Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text


For the cause that lacks assistance
'Gainst the wrongs that need resistance
For the future in the distance,

And the goed that I can do.







WHAT'S ON TODAY

Court of Grand Sessions: 10.60 a.m

Court of Ordinary: 11.00 a.m

Hon. Martyshow speaks at the Press
Club 8 p.m

Police Band at Charity Dance Drill Hall

8.00 pm

ESTABLISHED 1895



HE NEEDED “A
LITTLE, CASH”

OKLAHOMA CITY, July 31.

A prominent Sapulpa Okla-
homa farm m dealer
Thursday told authorities he
robbed the First National
Bank of Luther Oklahoma of
more than $2,000 Wednesday
in a desperate attempt to save
his business

The bandit, identified by the
PBI as Glen Cyrene Whitt, 42,
was held in Oklahoma county
jail in lieu of the $50,000 bond
on a Federal Bank robbery
charge. He has no previous
criminal record, Whitt said
his business had lost money
and he needed a little cash “to
recuperate.” U.P.

U.S. Will Get
Uranium Ore
‘From S. Africa

WASHINGTON, July 31.



Farouk Wishes
Government Luck

WASHINGTON, July 31.

USUALLY RELIABLE diplomatic officials said on}
Thursday that. Britain has warned Egypt that it is ready
to take the sternest steps if British subjects are molested
or injured in rioting or by any other cause.

They said the warning was delivered by the British
Embassy in Cairo before the return of Ambassador Sir
Ralph Stevenson from London and when it was seen that
W.A.F.D. leaders were in close association with the Gov-
core of Premier Aly Maher and General Mohammed

aguib.

King Farouk
Objected To

They said the British remember-
ed that the W.A.F.D. Government
ot former Premier Nahah was in
;power when rioting occurred in
Cairo last January resulting in
death and injury of British sub-
‘jects. They said information on
j | Britain's action was immediately
Arm Reform ; communicated by the embassy

y / ; here to Secretary of State Acheson
who knew of it when he called in
PARIS, July 31, | British Ambassador Sir Oliver

Egyptian General Mohammed|Franks on Thursday to discuss
Naguib, Leader of the army re.|international affairs including the
volt which forced King Farouk’s|Near East.



wh The United Stat i
abdication, purportedly declared Luck ! receiving tee gl ae
the tae ein ak = aaoraaey that} King Farouk in an_ interview| from gold mined in South Africa
gyptian Monarch had to go} wit} ysme apri i ic . ion
Daun Se soled some tke ee newsmen on Capri island | the Atomic Energy Commission

: reported today. Australia will
“IT will try to tell you as much | also be sendin i i

as I can of what I am told you! Soon. RAS MeN
want to know. i

army’s demands for reforms.
In a copyrighted interview witn

the Cairo correspondent of | ¥% " I can say that Ij The domestic output is increas-

France’s “Soir,” Naguib was | Wish very sincerely luck to those| ing, and new mining facilities in

edited as saying: “Our move-| Who have taken it into their hands| Canada and the United States
and upon their consciences to



ment began because we wanted to
obtain justice for the army. We
had not thought of going so far
las to demand abdication. An
ultimatum was handed to Farouk
because he did not want to give
a categorical response to ‘some
of our demands.”

may be operati

govern Egypt. I wish them lots of | a to the Com
luck because they will need it, I/semi-annual
hope that they will not think that/'The report said that, for security
governing a country in these{reasons, it was impossible to
aiffcult days of world crisis is specify the record of accomplish-
such an easy matter as might ment in atomic weapon develop-
perhaps have been thought by,ment. But it could be stated that
those who are new to the game. | “substantial improvement” had

“I love my country and I wish been made.
her all the best. When I became’ The Commission described its
King 16 years ago I was full of| experiments in the use of atomic
hope for what I might do to raise energy for medical research, and
her place among the nations, and said its third establishment de.
my love for Egypt and for my)voted to cancer research, had
countrymen is no less today,} been opened in San Francisco in
though I am now in exile.” January.

The report said that Britain
and the United States had agreed
to buy South African uranium in
1950. The first of several plants
being constructed on the Rand to
extract uranium ore from
was almost ready to start prod
tion,

The Commission

shortly, accord-
munission’s twelfth
report to Congress.

Egyptian Commander-in-Chief
ey denied that the army
ebels had any special link with
any political party, and said that
he and his supporters would stay
‘out of politics.”

“The W.A.F.D.S. (the largest
Egyptian political parity) came to
see us like all other Egyptian
political parties,’ Naguib was
quoted as saying. “Our contact
with the W.A.F.D.S has been lim-
ited to two courtesy calls made
hy ite Segretagy General

Alone in Exile
“T want to make it clear that it
is I alone who am in exile. My
wife and my children are free to
return to Egypt. Neither my wife
nor her perents dre exiled. ”
But my wife has chosen to be

We belong to no party. We| -
with me and so has each of m}

jare no more the vassals of the “was the first

Moslem Brotherhood (extreme] three daughters of their own free} official source in the United States
j.ationalist group) than of any]will, This has made me very]to announce an agreement to buy
other. We are only officers. The}proud and happy. As I am no] Australian uranium. But the

convocation of Parliament for the} permitted to return to Egypt I
nomination of the regency is a| must seek a new home, and I do
matter for political and juridical’ not yet know where to look, nor
men. We are not mixing in it.”' have I begun to think about it.

| U.P. * @ On Page 6

-TEHERAN RI

Australian Government had re-
cently announced its acceptance
of an American offer to buy
j uranium from South Africa.

t

BODY OF

OTER CARRIED BY COMRADES





‘

DURING THE HEIGHT OF THE RIOTS that swept through Teheran, Iran, demonstrators shout and wave as they
earry the body of a slain comrade through the streets of the city, Premier Mohammed Mossadegh’s new
director of police has warned the nation against the efforts of the Communists, under a guise of natiqnal-
ism, to take over control of the country. Many were killed and injured in the outbreak. (International)

Britons Must
Pull The Belt

LONDON, July 31,

Britain to-day prepared a new belt tightening drive to

get out of the rut after Parliament ‘approved Prime Minis-|
ter Churchill's plan to divert some production from defence| wre hie

to exports. The House of Commons last night approved{ The message said all Americans

the Conservative Government’s new economic programme | in the area escaped injury. It

by a vote of 299 to 277 after Churchill warned that the, Said a large tin dredge was dam-

alternative was bankruptcy. aged, The settlement is in Kinta

Lut bie et valley and operated by Pacific Tin

Consolidated Corporation with
Mossadegh Seeks



U.S. TIN SETTLEMENT
IN MALAYA RAIDED
BY RED GUERILLAS

| WSHINGTON, July 31-

reporting an attack on an Ameri-
can tin dredging settlement near
Kota Bahru Perak, Malaya by
armed Communist guerillas in
which a number of employees

The plan also calls for a slash!
jin imports and a continuation of
‘the wage freeze. Churchill said |
;that full sehedules on ‘the arms



offices in New York,
The cablegram said guerillas



‘attacked ith trench mortars,|munist troops were standing to in|
as eri eakery Me ; ’ yet
“Fullest Powers” | inte workea out at the Gom-|™achine guns and other weapons, ‘defence positions today on the
. i ¢ > . s s

1 July 31, {monwealth Economic Conference sami —UP. lena ihete “ainching vets ee

Persian Prime Minister Mohain (oeee: nes -Brcverber, (ud a ‘ourred twice in the past few days
- ae ~ternment’s proposal to build up ex- be St Te al |

med Mossadegh today asked the ports at the expense of arms was STANDARD OIL [Usually reliable snag | — se
Majlis (Lower House) to give him: po unexpected earlier this month, EXPLORATIONS iny Portuguese colony forty miles



“fullest powers” to execute his!

as Britain’s trade’ became more}

IN TRINIDAD








Harbaro




















Vin for

The Malayan tin bureau said it}dcmestic selling price of
received a cablegram Thursday, cents per pound,



_ U.K. Warns Egyptians Against a.
Molesting British Subjects

_Attlee-Bevan

_ Contention

Boils. Again:

|

| LONDON, July 31.

| Opposition Leader Clement
{Attlee publicly rebuked Leftwing
rebel Aneurin Bevan on the floor
of the House of Commons of
Thursday in the most open breach,
between the two men te date:

Attlee rose in the House just after}
question time to give a “personal }:

explanation” of remarks which
‘Bevan had made on Wednesday in
|the' economic debate about what
(went on when he was a Member
of the Labour Government.

Bevan, during his speech yes-
terday, said that when the British
Rearmament Programme was
launched in 1951 he insisted that
Attlee, then Prime Minister, should
say in his speech that rearmament
would be carried out — if raw
materials and machine tools were
available.

Attlee said: “In the course of
his speech yesterday the member
(Bevan) no doubt through inad-
vertence, made statements pur-
porting to describe the actions

—-








te,

PRICE : FIVE CENTS

AT SUMMER SCHOOL



> al

©

¢

£5, Sm

=

THIRTY students of the Third Annual Summer School at Codrington College are seen here in group with
their lecturers shortly after the 10.30 “break” from Lectures yesterday. The Principal of Codrington Col
lege Rev. C. A. Sayer and Professor A. K, Croston can be seen in the second row third and fourth from
right, respectively while Mr. Aubrey Douglas-Smith, Resident Tutor is on the extreme right in the front

|
|

Cwealth
Economic
Conference

3rd Annual Summer

School Ends 'Today





WEATHER REPORT

ESTERDAY
il trom Codringtor 14
est Tempegature: 96,5 °F
est Temperature: 73.5
iv 9 he
TO AY
imrise: 5.48 a
nset:/ 6.20 p.m
n: First @ I 20
h

Tid m



Federation Is

.



Says V. G. Pitt



der:
Indies
sooner it
vill be
i

of the Britisn
“must” and the
eomes about, the better
for all coneerned, Mr.
Spencer Pitt, Barrister-at-
of Toronto told the Advocaie
ssterday morning shortly before

ng for Canada
Mr, Pitt who was
e three
mother, arrived
Y mur 1



is a

z,

in Grenada
visiting hig
here yesterday
t by T.C.A, from
Crit i back home
He w mpanied by wife
and three children

weeks





wa



ce

his

He said that-too much ‘increas

being wasted on conferences and
Commissions.of Enquiry and _ it
seemed as if the several colonies

were vieing for a certaih preferen-
tial position and keeping in the
background, the more material and
important issue—confederation,

“If we once get confederation,
then all the other graces will duly
follow in their propér places”, he
said and added that it seemed as
if they were starting at the top
instead of at the bottom.

My. Pitt said that he was not at

he present moment disposed to
stigate particular island or
y;lities) secin mip, He however

hougnt that a people or group of
eop'e, having almost a common
cono and a common objective
hould get down to the core of the

iy

rather

taken by himseif in discussing) Nahe) than fighting over
matters of policy with myself and ITT baci 4g = ip as ‘ IV1ELLes,

othets corny ere hen he THE third Annual Summer School, run by the Extra-J “if 1 had anything to do with
was fr jour Gove! “Following is the text of an an- Mural Department of the University College of the West {West Indian affairs, I would sug-
ernment.” : houncement made by the Prime] Indies was held at Codrington College, by kind permission J %st that the British Government,
_ There is a well established fyle| Minister in Parliament on the| of the Principal and Governing Board, from Friday July§ 'TesPective of the warring factors
inhibiting members of the Govern! 99th of July: — 9% ond ends. toway ‘ . ver trivialities, pass a bill to give
ment from revealing what pass€$. «Some little time aco I com- The subject this year was “Drama” and “Dramatic he islands confederation because
in confidential diseussion. Thefsunicated to the other Prime Rect sul 8 ye as rama” anc ramatic J hey are old enough.

ee Rage Mis ae Ministers in the Commonwealth] + °C! UaUE The; principal: mueat: | ' eet isa oar a ane a

s r > 8 se > sipal guest has beet intries and place the wor

accuracy of Bevan's statements 1/f Proposal that we should meet Proiessor A, K, Creston who hol) [that had been enjoying responsi-
should commit precisely the. sa Be eee cant ee co o B G S ends he Chair of English at the t hi Bbility with less maturity than the
error to which I am now draw Data etna a att the oNFe p J S ersity College and he chos. People in these islands and added
attention. This I am not prepa: pressing issues of financial, com- “ | Modern Verse Dramatists as hi $that the present situation almost
to do. I make this statement lest perce and economic policy with 5 O12 860 } ubjcet bordered on being sinful to retain
oie ower or ne hag ey a ype agree , 9 | During the course ef the week, &,System without change for over
strued.” ’ » some o which have Ro . ee ae art, fifty. years,

Attlee’s statement brought loud}been the subject of Staonal With Canada gy ae ae 1 “We ure not sufficiently self
cheers from the Conservative |examination since the Financs lei ' oT} see icoont of “ee em ta, fasserted and it is pathetic if we
benches, but Bevan himself was}Ministers’ meeting in January of | GEORGETOWN, B.G. July 31. Ww. oH ae ali an are to continue in this way”, he
not in his place, although Attlee |this year. It wag our hope that, Gonada has shared $5,912,860 ved" by Christophae ere’ | aaid. /
said he had notified him that the jout of such discussions we could (B.W.L) or 13.6 per cent-of Brit- vai pick aed di ban sks eer de Swe | Speaking of his native Grenada
statement would be made. A few|work towards a ¢enstructive ap- Nar Guiseley otal imposttiradé © Shakespeare |Mr. Pitt said that there was an
minutes later he came hurrying inj proach to jhe economic problems $43,453,885 for the six months | jalmost blank appearance on_ the
and rose to say that no word had |which beset the world, ended June 30 this year, On the|,, Mt. Aubrey Douglas Smith,| wharf and the economic condition
reached him that the statement : a ‘ rea hand: the Dominion pur-|/*ei¢ent Tutor, contributed five | of the people seemed to be bad.
was going to be made, Attlee re-} | am glad \¢ be avie to inform ‘ I lectures on Shakespeare, The Heart Rending

lied that
—UP.









The surplus was the biggest

he had sent a ,note.|the House
evan said he did not receive it.|monwealth Prime Ministers have

Canadian ‘|

chased from this country produce
valued at $16,108,587, worth ©:
41.49 per cent of the exports totai
ling $38,727,173.

shat the other Com. practical side was devoted to lec-

\ures on stage production, make-
up and costuming by Mr. D. 5
boulds, Miss ®. Nurse and Miss K

agreed that such a meeting will

he apd useful and that it
ee BS





tha last week of} The United Kingdom during the Hawck ins,
November, The Prime Mjnister}samé@ period exported. to British/ [cluded also was a seties of
of South Alfriea has told me that/Guiana goods worth $17,287,112, |/;ehearsals representing plays Ww

while he himself would unfortun-|0¢ 39.78 pec cent of the total im-~ | various stages,











| During his three weeks there, it

was almost heart rending to look
at the harbour and not see a single
ship. He remembered as a boy
seeing the Piss ocean
vessels coming and going, but now
the place looked rather blank,
He said that it was bad enough

i


















: ately have special difficulty in}ports; and bought from this! Mr, C. A. Grossmith conducted} when they only had two “Lady”
attending the Conference at the, cougtry — produce valued atla rehearsal of “'Tetyas and the On Page 6
r. e p time proposed his country will oterecean ~~ 87.49 per eee ingel” in ity first steges when — -
be represented, The Prime Min-| total exports for the period. | players still have books in the.. |
TTAWA. July 31 ister of India will be unable to} The United States sent this} hands ae : e 9
Canada ek a ab announced |attend at the time proposed but}country $7,221,791 worth, or 16.61) Mr. A, F.C, Matthews conducted | 6 in
that her economic strength has}the Government of India have| per cent of the total of goods im-j)a rehearsal of “The Man Whe
leaped ahead, imports during agreed to make the appropriate ported, while receiving 6 51 per | Wotldn’t Go To Heaven in
June rising by more than $60,-!arrangements for the participa- cent or $2,523,652 worth of the | slightly more advance 1 stage
00000 in value, and creating|tion of India. All other Com-] produce exported. Mr, Golde White produced a
the biggest monthly trade surplus}monwealth Prime Ministers in-| British Guiana brought in from | Dress Rehearsal of scenes from « :
for a first half year. cluding the Prime Minister of;preferential countries other than A Midsummes Night s Dream
With sales to the United King-|Southern Rhodesia hope to be{Canada goods worth $8,599,784, Climax | NEW YORK, July 31.
dom sharply increased, and with present themselves for the whole}or 19.79 per cent of the total im- As a climax yesterday the Bar-| 4 detective masquerading as a
increases in almost all foreign|or part of the Conference. Ar-{ports and from countries other} b:dos Players journeyed to Cod }blind man with dark glasses, gui-
markets, June exports were worth|iangements will also be made|than the United States $4,432,329, | riugton College and exhibited ‘tar Un cup and seeing eye dog was
$378,800,000. as compared withlror the representation ,of they 0? 10.2 per cent. ‘ ished product with their pe--) credited Thursday with trapping
$315.800,000 for the previous Colonial territories. The Con-| The $82,181.059 in external |ioemance of “The Importence Cla suspected narcotics wholesaler.
June, the Bureau of Statistics re- ference will be precetted by|trade for six months w a 5} being Earnest. For ten days Detective Frank
ported. Imports dropped to $324,- preparatory digeussions between| $26.850,555 uo on the similar A very welcome feature of the} Martirella played his blind man’s
500,000 from $360,400,000 giving officials of the “Commonwealth period of 1951, and more than |School was a recording of T, S.! role in a park near the Manhattan
Canada the favourable balance of countries T shall five the House] three and a half times the value] Liiot’s play “The Cccktail Party ‘end of the ‘Triborough Bridge
$54,500.000 for the month as _ eve » OC Ye ext al trade for | Kindly provided by Lady Saint rate # through his dark glasses
d with the defici 44,-|further information on the sub-Jof the country’s external trade y 4 y watching through :

600,000 f “ oa ject in due course.” whole of 1938. The main factors|}who visited tre Schcol far this | the movements of Francis
600.000'for June, 1951, : rccounting for these blg increases { purpose. [i ubby” Russell, 23, If Russell

since the postwar monthly record
of $112,000,000 achieved last De-
cember. It brought the total sur-
plus for the half year of 1952 to
$614.200,000 —- a sharp contrast
to the $339,000,000 deficit in the
corresponding month last year.
UP.

U.S. May Buy
Foreign Tin
For Home Use

WASHINGTON, July 31.



U.S. importers may buy foreign] mission
home consumption for the| Weeks ago by Cuban
frst time since March last year,| Wis, Ortega

it was announced today by Nation-
al Production Authority, This
takes effect trom August the firs!
and importers may pay any pric
for it.

While reconstruction finance
corporaticn will thus give up its
monopoly as a buyer of tin, it will

continue to buy metal and sell ith ayy js

to North American industry at og
121

United Nations Production Au-
thority announced it would permit
tresumption of private imports in
wn amendment to its control
power.—(U-P.)



| Portuguese Reds
And Chinese Clash

HONGKONG, July 31.
Portuguese and Chinese Com-

'

southwest of here said the situa-

) Salad the Communists have created

features were fil.ns ¢;
Stage
British Council

in external trade in fourteen year | Other
are increased production and en-|!ilim_ strips on
hanced prices: but a few new small / «ih lly lent by the

exporting industries have appear-
Canadian, U.S. $

Cuba To Start
Red Inquiry



ad on the seene, The adverse trade }
balance of four and three qué
ter million dollars for the six-
month perie? is somewhat off-



HAVANA, July 31,



y ; F F ad y 31,

Cuban Consultative Council's} set by big imports of machinery The divest cena es ur
Justice and Law. Committee}and other goods more or less of A I, 32 of w cant at a premium 3 17/32
unanimously approved the creation} capital nature.—(CP) leer cans in terms of United States
iat antiviticg i aabe wor Wie ten eerie - |funds in qnsing teres? pereeee
" ealings on ednesday. The

must be approved by the whole 5 atte are . was VY, cent at
Council and Cabinet prior to the SHIF AGROUND pound staring. Was Un. 74 cent 8

$2. 79%.
In Montreal the

LONDON, July 31.

creation of an investigating Com-
. s° The 3.142 ton Brazilian steam-

pete States
mission,

United

The resolution creating the Com-| €! Alegrete grounded on a reef | dollar Wednesday closed at : dis~
was introduced many} neer the entrance to Cahbedello|co int of 3 13/32 per cent in ete
newsman| Harbour today, Lloyd's agents|of ¢ anadian _ funds, down 1/16

who is a, Council) reported. The “Alegrete” regis-| from Tuesday's close,

tered at Rio De Janeiro, was That is it took 96 19/32 cents

built in Canada for Lloyd Bra i-! Canadian to buy $1 American T he

jiro Patriomonia Nacional. ) pound sterling was $2.69 11/16 up
—U.P 11/16 from Tuesday.—(CP)

McDonald Bailey
Jo

Fron

Member. Arturo Fernandez Gon-
zalez, prominent Catholic Leader,
endorsed the proposal after which
the Council approved the plan.

Gonzalez cited the
report of Edward Miller, United
States Under-Secretary of State
that “Communist penetration in
a very serious problem.”
He also said reports from Athens

Fernandez

a Central Communist Committee
for Latin America to direct Red
activities in the Western Hemis-
phere. He said a Committee re-
'portedly “ed been set up in
| Havaria a. the “Cominform of the
Caribbean.”’—U.P.

45 More Added 7
| Captured List

MUNSAN, Korea, July 31.
| The United Nations Command
today added 45 names to the list!

Two hours later as the British
sprinter slept in his room in hus
thirteen Chugunov cams back.

He whispered: “Come on M
Bailey, to the gates of the village
You must come. I have a vers
important man there who can fix
everything.”

McDonald B-iley, frightened
refused. When Chugunov left,
Bailey bolted his door and witec
up for his room mate Geoff Eili-
ott. He did not remain alone

Our Own Correspondent)
LONDON, July 31,

When MeDoenald Bailey, ace}
British sprinter was in Helsinki |
for the Olympic Games, he was)
approached three times by a Rus-
sian — who asked him to quit
ithletics in Britain and go to Rus- |
sia as a coach,

On Sunday, Jul 7 he was
introduced by Mr.Geoff Dyson,
chief Pritish coach, to a Soviet
Journalist named Chugunov.



2



{ — ; Ree oer es de Chugunov said he specially! for the remaining seven hour:
jot UN. pee Tae it ayy bo na | wished to interview MoDonsié | in Helsinki.

jcaptured by the eae ve aue Bailey for his magazine “Voks.” | Here asked for accounung of names| mi, next night the two men had! own story of the events | pdin:

which were not made public. They
jwere given to the Reds at a 35
minute Staff Officers’ session at)
Panmunjom

dinner in a Helsinki hotel, Chu- |
gunov suggested that McDonald |
Balley should stay on to the end |

up to that night in Helsinki

“lL am back in’ London now
with friendly red buses running







nine point programme. The Gov-| 7% ition was calm but tense, cf the games “by which time | ; ,

erngibat tatemnent broadcast iy | aouteg” pedarves Teeter SAN FRANCISCO, July 31. A Chinese news agency at Hong-| The group of 45 brings to 1926; there would be a concrete offer vw we per bee _
Teheran radio today denied that! ¢; 799 900,000. _ The Standard Oil Company of|kong said that the Portuguese/the number of persons of whom| !rem Moscow.” Local ae ate he 5 kes Pittehint the
the Prime Minister had ever made|~"’ ~" * California announced today that|authorities had asked China yes-|the U.N. has asked for an account! He offered: . The finest facilities | had each ater sas - iheee
a proposal for arbitration in the| Churchill warned that very se-!0N¢ Of its subsidiary companies|terday to speed negotiations for the|since the original prisoner of war| tat the Soviet sporting organisa-| “uUSSIan oe s wn : ee
oil dispute with Britain during'.i,us measures affecting domestic’ WaS condueting latge scale ex.|settlement of two incidents im) lists were exchanged last Dec. 18.| tions could provide: A job as} days ago 1 could ae peer. oo
meetings’ with George Middleton, 214 defensive aspects of British Plorations in the British West |which there were machinegun and | With the latest list went a letter| ceach to Russian youth: A com-| my way Moscow-wards to t k

sritish Charge d’Affaires here policies were being planned, Since Indies with activity centred in|mortar exchanges last Friday and|from Major General William k.| fortable flat in Moscow for Mc| up a new life. -
A British Foreign Office spokes-' churchill became Prime Minister ‘Trinidad. jon Tuesday night. One Commun-~|Harrison, Senior U.N. negotiator,| Donald Bailey and his family — | It all began so quietly, just os
man yesterday id Mossadegh last fall “Britain's £4.500,000.000 It had acquired leases or made|ist report said that a team of seven! reminding the chief Red dele-| and he has three children: No! it might here. At 10.30 last Sun
Ss , to submit the ae ae . ie , application for leases on ap-|from Kwantung, a _ provincial| gate, General Nam [I]. that the firencial werries: An assured! day morning, Mr. Geoff Dyson
n but the Per- Se" eer has ' been proximately 700,000 acres on the|military area, had reached the'enly account t} the Comm t future national chief coach knocked ai
t I ied out f hree to four island d the surrounding sea'Communist side of the frontier to' have made the list 126 McDonald Bailey finally turne@| my door in 13b apartment in
ile floor.—U.P, investigate the situation,—U.P \? ame De 26.—C.P, | down the offer at 11.30 that night the Olympic village and intro-

\



Product 10 !ittle heed to him.

noticed Martirella at all he paid
His disguise
wag good, Policewoman Katherine
Barry accompanied Martirella as
his “guide” Another detective
lent him his Boxer as “a seeing-
eye dog. Martirella strummed his
guitar, collected nickels, dimes and

quarters from passersby and
watched.

Russell, porice cnaryeu «i ansact-
4 business at a nearby bar and

then walk to a ramp leading to
the bridge and leave a one ounce
package of heroin on the railing
for a peddiler to pick up.



Miss Barry and Martirella saw
Russell conferring at the
Wednesday night. They notified
two other detectives who hid on
the girders of the ramp nd they

placed the
railing.
U.P.

Offered

arrested Russell he
of heroin on the

pacage

b As Coach In Russia

duced me to Mr. C. Chugunoy,
correspondent for “Voks” magi-
zine. 4

Mr. Dyson and Geoff Elliott
—my room-mate who came
ninth in the Decathlon—th »
left me alone for an interview.

We spoke pleasantly about my
athletic career, my home lifes,
my plans for the future. Rem m-
ber I am now 31 and have per-
haps only four years left as a

r.

I told Mr. Chugunoy ‘hat my
plans for the future were not
yet settled.

“Surely,” he said, “a man who
has done so much for sport in
Britain will have difficulty

|

no
there ?”
He went on “You are 4
famous man. We in the Soviet

Union have long admired your
athletic feats. Would you b*
interested in coaching for us in
Russia—at one of our big ath-
letic centres ?”

I had already to'd Chug nov
—a pleasant man by the way,
spruce in his fawn egahbar*ine
snit, fluent in his command
English — that I had enjoy"
meeting Russian a’‘hietes. He

@ On Page 8

POR




















At the airport to see them off was
their son, Dr. S. Spira.

Professor to Lecture








ing discus champion’ !”’

‘0 Reside in Canada
ISS CLAIRE MILNE, a former





has been appointed Acting Solic-
itor General of that Colony.

Mr. Archer who has also acted
as Solicitor General of Barbados

a.

area















ARIES

% March 21—April 20













a ts : t whe e9
PAGE TWO BARBADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY, AUGUST 1, 1952
}
; , | | NING HOURS
7 4 J
The New Haven Day Nursery | LISTEN,
FRIDAY, AUGUST IST Tb — 0.46 pm 26.53 00 31 98M
| 4.00 — 7.45 p.m. .. 19.76 M 2% 38 M
j 4.00 p.m. The News, 7.10 p The 15 p.m. West Indian Diary. 1.45
|. AND MRS. MICHAZI ; poe A Tale of Two Cities, 8.15 pir
Dp’ Ww pe es angen ° Spent Three Weeks | ek Ripe: 430 po o ewsresl, & BO pay. Would Afters,
: papstes gle re 5. a Met ARTIE’S HEADLINE R. H. E. COLLYMORE, a vard, 5.00 p er tety 0.08 p.m. “ineies, Soa a ene
x cnar were rivat un Salad 3 cane | a 1.) Editorials, 6.00 p.m ing Up the Cur-
mada 4 watendity ‘wapratcia pias 3 Barbadian who has been Praaron gy ao wilion PI tnt . tain, 945 p.m. Olympic Report, 16.(0
T.C.A, for month's holida al ah ge residing in Canada since 1916, 6.45 p.m. Sports Round-Up and Pro- p.m. The News, 10.10 p.m. News Talk,
which the ss ieee a eae left for Montreal by T.C.A. yes- e-amme Parade, 7.00 p.m, The News, 10.15 p.m. The Debate Continuls, 19.20
eet y Re seeene wie. terday morning on his way to 7.10 p.m, Home News From Britain. ».m. From the Third Programme
Mair), 60ies Samana a} g wi
. "TW eats ye the son of My Toronto where he is employed
| a Me . A W. lasts of +} baie with the Canadian Music Sales
Lodue: S i ik dusted two : Corporaticn. v3
sg . 100! I gualifiec we a Mr Celiymore - Te Pe
7 ut cGi Iniversit . 5 spent three R ae :
aoe Pl eee ene — weeks’ holiday here as a guest ai ) ai * *
and i now specialising in the Hote} Royal : fe Tr
Ophthalmology at the Montrea Austead meas St Liste | rem.
Sea a -t rte o/s
: ISS AUDREY REECE who | and if ;
| Off to U.K. accompanied her father to ; ro , ~ * Te
Ly R. L. SPIRA,; merchant of St. Lueia for the Dedication of the |
M Swin Street and Mis. Spire New Abercromby Lodge returned {
“Green Actes”, Worthing lett home during week It BUTS. ; * :
sche eais aeeaeiioe | baw Miata, A Mr. Reece is District. Grand Mas-
rs Seo dM ig ha 4 me meg < ter of the Scottish Constitution in YOUR INDIVIDUAL HOROSCOPE
Via NMbontirca A. GO ouday, Se
wage = tumck 9 on elena a arbados. | :
ihey “wat teaver” via the tA. gat Te a iat + FRIDAY, AUGUST 1, 1952 *
they wi rave via e ot Ba igh? “= A : :
dive «% cting Solicitor Genera
where they wis PaaKe % BOP. “But, darling, alt | seid R "hen ARCHER, Legal | Look in the section in which your birthday comes and x
9 hang Brae igloo wes, “Fancy being mas Dr: Prini find what your outlook is, according to the stars.
he away for ahout two months. to @ Russian record-break- Draughtsman in Trinidad

Excellent star aspects all through day. if
you have the time, lend a helping hand
to some worthy cause, perhaps aid our

ROFESSOR A. K. CROSTON a to Trinidad wh \ % service men and women.

R ESSOR A. K, CROS student of St. Joseph’s Con- W@5 promote ‘0 inidad when i

of the University College of vent, Trinidad who’ finished he, was Judge of the Bridgetown lo Ifs or allowed thi ee da

he Wes dies ive a lecture “ : ae 5 > here. } TAURUS No Ifs or Buts allowec is ge! 5 a.

th W ae pi = of roe on education at the Ursuline Petty Debt Court he | April 21—May 20 Finish incompleted work or start new
onight in ne Harrisor “ge Convent, - 2 2 ea See , * i
Library on “Recent West Indian yesterday wechins eee eure From St. Kitis x ee ae giapaed. Arve pro x
Novels”. The lecture begins at 8.00 ‘Trinidad intransit for Canada R. FRANK BLACKMAN of essions, la s ‘S "

o'clock and the admission is 1/-.

For Three Weeks

where she Tow to reside,
After Two Weeks

4 the Colonial Secretary’s Office
returned home on Saturday last.
Mr, Blackman left here on the 7th

MRS. HALL and nurses supervise daily care of infant children

*

GEMINI

*

Use unemotional intuition, common sense

i , —e May 21—June 20 and you can really make headway. The
RS. JOYCE CLARKE, wife of J TTTLE Miss Bonny Martin, june for holiday and after spend-, The New Haven Day Nursery ‘mpression so necessary in the] of nursery maids in the care and " difficult equally sponhored with the easier
a¥i Capt. Ormie Clarke of Wood- ti oe oe, R. H. Mar- ing some time in St; Lucia went, and First Aid Centre, situated at formative stages of a child’s life| feeding of children. Y
in, Manager 0: e

brook, Port-of-Spain, arrived here

rine Hotel

tasks. Fine day for gain.

i on to Antigua and then to St. Kitts | Sargeant’s Village, Christ Church, 4nd releases mothers for work in| Apart from care provided for | * *
on Friday last by B.W.LA. for and Mrs. Martin, travelled out where he spent a week. was opened by the Rev. A. I. order to supplement the family| children, the aim of the Nursery A . ; i
three weeks’ holiday with her from St. Vincent by herself yes- y Johnson, Vicar of St. David’s on income. It also provides training @ On Page 5 + CANCER Today encourages thigh aims, bright ideas,
mother Mrs. Edith Gibbons of tetday morning by B.G. Airways Back to Brazil the 16th April, 1951, Its founder, ! June 21—July 23 worthy interests with hard work, Start
Jackson, St. Michael. on her way back to Barbados. re ea ae

Optician Returns

She spent two weeks’ holiday as ,

RS. WILLIAM DUFF and|





Mrs. L. A. Hali has been very in-|}
terested in the welfare of chil-







with a prayer that all may be to His

‘ : Mining | 7 honour, your good,
7 her two children, Kleanor and | : . " j

ETURNING to Trinidad by a oe of Mr. and Mrs, Cyril Robert left for Sao Paulo, Brazit oP 4p aan me nine, . the atu | G i @ |g * - «x
R BWLA. ‘on. ‘Wednesdey , on Wednesday by the S.S. Brazil) re oat eee oe te the tees wf u ; LEO Sound plans, well directed energy and
ON raat Cann Assi Cc after spending two weeks’ holiday | 4 Centre to cater to -he needs w Jul ‘Aug. 22 ability can return worth-while benefits,
night was Mr. Hal Ward, son of ssistant Curate as guests at the: Ocean View the poor at Sargeant’s Village did| | y 24—Aug. Mind’ ‘hands tecie ghpeia be tase ents *«
Mr. and Mrs. E, L. ox vf FTER spending five weeks’ Hotel, nct escape her, OPENING TO-DAY AT 5 & 8.30 { for good ay
“Deal”, Maxwell Coast. Mr, Wand , holiday with his parents in Mr. Duff who spent a few days! For many years the proceeds j :
is an Optician employed with Kingstown, St. Vincent, Rev. E. over here with his family, went|of concerts and dances organised AND CONTINUING DAILY t ; * * «x
Plimmer & Co,, of Frederick Gatherer, Assistant Curate at- back last week by air. He is!|by her have provided Christmas VIRGO Widely broadcast are very encouraging
Street, Port-of-Spdin and came tached to St. Joseph's Chyuyh, re- President of Agromotor. cheer, food and clothing for such a Aug. 23—Sept. 23 T@YS for practically all endeavour neces-
over to spend his holidays with turned here yesterday morning people of the Soeiety and Coilege . g. i.

his parents.

by B.G. Airways,

Intransit
I NTRANSIT from Trinidad

Districts of St. John. She has atso
been one of the foundation mem-




Whig,

Fae psy “ i fie
Steg WO



sary to good living. Seemingly menial
tasks as favoured as prominent ones, *

é stonday ning , . aoe * :
Ex-Preésident Lectured yesterday morning by T.C.A.|bers of the Children’s Goodwill a * *
ee ele Malley ‘ N Wednesday afternoon Mrs. Were Mrs. A. W, Penner, wife of| League and recently transferred » iti ee “ Stars rere Strongly support youngsters’ 4
* wifey Doin dehirs H. A. Ballou, Ex-President the Resident Manager of T.C.A./her activities to the St. David's apt. 24 ; and oldsters’ interest, government and
: Engl nf by ‘T.C.Ay was Me Wine of the Girls’ Industrial Union gave 1% Trinidad who has gone to New/Church District which is greatly civic matters of import. A responsive
sngla y T.C.A, was Mr. -

Brunswick for six weeks’ holiday,

in need of help. As a Leader of the



hs ; rt 3 period for clerk, teacher, business leader,
ston Marson of “Marine Lodge”, aoe yy eer pl eo ee Mr. John Wilkes who is on his)Church Girls’ Brigade and Guii- The musical that has every- labourer, +
Hastings. He has gone on holi- Res U1 i aeons erie Alma and Way to Montreal for a holiday,}ing Star Club and member of the >

day and expects to be away for
about three or four months.

Back From Trinidad

Objects of the G.1.U.” was espe-
“ially delivered for the benefit of

und Mr, M. C, Robinson who is
returning to Canada after spend-



Women’s Guild, of the St, David's
‘Church, she has come into contact





thing...songs, dances,

+
*
x
«x
x

SCORPIO

Planets in benefic array advocate doubling

*

; i ini i | . 92 e@ witho strain,
the new members who were wel- {2g a month in Trinidad. He is a/with every group in the district color ond a -wandinnye arary en © schaselines ability pet “apelin We:

ISS JOY COLE of the British comed +1 that afternoon, The geologist working with DominioDfand in this way she saw the need lad 336 ae ot inpartanse

American Tobacco Co, and Minutes c* the last General Meet- Oil Company who are now setting!foy such an organisation as the * *
Miss Quita Davies of the Marine ing were read and a_ financial UP offices in Trinidad. ‘ieee Haven Welfare Association. ; * E
Hotel, turned from Trinidad statement of the Annual Fete was Matron Returns lis Aims x SAGITTARIUS Whether on vacation, at work or just at
yesterday morning by B.W.I.A. presented. Mrs. D. W. Bentley, ISS M, BYER, matron of the] This Day Nursery is now in its Nov. 23—Dec. 22home, this is a promising, full day for
after spending two weeks’ holiday President, Miss G, Williams, Gen- St. Philip’s Almshouse, who} initial stage and provides care for wholesome Activities, x
as guests of Mr. and Mrs. R. H. eral Secretary. members of the has been spending a holiday in St J infant children who may not be x

Davies of Apex Oilfields.
Miss
sister.

Davies is Mr. Davies’





committee and other ladies inter-
ested in the activities of the Union
were present.

BY THE W AY=
Lucia, returned home by B.W.LA
during the week.

PLAZ

BARBAREES WO-DAW 445 4

properly looked after at home. Ji
also provides an atmosphere and





starring

FRED ASTAIRE

CAPRICO: :
Dec. 23 — — 21 Skilled workmanship,

Stars promote good intentions and needs,

A intricate matters, dy
keen brain work. Laborious trades can
gain.

* *
DIAL 5170 _ 8.30 P.M. AQUARIUS = your Uranus among the | a
and. Continuing Daily VERA FLLEN Jan. 22 —~ Feb. 20 aspected planets now. Unusual undertak-
AM CODFORTH, who, as I viaduct or something, and we can â„¢ ings that have merit are red with
have mentioned, supplies sell it as a landscape.” everyday activities. A challenge day to
Captain Foulenough with his Old Two little heroes MARJORIE MAIN you!
Masters, blundered again the the heroic little Spanisin

other day,

In an absent-minded mcod he
signed a Holbein, which had been
commissioned, Holborn, It was a
grimy, indistinet portrait, Foul-
enough sent him a note: ‘Add a

oO
S drummer of Bruch now has
his monument. During a_ battle
of the Peninsular War he rallied
the Spaniards and forced a retreat!
cn the French troops by beating
his drum at a spot where an egho
in the hills magnified the sound.








with

KEENAN WYNN

ALICE PEARCE
CLINTON SUNDBERG
GALE ROBBINS

a
Dd
*
*
*
*«
«

PISCES

Feb. 21—-March 20

*

Should be peak day for your endeavours. *
Sea travel, sports, handling vehicles, tools,
machinery under friendly rays. x



The French thought they heard
the many drums of reinforce- |
rents: This boy Casanova now
laises his place beside little Strob,
the drummer-boy of Wattignics,
who got behind the Austrian lines
and beat his drum. He was killed
in the battle, and his statue is in
Avesnes today.
What next ?
A SWEDE said the other day
that the latest Russian secre!
weapon is “a gas which weuld.b

CROSSWORD
| Dll dea
ak, AE a a a a




|



YOU BORN TODAY: Gay, debonair, interesting in con- «x
XK versation. Proud, a bit egotistical at times, but usually kind
organization or civic group, an instructor in sports amiable *€
with children or grownups. You can succeed in any worthy
undertaking if you seek God’s guidance and help, Big oppor-
be author of Star Spangled Banner.
* ¥ XM HX MM KM HK
Si pininenstetetinventtieenimerenieineiesitpnisithitngineliadingtestrsiertioninenrmansassieuaghdeisinmsiateoimaiaaniieiemiinennan
Pn Sa SON SS

and generous. Would be a brave soldier, a leader in any
tunities immediately ahead. Birthdate: Francis Scott Key,
)
ROODAL THEATRES









breathed out by every body.” EMPIRE ROXY.
Scientists are doubtless at work ah is J ¥ To-day 4,30 only
on a counter-gas, which wo! To-day 2.30 & 8.90 and Continuing





|

i
: } Daily 445% 80 p.m. “DESERY OF LOST MEN”
be breathed in by everybody, In | ;



















; BARBAREES OISTIN COLUMBIA PICTURES Presents and
Ties a permanent war of this kind, (Dial 2310) (Dial 5170) (Dial 8404) Bah hee Deena RODEO KING AND THE SENORITA
L Suggests trade ot the care) there would be no need for arma- CARIMPEAN PREMIERE |] To-day 4.45 & 830 p.m|] Today & Tomorrow asvinat
nol ing writing materiai (\ ments, nor, indeed, for anything and Continuing Daily



o Main water? (5)

4.45 & 830 p.m
(. Merit of the rear notice

RKO Agtion Packed Hit

if / Fredric MARCH—Mildred DUNNOCK vy Pomight at 8.30
4 much execpt supplies of gasses. Ua FO-BDAW (FRIDAY) || warner's action Thriller Pxtra. Short: PUNCHY De LION and [| Madam O’Lindy and Her Troupe in
a







i ne ; 9 4 2 Latest News Reel “CARACAS NIGHTS OF 1952"
¥ Needs nothing for speech, 14) But how long would it be before the s creen has on ears i Pu aS va STORM THE RACKET ——— — A Complete Ct f Pi
i vay, row i be sparkiins!y specially trained breathers, breath- He SlICe re) C ontiouthe | mUR Be veneer an LAR: a my 4 rae, ate hates aoe Lonramme
refreshin, ‘ sacteeliy ¢ i rate j ‘ ’ . “ ‘ : af me :
1s Tennir term upset on, cs Ing secretly, began Senet MET TL Robert L. Lippert Presents WARNING]| Pebert Mircium SRC cea ee ee arene array
cause ere’s the s' g-. ) into every country: B 5 . J ba od it oan a + r n ‘o-morrow 4.45 15...
jo Retrace this raised evel” (i) laces, where people used only THE STEEL Ronee: eae n= MUS TN ELAS WOON PARAMOUNT Presents
} * (6) * : 2 . a mm
20 L ana the tady take @ stroll '7) ordinary breath, special saboteurs H E L M E T Doris Day the, aeiine oa ‘To-morrow Night Midnite Alan LADD-—-Lizabeth SCOTT
21 Will always produceaciove. \6) with lethal hiccoughs could do Steve Cochran ‘UNDERCOVER WOMAN in

22 Joins back seat of the sto !-
(3) 483. Blow up 4)

Down

1. Musical put nothing short |
& miniature crown. (6)
Measure the race with care



Don BARRY & ,
‘OUTLAW COUNTRY”

Lash LA RUE
Fuzzy ST. JOHN

Robert Hutton—-Gene Evar
James Edwards



“RED MOUNTAIN”
Color By Technicolor

WARNER BROS'

AO a | ae

Sat. Special 1.30 p.m.
“RANGERS RIDE”
Jimrn; WAKELY &

COLORADO AMBUSH

great damage. “Hold your breath R

until you see the whites of their x atl
eyes.” 5 Y
Smellingham-Smith
at work

and
“TRAFFIC IN CRIME”





Special 9.30 & 1.30
TEXAS



Sat

Midnight To-morrow Nite
OUTLAWS OF

OLYMPIC

4)




































> : ‘ WHOLE Serial
. 7 Wilson & Johnns. Mack BROWN Midnite Special Sat. To-day to Monday 4.30 & 4.15
4% Model av now to stroke + aad END St ReneS, HOOF” Johnny WEISSMULLER as Jungle Jim “JUNGLE GIRL”
bird. (7) \ ' . Mack’ Br Midnii2 Specia : eston FOSTER & in fe
* Ott quoted Cau OR APC 15 READ that a plumber hes we % Johnny Mack ee APONTE KIN a erate venice “JUNGLE MANHUNT
ests a Wi re shi ‘g - : ' snech Sa zloria HEN . . an
% Makes ain seam retribution (7) went fishing caught a a 7 iT] Midnite Special Sat. . Gloria : RAIDERS: cating “Cte ae” ROYAL
10. Lure (7) grown bear. Cosmo Smelling- SILVER CITY BONANZ “BLAZING ACROSS Charles STARRETT Staxving: To-day only 480 & 815
12 Bright oraage eoiour (7) ham-Smith, who lassoes flying a aries ‘STARRETT = Jon HALL—Lisa FERRADAY Misi cee
te bart a )” fish and tickles hippopotamuses ‘ De 3 GUNMEN OF ABILENE Charles § Mon. (Bank) Special Sore vie Vale'e HOBSON in
18. Cotton pickers dance? (4) as though they were trout, seems Re : ss BOehy ees Mon. (Bank) Special 1.30 p.m. "Sane OF SAnGEE “BLANCHE FURY”
ly. Basement. (4) to have a rival. Smellingham- eet : S . Mon, (Bank) Special 1.30 p.m. “BARBARY PIRATE” and wipes lees annp iene iaciti caine |
¥ led ont wos) ° ™* °° Smith, fishing off the end of a Cee er . 930 & 1.20 By Request |] whip Wilson Double! Donald WOODS & “WHISPERING FOOTSTEPS” To-morrow & Sunday 5 & 8.15
= ; pier at a coastal resort, once Ginger Ronald Doris Steve Gee Sitrerh ta Bate Double! ARIZONA TERRITORY|| “RETURN of the ——— | REPUBLIC Presents
lution of Saturday's oussie —- Across: ; i hocolates ROGERS — REAGAN DAY — COCHAN ~ Nae FRONTIER REVENGE & ye SRR cre a DURANGO KID Midnite To-morrow } ' NL: --Forrest TUCKER
sa0,. Hetrieve: 9 Release, 1) caught two girls, using choco os OUTLAW COUNTRY “SILVER RAIDERS” Charles STARRET¢ REPUBLIC WHOLE Serial ‘ i in
cane: HE deus at Rise ee. as bait, As they were rather WARNER BROS. ACT: ON PACKED { “FEDEBAL OFERATOR 90" HOODLUM EMPERE”
Somer naam T telbesmian Ge gy ll, he th th bagk into
Byoner wn: y » %,% small, he threw them ql = ——————— a SSS.
plenien;, 6 At ming, "1 Galige the sea, according to the rules of a EAN Awe
__ampuaa 18 Sone te Farr it the local Angling Club. GALA CARIBB BB? PW OVW THE SCREEN EXCITEMENT
% 3556

GAIETY

The Garden—St. James
TODAY & TOMORROW 34.80 P.M.

. . _ 4,
OOSROPPSPPOOPSE SSS OSES OLEATE

PREMIERE yy { (DIAL 2310) OF THE YEAR!

JANETTA DRESS SHOP






Technicolor Double / 2.30—4.45 (CONTINUING AN EXPERIENCE
(Next D Singer's ned ASTARET® BENE eon aff} @=MDAW & 8.30 DAILY 4.45
Next Door to Singer’s) Se ee tat Te otae a p-ma. a -0.20°Pi) YOU'LL NEVER FORGET!
Midnite Special | SUN. & MON, i 2
Owing to the great reduction on Cotion Goods, we ane ES bi. Reo tay :
have reduced all of our dresses in time ‘cr the Races, “THUNDER “SEPTEMBER
and the coming week-end Smart Cotton and Beach $))8 QOUNTAN. HooahP ation a
Dresses from $14.98. oLEGION of the |/"SILVER CITY
| LAWLESS” (Color)
Swim Suits reduced from $17.00 to $10.00. OO | Brien

? POSSESSES LPP LESEEELPESEEE NL PIC ELLE LL EY
SS eNO § NE Rater teeta

A AT ae



IN STOC



An Assortment of





a
@ LADIES’ NYLON HOSE $2.09, $2.15, $2.28, $2.41 -
@ LADIES’ NYLACE HOSE $2.50
@ LADIES’ LISLE HOSE Aik \diohanealahuivanguanesirlsetonitios - $1.31



@ CHILDREN’S ANKLETS 30, 32 & 46 CENTS







= ALAO a
NEW SHIPMENT OF ...
@ MEN’S WILSON FELT HATS ooo.oooo.occcc. cescccsssssettseesceaes $6.40 |
ft % 1 A ROBERT L LIPPERT PRESENTATION starring y . = 2 : = 4 , ,
TR. EVANS & WHITFIELDS — __fabert HUTTON Steve BRODIE - James EDWARDS - Richard LOO v0 MELON = CUO wow «LLIN CAN Gane EVANS
DIAL 4220 YOUR SHOE STORES DIAL 4606 =!

Written. Produced and Directed by Samuel Fuller * A Deputy Corporation Production » Released by Lippert Pictures, Inc.





FRIDAY, AUGUST 1, 1952

BARBADOS ADVOCATE c PAGE THREE

U.S. Oilmen Spend MP: oN cuaro acaist LloomING ~ Canadians







Import Bar Affects U.K. Commerce












Tek y, ’ r
4 * . te v i » ®; * 3 - x l J nN srit k * - ~ £ ~t
ti . F wt et W t M LONDON men f or cars and whisk ern Europe Any further import
Over 3m Dail at — a : ah “ : bs an ore Commonwealth import restrie- while imports showed a _ further > said, might bring retati-
y 8 . : tions are having a substantial ef- it increase, mainly of iron and nd that something to
a x 5 : For Flour fect on the trade of the United steel and machinery be avoided at all costs. *
LONDON Bhs Ss a : Kingdom. This emerges clearly Exports to O.E.E.C. countries in
ais , a : : OTTAW from figures just published by the May were slightly more than in ©n_ the bro der question of
Could you spend £ 1,350,000,000 in a year: No, you may a All joi vA Board of Trade the fitst quarter—larger exports economic policy —that of rebuild-
say—and nobody else could, either. For that would mean é eine samaea To i > oe United Kingdom exports to the of iron and steel, machinery and i™s ne Rering area’s gold re~
. s fo =p Shes oe ai d od < ane al pee s serves—the Lane . : ey
spending at the rate of well over £ 3,000,000 a day! Yet h S Snterhationel flour prices “~ — —- —. — a al — partly counter gmc eS . not a aaneeieinae
Dr : ; : : y yin April and agi n May, balance cower exports of hé t to get : s ing
that is the amount that U.S. oil men have just announced it (aehingion in January -with ghougn imports from. the area textiles--while imports though with the dollar. I want sterling
they expect to spend during 1952 on operations both at home moe eta ta to be a bumpe* Continued to rise slightly. slightly greater than in April, re- 0 â„¢make friends with the doilar
and overseas. , va : tea *h Dicanbineel whout A break-down of UK tirade mained well below the leve! of 42d have an understanding on
And only a few weeks ago, a leading British oil execu- ieduan Sel vee during the period from January the first quarter. trade. By that I mean we expect
tive spoke of the likelihood of British and Dutch oi! com- resumed in January after they '° May, however, shows a we- For the non-sterling area , ew ee ee x goes
i j sthi Fp ; _ ee . -rease , sports to > > ve ‘ ; a at @ uying - materials—we
panies spending £500,000,000 within the next few years reathed an impasse this spring in hethchielinn cnsiivien ae ee el oe an = oe ‘om from Australia, rubber and tin
on expansion and development projects of their own London, with all producer coun- “77, > 7 Se Sea ee nye Eber Hae ;



enougn





5 ; : Total U.K. exports to the ster- products in the first five months from Malaya, and so forth. Then
BA an. tri ® $s a 1 i 7 T b in e in ve m mi Rice z z a
How will the oil men invest . a baie matics oer oe vices Ung area fell in May to £102 of this year maintained a high We know we have a certain mar-
tHese colossal sums? In new oil Armistice hele aakhd wate too high, Pp million, compared with £113 rate of expansion from the level Ket.
wells, refineries, pipelines, tankers, The four major exporting coun- million cae — ~ “ee of 1951. On the other hand, there «] want the United States to
chemical plants, research stations, - , i trieg—Canada, the United States, 2Verase of million during was little chahge in imports of jower its tariff barriers and let us
exploration projects and extend. re j emote Australia, and the Argentine— the first quarter of the year. The food, drink and tobacee from this into their market. If we have that,
Pa seg and distribution : a expect higher production of wheat ey. ape a" i wey the area, while a big decrease in um then we pay our way”.
| focitities, samme cer items, Ex- SEOUL, July 30 thig, fall and next spring than in Syersee gor the first five ronthe vee A taw materials was partly But he stressed that any large=
| pansion of such s€tvices and re- General James A. Van Fleet the 1951-52 crop year, The French "YCrese for the first five months offset by increased imports of goalie wage increases—such as A
| re becomes penises td Commander of the United States crop is reported to be fair. France oF ils eer wet bis - ee nie iron. ang steel: number of British trade unions
| necessary as world oil consumption Righth Army and the United s the place of Argentina than the monthly rate in 1951 ‘ y demanding——would inevi-
from — as it has done, already, wations Gtound Forces in Korea ampng* the four big exporters Exports of textiles in May were Not Far Enough raise the price of our ex-
tons in 4638 to 600,000 for uae i said that recent events in Korea er the L.W.A, any ot oenoe sii oan This improvement in our trad- ports, and this would rake our
a 1849S, gemgumplion for nue than ever belare® Price Not Known 2s ehginestine prot, thous stering aren, welcome, thou
’ it was even in 1946, end our own «Moreover, Van Fleet warned that Canada has not officially an- ‘ , ; is, has not yet gone far

: : , ‘T So-, the Communist strength in troops nounged what price it is seeking 1951, fell below the high level of to justify the hope that our over- ° Fe
kee: ge gy Bae eet oo oe still is “close to oe ee de- as a minimum under a renewa! ‘he first quarter of this yea seas payments veil be in balance Biggest Night
indiéation that this global in. SPite, the recent thinning out of of the international wheat agree - 2% Greater by the end of the year. It had ey >
crease in oil consumption has ed lines. He said “But I think we ment’ but it is known to be con- « anything like reached its limit: tion Thre siderably above the $1.60 in U.S. Imports from the rest of the measures taken to achieve this

on the contrary, the oil industry
is expecting this consumption tc
reach 1,000,000,000 tons of more
within the comparative next few
years.

Anticipatory Planning

The foreseeable

He said he was convinced that
the Communists needed an armis-
tice in June and November 1951
beeause they were “in bad Shape
both times” and were worried
about the winter. He said “Well,
they got through the winter, and
they have-since been a very tough



STANDING IN THE RUBBLE of a building destroyed by the California

earthquake, two armed MPs guard

against possible looting in Teha-



funds which was the floor during
the latter part of the agreement
which has just expired,

The United States, in the mean-
time, has established a wheat sup-
port price at a national average
of $2.20 per bushel, The price
Canada“is Seeking as a guarantee

sterling area, however, were two
per cent greater in the first five
months of this year than in the
corresponding period of last year,
and four per cent greater than the
average of 1951. Imports of food,
drink and tobacco in January to
May increased by 14 per cent,

balance would be reflected in a
marked improvement in the trade
figures by the middle of the year.
But the figures for June show
that the visible trade gap is
still far too large.

Total exports during the month,
which had 15 per cent fewer

SEOUL, July 31.

Lieut. General Otto P. Weyland
Far East Air Commander said
U.S, B29s scored “good to excel-
lent” results in the biggest night
raid of the Korean war last night
on a factory only five.miles from
the Communist China border. In.

aes " ; é . through IL.W.A. is understood to Compared with the corresponding yw . 4 ‘aviong 2ddition to being the biggest night
such a_ staggering eect ake trader at â„¢ SS To chapi, Eleven persons were killedyand many. injured by tremors felt be well over $2. Pee ae period of 1951, while haaorts uf cc ee ae ee abate bombing raid it was the axeatens
violsly calls for equally large- see “itm ee Pa from San Francisco to the Mexican border. (International Soundphodto) Crop prospects a°e {right in Taw materials fel] by six per cent to £193 million, while imports POMber attack on a single target
scale anticiyatory planning to perore” most parts of the wi which and imports of manufactures declined by 14 per cent from the ?2 ‘Me war and the first major raid
meet it. Such plans are, of course, ei :

already well in hand and taking
concrete shape. But they must
of necessity be of a far-reaching

Bad Weather

Van Fleet said that bad weather
and floods were causing the Com-

Empire Producers

Now

dependable reports are available,
according to the trade au artment
here. These include an expected
large crop in China—but no re-

increased slightly.

The United Kingdom's trade
gap+the excess of imports (c.i.f.)
over exports and re-exports



May level to £277 million, This
means that the trade gap remained
roughly the same as in the pre-

in the Yulu River area since
United Nations planes hit Suiho
power plant on June 23.—U.P.













: ; Btare ; : vious month at about £84 mil- - ene
international nature. It is in- munists more trouble than the i ‘ f a, port hag been published by Russia, (f.0,b.)—during this period was 1; bt
finitely more than just a matter tiled troops, All Bight ane Commonwealth | roducers Outlook Bright at the rate of £78 million a month, "° "8 RATES OF EXCHANGE
of senene eens vee roads and bridges were in good Tho outlook for the new year’s £23 million a month less than in Critical
of ¢ peice a t ll is wothat thape, and there were ample sup - At the annual general seting of the Britis id crops in North America is ‘par- ie, Sixteen million pounds of Selli a : tom
of ensuring that all the other plies Answering questions, the ; ay general meetung of the British Empire ticularly bright,” the trade depart- ‘4s improvement was accounted The situation, therefore, is 739 lbs pr. cheques one aCe
rte tear ae a Eighth Army Commander said he Producers’ Organisation held at the offices, 25, Victoria sient said. The US. crop is ex- (OY by our trade with the non- still very critical, It is doubtful ~~ Bankers. th anoe PH
ed apse Ceemta to the tan estimated that the Communists Street, London, S.W.I. on July 17 it was unanimously pected to be second only to the “tetling area and £7 million with whether’ the United Kingdom's Bete Dk .
And this means planning of a Were maintaining almost a million agreed that with effect from January 1, 1953, the name of record crop of 1947, of 1,359,000, ‘he Sterling area, balance of payments can now be 7 9/10% pr. cables
ceale and complexity perhaps un. ™€n in Korea, With the sixth suc- the Organisation should be changed to British G 000 (B) bushels. Despite the improvement in our restored without the “further 7 4/10 Pr. Currency 69 7/106 Pr.
‘equalled in any other industrial CesSive day of bad weather, ground , age = , 7 ommon~ “"So far, the bureau of statistics Tading position vis-a-vis the measures” foreshadowed by the ; eee Co Ex.
bg any ONE INES” ‘Sighting was almost completely wealth Producers’ Organisation and that the name of its has hot madé an estimate of the NoN-sterling area, there was a Charicellor in fila recent state- °°” ™ meee iy Ee
“Pit “Tieans, too. much more than Stopped today, and no allied fight- Journal “The Empire Producer” should be altered to “Com- amount of wheat that might be eterioration, compared with the ment on the gold reserves, But 79 110% Pr, Cheouee oe
mere paper planning: it means eo Deane, or carrier based planes monwealth Producer”. The change was felt to be desirable harvested in Canada this fall, ae ae on of oe it now seems that another round Bankers 17 2/10% Pr
ing—agai n probably an ‘OOK olf. in vi sti ions rhic ‘ 7 but it has predicted i il year, o million in our bal- of import cuts will be among Sie ay ‘
Gniffeceriented scald, Equipment , Peking radio today alleged that jn Coa oben impeneietri:s cadmas i tiieee larger than ire 1981 soi hice ance with the dollar area. This} these measures. Mit Butler, speak- Sight Dratts “6 9/10% Pr
of the type just mentioned . an ie eta MER vit on TAEe was in the bumper class although Was offset, however, by an im-ling in a television ‘programme 10 1/10% Br Cable : eee
often fantastically costly, even by : Rene A Mr. A. D. Dodds-Parker, M.P ich wa ye made agai a lange part of it was damaged Provement of £7 million in re-]last weekend, opposed this means vive Bis GUrERany 13 7/10% Pr
modern industrial standards, Ee etek” oa Deputy Chairman, who aeaed pn are nets cae eae by early frost. eae of ea rent pot of balancing our trade with West- 50°) Pr.” yr De pad
‘ -, Said that “We seem to be ap- Jevied on tobace ae Last May, the statistics bureau PCan) countries and of £15 mil-
Huge Cheques yee place Ae ee Sone Neve proaching and in some cases to Nearatbnet eben a ten, in said that farmers planned to plant lion in respect of the remaining
gency report earlier said 52 }.. err id Fae d ; d_ ssince + _Unfor- tortt : cet
i io Chinas Were killed or wounded in have reached a position in whien tunately the Nyasaland Govern- 25,000,000 (M) acres in wheat— Non-sterling countries.
The oil men are well used °° on American raid on Atung, just SUPPly and demand in the case ment and the Colonial Secretary 4M increase of two per cent over Slight Increases r gy
Milbods coriee forty million across the Yalu River from North bag lh jg ge! ive tee are have hitherto turned a deaf ear the area devoted to wheat last Exports to the dollar area show- OL Y MPI ¢
millions — s x t e f in balance an at to all repres $. *. Last year’s crop amounted ed slight i 30 , +
7 z . Korea. The agency also + ; - ee ay ill representations. year ast. sy: p amoun ed a slight increase in Ma ve
pom vs i. ea ipetinn the Mieciein” had eee fave Ee eae eat 2. mare to 562,400,000 (M) bushels, com- the average for the first quate ‘ TO-DAY TO MONDAY 4TH, 4.30 & 8.15
pan A ta a similar amount to “serious protest” to the United Rare. carat Se wiaag ae the Difficult pared with 461,700,000 in 1950-51. mainly attributable to larger ships Columbia’s Gigantic Double
pay for some new exploration Nations against the alleged killing seijer’s market of recent years. "The BP t ra — : an artcapee teas ’ : de
rogramme (which may of, may of one Communist prisoner and the “Ir js pocoming increasingly dit. 4. re rotectorate Government; , PIRATE QUEEN \;. RACKET KINGE
ot be rewarded by the ultimate wounding of seven others in a get to sell the lower is admittedly finding it very dif-

iscovery of fresh oil resources),

sembling a national debt. Only,
unlike such a debt, they cannot
be passed on to the community

prisoner of war camp last Sunday.



Red Charges

quality
grades and the import restrictions

given to reducing operating costs,
more efficient methods of produc-

ficult to raise revenue to meet the

sequence of exports having to
ear an impost which js not levied

sn competing countries, it is run<

c , a . = : heavy expenditure, due to a lz > er z
or to buy half a dozen new super- —U.P. imposed in many countries have oo.) p Ue +0 8 Marge ; coLvepin
a powers, snd build yet haere contributed to the widespread OSiicios, ‘Wut ager lrg os PLE TURES
me nker terminal at which . > decline in prices that has oc-. y: dae any) GA BESS eC " vecgonss
monsters canberth. Sums of this J PLO LC, Answer curred in the past year, In future mapDe a ge ac frog Mae sh
nature soon add up to totals re- ' more attention will have to be Renee ak eee for
ee








CORSAIn

; tion and marketing and the im- : s ; STARRING
in the shape of taxes. The oil TORONTO, Ontario, July 30. provement of the quality of the ae grave risks of losing the JON HALL
men have to replenish their ex- A voluminous report is to be product than has been necessary *’Venue derived from the export

chequer themselves, out of present
and past earnings. That is why
adequate capital reserves are ab-
solutely vital to the oil industry

presented to the 18th International
Red Cross Conference today by
the. International Committee an-
swering the Communist charges

in the past twelve years in ordet
to meet and indeed to survive in
the more competitive world of to-
day and the years ahead.

duties and maiming if not destroy.
ing the industries concerned,

We shall continue to press for

It’s as easy as
less. Sprinkle

and leave overnight — then flush, ‘Harpic’s'

ABC to keep the lavatory spot-
some ‘Marpic’ into the bowl





>. with LISA FERRADAY
RON RANDELE
DOUGLAS KENNEDY

“and, owing to the indispensi- against the Committee regarding a change af policy in the matter cleansing action disinfects and deodorises

bility of oil products to modern alleged atrocities in Korea. Paul Tth Session In October of export taxes on agricultural the S bend where no brush can reach, AND

civilisation, what is essential to Ruegger, President of the Inter- products ‘2D Siyaenvare and else. See Johnny, a pal, and
the oil industry is of concern to national Committee, -announced ‘In October the seventh session re. _ several countries have

everyone else in the world.



the release of the report yesterday

from it.

of the signatories to the General

policy on which it is now engaged

already found it necessary to re-










“Harpic’ is safe to use in








a glamor gal rout

during sessions in which Russian, Agreement on Tariffs and Trade duce or suspend export duties. = ele means eT
Communist Chinese, and Czechos- (G.A.T.T.) will open at Geneva, re earn a re suey lx those connected to septic a
a lovakian delegations denounced I do not think that the U.K. Gov- rs i fo 1 Scie i — be “ti ) tanks. COLUMBIA PICTURES presents no
. , the TR. C. C. as a tool of the west érnment will have completed its Cause ‘of the time ike ieee Ss ;
Labour Advisers and withdrew financial support examination of external trade py ii. exists between the onset WEl MULLER :

For All Colonies?

LONDON, July

Despite Communist attacks on
the Committee, General Commis-
sion 14, conducting the Conference
business, voted 61 to 14 to continue

before this conference meets but
it is to be hoped that our repre-
sentatives and those of other
Commonwealth countries attend-

of dificult trading conditions and
a decision on the part of govern.
ment to reduce a tax”,

At a meeting of Council held

Hector Hughes (Labour, the mandate of finance. ing the conference will endeavour Peete ed a d
Anbricen, North div.) asked the The commission was set up four to secure release from the pro- Sheen Me oor dnateeanne
Secretary of State for the Colo- years ago to accept contribution visions of GATT which restrict Qjseteq Chairman, in succession
nies, in view of the success of the from the Geneva Convention our freedom in the matter of in. 1 : S on

system of official labour and trade
union advisers to the Governments
of African British Colonies, if he
will extend this system to other
Colonies in the British Empire;

countries, The International Com-
mittee is designated as an enforcer
of the Geneva Convention, which
set down rules for the treatment
and exchange of war prisoners.



creasing preferences or at least
restoring the levels which existed
before the war in the case of
such articles as tobacco, wine,
spirits and cigars where as a re-

to the late Mr. H. R, F. Watson.

|



HARPIC

THE SAFE LAVATORY CLE



>



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and if he will make a statement of —Cp) sult of the heavy wartime in- NING TO-MORROW 4.45 &
i i creases in duty the margin of
ae ae preference ~has been whittled

Mr. Oliver Lyttelton (Secretary
of State for the Colonies): In all
but the smallest non-African ter-
ritories there are already labour
departments staffed with officers
of suitable training and experience
able to advise Governments on
labour and trade union matters,
The provision of such advice to
Governments through the officers
of these labour departments is a
permanent feature of the policy of
Her Majesty’s Government,

Mr. Hughes: May I take it from
that that the Secretary of State
agrees with the suggestion in the
Question that this has been a
great success, and will he consider
extending it in order to pave the
way for constitutional advances in
the various Colonies?

Mr. Lyttelton: I think the hon.
and learned Member will see from
my answer that I think that on the
whole this is going quite well.

ENGRAVING

U.N. Destroy Red

Aluminium Plant

KOREA, July 31.

United States B 29s levelled a
huge Communist aluminium lant
near the Manchurian border early
today in the biggest overnight
raid of the Korean War. Sixty-
three unescorted bombers braved
Red anti-aircraft fire and fighter
opposition, which the American
pilots described as the heaviest in
months, but all returned safely to
their bases itt Japan.

In Korea a_ factory 10 miles
southeast of Sinuiju went up in
smoke and flame after B,29’s hurl-
ed 630 tons of bombs on it. In the
adjacent troop build up area, five
other Surerforts hit other targets.
The 63 plane armada which blast-
ed the metals plant was the big-
gest Superfort raid af the war
against a single objective —C.P.

SPO.

II



away to a quite ineffective per-
centage. We are sending a further
communication to the Treasury
on this subject in the course of
the next few days.

Typical Example

This is a typical example of the
value of the Organisation as a

producers in _a_ number of
Dominions and Colonies to sup-
plement any representations that
may be made individually through
their respective governments. The
wine. and brandy industries of
Australia, South Africa and
Cyprus, the rum industries of the
British Caribbean Colonies and
Mauritius and the cigar industrie
of Jamaica, Dominica, India and
Borneo are all concerned in this
matter. pn

“The changing conditions in
markets have emphasised — the
validity of the repeated protests



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PAGE FOUR



‘BARBADOS ed



Printed by the Advocate Co,, Lt4., Broad 8t., Bridsctewan

Friday, August 1, 1952





WORKERS UNION

THE report of the Executive Council of
the Barbados Workers’ Union for the period
6th August 1951 to 27th July, 1952, is an
interesting document. There is a healthy
note of recognition of defects which exist
within the union and frank avowal of the
need for more education,

“The problems of the Trade Unions” it
is recognised “must be solved and they’
cannot be solved by wishful thinking, but
with a clear and intelligent mind that is
capable of giving the workers the best
advice”. But there is less guidance in the
report on how the educational needs of the
workers are to be met and there is admis-
sion that personnel and funds for educa-

tion cannot be obtained from within the
Union.

The Executive Council acknowledge that
during the period under review industrial
relations between the Employers and the
Union have been good. They disapprove
of rare occasions on which port workers

“took it to themselves to act without the
advice of the Executive Council” and the
warning is repeated that the Executive
Council can give better advice and have

greater knowledge of the answers to prob-
lems than any groups within or outside
the Union.

' Such plain speaking deserves commend-
ation because a union which is undis-
ciplined and disrespectful of its elected
officials cannot expect to receive the sup-
port which it is plain the Union is, with
few exceptions, receiving from the em-
ployers.

_ \It is true that the report might have been

more informative. The public would like

to know, for instance, how many workers

are on the membership roll of the union

and how many pay regular subscriptions

The absence of any reference in the report

to the accounts of the Union is also to be

regretted.

‘ Writing on the 30th May 1951 in the re-

port on the accounts of the Colony for the
year 1949-50. (which were published as a
supplement to the Official Gazette of May

15, 1952) the auditor general stated that

the examination of the Barbados Workers’

Union 1949 accounts are still in progress
and “it is hoped that this will be completed
shortly.” ay"

_ Surely the members of the Barbados
Workers’ Union ought to be told by the
Executive Council in their report exactly
what progress has been made in this im-
portant matter!

There might well be and the report of
the Executive Council of the Barbados
Workers Union states that they still are)
employers in Barbados by whom normal
and constitutional Trade Union practice is
not recognise But such persons yas the
report admits are not in a majority. The
industrial relations between the Employers
and the Union have been good and the
Executive Council took much pleasure in
stating that the Telationship at negotia-

tion level between the Sugar Producers ,

Federation and the Union has been cordial.
The Barbados Workers’ Union is recog-
nised by the majority of the employing
community ‘therefore as a constitutional
Trade Union with whom negotiations can
be conducted satisfactorily and even amic-
ably. Clearly then the employing commun-
ity as a whole has the interests of the
Union at heart and would not like to see
the Union’s power or influence weakened
by any disruptive influences within,

The absence of any reference to the ©

present state of the Union accounts is
therefore to be greatly regretted because
lack of information on a subject of such
great importance can*have no beneficial
effect on the Union, The report of the
Auditor General which was only published
on. May 15, 1952 stated that instructions
had been issued which if carefully followed,
should place the accounts of the Union on
a proper footing and “should minimise
to some extent the difficulty which the
“Union officials appear to experience as the
requirements laid down for their guid-
ance are both simple and orthodox.”
Surely nothing could have been calcu-
lated to have renewed. the confidence of
members of the Union more vigorously or
to have allayed public concern at the
Auditor General’s statements than an an-
nouncement by the Executive Council in
its report that accounting difficulties no
longer existed!

At the same time nothing could have
been more helpful towards further im-
provement of relations between employers
and workers and the breaking down of
_prejudices which still seem to exist in some
instances than a feeling of confidence
among the employers that the Union had
now got over its teething troubles.

The Barbados Workers Union enjoys a
well-deserved name among Labour Unions
of the British West Indies and its influence
can be beneficial throughout the Carib-
bean. But its influence ultimately depends
on sound administration and good organi-
sation. The proper auditing of accounts is
a fundamental step towards this end.

porn age

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



For
THE above heading was the
title of a specially striking ar-
ticle-in an issue of the ‘Readers’
Digest’ in the early part of last
year. It impressed me very
deeply. It gave fuller meaning
and clarity to ideas stirring in my
own mind and it possessed, I
thought, a close bearing on pres-
ent conditions and movements in
the affairs of our is.and home. So
I think it very desirabl>; to. intro-
duce it to readers of the Advocate
and to thoughtful persons gener-
ally in both Capital and Labour
circles. I hope they will be per-
suaded to reflect upon it to good
purpose.

























































































The Main Idea

This is, pretty obviously, that
such great. and far reaching
changes have taken place or are
now in progress in the ideas and
@cings of those who have had pos-
session, in past days, of accumu-
lated wealth, property and busin-
ess undertakings—in a word,
Capital—that the old name, with
all its selfish and oppressive
meanings and associations is no
longer correct and suitable, and
therefore that a new name, more
correct and appropriate, colculat-

ed to engender goodwill and
friendly cooperation, should he
sought out and substituted. To
uote from another article in a

later issue of the same interest-
ing magazine: ‘We have reached
9 poriod of enlightening indus-
trial relations unprecedented in
history’.

The Bad Old Days

It is agreed that for genera-
tions and even centuries the pos-
sessors of Capital did exp.oit
labour and take for themselves
the lion’s share of the results cf
industry. Low wages, sometimes
down to the point of semistarva-
tion; long hours of work; un-
healthy conditions and no protec-
tion against accident; very inade-
quate housing; the use of female
and child labour at very low pay;
and so on, were commonly im-
posed and because of their abso-
lute need for the basic elements
of existence the employees were
forced to accept those conditions,
And, as I have indicated, that state
of things continued for a very long
time. Complete enslavements, of
both body and mind existed as we
know, down to about a century
and half ago here in the British
West Indies, and slavery in vari-
ous ‘forms was prevalent in many

If you would flog a thug — as
the Lord Chief Justice seeks

leading.

We have examined our thug—
as he appears 100 times a week.
We have shown that he is a crea-
ture who wields a cosh often
without hoping to make a penny
out of it,

We have _ searched back
through his life to find where
his trouble began, and here we
uncover some disturbing facts: —

In law, no child under eight
can be guilty of any offence, but
more than 1,400 elght-year-olds
are listed in one year’s criminal
offenders. There are twice as
many of them now as before the
war,

In fact, the nation’s crime
figures show that early 40 per
cent, of all convicted criminals in
Britain are not older than 17.

So it is among these youngsters
that we may expect to find the
new thugs’ nursery,

Drifters

First, see how the State plays
nurse-maid to them. There is,
roughly, a five-way treatment.

Here is how the law deals
with every 100 up-to-17’s found
guilty of crime: —

41 are put on probation — and
one-third of them drift into. crime
again.

28 are freed (absolutely or
conditionally)—no record is kept
of them,

17 are fined—no figures show
how much of a deterrent this is.

10 are sent to approved schools
—and one-third of them go back
}to crime when they are freed.

4 are sent for medical treat-
ment, Borstal, or prison — and
half of the old Borstal boys end
up in prison later. Also, four out
of ten young criminals in grown-
up jails return, ‘

In piecemeal fashion the State
in its handling of lawbreaking
youngsters might claim good
results. Certainly not fewer than
half the youngsters seem to
respond to probation approved
school, and BorStal treatment,

Certainly, also, crime

Divergent Views ;
To The Editor, The Advocate— °

SIR,— The meeting in Queen’s
Park on Sunday night last should
go a long way in pointing out to
the people of Barbados what
sport can be made about their
affairs before their faces. I was
not present to hear the meeting,
but from what I fead in the
Advocate of Tuesday last, I weli
glean how divergent were the
views of the main speakers on
the occasion,

One finds in the reported
speeches of the Honourable N. W.
Manley, Q.C. Leader of the Oppo-
sition in the Jamaica House of
Representatives and President
General of the P.N.P. his dis-
regard for Colonialism and com-
plete abhorrence of imperialicem
and he gave reasons for his dis-
likes and to my mind nobody car
be angry with him—at least not
me. On the other hand, one finds
the leacer of our House of Assem-
bly, Mr. G. H. Adams, C.M.G
jfending the present day

the Colonial System.
Let us consider for a moment to
the true position where are

, de-

policy of

we

,cognise clearly two highly im- battle and secured conditions of

Capit ik |
leopard has changed his spots, that |
Capitalism has renounced its ideas



Hy
Rev. F. Godson

a main factor of well being in the!
world of ‘to-day—or is doing so|
before our eyes?
That is the vital question, |
The article from which I bor- |
rowed the heading for this study
went on to specify the beneficent
changes which have taken place |
in the United States—other leading
1 ; countries also-—the abolition of |
nherited Ignorance and starvation wages and the other |
Complacency slavish conditions and inhuman
But to avoid unfair and mis. hardships. briefly summarised
chievous conclusions about the above, and to point out that in the
Situation, it is necessary to re- modern world Labour has won its



parts of the world—in fact :t
still continues in some countries,
the Soviet Republic and its satel-
lites, for example,

portant circumstances: (1) The comfort and security. It is true
fact that the well-to-do person, that strikes are still resorted’ to
the capitalist, was just born into in a good many instances but they
it and had not yet been aroused are used al-I venture to say?
to observe its injustice its denial ~—irresponsibly:and selfishly to}
of primary human rights and (2) secure, sometimes unreasonable

the fact . that such a state concessions and tend to become an|
of things was by no means anachronism, a back number to}
peculiar” or local to the West fairplay, arbitration and national)
Indian colonies, or indeed any

other portion of the world. ene

For example, it is only a little But what is,the position in Bar-
over a hundred years since the pados? Here also extensive ame-
Chartist uprising in England jiorations and. improvements have |
brought . about the beginnings of been achieved, I point to the cre-
social freedom and fair treatment ation ‘of.a2 powerful Trades Union |
Seis os Sg ol ote with its arrangements for friendly |
ssoneaetne of that movement, discussions with employers and}
. harmonious gettlement of disputes;

It is so named because its lead- Substantial increases in wages and |
ers formulated their ideas in six S@laries; protection against acci-

points which were called “The dents; holiday with pay substan-
People’s Charter’. They were as “al housing schemes; and very |
follows: (1) Manhood' Sufferage helpful though painfully inade-

(2) Equal Electoral Districts (3) quate old age pensions, And I

im-

Voting by Ballot (4) Annual Par-
liaments. (5) Abolition of Prop-
erty qualifications for M.P’s, (6)
Payment for M.P.’s.

It will be recognised that this
was a political programme; the
leaders believed that that was the
pathway to success, but the basis
grounds for the revolt were the
economic and_ socia] hardships
which prevailed so widely and
appeared to be so deep rooted.
And their success finally justified
their belief.

It is, by the way, an astonishing
fact that Britain to-day is the
leading Socialist Welfare State in
the world, providing support and
shepherding for all citizens ‘from
the cradle to the grave.’ In fact,
there is perhaps ground for outcry
‘too much spoon feeding.’

The Good New Days

At the end of the first paragraph
of this article I presented the
question; is it true that ‘the





Crooks At The Age Of B

By James Wartlett



The frightening facts in
these headlines are the latest
evidence in the inquiry
prompted by the Lord Chief
Justice’s demand for the
right to flog violent men.



down steeply after the age of 14.
Before the age of 19 is reached
the national crime figures at that
age are lower than the crime
figures of the nine-year-olds.
But the potential young thug
survives this ironing out pro-
cess of early less-violent lawless-
ness, When he finally coshes an
old woman, his record read out
in court shows that he
beaten Borstal and the rest.
Borstal officials, proud of their
successes, are conscious of their
failures, They complain that
there is no longer the threat of
corporal punishment in Borstals
as a way to maintain discipline.
Prisons, they argue, are still able
to flog men who attack warders,
The Parents

The stark story of the State
replacing parents as nursemaid
to the thug can never be a
happy one. The State takes over
only because the thug’s parents
have failed,

Here, then, we must pause ‘to
review the target of our inquiry.
Evidence has been produced in
this series to show that the vio-
lent man of tomorrow is;—

DANGEROUS at ‘the age of
eight, @ A NATURAL gangster
and works most often with a
gang (in London, 91 out of 100
convicted children were members
of gangs). @ BEYOND the con-
trol of Borstal, and he cannot be
stopped from going wrong until
there is no turning back,

What we want, then, is some
system which keeps an eye on
the schoolboys who range our
cities in gangs,

One Task

One city is working on these
lines, Liverpool, with an appal-
ling record of child crime, thas
given seven police officers, the
full-time job of steering young-

has

goes sters away from bad company.

Our Readers Say:



heading, In the reported speeches
it is stated that it is for the Labour
Party in Barbados and the P.N.P.
in Jamaica to assist the people of
these colonies along the road to
federation, Self Government,
Dominion Status etc. but ask your-
self if in the face of such differ-
ence of opinion between the
leaders of the parties which are
to guide the West Indies, if those
high sounding plans mean any-
thing to us.
L, B. BRATHWAITE

The Sabbath

SIR, -— Appearing in this
column of your paper on July
26th, the letter headed ‘The
Olympic Games ang The Sab-

bath’ signed by F. G. was only a
mass of confusion. F, G. spoke
of Sunday as the Sabbath, a day
which he should have mentioned
as ‘the Lord's Day,’

Before I go into the full nature





of what I am about to express

I want F. G. and all readers. to

fully understand that I am not a

Seventh Day Adventist neither

am I in any way attached to this

religous body- but IT am only a
j

affirm that these and other
provements and reforms have been |
effected with the approval and co-
operation of the Capitalist. So
Capital and Labour are learning
to work together with goodwill
even in Barbados, |
Two Majo¥ Facts Still To |
Be Named

In conclusion I have to specify,
with all possible emphasis, two}|
supremely important points re-|
quired to complete the story. They |
are the Vital Necessity for Capital, |
and the Ideal Method of Co-opera- |
tion.

But to attempt to bring them in
at the end. of this somewhat!
lengthy article would mean heavy |
overloading, and an impossibility
to expound and illustrate them as,
is essential in view of their novel- |
ty to many students of the situation |
—and their fundamental nature, |
So I must ask to be allowed to}
return to the subject at an early
date.



|

These seven men do not prose-
cute. They do not take part in)
proceedings against any of the!
2,200 Liverpool youngsters before
the courts each year. |

Instead they concentrate on
the activities of the young gangs. |
In three years\they have broken|
up the bands of children who}
used to pilfer from Liverpool's |
multiple stores,

By ferreting around in ‘the
nursery of the thugs these seven
have built up first-hand know-
ledge of the temptations and)
home conditions of Liverpool’s|
children, |

They have made more than}
5,000 visits to homes, broken down!
the resistance of parents, to talk!
about. their , bothersome boys.|
They have made more than 1,000!
visits ta schools to talk with!
headmasters, more than 1,000)
visits to youth clubs.



They have cut down the figure}
of second-time young offenders,
They have spotted more than 500
likely young criminals and per-
suaded them to join the healthy)
atmosphere of respectable boys’ |
organisations,

Liverpool’s Chief Constable, '
Mr, Cyril Martin, says of this|
new approach; “I do not pretend |
it is a panacea for the evil of!
child crime.

“The full benefit will only
become apparent in future years.
But we have already proved that
if it had not been for our seven
juvenile liaison officers many
more children would have started
on the downward path.’ }

Promise

The price of all this is seven
policemen spared from the job of)
jottiyg down the numbers of}
parked cars,

It is a cOmmon-sense, get-at-
the-root-of—the—trouble system
which should appeal equally to)
‘ose who support and those who
oppose Lord Goddard’s demand
for the right to flog the man with
the cosh, ;

That is one long-term solution
which promises well. But it does
not deal with the men who will
cosh 100 vietitis next week.
Bie a L.E.S.



‘Bible Readery In the meantime
I want all readers to understand
that I havé “nothing against this
religous set of people of whom!
I know very little af their doc-
trines.

I think that Mr. F. G. has in
his possession a Bible and I hope
it does not vary in any way with
mine. Exd. 20, 10: begins with
these words, ‘Rut the seventh
day is the Sabbath of the Lord,
Thy God’. I 4m sure that he
also honours the Friday before
Easter day as Good-Friday and
in respect of any day when our
Lord was crucified and He rose
the third day from the grave
making it Easter Day (Sunday) |
and in Mark’ 16, 2 Sunday is}
mentioned as the ‘first day in the!
















week’ hence counting from Sun-! So the Transport Bill is also postponed.
Gay as the first day will bring us Meanwhile some quite trivial legislation
Saturday as the Seventh da! is being delayed by the Socialist tactics of fili-
wae Exd. ‘points out as the}huster by amendment. The question is how]
Sabbath. ‘ i the public houses will be rim the “new
I want in no way to criticise; °° Paves ts ge run sa the new
. F. G’s religion but if he be-| towns” that are at last, beginning to be built. |
lieve that inday ist Sab-) Soc ists wanted nat 1 pubs: Cor }
k ll is wrong at i lays want ord t British pub sotialinte
himself ¢ tk e cha :
being a Sabbath breaker. ay tne & servative: ire
BIBLE READER. from the brewers. A big row is brewi

approach. The Conservative Party wants to

ance | Wanted: A New Name NEWS FROM BRITAIN

By DAVID TEMPLE ROBERTS,

LONDON.
WINSTON CHURCHILL, in his 78th year,

js conscious of his place in history, and his
and methods and become instead nation’s fate. The party he leads is conscious
of its shaky support from the fickle “floating
voter”. And it is worried by its fate at the
next General Election.

That is why Winston Churchill is almost
alone ‘in giving us the kind of stern unwel-

come warnings that the situation undoubt-

edly demands. Once again, this week, he
spoke of the need for really urgent measures
—which he will have to announce before
Parliament disperses in August.

Meanwhile, the Conservative Party is de-
termined to look on the bright side. So there
seems to be some contradiction between the
leader’s call for stringent measures and the
subordinate’s announcement, (this one from
Harold MacMillan), even on the same day,
that the housing programme would not be

}cut even under conditions of austerity.

POLITICAL HOPES
The Conservative Party is not without
political hopes. The present Government has
three years before it must face election fever.
The plan of its leaders is to defy unpopular-
ity in the meanwhile and press on to a suc-
cessful resolution of Britain’s problems by

| the end of that period.

There are two ways of going about this.
One is the Churchillian method. Roughly,
the economic struggle looks, to Churchill,
like another war. He is on the point of prom-
ising nothing but the agony of effort and suf-
fering. Then he hopes that Britain, as usual,
will struggle through.

The other route is a much more political

get some aspects of the economy .reorgan-
ised, For instance, it wants to cut back sub-
sidies and it wants to vary the Rent Restric-
tion Acts which pin rents to their 1939 levels.
But in order to get these things done the
politician knows he has to sugar the pill
otherwise it is not swallowed. Thus Mr.
Butler took off some subsidies, and simul-
taneusly eased the income tax. Food prices
rose, but taxes. went down for millions.

But both the courses are dangerous, in
polities. It is difficult to lead a Party through
a trough of disappointment. The organisation
does not like the strain. There are already
noticeable signs that Conservatives all over
the country who believed in national salva-
tion when Mr. Churchill was re-elected, are
now dissatisfied.

There was an election in Scotland recently
in Dundee. The Conservative candidate lost
8,800 votes. And the Socialist majority went

up by 4,300.

HOUSE OF COMMONS

Conservative M.P.’s are delighted and
amused by the desperate squabbles that are
in progress on the Labour side of the House.

Each meeting of the Parliamentary Labéur
Party seems to be more acrimonious than the
last. Recently the Party had to take a vote,
once more, to decide what should be the
course of its policy in the House of Commons.
The subject of all the trouble was the re-
armament of Western Germany: Aneurin
Bevan, with his allies, including Hugh Dal-
ton, want an uncompromising line. And they
came within a few votes of defeating the
“Attleeites”. At the end of the meeting the
Bevanites were cock-a-hoop. One of them
said after the meeting, “Attlee’s a charming

| old gentleman, but he ought to retire.”

This kind of feuding inside the Labour
Party puts up the Conservative chances of
staying in power for the full term of five
years.

CONSERVATIVE MUDDLE

On the big matters the leadership of Win-
ston Churchill and the skill of R. A. Butler,
as Chancellor, seem to be triumphing. But
in the realm of party policy there is plenty
of confusion on the Conservative benches.

The party was put into office with promises
to de-nationalise the steel industry ard the
road transport. 40,000 trucks were acquired
by the Transport Commission in its great
take-over at the time of nationalization.
Conservatives promised to unravel both these
Socialist set-ups.

A candid reporter must admit that the first
expectation after the General Flection was a
plan to de-nationalise steel. This was an-
nounced in the King’s Speech. And Chur-
chill’s son-in-law, Mr. Duncan Sandys, was
reputed to be hard at work on a scheme to
get Britain’s basic industry back into private
hands,

But nothing developed. And then it was

suddenly announced that Transport would

have priority, and that it was really a very
urgent matter, The much smaller operation
of selling off 35,000 trucks to private owners
is taking the political machine a good deal
of its energfes as Labour has organised a
strenuous delaying action.

The Conservative Government seems to
have reached a muddle with its legislation.
Steel is postponed until next session—and
ihere are even some doubts if it will be de
nationalised then. Transport has had its Bill
prepared—but at the last moment the man-
agers of business realised that if it were in-
troducéd immediately there would be no
holiday for M.P.’s in August.







LSOSSCSSSSSSOOSSEGSSS

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sien ii Arata aes ecaecinds eae



FRIDAY, AUGUST 1, 1952

orem ante ate

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



PAGE FIVE

GIRL CHARGED WITH MURDER OF BABY

Prosecution Call

Twelve Witnesses
Defence Continues Today

THE trial of 17-year-old Verona Jackman of Hanson
: St. George, for the murder of an infant to which
she is alleged to have given birth and thrown in a well
near her home on May 23, started at the Court of Grand

Tenantry,

Sessions

Mr. W. W. Reece,
for the Crown, ~

The Prosecution called 12 witnesses.

that Jackman’s neighbours noticed that near the time of
the alleged offence she seemed about to

child, but she disliked being teased by them concerning it.

On May 23, shortly after 5 a.m.
she was seen going with a basin
towards the well which is 110
yards from her father’s home, and
one witness heard a baby’s cry
when he went near her. After-
wards, a baby was taken out of
the well by the police, and the
baby and she were taken to the
Police Medical Officerfand then the
Hospital. Medical evidence is that
she had recently given birth to a
child,

During his outlining of the case,
Mr. Reece told the jury that in-
tention had to be proved. Inten-
tion could be proved either by
words spoken by the accused, or
from the circumstances of the case.
It was seldom that a person ex-
pressed the intention to kill, and
then they had to make an infer-
ence from the circumstances. And
they had to do this in the case be-
fore them.

He said that the case had gone
before the Police Magistrate twice.
On the first occasion, the Police
Magistrate, Mr. C. W. Rudder, de-
cided that a prima facie case had
not been made out and discharged
Jackman, but a prima facie case
had after been made out before
Police Magistrate Mr. C. L. Wal-
wyn. It was, however, their opin-
ion that mattered.

He added that if they felt that
the child had been killed by Jack-
man while she was suffering from
the effects of the birth and was
not in her normal senses, that
would be infanticide.

Dr. Edmund L. Ward, Police
Medical Officer of District “B”
said that about 8.15 a.m. he saw
Jackman at his office and also a
new born male child which was
alleged to have been taken out of a
well. The body of the é¢hild which
was about four hours old, was
covered with blood, grass, manure.

Wounds on Baby

There was a lacerated wound
on the left upper arm about two
and a half inches long; one on the
left foot near the ankle joint
about an inch long, multiple
bruises on the skin, and the child
was suffering from cold and ex-
posure and was moaning. The
heart beat was weak. He sent it
to the hospital.

At the request of Sgt. Inniss he
examined Jackman who consented
to be examined. There was a
swelling of her legs and feet, and
dry biood was on them and on her
petticoat.

From his examination, he was
of the opinion that Jackman had
recently given birth to a child, not
more than six hours.

On the following. day, he per-

formed a post mortem examination
on the dead body of the child he
had examined the previous day.
It was a full term infant. In his
opinion death was due to shock
and haemorrhage following frac-
ture of the skull and rupture of
the liver.
_ On the day Jackman and the
infant were brought to him he vis-
ited a well at Hanson Tenantry,
pointed out to him by the police.
What appeared to be blood and
human excreta about a day old
was at the side of the well, A
house about 110 feet from the well
was pointed out as the house
where Jackman lived, People
migh* heve been using the well
as a latrine.

Blood on a track at the side of
the house, was covered with marl
but penetrated the marl.

The injuries the child had sus-
tained could have been caused by
a fall into the well.

No Marks of Violence

Cross.examined he said that the
child had not been bathed. There
were no marks of violence, such
e attempted strangulation, upon
it. ,

_Certain depositions he had, were
given him by Mr, Reece since the
first. preliminary hearing.

Here Mr. Reécce observed that
the witness was giving medical
testimony and Mr. Smith said he
was not questioning the ‘doctor’s

integrity but the question was
necessary to the defence.
Dr. T. J. Gilmore, medical

practitioner who examined Jack.
man and the child on May 23,
also said she had recently given
birth to a child.

KNIGHT'S PHOENIX & CITY
SODA FOUNTAINS.

|





Q.C., Solicitor General, is prosecuting



from the Police Medical Officer,
and she said she would. Sgt. In-
niss also tod her that she
might be charged for abandoning
the child, and cautioned her. He
asked her whether she had any-
thing to say and she said nothing.

Cross-examined, he said that
there had been two preliminary
hearings of the case, the first be-
fore Police Magistrate Mr. Rudder
and the other before Police Maxg-
istrate Mr. Walwyn, She was dis-
charged by Mr. Rudder, but was
arrested shortly after leaving the
dock, when she was under the

yesterday before His Lordship Mr. Justice G. L, @chway of the building.
Taylor. After the Prosecution closed its case and Jack-

man’s counsel Mr. F. G. Smith outlined the defence, it was
adjourned until to-day at 10

nso Walcott of Hanson
Tenantry who lived near Jack-
man said that shortly after 5 a.m.
on May 23 he saw someone going
towards the well walking uncom-
fortabiy and bending over. He did
Their case jis not recognize who it was at first,
but on going nearer he saw it was
Jackman and the sound of a
baby’s cry came from under her
skirt. He did not see any baby,
though.
The rain was drizzling and he

a.m,

give birth to a

Cross-examined, he too, said
that other than the bruises and

such injuries, th went back home for a coat and
marks of winiannee nad. sien. BS returned to the well. He stil
Dr. Z. Skomorock, the other heard the crying, but did not

doctor to give evidence concern- ®€¢ anything.

ing Jackman and the child, was Jackman asked him if he came
also of the opinion that Jackman Out there to téll lies on her and
had recently delivered a chili he replied that she had said she
when he examined her on May was not expecting a baby, but i!
23. she threw the baby in the well,
_, Cross.examined, he said that he would tell the world. He went
it was possible for a pregnant and told his daughter and when he
woman to have labour pains and returned he did not hear any

not know they were such. There erying. Later he again heard a
were cases on record in which ing, this ti comi , e
children cried before being born wot Were eee
and bystanders heard. A person “~~”
within about five yards from c

pregnant woman, the child of He was there when Carter went
whom was crying before birth, into the well and returned with ¢

Was Present

would hear the cry, One a lit- bab:
tle further might hear it too, Grete-examnisied, he said that

but such a cry was weak.
_ Re-examined, he said that such
instances of crying before birth,

‘when he first saw Jackman out-
side it was not so dark. He was
we 5 : not certain whether the piece of
mite TO aOOUt One te clothing Jackman wore was a pet-
Audrey Pencheon, sister of the ticoat, a dress or a nightgown, The
General Hospital, gave evidence Nearest he went towards her was
as to Jackman’s being brought #bout 15 feet. :
to the hospital on May 23. On his replying that he could
Gertrude Holder, nurse of the not remember if he had told Police
General Hospital, maternity Magistrate Mr. Rudder that he
ward, corroborated Pencheon’s had not heard the crying coming
evidence, and identified the from between Jackman’s legs,
clothes Jackman had been wear, Mr. Smith told His Lordship that
oe: s he was going to put in Walcott’s
Cross-examined, she said that evidence before Mr. Rudder.
She had given evidence at a pre. Walcott said that he remember-
liminary hearings at District “B” oq telling Mr. Walwyn he had
twice, before Police Magistrate heard the cry coming from that
C. W. Rudder and before Police position. L
Megiatrate C, 1, Welwyn. When he had first indistinctly

seen Jackman he had gone to her
Cr Pregnant because he thought me eee
a eekes of Hanson Ten- it was had wanted assistance, bul
antry said that she knew the when he went near her and she
accused while she was pregnant. said nothing to him he presumed
a ¥ 2 eee on ” nae that she did not wish assistance.
o ay » She opened a window s s e people use a
of the house in which she lived ce eee below the att for
und saw Verona Jackman going ©28" 9" b t the well itself
from the well toward her home ©*¢creting, but no ; Pan
with a basin in her hand Albert Small of Hanson Ten-
She (witness) then went to. antry said that about 5.30 a.m.
wards the well and heard a child he was going to the well near
erying from in it and blood was Jackman’s house when he saw a
around it, She saw more blood crowd of people and Jackman
around Jackman’s home and she leaving the well with a basin
threw marl over it. going towards her father's house.
Charles Carter, a 30 year old Her petticoat was dirtied with
agricultural labourer of Hanson blood.
Tenantry who lived near Jack-
man said that about 7.30 a.m. on
May 23 he was going to work
when he heard certain rumours
and went to the well near Jack-
man’s home. He heard a baby
crying in the well,

Heard Cries

He uweard a baby crying in the
well but he could not see it. One
Alphonzo Walcott was saying in a
fairly loud tone of voice that
Jackman had thrown the baby

When the police came, he was into the well.
lowered down in the well, taking P.Cc. Everton Sealy who was on
a crocus bag with him. Frogs duty at the hospital when Jack-
were down there and also some man toid Sgt. Inniss that she had
green, freshly pulled “pond” nothing to say, gave evidence
grass. On removing the grass, egncerning ‘this.
he saw an infant who was lying gg, Kenneth Inniss was the last
on similar grass. He had seen witness to give evidence, Besides
excreta outside the well, but none giving corroborative evidence con-

eee was on Jackman’s cerming ‘the blood around the
fatoer’s ground and “pond” well and Jackman’s home, and
grass grew about there. The well his taking a statement from the ac-
was a suck well and was sur. cused, he said that the distance
rounded by stones, from Jackman’s home to the well

He took the infant out of the was 110 feet and from the weil
well and gave it to the police. to the highway 600 feet. }
Next day he saw the body of the Cross-examined, he denied
dead child at the hospital. showing depositions of the pre-

Cross-examined he said the jiminary hearing to some of the
morning was a bright morning witnesses at the Court before
and he could have seen the bot- they gave evidence yesterday
tom of the well. The grass was jorning.
spread out at the ‘bottom. At the request of the Solicitor

d be bout there t the req :

Figg col b tt "aid not see General, His Lordship recalled
oe ne look i ‘HE well, some of the witnesses to enquire
neh ante of the district were not Whether the depositions had been
i i i in shown to them.
een ron Walcott, Small, Weekes and

The well was about eight feet Carter who were asked whether
in diameter. The grass in it was Sgt. Inniss had shown them the
not sufficient to cover the whole depositions or read any evidence
bottom. ai in to them, said he had not done 39.

1. Charles Goring, one of the :
calle who went to Hanson Ten- Mr. Smith Speaks. be
antry on the morning of May 23, After the Prosecution closed its
said that blood stains were along case, Mr. Smith reminded the
a tratk leading from the pee ar. that Gin sie poi ss tye
kman weil preliminary earings
Sn" mre f Police Magistrate in the first in-

Took ‘Child From Well stance had decided that no prima

facie had been made out.

A man ‘named Charles Carter Jackman had been arrested be-
was sent into the well and)fore she left the Court building,
brought up a living male child.) and again charged. On the second
Sgt. Inniss asked Jackman who| hearing two witnesses who had
was seen near the well if she| given evidence at the first, were

would consent to an examination | not called.

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HARRISON’S

Social Welfare
Adviser Returns
From Trinidad

Some interesting items of wel-
fare news came from Miss Dora
Ibberson the Comptroller's Social
Welfare Adviser who paid a short
visit to Trinidad last week.

The object of the visit was to
hold a conference with the United
Nations Mission which is conduct-
ing a survey of community cen-
tres and self help projects.

The Mission toured Trinidad
in order to see various com-
munity centres, some of the most
successful of which proved to be
humble buildings erected ‘by
communities at their own expense
in response to a need to provide

accommodation for already vig-
orous group activities.

The . Mission discussed the
posSibility of arranging for a

Resident Manager to be allocated
to one community centre in
order to give a demonstration of
programme making designed to
strengthen community life and
make full use of the centre.

Miss Ibberson discussed with
the Chairman of the Sugar In-
dustry Labour Welfare Board the
question of whether their scheme
of loans for the construction and
extension of dwellings .for
workers in the sugar belt might
be combined with some provision
for assisting them on the home
making side, e.g. in the planning
of well designed and smokeless
kitchens, conveniently equipped
at low cost.

Since the field workers in the
sugar industry are mainly East
Indians, this would present: an
opportunity to study the East
Indian way of life and address
home making teaching to its
special problems,

Met Miss Haglund
A contact was made with Migs
Haglund of F-A.O, who is remain-
ing in Trinidad for the regional
Y.W.C.A. Conference and mean-

while, ussisting in the revision of
the Domestic Science Curricula,
Miss \Lberson also-met the Com-

mittee which has been responsibl:
for orgenizing three annual Home
und Femily Weeks. The Comm/;t-
tee includes representatives of
all the Protestant sects. Angfi-
cans, Non-Conformists, Canadian
Mission, Seventh Day Adventists,
Pentecostals, Church of God etc.,
as well as some organizations such
as the Mothers’ Union and the
Y.W.C.A. They believe that the
movement does useful work jin
high-lighting the importance ot
stale family life,

Public meetings were a very
successful >art of the last “Week,”
audiences proving interested, ang
sympathetic. Over 1,000 péopls
attended a meeting in Woodfqri
Square, Port-of-Spain.

The Trinidad Government has
asked the Trustees of the Fuil-
bright Scheme for the services of
a high grade home economist to
assist for a year with teaching in
the Government Teachers’ Train-
ing College and other work in this
subject. This should mark a great
step forward in the teaching of
Home Economics throughout the
Colony.



2 Schooners Arrive
With General Cargo

Six hundred drums of colas
were brought to the island by the
Sehooncr Augustus B. Compton
which arrived from St, Lucia on
Wednesday. This vessel also
brought 59 cylinders of gas and
66 packages of fresh fruit.

Schooner Belqusen, which ar-
rived from St. Vincent the same
day, brought 686 bags of copra for
the Barbados Cotton Factory Ltd.
It also had in its hatehes arrow-
root, pigeon peas, peanuts, vegeta-
bles, cocoanuts, fresh fruit and
other general cargo,

Both vessels are consigned to
the Schooner Owners’ Association.

The law was that the Prosecu-
tion’s duty was to put before the
Court all the facts relevant to the
case and known by them, One
witness Edward Brathwaite, Ver-
ona Jackman’s father, who had
originally been called by the Pros-
ecution, said that he had been
ill, had used a basin and had asked
his daughter to carry it out for
him.

The Prosecution in leaving out
that witness left out the explana-
tion for the girl’s having the basin,
and jeft them, the jury, with ‘he
only inference that the child had
been in the basin. The duty of the
Prosecution was not to press for
a conviction, but to help the Court
in administering justice.

When hearing continues today,
the defence will call witnesses

Child Weeps As Magistrat



Awards Custody To Mother

A PATHETIC scene was enacted in His Worship Mr.
H. A. Talma’s Court yesterday forenoon when a seven- launching slope and foundation of

year-old girl wept softly as
the child by the Magistrate,

her mother, given custody of
took her away from her foster

For Bridge At
Pumping Station
Excavation in the coral for the

a steel bridge of 110 feet span ta

earry the 20 inch arterial main,
which connects the new Belle

mother with whom she had lived for six and a half years. Electric Pumping Station with
When His Worship ruled that the child be returmed to. Grandview and_ Brittons Reser-

the mother, she stood in the

dock with the woman who had

reared her from six months old, and refused to be separ-

ated. The mother went to the dock, and taking her by the Water

hand, pulled her away, while the child sobped and cried.



Conductor Bownd
Over To Keep Peace

WESLEY COWARD, a ‘bus
conductor, on the motor omnibus
0.30 was yesterday found guilty
of kicking Mr. Henderson Clarke,
Q.C., on the 28rd of last month.

He was bound over for 12
months in the sum of £10, to
keep the peace and be of good

‘haviour by His Worship Mr.
C. L. Walwyn, City Police Magis-
trate,

Coward was alleged to have
kicked Mr, Clarke in his chest
when the latter boarded the bus
en which Coward was working,
to travel from Roebtck Street,
opposite the Globe Theatre, to
come into the City.

Dr. R. L. Renwick gave evidence
as_to the extent of the injury
suffered by Mr. Clarke.

Mr. Clarke asked His Worship
to extend the leniency of the
Court to the defendant, and ad-
monishing the conductor His
Worship told him it was a very
serious offence, He told him that
in view of the fact that Mr.
Clarke had begged for him, he
would be lenient, and warned
him to “go straight” in future.

“Your job,” His Worship said,
“is a conductor on a public service
vehicle, and you~ should be
courteous to people whom you
have to serve, In future your
conduct must be such that you
serve the public well.”



Inquiry Adjourned

INQUIRY into the circumstances
surrounding the death of forty-
seven-year-old Edward Crichlow
of Sherbourne, St. John, was be-
gun and adjourned by Coroner
Mr, H. A. Talma yesterday after
medical evidence on the post
mortem examination was taken.
Hearing continues on the 13th
instant,

Crichlow died at the General
Hospital on Tuesday morning,
four days after he was injured
in an accident between a motor
cycle and a bicycle on Wilson
Hill, St. John.

Dr. J, A. Browne, who did the
autopsy, told the Coroner’s jury
that death was due to peritonitis
of the abdomen, following two
ruptures of the small intestines
complicated by pneumonia of tha
left lung.

WOMANPLEADS GUILTY
TO MALTREATING CHILD

Martha vnirty-seven-
year - old domestic yesterday
pleaded guilty before His Wor-
ship Mr, C. L, Walwyn. to strip-
ping her three and a half year
old daughter naked, beating her,
and putting her to stand in the
rain on the 7th and 16th July.

After the plea had been taken,
His Worship adjourned further
hearing of the matter until the
15th August.

The caus against John who re~
Sides aback of Chelsea Road, was
brought by Sgt. Gill,

John is the mother of four chil-
dren, two of whom are dead.

John, 4



FOUR LEGGED CHICKEN

Sinclair Gibson of Fair View
Place, Bay Land, St. Michael,
brought a four legged chicken to
the Advocate’s Editorial Cffice
yesterday. Two feet were quite
normal but the other two were
situated near the ehicken’s tail.
The chicken was hatchec on
Monday, y

The egg, from which the chick-
en was hatched, was larger than
normal. Up to yesterday the
chicken was still alive

Theatre Roof
Collapses

AUSTIN, Texas, July 31.
A section of the roof collapsed
today in downtown Queen Theatre
sending almost 100 children
screaming from the building and
injuring 25 persons, One boy was
believed seriously hurt, The thea-



tre owner said 92 children and 32
adults were in the theatre when a
35-foot section of plaster fell with-
out warning. —U.P.



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The mother of the child, Joan
Fitzpatrick, brought a case against
the foster mother, Violet Mc
Geary, charging her with unlaw~<
fully detaining the child, Gloria,
since May 1952 with intent to de-
prive her of the possession of the
child,

The story behind the matter
was that Fitzpatrick gave up pos-
session of the child when it was
six months old, allowing her to
live with her father who is now
dead, and who was the reputed
husband of the foster mother,

At the death of the father, the
natural mother claimed the child.
and she alleged that. McGeary
refused to give up possession of
the child.

His Worship in an effort to have
the matter settled amicably, ad-
vised the mother to allow the
child to spend periods at both
homes, but the mother refused,
saying “I want my child, she is
mine.”

McGeary in answer to His
Worship said she had two chil-
dren of her own, one 22, and the
other 19, both of whom are work-
ing.

When Mr. Talma asked the
child if she would go with her
mother, she shook her head, and
began to weep, His Worship,
turning to the mothey, said “you
are a complete stranger. The
child does not know you, It
knows this other woman, (Me
Geary) as its mother,” and he
suggested that the mother arrange
for the child to spend periods at
both homes.

His Worship invited the two
women to his Chambers where he
discussed the matter with them,
but later returned to the Court,

Mr, Talma, commenting on the
case, said there was one snag.
To the mother he added, “legal-
ly, you are entitled to the child,
but the child does not know you.
It would be very hard on the
child to be rooted from one per-
son whom she has known,
given to another whom she does
not know. A child is not like a
dog or a cat where you could say,
‘turn it over,’ Even cats and dogs
have a certain amount of affection
for the people they know.”

Entitled Legally

“Althougn you are entitled to
the child legally, yet from the
standpaint of equity, separation
from the person for whom she
has affection will not help her.
This woman (McGeary) has the
child’s affection which you have
not got. The child does not know
you. Although you are her mother,
you are still a stranger, and you
have not got her affection,”

Admitting that he did not know
what to da, His Worship told the
mother that the only way out of
it was “to wean the child grad-
ually. To uproot her from her
present home like a tree, will be
no use to the child,’ Mr, Talma,
added,

The mother was emphatic that
she wanted her child, but His
Worship asked “Why did you ever
allow her to go with her father?
Why did you not keep her? It is
enly now that this woman has had
all the trouble with her, now that
she has passed the worst, that
you are saying “T want my child,”

“Yes, legally you are entitled
to the child, But morally you are
not entitled to her, and you should
take that into consideration, Is
it that you really want your child,
or is it that you are only trying
to “spite” this woman?

His Worship added, “if you had
done your duty to the child, you
would have had her affection, As
it ig, she will be hostile to you,
end you will not be able to dis-
cipline her, and lead her. Now,
it is more difficult.”

After an adjournment, His Wor-
ship summoned the Probation
Officer and discussed the matter
again in Chambers. On returns
ing to the Court, he ruled that
the child be returned to the nat-
ural mother,



voirs, commanding Bridgetown
and its suburbs, has started. .

The Chief Engineer of the
Works Department told the
Advocate yesterday : ‘The several
parts of the bridge, which have
arrived from the United King-
dom in bundles, were given a
trial erection in the supplier's en-
gineering workshops in Glasgow.
They are galvanised to withstand
corrosion due to salinity in the
air,

“As it is proposed to launch the
bridge which weighs 18 tons, as
a complete unit across the gully
after it has been assembled on the
south bank, that is My Lord's Hill
side, considerable forethought and
preparation are necessary to en-
sure that the operation proceeds
Fmoothly and that the several
erections take up satisfactorily the
eccentric loads to be borne by
them.”

He said that there was litlle to
see at present but the planning of,
and preparation for, the launch-
ing are absorbing considerable
time,



Few Vessels In
Carlisle Bay

Carlisle Bay was practically
empty yesterday, No large steam-
ships were in port, The Motor
Vessel Terra Nova, which took
a load of molasses while in the
Careenage, was anchored off the
Pierhead,

The lower wharf however was
fairly active, Motor Vessel
Student Prince II continued to
jtake her load of molasses while
the Schooner Rosarene unloaded
wood and coals, Lighters were
being loaded with sugar.

The Motor Vessel Gloria Maria,
which arrived in port on Satur-

day, is now on dock undergoing
repairs,

Only two intereolonial vessels
arrived, The Sohooner Augustus
B,. Compton came in from St,

and) Lucia while the Schooner Bel-

queen arrived from St. Vincent,






























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CAVE SHEPHERD
& Co., Ltd.

10, 11, 12, 13, Broad St.

e. Excavation Starts Day Nursery

! @ from nore 2

is to keep in close contact with the
parents by visits to the homes,
holding meetings and information
classes and lectures when speak-
erg are on hand to answer ques-
tions. Babies are admitted from
two months old and are dis-
charged from the roll at the age
of four years,

The Nursery is supervised by
Mrs. Hall assisted by the matron
and two nurses. Thirty five chil-
dren have been registered and
receive attention at intervals
during the year. To date there
are 12 babies in residence. A stock
of first aid material is kept on
hand and help has, from time to
time, been given to urgent cases in
the district.

Subscriptions

The Association is run by vol-
untary subscriptions from mem-
bers, individual efforts of mem-
bers without reference to
Association,
public functions and raffles.

Through the efforts of the com-
mittee and others interested in the
welfare of the children, a Christ-
mas party was given for them
last December when the parents
and children were treated to light
refreshment and each child was
presented with a little gift and
garment.

On a visit to the Nursery the
“Advocate” was impressed by the
quiet and restful atmosphere pre+
vailing, Work of this kind calls
for consistent and constant ‘effort.
If the helpers, both local and
abroad. who have assisted in this
venture were to continue in_this
faith, in years to come the New
Haven Association would be justi-
fied in having launched out and
will perhaps spread their good
work in other districts.

FINED FOR EARLY
POSSESSION OF —

SEA-EGGS



Eric Harrison of
Village and Lawson Trotman of
Halls Road, were on Wednesday
each fined 30/- to be paid in 14
days or in default one month’s
imprisonment by Police Magis-

%

the
soliciting donations, «

Carrington -

trate Mr, C, W. Rudder, when °
they were found guilty of having |

sea-eggs in their possession earlier
in the day, the period being the
sea-eggs closed season. Harrison
and Trotman were along Ealing
Grove Road, Christ Church when

2

they were found with the sea- |

eggs.

TONIC

TUS

Sold Only At...




a





PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE

a

FRIDAY, AUGUST 1, 1952

Politician ‘SHIPPING NOTICES







CLASSIFIED ADS. | "0ST _& FeUnn | Yugoslavia And | Australia Is

TELEPHONE 2508 Mexico Oppose





































































































































| Lost A Country | Manhandled
eae ROYAL NE
DIED ] , eo oe U.N. Decision rm CO
A A FOR SALE | 7B 1,G,, RACE TICKET Series 7, No oO Contrasts KATHMANDU July 31 STEAMSHIP CO, ska ce SO ta
Thursd y 3 | 7772 between Swan Street and Victoria | prprypp TAT 12 | An angry crowd pulled Bish- ¥ ce 5 and Passengers for
Gee Gentratin, © vie. tinker yoo Pesem. manner Ee See - Wiech apes gd a | LONDON eswar Prasad Koirala, President |. - atgeoe ran pee teem Dominica, “Antigua, Montserrat,
his late, residgnce. Thin ble odge | AUTOMOTIVE r ie gy tlre 18 52 In Mexico and Yugoslavia object- Australia is a land of contrasts. = th epelt Congress, Fenty rom aes STEN TOR, Sh August, 1088, Piehes nik Tit oe
e why, St. Philip at 4.30 6’cloc« | : > sie Bini the platform at a public meeting|M.s. STEN August, 1952. ,
this afternoon for Holy ‘rintty| CAR—100 Prefect Ford. in. gé0d ;ed on Thursday to having the lits cities are as modern and bust-| ) °° P ker i Ped Mevercl {tt Ss HORA ate tee take wie Rear cpa linen gil
Church, Friends are @ Mtiend.| condition. Phone 3487 or the Beacon U Cc SAL is United Nations Collective Measures fing as any in the world, But} ™~"* “= a +5 a SAILING TO EUROPE - an@ ‘Passengers for
Mrs. Gertrude Cor Hunte ! Printer 1.8.52—In. J , . Ce wake Mtenas , saa +4 manhandled him. His wife and)... wittEMSTAD, 12th August, 1952. gecept Cargo an or
tails). Denk teanewt teacher; ana | methine Committee ask Spain what aid it] parts of its vast stretches of “Out- three forrner ministers were also] Sarina DAD, PARAMARIBG Pominica, . Ange, Meneese:.
Nevitt. Hunte (sons), Miss Doris! CAR—Morris 8 in good working condi- ia could give to combat future ag-| pack”, comprising some of the} acsaulted by the crowd. Koirala. AND TISH GviaNa - ae August, v2 .
Hunte Uneea-tasicher, “4 Pai tion. Tyres good. Thone ry cd, ree ‘i al c finest pasture known to cattle- younger brother of thé Prime!Ms NESTOR, oth August, er riday, st, :
Girls) (néice Mrs, N Varner 31. : REAL ESTATE The Collective easures Com- | ‘ te e= 5 a M.S. BONAIRE, 25t ugust,, :
Tee at " men, are stil] too remote from de-} \inister, had come to the meet-,â„¢-8 R. Sth September, 1952. asia
irelative 1.8.52-1 CAR Morris Hone Good, working Ppike ane ter the coeeede veloped areas to be even thor-Jing to explain the recent boiiti-} samaee Ta kia SS Cubed BW5 scuoceee ae
‘ bai = conditions, price $3 ») Can be seen a# yee a or r 0 an : - ls ‘ Ef *
LEWis_ Thureday. July ai, 1962. | Ethelridge, Bank Hail Road. Phone 3479.| ALL THAT MESSUAGE AT TUDOR drawing up plans for political, oughly mapped. 3 cal crisis in the kingdom. ras BOSKOGE: Fs, 18! Ger at Oonatenees,
Mrs. Evelyn Lewis. Her funera! takes | M Hunte., 30.7.52—T.F.N. | STREET and the land on which it stands economic and military steps to be Among these Outback grazing The crisis arose last week wher} * Tele. —- eo 4047
place at the Ebenezer Brethren Room, | -——_—.___. — Beiccaee cee ee soveeas. with TON I f ression. |tracts are the rich plains of the} Prime Minister Matrika Prasad| gs. p. MUSSON, SON & CO., LTD.
Crumpten Street at 4,30 o’elock this CAR—Fford Prefect 10 H.P) in — Galvanise at present rented out as twojlaken in the case o: aggression. ‘Kaaba 7 li 250,000 | Koiral jected a directive Senin . ‘ ‘kena
evening, where friends are asked to| working order. No reasonable offer | shops producing an income of 756 dollars|Tt sent letters to most world’s er, eys—a sprawling 10 oirala rejec a e fk a
gather and from thence to the West- j refused pores E Corti paeeme ee Pte FEB mee wes Governments. square-mile expanse of fertile} the Nepali Congress ’ Working
ee hay. mak ob dy det re ee — ~| inspection any day on application to| It was decided to ask Madrid!prairie in the Australian North Ronptinen-i68 Sheceilive a ‘: 4 a
Civ Service Association, P.C. yvol -CAR—1951 Black Hillman Minx, 15,000 mat TEs shove, wiih} set up for|}Government what it could do|West. But cavilemen, for long ar ie a, ealeliates for a re- anatlian ational teams 1 5
Yorke (sons) miles. Contact I. S. Robinson, Garden | sale VICTOREA om) FRIDAY a about sanctions against an ag-|found that the stumbling-block of | @ lis 0 seven n S *
eek in| House, eae aig Ame ee ‘AUGUST at 2p-m, Dial ‘2947 *|gressor in the event of any new]|the Kimberleys as a “beef coun-| constituted cabinet. The cabinet
MANNING—On July 91, 1952. Henry} : : R. ARCHER McKENZIE. | conflict.’ Jose Gorostiza of Mexico|try” was the trek to the nearest nye = ce Sree Three
Christie Manning. 4 rig de ay ae CAR—One Morris ore Ss Geer 27.7.52-4n. | caid his government could not abbatoir town of Wyndham, ly- Series a Lesge certenba SOUTHBOUND aie Sh pitt Aes aaie
leave his late residence “Newlands” | Saloon in perfect condition, year old. ES - ‘ any s + ; . Songress is 8 5 rt jails ails r
Two © he he Phe ental och ike Owner aang! SRASY, hee ae oe eee at eka oats pati wat Meee Se rene ee inites oh dg ion Demonstrators advanced on the Montreal Halifax Bosten Barbados Barbados
for the St. George Harish Church 31,7,52—2n, |at St. Lawrence, Christ Church, stand-! broaden participation o neo S!q barren mountain range. Such an Jatt waving black flags and|CANADIAN CHALLENGER 22 July 25 July _ SAug. 4 Aug.
pe empresa. Some” } Mine House ‘contains three bedrooms, | COVernment in the United Nations|eghausting trail stripped all the| P ulled the Congress Party Presi-| LADY NELSON... YAug. ¢ Aug, 6 Aug. 13 Aug. 18 Aus.
Manni . id i ; s = 1 . ug. =- . .
ater 1.6.52—1n. f drawing, dining and living room. garage | ANd, Said if a letter was sent tolt@ off prime beasts—who had to dent down among them. Th@|CANADIAN CONSTRUCTOR 22 AUE 2 Aug — 3Scpnt 4Sep..
Bc ELECTRICAL and servants’ rooms with, electric Ment genial it Siaid sis he seat. at least six years old before} i ojico arrived later, none being|LADY RODNEY 3 Sept. Seri BSept. 17 Sept. 18 Sept.
———-———— and water throughout. Inspection e anis! ublican Govern- . Rane a ana sabe | 35 Sept. — 24 Sept. ept.
IN MEMORIAM | “Pye PORTABLE RADIOS Combined appbintment, e 8260 beiween the |'ment in exile with which Mexico| el stamina was up to the jour-|Fresent when the __ incident LADY NELSON "Sept, ws Sept. 27 Sept. “6 Oct. 7 Ori.
—— —— Electric Mains and Self Contained Dry |hours of 9 and 12 a.m, Helnd relations ney. And, in addition, it means} G¢cyrred. st a
GRANNUM—In loving memor of ou) | Battery Operation. Price $120.00, P, C, S The above will be set up for sale at maintains re ations. i endless planning of camps and fc —_U.P : RTUBOUND
dear mother, Ua Grannum who de-] Maffei & Co., Ltd. 1.8.52--t.{.n. | Public Competition on Friday, the 15th Yugoslavia supported Mexcio, . d Soi No! Arrives Sails Arrives Arrives Arrives
parted this life on July 3ist 1949. day of August 198% at 2 pm. at the|but agreed with Gorostiza that| Watering places for rovers as i 2 ie Barbados Barbados Boston Halifax Montreal
“Till memories fade, and life depart | office of the undersigned. ‘there was no need to force recon-|Well as pasturing-halts for the Chances Of q ruce Y RODNEY es 7 AUS. Q9Aug. 19 Aug. 20 Aug. 23 Aug.
Youll live forever in our hearts.” FURNITURE CARRINGTON & SEALY, j here was a . tee h bstacl de cat~ TAN GER + 20 Aug = 2 Sept.
Ever remembered by— . Lucas Btreet. sideration vote on the issue. The|Steers. These obstacles made . . a 1 : a % 30 Aug. 9 Sept. 14 Sept.
Rita, Harold, Ina, Adiine and Elsic ; 7 52—-1M. |committee adjourned without|tle raising in the Kimberleys a Remain Remote CANAD! fe 5 10 Sept. Fi 23 ae.
Grannum ‘children. A | “FURNITURE—One Mahogany Wardrobe | ~ijentnnemninciasteicenti— Tn ane faking action, an indication that|much less attractive venture than CANADIAN CONSTRUCTOR 15 ie oe
7. with full length mirror inside. One] , 7H undersigned will offer for al’lihe request ‘would be sent to|might appear at first sight. LADY RODNEY | gion | SEE 2 Set. et ee at oa
WANTED Mahogany Morsiy Suite complete Witt! io, 19, ah. eireet,. Bridgetown, on| Madrid.—O.P. Freight Plane Service PANMUNJOM, July 31. SJ 19 Oct. 21 Oct. 30 Oct. 31 Oct 4 Nov
bul by RA Grifith. Pull’ partiou: | PFiday, the sth day of August 199%, “xt a ut as early as 1936, men of vis-| , Both the United Nations and the] “APY NEESON +.
HELP ars, Phone 3430. 31.7.52—2n, | 2 pom. Sie oi hinaas, oot a8 Once Fe d ° i were looking to the skies—|Communists took gloomy views of iounsk cape
‘A FEMALE BOOK-KEEFER requizea in BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE BANK ‘ eration amd the oil refineries — as gpuniee, tar a early coe = For further par rs, apply to—
A ' BR requige p italisi rea, but staff officers ke ) ‘ ey
experience of Journal entries and MECHANICAL COTTLE, CATFORD & CO., P ° S. means of capitalising the day's conference in ict by GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD.—Agents.
Ledger Balancing essential. Apply by Solicitors. Ts Essential lush Kimberley grass. They saw|@@y5. : y
letter stating experience to A.B.C. c/o} 1.8. 42--6n. ra! haggling over changes in the pro-
Advocate Co., Ltd, 1.8.52-—n.

a
GENERAL SERVANT (to sleep in)..

Good wages and accommodation. Apply
Mrs. Otho Dowding. Pine Hill.
30.7.52—3n
SALESMAN—"Required immediately
Salesman and General Office Clerk
A ~~ Cecil L, Straker & Co 4 Re”
Street, Bridgetown. 30.7.52

MISCELLANEOUS

tease reiipeeoctrepentnrpeeneamgeeeremetanen
USED STAMPS—Wanted large or smal
quantities of clean postally used BAR-

BADOS and other B.W.I1 stamps
Buying prices on application to
J, TURTON
P.O. Box 124, Kingstown, St. Vincent
31.7.52—3n

PERSONAL

The public are hereby warned against
giving credit to my wife, Odessa
Vai in (nee Patrick) as I do not hold
myself responsible for her or anyone
else contracting any debt or debts in my
name unless by a written order signed

by me.
Sed, JAMES VAUGHAN,
Welchman Hall,
St. Thomas.
31.7.62—2n

ANNOUNCEMENTS

CARS ON HIRB—Frierds and genera!



pu to Know that you can_ hire

bran self-driven cars at Holborn,

Porttabelle. Dial 3723, 30.7. 52—4n
HOUSES



Attractive seaside Flat main road Hae
tings, comfortably furnished, Eneil Path, Onen Verandah facing sea Syitabi
one person for couple). From August 1
Telephone 2949 18,6.62—t/f 9

BREEZELEY, Maxwell Coast — Unfur
nished House with 4 Bedrooms, Spacious
Reeeption FPooms, Double Garage, and
right-of-way to beach. John M. Bladon
& Co. Phone 4640, Pit. Ltd. Bullding

1.8,82—1n

FOR RENT
HOUSE-—Small new stone house (6)
six miles from Bridgetown nicely
furtiished, ideal for one or two adults
desiting a cool quiet comfaertab’e place
to live 4942. 1.8.52--1n,

AND NOW

can have



’



¢

you

A GAS COOKER

like those you have admired in
the magazines.

SEE THEM TO-DAY... 4+

At Your Gas Showroom,

Sane ey ‘ Bay Street,



CAMERA—1 — 4 x 5 Camera — Bpeed
Graphic complete with 120 Roll im
Pack, 4 x 5 — Out Film Holder and 4 x 5
Film Pack adaptor. Best Offer. Phone
#412. 30.7.52—3n.

MISCELLANEOUS

“AUTOBRITE” CAR POLISH, The
@lass-hard protective surface imparted
by Autobrite last for six months or
more and is_ excellent for Bicycles,
Motor Cycle, Baths, Refrigerators, Tiles.



Wonderful for Chromium etc, New
shipment just received. HARRISON.
Dial 2364 1.8.52—8n

FS
AUTO ACCESSORIES including coo)
cushions, upholstery rexine, fibre seat
covering, green cativas, chrome wheel
rings, steevingwheel covers, sun visors,
hood dressing, cigarette lighters (6 and
12 volt), reverse lamps, licence holders,
rear View mirrers (car & Truck), tyre
gauges (Car and Truck), insulating tape.

Courtesy Garage. Dial 4391.
25.7,52—6n

CYCLE ACCESSORIES including elec-





tne generator lamps (Miller & Impex),
Petcht kits, Solution (special whole-
sole ice), Flashlights and batteries,

r

Freneh Chalk (7 tb. tins), Brake blocks
pumps, rim tapes, Tyres and tubes,
ete, Courtesy Garage. Dial sr





“BASAKOF” is a compound Cough

Medicine for relieving Coughs, Sore
Throats ete in Pigs, Goats, Sheep,
Iforses and Cattle, made by the wel-

known Manufacturers, Day Son & Hewitt
ltd. Pyice 5/6 box. KNIGHT'S LTD
1,.8.52-—3n

PORKS—Agricultural Forks made of
the Best Steel and the right pattern at
$5.20. The Auto Tyre Co., opposite
the Cathedral, Spry Street.







27.7.52—On





GLUE KETTLES—A Glue Kettle that
so Light that wou don't realise its
presence in your kit and how efficient;
No joints to leak and unbreakable
capacity 1 pt Price $1.80 Harrison
31.7.52—Inr



LINIMENT—We have in stock ‘“Aintre
Liniment” a veterinary product [for treat-
ing Sprains, Muscular Strains, Windgalis,



ele, ete.,, in Horses and Cattle. Price
$2.48 bot. KNIGHT'S LTD.

1.8, 92-—3n
Oot. TINS--New empty 1-gallon Oil

Tins suitable fgr kerosene oil, ete. $1.00)
each. Apply: Courtesy Garage.
1.8.52—4n



ONE FLOOR BROODER' for sale with
1 hover to accommodate 300 baby
chicks to work by oil. Apply to Harold
Ward, Grazettes Road. 1,.8.52—-In





SUAVE by Helene Curtis, America’s
most popular hair Cosmetic — just a few





trops add glorious radiance to your
salir, Knight's Ltd. 30,7.52—3n
SUBSCRIBE now to the Daily

clegraph, England's leading Daily News-
aper now arriving in Barbados by Air
vnly a few days after publication in
ondon, Contact Ian Gale, C/o. Advo-














@ from page 1
boats visiting the island, but now
that they were going to be removed
he did not know what was g
to happen. Personally,

AUCTION
PUBLIC NOTICES



Cul
publ: Our wholesale Business will be} to
clo for our annual holiday from! j))4j
Sth August until the 19th. ;

their economy, and might

C. HERBERT, the people in the islands,

55, Tudor Street, City. Mr. Pitt was a school master in
30.7.52—4n |Grenada before he left for Canada

to study law, He graduated from

Dalhousie University in Halifax

in 1927 and went to England for a

He_ returned

NOTICE
aan if | oT een eae
pplications for a Qualified Midwife,
feoeived Oy the Churchwetes Mi! [Conada 11928 ants hee ee
urchwarden Mrs. anada in and has prac-~
Talma, Welches, Ch. Ch. up to 3 p. i q ;
ee he he ae: oe Hsing at the Bar in Toronto since
Terms of appointment obtainable from | then.
the Parochial Treasurer.
26.7.52—4n

He has two brothers in Grenada,



NOTICE

DEABREU TAILORING CO.
TAKE NOTICE
that the business of tailoring carried

a

tising Barrister and the other Mr.
Ronald Pitt a retired schoolmaster,
Mr. Pitt passed through Bar-
ths nance in 1928 and again in 1938
on by Guilherme Ansélmo DaSilva and |when he visit the courts
Eustace Gordon DeAbreu at Marnitt | om jew
Street, Bridgetown, under the style or
firm of DeAbreu Tailoring Co. has been
dissolved by mutual consent as from
the 8th day of July 1952; and FURTHER
TAKE NOTICE that the said Guilherme
Anselmo DaSilva has the sole right to
collect the outstanding debts and assets
of the said company under and by
virfue of the deed of dissolution.

he was intransit for
visits to
relatives,

His wife, who hails from Nash-
ville, Tennessee is a B.A. from
Fisk University and a Registered
nurse

Grenada on
his mother and other

All persons indebted to the said from. Meharry Medical
company are hereby required to setiie}College in Nashville. She also
their indebtedness immediately at the | did post graduate work at the

said address Marhill Street.
GUILHERME ANSELMO DaSILVA.
1.8. 52—3n

TAKE NOTICE
CHAMPION

That THE STUDEBAKER CORPORA-
TION, a_ corporation organized and
existing under the laws of the State of

University of Toronto School of
Nursing.







TAKE NOTICE
COMMANDER

That THE STUDEBAKER CORPORA-
TION, a corporation organized and
existing under the laws of the State of
Delaware, United States

Delaware, United States of America,
Manufacturers, whose trade or business
address is 635 South Main Street, South
Bend, State of Indiana, U.S.A., has
applied for the registration of a trade
mark in Part “A” of Register in respect
of aut Hes, and will be entitled to
register the same after one month from
the 3ist day of July, 1952, unless some
person shall in the meantime give notice
in duplicate to me at my office of oppo-
sition of such registration. The trade
mark can be seen on application at my
office,
Dated this 23rd_day of July,
H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.
31.7,52—3n



1952.

of America,
Manufacturers, whose trade or business
address is 635 South Main Street, South
Bend, State of Indiana, U.S.A., has
applied for the registration of a trade
mark in Part "A" of Register in respect
of automobiles, and will be entitled to
| register the same after one month from
the 3ist day of Juby, 1952, unless some
| Person shall in the meantime give notice
jin duplicate to me at my office of oppo-
sition of such registration. The trade
mark can be seen on application at my
office.



Dated this 23rd day of July, 1952.
| H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.
31.7,52—3n.



CHANCERY SALE -

The undermentioned property will be set up for sale at The Registration Office.

BARBADOS,
Public Buildings, Bridgetown, between



mately affect the loyalty of|cost

an abbatoir, a chilling plant and
an airfield on the spot, and a
freight plane service to the re-
frigeration plants at Wyndham,
as the answer. And although

he felt World War Ij temporarily forced
| that the withdrawal of these boats|Such plans into cold storage, the
NOTICE to Customers and the genera.| from the islands will be disastrous|post-war years have

seen them
eome to life—at Glenroy—at a
of — somewhere around
£20,000. Today, Kimberley beef
is being flown in frozen form to
Wyndham instead of plodding
wearily to market on the hoof,

As a result of this innovation,
thousands of head of cattle are
now being converted into meat
destined for Britain that would
otherwise never reach her lar-
ders, +

The real importance

of the

one being Mr. C, E. L, Pitt, a prac-;Glenroy experiment, however, ‘s

its value as a pattern for similar
projects elsewhere. Stockmen
today are anticipating the time
when over 150 such prairie plants
will service Australia’s entire

jof this island, On both occasions| cattle country, each within 300

miles of a port or railhead. And
they visualise nearly 100 huge
aircraft continuously employed

in flying out chilled beef ind
bringing back stores and equip-
ment for the new cattle stations
that such a project would bring
into being.

The Glenroy success has acted
as a spur to their imagination and
they are not likely to rest until

such a service hag been intro-
duced on a_ trang-continental
scale,

‘Australia’s herds already num-
ber some 14,000,000 but even this
tremendous total is far from the
taximum that the “Outback”
could easily support. Now the
eattlemen are savine emphati-
cally the beef production can be
expanded to an undreamed cf
level when the transport problems
are solved.

U.K. Warns Egypt

@ From Page 1

Anyone who says that I am
about to go to America, England,
Switzerland, South Africa, knows
more than I do.

“The only thing I am certain
about is that I shall not go behind
the Iren Curtain.

“Meanwhile we shall







posed ceasefire agreement. Radio
Peiping, the voice of Communist
China, joined Bighth Army Com-
mander General J. A, Van Fleet

prospects for an agreement,
for different reasons,

Van Fleet told a press confer-
ence yesterday that he is
confident”. of an

fer, and have

to deliver punishing air and artil-

POO@DDODOOODOG

SEA AND
TRAFFIC

In Carlisle Bay

Schooner Mary E. Caroline, Schooner
Emeline, Schooner Zita Wonita, Schoon-
er Confident F. G. Rainbow M., Sch,
Cyril E. Smith, Schooner Triumphant
Star, ‘Schooner Mandalay I, LMS,
Manuy, Gulf Barge No. 2. M.V, Terra
Nova, Sehooner May Olive, Schooner
Wonderful Counsellor, Schooner At Last,
Schooner Henry D. Wallace, Sch. Esso
Aruba, M.V. Gloria Maria, Motor Vessel
Caribbee, Schooner Rosarene.

ARRFVALS

Schooner Augustus B. Compton, 47
tons, Capt. Compton, from St Lucia,
Agents: Schooner Owners’ Association

Schooner Belqueen, 44 tons, Capt. Kins,





from St Vincent, Agents Schooyer
Owners’ Association .

DEPARTURES
_ Schooner Frances W. Smith for British



S.S. Brazil for Bahia, Schoone

for St. Vincent, M.V. Herd:
Trin and Schooner Ma
for St. Lucia

Seawell
Arrivals by B.W.I.A,
From Trimidad:

E. Jenkins, G.
Smith, H. Lucie-Smith, V. Dowrick, Ww.
Crickie, A. Mahabir, E, Baker, L Baker
A. Agostini, H Murphey, J. Fotter, P
Bennett, J. Hakip, E. Hakin, C, Hakin,
G. Hakin, S. Bovell) F. Barker, ¥-
Cooper, W. Daly, C. Lai-Fook, 1.
Troke, C. Troke
From Trimidad:

T. McLeod, C. Steinbok, A. Hurstfield,
G. Meld, E. Field, A. Feld, D, Fi id,
C. Field, R. Field, A. Henderson, “i,
Henderson, A. Julien, R Wenzelman,
F. Wenzieman, A. Wenzelman, Y. Wen-





man for
Henrietta

jad



Jenkins, A. Taicie-



zelman, C. Cova, B. Rodri uez, "O,
Johnson, C. Bolhuis, J. Bolhuis, B.
Lovell, E. Barnes, J. Brathwaite, M
ster, C. Blackett, R. Newton, P

B. Arroyo, P Arroyo, “Q.

Davies, I Cole, E. Flynn, C. Flynn, P.
Flynn, G. King, M, King, G. King Jr..



in taking a pessimistic view of the
but

“less
armistice than
ever before. His reasons were that
the Reds had survived a hard win-
thinned out their
lines making it harder for the U.N.



CG TRANSATLANTIQUE

lery blows at concentrated troops.
UP.

*“DE GRASSE” ..
“COLOMBIE” es
*“DE GRASSE”



Established



Sailings from Southampton to Guadeloupe, Martinique,
Barbados, Trinidad, La Guaira, Curacao & Jamaica





From Southampton Arrives Barbados
12th Juiy, 1952 .. 24th July, 1952
Bist July, 1952 .. 13th Aug., 1952
22nd Aug., 1952 .. 3rd Sept. 1952
*Not calling at Guadeloupe

SAILING FROM BARBADOS TO EUROPE
From Barbados Arrives Southampton

“COLOMBIE” +» 18th July, 1952 .. 25th July, 1952
*“DE GRASSE” .. 6th Aug. 1952 .. 16th Aug., 1952
“COLOMBIE” .» 24th Aug., 1952 .. 5th Sept, 1952
*““DE GRASSE” .. 16th Sept., 1952 .. 26th Sept. 1952

*Sailing direct to Southampton







WE HAVE =

RED ROOFING PAINT
at $4.50 per Gallon

THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM

Corner Broad and Tudor Sts.

699SSSSSS6S59SSSSSSSSSSSSSS9SSSSSS5:

JUST IN TIME FOR THE

HURRICANE SEASON
ANEROID BAROMETERS

Only a limited number so select yours early and be prepared

Also

HURRICANE LANTERNS

Incorporated













12 noon and 2 p.m. for the sum and on tc if Th ; ate oa 5 Oe = sets Vaan - T HERBERT LTD.
ite Co. Ltd, Local Representative! the date specified belaw. If not then sold, it will be set up on each succeeding | a Sapri, for ave four children sley, antelli, Maingo .
Tel, 3118, , 17.4.52—t.i.n | Friday iat ine aainie Place and during the same hotirs until sold, Full particulars} with me who must be kept happy ae gfe San ts. 2/6, “‘petinadee wie 10 & 11 Roebuck Street 1926
ona icatio; oO me, ‘ . a . ws ,
T0-DAY'S NEWS FLASH TABLETS—We have in stock “Do-Do si * CLARENCE SAMUEL KING-—Plaintitr and occupied. We may stay here} H. F Shearn, Mr. K. A. Murphy; Mr.
\sthma Tablets” a positive relief from and tor a few months, perhaps longer, | * Melville, _ E. C. Redman, Mr,
- pasm in 30 seconds, Price $1.20 bot. | _ NATHANIEL PILGRIM—Defendant perhaps less. eA Clee ae ee ee ey
pe aeasons,” improvements iy Pea a : fe enedooass tap OF PMs Rete ie the, BR ad Gee Mee ae The greatest kindness oe gee Mr. A, M. Cooper, Mts. M., Cooper.
Extefisions are taking place st VENETIAN BLINDS—Made to order. Island aforesaid containing by sdmeasurement one rood twenty|now, be done to us wou e@ to] Master Marshall, Mr. D. R. D, Wiles.
JONNSON'S STATIONERY 50 as All metal oe Sai | nes ae seven rehes or thereabouts Abutting ont landa ot, L Cumunings accept us as ordinary simple pres he Fp, SONS, yee a E
colours, immedia' lelivery ey on lands of one Arthur, deceased, on lands of one Corbin on lands * hav ittle . By : ie ir.
to-give greater shopping pleasure CARTAN Metal Company c/o Barbados of L. Cadogan and on a Public Road or however else the same may ee We oa eet \e rit first and Me “4 a See oe © Sere
to our numerous customer friends Advocate 1.8.52—6n abut and bound and SECONDLY ALL THAT certain piece or parcel ay a it w y Ss ae uy ser aM 4 ee a < eae ssdils
, of land situate at Brighton Road in the parish of Saint Michael] in spite of what has sometimes tle ae dy aie taunts eo
Please Note:—The THardware WHITE SHARKSKiN—Excellent qualit; and Island of Barbados aforesaid containing by admeasurement been said of me — since I became . e. iss Madelt ¥
nd velae 36 inches wide only $1.47 yard twenty and four fifths perches or thereabouts Abutting and bound ing Ki F honéymoon Mr, Joseph Tudor, Mr, Charles Lanoly
Department is now closed, at KIMPALANT 52, Swan Street. on lands of W. H. Leach on lands of Blanch Gittens on lands o ing. For even on my honey Mr. Tan Devaux.
iSON 1.8.52—1n one Blackett on lands of Martha Bowen and on a Pubile Road or! 1 was informed constantly about) From Jamaica:
sebagai’ iene: 0.8 pesca @lse the same may abut and ound Tometiier with, the affairs of State. Ss. RN ER
B. N, JOHNSON, messuage or dwellinghouse and all and singular other the buildings Si Peabaded: UE Ea: ty y B.W.LA,
and. erections. thereon. ain Ey Serie sith seen tt tn] tat Wie tun, mae ames lass oth Avenue. — Kelleville.
3 TAKE NOTICE | crser rmice! ete. 0 sti Mat Wee Gains e havtine | emt ees atte RI
= ’ cae Date of Sale. 15th August, 1952 i“. Aeutiate untrue that I have taken a fortune Pout! tates’ dean, Lohan aa: ae '
NPS9G9S SSF ISSISSISSSSOSOâ„¢, ZENITH Registrar-in-Chancery. from Egypt. Nor is it true that 1} -iisiine. Mis. Mary Christine, Master An Attractive and Well Proportioned 2 Storey House situated
% ’ ‘ S] rnat ZENITH RADIO CORPORATION . July, 1952, have a fortune hidden away. My Jobn Christine, Mr. Alexander Christine, on a corner site of 12,050 square feet. Contains 3 galleries (1
< Foresteér’s Scholarship § |: corporation organized and existing 31.7.52—4n. | wife, my baby son, and my three Re Miss Avis West. enclosed), large drawing room, dining room, study, modern
Abplications, in writing, ad- Sf inder the laws a 138 Sass ae young sg alee will Pon ver’ |p. Clairmonte, H. Douboulay, D. Dou- } kitchen, 3 bedrooms, garage, etc. Offers considered.
+ ry. Court Xs | Manufacturers, whose trade or bu 88 | sim I know some of you may | pouis Douboulay hes
si tary, Court & Te 2 . . ply. 3 ? ulay, T ouboulay, T. Devaux, lL
. Re hoa winscnd aeul be 3 Mee Ca dceen County of cob, state TAKE NOTICE . smile at that — but you should | Bomara, L. Thomas, H. Boxill,” 8 ) L ON co
received up to WANs ae SM] o6 minois, United States of America, ‘=| remember that any man who has PT Te ree hiner aay en JOHN Mi. B AD & fa
giietinic ap 3) eas: eat x vas applied for, the Apert Oe 8 ’| considerably less than we have ble, D. Troke, C. ‘Troke, R Delabastide : AF:S. F.V.A.
bit ene eke te ; rade mark in Part “A” o) egister in ce we , D. + . d 8. F. ;
Be eee eet ta must Sf enpeet, oF electrical hearing ‘aids’ and bEtabit to ben cor wack, cao tei Romeo: : REAL ESTATE AGENTS
Candidates, whose parents mus Sj}oarts thereof, and will entitle oO an, J , ‘ : Suckley. L att,
be financial members of the above~ %] ogister the same after one month from very poor standards I know I gm |, ™, Farman, See Fa R, y ’Phone 4640 -- Plantations Building
aEtie Gents pater ea aa gen oie ibaa ai ve eto still to be envied. J hope that (Stewart, A Chann, K, Dean, H. Roach, | Whe s
an years ‘ craon 8 . : j i ith- ;4 Neal ‘Ne Is _™~”unmnr~>-~-SSS
years on ist September, 1952 n duplicate to me at my office of oppo- from now on it will be envy with “4 theca ting e Tackaea coca :
A t be accom- ition of such registration. The trade out bitterness. My wife and I are ; y, § Soungiens, : ss
pplications mus e * h Sa applicati t my Wakefield, Joan Bennett, Michael Ben
; e q f - é
panied by either a Birth or a Bap x te can be seen on application a not embittered about what hap nett, Michela “‘Recett:
% Peron l emer een ate | “bated this ard dav of July, 1962 pened, for we know that we ar | Vor Trintdad:
$ Phy REBOURNY 1. es H. WILLIAMS, still rich in the many friends we got Sree, Freee A eae E
See re ‘ ou St. Michael's egistrar of 8. ede ars : + , a ;
% oe pe Dismend s cine ni ei “a 7 sn both nage The past few days Martin, T Mago, N. Bradshaw, W
° Dayreit’s Road. Sy} _ a | That THE GUIANA MATCH FACTORY LIMITED, a cumpany of British | have b anxious and difficu, | Smith, M. Pemberton, E. McKinnon, A.
Be oe a ae Basusdacturers, Whose trade or business address is 54 & 55 Water | but we have survived them. Soka amie A cen AN Aa ie
30,7.52—4n, street, orgetown, itish Guiana, has applied for the registration of a trade i as, E as, M. T! . &.
TAKE NOTICE mark in Part “A of Register in respect of matches, and will be entitled to The newspaper Il Tempo said Marhin, Ht. Ealy, M. Ealy, S. Ealy, E



King Farouk’s abdication was
| part of a “still evolving” political
ation at) manoeuvre and it was likely he
| would be returned to the Egyptian

register the same after one month from the 3ist day of July, 1952, unless some
Person shall in the meantime give notice in duplicate to me at my office of
opposition of such registration, The trade mark can be seen on applic
my office.

Dated this M&rd day of July, 1952.

BARFOOD

That BARBADOS PRODUCTS LEMITED,
1 company imcorporated and registeréd
n Berbados, Manufacturers, whose trade

Smith, F. Bermudez, R.. Shannon.

For Antigua: 4

E. Payne, C. O'Loughlin, G. Pilgrim,
Brisbane, J. Brisbane, S. Brisbane,

M. Bynoe, M, Buefong, H. Murphy.

Dd























































} « ”
w business address is in care of Fitz- H. WILLIAMS, throne “after a few months.”
patrick Graham & Co., Barclays Bank Registrar of Trade Marks __ It gave as the source of this in-| [y Touch with Barbados
Suilding, Broad Street, Bridgetown, has 31.7.52— | formation an unidentified Egypt- ‘ s ‘a
oe hast hr oF Hegisar at uhoest |ian official whom it said had Coastal Station
tebe arodut oth ‘ i ¢ ‘ i| CABLE & WIRELESS (West Indies)
of food products, substances used ¢ conferred with Farouk at Capri 3 aie a , a
food or as ingredients in food, and TAKE NOTICE yesterday and then ‘returned to aia eae ve Seaton anne eee
be entitled to register the oe oe A eth geet Egypt. thelr Bartsados Comat Station:
952 eitieen aoras | papean shail’ in ‘the i <——wH . In a dispatch from the island S.8. Alcoa Roamer, s.s. Mornace
meantime give notice in duplicate to me | | of Capri where Farouk and his hig a an anaes oat
7 it my office of opposition of such Tegis- | } family are now staying nn Tempo Polke eeastece, ie Tuiseanene an
tration. The trade a can be seen on i x |quoted the Egyptian source as | frerdsman, ss Brospector, s.§, Merea-
Peed this Sara any of July, 1952 | i 9 | saying that Farouk had been tor, ss. Dieppe, s.s. Alcoa Cavalier, tins
i A | . H ca : H. WILLIAMS, | ~ z , forced to abdicate because of his |: 5 Nccuba, ss. __ Covington Virginia, PER POUND g
! oe eee wee 3) | 2 ‘opposition to the WAFD party.’ Suniewel. So Alcoa Cavalier, s.s, Finn- 10 C ; ‘Ss { a rs
Only a few in stock as tt | 8 WHEL. bark) 5.2. Columbia Star, 8.8, Tasbire,;
* iS . P . a | s Stonegate, s.s. Esso Cristobal, s.s f
regener) i ienited. 7 : oo, ee ete es | POTATOES FOR THE
fi Fenheim, s.s. Pentire, s.s uerto ico, | ®
BUT YOUR BEST BET ¢ CIGARETTES ua. Uboribe Likes, 0.9. Alpha/Ryyn, 5; }% .
3 Rijandam. s.s, Uruguay, s.s. Afghanis-
IS TO GET ONE NOTICE ' ee cee an Sheuat oe. POPULATION
They are real magic |}| i | enbach, s.s. Palme, s.s. S. Catilina, s.s. "
it c 2g | i K L | Yunghing, M/T Bahia, ss. Alcoa, Puri- | : East of the
when it comes to |} CAPTAIN, OWNERS OR AGENTS. | | , —- tan, s.s. “Buceaneer/Hooo, s.s. Arneta,|® JOHN N. PEREIRA, Rickett Street (East o
quality. } of the Venezuelan Motor Vessel a ae eee oe egreeneatneeets < aT } ' Vitamin Bl isa world- s. Haakon Hana. s,s. Cavina, s . ® Post Office) announces the arrival of 1,000 baskets of
n | “GLORIA MARIA" do not hold That BROWN & WILLIAMSON TOBACCO CORPORATION (EXPORT) tenowned appetite restorer. Bataan/Lks, s.s. Polytrader, s.s. Tel- 1% h, ie _ Ss “SCHIE” t $5 50
17 Jewels Guaranteed | themselves responsible for any LIMITED, a company organised under the laws of the United Kingdom of Great F Combined with bi -build. es Medium White-Skin Potatoes ex S.S. a é
debt or debts contracted by any Britain and Northern Ireland, Tobacco Manufacture whose trade or businest " : ood. er basket of 55 lbs
Y D LIMA | member of the crew of this vessel address is Westminster House, 7, Millbank, nn. S.W., England has applied | ing minerals you have the MAIL NOTICE p § ° ‘
; | hile i ort for the registration of a trade mark in Part “A” of Register respect of manhu- . . i ; i : we
} - e ; oa mee factured tobacco, and will be entitled to register the same after one month from ‘ key to joyous buoyant Mails for _ St Vv incent, Grenada, were J €s HN nN. PEREIR A °
& CO LTD R. M. JONES .& COMPANY, the Slst day of July, 1952, unless some person shal th ¢ give notice health. dad and British Gui the M.V
aE, | LIMITED in duplicate to me at my office of opposition of registration The trade mark r halle be close * ;
oe a Agents [can be seen on application mt may office ; B jm al Pe (COMMISSION MERCHANT)
20 Broad St. and M.V. GLORIA MARIA | é Dated this M3rd day of July, 1952 ait di z DARE ot Rickett Street
i : . 26.7.52~—6n H. WILLIAMS | ° \
y arine araens Re t a) oe fark i z ‘ Mail t
Marine Gard \letinormnepiinniisitaiags® Trade Mark GENERAL. TONIC. Ma
SS 2

dod“

i







FRIDAY, AUGUST 1, 1952 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PACE SEVEN
RR Sec tt ne NO ELE SN NI TT TL TS LS LL SE LT TE Reenter

4
SL NNRNE TR SOS 56559000 LSPS oF vo

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CRICKET

er eee Ht seesne, a noure cage 4 aoitume aera > 4 ~*~, The West Indies in Australia 1951—52

RUSADERS.

By HAROLD DALE

enn

aS














SOMEWHERE ANE
THE NIGHT





FROM BUCKAROO,..IT
UPSET HER TERRIBLY...
I wiSH 1 KNEW




WHAT'S THE MATTER
*) WITH HER,
of te y ANY Way &

Mr. Harold Dale, already known to Millions
of readers for his forthright cricket reporting in
the Daily Express and the Barbados Advocate
adds another outstanding book to our series on
Test Cricket. How would the flashing strokes of
Weekes, Worrell and Walcott mateh up to the
efficient run-getting of Morris and Hassett?







AGAIN AT EIGHT
THE MORNING!



Read all about Your favourite

Would the spin and guile of Ramadhin and

Valentine be more effective than the menacing

Cricketing Stars— speed of Lindwall and Miller? Would the
“stormy petrel of cricket,’ Barnes, succeed in his

GODDARD, ATKINSON, attempt at a comeback? These and the other

questions that spring to mind are fully dealt with

TT in Mr. Dale’s eandid commentary. Apart from

MARSHALL, WALCOTT, detailed chapters on the Test, he covers all the
other important games of the tour.

WEEKES, WORRELL. Few cricket enthusiasts could afford the time

and money to be’ present throughout the “World

re errr pee Championship” matches, Cricket Crusaders is

ce Nr APPA DO 1OW, GOOD WiAN. | VONT te) Yee the ideal substitute for the absentee. Reinforced

YOURE NOTAPRAIDE, Ab Wow

by many splendid action illustrations, it brings @
(OU?
BROUGHT ME.THEY
a
=








at a WHER
a) OU LIVE? :




momentous series right to the reader’s armchair

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esas SEE

PAGE FIGHT

OLTMFICS:



Australia and ltaly Share Cy
Farnum 20th In|

Time

Trial

(Trevor Gale reports from Helsinki)

All the cycling events in the Velodrome were com-
pleted to-day and now there remains only the road race
which is due for Saturday. Australia and Italy divided
the major honours between them while the South Africans

were runners up in two events.

Russel Mockridge and

Tone] Cox of Australia were definitely the outstanding

cyclists of the games.

F en Farnurm who was eliminated
in tHe second heats of the 1,000
10°. ?és aa Monday could not pick
lip his kest form and was 20th in
ine tim trial today. Chiefly re
‘poisiMle for his set back in
training has been“a lot of tyre
i‘rortis which kept him off the
woart end track when the finishing
teuches to his training schedule
should have been applied.

For what small consolation we
miy fot out of it, most of the
eve ists and a few managers of
‘other teams think Farnum has a
ood pofential but fs lacking in
~veortence especially in the tvpe
of events on the Olympic cycling
programme,

Time Trial

The. first event this morning
was the time trial. The first four
inc'uding those from Japan, India
Pakistan were very slow, but the
Venezuelan Ituarte Andoni soon
hrought it down to the more re-
snectahle time of 1 minute, 15.4
soconds. Those not familiar with
rh- type of contest. each
nati*tor 3& started solo. and
races against the clock over 1,000
metres,

The fifth man off was the South
African Robinson and he did a
imazing rove effort to slock }
minute 13 seconds for the dis-'
tanee. It had its effects on him
anc he was forced to lie down
om a stretcher in a fainting con-
dition when he came off.

Cortoni of Argentina and Mc-
Kellow of Great Britain came
close to Robinson's time, but it
was not until Russel Mockridge
of Australia cam> on the scene
that it was lowered. Mockbridge, a
bespectacled ex-divinity student,
then ed to beat not only
Robinson's mark but the Oiympic
record as well, and he did it in
much easter style than anybody
else. His time was 1 minute 11.1
seconds.

One before last on the list came
Marino Morettini of Italy who
did 1 minute 12.7 seconds to
come second, The final order was
therefore Mockridge of Australia
first, Morettini of Italy second,
find Robinson of Australia third.

1,000-Metre Sprint

This afternoon in the final of the
1,000 metre sprint Sachi of Italy
defeated Cox of Australia and
Potzernheim in that order in a
three-man race,

Sachi is the present world
champion but it is generally
agreed that Cox of Australia

was outmanoeuvred and should
have been the winner. He lost
by half wheel having to make up
too much” ground in the final
sprint.

Personally 1 think this the most
nonsensical event in any type of
racing _in the world and that
covers the whole field for man
beast or machine. It is the only
vace I know of in which one can
Stand still and get away with it,

The final event was the tandem
2,000 metre race and in_ this
Australia’ met South = Africa,
Mockridge and Cox for the former
land Robinson and Shardelow for
‘the latter, This was another of
those manoeuvring affairs, but
*ventually there was an exciting
finish as the Australians won by
mn inch or two. As I should
imagine. Mockridge will ride in
the sprint in the world champion-
ships in Paris at the end of August
\— the meeting between himself
and Sachi should be interesting.

The other victory ceremony
this afternoon was held for the
4,000 metre pursuit race and this
svas won by the Italian team with
South Africa second and Great
Britain third,

Ken Farnum leaves Helsinki on
‘Tuesday next and is due to ride a
few races at Herne Hill before
returning home. I do not think
Barbados has anything to be

ashamed of and far from being
discouraged next time we must
send not one, but four. If what
I saw here is genuine world class,
then we are well up in it.

Do It Eve



com... ;
me |

i leave for England.

MacDonald
Bailey

@ From Page 1

had particu‘arly asked me for

my views on them.

He said I would have all facil-
ities for coaching in Russia,
“good money” — the sum was
never mentioned—and a comfort-
ible flat for my family,

Fine Offer

It sounded a fine offer.
IT would think it over,

Next day, Chugunov came back
and said:

“My leaders were very pleas-
ed to hear of your interest, But

we cannot give you a definite
offer until we have heard from
Moscow. This should be through
‘at any time. Anyway, come and
have dinner tonight and we will
‘talk about it.”

He called for me in his car at
7.30 that evening. This was the
night before we were due to

1 said

Chugunov said; “Don’t go
back with the rest of the team.
Tell them you are staying on till
the end of the Games—by which
time we shall have everything
arranged with Moscow.”

1 pointed out that this would
be a breach of the conditions we
British athletes had agreed on to
honour. I pointed out the duty
to my wife Doris—she is 24—
and my children, Christine 4,
Robert 2, and the 11-months-old
baby Joan.

And what about them? Could
I not fly back, wind up my affairs,
and return with them? And
what about my book? If it wasn’t
finished soon I could be sued.

Chugunoy smiled and said:
“You don’t understand that. if
you. come back with us direct
from the games it will be a great
propaganda victory for us.”

My family?

“We can discuss that later,” he
said; “and don*t worry about
money. We will settle all your
financial affairs for you.”

Why not contact me with an
offer through the Russian Em-
bassy in London I asked,

“That would not be a good
thing” said Mr, Chugunov. “Es-
pecially in view of recent unfor-
‘tunate happenings at the Em-
bassy.”

We said nothing more. But I
knew he meant the arrest of
Marshall (Foreign Office Radio
operator) and the expulsion of
Kutznetsov,

Doubtful

I had my doubts by this time
but—to be frank—there were
many things that attracted me
in the offer, Security for a sprint-
er over 30. It’s a big thing,

And my host was most cnarm-
ing. “Well” he said, “think it over
Mr. Bailey. Ring me tonight at
my hotel the “Karelie’, The num-
ber is “Helsinki 10016—room 119.”
1 told him IT would ask my team
chiefs if I could stey ch in Hel-
sinki. But I had decided on sec-
ond thoughts that I had to go back
to England first.

At 11,30 I telephoned snd saic
so, He thanked me politely anc
said I might hear from the Rus-
sians over here. And I went to
sleep.

just before 1.30 a.m, I awoke to
hear a voice calling — whispering
-— Mr. Bailey, Mr, Bailey. Ccm>
along. Come with me to the ga.s
of the village.

I was frightened. I was strung
up anyway after all the effort o:
the games. This really frightenee
me,

I looked up and saw Chugunoy
He gave me a parcel. “Here” he
said, “here’s a present for you.”

In a firm voice — I made it
sound that way — I said “please
gO away, I am not going to the

gates of this village with anyone
at this Hour of the night.”
“You must come,’ he insisted
“IT have a very important man al
the gates who can fix éverything
°
Time

Registered U. $. Patent Often

HERE, A ty

HOLES UNG Weve
HAD TO REL HM

seen! BALL
my i2 THES



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

WHITFIELD COPS 800-METER RACE |























IT AIN'T

mh wal Ge ramnri WHO_WANTED
PE fn eS ea Tt ON THE CADDIES
Orn TOO--HE REALLY |

BALL +++ i



. . r

REPEATING HIS VICTORY in the 1948 Olympiad, Mal Whitfield, of
Columbus, O., is shown streaking across the finish line in Helsinki,
Finland, to take first place in the 800-meter event. He tied the record
he set four years ago. His time was 1: 49.2. (International Radiophoto)

Indians Put Up
A Splendid Fight

(From Our Own Correspondent)
LONDON, July 31.



THE INDIANS put up a splendid fight to-day at
Adhikari
(73), Manjrekar (83) and Umrigar (59) all batted soundly

Northants after losing three batsmen cheaply.

so that the tourists finished only 56 behind Northants’
total of 365 for 7 declared.

Brisk batting by both sides will Note? iain sie Sarat ose
be necessary tomorrow, however, Worcester versus Kent
if there is to be any prospect of WEPRMRUET cre UNA Gee blew ss
a definite result, WR eis Ve CeaecasY

Four more points were collected
by Surrey today at Chesterfield
for their first innings’ lead over
Derbyshire and as the home side

Cowdray 95.





ows
only lead by 59 runs with four ¢ .
wickets left, Surrey look set for | By M. Harrison-Gray i
another victory. i Dealer; South $
SCOREBOARD ; Bagi Yas
mo! : N.
Indians versus Northants ; Q7539 i
Northants .. 365 for 7 declared 3 UK 84
Pte ets eere; 309 § g 20 4 ;
Derby versus Surrey : ee ee :
Derby ...... 214 and 140 for6 § . y W, . E i
1 OoK96 o QB i
Surrey rrrpeseretceess 205 § GOQI72 OF :
Gloucester versus Yorks ’ SA65 6Q9832 §
Works... 3% 378 for 8 declared § QS AJ7 @K865 §
Gloucester .. 190 and 132 for 3 3 8.
Leicester versus Warwick 5 9 AJ 104
Warwick .... 126 and 308 for 9 { QAWS 8 ;
Dollery 158 not out. i g f vat :
mn SS ey, Oe 122 The vg i ee the:*Tea ts :
Bannister 5 for 53. bs +a :
No-Trumps play is rarely §
Hants versus Sussex : appreciaced Outside tourna- }
FIQHUE id. vss 233 and 66 for 3 § ment cireles, where it. is
Meee ie ‘ § usually counted as hal &
Doggart 135. § point. In the above dea’
a s each of the four Tens proved
Somerset versus Essex # to be worth a full rick. i
Somerset .... 325 and 28 for 1 § South opened with One };
Glamorgan versus Notts es pir ; eae yeaa !
* oubled and all passed. |
Glamorgan .. 144 and 182 for 5 O2 was led and taken with }
act 3 0.10; South entered Dummy };
; ao nes ang eo o2. one :
for you. Don’t worry. It will be # 'D8 O10. West won and }
alright. Just come on”, i BO ht ‘agar, oes ee ;
I said: You had better go. My ; was virtually sure of his ;
rcom-mate is coming back at any i Sones ; + tori ;
non : " wing to the stopping ;
ae Chugunov left quickly E power of > 10" and 10. i
; ‘ $ East-West cou! y win |}
I bolted the door. I was tremb- $ five tricks in all with z saree :
jing and shivering. I just sat } bined count % 22 agalnat 18 3
Aron i $ (excluding Tens). ast’s |
> re on my bed watching the i penalty pass on a §-42-2 }
door. I refused to open it for } ‘Gistribution would have }
Geoff Elhott when he got back. } Seem mare sot it been |
* i g CK, { been more sound had it been }
He came in through the verandah ' his own lead i
j

window,

“Semeone has bolted the door”
he said. Then I told him ,the
story. Did I tell the British team
officials? No, When we arrived
back in England I told Mr. Crump,
the Team Manager that I was
upset because I had a slight brush
with the Russians the night be-
fore. I didn’t go into the matter
That was it.”

B Jimmy Hatlo | |

SLEEP LA EEEEEELE SSO! SOS EEE ESSE LL ELE LEE ECE CECE Hg

>




“ HE'S THE GUY

y





THINKS THIS IS
SCOT



THE MISERY GUY WHO's |
FOREVER IN THE ROUGH
ALWAYS WANTS COW\PANY<
4 THANX ANOAHWATLO }
HAT TIP TO GOOD ow?



+;

PFPr

\LEAGUE CRICKET REPORT



‘batsmen. were in trouble against had only scored 2 when he was
| Everton’s well flighted spinners. bowled by Bob Banks,
| Four of his 15 overs were maidens,





233 over the ‘hundred mark. As at the race for 1,000 runs, His 839)

343 a-tendance, and Clyde’s
358 for 7 amounted to just over £1. Enfield





cling Honours

Weekes Has Field
Day For Bacup

By ROY MARSHALL

LONDON, 23rd July,

The weather in Lancashire last Saturday was dull and
gloomy, but the performance of Everton Weekes shone
like the brightest surnmer sun.

He had a field day for Bacup against Colne, In Test
cricket Everton is universally recognised as one of the
vreatest batsmen in the world. In league cricket he also
takes his turn with the ball, and with considerable success.
So far this season he has taken 49 wickets at 21 runs apiece.
Colne has full reason to appre- pass the best aggregate for a sea-

ci te his all-round skill. Batting son for a Lowerhouse professional
first on a dead wicket they stayéd of 733 set up in 1937 by former
2 hours to score 109 and all their Lancashire player Len Parkinson, !





Lowerhouse came very near to
j in. defeat. They batted first and after
and he finished off the Colne in gn hour’ and three ‘quarters. were
nings wih 6 wickets in 5 ee a back in the pavilion for a mere 84
este oe m4 thay pens Sree runs. The match had started late,
lett vith on ore eee x Coast and Rawtenstall were left with an
to knock off the runs. Thanks to Mow to make the runs. « smen
a knock of 65 not out by Everton, shown more enterprise, Rawten-
who opened the innings, they did tal) would have won, But only
it with minutes to spare. 22 runs were scored in the first’

He gave a grand display of half hour and the chance of victory
powerful hitting, and despite the was lost. At the close they had
slow outfield, he hit seven fours. scored 64 for 2,

In addition to his performances Central Lancashire
with bat and ball, Everton took fy the Central Lancashire
"2. pat — catches. a League wickets were little drier,

is splay was one of the and most matches began on time.|
finest all-round performances the Frank Worrell ended any hopes of
League has seen for some time. a victory for Werneth with aj
He achieved the rare eet of classic 56 in - or bay
receiving a double collection. But cliffe. Werneth scored ‘or
os ee rae ous his wey. pare bi pe as to get |
ad weather ept the cro the runs, cliffe quic’
down to a mere handful, and for wickets and were in trouble, but!
performances which, on a fine day Worrell’s knock, which included 6,
fe heat oe ict Tk £40 % Be 50 fours, ae org day. At close they |
2roug! e u over ° were or 4,

Rain affected all the matches. Sonny Ramadhin could do little’
Pe ae ve an hour ane a on a dead ulate ase See:
ha . a nm coming Crompton batt and sgored :
down almost continuously since 148 rt 8 declared. Oldham were
Wednesday and was still pouring left 2 hours to get the runs, They |
on Se a eae - ae scored 120, losing only one wicket
cricket would rained o in the process.
gemer. but e ones a oe Sonny had the setintaction “

ith no sun, the wickets remained bagging this solitary wic an
_~ and oe giving no help to in keeping down the rate of scor-

atsmen or bowlers. ing.
Enfield v. Haslingden He made nine runs With the etl

A grand 84 not out by Clyde —one of his best e Ss is |
Walcott nearly Seaton Enfield to season. In spite of “2 o——
victory against Haslingden, It en- total is three more than that of:
abled them to score 158 for five his runs. At present he is lying
declared in just under two hours. second to Eric Price in the race for |
Talnutes and hit eight fours. ‘This 787 cach and Price 98 at 11.34,
minutes ani eight fours. S$ 7.87 each, ani ce a -34,
innings brings Clyde’s average to Frank Worrell is well ahead in





a small is more than a hundred more than
collection any other batsman,
The race for ‘the 1,000 runs in
made a strong bid for victory and the Lancashire League is develop-
Haslingden wickets fell quickly. ing into a race between Weekes,
But they managed to stave off Walcott and Marshall. Everton is
defeat. At stumps they had lcst leading with 797, with an aver-
seven wickets for 65. age of 66.41; Marshall has 706,
Lowerhouse were playing Raw- average 54.39; and Clyde had
tenstall. Marshall, needing 29 to scored 704, and his average 105.7.

Bacup there was only



Table Tennis:
picliianthicians 12 Venezuelans

Leave Helsinki

HELSINKI, July 31.

Twelve members of the Vene-
zuelan Olympic squad left by air
early today for Caracas.

They are flying to New York
where they will arrive to-morrow
and after two days there, they
will leave to fly to Caracas ar-
riving August 4th.

e , s
Finals Tonight

The Grades A and B Table
Tennis finals will be played at
the Y.M.C.A. Naval Hall tonight.
In the Grade A match Norman

vill of Everton will play Roy
Phillips of Pelican.

Gill is the holder of the Island
Championship which he won last
year from Louis Stoute. He has
also played fairly well this seas-
on but it is Roy Phillips who has
shown exceptional form, This
match is expected to be the best

The second group will leave
Helsinki August 4th, To-day’s
group included Eduardo R. Whaite,







UNGUENTINE »

A MODERN ANTISEPTIC

ema Quick Relief from Pain mame |“



FRIDAY, AUGUST 1,

1952







WHEN THE SO0S90000%" g
FINGER~ FIRE MAS THE BARBADOS AQuATIC ¢
CLUB Y

wee es ae? (Members only) é

. SATURDAY oe ANGI ST. 1952 $

N 1 2

FLOOR SHOW 3

DANCE

Featuring the International
Artistes

QUICK

Ser t
CURABELLA
And

ench 1

MON?

e Samba Queen

TUBES or JARS

"o Star



DOSS OH6HH9O0O8GOO4

ee

and His boean Troubadours

ADMISSION to BALL ROOM ?/-
FOSOS SSO

FOSDDIBDODLDOHS SO GH POOH PPS,

«

ERNIE'S :

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DEMOCRACY

+

2900004,

L.2-2O@S@

OOo



Waen a Girt doesn't want to leave | © : > ;

class—and have to make embarrass- | & CLUB 3 |
4ing explanations—it's Paradol she | — ©
asks for. For Paradol means quick | $
relief from suffering caused by. | There will _/ gnecting $

periodié pains—headache, ‘foo— thi> Lette, one 3 |
without disagreeable after-effects. to ro s’ racing of our %
Ask your druggist for Paradel, oa Se >
scientifically compounded from 4 ees ‘all. my friends
ingredients. The name “Dr. Chase” | % will rol! up. e
‘@ your assurance. 2 |@ There will be the a 2
’ |} Turkey and Ham and Lob- %
DR. CHASE Ss \@ ster Cocktails etc. ete. 2
PARADOL | soldi 3
\% @

@

ODOOO«



OOPODOGOODS
oo

2

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SOMETHING NEW FOR
THE CHILDREN
IN OUR MILLINERY DEPT

BIBS

PILLOW CASES
DRESSES

SUN SUITS
PINAFORES
BOYS’ SUITS



CAVE

SHEPHERD
& CO, LTD
10, 11,12 &13
Broad Sireet







~



o PSS DOOPDSD SSP PPPS PPP PS SPAPOPPPAPPFE?,

Does your Roof need Painting ? S
%

rHeN BOWRANITE 1
and Forget it %

: *
For the best protection against Rust and Corrosion use %






of the year.

In the semi-finals Gill defeated
Lincoln Worrell and Phillips beat
his team-mate Frank Willoughby.
Worrell, Phillips and Willoughby
are all representatives of Pelican.

Of the B Class pair, Guiler fin-
ished in the finals of the Boys
Championship last year but was
defeated because of his inaccurate
attack. He is a much improved

player this season and will give
a good performance against
Archer.

Special arrangements have been
made to accommodate the large
crowd which is expected to attend
‘the games.

STYLE
WORKMANSHIP

AND

QUALITY
SUITINGS

You Surely Must
Decide on

P.¢C. 5S. MARFEI
& (CO. LTD.

as the “TOP” SCORERS
IN TAILORING.

8

06 FOOSE OSE SOS SOO SSSS SONGS SSSSOSOGOS SOGSSSS HOSE



wrestling coach and team, Ladis-
lao Lazar, track and field trainer
and team.—vU.P,



o
>
Zz
Q
oH

THE TRIO'S DANCE }$
—- held by — %
NEBBS AND THE BOYS %
At QUEEN’S PARK, %

Â¥.

%

TO-NIGHT

Music by The Society Five. 3
Dinner Served x
ADMISSION .. 2

POOLED

SOOPSSSOOOSOOSSOSOOSF





Gums Bleed
leeding Gums, Sore Mouth and

Loose Teeth mean that you may
have Pyorrhea, Trench Mouth or
perhaps some bad disease that will
sooner or later cause your teeth to
fall out and may also cause Rheu-
matism and Heart Trouble. Amosan
stops gum bleeding the first day,
ends sore mouth and quickly tight-
ens the teeth. Iron clad guarantee.
Amosan must make your mouth well
and save your teeth or money back
Sa? of empty package. Get
Amosan from your chemist today,
The guarantee protects you.





Be Youthful, fit
& full of
vigour

Medically seyeorst
Bile Beans bunish

constipation, slug-
i liveri: ish- '





a 8)

ness and other
stomach, liver and
kidney troubles.
Bile renew
your energy and
vigour, give you
happiness, make




Take

BILE BEANS

—much better than a laxative |
cha ienenseteianeeiaedllnemmeitemetamaenamenemmimmaamn

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GOES FARTHEST — LASTS LONGEST %

One Gallon will cover 700—1,000 sq. ft. %
Stocked in RED and GREY %

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BOWRANITE is supplied ready-mixed and 2

should be well stirred before use. x

5

If required, a Special Thinners can be supplied %

at $2.40 per gallon.

; ee y
* ‘Phone 4456, 4267. x

WILKINSON & HAYNES €0., LID. :

+
8SS9SSS9SS9SSSSS6969596 95955959 GOOG PGOOOPG POOF.
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a

PDLODDIIHHDIDYHIHHHOH HF HOOHIPHIGGH I



o©

An age-old equation on which our costing has been
consistently based. It illustrates three tacts:
One is that of value.

DPOOODLES OOOH DOG 9O9 9099005099099 0G.96-0900000O>,
O96

2

The second, embodied in the text, is proof of

careful buying. $
The third is in the expressed satisfaction of our $
customers who, in turn, have introduced us to $
their friends. $

>

ss 8 3

$ 3
® é
1 C. B. Rice & Co. |
> eS ey Ed & aD. 3
3 Merchant Tailors 5



9O9OSO0OHO-OO



P29 2OV99909-99-904-0099O6-0-4



Full Text


For the cause that lacks assistance
'Gainst the wrongs that need resistance
For the future in the distance,

And the goed that I can do.







WHAT'S ON TODAY

Court of Grand Sessions: 10.60 a.m

Court of Ordinary: 11.00 a.m

Hon. Martyshow speaks at the Press
Club 8 p.m

Police Band at Charity Dance Drill Hall

8.00 pm

ESTABLISHED 1895



HE NEEDED “A
LITTLE, CASH”

OKLAHOMA CITY, July 31.

A prominent Sapulpa Okla-
homa farm m dealer
Thursday told authorities he
robbed the First National
Bank of Luther Oklahoma of
more than $2,000 Wednesday
in a desperate attempt to save
his business

The bandit, identified by the
PBI as Glen Cyrene Whitt, 42,
was held in Oklahoma county
jail in lieu of the $50,000 bond
on a Federal Bank robbery
charge. He has no previous
criminal record, Whitt said
his business had lost money
and he needed a little cash “to
recuperate.” U.P.

U.S. Will Get
Uranium Ore
‘From S. Africa

WASHINGTON, July 31.



Farouk Wishes
Government Luck

WASHINGTON, July 31.

USUALLY RELIABLE diplomatic officials said on}
Thursday that. Britain has warned Egypt that it is ready
to take the sternest steps if British subjects are molested
or injured in rioting or by any other cause.

They said the warning was delivered by the British
Embassy in Cairo before the return of Ambassador Sir
Ralph Stevenson from London and when it was seen that
W.A.F.D. leaders were in close association with the Gov-
core of Premier Aly Maher and General Mohammed

aguib.

King Farouk
Objected To

They said the British remember-
ed that the W.A.F.D. Government
ot former Premier Nahah was in
;power when rioting occurred in
Cairo last January resulting in
death and injury of British sub-
‘jects. They said information on
j | Britain's action was immediately
Arm Reform ; communicated by the embassy

y / ; here to Secretary of State Acheson
who knew of it when he called in
PARIS, July 31, | British Ambassador Sir Oliver

Egyptian General Mohammed|Franks on Thursday to discuss
Naguib, Leader of the army re.|international affairs including the
volt which forced King Farouk’s|Near East.



wh The United Stat i
abdication, purportedly declared Luck ! receiving tee gl ae
the tae ein ak = aaoraaey that} King Farouk in an_ interview| from gold mined in South Africa
gyptian Monarch had to go} wit} ysme apri i ic . ion
Daun Se soled some tke ee newsmen on Capri island | the Atomic Energy Commission

: reported today. Australia will
“IT will try to tell you as much | also be sendin i i

as I can of what I am told you! Soon. RAS MeN
want to know. i

army’s demands for reforms.
In a copyrighted interview witn

the Cairo correspondent of | ¥% " I can say that Ij The domestic output is increas-

France’s “Soir,” Naguib was | Wish very sincerely luck to those| ing, and new mining facilities in

edited as saying: “Our move-| Who have taken it into their hands| Canada and the United States
and upon their consciences to



ment began because we wanted to
obtain justice for the army. We
had not thought of going so far
las to demand abdication. An
ultimatum was handed to Farouk
because he did not want to give
a categorical response to ‘some
of our demands.”

may be operati

govern Egypt. I wish them lots of | a to the Com
luck because they will need it, I/semi-annual
hope that they will not think that/'The report said that, for security
governing a country in these{reasons, it was impossible to
aiffcult days of world crisis is specify the record of accomplish-
such an easy matter as might ment in atomic weapon develop-
perhaps have been thought by,ment. But it could be stated that
those who are new to the game. | “substantial improvement” had

“I love my country and I wish been made.
her all the best. When I became’ The Commission described its
King 16 years ago I was full of| experiments in the use of atomic
hope for what I might do to raise energy for medical research, and
her place among the nations, and said its third establishment de.
my love for Egypt and for my)voted to cancer research, had
countrymen is no less today,} been opened in San Francisco in
though I am now in exile.” January.

The report said that Britain
and the United States had agreed
to buy South African uranium in
1950. The first of several plants
being constructed on the Rand to
extract uranium ore from
was almost ready to start prod
tion,

The Commission

shortly, accord-
munission’s twelfth
report to Congress.

Egyptian Commander-in-Chief
ey denied that the army
ebels had any special link with
any political party, and said that
he and his supporters would stay
‘out of politics.”

“The W.A.F.D.S. (the largest
Egyptian political parity) came to
see us like all other Egyptian
political parties,’ Naguib was
quoted as saying. “Our contact
with the W.A.F.D.S has been lim-
ited to two courtesy calls made
hy ite Segretagy General

Alone in Exile
“T want to make it clear that it
is I alone who am in exile. My
wife and my children are free to
return to Egypt. Neither my wife
nor her perents dre exiled. ”
But my wife has chosen to be

We belong to no party. We| -
with me and so has each of m}

jare no more the vassals of the “was the first

Moslem Brotherhood (extreme] three daughters of their own free} official source in the United States
j.ationalist group) than of any]will, This has made me very]to announce an agreement to buy
other. We are only officers. The}proud and happy. As I am no] Australian uranium. But the

convocation of Parliament for the} permitted to return to Egypt I
nomination of the regency is a| must seek a new home, and I do
matter for political and juridical’ not yet know where to look, nor
men. We are not mixing in it.”' have I begun to think about it.

| U.P. * @ On Page 6

-TEHERAN RI

Australian Government had re-
cently announced its acceptance
of an American offer to buy
j uranium from South Africa.

t

BODY OF

OTER CARRIED BY COMRADES





‘

DURING THE HEIGHT OF THE RIOTS that swept through Teheran, Iran, demonstrators shout and wave as they
earry the body of a slain comrade through the streets of the city, Premier Mohammed Mossadegh’s new
director of police has warned the nation against the efforts of the Communists, under a guise of natiqnal-
ism, to take over control of the country. Many were killed and injured in the outbreak. (International)

Britons Must
Pull The Belt

LONDON, July 31,

Britain to-day prepared a new belt tightening drive to

get out of the rut after Parliament ‘approved Prime Minis-|
ter Churchill's plan to divert some production from defence| wre hie

to exports. The House of Commons last night approved{ The message said all Americans

the Conservative Government’s new economic programme | in the area escaped injury. It

by a vote of 299 to 277 after Churchill warned that the, Said a large tin dredge was dam-

alternative was bankruptcy. aged, The settlement is in Kinta

Lut bie et valley and operated by Pacific Tin

Consolidated Corporation with
Mossadegh Seeks



U.S. TIN SETTLEMENT
IN MALAYA RAIDED
BY RED GUERILLAS

| WSHINGTON, July 31-

reporting an attack on an Ameri-
can tin dredging settlement near
Kota Bahru Perak, Malaya by
armed Communist guerillas in
which a number of employees

The plan also calls for a slash!
jin imports and a continuation of
‘the wage freeze. Churchill said |
;that full sehedules on ‘the arms



offices in New York,
The cablegram said guerillas



‘attacked ith trench mortars,|munist troops were standing to in|
as eri eakery Me ; ’ yet
“Fullest Powers” | inte workea out at the Gom-|™achine guns and other weapons, ‘defence positions today on the
. i ¢ > . s s

1 July 31, {monwealth Economic Conference sami —UP. lena ihete “ainching vets ee

Persian Prime Minister Mohain (oeee: nes -Brcverber, (ud a ‘ourred twice in the past few days
- ae ~ternment’s proposal to build up ex- be St Te al |

med Mossadegh today asked the ports at the expense of arms was STANDARD OIL [Usually reliable snag | — se
Majlis (Lower House) to give him: po unexpected earlier this month, EXPLORATIONS iny Portuguese colony forty miles



“fullest powers” to execute his!

as Britain’s trade’ became more}

IN TRINIDAD








Harbaro




















Vin for

The Malayan tin bureau said it}dcmestic selling price of
received a cablegram Thursday, cents per pound,



_ U.K. Warns Egyptians Against a.
Molesting British Subjects

_Attlee-Bevan

_ Contention

Boils. Again:

|

| LONDON, July 31.

| Opposition Leader Clement
{Attlee publicly rebuked Leftwing
rebel Aneurin Bevan on the floor
of the House of Commons of
Thursday in the most open breach,
between the two men te date:

Attlee rose in the House just after}
question time to give a “personal }:

explanation” of remarks which
‘Bevan had made on Wednesday in
|the' economic debate about what
(went on when he was a Member
of the Labour Government.

Bevan, during his speech yes-
terday, said that when the British
Rearmament Programme was
launched in 1951 he insisted that
Attlee, then Prime Minister, should
say in his speech that rearmament
would be carried out — if raw
materials and machine tools were
available.

Attlee said: “In the course of
his speech yesterday the member
(Bevan) no doubt through inad-
vertence, made statements pur-
porting to describe the actions

—-








te,

PRICE : FIVE CENTS

AT SUMMER SCHOOL



> al

©

¢

£5, Sm

=

THIRTY students of the Third Annual Summer School at Codrington College are seen here in group with
their lecturers shortly after the 10.30 “break” from Lectures yesterday. The Principal of Codrington Col
lege Rev. C. A. Sayer and Professor A. K, Croston can be seen in the second row third and fourth from
right, respectively while Mr. Aubrey Douglas-Smith, Resident Tutor is on the extreme right in the front

|
|

Cwealth
Economic
Conference

3rd Annual Summer

School Ends 'Today





WEATHER REPORT

ESTERDAY
il trom Codringtor 14
est Tempegature: 96,5 °F
est Temperature: 73.5
iv 9 he
TO AY
imrise: 5.48 a
nset:/ 6.20 p.m
n: First @ I 20
h

Tid m



Federation Is

.



Says V. G. Pitt



der:
Indies
sooner it
vill be
i

of the Britisn
“must” and the
eomes about, the better
for all coneerned, Mr.
Spencer Pitt, Barrister-at-
of Toronto told the Advocaie
ssterday morning shortly before

ng for Canada
Mr, Pitt who was
e three
mother, arrived
Y mur 1



is a

z,

in Grenada
visiting hig
here yesterday
t by T.C.A, from
Crit i back home
He w mpanied by wife
and three children

weeks





wa



ce

his

He said that-too much ‘increas

being wasted on conferences and
Commissions.of Enquiry and _ it
seemed as if the several colonies

were vieing for a certaih preferen-
tial position and keeping in the
background, the more material and
important issue—confederation,

“If we once get confederation,
then all the other graces will duly
follow in their propér places”, he
said and added that it seemed as
if they were starting at the top
instead of at the bottom.

My. Pitt said that he was not at

he present moment disposed to
stigate particular island or
y;lities) secin mip, He however

hougnt that a people or group of
eop'e, having almost a common
cono and a common objective
hould get down to the core of the

iy

rather

taken by himseif in discussing) Nahe) than fighting over
matters of policy with myself and ITT baci 4g = ip as ‘ IV1ELLes,

othets corny ere hen he THE third Annual Summer School, run by the Extra-J “if 1 had anything to do with
was fr jour Gove! “Following is the text of an an- Mural Department of the University College of the West {West Indian affairs, I would sug-
ernment.” : houncement made by the Prime] Indies was held at Codrington College, by kind permission J %st that the British Government,
_ There is a well established fyle| Minister in Parliament on the| of the Principal and Governing Board, from Friday July§ 'TesPective of the warring factors
inhibiting members of the Govern! 99th of July: — 9% ond ends. toway ‘ . ver trivialities, pass a bill to give
ment from revealing what pass€$. «Some little time aco I com- The subject this year was “Drama” and “Dramatic he islands confederation because
in confidential diseussion. Thefsunicated to the other Prime Rect sul 8 ye as rama” anc ramatic J hey are old enough.

ee Rage Mis ae Ministers in the Commonwealth] + °C! UaUE The; principal: mueat: | ' eet isa oar a ane a

s r > 8 se > sipal guest has beet intries and place the wor

accuracy of Bevan's statements 1/f Proposal that we should meet Proiessor A, K, Creston who hol) [that had been enjoying responsi-
should commit precisely the. sa Be eee cant ee co o B G S ends he Chair of English at the t hi Bbility with less maturity than the
error to which I am now draw Data etna a att the oNFe p J S ersity College and he chos. People in these islands and added
attention. This I am not prepa: pressing issues of financial, com- “ | Modern Verse Dramatists as hi $that the present situation almost
to do. I make this statement lest perce and economic policy with 5 O12 860 } ubjcet bordered on being sinful to retain
oie ower or ne hag ey a ype agree , 9 | During the course ef the week, &,System without change for over
strued.” ’ » some o which have Ro . ee ae art, fifty. years,

Attlee’s statement brought loud}been the subject of Staonal With Canada gy ae ae 1 “We ure not sufficiently self
cheers from the Conservative |examination since the Financs lei ' oT} see icoont of “ee em ta, fasserted and it is pathetic if we
benches, but Bevan himself was}Ministers’ meeting in January of | GEORGETOWN, B.G. July 31. Ww. oH ae ali an are to continue in this way”, he
not in his place, although Attlee |this year. It wag our hope that, Gonada has shared $5,912,860 ved" by Christophae ere’ | aaid. /
said he had notified him that the jout of such discussions we could (B.W.L) or 13.6 per cent-of Brit- vai pick aed di ban sks eer de Swe | Speaking of his native Grenada
statement would be made. A few|work towards a ¢enstructive ap- Nar Guiseley otal imposttiradé © Shakespeare |Mr. Pitt said that there was an
minutes later he came hurrying inj proach to jhe economic problems $43,453,885 for the six months | jalmost blank appearance on_ the
and rose to say that no word had |which beset the world, ended June 30 this year, On the|,, Mt. Aubrey Douglas Smith,| wharf and the economic condition
reached him that the statement : a ‘ rea hand: the Dominion pur-|/*ei¢ent Tutor, contributed five | of the people seemed to be bad.
was going to be made, Attlee re-} | am glad \¢ be avie to inform ‘ I lectures on Shakespeare, The Heart Rending

lied that
—UP.









The surplus was the biggest

he had sent a ,note.|the House
evan said he did not receive it.|monwealth Prime Ministers have

Canadian ‘|

chased from this country produce
valued at $16,108,587, worth ©:
41.49 per cent of the exports totai
ling $38,727,173.

shat the other Com. practical side was devoted to lec-

\ures on stage production, make-
up and costuming by Mr. D. 5
boulds, Miss ®. Nurse and Miss K

agreed that such a meeting will

he apd useful and that it
ee BS





tha last week of} The United Kingdom during the Hawck ins,
November, The Prime Mjnister}samé@ period exported. to British/ [cluded also was a seties of
of South Alfriea has told me that/Guiana goods worth $17,287,112, |/;ehearsals representing plays Ww

while he himself would unfortun-|0¢ 39.78 pec cent of the total im-~ | various stages,











| During his three weeks there, it

was almost heart rending to look
at the harbour and not see a single
ship. He remembered as a boy
seeing the Piss ocean
vessels coming and going, but now
the place looked rather blank,
He said that it was bad enough

i


















: ately have special difficulty in}ports; and bought from this! Mr, C. A. Grossmith conducted} when they only had two “Lady”
attending the Conference at the, cougtry — produce valued atla rehearsal of “'Tetyas and the On Page 6
r. e p time proposed his country will oterecean ~~ 87.49 per eee ingel” in ity first steges when — -
be represented, The Prime Min-| total exports for the period. | players still have books in the.. |
TTAWA. July 31 ister of India will be unable to} The United States sent this} hands ae : e 9
Canada ek a ab announced |attend at the time proposed but}country $7,221,791 worth, or 16.61) Mr. A, F.C, Matthews conducted | 6 in
that her economic strength has}the Government of India have| per cent of the total of goods im-j)a rehearsal of “The Man Whe
leaped ahead, imports during agreed to make the appropriate ported, while receiving 6 51 per | Wotldn’t Go To Heaven in
June rising by more than $60,-!arrangements for the participa- cent or $2,523,652 worth of the | slightly more advance 1 stage
00000 in value, and creating|tion of India. All other Com-] produce exported. Mr, Golde White produced a
the biggest monthly trade surplus}monwealth Prime Ministers in-| British Guiana brought in from | Dress Rehearsal of scenes from « :
for a first half year. cluding the Prime Minister of;preferential countries other than A Midsummes Night s Dream
With sales to the United King-|Southern Rhodesia hope to be{Canada goods worth $8,599,784, Climax | NEW YORK, July 31.
dom sharply increased, and with present themselves for the whole}or 19.79 per cent of the total im- As a climax yesterday the Bar-| 4 detective masquerading as a
increases in almost all foreign|or part of the Conference. Ar-{ports and from countries other} b:dos Players journeyed to Cod }blind man with dark glasses, gui-
markets, June exports were worth|iangements will also be made|than the United States $4,432,329, | riugton College and exhibited ‘tar Un cup and seeing eye dog was
$378,800,000. as compared withlror the representation ,of they 0? 10.2 per cent. ‘ ished product with their pe--) credited Thursday with trapping
$315.800,000 for the previous Colonial territories. The Con-| The $82,181.059 in external |ioemance of “The Importence Cla suspected narcotics wholesaler.
June, the Bureau of Statistics re- ference will be precetted by|trade for six months w a 5} being Earnest. For ten days Detective Frank
ported. Imports dropped to $324,- preparatory digeussions between| $26.850,555 uo on the similar A very welcome feature of the} Martirella played his blind man’s
500,000 from $360,400,000 giving officials of the “Commonwealth period of 1951, and more than |School was a recording of T, S.! role in a park near the Manhattan
Canada the favourable balance of countries T shall five the House] three and a half times the value] Liiot’s play “The Cccktail Party ‘end of the ‘Triborough Bridge
$54,500.000 for the month as _ eve » OC Ye ext al trade for | Kindly provided by Lady Saint rate # through his dark glasses
d with the defici 44,-|further information on the sub-Jof the country’s external trade y 4 y watching through :

600,000 f “ oa ject in due course.” whole of 1938. The main factors|}who visited tre Schcol far this | the movements of Francis
600.000'for June, 1951, : rccounting for these blg increases { purpose. [i ubby” Russell, 23, If Russell

since the postwar monthly record
of $112,000,000 achieved last De-
cember. It brought the total sur-
plus for the half year of 1952 to
$614.200,000 —- a sharp contrast
to the $339,000,000 deficit in the
corresponding month last year.
UP.

U.S. May Buy
Foreign Tin
For Home Use

WASHINGTON, July 31.



U.S. importers may buy foreign] mission
home consumption for the| Weeks ago by Cuban
frst time since March last year,| Wis, Ortega

it was announced today by Nation-
al Production Authority, This
takes effect trom August the firs!
and importers may pay any pric
for it.

While reconstruction finance
corporaticn will thus give up its
monopoly as a buyer of tin, it will

continue to buy metal and sell ith ayy js

to North American industry at og
121

United Nations Production Au-
thority announced it would permit
tresumption of private imports in
wn amendment to its control
power.—(U-P.)



| Portuguese Reds
And Chinese Clash

HONGKONG, July 31.
Portuguese and Chinese Com-

'

southwest of here said the situa-

) Salad the Communists have created

features were fil.ns ¢;
Stage
British Council

in external trade in fourteen year | Other
are increased production and en-|!ilim_ strips on
hanced prices: but a few new small / «ih lly lent by the

exporting industries have appear-
Canadian, U.S. $

Cuba To Start
Red Inquiry



ad on the seene, The adverse trade }
balance of four and three qué
ter million dollars for the six-
month perie? is somewhat off-



HAVANA, July 31,



y ; F F ad y 31,

Cuban Consultative Council's} set by big imports of machinery The divest cena es ur
Justice and Law. Committee}and other goods more or less of A I, 32 of w cant at a premium 3 17/32
unanimously approved the creation} capital nature.—(CP) leer cans in terms of United States
iat antiviticg i aabe wor Wie ten eerie - |funds in qnsing teres? pereeee
" ealings on ednesday. The

must be approved by the whole 5 atte are . was VY, cent at
Council and Cabinet prior to the SHIF AGROUND pound staring. Was Un. 74 cent 8

$2. 79%.
In Montreal the

LONDON, July 31.

creation of an investigating Com-
. s° The 3.142 ton Brazilian steam-

pete States
mission,

United

The resolution creating the Com-| €! Alegrete grounded on a reef | dollar Wednesday closed at : dis~
was introduced many} neer the entrance to Cahbedello|co int of 3 13/32 per cent in ete
newsman| Harbour today, Lloyd's agents|of ¢ anadian _ funds, down 1/16

who is a, Council) reported. The “Alegrete” regis-| from Tuesday's close,

tered at Rio De Janeiro, was That is it took 96 19/32 cents

built in Canada for Lloyd Bra i-! Canadian to buy $1 American T he

jiro Patriomonia Nacional. ) pound sterling was $2.69 11/16 up
—U.P 11/16 from Tuesday.—(CP)

McDonald Bailey
Jo

Fron

Member. Arturo Fernandez Gon-
zalez, prominent Catholic Leader,
endorsed the proposal after which
the Council approved the plan.

Gonzalez cited the
report of Edward Miller, United
States Under-Secretary of State
that “Communist penetration in
a very serious problem.”
He also said reports from Athens

Fernandez

a Central Communist Committee
for Latin America to direct Red
activities in the Western Hemis-
phere. He said a Committee re-
'portedly “ed been set up in
| Havaria a. the “Cominform of the
Caribbean.”’—U.P.

45 More Added 7
| Captured List

MUNSAN, Korea, July 31.
| The United Nations Command
today added 45 names to the list!

Two hours later as the British
sprinter slept in his room in hus
thirteen Chugunov cams back.

He whispered: “Come on M
Bailey, to the gates of the village
You must come. I have a vers
important man there who can fix
everything.”

McDonald B-iley, frightened
refused. When Chugunov left,
Bailey bolted his door and witec
up for his room mate Geoff Eili-
ott. He did not remain alone

Our Own Correspondent)
LONDON, July 31,

When MeDoenald Bailey, ace}
British sprinter was in Helsinki |
for the Olympic Games, he was)
approached three times by a Rus-
sian — who asked him to quit
ithletics in Britain and go to Rus- |
sia as a coach,

On Sunday, Jul 7 he was
introduced by Mr.Geoff Dyson,
chief Pritish coach, to a Soviet
Journalist named Chugunov.



2



{ — ; Ree oer es de Chugunov said he specially! for the remaining seven hour:
jot UN. pee Tae it ayy bo na | wished to interview MoDonsié | in Helsinki.

jcaptured by the eae ve aue Bailey for his magazine “Voks.” | Here asked for accounung of names| mi, next night the two men had! own story of the events | pdin:

which were not made public. They
jwere given to the Reds at a 35
minute Staff Officers’ session at)
Panmunjom

dinner in a Helsinki hotel, Chu- |
gunov suggested that McDonald |
Balley should stay on to the end |

up to that night in Helsinki

“lL am back in’ London now
with friendly red buses running







nine point programme. The Gov-| 7% ition was calm but tense, cf the games “by which time | ; ,

erngibat tatemnent broadcast iy | aouteg” pedarves Teeter SAN FRANCISCO, July 31. A Chinese news agency at Hong-| The group of 45 brings to 1926; there would be a concrete offer vw we per bee _
Teheran radio today denied that! ¢; 799 900,000. _ The Standard Oil Company of|kong said that the Portuguese/the number of persons of whom| !rem Moscow.” Local ae ate he 5 kes Pittehint the
the Prime Minister had ever made|~"’ ~" * California announced today that|authorities had asked China yes-|the U.N. has asked for an account! He offered: . The finest facilities | had each ater sas - iheee
a proposal for arbitration in the| Churchill warned that very se-!0N¢ Of its subsidiary companies|terday to speed negotiations for the|since the original prisoner of war| tat the Soviet sporting organisa-| “uUSSIan oe s wn : ee
oil dispute with Britain during'.i,us measures affecting domestic’ WaS condueting latge scale ex.|settlement of two incidents im) lists were exchanged last Dec. 18.| tions could provide: A job as} days ago 1 could ae peer. oo
meetings’ with George Middleton, 214 defensive aspects of British Plorations in the British West |which there were machinegun and | With the latest list went a letter| ceach to Russian youth: A com-| my way Moscow-wards to t k

sritish Charge d’Affaires here policies were being planned, Since Indies with activity centred in|mortar exchanges last Friday and|from Major General William k.| fortable flat in Moscow for Mc| up a new life. -
A British Foreign Office spokes-' churchill became Prime Minister ‘Trinidad. jon Tuesday night. One Commun-~|Harrison, Senior U.N. negotiator,| Donald Bailey and his family — | It all began so quietly, just os
man yesterday id Mossadegh last fall “Britain's £4.500,000.000 It had acquired leases or made|ist report said that a team of seven! reminding the chief Red dele-| and he has three children: No! it might here. At 10.30 last Sun
Ss , to submit the ae ae . ie , application for leases on ap-|from Kwantung, a _ provincial| gate, General Nam [I]. that the firencial werries: An assured! day morning, Mr. Geoff Dyson
n but the Per- Se" eer has ' been proximately 700,000 acres on the|military area, had reached the'enly account t} the Comm t future national chief coach knocked ai
t I ied out f hree to four island d the surrounding sea'Communist side of the frontier to' have made the list 126 McDonald Bailey finally turne@| my door in 13b apartment in
ile floor.—U.P, investigate the situation,—U.P \? ame De 26.—C.P, | down the offer at 11.30 that night the Olympic village and intro-

\



Product 10 !ittle heed to him.

noticed Martirella at all he paid
His disguise
wag good, Policewoman Katherine
Barry accompanied Martirella as
his “guide” Another detective
lent him his Boxer as “a seeing-
eye dog. Martirella strummed his
guitar, collected nickels, dimes and

quarters from passersby and
watched.

Russell, porice cnaryeu «i ansact-
4 business at a nearby bar and

then walk to a ramp leading to
the bridge and leave a one ounce
package of heroin on the railing
for a peddiler to pick up.



Miss Barry and Martirella saw
Russell conferring at the
Wednesday night. They notified
two other detectives who hid on
the girders of the ramp nd they

placed the
railing.
U.P.

Offered

arrested Russell he
of heroin on the

pacage

b As Coach In Russia

duced me to Mr. C. Chugunoy,
correspondent for “Voks” magi-
zine. 4

Mr. Dyson and Geoff Elliott
—my room-mate who came
ninth in the Decathlon—th »
left me alone for an interview.

We spoke pleasantly about my
athletic career, my home lifes,
my plans for the future. Rem m-
ber I am now 31 and have per-
haps only four years left as a

r.

I told Mr. Chugunoy ‘hat my
plans for the future were not
yet settled.

“Surely,” he said, “a man who
has done so much for sport in
Britain will have difficulty

|

no
there ?”
He went on “You are 4
famous man. We in the Soviet

Union have long admired your
athletic feats. Would you b*
interested in coaching for us in
Russia—at one of our big ath-
letic centres ?”

I had already to'd Chug nov
—a pleasant man by the way,
spruce in his fawn egahbar*ine
snit, fluent in his command
English — that I had enjoy"
meeting Russian a’‘hietes. He

@ On Page 8

POR

















At the airport to see them off was
their son, Dr. S. Spira.

Professor to Lecture








ing discus champion’ !”’

‘0 Reside in Canada
ISS CLAIRE MILNE, a former





has been appointed Acting Solic-
itor General of that Colony.

Mr. Archer who has also acted
as Solicitor General of Barbados

a.

area















ARIES

% March 21—April 20













a ts : t whe e9
PAGE TWO BARBADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY, AUGUST 1, 1952
}
; , | | NING HOURS
7 4 J
The New Haven Day Nursery | LISTEN,
FRIDAY, AUGUST IST Tb — 0.46 pm 26.53 00 31 98M
| 4.00 — 7.45 p.m. .. 19.76 M 2% 38 M
j 4.00 p.m. The News, 7.10 p The 15 p.m. West Indian Diary. 1.45
|. AND MRS. MICHAZI ; poe A Tale of Two Cities, 8.15 pir
Dp’ Ww pe es angen ° Spent Three Weeks | ek Ripe: 430 po o ewsresl, & BO pay. Would Afters,
: papstes gle re 5. a Met ARTIE’S HEADLINE R. H. E. COLLYMORE, a vard, 5.00 p er tety 0.08 p.m. “ineies, Soa a ene
x cnar were rivat un Salad 3 cane | a 1.) Editorials, 6.00 p.m ing Up the Cur-
mada 4 watendity ‘wapratcia pias 3 Barbadian who has been Praaron gy ao wilion PI tnt . tain, 945 p.m. Olympic Report, 16.(0
T.C.A, for month's holida al ah ge residing in Canada since 1916, 6.45 p.m. Sports Round-Up and Pro- p.m. The News, 10.10 p.m. News Talk,
which the ss ieee a eae left for Montreal by T.C.A. yes- e-amme Parade, 7.00 p.m, The News, 10.15 p.m. The Debate Continuls, 19.20
eet y Re seeene wie. terday morning on his way to 7.10 p.m, Home News From Britain. ».m. From the Third Programme
Mair), 60ies Samana a} g wi
. "TW eats ye the son of My Toronto where he is employed
| a Me . A W. lasts of +} baie with the Canadian Music Sales
Lodue: S i ik dusted two : Corporaticn. v3
sg . 100! I gualifiec we a Mr Celiymore - Te Pe
7 ut cGi Iniversit . 5 spent three R ae :
aoe Pl eee ene — weeks’ holiday here as a guest ai ) ai * *
and i now specialising in the Hote} Royal : fe Tr
Ophthalmology at the Montrea Austead meas St Liste | rem.
Sea a -t rte o/s
: ISS AUDREY REECE who | and if ;
| Off to U.K. accompanied her father to ; ro , ~ * Te
Ly R. L. SPIRA,; merchant of St. Lueia for the Dedication of the |
M Swin Street and Mis. Spire New Abercromby Lodge returned {
“Green Actes”, Worthing lett home during week It BUTS. ; * :
sche eais aeeaeiioe | baw Miata, A Mr. Reece is District. Grand Mas-
rs Seo dM ig ha 4 me meg < ter of the Scottish Constitution in YOUR INDIVIDUAL HOROSCOPE
Via NMbontirca A. GO ouday, Se
wage = tumck 9 on elena a arbados. | :
ihey “wat teaver” via the tA. gat Te a iat + FRIDAY, AUGUST 1, 1952 *
they wi rave via e ot Ba igh? “= A : :
dive «% cting Solicitor Genera
where they wis PaaKe % BOP. “But, darling, alt | seid R "hen ARCHER, Legal | Look in the section in which your birthday comes and x
9 hang Brae igloo wes, “Fancy being mas Dr: Prini find what your outlook is, according to the stars.
he away for ahout two months. to @ Russian record-break- Draughtsman in Trinidad

Excellent star aspects all through day. if
you have the time, lend a helping hand
to some worthy cause, perhaps aid our

ROFESSOR A. K. CROSTON a to Trinidad wh \ % service men and women.

R ESSOR A. K, CROS student of St. Joseph’s Con- W@5 promote ‘0 inidad when i

of the University College of vent, Trinidad who’ finished he, was Judge of the Bridgetown lo Ifs or allowed thi ee da

he Wes dies ive a lecture “ : ae 5 > here. } TAURUS No Ifs or Buts allowec is ge! 5 a.

th W ae pi = of roe on education at the Ursuline Petty Debt Court he | April 21—May 20 Finish incompleted work or start new
onight in ne Harrisor “ge Convent, - 2 2 ea See , * i
Library on “Recent West Indian yesterday wechins eee eure From St. Kitis x ee ae giapaed. Arve pro x
Novels”. The lecture begins at 8.00 ‘Trinidad intransit for Canada R. FRANK BLACKMAN of essions, la s ‘S "

o'clock and the admission is 1/-.

For Three Weeks

where she Tow to reside,
After Two Weeks

4 the Colonial Secretary’s Office
returned home on Saturday last.
Mr, Blackman left here on the 7th

MRS. HALL and nurses supervise daily care of infant children

*

GEMINI

*

Use unemotional intuition, common sense

i , —e May 21—June 20 and you can really make headway. The
RS. JOYCE CLARKE, wife of J TTTLE Miss Bonny Martin, june for holiday and after spend-, The New Haven Day Nursery ‘mpression so necessary in the] of nursery maids in the care and " difficult equally sponhored with the easier
a¥i Capt. Ormie Clarke of Wood- ti oe oe, R. H. Mar- ing some time in St; Lucia went, and First Aid Centre, situated at formative stages of a child’s life| feeding of children. Y
in, Manager 0: e

brook, Port-of-Spain, arrived here

rine Hotel

tasks. Fine day for gain.

i on to Antigua and then to St. Kitts | Sargeant’s Village, Christ Church, 4nd releases mothers for work in| Apart from care provided for | * *
on Friday last by B.W.LA. for and Mrs. Martin, travelled out where he spent a week. was opened by the Rev. A. I. order to supplement the family| children, the aim of the Nursery A . ; i
three weeks’ holiday with her from St. Vincent by herself yes- y Johnson, Vicar of St. David’s on income. It also provides training @ On Page 5 + CANCER Today encourages thigh aims, bright ideas,
mother Mrs. Edith Gibbons of tetday morning by B.G. Airways Back to Brazil the 16th April, 1951, Its founder, ! June 21—July 23 worthy interests with hard work, Start
Jackson, St. Michael. on her way back to Barbados. re ea ae

Optician Returns

She spent two weeks’ holiday as ,

RS. WILLIAM DUFF and|





Mrs. L. A. Hali has been very in-|}
terested in the welfare of chil-







with a prayer that all may be to His

‘ : Mining | 7 honour, your good,
7 her two children, Kleanor and | : . " j

ETURNING to Trinidad by a oe of Mr. and Mrs, Cyril Robert left for Sao Paulo, Brazit oP 4p aan me nine, . the atu | G i @ |g * - «x
R BWLA. ‘on. ‘Wednesdey , on Wednesday by the S.S. Brazil) re oat eee oe te the tees wf u ; LEO Sound plans, well directed energy and
ON raat Cann Assi Cc after spending two weeks’ holiday | 4 Centre to cater to -he needs w Jul ‘Aug. 22 ability can return worth-while benefits,
night was Mr. Hal Ward, son of ssistant Curate as guests at the: Ocean View the poor at Sargeant’s Village did| | y 24—Aug. Mind’ ‘hands tecie ghpeia be tase ents *«
Mr. and Mrs. E, L. ox vf FTER spending five weeks’ Hotel, nct escape her, OPENING TO-DAY AT 5 & 8.30 { for good ay
“Deal”, Maxwell Coast. Mr, Wand , holiday with his parents in Mr. Duff who spent a few days! For many years the proceeds j :
is an Optician employed with Kingstown, St. Vincent, Rev. E. over here with his family, went|of concerts and dances organised AND CONTINUING DAILY t ; * * «x
Plimmer & Co,, of Frederick Gatherer, Assistant Curate at- back last week by air. He is!|by her have provided Christmas VIRGO Widely broadcast are very encouraging
Street, Port-of-Spdin and came tached to St. Joseph's Chyuyh, re- President of Agromotor. cheer, food and clothing for such a Aug. 23—Sept. 23 T@YS for practically all endeavour neces-
over to spend his holidays with turned here yesterday morning people of the Soeiety and Coilege . g. i.

his parents.

by B.G. Airways,

Intransit
I NTRANSIT from Trinidad

Districts of St. John. She has atso
been one of the foundation mem-




Whig,

Fae psy “ i fie
Steg WO



sary to good living. Seemingly menial
tasks as favoured as prominent ones, *

é stonday ning , . aoe * :
Ex-Preésident Lectured yesterday morning by T.C.A.|bers of the Children’s Goodwill a * *
ee ele Malley ‘ N Wednesday afternoon Mrs. Were Mrs. A. W, Penner, wife of| League and recently transferred » iti ee “ Stars rere Strongly support youngsters’ 4
* wifey Doin dehirs H. A. Ballou, Ex-President the Resident Manager of T.C.A./her activities to the St. David's apt. 24 ; and oldsters’ interest, government and
: Engl nf by ‘T.C.Ay was Me Wine of the Girls’ Industrial Union gave 1% Trinidad who has gone to New/Church District which is greatly civic matters of import. A responsive
sngla y T.C.A, was Mr. -

Brunswick for six weeks’ holiday,

in need of help. As a Leader of the



hs ; rt 3 period for clerk, teacher, business leader,
ston Marson of “Marine Lodge”, aoe yy eer pl eo ee Mr. John Wilkes who is on his)Church Girls’ Brigade and Guii- The musical that has every- labourer, +
Hastings. He has gone on holi- Res U1 i aeons erie Alma and Way to Montreal for a holiday,}ing Star Club and member of the >

day and expects to be away for
about three or four months.

Back From Trinidad

Objects of the G.1.U.” was espe-
“ially delivered for the benefit of

und Mr, M. C, Robinson who is
returning to Canada after spend-



Women’s Guild, of the St, David's
‘Church, she has come into contact





thing...songs, dances,

+
*
x
«x
x

SCORPIO

Planets in benefic array advocate doubling

*

; i ini i | . 92 e@ witho strain,
the new members who were wel- {2g a month in Trinidad. He is a/with every group in the district color ond a -wandinnye arary en © schaselines ability pet “apelin We:

ISS JOY COLE of the British comed +1 that afternoon, The geologist working with DominioDfand in this way she saw the need lad 336 ae ot inpartanse

American Tobacco Co, and Minutes c* the last General Meet- Oil Company who are now setting!foy such an organisation as the * *
Miss Quita Davies of the Marine ing were read and a_ financial UP offices in Trinidad. ‘ieee Haven Welfare Association. ; * E
Hotel, turned from Trinidad statement of the Annual Fete was Matron Returns lis Aims x SAGITTARIUS Whether on vacation, at work or just at
yesterday morning by B.W.I.A. presented. Mrs. D. W. Bentley, ISS M, BYER, matron of the] This Day Nursery is now in its Nov. 23—Dec. 22home, this is a promising, full day for
after spending two weeks’ holiday President, Miss G, Williams, Gen- St. Philip’s Almshouse, who} initial stage and provides care for wholesome Activities, x
as guests of Mr. and Mrs. R. H. eral Secretary. members of the has been spending a holiday in St J infant children who may not be x

Davies of Apex Oilfields.
Miss
sister.

Davies is Mr. Davies’





committee and other ladies inter-
ested in the activities of the Union
were present.

BY THE W AY=
Lucia, returned home by B.W.LA
during the week.

PLAZ

BARBAREES WO-DAW 445 4

properly looked after at home. Ji
also provides an atmosphere and





starring

FRED ASTAIRE

CAPRICO: :
Dec. 23 — — 21 Skilled workmanship,

Stars promote good intentions and needs,

A intricate matters, dy
keen brain work. Laborious trades can
gain.

* *
DIAL 5170 _ 8.30 P.M. AQUARIUS = your Uranus among the | a
and. Continuing Daily VERA FLLEN Jan. 22 —~ Feb. 20 aspected planets now. Unusual undertak-
AM CODFORTH, who, as I viaduct or something, and we can â„¢ ings that have merit are red with
have mentioned, supplies sell it as a landscape.” everyday activities. A challenge day to
Captain Foulenough with his Old Two little heroes MARJORIE MAIN you!
Masters, blundered again the the heroic little Spanisin

other day,

In an absent-minded mcod he
signed a Holbein, which had been
commissioned, Holborn, It was a
grimy, indistinet portrait, Foul-
enough sent him a note: ‘Add a

oO
S drummer of Bruch now has
his monument. During a_ battle
of the Peninsular War he rallied
the Spaniards and forced a retreat!
cn the French troops by beating
his drum at a spot where an egho
in the hills magnified the sound.








with

KEENAN WYNN

ALICE PEARCE
CLINTON SUNDBERG
GALE ROBBINS

a
Dd
*
*
*
*«
«

PISCES

Feb. 21—-March 20

*

Should be peak day for your endeavours. *
Sea travel, sports, handling vehicles, tools,
machinery under friendly rays. x



The French thought they heard
the many drums of reinforce- |
rents: This boy Casanova now
laises his place beside little Strob,
the drummer-boy of Wattignics,
who got behind the Austrian lines
and beat his drum. He was killed
in the battle, and his statue is in
Avesnes today.
What next ?
A SWEDE said the other day
that the latest Russian secre!
weapon is “a gas which weuld.b

CROSSWORD
| Dll dea
ak, AE a a a a




|



YOU BORN TODAY: Gay, debonair, interesting in con- «x
XK versation. Proud, a bit egotistical at times, but usually kind
organization or civic group, an instructor in sports amiable *€
with children or grownups. You can succeed in any worthy
undertaking if you seek God’s guidance and help, Big oppor-
be author of Star Spangled Banner.
* ¥ XM HX MM KM HK
Si pininenstetetinventtieenimerenieineiesitpnisithitngineliadingtestrsiertioninenrmansassieuaghdeisinmsiateoimaiaaniieiemiinennan
Pn Sa SON SS

and generous. Would be a brave soldier, a leader in any
tunities immediately ahead. Birthdate: Francis Scott Key,
)
ROODAL THEATRES









breathed out by every body.” EMPIRE ROXY.
Scientists are doubtless at work ah is J ¥ To-day 4,30 only
on a counter-gas, which wo! To-day 2.30 & 8.90 and Continuing





|

i
: } Daily 445% 80 p.m. “DESERY OF LOST MEN”
be breathed in by everybody, In | ;



















; BARBAREES OISTIN COLUMBIA PICTURES Presents and
Ties a permanent war of this kind, (Dial 2310) (Dial 5170) (Dial 8404) Bah hee Deena RODEO KING AND THE SENORITA
L Suggests trade ot the care) there would be no need for arma- CARIMPEAN PREMIERE |] To-day 4.45 & 830 p.m|] Today & Tomorrow asvinat
nol ing writing materiai (\ ments, nor, indeed, for anything and Continuing Daily



o Main water? (5)

4.45 & 830 p.m
(. Merit of the rear notice

RKO Agtion Packed Hit

if / Fredric MARCH—Mildred DUNNOCK vy Pomight at 8.30
4 much execpt supplies of gasses. Ua FO-BDAW (FRIDAY) || warner's action Thriller Pxtra. Short: PUNCHY De LION and [| Madam O’Lindy and Her Troupe in
a







i ne ; 9 4 2 Latest News Reel “CARACAS NIGHTS OF 1952"
¥ Needs nothing for speech, 14) But how long would it be before the s creen has on ears i Pu aS va STORM THE RACKET ——— — A Complete Ct f Pi
i vay, row i be sparkiins!y specially trained breathers, breath- He SlICe re) C ontiouthe | mUR Be veneer an LAR: a my 4 rae, ate hates aoe Lonramme
refreshin, ‘ sacteeliy ¢ i rate j ‘ ’ . “ ‘ : af me :
1s Tennir term upset on, cs Ing secretly, began Senet MET TL Robert L. Lippert Presents WARNING]| Pebert Mircium SRC cea ee ee arene array
cause ere’s the s' g-. ) into every country: B 5 . J ba od it oan a + r n ‘o-morrow 4.45 15...
jo Retrace this raised evel” (i) laces, where people used only THE STEEL Ronee: eae n= MUS TN ELAS WOON PARAMOUNT Presents
} * (6) * : 2 . a mm
20 L ana the tady take @ stroll '7) ordinary breath, special saboteurs H E L M E T Doris Day the, aeiine oa ‘To-morrow Night Midnite Alan LADD-—-Lizabeth SCOTT
21 Will always produceaciove. \6) with lethal hiccoughs could do Steve Cochran ‘UNDERCOVER WOMAN in

22 Joins back seat of the sto !-
(3) 483. Blow up 4)

Down

1. Musical put nothing short |
& miniature crown. (6)
Measure the race with care



Don BARRY & ,
‘OUTLAW COUNTRY”

Lash LA RUE
Fuzzy ST. JOHN

Robert Hutton—-Gene Evar
James Edwards



“RED MOUNTAIN”
Color By Technicolor

WARNER BROS'

AO a | ae

Sat. Special 1.30 p.m.
“RANGERS RIDE”
Jimrn; WAKELY &

COLORADO AMBUSH

great damage. “Hold your breath R

until you see the whites of their x atl
eyes.” 5 Y
Smellingham-Smith
at work

and
“TRAFFIC IN CRIME”





Special 9.30 & 1.30
TEXAS



Sat

Midnight To-morrow Nite
OUTLAWS OF

OLYMPIC

4)




































> : ‘ WHOLE Serial
. 7 Wilson & Johnns. Mack BROWN Midnite Special Sat. To-day to Monday 4.30 & 4.15
4% Model av now to stroke + aad END St ReneS, HOOF” Johnny WEISSMULLER as Jungle Jim “JUNGLE GIRL”
bird. (7) \ ' . Mack’ Br Midnii2 Specia : eston FOSTER & in fe
* Ott quoted Cau OR APC 15 READ that a plumber hes we % Johnny Mack ee APONTE KIN a erate venice “JUNGLE MANHUNT
ests a Wi re shi ‘g - : ' snech Sa zloria HEN . . an
% Makes ain seam retribution (7) went fishing caught a a 7 iT] Midnite Special Sat. . Gloria : RAIDERS: cating “Cte ae” ROYAL
10. Lure (7) grown bear. Cosmo Smelling- SILVER CITY BONANZ “BLAZING ACROSS Charles STARRETT Staxving: To-day only 480 & 815
12 Bright oraage eoiour (7) ham-Smith, who lassoes flying a aries ‘STARRETT = Jon HALL—Lisa FERRADAY Misi cee
te bart a )” fish and tickles hippopotamuses ‘ De 3 GUNMEN OF ABILENE Charles § Mon. (Bank) Special Sore vie Vale'e HOBSON in
18. Cotton pickers dance? (4) as though they were trout, seems Re : ss BOehy ees Mon. (Bank) Special 1.30 p.m. "Sane OF SAnGEE “BLANCHE FURY”
ly. Basement. (4) to have a rival. Smellingham- eet : S . Mon, (Bank) Special 1.30 p.m. “BARBARY PIRATE” and wipes lees annp iene iaciti caine |
¥ led ont wos) ° ™* °° Smith, fishing off the end of a Cee er . 930 & 1.20 By Request |] whip Wilson Double! Donald WOODS & “WHISPERING FOOTSTEPS” To-morrow & Sunday 5 & 8.15
= ; pier at a coastal resort, once Ginger Ronald Doris Steve Gee Sitrerh ta Bate Double! ARIZONA TERRITORY|| “RETURN of the ——— | REPUBLIC Presents
lution of Saturday's oussie —- Across: ; i hocolates ROGERS — REAGAN DAY — COCHAN ~ Nae FRONTIER REVENGE & ye SRR cre a DURANGO KID Midnite To-morrow } ' NL: --Forrest TUCKER
sa0,. Hetrieve: 9 Release, 1) caught two girls, using choco os OUTLAW COUNTRY “SILVER RAIDERS” Charles STARRET¢ REPUBLIC WHOLE Serial ‘ i in
cane: HE deus at Rise ee. as bait, As they were rather WARNER BROS. ACT: ON PACKED { “FEDEBAL OFERATOR 90" HOODLUM EMPERE”
Somer naam T telbesmian Ge gy ll, he th th bagk into
Byoner wn: y » %,% small, he threw them ql = ——————— a SSS.
plenien;, 6 At ming, "1 Galige the sea, according to the rules of a EAN Awe
__ampuaa 18 Sone te Farr it the local Angling Club. GALA CARIBB BB? PW OVW THE SCREEN EXCITEMENT
% 3556

GAIETY

The Garden—St. James
TODAY & TOMORROW 34.80 P.M.

. . _ 4,
OOSROPPSPPOOPSE SSS OSES OLEATE

PREMIERE yy { (DIAL 2310) OF THE YEAR!

JANETTA DRESS SHOP






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Midnite Special | SUN. & MON, i 2
Owing to the great reduction on Cotion Goods, we ane ES bi. Reo tay :
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Swim Suits reduced from $17.00 to $10.00. OO | Brien

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SS eNO § NE Rater teeta

A AT ae



IN STOC



An Assortment of





a
@ LADIES’ NYLON HOSE $2.09, $2.15, $2.28, $2.41 -
@ LADIES’ NYLACE HOSE $2.50
@ LADIES’ LISLE HOSE Aik \diohanealahuivanguanesirlsetonitios - $1.31



@ CHILDREN’S ANKLETS 30, 32 & 46 CENTS







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Written. Produced and Directed by Samuel Fuller * A Deputy Corporation Production » Released by Lippert Pictures, Inc.


FRIDAY, AUGUST 1, 1952

BARBADOS ADVOCATE c PAGE THREE

U.S. Oilmen Spend MP: oN cuaro acaist LloomING ~ Canadians







Import Bar Affects U.K. Commerce












Tek y, ’ r
4 * . te v i » ®; * 3 - x l J nN srit k * - ~ £ ~t
ti . F wt et W t M LONDON men f or cars and whisk ern Europe Any further import
Over 3m Dail at — a : ah “ : bs an ore Commonwealth import restrie- while imports showed a _ further > said, might bring retati-
y 8 . : tions are having a substantial ef- it increase, mainly of iron and nd that something to
a x 5 : For Flour fect on the trade of the United steel and machinery be avoided at all costs. *
LONDON Bhs Ss a : Kingdom. This emerges clearly Exports to O.E.E.C. countries in
ais , a : : OTTAW from figures just published by the May were slightly more than in ©n_ the bro der question of
Could you spend £ 1,350,000,000 in a year: No, you may a All joi vA Board of Trade the fitst quarter—larger exports economic policy —that of rebuild-
say—and nobody else could, either. For that would mean é eine samaea To i > oe United Kingdom exports to the of iron and steel, machinery and i™s ne Rering area’s gold re~
. s fo =p Shes oe ai d od < ane al pee s serves—the Lane . : ey
spending at the rate of well over £ 3,000,000 a day! Yet h S Snterhationel flour prices “~ — —- —. — a al — partly counter gmc eS . not a aaneeieinae
Dr : ; : : y yin April and agi n May, balance cower exports of hé t to get : s ing
that is the amount that U.S. oil men have just announced it (aehingion in January -with ghougn imports from. the area textiles--while imports though with the dollar. I want sterling
they expect to spend during 1952 on operations both at home moe eta ta to be a bumpe* Continued to rise slightly. slightly greater than in April, re- 0 â„¢make friends with the doilar
and overseas. , va : tea *h Dicanbineel whout A break-down of UK tirade mained well below the leve! of 42d have an understanding on
And only a few weeks ago, a leading British oil execu- ieduan Sel vee during the period from January the first quarter. trade. By that I mean we expect
tive spoke of the likelihood of British and Dutch oi! com- resumed in January after they '° May, however, shows a we- For the non-sterling area , ew ee ee x goes
i j sthi Fp ; _ ee . -rease , sports to > > ve ‘ ; a at @ uying - materials—we
panies spending £500,000,000 within the next few years reathed an impasse this spring in hethchielinn cnsiivien ae ee el oe an = oe ‘om from Australia, rubber and tin
on expansion and development projects of their own London, with all producer coun- “77, > 7 Se Sea ee nye Eber Hae ;



enougn





5 ; : Total U.K. exports to the ster- products in the first five months from Malaya, and so forth. Then
BA an. tri ® $s a 1 i 7 T b in e in ve m mi Rice z z a
How will the oil men invest . a baie matics oer oe vices Ung area fell in May to £102 of this year maintained a high We know we have a certain mar-
tHese colossal sums? In new oil Armistice hele aakhd wate too high, Pp million, compared with £113 rate of expansion from the level Ket.
wells, refineries, pipelines, tankers, The four major exporting coun- million cae — ~ “ee of 1951. On the other hand, there «] want the United States to
chemical plants, research stations, - , i trieg—Canada, the United States, 2Verase of million during was little chahge in imports of jower its tariff barriers and let us
exploration projects and extend. re j emote Australia, and the Argentine— the first quarter of the year. The food, drink and tobacee from this into their market. If we have that,
Pa seg and distribution : a expect higher production of wheat ey. ape a" i wey the area, while a big decrease in um then we pay our way”.
| focitities, samme cer items, Ex- SEOUL, July 30 thig, fall and next spring than in Syersee gor the first five ronthe vee A taw materials was partly But he stressed that any large=
| pansion of such s€tvices and re- General James A. Van Fleet the 1951-52 crop year, The French "YCrese for the first five months offset by increased imports of goalie wage increases—such as A
| re becomes penises td Commander of the United States crop is reported to be fair. France oF ils eer wet bis - ee nie iron. ang steel: number of British trade unions
| necessary as world oil consumption Righth Army and the United s the place of Argentina than the monthly rate in 1951 ‘ y demanding——would inevi-
from — as it has done, already, wations Gtound Forces in Korea ampng* the four big exporters Exports of textiles in May were Not Far Enough raise the price of our ex-
tons in 4638 to 600,000 for uae i said that recent events in Korea er the L.W.A, any ot oenoe sii oan This improvement in our trad- ports, and this would rake our
a 1849S, gemgumplion for nue than ever belare® Price Not Known 2s ehginestine prot, thous stering aren, welcome, thou
’ it was even in 1946, end our own «Moreover, Van Fleet warned that Canada has not officially an- ‘ , ; is, has not yet gone far

: : , ‘T So-, the Communist strength in troops nounged what price it is seeking 1951, fell below the high level of to justify the hope that our over- ° Fe
kee: ge gy Bae eet oo oe still is “close to oe ee de- as a minimum under a renewa! ‘he first quarter of this yea seas payments veil be in balance Biggest Night
indiéation that this global in. SPite, the recent thinning out of of the international wheat agree - 2% Greater by the end of the year. It had ey >
crease in oil consumption has ed lines. He said “But I think we ment’ but it is known to be con- « anything like reached its limit: tion Thre siderably above the $1.60 in U.S. Imports from the rest of the measures taken to achieve this

on the contrary, the oil industry
is expecting this consumption tc
reach 1,000,000,000 tons of more
within the comparative next few
years.

Anticipatory Planning

The foreseeable

He said he was convinced that
the Communists needed an armis-
tice in June and November 1951
beeause they were “in bad Shape
both times” and were worried
about the winter. He said “Well,
they got through the winter, and
they have-since been a very tough



STANDING IN THE RUBBLE of a building destroyed by the California

earthquake, two armed MPs guard

against possible looting in Teha-



funds which was the floor during
the latter part of the agreement
which has just expired,

The United States, in the mean-
time, has established a wheat sup-
port price at a national average
of $2.20 per bushel, The price
Canada“is Seeking as a guarantee

sterling area, however, were two
per cent greater in the first five
months of this year than in the
corresponding period of last year,
and four per cent greater than the
average of 1951. Imports of food,
drink and tobacco in January to
May increased by 14 per cent,

balance would be reflected in a
marked improvement in the trade
figures by the middle of the year.
But the figures for June show
that the visible trade gap is
still far too large.

Total exports during the month,
which had 15 per cent fewer

SEOUL, July 31.

Lieut. General Otto P. Weyland
Far East Air Commander said
U.S, B29s scored “good to excel-
lent” results in the biggest night
raid of the Korean war last night
on a factory only five.miles from
the Communist China border. In.

aes " ; é . through IL.W.A. is understood to Compared with the corresponding yw . 4 ‘aviong 2ddition to being the biggest night
such a_ staggering eect ake trader at â„¢ SS To chapi, Eleven persons were killedyand many. injured by tremors felt be well over $2. Pee ae period of 1951, while haaorts uf cc ee ae ee abate bombing raid it was the axeatens
violsly calls for equally large- see “itm ee Pa from San Francisco to the Mexican border. (International Soundphodto) Crop prospects a°e {right in Taw materials fel] by six per cent to £193 million, while imports POMber attack on a single target
scale anticiyatory planning to perore” most parts of the wi which and imports of manufactures declined by 14 per cent from the ?2 ‘Me war and the first major raid
meet it. Such plans are, of course, ei :

already well in hand and taking
concrete shape. But they must
of necessity be of a far-reaching

Bad Weather

Van Fleet said that bad weather
and floods were causing the Com-

Empire Producers

Now

dependable reports are available,
according to the trade au artment
here. These include an expected
large crop in China—but no re-

increased slightly.

The United Kingdom's trade
gap+the excess of imports (c.i.f.)
over exports and re-exports



May level to £277 million, This
means that the trade gap remained
roughly the same as in the pre-

in the Yulu River area since
United Nations planes hit Suiho
power plant on June 23.—U.P.













: ; Btare ; : vious month at about £84 mil- - ene
international nature. It is in- munists more trouble than the i ‘ f a, port hag been published by Russia, (f.0,b.)—during this period was 1; bt
finitely more than just a matter tiled troops, All Bight ane Commonwealth | roducers Outlook Bright at the rate of £78 million a month, "° "8 RATES OF EXCHANGE
of senene eens vee roads and bridges were in good Tho outlook for the new year’s £23 million a month less than in Critical
of ¢ peice a t ll is wothat thape, and there were ample sup - At the annual general seting of the Britis id crops in North America is ‘par- ie, Sixteen million pounds of Selli a : tom
of ensuring that all the other plies Answering questions, the ; ay general meetung of the British Empire ticularly bright,” the trade depart- ‘4s improvement was accounted The situation, therefore, is 739 lbs pr. cheques one aCe
rte tear ae a Eighth Army Commander said he Producers’ Organisation held at the offices, 25, Victoria sient said. The US. crop is ex- (OY by our trade with the non- still very critical, It is doubtful ~~ Bankers. th anoe PH
ed apse Ceemta to the tan estimated that the Communists Street, London, S.W.I. on July 17 it was unanimously pected to be second only to the “tetling area and £7 million with whether’ the United Kingdom's Bete Dk .
And this means planning of a Were maintaining almost a million agreed that with effect from January 1, 1953, the name of record crop of 1947, of 1,359,000, ‘he Sterling area, balance of payments can now be 7 9/10% pr. cables
ceale and complexity perhaps un. ™€n in Korea, With the sixth suc- the Organisation should be changed to British G 000 (B) bushels. Despite the improvement in our restored without the “further 7 4/10 Pr. Currency 69 7/106 Pr.
‘equalled in any other industrial CesSive day of bad weather, ground , age = , 7 ommon~ “"So far, the bureau of statistics Tading position vis-a-vis the measures” foreshadowed by the ; eee Co Ex.
bg any ONE INES” ‘Sighting was almost completely wealth Producers’ Organisation and that the name of its has hot madé an estimate of the NoN-sterling area, there was a Charicellor in fila recent state- °°” ™ meee iy Ee
“Pit “Tieans, too. much more than Stopped today, and no allied fight- Journal “The Empire Producer” should be altered to “Com- amount of wheat that might be eterioration, compared with the ment on the gold reserves, But 79 110% Pr, Cheouee oe
mere paper planning: it means eo Deane, or carrier based planes monwealth Producer”. The change was felt to be desirable harvested in Canada this fall, ae ae on of oe it now seems that another round Bankers 17 2/10% Pr
ing—agai n probably an ‘OOK olf. in vi sti ions rhic ‘ 7 but it has predicted i il year, o million in our bal- of import cuts will be among Sie ay ‘
Gniffeceriented scald, Equipment , Peking radio today alleged that jn Coa oben impeneietri:s cadmas i tiieee larger than ire 1981 soi hice ance with the dollar area. This} these measures. Mit Butler, speak- Sight Dratts “6 9/10% Pr
of the type just mentioned . an ie eta MER vit on TAEe was in the bumper class although Was offset, however, by an im-ling in a television ‘programme 10 1/10% Br Cable : eee
often fantastically costly, even by : Rene A Mr. A. D. Dodds-Parker, M.P ich wa ye made agai a lange part of it was damaged Provement of £7 million in re-]last weekend, opposed this means vive Bis GUrERany 13 7/10% Pr
modern industrial standards, Ee etek” oa Deputy Chairman, who aeaed pn are nets cae eae by early frost. eae of ea rent pot of balancing our trade with West- 50°) Pr.” yr De pad
‘ -, Said that “We seem to be ap- Jevied on tobace ae Last May, the statistics bureau PCan) countries and of £15 mil-
Huge Cheques yee place Ae ee Sone Neve proaching and in some cases to Nearatbnet eben a ten, in said that farmers planned to plant lion in respect of the remaining
gency report earlier said 52 }.. err id Fae d ; d_ ssince + _Unfor- tortt : cet
i io Chinas Were killed or wounded in have reached a position in whien tunately the Nyasaland Govern- 25,000,000 (M) acres in wheat— Non-sterling countries.
The oil men are well used °° on American raid on Atung, just SUPPly and demand in the case ment and the Colonial Secretary 4M increase of two per cent over Slight Increases r gy
Milbods coriee forty million across the Yalu River from North bag lh jg ge! ive tee are have hitherto turned a deaf ear the area devoted to wheat last Exports to the dollar area show- OL Y MPI ¢
millions — s x t e f in balance an at to all repres $. *. Last year’s crop amounted ed slight i 30 , +
7 z . Korea. The agency also + ; - ee ay ill representations. year ast. sy: p amoun ed a slight increase in Ma ve
pom vs i. ea ipetinn the Mieciein” had eee fave Ee eae eat 2. mare to 562,400,000 (M) bushels, com- the average for the first quate ‘ TO-DAY TO MONDAY 4TH, 4.30 & 8.15
pan A ta a similar amount to “serious protest” to the United Rare. carat Se wiaag ae the Difficult pared with 461,700,000 in 1950-51. mainly attributable to larger ships Columbia’s Gigantic Double
pay for some new exploration Nations against the alleged killing seijer’s market of recent years. "The BP t ra — : an artcapee teas ’ : de
rogramme (which may of, may of one Communist prisoner and the “Ir js pocoming increasingly dit. 4. re rotectorate Government; , PIRATE QUEEN \;. RACKET KINGE
ot be rewarded by the ultimate wounding of seven others in a get to sell the lower is admittedly finding it very dif-

iscovery of fresh oil resources),

sembling a national debt. Only,
unlike such a debt, they cannot
be passed on to the community

prisoner of war camp last Sunday.



Red Charges

quality
grades and the import restrictions

given to reducing operating costs,
more efficient methods of produc-

ficult to raise revenue to meet the

sequence of exports having to
ear an impost which js not levied

sn competing countries, it is run<

c , a . = : heavy expenditure, due to a lz > er z
or to buy half a dozen new super- —U.P. imposed in many countries have oo.) p Ue +0 8 Marge ; coLvepin
a powers, snd build yet haere contributed to the widespread OSiicios, ‘Wut ager lrg os PLE TURES
me nker terminal at which . > decline in prices that has oc-. y: dae any) GA BESS eC " vecgonss
monsters canberth. Sums of this J PLO LC, Answer curred in the past year, In future mapDe a ge ac frog Mae sh
nature soon add up to totals re- ' more attention will have to be Renee ak eee for
ee








CORSAIn

; tion and marketing and the im- : s ; STARRING
in the shape of taxes. The oil TORONTO, Ontario, July 30. provement of the quality of the ae grave risks of losing the JON HALL
men have to replenish their ex- A voluminous report is to be product than has been necessary *’Venue derived from the export

chequer themselves, out of present
and past earnings. That is why
adequate capital reserves are ab-
solutely vital to the oil industry

presented to the 18th International
Red Cross Conference today by
the. International Committee an-
swering the Communist charges

in the past twelve years in ordet
to meet and indeed to survive in
the more competitive world of to-
day and the years ahead.

duties and maiming if not destroy.
ing the industries concerned,

We shall continue to press for

It’s as easy as
less. Sprinkle

and leave overnight — then flush, ‘Harpic’s'

ABC to keep the lavatory spot-
some ‘Marpic’ into the bowl





>. with LISA FERRADAY
RON RANDELE
DOUGLAS KENNEDY

“and, owing to the indispensi- against the Committee regarding a change af policy in the matter cleansing action disinfects and deodorises

bility of oil products to modern alleged atrocities in Korea. Paul Tth Session In October of export taxes on agricultural the S bend where no brush can reach, AND

civilisation, what is essential to Ruegger, President of the Inter- products ‘2D Siyaenvare and else. See Johnny, a pal, and
the oil industry is of concern to national Committee, -announced ‘In October the seventh session re. _ several countries have

everyone else in the world.



the release of the report yesterday

from it.

of the signatories to the General

policy on which it is now engaged

already found it necessary to re-










“Harpic’ is safe to use in








a glamor gal rout

during sessions in which Russian, Agreement on Tariffs and Trade duce or suspend export duties. = ele means eT
Communist Chinese, and Czechos- (G.A.T.T.) will open at Geneva, re earn a re suey lx those connected to septic a
a lovakian delegations denounced I do not think that the U.K. Gov- rs i fo 1 Scie i — be “ti ) tanks. COLUMBIA PICTURES presents no
. , the TR. C. C. as a tool of the west érnment will have completed its Cause ‘of the time ike ieee Ss ;
Labour Advisers and withdrew financial support examination of external trade py ii. exists between the onset WEl MULLER :

For All Colonies?

LONDON, July

Despite Communist attacks on
the Committee, General Commis-
sion 14, conducting the Conference
business, voted 61 to 14 to continue

before this conference meets but
it is to be hoped that our repre-
sentatives and those of other
Commonwealth countries attend-

of dificult trading conditions and
a decision on the part of govern.
ment to reduce a tax”,

At a meeting of Council held

Hector Hughes (Labour, the mandate of finance. ing the conference will endeavour Peete ed a d
Anbricen, North div.) asked the The commission was set up four to secure release from the pro- Sheen Me oor dnateeanne
Secretary of State for the Colo- years ago to accept contribution visions of GATT which restrict Qjseteq Chairman, in succession
nies, in view of the success of the from the Geneva Convention our freedom in the matter of in. 1 : S on

system of official labour and trade
union advisers to the Governments
of African British Colonies, if he
will extend this system to other
Colonies in the British Empire;

countries, The International Com-
mittee is designated as an enforcer
of the Geneva Convention, which
set down rules for the treatment
and exchange of war prisoners.



creasing preferences or at least
restoring the levels which existed
before the war in the case of
such articles as tobacco, wine,
spirits and cigars where as a re-

to the late Mr. H. R, F. Watson.

|



HARPIC

THE SAFE LAVATORY CLE



>



*w dam Katzman + Directed by Lew Landers,

OPENING TO-MORROW 4.45 & 8.15 _

“tatroducing BOB WATERFIELO with SHEILA RYAN + RICK VALLIN + LYLE TALGOT and TAMBA (The Talented Chimp) + Written
“te Sereen by Samuel Newman + Based upon the famous Jungle tim King Features Syndicate newspaper festure «





and if he will make a statement of —Cp) sult of the heavy wartime in- NING TO-MORROW 4.45 &
i i creases in duty the margin of
ae ae preference ~has been whittled

Mr. Oliver Lyttelton (Secretary
of State for the Colonies): In all
but the smallest non-African ter-
ritories there are already labour
departments staffed with officers
of suitable training and experience
able to advise Governments on
labour and trade union matters,
The provision of such advice to
Governments through the officers
of these labour departments is a
permanent feature of the policy of
Her Majesty’s Government,

Mr. Hughes: May I take it from
that that the Secretary of State
agrees with the suggestion in the
Question that this has been a
great success, and will he consider
extending it in order to pave the
way for constitutional advances in
the various Colonies?

Mr. Lyttelton: I think the hon.
and learned Member will see from
my answer that I think that on the
whole this is going quite well.

ENGRAVING

U.N. Destroy Red

Aluminium Plant

KOREA, July 31.

United States B 29s levelled a
huge Communist aluminium lant
near the Manchurian border early
today in the biggest overnight
raid of the Korean War. Sixty-
three unescorted bombers braved
Red anti-aircraft fire and fighter
opposition, which the American
pilots described as the heaviest in
months, but all returned safely to
their bases itt Japan.

In Korea a_ factory 10 miles
southeast of Sinuiju went up in
smoke and flame after B,29’s hurl-
ed 630 tons of bombs on it. In the
adjacent troop build up area, five
other Surerforts hit other targets.
The 63 plane armada which blast-
ed the metals plant was the big-
gest Superfort raid af the war
against a single objective —C.P.

SPO.

II



away to a quite ineffective per-
centage. We are sending a further
communication to the Treasury
on this subject in the course of
the next few days.

Typical Example

This is a typical example of the
value of the Organisation as a

producers in _a_ number of
Dominions and Colonies to sup-
plement any representations that
may be made individually through
their respective governments. The
wine. and brandy industries of
Australia, South Africa and
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PAGE FOUR



‘BARBADOS ed



Printed by the Advocate Co,, Lt4., Broad 8t., Bridsctewan

Friday, August 1, 1952





WORKERS UNION

THE report of the Executive Council of
the Barbados Workers’ Union for the period
6th August 1951 to 27th July, 1952, is an
interesting document. There is a healthy
note of recognition of defects which exist
within the union and frank avowal of the
need for more education,

“The problems of the Trade Unions” it
is recognised “must be solved and they’
cannot be solved by wishful thinking, but
with a clear and intelligent mind that is
capable of giving the workers the best
advice”. But there is less guidance in the
report on how the educational needs of the
workers are to be met and there is admis-
sion that personnel and funds for educa-

tion cannot be obtained from within the
Union.

The Executive Council acknowledge that
during the period under review industrial
relations between the Employers and the
Union have been good. They disapprove
of rare occasions on which port workers

“took it to themselves to act without the
advice of the Executive Council” and the
warning is repeated that the Executive
Council can give better advice and have

greater knowledge of the answers to prob-
lems than any groups within or outside
the Union.

' Such plain speaking deserves commend-
ation because a union which is undis-
ciplined and disrespectful of its elected
officials cannot expect to receive the sup-
port which it is plain the Union is, with
few exceptions, receiving from the em-
ployers.

_ \It is true that the report might have been

more informative. The public would like

to know, for instance, how many workers

are on the membership roll of the union

and how many pay regular subscriptions

The absence of any reference in the report

to the accounts of the Union is also to be

regretted.

‘ Writing on the 30th May 1951 in the re-

port on the accounts of the Colony for the
year 1949-50. (which were published as a
supplement to the Official Gazette of May

15, 1952) the auditor general stated that

the examination of the Barbados Workers’

Union 1949 accounts are still in progress
and “it is hoped that this will be completed
shortly.” ay"

_ Surely the members of the Barbados
Workers’ Union ought to be told by the
Executive Council in their report exactly
what progress has been made in this im-
portant matter!

There might well be and the report of
the Executive Council of the Barbados
Workers Union states that they still are)
employers in Barbados by whom normal
and constitutional Trade Union practice is
not recognise But such persons yas the
report admits are not in a majority. The
industrial relations between the Employers
and the Union have been good and the
Executive Council took much pleasure in
stating that the Telationship at negotia-

tion level between the Sugar Producers ,

Federation and the Union has been cordial.
The Barbados Workers’ Union is recog-
nised by the majority of the employing
community ‘therefore as a constitutional
Trade Union with whom negotiations can
be conducted satisfactorily and even amic-
ably. Clearly then the employing commun-
ity as a whole has the interests of the
Union at heart and would not like to see
the Union’s power or influence weakened
by any disruptive influences within,

The absence of any reference to the ©

present state of the Union accounts is
therefore to be greatly regretted because
lack of information on a subject of such
great importance can*have no beneficial
effect on the Union, The report of the
Auditor General which was only published
on. May 15, 1952 stated that instructions
had been issued which if carefully followed,
should place the accounts of the Union on
a proper footing and “should minimise
to some extent the difficulty which the
“Union officials appear to experience as the
requirements laid down for their guid-
ance are both simple and orthodox.”
Surely nothing could have been calcu-
lated to have renewed. the confidence of
members of the Union more vigorously or
to have allayed public concern at the
Auditor General’s statements than an an-
nouncement by the Executive Council in
its report that accounting difficulties no
longer existed!

At the same time nothing could have
been more helpful towards further im-
provement of relations between employers
and workers and the breaking down of
_prejudices which still seem to exist in some
instances than a feeling of confidence
among the employers that the Union had
now got over its teething troubles.

The Barbados Workers Union enjoys a
well-deserved name among Labour Unions
of the British West Indies and its influence
can be beneficial throughout the Carib-
bean. But its influence ultimately depends
on sound administration and good organi-
sation. The proper auditing of accounts is
a fundamental step towards this end.

porn age

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



For
THE above heading was the
title of a specially striking ar-
ticle-in an issue of the ‘Readers’
Digest’ in the early part of last
year. It impressed me very
deeply. It gave fuller meaning
and clarity to ideas stirring in my
own mind and it possessed, I
thought, a close bearing on pres-
ent conditions and movements in
the affairs of our is.and home. So
I think it very desirabl>; to. intro-
duce it to readers of the Advocate
and to thoughtful persons gener-
ally in both Capital and Labour
circles. I hope they will be per-
suaded to reflect upon it to good
purpose.

























































































The Main Idea

This is, pretty obviously, that
such great. and far reaching
changes have taken place or are
now in progress in the ideas and
@cings of those who have had pos-
session, in past days, of accumu-
lated wealth, property and busin-
ess undertakings—in a word,
Capital—that the old name, with
all its selfish and oppressive
meanings and associations is no
longer correct and suitable, and
therefore that a new name, more
correct and appropriate, colculat-

ed to engender goodwill and
friendly cooperation, should he
sought out and substituted. To
uote from another article in a

later issue of the same interest-
ing magazine: ‘We have reached
9 poriod of enlightening indus-
trial relations unprecedented in
history’.

The Bad Old Days

It is agreed that for genera-
tions and even centuries the pos-
sessors of Capital did exp.oit
labour and take for themselves
the lion’s share of the results cf
industry. Low wages, sometimes
down to the point of semistarva-
tion; long hours of work; un-
healthy conditions and no protec-
tion against accident; very inade-
quate housing; the use of female
and child labour at very low pay;
and so on, were commonly im-
posed and because of their abso-
lute need for the basic elements
of existence the employees were
forced to accept those conditions,
And, as I have indicated, that state
of things continued for a very long
time. Complete enslavements, of
both body and mind existed as we
know, down to about a century
and half ago here in the British
West Indies, and slavery in vari-
ous ‘forms was prevalent in many

If you would flog a thug — as
the Lord Chief Justice seeks

leading.

We have examined our thug—
as he appears 100 times a week.
We have shown that he is a crea-
ture who wields a cosh often
without hoping to make a penny
out of it,

We have _ searched back
through his life to find where
his trouble began, and here we
uncover some disturbing facts: —

In law, no child under eight
can be guilty of any offence, but
more than 1,400 elght-year-olds
are listed in one year’s criminal
offenders. There are twice as
many of them now as before the
war,

In fact, the nation’s crime
figures show that early 40 per
cent, of all convicted criminals in
Britain are not older than 17.

So it is among these youngsters
that we may expect to find the
new thugs’ nursery,

Drifters

First, see how the State plays
nurse-maid to them. There is,
roughly, a five-way treatment.

Here is how the law deals
with every 100 up-to-17’s found
guilty of crime: —

41 are put on probation — and
one-third of them drift into. crime
again.

28 are freed (absolutely or
conditionally)—no record is kept
of them,

17 are fined—no figures show
how much of a deterrent this is.

10 are sent to approved schools
—and one-third of them go back
}to crime when they are freed.

4 are sent for medical treat-
ment, Borstal, or prison — and
half of the old Borstal boys end
up in prison later. Also, four out
of ten young criminals in grown-
up jails return, ‘

In piecemeal fashion the State
in its handling of lawbreaking
youngsters might claim good
results. Certainly not fewer than
half the youngsters seem to
respond to probation approved
school, and BorStal treatment,

Certainly, also, crime

Divergent Views ;
To The Editor, The Advocate— °

SIR,— The meeting in Queen’s
Park on Sunday night last should
go a long way in pointing out to
the people of Barbados what
sport can be made about their
affairs before their faces. I was
not present to hear the meeting,
but from what I fead in the
Advocate of Tuesday last, I weli
glean how divergent were the
views of the main speakers on
the occasion,

One finds in the reported
speeches of the Honourable N. W.
Manley, Q.C. Leader of the Oppo-
sition in the Jamaica House of
Representatives and President
General of the P.N.P. his dis-
regard for Colonialism and com-
plete abhorrence of imperialicem
and he gave reasons for his dis-
likes and to my mind nobody car
be angry with him—at least not
me. On the other hand, one finds
the leacer of our House of Assem-
bly, Mr. G. H. Adams, C.M.G
jfending the present day

the Colonial System.
Let us consider for a moment to
the true position where are

, de-

policy of

we

,cognise clearly two highly im- battle and secured conditions of

Capit ik |
leopard has changed his spots, that |
Capitalism has renounced its ideas



Hy
Rev. F. Godson

a main factor of well being in the!
world of ‘to-day—or is doing so|
before our eyes?
That is the vital question, |
The article from which I bor- |
rowed the heading for this study
went on to specify the beneficent
changes which have taken place |
in the United States—other leading
1 ; countries also-—the abolition of |
nherited Ignorance and starvation wages and the other |
Complacency slavish conditions and inhuman
But to avoid unfair and mis. hardships. briefly summarised
chievous conclusions about the above, and to point out that in the
Situation, it is necessary to re- modern world Labour has won its



parts of the world—in fact :t
still continues in some countries,
the Soviet Republic and its satel-
lites, for example,

portant circumstances: (1) The comfort and security. It is true
fact that the well-to-do person, that strikes are still resorted’ to
the capitalist, was just born into in a good many instances but they
it and had not yet been aroused are used al-I venture to say?
to observe its injustice its denial ~—irresponsibly:and selfishly to}
of primary human rights and (2) secure, sometimes unreasonable

the fact . that such a state concessions and tend to become an|
of things was by no means anachronism, a back number to}
peculiar” or local to the West fairplay, arbitration and national)
Indian colonies, or indeed any

other portion of the world. ene

For example, it is only a little But what is,the position in Bar-
over a hundred years since the pados? Here also extensive ame-
Chartist uprising in England jiorations and. improvements have |
brought . about the beginnings of been achieved, I point to the cre-
social freedom and fair treatment ation ‘of.a2 powerful Trades Union |
Seis os Sg ol ote with its arrangements for friendly |
ssoneaetne of that movement, discussions with employers and}
. harmonious gettlement of disputes;

It is so named because its lead- Substantial increases in wages and |
ers formulated their ideas in six S@laries; protection against acci-

points which were called “The dents; holiday with pay substan-
People’s Charter’. They were as “al housing schemes; and very |
follows: (1) Manhood' Sufferage helpful though painfully inade-

(2) Equal Electoral Districts (3) quate old age pensions, And I

im-

Voting by Ballot (4) Annual Par-
liaments. (5) Abolition of Prop-
erty qualifications for M.P’s, (6)
Payment for M.P.’s.

It will be recognised that this
was a political programme; the
leaders believed that that was the
pathway to success, but the basis
grounds for the revolt were the
economic and_ socia] hardships
which prevailed so widely and
appeared to be so deep rooted.
And their success finally justified
their belief.

It is, by the way, an astonishing
fact that Britain to-day is the
leading Socialist Welfare State in
the world, providing support and
shepherding for all citizens ‘from
the cradle to the grave.’ In fact,
there is perhaps ground for outcry
‘too much spoon feeding.’

The Good New Days

At the end of the first paragraph
of this article I presented the
question; is it true that ‘the





Crooks At The Age Of B

By James Wartlett



The frightening facts in
these headlines are the latest
evidence in the inquiry
prompted by the Lord Chief
Justice’s demand for the
right to flog violent men.



down steeply after the age of 14.
Before the age of 19 is reached
the national crime figures at that
age are lower than the crime
figures of the nine-year-olds.
But the potential young thug
survives this ironing out pro-
cess of early less-violent lawless-
ness, When he finally coshes an
old woman, his record read out
in court shows that he
beaten Borstal and the rest.
Borstal officials, proud of their
successes, are conscious of their
failures, They complain that
there is no longer the threat of
corporal punishment in Borstals
as a way to maintain discipline.
Prisons, they argue, are still able
to flog men who attack warders,
The Parents

The stark story of the State
replacing parents as nursemaid
to the thug can never be a
happy one. The State takes over
only because the thug’s parents
have failed,

Here, then, we must pause ‘to
review the target of our inquiry.
Evidence has been produced in
this series to show that the vio-
lent man of tomorrow is;—

DANGEROUS at ‘the age of
eight, @ A NATURAL gangster
and works most often with a
gang (in London, 91 out of 100
convicted children were members
of gangs). @ BEYOND the con-
trol of Borstal, and he cannot be
stopped from going wrong until
there is no turning back,

What we want, then, is some
system which keeps an eye on
the schoolboys who range our
cities in gangs,

One Task

One city is working on these
lines, Liverpool, with an appal-
ling record of child crime, thas
given seven police officers, the
full-time job of steering young-

has

goes sters away from bad company.

Our Readers Say:



heading, In the reported speeches
it is stated that it is for the Labour
Party in Barbados and the P.N.P.
in Jamaica to assist the people of
these colonies along the road to
federation, Self Government,
Dominion Status etc. but ask your-
self if in the face of such differ-
ence of opinion between the
leaders of the parties which are
to guide the West Indies, if those
high sounding plans mean any-
thing to us.
L, B. BRATHWAITE

The Sabbath

SIR, -— Appearing in this
column of your paper on July
26th, the letter headed ‘The
Olympic Games ang The Sab-

bath’ signed by F. G. was only a
mass of confusion. F, G. spoke
of Sunday as the Sabbath, a day
which he should have mentioned
as ‘the Lord's Day,’

Before I go into the full nature





of what I am about to express

I want F. G. and all readers. to

fully understand that I am not a

Seventh Day Adventist neither

am I in any way attached to this

religous body- but IT am only a
j

affirm that these and other
provements and reforms have been |
effected with the approval and co-
operation of the Capitalist. So
Capital and Labour are learning
to work together with goodwill
even in Barbados, |
Two Majo¥ Facts Still To |
Be Named

In conclusion I have to specify,
with all possible emphasis, two}|
supremely important points re-|
quired to complete the story. They |
are the Vital Necessity for Capital, |
and the Ideal Method of Co-opera- |
tion.

But to attempt to bring them in
at the end. of this somewhat!
lengthy article would mean heavy |
overloading, and an impossibility
to expound and illustrate them as,
is essential in view of their novel- |
ty to many students of the situation |
—and their fundamental nature, |
So I must ask to be allowed to}
return to the subject at an early
date.



|

These seven men do not prose-
cute. They do not take part in)
proceedings against any of the!
2,200 Liverpool youngsters before
the courts each year. |

Instead they concentrate on
the activities of the young gangs. |
In three years\they have broken|
up the bands of children who}
used to pilfer from Liverpool's |
multiple stores,

By ferreting around in ‘the
nursery of the thugs these seven
have built up first-hand know-
ledge of the temptations and)
home conditions of Liverpool’s|
children, |

They have made more than}
5,000 visits to homes, broken down!
the resistance of parents, to talk!
about. their , bothersome boys.|
They have made more than 1,000!
visits ta schools to talk with!
headmasters, more than 1,000)
visits to youth clubs.



They have cut down the figure}
of second-time young offenders,
They have spotted more than 500
likely young criminals and per-
suaded them to join the healthy)
atmosphere of respectable boys’ |
organisations,

Liverpool’s Chief Constable, '
Mr, Cyril Martin, says of this|
new approach; “I do not pretend |
it is a panacea for the evil of!
child crime.

“The full benefit will only
become apparent in future years.
But we have already proved that
if it had not been for our seven
juvenile liaison officers many
more children would have started
on the downward path.’ }

Promise

The price of all this is seven
policemen spared from the job of)
jottiyg down the numbers of}
parked cars,

It is a cOmmon-sense, get-at-
the-root-of—the—trouble system
which should appeal equally to)
‘ose who support and those who
oppose Lord Goddard’s demand
for the right to flog the man with
the cosh, ;

That is one long-term solution
which promises well. But it does
not deal with the men who will
cosh 100 vietitis next week.
Bie a L.E.S.



‘Bible Readery In the meantime
I want all readers to understand
that I havé “nothing against this
religous set of people of whom!
I know very little af their doc-
trines.

I think that Mr. F. G. has in
his possession a Bible and I hope
it does not vary in any way with
mine. Exd. 20, 10: begins with
these words, ‘Rut the seventh
day is the Sabbath of the Lord,
Thy God’. I 4m sure that he
also honours the Friday before
Easter day as Good-Friday and
in respect of any day when our
Lord was crucified and He rose
the third day from the grave
making it Easter Day (Sunday) |
and in Mark’ 16, 2 Sunday is}
mentioned as the ‘first day in the!
















week’ hence counting from Sun-! So the Transport Bill is also postponed.
Gay as the first day will bring us Meanwhile some quite trivial legislation
Saturday as the Seventh da! is being delayed by the Socialist tactics of fili-
wae Exd. ‘points out as the}huster by amendment. The question is how]
Sabbath. ‘ i the public houses will be rim the “new
I want in no way to criticise; °° Paves ts ge run sa the new
. F. G’s religion but if he be-| towns” that are at last, beginning to be built. |
lieve that inday ist Sab-) Soc ists wanted nat 1 pubs: Cor }
k ll is wrong at i lays want ord t British pub sotialinte
himself ¢ tk e cha :
being a Sabbath breaker. ay tne & servative: ire
BIBLE READER. from the brewers. A big row is brewi

approach. The Conservative Party wants to

ance | Wanted: A New Name NEWS FROM BRITAIN

By DAVID TEMPLE ROBERTS,

LONDON.
WINSTON CHURCHILL, in his 78th year,

js conscious of his place in history, and his
and methods and become instead nation’s fate. The party he leads is conscious
of its shaky support from the fickle “floating
voter”. And it is worried by its fate at the
next General Election.

That is why Winston Churchill is almost
alone ‘in giving us the kind of stern unwel-

come warnings that the situation undoubt-

edly demands. Once again, this week, he
spoke of the need for really urgent measures
—which he will have to announce before
Parliament disperses in August.

Meanwhile, the Conservative Party is de-
termined to look on the bright side. So there
seems to be some contradiction between the
leader’s call for stringent measures and the
subordinate’s announcement, (this one from
Harold MacMillan), even on the same day,
that the housing programme would not be

}cut even under conditions of austerity.

POLITICAL HOPES
The Conservative Party is not without
political hopes. The present Government has
three years before it must face election fever.
The plan of its leaders is to defy unpopular-
ity in the meanwhile and press on to a suc-
cessful resolution of Britain’s problems by

| the end of that period.

There are two ways of going about this.
One is the Churchillian method. Roughly,
the economic struggle looks, to Churchill,
like another war. He is on the point of prom-
ising nothing but the agony of effort and suf-
fering. Then he hopes that Britain, as usual,
will struggle through.

The other route is a much more political

get some aspects of the economy .reorgan-
ised, For instance, it wants to cut back sub-
sidies and it wants to vary the Rent Restric-
tion Acts which pin rents to their 1939 levels.
But in order to get these things done the
politician knows he has to sugar the pill
otherwise it is not swallowed. Thus Mr.
Butler took off some subsidies, and simul-
taneusly eased the income tax. Food prices
rose, but taxes. went down for millions.

But both the courses are dangerous, in
polities. It is difficult to lead a Party through
a trough of disappointment. The organisation
does not like the strain. There are already
noticeable signs that Conservatives all over
the country who believed in national salva-
tion when Mr. Churchill was re-elected, are
now dissatisfied.

There was an election in Scotland recently
in Dundee. The Conservative candidate lost
8,800 votes. And the Socialist majority went

up by 4,300.

HOUSE OF COMMONS

Conservative M.P.’s are delighted and
amused by the desperate squabbles that are
in progress on the Labour side of the House.

Each meeting of the Parliamentary Labéur
Party seems to be more acrimonious than the
last. Recently the Party had to take a vote,
once more, to decide what should be the
course of its policy in the House of Commons.
The subject of all the trouble was the re-
armament of Western Germany: Aneurin
Bevan, with his allies, including Hugh Dal-
ton, want an uncompromising line. And they
came within a few votes of defeating the
“Attleeites”. At the end of the meeting the
Bevanites were cock-a-hoop. One of them
said after the meeting, “Attlee’s a charming

| old gentleman, but he ought to retire.”

This kind of feuding inside the Labour
Party puts up the Conservative chances of
staying in power for the full term of five
years.

CONSERVATIVE MUDDLE

On the big matters the leadership of Win-
ston Churchill and the skill of R. A. Butler,
as Chancellor, seem to be triumphing. But
in the realm of party policy there is plenty
of confusion on the Conservative benches.

The party was put into office with promises
to de-nationalise the steel industry ard the
road transport. 40,000 trucks were acquired
by the Transport Commission in its great
take-over at the time of nationalization.
Conservatives promised to unravel both these
Socialist set-ups.

A candid reporter must admit that the first
expectation after the General Flection was a
plan to de-nationalise steel. This was an-
nounced in the King’s Speech. And Chur-
chill’s son-in-law, Mr. Duncan Sandys, was
reputed to be hard at work on a scheme to
get Britain’s basic industry back into private
hands,

But nothing developed. And then it was

suddenly announced that Transport would

have priority, and that it was really a very
urgent matter, The much smaller operation
of selling off 35,000 trucks to private owners
is taking the political machine a good deal
of its energfes as Labour has organised a
strenuous delaying action.

The Conservative Government seems to
have reached a muddle with its legislation.
Steel is postponed until next session—and
ihere are even some doubts if it will be de
nationalised then. Transport has had its Bill
prepared—but at the last moment the man-
agers of business realised that if it were in-
troducéd immediately there would be no
holiday for M.P.’s in August.







LSOSSCSSSSSSOOSSEGSSS

%
>
x p A
5,

ADVOCATE

CPF S

AUGUST 1,

FRIDAY,

1952



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sien ii Arata aes ecaecinds eae
FRIDAY, AUGUST 1, 1952

orem ante ate

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



PAGE FIVE

GIRL CHARGED WITH MURDER OF BABY

Prosecution Call

Twelve Witnesses
Defence Continues Today

THE trial of 17-year-old Verona Jackman of Hanson
: St. George, for the murder of an infant to which
she is alleged to have given birth and thrown in a well
near her home on May 23, started at the Court of Grand

Tenantry,

Sessions

Mr. W. W. Reece,
for the Crown, ~

The Prosecution called 12 witnesses.

that Jackman’s neighbours noticed that near the time of
the alleged offence she seemed about to

child, but she disliked being teased by them concerning it.

On May 23, shortly after 5 a.m.
she was seen going with a basin
towards the well which is 110
yards from her father’s home, and
one witness heard a baby’s cry
when he went near her. After-
wards, a baby was taken out of
the well by the police, and the
baby and she were taken to the
Police Medical Officerfand then the
Hospital. Medical evidence is that
she had recently given birth to a
child,

During his outlining of the case,
Mr. Reece told the jury that in-
tention had to be proved. Inten-
tion could be proved either by
words spoken by the accused, or
from the circumstances of the case.
It was seldom that a person ex-
pressed the intention to kill, and
then they had to make an infer-
ence from the circumstances. And
they had to do this in the case be-
fore them.

He said that the case had gone
before the Police Magistrate twice.
On the first occasion, the Police
Magistrate, Mr. C. W. Rudder, de-
cided that a prima facie case had
not been made out and discharged
Jackman, but a prima facie case
had after been made out before
Police Magistrate Mr. C. L. Wal-
wyn. It was, however, their opin-
ion that mattered.

He added that if they felt that
the child had been killed by Jack-
man while she was suffering from
the effects of the birth and was
not in her normal senses, that
would be infanticide.

Dr. Edmund L. Ward, Police
Medical Officer of District “B”
said that about 8.15 a.m. he saw
Jackman at his office and also a
new born male child which was
alleged to have been taken out of a
well. The body of the é¢hild which
was about four hours old, was
covered with blood, grass, manure.

Wounds on Baby

There was a lacerated wound
on the left upper arm about two
and a half inches long; one on the
left foot near the ankle joint
about an inch long, multiple
bruises on the skin, and the child
was suffering from cold and ex-
posure and was moaning. The
heart beat was weak. He sent it
to the hospital.

At the request of Sgt. Inniss he
examined Jackman who consented
to be examined. There was a
swelling of her legs and feet, and
dry biood was on them and on her
petticoat.

From his examination, he was
of the opinion that Jackman had
recently given birth to a child, not
more than six hours.

On the following. day, he per-

formed a post mortem examination
on the dead body of the child he
had examined the previous day.
It was a full term infant. In his
opinion death was due to shock
and haemorrhage following frac-
ture of the skull and rupture of
the liver.
_ On the day Jackman and the
infant were brought to him he vis-
ited a well at Hanson Tenantry,
pointed out to him by the police.
What appeared to be blood and
human excreta about a day old
was at the side of the well, A
house about 110 feet from the well
was pointed out as the house
where Jackman lived, People
migh* heve been using the well
as a latrine.

Blood on a track at the side of
the house, was covered with marl
but penetrated the marl.

The injuries the child had sus-
tained could have been caused by
a fall into the well.

No Marks of Violence

Cross.examined he said that the
child had not been bathed. There
were no marks of violence, such
e attempted strangulation, upon
it. ,

_Certain depositions he had, were
given him by Mr, Reece since the
first. preliminary hearing.

Here Mr. Reécce observed that
the witness was giving medical
testimony and Mr. Smith said he
was not questioning the ‘doctor’s

integrity but the question was
necessary to the defence.
Dr. T. J. Gilmore, medical

practitioner who examined Jack.
man and the child on May 23,
also said she had recently given
birth to a child.

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|





Q.C., Solicitor General, is prosecuting



from the Police Medical Officer,
and she said she would. Sgt. In-
niss also tod her that she
might be charged for abandoning
the child, and cautioned her. He
asked her whether she had any-
thing to say and she said nothing.

Cross-examined, he said that
there had been two preliminary
hearings of the case, the first be-
fore Police Magistrate Mr. Rudder
and the other before Police Maxg-
istrate Mr. Walwyn, She was dis-
charged by Mr. Rudder, but was
arrested shortly after leaving the
dock, when she was under the

yesterday before His Lordship Mr. Justice G. L, @chway of the building.
Taylor. After the Prosecution closed its case and Jack-

man’s counsel Mr. F. G. Smith outlined the defence, it was
adjourned until to-day at 10

nso Walcott of Hanson
Tenantry who lived near Jack-
man said that shortly after 5 a.m.
on May 23 he saw someone going
towards the well walking uncom-
fortabiy and bending over. He did
Their case jis not recognize who it was at first,
but on going nearer he saw it was
Jackman and the sound of a
baby’s cry came from under her
skirt. He did not see any baby,
though.
The rain was drizzling and he

a.m,

give birth to a

Cross-examined, he too, said
that other than the bruises and

such injuries, th went back home for a coat and
marks of winiannee nad. sien. BS returned to the well. He stil
Dr. Z. Skomorock, the other heard the crying, but did not

doctor to give evidence concern- ®€¢ anything.

ing Jackman and the child, was Jackman asked him if he came
also of the opinion that Jackman Out there to téll lies on her and
had recently delivered a chili he replied that she had said she
when he examined her on May was not expecting a baby, but i!
23. she threw the baby in the well,
_, Cross.examined, he said that he would tell the world. He went
it was possible for a pregnant and told his daughter and when he
woman to have labour pains and returned he did not hear any

not know they were such. There erying. Later he again heard a
were cases on record in which ing, this ti comi , e
children cried before being born wot Were eee
and bystanders heard. A person “~~”
within about five yards from c

pregnant woman, the child of He was there when Carter went
whom was crying before birth, into the well and returned with ¢

Was Present

would hear the cry, One a lit- bab:
tle further might hear it too, Grete-examnisied, he said that

but such a cry was weak.
_ Re-examined, he said that such
instances of crying before birth,

‘when he first saw Jackman out-
side it was not so dark. He was
we 5 : not certain whether the piece of
mite TO aOOUt One te clothing Jackman wore was a pet-
Audrey Pencheon, sister of the ticoat, a dress or a nightgown, The
General Hospital, gave evidence Nearest he went towards her was
as to Jackman’s being brought #bout 15 feet. :
to the hospital on May 23. On his replying that he could
Gertrude Holder, nurse of the not remember if he had told Police
General Hospital, maternity Magistrate Mr. Rudder that he
ward, corroborated Pencheon’s had not heard the crying coming
evidence, and identified the from between Jackman’s legs,
clothes Jackman had been wear, Mr. Smith told His Lordship that
oe: s he was going to put in Walcott’s
Cross-examined, she said that evidence before Mr. Rudder.
She had given evidence at a pre. Walcott said that he remember-
liminary hearings at District “B” oq telling Mr. Walwyn he had
twice, before Police Magistrate heard the cry coming from that
C. W. Rudder and before Police position. L
Megiatrate C, 1, Welwyn. When he had first indistinctly

seen Jackman he had gone to her
Cr Pregnant because he thought me eee
a eekes of Hanson Ten- it was had wanted assistance, bul
antry said that she knew the when he went near her and she
accused while she was pregnant. said nothing to him he presumed
a ¥ 2 eee on ” nae that she did not wish assistance.
o ay » She opened a window s s e people use a
of the house in which she lived ce eee below the att for
und saw Verona Jackman going ©28" 9" b t the well itself
from the well toward her home ©*¢creting, but no ; Pan
with a basin in her hand Albert Small of Hanson Ten-
She (witness) then went to. antry said that about 5.30 a.m.
wards the well and heard a child he was going to the well near
erying from in it and blood was Jackman’s house when he saw a
around it, She saw more blood crowd of people and Jackman
around Jackman’s home and she leaving the well with a basin
threw marl over it. going towards her father's house.
Charles Carter, a 30 year old Her petticoat was dirtied with
agricultural labourer of Hanson blood.
Tenantry who lived near Jack-
man said that about 7.30 a.m. on
May 23 he was going to work
when he heard certain rumours
and went to the well near Jack-
man’s home. He heard a baby
crying in the well,

Heard Cries

He uweard a baby crying in the
well but he could not see it. One
Alphonzo Walcott was saying in a
fairly loud tone of voice that
Jackman had thrown the baby

When the police came, he was into the well.
lowered down in the well, taking P.Cc. Everton Sealy who was on
a crocus bag with him. Frogs duty at the hospital when Jack-
were down there and also some man toid Sgt. Inniss that she had
green, freshly pulled “pond” nothing to say, gave evidence
grass. On removing the grass, egncerning ‘this.
he saw an infant who was lying gg, Kenneth Inniss was the last
on similar grass. He had seen witness to give evidence, Besides
excreta outside the well, but none giving corroborative evidence con-

eee was on Jackman’s cerming ‘the blood around the
fatoer’s ground and “pond” well and Jackman’s home, and
grass grew about there. The well his taking a statement from the ac-
was a suck well and was sur. cused, he said that the distance
rounded by stones, from Jackman’s home to the well

He took the infant out of the was 110 feet and from the weil
well and gave it to the police. to the highway 600 feet. }
Next day he saw the body of the Cross-examined, he denied
dead child at the hospital. showing depositions of the pre-

Cross-examined he said the jiminary hearing to some of the
morning was a bright morning witnesses at the Court before
and he could have seen the bot- they gave evidence yesterday
tom of the well. The grass was jorning.
spread out at the ‘bottom. At the request of the Solicitor

d be bout there t the req :

Figg col b tt "aid not see General, His Lordship recalled
oe ne look i ‘HE well, some of the witnesses to enquire
neh ante of the district were not Whether the depositions had been
i i i in shown to them.
een ron Walcott, Small, Weekes and

The well was about eight feet Carter who were asked whether
in diameter. The grass in it was Sgt. Inniss had shown them the
not sufficient to cover the whole depositions or read any evidence
bottom. ai in to them, said he had not done 39.

1. Charles Goring, one of the :
calle who went to Hanson Ten- Mr. Smith Speaks. be
antry on the morning of May 23, After the Prosecution closed its
said that blood stains were along case, Mr. Smith reminded the
a tratk leading from the pee ar. that Gin sie poi ss tye
kman weil preliminary earings
Sn" mre f Police Magistrate in the first in-

Took ‘Child From Well stance had decided that no prima

facie had been made out.

A man ‘named Charles Carter Jackman had been arrested be-
was sent into the well and)fore she left the Court building,
brought up a living male child.) and again charged. On the second
Sgt. Inniss asked Jackman who| hearing two witnesses who had
was seen near the well if she| given evidence at the first, were

would consent to an examination | not called.

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HARRISON’S

Social Welfare
Adviser Returns
From Trinidad

Some interesting items of wel-
fare news came from Miss Dora
Ibberson the Comptroller's Social
Welfare Adviser who paid a short
visit to Trinidad last week.

The object of the visit was to
hold a conference with the United
Nations Mission which is conduct-
ing a survey of community cen-
tres and self help projects.

The Mission toured Trinidad
in order to see various com-
munity centres, some of the most
successful of which proved to be
humble buildings erected ‘by
communities at their own expense
in response to a need to provide

accommodation for already vig-
orous group activities.

The . Mission discussed the
posSibility of arranging for a

Resident Manager to be allocated
to one community centre in
order to give a demonstration of
programme making designed to
strengthen community life and
make full use of the centre.

Miss Ibberson discussed with
the Chairman of the Sugar In-
dustry Labour Welfare Board the
question of whether their scheme
of loans for the construction and
extension of dwellings .for
workers in the sugar belt might
be combined with some provision
for assisting them on the home
making side, e.g. in the planning
of well designed and smokeless
kitchens, conveniently equipped
at low cost.

Since the field workers in the
sugar industry are mainly East
Indians, this would present: an
opportunity to study the East
Indian way of life and address
home making teaching to its
special problems,

Met Miss Haglund
A contact was made with Migs
Haglund of F-A.O, who is remain-
ing in Trinidad for the regional
Y.W.C.A. Conference and mean-

while, ussisting in the revision of
the Domestic Science Curricula,
Miss \Lberson also-met the Com-

mittee which has been responsibl:
for orgenizing three annual Home
und Femily Weeks. The Comm/;t-
tee includes representatives of
all the Protestant sects. Angfi-
cans, Non-Conformists, Canadian
Mission, Seventh Day Adventists,
Pentecostals, Church of God etc.,
as well as some organizations such
as the Mothers’ Union and the
Y.W.C.A. They believe that the
movement does useful work jin
high-lighting the importance ot
stale family life,

Public meetings were a very
successful >art of the last “Week,”
audiences proving interested, ang
sympathetic. Over 1,000 péopls
attended a meeting in Woodfqri
Square, Port-of-Spain.

The Trinidad Government has
asked the Trustees of the Fuil-
bright Scheme for the services of
a high grade home economist to
assist for a year with teaching in
the Government Teachers’ Train-
ing College and other work in this
subject. This should mark a great
step forward in the teaching of
Home Economics throughout the
Colony.



2 Schooners Arrive
With General Cargo

Six hundred drums of colas
were brought to the island by the
Sehooncr Augustus B. Compton
which arrived from St, Lucia on
Wednesday. This vessel also
brought 59 cylinders of gas and
66 packages of fresh fruit.

Schooner Belqusen, which ar-
rived from St. Vincent the same
day, brought 686 bags of copra for
the Barbados Cotton Factory Ltd.
It also had in its hatehes arrow-
root, pigeon peas, peanuts, vegeta-
bles, cocoanuts, fresh fruit and
other general cargo,

Both vessels are consigned to
the Schooner Owners’ Association.

The law was that the Prosecu-
tion’s duty was to put before the
Court all the facts relevant to the
case and known by them, One
witness Edward Brathwaite, Ver-
ona Jackman’s father, who had
originally been called by the Pros-
ecution, said that he had been
ill, had used a basin and had asked
his daughter to carry it out for
him.

The Prosecution in leaving out
that witness left out the explana-
tion for the girl’s having the basin,
and jeft them, the jury, with ‘he
only inference that the child had
been in the basin. The duty of the
Prosecution was not to press for
a conviction, but to help the Court
in administering justice.

When hearing continues today,
the defence will call witnesses

Child Weeps As Magistrat



Awards Custody To Mother

A PATHETIC scene was enacted in His Worship Mr.
H. A. Talma’s Court yesterday forenoon when a seven- launching slope and foundation of

year-old girl wept softly as
the child by the Magistrate,

her mother, given custody of
took her away from her foster

For Bridge At
Pumping Station
Excavation in the coral for the

a steel bridge of 110 feet span ta

earry the 20 inch arterial main,
which connects the new Belle

mother with whom she had lived for six and a half years. Electric Pumping Station with
When His Worship ruled that the child be returmed to. Grandview and_ Brittons Reser-

the mother, she stood in the

dock with the woman who had

reared her from six months old, and refused to be separ-

ated. The mother went to the dock, and taking her by the Water

hand, pulled her away, while the child sobped and cried.



Conductor Bownd
Over To Keep Peace

WESLEY COWARD, a ‘bus
conductor, on the motor omnibus
0.30 was yesterday found guilty
of kicking Mr. Henderson Clarke,
Q.C., on the 28rd of last month.

He was bound over for 12
months in the sum of £10, to
keep the peace and be of good

‘haviour by His Worship Mr.
C. L. Walwyn, City Police Magis-
trate,

Coward was alleged to have
kicked Mr, Clarke in his chest
when the latter boarded the bus
en which Coward was working,
to travel from Roebtck Street,
opposite the Globe Theatre, to
come into the City.

Dr. R. L. Renwick gave evidence
as_to the extent of the injury
suffered by Mr. Clarke.

Mr. Clarke asked His Worship
to extend the leniency of the
Court to the defendant, and ad-
monishing the conductor His
Worship told him it was a very
serious offence, He told him that
in view of the fact that Mr.
Clarke had begged for him, he
would be lenient, and warned
him to “go straight” in future.

“Your job,” His Worship said,
“is a conductor on a public service
vehicle, and you~ should be
courteous to people whom you
have to serve, In future your
conduct must be such that you
serve the public well.”



Inquiry Adjourned

INQUIRY into the circumstances
surrounding the death of forty-
seven-year-old Edward Crichlow
of Sherbourne, St. John, was be-
gun and adjourned by Coroner
Mr, H. A. Talma yesterday after
medical evidence on the post
mortem examination was taken.
Hearing continues on the 13th
instant,

Crichlow died at the General
Hospital on Tuesday morning,
four days after he was injured
in an accident between a motor
cycle and a bicycle on Wilson
Hill, St. John.

Dr. J, A. Browne, who did the
autopsy, told the Coroner’s jury
that death was due to peritonitis
of the abdomen, following two
ruptures of the small intestines
complicated by pneumonia of tha
left lung.

WOMANPLEADS GUILTY
TO MALTREATING CHILD

Martha vnirty-seven-
year - old domestic yesterday
pleaded guilty before His Wor-
ship Mr, C. L, Walwyn. to strip-
ping her three and a half year
old daughter naked, beating her,
and putting her to stand in the
rain on the 7th and 16th July.

After the plea had been taken,
His Worship adjourned further
hearing of the matter until the
15th August.

The caus against John who re~
Sides aback of Chelsea Road, was
brought by Sgt. Gill,

John is the mother of four chil-
dren, two of whom are dead.

John, 4



FOUR LEGGED CHICKEN

Sinclair Gibson of Fair View
Place, Bay Land, St. Michael,
brought a four legged chicken to
the Advocate’s Editorial Cffice
yesterday. Two feet were quite
normal but the other two were
situated near the ehicken’s tail.
The chicken was hatchec on
Monday, y

The egg, from which the chick-
en was hatched, was larger than
normal. Up to yesterday the
chicken was still alive

Theatre Roof
Collapses

AUSTIN, Texas, July 31.
A section of the roof collapsed
today in downtown Queen Theatre
sending almost 100 children
screaming from the building and
injuring 25 persons, One boy was
believed seriously hurt, The thea-



tre owner said 92 children and 32
adults were in the theatre when a
35-foot section of plaster fell with-
out warning. —U.P.



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The mother of the child, Joan
Fitzpatrick, brought a case against
the foster mother, Violet Mc
Geary, charging her with unlaw~<
fully detaining the child, Gloria,
since May 1952 with intent to de-
prive her of the possession of the
child,

The story behind the matter
was that Fitzpatrick gave up pos-
session of the child when it was
six months old, allowing her to
live with her father who is now
dead, and who was the reputed
husband of the foster mother,

At the death of the father, the
natural mother claimed the child.
and she alleged that. McGeary
refused to give up possession of
the child.

His Worship in an effort to have
the matter settled amicably, ad-
vised the mother to allow the
child to spend periods at both
homes, but the mother refused,
saying “I want my child, she is
mine.”

McGeary in answer to His
Worship said she had two chil-
dren of her own, one 22, and the
other 19, both of whom are work-
ing.

When Mr. Talma asked the
child if she would go with her
mother, she shook her head, and
began to weep, His Worship,
turning to the mothey, said “you
are a complete stranger. The
child does not know you, It
knows this other woman, (Me
Geary) as its mother,” and he
suggested that the mother arrange
for the child to spend periods at
both homes.

His Worship invited the two
women to his Chambers where he
discussed the matter with them,
but later returned to the Court,

Mr, Talma, commenting on the
case, said there was one snag.
To the mother he added, “legal-
ly, you are entitled to the child,
but the child does not know you.
It would be very hard on the
child to be rooted from one per-
son whom she has known,
given to another whom she does
not know. A child is not like a
dog or a cat where you could say,
‘turn it over,’ Even cats and dogs
have a certain amount of affection
for the people they know.”

Entitled Legally

“Althougn you are entitled to
the child legally, yet from the
standpaint of equity, separation
from the person for whom she
has affection will not help her.
This woman (McGeary) has the
child’s affection which you have
not got. The child does not know
you. Although you are her mother,
you are still a stranger, and you
have not got her affection,”

Admitting that he did not know
what to da, His Worship told the
mother that the only way out of
it was “to wean the child grad-
ually. To uproot her from her
present home like a tree, will be
no use to the child,’ Mr, Talma,
added,

The mother was emphatic that
she wanted her child, but His
Worship asked “Why did you ever
allow her to go with her father?
Why did you not keep her? It is
enly now that this woman has had
all the trouble with her, now that
she has passed the worst, that
you are saying “T want my child,”

“Yes, legally you are entitled
to the child, But morally you are
not entitled to her, and you should
take that into consideration, Is
it that you really want your child,
or is it that you are only trying
to “spite” this woman?

His Worship added, “if you had
done your duty to the child, you
would have had her affection, As
it ig, she will be hostile to you,
end you will not be able to dis-
cipline her, and lead her. Now,
it is more difficult.”

After an adjournment, His Wor-
ship summoned the Probation
Officer and discussed the matter
again in Chambers. On returns
ing to the Court, he ruled that
the child be returned to the nat-
ural mother,



voirs, commanding Bridgetown
and its suburbs, has started. .

The Chief Engineer of the
Works Department told the
Advocate yesterday : ‘The several
parts of the bridge, which have
arrived from the United King-
dom in bundles, were given a
trial erection in the supplier's en-
gineering workshops in Glasgow.
They are galvanised to withstand
corrosion due to salinity in the
air,

“As it is proposed to launch the
bridge which weighs 18 tons, as
a complete unit across the gully
after it has been assembled on the
south bank, that is My Lord's Hill
side, considerable forethought and
preparation are necessary to en-
sure that the operation proceeds
Fmoothly and that the several
erections take up satisfactorily the
eccentric loads to be borne by
them.”

He said that there was litlle to
see at present but the planning of,
and preparation for, the launch-
ing are absorbing considerable
time,



Few Vessels In
Carlisle Bay

Carlisle Bay was practically
empty yesterday, No large steam-
ships were in port, The Motor
Vessel Terra Nova, which took
a load of molasses while in the
Careenage, was anchored off the
Pierhead,

The lower wharf however was
fairly active, Motor Vessel
Student Prince II continued to
jtake her load of molasses while
the Schooner Rosarene unloaded
wood and coals, Lighters were
being loaded with sugar.

The Motor Vessel Gloria Maria,
which arrived in port on Satur-

day, is now on dock undergoing
repairs,

Only two intereolonial vessels
arrived, The Sohooner Augustus
B,. Compton came in from St,

and) Lucia while the Schooner Bel-

queen arrived from St. Vincent,






























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Front Derby, Brown Derby, Plain Front.
Available in Leather Soles and Edge-
grip Rubber Soles.

Apron Front Casuals in Brown Willow

from $19.51 to $26.68

CAVE SHEPHERD
& Co., Ltd.

10, 11, 12, 13, Broad St.

e. Excavation Starts Day Nursery

! @ from nore 2

is to keep in close contact with the
parents by visits to the homes,
holding meetings and information
classes and lectures when speak-
erg are on hand to answer ques-
tions. Babies are admitted from
two months old and are dis-
charged from the roll at the age
of four years,

The Nursery is supervised by
Mrs. Hall assisted by the matron
and two nurses. Thirty five chil-
dren have been registered and
receive attention at intervals
during the year. To date there
are 12 babies in residence. A stock
of first aid material is kept on
hand and help has, from time to
time, been given to urgent cases in
the district.

Subscriptions

The Association is run by vol-
untary subscriptions from mem-
bers, individual efforts of mem-
bers without reference to
Association,
public functions and raffles.

Through the efforts of the com-
mittee and others interested in the
welfare of the children, a Christ-
mas party was given for them
last December when the parents
and children were treated to light
refreshment and each child was
presented with a little gift and
garment.

On a visit to the Nursery the
“Advocate” was impressed by the
quiet and restful atmosphere pre+
vailing, Work of this kind calls
for consistent and constant ‘effort.
If the helpers, both local and
abroad. who have assisted in this
venture were to continue in_this
faith, in years to come the New
Haven Association would be justi-
fied in having launched out and
will perhaps spread their good
work in other districts.

FINED FOR EARLY
POSSESSION OF —

SEA-EGGS



Eric Harrison of
Village and Lawson Trotman of
Halls Road, were on Wednesday
each fined 30/- to be paid in 14
days or in default one month’s
imprisonment by Police Magis-

%

the
soliciting donations, «

Carrington -

trate Mr, C, W. Rudder, when °
they were found guilty of having |

sea-eggs in their possession earlier
in the day, the period being the
sea-eggs closed season. Harrison
and Trotman were along Ealing
Grove Road, Christ Church when

2

they were found with the sea- |

eggs.

TONIC

TUS

Sold Only At...




a


PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE

a

FRIDAY, AUGUST 1, 1952

Politician ‘SHIPPING NOTICES







CLASSIFIED ADS. | "0ST _& FeUnn | Yugoslavia And | Australia Is

TELEPHONE 2508 Mexico Oppose





































































































































| Lost A Country | Manhandled
eae ROYAL NE
DIED ] , eo oe U.N. Decision rm CO
A A FOR SALE | 7B 1,G,, RACE TICKET Series 7, No oO Contrasts KATHMANDU July 31 STEAMSHIP CO, ska ce SO ta
Thursd y 3 | 7772 between Swan Street and Victoria | prprypp TAT 12 | An angry crowd pulled Bish- ¥ ce 5 and Passengers for
Gee Gentratin, © vie. tinker yoo Pesem. manner Ee See - Wiech apes gd a | LONDON eswar Prasad Koirala, President |. - atgeoe ran pee teem Dominica, “Antigua, Montserrat,
his late, residgnce. Thin ble odge | AUTOMOTIVE r ie gy tlre 18 52 In Mexico and Yugoslavia object- Australia is a land of contrasts. = th epelt Congress, Fenty rom aes STEN TOR, Sh August, 1088, Piehes nik Tit oe
e why, St. Philip at 4.30 6’cloc« | : > sie Bini the platform at a public meeting|M.s. STEN August, 1952. ,
this afternoon for Holy ‘rintty| CAR—100 Prefect Ford. in. gé0d ;ed on Thursday to having the lits cities are as modern and bust-| ) °° P ker i Ped Mevercl {tt Ss HORA ate tee take wie Rear cpa linen gil
Church, Friends are @ Mtiend.| condition. Phone 3487 or the Beacon U Cc SAL is United Nations Collective Measures fing as any in the world, But} ™~"* “= a +5 a SAILING TO EUROPE - an@ ‘Passengers for
Mrs. Gertrude Cor Hunte ! Printer 1.8.52—In. J , . Ce wake Mtenas , saa +4 manhandled him. His wife and)... wittEMSTAD, 12th August, 1952. gecept Cargo an or
tails). Denk teanewt teacher; ana | methine Committee ask Spain what aid it] parts of its vast stretches of “Out- three forrner ministers were also] Sarina DAD, PARAMARIBG Pominica, . Ange, Meneese:.
Nevitt. Hunte (sons), Miss Doris! CAR—Morris 8 in good working condi- ia could give to combat future ag-| pack”, comprising some of the} acsaulted by the crowd. Koirala. AND TISH GviaNa - ae August, v2 .
Hunte Uneea-tasicher, “4 Pai tion. Tyres good. Thone ry cd, ree ‘i al c finest pasture known to cattle- younger brother of thé Prime!Ms NESTOR, oth August, er riday, st, :
Girls) (néice Mrs, N Varner 31. : REAL ESTATE The Collective easures Com- | ‘ te e= 5 a M.S. BONAIRE, 25t ugust,, :
Tee at " men, are stil] too remote from de-} \inister, had come to the meet-,â„¢-8 R. Sth September, 1952. asia
irelative 1.8.52-1 CAR Morris Hone Good, working Ppike ane ter the coeeede veloped areas to be even thor-Jing to explain the recent boiiti-} samaee Ta kia SS Cubed BW5 scuoceee ae
‘ bai = conditions, price $3 ») Can be seen a# yee a or r 0 an : - ls ‘ Ef *
LEWis_ Thureday. July ai, 1962. | Ethelridge, Bank Hail Road. Phone 3479.| ALL THAT MESSUAGE AT TUDOR drawing up plans for political, oughly mapped. 3 cal crisis in the kingdom. ras BOSKOGE: Fs, 18! Ger at Oonatenees,
Mrs. Evelyn Lewis. Her funera! takes | M Hunte., 30.7.52—T.F.N. | STREET and the land on which it stands economic and military steps to be Among these Outback grazing The crisis arose last week wher} * Tele. —- eo 4047
place at the Ebenezer Brethren Room, | -——_—.___. — Beiccaee cee ee soveeas. with TON I f ression. |tracts are the rich plains of the} Prime Minister Matrika Prasad| gs. p. MUSSON, SON & CO., LTD.
Crumpten Street at 4,30 o’elock this CAR—Fford Prefect 10 H.P) in — Galvanise at present rented out as twojlaken in the case o: aggression. ‘Kaaba 7 li 250,000 | Koiral jected a directive Senin . ‘ ‘kena
evening, where friends are asked to| working order. No reasonable offer | shops producing an income of 756 dollars|Tt sent letters to most world’s er, eys—a sprawling 10 oirala rejec a e fk a
gather and from thence to the West- j refused pores E Corti paeeme ee Pte FEB mee wes Governments. square-mile expanse of fertile} the Nepali Congress ’ Working
ee hay. mak ob dy det re ee — ~| inspection any day on application to| It was decided to ask Madrid!prairie in the Australian North Ronptinen-i68 Sheceilive a ‘: 4 a
Civ Service Association, P.C. yvol -CAR—1951 Black Hillman Minx, 15,000 mat TEs shove, wiih} set up for|}Government what it could do|West. But cavilemen, for long ar ie a, ealeliates for a re- anatlian ational teams 1 5
Yorke (sons) miles. Contact I. S. Robinson, Garden | sale VICTOREA om) FRIDAY a about sanctions against an ag-|found that the stumbling-block of | @ lis 0 seven n S *
eek in| House, eae aig Ame ee ‘AUGUST at 2p-m, Dial ‘2947 *|gressor in the event of any new]|the Kimberleys as a “beef coun-| constituted cabinet. The cabinet
MANNING—On July 91, 1952. Henry} : : R. ARCHER McKENZIE. | conflict.’ Jose Gorostiza of Mexico|try” was the trek to the nearest nye = ce Sree Three
Christie Manning. 4 rig de ay ae CAR—One Morris ore Ss Geer 27.7.52-4n. | caid his government could not abbatoir town of Wyndham, ly- Series a Lesge certenba SOUTHBOUND aie Sh pitt Aes aaie
leave his late residence “Newlands” | Saloon in perfect condition, year old. ES - ‘ any s + ; . Songress is 8 5 rt jails ails r
Two © he he Phe ental och ike Owner aang! SRASY, hee ae oe eee at eka oats pati wat Meee Se rene ee inites oh dg ion Demonstrators advanced on the Montreal Halifax Bosten Barbados Barbados
for the St. George Harish Church 31,7,52—2n, |at St. Lawrence, Christ Church, stand-! broaden participation o neo S!q barren mountain range. Such an Jatt waving black flags and|CANADIAN CHALLENGER 22 July 25 July _ SAug. 4 Aug.
pe empresa. Some” } Mine House ‘contains three bedrooms, | COVernment in the United Nations|eghausting trail stripped all the| P ulled the Congress Party Presi-| LADY NELSON... YAug. ¢ Aug, 6 Aug. 13 Aug. 18 Aus.
Manni . id i ; s = 1 . ug. =- . .
ater 1.6.52—1n. f drawing, dining and living room. garage | ANd, Said if a letter was sent tolt@ off prime beasts—who had to dent down among them. Th@|CANADIAN CONSTRUCTOR 22 AUE 2 Aug — 3Scpnt 4Sep..
Bc ELECTRICAL and servants’ rooms with, electric Ment genial it Siaid sis he seat. at least six years old before} i ojico arrived later, none being|LADY RODNEY 3 Sept. Seri BSept. 17 Sept. 18 Sept.
———-———— and water throughout. Inspection e anis! ublican Govern- . Rane a ana sabe | 35 Sept. — 24 Sept. ept.
IN MEMORIAM | “Pye PORTABLE RADIOS Combined appbintment, e 8260 beiween the |'ment in exile with which Mexico| el stamina was up to the jour-|Fresent when the __ incident LADY NELSON "Sept, ws Sept. 27 Sept. “6 Oct. 7 Ori.
—— —— Electric Mains and Self Contained Dry |hours of 9 and 12 a.m, Helnd relations ney. And, in addition, it means} G¢cyrred. st a
GRANNUM—In loving memor of ou) | Battery Operation. Price $120.00, P, C, S The above will be set up for sale at maintains re ations. i endless planning of camps and fc —_U.P : RTUBOUND
dear mother, Ua Grannum who de-] Maffei & Co., Ltd. 1.8.52--t.{.n. | Public Competition on Friday, the 15th Yugoslavia supported Mexcio, . d Soi No! Arrives Sails Arrives Arrives Arrives
parted this life on July 3ist 1949. day of August 198% at 2 pm. at the|but agreed with Gorostiza that| Watering places for rovers as i 2 ie Barbados Barbados Boston Halifax Montreal
“Till memories fade, and life depart | office of the undersigned. ‘there was no need to force recon-|Well as pasturing-halts for the Chances Of q ruce Y RODNEY es 7 AUS. Q9Aug. 19 Aug. 20 Aug. 23 Aug.
Youll live forever in our hearts.” FURNITURE CARRINGTON & SEALY, j here was a . tee h bstacl de cat~ TAN GER + 20 Aug = 2 Sept.
Ever remembered by— . Lucas Btreet. sideration vote on the issue. The|Steers. These obstacles made . . a 1 : a % 30 Aug. 9 Sept. 14 Sept.
Rita, Harold, Ina, Adiine and Elsic ; 7 52—-1M. |committee adjourned without|tle raising in the Kimberleys a Remain Remote CANAD! fe 5 10 Sept. Fi 23 ae.
Grannum ‘children. A | “FURNITURE—One Mahogany Wardrobe | ~ijentnnemninciasteicenti— Tn ane faking action, an indication that|much less attractive venture than CANADIAN CONSTRUCTOR 15 ie oe
7. with full length mirror inside. One] , 7H undersigned will offer for al’lihe request ‘would be sent to|might appear at first sight. LADY RODNEY | gion | SEE 2 Set. et ee at oa
WANTED Mahogany Morsiy Suite complete Witt! io, 19, ah. eireet,. Bridgetown, on| Madrid.—O.P. Freight Plane Service PANMUNJOM, July 31. SJ 19 Oct. 21 Oct. 30 Oct. 31 Oct 4 Nov
bul by RA Grifith. Pull’ partiou: | PFiday, the sth day of August 199%, “xt a ut as early as 1936, men of vis-| , Both the United Nations and the] “APY NEESON +.
HELP ars, Phone 3430. 31.7.52—2n, | 2 pom. Sie oi hinaas, oot a8 Once Fe d ° i were looking to the skies—|Communists took gloomy views of iounsk cape
‘A FEMALE BOOK-KEEFER requizea in BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE BANK ‘ eration amd the oil refineries — as gpuniee, tar a early coe = For further par rs, apply to—
A ' BR requige p italisi rea, but staff officers ke ) ‘ ey
experience of Journal entries and MECHANICAL COTTLE, CATFORD & CO., P ° S. means of capitalising the day's conference in ict by GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD.—Agents.
Ledger Balancing essential. Apply by Solicitors. Ts Essential lush Kimberley grass. They saw|@@y5. : y
letter stating experience to A.B.C. c/o} 1.8. 42--6n. ra! haggling over changes in the pro-
Advocate Co., Ltd, 1.8.52-—n.

a
GENERAL SERVANT (to sleep in)..

Good wages and accommodation. Apply
Mrs. Otho Dowding. Pine Hill.
30.7.52—3n
SALESMAN—"Required immediately
Salesman and General Office Clerk
A ~~ Cecil L, Straker & Co 4 Re”
Street, Bridgetown. 30.7.52

MISCELLANEOUS

tease reiipeeoctrepentnrpeeneamgeeeremetanen
USED STAMPS—Wanted large or smal
quantities of clean postally used BAR-

BADOS and other B.W.I1 stamps
Buying prices on application to
J, TURTON
P.O. Box 124, Kingstown, St. Vincent
31.7.52—3n

PERSONAL

The public are hereby warned against
giving credit to my wife, Odessa
Vai in (nee Patrick) as I do not hold
myself responsible for her or anyone
else contracting any debt or debts in my
name unless by a written order signed

by me.
Sed, JAMES VAUGHAN,
Welchman Hall,
St. Thomas.
31.7.62—2n

ANNOUNCEMENTS

CARS ON HIRB—Frierds and genera!



pu to Know that you can_ hire

bran self-driven cars at Holborn,

Porttabelle. Dial 3723, 30.7. 52—4n
HOUSES



Attractive seaside Flat main road Hae
tings, comfortably furnished, Eneil Path, Onen Verandah facing sea Syitabi
one person for couple). From August 1
Telephone 2949 18,6.62—t/f 9

BREEZELEY, Maxwell Coast — Unfur
nished House with 4 Bedrooms, Spacious
Reeeption FPooms, Double Garage, and
right-of-way to beach. John M. Bladon
& Co. Phone 4640, Pit. Ltd. Bullding

1.8,82—1n

FOR RENT
HOUSE-—Small new stone house (6)
six miles from Bridgetown nicely
furtiished, ideal for one or two adults
desiting a cool quiet comfaertab’e place
to live 4942. 1.8.52--1n,

AND NOW

can have



’



¢

you

A GAS COOKER

like those you have admired in
the magazines.

SEE THEM TO-DAY... 4+

At Your Gas Showroom,

Sane ey ‘ Bay Street,



CAMERA—1 — 4 x 5 Camera — Bpeed
Graphic complete with 120 Roll im
Pack, 4 x 5 — Out Film Holder and 4 x 5
Film Pack adaptor. Best Offer. Phone
#412. 30.7.52—3n.

MISCELLANEOUS

“AUTOBRITE” CAR POLISH, The
@lass-hard protective surface imparted
by Autobrite last for six months or
more and is_ excellent for Bicycles,
Motor Cycle, Baths, Refrigerators, Tiles.



Wonderful for Chromium etc, New
shipment just received. HARRISON.
Dial 2364 1.8.52—8n

FS
AUTO ACCESSORIES including coo)
cushions, upholstery rexine, fibre seat
covering, green cativas, chrome wheel
rings, steevingwheel covers, sun visors,
hood dressing, cigarette lighters (6 and
12 volt), reverse lamps, licence holders,
rear View mirrers (car & Truck), tyre
gauges (Car and Truck), insulating tape.

Courtesy Garage. Dial 4391.
25.7,52—6n

CYCLE ACCESSORIES including elec-





tne generator lamps (Miller & Impex),
Petcht kits, Solution (special whole-
sole ice), Flashlights and batteries,

r

Freneh Chalk (7 tb. tins), Brake blocks
pumps, rim tapes, Tyres and tubes,
ete, Courtesy Garage. Dial sr





“BASAKOF” is a compound Cough

Medicine for relieving Coughs, Sore
Throats ete in Pigs, Goats, Sheep,
Iforses and Cattle, made by the wel-

known Manufacturers, Day Son & Hewitt
ltd. Pyice 5/6 box. KNIGHT'S LTD
1,.8.52-—3n

PORKS—Agricultural Forks made of
the Best Steel and the right pattern at
$5.20. The Auto Tyre Co., opposite
the Cathedral, Spry Street.







27.7.52—On





GLUE KETTLES—A Glue Kettle that
so Light that wou don't realise its
presence in your kit and how efficient;
No joints to leak and unbreakable
capacity 1 pt Price $1.80 Harrison
31.7.52—Inr



LINIMENT—We have in stock ‘“Aintre
Liniment” a veterinary product [for treat-
ing Sprains, Muscular Strains, Windgalis,



ele, ete.,, in Horses and Cattle. Price
$2.48 bot. KNIGHT'S LTD.

1.8, 92-—3n
Oot. TINS--New empty 1-gallon Oil

Tins suitable fgr kerosene oil, ete. $1.00)
each. Apply: Courtesy Garage.
1.8.52—4n



ONE FLOOR BROODER' for sale with
1 hover to accommodate 300 baby
chicks to work by oil. Apply to Harold
Ward, Grazettes Road. 1,.8.52—-In





SUAVE by Helene Curtis, America’s
most popular hair Cosmetic — just a few





trops add glorious radiance to your
salir, Knight's Ltd. 30,7.52—3n
SUBSCRIBE now to the Daily

clegraph, England's leading Daily News-
aper now arriving in Barbados by Air
vnly a few days after publication in
ondon, Contact Ian Gale, C/o. Advo-














@ from page 1
boats visiting the island, but now
that they were going to be removed
he did not know what was g
to happen. Personally,

AUCTION
PUBLIC NOTICES



Cul
publ: Our wholesale Business will be} to
clo for our annual holiday from! j))4j
Sth August until the 19th. ;

their economy, and might

C. HERBERT, the people in the islands,

55, Tudor Street, City. Mr. Pitt was a school master in
30.7.52—4n |Grenada before he left for Canada

to study law, He graduated from

Dalhousie University in Halifax

in 1927 and went to England for a

He_ returned

NOTICE
aan if | oT een eae
pplications for a Qualified Midwife,
feoeived Oy the Churchwetes Mi! [Conada 11928 ants hee ee
urchwarden Mrs. anada in and has prac-~
Talma, Welches, Ch. Ch. up to 3 p. i q ;
ee he he ae: oe Hsing at the Bar in Toronto since
Terms of appointment obtainable from | then.
the Parochial Treasurer.
26.7.52—4n

He has two brothers in Grenada,



NOTICE

DEABREU TAILORING CO.
TAKE NOTICE
that the business of tailoring carried

a

tising Barrister and the other Mr.
Ronald Pitt a retired schoolmaster,
Mr. Pitt passed through Bar-
ths nance in 1928 and again in 1938
on by Guilherme Ansélmo DaSilva and |when he visit the courts
Eustace Gordon DeAbreu at Marnitt | om jew
Street, Bridgetown, under the style or
firm of DeAbreu Tailoring Co. has been
dissolved by mutual consent as from
the 8th day of July 1952; and FURTHER
TAKE NOTICE that the said Guilherme
Anselmo DaSilva has the sole right to
collect the outstanding debts and assets
of the said company under and by
virfue of the deed of dissolution.

he was intransit for
visits to
relatives,

His wife, who hails from Nash-
ville, Tennessee is a B.A. from
Fisk University and a Registered
nurse

Grenada on
his mother and other

All persons indebted to the said from. Meharry Medical
company are hereby required to setiie}College in Nashville. She also
their indebtedness immediately at the | did post graduate work at the

said address Marhill Street.
GUILHERME ANSELMO DaSILVA.
1.8. 52—3n

TAKE NOTICE
CHAMPION

That THE STUDEBAKER CORPORA-
TION, a_ corporation organized and
existing under the laws of the State of

University of Toronto School of
Nursing.







TAKE NOTICE
COMMANDER

That THE STUDEBAKER CORPORA-
TION, a corporation organized and
existing under the laws of the State of
Delaware, United States

Delaware, United States of America,
Manufacturers, whose trade or business
address is 635 South Main Street, South
Bend, State of Indiana, U.S.A., has
applied for the registration of a trade
mark in Part “A” of Register in respect
of aut Hes, and will be entitled to
register the same after one month from
the 3ist day of July, 1952, unless some
person shall in the meantime give notice
in duplicate to me at my office of oppo-
sition of such registration. The trade
mark can be seen on application at my
office,
Dated this 23rd_day of July,
H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.
31.7,52—3n



1952.

of America,
Manufacturers, whose trade or business
address is 635 South Main Street, South
Bend, State of Indiana, U.S.A., has
applied for the registration of a trade
mark in Part "A" of Register in respect
of automobiles, and will be entitled to
| register the same after one month from
the 3ist day of Juby, 1952, unless some
| Person shall in the meantime give notice
jin duplicate to me at my office of oppo-
sition of such registration. The trade
mark can be seen on application at my
office.



Dated this 23rd day of July, 1952.
| H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.
31.7,52—3n.



CHANCERY SALE -

The undermentioned property will be set up for sale at The Registration Office.

BARBADOS,
Public Buildings, Bridgetown, between



mately affect the loyalty of|cost

an abbatoir, a chilling plant and
an airfield on the spot, and a
freight plane service to the re-
frigeration plants at Wyndham,
as the answer. And although

he felt World War Ij temporarily forced
| that the withdrawal of these boats|Such plans into cold storage, the
NOTICE to Customers and the genera.| from the islands will be disastrous|post-war years have

seen them
eome to life—at Glenroy—at a
of — somewhere around
£20,000. Today, Kimberley beef
is being flown in frozen form to
Wyndham instead of plodding
wearily to market on the hoof,

As a result of this innovation,
thousands of head of cattle are
now being converted into meat
destined for Britain that would
otherwise never reach her lar-
ders, +

The real importance

of the

one being Mr. C, E. L, Pitt, a prac-;Glenroy experiment, however, ‘s

its value as a pattern for similar
projects elsewhere. Stockmen
today are anticipating the time
when over 150 such prairie plants
will service Australia’s entire

jof this island, On both occasions| cattle country, each within 300

miles of a port or railhead. And
they visualise nearly 100 huge
aircraft continuously employed

in flying out chilled beef ind
bringing back stores and equip-
ment for the new cattle stations
that such a project would bring
into being.

The Glenroy success has acted
as a spur to their imagination and
they are not likely to rest until

such a service hag been intro-
duced on a_ trang-continental
scale,

‘Australia’s herds already num-
ber some 14,000,000 but even this
tremendous total is far from the
taximum that the “Outback”
could easily support. Now the
eattlemen are savine emphati-
cally the beef production can be
expanded to an undreamed cf
level when the transport problems
are solved.

U.K. Warns Egypt

@ From Page 1

Anyone who says that I am
about to go to America, England,
Switzerland, South Africa, knows
more than I do.

“The only thing I am certain
about is that I shall not go behind
the Iren Curtain.

“Meanwhile we shall







posed ceasefire agreement. Radio
Peiping, the voice of Communist
China, joined Bighth Army Com-
mander General J. A, Van Fleet

prospects for an agreement,
for different reasons,

Van Fleet told a press confer-
ence yesterday that he is
confident”. of an

fer, and have

to deliver punishing air and artil-

POO@DDODOOODOG

SEA AND
TRAFFIC

In Carlisle Bay

Schooner Mary E. Caroline, Schooner
Emeline, Schooner Zita Wonita, Schoon-
er Confident F. G. Rainbow M., Sch,
Cyril E. Smith, Schooner Triumphant
Star, ‘Schooner Mandalay I, LMS,
Manuy, Gulf Barge No. 2. M.V, Terra
Nova, Sehooner May Olive, Schooner
Wonderful Counsellor, Schooner At Last,
Schooner Henry D. Wallace, Sch. Esso
Aruba, M.V. Gloria Maria, Motor Vessel
Caribbee, Schooner Rosarene.

ARRFVALS

Schooner Augustus B. Compton, 47
tons, Capt. Compton, from St Lucia,
Agents: Schooner Owners’ Association

Schooner Belqueen, 44 tons, Capt. Kins,





from St Vincent, Agents Schooyer
Owners’ Association .

DEPARTURES
_ Schooner Frances W. Smith for British



S.S. Brazil for Bahia, Schoone

for St. Vincent, M.V. Herd:
Trin and Schooner Ma
for St. Lucia

Seawell
Arrivals by B.W.I.A,
From Trimidad:

E. Jenkins, G.
Smith, H. Lucie-Smith, V. Dowrick, Ww.
Crickie, A. Mahabir, E, Baker, L Baker
A. Agostini, H Murphey, J. Fotter, P
Bennett, J. Hakip, E. Hakin, C, Hakin,
G. Hakin, S. Bovell) F. Barker, ¥-
Cooper, W. Daly, C. Lai-Fook, 1.
Troke, C. Troke
From Trimidad:

T. McLeod, C. Steinbok, A. Hurstfield,
G. Meld, E. Field, A. Feld, D, Fi id,
C. Field, R. Field, A. Henderson, “i,
Henderson, A. Julien, R Wenzelman,
F. Wenzieman, A. Wenzelman, Y. Wen-





man for
Henrietta

jad



Jenkins, A. Taicie-



zelman, C. Cova, B. Rodri uez, "O,
Johnson, C. Bolhuis, J. Bolhuis, B.
Lovell, E. Barnes, J. Brathwaite, M
ster, C. Blackett, R. Newton, P

B. Arroyo, P Arroyo, “Q.

Davies, I Cole, E. Flynn, C. Flynn, P.
Flynn, G. King, M, King, G. King Jr..



in taking a pessimistic view of the
but

“less
armistice than
ever before. His reasons were that
the Reds had survived a hard win-
thinned out their
lines making it harder for the U.N.



CG TRANSATLANTIQUE

lery blows at concentrated troops.
UP.

*“DE GRASSE” ..
“COLOMBIE” es
*“DE GRASSE”



Established



Sailings from Southampton to Guadeloupe, Martinique,
Barbados, Trinidad, La Guaira, Curacao & Jamaica





From Southampton Arrives Barbados
12th Juiy, 1952 .. 24th July, 1952
Bist July, 1952 .. 13th Aug., 1952
22nd Aug., 1952 .. 3rd Sept. 1952
*Not calling at Guadeloupe

SAILING FROM BARBADOS TO EUROPE
From Barbados Arrives Southampton

“COLOMBIE” +» 18th July, 1952 .. 25th July, 1952
*“DE GRASSE” .. 6th Aug. 1952 .. 16th Aug., 1952
“COLOMBIE” .» 24th Aug., 1952 .. 5th Sept, 1952
*““DE GRASSE” .. 16th Sept., 1952 .. 26th Sept. 1952

*Sailing direct to Southampton







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at $4.50 per Gallon

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12 noon and 2 p.m. for the sum and on tc if Th ; ate oa 5 Oe = sets Vaan - T HERBERT LTD.
ite Co. Ltd, Local Representative! the date specified belaw. If not then sold, it will be set up on each succeeding | a Sapri, for ave four children sley, antelli, Maingo .
Tel, 3118, , 17.4.52—t.i.n | Friday iat ine aainie Place and during the same hotirs until sold, Full particulars} with me who must be kept happy ae gfe San ts. 2/6, “‘petinadee wie 10 & 11 Roebuck Street 1926
ona icatio; oO me, ‘ . a . ws ,
T0-DAY'S NEWS FLASH TABLETS—We have in stock “Do-Do si * CLARENCE SAMUEL KING-—Plaintitr and occupied. We may stay here} H. F Shearn, Mr. K. A. Murphy; Mr.
\sthma Tablets” a positive relief from and tor a few months, perhaps longer, | * Melville, _ E. C. Redman, Mr,
- pasm in 30 seconds, Price $1.20 bot. | _ NATHANIEL PILGRIM—Defendant perhaps less. eA Clee ae ee ee ey
pe aeasons,” improvements iy Pea a : fe enedooass tap OF PMs Rete ie the, BR ad Gee Mee ae The greatest kindness oe gee Mr. A, M. Cooper, Mts. M., Cooper.
Extefisions are taking place st VENETIAN BLINDS—Made to order. Island aforesaid containing by sdmeasurement one rood twenty|now, be done to us wou e@ to] Master Marshall, Mr. D. R. D, Wiles.
JONNSON'S STATIONERY 50 as All metal oe Sai | nes ae seven rehes or thereabouts Abutting ont landa ot, L Cumunings accept us as ordinary simple pres he Fp, SONS, yee a E
colours, immedia' lelivery ey on lands of one Arthur, deceased, on lands of one Corbin on lands * hav ittle . By : ie ir.
to-give greater shopping pleasure CARTAN Metal Company c/o Barbados of L. Cadogan and on a Public Road or however else the same may ee We oa eet \e rit first and Me “4 a See oe © Sere
to our numerous customer friends Advocate 1.8.52—6n abut and bound and SECONDLY ALL THAT certain piece or parcel ay a it w y Ss ae uy ser aM 4 ee a < eae ssdils
, of land situate at Brighton Road in the parish of Saint Michael] in spite of what has sometimes tle ae dy aie taunts eo
Please Note:—The THardware WHITE SHARKSKiN—Excellent qualit; and Island of Barbados aforesaid containing by admeasurement been said of me — since I became . e. iss Madelt ¥
nd velae 36 inches wide only $1.47 yard twenty and four fifths perches or thereabouts Abutting and bound ing Ki F honéymoon Mr, Joseph Tudor, Mr, Charles Lanoly
Department is now closed, at KIMPALANT 52, Swan Street. on lands of W. H. Leach on lands of Blanch Gittens on lands o ing. For even on my honey Mr. Tan Devaux.
iSON 1.8.52—1n one Blackett on lands of Martha Bowen and on a Pubile Road or! 1 was informed constantly about) From Jamaica:
sebagai’ iene: 0.8 pesca @lse the same may abut and ound Tometiier with, the affairs of State. Ss. RN ER
B. N, JOHNSON, messuage or dwellinghouse and all and singular other the buildings Si Peabaded: UE Ea: ty y B.W.LA,
and. erections. thereon. ain Ey Serie sith seen tt tn] tat Wie tun, mae ames lass oth Avenue. — Kelleville.
3 TAKE NOTICE | crser rmice! ete. 0 sti Mat Wee Gains e havtine | emt ees atte RI
= ’ cae Date of Sale. 15th August, 1952 i“. Aeutiate untrue that I have taken a fortune Pout! tates’ dean, Lohan aa: ae '
NPS9G9S SSF ISSISSISSSSOSOâ„¢, ZENITH Registrar-in-Chancery. from Egypt. Nor is it true that 1} -iisiine. Mis. Mary Christine, Master An Attractive and Well Proportioned 2 Storey House situated
% ’ ‘ S] rnat ZENITH RADIO CORPORATION . July, 1952, have a fortune hidden away. My Jobn Christine, Mr. Alexander Christine, on a corner site of 12,050 square feet. Contains 3 galleries (1
< Foresteér’s Scholarship § |: corporation organized and existing 31.7.52—4n. | wife, my baby son, and my three Re Miss Avis West. enclosed), large drawing room, dining room, study, modern
Abplications, in writing, ad- Sf inder the laws a 138 Sass ae young sg alee will Pon ver’ |p. Clairmonte, H. Douboulay, D. Dou- } kitchen, 3 bedrooms, garage, etc. Offers considered.
+ ry. Court Xs | Manufacturers, whose trade or bu 88 | sim I know some of you may | pouis Douboulay hes
si tary, Court & Te 2 . . ply. 3 ? ulay, T ouboulay, T. Devaux, lL
. Re hoa winscnd aeul be 3 Mee Ca dceen County of cob, state TAKE NOTICE . smile at that — but you should | Bomara, L. Thomas, H. Boxill,” 8 ) L ON co
received up to WANs ae SM] o6 minois, United States of America, ‘=| remember that any man who has PT Te ree hiner aay en JOHN Mi. B AD & fa
giietinic ap 3) eas: eat x vas applied for, the Apert Oe 8 ’| considerably less than we have ble, D. Troke, C. ‘Troke, R Delabastide : AF:S. F.V.A.
bit ene eke te ; rade mark in Part “A” o) egister in ce we , D. + . d 8. F. ;
Be eee eet ta must Sf enpeet, oF electrical hearing ‘aids’ and bEtabit to ben cor wack, cao tei Romeo: : REAL ESTATE AGENTS
Candidates, whose parents mus Sj}oarts thereof, and will entitle oO an, J , ‘ : Suckley. L att,
be financial members of the above~ %] ogister the same after one month from very poor standards I know I gm |, ™, Farman, See Fa R, y ’Phone 4640 -- Plantations Building
aEtie Gents pater ea aa gen oie ibaa ai ve eto still to be envied. J hope that (Stewart, A Chann, K, Dean, H. Roach, | Whe s
an years ‘ craon 8 . : j i ith- ;4 Neal ‘Ne Is _™~”unmnr~>-~-SSS
years on ist September, 1952 n duplicate to me at my office of oppo- from now on it will be envy with “4 theca ting e Tackaea coca :
A t be accom- ition of such registration. The trade out bitterness. My wife and I are ; y, § Soungiens, : ss
pplications mus e * h Sa applicati t my Wakefield, Joan Bennett, Michael Ben
; e q f - é
panied by either a Birth or a Bap x te can be seen on application a not embittered about what hap nett, Michela “‘Recett:
% Peron l emer een ate | “bated this ard dav of July, 1962 pened, for we know that we ar | Vor Trintdad:
$ Phy REBOURNY 1. es H. WILLIAMS, still rich in the many friends we got Sree, Freee A eae E
See re ‘ ou St. Michael's egistrar of 8. ede ars : + , a ;
% oe pe Dismend s cine ni ei “a 7 sn both nage The past few days Martin, T Mago, N. Bradshaw, W
° Dayreit’s Road. Sy} _ a | That THE GUIANA MATCH FACTORY LIMITED, a cumpany of British | have b anxious and difficu, | Smith, M. Pemberton, E. McKinnon, A.
Be oe a ae Basusdacturers, Whose trade or business address is 54 & 55 Water | but we have survived them. Soka amie A cen AN Aa ie
30,7.52—4n, street, orgetown, itish Guiana, has applied for the registration of a trade i as, E as, M. T! . &.
TAKE NOTICE mark in Part “A of Register in respect of matches, and will be entitled to The newspaper Il Tempo said Marhin, Ht. Ealy, M. Ealy, S. Ealy, E



King Farouk’s abdication was
| part of a “still evolving” political
ation at) manoeuvre and it was likely he
| would be returned to the Egyptian

register the same after one month from the 3ist day of July, 1952, unless some
Person shall in the meantime give notice in duplicate to me at my office of
opposition of such registration, The trade mark can be seen on applic
my office.

Dated this M&rd day of July, 1952.

BARFOOD

That BARBADOS PRODUCTS LEMITED,
1 company imcorporated and registeréd
n Berbados, Manufacturers, whose trade

Smith, F. Bermudez, R.. Shannon.

For Antigua: 4

E. Payne, C. O'Loughlin, G. Pilgrim,
Brisbane, J. Brisbane, S. Brisbane,

M. Bynoe, M, Buefong, H. Murphy.

Dd























































} « ”
w business address is in care of Fitz- H. WILLIAMS, throne “after a few months.”
patrick Graham & Co., Barclays Bank Registrar of Trade Marks __ It gave as the source of this in-| [y Touch with Barbados
Suilding, Broad Street, Bridgetown, has 31.7.52— | formation an unidentified Egypt- ‘ s ‘a
oe hast hr oF Hegisar at uhoest |ian official whom it said had Coastal Station
tebe arodut oth ‘ i ¢ ‘ i| CABLE & WIRELESS (West Indies)
of food products, substances used ¢ conferred with Farouk at Capri 3 aie a , a
food or as ingredients in food, and TAKE NOTICE yesterday and then ‘returned to aia eae ve Seaton anne eee
be entitled to register the oe oe A eth geet Egypt. thelr Bartsados Comat Station:
952 eitieen aoras | papean shail’ in ‘the i <——wH . In a dispatch from the island S.8. Alcoa Roamer, s.s. Mornace
meantime give notice in duplicate to me | | of Capri where Farouk and his hig a an anaes oat
7 it my office of opposition of such Tegis- | } family are now staying nn Tempo Polke eeastece, ie Tuiseanene an
tration. The trade a can be seen on i x |quoted the Egyptian source as | frerdsman, ss Brospector, s.§, Merea-
Peed this Sara any of July, 1952 | i 9 | saying that Farouk had been tor, ss. Dieppe, s.s. Alcoa Cavalier, tins
i A | . H ca : H. WILLIAMS, | ~ z , forced to abdicate because of his |: 5 Nccuba, ss. __ Covington Virginia, PER POUND g
! oe eee wee 3) | 2 ‘opposition to the WAFD party.’ Suniewel. So Alcoa Cavalier, s.s, Finn- 10 C ; ‘Ss { a rs
Only a few in stock as tt | 8 WHEL. bark) 5.2. Columbia Star, 8.8, Tasbire,;
* iS . P . a | s Stonegate, s.s. Esso Cristobal, s.s f
regener) i ienited. 7 : oo, ee ete es | POTATOES FOR THE
fi Fenheim, s.s. Pentire, s.s uerto ico, | ®
BUT YOUR BEST BET ¢ CIGARETTES ua. Uboribe Likes, 0.9. Alpha/Ryyn, 5; }% .
3 Rijandam. s.s, Uruguay, s.s. Afghanis-
IS TO GET ONE NOTICE ' ee cee an Sheuat oe. POPULATION
They are real magic |}| i | enbach, s.s. Palme, s.s. S. Catilina, s.s. "
it c 2g | i K L | Yunghing, M/T Bahia, ss. Alcoa, Puri- | : East of the
when it comes to |} CAPTAIN, OWNERS OR AGENTS. | | , —- tan, s.s. “Buceaneer/Hooo, s.s. Arneta,|® JOHN N. PEREIRA, Rickett Street (East o
quality. } of the Venezuelan Motor Vessel a ae eee oe egreeneatneeets < aT } ' Vitamin Bl isa world- s. Haakon Hana. s,s. Cavina, s . ® Post Office) announces the arrival of 1,000 baskets of
n | “GLORIA MARIA" do not hold That BROWN & WILLIAMSON TOBACCO CORPORATION (EXPORT) tenowned appetite restorer. Bataan/Lks, s.s. Polytrader, s.s. Tel- 1% h, ie _ Ss “SCHIE” t $5 50
17 Jewels Guaranteed | themselves responsible for any LIMITED, a company organised under the laws of the United Kingdom of Great F Combined with bi -build. es Medium White-Skin Potatoes ex S.S. a é
debt or debts contracted by any Britain and Northern Ireland, Tobacco Manufacture whose trade or businest " : ood. er basket of 55 lbs
Y D LIMA | member of the crew of this vessel address is Westminster House, 7, Millbank, nn. S.W., England has applied | ing minerals you have the MAIL NOTICE p § ° ‘
; | hile i ort for the registration of a trade mark in Part “A” of Register respect of manhu- . . i ; i : we
} - e ; oa mee factured tobacco, and will be entitled to register the same after one month from ‘ key to joyous buoyant Mails for _ St Vv incent, Grenada, were J €s HN nN. PEREIR A °
& CO LTD R. M. JONES .& COMPANY, the Slst day of July, 1952, unless some person shal th ¢ give notice health. dad and British Gui the M.V
aE, | LIMITED in duplicate to me at my office of opposition of registration The trade mark r halle be close * ;
oe a Agents [can be seen on application mt may office ; B jm al Pe (COMMISSION MERCHANT)
20 Broad St. and M.V. GLORIA MARIA | é Dated this M3rd day of July, 1952 ait di z DARE ot Rickett Street
i : . 26.7.52~—6n H. WILLIAMS | ° \
y arine araens Re t a) oe fark i z ‘ Mail t
Marine Gard \letinormnepiinniisitaiags® Trade Mark GENERAL. TONIC. Ma
SS 2

dod“

i




FRIDAY, AUGUST 1, 1952 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PACE SEVEN
RR Sec tt ne NO ELE SN NI TT TL TS LS LL SE LT TE Reenter

4
SL NNRNE TR SOS 56559000 LSPS oF vo

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CRICKET

er eee Ht seesne, a noure cage 4 aoitume aera > 4 ~*~, The West Indies in Australia 1951—52

RUSADERS.

By HAROLD DALE

enn

aS














SOMEWHERE ANE
THE NIGHT





FROM BUCKAROO,..IT
UPSET HER TERRIBLY...
I wiSH 1 KNEW




WHAT'S THE MATTER
*) WITH HER,
of te y ANY Way &

Mr. Harold Dale, already known to Millions
of readers for his forthright cricket reporting in
the Daily Express and the Barbados Advocate
adds another outstanding book to our series on
Test Cricket. How would the flashing strokes of
Weekes, Worrell and Walcott mateh up to the
efficient run-getting of Morris and Hassett?







AGAIN AT EIGHT
THE MORNING!



Read all about Your favourite

Would the spin and guile of Ramadhin and

Valentine be more effective than the menacing

Cricketing Stars— speed of Lindwall and Miller? Would the
“stormy petrel of cricket,’ Barnes, succeed in his

GODDARD, ATKINSON, attempt at a comeback? These and the other

questions that spring to mind are fully dealt with

TT in Mr. Dale’s eandid commentary. Apart from

MARSHALL, WALCOTT, detailed chapters on the Test, he covers all the
other important games of the tour.

WEEKES, WORRELL. Few cricket enthusiasts could afford the time

and money to be’ present throughout the “World

re errr pee Championship” matches, Cricket Crusaders is

ce Nr APPA DO 1OW, GOOD WiAN. | VONT te) Yee the ideal substitute for the absentee. Reinforced

YOURE NOTAPRAIDE, Ab Wow

by many splendid action illustrations, it brings @
(OU?
BROUGHT ME.THEY
a
=








at a WHER
a) OU LIVE? :




momentous series right to the reader’s armchair

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i i a le ieee
esas SEE

PAGE FIGHT

OLTMFICS:



Australia and ltaly Share Cy
Farnum 20th In|

Time

Trial

(Trevor Gale reports from Helsinki)

All the cycling events in the Velodrome were com-
pleted to-day and now there remains only the road race
which is due for Saturday. Australia and Italy divided
the major honours between them while the South Africans

were runners up in two events.

Russel Mockridge and

Tone] Cox of Australia were definitely the outstanding

cyclists of the games.

F en Farnurm who was eliminated
in tHe second heats of the 1,000
10°. ?és aa Monday could not pick
lip his kest form and was 20th in
ine tim trial today. Chiefly re
‘poisiMle for his set back in
training has been“a lot of tyre
i‘rortis which kept him off the
woart end track when the finishing
teuches to his training schedule
should have been applied.

For what small consolation we
miy fot out of it, most of the
eve ists and a few managers of
‘other teams think Farnum has a
ood pofential but fs lacking in
~veortence especially in the tvpe
of events on the Olympic cycling
programme,

Time Trial

The. first event this morning
was the time trial. The first four
inc'uding those from Japan, India
Pakistan were very slow, but the
Venezuelan Ituarte Andoni soon
hrought it down to the more re-
snectahle time of 1 minute, 15.4
soconds. Those not familiar with
rh- type of contest. each
nati*tor 3& started solo. and
races against the clock over 1,000
metres,

The fifth man off was the South
African Robinson and he did a
imazing rove effort to slock }
minute 13 seconds for the dis-'
tanee. It had its effects on him
anc he was forced to lie down
om a stretcher in a fainting con-
dition when he came off.

Cortoni of Argentina and Mc-
Kellow of Great Britain came
close to Robinson's time, but it
was not until Russel Mockridge
of Australia cam> on the scene
that it was lowered. Mockbridge, a
bespectacled ex-divinity student,
then ed to beat not only
Robinson's mark but the Oiympic
record as well, and he did it in
much easter style than anybody
else. His time was 1 minute 11.1
seconds.

One before last on the list came
Marino Morettini of Italy who
did 1 minute 12.7 seconds to
come second, The final order was
therefore Mockridge of Australia
first, Morettini of Italy second,
find Robinson of Australia third.

1,000-Metre Sprint

This afternoon in the final of the
1,000 metre sprint Sachi of Italy
defeated Cox of Australia and
Potzernheim in that order in a
three-man race,

Sachi is the present world
champion but it is generally
agreed that Cox of Australia

was outmanoeuvred and should
have been the winner. He lost
by half wheel having to make up
too much” ground in the final
sprint.

Personally 1 think this the most
nonsensical event in any type of
racing _in the world and that
covers the whole field for man
beast or machine. It is the only
vace I know of in which one can
Stand still and get away with it,

The final event was the tandem
2,000 metre race and in_ this
Australia’ met South = Africa,
Mockridge and Cox for the former
land Robinson and Shardelow for
‘the latter, This was another of
those manoeuvring affairs, but
*ventually there was an exciting
finish as the Australians won by
mn inch or two. As I should
imagine. Mockridge will ride in
the sprint in the world champion-
ships in Paris at the end of August
\— the meeting between himself
and Sachi should be interesting.

The other victory ceremony
this afternoon was held for the
4,000 metre pursuit race and this
svas won by the Italian team with
South Africa second and Great
Britain third,

Ken Farnum leaves Helsinki on
‘Tuesday next and is due to ride a
few races at Herne Hill before
returning home. I do not think
Barbados has anything to be

ashamed of and far from being
discouraged next time we must
send not one, but four. If what
I saw here is genuine world class,
then we are well up in it.

Do It Eve



com... ;
me |

i leave for England.

MacDonald
Bailey

@ From Page 1

had particu‘arly asked me for

my views on them.

He said I would have all facil-
ities for coaching in Russia,
“good money” — the sum was
never mentioned—and a comfort-
ible flat for my family,

Fine Offer

It sounded a fine offer.
IT would think it over,

Next day, Chugunov came back
and said:

“My leaders were very pleas-
ed to hear of your interest, But

we cannot give you a definite
offer until we have heard from
Moscow. This should be through
‘at any time. Anyway, come and
have dinner tonight and we will
‘talk about it.”

He called for me in his car at
7.30 that evening. This was the
night before we were due to

1 said

Chugunov said; “Don’t go
back with the rest of the team.
Tell them you are staying on till
the end of the Games—by which
time we shall have everything
arranged with Moscow.”

1 pointed out that this would
be a breach of the conditions we
British athletes had agreed on to
honour. I pointed out the duty
to my wife Doris—she is 24—
and my children, Christine 4,
Robert 2, and the 11-months-old
baby Joan.

And what about them? Could
I not fly back, wind up my affairs,
and return with them? And
what about my book? If it wasn’t
finished soon I could be sued.

Chugunoy smiled and said:
“You don’t understand that. if
you. come back with us direct
from the games it will be a great
propaganda victory for us.”

My family?

“We can discuss that later,” he
said; “and don*t worry about
money. We will settle all your
financial affairs for you.”

Why not contact me with an
offer through the Russian Em-
bassy in London I asked,

“That would not be a good
thing” said Mr, Chugunov. “Es-
pecially in view of recent unfor-
‘tunate happenings at the Em-
bassy.”

We said nothing more. But I
knew he meant the arrest of
Marshall (Foreign Office Radio
operator) and the expulsion of
Kutznetsov,

Doubtful

I had my doubts by this time
but—to be frank—there were
many things that attracted me
in the offer, Security for a sprint-
er over 30. It’s a big thing,

And my host was most cnarm-
ing. “Well” he said, “think it over
Mr. Bailey. Ring me tonight at
my hotel the “Karelie’, The num-
ber is “Helsinki 10016—room 119.”
1 told him IT would ask my team
chiefs if I could stey ch in Hel-
sinki. But I had decided on sec-
ond thoughts that I had to go back
to England first.

At 11,30 I telephoned snd saic
so, He thanked me politely anc
said I might hear from the Rus-
sians over here. And I went to
sleep.

just before 1.30 a.m, I awoke to
hear a voice calling — whispering
-— Mr. Bailey, Mr, Bailey. Ccm>
along. Come with me to the ga.s
of the village.

I was frightened. I was strung
up anyway after all the effort o:
the games. This really frightenee
me,

I looked up and saw Chugunoy
He gave me a parcel. “Here” he
said, “here’s a present for you.”

In a firm voice — I made it
sound that way — I said “please
gO away, I am not going to the

gates of this village with anyone
at this Hour of the night.”
“You must come,’ he insisted
“IT have a very important man al
the gates who can fix éverything
°
Time

Registered U. $. Patent Often

HERE, A ty

HOLES UNG Weve
HAD TO REL HM

seen! BALL
my i2 THES



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

WHITFIELD COPS 800-METER RACE |























IT AIN'T

mh wal Ge ramnri WHO_WANTED
PE fn eS ea Tt ON THE CADDIES
Orn TOO--HE REALLY |

BALL +++ i



. . r

REPEATING HIS VICTORY in the 1948 Olympiad, Mal Whitfield, of
Columbus, O., is shown streaking across the finish line in Helsinki,
Finland, to take first place in the 800-meter event. He tied the record
he set four years ago. His time was 1: 49.2. (International Radiophoto)

Indians Put Up
A Splendid Fight

(From Our Own Correspondent)
LONDON, July 31.



THE INDIANS put up a splendid fight to-day at
Adhikari
(73), Manjrekar (83) and Umrigar (59) all batted soundly

Northants after losing three batsmen cheaply.

so that the tourists finished only 56 behind Northants’
total of 365 for 7 declared.

Brisk batting by both sides will Note? iain sie Sarat ose
be necessary tomorrow, however, Worcester versus Kent
if there is to be any prospect of WEPRMRUET cre UNA Gee blew ss
a definite result, WR eis Ve CeaecasY

Four more points were collected
by Surrey today at Chesterfield
for their first innings’ lead over
Derbyshire and as the home side

Cowdray 95.





ows
only lead by 59 runs with four ¢ .
wickets left, Surrey look set for | By M. Harrison-Gray i
another victory. i Dealer; South $
SCOREBOARD ; Bagi Yas
mo! : N.
Indians versus Northants ; Q7539 i
Northants .. 365 for 7 declared 3 UK 84
Pte ets eere; 309 § g 20 4 ;
Derby versus Surrey : ee ee :
Derby ...... 214 and 140 for6 § . y W, . E i
1 OoK96 o QB i
Surrey rrrpeseretceess 205 § GOQI72 OF :
Gloucester versus Yorks ’ SA65 6Q9832 §
Works... 3% 378 for 8 declared § QS AJ7 @K865 §
Gloucester .. 190 and 132 for 3 3 8.
Leicester versus Warwick 5 9 AJ 104
Warwick .... 126 and 308 for 9 { QAWS 8 ;
Dollery 158 not out. i g f vat :
mn SS ey, Oe 122 The vg i ee the:*Tea ts :
Bannister 5 for 53. bs +a :
No-Trumps play is rarely §
Hants versus Sussex : appreciaced Outside tourna- }
FIQHUE id. vss 233 and 66 for 3 § ment cireles, where it. is
Meee ie ‘ § usually counted as hal &
Doggart 135. § point. In the above dea’
a s each of the four Tens proved
Somerset versus Essex # to be worth a full rick. i
Somerset .... 325 and 28 for 1 § South opened with One };
Glamorgan versus Notts es pir ; eae yeaa !
* oubled and all passed. |
Glamorgan .. 144 and 182 for 5 O2 was led and taken with }
act 3 0.10; South entered Dummy };
; ao nes ang eo o2. one :
for you. Don’t worry. It will be # 'D8 O10. West won and }
alright. Just come on”, i BO ht ‘agar, oes ee ;
I said: You had better go. My ; was virtually sure of his ;
rcom-mate is coming back at any i Sones ; + tori ;
non : " wing to the stopping ;
ae Chugunov left quickly E power of > 10" and 10. i
; ‘ $ East-West cou! y win |}
I bolted the door. I was tremb- $ five tricks in all with z saree :
jing and shivering. I just sat } bined count % 22 agalnat 18 3
Aron i $ (excluding Tens). ast’s |
> re on my bed watching the i penalty pass on a §-42-2 }
door. I refused to open it for } ‘Gistribution would have }
Geoff Elhott when he got back. } Seem mare sot it been |
* i g CK, { been more sound had it been }
He came in through the verandah ' his own lead i
j

window,

“Semeone has bolted the door”
he said. Then I told him ,the
story. Did I tell the British team
officials? No, When we arrived
back in England I told Mr. Crump,
the Team Manager that I was
upset because I had a slight brush
with the Russians the night be-
fore. I didn’t go into the matter
That was it.”

B Jimmy Hatlo | |

SLEEP LA EEEEEELE SSO! SOS EEE ESSE LL ELE LEE ECE CECE Hg

>




“ HE'S THE GUY

y





THINKS THIS IS
SCOT



THE MISERY GUY WHO's |
FOREVER IN THE ROUGH
ALWAYS WANTS COW\PANY<
4 THANX ANOAHWATLO }
HAT TIP TO GOOD ow?



+;

PFPr

\LEAGUE CRICKET REPORT



‘batsmen. were in trouble against had only scored 2 when he was
| Everton’s well flighted spinners. bowled by Bob Banks,
| Four of his 15 overs were maidens,





233 over the ‘hundred mark. As at the race for 1,000 runs, His 839)

343 a-tendance, and Clyde’s
358 for 7 amounted to just over £1. Enfield





cling Honours

Weekes Has Field
Day For Bacup

By ROY MARSHALL

LONDON, 23rd July,

The weather in Lancashire last Saturday was dull and
gloomy, but the performance of Everton Weekes shone
like the brightest surnmer sun.

He had a field day for Bacup against Colne, In Test
cricket Everton is universally recognised as one of the
vreatest batsmen in the world. In league cricket he also
takes his turn with the ball, and with considerable success.
So far this season he has taken 49 wickets at 21 runs apiece.
Colne has full reason to appre- pass the best aggregate for a sea-

ci te his all-round skill. Batting son for a Lowerhouse professional
first on a dead wicket they stayéd of 733 set up in 1937 by former
2 hours to score 109 and all their Lancashire player Len Parkinson, !





Lowerhouse came very near to
j in. defeat. They batted first and after
and he finished off the Colne in gn hour’ and three ‘quarters. were
nings wih 6 wickets in 5 ee a back in the pavilion for a mere 84
este oe m4 thay pens Sree runs. The match had started late,
lett vith on ore eee x Coast and Rawtenstall were left with an
to knock off the runs. Thanks to Mow to make the runs. « smen
a knock of 65 not out by Everton, shown more enterprise, Rawten-
who opened the innings, they did tal) would have won, But only
it with minutes to spare. 22 runs were scored in the first’

He gave a grand display of half hour and the chance of victory
powerful hitting, and despite the was lost. At the close they had
slow outfield, he hit seven fours. scored 64 for 2,

In addition to his performances Central Lancashire
with bat and ball, Everton took fy the Central Lancashire
"2. pat — catches. a League wickets were little drier,

is splay was one of the and most matches began on time.|
finest all-round performances the Frank Worrell ended any hopes of
League has seen for some time. a victory for Werneth with aj
He achieved the rare eet of classic 56 in - or bay
receiving a double collection. But cliffe. Werneth scored ‘or
os ee rae ous his wey. pare bi pe as to get |
ad weather ept the cro the runs, cliffe quic’
down to a mere handful, and for wickets and were in trouble, but!
performances which, on a fine day Worrell’s knock, which included 6,
fe heat oe ict Tk £40 % Be 50 fours, ae org day. At close they |
2roug! e u over ° were or 4,

Rain affected all the matches. Sonny Ramadhin could do little’
Pe ae ve an hour ane a on a dead ulate ase See:
ha . a nm coming Crompton batt and sgored :
down almost continuously since 148 rt 8 declared. Oldham were
Wednesday and was still pouring left 2 hours to get the runs, They |
on Se a eae - ae scored 120, losing only one wicket
cricket would rained o in the process.
gemer. but e ones a oe Sonny had the setintaction “

ith no sun, the wickets remained bagging this solitary wic an
_~ and oe giving no help to in keeping down the rate of scor-

atsmen or bowlers. ing.
Enfield v. Haslingden He made nine runs With the etl

A grand 84 not out by Clyde —one of his best e Ss is |
Walcott nearly Seaton Enfield to season. In spite of “2 o——
victory against Haslingden, It en- total is three more than that of:
abled them to score 158 for five his runs. At present he is lying
declared in just under two hours. second to Eric Price in the race for |
Talnutes and hit eight fours. ‘This 787 cach and Price 98 at 11.34,
minutes ani eight fours. S$ 7.87 each, ani ce a -34,
innings brings Clyde’s average to Frank Worrell is well ahead in





a small is more than a hundred more than
collection any other batsman,
The race for ‘the 1,000 runs in
made a strong bid for victory and the Lancashire League is develop-
Haslingden wickets fell quickly. ing into a race between Weekes,
But they managed to stave off Walcott and Marshall. Everton is
defeat. At stumps they had lcst leading with 797, with an aver-
seven wickets for 65. age of 66.41; Marshall has 706,
Lowerhouse were playing Raw- average 54.39; and Clyde had
tenstall. Marshall, needing 29 to scored 704, and his average 105.7.

Bacup there was only



Table Tennis:
picliianthicians 12 Venezuelans

Leave Helsinki

HELSINKI, July 31.

Twelve members of the Vene-
zuelan Olympic squad left by air
early today for Caracas.

They are flying to New York
where they will arrive to-morrow
and after two days there, they
will leave to fly to Caracas ar-
riving August 4th.

e , s
Finals Tonight

The Grades A and B Table
Tennis finals will be played at
the Y.M.C.A. Naval Hall tonight.
In the Grade A match Norman

vill of Everton will play Roy
Phillips of Pelican.

Gill is the holder of the Island
Championship which he won last
year from Louis Stoute. He has
also played fairly well this seas-
on but it is Roy Phillips who has
shown exceptional form, This
match is expected to be the best

The second group will leave
Helsinki August 4th, To-day’s
group included Eduardo R. Whaite,







UNGUENTINE »

A MODERN ANTISEPTIC

ema Quick Relief from Pain mame |“



FRIDAY, AUGUST 1,

1952







WHEN THE SO0S90000%" g
FINGER~ FIRE MAS THE BARBADOS AQuATIC ¢
CLUB Y

wee es ae? (Members only) é

. SATURDAY oe ANGI ST. 1952 $

N 1 2

FLOOR SHOW 3

DANCE

Featuring the International
Artistes

QUICK

Ser t
CURABELLA
And

ench 1

MON?

e Samba Queen

TUBES or JARS

"o Star



DOSS OH6HH9O0O8GOO4

ee

and His boean Troubadours

ADMISSION to BALL ROOM ?/-
FOSOS SSO

FOSDDIBDODLDOHS SO GH POOH PPS,

«

ERNIE'S :

|
DEMOCRACY

+

2900004,

L.2-2O@S@

OOo



Waen a Girt doesn't want to leave | © : > ;

class—and have to make embarrass- | & CLUB 3 |
4ing explanations—it's Paradol she | — ©
asks for. For Paradol means quick | $
relief from suffering caused by. | There will _/ gnecting $

periodié pains—headache, ‘foo— thi> Lette, one 3 |
without disagreeable after-effects. to ro s’ racing of our %
Ask your druggist for Paradel, oa Se >
scientifically compounded from 4 ees ‘all. my friends
ingredients. The name “Dr. Chase” | % will rol! up. e
‘@ your assurance. 2 |@ There will be the a 2
’ |} Turkey and Ham and Lob- %
DR. CHASE Ss \@ ster Cocktails etc. ete. 2
PARADOL | soldi 3
\% @

@

ODOOO«



OOPODOGOODS
oo

2

«





SOMETHING NEW FOR
THE CHILDREN
IN OUR MILLINERY DEPT

BIBS

PILLOW CASES
DRESSES

SUN SUITS
PINAFORES
BOYS’ SUITS



CAVE

SHEPHERD
& CO, LTD
10, 11,12 &13
Broad Sireet







~



o PSS DOOPDSD SSP PPPS PPP PS SPAPOPPPAPPFE?,

Does your Roof need Painting ? S
%

rHeN BOWRANITE 1
and Forget it %

: *
For the best protection against Rust and Corrosion use %






of the year.

In the semi-finals Gill defeated
Lincoln Worrell and Phillips beat
his team-mate Frank Willoughby.
Worrell, Phillips and Willoughby
are all representatives of Pelican.

Of the B Class pair, Guiler fin-
ished in the finals of the Boys
Championship last year but was
defeated because of his inaccurate
attack. He is a much improved

player this season and will give
a good performance against
Archer.

Special arrangements have been
made to accommodate the large
crowd which is expected to attend
‘the games.

STYLE
WORKMANSHIP

AND

QUALITY
SUITINGS

You Surely Must
Decide on

P.¢C. 5S. MARFEI
& (CO. LTD.

as the “TOP” SCORERS
IN TAILORING.

8

06 FOOSE OSE SOS SOO SSSS SONGS SSSSOSOGOS SOGSSSS HOSE



wrestling coach and team, Ladis-
lao Lazar, track and field trainer
and team.—vU.P,



o
>
Zz
Q
oH

THE TRIO'S DANCE }$
—- held by — %
NEBBS AND THE BOYS %
At QUEEN’S PARK, %

Â¥.

%

TO-NIGHT

Music by The Society Five. 3
Dinner Served x
ADMISSION .. 2

POOLED

SOOPSSSOOOSOOSSOSOOSF





Gums Bleed
leeding Gums, Sore Mouth and

Loose Teeth mean that you may
have Pyorrhea, Trench Mouth or
perhaps some bad disease that will
sooner or later cause your teeth to
fall out and may also cause Rheu-
matism and Heart Trouble. Amosan
stops gum bleeding the first day,
ends sore mouth and quickly tight-
ens the teeth. Iron clad guarantee.
Amosan must make your mouth well
and save your teeth or money back
Sa? of empty package. Get
Amosan from your chemist today,
The guarantee protects you.





Be Youthful, fit
& full of
vigour

Medically seyeorst
Bile Beans bunish

constipation, slug-
i liveri: ish- '





a 8)

ness and other
stomach, liver and
kidney troubles.
Bile renew
your energy and
vigour, give you
happiness, make




Take

BILE BEANS

—much better than a laxative |
cha ienenseteianeeiaedllnemmeitemetamaenamenemmimmaamn

si

BOWRANITE Anti-Corrosive PAINT



GOES FARTHEST — LASTS LONGEST %

One Gallon will cover 700—1,000 sq. ft. %
Stocked in RED and GREY %

°

BOWRANITE is supplied ready-mixed and 2

should be well stirred before use. x

5

If required, a Special Thinners can be supplied %

at $2.40 per gallon.

; ee y
* ‘Phone 4456, 4267. x

WILKINSON & HAYNES €0., LID. :

+
8SS9SSS9SS9SSSSS6969596 95955959 GOOG PGOOOPG POOF.
POGOPS9HO90HOH4'H0HH0HOHHHHHHHHOHHOGDHH HE IHODPOOM,

a

PDLODDIIHHDIDYHIHHHOH HF HOOHIPHIGGH I



o©

An age-old equation on which our costing has been
consistently based. It illustrates three tacts:
One is that of value.

DPOOODLES OOOH DOG 9O9 9099005099099 0G.96-0900000O>,
O96

2

The second, embodied in the text, is proof of

careful buying. $
The third is in the expressed satisfaction of our $
customers who, in turn, have introduced us to $
their friends. $

>

ss 8 3

$ 3
® é
1 C. B. Rice & Co. |
> eS ey Ed & aD. 3
3 Merchant Tailors 5



9O9OSO0OHO-OO



P29 2OV99909-99-904-0099O6-0-4




PAGE 1

PACK s|\ RAKItAIMtS ADVOCATE I IMIHl Al'GI'ST I CLASSIFIED ADS. TFlIPMOMt ZSOB niFn Rt Ml-On Thut I 1.,. M 1 .<„.• Mill V.I.I. LOST A I Ol Ml LOST Heart •-*>-•: Hi Mar" %  A E Le-ai. 1 (t .11 4,3" %  e uaed I AUTOMOTIVE Alt ia Prefe.1 %  F..-.1 In M the 1 %  e~* 11.o) in M. re* good Phe, 31 J -*, n T C HACK TICKET ...I bfl.m v-n Street and VtctO Street Finder klrvdlj NU the Advocate AdverUilng Deperlme %  'i IMII *.AI.I;S < oomiKi %  i "-* Sana a* cm he -een at Rank Hail Road Ph..11* 3*Tt W 1 M T T N 10 M P .n good CMML IUCIKM *t 4 30 %  P|gi.lTL IN MEMOKIAM %  Ttyli live tnrevrt In our heart* w.ivri:.* IIKM' A FEVAIJr BOOK KIIJTR requi^i-d Ledger Balancing oMentlal Applv hi Irtt*r M*t 111* eSperk'fK'e In A II C r 1 :l II 53—1 arNiRAi IKRVAN Good %  *,< %  nnd ar-enre. modal.on Mr Olho DoMiri Pine 111 11 ^ £J SALESMAN H"i Salesman and Ornrrn. Offer Apply Coeli L v.a.-r At Ci Street. Bridgetown *> ; MISCELLANEOUS USED STAMPS Wanted large or luaniitie clean pool %  ADOS and other B W I -In luVlnf price, on amJJ n i'i:iiso\\i. i.-.(.in ale hereto* trat CAJ* ItKI Black Hillman Mini 13.000 -.tart I 1 Hnblnnn. C.at*en llouao. SI Gmrv, Dial 32S4 CAR One Morn* Minor two door S-.li ion in perfect < idltton 1 year old. Owner leaving Hand Phone S4.1* 31.1 M in ELECTRICAL PYX PORTABIJE RADIOS(omMnfd i Hell Contained Dr> Prtf* IINM. P. C S 1 %  M (In FURNITURE REAL ESTATE .. A J^l-T WAT M aB*BtM<.E AT TUDOH STlBntT and the Und o> i eh It standbuilt df .tone and retried if Clalvantae at preeem rrniM •ml .. m><> >a<>i producing an income of 716 dniiai' per annum Suitable lor bond .in enough land to erect more buildingin.pert Ion any dav on application to tenant* The above will be gel up >T MfOOH ..t I m. Dial 7MT ARCHER McKgNZLE ST 1 I* *n 'I'l-MT'lL 0 Camera Spetd O.aphK complete *ilh ID) Roll rtlm ( %  ark. Ill Out Film Holder ..nd 4 %  I Film Pa(h adaptor Baal Offer Phoe •ill 30 J SJ-3T. • %  RIOIITWOOU > I. ur. ..I and It a.m. The above will be Mt up lor ...I. a Public CompetlUou on Friday, (he IMh P %  I aao-OKUnar' Sharet vt H on r... h II, BAPBADOS CO-Oe>rRATWK HANK I.IM1TTJI 40TTLF. AIIOWII A CO.. •eMRahl I 3e~n Yugoslavia And Uv-xico Opposr U.JV. Decision %  -ATIONS. New York. I July 31 Ud YuctMlavu obiect: nuf-idoiy U, havin* thr -. %  '.'Miimiti. #uiii five tt. combal future J. %  I .-. eslabliihed more lhan %  I'M tot the purpose of ip plHMtt for POIHHAI. •Timomir nntl rmlilary step* Xo be uken m .^Ki*ion, It sent letters !., moirt world's fJovernmenlB. decider, to ink Madrid (rovemment what it could do %  blejl %  BeWtfOBI uRBinst all Bgsrir In the event i>f any new conlll.t/ J-w Gornjtl/.-i of Mivi,„ -;iid his Kovernmem could not support an> st**|: which would bifatten participation of Pranco'i Government in the United Nations 1' %  letter was sent to Madrid it should also be sent tn I'I %  si nlsh Republican Government in exile with which Mexico maintains relattV YusTO^lavia supported Mexclo, but nireed with OorOBtanl that then was no need to forctreconrilcrfiTinn vote on the issue. The itljourned without tion an Indication that 'he rc'ttirvi would he sent Madrid.—fl.f. AUCTION I'l'BUf MMHKS M1SCEJ-LANEOUS AI-T'.RR7TBT" CAM POUSH. Th. fim-nord pctertlvr mrtace Imparted by Autobrlte laat lor il inonlha nt rrwro an* 1. ewollent lor Blcycl-i Motor CTl*. Bath.. RHuseraioi*. TUe* Wondctful fir Citronilum etc New •Moment Jut) received HARRISON I>t-I I0B4 lW3n Vuusbnn inee ralrlck %  ai I do nut i.'vaelf mpomih." (or hei or anyone ei# rontrneiini an* debt ot mine i.nleu. r> .1 rlttrn ..idei .1,1111. b m SU JAMES VAU-MAN Welchi.uin Hall. -.1 Thomai 31 1 Bi—In AUTO ACCESSORIES includin* cool 1 'hlon.. uphnlMery reilne. flbre teal irvwrtng. oicen canvaa. chrome whael %  i<> KM heel loveta. aun vlaor. ..•y Ihe Church* nrdrn Mm J T-lino. Wclchoa. Ch Ch up to 3 p.11 %  m the Sth A.iir.i.t. ISM Terraa of appolnlmeul obtalnabU In, the Parochial Treuurtr. JO T.6S-4 NOTICE AWOIMI^IMS CAIB <>X HIRR-Trieo*1 I...I1IIC to know lal WU lii.md ne*. ..llflii.ro OOfl Jt NotSAI r.nilaballe Dial 3in 30 T S-I. FOR RRWT HOUSES MRFIVI 1 r\ ..lie.! HOUO* with 4 lledrr ItereptiMi. 1 riBiit i way 10 beach. Jn -inr^ %  mimim. AND NOW A GAS COOKF.R 'i ll l HO W. HMO OO TO-DAYS NEWS FLASH CYCU ACCE*90R.r5 Incl iilmj lel/W aennato. lamp. (Miller Si Impcal Trichinakm SoluUon lap-rial whole.:e prke riaaMiahtt and batterlea. ich Chalk .7 Ih in.. 1 nrake block* pomp*, nm tapea. Tyroa and tube. Courteay Carafe. Dial 4301. SST.a-an BAWK"r" it a compound CouEh UedareM rn nHlorion • agl >U>T. TluoMtelc 10 r*l*a. OoMl, Sheep. 10* and Ciltle, niada In Ihe wcl H 1 .1 turera. Day Son A Hrwitt KSW.IIT I Til 1 I M 1. loulttiiel lolka n>a*e o I and Ihe right pattern a Aulo Tyre Co oppoalh IBVS Street. nuut Rrrnxs A oiuo Keitir thai thai i-H tii-n t I..H.C it n-rncr In yn.IT kit an* how elTlclriil lo JoinU In leak and unbreakaM.1 11 Pri-'e II M Harrlaon 31 7 si :av .1MI..1' It* I..V, In .tack -Alnlr .. vrtetilarv product for Ire; Sprain*, Muarol... Strain., W.ndK'l .n .1 Honot ..od Cattle Prl 1 hnt KNIGHT'S LTD. %  II TDM New empty 1 ealloi It* -iiitahlr f_i keroeenr oil. elc rh Appli Coorlr.t 0*ine I'l \I.P-I I IV MM. I II TAKE NOTICE lhai the burlnea, of tailoringcarried on bv oiillheame Anielmo DaSjIvn .. ( l L"'".'* G ? rdo DaAbreu at Maihlll Street. Brldcetown. .inder the title 01 '" i 0f P rAbnu Tailoring Co. ha. been di.toivrd b/ mutual rnoaei.t u> from lha am u>v of July toat. and rttirniyii TAKI NOTICE that the '.,,,1 G llhei Aoirlmo I), collect the ooi.tnndmr debt* and aiaeta ild vompanjiunder nnd hv the deed Of dU.oliilip.il Ail peraoni indebted lo thr nald % %  % %  % %  .mI ereht r*Qulr* 1 1 ;rf'^rS*M.^iii' tZrt l '' ''' v "" i* ln ."* .graduate work fltniJIERMR AJSMLMo DnSILVA. irfue I I W 31. Dalhousie University in Halifax In 1927 and went to England for short while. He returned I Canada In 1928 nd has been prartl=mK a! the Bar In Toronto since then He has two brothers in Grenada, one he-ink Mr C. E. U Pitt, a practislnR Unrrister and the other Mr, Ronald Pitt a retired schoolmaster. Mr. Pitt passed through Barbados In 1928 and again I visited the law courts of this island. On both occasions he was intranslt for Grenada ot visits to his mother and othe; lelatlves. I*, who halls from Nashville. Tennessee is a B.A. from Pitt 1 liversitjr and a Begistered nurse from Meharrv Mi-dlcal Coatsfp in Nashville. She also i at tte University of Toronto School of Nursing. TAKE NOTICE TAKE NOTICE CHAMPION flRPORA. TKiN, That TWEl STVUEBAKFR TION, a corporation on emtiin* under the law* ot ih Hate oi Ited Stale* of Amerka. Delaware. Hade or biminea| M/mufatt. COMMANDER THE STUDEBAKRR CORPORA V.imifnrturei. odre.. ia U0 Soi Bend. Stale ol applied lor Ih i o ark in Part -'A" _. Of .tulomoMlea, nnd will i %  ti.trr the ID Indiana. i_n A boo rautratlnn of %  trade Reiiter In ie3 II WILLIAMS Heit.itrai of Trade Matk* month (rom TAII1 US .tnck "Do-D< FT: \N itllNDS—Made i-tui lalumlnlumi A in n led late deliver v \RTAN Metal Company o .' Hi %  l s \l the -,rn* abut and bound and SECONDLY ALL THAT certain piece or pa of land UtiMite al Brighton Road In Ihe pan.ri of Saint Michael -uid Uland ol Uarb.id.ia aforeanid containing b> ndineatii nrment twrntaafld lour tilth" pen dea ,n Ihiiclx. \ ., ,1 latiiivd(n|| on land* of W H Leach nn land, of Blanch Omen* nn landl ol wnr Bla-kett on landl of Maltha llowen ami on i, Pnh.lc Road oi however aloe lha laana >" aa1 d I ; i-" T u fa thai wlih the me MO* go or dwrltln|houe nut all and tkhtular other Ihe bulldln and erection* thereon. UPfBJnT PRICE; atlJOO. 0. 0 Date ol Sale IMh Augu.t. ItM H WILLIAMS. Regl.ti ii-li.-Chaiicri Julv. ItSX. 31 T.U~4n TAKE NOTICE pott 1*4 %  .facluren s LIMITED. .1 rratalrrctl inM i .-. ..i nn n n. ihado*. Xt.-> BB %  1 ..i %  ,.!. nndKetown. ha. Bad %  A -it th-Kitter in reaped I .b.tancr. uoed a. load or aa ingredient* in food, and will lo regl.ter the lame aflei Horn Ihr 3l>t day ol July %  13. unlcaa Borne pen-on -hall in thr neanllme give notice In duplii .i.t it mv offk-e of opposition of *uch rrsnIrati.m The trade mark can be ** %  Ofl ppllcatlon al m> office. iSSrd da,' of July. 1061 It WIU.IAMS. leaflatiar ot Trade Mark* Thai THE OUIANA MATCH i ii-i.inaiiiy. ManulacUirer*. whoae n -.'ir. t u...rgetown. flrili.h Guiana. mark In I'nrt "A" ot Rogliter In i "'•'•' the aame after one month fi peraon *hall In the meantime give oppoalllon of *uch reglMrallon The Dated Ihla Strd day of July. ISBI. ACTOttY LIMITED a (wSJaMsn of smith nde or liiai.io. addn-v. H M a> fil Walet ha. applied lor Ihr niitliatimi of a trade It! licr in duplicate to me nt moffice o* -.iik c*B be seen on application al %  WILLIAMS. TAKE NOTICE KGDL A CIGARETTE. KGDL (Jjamflk. K0DL Australia Is A Country Of Contrasts LONDO.N". Australia is a land oi i .re as modern and bustling as any m lotwin In BW DOS. | <>t Hg vast stretches of "OutOaxk', comprising some of UV nae^t pasture known to iatthmen. -re Mill lo*. icmo'e from developed areas to be even tho."fiuithly mapped. Annum these Outback grazing tracts arc lha rich pli.Kimberleys—a sprawling 250,(Mk square-mile expanse of fertile prairie in the Australian North West. But cattlemen for long found that the stumbling-block ot Kimberleys as a "I" I try" was the trek to the DSStfoM ebbatoir town of Wyndham, lying hundreds of miles away across a barren mountain range. Such a: exhausting trail stripped all th< a Off prime beasts—who had to at least six years old before their stamina was up to the tourney. And. In addition. It means endlejs planning of camps and watering places for di well ** pasturing-halts for the steers. These obstacle* made c ng in the Kimberleys much less attractive venture tl' might appear at first sight i Freight Plane Service ul as early as 1938. men of \ were looking lo the. ski.and the oil refinema means of capitalising the lush Kimbcrley may, Tlu-v an abbatoir, u chilling plant and an airfield on the spot, an freight plane service tu the refrigeration plants at Wynrlham. as the answer. And %  Irheaiasn World War II temporarily forced such plans into cold storage, the post-war years have seen thvai come to life—at Glenroy—at cost of .somewhere around £20,000. Today, Kimberlcy beef Is being flown in frozen form to Wyndham instead of plodding wearily to market on the hoof. As a result of this Innovation. thousands of head of cattle are now being converted into meat destined for Britain that would otherwise never reach her larders. The real importance of the Glenroy experiment, however i its value as a pattern for similar projects elsewhere. Stockmen today are anticipating the time when over 150 such pnli will service Australia's cntlncattle country, each within 3u mileg of a port or nUhoal \ they visualise nearly 100 huge aircraft continuously employed in flying out chilled beef md bringing back stores and equipment for the new rattle stations that such a project would brln,i Into being. The Glenroy success has acted aa a spur to their imagination and they are not likely to rest until such i isgsjaUl hag been Introduced on n trans-contlnriit.il Itjjita Australia's herds already number some 14.000.000 but ev.n Uiff tremendous total Is far f| i axlmuni that the "Outback" rouJd ea-ily support. Now the "aitlemen are siwlnp emDha'icnlly the beef production can be expanded to an undrcnmed of level when the transport are solved. U.K. Warns Egypt # Prom Pace 1 Anyone who says that I am about to go to America. England. Suitj.erU.nd. South Africa, knejvs tniiiQ than I do. 'The only thing 1 nm certain %  boul is that I shall i.ot go behind the Ircn Curtain. "Meanwhile we shall stay on at C*pri. for I have tour chudrsm with me who must be kepi and occupied. We may stay here Icr a few months, perhaps iongtr, perhaps leThe greatest kindness that could now be done to us would be to accept us as ordinary simple p*<>ple We are going to have a littlu holiday and it will be m] ID -pile it true thru 1 have a fortune hidden away. My wife, my baby son, and my three young daughters will Uva si simply. I know some of you niav >-mllt "* nal — ou vou *"V'>"' remember that any man who has considerably less than we haw been, accustomed to having mil himself to be a poor man. J5y very poor standards I know I (i-i •-till to be envied. J hope thai ironi now on it will be envy without bitterness. My wife and I arc not embittered about wh;ii hap i etiod. for we know that c ar' %  Till rich in the many : ( ,. iiolh ha***. The put : %  hiit-. hdasn anxious and dilDClj nit *e have survived them. The newspaper 11 Temp* said King Farouk's abdication was pan of a "still evolving" political manoeuvre and It was likelv ht would be returned to the Egyptian throne -after a few months." It gave ns the source of this In[ormitton an unidentitled Egyptian official whom ii %  (inferred wi'n Fnrouk at Canri yesterday and then 'returned to Egypt. In a dispatch from the Warn] if Capri where Farouk and his f.imily are now staying 11 Tempo quoted the Egyptian source as ivmg that Farouk had been nlived to abdicate because of his •ipposltion to the WAFT) part v." —C.F. Politician Manhandled SHIPPING NOTICES KATHMANDU July 31 r crowd pulled Bish.^ad Kotrala. HresKlefit %  f the Nepali Congress Party from arm -'I a public met ting *tTday and severely Qed him. His wife and three furrner minister; were also Kotrala ol 'he Prime Minister, had come to the mettBCtll polltiI the Kingdom. The rrists rfrosrlost week when • Prime Bft kg Prasad Koirala rejected u directive fcpm n Congress Working Committee—the executive body of die party—to resign or accept u lift of BV for a reconstitutetl .ablnet. Thl Of seven Congf %  pendent' Three ban icsigned. fjamoiv i ad ui. the platform waving black flags and pulled the Coos y a si Psrtj Ptsjgtdent down among them. The : lead later, none being whin the incident occurred. —IF Chances Of Truce Remain Remote PANMUNJOM, July SI. Both the United Nations and the Communists took gloomy views of chances for an early truce in Korea, but staff officers kept today"i coriference m motion by haggling nver changes in the proposed ceasefire agreement. Radio Peiping. the voice of Communist China, joined Bigiith Army Comn-i.irjcii-ic,r .%  ] %  .!I ,i A. v.in Fleet n taking pessimistic view of the prospects for an agreement, but for different reasons. Van Fleet told a press conference yesterday thai he la confident" of ; n armistice than ever berore. His reasons were the Reds had survived a hard ter, and have thinned out their lines making it harder for the U.N. to deliver punishing air and artillery blows at concentrated troops. u.r. .' " H I M t > ROYAL NETOOU-ANDS STEAMSHIP CO. Mil-. I HOI Ft Klll'l MiSKOcilit Aagutt. IBM. u s B')*VMi*K. atii A.igMtt i*aa M S srrgNTOR, SBn* Aua^.t ittf M fy HERA. SRh Aiii.nl 1SU ata WII.I-EMSTAD IH' August. ISM -tlilM. to HiMinii %  %  iw iiir. tNp nsiii-n ut nst : m, Hh Auguat, ItM. -TOR. Mh September. 1*11 -MUM. It> IRIMIlAU a I I HI tl -i nosjcoor. iith Amu.t. lou M S IfPRA lth Reptembei. ItSJ Canadian Natinnai Steamshiiis BROWN a WH-UAMSON TOBACCO CdRPORATION I IMITED. a company organiaed under ihe l>w* of ire IVit.n Kingdom nf Qreal Noithein I ra land | iradr or online I We.tmin.trr Houar I HI bank, London, s V"" • | of manu!!• t.'l B*dl for the r*Cl*ti f.ctured tobacco, and win Da Ik* ItM dav of gill, IPt) in duplicate to mr al can be *een on ,-ipphcalioiat Dated Ihla Bird dai ol July. IM3. A SS§TlTe %  r.ition Tha trade mark H UILIJAMB. tSe ef Trade Mark. 31 T 33-3n fViiBSBln Bl it %  worldF renowned apprtite renorer. I Cornbined with blood-huiidi ing Tiincralt you hare the J^key to jovom buoyant health. P*>* SEA AND AIR TRAFFIC In Cirlislr Bay Scbooner MatK. Cimlmr, Schooner %  BMIOI Ella (ronlta %  eboen' ^"-^"'S' r G aainaow M sch ^Snuth. Schooner 1 ktto a eaaw8*8 "'"'"'"V II LMS Januy, Otilf Barge No 3, M V Terra '•live. Schooner Schooner At 1* Bch Su A.ob*. M V Qlon.. Maria, sr. Carfbbaa, Srhomrr Roaaiene saatavAia Srnooner A.,,,.1,,. H Compim, 4t from t i ...,, %  tier ownrr* Aaaorlauoii Schoonct B roo. si Vinrcni. Anenl* Bchonne' Uner* A*on*tlon r nri-AKTUWta %  i %  ,. -iaii for Trinidad %  'lenrletfA Bar I Seawell '.;;'.;*,'... The MV "CARIBBEE will • ^rgo and Paawngeia fu* Ooininic.i, Antigua, M Nevia an* St Kitt* SaiBng Thuraaay 3l*t ln^ The M V %  • %  fOBIgatA" -illl •rcept Carlo an* l/a*aenaeri for Dominica. Anug.'*. Mont h.nai.d St K.'.tt SBittna End**. Sth Ai^iel. 1*33 SOITHBOINU CANADIAN rilALlJCNGER LADY NELRON CANADIAN CKUISEJl CANADIAN CONSTRICTOR UIIY RODNEY CANADIAN CIIAU.ENOEK LADY NBXaoN •fOBIllllOt Mi 1-\DY RODNEY ABTADIAM ( 1IAI A., '.. ith LADY NELSOK CANADIAN CRUISER CANADIAN CONSTRUCTOa IADY RODNEY CANADIAN CHAI.IJCNOEB LADY NELSON %  alia San* fallo Arrive* Sail* W.p.l.r.l 11. .1!.. it > rWbad.. Barha*.. aa July SS Julv i Am 4 Aug. 1 AUX 4 Auf A-J u AIM 34 Aug is Am U Awl. 33 Au. 3 Sept 4 Sep.. 3 Sept Sep SSepi 17 Sept in s. j' 1! Sept IS Sept 14 Sept Sept 23 Sept 33 Sept Sept C Oct. T Oci. Sail* Arrive* Arrt.e. bar Baa*. RaeSa*.. Beaten ii-.iu. M..I...I 3 Am l AUK H Bug 19 A>.. 13 *W 30 Act SO Aug .?*"" tSepl 14S.pt 3 Sept IB Sept. 10 Sepi Itsapt Matpl nsant 1 Oci 30 Sept. 1 Oct 11 Oct. 10 Or• < Oct a Oct. 11 0*L It Oct. 11 Oct 30 Oct 31 Oct 4 NuGARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD.—AgenU. From till .i.i. a E Jri.kln*. O. Jenkln*. A. Ijicu I. ..ic-amiui, V PoricK W I Hahatrir. P Baker. I. U,J. A Agoitml. K Miirphav, J nutter. V H.xi-, E iiak.n. c Hako g H..*,„, s Coven, p Barker, > C,xfr W Daly. C Ijii-rooh. II Troke lr** m..H.e T K.l^-od. C. Steinbok A H ,Uriel Ci Field. E rioirt. A, Itrid n VMV C ivid. R Field. A lloodaraort %J llindtrlnri. A Jullcn. R Hrnutm. F WenrUtmar. A Wenrrli 00*1 DolhuU. Bad Blacken. R N B Arroyo. P Arrojo u CW. El.. K.-ir H Kl,g. O King Jr J King. A Carrlnguin. p Santelll. L Malngot 9 M r sheHin. Mr K A Morphv, air A Molvui. M i i it.-dinan Mr B St John. Mr B O Davl.. Mi A Clarfcr Mr D II Roaehfnr-| r A M Coopor. Ml* M Coop i tA Ch %  . .' W W Rene. MB* M.idelme B> i Tudor, Mr Cht.ile. Lam Mr I.. S. tine*. M Frederick, F Ftederlck ">'•'"•'. a. n ii i \ I .,rurrto Blra: Ml ItotRart tObnt. Rev OaCoala Hiur ul. Mr Eme*t Banot*. Mr Higaiidi rrii.it. MiJe-n I.,-...,. \|, Andre-Chrlatlne. Ma.l-i lohn Chi I aline. Mr %  .. i Mi. IjinUe Stuart. Ml.. Avl* W.-t rat H i...M II CLormonir. H Donboulay, D Doitbout. T Douboiilay, T Driank. I. Barnard, L Th..„ H %  i.oi.i*>. 1 Ha c: LoukO/, It Marble, A, Mar ble, D TVoke. C. Trokr R Drintuall.l0 John-i>ii Par TNaldad: H Earmon. E llnckiev. L Sharr .it J Lund. E Poater. T. Bernard. R. Ste.it. A Chenn, K Dean. H Roarh I) 0740*1. C Trimlngham Yoongaatka, Saunden --(• i Btlnakrat Michael BenBOB, Michcie llennetl A tfur**, F Jordan. A Crlch, E Clananln. I) Careonln. II Martin. H Xli.K. N Urodtnaw, W i % % %  '. F McKJnnon. A N Hani* 0 Johnaon. W -rhoaia*. E Thorno*. M. Thornaa. A M Btly, S Ealy. T Smith. E Rrtmuder, R Shannon 1 "i toniva >: Payn* C I oufhlla. C. PUgei". D Brubnne. J Brl.bane. S Briaba tM Bynor. M Buelons. H Murpliv In Touch with Barbados Coastal Station CARLE A WIRELESS iWr.t faOBSl %  OWI thei COB no. rornin.1 nic*tr wnh IhI ol lowing *hip. through %  %  -• in.", SS Ak-oa Httnmer. a M..,,,,. i Ionian laadei. *, *. AOuW. %  Moadule, a a. .mite * Buccaneer, at lR *Sj*ggB, ( I'roaptctor. • MercaCavaUar. %  i Covlncta a Crete. %  COBon, B* Rrmi. %  Sunleael. %  Alcoa Cavalier. | > rinnn-iik %  a Columbia Star, a %  Tachtra.. • %  Stoncgatr. 1.0, Eeo Crlitobal. B g a Armeta. a Ecnhelm. a • IVntlrc. B Puerto Rico. • C.eorRe Like*. * Alpha Ku>n. a Vmgua.. a a Afghanitan. • > Pydprctor. .. Florrncr l.uekenbach. a a Palme. S Catllma. B* %  IV t> Altai PunI ccDnccr llooo. a Arne'ta. %  %  vina. • . TilMAIL NOTICE %  C •] ... [i 3 p m on the %  30 m. ai JL uve C IC 6 U TRANSATLANTIQUE s.lliiu. from SouUumplon lo Gumdeloape. M.ttlmlqur. BarlwlM. i rlnld.d. I.. Giulrft, Cnrsrao J..m..lr irnm SouU.Ampl.in Arrlvrs Barbuloa '"DE GRASSB q . I2tb Jut;, 1952 . 24th July, 1952 •COLOMBIE" . Slit July. 15! . Ulh Au., 1952 "DE OHASSE" . 22nd Aug.. 1992 . 3rd Sept. 1952 •Not calling at Guadeloupe SAILING FROM BARBADOS TO I I III.It Wnm BarbadM Arrive* Soath&mpton •COLOllBIE" . 13th July, 1952 25th July. 1952 "DE GRASSE" . 6th Aug.. 1952 .. 18th Aug., 1952 "COLOMBIE" . 24th Aug.. 1952 . Sth SepL, 1952 '"DE GRASSE" .. 16th Sept.. 1952 .. 26th Sept.. 1952 •Sailing direct to Southampton a M JONES a co.. LTD.,— aaaMa '.v,v/y.*A-.v,v.v.v.w/,v, WE HAVE — — III II IKHIIIM. I'AIM al 9 1..10 per Gallon THE CENTRA/. EMPOMUCM Corner Broad and Tud POUND POTATOES EOH THE I'OI'I I \ I IO \ JOHN N. PEREIKA. Rickett Street (East of the Post Office), announces the arrival ol 1.000 baskets of Medium White-Skin Potatoes ex S.S. "SCHIE" at $5.50 per basket of 55 lbs. JOH.X V. I'l It I III I (COMMISSION MERCHANT) Rickett Street ll l ll l l l llll m i m i M .



PAGE 1

1 FRIDAY. UGCST I, 1K2 BARBADOS ADVOCATf. p\r.r Fivr GIRL CHARGED WITH MURDER OF BABY Prosecution Calls Twelve Witnesses Defence Continues Today from Ibc PoUOS Medical Officer, and she Mid she would. Ift lnniss also to.d her that sAc might be charged lor aba the child, and cautioned her. He asked her whether sue had an> thing to MJ i nullunCroHt-examined, he said thai there had been two pn hearing* of the case. tn [ore Colice Mrtgisli I nrWjS 17-year-old Verona Jackman of +mmEJg&S£££mS\ Social Wei/are Child Weeps As Magistrate Excavation Starts bay Nursery Ail riser Returns For Bridge At From Trinidad Awards Custody To Mother imping station To,,,-. !" c, r.. n # .i_ Li %  %  * %  ' istrate Mi. Waiw.vn. Sin* Js di thl .12 3u L 0 60 ?'" fOF lhe '?" r ^ or of an ,nfan to which charged by Mr. Rodder, she is Alleged to have given birth and thrown in a well arrested short iv alM toavl near her home on May 23, started at the Court of Grand rin,k when she was under the Sessions yesterday before His Lordship Mr. Justice G. L. *SSP.<* &*&* +, j^ tres and self help preset* near Jackman said that shortly after 5 a.m. I trotn Mm Doia • ^ Boetei who paid a short la* mflk, The object of the visit was to lu United conduetej of Dontmunlty ef.ll to keep in close contact with the parent* by visits to the home;. holdii g meeting* and information A PATHETIC scene was enacted in His Worship Mr. Excavation in the coral for the classes and lectures when speakH A Talma's Court vesterdav forenoon when a sevenlaunching slope and foundation of era are on hand to answer que*year-old girl wept softly as her mother. K iven custody of "^'^M inch' 10 '"' *** W '" month old and i MaMid order to see irlottf comConductor Hniiiul Taylor. After the Prosecution closed ""its"case and Jackj" 1!" 10 WaJeoti man's counsel Mr P. <;. Smith outlined the defence, it was Ten,n,r >' wno v a adjourned until to-day at 10 a.m. v r*i W Keece> Q-^Solicitor General, is prosecuting towards the well wtlktng uncomsuccessful of which proved* to be 4Ju I?*""' fortab.y and bending over. He ,ii humble bUUdlngfl erected t g-v r %  The Prosecution called 12 witnesses. Their case j$ not reco n,zo whn '' M *i"-i>ll\(T loKtVU'r^llCC that Jackman's neighbours noticed thst near the time of bul on KolnK neatcr he law Iwi eed t.> provide the alleged offence she seemed about to give birth to a i a ? k T n und th e ou "" \ or alr ** dy vw ehilH hut sihr, lui.tnul K-,..,. .1 i_ A %  %  lun ,u %  baby's cry came from under h< disliked being teased by them concerning It skirt. He did no( cussed Use o_30 was veslcrdayYound "gumv The story behind the matter On May 23. shortly after 5 am Crow-examined he too aal I ,nou S h nrrangini for or kicking Mr. Henderson Clarke. was that PiUpatrtck gave up posshe was seen going with a basin that other than the bruises BPH **"* %  roin was drizzling and he ResJdenJ M a na ger to be allocated WC on the 23rd of last month. session of the child when it was towards the well which in 110 such injuries than had hi^r. m. went ba *' k home 1, t • coa, n,i "uinity centre In He was bound over for 12 fix months old. allowing her to yards from her father's home, and marks of violence ^^ returned to the well. He std: id nstrmtton o* "> erthi in the sum of £10. to hve with her father who u now OIK witness heard a baby's crv Dr. z. Skooaoroek th P <.th..r heard the crying, but d inme making designed te keep the peace and be of good dead, and who was the reputed her. Afterdoctor to give evidence concern** anything. mmunity Ul hehavloui by Mil Worship Mr husband of-the foster mother rg Jackman and the child, was Jackman asked him if be HOM m.-ke lull use of the centre, ?. L. Walwyn, City |"ol,ce M.igisoui there to tell llai Oil bi he replied that she haii Il„>h,l,l hv lhe MaRislrale took her away from her footer ^HV „, n lLr ,hrX n*U rh,, S cd Ira. lhe roll .1 5. ,.* tuotner with whom she had lived lor six and a half years Electric Pumping Station witn of four years. When His Worship ruL*d lhat the child be returned to Orandview and llnltons Rcser_. „ .__. .. lhe mother *. .tOod ,n tb. dock with ,he woman who had J^ SKrCKL JSZT"" STuSS^SUi &S?££, reared he. Ironi six months old. and refused to be scpar"£ eh,"} knj'nw? oi the %  l 1 l ""> nunw. Thirty live chilated. The imither went 10 the dock, and taking her bv lhe WUIPIWorks DapartiiMiil 10M iho Uren have h**" registered and hand, pulled her awav, while the child soboed and cried Advocate yterday : The several receive attention at intenrab . ..... .... p' ' <> %  > "< a '' %  *•* h> """r,?,. *• y r* r T , d ate ,h "r The mother of the child. Joan arrived from the United Kinsar l2 haol** n residence. A stock ntipatftck. brouf^t a CM againit dom in bundles, wore fiven ?' !" > *'•> material is kepi on the (orter molner, Violet lie r a i erection in lhe supplier enhand and help has. (ram lime to Wary, charcing bar with unlaw^neerlnn workshops In Glasgow, fully detaining lh,cluUl. Cloila, They are galvanised 10 withstand since May law wilh Inlent to decorr o,lo„ due to salinity In lhe \ I SI 'i COWARD, a 'bus prlvc her of the possession of that a [ r onduclor. on lhe raotof omnibus child. time, been gi the district. .'en to argent cases in Subscriptions As it Is proposed to launch the bridge which weighs 18 torn complete unit the gully £" lawl ,. th. J ^ ,,i tvhen he went wards, a baby was taken out of the well by the police, and the alib of the opinion that'jack baby and she were taken to the had recently delivered Medical Offlcernd then the when he examined her Poll Hospital, Medical evidence is that 23 ^ui"" 1 reoPntl >' iven b r"* 'o a Cross-examined. child. chill M.o was not expecting a baby, but ahe threw the babj _aid that he would tell the woild Ha •*•! During his outlining of the case, woman ZlSt \%*>>l ,^'" ia ^ an d to,d J hi 2 dax \f^ r "'" *^en ho Mr Recce told tinlum n.-,,r. ,, m ." c lHbour P dins and returned ho did not LMU ajn tcmion'h^'to^o'proted '"l", %  „! %£%£*% JSLTt 3S ">>"" %  M h < ^'" lion could be proved either by t*3i^rlld fifor? ril. £S yl "',M """ """ lnE ,r ""' "" words spoken b, the accused, or and bystanders heard A peSoT, —" %  \, w'' .. C ^ir,^"; C "li he !" "' Within about nve yards from then .hey had to make a,. m(erwould hear S cry.^Ca' m': tie further might hear it too. heh. I W.il.v.n (it %  kacUBMd tvHJ d'ward was alleged BugU Inkicked Mr. Clark Was Present He was there %  Into the well and returned baby. Craw.-cxan.inrd. M Ml when he first suw Jackm. not so dark. He was "rP'"" %  "> cert.mi whether the place ol I'" 11 • from the circumstances. And toe lne d m' "" ,mS inthc ca5e be b"' "Ch a cry was weak. beM^cetertSe: ~^^^'^ On the first occasion, the Police m ilUon m abOUl " V l " clothing Jackma, iAfrT.V'r' Rudder, dcAudrey Pencheon, sister of the U< 0i 1 ,ln ss Ul %  ">*h*own. The a^SL? 01 P n '"? f^" case had General Hospital g,,ve Tv.de < v """'"' h "' % %  "'"" i > • *•" ^l^ f, hS t0l !L andf !' ,,C h 8W, M ,n 'Oman's'hJng h ou gh< 'ut IS I. %  • tZ ^Tf.r* tH" ' a r 'l ^ 0f,e to '"c hospital on May JJ On hi s replying that he cou'U Police M M S?te Mr P t^l wT r G rtr d c "•• "urS of the not remember if he had l !"!" Hv££lw&WlT$i' Crtfneral SSSfl, matermtv Miiglstrate Mr. K ever, their opinward> corroborated Peneheon's had not heard the crying earning ridence. and identified the from between Jackmin. !. clothes Jackman had been wear. Mr. Smith told His Lordship th.it %  £; he was going to put in walcott' the effects of the birth and was -hV^'iSl^r^ie.* 11 '' Mid ""*' evidence before Mr. Ruddt MM IM i,.„„..,„,.,! !" v_. ""*. nn l given evldem V %  Board tin hi nf whether their schem' ,jri which Coward was work ,., ., t<> travel from Roebhck Sti extension of dwellings; ft %  i the s\i,,ar belt Might be combr Dor assistin them on the home making side. e.g. in the platuiin,: f well designed and smokeless wajfll Utehte* conveniently equipped ill.if low cost, if Held workers In the th.u sugar Induitry are mainly Bast i>_ Indians, this would present Iv the Of life and At the death of the fiither, th natural mother churned the child. to have ""d ahe alleged that McGcary his cheat '. en>sct *. ,u i' vc U P poasesalon of after It has been assembled on th south bankTthat is My Leeds Hill side, considerable forethought and preparation ure nccessan to cnure that lhe operation procsr^dn %  moothl. erectioi iCtattOB is run by voluntary subscriptions from members, individual efforts of memwitbout reference to the Association, soliciting donations, public functions and raffles. Through the efforts of the commiltte .,nd others interested i >.rfittha lattei Inmrded the bus 'he child. Hll Worship in ct. saying I want my child, she Is miw.'' opposite the Globe Theatre. I ome into the Citv. l>r R. I* Renwick gave evidence .is to the extent of the nmirv suffered by Mr. Clarke. Mr. Clarke asked His Warship McGcary In answer to Ilia to extend the leniency of the worship said she had two chllCourl to the defendant and addr of her own. one 22. and the montahinf the conductor His *her IB, both of whom are workWorship told him it was a verv '"*• serious offence. He told him that When Mr. Talma asked the In MOW (if the f;i,-t th.it Mr "*''* 'f he would go with he %  enli-ic ln.nl' them." ... _n effort to havo He said that there was litlle to the matter fettled amicably, adsee at present but the planning of, vised the mother to allow tho and preparation for. the launchchild to spend periods at both tng are absorbing considerable homes, but the mother refused, time *t the wveVwT wr ""o of " %  • 'hildi." take up satisfactorily the J"" P^ [L2S Few Vessels in Carlisle Hay ion that mattered. He added that if thev fell that the child had been killed by Jackman while she was suffering from Carlisle Bay t Sar^h* begied"^ "mm. he "'"'"or. she J^ook b* head, -"nd rou It i %  li r Ke-t*ri Mel Miss rbsflnnd vebicta, and you should be *.?*. 'his other womnn. (M-A contact cmirtenus to people whom you Ian bacember when the parents and children were tn-ated to light refreshment and each child was presented with a little gift and garment. On a visit to the Nursery 'he "Advocate" was impressed by the restful atmosphere prevailing Work of this kind calls for consistent and constant effort. If the helpers, both local and abroad, who have assisted in 'his venture were to continue in this faith, in years to come the New Haven Association would be Justipractically fled in having launched out and perhaps spread their good k in other districts. nuking .pecial problen tt %  |n| 1 r PA.O. who I rrlnldad for the not in her normal senses, would be infanticide. thiii Dr. Edmund U Ward. Police Mtdical Officer of District "B" said that about 8 15 a.m. he saw Jackman at his office and also a new born male child which was alleged to have been taken out of a well. The body of thec*hild which „ about four hours old, was About covered with blood, gi Wounds on Baby %  *.w.4 I %  I meanLn the revision of tl.il tome 'i Si % %  I.... Cuiricu i ,\iiLioerson also mei the Com mlttee which has been n for orgenltlng thn y hearings V DisTric, ^r cd ^"" ^ *^Z n lu DaO ,. ,,'n.s ESitJSraC "" ,h '' " t n,1,,K Proteatont position. cans, Non-Conformi When he had Bill U leventh D Knew Accused Pregnant swn J-'" ; <>n an ne ll ,, %  one to her p because he thought that Whoever .is well as some organizations such Edna Weekes ol Hanson Tenit was had wanted assistance. bu1 M .then' Union and tb antry said that she knew the when he went near her ft] :cused while she was pregnant. XA id nothing to him he on in I useful work in %  clock on the morning .(,ot she did not wish assistance, high-lighting the Impoi rent inhive to serve. In future your onduot must i-e such that you i %  vi' the puhlic well." FINED FOR EARLY POSSESSION OF SEA-EGGS Brie Harrl Village and Lawsou Cirri ngton Trot man Of inquiry Adjourned twice, before C W. Rudder and herore Pol -Magistrate C. I,. Walwyn. nnure. ,,|r May 23. she opened a window "ft e "had"seen ^ tat tali I I] Ufa iLTrlt'? 8n ^ fallow hollow below the well for und saw Verona Jackman going 1V( r< lint t ,,,,, n lt ht *)] „ „. Albert Small of Hanson Tenantry said that about 5.30 r. m o„ T Eu^ruriw„ 5%WWB & -aj-Li-! and a half inches long; one on the si* basin in her hand. (witness* then went was suffering from cold posurc and was moaning. heart beat was weak. He sent it to thehospital. "'7* <* St. Innlss he ESr'i i Z ^3 examined Jackm'" **' l "> —— %  -J npileated by pneumonii left lung. of tb* The Trinidad Govern inert h,ausked the Trustees of the FuilIth bright Bchcma i RC A %  uw% w !" step forward m the teaching of ISou.'"^".^'*.' anl " i""!' waTis t^'weT, and hearr, chS " ' """" n K oettlcoS 11 "" "" """" and " *" '>'"• *' win'near m aTk Jf J" • fJJ '"" •" J> f hi. ..„l„.,i !" k. """>•* !""", %  Ha iieard a baby Alphonzo Wa coll was >In, in a ^ Economic. Ihroughout •.', trom his examination, he was rrv(nff m the well fairly loud tone ol VMM thai rn i onv ol lhe opinion that Jackman ha:' Jackman bad tbrown lhe baby <01 n >recenlly given birth to a child, not When the police came, he was into lhe well. -^___^^_ more than six hours. lowered down in lhe well, taking P.C. Evettan Sally *0 • un the tallowing, day. he pera crocus bag with him. Frogs duty at the hospital when Jackxaminatlon were down ihcic and also some man lo ;d Sgt. Innias that lb had ihly pulled "pond' „„thmg lo say, gave evulr — removing lhe grass. conC e r nlnk (hla. inlant who was lying s „. K north Innlss was the la,t grass. He had seen llnm ,„ glv cvlrt ,.,,., the well, hut none uMn[ ^J^,^,. evidence conearning the blood around the well end Jackman's home, and discussed the matter but later returned lo the Court. Mr. Tdni.-., commenting on the INyriRV into the circumstances case, said there was one snag. )i( surrounding the death of fortyTo the mother he added, "ICKHIiceti Anglioeven-year-old Edward Crichlow ly. you are entitled t. tb.clnl,i. IsU Canadiiu ,,f Sherlxnirne. St. John, was bebul the child does not know you. gun and adjourned hy Coroner It would 1* very hard on the Mr. H. A. Talma yesterday after child to be rooted from MM pej medical evidence on the port son whom she has known god M mortem examination was taken, giver, to another whom she d.K-s r her and Uu -, w. A The, tytltev, thai the Mrln ^on*""'" " ,h ,ath "^ know A child is nut like ft instant. dog or a cat where you could say. Crichlow died :d the General 'turn it over.' F.ven rats and dogs Hospital on Tuesday morning 1 have n certain amount of onYellmi four days after he was injured f r jhe people they know." civ in an accident between a motor k ; cycle and a bicycle on Wilson hnlitled legally Hill. St. John. "Althougn you are entitled to I)r J A Hrowne, who did the the child legally, yet -from lhe aatop>v. told the Coroner's Jury standpoint of equllg. separation that death was due to perltODltH fronj tho person for whom she of the abdomen, following two has affection will not help her. ruptures of the small intestines This woman (McGcary> has the not know — other wI>ni. %  Geary) as Its mother." and h^ The lower wharf however wai suggested that the inoihei anang.. f m | y ..cltve. Motor Vessel for the child to spend periods nt -,i„drif priare /! continued to iiih homes lllkp hvr loud at moUllttrH whl|o --on..,.^Ki.T-h^^ ,"' '^" ,e Sc;,oon Rosarenc unlmided Halls Road, were on Weririesday .Chambers where he wood nnd coaL |jg h ters weie .„li im.-l 30 t. be paid m 1* I I'.U.M" 1 1 1 " 1 { lo-uV before His Woiship Mr. C. L. Walwyn to atripping her three and a half real old daughter naked, heating bei. and [Hitting her to stand in th H. coinaiun rrtved from Mt I^ucta on Wednesday This vessel also brought W cylinders of gas and lib packages of fresh fruit. Schooner Beluu en, which arrived from St. Vincent the Ml _^—^^~— day, brought 688 bugs of copra for t rM io %  cprrn THirKFN dos Cotton Factory i.rd. rOUR LLOUfcU *-HIClS.tri It al'o had in Its hatches arrow,-,,„,. „ ,. root, pigeon peas, peanuts, v.getap,|^ cU ^ v <, 'V2, n d V% bles. cocoanuts. fresh fruit *qd ,^ t ^nurlegge? 1 chu k! ." %  ;'' ,r . _. the Advocate's KlUjrlal %  ". ','' tmlmdMM Two feet were .(ulla normal but the other two were whe*i> Jackman lived. mlgh* h>-e been using the well and he"could have Men the bot. as a latrine, ton, of the well. The grass wan Blood on a track at the side of spread out at the bottom, the house, was covered with marl people had been about then.' but penetrate*! the marl. that morning but he did not see The Injuries the child had BUSanvone look inlo the well. tamed could have In-en caused by tenants of the district were i 1. '"IS wel J in •"•* habl1 f 'hrowinn grass No Mark*, of Violence lhe well. chSX-rnTKn^rd'^'here b.^aS^.'^'Stlf.] K £jj^ toT* !" ^ J gg were no mark, of violence, such not sunloent to cover the whole deposition, or ,. < %  %  •""' %  '" • ';'"". who had a. attempted strangulation, upon bottom. lo lhe,,.. laid he I I I net dam ' 'It. ^ cpl. < harle. rearing, one ot the eculion. said that he had own Certain depositions he had, were police who went to Hanson TenMr. Smith Speaks given him by Mr. Iteece .nice the antry on the morning ol May 23. Alter the Prosecution cUwd its his daughter to carry it out for llrjl preliminary hearing. said that blood stainwere .,lon:l e,,-. Mr. Smith reminded lhe him. Here Mr. Re,ee observed that T track leading from lhe house jury that the case bad r the witness was giving medical where Jackman lived, to a well preliminary hearings testimony and Mr. Smith said he nearby. At the request of lhe Solicit..;the Sell A-sOClatlun Ceneral. His Lordship recalled some of the v. %  • I ull • „ whether the depositions had been The law Ml .hown to them. 'ion's dutj Walcott. Small, Weekes and Court ail %  -nit lo tna asked Whall ..nowii by than <' %  situated near the chicken's tail. The chicken was halchr on Monday, The egg. from which the c icken was hatched, was larger •han normal. Up to yesterday the chicken was still iilive Theatre Roof Collapses hlld'a affection wh'cb you have not gut. The child does not know you. Although you are her mothe--, you are .nil a stranger, and you have not got her affection." Admitting thai he did not know what to do. His Worship told thd mother that the only way out of it was "to wean the child gradually. To uproot her from her lim in inr Ike .. tree, will le %  the child." Mr. Talma, added. The molhn was emphatic lhat %  he trailed her child, but His Wot i ii asked "Why did you ever allow hi i to go with her father? Why did you not keep her* It is nlv now lhat this woman has had all the trouble with hei,. now that she hi. |>j.",ed the worst, that you are saying "I want my "Yes. legally you are entitled to the child, hut morally you a not entitled to her. and you should take lhat into consideration. Is It that you really want your child. or la It that you are only trvin to "spite this woman? His. Worship added, "if you had done your duty to the child, you would have had her affection. As it i* she will be hostile to you, i'iid you will not be able to discipline her, and lead her. Now. it Is more difficult." %  After an ..djourninent. His Worship summoned the' Probation Officer and discussed lh> again in Chambers. Ori returning lo Un court, he the child be returned to the natural mother i ** Mf+d j AUSTIN, Texas. July 3! A section of the roof collapse* 1 Took Child From Well was not questioning the doctor integrity but the question war necessary to the defence. A man named Charles Carter Dr. T. J. Gilaaore. medical was sent into the well and practitioner who examined Jackbrought up a living male childman and the child on May 23. c.*, Inniss aiskvd Jackman who ntly giveJISM V..HI she bad birth to a child. was seen near the well if shr would consent to an examination NUT CREAMS TODAY'S ,£ SPECIAL KNIGHTS PHOENIX & CITY SODA FOUNTAINS. and the that witness left out Ul explan .Poh.e Magistrate in the find intx help the Court tre owner said 92 children and 32 hearing two witn'-ss. wh had in administi ring justice. adults were in the theatre when given evldenee (he Bl When hearing continue! today, :t.'.-foot section of ulasier fell wilhnot called. 'he defence will call rHtM I "ut warning.—1".r. AIRWEIGH LEnER SCALES Complete with M.P. Weights — I aaa, Only S6.44 each HAND TRUCKS 2 SACK CAPACITY ilest Knglish Make iiilh Kuhber Tyred Wheels with Plain Iron Wheels $52.42 t.'lKkll •Olt I AT SViNTIIEIK CHAMOIS LEATHERS THEY NEVER BECOME SLIMY Wei .r l>r\ the> un nlwayi *oft and pliable. Last longer and become even heller with use. They are ideal for t let nin| MoiOf Can, I'aniiworli. Glassware, Windows. Mirr


PAGE 1

HAOK KIC.HT BARBADOS ADVOCATE FU1DAY, AUGUST 1. HU OLYMPICS: Australia and Italy Share Cycling Honours Farnum 20th In Time Trial (Trevor Gale report* from Helsinki) All the cycling events in the Velodrome were corn |ilotel to-day and new there lemains only the road race : vhich is due for Saturday. Australia and Italy divided irtc ma)nr honours between them while the Souih Africans v/ere runners up in two events Mussel Mockndfle and la.iml Cox of Australia w-'re definitely the outstanding cyclists of the game*. .VHITFIELD COPS 800-METER RACE / A. ict* CRICKET REPORT %  %  in i.w ipcand heats .f .the 1.000 \ n <\ pick %  % %  • irni trial today. ChMb t... i .. lit of tyn; 11 %  ' %  %  -n off Ihe track whan tiv i mining schedule i-tiMuM bawt i aea pphed. F..r what vmill consolation wc f il money" the sum w* %  few m-mnefT* of 'i' v, i i t u n Uo n ad .-ind n e mu Ha | 1 flat for my family. -.ii >' .. i ine in Kinc Offer it Mundad %  ana offer. 1 JUMI 1 I would Think it ovn Next day, Chununov came back and said YlaeDonuld Bailey at From r* i i.4ii aaiHataili asked mi my views on thi-in t Would havo all facilItiea lor coaching In Russia. WoaTnunnie. Time Trial Tha first event this morning %  .me tn.l. The lint four %  II nHintt those from Jtipun. Indiii ''.ikntan were very slow, hut the in Ituarte Andoni BOOII I ii.uah* it down to the more renetiiMi time of 1 minute. 15.4 Those not famlltfir with %  *l l>Te of rontesr. each ram. %  %  -• "oi h "'i' -• ,l anH *>• I the clock over 1.000 The fifth man off was the Soutrfl sf i' i !!>•'; >id he did -i f %  Ing nil-out effort to • 'ot ,a i m'mite 11 seconds *-r Hie dis-f i IPCC It had i's effects on hlm| i"i(' he was forced to lie dowt I %  Iratehar in a fainting eon-* ditlon when he came off. M of Argentina and McKellow of Great Britain came close to Robinson's time, but it wik not until Russel Mockridgc ele. Hit time was I minute 11 1 %  erninda. One before last on the list came Marino Merettim of Italy who did I minute 127 seconds to roma second. The final order was therefore Mockridge of Australia flrtt, Morel tin i of Italv second. hnd Robinson of Australia third. 1,000-Metre Sprint This afternoon in the final of the 1.000 metre sprint Sachi of Italv defeated Cox of Australia and Potzernhrim in that order in a three-man race. Sachi > %  the present world champion but il Is generally UKTcctt that Cox of Aush.,1, was outmanoeuvred and should have been 'ho winner. He lost by half wheel having to make uti too mucif'' ground In the final sprint. Personull) I think this the most rtonsanalcal event in any tvpe of racing Iq in. world and that novel in,whole field for man boiisi or mochiiH'. It ,t the Mil] race I know or in which one can (land still and Bet .tw.iv with it The unal event was the tandem 2,i>00 metre race and in this Australia met .South Africa. MiK-kridae and Cox for the former and Hobtnson and Shardclow for ,0 England firs:. the latter. Tins w;is another of ..,.-„, . thON manoeuvring affairs, but Al ,," 3 ? . 'l< plmru ,1 eventually there was an excitini! *; th.nkud m politely alii flnlsh as the Australians won bv "W I might heir from the Ru n Inch or two. As I should "I 81 ov her Ami I went I i imagine alockrutgc will r.de in u fPfc ihe sprint in the world championJ u t berorc 1.30 am. I awoke to ships in Paris at the end of August hear a voice callnu the meeting l-elween hlmsell ~ Mr. Rallcy. Mr Ralley. l'< i-i %  and Saehl sh.nilrl be interesting. along Come with mo I. i 1 The other victors c-ermon> ' the vtllaie. ihi' afternoon was held for the 1 was frighten d I sra 4.000 metre nursuit race and this "•.is won by the Italian team with Kt second and Great Hritain third , I looked up and saw Lhugunov Ken Farnum leaves Helsinki on He gave me a parcel. !!.,,> he next and is due to ride a %  *. "here a prstnt for you." few races at Herne Hill before In Urm voice — I nude It Returning home. I do not think sound thai way — I said "p'easi Barbados has anything to be k"> away. 1 am not g >m to the ashamed of and far from being gat's of this village wiih anyone tlid next time wn must at thi* hour of the nig!it nd no', one. but four. If what "V, u must iom< %  I,. i ... %  I saw here i* genuine World cla**. 1 h ve I very impor'.nnl man .ihen we arc well up IB It, 'he gates who can ft* ei rytt leaders were very picasi.l to hear of your Interest. But we cannot give you a definite iffer until we have heard from Moscow. This should be through 'at any lime. Anyway, come and have dinner tonlfht and we will talk about it." He called for me m his car at %  .30 that evening. This was the | night before we were due to \ leave ha England. i Chugunov said 'Don't go i back with the rest of the team %  Tell them you are staying on till L the end of the Game*— bv which I F time we shall have everything | arranged wrt/\ Moscow." I 1 pointed out that this would P be a breach of the conditions we British athletes had agreed on to honour. I pointed out Ihe duty to my wife Doris—she is 24— and my children, Christine 4, Robert 2, and the 11-months-old baby Joan. And what about them? Could I not fly back, wind up my affairs, and return wiWa them? And what about my book? If It wasn't finished soon I could be sued. Chugunov smiled and said: "You don't understand that if you come back with us direct from the gamci II will be a great 1 mpaganda victory for u." My family' 1 Wc eaa discuss that later." he said, "and don't worry about %  may, Wo will settle all your llnancial affairs for you." Why not contact me with an offer through the Russian Embassy in London I asked. "That would not be a good thing" said Mr. Chugunov. "Especially in view of recent unfortunate happenings at the Embassy." Wc said nothing more. But I knew tie meant the arrest of Marshall (Foreign Office Radio operator) and the expulsion of Kutmctsov. Doubtful I had my doubts by this time • ut to be frank—there were many things that attracted me In the offer. Security for a sprinter over 30. If a big thing. And mv host was most manning. "Weir he said, "think It over Mr. Bailey Ring me tonight at my hotel Ihe Kar.in" The num. I>er i %  Helsinki Iniilri %  ,-.,,, 119 I told him 1 would ask mv team chiefs if I c. old ..t. 1 HI in 11.1Miiki. But I had decldid on well thoughts that I had to go back Weekes Has Field Day For Bacup flHGER'FIRE JOUCHCS YOU/ UNGUENTINE QUICK A MODERN ANTISEPTIC TTTBES or JARS By ROY MARSHALL LONDON, :rd July, The weather in Lancashire last Saturday was dull and Hloomy. but the performance of Everton 'Weekes shun..' iike the brightest summer sun. He had a field day for Bacup agains, Colne. In Test cricket Kverton is universally recognised as one of UM nMtflM batsmen in the world. In league cricket hi ilM lakes his turn with the ball, and with considerable success So far this season he has taken 4H wickets at 21 runs apiece l c.ln,. has full ifuson lo uppu|j.i*s Ihe bvsl agimilg l.n w Ml all-ruund skill. Halting son for a Lowcrhousp professional ...vt on a dead wicket they stay*:! "f 733 set up in 1937 b> former 12 hours to score 109 and all their Lancashire player U-n Purkiiua.ii. b.d.imen were in Uouble again>t had .wily scored 2 when he was Ev.rlcn's well rliKhted spinners, bowled by Boo Btflkf, r..ur of his 19 overs were maideni, i->^!* ou c ""\ „ v y "?".' 0 t and he finished oH the Colne In*'''•< %  r <"" b ?"* <1 "rst and .fter t on,-, wiU, 6 wickets in 5 over, ,t f"^Z',i"i 'T n TrT !" Z'Z •is*-^, ,VTi were -c-^3".;; g3fB 'A 1M tfSSVSSiT w h '" ...knock off die run* Thanks to |)ml |heir inj{ hltUmm .. knoeJl of 65 not out by Everton. Muwn more enterprlae. Kawtenwho opened the innings, thoy did gUlU wou i d have won But only it with minutea to spare. 22 runs were scored in the first He gave a grand display of hJ if hour an d the chance of victory powerful hitting, and despite the was lost. At the close they had slow outfield, he hit seven fours, scored 84 for 2. In addition to his performances Central Lancashire with bat and ball. Everton took In the Central Lancashire two grand slip catches, U-ague wickets were little drier, Hi* display was one of the an d most matches began on tlme.i finest all-round performances the Frank Worrell ended any hopes of league has seen for some time, a victory for Werneth with a He achieved the rare honour of classic 56 in 70 minutes for Radrwatvlng a double collection. But cllffe. Werneth scared 190 for 6 due reward did not come his way. declared. With two hours to get Bad weather kept the crowds the runs, Radcliffe lost quick down to a mere handful, and for wickets and were in trouble, but performances which, on a One day Worrell's knock, which included 6 would have reaped £40 or £50 fours, soved the day. At clone they bn light Everton Just over £2. were 128 for 4. Rain affected all the matches. Sonny Ramadhin could do little Many started over an hour and a on a dead wicket at Crompton. %  ilf late. It had been coming Crompton batted first and acored down almost continuously slnee 148 for 8 declared. Oldham were Wednesday and was still pouring |<-rt 2 riours to get the runs. They on Saturday morning. We thought M ored 120. losing only one wicket i cricket would be rained off altoj n the process. irc-ther, but it stopped at midday. Sonny had the satisfaction of With no sun. the wickets remained bogging this solitary wicket nn.i damp and slow, giving no help to | n keeping down the rate of acor-i latsmon or bowlers. j n g Enfield v. Ilaslingden He made nine runs with the be*. A grand 84 not out by Clyde —one of his best efforts this Walcott nearly carried Enfield to season. In spile of this, his wickets victory against Hasllngden. It entotal is three more than that of abled them to score 158 for five his runs. At present he is lying f7J>. Manjrekar (H.t) and Umrigar 159) all batted soundly declared in Just under two hours, second to Eric Price In the race for so that the tourists finished only 56 behind Norlhants' Clyde batted an hour and fifty ihe 100 wickets. Sonny has 87 at minutes and hit eight fours. This 7.87 each, and Price 93 at 11.34. innings brings Clyde's average to Frank Worrell is well ahead In 233 Over the hundred mark. As at the r.\cc for 1.000 runs. HU 839 Bacup there was only a small is more than a hundred more than 343 a tendance, and Clyde s collection any other batsman. 358 for 7 amounted to Just over £1. Enfield The race for the 1,000 runs in made a strong bid for victory and the Lancashire League Is developIlaslingden wickets fell quickly, ing Into a race between Weekes. Tut they managed to stave of! Walcott and Marshall. Everton Is defeat. At stumps they had lest leading with 797. with an overmen wickets for 65. age of 66.41; Marshall has 706 Lowerhouse were playing Rawaverage 54.39; and Clyde had tenstall. Marshall, needing 29 to xored '04. and his average 105.7. •Can }# a bid me g Paradol tablctl" $p THE BARBADOS AQUATIC j CLUB iBasaaHM aasii DAY Snd AL'Ol! %  r f as e xi iLOOR SHOH DAM I n i BAI l *1uM -/ %  todocx •••<* a %  %  • %  MIMMHIU \VnN ACISI. doesn't *.int to leave class—and have to make OWSUTOM. •ftf explanation! -ii' Paradol %  ..<• BMVS (or. For Parade! meann quii-t rrltef from MiAVruig cauaad by periodic paifi* hi-uilaciV u.iout duagrrrablr after-effects. A.It your druKiti*t '*" P-i'adcl, aric.-itiftcally comrx.unded from 4 ingfrdirnts. The nanir "I>r Chase" •* your auurance. DR. CHASE'S PARADOL ERNIES DEMOCRACY CLUB There Will be mretoiji Dln| St a P-Iti -liiri' to dlsru % the First a-d Srciiiii Days' raelm of our AuKtisl mr?'.. 1 hope all m Irlend-. will rul! ii. 1 Tbrre will be Ihe u I I Turkey and Ham and Lb%  10 i .. ktaHi ate. etc. 3.7.52—3n. %  i-rtATINO MIS VICTOY ID the 1948 Olympiad. Mai Whltl.eld. of Columbus, O, Is shown streaking across the finish line in Helsinki. Finland, to take first place In the 800-meter event. He tied tha record he set four years ago. His time was 1:49 2. {/nternatlonal RadlophoroJ Indians Put Up A Splendid Fight (From Our Own Correspondent) LONDON. July 31. THE INDIANS put up a splendid fiht to-day at Northants after losing three batsmen cheaply. Adhikari myway after nil the effon the game* This really frijthtenctotal of 365 (or 7 declared. Brisk batting by both Mm arlll be necessary tomorrow, however, if there la to be any prospect ofa definite result. Four more points were collected by Surrey t of lay at Chesterfield tor their first innings' lead over Derbyshire and as the home side only lead by 59 runs with faux wickets left, Surrey look set for another victory. .SCOREBOARD — Indians veniM Norlhants Northants 305 for 7 declared Indians 300 Derby Tereu* Surrey Derby 214 and 140 for 6 Surrey IJ6 Gloerester versus York* Yorks 378 for 8 declared OiOOCeatai )90 and 132 for 3 Leicester versus Warwick Warwick . 126 and 308 for 0 Dnllery 158 not out. Leicester ... .. 122 Ranuistei !"• fur 53. llmi* vrrsu* Sussex Hants ...... 233 and i>0 fat I Sussex 3 76 l>i>UKart 135. Ramerset versus Essex Somerset .... 323 and 28 for 1 tilamor x an vrrsui Notts Glamorgan 144 and 182 for 5 for you. Don't worry. Il will be •iliight. Just come on". i You had better g<. My n i;ni-mate Is ccming back at any in-nunt. Chugunov U-fi quickly %  • ugh, I bolttd the door I was trembling and shivering. I Vine on my bed watching Ihe door, I refused to Opart II for Geoff KUioll when he got hnck. Ii.camj in through the verandah window. "Scmeone has bolted the door" lie said. Then I told him .the story, Did I tell the British team officials* No. When we arrived back in England I told Mr. Crump, thl Team Manager thai 1 wa upset because I had a alixbl brusH uith tinRussians the night before, I didn't go into the matter That was it." Notts Worcester Worcester Kent %  •>wdia% 95, versua Kent WA I i^lWm By M. Harmon-Guy Drairr : Soutta Love all N. I 3 1 K 8 O 10 \ H : w I ; K n a c Q g 7 Q J 9 3 7 9 6 0A65 v Q 9 • 3 2 *AJ7 *RB6 *. O A i M 4 9 10 5 1 O K J 7 tui The va.ur of tlie Ten In NtvTnin.u* play .% rarely d ou'.*:d> :ournaa ehare H i* usually cojtited as half a point. In ihe above deal fMcfl of the four Tens proved .i (. trlt k South opened kith One No-Trump iwenk vera'.oni. Wej: doablrd and nil paused O 2 -i .-I and laKen wilh O 10; south entered Dummv li K and ed I iSS ing Q 10 West won and il %  but when cj i.under c A South . iy s'.re of lua contract nng •'!,v.oppmj power oi ; io and, 10. i ould only win five crick* i'i a'! win a combined ronti: ot 33 aiainst is Thr Soclrty Five. J Dlm.rr Mrrvrd ADMISSION 2 V SOMETHING NEW FOR THI CHILDREN IN OUR MILLINERY DEPT BIBS PILLOW CASES DRESSES SUN SUITS PINAFORES BOYS' SUITS CAVE SHEPHERD & CO., LTD 10,11,12 & 13 Broad Street .'/AV.V.VrtV.VAV.V.V/.V.'.V.'.'.V.V.V.V.V/.'.V/.V.V; lint's nour Hoof iifi-il I'liinliiii/ > THEN B0WRANITE IT umt i\iri§i-t it For the best protection against Rust and Corrosion use BOWRANITE MM*t*n PAINT GOES FARTHEST — LASTS LONGEST One Gallon will cover 700 1.000 sq. it. Slocked in RED and GREY BOWRANITE is supplied ready-mixed and should be well slirrod before use. II required, a Special Thinners can be supplied af $2.40 per gal/on. Teeth Loose Gums Bleed fllofhlln* Oum. 8or Mouth antj I.KIM Teeth mean that you mm h*v Pynrfhoa. Tntnrh Mnulh .* |-th[ 1 %  mtie bud dlvase Ihnl will %  ooavr or UW caiu* your t#th lo fall out ami mar *l* cauae linommailam MITJ %  (<• %  !I Tr-iul> Amoaan %  tona mim 'i Hnar Ihe r •nda aora im-tnh an4 qulrkly ilii"> %  tha tih Iron clad urntie Amoil" in-!-! rSSUIt ) %  HI mouth %r.Hl and aaia tour le-th or irmn-y ba.'k oraBveliirn at emptv iiVi|dt Anfoiin In m .uf rhemlat today. Tha auarantoa ntbtacta you. Be Youthful, fit & full of vigour MiaSM %  • m % % % %  >•bo* BaM Nauah (unatlpaUun. >lugIiil.iu-ii. U.in.hmit lad oihai Moiina.li. Itxr and %  Idoey iroubUi. %  ile Bnn. f.nrrow aaann and happietn. make yoa riiiWul. admiied b* all Take Ml %  >* iftgulailt 'Phone 4456. 4267. WILKINSON & IIAYNES CO., LTD. Take BILE BEANS — much better than a laxative An n^c-old c<|u:itioii on uliieh our ffffrt.m lus hcen consistently based. It illustrates three Uctti One is thai of value. The second, einlmtlicd in thtte\i. is proof of careful buying. The third is in the expressed s:itis(action *if uitr customers who. in turn, have introduced us to their friends. c. tieo h Co. &f &f u





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for the MUM ih.t lachi M |iui, n Qain *e mm iMt d iwuan FB> in* future in UI amm And the M Out I can do. ^ rfo WHAT'S ON TODAY Court at Grand Scauoni 10 op • m i Ordinary l| Ov %  m Hofi Marryenow *pck< *i in* fflP Club Ipm Poc Band el Chan* 1 ^1 I'il >ESTABLISHED 1895 FRIDAY. AUGUST I, 1952 PRICE : FIVE CENTS WEATHER REPORT %  )*( Hour U.K. Warns Egyptians Against Molesting British Subjects Farouk Objected To Reform HE NEEDED "A LITTLE CASH" OKLAHOMA CITY. July 31. A prominent Sapulpa Oklahoma farm machinery dealer Thursday told aathonum he robbed the First National Bank of Luther Oklahoma of more than 34000 Wednesday In a desperate attempt to save inbusiness The bandit. JdentUUd by the FBI a* Olen Cyrano White, i'i. was held la Oklahoma county '"il in lieu of the $60,000 bond on a Federal Bank robbery charge. Ho has no previous criminal record. Wbitt said his business had loot money and he needed a little cash "to recuperate." tj.P. Farouk Wishes Government Luck WASHINGTON. July SI USUALLY KKMAHI.P diplomatic officials said on Thursday that Britain has warned Egypt that it is ready to take the slum .1 -lips if British subjects are molested or injured in rioting or by any other cause. They raid the warning was delivered by the British Embassy in Cairo before the return of Ambassador Sir Ralph Stevenson from Uiridun and when it was seen that W.A.F.D. lenders were in close association with the Government of Premier Aly Maher and General Mohammed Naguib. aid the British remembcr-pvr. g-^ %  c*l that ihe W.A.K.D. Government IV ltKJT I* ill**'111 1*7 > 'ormei Premier Nahah was iii T9 "^ PO*** when rioting occurred in Cairo last January resulting In death and injury of British subjects. They said information on a ,. Britain's action was immediately /VriTIV Ih I'M dtl'Ill 'communicated by the embany !" "V lt-I*"lIII 'here to Secretary uf State Achcao.1 %  who knew of it when he called in British Amoassudor Sir Oliver Frank: on Thursday to discuss international affairs including the; Near East. ,. WASHINGTON. July 31. ..„. Tne United States will soon be I.UC* I receiving uranium ore extracted Kin* Farouk in an interview, from gold mined in South Africa with newsmen on Capri lslanu the Atomic Rnrigy Communion % %  S 'reported today. Australia will -I H25 '7w, T\ y U aj IUCh 'SS' ** Bdift America ianrum as I can inc. and new mining facilities IQ who have taken It into their hands'Canada and the United Stated and upon their consciences to may be operating shortly, accordgovern tgypt. I wish them lots of ling to the Commission's twelfth luck because they will need It. 11 emi-annual report to Congrcv hope that they will not think thai [The report said that for aecuiit governing a countdays of PARIS, July 31. Egyptian General Mohammed Naguib. Leader of the armv revolt which forced King Farouk's abdication. purported I <. declared In an interview on Thursdav that (he Lgyptlnn Monarch had to KO became he refused to accept the army's demand-; for reforms. In a copyrighted interview wit i i Cairo correspondent of Prance's "Soir." Naguib was edited as saying. "Our movement began bteatlM e wanted to obtain justice for the army. We had not thought of going so far as to demand abdication. An ultimatum was handed to Farouk because he did not watM lo ajvf a categorical respons. of our demands." Egyptian Commander-in-chief S urportedly denied that the army >bels had any special link with any political parly, and said thai he and his supporters would stay out of politics." "The W.A.F O S. (the largest Egyptian political parly) came to ev Di like all other Egyptian political parties," Naguib waa saying. "Our contact with He W.A.F.D.S has been limited to two courtesy culls made i ....... U.S. Will Get Uranium Ore From S. Africa We belong to no party. We %  re no more the vassals of the Moslem Brotherhood (extreme LaUotisUst group) than of am other. We are only officers. The convocation of Parliament for th>. nomination of the regency is • matter for political and juridical not yd know where to look, men. We are no; mixing in it.'' have 1 begun lo think about it. —U-P. • On I' %  8 these j reasons, It. was impossible ... Id crisis is specify the record of accomplish such an easy matter as might ment in atomic weapon developBut it could be stated that improvement" had perhaps have been thought by [ men! '"" are new to the game, j "substantial "1 love my country and I wish been made her allI the best. When I became The Commission described its King 16 years ago I was full of experiments in the use of atomic hope for what 1 rrujtfit do to lalso energy for medical research, and third establishment decancer research, had her place among the nations, and my love for Egypt and for my countrymen Is no leas today, though I am now in exile." Alone in Kxilr "I want to make it clear thai it Is I alone who am in exile. My my children are free to return to Egypt. Neither my wife nor her p*renQi ire exlleo. But n.y wife has chosen to be with me and so has each of mj three daughters of thtlr own free will Tins hag made me very proud anrl happy. As I am no. permitted to return to Egypt 1 %  a a new home, and I do voted l*•< tnn>our Government Theie is a well ectahhshed rule inhibiting members of the GovernV ment from revealing what passes in confidential discussion The reason for this is obvious If I undertook to affirm or dem iiie aceuracy of Bevan'i Mtstenienls I should commit precisely the same error lo which I am now drawing attention. This 1 am not prepared to do I make this statement lest silence should be misconstrued." Attlee'a statement brought !,-ud cheers from the Conservative benchgs but Bevan himself was not in hit place, although Attlee said he had notified him that the it.iterneiit would be made. A few minutes later he came hurrying In and rose to say that no word had reached him that the statement was going to be made. Attlee replied that he had sent a .note. BODY OF TEHERAN RIOTER CARRIED BY COMRADES Federal ion Is Kssenljjil i or B.W.T. V* elf-am Says V. G. tHH i %  THIRTY 'indents of the Third Annual Summer School at Oodrington College are seen here In group with their lecturers shortly after the 10 30 "break" from Lecture* yesterday. The Principal of Oodrington Col lags Bav. C. A. Saver and Profe-moi A K Croaton can be seen in the second row third and fourth from light, respectively while Mr. Aubrey DonglsSmith \\< -i.l. %  > t T i H is en the •gteafM rlxht m the front row. aid he did not receive It. —U.P. Canadian Trade Up OTTAWA July 31 Canada fnrmaJly announced that her economic strength hai leaned ai\ca(V Imports durng Juno rising by more than $00 000.000 in value, and creating the biggest monthly trade surplus for a first half year. With sales lo the United Kingdom sharply increased, and with increases In almost all foreign markets June exports were worth 1378,800,000 aa compared with S315 800.0OO for trie previous June ihe Bureau of St'it i re ported. Imports dropped to $324,500.000 sTOm 8380.400.000 giving Canada tho favourable balnnrc of $51.500 000 for the month as compared with the deficit of $44,800,000 for June, 1951. The surplus was the biggest since the postwar monthly record of 8112.000.000 achieved last December. It brought the total surtlus for the half year of 1952 to 114200.000 a sharp contrast to the 8339.000,000 deficit In the corresponding month last year. U.P. CVeallh Economic Conference •A/Mowing is the U'\t of an an: euncetnent made by ihe Prime 4Iini-ter m Parliament on the Mr) of July: 'Some little time at a I c< roimiefited lo the other Prtme In the Conunonw* proposal that we should meet la London in the latter pan of ember to review togcthe, UsO 'ii.,: issues of financial, comhen i ll aid economic policy with hlch our several Governin re faced, some of which have ben the subjeol of continuou examination since Ute Kinanes M'nutters' meeUng in January ol till* year, ll wag, out h >pi that %  u* of such have sp.n'ial difficulty In attending the i out %  i I • me proposed buf eounti? will i repraaenti i The Prime aflnte. of India will be i attend at the time proposed but the Government of India have greed to nuute the || rratigemenls for the parti el paion of India. All other C< r.onwenlth 1'ilmu Mun' luding the Prime Minister of SooiheiM Ithodrsia hope t I-iresent themselves for the g'hole ll the Conference AiwlU also be madi for the icprearntalio' oj ttv 'ol.ni.il tearrlbl ferenee will be preeeasad preparatory dlaCtU lotU lietwe uficiau of the Commoaweal countries. I shall live the Hoi further information on the BU Jeet in due course." DURING IHt HEIGHT OF IHE RIOTS that swept through Teheran, Iran, demonstrators shout and wave as they earry the body of a slain comrade through the streets of the city. Premier Mohammed Mossadegh's new director of police has warned the nation against the efforts of the Communists, under a guise of nationalism, to take over control of the country. Many were allied and Injured in the outbreak. ( International) Britons Must Pull The Belt LONDON. July SI, Britain to-day prepared a new bell tightaning drive to got out ol lh ml after Parliament rtnpmvrd Prime Minister Churchill's plan to divert same prediction from defence lo txports. The House of CotTunoafl last ni^ht approved the Conservative (".oYcrnmeni's new economic programme bv a vote of 299 to 277 after Churchill warned that the altVQfctive was bankruptcy. — i The plan also calls for a slash* I m Imports and a continuation of the anue freest. Churchill said| |that full schedules on the arms, .culback necessary for solvency (will be worked out at the Commonwealth Economic Conference %  : November. The GovU.S. May Buy roreigr. Tin For Home Use WASHINGTON, July 11. U.S importers may buy foreign 'tin for home consumption for '.ho frsl time since March last year. it was announced today by National Production Authority. Thii lakes effect Irom August the firs and importers may pay any prk for it. Whil? reconstruction flnanci corporatlcn will thus give up it monopoly as a buyer of tin. it wil continue to buy metal and sell It to North American industry at the istic selling price ol 121 i L.S. TIN SSTTI.KMK'ST IN MALAYA RAIDED BY RKD GVKRIUAS WSHINGTON. July 81 The Malayan tin bureau stld it iccelved a cablegram Thursday ,'>'• P*r pound. icporting an attack on an AmenUnited Nations Product.on Ancan tin dredging settlement near'lhof'y announced it would permit Kola Bahru Perak, Malaya by} ">urnptlon of private imports In armed Communist guerillas in n amendment lo its control which a number of employee* lower TEHERAN J ity ^l Persian Prime Minister Moham-.„,„„„,,.. vttt o%a\ to build up exC 1 / < '., Mo ,iu1p " "***> asked J."* ports at the expense of arms was Ma.Ua (Lower House) to give him not unexpf .^ c ,, enr | ler thll mcnthi %  fullest powers to *f "• "> ns BrlWn'i trade'became more nine point programme. The Gov., unbotanced and vital gold and ernment aUtnnent broadcast by do ,| nr rwr% M MMed b,^ Teheran radio today denied that i7(>0 00O0O0 the Prime Minister had ever made **' a proposal for arbitration in the. Churchill warned that very seoil dispute with Britain dunng IJOU< n ( ,. domestic .retlngs^with ', Brl „, n British Chaise d'AfTn. lnj| planned. Since A British Foreign Ofo^ *PoJce. c'hurchil! became Prime Minister man yesterday said Mosaadegh |art fl n Britain's £4.500.000.000 last week offered to submit th<, dispute to arbitration hut the Per.defence programme has been slan Pri" iter with-.stretched out from three to four '.'.r. years.—*•> v*ere wounded. The message said all Americans U1 the area escaped injury, ll said a large tin dredge was dam. 1 Th settle,, rttll in Kmta 1 |" l 1 ;„ -lu ,, |*" l, il -l, v.ilhy and operate j by Pacific Tint AllU tjllirM'm' l^lUMl Consolidated Corporatlcn wuh| offices in New York. HONGKONG. July 31 The cablegram said guerillai' Portuguese and Chinese Comattacfcasl \..th uench mortars, i munist trt-jpa were standing to in in.hine sjUnS and o'her weapons.'defence positions today on the —U.P. I frontier lietween China and — %  r Macao, where clashes have occurred twice in the past few days. (Usually reliable reports from the Uny Portuguese colony forty mile- southwest of here said the situation was calm but tense. A Chinese news agency at Hongkong said that tho Portuguese auwhonUes had asked China yesterday to speed negotiations for tho settlement of two incident* in which there were machinegun and centred m'mortar exchanges last Friday and Tuesday night One Communreport said that a team of seven r leases on no-) from Kwantung a i proximatelv 700.000 acres on theimlUlarv area, had reached th" II I the surrounding sea Communist side of the frontier to Boor.—U.P. investigate "i* situation.—v.p. Cuba To Start Red Inquiry HAVANA, July 31. Cuban Consultative Couneil'i JusU.e and Law Committee unanimously approved the creation of a group to investigate Commu isl activities In Cuba but ihe pi must be approved by tinwhile Council and Cabinet prior t< llir creation of an investigating Comnjaalaci %  .lutioi eragUAi the Commission was introduced many wek ago by Cuban IMIS Ortega who is a Council Member. Arlui" ( 7ale, prominent Catholic Loader. eiiuoiMd th propoaal a't.i which the Council approved the plan. Fernandez Gonzalez < report of Edward Miller, United States Undrr-Secretary of Slate that ••Communist pen-i Cuba Is a very serious problem Jttajae) said i"ports from Athens Saifl Ihe Communists have created Communist Committee for Latin America to direct Red .-I the Western Hemlsphere He said %  Committee reoorledly '•ad been set up in Havana t the "Comlnform of the Caribbean."—Ih*. 3rd Annual Summer School Ends Today THE third Annual Suimner Schiail, run by (he Exli i i i)i |;nimeni ni ihe University College ix ended June 3U this jreai other hand ue Dominion pur:hased from tin country produce valued ai 818,108,587, worth oi 41.41* per cent or the SXB ig S3H.V27.173. Tha United Ki'mdom during ihe ,,niie penod eaimrted lo Mnii-.i Gulnmi giHNls worth 817.287,11!, r 38 : the total imports; and bought from th: country piuducr valued at JI4^1.830 —37.48 percent of the total i \potts for Ihe pi 'In United Mates setM this I hands The pi K. i i Ik g id lists ns h. lb).Cl a Crostoi i tell ; %  i ii • ii:. Ascent oi t V q w H. Auden and "Vei i i fr) Shakespeare 'ii .,. idenl itad i %  r, . 'i %  i bj Mi I) .. I %  llaavklue. d also was a series of i c heart '.Is repp MJ C A QraaaaUUi conducted a lehearsal of 'l< bjai snd lit" %  .1-. rhen i.< m the W>'A Indies la a %  <* better 'ied. Mr %  rorrto %  %  • I %  norning shortly before nada. Mr. I'm who 'ing b*s %  rived here yesieniay %  i< cioanc 1 led by his wif-%  1 ''•saaBBBjsjsi %  and it seemed n if the several colonies wen doing for a certain i tial poaJtion and keeping in tire background, the more matof %  itl.m. tf are once set confi d n all UH Mil duly follow in then proper places", lie laid and added that it aaaaned .. r they awe rtarttne at she top i the iMrttom. Mr. Pitt said th i lend oi lOljt %  II oiuiiion %  I %  %  H bis la do srWi Wc*i Indian sffalni i wtiuid sug1 nkw Gi'vemmen:. live of the warring factor' lilies, pass a bill to give %  because i that there were oSBCf iey/tnj reaponslbtllt] with ban natality than ih • oeople HI M ind added 'hat the present situation almoa* botvlered on beaaa -mti.i %  for ovei ) %  am. try $7,221,701 worth, or 16.01 per cent •>( the Mai ••' %  I ported, while reviving .i IKT tlfiUjUH worth of tha produce wported, Hutisii Outana hroughi in (rom ther than Canada noo• n external trade In Ihurteen reai IIS increased production and enicer* but a few new snvi'l pxixtrting || i spw M sd on l'e> %  •' % % %  The sdw balance of lour and tfap ter million doUari for the sixmonth win 1 IS somewhiil offapt by ble imports of n IBM] otaei soee isaifs or less of . ibneet heart rending to look ri the harbour and not •*• %  single V 1 He lememberod an n boy •Si'lng the iarte e e aasi -WB> %  uing and going Ih" place looked rather blank. 1 that it wns bnil enough only had two # On Pare H ^Blind' Sleuth NEW YOHK. Jilv 31 Uve masquerading as %  man with dan glai or u d rhui %  %  %  1 ins blind mans etui of (he Tnborough Hridgt w.i'i hlng 11 1 k glasses 1 R I 1 tid .1 M ulirclla ..t ..11 little heed to him. Ills disguise .,.-! %  1. Barry accompanied M.uUrclla as detective lent luin hi.Boxer as "a seeingeye dog. Martin %  imes and quarters rrern pasaersby — and a stched Russell, i-< nald %  aaas] S llrlllvh sprintrr waa In Helsinki teg Ih. Olympic (iimf he snaS approarhed three tlmen h > Ku %  •bin — %  who aafc'd him to quit tlih iii in Hi ti MM and ge to in. •la aa a roach. On Sunda>. July J7 he i .nUodured hv Mrdeoff Dyson %  Ii .-I 1'iltish iDli to a Hoviet .i rn ilkft named I HUIUIMM I ini .mi-.' -.II.I he -initwishetl to interview Mcflcit.altf K.i'lry fir lu> magazine "Voks The nrxl n|ht Ihe two men had dinner in A ll'i-iiikl hotel, (hiinsstl ^usgenled thai Mcltonald %  alley -mould t y ra i- DM and l Uu gam"-' %  h> which tune there uould IN rout trte offer %  „ a T osoew." He offered: ii* Pause] ntelaWea i. <( th' Sovit %|Mirlim: i.rL'*iiii tasea rowid pees/Ida \ *>u m eaaeh <> Kuvltn youth: \ nun f. rtaais ii4t ba Heacana foe Mr llonald Bailey and hi* family — :>nd he has three children No win les All i-'iircil \P i.-i, Id B.ile% liiully turned offer at 11 3v that oifhl. Two Ben later a Ihe British -ptlntir *Upl in Ma r.-rni In hW lliirterii t huKur.nv urnback. lie arbaspereel! "tame on >l Bailey, to the gate* *f the \AUK\ ae saaat aeeae I beet i i %  I in I. nun in in there who i.u< tj eierythlni:. %|. hi K lle>. frUhlrtied refaeed Watae i hurunuv left Hallev boll. HI oi ni if (..oil I ili .,11 Hidid not remain aln< foe the renialiitiu seven hur in IM.inM Here Mclhinald %  lib • earn lean %  f bai eeanfa up to th ii mshl In H'Ulii i "I am bark In I... nln IIOM llh friemllt a il nu "^ rininm. by, itii peepls i bnee iae1 It nerim Ilka dream, but ii '. hjd -.mi <t ouh Uu" days .iitu I could have breti mi mr way Maetiaai sreiea 'o th up a new life. It all he can *o quietly. Jii-l HI ll michl here. At 18.10 IJ^I Bantaj asarstbki Mr f;-->rf Dreaa national .hi. f OSaab kumked Jl mv door In l'!b Jiiarliti'nt MI the Ohmpic vllla home life, ray plan* fee the future, itrm atber I am new 31 and have pcrhapa only faur years left as J U, aprlrrt-r. I told Mr. Chncunov -hil m. plane for the future arere ael yet artaled. •'Surely." he said, "a min "hi haa dene so much fa Britain will have no .lilh.ut" there T" He went on : "Vou famous man. We in <•<

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I RIOAV, M '.I -~r I. l52 I1AKIIADOS AIIVOTATK U.S. Oilmen Spend Over £3m Daily LONDON Could you spend £ 1 .;! 50,000,000 in a yew? No, you may say—and nobody else could, either. For that would mean spending at the rate of well over £3.000.000 a (lav V. the amount that U.S. oil men havi >uncod I bey expect tn spend dot mi; 19M on c,( and overseas. And only a few weeks ago. a leading British <>il exeeu%  %  i extend/W*>#V> ft OilttlM4> lie and HKtr.hi.t,,, "*'** flt.fflV/(I Armistice • %  -! marketing and dlstributioi unions otht i item.-.. Ex panslon <>f sura eerviei sources becomes Uv SEOUL, j.ii, so 1 Jamas A Vim Fie. Commander .oar. a, I, ha. don^aireW %  * %  ^ "J* ""'.. £ from approximately 280.000.0UJ ions In 1038 to goo.OmMHio tons in 1951. U.S. ctaBSumptJ it was even in 1940. anrt our own consumptti by 32" 'inct 194" X lobal irerssM In oil coasumpOofi ns anything like reache.i on the contrary, Ihs "'l industry is expecting this consumption to rench 1.000 000.000 tons or morr within the comparative next few paeai Anticipatory Planninj; OfOU. Forces in Korea BBld th.it recent events in Korea indicated "ISM chance of an arml-'.iee than ever before." Moreover, Van Fleet warned ti 11 ; unlst strength in troop-. %  till Ian to one million" deFpite the recent thinning out of Red Unas. Ha Mid Mm i think wo i an defeat "n eaascnj concentreti'-tl any point on the front." Ho aid he was convinced that the Communists needed an armislice in June and November 1931 ttasv wars "in Ixid Shape both times" and were worried about the winter. He said "Well. they fot through the winter, and tbt) bava<4smea been a very tough trador at the BrmssUoa table. To trends Indicate less Canadians Want More For Flour Import B h * jrth SUC. j. a | relve dny of had weather, ground fighting was almost comploiilv Yt* Vm-ans. too. much more than stopped today, and no allied flghtmerr paper planning: it means er, bomber, or carrier based planes spending—again on probably SO !" "• „__ unprcci-dcnted scale. Enulpmenl Peking radio today alleged that of the tvpe just mentioned is Amencnn aircraft violated China oft* tatosUcally COStly. even by Jg time, last week and killed 50 nduatrlal Stan Chinese in an attack on July 9. It had not specified where this took place, but a New China News Agency report earlier said :>?. TV oil men arc well used to Chinese were killed or wounded hi writing Cheques for mulliil ^J nc n /" n rnid ,. nn A,un ^J u ,f million* perhaps torts million -<-ro*s the Yslu River from North pounds or more tor I new reKorea. The agency also said that finerv or for a major pipeline "ie Communists had sent a ofti-.'• %  or a similar amount io "serious protest" to the United 1V for some new exploration Nations against the alleged killing roBxanuae rwhloh may J>g ol one Qmunu nistPr unner andths be rewarded by the (iltlnmuwounding of seven others in a %  f aw camp last Sundav. —r.r. portatton and aistraSutlon tacllities—are adequate to the task. And this means planning of scskt ant equalled sphere lluee Cheques STANDINO IN THE RUBltl of a building destroyer) by the California earthquake, two armed MP guard against possible looting In Tchachapl. Eleven persons were killcdand many injured by tremors felt from San Francisco to the Mexican l*>rder. f Inferno ilono! SoandDftotoi Empire Producers !\ow Commonwealth Producer* At the nnnual genera! mectini! of the British Empire ProHurfrs' Orguilwtion hold d iiu offioas, 2ri v Street. Uradon. S.W.I on July 17 n was imanhnotOly Blireed that with effect from January 1. 1953, the the Oranisation should be changed to BHUih lumm mwealth Producers ti. ni it! in and that the ram journal "The Empire Producer" should he attired <• %  "Commonwealth Producer' The change was tell to be derirable in view of the constitutional changes which have occurred in recent years. i %  oner i terminal at which these TH c n berth. Stnn of this LR.C.C. Answer Red Charges liscoven of fresh oil res.mree.-i. pn %  to buv half I dozen new superuinkeis .md build yet another tank. monMeni nature soon add up S3 totals semblmg a national debt. Only. unlike 'uch a debt. th< %  be passed on to the community in (he shape of taxes. The oil TORONTO. Ontario, July 30. men have to replenish their exA voluminous report Is to be cheAjuer Ihsmsetves. out of present presented to the 18th International earnings. Thai hi WM Red Cross Conference today oy adequate ,; are nhthe International Committee ansolutcly vital to the nil industry swerlng the Communist charge* -and, owing to the Indlspenatagainst the Committee regarding blufV "f "il products tt modern alleged atrociUe* in Korea. Paul civilisation, what is essential to Ruegger. President .if the Inter,he od Industry is of concern to national Committee, announced Mr. A. D. Dodds-Parker. Ml' Ih-puu Chairman, who su>d tli.it 'A %¡ Touching and In some CSSOI have reached a position supply and demand In I of many primary pro i. more nearly in bnlnn< < i ah> Ume since tin p/arj in %  << %  instances there hj alivids buyer's market in pi... %  11 -1 market <>r rec %  It is becnmlnv lUuit to saU Uisj lower Quality grades and the import 11 imposed In I contributed to the decline In price eurred in the past year. I more attention will have to be given to reducing operettl I production and marketing and the lm. provemen' of the qua! product lb %  %  to meet and in llvii of Stale for the Colonies): In all ~-. vj hut the smallest non-African territories there are already labour department* staffed with officers %  of notable training and experience *<£"-£Jul V 3I ante to advise Governments On Cntled Steles B 29levelled a labour and trade union matters, huge Communist aiutnn.ium flam The provision of such advice to ,icar 'he Manchurlan boi Governmenta through the officers *y n .. tb f_ biggest overnight Of these labour departments is a ^" of the Korean War. Sixtyi*rmanent feature of the policv of "ree unescorted bombers hraved Her MaiestVs Government. Red anti-aircraft fire and fighter opposition, which the American Mr. Hughes: May I take it from pilots described as the hesviest in that that the Secretary of State munths, but all returned safelv to agrees with the suggestion In the their bases in Japan Question that this has been Aluminium Plant Korea a f*nctorv 10 miles t.utheast of Sinulju went up in moke and flame after B.29's hurld 630 tuns of bombs on it. In the idjacem troop milld up area, five ither Surer* rti hit other targets. Mr, Lyttelton: I think the honThe 63 f external b policy on which it is now engaged before tlii*. ooofi It is to be hoped that our reproof onei Commonwealth countries attending the conference will endeavour to secure rclcTsifrom the provisions of GATT wh'.'h our freedom in the mi.i' creasing preferences oi restoring the le\ i I before the war in tin such articles as tobacco, win.. spirits and etasri where as a result of the heavy amrtlme in %  aaaas in duty the n preference has been whittled r...v to %  quite efled i eentage. Wi K l further eommuniCStlOn to the Treasurv on this sub|ect In the the next few Typical Example This is a typical example of DM v..Ille of 'M i means of presenting tba B 't.ducers in a number >.i ominiuns and Colonies to supplement any i.pn HI'. rn:r. tM 0M0S iDOi* I 111 lUj tttfOUtll their respective governments. Th wine and brandy industries of Australia, South Africa a n d the rum indus'.'. sen Colonies ami Mauritius and the cigar I of Jamaica, Dominica, India ana Borneo are all concerned in th I matter. "The changing corn markets have emphasised ihi validity of the repeated protetU I Seci I deaf ear to all represent stum*. Difficult ".tie Government i %  etue io moot it* %  nditure, due to a IAMB Whitehall bI government to reduce a i.i\" At n meefinr Ml Nuill Maci II P, :nanimously elected rhnirmnn. in 11 R. P. Watson. will join other wheat producing nations in demand-. lot hijf*afr international flour price. in iTashingtun in Jam what now appeart,, be i.il v.'heot are to bJ. aary afiet tttes iflaajkesl an Impasse this spring m l pivducvi countiiea seeking higher pe* huyei-natums claiming lh,priei living asked were t.-> high. The four major exporting couo i Cat id i. the Until ait the Argentine I -I.-.'..,, ,,( wll.'.-t this f.dl .wi in xl I%  %  cios> la reported to l>e fair. France S DM place of Araensina four big exporters cr the I.W.A. Price Not Known Ca.iada has not oma ..hat price u ja atokilig as a minimum under %  renew Ol :i internatiou.il wham agre> menl but it is known to be conSidei'ably above the JI 60 in U.S. fund' which was the floor during % % %  part of the agreement which has i : expired, Th. United Btataa in the roaan. Ume, has established a wheat supi nv at a national average of $2 J O pe r bushel. The price OBBBMI m laaUng M i gDatami o through I.W.A. is understood to be u.ll over S3. Crop prospects %  (hi n most pares of the wv.hie 1 Ie ep-itt iilahle according to the ... here. These include an expected large crop in China but no t.oort has been published by Kusaia. Outlook I!riht Too outlook for the new year, crops In North America is porticubirly bright.' 1 the trade department said. The US. crop is expeeled lo be second only to the record crop of 1947. of 1,330,000. 000 (B) I So far. the bureau of statistics 1ms not made an estimate of the I wheat that might be harvested In Canada | but It has predicted it will be n the 1951 crop, which was the bumper class althoug h I %  part of it was damaged bo e,i;> treat U May, the statistics bureau sold that farmer, planned to plant 25,000 000 (M> acies in wheat— an increase of two per ooal ovot Ihe a >•.! devoted to wheat la*l year, l-iat year's crwj, amounted lo 562.400.000 (M) bushels, Dora psrod with 401.700,000 in 1450-51. LOM I tions are having feet on th Iran,, of ill %  Board of Trade. .1 exports to the pod ehaspagaai m M.> though import-, (torn me area %  i. •.< from January %  %  ng countries. Total I'.K. exports to the ster%  light inii f iron and atinn—and "'.ng to be <> ExporK %  uuaftai larger exports economic i. of teon and steel, ma.; ""' orlit,g ares'gold ravehlel-v bcini prtl> counte Craiicellor ?lid. -We b\ lower %  -eater than in Apt trig on the first quarter. | .... ...,-,. lo dO 'omethir.r ,. v,!,,^ >n ,| ds—< wool ling area fell in May fee EMI trillion rompnn-d with IIU million in April and a monlhlv averageof £130 million dsirln: the tlrst ojuarter of the year. The than '.lie average for IW1. altho nvemge for the m t five inonthi lhan the month Rxports of textiles m Ma) wen o\-er E10 million les. th .n th' rl I %  and exports • lf1 fell betOW the hum level of Ihe Irst quarter of thl '.renter Imports from -'• itaag an i lT 0 ill greater m the months of this year ih.m in the corresponding period of and four per cent great* i f 1951. Imp-us of foo.1. dunk BBd IQbaCCO In J.miiai > May inei-ensed 'eaponding period of 1951, whie Imports f : pm ,. %  as Import of manufaeturei Increaseil SUghtll The Unit.-.! Kingdom's trade i;itp— the excess of lOtporl over exports and tf.o.b.|—during this period was at the rule Of 1 7B million C23 million a month less than in 1931. Sixteen million pounds of this improvement was account' d for by our trade with the non%  terUng area and C" million with Ihe ltei ing area. Ihe Impeovesnent in our trading position vis-.i-vis (he llg area, tin > deterioration, compared with the corresponding period of la I year, of £6 minion in our balanee wilh Ihe dollar irea. Thwas offset, however, by an improvement of £7 million in respect of O.EEC. (Western Fin Dean) countries and of £13 million in respect of ihe rciii.iim: non-slerlmg rountrles. Slight Increases Exports to the dollar area sh ed s slight Increase In May over Ihe average for the first quart.. %  experts of metals and engineering products in the fVsi flee roar aaaMalrai %  si from the lev.l Of 1951. On the other h was little CheBg) fOod, drink rid ton* from thai roe srhl %  ease %  T un%  trel i '.lii #r and Then %  I'.ain marRiftftest Night Raid Excellent thr United States to :id let us kel 'hen *e i il unions V SSaa. fa. • '' WOUld InCVlN..I far t-.iumeh r ^. This improvement In our tradports, nnd 'his .ing position visJa-vis t. : .iren, welcome though i' DM vet gODf far enougn to justify the hope that OOH OTOI seas payments will !• in balance i of the year, tt had been generally %  t taken to achieve this • would be ..-fleeted in %  SEOUI* July II, asariaad improvement m the trade Lieut General Otto P. Weylanrt tlgures by the middle of the year. Far East Air Commander said Bui the figures for .in:,. Lf.fl B2fl .' .-> ;,. exceK thai the riBtble trade gap is lent" result* in the biggest night %  till tar too large. raid of the Korean war last night Total exports during the moOll v f l • ,, which had 15 per cent few i the Communist China border. Onworking .lny than the previon. "''diji-ai to being *e luggest night nvnlh. were dOVB t ' ^ .-enl %  '""l"" "jM ll *'''' £t t *C2S -diion. irhue Impoi w,m -*[ '"' ,c \ "" I J,'"* 1 t r fj meanJT't'h amaa S^Zl ^S means that the tra.le gap remained lM WPr „i an „„ Junp n~V*. roughly the BBSBe SI ii the pre* vtoua month at about £84 million. Critical trtWB OF f:\aiK\cf: The situation, therefor.. *.till very critical. It is doubtful Whether the Untied Kingdom'* batanci of pajFmenla can now be T1 a i wklhuut the "further measures" foreshadowed by the Jar Chancellor in his recant statc•ti nt on the fa] But -,v i .-earns that another foufl I of import cuts will not be into Hie e II:', -.111 Ml Butler, pi.iking in a television programim' !" '" ''' last weekend, opposed thlt mean" "' ''' V.'.:'.', l\ \ ft* ''' Of balancing our trade wilh Westio i>. H n. nar jpi v i %  sirt liiKK nanlirr. Tl 3IOK Pr. U>M or 1*1* ft l I i I 11 l .s \n \ I'r rh*si DMTU p, IT now %  'i in Pi Of. YMPi i TO-DAY TO MONDAY ITII., 1.30 & H.I5 ( olunihia's (.niantic iKiuhle ENGRAVING JEWELLERY & REPAIRS Also Jewellery made lo order • We now have our own skilled Jeweller working on the premises which guarantees quick deliveries and reasonable charges. Y. He LIMA A. IO. 1.TIK 20 Broad St. Phone 4*44 • %  %  #4 t mnM .-> HIE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LTD. White Park R .ad, Bridgetown ENGINEERS, BRASS and IRON FOUNDERS Works contain modern appliances tor the execution ot first-clasji work of all kinds, and especially to SUGAR MACHINERY and STEAMSHIPS Dealers in AGRICULTURAL MACHINERY and GENERAL ENGINE ROOM STORES of all Description IRRIGATION PROJECTS, PUMPING EQUIPMENT and ELECTRICAL INSTALLATIONS A SPECIALTY For Satisfaction, Quality and Service %  Contact THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LTD. Phone : 4546, 4650 Workshop > M l Phone 4528 Store* Dept. II IIIIH I I I II WE House Scales Counter Scales Coffee Mills Sifters HAVE Fish Turners take Pan* Ladles Tin: Spoons KITMIKVDripping Puns Scoops Pattie Pans Cork Screws WARE Sponge I in. %  i Pans Can Openers IX I.mi Beaters Mincers Icing Sets STINK %  %  THE CORNER STORE HMHMSI ff O A I Greatest ACTION Spectacle! **' UAN UfAirtS ~ I it LADD SCOTT /*. > I "mtiuH i'-is k KENNEDY IRELAND . t\EiJ T.'cluiiailor • ">, Extra: 2-Keel Short:' IS1.K (If TAI1L OPKNINt; TO-IIAY 2,:HI & H-10 P.M. AMI C'ONTINl'ING DAILY 4.15 Si 8.30 i# e i it i one mistake... ...-.ii by hia son... unlmnhefl the ff qimaXMwA drajna of our tUy I OedZkofya Fredric March %  %  Extra: Short; T( \( in in I ln\ And Latest News Reel i



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PARE Forn BAItllADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY. ACCOM 1. la BARBADOS^ ADVOCATE r——%  >—"-•*" r -•-• "•" •• %  % %  '•nt conditions and mow ho affairs of our is.and home. Be i think It van to introlureit to : Advocate nd to thoughtful paraonfi Boner* lly in both dpital and UbOVI circles, I hope they w ,|| be persuaded to reflect upor puipoai s* Hrv. I I..MK.M. parts of the world—in fact %  %  ill continues in some cuui. MM, Inhrrili'd Ignorance < |ll.II ear, nnd method" %  nd beiomo instead nations fate. The party he leads is i i %  i fickle "floatinji world of to-day—or is doing so ., ~ !" ~ ~T" it is v.i'iiini fey WlMton Churchill is almost •ant on to specify the bt us the kind of stern unwel<****. .Mch hw. Mj v P}l com -hal II,,M-.u..l„m itndoubtcountries also—the abolition of edlv demands. Once %  gain, this ZZSP^SSK. %  £i tl 2 h 2!Sip<*e or ii.. hardships, biiefly summarised bove, and to point out that in the PAN BOOKS THE WIDEST SELECTION IN TOWN On Sale Al ADVOCATE STATION till -which he will have to annoum Parliament disperse in Au| Meanwhile, the Conservative Party is determined to look on the bright side. So there be some contradiction between the void unf;i.. I VOUI .'iiHuMons about th' situation, it is necessary to remodern world l.dKtur has won Its cognise clearly two highly ImUttle and secured conditions of The Main Idea porUint HrcUsTflS ts csa: (!) The comfort and security. It h This Is, atetty %  v M .-iv. that HJ ""'' •* wpli : to ;" f". that tfrikas %  i rh Breal -.nd """ born tnU '<* a good many instances but they! 8 ** 1 "* t ch'ange-TaVe ^^cTcfS! % ^ ** ** -** %  M ^ d '* S now in progres. In the idea, and lt( pnmjry numan r|gnis ana rT'lngs of those who have had posthe fact that such a state teanion. in past days, of nccumu,,f things was by no means a n .thro k.ted wealth, pn-i-eMv ,,„\ be ,.,. ll(W1 ,„ ho Wcfl !.,,*: JJJr* ar b\tiition and national th: '' ,ho hoUMn K programme would not be ess undertakm.t*—>n a wor I. Indian colonies, or indeed .. Capltal~th.it the old name, with other portion of the world. all its selfish nnd oppressive For example, it is only a little But what i* MM p.*,iUui meanings and association* hi no over a hundred years sbtCS the bodosT Here niso me_ longer correct and suitable, and CbjarUst upi-iwng In England | lon ,n,, n8 n o sessor.*-. of Capital did .xp.u.t labour and take for ttsanutlv' the lion's share or [he rosulta tA industry. Low wages, sometinn that great country. It is well %  onwttlllll ol tn.it movement. cut even under conditions of austerity. POLITICAL DOTES nservative Pai The present Government has WAWV/ joweiful Trades Union \~1 ditsjfiriiii'i for : % %  vi-:ics bofoii' -t must lace election fever treatment discussions with employers and I The plan of its leaders is to defy unpopularharmnmmi* settlement of dl ,. ., It Is to named because its leadwb I V m ll "' meanwhUe : ,:,, P"" '' Xu %  suc dated thair Waaa In alx *' |I: """'; pmteetlon again ful resolution of Britain's problems bv points which Wn i 11.! 'The nents; holiday wl'h | ., ,. ,. n ,t „f that neriod I-,,,,!,ChM-Ur Thaw were ,. Hid houMng avtasW l "" | lu '" 1 1) Manhood • Suffen.ge ""'l^ 1 th -> u n painfully InadeThenarc tWO OUlg about this. f2) Equal Electoral Districts_(3) V^^ ^ ^_P *"* l P n, :.. An d „' 1 OfW is the rhurclnlliuii method. Roughly, the economic struo.ijle looks, to Churchill, ith the approval and cojjk e another war, He is on the point of prom: .pern lion of the Capitalist. So Capital and Labom Bra It will l>e recognised that 4hi to work together with goodwill .riy (niaUOaUoni for M.p.'s. (6) \\ l Payment for M.P.'s. political programme; Hie even in Barbados leaders believed that that was the Two Major Furls Still To down to Uie point of MinlitslTs pathway to success, but the tssTMl p^ \ am ed " n .|. lon !'p ur "'work; ungrounds for the revolt were thTn cnIlr i u ion tav#J to specify Ithy conditions and no prot*Ceconomic and SOCto hardships w |th a|l ^^ empha -gaiust accident, very madewhich prevailed so widely and m r( inll v | mportatl | ling nothing but the aijony of effort and suffering. Then he hopes that Britain, .:> usual, l i-le thn)ujh. The other route is a much more political approach. The Conservative Party wants to aspects of the economy. reorganso deep ^i*' 1 ; (jiiirp,! t. ramplate Hurtgry. Thw laed. For msliinco, it wants to cut back surv ...MB lltsllltl.il —J -• Takr (lie eucsswnrk nut itf wi'lKhinK uilh: NI.W comma S( Al.l.S (10 lbs.) NEW SPRINfi BALANCE KITCHEN SCAI.1S (7 Mi & 23 HiI C. S. PITCHER & CO. Hint~ housing; the use uf female appeared to he and child labour at very low pay. And their success finully Justified *"" iJ." "V'fiaV v!'e'*,\*M, t^r'n^ttitt •nd .. wcr, cnunnnly V l„li,r. S^.ffi'lStSffJoSSS d '"* T'"* '" ""? ""' """L^ T posed and because of their ab*o11 is, by the way. an astonishing ('o,,. tion Acts which pin rents to their 19.J9 levels. lute need lor tho boskelements fact that Britain to-day h the B ut to attempt to bring them in Km in r.rrier tn irol ihp<. thlnoa v pn||||| in V|l w of |h(lli (V (1 ,_ BUtI< iibsulu's. and Simulboth body and mind exMad as % %  l n m,ich s Pon feeding." ly to many students of the situation taneusly cased the income tax. Food prices know, down to about a csntun The Good New Days i rnscrtaJ id half ago here in the British At the end of the first pan.i\iph Bo I must ask to be allow<-<| til West Indies, and slavery in VBrl'' IWl I anted tni return to Usl aubjeol at an early forms was jircvalent in m,iny QtsSstlon; is it tnie that 'the .late If you would flog a thug — as Ihe Lord Chief Justice seeks power to do—-would you tlu-ash eight-year old boy gangster! For that la where our Inquiry Is leading. We have examined our thug— as he appears 100 times a week. We liave shown that he Is a creature who wields a cosh often without hoping to make %  pennv out of it. We have searched bock lough his life to lind where s trouble began, and bare we uncover some disturbing tact i law, no child under eight be guilty of any oiler.. But more than 1,400 eight-year-olds listed in one year's criminal offenders. There are twice as ly of them now as before the Crooks \l The Age Off 8 It* leUsMsl H.irlh-fl The frightening factM in lAess %  icad'i'iea arc the latest ee i'i the inrfuini promptad by the f-ord Chief Justice's demand for fh** rlolit to flog t'tolenf men. rose, bul taxesj weslt down for millions. But both the courses are dangerous, in politics. II is difficult to lead a Party through i I dl %  M'poiiitnient. The organisation does riot like the strain. There are already noticeable signs that Conservatives all over the country who believed in national salvaUon when Mr. Churchill was re-elected, are now dissatisfied. These seven men do not prose1 Therc *" % %  BtecUon l Scotland recently cute. They do not take [Kirt in in Dundee. The Conservative candidate lost V—-1"'',. 00 votes. And Iho S. a liM n, a j..ri.y wont < ,n h vi up by 4.300. Insteud they lonccntrato on the activities of the young gS. IIOUSK OF COMMONS In three years Uiey have broken| r„ nB „ ri a il(a M „ u are erval e M.P.'s and the hand* of'ehildren who W BWV ,W mr s are '^lighted used to pilfer from Liverpool's amused 1 rate wpjabblcs that are m i| l !" ,l ?eSr^i'g around in H> I %  air side of the House. Bach meet mi; of the Parliamentary Labotir • ins to be more acrimonious than the last. Recently the Party had lo take a vote, down steeply after the age of 14. Before the age of 19 Is reached MM national crime figures at tha'. notarc lower than the crime figuret of the nine-year-olds. But the potential young thug in nvi'. trail ii'iiiniK out process of early less-violent lawlessi n ha imaiiy coahea an Old ""an, his record read out LteTS^a^S.^ ""S 0 "' lh u btAerson*, bo>s. B^tal official^fnSSJ o Iheh £8 %  * K* m ? re g" 1O0 , ^^^ successes, are corJcious of their ^ ,sl l, li ohcolS l ,* alk w,,h ""'"' "' ,ow that rtearty 40 per ^ JZJtttJti '^11 coiwicted crlntlnaU In ""^ la n 1 P" gcr f 1 ^ lh £ wrt / coi-poral punUhmcnt in Boretals Tlu v hHV( Cill d(lWn :lll hen; In fict, the nation's crime gures shi cent, of Britain ure not older than 17. So it Is among these youngsters around in the nursery of the thugs these seven have built up arat-hand knowledge of the temptations and home conditions of Liverpool": '''i U |!, r -y"'hac nude more than U, "' C """''• l d l k wlu sl, uld > the 5.0W) visits to homes, broken down COUK6 Ol Its policy m the HOUM Of Commons. Vl.Ih."'. !" ^. '"liv." Tl "' %  SUb J'-' f ll ""' ,r "" hl *" "'<' of Western Germany. Ancurin Bevan, with his allies, including Hugh Dalton. want an uncompromising line. And they %  came within a few votes of defeating th 1.000 y£.£ S^^SS 1 ^: "' *cond-tuno young otlenders. "Altlet %  Kes". At Ihe i-nd of the me. | i>. thev urtue. an si ill able TV..,, %  > %  ... ...~i !" ..^^ .t.._ IADI **. thai we may expect to And the ,' **£?+ ,h, y ; \T* !u '';, J "'u _J* Tht v have spotted more than 500 auadad them to j naid organ!sutions. to llog men who attack The Parents Tfc replacing parents as nurse to the thug van never be a Liverpool's Chief Constable. happy one. The State takes over Mr Cjrri] htarun, says of this ,.nl> l>eeauso the thug's parents new approach: "1 do not pretend Failed. '* %  a panacea for the evil of Here, then, we must pause 1o child crime. new thugs' nursery. Drifters First, see how the State plays II fr- ..uuii ^^ Kvi.l.iu.. kM bwn produced in twoino apparent In future years 2H un. fm.A (nh^.lu'olv AT U* H tl w Ui show thai the vieBut we have already provrii that rimditi'mallv^-IKl llvoll lkept ''' T man f '<"""•" %  "~ " hi "' "'" •>*"• '"' '" .if^en • DANGEHOUS id !,!„• aue ef juvenile lini-on Oflkm HMB tltied-no fluurc< slimy '' ,gnl • A NATI.-HAI. tnntrMer moiv cWIdran wmild have sUrted h„w nuich ,7„ delerV" t ,h?X %  '" "~ k f -' ''- ">> "" %  He duw,,, !" path.10 are MM to approved Kboota '""* 'V 'i'" 1 '""" "< L ' rronuie -"f one-third ot them go back S^ ^<" !" v ? !" ""SE The prire ot all thla I, to crime when they are freed. ^"VA '" psr'^n-d m -*i^ !" rz*i ga, half of the old Borjtat toy, end "'SLV ."? *££*£* %  h ii|> In prison later. Also, fotir out if ten young criminals in grownup jails return. pleceme.il fashion tho State its handling of law-breaking the healthy said after the meeting, "Attlee's a charming vfcted children were members of ga&l S) I'KVUND the con,„,,„.,.,„•„ „,., fSwl <„„ .hi„1 trol of BorAl and he be ^'"j,^^^^^ Cj ^ .1 is a common-sense, get-atWhai we wan then, is some dJe.rooi.oi thsMro -i.m which keeps an eye h ph s|lo ,„ (] llllM)1 ,.. be %  Btadttoya who range our ,^ me uho support „ nd lni>w wh0 nies in Bangs, oppose I-rd Goddard's demand One I ask f or the right in flog the man with youngsters ought claim good One city is working on these the cosh. results. Cer1ainl> not fewer than line> ling record of child crime, has uliieh proniiaas well. Hut i* does pttMOSttSU approved given seven police officers, the not :l with the men who will school, nnd Borstal treatment. full-time job of (tearing youngOOSB 109 v.'imn SSStl Cerwnly, also, crime goessters away from bad company. I U Our lUiulnvs Sa> : IHliTfivnl Yivws To The Editor. T'IC Adi'ocofe— SIR.— The ir.i-.tmg in QueaD's Park on Sunday night last should go i long way In pointing out to the people of Itarbados heading. In the reported speeches 'Bible Reader*. In the meantime it Is stated that it is for the "Labour I want all n-adrnt to understand Party in Barbados and the P.N.P. thai I have nothing agaUlsl thai in Jamaica to assist the people of rehgous set of people of whom ^ thencolonies along the road to I know very little t! their what f'"'leiaiion. Self (.ovemment. trfSM Dominion Status etc. but sk yourI think that Mr. F. G. has tn self if in the face of such differbil DO aaaVa :> Btbta and I hope opinion between the it Hoes not van m any way with leaders of the parties which .ire nun'* Bhtd. 16. 10. be to guide !>'.• Wesl Indies, if those the < %  l ut the sevenUi high sounding plans mean anyda> u-th of 'he tJrd, i us. Thy God'. I am sure U i. !l. KUATHWAITE lo honours %  !" . 4, .. .. Raster dav ns Good-Fri': ""' ^"'""11" in ropeet of am venUi da* %  port can be made about their affairs before their faces. I was not present to hear the meeting. but from whal I read in the %  tdroctttc of Tuesday fbt, I wall glean ho*l views of the main speakers on the occasion. One finds in the reported ppeeches of the Honourable N. W. Manley, g.c*. Leader of the opposition In the J. %  General of the p.N.p. his dlsefard f< r Colonialism plete abhorrence of bnpariall*tii nnd he I to my mind nobody I nave mentioned be angry with him—at I' •he other hand, one Qndd Before i go brto tha fnU nature %  nf our House of Asscmof I fending policy of full; %  r for a moment to an this being %  are rellgous body but I am only a This kind of feuding inside the Labour Party puts up the Conservative chances of n power for the full term nf live years. CONSEBVATTVB MVIHH.K On the big matters ihe leadership of Winton Churchill and the skill of R. A. Butler. as Chancellor, seem to be triumphing. Bul In th* realm of party policy there is plenty of confusion on the Conservative benches. : ;y was put into office with promises to lie -TKI'I steel Industry ard the %  10.000 trucks were acquired by the Transport Cosnnusslon In its great take-over ;ii the tune of nationalization. Conservatives promised to unravel both these Socialist set-ups. A candid reporter must admit that the first expectation after the General Election was ? plan to de-nal I ;n the King's Speech. And Churchill's son-in-law, Mr. Duncan Sandys, was reputed to be hard at work on a scheme t get Britain's basic industry batk Into privat I snds. But nothing developed. And then it was suddenly announced that Transport would have priority, and that it was really a very it matter. The much smaller 0001 DO trucks to private earners is taking the political machine a good deal ;is Labour i. %  nservative Government seems to ched a muddle with its le Steel is postponed until nes • oven some doubts if it will be de nationalised then. Transport has had its Bii %  lised that if II traduced inline for Ml 1 •poned. .... %  i is how the public hieh Bxd Sabbath, Sabbath breaker. BIBLE READER. J -„ ...v-l 1-w. .. — 1 from the brewers. A big row is brtv Ph. 1472 £79* & MARMALADE "First < %  />>< %  < %  an any shvlt..." Da Costa & Co., Ltd. Te&phone. G0DDARDS FOR ronK nirxiv .XEEOS Don't ferae*. QUJ FRIDAYS SPECIAL 11.50 PER LUNCHEON" Fruit Juice Pepper Pot West Indian Sweet Potatoes Breadfruit Rice Steamed Be.< Root Toast — Mannalade Coffee — Tea MEAT DEPT. CHICKENS DUCKS TURKEYS RABBITS FROZEN HADDOCK FRESH VEGETABLES Order Your ENRICHED SANDWICH BREAD to-day HITTER BEANS 16c. per lb. SWEET COUNTER Share's Sweets Nut Hot) Chocolates Marsh Ifalfccani Paseal's Glucose Carr's Biscuits Carr's Crackers A Cigarettes State Express JUST ARRIVED ALL BRAN RICE KRISPIES LOBSTER PASTE PASTE BOX FISH Uddard'.s hVstauranl



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r r r PACE TWO l:\Kll\DOs AI.VOCATI. nHDAT, MOIST 1. 1S2 Ccurib Ccdlinq %  lltomiliR i-v .. d %  I I p, ing in OK to U.K. M R, L SPOtaY m-rchant of ..If! tot England I X Q .Ii-i.... %  Kidi.. %  1 S \ %  Mr I.I r-xpect to two months. %  trporl lo see them or! wm B Spira. ARTIE'S HEADLINE : %  (. g-rli., all Wfll. %  < %  % % %  i 'UinfJ lu u Ttlll^gi.:eTd-e*afcM| JIIHI champion'.'" The New Haven Day Nursery LISTENING HOURS To ReauJTin Canada VfISS CLAIRE MlI.Nr •ph\ Professor to Lecture BOH A K CROW, n, .IT,. udent ol St. j. I f th. Univei lt> CoUei* of v rt. Trinidad „ i %  ill give a lecture her education at the Uraulin • Harrisoo College Convent, passed through ncn tf torfl r T. ?L cSSf -1 %  '. >"*> morning by T.t'.A (roan RM in-lure beams at 8 00 Trinidad intransit fur ..nd the admission is I where she huicv to reside For Thrta Waaks Afcer Two Weks M BS JOYC1 ll.AKKE. wife Of X TL Mm Bonny Oral* Clarke of Wood•*-' daughter of Mr ft H. Mar1-Spaln, Mrtved bete •'"• M nil c r of lhc Mf "•'%  ''" '' 1 on r'liday last bf B.W.I A. for nd "r*-. r dartu \ "Jvelled out three weeks' holiday with her J"*p St. Vincent by herself yas. mothM Mrs. Kdith Gibbons of '"dny morn.ng by B.G. Airway. Michael ?*• hw way back to Barbedo, i\,.*;^'„ (>.*... Sn Hpeni two week*' holiday — Optician Returns the ^ of M R KTCKNING to Trinidad uy Barnard, U.W.I.A. 00 Wednesday night ""a* Mr Hal Ward, son of Assistant Curate Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Ward l FTF.H spending nve week Deal", Maxwell Coast. Mr. W.i(! f\ holiday with hit a Optician employed with Kingstown,' St. Vincent, Rev K Spent Thre Week* M lt. II. t: COLLYUORE Barbadian im has been I ashling in Canada sine*lOlfl, left for Montreal by T < \ terday morning on hi i %  mti1..\o*i arleta the Canoa .tn ii Mr Coilymore *pcnl three weeks' holiday here as • guest the Hotel Royal. Arrived From St. I.ucia M AUDREY HEKi K accompanied he. l-.iw t St. LueiI New Abervrombv l-oo> -iome during the week byBWH Mr Reece is District Grand Mater of the Scottish Constitution ID narlssjfct) Acting Solicitor General M R. CLYDE ARCHER. I %  ... Draughtsman in Trimdai. BM been appointed Acting Solicitor General of mat Colony. Mr Archer who has also acted §j Solicitor General of Barbados was promoted to Trinidad when 1 he. was Judge of the Bridgetown Petty Debt Court here. From St. KUis FRANK BLACKMAN of >e Colonial Secretary's Office returned hum* on Saturday l.tsl. Mr Blackman left here on the 7th June for holiday and after spenning Miinc time in St Lucil wsjnl on to Antigua and then to St. Kit). where he spent a week. M'! Back to Brazil "V/IRS WILLIAM DUFT and children, fcleanoi and on Wedaaaday by UM s.s. Brsiil after spending two Wei ks* holiday as guests at the Ocean View Hotel. Mr. DufI who spent a few day.. OVel ben with his family, went over to spend his holidn M-nls;. %  mi turned heri B.G 0 N H For U.K. Holiday L LAVING for Montreal yesterday nuiriiinjintransit f*r KngVind b> T.C.A. was Mr. Wm" f T ,, V" 1 Industrial U 100 Marion of "Marine L..dge". Hastings. He has none on holiday and expects to be away fe 1 about three or four months. Back From Trinidad M ISS JOY COLE of the Brill* con Ameriem Tobacco Co. Bad MIn Miw Quita DuvieK of the Mnrin> || | IfnNl. ivturned from Trinidact statement yesterday morning by B.W.I.A preset) t-d nfter suendlnif two week'' bflHdav Presidei < as guests of Mr. and Mn H R era! Bacretai Dsvles of Apex Oilfields. committee n Miss Davles iMi DavieB' ested in U\< sister. were present Thu New Haven Day Nursi: v and First Aid Centre, situau .md inlirin. Thus the need for it Centre ti> eater to '.he needs f tinpOOl .it nhn She has *fco been one of the foundation rheinl*r of the Chlldren'i Ooodw U i • iuj nd neeatl] trantfi i rod hCT aetn.li.I. the SI. David's Church District which is greatly IT. noefi i f help. As ;i Leader of iue Church Oil md Gi ing Star Club and memlwr of the aim Mi. M. C. Kobinvon who is Women's Guild, rf the St I).,. i*turning to Canada after spendchurch, she has come into contact mben who were M-I "'-, %  !ll :; ''' '''">"' %  "' "'' 'j •(wttn nan iroup in the dtttri %  that afternoon The ift 0 "!*** 1 working with Dominion iin(i „, hl< way sh e saw the fieed the last General MeetOil Company who ; ue now setlingl for „ uch an organisation as thI'limmer & Co.. of Prederijk Gnlherer. Assistant 'ur.it* atback last week by _. Btraat, Port-of-Spain and caroe (ached to Si. Joseph'> (lu?,-h rePresident of Agrorootor m -.in %  %  Intransit I NTRANSIT from Trinidad %  | lay morning by T.C.A. won Mi A W Fanner, wife of the Hesidenl kaanaawi oi T.I.A. in Trinidad who has gone to New Brunswick f >r six weeks' holiday, Mr. John Wilkcs ai h ... Rooms""-The'Aimrand * J Montreal tor a holiday. Obicc*' <' the G.l.U." was espe! iivered for the benefit of th Fx-President Lectured Wednesday aiternOOO Mia. Ballou Kx-I'tesKleni %  1 Union gave Talk to nearly two hundred girls thiiem-ral Meeting held at i so necessary m the! of ourscry niaid-s in the care and l a etnld's life ; feeding of children, nd rtloa r work Inj] Apart from care provided for I.i to supplement the family children, the uim of the Nursery It. It also provides training • On Page S Ion t" wh.ch your birthday cutties and ^ i outlook i*. acoardaag to the stars. T** ARIES Excellent star aspects all through day. K ar March 21—April 20 you have the time, lend a helping hand ^ to some worthy cause, perhaps aid our service men and women. • * U oi Buti allowed this generous. MHniii|)leled work or start kino Well planned. Artistic laborious trades favoured. • • • j, Um unemotional intuition, common sens, yi and you can really make headway. The difficult equally sponsored with the easier tasks. Fine day for gain. m • • pro-ft (1EMINI May 21—June ead and a financial if 'he Annual l> Mi> D. W. Bentley, IliM (. Williams, Genbers of the ... ooaaoj In Trinidad. Matron Rat urns M ISS M. BYER. matron of tni St Philip's Almsbouse. who has bean spending a bcilidav ;_n St >ther ladies interLucia, returned home by ffw I A .-Hies at the Union during the week. BY THE YVAY-B> BEACHCOMBER CAM CODrORTH. PlA/4 *• ho. Captain Koulenough with hi's'Old Masters, blunderid again the oilm In an absent-ndnded mcod lie Mfcned a Holbein, which had been < "miasmned. Holborn. It wa? a gi my. indistinct portrait. FoulI M i-.ini a note Add a r,n, S O thu .Irumn 1 ICUSSUOIIIr s | p r s 1 F* It |i0 %  ." 1 4 5 1 rti n i tt n A S th ! IN.k susiaUf iruOr .1 Itlr en uoldiuii writins niiiiprini IM a Mam Water (ai %  Merit %  UM it.ii notici d %  N*r.i> uoihiuu lor upsecii i il May gnii* vo t -n i rrirmmns ci on ioause Were* ui* auifg. %  < la Itetrnfe thla rn.L-.ni .e\e. Il 'ear oi a misuse si tea •iJU I inu trirla<1\ lake -Iioi •il win aiwiv* eroduot %  clov . %  it Jolna bach et .1 me an ill a Worn up Ult quoVaa nimuui worn J HugmU i\ wag 141 iai %  • r th. .. Psrt ->t >uip. pert ^f : %  '. .Llilll PICK iivwrncn; i More than assrBao on i ftMueii ody ,.i.' doubUeai al work on a count! i -gai u hid Ubreathed in by everybody. In .1 permanent war of tiibkind. dd be no need fni „nn..manta, nor, to dsad. loi anytnlng n.uch cxi pt lUppUtl Bui ||. • long would il be before specially tralm bri Stharg, braanv Ing secretly, began to unutratc LUO BVfri mn:,try'' In rcmott places, where people used only ordinary brealb, ipeciul saboteur' wUh totha] hiccoughs could do ureat damage. "Hold your breath until you see the whtttl of then Smrlliiifehani-Sinilh a I uvirk I READ that a plumber who w< nl llshing caught a fullarawa bear Cosmo Smelllngham-Smltli. who lassoes rlyinr llsh and tickles hippopotamuse* .. though thty were trout, seems to have a rival SmelliniihatnSmith. fishing off the end of I pier at a cojsla] H M'. OPCI caught two gSrls. using chocolates As they were rather small, he threw thim back into the sea. according to the rules ol Nil Angling Club. New Haven Welfare Associate Its Aims This Day Nun I initial stage and t infant children who mi properly looked Sftei i i\<>u'r i also provides an alnmsphere am %  e-et% 4.45 a 8.30 P.M. nuing Dai -f. CANCER ^ Juofl 21 July M Today encourages sUgh aims, bright ideas. ^ inlereals with hard work. Star*, "f* GLOBE OPENING TO-DAY AT 5 & K.M AND CONTINUING DAILY M n> be lo HI, UM July II Au 22 VIROO AMI. 2J-pt. 23 As startling as the screen has ever rtarerl be 1 WARHERBHOS' Storm Warning <;iner K..1.1M Ii,..,Steve ROGERS — KtAGAN DAY COCHAN WARNER BROS. ACT ON PACKED THRILLER' worthy *ith l prayer that honour, your good. * * Sound plans, well directed energy and ability can return worth-while benefits. ^ Mind, hands, tools should be instruments "*r for good. • • • M Widely broadcast are very encouraging r* for practically all endeavour necea.iary to good living. Seemingly menial L tasks as favoured a? prominent ones. ** • • • Stars today strongly support youngster-*' if and oldsters' Interest, government and T ^ i IVIC matters of import. A responsive parlod for clerk, teacher, business leader, jfL labourer. *^ • • Planets in benetlc array advocate doubling %  >effort without strain. Make the most of education, ability and experiences. Neglect no item of importance. Whether on vacation, at work or just at Nov. 23— Dec. 2*>home. this Is a promising, full day fo* wholesome activities. ^ • • • CAPRICORN Stars promote good intentions and nasd i Dc. 23 Jan. 21 ^ ltllIo 1 workmanship, intricate matteis. w keen brain work. Laborious trades can ~ gain. Your Uranus among the favourably !" aspeeted planets now. Unusual undertakings that have merit are sponsored with ^ everyday activities. A challenge day to ~ YOU! • • • PISCES Should be peak day for your endeavours. Feb. 21—March 20 See travel, spurts, handling vehlclea. tools. machinery' under friendly rays. .A* YOU BORN TODAY. Gay, debonair, interesting in conyC •fK venation. Proud, a bit egotistical at times, but usually kind and generous. Would be a brave soldier, a leader in any jggSJ ,i or civic group, an instructor in sports amiable "fC ^( with children or grownups. You can succeed in anv worthy undertaking if you seek Gods guidance and help. Big opportunities immediately i*cad. Birthdate: FVanels Scott Kev. •< 1author Of Star Spangled Banner. .IWKTTA IIIIISN SIIOI* (Naxt l>oor u> Siniier't.) Owing Uj the n-Mt reduclioti on CottO *'.cods, we have reduced all of our dresses in lima ii' .{.ices, and tincoining wrck-i'iui Smari Collo!. and Beach Dresses from S1I.9S. SMIIII Suits reduced from 317.00 to Sin nil. ; V^-''*'*''''**'*'''''*''''"V"*'-"V*^'^*'*>^ la A I I I % The Garden—St. Jimo TODAY a TOMOKROM %  fl TfchiileDlor D%  .ll\ CARIBBEAN PRtMIIBI ! PLAZA B* ISWN DIAL 2310) (CONTINUING THE SCREEN EXCITEMENT OF THE YEAR! AN EXPERIENCE YOU'LL NEVER FORGET 1 l\ STOCK l#i Assortment • LADIES' NYLON HOSE • LADIES' NVLACE HOSE • LADIES' 1.ISI.E HOSE • CHILDREN'S ANKLETS ALSO — NEW SHIPMENT OF . • MEN'S WILSON FELT HATS T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS S2.D9 $2.15. $2.28. $2.41 $2.50 $1.31 SO. 32 tc U CENTS DIAL '220 YOUR SHOE STORES DIAL 460* Robert HUTTON • Steve BRODIE • James EDWARDS • Richard LOO rth SID MElT0N • mH ^^^l\^^JX Gene EVANS



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FRIDAY AIGIST I. lM: RXKBADOS ADVOCATL PARIS HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON IT PAYS YOU TO DE AL HERE SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Thursday to Saturday only SI'l-A I Al Ol KIIIS HIT now atnilaklr al our Wruiirlu-s While Park. I Hri- %  Sir. •-! lu.ll. NOW MUM) rWL rr lb > M M Kit \MS prr II. SB Ki.lM 5-11. Tin. $6.14 S3.7.". MLTANAI ,... lb 4i t-HI NT.* prr lb ,* COCMONQ IUTTKK .">•. Tills 1.511 4.:m UMUOU 4 rtu Ik. LM CONDCNSKD Mll.K 33 .31 WVMII1-. I IMA BKANS .45 ,. nUCt' lAMI .li UCHitM.ni 81 .75 OOLMN COIN 4U .. M S Ff pkV .11 mi o in t rti \M (iii IIM) •---'-'-',',',--'--,---', YES SIR.' | IIUwFlavour— UVip rt.stitS&SRUM mri tt (1938) LTD. f I Hi'jdq*)nirio for rV"I Rum j FOR NICE THINGS TO USE PANS $ .1% %  K.L.B PEAKS K.UB SI .W IMPERIAL SAUS \< .I'S LOAF &> n mo VIM' Iff tin|U| IH Drink llur popul*. riVi V[| RIM •I M |.t Kolllr IN(I-; & Co., Ilil. D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street CRICKET The West Indies in Australia 1951—52 CRUSADERS By HAROLD DALE Mr Harold Drill-, already known to Millions nt r—don for hla forthright cricket reporting in the Daily Kxpirst* and the Barbndo* Advocate add*; .mother out.s'.andin* book to our series on i'( r4 Criclwl Mow would the Hashing OttojMI i>f %  tad weic il m itefa up t<> the efficient rtin-goMag o( Morris and Huswtt? Would the spin and guile ol Ramadhtn and Valentine be more effective than the menacing speed of Lindwall and Miller' 1 Would the ".tormv petrel of cricket," Barnes, succeed in his at a comeback? These and the other iprlnfl lo mind are fully dealt with %  commentary. Apart Eron 1 on all lor i ol the tour. %  ticket enthusiast i ^ould afford the time rtt iiroutfhci;i the "World Championship" i latches. Cricket Crusaders to The idea! I %  Reinforced i by many splendid action illustrations, il I momentou rmchair ADVOCATE STATIONERY