Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text






ESTABLISHED 1895



India Can’t Give U.S.

Senator Charges That Indians
Rearm With Selfish Motive

WASHINGTON, Aug. 2.
SENATOR Theodore Green (Democrat) charged Sat-
urday that India has no right “to leeture this country” on
how to wage peace. Green, a merhber of the Senate Foreign
Relations Committee took up a sharp issue with the Indian



AN APOLOGY











b ; : > aw The conference, which op ned

Ambassador B. R, Sen who deplored the United States wire i a tae tas a x have ts Monday, issued a. brief
rearmament and recommended a conciliatory policy in a ed ‘Dr. Jekyll”, appearing India Again communique announcing merely
speech at Colgate University last week, aor the caption “Day of os aa eee nee eee

ao Fe a eckoning” in the columns _— reached, Saic he govern}

_ He said India’s position in the, ‘ headed “Our Readers Say” ‘ ace Maker oe of the United States, the
re Pakistan over Kash-j Is Aly Goi in tha “Advocate” News> | se ve ta saps. aa
mir left er in no position to ng paper of Frid lith July rE and Japan have satigfactorily con-|
criticize the (United States. He said} e 1952, has wenn De cause of TORONTO, Ontario, Aug. 2, | cluded their meetings on security |
“India {nds fault with us while} lo Rita? considerable annoyance to |; dia has, again adopted the | export control arrangements with
at the seme time building up her ° Mr, E. W. Barrow, B:Sc.. ; role of peace-maker, this tims at fart a) referon to the Far
own arms for purely selfish pur- 5 M.C.P., Barrister-at-Law {eae 18th International Red Cross j Eas Amendations with re-
poses. . NEW YORK, Aug. 2. We sincerely regret any | Sane b R, R. Saksena, spe to ‘ pemvewetion a waves
ae . ci ew Prince Aly Khan sped west annoyance or inconvenience ndia's igh Commissicner to has#, been formulated for consid-
India is putting up a fgbt! Saturday for the United States which may have been caus- Canada, asked the Conference to jerav®a by other interested gov- |
against Pakistan to prevent alamid speculation that he is com- ed to Mr. Barrow, and un- |}hring east and west together tojernments, They are being. com-
plebiscite to detsrmine which} ng to talk Rita Hayworth into re- reservedly withdraw any form an impartial body to inves- | municated to these governments, |
way Kashmir should go. He tr, | ‘onciliation or out of the financial allégations and imputations tigate Communist charges of Uni- | and therefore nothing further esn

a reporter the United States is} settlement she wants. He is aboard which may have been con- ted Nations atrocities in Korea.{ be stuted at this time.’
building: up its defences from al~| the liner Queen Elizabeth sched- tained in the letter referred ||He said he was confused by th } Enlarge Scope

truistic motives with Unite! uled to arrive here Monday. to, We tender him our sin- | conference meetings which. so fa) Inf@tmed scurces said that the
Nations backing to resist aggres-| The office of Attorney Bartley cere apologies for any an- }have consistet mainly of Com-] recommendations will “beta a
sion.”"—U.P. Crum, Miss Hayworth's bargain noyance _or inconvenience | mUnist charves and hastily passed} worded to members of the Par |
which may have been caus- | votes ignoring them, 1 ry up whieh include Western |

ed to him, and hope that ne of the main centtes of at-| Germany and 14 members of the}

" this apology will be accept- jtack by the Soviet bloe has beeninorth Atlantic Treaty Org mniza- |

: l : | ed in the spirit in which it jibe International Committee, com-}tign It said in essence that the re

1 ce carbibit || poses ai a re The! sommendation was to bring Japaii|

} Communist delegates hive term-Jinto the already established ma-!

jed the Committee a tool of the i {

Function

At St. Silas

A record gathering of parents, | ;
teachdrs and wdll-wishers were
assembled at the St. Silas Boys’ | °
School on Wednesday 30th. The-
25th Anniversary of the building}
of the present Boys’ School syn-|
chronised with Open Day. Ss

Among those present were Ma-! £
jor Glindon Reed, Director of
Education and Mrs. Reed, Sir Ed-
ward Cunard, Revd. F. Layne,
Miss Nell Manning of the Civic
Circle, Mr, and Mrs. Jack Outram
of Lancaster, Mr. and Mrs. G. C.
Miller. Miss G. Denny (Inspec-
tor of Domestic Science), Messrs.
R. Jordan and L. T. Gay (Inspec-
tors), Miss M. Crick and _ Staff,
Mrs, Cadogan and Staff, Messrs.
Smith and Williams of St. Simon's
Mixed, Messrs. Best and Vaughan
of St. Andrew's Church Boys’,
Mrs. E. Spencer of St. Silas Girls’,
Miss Daniel and Mr. S. Clarke of

12 Paragraphs
Stall Truce

TOKYO, Aug. 2,

Allied and Communist - staff
officers agreed to-day on the
wording of all but two paragraphs
of the armistice agreement but
there was no promise of early
peace in Korea as chief delegates
3| prepared to resume talks to-mor-
row. Staff officers scheduled an-
other meeting at 9 a.m. to-morrow.

The only two paragraphs still
to be worked over were 52 and
‘60, Paragraph 52 deals with the
parole of prisoners promised by
each side, that prisoners would
not be required to fight again in
Korea.

Reds wanted the term = cap-
tured personnel” replaced with
“prisoners of war”, apparently to
confine the no fighting restriction
to soldier prisoners actually re-

RITA HAYWORTH

ing agent said it heard the Prince
is on his way here but had no
information on the purpose of the
trip.

Miss Hayworth is on the west
coast where she recently com-
pleted a picture.



St. Thomas Boys’ and Girls’ Mr. —_UP patriated and not released in
Jervis, Mr. Nolan Sealy (Visual ct their home territories.
Aids), Mr. O. Weekes (Welfare), —UP.





FB, O'Neale (Probation Ser-] yr
vice) end. ‘Mess, “Arthur and U.S, Not Told of . ake
eorge Crick of Weston. «mms tification
9
juniors Sang | Mossadegh’s Plan.|_ Beatifi
After the rendition of ‘Hanni- WASHINGTON, Aug. 2 Starts At Home

bal’ and ‘All Thro’ the Night’ by : inns
the Juniors both of which drew A State Department spokesman

VATICAN CITY, Aug. 2

rounds of applause, selections Ss i a Friday tat the United! vatican sources said to-day any
from “Oliver Twist” were suc-| States has received no officiall ) eatifcation proceedings for Eva
cessfully staged against a fine}Motification that the Iranian} Peron, late wife of the Argentine

Premier Mohammed Mossadegh
plans to visit this country soon.

Spokesman Lincoln White said
he had seen press reports quot-
ing American shipping officialy

yackground done by the boys,

The Headteacher Mr, S. O.
Lorde, then delivered a lengthy
address paying tribute to the work
of Messrs. Abraham Holder, J. N.

President would have to start in
the diocese where she lived.
These quarters were commenting:
on Buenos Aires report that the
Argentine Food Workers’ Union

“ " ; “:}in Le Havre as saying that Mos: | appealed to Pope Pius XII to start
Gain on the late Mr. Oliver jadegh has booked a passage to a catwnaiy wena for her
alcott, America on Sept 12th To the} beatification.

best cf his knowledge, White said,
the United States had net invited
Mossada@gh to come here, He said
there had been no application for
a visa and “we have had no word
from any Iranian source what-
soever.

He then noted some of the in-
ternal changes in the Public Ele-
mentary School during the past
25 years. Some of the achieve-
ments of the school during the
past 2 years were the winning of
2 prizes by both the Vegetable and
Flower gardens, 6 Bursary Schol-
arships in 1951, 3 prizes—one in
each of classes I, Il, and IV dur-
ing the Music Festival Competi-
tion and the winning of an Ex-
hibition by Elric Payne to Com-
bermere.

Presented Prizes

Mrs. Reed then presented the

prizes after which she received a

It is not for the Vatican, they
explained, to take the initiative
for beatification, It is always the
Bishop of the diocese in which
the person to be beatified lives
who takes the preliminary steps.

The Pope himself finally decided
not to reject or approve the case.
Ordinarily at least two miracles
must be proved to have been per-
formed by God through the per-
son concerned either during his

White said that the Department
thought on Thursday that reserva-
tion for Mossadegh might have
been confused with plans for
Iranian Development Chief Hos-
sein Maaki to come here, but in
view of continued press reports
of a visit by Mossadegh the De-
partment was uncertain, He added |
lovely bouquet from which she}that the Department was trying |
plucked one of the flowers and|to check on Mossadegh’s plans}
stuck it into the. button-hole of: through official channels,
Frank Burrowes the pupil who!

after death before betiivetios.
—UP.







or her lifetime or by intercession | adiso Hotel



Dictator Policy Will

Sunday Advocate



BARBADOS, AUGUST 3, 1952

Peace L



seture |

JAPS MAY JOIN EXPORT
SECURITY CONTROLS —

A FIVE-POWER CONFERENCE called to decide
Japan's role in export security controls, ended on Satur-!
day with the agreement to recommend Japanese partici-
pation in the heretofore primarily European controlled |
group located in Paris.







chinery and enlarge the scope of
the Paris group to include policy |
co-ordination over the control of}
exports to [ron Curtain countries)
in the Far East as well as Europe. |

The basie purpose of the control!
system is to prevent the shipment
of material or equipment to Rus-
sia or the Iron Curtain countries
which must increase their war)
makipg power —U.P. |
|

west,

“It is not sufficient merely to
pass resolutions endorsing the
ICRC.” said Mr. Saksena. “We
should have taken advantage of
the presence here of delegates
who are not satisfied with opera-
tions of the LC.R.C. ahd tried to!
reduce their grievance,”—(CP)












Results At
A Glance



Train Smashes
Fighting Mob

JOHANNESBURG, :
South Africa, Aug. 2. FIRST DAY
An express train smashed First Race

through a fighting mob of natives
streaming across the tracks in the
suburb of Tooronga on Saturday
and killed four Zulus.

1. \MAGIC GAYE — Belle

(AIM LOW O'New

ABU-ALI — Yvonet
Second Race

»
o





Chanting war cries, about 100 | 1 MIKACLE — P. Floteher
Zulus were hunting for a band 2% MARCH WINDS
of Basutos who had _ been ter- —Quested
rorizing the natives in the Johan. 3, CARDINAL — Crossley
nesburg suburb of Newclare. Third Race
At oc Station they were 1, LANDMARK — Joseph
met by polife who were unable|| 2 BELLE SURPRISE
to stop them, The Zulus set upon, —Lutchman
the crowd on the platform. When 3. LUNWAYS — Newman |,
the victims fled the Zulus follow~ Fourth Race
ed oblivious of the on-coming)| 1.° BRIGHT LIGHT
train. The track was strewn with) —Hold «
bodies of wounded natives and 2. FIRST ADMIRAL
weapons before the ‘train could ~-¥voencet
stop.—U.P. ' | 3. RAMBLER ROSE
' —Josenh
; : Fifth Race
Farouk Orders | 1. DASHING PRINCESS
~ * —Lutchman
Sunimer Wardrobe | 2. FLIEUXCE — Wilder
CAPRI, Aug. : || 8% DOLDRUM — Holder
b 4 Ug. 2. | Sixth Race
Exile Farouk, who left Egypt 2
in something of a hurry, called 2 ee kee
at a tailor on Saturday and had 2. SEA FOAM —Lutchman ||
himself measured for a ward- | 3 GAVOTTE Wilder |
robe fit for the warm weather of Seventh Race \
this island resort. The portly ex- 1. TOP FLIGHT |
King ordered himself a_tailor- —Lutchm .1
made bathing suit too, | 2. COLLETON — Joseph |
owe or aes he lacked light 8. MARY ANN — Yvoneit |
clothing suitable for Capri; At a ‘i » |
Fress Conference the former 1 peers Bae |
poprerch van aremed in A beovy , 7 —Crossley
Ouble breasted suit, while the - aon ,
newsmen around wore igi 2, SWEET ROCKET
shirts and slacks. The tailor spent -Lutchman
the better part of an hour 3. MRS, BEAR — Joseph
at Farouk’s suite at the Eden Par-
measuring the ex-

King for slacks, beach suits and
a bathing suit—U.P.



Mossadegh Gets
Confidence Vote

9

TEHRAN, Aug.

presented it, ee | Prime Minister Mohammed Mos-

Rev. Layne in jubilant style : | e "i sadegh wan given en oer nat:

> his ¢ ress, + ing vote of confidence in ran

gave his addres Curate Returns ‘Bri Red Cou In Iran Senate today. Out of 35 Sena-

The Seniors then rendered a ; ' tors, 34 voted for Mossadegh and

selection of songs beginning with Edward Gatherer, _ Assistant his programme and only one sen-|
‘Bless This House’. After a vote|Curate of St Joseph’s Parish WASHINGTON, August 2. ator abstained
of thanks by Mr. C. Marshall, an Church resumed his duties on} ’

Friday

absence.
He returned from his homeland

(St. Vincent) on Thursday last.

old boy and parent, Psalm 23 was last. after a five-week

chanted, The singing of the Na-
tional Anthem ‘brought an im-
pressive programme to a close,
aiedadaaseperinci manera

editorial on Saturday that



coup in his country will dr

Red Cross Press For Investigation

TORONTO, Aug. 2.
The Eighteenth International



to submit these charges to in-
vestigation on a commonly agreed

lution introduced by Belgium.

Red Cross Conference on Satur- The text of the Resolution is:| upon basis for national Red
day voted 62 to zero with 13] “considering that several dele-| Cross Societies to unite their
abstentions to urge all govern-| gations have alleged that the] efforts in the support of that
ments involved in the Korean} Geneva Convention and human-| purpose.

warfare charges to submit to in-] itarian principles have recently The resolution replaced one

vestigation on a “commonly] been violated; and that these} introduced by Australia which
agreed upon basis”. allegations have repeatedly been| called for. the appointment of a
denied in categorical terms by] special commission of this con.

The Communist government} the authorities directly concern-| ference to conduct an investiga-

ed; (the Eighteenth Internation.
al Red Cross Conference) in-
vites all governments ccncerned

and the Red Cross societies ab-
stained on the vote. The confer-
ence accepted the amended reso-

tion. Australia withdrew the
proposal at the meeting of the
Legal Committee earlier -.-U.P.

INTO THE STRETCH





=

field turns the stretch for home in the North Gate Stakes.

ield home

Dashing’ Princess (Lutchman up)



THE EVENING STAR expressed the opinion in an

Iran alters his programme the probability of a Communist

Aboiza Lesani, member of the
Senate in speech supporting
Mossadegh demanded that United
States military advisers in Iran
should be dispensed with. “United
States advisers’ services should be
terminated.

unless Premier Mossadegh of 2
aw closer daily.

After reviewing recent events
affecting Iran the editorial con-

cluded ‘Dr. Mossadegh who has, “0! We. have several
returned to office with dictatorial] ©!!ce"s ‘" the Persian Army who
ape as good if not better in this

powers including control of the
army has issued statements prom-
ising settlement of the oil dispute
and restoration of Iran's economic

capacity.” Lesani said.

He ulso demanded that Soviet



Sea ete os fisheries concessions should not
and political stability, But the at-| bp renewed when the agreement
mosphere he and his followers} expires on October Ist this year.

have created is hardly conducive
to the fulfilment of such a prom-
ise. On the contrary now that the
United States has become the tar-
get of bitter attack along with
Britain the signs point bleakly to
a continuing drift from bad to
worse,

He said the fishery industry should
be nationalised by Iran and cayile
sold to Russia.—U.P,



Former Palestire
C-In-C, 81, Passes

LANARK, Scotland, Aug. 2,

Lt, Col. Sir John Robert Chan-
cellor, 81, who has had a distin-
guished career as an administra-
tor and soldier, died Friday night
at his home near here. Chancellor

Certainly unless the Mossadegh
programme undergoes sudden
and sweeping change for better
the pessibility of a Communi’
coup will move closer toward
probability with each passing day

—U.P.







was British High Commissioner
“Spourt” Bri ; and C i c
rings and Commander-in-Chief in the
Spurt ss mandated territory of Palestine
from 1928 to 1931

Split Peas, Milk

He. earned his D.S.O. during an
Four hundred and seventy-jexpedition on India’s turbulent
three bags of. yellow split peas! northwest frontier in 1897, Dur-
and 1,205 cartons of condensed} ing the first three decades of the
milk were brought to the islani| 20th century he heid successive
vesterday from Rotterdam by the! administrative posts in defence
SS, Spurt j establishment and as Governor in
British territories including Mau-
The “Spurt” also brought cot-)ritius and Trinidad aéd Tobago. |
ton piece goods, steel window
footwear, hurricane lanterns, pr¢ In hi later vear Chancello



serves cement, chairs, cigarettes, held numerous chairmanships and!
and other general cargo. | directorships in international |

S.S. Forester arrived from St | committee und business syndi-
Vincent to take’ a load of sugar |cates, Hi on Sir Christopher
She wil] be loading at Speights-|Chancellor is the Gener Man-|
town iger f Re —(CP)





PRICE ; SIX CENTS
WINNER



LEABING IN THE

-

|



4 ;
44

HON. V. G. GALB, assisted
by Mrs. ©, Williams of St,
Vincent, lead in Bright Light
after winning the Derby. Mr.
©. Williams with hat raised is
close behind.

W.German Riot Busters



Set For Red Invasion

; BERLIN, August 2.

WEST BERLIN POLICE today poised riot squads to
combat the planned invasion of the Western Sectors by
thousands of fanatical Communist youths. The Com-
munist Press has egged on Red Free German youth to
rush to West Berlin tomorrow to demonstrate. “We are
for peace.”

In whipping up enthusiasm the Communists have
1ecal’ed the bloody street tights on the boundaries a year
ago in which more than 300 persons were injured.

Western authorities already have, - .

Y ; Y
Drought Cost U.S.
’ ~
Farmers $500M.
NASHVILLE, Tennessee,
Aug. 2. |}
The Federal government de}
clared to-day that the $500 000,000
drought in the southeast and parts
of New England, will prevent the |
nation from reaching its agricul-|
tural defence goals. The depart-
ment officials agreed with repre-|
sentatives of drought stricken}

|



States at government sponsored } banned the demonstration schedul- ’
emergency conf€rence that it is}ed foy the city park in the British ontract Ma P
too late to avert @ “major blow" !sector, Communists claim they have



to the nation’s agricultural pro=inot been told of the prohibition
ee: if {Red youth leaders announced this
Disaster areas have been de=|morning the meeting will be held

End Steel Row

clared in six and parts of twWo|.. planned and that at least 10,000 PITTSBURGH, August, 2.

other southeastern states and in ep parte will rally, 0, The final contract settlement be-
ae aetins dienes hy ‘Te Sponsors said the aim of tHe|tween the Inland Steel Company
omargenar loans and okies ne demonstration will be to show | anc C.LO, United Steel workers
eral benefits to tide them over, |POPUlar opposition to the West|* 4s. seen to-aay a3 a possible

German Pact with the Western (Pattern for a complete end of the
Allies. seven*month dispute between In-

The Communist challenge came) try and Union,

In Georgia the damage to corn
crop was estimated up to 80 per















cent and cotton is also facing P
heavy damage. Tennessee farm|at the .end of a tense week in| * “formal contract announced
officials said the State's livestock |Wwhich there have been frequent|Yesterday by C.LO, President
industry will need 3.000,000 tons; kidnappings of West Berliners by Philip Murray follows the pro-
of extra hay during the next eight | Red agents, Then last night Russia V!0DS of an interim agreement
months, but farmers cannot afford!demanded that the “Big Three’ negotiated at White _ House last
the price without low interest| Western Powers lift restriction on jal by eee of the
loans !Trade between East and West !dustry’s “big six”. The Union
In Mississippi, the drought|Germany, which the Soviets charg. | oid the Inland agreement which
dam ge was officially called i violated the 1949 agreement | ‘overs 17,000 employees did not
the : t on record." A Mis- ending the Red blockade of Ber-|! jude the company which
souri official said the damage to) jin ucp jsough provision which would
feed Pe in the southeastern |! inaustry the right to assign
part of the state has been ‘severe’ { - ‘ me ‘ a
re UP BUS OWNERS GO TO > rie 1 Soe gs Big ae
— COURT TUESDAY | it\ clauses. re
Or ‘ : S ove ne Although Inland was the first o
Hight Dead In har Cock Ghuaiinee Cnet % arg teel companies to reach a
C { . id }ith : : ink agreement with the Union,
47 ACCU ent his week, beginning Tuesday es other amurentt eevee
ce i ening” piuiebes. 09 the Common Pleas Suit between |?4 not atcepted the strike
ipsa tisha + SRP Bus Owners and the St, Michael |settling “memorandum” expected
Aug. = Vestry will occupy the attention|to be a basis for settlement,
Fi ons were killed ni of the High Court,
ninth critically injured Satur-])
day when a heavily laden passen- ]
iger car collided with a_ gravel
truck I'he victims included thre
adults and five children all Jap
anese Americans officers said
The automobile driven by Mrs
Masako Yano Imoda failed to )
for a Boulevard “Sign iv oull
eastern Salt Lor ’ 3 unity police RAIS IGH-—Makers of the
tid and the truck aded with 12
tons of gravel crashed into it WORLD'S CHAMPION
side
Mr Imoda and Ben Watenabe CcYCL i)
(67) id his wife Sue 57 were : yf} ide
rong those killed U.P. o : >



Oils And Fats
Announcement

I fi ent)

pone
Au















PORT-OF-SPAIN, g. 2

The Olls and Fats Conference
held t Barbados dest month re-
commended to participating V
ernments that the ¢ ting agree-
ment be ¢ ed for further
three eal certain modl
fications, Thi as announced this
mornir by Hon, Norman Tang;
Acting ister of Labour, In-
dustry Commerce. Tang alse
stated that the area price of
copra to be ret ommended — \ 1
agreed upon by’a majority eel

It $12 per ton increase
from $280 to $300 (B.W.1.) per \
long ton F.O.B. for the year be- Y
ginning September 1, 1952 with | 1 ou are on a
provision for subsequent annual \ i
ee eee comallt |. WINNER when you ride a Raleigh!

I addition xports pre q

om Trinidad to Jamaica buyers) ) &
egreed to pay a premium off) 3 A Raleigh was the choice of Reg Harris—World’s
$14.40 (B.W.1.) per long ton in 1 Professional Sprint Champion for the second year in
oe aoe es _ , aaeten ne i succession. Here is proof of the wisdom of buying
lene Linaniigations it” ply a j your bicycle from, a Company with such great
rangements including the provi- technical experience and knowledge that designed

i

and built the record-breaking RALEIGH,

RALEIGH

sion of bag



Murderess Freed







|
From Ot Own Correspondent |
POPT-OF-SPAIN, Aug. 2 |
One of the last acts of Patrick} THE ALL-STEEL BIC VCLE
Mu Reniso the capacity of!
Acting Governor of Trinidad ana | A Product of Raleigh Industries Limsted, Nowingham, England.
Sobago was the freeing of a To-}
bago woman named Gwendoline Ps sd
| Andrews who ¥ ing a 2 CAVE, SHEPHERD
ear-prison te murdet & CO., LTD.
jee. a mvicted f
| murder eT Assizes ir 10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street.
1947 but the death sentence
commuted to 20 years’ priso NO CYCLE IS COMPLETE WITHOUT A STURMEY-
ment. $ i ARCHER 3. OR 4SPEED GEAR AND DYNOHUB











PAGE

two







SUNDAY ADVOCATE

‘tching, Burning and Smarting ot



































“ Health Facts” Series
DO YOU KNOW
9



SUNDAY,

AUGUST 3, 1952



Carub Calling

IS LORDSHIP Mr. Justice wi For B.G. After Holida
. Vincent-Brown -who was Woos itecaps = . : y
Sf d | ie acting Chief Justice of Trinidad ae gprereeeng igy cong
—that your mouth leamirrer ; a a a .

0 p p e n of events in yor our digestive up to July 31, is now on pre- months’ holiday left the island on
system? If all is in order retirement leave, part of which he Friday by B.W.LA. for British
your tongue is clean, your is spending in Barbados. He arriv- Guiana. “Boring her stay here she

ed on Friday by B.W.I.A. and is oo e
es mouth feels fresh, if y . was the guest of Mr. amd Mrs.
a the" system's @ guest at the Hotel Royal. Creighton Birch of Rendevous,
[o Johnson's Siner the discov jederm by he oe BERS ig coated, While here Mr. Vincent-Browne St James. A farewell party was
Stationery | ita Dhysieinn 4 iff pMrcesaary a sour, unpleagant will be attending the Race’. held ip her honour at the home
ae ding ae be such as taste n your mouth. For The Races of the Birches,
SL Ope TEBE ke 2 sparkling Andros Uieet | ALSO arriving by thé same Back Home After Holiday
fo . iy lose your Salt! Anrews cleans and opportunky from Trinidad EAVING the island by BWIA
oe ; Peer oi Paes, 7ect siete breatinans oe nae freshema the Set th, sin were Mr. and Mrs, William Scott. for St. Vincent was Miss
ita nf has ‘brought ‘clearer ulates the acth on of They have come over for the Races Stacy McDowall who came over
aunerens | fake ext sCenns, aah ae Mi Fear eATERnS ond koops and are guests at the Hotel Royal. to spend the month with Mr,
eren . and smarting ana fo. system r. Scott is a Director of Wil- and Mrs. B, I, Gilkes of “Myrtle
team i br ecen or | 33 oder it topped te 1 feet 7 hear: clogging food wastes. liam M. Seott and Co., Hardware Bank,” Bank Hall. Miss McDow-
re i iho pas opens se a ON Matted ian “es Merchants of Port-of-Spain. oa is a frequent visitor to the
it. it p ) $| on e NY colony and wishes all her friends
Nix Iigredients days. My’ friends were wmasn Hare Return To U.S.A. au revoir.
Mr 3 ways. | provement in my appearance.” rews EV. DACOSTA HAREWOOD, ;
tithes “One ‘deolttn. Satisfaction Guaranteed Rector of St. Philip Episcopal Ten Days’ Leave
2. it stops Meh and smarting Nixodern, costs absolutely nothing untes. for Church of Philadelphia who had R. VERE LAWRENCE, son of
the sein’ 9 oF he p eoermes Y Clears sour skin to your complete satis been holidaying here and who had Mrs. Lawrence of, “Water-
clear, sott and. yen Dane chee in’ the niches in Ee eee inner Cleanliness | been Guest Speaker at several loo”, St. Lawrence, arrived here
ama 2 Joa keep amazed at {ihe improvemer: churches in the island returned - Friday ae Trinidaa. Mr.
we ixoderm for on,
-| week and at the end : REE st to the U.S.A. during the week. awrence who is employed with
nin Your Se eatulae eae seer ‘moot ws" _ | Rey. Harewood is an old Barbadian Cable & Wireless in San Fernan-
ia \ rning a must give vo! who has been residing in the U.S.A. 1, Wi spending ten days’
’ . ¥ starts to| the Kind of skin that will make you aq GLOBE
' aired whi ‘ : for the last fifty years. leave with his family,
JAN ETTA ones SHOP \ Penne tun the sem ‘oat ai bie one THIS EVENING, 8.30 & ™ wee Visitors Impressed
‘efunde 2 fu ° < .
- your Chemist today. The Mearenine te teet Monday & Tuesday, Short Holiday R. H. C. RAWLE of Belfast,
(Next Doo: to Singer’s) 5.00 & 8:30 EAVING tl 1 Frid N. Ireland and Mr, _ 8B.
3 he colony on Friday Thompson, President of the Cos-

Owing to the great reduction on Cotton Goods, we







WE WISH TO



night by B.W.1.A. was Mr.
Godfrey King of California, Mr.



mopolitan League in Ireland, who
are staying in the island visited

King had come over for a short
have reduced ali of our dresses in time for the Races, holiday and is on his way back Lak ooereee Goodwill League
ve x 1 } during the week. Mr. Rawle and
and the coming week-end Smart Cotton and Beach ANNOUNCE “ home, During his stay here he wg g-briet respite trom h Mr. Thompson were impresseid
Dresses from $14.98. O r f _P Here On Holiday. ores before ie pave omen en ian ge 6 bag ae aimee or
‘ . oO ec ren 0. Ss
Swim Suits reduced f ; pening o ? ret Joyce MacKenzie presents
Peimimtmestteitess Iron : ee nie ae ieee |
OS e alakalaia PL PBPLLIEEL ILL PLBE ELLA ADD AS ee .W.LA, on ni, rom ‘ata i
A ant hi SN a A 8 lk oF CHATE AU DRESS SHOP Wulcihed pies Us oak te ex, > ee Guest Speaker
ise ender Chin who are here for 2 Farewell Function At Press Club
iday. ey will a ake Y 4 i .
WOMEN’S READY-MADES in Exclusive Designs | opportunity of attending the B.T.C. FAREWELL function took HE HON. 2b. A. suantRY~-

Starting To-smorrow





Race Meeting. During their stay
here they will be guests at Super

A

lace no Friday afternoon at
the

elmont Girls’ School in the

SHOW, C.B.E, ML<., of

Grenada, was Guest Speaker, in

T ES AUG. 5th 1952 Mare Guest House, Worthing. h - of Miss Ornella Workm: a discussion at the Barbados
Night UESDAY, ‘ Two Weeks’ Holiday Senior Assistant. Mistress. ‘The Martyahow'e” cite ed

AND

Every Night in August















CHALLENOR HOUSE — COUNTRY ROAD
(Near SANITARY vee?

PLAZA THEATRES











































R. JAMES WALROND arrived

in the Colony on Friday night
by B.W.1.A. from Trinidad. Mr,
Walrond is employed with Alstons
Limited, Trinidad and has come
over for two weeks’ holiday, During
his stay here he will be a guest at

Wane wes ay mage



“Wed., Thurs., 4.45 & 8.30

occasion marked the retirement of
Miss Workman who was a teacher
at the school for the past 17 years.
Carib ‘joins in wishing her many
years of happy retirement.

Horticultural Exhibition

the attention of an appreciative
audience and the number of
questions asked with regard to
Federation and the opinions ex-~
pressed, showed that greater in-
terest is being shown in the mat-











John
BOLES

Wallace Barbara

“MESSAGE To GARCIA”
BEERY STANWYCK
And





ter, The discussion lasted till 11
p.m.

To Spend Long Vacation

Crystal Waters, Worthing.

A
| Wedding Bells :

rem a= HS i 5 rs growers MONG the students arriying
ETOWN BARBAREES v z F interest to flowers growers
‘ sa 2310) (Dial 5170) «Dial 8404) ‘SECRET OF CONVICT PRETTY wedding took place and lovers of horticulture is + from the Us. during the
CARIZ2EAN PREMIERE Tope ee Ea. TODAY « TOMORROW LAKE” at St. Cyprian’s Church Fri- the exhibition Gardens in Minia- wae ware Te 2 Bothuis and
TO-DAY to TUES Warner's Action Thri‘le: SAE Soman Glenn FORD Zachary SCO.S| day the 25th of July at 3,30 ture which opens at the Barbados )" olnule baw Weother, who
ieadhaelaidepet VENDETTA |e ORR a KBPS SOO 1s] Srelock when Mr. Lionel Eustace Museum on August 29th, continu- Dave. ome to spend their long
: _ Robert L.. Lippert Presents ORM Faith DOMERGUE eee SEVY Evelyn of Hart’s Gap, took as his ing on 30th and 81st, weean with their parents,
a THE STEEL WARNING and bride Miss Daphne Tanthe Alleyne His Excellency the Governor on ‘Nee &. ™ colenen of Mr.
Bi L HELMET Ronald Reagan SPANISH MAIN The Garden—St. James of Hart’s Gap. and Lady Savage have graciously 4,2) p Ae Olhuis of Haggatt
i Ginger Rogers Paul HENKE.D color} \({ TODAY & TOMORROW 8.30 P.M. The ceremony which was fully consented to attend the exhibition 4% ungalow, and the grand
maul PT wveRT) Bors an. ; “TOMORROW'S Special 9) | mee, Soper oe. an choral was conducted by the Rev. which ought to provide enjoyment children of Mr. C. A. Dowding
one mee Goonies (Bank) 1.30 P.M {Joseph COTTON & Joan FONTAINE x Layne. The brid? v-ho to both the growers and admirers Civil Servant On Holiday.
will offer to its Members U_.INKS at TOMORROW SPECIAL |] TOMORROW'S Special |] "BARBARY PIRATES"\, , & “SILVER CITY" (Color) was given in marriage by Mr. of flowers, shrubs etc. It will RRIVING in the om
imu wee wie em. ll nerUEN el toe” minons OF Randall Grant, wore a dress -of include among novel features a Priday . night b LA.
REDUCED PRICES to liquidate food and Bes Furzy ARIZONA TERRITORY DURANGO KID Special Mat. TUES. sear! Facone and Nylon, her long yeil display of orchids, a miniature rose from Trinidad were . ane fee

























Charles STARRE1)
























MON. 440 p.m.

was kept in place by a headdress garden, a rock garden, and other Rann Maraj who have come over

and

. Deub SILVER RAIDERS yon THEM oi Orange Blossoms and carried resti display. fi t weeks’ holida M
stocks, as w 25. RONTIER ou VENOR e)) ————_ —_______.. TUES. ; “The DALTON — HAT liquor stocks, as we will be CLOSED PR OUTLAW COUNTRY Next Attraction 445 & untae ants RESPASS" ¥ a er Anthurium Lillies It ig hoped ane the. public will Mora) vs oe severe, nia
: oo} «xno BBAS “MAD WEDNESDAY” Don Steven Murray ‘ . eir full support ida uw her

SEP’ T: OCT NOV Next Attraction WAS A ROBBER". Harold LLOYD & “DEPUTY “BLUE BLOOD: Miss Barbara Evelyn was Ma- a auiciaing to ivan corte the they -will a guests at Toretal

: ee fs OME RACKET” UGARPOOT IColer ‘Gacy COOFER. ery Wittaams{t| tron of honour and the Misses object of the Exhibition apart from Waters, Worthing
Robert. MercHUM Nandolph SCOTT. “David NIVEN. Yee RE SPSS! ae PRESS Alma Welch and Laurita §irecno- it.’ interesting aspects is to raise I definite Sta
e ES Sa | ROX —hROXxY as bridesmaids, the flower #i"'5 funds for the Society to continue oumaras wae lee
ROODAL THEATRES | Betty Jordan, Barbara Greene, 1 Ee Vtredt of flower grows

NO ENTRANCE CHARGE

(Except on Saturday)
Same QUALITY
Same ORCHESTRA

Same STANDARD
in the West Indies most beautiful Night Club.
e
Drinks at Hotel Prices.











ROXY

Stanley KRAMER’S Production of Hel WALLIS’ ‘Preducticn
DEATH OF A SALESMAN RED MOUNTAIN
Starring
Starring
Fredric MARCH
Mildred DUNNOCK
Short—Punehy De Lion and
Latest news reel

A’an LADD lL. pepets scoTT
John TRELAND
i Color By Technicolor
xtrar

‘Extra
2 Reel Short

OLYMPIC
TO-DAY & TOMORROW 4.50 & 8.15
WEISSMULLER as Jungle Jim
in

ROYAL

TO-DAY last 2 Shows 5 & 8.15
Republic Pictures ieee ts
Brian DONLE
Forrest “ruck

John)

|
|

|

|

|

|

Isle of Tabu |

|

JUNGLE MANHUNT
\

and
CHINA "C re

,
i}
1) $i

Torte 4,45 ae? Sie and



LADD

Lurene
New

Atop

Betty Jordan, Barbara Greene,
Carolyn Stanton, Monica Gran-
num, Valda Farrel and Angela
Tull. Mr. Moses Gittens per-
formed the duties of Bestman, F ware ;
those of Ushers fell to Mr, Crispin _ The price of admission will be
Savoury and Mr. Cecil Watkins. 2/- which will include a free

A reception was held at their admission to the Museum exhibits
residence Hart's Gap. ; by the kind consent of the Curator.

for the past three worms 2 at
Crystal Waters is Mr. J.
née of the United sia ) 4
Furnée is now retired and ae
formerly in charge of the if
Country Club, New Jersey, New
York. He is here for an inde-
finite stay and is thoroughly en-
joying his holiday.

alive the interest of flower grow-
ing and propigate the knowledge

horticulture throughout the
Island.



| TO-DAY 4.45 & 8.30 P.M.
AND CONTINUING DAILY 4.45 & 8.30

AT EMP IR E
one mistake...

seen by his son...







‘









TO-DAY 4.45 7 ie and continuing TO-DAY 445 @ 8.15 ana continaing |
al
Columbia Fictures Presents Baraincunt Preesnis }












; NOODLUM EMPIRE | : proper-
\ Starrin
e { Jon HALL- ai aa FERRADAY Action ., Thrills .. Suspense tip sir. wily | ties of YEAST-PHOS will | unleashes the
| Toke WEDNESDAY MONDAY & ‘Twesdax B80 4 818 | ae restore lost energy and will greatest
‘ _ * ~ . 4.30 & &. a louble } fit!
CLUB MORGAN Famous Steak Dinner $3.00 i} Anthony DEXTER: Bitanor PARKER Alen Bere BEANE IRELAND ” ‘Technicolor | ea you q drama "
‘ ‘ J ALENTINO ‘ our da
SUPPER $2.50 including A LIQUEUR venand DRERAT OF 2908 MEN sunray EE, YEAST-PHOS ¥
| SATURDAY'S HERO, RODEO KING ho Tax sENoniTs ||| ES San De eee cee ae GENERAL TONIC ee
tarring arring EXTRA: j a -
John DEREK — Dona REED Rex ALLEN — Leela DROME — Bove ESD Jl Bez ALLEN — Ray BANCROF BANCROFT ; -
o es 2 Reel Short:—ISLE OF TABU saree COLUMBIA PICTURES presents
- LL LPESPSELVLPE CLP OPT ERPCSISOSPL ONIONS ot STANLEY KRAMER’S Production of



1 colangninlananioomaemintabeamehbnasestee rites PIPE

TO THE

“ RACES
MINDED ”

LADIES

OF OUR
LOCAL
COMMUNITY

N.E. WILSON & (0, SAYS:—

Right on the spot, and just in the ‘nick of time’
for the approaching

“SPORT OF KINGS”

COLONY CLUB

ANOTHER BARBECUE

BIENVENIDA CORDIAL A BARBADOS

\
Les invitamos a Vds. para visitar nuestro almacen

Fredric March

with Mildred Dunnock

SATURDAY, AUGUST
9TH j
RESERVE YOUR
TABLE EARLY



? a
; vetoes Op nly
Winner Pulitzer Prize— —
Critics Circle Award—
and Worldwide Honors

1 AT
Extra: Short: “PUNCHY DE LION”
2 Ang Latest News Reel

A Cycle for Health & Happinesd

e
HOME COOKING

WEST INDIAN COOKERY DIET DOES IT
‘Delicious Recipes for Tempting Meats”

ROBERTS & CQ.

an Walter Fried + Owected by LASLO =



=

PARA DAMAS

Materiales de Vestidos y Vestidos hechos de Hilo, Seda y Nylon
Ropa Interior de Seda y Nylon

Trajes de Bano de “Lastex”, Hilo Pintado y Lana.

Panuelos de



Cabeza con el mapa de Barbados, y Mantillas.

f A NUESTROS AMIGOS VENEZOLANOS!

PARA CABALLEROS



Camisas “Arrow” Pijamas, y Camisas de Hilo “Sea Island”.
Trajes de Bano, Ropa Interior, y Calcetines Corbatas, etc.

TAMBIEN

Toallas, Sobre Camas, Sabanas, Manteles, Maletas ete.

SELSO. SSESSSSOO



“Royal Doulton”,

Juguetes, y Recuerdos de la Isla.

“Your Stationers.’’ Dial 3301.















So, Hurry On Now to .%, @ CHILDREN’S ANKLETS ... ... 80, 32 & 46 CENTS

Vajilla Plateada, Figuras de la mejor Loza Inglesa ?
is that all-important item for which you were 8
waiting to complete your Bank Holiday Ensemble, ¥
Distribuidores Exclusivos the incomparable : IN STOCK a
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para BALLERINAS 3:

ae . An Assortment of =«-
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SUNDAY, AUGUST 3,



At The Cinema

WAR IN

1952

KOREA

Hy G. &

WAR STILL SEEMS to be a favourite theme for film

producers, and though one

constantly hears voices raised

GARDENING HINTS
FOR AMATEURS

Rainy Days

During the rainy months—and
the rains seem to have started in
earnest—little can be dome in the
garden on showery days.

Often it will be too wet to do

in a chorus, that audiences are tired of this subject, the anything at all, so the few sunny
films still keep coming and the people still go to see them.
Of course, every now and then, we get a war picture whose

Superior qualities set it apart from the rank and file of its are

predecessors.
Bridgetown.

is plenty of humour bandied amongst the men.

call it strong fare, with very little to lighten it.

As far as the goes, it

, began with the invasion of South
Korea and has not ended yet. One
is thrust into the midst of the
horror, desolation and destruction
of the Korean battle scene, where
an infantry sergeant, saved by hie

» steel helmet, is the sole survivor of
his outfit. Joined by a small
South Korean boy, he encounters

the remnants of a “lost platoon,

takes charge of them, and from a
Korean Temple, they fight a des-
perate rearguard action.

There are no punches pulled in,

this picture and the combination of
excellent direction and action make
‘this aewholly realistic and terrify-
ing. war drama. The group of
men include the sergeant, a
chieken-hearted lieutenant, a
Japanese-American soldier, an ex-
conscientious objector, the young
Korean boy, a Negro Red Cross
Medic., and later, a captured North
Korean major, whois without
doubt, a most insidiously, malig-
nant character. Trying to stir ap
trouble among the men, whose
nerves are at breaking point, he
taunts the Negro, who is dressing
his wound, with the racial dis-
crimination practised in his coun-
try and tells him to get wise to
himself. The reply struck me as
peculiarly telling. “One hundred
years ago, I couldn't ride on a
street car. Fifty years ago, I could
ride in the back. Now I can ride
in the middle. Fifty years from
now I may be able to ride in the
front. There are some things you
just can’t rush.”

All the characterizations are
sharply defined and one gets the

impression that these men are
no mere actors, but part and
parcel of the Korean scene. Top

“honours go to Gene Evans—a
newcomer to watch closely—for his
portrayal of the rough, callous and



VERA ELLEN



—

FRED

ASTAIRE

brutal sergeant, who, when his
feelings are touched, as they are
when the Korean child is killed,
machine-guns the taunting cap-
tured major in a shocking out-
burst of emotion. Next to him, I
would choose James Edwards, the
Negro Red Cross soldier. Mr.
Edwards is a most gifted actor, and
has a quiet dignity that is very
evident in all his roles—viz; his
recent one as the blind soldier in
“Bright Victory’—and he plays
his present role with feeling and
conviction. Neither does he
neglect another side of the char-
acter, when active participation in
the war is necessary and he han-
dies a machine gun instead of:a
hypodermic syringe. Steve Brodie,
James Hutton and Richard Koo
also give fine veteran performances
in their individual roles,

Action there is a plenty, and the
terse dialogue and sparing use of
musical background heighten the
dramatic impact of this tense,
timely story of a grim battle for
survival,

The Belle Of New York

For a
and complete contrast to the two
Plaza offerings, the Globe is show-
ing THE BELLE OF NEW YORK
with Fred Astaire, Vera-Ellen and
Marjovie Maine in a gay ’90’s
musical, It is based on the play by
Hugh Morton which was ‘set to
music by Gustave Kerker and was
a highly successful musical com-
edy in the days of our parents.
Unfortunately, it has been chopped
and changed to such an extent
that apart from the title, a mission-
worker heroine and a society play-
boy hero, any resemblance to the
original is purely accidental! It
is now a vehicle for the terpsi-
chorean talents of Astaire and
Ellen and as such it has its mo-
ments, It opens and closes with a
rousing chorus taken from the title
and there is another song called, I
think, “Naughty, But Nice” or
words to that effect, that is sung
by Vera-Ellen, that struck me as
attractive, but I’m afraid I don’t
even remember the rest of the
music. The two stars are individ-
ually and asa team ible
for carrying out the frail and dia-
phanous plot that concerns a
Philandering play-boy who re-
forms temporarily when he falls
in love with a mission worker.
She, in turn, tries “high life” to
meet him half way, and they
Ben decide they can make a go
ol -

Fred Astaire, who has defied all



light-hearted diversion I

days in between must not be
wasted, but must be used to pull
up weeds, cut grass and, if they
dry enough, to fork and re-

Such a film is STEEL HELMET at the Plaza shape the beds which are apt to
This is no light entertainment, though there
I would

get flattened by heavy rain.

Lawns especially soom get out
of hand in this weather, and how
quickly grass grows and weeds
spread! When digging out this
weed or tufts of bad grass, have a
bucket of mould near by with
which to refill the bare patches.
{f this is done at once, less injury
will result to the lawn and the
good grass will cover the
quicker. Never mow the lawn
when the ground is soft or the
grass wet. The lawn-mower will
only cut up the ground, and the
wet grass will clog and dull the
machine.

To keep the lawn-mover in good
order it should never be put up
dirty. Gardeners will do this, and
then call for the oil-can when the
mower is next to be used. With
this sort of treatment a Lawn-
mower soon gets out of order with
blades dull, and bearings stiff.

Every time, after use, the Lawn-
mower should be wiped clean and
free from grass, thoroughly oiled
and then put away.

Poinsettias

August is the month that is
generally accepted as the right
time for cutting back the Single
Poinsettia. The double Poinset-
tias which were cut back in March,
are now several feet high and in
full leaf again. The single variety
{s cut later than the double, be-
cause it is a ‘hardier and quicker
growing plant, and so it does not
take as long to grow back as the
slower double kind.

Second Cut

Both Poinsettias are supposed
to be cut again in October. This
second cut is not as drastic as the
first, as each branch is just cut
back a couple of feet, The result
of this second cut is that each
branch then sends out two or
sometimes three branches in the
place of the one, and so
the flower heads are increased,

Now there is great diversity of
opinion among gardeners as
this second cut, Some do not
approve of it at all, and hold that
even if the flower heads are in-
creased they are not as fine or as
big as when the plant is left un-
cut. Others think that if the
second cut is done October is too

ate.

So the whole Poinsettia treat-
ment must be left to the wishes
and judgement of each gardener.
Those who have established Poin-
settias will have learnt by exper-
lence which treatment, for them,
gives the best results.

Chrysanthemums

Do not forget that the end of
August should see the last Chrys-
anthemum suckers safely planted
out, that is if the flowers are
wanted at Christmas time, Put
them in a rich but light bed in the
sun. As soon as they are all
planted out it is just as well to
look over the stakes and see that
you have enough and that they
are in good order. The suckers
grow fast, and as soon as they are
a couple of feet high the plants
should be staked and loosely tied
to the stake.



the laws of gravity by dancing
upside down, * this time uses the
roof-tops and literally walks on
air in the development of nis
romance. Vera-Ellen dances de-
lightfully, as usual, and I found
the most successful and attractive
sequence was the animation of a
series of Currier and Ives prints
that are colourful and nostalgic
in their appeal.

Marjorie Main, as Mr. Astaire’s
wealthy aunt creates a comic di-

@ On Page 16





“KEEP EM FLYING”

DANCE AT

CRANE HOTEL
SAT. 30th August

TO THE TUNES OF

“KEITH CAMPBELL”
“SOCIETY SIX”

and HIS
and

THE

“THE JUMPING JACKS STEEL BAND"

featuring our own

nive of the CARIBBEAN PAUL WILK. INS

“A FREE 15 MINUTE FLIGHT
IN “BIM” TO













SUNDAY ADVOCATE





FARM AND GARDEN

iy
MANGO

Agricola

LORE

BROWSING through a miscellaneous collection o!
ald clippings, we came across this story, published some

years ago in the ‘Porto Rico Horticulturist’.
season is now in full swing and may be of interest to}

those looking for a tidy

fibrous specimens of this popular fruit.

unknown.



—_—

BBC. Radio Notes:

European

Survey

Weekly BBC Series of Talks
Now

talks
Survey



that the recent series of
from London -- African
has come to an end the
B.BC, will begin, on Monday
next, 4th August, a new series
entitled ‘European Survey.’ Until
the end of the year

and Western halves of the Europ-
ean continent will describe the
European scene today, and eval-
vate the many factors which are
influencing its role in world
affairs. J. H, Huizinga, the Lon-
don correspondent of a leading
Dutch newspaper published in
Rotterdam, gives the first of four
telks. Mr. Huizinga, who was
born in Holland but lived in
Britain for most of the past sixteen
years, has recently completed
four-mouth tour of Western Eu-
rope. These talks will be given
each Monday beginning at 8.30
p.m,
TALKS ON CENTRAL ASIA

Another series of talks which
begins in the coming week is
‘Spotlight on Central Asia.” The

talks will cover Siberia, Mongolia,
Turkestan and Afghanistan, ana
will be given on Sundays at 8.30
pm, The first talk is by Fitzroy
MacLean, M.P., the widely trav-
elled author of several books on
Asia, including ‘Eastern Ap-
proaches’.

THE SOVEREIGN’S DAY

Yet another talks series begins
in the coming week—“A Day in
the Life of the Sovereign’’—in
which listeners will be given a
glimpse into the lives of some of
the peopte who occupy impertant
and interesting positions in the life
of the . British community. The
first talk on the Sovereign is given
by Sir Owen Morehead, who as
Assistant Keeper of the Royal
Archives and Librarian of Windsor
Castle since 1926 has served two
Kings, George V and George VI,
as well as the present Queen
Elizabeth II. Sir Owen is a
Knight Commander of the Victori-
an Order, an honour bestowed for
personal service to the Crown. 4is
talk, and the succeeding ones, will
be heard on Thursdays at 10.15
p.m,, the first being on the 7th
August.

THE WEEK’S MUSIC

Excerpts from the current
Promenade Concerts will be heard
throughout the coming week, The
broadeasta@ at the most convenient
time for Meyers in this area are
on Sunday at 9.00 p.m. and on
Tuesday at 5.15 p.m, The first will
be a programme of Sibelius's music
—Storm Scene from The Tempest
and his Violin Concerto in D minor
—played by the London Symphony
Orchestra conducted by Basil
Cameron with Max Rostal as the
solo violin; Monday's broadcast
wil also be by the Lon-
don Symphony Orchestra under
the same conductor and will

present Prokofiev’s ‘Peter and
the Wolf? and Tchaikovsky’s
Capriccio Italien.’ Both will

be in the 25 metre band, the Sun-
day broadcast also being trans-
mitted in the 31 metre band and
Monday’s in the 19 metre band.
Each lasts for three quarters of
an hour.

George Orwell’s ‘Animal Farm’
will be presented as a Radio play
on Saturday 9th August, starting
at 8.30 p.m,

Truly delightful

GLASSWARE for

every occasion.

Our new stock
includes. Flowered
Jugs and Tumblers,
Cake Plates,
Sandwich Plates and
Fruit Bowls






speakers with ~
personal knowledge of the Eastern ~

The mango

method of dealing with the
The author is

“Qn® day 1 was asked to dine
et the house of a Mexican gen-
tleman, When I arrived at the
home of my host I found him, his
wife, married daughter, and grown
son and an American guest. We
went into the dining reom. Every-
thing passed off , well until we
came to the dessert. Then a dish of
mangoes was brought in. Did you
ever eat a mango? No? Then your
education js still defective. Wit
& mango I was given a furk wits
three tines, the middle one. abou,
twice as long as the other two, Doi
Carlos, my host, told me how t
pierce the fruit at one end so tha
the long tine would penetrate tht
seed at the one point where it can
be pierced. Then when the frui
thus impaled it is peeled,
drove the tine of my ferk seeming
ly to the vital spot, then tried to
remove the skin as I saw the oth
ers ck Just as I was gatherm
speed the mango flew off the ivr}
caromed against the sideboard
and landed in the grey silk lap
of the senora, my hostess. |
apologised profusely and the
mango was restored to me, Dur-
ing my second attempt the thing
struck the American in the right
right eye and then made a para-
bolic curve and fell into the patio
1 started with another mango an
this time finished the peeling sue~
cessfully.”

“About me, the ot) e eat-
ing their mangoes gnifies
ease, the fruit poised gracefully

on the forks, while they nibblec
about the suburbs of the pit. !
prepared to do likewise, I clos«
my teeth firmly on the yell
meat. It had a pleasant turpen-
tiny flavour, but when I tried t
disengage my bite from surrougd-
ing pulp I found that the fruit Was
held together by hundreds of
fibres. In my mad efforts to
break these threads with my
teeth my face became glazed with
a thin coating of mango. My sec-
ond bite was a repetition of the
first, and this time both ears were
filled with the pulp and one eye
was entirely closed. J wondered
if one could absorb his mango
through the pores of the skin, but
I attacked the fruit.for the third
time. On this occasien there was
general breaking loose of the pulp
from the seed, The juice dripped
from my chin in rivulets and
sparkled on my shirt bosom like
many topazes,.”

“IT threw away my fork and
took the mango resolutely in both
hands. I was oblivious to every-

thing but the determination f
conquer that mango, The sticky
juice ran up my sleeves as I

gnawed at the pit as a dog gnaws
at a bone.”

“1 finished the mango amid a
profound — silence. Then as I

looked up, all adrip and shining
mango juice, my Mexican

with é
friends, began talking in a_ polit«

but feverish way. But the Ameri-

ean kieked me under the table

and said in a stage whisper: ‘now

excuse yourself and take a bath.’|?

“If you ever go where there
pre mangoes, begin in private by
eating half a bushel of them. Put

on a mackintosh, a pair of rubber
boots and goggles. Then get 4
clamp to hold the mango to the
table while you gnaw.”

We think the small boys’ methoc
of dealing with these stringy buy

palatable sorts much more simple |‘

and efficient: soften the fruit
thoroughly and ingest the juice
direct through an aperture cor
veniently made at the poinied

end. Gardeners and others with
mango eating scruples should ask
the Agriculture Department to
top-work their seedlings with
Julie, Bombay, D’or or other
available select variejy with no
menipulatory problems,

in many designs,

colours and sizes.

We have plain Glassware,
too, and Glasses for
Champagne, Sherry and

A Wine




























































WORNOUT
aad Fined

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Pe

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omes ¢ with poisons
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THREE

PAGE



és Ue i ,
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BOTTLE of Lea & |






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PAGE FOUR



ALL OVER THE WORLD |



Good: mornings begin. witli Gillette

The up-to-date Chief cried “ Now mind what I say,

Here’s how to shave in the easiest way.

Use a Blue Gillette Blade —sharpest edge you can get
In a precision-made razor designed by Gillette.”



5 Blades 30.

Blue Gillette Blades












eect binsneiesacisaitinsieenl

Class of Business

Life Assurances:



TRADE ENQUIRIES TO;

THE STANDARD LIFE ASSURANCE (0.

Established 1825



EW business figures to 30th May, 1952 are given below,
with comparative figures for last year :—



Wise men turn gratefully to
Blue Gillette Blades, sharpest
ever honed. Special toughening
makes Blue Gillette Blades last
longer and save money. To
get the best out of a Blue
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are made for each other.



T.

1952 1951

Sum Assured | Sum Assured



Sum _ Assured Bum Assured









Ordinary .. & i‘ ,£11,814,954 £ 8,268,237
Group a sae ma 8,189,336 | 4,181,010
Total. £19,504,290 |” © 12,449,247
Deferred Annuities: __ber annum li per annum
Ordinary £172,259 | £202,503
Group 3,630,651 2,619,679
Total eit £ 3,802,910 £ 2,822,272
Immediate Annuities £47,075 | £56,015
« »

The Annual General Meeting was held on 25th March,

when the results of another year of solid achievement wero

GEDDES GRANT LIMITED

5 i aise htelaialbaai _ cea li _



reported to the members of the Company, The most striking










over 4%.



features of the report were the increase in the total funds to
over £98,000,000, the expense ratio of 9.3%, the lowest in the
history of the Company, the record volume of new business

and the further increase in the net rate of interest earned to

For full particulars of Yields per cent for Annuities, and
Estimates for Staff Pension Schemes, etc., please apply to:—

Wilkinson & Haynes Co., Ltd.

AGENTS,
Lower Broad Street.

“We wish to advise our customers
that our Workshop Department will be
closed from Tuesday 5th August to
Monday 18th August, 1952, both days

inclusive, in order to give our Work-

shop Staff their Annual vacation. There

will be a small relief staff on duty for

any emergencies.

Our Office, Parts

Department and Petrol Station will be

open as usual,”

e

ECKSTEIN BROTHERS

BAY STREET

DIAL 4269

iS

} *
%
>
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&.
%
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bis

x
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PPSE

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656 6h 9b 66 bf OOOO LOLOL OOD
POE

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z $4,6,666600+
LPSOSEOSD PPP PP OTST

W.l. BOARD CONFIRM

INDIAN TOUR
No Captain, No Pros.

BY O. S. COPPIN

eon Indian tour is now a réality as far
. ‘as confirmation 6 dates and itinerary
from official West Indian cricket sources is
toncerned
They are due to arrive in Barbados
January 21 after having played a colony
fixture and the First Test at Trinidad.
There are several points about this tour
which I shall take up in the course of these
articles from time to time but to-day I want
to deal particularly with the paragraph of the official release
from the West Indies Board under reference which states “No
replies have as yet been received from the seven West Indies
professionals by the West Indies Cricket Board of Control.”
A LEGACY ’
HERE has been a legacy of autocracy not unmixed with a
snobbery peculiar to the West Indies, in the negotiations
of the West Indies Cricket Board of Control with the profes-
sionals for their services and had it not been for the far-
sightedness and tact of one of the older members of the Board
there would have been a complete breakdown in friendly re-
lations between the W.I.C.B. of C. and the professionals a
long time ago.

Let us face facts. Who are the professionals?
Frank Worrell, Clyde Walcott,
Ramadhin, Roy Marshall, Frank King and Ken Rickards,
There is no need for.me to enumerate the individual feats
performed by these men that have served both singly and col-
lectively to place the West Indies prominently on the Inter-
national cricket map.

GENERAL AGREEMENT

N the circumstances it will be generally agreed that they

deserve nothing but the best treatment at the hands of
the Board. What do we find? I can vouch for the fact that
on two previous occasions an arbitrary sum was offered the
professionals for their services which it was suggested that
they take or leave.

The figure set out appeared to me to have been computed
not with regard to exigencies of the circumstances under which
the tours were to take place nor did it seem to give considera-
tion to the fact that the professionals earn their living by
playing cricket. If they do not play cricket they do not
eat and eating is important.

Common sense prevailed and an amicable agreement was
made because of the efforts of one member of the Board who
did not think he was another edition of Herr Hitler,

FANTASTIC
HAVE already drawn attention to the fantastic idea ex-
pressed by the new Board in which they claimed that
they were working on a theory by which they would pay all
members of West Indies teams a bonus and make no distinc-
tion between professionals and amateurs,

When this idea was mooted I commended it in principle
but stated definitely that I could not see how the proposal
could be implemented in time for the Indian tour since it
would take a few years before we were able to effect that
important change in our financial economy.

I elaborated to the extent that this was obviously adopting
a principle followed by Australia, I recalled that the mem-
bers of the victorious 1948 Australian team to England were
paid a bonus of £800 each in addition to expenses and a week-
ly allowance, from Sir Donald Bradman, down to Neils Harvey
the youngest member of the tearm included.

IMPOSSIBLE FOR ALL
THOHE West Indies professionals were paid roughly £700 in
round figures for their tours to England and Australia.
It is impossible to pay every member of the West Indies team
anything even in the vicinity of £300 each.

I am most reluctant to believe that this pay-all-same
seheme is not being put into practice nor have the professionals
been offered somé paltry arbitrary fee entirely out of propor-
tion to what they are really worth to the West Indies in this
tour or to what might be reasonably worthwhile to them for
making the trip.

NO “POUND OF FLESH”

KNOW sufficient of the professionals personally to vouch

for the fact that they are not unmindful of the fact that
West Indies cricket was the vehicle by which they entered
the professional ranks at a level at which they could demand
a living wage. This being the case they will certainly not
stick out for their “pound of flesh” but certainly they are
entitled to a fee proportionate to their usefulness as players
and as drawing-cards at the games.









Yet

They are
Everton Weekes, Sonny



Let the West Indies Cricket Board of Control make no
mistake about the matter. If the key professionals, are not
included in the West Indies team they can immediately say
goodbye to the greater part of the $150,000 which they are
planning to spend on the tour,

NO CAPTAIN APPOINTED

NOTHER matter that has greatly exercised my mind is

another paragraph of the release that states that Jamaica

will play British Guiana a series of the regular post-wat
Quadrangular Intercolonial games beginning in British Guiana
on October 10 and that the West Indies Selectors and the West
Indies captain—not yet selected—are expected to witness these
games.
’ It is strange that the West Indies captain has not been
selected. One would have thought it to be the intelligent
thing to do to have appointed the West Indies captain months
ago so that he could start. upon a_ plan to discover new
talent even if only in his own particular territory.

What is more I think it is a positive lapse in good taste
to appoint a West Indies captain then leave him with but a
few weeks to prepare for a trip to British Guiana and then
an Indian tour soon after.

DISAPPOINTMENT :
HAD hoped that the newly appointed Board would display
some sense of initiative, disseminate appropriate informa-
tion relating to West Indian cricket and on the main obviate
most of the criticisms that were levelled at the old Board.

They have not succeeded in convincing a large section of
the West Indies cricket public that they are actively concerned
with unearthing prospective West Indies talent for the forth-
coming tour, since no official scheme has yet been launched.

THEY HAVE NOT SUCCEEDED

FMHEY have not succeeded in convincing us that they plan

to offer the public more information on West Indian
cricket matters—Who will be captain? What are the terms
that have been offered the Professionals, so that the public
can judge themselves?) Why has not the report of the Man-
ager of the last West Indies tour to Australia not yet released
to member Associations? i

All these and other questions need still_to be answered
and should have been answered long ago. There was much
shouting and rejoicing in certain cricket quarters when the
new Board was elected. After these months have passed since
the election I see nothing yet in their behaviour to prompt
most of the remainder of the West Indian cricket audience to
join in the hysterics.



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SUNDAY

off



ADVOCATE

Bright Light

=|

Wins Derby

At Summer Meet

Min. CYRIL BARNARD'S three year old filly Bright
Light out of Burning Bow-Felicitas won the Barbados
Derby from a field of four as the B.T.C. four-day Summer
Meeting got underway at the Garrison Savannah yester-

day.

The filly, piloted by Jockey Sonny Holder, led the
field for the entire event to win comfortably from First
Admiral by two lengths and return the time of 1.58? secs.

This was 14s secs. slower

The
tended

large crowd
saw. some

which at-
1 keen racing
during which Miss K, C. Haw.
kins’ four-year-old filly Miracle
7 the Planters’ Stakes, equalled

e record of 1.08 1/5 sees. s
Dulecibella in 1950, ; oe

Jockey Lutchman ended the day
as the most successful jockey
with two wins to his credit,

The Fieid Sweep reached the
$600.00 mark on one occasion and
the $500.00 mark five times. The
Pari-Mutuel paid its highest divi-
dend of $21.06 on Pepper Wine
in the Stafford Stakes while the
Forecast brought $80.64 -to the
lucky punters of Landmark and
Belle Surprise in the Stewards’
Stakes,

The Police Band under Capt.
C. E. Raison was in attendance
and rendered some lovely airs
during the afternoon,

The Meeting continues to-mor-
row:

FIRST DAY

FIRST RACE

Summer Stakes
Eleven horses took part in this
event which was run over 5%
furlongs. The field got off to a
800d start with Aim Low piloted



by Frank O’Neil in the lead, fol-
lowed by Devil’s Symphony
(Crossley up) and Darham Jane
(Joseph) and The Thing (New-
man),

O’Neil kept Aim Low to the
fore and was still leading when
the field reached the three furlong
pole. At

this stage, Magic. Gaye
ridden by

Johnny Belle came
into the picture and was soon
second. There were some ex-
changes by the two furlong but
O’Neil still had Aim Low
premier

] in the
position,

The field bunched coming
around the bend and up the home
stretch Magic Gaye made a serious
bid to overtake Aim Low but only
drew level. Abu Ali after mak.
ing a challenge up the home
Stretch was third a head behind
Aim Low and Magie Gaye. who
had tied for first place,



SECOND RACE
Planters’ Stakes



This was another 5% furlong
event in which there was a field
of eight to test the starter’s
patience,

After a fairly good start Mira-
cle (Pat Fletcher up) took the
lead followed by March Winds,
Cardinal and Caprice with
Soprano bringing up the rear.

The field strung out in Indian
file as it raced towards the. three
furlong pole. Miracle, however,
was still in the lead and main-
tained this position throughout
the event making every pole a
winning one. March Winds made
a good effort to draw level as the
field came around the bend but
Miracle with Fletcher in the sad.
dle shook off the gelding and
eventually raced up the home
stretch a comfortable winner by



than the record set by Best

Wishes also out of Burning Bow-Felicitas, in 1951.

The company string out’‘as they
went into the straight on the far
side, and around the turn by the
9 furlong gate, there were quick
exchanges tor positions,

Land Mark and Belle Surprise
moved. on the outside, and took
over from Lunways at the 7
furlong pole, Land Mark main-
tained her lead to finish a length
ahead of Belle Surprise who was
1} lengths away from Lunways
who finished third. ‘

FOURTH RACE
Barbados Derby Stakes
and Cup





Cardinal and Dunquerque hay-
ing been scratched the field was
reduced to four that comprised
Bright Light, the favourite,
Rambler Rose, First Admiral and
Seedling.

No time was lost at the gates
and they were well away. Holder
who had drawn the outside posi-
tion quickly hustled Bright Light
to the front and was leading on
the rails.

brignt Light was strongly chal-
lenged by Rambler Rose when
they passed the Stands for the
first time and when they reached
the five and a half furlong mark
this pair was leading Seedling in
the third place by three lengths
while First Admiral trailed b:-
bind,

They bunched in approaching
the Hastings Stretch but going up
the hill Holder again sent Bright
Light away from the field.

On turning the stretch for home
there was a rapid changing of po-
sitions but Holder still kept the
bay filly comfortably on the rails
in front.

Now First Admiral challenged
and passed first Seedling and then
Rambler Rose. A final effort to
arrest the premier position from
Bright Light failed however, and
Holder piloted her home an easy
winner by two lengths while First
Admiral beat Rambler Rose by
one length for the second place.

Bright Light’s time of 1.583/5
was only 11/5 secs behind the
1951 record time of 1.572/5 set
by Best Wishes.



FIFTH RACE
North Gate Handicap



The entire field got off to a good
start in this event, the second 74
for the day. There were only
five horses — Doldrum, Dashing

Princess, Embers, Flieuxce and
Careful Annie.
As they passed the stands for

the first time,
Dashing Princess (Lutchman) in
the lead closely followed by
Embers (Crossley) and Flieuxce
(Wilder).

Dashing Princess and Embers
moved away from the field but
Flieuxce closed the gap by the
three furlong pole. Racing to the
four furlong, Flieuxce made. a
challenge and had soon overtaken
Embers, Lutchman however had

still in the lead.

two lengths ahead of March There was a ding dong tussle

Winds. Cardinal was third four coming around the bend and as

lengths behind March Winds. the field entered the straight

Flieuxce made a serious bid

for the premier position but

THIRD RACE ; : :

= | Lutchman still kept Dash: Prin-

Stewards’ Stakes R ts

cess to the fore to win by haif

the order wird

caught up with and passed Cot-
tage at the two furlong pole. He
finished third, five lengths away

; ; from Sea Foam who was second
Dashing Princess on the rails and ,

SUNDAY, 1952

RACING NOTES

By BEN BATTLE

AUGUST 3,

4

THE first day’s racing of the August meeting. has brought
with it its usual crop of thrills, surprises and disillusionments.
Most of us are, I suspect, poorer men, all of us are wiser men,
but none of us are, I hope, really sadder men, unless that is,
we put our pocket before our enjoyment of some really first
class racing. 5

For that was what it was as nobody who saw it can deny.
From the first race to the last, marred only by the rather
farcical start of the G Class, we saw nothing but really interest.
ing and enjoyable racing in which the element of surprise
was never lacking, Indeed the first Race set the tempo, for
it resulted in a finish as spectacular as the most captious
could have wished. No fewer than six horses came tumbling
down on the Judges together, and if the latter failed to separ-
ate the first two, I for one do not blame them. Personally, I
thought that Magic Gaye just got home, but it was a desper- |
ately close thing. Indeed the whole Race was hotly contesteds~*
From the time the gates flew and Aim Low -tooky.command
there was incident aplenty. First we saw Devils Symphony ~ <
prominent, then The Thing caused her backers, to roar, ~but--.]
hardly had she got on terms than Trimbrook appeared, rush” 5
ing round the field on the outside, But Magic Gaye was‘ the:
best of them ana from the time they turned into-the-straight~~
it was clear that she was going to be concerned with the finish.
In the end a dead heat was the verdict with Abu Ali who had
never been far away finishing third. Devils Symphony.was...
fourth and there can be no doubt that her turn and that of
Abu Ali will soon come. Cantaquisine pulled in very lame
having been bumped early on and sustaining an injury behind.




IN BEST FORM

.
The second race found Miracle in her best form, and just
how good this is she plainly showed by her time which was 1/5
of a second faster than that of the imported horses. She was
trailed home by March Winds who ran well, and Cardinal,
the latter clearly feeling the effects of his interrupted prepara-
tion, Mention should also be made of the running of Caprice
who showed her best form to date and may be heard from later.
The Steward’s Stakes produced a brilliant race indeed. After
Pepper Wine and Harroween had made the early pace, we
saw a challenge by the lightly weighted Belle Surprise and by
Lunways. No sooner did they appear to have the issue between
them, than the cry was Landmark! and Mr. Chase’s grand
stayer swept down on them in a way which made the final
result obvious. Red Cheeks was away slowly and forced to come
on the outside did well to be fourth. The time 1.32 4/5 was
excellent considering the condition of the track.

From the point of view of a spectacle the Derby must have
been regarded as a disappointment. But if we look on it as
the vindication of a good, perhaps a great, Creole Mare, then
we can have no complaints. Bright Light beat them pointless,
and there is no doubt that had she been at any time seriously
threatened her time could have been much better. First
Admiral showed how unwise it is to base our conclusions
purely on exercise form,

The Northgate Stakes was chiefly remarkable in that
Flieuxce was able to get so close to Dashing Princess, The
time was moderate and it is doubtful if any of the quintet is
outstanding.

WRETCHED START

The Oistin Stakes was marred by a wretched start which -
left the favourite Gavotte as well as Blue Diamond at the post,
and so provided the moderate Joan’s Star with an opportunity
of which she took full advantage. Gavotte, left nearly a fur-
long, did wonderfully well to be third. Mr. Gill’s Sea Foam,
on whom Lutchman was naturally reluctant to ride his hardest
finish, ran an exemplary race for a two-year-old, and should
benefit from his experience on Monday.

In the Trafalgar Stakes Mary Anne, whose form is so
difficult to assess, ran disappointingly, although not blessed
with the best of racing luck, In her absence Top Flight
just squeaked home from that old reprobate Colleton who gave
conventional Forecast Players an awful shock.

In the best traditions, however, the really good wine was
kept for the last — the pun in unintentional. The Stafford
Stakes saw a sight to which we have become, in recent years,
somewhat unaccustomed — a good creole showing the way
to a strong field of imported horses. The_start again was not
very satisfactory and although the two who were left—Castle
in the Air and Flying Dragon—were both the chief offenders,
I felt that they were dealt with a trifle summarily. Sweet
Rocket soon overcame the disadvantage of the draw and took
the lead closely followed by Demure, Between the two and the
three Spear Grass made a good run, but nothing could with-
stand Pepperwine when Edgar Crossley turned her loose in
the straight, The excellence of her performance was under-
lined by her time of 1.07—the best for the day, and although
I had neither tipped her nor backed her I went home in a
real glow of satisfaction at her success,



sull kept the premier position.
Entering the straight for home
it was still Top Flight who caught
the Judge’s eyes first a head in









length behind Joan’s Stay, front of Colleton. Mary Ann was
(Yvonet up). third half of a length behind
Colleton, cad 3 a
SEVENTH RACE ;
Trafalgar Stakes EIGHTH RACE
Stafford Stakes
Two were scratched in this
event, a seven and a half for Lunways and Careful Annie



a length. Doldrum who had made

¢. te.
DS AMMLLM MSS LLLP PLL LSPS 0

$54,666 6666660685
OSOPOSS POPES FFF OSS SF S

With Firelady scratched, ten
horses faced the Starter in this
event Over 74 furlongs for en-
trants classified “A” and “B”,

The entrants comprised such
veterans as Pepper Wine, carry-
ing 2 lbs, overweight, Rebate,
Harroween and Notonite among
others.

After a few minutes of restless-
ness at the Gate, the horses moved
up in line and the gate flew, but
Flying Dragon, Wilder up, was left
standing there,

The other nine were off
good start, and going past the
judges for the first time, it was
Pepper Wine, followed closely by
Harroween, with Red Cheeks lying
third on the rail.

to a

a determined effort coming up the

home stretch, was third a head

behind Flieuxce.



SIXTH RACE
Oistin Stakes



Meerschaum and Twinkle were
scratched, and Joan’s Star, Sea
Foam (carrying an overweight of
17 lbs.), Blue Diamond, Gavotte
and Cottage faced the starter.

The event, over 5% furlongs
for horses classified “G” and
“G2” was off to a bad start with
Blue Diamond and Gavotte left
far behind the other three.

Despite a lead of about 40 yards,
Wilder hustled Gavotte who



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horses classified “G’’ and Lower,
leaving a field of five. As soon
as the gates flew Lutchman
hustled Top Flight to the fore and
when they passed the stands for
the first time was still in that
position with Mary Ann (Yvone!)
and Colleton (Joseph) running
in the second and third positions
respectively,

Joseph’ began to move up with
Colleton and when they passed the
five furlong pole, was already
lying in the second position. The
field raced past the four furlong
pole with Top Flight still in the
lead closely followed by Colleton.

Mary Ann and Cross Bow tried
to position themselves on nearing
the two furlong but Top Flight



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being scratched, ten horses came
under the starter’s orders,

The event over 5% furlongs,
was for Class “B” and Lower.
Flying Dragon, left at the gate
earlier in the day, and Castle In
The Air were left at the gate,
but nevertheless the remainder of
the field got off to a good start.

With one trailer, the company
bunched beautifully as they raced
down the far stretch and up the
back stretch coming on to the two
furlong pole,

Coming into the home stretch,
Crossley pushed Pepper Wine to
the fore and maintained _ this
position to beat Sweet Rocke’,
(Lutchman up), by a length and
a half. Mrs. Bear was third a

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SUNDAY, AUGUST 3, 1952

RACING RESULTS

AT GARRISON SAVANNAH, SATURDAY, AUGUST 2, 1952
WEATHER : Fine TRACK : Firm

a
lst Race : SUMMER STAKES—Class C and C2 (Maidens) —$900



SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAGE FIVE

Results Of 27- *%°° NO. 235 | (/- etnan pau °y
Field Sweep | The Topic | = PAIN

FIRST DAY oO f

Last Week |













($306, $150, $50)—54¢ Furlongs Prise Ticket No Arcoent

were og sa18.36

1. (MAGIC GAYE .... 121 me. Mr. M. E. R. Bourne, Jockey Belle Third od n18. 76

(AIM LOW ...... ~ Dr. H. M. Weaver. doomny O'Neil. Fourth o1z9 39.37 |

3. “ABU-ALD 24 lbs. Mr. F. E. C. Bethel. sia Sa fens|
Jockey Yvonet. Sevanth 1181 10.00 | |

ALSO RAN : Devil's Symphony (121 Ibs., Crossley); Test Match (124 cn os4s 10.06 |

Ibs., Wilder); Darham Jane (121 ts., Joseph); Racton (133 Ibs., Teath csp 10.88 |

Lutchman); Dim View (121 fs., P. Fletcher); Cantaquisine (130 oe 0131 10.04 |

55.00 each to holders of tickets Nos. |

O598, MON, O2R5, OT G2OT, O209, 0128.
6180

Ibs., Holder); The Thing (121 l%s., Newman); Trimbrook (121
* Tds., Quested).



TIME : 1.08% ae SECOND RACE , |
ee | Win : $9.86, $2.46. Place : $3.94, $1.86, $2.68. First “war Amount |

INISH : Close. Head. Third, ; 368.43 |
START : Good FORECAST : $27.48. pear vst “aR |
WINNER : Three-year-old grf. Magic Red-Ecilace Sixth euie Hy
TRAINERS : Mr. M. E. R, Bourne and Mr. S. Massiah, Fishin ines rss |



$5.09 each to holders of tickets Nas The famous threefold action of !

2716. 2718. 1998, con, 1766 1708, iass. |; HENSIC tablets RELIEVES

o_o
2nd Race : PLANTERS’ STAKES-~-@lass F and F2 Onty—3$800


















1288 | Joe went to St George Wednesday PAIN, SOOTHES NERVES. COU NTERACTS DEPRESSION
($265, $135, $40)—5% Furlongs exten uieie | Diceere he toe Noaeien ae hese | No matter how intense the pain, 1.0 matter how weary your nerves,
Mi Prize Tieket No agape: | But we have a place to spree how depressed you feel, PHENSIC tablets will bring you reliet and
i. Arges en lbs. ss .K. C, Hawkins. First 1932 2.84 | *
Jockey P. Fletcher. Socona pa She9-84 1) Come to our Social ‘Centre | comfort, quickly and safely. Remember this — PHENSIC tablets
2. MARCH WINDS .. 117 lbs. Mr. U. J. Parravicino. aomwl is 160.67 so-apeee neither harm the heart nor upset the stomach. Don’t accept
Jockey Quested. ith ooo ++ 88.88 Rehnaa ee substi ly of PHIENSIC tablets !
3. CARDINAL ...... 117 Ibs. Mr. J. W. Chandler. Sixth + Sone a ge ce eee ee, See + are wate a
Jockey Crossley. Seventh 2608 10.00 | YOU see these Social Cent
ALSO RAN : Viceroy (126 I6s., M. Browne); Caprice (114 Ibs., J. Ninth yok 19.60 | h giuee tr skie One telat
Belle); May Day (117 Ibs., Yvonet); Soprano (123 Ibs., O’Neil); Tenth seo ae 1 kee {
Betzam (133 tbs. ) 00 each to holders of tickets Nex |
, Newman). 151, 1988, 2257, W200 1619, 162, 2908, W plehee Gant challenge: %
TIME : 1.083. ex xD Sew ek obtener Weccere |
PARI-MUTUEL : Win : $4.10; Place : $1.10, $1.10, $1.06. FOURTH RACE Tivis Was a young man's view }
rare Pras e:2 First fe Amount) chonid operate tea nln FROM ayo ner ier yo PAINS,
: Fairly good. FINISH : Comfortable : 2 lengths, 4 lengths +e 101s $20.16 | Should operate by a plan » LUMB.GO,
WINNER ; Four-year.old b.f. Battle Front-Marshlight Third Sue oepas The aan nine for Cae \ HEADACHES, NEURALGIA, (nS 0FNZ4, SOLOS & CHILLS
ourth a} * .
TRAINER : Miss K. C. Hawkins. ' am ensh te hiatdere. of Rikete | The next night for the household | = ae
COACH BRUTUS HAMILTON tries to cc. sole Henry H. (asic S. takg yk SE, Cae, ene eR re | eee eos fori’ Debio
ree Olympic team, who broke into tears wh« Ai ¢ FUTH RACE | And som ills defeat Th ° e e
3rd Race : STEWARDS’ ST A & B Only 1,000 games. Laskan was a contestant in the 18,000-meter walking race Sone Ticket No Amount | | ht . un ering goo ra 10 ae
($365, $185, $60)—714 Furlongs Regulations demand that a certain hoel-and-toe stride be maintained. seeona : ant enna pena he
. nite nat Ratlinphoto Th ‘ ia| To save the home tif | oN ,
1 re See te Cee aeahee Basegh, anne Ser Save Sees Tee Uae” Sinternetienes ReWODNC!) roam isis al sr ctsnes: Coat
2. BELLE SURPRISE ee Tie sich: 6s Seale uc hae |
Y . ; S85. each to holders of tickets Nos ine of. the MAING peopie
. & awe ” +4 Fa +. 4.) se Lutchman. Rain Curtails Play Fable Tennis : o748, O70, 24t0, 2482. seas ‘M685, tats, | he black as well as, wit |
Jockey Newman. SIXTH RACE To make the wrong things right |

_ . -
In County Cricket zine Tekst No, Amount | nievve iA: iune. ‘autouen
Phillips Island’s °° saa Wee | ak word sosty.
a ips 8 PS phira a3 vere, And the Christ Church people

ase 167.84 al
fourth S482 ag.q7 | Are saying “it concerns me

LONDON, Aug. 2. Pitth 00389 0. |
Rain seriously interfered with A Class Champion $5.00 each to holders of tickets Now. The carpenters the masons

ALSO RAN : Pepper Wine (108 + 2 Ybs., Crossley); Notonite (121
lbs., P. Fletcher); Flying Dragon (106 + 3 Ibs., Wilder); Rebate
(123 Ibs., J, Belle); Harroween (123 Ibs., Quested), Slainte
(111 16s., Thirkell); Red Cheeks (113 tbs., O'Neil).

(From Ov Qwn Correspondent

iTS AMAzING/
STORM OVERHLAD
~ YET YOUR RADIO



; ae 4 sabes IT'S NOTA RADIO
TIME : 1.328. Bank Holiday cricket in most ae, ae EEN, Sate, Oe le, S| Cease heme peabaeme Freely (6 ABSOLUTELY CLEAR] SET AT ALL=iI S
PARI-MUTUEL : Win $16.18; Place : $3.32, $2.64, $3.94, parts of the country today. Only .RAWLE PHILLIPS defeated ’ Without a fire brigade WHAT SORT OF SET | ReOIFFUSION!
FORECAST : $10.64. a few hours were possible at es ys * me oe SEVENTH RACE ; aN * asnobrne, aT anyway! /eacn procRAMME

$ ‘g a 5 » * a on riday night to One preblen all's problen GOOP PR h Se ae ae “
oe : Good. FINISH : Easy; 1 length, 1% lengths. See Manehes- » come A Class Champion % the »/is ~~ ee Aasetes | Ne ie an diet annie. crcl ON THE RAMO tec me STE

INNER : Five-year-old ch.m. Pylon II-Esperance t > place : island. Gill was last year’s A s ‘cond 1 ew) eee ie comuaudity. SHALL HEAR om THE ST Iai
TRAINER : Mr. V. Chase. shine was at Swansea and there Class Champion. third on ‘zal ' a ue ensue’ SPEAK AES
the Indians “made hay” against Pritis ‘ rah tas sake : ere SPEAKER SY ee

nnn = Glamorgan. With Burly “Buck” hillips is a sin h to holders : © worktt
4th Race ; BARBADOS DERBY STAKES AND CUP—Nominated Divecha capturing eigh ts ake nats tate” ote, atin” Set hn
p g eight wicke stead)













for 74 runs the tourists shot out Pt

$1,000 ($400, $275, $150)—9 Furlongs a
nine Glamorgan batsmen for 204

Aplayer and con-

EIGHTH RACE + rhe Churchwarden is @ lad
centrates on the lrize ae

Ticket Number Amount







1. BRIGHT LIGHT . 117 lbs. Mr. C. Barnard. Jockey Holder. ©” @M easy paced wicket. game. From ear- ''s! $os2 aa | Theres room fio ‘Tor Low
2. FIRST ADMIRAL. 120 lbs. Mrs. F. E. C. Bethell. Just cali it Surrey's Champion- in the season jin" fon ee
Jockey Yvonet. Ship with the rest nowhere. At | could clearly jour ie 125.18 | when portraits will be posted
3. RAMBLER ROSE . 117 lbs. Mr. V. Chase. Jockey Joseph. ‘he Oval today Surrey shot out be seen that he firth 8680 10.00 } Up in the halt of far
ALSO RAN : Seedling (120 ths., Crossley). Notts for 84. Alec Bedser five ‘Whad the makings <'\" 2eae 6:00 | Ere. Hea eee ner name,
'TIME : 1.588 Se 8 one One en eer of an Istand finn” 1063 10.00 | CER
+ 1.588. Rees ridge five for 38 did the damage. Champion Fs Was ooving 4 hrist '
PARI-MUTUEL : Win $1.16; Place : $1.30, $1.66. FORECAST : $4.32. And before the close Surrey had er Tenth oars 10.8 | Xia others with Mr. Fred
START : Good. FINISH : Easy : 2 lengths, 1 length. made 65 for the loss of Fletch- 4 Pen Herbert ii cach to holders of tickets Nos | ‘Save Hable eee ate hess cond ;
ne a ‘ Mi a6, . ’ Dor ev wh
WINNER : Three-year-old bf. Burning Bow-Felicitas, OR eee onl Bie Ma eae ee i Mai THANKS A ROMANO, ant 19 ASAINE A BIMALL BANTAL COMERS
TRAINER : Hon. V. C. Gale. aa sebada” toa takai come champion } Rar, the Congeged last Friday «ight | MUST TELL THE WIFE FA EVER? '4i, 3 ~ NO REPAIRS, NO BATTERIES, NO
Ww > or Glouces- ia ; | Ginimed this welfare work tent -
5th Race ; NORTH GATE STAKES—Class © and C2 Only—$900 “erin local Derby with Somer® In the B Class match D, Archer “aler Polo: | Catia ce

set at Bristol. Leicester's Charlic [¢8t D Guiler

Palmer came near three figures ._ oy : ~,
but was caught and bowled b P. Chandler and B, Carrington,

pa as caught and bowled 2’ the Adelpht par, beat ke wit SMAppers, H.C, | 3 & R BAKERIES

er ibaa ; . Oe liams and J, Clarke of Queen’s
a oW in Bren nein 88 College in the finals of the Ladies Wi K k | makers of
“OO Kent versus 3 MOCK | ENRICHED BREAD

Doubles Championship.
Kent versus Hampshire

($300, $150, $50)—744 Furlongs sponsored by

1. DASHING PRINCESS

126 lbs. Mr. R. E. Gill. Jockey Lutchman
2. FLIEUXCE ...... 126 lbs. Mr. S. A. Walcott. Jockey Wilder
3. .DOLDRUM ..,... 126 Ibs. Mr. N. M. Inniss. Jockey Holder.

ALSO R. : Emi 121 Ibs., 3; Cc 1 Anni 126 Ws., :
AN bers ( s., Crossley); Careful Annie (126 Ibs The results were as folluws:—







Worcester . 161 for 2 (rain) jg cea fe
Glamorgan versus The Indians af, Siam. 1-18,
Glamorgan

TRAINER : Mr. J. B, Gill,



Division “A”, Snappers defeated

a a ‘ ie y Whipporays 12—2 = arrisoi
brake sty 209 for 9 Class B Championship: D College beat Ronites "4. “3. The |

; ; a at .
72 a i 1 1 ; s, Whip orays wert
(rain). liams and J. Clarke 21—15, 21—15, knocked out by Police after play- |
_ 21—8. ing extra time. The game ended |
«ih Pulbgeae 71 for 5 6—5. For



Quested). Hants ........ 18 for 1 (rain) Gass." a Chamoi : O M. i
pionship: R, Phil- u
TIME : 1.35 ¢. ‘icueee tee ns lips beat N, Gill 91-42, 16—21, t ate es and the blenders of
PARI-MUTUEL : Win ; $1.66; Place ; $1.48, $2.82. FORECAST $21.96. jackson 5 for 30. 21—18, 19-21, 21—12, testis. sesh Weclae- dec }&R RUM
. > . © 6 , 4 Irs ater Cnock
START : Fair. FINISH : Close : % length, head, Derby ............-. 82 for 3 Y.M.C.A. Championship: R. Out matches were played nt the
WINNER : Four-year-old br.f. Dastur-Princess Regent. Worcester versus Essex Herbert beat S, Shields: 21—13 Aquatic Club last week. In ee eineeeaeneeencieamantniancncnon i
|
|
1

6th Race : OISTIN ST. — $600 Gloucester versus Somerset Archer beat D. Guiler 15—2) t rs
oa ti, oo cg Lower—$60 Guise Lorie 349 for i 21—16, 21—10, 2220 latter was a fairly exciting mate | |
, , Furlongs Lancashire versus Yorkshire Ladies Doubles:~ P. Chandler In Division “B”, the Challenge |
ORM yi a's. ae vp for 0 and B, Carrington beat R, Wil- Cup Winners

|. JOAN'S STAR 148 Ibs. Mr. S.J. Rock. | Jockey Yvonet.
2 FO. 86 Mr.

E. Gill. Jockey Lutchman.

3. GAVOTIE oe oS Sussex versus Middlesex







ALSO + 130 lbs. Mr. Vv. E. Cox. Jockey Wilder. Sussex 5 Police Best scored fiv
vo. J DI cn e
RAN : Blue Diamond (183 Ts., Newman); Cottage (112 Ibs., (rain). The competition for the Bar- of the six goals for his team. In the
P, Fletcher). Northants versus Leicester bados Championship will start at other match, Bonitas beat Caviars |
TIME : 1.10. Leicester .......... 326 for 6 the Y.M.C.A, on Frdiay, Augus: 5—0, Bruce Armstrong scored |
PARI-MUTUEL : Win : $6.98; Place : $3.14, $2.92. FORECAST : $32.64 Surrey versus Notts 29, while the Ladies Island four of the five goals,
START : Bad FINISH : Easy : 1 length, 5 lengths NOUS once re divedes owner us 84 Championship will start on Fri- This week, the semi-final |
, P : P. we Surrey 4... ss eeeeees 65 for 1 day, September 5, matehes will be Swordfish vs.
WINNER : Four-year-old hb. b.f. Dunusk-Colleen. —m College in Division “A” and
TRAINER : Mr. F. E. C. Bethell. 8th Race aay hg er B and Lower—$1,000 = Bonitas ve. College in Division
; . Furlongs “p", |
Ith Race : TRAFALGAR STAKES—Class D and Lower—$900) © ——————————$__$_————————————— —————————————————————CséThe “finals will be played ony
($300, $150, $50)—7%4 Furlongs ~ 2, PEPPER WINE; 150 Ibe), Gh S. M CURN Ae ster Sm aay: he. 10M, Are you content with the; way you speak and write? ae aeokes 0) es
ockey Crossle; :
113 ibs. Mr L 2, SWEET ROCKET . 125 lbs. Mr. R. E, Gill. Jouker batonaian, Are you sure that you are not) making mistakes that cause} viistory»—the prospectus of the




ro . T. Wong. Jockey Lutchman
eels it lbs. Mr. V. Fae.
ekvay Ibs, Mr. F. E. C,. Beth

$| people to underrate you? Effective English Course—ara

val " > unanimous in urging that good
Never has the inl of © tects com and writing Siclish is tnaiepenstbie, ta: tose
,een more widely recognised than ay you can @Xpress} wo aim at success.

3. MRS. BEAR ...... 116 lbs. Mr. V. Chase. Jockey Joseph. |
ALSO RAN : Demure (130 MHs., Wilder); Vectis ((1146 Ibs., Quested) ; |
Aim Low (115 ts., O’Neil); High And Low (120 Ths., New. |

Jockey Joseph

aoe

AND NOW

Jockey Yvonet

: ; ‘ you ca e q)
a : Apollo (111 ts., P. Fletcher); Cross Bow (126 ths., man); Spear Grass (116 ths., Holder). oan hay * | vgirself per rsuasively and fore efully, you have an immense ,
older). TIME : 1.07 A GAS COOKER 4¢) Sabena ye in your professional work as well as in social life.] :*Word Mastery” explains fully
TIME : 1.358 PARI-MUTUEL : Win $21.06; Place : $2.90, $1.82, $1.52. | 4 - 1 the importance of good English
PARI-MUTUEL : Win : $5.02: Place : $2.24, $3.54. FORECAST : $33.60 FORECAST : $45.36. } ERS nee 7 Beer 7 g Thousands of men and women (b) Everything is explained ro ane tater ue oar am

START : Fairly good. FINISH : Close : head, % length
WINNER : Five-year-old b.m, Flotsam-Meads.
TRAINER : Mr. R. H. Mayers.

START :Good.
WINNER :
TRAINER : Mr. F. E. C, Bethell.

FINISH : Easy :
Right-year-old b.m. O.T.C.-Condiment.

1% lengths,

1 length.

SEE THEM TO-DAY ef) a re handicapped because they

At Your Gas Showroom @ cannot speak and write English
oe Bay Street 4 orrectly.

Every day you may be com-

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There is a method by which you

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Words Frequently Mispre-
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> f the d a a Please send me—without obligation—a free copy of “Word
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MAST E

RPIECE.



PAGE SIX SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY, AUGUST 3, 1952

How DRAB they are,

these women ‘

















**For Women |
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I’m a fit man again. MEDILAX, the gentle, safe laxative ensures *
INNER CLEANLINESS. and an ABOUNDING VITALITY. I’m a *





good advertisement for MEDILAX. What d’you say, Girls?
" q * SUNDAY, AUGUST 3, 1952
FOR SATURDAY, AUGUST 2, 1952 *) by EILEEN ASCROFT
* Look in the section in which your birthday comes and > al ITH bo aheps ‘a9 Felt tromaea. Pe 00 “6 ‘ ~
find what your outlook is, according to the stars, ! of gay holiday clothes p,.nions that DON'T belong on
WHY are English the bench :: high-heeled sandals,
: ¢ tight blac tent court shoes.
ARIES Quiet indications with necessary money ) beaches so drab and full nylon stockings with black
March 21—April 20 matters, church, cha.ity collections, child- | of grey girls ? embroidered heels, diamond
* cen’s interests the top favoured. Start On ey de Coast ey and = fur
i Fab reso is not more
your day with prayer. + ihan's Gobet memati holley: Much BETTER Se
P * makers: most of these were in bright patterned beach
: , : TAURUS encouraging day for rightful Sunday in- j eee pkg be rn, peek saan
So it is, AIR-WICK. Just lift up the wick from the liquid in the + April 21—May 2o!erests, visiting friends, aiding the ill and | po eoenine co: os fe varlains eS unitved
bottle, and all unpleasant odours are absorbed. In kitchens, to kill lonely, Enjoy and improve health. _ holiday fabrics and designs. caps are better than
stale tobacco smoke, and to freshen cupboards or sick rooms, Yes * *« *« Women who dress with care and bedraggied head.
AIR-WICK is truly amazing : re ea ae ae” Uk rakeeiaeiia aaert ate a | to lone all cldthesscoine’ ies which marry tn with
, . thy aa - y erta Ss. ose @ clothes-sense when whic marry in with
May 21—June 21 PsA a mete panaeng health Planning their holiday luggage. SrruneeS Pps. Cone
S, socia athe gs. ‘ PY |
How foolish Is Tommy here when he > church. eee on’ names , Stripes and dots & crose-strap of eons
' lesh . are better
could sleep in comfort with a VAMOOSE a * * ORST offenders are the than those that do
} ; CER Some sane warnings for water sports mixers of strong patterns. In ‘oh:
PUFFER to hand. This handy little puf- % sune 22—July 23 travel: be sensibly careful, never ay + were floral Sadese “and Vanishing servaats Da®
fer contains D.D.T. Just press it, and sure, But whole day generally is promis- | polka-dot headscarf [THE domestic servant and nanny have h a Rix sketches some ideas
: SH, ing. Seaford produced a startling colour “4 ney aceon Pha ape MRL A c for holiday cases . . .
pouf! Not a mosquito or fly will bother * > 4 ba rie cr sonnet. shorts Washington to-day. Shortage of labour | or son tabilins nee
: you. Keep a VAMOOSE PUFEER handy LEO rien of those restful yet progressive periods | Horrid sights are the short. flared one Porn lls in other’ industries are | <<> ‘ wool tassel caps ‘for sail-
i ‘* July 24—Ang. 22 that invites earnest effort without strain | jackets worn over full skirts. In England, too, the cook-general and the ing; halter-necked beach
; and sleep in comfort. or rushing. Self-control will bring you { ee hy Pel siihoustes like a nursemaid are a vanishing race r) bras in black or tan linen
quicker gain. Attend church. ; ship in full sail. : Women employed in private domestic K and circular poplin skirts,
: te & | a ge TR pe ey Oe eee oe
Like to possess he -li : 8 119,133 in England an ales in 1931
A i ich e” we 7 ee like + vmEGo Music, good reading, religious services, * | promenading in Brighton and the 1951 census was 348,900—a drop of yore tikes hres e WHOSE DRESS 1S SHOWING?
eres: Arar os Sere 2 eer A 2 fun with family, and just plain relaxing see: Fb, even & Gulepcoat 2 A SounOD ine years bi
ing. no @xercises, just SELF that ug. 23—Sept. 23 21) top to-day’s agenda. Necessary money needs a little dusting itself. and Pre-war wages were £1 to 25s. a week. Now a general maid receives
ugly fat away. SILF SLIMMING transactions alsd favoured, | £3 and a nanny £4 Few
TABLETS, are safe, and sure. On families can afford them It is

sale everywhere, Try SILF SLIM-

, | often the alternative to running
MING TABLETS and even Pops * Read Taurus and Virgo helpful hints for a
+ |

@ small car or good boarding

Wh i C e I Schools for the children.
=. ats ooking n Those bangs
se. | Mes EISENHOWFR reveals
* * * ® to-day that hundreds of
+ SCORPIO Feel cheerful, helpful? Sunday! certainly _ u e Cc en. Anmirrican. women have written

sha ol : ; $ . to her criticising her bangs
Oct. 24—Nov. 22 encourages such inclinations. Follow your D C
conscience and you won't fail. Pray, rest. Pape o eecerdiae © to. tne ai.



: your day too. H d i Si i
down there will stop, look and listen. Sept. 24—Oct. 23 it, au ne ee ee ee






Sure I would. A lovely girl is a sight as

MMe, ae oo te * * * | The sea EER oe thas making of the sh will vary ae- square acres” They cal be Ce
; ; t . S as - . ;

to feel like gardening though, until, like SAGITTARIUS Your Jupiter more favourably aspected started in Barbados, 7. vod You can serve boiled snapper eee? oh This elegant Got _ of on

many a tired business-man I took a course 4 Nov. 23—Dec. 22 er faa ees, Su coe give three recipes that you might find with small English potatoes, a ie 8166) ene Oe

of MEDI.SED, which corrects and restores Pin “Head spines Seager ei ae ae useful, few bits of parsley all round it power has worn Royal wedding she broke one of

tense nerves. For nervous headaches, Neu- Boiled Snapper and a sauce made of olive oil,

* Snapper lime juice and salt and pepper.

i lieves they offset dresses or slips showing below the
x CAPRICORN No cause for concern, for frowns. Re- + Salt

ralgia and other aches and pains, MEDI-SED



because she be- the first fashion rules . .. no









‘ dye . ed S a high forehead hem of the coat, Her name:
is the answer. Try it and enjoy hours of re- Dec. 23—-Jan. 21 ligious services, parties, outdoor healthy Pepper ; ngee” a ‘Snapper & é aa" aoa rane See foot of column. %
laxation you would otherwise lose. * PU UISES AHICHE SR. BROUBSE SA, Onion Butter 3 oz. MRS IKE — discover was in Why ~ > women? 7
ae * * * + | Carrot Rum 1 small glass Pas and the bang. owiak than F the #3 principal London
Have your dates led up to. th AQUARIUS Your planet Uranus admonishes it won't Parsley Flour 1% tablespoonful, : the era of Louis XIII 2 O stores. on!y seven have women
“H Ht 'P i? t at x Jan. 22 — Feb. 20 be wise to make drastic changes in things Thyme Take the fish and cut it diagon- ! bangs were fashionable. com- directors on their boards,
appy ever after stage?” It’s a delicate already running fmoothly, Enjoy this Marjoram ally putting salt inside and out- i bined with shoulder-length ,One group chairman tells me it
subject, but unpleasant breath and e Sunday in pleasant, wholesome way. Vinegar % glass side. Butter the whole fish and ! ringlets p is because women have no heads
body odours ma be hte . gar 2 glass e . ( Back they came in Edwardian for money.
AMPLEX, tak y ¢ thi trouble (Se x * * * Small English potatoes put it on the grate of the fish times. made famous by Queen “They are good at selling and pro-
AMPLEX Giter 6 hata PISCES Neptune warns not to be reckless, espe- ae Lime saucepan, Pour the rum and some Alexandra and later the Galety motion,” he says, “but they
TABLET A DAY, to ensure = sially in activities acte: “ith wa é ) é t he rum Gir don’t understand the financial
you don’t offend. AMPLEX contains Feb. 21—March 20cially in activities connected with water. Oil. : : water on it and when the ru P The “Flaming Youth” girl, Irish side.”
Chlorophyll, nature’s deodorant. Try 3 Day can be happy, useful if you help make The best way to boil fish is to and water has started to boil | “actress Colleen Moore, made the A more opinionated chairman
AMPLEX— you'll see! - y «x it so. Prayer is in first order. + | put it in some water, add % glass cover the fish with some grease- Straight bang popular in 1928. believes that women can play an
Z of vinegar to the water when you proof paper which you have but- ky rN the ee pent Sars ey part: ee
; ; : ; il bi sh a bi i ¥ i 4 died her hairdressing—Norma on e is I
YOU BORN TODAY: Bright, engaging personality. May boil big fish, a bit of rum if you tered. Put the fish in the oven and sce her aire ing Lewis. Last year he appointed
Kena to arrogance at times, but you are generous, innately + boil small fish or if you don’t like let it cook. When ready take the by ithe? patra Swanson and Miss M. J, Ahern managing
kind-hearted, usually unaware that you may be domineering, the taste of rum, use plain water. fish out and put the sauce in 4 Until she bécame Queen, the director of John Lewis at a
tien “wou Bobb F egotistical. Can be reasoned with, but seldom driven, Have To give the fish a nice taste small saucepan. Add more butter Queen Mother always wore her qe eo hele a doaik oetias panne
young y has a few fine talent for entertaining, journalism; could make excellent you must put it in cold water, and % tablespoonful of flour, let hair in this style i ine “women directors in this
words to say, Yes vitamins are military leader, business organizer, salesman, sports enthusiast. add 1 onion, 1 carrot and thyme, the sauce thicken and when ready London Express Service. group.
: Birthdate: Rupert Brooke, Eng. poet; Henry Cuyler Bunner, parsley and marjoram, Let it to serve pour the hot sauce on the = -
important, particularly GLUCOSE) 4 Amer. humorist, editor, % | beil for a few minutes and then; fish and send to the table. Serve ¢ Whose dress is showing ?
after covering the saucepan let it{ with English potatoes or sweet my The Duchess of Kent's
D, for young and old. Use Savory »¥ a mh 4 ae ™ me *% | boil on one side of the fire. The potatoes and yam. uf ;
and Moore’s GLUCOSE D_ in
’ THE THINGS THEY DO... THE THINGS THEY DO THE THINGS THEY oo THE THINGS THEY oes ee ee ae ees
la THI THEY . «+ THE THINGS THEY DO - THE THINGS os iene ee
reek Ph ge cneiiowaiRcititarned THE THINGS THEY Do |. | THE THINGS THEY DO THE THINGS — THEY DO . THE THINGS THEY 0° EONS ENN Stee

will benefit, in added vitality and



strength. } 9 ’ ‘ . emcee OU Fa i gc cin lA Nee at BR Ad meet



No, we haven’t run out of ink, Just trying to illustrate what,

might happen if we didn’t use a SCROLL PEN. No messy ink filling
with SCROLL. No risk of accidents. Just slip in a refill now and again,
red, blue or both and your writing troubles are over, SCROLL is
smooth, and reasonable in price.

J Any difficulty in obtaining

supplies pleuse ring the sole



agents covering this column‘

c >
INTERNATIONAL TRADING CORPORATION
LTD. — tel. 5009.

Ney 4 , caf SSS Sp NO SROT c FASHION fj ODD SPOT. } It’s a wise woman who

at





3 . ' look provided this idea
Shades of Scotland! for headwear by day. . » » AND this is my parting-shot pic-

Pr : i : looped il
SURPRISING how you can ring the sce i Ee aren ture to iiiustrate the weakness of the

fringe)

FOR sCOTS SPOT i GIRL with the Eastern dresses her aBe...

The way this tartan
is spreading.
the








mother - and - daughter - dressing - alike

" nd little i ,
’ ye . Waianae on the cight in instance : tie one end through your neck- tekoifiation: Wear the fashion, If it's right for daughter—oh,

{ ae ’ . . a The! He is’ Cm As
ACTRESS GLADYS COOPER introduces Chetmstord, lace, fasten the other ends round your silk in a half-crescent ee ; '
® to London the blouse that has taken Paris on eee ey waist—and you have the suntop in from the top of the head Remember: OO NT ane doesn't help
by storm, The material: white cotton What's new; that Voung “hak on the drawing A. Now try out the other two. to behind the ear. .
soft shoulder-line, and elbow cuffs edged with black Swiss jet is part of the London Express Service
embroidery. . . . Notice Miss Cooper's new ultrashort: hoir London seene, in
style: it needs trimming every four days fortan sports enat



For



saw character fashion changes with a silk square

mother, you're in fashion trouble.

FIVE COUNTRIES
Dalat





Clarks SANDALS

1560.10

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Five countries and three | n

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} Your flight is swift and . _ which comes to you direct from nly one soap
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a's





SUNDAY, AUGUST 3, 1952



“

of the world where man is alone with





M
the Chu
a differen

i ‘| and TV star, who happens to be
ah the daughte the Prim
ii Pintecer of Creat Britain, But F led F rom
4
|

—_ > ; dramatic actress playing
'WO WEEKS of treading the pioneer path where nowomanhas ae . End befor- , ARNE
trod before cured Eve Perrick’s col ioe aon the corners je a he By CANON W s

hte you kKnow—not just since ae ue s
my tather became President 1 “It came with the house.” sac
qs London from aya

Truman, singer and TV the poli:ictans The women do Don't
star, who happens to. be the work. Maybe that’s whv ' expression ?

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

PAGE SEVEN *



The Wife Who

vehi] success story had
t beginni:

made the journey Her Home
n Young y

est, e
hill was Prim
en. In her lonely aes ** ' ,

@ “A LETTER from a husband

exile, she says, she longed for contact with people who would term of office coin- Says: “I married at 30 a girl
talk wisely or wiffily, who would be gay or glamorous, ol = “a. se! of 24. She became frustrated |

bright and/or beautiful. vice in WAAP.; and it because her social stawus was

70 THIS WEEK the column celebrates its reprieve from man’s was while he was leading the what she aesired. After

talk, nd meets— Qpposition that his daugtte: fivé years eur first and only

wree more established herself as chila i

@ celebrity in her own right.) was stillborn, and she

WwW talking on the Started to drink and smoke

uccecess or wo @ @ @ Siin-terrace of the little black and gad about. I gave her

, f Le. 2 eh her head because of the loss

e . is now the London residence o! of her child. When we set

in Spite Of TAMOUS Bote Mee Bt tees weet ae el

were drinking “ Moscow Mules "* for a shop assistant with

which is. said Mr, Beauchamp charm, and has left me for

what a few years in ne tume- hE Rie cer ol him. What do I do? I have

; ot a ver ha Hn)
fathers ao ae aoe been one big fool right
‘I've been in politics all my We were discussing the nuce through. Is it too late after

the niche behind us 16 years’ marriage to seek
anether partner?”

joked that I would ve Miss Churchit! “and my A WIFE who takes to drink

America. and on the the one to make the name mother. who got the place for

nsists | ye W ve te s ife who is missing something

f } Truman famous — bur Dad us insists that we will have \ is a w g g

nee * am ore didn't do too budiy. die ne? got rid of it in her marriage, For this her hus-
holiday, 1s Miss Marga “In our family. the men are “ But we're using it for iaughs band has often to take the blame.

{ust adore thar coy To most women the maternal

instinct is deeply awakened witn

thought | ight ¢ ice
the daughter of the Presi- | chunge a ier ae oe = shes Marbl id marriage, and hungers for satis-
dent of the United States. with arDte maiden faction in a family of children, On
‘Though there ure some I sad b thought ene marbie top of this your wife had her
Next year, of course SN@ people who don't agree. of maiden jooked exuctly like tne terrible tragedy of shattered hopes

will be Margaret Truman poutay ra ane weed with 4 yiewr's daughter who had eae after five years of frustrated am-
‘ ‘a sm}! to strip-tease fo pay Hi ne 43
‘ singer and television star Miss Truman tukes ner nol mortgage but wasn't really bition.
PREMIER'S DAUGHTER “And” she says. “I'm day im the American way— happy in her work At that moment she needed
hotographed by her h nd looking forward to that orgdnised almost to the minute “Good,” said sarah, “One 80 whe could restore her
' gp sisal loci immensely | just It's all been olanned for me more vole on the side ot keep confidence in herself; a husband
p ~ i _ by someone ‘np ‘he emba tiv ing the thing .
hope |] can make Nine countries in seven weeks M 5s OF a ! oar ty r whose tenderness and patience
it” including Finland imagine aon rth : er a ae would provide an antidote for
Well. anyway, thatt film,..one< Brosdway pias, ead gathering bitterness.
she's made. first “The onty deta: ot the trip ya5% genes 4) aeee pint So Brittle
base Her radio and 1 know is tha! I'm goine ‘o [8000 “the wa ttearid-set







TV contract was Salzinape for the Festival I'm shen



YOU gave her her head, when



renewed after the told hear some real good Jome ve fede Welh ess mon. it was your love she needed. A
rapper nag of music there.” first © - strong-minded, hard-headed man
her father’s decis on ‘ sat ice
Italy doesn’t find it easy to get inside
to become an ex- >
President, No peace for A a ae os the tangled emotions of a woman
“Tt was a great It seemed uw rather tiring Afterwards, until she goes who doesn’t even understand her
moment for me trip for a girl who had not nad pack to New Yok in Novembe: own bewilderment,
when 1 on rey te a week Cae of proremionn ony the Minister's daughter Excitement, drink, sex are the
newal ofker. agements for nearly a year. ins ave a ape sing routi 3
when I decided it Hit: Wouldn't she eer more ‘i Heakonarnp. ig ae a | Troggs 4 oo A
would be safe to rest on one of those Florida ’ in ee Caer eee
take a vacation. fishing trips with her father ? Tit talk Did you fail her here, perhaps?
We talked first on oe Daddy never takes a vaca- ito ta She will never rediscover her
the sun-deck of the nh. je does more work when * Tony has gone into fi confidence unning fro the
s.s, United States, he’s in the yacht than he does dugaion. He's doing : ford nt phantoms ¥ a earl ym
in ot in Washington. Don't be tooled short detective stories, and some lif WwW reco; r ick!
the two m by those flash shirts he weurs, documentaries for showing here r ee enise = quicker
who gre never ose trips are a serious and in America—we hope both than men how brittle are the
PRESIDENT’S DAUGHTER aver sea abt Fi € business.” in cinemas and on TV hopes and how tawdry the thrills
—release for her is nearer now. tdvarae clo aughter mainee =, tert hone Miss “My bretier Randolph is which adultery, as a rule can
; man’s adventures have not Starring in the documentaries. offer.
Miss Truman had spent the ne entire r . ' arr
morning in het suite, with one She's iitide pecved at having 19 (ntervacaites ae enazation, and But a woman is less ready to
of the denechives. puasding the cope with cameras and Press leaders—like Tito, for instance admit) this ey, ~— it
door because had receptions on her vacation ? “ way. I’ : seems her 0 of “love,”
GEM FOR TO.DAY docked at Le Havre and l|ois Her reply was Toaligtte re do qnyway,t fo letting the men Your wite ro a te wilderness
of strange and, ag yet. unvetied yealing. “Well, you ever months, I'm ‘resting’ for a | it sile.gaode tn Wait “odie” otter
seared People were aboard. know. Perhaps this time next TT? [' y . s ~# ; .
Music is the harmonious 1 len I've got my eye on a play uffair, a sense of guilt wil
; tion: h But now the liner was sailing, year I'll be just dying to be fd like to do in London and 4 wie 8 ;
voice of creation; an echo and Miss Truman was allowed ‘hounded’ by the Press und New York . hound her through the years,
of the invisible world; one out. She had not resented being find myself completely ignored “But nearly every actress tearing her self-respect to ribbons.
note of the divine concord in protective custody until Wouldn't that be terrible?” these days has a play shed like No Conditions
which the entire universe is lunch-time. Miss T., sensible As for gaging farewell to the to do in England and America. SOCK “ag ; ;
destined one day to sound, girl that she is. has a taste for bodyguard, Miss Truman's shrug Let's hope my one goes on.” POCKET your pride. Write to
—Mazzini noon-rising. indicated that it really wasn't We moved inside the house her, Tell her where you failed
Still, there she was now, with {00 trying for @ girl to know where three Churchill oils—two her in the hour of her tragedy.
her golden hair done up ship- that, wherever she goes, there “painted boats” studies and a Make no conditions when you
shape, tightly curled at theends Were always two strong menand new flower one: My favourite,” offer her l nd comfort
* id f the breezes ‘Tue following her around. commented Sa — de t r her your love a e halal
Talk Point fy pigsen: oe ral ominate A cynical hardness may for a
7 ing Sp earns. Set aes. * ae toyed anew eee time provedle her with le
Dear God, give us strength to I N “We're just starting to fur- against acknowledgement of fail-
‘ now ow si. ”
accept with serenity the things * pee oy Pl ce,” said Miss ure, so don’t be put off by a facacte
that cannot be changed. Give us | She showed by the selfcon- y {N LONDON trom & ie banat cots", wee of “couldn’t care less.”
courage to change the things that nt, experienced way she America, on the way toa = "4 Cee oe ere You both need each other. You
can be changed. And give us wis- led an interview, in rather pe ar holi is Miss * Ingredients : Vodka, ginger bot f b .
dom to distinguish one from the “8eomfortable circumstances, Sarah actress beer, and ice. both ~ afford = eve, ne
other.—Admiral Thomas Hart. London Express Service ing in the past what rightly be



But when taking children's snapshots you can—





longs to it. Sixteen years should
covnt for nothing. —L.E-S.

Talking Point
The man who sees both sides of





Forget That “Dicky Bird? 9 (= "sw:

ERIC COOP. expert portrait Naturals The best effect js obtained if
photographer whose work is to the sun is coming from the left
be exhibited in London has If the children see you always or t behind the 4
been summing-up the advice with the camera in your hands, (There will be plenty of reflected
he would give to the amateur Coop has found they will soon light from the beach to illum-
on holiday who wants REALLY get tired of posing for pictures, inate their faces, but not so much
GOOD, snaps of the children. and then you will be able to get that their eyes will be screwed

- really natural shots of them. up against the sun’s glare. And—

Coop says there is only one The old days of standing still

way to avoid the lament: and watching for the bird Don’t tilt the



dicky
“If only I had had the camera are one for , © apetyy camera to left or
ready. . . .” And that is to have good, films are tod b ¢ right but do in-
it ready always and take the . ~« so fast nowa- cline to point it
picture as soor as you see it. —**% days that, for down’ rath-
This is comparatively easy if & — on the er_than upward.
your camera is of the simple Vie ae you can . Dent unless
snapshot type, work at 1/100 you want comi-
gach > but if it is a fo- : . see. all the tima cal effects, taka
BY. eee cussing camera * the children Be close-u) in
&. have it set at ao. 343 go on play- — which feet or
a about 9 ft. dis- . & ates ing with thea hands are closer
‘ tance. Ms sand while you to the camera than the rest of

Don’t worry snap them. the body.
about the posi- If they become self-conscious 7
tion of the sun tell them you want to photo. Don’t forget to take off your
it hap« graph the sand castle they are Sun glasses before estimating
pens to be shin« building, or the toys they ere the exposure. On a bright sunny



ing straight into Playing with. day at this time of the year it is
the lens, in which case change Sun Spot e to work at 1/100sec. with an
your own position. aperture of £/16 ing a fast

And if anyone has ever told film. If, as in simple cameras,

Don’t ask the children to moye, you that the sun must be shin- the speed and aperture are fixed,

and so lose the spontaneity of img on your back when are ask your chemist for a suitably
the moment. taking a picture, f ee : slow film.





Gil ae
TROUBLE




By
BOURJOIS

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Your Horoscope

Would ke ¢
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{ @qur experiences
weak points, etc ‘

to test FREE the
! most fan





ous Astrologer,
who by eppiving

the ancient -sci-
ence to usefu
pufposest
built up an er
ble t wr
The ac ‘
ris “
and = the t
THERE’S NOTHING |°2:. =
ontained im his

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Love iffa

Friends, Enetni



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BARBADOS wild ADVGCAT

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Printed by the Advecate Co., Lid., Bro-* 8, Bridgetews

Sunday, August 3, 192



Caribbean Couneil

LORD Ogmore, who, as Mr, Rees-
Williams, held brief office as Parliamen-
tary Under Secretary of State for the
Colonies during a post-war Socialist ad-
ministration took the opportunity during
a debate in the House of Lords on the
Colonial Territories for the year 1951—52
to give expression to views about the
Colonial Empire which might well be
interpreted as representative of some
Socialist “thinking aloud.”

Lord Ogmore in his “thinking aloud”
divided colonies into three types. There
are Colonies, he said, which could and
which would, he hoped, in time become
Dominions. There are others which, com-
bined with others (and there is no doubt

that the West Indies prompted this classi-
fication) could become a Dominion.

The third type includes the colony
“which either by reason of lack af econo-
mic resources or some multi-racial prob-
lem or the like can never become a self-
governing Dominion, can never stand on
its own feet.”

Should the West Indies degide to feder-
ate they would eventually disappear into
Lord Ogmore’s second category of the com-
bined colonies which become a Dominion.
yBut since there is far less likelihood of
federation today than there ever has been
the ideas of a Socialist peer, ennobled for
his party allegiance, about the administra-
tion of colonies of the third type are
worthy of consideration.

Lord Ogmore’s suggestion is that these
colonies should have representation in a

Grand Council which would meet every
year and make recommendations to the

various Parliaments. The Council would,
he suggested, make recommendations
which would be very seriously considered
by the Governments concerned and it
would give an opportunity to the repre-
sentatives of the Colonial Parliaments to
meet and exchange ideas. It would have
a permanent secretariat, by which the
various economic and other problems
would be considered from day to day.

During the debate Lord Milverton put
his finger on the weakness of the Socialist
peer’s proposal.

When, he said, it is remembered that the
Colonies extend over the whole width of
the world and comprise within them
almost every problem . economic and
racial that can possibly be imagined “I do
not think that a general council of that
kind would do other than perhaps provide
a sounding board for the political charla-
tan.”

How true, will be universal West Indian
comment,

But Lord Milverton put his finger fur-

ther in and underscored a difficulty which
is already causing great inconvenience in

the British Caribbean. “There are not
enough men of ability in the Colonies,” he
said, “at present even to go round in man-
aging their own affairs at home, let alone
to send men to a big Central Council to
get a view of world affairs with a Colonial
background.”

This shortage of men of ability in the
West Indies is of course not unconnected
with the dislike of the electorate to return
such men to power but basically what
Lord Milverton says of all the Colonies is
true of the West Indies. And even if the
truth of the statement is disputed by some
who refuse to distinguish between ability
and ability to win over electors the final
result is the same.

At regional meetings of importance in
the area only the important politicians
attend. The formation of a Grand Council
of the United Kingdom and Colonial terri-
tories would not only provide a sounding
board for the political charlatan from some
colonies but would further deprive this
region of the services of their most impor-
tant politicians and these would be tempt-
ed to interfere in other colonial matters
about which they knew nothing.

Lord Milverton’s criticism of Lord
Ogmore’s idea was justified but perhaps
the idea as applied to the West Indies is
worth a little more investigation. It now
seems almost certain that West Indian
political federation will either be post-
poned indefinitely or some partial politi-
cal federation between the Leewards,
Windwards and Trinidad might be
attempted.

Suppose on the other hand that Lord
Ogmore’s suggestion for a Grand Council
of the United Kingdom and Colonial Ter-
ritories were modified and the idea of a
Caribbean Council put forward in its place.
Such a Council comprising the most im-
portant political representatives of exist-
ing British Caribbean Legislatures could
meet in one or more of the participating
territories annually

This Council would make recommenda-
tions on matters of regional importance
and those recommendations would be con-

sidered seriously by the participating gov-
ernments. concerned he secretariat of
this Council is already in existence at
Hastings House and is in fact performing
the task of such a Council without having
any legal status as a Council secretariat
and without the existence of a Council.

Lord Ogmore cannot claim credit for
this proposal since it has already been put
forward by West Indian political commen-
tators but just as Lord Ogmore’s sugges-
tion for a Grand Council has a certain
theoretical attraction so the idea of a Car-
ibbean Council appears at first sight
desirable.

Without regional co-operation the Brit-
ish Caribbean is doomed to stagnation. A
Caribbean Council would tie up all the
loose regional ends into a tidy whole and
would achieve all the obvious advantages
of + i pata without any of the attendant
risks,



Macdonaldism

MR. Malcolm MacDonald’s behaviour. in
South East Asia will strengthen the hands
of those who have been championing dress
reform in Barbados for decades.

Lord Baldwin, whose unconventional be-
haviour introduced open-neck shirts and
shorts in West Indian Government House
circles, unfortunately made few converts.
Yet his intentions were good.

In Bridgetown one or two “dress reform-
ers” always wear open neck shirts. Offi-
cials of the Department of Science and
Agriculture regularly wear open neck
shirts and shorts and some schoolmasters
do likewise.

But the pioneer work of the individual
dress reformers in Bridgetown is not sup-
ported by the private or official commun-
ity. The Police Force have in recent years
received cooler shirts and after a period of
service policemen receive light weight
trousers, but only police officers are privi-
leged to wear shorts.

At Government House and at the Secre-
tariat protocol has never been more
strictly observed. The difference between
the stiff formality of Barbados’ Govern-
ment House and the informal atmosphere
of Trinidad’s Government House was the
subject of comment by the elder Dr. C,
B. Clarke when he spoke a few years ago
to members of the Royal Empire Society
about his recent visit to the West Indies,

It would be a mistake to suppose, how-
ever, that Barbados’ resistance to more
rational dress is due to any peculiar Brit-
ish jnfluence. No one who has visited
Hampstead Heath on August Bank Holiday
or strolled through any London Park on
Sundays during the summer would accuse
the British of clinging to their surplus
clothing one moment longer than was
necessary,

This anxiety to “cast clouts” which is
enshrined even in the old-wives’ saws of
the country takes a violent form in Lon-
don’s Hyde Park where the murky and
ice-cold water of the Serpentine does not
deter the Britishers in search of coolness.
The overseas’ armed forces of Her Maj-
esty relentlessly change from winter
clothes into summer brevities on the day
pre-selected by the High Command irre-
spective of whether it hails or snows. The
British are certainly no worshippers of
British clothes for the sake of maintaining
their British appearance. They look just
as British in shirts and shorts.

If a parallel is to be drawn between Bar-
bados and any other part of the world it
might aptly be drawn with Brindfsi. At
this eastern seaport town of South Italy
as famous for its wine as Barbados is fam-
ous for its rum all the mezze-cazette, the
small town tradesmen and merchants,
gather together in the market places to dis-
play their heavy black clothes which coun-
try people all over the world regard as
conventional Sunday wear.

In Barbados where every school boy or
school girl still learns by heart the poem
of “Sally in our alley” with its direct en-
couragement to love Sunday because that
is the day when the lover is “dressed in
all his best” it is not surprising that petit
bourgeois standards of dress should rule
the roost. But those standards as Mr.
MacDonald has pointed out in his letter to
the “Straits Times” are not British. They
are the standards of the “little” people of
all countries.

Some years ago when English officials,
whose education approximated more to
that of the true British traditions of the
Armed Forces and of the bathers in the
Serpentine, attempted to shed their ties
and to wear sandals in government offices,
the offended voices of the mezze-cazette of
Barbados were immediately raised to
denounce this intelligent attempt to
rationalise dress. Complaints were even
made by individuals with more than the
normal dose of sensibility that the wearing
of sandals by officials was a calculated in-
sult to Barbadians.

Maybe Barbadian sensitiveness about
dress reform in recent years is responsible
for that very noticeable formality which
distinguishes Barbados’ Government
House parties from the less formal affairs
in Trinidad.

If so it is a pity, A little dose of Mac-
Donaldism seems badly needed in Barba-
dos. If dress reform is ever to become
effective the high officials of the Secre-
tariat will have to give the lead. If some-
one could prove that cooler dress would
mean improved health and reduced ex-
penditure’ the argument for dress reform
would be unassailable. But the medical
fraternity are great upholders of local
dress conventions and until doctors say
that less clothes mean improved health
there will always be hesitation among
those willing to make the change for per-
sonal reasons of comfort and _ efficiency.

As for the new “MacDonald” evening
dress, the tailors of Bridgetown by skilful
advertising ought easily to persuade the
“flannel” dancers that the new MacDonald
evening dress is classier and cheaper than
their usual hop attires. Here again a lead
in high places will produce more contented
and more aesthetically apparelled diners
and dancers. A Calypso might even be
composed with the refrain: “Look! I got
what Malcolm got! and it’s cool not hot.”

With chaps like that one



SUNDAY ADVOCATE

| The man that
keeps Barbados
laughing on
Sundays

SUNDAY,

AUGUST 3, 1952



eS ‘
| pamanannaanimdmmaaae POooe



“Many Socialists’ (in the
House of Commons during:
the heat wave) “were ar-
rayed in tropical suits, most-
ly very crumpled.”— Peter-
borough, in the Daily Tele-
graph.

IVE me chaps in decent
clothes, chaps who know
the rules, -
Decent, smart, uncrumpled chaps
who went to decent schools,
Chaps whose clothes are nicely
pressed, laundered neat and
clean,
Chaps who sort of do belong—
ectually, I mean,
The sort of chaps who don’t
belong, chaps who hurt the
eye,

Are chaps whose clothes are
washed at home and. then
hung up to dry. é

sort

of feels one sort of can’t be
seen, “

Somewhere one sort of draws
the line—ectually, I mean,

FAN MAIL
HIS week’s letter from the
constant reader who always
begins “Dear Pig”:—
Dear Pig, i,
I have caught you out in a lie
again. When you wrote your
life story last week and how you
swindled people all over the
Empire and Africa, which I can
believe, as your photo is the face
of a criminal, you said you sold
electric blankets to Hottentots
in Darkest and Hottest Africa,
your own words,

Why should Hottentots in
Hottest Africa want electric
blankets, and if they did, where
did they plug in for electric
current, as Darkest Africa must
be in the jungle?

Let us have the facts before I
stop borrowing a paper
is first-class except for your
tripe.

* *

ELL, dear am

astonished that you have

failed to see the point about the
electric blankets,

Although nobody but an im-
becile would believe that trees
in the African jungle are wired
far electricity, there was a time
when the simple Hottentot be-
lieved implicity in the white
man’s magic, or ju-ju.

Therefore, if he wanted



blankets it was more profitable
to sell him, electric blankets than
the ordinary kind. If he com-
plained that the ju-ju didn’t work
you then sold him electric bat-
teries at an even greater profit.

If the fool, sweltering under
his electric blanket, then got
prickly heat, you sold him two-
penny jars of ointment at a
couple of bob a go.

Evidently you don’t know
much about salesmanship, dear
Pig.

DEATH OF CHARLIE

A’ a conference of Winged
Insects, the chairman, a
bluebottle, said: —

“Gentlemen, we are gathered
there today to hear evidence of
unfair methods being used in the
war of extinction now being
waged against us. Mr. Wasp, will
you begin?”

“IT was on my way home after
being the uninvited guest at a
tea party where they had three
kinds of jam in open dishes,”
said the Wasp (cries of “Hear,
hear’ and “Good work”) “when
I saw a man a glass of

(Cheers and

beer in a garden.
laughter.) I think you gentlemen
are aware that wa have a

weakness for malted (loud
cheers .and cries of ‘Good old
Wasp’), but when I tried toe take
a sip the man whipped out a
press button gun and fired a
spray at me.” (Cries of “Shame.”)

“What happened after that?”
asked the chairman.

“After being unconscious for
several hours I managed to fly
home,” said the Wasp, “but I
think I owe my life to the fact

that, like most wasps, I am
frightfully fit.”
“Thank you, Mr. Wasp.

You're next, Mr. Housefly.”
“Out of more than 7,000,000
brothers,” said the Housefly, in
a small voice that trembled with
‘emotion, “there was one I loved

best of all, name was
Charlie.”
Noticing the Housefly’s dis-

tress, the kindly chairman said.
“You may give evidence sitting

you wish.”
“Thank you, Mr. Chairman,”
said the Housefly. “Charlie was

just settling on a piece of uncov-
ered meat (cries of ‘Hear, hear’),
and I think we all know how

difficult it is to find meat covered
or uncovered these days (laugh-
ter), when he was disturbed at
this meal and tried to take refuge
in what he thought was a basket
of flowers on the wall. I never
saw Charlie alive again.”

“What, im fact, was the
basket of flowers ?” asked the
chairman.

“A piece of painted cardboard
impregnated with insecticide,”
said the Housefly (loud cries of
“Shame”).

“Anything else ?” asked the
chairman,
“Only that it would have been
Charlie’s birthday today,” said
the Housefly.

Amid murmurs of sympathy,
the chairman said: “Gentlemen,
I ask for your vote on the mo-
tion that this meeting core
the passing of the good old days
when fly swatters and_ rolled
newspapers were the only wea-
pons used against us by gentle-
men, and to declare that we con-
sider modern methods unfair,
unsporting, and unBritish.”

The motion was carried unani-
mously,

PAWS ACROSS THE SEA
ABLE received from Man-
hattan Mouser, American
cat, to his English sweetheart,
Lottie.

Hiya Sugar Puss thanks to
publicity given to us both sides
Atlantic U.S, Lines have handed
me free passage luxury suite
aboard new flagship United
States on maiden voyage east
stop will also arrange pass for
you meet me Southampton July
8 stop this is the real McCoy no
foolin stop got a kick outa your
picture in paper but why not your
chassis too stop also got a kick
outa you running for Beauty
Queen contest stop I am think-
ing of running for President here
on Republican ticket as_ fight
looks like getting dirty stop no-
body has won more dirty fights
than yours truly stop publicity
blurbs say we are taking aboard
24,458lb. of fish stop oh boy oh
boy stop also 56,450 Ib. poultry
Stop oh boy oh boy oh boy stop
24,458 Ib. of fish, 56,450 lb. of
poultry and you Honey Cat oh
boy oh boy oh boy oh boy oh boy
Mitop stop stop.

—L.E.S,



Black Rock Babies

Not far from Eagle Hall Corner
off the Black Rock Road a neat
green painted building which re-
sembles a small pavilion com-
memorates the name of Mrs.
Florence Browne,

The wife of Dr. Sinciair Browne,
who practised medicine at Sum--
mervale in Eagle Hall more than
30 years ago opened a small clinic
at the back of her home to help
poor mothers with the bringing
up Of their babies. After Mrs.
Browne’s death, her son George
donated the land on which the
Black Rock Baby Clinic stands
today and the building was erected
from funds provided by the Brit~
ish Red Cross and the Order of St.
John of Jerusalem in gratitude for
the help given by the Empire to
the United Kingdom during the
war,

For years Mrs. Muriel Hanschell
was President of the Clinic and
when she was appointed to the
Legislative Council she was suc-
ceeded by Mrs, Florence Daysh,
who is also Chairman and Hon,
Secretary of the St- Philip Baby
Welfare Clinic.

‘Today 330 babies are registered
at the Black Rock Clinic and 334.
attendances a month are recorded.’

Mothers bring their children to
the clinic from St. Thomas, St.
George, St. James and Christ
Church but most come from the
crowded city areas of New Orleans,
Chapman’s Lane, Hall’s Road and
Baxters Road.

Twice a week a nurse attends
it the clinic to weigh babies, reg-
ister new babies and to prepare
them for the doctor who arrives
at ten.

Mothers wait on wooden
benches ona roofed verandah,
When they have seen the doctor
they receive quantities of milk
and cod liver oil and for babies
of six months and up Jamaican
food yeast.

Between 1} to 2 lbs. of food
yeast are distributed weekly while
112 pounds of skimmed milk and
two gallons of cod liver oil are
distributed monthly- Between 80
and 90 mothers attended at the
clinic each week during July. Some
mothers attend twice weekly while
others attend once a week or
once a fortnight.

In 1951, the average weekly at-
tendance was 58.9 and 3,066
babies attended the Clinic.

Two hundred and eighty five
babies were registered in 1951
and 112 were written off for bad
attendance.

The Baby Welfare League as the
clinic in Black Rock is called is an
outstanding example of a_ social
|service which was begun more
| than 30 years ago and which has
been carried on to this day by the
|support of government, vestry,
'Turf Club, commercial firms and

the voluntary service of ladies
living in the island.

The problem it is tackling may
be understood by realisation of
the fact that of 330 mothers at-
tending only 40 are married.

Those superficial critics who
accuse well-to-do Barbadians of
Bourbonism and indifference to
conditions round them ought to
ponder and reflect on these statis-
tics. They would be doing a better
service to the community which
shelters them by themselves lend-
ing a helping hand instead of
adding to the difficulties of those
who have already set the »lough
in motion.

By
George Hunte

How is marriage to appeal to a
community of women if the un-
married status of a mother-is-the
norm and not the exception?

Many of the mothers attending
the Black Reck Clinie are suffer-
ing from venereal disease, They
are advised to seek treatment at
the General Hospital, but even if
they seek treatment, the father
of the child might refuse to do
likewise and if his affections re-
main constant the sad story is
enacted over again. Some mothers
are premature: they give birth
to children when aged only 15 or
16. Other mothers’ children die
and instead of taking a rest from
pitiful motherhood, new births to
new fathers take place.

Still the good work goes on.
Public spirited ladies, a devoted
nurse, an unselfish; doctor con-
tinue to attend twice weekly at
the Black Rock Clinic to battle
against death, to give human lives
greater opportunities of survival,
to train mothers in the practice
of mothercraft and to supply their
vabies with the nourishment neces-
sary to resist disease,

For thirty years this social ser-
vice has been going on and the
work of the Black Rock Clinic
is being imitated in other parts
of the island. But the records
stil! show how much remains to
be done.

Legitimacy has insufficient at-
traction for Barbadian women.

Until women feel that the sur-
render of their honour is something
of whirh to be ashamed; until they
cherish their virginity as some-
thing of which to be proud: until
they begin to realise that the
married state is the normal state
of civilized people: the efforts of
those who have for so many year
been trying to help mothers t

help their babies will need to be
supported by every agency work-
ing for the spiritual and material
improvement of their fellow-
beings,

What Barbados suffers from is
not the absence of a social con-
science — relative to its size and
making allowance for the notori-
cus lack of appreciation by the
community as a whole of disinter-
ested endeavour, its social
conscience is surprisingly highly
developed — but from the large
deadweight of ignorance, vice an‘
superstition, which has to be
dispelled if ever a healthy society
is to survive.

Overlooking the obvious draw-
backs of illegitimacy, venereal
disease and wundernourishment,
and ignoring the stupidity of
mothers who rely on bush tea,
crab oil and _ other so-called
remedies, other especial difficulties
arise in Barbados which compli-
cate the task of social workers,

In the report of the St. Philip
Baby Welfare Centre of 1951-52
Mrs: Daysh noted the independent
attitude of some mothers resulting
from higher wages and bonus paid
to sugar workers.

During the General Elections
mothers ceased to attend at the
St. Philip Clinic for “political”
reasons,

To do good to others requires
a great effort in most countries
To do good in Barbados requires
more than effort. It requires
strength of character and a spirit
of self-denial of a very high order
indeed, Because not only is it?
certain that little gratitude wil)
be forthcoming from those to
‘whom the good work is done bu
there is the absolute 2
that more abuse than appreciation
will be coming from those who

ought to be standing at the head

of a movement to proclaim from
the housetops what has been

Jachieved already by devoted and

public svirited citizens in stem-
ming the advance of low moral
standards. The work of the Baby
Welfare Clinics throughout the
island would be lightened by tie
growth of .family life. Bishop
Bentley did sterling work in that
direction many years ago. Every-
one must become more militant
about the advantages of the mar-
ried state.

Meanwhile the workers who
have toiled so arduously and well
in the service of the Black Rock
clinic might find consolation and
encouragement to continue their
labours from a prayer recently
recommended to the Secretary of
State for the Colonies by Lord
Milverton :

“Grant me the serenity to
accept things I cannot change,
courage to change things I can,
and wisdom to know the

difference.”

md



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SUNDAY, AUGUST 3,

The. tremendous

that happened to a quiet

little English

1952

secretary

IMAGINE me, a Waaf—only
5ft. 4ins. tall, standing on tip-toe
trying hard to read my posting
form over the shoulder of the
orderly room clerk.

The typewritten sentence stood
out blunt and clearly...“This air-
woman is not to be employed on
secret and confidential work.”

That was because my mother
was French and the Battle of
Britain was at its height. No one
in Britain at that time was quite
sure who were their friends and
who their enemies.

COMMISSIONED
One of the Youngest

My dual nationality made me
suspect, and that summer of 1940
I was happy to be A.C.W.2 421234
Baseden,

I was born in Paris, My father
is an engineer, and I travelled
through Europe with my family.

At 12 I was sent to school at
St. Mary’s Priory in Stamford
Hill, London, There I stayed until
war broke out. My father was
ork put on secret engineering
work.

BUT MY MOTHER WAS
STILL LIVING AT ARCA-

CHON, IN FRANCE, AND
WAS TRAPPED THERE
WHEN THE TIDE OF INVA-

SION FLOWED OVER
FRANCE,

In the W.A.A.F I worked at
Kenley fighter station sorting let-
ters. I was happy, I worked like
that for a year and then J spplied
for a commission. I wen* before
a board.

The head, an air yice-marshal,
said to me: “With your knowledge
of languages, why don’t you apply
for a commission in Intelligence?”

I told him I thought, at 18, I
was too young. Nevertheless, in
three weeks’ time I was ¢
sioned in Intelligence. I was one
of the youngest officers in the
WAAF.

* * *

COME time later I got to know

a girl called Pearl Withering-
ton. She was to be decorated later
fo* helping the French Resistance
Movement,

She told me she was going to be
posted to a job where she could
use her Firench vocabulary.

I said, “See if you can get a job
for me, too, I’m forgetting all my
French.” For the Service had put
me in an office coping with Dutch
and Norwegians,

One morning two months later
I received a letter.

It said: —

“Dear Madam, Would you
please report to the Ministry of
Pensions, Sanctuary-place, West-
minster, and ask for Mr, Ben-
net.”

Of course, I went. A small man,
rather bald, in a tweed suit, was
waiting for me, He said:—

‘Miss Witherington mentioned
you. The job’ we have in mind is
rather dangerous, and from a
security point of view you won’t
be able to mention it to anybody.
It might mean going over to
France.”

He questioned me for some time
and then said he would give me a
few days to think it over.

ANSWER : ‘YES’
Ready to go to Franco
A few days later, on a May
morning in 1943, I was back in
that office saying “Yes.”
Then my face did fall, I was

told that I would have to give up
my uniform—which I thought
suited me—and dress in, the

khaki of the F.A.N.Y,

ON JUNE 18 I WAS TOLD
TO REPORT AT AN OFFICE
IN BAKER-STREET, I WAS
SHOWN INTO A_ LITTLE
ROOM FULL OF YOUNG
MEN AND WOMEN, ALL OF
WHOM HAD VOLUNTEERED
TO GO TO FRANCE.

Soon came the day when our
training started. r an hour’s
train journey we arrived at a
lovely country house, which we
were soon to call the “Mad-house.”
There were ten of us, seven men
and three women.

All those men were to die before
the war ended, and only one of the



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women was to avoid capture by
the Germans. But we didn’t
know that, and we were very gay.

HE house was magnificently
furnished, the food was ex-
cellent. We were always under
observation. Even our personal
letters had to be sent to a box
number, where they were read by
the authorities before reaching us,
Security was everything.

The first morning we were taken
outside one at a time and given
tests in physical obstacles.

The first was to cross a ditch—
supposed filled with burning acid
—too wide to jump.

The last was to leap from the top
of a high tree to a rope a few feet
away. A miss would have meant a
fall of 30 or 40 feet,

After that we eaah had an
hour-long interview with a psy-
chiatrist, who left us limp puzzled,
and angry.

LONELY LODGE
Handling Explosives

It was at this house that I saw
Mr. Bennett again. This time he
was in Army major’s. uniform.

We were there for only five days,
Then we went off to Scotland.

We arrived at Loch Morar, near
lonely Arisaig. After a long boat
journey we landed on the opposite
shore.

Then we had a four-mile walk
through the mountain valleys to
reach a_ deserted grey stone
hunting lodge.

‘ The next morning found us in a
classroom, and we were bein
taught all about explosives, .

Soon we had to blow things up
on exercises,

I had to blow up some railway
lines. I was rather fond of explo-
sives and did it effectively.

Then there was weapon train-
ing. We handled everything from
anti-tank guns to Continental au-
tomatics.

At the end of the course I had
developed a great affection and a
lot of skill with grenades, the
Bren-gun, and the colt .45 revol-
ver.

MY KNIFE

How to kill

But there was one very bad
moment for me. The instructor
gave me a long black-handled
Commando knife. " had to learn
to use it.

In a glade among the fir trees
were three dummy men, which
the instructor manipulated by
wires. I had to learn to stab theta
and kill, + a

“Stab upwards, stab upwards”
was the ord-r repeated over and
over again. hated it. I hated
it so much I never did use a knifo
in France.

' * * *

came unMarmed combat
training with a tough Com-
mando sargeant-major. By the
time I returned to London I had
learned a lot of ways of killing.
And there were many flights on
the rain-swept mountain-sides
attacking sentries, blowing up tar-
gets and practising destruction.
Security was vital. So much so
that when I had toothache I had
to drink rum and svffer for a
week before permission came for
tue to go to the nearest town to
« dentist. Then I was taken under

escort. .

Eventually we went back to
London, i

I was now told that my job
in the Resistance organisation
would be that of a radio opera-
tor. I was sent to Thame to
train,

Hour after hour, day after day,
we practised until I could take a
radio set to pieces, trace faults
and send and receive morse at 30
words a minute.

TRY-OUT
Bedroom radio

But, first, there was an exer-
cise. With my radio in a suitcase,
{ took lodgings in Manchester, I
had a false identity card and
described myself as a student.

In a first-floor back bedroom
overlooking the yards I set up my
aerial and started to transmit.

Bes
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All over Britain
detection
students had been caught and I
waited for the police to come
knocking at the door, but they
never cume.

* * *

Y training was over. I was

taken to a mansion just out-
side London and given a final
security talk.

There I was told of the meth-
ods the Gestapo used to extracé
information from prisoners,

I was told of the bath in which
prisoners were submerged over
and over and over again, of the
way finger and toe nails were
pulled out, of the head screws
which were slowly _ tightened
until consciousness sank in a
flood of pain,

“THERE IS NOTHING WE
CAN DO TO HELP YOU IF
YOU ARE CAUGHT,” I WAS
INFORMED. “WE CAN
ONLY GIVE YOU A TABLET
WHICH WILL KILL YOU IN
ONE MINUTE.”

That night as I went to sleep
I could not honestly say I was
upset by what I had been told.
{ was too excited.

It was then I told my father
what my job was. I had permis-
sion ‘to do that.

He looked serious and then
said: “It ts your decision. It is up
to you.”

Soon I was called to our new
H.Q. There, for the first time, 1
met the famous Colonel Buck-

master,
He was very nice. He said:
You are going on a mission

which is rather difficult.”
He told me that I was to go
with another officer to pick up

the threads of a _ once-strong
Resistance organisation near
Dijon, in North-East France,

which had been discovered and
smashed by the Gestapo.

‘LUCIEN’
My Companion

In a little room I waited
anxiously for the man who was
to go with me. He came in, tall,
young, brown-eyed, and looking
as though he came from a long
line of aristocrats, Which was
indeed the case.

His code name was “Lucien”,
and his first words to me were;
“Come and have something to
eat.” over a little table in Soho
this second-lieutenant told me
how he had been on one mission
and tad been caught and tor-
tured,

“IT am going to take one of those
tablets this time,” he said. “Do
you think it’s right?”

So intent was “Lucien” that he
went along to a bishop before
we left England to ask if he would
be right in destroying himself if
the need arose. Of course, the
bishop said he would be.

* a *

*T UCIEN” and { were moved to
a countyy house in Hertford-
shire.

There we waited, sleeping and
eating and talking. There was a
bar and lots to drink, but neither
of us felt like it. Instead, “Lu-
cien” was smoking rather heavily.

From our point of view the most
important fitting was the school
blackboard in the hall. On this
departure times were chalked.

SURE ENOUGH, ONE

MORNING THERE WERE

OUR NAMES AND THE

CRYPTICS “4 P.M.”

We were driven to an airfield,
straight to a lonely dispersal hut.
Here we put flying overalls over
our civilian clothing and strapped
on parachutes and equipment.
And on the plain wooden table
was “Lucien’s” tablet.

NO SIGNAL

We returned

The aircraft took off and soon,
it seemed, I was sitting with my
legs dangling over the rim of
the hole through which we were
to jump.

Then things went wrong. We
got no signal from the reception
committee on the ground.

We flew round until the pilot
was told an enemy aircraft was
stalking him, so we returned to



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were radio
stations. Some of our

.. SUNDAY ADVOCATE :

England.

I was bitterly cold, and for the
first time really low and miser-
able. The tension gave way to
despair.

“Lucien” and I wandered round
London, We had seen all the



things |



shows, We just ate and talked,
Then we were sent back to the
mansion. We were told we were

to be dropped in Irance hun-
dredg of miles from our destina-
tion, We would have to make our
way overground,



MICE ARE GOOD MEDICINE

If you have seen flying saucers

recently — or to be more exact,
circucar lights in the air — or
if your hen has brought off a

sitting of all hen chicks, or even
if you have heard a cricket you
are, according to superstition, in
danger of death!

But do not get too worried,
there are hundreds of other death
bortents, To mention only a few:
The sound of bells at night; call
by some absent person; howling
of dogs at the house door; hens
laying eggs with double yolks:
chirping of fish after they
have been taken from the water;
and finally, a whistling Woman or
a crowing hen. So you s¢e, there
are so many things to worry about
that it is not worth worrying,

But to turn to a more serious
subject—drunxkenness, I think jt
is literally irue to say in this cas«
that the cures are worse than the
disease. For instance, in Wales
they say: “To prevent drunken-
ness, take the lungs of a hog and
roast them. If a man eats these,
after fasting all day, he will not
get drunk next day no matter
how much he drinks.”

Then comes this awful advice
to wives: “To cure a husband of
drinking to excess put a live cel
in his drink”, This cure, no doubt,
would work, unless of course the
suspecting husband had taken the
precaution to have a meal of hog’s
lungs!

Another rather drastic cure for
drunkenness is recorded by Swan
in his Speculum Mundi, He says
the eggs of an owl, broken and
put into the cup of a drunkard,
will so work with him that he
will suddenly lothe his good
liquor, and be displeased with
drinking.” It seems a_ shocking
waste!

Lucky Or Unlucky?

Eyebrows have given rise to a
few superstitions. The general
belief is that persons whose eye-
brows meet will be lucky in al)



By IAN GALE
their undertakings.
On the other hand there is a

couplet which runs:
Trust not those whose eyebrows
meet,
For in their
deceit,
But perhaps the two supersti-
tidtis are not so variaht as they
at first appear, for deceit may
possibly be an attribute to being
lucky in one’s financial under-
takings,
Curiously enough another su-
perstition on eyebraws says that,
should they meet, the person thus

heart they carry

adorned will be unlucky, For it
is held that:
If your eyebrows meet across
your nose,

You'll never live to wear wed-

ding clothes.

On the other hand, the couplet
may have been composed by some
disillusioned husband!

I once knew a Chinese who told
me that newborn mice coated with
honey and then swallowed alive
were absolutely delicious. I was
not tempted but oddly enough |
haye since discovered that, in
superstition, mice are good medi-
cine.

For instance, these three super-
stitions: “Mice minced, given to
a sufferer, will cure the measles.”
“To cure the whooping cough,
roast a mouse and give it to the
patient.” And finally, “A roast
mouse is a certain cure for a child
who wets its bed at night.”

Clean And Healthy

To deal with the last one first.
Quite recently a rs. Rowe of
London wrote this letter, which
shows that the bed-wetting super-
stition is still believed. “A friend
of mine with a mite three years
old is at present giving her stew-
ed mice for bladder trouble, and
it is curing her. Of course she
buys lean, healthy mice from pet



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That night we jumped,

FTER the din and bone-pro-

bing coldness of the journey

I found myself falling through 300

eet with a revolver at my side}

and 5,000,000 franes on my back
( was a lovely starlit night,

As | landed, 1 could smell the



xine trees, and the air felt soft
ind warm,

1 was alone, “Lucien” had
landed some distance away and

was out of sight.

SUDDENLY I H EA RD
HEAVY BOOTS POUNDING
OVER THE GROUND
TOWARDS ME.

My parachute lay awout my
feet, and my revolver was in my
hand,

Then, just as rapidly as it had
come, that small tight knot that
was my tummy melted. For the
running feet stumbled, and a
they stumbled a French voice
swore loud and lustily.

It was a friend coming toward:
me and not a. German.

I was just 21 as 1 was greetec
by the Resistance on- that eage
and exciting night, and. ‘Lucien’
was very little older.

(World Copyrignt)

NEXT WEEK
Our first operation:

Success—then capture :
I face the torture

—L.E.S.

stores. Incidentally, I kmew in my
youth a lad of fifteen cured by
this means of this complaint, And
isn’t it quite possible that some of
us are having mice extract in our
present day medicine?”



In his Compleat History of Ani-
mals and Minerats, Richard Lovell,
St. C.C,, Oxon, states; “A mouse
dissected and applied draweth out
reeds, darts and other things that
stick to the flesh. Mice bruised
and reduced to the consistence of

an acopon with old wine cause
hairs on the eyebrows, Bein
eaten by children when roasted

they dry up the spittle. The wate
in which they have been boiled,
helps the quinsey. The fresh blood
kills wars. The ashes of the
skinne, applied with vinegar helpe
the pains of the head. ‘The liver,
roasted in the new moon, trieth
the epilepsy.” The moral seems to
be that no doctor should be with-
out mice in his bag,

But before we leave those dear
little creatures it is interesting to
find that Professor G. Eliot Smith,
in dissecting the naturally mum-
mified bodies of pre-Dynastic
Egyptians found in the Sudan,
notes “the occasional presence of
the remains of mice in the alimen-
tary canals of children."’ Thus the
mouse cure goes back some sixty
centuries,

And finally a few words of warn-
ing for cricketers, Three cricket
superstitions that I have found go
like this; “If a batsman takes
guard twice, he will soon be bowl-
ed.” “A batsman whose pads are
on the wrong legs will score no
runs.” And “If two members of
the team wash their hands at*the
same time, it means a duck for
both.” All very depressing.

The great W. G, Grace had a
superstition of his own. He be-

lieved that if he went in the bat-
ting list with an even number he
would make no runs.
ways went in first!

So he il.

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PAGE .TEN

SUNDAY ADVOCATE



OLYMPICS;
3 Swimming Records Set

Olympics Finish Sunday

: HELSINKI, Aug. 2.
THE swimming and diving events were brought to
conclasion here today with three more Olympic records.
The 1,500 metres Men’s Freestyle, the “Blue Riband” event ’
in which world records were expected to tepele, saw two in the end. Konno followed
new faeces taking over world supremacy from reigning Toushly two lengths behind
champions Surueiashi of Japan and Marshall of Australia.
These Wére Ford. Konno the five all broke the Olympic record.
young Hawatian star who was the Konno and Hashizume of
eventual-winner and Japan’s com- course were not completely un-
parative néweomer S. Hashizume known. In fact the former is
who Yano mecond. Okamoto of credited with twice breaking the
Brazil but-obviously of Japanese world record for the 1,500 metres
origin was Third and J. McLane o! but they were not reco;
the U.S.A. was fourth. The firsi cause they were made



pools. But neither of them had.
swam in the world com .
the race started off with Hashi-
zume setting a ‘blistering pace
which I suspect was his undoing

gradually falling back as lap fol-
lowed lap. Hashizume’s style is
said to be the best of all the Ja
anese but it is a quick stroke while
Konno in contrast has a slower
tempo but gets more speed out of
it. He also moves his bet-
ter than the Japanese. 3
easier style began to tell and he
forged into the lead. He never
looked back after this and in the
last 50 metres it was pathetic to
see how he lapped John Marshall
who finished last,

Determined Effort

Okamoto of Bi«zil was many
lengths behind Hashizume but he
had to make a determined effort
to keep just ahead of McLane and
the Frenchman Bernardo who had
made a good finishing sprint
Konno therefore won both a gold
and silver medal as he was second
in the 400 metres two days ago.
The experts predicted that it will
not be long before he lowers the
world mark but they might he
wrong as only recenty Marshall
and Furuhshi were hailed as
the world’s greatest ever and
just recently two books were
about to be published on the in-
fluence of their respective styles
m swimming when along came
two orthodox men like Konno and

in short



mins. 30 secs. . 42.4 secs. better
than the old mark.

Exciting Race

The 200 metres breast stroke for

The great Finn Paavo Nurmi carries the Olympic Torch round the
track on the last leg of its journey all the way from Athens where

the original flame was lit. Here he is seen passing the members of

the International Olympic Committee on the straight way in front
of the grand stand. Thunderous applause proclaimed the everlasting
popularity, of Nurmi and his stride still carried rhythm of youth.








































any whose style I commented
m yesterd: led from the start
but none of the others were far
“behind him. But when it looked
@as if Davis was going to provide
another “Marshall” he let go with
his sprint which indicated that he
had only been biding his time.
He passed the whole lot gnd
just reached Klein with abput 20
metres to go. Here it was well
demonstrated that Klein’s sub-
marine action is not conducive to
sprinting and Davis went away’
from him to win by about half a
length. Meanwhile Stassorth of the
U.S.A. also turned in a splendid
last minute sprint to beat Klein
for second place. The German’s
syle Must take tremendous
strength and endurance.

Davis’ time of 2 mins. 34.4 secs.
was a new Olympic record. Only
the seventh and eighth men, the
last two to finish, did not break
the old record.

The ladies’ high diving com-
petition was won easily by Pat
McCormick and the U.S.A. just
to finish with a flourish brought
off another treble with Paula
Myers and June Irwin in second
and third places,

In the final of the 400 metres
Freestyle for ladies the Hunga-
rian National Anthem which has
been heard almost as much as

the Star Spangled Banner
was in the field track
events was once again played.

The facial expressions of Emil Zatopek in the 10,000 metres tell But this time it was for Valeria

their own story of the terrific pace he set. Behind him is Mimoun ee wae tee pee Pm pes
ance cond. a

re $ or country. One Eva, however,

ener Ter Novak was second and the Ha-

ss waiian girl Katanoto was third
for the U.S.A.

After swimming I saw the Foot-
ball final between Hungary and
Yugoslavia and as both teams are
full of professionals it was de-
finitely a world class game. There
was not much to choose between
them although Hungary’s winning
score of two—nil and a missed
penalty in the bargain would
make it appear so.

The Yugoslavia forwards lacked
the finishing touches of the Hun-
garians but later were lucky to
get their second goal when the
Yugoslav’s goalie was caught in
a blind spot behind one of his
backs. Otherwise h> was easily
the man of the match. As the
Games end to-morrow it is with
regret that a sordid tale has to
be told about the boxing and
basket ball contests which will
spoil the goodwill so abundantly
evident in the other: contests.







Basketball:

Knock-out Matches
Begin Tuesday

NO Ist Division Basketball!
matches were played last week.
The Knock Out Cup matches are
scheduled to start on Tuesday.



THE WINNER OF THE OLYMPIC «
Bob Mathias, of Tulare, Calif
Campbell (left), of Plainfleld

Simmons, pf Los A
world’s record by scori

~
thlon for the second straight time,
s congratulated in Helsinki by Milt
J., who finished second, and Floyd
»k third place. Mathias set a new
S7 . ints. (International Soundphoto)










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The spirit of friendship in the Olympic village of Kapyla could not
be better. Here members of the Jamaican track team get together
with some French and Israelies over a common problem of finding
their way about with the aid of a map. Seated are George Rhoden
and Herb McKenley. Looking over McKenley’s shoulder is Leslie
Laing and behind him is Byron LaBeach.

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SUNDAY, AUGUST 3, 1

By JOHN PRIDEAUX

Slavery

THE recognition of free col-
oured people was gradually gain-
ing headway, but was still meet-
ing with tremendous opposition.
In 1804, Mr. Thomas Briggs, a
Member of the House of Assem-
bly, sided with the weaker side,
and started a campaign for the
admission of evidence of free
coloured people in the Courts of
Law. Up to now these people
could not given sworn testimony.
A terrific controversy arose over
this campaign, with the result
that Briggs lost his seat in the
House,

Lord Seaforth, the Governor,
was also active in his humani-
tarism, for in 1805 he induced
the ture to pass an Act
making the wilful murder of a
slave punishable with death
instead of, as had been the law,
by a fine of fifteen pounds in
the case of the Murderer’s own
slave, and in the case of another
man’s slave, a fine of twenty-
five pounds plus double the
value of the slave, which was to
be paid to the owner. It will be
remembered that Mr. John
Brathwaite, Agent for the House
of Assembiy of Barbados in
‘England, recommended this in
his evidence before the Lords of
the Privy Council in 1788;. a
matter of seventeen years be-
fore this law was passed.

William Wilberforce (1759-
1833) the son of a Hull merchant,
‘who was educated at Cambridge
and entered Parliament in 1780,
and Thomas Clarkson (17450-
1846) were two of, the leaders
of the Negro Emancipation
movement. Wilberforce cham-
pioned the abolition of the slave
trade, as it was thought that if
this trade was abolished, then
‘tthe state of Slavery would soon
die out, as there would be no
replenishments received from
Africa, and the cost of raising
children for slaves was terrific;
also the breeding of slaves was
not economical as during the
pericd of pregnancy and for
some time after confinement anc
delivery, the woman slave was
of no economical value to the
plantation. Wilberforce cham-
pioned this cause in Parliament,
his first proposals for the aboli-
‘tion of this trade’ were made in
1789, but the time was not yet
It was not until 1807 that
Act which ended this
horrible trade was passed. This
‘was not emancipation, for those
slaves already in the colonies
remained as such; it was only
the stopping of the capture of
tthe African on his native soil
and the transportation of these
unfortunate people to the
Colonies that came to an end.
Even though this law was
passed, there were Captains of
ships who ran the risk and
smuggled these unfortunate
‘wretches itto the United States
of America, where slavery did
not end until 1863, when it was
abolished by proclamation by
President Lincoln.

There is no doubt that some
of the slaves had endured many
cruelties at the hands of many
of their masters; but the treat-
ment of the slaves in Barbados,
‘taken as a whole, appears to
have been by no means as harsh
as it was in many of the other

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British Colonies, The passing
of the ‘Slave Trade’ act fur-
nished the slave owners with a
very strong motive to conserve
and foster the slaves they
already possessed.

Simultaneously, to the slaves,
‘the fresh air of a new and
brighter day breathed, faintly
at first, and with much of what
Carlyle would have called the
fuliginous in ti, yet with ever-
increasing exhilaration over
the night of European irreligion
and Negro heathenism.’ The
stipends of the clergy were in-
creased, not, as the House of
Assembly put it, ‘as an act of
justice to that worthy and re-
spectable class of men,’ but
because of the external pres-
sure from England.

The first Church of England
minister to start instructing the
fyaves of his parish the
duties and principles of Chris-
tianity, was the Reverend Wm.
Hart, of St. Joseph’s Parish.
Schomburgk records that ‘he
commenced on Sunday, July
24th, 1808, the laudable under-
taking of instructing the Neg-
roes of his parish in the duties
of principles of Christianity.’

The passing of the Act mak-
ing the wilful murder of a
slave punishable by the death
enalty, appears to have been
general throughout the West
Indies and not confined to Bar-
bados alone; for in 1811 an
event of the greatest signifi-
cance took place in ‘Tortola,
where a Mr. Hodge, a Member
of the Council of that Island,
was hanged for the murder of
five slaves. This was brought
about only after ‘the Governor
had brought a warship to the
Island and disregarded the
Jury’s recommendation to
mercy. This immediately arous-
ed the elements of opposition
in the Islands of Jamaica and
Barbados, the planters did
their utmost to impede progress
of the education and religious
teachings of the slaves, but it
was of no avail. One historian
records ‘that Hodge was event-
ually convicted and hanged was
satisfactory; but it was not sat-
isfactory that he had been
allowed, previously to commit
dozens of such horrible murders
with impunity. Whether Hodge
was the exception or the rule
among planters was less im-
portant than the tolerance
apparently extended by colonial
society to those who defied its
not very exacting standards.’ (1)

The Church was meeting with
opposition from the planters
with their programme of educa-
tion and Christianising the
slaves, mainly due to the Hai-
tian rebellion in 1791, and the
massacre of all the white in-
habitants in San Domingo in
1804. It was felt that if the
Church continued with its
teachings of equality, it would
lead to the same effects in Bar-
bados; and that there would be
a rebellion of the slaves before
long. Lord Seaforth had also
caused great offence to the
planter section by his letter of
November 13th, 1804, which
was laid before the House of
Commons on February 25th,
1805 forwarding ‘four papers
containing from different quar-
ters reports of the horrid

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murders . . . selected from a
great number” and Stating
that the bottom of the business,
so horribly absurd was the pre-
judices of the people. On Jan-
uary ‘th, 1805, Lord Seaforth
had written ‘I enclose’ the
Attorney-General’s letter to me
‘on the subject of the Negroes so
most wantonly murdered. I am
sorry to say several other in-
cidents of the same barbarity
have occurred. . . .’

In 1816, the slaves misled by
mandaceous rumours that free-
dom had been granted by the
Imperial Government, and was
being withheld by the local
authorities, also stirred up by a
craft agitator, the slaves in the
Windward parishes rose in rebel-

lion, burning and plundering
property but committing no
murder.

Joseph Pitt Washington Frank-
lin, a freed coloured man, de-

scribed as a ‘person of loose
morals and debauched habits,
but superior education’ con-

ceived and planned the insur-
rection which was carried out
under the leadership of a
African named Bussa. Franklin
went about the country reading
to the slaves those violent speech-
es at that time delivered against
slavery in England.

This outbreak took place on
Easter Sunday, April 1816, and
one eminent planter recorded ‘a
Hell-broth——-which has been long
in the brewing—at length broke
forth.” The first signal for this
revolt was the firing of cane
trash and the ringing of the plan-
tation bells in the parish of St.
Philip at 8.00 o’clock in the eve-
ning. This revolt spread like the
fire in the cane trash, and within
a short space of time ‘mill after
mill was turned into the wind to
fly untended...... the fire spread
during the whole night from field
to field...... the rebellious mob
increased,’ These revolting
slaves looted the hardware store
of a Mr. Bayne, and armed them-
selves with cutlasses, bills, and
such weapons as they could find,
also some firearms, They looted
also the Militia stores of the St.
Philip’s Batallion, and when the



Emigrate

LONDON.

Because of political considera-
tions, some British mining com-
panies operating overseas have lit-
tle hope of survival unless they
emigrate. This view is put for-
ward to the Britsh Overseas
Mining Association in a memoran-
dum to the Royal Commission on
Taxation.

It urges the abolition of re-
strictions on emigration of com-
panies,

The association points out that
where British Companies are
working natural resources over-
seas, political considerations often
demand some measure of partner-
ship with local interests.

The attempt to make the pattern
of control inflexible and subject to
veto by the U.K. Treasury, it says,
has created an atmosphere of
hostility abroad which may have
unfavourable repercussions far
out-weighing the narrow fiscal
advantage which the prohibitions

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SUNDAY ADVOCATE

THE PEOPLE OF BARBADOS-XVII

troops advanced to meet them,
the rebels advanced on them
brandishing aloft the stolen
colours of this section of the
Militia. The first engagement
with the Militia of this parish
took place at the Golden Grove |
estate. The troops surprised the)
rebels in the act of rifling the’
stated house, so they fired on the |
troops, who only dislodged them
after much trouble. This out= |
break was so sudden that all the
planters, who were mostly mem-|

bers of the Militia, were fully |?

occupied with defending their
own lives and property, so help
was not at first summoned from |
the Regular troops stationed at
different points in the Island,
and it was not until two o’clock
on ‘Monday. afternoon that the
news reached Bridgetown that
any organised attack was made
upon the rebels. Once the
‘Regulars’ came into action, the
outbreak was quickly subdued,
and the Island was put under
Martial Law,

One General of the Militia
records “....not, however with-
out bloodshed, this being un-
happily not as before wholly con-
fined to the rebels.
everywhere apparent of most
wanton distruction by fire and
pillage; to an exten, at present
incalculable, but without ques-
tion irreparable of many weeks.
Truly, the vengeance of this
horde, inflamed with every vile
passion, which committed every

imaginable and filthy outrage in | ‘

its path has afforded but a fore-
taste of what would have been
the fate of us all had these |

miscreants succeeded in wreak- | X
ing their savage will. (2), rR:
1) OSePh Pitt Washington Franke |}
in and some others were hanged, | \
and 123 of the other slaves con-. | %

cerned in the insurrection were |
transported to British Honduras.

(To be continued)

1. ‘The British West Indies,’
by E. L. Burn,
1951, p 112.

2. ‘The Barbadian Diary of
Gen. Robert Haynes, 1787-
1836. Edited by Everil M.
W. Cracknell, 1934.

Or Expire
seek to preserve for the United
Kingdom.

Taxes Must Come Back

Profits made by British mining
companies overseas, the Associa-
tion urges, should be taxed only
to the extent that they are remit-
ted to this country.

Payment of taxes to the British
Government is viewed in overseas
territories in almost as adverse a
light as the excessive withdrawal
of profits,

In most territories, British min-
ing companies have to compete, it
is stated, with locally-owned com-
panies and, in many territories
with American companies,

Arguing in favour of full uni-
lateral relief from double taxation
in respect of all taxes imposed
overseas, the Association states:
“It is most unfortunate that taxa-
tion coneessions urged on Colonial
Governments by the Colonial
Office are largely negatived for
United Kingdom companies by the
taxation policy of the U.K,

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PAGE TWELVE SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY, AUGUST 3%, 1952

































> mae oF eee
EDUCATION NOTES: iz
acne , 1 1 y , é
THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LID. :¢ 4RTER THE RACES
’ ° QO h \. h White Park-Road, Bridgetown 3 ;
The Influence Of The Teacher 3 :
7 & 2
nN > PERN . . ) ris Male to oli . . 147 — we 2 |
n a tines enema een of the Seinen the atmosphere in which it is Pitcher Clarke, outstanding con- ENGINEERS, BRASS and IRON FOUNDERS 3
! . ae “is - & - = 7 ared can be of great assistance to stitutional lawyer and Attorney j ‘ s aiilie ike P . 20 = _
system in this island when I discovered that in this comedy the Gaucher interested in the child. General of this island after nelag weal anee ; hee en canal 40 _ : eae sri Ne aaa a
of errors the worst seems yet to come. And sol apologise Let it not be forgotten too that secretary to Mr. W. E. Gladstone; pe dba hearer : |2@ SANJ‘WICH PASTE ,, GREEN CHARTREU
aia hie ae F thet Sudictesil , much of the friction which is like~ Sir John Randall Phillips, Presi- SUGAR MACHINERY and STEAMSHIPS . =r
to readers of this column for the indiscretion. . 7 . Cc. T. CHERRIES Bots DRAMBUE....
ly to arise between teacher and dent of the Council succeeding in AGRICULTURAL MACHINERY d | A es foes , : s+
There is a general feeling of Remove him and the cord is pon or teacher and parent can Chandler; and Sir John Hutson, Dealers in ‘ ‘ ani | SALTED NUTS CURACAO TRIPLESEC ,,
alarm that something has happen- snapped, There will hardly be the avoided if there are thimgs in President succeeding Phillips, ' GENERAL ENGINE ROOM STCRES i $/3 SALTED NUTS ..... " Chases ti -seteiees:
ed of has been allowed to happen same feeling towards another common, such as resid and G.B.R. Burton, the greatest head- of all Description Cc. T. ONIONS ...... n .
and that it is throwing the machin- school and its pupils and so the good ——— relationship master Combermere School has CONTREAU ......... ‘a
ey Suet ayer. I ron inalined te velue of thle work ah a ws - . It might not ever seen. They at one pe IRRIGATION PROJECTS, PUMPING tee MUSTARD ......... ” KOLA TONIC
view that some 3 in n yet another ins 2 many spok lmost verentially of the and AIC AL, INSTALL. ATIONS A GPEGIALZYT S10 ese chew ccc: mt eee .
on wrecking our system, If this really sound teacher might be led people, but the eer hes been aaade oF Mr, ‘Wright and it ELEC CAL INSTALLATIONS A SPECIAL | ICE CREAM MIX ....Tins. DRY MONOPOLE
were not so there could not be so to feel that he or she is being used displaced by the teacher as the jx for us to measure the contri- For BRANDY
many mistakes. to build up schools for favourites “friend of all” in the district and it bution which they made to public Be le ae ee Se a Con iee 8¢ 8s aes 5 Bots DRY FLY SHERRY ,,
The most recen{ announcement and that as soon as there is im- is essential that nothing be done jjfe in Barbados. A son of this Satisfaction, Quality and Service WHISKY GOLDEN ARROW RUM
is that teachers at the Elementary provement in one school he or she to disrupt the relationship, ae wa a I a i oe be oie. ek a re er aes tne ” .
Schools will be transferred to is removed to do the spade work But if I have dealt with the Administrator of St. Lueia, ar- Contact ie ——-——

different schools in various parts {n another. minor aspects of the objection, let
of the island and that no teacher For me itis so serious a matter me for one moment point those
will be allowed to remain at one thet | invite teachers to wait Upo" even more qualified than I, t0 transit passenger was to see Cou-
school more than five years, the Director in a delegation and gauge the influence which a sound bnddaie. Ceaaee where, accordin?

There are occasions when trans- pegister strong objection, They teacher has over the entire lives to hits, he Was born and where
fers are necessary in the interes! should not wait to object, individ of his pupils and the school (a8 aM j,i; father laboured for so many
of teachers and schools, but as ® yally, when a transfer is made. _—jnstitution) in which he serves for pears. A mi ;

deliberate i the indiscrim- 7 ;
inate Gunster ~ teachers is as 7 is ty Be Oa pene any length of time, ; And who in later years can
‘0s 0! ling

stupid as it is dangerous I i 1 Those who have taken the forget the influence of Mr. G.B.Y,

I did not want to believe it but : tac aee pe genet cont pe trouble to delve into the past ‘Gussie’ Cox On the Lower

I recollect now that a teacher of {} st teacher's salary and in other history of Barbados will have School of Harrison College. I!

: the Roebuck Boys’ School and cases his domestic arrangements "Cad of the Reverend Wright who could say much more on this but

; who lives in St. Michael, was re- might be seriously upset. Imagine Was a Master at Lodge Scnoo) there are men in business and

cently transferred to the Mess the case of a young man who must and later Lecturer at Codrington the professions today whose testi-

House School, St. Lucy; later he joaye his family and, because of College. During his years he had Monies _ would be worth more

was sent to St. George. Another {,, ve} difficulties, get board and among his pupils at one time o» than mine, Let them speak for
lady who lives at Barbarees Hill lodging with strangers. His only another, men who not only in themselves.

and had been teaching at Westbury ajternative is to carry his entire their day and generation made The influence of a good teacher

a Girls’ was transferred to St. family and in the absence of buy- Barbados great, but who together does not cease with the end of

Histives Ailttict ama teahine a ing a house, live under the school made an unrivalled contribution school days and to root him out

rived here a few years ago and
his greatest anxiety while an in-

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MESH WIRE

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St. Matthias was transferred to cellar, to the welfare of this island. The of his place like ge a, i
‘ quan In the case of young women, the list, short as it is, reads like an transferred from sta 0 sta- Pp,
Py tenet oth wrong, but it might °##¢ is even more absurd. extract from ‘Who's Who’ rather tion to prevent criminals from remeises .. - all sizés and guages

be that transfers of this kind are 1 must net be understood to than a_ collection of Barbadians knowing him too well is to do an






intended to breed grave dissatis- mean tha’ .vachers must not pe who became eminent because injustice to the cause of teaching. WITH THE 4684 in best quality
' faction on the part of the teacher (ransferrea or must be found they had come under the influ- To advocate it is to preach 4723
: and so undermine his or her work. appointments in the district in ence of Rev. Wright. Sir William heresy and if there is not some

| ne, £ thie’ » > \ - Chandler, eminent judge and inquiry into the administration

-endney oY the, “ebodhand its read sais Tidip tn "the district or President of the Legislative of adidnlloe in this island, neither
pupils, he watches it grow in size being close to the ‘school ig a Council the one Barbadian who Governor nor teachers will be
and improve in standards; its suc. decided asset to teacher, pupils and was awarded two knighthoods in able any longer to boast that
cess becomes his chief ambition parents. Personal knowledge of a lifetime; Sir Frederick Clarke, Barbados led the West Indies in
and as an institution it becomes the circumstances of a child’s Speaker of the House of Assem- anything.

SPECIAL LOW PRICES

MASTER LOCKS

We have them in all sizes



part and parcel of his very being. parents or family background and bly;' his brother Sir Charles J.E.B. e
Dorinfinemesmnensnientmattnccenht eis: aldara mavertnarenaiahendaaeeaasne antenatal ATT

ee ee re Sk: Sasa: tk sedan ake aad ge GENERAL HARDWARE _ SUPPLIES BARNES & CO., LTD.

SCOUT NOTES: Bes yoy i itd elaine Restrictions On seems eT



has a chan¢e to learn all the parts . EET (Opposite Post Offic ‘

of making the Patrol System work. Salt Fish Imports RICKETT STREET (Opposite Post Office) "PHONE 4918
OwW’s YOUR SYSTEM These are the sort of things that i }

. - Bave to be wosked out with #aae Relaxed ee
Patrol and then, once the decis~ i ‘ : ;

(From the Canadian ‘Junior Leader") membering that it has been used ion is made, the Patrol Leader |, ,.cordance with an Order
mu

; suceessfully many times, st make sure that everyone ,,,, rece by His Excellen:
HAVE you eee of a "Patrol Toho In Headquar- does his share, Of course the spate seo bee the Exports
Patrol as being a Council just like |. O. Camp, responsible for as- Patrol Leader should be able and nq Imports (Restriction Act,
pee -che-tmat fuse the affairs of signing duties and seeing that willing to do any of these jobs j939) persons may now import

se

Some put their money



your Village, Town or City? Well, tiny are ¢ t himself and occasionally lend o from any country dried, smoked,

that tnt eet ip just what the rete hand, pickled and salted fish, onions and th bo b ta il na

Patrol is, although the duties of § © ¢ o nd: Quartermaster, in Work out your own ideas and potatoes. e Z

@ach member may be a little ¢)arge of supplies of food and then when camp time rolls around The Order is only applicable to

different from the Municipal cquipment and First Aid. your Patrol will “be prepared.’ this type of goods which are wholly Z

Councillor or Alderman. The No, 1 Scout; Chief Cook, in Scouts of the Third Sea Scouts prepared in countries from whic t t th b a
Patrol Leader is the Chairman of charge of preparing meals. Proop of Speightstown and of export takes place. ome pu 1 on e y
i this “Council” and he develops No, 2 Scout: Assistant Cook. the Ist Harrison College Troop The Order stipulates that the

his Patrol by giving each indi- No, 3 Scout: Scribe, keeping are in camp at St. James’ Mixed certificate of origin of all
} vidual some definite responsibil- accounts of moneys and stores, School near Trents, St. James. of such goods shall be produced by
i ity ee in oe keeps log of the camp or hike. The camp is in charge of Scouters the ers ee the J
and camp, if ea cout has a No. 4 Scout: Pioneer, making V. E, Matthews and D. Fowles 4pprovai 0 retary ial B fi lk l J b k
definite share in making the drains, bridges, latrines. both of Harrison College Staff, must be obtained prior to was eee ut wise oO a ways ACR .«s
Patrol work smoothly he will be They expect to be in camp unti] portation of any such gee by bel
more interested and the Patrol No. 5 Scout: Sanitation, keep- wednesday next. payment for such sony than thal
Leader will have time to develop ing camp clean, incinerator. made to a country other

new ideas. No. 6 Scout: Axeman, supply- country of origin of the goods.
With Troop camp ,coming up ing firewood; Fireman and Water. ° ;
‘gery soon you will want to make man, has charge of cooking or Good Fish Catches Band Concert ‘
ere. Yape. Palcol ts working Oa~ garde Akg Sie i anes ees Fishermen from Bathsheba are \
some ystem of this kind, Our This is just an outline, of course, ineing mi ' olice Band
. . . . » having a good season with sna There will be a_ Police
Founder, Lord Baden-Powell sug- and Patrol Leaders are urged 8 sare < we weported on Prides, . Coneert at. the Bathsheba Social

sted the following as a logical develop their own “council.”
ivision of dyties for members of you have eight in the Patrol, for . tas soe re fae on ae ha 4 = age
the Patrol in camp, Look it over examiple, then some ofthe dutics and returned to the Bay with first scheduled for Wednesday, but

and see what you think of it, re- can be divided. It might be ® reagonable good catches. Boats was changed because Wednesday
went out in full force yesterday. is Transfiguration Day. i HE W A j







COME AND SEE Our Big Assortment BBs) 6

“.
CLOCKS OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS

SMALL CLOCKS, BIG CLOCKS, DESK CLOCKS

WALL, CLOCKS, TRAVELLING CLOCKS














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PAGE SIXTEEN



RANGERS TO CAMP IN 1





RINIDAD



=





YESTERDAY afternoon relatives and friends were at Seawell Airport to see tho Queen's College Ran-
gers go off to Trinidad where they will be in camp at the Girl Guides’ Headquarters, Belmont Circular

oad for 14 days.

Miss Beryl Skeete is in Charge of the group.

This is the first Queen's College group to visit Trinidad but previously girls have camped in Grenada,
Miss Bleanor Nurse an dthree other rangars left by B.W.I.A. on Friday and will later join the others

at Headquarters.
The list are as follows:

Miss Bery) Skeete (Leader-in-Charge), Joan Best, Yvonne Barnwell, Thelma

Brathwaite, Doreen Dear, Andoliny King, Maridene King, Anita Lowhar, Leila Mascoll, Patricia Max-

well, Joyce Maynard, Daphne Smith, Joan Walkes, Marcia Yarde,

(Nurse).

Butter, Cornmeal
Expected Soon

THIRTEEN THOUSAND BAGS of cornmeal are due
to arrive here in shipments arriving between the -latter

part of this month and early December.

Shipments of

table and cooking butter are coming during the next
few months.
A recent notice issued
Controller of Supplies states that
licences. for table butter from
5terling and Soft Currency
scurces Will be issue to ‘mport-
ers from whom quotas have been
received .,.against wholesalers’
signed confirmation notes up to
their maximum quotas of 35 tons
for arrival before the end of De-
cember.

The ceiling price for this com-
modity will be 99.27 cents per 1
ib. tin: 82,6 cents per 1 lb. parcel;
and 97.61, cents per five Ib. tin.

Licenees will also be issued for
quentities af cooking butter from
the. same sources to importers
trom whom quctas have been re-
ceived against wholesalers’ signed
confirmation notes up to their
maximum distribution quotas of
115 tons for .arrival. also before
the end of December,

A different ceiling price has;
been fixed in respect of shipments
which arrive immediately, and
shipments “arriving later,

For the August shipments, the
ceiling price is as follows. 84.72
cents per 1 lb. tin; 79.81 cents per
five lb. tin and 77.85 cemis per 25
Ib. tin. For the September —
October shipment. the prices has
been fixed at 86.19 certs per 1 Ib.
tin; 81.28 cents per five lb. tin and
79.39 c@nts per 25 Jb. tin.

“RED” DEAN GENTL®

SPIRITUAL OLD MAN
WOLVERHAMPTON, Aug, 2
Dr. Hewlett Johnson “Red” Dean

of Canterbury who returned from
China recently with alleged proof
of Allied germ warfare is “a very
gentle and spiritual old man,’ says
Canon Jobn Brierley, Rector of
this Midlands town, Canon Brier-
ley wrote In the Parish Magazine
that the Dean’s “simplicity is being
used asa tool by the very astute
people ‘who lead the Communist
forces in Europe and Asia,”

Canon Brierley said “it is abun.

dantly clear that if he holds these
views and wants to expound them
he ought to resign the high office
which he holds in the church. He
has no right to use his position to
give a Cloak of respectability to
emotional accusations based on
statements which would not for a
moment bear even a_ cursory
examination.”
a0 she —U.P.



The Weather Report

YESTERDAY
Rainfall from Codrington: .08
Temperature; 75.5 °F
hour

Wind Velocity: 9 miles per
hour

Barometer: (9 a.m.) 29.973
(11 a.m.) 29.954

TO-DAY

Sunrises 5.48 a.m.

Sunset: 6.20 p.m.

Moon: First Quartet, July 29

Lighting: 7.00 p.m.

High Tide: 12:57 a.m. 2.14
p.m,

Low tide: 8.10 a.m., 8.00 p.m.





[ Theyll Do lt Every Time

3 Sete
THE CHILDREN'S
GOVERNESS HAS A DAY
OFF TODAY:~AND IT WAS
A QUESTION OF GETTING
A BABY-SITTER OR

BRINGING THEM WITH ME
JUST PAY NO ATTENTION
TO THEMTHEY’LL PLAY

Pr BY THEMSELVES ++












by She --——








GOVERNESS P BABY’
SITTER P WHAT THOSE (7

At the Cinema

@ From Page 3

version with her naucus voice,
bombastic manner and colourful
costumes of the period,

I guess, by and large, THE
BELLE OF NEW YORK will ap-
peal to most people, but it cer-
tainly can’t touch the earlier
Astaire entertainments, Sorry, I
forgot to mention that it is in
Technicolor,

Storm Warning

STORM WARNING, at _ the
Plaza, Barbarees, exposes the
terrorist activities of the Ku Klux
Klan and constitutes an_ indict-
ment of this infamous organiza-
tion, Again, this is a_ strong
meat, and not for the squeamish.

The film has a definite, serious
message concerning the need for
reform, and the’ story points up
the obligation of the private citi-
zen to support law and order when
called upon to do so, regardless of
personal consideration and dan-
ger.

The story concerns a dress model
whe, on her arrival in a small
Southern town to visit her newly-
married sister, is the sole witness
of a murder by a band of hooded
hoodlums. When she realises that
her brother-in-law is one of the
gang she promises not to report
her experience—but later changes
her mind when she becomes more
familiar with the Klan’s acts of
terrorism,

Ginger Rogers and Doris Day
play the two sisters and acquit
themselves well, as does Ronald
Regan as the District Attorney,
while Steve Cochran gives an
admirable performance as_ the
brutish truck driver and cowardly
klansman. of little mental capac-
ity but infinite lechery.

Excellent photography, lighting
and a fine musical score heighten
the dramatic impact of this pic-
ture, Fortunately, we. in this
island do not have to faee a prob-
lem as. presented in STORM
WARNING. Let us earnestly hope
we never do,



Cambridge Road
Being Renovated

Camprige Road is at present
being reconstructed and renovated.
This is the second occasion that
this road will be repaired during
the last 27 years, one of the Super~-
intendents said on Friday,

Through the efforts of the St.
Joseph’s Vestry, 200 C&suarina
trees were planted in a pasture at
Bissex, St. Joseph, during the last
week. They were planted with
the tentative hope of preventing
soil erosion (if they thrive). Some
time ago, trees were planted in
this area for the same purpose, but
they all dried up,

Registered U.S. Patent Office



HOODLUMS NEED J)
IS A WARDEN!



one ee =
ITS LIKE TRYING

: TO PLAY CARDS IN
\Y A SCHOOL BUS! I'D
LIKE TO SIT FOR THEM
JUST ONCE: THEY
WOULDN'T BE ABLE

\)

Jean

(7 WHEN IT WAS HER TURN titi
TOHAVE THE MEETING 3-02 22
AT HER HOUSE, THE :

-( BUTLER WAS SICK OR WHY DIDN'T
SA SOMETHING GOVERNESS, A HER HUSBAND
My FooT! MIND THEM *+s+
OR DON'T THEY
: ALLOW KIDS
IN HORSE-














Best, and Clarita Jordan

Good Crops Of
Ground Provisions
Expected

SOME of the planters who
visited Bridgetown Friday tons
the Advocate that they were look-
ing forward to splendid crops of
ground provisions. “The recent
raintail was a like a “tonic” to
the sweet potatoes and yams which
were recently planted. “And,
what is more, mantring is com-

pleted,” one: planter. told the
Advocate.
Another’ said that the sweet

potatoes, which were only plant-
ed last month, showed good signs.
Yams, eddoes, and pea crops
were also doing fine.

He said that the young. cane
crops were also splendid to look

These planters, although from
various parts of the island, had
nothing to complain about at
present. They are quite satisfied
with the progress of the various

crops.

WEDDING



Toppin— Warner

Yesterday morning. St. George
Parish Church was the scene

of a auiet but pretty wed- p

ding when Mr, Audley Toppin,
Charge Clerk of Messrs. Stuart
& Sampson and only son of Dq’s.
A. D. Seale, took as his bride
Miss Joyce Warner, daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Warner of Two
Mile Hill, St. Michael.

The cbremony was performed by
Canon C., C, Conliffe, Rector of St.
George.

The bridé, who was given in
marriage by her father, wore a
dress of Faconné. Her headdress
was held in place by a wreath of
orange blossoms and she carried
a bouquet of Queen Anne’s Lace,
and tube and radiance roses.

The duties of bestman were per-
formed by Mr. A. D, Seale.

The reception was held at the
heme of Mr. and Mrs. A. D, Seale
at Tudor Street

Listening Hours

SUNDAY, AUGUST 3
4.00—7,15 pam, — 1.76m







4.00 p.m. The News, 4.10 pm. Inter-
lude, 415 p.m For The Common Good,
430 pm Sunday Half Hour, 5 00 pm
From The Bible, 5 10 p m_ Interlude,
515 p.m Bach. 5 45 pm. Arthur's Inn,
615 pm. English Magazine, 6 45 pm
Programme Parade and Interlude, 7 00
pm The News, 710 p.m. Home News
From Britain,
T1046 pm —

715 p,m
Sunday Service, 815 pm
re.l, 830 pm _ Spotlight on Central
Asa, 845 p.m Interlude, 855 pm
rrom The Editorials, 900 pm, From
The Promenade Concerts, 9 45 pm
Olympie Report, 10.00 pm The News,
1) 10 pm News Talk, 10 15 p m. Lon.
con Forum, 10 45 p.m. My Brother's
Keeper, °

MONDAY, AUGUST 4, 1952
100—7.15 pom, — 19.96m,, 25.53m,

25,58m., 31.32m



Caribbean Voices, ¥ 45 p.m
Radio News



400 pm ‘The News, 410 pm _ The
Nally Service, 415 p.m A Tale of Two
Cities, 445 pm Make Mine Country
Style, 5.00 pm. Bach, 5 15 p m_ Peter
Vorke, 555 pm = Interlude, 600 pm
Welsh Miscellany, 615 pm Listeners’
Choice, 6 45 pm Sports Round-Up and
Programme Parade, -700 p.m The
News, 710 p.m Home News From
Britain
7.15—10.80 p.m.

— 6.53m,, 31.32m



715 pm _ Books To Read and Ballet,
° 45pm Eten College, 8 15 p m_ Radio
Newsreel, 8 30 p.m European Survey.
& 45 .9.m_ Interlude, 855 p m From The
Fditorials, 900 pm (~The ‘Edinburgh
Tnternational Festival. 9 30 pm
Records. 1000 pm, The News, 10 10
nm News Talk, 1015 pm The
Vealth .» of Man, 1030 pm
Tunes,

By jimmy Hatlo |

Ay
.



TRYING TO PuT UP WITH
A THE DAME WHO BROUGHT
HER LITTLE DEARS TO |
THE BRIDGE-CLUB TEA>:. |
i) TANS AND A HAT TIP TO |
ARS. S.0. WOODRUFF, |
Box 182, WALLACE,
22) DAO |

i

SUNDAY ADVOCA'Tâ„¢

St. Joseph Round.Up:

Residents
Experience _
Food Shortage |

Residents of Cambridge distriet :

in St, Joseph are at present facing
a very grave situation.

The water problem is very acute’
and in addition to a shortage of |
rice, no ground provisions can be!
obtained. Cornmeal can be pur-!
chased without difficulties; but
okras (price one cent each) are in
short supply. nt

The water was off for the greater.|
part of the day on Monday and
Tuesday; and again at intervals

every day subsequently, a resi-
dent said yesterday.
A surprising feature, was that

there was a steady flow of water at
the pipe situated at’ Sheffler’s on?
Thursday, Friday and again yes-!
terday. There has not been a
steady flow of water there for
nearly 18 months it was learnt.

CHURCH SERVICES

+
}
|

'



7.30 a.m, Matns, 8.60 am Low Mass
* 0 aim. Solemn Mass and Sermon
"20 pm Sunday School, 400 pm +
Children's. Vespers. 7.00. p m Solemn |
Exvcnsong and Sermon, |
8T. PAUL'S }

r'" a.m, Hely Communion; 9.20 a.m,
Se mn Mass & Sermon, 3 p.m. Sunday

Schuol & Children's Service 7 p.m
Soemn Evensong, Sermon & Procession |

Woes east of Transfiguration. 5 p.m.
Quiet Afternoon for S.S. Teachers. 7
vrv Solemn Eversong: Address, Deyo-

tion
LEONARD'S
Services for.

ST

Vill, SUNDAY AFTER TRINITY
Bf a.m. Holy Communion. 9 a.m.
Matt ns and Sermon, 10.30 a.m Holy

Pi ptism, 3 p.m,
Clafoes 7 o.m. Evensong and Sermon.
ST. STEPHENS—Proto-Martyr
TRINITY VIIIl—(Finding of S. Stephen).
Mattins and Low Mass 7.3) a.m. Solemn
Mass 9 a.m. 7 pm_ Solemn Evensong

and Adoration,
MORAVIAN

ROEBUCK STREET; 11 a.m. Morn-
ing, Service, (followed kh? Holy. Gom-
munion) Preacher; Rev. E, E. New, 7
nm. Evening Service, preacher: Rev.
F. New i
GRACE Hild: 11 a.m. Morning Set
vies, Preacher: Mr. W. Hayde; 7 p.mi
Evening Service, Preacher: Mr. I, Oxley,
FULNECK: 11 a.m. Morning Service,

Sunday School & Bible

E

Preacher: Mr. G. Francis, 7 p,m, Ever
ning Service, Preacher: Mr. O. ‘RR.
Lewis. ‘
MONTGOMERY: 7 p.m. Evening Ser-
vice, Preacher: Mr. A. Phillips.
DUNSCOMBE:; 7 p.m, Evening Ser-
vice, Preacher: Mr. W. 8S. Arthur.
SHOPHILL: 7 p.m. Evening Service,
Preacher: Mr. F. G. Downes

THE METHODIST CHURCH
JAMES STREET:—11 a.m. Rev. K. E,
Towers, B.A., B.D, (S). 7 p.m. Rev. K
E Towers,BA,B.D (8S).
PAYNES BAY:—9.30 a.m. Rev, F. Law-
rence. (S). 7pm. Mr J, A, Griffith,
WHITEHALL;—9.30 a.m. Rev K_ E
Towers (S). 7 p.m. Mr R. Crawford,
GILL MEMORIAL:—11 a.m, Mr. F
Moore, 7 pm. Mr J Layne
HOLETOWN:-—-8.30 am. Mrs
7 pm. Rev. F. Lawrence (S).
BANK HALL:—9.30 am Mr, G. Harp-
m Mr J. E Haynes
B. Mc

Morris,

er L2

SPEIGHTSTOWN:—11 a.m, Mr.
Lean. 7 pm. Mr. D_ Scott
SELAH:—11 am. Mr. Barnett. 7 p.m.
M

BETHESDA:—11 a.m. Mr. Greaves
BETHEL:—11_a m, Rev T J_ Furley.
7 pm: Rev. T. J. Furley. Holy Com-
munion,

DALKEITH:—9 a.m. J * Fur-
ley. Holy Mr. C
Forde.

BELMONT;—5 am Holy Communion,
11 am. Mr. J. Clarke. 7 pm Mr. J
Lovell

Rev. T
Communion, 7 pm,

SOUTH DISTRICT:—9 am. Mr. C.
Jones 7pm Mr St Hill
PROVIDENCE:—11 am Mr D., Fitt.
7 »™m_ Mr. E Browne
VAUXHALL:—11 am Mr G_ Brews-
ter 7 p.m, Mr. H. Harris.
SALVATION ARMY

OISTIN:—1) am Holiness Meeting
2 p.m Company Mectint 7 pm Salva-
tion Meeting. Mrs Major S_ Morris.

SPEIGHTSTOWN:-—11 am Holiness
Meeting. 3 p.m Company Meeting. 7
p.m, Salvation Meeting. Sr. Captain V
Campbell

EBENEZER CIRCUIT

EBENEZER: 11 a.m, Mr, E, Brath-
weite; 12 noon, Sacrament of Lord’s
Supper. Revd. S. W. C. Crosse; 7 p.m.

Reception Service for New Members,
Revd, S, W. C. Crosse.

BEULAH: 3.00 p.m. Re-opening and
Rededication of the Church Doors to be
opened by Mesdames F, Lawrence and
Ss. W. C. Crosse. Preacher Revd. F.
Lawrence. Chairman: Mr. Vincent St.
John, Sacrament of Lord's Supper at
close of service.

7.00 p.m. Mr, Joseph Sargeant.
SHREWSBURY: 9 a.m. Revd. S. W.
Cc. Ros: Sacrament of Lord's Supper.



7 p.m, Mr. R. Garnes.

4
RICES: 7.30 s.m, Revd. S. W. C, Crogsge,

Sacrament of Lord's Supper; 7 p.m. Mr,
A. L, Lueas,

Wednesday 6th, 8.30 a.m, Circuit Ex-
cursion to Selah Boys’ School.

WELLINGTON STREET:—l aim, Holi-
ness Meeting. 3 p m, Company Meeting.
Tom
Gibbs:

FOUR ROADS:—11 a.m, Holiness Meet-
ing 3 pm Company Meeting 7 pm
Selvation Meeting. Major L. Rawlins.

DIAMOND CORNER:-—-11 am_ Holi-
ness Meeting 3 p.m, Company Meeting.
7 pm. Salvation Meeting. Captain L
Moore

PIE CORNER:—11 a m_ Holiness Meet-
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Salvation Meeting. Sr Major Hollings-
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THE ST. JAMES NATIONAL BAPTIST

11 a.m, Matins and Sermon. 7 p m.
Fvensong and Sermon. Preacher for both
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FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, SCIENTIST
Bridgetown, Upper Bay Street
Sundays 11 a.m. and 7 p.m
Wednesdays 8 p.m. A_ service which
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Healing.
Subject; LOVE. Sunday, August 3, 1962.
Golden Text: | John 4: 8. He that
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Full Text

PAGE 1

% ESTABLISHED 1835 BARBADOS, MRU ST 3. 1952 PRICE SIX CENTS India Can't Give U.S. Peace Lecture Senator Charges That Indians .JHJRS MAY JO/\ EXPORT Rearm With Selfish Motive SECURITY COMXOLS IIAIMM. ix mi \vnM MINGTON. AllM SENATOR ThetKlute Grcn i Democrat) charged Sat urdu thai % %  %  %  %  h "to lecture this country" on i ri.u Senate Fan %  in iawe with the Indian 11 1{ Sen v i the United States" p %  ., |a coMHlfttory policy In a speech at Colgate Unl I week. Hi • innhit) bar ,m no poaittoa 10 i nil with us vshllfl gag UB bei . i ugairst Pakistan t<> i i e which K Hi ii reporter the Untied State* U trulstic motlvea with United Nations Larking to mint aggression.'*— r.p Is Aly Going lo See Rita? NEW YORK, Aug. 2. Priaci Alj Khan sped west i.i iiu llnttad States uletlon that he Is comi:r i Ha] ""ill" into ren or "in of the financial ranta Hiis aboard the liner Qaeea Etbabsfh seix-duled to arrive Inn Monday. The office of Attorney Hartley ''irthS bargain' Jubilee Function At St. Silas A record gathering of |>urents. teaclistrs and wall-wi-diei %  were assembled ;it the St. Silas Boys' School on Wednesday 30th, The 25th Anniversary of the building of the present Boys' School synchronised with Ojien Day Among those present were Malor Ohndon Reed, Director of Education aiul Mrs. Reed, Sir Edam i C inardj Reed f Layne, Miss Nell Manning of the Civic Circle, Mr. and Mrs. Jack Outrnm % %  i M. and Mrs <;. C Miller, Miss Q. Denny (Inspector of Domestic Science). Messrs. R. Jordan and L. T. Gay (Inspectors), Miss M. Crick and Staff, Mrs. Cadogun and Staff. Messrs Smith anrt Williams of St. Simons Mixed, Messrs. Best and Vaughon of St. Andrew's Church Boys', Mrs B. Spencer of St. Silas Girls'. Miss Daniel and Mr. S. Clarke of St. Thomas Boys' and Girls' Mr Jervls, Mr. Nolan Sealy (Visual Aids). Mr. O. Weekes (Welfare) Mi f 0'N.ttls (Probation Service) and Messrs. Arthur and George Crtck of West on limior. Sang After the/ rendition of 'Hannibal' and 'All Thin' the Night' by the Juniors both of which drew rounds of applause. from "Oliver Twist'' Were successfully staged against a line jsckgronnd done by the boys. The HmdteaefaeK Mr. s. o. Lordc, then deliver, d a lengthy to uu won Abraham Holder, J. N. Crick and th, late Mr. Oliver Walcott ibthan anted some of UM Intemal changes in tin Public BeSchool during the past 25 years. Some of the achievements of the school during the past 2 years were the winning of 2 pri2cs by both the V.-,. Flower gardens. 6 Bursary Scholarships in 1951, 3 prizes—one in each of classes I. II. and IV during the Music Festival Competition and the winning of an Exhibition by Elnc Payne to Comber mere. Presented Prizes Mrs. Reed then presented the E i,/. grltr which she i ivih iMiuquet from which she plucked one of the flowers and stuck it into the button-hole of Frank Burrowes the pupil who i %  %  ll.v I-tyne In jubilant stu< gave his address. The Sennas then rendered i Of songs beginning with 'Bless This House'. After a vole Of thanks by Mr. C. Marshall, an old boy and parent. Psalm 23 was chanted. The singing of the National Anthem brought an impressive programme l" AN APOLOGY It has been drawn to our %  Mention that a letter signiJekyll". iippcuriint under tho caption "Day of Reckoning" in ihe columns headed "Our Renders Say" in th Newo pacer of Friday 11th July l!*52. has been the cause of considerable annoyance to Mr. E. W. Harrow I MC P., Barrister-at-Law We sincerely regret any ..mi' vance ur ineonveni. nre •vhich may have been caused to Mr. Barrow, and un' uly withdraw any allegations and Imputations which may have been contained In tbe letter referred to. We tender him our sincere apologies for any annoyance or inconvenience which nay have been caused to him. and hope that this apology will be accepted in the spirit In which It loffered A FIVE-POWKK CONI Japan's role m export sreurin day with the uereement lo re. rnmend Japanese participation in the heNtofon prtei niy Europ ea n controlled i led h I n La, c, which op ntd hi nv-rely %  ( mcnl nad bean rea. hed. !' Hi 1 %  %  •:, I land Jap.i.i nave India Peace Maker [gain I IB aa ItlTV HAYYVOKTII mg agent said it heard the Prince Ig on his way here but had no Information on the purpose of the trip. Miss Hayworth is on the west coast where she recently completed a picture. — v.r. 2 Paragraphs Stall Truce TOKYO. Aug. 2. Allied and Communist staff officers agreed to-day on the wording of all but two paragraphs Of Ihe armistice agreement but there was no promise of early peace In Korea as chief delegates prepared to resume talks to-morrow. Staff officers scheduled another meeting at 9 a.m. to-morrow The only two paragraphs still to be worked over were 53 and 60. Paragraph 52 deals with tbe p.irole of prisoners promised by each side, that prisoners would not be required to fight again m Korea. Reds wanted the term captured personnel" replaced with "prisoners of war", apparently to confine the no righting restriction to soldier prisoners actually repatriated and not released in their home territories. —I'.P. ] TORONTO. Ontario. Aug has Bgai i j i ile el pen s-ra ifcar, thi Ihe 18th International i:. %  IKS Shn If. K India's High Commissioner to ha'Canada, aske.l the Conference to i *:*"irig east and iform an lmpa*lial bod\ mmunist charges of UntI lad Nations atrocities in Korea I He said he was confused bv th %  %  have consist* m unit m • munil charges and hast • i I voles ignoring them. i. centn of at tark b] UM Soviet bloe has licen tbe International Committee, com1 posed of 25 Bwl %  'i.iniiuiiusl delegates have termI ed the Committee a tool of the t. M not sufficient Biaral pass resolutions endorsing the ICRC." said Mr Saks' should have taken advantage o the presence hare of delegate: who are not satisfied with operations of the 1 C.R.C. and tried to reduee their gr!avanca?'--4Cn U.S. Not Told Of Moe>adegh'H Plan WASHINGTON. Aug. 2 A State Department spokesman %  aid on rridaj thai the United i. receive a thai UM Itanian Hohanunod Mossadegh plans lo visit this OOUnQ^ .>ii i.iiKKiti White said be had laori preag raporti quoting American shipping officials' in Li Havre as saying that M *idegh has booked a passage America on Sept 12th To the 1 I %  u tna Uniled 81 itai bad net invited MosSitda-h lo coma here. He said explained, to take the initiative there had been no application for for beatification. It is always the a visa and "we have had no word Bishop of the diocese In which from any Iranian source whattrie person to be beaUfied lives %  never. .who takes the preliminary stops. White sni.l thai the Department Tht f^P* himself finally decided it reatrva. " lo !* or approve the case. Mossadegh might have Ordinarily at lea JOHANNESBURG, South Africa. Aug. 2. An express train smashed through a lighting mob of native treammg across the tracks in th* suburb of Toorcnga on Saturday and killed four Zulus Chanting war cries, about 100 Zulus were hunting for a band of Basutok who had been lc;~-1 rorising the natives in the Johan. 1 msburg suburb of Newclare. At Toorongii Station they were met by police' who *mn uoab 1 to stop them. Tbe Zulus set upon the crowd on the platform. When the victims fled the Zulu" follow ed oblivious of Ihe on-coming train. The track was strewn with bodies of wounded natives and weipcns before the train cmil.l stop —r.p. Furothk Orders Sununor Wardrobe CAPRI, Aug 8. Exile Farouk. who left Egypt in something of a hurr called at a tailor on Saturday and had himself measured! for a wardrobe fit for the %  warm weather ->t this island resort. The DOrUj 03 King ordered himself a tailormade buttling suit too. It was clear that he lacked light clothing suitable for Capri. At a 1 res* Conference the former monarch was dressed in a heavy double breasted suit, while the newsmen around wore sports shirts and slacks. The tailor spent the better part tf on boOl at Farouk* suite at the Eden I fc -i adiso Hotel measuring the ea-| King for slacks beach %  bathing su'l-t'.P. UM FBI ,. mar rated %  %  %  I nl.i <;c Scope lnfgaii-J-> %  I warded to ft nip which in %  %  th -I % %  tion. It said in essence thai the re %  I rnl.i |B th< the Paris group to inclua re-ordination ovei the pant exports lo (ron CwMdn eountnea: in Ihe Far East as well as Europe. The basic purpose <>' the control system is to prevent the of material M *BVtp< nl t>> Rus> SIJI or the Iron Curtain wii ,-h inn.T mereate then warj -I'.P HON. V O. O A LB, .listed by Mrs 0. Willlsm. of Bt Vliwent. lesil 111 Bright Llgbt i.mg the Derby. Mr. C William, with hat raised I* dose behind Remittn A Gkrmc€ 1/ FIRST DAY Kirsl Kaee 1 MAGIC GAVE — Belle UM LOU o.Ncn \HI \LI — Vvoncl S..0111I Hate Mm \i 11 r 1 1 1. h %  I \Kl II WISH. — ttufki.il CARDINAL — Crasalc) Third Race UNIIMAKK Joseph HKLLh Sl'HPMlHi: 1 UU I'll %  ' LUNWAYB Nrm*'i Fourth Uuce IIHIGIIT I.IGII1 — llald • nasr AUMIEAI. —t vtmi • %  H aWilh iOatl l ose ah tilth Hate D\SHIM. 1-lllM t >^ —Lulchnn'i I III IXtl Wild'r IHH.DRI M Mafar Sixth Rare lOAItt BTAI feea e t |BA HUM — l.ulilim,.n OAVOrn Hild r Seventh Kuce I Of FLIGHT —Lutiiiin a 1 01 11 TON — laaapli MARY ANN Yvoncl K.k'hth Ii... rH'1'IB WIN! —< rowilr* s\M H RIH'KFT 1 iitrhman MRS. HI tit .Ltwph Drought Co*i ( '•& farmer* $500JU. NASHVILLE TannaiMti r ., h ml 1 1 1 %  dniughl n ll -ir Neu England, will pr nation from reaching ii di asp Bed a 'ii n prs> droughi stiirki-ii %  1 %  thai it is '.'HI Kit.' %  in 11 haw IH-.-II deilarod in nx and parts o two other gOUtHsattOm vi.ites and In 11 Maaaachuatti t.i wi .oid id hot Fed; Is to tld< thai W.German Riot Busters Set For Red Invasion BERLIN, Aofufd WKST BERLIN POLICE today p<. i idi t. 1 U 1 %  SUui <>1 the Western Sectors by itlcal Conununlal youthi The 1 Com! at Garman youth to MSII 1. West iSeilm tnino %  %  ' to n the luiiuia! u-s a year I 1 which 1 tnora than 300 pea-aona were injured. Wi-stetn authorities llrtadj have. Contract May End Steel Row PITTSBURGH. August, 2. !'ii. final i on) aei %  • % %  tWOen the Inland Stc. I I i HI United Steel workers seen to-uay a.. possible intplete and <>f lha mini the demount ration schedule < .I (01 tincilv patk in the u.i CosiunnnJJlg ctaira they hov not \*-< n tidd i* lha prohibition Kd youth lea.iei .iniK.iin. <;\ Uil tin iiiinx the meeting Bill planned nad that at least 10,000 1 oil 1 .ill. BBld tinaim ..f the leuonBtratlon win bi MMi lUon i" use Wi-t I 1 lUi the ii'.p ws* esltnulcd up lo 'i per "'ST 1 peril .in.. < inal '" l| "" ,l s t chnllenftc heavy d mm atsj fr:n %  ' '* >ounced been rrequ ' n iTesfcfent. Industrj will need Si '" """ %  '. %  touows the prorhen last night Russia %  l ,, '•' %  > hitertm .K'-fftnent iiruiitialed at White House ihe pries 11 mon •u-y nn.l Union In %  %  mi reed n ii' %  A Ula%  outhssutsrn l ir lift rertfl lie,, on v " k M between b 1 sad w. < i"Justry'! %  %  % %  %  1 ihe i:M'i ndlni the Red blockade >f Her. 1. -t %  %  % %  %  TI'.I id tin"big six I %  —t.P. Curate Returns Edward Gatherer. Assistant Curate of St Joseph's Paraatl Church resumed his duties 00 Friday last after a five-week absence. He returned from his homeland (St. Vincent) >*\ Thursday last. Red Cross Press For Investigation Dictator Policy Will Bring Red Coup In Iran WASHINGTON. August 3. THK EVENING STAR expressed the opinion in an editorial on Saturday that unless Premier Mossadegh of Iran alters his programme the probability of u Communist coup in his country will draw closer daily. —^^^— Affca revlowla| fleeting Iran the editorial TOltONTO, Aug. 2 The Eighteenth International Red CnaU Conference on Satur. %  d 02 to zero with 13 MM to urge all governments involved In the Ean 1 hargai lO submit to investigation on 11 %  ..imiiioiil.v uuon 'basis". The Communist government and the Red Cross societies abm the vote The conferbadJ lution introduced by Belgium. The text of the R-solution is: "considering that several dele, gatiotu have alleged that the Pane*/! Convantton and humanllarian principles have recently been violated; and that UsBBS allegations have repeatedly boon categorical terms by fie authorilie-s directly coiucricii. (the Eightceiitii [nlornatinci. :il lied Cross Conferencej invites all government.cencernei to submit these charges lo investigation on a commonly agreed upon basis for national Rd Cross Societies lo unite th ir efforts in the support of that pwposf. The resolution re-placed one introduced by Australia which called for the appointment of a special commission of this conference to conduct an investigation. Australia withdrew the proposal at the meeting of the I-egil Committee earlier -U.P. IXTO THK Sim I CM ^^^Bbl^BslnK ^^B89BTV Hip ^1 \ jBl^^aaRi ^*^M h t--|J sssrB T^ eluded 'Dr. Mossadegh returned to office with dictatorial powers including control of tho iy has Issued statements promising senien.ent of Ihe oil disput. and restoration of Iran's scotsOgnii and political stability. But the atmosphere he and his fotlown have ensaksd is hardly cii-lui kvi to the fulfilment of such a promise On the contrary now that the United States has become the largtt of hitler attack along Britain the signs point bleakly to continuing drift from bad to worse. Certainly unless the Mossadegh programme undergoes sudden and sweeping change for hatk I the possibility of a Commune' OOUfl will move closer tow.o I probability with each pal —u.p. Mossadegh (rets Confidence Vole TIHRAM h Prlma MlnhHai Mohanui 1 I ..givin an ov Ing v ota I %  "i Iran %  -..., a Out of Uirs. 34 vot ins preajraaoBw and on| • .11.. Aboiza Laaanl, fienate in 'spe %  %  %  % %  % %  % %  akpai IM" Lesanl said. 11. lao danu adad th d lavkM shai '%  %  i' n hould Dot 1^ renewed when the agreement I 1 %  %  UM fishery indii.-. ilisrd by Iran and OBI le Big 10 H11-M.1—r.p. Eight Head In Cur \ccideni : .KI: CITY 11 a Aug 1, I 1. car led Ihrei %  Imoda rd %  into 11 1 1 .P. Oils \..< foi letlli —U.P. "Spurl" Brings Split INus. Milk Four hundred and seventythree bats of yellow split peal -nd 1.203 cartons of %  milk were brought to the lsum vederday from Rotterdam by the R v. Spurt The "Spurt" also brought co* %  ton piece goods, steel window: footwear, hurricane lanterns, preserves cement, chairs, cigarette-, SnS Other general sanja _SS Forester arrived from S' take % %  load of sugai former Palestine C-fn-t\ />/, Passe* LANARK, Scotland, Aug 2. Lt. Col. Sir John lb.beit Chuil%  • bo baa bad %  1 l 'tay night %  r ,! %  near h< P* Bfld I '.ii. %  :t..1. rUOl m tlie mandated tr. i' from 192S to 1931. %  on India'' %  %  %  20th century he heid admimslr..' ; % %  • "' Br'flsh territories Including Mauritius and Trinidad aid Tobago %  The I I %  %  %  .. -,. %  of Labour, in that the area 1 %  It s $12 .v 1 1 pat 1 ng ton F.O.H ubaoquent annual ..,,,. 1. %  %  I S 14.40 (Ii W I i pel long ton In return fi %  eient orgi %  RA'-'iGH— Mokor$ or iha WORLD'S CHAMPION CYCLE Munfert'ss freed POPT-OF-SPAIN A I ', m .. %  .. Toi BSMidoHne %  was convi lead, the field boms. In his later vears Chancellor directorships in internal;'-' %  eomtnitt-^ and business syo I rates. Mis son Sir Christoph. She will he loading a t SpeghUChancellor IS tl town. lager of Reu'era—tCF) Tobago. You are on a WINNER when you ride a Raleigh! A Rslcigb wis tbe choice of Reg Harris— World's Professional Spnnt Champion dw ins second year in succession. Here is pnx>* of th* widom of buying your bicyJc from a (wmpany with such great %  c.hm.al experience and knuwlcdjic ilut dctigncd and built die record -bi caking RALEIGH. RALEIGH T>4fs ALL-STEEL BICYCLE A r>i J— e *t^t tm A ami l* i a. ,\iu% \*m. t%-( i CAVK. SHKI'IIKRD & CO., LTD. 10, 11, 12 St 13 Brod Street.



PAGE 1

FACTI |f.ii: SUNDAY ADVOCATE -l\MU VI (.1ST 3. I3! BARBADOS.^ ADVOCATE r. u s MM *M*u o. i.w a**-* >-,*#V->VVV'**,*'*V'*****^<.OOOCOO Sunday. August 3. 1952 I nribbean (euncil LORD Ogmore. who. as Mr. ReesWilliams. held brief office as Parliamentary Under Secretary of Slate for the Colonies during a postwar Socialist administration took the opportunity during a debate in the House of Lords on the Colonial Territories for the year 1951—52 to give expression to views about the Colonial Empire which miflht well be interpreted as representative of some Socialist "thinking aloud." Lord Ogmore in his "thinking aloud" divided colonies into three types. There are Colonies, he 1 said, which could and which would, he hoped, in time become Dominions. There are others which, combined with others (and there is no doubt that the West Indies prompted thib classification) could become a Dominion. The third type includes the colony "which either by reason of lack of economic resources or some multi-racial problem or the like can never become a selfKoverning Dominion, can never stand on its own feet." Should the West Indies decide to federate they would eventually disappear into Lord Ogmore's second category of the combined colonies which become a Dominion. .But since there is far less likelihood of federation today than there ever has been the ideas of a Socialist peer, ennobled for his party allegiance, about the administration of colonies of the third type are worthy of consideration. Lord Ogmore's suggestion is thai these colonies should have representation in a Grand Council which would meet every vear and make recommendations to the various Parliaments. The Council would, he suggested, make recommendations which would be very seriously considered by the Governments concerned and il would give an opportunity to the representatives of the Colonial Parliaments to meet and exchange ideas. It would have a permanent secretariat, by which the various economic and other problems would be considered from day to day. During the debate Lord Milverton put his finger on the weakness of the Socialist peer's proposal. When, he said, it is remembered that the Colonies extend over the whole width of the world and comprise within them almost every problem economic and racial that can possibly be imagined "I do not think that a general council of that kind would do other than perhaps provide a sounding board for the political charlatan." How true, will be universal West Indian comment. But Lord Milverton put his finger further in and underscored a difficulty which is already causing great inconvenience in the British Caribbean. "There are not enough men of ability in the Colonies," he said, "at present even to go round In managing their own affairs at home, let alone to send men to a big Central Council to get a view of world affairs with a Colonial background." This shortage of men of ability in the West Indies is of course not unconnected with the dislike of the electorate to return such men tu power but basically what Lord Milverton says of all the Colonies is true of the West Indies. And even if the truth of the statement is disputed by some who refuse to distinguish between ability and ability to win over electors the final result is the same. At regional meetings of importance in the area only the important politicians attend. The formation of a Grand Council of the United Kingdom and Colonial territories would not only provide a sounding board for the political charlatan from some colonies but would further deprive this region of the services of their most important politicians and these would be tempted to interfere in other colonial matters about which they knew nothing. Lord Milverton's criticism of Lord Ogmore's idea was justified but perhaps the idea as applied to the West Indies is worth a little more investigation. It now seems almost certain that West Indian political federation will either be postponed indefinitely or some partial political federation between the Leewards. Windwards and Trinidad might be attempted. Suppose on (he other hand that Lord Ogmore's suggestion for a Grand Council of the United Kingdom and Colonial Territories were modified and the idea of a Caribbean Council put forward in its place. Such a Council comprising the most important political representatives of existing British Caribbean Legislatures could DMM HI osM off DAOffO i the participating ttnltoriee annually. This Council would make recommendations on matters of regional importance and those recommendations would be considered seriously by the participating governments concerned The secretariat of until is already in existence at Hasting! House and is in fact performing R of such a Council without having any legal status as a Council secretariat and without the existence of %  Council. Lord Ogmore cannot i laim credit for this proposal since it has already been put forward by West Indian political commentators but just as Lord Ogmore's suggestion for a Grand Council has a certain theoretical attraction so the idea of a Caribbean Council appears at first sight desirable. Without regional co-operation the British Caribbean is doomed to htagnation. A Caribbean Council would tie up all the loose regional ends into a tidy whole and would achieve all the obvious advantages of federation without any of the attendant risks. The man that keeps Barbados laughing on Sundays NATHANIEL GUBBINS Mardonaldi**m MR. Malcolm MacDonald's behaviour in South East Asia will strengthen the hands of those who have been championing dress reform in Barbados for decades. Lord Baldwin, whose unconventional behaviour introduced open-neck shirts and shorts in West Indian Government House r-rclt's. unfortunately made few converts. Vet his intentions were good. In Bridgetown one or two "dress reformers" always wear open neck shirts. Officials of the Department of Science and Afrtcuhun regularly wear open neck shirts and shorts and some schoolmasters do likewise But the pioneer work of the individual dress reformers in Bridgetown is not supported by the private or official community. The Police Force have in recent years received cooler shirts and after a period of service policemen receive light weight trousers, but only police officers are privileged lo wear shorts. At Government House and at the Secretariat protocol has never been more strictly observed. The difference between the stiff formality of Barbados' Government House and the informal atmosphere of Trinidad's Government House was the subject of comment by the elder Dr. C. B. Clarke when he spoke a few years ago to members of the Royal Empire Society about his recent visit to the West Indies. It would be a mistake to suppose, however, that Barbados' resistance to more i itmn.il dress is due to any peculiar British influence. No one who has visited Hampstead Heath on August Bank Holiday or strolled through any London Park on Sundays during the summer would accuse the British of clinging to their surplus clothing one moment longer than was necessary. This anxiety to "cast clouts" which is enshrined even in the old-wives' saws of the country takes a violent form in London's Hyde Park where the murky and ire-cold water of the Serpentine does not deter the Britishers in search of coolness. The overseas' armed forces of Her MaJ. ity relentlessly change from winter elouMi into summer brevities on the day pf fitted by the High Command irrespective of whether it hails or snows. The British are certainly no worshippers of British clothes for the sake of maintaining their British appearance. They look just as British in shirts and shorts. If a parallel is to be drawn between Barbados and any other part of the world it might aptly be drawn with Brind&i. At this eastern seaport town of South Italy as famous for its wine as Barbados is famous for its rum all the meue-cazette, the small town tradesmen and merchants, t;ather together in the market places to display their heavy black clothes which country people all over the world regard as conventional Sunday wear. In Barbados where every school boy or school girl still learns by heart the poem of "Sally in our alley" with its direct encouragement to love Sunday because that is the day when the lover is "dressed in all his best" it is not surprising that petit bourgeois standards of dress should rule the roost. But those standards as Mr. MacDonald has pointed out in his letter to the "Straits Times" are not British. They are the standards of the "little" people of all countries. Some years ago when English officials, whose education approximated more to that of the true British traditions of the Armed Forces and of the bathers in the Serpentine, attempted to shed their ties and to wear sandals in government offices, the offended voices of the mesxe-caiette of Barbados were immediately raised to denounce this intelligent attempt to rationalise dress. Complaints were even made by individuals with more than the normal dose of sensibility that the wearing of sandals by officials was a calculated insult to Barbadians. Maybe Barbadian sensitiveness about dress reform in recent years is responsible for that very noticeable formality which distinguishes Barbados' Government House parties from the less formal affairs in Trinidad. If so it is a pity. A little dose of MacDonaldism seems badlv needed in Barbados. If dress reform is ever to become effective the high officials of the Secretariat will have to give the lead. If someone could prove that cooler dress would mean improved health and reduced expenditure the argument for dress reform would be unassailable. But the medical fraternity are great upholders of local dress conventions and until doctors say that less clothes mean improved health there will always be hesitation among those willing to make the change for personal reasons of comfort and efficiency. As for the new "MacDonald" evening dress, the tailors of Bridgetown by skilful advertising ought easily to persuade the "flannel" dancers that the new MacDonald •venlag dress is classier and cheaper than their usual hop attires. Here again a lead in high places will produce more contented and more aesthetically apparelled diners and dancers. A Calypso nujrhl even bsj composed with the refrain: "Look! I got what Malcolm got! and it's cool not hot." "Many Socialists' (in the House of Commons during the heat wave) "were arrayed in tropical suit*, mostly very crumpled."— Peterborough, In the Daily Telegraph. In decent who know G IVE me chaps clothes, chaps the rules, I>econt, smart, unciumpled chaps who went lo decent schools, Chap* whoso clothes axe nicely pressed, laundered neat and clean. Chaps who sort of do belong— ectualry, I mean. The sort of ohaps who don't belong, chaps who hurt the eye. Anchap* whose clothe* are washed at home and then liiinii up to dry. With chaps like that one sort of feels one sort of can't be seen. s->mewhi-re one sort of draws Wie line—ectually, I mean. FAN MAIL T HIS week's letter from the constant reader who always begins "Dear Pig": — Dear Pig. 1 have caught you out in a lie (.gain. When you wrote your life s^ory last week and how you swindled people all over tha Empire and Africa, which I can believe, as your photo Is the face of a criminal, you said you add electric blankets to Hottentot' in Darkest and Hottest Africa, vmir iiwn words. Why should Hottentots In Hottest Africa want electric blankets, and If they did, where did they plug in for electric i :i nl as Darkest Africa must be in the jungle? Let us have the fact* before I *top borrowing a paper which is first-class except for your tripe. W ELL, dear Pig, I am astonished that you have failed to sw the point about the electric blankets. Although nobody but an Imbecile would believe that trses in the African Jungle are wired for electricity, there was a time when the simple Hottentot believed Implicity In the white man's magic, or Ju-ju. Therefore. if he wanted blankets it wai more profitable to sell film, electric blankets than the ordinary kind. If he complained that the Ju-ju didn't work you then sold him electric batteries at an even greater profit. If the fool, sweltering under his electric blanket. then got prickly heat, you sold him twopenny Jars of ointment at a couple of bob a go. Evidently you don't know much about salesmanship, dear Pig. DEATH OF CHARLIE A T a conference of Winged Insects, the chairman, a bluebottle, said: — %  Gentlemen, we a if gathered here today to hear evidence of unfair method* being used In the war of extinction now being waned against us. Mr. Wasp, will you begin?" "I was on my way home after being the uninvited guest at a u-a party where they had three kinds of Jam in open dishes," said the Wasp (cries of "Hear, hear" and "Good work") "when I saw a man drinking a glass of beer In a garden. (Cheers and laughter > 1 think you gentlemen are aware that waspa have a weakness for malted liquor (loud cheers and cries of 'Good old Warp*), but when I tried to take a ip the man whipped out a press button gun and fired a spray at me." (Cries of "Shame."J "What happened after thai I* askrd tinchairman. "After being unconscious for several hours I managed to fly home." said the Wasp, "but I think 1 owe my life to the fact that, like moat wasp*. I am frightfully At." "Thank you. Mr. Wasp. You're next, Mr. Housefly." "Out of more than 7,000,000 brothers." said the Housefly, in a small voice that trembled with emotion, "there was one I loved best of all. Ills name was Charlie." NoUcing the Housefly's distress, the kindly chairman said. "Yoa may five evidence sitting ST you wish." "Thank you. Mr. Chairman." said the Housefly. "Charlie was just settling on a piece of uncovered meat (cries of 'H'ar. hear"), and 1 think we all know how difficult it u to And meat covered or uncovered these days (laughter), when he was disturbed at his meal and tried to take refuge In what he thought was a basket of flowers on the wall. I never saw Charlie alive again." "What, in fact, waa the baaket of flowers *" asked the rhainsn. "A piece of painted cardboard impregnated with insecticide." said the Housefly (loud cries of ••Shame"). "Anything else ?" asked the chairman. "Only that it would have been Charlie's birthday today," said the Housefly. Amid murmurs of sympathy. the chairman said: "Gentlemen, I ask for your vote on the motion that this meeting deplores the passing of the good old days when fly swatters and rolled newspapers were tho only weapons used against us by gentlemen, and to declare that we consider modem methods unfair, unsporting, and unBrltish." The motion was carried unanimously. PAWS ACROSS THE SEA C ABLE received from Manhattan Mouser, American cat, to his English sweetheart. Loot* Hiya Sugar Puss thanks to publicity given to us both sides Atlantic VS. Lines have handed me free passage luxury suite aboard new flagship United Stolen on maiden voyage east stop will also arrange pass for you meet me Southampton July 8 stop this is the real McCoy no foolln stop got a kick outa your picture in paper but why not your chassis too stop also got a kick outa you running for Beauty Queen contest stop I am thinking of running for President here on Republican ticket as fight looks like getting dirty stop nobody has won more dirty fights than yours truly stop publicity blurbs say we are taking aboard 24,4381b. of fish stop oh boy oh boy stop also 36,450 lb. poultry stop oh boy oh boy oh boy stop 24.458 lb. of Qsh. 56.450 lb. of poultry and you Honey Cat oh boy oh boy oh boy oh boy oh boy Stop stop stop. —UA %  Hawk Ro<'k llahie* Not far from Eagle Hall Corner off the Black Rock Road a near green painted building which resembles a small pavilion commemorates the name of Mrs. Florence Browne. The wife of Dr. Sinclair Browne, who practised medicine ..t Buntmtrvafts In Eaglf Hall more than 30 yiars ago opened a small clinic St Ihe back of her home lo help poor mothers with the bringing up Of their babies. After Mrs. lirowne's death, her son George donated the land on which the Black Rock Baby Clinic stands today and the building was erected from funds provided by the British Red Cross and the Order of St. john of Jerusalem in gratitude for the help given by the Empire to the United Kingdom during the K.r years Mrs. Muriel Hangchell as President of the Clinic and hen she was appointed to the legislative Council she was succeeded by Mrs. Florence Daysh. who Is also Chairman and Hon. Secretary of the St Philip Babv Welfare Clinic. •Today 330 babies are registered Si the Black Rock Clinic and 334 uttendances a month are recorded. Mothers bring their children to Ihe clinic from St. Thomas. St. (•corgo, St James and Christ .'huich but most come from the crowd**) (ity BfStJ of MVw Orleans. Chapman's Lane. Hall's Road and Haulers Road. Twice u week a nurse attends .t the clinic to weigh babies, register new babies and to prepare them for the doctor who arrives st ten. Mothers wait on wooden benches on a roofed verandah. When they have seen the doctor they receive quantities of milk and cod liver oil and for babies of six months and up Jamaican food > Cl.-t Between 1J to 2 lbs. of food yeast are distributed weakly whilu 112 pounds of skimmed milk and two gallons of cod liver oil are distributed nunthlyBetween 80 and 90 mothers attended at the clinic each week during July Some mothers attend twice weekly while others attend once a week or once a fortnight. In 1951. the average weekly attendance was 58.9 and 3.066 babies attended the Clinic. Two hundred and eight) &VS bibles were registered In 1951 and 112 were written off for bad Mndanc i The Baby Welfare league as the clink m Black Rock is called Is an outstanding example of a social Barries) which was begun more than 30 years ago and which has bean carried on to this day by the support of government, vestry. Turf Club, commercial Arms and the voluntary sen-ice of ladies living in the island. The problem it is tackling may be understood by realisation of the tact that of 330 mothers attending only 40 are married. Those superficial critics who accuse well-to-do Barbadians of Bourbon ism and Indifference to conditions round them ought to ponder and reflect on these statistics. They would be doing a belter service to the community which shelters them by themselves lending a helping hand Instead of adding to the difficulties of those who have already set the Plough in motion. By George Hunte PAX BOOKS THE WIDEST SELECTION IN TOWN On Sale At AH\M AH STATION !" '.'S.'S+'ssss.;'.'.:;','^','*',:;-*:-*: How is marriage to appeal to a 'onimunity of women If the unmarried status of a mother is the norm and not the exception? Many of the mothers attending Ihe Black Reck Clinic are suffering from venereal disease. They -ire advised to :ek treatment ; %  the O susrsl Hospital, but even il Ihey seek treatment, the fatlui of the child might refuse to do likewise and If his affections retrain constant the sad story is enacted over again. Some mothers are premature : they give birth to children when aged only 15 .'i 16 Other mothers' children die an'l instead of taking a rest -from pitiful motherhood, new births to new fathers take place. Still the good work goes on. Public spirited ladies, a devoted nurse, an unselfish doctor continue to attend Iwice weekly ..: the Black Rock Clinic to battle against death, to give human lives greater opportunities of survival. M> train mothers in the practice of mothercraft and to supply their i ables with the nourishment necessary to resist disease. For thirty years this social service has been going on and the work cf the Black Rock Clinic is being imitated in other part* of the island. But the records stiP show how much remains It be done. Legitimacy has insufficient attraction for Barbadian women. Until women feel that the surrender of their honour Is something of whirh to be ashamed: until they cherish thenvirgn thing of which to be prcitd: until they begin to realise that the married stale is the normal state of civlllied people: the efforts ot those who have for so many years been trying to help mother* SO help their babies will need to be supported by every agency working for the spiritual and material improvement of their fellowbeings. What Barbados suffers from is not the absence of a social conscience — relative to it* size and making allowance for the notorlcus lack of appreciation by the community as a whole of disinterested endeavour. its social conscience is surprisingly highly developed but from the large deadweight of ignorance, vice an' superstition, which has to be dispelled if ever a healthy society is lo survive. Overlooking the obvious drawbacks of illegitimacy, venereal disease and undernourishment and ignoring the stupidity of mothers who rely on bush tea. crab oil and other so-called remedies, other especial difficulties arise in Barbados which complicate the task of social workers. In the report of the St. Philip Ilaby Welfare Centre ot 1951-5:! Mrs Daysh noted tho Independent attitude of some mothers resulting from higher wages and bonus patu to sugar workers. During the General Elections %  -..others ceased to attpnd at the St. Philip Clinic for "poliii':il" nssssn To do gcod to others requires a great effort in most countries To do good In Barbados require* more than effort. It requires • •.length of character and a spirit of self-denial of a very high order indeed. Because not enly ts it* certain that little gratitude will be forthcoming from those tc tvhom the good work Is done butt there is the absolute certainty' that more abuse than appreciation will be coming from those who ought to be standing at the head of a movement to proclaim from the housetops what ha> been achieved already by devoted and jMihlic snirlted clUzons in stemming tbi advance of low moral fUndards. The work of Ihe Baby Welfare Clinics throughout the island would be lightened by in* growth of family life. Bishop Bent ley did sterling work in that direction many years ago. Everyone must become mote militant about the advantages of the married stateMeanwhile the workers who have toiled so arduously and well in the service of the Black Rock clinic might And consolation and encouragement lo continue their labours from a prayer recently recommended lo the Btcr Slate for ihe Colonies by Lord sDlvasptoa "Grant me the seremiv U) things I cannot change. courage to change things I can. and wisdom to know the difference." . would be an excellent time to select from these GARDEN TOOLS . W* Garden Hose 'a" & V I.IIU.11 Bih Cocks Watering Pots Pruning Shears Border Forks Hand Forks Wheelbarrows V.G.M. Manure C. $. PITCHER & CO. %  4472 tfiff* tyf? Arrow & B.V.D. Underwear... And Men's IDOL ANKLET SOCKS and HALF-HOSE in Fancy Designs. NYLON ANKLETS in self colours. "KEEP COOL" Shirts by ARROW $760 This most recenl of Canadian ARROW SHIRTS is of fine mesh, beautifully tailored and designed for the tropics. One of a number of shirt styles to choose from including SEA ISLAND COTTON SPORTS. Da Costa & Co., Ltd. TRY AGAIN MAY BE HER FAVOURITE HORSE — BUT — 3-YEAR OLD GODDARDS **\ MM n A , RUM Mixed with CANADA DRY QUININE TONIC WATER is always his favourite drink —You sure bet I



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PA<;F SIX SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY. AUGUST 1 1SJ5 Only!" < WWrf W^^VWWS^VVA^^VWVtfWS^^ So long, girls' Just p ssing through Since taking MEDILAX I'm a tit nun again. MED1LAX. Ilia? gentle. iafv laxative ensure: INNER CLEANLINESS, and *ui ABOUNDING VITALITY. I'm a good atlverllsemet.: tw MEIHLAX What d'you wy, Gfrl*'" So It It. AIR-HICK. Just lift up the wick from the liquid in the bottle, and all unpleasant odour* an absorbed. In kitchen*. |g kflj 'tale tobacco smoke, and to freshen mpbuards or sick rooms Yes AIR-WICK itrulv satiating. How foolish Is Tommy here when lit could sleep in comfort with %  YAMOOSt; TVTtt* to hand. This handy little puffer contains D.D.T. Ju?t press il. and pouf Not a mosquito or fly will bother you. Keep a VAMOOSE PI'FEER handy and sleep In comfort. SUNDAY. AUGUST 3. 1052 FOR SATURDAY, AUGUST 2. 152 Look irf the aoctloa in 'I what your om which youc btttbdaj rcorcling to the stars. AKIU %  fares 21 %  April 90 TAURU April 21 May I OF. MINI May 21 -June 21 Lite llgire. girl: gim-t inuicatluns .with necessary money matters, church, chc.uy collecliun-. liiikiren's interests the top favoured. Start yew day with prayer. • • ng day for HKhtful Sunduy inilerests. visiting fnenits, Hiding the ill JIK I lonely. WKm Md UMTOVg health. 1 for necessary undertakings, childrenactivities. |,|j garnet, social gatherings. church. • ngs fur water sports. ning health Don't neglect R, %  po etess my sylph-like i? It's easy. No dieting, no ftcrciscs, just SILF that ugly fat away. SILF 8LIMM1M. I ABLETS, are safe, and sure. On sjki-vciywhere. Trv SILF SLIMMING TABLETS and even Pops down there will stop, look and listen Sure I would. A lovely girl Is a sight a* pretty as the flowers I cultivate. Never used * 'eal like gardening though, until, like many a tired business-man 1 look a course of MKDI.SED. which corrects and restore* tense nerves. For nervous headaches. Neuralgia and other aches and pains. MEOI-SED is Use answer. Try it and enjoy hours of relaxation you would otherwise loae. Have your dates led up to that %  Happy ever after stage?" Its a dehcaf subject, but unpleasant breath and body odours may be hte trouble AM PL EX. take* care of this. Take an AMPLEX TABLET A DAY. to ensure you don't offend. AMPLEX contains Chlorophyll, nature's deodorant. Tt y C\ fa* AMPLEX—you'll Even young Bobby hai words to say. Yes vitamins are important, particularly GLL'COSE D. for young and old. Use Savory and Moore's GLUCOSE l> m place of sugar, and the famil\ will benefit, in added vitality and alrenitk. No. we haven't run out of ink. Just trying to Illustrate what might happen if we didn't use a SCROLL PEN. No messy Ink Ailing with SCROLL. No risk of accidents. Just slip in a refill now and again, [ red, blue or both and your writing troubles are over. SCROLL is j unoath. and reasonable in price. VIROO Aug. 23—Sept. 23 LIBRA Sept. 24—Oct. 23 ,g SCORPIO ^ Oct. 24— HOT. M %  AOITTARJUA ijNov. 23—Dae. 22 4* CAPRICORN Dec. 23 — Jan. 21 AQUARIUS M Inn 22 — Fab. 20 PISCES Fab. 21-March V travel careful, never tocksure. But whole day generally is promtsng. * I >i.. at worn restful pat {tgvajrsaanra periods rort without strain or rushing. Self-control will bring you quicker g.iin Attend church. "d reading, religious services, fun with family, and just plain relaxing all lop to-da.v's agenda. Necessary money transactions also favoured. Head Taurus and Virgo helpful hints for jrotlf da* too Have a quiet, pleasant time with family and friends. Church Oral of • • • re l < hierful. helpful? Sunday certainly encourages such Inclinations. Follow your conscience and you won't fail. Pray, rest. Your Jupiter more favourably aspected than any planets to-day. This could give you edge on many IF you are on the beam Heed spiritual needs. No cause for concern, for frowns. Religious services, parties, outdoor healthy activities among (he sponsored, • • • your planet Uranus admonishes it wont 'irastic changes In things AjTSBinS kmoothly. Oijoy this n pleasant, wholesome way. • • %  %  Neptune u.nus not to be reckless, especially in activities connected with water. Day can be happy, useful if you help make It so. Prayer is In first order. YOU BORN TODAY: Bright, engaging personality. May lend to arrogance at times, but you are generous, innately kind-hearted, usually unaware th.it you may b* domineering, egotistical. Can be reasoned with, hut seldom driven. Have 4|Ane talent for entertaining, journalism; could make excellent military leader, business organizer, salesman, sports enthusiast. Birthrate: Rupert Brooke, Eng. poet; Henry Cuyler Bunner, JJg Amer. humorist, editor. * * * * * * 4 4 4 How DRAB they are, these women on the beach by EILEEN ASCROFT ITH the shops so full %  fia i iron to get id of the of gay holiday clothe WHY are English ihebrach nigh-he> bcache, *> drab and lull $£ 'ff' £87 "$S& oi grey girls r embrotclered heels, d.amond On a week-end tour of south Coa>*. Jewellery and fur resorts I d-aroverad not morr capes Than a down -mart holidayMuch BETTER are maker*: mosi of thane were In bright patterned beach Brighton Elsewhere I found towels better tin only beach-mlc* — girls "who Ignore sunshine colours and .holiday fabr.es and design* A omen who dress with can and good taste the yaar round m to loae all clothes-*-nae wlMn planning their holld-v luggage Stripes nd dors llTOasr offenders the variety: cute Knitted raps are belter than bedraggled head scarves cotton frocks which marry In with iwlmsuits and dont show a bare back with a cross-strap of white flesh are better than those that do Vanishing servants 1 '" 'IMfE domestic servant and nanny have ur pntt'Jeauy vanished from the t* S me rltin * lir : '• ' announced, from ioria* oi labour The figure i irec-qua"r^ ( are the of strong pattens in iTMI D OU ine I saw a girl m a striped skirt, floral blouse and polka-dot head-arf Sralord produced a Marling rnloti mixture ... of scarlei shorts with a crlinnon aJnrl Horrid sights arc the sliort. flared rhe~rcaaori.s JS^l*^!, !" 01 XSLJuJ ,'f''' In'England. ioo the cook-general and lilt presenting a silhouette like B nursemaid *rc k anutfi:iiK race. ship in lull sail Women employed in private do:n, Duaier coaut are high lanluon AM service cresident and non-tesiotnn Mimmei 1 counted dozen. numbered I ll'j.lJ.i in England and Wulr promenadir.g in Brighton and the 1961 .en.su.. M. MB.900 n Hove Bui even a dust-coat a million in 20 years needs a little dusting itaclf. and Pre-war wages were £1 to 2is. a week ;* >w a general maid receives £3 and a nanny £4 f*r* lamllies can afford 'Item li u „___^-^_^^^^^^^__^^^^__^^^ often the alierna-'ive to running a small car or good boarding schools for the children Those bangs 1|JIA KISEMIOWPR reveal. -* %  i-dU that Imr.dreds oi ajun in niiK-n iiave written to her erutcntng her bangs I according to the diet.onorv are "the tronr hsir .HI stnatp gCfoai nn *< %  iletcaet MAN lor hvi-o„, mi-, ft^oc* caati m roloarful 4*tkch a „ lob,k*. tarred "4Ml %  ur/ tap, tp, ^J. i". aJlrr-necftea 1 beock luei In Mmck or ton ftfua onrf i. rc if for ( I l*'(tl WHOSf DRISS IS SHOWINCr What^s Cooking In The Kitchen SNAPPER "'1 %  T Ml,IJ>| %  Ill started In Barbados. Here are three recipes that you might find useful. Boiled Snapper Snapper Salt Pepper Onion Carrot Parsley Thyme Marjoram Vinegar *f glass Small English potatoes Lime Oil The bast way to boil Ash Looking of the tlsh will vary acIIKIINU to the size. You can serve boiled snapper with small English potatoes, a few bits of parsley all round it and a sauce made of olive oil. lime juice and salt und pepper. Steamed Snapper Snapper 1 Butter 3 oa. Hum 1 small glass Flour 't tablespoonful. Take tho fish and cut it diagonally putting .-alt inside and outside. Butter the whole tlsh and put It on the gr.ite of the llsh saucepan. Pour the rum and some water on it and when the rum ti and water has started to boil pul It in some water, odd V* glass cover tho llsh with some greas— of vinegar to the water when you proof paper which you have blltboil big tlsh, a bit of rum if you tcred. Put the llsh in the oven anl boll small fish or if you don't like let it cook. When ready take the the taste of rum. use plain wate\ fish out and put the sauce in •• To give the fish a nice taste small saucepan. Add more butter vou must put it in cold water, and £ tablespoonful of flour, let ndri 1 onion. I carrot and thyme, the sauce thicken and when ready pirsley and marjoram. Let it to d*vc pour the hot sauce on the bcil for a few minutes and then fish and send to the table. Serve nftcr covering the saucepan let Uj.wlth English potatoes or swe.'t bil on one .side of the Are. The?! potatoes and yam. tight or %  urlv tm Eisen tiower has *orn hers for 30 vears because she bllevcs thev offset a high forehead Tlie first trace of bangs I can MM i discover was in . MM ••>• SMI o r r •• K and the era of Loui-s Xin i orfwi ban*tDle. combined with shoulder -length Back ihey came in Edwardian made famous bv Queen A % %  ndra and la*.*r '.lie Oaieiy O rla. The "Flaming Youth gin. Iruh Colleen Moore made Uuj atraight bnng popular in HUB Manv of the o:d-*-ime silent star* copied ner haiPdrosMng—Norma 'I indgc, ti'or.a Uwanson and v ... :.! i'r *ic became Queen, the Queen Mother alway* wore her hair in this Kyle t0itfo* rro-.i 'filet This clg>f belong lo one diiind women. But -I Roval wagging ah* biok* OM ol tho fini lashtof tiale* . "<> irran •> slips showini below >h hrm of tho to.it. H> naaia: S*c foot a* rolumit. Why woman? O F the ii pi TKipai London directors on tbtb* boards. .One group chairman tetU me It U because women have no heads for money. Thev are good at celling and promotion.' he says. bu: '.ticv do:rt t unders-.and the financial A mort year he appoinini MIM M J Aliern manag.ni* director of John Lewis at a %  alary PI £5000 a .ear. • Tliere arc null g -l.wen uiliei worx* ing women directors in ihU group ^^___—^_ Whc*f dress is showing/ •-.sgrtaN .>-.. i The Ouches. 0! K"'-.; IMI THINOft TM*V DO . IMt THINGS THuT DU THE THE IHIrlGa THEV DO . THE THINGS TMEV DO THE THE THINGS THEV DO THE THINGS TMEV OO THE E THINGS iNGs i>y ^dV ^^ mm ml OU THEV OO THEV OO THE THE THE THINGS THEV OO THINGS THEV DO THINGS THEV DO Any difficulty in obtaining u/>/ili>fifni'iriiifi tho ggkJl agvntciwrin/r thin rnliimn' INTERNATIONAL TRADING III). Tel. 5009. VACATION FIVE COUNTRIES $1560.10 nut Mi TETT Five countries and three great capitals on one ticket! Should you be a vacationer, casual about time, you stay as long as you like in the place that interests you most or where you have friends to entertain you. Your flight is swift and sure, your service perfect, no extras, no tipping, you get there sooner ond stay there longer, what a perfect holiday. CONSULT YOUR TRAVEL AGENT OR B.W.I.A., LOWER BROAD ST., BRIDGETOWN THE THINGS THEV DO THE THINGS THEV OO THE THINOS THEV OO ODD SPOT 4tTrTCSS < %  "> S I 1 1 N MfrodM fo i.i'"ji>n ih< fctsasg ihji hai faatTi I'w ••ir %  form. Ih, mat,-itat uhd.' roffaa Mfsafa •> '' % %  *oll ihouldtt-line. and eltum raf> aafged %  ("> MtrA •*• rmhoiJftu . \i>tnr trail C a a aei aea aUra-aaon hm Sh4de* l ^rolland Ill..n Hi ii i HI HI H >|irr.iging. I -ithe ili.tf .iclrr on the right in 1'hHmsinrd. He U G | —hi grrrn hai ind liruii shirt. \nung III.I.I M (he IMI Iuacl of the I .: %  1-1 11 Wi silk In s half-e from Hi-' top of Ihr head lo behind Ibe ear. Kiped .1I11011 III lie %  r ih.rseen I It's a wise woman who dresses her a&.-.. . . WD this .. nag por(ing.aAof pit%  fur* lo iinnirjii' Iht weakntu ol Ih* mothtr • and • tlaughlit %  ditttlno alik* lathlon. II il't right lor da-abltr—oh, mother, you're in fashion tumble. Remember %  m .* f-.fi...my doftit't belp ASY age. London Express Serviog atawtf %  >.' £-LOAA


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I'Al.l I ltd SI AII. W ADVOCATE SUNDAY, AUGUST 3. IBS* rC VOOR H* BV Bijoux 'ching, turning and Smarting ot E c z e Slopped In 10 Minutes gfTBaaaaT ai, TOOT Mn,ii lli>r rsiir sklit bv 'i • %  i iJ lot, r let %  M9l *•'• IP)* s-ts. gee Jhs tBn&l folhclinit in Quality OJahJuu jpWkkm J.\.\KTT% Dili:** SHOP Owin at n duction on Cotton Goods, we i our AHS in time lor the Kates. and Iht' turning wet* vi.d Swan Oiiun and Bearb Dresses from *14.W. E S" mi Suits redueed from M 7 mi („ Mti.mj aatktaliW t bi"dl*nl. muMM 1c Ihe.I SST' ._ -ID. lh( rokrabo ai para%  .^onlala (or sUi duordan rl:iof. amli4 ai.4 -n.-itTB i tv nirnt.1*! at.d coult and .oo'S*. II ixltx r.aiarr 1-ai lt asln on an* vslvaii sraoeUi. Wa#*s Fas* I It* IBUUU*. 1MB Haiti Iv • "%  and nralina MiMrtif _. 01' i ltd* dli %  : i an. mal: %  ll I I'. MllOt-ll. 1 %  tlof and >*ahna aoftar. %  irana Itui a Sai or i* tour tain U t" p* looa nor* am..-...tt..i. h n *ari. haaiiOUt aElui to U-ou.ai.Oi. H K VI* -III*. %  I %  uafttid •f WiSassa. II >tirpM it,. ihi. M aUnuia*.. I •asff at* SBY akin atawu^ t oa Uti -.and a> AH UM I..I rliarii"'" wmttm ass. araij urn iutiii. m i Str* Iff Irian* a*rr aoii'-d a', n pvm*ut la m appaaraow. Satisfaction Guorantai.J N % %  •*••% raita ahaelulrtT ttothirn ui :* 11 rl*ari .'-.I illn In jon: rcm^u 'ill lacimn an Hiaaasisa Irani votii .. mu> tada> Url in (he arm sou *m ka antarrd M ,• Unp*o"t Than |N tat a* ., MssaSar. ( U • art at ih. rnri of u,.t UnM H mm ha*a aiadr roar *in ao. al>nr. .iaow Mi mafnatlcallT a:itnclii<--oav II>* >o it* kind o! Utn i Blta ('rtxr to-.i fo. or i"i alsiplr i* tarn llw rawtr mct-fr an. .. %  IU • r-tuitd.a i i. %  ; o.-: N>iM*.m . *ou. Clwmiu lui. > ypu. DO YOU KNOW of evairu in your dlffattlr* sysiem? If ail Is la ortar your tongue u claahB, yoar mouth rela fresh. Bol ir S our systems %  Insslali ba tooifua Is coated inare's a sour, uaplaaajaat ta*t*> In your mouth. That's when you need cparkllriaT AndreWa Uver Bail' Anrtr-'ws clasas sad Ir.iadens th>> mouth. BtUn mates the action of thf diticsti ve onr/ans sod keap* your kvstm frse froni U<. K icinir rood waatas Kemrmb*T Andrews for Inner Cleanliness /jkAt^ gaUinx} Sliirliiifi I u-iiiini im Xif,hl AND Iri-ifi Aif/hi in liif/usi CLUB >IOI4. 1\ will iiffw t il* Membrrs i> INKS at l:i III ( I D PRICKS to Hquida'i' bad and liquor stocks, j.. .• will br CI.OSKD .... si;i:. OCT. MOW. a .\o I:M i\\< i: a.\Hi.fr: (Kxcepl n Saturday) Sam. 4ll.tl.ITV Sam. OIK III SI II \ St. S I AXII VIII. ..1 IIK VMI Imiii-s iioisl bratiliful NiKhl Club. a Orinks at llolrl Prir.s>. a (III! .MdRt.AN I'IIIKUUS Steak Dinner SXIHl SI'I'I'K.H S3.."ill ini'luilinit A l.lt|l'l'l'l! WE WISH TO ANNOUNCE Opening of "LE CHATEAU DRESS SHOP WOMEN'S Kr-ADY MADfcS in Exclusivr Ih-si^n, TUESDAY, AUG. 5th, 1952 CIIAI.I.KNOK Mill SI COUNTRY KOAD (Near SANITARY LAUNDRY) -^ %  ^ %  aaaar ----------PLAZA THEATRE* Cl OBI THIS IVENFNG. 8.3S MsSMBSf A Tursdky, SH St 111 H IS LORDSHIP Mr. Jiutlt* Vincent-Brown ' k i j'-tuiR t'hiot Jasltas "f TflBaJastd up le July ai. MI natw on pr*rvtlreTnent leave, part of which hr l* spendinc in Barbados. Mr arnv. ed on Friday by B.W.I.A. and is a CUSM .it the Hotel [:. Whiliht'ir Mi Viiicn-Br.wn. will be JI lending the !( %  For The Races A LSO anivlng by the same oprxinitnity from Trinidad A.er Mare Guest House, Worthing Two Week.' Holiday Woos Whitecaps I IIKIDGETOWN ( %  Hal tsiai PHP.MIF.Iil in u\i ia i. iTHE S T E E L HELMET Holutt II.ill:.i. l.i 1 tUMONKOW ll"l'l tlUafe i RARRAKKKS lOIIAl la HIS 11* a a M I' M ajai >> % %  Action Ttt-i I STORM WARNING roatoMaowa -.rn.i iM-iia, IJa* pm Whl|> S'lUnn Oovthlt ARI/ONA II KHIIiiKI HI \ m mii)i Vd.. Tkun... It., a, H::I\ -MESSACK TO C.ARCIA .i ..... Wiilliu-.Il.rta.ru IMJI.KS I1EKIIV SI IKWVI K And "SKCRCT Of CONVICT I.AKK" gjawjj KORO Zudui ry SCO 1, ssTaTa Thr l.ai-J, n—St. J.ini' HOODAL THEATRES EMPlatE TO DAI ti. S B.M and .a-UaaJ-i dall. KHAMEH1 Frwl IIM1N Ol A AI- OLYMPIC it TOMOKKOW I WnsSJitniJlll ar .1 in ,.,-.. J Jl Nlil-k M*NI M •ltd < IIIMA rOKDAia jaa iiAi-i. -UM rr.HHADAv n I-I.A. a SrBDMI B *t I VTEH Ki—itui PAHK VAI.aSTINO MI IUAI* iiaao Jinn DKHEK t>.. HEKil KOXY : AII> i J1.I1II ll'l.l AMI rMtudcotor again KUYAI. %  O-IIA. U.I I l.a H >. \ A 1 Br-,.1.1, !•. 1 ( f . >< %  DONI n \ %  Mi>saiT a r** ; ., P^ilublH A. ., II Alan 'Hochy' UNF Bitv nA-Ni'Hon %  i'i -tar Or iosr MIS RlHil II kIM. \VI. Mil -I M si riag Br* AU-EN H u HAM li, MAT. u *.; f I -I I II Ml'.' II M I Ml. -rph COTTOV A ) t, -allA'ia CITt HO X Y To-day 4.13 A 8.15 and coauhiilDg Dally M R. JAMES WALROND arrived in the Colony on Friday night by B.W.I.A. from Trinidad. Mr. W.ilrond in employed with Alstons Limited, Trinidad and has come over for two weeks' holiday. During his stay hare he will be s guc^t at CrvMal WaTt-i W-'i : %  .•: Wedding Bella A PRETTY wedding took place ji St. Cyprian's Church Friday the 25lb of July at 3.3.1 o'clock when Mr. Lionel Eustace E\'.-lyn of Hart's Cap. took as his brlda Mia* Daphne Unthe Alleyne of Hart*! Gap. The ceremony which was fully choral was conducted by the Rev. Father Layne. The ond." v.ho was given in marriage by Mr. Randall Grant, wore a dress of Facone and Nylon, her long veil wa* kept in place by a headdress ci Orange Blossoms and c*rr*Sa > a bouquet of Anthurlum UHies and Coralilati. Miss Barbara Evelyn was Matron of honour and the Misses Alma Welch and Luuril l BrtaS as bridesmaids, the flower girU wc n M lanes Eleanor Newion. 1 Betty Jordan, Barbara Greene, Carolyn Stanton, Monica GrnnI num. Valda Farrel and Angela I Tull Mr Motes GitUns per, formed the dutiea. of Best man. 'hose of Ushers fell to Mr Crispin I Savoury and Mr. Cecil Watkuvs [ A reception was held at their rosid. ncr Hart's Gap "NO a brier respite from her iics before the movie cameras, I let Joyce MacKetuie presents -ire as she prepares tor at a California beach resell. Farewell Function A FAREWELL function look lintno Friday afternoon at the Belmont Girls' School in the honour of Miss Ornella Workman. Senior Assistant Mistress. The occasion marked the retirement of Miss Workman who was a teacher at the.achool for the past 17 >...i . Carib joins in wishing her many years of happy retiicmunt Horticultural Exhibition At museum O F interest to flower* growers and lovers of horticulture U the exhibition Gardeiu in Miniature which opens at the Barbados Museum on August 29th. continuing on 30th and 31st. His Excellency the Governor and Lady Savage have graciously consented to attend the exhibition which ought to provide enjoyment to both the growers and admirers of flowers, shrubs etc. It will Include among novel features a display 0? orchids, a miniature roaie garden, a rock garden, and other iuleresUiiK displays It is hoped that the public will give this show their full support by attending in large numbers. ihOtajaot of the Exhibition, apart from its interesting aspects is to raise funds for the Society to continue its good work in trying to keep alive the interest of flower growing and propitiate the knowledge of horticulture throughout the Island. The price of admiaaion will be 8/. which will include a free admission to the Museum exhibits by the kind consent of the Curator For B.C. After Holiday M ISS SHIRLEY BACCHU3 who catme over for three months' holiday left the island on Friday by B.W.I.A. far British I iTuring'her stay here she was uio guest of Mr. and Mrs. Creighton Birch of Refat*evou-. fit James. A farewell party was held lp her honour at the home of the Birches. Back Home After Holiday L EAVING the island by BWIA for Si. Vtncsm was Miss Stacy McDowdll who came over •" SMnd the month with Mr. and Mrs. B I. Cukes ot -Myrtle Pank." Bank Hall. Miss McDowall ..oiiig. Civil Servant On Holiday A RRIVING in the colony an n day night by B.W.I.A. fiom Trinidad were Mr. and Mrs. Rann Maraj who have corns over for two weeks' holiday. Mr. Mara) Is a Civil Servant of Trinidad. During their stay here they will be guests at Crystal Waters. Worthing. Indefinite Stay H OLIDAYING in the colony for the pan three weeks at Crystal Waters U Mr. John Furnes of the United States. Mr. Furnee is now retired and wss formerly in charge of the Golf Country Club, New Jersey New York. He is here for an Indefinite stay and is thoroughly enloving his holiday. LXBD scon ssTsasN IRELAND Tedimoolor AM l>IKTftBLE EXTRA Z Reel Short:—ISLF. OF TABU A NUESTR0S AMIG0S VENEZ0LAN0S! BIENVENIDA CORDIAL A BARBADOS Les invit.imos a Vds para visitar nueslro almttcen PARA DAMAS M.H.-iiaW'de Vesrtkiog y Vestidos hechos de Hil<>. Seds y Nylon Rope Interior dc Soda y Nylon Tr*t*M do s*;ifni do "I aautt", Hilo Pintado y Lann. it I',IIMV.I mn t'l mapii df Barbados, y Mantillas. PARA CABALLER0S Caning "Arrow" Pijamas, y Camtaad de Hilo "Sea Island" d BJaAo. Ropa Interi": \ CAlcetlnea Corbatas, elc TAMBIEN Toallas. Sobrt) I'amns, Sabanas. Mantelcs. Malclas etc. Vajilta Platearla. Fiyuras de la mcjor Loxa Inglesa "Royal Doultun". JunueU*. y Recuerd'>s de la Isla. .y^^^^*^*^*,'^'^^^^'^^',-^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^,'^^^^^'^^ Dislrilniidori's Kxiiusivos para Y\ Zapalu Kitmoso "K" piirn Caballeros 6 Dainas. C. F. HARRISON & CO., LTD. HKOAD STREET. AQUI SE HABLA ESPAN0L TO THE RACES MINDED LADIES OF OUR LOCAL COMMUNITY N. E. WILSON & CO., SAYS:Ri^ht on the spot, .ind just in the 'nick of time' for the approaching SPORT OF KINGS ig that all-imporimit item for which you were waiUhf! to complete your Bank Holiday Ensemble, the incomparable BALLEMUJVAS made of suede. In shadM <>f Pepper (Jreen. Town Brown, Cherry Red. Pine (ireen and Bluck m tin unbealablv l" Prices of S5.48 to $8.93 per pair a .s.i. ;//.i-i i)n v. !" ro .. N. E. WILSON & CO. Popular Headqimrlers for Ladies' rsshinnablr Footwear at No. 31, SHU 11 Street ur Dial 3676 for Your Kei[iiircnnnlv '>v/,v/^v/ / vvx>w^/,v / vv/,y,v/xvxrv ; c > s a saM TO-DAY 1.43 & 8.30 P.M. AND C'ONTINL'INfi DAILY 4.45 & 8.311 AT i M l> I H I one mistake... seen by hia son.. uxdeeuBhes the ., o/TSroldsert II — fifuH.i T\mn*m rru. .in." w Fredric March. An .Ys.sivtMiu*nt of m a LADIES NYLON HOSE 2.0, $J.I5, 2.28, 11.41 . a LADIES' NYLACE HOSE I2.&U a LADIES' LISLE HOSE $IM a CHILDREN'S ANKLETS MH1U CENTS — ALSO — NEW SHIPMENT OF . a MEN'S WILSON FELT HATS T. R EVANS & WHITFIELDS DIAL 220 YOUR SHOE STORES DIAL 60fc K



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PACE TWELVE SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY. AUGUST 1. ltSJ Utl. tiin\ \OTSSi The Influence Of The Teacher I HAD ONLY BEEN able to allow one week .ri in> ortticiH system in this island when I da* II i otnad] a) errora the %  y*t to cow Ami so I Bp idei il tins column t"r llic indiscretion %  •dares Hut Mtnelhiiu; ha* happened or has been allowed lo happci. •md Uui it it throwing ihe machinery out of fear. I am i nch —d to the view thai tome hand 1* Intent on wrecking our system. If this were not so then' could not be .0 many mistakes. The mo.i rereiii, innauni eim Bl 1* that leather* at tinllnmiiii" -' li.-.ilv mil be ir-jn-tt 11., 1 |<> illfTerenl arhewl< in virtue* part* of the bland and lhat no trarhrr will be allowed to remain al om school Mare than h>r *f.ir. There are occasion-when tr.m>fers ar necess-i %  In U* nti-n-of le o thsrs and school* but M ml 1 beratepolicy the indiscrlminata transit r of teachers i* ;>. 5tuptd n* it IR dangerous I did not want to believe it but I recollect now that a teacher 01 the Roebuck Boys' School ami who live* .n St Michael, was recently transferred to the MesHouae School, St. Lucy; Inter he was soil to St George. Another Udv who lives at Barbaroes Hill and had been teaching at Westbun G1.1 .-... tarred to St. Mai thus, yet another living in Hastings district and teaching a* St. Matthias was transferred to West bury. I hope 1 am wrong, but It might be that transfers of this kind arc Intended to breed grave dhaatisfaction on the part of the teachci and so undermine his or her work In the tinst place, a teacher has an allegi.ince to his school and Us pupils, he watches it grow In stir and improve in standards, its success becomes his ohief ambition and as an Institution it becomes pajl and parcel of his very being linn -nd the eord 11 -napped. There will hardly oa the .ling towards another 1 us pupils and so the value of his work is lost. In yet another instance the really sound teacher might be led to feel that he or she Is being used to build up s ch o o ls for favourites and that as soon as there is improvement i" one school he or aha o. removed to do the spade work in another. ( %  '• % %  .'ii< s er i ous a matter heft u. wan upon in* Director in 11 (talagatlon and itfguter -trong objection. They -iiould not Walt to object, indlvidjolly, when a transfer Is made. It is to be remembered that the oat of travelling as In the case 4 the St. Michael teacher sent U St. Lucy must take a large perl o. that toucher's salary and. In other caass his domestic arrtmgetoents %  night be seriously upset. Imagine '.he ca.se of a young man who must leave his family and, because of travel difficulties, gel board an.l lodging with stranger*. Hla 00 ly .ilteraative is to carry his entire family and in the absence of buying .. house, live under the school %  llnr. In the case of young women, the case U even more absurd. 1 must i**t be understood t<> mean the' .-•echera must not Do 'laiu-ferreo or must be found appoint menta In the district In %  hull the* live But'I do conhving in the district 01 9*jnj • lose to the school is i> leaded asset to teacher, pupils ami leraoiial knowledge of the circumstances of a child's parent*, or family background and • he liimMli-o in srigl 1 >' I in b* Of fc re-l s. Q ialaii HV u. the teerher uilereated In the child. at In forgotten too l th* Raven Wright who was a Master at Lodge knooi ,ind later Lacturer -it Osdtrfaigton College, (hiring his years he had %  mong hli punibj al on. Una % %  another, men who not only 11 their day and generation made Barbudos great, but who logethei made an unrivalled contribution to the welfare of this island. The list, short as it is, reeds like an I n 'Who'd Who' rather than a eoll'-elion of Barbadian* who became eminent because they had come under the influence of Rev. Wright Sir William eminent judge an 1 I'-esi'lent of (he l-ogialative Council the one liarbadian who wa.s awarded two kidgnho-i In I lif.tini<. Sir Ftederiek Clark*, Speaker of the House of Assemnly; hts brother Sir Charles %  %  of this island aflei being lo Mi W K . Sir John Randall Phillip". Ptesidenl of the Council -ucceer! Thandler; and Sir Jokfli Hut son, ee %  ; tnti 'Hy of the influence of Mi Wright and It i' f'H 1" u measure the contribution which Ihe) tiade to public life in Barbados. A son of lh>* gentleman. Hon All.in W'ij*h\ . 1 few rears ago on-t his i/n-eUvM anxiety while an li hut Patrol by giving each individual some definite responsibility both in TTO-HI Hcadquartvts and in camp. If each Scout has a definite share in making Ihe Patrol work smoothly he will be more Interested and the Patrui Leader will have tune to develo.i new Ideas. With Troop camp coming up very soon you will w*nt to moke aure your Patrol Is working on some ystem of this kind. Our Founder, Lard 1 gested the following as a logic:il division of duties for members uf the Pair il in camp. Look It over and see what you think of it. iv'•' Ueaai 1 ntembering that it has been used iccessfully many times. Patrol Leader: In Haedquarleror Camp, responsible for assigning duties and seeing thU -hey arc carried out. B I 1 0 D d Quartermaster, ill < ii.ii ye of supplies of food and iquipmcnt and First Aid. No. I Scout: Chief Cook, in charge of preparing meals. Mo. 2 Scout: Assistant Cook. No. 8 Scout: Scribe, keepi"j; accounts of moneys and store, keeps log of the camp or hike. No. 4 Scout Pioneer, making drains, bridge*, latrines No. 5 Scout: Sanitation, keep. 1 p clean, Incinerator, No. 6 Scout' Axeman, supplying firewood; Fireman and Waterman, has charge of cooking or Qam In and of Mrtat supply. This f llist nil outline, ol coun and Patrol Leaders are urged to develop their own "council." M you have eight in Iho Patrol, for example, then some of the duties can be divided. It might he a good idea to rotate some of the duties in camp so that everyone has a chanee 10 learn all the parts ( n.il inj the I'.drol System work. These are the *ort of thmg& thul have to be worked out with your Patrol and then, QCtel the decision Is made, the Patrol Leader must make sure that everyone does hla share. Of com Patrol Leader should be able and willing to do any of these Jobs himself and occasionally lend .. hand. Work out your own idea* and then when camp lime rous around your Patrol will "he pn-pured." Scouts of the Third Ml S.ouls S*roop of Speightstown and of %  he 1st Harrison College Troop are in camp at St. JameMix 1 School near Trents, St. Jam-' The camp bj In charge of Scouters V. E. Matthews and D. Fowleboth of Harrison College Stuff They expect to be in OaBia Untl Wednesday next. % &f&f a THE i;\lii;\lMis mi Mii:\ LID. While Park Road, Bridgetown ENliiNhKKS BRASS ..nd IRON FOUNDERS Works c-i.ul.m torn ipplMMn lur the execuliun nf ftfltrrtMi Wl 1 1 all kinds, and c-specially to SUGAR MACHINERY and STEAMSHIPS Dealers in AGRICULTURAL MACHINERY and GENERAL ENGINE ROOM STORES of all Description IRRIGATION PROJECTS, PUMPING EQUIPMENT and ELECTRICAL INSTALLATIONS A SPECIALTY For Satisfaction, Quality and Service THE BARBADOS llllMil!. LTD. Phone : 4546, 4650 Workshop Phone 4528 Stores Dept: Z %  saaaaassaaa>aa MM aaeasss M aa*sa***sa*** Good Fifth Ctttcho.* I nan from Bathsheba are having a good season with snappers It was reported on Friday. A few (Ishing boats went out on fishing trips during the last week and returned to the Bay with reasonable good catches. B>>at s/ejii ool in full force yesterday. Restrictions On Salt Fish Imports Relaxed In accotdaiucc with an Order made icceutly uj His Excellency itie Governor under the %  sport* and Imports (Be*rlctlon Act. as now iropori from any country dried, smoked. pickled and salted (lsh onions and pnUtues. The Ordec is only applicable u< this type of goods which are whom invpared in countries from which export takes place. The Order stipulates lhat the I ertiflcate of origin of all import* .>f such goods shall be produced try ihe Importer 01 consignee, and the approval of the Financial Secretary must be obtained prior to the importation of any such goods wher payment for such goods has to be 11,tide to a country other than the country of origin of tne_g oods. Hand Concert There will be a Police Band Concert tit the Bathsheba Social Centre on Tuesday next, beginning i,\ t.30 p.m. This Concert was at Brit schedulrd lor Wede -sday. but w.is changed because Wednesday bi Ti.mMiHuratlo" Day. TBIIXh MT OVEH Vll 7 Sfrurf foHf* l*rt>misvs ... WITH mi: MASTER LOCKS II .. hurtI II>-III in mil siai-s GENERAL HARDWARE SUPPLIES P.ICKETT STREET (Opiio.it* Post Offlee) 'PHONB flMI AFTER THE RACES T UIHCUITS SANIWICII 1'ASTE C T CHERRIES SAUTE1> HITS C T. ONIONS . MUSTARD .. ICE CREAM MIX BRANDT WHMKY Tins, •tots GIN CKEEN CHARTREUSE EftAMBUtE CURACAO TRIPLBSEC *REME DE MENTIIE CONTRBAU KOLA TONIC DRY MONOPOIX DRY FLY SHERRY GOLDEN ARROW RUM .. %  tout PKHKiJVX A €0.. LTD. Roebuck Street Dial 2072 & 4502 (sm DIAL 4684 4723 GALVANISED MESH WIRE • all aizet and fuafea in beat quality • SPECIAL LOW PRICES A. BARNES & CO.. LTD. ^ &f&f&f&f&f&f e,ooaeaoaaoan .. you fl worn out.'dspraiisd. or |riiciilly run down s gUu or two %  dr of twrkfut Tonic Wine will quickly rsitort lost •nargy nd ton* up Ui whol* narwoui tyiism, if ntf vluWIty It tortitte* you sgilnit ttsr %  nd •xhauitlon and remember. BucKfstl Tonk Wins H atpaclsJIy veluiblt alter lllnsu. CM.OCKS COMi: AND SEE Our Hit Anortmrnl o\ . CLOCKS OF AM. DESCRIPTIONS SMAI I ( LOCKS. HIC. (LOCKS, DESK CLOCKS WAI I CLOCKS IRAN M I INO CLOCKS AWD ALARM C"l (X'KS • .4/-.. /list Optlttt JUHaW WRIST WATCHES in PnllcniN >' ill Simply lxve They Mule Very ChwminR Gifts II you vvaiil lo Ix* sure of ihe Bcsl ibnyi Shup at Yoot icwcllen . LOUIS L. BAYLEY Boi roN LAM o AQUATK CLVH Gin BOOTH Phone 3VW Phone 4897 mi %  iiii l li iii i i Youthful Vigor Restored In 24 Hours Gland s Fortified ^jj by New Disco' cry %  53 S or. tl*n yn are ihi IRII %  Unilt. anal unl*


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VM.t nil K si Ml\Y Ul\<>< til SUNDAY, AUGUR 3. 152 ALL OVER THE WORLD Good.mornings begin with Gillette The up-to-date Chief cried Now miod wfaal I gay, Here\ how to sha\e in ibe easiest nay. tsc a Blue Gillette Blade—sharpest edge you can get In a precision-made razor designed by Gillette." Wise men turn gratefully to Blue Gillette Blades, sharpest ever honed. Special toughening makes Blue Gillette Blades last longer and save money. To get the beat out of a Blue Gillctle Blade use it in a Gillette razor because razor and blade arc made for each other. 5 Blade* 30e Blue Gillette Blades TRAUt INQUIRIES TO; I. OhUDfcft ORAM li'iin THE STANDARD LIFE ASSURANCE CO. Established 1825 N EW business figures to 30th May. 1952 nre niven below. Ith comparative figures for lnsl year :— Class of Business Life Assurance*; Ordinary ... Group Total Deferred Annuities: Ordinary .... Group Total Immediate Annuities neu 1*52 %  ton A"in. d Sum Assured £11.314,954 8.189,336 *I.5J4.2flO per annum es fi 172.259 3.030.651 £3.802.910 £ 47.075 Sum Assured Sum Aasui rd £ 8.268.237 4,181,010 par annum £ 202.593 2.819.679 t: | H22.272 £56.015 The Annual QfMra] Keating was bald on IStt March when the results of another year of solid .uhi< \ m.-til ffirt reported to the members of the Company. The mo,t striking features of the rapOfll were the Inimn tit the total funds to over X98.0O0.000. the expense ratio of 9.3*!S, the lowest In the history of the Company, the regard volume ol new hlMln— and the further increase m the net rate or interest earned to over 4%, For full particular.., of Yields per cent for Annuities, and Estimates for Staff Pension Schemes, etc.. please apply to: — Wilkinson & Haynes Co., Ltd. AGENTS. Lower Broad Street. NOTICE "We wish to advise our custoinci* that our Workshop Department will M closed from Tuesday 5th August * Monday 18th August. 1952. both days inclusive, in order to give our Workshop Staff their Aniuiul \aealion. There will be u smull relief staff on duty for any emergencies. Our Office. Ports Department and Petrol Station will be open as usual." ECKSTEIN BROTHERS BAY STREET DIAL 4269 J \\ .1. BOARD CONFIRM INDIAN TOUR A (Aiptain,. \o Pro*. \<>t BI a & COfflS T HE Indian tour is now a reSlny at far 'as confirmation A dates and itinerary metal West Indian cricket sources if The. Barbados oaf fter having played • %  %  Mints about Ui shall take up In the course of these %  Uma but to-day I want to deal panirui.i %  ragraph <.f the ofladal relaeao West Incflaa Hoard uzk ieplic have as yet beet; at Indies professionals by the West Indies Criekct Board of Control." A LKGACY T u been a legacy of autocracy not unmixed with a "' West Indies. In the m. .. ilh the profes..:., %  M oldar DMtnbari of the Board, M %  complete breakdown in H laUons between the W 1 C B. of C. and the professionals a long time ago. the professionals? T| Frank Worrell, Clyde Walcott, Ev< Marshall. Frank King and I no need for me to enumerate Hit Uldtotd performed by these men that h.. |fc singly and eol:. %  InlerI map. GKNEBAL AC.kr.KMr.NT I N the circumstances it Will be generally agreed that they deserve nothing but the best treatment .it the hands of i can roveh Ear the fact that on two pit rUtrary professionals for then pervicti which it WM suggested th..t ike oi leavi The i, i i (Minputed not with regard did it seem to give consideration 10 the fact thai th lairfaailoiaill earn their living by u Ihej do not plaj cricket they do not I %  tiled and an amicable agreement was made because of the efforts ot ooa member of the Board who %  dltton ol Harr I I \\T\STIC 1 HAVE alraadj drawl idea expressed i.y the new Board in which they claimed that ng on a theory by which they would i members of West Indus teams a bonus and make no dlstinclonaii and amah i When this it in principle .M not see how the proposal could be I In u a II Sect tint important BUI Hnaneial economy. I elaborated to tinextent thai this was obviously adopting t principle fellow [recalled thai the members of the victorious 1048 Australian team to England were paid a bonus of £801, each In addition t expenses and a weekly allowaiui'. (i Sii Donald Bradman. down to Neils Harvey tin younger! nvtmbar of the team included. IMPOSSIBLE FOR ALL •T1IF. West I %  paid roughly 1.700 In round figures, for then lours to England and Australia. It Is impossible t anything even In I am I thai this payill ng put into practice nor have the piufessionals %  ary lei entlrel: tion to what they are really worth to the West India in this tour oi to what might ba iea.-on.iiii> worthwhlla to them for making the trip. NO "POUND OF FI.KSH I KNOW lUfflcli ifi-sflonals personally to vouch (Ol II are not unmindful of trie I West Indies cricket was the vehicle by which they entered rel at which they eould demand % %  Mje. This being the caaa they win certainly not %  tick out for their '"[omul of flesh" but certainly they are h> a fee proportionate to their usefulness as players and as drawing-raids at the games, I ol tha Waal Indies Cricket Board of Control make no mistake about the matter. If the key professional H %  i leant they can Immediately any goodbye U> UM greater part of the $130,000 Which they arc plannini; to namd on I he tour. NO FAPTAIN APPOINTED A NOTHER matter that has greatly exercised my mind is anothei paragraph of the release that stales that 1 will play British Guiana a series ot the regular post-war nlerenlontal names beginning in British Guiann an October 10and that II lee Selectors and the West Kit < Kpected ba alluaai these It I %  :.!,> M eaptaln baa 111 %  nnught tt to be the intelligent thing to itited the West Indies captain months ago so that he enuld start upon a plan to discover new talent even if only in his own parti. What is more 1 think it is a positive lapse in go.*! taste .... t ] bun with but a tor ;. trip to British 'luiana and then HI Indian tour soon after. DISAPPOINTMENT I HAD hoped that the newly appointed Board would display son,, | tive, dlatemlnats nformatiiit to West Indian cricket and on U the crltldami that were levelled at the old Board. They have not succeeded in convincing • tare* section of %  public that the* an activelj concerned With unearthing prospective West Indies talent for thr forthcoming tour, sn> i.een launched. TIIKY HAVE NOT SITIEF.DKD f^nrv have %  "> oanvincini ua tiiat they plan lo offer the public more Information on West Indian Utteri Who will lie captain? What are the terms thai have baei i!s s lh,,t ,llc P" bLk ,.. Whj baa aol II report of the Man• %  not yet released to men All these and other questions naad dill to be answered and should have been answered long ago. There was much icket quarters when the months have paused since the elect! 1 I I ta then hehav our to prompt ,.. I : o-ket audience to loin in the byaterlei j Overheard n"t know how to prevent it. Can you help me ? WELL .IOIIN. they My : "Prcont: batter lhn cure." My house la u ifl a bone. Why Beeaute I bull! with %  • HOLLOW CONCRETE BLOCKS %  uppUad b] CONGBRB l'KODKls LTD. mU* l((inil damp, and What u < iu-jip Wiiy lo Bul'id ! Bright Light Wins Derby At Suiiriiier Meet IARD*S three year old li.: %  out ol Burning Buw-Kelicitas won the Barbados j from a Held df toll B I'C. four-day Summer Meeting got underway at the Garrison Savannah vesterdav. The filly, piloted by Jockey Sonny Holder, led the field for the entire event to win comfortably from First two lengths and return the time of 1.58J sees. i'V Best %  out ol Burning Bow-FeUcitasl, In tended saw | icing lh.eompany sL ing cut aj thejr during whk-h MIM K, c. 1 lhe straI nt " Ule '*" %  i-year-old lilly Mlr.cl ll "* lurn by H 1 ? In the r. %  'jrk>n* gate, tttera were onlch inges tor posiUons. i rh and Belle Surprise Oidcibclld i I gag -n ended the day moved on " ut*>. V" 1 ,. 100 !; the moat ucceartj : f """ x u ," w >*„ *\ ,h 7 *i!i. tarn mtom ../fcT. ,L, I '"' M ,h '"""'wiua two wini to hie credit. Illim d tl( r „. ;u[ ,„ ,„ ntti B leni;th etuinm L h u ,s jouo.oo mark on one occusion and n length! away Irom Lunwaj the 9500.00 mark five tlmea. The w no finished third. FOURTH RACK lliirbados Derby Stakes and Cup Cardinal and Dunquerque hUTbeen Mcralched il> n*l•"•" P ^ K .-cllniK %  "" '"''" A final effort to Mound ttic biiiii and n the bomc inw ""' pmmkr uu m l U on irom .. Bright LiKht failed however, and hid to OVatrl Ul LOW but only HoWW piloted her homo u Ml I level. Abu All after mak. "''"'" bv two Imglhs whil Hnil A -i* 1 fc-^^ft D^-^klju. 1J.^^.. 1..* Aim ...... mm muKic U*iC WOO ; n | v had tied for flr.t plw. ,, J5| „,.„,„ ,,„„. o( 572/5 ,„ ~~"^ — • by Best Wishes. SECOND HACK Planters' StakM K1KT11 RACE Abu All an* mak. '"" %  """' •*'""' %  '" i..,l beat Rambler teW third i head bahtn I ""V '•"'"! ^"LTI ?"-f s North (lute Handicap This was another event to Which than was ;. liel.l The entire field got off to a good Of eight to test the starter i sl;irl lri thls CV ent. the so od T 1 patience. /or Ull day> Thcre Wf?re oni y After a fairly good start MiraQve horses — Doldrum. Daahlng ele (Pat Fletcher Up) took tin PrtBeeaa, Embers. Flieuxce and lead f'> lowed by Mar-h Wind-.. (..,^ful Annie. Cardinal und Caprice with Al Ihej Isaed thl stands for Soprano briiiRinu up the rear. the first time, the order who* wag still in the lead and mainDashing Princess and Embers tamed this position throughout moV ed away from the fleW but the event making every pole a Klieuxce closed the gap by the winning one. March Winds made | nr 0 furlong pole. Racing to the iifurlong. Flieuxce made a Held canillonao and had soon overtaken Mn.ule with Hatcher In tha sadlimberf. Lutclunan bow die shook off the gelding Prlnceai on the rails and eventually raced up the home ,i,n in thi Btratoh a comfortable wtntlej torO lenatni ahead <.f ataxch Thi re was a ding dong tusslo Winds. Cnniinal was third four coming around the bend and as ttM Held entered the straight Flieuxce made a serious bid for the premier position but Lutchman still kept Dashing Princess to the fore to win by naif a length. Doldrum who had made ten a determined effort coming up the this home stretch, was third a head RACING NOTES By B*:\ man* THE nrst day's racing of the August meeting has brought with it its usual crop of thrills, surprises and disillusionment?. Most of us are. 1 suspect, poorer men, all of us are wiser men. but none of us are. I hope, really sadder men. unless that is. we put our pocket before our enjoyment of some really first class racing. For that was what it was as nobody who saw it can deny. From the first race to the last, marred only by the rather farcical start of the C Class, we saw nothing but really interesting and enjoyable racing in which the element of surprise lacking. Indeed the llrst Race set the tempo, for it resulted in a finish as spectacular as the most captious could have wished. No fewer than six horses came tumbling down on the Judges together, and if the latter failed to separate the first two. 1 for one do not blame them. Personally, I thought that Magic Gaye Just got home, but it was a desperately close thing. Indeed the whole Race was hotly contested From the time the gates flew and Aim Low took command there was incident aplenty. First we saw Devils Symphony prominent then The Thing caused her backers to row, but hardly had she got on terms than Trimhrook appeared, rushing round the Held on the outside. Dot Magic Gaye the than and from the time they turned Into the %  draight it was clear that she was going to be concerned with the finish. In the end a dead heat was the verdict with Abu Ah who had never been far away finishing third. Devils Symphony was :t there can be ho doubt that hci turn and that of Abu All will soon come. Cantaquisine pulled in very lame having been bumped earW tin and sustaining an injury behind. IN BEST FORM The second race found Miracle in her best form, and just how good this is she ulainly showed by her time which was I 5 of a second faster than that of the imported horses. She was trailed home by March Winds who ran well, and Cardinal. the latter clearly reeling the effects of his interrupted preparation. Mention should also be made of the running of Caprice who showed her best form to date and may be heard from later. The Steward's Stakes produced a brilliant race indeed. After Pepper Wine and Harroween had made the early pace, we saw a Challenge b) tha lightly weighted Belle Surprise and by Lunwayi No sooner did they appear to have the issue between theni. than the cry was Landmark' and Mr. Chase's grand stayer swept down on them in a way which made the final result obvious. Red Cheeks was aw.iv slowly and forced to come on the outside did well to be fourth. The time 1.32 4/5 was excellent considering the condition of the track. From the point of view of a spectacle the Derby must have been regarded as a disappointment. But if we look on it as the vindication of a good, perhaps a great. Creole Mare, then we can have no complaints. Bright Light beat them pointless, ami there is no doubt that had she been at any time seriously i d her time could have been much better. First Admiral showed how unwise it is to base our conclusions pmelv on exercise form. The Northgatc Stakes was chiefly remarkable In that Flieuxce was able to get so close to Dashing Princess. The time was moderate and it is doubtful if any of the quintet is outstanding WRETCHED START The Oistin Slakes was marred by a wretched >t*rt which left the favourite Gavotte as well as Blue Diamond at the post, and so provided the moderate Joan's Star with an opportunity of which she took full advantage. Gavotte, left nearly a furlong, did wonderfully well to be third. Mr. Gill's Sea Foam, on whom Lutchman was naturally reluctant to ride his hardest finish, ru an exemplary race for a two-year-old, and should benefit Irom his experience on Monday. In the Trafalgar Stakes Mary Anne, whose form Is so difficult to assess, ran disappointingly, although not blessed with the best of racing luck. In her absence Top Flight Just squeaked home from that old reprobate Colleton who gave conventional Forecast Players an awful shock. In the best traditions, however, the really good wine was kept for the last — the pun In unintentional. The Stafford Stakes saw a sight to which we have become, in recent years, somewhat unaccustomed — a good creole showing the way to a strong field of imported horses. The start again was not very satisfactory and although the two who were left—Castle m the Air and Flying Dragoi—were both the chief offender?;, I felt that they were dealt with a trifle summarily. Swee! Rocket soon overcame the disadvantage of the draw and took the lead closely followed by Demure. Between the two and the three Spear Grass made a good run, but nothing could withstand Pepperwine when Edgar Crossley turned her loose in tralght. The excellence of her performance was underlined by her time of 1.07—the best for the day, and although I had neither tipped her nor backed her I went home in a real glow of satisfaction at her success. caught up with aud passed Cottage at the two furlong pole. He finished third, five lengths iiw.y from Sea Foam who was second a length behind Joan's Sta.-, (Yvoilet up). lengths behind March wind: THIRD RACK Stewards' Stakes With I :. ; ,.trhed. I Starter in %  enbehind FUeuxce. trants classified "A" and "B". ntranll comprised inch I i wine, carrying 2 lb", overweight. Rebat-. : and Not or. IK others. After ;. few minutes of rertlata scratched, and ness at thi I i 1' ira (carry HO in I. %  SIXTH RACE Oislin Stakes Mi n i., and Twinkle were Joan's Star, Sea j an overweight : ti Hew. I*it 17 lbs.). Blue Diamond. Gavotte living Dragon, Wilder up. was left and Cottage faced the starter. %  tending The event, over 5'-, furlongs The I'll Pot horses classified "C" and good start, and going past the "C>2" was off to a bad start with judges tor the iirst time, it was Blue Diamond and Gavotte left Pepper Wine, followed closelv by far behind the other three. I en, with Red Checks lying Despite %  lead of about 40 yard;, third n,i the rail. Wilder hustled Gavotte win SEVENTH RACE Trafalgar Slakes Two were scratched in thi' evi-nt. :i seven and a half for horse? classified "G" and Lower, leaving a Held of five. As soon MS the gates flew Lutchman hustled Top Flight to the fore and when they passed the stands for the first time was still in th; diuppcar. and JOttTl I %  to mutt) better. REUEVtS YOUR PAIN -, • -'/,V.V.V.V/.V//.(,V/AVAy/V.VAV.VAV.V.V/.l. I mxi: roo mi wiv. HEADACHHTV S.S NERVE PAIHS > SI *JMj" "'""' COLDS, CHILIS' I %  aril. HEUMATIC I PAINS J ban way i g. t quick rcV '.tool UNlVtnSAl-Docbr j'Morponr,vep-;::;ti;-nj.:niiWliltr Ann. Bore* KM and Fungi, Pilnl or pol .hover trened wood No odour No Arc'riik. ECONOMICAL—Hifhly


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si M> \s M'l.l'ST 3 I9S2 SL'SIHV AIUOi PACE NINE The tremendous things that happened to a quiet little English secretary tv IMAGINE mp, a Waaf—only women was to avoid capture by All over Britain wenradio Stt. 41ns. lull, standing on tip-too the German*. But we didn't leatetlon stations. Some of our Iryin* hard to read my posting know that, and we were very Kay. liudeiltl h.id been caught and I form over the shoulder of UM *altfd for the police ti> come orderly room clerk. "TM1E house was magnificently knocking at the door, but they The typewritten sentence stood A furnished, the food was exm-ver came. out blunt and clearly.. ."This atrrellenl. We were always under woman it not (o be employed on observation. Even our personal • • secret and con/idenltal work." letters nad to be sent to a box That was because my mother number, where they were read by was French and the Battle of (he authorities before reachlnK us. Britain was at its height. No one Security was everything. In Britain at that time was quite The first morning we wentaken outside one at a time and given lesta In physical obsUicli The nrst was to cross upposcd 11 Bed Cardinal Polish M Y training was over. I was tal mansion Just outid given a final sure w*m were their friends and who their enemies. COMMISSIONED One of the Youngest My dual nationality made me suspect, and that summer of 1940 I was happv lo be A.C.W.2 421234 Baseden. I was born in Parti. My father is an engineer, and 1 travelled ,nd %  "P?through Europe with my family. „.._ ^ LONELY LODGE At 12 I was sent to school at St. Mary's Priory in Stamford Handling Explosives Hill. London. There I stayed until war broke out My father was it was at thjs house that I saw then put on secret engineering Mr. Bennett again. This time h %  to n a st.k* tendon ecuiity talk. Then I anal told of the methods the Gestapo used to extrasw snaal a ditch-— ,nformatton from prisoners, with burning acid i was told af the buth in which —too wide to Jump. ;, : is,,,,,-,, were sullUMMd OWa* The last was to leap from the top „nd over and over again, of the of a high tree to a rope a few feet wav linger and toe na'ls were sway. A miss would have meant a pulled out, of tin In % %  M-U fall of SO or 40 feet. which were slowly tightened After that we eauh had an until consciousness sank in a nour-long interview with a payflood of pain. -hlatrist. who left us limp puzzled. "THFRK IS NOTHING WE CAN DO TO HELP YOU Ii YOl' ARE CAUGHT I WAS INtOKMEU. "WE CAN ONLY GIVE YOU A TABLET WHICH WILL RILL Y'OU IN ONE MINUTEBUT MY MOTHER WAb STILL HUM, AT Mil \ CHON. IN FRANCE. AND WAS TRAPPED THEKl WHEN THE TIDE OF INVASION 1 1. (I W I 1) OVER FRANCE. — in Army major's uniform. That night as I went to sleep We were there for only five days. W no 12i 0n c ^ ^?L } W ,V Then we went off to Scotland. "P** 1 b Y wh "' ', had be n to,d We arrived at Loch Morar. near [ was ,0 tcit d lonely Arisaig. After a long boat r WM hen *** "}* ****' iourney we landed on the opposite what "^ *?* ,"• l *** permisihore ion to do that. Then we riad a four-mile walk 5" l . C f tCd ""j^l and , lhen through the mountain valleys to uld: 1} "* vour <* irt m '•* " Sng^odgT !" !" rt0nP * > — -ailed to our new I ^-hap^r. wo'riced luce c J£^ a Z !" *"£ • me? ^Tarn'ou^oSe! * ,at for a year and then I. .ppHed [.ShTS E£ 2S*SS b inK ***• He was very In the W.A.A.F I worked at Kenley fighter station sorting letters England. I was bitterly c< Buck first lime really I, iSV^Sor rzb ras'"""" %  nb "' -'-"'vv,. ii boar* Soon we had to blow things up on exercises. The head, an air Vic* marshal. „, d bto railway £t£2£ji wh Sort vT.Sw nCS "" "<^lon7o,"Z'three weeks' Ume I was commls,,":;f nR sunB Io continental Msmashed bv th GesUco. sioncd In Intelligence. I was one '"' of the youngest officers In W.A.A.F. m jumped. A FTEM the din and bone-pro| lung culti.es* of the journey i mi aiyeell tailing u.nHigh 30c my aWi d i.OOO.iHMi hMskH OR my back taj HI night I couU BEWU tnc and Uw air felt aof %  ram i v.tv alone; UaaaaBY* had •raj REal M out of sight. •>! 1)1)1 Nl.v I II r: A It D III U V HOOTS I'OI'MHM, OVrR THE (i K O U N V TOWAKM Mat %  nd. nchiite 1'V nviiul mj iv iwulvr: Was i;i 111? it ale and talked. and for the than ma artra stot back to the and misermansion Wtartn told Sht l _.ve way tg u> u> dropped in rraaca hunHe said: v ^ alr : dreds of miles r.-um our deslinuYou anootiuj on a mission i-ucien and I wandered round Uon We would have to make our trf'irh is rolher difjlcult." uondon. We had seen all the w,.> overground. He tohl me that 1 was to go with another officer to pick up the threads of a once-strong Resistance organisation near Th.'n, ju.t us rapidly as it ha thag s'virnMi-i | r'ench voict •wore loud and lustily. It wai a friend coining toward ma and not a German I wu Just 21 BI I was gieetec bv the Resistance onthat cage; and exciting night, ami "Lm .'il I little older. (World Cnpvririftt) NKXT VtDKK Our first operation : Success1 fare Ihen ..pi in : the Inrfurr and 'LUCIEN' My Companion f^OME time later 1 got to know a girl called Pearl Witherington She was to be decorated later /o • helping the Frenob Resistance Movem.nt. She told me sh* win going to be posted to i MY KNIFE How to kill laying eggs chirping with doubli •n t.ken £om"!£ ""A" and llnall,. whl.Hu., w a crowing hen. So you s-je f then' are so many things to uorry about that it is not worth worrying. But to turn to a more serlou%  4St upward,. „.„ upwardaU^SKS^TJL^ ^SS^rSS^VUED as the or-t-r repeated over and you think It's right?" hat lhr curcs J.'" '; tomatics. the l ,llc en *l ' 'he course I ha I developed a great affection and a lot of skill with grenades, the Bren-gun. and the colt .45 revolIn a little room anxiously for the man wsio was to go with me. He came in, tall, young, brown-eyed, and looking as though he came from a long „ ,. . line of nn.stix-rats. Which was r „,...—, B ul *•• *•* o" 0 ,2 b d indeed the case. lob where she could moment for me. The instructor Hu (w|( „ amc waJ .T^ucien". ?' '^e-L. f ..h'"? door: h f ns ;,.her Frenoh vocabulary. Jve me a long black-handled nnd hls flrBt words to me „„. ta I said. "See if you can get a Job i-ommando knife. had to learn -Come and liave something to for me. too. I'm forgetting all my io use it. ral (lV( r „ llltle Uble French." For the Service had put In a glade among the ilr treti this coi id-lieutenant told me me in an office coping with Dutch were three dummy men. which how he had been on one mission and Norwegians. the Instructor manipulated by and riad been caught and tor* One morning two months later wires. I had to learn to slab theia lured. I received a letter. and kill. It said: — •Dear Madam. Would you was the or*-r repeated over and you tninic us ngnt*,h B t ih emplease report to tho Ministry of over again. hated it. I hated So intent was "Luclen !" that ho disease. For instance Pensions. Sanctuary-place, Westit so much I never did use a knlfj went along to a bishop before MJ, !" M y: "Tu prevent mlnctor, and ask for Mr. Benin Fr ance " u i P "" 1 ' C "net." Of course, I went. A small man, rather bald, in a tweed suit, was waiting for mc._ He said:— *T>HEN came unarmed combat 'Mia* Withenngton mentioned X tlil i n ing with a tough Comyou. The Job-we have in mind la matldo sargeant-major. By the mther dangerous, and from a tj mc i •ecurity point of view you won': learned be able to mention it to anybody. And then were many (lights on "TK!* %  > ..lt^ -i—„i„„ ,„^ would wor t unleM ' "• 'he It might mean going over to lhc rain-swept mountain-si.les ,..,.,',.,", ,^ „' TSS 1JI suspecting husband hail taken Uv Prance..^^ sCnl ^ bl ing up tarLar'^nJ tots'^ln^Sne'itner KJf* 0 l "~ — •* He questioned me for some Ume %  "4. ** "'>: u • **>""<: T "' %  *• lii which ii.i |T adorned will be unlucky. For II helBe the quinary. The fresh blooo is held that kills waifs. The ashes or tin Had with vinegar help.your nose, ,r tde head The Uvei You ll never live lo wear wedlud ,t,.,i m t(l( naw moon, trleth ding clothes we left England to atk if he would be right l.i dolroying himself the need aros bishop said he are worse than the w.,i. inkenness, Uke the lungs of a hog an,i df"cour,e;"tne XJ t-sSig'aU fSv" h^wiu ^'i mc lhn "' ' w,i,i "Id be. £ dlSi 8 rSi %: h L W "LT. honey -nd the, .l.w ..,.,. Hi. eDilepgy," The morul seems If get drunk next day no m,itter how much ho drinks." Then comes this awful advice to wives: "To cure a husband of live (el doul' iKd a lot of ways of killing ,iT? """"•> •"" I" Hrtord|„ h M drink'. Thia cure. hd Ihcrc wero many fllnhta on !!? %  .. „„ _u %  %  would ""'k unlraa ol i raln-^cpl mo,,,,!,,!,,-,.,*. ,.,' ''' "' *" £"• i'!!^ n "'"' ""Pect'n, huaband had ckiny -*. blow,,,, up ..,Lar' n n 1,;'lot S 1 „ kl d n ?,„k T bu, C n"*th."r ESS*" ' "" Vl "" and pradlamn dcatrudlon. ,, us cU |k „ n „ ead .. Lu ""^^ ^ . Security was vital. So much 10 cien" was amokin. rather heavily dr^enne^ W Recorded I v Swan %  >"'" that whn I had toothach,. 1 had From our point ot view the most ?„ h ," Naie.lua, tSSS 11. ., Mai ANSWER: 'YES' Ready to go to FraPvc A few days later, on a May L"^" Then my faco did fall. I was told that I would have to give up ti'hi-I .t.-....,L. my uniform—which suited me—and drc khuki of the F.A.N.V. m !tl0 will suddenly lothe hi: liquor, and be displeased with drinking." It seems a shocking ,l.l' te' I.ucky Or Unlucky? Fyehrows have given rise to | I thought w to. that of %  radio operaReW we put flying overalls over In our civilian clothing and strapped p superstitions. 1T„ mi parachutes and equipment, belief is that persons who* fter day And on the plain wooden table J>">ws meet wi ll bo lucky *' %  I.in i lor. 1 was sent to Than train ON JINK 18 1 WAS TOLD Hour a ,w T hour, day TO RtrORT AT AN OFFICE we prtctised until I could take n IN BAKF.R-STRFRT I WAS n io *" * Piece*, trace faults SHOWN INTO A LITTLE nd send and receive morse at 30 ROOM FULL OF YOUNG word a !" mule MEN AND WOMEN, ALL OF WHOM HAD VOLUNTEERED TO GO TO FRANCE. Stm came the day when our tiainlag; started. After an hour's train Journey we arrived at o lovely country house, whloh we : soon to call the "Mad-house.' TRY-OUT lied room radio But. first, the.. cise. With my radio in a suitcase, lo i"" ( took lodgings in Manchester. I Tr "' 1 id a false identity card and K 01 tablet. NO SIGN .1. We returned The aircraft look off at it seemed, I was sitting t legs dangling over the he hole thriKigh whloh I On the other hand, the COUpM lha| octOl MsMlM be wilhruav have he.ti c.n ,,,,, ,, uC |„ MK ba -_ ed husbandl I once knew a Chinese who told Hut Ix-fore we leave those dear res it Ii iiiUire-ting to %  '.<> ind Uyn %  /allowed alive hi I Q BUot Smith, were nbsoliHilv dellclou 1 Uni the nuturally mum. pied bul '-iii)> i utnith i mi fled bodlai ol pve^DynaeUi hajje iJnee Aacorered thai In Estyptleni found "> Uie oaadan, %  uperetttlon. mice ere food mtdln d HI erto n mi<"I lime MI the illin'ri For instance, theee ihrac %  upercanal ol phUdreci.' 1 ihu* ihe Rtitloni: %  Mi, • % %  b % %  i %  Igt a --ufferer. will cure UM rneaali nturlei "To cure th< tthimping coufh, And flnallj .i few %  rordiot roast a mouea and give •' %  < %  Die "• for cncketefi. Three cricket And (liinllv. A roaat ^IJUT .iitm n. th.il I have found go "If a bataman take* who wets it* bed at night." guard twice, he will soon he bowU • d." "A bathiiiiin whose pads ire C'lran And lleallh> on the wrong legi will ttori n To deal with the last one Brst rune." And "If two member %  ol Quite recently a Mm Howe of "' team wash their hands at the London Wrote Ihil h'lter. which same time, it means u duck for -hows that the bed-wetting superboth.* 1 All very dtpreaeiltg, lUtlon i^ still believed. "A Mend The greal w. <; (.race had a of mine with a mile three year, superstition ol hli own. He be(• old Is at present giving her Ml ; llUrl II InRenl In the bet* i r.l r %  !,.i !ii, .... i ind inig h>t with en teen number he %  is curing her. Of course *he would make '"' ngM s be iL ; ali 'tuys lean, healthy mice from pet wayg went In flrrtt ; eee< M 00II M 0 M I0I % MMMM I I III MH MM I' ,i 000, ith my rim of '< %  were Wc things went wrong %  goal from the reception There were ten of us, seven men described myself as a student. committee on the ground. and three women. In a first-floor back bedroom We flew round until the pilot All those men were to die before overlooking the yards I set up my ,; * t" 1 1 an enemy aircraft was the war ended, and only one of the aerial and started to transmit. stalking him, so we returned to AIRWEIGH LETTER SCALES Complete ullh N.P. Weights—8 am Only $4.44 each HAND TRUCKS 2 SACK CAPACITY Best Kncli-h Make uith Knl.I..-, Tyred Wheels S52.42 with Plain Iron Wheels *38.8(l "i IIII A C SYNTHETIC CHAMOIS LEATHERS THEY NEVER BECOME SLIMY Wei or I %  %  Ihey are always toft and pliable. Last longer and become even better with use. They are ideal lor (leaning Motor Cars, Paintwork. (.lav>ware. Windows, Mirrors etc. Size 22 x IK inches —Only HI Cents Each II Alt II ISO VS Hardware Dept. DIAL 3142 or 2364 laVafeiililiil Ctft. for a I > i-i<|< For Red Composition floors, Red Tile floors, Brick & Cement Paths, etc. Agent: A & S Biyden & Sons Ltd. Barbados In Paris London New York . 7 women are bujiny pcrjumc this new H ,n IM \i'i NaiVI M tNDBafl I'MIAIJ* oi A ur>rtv n m i MI. Tlieir u no Tii" t [--IIUIIK ruxlr ilun ( %  >•—yet It neni COM ao iii'ilae |-I!II-IIou <>Hy boldn— ihrir i> aanph % %  "I It llirw phmli nr intnjiiu,oi by i MM %  ,||J| • 'sea l ""Id %  any parfiaac alxHii with hsr ui lirr IIJIHIII.IW m ilisi si any luunirnt ol the ttav, no UIBII-T wtv-r^ *l>r wu, iln inuld renew snd ralrtah her IrMttamr. I.t a liAixJUg nhial ••> Oaya peilumc lo-day H,indba# Vhluli b\ OS DOS NIW roes A ( Ijd.. f.U. AM iri. ib^SM mi: 111 SI Till": OM > KIMI or m.M.s nr UW Naturally. Ihere are grades of quillty In pharmaceuticals H in I'VIT Hiifu elae. And it *houid go without iiyinf that only the very I>>-1 -Hie lop ciunlttv In every respeel—-re used by us in eoinpoundlni. prescript Ions. Hence you are ilwayi certain of the prectw results per dosage your doctor w mts snd expects. % %  ft* TIIK KM PRKHCRirilON StRVKt KNIGHTS LTD. All Branches WEDGE WOOD CAVE SHEPHERD & Co. Ltd. 10, 11, 12. 13, Broad St. I)<< m ilftl mlii Plata $3.90 14 '.' %  s,. 93 k % 7.4 l t *'. M S7 15 „ S4.23 .. SftftK „ $5.31 M IU ilM Fyj&fi&sSSL \ \SI s II OS .. S5.4 PLOWI R BOW1 s CIGARI I II I1DM s < KiARI III I MIS III is BON MOM S v.H rRAYS ALSO WEDOWOOD HIISI CHINA In \i Kinfeop .*l AanjMd Da //,. i i II-I h.MMRfftl ,', LVnVaer Sel\. ttu Sir, <""/ %  tndivUaal I MAM VIII 1/ \l I I I ll(l\ WIIITKWAVS CYDER WIIITKWAYS CYDHAX In Laritc ll.lt; SM,.I1 Bottle Alcoholic, Larf* 11.04; Small AUSTRALIAN GRAPE JUICE—Lara,. II n:!, S,r..U ItilSf'S IIAItl.KY f. LIME ORAPK Fltnr .ytlASIl. ORANGE SQUASH, IEMON SQUASH LEMON ii..,i.v pa* i. .MI.. IM %  .![.,', .-. PALMERS ASST IIK.'KTAIL r.is, i i is ,. r tin I ARHS TABLE WATER IIISCLI Is ... BY A PALMERS HEADING BREAD—par tin HF.1N/. I-IIOW (HOW PICKI I lr J*' HEINZ SWEET CAULJFLOWEH I'll Al.II.l I %  MI ( ill E"S BAKIrta SUOAR i i l- p.l 0NT1 SHEEP TONGUES -|.T Ui IMPERIAL TRIM, P'.ik (. H.s-I Lu I '• DANISH si. K El. HAM pet lb. L>ANISII SLICED HACON—per lb 1JANISH SAI^MI SAUSAGE-per B l>ANISH L'AMEMBERT pel A ljr „. \.\UIAN SOUPB_ RAISINS pat n. rilllltANTS —per lb t'RUNEii-pei II> ,5 .42 XI I 13 2.09 133 2.40 m .97 39 1 ..,'• .86 1.92 1.32 I.Ml 1.32 W .41 .311 58 t ot K nr. nNE >I-M snv.fH.IJ SCOTT A .. Ltd.



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SUNDAY, AUGUST J, 1M2 SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAGE SEVEN w *-mnm "i a*d '.' iU:. WHO ....ujxns 'e U* .> daugRtcf of 'he Prln.t Jrmn %  rlteia B-; r h*.1 / U'U H*f£fT5 of rrtodrnp tnepttnuft pat* whet* no unman hat 'rod be/ore cured Ere PerrickYi wont* about the corner* of the world Khere man u alnnr uilh wen In her lonely exile. $ht wayt. the longed for collar.* with people who would talk wisely or wittily, who would be may or glamorous, bright and or beo.ittful %  O THIS WEEK the column celebrate* its reprieve trum man 'ilk *nd meet' Success for two... in spite of famous fathers I'III Mil | l)\l (.11! >H —photoa'aD'^tt f'f del huvamt I N London from America, and on t."i* wiy io i tontnentdl ttOlMUfi is Miii Margaret num.in. -anger and IV Nat, who happens la b* .-.itchier of the Pre.*iJeni or the United SUt.s Next vear o\ course sne *-iu be Margaret Truman linger and television MM And.' sne says I m looking forward to that immense)v I |uM nope I can mane It" Wrli * a •nut at a o r bust Her udn : TV contract si renewed a'.r* u niinoiuiet-iiirni tier father's dm-I to oecome an l President. Ii I n fan mi tflDBNTI i'\i .n I —eeleate lor her u nearer GEM FOR TO-DAY Music is the harmonious voice or creation; an echo of the Invisible world; one note of the divine concord which the entire universe la destined one day to sound. —Mozzini Talking Point Dear God, \fivc us strength to accept uHth serenity the things that cannof be chanaed. Give us courage to change the things (hat can be changed. And give us wisdom to distinguish one from the other.—Admiral Thomas Hart. n<*il I IfOl lllat fS> nea) oiler That's when 1 decided n .vgu.J De aals to OK. a vacation.' *> luism drsi on tnr auu-deck ol ihe •..%. Jni'ed sin'.e.i .n the iiiaun* "i '.ha two FBI men who aro never (MI awsj wnrn the Presiaent'.s anfMvt takes a trip. Mm Trunuui Had spent tne moraine in her suite, with one of the detectirea guarding 'he door Decaust the y.p nad docked at Le Havre and HMJ or strange and, as vat unvened people ware aboard Bui now the liner was wiling, and Miss Tnimsn ws niiioi-d outShe hart not resented being In protective ruirodr mull lunch-time. Miss T.. sensible gin tnat she is has , taste lo' noon-rising Still mere she was now witn hei golden hair done up shipshape tightly curled a' the ends and protected from the brasses or an "invisible" ha' 11ST • I ve MM n polrics nit art iltr will gajoi OXM i I IM Qevauna* Pre-vdent I | iha oaa> to niaRe in* luiic Truman lamou* i,u Dad 4o too undiv dM a In oui inmllv 'he men are tn oolrrtan* The a tlu> work. Mat be that'* *hi %  •hi tient h mh' make a %  '* <• n* ntii 'Thottitti tngffg -re tome people woo don't M couraa.' ihe lcl<mve omwn • M M rruma-1 Kes nrt noit. Oar in 'he *.meneai: oriianiaed al^ls %  • ne 'n t KBOW :t thw I'm l SalMnirt Tot -hr Fr^i val Tin lold fTT neat niti'ic Ihere" No peace for— II s ag aw a miner tinni 'np lor a gin who nad not -mi was* I ne ol proless.oonl iu> gagamanu for nearly > tear 1 aiterf • Wouldn't she get more re*r on one of those Fior 1M tUn>nf irlD> w.ih her rgihrr %  Daddv never takaa a vacation. He dove more aora wnrn nes in 'he yaehl than lw doe* .n Washington Don't w lool-rt ov -hone fla>h gbirtl he wears Those tr.tts are a semmu business." Since she left nome Miss Truman's tdventurea nave not gone entirely unrecorded Wat she a little peeved si having to cope with cameras and Prrs> recunons on her vacation Her reply was reali< veallng. *' Welt, you never know Pernapei uiis 'ime n* tHtds to tha WaK End ••/ Oppaaltlon thai ma daugrv %  nee mor* ^^*ablnn-d rMrselt %  a rrlrtr... :n nrt uwn righi We were t alkini oa tnasnvwrraer oi dM little kigraiid-white pavntad houar PMikre .dwr^paaaaa^i wtaVh is now th" london raan )tir Anlhflix IbJUiliamn* %  ere drakuig h ah i as d uBe %  ffct ncci '*a> Irakiri • od n nava %  i %  > atta 'hat A We aere -1 scuvns 'tr BBO) %  U some witn iae noaat" saio M'w Chii-rritH and mv mother ahn got 'he pi i I hoi at' *il'. i %  Marble maiden t Said I I i aiato.r an h ii aaaefl i... ., i.. n. %  p %  i I.T -1% i Sang iaran ttne tm %  %  SM-atOH %  I %  -. I • plan wi %  %  %  II' to H..K -Ir.s re*% • .rr: IB rotm uie ea %  \fii-aro\ until she aoenark, io Mew 1 \ mbei ihe Pria* M IS go. 114 to navr a Spell 01 bein k ra Betnifhimp Tito talk Tuny naa aonr into nim pn> duciion. He's (lorn* a a-tiM -' slton de'ectlvi-stories, ana sonu' do^uni'-ntsrle* for showing nere ind n Am<*r.cs-we nope botn SMN and on TV M* or-ir.iet Randolph la *tamng in the documen arc on a play ro IIKI-o do m laindon and New York But waari| i-v.-ry uctreas in h.is a play shed Iik* 'o do in England and America. Lets nop.' my one goes on." W moved inside the housv where threr Clmrchlll otls—ton palnt'd boats'' studies and a new flower one %  My tavowir*:•afajBansM smnli d atlnsuo the decor ot Rogerkn su-ipaa *nd pu-tel walls. We're lust starting to furnish the place," said Miss Churcnill. and na so useful to have a rather who points' lugredlrtitt : Vndka ginger beer, and totaYswM Esprwn Service The Wife Who Fled From Her Home Rt (AVON \KMI; • IHlLk Crosa %  nuabaaul *i: "1 aaaerloa as M a girl •i .'*. avtaa? krtsaai (rwoUatro '• 11air lire -HUI alisuia MI> nut, who! she oraired. After live yeora aur ttrat and unl> ohUd waa stillborn, and -n* -i.ifc.il u> drink and saaoke and gad about. 1 gave her i % %  head beeauae of the !> %  • %  • uf her child. Whan wo aet up K bualneok togelher ahr fell far ahop a—Ulant with rharm. and haleft me lor him. What do 1 dot 1 have been uar big faol rlghl throuxh. la it tara late alter la ".is ni.i MM,,(e seek A -. IKr. who Likes lu sMOfe H a wilo vxiiu u miasma sonurtnn.; HI h**i mariiaaio. For this her hufand has often to toko the b.am %  lb uiuai WMU'II the nvatein.i II de for ti-'therinsi Mitamea*. So Brittle YOU gave her hr head, when it waa your love aha needed. A strung-minded, hard-headed in.ni do^Mi't ilnd it oaay lo got inai>ithe tangled atnoUons of %  woman who doesn't even understand hoi own bowiidarmont. h.x.iu-ment. drink, sex are the routine rcfugea of those ffrisO try to run sway from themselves. Did you fall bar here, perhaps? She will never r-'duvcovar her oonndencc by running from UK' phantotns of bar early marrk'd life. Women recognise g,uick i than men how brittle are tha bopea and how tawdry ih,thrill* which adultery, as a rule ran offer But a woman Is less remdy to admit this consciously when ii arviiv her only hope of "love." Your wife is In the wUderncts. I' he goeo on with "affair" afti-i .ifair." a aanse of vuih wt.l hound her through the yearn, tearing her self-res|>ert at) riboon No < "mli'..... POCkWB your pride. Write W her. Tell her where you failed her In the hour of her tragedy. Make no conditions wfuni you offer her your love and comfort. A eynlcal hardness msy for .. time provide her with armour again''t acknowledgement of failure, HO don't be put off by a far. of "couldn't care lass." You both need each other. You both can afford to forgive, burying ' the post what rightly belongs to it. Sixteen years should count for nothing. —LtMl. But when taking children's snapshots you can— ERIC COOP, expert portrait photographer whose work la to be exhibited in London has been summing-up the advice he would givo to the amateur on holiday who wants RFALLY GOOD Knaps of the children. Coop say's there is only one way to avoid the lament : "If only I had had the camera retdy. . ." And that U lo have it ready always and lake th>picture as soon* as you see it. This ia comparatively easy ll your camera Is of the simple n upshot type, hut if it is a %  i-i. -mi* camera have it set at about ft. distance. Dea't worry about the position of the sun unless U happens to be shining straight into ivhlch use change Talking Poinf 7'fte i-uni who sees both sides <•/ %  OWS-HON is the man icho meet abeolutcly nothung at oil •aJWilde. He dndcth. God uiho find* the eorth He mode. —John Buchan. ' the lens, in your own posit lo Don't ask the children to move. and so lose the spontaneity of the moment. Naturals If the children see you always with the earners in your hands. Coop has found they will soon get tired of posing for picture-., and then you will be able to n t really natural shots of them. The old days of standing still and watching for the dicky bird are gone foi good. Films are so fast nowadays that, for pictures on thu beach, you con work at -|/100 sac. all the Unm and the children can go on pla\ log with tha sand while you snap them. If they r-ecotne B*lf-eonscioia tell them you want to photo, graph the sand castle they art building, or the toys they *.. playing with. Sun Spot And If anyone has ever told von that the sun must be shining on ycur back when you are taking a picture, forget ft. H .. The best effect is obtained |l the sun Is coming from the hit or right behind the children There will be plenty of reflected light from the beach to iliumj Inate their facet., but not so much j that their eyes will be screwed up against the sun's glare. And— j Desft nil tha camera to left or right but do incline to point it downward rather than upward. .Dew/I unlesa you want conical effects, takd cloae-uue i n which faet or hands axe closer to the camera than the rest of the body. Don't forget to take off your sun glasses before estimating the exposure On a bright sunny day at this time of the year it is safe to work at I'lOOsec. with an aperture of f/18 using a fast film. If, as in simple box earner^--. the speed and aperture are fixed. ask your chemist for a lultably slow film %  aawaM'loaM for STUBBORN hang-on Bronchial COUGHS COLDS THERE'S NOTHING OWES AS SWIFTLY AS CANADA'S LARGEST SEUJNG COUGH AND COLD REMEDY BUCKLEY'S MIXTURE The Truth in Your Horoscope I .'itnaut aial aiiil Ih. I lOu. Otr r •W*„ hava aaioundao % %  a.U\a J <>rM -re. OBOHCR JACKFV of ."ft.— VcrK i*Hcvr. that Tabor%  M ..Tt oi oeoaa-* ghi T i-piii*nir hn ITII" %  rod f i Ml %  -' %  a nd aeti ar>> wrkw-n *W T bit —nrl I U\ I %  Bti-.i-.i. i'ai toarota f 1 %  PflOSFiRINE in cases of WEAKNESS... PHOS1 IvKINK is a VKKatafid ionic tor the weak anil ailing, the cimvalcNccnt and tlie r%tndown. \^^ r in cases uf LASSITUDE... RHEUMATISM and agonising BACKACHE GONE! > Ih* ne rvnui trncni. iHtfd %  It, .tlllli ulllt. in M"IT> i, I Fill's. I IHM npl.l.l. /ii oaati nl DEBILITY... i RINfl raaterei titaappcixr, sun iiheaa the Btrvasi runt ha.k ihe .. MI liadly need ,M in cusrs uf riiiilp NERVOUSNESS... PW 'SI IRISH helps vou to taka Hi ir .ui and dtffkuttM a* hie A. ,lahlin 1 iqUKl or TaWct lottB. io drop* coual a Tablcit THE GREATEST OF ALL TONICS be interested, la tha eaparleocs ,.i'—.J k. iwlated in rhla reiiew j man a letter :— %  aiirruru "Some years fael rheumatism In my arms anl ahouldara Tbajl K in* marled In th email of my nk, lncraaatna until they ware roallv aevera. I bought a bottle yf Krufl-'han and waa urprl*ad.U. > And that I got a little reltaf. I boturht annlber and before tc was Hnlahad all any pains ho-erad stain. My pain* art re obntlnate and ths roilof really auriirtaed me." T it Klmnmatte painand t.atikauhp are uaoolTy the result of pos*4na tn tbn blood—polaoBO wblrJrtawe*bowels aad tlrad kldnoya are falllnt to expel. Fo 'complaints thor" Is I treatment than Kruaoban l which cUsnsea all tha Int orwaoa. a'.tmiilat*a tham to Bor* %  mat healthy action and toaal raatorso frsabnaaa and el-fear. •AH GbamlaU and Stores sail Xruuchan •"! T. -t*e To •'. keep f' £ an** -iS?s take ENO'S KlIM/S sa/emifk ] KIDNLY TROUBLE arrase imt oj Parii tjitw dark OUAHAMTM D. WKi Pill* u. etoW BB*W atratlv bf(iMic iMcv> coaditMMM and tb. ingr* KLIMi..up.'riu[4u*liiyaiw'sniilk.pfodiK*d undci .Iliclcvi .anil.iy (uniljuont. Yt, and ibe .pccully-packcil lin prolult KLIM i thai j-ou get milk a. fint a. the tta\ ic Icfl ihe farm. Buy KLIM—milk lhal you tan .Iwwys (lepcnd upua tot ii. "Inil.vuiir ne. ami [Burily* jylltl-IM IS N*> SAFE MILK |atj KLIM keapi w'houl red .],ialioa (Tj KLIMqualHyi.olway, uniform [Tj KLIMilliollmllor cjrawinq child,.. [Tj KLIM add. now-lshmtart 'o coofc.d dliha. jTj KLIMltr*comnwid productd und.r tfrletnit central Tokt puwalai. add KlIM, Mir ond you ho pu'a, tole milk BOURJOIS '"*'-** %  '* %  DE WITTS PILLS M i rowDI 'Ku'i.i iipsTiri; TAI.C • COLD ar.Aii \ .MSHIMI CREAM BUM. I.I AMI Nl II MR CREAM KLIM awn tele MILK Mtar in riiHiiNci TMI WOIID OI Healthy, happy families rake 1-NO'S "Iruit S.ili I'leasam. retrc.hinc "Iruit Sail ji ihe gentle COliCClfVlj mot) nl us need to keep '.esvsiem regular. I NO'S is panicularlv suitable fur children-and lor anyone i.ih a delicate Horn* I N( rs will safclj reliere ovo-acidiiy, a D-OSI frequenr i ause ot Indigestion, heartburn and flatulence. Ii is toothing and settling to theMomach upset by unsuiiahle finid nr drink. A dtst of I-.KO'S al any time of day %  lakes a %  earUing, invigorating l.ralih-dnnk. Witn ENO*S Fniit Sail you can %  I i-cp the whiile lamilv I:', flreSB an d regulat-, Keep BKCTS handy Eno's Fruit Salt •I'll ML;.) RKcomm \ni i. M IKKK.I I .K M| |OM, Mlk MMOM III. U1KNIM x,. HlLKHsMs.,. INt.li.isllON. rU-. Sold in bottles for %  lasting freshness.



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SUNDAY. AUGUST 3. 152 -I VII1V U>V(X VTF. I'M.I IIIUV THE PEOPLE OF BARBADOS-XVII B JOHN I'liHil vi \ Slavery THE recognition of free coloured people was gradually gaining headway, but was still meeting with tremendous opposition. In 18*4. Mr. Thomas Bnggs. %  Member of the House of Assembly. skied with the weaker side, and started %  campaign fur the admission of evidence of free coloured people in the Courts of Law. Up to now these people could not given sworn testimony. A terrific controversy arose over this campaign, with the result that Brlggs lost his seat In the House. Lord Seaforth, the Governor. was also active in his humanilarism, for in 1805 he induced the Legislature to pass an Act making the wilful murder of a slave punishable with death instead of, as had been the law, by a fine of fifteen pounds in the case of the Murderer's own slave, and in the case of another man's slave, a fine of twentyfive pounds plus double the value of the slave, which was to be paid to the owner. It will be remembered that Mr. John Brathwaite, Agent for the House of Assembi.v of Barbados In England, recommended this in his evidence before the Lords of the Privy Council In 17M; a matter of seventeen years before this law was passed. William Wilberforce (17591833) the son of a Hull merchant, who wns educated at Cambridge' and entered Parliament In 17W. and Thomas Clarkson (171U1846) were two of. the leaders of the Negro Emancipation movement. Wilberforce championed the abolition of the slave trade, as it was thought that if this Hade was abolished, then the state of Slavery would soon die out. as there would be no replenishments received from Africa, and the cost of raising children for slaves was terrific; also the breeding of slaves was not economical as during the period of pregnancy and for some time ufter confinement am! delivery, the woman slave was of no economical value to the plantation. Wilberforce cham"pioned this cause in Parliament, his first proposals for the abolition of this trade were made in 1789, but the time was not yei ripe. It was not until 1807 that the Act which ended this horrible trade was passed. This was not emancipation, for those slaves already in the colon fs remained as such; it was only the stopping of the capture of the African on his native soil and the transportation of these unfortunate people to the Colonies that came to an end. Even though this law was passed, there were Captains ef ships who ran the risk and smuggled these unfortunnte wretches igto the United Suites of America, where slavery did not end until 1883. when it was abolished by proclamation by President Lincoln. There Is no doubt that some of the slaves had endured many cruelties ot the hands of many of their masters; but the treatment of the slaves In Barbados. taken as a whole, appears to have been by no means as harsh as It was in many of the other Hears Trouble Caused by High Blood Pressure If you hav* pama uound lha haart. palpiiaiinn. dluin*... haarfachaa at tup and bach of htari and abova vyca. ahon-icaa of breath. Itr\ narvy, or tutfar fro*B peor %  l--p. Inaa of mamorr and an iTty. Induration, worry and faar. j*o. r itoul.lt la probaMy cauaad hv Hlsh Blood I'rrnaur*. THIS la a myaltr British Colonies. The passing nf the Slave Trade' act furnished the slave owners with a very strong motive to contanra and foster the slave* they already possessed. Simultaneously, to the slaves, 'the fresh air of a new and brighter day breathed, faintly at first, and with much of what Carlyle would have Called the fuliginous In ti. vet with everincreasing ex h i lar ation over the night of European irrt-ligu>n and Negro heathenism.' The stipends of the clergy were increased, not. as' the House of Assembly put it. 'as an act of Justice to that worthy and respectable class of men,' but because of the external pressure from England. The first Church of England minister to start Instructing the f|aves of his pariah tn tine duties and principles of Christianity, was the Reverend Wm. Hart, ol SI. Joseph's Parish. Schomburgk records that 'he commenced on Sunday, July 24th. 1808, the laudable undertaking of instructing the Negroes of his parish In the duties of principles of Christianity.' The passing of the Act making the wilful murder of a slave punishable by the death penalty, appear* to have been (general throughout the West Indies and not confined to Barbados alone: for in 1811 an event of the greatest significance took place In Tor tola, where a Mr. Hodge, a Member of the Council of that Island, was hanged for the murder of five slaves. This was brought about only after the Governor had brought a warship to the bund and disregarded the Jury's recommendation to mercy. This immediately aroused the elements of opposition in the Islands of Jamaica and Barbados. the planters did their utmost to impede progress of the education and religious teachings of the slaves, but It was of no avail. One historian records 'that Hodge was eventually convicted and hanged was satisfactory; but it was not satisfactory that he had been allowed, previously to commit dozens of such horrible murders with impunity. Whether Hodge was the exception or the rule UKMlg [.lanters was less important than the tolerance apparently extended by colonial .•ociety to those who defied its not very exacting standards.' •'• The Church was meeting with opposition from the planters with their programme of education and Christianising the slaves, mainly due to the Hal. tlan rebellion in 1791, and the massacre of all the wbjta Inhabitant! in Sun Domingo in 1804. It was felt that if the Church continued with iU teachings of equality, it would lead to the same effects in Barbados; and that there would be a rebellion of the slaves before HOg Lord Seaforth had also caused great offence to the planter (eetinn by his le'ter of November 13th. 1804, which uus laid before the House of Common, on February 35lh. 1805 forwarding 'four papen containing from different quarters reports of the horrid murders . selected fro m a great number* and stating that the bottom of the business, so horribly absusd was the prejudices of the people. On Jan* uary ~:h. 1805. Lord Seaforth had written 'I enclose the Attorney-General's letter to me on the sub.'eet of the Negroes so most wantonly murdered. I am %  orrv to say several tther Incidents of the same barbarity have occurred. . .' In 1818. the slaves misled by mandaceous rumours th it In • % %  dom had been granted by the Imperial Government, and was befog, withheld by the Inol authorities, also stirred up by a craft agitator, the -laves In the Windward parishes rose m rebellion, burning and plundering property but commuting no murder. Joseph Pitt Washington F ..nklin. a freed coloured man. described as a 'person of loose morals and debauched habits, but superior education' conceived and planned the insurrection which was tarried outj under the leadership of %  >. African named Bussa. Franklin went about the country reading to the slaves those violent speeches at that time delivered against m England. This outbreak took place on Easter Sunday, April 1816, and one eminent planter recorded 'a Hell-broth—which has been long in the brewing—at length broke forth.' The first signal for this revolt was the firing of cane trash and the ringing of the plantation bells In the parish of St. Philip at 8.00 o'clock in the evening. This revolt spread like the nre in the cane trash, and within a short space of time 'mill after mill was turned into the wind to flv untended the fire .spread during the whole night from field to field the rebellious mob increased.' These revolting slaves looted the hardware store of a Mr. Bayne, and armed themselves with cutlasses, bills, and such weapons as they could find, also some firearms. They looted also the Militia stores of the St. Philip's Batallion, and when the troops advanced to meet them, the rebels advanced reak was so sudden that all the planters, who were mostly memMiiitia. wenfully with defending their Own lives -tint property, so help was not at llrst summoned from the Regular troops stationed at different points in the Island, and it was not until two o'clock on Monday afternoon that the news reaehed Bridgetown that any organised attack was made upon the rebels. Once the Regulars' came into action, the outbreak was quickly subdued, and (he Island was put under Martial Law. One General of the Militia records % %  . not, however without blortdshed. this being unhappily not as before whollv confined to the rebels. Evidence t> everywhere apparent of moat wanton destruction bv fire and pillage; to an extern t praaanl incalculable, but without question irreparable of many weeks. Truly, the vengeance of this •horde, inflamed with every vile passion, which committed every imaginable and filthy outrage in its path has afforded but a foretaste of what would have been the fate of us all had there miscreants succeeded In wreaking their savage will.' (2). Joseph Pitt Washington Fninklui and some others were hanged and 123 of the other slaves eonearned in th,. insurrection were transported to British Honduras. (To oc continued) 1. The British West Indies,' by E. L. Burn, London, 1951, p 112. 2. The Barbadian Diary of G*n. Hubert Hay ties. 17871838. Edited by Evcnl M. W. Cracknell. 1934. Emigrate Or Expire LONDON. Because of political considerations, some British mining companies operating overseas have little hope of survival unless they emigrate. This view is put forwm to the Biitsh Overseas Mining Association in a memorandum to the Royal Commission on Taxation. It urges the abolition of restrictions on emigration of comp.uiuThe association points out that where British Companies are working natural resources overseas, political considerations' often demand some measure of partnership with local interests. The attempt to make the pattern of control inflexible and subject to veto by the U.K. Treasury, It says, has created an atmosphere of hostility abroad which may have unfavourable repercussions far out-weighing the narrow fiscal advantage which the prohibitions % "^XVVV,V>V'A^V^*,^V,^V*V^^^ in pi I.I II.. •taktn to. aoaia a • uff*r ft. atari iraaimrnl al nnca The vary "*ai doaa of Noac* iformarlv knowi a* Hymn), a naw ntadl' al dlacovarj rtducaa Hun Blood uncr I and i daye. del thamlat • -lay It la I ./ink* lou (aal arell and money back n raiura of JUST RECEIVED FFRROZONE CATAaRBZONE Da. HAMILTON FILLS M.KM III IM C. CARLTON BROWNE Wholesale A Retail Druggist 13< Roebuck St Dial Mil i M MtM CHELSEA OARAGE (1950) LTD. UNFOLD ST. —— H < PH0N1 4949 Keep her in full breeae -. but keep her in fine trim too. with .... PEACOCK PAINTS „U-r— ANTI-FOUUNG Green and Ked M MUM PAINT IILI.COTK JUST IN TIME FOR THB III llllll Wl SEASON ANEROID BAROMETERS Only a limited number so select > HITS et-rly and be prepared Also HURRICANE LANTERNS *""** T. HERBERT LTD. '"'"^^ 1M0 10 At 11 Roebuck Street 1926 FIT^BERGOUGNAN FOR GREATEST seek to preserve for the United Kingdom. Taxes Musi Come Bark Profits made by British mining companies overseas, the Association urges, should be taxed only' to the extent that they are remitted to this country. Payment of taxes to the British Government Is viewed In overseas territories in almost as adverse a light as tha excessive withdrawal of profits. in most territories. British mining companies have to compete, it is staled, with locally-owned companies and, in many territories with American companies. Arguing in favour of full unilateral relief from double taxation in respect of all taxes Imposed overseas, the Association state*: "It Is nkost unfortunate that taxation concessions urged on Colonial OlilDillHenli by the Colonial Office jire largely negatived for United Kingdom companies by the taxation policy of the U.K. BRITISH BERG0UGNAN TYRES GENERAL HARDWARE SUPPLIES HEAVY DUTY GIANTS. SILENT SAFETY CAR TYRES. TUBES. \\ 111 II Hill llll. KKIIMM iM.V\.\ .* % %  III!.. 111! Ill S I Let us supply your RKQUKI MI'.M.S Its best to but] Platignum r %  MM IN M INSiAND • JtNS Asm 11.00 to Si 32. "" BAU-fOtNTS $1.08 (Refilli 36 C • PLANTATIONS LIMITED MM CASH OFFER GALVANISED CORRUGATED SHEETS li f.-et l.ong fll $432 i" 7 ., „ W $5.04 .. 8 .. .. -ii! $5.70 ., 9 '' J8.4H .. 2fl CUAGE:— B feet Long NAILS Q MV. IVr Hi fMT* Shop Now and Save BARBADOS HARDWARE CO. LTD. (The House For Bargains) No. 16 Swan Street Phono : II"... 2109, :. : I FOR STYLE HIMI lllll l.Vf* VALVE BUYA RELIANCE SHIRT OHTAM1VABEE AT ALL 11 HUM, STOKES TOW tllic I MM t M t U I IHM II tlll ll KIC Kl II -IKHI oppoiiU Pott Office 'PHONE 4913 iniH ii iii iii ii inn FOR BALANCED OILNESS Engine Teats have proved that BALANCED OIMNESS reduces weight loss mi (>il--ensitive bearing material %  i.-ubly cvtendiiii! its useful life. You will of course ask us: "Wl We'll explain. Scientific research has established the fact that th* use of additlvM substantially impruv OUINESS of Lubricating Oils. This Property of Oilin* I prated nil Bf*i I irfaaOM Hen your Engine is running As soon an your engine remains r .' ..<. u v the Oil drains away from the Hearings, and with ordinary Oil cold ring to your Cylinder Walls! Mtl in. GERM OILS in addition to llw additives which produce the oilines* are also treated with an INHIBITOR wl Id ition of acid properties in the oil sump, thus reducing cold corrosion This double protection feature is known as BALANCED OI LIN ESS. obtainable only In GERM OILS CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD. Aflenl*



PAGE 1

SUNDAY \ii.l-i I ltd SI \l>\\ AIIWK All I'Aul. 1IIKII. Al I Ini % %  !• in. %  WAR IN KOREA HARDENING HINTS FOR AMATEURS Kuiny Days Hj Is. IK. During the rainy month*—and the rains stem to have started in WAB STILL SEEMS lo b favourite Ihome for film SIS^'lE^.VL'S* '" ** producers ;ird though one constantly hears voices raised often It will be too" m to do in a chorya, that audience* an tired of Ihis subject, the tuivihinjc at all. &.. c few ajnny fllma still ke. p cuminu and the people still to see them. '""" '." I*"""* !" "" •><* b Of .ours... ,,, rv now and then, we ?e, war" picture X. 7^5 ."n? f £S auperior qualities set it apart from the rank and Ala of its we dry enough, to fork and reE redecesaurs. Such a film la STEEL HELMET at the Plaza *ape the oed. which are apt to i.'SESrs K "" 8 ,s r 5ft !" ten in "?"' **< %  ', &5ri£ v iff plenty of humour bandied amongst the men. I would call It strong fare, with very little to UgbttB it Aa far as the story goes, tt began with the invasion of South Korea and has no! ended yet. One is thrust into the midst of the horror, desolation and de^lrucbon of the Korean bottle scene, where Ml infantry sergeant, nvtd by hte •teal helmet, in the sole survivor of his outfit. Joined by a small South Korean hoy, he encounters tt.e remnants of a 'lost'' platoon takes charge of them, and from a Korean Temple, they fight a desperate rearguard acUon. 'Kieii' are no punches pulled in %  his picture and the combination of excellent direction and action make this a .wholly realistic and terrifying waff drama. The group of men Include the sergeant, a chicken-hearted lieutenant, a Japa.iese-Arm-hi.in soldier, an exi-onscientiou.* objector, the young Korean boy. a Negro Red Cross Mawe and later, a caplured North Koffaan iwijar, who -is without doubt, a most Insidiously, maligTrying to stir dp ^ trouble among the men. whose ,ru 1 lal -*nnt, who, nerves are at breaking point, he '-'''ng ore touched taunts the Negro, who is dressing his wound, with the fi-immatlon practised iFARM AND G\RDi;\ Hv Aitrirtslw MANt.O LOfcr BROWSiNi; through a miscellaneous collection %  ppinys, we carue across tin.. ItOty, iut>.ished tDDMr] years ago m the 'Porto Rtoo Horticulturist'. The i season is :uiw in full swin^ and may be of interest tot those looking for a tidy moti.od of dealing with th-j il popular fruit T: < unknown. ' " < % &f iu) I ..* a**.-.. ; l the nous* ul %  > Ml Ii'Sn.n W hoeer ef my host I found him. In. %  vier married daughter, and growi i %  i Hu gueat. W went u>to the dining room Kvtiything passed off well until W* i.m> ••> the dessert. Then a dish of OMRI was brought in Did yn No? Then youi H.H.I', /'mil" \<>jV< European Survey fnarhiitc To kp the lawn-mover in good DOUld never be put up mi' | ( %  erdetssta' will do this, and then call for the oil-can when the mower la next to be used. With this sort of treatment a Lawnmower soon gats out of order with blades dull, and bearing* stiff. Every time, after me. the Lawnmower should be wiped clean and free from mass, thoroughly oileo and i Men put away. Poinseltias August is the month that igenerally accepted as the right when his time for cutting back the Single they are Poinsottu. The double IHsnsethen the Korean child is killed, has which wencut bark in Miurh. racial dlsmachine-guns the taunting capnnnow several feet high and In his coun, lur *d major in a shocking outfull leaf again. The single variety rf hand in this weather, and ho> juickly grass grows and weeds ipread! When digging out this mad or tufts of bad grass, have a mould near by with v ,. I I n*tr a. u eWnch to retlU the bare patches. VV*lV BBC Set i-S of Talks ,l t..l .leKtt.v* tt If this is done at once, less injury will result to the lawn and '.ha N rfnej of ,nr e ,lic *"• middle one abou. pod grass will com the sail < rron Londo, \r, ...„,'' %  %  %  '"'" l '"' V 1 '"' '*"" n quicker N. ver rr-nv the l.ii "'* l when the ground is soft or the B.BJ Mondas pu '' %  *•"• grass wet. The laun-mower will next 1th Augu*t,'a i* '" **ild penetrate tm %  "--one p..ml when it tily Ctrl up the ground, and the entitled 'European Survey.' Uul onepoi x> ill clog and dull th ASTAIKF Affairs. J. u. Uulnga. the Lon,, nd ljml€t! ^ lhgI y lU x ., """* O 'f*~ d,n ol ih, amors nn h.Wis. I Outch newspaper puWiohaU in ^...III.K-MHI ucfuscl, Kmierdani, gives the first of four mango was restored to n "• lk ' M who was ,ng m> second attempt !! %  thlni uom in Holland but hvi-d BriUtn for most of the ,%  rtesn a) ,>. tm4 then made a parayrs. kg tnpleied .• i .;i mte MM petk iin lour "f WS t i %  | .in laeahOI mango an Ifti will be giver, j tirae ftnlshed the peeueg sue* da) begiiiiuin: fully TALKS OK CENTRAL ASIA A of uUu whi h u-ng.-..•SiK>tlight mi Central Asia." Th. Iff* and K'll.him to get wise to bu '" ' mwliun Nwn to him. 1 is cut later than the double, behimw;lf The !" nlv struck m M w ""'d choose James Edwards, the cause It is a hardier and quicker talks wi I M i ia, Mongoua. One nundred %  *-£ Rwl Cross soldier. Mr. growing pUnt, and wit does pot Tmkextau and Afgh.nu.tau. ,na P">P'"^ to_do_lik 1 en the forks, while the* nlbM* about the suburbs, of th be cut again in October. This cmivictioo. Neither does he nvond cut is not as drastic as the neglect another side of the charrlrst, ai each branch is Just cut acter. when nctive participation in b ick a couple of feel. The result the war is necessary and he nan.** this second cut Is that eaoss :ichlne gun instead of a branch then sends out hypodermic syringe Steve Drodie, sometimes three branches in tho James Hulton and Richard Koo place of the ongiiial one, and so also give fine veteran performances the flower heads are Increased. D heir individual roles. Now there is great diverniy of Action there Is a plenty, and the opinion among gardenere as to terse diajogue and sparing use of i n is second cut Some do not Tha first talk is by Flt/roy teeth firmly n meat II had I at *hcn I I isjn 1 or which listenerwill be given a llvei of some ot ii %  i"-"i -• %  who < %  up) In i >ting positions in tinnfv ot the lln:th cotiiinunity. The first talk on the Sovereign is gi\n musical background "heighten the ^r^ove'trf It Vt~aU7snd hold that ? SL^SJS^^fn, W> ?LJ?i &ZPL**"<*>>}* !" -" the flower heads, arc ini$££ JOZ.** %  /^S^'S* 1 A? !^/ u pl f u,,,, l ,h ,, i ,h r,S / :, i K l u ^. r held together by hundreds "f THE HOVEKEIGN". 1.AV ^IT.llT" "'"" "** v.i ii b,'Binn J^j; k „.. J^, the cnimiu: we-k—"A Dny In WORN O UT tad Srai staaal Mch *0. — hUI. -.1. alMllo f MM* •> IMliaular fWri ir rax kMawi* %  >• nia IUua, t..L-f.-.. W> *II nan and! .••J a.a> Md r-.,.M. Th.n .. .1 thtM Wadul -ait.a. San raj* *• %  -*' feaaas is nalatsd b> daw laradirJ rnt'i) and prp lal b. Mat. I. ft lh* runa Ualdi kaWf Mi 1 Im l.t.r ba-HV al all dni| iMrak UJ DoddsKioW Pills SEA VIEW I.I hi HOUSE H*MIN(iS. BAHBAIIOI Daily snd Longterm Hates quoted un request. I'll in no-ill (tuola wrleotar. Dinner and t -cki.il I' iriim arransed. J H r,i I M.AMi Proprietor. How 10 I subtlety It ulftd •3 mth %  Jmttxif —iJ ; 1.41 MTMI drnani ii M> %  %  aafcaaMh l^ ft IV Ii L-.vr. Sbfl tUvivur of all th. -ir and arancunff* ntu nevvr ha.c ihe utnc t uar — and far. far nn.tr %  .... tout (ahlaaaon uU n< aalad ml 11 lableapoonluU lanMi •*c. • l< •DMAlul !•< aali. aal Ka. aa> i*aUa>Laih -,.i ibtm diaaata -Sk MMaaausi |fca* only Ira ft IV m. .an B .*-e! A lea k magK in the KiK.iee — just a tvMpoonful in soups end Mvoiine*. hsh.tunissimpli i %  %  fast wonderful Qsmnu bte in the recipe, i hich has i tontsatfl lOQyesrs. l^aftPerhnaw 1 ...-.t ii It.mil. lilt .11, A ,erst of sauces. MMMj lafe of tho survival. grim battle for Thm-lle Of Neu York For a light-hearted div and complete contrast to the two f crings, the r>lobe is showing THE I1EU-K OF NEW YORK E" *ith Fn^d AsUiire. Vera-Ellen and Mai-j...Maine cut. Others think that If thse ^t. !" -.! second cut Is done October is too late. So the whole Polnsottia treatment must be left to the wishes and Judgement of each gardener. threads' wiih bMth my face became glazed with n thin coating of mango. My let end bits was a repetition of the %  t;ns time both ears were filled with the pulp and one eye was entirely closed, i wondered if one could nbsnrh his mangn through the poreg of the ikui liu' 1 attacked the fruit-for the third tim\ On this occasion there was Archives .Hid LUsrnrten Of Windsor f^'"''" 1 hreakmg lon-e ,,f the, pull d assen gay I who have established Pointelfe and the IU has served two Jf" "*, Th lu^ dripped and Uciirge VI r,,,,,L ,v chl '" rivulets and well as the present Queen sparkled on my ahlrt bosom like th II. Sir Owen U n manv tmmees.Knight Commander el 'he Viet..,.. ' hrpw • %  my fork ;.' an Order, an hon.m, beetoerad for look ,ho mange lesolutelv In bollDsrsonal service i<. the f>own. Ml. rutn,i t by Gustuve Kerker and was highly successful musical the days ftlllTl parents. *ugusl should sw'^'inst Chrysl'i-ine..ue r-.... % %  %  Unfortunately'; it has been chopped -nthemum suckers safely planted U.rough.iut liui and changed to such an extent ut. '.hat is il the ttowers are VERA U.I.I \ | Bg I.I the determination "i ttias will have learnt by esperbo heard on Thursday* at 'lO.IS enoquer that mango. The stickicnce which treatment, for them, l> m. the nrst being on the 7th i" 1 "P ">' *l*eves ss i H, 1 ^liit,'' ^1 I" the ^ ^ tive. the best resulU. August. JtUWOd at the pit ag a dog gnswC-Tysantheintims THE WEKK'M MUSIC t I Ih> not forget that tho end of Excerpts from the < rvem %  ] n, yls i,rd lli~ inaUD HnU I rw will be heard proloui d illence, Ti %  .ming week The looks.' i| •' %  hat is if the flowers are broadcast* at the most convenient ,II, mineo luiee. m> Mextea that apart from IhetlUe. a rnisaionwanted at Christmas time. Put Inn.foi Urtenern in this era* eie ,,„,„. u< a-n talking Kl > B Psstl worker heroine and a society playthem In n rich but light bed In ahe "" Sunday at 0.00 pjji. and an but fi reri h way But the Anienbov hero, any rroomulance to the 'n. As soon as they are aU Tuesday at .VIS p.m. The Hist will ,.,, kicked Hli under the table original Is purely accidentair It planted out It is just as well to be a programme of Sibelius'* musiv md said In %  rtaS uln ; %  is now a vehicle for the terpsll"k vp i" 'he stakes and are that Stonn Beeae iTOrn The TentBl irsell end lake a bath' .horc.ui talents of Astaire and you have enough and that Uu-y and his Violin Concerto 10Z) n-m-., H ) ivei where Iheri Ellen and as such it has its mo•"* in good order. The suckers played iy the 1 Dgoh %  in Ul prtvele by ments. it opens and closes with a grow fast, and aa soon as they are Oieheatra eondncted by n.-i .1 latmg half a buesssl "' Ih musing chorus taken from the title -' <'""pl* of '* high the plant* Cameron with M..Fta tal eg Ihi n msesJntoah, a pair ol nihbei and Iheie Is another song called, I .mould he staked and loowly tied .„) 0 violin; Monday's blond. | %  >• '''" think. "Naughty. But Nice" or to the stake. W iu also be by the Lonelsmp to hold (he n BfR le hs< words to that effect, that is sung don Symphony Orchestra bassOa Die wink you gnaw." by Vera-EIlen. that struck me ss the same conductor and will ;r,. u,nik th* i BttreuUve, but I'm afraid I dont the laws of gravity by dancing present Prokoflev's 'Peter and (l dealing a Ik U* eeen re rn e w tbe r the rest of the upside down, %  this time uses the the Wolf* and Tcruus:ovsky'* ^..L.uible sorts much mon music. The two stars are Individroof-tops and literally walks on Capncciu Italien.' Both will „, (1 ,.|iii ,. ually and ae I team responsible air In the development of nis be In the 25 metie band, the Santhorough!. for carrying out the frail and diaromance. Vera-EIlen dances dcday broadcast also being trans,'.,,„.( through an %  urturi coi phanous plot that concerns a lightfully. as usual, and 1 found edited In the 31 metre band and vtnienUy made It Ihi Philandering play-boy who rethe most successful and attractive Uondsy*a in ihe IB metre band, ,', forms tempororUy when he falls sequence was the animation of e Eoch lasts for three quarters :/ templet lhl In love with a mission worker, series of Currier and Ives prints ail hour, the AgiKulture beparUrk turn, tries "high life" to Ui.it are colourful and m-talgde Genre Orwell's Animal Farm* mp-work iheir ae. ilna'm deeide B they W cin n^ke if^ '" *$£-&& -.—. • " Seeto pVr Juhe. Ilombay. D of it. Fred Astaue, who has defied HURRICANE PRECAUTION HINT No. I \VYHM\.S Pay no attention to rumours. Ltiuk ntu fr official warning*. 2.8.53—3n. ftooeooo+e; teeeeeeee* SPECIAL for INFANTS and CHILDREN and for INVALIDS "XIKIK'S HEST ul ALITY DUTsUMn DEXTKtlM f. t,i i rosi MEKt'K'S DEMltoSr Olt I.I t < OSI Buppl i Nourishment inm i For Children ta tc 1 t. %  ..,i :i limes a day. Far AdulU Half t.. ..ne dessert spoonful S times a day .'RICE l/g per -In Ml Itl Rf III \ I Itli^l be used m place of sugar and %  i .in be t.iki 1. tii. HI %  quired lilllll WEATIII:RIII:AI) LIMITED LEA & PERKINS WORCESTERSHIRE StUCE %  m JIM* I I A ii IS THE ANSWER l ^9n^r \^% |gde -#* V 0* %  asfO** \" Brmli your tccih with Ipana snd you clean them cstra-whitc. An.1. awXaUse of the unique formula underlying Ipana's refreshingly different" mint flavour, you light decay by reducing acid-forming haaeris. Massage Ipana into your gums and you help keep them firm and healthy. In this wsy, Ipans acts as a safeguard against tonih-kmct. more than hsll of which arc caused by gum triiuhlcs. l : or winter teeth, healthier gums, lolkiw the Ipana way 1 THE TOOTH PASTE.. REFRESHINGLY DIFFERENT "KEEP EM FLYING" DANCE AT THE CRANE HOTEL SAT. 30th August TO THE TUNES OF "KEITH CAMPBELL and HIS "SOCIETY SIX' and "THE JUMPING JACKS STEEL BAND" featuring our own ni\f. / th* CAMUWmWA v I^lfX WKLhMXS %  A HiKE 15 MINUTE FLIGHT IN "BIM" TO ONE IN EVERY .? PERSONS ENTERING THE DANCE DANCING from 8.30 p.m. Supper included Dress Optional Al.tl I II \\ I — 9*2.00



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SUNDAY, AUGUST 1, 1M2 SUNDAY U.VOCMT. I'M, I UVE RACING RESLLTS AT GARRISON SAVANNAH. SATURDAY. AUGUST J. 1S2 WEATHER ; Fine TRACK : Firm M bw : SUMMES RAKB8—Ctua c ud Cl (MiMt—)— t— l*M4, 41*4, 4441 — 5', r'urlsota IX TEAMS 1 (MAGIC GAYE (AIM LOW 3 ABU-ALI 111 111* atr. M I R. Bourne. Jockey BeUt 110 lbs. Dr R. al Wsarer Jockev O'Nnl. 134 lb* Mi F F C 11th. II Jockey Yvonel. ALSO RAN : Devil's Symphony (111 B>s c rosslry). Tori Match (114 mi.. Wilder), Darham Jane (111 ass. Joseph): Raclon ( ID lbs LuU'hmanl. Dim View (III .. P. Flelcherl: Cantaqulalne 1110 .. Holder): The Thing (III Da.. Newman*. Trlmbronk (111 lbs, Quested) : IMF : I.M| PARI.Ml.TUEL Win *• 44 42 46 Pkwe M.M II M 41 44 FINISH I Close Head. START Good rORKAST tTI.it. WINNER Three.year-aM gr.l Mam. Rod-Icilact TRAINERS Mr M. E. R. Bourne and Mr S. Messiah. ind Hair rLANTEKK* KTAKBfl—(Haas r and rt Only—ffdos (IMS. (115, Mll-1> rarteaga 1 MIRACLE 2. MARCH WINDS 3. CARDINAL no ibs 117 lbs. Miss K C. Hawkins Jockey P. Fletcher Mr. U. J. Parravldno. Jockey Quested 117 lbs Mr J. W. Chandler. Jockey Crossley ALSO RAN : Vtcaroy (1M Ms.. M. Browne); Caprice (114 tbs., J Belle); May Day (117 IBs. Yvonel); Soprano (123 IBs. li'N.n. Iletsam (133 Ibs, Newman) TIME I I .Mi PARI-MUTUEL : Win 14 10. Place : l.ll). $1.10. Il.ua. FORECAST : 413.42 START : Fairly food. FINISH Comtoruible 2 lengths. 4 lengths. W1NNKK : r'our-year-old bJ. Baltle Froal-Marshllghl. TRAINER : Miss K. C. HaeUni 3rd Race : STEWARD*' STAKES—Claaa A at B Only—SI.ess (1145. 4144, 4601— T.j Furlongs I. LANDMARK .... Ill lbs 2 BELLE SURPRISE M + 4 lbs 3 LUNWAYS .. ,. 113 lbs. Mr. V Chase Jockey Joseph ALSO RAN : Pepper Wine (10 Mr. R. E. Gill. Jockey Lutchman Mr K. D Edwarda. Jockey Newman. • 2 lbs., Crossley); Notonite (121 lbs., P. Fletcber); Flying Dragon (1M 3 lbs.. Wilder); Rebate (111 lbs., J. Belle): Harroween (123 lbs.. Quested). Slainte (HI me., Thlrkell); Red Cheeks (113 Bi.. OTIell) TIME : 111 PARI-MUTUEL Win 4l.li. Place 43.11. 4144. 43.04. FORECAST : $10.4 START : Good. FINISH : Easy; 1 length. 1 %  lengths WINNER : Five-year-old ch.m Pylon 11-Esperanoe TRAINER I Mr V. Chase. 4th Race : BARBADOS DKRBV >I.\K1> \M> III' Sniiiii.ii.il •1,4** 144*4. (175. 114*)—• Farlongs 1 BRIGHT LIGHT 117 lbs Mr. C. Barnard. Jockey Holder 2 FIRST ADMIRAL 130 lbs Mrs. F. E. C. Bethell Jockey Yvonet. %  RAMBLER ROSE 117 lbs. Mr. V. Chase. Jockey Joseph ALSO RAN Seedling (110 Ibi Crossley) TIME : 1.411. PARI-MUTUEL Win 11.16; Place : 1.30. 4146 FORECAST : 44.32 START : Good FINISH I Easy 2 lengths. I length WINNER Three-year-old b.(. Burning Bow.FellclUs TRAINER : Hon. V. C. Oal*. 5th Rare : NORTH GATE STAKES—Claaa C and CM Only—44*0 (4144, 4140. S5U)—:' Furlongs 1. DASHING PRINCESS 134 Illy Ml. R. E. Gill Jockey Lutchinuii 2. FL1EUXCE 126 Ibs. Mr. S. A. Waleoti Jockey Wlldi-i 3. DOLDRUM 126 lbs. Mr. N. M. Inniss. Jockey Holder. ALSO RAN : Embers (121 lbs., Crossley). Careful Annie (126 lbs.. Quested). TIME I 1.35 1 PARI-MUTUEL Win 41.66; Place : •1.4*. 42.82. FORECAST 421 06 START Fair. FINISH : Close : U length, head, WINNER : Four-year-old br.f. Daslur-Prlncess Regent. TRAINER : Mr. J. B. OUI. 4th Rare : OI8T1N STAKES—Class G and Lower—4400 1414*. II**. 4441-51.. Furlongs 1. JOAN'S STAR 118 lbs. Mr S. J Rock Jockey Yvonel 2 SEA FOAM 46 lbs Mr. R. E. OUI. Jockey Lutchman 3. OAVOTTK IK lb*. Mr. V. I Coi. Jockey Wilder ALSO RAN : Blue Diamond (133 Bs., Newman): Cottage (112 lbs P. Fletcber I. TIME : 1.10. PARI-MUTUEL : Win : HOI; Place I 43.14. 43 02. FORECAST 532 (11 START : Bad. FINISH : Easy : I length. 5 lengths WINNER : Four-year-old ho. bi. Dunusk-Colleen TRAINER : Mr. F. E C Bethell. :th Rare TRAFALGAR STAKES—Claaa D and Lower—4*00 (414*. 4110, 4441—7V4 Furlongs AUG. 3 — NO. 235 Results Of2'FUld Sweep The Topic FIRST Daft] Q{ Last Week r ..-i >MI I.-ft.* Hi mr h sn • %  -It -ItM-.l rath M13 Hi m, -.i-ll ||g) ,„„, %  •" •*• MM T-il* MM SE •••"<> -Hi !•->. •JSS „. i. h. M „. ., „,„. s.. %  BBS *— %  MM nr Ml] M %  ! MY iisn ujkci J"tot*.*:. <....( nit MI %  —'4--1I. I.. I.,. U* 4M> HH rrn STOP PAIN -' QUICKLY iiimii PH. I'. > IS* %  Ml i-" %  Ma with Phensic... %  ••I KIM Hill 11,...i \,. A Irumd i raw's n_ I*U,, nf „, t^, %  lit -r r.-. i OMKH %  nfiiirO U> Lnjjiiih r KHl MllBlllaii i %  'Wim m*". %-M rii*-..' i. %  hi i Ini...i i COACH BRUTUS HAMILTON i i. ..in. who b;o',.v Into I games. Ijilun was a contestant ID toe lOJXrO-nMttt an %  riernast*] that* certain hial-and-toe stride U m Ih tulr "TV tamowi ilitc-loM BCti 01 II s' II Ul I : I M-\hS PAIN.SOOTHKSNl-KVl s < I flPPA* IS Hi PRI SSIOf No maner how rmvni.iht twin,. o rulifr how twor, vour Ttt n'. how drfreueJ vou tccl. PH£NSI<' D btea will l~ring vuu ulic! dad oomfon, quKklv and Mfct) K.-i.icmber thi^ PHBNS1C lablct^ onihcr harm the hcan nor ui M it.< i'| ^.*.*pi wbantuir Keep -uppiv d PlIHNSIC ttbkta t*y "O-Bl Phensic TWO TtUttTS BT.IN 1/1V/CJI RtLIEf FROM RHEUMATIC PAINS,' I WMQ, NERVc PAINS, I HEADACHES. NEURALGIA. .' r ?*. T010S A CHIltS \J Kaiu CurtaUd IMa^ In County Crickol RRWP Ti'nm* : LONDON. Au*. 2. Ktiin iscnoubly micrfgrutl willi Itaiik Holiday crtck*?t In moht paru of the country today. Only a finv hourn were powuble ;>l i \in'.iTliuf> Wontattr, M-nchc*. lor and Hove. Bui one place the BUII ihu shine was al SWJIIM-V jnd than 1 ida bay" agaliui Glajiiorgan With Ilurl> "luok" Divecha capturing eight wicket: for 74 runs the tourlsla shot out LmoTftUl batsmen for 204 on an easy paced "Ukci. Jus) call it Surrey's Championship with the rent nowhere At i he Oval todav Surrey shot out Notts for 84. Alec Bedaer live fof 28 and skipper Stu.n Sm ridge five t>r 38 did the Mm >-'i And before ihe clOM SUM. I b I made 65 for the Uns ol ert uickei. TTie day's only eenlui> nuik. wax England's Tom Onvan ".Ini hit 111 not out for Oloun" %  .. %  r it. li.c.il Dartq wilh Somcr Lftol, I*eleeter'> CbarlM ralimi CUM I'i'ji llnt-l llRurti .uph' and DOWIM 1' Noitn .ui-. k i ,i p %  i FYIMMII Phillip* Island's A Chtss Champion KAWLE PHILLIPS ,Ui,.n. Norman Gill at the Y.M.CJ.. Naval Hall on Friday night lo ftonw A C'las*. Champion of Ih' HHML Gill was left year-F A Champion. Phillips is i r stead player ami i %  b '< on the im. From er, tin-•• % %  '" %  < teen that he ,1 ihe makingan I at a n d tampion Ken Herbeil '• f r ., 1 id R Shi^'ld^ to berome champion k..iruMw* f Ihe YM.C.A In the II Class match l> vn-her ''./'T /*/; ^K-at D Culler Thundering good adio reception.^ ;,-^k*^ BTO ..ft. nakti Sf'dKKHOAKU — Kent vemuo llampablre 'l.n. IS for 1 (raim Warwick vemm Derby Wuwlck 75 .tackson .5 for 30 Derby B2 for 1 Worcester vrrwi Eaaex WO K—U l 181 for 2 (num (.Uni (rain). Soaaei. versus MMdleaea Sussex .71 for a (rain). NerthanU versw Lelresler Leicester 3 28 foi H Sarrey versus Netta NotU 64 Surn-% 85 for 1 P. Chainllei and H. CarniiRtur.. the Adelphi pair, beat K. Wi. nama and J. Clarke of QueenV College in the finals of the Ladlei • >oubFes Championship. The result* were a* foll..*s: Class A Championship; R. Phillips lieat N. Gill 21 — 12, 18—2'. 21—18, 19-21. 21—12. Y.M.C.A. Championshiii U Harbarl beat s. Bbkddi 21 II 18—21. 21—18. 21 — 18. Clatjs B Championship 1 Archer beat D. Guilei U II 21 — 16. 21—10, 22—20. Indies Doubles: P. Chandler and B. CurTinftun beat It. Wll lianwandJ Clarke 21 —IS, 21—15. 21—•. The competition for the Bar.Hidos Championship will start al the Y.M.C.A. on Frdiay. Augus. 29, while the Ladies IsUnd Championship will start on Friday. September 5. 1 TOP FLIGHT 2. COLLITON 3 MARY ANN 113 lbs. Mr. L. T. Won*;. Jockey Lutchmari HI lbs Mr. V. Chase. Jockey Joseph 112 lbs. Mr. F. E. C. Bethell. Jockey Yvonel ALSO RAW : Apollo (111 Tbs., P Fletcber); Cross Bow (128 ft* HoMar,. TIME : l 35| PARI-MUTUEL I Win : *5.02: Place : $2.24. $3.84. FORECAST : $33.61. START : Fairly good. FINISH i Close : head, Mi length WINNER Five-year-old b.m. Flotsam-Meads. TRAINER Mr. R. H. Mayers. 8th Rare : %  TAfTOlO STAKFS—Claw B and Lower—$!.$• (335. 1185. $5.M— J'J FurUnis 1. PEPPFR WINE 125 1b*. Hon. J. D. Chandler. Jockey Crossley 2. SWEET ROCKET 125 Ita Mr R E GUI Jockey Lutchman i. MRS BEAR 116 lbs. Mr V Chase. Jockey Joseph. ALSO RAN Demure (130 Bs.. Wilder); Vectis <<11 "., Quested). Aim Low (115 B.. C/Neil), High And Low (120 Tbs.. New. man); Spear Grass (118 Tbs.. Holder). TIME : LOT PARI-MUTUEL Win $21.06; Plao< : $2.90. $1.32. $1.52. FORECAST : $45.36. START :Good. FINISH : Easy : 1*4 lengths. 1 length. WINNER : F.ight-year-i>ld b.m. OT.C.-Cendji TRAINER : Mr r. F, C Bethell. Snappers, II.C. Win Knock Out Matches i MI m Watsa Poi., KI..K.. „ nut iiuitches an : %  pland al the I chih last M,-,k l>) Division "A" SnafiptTs defeated Whlpporayi 12 2 and Harrlso. i -ih-, beat r,.„ ; %  | I ding match { In Division H tin Challengi I (mi Wlnnarai Wklpiman arari knocke.1 oul b> Police aftei play nig exli.i lime. The i: m I fl i Foi PoUoa ite.t icored Ova %  '! the six foala for hi< i.ther match, Bonktas beat Caviar. sV—0. Bruce Armstrong scored j tie five goals. This week, the semi-fin.', will !%  SwordAsh v. Collegi ii D i !•>" A % %  The finals will lie played or, %  tin16th. sponaored by J it R BAKERU.S linkers of ENRICHED BREAD and thr blender* of J & R RUM Be Proud of Your English I.I % %  I %  aaki i ill %  1 Ruiuiiax' Insider* uho rontlil Are you COOtaVlt with tl^ way you speak and write? II, i intikinK miatakex lhai causa AND NOW .\i. vou Mir. thai yu an iieopl*! to underrate you? ( Never has the iruportancf o| ,,, artdeh <• -oKtiisad than today. (Ii-cllve ape*-ch and wnttng If you can cxpreaa : ptnuuiVfiy and forcetlllhr, you have an immense I vintage in yuur professional work aa wtill as in social life I i id women I.hanateappad i-auwf they pa-ak and write Kngllsh Kvery day i mo .tting mlatake wtriok -if otnan. Are a spelling? For nstance. i KUsie n* •lUfje. benelllted or heneflted ilrlaht or all ris;hl? I.' OVU prODUD' latiorr* For examplaaaaaaasr, hmiiitable Tivriii.tr. and arobliy your c Caj ; ou depend up'.' I %  %  •1 "letlh i.ml \ 'I'll Kmbarrassing Errora There la a method by whn-h yoo i.m guard against embarrassing %  vhlch imbodled in Ih. Mact l va Engli'h Course conducted trv l^ititu'.c Considei th.se distinctive features: 'st You learn only UM Ihlngi you need to know ilj Everything Is explained with the utmost simplicity. • i Suit are not required to memorise Tedious lists of rules You are shown how to avoid II .wni how to mrself fluently and effec%  low to Gain miiuage-Power ii i v. plannad on stmiu% %  t* cov< The Cour*p that lV/rv~ You Confidence nif Ri i HI tfa way to r v of English is the sure i f and the -wITt way. Effective English Course In the odd mlni day 'the Course M -• %  pl.t I you make definite progress from %  first lesson. ."ii to speak and II-.. words %  %  %  %  ills, and leam how friendly and thorough tuition by post tuitic t| In, | ilude: How Ui Increase Yuur VocabularyHow lo Make Yeur l-etler lnI.-i—Ung How to Convene I'luentli How l Npeak In Public. I verwljy Crrurs In English. Uiird* I ommonly Mtmp.lt Wards Ert-queDtl* MlspraiiAuared. •loH la I'MBCluate Correctly. Hi. %  .ii-.ui. i in utitribuiii itriking message* to -Word it' the prospeiius of tftst Mlac U va English Course—ant unanimous In urging that good English is indispensable lo those whu aim at success. a ."Word Mastery" explains fully the Importance of good English to you and describes how you can acquire the power of ready and attractive expression This interacting booklet, which ran be obtained free from the MfJMM Institute, should be In ''' hands of every ambitious mat. and woman The Danger of Delay Daafttj at ma th..i you will rid vourseir of the handi.Mp that poor English imposes You can do so without drud•n md without costly outlay. Wtai torn for a free copy of "Word Mastery." which will be %  ant to you without any obligation on your part. Don't delay. Year I.I>'I t> all-Important to yea, and you mi.ui ."..MI tn neglect It, f u tyoupon or write a imple request for the booklet. addressed to The Regent Institute (Dept. 50IB). Palace Oafe. London. W 8, England. #*.% %  / this t wwmmm \on THE REGENT INSTITUTE %  IK|il 50IB). Palarr Galr. London. W.8. F.ncland I '' %  aeod :n.. v. llhoul oMIgaUnD—a in* ropy or Wsrg Maatarv". dssrrlblns yaur raatal Couna in Kflrrlivc Engllaai aaM. lh^ sprrlal arrangraaDla for osvrssaa slagcsiai. NAME (Block Lenars) ADDRESS



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VMM SIXTEEN M MOAY ADVOC.4 SUNDAY. Alt.I ST : %  1'.2 It % M.I IIS II) CAMP l.\ 'I It I.VI IP AII SI. Jn.rph Huuml-Vp; Residents Experience Food Shortage Residents of Camhridmitistrkt in St. Joseph arc at present faeidg •i very grave situation. The water proble.n H very acute %  nd In addition to a shortage of rice, no ground provisions can be C'ornmeal can be purchafed without dirilrultir -. but okrai (price "tie cent each) are in short siipph The water was off for the greater par: of the day on Monduy and %  nd again at intervals ev*r\ day subsequently, a resident laid Mftff A surprising feature, was that there waa .lead flov* of water at '.!!' pipe situated at Sheffter s oti Prida) and a#nn yesterday. There has not been a steady flow of water than for II month* it was learnt. YESTERDAY afternoon re.alive* and friend* were at Be* well Airport to ae Un Qneens CoUcjte. Ran Htn. go off to Trinidad where they will t In camp at ths Olrl Oulilr-' Headquartam, Belrnont circuUr '•toad for U dayv Miss Beryl Skeete Is In Charge of the group. This U the first Quean's College group to visit TrlniJad but previously girls have camped In Grenada Mm Eleanor Norse an dttaree other rangsra left by B W I A on Friday and will later join the otliera The liat are as follows M1M Beryl Bkeete (Lcadorln Charge). Joan Best. Yvonne Barnwei). Tlielma BrathwalU. Dorcan Dear Andolln King. Martdeue King. Anita Lowiiar. Leila Ma-tol). Patricia Max wall Joyce Maynnrd D.inliiie Smtl.i, Joan Walked, Harcla Varde. Jean Beat, and Clarlla Jordan (Mr %  ) (Hindi SKKVKFS IT JNiaV'B Tit IN IT V Mat na 1*1 ST Ml! .:. If.]-. C, M.. A S*I VIII %  ..... %  iiL'a Butter, Cornmeal Expected Soon Good Crops Of Ground i*ro\ .t*ioii> Expected BOall Of the planters who Malted Bridgetown Knauv io.. the Ad vacate that they were look', %  <• .,' T %  s .., | run awfcm %  ntl aura lion 9 pti W 1 S Teachera. 1 n*. L B II.... r..l S*r„, m 10 SO .in. 1 p.m. Sunday S. am s..l.inn THIRTEEN THOUSAND BAGS of cornmeal are due tnf forward io splendid rrops or !" j>" !" !" > :„,„,. her. ,n shipmenl, arriving between Ihe latter fJ<%*?&, Z*UFZ sTaU&J part of this month and early December. Shipments or llu „*.,.,., poti'ioe* and yams which WBBATIAN table and cookinc butter are coming during the next was* recently planted. ••-few months. A ceiling price for the butter has been flxed. 'hat morr. tnantinni notice Issued by I.. "' %  '"' ""' "'*"'" %  l a 1 a~sa At the Cinema > %  .. %  ... •And. itUe* frowi i Issue.1 to .nporttrs from whom quotas h id again.it wholesaler:" i onflrm.*.tion note* up to version Iholr maximum quota* of 35 tons bombastic manner and lor i n-vn. rxforp the end of Dtcostumes of the period. timber. I nieaa. by and lanr pleted." one planter told the Advocate. Another said that the sweet potatoes, which were only planted last month, showed good sign^ a m MornHati c-iinr N-, ? 9 From r i %  3 with her naucus voice. :olourful Yams, eddoes. and pea cropa Jj5* ,ll S|! ran aiao doing ime. He said thai the young cane :ropa were also splendid to look follow.*] T' %  rteffl T-t m Cvxitliic finvicr. pnKhri: B*v r He* GRACE HUJII a.m Morning fifty W, Ir.B.'.'r Mr W ll.vur. 1 p Ilk. vinlnl Snvlrf. Ptrf,#t Mr I OkLfy. MI-rCK II m Mnininn VivW, t?R#Ct + !Fi,*-" T. Mr at. I guess, by and Urffe. TIIE The planters, although The ceiling pr < %  %  for this comBElXB OP* NEW YORK will apvnric PhlLllpt i. Evening B*t8 Arlhui Dtma QH9I i-r Pi*-h SHOI'HIII ruenrr: Mr *" O Down-n THl MI %  in n.ii i Hi i. II I ii' be 98.27 cents per 1 u*.ol to moat people, but it Cfnolh l"f Th-vvTr^ ,,mte^.lisned JAME9 D ST "' :rT "" ^^tF^"\U*2't^c^XS***^*". S^.p?ogr^o1 U ^ S va?r 7^^^^ &? nth the progress i crops. JUv. I'AVNKS HAY Toppin Warner nnd 97.81. eentr per five Itv tin. AsLalre entertainments, Sorry. I laiconees will also be issue,! f.r forgot To mention that It is In For the AilguM shipments, the irI1UTn and the storv points up A. D Sole, took us his br.Je DAUttlTM ?ilinf price is as follows 8* 72 „• obligation of the private ci*iMiss Joyce Warner, daughter of Rfcg" 0 support law and order when Mr. and Mrs. Warner of Two nci-MoMT I %  ailed upon to do so, regardless ot Mile Hill, St. Michael LawGillnlh WMITFHAM>:-Bao am H>v K E Totevn iSi. 7 p.m. Mt H Crawford. OI1.I. MIMOHIM n Bin. Mr 8* Moortv 7 p m Mr j L*yn Hoi-KTOWN: a an MrMorrU. ,. %  II,. f l.. -rn IS>. I1ANK IIAI.L:930 a m Mr G Harprr T V in Mr J V Haynrs. 8PEIOHT5/TOWN Man. M.. B Mc Man. 7pm Mr D Scott si 1 .Ail II a in Mr Ramrll. 1 p m VAIU£ liar.Tlir.SDA BETHEL II T p m Rv T i.m Mr. 0"va Brv T J Furl*y F.irlev Holy Comcents per 1 lb. fvc lb. tin and "7.8S cenvs per 25 Ih. tin. Tor tne -September — Octi>ber shipment Ihe prices ha* -Zl" been fixed at 86.1!) certi ter 1 lb. tin; 81.28 cents ,.cr n V e lb. t'n and 79.39 cents per 25 lb. tin. pci'Sona] consideration and dan"RED" DEAN CENTL C SPIRITUAL OLD MAN WOT.VERHAMPTON. Air.'. 2 br.'H^VtVj^hi',,l,n' : Red : Dcan .""" "he. promise., not to repor ..f Cinlcrburv who returned from V*"" .,. Canon fetor. ^X!*l,.!?T£? li"->al'l the District AUoin.-.. .... Steve Cochlun gives ;m isr, Sl J11( The reception was held ui the Mi. and Mrs. A D. Seal*.it TudsW Slrcet The story toneems a dress model who, on her arrival In a small Southern town to vlalt her newlyninrned sister, is Hie sole witneis of u murder by hoodlums. Whe her brother-in-law is one of the .............. .-.* i. N mmUll'll -iClVCS ley wrote In the Parish Magazine DgajM (a in..Ih* DtsUl*l "simplicity Is belli,-; while Ste Listening Hours iaw_i.ia an is..a> W p.m 1 U.dc. 4 IS p i" rr in* 4 M p in s .: ...... H.ll Hi HI rmi" Thr Uiblc, i la p "i %  r. p MI l'.... I. 1 4S p in i II p m Ensluh Maa-B/iiK rii.rjiiiiiir Paradv and In n..Nasn, 1" p "> SOI'TII DISTIMCTr-a a m Mr C I..no 7pm Mr St Hill l-RoVlliKNCE. II am Mr P Fltt VAUXHALL:-II am Mr Ci Brw. I r pm Mr M. MarrU. SAI.VATIOM ABMT OISTIN II a in llr.Hr— Me-Hni BMIU Mi-lln1 p n. AalvaI .m M.rtu M. %  : Major N MorrU. SI'EICIITSTCiWN II a m Holln*... UaaUirl 3 p Bl r.impanv Mi*on 7 pin Salvation Mrctlii*. tr Caplaln V !'.. n|.|M-ll M'IM/I. I Hi. I IT EHENEZtM II am. Mr E Brathn, 12 noon. Eacranwnl of Lord** "iipptr. B*vd. B. W. C. Crime; 1 p.m. Htcaptlon Sarvic* (ur Kov Mrmbrrm. H...I S W. V do-** IIEl'l-AH 100 pm Reontninl and •n-iladlcatlon nf thiChurch Don" to la" Oi-atllf i Mi^ulanwn P. Iiwmiff and V\ (I Craaa* Prmirlwr llrvd. F. I.. —nil—Chairman I Mr VincrM Bl. Barramrnt ol Lordi Suppri An .i-i'-old equation on which our coslinK has been consistently based. It illustrates Ihrce tarts: One is that of value. The second, embodied in the text, is proof of careful buying. The third is in the expressed satisfaction of our customers who. in turn, have introduced us to their friends. C. B. Rice & Co. Mrrefcaeat l-ilo.% i i i i iii 'miiiiii i THE 1952 ANNUAL BALL BY THE BARBADOS POLO CLUB AT THE MABiNE BOTEL ONCE AGAIN OFFERS YOU TOPS (N AN EVENING'S ENTERTAINMENT SATURDAY. I6TH AUGUST. AT 9.110 P.M. a Dacha Io IhiPolice Bend t>rchoslra a A Flight in "Miss Bins" on Ailclinn a Dances by our popular Ballerina —Miss Joan Ransome I..R.A.D. a Spol Dance. Bridge, Etc., Etc. a Enjoyment Galore THE WORLDS MOST SUCCESSFUL LIGHT CAR! r'-ia* Ol I 1SS wn %  lllKEVVIIt-IIV .1. ,.-1111 Barrvant luda. Ilivl S ol I "ul Suppar Bavd. 8. W. C. Ci i N I l N*tt>. in New. Talk. Ill IS p n. Lourum. 10 44 p in My Brnlhrr.Wdne.di. lh. S am (ireuil K-ireion Io Sla>i B.iv.S.-haal WE1.1INOTON STI.EET II a.m. Holi>•. Martins, ipm Company MaeUaa. i rs-i Q m Salvation Mi-rim* Br Malar T fin Central oi>ba a is pm roi'H BdAii* From m .j Tables can be Reserved through Mrs. M. M. PARKER (Dial 8322) — OR — For Bridge Partial ihrounh Mrs. J. W. CHANDLER (Dial 95-211) or THE MARINI HOTEL TICKKTS SLWt Inn any Polo Chah Member or at the I>mr Dmi Optional all ih o-jjr ( ,....-;,. r! • Mrei... IM-Una. Major L Bawlin.. UtAMONn riiHM-fi Ham Hull..Mertm>r 3 pm Company Meetma P m Salvalon Maallna Capl^ln I, iorp..! Mirr MONDAY. AVISUBT 4, ISSS j-n: COBttn Mam Hollnaai Meatria— US am — llaas.. U.Uaa has 1 %  ID r<>mpan% Meviina 1pm ••alvaliun Mmtm Si Major It. .ling.4 HI i> "i Tlie ,. .,tn A Tala ol Tun THl HT l^MrS NATIONAL BM-IIST llle., d *i P Bl Make Mum Counlry n am Maim, and Harmon Tha Nr. H lla.ii | 13 ii IntarliMir. l> in Spotu R. P.railr. T 00 o n p m Monw Naw l-clar rvan%  ,nd-Vp aria Frirlai ITW .'isndu p ,IM pa — aWBaV, ii I:. •tjpm BI-*. aaajaajajl I I %  %  i • dlfcaTeSli v i> n i %  .i Raa Ml.T .in 1 i II l HHdlrt.-n I Inosvde. T. % %  ll-Klins: -ur-le.i: inVE as l ii a Tesi: %  th not kii( I U D ni From Th m Thr rdln* Thi< will be r i i aracs Clark* nd Mr.. Ol-a Browne. iiiaiiT. -i i MI>I apar Bay •.*-'! .....I 1 pm m. A aarvKS whtrii • .1 cnu.iian SeMnreThcyll Do It Every Time by Ji mmy .l.itlo WHEN IT *vt*S HER TjtCN TDMVE THE /AEBDSCi AT HER HOUSE, TW£ BUTLER WHS SCK OR S^ETHiMG "-tSOVlWKESS, _. AVr-FOOT.' HER .'uSa4'C M\S3 TMSrM*" OR 3>i'T THEy ALLOW JOS IN MOfTSEBETTiM toavis. p Suiidav. Aupust 3. IBU I J.-lin 4 %  lla that it. nrt Ood. lot God. H fllhle TtlOM The I1ILLM \\ >ll> V ANOTHER SHIPMENT ARRIVED IS'ntt' This I'riev $2550 perfrct irlrnrc and Brallh ialth Kay i the Oitdalarra a. MABV HAKta I.IPIl. Ttia iindrraland.na. urn In ,i dacree. Ol in* dlvlno All po*r drelroya laar. and pUnu Iha teal In Ihe true path. %  IOLE % CO. I III. A PRODUCT OF THE ROOTES GROUP RYlKG TD PUT UP WITH CMME *W> 8KOUC1H-LITTLE 9E.4R5 TO 8RJCE-CLJS TE4-. *tOA hy TIP TO s.^ ^coofJucr, IB*I w*Lv_*ice. .• a !" !" & ca. in,. Rel in a Portabl Tyi)*>writ'rs m Swiss precision. li.r-w are choaen from our irmarkatMselect ion ml rvrryday oflirc nerdn on a>le to Mr. XMrt. Public Desk Films; Drawers nnd 3 & 4 Drawtr Cabinets. Steel Desks and Chairs for Executives and 1>pis^. K. K. HUSH t ( O.. ltd. l.ne.H.W,.,rr. AND ,! QUALITY SUITINGS You Surely Musi Deride on MAFFEI LTD. as III,"TOP" SC'OKKKS S IN TAILORING. #/'ffjf.v' lour li*mt> WITH FLOOR TILES in Your Verandah anil kitchen Red. While, and two shades of Speckled Cream 6 x 6, 4x 4. 3 x i. 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ESTABLISHED 1895



India Can’t Give U.S.

Senator Charges That Indians
Rearm With Selfish Motive

WASHINGTON, Aug. 2.
SENATOR Theodore Green (Democrat) charged Sat-
urday that India has no right “to leeture this country” on
how to wage peace. Green, a merhber of the Senate Foreign
Relations Committee took up a sharp issue with the Indian



AN APOLOGY











b ; : > aw The conference, which op ned

Ambassador B. R, Sen who deplored the United States wire i a tae tas a x have ts Monday, issued a. brief
rearmament and recommended a conciliatory policy in a ed ‘Dr. Jekyll”, appearing India Again communique announcing merely
speech at Colgate University last week, aor the caption “Day of os aa eee nee eee

ao Fe a eckoning” in the columns _— reached, Saic he govern}

_ He said India’s position in the, ‘ headed “Our Readers Say” ‘ ace Maker oe of the United States, the
re Pakistan over Kash-j Is Aly Goi in tha “Advocate” News> | se ve ta saps. aa
mir left er in no position to ng paper of Frid lith July rE and Japan have satigfactorily con-|
criticize the (United States. He said} e 1952, has wenn De cause of TORONTO, Ontario, Aug. 2, | cluded their meetings on security |
“India {nds fault with us while} lo Rita? considerable annoyance to |; dia has, again adopted the | export control arrangements with
at the seme time building up her ° Mr, E. W. Barrow, B:Sc.. ; role of peace-maker, this tims at fart a) referon to the Far
own arms for purely selfish pur- 5 M.C.P., Barrister-at-Law {eae 18th International Red Cross j Eas Amendations with re-
poses. . NEW YORK, Aug. 2. We sincerely regret any | Sane b R, R. Saksena, spe to ‘ pemvewetion a waves
ae . ci ew Prince Aly Khan sped west annoyance or inconvenience ndia's igh Commissicner to has#, been formulated for consid-
India is putting up a fgbt! Saturday for the United States which may have been caus- Canada, asked the Conference to jerav®a by other interested gov- |
against Pakistan to prevent alamid speculation that he is com- ed to Mr. Barrow, and un- |}hring east and west together tojernments, They are being. com-
plebiscite to detsrmine which} ng to talk Rita Hayworth into re- reservedly withdraw any form an impartial body to inves- | municated to these governments, |
way Kashmir should go. He tr, | ‘onciliation or out of the financial allégations and imputations tigate Communist charges of Uni- | and therefore nothing further esn

a reporter the United States is} settlement she wants. He is aboard which may have been con- ted Nations atrocities in Korea.{ be stuted at this time.’
building: up its defences from al~| the liner Queen Elizabeth sched- tained in the letter referred ||He said he was confused by th } Enlarge Scope

truistic motives with Unite! uled to arrive here Monday. to, We tender him our sin- | conference meetings which. so fa) Inf@tmed scurces said that the
Nations backing to resist aggres-| The office of Attorney Bartley cere apologies for any an- }have consistet mainly of Com-] recommendations will “beta a
sion.”"—U.P. Crum, Miss Hayworth's bargain noyance _or inconvenience | mUnist charves and hastily passed} worded to members of the Par |
which may have been caus- | votes ignoring them, 1 ry up whieh include Western |

ed to him, and hope that ne of the main centtes of at-| Germany and 14 members of the}

" this apology will be accept- jtack by the Soviet bloe has beeninorth Atlantic Treaty Org mniza- |

: l : | ed in the spirit in which it jibe International Committee, com-}tign It said in essence that the re

1 ce carbibit || poses ai a re The! sommendation was to bring Japaii|

} Communist delegates hive term-Jinto the already established ma-!

jed the Committee a tool of the i {

Function

At St. Silas

A record gathering of parents, | ;
teachdrs and wdll-wishers were
assembled at the St. Silas Boys’ | °
School on Wednesday 30th. The-
25th Anniversary of the building}
of the present Boys’ School syn-|
chronised with Open Day. Ss

Among those present were Ma-! £
jor Glindon Reed, Director of
Education and Mrs. Reed, Sir Ed-
ward Cunard, Revd. F. Layne,
Miss Nell Manning of the Civic
Circle, Mr, and Mrs. Jack Outram
of Lancaster, Mr. and Mrs. G. C.
Miller. Miss G. Denny (Inspec-
tor of Domestic Science), Messrs.
R. Jordan and L. T. Gay (Inspec-
tors), Miss M. Crick and _ Staff,
Mrs, Cadogan and Staff, Messrs.
Smith and Williams of St. Simon's
Mixed, Messrs. Best and Vaughan
of St. Andrew's Church Boys’,
Mrs. E. Spencer of St. Silas Girls’,
Miss Daniel and Mr. S. Clarke of

12 Paragraphs
Stall Truce

TOKYO, Aug. 2,

Allied and Communist - staff
officers agreed to-day on the
wording of all but two paragraphs
of the armistice agreement but
there was no promise of early
peace in Korea as chief delegates
3| prepared to resume talks to-mor-
row. Staff officers scheduled an-
other meeting at 9 a.m. to-morrow.

The only two paragraphs still
to be worked over were 52 and
‘60, Paragraph 52 deals with the
parole of prisoners promised by
each side, that prisoners would
not be required to fight again in
Korea.

Reds wanted the term = cap-
tured personnel” replaced with
“prisoners of war”, apparently to
confine the no fighting restriction
to soldier prisoners actually re-

RITA HAYWORTH

ing agent said it heard the Prince
is on his way here but had no
information on the purpose of the
trip.

Miss Hayworth is on the west
coast where she recently com-
pleted a picture.



St. Thomas Boys’ and Girls’ Mr. —_UP patriated and not released in
Jervis, Mr. Nolan Sealy (Visual ct their home territories.
Aids), Mr. O. Weekes (Welfare), —UP.





FB, O'Neale (Probation Ser-] yr
vice) end. ‘Mess, “Arthur and U.S, Not Told of . ake
eorge Crick of Weston. «mms tification
9
juniors Sang | Mossadegh’s Plan.|_ Beatifi
After the rendition of ‘Hanni- WASHINGTON, Aug. 2 Starts At Home

bal’ and ‘All Thro’ the Night’ by : inns
the Juniors both of which drew A State Department spokesman

VATICAN CITY, Aug. 2

rounds of applause, selections Ss i a Friday tat the United! vatican sources said to-day any
from “Oliver Twist” were suc-| States has received no officiall ) eatifcation proceedings for Eva
cessfully staged against a fine}Motification that the Iranian} Peron, late wife of the Argentine

Premier Mohammed Mossadegh
plans to visit this country soon.

Spokesman Lincoln White said
he had seen press reports quot-
ing American shipping officialy

yackground done by the boys,

The Headteacher Mr, S. O.
Lorde, then delivered a lengthy
address paying tribute to the work
of Messrs. Abraham Holder, J. N.

President would have to start in
the diocese where she lived.
These quarters were commenting:
on Buenos Aires report that the
Argentine Food Workers’ Union

“ " ; “:}in Le Havre as saying that Mos: | appealed to Pope Pius XII to start
Gain on the late Mr. Oliver jadegh has booked a passage to a catwnaiy wena for her
alcott, America on Sept 12th To the} beatification.

best cf his knowledge, White said,
the United States had net invited
Mossada@gh to come here, He said
there had been no application for
a visa and “we have had no word
from any Iranian source what-
soever.

He then noted some of the in-
ternal changes in the Public Ele-
mentary School during the past
25 years. Some of the achieve-
ments of the school during the
past 2 years were the winning of
2 prizes by both the Vegetable and
Flower gardens, 6 Bursary Schol-
arships in 1951, 3 prizes—one in
each of classes I, Il, and IV dur-
ing the Music Festival Competi-
tion and the winning of an Ex-
hibition by Elric Payne to Com-
bermere.

Presented Prizes

Mrs. Reed then presented the

prizes after which she received a

It is not for the Vatican, they
explained, to take the initiative
for beatification, It is always the
Bishop of the diocese in which
the person to be beatified lives
who takes the preliminary steps.

The Pope himself finally decided
not to reject or approve the case.
Ordinarily at least two miracles
must be proved to have been per-
formed by God through the per-
son concerned either during his

White said that the Department
thought on Thursday that reserva-
tion for Mossadegh might have
been confused with plans for
Iranian Development Chief Hos-
sein Maaki to come here, but in
view of continued press reports
of a visit by Mossadegh the De-
partment was uncertain, He added |
lovely bouquet from which she}that the Department was trying |
plucked one of the flowers and|to check on Mossadegh’s plans}
stuck it into the. button-hole of: through official channels,
Frank Burrowes the pupil who!

after death before betiivetios.
—UP.







or her lifetime or by intercession | adiso Hotel



Dictator Policy Will

Sunday Advocate



BARBADOS, AUGUST 3, 1952

Peace L



seture |

JAPS MAY JOIN EXPORT
SECURITY CONTROLS —

A FIVE-POWER CONFERENCE called to decide
Japan's role in export security controls, ended on Satur-!
day with the agreement to recommend Japanese partici-
pation in the heretofore primarily European controlled |
group located in Paris.







chinery and enlarge the scope of
the Paris group to include policy |
co-ordination over the control of}
exports to [ron Curtain countries)
in the Far East as well as Europe. |

The basie purpose of the control!
system is to prevent the shipment
of material or equipment to Rus-
sia or the Iron Curtain countries
which must increase their war)
makipg power —U.P. |
|

west,

“It is not sufficient merely to
pass resolutions endorsing the
ICRC.” said Mr. Saksena. “We
should have taken advantage of
the presence here of delegates
who are not satisfied with opera-
tions of the LC.R.C. ahd tried to!
reduce their grievance,”—(CP)












Results At
A Glance



Train Smashes
Fighting Mob

JOHANNESBURG, :
South Africa, Aug. 2. FIRST DAY
An express train smashed First Race

through a fighting mob of natives
streaming across the tracks in the
suburb of Tooronga on Saturday
and killed four Zulus.

1. \MAGIC GAYE — Belle

(AIM LOW O'New

ABU-ALI — Yvonet
Second Race

»
o





Chanting war cries, about 100 | 1 MIKACLE — P. Floteher
Zulus were hunting for a band 2% MARCH WINDS
of Basutos who had _ been ter- —Quested
rorizing the natives in the Johan. 3, CARDINAL — Crossley
nesburg suburb of Newclare. Third Race
At oc Station they were 1, LANDMARK — Joseph
met by polife who were unable|| 2 BELLE SURPRISE
to stop them, The Zulus set upon, —Lutchman
the crowd on the platform. When 3. LUNWAYS — Newman |,
the victims fled the Zulus follow~ Fourth Race
ed oblivious of the on-coming)| 1.° BRIGHT LIGHT
train. The track was strewn with) —Hold «
bodies of wounded natives and 2. FIRST ADMIRAL
weapons before the ‘train could ~-¥voencet
stop.—U.P. ' | 3. RAMBLER ROSE
' —Josenh
; : Fifth Race
Farouk Orders | 1. DASHING PRINCESS
~ * —Lutchman
Sunimer Wardrobe | 2. FLIEUXCE — Wilder
CAPRI, Aug. : || 8% DOLDRUM — Holder
b 4 Ug. 2. | Sixth Race
Exile Farouk, who left Egypt 2
in something of a hurry, called 2 ee kee
at a tailor on Saturday and had 2. SEA FOAM —Lutchman ||
himself measured for a ward- | 3 GAVOTTE Wilder |
robe fit for the warm weather of Seventh Race \
this island resort. The portly ex- 1. TOP FLIGHT |
King ordered himself a_tailor- —Lutchm .1
made bathing suit too, | 2. COLLETON — Joseph |
owe or aes he lacked light 8. MARY ANN — Yvoneit |
clothing suitable for Capri; At a ‘i » |
Fress Conference the former 1 peers Bae |
poprerch van aremed in A beovy , 7 —Crossley
Ouble breasted suit, while the - aon ,
newsmen around wore igi 2, SWEET ROCKET
shirts and slacks. The tailor spent -Lutchman
the better part of an hour 3. MRS, BEAR — Joseph
at Farouk’s suite at the Eden Par-
measuring the ex-

King for slacks, beach suits and
a bathing suit—U.P.



Mossadegh Gets
Confidence Vote

9

TEHRAN, Aug.

presented it, ee | Prime Minister Mohammed Mos-

Rev. Layne in jubilant style : | e "i sadegh wan given en oer nat:

> his ¢ ress, + ing vote of confidence in ran

gave his addres Curate Returns ‘Bri Red Cou In Iran Senate today. Out of 35 Sena-

The Seniors then rendered a ; ' tors, 34 voted for Mossadegh and

selection of songs beginning with Edward Gatherer, _ Assistant his programme and only one sen-|
‘Bless This House’. After a vote|Curate of St Joseph’s Parish WASHINGTON, August 2. ator abstained
of thanks by Mr. C. Marshall, an Church resumed his duties on} ’

Friday

absence.
He returned from his homeland

(St. Vincent) on Thursday last.

old boy and parent, Psalm 23 was last. after a five-week

chanted, The singing of the Na-
tional Anthem ‘brought an im-
pressive programme to a close,
aiedadaaseperinci manera

editorial on Saturday that



coup in his country will dr

Red Cross Press For Investigation

TORONTO, Aug. 2.
The Eighteenth International



to submit these charges to in-
vestigation on a commonly agreed

lution introduced by Belgium.

Red Cross Conference on Satur- The text of the Resolution is:| upon basis for national Red
day voted 62 to zero with 13] “considering that several dele-| Cross Societies to unite their
abstentions to urge all govern-| gations have alleged that the] efforts in the support of that
ments involved in the Korean} Geneva Convention and human-| purpose.

warfare charges to submit to in-] itarian principles have recently The resolution replaced one

vestigation on a “commonly] been violated; and that these} introduced by Australia which
agreed upon basis”. allegations have repeatedly been| called for. the appointment of a
denied in categorical terms by] special commission of this con.

The Communist government} the authorities directly concern-| ference to conduct an investiga-

ed; (the Eighteenth Internation.
al Red Cross Conference) in-
vites all governments ccncerned

and the Red Cross societies ab-
stained on the vote. The confer-
ence accepted the amended reso-

tion. Australia withdrew the
proposal at the meeting of the
Legal Committee earlier -.-U.P.

INTO THE STRETCH





=

field turns the stretch for home in the North Gate Stakes.

ield home

Dashing’ Princess (Lutchman up)



THE EVENING STAR expressed the opinion in an

Iran alters his programme the probability of a Communist

Aboiza Lesani, member of the
Senate in speech supporting
Mossadegh demanded that United
States military advisers in Iran
should be dispensed with. “United
States advisers’ services should be
terminated.

unless Premier Mossadegh of 2
aw closer daily.

After reviewing recent events
affecting Iran the editorial con-

cluded ‘Dr. Mossadegh who has, “0! We. have several
returned to office with dictatorial] ©!!ce"s ‘" the Persian Army who
ape as good if not better in this

powers including control of the
army has issued statements prom-
ising settlement of the oil dispute
and restoration of Iran's economic

capacity.” Lesani said.

He ulso demanded that Soviet



Sea ete os fisheries concessions should not
and political stability, But the at-| bp renewed when the agreement
mosphere he and his followers} expires on October Ist this year.

have created is hardly conducive
to the fulfilment of such a prom-
ise. On the contrary now that the
United States has become the tar-
get of bitter attack along with
Britain the signs point bleakly to
a continuing drift from bad to
worse,

He said the fishery industry should
be nationalised by Iran and cayile
sold to Russia.—U.P,



Former Palestire
C-In-C, 81, Passes

LANARK, Scotland, Aug. 2,

Lt, Col. Sir John Robert Chan-
cellor, 81, who has had a distin-
guished career as an administra-
tor and soldier, died Friday night
at his home near here. Chancellor

Certainly unless the Mossadegh
programme undergoes sudden
and sweeping change for better
the pessibility of a Communi’
coup will move closer toward
probability with each passing day

—U.P.







was British High Commissioner
“Spourt” Bri ; and C i c
rings and Commander-in-Chief in the
Spurt ss mandated territory of Palestine
from 1928 to 1931

Split Peas, Milk

He. earned his D.S.O. during an
Four hundred and seventy-jexpedition on India’s turbulent
three bags of. yellow split peas! northwest frontier in 1897, Dur-
and 1,205 cartons of condensed} ing the first three decades of the
milk were brought to the islani| 20th century he heid successive
vesterday from Rotterdam by the! administrative posts in defence
SS, Spurt j establishment and as Governor in
British territories including Mau-
The “Spurt” also brought cot-)ritius and Trinidad aéd Tobago. |
ton piece goods, steel window
footwear, hurricane lanterns, pr¢ In hi later vear Chancello



serves cement, chairs, cigarettes, held numerous chairmanships and!
and other general cargo. | directorships in international |

S.S. Forester arrived from St | committee und business syndi-
Vincent to take’ a load of sugar |cates, Hi on Sir Christopher
She wil] be loading at Speights-|Chancellor is the Gener Man-|
town iger f Re —(CP)





PRICE ; SIX CENTS
WINNER



LEABING IN THE

-

|



4 ;
44

HON. V. G. GALB, assisted
by Mrs. ©, Williams of St,
Vincent, lead in Bright Light
after winning the Derby. Mr.
©. Williams with hat raised is
close behind.

W.German Riot Busters



Set For Red Invasion

; BERLIN, August 2.

WEST BERLIN POLICE today poised riot squads to
combat the planned invasion of the Western Sectors by
thousands of fanatical Communist youths. The Com-
munist Press has egged on Red Free German youth to
rush to West Berlin tomorrow to demonstrate. “We are
for peace.”

In whipping up enthusiasm the Communists have
1ecal’ed the bloody street tights on the boundaries a year
ago in which more than 300 persons were injured.

Western authorities already have, - .

Y ; Y
Drought Cost U.S.
’ ~
Farmers $500M.
NASHVILLE, Tennessee,
Aug. 2. |}
The Federal government de}
clared to-day that the $500 000,000
drought in the southeast and parts
of New England, will prevent the |
nation from reaching its agricul-|
tural defence goals. The depart-
ment officials agreed with repre-|
sentatives of drought stricken}

|



States at government sponsored } banned the demonstration schedul- ’
emergency conf€rence that it is}ed foy the city park in the British ontract Ma P
too late to avert @ “major blow" !sector, Communists claim they have



to the nation’s agricultural pro=inot been told of the prohibition
ee: if {Red youth leaders announced this
Disaster areas have been de=|morning the meeting will be held

End Steel Row

clared in six and parts of twWo|.. planned and that at least 10,000 PITTSBURGH, August, 2.

other southeastern states and in ep parte will rally, 0, The final contract settlement be-
ae aetins dienes hy ‘Te Sponsors said the aim of tHe|tween the Inland Steel Company
omargenar loans and okies ne demonstration will be to show | anc C.LO, United Steel workers
eral benefits to tide them over, |POPUlar opposition to the West|* 4s. seen to-aay a3 a possible

German Pact with the Western (Pattern for a complete end of the
Allies. seven*month dispute between In-

The Communist challenge came) try and Union,

In Georgia the damage to corn
crop was estimated up to 80 per















cent and cotton is also facing P
heavy damage. Tennessee farm|at the .end of a tense week in| * “formal contract announced
officials said the State's livestock |Wwhich there have been frequent|Yesterday by C.LO, President
industry will need 3.000,000 tons; kidnappings of West Berliners by Philip Murray follows the pro-
of extra hay during the next eight | Red agents, Then last night Russia V!0DS of an interim agreement
months, but farmers cannot afford!demanded that the “Big Three’ negotiated at White _ House last
the price without low interest| Western Powers lift restriction on jal by eee of the
loans !Trade between East and West !dustry’s “big six”. The Union
In Mississippi, the drought|Germany, which the Soviets charg. | oid the Inland agreement which
dam ge was officially called i violated the 1949 agreement | ‘overs 17,000 employees did not
the : t on record." A Mis- ending the Red blockade of Ber-|! jude the company which
souri official said the damage to) jin ucp jsough provision which would
feed Pe in the southeastern |! inaustry the right to assign
part of the state has been ‘severe’ { - ‘ me ‘ a
re UP BUS OWNERS GO TO > rie 1 Soe gs Big ae
— COURT TUESDAY | it\ clauses. re
Or ‘ : S ove ne Although Inland was the first o
Hight Dead In har Cock Ghuaiinee Cnet % arg teel companies to reach a
C { . id }ith : : ink agreement with the Union,
47 ACCU ent his week, beginning Tuesday es other amurentt eevee
ce i ening” piuiebes. 09 the Common Pleas Suit between |?4 not atcepted the strike
ipsa tisha + SRP Bus Owners and the St, Michael |settling “memorandum” expected
Aug. = Vestry will occupy the attention|to be a basis for settlement,
Fi ons were killed ni of the High Court,
ninth critically injured Satur-])
day when a heavily laden passen- ]
iger car collided with a_ gravel
truck I'he victims included thre
adults and five children all Jap
anese Americans officers said
The automobile driven by Mrs
Masako Yano Imoda failed to )
for a Boulevard “Sign iv oull
eastern Salt Lor ’ 3 unity police RAIS IGH-—Makers of the
tid and the truck aded with 12
tons of gravel crashed into it WORLD'S CHAMPION
side
Mr Imoda and Ben Watenabe CcYCL i)
(67) id his wife Sue 57 were : yf} ide
rong those killed U.P. o : >



Oils And Fats
Announcement

I fi ent)

pone
Au















PORT-OF-SPAIN, g. 2

The Olls and Fats Conference
held t Barbados dest month re-
commended to participating V
ernments that the ¢ ting agree-
ment be ¢ ed for further
three eal certain modl
fications, Thi as announced this
mornir by Hon, Norman Tang;
Acting ister of Labour, In-
dustry Commerce. Tang alse
stated that the area price of
copra to be ret ommended — \ 1
agreed upon by’a majority eel

It $12 per ton increase
from $280 to $300 (B.W.1.) per \
long ton F.O.B. for the year be- Y
ginning September 1, 1952 with | 1 ou are on a
provision for subsequent annual \ i
ee eee comallt |. WINNER when you ride a Raleigh!

I addition xports pre q

om Trinidad to Jamaica buyers) ) &
egreed to pay a premium off) 3 A Raleigh was the choice of Reg Harris—World’s
$14.40 (B.W.1.) per long ton in 1 Professional Sprint Champion for the second year in
oe aoe es _ , aaeten ne i succession. Here is proof of the wisdom of buying
lene Linaniigations it” ply a j your bicycle from, a Company with such great
rangements including the provi- technical experience and knowledge that designed

i

and built the record-breaking RALEIGH,

RALEIGH

sion of bag



Murderess Freed







|
From Ot Own Correspondent |
POPT-OF-SPAIN, Aug. 2 |
One of the last acts of Patrick} THE ALL-STEEL BIC VCLE
Mu Reniso the capacity of!
Acting Governor of Trinidad ana | A Product of Raleigh Industries Limsted, Nowingham, England.
Sobago was the freeing of a To-}
bago woman named Gwendoline Ps sd
| Andrews who ¥ ing a 2 CAVE, SHEPHERD
ear-prison te murdet & CO., LTD.
jee. a mvicted f
| murder eT Assizes ir 10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street.
1947 but the death sentence
commuted to 20 years’ priso NO CYCLE IS COMPLETE WITHOUT A STURMEY-
ment. $ i ARCHER 3. OR 4SPEED GEAR AND DYNOHUB








PAGE

two







SUNDAY ADVOCATE

‘tching, Burning and Smarting ot



































“ Health Facts” Series
DO YOU KNOW
9



SUNDAY,

AUGUST 3, 1952



Carub Calling

IS LORDSHIP Mr. Justice wi For B.G. After Holida
. Vincent-Brown -who was Woos itecaps = . : y
Sf d | ie acting Chief Justice of Trinidad ae gprereeeng igy cong
—that your mouth leamirrer ; a a a .

0 p p e n of events in yor our digestive up to July 31, is now on pre- months’ holiday left the island on
system? If all is in order retirement leave, part of which he Friday by B.W.LA. for British
your tongue is clean, your is spending in Barbados. He arriv- Guiana. “Boring her stay here she

ed on Friday by B.W.I.A. and is oo e
es mouth feels fresh, if y . was the guest of Mr. amd Mrs.
a the" system's @ guest at the Hotel Royal. Creighton Birch of Rendevous,
[o Johnson's Siner the discov jederm by he oe BERS ig coated, While here Mr. Vincent-Browne St James. A farewell party was
Stationery | ita Dhysieinn 4 iff pMrcesaary a sour, unpleagant will be attending the Race’. held ip her honour at the home
ae ding ae be such as taste n your mouth. For The Races of the Birches,
SL Ope TEBE ke 2 sparkling Andros Uieet | ALSO arriving by thé same Back Home After Holiday
fo . iy lose your Salt! Anrews cleans and opportunky from Trinidad EAVING the island by BWIA
oe ; Peer oi Paes, 7ect siete breatinans oe nae freshema the Set th, sin were Mr. and Mrs, William Scott. for St. Vincent was Miss
ita nf has ‘brought ‘clearer ulates the acth on of They have come over for the Races Stacy McDowall who came over
aunerens | fake ext sCenns, aah ae Mi Fear eATERnS ond koops and are guests at the Hotel Royal. to spend the month with Mr,
eren . and smarting ana fo. system r. Scott is a Director of Wil- and Mrs. B, I, Gilkes of “Myrtle
team i br ecen or | 33 oder it topped te 1 feet 7 hear: clogging food wastes. liam M. Seott and Co., Hardware Bank,” Bank Hall. Miss McDow-
re i iho pas opens se a ON Matted ian “es Merchants of Port-of-Spain. oa is a frequent visitor to the
it. it p ) $| on e NY colony and wishes all her friends
Nix Iigredients days. My’ friends were wmasn Hare Return To U.S.A. au revoir.
Mr 3 ways. | provement in my appearance.” rews EV. DACOSTA HAREWOOD, ;
tithes “One ‘deolttn. Satisfaction Guaranteed Rector of St. Philip Episcopal Ten Days’ Leave
2. it stops Meh and smarting Nixodern, costs absolutely nothing untes. for Church of Philadelphia who had R. VERE LAWRENCE, son of
the sein’ 9 oF he p eoermes Y Clears sour skin to your complete satis been holidaying here and who had Mrs. Lawrence of, “Water-
clear, sott and. yen Dane chee in’ the niches in Ee eee inner Cleanliness | been Guest Speaker at several loo”, St. Lawrence, arrived here
ama 2 Joa keep amazed at {ihe improvemer: churches in the island returned - Friday ae Trinidaa. Mr.
we ixoderm for on,
-| week and at the end : REE st to the U.S.A. during the week. awrence who is employed with
nin Your Se eatulae eae seer ‘moot ws" _ | Rey. Harewood is an old Barbadian Cable & Wireless in San Fernan-
ia \ rning a must give vo! who has been residing in the U.S.A. 1, Wi spending ten days’
’ . ¥ starts to| the Kind of skin that will make you aq GLOBE
' aired whi ‘ : for the last fifty years. leave with his family,
JAN ETTA ones SHOP \ Penne tun the sem ‘oat ai bie one THIS EVENING, 8.30 & ™ wee Visitors Impressed
‘efunde 2 fu ° < .
- your Chemist today. The Mearenine te teet Monday & Tuesday, Short Holiday R. H. C. RAWLE of Belfast,
(Next Doo: to Singer’s) 5.00 & 8:30 EAVING tl 1 Frid N. Ireland and Mr, _ 8B.
3 he colony on Friday Thompson, President of the Cos-

Owing to the great reduction on Cotton Goods, we







WE WISH TO



night by B.W.1.A. was Mr.
Godfrey King of California, Mr.



mopolitan League in Ireland, who
are staying in the island visited

King had come over for a short
have reduced ali of our dresses in time for the Races, holiday and is on his way back Lak ooereee Goodwill League
ve x 1 } during the week. Mr. Rawle and
and the coming week-end Smart Cotton and Beach ANNOUNCE “ home, During his stay here he wg g-briet respite trom h Mr. Thompson were impresseid
Dresses from $14.98. O r f _P Here On Holiday. ores before ie pave omen en ian ge 6 bag ae aimee or
‘ . oO ec ren 0. Ss
Swim Suits reduced f ; pening o ? ret Joyce MacKenzie presents
Peimimtmestteitess Iron : ee nie ae ieee |
OS e alakalaia PL PBPLLIEEL ILL PLBE ELLA ADD AS ee .W.LA, on ni, rom ‘ata i
A ant hi SN a A 8 lk oF CHATE AU DRESS SHOP Wulcihed pies Us oak te ex, > ee Guest Speaker
ise ender Chin who are here for 2 Farewell Function At Press Club
iday. ey will a ake Y 4 i .
WOMEN’S READY-MADES in Exclusive Designs | opportunity of attending the B.T.C. FAREWELL function took HE HON. 2b. A. suantRY~-

Starting To-smorrow





Race Meeting. During their stay
here they will be guests at Super

A

lace no Friday afternoon at
the

elmont Girls’ School in the

SHOW, C.B.E, ML<., of

Grenada, was Guest Speaker, in

T ES AUG. 5th 1952 Mare Guest House, Worthing. h - of Miss Ornella Workm: a discussion at the Barbados
Night UESDAY, ‘ Two Weeks’ Holiday Senior Assistant. Mistress. ‘The Martyahow'e” cite ed

AND

Every Night in August















CHALLENOR HOUSE — COUNTRY ROAD
(Near SANITARY vee?

PLAZA THEATRES











































R. JAMES WALROND arrived

in the Colony on Friday night
by B.W.1.A. from Trinidad. Mr,
Walrond is employed with Alstons
Limited, Trinidad and has come
over for two weeks’ holiday, During
his stay here he will be a guest at

Wane wes ay mage



“Wed., Thurs., 4.45 & 8.30

occasion marked the retirement of
Miss Workman who was a teacher
at the school for the past 17 years.
Carib ‘joins in wishing her many
years of happy retirement.

Horticultural Exhibition

the attention of an appreciative
audience and the number of
questions asked with regard to
Federation and the opinions ex-~
pressed, showed that greater in-
terest is being shown in the mat-











John
BOLES

Wallace Barbara

“MESSAGE To GARCIA”
BEERY STANWYCK
And





ter, The discussion lasted till 11
p.m.

To Spend Long Vacation

Crystal Waters, Worthing.

A
| Wedding Bells :

rem a= HS i 5 rs growers MONG the students arriying
ETOWN BARBAREES v z F interest to flowers growers
‘ sa 2310) (Dial 5170) «Dial 8404) ‘SECRET OF CONVICT PRETTY wedding took place and lovers of horticulture is + from the Us. during the
CARIZ2EAN PREMIERE Tope ee Ea. TODAY « TOMORROW LAKE” at St. Cyprian’s Church Fri- the exhibition Gardens in Minia- wae ware Te 2 Bothuis and
TO-DAY to TUES Warner's Action Thri‘le: SAE Soman Glenn FORD Zachary SCO.S| day the 25th of July at 3,30 ture which opens at the Barbados )" olnule baw Weother, who
ieadhaelaidepet VENDETTA |e ORR a KBPS SOO 1s] Srelock when Mr. Lionel Eustace Museum on August 29th, continu- Dave. ome to spend their long
: _ Robert L.. Lippert Presents ORM Faith DOMERGUE eee SEVY Evelyn of Hart’s Gap, took as his ing on 30th and 81st, weean with their parents,
a THE STEEL WARNING and bride Miss Daphne Tanthe Alleyne His Excellency the Governor on ‘Nee &. ™ colenen of Mr.
Bi L HELMET Ronald Reagan SPANISH MAIN The Garden—St. James of Hart’s Gap. and Lady Savage have graciously 4,2) p Ae Olhuis of Haggatt
i Ginger Rogers Paul HENKE.D color} \({ TODAY & TOMORROW 8.30 P.M. The ceremony which was fully consented to attend the exhibition 4% ungalow, and the grand
maul PT wveRT) Bors an. ; “TOMORROW'S Special 9) | mee, Soper oe. an choral was conducted by the Rev. which ought to provide enjoyment children of Mr. C. A. Dowding
one mee Goonies (Bank) 1.30 P.M {Joseph COTTON & Joan FONTAINE x Layne. The brid? v-ho to both the growers and admirers Civil Servant On Holiday.
will offer to its Members U_.INKS at TOMORROW SPECIAL |] TOMORROW'S Special |] "BARBARY PIRATES"\, , & “SILVER CITY" (Color) was given in marriage by Mr. of flowers, shrubs etc. It will RRIVING in the om
imu wee wie em. ll nerUEN el toe” minons OF Randall Grant, wore a dress -of include among novel features a Priday . night b LA.
REDUCED PRICES to liquidate food and Bes Furzy ARIZONA TERRITORY DURANGO KID Special Mat. TUES. sear! Facone and Nylon, her long yeil display of orchids, a miniature rose from Trinidad were . ane fee

























Charles STARRE1)
























MON. 440 p.m.

was kept in place by a headdress garden, a rock garden, and other Rann Maraj who have come over

and

. Deub SILVER RAIDERS yon THEM oi Orange Blossoms and carried resti display. fi t weeks’ holida M
stocks, as w 25. RONTIER ou VENOR e)) ————_ —_______.. TUES. ; “The DALTON — HAT liquor stocks, as we will be CLOSED PR OUTLAW COUNTRY Next Attraction 445 & untae ants RESPASS" ¥ a er Anthurium Lillies It ig hoped ane the. public will Mora) vs oe severe, nia
: oo} «xno BBAS “MAD WEDNESDAY” Don Steven Murray ‘ . eir full support ida uw her

SEP’ T: OCT NOV Next Attraction WAS A ROBBER". Harold LLOYD & “DEPUTY “BLUE BLOOD: Miss Barbara Evelyn was Ma- a auiciaing to ivan corte the they -will a guests at Toretal

: ee fs OME RACKET” UGARPOOT IColer ‘Gacy COOFER. ery Wittaams{t| tron of honour and the Misses object of the Exhibition apart from Waters, Worthing
Robert. MercHUM Nandolph SCOTT. “David NIVEN. Yee RE SPSS! ae PRESS Alma Welch and Laurita §irecno- it.’ interesting aspects is to raise I definite Sta
e ES Sa | ROX —hROXxY as bridesmaids, the flower #i"'5 funds for the Society to continue oumaras wae lee
ROODAL THEATRES | Betty Jordan, Barbara Greene, 1 Ee Vtredt of flower grows

NO ENTRANCE CHARGE

(Except on Saturday)
Same QUALITY
Same ORCHESTRA

Same STANDARD
in the West Indies most beautiful Night Club.
e
Drinks at Hotel Prices.











ROXY

Stanley KRAMER’S Production of Hel WALLIS’ ‘Preducticn
DEATH OF A SALESMAN RED MOUNTAIN
Starring
Starring
Fredric MARCH
Mildred DUNNOCK
Short—Punehy De Lion and
Latest news reel

A’an LADD lL. pepets scoTT
John TRELAND
i Color By Technicolor
xtrar

‘Extra
2 Reel Short

OLYMPIC
TO-DAY & TOMORROW 4.50 & 8.15
WEISSMULLER as Jungle Jim
in

ROYAL

TO-DAY last 2 Shows 5 & 8.15
Republic Pictures ieee ts
Brian DONLE
Forrest “ruck

John)

|
|

|

|

|

|

Isle of Tabu |

|

JUNGLE MANHUNT
\

and
CHINA "C re

,
i}
1) $i

Torte 4,45 ae? Sie and



LADD

Lurene
New

Atop

Betty Jordan, Barbara Greene,
Carolyn Stanton, Monica Gran-
num, Valda Farrel and Angela
Tull. Mr. Moses Gittens per-
formed the duties of Bestman, F ware ;
those of Ushers fell to Mr, Crispin _ The price of admission will be
Savoury and Mr. Cecil Watkins. 2/- which will include a free

A reception was held at their admission to the Museum exhibits
residence Hart's Gap. ; by the kind consent of the Curator.

for the past three worms 2 at
Crystal Waters is Mr. J.
née of the United sia ) 4
Furnée is now retired and ae
formerly in charge of the if
Country Club, New Jersey, New
York. He is here for an inde-
finite stay and is thoroughly en-
joying his holiday.

alive the interest of flower grow-
ing and propigate the knowledge

horticulture throughout the
Island.



| TO-DAY 4.45 & 8.30 P.M.
AND CONTINUING DAILY 4.45 & 8.30

AT EMP IR E
one mistake...

seen by his son...







‘









TO-DAY 4.45 7 ie and continuing TO-DAY 445 @ 8.15 ana continaing |
al
Columbia Fictures Presents Baraincunt Preesnis }












; NOODLUM EMPIRE | : proper-
\ Starrin
e { Jon HALL- ai aa FERRADAY Action ., Thrills .. Suspense tip sir. wily | ties of YEAST-PHOS will | unleashes the
| Toke WEDNESDAY MONDAY & ‘Twesdax B80 4 818 | ae restore lost energy and will greatest
‘ _ * ~ . 4.30 & &. a louble } fit!
CLUB MORGAN Famous Steak Dinner $3.00 i} Anthony DEXTER: Bitanor PARKER Alen Bere BEANE IRELAND ” ‘Technicolor | ea you q drama "
‘ ‘ J ALENTINO ‘ our da
SUPPER $2.50 including A LIQUEUR venand DRERAT OF 2908 MEN sunray EE, YEAST-PHOS ¥
| SATURDAY'S HERO, RODEO KING ho Tax sENoniTs ||| ES San De eee cee ae GENERAL TONIC ee
tarring arring EXTRA: j a -
John DEREK — Dona REED Rex ALLEN — Leela DROME — Bove ESD Jl Bez ALLEN — Ray BANCROF BANCROFT ; -
o es 2 Reel Short:—ISLE OF TABU saree COLUMBIA PICTURES presents
- LL LPESPSELVLPE CLP OPT ERPCSISOSPL ONIONS ot STANLEY KRAMER’S Production of



1 colangninlananioomaemintabeamehbnasestee rites PIPE

TO THE

“ RACES
MINDED ”

LADIES

OF OUR
LOCAL
COMMUNITY

N.E. WILSON & (0, SAYS:—

Right on the spot, and just in the ‘nick of time’
for the approaching

“SPORT OF KINGS”

COLONY CLUB

ANOTHER BARBECUE

BIENVENIDA CORDIAL A BARBADOS

\
Les invitamos a Vds. para visitar nuestro almacen

Fredric March

with Mildred Dunnock

SATURDAY, AUGUST
9TH j
RESERVE YOUR
TABLE EARLY



? a
; vetoes Op nly
Winner Pulitzer Prize— —
Critics Circle Award—
and Worldwide Honors

1 AT
Extra: Short: “PUNCHY DE LION”
2 Ang Latest News Reel

A Cycle for Health & Happinesd

e
HOME COOKING

WEST INDIAN COOKERY DIET DOES IT
‘Delicious Recipes for Tempting Meats”

ROBERTS & CQ.

an Walter Fried + Owected by LASLO =



=

PARA DAMAS

Materiales de Vestidos y Vestidos hechos de Hilo, Seda y Nylon
Ropa Interior de Seda y Nylon

Trajes de Bano de “Lastex”, Hilo Pintado y Lana.

Panuelos de



Cabeza con el mapa de Barbados, y Mantillas.

f A NUESTROS AMIGOS VENEZOLANOS!

PARA CABALLEROS



Camisas “Arrow” Pijamas, y Camisas de Hilo “Sea Island”.
Trajes de Bano, Ropa Interior, y Calcetines Corbatas, etc.

TAMBIEN

Toallas, Sobre Camas, Sabanas, Manteles, Maletas ete.

SELSO. SSESSSSOO



“Royal Doulton”,

Juguetes, y Recuerdos de la Isla.

“Your Stationers.’’ Dial 3301.















So, Hurry On Now to .%, @ CHILDREN’S ANKLETS ... ... 80, 32 & 46 CENTS

Vajilla Plateada, Figuras de la mejor Loza Inglesa ?
is that all-important item for which you were 8
waiting to complete your Bank Holiday Ensemble, ¥
Distribuidores Exclusivos the incomparable : IN STOCK a
; ' 3
para BALLERINAS 3:

ae . An Assortment of =«-
El Zapato Famoso “K” para made of suede, in shades of Pepper Green, Town |

Caball \D Brown, Cherry Red, Pine Green and Black at the @ LADIES’ NYLON HOSE ................... 00, ous, oe, ye

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e | @ LADIHES’ LISLE HOSE oon iccccccsseeeteseenesessneaeecens iat
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S
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eta kc iets N. E WILSON & CO. S| @ MEN’S WILSON FELT HATS 00. ooccccncnun $B AO
Popular Headquarters for Ladies’ Fashionable 3 y
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J eos ddiuiediabictiame GE aad i ae YOUR SHOE STORES DIAL 4606


SUNDAY, AUGUST 3,



At The Cinema

WAR IN

1952

KOREA

Hy G. &

WAR STILL SEEMS to be a favourite theme for film

producers, and though one

constantly hears voices raised

GARDENING HINTS
FOR AMATEURS

Rainy Days

During the rainy months—and
the rains seem to have started in
earnest—little can be dome in the
garden on showery days.

Often it will be too wet to do

in a chorus, that audiences are tired of this subject, the anything at all, so the few sunny
films still keep coming and the people still go to see them.
Of course, every now and then, we get a war picture whose

Superior qualities set it apart from the rank and file of its are

predecessors.
Bridgetown.

is plenty of humour bandied amongst the men.

call it strong fare, with very little to lighten it.

As far as the goes, it

, began with the invasion of South
Korea and has not ended yet. One
is thrust into the midst of the
horror, desolation and destruction
of the Korean battle scene, where
an infantry sergeant, saved by hie

» steel helmet, is the sole survivor of
his outfit. Joined by a small
South Korean boy, he encounters

the remnants of a “lost platoon,

takes charge of them, and from a
Korean Temple, they fight a des-
perate rearguard action.

There are no punches pulled in,

this picture and the combination of
excellent direction and action make
‘this aewholly realistic and terrify-
ing. war drama. The group of
men include the sergeant, a
chieken-hearted lieutenant, a
Japanese-American soldier, an ex-
conscientious objector, the young
Korean boy, a Negro Red Cross
Medic., and later, a captured North
Korean major, whois without
doubt, a most insidiously, malig-
nant character. Trying to stir ap
trouble among the men, whose
nerves are at breaking point, he
taunts the Negro, who is dressing
his wound, with the racial dis-
crimination practised in his coun-
try and tells him to get wise to
himself. The reply struck me as
peculiarly telling. “One hundred
years ago, I couldn't ride on a
street car. Fifty years ago, I could
ride in the back. Now I can ride
in the middle. Fifty years from
now I may be able to ride in the
front. There are some things you
just can’t rush.”

All the characterizations are
sharply defined and one gets the

impression that these men are
no mere actors, but part and
parcel of the Korean scene. Top

“honours go to Gene Evans—a
newcomer to watch closely—for his
portrayal of the rough, callous and



VERA ELLEN



—

FRED

ASTAIRE

brutal sergeant, who, when his
feelings are touched, as they are
when the Korean child is killed,
machine-guns the taunting cap-
tured major in a shocking out-
burst of emotion. Next to him, I
would choose James Edwards, the
Negro Red Cross soldier. Mr.
Edwards is a most gifted actor, and
has a quiet dignity that is very
evident in all his roles—viz; his
recent one as the blind soldier in
“Bright Victory’—and he plays
his present role with feeling and
conviction. Neither does he
neglect another side of the char-
acter, when active participation in
the war is necessary and he han-
dies a machine gun instead of:a
hypodermic syringe. Steve Brodie,
James Hutton and Richard Koo
also give fine veteran performances
in their individual roles,

Action there is a plenty, and the
terse dialogue and sparing use of
musical background heighten the
dramatic impact of this tense,
timely story of a grim battle for
survival,

The Belle Of New York

For a
and complete contrast to the two
Plaza offerings, the Globe is show-
ing THE BELLE OF NEW YORK
with Fred Astaire, Vera-Ellen and
Marjovie Maine in a gay ’90’s
musical, It is based on the play by
Hugh Morton which was ‘set to
music by Gustave Kerker and was
a highly successful musical com-
edy in the days of our parents.
Unfortunately, it has been chopped
and changed to such an extent
that apart from the title, a mission-
worker heroine and a society play-
boy hero, any resemblance to the
original is purely accidental! It
is now a vehicle for the terpsi-
chorean talents of Astaire and
Ellen and as such it has its mo-
ments, It opens and closes with a
rousing chorus taken from the title
and there is another song called, I
think, “Naughty, But Nice” or
words to that effect, that is sung
by Vera-Ellen, that struck me as
attractive, but I’m afraid I don’t
even remember the rest of the
music. The two stars are individ-
ually and asa team ible
for carrying out the frail and dia-
phanous plot that concerns a
Philandering play-boy who re-
forms temporarily when he falls
in love with a mission worker.
She, in turn, tries “high life” to
meet him half way, and they
Ben decide they can make a go
ol -

Fred Astaire, who has defied all



light-hearted diversion I

days in between must not be
wasted, but must be used to pull
up weeds, cut grass and, if they
dry enough, to fork and re-

Such a film is STEEL HELMET at the Plaza shape the beds which are apt to
This is no light entertainment, though there
I would

get flattened by heavy rain.

Lawns especially soom get out
of hand in this weather, and how
quickly grass grows and weeds
spread! When digging out this
weed or tufts of bad grass, have a
bucket of mould near by with
which to refill the bare patches.
{f this is done at once, less injury
will result to the lawn and the
good grass will cover the
quicker. Never mow the lawn
when the ground is soft or the
grass wet. The lawn-mower will
only cut up the ground, and the
wet grass will clog and dull the
machine.

To keep the lawn-mover in good
order it should never be put up
dirty. Gardeners will do this, and
then call for the oil-can when the
mower is next to be used. With
this sort of treatment a Lawn-
mower soon gets out of order with
blades dull, and bearings stiff.

Every time, after use, the Lawn-
mower should be wiped clean and
free from grass, thoroughly oiled
and then put away.

Poinsettias

August is the month that is
generally accepted as the right
time for cutting back the Single
Poinsettia. The double Poinset-
tias which were cut back in March,
are now several feet high and in
full leaf again. The single variety
{s cut later than the double, be-
cause it is a ‘hardier and quicker
growing plant, and so it does not
take as long to grow back as the
slower double kind.

Second Cut

Both Poinsettias are supposed
to be cut again in October. This
second cut is not as drastic as the
first, as each branch is just cut
back a couple of feet, The result
of this second cut is that each
branch then sends out two or
sometimes three branches in the
place of the one, and so
the flower heads are increased,

Now there is great diversity of
opinion among gardeners as
this second cut, Some do not
approve of it at all, and hold that
even if the flower heads are in-
creased they are not as fine or as
big as when the plant is left un-
cut. Others think that if the
second cut is done October is too

ate.

So the whole Poinsettia treat-
ment must be left to the wishes
and judgement of each gardener.
Those who have established Poin-
settias will have learnt by exper-
lence which treatment, for them,
gives the best results.

Chrysanthemums

Do not forget that the end of
August should see the last Chrys-
anthemum suckers safely planted
out, that is if the flowers are
wanted at Christmas time, Put
them in a rich but light bed in the
sun. As soon as they are all
planted out it is just as well to
look over the stakes and see that
you have enough and that they
are in good order. The suckers
grow fast, and as soon as they are
a couple of feet high the plants
should be staked and loosely tied
to the stake.



the laws of gravity by dancing
upside down, * this time uses the
roof-tops and literally walks on
air in the development of nis
romance. Vera-Ellen dances de-
lightfully, as usual, and I found
the most successful and attractive
sequence was the animation of a
series of Currier and Ives prints
that are colourful and nostalgic
in their appeal.

Marjorie Main, as Mr. Astaire’s
wealthy aunt creates a comic di-

@ On Page 16





“KEEP EM FLYING”

DANCE AT

CRANE HOTEL
SAT. 30th August

TO THE TUNES OF

“KEITH CAMPBELL”
“SOCIETY SIX”

and HIS
and

THE

“THE JUMPING JACKS STEEL BAND"

featuring our own

nive of the CARIBBEAN PAUL WILK. INS

“A FREE 15 MINUTE FLIGHT
IN “BIM” TO













SUNDAY ADVOCATE





FARM AND GARDEN

iy
MANGO

Agricola

LORE

BROWSING through a miscellaneous collection o!
ald clippings, we came across this story, published some

years ago in the ‘Porto Rico Horticulturist’.
season is now in full swing and may be of interest to}

those looking for a tidy

fibrous specimens of this popular fruit.

unknown.



—_—

BBC. Radio Notes:

European

Survey

Weekly BBC Series of Talks
Now

talks
Survey



that the recent series of
from London -- African
has come to an end the
B.BC, will begin, on Monday
next, 4th August, a new series
entitled ‘European Survey.’ Until
the end of the year

and Western halves of the Europ-
ean continent will describe the
European scene today, and eval-
vate the many factors which are
influencing its role in world
affairs. J. H, Huizinga, the Lon-
don correspondent of a leading
Dutch newspaper published in
Rotterdam, gives the first of four
telks. Mr. Huizinga, who was
born in Holland but lived in
Britain for most of the past sixteen
years, has recently completed
four-mouth tour of Western Eu-
rope. These talks will be given
each Monday beginning at 8.30
p.m,
TALKS ON CENTRAL ASIA

Another series of talks which
begins in the coming week is
‘Spotlight on Central Asia.” The

talks will cover Siberia, Mongolia,
Turkestan and Afghanistan, ana
will be given on Sundays at 8.30
pm, The first talk is by Fitzroy
MacLean, M.P., the widely trav-
elled author of several books on
Asia, including ‘Eastern Ap-
proaches’.

THE SOVEREIGN’S DAY

Yet another talks series begins
in the coming week—“A Day in
the Life of the Sovereign’’—in
which listeners will be given a
glimpse into the lives of some of
the peopte who occupy impertant
and interesting positions in the life
of the . British community. The
first talk on the Sovereign is given
by Sir Owen Morehead, who as
Assistant Keeper of the Royal
Archives and Librarian of Windsor
Castle since 1926 has served two
Kings, George V and George VI,
as well as the present Queen
Elizabeth II. Sir Owen is a
Knight Commander of the Victori-
an Order, an honour bestowed for
personal service to the Crown. 4is
talk, and the succeeding ones, will
be heard on Thursdays at 10.15
p.m,, the first being on the 7th
August.

THE WEEK’S MUSIC

Excerpts from the current
Promenade Concerts will be heard
throughout the coming week, The
broadeasta@ at the most convenient
time for Meyers in this area are
on Sunday at 9.00 p.m. and on
Tuesday at 5.15 p.m, The first will
be a programme of Sibelius's music
—Storm Scene from The Tempest
and his Violin Concerto in D minor
—played by the London Symphony
Orchestra conducted by Basil
Cameron with Max Rostal as the
solo violin; Monday's broadcast
wil also be by the Lon-
don Symphony Orchestra under
the same conductor and will

present Prokofiev’s ‘Peter and
the Wolf? and Tchaikovsky’s
Capriccio Italien.’ Both will

be in the 25 metre band, the Sun-
day broadcast also being trans-
mitted in the 31 metre band and
Monday’s in the 19 metre band.
Each lasts for three quarters of
an hour.

George Orwell’s ‘Animal Farm’
will be presented as a Radio play
on Saturday 9th August, starting
at 8.30 p.m,

Truly delightful

GLASSWARE for

every occasion.

Our new stock
includes. Flowered
Jugs and Tumblers,
Cake Plates,
Sandwich Plates and
Fruit Bowls






speakers with ~
personal knowledge of the Eastern ~

The mango

method of dealing with the
The author is

“Qn® day 1 was asked to dine
et the house of a Mexican gen-
tleman, When I arrived at the
home of my host I found him, his
wife, married daughter, and grown
son and an American guest. We
went into the dining reom. Every-
thing passed off , well until we
came to the dessert. Then a dish of
mangoes was brought in. Did you
ever eat a mango? No? Then your
education js still defective. Wit
& mango I was given a furk wits
three tines, the middle one. abou,
twice as long as the other two, Doi
Carlos, my host, told me how t
pierce the fruit at one end so tha
the long tine would penetrate tht
seed at the one point where it can
be pierced. Then when the frui
thus impaled it is peeled,
drove the tine of my ferk seeming
ly to the vital spot, then tried to
remove the skin as I saw the oth
ers ck Just as I was gatherm
speed the mango flew off the ivr}
caromed against the sideboard
and landed in the grey silk lap
of the senora, my hostess. |
apologised profusely and the
mango was restored to me, Dur-
ing my second attempt the thing
struck the American in the right
right eye and then made a para-
bolic curve and fell into the patio
1 started with another mango an
this time finished the peeling sue~
cessfully.”

“About me, the ot) e eat-
ing their mangoes gnifies
ease, the fruit poised gracefully

on the forks, while they nibblec
about the suburbs of the pit. !
prepared to do likewise, I clos«
my teeth firmly on the yell
meat. It had a pleasant turpen-
tiny flavour, but when I tried t
disengage my bite from surrougd-
ing pulp I found that the fruit Was
held together by hundreds of
fibres. In my mad efforts to
break these threads with my
teeth my face became glazed with
a thin coating of mango. My sec-
ond bite was a repetition of the
first, and this time both ears were
filled with the pulp and one eye
was entirely closed. J wondered
if one could absorb his mango
through the pores of the skin, but
I attacked the fruit.for the third
time. On this occasien there was
general breaking loose of the pulp
from the seed, The juice dripped
from my chin in rivulets and
sparkled on my shirt bosom like
many topazes,.”

“IT threw away my fork and
took the mango resolutely in both
hands. I was oblivious to every-

thing but the determination f
conquer that mango, The sticky
juice ran up my sleeves as I

gnawed at the pit as a dog gnaws
at a bone.”

“1 finished the mango amid a
profound — silence. Then as I

looked up, all adrip and shining
mango juice, my Mexican

with é
friends, began talking in a_ polit«

but feverish way. But the Ameri-

ean kieked me under the table

and said in a stage whisper: ‘now

excuse yourself and take a bath.’|?

“If you ever go where there
pre mangoes, begin in private by
eating half a bushel of them. Put

on a mackintosh, a pair of rubber
boots and goggles. Then get 4
clamp to hold the mango to the
table while you gnaw.”

We think the small boys’ methoc
of dealing with these stringy buy

palatable sorts much more simple |‘

and efficient: soften the fruit
thoroughly and ingest the juice
direct through an aperture cor
veniently made at the poinied

end. Gardeners and others with
mango eating scruples should ask
the Agriculture Department to
top-work their seedlings with
Julie, Bombay, D’or or other
available select variejy with no
menipulatory problems,

in many designs,

colours and sizes.

We have plain Glassware,
too, and Glasses for
Champagne, Sherry and

A Wine




























































WORNOUT
aad Fined

| and drag around each
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| ~ took to the cause of





Pe

from
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omes ¢ with poisons
feel mean miserable, Then is the
time to take Dodd's Kidney Pills. Within
1 hour Dedd’s start to help the kidneys
these Soon



SEA VIEW GUEST
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HASTINGS, BARBADOS
Daily and Longterm Rates
quoted on request,
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Dinner and Cocktail
Parties arranged. |
J. H, BUCKLAND |

Proprietor. \

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MERCK’S DEXTROSE OR
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For Children: \% to 1 tea-
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For Adults: Half to one des-
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PRICE 3/6 per otn,
MERCK’S DEXTROSE
be useq in place of sugar and
very much larger quantities
taken

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Why Endure
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Relax in Pleasure



THREE

PAGE



és Ue i ,
Ah yee Cth: Hy |

BOTTLE of Lea & |






Perrins Sauce works
magic in the kitchen —
just a teaspoonful in soups

and
fish, turns simple fare intoa

and savouries, meat
ALADS taste so much better

} with a dressing — and a per-
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| make with Lea & Perrins Sauce.
| It gives the flavour of all the
| spices and seasonings you never
| have the time to use —and far,
| far more economically, Just take
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1% tablespoonfuls of vinegar or JT

lemon juice, ateaspoenful of salt,
| and two teaspoonfuls of Lea &

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PAGE FOUR



ALL OVER THE WORLD |



Good: mornings begin. witli Gillette

The up-to-date Chief cried “ Now mind what I say,

Here’s how to shave in the easiest way.

Use a Blue Gillette Blade —sharpest edge you can get
In a precision-made razor designed by Gillette.”



5 Blades 30.

Blue Gillette Blades












eect binsneiesacisaitinsieenl

Class of Business

Life Assurances:



TRADE ENQUIRIES TO;

THE STANDARD LIFE ASSURANCE (0.

Established 1825



EW business figures to 30th May, 1952 are given below,
with comparative figures for last year :—



Wise men turn gratefully to
Blue Gillette Blades, sharpest
ever honed. Special toughening
makes Blue Gillette Blades last
longer and save money. To
get the best out of a Blue
Gillette Blade use it in a Gillette
razor because razor and blade
are made for each other.



T.

1952 1951

Sum Assured | Sum Assured



Sum _ Assured Bum Assured









Ordinary .. & i‘ ,£11,814,954 £ 8,268,237
Group a sae ma 8,189,336 | 4,181,010
Total. £19,504,290 |” © 12,449,247
Deferred Annuities: __ber annum li per annum
Ordinary £172,259 | £202,503
Group 3,630,651 2,619,679
Total eit £ 3,802,910 £ 2,822,272
Immediate Annuities £47,075 | £56,015
« »

The Annual General Meeting was held on 25th March,

when the results of another year of solid achievement wero

GEDDES GRANT LIMITED

5 i aise htelaialbaai _ cea li _



reported to the members of the Company, The most striking










over 4%.



features of the report were the increase in the total funds to
over £98,000,000, the expense ratio of 9.3%, the lowest in the
history of the Company, the record volume of new business

and the further increase in the net rate of interest earned to

For full particulars of Yields per cent for Annuities, and
Estimates for Staff Pension Schemes, etc., please apply to:—

Wilkinson & Haynes Co., Ltd.

AGENTS,
Lower Broad Street.

“We wish to advise our customers
that our Workshop Department will be
closed from Tuesday 5th August to
Monday 18th August, 1952, both days

inclusive, in order to give our Work-

shop Staff their Annual vacation. There

will be a small relief staff on duty for

any emergencies.

Our Office, Parts

Department and Petrol Station will be

open as usual,”

e

ECKSTEIN BROTHERS

BAY STREET

DIAL 4269

iS

} *
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bis

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z $4,6,666600+
LPSOSEOSD PPP PP OTST

W.l. BOARD CONFIRM

INDIAN TOUR
No Captain, No Pros.

BY O. S. COPPIN

eon Indian tour is now a réality as far
. ‘as confirmation 6 dates and itinerary
from official West Indian cricket sources is
toncerned
They are due to arrive in Barbados
January 21 after having played a colony
fixture and the First Test at Trinidad.
There are several points about this tour
which I shall take up in the course of these
articles from time to time but to-day I want
to deal particularly with the paragraph of the official release
from the West Indies Board under reference which states “No
replies have as yet been received from the seven West Indies
professionals by the West Indies Cricket Board of Control.”
A LEGACY ’
HERE has been a legacy of autocracy not unmixed with a
snobbery peculiar to the West Indies, in the negotiations
of the West Indies Cricket Board of Control with the profes-
sionals for their services and had it not been for the far-
sightedness and tact of one of the older members of the Board
there would have been a complete breakdown in friendly re-
lations between the W.I.C.B. of C. and the professionals a
long time ago.

Let us face facts. Who are the professionals?
Frank Worrell, Clyde Walcott,
Ramadhin, Roy Marshall, Frank King and Ken Rickards,
There is no need for.me to enumerate the individual feats
performed by these men that have served both singly and col-
lectively to place the West Indies prominently on the Inter-
national cricket map.

GENERAL AGREEMENT

N the circumstances it will be generally agreed that they

deserve nothing but the best treatment at the hands of
the Board. What do we find? I can vouch for the fact that
on two previous occasions an arbitrary sum was offered the
professionals for their services which it was suggested that
they take or leave.

The figure set out appeared to me to have been computed
not with regard to exigencies of the circumstances under which
the tours were to take place nor did it seem to give considera-
tion to the fact that the professionals earn their living by
playing cricket. If they do not play cricket they do not
eat and eating is important.

Common sense prevailed and an amicable agreement was
made because of the efforts of one member of the Board who
did not think he was another edition of Herr Hitler,

FANTASTIC
HAVE already drawn attention to the fantastic idea ex-
pressed by the new Board in which they claimed that
they were working on a theory by which they would pay all
members of West Indies teams a bonus and make no distinc-
tion between professionals and amateurs,

When this idea was mooted I commended it in principle
but stated definitely that I could not see how the proposal
could be implemented in time for the Indian tour since it
would take a few years before we were able to effect that
important change in our financial economy.

I elaborated to the extent that this was obviously adopting
a principle followed by Australia, I recalled that the mem-
bers of the victorious 1948 Australian team to England were
paid a bonus of £800 each in addition to expenses and a week-
ly allowance, from Sir Donald Bradman, down to Neils Harvey
the youngest member of the tearm included.

IMPOSSIBLE FOR ALL
THOHE West Indies professionals were paid roughly £700 in
round figures for their tours to England and Australia.
It is impossible to pay every member of the West Indies team
anything even in the vicinity of £300 each.

I am most reluctant to believe that this pay-all-same
seheme is not being put into practice nor have the professionals
been offered somé paltry arbitrary fee entirely out of propor-
tion to what they are really worth to the West Indies in this
tour or to what might be reasonably worthwhile to them for
making the trip.

NO “POUND OF FLESH”

KNOW sufficient of the professionals personally to vouch

for the fact that they are not unmindful of the fact that
West Indies cricket was the vehicle by which they entered
the professional ranks at a level at which they could demand
a living wage. This being the case they will certainly not
stick out for their “pound of flesh” but certainly they are
entitled to a fee proportionate to their usefulness as players
and as drawing-cards at the games.









Yet

They are
Everton Weekes, Sonny



Let the West Indies Cricket Board of Control make no
mistake about the matter. If the key professionals, are not
included in the West Indies team they can immediately say
goodbye to the greater part of the $150,000 which they are
planning to spend on the tour,

NO CAPTAIN APPOINTED

NOTHER matter that has greatly exercised my mind is

another paragraph of the release that states that Jamaica

will play British Guiana a series of the regular post-wat
Quadrangular Intercolonial games beginning in British Guiana
on October 10 and that the West Indies Selectors and the West
Indies captain—not yet selected—are expected to witness these
games.
’ It is strange that the West Indies captain has not been
selected. One would have thought it to be the intelligent
thing to do to have appointed the West Indies captain months
ago so that he could start. upon a_ plan to discover new
talent even if only in his own particular territory.

What is more I think it is a positive lapse in good taste
to appoint a West Indies captain then leave him with but a
few weeks to prepare for a trip to British Guiana and then
an Indian tour soon after.

DISAPPOINTMENT :
HAD hoped that the newly appointed Board would display
some sense of initiative, disseminate appropriate informa-
tion relating to West Indian cricket and on the main obviate
most of the criticisms that were levelled at the old Board.

They have not succeeded in convincing a large section of
the West Indies cricket public that they are actively concerned
with unearthing prospective West Indies talent for the forth-
coming tour, since no official scheme has yet been launched.

THEY HAVE NOT SUCCEEDED

FMHEY have not succeeded in convincing us that they plan

to offer the public more information on West Indian
cricket matters—Who will be captain? What are the terms
that have been offered the Professionals, so that the public
can judge themselves?) Why has not the report of the Man-
ager of the last West Indies tour to Australia not yet released
to member Associations? i

All these and other questions need still_to be answered
and should have been answered long ago. There was much
shouting and rejoicing in certain cricket quarters when the
new Board was elected. After these months have passed since
the election I see nothing yet in their behaviour to prompt
most of the remainder of the West Indian cricket audience to
join in the hysterics.



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ADVOCATE

Bright Light

=|

Wins Derby

At Summer Meet

Min. CYRIL BARNARD'S three year old filly Bright
Light out of Burning Bow-Felicitas won the Barbados
Derby from a field of four as the B.T.C. four-day Summer
Meeting got underway at the Garrison Savannah yester-

day.

The filly, piloted by Jockey Sonny Holder, led the
field for the entire event to win comfortably from First
Admiral by two lengths and return the time of 1.58? secs.

This was 14s secs. slower

The
tended

large crowd
saw. some

which at-
1 keen racing
during which Miss K, C. Haw.
kins’ four-year-old filly Miracle
7 the Planters’ Stakes, equalled

e record of 1.08 1/5 sees. s
Dulecibella in 1950, ; oe

Jockey Lutchman ended the day
as the most successful jockey
with two wins to his credit,

The Fieid Sweep reached the
$600.00 mark on one occasion and
the $500.00 mark five times. The
Pari-Mutuel paid its highest divi-
dend of $21.06 on Pepper Wine
in the Stafford Stakes while the
Forecast brought $80.64 -to the
lucky punters of Landmark and
Belle Surprise in the Stewards’
Stakes,

The Police Band under Capt.
C. E. Raison was in attendance
and rendered some lovely airs
during the afternoon,

The Meeting continues to-mor-
row:

FIRST DAY

FIRST RACE

Summer Stakes
Eleven horses took part in this
event which was run over 5%
furlongs. The field got off to a
800d start with Aim Low piloted



by Frank O’Neil in the lead, fol-
lowed by Devil’s Symphony
(Crossley up) and Darham Jane
(Joseph) and The Thing (New-
man),

O’Neil kept Aim Low to the
fore and was still leading when
the field reached the three furlong
pole. At

this stage, Magic. Gaye
ridden by

Johnny Belle came
into the picture and was soon
second. There were some ex-
changes by the two furlong but
O’Neil still had Aim Low
premier

] in the
position,

The field bunched coming
around the bend and up the home
stretch Magic Gaye made a serious
bid to overtake Aim Low but only
drew level. Abu Ali after mak.
ing a challenge up the home
Stretch was third a head behind
Aim Low and Magie Gaye. who
had tied for first place,



SECOND RACE
Planters’ Stakes



This was another 5% furlong
event in which there was a field
of eight to test the starter’s
patience,

After a fairly good start Mira-
cle (Pat Fletcher up) took the
lead followed by March Winds,
Cardinal and Caprice with
Soprano bringing up the rear.

The field strung out in Indian
file as it raced towards the. three
furlong pole. Miracle, however,
was still in the lead and main-
tained this position throughout
the event making every pole a
winning one. March Winds made
a good effort to draw level as the
field came around the bend but
Miracle with Fletcher in the sad.
dle shook off the gelding and
eventually raced up the home
stretch a comfortable winner by



than the record set by Best

Wishes also out of Burning Bow-Felicitas, in 1951.

The company string out’‘as they
went into the straight on the far
side, and around the turn by the
9 furlong gate, there were quick
exchanges tor positions,

Land Mark and Belle Surprise
moved. on the outside, and took
over from Lunways at the 7
furlong pole, Land Mark main-
tained her lead to finish a length
ahead of Belle Surprise who was
1} lengths away from Lunways
who finished third. ‘

FOURTH RACE
Barbados Derby Stakes
and Cup





Cardinal and Dunquerque hay-
ing been scratched the field was
reduced to four that comprised
Bright Light, the favourite,
Rambler Rose, First Admiral and
Seedling.

No time was lost at the gates
and they were well away. Holder
who had drawn the outside posi-
tion quickly hustled Bright Light
to the front and was leading on
the rails.

brignt Light was strongly chal-
lenged by Rambler Rose when
they passed the Stands for the
first time and when they reached
the five and a half furlong mark
this pair was leading Seedling in
the third place by three lengths
while First Admiral trailed b:-
bind,

They bunched in approaching
the Hastings Stretch but going up
the hill Holder again sent Bright
Light away from the field.

On turning the stretch for home
there was a rapid changing of po-
sitions but Holder still kept the
bay filly comfortably on the rails
in front.

Now First Admiral challenged
and passed first Seedling and then
Rambler Rose. A final effort to
arrest the premier position from
Bright Light failed however, and
Holder piloted her home an easy
winner by two lengths while First
Admiral beat Rambler Rose by
one length for the second place.

Bright Light’s time of 1.583/5
was only 11/5 secs behind the
1951 record time of 1.572/5 set
by Best Wishes.



FIFTH RACE
North Gate Handicap



The entire field got off to a good
start in this event, the second 74
for the day. There were only
five horses — Doldrum, Dashing

Princess, Embers, Flieuxce and
Careful Annie.
As they passed the stands for

the first time,
Dashing Princess (Lutchman) in
the lead closely followed by
Embers (Crossley) and Flieuxce
(Wilder).

Dashing Princess and Embers
moved away from the field but
Flieuxce closed the gap by the
three furlong pole. Racing to the
four furlong, Flieuxce made. a
challenge and had soon overtaken
Embers, Lutchman however had

still in the lead.

two lengths ahead of March There was a ding dong tussle

Winds. Cardinal was third four coming around the bend and as

lengths behind March Winds. the field entered the straight

Flieuxce made a serious bid

for the premier position but

THIRD RACE ; : :

= | Lutchman still kept Dash: Prin-

Stewards’ Stakes R ts

cess to the fore to win by haif

the order wird

caught up with and passed Cot-
tage at the two furlong pole. He
finished third, five lengths away

; ; from Sea Foam who was second
Dashing Princess on the rails and ,

SUNDAY, 1952

RACING NOTES

By BEN BATTLE

AUGUST 3,

4

THE first day’s racing of the August meeting. has brought
with it its usual crop of thrills, surprises and disillusionments.
Most of us are, I suspect, poorer men, all of us are wiser men,
but none of us are, I hope, really sadder men, unless that is,
we put our pocket before our enjoyment of some really first
class racing. 5

For that was what it was as nobody who saw it can deny.
From the first race to the last, marred only by the rather
farcical start of the G Class, we saw nothing but really interest.
ing and enjoyable racing in which the element of surprise
was never lacking, Indeed the first Race set the tempo, for
it resulted in a finish as spectacular as the most captious
could have wished. No fewer than six horses came tumbling
down on the Judges together, and if the latter failed to separ-
ate the first two, I for one do not blame them. Personally, I
thought that Magic Gaye just got home, but it was a desper- |
ately close thing. Indeed the whole Race was hotly contesteds~*
From the time the gates flew and Aim Low -tooky.command
there was incident aplenty. First we saw Devils Symphony ~ <
prominent, then The Thing caused her backers, to roar, ~but--.]
hardly had she got on terms than Trimbrook appeared, rush” 5
ing round the field on the outside, But Magic Gaye was‘ the:
best of them ana from the time they turned into-the-straight~~
it was clear that she was going to be concerned with the finish.
In the end a dead heat was the verdict with Abu Ali who had
never been far away finishing third. Devils Symphony.was...
fourth and there can be no doubt that her turn and that of
Abu Ali will soon come. Cantaquisine pulled in very lame
having been bumped early on and sustaining an injury behind.




IN BEST FORM

.
The second race found Miracle in her best form, and just
how good this is she plainly showed by her time which was 1/5
of a second faster than that of the imported horses. She was
trailed home by March Winds who ran well, and Cardinal,
the latter clearly feeling the effects of his interrupted prepara-
tion, Mention should also be made of the running of Caprice
who showed her best form to date and may be heard from later.
The Steward’s Stakes produced a brilliant race indeed. After
Pepper Wine and Harroween had made the early pace, we
saw a challenge by the lightly weighted Belle Surprise and by
Lunways. No sooner did they appear to have the issue between
them, than the cry was Landmark! and Mr. Chase’s grand
stayer swept down on them in a way which made the final
result obvious. Red Cheeks was away slowly and forced to come
on the outside did well to be fourth. The time 1.32 4/5 was
excellent considering the condition of the track.

From the point of view of a spectacle the Derby must have
been regarded as a disappointment. But if we look on it as
the vindication of a good, perhaps a great, Creole Mare, then
we can have no complaints. Bright Light beat them pointless,
and there is no doubt that had she been at any time seriously
threatened her time could have been much better. First
Admiral showed how unwise it is to base our conclusions
purely on exercise form,

The Northgate Stakes was chiefly remarkable in that
Flieuxce was able to get so close to Dashing Princess, The
time was moderate and it is doubtful if any of the quintet is
outstanding.

WRETCHED START

The Oistin Stakes was marred by a wretched start which -
left the favourite Gavotte as well as Blue Diamond at the post,
and so provided the moderate Joan’s Star with an opportunity
of which she took full advantage. Gavotte, left nearly a fur-
long, did wonderfully well to be third. Mr. Gill’s Sea Foam,
on whom Lutchman was naturally reluctant to ride his hardest
finish, ran an exemplary race for a two-year-old, and should
benefit from his experience on Monday.

In the Trafalgar Stakes Mary Anne, whose form is so
difficult to assess, ran disappointingly, although not blessed
with the best of racing luck, In her absence Top Flight
just squeaked home from that old reprobate Colleton who gave
conventional Forecast Players an awful shock.

In the best traditions, however, the really good wine was
kept for the last — the pun in unintentional. The Stafford
Stakes saw a sight to which we have become, in recent years,
somewhat unaccustomed — a good creole showing the way
to a strong field of imported horses. The_start again was not
very satisfactory and although the two who were left—Castle
in the Air and Flying Dragon—were both the chief offenders,
I felt that they were dealt with a trifle summarily. Sweet
Rocket soon overcame the disadvantage of the draw and took
the lead closely followed by Demure, Between the two and the
three Spear Grass made a good run, but nothing could with-
stand Pepperwine when Edgar Crossley turned her loose in
the straight, The excellence of her performance was under-
lined by her time of 1.07—the best for the day, and although
I had neither tipped her nor backed her I went home in a
real glow of satisfaction at her success,



sull kept the premier position.
Entering the straight for home
it was still Top Flight who caught
the Judge’s eyes first a head in









length behind Joan’s Stay, front of Colleton. Mary Ann was
(Yvonet up). third half of a length behind
Colleton, cad 3 a
SEVENTH RACE ;
Trafalgar Stakes EIGHTH RACE
Stafford Stakes
Two were scratched in this
event, a seven and a half for Lunways and Careful Annie



a length. Doldrum who had made

¢. te.
DS AMMLLM MSS LLLP PLL LSPS 0

$54,666 6666660685
OSOPOSS POPES FFF OSS SF S

With Firelady scratched, ten
horses faced the Starter in this
event Over 74 furlongs for en-
trants classified “A” and “B”,

The entrants comprised such
veterans as Pepper Wine, carry-
ing 2 lbs, overweight, Rebate,
Harroween and Notonite among
others.

After a few minutes of restless-
ness at the Gate, the horses moved
up in line and the gate flew, but
Flying Dragon, Wilder up, was left
standing there,

The other nine were off
good start, and going past the
judges for the first time, it was
Pepper Wine, followed closely by
Harroween, with Red Cheeks lying
third on the rail.

to a

a determined effort coming up the

home stretch, was third a head

behind Flieuxce.



SIXTH RACE
Oistin Stakes



Meerschaum and Twinkle were
scratched, and Joan’s Star, Sea
Foam (carrying an overweight of
17 lbs.), Blue Diamond, Gavotte
and Cottage faced the starter.

The event, over 5% furlongs
for horses classified “G” and
“G2” was off to a bad start with
Blue Diamond and Gavotte left
far behind the other three.

Despite a lead of about 40 yards,
Wilder hustled Gavotte who



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horses classified “G’’ and Lower,
leaving a field of five. As soon
as the gates flew Lutchman
hustled Top Flight to the fore and
when they passed the stands for
the first time was still in that
position with Mary Ann (Yvone!)
and Colleton (Joseph) running
in the second and third positions
respectively,

Joseph’ began to move up with
Colleton and when they passed the
five furlong pole, was already
lying in the second position. The
field raced past the four furlong
pole with Top Flight still in the
lead closely followed by Colleton.

Mary Ann and Cross Bow tried
to position themselves on nearing
the two furlong but Top Flight



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being scratched, ten horses came
under the starter’s orders,

The event over 5% furlongs,
was for Class “B” and Lower.
Flying Dragon, left at the gate
earlier in the day, and Castle In
The Air were left at the gate,
but nevertheless the remainder of
the field got off to a good start.

With one trailer, the company
bunched beautifully as they raced
down the far stretch and up the
back stretch coming on to the two
furlong pole,

Coming into the home stretch,
Crossley pushed Pepper Wine to
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SUNDAY, AUGUST 3, 1952

RACING RESULTS

AT GARRISON SAVANNAH, SATURDAY, AUGUST 2, 1952
WEATHER : Fine TRACK : Firm

a
lst Race : SUMMER STAKES—Class C and C2 (Maidens) —$900



SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAGE FIVE

Results Of 27- *%°° NO. 235 | (/- etnan pau °y
Field Sweep | The Topic | = PAIN

FIRST DAY oO f

Last Week |













($306, $150, $50)—54¢ Furlongs Prise Ticket No Arcoent

were og sa18.36

1. (MAGIC GAYE .... 121 me. Mr. M. E. R. Bourne, Jockey Belle Third od n18. 76

(AIM LOW ...... ~ Dr. H. M. Weaver. doomny O'Neil. Fourth o1z9 39.37 |

3. “ABU-ALD 24 lbs. Mr. F. E. C. Bethel. sia Sa fens|
Jockey Yvonet. Sevanth 1181 10.00 | |

ALSO RAN : Devil's Symphony (121 Ibs., Crossley); Test Match (124 cn os4s 10.06 |

Ibs., Wilder); Darham Jane (121 ts., Joseph); Racton (133 Ibs., Teath csp 10.88 |

Lutchman); Dim View (121 fs., P. Fletcher); Cantaquisine (130 oe 0131 10.04 |

55.00 each to holders of tickets Nos. |

O598, MON, O2R5, OT G2OT, O209, 0128.
6180

Ibs., Holder); The Thing (121 l%s., Newman); Trimbrook (121
* Tds., Quested).



TIME : 1.08% ae SECOND RACE , |
ee | Win : $9.86, $2.46. Place : $3.94, $1.86, $2.68. First “war Amount |

INISH : Close. Head. Third, ; 368.43 |
START : Good FORECAST : $27.48. pear vst “aR |
WINNER : Three-year-old grf. Magic Red-Ecilace Sixth euie Hy
TRAINERS : Mr. M. E. R, Bourne and Mr. S. Massiah, Fishin ines rss |



$5.09 each to holders of tickets Nas The famous threefold action of !

2716. 2718. 1998, con, 1766 1708, iass. |; HENSIC tablets RELIEVES

o_o
2nd Race : PLANTERS’ STAKES-~-@lass F and F2 Onty—3$800


















1288 | Joe went to St George Wednesday PAIN, SOOTHES NERVES. COU NTERACTS DEPRESSION
($265, $135, $40)—5% Furlongs exten uieie | Diceere he toe Noaeien ae hese | No matter how intense the pain, 1.0 matter how weary your nerves,
Mi Prize Tieket No agape: | But we have a place to spree how depressed you feel, PHENSIC tablets will bring you reliet and
i. Arges en lbs. ss .K. C, Hawkins. First 1932 2.84 | *
Jockey P. Fletcher. Socona pa She9-84 1) Come to our Social ‘Centre | comfort, quickly and safely. Remember this — PHENSIC tablets
2. MARCH WINDS .. 117 lbs. Mr. U. J. Parravicino. aomwl is 160.67 so-apeee neither harm the heart nor upset the stomach. Don’t accept
Jockey Quested. ith ooo ++ 88.88 Rehnaa ee substi ly of PHIENSIC tablets !
3. CARDINAL ...... 117 Ibs. Mr. J. W. Chandler. Sixth + Sone a ge ce eee ee, See + are wate a
Jockey Crossley. Seventh 2608 10.00 | YOU see these Social Cent
ALSO RAN : Viceroy (126 I6s., M. Browne); Caprice (114 Ibs., J. Ninth yok 19.60 | h giuee tr skie One telat
Belle); May Day (117 Ibs., Yvonet); Soprano (123 Ibs., O’Neil); Tenth seo ae 1 kee {
Betzam (133 tbs. ) 00 each to holders of tickets Nex |
, Newman). 151, 1988, 2257, W200 1619, 162, 2908, W plehee Gant challenge: %
TIME : 1.083. ex xD Sew ek obtener Weccere |
PARI-MUTUEL : Win : $4.10; Place : $1.10, $1.10, $1.06. FOURTH RACE Tivis Was a young man's view }
rare Pras e:2 First fe Amount) chonid operate tea nln FROM ayo ner ier yo PAINS,
: Fairly good. FINISH : Comfortable : 2 lengths, 4 lengths +e 101s $20.16 | Should operate by a plan » LUMB.GO,
WINNER ; Four-year.old b.f. Battle Front-Marshlight Third Sue oepas The aan nine for Cae \ HEADACHES, NEURALGIA, (nS 0FNZ4, SOLOS & CHILLS
ourth a} * .
TRAINER : Miss K. C. Hawkins. ' am ensh te hiatdere. of Rikete | The next night for the household | = ae
COACH BRUTUS HAMILTON tries to cc. sole Henry H. (asic S. takg yk SE, Cae, ene eR re | eee eos fori’ Debio
ree Olympic team, who broke into tears wh« Ai ¢ FUTH RACE | And som ills defeat Th ° e e
3rd Race : STEWARDS’ ST A & B Only 1,000 games. Laskan was a contestant in the 18,000-meter walking race Sone Ticket No Amount | | ht . un ering goo ra 10 ae
($365, $185, $60)—714 Furlongs Regulations demand that a certain hoel-and-toe stride be maintained. seeona : ant enna pena he
. nite nat Ratlinphoto Th ‘ ia| To save the home tif | oN ,
1 re See te Cee aeahee Basegh, anne Ser Save Sees Tee Uae” Sinternetienes ReWODNC!) roam isis al sr ctsnes: Coat
2. BELLE SURPRISE ee Tie sich: 6s Seale uc hae |
Y . ; S85. each to holders of tickets Nos ine of. the MAING peopie
. & awe ” +4 Fa +. 4.) se Lutchman. Rain Curtails Play Fable Tennis : o748, O70, 24t0, 2482. seas ‘M685, tats, | he black as well as, wit |
Jockey Newman. SIXTH RACE To make the wrong things right |

_ . -
In County Cricket zine Tekst No, Amount | nievve iA: iune. ‘autouen
Phillips Island’s °° saa Wee | ak word sosty.
a ips 8 PS phira a3 vere, And the Christ Church people

ase 167.84 al
fourth S482 ag.q7 | Are saying “it concerns me

LONDON, Aug. 2. Pitth 00389 0. |
Rain seriously interfered with A Class Champion $5.00 each to holders of tickets Now. The carpenters the masons

ALSO RAN : Pepper Wine (108 + 2 Ybs., Crossley); Notonite (121
lbs., P. Fletcher); Flying Dragon (106 + 3 Ibs., Wilder); Rebate
(123 Ibs., J, Belle); Harroween (123 Ibs., Quested), Slainte
(111 16s., Thirkell); Red Cheeks (113 tbs., O'Neil).

(From Ov Qwn Correspondent

iTS AMAzING/
STORM OVERHLAD
~ YET YOUR RADIO



; ae 4 sabes IT'S NOTA RADIO
TIME : 1.328. Bank Holiday cricket in most ae, ae EEN, Sate, Oe le, S| Cease heme peabaeme Freely (6 ABSOLUTELY CLEAR] SET AT ALL=iI S
PARI-MUTUEL : Win $16.18; Place : $3.32, $2.64, $3.94, parts of the country today. Only .RAWLE PHILLIPS defeated ’ Without a fire brigade WHAT SORT OF SET | ReOIFFUSION!
FORECAST : $10.64. a few hours were possible at es ys * me oe SEVENTH RACE ; aN * asnobrne, aT anyway! /eacn procRAMME

$ ‘g a 5 » * a on riday night to One preblen all's problen GOOP PR h Se ae ae “
oe : Good. FINISH : Easy; 1 length, 1% lengths. See Manehes- » come A Class Champion % the »/is ~~ ee Aasetes | Ne ie an diet annie. crcl ON THE RAMO tec me STE

INNER : Five-year-old ch.m. Pylon II-Esperance t > place : island. Gill was last year’s A s ‘cond 1 ew) eee ie comuaudity. SHALL HEAR om THE ST Iai
TRAINER : Mr. V. Chase. shine was at Swansea and there Class Champion. third on ‘zal ' a ue ensue’ SPEAK AES
the Indians “made hay” against Pritis ‘ rah tas sake : ere SPEAKER SY ee

nnn = Glamorgan. With Burly “Buck” hillips is a sin h to holders : © worktt
4th Race ; BARBADOS DERBY STAKES AND CUP—Nominated Divecha capturing eigh ts ake nats tate” ote, atin” Set hn
p g eight wicke stead)













for 74 runs the tourists shot out Pt

$1,000 ($400, $275, $150)—9 Furlongs a
nine Glamorgan batsmen for 204

Aplayer and con-

EIGHTH RACE + rhe Churchwarden is @ lad
centrates on the lrize ae

Ticket Number Amount







1. BRIGHT LIGHT . 117 lbs. Mr. C. Barnard. Jockey Holder. ©” @M easy paced wicket. game. From ear- ''s! $os2 aa | Theres room fio ‘Tor Low
2. FIRST ADMIRAL. 120 lbs. Mrs. F. E. C. Bethell. Just cali it Surrey's Champion- in the season jin" fon ee
Jockey Yvonet. Ship with the rest nowhere. At | could clearly jour ie 125.18 | when portraits will be posted
3. RAMBLER ROSE . 117 lbs. Mr. V. Chase. Jockey Joseph. ‘he Oval today Surrey shot out be seen that he firth 8680 10.00 } Up in the halt of far
ALSO RAN : Seedling (120 ths., Crossley). Notts for 84. Alec Bedser five ‘Whad the makings <'\" 2eae 6:00 | Ere. Hea eee ner name,
'TIME : 1.588 Se 8 one One en eer of an Istand finn” 1063 10.00 | CER
+ 1.588. Rees ridge five for 38 did the damage. Champion Fs Was ooving 4 hrist '
PARI-MUTUEL : Win $1.16; Place : $1.30, $1.66. FORECAST : $4.32. And before the close Surrey had er Tenth oars 10.8 | Xia others with Mr. Fred
START : Good. FINISH : Easy : 2 lengths, 1 length. made 65 for the loss of Fletch- 4 Pen Herbert ii cach to holders of tickets Nos | ‘Save Hable eee ate hess cond ;
ne a ‘ Mi a6, . ’ Dor ev wh
WINNER : Three-year-old bf. Burning Bow-Felicitas, OR eee onl Bie Ma eae ee i Mai THANKS A ROMANO, ant 19 ASAINE A BIMALL BANTAL COMERS
TRAINER : Hon. V. C. Gale. aa sebada” toa takai come champion } Rar, the Congeged last Friday «ight | MUST TELL THE WIFE FA EVER? '4i, 3 ~ NO REPAIRS, NO BATTERIES, NO
Ww > or Glouces- ia ; | Ginimed this welfare work tent -
5th Race ; NORTH GATE STAKES—Class © and C2 Only—$900 “erin local Derby with Somer® In the B Class match D, Archer “aler Polo: | Catia ce

set at Bristol. Leicester's Charlic [¢8t D Guiler

Palmer came near three figures ._ oy : ~,
but was caught and bowled b P. Chandler and B, Carrington,

pa as caught and bowled 2’ the Adelpht par, beat ke wit SMAppers, H.C, | 3 & R BAKERIES

er ibaa ; . Oe liams and J, Clarke of Queen’s
a oW in Bren nein 88 College in the finals of the Ladies Wi K k | makers of
“OO Kent versus 3 MOCK | ENRICHED BREAD

Doubles Championship.
Kent versus Hampshire

($300, $150, $50)—744 Furlongs sponsored by

1. DASHING PRINCESS

126 lbs. Mr. R. E. Gill. Jockey Lutchman
2. FLIEUXCE ...... 126 lbs. Mr. S. A. Walcott. Jockey Wilder
3. .DOLDRUM ..,... 126 Ibs. Mr. N. M. Inniss. Jockey Holder.

ALSO R. : Emi 121 Ibs., 3; Cc 1 Anni 126 Ws., :
AN bers ( s., Crossley); Careful Annie (126 Ibs The results were as folluws:—







Worcester . 161 for 2 (rain) jg cea fe
Glamorgan versus The Indians af, Siam. 1-18,
Glamorgan

TRAINER : Mr. J. B, Gill,



Division “A”, Snappers defeated

a a ‘ ie y Whipporays 12—2 = arrisoi
brake sty 209 for 9 Class B Championship: D College beat Ronites "4. “3. The |

; ; a at .
72 a i 1 1 ; s, Whip orays wert
(rain). liams and J. Clarke 21—15, 21—15, knocked out by Police after play- |
_ 21—8. ing extra time. The game ended |
«ih Pulbgeae 71 for 5 6—5. For



Quested). Hants ........ 18 for 1 (rain) Gass." a Chamoi : O M. i
pionship: R, Phil- u
TIME : 1.35 ¢. ‘icueee tee ns lips beat N, Gill 91-42, 16—21, t ate es and the blenders of
PARI-MUTUEL : Win ; $1.66; Place ; $1.48, $2.82. FORECAST $21.96. jackson 5 for 30. 21—18, 19-21, 21—12, testis. sesh Weclae- dec }&R RUM
. > . © 6 , 4 Irs ater Cnock
START : Fair. FINISH : Close : % length, head, Derby ............-. 82 for 3 Y.M.C.A. Championship: R. Out matches were played nt the
WINNER : Four-year-old br.f. Dastur-Princess Regent. Worcester versus Essex Herbert beat S, Shields: 21—13 Aquatic Club last week. In ee eineeeaeneeencieamantniancncnon i
|
|
1

6th Race : OISTIN ST. — $600 Gloucester versus Somerset Archer beat D. Guiler 15—2) t rs
oa ti, oo cg Lower—$60 Guise Lorie 349 for i 21—16, 21—10, 2220 latter was a fairly exciting mate | |
, , Furlongs Lancashire versus Yorkshire Ladies Doubles:~ P. Chandler In Division “B”, the Challenge |
ORM yi a's. ae vp for 0 and B, Carrington beat R, Wil- Cup Winners

|. JOAN'S STAR 148 Ibs. Mr. S.J. Rock. | Jockey Yvonet.
2 FO. 86 Mr.

E. Gill. Jockey Lutchman.

3. GAVOTIE oe oS Sussex versus Middlesex







ALSO + 130 lbs. Mr. Vv. E. Cox. Jockey Wilder. Sussex 5 Police Best scored fiv
vo. J DI cn e
RAN : Blue Diamond (183 Ts., Newman); Cottage (112 Ibs., (rain). The competition for the Bar- of the six goals for his team. In the
P, Fletcher). Northants versus Leicester bados Championship will start at other match, Bonitas beat Caviars |
TIME : 1.10. Leicester .......... 326 for 6 the Y.M.C.A, on Frdiay, Augus: 5—0, Bruce Armstrong scored |
PARI-MUTUEL : Win : $6.98; Place : $3.14, $2.92. FORECAST : $32.64 Surrey versus Notts 29, while the Ladies Island four of the five goals,
START : Bad FINISH : Easy : 1 length, 5 lengths NOUS once re divedes owner us 84 Championship will start on Fri- This week, the semi-final |
, P : P. we Surrey 4... ss eeeeees 65 for 1 day, September 5, matehes will be Swordfish vs.
WINNER : Four-year-old hb. b.f. Dunusk-Colleen. —m College in Division “A” and
TRAINER : Mr. F. E. C. Bethell. 8th Race aay hg er B and Lower—$1,000 = Bonitas ve. College in Division
; . Furlongs “p", |
Ith Race : TRAFALGAR STAKES—Class D and Lower—$900) © ——————————$__$_————————————— —————————————————————CséThe “finals will be played ony
($300, $150, $50)—7%4 Furlongs ~ 2, PEPPER WINE; 150 Ibe), Gh S. M CURN Ae ster Sm aay: he. 10M, Are you content with the; way you speak and write? ae aeokes 0) es
ockey Crossle; :
113 ibs. Mr L 2, SWEET ROCKET . 125 lbs. Mr. R. E, Gill. Jouker batonaian, Are you sure that you are not) making mistakes that cause} viistory»—the prospectus of the




ro . T. Wong. Jockey Lutchman
eels it lbs. Mr. V. Fae.
ekvay Ibs, Mr. F. E. C,. Beth

$| people to underrate you? Effective English Course—ara

val " > unanimous in urging that good
Never has the inl of © tects com and writing Siclish is tnaiepenstbie, ta: tose
,een more widely recognised than ay you can @Xpress} wo aim at success.

3. MRS. BEAR ...... 116 lbs. Mr. V. Chase. Jockey Joseph. |
ALSO RAN : Demure (130 MHs., Wilder); Vectis ((1146 Ibs., Quested) ; |
Aim Low (115 ts., O’Neil); High And Low (120 Ths., New. |

Jockey Joseph

aoe

AND NOW

Jockey Yvonet

: ; ‘ you ca e q)
a : Apollo (111 ts., P. Fletcher); Cross Bow (126 ths., man); Spear Grass (116 ths., Holder). oan hay * | vgirself per rsuasively and fore efully, you have an immense ,
older). TIME : 1.07 A GAS COOKER 4¢) Sabena ye in your professional work as well as in social life.] :*Word Mastery” explains fully
TIME : 1.358 PARI-MUTUEL : Win $21.06; Place : $2.90, $1.82, $1.52. | 4 - 1 the importance of good English
PARI-MUTUEL : Win : $5.02: Place : $2.24, $3.54. FORECAST : $33.60 FORECAST : $45.36. } ERS nee 7 Beer 7 g Thousands of men and women (b) Everything is explained ro ane tater ue oar am

START : Fairly good. FINISH : Close : head, % length
WINNER : Five-year-old b.m, Flotsam-Meads.
TRAINER : Mr. R. H. Mayers.

START :Good.
WINNER :
TRAINER : Mr. F. E. C, Bethell.

FINISH : Easy :
Right-year-old b.m. O.T.C.-Condiment.

1% lengths,

1 length.

SEE THEM TO-DAY ef) a re handicapped because they

At Your Gas Showroom @ cannot speak and write English
oe Bay Street 4 orrectly.

Every day you may be com-

riitting mistakes which depreciate

ou in the eyes of others. Are

ou sure of your spelling? For

ou depend upon your English
iot “letting you down”

Guard Against

Embarrassing Errors
There is a method by which you

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embodied in the Effective English
Course conducted by the Regent
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(a) You learn only the things
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————
The Course that

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You are shown how to avoid
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How to Increase Your Voca-
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How to Make Your Letters In-
ter

i

How to Converse Fluently.
How to Speak in Public.

Everyday Errors in English.
Words Commonly Misspelt.

Words Frequently Mispre-
nounced,

tiow to Punctuate Correctly.

Post this Co

attractive expression. This inter-
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obtained free from the Regent
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istance, do you write guage or
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| Do you stumble over pronun-§ ‘low to Gain Decide at once that you will
| ciation? For example, can yor Language-Power rid yourself of the handicap that
ronounce amateur, hospitable poor English imposes,
| inventory and probity correctly’? : ashi
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Write now for a free copy of
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upon NOW



THE REGENT

INSTITUTE

y and the swift way. e
rh eae re we aaa (Dept. 501B), Palace Gate, London, W.8. England
> f the d a a Please send me—without obligation—a free copy of “Word
e Course » planne tha
tials aednite pecufess fcas Mastery”, describing your Postal Course in Effective English and
| the very first lesson the special arrangements for overseas students.
ll equip you to speak and
te correct nd to use words NAME ‘ cA are aia dia Aeael ed area hives 4 64 ol a
1 st] r t vels (Block alitaee’
le and| |
2 ight}! || ADDRESS iiss cece sce esses easter spheeer vpeeesg een otet et
: - |
Write lay for etail nec Te Pe Lye ery re my eros POP Teen eR Tey hava eh
ANYWHERE, 1S TRULY A pearn how friendly end. thorough ||



MAST E

RPIECE.
PAGE SIX SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY, AUGUST 3, 1952

How DRAB they are,

these women ‘

















**For Women |
Only!’ 9



So long, girls! Just pissing through. Since taking MEDILAX
I’m a fit man again. MEDILAX, the gentle, safe laxative ensures *
INNER CLEANLINESS. and an ABOUNDING VITALITY. I’m a *





good advertisement for MEDILAX. What d’you say, Girls?
" q * SUNDAY, AUGUST 3, 1952
FOR SATURDAY, AUGUST 2, 1952 *) by EILEEN ASCROFT
* Look in the section in which your birthday comes and > al ITH bo aheps ‘a9 Felt tromaea. Pe 00 “6 ‘ ~
find what your outlook is, according to the stars, ! of gay holiday clothes p,.nions that DON'T belong on
WHY are English the bench :: high-heeled sandals,
: ¢ tight blac tent court shoes.
ARIES Quiet indications with necessary money ) beaches so drab and full nylon stockings with black
March 21—April 20 matters, church, cha.ity collections, child- | of grey girls ? embroidered heels, diamond
* cen’s interests the top favoured. Start On ey de Coast ey and = fur
i Fab reso is not more
your day with prayer. + ihan's Gobet memati holley: Much BETTER Se
P * makers: most of these were in bright patterned beach
: , : TAURUS encouraging day for rightful Sunday in- j eee pkg be rn, peek saan
So it is, AIR-WICK. Just lift up the wick from the liquid in the + April 21—May 2o!erests, visiting friends, aiding the ill and | po eoenine co: os fe varlains eS unitved
bottle, and all unpleasant odours are absorbed. In kitchens, to kill lonely, Enjoy and improve health. _ holiday fabrics and designs. caps are better than
stale tobacco smoke, and to freshen cupboards or sick rooms, Yes * *« *« Women who dress with care and bedraggied head.
AIR-WICK is truly amazing : re ea ae ae” Uk rakeeiaeiia aaert ate a | to lone all cldthesscoine’ ies which marry tn with
, . thy aa - y erta Ss. ose @ clothes-sense when whic marry in with
May 21—June 21 PsA a mete panaeng health Planning their holiday luggage. SrruneeS Pps. Cone
S, socia athe gs. ‘ PY |
How foolish Is Tommy here when he > church. eee on’ names , Stripes and dots & crose-strap of eons
' lesh . are better
could sleep in comfort with a VAMOOSE a * * ORST offenders are the than those that do
} ; CER Some sane warnings for water sports mixers of strong patterns. In ‘oh:
PUFFER to hand. This handy little puf- % sune 22—July 23 travel: be sensibly careful, never ay + were floral Sadese “and Vanishing servaats Da®
fer contains D.D.T. Just press it, and sure, But whole day generally is promis- | polka-dot headscarf [THE domestic servant and nanny have h a Rix sketches some ideas
: SH, ing. Seaford produced a startling colour “4 ney aceon Pha ape MRL A c for holiday cases . . .
pouf! Not a mosquito or fly will bother * > 4 ba rie cr sonnet. shorts Washington to-day. Shortage of labour | or son tabilins nee
: you. Keep a VAMOOSE PUFEER handy LEO rien of those restful yet progressive periods | Horrid sights are the short. flared one Porn lls in other’ industries are | <<> ‘ wool tassel caps ‘for sail-
i ‘* July 24—Ang. 22 that invites earnest effort without strain | jackets worn over full skirts. In England, too, the cook-general and the ing; halter-necked beach
; and sleep in comfort. or rushing. Self-control will bring you { ee hy Pel siihoustes like a nursemaid are a vanishing race r) bras in black or tan linen
quicker gain. Attend church. ; ship in full sail. : Women employed in private domestic K and circular poplin skirts,
: te & | a ge TR pe ey Oe eee oe
Like to possess he -li : 8 119,133 in England an ales in 1931
A i ich e” we 7 ee like + vmEGo Music, good reading, religious services, * | promenading in Brighton and the 1951 census was 348,900—a drop of yore tikes hres e WHOSE DRESS 1S SHOWING?
eres: Arar os Sere 2 eer A 2 fun with family, and just plain relaxing see: Fb, even & Gulepcoat 2 A SounOD ine years bi
ing. no @xercises, just SELF that ug. 23—Sept. 23 21) top to-day’s agenda. Necessary money needs a little dusting itself. and Pre-war wages were £1 to 25s. a week. Now a general maid receives
ugly fat away. SILF SLIMMING transactions alsd favoured, | £3 and a nanny £4 Few
TABLETS, are safe, and sure. On families can afford them It is

sale everywhere, Try SILF SLIM-

, | often the alternative to running
MING TABLETS and even Pops * Read Taurus and Virgo helpful hints for a
+ |

@ small car or good boarding

Wh i C e I Schools for the children.
=. ats ooking n Those bangs
se. | Mes EISENHOWFR reveals
* * * ® to-day that hundreds of
+ SCORPIO Feel cheerful, helpful? Sunday! certainly _ u e Cc en. Anmirrican. women have written

sha ol : ; $ . to her criticising her bangs
Oct. 24—Nov. 22 encourages such inclinations. Follow your D C
conscience and you won't fail. Pray, rest. Pape o eecerdiae © to. tne ai.



: your day too. H d i Si i
down there will stop, look and listen. Sept. 24—Oct. 23 it, au ne ee ee ee






Sure I would. A lovely girl is a sight as

MMe, ae oo te * * * | The sea EER oe thas making of the sh will vary ae- square acres” They cal be Ce
; ; t . S as - . ;

to feel like gardening though, until, like SAGITTARIUS Your Jupiter more favourably aspected started in Barbados, 7. vod You can serve boiled snapper eee? oh This elegant Got _ of on

many a tired business-man I took a course 4 Nov. 23—Dec. 22 er faa ees, Su coe give three recipes that you might find with small English potatoes, a ie 8166) ene Oe

of MEDI.SED, which corrects and restores Pin “Head spines Seager ei ae ae useful, few bits of parsley all round it power has worn Royal wedding she broke one of

tense nerves. For nervous headaches, Neu- Boiled Snapper and a sauce made of olive oil,

* Snapper lime juice and salt and pepper.

i lieves they offset dresses or slips showing below the
x CAPRICORN No cause for concern, for frowns. Re- + Salt

ralgia and other aches and pains, MEDI-SED



because she be- the first fashion rules . .. no









‘ dye . ed S a high forehead hem of the coat, Her name:
is the answer. Try it and enjoy hours of re- Dec. 23—-Jan. 21 ligious services, parties, outdoor healthy Pepper ; ngee” a ‘Snapper & é aa" aoa rane See foot of column. %
laxation you would otherwise lose. * PU UISES AHICHE SR. BROUBSE SA, Onion Butter 3 oz. MRS IKE — discover was in Why ~ > women? 7
ae * * * + | Carrot Rum 1 small glass Pas and the bang. owiak than F the #3 principal London
Have your dates led up to. th AQUARIUS Your planet Uranus admonishes it won't Parsley Flour 1% tablespoonful, : the era of Louis XIII 2 O stores. on!y seven have women
“H Ht 'P i? t at x Jan. 22 — Feb. 20 be wise to make drastic changes in things Thyme Take the fish and cut it diagon- ! bangs were fashionable. com- directors on their boards,
appy ever after stage?” It’s a delicate already running fmoothly, Enjoy this Marjoram ally putting salt inside and out- i bined with shoulder-length ,One group chairman tells me it
subject, but unpleasant breath and e Sunday in pleasant, wholesome way. Vinegar % glass side. Butter the whole fish and ! ringlets p is because women have no heads
body odours ma be hte . gar 2 glass e . ( Back they came in Edwardian for money.
AMPLEX, tak y ¢ thi trouble (Se x * * * Small English potatoes put it on the grate of the fish times. made famous by Queen “They are good at selling and pro-
AMPLEX Giter 6 hata PISCES Neptune warns not to be reckless, espe- ae Lime saucepan, Pour the rum and some Alexandra and later the Galety motion,” he says, “but they
TABLET A DAY, to ensure = sially in activities acte: “ith wa é ) é t he rum Gir don’t understand the financial
you don’t offend. AMPLEX contains Feb. 21—March 20cially in activities connected with water. Oil. : : water on it and when the ru P The “Flaming Youth” girl, Irish side.”
Chlorophyll, nature’s deodorant. Try 3 Day can be happy, useful if you help make The best way to boil fish is to and water has started to boil | “actress Colleen Moore, made the A more opinionated chairman
AMPLEX— you'll see! - y «x it so. Prayer is in first order. + | put it in some water, add % glass cover the fish with some grease- Straight bang popular in 1928. believes that women can play an
Z of vinegar to the water when you proof paper which you have but- ky rN the ee pent Sars ey part: ee
; ; : ; il bi sh a bi i ¥ i 4 died her hairdressing—Norma on e is I
YOU BORN TODAY: Bright, engaging personality. May boil big fish, a bit of rum if you tered. Put the fish in the oven and sce her aire ing Lewis. Last year he appointed
Kena to arrogance at times, but you are generous, innately + boil small fish or if you don’t like let it cook. When ready take the by ithe? patra Swanson and Miss M. J, Ahern managing
kind-hearted, usually unaware that you may be domineering, the taste of rum, use plain water. fish out and put the sauce in 4 Until she bécame Queen, the director of John Lewis at a
tien “wou Bobb F egotistical. Can be reasoned with, but seldom driven, Have To give the fish a nice taste small saucepan. Add more butter Queen Mother always wore her qe eo hele a doaik oetias panne
young y has a few fine talent for entertaining, journalism; could make excellent you must put it in cold water, and % tablespoonful of flour, let hair in this style i ine “women directors in this
words to say, Yes vitamins are military leader, business organizer, salesman, sports enthusiast. add 1 onion, 1 carrot and thyme, the sauce thicken and when ready London Express Service. group.
: Birthdate: Rupert Brooke, Eng. poet; Henry Cuyler Bunner, parsley and marjoram, Let it to serve pour the hot sauce on the = -
important, particularly GLUCOSE) 4 Amer. humorist, editor, % | beil for a few minutes and then; fish and send to the table. Serve ¢ Whose dress is showing ?
after covering the saucepan let it{ with English potatoes or sweet my The Duchess of Kent's
D, for young and old. Use Savory »¥ a mh 4 ae ™ me *% | boil on one side of the fire. The potatoes and yam. uf ;
and Moore’s GLUCOSE D_ in
’ THE THINGS THEY DO... THE THINGS THEY DO THE THINGS THEY oo THE THINGS THEY oes ee ee ae ees
la THI THEY . «+ THE THINGS THEY DO - THE THINGS os iene ee
reek Ph ge cneiiowaiRcititarned THE THINGS THEY Do |. | THE THINGS THEY DO THE THINGS — THEY DO . THE THINGS THEY 0° EONS ENN Stee

will benefit, in added vitality and



strength. } 9 ’ ‘ . emcee OU Fa i gc cin lA Nee at BR Ad meet



No, we haven’t run out of ink, Just trying to illustrate what,

might happen if we didn’t use a SCROLL PEN. No messy ink filling
with SCROLL. No risk of accidents. Just slip in a refill now and again,
red, blue or both and your writing troubles are over, SCROLL is
smooth, and reasonable in price.

J Any difficulty in obtaining

supplies pleuse ring the sole



agents covering this column‘

c >
INTERNATIONAL TRADING CORPORATION
LTD. — tel. 5009.

Ney 4 , caf SSS Sp NO SROT c FASHION fj ODD SPOT. } It’s a wise woman who

at





3 . ' look provided this idea
Shades of Scotland! for headwear by day. . » » AND this is my parting-shot pic-

Pr : i : looped il
SURPRISING how you can ring the sce i Ee aren ture to iiiustrate the weakness of the

fringe)

FOR sCOTS SPOT i GIRL with the Eastern dresses her aBe...

The way this tartan
is spreading.
the








mother - and - daughter - dressing - alike

" nd little i ,
’ ye . Waianae on the cight in instance : tie one end through your neck- tekoifiation: Wear the fashion, If it's right for daughter—oh,

{ ae ’ . . a The! He is’ Cm As
ACTRESS GLADYS COOPER introduces Chetmstord, lace, fasten the other ends round your silk in a half-crescent ee ; '
® to London the blouse that has taken Paris on eee ey waist—and you have the suntop in from the top of the head Remember: OO NT ane doesn't help
by storm, The material: white cotton What's new; that Voung “hak on the drawing A. Now try out the other two. to behind the ear. .
soft shoulder-line, and elbow cuffs edged with black Swiss jet is part of the London Express Service
embroidery. . . . Notice Miss Cooper's new ultrashort: hoir London seene, in
style: it needs trimming every four days fortan sports enat



For



saw character fashion changes with a silk square

mother, you're in fashion trouble.

FIVE COUNTRIES
Dalat





Clarks SANDALS

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Five countries and three | n

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a's


SUNDAY, AUGUST 3, 1952



“

of the world where man is alone with





M
the Chu
a differen

i ‘| and TV star, who happens to be
ah the daughte the Prim
ii Pintecer of Creat Britain, But F led F rom
4
|

—_ > ; dramatic actress playing
'WO WEEKS of treading the pioneer path where nowomanhas ae . End befor- , ARNE
trod before cured Eve Perrick’s col ioe aon the corners je a he By CANON W s

hte you kKnow—not just since ae ue s
my tather became President 1 “It came with the house.” sac
qs London from aya

Truman, singer and TV the poli:ictans The women do Don't
star, who happens to. be the work. Maybe that’s whv ' expression ?

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

PAGE SEVEN *



The Wife Who

vehi] success story had
t beginni:

made the journey Her Home
n Young y

est, e
hill was Prim
en. In her lonely aes ** ' ,

@ “A LETTER from a husband

exile, she says, she longed for contact with people who would term of office coin- Says: “I married at 30 a girl
talk wisely or wiffily, who would be gay or glamorous, ol = “a. se! of 24. She became frustrated |

bright and/or beautiful. vice in WAAP.; and it because her social stawus was

70 THIS WEEK the column celebrates its reprieve from man’s was while he was leading the what she aesired. After

talk, nd meets— Qpposition that his daugtte: fivé years eur first and only

wree more established herself as chila i

@ celebrity in her own right.) was stillborn, and she

WwW talking on the Started to drink and smoke

uccecess or wo @ @ @ Siin-terrace of the little black and gad about. I gave her

, f Le. 2 eh her head because of the loss

e . is now the London residence o! of her child. When we set

in Spite Of TAMOUS Bote Mee Bt tees weet ae el

were drinking “ Moscow Mules "* for a shop assistant with

which is. said Mr, Beauchamp charm, and has left me for

what a few years in ne tume- hE Rie cer ol him. What do I do? I have

; ot a ver ha Hn)
fathers ao ae aoe been one big fool right
‘I've been in politics all my We were discussing the nuce through. Is it too late after

the niche behind us 16 years’ marriage to seek
anether partner?”

joked that I would ve Miss Churchit! “and my A WIFE who takes to drink

America. and on the the one to make the name mother. who got the place for

nsists | ye W ve te s ife who is missing something

f } Truman famous — bur Dad us insists that we will have \ is a w g g

nee * am ore didn't do too budiy. die ne? got rid of it in her marriage, For this her hus-
holiday, 1s Miss Marga “In our family. the men are “ But we're using it for iaughs band has often to take the blame.

{ust adore thar coy To most women the maternal

instinct is deeply awakened witn

thought | ight ¢ ice
the daughter of the Presi- | chunge a ier ae oe = shes Marbl id marriage, and hungers for satis-
dent of the United States. with arDte maiden faction in a family of children, On
‘Though there ure some I sad b thought ene marbie top of this your wife had her
Next year, of course SN@ people who don't agree. of maiden jooked exuctly like tne terrible tragedy of shattered hopes

will be Margaret Truman poutay ra ane weed with 4 yiewr's daughter who had eae after five years of frustrated am-
‘ ‘a sm}! to strip-tease fo pay Hi ne 43
‘ singer and television star Miss Truman tukes ner nol mortgage but wasn't really bition.
PREMIER'S DAUGHTER “And” she says. “I'm day im the American way— happy in her work At that moment she needed
hotographed by her h nd looking forward to that orgdnised almost to the minute “Good,” said sarah, “One 80 whe could restore her
' gp sisal loci immensely | just It's all been olanned for me more vole on the side ot keep confidence in herself; a husband
p ~ i _ by someone ‘np ‘he emba tiv ing the thing .
hope |] can make Nine countries in seven weeks M 5s OF a ! oar ty r whose tenderness and patience
it” including Finland imagine aon rth : er a ae would provide an antidote for
Well. anyway, thatt film,..one< Brosdway pias, ead gathering bitterness.
she's made. first “The onty deta: ot the trip ya5% genes 4) aeee pint So Brittle
base Her radio and 1 know is tha! I'm goine ‘o [8000 “the wa ttearid-set







TV contract was Salzinape for the Festival I'm shen



YOU gave her her head, when



renewed after the told hear some real good Jome ve fede Welh ess mon. it was your love she needed. A
rapper nag of music there.” first © - strong-minded, hard-headed man
her father’s decis on ‘ sat ice
Italy doesn’t find it easy to get inside
to become an ex- >
President, No peace for A a ae os the tangled emotions of a woman
“Tt was a great It seemed uw rather tiring Afterwards, until she goes who doesn’t even understand her
moment for me trip for a girl who had not nad pack to New Yok in Novembe: own bewilderment,
when 1 on rey te a week Cae of proremionn ony the Minister's daughter Excitement, drink, sex are the
newal ofker. agements for nearly a year. ins ave a ape sing routi 3
when I decided it Hit: Wouldn't she eer more ‘i Heakonarnp. ig ae a | Troggs 4 oo A
would be safe to rest on one of those Florida ’ in ee Caer eee
take a vacation. fishing trips with her father ? Tit talk Did you fail her here, perhaps?
We talked first on oe Daddy never takes a vaca- ito ta She will never rediscover her
the sun-deck of the nh. je does more work when * Tony has gone into fi confidence unning fro the
s.s, United States, he’s in the yacht than he does dugaion. He's doing : ford nt phantoms ¥ a earl ym
in ot in Washington. Don't be tooled short detective stories, and some lif WwW reco; r ick!
the two m by those flash shirts he weurs, documentaries for showing here r ee enise = quicker
who gre never ose trips are a serious and in America—we hope both than men how brittle are the
PRESIDENT’S DAUGHTER aver sea abt Fi € business.” in cinemas and on TV hopes and how tawdry the thrills
—release for her is nearer now. tdvarae clo aughter mainee =, tert hone Miss “My bretier Randolph is which adultery, as a rule can
; man’s adventures have not Starring in the documentaries. offer.
Miss Truman had spent the ne entire r . ' arr
morning in het suite, with one She's iitide pecved at having 19 (ntervacaites ae enazation, and But a woman is less ready to
of the denechives. puasding the cope with cameras and Press leaders—like Tito, for instance admit) this ey, ~— it
door because had receptions on her vacation ? “ way. I’ : seems her 0 of “love,”
GEM FOR TO.DAY docked at Le Havre and l|ois Her reply was Toaligtte re do qnyway,t fo letting the men Your wite ro a te wilderness
of strange and, ag yet. unvetied yealing. “Well, you ever months, I'm ‘resting’ for a | it sile.gaode tn Wait “odie” otter
seared People were aboard. know. Perhaps this time next TT? [' y . s ~# ; .
Music is the harmonious 1 len I've got my eye on a play uffair, a sense of guilt wil
; tion: h But now the liner was sailing, year I'll be just dying to be fd like to do in London and 4 wie 8 ;
voice of creation; an echo and Miss Truman was allowed ‘hounded’ by the Press und New York . hound her through the years,
of the invisible world; one out. She had not resented being find myself completely ignored “But nearly every actress tearing her self-respect to ribbons.
note of the divine concord in protective custody until Wouldn't that be terrible?” these days has a play shed like No Conditions
which the entire universe is lunch-time. Miss T., sensible As for gaging farewell to the to do in England and America. SOCK “ag ; ;
destined one day to sound, girl that she is. has a taste for bodyguard, Miss Truman's shrug Let's hope my one goes on.” POCKET your pride. Write to
—Mazzini noon-rising. indicated that it really wasn't We moved inside the house her, Tell her where you failed
Still, there she was now, with {00 trying for @ girl to know where three Churchill oils—two her in the hour of her tragedy.
her golden hair done up ship- that, wherever she goes, there “painted boats” studies and a Make no conditions when you
shape, tightly curled at theends Were always two strong menand new flower one: My favourite,” offer her l nd comfort
* id f the breezes ‘Tue following her around. commented Sa — de t r her your love a e halal
Talk Point fy pigsen: oe ral ominate A cynical hardness may for a
7 ing Sp earns. Set aes. * ae toyed anew eee time provedle her with le
Dear God, give us strength to I N “We're just starting to fur- against acknowledgement of fail-
‘ now ow si. ”
accept with serenity the things * pee oy Pl ce,” said Miss ure, so don’t be put off by a facacte
that cannot be changed. Give us | She showed by the selfcon- y {N LONDON trom & ie banat cots", wee of “couldn’t care less.”
courage to change the things that nt, experienced way she America, on the way toa = "4 Cee oe ere You both need each other. You
can be changed. And give us wis- led an interview, in rather pe ar holi is Miss * Ingredients : Vodka, ginger bot f b .
dom to distinguish one from the “8eomfortable circumstances, Sarah actress beer, and ice. both ~ afford = eve, ne
other.—Admiral Thomas Hart. London Express Service ing in the past what rightly be



But when taking children's snapshots you can—





longs to it. Sixteen years should
covnt for nothing. —L.E-S.

Talking Point
The man who sees both sides of





Forget That “Dicky Bird? 9 (= "sw:

ERIC COOP. expert portrait Naturals The best effect js obtained if
photographer whose work is to the sun is coming from the left
be exhibited in London has If the children see you always or t behind the 4
been summing-up the advice with the camera in your hands, (There will be plenty of reflected
he would give to the amateur Coop has found they will soon light from the beach to illum-
on holiday who wants REALLY get tired of posing for pictures, inate their faces, but not so much
GOOD, snaps of the children. and then you will be able to get that their eyes will be screwed

- really natural shots of them. up against the sun’s glare. And—

Coop says there is only one The old days of standing still

way to avoid the lament: and watching for the bird Don’t tilt the



dicky
“If only I had had the camera are one for , © apetyy camera to left or
ready. . . .” And that is to have good, films are tod b ¢ right but do in-
it ready always and take the . ~« so fast nowa- cline to point it
picture as soor as you see it. —**% days that, for down’ rath-
This is comparatively easy if & — on the er_than upward.
your camera is of the simple Vie ae you can . Dent unless
snapshot type, work at 1/100 you want comi-
gach > but if it is a fo- : . see. all the tima cal effects, taka
BY. eee cussing camera * the children Be close-u) in
&. have it set at ao. 343 go on play- — which feet or
a about 9 ft. dis- . & ates ing with thea hands are closer
‘ tance. Ms sand while you to the camera than the rest of

Don’t worry snap them. the body.
about the posi- If they become self-conscious 7
tion of the sun tell them you want to photo. Don’t forget to take off your
it hap« graph the sand castle they are Sun glasses before estimating
pens to be shin« building, or the toys they ere the exposure. On a bright sunny



ing straight into Playing with. day at this time of the year it is
the lens, in which case change Sun Spot e to work at 1/100sec. with an
your own position. aperture of £/16 ing a fast

And if anyone has ever told film. If, as in simple cameras,

Don’t ask the children to moye, you that the sun must be shin- the speed and aperture are fixed,

and so lose the spontaneity of img on your back when are ask your chemist for a suitably
the moment. taking a picture, f ee : slow film.





Gil ae
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BARBADOS wild ADVGCAT

seh v
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Printed by the Advecate Co., Lid., Bro-* 8, Bridgetews

Sunday, August 3, 192



Caribbean Couneil

LORD Ogmore, who, as Mr, Rees-
Williams, held brief office as Parliamen-
tary Under Secretary of State for the
Colonies during a post-war Socialist ad-
ministration took the opportunity during
a debate in the House of Lords on the
Colonial Territories for the year 1951—52
to give expression to views about the
Colonial Empire which might well be
interpreted as representative of some
Socialist “thinking aloud.”

Lord Ogmore in his “thinking aloud”
divided colonies into three types. There
are Colonies, he said, which could and
which would, he hoped, in time become
Dominions. There are others which, com-
bined with others (and there is no doubt

that the West Indies prompted this classi-
fication) could become a Dominion.

The third type includes the colony
“which either by reason of lack af econo-
mic resources or some multi-racial prob-
lem or the like can never become a self-
governing Dominion, can never stand on
its own feet.”

Should the West Indies degide to feder-
ate they would eventually disappear into
Lord Ogmore’s second category of the com-
bined colonies which become a Dominion.
yBut since there is far less likelihood of
federation today than there ever has been
the ideas of a Socialist peer, ennobled for
his party allegiance, about the administra-
tion of colonies of the third type are
worthy of consideration.

Lord Ogmore’s suggestion is that these
colonies should have representation in a

Grand Council which would meet every
year and make recommendations to the

various Parliaments. The Council would,
he suggested, make recommendations
which would be very seriously considered
by the Governments concerned and it
would give an opportunity to the repre-
sentatives of the Colonial Parliaments to
meet and exchange ideas. It would have
a permanent secretariat, by which the
various economic and other problems
would be considered from day to day.

During the debate Lord Milverton put
his finger on the weakness of the Socialist
peer’s proposal.

When, he said, it is remembered that the
Colonies extend over the whole width of
the world and comprise within them
almost every problem . economic and
racial that can possibly be imagined “I do
not think that a general council of that
kind would do other than perhaps provide
a sounding board for the political charla-
tan.”

How true, will be universal West Indian
comment,

But Lord Milverton put his finger fur-

ther in and underscored a difficulty which
is already causing great inconvenience in

the British Caribbean. “There are not
enough men of ability in the Colonies,” he
said, “at present even to go round in man-
aging their own affairs at home, let alone
to send men to a big Central Council to
get a view of world affairs with a Colonial
background.”

This shortage of men of ability in the
West Indies is of course not unconnected
with the dislike of the electorate to return
such men to power but basically what
Lord Milverton says of all the Colonies is
true of the West Indies. And even if the
truth of the statement is disputed by some
who refuse to distinguish between ability
and ability to win over electors the final
result is the same.

At regional meetings of importance in
the area only the important politicians
attend. The formation of a Grand Council
of the United Kingdom and Colonial terri-
tories would not only provide a sounding
board for the political charlatan from some
colonies but would further deprive this
region of the services of their most impor-
tant politicians and these would be tempt-
ed to interfere in other colonial matters
about which they knew nothing.

Lord Milverton’s criticism of Lord
Ogmore’s idea was justified but perhaps
the idea as applied to the West Indies is
worth a little more investigation. It now
seems almost certain that West Indian
political federation will either be post-
poned indefinitely or some partial politi-
cal federation between the Leewards,
Windwards and Trinidad might be
attempted.

Suppose on the other hand that Lord
Ogmore’s suggestion for a Grand Council
of the United Kingdom and Colonial Ter-
ritories were modified and the idea of a
Caribbean Council put forward in its place.
Such a Council comprising the most im-
portant political representatives of exist-
ing British Caribbean Legislatures could
meet in one or more of the participating
territories annually

This Council would make recommenda-
tions on matters of regional importance
and those recommendations would be con-

sidered seriously by the participating gov-
ernments. concerned he secretariat of
this Council is already in existence at
Hastings House and is in fact performing
the task of such a Council without having
any legal status as a Council secretariat
and without the existence of a Council.

Lord Ogmore cannot claim credit for
this proposal since it has already been put
forward by West Indian political commen-
tators but just as Lord Ogmore’s sugges-
tion for a Grand Council has a certain
theoretical attraction so the idea of a Car-
ibbean Council appears at first sight
desirable.

Without regional co-operation the Brit-
ish Caribbean is doomed to stagnation. A
Caribbean Council would tie up all the
loose regional ends into a tidy whole and
would achieve all the obvious advantages
of + i pata without any of the attendant
risks,



Macdonaldism

MR. Malcolm MacDonald’s behaviour. in
South East Asia will strengthen the hands
of those who have been championing dress
reform in Barbados for decades.

Lord Baldwin, whose unconventional be-
haviour introduced open-neck shirts and
shorts in West Indian Government House
circles, unfortunately made few converts.
Yet his intentions were good.

In Bridgetown one or two “dress reform-
ers” always wear open neck shirts. Offi-
cials of the Department of Science and
Agriculture regularly wear open neck
shirts and shorts and some schoolmasters
do likewise.

But the pioneer work of the individual
dress reformers in Bridgetown is not sup-
ported by the private or official commun-
ity. The Police Force have in recent years
received cooler shirts and after a period of
service policemen receive light weight
trousers, but only police officers are privi-
leged to wear shorts.

At Government House and at the Secre-
tariat protocol has never been more
strictly observed. The difference between
the stiff formality of Barbados’ Govern-
ment House and the informal atmosphere
of Trinidad’s Government House was the
subject of comment by the elder Dr. C,
B. Clarke when he spoke a few years ago
to members of the Royal Empire Society
about his recent visit to the West Indies,

It would be a mistake to suppose, how-
ever, that Barbados’ resistance to more
rational dress is due to any peculiar Brit-
ish jnfluence. No one who has visited
Hampstead Heath on August Bank Holiday
or strolled through any London Park on
Sundays during the summer would accuse
the British of clinging to their surplus
clothing one moment longer than was
necessary,

This anxiety to “cast clouts” which is
enshrined even in the old-wives’ saws of
the country takes a violent form in Lon-
don’s Hyde Park where the murky and
ice-cold water of the Serpentine does not
deter the Britishers in search of coolness.
The overseas’ armed forces of Her Maj-
esty relentlessly change from winter
clothes into summer brevities on the day
pre-selected by the High Command irre-
spective of whether it hails or snows. The
British are certainly no worshippers of
British clothes for the sake of maintaining
their British appearance. They look just
as British in shirts and shorts.

If a parallel is to be drawn between Bar-
bados and any other part of the world it
might aptly be drawn with Brindfsi. At
this eastern seaport town of South Italy
as famous for its wine as Barbados is fam-
ous for its rum all the mezze-cazette, the
small town tradesmen and merchants,
gather together in the market places to dis-
play their heavy black clothes which coun-
try people all over the world regard as
conventional Sunday wear.

In Barbados where every school boy or
school girl still learns by heart the poem
of “Sally in our alley” with its direct en-
couragement to love Sunday because that
is the day when the lover is “dressed in
all his best” it is not surprising that petit
bourgeois standards of dress should rule
the roost. But those standards as Mr.
MacDonald has pointed out in his letter to
the “Straits Times” are not British. They
are the standards of the “little” people of
all countries.

Some years ago when English officials,
whose education approximated more to
that of the true British traditions of the
Armed Forces and of the bathers in the
Serpentine, attempted to shed their ties
and to wear sandals in government offices,
the offended voices of the mezze-cazette of
Barbados were immediately raised to
denounce this intelligent attempt to
rationalise dress. Complaints were even
made by individuals with more than the
normal dose of sensibility that the wearing
of sandals by officials was a calculated in-
sult to Barbadians.

Maybe Barbadian sensitiveness about
dress reform in recent years is responsible
for that very noticeable formality which
distinguishes Barbados’ Government
House parties from the less formal affairs
in Trinidad.

If so it is a pity, A little dose of Mac-
Donaldism seems badly needed in Barba-
dos. If dress reform is ever to become
effective the high officials of the Secre-
tariat will have to give the lead. If some-
one could prove that cooler dress would
mean improved health and reduced ex-
penditure’ the argument for dress reform
would be unassailable. But the medical
fraternity are great upholders of local
dress conventions and until doctors say
that less clothes mean improved health
there will always be hesitation among
those willing to make the change for per-
sonal reasons of comfort and _ efficiency.

As for the new “MacDonald” evening
dress, the tailors of Bridgetown by skilful
advertising ought easily to persuade the
“flannel” dancers that the new MacDonald
evening dress is classier and cheaper than
their usual hop attires. Here again a lead
in high places will produce more contented
and more aesthetically apparelled diners
and dancers. A Calypso might even be
composed with the refrain: “Look! I got
what Malcolm got! and it’s cool not hot.”

With chaps like that one



SUNDAY ADVOCATE

| The man that
keeps Barbados
laughing on
Sundays

SUNDAY,

AUGUST 3, 1952



eS ‘
| pamanannaanimdmmaaae POooe



“Many Socialists’ (in the
House of Commons during:
the heat wave) “were ar-
rayed in tropical suits, most-
ly very crumpled.”— Peter-
borough, in the Daily Tele-
graph.

IVE me chaps in decent
clothes, chaps who know
the rules, -
Decent, smart, uncrumpled chaps
who went to decent schools,
Chaps whose clothes are nicely
pressed, laundered neat and
clean,
Chaps who sort of do belong—
ectually, I mean,
The sort of chaps who don’t
belong, chaps who hurt the
eye,

Are chaps whose clothes are
washed at home and. then
hung up to dry. é

sort

of feels one sort of can’t be
seen, “

Somewhere one sort of draws
the line—ectually, I mean,

FAN MAIL
HIS week’s letter from the
constant reader who always
begins “Dear Pig”:—
Dear Pig, i,
I have caught you out in a lie
again. When you wrote your
life story last week and how you
swindled people all over the
Empire and Africa, which I can
believe, as your photo is the face
of a criminal, you said you sold
electric blankets to Hottentots
in Darkest and Hottest Africa,
your own words,

Why should Hottentots in
Hottest Africa want electric
blankets, and if they did, where
did they plug in for electric
current, as Darkest Africa must
be in the jungle?

Let us have the facts before I
stop borrowing a paper
is first-class except for your
tripe.

* *

ELL, dear am

astonished that you have

failed to see the point about the
electric blankets,

Although nobody but an im-
becile would believe that trees
in the African jungle are wired
far electricity, there was a time
when the simple Hottentot be-
lieved implicity in the white
man’s magic, or ju-ju.

Therefore, if he wanted



blankets it was more profitable
to sell him, electric blankets than
the ordinary kind. If he com-
plained that the ju-ju didn’t work
you then sold him electric bat-
teries at an even greater profit.

If the fool, sweltering under
his electric blanket, then got
prickly heat, you sold him two-
penny jars of ointment at a
couple of bob a go.

Evidently you don’t know
much about salesmanship, dear
Pig.

DEATH OF CHARLIE

A’ a conference of Winged
Insects, the chairman, a
bluebottle, said: —

“Gentlemen, we are gathered
there today to hear evidence of
unfair methods being used in the
war of extinction now being
waged against us. Mr. Wasp, will
you begin?”

“IT was on my way home after
being the uninvited guest at a
tea party where they had three
kinds of jam in open dishes,”
said the Wasp (cries of “Hear,
hear’ and “Good work”) “when
I saw a man a glass of

(Cheers and

beer in a garden.
laughter.) I think you gentlemen
are aware that wa have a

weakness for malted (loud
cheers .and cries of ‘Good old
Wasp’), but when I tried toe take
a sip the man whipped out a
press button gun and fired a
spray at me.” (Cries of “Shame.”)

“What happened after that?”
asked the chairman.

“After being unconscious for
several hours I managed to fly
home,” said the Wasp, “but I
think I owe my life to the fact

that, like most wasps, I am
frightfully fit.”
“Thank you, Mr. Wasp.

You're next, Mr. Housefly.”
“Out of more than 7,000,000
brothers,” said the Housefly, in
a small voice that trembled with
‘emotion, “there was one I loved

best of all, name was
Charlie.”
Noticing the Housefly’s dis-

tress, the kindly chairman said.
“You may give evidence sitting

you wish.”
“Thank you, Mr. Chairman,”
said the Housefly. “Charlie was

just settling on a piece of uncov-
ered meat (cries of ‘Hear, hear’),
and I think we all know how

difficult it is to find meat covered
or uncovered these days (laugh-
ter), when he was disturbed at
this meal and tried to take refuge
in what he thought was a basket
of flowers on the wall. I never
saw Charlie alive again.”

“What, im fact, was the
basket of flowers ?” asked the
chairman.

“A piece of painted cardboard
impregnated with insecticide,”
said the Housefly (loud cries of
“Shame”).

“Anything else ?” asked the
chairman,
“Only that it would have been
Charlie’s birthday today,” said
the Housefly.

Amid murmurs of sympathy,
the chairman said: “Gentlemen,
I ask for your vote on the mo-
tion that this meeting core
the passing of the good old days
when fly swatters and_ rolled
newspapers were the only wea-
pons used against us by gentle-
men, and to declare that we con-
sider modern methods unfair,
unsporting, and unBritish.”

The motion was carried unani-
mously,

PAWS ACROSS THE SEA
ABLE received from Man-
hattan Mouser, American
cat, to his English sweetheart,
Lottie.

Hiya Sugar Puss thanks to
publicity given to us both sides
Atlantic U.S, Lines have handed
me free passage luxury suite
aboard new flagship United
States on maiden voyage east
stop will also arrange pass for
you meet me Southampton July
8 stop this is the real McCoy no
foolin stop got a kick outa your
picture in paper but why not your
chassis too stop also got a kick
outa you running for Beauty
Queen contest stop I am think-
ing of running for President here
on Republican ticket as_ fight
looks like getting dirty stop no-
body has won more dirty fights
than yours truly stop publicity
blurbs say we are taking aboard
24,458lb. of fish stop oh boy oh
boy stop also 56,450 Ib. poultry
Stop oh boy oh boy oh boy stop
24,458 Ib. of fish, 56,450 lb. of
poultry and you Honey Cat oh
boy oh boy oh boy oh boy oh boy
Mitop stop stop.

—L.E.S,



Black Rock Babies

Not far from Eagle Hall Corner
off the Black Rock Road a neat
green painted building which re-
sembles a small pavilion com-
memorates the name of Mrs.
Florence Browne,

The wife of Dr. Sinciair Browne,
who practised medicine at Sum--
mervale in Eagle Hall more than
30 years ago opened a small clinic
at the back of her home to help
poor mothers with the bringing
up Of their babies. After Mrs.
Browne’s death, her son George
donated the land on which the
Black Rock Baby Clinic stands
today and the building was erected
from funds provided by the Brit~
ish Red Cross and the Order of St.
John of Jerusalem in gratitude for
the help given by the Empire to
the United Kingdom during the
war,

For years Mrs. Muriel Hanschell
was President of the Clinic and
when she was appointed to the
Legislative Council she was suc-
ceeded by Mrs, Florence Daysh,
who is also Chairman and Hon,
Secretary of the St- Philip Baby
Welfare Clinic.

‘Today 330 babies are registered
at the Black Rock Clinic and 334.
attendances a month are recorded.’

Mothers bring their children to
the clinic from St. Thomas, St.
George, St. James and Christ
Church but most come from the
crowded city areas of New Orleans,
Chapman’s Lane, Hall’s Road and
Baxters Road.

Twice a week a nurse attends
it the clinic to weigh babies, reg-
ister new babies and to prepare
them for the doctor who arrives
at ten.

Mothers wait on wooden
benches ona roofed verandah,
When they have seen the doctor
they receive quantities of milk
and cod liver oil and for babies
of six months and up Jamaican
food yeast.

Between 1} to 2 lbs. of food
yeast are distributed weekly while
112 pounds of skimmed milk and
two gallons of cod liver oil are
distributed monthly- Between 80
and 90 mothers attended at the
clinic each week during July. Some
mothers attend twice weekly while
others attend once a week or
once a fortnight.

In 1951, the average weekly at-
tendance was 58.9 and 3,066
babies attended the Clinic.

Two hundred and eighty five
babies were registered in 1951
and 112 were written off for bad
attendance.

The Baby Welfare League as the
clinic in Black Rock is called is an
outstanding example of a_ social
|service which was begun more
| than 30 years ago and which has
been carried on to this day by the
|support of government, vestry,
'Turf Club, commercial firms and

the voluntary service of ladies
living in the island.

The problem it is tackling may
be understood by realisation of
the fact that of 330 mothers at-
tending only 40 are married.

Those superficial critics who
accuse well-to-do Barbadians of
Bourbonism and indifference to
conditions round them ought to
ponder and reflect on these statis-
tics. They would be doing a better
service to the community which
shelters them by themselves lend-
ing a helping hand instead of
adding to the difficulties of those
who have already set the »lough
in motion.

By
George Hunte

How is marriage to appeal to a
community of women if the un-
married status of a mother-is-the
norm and not the exception?

Many of the mothers attending
the Black Reck Clinie are suffer-
ing from venereal disease, They
are advised to seek treatment at
the General Hospital, but even if
they seek treatment, the father
of the child might refuse to do
likewise and if his affections re-
main constant the sad story is
enacted over again. Some mothers
are premature: they give birth
to children when aged only 15 or
16. Other mothers’ children die
and instead of taking a rest from
pitiful motherhood, new births to
new fathers take place.

Still the good work goes on.
Public spirited ladies, a devoted
nurse, an unselfish; doctor con-
tinue to attend twice weekly at
the Black Rock Clinic to battle
against death, to give human lives
greater opportunities of survival,
to train mothers in the practice
of mothercraft and to supply their
vabies with the nourishment neces-
sary to resist disease,

For thirty years this social ser-
vice has been going on and the
work of the Black Rock Clinic
is being imitated in other parts
of the island. But the records
stil! show how much remains to
be done.

Legitimacy has insufficient at-
traction for Barbadian women.

Until women feel that the sur-
render of their honour is something
of whirh to be ashamed; until they
cherish their virginity as some-
thing of which to be proud: until
they begin to realise that the
married state is the normal state
of civilized people: the efforts of
those who have for so many year
been trying to help mothers t

help their babies will need to be
supported by every agency work-
ing for the spiritual and material
improvement of their fellow-
beings,

What Barbados suffers from is
not the absence of a social con-
science — relative to its size and
making allowance for the notori-
cus lack of appreciation by the
community as a whole of disinter-
ested endeavour, its social
conscience is surprisingly highly
developed — but from the large
deadweight of ignorance, vice an‘
superstition, which has to be
dispelled if ever a healthy society
is to survive.

Overlooking the obvious draw-
backs of illegitimacy, venereal
disease and wundernourishment,
and ignoring the stupidity of
mothers who rely on bush tea,
crab oil and _ other so-called
remedies, other especial difficulties
arise in Barbados which compli-
cate the task of social workers,

In the report of the St. Philip
Baby Welfare Centre of 1951-52
Mrs: Daysh noted the independent
attitude of some mothers resulting
from higher wages and bonus paid
to sugar workers.

During the General Elections
mothers ceased to attend at the
St. Philip Clinic for “political”
reasons,

To do good to others requires
a great effort in most countries
To do good in Barbados requires
more than effort. It requires
strength of character and a spirit
of self-denial of a very high order
indeed, Because not only is it?
certain that little gratitude wil)
be forthcoming from those to
‘whom the good work is done bu
there is the absolute 2
that more abuse than appreciation
will be coming from those who

ought to be standing at the head

of a movement to proclaim from
the housetops what has been

Jachieved already by devoted and

public svirited citizens in stem-
ming the advance of low moral
standards. The work of the Baby
Welfare Clinics throughout the
island would be lightened by tie
growth of .family life. Bishop
Bentley did sterling work in that
direction many years ago. Every-
one must become more militant
about the advantages of the mar-
ried state.

Meanwhile the workers who
have toiled so arduously and well
in the service of the Black Rock
clinic might find consolation and
encouragement to continue their
labours from a prayer recently
recommended to the Secretary of
State for the Colonies by Lord
Milverton :

“Grant me the serenity to
accept things I cannot change,
courage to change things I can,
and wisdom to know the

difference.”

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SUNDAY, AUGUST 3,

The. tremendous

that happened to a quiet

little English

1952

secretary

IMAGINE me, a Waaf—only
5ft. 4ins. tall, standing on tip-toe
trying hard to read my posting
form over the shoulder of the
orderly room clerk.

The typewritten sentence stood
out blunt and clearly...“This air-
woman is not to be employed on
secret and confidential work.”

That was because my mother
was French and the Battle of
Britain was at its height. No one
in Britain at that time was quite
sure who were their friends and
who their enemies.

COMMISSIONED
One of the Youngest

My dual nationality made me
suspect, and that summer of 1940
I was happy to be A.C.W.2 421234
Baseden,

I was born in Paris, My father
is an engineer, and I travelled
through Europe with my family.

At 12 I was sent to school at
St. Mary’s Priory in Stamford
Hill, London, There I stayed until
war broke out. My father was
ork put on secret engineering
work.

BUT MY MOTHER WAS
STILL LIVING AT ARCA-

CHON, IN FRANCE, AND
WAS TRAPPED THERE
WHEN THE TIDE OF INVA-

SION FLOWED OVER
FRANCE,

In the W.A.A.F I worked at
Kenley fighter station sorting let-
ters. I was happy, I worked like
that for a year and then J spplied
for a commission. I wen* before
a board.

The head, an air yice-marshal,
said to me: “With your knowledge
of languages, why don’t you apply
for a commission in Intelligence?”

I told him I thought, at 18, I
was too young. Nevertheless, in
three weeks’ time I was ¢
sioned in Intelligence. I was one
of the youngest officers in the
WAAF.

* * *

COME time later I got to know

a girl called Pearl Withering-
ton. She was to be decorated later
fo* helping the French Resistance
Movement,

She told me she was going to be
posted to a job where she could
use her Firench vocabulary.

I said, “See if you can get a job
for me, too, I’m forgetting all my
French.” For the Service had put
me in an office coping with Dutch
and Norwegians,

One morning two months later
I received a letter.

It said: —

“Dear Madam, Would you
please report to the Ministry of
Pensions, Sanctuary-place, West-
minster, and ask for Mr, Ben-
net.”

Of course, I went. A small man,
rather bald, in a tweed suit, was
waiting for me, He said:—

‘Miss Witherington mentioned
you. The job’ we have in mind is
rather dangerous, and from a
security point of view you won’t
be able to mention it to anybody.
It might mean going over to
France.”

He questioned me for some time
and then said he would give me a
few days to think it over.

ANSWER : ‘YES’
Ready to go to Franco
A few days later, on a May
morning in 1943, I was back in
that office saying “Yes.”
Then my face did fall, I was

told that I would have to give up
my uniform—which I thought
suited me—and dress in, the

khaki of the F.A.N.Y,

ON JUNE 18 I WAS TOLD
TO REPORT AT AN OFFICE
IN BAKER-STREET, I WAS
SHOWN INTO A_ LITTLE
ROOM FULL OF YOUNG
MEN AND WOMEN, ALL OF
WHOM HAD VOLUNTEERED
TO GO TO FRANCE.

Soon came the day when our
training started. r an hour’s
train journey we arrived at a
lovely country house, which we
were soon to call the “Mad-house.”
There were ten of us, seven men
and three women.

All those men were to die before
the war ended, and only one of the



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women was to avoid capture by
the Germans. But we didn’t
know that, and we were very gay.

HE house was magnificently
furnished, the food was ex-
cellent. We were always under
observation. Even our personal
letters had to be sent to a box
number, where they were read by
the authorities before reaching us,
Security was everything.

The first morning we were taken
outside one at a time and given
tests in physical obstacles.

The first was to cross a ditch—
supposed filled with burning acid
—too wide to jump.

The last was to leap from the top
of a high tree to a rope a few feet
away. A miss would have meant a
fall of 30 or 40 feet,

After that we eaah had an
hour-long interview with a psy-
chiatrist, who left us limp puzzled,
and angry.

LONELY LODGE
Handling Explosives

It was at this house that I saw
Mr. Bennett again. This time he
was in Army major’s. uniform.

We were there for only five days,
Then we went off to Scotland.

We arrived at Loch Morar, near
lonely Arisaig. After a long boat
journey we landed on the opposite
shore.

Then we had a four-mile walk
through the mountain valleys to
reach a_ deserted grey stone
hunting lodge.

‘ The next morning found us in a
classroom, and we were bein
taught all about explosives, .

Soon we had to blow things up
on exercises,

I had to blow up some railway
lines. I was rather fond of explo-
sives and did it effectively.

Then there was weapon train-
ing. We handled everything from
anti-tank guns to Continental au-
tomatics.

At the end of the course I had
developed a great affection and a
lot of skill with grenades, the
Bren-gun, and the colt .45 revol-
ver.

MY KNIFE

How to kill

But there was one very bad
moment for me. The instructor
gave me a long black-handled
Commando knife. " had to learn
to use it.

In a glade among the fir trees
were three dummy men, which
the instructor manipulated by
wires. I had to learn to stab theta
and kill, + a

“Stab upwards, stab upwards”
was the ord-r repeated over and
over again. hated it. I hated
it so much I never did use a knifo
in France.

' * * *

came unMarmed combat
training with a tough Com-
mando sargeant-major. By the
time I returned to London I had
learned a lot of ways of killing.
And there were many flights on
the rain-swept mountain-sides
attacking sentries, blowing up tar-
gets and practising destruction.
Security was vital. So much so
that when I had toothache I had
to drink rum and svffer for a
week before permission came for
tue to go to the nearest town to
« dentist. Then I was taken under

escort. .

Eventually we went back to
London, i

I was now told that my job
in the Resistance organisation
would be that of a radio opera-
tor. I was sent to Thame to
train,

Hour after hour, day after day,
we practised until I could take a
radio set to pieces, trace faults
and send and receive morse at 30
words a minute.

TRY-OUT
Bedroom radio

But, first, there was an exer-
cise. With my radio in a suitcase,
{ took lodgings in Manchester, I
had a false identity card and
described myself as a student.

In a first-floor back bedroom
overlooking the yards I set up my
aerial and started to transmit.

Bes
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All over Britain
detection
students had been caught and I
waited for the police to come
knocking at the door, but they
never cume.

* * *

Y training was over. I was

taken to a mansion just out-
side London and given a final
security talk.

There I was told of the meth-
ods the Gestapo used to extracé
information from prisoners,

I was told of the bath in which
prisoners were submerged over
and over and over again, of the
way finger and toe nails were
pulled out, of the head screws
which were slowly _ tightened
until consciousness sank in a
flood of pain,

“THERE IS NOTHING WE
CAN DO TO HELP YOU IF
YOU ARE CAUGHT,” I WAS
INFORMED. “WE CAN
ONLY GIVE YOU A TABLET
WHICH WILL KILL YOU IN
ONE MINUTE.”

That night as I went to sleep
I could not honestly say I was
upset by what I had been told.
{ was too excited.

It was then I told my father
what my job was. I had permis-
sion ‘to do that.

He looked serious and then
said: “It ts your decision. It is up
to you.”

Soon I was called to our new
H.Q. There, for the first time, 1
met the famous Colonel Buck-

master,
He was very nice. He said:
You are going on a mission

which is rather difficult.”
He told me that I was to go
with another officer to pick up

the threads of a _ once-strong
Resistance organisation near
Dijon, in North-East France,

which had been discovered and
smashed by the Gestapo.

‘LUCIEN’
My Companion

In a little room I waited
anxiously for the man who was
to go with me. He came in, tall,
young, brown-eyed, and looking
as though he came from a long
line of aristocrats, Which was
indeed the case.

His code name was “Lucien”,
and his first words to me were;
“Come and have something to
eat.” over a little table in Soho
this second-lieutenant told me
how he had been on one mission
and tad been caught and tor-
tured,

“IT am going to take one of those
tablets this time,” he said. “Do
you think it’s right?”

So intent was “Lucien” that he
went along to a bishop before
we left England to ask if he would
be right in destroying himself if
the need arose. Of course, the
bishop said he would be.

* a *

*T UCIEN” and { were moved to
a countyy house in Hertford-
shire.

There we waited, sleeping and
eating and talking. There was a
bar and lots to drink, but neither
of us felt like it. Instead, “Lu-
cien” was smoking rather heavily.

From our point of view the most
important fitting was the school
blackboard in the hall. On this
departure times were chalked.

SURE ENOUGH, ONE

MORNING THERE WERE

OUR NAMES AND THE

CRYPTICS “4 P.M.”

We were driven to an airfield,
straight to a lonely dispersal hut.
Here we put flying overalls over
our civilian clothing and strapped
on parachutes and equipment.
And on the plain wooden table
was “Lucien’s” tablet.

NO SIGNAL

We returned

The aircraft took off and soon,
it seemed, I was sitting with my
legs dangling over the rim of
the hole through which we were
to jump.

Then things went wrong. We
got no signal from the reception
committee on the ground.

We flew round until the pilot
was told an enemy aircraft was
stalking him, so we returned to



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were radio
stations. Some of our

.. SUNDAY ADVOCATE :

England.

I was bitterly cold, and for the
first time really low and miser-
able. The tension gave way to
despair.

“Lucien” and I wandered round
London, We had seen all the



things |



shows, We just ate and talked,
Then we were sent back to the
mansion. We were told we were

to be dropped in Irance hun-
dredg of miles from our destina-
tion, We would have to make our
way overground,



MICE ARE GOOD MEDICINE

If you have seen flying saucers

recently — or to be more exact,
circucar lights in the air — or
if your hen has brought off a

sitting of all hen chicks, or even
if you have heard a cricket you
are, according to superstition, in
danger of death!

But do not get too worried,
there are hundreds of other death
bortents, To mention only a few:
The sound of bells at night; call
by some absent person; howling
of dogs at the house door; hens
laying eggs with double yolks:
chirping of fish after they
have been taken from the water;
and finally, a whistling Woman or
a crowing hen. So you s¢e, there
are so many things to worry about
that it is not worth worrying,

But to turn to a more serious
subject—drunxkenness, I think jt
is literally irue to say in this cas«
that the cures are worse than the
disease. For instance, in Wales
they say: “To prevent drunken-
ness, take the lungs of a hog and
roast them. If a man eats these,
after fasting all day, he will not
get drunk next day no matter
how much he drinks.”

Then comes this awful advice
to wives: “To cure a husband of
drinking to excess put a live cel
in his drink”, This cure, no doubt,
would work, unless of course the
suspecting husband had taken the
precaution to have a meal of hog’s
lungs!

Another rather drastic cure for
drunkenness is recorded by Swan
in his Speculum Mundi, He says
the eggs of an owl, broken and
put into the cup of a drunkard,
will so work with him that he
will suddenly lothe his good
liquor, and be displeased with
drinking.” It seems a_ shocking
waste!

Lucky Or Unlucky?

Eyebrows have given rise to a
few superstitions. The general
belief is that persons whose eye-
brows meet will be lucky in al)



By IAN GALE
their undertakings.
On the other hand there is a

couplet which runs:
Trust not those whose eyebrows
meet,
For in their
deceit,
But perhaps the two supersti-
tidtis are not so variaht as they
at first appear, for deceit may
possibly be an attribute to being
lucky in one’s financial under-
takings,
Curiously enough another su-
perstition on eyebraws says that,
should they meet, the person thus

heart they carry

adorned will be unlucky, For it
is held that:
If your eyebrows meet across
your nose,

You'll never live to wear wed-

ding clothes.

On the other hand, the couplet
may have been composed by some
disillusioned husband!

I once knew a Chinese who told
me that newborn mice coated with
honey and then swallowed alive
were absolutely delicious. I was
not tempted but oddly enough |
haye since discovered that, in
superstition, mice are good medi-
cine.

For instance, these three super-
stitions: “Mice minced, given to
a sufferer, will cure the measles.”
“To cure the whooping cough,
roast a mouse and give it to the
patient.” And finally, “A roast
mouse is a certain cure for a child
who wets its bed at night.”

Clean And Healthy

To deal with the last one first.
Quite recently a rs. Rowe of
London wrote this letter, which
shows that the bed-wetting super-
stition is still believed. “A friend
of mine with a mite three years
old is at present giving her stew-
ed mice for bladder trouble, and
it is curing her. Of course she
buys lean, healthy mice from pet



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aT EE
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nn

That night we jumped,

FTER the din and bone-pro-

bing coldness of the journey

I found myself falling through 300

eet with a revolver at my side}

and 5,000,000 franes on my back
( was a lovely starlit night,

As | landed, 1 could smell the



xine trees, and the air felt soft
ind warm,

1 was alone, “Lucien” had
landed some distance away and

was out of sight.

SUDDENLY I H EA RD
HEAVY BOOTS POUNDING
OVER THE GROUND
TOWARDS ME.

My parachute lay awout my
feet, and my revolver was in my
hand,

Then, just as rapidly as it had
come, that small tight knot that
was my tummy melted. For the
running feet stumbled, and a
they stumbled a French voice
swore loud and lustily.

It was a friend coming toward:
me and not a. German.

I was just 21 as 1 was greetec
by the Resistance on- that eage
and exciting night, and. ‘Lucien’
was very little older.

(World Copyrignt)

NEXT WEEK
Our first operation:

Success—then capture :
I face the torture

—L.E.S.

stores. Incidentally, I kmew in my
youth a lad of fifteen cured by
this means of this complaint, And
isn’t it quite possible that some of
us are having mice extract in our
present day medicine?”



In his Compleat History of Ani-
mals and Minerats, Richard Lovell,
St. C.C,, Oxon, states; “A mouse
dissected and applied draweth out
reeds, darts and other things that
stick to the flesh. Mice bruised
and reduced to the consistence of

an acopon with old wine cause
hairs on the eyebrows, Bein
eaten by children when roasted

they dry up the spittle. The wate
in which they have been boiled,
helps the quinsey. The fresh blood
kills wars. The ashes of the
skinne, applied with vinegar helpe
the pains of the head. ‘The liver,
roasted in the new moon, trieth
the epilepsy.” The moral seems to
be that no doctor should be with-
out mice in his bag,

But before we leave those dear
little creatures it is interesting to
find that Professor G. Eliot Smith,
in dissecting the naturally mum-
mified bodies of pre-Dynastic
Egyptians found in the Sudan,
notes “the occasional presence of
the remains of mice in the alimen-
tary canals of children."’ Thus the
mouse cure goes back some sixty
centuries,

And finally a few words of warn-
ing for cricketers, Three cricket
superstitions that I have found go
like this; “If a batsman takes
guard twice, he will soon be bowl-
ed.” “A batsman whose pads are
on the wrong legs will score no
runs.” And “If two members of
the team wash their hands at*the
same time, it means a duck for
both.” All very depressing.

The great W. G, Grace had a
superstition of his own. He be-

lieved that if he went in the bat-
ting list with an even number he
would make no runs.
ways went in first!

So he il.

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PAGE .TEN

SUNDAY ADVOCATE



OLYMPICS;
3 Swimming Records Set

Olympics Finish Sunday

: HELSINKI, Aug. 2.
THE swimming and diving events were brought to
conclasion here today with three more Olympic records.
The 1,500 metres Men’s Freestyle, the “Blue Riband” event ’
in which world records were expected to tepele, saw two in the end. Konno followed
new faeces taking over world supremacy from reigning Toushly two lengths behind
champions Surueiashi of Japan and Marshall of Australia.
These Wére Ford. Konno the five all broke the Olympic record.
young Hawatian star who was the Konno and Hashizume of
eventual-winner and Japan’s com- course were not completely un-
parative néweomer S. Hashizume known. In fact the former is
who Yano mecond. Okamoto of credited with twice breaking the
Brazil but-obviously of Japanese world record for the 1,500 metres
origin was Third and J. McLane o! but they were not reco;
the U.S.A. was fourth. The firsi cause they were made



pools. But neither of them had.
swam in the world com .
the race started off with Hashi-
zume setting a ‘blistering pace
which I suspect was his undoing

gradually falling back as lap fol-
lowed lap. Hashizume’s style is
said to be the best of all the Ja
anese but it is a quick stroke while
Konno in contrast has a slower
tempo but gets more speed out of
it. He also moves his bet-
ter than the Japanese. 3
easier style began to tell and he
forged into the lead. He never
looked back after this and in the
last 50 metres it was pathetic to
see how he lapped John Marshall
who finished last,

Determined Effort

Okamoto of Bi«zil was many
lengths behind Hashizume but he
had to make a determined effort
to keep just ahead of McLane and
the Frenchman Bernardo who had
made a good finishing sprint
Konno therefore won both a gold
and silver medal as he was second
in the 400 metres two days ago.
The experts predicted that it will
not be long before he lowers the
world mark but they might he
wrong as only recenty Marshall
and Furuhshi were hailed as
the world’s greatest ever and
just recently two books were
about to be published on the in-
fluence of their respective styles
m swimming when along came
two orthodox men like Konno and

in short



mins. 30 secs. . 42.4 secs. better
than the old mark.

Exciting Race

The 200 metres breast stroke for

The great Finn Paavo Nurmi carries the Olympic Torch round the
track on the last leg of its journey all the way from Athens where

the original flame was lit. Here he is seen passing the members of

the International Olympic Committee on the straight way in front
of the grand stand. Thunderous applause proclaimed the everlasting
popularity, of Nurmi and his stride still carried rhythm of youth.








































any whose style I commented
m yesterd: led from the start
but none of the others were far
“behind him. But when it looked
@as if Davis was going to provide
another “Marshall” he let go with
his sprint which indicated that he
had only been biding his time.
He passed the whole lot gnd
just reached Klein with abput 20
metres to go. Here it was well
demonstrated that Klein’s sub-
marine action is not conducive to
sprinting and Davis went away’
from him to win by about half a
length. Meanwhile Stassorth of the
U.S.A. also turned in a splendid
last minute sprint to beat Klein
for second place. The German’s
syle Must take tremendous
strength and endurance.

Davis’ time of 2 mins. 34.4 secs.
was a new Olympic record. Only
the seventh and eighth men, the
last two to finish, did not break
the old record.

The ladies’ high diving com-
petition was won easily by Pat
McCormick and the U.S.A. just
to finish with a flourish brought
off another treble with Paula
Myers and June Irwin in second
and third places,

In the final of the 400 metres
Freestyle for ladies the Hunga-
rian National Anthem which has
been heard almost as much as

the Star Spangled Banner
was in the field track
events was once again played.

The facial expressions of Emil Zatopek in the 10,000 metres tell But this time it was for Valeria

their own story of the terrific pace he set. Behind him is Mimoun ee wae tee pee Pm pes
ance cond. a

re $ or country. One Eva, however,

ener Ter Novak was second and the Ha-

ss waiian girl Katanoto was third
for the U.S.A.

After swimming I saw the Foot-
ball final between Hungary and
Yugoslavia and as both teams are
full of professionals it was de-
finitely a world class game. There
was not much to choose between
them although Hungary’s winning
score of two—nil and a missed
penalty in the bargain would
make it appear so.

The Yugoslavia forwards lacked
the finishing touches of the Hun-
garians but later were lucky to
get their second goal when the
Yugoslav’s goalie was caught in
a blind spot behind one of his
backs. Otherwise h> was easily
the man of the match. As the
Games end to-morrow it is with
regret that a sordid tale has to
be told about the boxing and
basket ball contests which will
spoil the goodwill so abundantly
evident in the other: contests.







Basketball:

Knock-out Matches
Begin Tuesday

NO Ist Division Basketball!
matches were played last week.
The Knock Out Cup matches are
scheduled to start on Tuesday.



THE WINNER OF THE OLYMPIC «
Bob Mathias, of Tulare, Calif
Campbell (left), of Plainfleld

Simmons, pf Los A
world’s record by scori

~
thlon for the second straight time,
s congratulated in Helsinki by Milt
J., who finished second, and Floyd
»k third place. Mathias set a new
S7 . ints. (International Soundphoto)










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The spirit of friendship in the Olympic village of Kapyla could not
be better. Here members of the Jamaican track team get together
with some French and Israelies over a common problem of finding
their way about with the aid of a map. Seated are George Rhoden
and Herb McKenley. Looking over McKenley’s shoulder is Leslie
Laing and behind him is Byron LaBeach.

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Russian women bid fair to sweep the board in their division.
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JEROME BIFFLE of the U.S.A. jumping in the long jump event
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but on each occasion it was a fould jump.

SMILING HAPPILY, C. C. Scholes (center), a member of the U.S, Olym- |
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freestyle swim finals at Helsinki, Finland. At left is H. Suzuki, of Japan, j
second place winner, and G. Larsson, of Sweden, third, (International)




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SUNDAY, AUGUST 3, 1

By JOHN PRIDEAUX

Slavery

THE recognition of free col-
oured people was gradually gain-
ing headway, but was still meet-
ing with tremendous opposition.
In 1804, Mr. Thomas Briggs, a
Member of the House of Assem-
bly, sided with the weaker side,
and started a campaign for the
admission of evidence of free
coloured people in the Courts of
Law. Up to now these people
could not given sworn testimony.
A terrific controversy arose over
this campaign, with the result
that Briggs lost his seat in the
House,

Lord Seaforth, the Governor,
was also active in his humani-
tarism, for in 1805 he induced
the ture to pass an Act
making the wilful murder of a
slave punishable with death
instead of, as had been the law,
by a fine of fifteen pounds in
the case of the Murderer’s own
slave, and in the case of another
man’s slave, a fine of twenty-
five pounds plus double the
value of the slave, which was to
be paid to the owner. It will be
remembered that Mr. John
Brathwaite, Agent for the House
of Assembiy of Barbados in
‘England, recommended this in
his evidence before the Lords of
the Privy Council in 1788;. a
matter of seventeen years be-
fore this law was passed.

William Wilberforce (1759-
1833) the son of a Hull merchant,
‘who was educated at Cambridge
and entered Parliament in 1780,
and Thomas Clarkson (17450-
1846) were two of, the leaders
of the Negro Emancipation
movement. Wilberforce cham-
pioned the abolition of the slave
trade, as it was thought that if
this trade was abolished, then
‘tthe state of Slavery would soon
die out, as there would be no
replenishments received from
Africa, and the cost of raising
children for slaves was terrific;
also the breeding of slaves was
not economical as during the
pericd of pregnancy and for
some time after confinement anc
delivery, the woman slave was
of no economical value to the
plantation. Wilberforce cham-
pioned this cause in Parliament,
his first proposals for the aboli-
‘tion of this trade’ were made in
1789, but the time was not yet
It was not until 1807 that
Act which ended this
horrible trade was passed. This
‘was not emancipation, for those
slaves already in the colonies
remained as such; it was only
the stopping of the capture of
tthe African on his native soil
and the transportation of these
unfortunate people to the
Colonies that came to an end.
Even though this law was
passed, there were Captains of
ships who ran the risk and
smuggled these unfortunate
‘wretches itto the United States
of America, where slavery did
not end until 1863, when it was
abolished by proclamation by
President Lincoln.

There is no doubt that some
of the slaves had endured many
cruelties at the hands of many
of their masters; but the treat-
ment of the slaves in Barbados,
‘taken as a whole, appears to
have been by no means as harsh
as it was in many of the other

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British Colonies, The passing
of the ‘Slave Trade’ act fur-
nished the slave owners with a
very strong motive to conserve
and foster the slaves they
already possessed.

Simultaneously, to the slaves,
‘the fresh air of a new and
brighter day breathed, faintly
at first, and with much of what
Carlyle would have called the
fuliginous in ti, yet with ever-
increasing exhilaration over
the night of European irreligion
and Negro heathenism.’ The
stipends of the clergy were in-
creased, not, as the House of
Assembly put it, ‘as an act of
justice to that worthy and re-
spectable class of men,’ but
because of the external pres-
sure from England.

The first Church of England
minister to start instructing the
fyaves of his parish the
duties and principles of Chris-
tianity, was the Reverend Wm.
Hart, of St. Joseph’s Parish.
Schomburgk records that ‘he
commenced on Sunday, July
24th, 1808, the laudable under-
taking of instructing the Neg-
roes of his parish in the duties
of principles of Christianity.’

The passing of the Act mak-
ing the wilful murder of a
slave punishable by the death
enalty, appears to have been
general throughout the West
Indies and not confined to Bar-
bados alone; for in 1811 an
event of the greatest signifi-
cance took place in ‘Tortola,
where a Mr. Hodge, a Member
of the Council of that Island,
was hanged for the murder of
five slaves. This was brought
about only after ‘the Governor
had brought a warship to the
Island and disregarded the
Jury’s recommendation to
mercy. This immediately arous-
ed the elements of opposition
in the Islands of Jamaica and
Barbados, the planters did
their utmost to impede progress
of the education and religious
teachings of the slaves, but it
was of no avail. One historian
records ‘that Hodge was event-
ually convicted and hanged was
satisfactory; but it was not sat-
isfactory that he had been
allowed, previously to commit
dozens of such horrible murders
with impunity. Whether Hodge
was the exception or the rule
among planters was less im-
portant than the tolerance
apparently extended by colonial
society to those who defied its
not very exacting standards.’ (1)

The Church was meeting with
opposition from the planters
with their programme of educa-
tion and Christianising the
slaves, mainly due to the Hai-
tian rebellion in 1791, and the
massacre of all the white in-
habitants in San Domingo in
1804. It was felt that if the
Church continued with its
teachings of equality, it would
lead to the same effects in Bar-
bados; and that there would be
a rebellion of the slaves before
long. Lord Seaforth had also
caused great offence to the
planter section by his letter of
November 13th, 1804, which
was laid before the House of
Commons on February 25th,
1805 forwarding ‘four papers
containing from different quar-
ters reports of the horrid

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murders . . . selected from a
great number” and Stating
that the bottom of the business,
so horribly absurd was the pre-
judices of the people. On Jan-
uary ‘th, 1805, Lord Seaforth
had written ‘I enclose’ the
Attorney-General’s letter to me
‘on the subject of the Negroes so
most wantonly murdered. I am
sorry to say several other in-
cidents of the same barbarity
have occurred. . . .’

In 1816, the slaves misled by
mandaceous rumours that free-
dom had been granted by the
Imperial Government, and was
being withheld by the local
authorities, also stirred up by a
craft agitator, the slaves in the
Windward parishes rose in rebel-

lion, burning and plundering
property but committing no
murder.

Joseph Pitt Washington Frank-
lin, a freed coloured man, de-

scribed as a ‘person of loose
morals and debauched habits,
but superior education’ con-

ceived and planned the insur-
rection which was carried out
under the leadership of a
African named Bussa. Franklin
went about the country reading
to the slaves those violent speech-
es at that time delivered against
slavery in England.

This outbreak took place on
Easter Sunday, April 1816, and
one eminent planter recorded ‘a
Hell-broth——-which has been long
in the brewing—at length broke
forth.” The first signal for this
revolt was the firing of cane
trash and the ringing of the plan-
tation bells in the parish of St.
Philip at 8.00 o’clock in the eve-
ning. This revolt spread like the
fire in the cane trash, and within
a short space of time ‘mill after
mill was turned into the wind to
fly untended...... the fire spread
during the whole night from field
to field...... the rebellious mob
increased,’ These revolting
slaves looted the hardware store
of a Mr. Bayne, and armed them-
selves with cutlasses, bills, and
such weapons as they could find,
also some firearms, They looted
also the Militia stores of the St.
Philip’s Batallion, and when the



Emigrate

LONDON.

Because of political considera-
tions, some British mining com-
panies operating overseas have lit-
tle hope of survival unless they
emigrate. This view is put for-
ward to the Britsh Overseas
Mining Association in a memoran-
dum to the Royal Commission on
Taxation.

It urges the abolition of re-
strictions on emigration of com-
panies,

The association points out that
where British Companies are
working natural resources over-
seas, political considerations often
demand some measure of partner-
ship with local interests.

The attempt to make the pattern
of control inflexible and subject to
veto by the U.K. Treasury, it says,
has created an atmosphere of
hostility abroad which may have
unfavourable repercussions far
out-weighing the narrow fiscal
advantage which the prohibitions

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SUNDAY ADVOCATE

THE PEOPLE OF BARBADOS-XVII

troops advanced to meet them,
the rebels advanced on them
brandishing aloft the stolen
colours of this section of the
Militia. The first engagement
with the Militia of this parish
took place at the Golden Grove |
estate. The troops surprised the)
rebels in the act of rifling the’
stated house, so they fired on the |
troops, who only dislodged them
after much trouble. This out= |
break was so sudden that all the
planters, who were mostly mem-|

bers of the Militia, were fully |?

occupied with defending their
own lives and property, so help
was not at first summoned from |
the Regular troops stationed at
different points in the Island,
and it was not until two o’clock
on ‘Monday. afternoon that the
news reached Bridgetown that
any organised attack was made
upon the rebels. Once the
‘Regulars’ came into action, the
outbreak was quickly subdued,
and the Island was put under
Martial Law,

One General of the Militia
records “....not, however with-
out bloodshed, this being un-
happily not as before wholly con-
fined to the rebels.
everywhere apparent of most
wanton distruction by fire and
pillage; to an exten, at present
incalculable, but without ques-
tion irreparable of many weeks.
Truly, the vengeance of this
horde, inflamed with every vile
passion, which committed every

imaginable and filthy outrage in | ‘

its path has afforded but a fore-
taste of what would have been
the fate of us all had these |

miscreants succeeded in wreak- | X
ing their savage will. (2), rR:
1) OSePh Pitt Washington Franke |}
in and some others were hanged, | \
and 123 of the other slaves con-. | %

cerned in the insurrection were |
transported to British Honduras.

(To be continued)

1. ‘The British West Indies,’
by E. L. Burn,
1951, p 112.

2. ‘The Barbadian Diary of
Gen. Robert Haynes, 1787-
1836. Edited by Everil M.
W. Cracknell, 1934.

Or Expire
seek to preserve for the United
Kingdom.

Taxes Must Come Back

Profits made by British mining
companies overseas, the Associa-
tion urges, should be taxed only
to the extent that they are remit-
ted to this country.

Payment of taxes to the British
Government is viewed in overseas
territories in almost as adverse a
light as the excessive withdrawal
of profits,

In most territories, British min-
ing companies have to compete, it
is stated, with locally-owned com-
panies and, in many territories
with American companies,

Arguing in favour of full uni-
lateral relief from double taxation
in respect of all taxes imposed
overseas, the Association states:
“It is most unfortunate that taxa-
tion coneessions urged on Colonial
Governments by the Colonial
Office are largely negatived for
United Kingdom companies by the
taxation policy of the U.K,

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PAGE TWELVE SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY, AUGUST 3%, 1952

































> mae oF eee
EDUCATION NOTES: iz
acne , 1 1 y , é
THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LID. :¢ 4RTER THE RACES
’ ° QO h \. h White Park-Road, Bridgetown 3 ;
The Influence Of The Teacher 3 :
7 & 2
nN > PERN . . ) ris Male to oli . . 147 — we 2 |
n a tines enema een of the Seinen the atmosphere in which it is Pitcher Clarke, outstanding con- ENGINEERS, BRASS and IRON FOUNDERS 3
! . ae “is - & - = 7 ared can be of great assistance to stitutional lawyer and Attorney j ‘ s aiilie ike P . 20 = _
system in this island when I discovered that in this comedy the Gaucher interested in the child. General of this island after nelag weal anee ; hee en canal 40 _ : eae sri Ne aaa a
of errors the worst seems yet to come. And sol apologise Let it not be forgotten too that secretary to Mr. W. E. Gladstone; pe dba hearer : |2@ SANJ‘WICH PASTE ,, GREEN CHARTREU
aia hie ae F thet Sudictesil , much of the friction which is like~ Sir John Randall Phillips, Presi- SUGAR MACHINERY and STEAMSHIPS . =r
to readers of this column for the indiscretion. . 7 . Cc. T. CHERRIES Bots DRAMBUE....
ly to arise between teacher and dent of the Council succeeding in AGRICULTURAL MACHINERY d | A es foes , : s+
There is a general feeling of Remove him and the cord is pon or teacher and parent can Chandler; and Sir John Hutson, Dealers in ‘ ‘ ani | SALTED NUTS CURACAO TRIPLESEC ,,
alarm that something has happen- snapped, There will hardly be the avoided if there are thimgs in President succeeding Phillips, ' GENERAL ENGINE ROOM STCRES i $/3 SALTED NUTS ..... " Chases ti -seteiees:
ed of has been allowed to happen same feeling towards another common, such as resid and G.B.R. Burton, the greatest head- of all Description Cc. T. ONIONS ...... n .
and that it is throwing the machin- school and its pupils and so the good ——— relationship master Combermere School has CONTREAU ......... ‘a
ey Suet ayer. I ron inalined te velue of thle work ah a ws - . It might not ever seen. They at one pe IRRIGATION PROJECTS, PUMPING tee MUSTARD ......... ” KOLA TONIC
view that some 3 in n yet another ins 2 many spok lmost verentially of the and AIC AL, INSTALL. ATIONS A GPEGIALZYT S10 ese chew ccc: mt eee .
on wrecking our system, If this really sound teacher might be led people, but the eer hes been aaade oF Mr, ‘Wright and it ELEC CAL INSTALLATIONS A SPECIAL | ICE CREAM MIX ....Tins. DRY MONOPOLE
were not so there could not be so to feel that he or she is being used displaced by the teacher as the jx for us to measure the contri- For BRANDY
many mistakes. to build up schools for favourites “friend of all” in the district and it bution which they made to public Be le ae ee Se a Con iee 8¢ 8s aes 5 Bots DRY FLY SHERRY ,,
The most recen{ announcement and that as soon as there is im- is essential that nothing be done jjfe in Barbados. A son of this Satisfaction, Quality and Service WHISKY GOLDEN ARROW RUM
is that teachers at the Elementary provement in one school he or she to disrupt the relationship, ae wa a I a i oe be oie. ek a re er aes tne ” .
Schools will be transferred to is removed to do the spade work But if I have dealt with the Administrator of St. Lueia, ar- Contact ie ——-——

different schools in various parts {n another. minor aspects of the objection, let
of the island and that no teacher For me itis so serious a matter me for one moment point those
will be allowed to remain at one thet | invite teachers to wait Upo" even more qualified than I, t0 transit passenger was to see Cou-
school more than five years, the Director in a delegation and gauge the influence which a sound bnddaie. Ceaaee where, accordin?

There are occasions when trans- pegister strong objection, They teacher has over the entire lives to hits, he Was born and where
fers are necessary in the interes! should not wait to object, individ of his pupils and the school (a8 aM j,i; father laboured for so many
of teachers and schools, but as ® yally, when a transfer is made. _—jnstitution) in which he serves for pears. A mi ;

deliberate i the indiscrim- 7 ;
inate Gunster ~ teachers is as 7 is ty Be Oa pene any length of time, ; And who in later years can
‘0s 0! ling

stupid as it is dangerous I i 1 Those who have taken the forget the influence of Mr. G.B.Y,

I did not want to believe it but : tac aee pe genet cont pe trouble to delve into the past ‘Gussie’ Cox On the Lower

I recollect now that a teacher of {} st teacher's salary and in other history of Barbados will have School of Harrison College. I!

: the Roebuck Boys’ School and cases his domestic arrangements "Cad of the Reverend Wright who could say much more on this but

; who lives in St. Michael, was re- might be seriously upset. Imagine Was a Master at Lodge Scnoo) there are men in business and

cently transferred to the Mess the case of a young man who must and later Lecturer at Codrington the professions today whose testi-

House School, St. Lucy; later he joaye his family and, because of College. During his years he had Monies _ would be worth more

was sent to St. George. Another {,, ve} difficulties, get board and among his pupils at one time o» than mine, Let them speak for
lady who lives at Barbarees Hill lodging with strangers. His only another, men who not only in themselves.

and had been teaching at Westbury ajternative is to carry his entire their day and generation made The influence of a good teacher

a Girls’ was transferred to St. family and in the absence of buy- Barbados great, but who together does not cease with the end of

Histives Ailttict ama teahine a ing a house, live under the school made an unrivalled contribution school days and to root him out

rived here a few years ago and
his greatest anxiety while an in-

THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LTD.

Phone : 4546, 4650 Workshop

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GALVANISED
MESH WIRE

Secure Your

St. Matthias was transferred to cellar, to the welfare of this island. The of his place like ge a, i
‘ quan In the case of young women, the list, short as it is, reads like an transferred from sta 0 sta- Pp,
Py tenet oth wrong, but it might °##¢ is even more absurd. extract from ‘Who's Who’ rather tion to prevent criminals from remeises .. - all sizés and guages

be that transfers of this kind are 1 must net be understood to than a_ collection of Barbadians knowing him too well is to do an






intended to breed grave dissatis- mean tha’ .vachers must not pe who became eminent because injustice to the cause of teaching. WITH THE 4684 in best quality
' faction on the part of the teacher (ransferrea or must be found they had come under the influ- To advocate it is to preach 4723
: and so undermine his or her work. appointments in the district in ence of Rev. Wright. Sir William heresy and if there is not some

| ne, £ thie’ » > \ - Chandler, eminent judge and inquiry into the administration

-endney oY the, “ebodhand its read sais Tidip tn "the district or President of the Legislative of adidnlloe in this island, neither
pupils, he watches it grow in size being close to the ‘school ig a Council the one Barbadian who Governor nor teachers will be
and improve in standards; its suc. decided asset to teacher, pupils and was awarded two knighthoods in able any longer to boast that
cess becomes his chief ambition parents. Personal knowledge of a lifetime; Sir Frederick Clarke, Barbados led the West Indies in
and as an institution it becomes the circumstances of a child’s Speaker of the House of Assem- anything.

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part and parcel of his very being. parents or family background and bly;' his brother Sir Charles J.E.B. e
Dorinfinemesmnensnientmattnccenht eis: aldara mavertnarenaiahendaaeeaasne antenatal ATT

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SCOUT NOTES: Bes yoy i itd elaine Restrictions On seems eT



has a chan¢e to learn all the parts . EET (Opposite Post Offic ‘

of making the Patrol System work. Salt Fish Imports RICKETT STREET (Opposite Post Office) "PHONE 4918
OwW’s YOUR SYSTEM These are the sort of things that i }

. - Bave to be wosked out with #aae Relaxed ee
Patrol and then, once the decis~ i ‘ : ;

(From the Canadian ‘Junior Leader") membering that it has been used ion is made, the Patrol Leader |, ,.cordance with an Order
mu

; suceessfully many times, st make sure that everyone ,,,, rece by His Excellen:
HAVE you eee of a "Patrol Toho In Headquar- does his share, Of course the spate seo bee the Exports
Patrol as being a Council just like |. O. Camp, responsible for as- Patrol Leader should be able and nq Imports (Restriction Act,
pee -che-tmat fuse the affairs of signing duties and seeing that willing to do any of these jobs j939) persons may now import

se

Some put their money



your Village, Town or City? Well, tiny are ¢ t himself and occasionally lend o from any country dried, smoked,

that tnt eet ip just what the rete hand, pickled and salted fish, onions and th bo b ta il na

Patrol is, although the duties of § © ¢ o nd: Quartermaster, in Work out your own ideas and potatoes. e Z

@ach member may be a little ¢)arge of supplies of food and then when camp time rolls around The Order is only applicable to

different from the Municipal cquipment and First Aid. your Patrol will “be prepared.’ this type of goods which are wholly Z

Councillor or Alderman. The No, 1 Scout; Chief Cook, in Scouts of the Third Sea Scouts prepared in countries from whic t t th b a
Patrol Leader is the Chairman of charge of preparing meals. Proop of Speightstown and of export takes place. ome pu 1 on e y
i this “Council” and he develops No, 2 Scout: Assistant Cook. the Ist Harrison College Troop The Order stipulates that the

his Patrol by giving each indi- No, 3 Scout: Scribe, keeping are in camp at St. James’ Mixed certificate of origin of all
} vidual some definite responsibil- accounts of moneys and stores, School near Trents, St. James. of such goods shall be produced by
i ity ee in oe keeps log of the camp or hike. The camp is in charge of Scouters the ers ee the J
and camp, if ea cout has a No. 4 Scout: Pioneer, making V. E, Matthews and D. Fowles 4pprovai 0 retary ial B fi lk l J b k
definite share in making the drains, bridges, latrines. both of Harrison College Staff, must be obtained prior to was eee ut wise oO a ways ACR .«s
Patrol work smoothly he will be They expect to be in camp unti] portation of any such gee by bel
more interested and the Patrol No. 5 Scout: Sanitation, keep- wednesday next. payment for such sony than thal
Leader will have time to develop ing camp clean, incinerator. made to a country other

new ideas. No. 6 Scout: Axeman, supply- country of origin of the goods.
With Troop camp ,coming up ing firewood; Fireman and Water. ° ;
‘gery soon you will want to make man, has charge of cooking or Good Fish Catches Band Concert ‘
ere. Yape. Palcol ts working Oa~ garde Akg Sie i anes ees Fishermen from Bathsheba are \
some ystem of this kind, Our This is just an outline, of course, ineing mi ' olice Band
. . . . » having a good season with sna There will be a_ Police
Founder, Lord Baden-Powell sug- and Patrol Leaders are urged 8 sare < we weported on Prides, . Coneert at. the Bathsheba Social

sted the following as a logical develop their own “council.”
ivision of dyties for members of you have eight in the Patrol, for . tas soe re fae on ae ha 4 = age
the Patrol in camp, Look it over examiple, then some ofthe dutics and returned to the Bay with first scheduled for Wednesday, but

and see what you think of it, re- can be divided. It might be ® reagonable good catches. Boats was changed because Wednesday
went out in full force yesterday. is Transfiguration Day. i HE W A j







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PAGE SIXTEEN



RANGERS TO CAMP IN 1





RINIDAD



=





YESTERDAY afternoon relatives and friends were at Seawell Airport to see tho Queen's College Ran-
gers go off to Trinidad where they will be in camp at the Girl Guides’ Headquarters, Belmont Circular

oad for 14 days.

Miss Beryl Skeete is in Charge of the group.

This is the first Queen's College group to visit Trinidad but previously girls have camped in Grenada,
Miss Bleanor Nurse an dthree other rangars left by B.W.I.A. on Friday and will later join the others

at Headquarters.
The list are as follows:

Miss Bery) Skeete (Leader-in-Charge), Joan Best, Yvonne Barnwell, Thelma

Brathwaite, Doreen Dear, Andoliny King, Maridene King, Anita Lowhar, Leila Mascoll, Patricia Max-

well, Joyce Maynard, Daphne Smith, Joan Walkes, Marcia Yarde,

(Nurse).

Butter, Cornmeal
Expected Soon

THIRTEEN THOUSAND BAGS of cornmeal are due
to arrive here in shipments arriving between the -latter

part of this month and early December.

Shipments of

table and cooking butter are coming during the next
few months.

A recent notice issued
Controller of Supplies states that
licences. for table butter from
5terling and Soft Currency
scurces Will be issue to ‘mport-
ers from whom quotas have been
received .,.against wholesalers’
signed confirmation notes up to
their maximum quotas of 35 tons
for arrival before the end of De-
cember.

The ceiling price for this com-
modity will be 99.27 cents per 1
ib. tin: 82,6 cents per 1 lb. parcel;
and 97.61, cents per five Ib. tin.

Licenees will also be issued for
quentities af cooking butter from
the. same sources to importers
trom whom quctas have been re-
ceived against wholesalers’ signed
confirmation notes up to their
maximum distribution quotas of
115 tons for .arrival. also before
the end of December,

A different ceiling price has;
been fixed in respect of shipments
which arrive immediately, and
shipments “arriving later,

For the August shipments, the
ceiling price is as follows. 84.72
cents per 1 lb. tin; 79.81 cents per
five lb. tin and 77.85 cemis per 25
Ib. tin. For the September —
October shipment. the prices has
been fixed at 86.19 certs per 1 Ib.
tin; 81.28 cents per five lb. tin and
79.39 c@nts per 25 Jb. tin.

“RED” DEAN GENTL®

SPIRITUAL OLD MAN
WOLVERHAMPTON, Aug, 2
Dr. Hewlett Johnson “Red” Dean

of Canterbury who returned from
China recently with alleged proof
of Allied germ warfare is “a very
gentle and spiritual old man,’ says
Canon Jobn Brierley, Rector of
this Midlands town, Canon Brier-
ley wrote In the Parish Magazine
that the Dean’s “simplicity is being
used asa tool by the very astute
people ‘who lead the Communist
forces in Europe and Asia,”

Canon Brierley said “it is abun.

dantly clear that if he holds these
views and wants to expound them
he ought to resign the high office
which he holds in the church. He
has no right to use his position to
give a Cloak of respectability to
emotional accusations based on
statements which would not for a
moment bear even a_ cursory
examination.”
a0 she —U.P.



The Weather Report

YESTERDAY
Rainfall from Codrington: .08
Temperature; 75.5 °F
hour

Wind Velocity: 9 miles per
hour

Barometer: (9 a.m.) 29.973
(11 a.m.) 29.954

TO-DAY

Sunrises 5.48 a.m.

Sunset: 6.20 p.m.

Moon: First Quartet, July 29

Lighting: 7.00 p.m.

High Tide: 12:57 a.m. 2.14
p.m,

Low tide: 8.10 a.m., 8.00 p.m.





[ Theyll Do lt Every Time

3 Sete
THE CHILDREN'S
GOVERNESS HAS A DAY
OFF TODAY:~AND IT WAS
A QUESTION OF GETTING
A BABY-SITTER OR

BRINGING THEM WITH ME
JUST PAY NO ATTENTION
TO THEMTHEY’LL PLAY

Pr BY THEMSELVES ++












by She --——








GOVERNESS P BABY’
SITTER P WHAT THOSE (7

At the Cinema

@ From Page 3

version with her naucus voice,
bombastic manner and colourful
costumes of the period,

I guess, by and large, THE
BELLE OF NEW YORK will ap-
peal to most people, but it cer-
tainly can’t touch the earlier
Astaire entertainments, Sorry, I
forgot to mention that it is in
Technicolor,

Storm Warning

STORM WARNING, at _ the
Plaza, Barbarees, exposes the
terrorist activities of the Ku Klux
Klan and constitutes an_ indict-
ment of this infamous organiza-
tion, Again, this is a_ strong
meat, and not for the squeamish.

The film has a definite, serious
message concerning the need for
reform, and the’ story points up
the obligation of the private citi-
zen to support law and order when
called upon to do so, regardless of
personal consideration and dan-
ger.

The story concerns a dress model
whe, on her arrival in a small
Southern town to visit her newly-
married sister, is the sole witness
of a murder by a band of hooded
hoodlums. When she realises that
her brother-in-law is one of the
gang she promises not to report
her experience—but later changes
her mind when she becomes more
familiar with the Klan’s acts of
terrorism,

Ginger Rogers and Doris Day
play the two sisters and acquit
themselves well, as does Ronald
Regan as the District Attorney,
while Steve Cochran gives an
admirable performance as_ the
brutish truck driver and cowardly
klansman. of little mental capac-
ity but infinite lechery.

Excellent photography, lighting
and a fine musical score heighten
the dramatic impact of this pic-
ture, Fortunately, we. in this
island do not have to faee a prob-
lem as. presented in STORM
WARNING. Let us earnestly hope
we never do,



Cambridge Road
Being Renovated

Camprige Road is at present
being reconstructed and renovated.
This is the second occasion that
this road will be repaired during
the last 27 years, one of the Super~-
intendents said on Friday,

Through the efforts of the St.
Joseph’s Vestry, 200 C&suarina
trees were planted in a pasture at
Bissex, St. Joseph, during the last
week. They were planted with
the tentative hope of preventing
soil erosion (if they thrive). Some
time ago, trees were planted in
this area for the same purpose, but
they all dried up,

Registered U.S. Patent Office



HOODLUMS NEED J)
IS A WARDEN!



one ee =
ITS LIKE TRYING

: TO PLAY CARDS IN
\Y A SCHOOL BUS! I'D
LIKE TO SIT FOR THEM
JUST ONCE: THEY
WOULDN'T BE ABLE

\)

Jean

(7 WHEN IT WAS HER TURN titi
TOHAVE THE MEETING 3-02 22
AT HER HOUSE, THE :

-( BUTLER WAS SICK OR WHY DIDN'T
SA SOMETHING GOVERNESS, A HER HUSBAND
My FooT! MIND THEM *+s+
OR DON'T THEY
: ALLOW KIDS
IN HORSE-














Best, and Clarita Jordan

Good Crops Of
Ground Provisions
Expected

SOME of the planters who
visited Bridgetown Friday tons
the Advocate that they were look-
ing forward to splendid crops of
ground provisions. “The recent
raintail was a like a “tonic” to
the sweet potatoes and yams which
were recently planted. “And,
what is more, mantring is com-

pleted,” one: planter. told the
Advocate.
Another’ said that the sweet

potatoes, which were only plant-
ed last month, showed good signs.
Yams, eddoes, and pea crops
were also doing fine.

He said that the young. cane
crops were also splendid to look

These planters, although from
various parts of the island, had
nothing to complain about at
present. They are quite satisfied
with the progress of the various

crops.

WEDDING



Toppin— Warner

Yesterday morning. St. George
Parish Church was the scene

of a auiet but pretty wed- p

ding when Mr, Audley Toppin,
Charge Clerk of Messrs. Stuart
& Sampson and only son of Dq’s.
A. D. Seale, took as his bride
Miss Joyce Warner, daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Warner of Two
Mile Hill, St. Michael.

The cbremony was performed by
Canon C., C, Conliffe, Rector of St.
George.

The bridé, who was given in
marriage by her father, wore a
dress of Faconné. Her headdress
was held in place by a wreath of
orange blossoms and she carried
a bouquet of Queen Anne’s Lace,
and tube and radiance roses.

The duties of bestman were per-
formed by Mr. A. D, Seale.

The reception was held at the
heme of Mr. and Mrs. A. D, Seale
at Tudor Street

Listening Hours

SUNDAY, AUGUST 3
4.00—7,15 pam, — 1.76m







4.00 p.m. The News, 4.10 pm. Inter-
lude, 415 p.m For The Common Good,
430 pm Sunday Half Hour, 5 00 pm
From The Bible, 5 10 p m_ Interlude,
515 p.m Bach. 5 45 pm. Arthur's Inn,
615 pm. English Magazine, 6 45 pm
Programme Parade and Interlude, 7 00
pm The News, 710 p.m. Home News
From Britain,
T1046 pm —

715 p,m
Sunday Service, 815 pm
re.l, 830 pm _ Spotlight on Central
Asa, 845 p.m Interlude, 855 pm
rrom The Editorials, 900 pm, From
The Promenade Concerts, 9 45 pm
Olympie Report, 10.00 pm The News,
1) 10 pm News Talk, 10 15 p m. Lon.
con Forum, 10 45 p.m. My Brother's
Keeper, °

MONDAY, AUGUST 4, 1952
100—7.15 pom, — 19.96m,, 25.53m,

25,58m., 31.32m



Caribbean Voices, ¥ 45 p.m
Radio News



400 pm ‘The News, 410 pm _ The
Nally Service, 415 p.m A Tale of Two
Cities, 445 pm Make Mine Country
Style, 5.00 pm. Bach, 5 15 p m_ Peter
Vorke, 555 pm = Interlude, 600 pm
Welsh Miscellany, 615 pm Listeners’
Choice, 6 45 pm Sports Round-Up and
Programme Parade, -700 p.m The
News, 710 p.m Home News From
Britain
7.15—10.80 p.m.

— 6.53m,, 31.32m



715 pm _ Books To Read and Ballet,
° 45pm Eten College, 8 15 p m_ Radio
Newsreel, 8 30 p.m European Survey.
& 45 .9.m_ Interlude, 855 p m From The
Fditorials, 900 pm (~The ‘Edinburgh
Tnternational Festival. 9 30 pm
Records. 1000 pm, The News, 10 10
nm News Talk, 1015 pm The
Vealth .» of Man, 1030 pm
Tunes,

By jimmy Hatlo |

Ay
.



TRYING TO PuT UP WITH
A THE DAME WHO BROUGHT
HER LITTLE DEARS TO |
THE BRIDGE-CLUB TEA>:. |
i) TANS AND A HAT TIP TO |
ARS. S.0. WOODRUFF, |
Box 182, WALLACE,
22) DAO |

i

SUNDAY ADVOCA'Tâ„¢

St. Joseph Round.Up:

Residents
Experience _
Food Shortage |

Residents of Cambridge distriet :

in St, Joseph are at present facing
a very grave situation.

The water problem is very acute’
and in addition to a shortage of |
rice, no ground provisions can be!
obtained. Cornmeal can be pur-!
chased without difficulties; but
okras (price one cent each) are in
short supply. nt

The water was off for the greater.|
part of the day on Monday and
Tuesday; and again at intervals

every day subsequently, a resi-
dent said yesterday.
A surprising feature, was that

there was a steady flow of water at
the pipe situated at’ Sheffler’s on?
Thursday, Friday and again yes-!
terday. There has not been a
steady flow of water there for
nearly 18 months it was learnt.

CHURCH SERVICES

+
}
|

'



7.30 a.m, Matns, 8.60 am Low Mass
* 0 aim. Solemn Mass and Sermon
"20 pm Sunday School, 400 pm +
Children's. Vespers. 7.00. p m Solemn |
Exvcnsong and Sermon, |
8T. PAUL'S }

r'" a.m, Hely Communion; 9.20 a.m,
Se mn Mass & Sermon, 3 p.m. Sunday

Schuol & Children's Service 7 p.m
Soemn Evensong, Sermon & Procession |

Woes east of Transfiguration. 5 p.m.
Quiet Afternoon for S.S. Teachers. 7
vrv Solemn Eversong: Address, Deyo-

tion
LEONARD'S
Services for.

ST

Vill, SUNDAY AFTER TRINITY
Bf a.m. Holy Communion. 9 a.m.
Matt ns and Sermon, 10.30 a.m Holy

Pi ptism, 3 p.m,
Clafoes 7 o.m. Evensong and Sermon.
ST. STEPHENS—Proto-Martyr
TRINITY VIIIl—(Finding of S. Stephen).
Mattins and Low Mass 7.3) a.m. Solemn
Mass 9 a.m. 7 pm_ Solemn Evensong

and Adoration,
MORAVIAN

ROEBUCK STREET; 11 a.m. Morn-
ing, Service, (followed kh? Holy. Gom-
munion) Preacher; Rev. E, E. New, 7
nm. Evening Service, preacher: Rev.
F. New i
GRACE Hild: 11 a.m. Morning Set
vies, Preacher: Mr. W. Hayde; 7 p.mi
Evening Service, Preacher: Mr. I, Oxley,
FULNECK: 11 a.m. Morning Service,

Sunday School & Bible

E

Preacher: Mr. G. Francis, 7 p,m, Ever
ning Service, Preacher: Mr. O. ‘RR.
Lewis. ‘
MONTGOMERY: 7 p.m. Evening Ser-
vice, Preacher: Mr. A. Phillips.
DUNSCOMBE:; 7 p.m, Evening Ser-
vice, Preacher: Mr. W. 8S. Arthur.
SHOPHILL: 7 p.m. Evening Service,
Preacher: Mr. F. G. Downes

THE METHODIST CHURCH
JAMES STREET:—11 a.m. Rev. K. E,
Towers, B.A., B.D, (S). 7 p.m. Rev. K
E Towers,BA,B.D (8S).
PAYNES BAY:—9.30 a.m. Rev, F. Law-
rence. (S). 7pm. Mr J, A, Griffith,
WHITEHALL;—9.30 a.m. Rev K_ E
Towers (S). 7 p.m. Mr R. Crawford,
GILL MEMORIAL:—11 a.m, Mr. F
Moore, 7 pm. Mr J Layne
HOLETOWN:-—-8.30 am. Mrs
7 pm. Rev. F. Lawrence (S).
BANK HALL:—9.30 am Mr, G. Harp-
m Mr J. E Haynes
B. Mc

Morris,

er L2

SPEIGHTSTOWN:—11 a.m, Mr.
Lean. 7 pm. Mr. D_ Scott
SELAH:—11 am. Mr. Barnett. 7 p.m.
M

BETHESDA:—11 a.m. Mr. Greaves
BETHEL:—11_a m, Rev T J_ Furley.
7 pm: Rev. T. J. Furley. Holy Com-
munion,

DALKEITH:—9 a.m. J * Fur-
ley. Holy Mr. C
Forde.

BELMONT;—5 am Holy Communion,
11 am. Mr. J. Clarke. 7 pm Mr. J
Lovell

Rev. T
Communion, 7 pm,

SOUTH DISTRICT:—9 am. Mr. C.
Jones 7pm Mr St Hill
PROVIDENCE:—11 am Mr D., Fitt.
7 »™m_ Mr. E Browne
VAUXHALL:—11 am Mr G_ Brews-
ter 7 p.m, Mr. H. Harris.
SALVATION ARMY

OISTIN:—1) am Holiness Meeting
2 p.m Company Mectint 7 pm Salva-
tion Meeting. Mrs Major S_ Morris.

SPEIGHTSTOWN:-—11 am Holiness
Meeting. 3 p.m Company Meeting. 7
p.m, Salvation Meeting. Sr. Captain V
Campbell

EBENEZER CIRCUIT

EBENEZER: 11 a.m, Mr, E, Brath-
weite; 12 noon, Sacrament of Lord’s
Supper. Revd. S. W. C. Crosse; 7 p.m.

Reception Service for New Members,
Revd, S, W. C. Crosse.

BEULAH: 3.00 p.m. Re-opening and
Rededication of the Church Doors to be
opened by Mesdames F, Lawrence and
Ss. W. C. Crosse. Preacher Revd. F.
Lawrence. Chairman: Mr. Vincent St.
John, Sacrament of Lord's Supper at
close of service.

7.00 p.m. Mr, Joseph Sargeant.
SHREWSBURY: 9 a.m. Revd. S. W.
Cc. Ros: Sacrament of Lord's Supper.



7 p.m, Mr. R. Garnes.

4
RICES: 7.30 s.m, Revd. S. W. C, Crogsge,

Sacrament of Lord's Supper; 7 p.m. Mr,
A. L, Lueas,

Wednesday 6th, 8.30 a.m, Circuit Ex-
cursion to Selah Boys’ School.

WELLINGTON STREET:—l aim, Holi-
ness Meeting. 3 p m, Company Meeting.
Tom
Gibbs:

FOUR ROADS:—11 a.m, Holiness Meet-
ing 3 pm Company Meeting 7 pm
Selvation Meeting. Major L. Rawlins.

DIAMOND CORNER:-—-11 am_ Holi-
ness Meeting 3 p.m, Company Meeting.
7 pm. Salvation Meeting. Captain L
Moore

PIE CORNER:—11 a m_ Holiness Meet-
ing. 3 pm Company Meeting, 7 p m
Salvation Meeting. Sr Major Hollings-
worth
THE ST. JAMES NATIONAL BAPTIST

11 a.m, Matins and Sermon. 7 p m.
Fvensong and Sermon. Preacher for both
Services the Rev. J B Grant, L.th. Min-
ister in Charge, 445 pm Wednesday,
Friday, trainine for youths. This will be
conducted hy the Rev L Bruce Clarke
(Assistant Pastor) and Mrs, Olga Browne.

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, SCIENTIST
Bridgetown, Upper Bay Street
Sundays 11 a.m. and 7 p.m
Wednesdays 8 p.m. A_ service which
ineludes Testimonies of Christian Science
Healing.
Subject; LOVE. Sunday, August 3, 1962.
Golden Text: | John 4: 8. He that
‘evoth not kneweth not God; for God is

‘ove.
Tip Tork THE following Citations are included

n the Lesson-Sermon The Bible: There
is no fear in love; but perfect love
casteth out fear:

Seience and Health ‘with. Key to the’

Scriptures by MARY BAKER EDDY.
The understanding, even in a degree,

of the divine. All power destroys fear,

and plants the feet in the true path, —

Portable
made

& Office
with

—_——





OOOeo

Salvation Meeting. Sr. Major T. }



cg Sepa

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Merchant Tailor






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PAGE 1

l'AGfc TEN SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY, AUGUST 3, 1M1 OLYMPICS; 3 Swimming Records Set Olympics Finish Sunday HELSINKI, Aug 2 THE swimming and diving events were brought to cunclc&Hnn here tuday with three more Olympic records. 1 he 1,500 metres Men's Freestyle, the "Blue'Riband" event in which world records were expected to topple, saw two new faces taking over world supremacy from reigning champion* Suruciashi of Japan and Marshall of Australia. These were Ford Konno tho five all broke th*. Olympic record. Konno and Ifashizume of course were no> completely unknown In fact the farmer is credited with twice breaking the world record for the 1,500 metn-s but they were not 1en nunliil because they were made In shor* young Hawaiian star who wu the eventual winner and Japan's comparatlve o***omcr S HashlrurT i who WfB. second. Okamoto %  Braal nit obviously of .lapnnce. origin was tMrd and J. McLanc i the USA. was fourth. The fir' Tbo great Finn Paavo Nurml aarfUl the Olympic Torch round tho track en the last lag of Ita Join-~y all the way from Athens where the original flame was lit. Hare lie Is seen passing the members of the International Olympic Committee on the straight way In front of the grand stand. Tnuuderou*pplanse proclaimed the everlasting popularity of Nurml and his ftrtAt still carried rhythm of youth. nan v F-. .„ %  •-• tm\t ir Wi Vaat iu The facial expansions of Eml) Zatopek In the lO.OOO mstrea tell their own story of the. terrific p..cs he aet. nehlcd him la Mlosoun of Franca who was second. pool*. But neither of them had swam In the world competitions. ihe race started off with Hashi7i4me setting t. blkaVring pace which I suspect was his undoing; in the end. Konno followed roughly two lengths behind and ttatj s ense d down to a steady crawl with their opponents gradually falling back as lap followed lap. Hashlsume's style la said to be the best of all the Japanese but It la a quick stroke while Konno in contrast has a slower tempo but gete more speed out of it. H<* also move* hla body better than the Japanese. Konno* • ;isier style began to tell and he 'orged Into the) lead. He never looked back after this and In the last 50 metres It was pathetic to % %  • %  • %  how he lapped John Marshall who finished last. Determined Effort Okamoto of Biezll was many lengths behind Haahimme but he had to make a determined effort to keep just .ihcad of McLane and tlie Frenchman Bernardo who had made a good finishing sprint Konno therefore won both a gold and silver medal as he was second in the 400 metres two daya ag<> The expert* predicted that It will not be long before he lowers the world mark but they might lie wrong as only recently Marshal %  •Ml Fur uhhi were hailed n yesterday led from the start -Jbut none of the other* were t • •behind him. But when it look'ii 1.is If Davis was going to provide another "Marshall" he let go with his sprint which indicated that he had only been biding his time. He passed the whole lot Mid )ust reached Klein with abnut 20 metres to go. Here it was well demonstrated that Klein's submarine action la not conducive to -printing and Davis went away' from him to win by nbout hulf a length. Meanwhile Stassorth of th< U.S.A. also turned In a splendid last minute sprint to beat Klein for second place The German'* evylc fciust take tremeraJoue strength and endurance. Davis' ,lnve of 2 mlns. 34.4 aces was a new Olympic record. Only the seventh and eighth men. the last two to finish, did not break the old record. The ladles' high diving compeMion was won easily by Put McCormlck and the U.S.A. Just (o finish with a flourish brought off another treble with Paula Myers and June Irwln in second %  nd third placet In the final of the 400 metre* Freestyle for ladles the Hung.inan National Anthem which DM been heard almost as much u thc Star Spangled Bannei was In the field tracK events was once again played. But this time It was for Valeria Oyenge who upset the two world famous Eva's also from the same country. One Eva, however. Novak was second and the Hawaiian girl Kalanoto was third for the U.S.A. After swimming 1 saw the Foothall final between Hungary and Yugoslavia and as both teams are full of professionals it was definitely a world class game. There was not much to choose between lhem although Hungary's wlnnlni: score of two—nil and a missed penalty in the bargain would make It appear so The Yugoslavia forwards lacked tho finishing touches of the Huntartans but later were lucky to get their second goal when the Yugoslav's goalie wai caught In a blind spot behind one of his backs. Otherwlfi hi wai easily the man of the match. As the Games end to-morrow It Is with regret that a sordid tale has to he told about the boxing and basket ball contests which will spoil the goodwill so abundantly evident In the other contests It ^ 1 1 SBSL * */ Veal4 Tho spirit of friendship In the Olympic village of Kapyla could not be bettor. Hero member* of the Jamaican track team gat together with some trench and Israeli*., over a common problem of finding their way about with the aid of a map. Seated are Oeorge Bhoden and Herb McKenloy. Looking over McKenley's shoulder is Leslie Lalng and behind him 1* Byron LaaUach IHf W1NNM OF THI OlYMMC Bob Mathii*. el Tuliuv, Cilif Campbell (left), of Pli buumons. of I. worldsrceordb> acorlng .,t.< thlOO f<>i the second straight time, i.ted In Helsinki by Milt I. \M>'> unshed second, and r myd i ihu.< place Mathlas set a new *%> (International SoundpheieJ llnnh-lhull : Knock-out !Vfatch. s Begin Tuesday NO 1st DivUion Basket I>..I matches were played last week The Knock Out Cup matches an M'hctiulrd to start on Tuesday For Smart and Healthy Hair Rusilan women bid fair to sweep the board In their division Hera Is Nina Romaschova nuking the winding throw In the Disco*. She brohs the Olympic reecord with a throw of 61.42 metres. Tor hair that iilvva; .i< good as it look, tliurt, UBStnMal .,IH|NIV well rarsd tor rouovv ihe le.nl of li>. rimliintlng nun the worn over. u*e JULYSIA HAIR CREAM The Cream of Hairdressings Trade i()u/riel to. S. M. G. AGENCIES J. R. BUILDING. PALMETTO STREET, BRIDGETOWN, BARBADOS JEROME BIFFLE of tbo U s A Jnnptng In tha long Jump t*ut wblch hwon vlth Uap of 1* feL BUBo wu lucky to boat hl compj tnoi Morodith Oonrdlna. wbo MYorol time, hoot thlo dl.tonc but 'ii o.icli OCCOMOII it wai muld lump WHEN YOU ARE VACATION BOUND MAGI HEALING OIL wherever you go. Fer Coughs. Colds, Colic. For HniU,-,. and Cots. For Strains anal flprains It's your First -Aid Kit In a Bottle. coughing.-Strangling Asthma. Bronchitis Curbed in 3 Minutes l'-> v>u ti.iviat*\it Asthma or J. It. had loI 40 11M.., r-ufTered coufh. .i.-hiti. mt i ISB hs Do >UJ VUK KM, w-~ou do I" taka two laaieltas mM'H at mrali anil your i.tn.rhis Boiund %  !•> |i tho Hrat alaht so Ibat you non fcrl ytara yuuns-r %  i-l iiroaser. -* He AiniN la 1 Yaan MUNDACO not only brine* almoal tminw-diala romfort and rr brr-aUt; __ _nd stn -! % % %  .< .. Ul SDAi stopped A.ibma mas oat ilrht an-l h. hsa had nona alnoa Mea** ... OoeMh. Th. v-ry Aral doM of MENDACO %  or. rifht to work elrtulatlag thruuah your UuoJ and halpeng aatura rfd yon of Ih*n*ct* of Aalfana. I tin • Of th-rtl^Uof Axb i at ail MKKDACO aa Iron-< tad nvny i>ack suarantao. You b.i the Juilae. If you don't ttt\ -ntlroily ••11. Ilka now prnon nJ fully aailaB<>d afl-r taking ilKXI'ACO Jviat raturn tha ampty paekyour Chatnlat today and aae how *?ll you alaap tuiilf hi and bow much h*ttr yoo will feal tomorrow. ThM end a co UB&& la*, am.a IrtticllUa HII '.•• SMIIINO HAaaiiY. c C. Rcholes ( pic team, displays his medal after freestyle swim flnali at Hclvinki, F: second place winner, and G. Laraac fMf.V COKES WITH ill MA SACROOI, KNOCKS OUT PAIN ON SALE AT .... KNIGHTS LTD. ALL BRANCHES itrr),a member of the TJ. S. Olym• Mlng first place In the 100-meter ;l>nd-At left Is H. Suzuki, of Japan, i. of Sweden, third, f iMrrruiHoiuilJ Stepping from your home end into your waiting ear rnn h* a tiresome necessity — or an unlieiputorv pleasure, the thrill of which never warn-. The CONSUL owner tutows thk thrill nnd WVM ii—.loves, too, tin* riMli/auMn of power-smooth. Five Star tr a—pert attsm. ^2675 Charles Me Enearney & Co., Ltd.