Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text




For the cause that lacks assistance

‘Gainst the wrongs that need resistance

For the future in the distance,
And the good that I can do.



WHAT'S ON TODAY



Court of Grand Sessions: 10.00 a.m

Mobile Cinema, Mt. Tab: School
Pasture, St. John, p.m

Police Band Concert at Princess Alice
Playing Field, 7.45 p.m

Water Polo, Aquatic Clut, >m



Governor Challenges B’dos

ESTABLISHED 1895

Lady Savage Opens |
St. George Social Centre |

YOU HAVE PUT BARBADOS on the map in so many

ways; you have led the Caribbean in sugar production, in |

education and health services.
to the Caribbean in the development of family and com-}

munity life, His Excellency

Surely you can give a lead |

;
the Governor told an audience |

at the opening of the St. George Social Centre yesterday

afternoon. He made those

remarks after saying that he

was told—on good authority—that the development of the

community centres and community life in Jamaica was far
ahead of that in Barbados.

opened by Lady Savage.

St. George's Social Centre;
which is situated at Ellerton,
stands on a prominent site over-
looking nearly the whole parish
of St. George. The outside is de-
corated in more than one pastel
shade whi'e the interior is a com-
bination of green and pale blue
with a touch of red here and there.
The verandah, on the southern
side, extends the full length cf
the building, thereby providing
an imposing view to cricket and
football enthusiasts.

The Centre has two latrines and
a canteen, It can accommodate
over 200 people. It was designed
by Mr. Bruce Moulder and built
by Mr. G. A. Fitzgerald.

For the opening ceremony, the
interior was decorated with vases
of Anthurium and Lotus of the
Nile Lilies and to the enjoyment
of everyone, the Police Band, con-
ducted by Capt. C. E. Raison,
played some lively tunes as the
afternoon wore on.

His Excellency and Lady Sav-
age, accompanied by Mr. Denis
Vaughn, A.D.C., arrived at 4.45
p.m. They were met by Mr. W.
A. Yearwood, Churchwarden and
Canon C, C. Conliffe.

Mr. Yearwood took the oppor-
tunity to introduce His Excellen-
cy and Lady Savage to members
of the Playing Fields Committee
and of the St. George Vestry.
Lady Savage officially opened the
building.

Mr. W. A. Yearwood, Church-
warden, said that it was his privi-
lege and pleasure as Chairman of
the St. George’s Social Centre,
on beha'f of the Committee, to
extend a welcome to His Excel-
lency and Lady Savage.

On Committee

He said, ‘I personally can claim
no credit directly to the planning
and building of this hall, I was
one of the Members of the Com-
mittee appointed by your prede-
cessor, Sir,
to Government that playing fields
and community halls be instituted
in each parish, I may add Sir, the
Members of that Committee at the
time visualised that bal games
such as cricket, croquet, footbat!,
and athletics be organised on the
playing field.

“In the building, indoor games
such as table tennis, draughts and
dominoes he played, projecto-

@ On Page 5



Reds Suggest New
Wording For
Truce Document

MUNSAN, Korea, July 30,

Communists to-day suggested a
possibly significant change in the
wording of the proposed Korean
armistice document, now’ under
study by both sides. It dealt with
the paragraph relating to war
prisoners. The issue of prisoner
exchange has blocked the truce
for months, The Reds _ proposed
changing the term “captured per-
sonnei” to “prisoner of war.”

Col. Duncan S. Somerville, U.N.
Command Staff Officer, said he
had asked the Reds for a clarifi-
cation during recent secret truce
talks, Maj. Gen, William K. Har-
rison, Senior U.N. Armistice Dele-
gate, told the /Reds-that the term
“captured personnel’. meant all
persons in custody, even those
opposing repatriation. “War pris-
oners”, he added, were all those
persons who were to be repatri-
ated.— (CP)

_ ANTLU. 5.



i le

which recommen@ed ;

The building was officially

_ Britain Will
- Concentrate

On Atom Arms

LONDON, July 30

Prime Minister Winston Chur- |
chill indicated on Wednesday that
| Britain will concentrate on atomic |
age weapons in a_ streamlined
economy re-armament programme,
Outlining the Government's Eco-
nomy Programme in which he}
‘said Britain will switch some in-|
dustries from rearmament to ex- |
port goods production, Churchill |
told the Commons: “We must
take account of the ceaseless tech-
nical development which has re-
‘sulted in some weapons becoming
antiquated and the advance of types
of greatly improved character.
|These developments have affected
\the views of our military experts
on the character and course of
any ‘future struggle, and these
processes of change continue and
even accelerate with the remorse-
‘less march of the science of human
jdestruction,
+ He said



} the United States has
,;made “immense strides in its pol-
jicy of atomic weapons, and in the
range and accuracy of their deliv-
jery,” and added: “Remarkable
‘progress has been made in’ our
jown development of guided mis-
'siles or rockets.”

| The Government got majorities
cf 25 and 22 in the vote of confi-
dence on their economic pro-
gramme.

| Churchill told the crowded
| House of Commons in opening the
‘second day of the economic de-
bate that there could be no mili-
tary strength without firm eco-
nomic foundations, and that the
‘rearmament programme must be
kept within the limits of Britain’s
‘ability. “I may say that, broadly
speaking the decisions we have
/reached will alter the pattern of
defence production in a way}
which will limit these demands on
the engineering industry, and in,
coming years set free a valuable
part of its capacity of our civil
{exports.”"—U.P.

| U.S. Taking Over
| Bahamas’ Guided
| Missile Base

NASSAU, July 29

Tomorrow the Consolidated Con-
struction Company, will be hand-
ing over the Guided Missile Base of
the Grand Bahamas to representa-
tives of the United States Navy and
Air Force. Construction started 1.
months ago, and the United States











forces have been in occupation for
the last ten months, United States
officials are flying from Florida

for the formal ceremony, The
Company expects to hand over
the base at Eleuthera a fortnight
hence. Completion of work on the
bases at San Salvador, Maya-
guana, and Grand Turks will be



several manths hence An item
from the remote settlement of
Deadman's Key, Long Island,
where people probably never
heard about “flying saucers”
'comes a report that about two

weeks ago a group of people saw
several objects “styeaking across
the sky-’ They described them
as noiseless, and whiter and much
faster than any plane, and spoke
of them as guided missiles.——(CP)




|

oe res

ae wees

’



THE ST. GEORGE SOCIAL CENTRE, situated at Ellerton, was offi clally openod yesterday afternoon by Lady Savage. The Centre is
situated on a prominent site, overlooking nearly the whole of the parish.

Graft Bled Farouk’s Army White

hhavbados



Settlement
Unlikely

WASHINGTON, July 30.
Secretary of State Dean Ache-

son
ments in
any
early
pute.
Acheson

told a press
Wednesday that

also

conference
recent
Iran did not give him
encouragement
settlement of the oil

said

on
develop-
about an
dis-

that the

Iranian Government has made no

request for

in

the withdrawal
United States military
that country.

of
missions

Asked by reporters if he was

hopeful of an oil settlement
Tran the Secretary pointed
Mossadegh
negotiation
the Premier
immediately withdrawn
things

that
made
Britain,
had
offer.

Premier
direct
but

This

left

that

in
out
had
with

his
where

they were when the oil dispute
started, Acheson commented.



‘RIGS ROCK ‘IRANIAN CAPITAL

”

SOLDIERS ATTEMPT TO QUELL one of the many ssrinus disturbances that have broken out in Teheran, Iran,

since the resignation of former Premier Ahn

of 20,000 and more,

anti-American sentiments,






1,5 officer v



nad Ghavam, who escaped the country as his life was threat-
ip,ed up by Communist and Nationalist propaganda, have been voicing
us beaten and an economic aid office stoned. (Internation



al)

‘The Proposed |



AAW y-,

OO



URSDAY, JULY 31

TH



7

ST. GEORGE Sci Ab CENTRE

It can accommodate over 200,

CAIRO, July 30,
Exiled King Farouk was ‘accused on Wednesday of
contributing heavily to the Egyptian debate on the Pales-
tine war by bleeding the army white through his won graft
and treachery. farouls wa reported to have obtained a
commission of nearly $300,088 on a single purchase of wai
material for the army*duting the Palestine campaign.

open the Government case against Egyptians with the
settling of supplies to the army during the war. He charged
. :

that Farouk was involved personally and had strangled the
inquiry i

Army Commander General
being hailed as Egypt’s
1 of Des

ruib

N
“Mar tiny”, and is shuffling









omcers in a far reaching

'Y to purge the army of cor-

Iti * Of ‘ elements Group Com
inerary n Hussein Mahmoud Bey,

. | Air Force Attache in London hus

I] | T lbeen appointed Chief of Staff of
hic 1an our ithe Air Foree. Wing Commander

‘EB! Din Mahmoud Afifi has’ been

The Indian Cricket team is ex-| @Ppointea Commander of the Air
pected to leave Southampton on Fores College Afifi h ut been
December 26 by the S.S. “Golaty? feenished aa forgotten pee. oy
Aiptidte th Saft An 4 arouk 7 i A t
I aE ne a lt wa | Ale abn he Ko



bt Wea yle@aptain Hassan: Akesé
}Bey of the Air Force,‘ Farouk’s
“| personal pilot until he was forcec

Trinidad om January 8) 9)-16,
& 13 ‘and the First Test Mate!


























Reporters asked him to ana- tee es roam January 15, 16, 17.) (6 resign recently, surrendered to
lyse the crisis in Iran, but hej “he. mndian team v tderive J {army authorities and was held.
declined, saying that it would be), og at oo am will ¢ tve Wh) A spokesman said most of the
“unhelpful.” | Barbac o3 at 9.20 p.m, on January | omc the high comman

—vU.p. |21 and play against the Bar for Palestine end saw the

}team on January 23, 24, ," “y j e distribution of arm
& 28. The second ‘Test be md ammunition They blamed it

- layed on January 30, 31, Fe 2,,on rruption and mistrust i

‘oreigw, Aid 7: aeimeaaaetmumadiee

Foreige: , . Cuts The visitors will open ul ir} It wa iid be teen agents
1 , “gh programme against the B.G. In-j| ane i the King himse
Will Slow Defeisce dians when a two-day matc} i if } > mg one ; of in
. be played on February 7 & 9. The| ¥ tor The actual inquiry
Production match against British Guiana will Vin ied about sixty. separate
take place on February 11, 12, 13 dals_ the smallest of wnich

WASHINGTON, July 30, }14 & 16..The Third Test is sched-|involved nearly $300,000 he sai

Secretary of State Dean Ache-' uled for February 19, 20, 21, 23,|4 Biished | repart | ane
son said on Wednesday that the 24 & 25, isp cial committee fo myc to S a
concessional cuts in the adminis-; The Indian Team is expeet-j the former King 4 ee see
tration’s foreign aid programme ed to return. to Trinidad from |¢valusted his personal provert
will slow up or extend the limit/British Guiana and play the | md lands at $287,000, Pyata eat
of time for Western Defence pro-!'Trjnidad East Indians on Feb-, "rnishin ee ies iia 7 a
duction. Just before it adjourned]; yory 28 and March 1, The!!! ; und Gn Alexandria =i
“sine die” congress cut the for-)Fourth Test will be played in| %!4,909,¢ 10 ——U.P,
eign aid programme from $7,900,- Trinidad on March 8, 4, 5, 6, 7,1 ni
000,000 to about $6,000,000,000, & 9, A derauer Wins

Acheson told the press confer-/ en pic lt .o 14, ‘

e y spe i e is Oo NLare 4 °, st ~ ‘
ar will thocp tho Gilets ok sivietee ae = a ofr ig and Final Test | C ourt Victory
r stretching o efence pro-| Wi e playec in Jamaica onj SS da sat J : 4
aucion an the West where he March 19, 20, 21, 23, 24, & 2: poe Comet or ny a oo
North Atlantic Treaty Powers} The Indian Authorities have not We | German ( hancel oF. Db
were building a defence line|mentioned the names of any o ad A pen acl parti gree: ve
against Communist aggression,|the players likely to make the;0-Gay in hi fight or the fiat -
Acheson indicated that this was|trip but the West Indies Cricket Cation of mu country Se
one of the big reasons why the} Board of Control have made | with the West, Yee Pree ;
United States was unable to ap-|clear that they expect the “very | 0P* an. nee adi ega " rae aS
proach the fulfillment of requests] best side” to visit the West Indic air Nei ore al Conet ied
by France for large American mil-} No replies have as yet been re-|,, The Co at ea ma Re yale od '
itary contracts that would be|ceived from the seven West In- a * cr ee ‘the nanan.
qaged.in that COMntTy: dies professionals by the W.L.C.B tuact with “tt e allie ; oba ipe Bu-
ane gap banrgen sae Fee: of C | ropean arn y gt sement until the
request and American ability to} Jamaica will play British Gui-! 7 j ands at bout $300,-|.... i ia 3 : fs : pacts had een enacte into law
meet it stanc oF $ “jana in Georgetown from October|py the West German Parliament
000,000.—U.P. 10 to October 22 [he Jamaica! “Two treaties ending most of
ail i a tla ————-—». | team will play Berbice a €€-\ fe occupation controls, and obli-
day fixture on completion of thé jyating West Germany to raise
oe Intercolonial matches, It is ex= {490,000 troops for the proposed
= pected that the W.I. Selector#!Muropean Army come up for final
ane and the W.I. Captain, not yet/vote after the Lower House of
; appointed, will witness the/Parliament (Bundestag) recon

Jamaica—Br, Guiana tournament. / yer

in September.—U.P.



j —~

O’Dwyer Denounces Prescott:
Injures Insulting Newsman
MEXICO, July 30.

Mexico's leading newspaper El Universal on Wednes-
day described as a “serious incident” the press conference
at which the United States Ambassador William O’Dwye1
angrily denounced the United Press Bureau Chief Robert

Prescott for a story about O'Dwyer’s plans. Prescott said















| today that he would stand on his dispatch of yesterday
which quoted the friends of O’Dwyer as hinting that the
| Ambassador had considered becoming a Mexican citizen
| When he retires from diplomatic service
| El Universal bannered the ory of the North American Depart.
of the Embassy Press Conferer ment of State’ kept O'Dwyer
| under the headline “Scandal about|from } ing “from offen and
O’Dwyer over. whether he jmenaces to i of action” against
thinking of nationalizing hirnself |Prescott
as a Mexican.”, The Ambassador |
injured a newspaperman for call.| Tt per Excelior als<
ing him “bastard,” “liar” jPlayed the story in a top position
other epithe which in noting in its lead paragraph that
| were equivalent to the max | O'Dwyer voice vibrated in the
linsult that would be used jtomb of | Irish ancestors’
| Mexico. The newspaper d |dur the ir ent The Excelior
incident occurred I n t it OC
;O’Dwyer giv n ¢ col i O'Dwyer
jfer the n of tt | fa t
Pre fy } t Pres in-
personal frier f
| O’Dw
| The newspat
f —U.P

i
Former Attorney General Mohammed Azmi moved to







New Administrator



n Family Life

|

!
|

‘

!

u

No One May
Quit Egypt

CAIRO, July 30,

General Mohammed Naguib
Bey, Egypt's new “strong man”
moved swiftly to prevent suspect-
ed grafters and war profiteers
from fleeing the country to escape
prosecution. The Army prohibit-
ed anyone leaving Egypt without
a special Interior Ministry permit
after a number of close friends of
ousted King Farouk tried to cross

the border.
Informed sources said in one
ease two former associates of

Farouk left Cairo by air but their |
aircraft was ordered back 15 min-
utes later and the men arrested

—UP. |

Colonies Will Be |

Represented At |
“alks By Lyttelton |



From Our Own Corr

LONDON, July 30. |

Colonial representation at the}
forthcoming Commonwealth Prime
Ministers’ Conference which is to}
financial, commercial ue
economic issues will probably be
in accordance with the precedent |
at the last Commonwealth |
Economic Conference in January |
Mr. Oliver Lyttelton, Secretary |
of State for the colonies will repre- |
ent the colonial

espondent |

territories at)

the full sessions of tihe conference | ,

which will be attended by Prime}
Ministers, He will be assisted and |
idvised by economic experts from
the colonial territories most |
lireetly concerned in the confer- |
ence though these will not attend |
full sessions.

It is theught likely that a com- |}
mittee of colonial experts will
neet daily to hear Lyttelton’s re-|
view of the previous day’s busi-!
ness and prepare a brief for the}



current day's discussions, Each |
rolony will therefore have a voice
in matters under review though}
hey will not be directly repre-|
sented

It is not yet known whether re-
resentatives of the colonies will}
be invited to the meeting of offi-!

which will shortly start work |
m the preparation of the agenda}
for the Prime Ministers’ Confer-|

nee }

}
ial



Presides Over

Legislature

DOMINICA, July 30,

The new Administrator H. L.
Lindo presided over the first meet-
ing of the legislature yesterday. A
Bill to enlarge the Police Force!
and create a Police reserve w is |
deferred by a majority vote.

A resolution demanding imme-

diate payment of compensation
for evicted tenants of the Gov-|
ernment-owned * Goodwill Estate}

wes passed unanimousiy, the roid
Austin Winston remarking that!
the days when heads of Govern-

ment departments considere
themselves little Czars are ove
Miss Eugenia Charles, Barri |

ter was the new nominated mem-|
ber for Mrs. Elma Napier who is on
long leave. Hon, Austin Winsto |
was selected to represent the co!-|
ony at the Federation Conference |
n the ULE (CP) |

HON. MARRYSHOW WILL
START DISCUSSION
47° PRESS CLUB |







Hon. T. A. Marryshow, M.L.C.,|
Grenada will be the gue t)
peaker at the Press Club tomor-
row night at 8 o'clock in the regu
li monthly series of discussions,
on matters of public interest |
Hon. Marryshow will lead off}
the discussion on “Federation of
the B.W.I.”
Members and their friend ur
welcome to the disc ion \



ié

H

PRICE : FIVE CENTS | 2

|

Airforce

_ Explains

“Saucers”

WASHINGTON, July 30
The US. airforce flered a com-
bination of summer heat waves,
optical and radar illusions as a

plausible explanation of the latest
flurry of “flying saucers.” Intel-
ligence officers ridiculed the notion
that the mysterious objects in the
sky were hail from other planets









or Russia—or pose iace to
the Uni States.

They confident th new
scientific nvestigations ith
powerful telescopes ar pecial
cameras would. explain vay the
objects as “physical !
Such as mirages

As f thre “flock bject
iSighted by radar over Washington!
in thy’ past ten days Major Gen-
eral Jchn A. Samford, Airforce
Director of Intelligence, told a
news conference my own mind is
satisfied that they resulted from
temperature inversion

This was explained in detail
later by two experts from the Air
Technical Intelligence Centre of
the Wright Patterson Air Force
3ase at Bayton Ohio. They ere
Dr. B, L. Griffing and Captain Roy
James. They pointed out that air
temperatures decrease ith alti-
tude, However when a warm

layer is passed over a cooler one,
the temperature temporarily in-
creases and a layer of warm air
is formed,

Tois will cause radar beams
to speed earthward. The radar
ipulsts then bounce cff-ground
“targets.” What then appear as
unidentified white lights on radar-
cop ire not cbjects in the sky
bul objects on the ground

Street and automobile lights
ney be similarly reflected as if

they are formations on the clouds,
and if there is sufficient wind
velocity or turbulence, the lights
will appear to dance, creating the
illusion that they fiying
saucers.”—U,P,

U.N. Blast

Red War
Factory

TOKYO, July 39

American B29 Superforts blasted
the vast Communist war factor:
only four miles from the border of
Red China éarly on ‘Lhursday in
the war’s biggest air strike against
a single target. Sixty superiorly
three full wings of the Far Fast
Air Force 3omber Command
Gropped more than 600 tons
bombs on the Oriental Light
Metals Company,-recently expand

are



;ed to accommodate an aluminit
alloy factory,

Flying high over a dense cloud
\layer superforts, struck in three
wuves without fighter escort, al
most within sight of the grea

Communist jet fighter dase
Antung in Manchuria



Pombers using elcetroni iim
fing devices truck at the main
bulldings, power houses, clectric
transtormer yards, warehouse
nd nearly 300 barracks typa
structures The attack began
hortly before 1! p.m. and con-
Unued until 2.30 a.m The 12
sere factory in prewar days had
| an annual capacity of 40,000
metric tons of aluminium. U.P.



7

gy

(Yywe me |








of;









WEATHER REPORT

YESTERDAY



infall fram Codringtor nil
Rainfall for month to date: 3.72 ib

aghest Temperature 06.5 F

west Temperature: 71.5 °F

Velocity

7 miles per hour
ter , a

+ 20.099 13 5



TODAY
5.48 aye
6.20 p.m
July 2

. 2.46 p.m



ft

|: GEN: MATTHEWIRIDGWAY

All U.S. Forces
In Europe Now
Under Ridgway

PARIS, July 30.

Ali American soldiers, sailors
and airmen stationed in Europe
were brought under the personal
command of General Matthew
Riagway, N.A.T.O. Supreme
Commander on Wednesday.

Ridgway announced a sweeping
reorganization of U.S. troop com-
mands extending from Britain
across Europe to Turkey, He said
that effective Thursday, he also
will assume command of all U.S.
forces, with former American
Commander in Europe, General
Thomas Handy, acting as his depu-
ty. The general . said the new
|Command will give him broad
powers to streamline and cut the
costs of the defence of the West.
Supreme Allied headquarters said
be action was taken on the orders

of U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff.
Ridgway explained that the
streamlining of American troops

‘and commands in Europe: will not
affect U.S. formations assigned
cperationally, to N.A.T.O. com-
| LL stlhelye - >

| T’DAD OPENS DOOR
TO W.I. NURSES

PORT-OF-SPAIN, July 30.





Trinidad Nursing Council has

ened its dcor to nurses from
British Guiana, Jamaice and
ther West Indian colonies in an
fort to ¢ the critical staff
hortage t Caura Tuberculosis
Sanatorium her

Mi Clyde Archer, Barbacos
born legal draughtsman is here,
making provisions to allow for the

emporary registration of qualified

nurses from countries for which a
plesent there is no arrangement for
1cciprocal registration,

These nurscs would be employed
on condition that they work at
spccified institutions here, such as



the Caura Sanatorium, Lepro
rium at Chacacachacare and th
Viasson T.B, Hospital.—-(CP)



(| CLIPPER





PAGE TWO



the Gcv-

EXCELLENCY

H's




erner and Lad sava gE
cempanic¢ by Major Denis
Vaughn A.D.C., attended the
pening of the St. George Social
Centre yesterday evening. The
Centre was officially opene by
Lad; Sav e.

The invited guests were Sis
George and Lady Secel, Hon. an
Mrs. R. N. Turner, Mr. E. W. Bar-
row, M-C.P., Mr. F. E.. Miller,
M.C.P., Mr. G. H. Adams, C.M.G.,
Mr. F. L. Walcott, M.C.P., Mr.

Fred Goddard, M.C.P,, Dr. H. G
Cummins, M.C.P, Mr, M. E. Cox,
M.C.P., Miss Betty Arne, Mr.
A. G. Jordan, Mr. and Mrs. C, C.
Barrow, Mr. and Mrs, L. C. Moore,
Mr,. and Mrs, H. G. Yearwood,
Miss E. Smith, Miss Daphne Moore,
Mr, and Mrs. Cyril Reifer, Mrs.
Almira Aimey, Miss Nellie Pitt,
Mr, and Mrs, Q. Dottin, Mr. and
Mrs. G, S. Robinson, Canon C. C.
Conliffe and Mrs, Conliffe, Rev.
and Mrs, Coleman, Rev. Brath-
waite, Mr. and Mrs. W. B. Carring-
ton, Mr. Bruce Moulder, Mr, and

Mrs. G.’A. Fitzgerald, Mr, and
Mrs. MeKenzie, Mr, and \'rs.
Herbert Weekes, Mrs. de Viera,

Mr, and Mrs, E, M, Shilstone, Mr.
A. D. Nicholls, Mr. and Mrs
D. A. V. Weekes, Mr, and
Mrs. W. F. Brathwaite, Mr. ond
Mrs. E. Thornton, Sgt. and Mrs.
Inniss, Capt. and Mrs. Grant,
Capt. and Mrs. Raison, Major and

Mrs. R. A. Stoute, Members of
the Vestry and the Parochia!
Treasurer.

After the opening of the Centre
the Pclice Band, conducted by

Capt. C- E, Raison, entertained
those present to some lively
music.

For One Month
PENDING a month's holiday in
Barbados are Mrs. D. A. Prior
and her three sons from Mara-
caibo, Venezuela, They arrived
on Sunday by B.W.LA. and are
guests at Maresol Beach Flats, St
Lawrence Gap.
Mrs, Prior’s husband is em-
played with the Shell Oil Com-
pany in Maracaibo.

On Holiday

MONG the passengers arriv-
ing yesterday morning from
Trinidad by the S.S. Brazil were
Mr. and Mrs. F’, BE. Agostini who
have come over for two weeks’
holiday which they are spending

as guests at the Hotel Royal.

Mr. Agostini, a Director of
Agostini Bros, Ltd. Commission
Agents of Port-of-Spain, has

visited Barbados on several oc-
easions before. He was here two
years ago when he spent two days
on business.

Spe t Three Weeks
ETURNING to St. Kitts by
B.W.LA. this morning is Miss
Cc, O’Laughlin, Cashier of Archi-
bald Agencies. She has been here
for the past thnee weeks on busi-
ness coupled with pleasure as a
guest of Mrs. Arthur Cadogan of
“Swansea”, Hastings.

Leaving Tonight

EAVING tonight by B.W.LA.
4.4 for Trinidad will be Mr, and
Mrs. G. E. Burton and their two
sons Ivan and Larry from San
Tome, Venezuela who have been
holidaying here as guests of the
Hotel Reyal for the past week
They expect to remain in Trinidad
for a couple of days before re-
turning home. ‘

Mr. Burton is Pipe Line Con-
struction Superintendent of the
Mene Grande Oil Company in Sun
Tome.



ent

Carb Calling



LADY SAVAGE opens the St. George Social Centre after being intro-
duced to members of the Playing Fields Committee and the Vestry.

For Trinidad Post
M* D. 8S, COZIER, a Barbadian

and old Harrisonian, at pre-
sent Superintendent of Police in
North Borneo, has been trans-
ferred to Trinidad as an Assistant
Superintendent. a

Mr. Cozier served at Harrison
College as an Assistant Master be-
fore taking up an appointment as
an Assistant Master of the St.
Vincent Grammar School which
he held from 1931 to 1941.

He joined the St. Vincent Police
Force as Assistant Superintendent
and was Superintendent when he
was transferred in September 1946
to North Borneo,

Mr. Cozier is spending his leave

in St. Vincent before going to
Trinidad. He is an uncle of Mr.
Ee. L. Cozier, former Managing

Editor of the “Barbados Advocate”
and at present Assistant Informa-
tion Officer of the Caribbean Com-
mission.

Trinidad Director
ERE on a two-week visit 0:
business combined with pleas-

ure is Miss Cecilia Lai Fook,
Directer of the L. J. Williams
Marketing Co., Ltd, of Port-of-

Spain, She arrived on Tuesday
by B.Vi.A. and is a guest at the
Hotel Royal,

Keturried to Jamaica
R. K. L. STUART, Registrar
of the Hospital of the Uni-
versity College of the West Indies
has left the colony after spending
a short holiday with his nts
here, Mr, and Mrs, E, A. Stuart of
“Broughderg”, Black Rock.

Attended General Meeting

R. NESTOR BAIZ, Director

of Bottlers Lid. Trinidad,
returned home earlier in the week
by B.W.LA. after spending about
three weeks in Barbados, He
came over for the Company’s
Annual General Meeting and was
a guest at the Ocean View Hotel.

On Business

R. ROY. SKINNER of the

National Cash Register, Trini-
dad, arrived here over ‘the weck
end by B.WILA. on a_ business
visit and is a guest at Cacrabank
Hotel, .

Mr. Jeffrey Martin also of
National Cash Register who has
been here for sometime, will ba

remaining for another month. He
is also a guest at Cacrabank
Hotel,

Caribbean Representative

R. G. WEBDALE, Caribbean

Representative stationed in
Trinidad, of the Crittal Manufac-
turing Co. of England, returned
to his headquarters on Monday
evening by B.W.1LA, after paying
a week's business visit. He was a
guest at the Ocean View Hotel.

Aniateur Horticulturist
R. S. W. YOUNGHANS, Presi-
dent of Younghans and Cole,
Insurance Agents of “Miami, left
last night by B.W.LA, for Trini-
dad where he will take Pan

American Airways back home.

An amateur horticuiturist, Mr.
Younghans has been in the West
Indies for the past three weeks
collecting seeds and plants which
he has already sent back to Miami.
While in the Caribbean, he visited
Jamaica, Trinidad, Grenada and
Dominica before coming here.
During his short stay in Barbados,
he was a guest at the Hotel Royal

Recovering
TT°HE many friends of Mr, Hut-
gon Chandler, Overseer of the
Belle Factory would be glad to
know that he is recovering from
the injuries suffered in a motor
cycle accident last week.
He is still a patient at the Ter-
centenary Ward at the General
Hospital.

Features Editor

R. G, JENKINS, Features
Editor of the Trinidad
Guardian and Mrs. Jenkins are

now in Barbados for a month’s
holiday, They arrived on Tuesday
by B.W.LA. and are guests of the
Hotel Royal.

‘Mr. Jenkins who has been at-
tached to the Guardian since 1938,
has been visiting Barbados nearly
every year since then for his
holidays.

Twenty-first Birthday
N SATURDAY night last Mr.
& Mrs. Gilbert Howard gave
' party at their residence, Station
Hill, St. Michael, for their daugh-
ter Hazel on the celebration of
her 21st birthday.

For Three Weeks

RRIVING in the colony on

Thursday last was Mr, LeRoy
Gittens who has come over from
Curacao where he has been work-
ing for the past six years. Mr.
Gittens will be spending three
weeks’ holiday with his mother at
Westbury Road.



ASpy Turns UpToSee Me Eating

THE STORY SO FAR: A gang of By BERNARD WICKSTEED —— steak; 2 new potatoes

unscrupulous characters calle

rozen peas or fresh cauliflower

“They” have got hold of a myS- I am beginning to get my second Grilled mushrooms on half slice

terious formula which is sup-
posed to have the property 0)
transforming contented but
overweight husbands into mati-
nee idols with the figures of
Greek gods.
IT IS called the Tubby
diet
BUT THEY reed a victim for
Their inhuman experiments.
Who shall it be? The choice falls
on Bernard Wicksteed (height
5ft. Sins., weight 12st, 2lb.),
harmless hubby of Happy Ham-
stead,
FRIDAY NIGHT
HE Tubby Hubby is under a
cloud on this, the fifth day of
his 12-day ordeal by diet, He was
caught out at the breakfast table
trying to barter a sweet coupon
for a slice of the children’s fried
bread.
So They sent one of their repre-
sentatives to have lunch with me

Hubby

(at my expense!) in case I tried
any similar tricks with the
waitress, So bang went the last

chance of an unsupervised meal
this week.

You can take it from me, I shall
be watched like a hawk over the
week-end,

They'll probably
children trailing me whenever 1
leave the house, I thought yes-
terday I had got Them softened a
bit, but lunch proved They have
no mercy,

While I wolfed my miserable
drop of cold soup, the bodyguard
lingered long and lovingly over a
huge plate of hors-d’ceuvres, fol-
lowed by steak and kidney pudding
and peach melba,

And I was paying
mark you!

So far I haven’t told Them, but

have the

for it all,



IN STOCK



An Assortment of

@ LADIES’ NYLON HOSE

@ LADIES’ NYLACE HOSE
@ LADIES’ LISLE HOSE
@ CHILDREN’S ANKLETS ............

NEW SHIPMEN
@ ME




wind or whatever you would call
it when you are dieting. I no
longer want to eat a horse, I'd be
quite satisfied with a pony.

MY FIFTH DAY

MENU

(What IT did eat)

BREAKFAST
One orange. Haddock.
2 thin slices of toast, scraping of
butter. Tea

LUNCH

Cold clear soup
Omelette (two eggs, tomato
filling); spinach, asparagus,

with vinegar

(Alternative: Green salad)
One roll, scraping of butter
Black coffee
DINNER

Tomato juice

Rastus strolls over to look at
the place where the fire has been,
and Ruper: cells him about the
mysterious wisp of smoke. ‘*'Tis
very odd,” says the little mouse,
“I've seer, no picnic parties. In
tact, I've seen no one at all
except Pong-Ping, and he seems

— ALSO —

TOF...
VS WILSON FELT HATS











of toast. Black coffee

MY SIXTH DAY

(What I Will eat)
BREAKFAST
Slice of melon (or } grapefruit)
1 gammon rasher grilled, with

tomatoes

2 slices toast, scraping of honey

Tea
LUNCH
1 poached egg on spinach
1 roll ang butter
Stewed prunes or figs (no sugar)
Coffee, with milk
DINNER
1 cup clear soup, Cold meat
1 baked potato (small) with tiny
piece of butter
The inevitable green salad
1 apple or orange. Black a4
—L.E:S.



ing, ys t
“TM go and try to cheer him
up, and perhaps can in
these bi va i

he finds his pal busy beside the
ie hedge that surrounds his
use,

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED



$2.09, $2.15, $2.28, $2.41

.. $2.50
asicicsiisnnn se: Mee
ow. 30, 32 & 46 CENTS

T. R EVANS & WHITFIELDS

DIAL 4220

YOUR SHOE STORES

DIAL 4606



_| CARIBBEAN PRE.

BARBADOS



Choral Society
Stages Successful |
Concert

The Barbados Choral Society
siaged its annual concert on
Tuesday night at the Comber-
meére School Hall before a packed
and appreciative audience. His
Excellency the Governor, ana |
Lady Savage, accompanied by)
Major Dennis Vaughan Private
Secretary, also attended,

The programme which © was
presented by over seventy mem-
bers was of the usual high
standard. .

The list of items incfidea

many old favourites which drew
forth

rounds of applause from

the audience Perhaps worthy of
mention was the Six-Part Motet
— “There is an Old Belief” by

Parry. This was sung in memory

of the late President and Vice-

President Archdeacon Shankland
and Charlie Elder,

The Saxophone Quintet led by
Bandsman Prince Cave rendered
a group of tunes in the usual
style that* pupils of Captain
Raison would perform them,

Mr. Bruce St. John, baritone,
also rendered familiar airs with
deep and effective tone with
“Toreador’s Song From ‘Car-
men’" as the most outstanding.

“I Don’t Want To Get Mar-
ried” — a Spanish Folk Song
sung by the Ladies also carried
off honours in that group, Three
Pianoforte Solos by Mr. Qedric
Phillips were instrumental high-
lights of the evening's perform-
ance Scenes from ‘King Olaf’
by Elgar with Mr. St. John, as
soloist were explained by Mr.
Hudson and The Invitation to the
Dance by Weber brought the
programme to its close,

Thanks are due to Mr. Gerald
Hudson. A.R.C.M the conductor

end to Mr, Winston Hackett,
Accompanist. Through their
efforts The Barbados Choral

Society was able to stade a suc-
cessful concert of high standard
and the music loving public are
grateful for an evening of enter-
tainment in an island where an
opportunity of hearing good
musie is rare,

ee

BY THE WAY
By Beachcombeg

AM CODFORTH is_ what
Fdulenough calls tempgra-
mental; a useful adjective wfich
covers pretty well everything from



alcoholic frenzy to mere tom-
foolery.
Yesterday the antique shop

received a picture of fruit signed
“Ted Vellassquezz.” Foulenough
at once rang up Codforth. “What
the devil is this ‘Ted’ business?”
the asked, “And why is Velasquez
spelled all wrong? Who’s going to
buy a thing signed like that?’
“Listen,” bawled Codforth, “If the
first edition of a book with the
author’s .name_ spelled wrong is
worth moré than the same book
with it spelled right, well then,
why isn’t a picture with Ted
spelled wrong, eh?” “It’s the sur-
name that’s spelled wrong,” said
Foulenough patiently. “Ted’s not
a surname,” shouted Codforth,
“And your customers don’t know
Vellthingamegig’s Christian name
anyhow. Nor do you. And let
me tell you that the Constable you

ordered is signed ‘Freda.’ A woman |
policeman, Joke. Got it?”,

Foulenough rang off,
One thing and another

I T was, they said, a Greek

wine. And I believed them,
fer enough resin had been
shoved into it, when young, to
sink a_ battleship. In Cette it
would have been considered a
masterpiece: in fact I have read
that Cette includes among its
nefarious activities the making of
Samian wine. The only Greek
wine worthy of me comes from
Kephesia, It is an Attic wine, and
he who drinks it murmurs that
naunting line of Matthew Arnold:

Lone Daulis and the _ high
Cephissian vale....

In Mitylene I once drank a wine
with the amusing name Bacchus
Sec. It came, I suppose, from
Santorin of the Cyclades, where
they make their wine by night; the
island whiah kindled Flecker’s
imagination,

Wisdom of the ages

A horse-fly in a garage is not
more ridiculous than the hoses
of a fiterbrigade summoned to
extricate the head of a water-
carrier from between park-
railings.

(Sayings of Shabash-Ibn-Daoul
of Bagdad)





MEIRE!

F eREAL
| ro :
| ies IN COMBgy

, _ MOPE AND py,’
& 98h teayy?











A Robert 1. Lippert Presentation

staring

Robert HUTTON - Steve BRODIE
James EDWARDS - Richard LOO

mah
Sid TON Richard MONAHAN - William .HUN

end Introducing a dynamic screen personality

tie EVANS














Samal Flr

res. Ine

BRIDGETOWN (DIAL 2310)




|
FRIDAY 2.30, 4.45 &8.30P-M PASH 2 SHOWS TO-DAY 4.45 & 8.30 p.m.

ra

\Tyrone POWER-—Randy SCOTT — Joe E, BROWN—Ava GARDNER











ADVOCATE





The Toys Took a Train Trip

—They Went All the Way to Afric” -

By MAX TRELL

IT wasn’t as though Knarf had
wanted it to happen. It just hap-
pened, quite of its own accord. And
the most amazing thing of all was
that everyone else was along with
him when it happened, so that no
one could possibly say later on that
Knarf just dreamed it. They couldn’t
all dream it!

Knarf had climbed on the engine
of the train that stood in the eorner
of the room, right under the canary |
cage and the geranium plant. Then |




he invited everyone else to come on
the train. “All aboard!” he shouted.
“All aboard!”

Hanid and Mr. Punch, and Gen- |
eral Tin the tin soldier, and Mary-

Jane the rag-doll, and Teddy the “Where's the train going,”



SI Bear all looked up. said Teddy.

aboard!” Knarf shouted
ay Horry up! We're leaving in| flow did they know it was Africa?
a niiutel” . | Because, when they looked out of

the window of the moving train,

an there they saw lions and tigers and
At this Teddy, who didn’t like to | oi rattes, "They pane pe a gy hati

be disturbed unless it was really with atrange leaves and great col-
important and interesting, said: | cred blossoms. They saw monkeys.
“Where's the train going?” | They saw a herd of zebras dashing

“Just around the room,” General | .oross the tracks ahead of the train.
Tin said. ‘Not much of a trip. Noth- Col Rainb:

i but four walls and a lot lors of Rainbow .
ing. te gee DU | They saw elephants tearing fruit
of furniture. | off the tops of tall-trees. They saw

Hanid and Mr, Punch and Mary- | oy eodilesand hippopotamuses bath-
Jane were all about to say that they | ing in.a river, They saw parrate
didn't think they cared to go 0” 4| with feathers the colors of the rain-
train-trip, when Knarf suddenly | bow.
said in a very loud voice: “All| They saw deer and wila goats.
aboard for—for Africa! Allaboaril! ‘They saw vultures and eagles. They

“For Africa?” everyone said.) aw every animal that lives in
“Africa!” | Afriea, and all the birds and all the

So they instantly crowded to get | insects.
aboard the train, for it isn’t every | Knarf couldn't believe his eyes.
day in the week that you can cated | Phe others couldn't believe their
a train going to Africa. The moment eyes, But this was Afviea, Thee
they were all on, Knarf yanked the | could be no doubt about it.
bell. The engine gave a snort, the | Meanwhile Knart kept think) 2
wheels gave a whirl, and soon the | tq himself: “How did we get her”
train was rattling along the rails, | And how are we ever goin: te:
past the sofa and the chairs and the pack? Yes, how are we eve: going
table. {to get back?"

Now Knarf never really expected | {It was as simple getting back as
the train to go to Africa. Just as going there. Suddenly the boon
General Tin said, he expected it to | turned again, just as they came °°
go around the room. But all at once, | the edge of the ocean, Again there
just as the train was going around | was a moment of darkness. © '
a curve it turned sharply andj|then, when it grew light again. | +
plunged straight into the bookcase. | train was back in the room. It cus

Knarf shut his eyes! Everyone |to a stop.
shut his eyes! | It was only later, when Krovi

But there was no crash—no col- | went to take a good look at the bc
lision. There was just a moment of | ense, that he saw a big Animal Bool
darkness, and then when Knar! and | lying open on the first shelf. And
the others opened their eyes aguin, | across the book were two distinct
there they were in Africa! | tracks!

Really Important





CROSSWORD OPENING FRIDAY

4.45 & 8.30 P.M. & Continuing Daily
DRAMATIC THUNDER!
wt





cross
1. Send over tin trams, (8)
8: Bree to nee e it Tetting "
s see n
(7) 10. Stem (5)
ie ‘ax on speed ? (4)

1
‘ugal expenditure. (7
io: See sre tee ila (4
. mona C-! » (4)
20. Is she the result? (3)
21 Climb and exist among sappers

(4)
22. Artisan who means something
in addition to her.
Down
1. Nib, master made from a
, member of the clan. (9)
3: At tne tebulous bird, din,
: e fabulous . 2
debts. (9) one
4. Taken at the bar, (4)
5. Merely @ pool. (4)
6. Taken at exams, (4
|

(6)

7. “ Hullo, come inf 38
ll. You have grounds for. Seinkine

16. Witness suggests jou

16. In @ rusty ore min

if: Made for defence. ea
Solutt rn :

1 “Assembles. yn 2 oars:

16, Date?’ 18. tens: ‘

; 15, Lee!
Lopiey 24, grit 25. Moan. Down: oF

Elemental; 8, a § casts te atu
%, Bvoke; 11, She; fo Ben +7
Train: 19. Swee; 21, (trot)@ki; 22, gin

GAILETY

The Garden—St. James
TODAY (onty) 8.30 P.M.

“The DALTON GANG” (Don BARRY):
“OUTLAW COUNTRY” Lash LA RUE
—————S—Sea———

cop














Rows REATAN OA
LOMA @ se:



Fri, & Sat. 8.30 |] Midnite Special “om
p.m. Saturday wee UA

7 . ' Zane GREY'S
echnic :
meee THUNDER
MOUNTAIN

“LET'S DANCE” Tim HOLT &

Fred ASTAIRE & |]“LEGION of the
diGH VENTUAE LAWLESS”

John PAYNE IIGeorge O'BRIEN

| BARBAREES (DIAL 5170)

GLOBE





JESSE JAMES and SHOW BOAT



OPENING 1O.4ORROW 5.00 & 8



VERA ELLEN? MARJORIE MAIN

BAR
(Deal 6170)
Last’ 2 Shows To-day
4.30 & 8.30 p.m.
Univer Comedy Hit
“LIFE of RILEY”
William BENDEX &
The MUMMY’S GHOST
Lon CHANEY

(Dial 2310)
Last 2 Shows Today
4.30 & 8.30 P.M.
Smashing Double Bill
“THE BIG STEAL”
Robert Mitchum
Wiliam Bendix &
“THE OUTLAW"
Jane Russell



TODAY (Only)
445 & 8.30 P.M.
“WALK SOFTLY
STRANGER
Joseph Cotten & Vall
and Zane Grey's
“NEVADA”™
Robert Mitchum
Fri 445 &
Robert
MITCHUM
“The RACKET”

Sat. Special 1 pom
The DALTON GANG
Don BARRY &
“OUTLAW COUNTRY”
Lash LA RUE
Fuzzy ST. JOHN
ere hee eienmnpatted
Midnite Spectal Sat
“THUNDER HOOF”
Preston FOSTER
“WHIRLWIND
RAIDERS”








To-dey Special 1.30
“MAD WEDNESDAY”
Harold LLOYD &
SPANISH MAIN (color)
Paul HENREID

————

OO

Te-day’s Special 130 p.m,

“IN OLD AMARILLO”

Roy ROGERS &

“THE WYOMING
BANDIT"

Rocky LANE






Opening Friday
445 & 8.30 pm. &
Continuing
“STORM WARNING”
Ronald REAGAN

Friday Ist
TEEL HELMET
ne Evans &

|
} c
| es Edwards

Ja








MIDNITE Special Sat
‘SILVER CITY BONANZA’ RANGERS RIDE
Rex ALLEN & Jimmy WAKELY &
My ° COLORADO AMBUSH"
Johnny Mack BROWN

Sat, Special 1.30 P.M

&







































































































THURSDAY, JULY 31, 1952
LISTENING HOURS
} 4

THURSDAY, JULY 16.90 p.m 6.53 M Si SoM
100 7.15 pam, 19.76 M 25.53 M sheen nalioaiaheth - nae
—————_—— 5 m. We See Britain, 7.45 p m.
4.00 p.m. The News, 4.10 p.m. The Championship Bands, & 15 pp. Radio
Daily Service, 4.15 p.m. The Portrait Newsreel, 8.30 p.m Special Despatch,
Of A Lady, 4.45 p.m. Sporting Record, 8.45 p.m Interlude, 8.55 p.m. From the
5.00 p.m. Verdi, 5.15 p.m Listener Editorials, 9.00 p.m Henry Wood
Choice, 6.00 p.m. Welsh Diary, 6.15 Promenade Concerts, 9.45 p.m. Okympic
Variety Road Show, €.45 p.m Report,, 0.00 p.m The News, 10.10

News Taik, 10.15 p'm, It Stuck in
The Portrait of a

Parade
Home

p.m
my mind,
Lad

Round-Up and Programme
p.m. The News, 7.10 p.m
From Britain

10.30 p.m

w/e

and YOU ~ N°

Tt.
+

YOUR INDIVIDUAL HOROSCOPE x
THURSDAY, JULY 31, 1952

Look in the section in which your birthday comes and x
find what your outlook is, according to the stars.

ARIES Hold back a bit. We all fare better when
21—April 20 we don’t rush things, take foolish chances
or speak out of turn, Move in sane, well

organized manner.
* * *

Be content with moderate gains. Some
uncertainties to-day. A safe attitude rather
than any blustering, hit-or-miss method
stressed. Don’t worry,

Go conscientiously about duties. Pass “Pp *
the unsure, needlessly hazardous and sti

to what you really understand. Be very
careful in money, legal issues.

*

3 March

*
TAURUS
+ April 21—May 20

GEMINI
May 2i—June 20

CANCER A day to promote essentials, improve when
June 21—July 23 and where you can, and hold to a good
schedule. Don’t hopscotch around, nor be

drawn into useless argument. ,

mM

You rather daring people of the Leo clan
setter take wise precautions and remain
calm if you've been going a hectic pace

LEO
July 24—Aug. 22

Sort of day that gives ample opportunity
to demonstrate your sound, clean thinking.
Be expressive but not over-anxious carry-
ing out job. ~

Rather skimpy in part for other than rou-
tine endeavours. Accept your duties in
Libra’s manly style; be mindful you aren’t
the only one anxious to achieve.

* *

Stars advise reviewing, strengthening your
methods up to sundown, Don’t embark on
new ventures unless sure you have proper
formula. News after 6 p.m, can bring
pleasure.

VIRGO
Aug. 23—Sept, 23

*«
*«
*
*

LIBRA
Sept. 24—Oct. 23

SCORPIO
Oct. 24—Nov. 22

SAGITTARIUS

Nov, 23-Dec. 22 Curb likely unrealistic ideas. Be idealis-

tically motivated both in personal and busi-
ness matters for safely gainful ends. Ro- «x
mance needs extra - . ;
CAPRICORN Some ideas, propositions may be tempting
Dec. 23—Jan. 2lput conscience forbids. Don’t talk first,
think afterward. Logic will help avoid
mistakes, *

*

Excellent for general endeavours, invest-
ments well checked. Freshly favoured:
Finances with long-term merit. P.M. fine
for heart interests, home activity.

*

Helpful aspects for most trades, civic and
children’s possibilities. Labour, ooer ere
have much in common and can make this
Give-and-take

KKM H HHH HH OF

*

*
AQUARIUS
* yon a2 — Feb. 20

+ PISCES
Feb, 21—March 20

day a memorable one.
favoured.

ad YOU BORN TODAY are natural leaders and, while con- *
servative, are very active, with fine reserve vitality and power
to put over good ideas. Are magnetic, generous and proud.
% Seldom selfish, nothing underhanded in your makeup. Birth- *«
date: John Ericsson, Swedish-Amer, naval engineer.

tae we FD FF





“We wish to advise our customers
that our Workshop Department will be
closed from Tuesday 5th August to
Monday 18th August, 1952, both days
inclusive, in order to give our Work-
shop Staff their Annual vacation. There
will be a small relief staff on duty for
Our Office,

Department and Petrol Station will be

any emergencies. Parts

open as usual.”

©

ECKSTEIN BROTHERS

BAY STREET DIAL 4269





RES
ROXY

TO-DAY 4.90 & 8.15
TOMORROW 4.30 Only
Alan Pocky LANE
in





EMPIRE

LAST 2 shows TO-DAY 4.45 & 8.56

Barbara STANWYCK: Paul DOUGLAS
Robert PYAN; Marilyn MONROE
in

CLASH BY NIGHT DESERT OF LOST MEN

eoneiatseecinseticiaeniaiamisiaiciaapeaatin te ceil
Opening FRIDAY at 2.30 & 8.50 RODEO NG de 4
Frederick MARCH TONG Ae THE RENONITA
Mildred DUNNOCKS Rex ALLEN

in

DEATH OF A SALESMAN
—————_—_——_—

OLYMPIC

TO-DAY only 4.30 & 8.15
Dan DURYBA Gale STORM
in

THE UNDERWORLD STORY
and
BORROWED TROUBLE
Starring
William BOYD



TO-DAY AT 120 P.M.
UNDERCOVER WOMAN
and
TRAFFIC IN CRIME
TOMORROW NITE at 8.90
Madam O'LINDY & Her Troupe










in *
CARACAS NIGHTS OF 1952-

ROYAL

Last 2 shows 4.30 & 8.15



oe

TO-DAY & SATURDAY at 1 p.m

Republic Whole Serial
WEB OF DANGER FEDERAL OPERATOR 99 |
d ,
WHISPERING FOOTSTEPS TOMORROW only 4.30 & 8,15. }






Opening TOMORROW 420 & 8.15
Johnny WE.SSMULLER
in
JUNGLE MANHUNT
and
CHINA CORSAIR
With
HALI

Stewart GRANGER: Valerie HOBSON |
in |



NOCHE FURY

DAY 4.90 & 8.15
s Presents

Forrest TUCKER

SATURDAY st
Republic Pictur
DONLEVY











Briar

in
Jon HOCDLUM EMPIRE





THURSDAY, JULY 31,

1952



, . *
In 8. Africa
s
CAPETOWN.
_ Proposals for a levy on sugar
in South Afpiea, to be paid for
by the consumers, with the pro-
ceeds going to finance the Govern-
ments attempts to cut down its
Sugar imports still further, are
meeting with considerable criti-
cism in Cape Town.
The Government wants to erect
a sugar mill on its Pongola sugar
estate, in Zululand. To pay for
this, it proposes to levy one-eighth
of a penny a pound on consumers,
which it is estimated would yield
more than £400,000 a year.

Nearly £900,000 has already
been spent on developing the
Pongola estate and on irrigation
schemes there, Last season's pro-
duction of sugar cane amounted
to 12,479 tons. Considerable ex-
pense was entailed in delivering
it from this remote estate.

One of the reasons why the
South African sugar industry
does not regard the Pongola

scheme as economic is because of
the lack of_rail and other trans-
port facilities. Producers also say
that the output in the estate at
present is not big enough to jus-
tify a mill. ;
Government spokesmen, how-
ever, believe that there are great
possibilities in the estate. Mr.
J. G. Strydom, Minister of Lands,
estimates that maximum produc-
tien of sugar when the estate is
fully developed will be 30,000 tons
a year. Mr. E. H. Louw, Minister
of Economic Affairs, is more
optimistic and puts the figure at
35,000 to 40,000 tons a year,

Warning

Mr. Louw has warned that
in ten years’ time, South
Africa will produce 150,000
tons of sugar a year less than
it consumes. It is therefore
in the public interest that the
development of the Pongola
mill should be undertaken.
But commercial interests have

not been interested in the Pon-
gola scheme. An Italian concern
did once undertake to erect a mill
at Pongola, but later found itself
unable to supply either the capi-
tal or the nlant,

One of the reasons why the
sugar industry believes the Pon-
gola scheme has no. great future
is that transport is difficult. A
railway link to the estate is being
considered, but at present cane
has to be carted from the planta-
tion by road for distances varying
from’ 17 to 24 miles. The cost of
this transport alone ranges from

13s. 4d. to 6s. 8d. per ton.
Objections
Other objections to the levy

proposal to finance the mill are on
political grounds. Many people
point out that this is a way of






AND
WHY THEY'RE
OVEN-BAKED





Mi







Mossadegh Changes
His Mind

LONDON, July 30.

The British Foreign Office said
that Prime Minister Dr, Moham-
med Mossadegh proposed to the
British that there should be arbi-
tration in the oil dispute. This
suggestion was withdrawn soon
afterwards without explanation.
The offer was made over the
week-end by Mossadegh «to the
British Minister to Iran, George
Middleton.

The British official said that the
British attitude was unchanged.
Britain continued ready to nego-
tiate over a settlement,

—UP.



raising money for the Government
outside the tax system, It is con-
sidered as concealed taxation and
a dangerous precedent.

Other people declare that con-
sumers are to be forced to become
shareholders in a state industry
They will receive no dividends
and no interest on their enforced
investment.

Government spokesmen point to
the recent sugar shortage in South
Africa as proof of the need for
increased production. If sugar
had been imported to meet this
shortage, they say, it would have

been landed at double the local
price.

™ —B.ULP.



Oven |.!.ing makes all the
differer in “‘:e world with
beans. ft bh le, them to a
tender. isculy goodness un-
obtains. ©> in any other way.
Tt soal. -he sauce through
and theoogh, brings out the

full bean flavor. That's why
Heinz Beans are Oven-Baked
—to give you the ‘inest »eans
you ever tasted.

OVEN-BAKED



oss

BEANS.

BARBADOS

mee ema;

Pais

ADVOCATE






London Expréss Service

Housing Board Will
Approach Government On
Aided Self-Help Scheme

THE HOUSING BOARD is to approach Government
with a view to getting them set up a Committee to draft
plans for starting an-experimental Aided Self-Help Scheme
at Clinketts, St. Lucy as recommended by the Manager-
Secretary in his report on recent visits of inspection and
study of housing in various West Indian islands.

It was pointed out that

while it was a matter for the

Executive Committee, the Committee which was to be set

up should comprise of the Manager of the Housing Board
representatives from the Agricultural Department, the

’

Public Works Department, the Social Welfare Department
and the Education Department.

Mr. Adams mentioned the ben-
efits which were derived from Aid-
ed Self-Help Schemes in Jamaica
where he had seen it in operation
a few years ago, and emphasised
that the “sooner Barbados got on
with such an experiment, the bet-
ter it would be,” and he thougit
that Clinketts was a good place
to start.

Mr. Lashley reported on the
methods on which similar schemes
are operated in Puerto Rico and
Antigua where he had recently
visited, and supported the Chair-
man that such a scheme should
be eneouraged.

The Board accepted another
recommendation by the Secretary
to apply for assistance under the
American Point Four Programme
for the purpose of sending a tearm
from Barbados to study the
various aspects of Aided Self-
Help Schemes in Puerto Rico.

It was stressed that included in
the team should be a social lead-
in one of the Village Communi-

es,

Financial Report

The Board accepted the finan-
cial report of the Manager-
Secretary on the recently erected
47 houses at the Bay Estate, and
accepted the recommendation of
the Manager that the rents for
the three sized houses should be
$1.20, $1.50 and $1.80 per week
respectively.

This recommendation will be
referred to the Executive Com-
mittee for their consideration and
approval,

The (Manager-Secretary ex-
plained to the Board that the 47
houses were built at a total cost
of $93,485, The cost of building a
two-room house was $1,516.29; a
three-room house, $1,998.74; and
a four-room house, $2,523.61.

He pointed out further that the
subsidy involved was at a rate of
42% when interest, sinking fund,
maintenance and insurance were
taken into consideration,

The Manager-Secretary also in-
formed the Board that he had
written to tha Financial Secre-
tary relative to the insurance of

the houses, and submitted the

figures “at which the respective

sized houses were covered.
Recommendations

The Board accepted a number
of recommendations submitted by
the Bay Estate Committee, among
which was a suggestion that the
open area covering about 2% acres
on the Bay Estate to the east of
Culloden Road (Chelston Area)
be retained as a playing field.

The Board also decided that in
the event that the Wanderers’
Cricket Club vacate their field ut
the Bay Estate, that area should
be used for “housing” with the
exception of a small portion be-
hind and alongside of the Bay
Estate House.

During the brief -discussion on
this recommendation, Mr. G. H
Adams, Chairman of the Board,
pointed out that Government
|were not asking, or did they have
lany intention of asking Wander-
ers’ to give up their field, but it
was only a matter of whether the»
did vacate it on their own de-
cision.

He said it was inevitable that
existing playing fields would t
retained, and he wanted to mak





in the case of the Wanderers’ field,
junless they removed to some other
site.
The Board postponed considera-
tion of another recommendatio.:
jby the Committee “that a sma!
triangular area of land to th
eastern end of Section “H” be
sold to Mr. Brooks, the owner of
the Chelston Lime Works

The matter was deferred i
|order to give some members of the
| Board an opportunity to see the
area for thems

The Co
the s
\ Bo









it clear that that would apply.

In addition to the Committee's
Suggestion to sell the land, two
alternative suggestions were put
forward at the meeting yesterday,
One, by Hon. F, C. Hutson, that
the matter be referred to the
Executive Committee with a sug~
gestion that the land be exchanged
for another more useful area; the
other by Miss Arne, that Mr.
Brooks be granted a long lease.

Another recommendation which
the Board agreed to was that the
roads in Section “H” be constructed
with grass verges instead of con-
crete curbs, and that the whole
question of roads in housing areas
be discussed by the Board with a
view of getting the matter consid-
ered at Executive Committee level.

On this point, it was decided to
refer the matter to the Select
Committee asking for a directive
on the question of the width of
roads in the area as laid down by
the General Board of Health, It
was pointed out that where small
tenantries were concerned, the
question of the size of roads should
be based not on any definite
dimensica, but rather there should
be some latitude given to a Hous-
ing Authority,

The Board also accepted a re-
commendation by the Committee
that new houses be erected on the
open nee adjoining the com-
munal baths in section “F’’

Bay Estate, . ne

Selling Tenantries

The Board diseussed the ques-
tion of the selling out of large ex-
isting tenantries in the City area
which was the subject of concern
by a number of tenants in Del-
amere Land on which matter the
Colonial Secretary sent a Minute
to the Board.

The tenants who made repre.
sentation to the Colonial Secretary
«xpress concern over the matter,
tnd enquired what help would
be given by Government in the
event the land was set up for sale,
and tenants were unable to raise
the purchase money,

In connection with this matter
which was postponed pending
further information, the Manager
explained that in his office he had
more than 3,000 applications, a
large number of which were
pressing cases, and that the further
sale of large tenantries would
ceenorete the position consider.
ably,

The point was raised as to
whether the cost of removing the
houses from such tenantries
would not be in excess of the
cost of the entire tenantry, if set
up for sale.

Certain members of the Board
ask for figures in connection with
this point, and it was decided to
postpone consideration pending
such information.

Further consideration was given
to the question of recommending
an amendment to the Public
Health Act in connection with the
reduction of the minimum area
of land for a house spot, and the
Board expressed the view that
such an amendment should not
come within the ambit of the new
Public Health Bill, but should be
dealt with under the Town and
Country Planning Bill.

The Board postponed consider-
ation of the application of Mr.
J. M. Hewitt, Secretary of the
People’s Co-operative Trading
Society, for permission to run a
shop at the Pine Estate, as well
as consideration of the question
of funds for the erection of the
proposed shop. The matter was

deferred to give the Secretary
‘ime to obtain certain informa-
tion from the Co-operatives
Officer,

It was decided to submit to the
Governor-in-Executive Commit-
the plan and model for the
w four-units houses which were

tee





approved by the Board at a
meeting on the 8th May this year
The question was raised as to
hether cheme should not
pe ' Government

Five Year plat

muc

a portant ite

the matter should be dealt with
immediately.

Salaries
The Board considered and
agreed on certain recommenda.
tions regarding salaries for the

Staff of the Housing Board, and
thege recOmmendations are to be
forwarded to the Civil Service
Commission which is to consider
and, report on salary increase:
for’ the Subordinate Staff of the
Service.

Under General Business the
question of rumours that mem.
bers of the subordinate staff of
the Housing .Board were being

offered bribes to enable persons
to secure spots for houses was
discussed,

The Secretary pointed out tha!
there could be little or no validity
in such rumours because the
selection of persons to be helped
rested with a Selection Commit-
tee, and not with any member of
the subordinate staff,

The point was also raised that
there might be some truth in the
statement that some persons did
offer money to members of the
subordinate staff, and it was de-
cided “that it should be made
clear that any member of the staff
who took part in anything which
savoured of bribery, such mem-
ber would be dismissed.

It was decided that notices
should be published in all sec.
tions of the Press, drawing atten-
tion to the public that any
attempt at bribery would dis-
qualify such applicant from con-
sideration by the Board.

Before the business of the
meeting of the Housing Board
was begun yesterday morning,
Mr. G, H. Adams, Chairman of
the Board, and Mr. John Beckles,
took opportunity to express on
behalf of the Board sincere con-
dolence to Hon. F.C. Hutson on
the death of his mother whic)
hook place’ recently.

Mr, Beckles also took the op-
portunity to welcome Mr. Adams
back to the colony after his visits
to Berlin and London, where he
attended an Investiture Ceremony
at Buckingham Palace, and ex-
pressed the hope that when next
Mr, Adams visits London, he
“would bow before Her Majesty
the Queen who would rest her
sword on both his shoulders and
command him to “Arise Sir
Grantley.”

Replying Mr. Adams said al
though he considered it an honour,
hnevertheless his duty towards his
people came first, and if he
should be so honoured, he would
consider it only as a result of his
duties to the people of Barbados,
fand not as a personal achieve-
ment,

He pointed out however, that
from a query asked by Her
Majesty, he considered that even
in Court Circles, Barbados wa‘
not considered just a dot on the
map, but was recognised in the
Court Circles.

A-Bomb Process
Reversed By
Physicist

NEW YORK, July 29.

US. atomic scientists said here
today that the Italian nuclear
physicists who had succeeded in
exploding hydrogen to make
helium were apparently using 4
“method the exact opposite of that
employed in the production of the
atom bomb. (Italy’s Defence Min-
ister Randolfo Pacciardi announced
last night that Italian scientists
had exploded hydrogen to make
helium, but denied the newspaper
report that Italy had successfully
tested the hydrogen bomb).

American scientists, who asked
not to be quoted by name, said that



Professor Ubaldo Losahi, the
Italian in charge of hydrogen ex-
plosion might have m bom-

barding hydrogen with its radio-
active isotope,
—UP.

NANTON TO STUDY
AGRICULTURAL
ECONOMICS

GRENADA, July 30.
W. R. E. Nanton, Superintend-
ent of Agriculture, leaves by air
for Trinidad tomorrow enroute to

England: to enter Brasenose Col-
lege, Oxford for a‘ year’s study of !
icultural economics on a Colo

Office scholarship award
Mrs, Nanton accompanies him

Spiritual
f . i wy ‘
ntelleet Can

Save Man

BOSTON

Spiritual understanding
government and
and lead mankind to lasting
Safety and security, The Chris-
tian Science Board of
said.

About 7,500 Christian Scientists
from throughout the world heard
the Directors’ special message at
the Annual Meeting of Th
Mother Church, The First Church
of Christ, Scientist, in Boston
Massachusetts,

The Directors said that human
ingenuity alone will never
mankind's deepest problems. But
they added that the ‘means for
right adjustment are spiritual and
are immediately available

“Not mumbers nor human
might but Truth—spiritual under-
standing—is the power that will

mold the world’s destiny,” they
declared.

world confusion

Named President of The Mother
Church for the coming year was

Lt. Col. Robert Ellis Key of Lon
don, England, Associate Editor of
the Christian Science

the religion for more than
years, including service as prac-
titioner, lecturer and

~ teacher,

Christ Not Chaos

“The keynote of this century is

not chaos but Christ,” Colonel
Key told the huge crowd, “War
and destruction have been asso-

ciated with the first half of the
twentieth century, but progress
and spiritualization will mark the
succeeding years.”

“The old materialism must be
replaced by a spiritual concept of
creation,” he added,

Mrs. Lora C. Rathvon, Retiring
President, said there is “growing
recognition that spiritual enlight-

enment, and spiritual enlighten-
ment alone, will blot out the
materialism which is the source

of all confusion and of mankind's
multiplied problems.

She added: “We rejoice in
widely accumulating evidence, in
terms of Christian healing, that
the needed spiritual understand-
ing is available to humanity to-
day.”

Key officials reported on the
far-flung activities of the denomi-
nation, which has branches
throughout the United States and
in 41 other countries,

Growing public acceptance of
spiritual healing was noted by
Gordon V, Comer, Clerk of The
Mother Church, Current church
records, he said, include testi-
monies of Christian Science heal-
ings of arthritis, cancer, deformed
nose, infantile paralysis, gall-
stones, carious bones and flesh, as
well as of social] drinking and
smoking.

Right Of Exemption

George Channing,
Christian Science Committees on
Publication, reported increasing
official state and local recogniton
of the right of the individual to
exemption from compulsory

Manager of



physical examinations in good
faith on religious grounds, He
said fluoridation of the publie
water supply is being opposed on
the grounds that it represents
state medicine, and there are
prospects of suecess,

Relief totalling some 200,000
was voluntarily contributed by

Christian Scientists to aid suffer-
ers in the Kansgas-Migsouri Valley
flood, Roy Garrett Watson, Treas-

urer of The Mother Chureh
announced,
In another field, the Christian

Science Camp Welfare department
disclosed that more than 360 Camp
Welfare Workers were minister-
ing to hospitalized veterans and
members of the armed forces, In
addition, t h i r t e e¢ n Christian
Science chaplains—three of them
in Korea — were on active duty
with troops,



Fishermen
Prefer Nylon

OTTAWA

Fishermen, too, seem to prefer
nylon,

And now the federal fisheries
research board has come along to
find out why. It seems nylon gill
nets being used by commercial
winter fishermen on Lake Win-
nipeg last longer, take less clean-
ing and catch more fish,

Records collected during two
winters of ice fishing operation by
a research team that travelled the
frozen lake in a snowmobile show
that the efficiency rating of the
three-inch nylon gill nets used by
a number of the fishermen is far
ahead of that of cotton nets of the
same size,

During the 1950-51 season nylon
1ets caught 57 pounds per 100
yards of net, as compared with 17
pounds caught by cotton nets.
That is a ratio of about three to

ne,

Nylon Caught More
A similar set of tests conducted
last winter showed that nylon nets
caught 67 pounds of all types of
fish per 100 yards compared with
31 pounds in cotton nets.
Researchers said a particularly

°

heavy occurrence of “water-
bloom”—~the » colored slime that
fills the lake during very cold

seasons-—might have cut down the
efficieney ratio of nylon last year.

In any event, the nylon nets
turned im a good record, In
addition, researchers discovered
that fishermen frequently leave
nylon nets in place

nets at least once to dry. The rot-

resistant qualities of the nylon
nets permitted this practice
The major complaint of the

jake fishermen against nylon was
that it was harder clear the
net during clear frosty weather

Since the nylon thread does not

to

id a Mu wate 2. the ¢

tenc to free

alone
can pierce to-day’s corruption in

Directors

solve

religious
periodicals. He has been active in
40

authorized

throughout |
the season while they raise cotton |

PAGE THREE



|
|
|
|



JUST ONE—and aren't we enjoying ourselves?
Baby wonders what all the fuss is about on this
particular day —the toys, the new frock, the cake
and this lovely, lovely candle — but what’ fun ! !
And what a happy year it has been on the whole
for everyone — particularly since we put baby on
Cow & Gate. Steady progress —- abounding health
peace and contentment. :
Yes— carry on, baby, with that charming smile
~— at least we have given you a good start!

COWS GATE ¥885

Ne FOOD of?

08




| ROYAL BABIES








» CowyGate |
i Matis aa

I merce neve’ fl



Distributors

OUR WIRELESS 1S HOPELESS

THESE DAYS, PHYL. 1M FED

TO THE BACK TEETH With
INTERFERENCE

THERE'S A WONDERFULS
CONCERT TONIGH, MAGGIE.
COME AND LISTEN TOIT
AT OUR HOUSE














Sera pe asia
‘AYE DEAR, AND NO MAGGIE, |
THANKS AGAIN THE COSTIS

FOR LETTING ME AMAZINGLY

LISTEN TO THE LOW, AND |
CONCERT. ISN'T RE DIFFUSION |
RE DIFFUSION A Nt HOI NO j
AIT OF A LUXURY Fuecreierryt}

Ae
IT'S REDIFFUSION,
MAGGIE - NOT A SET
ATALL! WUST A
LOUDSFY AKER
CONNECTED BY
WIRE TO THE

* sTuDIas

war WAS LOVELY,
“¥t! your
% SFLESS IS ASG
“| MRASA
‘h WHAT
sé7 1S or P





is the time

to select your

requirements from

our PYREX TABLEWARE.

















@ OVENWARE
SOUP PLATES
DINNER PLATES
PIE DISHES

FISH OR MEAT
PLATTERS

@ CASSEROLES
SAUCE BOATS

and 26 Piece Dinner
Services in PYREX

The above extensive
selection is also
available in
WARE.

EKARTHEN-





|

| BARBADOS
(0-O0P. COTTON

FACTORY LTD.





|



'
'
'
'
’





PAGE FOUR

-



ADVOCAT

ieee B 7

Printed by the Advocate Co., Ltd., Broad 8t., Bridsctewn

Thursday, July 31,192 tS

READING

THE report of the Public Librarian for
the year ended on the 3ist March 1951
records the total number of adult and
juvenile registered borrowers of books at
24,746,

Less than one ninth of the island’s total
population borrows books from the head-
quarters Library, the Speightstown Library
and the seven deposit stations. But the reg-
ular borrowers of books seem to read wide-
ly because no less than 178,150 issues of
books were made at the headquarters adult
department during the year. How many of
the 14,526 registered borrowers withdraw
books is not mentioned so that no conclu-
sions can be drawn as to percentage of
actual borrowers.

It is interesting to note that whereas 1,577
new borrowers were registered 6,077 less
issues were made at the headquarters adult
department than in the previous year.

On the other hand 4,369 more issues were
made in the juvenile department of head-
quarters than in the previous year and
membership increased by 1,206 to 6,622.

The Speightstown. Branch Library now

has 835 adult and 613 juvenile members
and 12,992 books were issued. during the
year.
At the deposit stations it is impossible
to meet in full the demands of the young
readers. And it is very significant that there
are more than 798 more juvenile than adult
members who make use of the stations.

This appetite for reading on the part of
the juvenile inhabitants of the country dis-
tricts would seem to justify the formation
of more school libraries than now exist.
Since the duties of issuing books, register-
ing borrowers and keeping the necessary
statistical records of the deposit stations
are now undertaken for the most part by
elementary school teachers, the growth of
school libraries would seem to be a natural
evolution from the existing system. A
school library department was started in
Qctober 1949 and 28 schools are now re-
eeiving books through the department.
During the year 8,135 children received
books in this way. This figure is quite
startling when compared to the total num-
ber of 8,709 juvenile borrowers registered at
headquarters, Speightstown and the. six
deposit stations,

;. The statistics of book circulation at the
Public Library and all its branches during







the years 1946—51 record a drop in books”

issued to adults from 208,510 in 1948. to
194,662 in 1951. Juvenile readers after
reaching 76,289 dropped to 65,906 in 1949
but had reached 76,138 in 1951.

Combined totals of book circulation show

‘a substantial decrease from 280,038 in 1948-

to 270,798 in 1951. '

! The classification of books at headquar-
ters read by juveniles show the appeal that
sociology is having on young minds.
Whereas religious books were circulated
on 2,806 occasions during the year and

there were 3,881 circulations of books °

dealing with applied science there were
4,871 issues of books dealing with sociol-
ogy. History by comparison only received
1,500 circulations. Fiction, however, still
“is the favourite reading of juveniles at
headquarters and received 35,895 circula-
tions as compared with 25,946 issues of
non-fictional works,

_} The adult reader at headquarters also
displays greater enthusiasm for sociology
and philosophy than for religion, although
the main interest of adults in non-fictional
work is claimed by applied science.

There were 15,517 issues of books deal-
ing with applied sciences during the year,
8,472 dealing with sociology, 6,889 with
philosophy, and 5,928 with religion.

*In Speightstown on the other hand, in-
terest in applied science was followed by
interest in religion, philosophy, biography
‘and fine arts, before sociology. Adults at

headquarters also show interest in bio- ©

graphy there being 6,526 circulations.
; Only 4,381 circulations, however, were
made of books dealing with history. Fiction
continues to hold sway over the adult as
over the juvenile mind, there being 100,579
issues of fiction at headquarters as com-
pared with 77,571 issues of non-fiction.

} What conclusions are to be made from
some of the statistics in this report? First
the total number of 16,037 registered adult
borrowers of a public library in a commun-
ity with a total registered electorate of
95,939 of whom 62,028 actually voted during

the last elections is a subject for deep re--

flection. If almost one sixth of the island’s
registered voters are not even registered
borrowers of the public library their know-
ledge of the world in which they live can-
not be said to be extensive. The respons-
ibility of those who do read books is there-
fore increased enormously and the result-
ing danger of acquiring all knowledge
from books becomes real.

The selection of books for reading in the
public library particularly for the juven-
iles who now form more than half of the
public library’s readers becomes a greater
responsibility than ever. A little knowledge
isa dangerous thing.



| John Gordon In America:

When













































































CHICAGO.
The Press agents of kings and
queens—oh yes, they have their
Press agents just the same as
lesser people—tell you that being
a monarch is the toughest job in
the world. !

I am not prepared to go all
the way with them on that, but
if you hanker after a job of the
sort here's a bit of wise advice.

Should we ever become a
republic and anyone suggest that
you run for President, hit him
on the head and run like mad.

After a week spent watching
unfortunate men who have been
bitten with the idea, and watch-
ing also their pathetic, distracted
wives, I assure you that there is
j I would hate

Can Yeu See It?

Of course, we in Britain would
do it differently. I cannot picture
stout dowagers proceeding down
Parklane towards midnight wav-
ing double life-sized pictures of
wearing crazy hats
“I Like Gordon,”
chanting a voodoo dance chant.

Yet that is what has been hap-
pening in Chicago every night
this week,

I can’t imagine Claridges, the
Savoy, or the Ritz allowing car-
nival processions of brass bands
to walk in at their front doors,
through their foyers, and up and
down their corridors whenever
they felt thelr exuberance rising.

Yet ‘ swank hotels of
Chicago have had to put up with
that all day and half the night
as well,

Too Tough

Although ‘the town is not quite
as wide open as it used to be, as
a taxi driver lamented to me the
lights still go round and round
till the dawn comes up. And
whether you have a dollar or a
million in your pocket you can
get a meal or a drink anywhere
is

now the legal closing hour.

If you think that is making life
a bit too tough, believe me things
are not so bad, for many places
which announce that they must
—to keep the law—close at 4.30
announce also that they will
reopen at 5.30 a.m.

Poor Senator Taft has been
living a crazy sort of life for
many months. He has been trav-
elling ceaselessly up and down
the American continent, showing
himself to the electors.

How he must hate the sight of
people now. Poor Senator Taft
couldn’t drink a cup of coffee
without the news being known.

Every time he changed his
pyjamas in a strange town a
local columnist regarded it as the
scoop of the week, The local

my — of pleasant people to
meet.

The harassed Senator has had

uite a time keeping them out-
side his bedroom door. But he has
managed to get away with it
more easily than most by plead-
ing that his invalid wife must not
be disturbed.

It took. Senator Taft many
months to get his smile fixed on
what [I am told is normally a
rather ruthless face, But it took
General Dwight D. Eisenhower
just a week to rub it off,

Never have I seen so swift and
pathetic a change in any man, It
seemed to happen in a few hours.
One day Taft was on top of

SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico,
More than 2,000,000 Americans
on the sunny Caribbean island of
Puerto Rico are showing how.pro-
gress toward self-government can
be achieved under democratic
stewardship,

With the overwhelming ratifi-
eation of their new Constitution
on March 3, 1952, Puerto Ricans
will govern themselves as a com-
monwealth under the United
States flag. :

Keeping abreast of the progress
in self-government has been the
economic and social development
of the island during the last eight
years .

Faced with the problem of
maintaining over 2,200,000 people
in an area of 3,435 square miles
(8,931 square kilometers) — one
of the. most densely populated re-
gions on earth—the Puerto Rican
government His been conducting
a vigorous economic development
programme,

Known as “Operation Boot-
strap,” this programme is a con-
certed effort to free the island
from its customary one-and two-
crop agricultural economy, One
method has been to invite U.S.
businesses to establish new plants
in Puerto Rico.

Over 150 plants have opened
since the programme began five
years ago, They are producing
such varied items as cement, iron
castings, candy, textiles, shoes,
pottery, and radio sets.

Despite this rapid industrializa-
tion, agriculture is still dominant.
But here, too, diversificahion is
being encouraged. The island’s
agriculture is no longer a syno-

Private Affair

To The Editor, The Advocate—
SIR,— In yesterday’s issue of
the Advocate O.N, Looker criti-
cised the composition of the
“B.C.A.” Intermediate side claim-
ing that only five players were
worthy of their places and he
questioned the method used by
the B.C.A. in selecting the team.
In reply may I be permitted to
say that the side is an -entirely
private affair. The Secretary of
the B.C.L. asked me for a fixture
against C. F. Herrison & Co, Ltd.
I resisted this suggestion as
Harrison’s were too weak a com-
bination, in my view, to oppose
the B.C.L. Mr. Hewitt then agreed
to play a match against Inter-
mediate players selected by
| Incidentally, five of the players
took - part, play for the

me.

that



eT per



A Bis

the -world, The next- down the

drain.
The Cure

I do not suppose that even now

he knows how it happened, But

there seems to me to be a moral
in it worth passing on,

It is that ambition is a most
devastating disease to catch. Tf
caution you, my young man, that
if you ever’ see the spots comin;
out on you, jump in the coldes
river you can find and get your
temperature down again.

Men reputed to be wise are
prone to tell innocent youth that
the way to get a thing in life is
to want it desperately badly.

But Senator Taft will be able
to assure his grandchildren that
just isn’t true. His trouble was

that he wanted something too
desperately badly and lost it
because of that.

Ike Awakes

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

|

Dinner Jacket Tyrann
Man's _ Pee

Life-Dreams Perish

ae percep will Bac 4
like wild cats. The c the} ; $ 2 “
‘Taft machine tried to play on| Mr. MacDonald believes in changing into

him will be nothing compared
with the Truman tricks.

What does Mrs. Mamie Eisen-
hower think of.the future destiny
seems to be shaping for her?

She has played her part through
this tremendous week with a
charm and modest; that has cap-
tured all hearts—though women
say they cannot understand why
she wears her hair in these pecu-
liar bangs.

‘So Can

SHE nearly fainted in the pro.
cess Of shaking hands with 3,000
people in one night. All she said
was ‘If Ike can do it, so can I.”

She calls him Ike to everyone,
naturally and easily,

Only once did anger light her
eyes. That was when a womah
reporter with that touch of
cruelty that seems to come natur-
ally to newspaper girls suddenly

1 wonder if Ike is happy about 28ked her if she was worxied Over

it all. He never seemed to me to

and be trying very hard, He did not “orea.

ACANTHUS-

“Archie says the
prisiciple of nO more pay
without mcre production
should apply to MPs, too
—but who the deuce
wants more legisla-
tion?’”



seem to care very much whether
he won or not—until the last two
or three days.

Then, all of a sudden, he
decided that the monkey tricks
being played on him were a little
more than he cared to take. He
Said so with an asperity most
unusual for him. And_ behold
what happens. Down fell the
walls of Jericho, the Citadel was

his.

The difference between Eisen-
hower and MacArthur, who for
all his indisputable genius would,
I think, be a disastrous President,
is that MacArthur’s driving
motive in life is the glorification
of MacArthur, while Ike says
quite ‘simply, and believes it, that
he takes his job seriously but
never himself,

Two months of MacArthur as
President and America would be
quarrelling with the world, Which
is not what either America or the
world wants or needs.

More difficult infinitely than
anything Truman has experi-
enced in office are the days that
lie ahead for America. And
Eisenhower certainly has a tough
journey ahead of him if he is
going to the White House.



her soldier son leaving for

“What a question to ask a
mother,” she snapped. The subject
was dropped,

Amerieans—and Ike—call her
Mamie. But to her daughters-in-
law and Ike's grandchildren she
is Mimi.

Her Treasure

HAS her marriage been a suc-
cess in a land where marriages
don’t seem to last too long? The
answer is that she still treasures
above all things in the world the
little Heart-shaped jewel box Ike
gave hér on» their first wedding
anniversary.

If 4 feel a little sorry for
Mamie in the months and perhaps
years of little privacy that lie
ahead of her, I cannot help feel.
ing deep sympathy for the invalid
Mrs. Taft, In spite of her disabili-
ties following the strokes she suf-
fered 18 months ago, she has
played her part in the fight these
last few days like a very brave
woman,

She sat in her wheelchair
through endless, noisy, exhausting
receptions laughing off her trou-
bles ‘vith the joke that she was
worrying about her double chin
showing on the photographs.

I am sure the week will leave

a permanent mark upon her. it

seems a pity that her sufferings

were not to be compensated by a
victory for her husband.

of * ae

No, no. no...
FOR nearly seven years General

Eisenhower withstood the Repub-
lican political suitors before he
would allow his name to be put

forward as prospective candidaie.

In a new biography,—‘“Man of
be published by
the
author, Kevin McCann, lists the

Destiny” to

Heinemann’s tomorrow

“Noes” as:—

JUNE 1945: “I’m a soldier . .
nobody thinks of me as a politi-
cian.”

JANUARY 1947: “Nothing in
the international or domestic situ-

ation especially qualifies for the

most important office in the world
a man whose adult years have
been spent in the country’s mili-
tary forces.”

MARCH 1948: He is “consider-
ing the presidency of Columbia

University.”
DECEMBER 1950: “I'm an
ofticer on the active list.”
And finally
MAY 1952: He consented.
—L.E.S.



nym for sugar cane. More than
50 percent, of all Puerto Rican
agricultural workers still farm
sugar cane, but pineapple, tobac-
co, and coffee are becoming in-
creasingly important,

New dock facilities are being
constructed to handle increased
shipping traffic from U.S. ports.
Passenger traffic through San
Juan’s Isla Grande airport is
steadily on the increase,

Eradication of slims and im-
provement of existing housing
facilities is another ambitious
project undertaken by the gov-
ernment, The government has also
acquired tracts of land to which
it is moving the best houses from
slum areas, Central sewage and
water facilities are installed by the
government and provided for the
new dwellers at low cost.

The island’s Social Programmes
Administration has also developed
a plan by which rural families
will be able to build their own
homes at an average cost of about
$300, The Administration will
provide plans, a concrete block
‘machine, and a few simple tools.
Administration construction en-
gineers will start the work and
supervise construction during its
initial stages.

Under this plan each family
will make a cash payment of only
$20 initially, pay an additional $10
when the house is completed, and
then pay about $2.50 a month
over a 10-year period,

The Puerto Rican government
is also expanding its educational
facilities so that its citizens will
be able to assume more responsi-
ble positions,



Puerto Rico Shows Economic
And Social Progress

With over one-third of the
island’s total budget being allo-
cated to education it is expected
that more than 10,000 _ students
each year will be able to receive
specific technical training.

In the field of general education
a new system of secondary edu-
cation known as the Morovis plan
is in operation. Started in the
town of Morovis two years ago
this plan is now being used in
six other communities and will
be extended throughout the
island:

Under the Morovis plan, sec-
ondary education is made avail-
able to students who cannot at-
tend a regular secondary school
because of inadequate transporta-
tion facilities or financial short-
comings, :

meets with his
ours once each
the time is used
in teaching each
receive the equiv-
alent of secondary school diplomas
upon successful completion of
their studies.

Puerto nuico’s progress in indus~
trial expansion and in political,
educationai, and social advance-
ments has bagsted the morale of
its residents. ‘

Teodoro Moscoso, chief of the
island’s Economic Development
Administration, says:

“Our greatest asset is the won-
derful fact that with no resources
to speak of, a people who should
be desperate have great hope.”
(U.S.A. — Territories & Posses-
sions)







Our Readers Say:

Y.M.P.C., as Croney and Gilkes
did not show up on Sunday.
Personally I thought, and Mr,
Hewitt agreed, that this match,
was a private affair financed by
the B.C.L. and myself for the
purpose of giving the B.C.L. side
additional practice

Yours faithfully,
W. F. HOYOS,
“Dexterville”’,
Belleville,
30th July, 1952.

“Riots”

To The Editor, The Advocate—





t
ing facts to your kind considera-
ion.

Firstly the, riots broke out in
Lahore, in Pakistan, That is an
internal--affair in Pakistan and
India has nothing to do with it.
Your news headline as ‘Indian
Riots Broken-Up’ is very mis-
leading. People here might not be
accustomed to differentiate be-~
tween India and Pakistan, but
we must admit the fact that they
are two independent

in today’s paper can create a lot)
of mistrust among the different
sections of Indians here.

’

Yours sincerely,

SIR With reference to your
news it “Indian Riots Broken- R. C. MURTY, M.Sc., Dip. Li
Up” on ge six of the Barbados Y.M.C.A.,
Advocate dated July 29th, 1952, Pinfold Street,

I would like to draw the follow-

29th July, 1952.

|down the old idea that the Pukka Sahibs,







































) it countries |
and news headings like the one/consultation of the Africans ‘in those terri- {

“wherever it operates.”

THURSDAY, JULY 31, 1952 ;















‘PAN BOOKS

LONDON.
Mr. MacDonald, Commissioner- THE WIDEST SELECTION IN TOWN
On Sale At - - -

Malcol
General for Reuth-tie Asia, has slapped} %
S ADVOCATE STATIONERY |

Tuans and Bwanas in the tropics must
always wear a dinner jacket at night-time.







evening dress—he makes a point of that—
but he leaves the jacket at home.

Recently, Mr. MacDonald looking cool and
trim, went to hear American singer Helen
Traupel. He wore black trousers, white shirt,
black tie, but, as usual—no jacket.

Take the guesswork out ee
of weighing with: r

NEW COUNTER
SCALES (10 Ibs.)

Hide-bound old-timers, sweltering in their NEW SPRING
coats, spluttered over their whisky sodas. ea

They even protested openly at what they
considered was his lack of adequate dress.

Now he has forcibly answered his sar-
torial critics in a letter to the Straits Times.

Calling on Malaya to “break with the
tyranny of the dinner jacket”, he asserted
that “fine Imperial statesmen and shining
aristocrats who happened also to be sensible
men” had discarded their coats in other parts
of the Commonwealth. His critics continued
Mr. MacDonald, seemed to think that a
jacketless evening dress was a “crude inno-
vation.”

“It is nothing of the kind. For a. long
time, various sunny parts of the British Com-
monwealth accepted as evening dress for
men a black tie, white shirt, black cummer-}
bund, black or white trousers and no coat”.

This was the regulation wear at dinner
parties, during the hot weather, at Govern-
ment Houses, including those of Indian pro-
consuls, he stated.

“If the critics had arrived wearing a coat
for dinner at these Residencies, they would
have been politely de-coated and regarded
as ignorant of the proper dress for gentle-
men,

“Dinner jackets are designed for cool clim-
ates, not for the tropics. The dress looks
more aesthetically pleasing without the
superstructure of a white jacket which con-
tributes nothing to the effect except an occa-
sional awkward bulge, and frequently
trickles with perspiration”,

Mr. MacDonald’s letter follows a recent
incident when members of a stage touring
party who were entertaining troops in
Malaya were refused entry into an army
mess because they were not wearing evening
dress.

The Manchester Guardian in a leader
headed “Political Undress” says:

“The Commisioner-General’s behaviour in
Malaya has always been ‘unofficial’ in a far
wider than the sartorial sense. By his swim-
ming parties, with Asian students, his hos-
pitality to all sorts of Asian people, and his
refusal to join clubs which exclude Asian
guests he has trodden hard on the corns of
Europeans‘ who are finding it impossible to
move with the times. The relinquishing of
the dinner-jacket on ,all except State occa-
sions by high persons in Singapore can do
little except make them a little more human
in the eyes of the ordinary Chinese, Indians
and Malays. There may have been Asians—
and even British—at the notorious concert
who could not afford a dinner-jacket, and
the more Britain’s representatives identify
themselves with such average people the



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“Immediate Independence”

LONDON.

IF resolutions put down by two local
Labour parties were accepted by the British
Labour Party annual conference in Septem-
ber, the next Socialist Government would be
committed to grant “immediate independ-
ence” to all British colonies and dependenc-
ies, wee
These resolutions, however are unlikely
to be approved by the main body of the],
Labour Party.
Other resolutions call for the withdrawal
of all British troops from Malaya and other

Da Costa & Co., Ltd.

GODDARDS



















colonies. One says that the dependent terri- FOR YOUR’
tories should be offered instead “technical Pr ;
and material assistance to help in their de- entre NEEDS i
velopment.” MEAT DEPT j
Some of the views expressed in these reso- ; @
lutions are clearly against the general trend a .
of opinion in the LabourParty. One, for in- ieee "
stance, calls on the Party to, urge the with- FROZEN HADDOCK ze
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Party are two resolutions calling for long-
term development of the Commonwealth
and Colonies to enable this country to be-
come independent of United States supplies.
This is also seen as a means of raising the
standard of living of Commonwealth and
colonial people and solving the “greatest
problem facing the world, namely the inter-
national economic unbalance.”

A number of resolutions deal with the
question of the Federation of African Terri-
tories. Most of them express the view that,
there should be no federation without full



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ies are against any form of colour bar|















THURSDAY, JULY 31,



1952

Jury Discharged:
Case For Re-trial

AFTER deliberating three hours at the Court of Grand
Sessions yesterday over a case in which Carlton O’Brien

Hope was charged with attempting te shoot with intent to ce Sone See eee me ety eign soil, sleeping in a rented reading, also sewing and cooking gue . imereve Ge standards of thy tate
rder Ursil. Linton, his f od ath hotel. room here; but indications classes be organised, ving o people, and HEAL y
eutaer Ure nton, his former reputed wife of Dayrells been making sport, were that he world soon be “It is the intention of the Com- You may not know that I am y
Road, on February 23, a jury told His Lordship Mr. Justice While giving evidence Edghill moving. Reports that Farouk mittee of the St. George’s Social 4 VeTy jealous person—jealous for 5
G. L. Taylor that there was no possibility of their agreeing ®#4 to be asSted from the — planned to leave shortly—most Centre that it be run on similar Barbados. I admit I dislike hear- linoleum
on a verdict. ee sn a _— and likely for the United States—gain- ings. ing reports of things being done |
_ This was at 9 p.m. and after commenting that it seemed gum ed support from the fact that only “There are three gentlemen who Detter in, other, istands, becuse t
a simple case and he saw no reason why they could not Threat luggage were unloaded here last {yee members of the Committee of jus as capable—I would say more
agree at a verdict, His Lordship discharged the jury. The ,,CP!:_Cleophas Sealy of the night from the Royal Yacht~ '°© Socia! Centre who took a lead- Capable — than any other West
case will be retried. Ep hell od — a Lo that “Mahroussa”, which carried the '"8 part in the planning and erec- Indian. And yet I am told—on
e had had occasion to interview

Counsel for Hope was Mr. E. W.

Barrow, while Mr, F. E. Field,
Acting Attorney General, prose-
cuted for the Crown.

Hope had been charged on two

4 month, she would be better than gardens of the Eden Paradiso Post as Rector in December to to be so. I will not listen to the
Saeivend te oe eae con Mean ee he was. . Hotel. The balding Monarch wear- take up an appointment in person who says that Barbadians
to do grevious bodily harm, main, but he would leave her caer the Sgt. Haynes was the last witness jng slacks and a white “T” shirt Jamaica. Jamaica’s gain, Barba- —dare I say we Barbadians—are
disfigure or disable "* end of each month and return a © Sve evidence, and he also spoke with a yellow shirt over it dos loss. too ipdiviqualistio and _ men-co-
The alleged offence was the few days after the new month h 4 of Hope threatening to kill Linton. appeared in slightly better spirits Mr, de Viera our late Churca- operative. You have put Barbados
result of a break in the friend. begun, She had written one letter Defence on. Wednesday PR ag Re ae stat — ee ed ee gh Be thoes Weare ee
i + +" . ence did on Tuesday night after the ed in the Social Centre resigne¢ ave led the Caribbean in sugar
ship between Hope and Linton, it that she remembered to Dr. Lloyd Mr. Barrow

was given in evidence, and a re-
fusing on Linton’s part to renew
the friendship. He was alleged
to have attempted te shoot her,
but due to a defect in the revolver,
the bullets did not go off.

in 1946, Hope and she still went
on living together. They had
had several quarrels and re-

unions.
She had been friendly with

Still of the Mental Hospital, hop-
ing that Hope might be compelled
to pay her for board and lodging.
In this letter, she had accused
Hope of intending to poison her

son-in-law took the revolver out
of his hand and put him out. At
the time Hope said that Linton
was his wife ang he was making
sport.

This was corroborated by Win-
field Trotman, his son and Collin
Edghill his son-in-law.

In cross-examination, Winfield

Hope in connection with threats
Linton had alleged he had made
to her, and Hope told him that if
Linton lived to see the end of the

in addressing the
jury. told them that if they were
satisfied that the accused attempt-
ed to shoot Linton, but through
no design on his part the revolver
did not go off, they would neces-

Leave Soon

ISLE OF CAPRI, July 30.
Ex-King Farouk of Egypt spent
his first night as an exile on for-

former monarch
Alexandria.
Farouk was up before noon and
appeared briefly on his private
balcony overlooking the colourfu

into exile from

emotional send-off given him by
a crew of Egyptian Royal yachts-
men.

Farouk’s personal yacht “Fakir
El Bishar” was tied up at the Capri

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Jury Disagree Over Shooting Attempt Verdict ¢o sion

sb eed es oche-an'waasiptencrp Besnehieseeicoenaclioeset SAMMI we
OPENS | healthy

floors,
furniture

Farouk May LADY SAVAGE

SOCAL

graph shows, concerts, lectures,

tion of this building, who I regret
to say are not with us this after-
noon. They are our late Rector
Mr. Dowlen, who was Chairman of
the Committee, He resigned his

the Vestry in December, I regret
to say he is no longer with us.
“Mr. Dowding also resigned the
Vestry in December, he wouid
have been with us this afternoon

CENTRE

that fund, and I look upon the
community centres as being com-
plementary and a part of this

good authority—that the develop-
ment of community centres and
community life in Jamaica is far
ahead of our achievement in Bar-
bados. There is no reason for it

production, in education and in
health services, Surely you can
give a lead to the Caribbean in
the development of family and
community life.

; dock undergoing repairs. Chiefme- jut is out of > Isle 7 sin- “I shall be told that these are

The Prosecution called t ee who ‘was an’ inmate sarily find him guilty on the first chanic Giuseppe Luise said the ee - the ‘Taland on: busin just words and what is wanted is

witnesses to prove their ease et ‘She denied that h count and there would be no need yacht was built for Germany’s “< fee) 1 must mention Sir, that &tion. I agree. That is the job

During the evide Mr. B eer at her daughter-¢o, consideration of the second Kaiser Wilhelm, mostly from old the Parishioners of: Sit Geotge’s of the people of St, George and

row a eat eae and Ho had fought on t day count materials, The engines are old, | tee 7 » © of all Barbadians,” His Excellency
rgued that certain evidence of the alleged offence. She had not : owe a great debt of gratipude to

dealing with threats previous to
the alleged incident, should not
be given in evidence, but His
Lordship ruled that such evidence
Was admissible,

seen Hope for about a week be-

fore he attempted to shoot her.
To the question whether she

ran towards Hope despite his

They had to be satisfied with
Linton and her daughter's evi-
dence before deciding to convict
the accused and he was submit-
ting that they could not accept

and have ball-bearing trouble” he
said, “We cannot have it ready
before tomorrow night.”

—UP.



the late Sir Laurie Pile without
whose generosity this large playing
field would never have been ac-
quired by Welfare -Limited, and

concluded,
Vote of Thanks
Hon. G. D. L. Pile, O.B.E.
M.L.C., in moving a vote o
thanks, said that. His Excellency

having a gun, she said, “Of course ;: : i moreover, after his death, when ,
” , the evidence of Linton who was — ath, when and Lady Savage, through their
Separations ye helhed admittedly a woman of slack Caribbee, Rosarene Welfare Limited went into liqui- presence, had given the Centre a

Ursil Linton told the Court that
Hope and she used to live together
as man and wife for about seven
years, and during that time there
would be occasional separations,
the last being on June 30 last
year. After this she lived with
her three children.

When he saw her after this

run from the
yard and was pursued by Hope,
she had said nothing to Hope nor
had he said anything to her.

Gun Could Shoot
Nathaniel Carmichael, Govern-
ment Analyst said that the police
brought the revolver to him, It

morals.

He suggested that a woman like
Linton who was capable of writing
a letter to Dr. Lloyd Still to get
Hope out of a job was not the
woman to scruple over concocting
a story to get Hope in the position
in which he then was.

Bring Copre, Coal

Two inter-colonial vessels ar-
rived in Carlisle Bay yesterday.
They were the motor vesssel
Caribbee and the schooner Ros-
arene,

dation, the Directors of Bulkeley
Limited consented that the playing
field be sold by Welfare Limited
to the Government at a reasonable
price for the benefit of the Parish-
ioners of St. George and the money
be used to assist Welfare Limited
to liquidate their debt.

good start. His Excellency had
not only given the Centre a good
start by his presence but also by
what he had told them.

He felt quite sure that His Ex-
cellency’s hopes would be realised
and Barbados would not lag be-
hind other islands when it came

i i taon she so community life.

was a seven chamber, 22 calibre _ He pointed out certain discrep- “ Rosarene arrived from British «) would also li . Pile reminded the youn,
oe: he would come to her gun, Canadian made,‘and had a #®"Ces in the evidence, the evidence Guiana with 75 tons of firewood gir that a ao, Tee ae — same ong teres wae et ng
aaein HVin proposals for their rotating cylinder. When handed 2S to which of them, Linton or her ang 750 bags of charcoal, The 500,00 has been given by the them alone but also for the aged
4 san a together. to him, the cylinder contained two “aughter, saw Hope first when.he Garibbee brought copra, white Hon, G. D. L. Pile to assist in to spend quiet evenings, “One day
aun te Saturday evening of the live cartridges. The automatic C2Me with the gun, and Linton’s jeans, fresh fruit and other purchasing furniture for the in the course of nature, you will
offence, she was home in her mechanism for rotating the cyl- 54Ying that when she ran behind general cargo. She also had on building. also belong to the older brigade”,
Shedroof when someone pulled inder was defective, but the cyl- Barker that she had heard_ one

the gate and called. She recog-

board four passengers



“The Social Centre Committee

i li whi 2 i ; he hinted to the youngsters of the
fined th ; 3 inder could have been easily put Click while Barker said he had Both vessels are consigned tO has been criticised for not opening district.
when she Yorpudn ath "one ae oer h ath the fingers, and pony Pain ge ahs ae oe £-hooner Owners’ Assocla- the Centre earlier, but Sir, I His Excellency and Lady Sa-
. . ’ a bu isc ; sses telling de- tion. , ‘i . ak ovitive
him pushing the gate with one et discharged by cocking the iF D would like ‘to ask those critics to

hand and in the other he held a
revolver,

She cried out asking him what
he was going to do with it and he

hammer and pulling the trigger.

By so doing, he had been able
to discharge the two bullets it
contained when it was brought to
him, He produced the shells of

liberate falsehoods, they had to
ask themselves if they would not
be committing a miscarriage of
justice if they convicted the
accused.



365 Passengers
Intransit On ‘Brazil’

remember that the building was
handed over to the Vestry by the
Contractors during October last
year, up to the middle of Decem-
ber we were very busy preparing

vage afterwards inspected the Hall
and the grounds. Two Fide of
India trees were planted by His
Excellency and Lady Savage.
While touring the grounds, His





FOR LINOLEUM”
WOOD FLOORS

FOR BRIGHT AND

POLISH



PAGE FIVE









yam

MARMITE

IS EVERYONE’S
FOOD

‘4










Agent: A & S Bryden & Sons Ltd, Barbados e-em

—_——

epi in i Excellency took the opportunity
one wa tot nwo Shots were in it, the discharged bullets. After | Actually, the charge was only for and staging the General Elec- to have a chat with some of the
self; for if t her and one for him- passing through four inches of OMe of a continuous series of traps Bridgetown was busy yesterday tion. cricketers and footballers of the
ot eres aoe ~~ live to- water, one of the bullets had for Hope which Linton used tO as the 365 intransit passengers “Secondly, the Committee had district. From the pleasing look The vitamins in Marmite keep everyone fitter, By
anothe! could not live with made a hole in a zinc plate. practice and was the committing from the 8.8. Brazil strolled up made an application to Govern- on his face ,it would appear as iene di. ‘ou niet eeeete liege aaa
lis dunt ook and ithi Cross-examined, he saiq that it °f @ Public mischief just as she and down the main streets, The ment for an extra grant of money though the answers he was receiv- & ry day, gthen
was within a ’ 2.

yard and a half of him when he
pointed the gun at her and she
heard a click, but no bullet came
from the gun. She held him and
told her daughter who was in the

was difficult to get the hammer
of the gun to strike the pin. If
one pulled the trigger and a shot
did not go off, it would have
meant that a shot was not in the

— tried to make him lose his
job. ¥,

He pointed out that Linton had
sworn that she had not seen Hope
for about a week before the date

Brazil, which arrived at 7 o'clock
in the morning, was making her
third trip to the island this year.

Six passengers arrived by the
Brazil for Barbados, They were:

fo assist them in carrying out the
plans they had in view, I am
pleased to say Sir, that Govern-
ment very magnanimously acced-
ed to our request, and that money

ing were very satisfactory.

Harr. College Wins








Marmite is delici

our bodies to resist chills and diseases; we get more
goodness from everything we eat; and children are
assured of a vital ‘extra’ to help them grow
up sturdy and fit.

jous in

\ i of the offence, and then her Godfrey King, Mary Cherrie, became available during the first 2 = GRE dishes, oyere (savouries — and
yard to take a stick and knock oa ant aie: alignment had daughter had positively said that Majorie Cherrie, Everard Patin, week of June, we made an attempt Martinez Shield me, Sandwiches, Cooks like Marmite also
wenuhlae ata out So ort Joan Linton Ursil Linton’s he had come at their home the pre- Francis Agostini and Monica to open the Social Centre in June m . , era) because a jar lasts such a long time,

id so and picking it up, ‘ r vious morning and had made Agostini, but could not obtain the services 4 sg
threw it over the paling. Ge ete ares tr ao threats. Brazil called from Trinidad of the Police Band on the day Snesieott College, jo 1 cole ye
He struggled to get away from mother in examination in chief, , He argued that it would have 4nd left in the afternoon for we planned. arene, Oe re Rifle Shoot se
her and to regain the revolver, atid. added ‘that after throwing been very unlikely for Linton to Bahia, Rio, Santos, Montevideo “We then started to carry out Cadet Inter- Se aia per
and eventually got it. He stamped 4.6 gun over the paling. she ran ave run from inside the house #%d Buenos Aires. She is on her certain work which had our for the Martinez . oy

her, and she escaped and ran.

off and called the police.

towards Hope with a_ revolver

summer cruise,

ground somewhat disfigured.

The shoot took place at tihe Drill





; ; THE VITAMIN B FOOD
Her nearest neighbours shut | : when she felt he intended shoot The vessel is consigned to | “The Committee was informed Hall on Friday last, College’s cy
their doors as they were afraid Pg ate pe Eh aan ao bar ing her, and added RHAt wince Messrs. R. M. Jones & Co, Ltd., that you Sir were not taking part winning total was 626, Lodge 5 j FOR FAMILY FITNESS
of Hope with the gun. After cave ct. els Hiethe wan “hrect. Joan, Linton’s daughter had a Agents for Moore-McCormack in functions of this description School, ae © Snr = . ; 37
nam Geibert Sackon made demas ened to kill her mother. She had Dicycle, there should have been Lines. until Court mourning for our late and Combermere Schoo . r
and c .

on behind him, dodging from
side to side when Hope came up
and tried to get at her.

Go Ahead and Shoot

met him earlier in town on the
day he tried to shoot her mother,
but she reached home before he
came, She had thrown the gun
over the paling because she was

no fear of Hope catching her.
Even if Hope had a gun in his
hand the offence would only have
been assault.
Mr. Field for the Prosecution



Vessels Loading
Molasses

beloved King terminated on the
3ist May.

“We would have opened earlier
in July Sir, but received informa-
tion that the Members of the band

Company was third,
The details of the scoring are as
follows: —
No, 1, Company
HARRISON COLLEGE





KWS:

2? —



: said that at i were earning a well deserved C.S.M, Hinds,-L. K. 87): eae —————
| _Hope told Barker that if he did afraid that if she had oe ft tine itenes world Core Cee Two'-vaeenie. ate loading pun- Difax usel She sty not move he would shoot him, : y that the affair was a joke, but he cheons of farev slew ste tne ;.. There is still a lot to be done Cadet Jordan, G. A, .
and when Barker replied that if Womlied that the had ridden to WS, fiad that that defence had lower wharf. They are the MW. (Cy iinayies Ane, building and in C/al4 Meld Noe. $} FOR LOWERED VITALITY!
S » he “tea . not been made. \ Student Prince Fae a dpi. e i ’ § Set. ,m DD «. 4
as well go ahead ; the Police Station. When Hope ~ + 5 7 tudent Prince If which is con- gir, that with co-operation of the Cadet Johnson, P. A. D. ., 83
pointed e Sen i tases nak te held the revolver and she heard They, the jury, were not there signed to Messrs. W. S. Monroe P eee

heard another click, but again no
bullet came.

She ran from behind Barker
and Hope pursued her, and fol-

the click, but nothing happened,
he looked at it and with an oath
said, “This thing!”

Sgt. Gill of Hastings’ Police



to judge the morals of the wit-
nss and he “suggested to them
that they should not let matters
of that kind influence them. }

»& Co., and the M.V. Terra Nova,
sconsigned to Messrs, DaCosta &
Co., Ltd,

The Student














Parishioners in the near future
we will have a really first class
centre run on cultural as well as
recreational lines. And judging

Team Score 6526
No. 2, Company



TAKE

ce He said that if the Prosecution! apne. Prince is loading by what I observe taking place LODGE SCHOOL

lowed her into the house of one Station who arrested Hope, in pad been in need pe Eee appr oximately 520 puncheons of here on afternoons the prowess of Cadet Gill, T, C. 1. 65
Joyce Moore which she entered. connection with the attempted establish their case, counsel for ra ae for Newfoundland, The Everton Weekes and Valentine is G2Lt, Bayne, I. D., ., 84 66
Some men who were Moore’s shooting, said that Hope did not the defence had brought out such Wes navth no its her load to going to be challenged severely,” G/2rt, Chase,'P,D. BE, .. 82 V, q ONE
relatives, held Hope. After this, make any statement. a motive in his cross-examination. ymouth, Nova Scotia, ended Mr. Yearwood. C.SM, Goddard, P. R. ., 85
she fainted. Seibert Barker gave evidence For it could be that Hope was}! ANNUAL : Governor’s Address Cpl. Humfrey, J. M. P. .. 83

Under cross-examination, she as to Linton running to him and thinking that Linton had made MEETING OF His Excellency, in his address, Cadet Johnson, L, FE. C, ,, 85 Y ae
‘admitted that she had gone clinging on behind him, He said him lose his job, and had taken}’ SUMMERHAYES CLUB © said: “My wife and I are very —_— 7 ONIC WIN)
through a form of marriage with that after he had told Hope that him to the altar falsely. The annual general meeting. of pleased to be present here this Team Score 484 assy of
Hope although she had been if he was going to shoot he could He reminded them of the evi-/4the ainmmaeiarou ‘Teahis tbab afternoon and to associate our- wot
already married, and said she shoot, he heard several clicks. dence of the Analyst and the fact! wilt tale place to-morrow at the S@!ves once again with the devel- No, 3. Company It Stimulates the Nerves, enriches the blood and
was subsequently convicted for that the revolver could have gone* Club House, Fifth Avenue, Belle. opment of community life in builds up new reserves of strength which i :
bigamy. Her husband was in Took Revolver Away off. If by a slight defect it didtivinte at 5 p.m » Belle- Barbados, COMBERMERE SCHOOL oh P reserves of strength which is lacking
St. Lucia when Hope and she _ Robert Trotman, father of Joyce not go off that did not exculpate = “You will not want me to repeat Cadet Clarke, C. B. i ae when you are feeling below par.
‘went through the form of mar- Moore at whose house Linton had Hppe. If they were satisfied thath - what I have said in St. Andrew, L/Cpl. Carter, H. G. ote
riage. She had never actually fled, said that he was going at the weapon could have gone off in St. Joseph and in Christ Church Cpl, Lokey, V. A. S. 698 5/6 d 10
separated from her husband, but his daughter when he saw Linton and that Hope pointed it at Lin- ASSIZE DIARY about community centres and the Cpl. Goring, L. F. .. ‘a ee /6 an fs
she had heard that he was dead. running towards the house and ton and tried to fire it the only, Th 4 blessings of the Labour Welfare L/Cpl. Harrison, C. 16 aida ie

She said that Hope and she Hope chasing her. When Linton verdict could be guilty. | e murder case Reg. vs. | .Fund, In the last two yearsI have L/Cpl Lewis, K. .. 80
were friendly before her husband ran into the house and Hope fol- He reminded them of the threats Verona Jackman is set down |. seen visible evidence of improve- owas
went to St. Lucia, and after she lowed her, he went in and held and said that these proved the for hearing to-day. ments in homes all round the Team Score 454 KNIGHTS LTD.
had been convicted for bigamy him around his .neck while his intention. sountry, provided by loans from onside

| _ OO All Branches
==

BEGINS WITH





Rodgers

A SPLASH!

See our lovely

WHAT A FINE
ASSORTMENT OF










) GROCERIES?
‘ Ladies’ Bath Sui forthe family
1b adies Bath Suits forthe
‘ Y¢jv~a
7, SATIN LASTEX OCTOGEN ‘SOAP . per Cake $ .16
The Finest Range Y SALISBURY CORNED MUTTON . _ per Tin .68
Uy ’ In 1 Piece and 2 Piece Styles WALLS OXFORD SAUSAGES . ‘ ssanpeamis aha 69
. Yj, Prem S146 to 900.66 CAMPBELLS PORK & BEANS Ge oe
in Town V Ls & BEANS |
; _y FLOWERED COTTON SWIFTS VIENNA SAUSAGES Ree tg 43
TABLE KNIVES @ ............. $135 TABLE SPOONS @..........-:. 1.66 ; MOR TONS COD ROWS. ....5:cccresivisieepeesuniagevar | si, te is
t ni - r . 2 7" 69
DESSERT KNIVES @ ............ 122 DESSERT SPOONS @ .......... . 116 From $7.60 to $9.01 poet ein ese Sea gaa are ecg ea
TEA KNIVES @ .............,.. 111 SOUP SPOONS @ ..... svenege reed 1,16 WOOLLEN LYNN VALLEY GOLDEN CORN et gee
BUTTER KNIVES @ ........... 1298 TEA SPOONS @ ........:ccceees 67 / AYLMERS TOMATO JUICE Large 39
UTTER KNIVES @ srsseperees 128 TEA SPOONS @ arr te er toe, In 1 Piece and 2 Piece Styles AYLMERS TOMATO JUICE Small —.28
TABLE FORKS @ ............... 167 COFFEE SPOONS @..... ...... 63 coe From $10.50 to $15.06 AYLMERS FRUIT SALAD coccssee per Tin .90
1 o
DESSERT FORKS @ ............ 116 SUGAR TONGS @.............. 1.48 @| o Q.B.B, BUTTER CONCENTRATE ae 7
ir @ CORNED BRISKET BEEF . 41 4.20
CAKE FORKS @ ..........5.:.. 1.10 FISH EATERS per pair @ ....... 3.07 6! ‘erm eget a ath 2.17
, DANISH HAM
6 Pieces CANTEEN SETS @ ..... $83.75 HARRISON S CHILDREN S BATHSUITS |} CHIVERS MASHED POTATO POWDER ........ per -58
j se Ere i . TE er Bottle 99
@ Flewetes Cotten | HEINZ CHILI SAUCE . oo per : r a
From $2.65 to $7.50 \{{ DANISH SALAMI SAUSAGE per é



CAVE SHEPHERD & CO. LTD.

10, 11, 12, & 13 BROAD STREET

COCKADE FINE RUM

Stansfeld Scott & Co, Ltd.

SSS
oe

DIAL 2352

WOOLLEN |

From Toddlers’ to Girls’ Sizes
From $2.93 to $6.09









)
(
—_—— y

+O ODDOOO 6000024064124 04004 ook







“PAGE SIX











__TELEPHONE 2508
IN MEMORIAM FOR SALE
MARSHALL —In loving + er of oe
va Cd ohare ees | AUTOMOTIVE











Till meinory fades and life dep
*Â¥eu'll live forever 1 my her
Isobel Marshall §2—1n

eet
WANTED
HELP
a bs cen nines
FIELD OVERSEER for Spring Vale
Plantation, St. Andrew. Apply to the
Manager. 29.7,.52—3n
GENTLEMAN secks responsible posi

tion, Over eleven years office experience
with radio engineering qualifications ana
experience added assct. No night duties



rr arrangement of interview and full
details reply “Ramsey” c/o Advocate
29.7,52—3n





SALESMAN—*Required immediately





Sdlesman and General Office Clerk
Apply — Cecil L. Straker & Co., Spry
Street, Bridgetown 30.7. u
MISCELLANEOUS
BOTTLES—i,000 (8 oz.) Medicine Bot-
tles — graduated preferred — good price
paid. Knights’ Ltd. 29,.7.52--3n.

ar
$62.50 POCKET MONEY easily earned
by recommending 25 new subscribers tc
REDIFFUSION in one month.
Hn) 1.7.52—6n

A

REDIFFUSION offers $1.50 cash for

each new Subscriber recommended by
you. 1,7,.52—6n

Na
SUPPLEMENT YOUR sNCOME by
recommending REDIFFUSION. Obtain
particulars from the REDIFFUSION
office 1,.7.52—6n.

a fhe rntninstenseene
TWENTY-FIVE DOLLARS extra Bonu:
from Rediffusion for 25 recommenda-

tions in one calendar month.
1.7.52~—6n

——___

USED STAMPS—Wanted large or smail

quantities of clean postally used BAR-

BADOS and other B.W.I stamps
Buying prices on application to

TURTON
P.O. Box 124, Kingstown, St. Vincent
31.7.52—8n

PERSONAL

The public are hereby warned against
giving credit to my wife, Odessa
Vaughan (nee Patrick) as I do not hold
myself responsible for her or anyone
elge contracting any debt or debts in m5
name unless by a written order signed
by me.





Sed. JAMES VAUGHAN,
Welchman Hall,

St. Thomas

31.7.52—2n

ANNOUNCEMENTS

ARS ON HIRE—Friends and general
public to know that you can_ hire
brand new self-driven cars at Holborn,
Fontabelle. Dial 3723. 30,7. 52—4n

—
EARN BIG MONEY by selling Redif
fusion in your spare time. Get a supply
af forms today. 1.7.52—-6n.

LOST & FOUND
‘LOST

a
One B.T.C. TICKET for Summer meet-
ing, Series OOO, number 6068 on the hos
pital grounds Finder please contact
Nurse T. Saunders, Dial 2008
‘ 31,7.52









in





FOR RENT

HOUSES

Attractive seaside Flat main road fas
+ comfortably furnished, English

, Open Verandah facing sea. Suitable
one person for couple); From August 1,
Telephone 2949. 18.6,52—t.{.n.







Rub away the pain-/

Se aeuier tol dorcel
s

A.l, White Linterern e-

trates to the source of the,
pain. Its soothing warmth
brings welcome relief. Buy
a bottle today!

WHITE.








| =— LINIMENT
YPOS000990000000090000/
» AND NOW

A GAS COOKER
like those you have admired
the magazines.
SEE THEM TO-DAY . ‘
sit At Your Gas Showroom.
Pra at Py Bay Street.

DEeee eee ee Coe eee ee ees
NATURALIZATION

in






eee
j

{ NOTICE is hereby given that
JAKOB HANS (JOHNNY)
HERBST of “Maple Manor,”

Hastings, is applying to the Gov-
ernor for naturalization, and that
)PnyY person who knows any reason
Why naturalization should not be
y ‘granted should send a written and

/Figned statement of the facts to
the Colonial Secretary.’

SOO

30.7.52—2n.

_ AUCTION
i SALE

. DAIRY
if COW’S
REX DAIRY FARM

HOTHERSAL TURNING
; St. Michael

i TO.DAY

e
AUCTIONEERS

Jotn 4. Biadon
& ce. |

Phone 4640
Plantations Building.

%









"| will sell











| CAR—Morris 8 in good working co@i-







edie “al ca * enough land to erect more buildings
} tion. Tyres good, Rhone “as 50-3 inspection any day on application to
' mrsnas “> | tenants. The above will be set up for |
PSR mle apie. ale by Public Competition at my}
| CAR—Morris a2 H.P. Good working |*/© &3 are ; ,
covatigns pce 4000 tw i"be aaen at gee, WICTORIA, STREET, ERNDAY in
Etheiridge, Bank Hall Road. Phone 3479. 5 “MER WI os
M. R. Hunte 30.7.52—T.F.N R. ARCHER MoKENZIE
27.7. 32-—4n
CAR-—-Ford Prefect 10 H.P. in good aE TOR. iin .
working order. No_ reasonable offer | , 1. “TREVOR', Black Rock, ae ere
refused. Apply: N. E. Corbin, DaCosta|# desirable bungalow-type a.
& Co.. D 31.7.52—2n, | house, standing on 3 roods 30 perches



Goods







CAR—1951 Black Hillman M
miles Contact I
House, St

hinx, 15,000
S. Robinson, Garden
George, Dial 3254. :
31.7.52—4n
CAR—One Morris Minor two door
Saloon in perfect condition | year old,
; Owner leaving Island, Phone 23430
31.7. 52—2n





——
CAR—Dodge Super-de Luxe (X—88)
for \cash, best offer, bought
smaller car. First class order, owner
| driven. Dial 3359. t
16,7,52—t.f.n.

CAR—Ford V-8 Super DeLuxe X—754
will sell at bargain price,
R. D. Stewart, Dial 3248.





2 .7,52—4n

TRUCKX—Chevrolet truck, no reason-
able offer refused. A Barnes & ¢°.
3.17.52—+.f,n.

Ltd.
FURNITURE

FURNITURE—One Mahogany Wardrobe
with full length mirror inside One
Mahogany Morris Suite complete with
imported spring Cushions. Furnitur
built by R. A. Griffith, Full_particu-
lars, Phone 3430. 31,7.52—2n.









LIVESTOCK

COWS—Two (2) Milch Cows, 22 and
14 pts. respectively; also donkey and
cart and harness. Apply: A. F. Browne,
Massiah Street, St. John

29.7.52—gn.







POULTRY



PIGEONS—A few pairs Black Caru-
aux Silver & White Kings. P._ D.
Maynard, Porters, St. James. Dial 0119

26.7.52—6n

MECHANICAL

MACHINE—One Jones Sewing Machine.
Dial 3278, 31.7.52——1n.







MACHINE—Almost new Singer Hand
Sewing Machine Latest Model, (re-
versible stitching ete.) very little used,
perfect condition $140.00 Telephone
2222. Preferably before 10.30

31.7.52—-1n,



MISCELLANEOUS

AUTO ACCESSORIES including cool
eushions, upholstery rexine, fibre seat
covering, green canvas, chrome wheel
rings, steeringwheel covers, sun visors,
hood dressing, cigarette lighters (6 and
12 volt), reverse lamps, licence holders,
reor view mirrers (car & Truck), tyre
gauges (Car and Truck), insulating tape.
Courtesy Garage. Dial 4391.

25.7.52—6n

CYCLE ACCESSORSES including elec-
ire generator lamps (Miller & Impex),
Petching kits, Solution (special whole-
ssle price), Flashlights and _ batteries, |
French Chalk (7 tb, tins), Brake blocks











pumps, rim tapes, Tyres and_ tubes,
ete. Courtesy Garage. Dial 4391. |

29.7.52—6n
CREPE BACK SATIN A. Mafshal |

Fabric Superior heavy quality in green,

——

CLASSIFIED ADS.

enquiries t0/¢or sale by Public Competition at our





PUBLIC SALES |
REAL ESTATE |



ALL THAT MESSUAGE AT TUDOR
STREET and the land on which it stands
built of stone and covered with
Galvanise at present rented out as two
shops producing an income of 756 dollars
per annum. Suitable for a bond with





land, and containing open marble-tiled |
verandah to North and East, drawing
and dining rooms, 3 bedrooms (each with
running water), and usual conveniences,
(all on one flat), and, on ground level, |
spacious Kitchen, reom, wash-
room, store room &c. Electricity, Gas
and Government Water installed.
Garage for two cars, servants rooms,

fowl house, flower garden, lawn, and
orchard, in spacious yard.
The house and outbuildings have just

been repaired and inted throughout,

Inspection any y (exeept Sunday!
from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on application to
the Caretaker on the premises.

2. 1 Rood 64 ches of Land opposite
“TREVOR” at Black Rock.

The above properties will be set up
Office, James Street, Bridgetown, on
Friday, ist August at 2 p.m.

YEARWOOD & BOYCE,
Solicitors,
18,.7.52—Tn





AUCTION

LIVESTOCK—To be sold by auction
to-day at 2 p.m. at Rex Dairy farm,
Hothersal Turning, 21 heads of Diairy
Cows and one pedigree Holstein Bull.

31.7.52—2n



by public auction at the offices of the
undersigned on Tuesday, the 5th Augiist
1952, at 1.30 p.m.
MARGARET GROVE

will the land whereon the same stands
and thereto belonging containing by
admeasurement 3 roods 22:7/10. perches
situate at Bank Hall Cross Road, Saint
Michael, v

The se is a stonewall building
and the land is good arable land.

For inspection apply on the premises
to the owners Corporal F. F. Denner
and others.

For further particulars and conditions
of sale, apply to:

R. 8. NICHOLLS & Co.,
Solicitors,
151/152 Roebuck Street.
Telephone 3925. 30.7.52—7n.





PUBLIC NOTICES

NOTICE to Customers and the generai
public; Our wholesale Business will be
closed for our annual holiday from
1fth August until the 19th.

Cc. HERBERT,
55, Tudor Street, City.
30.7,52—4n





NOTICE
“THE SUNDAY GUARDIAN”

As from next Sunday, the “Sunday
Guardian” will be sold in Trinidad at
lac. instead of 10¢., as a result, the price
here will be 18c, instead of i6c. The
“Trinidad Guardian Daily", however,
will continue to be sold at 10c.

31,.7.52—1n

NOTICE
1S HEREBY GIVEN that it is the inten-
tion of the Vestry of the parish of Saint
Andrew in this Island to cause to be
introduced into the Legislature of this
Island a Bill authorising the said Vestry
to raise a loan not exceeding £700 to
enable the said Vestry to erect com-
munal Baths and Latrines at St. Simons.
Dated this 28th day of July, 1952.
CARRINGTON & SEALY
Solicitors for the Vestry



Royal Blue and Dark Green 36 inches

wide usually $2.97 yard reduced to $219

ut KIRPALANE 52, Swan Street.
31,7.52—In.

———
GLUE KETTLES--A Glue Kettle that
so Light that .you don't realise its
presence in your kit and how efficient;
No joints to leak and unbreakable

capacity I pt. Price $1,860 Harrison,
31,7.52—gne

RECORDS—Clearing all stocks of 78
R.P.M. Records at 3 for $1.50 at Da
Costa & Co., Ltd. Electrical Department.

25.7.52—6n

‘





) STOVE—One Wood and Coal Iron
Stove. Dial 3278. 31.7.52—i1n
—_—S—

SUBSCRIBE now to the Dally
Telegraph, England's leading Daily News-
paper now arriving in Barbados by Air
only a few days after publication in
London, Contact Ian Gale, C/o. Advo-





ctte Co. Ltd., Local Representative
Tel, 3118, 17,4,52—t.f.n
SUAVE by Helene Curtis, America’s

nost popular hair Cosmetic — just a few
jvops add glorious radiance to your
iair, Knight's Ltd, 30.7,52-—3n,

TOYS—New American Toys which in-

‘tude Doctor and Nurse Kits, Beach
‘ills, Pistols, Cannons. Cars, Jeeps,
Vater Pistols, Dippy Ducks and several
‘ther attractive toys All reasonably
oriced Gc. WwW Hutchinson & Co,,
td, — Broad Street.

29.7.52—3n





“WEDDING GIFT—A few ironing board
nd No-cord iron sets, subject to special







er one tae
TAKE NOTICE

ZENITH

That ZENITH RADIO CORPORATION,

vorporation organized and existing
inder the laws of the State of Tlinois,
lanufacturers, whose trade or business
vuidress is 6001 West Dicken Avenue,
‘ity of Chicago, County of Cook, State
4 Illinois, United States of America,

118 applied for the registration of a
rade mark in Part “A” of Register in
espect of electrical hearing aids and
warts thereof, and will be entitled

egister the same after one month front
he 31st day of July, 1952, unless some

erson shall in the meantime give notice
1) duplicate to me at my office of oppo-
ition of such registration, The trade
pork can be seen on application at my |
office, =

Dated this 23rd day of July, 1952

H. WILLIAMS,



TAKE NOTICE

BARFOOD

That BARBADOS PRODUCTS LEMITED,

company incorporated and
n Berbados, Manufacturers, whose trade
r business address is in care of Fitz-
Graham & Co.,

witrick Barelays Bank

Juilding, Broad Street, Bridgetown, has
pp'ied for the registration of a trade
vark in Part “A of Register in respect
f food products, substances used as
eod or as ingredients in food, and will
x© entitied to register the same after
me month from the 31st day of July,
$82, unless some person shall in the

neantime give notice in duplicate to me
t my office of opposition of such regis-




tration. The trade mark can be seen on
pplication at my office
Dated this 28rd day of July, 1962
H, WILLIAMS,

Registrar of Trade Marks
31.7.52—2n

Forester’s Scholarship

Applications
dressed to the
Michael's

in writing, ad-
Secretary, Court
Diamond, will be
received up to Saturday, 2nd
August, 1952, for one Enabling
Scholarship tenable at any first
or Second Grade School,

Candidates, whose parents must
be financial members of the above-

St

4
4

PAt ptf Se
PLLC SEF FF CPS SSIS EI






named Court, must be, not less 4

than 10 years ola and under 14 &

years on Ist September, 1952 $

Applications must be accom- $

panied by either a Birth or a Bap- §

tismal Certificate R

S. A. OSBOURNE % |

Secretar Court St. Michael $

} Diamond 2

. Dayrell's Road, %

ie St. Michael 19. $ |

ies 30.7.52—4an %
*

| PPSSSSS95999996999 S909 :



to } Manufacturers, whose trade or business

registered | \&

of St. Andrew.
29,.7.52—3n.



NOTICE

All male citizens of the United States
are requested to call at
ts am Lo par had from July 1 to
» 1952 Selective Service Registrati

under the Universal Military ‘Trainin
Service Act

All male citizens of the United States
who attain the age of 18 years sub-
sequent to July 31, 1952, are required
to register upon the day ae attain the
eighteenth anniversary of the day of
eo birth, or within five days there-
after.

For further information, consult fhe
American Consulate, Bridgetown, Bar-
. 27.6 ,52—t.f.n.

TAKE NOTICE —
COMMANDER

That THE STUDEBAKER CORPORA-
TION, a corporation organized and
existing under the laws of the State of
Delaware, United States of America,
Manufacturers, whose trade or business
eddress is 635 South Main Street, South
Bend, State of Indiana, U.S.A., has
applied for the registration of a trade
mark in Part “A” of Register in respect
of automobiles, and will be entitled to
register the same after.one month from
the 3lst day of July, 1952, unless some
person shall in the meantime give notice
in duplicate to me at my office of oppo-
sition of such registration. The trade
mark can be seen on application at my
office,

Dated this 23rd day of July,

H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks,
31,7,53—3n.





1952,









BARBADOS ADVOCATE













THURSDAY, JULY 31, 1952
aaa Een
« !
es From Grenada |Miss M. Jordana, Mi Marie Jordana.
M. Berquist, K. Royer, J Royer, E.| For St. Lacia:
Lame. R, Carbot, P. Leyer, C. Coppin, |H. Shearn, K, Murphy, Rev. Harold Mei-
R. Morgan. C, Johnson, W. Johnsen, D\| ville, L. Chase, C. Redman, M. St. John,
6 J m, R. Skinner, Ramroop, Dhan-|S. Davies, K. Cooper. M. Cooper, P. Scosieestnasbenienemniianmeememediontememmenneeemenooteneeareeneenmnenemertaeneneennstieeseneen tae oeenenesieennnnmnnmnennnaanaa
® dayah, F. Phillip, J.’ Redhead, D. Red- Marshall, L. Brathwaite. A. Rocheford, MONTREAL, a!
: head, S. Maseall, T. Marryshow, R.|A Clarke, E. Bohne, Mitchell, H. ZEALAND UL #& \
© Shannon. | Pierrot, L. Haywood, M. Bristol, D MAN SZ. %
AFF ( F Trinidad | Wiles, F. Clairmonte, P. Walker, D.!
rom Trinidad: Johnson, Revd. A. Armstrong, C. Arm- S.S. “GLOUCESTER” ts scheduled to
3 G. Maingot, R. Thomas, M. Monsegue, | strong, H. Arrindell, F. Olton, C. Clarke, sail from Port Pirie May Sist, The M/V “CARIBBEE” will
(a D. McDonald, E, Katz L. Yufe, B. Hutch-|M, Reece, Mr. Louis Fisher, Mrs. Blanche | June Sth, Melbourne June 44th, aceept Cargo and Passengers for
I li l Ba: inson, C, Mariani, F. Mariani, V. Mariani,|St, Rose, Mr. Clement Bourne, Mr, Ed- | June 24th, Brisbane Sth, Antigua, Montserrat,
n Car isie y Rs Watson, A. ataoe, ¢ Goadara, 2: | ward Elliott, Mr. John Dos Samos, Mrs. | Barbados about Cth: Nevis me St. Kitts. Sailing
emming, jarke, utehinson, Esther Roach. Thursday 3ist inst.
Schooner Mary E. Caroline, Schooner Tempro, V. LeWis, N. Lewis, E. Foster, | For Grenada: Th addition to general cargo this vessel -
neline, Schooner Frances W. Smith, M- Foster, P. Foster, K. Foster, E. Hold-| Pp. Preudhomme, S. Preudhomme, L.|®8S @mple space for chilled amd hard The M/V “MONEKA" will
Schooner Zita Wanita Schooner Confident ¢, R. MeDavid, M, Roett, D. Roett, A.| Alexander, S. Defreitas, H. Copland, F. | fozem cargo. accept Cargo and Passengers for
F. G, Rainbow M., Sch, Cyril E. Smith, Nathan, C. Nathan, S. Nathan, F. Os-|Kerr, C. Coppin, Roy Williams, Cargo aopee throng Tes of Dominica, Antigua, Mi *»
Schooner Triumphant Star, Sehooner borne, N. Brewster, K. Paddock, G. Pad-|Â¥or Puerto Rico: Lading for pment at to Nevis and St Kitts. Hing
Mandalay 11, L.M:S. Manuy, Guif Barge %0ck,'V. Paddock, A. Paddock Miss Ariel Thompson, Miss Edna] British Guiana, Leeward and Windward Friday, 8th August, 1952,
No. 2, Schooner Cloudia S.; M.V. Terra DEPARTURES BY FP W.LA, 'Applewhite, Mr, Oliver Hall, Mr, John | fslands.
Nova, Schooner May Olive, Schooner Plaza. further particwars apply—
Wonderful Counsellor, Schooner Marea For Antigua: or Martinique: = B.Wi SCHOONER OWNERS’
Henrietta, Schooner At Last, Schooner | H. Savoury, B. Savoury, P. MJchael, J.| F. Warjn-Weil, G. Baillargeau FURNESS WITHY @ CO., LID., ASSOCIATION (INC,)
Henry D, Wallace, Sch. Esso Aruba, M.V, Massiah, J. Massiah, G. Sahely, R. Has-| For Guadeloupe: TRINIDAD. Conmgnes
Herdsman, M.V, Gloria Maria. sell, K. Hassell, M, Hassell, A, Sarkis, H, Sarkis, R. Sarkis, J. Sar- and Tele. a ou
For Trinidad: - kis, A. Sarkis, F. Synsky. DA COSTA @ CO., LED
ARRIVALS ARRIVALS BY B.W.1LA. - =

M.V, Caribbee, 100 tons, Capt. Gumbs,

M, Simpson, E. Gribas, K.
from Dominiea, Agents: Schooner Own-

M, “em
Gribas, K, Gribas, L. Stanley, A. Cozier,

From 8t. Kitts:
Frank Blackman, Dr. Malcolm Parker.

ers’ Association, R. Foster, James Wickham, Lourdes
Sehooner Rosarene, 60 tons, Capt, Lyon, Ulusia Leon, S. Rider, B. Hutchin- =o a nen
Hazel. from British Guiana, Agents: Son. 1. Ferguson, H, Villafaria, R. Goods- "
Schooner Owners’ Association,” an, L, rts, C, Seott, P, Rezende, ” B ¥ NGE
S.S, Brazil, 11,123 tons, Capt. Pierre, J. Rezende, P. Rezende, M. Rezende, V. RATES OF EXCHANGE
from Trinidad, Agents: Messrs. R. M. Gill, M. Gill, S. Gill, ¥. George, Aleda JULY 30, 1952
Jones & Co. Ltd. Bowen, Wilkye Lowe, J. Cheeks, H.| Selling NEW YORK Buying
DEPARTURES Cheeks, L. Johnson, E. Birse, A. Sparey,| 73.1% pr. Cheques on
M.V. Clara for Trinidad; 8.8. Schie C; Parravicino, E, Kong, V. Durant, J. nkers 71.4% pr
for Trinidad and SS. Brazil for Bahia, Miner, J. Miner, M. Miner, E. Miner, B. Sigit or
Thomas, E. Batz, G. Walker, G, Downie. demand Drafts 71.2% pr.
For Venezuela: 73.1% pr. Cable ae aks
Seawell 71,6% pr. Currency 69.9% or
nee Hureos Van Middlesworth, Donne pk 69.2% pr.
= aster Jan ssen, Miss M, Font, Miss CANA
= vate BY B.W.LA. Edwina Parsons, Miss R. Wilson, Miss C. (including Newfoundland)
rom Venezuela: Puigbo, Miss Rita Puigbo, Master Peter | 79.2% pr. Cheques on
es iiliam Smith, Edna Smith, Douglas Schick, Miss Maria Urbaneia, Miss Bankers 17.4% pr.
Smith, Sheila Smith, Gerard Maureau, Bianca Urbaneja, Miss Jayone Bilboa Demand Drafts 17.25% pr.
Daniel ro, Winifred Small, Harriett Miss A. Bilboa, Miss Ave Bilboa Miss -. Sight Drafts TTA pr.
Smail, Donald Small, Jesusa Hofman, Cecilia Perez, Miss Renata Pennacchiotti, | 792% pr. Cable sesee
a ee ome Beeoan. qoexta Miss Irene Pennacchiotti, Miss Diana| 77.7% pr. Currency 15,27 pr.
, iceno, erre rnal, nnacc! 3 15.2% pr.
Arnal, Andres Reti| Margarita Reti, ee hiott!, Miss Roberta Maso, Miss Coupons 75 P

Daniela Maso, Miss Yvette Ardila, Mrs.
Gladys Spinetti, Master Hugo Spinetti,

Se eestesssteasesetssenisssiseninsnisssnsessinenseeieneenes

CHANCERY SALE

The undermentioned property will be set up for sale at The Re istratio:
in Office,
Public Buildings, Bridgetown, between 12 noon and 2 p.m. for the sum and aa
the date specified belaw. If not then sold, it will be set up on each succeeding
Friday at u same place and during the same hours until sold. Full particulars
on applicatidn to me.

CLARENCE SAMUEL, KING—Piaintiff

land
NATHANIEL PILGRIM—Defendant

FIRSTLY ALL THAT certain piece or parcel of land situate at
Yearwood's Gap off Black ck in the parish of Saint Michael and
Island aforesaid containing) by admeasurement one rood twenty
seven perches or thereabouts Abutting on lands of L. Cummings
on lands of one Arthur, deceased, on lands of one Corbin on lands
of L, Cadogan and on a Public Road or ho ever else the same may
abut and bound and SECONDLY THAT certain piece or parcel
of jand situate at Brighton Road In the parish of Saint Michiel
and Island of Barbados aforesaid containing by admeasurement
twenty and four fifths perches or thereabouts Abutting and bounding
on lands of W. H, Leach on lands of Blanch Gittens on lands of
one Blackett on lands of Martha Bowen and on a Public Road or
however else the same may abut and bound Together with the
messuage or dwellinghouse and all and singular other the buildings
and erections thereon. é
UPSET PRICE: £1,200. 0. 0.

Date of Sale. 15th August, 1952. f

Herbert Ascough,

NROPERTY.





H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar-in-Chancery.
July, 1952.
31.7,52—4n,
That THE GUIANA MATCH FACTORY LIMITED, a cumpany of British

nationdlity, Manufacturers, whose trade or business address is 54 & 55 Water

Street, Georgetown, British Guiana, has applied for the registration of a trade
mark in Part “A™ of Register in respect of matches, and will be entitled to
register the same after one month from athe 3ist day of July, 1952, unless some
person shall in the meggtime give notice in duplicate to me at my office of

Opposition of such registfation, The trade maric can be seen on application at
my office

Dated this %rd day of July, 1952.
H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.
31.7.52—3n.







apy

24von>



}
| CIGARETTES

onsen silent



That BROWN & WILLIAMSON TOBACCO CORPORATION (EXPORT)
LIMITED, a company organised under the laws of the United Kingdom of Great
Britain dnd Northern Ireland, Tobacco Manufacturers, whose trade or business
address is Westminster House, 7, Millbank, London, S.W., England has applied
for the registration of a trade mark in Part “A" of Register in respect of manu-
factured tobacco, and will be entitled to register the same after one month from
the 3lst dav of July, 1952, unless some person shall in the meantime give notice
in duplicate to me at my office of opposition of such registration
ean be seen on application at my office.
Dated this @ird day of July, 1952

The trade mark

H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.
21.7.52—8n.

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF THE WEST INDIES

EXTRA-MURAL DEPARTMENT



TAKE NOTICE

CHAMPION
That THE STUDEBAKER CORPORA-
TION, a corporation organized and

existing under the laws of the State of
Delaware, United States of America,

address is 635 South Main Street, South
Bend, State of Indiana, U.S.A., has
applied for the registration of a trade

mark in Part “A” of Register in respect
of automobiles, and will be entitled to
register the same after one month from
the 3ist day of July, 1952, unless some
person shall in the meantime give notice
iy duplicate to me at my office of oppo-
sition of such registration. The trade
mark can be seen on application at my
fA

office.
Dated this 23rd day of July, 1952
H, WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.
31,.7.52—3n



in

GOOD USED

FURNITURE

Big & Medium imported Chef-
fonieres with many Fane, Mirrors,
$48 up — Sideboards $36, Big
Larders $12, Liquor Cases with
secure locks $5.50, Metal keeboxes
$20 up, Round Osk Dining Table



A LECTURE
Sw
RECENT WEST INDIAN NOVELS
PROFESSOR A. K. CROSTON

IN THE
HARRISON COLLEGE LIBRARY
N oe

“ON a.
FRIDAY, AUGUST 1ST

TAKE NOTICE
|
AT 8.00 P.M. |

ADMISSION Shes a 1/-
509O5OSS55S05S0S0 $O00nodSe eae



10 CENTS PER «POUND





for 4 or more, $22 Hit, Metal
Ware Drainers $3
Iron Bedstead $8, Old World
Carved Tall Pole Mahogany Be'-
stead $10/ Enamelled 2-drawer i
P with Mirror $9, Smali
r-roBe $20, 42” Fibre Bed
$7, Cot and Cot Frames, Metal
Trunk $8
Railed -Oak Chairs $3.50, Rush |
Chairs $2.88, Round many-pu:pose :
Varnished 20” Tables $3.50, Ladies R |
Work Basket, x |
PIANOS, Portable and Table
Gramophones $20, Banjos $14
x Portable Typewriter % |
4
7’ , 7 s
BUY NOW! 3
%,
v %
4 «
%, a. S,
SL. S. W
x ‘“
> ° . | ¥
> g |
x SPRY STREET. DIAL 4009 % }
y .
PSOCSSSSS9F99 9S SSS 9999S





POTATOES FOR THE
POPULATION

JOHN N. PEREIRA, Rickett Street (East of the
Post Office), announces the arrival of 1,000 baskets of
Medium White-Skin Potatoes ex S.S. “SCHIE” at $5.50
per basket of 55 lbs,

> JOHN N PEREIRA

(COMMISSION MERCHANT)
Rickett Street



|



——






restores
digestion

‘Dolsa’ brings quick relief for indiges-
tion discomforts by neutralizing excess
stomach acid, often the cause of after-
meals distress. One measured dose
swiftly reaches a//theinflamed surfaces
of the stomach with its gentle, soothing
action.

Recommended for:
Indigestion
Dyspepsia
Heartburn
Flatulence
Gastric

acidity, etc,





=

.

IN CARTONS OF 15 MEASURED DOSES







WANTED

HOUSE on long lease by October
on Sea Coast or overlooking sea.
Large verandah, 3 bedrooms, usual
offices, vicinity Hastings, St.
Lawrence, Worthing, Maxwell or
Top Rock Preferably unfur-
nished and enclosed Call K. D.









Edwards 4145 or 2375 ‘





DOLTAR SALE
O

DECCA
RECORDS

BING CROSBY

| Down by the River

When the bloom is on the
sage

It’s a lonely trail

I'm falling in
someone

Gypsy love song

Little Sir Echo

Poor old Rover

Going my way

Swinging on a star

Aren’t you glad you’re you

In the _land of beginning
again

Welcome.to my dream

It’s anybody’s spring

Personality

Would You.

Soon

I wished on the moon

Two for to-night

Empty Saddles

Round-up Lullaby

Just one word of consolation

Dear old gal

Sweet Leilani

Blue Hawaii

Dancing under the Stars

Paiace in Paradise

Speak to me of love

That big base viol

Looping the loop

My inspiration

BRADSHAW & CO.

love with











Ve ah aed
As yy]
AS SLL





|
-
|

GRASS LOADER



+



Steamship Co.
One.

NEW YORK SERVICE.

S/S “ALCOA PEGASUS” sails 8th August — arrives Barbados 20th
S/S “ALCOA PLANTER” sails 5th September—arrives Barbados 17th

NEW ORLEANS SERVICE.

A STEAMER sails 17th July
A sails 3ist July

A STEAMER sails 14th

A sails 28th Ai
A STEAMER epten

sails 11th September

August
September

arrives Barbados 2nd August
arrives Barbados 16th Barbados
arrives Barbados 30th August
arrives Barbados 13th September
arrives Barbados 27th September

piel



CANADIAN SERVICE

SOUTHBOUND
5 Sails Sails Arrives
Montreal Halifax Barbados
“ARGOBEC” : July 15 Juy 20 . August 1
“TYRA” vs a. + oe os July 25 Juky 2B August 11
“A STEAMER” os od ia +. August 12 August 16 August 29
“A STEAMER” + se August 29 September 2 Sept. 15
NORTHBOUND

“A STEAMER” Due Barbados, August 9th for ST, JOHN, N.B. and
ST. LAWRENCE RIVER PORTS.

| one
ROBERT THOM LTD.— NEW YORK & GULF SERVICE

Apply:— DA COSTA & CO.,LTD. CANADIAN SERVICE

<, HARRISON LINE

Na
OUTWARD FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM

Vessel From Leaves Due



Barbados.

S.S. “SCHQLAR”

S.S. “CROFTER”
S.S. “SPECIALIST”

-. London and

ere
.+» London
.. Glasgow and

26th July 10th Aug.
2nd Aug. 15th Aug.
2nd Aug. 16th Aug.



L/pool
| S.S. “TROJAN STAR” ., Liverpool 2nd Aug. 15th Aug.
|
HOMEWARD FOR THE UNITED KINGDOM
Vessel For Close in *
Barbados
S.S. “CRISPIN” S.S. “FORESTER” oe .. Liverpool ist Aug.

For further information apply to

DACOSTA & CO.. LTD.—Agents



WE HAVE

RED ROOFING PAINT
at $4.50 per Gallon
THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM

Corner Broad and Tudor Sts.

AT LAST!

A AYGIENIC
YOUR FLASK

+

TaE SEAL-A-VAC

WILL NOT “POP OUT”

CANNOT LEAK ,

DISMANTLES, QUICKLY FOR EASY CLEANING
FITS ANY 1.PINT FLASK

HIGHEST THERMAL EFFICIENCY FOR HOT AND
COLD LIQUIDS

37e.

STOPPER FOR

EACH.

GENERAL HARDWARE SUPPLIES:

Lae nnd
RICKETT STREET (Opposite Post Office) "PHONE 4918

GRASS
HARVESTING —
EQUIPMENT

Za
bie? yA? \t ea
Arial =
PFT Py }



SIDE DELIVERY RAKE

AVAILABLE FROM STOCK.

Secure Your Requirements Now !

COURTESY GARAGE

(Robert Thom Limited)
Whitepark Rd.

\ Speen PSE = )

Dial 4616















THURSDAY, JULY 31, 1952 BARBADOS ADVOCATE

case eeeeemeneneememmeeneememmemmemeemeneenetemnenesceeeneenne een eae

PAGE SEVEN

| BACKACHE

THE PERFECT | ___ IS YOUR f
CEREAL WARNING:

| Backache is usually the first sign of Kidney
Trouble. The kidneys are the biood’s filters,
When they get out of order, instead of pure, ,
fresh blood flowing to every nerve and
| muscle, your blood stream is heavy with
waste poisons and acids. Then you feel rotten.
Half ac " "s . and = if
tests by fa ee = prove tha
Dodd’s Kid ida your Moed
of excess acids and poisons, Then your
blood is clear—your backache disappears
and your tired feeling is replaced by robust
health and energy. You feel a
Insist on Dodd's Kidney Pills. Only 2/-~
| for large hettle at all chemists. J14

| Dodd's Kidney Pills











HENRY



CARL ANDERSON

-
a










| @® 00D FOR CHILDREN
Watch your children grow up full
of life and energy. See that your
} men and women of tomorrow get
| nourishing foods today! Nourish-
ing, delicious Cream of Wheat is
| easy to digest — you and your chil-
dren will love it! Try it today,










BY ALAN STRANKS & GEORGE DAVIES |

({









































Lal 1 TO-DAY'S NEWS FLAS! }
Y *euceOwire \ i vn i
} LOVAT!I 1D GROWN gt sarcnnanganentigenin-s testicals
rer TIRED OF HER .. f | | Alterations, improvements, and §
A STATEMENT... > \ | IN BODY-BUILDING extensions are teking.iplsce: at
c | JOUNSON'S STATIONERY so as J
} NOURISHMENT to give greater shopping pleasure
| to ¢ nerous customer friends. ‘
| Please Note:—The Hardware
| | tment is now elosed
| | ©. HH, SOHNSON.
| N. JOHNSON
|
|
|

BY CHIC ‘fOUNG





GOSH --!T TAKES A
LOT OF GROCERIES TO
FEED A
FAMILY )

‘“
REGISTERED mrand hanes
need - -

|| SDS areecacell | |
o te 4S. ( oa Cc R E A pi ; NUTROPHOS
Be N | (Ue \

| i"
) A scientific preparation for
| | the treatment of all
|
| | a OF
| I

nerve ills.

YOU EAT WELL, SLEEP
WELL, FEEL WELL

when you take
NUTROPHOS.





REWITCHED,
BOTHERED and
BEWILDERED
That's how you feel when
your nerves are out of
order. That's when you




































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eer eaiialinieterciep ens cacieaamiemeaiisi
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ne ee rer na ae SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Thursday to Saturday only
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CRICKET

The West Indies in Australia 1951—52

CRUSADERS

By HAROLD DALE .





MR. JIGGS - VIAAKE UP!
IT'S FIVE O'CLOCK /--
YO WON'T ENJOY YOUR
NAP AT HOME BEFORE










!

RIP KIRBY

. }

}

og Z
a = See eee ee Mer | . Mr. Harold Dale, already known to Millions
a Uh c, Vv u oi . : - . : .

eee pn garnets ease a of readers for his forthright cricket reporting in
| BE A MINT! PAGAN'S BOOKED AT the Daily Express and the Barbados Advocate
| et wel ie vee ee adds another outstanding book to our series on
—_— A A LD Test Cricket. How would the flashing strokes of



Weekes, Worrell and Walcott match up to the

ll “vs Y. f t efficient run-getting of Morris and Hassett?
our avourite ‘ 3
Read « yoeet Would the spin and guile of Ramadhin and
Valentine be more effective than the menacing

Cricketing Stars— speed of Lindwall and Miller? Would the

“stormy petrel of cricket,” Barnes, succeed in his

GODDARD, ATKINSON, attempt at a comeback? These and the other



questions that spring to mind are fully dealt with
TT in Mr, Dale’s candid commentary. Apart from
‘ MARSHALL, WALCO ’ detailed chapters on the Test, he covers all the

other important games of the tour.

WEEKES, WORRELL. Few cricket enthusiasts could afford the time

and money to be present throughout the “World
$









}
{
\
{
}
y
; Championship” matches. Cricket Crusaders is
‘ es | s | COULD LETGO the ideal ih for the absentee eee
yO ts g] FOR A SECOND 10 by many splendid action illustrations, it brings a
? MGHT IN THE JUNGLE } | . GET MYGUN-++ ¢ ( macmaeribiia aavind vighe th he render ane }
' MAN AGAINST LIONS |} - fy) # BUT | CAN'T |
| ADVOCATE |
| $3.50
| TATIONERY
: per copy ST | |
5















eS

PAGE EIGHT

Out!
Ball in hand

Not Out!
Ball not in hand



Not. Out!

Ball not in hand



Out!
Ball in hand

Know Your Cricket—ww 31

1 SHALL discuss to-day Law
31 which sets out the conditions
under which the wicket is consid-
ered “down”. Since the interpre-
tation of this law often leads to

By O. S. COPPIN

about the bail being “disturbed”
as used to be the case in the old
days and which led to much con-

normally worn.
a player’s hat is blown off by the

For example if

wind and its puts his wicket

“down” he is out,

Wicket Broken

man Jean
swim
star

pearing for the U.S.A, After a long
drawn out duel

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

| OLYMPICS:

F renchman Wins 400 Metres
Free Style Swimming Race

(Trevor Gale Reports From Helsinki)

x . ye
Swimming continues to be the main attraction at the French Design Wins

athle

Olympics now that the
basket ball are the next in pc
finals now played in the stadi
crowds.

tics are over. Boxing and
ypularity while football semi-
um this week also draw good

I have not seen a football match yet as they clash

with other sports very often but the final scheduled tor next

Saturday is a “must” on my

This afternoon the man’s 400 metre free style
main attraction at the swimming stadium.

was well thought of.

It was left to the young French-
Boiteux however to
it out with the Hawaiian
Ford Konns who was ap-
Konno

in which

confusion I have been at some fiygion, With regard to the wicket being |!¢d at firs: then gradually gave
pains to photograph two local If cne bail is off, the M.C.C. broken while the ball is in play {Way to Boiteux only to draw al-
players in action to illustrate the fyrtijer rules, it is sufficient for it must be borne in mind that [most level with him again, the
Law and I am indeed grateful for ty¢ purpose of this Law to dis- even if the bails are off, the Frenchman won by half an arm's
heir co-operation. lodge the remaining one in any wicket can be bowled or thrown j!ength. Third was Ostrand of
LAW 31. The wicket shall be Gf the ways stated. “ down if the ball strikes a stump |Sweden,
ha te bo “Down” if either the } entirely out of its Hole in the ‘ wd
ball or the striker’s bat or per- Still Out ground. Alternatively a player Great Excitement

scm completely removes either bail
t om the tep of the stumps, or if

Â¥ oe beth of the bails be pre-
viously off, strikes a stump out of
«wn. ground. Any player may use
his hand crearm to put the wicket
down or, even should the bails be
previously off, may pull up a
stump, provided always that the
bal os held in the hand or honds
so used.

Not Down

The M.C.C. have pointed out in
thele “Notes to this Law that a
wicket ds not “down” merely on
account. of the disturbance of a
bail, but it is “down” if a bail in
failing from the wicket lodges be-
iween the stumps.

There must be no nonsense

Saturday’s Gall

THE DERBY

If owing to the strength of the

wind the captains have agreed to
dispense
(Law 8, Notes) the decision as to
when a wicket is “down” is one
for
the
circumstances
be held to be down even though
a stump has not been struck out
of the ground,

with the use of bails

the umpires to decide with
facts before them, In such
the wicket would

Further, if the wicket is broken

while the ball is in play it is not
the umpire’s duty to remake the
wicket until the ball has become
“ dead”.
may remake the wicket in such
circumstances,

A fieldsman however

The term “person” includes a

player's dress and equipment as

lops

CANDIDATES

(By BEN BATTLE)
THE best time for the morning was Seedling’s, a box

to box in 1.251/5, with Slainfe as his companion.

The

three-year-old certainly did not have the worse of the gallop
and juoks as if he will be as fit as hands can make him

by Saturday.

Tnis filly worked the same
distance with Cross Bow, in 1.26
and looked very impressive as
she did so I thought this her
best effort to date, and it was one
which plainly showed the mag-
nitude @? the task which faces
her rivals. Rambler Rose, com-
ing from the mile and picking
up Colleton, did the box in 1.26
4/5 which must have been all or
more than her connections could
have expected, In a year with-
out a Bright Light, she would
certainly have a good chance, if
exercise form counts for any-
thing. Dunquerque did her box
in 1.27 3/5, but the fact that a
policy of caution is being pursued
in preparing this grand little
filly, Ought not to cause us to
ignore her. The same can be
said of First Admiral, who was
only allowed to do his box in 1.30.

The Two Year Olds

Only a few of these youngs-
ters worked and if the tales that
ere told concerning them are
hal? true, we must look forward
to some disappointing — racing
where they are concerned. The
Bernard pair Bow Tie and
Faerie Queen, looked best over
4, which they covered in 54 3/5
with the filly having much the
best of things. Jim La _ Rue,
working with Joan’s Star did the
same distance in 55 3/5. while
Superjet look 57 seconds. How-
itzer did a five with Caprice, but
I was only able to get the time
(1.11 1/5) approximately.

The B. Class

The B’s returned some of the
best times for the morning, and
it seems that some of the keenest
racing ill occur in this class.
Sweet locket probably turned
in the best time over 5, — 1.03
3/5, although the time for Fire-
‘lady’s gallop with Trimbrook
was 1/5 of a second faster.

Firelady however had slightly
the worst of things and may not

have quite done the time. No
fewer than 3 horses did this
distance in 1.05 1/5.

They were Flying Dragon

Lunways, and Spear Grass. Spear
Grass worked on her own, but
Flying Dragon had Demure as
his companion and beat her very
badly. Lunways ,was accompan-
ied by The Thing who went re-
markably well and seemed to
have slightly the better of it.
Vectis working with March
Winds came back in 1.07, Over
a box to box Pepper Wine re-
turned 1.24, flat — she is still a
force to be reckoned with. Mrs.

_ They'll Do It

i a rae

T SWELL OFFICE SP. + FIRST TIME
VE BEEN HERE, ALTHOUGH We’VE
BEEN DOING BUSINESS FOR YEARS ¥
OH, BY THE WAY-»WHERE'S THAT SWEFT-
VOICED CHICK WHO ANSWERS THE
PHONE P SHE MUST BE 4 HONEY! HER,
I GOTTA MEET! THE VOICE WITH







HE CUDDLE! SHE'S WORTH AT.
LEAST A MILLION BUCKS TO
YOUR FIRM iN GOOD WILL



‘



Every

Also most impressive, was Bright Light,

Bear and Landmark did a brisk
box in 1.24 2/5 a good, gallop for
both. Beli Surprise also worked
well getting the same trip in
1,24 lw. Castle in the Air pro~
duced the most spectacular effort
of the morning, when he made
two and a half circuits of the
track quite oblivious to his riders
efforts to pull him up. His tem-
perament is his own worst
enemy.
The C, Class

Apart from Test Match who
was sent over four furlongs with
Super Jet most of the C's were
sent from box to box. None did
better than Dashing Princess
and High and Low who got back
in 1.23 1/5, Dashing Princess
appeared slightly the better of
the two at the finish and will be
dificult to beat this meeting.
Cantaquisine worked well in 1.24
2/5. Flieuxce lodking as though
she would have appreciated more
give in the ground, did 1.25,
while Aim Low took 3/5 of a
second longer. Neither Abu Ali,
Tiberian Lady nor Racton were
allowed their heads and returned
1.30 4/5, 1.40 and 1.35 respec-
tively. Doldrum came from the
mile and picked Viceroy at the 5.
She did the box in 1.25 1/5 but
could not get on her terms with
Viceroy. Among those who were
confined to 5 furlongs mention
must first be made of Trimbrook,
This rather leggy and light grey
filly may not be an oil painting,
but she apparently can run ag
her gallop with Fire Lady plainly
showed. The Thing also pro-
duced her best form so far in her
run with Lunways. Embers and
Magie Gaye worked together but
the latter is a long way below
her best form and could not keep
up with the Jamaican filly. The
time of 1,05 3/5 was quite im-
pressive. Street Arab showed
that she is improving when she
accompanied Water Cress in
1,06 2/5,

The D. And E. Class

The gallops of Cross Bow and
Water Cress have already been
referred to (see Bright Light
and Street Arab). Both = are
going well and there should be
close rivalry between them
Colleton had his best gallops so
far when he worked with Ramb-
ler Rose,

The F. Class

With the exception a* Miracle
and May Day who worked a box
to box in 1.29 4/5 the F. Class
were confined to Five Furlongs.
Best Time was 1.07 returned by

Registered US Patent Ofer

‘Time

(
















YOU MEA

MISS ARSENIC:
UR:SUPPOSE~
WE GO THROUGH
THE BOTTLING

















A—
i
t/
'



ANOTHER GUy
; 1S GONNA FIND OUT
Af YOU CAN'T TELL WHAT
A SOPRANO LOOKS LIKE
FROM THE WAY HER





WHERE GILA GOT
|{ HER SWEET VOICE,
SMR HER SOUR O'SAOSITION

can put down the wicket by pull-
ing up a stump with the hand

or hands holding the ball. *
If all the stumps are on the]*”
ground, the fielding side is allow- |”

ed to put back one or more stumps
in order to have an opportunity
of breaking the wicket.

No Bails

In accordance with Law 25 [5
(Dead Ball) if either or both |.
bails are blown off the striker’s |®

a

wiyket before he receives deliv- a

ery, that ball is considered can-
celled but the M.C.C, advise that
in general the captains should
agree to dispense with the use of
bails if the conditions are such as
to make the blowing off of bails
likely,

S
h
h
c

Jean, who

2

concerned about

There wa great excitement

nong the Freneh and although
iere were no tears this time it
as Monsicur Boiteux, father of

provided the human

touch, Running over to the finish
he jumped into the pool fully
clothed and hugged and kissed

is son dozens of times.

I was once again esconed among
cluster of French journalists
nd swimmers and my ears yibrat-
{ to their wild snouts, Madame

3oiteux sat just behind * bat she

seemed too overjoyed even to talk.

he smiled and probably would
ave shed a tear, but the sight of
er husband in the water in his
lothes must have made her more
him than her

son’s victory.

Cricket:

Northants Bat
Well Against

Indians

(From Our Own Correspondent)
LONDON, July 30.
At Northampton today the
Indian tourists ran into trouble
when F. R. Brown, former
England captain, won the toss
for the first time this season and
elected to bat. With Denis Brooks
former England player who hag
toured the West Indies making
156, Northants rattled up 365 for
seven before Brown declared.
Then in the closing minutes the
Indians lost the valuable wicket
of Roy for only three runs.
A century by number nine
batsman Johnnie Lawrence
his second in first class cricket—














t







t







saved Somerset from _ collapse
against Essex at Taunton. After
being 167 for seven, Somerset

rallied to make 325.
SCOREBOARD —

Northants versus Indians
Northants .. 365 for 7 dec’d
indians 3 for one wicket.

Derby versus Surrey
Derby 214
Surrey Talucuiat ee LOL 2

Hants versus Sussex







BOON Tf iy 60a ood Wapeae cs 233;
BUBSOR i LY 82 for &:,
Gloucester versus Yorks
Yorks . eat . 378 for 8
Watton sok, Paty akdiecsy" awe
Leicester versus Warwick
Warwick 126, Spencer 5
for 47, Goodwin ...... 5 for 64;
Leicester ..,..... 118 for nine,

Somerset versus Essex
Somerset .. 325, Lawrence 111.
Worcester versus Kent

Worcester on... 317 for 8,
Kenyon 117.
amorgan versus Notts.
TIOENOUMON 5% iv asters 144:
TRON full ci Pakeeniy uht 130 for 4.





Sports Window

To-night’s Division “A”
Water Polo matches at the
Aquatic Club. are:—Snappers
vs. Whipporays and Bonitas
vs. Harrison College. Play
starts at 8.30 p.m.

There will be a silver col-
lection.



March Winds who is improving
Viceroy and Betsam both covered
in 1,09 2/5 while Soprano work-
ing with Twinkle did 1.10, Cap-
rice accompanied Howitzer and
returned 1,11 1/5 approximately,
while Apronusk working with
Cottage could do no better than



1,12.
The G. Class
Gavotte was sent over a box
which she covered in 1.31 4/5.

The gallops of Cottage, Twinkle
and Joan’s Star have already
been reported.








{4.5 GOT T CALL UP
FROM THE OUTSIDE.
SOME TIME-SHE SURE
SNARLS WHEN ANY
OF US ASKS HER TO
GET A NUMBER;>».

HE ALPINE HAT

MADE A DATE WITH
THE CUDDLE VOICE,
SIGHT UNSEEN*2







THE HATLO HAT TO

ROBERT V. CHENNELL
358 HOLLEY S7.,
BROCKPORT, em

entire
play

Koen in the athletics. This is none
other than John Marshall of Aus-

Boiteux’s time or 4 minutes 30.7

seconds was a new Olympic re-
cord while the next five competi-
tors also beat the old mark. Sur-
prisingly Wayne Moore and Jim-
my McLane both of U.S.A. and
Japan’s Hironoshin Furuhashi, all
hot favourites, came 6th, 7th and
8th in that order.

In swimming there is perhaps
he second greatest flop in the
games after the sad dis-
of Mrs. Fanny Blankers-

ralia who simply cannot find his

BUILD

HEALTHY APPETITES |
and STRONG BODIES

‘MCF.
MO-CHEMICAL” FO)
F000 surritmin

programme.

world record breaking form, ©}
understand from reliable source
that he is very much evertrojned

Of Durm

liar style of slapping the water
with his right arm which he
brings down with

faster than his left.

The ladies springboard
was won as expected by Pat Mc
Cormick of the U.S.A, with Mady
Moveau of France sécond, and
"tle" Zoe Jensen another U.S.A
star third.

Jensen did some well executed Vv
backward jumps with
somersaults as well as a_ back-

ward one and a half to boost the
score in her last three jumps.

Yesterday she had caused
sensation by compl
the board and after she had three
tries the crowd grew a bit angry.
When the Swedish girl came on
and also flopped she ‘too com-
plained about the board and the
judges decided to start the com-
petition again.

a

all ever

Young fifteen-year-old Char-
mian Welsh of Great Britain was
good but patchy and _ obviously
lacked experience. But she was
still good enough to come fifth,

Now that the games are nearly
over the Communist China’s team
have arrived. To do what, no-



has never been able to go on hard

ground; caused a real surprise ut
was the Goodwood this afternoon when he
Record break- came through with a late chal-
ers from U.S.A. and Japan were favourites while the Swede enge to win the Goodwcod Stakes
Ostrand had also lowered some records in the heats and >y_# length from Vidi Vici.

quarters of a length away third
and
Piggott lost his cap was forth.

ter for the first half mile, no one
wanting to make the running. The

Japan's furuhashi also seems to race was run in 37 seconds outside
be off form. He has a most pecu- the record—that shows at what a
slow gallop they went.

a snap much Sycomore II along and increased

3 the pace until five furlongs from
diving home
Veuillin went on.

from
rd. Pat McCormick was and then Vidi Vici on the rails
easily ahead of the others but Zoe and Flighty Frances moved. up.

forward st the distance but then Arnold

al

Goodwood Stakes

From Our Own Correspondent)

LONDON, Juiy 30.
French Design, a horse wno

Flighty Frances was_ three

Grudwell on whom Lester

The field set off at a slow can-

Then Gordon Richards sent

when last year’s winner

Crudwell came to take the lead
Veuillin three furlongs out

idi Vici had mastered Crudwell

brought French Design with a
well-timed challenge and running
on well he mastered Vidi Vici

aining about ©lose home.





Bay St. Boys’ Club
Defeats Police

The second division - basketball
replay fixture between Bay Street
Boys’ Club and Police which was
played at Harrison College yes-
terday resulted in a victory for
Bay Street Boys’ Club with the
score at 27—22

Forde, Barker,

Pollard, and

body seems to know. To-day how-] Sebers sco-ed 10, 8, 5, and 4 re-

ever, it was announced that they spectively

would play in an_ international
football match against Finland.
The Finns are trying very hard
to please everybody but the
Chinese Communists are obvious-
ly here on a propaganda mission.
It is one of the few incidents
which mars an otherwise genuine
Olympic spirit at these games,







_The Complete

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Pleasant tasting — Economical

~

Available at all leading Drug Stores








ALL







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By LUSINA of
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a perfect gift

THE RICH VITAMIN.PACKED
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HAKED IN

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and guaranteed LUSINA servicing !

K. RR. Humte & Co., Led.
Lower Broad St.



for BS.B.C., while
King, Dodson and Browne scored
14, 5, and 3 respectively for Police.










SSSSSSSS9S

POS S
A GRAND DANCE
i INU
will be given by
MR, CLYDE HINDS & MISS
M. CRAIGG
At their residence

BLACK ROCK
on

TONIGHT

ADMISSION:

































2/-










Music by Mr. P. Green's
Orchestra
Refreshments on Sale

27.7.52—2n



DEMOCRACY
CLUB

There Will be a meeting
on Friday at 5 p.m. sharp
to discuss the First and
Second Days’ racing of our
August meet.

I hope all
will roll up.

There will be the usual
Turkey and Ham and Lob-
ster Cocktails etc. ete,
30.7.52—3n.








my friends








HREAD







A random choice from
our remarkable watch
and jewelery counter.
Unsurpassed value .. .



















THURSDAY, JULY 31, 1952



CANADIAN
HARD BOTTOM
CHAIRS

$7.88 & $8.52 each
CAVE SHEPHERD & €0., LID.

10, 11, 12, 13 Broad St.



Brush your teeth with Ipana and you clean
them extra-white. And, because of the unique formula
underlying Ipana’s “refreshingly different” mint flavour,

you fight decay by reducing acid-forming bacteria. Massage
Ipana into your gums and you help keep them firm and
healthy, In this way, Ipana acts as a safeguard against
tooth-losses, more than half of which are caused by gum
troubles, For whiter teeth, healthier gums, follow the Ipana way!

_ THE TOOTH PASTE..
REFRESHINGLY DIFFERENT

LONDON AND _ NEW __ YORK
StITI5

A PRODUCT OF BRISTOL - MYERS,











IT’S HERE !!

PAINT
REMOVER

4 pt Tins — 83¢
1 pt Tins — $1.55

Now obtaina ble from

GENERAL FHA RDWARE scercies

RICKETT STREET (Opposite Post Office)





PHONE 4918







Does your Roof need Painting >?

THEN BOWRANITE i'r

and Forget it

For the best protection against Rust and Corrosion use

BOWRANITE Anti-Corrosive PAINT

GOES FARTHEST LASTS LONGEST
One Gallon will cover 700—1,000 sq. ft.
Stocked in RED and GREY

BOWRANITE is supplied ready-mixed and
*should be well stirred before use.

It required, a* Special Thinners can be supplied
at $2.40 per gallon.

aoe

COSSSS

‘Phone 4456, 4267.

WILKINSON & HAYNES (0. LID.

COSOOS SS SSS SSS OFFS SOC EEL A PEE CLL CLA ES



Full Text




For the cause that lacks assistance

‘Gainst the wrongs that need resistance

For the future in the distance,
And the good that I can do.



WHAT'S ON TODAY



Court of Grand Sessions: 10.00 a.m

Mobile Cinema, Mt. Tab: School
Pasture, St. John, p.m

Police Band Concert at Princess Alice
Playing Field, 7.45 p.m

Water Polo, Aquatic Clut, >m



Governor Challenges B’dos

ESTABLISHED 1895

Lady Savage Opens |
St. George Social Centre |

YOU HAVE PUT BARBADOS on the map in so many

ways; you have led the Caribbean in sugar production, in |

education and health services.
to the Caribbean in the development of family and com-}

munity life, His Excellency

Surely you can give a lead |

;
the Governor told an audience |

at the opening of the St. George Social Centre yesterday

afternoon. He made those

remarks after saying that he

was told—on good authority—that the development of the

community centres and community life in Jamaica was far
ahead of that in Barbados.

opened by Lady Savage.

St. George's Social Centre;
which is situated at Ellerton,
stands on a prominent site over-
looking nearly the whole parish
of St. George. The outside is de-
corated in more than one pastel
shade whi'e the interior is a com-
bination of green and pale blue
with a touch of red here and there.
The verandah, on the southern
side, extends the full length cf
the building, thereby providing
an imposing view to cricket and
football enthusiasts.

The Centre has two latrines and
a canteen, It can accommodate
over 200 people. It was designed
by Mr. Bruce Moulder and built
by Mr. G. A. Fitzgerald.

For the opening ceremony, the
interior was decorated with vases
of Anthurium and Lotus of the
Nile Lilies and to the enjoyment
of everyone, the Police Band, con-
ducted by Capt. C. E. Raison,
played some lively tunes as the
afternoon wore on.

His Excellency and Lady Sav-
age, accompanied by Mr. Denis
Vaughn, A.D.C., arrived at 4.45
p.m. They were met by Mr. W.
A. Yearwood, Churchwarden and
Canon C, C. Conliffe.

Mr. Yearwood took the oppor-
tunity to introduce His Excellen-
cy and Lady Savage to members
of the Playing Fields Committee
and of the St. George Vestry.
Lady Savage officially opened the
building.

Mr. W. A. Yearwood, Church-
warden, said that it was his privi-
lege and pleasure as Chairman of
the St. George’s Social Centre,
on beha'f of the Committee, to
extend a welcome to His Excel-
lency and Lady Savage.

On Committee

He said, ‘I personally can claim
no credit directly to the planning
and building of this hall, I was
one of the Members of the Com-
mittee appointed by your prede-
cessor, Sir,
to Government that playing fields
and community halls be instituted
in each parish, I may add Sir, the
Members of that Committee at the
time visualised that bal games
such as cricket, croquet, footbat!,
and athletics be organised on the
playing field.

“In the building, indoor games
such as table tennis, draughts and
dominoes he played, projecto-

@ On Page 5



Reds Suggest New
Wording For
Truce Document

MUNSAN, Korea, July 30,

Communists to-day suggested a
possibly significant change in the
wording of the proposed Korean
armistice document, now’ under
study by both sides. It dealt with
the paragraph relating to war
prisoners. The issue of prisoner
exchange has blocked the truce
for months, The Reds _ proposed
changing the term “captured per-
sonnei” to “prisoner of war.”

Col. Duncan S. Somerville, U.N.
Command Staff Officer, said he
had asked the Reds for a clarifi-
cation during recent secret truce
talks, Maj. Gen, William K. Har-
rison, Senior U.N. Armistice Dele-
gate, told the /Reds-that the term
“captured personnel’. meant all
persons in custody, even those
opposing repatriation. “War pris-
oners”, he added, were all those
persons who were to be repatri-
ated.— (CP)

_ ANTLU. 5.



i le

which recommen@ed ;

The building was officially

_ Britain Will
- Concentrate

On Atom Arms

LONDON, July 30

Prime Minister Winston Chur- |
chill indicated on Wednesday that
| Britain will concentrate on atomic |
age weapons in a_ streamlined
economy re-armament programme,
Outlining the Government's Eco-
nomy Programme in which he}
‘said Britain will switch some in-|
dustries from rearmament to ex- |
port goods production, Churchill |
told the Commons: “We must
take account of the ceaseless tech-
nical development which has re-
‘sulted in some weapons becoming
antiquated and the advance of types
of greatly improved character.
|These developments have affected
\the views of our military experts
on the character and course of
any ‘future struggle, and these
processes of change continue and
even accelerate with the remorse-
‘less march of the science of human
jdestruction,
+ He said



} the United States has
,;made “immense strides in its pol-
jicy of atomic weapons, and in the
range and accuracy of their deliv-
jery,” and added: “Remarkable
‘progress has been made in’ our
jown development of guided mis-
'siles or rockets.”

| The Government got majorities
cf 25 and 22 in the vote of confi-
dence on their economic pro-
gramme.

| Churchill told the crowded
| House of Commons in opening the
‘second day of the economic de-
bate that there could be no mili-
tary strength without firm eco-
nomic foundations, and that the
‘rearmament programme must be
kept within the limits of Britain’s
‘ability. “I may say that, broadly
speaking the decisions we have
/reached will alter the pattern of
defence production in a way}
which will limit these demands on
the engineering industry, and in,
coming years set free a valuable
part of its capacity of our civil
{exports.”"—U.P.

| U.S. Taking Over
| Bahamas’ Guided
| Missile Base

NASSAU, July 29

Tomorrow the Consolidated Con-
struction Company, will be hand-
ing over the Guided Missile Base of
the Grand Bahamas to representa-
tives of the United States Navy and
Air Force. Construction started 1.
months ago, and the United States











forces have been in occupation for
the last ten months, United States
officials are flying from Florida

for the formal ceremony, The
Company expects to hand over
the base at Eleuthera a fortnight
hence. Completion of work on the
bases at San Salvador, Maya-
guana, and Grand Turks will be



several manths hence An item
from the remote settlement of
Deadman's Key, Long Island,
where people probably never
heard about “flying saucers”
'comes a report that about two

weeks ago a group of people saw
several objects “styeaking across
the sky-’ They described them
as noiseless, and whiter and much
faster than any plane, and spoke
of them as guided missiles.——(CP)




|

oe res

ae wees

’



THE ST. GEORGE SOCIAL CENTRE, situated at Ellerton, was offi clally openod yesterday afternoon by Lady Savage. The Centre is
situated on a prominent site, overlooking nearly the whole of the parish.

Graft Bled Farouk’s Army White

hhavbados



Settlement
Unlikely

WASHINGTON, July 30.
Secretary of State Dean Ache-

son
ments in
any
early
pute.
Acheson

told a press
Wednesday that

also

conference
recent
Iran did not give him
encouragement
settlement of the oil

said

on
develop-
about an
dis-

that the

Iranian Government has made no

request for

in

the withdrawal
United States military
that country.

of
missions

Asked by reporters if he was

hopeful of an oil settlement
Tran the Secretary pointed
Mossadegh
negotiation
the Premier
immediately withdrawn
things

that
made
Britain,
had
offer.

Premier
direct
but

This

left

that

in
out
had
with

his
where

they were when the oil dispute
started, Acheson commented.



‘RIGS ROCK ‘IRANIAN CAPITAL

”

SOLDIERS ATTEMPT TO QUELL one of the many ssrinus disturbances that have broken out in Teheran, Iran,

since the resignation of former Premier Ahn

of 20,000 and more,

anti-American sentiments,






1,5 officer v



nad Ghavam, who escaped the country as his life was threat-
ip,ed up by Communist and Nationalist propaganda, have been voicing
us beaten and an economic aid office stoned. (Internation



al)

‘The Proposed |



AAW y-,

OO



URSDAY, JULY 31

TH



7

ST. GEORGE Sci Ab CENTRE

It can accommodate over 200,

CAIRO, July 30,
Exiled King Farouk was ‘accused on Wednesday of
contributing heavily to the Egyptian debate on the Pales-
tine war by bleeding the army white through his won graft
and treachery. farouls wa reported to have obtained a
commission of nearly $300,088 on a single purchase of wai
material for the army*duting the Palestine campaign.

open the Government case against Egyptians with the
settling of supplies to the army during the war. He charged
. :

that Farouk was involved personally and had strangled the
inquiry i

Army Commander General
being hailed as Egypt’s
1 of Des

ruib

N
“Mar tiny”, and is shuffling









omcers in a far reaching

'Y to purge the army of cor-

Iti * Of ‘ elements Group Com
inerary n Hussein Mahmoud Bey,

. | Air Force Attache in London hus

I] | T lbeen appointed Chief of Staff of
hic 1an our ithe Air Foree. Wing Commander

‘EB! Din Mahmoud Afifi has’ been

The Indian Cricket team is ex-| @Ppointea Commander of the Air
pected to leave Southampton on Fores College Afifi h ut been
December 26 by the S.S. “Golaty? feenished aa forgotten pee. oy
Aiptidte th Saft An 4 arouk 7 i A t
I aE ne a lt wa | Ale abn he Ko



bt Wea yle@aptain Hassan: Akesé
}Bey of the Air Force,‘ Farouk’s
“| personal pilot until he was forcec

Trinidad om January 8) 9)-16,
& 13 ‘and the First Test Mate!


























Reporters asked him to ana- tee es roam January 15, 16, 17.) (6 resign recently, surrendered to
lyse the crisis in Iran, but hej “he. mndian team v tderive J {army authorities and was held.
declined, saying that it would be), og at oo am will ¢ tve Wh) A spokesman said most of the
“unhelpful.” | Barbac o3 at 9.20 p.m, on January | omc the high comman

—vU.p. |21 and play against the Bar for Palestine end saw the

}team on January 23, 24, ," “y j e distribution of arm
& 28. The second ‘Test be md ammunition They blamed it

- layed on January 30, 31, Fe 2,,on rruption and mistrust i

‘oreigw, Aid 7: aeimeaaaetmumadiee

Foreige: , . Cuts The visitors will open ul ir} It wa iid be teen agents
1 , “gh programme against the B.G. In-j| ane i the King himse
Will Slow Defeisce dians when a two-day matc} i if } > mg one ; of in
. be played on February 7 & 9. The| ¥ tor The actual inquiry
Production match against British Guiana will Vin ied about sixty. separate
take place on February 11, 12, 13 dals_ the smallest of wnich

WASHINGTON, July 30, }14 & 16..The Third Test is sched-|involved nearly $300,000 he sai

Secretary of State Dean Ache-' uled for February 19, 20, 21, 23,|4 Biished | repart | ane
son said on Wednesday that the 24 & 25, isp cial committee fo myc to S a
concessional cuts in the adminis-; The Indian Team is expeet-j the former King 4 ee see
tration’s foreign aid programme ed to return. to Trinidad from |¢valusted his personal provert
will slow up or extend the limit/British Guiana and play the | md lands at $287,000, Pyata eat
of time for Western Defence pro-!'Trjnidad East Indians on Feb-, "rnishin ee ies iia 7 a
duction. Just before it adjourned]; yory 28 and March 1, The!!! ; und Gn Alexandria =i
“sine die” congress cut the for-)Fourth Test will be played in| %!4,909,¢ 10 ——U.P,
eign aid programme from $7,900,- Trinidad on March 8, 4, 5, 6, 7,1 ni
000,000 to about $6,000,000,000, & 9, A derauer Wins

Acheson told the press confer-/ en pic lt .o 14, ‘

e y spe i e is Oo NLare 4 °, st ~ ‘
ar will thocp tho Gilets ok sivietee ae = a ofr ig and Final Test | C ourt Victory
r stretching o efence pro-| Wi e playec in Jamaica onj SS da sat J : 4
aucion an the West where he March 19, 20, 21, 23, 24, & 2: poe Comet or ny a oo
North Atlantic Treaty Powers} The Indian Authorities have not We | German ( hancel oF. Db
were building a defence line|mentioned the names of any o ad A pen acl parti gree: ve
against Communist aggression,|the players likely to make the;0-Gay in hi fight or the fiat -
Acheson indicated that this was|trip but the West Indies Cricket Cation of mu country Se
one of the big reasons why the} Board of Control have made | with the West, Yee Pree ;
United States was unable to ap-|clear that they expect the “very | 0P* an. nee adi ega " rae aS
proach the fulfillment of requests] best side” to visit the West Indic air Nei ore al Conet ied
by France for large American mil-} No replies have as yet been re-|,, The Co at ea ma Re yale od '
itary contracts that would be|ceived from the seven West In- a * cr ee ‘the nanan.
qaged.in that COMntTy: dies professionals by the W.L.C.B tuact with “tt e allie ; oba ipe Bu-
ane gap banrgen sae Fee: of C | ropean arn y gt sement until the
request and American ability to} Jamaica will play British Gui-! 7 j ands at bout $300,-|.... i ia 3 : fs : pacts had een enacte into law
meet it stanc oF $ “jana in Georgetown from October|py the West German Parliament
000,000.—U.P. 10 to October 22 [he Jamaica! “Two treaties ending most of
ail i a tla ————-—». | team will play Berbice a €€-\ fe occupation controls, and obli-
day fixture on completion of thé jyating West Germany to raise
oe Intercolonial matches, It is ex= {490,000 troops for the proposed
= pected that the W.I. Selector#!Muropean Army come up for final
ane and the W.I. Captain, not yet/vote after the Lower House of
; appointed, will witness the/Parliament (Bundestag) recon

Jamaica—Br, Guiana tournament. / yer

in September.—U.P.



j —~

O’Dwyer Denounces Prescott:
Injures Insulting Newsman
MEXICO, July 30.

Mexico's leading newspaper El Universal on Wednes-
day described as a “serious incident” the press conference
at which the United States Ambassador William O’Dwye1
angrily denounced the United Press Bureau Chief Robert

Prescott for a story about O'Dwyer’s plans. Prescott said















| today that he would stand on his dispatch of yesterday
which quoted the friends of O’Dwyer as hinting that the
| Ambassador had considered becoming a Mexican citizen
| When he retires from diplomatic service
| El Universal bannered the ory of the North American Depart.
of the Embassy Press Conferer ment of State’ kept O'Dwyer
| under the headline “Scandal about|from } ing “from offen and
O’Dwyer over. whether he jmenaces to i of action” against
thinking of nationalizing hirnself |Prescott
as a Mexican.”, The Ambassador |
injured a newspaperman for call.| Tt per Excelior als<
ing him “bastard,” “liar” jPlayed the story in a top position
other epithe which in noting in its lead paragraph that
| were equivalent to the max | O'Dwyer voice vibrated in the
linsult that would be used jtomb of | Irish ancestors’
| Mexico. The newspaper d |dur the ir ent The Excelior
incident occurred I n t it OC
;O’Dwyer giv n ¢ col i O'Dwyer
jfer the n of tt | fa t
Pre fy } t Pres in-
personal frier f
| O’Dw
| The newspat
f —U.P

i
Former Attorney General Mohammed Azmi moved to







New Administrator



n Family Life

|

!
|

‘

!

u

No One May
Quit Egypt

CAIRO, July 30,

General Mohammed Naguib
Bey, Egypt's new “strong man”
moved swiftly to prevent suspect-
ed grafters and war profiteers
from fleeing the country to escape
prosecution. The Army prohibit-
ed anyone leaving Egypt without
a special Interior Ministry permit
after a number of close friends of
ousted King Farouk tried to cross

the border.
Informed sources said in one
ease two former associates of

Farouk left Cairo by air but their |
aircraft was ordered back 15 min-
utes later and the men arrested

—UP. |

Colonies Will Be |

Represented At |
“alks By Lyttelton |



From Our Own Corr

LONDON, July 30. |

Colonial representation at the}
forthcoming Commonwealth Prime
Ministers’ Conference which is to}
financial, commercial ue
economic issues will probably be
in accordance with the precedent |
at the last Commonwealth |
Economic Conference in January |
Mr. Oliver Lyttelton, Secretary |
of State for the colonies will repre- |
ent the colonial

espondent |

territories at)

the full sessions of tihe conference | ,

which will be attended by Prime}
Ministers, He will be assisted and |
idvised by economic experts from
the colonial territories most |
lireetly concerned in the confer- |
ence though these will not attend |
full sessions.

It is theught likely that a com- |}
mittee of colonial experts will
neet daily to hear Lyttelton’s re-|
view of the previous day’s busi-!
ness and prepare a brief for the}



current day's discussions, Each |
rolony will therefore have a voice
in matters under review though}
hey will not be directly repre-|
sented

It is not yet known whether re-
resentatives of the colonies will}
be invited to the meeting of offi-!

which will shortly start work |
m the preparation of the agenda}
for the Prime Ministers’ Confer-|

nee }

}
ial



Presides Over

Legislature

DOMINICA, July 30,

The new Administrator H. L.
Lindo presided over the first meet-
ing of the legislature yesterday. A
Bill to enlarge the Police Force!
and create a Police reserve w is |
deferred by a majority vote.

A resolution demanding imme-

diate payment of compensation
for evicted tenants of the Gov-|
ernment-owned * Goodwill Estate}

wes passed unanimousiy, the roid
Austin Winston remarking that!
the days when heads of Govern-

ment departments considere
themselves little Czars are ove
Miss Eugenia Charles, Barri |

ter was the new nominated mem-|
ber for Mrs. Elma Napier who is on
long leave. Hon, Austin Winsto |
was selected to represent the co!-|
ony at the Federation Conference |
n the ULE (CP) |

HON. MARRYSHOW WILL
START DISCUSSION
47° PRESS CLUB |







Hon. T. A. Marryshow, M.L.C.,|
Grenada will be the gue t)
peaker at the Press Club tomor-
row night at 8 o'clock in the regu
li monthly series of discussions,
on matters of public interest |
Hon. Marryshow will lead off}
the discussion on “Federation of
the B.W.I.”
Members and their friend ur
welcome to the disc ion \



ié

H

PRICE : FIVE CENTS | 2

|

Airforce

_ Explains

“Saucers”

WASHINGTON, July 30
The US. airforce flered a com-
bination of summer heat waves,
optical and radar illusions as a

plausible explanation of the latest
flurry of “flying saucers.” Intel-
ligence officers ridiculed the notion
that the mysterious objects in the
sky were hail from other planets









or Russia—or pose iace to
the Uni States.

They confident th new
scientific nvestigations ith
powerful telescopes ar pecial
cameras would. explain vay the
objects as “physical !
Such as mirages

As f thre “flock bject
iSighted by radar over Washington!
in thy’ past ten days Major Gen-
eral Jchn A. Samford, Airforce
Director of Intelligence, told a
news conference my own mind is
satisfied that they resulted from
temperature inversion

This was explained in detail
later by two experts from the Air
Technical Intelligence Centre of
the Wright Patterson Air Force
3ase at Bayton Ohio. They ere
Dr. B, L. Griffing and Captain Roy
James. They pointed out that air
temperatures decrease ith alti-
tude, However when a warm

layer is passed over a cooler one,
the temperature temporarily in-
creases and a layer of warm air
is formed,

Tois will cause radar beams
to speed earthward. The radar
ipulsts then bounce cff-ground
“targets.” What then appear as
unidentified white lights on radar-
cop ire not cbjects in the sky
bul objects on the ground

Street and automobile lights
ney be similarly reflected as if

they are formations on the clouds,
and if there is sufficient wind
velocity or turbulence, the lights
will appear to dance, creating the
illusion that they fiying
saucers.”—U,P,

U.N. Blast

Red War
Factory

TOKYO, July 39

American B29 Superforts blasted
the vast Communist war factor:
only four miles from the border of
Red China éarly on ‘Lhursday in
the war’s biggest air strike against
a single target. Sixty superiorly
three full wings of the Far Fast
Air Force 3omber Command
Gropped more than 600 tons
bombs on the Oriental Light
Metals Company,-recently expand

are



;ed to accommodate an aluminit
alloy factory,

Flying high over a dense cloud
\layer superforts, struck in three
wuves without fighter escort, al
most within sight of the grea

Communist jet fighter dase
Antung in Manchuria



Pombers using elcetroni iim
fing devices truck at the main
bulldings, power houses, clectric
transtormer yards, warehouse
nd nearly 300 barracks typa
structures The attack began
hortly before 1! p.m. and con-
Unued until 2.30 a.m The 12
sere factory in prewar days had
| an annual capacity of 40,000
metric tons of aluminium. U.P.



7

gy

(Yywe me |








of;









WEATHER REPORT

YESTERDAY



infall fram Codringtor nil
Rainfall for month to date: 3.72 ib

aghest Temperature 06.5 F

west Temperature: 71.5 °F

Velocity

7 miles per hour
ter , a

+ 20.099 13 5



TODAY
5.48 aye
6.20 p.m
July 2

. 2.46 p.m



ft

|: GEN: MATTHEWIRIDGWAY

All U.S. Forces
In Europe Now
Under Ridgway

PARIS, July 30.

Ali American soldiers, sailors
and airmen stationed in Europe
were brought under the personal
command of General Matthew
Riagway, N.A.T.O. Supreme
Commander on Wednesday.

Ridgway announced a sweeping
reorganization of U.S. troop com-
mands extending from Britain
across Europe to Turkey, He said
that effective Thursday, he also
will assume command of all U.S.
forces, with former American
Commander in Europe, General
Thomas Handy, acting as his depu-
ty. The general . said the new
|Command will give him broad
powers to streamline and cut the
costs of the defence of the West.
Supreme Allied headquarters said
be action was taken on the orders

of U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff.
Ridgway explained that the
streamlining of American troops

‘and commands in Europe: will not
affect U.S. formations assigned
cperationally, to N.A.T.O. com-
| LL stlhelye - >

| T’DAD OPENS DOOR
TO W.I. NURSES

PORT-OF-SPAIN, July 30.





Trinidad Nursing Council has

ened its dcor to nurses from
British Guiana, Jamaice and
ther West Indian colonies in an
fort to ¢ the critical staff
hortage t Caura Tuberculosis
Sanatorium her

Mi Clyde Archer, Barbacos
born legal draughtsman is here,
making provisions to allow for the

emporary registration of qualified

nurses from countries for which a
plesent there is no arrangement for
1cciprocal registration,

These nurscs would be employed
on condition that they work at
spccified institutions here, such as



the Caura Sanatorium, Lepro
rium at Chacacachacare and th
Viasson T.B, Hospital.—-(CP)



(| CLIPPER


PAGE TWO



the Gcv-

EXCELLENCY

H's




erner and Lad sava gE
cempanic¢ by Major Denis
Vaughn A.D.C., attended the
pening of the St. George Social
Centre yesterday evening. The
Centre was officially opene by
Lad; Sav e.

The invited guests were Sis
George and Lady Secel, Hon. an
Mrs. R. N. Turner, Mr. E. W. Bar-
row, M-C.P., Mr. F. E.. Miller,
M.C.P., Mr. G. H. Adams, C.M.G.,
Mr. F. L. Walcott, M.C.P., Mr.

Fred Goddard, M.C.P,, Dr. H. G
Cummins, M.C.P, Mr, M. E. Cox,
M.C.P., Miss Betty Arne, Mr.
A. G. Jordan, Mr. and Mrs. C, C.
Barrow, Mr. and Mrs, L. C. Moore,
Mr,. and Mrs, H. G. Yearwood,
Miss E. Smith, Miss Daphne Moore,
Mr, and Mrs. Cyril Reifer, Mrs.
Almira Aimey, Miss Nellie Pitt,
Mr, and Mrs, Q. Dottin, Mr. and
Mrs. G, S. Robinson, Canon C. C.
Conliffe and Mrs, Conliffe, Rev.
and Mrs, Coleman, Rev. Brath-
waite, Mr. and Mrs. W. B. Carring-
ton, Mr. Bruce Moulder, Mr, and

Mrs. G.’A. Fitzgerald, Mr, and
Mrs. MeKenzie, Mr, and \'rs.
Herbert Weekes, Mrs. de Viera,

Mr, and Mrs, E, M, Shilstone, Mr.
A. D. Nicholls, Mr. and Mrs
D. A. V. Weekes, Mr, and
Mrs. W. F. Brathwaite, Mr. ond
Mrs. E. Thornton, Sgt. and Mrs.
Inniss, Capt. and Mrs. Grant,
Capt. and Mrs. Raison, Major and

Mrs. R. A. Stoute, Members of
the Vestry and the Parochia!
Treasurer.

After the opening of the Centre
the Pclice Band, conducted by

Capt. C- E, Raison, entertained
those present to some lively
music.

For One Month
PENDING a month's holiday in
Barbados are Mrs. D. A. Prior
and her three sons from Mara-
caibo, Venezuela, They arrived
on Sunday by B.W.LA. and are
guests at Maresol Beach Flats, St
Lawrence Gap.
Mrs, Prior’s husband is em-
played with the Shell Oil Com-
pany in Maracaibo.

On Holiday

MONG the passengers arriv-
ing yesterday morning from
Trinidad by the S.S. Brazil were
Mr. and Mrs. F’, BE. Agostini who
have come over for two weeks’
holiday which they are spending

as guests at the Hotel Royal.

Mr. Agostini, a Director of
Agostini Bros, Ltd. Commission
Agents of Port-of-Spain, has

visited Barbados on several oc-
easions before. He was here two
years ago when he spent two days
on business.

Spe t Three Weeks
ETURNING to St. Kitts by
B.W.LA. this morning is Miss
Cc, O’Laughlin, Cashier of Archi-
bald Agencies. She has been here
for the past thnee weeks on busi-
ness coupled with pleasure as a
guest of Mrs. Arthur Cadogan of
“Swansea”, Hastings.

Leaving Tonight

EAVING tonight by B.W.LA.
4.4 for Trinidad will be Mr, and
Mrs. G. E. Burton and their two
sons Ivan and Larry from San
Tome, Venezuela who have been
holidaying here as guests of the
Hotel Reyal for the past week
They expect to remain in Trinidad
for a couple of days before re-
turning home. ‘

Mr. Burton is Pipe Line Con-
struction Superintendent of the
Mene Grande Oil Company in Sun
Tome.



ent

Carb Calling



LADY SAVAGE opens the St. George Social Centre after being intro-
duced to members of the Playing Fields Committee and the Vestry.

For Trinidad Post
M* D. 8S, COZIER, a Barbadian

and old Harrisonian, at pre-
sent Superintendent of Police in
North Borneo, has been trans-
ferred to Trinidad as an Assistant
Superintendent. a

Mr. Cozier served at Harrison
College as an Assistant Master be-
fore taking up an appointment as
an Assistant Master of the St.
Vincent Grammar School which
he held from 1931 to 1941.

He joined the St. Vincent Police
Force as Assistant Superintendent
and was Superintendent when he
was transferred in September 1946
to North Borneo,

Mr. Cozier is spending his leave

in St. Vincent before going to
Trinidad. He is an uncle of Mr.
Ee. L. Cozier, former Managing

Editor of the “Barbados Advocate”
and at present Assistant Informa-
tion Officer of the Caribbean Com-
mission.

Trinidad Director
ERE on a two-week visit 0:
business combined with pleas-

ure is Miss Cecilia Lai Fook,
Directer of the L. J. Williams
Marketing Co., Ltd, of Port-of-

Spain, She arrived on Tuesday
by B.Vi.A. and is a guest at the
Hotel Royal,

Keturried to Jamaica
R. K. L. STUART, Registrar
of the Hospital of the Uni-
versity College of the West Indies
has left the colony after spending
a short holiday with his nts
here, Mr, and Mrs, E, A. Stuart of
“Broughderg”, Black Rock.

Attended General Meeting

R. NESTOR BAIZ, Director

of Bottlers Lid. Trinidad,
returned home earlier in the week
by B.W.LA. after spending about
three weeks in Barbados, He
came over for the Company’s
Annual General Meeting and was
a guest at the Ocean View Hotel.

On Business

R. ROY. SKINNER of the

National Cash Register, Trini-
dad, arrived here over ‘the weck
end by B.WILA. on a_ business
visit and is a guest at Cacrabank
Hotel, .

Mr. Jeffrey Martin also of
National Cash Register who has
been here for sometime, will ba

remaining for another month. He
is also a guest at Cacrabank
Hotel,

Caribbean Representative

R. G. WEBDALE, Caribbean

Representative stationed in
Trinidad, of the Crittal Manufac-
turing Co. of England, returned
to his headquarters on Monday
evening by B.W.1LA, after paying
a week's business visit. He was a
guest at the Ocean View Hotel.

Aniateur Horticulturist
R. S. W. YOUNGHANS, Presi-
dent of Younghans and Cole,
Insurance Agents of “Miami, left
last night by B.W.LA, for Trini-
dad where he will take Pan

American Airways back home.

An amateur horticuiturist, Mr.
Younghans has been in the West
Indies for the past three weeks
collecting seeds and plants which
he has already sent back to Miami.
While in the Caribbean, he visited
Jamaica, Trinidad, Grenada and
Dominica before coming here.
During his short stay in Barbados,
he was a guest at the Hotel Royal

Recovering
TT°HE many friends of Mr, Hut-
gon Chandler, Overseer of the
Belle Factory would be glad to
know that he is recovering from
the injuries suffered in a motor
cycle accident last week.
He is still a patient at the Ter-
centenary Ward at the General
Hospital.

Features Editor

R. G, JENKINS, Features
Editor of the Trinidad
Guardian and Mrs. Jenkins are

now in Barbados for a month’s
holiday, They arrived on Tuesday
by B.W.LA. and are guests of the
Hotel Royal.

‘Mr. Jenkins who has been at-
tached to the Guardian since 1938,
has been visiting Barbados nearly
every year since then for his
holidays.

Twenty-first Birthday
N SATURDAY night last Mr.
& Mrs. Gilbert Howard gave
' party at their residence, Station
Hill, St. Michael, for their daugh-
ter Hazel on the celebration of
her 21st birthday.

For Three Weeks

RRIVING in the colony on

Thursday last was Mr, LeRoy
Gittens who has come over from
Curacao where he has been work-
ing for the past six years. Mr.
Gittens will be spending three
weeks’ holiday with his mother at
Westbury Road.



ASpy Turns UpToSee Me Eating

THE STORY SO FAR: A gang of By BERNARD WICKSTEED —— steak; 2 new potatoes

unscrupulous characters calle

rozen peas or fresh cauliflower

“They” have got hold of a myS- I am beginning to get my second Grilled mushrooms on half slice

terious formula which is sup-
posed to have the property 0)
transforming contented but
overweight husbands into mati-
nee idols with the figures of
Greek gods.
IT IS called the Tubby
diet
BUT THEY reed a victim for
Their inhuman experiments.
Who shall it be? The choice falls
on Bernard Wicksteed (height
5ft. Sins., weight 12st, 2lb.),
harmless hubby of Happy Ham-
stead,
FRIDAY NIGHT
HE Tubby Hubby is under a
cloud on this, the fifth day of
his 12-day ordeal by diet, He was
caught out at the breakfast table
trying to barter a sweet coupon
for a slice of the children’s fried
bread.
So They sent one of their repre-
sentatives to have lunch with me

Hubby

(at my expense!) in case I tried
any similar tricks with the
waitress, So bang went the last

chance of an unsupervised meal
this week.

You can take it from me, I shall
be watched like a hawk over the
week-end,

They'll probably
children trailing me whenever 1
leave the house, I thought yes-
terday I had got Them softened a
bit, but lunch proved They have
no mercy,

While I wolfed my miserable
drop of cold soup, the bodyguard
lingered long and lovingly over a
huge plate of hors-d’ceuvres, fol-
lowed by steak and kidney pudding
and peach melba,

And I was paying
mark you!

So far I haven’t told Them, but

have the

for it all,



IN STOCK



An Assortment of

@ LADIES’ NYLON HOSE

@ LADIES’ NYLACE HOSE
@ LADIES’ LISLE HOSE
@ CHILDREN’S ANKLETS ............

NEW SHIPMEN
@ ME




wind or whatever you would call
it when you are dieting. I no
longer want to eat a horse, I'd be
quite satisfied with a pony.

MY FIFTH DAY

MENU

(What IT did eat)

BREAKFAST
One orange. Haddock.
2 thin slices of toast, scraping of
butter. Tea

LUNCH

Cold clear soup
Omelette (two eggs, tomato
filling); spinach, asparagus,

with vinegar

(Alternative: Green salad)
One roll, scraping of butter
Black coffee
DINNER

Tomato juice

Rastus strolls over to look at
the place where the fire has been,
and Ruper: cells him about the
mysterious wisp of smoke. ‘*'Tis
very odd,” says the little mouse,
“I've seer, no picnic parties. In
tact, I've seen no one at all
except Pong-Ping, and he seems

— ALSO —

TOF...
VS WILSON FELT HATS











of toast. Black coffee

MY SIXTH DAY

(What I Will eat)
BREAKFAST
Slice of melon (or } grapefruit)
1 gammon rasher grilled, with

tomatoes

2 slices toast, scraping of honey

Tea
LUNCH
1 poached egg on spinach
1 roll ang butter
Stewed prunes or figs (no sugar)
Coffee, with milk
DINNER
1 cup clear soup, Cold meat
1 baked potato (small) with tiny
piece of butter
The inevitable green salad
1 apple or orange. Black a4
—L.E:S.



ing, ys t
“TM go and try to cheer him
up, and perhaps can in
these bi va i

he finds his pal busy beside the
ie hedge that surrounds his
use,

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED



$2.09, $2.15, $2.28, $2.41

.. $2.50
asicicsiisnnn se: Mee
ow. 30, 32 & 46 CENTS

T. R EVANS & WHITFIELDS

DIAL 4220

YOUR SHOE STORES

DIAL 4606



_| CARIBBEAN PRE.

BARBADOS



Choral Society
Stages Successful |
Concert

The Barbados Choral Society
siaged its annual concert on
Tuesday night at the Comber-
meére School Hall before a packed
and appreciative audience. His
Excellency the Governor, ana |
Lady Savage, accompanied by)
Major Dennis Vaughan Private
Secretary, also attended,

The programme which © was
presented by over seventy mem-
bers was of the usual high
standard. .

The list of items incfidea

many old favourites which drew
forth

rounds of applause from

the audience Perhaps worthy of
mention was the Six-Part Motet
— “There is an Old Belief” by

Parry. This was sung in memory

of the late President and Vice-

President Archdeacon Shankland
and Charlie Elder,

The Saxophone Quintet led by
Bandsman Prince Cave rendered
a group of tunes in the usual
style that* pupils of Captain
Raison would perform them,

Mr. Bruce St. John, baritone,
also rendered familiar airs with
deep and effective tone with
“Toreador’s Song From ‘Car-
men’" as the most outstanding.

“I Don’t Want To Get Mar-
ried” — a Spanish Folk Song
sung by the Ladies also carried
off honours in that group, Three
Pianoforte Solos by Mr. Qedric
Phillips were instrumental high-
lights of the evening's perform-
ance Scenes from ‘King Olaf’
by Elgar with Mr. St. John, as
soloist were explained by Mr.
Hudson and The Invitation to the
Dance by Weber brought the
programme to its close,

Thanks are due to Mr. Gerald
Hudson. A.R.C.M the conductor

end to Mr, Winston Hackett,
Accompanist. Through their
efforts The Barbados Choral

Society was able to stade a suc-
cessful concert of high standard
and the music loving public are
grateful for an evening of enter-
tainment in an island where an
opportunity of hearing good
musie is rare,

ee

BY THE WAY
By Beachcombeg

AM CODFORTH is_ what
Fdulenough calls tempgra-
mental; a useful adjective wfich
covers pretty well everything from



alcoholic frenzy to mere tom-
foolery.
Yesterday the antique shop

received a picture of fruit signed
“Ted Vellassquezz.” Foulenough
at once rang up Codforth. “What
the devil is this ‘Ted’ business?”
the asked, “And why is Velasquez
spelled all wrong? Who’s going to
buy a thing signed like that?’
“Listen,” bawled Codforth, “If the
first edition of a book with the
author’s .name_ spelled wrong is
worth moré than the same book
with it spelled right, well then,
why isn’t a picture with Ted
spelled wrong, eh?” “It’s the sur-
name that’s spelled wrong,” said
Foulenough patiently. “Ted’s not
a surname,” shouted Codforth,
“And your customers don’t know
Vellthingamegig’s Christian name
anyhow. Nor do you. And let
me tell you that the Constable you

ordered is signed ‘Freda.’ A woman |
policeman, Joke. Got it?”,

Foulenough rang off,
One thing and another

I T was, they said, a Greek

wine. And I believed them,
fer enough resin had been
shoved into it, when young, to
sink a_ battleship. In Cette it
would have been considered a
masterpiece: in fact I have read
that Cette includes among its
nefarious activities the making of
Samian wine. The only Greek
wine worthy of me comes from
Kephesia, It is an Attic wine, and
he who drinks it murmurs that
naunting line of Matthew Arnold:

Lone Daulis and the _ high
Cephissian vale....

In Mitylene I once drank a wine
with the amusing name Bacchus
Sec. It came, I suppose, from
Santorin of the Cyclades, where
they make their wine by night; the
island whiah kindled Flecker’s
imagination,

Wisdom of the ages

A horse-fly in a garage is not
more ridiculous than the hoses
of a fiterbrigade summoned to
extricate the head of a water-
carrier from between park-
railings.

(Sayings of Shabash-Ibn-Daoul
of Bagdad)





MEIRE!

F eREAL
| ro :
| ies IN COMBgy

, _ MOPE AND py,’
& 98h teayy?











A Robert 1. Lippert Presentation

staring

Robert HUTTON - Steve BRODIE
James EDWARDS - Richard LOO

mah
Sid TON Richard MONAHAN - William .HUN

end Introducing a dynamic screen personality

tie EVANS














Samal Flr

res. Ine

BRIDGETOWN (DIAL 2310)




|
FRIDAY 2.30, 4.45 &8.30P-M PASH 2 SHOWS TO-DAY 4.45 & 8.30 p.m.

ra

\Tyrone POWER-—Randy SCOTT — Joe E, BROWN—Ava GARDNER











ADVOCATE





The Toys Took a Train Trip

—They Went All the Way to Afric” -

By MAX TRELL

IT wasn’t as though Knarf had
wanted it to happen. It just hap-
pened, quite of its own accord. And
the most amazing thing of all was
that everyone else was along with
him when it happened, so that no
one could possibly say later on that
Knarf just dreamed it. They couldn’t
all dream it!

Knarf had climbed on the engine
of the train that stood in the eorner
of the room, right under the canary |
cage and the geranium plant. Then |




he invited everyone else to come on
the train. “All aboard!” he shouted.
“All aboard!”

Hanid and Mr. Punch, and Gen- |
eral Tin the tin soldier, and Mary-

Jane the rag-doll, and Teddy the “Where's the train going,”



SI Bear all looked up. said Teddy.

aboard!” Knarf shouted
ay Horry up! We're leaving in| flow did they know it was Africa?
a niiutel” . | Because, when they looked out of

the window of the moving train,

an there they saw lions and tigers and
At this Teddy, who didn’t like to | oi rattes, "They pane pe a gy hati

be disturbed unless it was really with atrange leaves and great col-
important and interesting, said: | cred blossoms. They saw monkeys.
“Where's the train going?” | They saw a herd of zebras dashing

“Just around the room,” General | .oross the tracks ahead of the train.
Tin said. ‘Not much of a trip. Noth- Col Rainb:

i but four walls and a lot lors of Rainbow .
ing. te gee DU | They saw elephants tearing fruit
of furniture. | off the tops of tall-trees. They saw

Hanid and Mr, Punch and Mary- | oy eodilesand hippopotamuses bath-
Jane were all about to say that they | ing in.a river, They saw parrate
didn't think they cared to go 0” 4| with feathers the colors of the rain-
train-trip, when Knarf suddenly | bow.
said in a very loud voice: “All| They saw deer and wila goats.
aboard for—for Africa! Allaboaril! ‘They saw vultures and eagles. They

“For Africa?” everyone said.) aw every animal that lives in
“Africa!” | Afriea, and all the birds and all the

So they instantly crowded to get | insects.
aboard the train, for it isn’t every | Knarf couldn't believe his eyes.
day in the week that you can cated | Phe others couldn't believe their
a train going to Africa. The moment eyes, But this was Afviea, Thee
they were all on, Knarf yanked the | could be no doubt about it.
bell. The engine gave a snort, the | Meanwhile Knart kept think) 2
wheels gave a whirl, and soon the | tq himself: “How did we get her”
train was rattling along the rails, | And how are we ever goin: te:
past the sofa and the chairs and the pack? Yes, how are we eve: going
table. {to get back?"

Now Knarf never really expected | {It was as simple getting back as
the train to go to Africa. Just as going there. Suddenly the boon
General Tin said, he expected it to | turned again, just as they came °°
go around the room. But all at once, | the edge of the ocean, Again there
just as the train was going around | was a moment of darkness. © '
a curve it turned sharply andj|then, when it grew light again. | +
plunged straight into the bookcase. | train was back in the room. It cus

Knarf shut his eyes! Everyone |to a stop.
shut his eyes! | It was only later, when Krovi

But there was no crash—no col- | went to take a good look at the bc
lision. There was just a moment of | ense, that he saw a big Animal Bool
darkness, and then when Knar! and | lying open on the first shelf. And
the others opened their eyes aguin, | across the book were two distinct
there they were in Africa! | tracks!

Really Important





CROSSWORD OPENING FRIDAY

4.45 & 8.30 P.M. & Continuing Daily
DRAMATIC THUNDER!
wt





cross
1. Send over tin trams, (8)
8: Bree to nee e it Tetting "
s see n
(7) 10. Stem (5)
ie ‘ax on speed ? (4)

1
‘ugal expenditure. (7
io: See sre tee ila (4
. mona C-! » (4)
20. Is she the result? (3)
21 Climb and exist among sappers

(4)
22. Artisan who means something
in addition to her.
Down
1. Nib, master made from a
, member of the clan. (9)
3: At tne tebulous bird, din,
: e fabulous . 2
debts. (9) one
4. Taken at the bar, (4)
5. Merely @ pool. (4)
6. Taken at exams, (4
|

(6)

7. “ Hullo, come inf 38
ll. You have grounds for. Seinkine

16. Witness suggests jou

16. In @ rusty ore min

if: Made for defence. ea
Solutt rn :

1 “Assembles. yn 2 oars:

16, Date?’ 18. tens: ‘

; 15, Lee!
Lopiey 24, grit 25. Moan. Down: oF

Elemental; 8, a § casts te atu
%, Bvoke; 11, She; fo Ben +7
Train: 19. Swee; 21, (trot)@ki; 22, gin

GAILETY

The Garden—St. James
TODAY (onty) 8.30 P.M.

“The DALTON GANG” (Don BARRY):
“OUTLAW COUNTRY” Lash LA RUE
—————S—Sea———

cop














Rows REATAN OA
LOMA @ se:



Fri, & Sat. 8.30 |] Midnite Special “om
p.m. Saturday wee UA

7 . ' Zane GREY'S
echnic :
meee THUNDER
MOUNTAIN

“LET'S DANCE” Tim HOLT &

Fred ASTAIRE & |]“LEGION of the
diGH VENTUAE LAWLESS”

John PAYNE IIGeorge O'BRIEN

| BARBAREES (DIAL 5170)

GLOBE





JESSE JAMES and SHOW BOAT



OPENING 1O.4ORROW 5.00 & 8



VERA ELLEN? MARJORIE MAIN

BAR
(Deal 6170)
Last’ 2 Shows To-day
4.30 & 8.30 p.m.
Univer Comedy Hit
“LIFE of RILEY”
William BENDEX &
The MUMMY’S GHOST
Lon CHANEY

(Dial 2310)
Last 2 Shows Today
4.30 & 8.30 P.M.
Smashing Double Bill
“THE BIG STEAL”
Robert Mitchum
Wiliam Bendix &
“THE OUTLAW"
Jane Russell



TODAY (Only)
445 & 8.30 P.M.
“WALK SOFTLY
STRANGER
Joseph Cotten & Vall
and Zane Grey's
“NEVADA”™
Robert Mitchum
Fri 445 &
Robert
MITCHUM
“The RACKET”

Sat. Special 1 pom
The DALTON GANG
Don BARRY &
“OUTLAW COUNTRY”
Lash LA RUE
Fuzzy ST. JOHN
ere hee eienmnpatted
Midnite Spectal Sat
“THUNDER HOOF”
Preston FOSTER
“WHIRLWIND
RAIDERS”








To-dey Special 1.30
“MAD WEDNESDAY”
Harold LLOYD &
SPANISH MAIN (color)
Paul HENREID

————

OO

Te-day’s Special 130 p.m,

“IN OLD AMARILLO”

Roy ROGERS &

“THE WYOMING
BANDIT"

Rocky LANE






Opening Friday
445 & 8.30 pm. &
Continuing
“STORM WARNING”
Ronald REAGAN

Friday Ist
TEEL HELMET
ne Evans &

|
} c
| es Edwards

Ja








MIDNITE Special Sat
‘SILVER CITY BONANZA’ RANGERS RIDE
Rex ALLEN & Jimmy WAKELY &
My ° COLORADO AMBUSH"
Johnny Mack BROWN

Sat, Special 1.30 P.M

&







































































































THURSDAY, JULY 31, 1952
LISTENING HOURS
} 4

THURSDAY, JULY 16.90 p.m 6.53 M Si SoM
100 7.15 pam, 19.76 M 25.53 M sheen nalioaiaheth - nae
—————_—— 5 m. We See Britain, 7.45 p m.
4.00 p.m. The News, 4.10 p.m. The Championship Bands, & 15 pp. Radio
Daily Service, 4.15 p.m. The Portrait Newsreel, 8.30 p.m Special Despatch,
Of A Lady, 4.45 p.m. Sporting Record, 8.45 p.m Interlude, 8.55 p.m. From the
5.00 p.m. Verdi, 5.15 p.m Listener Editorials, 9.00 p.m Henry Wood
Choice, 6.00 p.m. Welsh Diary, 6.15 Promenade Concerts, 9.45 p.m. Okympic
Variety Road Show, €.45 p.m Report,, 0.00 p.m The News, 10.10

News Taik, 10.15 p'm, It Stuck in
The Portrait of a

Parade
Home

p.m
my mind,
Lad

Round-Up and Programme
p.m. The News, 7.10 p.m
From Britain

10.30 p.m

w/e

and YOU ~ N°

Tt.
+

YOUR INDIVIDUAL HOROSCOPE x
THURSDAY, JULY 31, 1952

Look in the section in which your birthday comes and x
find what your outlook is, according to the stars.

ARIES Hold back a bit. We all fare better when
21—April 20 we don’t rush things, take foolish chances
or speak out of turn, Move in sane, well

organized manner.
* * *

Be content with moderate gains. Some
uncertainties to-day. A safe attitude rather
than any blustering, hit-or-miss method
stressed. Don’t worry,

Go conscientiously about duties. Pass “Pp *
the unsure, needlessly hazardous and sti

to what you really understand. Be very
careful in money, legal issues.

*

3 March

*
TAURUS
+ April 21—May 20

GEMINI
May 2i—June 20

CANCER A day to promote essentials, improve when
June 21—July 23 and where you can, and hold to a good
schedule. Don’t hopscotch around, nor be

drawn into useless argument. ,

mM

You rather daring people of the Leo clan
setter take wise precautions and remain
calm if you've been going a hectic pace

LEO
July 24—Aug. 22

Sort of day that gives ample opportunity
to demonstrate your sound, clean thinking.
Be expressive but not over-anxious carry-
ing out job. ~

Rather skimpy in part for other than rou-
tine endeavours. Accept your duties in
Libra’s manly style; be mindful you aren’t
the only one anxious to achieve.

* *

Stars advise reviewing, strengthening your
methods up to sundown, Don’t embark on
new ventures unless sure you have proper
formula. News after 6 p.m, can bring
pleasure.

VIRGO
Aug. 23—Sept, 23

*«
*«
*
*

LIBRA
Sept. 24—Oct. 23

SCORPIO
Oct. 24—Nov. 22

SAGITTARIUS

Nov, 23-Dec. 22 Curb likely unrealistic ideas. Be idealis-

tically motivated both in personal and busi-
ness matters for safely gainful ends. Ro- «x
mance needs extra - . ;
CAPRICORN Some ideas, propositions may be tempting
Dec. 23—Jan. 2lput conscience forbids. Don’t talk first,
think afterward. Logic will help avoid
mistakes, *

*

Excellent for general endeavours, invest-
ments well checked. Freshly favoured:
Finances with long-term merit. P.M. fine
for heart interests, home activity.

*

Helpful aspects for most trades, civic and
children’s possibilities. Labour, ooer ere
have much in common and can make this
Give-and-take

KKM H HHH HH OF

*

*
AQUARIUS
* yon a2 — Feb. 20

+ PISCES
Feb, 21—March 20

day a memorable one.
favoured.

ad YOU BORN TODAY are natural leaders and, while con- *
servative, are very active, with fine reserve vitality and power
to put over good ideas. Are magnetic, generous and proud.
% Seldom selfish, nothing underhanded in your makeup. Birth- *«
date: John Ericsson, Swedish-Amer, naval engineer.

tae we FD FF





“We wish to advise our customers
that our Workshop Department will be
closed from Tuesday 5th August to
Monday 18th August, 1952, both days
inclusive, in order to give our Work-
shop Staff their Annual vacation. There
will be a small relief staff on duty for
Our Office,

Department and Petrol Station will be

any emergencies. Parts

open as usual.”

©

ECKSTEIN BROTHERS

BAY STREET DIAL 4269





RES
ROXY

TO-DAY 4.90 & 8.15
TOMORROW 4.30 Only
Alan Pocky LANE
in





EMPIRE

LAST 2 shows TO-DAY 4.45 & 8.56

Barbara STANWYCK: Paul DOUGLAS
Robert PYAN; Marilyn MONROE
in

CLASH BY NIGHT DESERT OF LOST MEN

eoneiatseecinseticiaeniaiamisiaiciaapeaatin te ceil
Opening FRIDAY at 2.30 & 8.50 RODEO NG de 4
Frederick MARCH TONG Ae THE RENONITA
Mildred DUNNOCKS Rex ALLEN

in

DEATH OF A SALESMAN
—————_—_——_—

OLYMPIC

TO-DAY only 4.30 & 8.15
Dan DURYBA Gale STORM
in

THE UNDERWORLD STORY
and
BORROWED TROUBLE
Starring
William BOYD



TO-DAY AT 120 P.M.
UNDERCOVER WOMAN
and
TRAFFIC IN CRIME
TOMORROW NITE at 8.90
Madam O'LINDY & Her Troupe










in *
CARACAS NIGHTS OF 1952-

ROYAL

Last 2 shows 4.30 & 8.15



oe

TO-DAY & SATURDAY at 1 p.m

Republic Whole Serial
WEB OF DANGER FEDERAL OPERATOR 99 |
d ,
WHISPERING FOOTSTEPS TOMORROW only 4.30 & 8,15. }






Opening TOMORROW 420 & 8.15
Johnny WE.SSMULLER
in
JUNGLE MANHUNT
and
CHINA CORSAIR
With
HALI

Stewart GRANGER: Valerie HOBSON |
in |



NOCHE FURY

DAY 4.90 & 8.15
s Presents

Forrest TUCKER

SATURDAY st
Republic Pictur
DONLEVY











Briar

in
Jon HOCDLUM EMPIRE


THURSDAY, JULY 31,

1952



, . *
In 8. Africa
s
CAPETOWN.
_ Proposals for a levy on sugar
in South Afpiea, to be paid for
by the consumers, with the pro-
ceeds going to finance the Govern-
ments attempts to cut down its
Sugar imports still further, are
meeting with considerable criti-
cism in Cape Town.
The Government wants to erect
a sugar mill on its Pongola sugar
estate, in Zululand. To pay for
this, it proposes to levy one-eighth
of a penny a pound on consumers,
which it is estimated would yield
more than £400,000 a year.

Nearly £900,000 has already
been spent on developing the
Pongola estate and on irrigation
schemes there, Last season's pro-
duction of sugar cane amounted
to 12,479 tons. Considerable ex-
pense was entailed in delivering
it from this remote estate.

One of the reasons why the
South African sugar industry
does not regard the Pongola

scheme as economic is because of
the lack of_rail and other trans-
port facilities. Producers also say
that the output in the estate at
present is not big enough to jus-
tify a mill. ;
Government spokesmen, how-
ever, believe that there are great
possibilities in the estate. Mr.
J. G. Strydom, Minister of Lands,
estimates that maximum produc-
tien of sugar when the estate is
fully developed will be 30,000 tons
a year. Mr. E. H. Louw, Minister
of Economic Affairs, is more
optimistic and puts the figure at
35,000 to 40,000 tons a year,

Warning

Mr. Louw has warned that
in ten years’ time, South
Africa will produce 150,000
tons of sugar a year less than
it consumes. It is therefore
in the public interest that the
development of the Pongola
mill should be undertaken.
But commercial interests have

not been interested in the Pon-
gola scheme. An Italian concern
did once undertake to erect a mill
at Pongola, but later found itself
unable to supply either the capi-
tal or the nlant,

One of the reasons why the
sugar industry believes the Pon-
gola scheme has no. great future
is that transport is difficult. A
railway link to the estate is being
considered, but at present cane
has to be carted from the planta-
tion by road for distances varying
from’ 17 to 24 miles. The cost of
this transport alone ranges from

13s. 4d. to 6s. 8d. per ton.
Objections
Other objections to the levy

proposal to finance the mill are on
political grounds. Many people
point out that this is a way of






AND
WHY THEY'RE
OVEN-BAKED





Mi







Mossadegh Changes
His Mind

LONDON, July 30.

The British Foreign Office said
that Prime Minister Dr, Moham-
med Mossadegh proposed to the
British that there should be arbi-
tration in the oil dispute. This
suggestion was withdrawn soon
afterwards without explanation.
The offer was made over the
week-end by Mossadegh «to the
British Minister to Iran, George
Middleton.

The British official said that the
British attitude was unchanged.
Britain continued ready to nego-
tiate over a settlement,

—UP.



raising money for the Government
outside the tax system, It is con-
sidered as concealed taxation and
a dangerous precedent.

Other people declare that con-
sumers are to be forced to become
shareholders in a state industry
They will receive no dividends
and no interest on their enforced
investment.

Government spokesmen point to
the recent sugar shortage in South
Africa as proof of the need for
increased production. If sugar
had been imported to meet this
shortage, they say, it would have

been landed at double the local
price.

™ —B.ULP.



Oven |.!.ing makes all the
differer in “‘:e world with
beans. ft bh le, them to a
tender. isculy goodness un-
obtains. ©> in any other way.
Tt soal. -he sauce through
and theoogh, brings out the

full bean flavor. That's why
Heinz Beans are Oven-Baked
—to give you the ‘inest »eans
you ever tasted.

OVEN-BAKED



oss

BEANS.

BARBADOS

mee ema;

Pais

ADVOCATE






London Expréss Service

Housing Board Will
Approach Government On
Aided Self-Help Scheme

THE HOUSING BOARD is to approach Government
with a view to getting them set up a Committee to draft
plans for starting an-experimental Aided Self-Help Scheme
at Clinketts, St. Lucy as recommended by the Manager-
Secretary in his report on recent visits of inspection and
study of housing in various West Indian islands.

It was pointed out that

while it was a matter for the

Executive Committee, the Committee which was to be set

up should comprise of the Manager of the Housing Board
representatives from the Agricultural Department, the

’

Public Works Department, the Social Welfare Department
and the Education Department.

Mr. Adams mentioned the ben-
efits which were derived from Aid-
ed Self-Help Schemes in Jamaica
where he had seen it in operation
a few years ago, and emphasised
that the “sooner Barbados got on
with such an experiment, the bet-
ter it would be,” and he thougit
that Clinketts was a good place
to start.

Mr. Lashley reported on the
methods on which similar schemes
are operated in Puerto Rico and
Antigua where he had recently
visited, and supported the Chair-
man that such a scheme should
be eneouraged.

The Board accepted another
recommendation by the Secretary
to apply for assistance under the
American Point Four Programme
for the purpose of sending a tearm
from Barbados to study the
various aspects of Aided Self-
Help Schemes in Puerto Rico.

It was stressed that included in
the team should be a social lead-
in one of the Village Communi-

es,

Financial Report

The Board accepted the finan-
cial report of the Manager-
Secretary on the recently erected
47 houses at the Bay Estate, and
accepted the recommendation of
the Manager that the rents for
the three sized houses should be
$1.20, $1.50 and $1.80 per week
respectively.

This recommendation will be
referred to the Executive Com-
mittee for their consideration and
approval,

The (Manager-Secretary ex-
plained to the Board that the 47
houses were built at a total cost
of $93,485, The cost of building a
two-room house was $1,516.29; a
three-room house, $1,998.74; and
a four-room house, $2,523.61.

He pointed out further that the
subsidy involved was at a rate of
42% when interest, sinking fund,
maintenance and insurance were
taken into consideration,

The Manager-Secretary also in-
formed the Board that he had
written to tha Financial Secre-
tary relative to the insurance of

the houses, and submitted the

figures “at which the respective

sized houses were covered.
Recommendations

The Board accepted a number
of recommendations submitted by
the Bay Estate Committee, among
which was a suggestion that the
open area covering about 2% acres
on the Bay Estate to the east of
Culloden Road (Chelston Area)
be retained as a playing field.

The Board also decided that in
the event that the Wanderers’
Cricket Club vacate their field ut
the Bay Estate, that area should
be used for “housing” with the
exception of a small portion be-
hind and alongside of the Bay
Estate House.

During the brief -discussion on
this recommendation, Mr. G. H
Adams, Chairman of the Board,
pointed out that Government
|were not asking, or did they have
lany intention of asking Wander-
ers’ to give up their field, but it
was only a matter of whether the»
did vacate it on their own de-
cision.

He said it was inevitable that
existing playing fields would t
retained, and he wanted to mak





in the case of the Wanderers’ field,
junless they removed to some other
site.
The Board postponed considera-
tion of another recommendatio.:
jby the Committee “that a sma!
triangular area of land to th
eastern end of Section “H” be
sold to Mr. Brooks, the owner of
the Chelston Lime Works

The matter was deferred i
|order to give some members of the
| Board an opportunity to see the
area for thems

The Co
the s
\ Bo









it clear that that would apply.

In addition to the Committee's
Suggestion to sell the land, two
alternative suggestions were put
forward at the meeting yesterday,
One, by Hon. F, C. Hutson, that
the matter be referred to the
Executive Committee with a sug~
gestion that the land be exchanged
for another more useful area; the
other by Miss Arne, that Mr.
Brooks be granted a long lease.

Another recommendation which
the Board agreed to was that the
roads in Section “H” be constructed
with grass verges instead of con-
crete curbs, and that the whole
question of roads in housing areas
be discussed by the Board with a
view of getting the matter consid-
ered at Executive Committee level.

On this point, it was decided to
refer the matter to the Select
Committee asking for a directive
on the question of the width of
roads in the area as laid down by
the General Board of Health, It
was pointed out that where small
tenantries were concerned, the
question of the size of roads should
be based not on any definite
dimensica, but rather there should
be some latitude given to a Hous-
ing Authority,

The Board also accepted a re-
commendation by the Committee
that new houses be erected on the
open nee adjoining the com-
munal baths in section “F’’

Bay Estate, . ne

Selling Tenantries

The Board diseussed the ques-
tion of the selling out of large ex-
isting tenantries in the City area
which was the subject of concern
by a number of tenants in Del-
amere Land on which matter the
Colonial Secretary sent a Minute
to the Board.

The tenants who made repre.
sentation to the Colonial Secretary
«xpress concern over the matter,
tnd enquired what help would
be given by Government in the
event the land was set up for sale,
and tenants were unable to raise
the purchase money,

In connection with this matter
which was postponed pending
further information, the Manager
explained that in his office he had
more than 3,000 applications, a
large number of which were
pressing cases, and that the further
sale of large tenantries would
ceenorete the position consider.
ably,

The point was raised as to
whether the cost of removing the
houses from such tenantries
would not be in excess of the
cost of the entire tenantry, if set
up for sale.

Certain members of the Board
ask for figures in connection with
this point, and it was decided to
postpone consideration pending
such information.

Further consideration was given
to the question of recommending
an amendment to the Public
Health Act in connection with the
reduction of the minimum area
of land for a house spot, and the
Board expressed the view that
such an amendment should not
come within the ambit of the new
Public Health Bill, but should be
dealt with under the Town and
Country Planning Bill.

The Board postponed consider-
ation of the application of Mr.
J. M. Hewitt, Secretary of the
People’s Co-operative Trading
Society, for permission to run a
shop at the Pine Estate, as well
as consideration of the question
of funds for the erection of the
proposed shop. The matter was

deferred to give the Secretary
‘ime to obtain certain informa-
tion from the Co-operatives
Officer,

It was decided to submit to the
Governor-in-Executive Commit-
the plan and model for the
w four-units houses which were

tee





approved by the Board at a
meeting on the 8th May this year
The question was raised as to
hether cheme should not
pe ' Government

Five Year plat

muc

a portant ite

the matter should be dealt with
immediately.

Salaries
The Board considered and
agreed on certain recommenda.
tions regarding salaries for the

Staff of the Housing Board, and
thege recOmmendations are to be
forwarded to the Civil Service
Commission which is to consider
and, report on salary increase:
for’ the Subordinate Staff of the
Service.

Under General Business the
question of rumours that mem.
bers of the subordinate staff of
the Housing .Board were being

offered bribes to enable persons
to secure spots for houses was
discussed,

The Secretary pointed out tha!
there could be little or no validity
in such rumours because the
selection of persons to be helped
rested with a Selection Commit-
tee, and not with any member of
the subordinate staff,

The point was also raised that
there might be some truth in the
statement that some persons did
offer money to members of the
subordinate staff, and it was de-
cided “that it should be made
clear that any member of the staff
who took part in anything which
savoured of bribery, such mem-
ber would be dismissed.

It was decided that notices
should be published in all sec.
tions of the Press, drawing atten-
tion to the public that any
attempt at bribery would dis-
qualify such applicant from con-
sideration by the Board.

Before the business of the
meeting of the Housing Board
was begun yesterday morning,
Mr. G, H. Adams, Chairman of
the Board, and Mr. John Beckles,
took opportunity to express on
behalf of the Board sincere con-
dolence to Hon. F.C. Hutson on
the death of his mother whic)
hook place’ recently.

Mr, Beckles also took the op-
portunity to welcome Mr. Adams
back to the colony after his visits
to Berlin and London, where he
attended an Investiture Ceremony
at Buckingham Palace, and ex-
pressed the hope that when next
Mr, Adams visits London, he
“would bow before Her Majesty
the Queen who would rest her
sword on both his shoulders and
command him to “Arise Sir
Grantley.”

Replying Mr. Adams said al
though he considered it an honour,
hnevertheless his duty towards his
people came first, and if he
should be so honoured, he would
consider it only as a result of his
duties to the people of Barbados,
fand not as a personal achieve-
ment,

He pointed out however, that
from a query asked by Her
Majesty, he considered that even
in Court Circles, Barbados wa‘
not considered just a dot on the
map, but was recognised in the
Court Circles.

A-Bomb Process
Reversed By
Physicist

NEW YORK, July 29.

US. atomic scientists said here
today that the Italian nuclear
physicists who had succeeded in
exploding hydrogen to make
helium were apparently using 4
“method the exact opposite of that
employed in the production of the
atom bomb. (Italy’s Defence Min-
ister Randolfo Pacciardi announced
last night that Italian scientists
had exploded hydrogen to make
helium, but denied the newspaper
report that Italy had successfully
tested the hydrogen bomb).

American scientists, who asked
not to be quoted by name, said that



Professor Ubaldo Losahi, the
Italian in charge of hydrogen ex-
plosion might have m bom-

barding hydrogen with its radio-
active isotope,
—UP.

NANTON TO STUDY
AGRICULTURAL
ECONOMICS

GRENADA, July 30.
W. R. E. Nanton, Superintend-
ent of Agriculture, leaves by air
for Trinidad tomorrow enroute to

England: to enter Brasenose Col-
lege, Oxford for a‘ year’s study of !
icultural economics on a Colo

Office scholarship award
Mrs, Nanton accompanies him

Spiritual
f . i wy ‘
ntelleet Can

Save Man

BOSTON

Spiritual understanding
government and
and lead mankind to lasting
Safety and security, The Chris-
tian Science Board of
said.

About 7,500 Christian Scientists
from throughout the world heard
the Directors’ special message at
the Annual Meeting of Th
Mother Church, The First Church
of Christ, Scientist, in Boston
Massachusetts,

The Directors said that human
ingenuity alone will never
mankind's deepest problems. But
they added that the ‘means for
right adjustment are spiritual and
are immediately available

“Not mumbers nor human
might but Truth—spiritual under-
standing—is the power that will

mold the world’s destiny,” they
declared.

world confusion

Named President of The Mother
Church for the coming year was

Lt. Col. Robert Ellis Key of Lon
don, England, Associate Editor of
the Christian Science

the religion for more than
years, including service as prac-
titioner, lecturer and

~ teacher,

Christ Not Chaos

“The keynote of this century is

not chaos but Christ,” Colonel
Key told the huge crowd, “War
and destruction have been asso-

ciated with the first half of the
twentieth century, but progress
and spiritualization will mark the
succeeding years.”

“The old materialism must be
replaced by a spiritual concept of
creation,” he added,

Mrs. Lora C. Rathvon, Retiring
President, said there is “growing
recognition that spiritual enlight-

enment, and spiritual enlighten-
ment alone, will blot out the
materialism which is the source

of all confusion and of mankind's
multiplied problems.

She added: “We rejoice in
widely accumulating evidence, in
terms of Christian healing, that
the needed spiritual understand-
ing is available to humanity to-
day.”

Key officials reported on the
far-flung activities of the denomi-
nation, which has branches
throughout the United States and
in 41 other countries,

Growing public acceptance of
spiritual healing was noted by
Gordon V, Comer, Clerk of The
Mother Church, Current church
records, he said, include testi-
monies of Christian Science heal-
ings of arthritis, cancer, deformed
nose, infantile paralysis, gall-
stones, carious bones and flesh, as
well as of social] drinking and
smoking.

Right Of Exemption

George Channing,
Christian Science Committees on
Publication, reported increasing
official state and local recogniton
of the right of the individual to
exemption from compulsory

Manager of



physical examinations in good
faith on religious grounds, He
said fluoridation of the publie
water supply is being opposed on
the grounds that it represents
state medicine, and there are
prospects of suecess,

Relief totalling some 200,000
was voluntarily contributed by

Christian Scientists to aid suffer-
ers in the Kansgas-Migsouri Valley
flood, Roy Garrett Watson, Treas-

urer of The Mother Chureh
announced,
In another field, the Christian

Science Camp Welfare department
disclosed that more than 360 Camp
Welfare Workers were minister-
ing to hospitalized veterans and
members of the armed forces, In
addition, t h i r t e e¢ n Christian
Science chaplains—three of them
in Korea — were on active duty
with troops,



Fishermen
Prefer Nylon

OTTAWA

Fishermen, too, seem to prefer
nylon,

And now the federal fisheries
research board has come along to
find out why. It seems nylon gill
nets being used by commercial
winter fishermen on Lake Win-
nipeg last longer, take less clean-
ing and catch more fish,

Records collected during two
winters of ice fishing operation by
a research team that travelled the
frozen lake in a snowmobile show
that the efficiency rating of the
three-inch nylon gill nets used by
a number of the fishermen is far
ahead of that of cotton nets of the
same size,

During the 1950-51 season nylon
1ets caught 57 pounds per 100
yards of net, as compared with 17
pounds caught by cotton nets.
That is a ratio of about three to

ne,

Nylon Caught More
A similar set of tests conducted
last winter showed that nylon nets
caught 67 pounds of all types of
fish per 100 yards compared with
31 pounds in cotton nets.
Researchers said a particularly

°

heavy occurrence of “water-
bloom”—~the » colored slime that
fills the lake during very cold

seasons-—might have cut down the
efficieney ratio of nylon last year.

In any event, the nylon nets
turned im a good record, In
addition, researchers discovered
that fishermen frequently leave
nylon nets in place

nets at least once to dry. The rot-

resistant qualities of the nylon
nets permitted this practice
The major complaint of the

jake fishermen against nylon was
that it was harder clear the
net during clear frosty weather

Since the nylon thread does not

to

id a Mu wate 2. the ¢

tenc to free

alone
can pierce to-day’s corruption in

Directors

solve

religious
periodicals. He has been active in
40

authorized

throughout |
the season while they raise cotton |

PAGE THREE



|
|
|
|



JUST ONE—and aren't we enjoying ourselves?
Baby wonders what all the fuss is about on this
particular day —the toys, the new frock, the cake
and this lovely, lovely candle — but what’ fun ! !
And what a happy year it has been on the whole
for everyone — particularly since we put baby on
Cow & Gate. Steady progress —- abounding health
peace and contentment. :
Yes— carry on, baby, with that charming smile
~— at least we have given you a good start!

COWS GATE ¥885

Ne FOOD of?

08




| ROYAL BABIES








» CowyGate |
i Matis aa

I merce neve’ fl



Distributors

OUR WIRELESS 1S HOPELESS

THESE DAYS, PHYL. 1M FED

TO THE BACK TEETH With
INTERFERENCE

THERE'S A WONDERFULS
CONCERT TONIGH, MAGGIE.
COME AND LISTEN TOIT
AT OUR HOUSE














Sera pe asia
‘AYE DEAR, AND NO MAGGIE, |
THANKS AGAIN THE COSTIS

FOR LETTING ME AMAZINGLY

LISTEN TO THE LOW, AND |
CONCERT. ISN'T RE DIFFUSION |
RE DIFFUSION A Nt HOI NO j
AIT OF A LUXURY Fuecreierryt}

Ae
IT'S REDIFFUSION,
MAGGIE - NOT A SET
ATALL! WUST A
LOUDSFY AKER
CONNECTED BY
WIRE TO THE

* sTuDIas

war WAS LOVELY,
“¥t! your
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“| MRASA
‘h WHAT
sé7 1S or P





is the time

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our PYREX TABLEWARE.

















@ OVENWARE
SOUP PLATES
DINNER PLATES
PIE DISHES

FISH OR MEAT
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@ CASSEROLES
SAUCE BOATS

and 26 Piece Dinner
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The above extensive
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WARE.

EKARTHEN-





|

| BARBADOS
(0-O0P. COTTON

FACTORY LTD.





|



'
'
'
'
’


PAGE FOUR

-



ADVOCAT

ieee B 7

Printed by the Advocate Co., Ltd., Broad 8t., Bridsctewn

Thursday, July 31,192 tS

READING

THE report of the Public Librarian for
the year ended on the 3ist March 1951
records the total number of adult and
juvenile registered borrowers of books at
24,746,

Less than one ninth of the island’s total
population borrows books from the head-
quarters Library, the Speightstown Library
and the seven deposit stations. But the reg-
ular borrowers of books seem to read wide-
ly because no less than 178,150 issues of
books were made at the headquarters adult
department during the year. How many of
the 14,526 registered borrowers withdraw
books is not mentioned so that no conclu-
sions can be drawn as to percentage of
actual borrowers.

It is interesting to note that whereas 1,577
new borrowers were registered 6,077 less
issues were made at the headquarters adult
department than in the previous year.

On the other hand 4,369 more issues were
made in the juvenile department of head-
quarters than in the previous year and
membership increased by 1,206 to 6,622.

The Speightstown. Branch Library now

has 835 adult and 613 juvenile members
and 12,992 books were issued. during the
year.
At the deposit stations it is impossible
to meet in full the demands of the young
readers. And it is very significant that there
are more than 798 more juvenile than adult
members who make use of the stations.

This appetite for reading on the part of
the juvenile inhabitants of the country dis-
tricts would seem to justify the formation
of more school libraries than now exist.
Since the duties of issuing books, register-
ing borrowers and keeping the necessary
statistical records of the deposit stations
are now undertaken for the most part by
elementary school teachers, the growth of
school libraries would seem to be a natural
evolution from the existing system. A
school library department was started in
Qctober 1949 and 28 schools are now re-
eeiving books through the department.
During the year 8,135 children received
books in this way. This figure is quite
startling when compared to the total num-
ber of 8,709 juvenile borrowers registered at
headquarters, Speightstown and the. six
deposit stations,

;. The statistics of book circulation at the
Public Library and all its branches during







the years 1946—51 record a drop in books”

issued to adults from 208,510 in 1948. to
194,662 in 1951. Juvenile readers after
reaching 76,289 dropped to 65,906 in 1949
but had reached 76,138 in 1951.

Combined totals of book circulation show

‘a substantial decrease from 280,038 in 1948-

to 270,798 in 1951. '

! The classification of books at headquar-
ters read by juveniles show the appeal that
sociology is having on young minds.
Whereas religious books were circulated
on 2,806 occasions during the year and

there were 3,881 circulations of books °

dealing with applied science there were
4,871 issues of books dealing with sociol-
ogy. History by comparison only received
1,500 circulations. Fiction, however, still
“is the favourite reading of juveniles at
headquarters and received 35,895 circula-
tions as compared with 25,946 issues of
non-fictional works,

_} The adult reader at headquarters also
displays greater enthusiasm for sociology
and philosophy than for religion, although
the main interest of adults in non-fictional
work is claimed by applied science.

There were 15,517 issues of books deal-
ing with applied sciences during the year,
8,472 dealing with sociology, 6,889 with
philosophy, and 5,928 with religion.

*In Speightstown on the other hand, in-
terest in applied science was followed by
interest in religion, philosophy, biography
‘and fine arts, before sociology. Adults at

headquarters also show interest in bio- ©

graphy there being 6,526 circulations.
; Only 4,381 circulations, however, were
made of books dealing with history. Fiction
continues to hold sway over the adult as
over the juvenile mind, there being 100,579
issues of fiction at headquarters as com-
pared with 77,571 issues of non-fiction.

} What conclusions are to be made from
some of the statistics in this report? First
the total number of 16,037 registered adult
borrowers of a public library in a commun-
ity with a total registered electorate of
95,939 of whom 62,028 actually voted during

the last elections is a subject for deep re--

flection. If almost one sixth of the island’s
registered voters are not even registered
borrowers of the public library their know-
ledge of the world in which they live can-
not be said to be extensive. The respons-
ibility of those who do read books is there-
fore increased enormously and the result-
ing danger of acquiring all knowledge
from books becomes real.

The selection of books for reading in the
public library particularly for the juven-
iles who now form more than half of the
public library’s readers becomes a greater
responsibility than ever. A little knowledge
isa dangerous thing.



| John Gordon In America:

When













































































CHICAGO.
The Press agents of kings and
queens—oh yes, they have their
Press agents just the same as
lesser people—tell you that being
a monarch is the toughest job in
the world. !

I am not prepared to go all
the way with them on that, but
if you hanker after a job of the
sort here's a bit of wise advice.

Should we ever become a
republic and anyone suggest that
you run for President, hit him
on the head and run like mad.

After a week spent watching
unfortunate men who have been
bitten with the idea, and watch-
ing also their pathetic, distracted
wives, I assure you that there is
j I would hate

Can Yeu See It?

Of course, we in Britain would
do it differently. I cannot picture
stout dowagers proceeding down
Parklane towards midnight wav-
ing double life-sized pictures of
wearing crazy hats
“I Like Gordon,”
chanting a voodoo dance chant.

Yet that is what has been hap-
pening in Chicago every night
this week,

I can’t imagine Claridges, the
Savoy, or the Ritz allowing car-
nival processions of brass bands
to walk in at their front doors,
through their foyers, and up and
down their corridors whenever
they felt thelr exuberance rising.

Yet ‘ swank hotels of
Chicago have had to put up with
that all day and half the night
as well,

Too Tough

Although ‘the town is not quite
as wide open as it used to be, as
a taxi driver lamented to me the
lights still go round and round
till the dawn comes up. And
whether you have a dollar or a
million in your pocket you can
get a meal or a drink anywhere
is

now the legal closing hour.

If you think that is making life
a bit too tough, believe me things
are not so bad, for many places
which announce that they must
—to keep the law—close at 4.30
announce also that they will
reopen at 5.30 a.m.

Poor Senator Taft has been
living a crazy sort of life for
many months. He has been trav-
elling ceaselessly up and down
the American continent, showing
himself to the electors.

How he must hate the sight of
people now. Poor Senator Taft
couldn’t drink a cup of coffee
without the news being known.

Every time he changed his
pyjamas in a strange town a
local columnist regarded it as the
scoop of the week, The local

my — of pleasant people to
meet.

The harassed Senator has had

uite a time keeping them out-
side his bedroom door. But he has
managed to get away with it
more easily than most by plead-
ing that his invalid wife must not
be disturbed.

It took. Senator Taft many
months to get his smile fixed on
what [I am told is normally a
rather ruthless face, But it took
General Dwight D. Eisenhower
just a week to rub it off,

Never have I seen so swift and
pathetic a change in any man, It
seemed to happen in a few hours.
One day Taft was on top of

SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico,
More than 2,000,000 Americans
on the sunny Caribbean island of
Puerto Rico are showing how.pro-
gress toward self-government can
be achieved under democratic
stewardship,

With the overwhelming ratifi-
eation of their new Constitution
on March 3, 1952, Puerto Ricans
will govern themselves as a com-
monwealth under the United
States flag. :

Keeping abreast of the progress
in self-government has been the
economic and social development
of the island during the last eight
years .

Faced with the problem of
maintaining over 2,200,000 people
in an area of 3,435 square miles
(8,931 square kilometers) — one
of the. most densely populated re-
gions on earth—the Puerto Rican
government His been conducting
a vigorous economic development
programme,

Known as “Operation Boot-
strap,” this programme is a con-
certed effort to free the island
from its customary one-and two-
crop agricultural economy, One
method has been to invite U.S.
businesses to establish new plants
in Puerto Rico.

Over 150 plants have opened
since the programme began five
years ago, They are producing
such varied items as cement, iron
castings, candy, textiles, shoes,
pottery, and radio sets.

Despite this rapid industrializa-
tion, agriculture is still dominant.
But here, too, diversificahion is
being encouraged. The island’s
agriculture is no longer a syno-

Private Affair

To The Editor, The Advocate—
SIR,— In yesterday’s issue of
the Advocate O.N, Looker criti-
cised the composition of the
“B.C.A.” Intermediate side claim-
ing that only five players were
worthy of their places and he
questioned the method used by
the B.C.A. in selecting the team.
In reply may I be permitted to
say that the side is an -entirely
private affair. The Secretary of
the B.C.L. asked me for a fixture
against C. F. Herrison & Co, Ltd.
I resisted this suggestion as
Harrison’s were too weak a com-
bination, in my view, to oppose
the B.C.L. Mr. Hewitt then agreed
to play a match against Inter-
mediate players selected by
| Incidentally, five of the players
took - part, play for the

me.

that



eT per



A Bis

the -world, The next- down the

drain.
The Cure

I do not suppose that even now

he knows how it happened, But

there seems to me to be a moral
in it worth passing on,

It is that ambition is a most
devastating disease to catch. Tf
caution you, my young man, that
if you ever’ see the spots comin;
out on you, jump in the coldes
river you can find and get your
temperature down again.

Men reputed to be wise are
prone to tell innocent youth that
the way to get a thing in life is
to want it desperately badly.

But Senator Taft will be able
to assure his grandchildren that
just isn’t true. His trouble was

that he wanted something too
desperately badly and lost it
because of that.

Ike Awakes

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

|

Dinner Jacket Tyrann
Man's _ Pee

Life-Dreams Perish

ae percep will Bac 4
like wild cats. The c the} ; $ 2 “
‘Taft machine tried to play on| Mr. MacDonald believes in changing into

him will be nothing compared
with the Truman tricks.

What does Mrs. Mamie Eisen-
hower think of.the future destiny
seems to be shaping for her?

She has played her part through
this tremendous week with a
charm and modest; that has cap-
tured all hearts—though women
say they cannot understand why
she wears her hair in these pecu-
liar bangs.

‘So Can

SHE nearly fainted in the pro.
cess Of shaking hands with 3,000
people in one night. All she said
was ‘If Ike can do it, so can I.”

She calls him Ike to everyone,
naturally and easily,

Only once did anger light her
eyes. That was when a womah
reporter with that touch of
cruelty that seems to come natur-
ally to newspaper girls suddenly

1 wonder if Ike is happy about 28ked her if she was worxied Over

it all. He never seemed to me to

and be trying very hard, He did not “orea.

ACANTHUS-

“Archie says the
prisiciple of nO more pay
without mcre production
should apply to MPs, too
—but who the deuce
wants more legisla-
tion?’”



seem to care very much whether
he won or not—until the last two
or three days.

Then, all of a sudden, he
decided that the monkey tricks
being played on him were a little
more than he cared to take. He
Said so with an asperity most
unusual for him. And_ behold
what happens. Down fell the
walls of Jericho, the Citadel was

his.

The difference between Eisen-
hower and MacArthur, who for
all his indisputable genius would,
I think, be a disastrous President,
is that MacArthur’s driving
motive in life is the glorification
of MacArthur, while Ike says
quite ‘simply, and believes it, that
he takes his job seriously but
never himself,

Two months of MacArthur as
President and America would be
quarrelling with the world, Which
is not what either America or the
world wants or needs.

More difficult infinitely than
anything Truman has experi-
enced in office are the days that
lie ahead for America. And
Eisenhower certainly has a tough
journey ahead of him if he is
going to the White House.



her soldier son leaving for

“What a question to ask a
mother,” she snapped. The subject
was dropped,

Amerieans—and Ike—call her
Mamie. But to her daughters-in-
law and Ike's grandchildren she
is Mimi.

Her Treasure

HAS her marriage been a suc-
cess in a land where marriages
don’t seem to last too long? The
answer is that she still treasures
above all things in the world the
little Heart-shaped jewel box Ike
gave hér on» their first wedding
anniversary.

If 4 feel a little sorry for
Mamie in the months and perhaps
years of little privacy that lie
ahead of her, I cannot help feel.
ing deep sympathy for the invalid
Mrs. Taft, In spite of her disabili-
ties following the strokes she suf-
fered 18 months ago, she has
played her part in the fight these
last few days like a very brave
woman,

She sat in her wheelchair
through endless, noisy, exhausting
receptions laughing off her trou-
bles ‘vith the joke that she was
worrying about her double chin
showing on the photographs.

I am sure the week will leave

a permanent mark upon her. it

seems a pity that her sufferings

were not to be compensated by a
victory for her husband.

of * ae

No, no. no...
FOR nearly seven years General

Eisenhower withstood the Repub-
lican political suitors before he
would allow his name to be put

forward as prospective candidaie.

In a new biography,—‘“Man of
be published by
the
author, Kevin McCann, lists the

Destiny” to

Heinemann’s tomorrow

“Noes” as:—

JUNE 1945: “I’m a soldier . .
nobody thinks of me as a politi-
cian.”

JANUARY 1947: “Nothing in
the international or domestic situ-

ation especially qualifies for the

most important office in the world
a man whose adult years have
been spent in the country’s mili-
tary forces.”

MARCH 1948: He is “consider-
ing the presidency of Columbia

University.”
DECEMBER 1950: “I'm an
ofticer on the active list.”
And finally
MAY 1952: He consented.
—L.E.S.



nym for sugar cane. More than
50 percent, of all Puerto Rican
agricultural workers still farm
sugar cane, but pineapple, tobac-
co, and coffee are becoming in-
creasingly important,

New dock facilities are being
constructed to handle increased
shipping traffic from U.S. ports.
Passenger traffic through San
Juan’s Isla Grande airport is
steadily on the increase,

Eradication of slims and im-
provement of existing housing
facilities is another ambitious
project undertaken by the gov-
ernment, The government has also
acquired tracts of land to which
it is moving the best houses from
slum areas, Central sewage and
water facilities are installed by the
government and provided for the
new dwellers at low cost.

The island’s Social Programmes
Administration has also developed
a plan by which rural families
will be able to build their own
homes at an average cost of about
$300, The Administration will
provide plans, a concrete block
‘machine, and a few simple tools.
Administration construction en-
gineers will start the work and
supervise construction during its
initial stages.

Under this plan each family
will make a cash payment of only
$20 initially, pay an additional $10
when the house is completed, and
then pay about $2.50 a month
over a 10-year period,

The Puerto Rican government
is also expanding its educational
facilities so that its citizens will
be able to assume more responsi-
ble positions,



Puerto Rico Shows Economic
And Social Progress

With over one-third of the
island’s total budget being allo-
cated to education it is expected
that more than 10,000 _ students
each year will be able to receive
specific technical training.

In the field of general education
a new system of secondary edu-
cation known as the Morovis plan
is in operation. Started in the
town of Morovis two years ago
this plan is now being used in
six other communities and will
be extended throughout the
island:

Under the Morovis plan, sec-
ondary education is made avail-
able to students who cannot at-
tend a regular secondary school
because of inadequate transporta-
tion facilities or financial short-
comings, :

meets with his
ours once each
the time is used
in teaching each
receive the equiv-
alent of secondary school diplomas
upon successful completion of
their studies.

Puerto nuico’s progress in indus~
trial expansion and in political,
educationai, and social advance-
ments has bagsted the morale of
its residents. ‘

Teodoro Moscoso, chief of the
island’s Economic Development
Administration, says:

“Our greatest asset is the won-
derful fact that with no resources
to speak of, a people who should
be desperate have great hope.”
(U.S.A. — Territories & Posses-
sions)







Our Readers Say:

Y.M.P.C., as Croney and Gilkes
did not show up on Sunday.
Personally I thought, and Mr,
Hewitt agreed, that this match,
was a private affair financed by
the B.C.L. and myself for the
purpose of giving the B.C.L. side
additional practice

Yours faithfully,
W. F. HOYOS,
“Dexterville”’,
Belleville,
30th July, 1952.

“Riots”

To The Editor, The Advocate—





t
ing facts to your kind considera-
ion.

Firstly the, riots broke out in
Lahore, in Pakistan, That is an
internal--affair in Pakistan and
India has nothing to do with it.
Your news headline as ‘Indian
Riots Broken-Up’ is very mis-
leading. People here might not be
accustomed to differentiate be-~
tween India and Pakistan, but
we must admit the fact that they
are two independent

in today’s paper can create a lot)
of mistrust among the different
sections of Indians here.

’

Yours sincerely,

SIR With reference to your
news it “Indian Riots Broken- R. C. MURTY, M.Sc., Dip. Li
Up” on ge six of the Barbados Y.M.C.A.,
Advocate dated July 29th, 1952, Pinfold Street,

I would like to draw the follow-

29th July, 1952.

|down the old idea that the Pukka Sahibs,







































) it countries |
and news headings like the one/consultation of the Africans ‘in those terri- {

“wherever it operates.”

THURSDAY, JULY 31, 1952 ;















‘PAN BOOKS

LONDON.
Mr. MacDonald, Commissioner- THE WIDEST SELECTION IN TOWN
On Sale At - - -

Malcol
General for Reuth-tie Asia, has slapped} %
S ADVOCATE STATIONERY |

Tuans and Bwanas in the tropics must
always wear a dinner jacket at night-time.







evening dress—he makes a point of that—
but he leaves the jacket at home.

Recently, Mr. MacDonald looking cool and
trim, went to hear American singer Helen
Traupel. He wore black trousers, white shirt,
black tie, but, as usual—no jacket.

Take the guesswork out ee
of weighing with: r

NEW COUNTER
SCALES (10 Ibs.)

Hide-bound old-timers, sweltering in their NEW SPRING
coats, spluttered over their whisky sodas. ea

They even protested openly at what they
considered was his lack of adequate dress.

Now he has forcibly answered his sar-
torial critics in a letter to the Straits Times.

Calling on Malaya to “break with the
tyranny of the dinner jacket”, he asserted
that “fine Imperial statesmen and shining
aristocrats who happened also to be sensible
men” had discarded their coats in other parts
of the Commonwealth. His critics continued
Mr. MacDonald, seemed to think that a
jacketless evening dress was a “crude inno-
vation.”

“It is nothing of the kind. For a. long
time, various sunny parts of the British Com-
monwealth accepted as evening dress for
men a black tie, white shirt, black cummer-}
bund, black or white trousers and no coat”.

This was the regulation wear at dinner
parties, during the hot weather, at Govern-
ment Houses, including those of Indian pro-
consuls, he stated.

“If the critics had arrived wearing a coat
for dinner at these Residencies, they would
have been politely de-coated and regarded
as ignorant of the proper dress for gentle-
men,

“Dinner jackets are designed for cool clim-
ates, not for the tropics. The dress looks
more aesthetically pleasing without the
superstructure of a white jacket which con-
tributes nothing to the effect except an occa-
sional awkward bulge, and frequently
trickles with perspiration”,

Mr. MacDonald’s letter follows a recent
incident when members of a stage touring
party who were entertaining troops in
Malaya were refused entry into an army
mess because they were not wearing evening
dress.

The Manchester Guardian in a leader
headed “Political Undress” says:

“The Commisioner-General’s behaviour in
Malaya has always been ‘unofficial’ in a far
wider than the sartorial sense. By his swim-
ming parties, with Asian students, his hos-
pitality to all sorts of Asian people, and his
refusal to join clubs which exclude Asian
guests he has trodden hard on the corns of
Europeans‘ who are finding it impossible to
move with the times. The relinquishing of
the dinner-jacket on ,all except State occa-
sions by high persons in Singapore can do
little except make them a little more human
in the eyes of the ordinary Chinese, Indians
and Malays. There may have been Asians—
and even British—at the notorious concert
who could not afford a dinner-jacket, and
the more Britain’s representatives identify
themselves with such average people the



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“Immediate Independence”

LONDON.

IF resolutions put down by two local
Labour parties were accepted by the British
Labour Party annual conference in Septem-
ber, the next Socialist Government would be
committed to grant “immediate independ-
ence” to all British colonies and dependenc-
ies, wee
These resolutions, however are unlikely
to be approved by the main body of the],
Labour Party.
Other resolutions call for the withdrawal
of all British troops from Malaya and other

Da Costa & Co., Ltd.

GODDARDS



















colonies. One says that the dependent terri- FOR YOUR’
tories should be offered instead “technical Pr ;
and material assistance to help in their de- entre NEEDS i
velopment.” MEAT DEPT j
Some of the views expressed in these reso- ; @
lutions are clearly against the general trend a .
of opinion in the LabourParty. One, for in- ieee "
stance, calls on the Party to, urge the with- FROZEN HADDOCK ze
drawal of British troops from Korea. Dod Ateet out FRESH VEGETABLES
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i (

Party are two resolutions calling for long-
term development of the Commonwealth
and Colonies to enable this country to be-
come independent of United States supplies.
This is also seen as a means of raising the
standard of living of Commonwealth and
colonial people and solving the “greatest
problem facing the world, namely the inter-
national economic unbalance.”

A number of resolutions deal with the
question of the Federation of African Terri-
tories. Most of them express the view that,
there should be no federation without full



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The South African Government is severely
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THURSDAY, JULY 31,



1952

Jury Discharged:
Case For Re-trial

AFTER deliberating three hours at the Court of Grand
Sessions yesterday over a case in which Carlton O’Brien

Hope was charged with attempting te shoot with intent to ce Sone See eee me ety eign soil, sleeping in a rented reading, also sewing and cooking gue . imereve Ge standards of thy tate
rder Ursil. Linton, his f od ath hotel. room here; but indications classes be organised, ving o people, and HEAL y
eutaer Ure nton, his former reputed wife of Dayrells been making sport, were that he world soon be “It is the intention of the Com- You may not know that I am y
Road, on February 23, a jury told His Lordship Mr. Justice While giving evidence Edghill moving. Reports that Farouk mittee of the St. George’s Social 4 VeTy jealous person—jealous for 5
G. L. Taylor that there was no possibility of their agreeing ®#4 to be asSted from the — planned to leave shortly—most Centre that it be run on similar Barbados. I admit I dislike hear- linoleum
on a verdict. ee sn a _— and likely for the United States—gain- ings. ing reports of things being done |
_ This was at 9 p.m. and after commenting that it seemed gum ed support from the fact that only “There are three gentlemen who Detter in, other, istands, becuse t
a simple case and he saw no reason why they could not Threat luggage were unloaded here last {yee members of the Committee of jus as capable—I would say more
agree at a verdict, His Lordship discharged the jury. The ,,CP!:_Cleophas Sealy of the night from the Royal Yacht~ '°© Socia! Centre who took a lead- Capable — than any other West
case will be retried. Ep hell od — a Lo that “Mahroussa”, which carried the '"8 part in the planning and erec- Indian. And yet I am told—on
e had had occasion to interview

Counsel for Hope was Mr. E. W.

Barrow, while Mr, F. E. Field,
Acting Attorney General, prose-
cuted for the Crown.

Hope had been charged on two

4 month, she would be better than gardens of the Eden Paradiso Post as Rector in December to to be so. I will not listen to the
Saeivend te oe eae con Mean ee he was. . Hotel. The balding Monarch wear- take up an appointment in person who says that Barbadians
to do grevious bodily harm, main, but he would leave her caer the Sgt. Haynes was the last witness jng slacks and a white “T” shirt Jamaica. Jamaica’s gain, Barba- —dare I say we Barbadians—are
disfigure or disable "* end of each month and return a © Sve evidence, and he also spoke with a yellow shirt over it dos loss. too ipdiviqualistio and _ men-co-
The alleged offence was the few days after the new month h 4 of Hope threatening to kill Linton. appeared in slightly better spirits Mr, de Viera our late Churca- operative. You have put Barbados
result of a break in the friend. begun, She had written one letter Defence on. Wednesday PR ag Re ae stat — ee ed ee gh Be thoes Weare ee
i + +" . ence did on Tuesday night after the ed in the Social Centre resigne¢ ave led the Caribbean in sugar
ship between Hope and Linton, it that she remembered to Dr. Lloyd Mr. Barrow

was given in evidence, and a re-
fusing on Linton’s part to renew
the friendship. He was alleged
to have attempted te shoot her,
but due to a defect in the revolver,
the bullets did not go off.

in 1946, Hope and she still went
on living together. They had
had several quarrels and re-

unions.
She had been friendly with

Still of the Mental Hospital, hop-
ing that Hope might be compelled
to pay her for board and lodging.
In this letter, she had accused
Hope of intending to poison her

son-in-law took the revolver out
of his hand and put him out. At
the time Hope said that Linton
was his wife ang he was making
sport.

This was corroborated by Win-
field Trotman, his son and Collin
Edghill his son-in-law.

In cross-examination, Winfield

Hope in connection with threats
Linton had alleged he had made
to her, and Hope told him that if
Linton lived to see the end of the

in addressing the
jury. told them that if they were
satisfied that the accused attempt-
ed to shoot Linton, but through
no design on his part the revolver
did not go off, they would neces-

Leave Soon

ISLE OF CAPRI, July 30.
Ex-King Farouk of Egypt spent
his first night as an exile on for-

former monarch
Alexandria.
Farouk was up before noon and
appeared briefly on his private
balcony overlooking the colourfu

into exile from

emotional send-off given him by
a crew of Egyptian Royal yachts-
men.

Farouk’s personal yacht “Fakir
El Bishar” was tied up at the Capri

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Jury Disagree Over Shooting Attempt Verdict ¢o sion

sb eed es oche-an'waasiptencrp Besnehieseeicoenaclioeset SAMMI we
OPENS | healthy

floors,
furniture

Farouk May LADY SAVAGE

SOCAL

graph shows, concerts, lectures,

tion of this building, who I regret
to say are not with us this after-
noon. They are our late Rector
Mr. Dowlen, who was Chairman of
the Committee, He resigned his

the Vestry in December, I regret
to say he is no longer with us.
“Mr. Dowding also resigned the
Vestry in December, he wouid
have been with us this afternoon

CENTRE

that fund, and I look upon the
community centres as being com-
plementary and a part of this

good authority—that the develop-
ment of community centres and
community life in Jamaica is far
ahead of our achievement in Bar-
bados. There is no reason for it

production, in education and in
health services, Surely you can
give a lead to the Caribbean in
the development of family and
community life.

; dock undergoing repairs. Chiefme- jut is out of > Isle 7 sin- “I shall be told that these are

The Prosecution called t ee who ‘was an’ inmate sarily find him guilty on the first chanic Giuseppe Luise said the ee - the ‘Taland on: busin just words and what is wanted is

witnesses to prove their ease et ‘She denied that h count and there would be no need yacht was built for Germany’s “< fee) 1 must mention Sir, that &tion. I agree. That is the job

During the evide Mr. B eer at her daughter-¢o, consideration of the second Kaiser Wilhelm, mostly from old the Parishioners of: Sit Geotge’s of the people of St, George and

row a eat eae and Ho had fought on t day count materials, The engines are old, | tee 7 » © of all Barbadians,” His Excellency
rgued that certain evidence of the alleged offence. She had not : owe a great debt of gratipude to

dealing with threats previous to
the alleged incident, should not
be given in evidence, but His
Lordship ruled that such evidence
Was admissible,

seen Hope for about a week be-

fore he attempted to shoot her.
To the question whether she

ran towards Hope despite his

They had to be satisfied with
Linton and her daughter's evi-
dence before deciding to convict
the accused and he was submit-
ting that they could not accept

and have ball-bearing trouble” he
said, “We cannot have it ready
before tomorrow night.”

—UP.



the late Sir Laurie Pile without
whose generosity this large playing
field would never have been ac-
quired by Welfare -Limited, and

concluded,
Vote of Thanks
Hon. G. D. L. Pile, O.B.E.
M.L.C., in moving a vote o
thanks, said that. His Excellency

having a gun, she said, “Of course ;: : i moreover, after his death, when ,
” , the evidence of Linton who was — ath, when and Lady Savage, through their
Separations ye helhed admittedly a woman of slack Caribbee, Rosarene Welfare Limited went into liqui- presence, had given the Centre a

Ursil Linton told the Court that
Hope and she used to live together
as man and wife for about seven
years, and during that time there
would be occasional separations,
the last being on June 30 last
year. After this she lived with
her three children.

When he saw her after this

run from the
yard and was pursued by Hope,
she had said nothing to Hope nor
had he said anything to her.

Gun Could Shoot
Nathaniel Carmichael, Govern-
ment Analyst said that the police
brought the revolver to him, It

morals.

He suggested that a woman like
Linton who was capable of writing
a letter to Dr. Lloyd Still to get
Hope out of a job was not the
woman to scruple over concocting
a story to get Hope in the position
in which he then was.

Bring Copre, Coal

Two inter-colonial vessels ar-
rived in Carlisle Bay yesterday.
They were the motor vesssel
Caribbee and the schooner Ros-
arene,

dation, the Directors of Bulkeley
Limited consented that the playing
field be sold by Welfare Limited
to the Government at a reasonable
price for the benefit of the Parish-
ioners of St. George and the money
be used to assist Welfare Limited
to liquidate their debt.

good start. His Excellency had
not only given the Centre a good
start by his presence but also by
what he had told them.

He felt quite sure that His Ex-
cellency’s hopes would be realised
and Barbados would not lag be-
hind other islands when it came

i i taon she so community life.

was a seven chamber, 22 calibre _ He pointed out certain discrep- “ Rosarene arrived from British «) would also li . Pile reminded the youn,
oe: he would come to her gun, Canadian made,‘and had a #®"Ces in the evidence, the evidence Guiana with 75 tons of firewood gir that a ao, Tee ae — same ong teres wae et ng
aaein HVin proposals for their rotating cylinder. When handed 2S to which of them, Linton or her ang 750 bags of charcoal, The 500,00 has been given by the them alone but also for the aged
4 san a together. to him, the cylinder contained two “aughter, saw Hope first when.he Garibbee brought copra, white Hon, G. D. L. Pile to assist in to spend quiet evenings, “One day
aun te Saturday evening of the live cartridges. The automatic C2Me with the gun, and Linton’s jeans, fresh fruit and other purchasing furniture for the in the course of nature, you will
offence, she was home in her mechanism for rotating the cyl- 54Ying that when she ran behind general cargo. She also had on building. also belong to the older brigade”,
Shedroof when someone pulled inder was defective, but the cyl- Barker that she had heard_ one

the gate and called. She recog-

board four passengers



“The Social Centre Committee

i li whi 2 i ; he hinted to the youngsters of the
fined th ; 3 inder could have been easily put Click while Barker said he had Both vessels are consigned tO has been criticised for not opening district.
when she Yorpudn ath "one ae oer h ath the fingers, and pony Pain ge ahs ae oe £-hooner Owners’ Assocla- the Centre earlier, but Sir, I His Excellency and Lady Sa-
. . ’ a bu isc ; sses telling de- tion. , ‘i . ak ovitive
him pushing the gate with one et discharged by cocking the iF D would like ‘to ask those critics to

hand and in the other he held a
revolver,

She cried out asking him what
he was going to do with it and he

hammer and pulling the trigger.

By so doing, he had been able
to discharge the two bullets it
contained when it was brought to
him, He produced the shells of

liberate falsehoods, they had to
ask themselves if they would not
be committing a miscarriage of
justice if they convicted the
accused.



365 Passengers
Intransit On ‘Brazil’

remember that the building was
handed over to the Vestry by the
Contractors during October last
year, up to the middle of Decem-
ber we were very busy preparing

vage afterwards inspected the Hall
and the grounds. Two Fide of
India trees were planted by His
Excellency and Lady Savage.
While touring the grounds, His





FOR LINOLEUM”
WOOD FLOORS

FOR BRIGHT AND

POLISH



PAGE FIVE









yam

MARMITE

IS EVERYONE’S
FOOD

‘4










Agent: A & S Bryden & Sons Ltd, Barbados e-em

—_——

epi in i Excellency took the opportunity
one wa tot nwo Shots were in it, the discharged bullets. After | Actually, the charge was only for and staging the General Elec- to have a chat with some of the
self; for if t her and one for him- passing through four inches of OMe of a continuous series of traps Bridgetown was busy yesterday tion. cricketers and footballers of the
ot eres aoe ~~ live to- water, one of the bullets had for Hope which Linton used tO as the 365 intransit passengers “Secondly, the Committee had district. From the pleasing look The vitamins in Marmite keep everyone fitter, By
anothe! could not live with made a hole in a zinc plate. practice and was the committing from the 8.8. Brazil strolled up made an application to Govern- on his face ,it would appear as iene di. ‘ou niet eeeete liege aaa
lis dunt ook and ithi Cross-examined, he saiq that it °f @ Public mischief just as she and down the main streets, The ment for an extra grant of money though the answers he was receiv- & ry day, gthen
was within a ’ 2.

yard and a half of him when he
pointed the gun at her and she
heard a click, but no bullet came
from the gun. She held him and
told her daughter who was in the

was difficult to get the hammer
of the gun to strike the pin. If
one pulled the trigger and a shot
did not go off, it would have
meant that a shot was not in the

— tried to make him lose his
job. ¥,

He pointed out that Linton had
sworn that she had not seen Hope
for about a week before the date

Brazil, which arrived at 7 o'clock
in the morning, was making her
third trip to the island this year.

Six passengers arrived by the
Brazil for Barbados, They were:

fo assist them in carrying out the
plans they had in view, I am
pleased to say Sir, that Govern-
ment very magnanimously acced-
ed to our request, and that money

ing were very satisfactory.

Harr. College Wins








Marmite is delici

our bodies to resist chills and diseases; we get more
goodness from everything we eat; and children are
assured of a vital ‘extra’ to help them grow
up sturdy and fit.

jous in

\ i of the offence, and then her Godfrey King, Mary Cherrie, became available during the first 2 = GRE dishes, oyere (savouries — and
yard to take a stick and knock oa ant aie: alignment had daughter had positively said that Majorie Cherrie, Everard Patin, week of June, we made an attempt Martinez Shield me, Sandwiches, Cooks like Marmite also
wenuhlae ata out So ort Joan Linton Ursil Linton’s he had come at their home the pre- Francis Agostini and Monica to open the Social Centre in June m . , era) because a jar lasts such a long time,

id so and picking it up, ‘ r vious morning and had made Agostini, but could not obtain the services 4 sg
threw it over the paling. Ge ete ares tr ao threats. Brazil called from Trinidad of the Police Band on the day Snesieott College, jo 1 cole ye
He struggled to get away from mother in examination in chief, , He argued that it would have 4nd left in the afternoon for we planned. arene, Oe re Rifle Shoot se
her and to regain the revolver, atid. added ‘that after throwing been very unlikely for Linton to Bahia, Rio, Santos, Montevideo “We then started to carry out Cadet Inter- Se aia per
and eventually got it. He stamped 4.6 gun over the paling. she ran ave run from inside the house #%d Buenos Aires. She is on her certain work which had our for the Martinez . oy

her, and she escaped and ran.

off and called the police.

towards Hope with a_ revolver

summer cruise,

ground somewhat disfigured.

The shoot took place at tihe Drill





; ; THE VITAMIN B FOOD
Her nearest neighbours shut | : when she felt he intended shoot The vessel is consigned to | “The Committee was informed Hall on Friday last, College’s cy
their doors as they were afraid Pg ate pe Eh aan ao bar ing her, and added RHAt wince Messrs. R. M. Jones & Co, Ltd., that you Sir were not taking part winning total was 626, Lodge 5 j FOR FAMILY FITNESS
of Hope with the gun. After cave ct. els Hiethe wan “hrect. Joan, Linton’s daughter had a Agents for Moore-McCormack in functions of this description School, ae © Snr = . ; 37
nam Geibert Sackon made demas ened to kill her mother. She had Dicycle, there should have been Lines. until Court mourning for our late and Combermere Schoo . r
and c .

on behind him, dodging from
side to side when Hope came up
and tried to get at her.

Go Ahead and Shoot

met him earlier in town on the
day he tried to shoot her mother,
but she reached home before he
came, She had thrown the gun
over the paling because she was

no fear of Hope catching her.
Even if Hope had a gun in his
hand the offence would only have
been assault.
Mr. Field for the Prosecution



Vessels Loading
Molasses

beloved King terminated on the
3ist May.

“We would have opened earlier
in July Sir, but received informa-
tion that the Members of the band

Company was third,
The details of the scoring are as
follows: —
No, 1, Company
HARRISON COLLEGE





KWS:

2? —



: said that at i were earning a well deserved C.S.M, Hinds,-L. K. 87): eae —————
| _Hope told Barker that if he did afraid that if she had oe ft tine itenes world Core Cee Two'-vaeenie. ate loading pun- Difax usel She sty not move he would shoot him, : y that the affair was a joke, but he cheons of farev slew ste tne ;.. There is still a lot to be done Cadet Jordan, G. A, .
and when Barker replied that if Womlied that the had ridden to WS, fiad that that defence had lower wharf. They are the MW. (Cy iinayies Ane, building and in C/al4 Meld Noe. $} FOR LOWERED VITALITY!
S » he “tea . not been made. \ Student Prince Fae a dpi. e i ’ § Set. ,m DD «. 4
as well go ahead ; the Police Station. When Hope ~ + 5 7 tudent Prince If which is con- gir, that with co-operation of the Cadet Johnson, P. A. D. ., 83
pointed e Sen i tases nak te held the revolver and she heard They, the jury, were not there signed to Messrs. W. S. Monroe P eee

heard another click, but again no
bullet came.

She ran from behind Barker
and Hope pursued her, and fol-

the click, but nothing happened,
he looked at it and with an oath
said, “This thing!”

Sgt. Gill of Hastings’ Police



to judge the morals of the wit-
nss and he “suggested to them
that they should not let matters
of that kind influence them. }

»& Co., and the M.V. Terra Nova,
sconsigned to Messrs, DaCosta &
Co., Ltd,

The Student














Parishioners in the near future
we will have a really first class
centre run on cultural as well as
recreational lines. And judging

Team Score 6526
No. 2, Company



TAKE

ce He said that if the Prosecution! apne. Prince is loading by what I observe taking place LODGE SCHOOL

lowed her into the house of one Station who arrested Hope, in pad been in need pe Eee appr oximately 520 puncheons of here on afternoons the prowess of Cadet Gill, T, C. 1. 65
Joyce Moore which she entered. connection with the attempted establish their case, counsel for ra ae for Newfoundland, The Everton Weekes and Valentine is G2Lt, Bayne, I. D., ., 84 66
Some men who were Moore’s shooting, said that Hope did not the defence had brought out such Wes navth no its her load to going to be challenged severely,” G/2rt, Chase,'P,D. BE, .. 82 V, q ONE
relatives, held Hope. After this, make any statement. a motive in his cross-examination. ymouth, Nova Scotia, ended Mr. Yearwood. C.SM, Goddard, P. R. ., 85
she fainted. Seibert Barker gave evidence For it could be that Hope was}! ANNUAL : Governor’s Address Cpl. Humfrey, J. M. P. .. 83

Under cross-examination, she as to Linton running to him and thinking that Linton had made MEETING OF His Excellency, in his address, Cadet Johnson, L, FE. C, ,, 85 Y ae
‘admitted that she had gone clinging on behind him, He said him lose his job, and had taken}’ SUMMERHAYES CLUB © said: “My wife and I are very —_— 7 ONIC WIN)
through a form of marriage with that after he had told Hope that him to the altar falsely. The annual general meeting. of pleased to be present here this Team Score 484 assy of
Hope although she had been if he was going to shoot he could He reminded them of the evi-/4the ainmmaeiarou ‘Teahis tbab afternoon and to associate our- wot
already married, and said she shoot, he heard several clicks. dence of the Analyst and the fact! wilt tale place to-morrow at the S@!ves once again with the devel- No, 3. Company It Stimulates the Nerves, enriches the blood and
was subsequently convicted for that the revolver could have gone* Club House, Fifth Avenue, Belle. opment of community life in builds up new reserves of strength which i :
bigamy. Her husband was in Took Revolver Away off. If by a slight defect it didtivinte at 5 p.m » Belle- Barbados, COMBERMERE SCHOOL oh P reserves of strength which is lacking
St. Lucia when Hope and she _ Robert Trotman, father of Joyce not go off that did not exculpate = “You will not want me to repeat Cadet Clarke, C. B. i ae when you are feeling below par.
‘went through the form of mar- Moore at whose house Linton had Hppe. If they were satisfied thath - what I have said in St. Andrew, L/Cpl. Carter, H. G. ote
riage. She had never actually fled, said that he was going at the weapon could have gone off in St. Joseph and in Christ Church Cpl, Lokey, V. A. S. 698 5/6 d 10
separated from her husband, but his daughter when he saw Linton and that Hope pointed it at Lin- ASSIZE DIARY about community centres and the Cpl. Goring, L. F. .. ‘a ee /6 an fs
she had heard that he was dead. running towards the house and ton and tried to fire it the only, Th 4 blessings of the Labour Welfare L/Cpl. Harrison, C. 16 aida ie

She said that Hope and she Hope chasing her. When Linton verdict could be guilty. | e murder case Reg. vs. | .Fund, In the last two yearsI have L/Cpl Lewis, K. .. 80
were friendly before her husband ran into the house and Hope fol- He reminded them of the threats Verona Jackman is set down |. seen visible evidence of improve- owas
went to St. Lucia, and after she lowed her, he went in and held and said that these proved the for hearing to-day. ments in homes all round the Team Score 454 KNIGHTS LTD.
had been convicted for bigamy him around his .neck while his intention. sountry, provided by loans from onside

| _ OO All Branches
==

BEGINS WITH





Rodgers

A SPLASH!

See our lovely

WHAT A FINE
ASSORTMENT OF










) GROCERIES?
‘ Ladies’ Bath Sui forthe family
1b adies Bath Suits forthe
‘ Y¢jv~a
7, SATIN LASTEX OCTOGEN ‘SOAP . per Cake $ .16
The Finest Range Y SALISBURY CORNED MUTTON . _ per Tin .68
Uy ’ In 1 Piece and 2 Piece Styles WALLS OXFORD SAUSAGES . ‘ ssanpeamis aha 69
. Yj, Prem S146 to 900.66 CAMPBELLS PORK & BEANS Ge oe
in Town V Ls & BEANS |
; _y FLOWERED COTTON SWIFTS VIENNA SAUSAGES Ree tg 43
TABLE KNIVES @ ............. $135 TABLE SPOONS @..........-:. 1.66 ; MOR TONS COD ROWS. ....5:cccresivisieepeesuniagevar | si, te is
t ni - r . 2 7" 69
DESSERT KNIVES @ ............ 122 DESSERT SPOONS @ .......... . 116 From $7.60 to $9.01 poet ein ese Sea gaa are ecg ea
TEA KNIVES @ .............,.. 111 SOUP SPOONS @ ..... svenege reed 1,16 WOOLLEN LYNN VALLEY GOLDEN CORN et gee
BUTTER KNIVES @ ........... 1298 TEA SPOONS @ ........:ccceees 67 / AYLMERS TOMATO JUICE Large 39
UTTER KNIVES @ srsseperees 128 TEA SPOONS @ arr te er toe, In 1 Piece and 2 Piece Styles AYLMERS TOMATO JUICE Small —.28
TABLE FORKS @ ............... 167 COFFEE SPOONS @..... ...... 63 coe From $10.50 to $15.06 AYLMERS FRUIT SALAD coccssee per Tin .90
1 o
DESSERT FORKS @ ............ 116 SUGAR TONGS @.............. 1.48 @| o Q.B.B, BUTTER CONCENTRATE ae 7
ir @ CORNED BRISKET BEEF . 41 4.20
CAKE FORKS @ ..........5.:.. 1.10 FISH EATERS per pair @ ....... 3.07 6! ‘erm eget a ath 2.17
, DANISH HAM
6 Pieces CANTEEN SETS @ ..... $83.75 HARRISON S CHILDREN S BATHSUITS |} CHIVERS MASHED POTATO POWDER ........ per -58
j se Ere i . TE er Bottle 99
@ Flewetes Cotten | HEINZ CHILI SAUCE . oo per : r a
From $2.65 to $7.50 \{{ DANISH SALAMI SAUSAGE per é



CAVE SHEPHERD & CO. LTD.

10, 11, 12, & 13 BROAD STREET

COCKADE FINE RUM

Stansfeld Scott & Co, Ltd.

SSS
oe

DIAL 2352

WOOLLEN |

From Toddlers’ to Girls’ Sizes
From $2.93 to $6.09









)
(
—_—— y

+O ODDOOO 6000024064124 04004 ook




“PAGE SIX











__TELEPHONE 2508
IN MEMORIAM FOR SALE
MARSHALL —In loving + er of oe
va Cd ohare ees | AUTOMOTIVE











Till meinory fades and life dep
*Â¥eu'll live forever 1 my her
Isobel Marshall §2—1n

eet
WANTED
HELP
a bs cen nines
FIELD OVERSEER for Spring Vale
Plantation, St. Andrew. Apply to the
Manager. 29.7,.52—3n
GENTLEMAN secks responsible posi

tion, Over eleven years office experience
with radio engineering qualifications ana
experience added assct. No night duties



rr arrangement of interview and full
details reply “Ramsey” c/o Advocate
29.7,52—3n





SALESMAN—*Required immediately





Sdlesman and General Office Clerk
Apply — Cecil L. Straker & Co., Spry
Street, Bridgetown 30.7. u
MISCELLANEOUS
BOTTLES—i,000 (8 oz.) Medicine Bot-
tles — graduated preferred — good price
paid. Knights’ Ltd. 29,.7.52--3n.

ar
$62.50 POCKET MONEY easily earned
by recommending 25 new subscribers tc
REDIFFUSION in one month.
Hn) 1.7.52—6n

A

REDIFFUSION offers $1.50 cash for

each new Subscriber recommended by
you. 1,7,.52—6n

Na
SUPPLEMENT YOUR sNCOME by
recommending REDIFFUSION. Obtain
particulars from the REDIFFUSION
office 1,.7.52—6n.

a fhe rntninstenseene
TWENTY-FIVE DOLLARS extra Bonu:
from Rediffusion for 25 recommenda-

tions in one calendar month.
1.7.52~—6n

——___

USED STAMPS—Wanted large or smail

quantities of clean postally used BAR-

BADOS and other B.W.I stamps
Buying prices on application to

TURTON
P.O. Box 124, Kingstown, St. Vincent
31.7.52—8n

PERSONAL

The public are hereby warned against
giving credit to my wife, Odessa
Vaughan (nee Patrick) as I do not hold
myself responsible for her or anyone
elge contracting any debt or debts in m5
name unless by a written order signed
by me.





Sed. JAMES VAUGHAN,
Welchman Hall,

St. Thomas

31.7.52—2n

ANNOUNCEMENTS

ARS ON HIRE—Friends and general
public to know that you can_ hire
brand new self-driven cars at Holborn,
Fontabelle. Dial 3723. 30,7. 52—4n

—
EARN BIG MONEY by selling Redif
fusion in your spare time. Get a supply
af forms today. 1.7.52—-6n.

LOST & FOUND
‘LOST

a
One B.T.C. TICKET for Summer meet-
ing, Series OOO, number 6068 on the hos
pital grounds Finder please contact
Nurse T. Saunders, Dial 2008
‘ 31,7.52









in





FOR RENT

HOUSES

Attractive seaside Flat main road fas
+ comfortably furnished, English

, Open Verandah facing sea. Suitable
one person for couple); From August 1,
Telephone 2949. 18.6,52—t.{.n.







Rub away the pain-/

Se aeuier tol dorcel
s

A.l, White Linterern e-

trates to the source of the,
pain. Its soothing warmth
brings welcome relief. Buy
a bottle today!

WHITE.








| =— LINIMENT
YPOS000990000000090000/
» AND NOW

A GAS COOKER
like those you have admired
the magazines.
SEE THEM TO-DAY . ‘
sit At Your Gas Showroom.
Pra at Py Bay Street.

DEeee eee ee Coe eee ee ees
NATURALIZATION

in






eee
j

{ NOTICE is hereby given that
JAKOB HANS (JOHNNY)
HERBST of “Maple Manor,”

Hastings, is applying to the Gov-
ernor for naturalization, and that
)PnyY person who knows any reason
Why naturalization should not be
y ‘granted should send a written and

/Figned statement of the facts to
the Colonial Secretary.’

SOO

30.7.52—2n.

_ AUCTION
i SALE

. DAIRY
if COW’S
REX DAIRY FARM

HOTHERSAL TURNING
; St. Michael

i TO.DAY

e
AUCTIONEERS

Jotn 4. Biadon
& ce. |

Phone 4640
Plantations Building.

%









"| will sell











| CAR—Morris 8 in good working co@i-







edie “al ca * enough land to erect more buildings
} tion. Tyres good, Rhone “as 50-3 inspection any day on application to
' mrsnas “> | tenants. The above will be set up for |
PSR mle apie. ale by Public Competition at my}
| CAR—Morris a2 H.P. Good working |*/© &3 are ; ,
covatigns pce 4000 tw i"be aaen at gee, WICTORIA, STREET, ERNDAY in
Etheiridge, Bank Hall Road. Phone 3479. 5 “MER WI os
M. R. Hunte 30.7.52—T.F.N R. ARCHER MoKENZIE
27.7. 32-—4n
CAR-—-Ford Prefect 10 H.P. in good aE TOR. iin .
working order. No_ reasonable offer | , 1. “TREVOR', Black Rock, ae ere
refused. Apply: N. E. Corbin, DaCosta|# desirable bungalow-type a.
& Co.. D 31.7.52—2n, | house, standing on 3 roods 30 perches



Goods







CAR—1951 Black Hillman M
miles Contact I
House, St

hinx, 15,000
S. Robinson, Garden
George, Dial 3254. :
31.7.52—4n
CAR—One Morris Minor two door
Saloon in perfect condition | year old,
; Owner leaving Island, Phone 23430
31.7. 52—2n





——
CAR—Dodge Super-de Luxe (X—88)
for \cash, best offer, bought
smaller car. First class order, owner
| driven. Dial 3359. t
16,7,52—t.f.n.

CAR—Ford V-8 Super DeLuxe X—754
will sell at bargain price,
R. D. Stewart, Dial 3248.





2 .7,52—4n

TRUCKX—Chevrolet truck, no reason-
able offer refused. A Barnes & ¢°.
3.17.52—+.f,n.

Ltd.
FURNITURE

FURNITURE—One Mahogany Wardrobe
with full length mirror inside One
Mahogany Morris Suite complete with
imported spring Cushions. Furnitur
built by R. A. Griffith, Full_particu-
lars, Phone 3430. 31,7.52—2n.









LIVESTOCK

COWS—Two (2) Milch Cows, 22 and
14 pts. respectively; also donkey and
cart and harness. Apply: A. F. Browne,
Massiah Street, St. John

29.7.52—gn.







POULTRY



PIGEONS—A few pairs Black Caru-
aux Silver & White Kings. P._ D.
Maynard, Porters, St. James. Dial 0119

26.7.52—6n

MECHANICAL

MACHINE—One Jones Sewing Machine.
Dial 3278, 31.7.52——1n.







MACHINE—Almost new Singer Hand
Sewing Machine Latest Model, (re-
versible stitching ete.) very little used,
perfect condition $140.00 Telephone
2222. Preferably before 10.30

31.7.52—-1n,



MISCELLANEOUS

AUTO ACCESSORIES including cool
eushions, upholstery rexine, fibre seat
covering, green canvas, chrome wheel
rings, steeringwheel covers, sun visors,
hood dressing, cigarette lighters (6 and
12 volt), reverse lamps, licence holders,
reor view mirrers (car & Truck), tyre
gauges (Car and Truck), insulating tape.
Courtesy Garage. Dial 4391.

25.7.52—6n

CYCLE ACCESSORSES including elec-
ire generator lamps (Miller & Impex),
Petching kits, Solution (special whole-
ssle price), Flashlights and _ batteries, |
French Chalk (7 tb, tins), Brake blocks











pumps, rim tapes, Tyres and_ tubes,
ete. Courtesy Garage. Dial 4391. |

29.7.52—6n
CREPE BACK SATIN A. Mafshal |

Fabric Superior heavy quality in green,

——

CLASSIFIED ADS.

enquiries t0/¢or sale by Public Competition at our





PUBLIC SALES |
REAL ESTATE |



ALL THAT MESSUAGE AT TUDOR
STREET and the land on which it stands
built of stone and covered with
Galvanise at present rented out as two
shops producing an income of 756 dollars
per annum. Suitable for a bond with





land, and containing open marble-tiled |
verandah to North and East, drawing
and dining rooms, 3 bedrooms (each with
running water), and usual conveniences,
(all on one flat), and, on ground level, |
spacious Kitchen, reom, wash-
room, store room &c. Electricity, Gas
and Government Water installed.
Garage for two cars, servants rooms,

fowl house, flower garden, lawn, and
orchard, in spacious yard.
The house and outbuildings have just

been repaired and inted throughout,

Inspection any y (exeept Sunday!
from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on application to
the Caretaker on the premises.

2. 1 Rood 64 ches of Land opposite
“TREVOR” at Black Rock.

The above properties will be set up
Office, James Street, Bridgetown, on
Friday, ist August at 2 p.m.

YEARWOOD & BOYCE,
Solicitors,
18,.7.52—Tn





AUCTION

LIVESTOCK—To be sold by auction
to-day at 2 p.m. at Rex Dairy farm,
Hothersal Turning, 21 heads of Diairy
Cows and one pedigree Holstein Bull.

31.7.52—2n



by public auction at the offices of the
undersigned on Tuesday, the 5th Augiist
1952, at 1.30 p.m.
MARGARET GROVE

will the land whereon the same stands
and thereto belonging containing by
admeasurement 3 roods 22:7/10. perches
situate at Bank Hall Cross Road, Saint
Michael, v

The se is a stonewall building
and the land is good arable land.

For inspection apply on the premises
to the owners Corporal F. F. Denner
and others.

For further particulars and conditions
of sale, apply to:

R. 8. NICHOLLS & Co.,
Solicitors,
151/152 Roebuck Street.
Telephone 3925. 30.7.52—7n.





PUBLIC NOTICES

NOTICE to Customers and the generai
public; Our wholesale Business will be
closed for our annual holiday from
1fth August until the 19th.

Cc. HERBERT,
55, Tudor Street, City.
30.7,52—4n





NOTICE
“THE SUNDAY GUARDIAN”

As from next Sunday, the “Sunday
Guardian” will be sold in Trinidad at
lac. instead of 10¢., as a result, the price
here will be 18c, instead of i6c. The
“Trinidad Guardian Daily", however,
will continue to be sold at 10c.

31,.7.52—1n

NOTICE
1S HEREBY GIVEN that it is the inten-
tion of the Vestry of the parish of Saint
Andrew in this Island to cause to be
introduced into the Legislature of this
Island a Bill authorising the said Vestry
to raise a loan not exceeding £700 to
enable the said Vestry to erect com-
munal Baths and Latrines at St. Simons.
Dated this 28th day of July, 1952.
CARRINGTON & SEALY
Solicitors for the Vestry



Royal Blue and Dark Green 36 inches

wide usually $2.97 yard reduced to $219

ut KIRPALANE 52, Swan Street.
31,7.52—In.

———
GLUE KETTLES--A Glue Kettle that
so Light that .you don't realise its
presence in your kit and how efficient;
No joints to leak and unbreakable

capacity I pt. Price $1,860 Harrison,
31,7.52—gne

RECORDS—Clearing all stocks of 78
R.P.M. Records at 3 for $1.50 at Da
Costa & Co., Ltd. Electrical Department.

25.7.52—6n

‘





) STOVE—One Wood and Coal Iron
Stove. Dial 3278. 31.7.52—i1n
—_—S—

SUBSCRIBE now to the Dally
Telegraph, England's leading Daily News-
paper now arriving in Barbados by Air
only a few days after publication in
London, Contact Ian Gale, C/o. Advo-





ctte Co. Ltd., Local Representative
Tel, 3118, 17,4,52—t.f.n
SUAVE by Helene Curtis, America’s

nost popular hair Cosmetic — just a few
jvops add glorious radiance to your
iair, Knight's Ltd, 30.7,52-—3n,

TOYS—New American Toys which in-

‘tude Doctor and Nurse Kits, Beach
‘ills, Pistols, Cannons. Cars, Jeeps,
Vater Pistols, Dippy Ducks and several
‘ther attractive toys All reasonably
oriced Gc. WwW Hutchinson & Co,,
td, — Broad Street.

29.7.52—3n





“WEDDING GIFT—A few ironing board
nd No-cord iron sets, subject to special







er one tae
TAKE NOTICE

ZENITH

That ZENITH RADIO CORPORATION,

vorporation organized and existing
inder the laws of the State of Tlinois,
lanufacturers, whose trade or business
vuidress is 6001 West Dicken Avenue,
‘ity of Chicago, County of Cook, State
4 Illinois, United States of America,

118 applied for the registration of a
rade mark in Part “A” of Register in
espect of electrical hearing aids and
warts thereof, and will be entitled

egister the same after one month front
he 31st day of July, 1952, unless some

erson shall in the meantime give notice
1) duplicate to me at my office of oppo-
ition of such registration, The trade
pork can be seen on application at my |
office, =

Dated this 23rd day of July, 1952

H. WILLIAMS,



TAKE NOTICE

BARFOOD

That BARBADOS PRODUCTS LEMITED,

company incorporated and
n Berbados, Manufacturers, whose trade
r business address is in care of Fitz-
Graham & Co.,

witrick Barelays Bank

Juilding, Broad Street, Bridgetown, has
pp'ied for the registration of a trade
vark in Part “A of Register in respect
f food products, substances used as
eod or as ingredients in food, and will
x© entitied to register the same after
me month from the 31st day of July,
$82, unless some person shall in the

neantime give notice in duplicate to me
t my office of opposition of such regis-




tration. The trade mark can be seen on
pplication at my office
Dated this 28rd day of July, 1962
H, WILLIAMS,

Registrar of Trade Marks
31.7.52—2n

Forester’s Scholarship

Applications
dressed to the
Michael's

in writing, ad-
Secretary, Court
Diamond, will be
received up to Saturday, 2nd
August, 1952, for one Enabling
Scholarship tenable at any first
or Second Grade School,

Candidates, whose parents must
be financial members of the above-

St

4
4

PAt ptf Se
PLLC SEF FF CPS SSIS EI






named Court, must be, not less 4

than 10 years ola and under 14 &

years on Ist September, 1952 $

Applications must be accom- $

panied by either a Birth or a Bap- §

tismal Certificate R

S. A. OSBOURNE % |

Secretar Court St. Michael $

} Diamond 2

. Dayrell's Road, %

ie St. Michael 19. $ |

ies 30.7.52—4an %
*

| PPSSSSS95999996999 S909 :



to } Manufacturers, whose trade or business

registered | \&

of St. Andrew.
29,.7.52—3n.



NOTICE

All male citizens of the United States
are requested to call at
ts am Lo par had from July 1 to
» 1952 Selective Service Registrati

under the Universal Military ‘Trainin
Service Act

All male citizens of the United States
who attain the age of 18 years sub-
sequent to July 31, 1952, are required
to register upon the day ae attain the
eighteenth anniversary of the day of
eo birth, or within five days there-
after.

For further information, consult fhe
American Consulate, Bridgetown, Bar-
. 27.6 ,52—t.f.n.

TAKE NOTICE —
COMMANDER

That THE STUDEBAKER CORPORA-
TION, a corporation organized and
existing under the laws of the State of
Delaware, United States of America,
Manufacturers, whose trade or business
eddress is 635 South Main Street, South
Bend, State of Indiana, U.S.A., has
applied for the registration of a trade
mark in Part “A” of Register in respect
of automobiles, and will be entitled to
register the same after.one month from
the 3lst day of July, 1952, unless some
person shall in the meantime give notice
in duplicate to me at my office of oppo-
sition of such registration. The trade
mark can be seen on application at my
office,

Dated this 23rd day of July,

H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks,
31,7,53—3n.





1952,









BARBADOS ADVOCATE













THURSDAY, JULY 31, 1952
aaa Een
« !
es From Grenada |Miss M. Jordana, Mi Marie Jordana.
M. Berquist, K. Royer, J Royer, E.| For St. Lacia:
Lame. R, Carbot, P. Leyer, C. Coppin, |H. Shearn, K, Murphy, Rev. Harold Mei-
R. Morgan. C, Johnson, W. Johnsen, D\| ville, L. Chase, C. Redman, M. St. John,
6 J m, R. Skinner, Ramroop, Dhan-|S. Davies, K. Cooper. M. Cooper, P. Scosieestnasbenienemniianmeememediontememmenneeemenooteneeareeneenmnenemertaeneneennstieeseneen tae oeenenesieennnnmnnmnennnaanaa
® dayah, F. Phillip, J.’ Redhead, D. Red- Marshall, L. Brathwaite. A. Rocheford, MONTREAL, a!
: head, S. Maseall, T. Marryshow, R.|A Clarke, E. Bohne, Mitchell, H. ZEALAND UL #& \
© Shannon. | Pierrot, L. Haywood, M. Bristol, D MAN SZ. %
AFF ( F Trinidad | Wiles, F. Clairmonte, P. Walker, D.!
rom Trinidad: Johnson, Revd. A. Armstrong, C. Arm- S.S. “GLOUCESTER” ts scheduled to
3 G. Maingot, R. Thomas, M. Monsegue, | strong, H. Arrindell, F. Olton, C. Clarke, sail from Port Pirie May Sist, The M/V “CARIBBEE” will
(a D. McDonald, E, Katz L. Yufe, B. Hutch-|M, Reece, Mr. Louis Fisher, Mrs. Blanche | June Sth, Melbourne June 44th, aceept Cargo and Passengers for
I li l Ba: inson, C, Mariani, F. Mariani, V. Mariani,|St, Rose, Mr. Clement Bourne, Mr, Ed- | June 24th, Brisbane Sth, Antigua, Montserrat,
n Car isie y Rs Watson, A. ataoe, ¢ Goadara, 2: | ward Elliott, Mr. John Dos Samos, Mrs. | Barbados about Cth: Nevis me St. Kitts. Sailing
emming, jarke, utehinson, Esther Roach. Thursday 3ist inst.
Schooner Mary E. Caroline, Schooner Tempro, V. LeWis, N. Lewis, E. Foster, | For Grenada: Th addition to general cargo this vessel -
neline, Schooner Frances W. Smith, M- Foster, P. Foster, K. Foster, E. Hold-| Pp. Preudhomme, S. Preudhomme, L.|®8S @mple space for chilled amd hard The M/V “MONEKA" will
Schooner Zita Wanita Schooner Confident ¢, R. MeDavid, M, Roett, D. Roett, A.| Alexander, S. Defreitas, H. Copland, F. | fozem cargo. accept Cargo and Passengers for
F. G, Rainbow M., Sch, Cyril E. Smith, Nathan, C. Nathan, S. Nathan, F. Os-|Kerr, C. Coppin, Roy Williams, Cargo aopee throng Tes of Dominica, Antigua, Mi *»
Schooner Triumphant Star, Sehooner borne, N. Brewster, K. Paddock, G. Pad-|Â¥or Puerto Rico: Lading for pment at to Nevis and St Kitts. Hing
Mandalay 11, L.M:S. Manuy, Guif Barge %0ck,'V. Paddock, A. Paddock Miss Ariel Thompson, Miss Edna] British Guiana, Leeward and Windward Friday, 8th August, 1952,
No. 2, Schooner Cloudia S.; M.V. Terra DEPARTURES BY FP W.LA, 'Applewhite, Mr, Oliver Hall, Mr, John | fslands.
Nova, Schooner May Olive, Schooner Plaza. further particwars apply—
Wonderful Counsellor, Schooner Marea For Antigua: or Martinique: = B.Wi SCHOONER OWNERS’
Henrietta, Schooner At Last, Schooner | H. Savoury, B. Savoury, P. MJchael, J.| F. Warjn-Weil, G. Baillargeau FURNESS WITHY @ CO., LID., ASSOCIATION (INC,)
Henry D, Wallace, Sch. Esso Aruba, M.V, Massiah, J. Massiah, G. Sahely, R. Has-| For Guadeloupe: TRINIDAD. Conmgnes
Herdsman, M.V, Gloria Maria. sell, K. Hassell, M, Hassell, A, Sarkis, H, Sarkis, R. Sarkis, J. Sar- and Tele. a ou
For Trinidad: - kis, A. Sarkis, F. Synsky. DA COSTA @ CO., LED
ARRIVALS ARRIVALS BY B.W.1LA. - =

M.V, Caribbee, 100 tons, Capt. Gumbs,

M, Simpson, E. Gribas, K.
from Dominiea, Agents: Schooner Own-

M, “em
Gribas, K, Gribas, L. Stanley, A. Cozier,

From 8t. Kitts:
Frank Blackman, Dr. Malcolm Parker.

ers’ Association, R. Foster, James Wickham, Lourdes
Sehooner Rosarene, 60 tons, Capt, Lyon, Ulusia Leon, S. Rider, B. Hutchin- =o a nen
Hazel. from British Guiana, Agents: Son. 1. Ferguson, H, Villafaria, R. Goods- "
Schooner Owners’ Association,” an, L, rts, C, Seott, P, Rezende, ” B ¥ NGE
S.S, Brazil, 11,123 tons, Capt. Pierre, J. Rezende, P. Rezende, M. Rezende, V. RATES OF EXCHANGE
from Trinidad, Agents: Messrs. R. M. Gill, M. Gill, S. Gill, ¥. George, Aleda JULY 30, 1952
Jones & Co. Ltd. Bowen, Wilkye Lowe, J. Cheeks, H.| Selling NEW YORK Buying
DEPARTURES Cheeks, L. Johnson, E. Birse, A. Sparey,| 73.1% pr. Cheques on
M.V. Clara for Trinidad; 8.8. Schie C; Parravicino, E, Kong, V. Durant, J. nkers 71.4% pr
for Trinidad and SS. Brazil for Bahia, Miner, J. Miner, M. Miner, E. Miner, B. Sigit or
Thomas, E. Batz, G. Walker, G, Downie. demand Drafts 71.2% pr.
For Venezuela: 73.1% pr. Cable ae aks
Seawell 71,6% pr. Currency 69.9% or
nee Hureos Van Middlesworth, Donne pk 69.2% pr.
= aster Jan ssen, Miss M, Font, Miss CANA
= vate BY B.W.LA. Edwina Parsons, Miss R. Wilson, Miss C. (including Newfoundland)
rom Venezuela: Puigbo, Miss Rita Puigbo, Master Peter | 79.2% pr. Cheques on
es iiliam Smith, Edna Smith, Douglas Schick, Miss Maria Urbaneia, Miss Bankers 17.4% pr.
Smith, Sheila Smith, Gerard Maureau, Bianca Urbaneja, Miss Jayone Bilboa Demand Drafts 17.25% pr.
Daniel ro, Winifred Small, Harriett Miss A. Bilboa, Miss Ave Bilboa Miss -. Sight Drafts TTA pr.
Smail, Donald Small, Jesusa Hofman, Cecilia Perez, Miss Renata Pennacchiotti, | 792% pr. Cable sesee
a ee ome Beeoan. qoexta Miss Irene Pennacchiotti, Miss Diana| 77.7% pr. Currency 15,27 pr.
, iceno, erre rnal, nnacc! 3 15.2% pr.
Arnal, Andres Reti| Margarita Reti, ee hiott!, Miss Roberta Maso, Miss Coupons 75 P

Daniela Maso, Miss Yvette Ardila, Mrs.
Gladys Spinetti, Master Hugo Spinetti,

Se eestesssteasesetssenisssiseninsnisssnsessinenseeieneenes

CHANCERY SALE

The undermentioned property will be set up for sale at The Re istratio:
in Office,
Public Buildings, Bridgetown, between 12 noon and 2 p.m. for the sum and aa
the date specified belaw. If not then sold, it will be set up on each succeeding
Friday at u same place and during the same hours until sold. Full particulars
on applicatidn to me.

CLARENCE SAMUEL, KING—Piaintiff

land
NATHANIEL PILGRIM—Defendant

FIRSTLY ALL THAT certain piece or parcel of land situate at
Yearwood's Gap off Black ck in the parish of Saint Michael and
Island aforesaid containing) by admeasurement one rood twenty
seven perches or thereabouts Abutting on lands of L. Cummings
on lands of one Arthur, deceased, on lands of one Corbin on lands
of L, Cadogan and on a Public Road or ho ever else the same may
abut and bound and SECONDLY THAT certain piece or parcel
of jand situate at Brighton Road In the parish of Saint Michiel
and Island of Barbados aforesaid containing by admeasurement
twenty and four fifths perches or thereabouts Abutting and bounding
on lands of W. H, Leach on lands of Blanch Gittens on lands of
one Blackett on lands of Martha Bowen and on a Public Road or
however else the same may abut and bound Together with the
messuage or dwellinghouse and all and singular other the buildings
and erections thereon. é
UPSET PRICE: £1,200. 0. 0.

Date of Sale. 15th August, 1952. f

Herbert Ascough,

NROPERTY.





H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar-in-Chancery.
July, 1952.
31.7,52—4n,
That THE GUIANA MATCH FACTORY LIMITED, a cumpany of British

nationdlity, Manufacturers, whose trade or business address is 54 & 55 Water

Street, Georgetown, British Guiana, has applied for the registration of a trade
mark in Part “A™ of Register in respect of matches, and will be entitled to
register the same after one month from athe 3ist day of July, 1952, unless some
person shall in the meggtime give notice in duplicate to me at my office of

Opposition of such registfation, The trade maric can be seen on application at
my office

Dated this %rd day of July, 1952.
H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.
31.7.52—3n.







apy

24von>



}
| CIGARETTES

onsen silent



That BROWN & WILLIAMSON TOBACCO CORPORATION (EXPORT)
LIMITED, a company organised under the laws of the United Kingdom of Great
Britain dnd Northern Ireland, Tobacco Manufacturers, whose trade or business
address is Westminster House, 7, Millbank, London, S.W., England has applied
for the registration of a trade mark in Part “A" of Register in respect of manu-
factured tobacco, and will be entitled to register the same after one month from
the 3lst dav of July, 1952, unless some person shall in the meantime give notice
in duplicate to me at my office of opposition of such registration
ean be seen on application at my office.
Dated this @ird day of July, 1952

The trade mark

H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.
21.7.52—8n.

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF THE WEST INDIES

EXTRA-MURAL DEPARTMENT



TAKE NOTICE

CHAMPION
That THE STUDEBAKER CORPORA-
TION, a corporation organized and

existing under the laws of the State of
Delaware, United States of America,

address is 635 South Main Street, South
Bend, State of Indiana, U.S.A., has
applied for the registration of a trade

mark in Part “A” of Register in respect
of automobiles, and will be entitled to
register the same after one month from
the 3ist day of July, 1952, unless some
person shall in the meantime give notice
iy duplicate to me at my office of oppo-
sition of such registration. The trade
mark can be seen on application at my
fA

office.
Dated this 23rd day of July, 1952
H, WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.
31,.7.52—3n



in

GOOD USED

FURNITURE

Big & Medium imported Chef-
fonieres with many Fane, Mirrors,
$48 up — Sideboards $36, Big
Larders $12, Liquor Cases with
secure locks $5.50, Metal keeboxes
$20 up, Round Osk Dining Table



A LECTURE
Sw
RECENT WEST INDIAN NOVELS
PROFESSOR A. K. CROSTON

IN THE
HARRISON COLLEGE LIBRARY
N oe

“ON a.
FRIDAY, AUGUST 1ST

TAKE NOTICE
|
AT 8.00 P.M. |

ADMISSION Shes a 1/-
509O5OSS55S05S0S0 $O00nodSe eae



10 CENTS PER «POUND





for 4 or more, $22 Hit, Metal
Ware Drainers $3
Iron Bedstead $8, Old World
Carved Tall Pole Mahogany Be'-
stead $10/ Enamelled 2-drawer i
P with Mirror $9, Smali
r-roBe $20, 42” Fibre Bed
$7, Cot and Cot Frames, Metal
Trunk $8
Railed -Oak Chairs $3.50, Rush |
Chairs $2.88, Round many-pu:pose :
Varnished 20” Tables $3.50, Ladies R |
Work Basket, x |
PIANOS, Portable and Table
Gramophones $20, Banjos $14
x Portable Typewriter % |
4
7’ , 7 s
BUY NOW! 3
%,
v %
4 «
%, a. S,
SL. S. W
x ‘“
> ° . | ¥
> g |
x SPRY STREET. DIAL 4009 % }
y .
PSOCSSSSS9F99 9S SSS 9999S





POTATOES FOR THE
POPULATION

JOHN N. PEREIRA, Rickett Street (East of the
Post Office), announces the arrival of 1,000 baskets of
Medium White-Skin Potatoes ex S.S. “SCHIE” at $5.50
per basket of 55 lbs,

> JOHN N PEREIRA

(COMMISSION MERCHANT)
Rickett Street



|



——






restores
digestion

‘Dolsa’ brings quick relief for indiges-
tion discomforts by neutralizing excess
stomach acid, often the cause of after-
meals distress. One measured dose
swiftly reaches a//theinflamed surfaces
of the stomach with its gentle, soothing
action.

Recommended for:
Indigestion
Dyspepsia
Heartburn
Flatulence
Gastric

acidity, etc,





=

.

IN CARTONS OF 15 MEASURED DOSES







WANTED

HOUSE on long lease by October
on Sea Coast or overlooking sea.
Large verandah, 3 bedrooms, usual
offices, vicinity Hastings, St.
Lawrence, Worthing, Maxwell or
Top Rock Preferably unfur-
nished and enclosed Call K. D.









Edwards 4145 or 2375 ‘





DOLTAR SALE
O

DECCA
RECORDS

BING CROSBY

| Down by the River

When the bloom is on the
sage

It’s a lonely trail

I'm falling in
someone

Gypsy love song

Little Sir Echo

Poor old Rover

Going my way

Swinging on a star

Aren’t you glad you’re you

In the _land of beginning
again

Welcome.to my dream

It’s anybody’s spring

Personality

Would You.

Soon

I wished on the moon

Two for to-night

Empty Saddles

Round-up Lullaby

Just one word of consolation

Dear old gal

Sweet Leilani

Blue Hawaii

Dancing under the Stars

Paiace in Paradise

Speak to me of love

That big base viol

Looping the loop

My inspiration

BRADSHAW & CO.

love with











Ve ah aed
As yy]
AS SLL





|
-
|

GRASS LOADER



+



Steamship Co.
One.

NEW YORK SERVICE.

S/S “ALCOA PEGASUS” sails 8th August — arrives Barbados 20th
S/S “ALCOA PLANTER” sails 5th September—arrives Barbados 17th

NEW ORLEANS SERVICE.

A STEAMER sails 17th July
A sails 3ist July

A STEAMER sails 14th

A sails 28th Ai
A STEAMER epten

sails 11th September

August
September

arrives Barbados 2nd August
arrives Barbados 16th Barbados
arrives Barbados 30th August
arrives Barbados 13th September
arrives Barbados 27th September

piel



CANADIAN SERVICE

SOUTHBOUND
5 Sails Sails Arrives
Montreal Halifax Barbados
“ARGOBEC” : July 15 Juy 20 . August 1
“TYRA” vs a. + oe os July 25 Juky 2B August 11
“A STEAMER” os od ia +. August 12 August 16 August 29
“A STEAMER” + se August 29 September 2 Sept. 15
NORTHBOUND

“A STEAMER” Due Barbados, August 9th for ST, JOHN, N.B. and
ST. LAWRENCE RIVER PORTS.

| one
ROBERT THOM LTD.— NEW YORK & GULF SERVICE

Apply:— DA COSTA & CO.,LTD. CANADIAN SERVICE

<, HARRISON LINE

Na
OUTWARD FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM

Vessel From Leaves Due



Barbados.

S.S. “SCHQLAR”

S.S. “CROFTER”
S.S. “SPECIALIST”

-. London and

ere
.+» London
.. Glasgow and

26th July 10th Aug.
2nd Aug. 15th Aug.
2nd Aug. 16th Aug.



L/pool
| S.S. “TROJAN STAR” ., Liverpool 2nd Aug. 15th Aug.
|
HOMEWARD FOR THE UNITED KINGDOM
Vessel For Close in *
Barbados
S.S. “CRISPIN” S.S. “FORESTER” oe .. Liverpool ist Aug.

For further information apply to

DACOSTA & CO.. LTD.—Agents



WE HAVE

RED ROOFING PAINT
at $4.50 per Gallon
THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM

Corner Broad and Tudor Sts.

AT LAST!

A AYGIENIC
YOUR FLASK

+

TaE SEAL-A-VAC

WILL NOT “POP OUT”

CANNOT LEAK ,

DISMANTLES, QUICKLY FOR EASY CLEANING
FITS ANY 1.PINT FLASK

HIGHEST THERMAL EFFICIENCY FOR HOT AND
COLD LIQUIDS

37e.

STOPPER FOR

EACH.

GENERAL HARDWARE SUPPLIES:

Lae nnd
RICKETT STREET (Opposite Post Office) "PHONE 4918

GRASS
HARVESTING —
EQUIPMENT

Za
bie? yA? \t ea
Arial =
PFT Py }



SIDE DELIVERY RAKE

AVAILABLE FROM STOCK.

Secure Your Requirements Now !

COURTESY GARAGE

(Robert Thom Limited)
Whitepark Rd.

\ Speen PSE = )

Dial 4616












THURSDAY, JULY 31, 1952 BARBADOS ADVOCATE

case eeeeemeneneememmeeneememmemmemeemeneenetemnenesceeeneenne een eae

PAGE SEVEN

| BACKACHE

THE PERFECT | ___ IS YOUR f
CEREAL WARNING:

| Backache is usually the first sign of Kidney
Trouble. The kidneys are the biood’s filters,
When they get out of order, instead of pure, ,
fresh blood flowing to every nerve and
| muscle, your blood stream is heavy with
waste poisons and acids. Then you feel rotten.
Half ac " "s . and = if
tests by fa ee = prove tha
Dodd’s Kid ida your Moed
of excess acids and poisons, Then your
blood is clear—your backache disappears
and your tired feeling is replaced by robust
health and energy. You feel a
Insist on Dodd's Kidney Pills. Only 2/-~
| for large hettle at all chemists. J14

| Dodd's Kidney Pills











HENRY



CARL ANDERSON

-
a










| @® 00D FOR CHILDREN
Watch your children grow up full
of life and energy. See that your
} men and women of tomorrow get
| nourishing foods today! Nourish-
ing, delicious Cream of Wheat is
| easy to digest — you and your chil-
dren will love it! Try it today,










BY ALAN STRANKS & GEORGE DAVIES |

({









































Lal 1 TO-DAY'S NEWS FLAS! }
Y *euceOwire \ i vn i
} LOVAT!I 1D GROWN gt sarcnnanganentigenin-s testicals
rer TIRED OF HER .. f | | Alterations, improvements, and §
A STATEMENT... > \ | IN BODY-BUILDING extensions are teking.iplsce: at
c | JOUNSON'S STATIONERY so as J
} NOURISHMENT to give greater shopping pleasure
| to ¢ nerous customer friends. ‘
| Please Note:—The Hardware
| | tment is now elosed
| | ©. HH, SOHNSON.
| N. JOHNSON
|
|
|

BY CHIC ‘fOUNG





GOSH --!T TAKES A
LOT OF GROCERIES TO
FEED A
FAMILY )

‘“
REGISTERED mrand hanes
need - -

|| SDS areecacell | |
o te 4S. ( oa Cc R E A pi ; NUTROPHOS
Be N | (Ue \

| i"
) A scientific preparation for
| | the treatment of all
|
| | a OF
| I

nerve ills.

YOU EAT WELL, SLEEP
WELL, FEEL WELL

when you take
NUTROPHOS.





REWITCHED,
BOTHERED and
BEWILDERED
That's how you feel when
your nerves are out of
order. That's when you




































BY DAN BARRY IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE
eer eaiialinieterciep ens cacieaamiemeaiisi
| .
ne ee rer na ae SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Thursday to Saturday only
' THE RAMP, FIRING AT THE [7] YOUR HEAT GUN |S [Abi Sue, Rte OU. | eed
wl OF AMW ON, > ’ 7 . = “*
is Be sce tke ce a ae 50. 400K OUT! SPECIAL OFFERS are now available at our Branches White Park,
H BERT CS Tweedside, Speightstown and Swan Street
an Usually NOW MIXED PEEL per ib ie
a, CURRANTS per tb 39
—- KLIM 5-t6h Tins ........... $6.14 $5.75 SULTANAS per tb Ai
vi Rh ‘ PRUNES per Ib 68
; Re COOKING BUTTER 5-Ib Tins .. 4,50 4.30 ASPARAGUS & PEAS 2-1 tins 2.38
; 2 ‘ ‘ ALYMERS LIMA BEANS 45
va\ll i CONDENSED MILK .......... 33 1 SUCCATASH “45
| PEACHES 30-02. Tins .......... 81 5 ‘i GOLDEN CORN 40
ees CHASE—SANBOURNE INSTANT COFFEE per tin 87
GREEN SEAL RUM .......... 1.20 1.00 PEARL BAGO ver a
CARIB BEER ...... eerie teeta .24 20 JELLO PUDDINGS per pkg, ’ BS : \
; BICO ICE CREAM (all sizes)
BY FRANK ROBBINS
eee | ene
IT CAN'T BE TOO FAR . SEE WHAT y .
- H | FROM HERE ...THE CAR I MEAN? ; y 7
PM THE BACK ~ AS St THAT BROUGHT ME ONLY 4 a |
SERVICE ENTRANCE }& ee ’ ROPE FOR FIVE
vsTHIS WAY! yg Wiss , MINUTES / i

ot] Schluggens

CRICKET

The West Indies in Australia 1951—52

CRUSADERS

By HAROLD DALE .





MR. JIGGS - VIAAKE UP!
IT'S FIVE O'CLOCK /--
YO WON'T ENJOY YOUR
NAP AT HOME BEFORE










!

RIP KIRBY

. }

}

og Z
a = See eee ee Mer | . Mr. Harold Dale, already known to Millions
a Uh c, Vv u oi . : - . : .

eee pn garnets ease a of readers for his forthright cricket reporting in
| BE A MINT! PAGAN'S BOOKED AT the Daily Express and the Barbados Advocate
| et wel ie vee ee adds another outstanding book to our series on
—_— A A LD Test Cricket. How would the flashing strokes of



Weekes, Worrell and Walcott match up to the

ll “vs Y. f t efficient run-getting of Morris and Hassett?
our avourite ‘ 3
Read « yoeet Would the spin and guile of Ramadhin and
Valentine be more effective than the menacing

Cricketing Stars— speed of Lindwall and Miller? Would the

“stormy petrel of cricket,” Barnes, succeed in his

GODDARD, ATKINSON, attempt at a comeback? These and the other



questions that spring to mind are fully dealt with
TT in Mr, Dale’s candid commentary. Apart from
‘ MARSHALL, WALCO ’ detailed chapters on the Test, he covers all the

other important games of the tour.

WEEKES, WORRELL. Few cricket enthusiasts could afford the time

and money to be present throughout the “World
$









}
{
\
{
}
y
; Championship” matches. Cricket Crusaders is
‘ es | s | COULD LETGO the ideal ih for the absentee eee
yO ts g] FOR A SECOND 10 by many splendid action illustrations, it brings a
? MGHT IN THE JUNGLE } | . GET MYGUN-++ ¢ ( macmaeribiia aavind vighe th he render ane }
' MAN AGAINST LIONS |} - fy) # BUT | CAN'T |
| ADVOCATE |
| $3.50
| TATIONERY
: per copy ST | |
5












eS

PAGE EIGHT

Out!
Ball in hand

Not Out!
Ball not in hand



Not. Out!

Ball not in hand



Out!
Ball in hand

Know Your Cricket—ww 31

1 SHALL discuss to-day Law
31 which sets out the conditions
under which the wicket is consid-
ered “down”. Since the interpre-
tation of this law often leads to

By O. S. COPPIN

about the bail being “disturbed”
as used to be the case in the old
days and which led to much con-

normally worn.
a player’s hat is blown off by the

For example if

wind and its puts his wicket

“down” he is out,

Wicket Broken

man Jean
swim
star

pearing for the U.S.A, After a long
drawn out duel

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

| OLYMPICS:

F renchman Wins 400 Metres
Free Style Swimming Race

(Trevor Gale Reports From Helsinki)

x . ye
Swimming continues to be the main attraction at the French Design Wins

athle

Olympics now that the
basket ball are the next in pc
finals now played in the stadi
crowds.

tics are over. Boxing and
ypularity while football semi-
um this week also draw good

I have not seen a football match yet as they clash

with other sports very often but the final scheduled tor next

Saturday is a “must” on my

This afternoon the man’s 400 metre free style
main attraction at the swimming stadium.

was well thought of.

It was left to the young French-
Boiteux however to
it out with the Hawaiian
Ford Konns who was ap-
Konno

in which

confusion I have been at some fiygion, With regard to the wicket being |!¢d at firs: then gradually gave
pains to photograph two local If cne bail is off, the M.C.C. broken while the ball is in play {Way to Boiteux only to draw al-
players in action to illustrate the fyrtijer rules, it is sufficient for it must be borne in mind that [most level with him again, the
Law and I am indeed grateful for ty¢ purpose of this Law to dis- even if the bails are off, the Frenchman won by half an arm's
heir co-operation. lodge the remaining one in any wicket can be bowled or thrown j!ength. Third was Ostrand of
LAW 31. The wicket shall be Gf the ways stated. “ down if the ball strikes a stump |Sweden,
ha te bo “Down” if either the } entirely out of its Hole in the ‘ wd
ball or the striker’s bat or per- Still Out ground. Alternatively a player Great Excitement

scm completely removes either bail
t om the tep of the stumps, or if

Â¥ oe beth of the bails be pre-
viously off, strikes a stump out of
«wn. ground. Any player may use
his hand crearm to put the wicket
down or, even should the bails be
previously off, may pull up a
stump, provided always that the
bal os held in the hand or honds
so used.

Not Down

The M.C.C. have pointed out in
thele “Notes to this Law that a
wicket ds not “down” merely on
account. of the disturbance of a
bail, but it is “down” if a bail in
failing from the wicket lodges be-
iween the stumps.

There must be no nonsense

Saturday’s Gall

THE DERBY

If owing to the strength of the

wind the captains have agreed to
dispense
(Law 8, Notes) the decision as to
when a wicket is “down” is one
for
the
circumstances
be held to be down even though
a stump has not been struck out
of the ground,

with the use of bails

the umpires to decide with
facts before them, In such
the wicket would

Further, if the wicket is broken

while the ball is in play it is not
the umpire’s duty to remake the
wicket until the ball has become
“ dead”.
may remake the wicket in such
circumstances,

A fieldsman however

The term “person” includes a

player's dress and equipment as

lops

CANDIDATES

(By BEN BATTLE)
THE best time for the morning was Seedling’s, a box

to box in 1.251/5, with Slainfe as his companion.

The

three-year-old certainly did not have the worse of the gallop
and juoks as if he will be as fit as hands can make him

by Saturday.

Tnis filly worked the same
distance with Cross Bow, in 1.26
and looked very impressive as
she did so I thought this her
best effort to date, and it was one
which plainly showed the mag-
nitude @? the task which faces
her rivals. Rambler Rose, com-
ing from the mile and picking
up Colleton, did the box in 1.26
4/5 which must have been all or
more than her connections could
have expected, In a year with-
out a Bright Light, she would
certainly have a good chance, if
exercise form counts for any-
thing. Dunquerque did her box
in 1.27 3/5, but the fact that a
policy of caution is being pursued
in preparing this grand little
filly, Ought not to cause us to
ignore her. The same can be
said of First Admiral, who was
only allowed to do his box in 1.30.

The Two Year Olds

Only a few of these youngs-
ters worked and if the tales that
ere told concerning them are
hal? true, we must look forward
to some disappointing — racing
where they are concerned. The
Bernard pair Bow Tie and
Faerie Queen, looked best over
4, which they covered in 54 3/5
with the filly having much the
best of things. Jim La _ Rue,
working with Joan’s Star did the
same distance in 55 3/5. while
Superjet look 57 seconds. How-
itzer did a five with Caprice, but
I was only able to get the time
(1.11 1/5) approximately.

The B. Class

The B’s returned some of the
best times for the morning, and
it seems that some of the keenest
racing ill occur in this class.
Sweet locket probably turned
in the best time over 5, — 1.03
3/5, although the time for Fire-
‘lady’s gallop with Trimbrook
was 1/5 of a second faster.

Firelady however had slightly
the worst of things and may not

have quite done the time. No
fewer than 3 horses did this
distance in 1.05 1/5.

They were Flying Dragon

Lunways, and Spear Grass. Spear
Grass worked on her own, but
Flying Dragon had Demure as
his companion and beat her very
badly. Lunways ,was accompan-
ied by The Thing who went re-
markably well and seemed to
have slightly the better of it.
Vectis working with March
Winds came back in 1.07, Over
a box to box Pepper Wine re-
turned 1.24, flat — she is still a
force to be reckoned with. Mrs.

_ They'll Do It

i a rae

T SWELL OFFICE SP. + FIRST TIME
VE BEEN HERE, ALTHOUGH We’VE
BEEN DOING BUSINESS FOR YEARS ¥
OH, BY THE WAY-»WHERE'S THAT SWEFT-
VOICED CHICK WHO ANSWERS THE
PHONE P SHE MUST BE 4 HONEY! HER,
I GOTTA MEET! THE VOICE WITH







HE CUDDLE! SHE'S WORTH AT.
LEAST A MILLION BUCKS TO
YOUR FIRM iN GOOD WILL



‘



Every

Also most impressive, was Bright Light,

Bear and Landmark did a brisk
box in 1.24 2/5 a good, gallop for
both. Beli Surprise also worked
well getting the same trip in
1,24 lw. Castle in the Air pro~
duced the most spectacular effort
of the morning, when he made
two and a half circuits of the
track quite oblivious to his riders
efforts to pull him up. His tem-
perament is his own worst
enemy.
The C, Class

Apart from Test Match who
was sent over four furlongs with
Super Jet most of the C's were
sent from box to box. None did
better than Dashing Princess
and High and Low who got back
in 1.23 1/5, Dashing Princess
appeared slightly the better of
the two at the finish and will be
dificult to beat this meeting.
Cantaquisine worked well in 1.24
2/5. Flieuxce lodking as though
she would have appreciated more
give in the ground, did 1.25,
while Aim Low took 3/5 of a
second longer. Neither Abu Ali,
Tiberian Lady nor Racton were
allowed their heads and returned
1.30 4/5, 1.40 and 1.35 respec-
tively. Doldrum came from the
mile and picked Viceroy at the 5.
She did the box in 1.25 1/5 but
could not get on her terms with
Viceroy. Among those who were
confined to 5 furlongs mention
must first be made of Trimbrook,
This rather leggy and light grey
filly may not be an oil painting,
but she apparently can run ag
her gallop with Fire Lady plainly
showed. The Thing also pro-
duced her best form so far in her
run with Lunways. Embers and
Magie Gaye worked together but
the latter is a long way below
her best form and could not keep
up with the Jamaican filly. The
time of 1,05 3/5 was quite im-
pressive. Street Arab showed
that she is improving when she
accompanied Water Cress in
1,06 2/5,

The D. And E. Class

The gallops of Cross Bow and
Water Cress have already been
referred to (see Bright Light
and Street Arab). Both = are
going well and there should be
close rivalry between them
Colleton had his best gallops so
far when he worked with Ramb-
ler Rose,

The F. Class

With the exception a* Miracle
and May Day who worked a box
to box in 1.29 4/5 the F. Class
were confined to Five Furlongs.
Best Time was 1.07 returned by

Registered US Patent Ofer

‘Time

(
















YOU MEA

MISS ARSENIC:
UR:SUPPOSE~
WE GO THROUGH
THE BOTTLING

















A—
i
t/
'



ANOTHER GUy
; 1S GONNA FIND OUT
Af YOU CAN'T TELL WHAT
A SOPRANO LOOKS LIKE
FROM THE WAY HER





WHERE GILA GOT
|{ HER SWEET VOICE,
SMR HER SOUR O'SAOSITION

can put down the wicket by pull-
ing up a stump with the hand

or hands holding the ball. *
If all the stumps are on the]*”
ground, the fielding side is allow- |”

ed to put back one or more stumps
in order to have an opportunity
of breaking the wicket.

No Bails

In accordance with Law 25 [5
(Dead Ball) if either or both |.
bails are blown off the striker’s |®

a

wiyket before he receives deliv- a

ery, that ball is considered can-
celled but the M.C.C, advise that
in general the captains should
agree to dispense with the use of
bails if the conditions are such as
to make the blowing off of bails
likely,

S
h
h
c

Jean, who

2

concerned about

There wa great excitement

nong the Freneh and although
iere were no tears this time it
as Monsicur Boiteux, father of

provided the human

touch, Running over to the finish
he jumped into the pool fully
clothed and hugged and kissed

is son dozens of times.

I was once again esconed among
cluster of French journalists
nd swimmers and my ears yibrat-
{ to their wild snouts, Madame

3oiteux sat just behind * bat she

seemed too overjoyed even to talk.

he smiled and probably would
ave shed a tear, but the sight of
er husband in the water in his
lothes must have made her more
him than her

son’s victory.

Cricket:

Northants Bat
Well Against

Indians

(From Our Own Correspondent)
LONDON, July 30.
At Northampton today the
Indian tourists ran into trouble
when F. R. Brown, former
England captain, won the toss
for the first time this season and
elected to bat. With Denis Brooks
former England player who hag
toured the West Indies making
156, Northants rattled up 365 for
seven before Brown declared.
Then in the closing minutes the
Indians lost the valuable wicket
of Roy for only three runs.
A century by number nine
batsman Johnnie Lawrence
his second in first class cricket—














t







t







saved Somerset from _ collapse
against Essex at Taunton. After
being 167 for seven, Somerset

rallied to make 325.
SCOREBOARD —

Northants versus Indians
Northants .. 365 for 7 dec’d
indians 3 for one wicket.

Derby versus Surrey
Derby 214
Surrey Talucuiat ee LOL 2

Hants versus Sussex







BOON Tf iy 60a ood Wapeae cs 233;
BUBSOR i LY 82 for &:,
Gloucester versus Yorks
Yorks . eat . 378 for 8
Watton sok, Paty akdiecsy" awe
Leicester versus Warwick
Warwick 126, Spencer 5
for 47, Goodwin ...... 5 for 64;
Leicester ..,..... 118 for nine,

Somerset versus Essex
Somerset .. 325, Lawrence 111.
Worcester versus Kent

Worcester on... 317 for 8,
Kenyon 117.
amorgan versus Notts.
TIOENOUMON 5% iv asters 144:
TRON full ci Pakeeniy uht 130 for 4.





Sports Window

To-night’s Division “A”
Water Polo matches at the
Aquatic Club. are:—Snappers
vs. Whipporays and Bonitas
vs. Harrison College. Play
starts at 8.30 p.m.

There will be a silver col-
lection.



March Winds who is improving
Viceroy and Betsam both covered
in 1,09 2/5 while Soprano work-
ing with Twinkle did 1.10, Cap-
rice accompanied Howitzer and
returned 1,11 1/5 approximately,
while Apronusk working with
Cottage could do no better than



1,12.
The G. Class
Gavotte was sent over a box
which she covered in 1.31 4/5.

The gallops of Cottage, Twinkle
and Joan’s Star have already
been reported.








{4.5 GOT T CALL UP
FROM THE OUTSIDE.
SOME TIME-SHE SURE
SNARLS WHEN ANY
OF US ASKS HER TO
GET A NUMBER;>».

HE ALPINE HAT

MADE A DATE WITH
THE CUDDLE VOICE,
SIGHT UNSEEN*2







THE HATLO HAT TO

ROBERT V. CHENNELL
358 HOLLEY S7.,
BROCKPORT, em

entire
play

Koen in the athletics. This is none
other than John Marshall of Aus-

Boiteux’s time or 4 minutes 30.7

seconds was a new Olympic re-
cord while the next five competi-
tors also beat the old mark. Sur-
prisingly Wayne Moore and Jim-
my McLane both of U.S.A. and
Japan’s Hironoshin Furuhashi, all
hot favourites, came 6th, 7th and
8th in that order.

In swimming there is perhaps
he second greatest flop in the
games after the sad dis-
of Mrs. Fanny Blankers-

ralia who simply cannot find his

BUILD

HEALTHY APPETITES |
and STRONG BODIES

‘MCF.
MO-CHEMICAL” FO)
F000 surritmin

programme.

world record breaking form, ©}
understand from reliable source
that he is very much evertrojned

Of Durm

liar style of slapping the water
with his right arm which he
brings down with

faster than his left.

The ladies springboard
was won as expected by Pat Mc
Cormick of the U.S.A, with Mady
Moveau of France sécond, and
"tle" Zoe Jensen another U.S.A
star third.

Jensen did some well executed Vv
backward jumps with
somersaults as well as a_ back-

ward one and a half to boost the
score in her last three jumps.

Yesterday she had caused
sensation by compl
the board and after she had three
tries the crowd grew a bit angry.
When the Swedish girl came on
and also flopped she ‘too com-
plained about the board and the
judges decided to start the com-
petition again.

a

all ever

Young fifteen-year-old Char-
mian Welsh of Great Britain was
good but patchy and _ obviously
lacked experience. But she was
still good enough to come fifth,

Now that the games are nearly
over the Communist China’s team
have arrived. To do what, no-



has never been able to go on hard

ground; caused a real surprise ut
was the Goodwood this afternoon when he
Record break- came through with a late chal-
ers from U.S.A. and Japan were favourites while the Swede enge to win the Goodwcod Stakes
Ostrand had also lowered some records in the heats and >y_# length from Vidi Vici.

quarters of a length away third
and
Piggott lost his cap was forth.

ter for the first half mile, no one
wanting to make the running. The

Japan's furuhashi also seems to race was run in 37 seconds outside
be off form. He has a most pecu- the record—that shows at what a
slow gallop they went.

a snap much Sycomore II along and increased

3 the pace until five furlongs from
diving home
Veuillin went on.

from
rd. Pat McCormick was and then Vidi Vici on the rails
easily ahead of the others but Zoe and Flighty Frances moved. up.

forward st the distance but then Arnold

al

Goodwood Stakes

From Our Own Correspondent)

LONDON, Juiy 30.
French Design, a horse wno

Flighty Frances was_ three

Grudwell on whom Lester

The field set off at a slow can-

Then Gordon Richards sent

when last year’s winner

Crudwell came to take the lead
Veuillin three furlongs out

idi Vici had mastered Crudwell

brought French Design with a
well-timed challenge and running
on well he mastered Vidi Vici

aining about ©lose home.





Bay St. Boys’ Club
Defeats Police

The second division - basketball
replay fixture between Bay Street
Boys’ Club and Police which was
played at Harrison College yes-
terday resulted in a victory for
Bay Street Boys’ Club with the
score at 27—22

Forde, Barker,

Pollard, and

body seems to know. To-day how-] Sebers sco-ed 10, 8, 5, and 4 re-

ever, it was announced that they spectively

would play in an_ international
football match against Finland.
The Finns are trying very hard
to please everybody but the
Chinese Communists are obvious-
ly here on a propaganda mission.
It is one of the few incidents
which mars an otherwise genuine
Olympic spirit at these games,







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for BS.B.C., while
King, Dodson and Browne scored
14, 5, and 3 respectively for Police.










SSSSSSSS9S

POS S
A GRAND DANCE
i INU
will be given by
MR, CLYDE HINDS & MISS
M. CRAIGG
At their residence

BLACK ROCK
on

TONIGHT

ADMISSION:

































2/-










Music by Mr. P. Green's
Orchestra
Refreshments on Sale

27.7.52—2n



DEMOCRACY
CLUB

There Will be a meeting
on Friday at 5 p.m. sharp
to discuss the First and
Second Days’ racing of our
August meet.

I hope all
will roll up.

There will be the usual
Turkey and Ham and Lob-
ster Cocktails etc. ete,
30.7.52—3n.








my friends








HREAD







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our remarkable watch
and jewelery counter.
Unsurpassed value .. .



















THURSDAY, JULY 31, 1952



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PAGE 1

TIUJBSDAV. JUI.V 31, USJ BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE FIVE Jury Disagree Over Shooting Attempt Verdict Jury Discharged: Case For Re-trial son-in-law took the revolver out of his hand and put him out. At the lime Hope Mid that Llnton was his wile and he was making sport. This ww corroborated by WinHeld Trotman, his son and Collin AFTER deliberating three hours at the Court of Grand Ed* 0 11 •"* wn-ln-taw. Sessions yesterday over a case in which Cariton O'Brien „i n ,i?SS"dTio^m w? Hope was charged with attempting i shoot with intent to lo h lm when he said that he had murder Ursil Lmton, his former reputed wife of Dayrells been making sport. Road, on February 23, a tury told His Lordship Mr Justice While giving evidence Edshiii G. L. Taylor that there was no possibility of their agreeing h8d Xt l** as > ,cd k ,om ,hr w ", un a vmlirt ^^ -*'=--...K nets box when ^ sagged and on d verdict. se-mod about to collapse. This was at 9 p.m. and after commenting that it seemed a simple case and he saw no reason why they could not Threat agree at a verdict, His Lordship discharged the'iurv. The -. cpl „ cl 5 0 5 h ? s !" Sw,1 >' E l,p ...:n i fi.j * nUcIc Rnck Sub Station s.iiil tha' Farouk May Leave Soon LADY SAVAGE OPENS SOCIAL CENTRE isi I OF CA.'Kl Juh IB Parouk >f Kgypi pent an rxiir on ft • From I'.ir 1 elan soil, sleeping in •' Matt trading, also sewing and cooking hotel room here: but indication* elaagea be organised, were lii soon he "ft ; s the inteniion of the ComReporta that Parouk mmaa of the St. George's Social planned to leave short 1> — mmt ^.mrc Ihiil il be run on similar that fund, and I look upon the commu'ulv central as being cornshows, concerts, lecture-. plementar>' %  '•d %  P*' 1 ' ,hl case will be retried Counsel for Hope was Mr. E. W, in 1I6. Hope Barrow, while Mr. F. E. Field, on living together. Acting Attorney General, prosehad several Quarrels cuted for the Crown. unions. Hope had been charged on two She had been friendly counts. The second count was Hope when hi ed support from the I ia of mot.than -i' 11 otaeai oil %  %  night from ih. Royal Yacht 'Mahroussa". which can i rch Into vxJ %  "There are three gentlemen I libers of ihe Commlttc iinvc to improve the standards of living of the people. "You may not know that I am a very Jealous person—jealous for Barbados. I admit I dislike hearing reports of things being done better In other islands, because I nm certain that the Barbadian is Jus* as capable—I would say more . ... he had had occasion to interview / ormcr m „ I-^TW \TH "OP* ln 66BMa*laB with thrwta [ mey naa Linton had alleged he had made parouk WM up before noon and *" to her. and Hope told him that if appeared brieil. Linton lived to see the end of the i lu icony overlooking the colourivil with the Social Centre who to,* a leadJ^V"-"th^" a"T*hS ^S mg part in the planning and crccinAtan A nd yet 1 am told-on non of ihis building, who 1 regret good authority—that the developto say are not with us this altermpn t of community centres and norni They are our late Rector community life in Jamaica is far Mr. Dowh-n. who was Chairman of ahead of our achievement in Barihr Committee. He resigned his bados. There Is no reason for it n urn in, MM nw" ..%  —— trarnrns MIIMI I —— — %  -—•—a ... I'XKHIV I to \ a be SO. I will not listen to the attemutina t<% nM was ,he lMt wiUM ?" in '"** ** a whn '* T 8n,rt J !" '"J-nalca's gain. Barba^d.re 1 say we Barbadiansare SsSmJVor^fisShle !" num. W be ^WJ* h nnr du to J dfm |nd to (lo .pok,. „,., v ,, v „ lt dotra leaa. too individualistic and non-coT^UegM^offence was the Sw&-i?ftethenewmShsS f Hope threau-n.ng to kill l.m,.m .„ r „ rril £ %&*, batterspirits Mr de Vlera our late ChurcnopcraSvc. You have put Barbados t*it or hr,fc i.*.t t*!* 21. Vki .. month had Wednesdaj morning than he warden who was keenly LnUeeat„ n the map in so many ways; you Defence did on Tuesday Dig. In the Sov-al Cent,., .esigne-l have led tha Caribbean In sugar Mr. Barrow in addressing Uw,. dona) send-oft given hlm Dry in December, 1 regret production, in education and in jury told them that if Ussa war .< Rgyptian Royal vacbteto say he is no konaai anal, ua, he.dth %  arvteea. Surely you can 1 satisfied thai the accused attemptMi DowtUng ajan resigned the l*M a lead to the Caribbean in to have attenuated ,. j^Th^T i„'^..'"il.lll "^"u" !" 7ZXZS * Io sho ' .M nlan -. but thrm, h I '":'' >?t "Pk*r Vostrj in December, he WOUld &• flevelopinent of family and end of each month and return was the few days after the new month had break in the friendbegun. She had written one letter ship between Hope and Linton. it that she remembered to Dr. Lloyd was given In evidence, and a reStill of the Mental Hospital, hoplusing on Llnton's part to renew ing that Hope might be compelled the friendship. He was alleged lo pmy her for board and lodging. attempted to shoot her. In this letter, she had accused but due lo a (lcieclm iho-.Vnl'.^r' iinl"i "iZZ^M*? I.V" !" I !" T.'; n d" 1 "" ' hls P" n ""' %  volvcr El Buhor" was lied up t th UfH havr hn-n wllh ua IKI arirrnnui 5S& a — M -, Saw.^ HM^.TIH: .. as man and wife for about seven h ari he ..! anvth.na 1A h^, Linton who was capabte of writing had he said anything to her. Two ved 1 reel 1 mutt mention Sir, th.it %  i Ol St Georges iiwo a great debt of gratijude to %  Sit Laurie Pile without whose generosity this large playing Held would never have been .. %  luired by Welfare Limited, and rt iver, after his death. !" h.n Kosart'lH' Watfaae Limited went Into liuiU resence7had "given"the~Centre a tenon, the Directors of Bulkelev good start. His Excellency had Limited consented that the playing not only given the Centre a good Held be sold by Welfare Limited start by his presence but also by U the C.overnnient at a reasonable what he had told them. price for the benefit of the ParishHe felt quite sure that His Ex!v life. "1 shall be told that these are just words and what is wanted If .ition 1 agree. That is the job of the people of St. George and of all Barbadians." His Excellency concluded. Vote of Thanks Hon. 0, D. L. Pile. O BE., M 1, C in moving a vote of thanks, said that His Excellency nd Lady Savage, through their lar colonial vessels ar2"*. ""l "**.S.il Sim'3 St " cylinder contained two daughter, saw Hope llrst when.he r „, bb „ brought !" pra. white „7 n c „ ,. p,,', „,'„,,, _On Ihe Saturday even.ng of the H V e cartridges. The automatic ramp """ ,h ? ""• nd "i"!/' l>eans fresh fi ull .. „„,„,, furniture for the wa home in heimechanUm for rotating the cylf. v '" ln when she ran behind Keneral cargo. She also had on building. pulled mder was defective, but the cylSt!?".,!*!! ..!L.f ... he !" ?!?S baird four pass.-.i The Social Centre Commlllcr offence she wa, home in her mechanUm '"for"'rotating "the"""yi""',"" "l? 1 shedroof when someone pulled mder was defective but the cylBtrker that she had heard the gale and called. She recogmder could have been easily put cUck h,to Barker said he had Both veaaeli nised tho voice in Hopes, and |„ rotation with the fingers and heard aeveral. He said that when the 1 Ml Mm „M.!f-i 0 ".! "V *?,! W b """ •"'Charged by cocking the !" g ,' ou nd witnesses telling deHon. him pushing the gate with one hammer and pulling the trigger liberate falsehoods, they had to By so doing, he had been able ?" k themselves If they would not lo discharge the two bullets It ^ committing a miscarriage of -2 a"^ S, l m "['I"' contained when II was brought to justice If they convicted the JiJJ JH!*J! do wilh it and he hlm H e produced Ihe shells of "ccuaed. replied that two shot, were in it. y,, discharged bullets After Actually, the charge was on!" one was for her and one for him"if'Shas been criticised for not openinif district. community life Mr Pile reminded the young people that the Centre was nol for them nlone but also for the sieii to spend quiet evenings. "One day In the course of nature, you will also belong to the older brigade". Kg hinted to the youngsters of the hand and in the other he held a revolver. She cried i 365 PiMwengefi 11 Iran-it Onitru/il" Aseoelalhc Centre earlier, but Su. would like to ask those critics to remember that the building was handed over to the Vestry by the Contractors during October last year, up to the middle of DeeamIri we were verv husv preparing for and staging the General Election. '• Ills Excellency and Lady Savage afterwards inspected the Hall and the grounds Two l-.lde of India trees were planted by His Excellency and Lady Savage While touring the grounds. His Excellency took the opportunity lo have a chat with some of the cricketers and footballers of tin gcttier. she could not live with another man. She ran out and was within ft yard and a half of him when he K in ted the gun al her and she ard a click, but no bullet came ..„ from the gun. She held him and mean hat (old her daughter who was In the yard to take a stick and knock the revolver out of his hand. Her daughter did threw It over the paling. He struggled to get Harr. College Wins \i:ii-liin-/ Shield For bright clean and healthy floors. furniture and linoleum passing through four inches of ? nc .. f a !" ntlnuoua series of traps [frtdjetown of the bullets had for "P p which Linton used 10 u the 395 H made a hole in a zinc plate. practice and was the committing from tha BA Hraill "trolled uo made an application to Governon his face ,H would appear as Cross-examined, he said that it * a Public mischief Just as the and dsJWJ the main streets. Tin' men! for an extra grant of money though ihe answers he was recelvwas difficult to gel the hammer had tr| ed to make him lose hi.s BNB, O'clock fa assist them in carrying out the ing were verv satisfactory. of the gun to strike the pin. If *^: ta the nontlrig, %  making betf plans thev had In view. I am one pulled the trigger and a shot e Pinted out that Linton had third trip to the Llland this year, nleaiwl to say Sir. that Governdid not go off. it would have sworn *hat she had not seen Hope Six passengers arrived by tho ment very magnanimously accedit that a shot was not in the * r aDout a week before the date Braill foi K.irbodo* They were .d to our request, and that money or a proper alignment had of lhe offence, and then her Godfrey King. Mn > Cberrie became available during the llrst not been made daughter had positively said tha"Majnrie C'herrie. F.vernr.l Patln. week of June, we made an attempt Joan Linton' Ursil Linton's he ,11 "' ron > p at their home Ihe prelYanew Aaostinl and Monica to open the S 1 Ct ntre in June and pirklng it up. daughter, corroborated that Dart vious morning and had made AfOatUlL '" < %  ''•'' '" obtain the service* ,.,_,.,„ ^„ llM M„ I rad. Ihe 'evidence ,„.n oy Vr ft_ *& gS^ --.%*$• """" " "" *• "^%i ?lt J^ Bahin. Rio, SantOg. Montevideo "We then started U. carry out ^dsi Int-<;Ompany fie Shout %  nd lam-Los A...She ^ on her cartata work win.h had our *5^JS l S!irJ!l^*s*tsem ground somewhat disllgure.1 The *M* P |acp at SlisaS The vessel is consigned to "The Committee was Informed Hall on Friday ^* r***!" Messrs. n. M. Jones & Co. Ltd.. il>t V"i Sir were not taking par' * %  """* ,0 al •" a2b JSB Agents f.ir Monre-Mit'ormoek > functions of this desn.oti.m geJWOJt HO. 1 Cvnp ^WWm aaaann l ;,-..., until Court mourning for our late and C onibrmiere Sehol her and l" Meaars. V, her, and added that since Joan, Linton's daughter had a She had blc vcle mere should have been earlier In town on the no fcar "'."ope catching her. to "side when H^'Ame'Ti'.' dav " '"" *> "<> ot h r mother. ,,.?"" ^^ had a J u ln his In* tV 0 ied ld ro 1 g h er.t H ner. eanie "' she reached home before he ££ %<8?* OUM "* haV came. She had thrown the gun „' a S.Vi'• .„ ,. „ Go Ahead and Shoot er Ihe paling because she was M S r h 1 | l a 1 *5 h "„ C5SH2! Ho,a, lold Barker Ihat If he did '"'U thai if she had Atempted Si? .'hTdef.ne. wo !" W have^en not move he would shoot him. "> <•}•'< lo " • ^ police he ,„ |h urr ,r w^^a Inke ., 1 I," Tw TT ta '" I !" 11 "* pun and when Barker renlied lh a ,f would have pursued her. She J"' „i J i, .w !!i.. w j clieons of fancy molasses at the h?w wlS to niS^he m'gn! ^m.^ed that W had ridden to $£>££*£. hflI de,CnCP *"\ gj ; '-< ^ - the M.V as well go ahead and do it. Hope he Police Station. When Hope Th ... SSS\ f^SZ w"'e h poinlcd the gun at Barker and she -eld the revolver and she heard lo .^ h j mo V a ls of the wit* WnM heard another click, but again no *• click, but nothing haooened —I -5S ETJ? !" bullet came. She ran from behind E and Hope pursued her. and lowed her into the house of Joyce Moore which she entered Some men who were Moore*! relatives, held Hope. After this ahe fainted. Under cross-examination, she as to Linton running to him and thinking that Linton had' admitted that she had gone clinging on behind him. He said him lose his Job, nnd had laker through a form of marriage with that after he had told Hope that him to the altar falsely. Hope although she had been if he was going to shoot he could He reminded ihem of tinl St. Lucia when Hope and she Robert Trotman, father of Joyce •went through the form of marMoore at whose house Linton had mge She had never actually fled, said that he was going at separated from her husband but his daughter when he saw Linton and that Hope point' ishe had heard that he was dead, running towards the house and ton and tried to lire it the only She said that Hope and she Hope chasing her. When Linton verdict could be guilty. were friendly before her husband ran into the house and Hope folHe reminded them of the threat* •went to St. Lucia, and after she lowed her, he went in and held and aald that these prored "'< had been convicted for bigamy him around his neck while his intention beloved King terminated on the Company was third 31st May. The details of the scoring i Wi %  TOUM hive opened earliei fallows — • ,!>. su hut received information that the Members of the band were i-arnlng a well deserved until the 251 h July. %  There is still a lot to he done in furnishing the building and in levelling the field, but I t> I l lira Sir, that with co-operation of the Monroe i-anshlnners m the near future o arid the M\ Ten;. EfOvU ,, Al |l have a really first class Dnl '-. A centre run on cultural as wHI as recreational lines. And judging ncc is loading by what 1 observe taking place ested Hope, in nad becn n nwd of mmSSTivSSSSSSiAJS P W*"? 2 I %  *• n "' W •molasses for Newfoundland. The Kverton Weekes and Valentine Is Station who connection with the attempted csla bUsh their case, counsel for shoolmg, said that Hope did not the defence had brought out such make any statement. a motive in his cross-examination. Seibert Barker gave evidence y or ti co .ji d he that Hope was N<. nouth, taking hor lot SeoUa. not go off that did not exculpate*! Hope. If Ihey were satisfied tha*t the weapon could have gom ofll and that Hope pointed it .it Lin!" ANNUAL MEETING OF SUMMERHAYES CLUB The annual general meeting of 'the SummcThaves TenhJ Qul win take place to^norrow at the %  i Fifth AvenUCi hi Neville al 8 p.m. H MMH $JDAQph The Finest Range in Town TABLE KNIVES $1.35 DESSERT KNIVES @ 1^2 TEA KNIVES Co) MI BUTTER KNIVES @> 1.28 TABLE FORKS @ 1.67 DESSERT FORKS (S> 1.16 CAKE FORKS f. 1.10 i8Si£g />/iiV) The murder case Reg. vs. Verona Jsckmsn iset down for hearing to-day. going to be challenged severel) ended Mr Yearwood. Governor's Address His Excellency, in his address. snld: "My wife and I are very pl< aj ed to IKpresent here his afternoon and to associate • urOOOa again with the development of community life in Barbados, "You will not want me to repeal what I have said in St. Andiew, aph and In Christ Church about community centres and the blessings of the labour Welfare • Fund. In the last two years I I ave I seen visible evidence of improvements in homes all round the .wintry, provided by loans from Oeanaaaa HARRISON COIXEOR ( S.M Hinds. L K. 17U, Rudder. G. M. Cadet Jordan. G, A. .. 85 C/2LI. Held, N. E 0 Sgt. King K. I) P I Cadet Johnson, P. A D. .. 83 Team Score 526 No. t. Cwnpany I.OIK.F. hCIIOOL Cndet Gill. T. C 65 ( 21.1 Hayne. I. D. .. 84 C/1U Chase. P. D. E. .. 8S ( SM C-ldnrd. P H. .,86 Cpl. Humfrey, J M. P. .. 83 Cadet Johnaon, L. E. C. .. 66 Team Score 484 Ne. 3. Company COMBERMERE SCHOOL Cadet Clarke, C. B. L/Cpl. Carter. H. G. Cpl. Lokey. V. AS. Cpl. Goring. L. F L/Cpl, Harrlaon. C. L/Cpl Lewla, K Team Score 464 TABLE SPOONS @ -•* DESSERT SPOONS r d I.U SOUP SPOONS @ l-> TEA SPOONS @ * COFFEE SPOONS @ M SUGAR TONGS f w 1.4* FISH EATERS per pair Ti 3.67 6 Piece* CANTEEN SETS Q SK3.7a CAVE SHEPHERD & CO.. LTD. 10, 11. 12. & 13 BROAD STREET "" Il ll lll l l ll i VACATION! HARRISONS DIAL 2352 BEGINS WITH A SPLASH! See our lovely Ladies' Bath Suits SATIN LASTEX In 1 Plere and t Plere Styles Prom SI144 to S2C6 FLOWERED COTTON From 17.M to WOT WOOLLEN In 1 l-i-. .• and '. Plrc. Slrlea from 110 M lo 51', or. &f CHILDREN'S BATHSUITS 6? Flowered Cotton From It.IS to 17.50 WOOLLEN From Toddler** to Girls' Ktara From 62.13 to 66.M Agent A & S Bryden A Son, Ltd. Barbados MAR MITE IS EVERYONE'S fitnett FOOD Mirmlio hoop •varyoA* flitor. Bf adding Marmiw to our moali ovtry diy. w .trtngthen %  bodlet lo rint chilli and di.am; w gt more i from avarrlhing w tit. and childran are aiiurad o* a ual Mira to rnjlp lham grow up uurdy and fit Martnif* H dtlkloua in dnhoi, toupi. lavoiiritt — and iandwKh. Cooka lik* rtarmHo alio bcaui a |ar laiu imh a long tuna. MARMITE VITAMIN FAMILY B FOOD FITNESS FOR LOWERED VITALITY! TAKE TOJXMi 1 WINE '• It Slimululcs UM Ni'ivrs, tntiofaaj the blood and builds up new reserves of s1r<-ni;tb which is lacking when you are feeling below p:n 5/1. and 10 KNIGHTS LTD. All Branches WHAT A Hffl ASSORTMENT OF l.l'OiHillN? r"orlh< fiimiJy OCTOOW S11AI' Par Cake s SAI.ISHUHY CORMtO ktUITOM per Tin WALLS 0XFOBD BAUSAOU .... CAMI'IIH.I.S l-OKK I BIAM • •• .SWIfTS VIENNA SAI.SAUKS MORTONS col) ROB .. SOUTH AFRICAN ROCK I.OHSTKll .. .. AYLMERS SUCCOTASH .. .. LYNN VALLEY OOLDBI CORN AYLMKI'S TOMATO lOtC* Lars* AYLMEBS TOMATO II II 1. Small AYLMERS FHUIT SALAD P" Tin g all. BUTTER CONCENTRATE .. MB • <"> %  • DANISH HAM SAUSAGE -'• CIUVKIIS MASHED POTATO POWDER ..per .. HEINZ CHILI SAUCE PH UolUc DANISH SALAMI SAUSAGE p,T m 1 COCKADE FINK RIM Stansfeld Sr.nii H Co, Lid.



PAGE 1

P M.I BARBADOS \i>*"i ui nil BSDAY, HILT M. Utt Ccudb Cailinxj. H IS K\ %  g* Social %  I H 111 F I kti a H AdM A ...,ti. MT.r.. Mr. F'fd Coddurrl. M.C.P.. Dr H. C, Cummins. M.C.P Mr. M. ft ( >x. Mkw Bettv Artif. Mr. A G. Jor.lnn. Mr. and Mm. C C. U I. C. Moure, Mi and Mnt. H. G. Ycanvond. U M,^DiiPh !" ?M>..fr, Mr. and Mrs Cyril K?if*r. Mi\ Almira Almry. HlM Nellie Pill. htn w Dattta H. Q s Hf.hin*>n, Canon C. C. ConUfft nnd Mm, Conltlte. Hrx. ;.nd Mrs. Co-aman, H. waile, Mr and Mi* W. B. C-irn ion. Mr. Bruce Moulder. Mr and Mr*. G. A Filzgnald. Mr. Mtd Mrs. McKenzie. Mr and I n Herbeil WTkr 1 *. Mrs dc Vkn, Mr and Mrs. E. M. ShilMone, M A. D Ntcholls. Mr and D. A V. Weekes. Mr. Mrs. W F Brathwaile, Mr %  I V** 'I ^B M' af' Majo %  MI The tirograrr prescnled be o\ IJVDY 8AVAOE op*n Hi* R' Qeorg* Social Centra after bolng introd.icrd to membsr* of th Playing Field* Commute* and the Vestry For Trinidad Pott M B. D. S. COZIER, a Barbadian and old Harrisonlan. at (>< % %  Mrs ent Suprrinlendrnt of Police in i'.li Borneo, has been transmd lo Trtnldad at an Aarlstan* Choril Society Stages Success/at (Concert The Barbados Choral Society su:ed its annual concert on Tuesday main ,,t the C'osnber• pacKed %  ltd appmiattve audience, litExwlsancj C rvfBOr, and L.I.IV Savage, accompanied 1 %  m Pfivoic ttary also attandjad, which was •n*enty n*emv usual standard. The Isst of many old favourites which forth round* of upplause frc the audience pcrh.ipworthy n.entioii was (lie Six-Part MoM — -There an Old iu-licf Parry. This m sung >'• mesnoi> of the late President and VloPresident ArclKlcn..n Shanklar.l and Charlie Elder. The Saxophone Quintet |sjd I > Bandsman Prince Cave rendered a group of tunes in the Usual style that' pupils of Captain Ratson would perform them. Mr. Bruce Si. John, baritone, also rendered familiar airs WIMI Caribbean Repreaentalive deep %  < effective lone with w "Toreador's Song From 'CarR G WEBDALE Caribbean men' as the most ouUtandlng. stationed in 1 Don't Want To Get MarThe Toys Took a Train Trip —Thty Went All ine Wmy to Air. LISTENING HOVRS ruSd'-'l h drew B, MAX l K. I l IT wan't aa thoueb Knarf had nnttd it to hapoan. It ) %  • "PK r.d. quita of It. own accord. And th. moal .realm thin, of .11 -•• that ovorrono olw waa aloof"iin him >hn it happened, ao that no nn. roold po-ibly aa. bta> •."" Kn.tf Juat dreamed ll.TI.ey eooMa l ell dream it! Knarf had clhaoed on Uio enirtn. „r in. train that stood in th corner ,.i Iho room. ria-ht und.r th. canary caiia and iho ireranlum plant, rnon rmviled ..eiyone olra to coma on UH train. "All aboard!" h. ahouUd. "All aboard!" Ilanid and Mr. Punch, and i.o%  iil Tin Ih. tin .oldlcr. and Maryrai-rfoll. and Toddy tha ('.car all looaad up. ..board!" Knart ohoutad a Hurry up! Wa'ra loavlnf In iirunsriAv m.\i H M at at I.7.W 1 5 ] I S p m MM**. S St P .m | r, *.'^ TH* Nrwi 10 P %  *> Tfti *. • U p "< T 1 14) pm Sporlina B c >W ,a-'dt % IS It aUatlntrH 1 %  •" %  -• ~ •"— ^. -Ednanal.. S St iKo*-... 0 OS p VarttSJ K,aw SMMT-. I • V ... r*.,..i-i i p aad nasj %  "* %  i % %  s NMrt T**. 10 l* a 1 i %  n mart Wisjgti lh "•In gon." ,n.l I..ill*. How did lhay know it was Africa T Because, when they looked out of the window of the moving tram. there llwy % %  lions and tigers ard gbatfaa. They taw strans:* "s M L Kepresenl.tli Trinidad, of the Criltal Manufarnad" — Spanish Folk Song Mrs. E Thorntoi.. Sgt. and Mr* Superintendent. Innlss. Capt and Mrs Gr.nU. Captand Mrs. Ralson. Major and r l ihc Vl • Treasurer. Aftir ihe opening o( the Pellet Land, conducted by (apt (' K li those present lo MRM ii\cly music . of England, returned s "i n b > the Ladies sjao carried an Aasi^tant Master begueat at the Ocean View Hotel Amateur Horticulturist %  .. %  V..1 lUrrlson lights of the evening's peril ance Scenes from "King Ol.iT an Aaalstant Master' of the S. AltiatdUr Horticulturi.t giJgs'^J^tJ&gS 1 V.ncenl Grammar School which m*R. S W VOUNGHANS, PreslHudson and The Invitation'to th* he held Irom 1931 to 1941 |yf d( n of Younghana and Cole. Dance by Weber brought ihc a, „ .,„,, ,*.„ c, tfinemi Police Insurance AgvnU of ^flamt. left programme lo it* i M" r STlT .-ri.n. hi. leave An amalamr horticulturlat. Mr. efforta The Barbs...*, choral ive Yminghsn^ ha* been m Ihe West s.-cu-t^ *ai i a sucIndJaa for the past three weeks cessful concert of Hi. >• standard collecting seeds and plantawhlch nnd the music loving publii ( .Li p-nding his leave Si. Vincent before going to Trinidad. Be u u uneta of Mr Harm%  ; i^ Cower, former Miinaginti For One Month S PF.ND1NG i> month's holida> In Barbados are Mra. D A. Pi* '""! hW vJ.^ei? in Thev m arrived U. 'i'Vi'"' %  '"." 7 SEZE9 ,e •"" TiVady"nt be'ck to Miami. BraTtefui bran evening' a^enti/. calbo. Venezuel.. Iht, amved M Uir l( lhf B; .rb..dos A Y !" While in ihe Caribbean, he visited tnlnmenl in an island where an 1,, l_ Jamaica. Trinidad, (irenada and opportunity of hearing good D-Hniiiicti before coming bar*, music Is rare "i*-" During his short stay in Barbedna, K l( T i , r.. he Wi a 10101 at bhe Hotel Royal Trinidad Director %  1 m tm Recovering; ,| 'i'i li H/r k %< •X"E many friends of Mr Hutfj 1 ( II' \\ A | \ MONG the passengers amv, ,,Mi. CaclUi U %  -** %  aaa_i vvr^m i„HM (.rrt.v mnminc from Directcof the I. J Williams arrived s>jn,, r „f the ''BarbadM AtivtM-alc .... Sunday by B.W.I.A. and are .„„, .,, |(ipwnl A -slslant Informa"' gucsta at Maresol Beach Flats. Si llull oflScei of the Caribbi Lawranci Oao Mra. I'rlor'i husband is cmployed wilh the Shell Oil Comi Marucaibo. On Holiday MONG the passengers arrlvura Miss Cecil nn; vesterday morning from DM.H)Cof II I irf Port-ofson Chandler, Overseer of thr Melle Fart, i %  > srooM l>e glad to that %  covering from By Be&chcombec S AM Keturned to Jamaica by the S.S. Bro:il wain I Co., Ud. Mr. nnd Mrs. F. E. Agostlnt trtal he aefwad tag over for two weeks 1 l.y 11 .A. and Is holidav which they are spending I, as guest* al the Hotel Royal. Mi Agoatlnl, a Director of Agostim Bros. Ltd. Commission sr-|( K L STUART. Regislrai Agents Of Port-of-Spaln. has \J ,, f hr H-spital of the Uni| llarbados on several ocvr ,.,.., ( -,,n, M ,.^ the West Indies __ R JENK i NS Featurea Yesterday the .unique shop castons before. He was here two has lcf) llC „ t \,my after spending jyi ;. .: „,. nf ,.' T -_ Wfl rt received a picture of fruit signed ,,_^c„ h. .pen. two day, jjl^kljlj* ^5^2 LcrLl" ."„„ Hnl'jJSSiS l !"!" ^?,^''"^ Barbados for a month's m once rnng up Codfonh. What the injuries suffered ry-le nccldent last week. CAM CODFORTH is what He is still a patient at the TerLj Fbutenough oalla tempapii-enteniry Ward at the General mental; n useful adjective wrficii Hospital. covers pretty well everything from if aaa alcoholic frenzy to mare lomreaturet tditor fooieo-. Keall* ImperlsBt At Ihis Teddy, who didn't he disturbed unless it as really lh tUt ,„„ leares and grea important and intarerttrig, said oml blossoms. They saw m-.m.*) "Where's the train going > They saw a herd of sebrss dn-h. "Just around Ihe room. Oeneral | „„„ lh# imcks ahead of the tr-> Tir. said. "No. much of a trip. Noili| ^ n m HMtnbm i., K to see but four walls and a lot | of lurniturt." Ilanid and Mr. Punch and MaryJane were all about to say that thai diJn't thin* ihey cared to go M a u.in-trlp. when Knarf .u*J''J i Hid tn a etry loud fsjleai Ail aboard for-for Africa! Allaboatd %  For Africa*" eveiyone .aid. "Africa!" So they Instantly crowded lo gel aboard th train, for it isnt ev. r day in the week lhat you can caic.i a tram going lo Africa. Tha monwnt Ihey were all on. Knarf yanked the bell. The engine gave a snort. Uia wheels gave a whirl, and soon ihe t-ain was rattling along Iht rails. past the sofa and Ihe chairs and the t, r k? Yes. hew are we *n a>" tail it to -•* Now Knarf never really expected It was as simple ircll"" %  •"' the train to go lo Africa. Ju'l h going their BadaMl Qamral Tin said, he esnecled il to turned agam. |ut as ih. v %  go around tha room. Hut all at on-t, | the edae af Ihtocean *,* % %  < lust at tha train was going aruu i was a moment of dai a curst it turned sharnly BSHB I tat-o. wgaa MV litrht aaaftn i.lnnged straight into the booken-e. Irain was back in the room li ra Knarf shut his eye! Ever)one to a stop. hut his ayes! < *" %  on) * r wl, n R Rut ihert wss no crashr.o Cotati i leiaVea goad kokat llkeg. ttftea. There was fust a mm i • f frte that he aw a big Anlmat I darkness, and then when Knai snd Ij hug DffH en tha ht •hell the others opened their eyes Sgam. nr.o-. the book .xe.e two lUtl there they wtrt in Afncal .tracks! tatThey saw eltphants tearing fruii off the tops of tall-trees They aw cr^codilesandhippopol amuses bat liIng in a ri They aw |.n.i-ie with feathers the colors ol ihc ranbow. They saw deer and wilu gaats. Ihey saw vultures and aafjlej Tl i v %  aw every animal thai lies n Africa, and all Ihe birds and all H e insects. Knaif couldnt brlteve hi" ares ihe atlas** rauidal battavo il < > eve-. Bui Ihis was Afiira. Tl t could be nn doubt about il. Meanwhile Knarl kepi Ikiuk' i tn himself: "How did *• %  gel h*'. Ar!t how are we ei < nhe STARS*r roi iNDnriDi'AL Honoscore THURSDAY. JtLY 31. 1*52 TAomua %  d. April 21 May 30 (1KMIN1 day 21— JOB&f Look in ihe section in which your birthday comes and A( find what your outlook is. according lo the stars. AVM Hold back a bit. We all fore better when %  March 21—AarU we don't jush Ihings. take foolish chances ^ or speak out of turn. Move in sone. veil organized manner. * o. Be content with moderate gains. Some uncertainties to-day. A safe attitude rather than any blustering, hit-or-miss method ^t. Mimscd. Don't worry. • • Go conscientiously about duties. Paas uu ^ an the unsure, needlessly hazardous and stick to what you really understand. Be very careful in money, legal issues. -ft . l K CAWtTEH \ day to promote essentials, improve when ^ June 21—July 23 iin< | W herr you can. and hold to a good ^ schedule. Don't hopscotch around, nor be drawn into useless argument. * * You rather daring people of the Lao clan seller take wise precaution* and ramain ^ calm If you've been going a hectic pace ^ * Sort of day that gives ample opportunity w to domonstrale your sound, clean thinking. ^ Be expressive but not over-anxious carrying out Job. w • n part for other than roui business. here. Mr and Mrs. F,. A Stuart of •'BrtHiahd-m' '. Black Hock holiday. They arrived on Tuesday SH&tS Ait e nd.d C.n.r.l Mcelitt UfiSfif" m ""*" ^ *' Xil^ii '^ Spe t Three Week R ETURNING lo St. Kill n W I A. thin inominK in Ml— C 0-L.um.lui. Ca.hicr or ArchlAll" NESTO " Mz '"*<' bald Agncl. She ha. own ftrro 11 of Ilottl... I.ta.. Trinidad. , ^ Ifcirbatioe for the ,.s, IhMI *. on bus,rolurnr,! h. m Mrtkn m lu !" k ^' fa r .mcrthen m r natal coupled with pleasure a a by B.W.I.A. after apnidlnil about ||n|[|ia tfueid 0. Mrs. Arthur Cadwttan ot three weeks in Barbados. II devil Ted' business why i. VeUaquez ig? Who's coins to Mr. Jenkins who has bran at*• .'"'" JKA.S SST he,l to the nilllaa*. .inc. IM. ? %  %" hawIM Codforth. ;H Ihe it^_.a l-...^ _jf — i i_ :it_ j hoUdayi (lr;" %  : %  'V,' 1 .'" %  Sagaa," shouted Codfor^. Hill. St. Michael for Ihe., daugh.. And vour €liKtomm ^^^ know M R. ROY SKINNER of the ler Hazel on the celebration of VcllthingamegigV Christian name N'.i iial Cash Register. Trim,ier 2,sl birthday. anyhow. Nor do you. And let dad. arrived here over \hc wCfk c -TI_ +~ — %  %  me tell you lhat the Constable you BW1A. on a bu por I nrM <'< ordered is signed'FYeda.'A woman) gg | at Cnrrab; On Business Twenty-first Birthday /"\N SATURDAY nUhl last Mr CROSSWORD i " I" J 4 r • ii m n> it A RRIV1N0 Thiiradaj s Mr. lx-ltoy ,e over from i been workexpect to remain m trtnldad HosaL J\T> for a W "'" las*, -icffrev M irtm ilao ol Glllen nKi I..I < %  %  < Uirnlnsj home. Watlonal Caah Ragdatar who hag Curacao wherr he hi Mr Burton i> Plpl Line Conbean ban fOl %  OgfMtlma, will bo ui| for the pasl fix yearn. Mr. perlntendenl "' ll1 '" ramaintnj far nnothcr month He (ilttens will be spending ihree Sui |g also a guest at Cacrubank weeks'boliday with his molhei at HotaL WMtkasry Road A Spy Turns Up To See Me Eating THE STORY SO EAR: /I oa-.p of By BERNARD W.CKSTEED inisen-imlous ehamcIerK called "Tlu-p" hare aot hold of a mii| am beginning to get my second ferioiu formula mliie'i ut supVrtnd or ivhatevei you would cull posed lo hare ihc propcriu of a when you are dieting. I no frana/orminy conlcmed hut longer w,ant lo eat a horse. I'd be (tnenrcight ruisbands into Man.-nt'r .it tiiti with a pony. nee Idolt trlrh the flaures of M\ FIFTH DAY Greek pods. MENU IT I called the Tubbn Hubby ilthal I did ratl diel HKEAKFAST BIT THEY BMBj a victim for Onr aranur. Haddock. Tneir inhuman experimen|. 2 thin slices of tout, scraping ol Who shall il be? The choice falls htiller Tea on Bernard Wlcksfeed (Mel ,hf EtlNCH 5ff. Sins.. u'eli;hf 12it. 21b.). harmless hubby of Happu Hairnatgfljd. FRIDAY NIGHT T HE Tubby Hubby is under , glow) "• %  thu, the Bfl his 12-day prdeiil by diet. He ^ %  > raught oul at the breakfast table DINNER Cold ataai mall> wHh tln piece ol hutler The InevlUble green salad I apple or nr*nge Black roffer —L.E.S Joke. Got it?" FoutentHigh rang off. Or.f Ihittfi ajggaj wiothrr I T was. they said, a Greek wine And I believed them i an ugh reain had been Rhovad into il. when young, to 5i nk a battleship. In Cette It would have been roruilden-d I maslerpie..' in fael I have redd thai fiy In a oarooc is not mart ridiculous than fhe hose <>f a A re* brigade summoned lo rj-trtcall The head of a n'atercarrier frotn between park| ralUngs. (Sayings of Shabash-Ibn-Daoul ,1 Bagdad). 1. u*t ihain back ? it) v. Fre to IN sbuui letting gfai 10. g— is. deen M. 1. >!>• the resulST il. It Climb sod oitst amona saopi ti. A.i.i.n wtio maana someth: %  In addition to her. 161 Dawa 1. NID. maaur mao frosn member of the clan. (9) i. Juat refill. IB) S. At Ihe fabuloua bird. euQU-n i debts. IB) 4. ranen al Hie bar. () .v Merelv a pooL <*> d Ten atosasaa. (•) 7. Hulio. oosoa in I L (01 n TOU baaa grouodi for ppuni It Si 13. Trap i for defence. (Si I* mu IB. *.•• BO. VeVterta* P Uirlr B4. WtllT , Una D*w l OPISISf. SSIIB4% 4.458.3JP.M. Conlinu.ng Daily LEO Jnly 84—Aog. *2 )*• TIROO A 1.1. a-Unt. as LIBRA (apt 24—Oct. S Ralher skir endeavours. Accept your duties In w ityle; be mindful you aren't ~ I0OIPI0 Oct 24— MOT. 1>8 SAOITTABUUB Ubra's manL the only one anxious to achieve * * Stars advise reviewing. 5trengthenlng your *^ methods up lo sundown. Don't embark on new ventures unless sure you have proper ^ formula KtWi afler 8 p.m can bring %  pleasure. __ Curb likely unrealistic ideas. Be idealisNov. 23—Dec, 22 tically motivated both In personal and business matters for safely gainful ends. Fo.Arj mance needs extra care. CAPRICORN Some ideas, propositions may be tempting ^C Dec. 23 —Jan. 21 DU l conscience forbids. Don'l talk flrst. think afterward. Logic will help avoid mistakes. -* if AQUAttlOB Excellent for general endeavours. InvestT.n !" *--reta -inmcnts well checked. Freshly favoured Jan. IS rsa. 20 r nanccs ^ lonf term me rit. P.M. fine ^ for heart Interests, home activity. if yr ir M Helpful aspects for most trades, civic and children's possibilities. Labour, employer* have much in common and can make this .V day a memorable one. Give-and-take favoured. &f YOU BOFN TODAY are natural leaders and, while con1*> servative, are very active, with fine reserve vitality and power to put over good' ideas. Are magnetic, generou* and proud. J-T Seldom selfish, nothing underhanded in your makeup. Minn-^ date: John Ericsson. Swedish-Amer. naval engineer agaagay piacEg Feb. 21—Msreh 2n MOTICE The Garden—SL James I""" ••nlj't IBS r M hr DALTOW 1. \ -.1. %  (Don BABKV PI 4/ 1 BARBAREES iDIAL 5170) Rupert's Spring Adventure—3 CARIBBEAN PREMEIRE>\ FRIDAY 2.30. 4.45 ft 8 .30 P.M ,' %  Ru Niafj ovir 10 look *t (h obrt *hriw lhf hre lui been. •nd R-per: ISM him jboui th* mvHcnoui ip ol noke. 'Tn vr odd." Ui* link moots. I've. .en. no picnw pin> In tict. I'sa an tv, ON II all our' Pons-Ping. ">d he iceou SLL HlfM 10 be in %  bal I old I'txin-Pitit." an Paip ii i I'l go and try tsi chaar ( % % % %  up. nJ pathape he can aspUai Imr black pauriei." Biasnirif ofl. he finds hia pal busy beside the ih>ck badge .hit •urrounda kit houst. ggaggraa IX SUM h .lit Assortment of • LADIKS' NYLON HOSK • LADIKS' NVLACE HOSE • LAMES' LISLE HOSE • CHILDREN'S ANKLETS — ALSO NEW SHIPMENT OF . • MEN'S WILSON FELT HATS $2.09. $2.15, $2.28. $2.41 M.50 $1.31 JO. 32 CENTS $S.40 Sltll aar a Mum. %  • %  •4i -•.-•* aa.ia %  >.•. JISSI I..II. >a SIMMS HO II IWEB It.I-1,iy SCOTT — Joe E. BROWN—Ava GARDNER OPI SINS. T-* M G M •' *c*a ON MK MUSICAL' ; •MM : -T*afcr^': TccHMien***^ 1 FRED ASTAIRE ^ VERA-ELUN MARMORIE MAIN T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS DIAL *220 YOUR SHOE STORES DIAL 4606 "Wr wish to advise our ciistomei* Ihul our Workshop Dcparlnn-nt will be closed Irom Tuesday 5lh AugHat l Monday ISIh Aueusl. 1952. both days inclusive, in order to Rive our Workshop Star! their Annual vacation. There, will he a small relief staff on duly for liny emercencies. Our Office, Parts Department and Petrol Station will be open as usual." ECKSTEIN BROTHERS BAY STREET '•.• %  %  -.%  %  •.'.'.'-' %  •----•'-'-•-• %  %  '-' %  DIAL 4269 IHHHf I I THEATRES i vi ; %  >,..-.. TO.OAt MBit %  h.. STANWYCK Paul DOl'Ol * K ri PVAN. Marilyn MONBOB. 1 •.-II n. Ml.HI P .1 KM ..... arss) II (ii ^ MANCK MNOCKS III 1 x Ml -M -• OLYMPIC noHHiiwi II ram nil STIF*I PLAZA BRIDGETOWN (DIAL 2310) ROXT i. iiw i' a an iiiuoBsnw i II. I. U .i r *-*) i ANT. aaasttn or LOST MBM %  I ii Kist, \NII mi -is-ni Will. tH AL1.TN -UUDlV il I Mt II III DANI.IS A cnasAia arpfe 1IA1.1 Tl.rtK IN I aiMR TOMORHOK WITt at *s Hiifflam Ol IS'iiV .X lln IrBUpl mmNIUHTS or KM ROYAL •Stair. (SB a ail HI.. i.asfial U. orsaATOB ss HUM in II a. Minim a -I'WDAT ss a iU i ici^te* PrnraU Brian DONUEVV Forrl TUCKEB i



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THURSDAY. JLU II. Un BARBADOS WINOI.WI HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON \,c3 CAUTION MEN WOAKINtt1 li — m— J3 1 S ^afck* ip <^^^> FLINT OF THE FLYING SQUAD .... BY ALAN STRANKS & GEORGE DAVIES THE PI HI I l H.-I\ how ton feel when ur aerret an out of ertfer Thal-s whm ..... need • NUTROPHOS A BOtCasssV irrp.r*tiort for the lic'MhMit of all nrrvr UN. ^


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Till BSD U JTJL1 ,l Ml IIAKIUDOS ADVOCATE PAGE THREE Sugar Levy Proposed /In S. Africa ^_ CAPETOWN. Proposals for a levy on tuna' in South Africa, to be paid (or by the consumers, wlih the proceeds coins to finance the Government's attempts to cut dow n it* sugar imporU still further, are meeting with considerable criileiarn in Cape Town. The Government wants to erect a sugar mill on Its Pongola sugar estate. In Zululand. To pay for this, it proposes to lery one-eighth of a penny a pound on consumers, which il Is estimated would more than £400.000 n year. Nearly CtOO.OOO has already bean spent on developing the Pongola esUte and on irrigation schemes there. Least season's production of sugar can.amounted to 12,479 tons. Considerable expense was entailed in delivering il from this remote estate On*of the reasons why the South African sugar Ind does not regard the Pongola scheme as economic is because of the lack of raU and other transport facilities Producers also say That the output in the estate at present is not big enough to justify n mill diver iiment spokesmen, however, believe that there are great possibilities in the estate. Mr. J. G. Strydom. Minister of Lands, i tn ites that maximum production of sugar when the estate is fullv o.veloped will be 30.000 Inns a year. Mr. E. 11 Louw, Minister of Economic Affairs. Is more optimistic and puts the figure at 35,000 to 40,000 tons a year. Warning Mr. Louw has warned that in ten years' time, South Africa will produce 150,000 tons of sugar a year leas than it consumes. It is therefore in the public mien-: that tha development of the Pongola MUld be undertaken. But comnirni.il inter. %  i hive not been interested in the Pongola scheme. An Italian concern did once undertake to erect a mill at Pongola. but later found itself unable to supply -ithcr the capital or 'He niant. One of the reasons why the sugar industry believes the PongQgi n at future IS thai uOaCulL A railway link to 'he estate is being considered, but at present cane hat to be carted from the plantation by road for distant c I from 17 to 24 miles. The cost of -norl alone ranges from %  Jl Id to Ifls 8d. per ton. Objection* Other objections to the levy proposal to finance the mill art on political ground*. Many people point out thai this Is a way of ffg to HiWllfcJ OUI Of rUTe llli luIUl." LqndM Bnan p •antta VtW>adtgIi ChungeH His Mind LONDON. July SO. The British Foreign Office said that Prime Minister Dr. Mohammed Mossadegh proposed to the British that there should be arbitration in the oil dispute. This suggestion was withdrawn soon afterwards without expLiiurtlon The offer was made over the week-end by Mossadegh -to the British Minister to Itan, George Middle! on. The British official said that the British attitude was unchanged. Britain continued ready to negotiate over a settlement —P.T raising money for Ihc Government outside the tax system. It Is considered as concealed taxation and %  dangerous, precedent Other people declare that consumers are to be forced to shareholder!, in a State Industry. They will receive no dividends and no interest on their enforced investment. Government spokesmen point to the recent sugar shortage Africa as proof of the need for increased production If sugar had been imported to l shortage, the". been landed at double the local price, —*U I* Housing Board Will Approach Government On Aided Self-Help Scheme AND WHY THEY'RE OVEN-BAKED THE HOUSING BOARD is lo approach Government with :i 'lew to getting them set up I Committee lo draft toi starting an experimental Aided Sell-Help SVIume at Clinketts. St. Lucy as recommended by the Kana • : %  Secretary in his n| recent visits <.( inspection end study of bowing in various West Indian islands. It was pointed out that while il wren .1 matter for the Executive Committee, the Committee which was to be set up should comprise 1 llnMana .1 1 the Ii representatives: from the Agricultural Department, the Public World Department, the Social Well Department and the Education Department. Mr. Adams mentioned the bBI I l„. Committee's efits which were derived from AidniHaetfon to sell in, nl Self-Help Schemes in Jamaica alternative sutujestions %  where he had seen It In operui.ou forward at the meeting yesterday, a few years aau. and emjihaslscd One. by Him. F. C. llutwrn. that that the "sooner Barbados not on "lie matter bo referred to the with such an experiment, the betExei-uliviCommittee with a softer il would be," and he UMaigM J 8 ** 00 teal the land be pxchttired that CliDkctts was a good ptaee '" r anether more uaeful area; the to atart. '"'"' '>> Miss Amo. that Mr. Mr. Lashley reported 011 the r '->ks ugranted a lone lease. ...cthods on which similar schemes U ^?" I 'T recommenilation which are operated In Puerto Rico and nc 1 B a !" """I'd to was that the Antigua where he ha a 11. .•... %  turn II reconstructed visiled. and supported the Chair!" "" v "S a J n f u ^ <* *>man that such a scheme shoulj ^^^ J^ ', "' T "" %  %  ae emuunuted. question of road, |„ houalnK ar-ai mTtoS accept .„,„,!,„ ?L!?27&£ £r£z? "".,recommendation b, the Se, ,e. „ %S£Z££g£S& to apply for assistance under the On this point, it ., decided to American Point Four Promamn.c rater the matter fc aSTgaWet for the purpose of sending a team CernmlBee asking for „ directive from Barbados to study the an the question of the width of various aspects of Aided Selfroads in the area as laid down bv Help Schemes in Puerto Rico. the General Hoard of Health It It was stressed that Included ted out that where amatl the team should be a social leadn-nantnes were concerned the er In one of the Villaae Cumrauiilquestion of the size of roads should ties. e based not on any defluluKiiianrial Report ""'there should The Board accepted the linan}?,' A ^J2' ,ud< *"'•> • Houac.l report oi Ihe Maiamer'% h U £ 0 Ji 1 Secretary on the recenllv erected '^JS?,? 1 %  ^ %  a ccepted a re7 houses at the Hay Estate, an ,. ',.':'',",','' b "" tommltta. accepted the recommendation ,ZL,T^ " ""* -he M,„ 3E er that the rent, fo, „!o, ,',.';.',, £*££. 55 "ST the three sized houses should 1. %  Hay gstale at tho JlJto. (1.50 and $1.S11 per %  reel) "Si?, ""ifa ., Scllinc Tenantries This recommendation will be referred to the Executive Com' i usaed the qucsmittee (or their -.filing out of lurgv exapproval. %  %  %  %  %  m the city area The Man.iger-S.cr.-t.iry lh*eet of concern plained to the Board that the 47 "il n mncr of tenants in 1*1houaea were built at a total < "" wh,cn "" %  " the Colomal becretary icnt u Miiiu;o to tha i, I", N nimbi who made rewv_ v-TV.U ''""" Bwretaiy ...... %  tw the mattar, at a rale Of i* K yru ,,y C-overnment in the". event the liind was set up f nd tcnatitji were unable to raise ponhaae 1 haco |j in iak#i nil the ililTcrrii %  uurlil With I. an-. ' thetn 1" %  trnder .. ^oodne* unohtain in an\ nllirrway. I: KM be Hum tivotqjfa Mini tl |h f I II iii-• oal the full bean llavor. 'Iliai'n wU\ 11< in/ l.ian-.ir< I )\-n-l..il.i-il — to give you 11K'"me-1 ieani rou ever taelnl. of S93.48S. The cost of bulldlnit two-room house was $1,S16.2'J. threv-iejotn house, a four-room house He pointed out further that tl uibsidy involved wi lAm interest. maintenance and Insurance wer takea Into roniMaiallan TheManager-Secretary also InDl unihw niiittei formed the Board that he h; I wnlek waa postponed pending written to tho Financial Sen '"rrnation, the Mantfw tary rejattvt to the insurance of "i UaOsBee he had the hounes. and submitted the In, ""e than 3/rt)0 applications, a Bifuroii ni which theneptctlva ''"'' Bwaber of which wan Hied housGi were covered. iresaiiui cases, and that tho further Recommendation* ^-V,^!, ,P lrna ^"** would The Boa &*** ,he K ' ll " consider, of reconunendaUons submitted bj rh 0 n jrit _._ Ia(u B< n *L!? y ^^"^T^ -hether'^'c^of n^toS tlS which W ae a iruueat...,, t„,t , -^ lmm Sli ,. (| liina r(ft nmn area covering about J "a iicrv; woold not be in excau of the on the Bay Estate to the east of coat of the anUnj ten.intry. tt act Culloden Road (CbeMoo Areu 'i> for sale. Certain members of theBoard .|^^c for llsure'i In connection with I'M* point, and It was decided lo j"lp<>ne consideration pending •ten uifoi'i Further cmi.wder.ilion waa fiven t-ained as a playing Held. The Board also decided that In the event that the Wanderer." Cricket Club vacate their i.eld the Bay Estate that area shou! 1 be ult uueation of rwomniendlim .. i a %  :i %  Ptne ">'..itr. as well queatlor. %  f fioMf for tha er etion of 'H hop The mattar wax rred to give the scretarv i-rt-i.r. uifiir'n.ifrom the Co-operatives Officer. the matter should be dealt wiih lmim-dKiUU Salaries The Board considered ami agread on certain ncommenda uding s.il tries for tin Slafl of tinHousing Board, and the^r recommendations are to be i to the civil Bervta 'ii which IS to ennsid.i and report on salary ineie., for the Suborduiale Stall of the Service. %  • %  %  • %  -.1 Buslnaaa thequestion of rumours that members of the subordinate start %  >( the Housing Board were being offered briiNto enable perwfjw a to so ure ipoti EM hou dim .'I The Becretan pointed out thi. there could \*little or no vnliditv In Burh rumours because th" %  eleetion of ptraoni lo IN I i rested with .< BelecHon Commit tee. and not with on member f the subordinate staff. Tho point was also raised thai there might be some truth In the statement thai some persons did offer money to members of the sulsordinate stall, and It was decided that it should he made clear thai any member of the stafl who took part In anything which savoured of bribery, surh member would be diMnissed. It wit* decided that noticeshould i-c published bl all sections of the Press, drawing attention to the public that anv ..•.tempi at bribery would disI .. h %  npUeant tree bideration by the Board. Before she bugtnaai of the meeting of the Housing Board was begun yesterday morning. Mr O. 11. Adams, Chairman of the Board, ond Mr. John Berkle took opportunity to express IWI Uli.ilf of the Bouril sun i dolence to Hon. F.C Hotion Oil the death of hi* n lher whk i took place n-rrntly. Mr. Beckles also took the ..|>_ purlunlly to welcome Mr Ail.nn liick tn the enlony after his visit* to Berlin and l/iiulon. Where he attended an Investiture Ceremony at Buckingham Palace, and e*pressed the hope that srhOB I I %  •' Mr Adtimi visits Umdnn. he %  would bow before Her Majesty tho Queen who would rest her nldem nnd command him to "Arise S.r Grantley." It.rplying Mr. Adams said al IhOIIgh he "ii idered II an hraioti lie\enhelee, hm etuty towarde hipeople came lift, and if he ataauld >• BO honoured, he erauM consider it only as a result of hrl duties to the people of R.irhadu as a pcraonal achievement. He pointed out however, thai from a ouri eke.I |,y IP bo lered that eve.) io Court Circles. Barbados wanot Bonatdared |ue| a del on ihi map. but was recognised in the Court Cir-Je* \-liomh Process Reversed liy Physicist NEW YOltK. July 29. U.S. atomic scientists said hentoday that the lUlian nuclei" physicists who had succeeded In exploding hydrogen to make helium were apparently using '• method the exaei oppxite of shut employed In the production of UM atom bomb. (Italy's Defence Mlr.isliT Rnndolfo Pact iardl announnvl last night that Itallnn scientist* had exploded hydrogen to make helium, but denied tha newspapei report that lUly had successfully tcded tlvhydrogen bomb). American scientists, who naked not to be quoted by name, said that lT.,feasor Ubaldo Losohi. the Italian in charge of hyd r ogen ex:,ight h.ive been bomirtiniing hydreigrn with Its radloactl.e Isotope. —c.r. Spiritual Intellect Can Save Man BeOSTON Spiritual undemanding alone can pierce to-daj . S4Ud ALxit T.MK) Chrtesttai "^ghout the we the Directors' special message a: the Annual Meeting oi Phi Mothei Church. The ftl rf Csotss, Identag iktstew MaaaacgM %  iiupniiut> alone will never solve BBBBBsdnd*! dee:-had th-'"Ihe i right adju aedattels ava "Not mimt>cr nor human mlajhl but Tniiti--spinui.ii underNtiindingii il e powet mold the world %  %  M.'li Church for ihe coming year wa* I %  v I -igland. Assoei te K.'M. i IBai e brtettnil Si kmoe religious be tore then *0 ,.., %  .. toeoher, t hri.l Km Cham. "The keynote of thLs i.niniv 1* not chaos but Christ sssd "We* %  lad deetructton have dated tvttt the %  i g half ,>t tha century, but progreM Bttd spirituiill/ntioii will ,i I'" i phuvd l>. ;i ltu.il concept o' creation I I Mm. Lnra C. Rattwon, Rt tlrll %  %  en! lecognltton th.it <>plhtual en.i,;hteoroent, and spiritual anllghterv ment alone, will lil"t out the materialism v.linii b trie source of all contusion and of iii.iiil.iniis multiplied probleini.. sinadded aT< e Idol] ecoMmuletlnaj at tdeisM U terms of Chiutian lu'almg. '.hat Ing Is available to humsnitv toKe| I'ttin.il icported eg the '.-n -flung i %  itanoinlnation, which hns througliout the Unite.! N In 41 other coup Growing public eeiigenm of "plhlual healing was neted bj Uurdon V. Cornel tick of Th. Mother Church. Currerrl church it'conU, he said, incl | Momies. of Chrtstian Beta iiKS of arthritis itoae. Infantile ••tones, carious l.une-# and llesh. 1 %  i iiklng and smoking Riuht Of Ix.-iiipiion Oeorge Chaniung, Man.igei o Christian aWenee Cornrnitteei m I'uhiicati.m. re ported ofhcial state and local rocogjnttoa Of th.nglit of the liidiMlii.il t a fro in I physical in goud failh on ii oi the public ,-. inde that tl i tele ni dk K id there ere w-eaa. iteiier totalling nme eaoo.ooo i tl ee to .mi idfei %  en in the KaaesavMigpouii v.iiie. flood. Ro\ < I V. rl on, Trenseuei of The Mothei Churil aniieuiiceil. ther Held, the Chtlitlgn i i %  imp Wi If a re %  disclosed th.it mo Workers were minlaterIrfg In hospitalized veterans and members of the aimed forces. In addition, thirteen Christian Belenee chaplelna tin., m Korea wenon .nine dul\ with troops. Fishermen Prefer Nylon OTTAWA nylon. Anil now the federal fisheries research l I o ii why. It seems nylon gill %  on Lake Winnipeg last longer, lake leas cleaning and catch more I i lag iu | %  inAshing opt %  MO lake in a SHOWN I I I | rating uf the nylon gill nets used by .( the fleherrnen is far Hat •! of that of eottim nets uf the During the IP50-51 season nylon .e-ts caught i7 ji-mnds per 100 \ards of m >< j with 17 pounds caught by COftOn nets. That la a ralio of Board an opportunity to see Che ; area for themselves. The CominilU-e in making thl I the amall area waa useless .Board. ould not %  %  d tl I in ee much al housing was an important Item NANTON TO STUDY AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS i.RFNAIM. July 30. V !{ t. N.irUon. Sniierintenh per 100 yard %  iis in peetoa i I i irtlcularly bloom*'—the colored alime that fills the lake during sej.sona----mii.-ht have eul iiUclency ratio of nylon last year hi any event. Hie nylem DOtg i. .i R'-rfl ni'ord. In addition, reaearrhors discovered that nsherrnen frequently leave nylon nets In place throughout the season while they i; nets at least ofatai to -ti y. The rot> eueUUes of the nylon nets permitted thi* pt The major iiiinplatnl of the nylon was that it was ham net during weather. hold as m %  in the air. members Of search team said. I'lr-.' ]UST ONE—and aren't we enjoying oui.r.e.' Baby wonders what all the futt it about on this particular day — the toyt, the new frock, the cake and this lovely, lovely candle but what fun ! And what a happy year It hat been on the a for everyone particularly since we put baby on Cow A Gate. Steady progress abounding health peace and contentment. Yes carry on. baby, with that charming smile at least we have given you a good start I COW & GATE &0-&5 %FOODo/ fSJUfr J B LESLIES. Co. Lid. ROYAL B A HITS Distributor* NOW! is the lime lo select your requirements from our ma* T.XBI.F.WARK. • OVSHWASC • Still' PIVIIS • DIN'NKR Pl.ATKS • I'lK DISH I s • I ISII OK MKAT PLATTEBS • CASSEROLES • SAUCE BOATS and 2t> Pieee Dinner Services in PYREX The above extensive selection is also available in I MITHENWARE. BAMBABOS CO-OIK VOTTO.X I ICIOItY LTMP.



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PACK klOIIT BARBADOS ADVOCATE TIIIKM1W Jl I.Y 31. 1M OLYMPICS: Know Your Cricket—i AW 31 Frenchman Wins 400 Metres Free Style Swimming Race (Tri-voi (..ill Beawrte l roni HeUaki) French Design \\ inn %  rlthrr ball 11 I 1 -.h .> 01 ttM • luinas. r 1( 1. i 1 1 ill htil. I..prrvioip.lv nrT. slrlkr. a stump nut .f wind %  down Hays and which led to much confusion. i,:.il is oft the M.fC It -lent (.it llH purpose ot thin L;IA lc. ilislixlge the rii aloinf one in any of the wan smttd. Still (Mil If UWIIIK to lhr strength of IhC uirid the nptelM have nitrced to iliKpriise with the use of ball* (Law 8. Note*) the decision as to \n> pUvrr nut use when a wicket is "down" Ls one mound. htnd %  r.arm 1-1 pul the wleket ,,„ %  the ..umpires to rticlde with 1 or. Ctrl should lhr balls be t(l f;i( s before them. In such ft. nw pH e trrumsUinces the wicket would be held to be down even though I stump has not been struck out 1 >f the ground. Further, tl Hie wirket is broken while the ball is in ploy It Is not Hie umpires duty to remuke the nil] the ball habecome deiid" A tleldsniaii hpWCVM may remake |he wi.ket in KH1 Hanoi % %  term "person" UM IlldM [ I I %  Q l\ slump, pravldfd always that th* 1. h hrld In the hand or h nd Nol Down The M.CC have pointed oul it (11 H Nut. to 11.1* Law thai not "down" merely or of the di ft urbane* of i .11! hul it is "down" If .i bail ir from thi 1 %  M berircu; 1.. rtumps. Thi There iinii Ir rm nonsense player's dress and equipment as I >r's hat Is blown off by the jn.1 its put* his wicket he Is out. Wicket Broken With regard to iht wrlcket being broken while u>ball I ,: must be borne in mind thai even tf Hit balls lire off. the %  like! can be bowled ot thrown down if tin ball entire!) oul <strand bad ordS in the heats ard "y a l< ngth from vidi Vm. was well thought "! Highly Frances was three It was Ml to iha roun Prencfa rid record breaking form, l Ef'S.SL!, l lZF h JZ2',2%* ^ however to understand from reliable source a, d Gru,,tt ''" "" *"<" LMI swim it oul with the Hawaiian that he Is verv much < v star Ford KorUtt who ... %  ,;,*.i!i. ;. long "fl : ana OUt duel in which Konno l ally gave Japans ruruh.ishi als.. seems tr to Bl !b* On fenn llwu of Prance second, and thi 1 eneh and although illtfVZoe Jenaen another USA Pat ifcCormlck was %  %  I eaattr ahead of the others but Zee human Jensen did Some uifll executed !>;ickward Jumps With lorward h r J" BtB **j ",'"' "*• i"" 1 %  %  M well as a bachni^3t~Wrti*nsMian clithed and hugged and kissed ward one and a half to boost the Ur nil son d<> score in her last three )un I was once ii-.. n e-ealisU aensnhon b v complaint:, nnd swimi t,[the board and aftei she had three ed to then wild "ic.it %  fSjaJns trtei the crowd grew a bit angry. <"teux %  I SM When tha Swedish girl %  11 to talk, and also floppe.i Wd and probnob would plained nbcul the board and the have shed a tear, but the tight of ,ud| start the comSaturday's Gallops THE DERBY CANDIDATES (By BKN BATTLE) Till', beat time for the morning was Seedling's, a bo\ to box in 1.25 1/5. with SlainCe as his companion. The three-year-old certainly did not have the worse of the gallop and ludka as if ho will lie as fit as hands can make him bv Saturday. Also most impressive, was Bright Light. 'Inis filiv worked the same Bear and Landmark did u brisk distant* wdh Cross Bow. in 128 box in 1.24 2/5 a good gallop for nnd looked very impressive ^ both. Hell Surprise also worked she .lid so I tnought this her well getting the same trip in best eJfDrJ le .' ite, and It erai one 1 24 4. caitie In the Aii Crivkvl: Northants Bat Well Against Indians Uoiteux her husband in the w,,i 1 ,,, i u: peutJon ilothes must have made her more concerned about him than I • I old Charicton. welsh ol Oreal Britain was good but patchy nnd obviously time <-i 4 mil 1 aapwrlance But ; -econda was a new Olympic ietill good enough to come fifth cord while the next live competiNow that the B ton also beat the old mark. Surovei the CommunuH China's team pnsingly Wayn, U .1 : „. h )Ve irr | V ed To do my McLane bolh of USA. and body seems to know. To-day howJapans Hlrnnosh.n Funiheshi, all eVer, it was announced thai they hoi favourites, came 6th, 7th an .. in an international 8th in that order. illu) In iwlmming there is pel haps The Finns are trying second greatest flop In (lie In pklM I but the ... LONDON, Juiy iO Preach Design, a horse woo able to go on hard •used a real t-urprise a Piggott losl his cap v.. The field set off at a slow ranter for the llrst half mile, no one wanting lo make the running. The race was run In 37 seconds outside Crudwell e.ime lo take the leid from VeuDlln three furlongs out Kid then Vidi Vm on the rails .mi Plight? Praneea moved up. \'idi Vui had mastered Crudwell i>l Use di' elected to hat. With DSttls BTOOkl liiimiT Knglan,] ph.yei who has S, r ,7 loured the West Indies m.ik entire game* after the sad d 1 mmumsu are obviousplay of Mrs. Fanny Blankoi „ a propaganda mission. Kocn in the alhleiics. II incidents other lhan John Mai. hall of An-which mars an otherwise genuine tralin who simply cann I And I llymplc spirit at these games. 158, Northants rattled up 365 for seven before Brown Then In the closing mnuit.-. the Indians lost the valuable wicket !" ", of Roy for only three runs. ur A century Oy number nine batsman Johnnie Lawrence — his second In first class cricket Apart from Test Match who Mveu > Somerset from collapse %  ni ojcr four furlongs with ;igainst b&sex ;.; Taunton. Afn exercise form countt for anySuper Jet most of the C's were hctng 167 for seven thing. Dunqucrque did her box sent from box to box. None did n n lt j ly mBke 325. 157 J'5. but Ihe fact that I better lhan Dashing Princes* SCOKKIIOAIU) — Bomerse policy of caution is being pursued and High and Low who got back In stepgrlai ibi mad iti< m 1 vi 1 :v h.ishmg ivu...-. IWIy. ought not to cause us to appeared slightly the better i>f Ignore Ser. The same can be the two at the finish and will be aid Of First Admiral, who was difficult to beat this meeting. only allowed to do his box In 1.3') Cants lulslne worked well in 124 The Two Year Ui ihe ground did i., 1 ; concerning them are *Nlf Aim Low took 3 B 0 S I ere must Took forward ."" ut >' l cr Neither Abu All. ,me disappointing racing Tdxrir.n Lady nor RactOi where they are concerned The luowed their heads end relumed B rnard pa it Row Tie and %  * • \ !" %  "$ '• "fPffI ,1.. Queei looked l>est over "vely. Itoldruiu came from |be 4. which they covered En M 1/8 :il,l " "*•' plaked Viceroy at the :. wdh Ihe Illly having much the Shidid the box in 125 1/5 but best of things, Jim l*i Hue. "'"'d not get On her terms with working with Joan's Star did the Viceroy Among those who were 11 V, 3 .'1 while confined lo 5 furlongs mention 7 seconds. Howm sl "> be made of Trimbrook lt ( er did a flve with Cainice, but Th'r rather leggy and light grey I was onlv able tu gi-t the limn lllv m -'> "* be ;'" ">> painting. (Ill 1/5) approximutelv. DU t she apparently can run an KJ"S?JS3.? 22 SSd tmfm, rorm',0 rnr n,"h„ .vlth Lunwayv Emberi. :,m\ NorlhanU versus Indians Northants 365 for 7 dec'* Indians 3 for one wiekel I>erb> versus Surrey Derby Sil 6!l for li.i.iiversus Sas^x Mam. 2S3; Sussex .. ,.S b>r 'i Oleemeter versus vorkK yoraa 378 (or 8 ... 114 l.i-ltr-lir versus lbrlik Warwick I I'll. S|H-neei :". for 47, Goodwin 5 for 64. Lcuester I IK for nine. Somerset eesees t'jMrx Somerset 22C. I^wrence 111 Worcester versus Krnt Worcester 317 for B Kenyon 117. Giamonsn rersaa Noiu. Cilpmorgan 144 Notts 1 3l> for 4 Tlie B' best limes for the morning, and it seems thai some of the keenest racing will occur in this class. Itoeket probably turned in the best lime over .V 1.0s 3 5. although the time for Fi lady's gallop wltl was 1/5 oFlrelsdy however had slightly Ihe worst of things and may not have quite done the lime. No fewer than 3 horses did this distance In 1.05 1'5. They were Flying Dragon %  ''' '"^ "" and Spear Grass. Spear *wrred lo (see Magic <;..>.worked together but the latter is n long way below her best form and could not keep up with the .1. maniiM (lllv. The JTL. "\,i,h'" iCui^ ,l,nc ot lM S 5 *' %  Multe lmof asrntd f ? &**" %  Sl "^ Arab showed that she is Imoroving when she sccornpsnled Water Crcs in 1.06 2 5. The D. And K. Class The gallops of Cross Dow and already l>eei Bright Ugh Sports Window To night's Division "A" Water Polo match** st the Aquatic Club arc: Snappers vs. Wfaluporay* and Boiutss vs. Ham-on Collcgti Play %  tarts at 8.30 p.m. There will be a nilvr colUcUon. Mdivh Wimis wuo is improving Viceroy and lU'ts.im t-oth covered in 1.09 2/5 while Boprano workGrass worked on her own, but i,n,i Street Arab). Both HIT ing with Twinkle did I lit CapHvmg I>ragon had Demure as (Mn a W|, 'l and there should be rice accompanied Howllsei and nnanlon and beat her very C ,0 J"' rivalry between them iclumed 1.11 1 5 approximately. badlv. Lunways.wna seeompanP !" !" 0 hi n s br *< gallops so while Apronu^k working wlfii ie.1 by Ttie Tiling who went re[ ar when he worked with HamhCottage could d.> no better than markabhwell and seemed 'o k r R.'HER. ) r OCfTTA /fSE-. 1 T-1E KXCE WrM I TU*i CUDOLE.' SHE'S WO?l% J-EAST A X-'LLCW SUCKS TO >COk P(Rv1 r. GOOD WiLL By Jimmy Hallo OH W ER >OU VKAH MSSARSEHC %  n-E FtrrTUh*3, PLAVT FIRST--v ANOTHER OUY S OONM4 RN0OUT lOO CAttT T£LL WR4T SOPR4MQ UXXS IJKE 4E VV4Y ME^ RBCORDS SOJNPrr SW0W > t WR£ OJLA fjOT ] [ MER StvECT 3rCE,\ S*E COMES BV \\i NATJx'^LLy.'SMES / 1* A RELATIVE OP A?S SlSCOWEii-^ & %  ear -o CAUUP SOME TW£ SUE SUJE S^RLS .V-'EN A^Y OF OS -ISKS HER TO, aCT/J NUI-BER£ lOM-r tdPE .UE ^LPI^t HAT MUX A D4TC MTU WE CJDCT.E ICKCE, SQUT LNSEEK--I AVJST BEOETTA' I MEAH /IN5 .anenr.-no-} HEALTHY APPETITES end STRONG BODIES y ,. wife The second division bosk'nball replay fixture between Bay Street Hoys' Club and Police which waa played ,it Hairison College yesterday resulted in a victory for Pay Street Boy.1 Club with the score al 27—22 Forde. Barke \ Pollard, and Sobers seo ed 10. 8. 5, and 4 remeeUvely for 11 s.H.C, while King. Doddon and BrOWTJe KWed Od 1 resiMetively for Police. I A GtANI DANCE Milt I-. givrn bv *a cii or MINDS a MIS SI. C RAIOO Al Ihrir rnldrnrr HI Al K RiJ'K I -SI,ll %  %  > NE0-CHEMICAL FOOD The Complete VITAMIN and MINERAL FOOD SUPPLEMENT Pleasant lasting Economical Available of all leading Drug Stores ERNIE'S DEMOCRACY CLUB There Will be a meetimr 1.11 frlda* al 5 p.m. slurp to IIIMU-N Ihe First and Sii 0111I Daia* ratline of #ur Autusl meel. I hope all my friend* will roll up. There will be the usual Turkey and Ham and Lobster Cocktails etc. etc. 30.7.52—Sn. IS THE ANSWER .,,* 4$* 4 eica *0* Bru-.li your teeth with Tpana and you clean them extra-while. And, because of the unique formula underlying Ipana's "refreshingly different 1 mint flavour, you fighi decay by reducing acid-form IIIR bacteria, M-i^age Ipana into your gums and you help keep them hrm and healthy. In this way, Ipana acts as a safeguard against tooth-losses, more lhan half of which urc Caned bv gum troubles. For whiter tccih. healthier gums, follow ihe Ipana way! THE TOOTH PASTE.. REFRESHINGLY DIFFERENT mOPUCT OF IsnTOt-MTHlS. IONDON NfW YQ"S MT*S mini: 11 PAINT REMOVER i pt Tins — 83^ 1 pt Tins — $1.55 .Vow iilUlliimblf IDill ISHSAI HARDWARE SUPPLIES RICKBTT STREET (Opposite Post Office) PHONE 4918 THArf* AHO A -np OP THE K4TLO HAT TO l)ae*?T V. CWN*ELL, 35fl woLi.e> ar. 9XK3RT, *Y. By LUSINA of Su ii/erl.md — a perfect c\U A ..uid.mi choice from our remarkable watch nnd jewelcry counter. Unsurpassed value . . . and uunranleed l.l'SINA servicing ti. It. II....I. 4V Co.. Ltd. lower BroAtl Si. W'.v i/tmr Hoof %  •# I'lihiliiiif V THEN BOWRANITE IT { Tor Ihe best protection against f?usl and Corrosion use BOWRANITE ftrt^erehi PAINT GOES FARTHEST — LASTS LONGEST One Gallon will cover 700—1.000 q. it Slocked in RED and GREY BOWRANITE is supplied ready mixed and 'should be well stirred beloro use. // required, a Special Thinner* can be supplied al $2.40 per gallon. Phone 4IS6. 4267. WILKINSON & RAINES CO., LTD. &V,'*V,V..'..*, -W.'.'.'.V •$



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For ih* MUM uu< lack, iNtium 0b>jt IM ran (h.| „.l rMUUiu. For ike fulur. In a* < Alt* PU*>n* rtrW. T 4 p T, Wt*r %  olo Ao.uiu C1... e SB p m ESTABLISHED 1895 Tiirx v :n io:2 PRICE : FIVE CENTS WEATHER REPORT VMTB-IWY • il fc"i-l TV.ipaiiiuri MS *F Kind Vtlnc'tr 1 MM* par houi Jul* '•> p*n Governor Challenges B'dos On Family Life Lady Savage Opens St. George Social Centre YOU HAVE PUT BARBADOS on the map in so many ways; you have led the Caribbean in sugar production, in education and health services. Surciy you can give a lead to the Caribbean in the development of family and community life. His Excellency the Governor told an audience at the opening of the St. George Social Centre v. afternoon. He made those remarks after saying thai lie was told—on good authority—that the development of the community centres and community life in Jamaica was fai ahead of that in Barbados. The building was officially opened by Lady Son St. Q so r sa V l Social Centre. which is situated at Ellertoi. standon a prominent site overlooking nearly the whak of St. Grorge. The outside is d. com ted in more than a shade whi'e tinInterior is a combination of green and pale I with %  tOUdl Of rut h<-iv and then The verandah, on the south eside, extends the full length f the building, thereby providing an imposing view to cricket and football enthusiasts. This C rdrs bat two latrine* and a canteen. It can accommodate jver 200 people. It was t k atg W d Outlining the Governments Ec~ oy Mr. Bruce Moulder and built nomy Programme In which ho by Mr. G. A. Fit7gerald. |salfJ Britain will switch some in1 For the optning ceremony, the dustries from nan. interior was decorated with vases port goods production. Churchill' of Anthurium and Lotus of the told the Commons. "We must t of the ceaseless techBritain Will Concentrate On Atom Arms LONDON. July 30 Prime Minister Winston Churchill indicated on Wednesday lha: Britain will concentrate 01 age weapons in a st lean ill tied omy re-armament programme. Airforcp Explains "Saucers' OEOROE SOCIAL CENTRE, in a prominent *lte, overlm king i uated at Ellcitoii. was of ytcril*y sftenu) irly the whole of the part*!. 1* can accommodaU' over Jut! by Lady Ssvtge. The Centn Nile i -. I. ncl to the enjoyment **ke on the character and course of any •fuiure struggle, and these processes of change continue and even accelerate with the remorseless march of trie science of human of everyone, the Po'dcc Band, conn| cal domtlopmonl which has reducted by Capt. C. E. Raison suited in some weapons becoming played some lively tunes as the antiquated and the advance of type* afternoon wore on. i* Krcutly unproved ceiuraclex His Excellency and Lady Sa 1 mada tmmoni. strides in its poiol the Playing Fields CommiU-e ley of atomic weapons, and in the and of the St George Vestry. range and accuracy of their delivi-ady savage otlicially opened Wo ery." tnd added: "Remarkable building I progress has been made in our Mr. W. A. Yearwood. Chuicnown development of guided miswarden, said that it was his priv.-'siles or rockets." japs ana pleasure M < bairn m ol TIM Govern! enl got a dortues the St. George'^ Social Centre, strength without firm eco00* Of the Member* of ihe ComnorniC foundations, and that the ..ppointed by your urcd— ea m m <'' programme must be .-omm%nV1 ^/'^ V"* ***** *£ %  ftnmeni thai playing iieiris ^ n (^^1^ ; i br £ TJTSSSiSi B^SKC SSly^J JSFSZXJ??, M,^r/f ,K o ay ,? ,r '^ c del( ncc production in a way SZFZi&SSf f ( nmm 1,, r aI U,C whlch "UTUmil th W demand, on %  uaUMd that bat ftam>< the engmeennc lltduitn and in such as cricket, croquei. football, coming years set free ;i vaniabla and athletics be orgmised on the part of It our civil Bl Id. lexpp'ts."—l!.P. "In the building, indoor gain* i ibl Graft Bled Farouk's Army While No One May Quit Egypt Settlement Unlikely WASHINGTON. July 30. Secretary of State Dean Acheson told a press confcreiur on Wednesday that recent developments in Ir.iii did BOt plva him any encouragement about a early settlement of the oil dispute. Acheson also said that the Iranian Government has made no request for the withdrawal h;.mmed Azmi moved to rehe Government case against Egyptians with the Mttllng of supplies to the army dunn thi war. Heel i %  led thv inquir} ,. i Oenara i. . i;. .. %  %  en ii < Irmip Com domiti 1 tcnntn. draughts be play '. projecl %  On Pace 5 Rock Snggeerl New 'lrriording For Truco D'm-uiii^nt MUN3AN. Korea. July 30. Communists to-day suggested a possibly significant change in th wording of the proposed Korean armistice document, now under study by both sides. It dealt with the paragraph relating to war prisoners. The Issue of prisoner exchange has blocked the true? for months. The Reds proposed chsnging the term "captured personnel to "prisoner of war." Col. Duncan S. Somemlle. UN. Command stall < >nii ei. --..ni he had askod the Reds for a clarification during recent secret trud; William K. Harrison, Senior U.N. Armistice Dele gate, told I he Reds that the trim personnel" meant ail persons in cvei (hoi opposing repatriation. "War prisoners'^ he i'dded, were all those persons who were to be repatriated — U.S. Taking Over Hahamtt*' Gidiled HtHsile li'isi' NASSAU, July 29 i .nsolidated Construction Company, will be handing over the Guided Mlsslla Baas >i the Grand Bahamas to reia . .... ..' 1 mil tht^.t Te*l Mm.l .^' H< nT "" ,r f rf F l.'.Td fm I %  . • until hewn •duied f.i Januao i... IB, i "-V* 0, ,* ?. 1 ... 7hr In,: at B.20 p.m. 00 :i mfl pi . & 28. Tin I 3. 4 & 5 The vtattori riU opt dlana when p mro-day i m %  match afalnal Brl lake place on Wbruary 11 14 1 16. The Third rest I uled for Fcumary ll> 20, 11, ^3. WASHINGTON, Julv 30. Secretary of Slate I>ean Acheson said <>n Wednesday thai the 21 a is. concessional cuts in the adminis-, ThihIratmn's foreign aid programme will slow up or extend the limit nf lime (or Western Defence pro duction. Just before it adjourned "BUM die" congress cut the foreign aul programme from $7,900,0O0.O0O to about 46,000.000,000. Acheson told the press conference that, broadly speaking, the cut *>ii have ti" 1 affect of %  towtnl up or stretching out defence production in the West | North Atlantic Treaty Powers were budding a dsaaBM IBM against Communist aggrei>sion. Acheson Indicated that this was one of the big reasons why the IV:! M S'..;..'..I. unable lo ai>! roach the fulfillment of raojuaitl y France for large American milatraesi that would be placed in that country. The gap between the French snd American ability to meet II %  landat BbOUl 300.OflO.OOU — I'.P. AUIIU.S. SIO'S f^^K 'IRANIAN CAPITAL The) blamed '.' %  C %  11 . lual Inqulm .... %  ; .| Of Whirl -1 that a %  the (O'TI.i I propertv. hac i I 11 nd i" \ h i i p %  • turn i" Trlnli I i lliitish Ou Trinidad Baal b dun on Bn luory 2a and Usrch I The Fourth Test will le pi Trinidad on Man b :i i i | a . The Jar ;. |1] ipp o ihe visitors on March I ic & 17. The Fifth snd I'm I Test will be played in Jamaica on March IB, 20. 21, 23, 24. a 25. II.. I : I the i %  %  any ol the playsH likely to make the trip but Uw *Te • 1 Board of Contra made rleor thai the) BXpecl U best side" I Wl l Indies. i b*-en reI i, „ „ until M.i ana in Goorgen. \ prohlbll ed anyone leaving Egyj t wlthoul Intel tor Mlntsti. permij .ifui .. Durobei of close friends of ousted King Farouk itn.l N CrOH Informed sources said in one ease two former associali rnrouk left Cairo h air but thei aircraft wai ordered back 15 mm..'.'..ii i jiiii Ihi an II ,ii resti -I —rr VASHDfC : N July 30 it waves, i piica i sad radar Itlaadona as m plausible explai...; Burry of "flylns saucers. H Intel" he notion %  ..' th.,i (ail frum oil.. %  %  • %  %  United sha| new : i i' i i r 0*Dwyt*r Denounces Presroll: Injures Insulting Newsman MEXICf). July N Mexico's leading m %  %  i UlUtrarsal on Wednesj day described as a "serious Inoti %  eaa i ntft renct at which the CJnll 0 11 •• \ i nn>fiily denounced Ihe l %  \ Robert Pitsc.it f<-r a ftory arxjut OTJwyi i i lai P m i today that ii4l bsUUMN Ainenrm Depart. nf 'lie > under the he;u SOlOlItS ATTEMPT TO OUffU one of the many .-'lous disturbances that have broken out in Teheran, Iran, i resignation of former Premier Ahmad Ohavam, who escaped the country as his life was threatened. Moos of 20.000 and more, wbir,d up by Communist and Nationalist propaganda, have been voicing anu-AntricaD scntimtnU. A U> jtt.-er v-.is beaten and an economic aid office stonsd, t/nternstional/ %  thinking of nationalslag a Mexican.". • 1 • which In English %  %  %  i P r the truvnaajer of II %  | Th** ne.-pa|>er added foreign correspu%  i geassMT . %  noting In Its M i %  %  i In a stf.' %  I'rescott'i In%  %  %  —r.r. I UM" IN. July 3(1 tntatlon at the n %  i %  % %  on* faith prime 0 .' %  %  < i i %  v.lnch is to Inai Sconomlc IsSUSa Will probably Ie ince ith the preceaenl •eX at the IBKI Comnionwealth %  % %  n i %  %  ui Januai) Mellon. Secretary UMcolonlai will M pre sent the eotonlal territories at • iifull lea ri o n s ol bos eeedsvanea be ittended t>y Prime lie will l)e nsststed and .one aaperta mm %  will I territories nwel i in the coufei enee though these will | I %  %  Inns. it !•thought llkel, ilu.i ii lomI i. I < ohm ml experta will neef dally to hem i.yttrium's review of 'he previous da i repara %  brid lor the K. i l •i.'ony will Uusrefore haw :ii mutter* UOdSf review though nei will not be directly repsetented. it is not yi known vrhi I tlVe "f tl(nil. Hiewill %  i U) InS nieeling irf ofll•ijls which will shortly start work % %  Mi of Hie iigendj I.,I 'lie Ceo Mn I let ('..I.(el'U.N. Blast Red War Factory TOKYO. ,h i Mipci torts bliislecl .-. .i f.i. t i only foui miles I: %  hrlks against line full wings nf (he Far End [Ah rorea Bombei i than 'loo ions ii Mat i" ental Light Metals Con ri) log hlsh over a R in three meet witB C\ mmunl %  %  o Aniung In %  ,-IK devieei truck at n i iln %  %  %  i clruetuHi Thi i .[ore II p m. OIK ll Oltll 3 10 .1 II. I %  %  an annual iRD i if aluminium t r All K& forces In Europe Mow Under Ritlgicny I'AltlS. July 30. All Amcricjii .oldiei 'ii-1 .uin.er, .. i -1 were brought under the personal command of General Mattnew ltlu^w-y. NATO. Supremo %  'ommander on Wednesday. Kulgway announced o sweeping rsorganliatlon >4 us troop comntenduuj from across Europe to Tut key. He snid that effective Thursday, he also will assume command of all U.3. f rces, with former American Coinmandar in Eunix-. flsnaral Thomas Handy. arUng as his depui I general ssld the new i will give hun broad OWSI I tO I tie.imhne mil CUl l"*-' ts of the defence of ihe Went. i' Allied headquniters said MM uuMjn 00 the order. %  i I S Joint Chiefs of Staff. explained that the log of American Iroops rsansli in Banrnpe will not .I'M U.S farmalionj assigned I rstlonalb u. N.ATO romT'DAD OPENS DOOR TO W.I. NURSES PORT OP-SPAIPf July 3.) Trtnlds I ..,,i j, .s la dior to nurses from %  itrlt.sh GuUna. Jama %  v. %  %  l i • %  I it im her-. Mr C|| %  I is hare. I making provision to all w foi tne I registralli n • Ah i n .. %  %  implored n to..' uiej work at %  ll %  %  i i I iium at Chacacachacap %  % %  %  ^i l :[Wppm Aew Administrator Presides Orer Legislature IK>MINICA, July 30. The new Adminiitralor, H. I-. LindO i a Oldsd over th< : mrt of ihe legislature yesterday. A Mill to enlarge the Police Eor.e and erSBtfl Pel | RjfTB v. %  i.. .. n, .|i.r.lv vote. A resolution d> mantling immediate payment of eomi for evkted tenants of Ihs Oovt-riunent-owned OOOdwUl I lab Wti passed unenimou y. the H >< Austin Winston remark the days whtn heads Of Oovarn* %  need departiBenti i %  Miv. Eugenia CharlBa, Han ler was Ihe new aORllnafa bet for Mrs. Elma Napier who iv ... long leave. Hon. Austin Winston > elted to ii : ony al the Federation Con! f IIO\. M\Hit}SHOW WILL STAXT Di8CU88tO> AT MTKS3 t'U'H Mon. T, A lajuryihow, ILL.C His will be the guest pSSkse at the Press Club tomorrow night at 8 o'clock In the regular rnontl on matters of public Inti Hon. Marrynhow will lend off the discussion V I." welcome to the discussion.



PAGE 1

PACE FOUR slARRADOS ADVOCATE TinnsnAV. m.v ai. is; BARBADOS *& ADVOCATE s l sss.* s? *• UraM • LM Hil l •BraSss—• Thuraslay. July 31, 1542 lit :\IM\(. THE report of the Public Librarian fo. the rail ended on the 31st March 1951 records the total number of adult and juvenile registered, borrowers of books al 24.746. Less than one ninth of the island's total population borrows books from the headquarters Library, the Speightslown Library and the seven deposit stations. But the regular borrowers of books seem to read widely because no less than 178,150 issues of books were made at the headquarters adult department during the year. How many of the 14.526 reRistered borrowers withdraw books is not mentioned so that no conclusions can be drawn as to percentage of actual borrowers. It is interesting to note that whereas 1,577 new borrowers were reRistered 6.077 less issues were made at the headquarters adult department than in the previous year. On the other hand 4,369 more issues were made in the juvenile department of headquarters than in the previous year and membership increased by 1,206 to 6.622. The Speightstown Branch Library now has 835 adult and 613 juvenile members and 12.992 books were issued during the year. At the deposit stations it is impossible to meet in full the demands of the young readers. And it is very significant that there are more than 798 more juvenile than adult members who make use of the stations. This appetite for reading on the part of the juvenile inhabitants of the country districts would seem to justify the formation of more, school libraries than now exist. Since the duties of issuing books, registering borrowers and keeping the necessary statistical records of the deposit stations are now undertaken for the most part by elementary school teachers, the growth of school libraries would seem to be a natural evolution from the existing system. A school library department was started in October 1949 and 28 schools are now receiving books through the department. During the year 8,135 children received books in this way. This figure is quite startling when compared to the total number of 8,709 juvenile borrowers registered at headquarters, Speightstown and the six deposit stations. The statistics of book circulation at the Public Library and all its branches during the years 1946—51 record a drop in books issued to adults from 208,510 in 1948 to 194,^62 in 1951. Juvenile readers after reaching 76,289 dropped to 65,906 in 1949 but had reached 76,138 in 1951. Combined totals of book circulation show a substantial decrease from 280,038 in 1948 to 270,798 in 1951. The classification of books at headquarters read by juveniles show the appeal that sociology is having on young minds. Whereas religious books were circulated on 2,806 occasions during the year and there were 3,881 circulations of books dealing with applied science there were 4.871 issues of books dealing with sociology. History by comparison only received 1,500 circulations. Fiction, however, still is the favourite reading of juveniles at headquarters and received 35,895 circulations as compared with 25,946 issues of non-fictional works. The adult reader at headquarters also displays greater enthusiasm for sociology and philosophy than for religion, although the main interest of adults in non-fictional work is claimed by applied science. There were 15.517 issues of books dealing with applied sciences during the year, 8,472 dealing with sociology. 6,889 with r ilosophy, and 5,928 with religion. In Speightstown on the other hand, interest in applied science was followed by interest in religion, philosophy, biography and fine arts, before sociology. Adults at headquarters also show interest in biography there being 6,526 circulations. ', Only 4,381 circulations, however, were made of books dealing with history. Fiction continues to hold sway over the adult as over the juvenile mind, there being 100,579 issues of fiction at headquarters as compared with 77,571 issues of non-fiction. What conclusions are to be made from some of the statistics in this report? First the total number of 16,037 registered adult borrowers uf a public library in a community with a total registered electorate of 95.939 of whom 62.028 actually voted during the last elections is a subject for deep reflection. If almost one sixth of the island's registered voters are not even registered borrowers of the public library their knowledge of the world in which they live cannot be said to be extensive. The responsibility of those who do read books is therefore increased enormously and the resulting danger of acquiring all knowledge from books becomes real. The selection of books for reading in the public library particularly for the juvenwho now form more than half of the public library's reader* becomes a greater responsibility than ever. A little knowledge is a dangerous thing. John la'ordon In Aimi-M'.i When A Big Man's Life-Dreams Perish > the world. md dram. The next down the lba|i The Cure I do not suppose that even i ivith the Truman tricks. What does Mrs. Mamie Eisenhower think of the future dcatiny iecms to be shaping tor her'.' She has played her part through Jm tremendous week with a rauuon you. my youn man. that cnarm „„. „„,!„,, y^, na ^p. — see the spots coming ured a(1 hearts—Uiough women out on you. jump i the coldei •ay they cannot understand wh, river you cam find and get your she ^n her hair in these pecutemperature down again. lu>r bangs. Men reputed to be wise are c_ p an |* I I11CU %  fanta t king* queen*—oh vc>\ they have agents just the sai TT 1 ,!" CSJS* 5T"!" *' K B happened. But a monarch Is the toughest job In ^^ ^^^ to me u *)£ „ „„,„, the world. „, a „„„„ „„,(„, on. "li.'ftF ?,. *, k 1 ">> ambition Is a most he way with them en that, hut dcva5U „ ng disease to catch, r i( v..ii hanker after a |oh of the sort here's a bit of wue advice. .. yo „ Should we ever become a republic and Jmyom. suggest that you run for President, hit hi on the head and run like mad. After a week spent watching pronV'to'tell Innocent" youth that unfortunate men who have been ^ wty (Q -at a trunk In life la SHE nearly fainted in the pro bitten wi That •" when a woman ,, oWntU. i gjg,gj ^*££Jft*£$£ stout dowagers proceeding down ** r f*aKe-> Park lane toward* midnight waving double liftli-ed pictures of 1 wonder II Ike is happy abou; mc. \ earing crasy hats it alt. He never seemed to me to i „ inscribed "J Ltkm Gordon," an1 be lr>mg very hard. He did not -^hat „ question to ask a %  hunting a v.*.).-. (1,IT,. .I...!, 1 i-lier" she snapped. The subject Yrt lh..l la what has been hap. dropped pening in Chicago every night *0 M^ Americansand Ikecall her Mamie. Hut to her daugnv law and Ike's grandchildren ah is Mimi. Her Treasure HAS her marriage been a sueDinner Jacket Tyranny LONDON. Mr. Malcolm MacDonald. Commissioner.] for South-East Asia has slapped clown the old idea that the Pukka Sahibs, Tuans and Bwanas in the tropics must ri'k' "thS' alw y wear dinner jacket at night-time. fu u onoao o wv' M noonnav^ ovM The Democrats will like wild cata. The tricks the, Taft machine tried to play on: Mr MacUonald believes in changing into kin win be nothing compared, evenlrl( dress—he makes a point of thatT-1ITT1-HI fs-'ialfc PAN BOOKS THE WIDEST SELECTION IN TOWN On Sale Al _,-_,-., ADVOCATE STATIOXfcBl ally to newspaper girls sudd „. asked her if she w worried over leavmu foi I his week. 1 cant imagine Claridges, the Savoy, or the Bitz til lowing carnival processions of brass bands to walk in at their front doom, nigh their foyers, and up and down tholr corridors wtienever they felt their exuberance rising. Yet the swank hotels of Chicago have had to put up with that all day and halt the night ell. Too Tough Although the town Is not quite wide open as it used to be, as a taxi driver lamented to me the lights sUII go round and round till the dawn comes up. And hether you have a dollar or n million In your pocket you can get a meal or a drink anywhere up to 4.30 in the a.m„ which is now the legal closing hour. If you think that is making hfo a bit too tough, believe me things are not so bad, for many place-* which announce that they must —6T keep the law—close at 4.30 announce also that they will T-Tr 8 Scnlto?' Taft ha. been * m **> "* v ? much whclhrr many months. He has been travor J i hrM <**?* %  ,._ v „ elt.ng ceaselessly up and down T 'f"' ,l <•< *££"".wK the American ontlnVnt, showing **lded that the mon *** *%& himself to the elector.. n H lave ^ " hlm WPre u Uule -Archie %  .".' the pr... ;ii. tt 1.1 more pay wilhuut mire production 1'ioi.Jd apply to MPi. loo -out whn the deuce %  POllU more teoulacess in a land where marriage* dnn't seem to las: too long? Thi answer Is that she still treasure above all things in the world the little heart-shaped jewel box Ike tfave her on their first weddine ..: rUvanavji if 1 feel a litUe sorry for Mamie in the rhonths and perhaps years of little privacy thai lie thead of her, I cannot help feeling deep sympathy for the InvahJ Mrs. Taft. In spite of her disabkli. ties following the strokes she %  offered 18 months ago. she has plaved her part in the fight these fast few days like a very br.ive woman. She sat in hrr wheelchair through endless, nmsy, cxhamUnu receptions laughing off her troubles vlth the joke that she wai wiirr. ng about her double chin showing on the photographs. I urn sure the week will lM\ i permanent mark upon her. II seems a pity Hi were not to be compensated by i victory for her husband. How he must hate the sight of •ople now. Poor Senator Taft uldn't drink a cup of coffee %  thout the news being known. Every time he changed his pyjamas In n strange town n .1 columnist regarded_lt as the scoop of the week, columnist Is usually and women columnists are not l\o. no. no FOH nearly seven years Gen. more than he cared to take. He said so with an asperity most unusual for him. And behold FOR nearly seven year I what happens. Down fell tho Eisenhower withstood the Rapub* walls of Jericho, the Citadel was lienn political suitors before hc would allow his name to be put his. forward as prospective candid...c. The difference )>etwecn Eisen|„ „ new biography,—-Man of ine local n ower md MacArahur, who for Destiny" to be published by "*"• all his Indisputable genius would, Heinemann's tomorrow — the 1 think, bo a disastrous President, juthor. Kevin McCann, lists the my ideal of pleasant people to if that MacArthui-a driving Noes" as:— m ^. t, „ L_ .'motive in life ts the glm-iftcntion JUNK lf45: "I'm a soldier The harassed Scnutoi has had of tSjuArthur, while Ike says nohodv thinks of ine M a politill 11 ^. 8 .."'I 10 kct 'l' ln th n ou| riulte simply, and believes it. that clan." -ii Mut he hi,.,, lilk ,. s hls ,„(, senously but JANI'AKV 1947: "Nothinp in managed to get away with it nvvrr hi mse lf. the International or domestic tsiiumore easily than most by pleadx^,,, months of MacArthur as atlon especially qualilles for illing Uiat his invalid, wife must not president ond America would be -nost important office in the worU quarrelling with tho world. Which R man whose adult years haw !" W is not what either America or the been spent in the country'" mill world wants or needs. taty forces." MARCH I94S: He is "considerMore difficult Infinitely than nK the presidency of Columki.i be disturbed. It took Senator Taft months to get his smile fixed on what I am told is normally a rather ruthless face. But it took General Dwight D. Eisenhower anything Truman has expertUniversity lust a week to rub it off. enced in office are the days that DECEMBER 11*50: "I'm Never have I seen so swift and lie ahead for America. And officer on the active list." pathetic a change in any man. It Kisenhower certainly has a tough And firm Up seemed to happen in a few hours, journey ahead of him if he is MAT 19??: He consented. One day Taft was on top of filing to the White House. I. I tl Puerto Ilico Sliotv* Economic* And Social Progress SAN JUAN. Puerto Rico, nym for sugar cane. More than With over one-third of thi More than 2,000,000 Americans 50 percent, of all Puerto Kican island's total budget being allo on the sunny Caribbean island of agricultural workers still farm cated to education It Is expected Puerto Rico are showing bow prosugar cane, but pineapple, tobacthat more than 10.000 students %  tress toward self-government can co, and coffee are becoming ineach year will be able to receive be achieved under democratic rreasingly important. spenftc technical training. stewardship. New dock facilities are being With the overwhelming rutillconstructed to handle increased In the field of general education cation ol their now Constitution sluppinn trathc from U.S. ports, a new system of secondary eduon March 3. 1952. Puerto Rlcans Passenger traffic through San cation known as the Morovis plan will govern themselves as a comJuan's lsla Grande airport is is in operation. Started in the munwealth under the United steadily on the increase. town of Morovla two years ago States flag. Eradication of slums and In;this plan is now being used Keeping abreast of the progress piuvement of existing housing six other communities and will in M'lf-government has been the facilities is another ambitious be extended throughout the conuniuand social development project undertaken by the govisland. of the Island during the last eight crnment. The government has also Under the Morovis plan, seeyears ad tracts of land to which ondary education is made availFaced With the problem of it is moving the best houses from able to students who cannot atmalnlalnlng over 2,200,000 people shim areas. Central sewage and tend a regular secondary school in an area of 3.435 square miles water faclUUM are installed by the because of Insdequatc transporta(8.931 square kilometers) — one, government and provided for the tion facilities or financial shortof the most densely populated renew dwellers at low cost. comings, gions on earth—the Puerto Hican The island's Social Programmt-.. government l|is been conducting Administration has also developed Each leackjr meets with hia vigorous economic development a plan by which rural families Mass aJMsej^BfcjjLhours once each programme. will be able to build their own week Ts na*t of ininn. iim-ti Known as "Operation Boothomes at an average cost of about by the nBBaB* In teaching i strap," this programme Is n con$300, The Administration will other Students receive the equivcerted effort to tree the island provide plans, a concrete block slant of secondary school diplomas from its customary one-and twonut-chine, and a few simple tools, upon successful completion of irop agricultural economy. One Administration construction entheir studies. method has leen to invite U.R. gineers will start the work and Puerto iiuos progress in indusbusinessei to establish new plants supervise construction during its trial cxpansLon and in political, n Puerto Rico. Initial stages. educational, and social advanceOver 150 plants have opened Under this plan each family ments has Inaaated the morale of Ince the programme began live will make a cash payment of only its residents. years ago Ttwy are producing $20 initially, pay an additional $10 Teodoro Moscoso, chief of the such varied items as cement, iron when the house is completed, and Island's Economic Development castings, candy, textiles, shoes ihen pay about $2.50 a month Administration, says: pottery,'and rndio sets. over a 10-year period. "Our greatest asset is the wonDespite this rapid industriallzaThe Puerto Rlcan government derful fact that with no resources tion, ajnculture is still dominant, is atso expanding its educational to speak of, a people who should Bul hs;re. too, diversification is facilities so that its cltiaens will be desperate have great hope." being encouraged. The Island's be able to assume more responsi(I'.S.A. — Territories A Po-ssesagriculture is no longer a synoble positions. sions) but he leaves the jacket at home. Recently, Mr. MacDonald looking cool and trim, went to hear American singer Helen Traubel Me wore black trousers, white shirt, black tie, but, as usual—no jacket. Hide-bound old-timers, sweltering in their coats, spluttered over their whisky sodas. They even protested openly at what they considered was his lack of adequate dress. Now he has forcibly answered his sartorial critics in a letter to the Straits Times. CallinK on Malaya to "break with the tyranny of the dinner jacket", he asserted that "fine Imperial statesmen and shining incuts who happened also to be sensible men" had discarded their coals in other parts of the Commonwealth. His critics continued Mr. MacDonald, seemed to think that a jacketless evening dress was a "crude innovation." "It is nothing of the kind. For a long time, various sunny parts of the British Conv monwealth accepted as evening dress for men a black tie. white shirt, black cummerbund, black or white trousers and no coat". This was the regulation wear at dinner parties, during the hot weather, at Government Houses, including those of Indian proconsuls, he stated. "If the critics had arrived wearing a coat for dinner at these Residencies, they would have been politely de-coated and regarded as ignorant of the proper dress for gentlemen. "Dinner jackets are designed for cool climates, not for the tropics. The dress looks more aesthetically pleasing without the superstructure of a white jacket which contributes nothing to the effect except an occaM*m;il awkward bulge, and frequently trickles with perspiration". Mr. MacDonald's letter follows a recent incident when members of a stage touring party who were entertaining troops Malaya were refused entry into an army mess because Ihey were not wearing evening dress. The Manchester Guardian in a leader headed "Political Undress" says: "The Commisioner-General's behaviour in Malaya has always been 'unofficial' in a far wider than the sartorial sense. By his swimming parties, with Asian students, his hospitality to all sorts of Asian people, and his refusal to join clubs which exclude Asian guests he has trodden hard on the corns of Europeans who are finding it impossible to move with the times. The relinquishing of the dinner-jacket on ail except State occasions by high persons in Singapore can do little except make them a little more human in the eyes of the ordinary Chinese. Indians and Malays. There may have been Asians— and even British—at the notorious concert who could not afford a dinner-jacket, and the more Britain's representatives identify themselves with such average people the better. Less stuffiness and exclusivity on the part of offlelal personages in Malaya will make Britain's declared mission there^—the establishment of a democracy—a good deal less difficult of fulfilment. Take Ihe guesswork out ol weighing with: NEW COUNTER SCALES (10 lbs.) NEW SPRING BALANCE KITCHENSCALES (7 lbs. & 23 lbs.) C. & PITCHER & CO. Ph. Our Headers Say: w Privatr Ufnir Y.M.P.C. as Croncy and dikes ing farts to your kind conjddcra_ „,. , ... M <\ not show up on Sunday ti To The Editor. The Adroroif— p cr80 nallv I thought, and Mr. Firstly the riota broke out In SIR.— In veslerdiiys issue_ ol Hewitt agreed, triat this match I-ahore. in Pakistan. That is an the Adt-orale O.N Looker en tiwa> a private affair financed by internal affair in Pakistan and the composition of tho tne B.C.L. and myself for the India has nothing to do with ft purpose of giving the D.C.L. side Your news headline as 'Indian Riots Broken-Up' la very mis of B (' A Intermediate slda ing that only five players were Additional practice worthy of their places and he i the method used by the B.C.A. in aeleetinc Us* team In raplj may I he permitted to he side Is an entirely '^.iir. The Secretary of the 11C L. asked me for a fixture against C. F. Hci-rison A Co. Ltd. I resisted this suggestion as Harrisoi.MM too weak a combination, in my view, to oppose To The Editor, The -4drocole— OM B.CX Mr. Hewitt then agreed SIH— With reference to yout a match %  gainst Internews item "Indian Riots BrokenR C Mt'RTY MS... Dip. Lib mediate players selected by me. Up" on page six of the Barbados Y.M.C.A.. Incidentally, five of llic players ^dvoraie dated July 2Dth. 1M2. Pinfold Street. IBM look part, play for the I would like to draw the follow29th July. 1W2. Yours faithfully, W r, 1IOYOS. Drxt.Tville". Belleville. 30th July. 1952. ••Riot*" ^Immediate Independence" LONDON. IF resolutions put down by two local Labour parties were accepted by the British Labour Party annual conference in September, the next Socialist Government would be committed to grant "immediate independence" to all British colonies and dependencies. These resolutions, however are unlikely to be approved by the main body of the Labour Party. Other resolutions call for the withdrawal of all British troops from Malaya and other colonies. One says that the dependent territories should be offered instead "technical and material assistance to help in their development." Some of the views expressed in these resolutions are clearly against the general trend of opinion in the LabourParty. One. for instance, calls on the Party to urge the with drawal of British troops from Korea. More in line with present opinion in the Party are two resolutions calling for longterm development of the Commonwealth and Colonies to enable this country to become independent of United States supplies. This is also seen as a means of raising the standard of living of Commonwealth and i:il people and solving the "greatest problem facing the world, namely the international economic unbalance." A number of resolutions deal with the question of the Federation of African Territories. Most of them express the view that there should be no federation without full leading People here might not be accustomed to differentiate between India and Pakistan, but we must admit the fact that thev are two independent countries and news headings like the one; consultation of the Africans in those lerriln todays paper can create a lot. of mistrust among the different WTBBfc sections of Indians here. Yours sincerely. The South African Government is severely attacked for its racial discrimination and segregation policies. Many local Labour parties are against any form of colour bar "wherever it operates." 'flta New Gasrlle Motor Mower to whip awsy the rouxhest snd toughest grass. 98 cc Villiers New Minor Motor Mower —an Ideal machine for smooth liwns. The Fealherllxht \rlel Mower Is amaxlnxlr easy for a lady to use. 12" or 14" Blsdes The Ions proven Tiger llandmower hat no peer in iiHeld. Da Costa & Co., Ltd. fiaphone G0DDARDS FOR }(>! K mi.xiv frndos Don't forget our FRIDAY'S SPECIAL $1.50 PER LUNCHEON Pepper Pot West Indian Sweet Potatoes BreaJfruit Rice Steamed Beet Root Toast — Marmalade Cofle* Tea MEAT DEPT. CHICKENS DUCKS TURKEYS RABBITS FROZEN HADDOCK rRESH VEGETABLES Order Your ENRICHED SANDWICH .BREAD to-day BUTTER I1EANS 16c. per lb. Visit our . SWEET COUNTER Sharp'. sVMbj Nut Hull Chocolates Marsh Mallr-ivs Pascal's Glucose Carr's Crackers Craven A Cigarettes State Express JUST ARRIVED Al.I. RRAN RICE KIIISPIES LOBSTER PASTE LIVED PASTE BOX FISH liotHardN Rrstaurant -i.




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fM.l SIX CLASSIFIED ADS. ""*" BARBADOS ADVOCATE TIILRsDAV. JULY JL 1952 SALES III MMMM I IMIMI' T(irMONI rso. REAL ESTATE IN MKMOKIAM MM\ . Til, M %  ti HAMKO HELP i OK SALE AUTOMOTIVE %  c rjn-D OVEHBEEH Plantation. Si Andrti Manager n v**n otBrr ajisarMfiaa -'"n* qualification, an,, 1 um No night dub*. i %  -.,.' wn : aT r N AIJ. THAT MESSUAGE AT TUOOR STHTBT and the land on which it ete**** built of .tune and covered wtUi Galvanlaa al ptce—>1 rer t*o out a* t* •hopa prodigting aa Imir ol !M 4*41**. l-f annum Suitable for a bond with enough land to erect IIMVC building. >iapacli"n an. day en ^pltrpli-n "* i*t up Competition at -nVe VICTuf'IA STHfcKT IIIIIMl ,AUUl'*"I ^M7 It A NT II KM MeKENZIE I SEA AND AIR TRAFFIC In Carlisle Bay i C, Jaham, W Joknaan, D H TMniwr. FUmn-*> Dh*al-hillip. J. Rc-liMM. D. Mad Mam-all T M,,*o. R • ran. Trial*.* '; HaJM %  D M.I.,., ... %  ? in*on. C. Mariai R Thorn %  raSega IBM r kft*****g N la. a Hutch V Mar lam ..__... .. „_^__ . Oiddard. M rnlna J Clarke T Hull Mm %  dd, V l**i.. N Lewi. Padtai i >a ton* bl* i>nr Cochin. DaCoata 31 T 5S—an. SWIJCBMAX Salesman and General Ap*>ly — Cecil L Btr.ker A C Sajeet. Bridget....!, •X MISCELLANEOUS CAK iftM Rik Hittman Kino, lie** lad I a. Rotdnaon. Cardan louae, St George. Dial IBM. SI T SS-*. T 99 In .ON i| > Medicine II graduated preferred good pr Knigr-.w i.td 1 M ft*? fO POCKET MONEY i KXDirrusioN i attDeFFUSION off-., |i M ca.h I *h new Suber-rlber reco.nrnenile.1 7au. II M- SlriTI.tMX.NT YOUR INCOME b% recommend INK REDlm'SlOH. OMdiB full pertleul.ri from the KEptrTUBtON "•Be* I JM-f. TWENTY-FIVE DOLLARS • nom Rediiruiion for re IIOH. In one calendar month MID I rAaO %  I Quantititol clean paaiallv RADO* riiii plica* an applicatki ii'i.-l", %  PKIINO* AI. |n %  puMtr arc n Kivirif credit to Vaiigh.n (nee Patr. %  rur.elt reapoii.iblr rlr r..,i trading dnj name unleix h ., be nWNOIMIMIMS CARS ON MtRR—Friend, public tn know that yoi brand new .ell-driven car* F<*Uatir Di.l 3TIJ EARN RIO KONBY by aaHinc lirdu Mori In your npnta lint CJ.t tf formi today. nil o LOST A IOI\l LOST Cna II T t 1 U'KCT tui Buai inf. >fli (XJ>> .. i rA Flndar „l.", Nur-r T aaundarr. Dial aadd .11 7 il FOR HEIST HOUSES A-1 UN AND NOW I NATlllALI/AflOV %  rihi •*** %  "i-t MANS iJUMNNYM-Plr M.n.,..1 ; -ppl\ ma iu | yrnoi tor nnturalifailon. and Inat *raritl l*iieU ,i 30 T U In AUCTION SALE DAIRY coys REX DAIRY FARM IIOTIIIKU II IMM, . MlehaaJ IO.IIAY a AUCTIONEERS Jad.M.Bl.4.. a> cat. l'llour 4640 PlanUllom Building. CAK-Dodge Buper-d* Una iX-aH' Will >ll (or rath, ben edtar. bought unallar car. PlrM data order, owr*r drlvrn. Dial OH. HI M-t In CAR Furd V.| Super DeLua* X-7M nil >ell at bargain price, enqulrtea to I D Slewart. Dial 3SU 71 7.BJ-*i I '-TOXVOJt ftlaa* Nock. St Mlahaal d daiRabli buncatovtypc D"! mi. hduae. • tending on 3 rood* 30 perchn if land, end ran tuning open imarMr-tllrd • rrandah lo North and Ea*L dri -nd dining roonu. 1 badrooaa* %  lining water), and uiual convenience, all on and San. aatd, on ground lent. rfMraSgejJ Kilebrn be—hrtat re— *raab> I'-om. atere -iid Governmenl Water inaiailed Garage fee two ran. arrvant* rooar-a. rued houaa. Soe.'*r garden, lawn, and orchard. M apacteua yard. The bewee and outbulldtnfa have Juil i*.fi repaired and palntrd throughout. Inep-ction any day (except Sunday liom^M a in lo 4 r>-n. en appi on A watao*. r 1 C, %  n*. *choon*. Tempfo. V Le Fra.ice. W Smith •* fa* P Fu-tcr. K Fortar. E Hold. 1 %  /•< %  %  '.t I%  • '' M.D..' '" l: %  %  • H K...I-. A • n I Nathan fl Nathan F <>.-. Paddock, n r*. St Savoon. P. Hchael J %  agen I) Wallace Sti F. !" i Aruba M V. Maaeieh. J Met. ah G Mahal. M Ua>liria.man. MV. Gloria M.ii. —U. X. Haaaell. U, H. lrlcl1>, O-r srt —"•' Rowwenr. M bat. Cep* ~ %  rtUab QHHM. Aimi,; Stnounri tl*m ," *ai'l. II.IH ion.. Cap* Perre. from TrlnMad Agmu Me*ar> H M Jonaa C llr| % %  PARTICM MV CUre b.r Trinidad; "I •> Schle lor TnnkaM and S.R Rraril I TRUCY Chevrolet truck, no e br offer refuaed A Barnea %  Co id 31.BS—4.1.1 TREVOR" The above properUe* will be aef tip (r aal* fev Public Competition at our Office, Jamea Sueet. IHldg*tou. on Friday, let Auguit at 1 Mi YFARWOOD A BOYCE. . gHan 11.7 ts7n Seauwll la i*s, n Rider. I) II *on. I rriliaen. H VllUfaiu K G...-I-. man. L HoberU. C Seolt. V Kcu-nd. J Reevnde. P Reiende M fei-i.1. V Oill. U Gill. 5 GUI. y Oeneaa, Alrj, Id>we. J Oirrfc* |( >n. E Blrae, A. Sparey. I Kong. V. Durant. J ~ Miner. H rjareraea ... WUkye Cheetaa, i. Jotaru C. Parr.vlclnn. | Miner. J. Miner ..,,_. Thoinaa. E. Beu. G WrJkei Fa* Veaeiaela: FURNITURE AUCTION ITItNITirRf; Maatei Eugene Van Middle, worth ARRIVAL* Bl RWIA 1*?*'." J £" DeU *r n Ml M r ". M1 ara.is.-ajssr-a.ss est t r^."^„ ^.rssSr a. Tssrzs ssss. sS^SiaSrS-aa? „ AysrJs&tst K= h ss;.5= Er^sc sz Herbert AareuaB. 0|ftdyt Spin, u< „,„„ -T* ,,; ir p „, complala with i Flirnnura Fill parTU-nJI 7 ta-ln LIVE*TUCK Ti in-day al I p in H'dtoerwl Tui Id b* aurtlo.i n at !'• %  Dairy l.nn. ing. II head! of Dair> pedlgrr-r llol-t.li Hull 31 t M—Ii. LIVESTOCK I the Hi. ceapectKi M.mah Str*M, at POULTRY PIGEONS—A few ix e-llvrr A Whl MKCIIANICAI. AROARET GROVE ui whrreon tha na %  belonging containing by a-inieaeurewieni > rood! a 7/10 parchaa ; ritual* at Bank IIal> Croaa Rnad. Salnl Michael. Tlie nouae I* a -lonewail building end the land I* good arable land For Inepectlon apply on the p-emlae. I.I the owneia Corporal T F Danner .l 1-S CO.. Solicit or.. 1*1/IIS Roebuck Slml Telephone 3faIS. Ml U 7n T* I* phot 31 7 B3—1> I'lHi.n xirniis I NOTICE Lo Cu.toniera and the genera. 1 public: Our wboleeal* Bu.inee* will be i loaad for our annual holiday dorr 1 IMS Aogu.l until the Itlh MISCEI.iaANEOUS AITTO ACCESSORIER Including cool %  hlona. tiphntatery realnr. fibre aeat %  •ring, green canvaa. cMome wheel I.*., aleeringwheel cover., iun vlaor. -ood dreaaing. cigarette lighter, it and l volti. revere* limp, iieencr holder.. Men niirrrra tear & Truck), lyr j.n.gea ICar and Trerlu. inaulaling tape. %  i. .i ... in .1 4.-.1 3S7 M-gp %  trie generator lampa (Mil I'.n.iutig kit* Bolullon i %  ale peirei. FlJihlight* rreaa ciiaik a lb tm.i. imn.pa. rim tapea, T)M_ etc. Courteiy Garage. Dial 43SI. SS.1.R urludllii! eleccr a. lmpeKi. ipeclal wlraleind batleela., Brake block. and tul*. "THE A. from ne ; lardian %  wii Noncfc ardaj will be lit HtaNUE, .Old I a* a reault. the price tnntead ol IBc The bafBf**. however. ...hi 31 7 53—li NOTICE IS MKItKHY GIVEN thai It I. Ov in>n of the Vetry of the parl'li thla I.land to rai.Ki lot %  iI'iiiK 1 gtalu I aaid Sa>nt %  .; %  i il'K SATIN J attain) ov il Ulna and Dark Green 38 Ida uaually MM >ard redured .illll-Al-ANl M Swan Street 31 1 Maralml i Kin. 10 Rl 11 In i-nablo I lie ..1,1 i ..ml B*Uiand lalrtn*. al It. Simon. Di.tcd thu 38th day of July, 1*1 CARRINOTON A HEALY Hollcitara fae the Ve*m of St Andrew %  l %  la GLL'E KETTIJ-S -A Glue Kelllc that I it.-hi that von dont rpirlla* iu IN enaa In your kit and how efficient. mint. i<> Irak and unbreakable line II ill Harrteon 31 1 lifiPOHDR-Clearing all Mock, of 7 i.I'M l...ord. at 3 for tl.MJ al Da CiqU a> Co Lid llactriral Department 33 1.H~n NOTICE All mala clUaana of tha United Stataa liatwaen th* agea of IS and M reHduag In Barbadoa are requeued lo call th* American Conaulate from July I 31, leM for a*4actlve Service Rcgi.lraf.un inter tha UnlveiMl MlUUry TralnUSi %  .-.%  !.-" Aet. AU mala clUaena of the United State. CHANCERY SALE %  % %  : %  . %  n 1J noon and I p i i aold. il anil b* aet Ihe earn* hour* unll The R eg 1 •(ration OfRce, SAM UMM The under man tinned prapatty will Public Ihiltdir.r. Hildgat..-.. the dale .pacified below If Friday at the ..me place and during CLABENCF. SAMUJB. KWO -Plaintiff -nil NATHANIEL PILGRIM Defendant FWrlTI.Y ALL THAT certain piece or paiccl of land altuala at Y.wood-. Gap off Blirck -%. k "m the p_^.h of *L.n?M "ru£i%,J I.land aforeaald .-onulnirgi by admea>ur*rn*n| one rood twenty u-^te-5T3 la"2rrS A *"" n " >•' >* L Da-tlkf. no land* of one Arthur decwaacri. on lanrli ol ..I 1. Cadngan and on Public KuM or howc.ci ei-e the .„,.,, m „ abut and bound and SETOWTyLY Al-L THAt 'certain p.c* or parcel ... Una .lluate at Htitbitm Rcaid V %  „,. Ml.h,,: IIHI laland % %  ( Barbadna afueeuMt containing bv adraaaaaueap; enl mdtng w Pflh. perch.>a or IhrreabouU AbuUmg and I i-nrta i w H Leach on land* of Blanch Oitten* on nuiketl mi land* of Martha Bowi. however elae the aammay abut and %  uaaiuagw ur dwelllnghouac and all ami Public Road or bound Together with the ingular other in* liuildlng* H WILLIAMS. Ketl.tr.rIn -Cham-n' July. 1B03. 31 7 S3TAKE NOTICE U A That THE GUIA.VA MATtll IACTOHY LIMITED l ,""" nj 1 "' -' %  i... '!-Tt". < *^?M ?V' *Z'\!' n "' %  % %  •"" -PP<" 'or Ihe reglit aaaa* n „ ^" A /'' Regiiler in reapect at maiche*. and -III be oarUUad t.. ._! "•• %  %  ne after one month Iram the 3l.t da\ of Jul>. 1.M. unieaa ^.ine H-SIIT" '" l '"tlioa n^null.* in duplM-te In me at my ofTlce Of grpiMlllcm <>( .uch regUlRr-— %  i% office Dated ihli aird dav of %  -1.ppgg itlM law Regni II TAKE NOTICE tSa of la smsCRIRE now to the Dally ''Iriraph. EiiKlinn'. leading Dally New.ipai now arriving In Barbados brr Air %  l> a few daya after publication In mdon. Contact Ian Oale. C/a. Aden. I* Co. Ltd Local Representative -t. 311". tta.33—t fi July 31, Itn, ara required regtetar upon th* day tbey attain the Igtilaanth annlver.ary of (he day of ihalr birth. %  Her For furthi 1 Informatii aaulata. Eld*Town, Bar i il id. day* thatritult (he KGDL I CICARFrTES H Srwarw. K HurvMUe. L Chaae. C lt.dmaiM St. John. S Davi**. X C.-wer. M Ooper. P. Mai .hall. L Braoiwait* A aV^iurfo.d. Clarke. E B..n r > ""[KllT H. Haywood, M Bn.tol D Wile., r Clalrrnonte P. Walker D Jccmaon. Be\d A Arm.lri.na-. C Arn • iron*. H Axindell. F Olti.i %  st Hoe* Mr. dement Bourne. Mr Ed vard Elliott. Mr J.hn Do* Samoa. Mia. I tner Reach Pre.alhomnaL :-nBMraii ; June 3*ui. aa-d j aaai JaJy safe, awt**a*| at Barbadoa about Augwat **fe. In addition to general cargo thla Taaael >-* ample apac* (or chiliad aad hard rrueaat efanfa. Caraja acoaptaa an throuxh BBU pi l-dina for traiiahlpmant at Ttlnldad lo ;;.iti.h Guiana, ta n wa jd aad *TB>iaiai*T %  aaaaaaV Fat furthat paauoauan apply— i uNr.i *nit m CO„ LT, Tlie kl V ..Ml! KCept L'^rg* and Paa.—uye' *•• >OBU*Mca, Antigua. MoaaainM, vevia and St Kltu Balling Phureda> 3Ut m-t Tha M/V 'M UN EX A %  ••ft carajo -id P aaaaagi Ai i gut. Maul %  ill HE, Cheque! tud Dr.lt. Cable Currancy ()yf/re//(' 'PL TAKE NOTICE IT! p) H. en* Curtia. America popm.ir hair Cwmellc — ]u*t a fee adit glortnua radiance to YOU K l Ltd 30 7,a3—3n Atnerh-an Toy. which InDDCtai .iid Nuiee Kit.. Beach Pl**Dla. (Miinem* CaiJcepe ll.tou. Dippy Duck, and aevornl WEDDtNO GUTA %  d No-cord Iron art! aub)ect to apecial -ddlng-glfl allowan '".. Ltd 3 1 M— t f n TAKE NOTICE ZENITH uli. I 1.1. of I >i .-. s/aai %  ". 'Ii of Ctilcagn. Count, ol l-iitcl Slate, of Aninlc.i. tt upplied for the regtatratlon of a i.ile mark in Part "A" of ft.ii.1e. In |>ect of .lei-tin.il Inuring r Ida and I n DC, iintl will be entitled to >fl IW Brth fr. -in M 3i*t dav of July. lfM. iinleea aome "im hall in ihe nwaniline glv* notice I •l-.i|ilH-,ite In me at mv office rrf oppoH Itegi.tr.i II .ippllC.it Hill . %  of July, 1H1 Wn.LIAMS. %  T1...I. Maik. :..n.TAKE NOTICE BAR FOOD ,i KMtltMKM PRODUCTS UMITED. rpi .urd mul ie.gletri.il i Btrbadoa M.iiiuf.-ictureni. a hOae li jil..Idreaa I. In rare of Fiti rahaifl A CO., Itirclaya nonli t Itridgetown. ha.( a trail.i in leapect -i ... uaed a. i %  .! wUI %  • %  i. ... (.-• .... | | % %  ..tl. liiiiii the 1IM da> ol Jill. ag mile--' Mime paeaon ahall in Ihe • %  mitu-e In dupln-it. i" BM .1 .H>|H~iti<>n of >uih regi-nude mark can be aaen on ly, 19ui ii wn : l> i Dated IM %  I Jl. PilllAi-CO CORIf organiaea under Ihe law of Ihe Unit Ireland. Tobacco M.nul.i. tuiei > win 'I Houa*. 1. Mlilbank. I^nndon. SW. a trad* mark in Part "A" ol It.gutei will be entitled to reglatei Ihe .ame J lMl_.nl**. tome peieon .hall In ihe T, uch reguiratl fftt a applied imh from auon offic. f July IBM ihi. 33rd dar <•( July, IRH H WIUJAMs Pegkatra: of Trade Mark.. TAKE NOTICE CHAMPION Thai THE, STUDEBAKEK CHRIXWATION, .i corporation Of**! exlaung under Ihe law. of the State ol Delaware. United St.ile. ..f Acneit... r/.^iiufacturer.. whnae trade or biiMnc ondreaa % %  fOft Roulh Main Street. South Bend. Slate ol Indiana, U.S A n.i> applied lor tha I ir.arfc In J-arl "A' of automobile*. the :il.t cuof Julv IBU ShkM -can* perwm .hall In the meantime ff* nod.. in duplicate to nie at my office m appa ..i... ol Mgh i,,.u .i .-<: The Uad* mark c-n be iren an applkallon in m irRce Dated ihi. 33rd dav of July. Ift? II WILLIAMS R*gl.|r.ii ol TIJ.II' M.nk 31.7 S-3n i . md win be entitle II: Will be luguat. •rahlp Saturday, Snd %  %  %  Ir. %  o.bl. .t any tlrat ir snona urad* School %  taaag parent* mu.t "'-' %  %  %  aa han • %  • t'.r*taM*> imed Court, muat be. not I. han 10 year* olo and rara on l-t AppliiaUoni muat b. %  %  ••• .. Hutu t ideate under 14 Bap OSBOUHNF si v M : si *,, /.V/,V/,',V,V-V/,V,V,v// S Thundering Valuer § GOOD USED FUHMITHF ... r. 113. Liquor Ca*e< with lock. HW. Metal hehov". ;>. Round OiK Ihnin; Tab].or more IB VI,. Ml a fO PI.I i %  ...Ml IB. Old World %  .tod 110. Enamelled l-dwacr M. Smah %  -. r. and Coi I-., R-lled. O.h Chan. Chair* Da noimd n Varui.hed W Table* Work Baekel PIANOS. Portable Gramophone* a I vpcwritrt S3BO. Bi n.M laUUM Bl-V VIIW UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF TBF WEST INDIES EXTRA MURAL DEPARTMENT A LECTURE — ON — RECENT WEST INDIAN NOVELS — BY — PROFESSOR A. K. CROSTON IN THE IIAKKISON COLLEGE LIBRARY — ON — KRIDAY. AUGUST 1ST AT s mi P.M. ADMISSION .... |/_ ~ .... .. | ....... A^atf*? %  %  1 CENT* PER POUND f ## T .1 i• omm WOH THB POP! I. I MOV JOHN N. rillKIKA. Rickelt Streel (Easl of the Post Office), announces the arrival of 1.000 baskets of Medium WhileSkin I'ulutoes ox S S. "SCHIE" at $5.50 per basket of 55 lbs. JOII.X V. 1KHEMH\ lIHISSION MERCHANT) Rickett Street : L S. WiLSON | $ SPRY BT4IET RIAL **• g It ;WWV, V ,V,V,y//^J \ t SSa i a cS SSStS MM SS al M a^f^-r-----. I NEW TOM SEBVICE. 1 ? ,'?,f.* P OA _*V*" MlU "" AiSu.t arrive. Barbadoa 3*tli August S ALCOA PLANTER.all* Mh Beptpmber -..ni.e. Barbado. 17th September NEW OILCANS A STEAMER gaflg I7lh July — aim A BTKAMBR .ath 31tt July urit ITrEAMBR Mil* lath Augurt am. STEAMER Mlla ttth Aiiguil ami srEAMXH u nth S e par t waaa — artfv • llarbado* 3rd AuauU Barbadoa Itith Barbaajoa %  Barbadoa 30th Auguit %  Bnrbad'13th September Barbadoa 37th September CANADIAN SfcEVRI SOI'TN BOUND restores digestion %  |>i>l'hrinft quick felieifof indipesliaa disv.riif.fi. brj r w Ml w l lrim SKBSM vtunuK'h livid, fjfkan lire OHM of aficirn*Ml( dltuaai tin. IIICJ-UICIIIIOH: • "llllv icaClW>t///li>i.'inliaRKd Mill'.KV. of the ommh wiih ilv gxnlk. wolhing acnoo. %  '. "' % %  Ii r .i, I %  IndlKcvliun lll.p.|r.lil M. vri'iini llatulcnrc Gaetric % acldt(.,etc. ^ IS CARtOMI Of II MIA3URI0 DC:.:'. ARGOalEC TYRA" A to TEAM Ell %  STEAMFK tla-lraal Ml.I MM HaUtal July is Jtuy as AuguM 1 Julys* .!... Auguit 11 A.igU.t II Augu.l 16 Augu-t Augu.l SB September 1 "pl ir. NORTBBOUND A STEAMER Dua Barbado*. Auguit KOBEKT THOM LTD.— KEW YORK OVLW 8EAVICK Aply:— DA COSTA A 00LTD. CANADIAN SERVICE HARRISON LINE OUTWARD FROM THE UNITE!) KINODOM Vrsarl S S. 'SCHQL-AR 1 S.S. "CROFTER S.S. "SPECIAUST" S.S. "TROJAN STAR' Prom London and Mybroufh i London Glasgow and la/pool Liverpool Leave* Due Bar bade 26th July 10th A;I.T 2nd Aug. 15th Aug. 2nd Aug. 16th Aug. 2nd Aug. 15th Aug. DOLLAR OF DECCA RECORDS BINC CROSBY Down by the Hivt-i When the bloom is on the mm It's a lonely trail I'm falling in live with someone Gypsy love song l-mlr Sir Echo Poor old Rover Going my way Su. inking on a star Aren t you glad you're you In the land of beginning again Welcome jo my dream Il's anybody's spring IVlMlllallity Would You. Soon I wished on the moon Two for to-night Empty Saddles Round-up Lullaby Juot one v/urd] of consolation Dear old gal Sweet Leilani Blue Hawaii Dancing under the Stars Palace in Paradise Speak lo me of love Thai big base viol Ixioping ihe loop My inspiration BRADSHAW a CO. %  OUIAU roa rat CNrm> UNODOM S.S. "CRISPIN" S S "FORESTF.II .. London .. Liverpool Clow in Barhtd.i-. 31*t July 1st AUK. For further Information apply to DA COSTA A CO. LTD.—Agaatl WE HAVE — — HEM HOOFING I'AIVI al S I...0 per (.allon THE VEXTRAM. EMPORIUM One Bread and Tudor su. AT LAST! A HYCIEMC STOPPER YOVR FLASK FOR THK SEAL-A-VAC WILL NOI "POP OUT" CANNOT l.KAK DISMANTLES. QUICKLY FO. EAST CLEANTNO FITS ANY l.PINT FLASK HIGHEST THEIHAL EFFICIENCY FOR HOT AND COLD LIQUIDS :i7e. EACH. GENERAL HARDWARE SUPPLIES RICKETY STRUT (Orpotfte PMt (iriic.l PHONE WII Am* MODERN HEAVY DUTY MASSEY HARRIS GRASS HAIU ESTl.M. EQEiPMEXr GRASS LOADER SIDE DELIVERY RAKE tl 1## lltii; FROM STOCK. Secure Your Requirements Now COURTESY GARAGE (Robert Thorn l.in..i..1> •%'hilepnrk Hd. — Dial 1616