by a Paris Court to pay .i [3 BM and ii 100 damages tu who had a piece of his noae pinched off by a too-alive The character* in the drama appeared befurv three judgee of .1 votret'tional chamber of the central Punt, court* of justice. They were tin lawyer. Maitre Charlie Maicepoil. and the diner, with a bandaged noae. M Magnleu. The lobatet, which had been act-used of not being "fresh enough" was, ala.i. nu more. M Magnicu explained to the judges how .1 few vveelu ago he had a gre.it hunger, and a great desire for a fresh lobster. He went to a restaurant apei/iabJUhf in sea foods. The "patron" brought up a basket with several squirming lobsters in it for the guest lo take baa choice. (It is the custom at the better lish restaurant* in Prance for the diners to choose their fish before it is cooked.) "1 was much taken aback by the kaavsva* verv strong' odour." M Magim-u Mid thi' judgus. "I aniffed at Mie.ii. but all 1 said to the puiion was "I don't think theselobsters are very fresh. !" The restaurant keeper was annoyed, and said so. Whereupon". coatinued M. Mngnieu. "he slapped the basket on the table, got hold of the largest of the lobsters and waved it under my nose, shouting "Not fresh. My lobsters not fresh! Here, smell it." The lobster, retaliating on behalf of the patron, seized the end of M. Magnieu's nose in its pincers. M. Mngnieu continued his sad atoj 1 "It was impossible for me to free my nose. I must admit that the restaurant keeper did all he could to try to remove the lobster's pincers." But the nose gave way before the lobster, which retired wish a small piece of flesh. The restaurant keeper interi-upted M. Magnleu's recital to the judges, to comment: "It really was not my fault The man put his nose in nty lobster basket like a policeman. Ibsters do not lite that." "And In any ease," struck in M. Marcepotf. the defending lawyer, "Monsieur Magnleu can always get his revenge b> making his otomach a tomb for any quantity of lobsters, one every night if he wishes—a most agreeable revenge!" The judges were not amused. and awarded £100 damages. This is the price charged in Paris by plastic surgeons who remodel the too-long noses of lllm stars into the short, Up-tlted variety. SEA AND AIR im aeusri emta III il ll-lr WAS l %  vsssa v M •a. AS**U: *fW—i. %  I*""' AMIVl.ltHMl SrMotWr tvudmf OS bvn> C**i • m Hnliih 1. I %  thm ifi'.ni Ml IOQN. C i ran. i %  tlal linHT.w Aarni. M V Ihtnr^M. I I •" %  "' t I sensf owpfi aaaaei %  o*u I Seawall "Repeat after me 'L Aiiroetl Fusg. .on of Farouk. do solemnly i* Australian P Yoshida Ami A Chang Confer HO DICE NO KOU1.ETTF N" I. All! MOUTH Councillors Want Expenses Kefiuided PORT-OF-SPAIN. July 18 The City father! (members of the Port-of-Spjin City C\um:l: are making pnottati Ha to be paid out-of-pocket expenses. From time to time the council have toyed with the idea of paying themselves out of pocks* expenses, have nude a strong case for such expenses. Earlier this year the Council even inserted provision for meeting such cxpeatea in their 1952 estimates, but Government struck It out when considering the estimates on the ajround tlon wa> "premature". This week the Council's Finance Committee recommended that a delegation of the Council should interview the Hon. A. It. W. Robertson, the Finunciitl SM and Sn John Unfit, Oointsdaaaontr of Local Government, on the question of paying out-of-pocket expenses to members of the Council. Apparently the new BOV| la being made by taeVCouO the County Councils will soon be paid out-of-pocket expense" CA.Nbfc.KHA, Aug. 6. lie.isuiei bu -vi li.. u ratiuaii nrsaantajd nu >^,in.7anWIU budget to Hie ilou*c ol Met iaaeumwea iui lttsz.oa. on Wednesday, of ,^hich |-w,U0tl.i".o U lor ueience. Uie buaget. winch estnnateil .. surplus ol al.w^.uuu k tasnva a wme mage of taxes and urovides lor increased pension. redden saiu that pension* WoUafl oe increased by Is. M. per week and tnat a ten per cent suiehaige on the assessment of individual IneenM tax. would be abol:.-<>i. He also aiuiuunctd a leuucnon of twu shillings in the rate of but on the urst iii.uou and taxable iiinimes of public cumpauies and the abolition of advance tax payments by Companies. Madden announced the minimum amount of prohta which private cnrnneuUaa would be allowed to reap from their distributable ln. %  -iiiwithout incurring an undistributed tax would be increased fiom ten to 2J per cent. The undistributed income tax will be at a flat rale of 5fl per. cent instead of a graduated scale. Kuddi-n said that the "talk or %  lepression in Australia is dangerous nonsense. With high export prices the pool season, growing population, and lower taxation, conditions have never been fav. ourable."—U.P. British Cruiser Shelled LONDON, August 5. The British Admiralty said Britain's blgacvt cruiser, the 11.500ton Belfast was struck by a shell from a Communist shore battery while patrolling off the west coast of Korea The report said "the ship was straddled and in subsequent salvoes was hit by a shell which exploded In one of the mess decks." Four Chinese ratings were injured one of whom later died The date of the engagement was nol disclosed. The Admiralty said damage to the ship was "unimportant" ami thai the Belfast resumed patrol after silencing the Communist battery with her six-inch guns. It said nearly every Allied whip had lieen under Ore and several had been hit *n keeping the armed E itrol vigil off the west coast of area, adding that the Belfast i. the eleventh hit in the past nine months.—U.P. TOKYO, Aug. The Japanese l'mne Minister. Shigeru Yoshida. said on Wednesday that it K ;i foregone BStKfcl. s.0.1 "that Uie United SlateaJapun Security Agreement wi'l develop into a Pacific allianci Yoshida made his observation in the course of an hour-long eon. ference with General Chang Chun, special envoy of Generalissimo Chiang Kai Shek. who arrived here on Sunday on a goodwill visit coincident with ratification of the Japanese Pe.. i Reports said that Yoshtda and Chang had been together at the Premier's summer residence lr Hakone and then discussed mutual nrtd international problems for seteml hours. Chang observed that the delegates working on tlv Anzus Council in lion..lulu regani the rearmament of Japan as necessary to peace and security MI the Far East, and expressed thhope that Japan would rearm n* cnaMkb .i-> possihle in view of the possibility of further Communist aggression in Ibis area. Yoshldn concurred, but pointed out thnt e.irly renrmnment would \# difr cult unless th* Japanese peopl.* themselves become ee gwc lO fM of the neeessitv for such nrx artior He recalled the criticism levelle-t at him todav for saying that the National Police reserve la "the cnrner*t'>tie of the new army. —rr U.S. Plane Shot Down OKer Sib*?ria TOKYO. Aug. '•• United Nations sourcea in Tokyo said tonight that a U.S. navy observation plane with five men aboard was shot down off the Siberian coast on Saturday by a Soviet Fighter plane. Navy headquarters here refused to confirm or deny the report. It only said: "We are leaving this to the Chief of Navy Information In Washington. No announcement will be made here." U.N. sources said that the plane, of an undisclosed type, was hit as it made its routimflight. Far East air force headquarters denied that any of IU planes had been involved in suih ,iu Incident. Tokyo sources aho said one or more Russian submarines hail been sighted close to shores In the lasi week. The navy would neither confirm nor deny this—OFVtfir Drug Tried On ('onrici* LOW AMKHK'AN DMVli I OgVO bi Hi bu I tf) LllnCfl pig! for a new drug by 1 ,veri thawnaelvH lo t-e %  fected with malaria—nn inmi *e that their >enten.%  would be i educed. THE DRUG is DAKAPRIM. i vnthrti. Lhemli.i) made by American chemts, THF. JAIL MM I BIB* tUU ii THE RESULTThe RXfvhM gi\en darnprira were atJ rntht, ih.m J" who v ere not iliised went down with malatia. Bi-i'.idler John Boyl. of the W ntonea of Tropical Medicine, gave the report to a meeting of dooteri it the Mansion House in Loud 'o laM night. He said the tn.il %  I Uoodon and mi Oaraprim's aaill malai was first i %  l/xidon bv l>i 1. M. Rollo —ir.r. (lliiiiaiiian KINGSTON Aug. 5. U-ptain William Rupeit ChsUI| 11.E.M. Janiai.il IM>I?L was attacked and beaten by a gang of local Chinese Communists on Sunday night because he condemned the atro.ni. the Communist regime in China. Chang with hi. wir.and three children returned from rsong Kong Ion. geajh ami gave the press an tttaTTani n which he told, of thej btutgl eondi tlons for which he hi Communists He attended a garden party at the Chinese Public School ;ind while on the premiM's teli Chinese on the side munist sympathisers, surrounded him and told him BOi WOn reports against Con\nuno-i China in future as it would OfffSlk up their underground here. The. then beat him up. He was conveyed under police guvd to the hospital for treat mi M to his home. The C.IT) are now searching fm the a aaaH a nt a who are ha ta we d to bo locked | (l an irnrfei hideout 1 • o* u \Luil*v SoggMii IHM' Of Courage For T-ituid .Soids i I SPAIN, August 1. %  oples' National Ml Norman W, Manky. yr. itopped here for an I % %  ui on bis way back home Horn Bai I no altendr leader n in the Jamali %  : freely ,,t British W< ild among jthi ':. i M kmk ing .. ii on n. West India that Ihe II % % %  tar Pan u ornrnitted %  Ci tin i; as] had this tu an) I think we aie all H gretd tnat in i the Ranra kUisallatactory. particuBsrlJ In the pesBsVOBl constitution It has devised which we do not leel to be any longer, if it ever was an adequate instruun M fm Weal Indian ambition, or for an %  hederal Government." A lUnaj that the Kancej I % % %  ;.;..-. uie as anuck in federal affairs | hoped and InaVsdod l> %  aJ alfaiis before fedem MtB %  i. place), he u>ok ,i "di*; at Tiuiidad's politicians. "I advo-l < .iti i„ iM : ."g tluae ofl Id mils, ol .hon %  \i a, ii H i i %  B I I -.14. '' r . r %  tie* nrh. \ n ..IHI nait % %  l MUM aaaea %  Mea s wrrn. %  .i i Mawai .i yeniMiare N, o. P-,.,1 ., n , %  >,,, "MM SI'A> >' rt,~,4.s \ Hnaw w \ %  I.ifM-SniHli. A 0tnr lfnn A HaoMfi. H Ml ^ *.lt.M. O i^(.—1 ood. i 'Haoort. A 0-S."-l A %  %  t Lartari. f %  >i DUMLOP CYCLE TTRES § ftOm SlOT V'f"-i. Taamaa Vrnner ll'rnwi % %  !— Mf. VKIWI Bin.l. Ilml.i \ni-hi.#n. Jitrr* S VI... p. Bi %  Whjir Drwn Millw < -...rle* MHI-T M-.ii Jiiii*!.. I. ii. Jnh ,. riTiin.M J<*n*m. I*h Jinii> Mona Hmillns. Altwil T\ .-I %  i I'x.lyn, wiitg Command*. I. A r|l.-DWMtaa. s.hu Han %  * %  < \m* RATES OF EXCHANGE -.-lllni MM IOBK Ilium. ri i i* pi ifmrn Tu in in I IS^ r-r I'ahlr Carres* I u .,, „ i ISAM 'ffiuut?"" n P i I BS Hism brutt. *' • Gets the Dirt out of WORK CLOTHES faster a>nd easier than AMY Soapt Ye*, FAB — even in th* fwtfttaat werter waW snt the dirtiest garment* clcnuer. whiter, brhrhaer — nasal Wi'IfKLY too. For yonr tumiy thm^; or henvieaat wanh—e FAR. peat It M >y>ajr ajMoag-tg ah* JO-DaVIt. Vr.-Vn.Hiy, Mth AB SAVES Use HALF mmth mb m i..rlii -I I till in I "SANTlAtiU. Chile, Aug. 6 Salvador Allende. laftl-QUQportcd can, utmhnr Fresidenti.ii aleeUon. fought a pistol dastl %  Ii radii al Bemttoi ir Until enma ut un hm t. The dtaM followed a violent 0l tinday. EtotU| hurlen Which Allende took 0* Ultra to him. He rephed io Rind, and Hetlig. feelhonoar involved, chnl%  i.i 1 Ikrth %  i %  in After stai %  iach. the duellists tool m oppiturned I | Both i Thi w remained unreconciled— I'.f. We now have our skilled Jeweller working on the premises which (itiaranlews quick deliveries and reasonable charges. V. lie I l>l A A ro. mi 2ii id....ii St. 1-IH.H.inn II 'lit/ Endure Commercials > ileiux in Pteuuure WITH A NEW PHILIPS Variety Radio Player SELECT YOURS NOW FOR — Flawlets reception High sensitivity Astounding tonal reproduction Attractive appearance oi it in-: M.I. its MANNING & CO., LTD. Dial 4284 PIER HEAD FIRST TOR LASTING WEAR HtfucantuUt GOOD/YEAR NEW FIT! NEW FREEDOM! NEW FLATTERY! THE NEW SHAPE NO TIG AT Till-: NO Slllll 1 IIFRS TAPER AT THE WAIST NO TIGHTNESS AT THE HIP You've never owned a suit like il! Its New .Shape is designed on a revolutionary. n e wT "cone" principle Its lines dip straight and true from broad, handset shoulders to the hips. No old-fashioned taper at the waist! Try on THE NEW SHAPE, in >iew dynamic. DeepTones . Let >our mirror be the judge '. flTY GARAGE I HADING (0.. LTD. Dhlribatwv i iiii iim ii iiMi A. E. TAYLOR LTD. 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WHAT'S ON TODAY Csurt -X <" % % %  II t PW.. I* M YrOi a •afJSS a-nrf fit *• I And n. VESTti>AV S WEATH MK>T *.lof-llf Ml CU!"*•> JO la, I.-UM S>i->r.a far —* I Whit Jf .II.. M kw ESTABLISHED 1895 Greeks Shell Bulgarians On The Disputed Gamma Island U.N. Observers Watch Operation ATHENS, Aug. 7. The Greek Army began shelling the disputed Gamma Island seized b^ Communist Bulgaria in a raid on July 23. A Greek General Staff communique said shelling began at 9.30 am. in the presence of United Nations observers and after a radio warning. It said "so far there hag been no reaction". The communique was issued at 11.00 a.m. Gamma Island is in the Evros River which for ten miles forms a frontier betwen Bulgaria and Greece. The island has always been considered Greek but Bulgarian troops landed there on July 23 and seized control after killing two Greek gendarmes and wounding three. The Greek Government com-. %  --' ~Railroad Workers In Italy Strike eminent com-, p lained to the Uiuled Nuuuiis I ugauisl tntincident aud UM ui kiuxaiion K oauuin ^umnu&siun went to me scene. Toe U-ncx lurcign nuiustci Sopuocles Veuuelos iwo u^-> ... > aemaiuMd uie Bulgarians tu avacuaie UM* uUuu. A* yesivruay Urea* and bulgarian troops were re* ported lined up opposite uie sides oX the river. The Greet bombardment o( tht (viand came as a suiprtte. Only Last night the Ureek general stall issued a coaununit|ue saying iu Bulgarian Uuop u-ve appeared on Uw islaiMi u( Gamma'. It siso denied iporl& uut Bulgarian troops haa occupied other islanus ui Kvrue. However this morning a genor.il -ufT communique said "during uie nigiit ,ii.., morning i,""ii%  .... oi .t lew tjulgarlana were observed on Uie Greek Isle ol Gamma. Aiiei that from V.3U aun. to-oay we oe gan a cannonade of the uie after a radio warning and in the presence of United Nation* observers. So far there has been no reaction". A Greek press said the bombardment was Uie prelude to Greek reoccupation of the Island. According to press reports Graex observon saw one Bulgarian *n the eight acre island at 4.30 ajp but waited until dawn to be sure. After daybreak the presence of Bulgarians on the island was esUib.itlied and reported to the General staff at Athens which ordered troops to open are ai w.3u a.aaAthens wu calm es authorities Issued a standby alert to gendarmes and army units. In Naples, Southern European N.A.T.O. headquarters of Admiral Robert B. Carney U "closely following" the Greek-Bulgarian dispute over the Island of Gamma tn the river, a spokesman said 1 %  Thursday. The spokesman said reports on the tense *iluaUon is being filed by speclnl teams of observers stationed in Athens. Up to now however no NA.T.O. observers are at the scene of the dispute Hull. V&. ROME, August 7, More than lOO.Odu Communistled railway workers went out on a 24-nout nation-wide strike, curtailing normal schedules but falling to achieve their goal ol total paralysis In the country*. \ast railway system. The government kept more than a skeleton service guiim throughout the country with the aid of troops July and 80.000 members of nonHe said, "I handed my resign;)Communists unions which refused Uon to His Imperial Majegty beto join the walkout cause of ul health on Jury 19, i therefore I was not Prime At midda> the Ministry t of, Minister on July 21. I informed Transport In Home said li—i all deputies who called 'on me emergency crews were operalini*, on July Is. that I had resigned almost twice as many trains as jand had not an official posit; Iran House Session Ends In Uproar TEHERAN. August. 7. I A session of the Lower House tt Iran's Parliament ended in an jprour when deputies were debet-[ ng the nomination of Se-yed, Ay.tuiUh KMMKI ranalicai reii-I gious leader as Speaker of the House. When the session endod it, not known whether Kas>ani; had accepted nomination. Previously a group of 30. deputies tabled the motion demanding the release ul the assassin of. Premier Raimara who. has been in Jail since March '. last year. This motion started a I verbid ball!* between tribal. leaden! o?i Government beociietight about an upnmi whk'h closed the session. Meanwhile Ahmed Ghivain. I M-yenr-old million.ure statesman' who was appointed Premier by th." Shah, and Held oftlce onlj foul days prior to the bloody riots of July 11, publUihed the. text of a letter he has sent to Parliament seeking to free himself from all 1 blame for the Incidents He said "I proclaim that I was[ real martyr because I was the ic who was destroyed..'' He sairtj he wcaiMn t be blamed for military id police actions against demonstratum in Teheran on July 31. because he actual!)' resigned on Committee To Investigate Port Services Following, an inllmatWu in.in the Skipping and M.-t rantile A—a elation sad the Barbados Worker*Union of their wUllnasteat to have flOOD OFflCKS Comsnlttee set ap to anvaasle**-' conditsona m the Fee* of HrMtsetowa, HI* Exorllrsw> has ras j — s fd H eat. H. A. cut-. M.L.C.. and Mr. P. D. McDcrssett le prepare earii) Infarmstton aad laurt-S un haw earae is handled in the Pert, Mr. O. H Klnc. Prria>id of the Chamber of Cojnsseree reported that while those fsgsires have not yet been prepared the Shlppms and Mercantile Association has seesawed s general repert far Hen. Mr. Cake • %  hew cargo Is handled Eseept far this, ee further progress haa set been made in connection with the %  ettins up of the Commlll" which will he under the chsirmanshlp of HI* Excel leuey the Governor —CJ-. had been scheduled for the duration of Ihe strike. At Bologna, one of the country's biggest railway hut.*, special cicws handled 21 trains—IS passcngci and five, I eight during the lint eight hours of the strike. Emergency schedules had listed only 12 Ualns for the entire 24-huur period of ii strike. Special Crews 11M aiUUSUy ul Tlaua+iCut, which had hoped to run ocdy about ISO trams today, said that special crews had run 109 Iral more than had been scheduled I Yung, an obscure Presbyterian during the first eight hours of [minister, piled up s commanding the walkout. head over his eight opponents in , llate returns from Tuesday's clecTne strike vti called by Uie'tion. Communist-dominaU-d General. titit (77) puttered in his Seoul Confederation of Labour to sup-j garden as the vote count assured port demands lor pay boost* t>hh return to ofnee for four years, tailing about S5.000.000 annually. He declined to make a statement The countty's two big non-Com-j OT p,,,,, for photographs. His inmunist unions refused to Join augursUon Is set for August IS. Jamaica Move To Encourage Newlndustrieh KINGSTON, Aug. 7 The Jamaica Government pi* further incentive for investt.rs I i I U l lls 11 1.1 BUI hj Rhee Back In Office PUSAN KOREA, Aug> 1 Aauig President Syngman Rhee waa iwept back into office by *i\ overwhelming majority tn the neaegjr rainpleu* returns from ine Republic nf Korea's first direct election of chief executives. Rhee':. choke for V Ice-President, Ham T. despite the fact that they %  upport the pay demands the fourth anniversary of the republi .i/lasMacArthur {right. %  llcniuigton Rand. Inc., after the lip of the ronioratinn's board of directors, la taking the poit. Ma-Arthur said: "I have look*' 1 forwsrd to this s—nrltrlnn with interc-t for nearly 3 years." flnieinsrionaO (MAKINO HANOI la New York a and James H. Rand, president • former bad accepted the rh.iirr •Pac'ifi<* Defence Will Be Plotted HONOLULU, August 7. Armed defense against attack in the Pacific from Communist China or any other nggrsatar will be plotted by military leaders of Australia, New Zealand and thai United States at Honolulu at a meeting expected to be held within 00 days. Admiral Arthur Rsdford Com.-tander-in-Chief of the Pacific Ocean area and the Pacific Heel will represent the United States Australia and New Zealand are .•xported to name their military planners soon. The three will meet at Hadford'i iv.nl Harbour Headquarters to >nap strategy which would unite 'he tanks, guns, planes and men •f the three countriesagainst planning will not bo i mited to defence of the ihalali irens of the "Angus" countries their territories or island possessions. The broad terms of the Security Pact pledge the three natiorui to defend armed attack against public vessels, aircraft and ..ine.1 forces of the three a* well as each other's metropolitan territory connection with the sat i on programme. been prepared which investors a tax tree holiday of tei years. Thu. period has been n at January 1993 ui Deicmher :t The new Hill will extend an ssjissi|| thai present Pioneer Indu tries Encouragement Law in ir portant respect* and for the pui pose of setting a specific perio so as to give added Incentive, investors to move quickly i tablLshlng new industries. Manufacturers have nlreaii. said that Pioneer Manufaeturei under the present law will receive benefits from the tax hnlldny period except only so far as it completes ten years for them si for their production dates, while long established Industries, not being run on a commercial scale and capable of expansion will be grmnuM similar concessions. Under the present law pioneer industries are permitted to wipe off capital expenditure by deductions out of profits for any five years of the first eight years of I'xiBtencc. The new Bill provides for Ihe wlplni on* of capital during tail years and possible extension foi five years after that of capital I* *'"• completely deducted out of profits. Pacific Defence Body Set Up HONOLULU. Aug. 1. %  Srlst Mutual Defence i iiwau \.'io. afg to a good stan %  fter PoiMgn Ministers concluded their mr— day cooferenee i)> rtjtlne up a permanent militarj boii* to plan resistance against eoninunist aggression Top diplomats I rum the United States. Australia and New Zealand .formally ended Ihe hlstorli meeting at S.OO p.m Honolulu 8tsniiairl Time. (12lMJi yesterday, snd Junanimously agieetl thut the con).i been %  %  oeceeR "We thli trdng off I i atart," Ba t re ta rj M Natsj A aeon said "Evciyotic is please*' with •he meeting." Acheson ano External Affair* Ministers of the other two countries concluded the conference designed to implement the Anxui Treaty, signed In San Frsnrlsei last September, by agreeing not |to attempt to establish formal re;latlonshlps with ether Paclfli states al this time i Estah1tnr:4,(HK.0U0 this In, .,n, ,1 ,. .,, oi tlii' licvclopinent of the stale'' uiamuni deposits, Premier Playlunend un Thursday. The money will be spent develupi underground mining ut Uranium Hill, erecting a treatment plai at Port Pile, and surveying new areas for possible location additional radio-active i Play ford said. Arrungcmenta arc I P wuv ME J CHAsIDLRR-a Cardinal tCristaj spi iriaaiaig ov > kesg frosa Mli — ggssT up on tfee third day of the % %  '. C foordsy mset. Tas rs was the Merchants' Han'Mrs. Bear 9 Scores Upset Win B'dos Turf Club Summer Meet Concludes Saturday <.oi;o\i;um.(.i\> DE4XB E>gLliti The enquiry :nlo the ctrcuiu stances surrounding ihe death oi O oil Boca. M %  csUuffeur ol Jaokmana, St. Michael, was begur. before His Worship, Mr. t. A McLeotl, Coroner of District "A' On Wednesday and nif %  mai. person. Ho went and found i man in an unconscious eundltloi in Ihe bed. AJtar axamteaaton, he discovj erel that the man wu from a serious injury to I.is brain [ He admitted him to the ward an> i saw him twice afterwards but h> lined consciousness Dr. E. L. Ward. P.M.O. Of Christ Church who ogrfoTmed the post mortem exaiiiin.ilinn g| the Pti'i lii M'TIuaiv un Monday, Ann ust 4, said that death was due t< %  hock iivt hattuorrbaKe tollowhi ardunds, Lavinla Hope. moihci k of lh B> a ustd s.i d lh il l % %  rasldnl Jackmans wiUi her. She last saw him alive on August 2 about J o'clock In the artarnoon when he left home saying he was going t< She next saw him at \U.it.. pltal tlie following day after betnn informed hy the Policy but he could net spt-nk to her. On Mon<< Q morning, she saw his -lead l-ody at the Public Mortuarv and dent (fled l( to Dr. War.) HI. p.m. Mr. Victor Chase's > v >.r-old lllly Mr* Bear out of Limckiln-Smylax won th< itafford Handu.ip from a Held % % %  lip el ol ine third day's ner meetinim the f twelve and caused the I racing of ihe B.T.C., Sum Suvannali yesterday. On this occasion Ihe h#260 20 was paid nut on M bination. The weather was again beaut If M. and the racing although keen. v. is marred by a single mishap when Jockoy Joseph had hu rfRhJ k I fi.i.Uneil while riding CoUeb> > whu ii fell in ii„Tralalgsi Hand %  being made for loat come from I V iNugudb B<4ong8 'I'D No Polilioal Party CAIRO, Aug. 7 Egyntian .strongman General Naguib on Thursday declared that BUENOS AIRES. August 7. the military coup which pushed The Peron government annoiiiicKing Farouk off his throne las* ed Thursday It will buy -vny month was 'purely nationalist,nd iiount of raw cotton offered it unconnected with any part .an by Argentine producers from he consideraUons.' Naguib said in a meaent lttfit-^2 erne communique that some organi'-g"!" !".^. Uon. in Egypt were alaeemlnat.ng 22 aa5S TJ" l il 'iT '"l" rumours to the effect thai the coup was do iim iwu —ma uuitc in their liati %  the lowest grades to 1801 7S for Th J ommui ,„. denounced th, Uie highest delivered in Buenes rumours as "absolutely unfound A 1 "*' ed." Naguib added that he ncv ni (I.AP.Il announced Wednesday organizaUon. Meanwhile, politilt had sold an unspecified am of cotton to Britain This WARD. Party Split Likely CAIRO. August 7, The powerful WAFD party may Iv headed for a full fledged split in the wake of the present purge poiiUcat observers said here Thursday. Observers predicted that dismissed party members are likely to retaliate by making pcnetraUnC accusations against remaining members before the Party's cleanup of the Committee. Such a jolt might result in reducing WAPD to secondary importance In the country's political life and bringing the Moslem biotherhood to the fore as the Party, observers said. Meanwhile It is understood that cne i eaaMi fee strong man General Mohammed Naguib's frequent visits to Prfang Ministe, Aly Mahe; waa to make pl.ins fbe increasing the Army midget by cultu.g 0 ernmen: spending etsewberr Naguib is known as .< of a strong Egyptian quickest possible rearmament. Th. Egyptian' Cabinet imposed Thursday an extra 20 per cent import tax on automobiles photographic apparatus, musical Instruments-and articles made of wool, cotton and artificial and pure silk. An additional 30 per cent tax has been imputed on Imported wine-, apctns, and cigars and 20 per rent on beer. —U.P. %  Mane Crashes Into The Rhine River GERMANY. August 7. Police aaid that a flaming I Cnited S t aaw airfo. :t two-^ngjnacl H-20 light bomber crash-landed In the Rhine River between the two main bridges In the teeming cwitre of Mala* this morning. Preliminary reports said that all crew members werf rescued An eye witness said two men parachuted out of the plane before it landed on the crowded river The other crew members were rescued by German river boats and rushed to the hospital here Their condition fa unknown. nge from 1398.76 per ton foi w.i. fhmftnri or Commune WillMeel In (fctoher The Ninth Congress of the In I ".ipnratcd Chambers of Com-, U bg held in Brills). Oulana m Oc/mbar, and it %  J that Mr. ilex Stollmevcr Trade r^mlfferTgWr in Canada, will attend the meet ing. I The Council of the Barbtido. i Chamber of Contnasrca 00 w* nt-sday decided to contribute f 2'> I It assist In meeting the cost of! bunging Mr Stollniever to th' W< | IndHSB, The question of Canada-Wat'. Indie* Trade is high on the Ii %  • if important matters to be dlsnasMd at the Congress NW Killer Stalks Through Chicago Results At A Glance THIRD DAY HKVKN'TKKNTII RACK I. Apple HamThlrkrll I. Super Jet—Yvonet .1. Sen Poem—l.utrhman i II.H I I I \ I M RACK I, Mrs. Bear—Joseph t Red ( hr. . ii s, M l. castle In The Air— J. Belle MM 11 I Mil RACK I. Paerle Queene—Holder '!. MrerHcbium l ulehmai TWr.NTlHH HACK I Top Flight—l.utrhasan 1. Cress lew-UoUee Mhsy tfay—4'roMlev TWFNTV-FIRMT RACK 1 cardinal t>aaah>r 2. I %  ilnriitni. I uiilmuii X. Mart h WbiaV—quested MM N I \ -SM (IND K 111 1. I .-.i Match—-* von<-| i. Careful Amile iiu.---i.-ti 1 l>sahing Princess I.ukhmaii TWVNTV-THIslU RACK 1. I IM I.I.I. >|U. .1 < :. Pepper V>lne—( rwaalev J Landmark—Holder • CUI Ptachiti HN lu_, .-1 wliei %  Mrs Bear-Red Cheeks com.ilULt .Ktuued J.OI an the held was coming around the band foi ihe Oral limp. Joseph was taken -o Hospital Prises m the Plaid HMIgn not ns great as on ihe second day. reached the ."ii mark on nae occasion. The i'arl pai to—morrow. THIRD DAY 8EVBNTBKNTH RAO: Javenik Stakes j S\x entrani faced aae starter • for Ihe fin.1 event ,.f the Ulir-I .i,i>. the Juvenile Slakes mi. oyel Sti furlongs for Class Ft and l.uw.-i two-year-olds With the exception of Sea Foam who carried 108 lu>. Uu OChei horses. Apple Sam. Super J** Hoe/Uaer, Bow tie and Jun 1Mtue aaoh Carriatl 111 I The rare was off to %  ft .with Apple Sam. Super Jei, Sci 'Ftmm and Bow Tie leading the ileld in that Order. Apple Sam was able tn mnnitaiii the ] %  -...i rlgbt aaosshd ih>eniirse, ,iud won on an easy gallop (our lengthshfl l of Bupar JH who was two lengthan Sea Fosm Ihe ihiM h..rse. BexTie was fourth. The raOB was slover than ;m • of the yrevloi-.* iv.o days. The • '.. i. .. %  I marked the flrst tune I.A IM engaged in cotton trading abro.nl Crop estimates place the lo'al st 500,000 sons i.f which 50,0( will be available for export. —D.P. %  gani/all.n. Mejuwhile. pnl.n"' cal observers here said that Ejry i' %  E werful Wafd Party may b adud for a major split as a rasull of Its oresent purge. —V.T. Fighter Explodes 8 Die la Flame* CHICAGO, August V. Police patrol cars cniw thnmgh the narrow gfl hi.-../ north '.idr *-ar. I, tot the hammer Ulan 111 ed '. kill -gain ,,i iKTsTed: "Mop me for (rads s..l forg II i loo lale! A dragne was thrown ., u i j,(t,. r a mai wearing t "light" suit who •** (fronted t*j women as a streetc; (stop and £old them "I killed jman with a hammer |Dd I km how k> take care of in>self Tl 'killer had the poUee acurrylr. loll over thr city last night a' tail.' today when he made IK •hantom lalephona DaUs to hoa WASHINGTON, Aug The US Navy said a jet lighter exploded aboard the a< raft, Paleatlne. carrier "Boxar' 1 off the Koiean Rosi also will continue to sei ve coast yesterday killing eight ril.'!n his present )'-b a^ Deputy U I The plane exploded In the %  arrepresentHtive on the U.N. Beeunh. rise** hangar setting off Are io a Council. Palmer h retiring afi-i below (lack space used for stoi ma. 42 years of government service planea, —C*. —C.P. ROSS SUCCEEDS PALMER ON U.N. COMMISSION WASHINGTON. Aug. T. John C. Ross was appoint Thursday by President Trumai. succeed Ely E. Palmer as depu<> [quarters and threuU-ned to Irreae US. representative on the t: N [two fashionable hotels in h Conciliation Commission foi j quest for blood Officers found the buttered fx-i >f Tom Acton. 35, of Birminghan Alalwnu, in a dingy hotel .ifter a man with a voice describe iu\ "raspy with a whine" call' nnd said they would "find sotm thing bloody" in the room. —I'.P. Boy King Sails To U.S. Koje Kef^* Sturl "Rice Riots" PCSAN, Korea. Aug. 7. Alxait BOO North Korean ren Koj Island raided i l Chan.. Sun Po last nigh Snuth Korea's first "rice riot A usually reliable source her' : .i i ,'..il f.>i RO.'i SOUTHAMPTON, England. August 7 S EVENTEEN-YEAR-OLD Kng Felsal of Iraq sailed today aboan the Qaeen Mary for the United States where he will spend a nv weak aducaUonal visit at the invitation of the United States Governfuge ment. The youthful monarch who will ascend the throne of Iraq on village his 18th birthday, nest May 2 Is particularly Interested In the study of US. Irrigation methods sorely needed in his parched homeland. He wlM spend some turn looking over the Tennessee Valley AcNorth Korean refugees near tr compassed by his uncle the ifince Regent of Iraq. Colonel Ahmed, village had been cut from 00 ton Mohammed Yahya and othei -fflclals, young Felsal will tour the US '" 37 V"** a ntonth because of trfrom Vast (o West s -'"' h K "" A*l b, wu, wh.-Mr M looked torw.rd t. •K.nd.n,, • ff IZZPXS "u. Iraq throne, the teenage Mot. urh replied. "On the whole ye*, but 1 mghl destroyed an oanee buildlm have not thought about 11 mm n" King Pelsal who had been studvinit '" "'' village anil burned docuin England since IW7 retuns to England in September ami will "' ?"* P 0 ," 0 *;""" w f*. Ir leave for lr^ in Oetohar.-tJ.P. J '" "" rio1 whlch ^%* D CHINESE LOSE 'CAPITOL HILL SEOUL. Am:. I Swift ('ruled States sabrejela shut down four Communist Mir; 15 jet filthier* and damaged four others today, while infantrymen pushed Chinese Red troops off the bitterly contested "Capitol Hill". Four air battles between Sabres and MKI's took placa DAWI Sinuiju. a few miles south of the Yalu River boundary between North Korea and jfanchtlfam. The ciijht MIG's shot down or d-i to-day brought the toll of Communist jets for Aup,usl to 41) The Kepublk of Korea soldier* >t the fnmed "capitol" dtvisioi | louaht a back and furlh battle | for the control of the key hill wr f Pukhan Hiver on the centr.il 'tout. The hill changed hands f< t he fifth time early t.day as Korean infantrymen smashed l" 'he top i iln.I The tight for "eapitol Rill oamed after the veteran Korean 'ivialon that held it began on Tuesday night, when the Chinese tormed the slopes and reached •Im crest. The spirited roopa won it back a few hours. later in a savage counter attach but the lommunul* came bu %  situation drei\ brick bath fret both houses In Congress and hi-. cwn colleagues. —IF.


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