Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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at
Water Polo, Aquatic Club





ESTABLISHED 1895



NAGUIB BEY WARNS ABOUT
FOREIGN INTERFERENCE

Army General Promises

Corruption Clean-Up
NILE REJOICE OVER ~ ——

FAROUK’S DEPARTURE |

CAIRO, July 28, |
Egypt's new government re-established itself in Cairo)
to-day, promising the relentless country a wide cleanup of;
bribery and corruption in the wake of King Farouk’s abdi-
cation. The country’s new military power, Major General;
Mohammed‘Naguib Bey promised that he and Premier Aly |
Maher Pasha would meet with armed force if necessary |
any attempt at demonstrations or disorders.

Naguib warned, too that the
army would tolerate no foreign
interference~as the cal — =
its summer capital at
for Cairo and the ousted monarch
sailed toward Italy in the royal
yacht “Mahroussa.” With Farouk
were his six-month old son, now
Egypt’s King Faud II. Farouk’s
teen age second wifg Narriman,
a his three daughters by a pre-

ous marriage. Premier Mohammed Mossadegh

One newspaper said that the|jo baby King would be returned 2 Iran’s oil resources, indicating con-|
Egypt when he oe yore fident hopes of a settlement with
i e at — aS thelr Britain that would end the crip-

pling blockade of this near-bank-
eee The Cabinet meanwhile, rupt nation’s. chief money make
temiporarily held royal powers|'UP' " : ; ae
pending the creation of a regency



Mossadegh —
Will Exploit
Iranian Oil |

TEHERAN, Iran July 28

As the Premier spoke to Par-



MR. NORMAN

W.I. Should

MANLEY





To DieIni-Day Trial

| conducted the defence at the request of the Crown.





TUF DAY,

-_—_——

JULY 29, 1952



Butcher Condemned

Found Guil'y Of Killing
Former Common Law Wife

VALMAR SMALL, J6-year-old butcher of New Or-
| leans, was yesterday found guilty of the murder of Gwen-
| dolyn Small, his former common law wife on the 20th of
| February. His Lordship the Chief Justice, Sir Allan Colly-

. Kt., prerownced the death sentence.
| The jury returned their verdict of guilty after delib
' erating for 25 minutes, five minutes less than His Lordship
| took to sum up the case which ended after only one day's |

hearing. In returning their. verdict of guilty, the jury re-|

n : DR, CATO (extreme left) Sir All
jected an “insanity plea” made by Mr. F. G. Smith, who}

Governor Sir Alfred Savage ch
Saturday night (See page 2)





The Crown alleged that on the
20th February sometime between
6 p.m. and 6,30 p.m,, the accused
| Vatmar Small murdered his ex-
wife when he inflicted some 18]
\stab wounds on her body at the}

Congrats!

LONDON, July 28

Oliver Lyttelton, Secre- corner of Westbury Road near

tary of State for the Cole- ithe Baxters Road junction eS ne a is

nies, to-day sent the follow- [|| Bwidence was produced to the

ie aearen Cie tee jeffect that the accused who had * e
aica’s ec te ltwo children by the deceased, I l *e D ing

at Helsinki. pused to beat her during theii Oo ice oO

“Please give my warmest

congratulations to the Ja-* and that

about six

| residence together,



AT CHARITY BALL

Free Nations Wish Stable |
Government For Egypt




















on nn se ecemncine

WEATHER REPORT
YESTERDAY

fail from Codrington 02 in

rainfall for month to date: 3.523 ins,
nest Temparture: 87.5 °F,

Lowest Temperature: 74.0 F.

Wind Velocity: 6 miles per hour

Barometer ‘9 a.m 29.960; (3

29.909.



p.m.)

TO-DAY
Sunrise: 5.48 a.m,
Sunset: 6.20 p.m.
Moon: First Quaster
Lighting: 7.00 p.m.
High Tide: 8.29 a.m, 848 pm
Low Tide: 2.31 am 266 pm

PRICE : FIVE CENTS

July 29.



an Collymore, LadySavage, Major D. Vaughn and His Excellency the
at together when they attended the Charity Ball at the Marine Hotel
.

EDEN COMMENTS

council. The Nile Kingdom gen-
—. rejoiced at 7 oom on
Farouk, whose downfall started

when 51-year-old General Naguib |

and his coterie of younger officers
teok over the army last Wednes-
day and forced the King to install

Maher Pasha and the new anti-
corruption
The cleanup was expected to

probe into every section of the
government extending to former
cabinet ministers and palace offi-
cials. High on the pene oth ge ng
are charges against seve!
officials, inclu Farouk’s cousin
Prince Abbas who is
charged with supplying faulty
arms to Egypt’s army during the
Palestine war.—(CP)



algae minnie

DEMOCRATIC NOMINEE

liament at the height of his new
patalecy, the newspaper Bakhtat |

mrooz, which often reflects his
views, hinted to the Shah that|
he should never stand in the
way of the nationalists if he wants
to avoid being ousted like Egypt's
Farouk. : |

Mossadeghs plan for exploiting!
Iran's oil riches is part of his
programme for drastic reforms to
lift the country from its present
economic plight. His programme!

Not Rush
Blindly

Into Federation

P.N.P. LEADER of Jamaica,
‘Mr. Norman Manley and Labour
Leader here, Mr. Grantley Adams
both expressed the view at a



mass

|
|
|
| maican team on their splen-
|

called also for higher taxes, land
reforms, and work projects for
the unemployed, measures which}
are bound to be opposed by many]
wealthy supporters of the goyern-
ment. (CP)



meeting at Queen’s Park on
Sunday night that the West Indies
should not rush blindly into
federation without being sure
that the conditions of federation
were secure,

The other West Indian Leader
who spoke on Federation at this
meeting, Mr. T. A. Marryshow,
said that power was in the hands

jof the people, but federation had



not been achieved because the
} people did not use it.

“Where Federation is concern-
ed,” Mr. Manley said, “it is better



that we should make haste
slowly. It is such a great step
that it might be a misfortune,

| might be a disaster, to start on
the wrong foot or before we are
|quite ready.”
Trinidad

| “Until Trinidad comes in the
jway of the P.N.P. of Jamaica and
|the Labour Party’ of Barbados,
and set about putting power in
the hands of the working voters,
j there can be no Federation in the
| West Indies. Federation must
not be on such terms that the
| working class would be ruled by
Mr. “So and so” down Broad
| Street or Frederick Street’,

, Addressing the people, Mr.
| Manley first referred to this be-
jing his first visit to Barbados.
Then spedking of Barbados, he

did achievement in winning
the 1,600 metres relay and |
the 400 metres.”



Manley
‘Introduced
To Local Bar

| lived

MR, NORMAN W. MANLBEY, |
Q.C., M.H.R. Leader of the,
People’s National Party o!
Jamaica, was yesterday intro.
duced to the local Bar by the
Attorney General, Hon. C, Wylie |
and admitted to practise at ty!
Courts of the island by His Lora- |
ship the Chief Justice, Sir Allan
Collymore.

The introduction was done be-
fore the business of the Court of
Grand Sessions was begun, The
Bar was fully represented for the
occasion and the Judges of the
Assistant Court of Appeal were
also present.

Making the introduction, Hon,
Wylie said that Mr. Manley was
born on July 14, 1893. He was
educated at the elementary school
and the Jamaica College and in
1914 became a Rhodes Scholar;
and went to Jesus College, Ox-|
ford. !

He had war service with the
Royal Field Artillery.

He attended Oxford from 1919
to 1921 and achieved the Certifi-|
eate of Honour, He was Lee
Prizeman of Gray’s Inn (Essay
Prize) and was called to the Bar
on April 20, 1921. He was ad-
mitted to the Jamaica Bar on
August 30, 1922 and since 1923



said that it was not surprising
| that the history and achievements
of Barbados has played a prom-
inent and distinguished part in
the West Indian events of the
last 14 years. For, he said, he
counted the years 1937 and 1938
as the second emancipation in the
West Indies when not a territory
escaped the enraged outburst of
}a people unable any longer to
tolerate the sufferings that mal-
jadministration brought upon
them.

Speaking of the accomplish-
ments of the West Indies, he said
he named as foremost of them,
jthe achievement of universal
adult suffrage. He could remem-
ber that before 1943 in Jamaica
one man out of ten had a vote. A
man without a vote was neces-



ay

Holding his glasses in his hand, Governor Adlai Stevenson of Lilinois.
smiles in his office in Chicago. He was chosen Democratic Presiden-
tial nominee at the Democratic National Convention.





|cians because in the last analysis,

Farouk’s Mother Knew
Something Would Happen

BEVERLY HILLS, CALIFORNIA, July 28,
Egypt’s Queen Mother Nazli defended on Monday her |
son who stripped her of all royal rights, and said he would |
face the crisis that forced King Farouk’s abdication “with |
faith and courage.” The dowager queen expressed hope |
that Farouk would come to America, but a close family
friend doubted that the deposed king would make the trip.
Queen Nazli, who was stripped of her royal rights and vir-
tually disowned by Farouk because she approved of the |
marriage of her daughter Princess Fathia to a commoner
in 1950, said that she still loved her son “deeply.” |
“I know he wiil face this crisis, would make a better king if he)
with faith and courage” she said. me to this country and observed |
“He has always been a courageous| American life. Ghali and the
and deeply religious young man.”| Princess Fathia expect their first
The queen, who came to the! child this autumn.
United States about four years ago, | —U.P.
moved here more than a year 12
to live with her thirty year old) E : .
daughter. and. son-in-law Riad State Dept. Agaimst
"Although Farouk cut e nié Pard ins Of Nazi
Altho ‘ar cut of f
mother’s $1,000 per day royal in-, omg azis
come in their dispute over Prin-| WASHINGTON, July 28.
cess Fathia’s marriage the family; The State Department made
lives in a fashionable apartment,| public on Monday its disapproval |
largely upon private funds and in-|of the recently passed Austrian|
vestments. Queen Nazli said she laws pardoning certain lesser Nazi
has been expecting “something to’ war criminals. The laws passed
happen” in Egypt for some time by the Austrian Pariiament go}
because “events have been be- into effect 30 days after submis-
coming worse and worse”. She sion to the Four Power Allied War
said she had no idea what plans Council unless vetoed by any one
her son might have but a friend)| of the four powers
said the queen believed Farouk

;politicians looked after votes
more than anything else.
Revolution

“Believe me,” he said, “nothing
else, nothing else that has been
@ On Page 3





~U.P.

sarily disregarded by the politi- |

PINISH of the much disputed 100 metres.
won
from right next to McKenley

has appeared in every important
and sensational case in that

colony.
Gained His Silk

He recently went to England to
defend a Jamaican charged with

murder, had occasion to go be-
fore the Privy Council, was
President of the Jamaica Bar

Council and had gained his silk.

“On this occasion” the Attorney
General said, “there is another
aspect and it is this, that through-
out the world there is a demand
on all sides for the democratic
and Self-Government and one
sometimes wonders whether the
‘people who make these demands
\think only of the privileges at-}
tached to these desirable political |
| advantages, or whether they
think also of the onerous dutic
which come with them.’
| One of the most onerous of
| those duties, he said, was the duty
of representing and leading and
guiding one’s fellow citizens.

The legal profession had a).
ways regarded itself as a pro.

@ On page 5.

FINISH OF 100







This picture lends much

It also seems to show from the position of the tape that both
The white line behind the heel of MacDonald Bailey's left foot i

| conducted
'Legal-Draughtsman and
|\to the Attorney

; Orleans, St.

having left her for
months prior to the incident, met
her on the evening in question
and fatally stabbed her.

The case for the Crown wa
by Mr. F. E, Field
Assistant
General
New

Daisy Clarke, 52> of

of Gwendolyn Clarke, was the

first witness to give evidence on} He said

behalf of the Crown.
Her daughter and

Michael and mother:

Useful Work

'In Dominica

| The Police Force tin Dominica |
is a good little one which is do-|
ing useful work, Lt. Col, K |
j Ozanne, island’s Superintendent of!
Police told the Advocate shortly!
before returning home yesterday |
iby B.G,. Airways
that

. LONDON, July 28.
British Foreign Secretary Anthony Eden said Monday
that all free nations are interested in seeing a stable and
orderly Egyptian Government emerge from the present
crisis. Eden appeared in the House of Commons to make a
statement on Egypt for the first time since his illness with

jaundice,

“I am sure the House will not
j|expect me to comment on the

the Foree com-' internal course of future develop-

prised 140 members including nine ments but I should like to take

ON PRESENT CRISIS
|



the accused! Barbadians who were doing quite
together as husband and| well

wife for a period of about three Lt.-Col, Ozanne spent a week
or four years, There were erp tsp Barbados after attending the
children, Conference of Fire Officers of the
eee eee Se Savane oer British West Indies in Trinidad.

er CAUSE s at- aa % .

ude vance er Senintes and es Maite of oe foe
herself, she as m to leave. He asa that the fruit export

Gwendolyn. left heme aboutlsiiness in Dominica was’ ex-

this opportunity to stress our in-|
terest and I am sure the interests ,
of all free nations that a stable
and orderly administration may |
emerge from the present crisis.’ |
|Eden said in his statement, \
He said that in the cireumstances
Sir Ralph Stevenson, British Am-
baseador to Cairo who was vacn-—
tioning in France when General |

7.30 o'clock on the morning of the

panding and the new canning in- ;| Mohammed Naguib seized control

; on the road with the accused ov«

20th. She used to leave work at
4 p.m. but on the evening of the dustry _ which had
she heard| was doing well.

just started



20th. about 5.45 p.m,
a report and went to Westbury
Road. .

There she saw her daughter Special B. W.LA
lying in the street jin a pool of
blood. Vi ,

The accused was also there Flight Arranged
lying in the street. The Police’ §. W. I. A, arranged an addit-|

Waggon arrived and took them to|jonal flight from Barbados to St
the General Hospital, Next day'Tucia on Sunday to accommodate
she went to the hospital and], special assembly of Masonic
identified her daughter’s body. Lodge Brethren who ant Gr :

To The Court :—‘When I saw|for the Consecration of
the two persons in the street,| Masonic Temple which took place
Gwendolyn had many. cuts on] yesterday evening.
her, and the accused seemed to This Temple now replaces the
have his throat cut too.’

To Mr. Smith: ‘The deceased|the

Castries fire,
had five children other than the

The party comprised Mr, D, R. D.

two she had for the accused Wiles, Mr. F. A. C. Clairmonte,
During the years when the ac-]0.B,.E,, Mr. Prince Walker, Mi
cused lived at her no other|pon Johnson, Rev. A. E. "arm -'|

‘strange’ friends visited her] stror eS

§ ng, Mr. C,
daughter, She cannot say whether .
the accused drank alcohol,

R. Armstrong, Mr
H. Arrindell, Mr, Fred Olton, Mr,
Carlos Clarke, Mr, H. F. Shearn

To The Court: The accused|Mr. Keith Murphy, Rev. Harold
used to beat my daughter con-| Melville, Mr, Lisle Chase, Mi
stantly. The last time he beat|Colin Redman, Mr, Vincent St
my daughter, he struck her, she]John, Mr, Stanley Davis, Mi:
attempted to strike him back and| Kenneth Cooper, Mr, L. Brath-
the accused told her ‘if you had| waite, Mr, V, H. B, Rocheford,
struck me with that shoe, you|Mr, Arthuy Chase and Mr, E. H
would sleep in the mortuary to-| Bohne.
night.’ One night he did attempt Also leaving by the same flight
to strike me, but he never did.j were Mrs, Kenneth Cooper and
He said if he had put his hands} Mise Mary Reece

Mr, W. W. Reece, Q.C., who i

on me, when he let me go I would
be dead. This was spoken loudly |



Next to give evidence was|'eft by the M.V. Daerwood 0:
Joseph Arthur, a seaman of} Sunday.
Passage Road. On 20th. Feb The party will be returning to
ruary he was in a shop at the |day by

: | a special flight.
junction of Passage and West eer ear ee
bury Roads. He heard a shou

for murder and when he looked |

around, he saw a woman lying |

Rain Halts
Korean War

her.

the new}

old one which was burnt during}

| —UP.
U.K. First Time

also attending the Consecration, |

| was on his way back to Egypt.

| Stevenson was recalled. from
this holiday in the South of France
| last week when General)
|Moharmmed Naguib staged his
| bloodless military coup at Cairo,
| whieh led to King Farouk’s abdi-
cation. Stephenson said that he
would make no comment as he
boarded a “comet” airliner at the |
Loneclon airport. He said “it would
be impossible for me to say any-
thing. I am returning to Cairo
|by the first available service.”

Sir Ralph also had consultations

}here with British Mimister of
'State Selwyn Lloyd over the
weekend,



Rhee Lifts



‘Martial Law
| PUSAN, Korea, July 28.
President Syngmann Rhee
| lifted Monday the martial law he
|imposed on ssorea but called a
{meeting of provincial governors
‘and police chiefs to discuss the
|maintenance of order during the
next week’s Presidential election.
Pusan was ruled by Martial law
for 64 days during which Rhee
wrought a change in the consti-
tution to allow the people to vote
directly for a President.
—UP.



|

Fechteler Says
Armistice Will Be

WASHINGTON, July 28.

He | ; ” drniral William Fechteler,
From the action, he appeare: SEOUL, KOREA, July 28. ° As < a 2
to be beating the woman. HH Torrential rains beat down on| chief of naval pee. ee
the witness, went up to the tw«. me already soaked and mudd, toe da we a the . er that on
people and asked the accused i’ Korean battle lines today an| Mone Mie ee, h . i.
te knew what he was doing vice halted ground and ait ores, we ne reached = tn

fighting for the third straight da) o ‘ :
@ On Page 5 = a“ | “We still think we are going to



METRES FINALS

dha, ofr & ¢ Ltée le

oA

strength to the assumption that McKenley of Jamaica second from right,
Bailey and Smith (together in the middle) beat Remigino who is third
the finishing line.

{get an armistice out there—parti-
cularly because I think the com-
munists want one”, he told
reporters at the National Airport.

Everytime they stick their heads
up they get hurt.”

Fechteler
Japan, Formosa and
-U.P.

Korea,
Philip-

stopped in
the

pines

Steel Workers Go
Back To Jobs

PITTSBURGH, July 28

Steel workers stepped up the
jpace in their “back-to-work”
movement to-day, but a few still
grumbled over the wage settle-
{ment reached with the big steel
undercurrent
| Dissatisfaction led from the
15,500 member of locel united-
‘steel workers at Jones and
| Laughlins, a south side Pittsburgh
plant.

James McLaughlin, local Presi-
;dent, said his group voted du-
ring the week end to return to
work but under protest that he
will forward a protest to the
teelworkers president Philip
Murray that the principal com-
plaimt is that the wage increase

not board, (CP)

acros.

visit— man of the man who founded the
College two centuries age.
. The tishop has a daughter,
Reached In Korea Monica, in London, She is a nurse



ANTHONY EDEN



Bishop Mandeville

(From Our Own Correspondent)
LONDON July 28

The Bishop of Barbados, Rev.
Gay Lisle Griffith Mandeyille, is
seeing Britain for the first time.
He was born in the West Indies.
He says : “My family came from
England so long ago | don’t know
which part of the country to re-
gard as my home.”

Tall, with a dalting of grey in his
hair the Bishop is in his sixties. He
is spending several months’ holi-
day touring Britain, He is arrang-
ing for several men to go to Bar-
the Ministry at
Coliege, which has
Durham Univer-
took his own
He is to

bados to train for
Codrington
affiliations with
sity. The Bishop
degrees at Codrington.

Salisbury Wilts a kins-

at King’s College Hospital, Next
month he will see his eldest
daughter, Sheila, on his way to a
charge conference in Sweden. She
is in her twenties and works at
the British Embassy in Denmark.



Naguib Must Rule
With Restraint

LONDON, July 28.
The London Times Monday saic
that General Mohammed Naguib
must exercise “almost superhuman
restraint” if he is te steer Egypt
away from military dictatorship.
Everything depends the Times
said in an editorial’ on the view
that General Naguib takes of his
for’ there is mn
force in Egypt to challenge his
will. However salutary his action
thus far may be from the stand-
point of the country’s interests—
and he is believed to be disinter-

ested as well as patriotic.—
—v.P.

responsibilities



SHERLOCK ON J’CA
LEG. COUNCIL

KINGSTON, Jamaica July 28

It has been announced that her
Majesty has given instructions for
the appointment of Mr. ~ Philir
Sherlock Vice-Principal of the Uni-
versity College of the West Indies
1s an Official member of the Legis-
lative Council,—€CP)





PAGE TWO



IS Excellency the Governor
and Lady Savage gave their
distinguished patronage to the
Charity Ball staged at the Marine
Hotel in aid of the Barbados
Association for the Blind and Deaf
on Saturday night.
There was a fine attendance in-
cluding’ the President of the

2 ine mag Sir Allan Collymore
ae. Lady Collymore.

The muiSic was supplied by the

Police Band Orchestra with Capt.

Raison carrying the baton. It was

an evening of fine entertainment

for those who attended and an

indication of public support for a
deserving institution.

For One Week
RS. P. D. MACDONALD,
wife of the Colonial Secre-
tary of the Leeward Islands,
arrived in Barbados on Sunday.
Mrs. Macdonald, who is on a
week's visit is the guest of Mr. and
Mrs, Philip MHewitt-Myring at
“Chaden”, Marine Gardens.

Cocktail Party
R. G. H. ADAMS, C.M.G,
M.C.P., was host at a cock-
tail party at his residence “Tyrol
Cot” on Saturday evening. The
Guest of Honour was Mr. N. W,
Manley, Q.C. of Jamaica who had
come over to attend the Barbados
Labour Party’s annual Confer-
ence, .
The Party was well attended
and included Sir Allan Collymore,
Sir George Seel, Members of the
Civil Establishment, the Legisla-
ture, business interests and the
waterfront.

Welfare Adviser Returns
' ISS DORA IBBERSON, Social

Welfare Adviser to the
Comptroller of Development and
Welfare, returned from Trinidad
last week.

Miss Ibberson had gone there
to have talks with the three-mau
United Nations Mission on com-
munity self help in Trinidad

Attended Workers’

Conference
ON. T. A, MARRYSHOW,
C.B.E., M.L.C. of Grenada

arrived in Barbados on Sunday to
attend the Annual Conference of
the Barbados Workers’ Union
‘which took place the same day.
He will also take the oppor-
tunity to discuss matters of West
aoen interest with Mr. Norman
fanley, Q.C. During his stay he
will be the guest of Mr. and Mrs.
W. Barrow at “Westward Ho,”
nds End.

Students Intransit
NUMBER of students arrived
hereâ„¢ yesterday morning by

.W.L.A. from Mt. St. Benedict
ollege, Trinidad, intransit for
Guadeloupe and Martinique to

end the summer holidays with
eir relatives.
“They were Michael Divies,
Maurice and Louis Lacour of
Guadeloupe and Allan Devaux of
Martinique.

Controller of Supplies
M* A. V. SPROTT, Controller
of Supplies, St, Vincent, left

yesterday morning by B.W.LA.
for and Puerto Rico in-
or ‘the USA.

transit where he
will spend part of his long vaca-
tion,

While there, he was a guest of
Mr, and Mrs, Fred Cole of Henry's
Lane, :

Trinidad Merchant

R. ARTIE S. Joseph, a mer-

chant of Trinidad, is now in
Barbados for a holiday: He ar-
rived yesterday morning by
B.W.LA. and will be remaining
for a week as a guest at “Accra,
Rockley. ,

WAY
Y THE ;
Y reference to the suggestion
(made seriously, it seems)
that the public should have a
statutory right to inspect hotel
and restaurant kitchens draws the
comment that people would be far
more interested in matters of

hygiene than in finding out what
they were eating.

This is probably true, Every
now and then there are angry
letters to the Press about assis-
tants in food shops who blow into
paper bags before putting food
into them. How are you to stop
hotel and restaurant chefs from
breathing all over the place? And
every normal breath, as Professor
Numskull has proved, contains
43,721,480 disease-laden germs. A
posse of diners surging into a West
End kitchen, each diner carrying
a germ-recorder, would certainly
add to the gaiety of nations, But
escallope de veau Lafayette would
still be horse,

No luck

MPUDENCE with a police-

woman is inadvisable; they
can look after themselves.” These
stern words recalled to me the
tase of a man who approached a



“



lovely policewoman with the
words: “Hello my pretty one!
What 2” He got no further.

The pretty one gripped him, and
flung him clean over her head,
and through the open window of
a first-floor flat. He landed in a
bath-tub, and when the occupant
of the flat came in to bathe her
little Billy, she, being an ex-
policewoman, picked the stranger
up and flung him out of the win-
dow. “Fifteen all,” said the



MAR. J. W. B. CHENERY, Mrs. D. H. Iu. Ward and Hon. N. W. Manley
were among the guests at the ball at the Marine Hotel Saturday night.

For Six Weeks

PENDING six weeks’ holiday in
\ Barbados are Mr. and Mrs.
Joseph Moraine of Port-of-Spain,
Trinidad, They were arrivals by
B.W.1A. yesterday morning and
are guests of Mr. and Mrs. W
Harewood of “Camelot,” Chelsea
Road,

Mrs. Moraine is a sister of T¢rs
Harewood while her husband is
a C°partmental manager of Messrs.
7. T. Johnson’s Ltd.

oy ame



On Holiday

RS- N. TAWIL whose hus-

band is Managing Director
of the Faulkener Trading Com-
pany Ltd. of Port-of-Spain, Trini-
dad, arrived yesterday morning
by B.W.LA, for a holiday and is
a guest at the Hotel Royal.

While here, Mrs. Tawil will
also attend the Races. Her hus-
band is expected to join her on
Saturday,

MR. and MRS. MICHAEL CLARKE

T. MATTHIAS CHURCH was
the scene of a very pretty
wedding at 5 p.m. on Saturday,
26 July; when Miss Sheila Doreen
Heath, eldest daughter of Mr, and
Mrs. A, Brereton Heath of Jack-
sonville, Worthing, was married
to Mr, Michael Clarke, son of Mr.

ope Mrg, Dudley Clarke of
“Ryde”, St.

Lawrence.

The bride who was given in
marriage by her father, wore a
gown of Slipper Satin, cut on
simple and beautiful lines, with
deep blonde lace forming frills at
the bottom of the front of her
skirt. -

Her finger tip nylon veil was
held in place by a tiara of orange
blossoms. She carried a bouquet
of Cattelya President Wilson
Orchids, and was attended by her
sister Miss Mary Heath as brides-

. By Beacheomber
her

policewoman, continuing on
beat.

Pop goes the widow!

HERE is something very mov-

ing in the sight of a small

boy in the street, with his nose

pressed against a widow bursting
with cream-cakes,

(Evening paper.)
Traveller’s Joy

DESCRIPTION, by a visitor,
of the spire of Salisbury
Cathedral as a whale of a prong
deserves to L* remembered side by
side with the American’s salute to

Chartres Cathedral as a nifty hunk distinguishes a learned man from |

of masonry.



maid, also two flower girls Miss
Ruth Cox, and Miss Margaret
Simpson, all of whom wore
dresses of blue embroidered organ-
dy, carrying horse-shoes of for-
get-me-nots and blush radiance
roses, with headdresses to match.

The ceremony was _ conducted
by Rev. S. R. Ripper and the
the bestman was r. Tan Robin-
son, the ushers were Mr, William
Simpson, Mr. Bob Edghill, Mr.
Harold Roett and Mr, Michael
Clarke,

The reception was held at “Day-
ton”, Worthing, the home of Mr.
and Mrs, I. S. Cox and the Happy
Couple left for the. Crane Hotel
where the honeymoon is_ being
spent,

Mr. and Mrs. Clarke will short-
ly be leaving for their home in
Trinidad.

A new burglar-ularm

R. STRABISMUS (Whom

God Preserve) of Utrecht is
experimenting, at Waggling Parva,
with a new burglar alarm. It is a
strong magnet which, concealed in
a room, would attract trouser-
buttons. The moment the burglar
entered his breeches would fall
about his feet, thus encumbering
his movements. The action of the
magnet on the buttons would set
off an alarm connected with the
nearest police-station,

Prodnose: Would not _ the
trousers of the police fall, too?

Myself: No, They would wear
special magnet-proof Luttons,

Wisdom of the ages

It is often only his hat that

his goat, (Turkish proverb)





One lovely morning in April
Rupert has set off for a brisk trot
in the sunshine. ‘* What a top-
ping day!" he thinks, ‘ Why
aren't all my pals here too?

Hallo, there's a wisp of smoke
over there, That means that
somebody ss there. | wonder



IN STOCK

An



i Ceol ae
f AMET eet
what they are doing. Surely they
can’t be having a picnic so early
in the year, It’s still toe chilly.”
He scrambles up and_ gazes
around, Then he leoks at the
smoke drifting away. ‘* What
can. it mean he = murmurs.
** There's no one here, no one in
sight anywhere!"



Assortment of

@ LADIES’ NYLON HOSE

@ LADIES’ NYLACE HOSE
@ LADIES’ LISLE HOSE
@ CHILDREN’S ANKLETS ...



— ALSO —

NEW SHIPMENT OF ...

@ MEN’S WILSON FELT HATS ............







w. $2.09, $2.15, $2.28, $2.41

$2.50
- $131
30, 32 & 46 CENTS



sa ates alssstionhinnv $6.40

T. R EVANS & WHITFIELDS

DIAL 4220

YOUR SHOE STORES

DIAL 4606





BARBADOS

Post Graduate in Education
BARBARA

M's KINCH,
daughter of Mr.

and Mrs.
Ernest Kinch of “Marlow”, Hast-
ings, arrived from England via
I'rinidad yesterday morning by
B.W.1.A. to spend about a month’s
holiday with her parents.

Miss Kinch who got her B.A.
in English last year in Canada,
at the University of Toronto
went over to England where she
took part in a post graduate
course in Education at Oxford
University.

ried to Mr. Anthony Lee, who is
a Geologist employed with the
Gulf Oil Company in Canada. He
is expected to arrive here about
the middle of next month,

Holidaying From Germany

R. OLIVER CECIL HALL,

P his wife and eighteen
months’ son arrived here from
Germany a fortnight ago on holi-
day. Mr. Hall left yesterday by
B.W.1I. Airways for Puérto Rico,
en route to Germany. via New
York but Mrs. Hall and Junior
will remain for a longer holiday.
The Halls have been in Ger-
many for the past six years where
Mr. Hall is employed with the
Q.M. staff of the army in the per-
sonnel administration department,
Mr. Hall was born in the U.S.A.
and this is his first visit to Bar-
bados but Mrs, Hall was born

here although she has spent the}

greater part of her life in the
U.S.A. Married quarters are pro-
vided in Germany and the Halls
have lived together there for the
past six years. Baby Herbert was
born in Germany eighteen months
ago.



Talking Point
I believe without a shadow of
doubt that science and peace will
finally triumph over ignorance
and war, and that the nations of
the earth wili agree not to destroy
but to build up.—Louis Pasteur:

* * *

I wish your “horses swift and
sure of foot.—Shakespeare.

To force myself to earn more
money, I determined to spend
more.—James Agate.

a ROSSWORD :







She has come down to get mar-|

ADV OCATE

|
’
|
}
|
|
|
|
Hali-Time Weights Show 5lbs.
| Losses

} Five full members of the Daily
; Express Tubby Hubby Club re-
; ported last night: “Losing weight.
| Feeling fine.

The five — who are testing the
12-day diet launched in the
xpress by Bernard Wicksteed—
nave lost an average of 5lb, each
| in six slimming days.
\¢ Here is the Tubby-Hubby-by-
p ebby ae report. In some
cases the starting weights shown
} here vary from those given last





week. The reason: The five
men (modestly) guessed their
weights when volunteering:

The weights given today were
taken at an official weigh-in :—
HARRY JOHN

Last Monday
16st. 10]b. Waist 46ins.
Last Night
16st. 4lb, 44ins.
QUOTE: “It must be work-
ing all right. Now I know

where the weight came from —
bread, potatoes. and beer.”
STANLEY TANNER
Last Monday
15st. 4lb, Waist 43 \sins,

LISTENING HOURS

} TUESDAY, JULY 29
£00 — 7.15 p.m, .. 19.76 M % 53 M
4.00 p.m. The News, 4.10 p.m. The
Daily Service, 4.15 p.m. New Records,
5.00 p.m. Verdi, 5.15 p.m. From the
) Promenade Concerts, 6.00 p.m. Ulster

Magazine, 6.15 p.m. Meet. the Common-
weMth, 6.45 p.m. Sports Round-Up and
Programme Parade, 7.00 p.m. The News,
10 p.m, Home News From Britain
715 — 10.30 pom. 25.53 M 31.323 M

7.15 p.m. Rendezvous, 7.45 p.m. Per-
fonal Portrait, 8.00 p.m. Take It Easy.
® 15 p.m. Radio Newsreel, 8.30 p.m
Report From Britain, 8.55 p.m. Inter
‘ude, 8.55 p.m. From the Editorials, 9.00
ym Australia Fair, 9.30 p.m. Royal
Windsor Horse Show, 9.45 p.m Olympic
Peport 10.00 p.m, The News, 10.10
pm. News Talk, 10.15 p.m. Geoffrley
Pleasant

Fumphrey Talking, 10.30 p.m
Journey °

OPENING FRIDAY
4.45 & 8.30 P.M. & Continuing Daily
DRAMATIC THUNDER!

Ly =








TUBBY HUBBIES
DOING WELL

Last Night
14st. 10 4elb 42 ins |
QUOTE: “I'm _ feeling jolly
good, and the family say Ive

already lost one chin. You know
you interrupted me cleaning tht
car — just after Sunday lunch
too! I must be feeling good. I
generally sleep.”

JOHN JOHNSTON

Last Monday
14st. 1lb, Waist 4lins
Last Night
13st. . 10lb 401, ins,
QUOTE: “I’m afraid I feel

very hungry periodically, but on
the whole it’s a_ livable-with
diet. My daughter wants me
te keep it up until I go down to
three stone and she can carry me
around !”
DONALD GLOAG
Last

M y
13st. 4%lb. Waist 36%%ins.

Last Night

13st. No change.
QUOTE: “Never felt better in
my life. I think I’ve lost some

weight off my face and neck.”
WALTER GRATRIX

Last Monday
12st. 3lb, Waist 42ins.
it Night
11st. 13lb. 4lins,
QUOTE: “Tt’s doing the trick.

The first two days were grim. but
now I find the diet is adequate.
| My wife — she has started the
diet, too Says my collar is
hanging round my neck, making
me look like a cart-horse.”

CARIBBEAN PREMIERE!
FRIDAY 2.30, 4.45 & 8.30 P.M.

che REAL Hore g |
ys QURAGE IN COMag7
a og 0 NOE AND ye,



CY
Hgg fs




















TUESDAY,

JULY 29, 1952



YOUR INDIVIDUAL HOROSCOPE

x

Look in the section in which your birthday comes and find *

what your outlook is, according to the stars.

*«
ARIES
March 21—April 20

FOR TUESDAY, JULY 29. 1952

Could be gainful period for creative work,
new metheds of merchandizing, building,
experiments for future. Be careful not to

*

overload self, impair health.

*«
* TAURUS
April 21—May 20

*

perties can

new ideas.

x GEMINI
May 21—June 20 turing, for

*

tions. P.M.

domesticity

CAN

CER
June 21—July 23 issues,

on guard.

LEO
July 24—Anug. 22
things.

23—Se’ 23
an, diplomacy,

LIBRA
Sept. 24—Oct. 23
aspects

SCORPIO

binin,
Oct. 24—Nov. 22 Cae .

xkxkeewkkkke

study and arg astute.

Vibrations on generous side for manufac-

Excellent day for unusual matters,
oured:
Souk Late news may mislead to-day; be

One of your
and with system.
with social

A little prodding
Courship, marriage,

should make it a happy,
You can accomplish most
line, The unusual may go over big.

Money matters, investments in good pro- *

brin, ofits if you take time,
stu Don’t be afraid of

*
+

social and advertising proposi~
highly favours personal affairs,

Fresh-
travel, shipping, all urgent

+

“pe careful” days. Start early +
Wisely mix business

life; don’t attempt to rush

will be medicine now.
family affairs demand
serenity.

Being sufficiently consistent in handling *

lems will add to your gains.
pat between 9 a.m. and 4 p.m, for con-

centrated effort.

Fine
*

and friendly rays
productive day.
in a necessary

energy

Planetary configurations still on favourable

SAGITTARIUS side.

Nov. 28—Dec. 22

Useful,
should bring good returns.

up-to-date propositions
fb Be aware that

+

others are trying, too.

*

Aspects

CAPRICORN
Dec. 23 — Jan. 21

usual.

.

*

AQUARIUS ©
Jan. 22 — Feb. 20 ;

thought in

future plans;
paving way for bigger things ahead. Heart

interests bright.

sponsor general improvement, +

discussing contacts, estimates,

>

Keep keyed up to the best, maybe the
Don't
opportunity knocks.

un- +
be caught off balance when
Exercise extra fore-

You should experience little trouble with

CES routine, daily tasks.
ven aa aise 20 tend to disrupt. A fresh outlook will serve
st.

business openings.
The unexpected may *


















be
A Robert L. Lippert Presentotion x
saning 5
’ 6 , vant, magnetic personality.
J] Roiert HUTTON - Steve BRCDIE May noe PORN ice You like affection, may become moody
" e . A .
James EDWARDS - Richard LOO if athe you care for show peters. oe int om be pet cba, Rely
wth : spoil our ood v6
Site youtt cots fvays, You Bave fine mind, use it rightly. *
and introd 4 dynamic screen personality iif di
, Generous aspects these days. 1 : Wm.
4 av * ce Birthdate: Newton Booth Tarkington, novelist;
1. Gets together. (9) 7 ,
iB tien of expression, (5) ras Powell, actor i. a +
1. nere oO as’ oats f
oC r
7 Meet bing iter the Cup tte * * * * * ; * * bl
. See .
14 Young Leonard and Thomas mw \ h la e
et hot running. (6) = More Meat On I e€
15. egetable, (4) cs
46 Seen on the paim,, (4) Witten, Produeed ane Drected by SAUNUEL Fuller ! their meat ex-
(8 Features Tor Rood Netening. (4) A brut Comnton hua sonsncsetadby tower Petunia | PEARL RIVER, New York, July, pend ere need economy.
23. Chain of reasoning. (5) Researchers responsible for the ports for
24. Must be driven to. join up, (4) | 7 This fact is shown clearly in a
25. Nothing in man sounds so: (4) development of new animal feeds, ; ie t
Down | ; based on modern-day antibiotics, a recent article, “More wen
1. Wingless washing, (3) | “ believe that their efforts will have the Table”, published 7m ‘ ae
2 Burn inwardly. (8) o Waa gon BRIDGETOWN (DIAL 2310) | important economic results in the Monthly Bulletin” by the . yin
4. It makes the ee! tament. 1 | & meat producing countries of the Laboratories Division °
5. Stone, sounds more e 4 aneee world American ey “Ty Sremnere
Pe S.. Boer (S) ) GINGER [fF RONALD — fppoR - 7 P The article traces the develop
iM Sait mia te inne of an Rap GAIETY The new feeds, which cut down of “aurotac, the ‘irst of the _
ph Hees com mietely, Comaned: 4) AUN \ by h | if on animal mortality and speea up feeds, developed from = wae
cs stream. (6) 17, Educate. § & STEVE ba oe The Garden—St. James their srewsh, hold pee of = ee pills already
og: eines Bepor | hs mam mar = JERRY WALD ; @| increased output an igher mar- far-reac
- Sik-it tactics, ] HAN @ Foal Et ta TODAY & TOMORROW 8.0 p.m. Bit prices for countries that de- achieved by U.S. fermers.
$B One of our secs 8) | CUE > © stunt Htisier CASA MANANA LEC PDSOF PS 9SPSSO OOD S99
Solution of yesterday's pusy ro i
1, Stange ARs "% Virginia WELLS — Robert CLARK &
hottie etre an: | PHEATA a GLOBE
24. Meal, Down ‘ Tele , MASTER MINDS 4 TODAY 5 4 8.30 LAST SHOWS
3, ales 4. Lenient: 5. Ire { and 8. .m.
Rouen’? Searels" Stout. | BARBAREES (DIAL 5170) | $ico concey & me Dead End sia DEADLINE U.S.A.
BSSSSSOSSESSSSS~SSEESS . &







HUMPHREY BOGART — KIM HUNTER
TOMORROW AND THURSDAY 4.45 and 8.30 p.m. -
JESSE JAMES AND SHOW BOAT

OPENING FRIDAY 5 and 8.30 p.m.
24 FRED ASTAIRE — VERA ELLEN
% BELLE OF NEW YORK

s

3855560500 POO HOOD

:

\





PLAZA THEATRES

SSeS
' BAP BAREES
(Mal 5170) ~
HELD OVER TO-DAY
Last 2 Shows
To-day 4.45 & 8.30 p.m:

BRIGHT VICTORY




WASHES |
Brighter! Quicker! |
Easier 7



GaS'VIN
_ (Dial 8404)
To-day & To-morrov
4.45 & 8.30 p.m.
Action Packed Double
“IN OLD AMARILLO’
Roy ROGERS &

BRIDGETOWN
(Dial 2310)

TO-DAY LAST 2 SHOWS
4.30 and 8.30 p.m.

“BLUE BLOOD”
(Cinecolor) with

| aN







Bill Williams

__ cel dag . 2 Jane Nigh & Arthur Peggy “THE WYOMING
anne } v 3 B “IT WAS AN KENNEDY — DOW BANDIT’
: AMERICAN SPY” Rocky LANE

Ann Dvorak—Gene Evans Wed. & Thurs.

4.30 & 8.30 p.m

THE LIFE OF RILEY

William Bendix &

MUMMY’S GHOST

Lon Chaney

——

———

THURS. Special 1.30 p.m

“IN OLD AMARILLO”

Roy ROGERS &

“THE WYOMING
BANDIT"

Rocky LANE

—————————————
Thurs. (only) 4.45 and
8.30 p.m.

“WALK SOFTLY
STRANGER”

Robert Mitchum

Thurs. Special 1.30 p.m.
Harold LLOYD in

“MAD WEDNESDAY”

Wed. & Thurs
4.30 & 8.30 p.m.
“THE BIG STEAL”
Robert Mitchum.

\ a i and
i THE OUTLAW" “SPANISH MAIN”

Jane Russell (Color) Paul_ Henreid

RO THEATRES

Midnite Sat. 2nd

“THUNDERHOOF”,
Preston Foster &

Charles Starrett

ODAL





To-day 445 & 8.30 and Continuing To-day Last Two Shows 4.30 & 8.16
Daily

REPUBLIC PICTURES Presents

earn Brian DONLEVY—Forrest TUCKER
in

RADIO PICTURES Presents
‘
Barbara STANWYCK




DOUGLAS — Robert RYAN “HOODLUM EMPIRE”

Marilyn MONROE

| Paul

Your coloured clothes are so much brighter—

and whites whiter, too—when you use Rinso,

Rinso is so easy to use, and so gentle—its rich
lather floats out the dirt thoroughly, without
harm to the fabric. For better, brighter results
use Rinso—always.

with \
Claire TREVOR—Vera RALSTON
—..








i
\ in
| Wed. & Thurs. 4.30 & 8.15
Allan (Rocky) LANE in

“DESERT OF LOST MEN”

“CLASH BY NIGHT”

Two Reel Short:—



| Extra:
| and
“FOLLOW THAT MUSIC”
‘OLLO “RODEO KING & THE SENORITA”








sal for use in with Rex ALLEN
one We os OLYMPIC ae
‘By > and for 100! ee J | To-day & To-morrow 4.30 & 8.15 ROYAL



=

b EZ RINSO for all your wash!

S| UNITED ARTISTS Double . .

Last Two Shows To-day 4.30 & 8.15)
“BLANCHE FURY” “TWO LOST WORLDS”
with Laura ELLIOTT—Jim ARNESS |

with Stewart GRANGER and



and “OLOUD BURST” |
sdesieicdienediieent eae
és a Starring: Robert PRESTON
el TULSA Elizabeth SELLERS







TUESDAY, JULY



W.I. Should Not Rush Blindly Into Federation | 9 Sidawels

@ From Page i

done is as great a revolution as

that simple transfer of power
into the hands of the ordinary
man—the power to vote. Natural-
ly, for ‘those who were blessed
With possessions it was not a
happy change I do not know
what they might have thought
about it here, but I know what
they called me in Jamaica in 1938
and I know what they thought
about me.

Lunatic was a mild term. Be-
trayer was more common. Mad

and bad about summed it up.
“Il phophesy, I see all around

me signs of the fact that they
are thinking everytime to find
ways and means to maintain
power in spite of the fact that
the masses have the real power
in their hands. That is one of
the greatest responsibilities on

the shoulders of leadership in the
West Indies today.

“Look at what has happened in
a place like Trinidad where, in
spite of adult suffrage the wealthy
and the privileged are more firm-
ly in the saddle today than they
haye ever been. They are more
solidly entrenched because of the

fallacies of the popular leaders
of the people. The power of the
masses is swabbed up in the

fabrics of disunity.”

After referring to the position
in Jamaica with the workers and
the privileged class, he said that
it was seen that in spite of the
changes and constitutional ad-
vances, the basic problems of the
West Indies had yet to be pattern-
ed. Not that he was by any
means belittling the accomplish.
ments of the last 14 years.

But one thing had been ac.
quired, one other great thing,
may be the greatest of all, may-
be the thing on which West
Indians would one day build the
future, and that was the begin-
ning of a national feeling through-

out all the territories and they
were beginning to feel that a
West Indian Nation was a
possibility,

“Now to me that means a great
deal,” he said. “It means a great
deal because there is nothing in
this world that I am so sworn

in enmity with than I am to
Colonialism and Imperialism in
all its forms. I lJoathe and de-

test Imperialism. I regard it as
a destroyer of the human. spirit
and the human soul. I believe it
inflicted numerous wounds upon
the West Indian spirit and the
West Indian heart,”

He mentioned that ‘sometimes
sensitiveness was felt by persons
of varying colour, and

said
that the inevitable gravita-
tion towards power was the
Bhame of one’s own history, of
their own ancestry. All that
happened because it was the

policy of Imperialism to teach a
Government to feel inferior. If
people were not taughi to feel
inferior, Imperialistic masters
could not rule them, that was
why such happened.

Sacrifices
He said that if there is one
great thing in the West Indian

heritage, it was the sacrifices of
the ordinary people to give an
opportunity of education to their
sons,

After referring to the present
constitutional position of the
various islands, he said that only
a month ago changes were pro-
posed and even expedited where-
by they in Jamaica were to have
eight elected ministers who would
actually be in charge of the de-
partments of administration, so
that the country would cease to
be ruled by Civil Servants to a
large extent, and in part be
ruled by their own people.

“Maybe we will make mis-
takes,” he said, “But when I look
around the West Indies after 300
years of Imperial rule, I do not
think even these mistakes will be
any worse than we have suffered
in the past. At any rate, I am
prepared to gamble it, and I
would sooner make my own mis-
takes and suffer for them than to
suffer for the other people’s mis.
takes.

“Make no mistake, we are only
being given limited doses of
power. Those countries think
freedom is a dangerous medicine
to be given with caution.”

He talked about Jamaicans not
filing as many high posts as
could be wished and said that he
repudiated the advances they had
made as sufficient or adequate.
He denied absolutely that they
were unfit to attempt any aspect





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M-LBT 669-11 10-55

29.

1952” =



RECORD HROKEN

KEITH CORBIN reaches the tape first in the 440 yards. D. Skeete

is second and J. Gittens

third. Corbin,

who ended up Victor

Ludorum, clipped 1§ second off the record of 612 seconds for the 440

yards.

of the
country.

He had the privilege last week
of reproducing a motion in their

administration of their

House of Representatives where-
by their House unanimously de-
eclared its opinion that Jamaica
was fit and ready for self Gov-
ernment. It had taken him 14
jong years to bring Jamaica to
that point,
Beacon Light
“Some of us think that by

Federation we can quickest reach
the road to dominion status which
is political independence,’ he
said, “that by that means we
would be the first among colour-
ed people of the world in the
British system to build an in-
dependent nation, and our efforts
will be the beacon light of the
Dominion of Africa who are yet to
win their freedom,”

He outlined the situation in
Africa and the British handling
of it, and said that the coloured

people will force others to give
them respect when more and more
negro people were governing
themselves and proving to the
world that they have all the
capacity to stand side by side.
Not that he had any colour pre-
judice, he said. He thought the
West Indies had made a tremend-
ous contribution to civilisation in

that men of all colour were
learning to live alongside each
other,

Again referring to imperialism,
he said that he did not take the
view that in the last analysis
England would make the smallest
sacrifice for a colonial possession,
and if anybody still lived in that
deluded atmosphere of political
ignorance as to suppose that
Imperial Countries really made
sacrifices for the Empire, he could
go back to school.

He then mentioned what he
termed Britain’s failing to put
through a really beneficial scheme
for Africa, but rather spending
money on peanuts which did not
grow. He mentioned too that
many of their young women were
thrown out of work because Brit-
ain placed a heavy tax on cigars,
and factories in Jamaica had
closed down, Then there was the
banana contract which was being
ended abruptly after they had
spent £1,200,000 in restoring the
industry after the recent hurri-
cane,

He said that they should not be
frightened with the idea that if
England did not take our sugar the
West Indies would be in a_ bad
position.

“I know perfectly well that we
buy British goods at a price they
set for their standard of living and
they buy our goods at the prices
they set, but I know that after all
we belong to the Western hemis-
phere,” he said. “More and more
the American continent is going to
demand the products of external
countries, There was a _ recent
economic survey of the United
States and the experts said that in
20 years time America will be im-
porting five times as much as she
is importing, by necessity.’”’ Then,
too, there was vast Canada which

| keep fresh all day...!

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FRESHNESS ALWAYS

would in the future
products,

be wanting

Pioneers

Five years ago -they had had
a conference in Jamaica on Fed-
eration in which Mr. Adams hac
played a great part. Mr, Adams
and Mr. Marryshow were pion-
eers in that movement and he
doubted if there was any West
Indian who had given more pro-
found and careful study to it than
Mr. Adams had done, At the con-
ference the only decisbon they
could come to was to send it to
a Committee, A proposed constitu-
tion was made which would not
have given the Federal. Govern-
ment as much power as Barba-
dos Executive Committee, as
Jamaica’s Executive Council, and
as far as he and his party were
concerned, when it was adopted
last week in the House of Rep-
redentatives, they repudiated it
entirely as an unsatisfactory in-
strument. A lot of water had
flown under the bridge since the
conference-—and he believed it was
in this very island that it was
concealed—and they were looking
forward to a conference in En-
gland by next year, and that by
then stronger minded people witi
more stomach for freedom would

have a’ chance of saying their
minds.

“Where Federation is con-
cerned,” he said, “It is better to

make haste slowly. It is such a
great step that it might be a mis-
fortune, might be a disaster, to
start on the wrong foot or before
we are quite ready.”

He said that the West Indies

could not fashion our constitu-
tion solely from copying from
places like America or England.

They had to fashion it to suit
their own needs.
His last point was the need

for fostering socialism.

Hon. T. A. Marryshow, the sec-
ond speaker to address the large
crowd, was like Mr, Manley
greeted with an uproarious
applause, and as he claimed asso-
ciation with Barbados, and re-
called how it was as a result of
his encouragement that the late
Mr, C. A. Brathwaite first sought
political honours, the crowd once
again cheered lustily.

He paid glowing tribute to the
Captain Cipriani’s, the Dr.
O'Neales, ‘and those people with
whom he was associated 25 or 30
years ago, and “who saw the light
in the far distant”, and lit the
torch which was now being held
by present day leaders, and ex-
horted West Indians to pay honour
to their memory.

He told of his fifty years of
fight for the working class peo-
ple, the raw and bitter road of
progress in the fight, and said
that if to-day West Indian Fed-
eration was long in coming, they
should not blame the British Gov-
ernment, but themselves.

He said that the problem of
the West Indies was how to get
the people and the leaders to-





a

BARB: BADOS Ss ADVE OCATE — ATE

NINE

when

Keith Corbin of C
up Victor Ludorum

honour

Cerbin gave
performance,

He w





He gave an excellent perform- Time: 1.92 4/5 sees re
V. Skeete’s record of 61 2/5 sec- «m). ara J. Best (Di
gether, and how to get the masses onds by 1 3/5 seconds. Time: 83 sees
“a9 . » , ar things Se 3 s firs i § , Record: R. Worrell
to respect _ own and Zz Set B was first with 73 point ae ee Mee ok aan hs
of that kind, : : > EV Ist L. Jones (A).
The fight for federation and THE EVENTS 3rd I. MeGeary (B)
i i TK 29:1/5 :
freedom is won, he said. But we fhe Results were as follows:— Recard: & wattow wT
are so chicken-hearted, our aims GIRLS’ BICYCLE RACE \) MILE



Ashby



are s hat we would not get Ist H (A), 2nd Jean Brath at J. Lowe (C). Ind M
ee low, soe selves waite ard Joan Brathwaite (A) wa P. W a c ”
up and seize them ourselves. vi 1 min. 48 secs Nine os arn at ‘Seneas
8 YDS. GIRLS CLASS IV Record: L, Jones 90 1/8 aa
Get Down To Job aren ope © hgand H. Chae) MW ¥DS GIRLS CLASS LV
He urged West Indian Leader ete: tee eae ® 2/5 ¢ we O nschoates oe
c 8 i : Record: D. Clarke, 9 2/5 secs rims: S8a/8 wees’ UReeate)
to stop all the talk about self- 00 YDS. GIRLS CLASS UI ecard: 64, Witiiawes Tl ois: pecs
government an qd Ministerial Jt Walker, 2nd F. Holder, aut Watso ) YDS. BOYS CLASS 1
GS ; Time: 18:1 secs (Record) Ist K. Corbin (B), 2nd D
Status, and get down to business. Record: L. Jones & BR. Clarke 13 set es " 4
, Sed A. Clarke (D)
He said, they could appeal to the Bes Bf YyDs Sie oneoee u ‘ Time: 25 secs
; * is > . st L. Jones (A), and J eGeary (B . ; Skeote 24 5
pride of the English people, or oA Xo Clarke GB) . Record: V. Skeete 23 4/5



@ On page 6 Time:








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fell to Lorna Jones of Class I
a good all-round

11 2/5 secs (Record)
















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four events and finished the day Ist K. Corbin (Bi, and 4 » Clark
with 20 points to his credit. Miss ‘D) 9D Holder
Jones scored ten points after Ritora: c’ warper 10 1/5 secs
having clipped 3/5 of a second 1 YDS" BOYS CLASS 11
off the record for the 100 yards ist J C), Ind C. Clarke

12 seconds — which was held *41 ;
by Mi . ae Time: 03/5 secs. (Record)
»y Miss E. Barrow. Record: C. Harper and H. Chandler

. 11 sees

Not satisfied with her grand 0 YDS. BOYS CLASS
performance in the 100 yards, ist N. Greaves (B), god V. Sprint
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7 met 12 sees

to equal the record of 29 15 Record: J. Gittens 11 4/5 secs
seconds, alsc held by Miss E.
Barrow for the 220 yards. ‘ia te "0 ea ne ar acl

> . . . >. Stus (A), 2 4

Keith Corbin created new x Innis (D) 7 ween
records in the 440 yards and Time: 10 1/5 secs
High Jump fer Boys over 14. His Record: C. Colivmore 9 secs
jump of five feet four inches, W> BALP-MILE ROADSTER BRACE BOY
two inches better = than ist L.. Bayley (B), 2nd N. Greaves (A
Harper's record. rd M. Sealy (A)

}

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PAGE FOUR

ed ADVOCAT

~ xe See Le ee BL

Printed by the Advocate Co., Ltd., Broad St. Bridsetewn



Tuesday, July 29, 1952.

TOURIST INDUSTRY

SIR ALEXANDER MAXWELL, chair-
man of the British Travel and Holidays
Association has been speaking words of
wisdom in London which might very well
be applied to Barbados.

Addressing the annual general meeting
of the Association this month he asked
“whether we deserved as many visitors as
we had and whether the Government had
a tourist policy.” “Plant and machinery”
he said “was needed in this as in any other
industry”.

We had to choose whether to stabilize
the industry at its present level or whether
to develop it in every way possible. If we
wanted to double our tourist earnings then
we must build and invest and do every-
thing possible to obtain the maximum
benefit from this great invisible export
trade.

Last year the United Kingdom earned
£73 million of foreign currency and there
had been 695,000 oversea visitors. Yet the
Chairman of the British Travel and Holi-
days Association could ask whether the
Government had a tourist policy.

In Barbados the government if it has a
tourist policy bases it on suspicion of the
motives of hotel keepers and distrust of
those who advocate the development of
the tourist industry as essential for the
maintenance of, Barbadian living stand-
ards. This criticism can only be applied to
the political side of the government: the
executive side of the government supports
the Barbados Publicity Committee which
obtains funds from a government grant
and from private subscriptions and dona-
tions,

Basically the political opposition to tour-
ism as an industry is based on the legacy of
the past when the hotels of Barbados
catered almost exclusively for guests of
one colour. To-day criticism of Barbadian
hotels on grounds of racial discrimination
could only be made by persons with little
knowledge of Barbadian hotels.

At the same time it is worth nothing that
in Nassau where racial discrimination is
practised in hotels some proprietors of
hotels run exclusively for persons of one
colour have themselves another pigmen-
tation.





In Barbados no such discrimination
exists to-day although it did exist in some
hotels up to quite recent years.
_The time is therefore ripe for the gov-
ernment of Barbados to recognise that
tourism as an industry deserves to be
treated as an industry and ought not to be
made a whipping-post for the diatribes of
a few individuals who cannot forget the
past.

Professor Beasley in A Fiscal Survey of
Barbados has shown clearly what little
hope can be placed on any economic de-
velopment of the island other than tourism.
If he errs in his analysis at all he errs on
the side of optimism. Barbados therefore
is forced with a very bleak future unless
oil is found in large quantities or unless
the tourist industry 1s considerably ex-
panded.

Even if the average yearly production of
sugar could be doubled, there will never be
any guarantee against hurricane, drought,
or cane diseases and unless world wars
occur with regular frequency the markets
for Barbadian sugar must always depend
on world supplies of sugar which are in-
creasing. Only an efficient and well-run
tourist industry can provide additional em-
ployment to an extent necessary for a popu-
lation which is not only increasing but
expecting higher living standards. Oppo-
sition to the tourist industry based on the
prejudices of the past is really opposition
to the interests of the young Barbadian
generation.

No other Caribbean territory is less
active to consider the economic value of
the tourist industry than Barbados. Haiti,
Cuba, Jamaica and Puerto Rico among the
“Greater Antilles, Trinidad, Tobago, Mar-
tinique, Antigua, Grenada, among the
lesser are advertising their attractions for
tourists and have given tourism the prior-

Our Readers

Sunday Observance

To The Editor, The Advocate— made _ laws

SIR.—Religious controversies
in the newspaper are not
always in the best interest but
there are times when some of

“Sunday”
bath”. It

and

the statements made should be Sabbath”.

examined, _ I shall not
I must confess to a great re- joining in any

spect for the opinions of “F.G.” I thought

and I have no desire to en-~

courage a desecration of the Yours, ow | that work jas progressing
Sabbath; but I think “F. G.’s CHURCHMAN. and enjoined his tearers to sup-
latest effusion is a waste of jp, ; port the Church not only with
time and space. If the Olym- isrespecting The Church their Bibles and Prayer Books

pic (Sames at Helsinki opened
on Sunday, there is nothing that
can be done in Barbados about
it. I @o not cavil at the space
he oecupied in your paper on
Friday but it might have been

SIR,— It
members of the

on Sunday night

a desire to keep Christ’s resur-
rection; and (c) that the man-
for
Sabbath holy always

is the Fourth Com.
mandment which speaks of “the

it worth while to
record these facts.

To The Editor, The Advocate—
would have
astonishing t6 most people to see

St. Mary’s walking out of service





BARBADOS ADVOCATE



ity it deserves in plans for economic de-
velopment. Barbados continues it is true
to attract tourists but in the words of Sir
Alexander Maxwell “We should ask our-
selves whether we deserved as many visit-
ors as we had” ought to be asked and
answered here by. everyone connected
with the tourist industry. Hotel waiters,
cooks, taxi-drivers, shop assistants, restau-
rants, clubs, hotels, street traders are only
some of the persons and institutions to de-
rive benefit from the influx of visitors to
Barbados.

Yet the tourist industry is not well or-
ganised here and sectional rivalries are
creeping in which may do as much damage
to the industry as the antagonism of those
who see nothing else in tourism but the
colour of someone’s skin, or an intrusion on
someone's privacy. If Barbados is to main-
tain the expensive social services which it
hopes to maintain and which it ought to
maintain and seek to improve, no one can
afford to sniff at tourism.

The expert investigators have explored
every avenue have looked into every cran-
ny and are forced back to the inevitable
conelusion that barring any potential re-
ceipts from oil, and except for the encour-
agement of tourism and investors’ capital
the people of Barbados are going to be
tao very shortly with serious problems
which cannot be solved by political
promises or even by increased productiv-
ity. The government of Barbados has got
to have a tourist policy and to have it soon
before Tobago, Antigua, Martinique and
Grenada become as well known and their
tourist facilities as developed as those of
Barbados.

Jamaica, Puerto Rico, Haiti and Cuba
have such a flying start that it would be
folly even to try to catch up with them
although urgent efforts must be made to
counteract the advertising which is luring
Venezuelans to fly to Jamaica instead of to
Barbados during the summer.



Sugar Funds

IT has been decided that Barbados is to
receive the sum of £196,000 ($941,282) pro-
ceeds from the resale of West Indian sugar
by Great Britain to Canada. It is import-
ant to decide at an early time what is to be
done with that money.

Within recent months there have been
many statements made as regards projects
wkich might be giver. priority when the
time comes for spending. First among
these will be the Deep Water Harbour and
it is significant that Professor Beasley in
his Survey of Barbados has been at pains
to point out that the million dollars spent
on subsidisation would pay the interest on
the fourteen millions needed to build the
Harbour, On the other hand it might be
argued that the sum of $941,000 could be
supplemented to raise the first million to
pay for the harbour.

There will be those who believe that in-
asmuch as the money has been derived
from the sale of sugar it should be kept for
use of those people who contribute to the
irdustry. This has already been done by
reeans of the Labour Welfare Fund allo-
cated specifically to housing for those peo-
ple in the sugar industry.

Since it was announced that the various
colonies would receive amounts of money
ia accordance to the amount of sugar pro-
duced Jamaica and British Guiana have
announced their amounts. The Barbados
amount has not yet been published and it
is. not known whether the Secretary of
State for the Colonies has indicated any
avenue in which this sum should be spent.

It is however to be realised that while
such expression of opinion should be re-
spected it is not binding on the local leg-
islature to accept it. For that reason it
weuld be well for the Legislature to dis-
cuss the matter in the light of suggestions
which will be made.

The extension of the Peasants’ Loan
Bank and the liberalising of its policy to
cater to renters of land will mean that the
capital of the Bank should be increased.
It started sixteen years ago with ten
thousand pounds and when it was neces-
sary to increase that amount legislation
provided that the amounts needed should
be drawn from the Public Treasury. That
is not good enough. In a recent debate in
the Legislative Council the Colonial Sec-
retary pointed out that the amount needed
for the Bank was $150,000, This amount
could easily be taken from. the amount to
be received now and the $790,000 set aside
for paying the interest and sinking fund on
the first loan for the Deep Water Harbour.
In this way the claims of the agriculturalist
would have been satisfied and the interest
of the sugar industry buttressed. If there
is no bulk shipment of sugar such as can
be done in a deep Water Harbour, the
sugar industry is likely to suffer very
greatly.

nna nasa

well remembers the case of the
late Rev. Durant another Barba-
dian who had lived in the United
States at the St. Michael's Cathe-

Say :
2
dral.
greeting which Mr.
keeping the
refer to
not “the Sab-
years, he has a_ pulpit

ing.
be replying or
controversy but

been the address was

congregation at then

while the Rev, ‘ mi Yee os

In this case the message and
Harewood
brought was no less interesting.
He is a fine speaker with a good
delivery and even at his age, 82
manner
which is to say the least engag-

He spoke of the work which
Barbadians had been doing in the
Church in the United States and

and Hymn Books but with their
“Pocket Books”. Up to this point
interesting but
the Reverend Gentleman
took his text from Ezekiel Chap-
“Son of man, arise



HOME COSTS AND
EXPORT PRICES

; LONDON. In one sector of her trade last for British products in 1951 we
Serious competition has now re- year Britain certainly did weil: exported to her about £13 million
turned to foreign markets for

she had a big surplus with other of machinery. With the better
sterling area countries, as she delivery dates which can now be
usually does, though it was only Offered this figure should be much

most kinds of manufactures pac-
ticularly consumer goods, says the



Bulletin for Industry. Price con- a small fraction above the 1950 higher in 1952,

siderations are therefore once level. But this surplus was no- In 1951, the United States ex-
again of great importance in the ‘where near sufficient to offset the Ported to Latin America eight
United Kingdom's export trade. deficit with the non-sterling world, “#™¢5,48 much as did the United

* Kingdom,

which was over three times as In 1951, German ex-

i ports to Latin America were well
rt oe it is here that the over twice the value they were
rouble Hes. in 1950; and since 1947 West Ger-
The normal pattern of tradé man earnings in Latin America
(visible and invisible) for the have risen from a mere £100,000
United Kingdom, both before the to £130 million, What is it that
war and since, has been a sur- the United States and Germany
plus with the rest of the sterling can manufacture and sell in those
’ ! area and a deficit with the non- markets which we cannot?
igh export prices recently and sterling world. And when this 3. This country is on the verge
what are the factors now at work U.K. deficit is counter-balanced Of having to settle the whole of
which will determine their future py the rest of the sterling area’s its deficit with the E n
level? : turplus with the non-sterling Payments Union in gold. (As a
By March 1952 British ex sworld, then the whole of the Country gets deeper into deficit
prices for metals and engineering’ sterling area’s account with the With the Union, a larger sereee
products together were jUst uN- outside world balances. But, tion of the deficit is paid in gold
der 30 per cent higher than in the first place, our non-sterling and a smaller proportion allowed
September 1949 (the time of de- deficit in 1951 was £521 million jy a We have used up near-
valuation). The average price of jarger y all our credit.) That means

¢ I than our sterling surplus. that fo
all United Kingdom experts rose Jn the second place, the rest of eee Ria’ outs te _rw

by about 35 per cent in this period, the sterling area, instead of hav- sion are wort
but for textiles and clothing the jng a counter-balancing surplus value in ps Oe t he’ seen.
rise was more than 40 per cent. jn the second half of 1951, was therefore, any currency of any
This is some 8 per cent below the jtself in deficit with the non- E.P.U. country is hard; and, be-
peak reached last September, but sterling world. cause of the Payments Union, ex-
it means that textile prices. have. To rebuild the reserves the ster- ports to one country in the Union
risen so high as to offset the v hole jing area must not only get into are just as good as exports to any
effect cf devaluation: their dol- palance, but must have a sur- other. From Iceland to Turkey,
lar price in March was the same plus, with the rest of the world. all exports are potential gold-
{as in the summer of 1949. The So the United Kingdom’s aim is ©@rners. There cannot be many
risa in export prices of other con= not merely to reduce her deficit products manufactured in this
| sumer goods, particularly paper \yith the non-sterling world it is country for which there is not a
and rubber manufactures was {, gliminate it altogether in the Market somewhere in this huge
also much greater than for engin- second half of 1952 (with the help “"°*
eering goods. of Defence Aid). Since the deficit
Calculations made by the Eco- jn the second half of 1951
Inomic Commission for Europe ¢¢90 million, this calls
es that the average increase iN mighty effort.

Even in the casé of what are gen-
erally termed capital goods, where
world demand is still very heavy,
keen prices may oftea be neces-
sary if export earnings are to be
increased, particularly when for-
eign firms can offer shorter de-
livery dates and longer credit.
What has been happening to Brit-





Production last year in the en-
wes gineering, shipbuilding and elec-
for a trical goods industries was 7 per

cent higher than in 1950. The rate
Coe of increase, however, fell from
Only the Beginning 11 per cent in the first four
Closing the gap, moreover, will months to 4 per cent in the last
other countries. The comparison be only the beginning. There must four. In January and February
was much less favourable, how- follow years of surpluses, enabling of this year output was still ris-

British expert prices, between
devaluation and the third quar-
ter of 1951, was less than in most

ever, for textiles than for metals the reserves to be rebuilt to a ing, and increase over a year
and other manufactured goods. point where they are not threat- oe vee per o The pa
ened with extinction by every ing factor 1s e supply ©
= The rrice Prospect major fluctuation, And we cannot Steel. . Fé
Future prices of British exports, fo. Jong be content with the pres- In the building and contracting
as of gooas for the home market, .nt reduced level of imports: we industry, production was_ higher
depena largely on present move- shall need more raw materials to in the first quarter of 1952 than
ments in cost of production: ex- expand production; and we must in the corresponding period of
ternal (that is import costs) and») i)q up our stocks again.

1951, but was not so high as in
ee labou" “So exports to non-sterling mar-
costs).

(particularly sie ee alone was the
kets must rise considerably; and wae ET ening Banat
con-sberting dbcste ovencacen asa _ result of bad
of the Korean war, that set off the have been lagging behind. By Ware arcane ast ss

ot manufactured volume it is doubtful whether building. The three months stand.
goods in 1951. The wholesale prices they were any higher at all in still (from December 1951 to

ee for basic materials (whieh 1951 than in 1950, All the extra February 1952) on the granting

It was the steep increase in as rapidly as possible.
import costs, after the outbreak Recently,

rise in prices

reflects the cost to British indus- g00ds exported last year went to of permission to start new

try of commodities obtained main- the sterling area. By value they with the main ees a
fly from abroad) rose by 75 per increased far less in 1951 than in housing and some defence proj-
;cent from June 1950 to its peak in 1950; dollar exports went up only ects, was ordered to try to ease
March 1951. By March this year, 16 toma ce ne per cent this overload, Some building work
however, it had fallen about two- re anaes s to O. a coun- js still being delayed by short-
thirds of the way back, the down- ‘Tes and possessions went up only ages of steel, especially of rein.

; 13 per cent inst p ‘ :
ward movement of prices last What nea Ma tate cat toscing steel.

. - —
summer having been renewed 1M Recent trends for three types of | In manufacturing and in build-
January. . - exports to non-sterling markets ing, therefore, steel shortage is
Prices of wool, hides and skins, are shown in a chart on this page. still hindering production. And
cotton and rubber are the main The general implication is that from behind the shortage of steel
ones which have been falling iâ„¢ the chances are better for capital is beginning to emerge another
recent months: the first two are than for consumer goods. Hence difficulty : coke supplies to enable
now substantially below their pre- this year’s cuts in home invest- more pig iron to be made from
Korean levels. Prices of copper ment in plant and machinery, for increased supplies of iron ore,
and other non-ferrous. metals the sake of exports. But it does both from home sources and from
(except tin), though still high not follow—quite the contrary— abroad, in replacement of dwind-
relative to June 1950, have been that no manufacturer of consumer ling scrap imports.

fairly stable since the third goods need bother about non- Crude steel output in the first
quarter of 1951. Even after allow- sterling markets. After all, most two months was 4 per cent below
ing time for changes in raw of our exports to the United last year. March (not affected by

Pe by States are consumer goods, The Easter as it was in 1951) showed
material costs to work through tO Moct unlikely sounding products an increase, and in the fest quar-
the price of the finished goods, it 4, . f 7 ; 7
{ : ; can often be sold in the most diffi- ter production was at an annual
\is unlikely that they will lead oyjt markets. Orchids grown in rate of just under. 16 million ton
any general increase in export this country are flown to America, compared with 16.4 million in the
prices in the next few months. and polyps dredged up from the first quarter of 1951 and 16.6 mil-
They might even make some price Thames Estuary end by gracing lion in the first quarter of 1950.
reductions possible. New York hats. It is hoped that a progressive
The vicissitudes of world raw The Limits Of Government improvement throughout the year
material costs, however, also affect Action will raise production above the
export prices of many other coun- ~he Government can indicate 1951 figure of 15.6 million, But
tries, Whether or not United King- what is needed: more non-sterling there will have to be a large in-
dom export prices are competi- exports. It can do its best to Crease in pig iron production to
tive depends therefore to a large remove obstacles and provide offset the decline in scrap sup-
exterit on home costs of produc- facilities, But it cannot, itsett, Pies, This depends in turn on a
tion and on profit margins. Here take the initiative: that depends. pro tne increase in iron ore
the outlook is far from clear. on manufacturers realising how sop jhard ogee) supplies. Prospects
The Cost of Labour grave and dangerous the situation ieee a on iron ore have
Since the end of 1950 there has 18 and adapting and pushing their ple for blast faradeas ay hold
been a steady upward movement S¢lling policies accordingly. back pig iron ducti rer
: a PeaNied tae “All concerned in the export “ Pe Coe MOns
in labour costs as the rise in retail jnauctry”. th * tse The blast furnaces need more
prices of some manufactured POUSTY + Une President of the hard coke to make more pig i
oer Tee Board of Trade has said, “should Vidi on, Sadao
goods (begun by the rise in im- jecognise that it is the firm i Three new blast furnaces are
port costs) led to successful claims tention of the Government ts ohak being blown in and if there is
for higher wages which outstrip- to make everything possible avail- enpyah core ley sheaed. Provide
ped any increase in productivity. able to them and to make selling another 200,008 Was oF pig ion &
The chart shows the divergent for export a more attractive pot nd The steel industry is the
movements of earnings and out- proposition than selling for the we pcs user of hard coke, supply-
put per man in manufacturing in home market”. Advice can be had fren’ net eye et aes
1951, in contrast to the position direct from the Board, from the anq tae Secs a athe The rest,
in 1948 to 1950 when they kept long-established national trade (the ona Oe GINTaN: Gen hee
i r organisations ‘ gest of which are foun-
fairly well in step. rganisations, and for dollar mar- dries), are met from the Nati
Increases in labour costs and kets from the Dollar Exports Coal Board’s ovens Shh dolce ee
import prices in 1951 were also Council, The Exports Credits dependent ovens. Although ake
the main eause of the recent rise Guarantee Department offers production has been inbreusing
in prices of transport and of Cover against many risks beyond and further increases are expects
home-produced _ materials: iron the control of the exporter iid Gd: the total currant mined
: ; â„¢ : has for the benefit of the dollar not i pies ape
and steel, cement and fuel. In in- ; not sufficient to mee
exporter worked out a wid i t in full the
dustry generally, however, from e range requirements both of the steel

November to March the index of yg ete Nr te Aaa 49 industry and of other essential
weekly wage+rates rose by less ing, advertising and sales promo- ber yee or tak entonaed

than % per cent a month, co A
; tion, ‘ oa with the United States steel im-

pared with the 1 per cent a month
average from September, 1950, 10 Phere are three pointers to non- ports are_expected to be over a

November, 1951. Between Febru-) sterling sales:—- million tons higher (in ingot
ary and March the index remain#®}. Canada Mi tdlaas suivichter equivalent) than last year. The

full benefit will however not be

felt until after 1952 because a

substantial proportion of these

supplies has to be further process-

ed in the U.K. At the end of the

first quarter only about 172,000
@ On Page 5

ed unchanged. fi capital goods in the world an
We shall need to look anxi ng 1950 hae total new avagtinent
to our export prospects; for” #Fin plant and equipment was about
er labour costs in industry would £730 million—and year by year
give a new and dangerous upward the total grows. There is plenty
thrust to export prices. of room in this vast expenditure



that he had to overstep the time
for his sermon. When it was 8.30,
young people with nothing more
important than to reach a theatre
or some trysting place could be
seen walking out when Evensong
was not yet finished. Others fol-
lowed until it looked that the
support which should have come
from their “pocket books” or
purses would he lost to St. Mary's,

In this same church where Pee
form and ceremony take prece Flushing Gutters
dence to many other things and

where genuflecting has become a To:The Editor, The Advocate—

fine art and part of a hybrid” SjTR—Some weeks ago your people ave Haeaaad a oot ia
ritual it was distressing to-see Evening Advocate called atten- others who have on one we is
people treat the Church in so off tion continuously to the annoying to get to their jobs b: Se. * .
hand a manner and the visiting conditions created by the Scaven- There are very ew 1 h
preacher with such scant cour- ging Cart flushing gutters in do not now feel that Esere te .
tesy. It may be that those who Baxters Road early in the day. attitude on the part of th ms
so offended were not members of The condition of things abated who werk with the cart ‘aadoties
the St. Mary’s congregation and but now it seems to have returned to cause inconvenience. f mon
bad only been attracted by the with even greater inconvenience be realised that the tter oA
voice of the Preacher. than before. be flushed but surely the cae oe
ing the work could have a little

the priests to accommodate the
cinema goer by preaching short
sermons and finishing Evensong
before 8.30 so that members of
the congregation, who desire to
do $0 can get to the show in tinve.
_ We need a strong and convinc-
ing call back to the paths of
rectitude and respect for moral
and spiritual enlightenment.
Yours

road. But the method of leavin
the shaft jutting out on one wide
while the hose ran across the
other prevented any passage for
some time.

A few protests by drivers and
pedestrians made them put the
cart in line with the gutter and so
there was some relief as ’buses
were not passing always. Now
they have returned to the old
practice of blocking the road,

What makes matters worse is
that the time for flushing these
gutters is the peak hour of traffic,

It is regrettable but neverthe-

i i a al I will speak °o fr, as It used to be the practice cf 33 ;
beter ee oe advocating a mesewods pe Rt Philip’s ae center aaaaaee a ee less re that our people need the men operating li rahe to dee more consideration for the travel-
: ause, piscopa Mhurch, Philadelphia; ee 5: much more discipline of mind. the vehicle diagonally acr ‘ ing public,
Let me however draw was preachi ’ ted the congregation to progress Their ¢ "Peis e diagonally across the
L Ss preaching. a ae ; Their conduct on Sunday eve g ros é » . ne ac
F. Gs attention to these facts: = morally spiritually and educa- would lead aes Sine cone roa m6 aun bn the ; attached On the other hand it is up to
(a) that the original Christian In years past when things tionally, to see to it that their cjusion that this is, even if not an cart had bee “all wed 4a If nine the Sanitary Commissioners to
Sabbath was Saturday and not religious were of greater value it children were educated and sO anti-Christian community, arallel rith aowed to remain point out to them that while they
Sunday; (b) that the setting was good to see large and ap- fitted for the tasks ahead. 1 \netisen coe Phat aay tees ee gutter there are doing public service they
apart of Sunday as a day of preciative congregations flocking Having given an account of the certainly is not true of Barbados vehicles at le SS ca ae ee should not cause inconvenience
worship was because there was to hear visiting preachers. One work in America it was obvious but it has become the fashion of ones to is ; pa see is smaller unnecessarily,
t C pass 1 one side of the MOTORIST.
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Butcher Condemned to Die in 1-Day

@ From Page 1

Without answering, the accused
got up from over the woman and
slashed his throat on the left
side with the knife which he
had. ;

Assisted by another man, the
witness took away the knife from
the defendant and a few minutes
later a constable arrived on the
scene. The Police also arrived
shortly afterwards and both the
accused and the deceased were
put in a van and taken away.

To Mr. Smith: ‘I only saw the
accused that evening. The ac-
cused worked as a butcher in the

market. I cannot say if the
accused is a ‘hard’ drinker.
Sometimes in the market the

accused did a lot of funny things,
He would go into anybody’s stall,
take up their meat and if asked
for it, he would challenge them
to fight. People in the market
would make no trouble because
he was thought to be half-mad.

His actions tend to show that
he was not in a sound state of
mind.

Dr. A. S. Cato who performed
the post mortem examination
described the multiple injuries
which included a deep incised
five inch wound in the lower
part of the middle area of the
back extending down to the bone,

The left lung was cut over an
area one inch long in the lower
lcbe. In the abdomen there was
a deep 5 inch incised wound.

Death, he said, was due in his
opinion to shock and haemorr-
hage from the multiple injuries.

The wounds’ were inflicted
with a sharp instrument such as
a knife.

Cuthbert Archer of New Or-
leans, St. Michael said that on
20th, February he was standing
at the junction of Passage Road.
and Westbury Road. He heard
shouts of murder and when he
looked around he saw the accused
striking the deceased, He related
in detail the same story told by
Joseph Arthur,

Clyde Skeete, mason of Hunte
Street, Bridgetown, was next to
give evidence. Like the two other
witnesses he was standing on the
Westbury-Passage Road junction.

The deceased came up Baxters
Road and turned into Westbury
Road.

The accused stepped out of a
nearby shop, crossed the road
and said ‘I told you when you
go out don’t stay so late’ The
deceased made some inaudible
reply and the accused held her
by the hand, pulled her a few
feet from where he had stopped
her and started to beat her.

The deceased fell, Witness
said ‘You could wait until you
go home and beat the woman.’
And then she said ‘Oh Lord, you
are going to let him kill me?’

Two men ran to her and the
accused said, ‘let me go, let me
kill her.

He went down on her and gave
the woman a stab while she was
on the ground. It was only
after she calleq for help that
per realised he was stabbing

er.

The accused got up and cut
his own throat and then dragged
to a spot near where the woman
lay and said ‘let me die with my
boots on’,

. An island constable took the
knife from him.

The witness at this point cor-
roborated the story about the
arrival of the van and its subse-
quent departure for the hospital
with the deceaseq and _ the
accused.

To Mr. Smith: I saw the ac-
cused give only one stab when
on the ground. I do not re-
member saying that 3 men held
the accused.

Lionel Wilkinson, Warehouse
porter of Hunte Street told of
having arrived on the scene and
seeing the deceased woman bleed-
ing a great deal.

He took away the knife from
the accused who had cut his own
throat, and shortly ‘after the
police waggon arrived and took
the two people to the hospital.

He did not hear the accused
say anything after he, witness,
had arrived on the scene, nor in
the van, nor in the hospital where
he witness, accompanied the two
injured parties, ‘

Joseph Downes, an island Con-
stable, said on the 20th February
he was at the corner of King
Street, near Baxters’ Road. He
heard a woman's voice shouting
for ‘murder’, He went to the

scene and there saw a woman
lying on the ground bleeding, He
also saw a man holding the ac-
cused who was bleeding from his
throat.
and when the Police came,

He arrested the accused
the





woman and the man were taken
to the General Hospital.

About a half hour before the
incident the accused and the de-
ceased passed him on Baxter's
road. The accused appeared to be
speaking to the deceased, but she
did not seem to reply. On both
occasions, the accused was dressed
the same way.

Cpl. Ralph Williams corroborat-
ed the latter part of the story al-
ready told by previous witnesses.

Set. Louis Marshall told of his
arrival on the scene and described
the condition of the woman and
the accused whom he had removed
by van to the General Hospital.

On. the 4th March he arrested
the accused and charged him witn
the murder of Clarke. On being
cautioned the accused said, ‘I
would not say anything.’ 7

The Crown tendered Clarice
Bennett and Judah Ramsay for
cross-examination, Ramsay told of
an instance when the accused at-
tacked him with a knife because
he, witness, rescued one of the
children of the accused whom the
latter had turned out from home.

Daisy Scantlebury was also
also tendered for cross-examina-
tion, and at 12.50 o'clock the
Crown closed its case against the
accused. The adjournment was
taken at this point.

Mother Gives Evidence

ADA SMALL 74, of Fairfield
Road, Grazettes, and mother of
the defendant, was the first wit-
ness to give evidence on behalf
of the defence,

The accused and she got on
very well until he was scalded,
and struck on the head. From
then he beat her and dragged her
off the bed. He did not seem hin.-
self after that incident,

He was a very nice child before
the scalding incident,

She has eight children, Of them,
a boy and girl are at the Menta!
Hospital, They used to beat her
and tear up her clothes,

The accused’s father’s brother
appeared to be unsound in mind.
The accused’s father has a sister
who went to the Mental Hospital,

The accused used to lick up
and break up anything he put his
hands on. Her other two children
who are at the Mental Hospital
Just took suddenly ill,

To Mr. Field: The accused was
scalded and beaten on the same
day. She saw her son—the ac-
cused—at her house this year,
and because he used to beat her,
she left home. She had doubts
that he would harm her,

Selvin Campb.ll, 20, butcher of
Peterkin Land, said he knew
Small who used to slaughter for
his, (witness’) brother,

Drank Rum

There were umes when &mall
drank rum and behaved badly.
He went to fight others who used
to try their utmost to evade him,

On the day of the 20th, some
butchers were playing cards in
the market. Small was there, but
although he did. not behave badly,
he appeared to have something on
his mind, and was shaking his
head as if worried.

Simeon Forde, 26, butcher of
Deacon’s Road said he knew the
accused for about two or three
years. He met him as a butcher
in the market where they worked
side by side slaughtering animals.

The defendant and he got on
very well, except that at times he
appeared not to be in his proper
senses, He used to take up other
people’s things and walk off with
them.

This closed the case for the de-
fence, and the Crown called no
witness in rebuttal.

Mr. Smith then addressed the
jury and said that from the prose-
cution’s evidence, it would appear
to be a cold-blooded murder.

They should however discard
from their minds anything which
they might have heard since the
incident.

He told them that he would sub-
mit that the accused at the time of
the incident was suffering from
a defective mind, and that they
should return a verdict of “not
guilty”, on grounds of insanity.

Accused Demeanour

The demeanour of the accused as
seen in the dock had nothing to
do with the murder, they were
concerned with trying to come to
a conclusion that at the time the
defendant was suffering from a
defect of reasoning.

In a defence of insanity, the

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BARBADOS ADVOCATE



burden of proof on the part of the
defence was not as high as the
burden of proof on the part of the
prosecution in proving their case.

He was not trying to establish
that the accused did not kill the
woman, but that on the particular
day, and it was supported by the
evidence fcr the prosecution,
something was wrong with the
accused, or that something was
resting on his mind, What was
more, even the people with whom
he worked, tried to avoid him,
saying, “don't mind you, you are
half-a-madman,”

The fact that the accused had
killed the woman did not mean
that he was the criminal type,
but he was submitting that at the
time of the fatality, something
had gone wreng with the accused
—something which only provi-
dence could tell, and which he was
suggesting was a mental “black

out.”
Defect of Reason

He asked the jury to say that
the accused was at the time suf-
fering from such a defect 90
reason or disease of mind as not
to know the nature or quality of
the acts or to know that what he
was doing was wrong.

He ccunselled the jury to
search their minds carefully, be-
cause on their verdict which he
knew would be in keeping witn
the high tradition of the jury sys-
tem in this country, and because
too, he knew that by their ver-
dict his client, whether condemned
or acquitted, would have the sat-
isfaction and the consolation of
knowing that 12 “honest men and
true” passed their verdict, be-
cause they were convinced either
of his guilt or innocence.

Replying, Mr, Field, the Crown
prosecutor argued that the fact
that other relatives of the ac-
cused were patients of the Men-
tal Hospital did not prove heredi-
tary mental illness,

He agreed that the burden of
proof on the defence to prove in-
sanity was not so on@€rous as the
burden of proof which lay on the
prosecution, but submitted that
none the less, the defence had to
produce evidence of the “proba-
bility” of his being mentally de-
ranged,

Must be Satisfied

The jury had to be satisfied
that on the 20th February the ac-
cused did not know right from
wrong when he was administer-
ing the blows on a woman who
was formerly his reputed wife, but
who no longer was.

It was the duty of the defence
to prove that he was insane, be-
cause every man is thought to be
sane until he was proven insane.

It was not the duty of the
Crown to produce evidence to
prove his condition of mind.

Dealing with the evidence of
the defence witness, the Crown
Prosecutor said that the behaviour
of the accused when he drank,
only went to show that he was

of a violent temper when he did

drink.

The verdict which they would
arrive at was either “guilty” or
“not guilty on ground of insanity”.
It was for them to say that at the
time of the incident, he was or
was not suffering from a defect
of reasoning.

C.J. Sums Up

His Lordship summed up for
half an hour, and pointed out that
the question for the jury was
whether on the particular day
and at the particular time of the
offence, the accused was suffering
from a mental aberration which
would cause him not to know that
what he was doing was wrong or
to know the nature or quality of
his acts.

There were therefore two ver-
dicts open to them, as admitted by
koth Counsel for the defence and
Counsel for the Crown, there be-
ing “guilty of murder” or “net
guilty of murder on grounds of
insanity.”

His Lordship dealt briefly with
the submissions made by Coun-
sel, and after half an hour, in-
structed the jury to retire and
consider their verdict.

The jury deliberated for 25
minutes, and returning to the
Court, the foreman, announced a
verdict of guilty against the ac-
cused,

The Court rose as His Lord-
ship pronounced the sentence of
death, after which the Court was
adjourned until this morning at
10 o’clock.

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Manley Introduced
To Local Bar

@ From Page |
fession which gave a great num.
ber of its members to perform
those civic duties. Mr. Manley
was no exception. He had for a
great number of years taken part
in the political life of his colony
and assisted his fellow citizens in
that way. He had served on a
great number of Boards in
Jamaica and also was the founder
of the co-operative concern
originally known as Jamaica Wel-
fare Ltd. It was placed on a basis
which the Colonial Development
and Welfare had since recom-
mended to other parts of the
British West Indies,
U.S. Agreement

In 1937 he went to the United
States and negotiated a special
export agreement, the main pro-
visions of which helped sub-
stantially with their minor in-
dustries,

“He has been prepared to risk
losing the remuneration of a suc-
cessful practice by taking up
these duties on behalf of his fellow
citizens,”

He said that apart from his
other qualifications, Mr. Manley
had been an outstanding athlete.

“It amazes me My Lord, to
know that in 1914 he put up a
school record of 10 seconds for the
100 yards, which to this day has
not been beaten, though equalled
in 1942 by no less a person than
Manley, Junior.”

He had also understood that
Mr. Manley had made his mark
in boxing, and in recent years
had been a judge in local boxing
bouts. He was also. mainly
responsible for sending an
Olympic team to the Olympic
Games in England in 1944.

In admitting Mr, Manley to
practise, His Lordship said that
in the history of this island,
seldom if ever, so far as I am
aware, has a man with his distine-
tion and eminence in the pro-
fession been introduced to the
Bar of this island. Generally
those admitted to practise were
newcomers, so that, apart from
everything else, it was an ex-
ceptional and unique occasion. So
he was giving him a hearty and
sincere welcome to the Bar of
Barbados.

“Caribbean Bar”

“It well may be that in the not
far distant future there will be
one Bar for the whole of the
British Caribbean area,” he said.
“and that Seniority in one
territory or area, will be
recognised as seniority in another,
and indeed in all the others witin
certain safeguards that may have
to be, but I mention this because
I see you sit where you are in
spite of your wonderful career
otherwise.”

He said that he had heard then
for the first time of the extent
of his athletic achievements of
which he had known something
beforehand, but not of such a
remarkable one as he had jusi
heard, ‘

After admitting him to audience
in the Court of the island, His
Lordship said that there was one
feature common to both of them,
a feature for which neither of
them were responsible, and that
was that they were both born in
1893,

After expressing a sense of
obligation to His lordship for his
kind and generous welcome, he
said he was particularly obliged
to His Learned Friend the At-
torney General, not only for the
very kind words in which he had
moved his admission, but also
because he understood that he
had interrupted his holiday to do
that on his behalf. That he
would assure him, was a good ex-
ample of professional kindness
and courtesy.

Barbados Courtesy

He remarked at the circum-
stances that in Barbados no fee
was charged for introduction, and
said that in Jamaica it would have
cost him or His Learned Friend,
£25. That was another uf the evi-
dences of the preservation of cour-
tesy and customs for which Barba-





Assize Diary

ASSIZE DIARY
Reg. \vs, Eunice New-
ton

No, 6.



DIAL 2352

§


VACATION

HARRISONS
|



°
Officers Elected
rr . Toet
At Workers’ Union
Conference
The following Officers were
elected at the Annual Delegates
Confererice of the Barbados
Workers’ Union at their Fairchild
Street headquarters yesterday :—
President: Mr. G. H. Adams,
General Secretary: Mr. F. L
Walcott, Treasurer: Mr. Archie
King: other members of the Coun-
cil: Messrs. J. Cabral, G. Hep-
burn, R. Clarke, E, Walcott, W.
Blunt, D. Farrell, F. N. Layne, D,

D, Holder, H. C. Rock and Erro!
Jones.



COMMITTEE GIVES
ADVICE ON “‘AVALON’S”
FURNITURE

The Advisory Committee of
the Barbados General Hospital
at their meeting yesterday recom-
mended that certain furniture
should be purchased for the three
bedroom flat at “Avalon” the
newly sequired premises for
members of the hospital staff.

The Committee decided that
the overhauling of the electrical
installations of the Hospital as
recommended by the Acting
Electrical Inspector be proceeded
with urgently,

The Committee also discussed
proposals for relieving the pres-
ent overcrowding at the Hospital.

Members present were:— Dr
H. G. Cummins, M.C.P. (Chair-

man), Mrs, J. A. Martineau, Mr.
R. B. Skeete, Mr. R. M.-Cave
and Dr. D, S. Gideon, Medical

Superintendent.

M.HLS. SPORTS

@ From Page 3
â„¢) YDS. BOYS chass m
Ist J. Gittens (C), 2nd C. Clarke (D),
Srd D. Skeete (B)
Time: 25 4/5 secs
Record: H. Chandler 24 secs
0 YDS BOYS CLASS UI
Ist N. Greaves (B), 2nd C. Linton (8),
3rd E. Clarke (C)
Time: 294/5 secs
Record: J. Gittens 26 secs
1M YDS BOYS CLASS IV
Ist E. Stuart (A), and L. Griffith (D),
K. Inniss (D).
Time: 21 1/5 secs
Record: C. Collymore 193/5 secs
HIGH JUMP GIRLS UNDER 14

Ist N. Greaves (C), 2nd L.. Ashby (A),
wd P. Watson (C).

Height: 4 ft 6 ins. (Record)

Record: J, Laurence 4 ft 2 ins

HIGH JUMP BOYS UNDER 14
ist A. Estwick (B), and L. Clarke (A),
3rd V. Springer (C)
Height: 4 ft 8 ins (Record)
Record: J. Gittens 4 ft @ Ine
HIGH JUMP GIRLS OVER 14
Ist O. St. John (D), 2nd K. Clarke
(B). 3rd J. Trotman ¢D)
Height: 4 ft 5 ins
Record: J. Sandiford 4 ft 6 ins
HIGH JUMP BOYS OVER 14
ist K. Corbin (B), 2nd A. Clarke (D),
ord Ry, Gibbs (A),

Height: 5 ft, 4 ins. (Record)
Record: C. Harper 5 ft. 2 ins
(INTERVAL, 4—4 380)

SET RELAY RACE GIRLS
Ist B, 2nd O, 3rd D
Time: 1.03/5 secs

SET RELAY RACE BOYS
Ist C, 2nd B, 3rd A,

Time: 51 secs
80 YDS FLAT
Ist R. Gibbs, Ind D. Skeete

40 YDS BOYS UNDER M4
Ist V. Springer (CC), 2nd N. Greaves
(B). 3rd C. Linton (By)
Time: 1 min, 5 2/6 secs,
Record: V. Skeete 1 min & sees,
40 YDS BOYS OVER 14
Ist K. Corbin (B), 2nd D. Skeete (B),
3rd J. Gittens (C)
LITTLE VISITORS
(HANDICAP)
Ist E. Griffith,
LITTLE GIANTS
(HANDICAP)
Ist J. Gibbs (B).
OLD GIRLS RACE #0 YDS
Ist Miss Blackman
OLD BOYS RACE 1 YDS
Ist V. Skeete

RACE

RACE

lawr Tennis t

R.B.Y.C. TOURNAMENT

Men's Doubles final: L. St. Hill
and J, D. Trimmingham beat P.
Paterson and G. H. Manning 6—1,
8—6, 6—2.

At the conclusion of this match
prizes were presented to the
various winners,

dos among all the West Indies was
so renowned

He was particularly proud to
be admitted to the Bar of an
island like Barbados with unique
distinctions, Among the things
for which Barbados could be
proud was the fact that the Bar.
badian Bar had been able to pro-
duce its own Chief Justices whu
had sat generation after genera-
tion. He looked forward to the
time when indeed there would be
one Bar for the whole of the
West Indies, guided by the tradi-
tion of Barbados.



See our

Ladies

From

BEGINS WITH
A SPLASH!

CHILDREN’S BATHSUITS

Flowered Cotton
From $2.65 to $7.50

WOOLLEN

Toddlers’ to Girls’ Sizes

Indians Need
206 Runs To
Beat Surrey

‘(From Our Own Correspondent)
LONDON, July 28.

A splendid century by actiag
Surrey skipper Peter May en-
abled Surrey to recover against
the Indians at the Oval today.
May hit 143, his seventh century
of the season and as a result Sur-
rey at their second attempt totall-
ed 819, leaving the tourists 212
to win, And they made a bad start
losing ene wicket for 6 in the final
20 minutes,

Apart trom
batsmen made centuries
Derbysnire’s Hamer
way with 165
first class cricket,

Haro.d Gimblett, Somerset
batsman celebrated his benetit
match by making a century olf
the Nerthants atuack at Glaston-
bury.

SCUREBOARD —
Surrey versus Indians

WEE, Wives ve3's 71 and
Ghulam Ahmed four for 5v.
dians 179 and 6 for 1,

Lancs versus Gloucester

Gloucester 266 and 11 for 1.
Lanes 402 for 8 declared,
Grieves 118.

Middlesex versus Yorkshire

May, four other
to-day,
leading me

his highest in

319.
in-

Middlesex 250 and 2 for
no wicket.
Yorks .. 354, Close 87 not out.

Somerset versus Northants
Somerset .. 109 and 206 for 3.
Gimblett 104,



Northants hae pags eR
Hants versus Warwick

Warwick 185 and 154 for 4

WOR Vs. vert visweate ti: 184,

Sussex versus Kent
Kent 302 and 160 for 9.
WM eis caci tale ee
Wright 5 for 64,
Leicester versus Worcester
Leicester 364 for 8 declared
and 3 for 1,
Wercester
Bird 98,
Derby versus Notts
Notts . . 338 and 18 for 1,
Derby , . 529 for 7 declared,
Hamer 165, Carr 116.
Glamorgan versus Essex
Glamorgen 353 for 6 declared.
Parkheuse 99 not out.
Essex :

355,

. 827 for 8



Home Costs And

Export Prices

@ From Page 4

tons of steel, pig iron and scrap
for the U.K. had been delivered
«at works in the U.S. or other
sources of supply. Of this, 85,000
tons had reached the U.K,

tee . The situation arising
from the steel strike in America
is very uncertain,” said the Min-
ister of Supply on Ist May, "How-

ever, my latest information is that

export licences have not been
stopped, We are in touch with
the United States Administration

on this matter, and we are confi-
dent that in the disposal of avail-
able steel supplies they will keep
our needs well in mind,”
Weather has not hindered build-
ing much this year, and comple-

tions of new permanent houses in]..

the first quarter were the high-
est for that time of year since the
war. The number of houses under
construction at the end of March
was nearly 30,000 greater than a
year earlier, reflecting partly the
rise in the number of houses on
which building started during
April-December 1951, and partly
the removal of the 200,000 a year
ceiling.

The housing programme is to be
expanded over the

intended to increase
varied little over the past four
years), but to attract workers to
housebuilding from other types
of building work. Steel shortages
and increasing defence needs have
made reductions in parts of the
building programme necessary,
notably in factory building,
schools and transport, These re-
ductions have been offset by in-
creases in other parts where the
need for steel is relatively small,

particularly in houses.
Economie Survey of Europe in 1961

lovely

°

From $2.93 to $6.09



PDOs 2 SS HOOOOGO9OO

next three
years as far as resources of mate-~
rials and labour allow; it is not
the total
building labour force (which has



| a rial |














Bath Suits
SATIN LASTEX

In 1 Piece and 2 Piece Styles
From $11.64 to $26.66

FLOWERED COTTON

From $7.60 to $9.07

WOOLLEN

In 1 Piece and 2 Piece Styles
From $10.50 to $15.06

PAGE FIVE


















; % 3 2 LINOLEUM SS
i bright 4a. WOOD FLOORS © SS
d AND FURNITURE os
e ——, \
ean an \N 2K) ,
valthy AAA OOLIA hI
HYGIENIC | ee j
0F8, Pol rift}

FOR BRIGHT AND |. 4/7
HEALTHY HOMES

Agent; A & S Bryden & Sons Ltd, Barbad



The name speaks foritself Seeuamem

A t - oned Mik ture “ules

cusnseceeeee
Tablets
Helps to cleanse the system
from blood impurities

a

4 Impurities in the blood may cauwee rheumatic
aches and pains, stiff and painful joints,
boils, pimples and common skin disorders,
Clarke’s Blood Mixture helps to purify
the blood, cleanses the system and assists
in restoring good health.

aul





w “S. MONROE 4€0.LTD.,
Bridgetown,

Distillers
Leith, Scotland











FOR LOWERED VITALITY!
TAKE

** NERVITONE
TONIC WINE”

It Stimulates the Nerves, enriches the blood and
builds up new reserves of strength which is lacking
when you are feeling below par.

5/6 and 10/-

KNIGHTS LTD.

All Branches



: SS ———————
LS ae —— >> 7
, OOO ea
ot PROFS OO SSCP LILIES LA ET
Â¥
%,
my

NOTICE



“We wish to advise our customers
that our Workshop Department will be
closed from Tuesday 5th August to
Monday 18th August, 1952, both days
inclusive, in order to give our Work-
shop Staff their Annual vacation. There
will be a small relief staff on duty for
any emergencies. Our Office, Parts x
Â¥
Department and Petrol Station will be %
= x
open as usual. %
%,
x
x
&
+ %
5
x
,
%
ECKSTEIN BROTHERS §
%
%
— IAL 4269 3
BAY STREET D :
%,
S *
$ a a ce ih ca oe eR
MARAE ¢

ay POLO OES
CPSOSOSS SSS DI SLIP DS OT PPLSS





PAGE SIX



CLASSIFIED ADS.

TELEPHONE

~~



IN MEMORIAM

MURRAY-—To the



sacred memory of a















7 one person (or couple. From August 1. |
dear friend Rosa Murray, parted thi¢
Vile three years to-day, (3 yrs.) th AUTOMOTIVE | Telephone 249. 18.4, 52-—-t fon
July, 149 [—_—_ ceeeepeseinsiene
Our humble prayer oh God cnenerinen, Sirmione aeenaniliiiniras | oars Two Furnished Flats at Dun-
‘That she has been reconciled to Thee.| _CAR—Morris Oxford in good condition. | 4% are ante ane Suitable fer 2 only.
Joseph N. Howard and others. Tyres and Batteries New Dial 2582. | g: ; ri > oparare oo ‘|
29.7.52—In be Sethe es 1.6.52—t4.n
ABALE—In never {fading memory of curl CAR—Dodge Superde Luxe (X88) |ruie runkne Bala”
dear sister Gladys Seale who was called] Will sell for cash, best offer, bought! " 7.6820
to higher service on 28 July, 1951 smaller = First class order, owner a
To live with Christ is not to die driven. jal 3359. Pn :
Sy - amin * TO AN APPROVED TENANT-Cool
Doris, Cyril and Gordon Seale a weal 16.7.52—t.f.n | comfortably furnished first floor float with
aoe oe wea Le. ake oe ————-——— | modern Gas Cooker, English tub bath,
st eet ae he ae yealinear sea in the Hotel area. Available
PERSONAL job, Good as new. Twin carburettors sone as ae Se be Apply
riving high class performance. Owner | ee pants oe
~ i caddy Teena, cae Resale aa = Apply D. Harvey
1 public ore hereby a Nead/C/o Canadian Bank of
giving credit to my wife, MIRIAM bine Spee Commerce. | PUBLIC SALES
ROBINSON (nee Grant) as I do not ey
myself responsible for her or anyone CAR—Ford V-8 Super DeLuxe X—T754
else contracting any debt or debts in] will sell at bargai to |
my name unless by a written order : D Stewart Dia po ses ean te: AUCTION
signed by me. 7752S |
WALTER ROBINSON, ih decieiacle 4 To be sold by auction on Thursday
Hindsbury ae. CAR—1951 model —- M.S. 1500 Singer | "ext 3ist July at Rex Dairy Farm,
a eae loon. Owner driven, 15,000 miles, Only | Hothersal Turning: 2» heads of Dairy
$2—20 ason for sale, owner going abroad.| Cows and one pedegree Holstein Bull.
il 5114 26.7.52—3n 29.7. 52—I1n.
& seiee les
LOST «A FOUND i" T'RUCK-—Chevrolet truck, no bg Wednesday 30th July at 1 p.m. at 6th
ve offer refused. A Barnes $e. Avenug, Peterkins Land, Boarded and
ant ata. rn bene: .n.'Shingled House 16 x 9 x 8, kitchen,
se closet and palings. Land can be rented
LOST LIVESTOCK $1,00 per month. Terms CASH on fall
of hammer, R. Archer MeKenzie
ANAT ee ce vanes ga answering to the name of Tom. Finder ee “Two (2) Milch Cows, 22 and
will be suitably rewarded. L. A. Walcott, | art an dl Nahi hod Ae ae * .
Teles Sines Sones a ana: | arian Hames, "Ap PUBLIC NOTICES
we TC RACE TICKET —Serios K.K. 20.7.08-—gn
0. 9836. nder kindly return same -
to the Advocate Advertising |Depart- MECHANICAL NOTICE

ee) ee 52—-1n.

SWEEPSTAK® TICKETS -- Series T
7968 and Series A.4703. Finder please
return same. to Charles Cave, er
Road, Carrington's Village

) 29.7, 52— in

SWEEPSTAKE
842. Finder please
Gracie Holder “Samremo,’
Hill.

bs
Saree
asso secmuns

TICKET Series
return same to
Two Mile
29.7.52—In

H.H







ene iggetemrn—pe™
BROKEN DENTAL PLATES SKIiL-
FULLY REPATRED-—Save, that crack
stitch in time
slack plates
Laboratory
26.7.52—2n

from going further; a
saves nine,
tightened. Square
Upper Reed Street

BIG MONEY by soedling Redif
your a time, Get a supply
1.7.52—6n

teeth replaced,
Deal

fusion .



FIRLD OVERSEER for



Spring Vale

Plantation, St. Andrew. Apply to the
Manager. 1.7 .§2—In
GENTLEMAN seeks responsible posi-

tion. Over eleven years office experience
with radi engineering qualifications ano
experience added asset. No night duties,
For arrangement of interview and full
details c/o Advocate.

29.7.5%2--3n.

reply ‘“‘Ramsaey"





Old reliable Company established in
Trinidad for many years requires the
services of a competent and experienced
Manager for Branch Office ‘to be
established in Barbados end September
1952. Please send full deta’ ano
Salary required» with small Passport
picture to Advocate Box G.T. c/o
Advocate Co. 19.7.62—10n

MISCELLANEOUS

BOTTLES—1,000 (8 oz.) Medicine Bot-
tles — ‘aduated preferred — good price
paid. its” 29.7 52-—3n

$62.50 POCKET MONEY easily earnec
by recommending 25 new subscribers t

REDIFFUSION in one month.
1.7.62—6n

——————_—
REDIFFUSION offers $1.50 cash fo
each new Subscriber regornmp ented by
wou, 1.7.6) Db
SUPPLEMENT YOUR YNCOME bh)
recommending REDIFFUSION. Obtain
full particulars from the REDIFFUSIO®
office 1,7.52—6n











SMALL. HOUSE OR FLAT, unfucn-

ished, 2 bedrooms, garage, for quiet
elderly couple. Garrison, Hastings
Worthing. Ring 6185, §—12.

9.7,52—4n.

—_—
TWENTY-FIVE DOLLARS extra Bonus
from Rediffusion for 25 recommenda-
tions in one calendar month. ae
1.52 —6n

MIG’S Damage —
3 U.K. Planes |

SEOUL, July 28.

Communist MIG-15 swooped |
down from Manchuria on Sun |
jay in their most daring thrust
in months, and damaged three
British propellor-driven warplanes,
It was the first MIG attack of the
war against British carrier-bascd
planes, and the deepest southward
pevetration made by Russian-
built jets in many weeks.

All of the damaged planes were
two seater “fireflies” from the
carrier “Ocean”, One plane was
forced down in the Yellow Sea off
the West Korean coast, Another
made a forced landing on the





island and a _ third staggered
back to its landing on
the carrier, The navy said none

of the plane*crews suffered injury.
No damage claims were made.
—U.P.

| iM saow |

THE BARBADOS AQUATIC
CLUB
(Local and Visiting Mem-
bers Only).

Through the courtesy of
The British Council there
will be.a FILM SHOW in
the Ballroom on Wednesday
July 30th, at 8.30 p.m.

The Programme includes
BRITISH NEWS; THE
BRIDGE OF TIME, show-
ing some of the Traditional
Ceremonies of England;
THE “GREEN GIRDLE,
(Londom’s Parks and open
spacés)~ and CRICKET,

Members are cordially
invited. —

N.B—There will
shaWs after this untit
a I

SSS

Palace Oriental

Recuerdos De India,
Chino, y Cylon
Bolsa De Tachapelo








|





2508

FOR SALE

















CHILD'S TRICYCLE—Full size. Excel-! between the ages of 18 26 residing
jant meee Little used. Phone Bellamy. i Barbados are req to call at



CYCLES-—Limited

Co.,

Ltd., Bridge Street.



POULTRY



PIGEONS-—-A few pairs



sit & White Kings, Poo, | after
4x iiver te ings °
Maynard, Porters, St. James. Dial o119 | , 50%, further Antormation, consult the
26.7.52—en | American Consulate, jgetown,
as bados. 27.5.52—+.f.0
SCELLAN } NC on fe
MI tous NOTICE
“AUTO AGCESSORIES including cool
cushions, upholstery rexine, in seat PARIOE OF 83. SOHN

overing, green canyas, chrome wheel
sun visors,
‘ood dressing, cigarette lighters (6 and
licence holders,
‘eur View mirrors (Car & Truck), tyre
,auges (Car and Truck), insulating tape.

Les, Steeringwheel covers,

2

volt), reverse lamps,

Courtesy Garage, Dial 4391.

“CYCLE AC ACCESSORIES including alec
trie generator lamps (Miller
ae kits, Solution (spec
de

ee ee 7.52—n

‘e tinpes), pirce

"ati as, es cele:





27.7.52—8n

‘ number of Gents |
‘cles $60.00 each. K. J. Hamel-Smith &

23.7. 52—6n





HOUSES

Attractive seaside Flat main road Has- |
| tings, comfortably furnisned, English |
| Bath, Open Verandah facing sea. Suitable |

















All male citizens of the United States

the American cons from July 1 to
| wodae ap Uni real Military Training
ve: Training

Serviee Act.
All male citizens of the United States

who 20 Juby =< of 18 years sub-
sequent to 1952, are required
\ to pecisiet upon the’ day ney attain the
eighteen’ anniversary e day of
their birth, or within five days there-

Applications in writing and in person
for the post of a Special Nurse for the
Almshouse, St. John, will be received
by Dr. E. B. Carter, P.M.O. up to the
15th, August, 1952 Applicants must be
qualified Mid-Wives and not more than
30 years of age Appointments for inter-
views may be made by telephoning
95—225; recommendations if any, should
be produced The salary to be $60.06
per month, inclusive of C. of L.B
and ration allowance of $21.60 if not
in residence at the Almshouse. The



Â¥ reno! successful applicant to assume duties on
rene
pumps, br tapes, Tyres and tubes, the 6th August, 1952.
ote, Courtesy Garage. Dial 4391. Ey “pemet of the
98.7.52—6 BOARD OF POOR LAW GUARDIANS
siecagery-4-cireaiieaeaneirpreaeareries: — fiqned, KR. 8 St. John.
FORKS—Agricultural Forks made of | + Be. RED, Slee:
the fae Steel and the right pattern at {Beman
5. 2 The Auto Tyre Co., opposite Se, oe ee
he Cathedral, Spry Street. iii NOTICE
27.7. 52—6n Applications will be received by the
~| Clerk of the Vestry up to 12 (noon) on
PLANTS—Anthurium Plants Nurse, ae Ist August, 1952 for:
vim Beach, St. James. One Archer Gittens Scholarship at
27.7.52—2n St. Michael's Girls’ School, now
vacant.
RECORDS—Clearing all stocks of 78 2. Any Vestry Scholarship at the
R.P.M. Records at 3 for $1.50 at Da same School which may become

Costa & Co., Ltd. Electrical artment
7 52—6)



now to the

pa

on a few days after publication

London, Contact Ian Gale, C/o. Advo-
Representative
17.4,53—t.i.n

TOYS—New American Toys which in-
Beach
Jeeps,
Water Pistols, Dippy Ducks and several
All reasonably
aa ie & Co.,

28.7 ,52—3n.

WEDDING GIFT—A few ironing board
ee No-cord tron sets, subject to special
we allowance. A Barn

eate
Tel,

Co.,

Ltd, Local
3118.



clude Doctor and Nurse Kits,
“alls, Pistols, Cannons. Cars,

wher attractive toys.
priced . a. Me
(Ad. —~ Broad 8t



es
£ ton 3.7.52—t.f.

SUBSCRIBE Daily
Telegraph, England’s leading Daily News-
r now arriving in Barbados by Air





vacant during the school year

Candidates must be the daughters of
parishioners in straitened circumstances
and must not be less than 9 wears nor
more than 10% years of age on_ Ist
September, 1952, to be proved by a Bap-
tismal Castigente which must accom-
pany the apelpation

Forms plication will be issued
and received at the Vestry Clerk's Office
between the hours of 10 a.m. and 12

(noon)
. REDMAN,
Michael's Vestry
22.7.52-—5n

in

in

zB. c
Clerk, St.



NOTICE
PARISH OF ST CHURCH
Applications for a alifed Midwife,
and 35 will be

between the age of
received by the Churchwarden Mrs, H.
& | Talma, Wi es, Ch. Ch. up to 3 p.m,

n. | on the Sth August, 1952



Terms of a euoas obtainable from
YAWL_ “FRAPEDA”. Excellent con- | ‘2¢ Parochial Treasurer.
aiten. New Diesel | Bngine. For_ full 26.7.52—4n
particulars apply Edwards. Phone
2520, 20.7.52—6n NOTICE





NOTIC

GIRLS’ INDUSTRIAL UNION
There will be a General Meeting of t

G. t. U. at the Union Room on Wednes-
H. A.
Ballou has graciously consented to give a

day 30th July 445 p.m. Mrs.

talk.
Subject — Aims and Objects of t
G.L.uU.
G. WELLIAMS,
General Sevretar
29.7 .52—1

YourPiles

t fs no longer Lat? to suffer
pains, ttching and torment from Piles
since the discovery of Hytex (formerly
known as Chinarold). Hytex starts to
work In 10 rolnutes and hot only stops
the pain but also takes out the aweil-
ug, Stopes bleeding and combats nerve
teritation thereby curbing other trou-
lea caused by Piles such as Headache,
iv rvougness, Backache, Constipation,

lose of energy Sabie and irritable
dieposition Get tex from your
drugetet today ae er tho positive
guarantee Hytex must s.op your pile
paine and troubles or money beck or
~eturn of empty packags.

IS HEREBY GIVEN that it is the inten-
tion of the Vestry of the parish of Sajnt
Andrew in this Island to cause to be
introduced into the Legislature of this
Island a Bill authorising the said Vestry
to raise a loan not exceeding £700 to
enable the said Vestry to erect com-
munal Baths and Latrines at St. Simons

he

ie Dated this 28h day of July, 1952.
CARRINGTON & SEALY
Solicitors for the Vestry

y of St. Andrew.

5 29.7.52—3n
Se
LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

REMOVAL
The application of Sylvan Williams
of Vauxhall, Christ Church, holder ot

Liquor License No. 1113 af 1952, granted
in respect of a board and shingled shop
with shedroof attached at Vauxhal:
Christ Church within District “B" for
permission to remove the said License
to a board and shingled shop attached
to residence at Maxwell Hill, Christ
Chureh within Distcict “B” and to use
the said License at such last describeo
premises.
Dated this 25th day of February,
To C, W. RUDDER, Esq.,
Police Magistrate, Dist. “B."
YLVAN WILLIAMS,
Applicant.
N.B.—This application will be con-
sidered at the Licensing Court to be
held on Friday, 8th day of August, 1952,
at 1 o'clock a.m. at Police Courts,

1962

(:99999556999909999969004 | Dist. “B."

% REMOVAL NOTICE x Police Magisiate’ Dist "B."
8 Variety Sandal Shop $ Des Soa
% will be removed to No. 3

% 37 Swan Street as from

Ist August,
x 28.7.52—1 we
RAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAS

AND NOW

you can have

A GAS COOKER



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SEE THEM TO-DAY .
At Your Gas Showroom.
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FURNITURE
WARNING!

BUY NOW — BEFORE
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YOU BY STORM ,

ROUSING VALUES in Vanities,
Wardrobes, Dresser Robes, Chest-
of-Drawers, Simmons an@ other
All-panelled and other Bedsteads,
Coll & flat Springs. narrow and
wide including 4-foot,

DRAWING ROOM SUITES &
separate pieces in Upholstered

and other Morris and _ other

1: Caned Mahogany or Birch, Morris
Especilitamente Spring or Spring-like Cushions,
Menos 15% Quince sore Bedroom and Kitchen
abincts
“Perciento

Durante De Baratillo

THANTS

Pr. Wm.. Henry Street







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Cedar or Deal, plain or Polished
Fine. Sideboards $36 to 900,
Liquor Cases $5.50 up, Big Ice-
boxes, $20 up.

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SOOO SSO SOOO

BARBADOS AD

VOCATE







v~~ TUESDAY,

__Fon ment | The Yanks W.l. SHOULD NOT RUSH |6 Dead In Car,




.
z @ From Page & the good cf destroying this power j il Cr h
| Get }: ort failing that, go to them with an only to be run by people who are rauer as
ultimatum, demanding federation merely running big businesses in
and freedom which “are already Trinidad UNIONTOWN Pennsylvania,
in our hands.” “We in Barbados have a better
Aireraft 1 a Mant ; , constitution than was suggested in July 28
zike Mr. Maniey ne urged the the Rance Report.’ 7" i
ONDON. July 2: masses to support their Jeaders The colonial problem they were Six persons were killed when a
“ LON ION, July 26 ts 1 their demands for a West India: jetting rid of was the 18th cen- tractor trailer went out of control
fhe Privy Council on ppentay Nation He exhorted them to tury domination of people with{" 4 downhill mountain curve on
eS ol aay el nae build up a mighty organ, to create wealth who expected to call in at| ® bighway near here and crashed
Hongkong Supreme Court awatd- 144 wield a terrible power, sO these colonies and buy sugar plan-{/9t0 an auto carrying @ group of
ing 40 civil aircraft to the ye that when they were strong in jations, maybe oil, bauxite and so|Picnicers. The State Police said
Communists ,and awarded €M their own trade unions, they on, and exploit them. “Th the truck, loaded with a cargo of

instead to an American Company.
The Judicial Committee of

, . tion and self-government, but ‘That is what w
Council the highest court of — would be able to stand up with
British Empire, allowed the jjocts gut and heads in the air, we got on the

appeal of the Civil Air Transport
Incorporated of Delaware against

the Hong Kong decision.

ceeded

Nationalist

The American Corporation sue-
Airlines Company
headed by General Claire Chen-
nault of the “Flying Tigers”
China before the civil war.
Chinese sold planes
originally to the Chennault com-
pany. “They sold to Chennault on
December 12th 1949 when Britain
still recognized the Chiang Kal!
Shek government as the legal
government of China.
midnight of January 5th
Britain recognized the Commun-
ist regime as China’s legal gov-

the
i

the

The

But on
1950

would not have to beg for federa- the Colonial

and demand their legitimate share
in the best traditions of the human
pirit, and in keeping with the
dignity of the human person

Mr. G-. H. Adams first spoke o1
the march of events over the past
i4 years and went on to say that
ihe Labour Party of Barbades

Lose we strike

n

them to continue to work together
sn harmony in order that they
might bring about as early as pos-
sible the hopes and aspirations
that they all shared — West In-
dian unity, West Indian Federa-

system,”
e aim to destroy.
“Lock at the amount of cursing

have not yet replied to that.

he

oil question

oil

and every time we tell them we
do not give any monopoly.
ing one company the right
explore for oil we have not com-
mitted ourselves,
pert comes and gives us advice

said

Sup-
in_ Barbados,
ve could build the schools and
hospital and everything else
and incidentally I have a lot more
information about oil possibilities
and why all this is taking place

No Promise

In giv-
to

When the ex-






soap products, failed to make the
curve at the bottom of the moun-
iain and crashed headlong into
the auto. The car was smashed
against the stone wall surround-
ing a roadside estate-—U.P.

1

ow ~ . , ‘TREAL, USTRALI-, NEw
and the P.N.P. of Jamaica had in We four, Mr. Cummins, Mr. MOMALAND ‘Lf LIMITED.
their hands the destinies of the Walcott, Mr. Cox and myself have (MAN Z LINE)

West Indies, and it was up to been beset over and over again,

SS. “GLOUCESTER” 1s scheduled to
ati from Port Pirie May 3ist,

une se x -, Ry =

mune ane arriving

arbados about August 6th.

In addition to general cargo this vessel
vas ample space for and hard

2 cargo.
ernment and since the planes had jjop_ and he says one company, then
originally belonged to the gov- one, and if two, then two. We], “are P sor tranahipment oven ae, ie
ernment air lines, the Hong He had not seen that as yet in never promise. ritish Guiana, Leeward and Windward

Kong court held that the planes

Government.
1949. Uppel of the American firm

had belonged to the Communi
Since October 1

in Hong Kong was dismissed.
Lord Oaksey announced

was en for a

property of the appellants.

that
their Lordships would allow the
appeal and that a judgment hold
declaration
that the forty aircraft were the
He
said there would be no order as

the whole of the Caribbean area
the people have shown the readi-
ness to grasp the power which as
Mr. Marryshow had told them,
yas there.

st

st was 1852.

No one had done more for the
cause of Federation and Self Gov-
ernment than Mr. Marryshow. It
was no accident that they were
seeing them there together in
Barbados. Apart from the fact

to costs, and added that their that he has come Mr. Manley has ,;)

Lordships would give their told you he has come over to fulfil j

reasons for the decision later. this long standing promise to at- “T mention
—U.P vend one of our Annual Confer- ciance to show



ences, it was something more than

are up against.”
that

this only as



“What happened was that these
B.U.0.C. boys thought that .1952
They ran to the Colo-
néal Office and got a few back room
boys to say, ‘leave it to us, we will
tell the Governor
forgetting that there was Sir Grat-
tan Bushe’s new dispensation;
getting that that gave us the right
to say yes or no.

“We feel that if oil is found, i
would be for the

advantage

an
you the things

He said that if the West Indies

of Barbados,”

for-

of us

in-
we




Islands.
For further particulars apply—
;URNESS WITHY @ CO., LED.,
TRINID.

DA COSTA & CO., LTD.,


















JULY 29, 1952

Areas Around

Sydney Flooded

SYDNEY, July 28.
Hundreds of people have been

driven from their homes in
last 24 hours by floods in the
country and coastal areas. Rivers,
swollen by torrential rains, have
burst their banks, Flood waters
are pouring through towns and
over farmiands, extensively ——-
aging property and crops, bloc
ing highways, and pusing tele-
phone communications a

The police
ucks”

supplies out of action.

and troops with army “
ena launches have been evacu-
atung many families to safety,
carrying on their rescue work
efficiently.

NOTICES



















The M/V “CARIBBER’ wil
accept Cargo and eee os
ini Antigua, on
ss uae "St. Kitts. Sailing
‘ist inst.

The M/V
accept Cargo and Pa
Dominica, Antigua,
Nevis and St Kitts
Friday, 8th August,

* Kssoeianion an

Tele. ot



CANADIAN SERVICE
From Montreal and Halifax.









Montreal Haltfax Dates
i e “e aah : OM) , did not make progress the fault Be Bridgetown, Barbados
n tan Riots Todsy we. Sete. penane oe was no longer the British Officials’ 5 ‘SUNDALE” 15 rd 1 Suny * 2 re 4
stage when the destinies of the 4) the British Government's. As], ugus' ugust
West Indies are in the West Indies ni 14 ‘August 19 August 3 September
, t West Indie: 1 h far as Colonial Government was | atv 20 Aug. 4 Sept. 16, Bep
en- ‘P aa. eo ae ads ae = © concerned, they would be asked,
vacussing Wodesesion, YT Gk Bake eo E Pe emicale eh wna solo Ue. ee
at was the attitude of the ‘Colo-
KARACHI, July 28, ee the Secretary of State himself. ia) Office. He would not get it From South Wales, Liverpool and Glasgow.
Police used tear gas to break up He was extremely busy, but I told 45) Barbados because he was G. H.
demonstrations at a meeting of ‘he boys what I was told he want- ‘Adams, but that was the atmos-| —
the Punjab Province League ‘( my opinion on.” phere . Sone Titi is eeicenaah Beroetes sn
Council, meeting in Lahore on 2 , f - . . .
Sunday night, according to news- Hype ae Nae epee ne eh In Barbados they had succeeded “SUNWHIT” -.30 June SJuly 9 July 23 July
aper Te cst & ‘ation he would say tha ‘ ade ses IA DE
a0 Rhy ee ra pare, see the British Government were no es che peotie’ ane ee ot ¢ VARRINAGA” --26 July 31 July -5 August 19 August
member of the Council, was hos- more prepared today whatever jhose promis He had not the :3 ‘eee BP oe RUE. 21 Aust 36 August Sn oe
Se ail 9 ee they might be jn the past, to hitch : ; t 1. “Eure rc = PR mpecaber. ei or
pitalized because of injuries re- ‘hom as far as Self Government SH#nCSt fear Mite een: get YOu U.K. AND CONTINENTAL SERVICE
eeived when a crowd of over 500 —'' Reid eich vee ry on with Federation ae ip 32
hurled stones at Council members “4 Federation were concerned’ jocal draughtsmen to handle it”,| ;
leaving the hall. oO ; they would do it. rom Middlesbrough, Antwerp, Rotterdam and London,
TY d a pponents He said that they had to sane
lhe crowd was reportedly age ; ; every single island — ritis
monstrati j Ahmadia If I had only his enemies to Middles- Rotter- Arrival
anaes 6 — Sansltes sect ‘ight in the West Indies,” he said, Honduras, British, Guiane, At fh brough Antwerp dam London
which has been the centre of Barbados would be a paradise; yo. cot the atmosphere changed “SPURT” 8 July 1 July «12 July _18Juby 3 August
religious controversy in recent and sueh is the same with Mr. gust Zz it had been changed by the “sOAgi " = My ae: = a. Mia Septemnbes
months, The crowd shouted Marryshow and Mr. | Manley. P.NP. in Jamaica and the Labour + — ng Sep’ ¢

Anti-Ahmadia slogans and stoned
Council members’ cars when_ the
meeting failed to pass a resolution
opposing the Ahmadia movement,
‘oreign Zafrullah
Khan, Member of the Ahmadia
sect, and key figure in the recent
controversy, tendered his resigna-
Reports from Lahore said

that the police successfully broke
up the demonstrations with tear





tion,

Minister

gas and that the situation w
under control by midnight.
fatalities were reported.

—U.P.








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NOTICE

CAPTAIN, OWNERS OR AGENTS




of the Venezuelan Motor Vessel
“GLORIA MARIA” do not hold
themselves responsible for any

debt or debts contracted by any
member of the crew of this vessel
while in port








R. M, JONES & COMPANY,
LIMITED
Agents
M.V. GLORIA MARIA

46.7 .52—6n









‘as
No
RATES OF EXCHANGE



__ No appetite? No pep? The



Whom do you think are Mr, Man-
Jey’s opponents, not so mych the
capitalists whom he can always
beat, but the alleged Labour Par-
iy of Jamaica,












Party

“T told you a moment ago that ticn tomorrow.”
{ was paid a doubtful compliment
in the Legislature in Trinidad. tf
we appear to go slow on Federa-
tion, there is one answer, one
reason and one reason alone —
Trinidad, Trinidad is the most
backward political portion of the
3ritish Caribbean area-

came to the
hamlet.

“What is the good of our fight-
ing as we have fought in this
colony to destroy the powers of
the Chamber of Commerce and



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in Barbados.

“We have got to convert every
colony in the West Indies to see
that only socialism can pull us out,
before we can say — have Federa-

Mr, Adams enueu up his address
on the question of loyalty.
Mr. Manley had said, they should
trust their leaders

worst,

The meeting ended just after
midnight with a vote of thanks by

73 210% Pr. Gheques on Buying |ihe Electors’ Association — the
"Bankers 71 5/10% Pr. | 4ssociation spent thousands of to lead them.
Sight or pounds the election before last to
eA me cane ee Pr. |defeat us, but we beat them, and
73 2/10% . Cable <<
71 7/10% Pr. Currency 20% Pr. again we beat them — what is Mr. M. E. Cox:
Coupons 69 3/10% Pr.
50% Pr, Silver 20% Pr
sith be CANADA
9% Cheques on =
Bankers 17 a/10% Pr MIRROR GLASS
Demand Drafts 77.05% Pr.
Sight Drafts 76 9/10% Pr.
79% Pr. Cable os kaa
77 6/10% Pr. Gurreney 45 7710% Br. Straight and Bevelled Edged
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50% Pr. Silver 20% Px.

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Guttering
Etc.

.
SSOSORSSSSOR.

As

If the worse

the people
would see him in every village
He instanced Dr.
mins and asked whether
thought a man

Cum-

they
like him would
betray the people of Barbados. He
was: the last man to wish yes men
around him, but they should sup-
port the people they had chosen.

































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A STEAMER sails 17th July

A STEAMER sails 31st July

A STEAMER sails 14th August

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A STEAMER sails 11th September

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NEW YORK SERVICE.



sails 8th August — arrives Barbados 20th Au
“ALCOA PLANTER” sails Sth Septe mber—arrives Barbados 17th September

NEW ORLEANS

SERVICE.

arrives Barbados 2nd August
arrives Barbados 16th Barbados
arrives Barbados 30th August
arrives Barbados 13th September
arrives Barbados 27th Septermber



CANADIAN SERVICE

SAILS FROM
Montreal Arrives
June 28th July
July ilth July 28th
July 25th August Tith
August 12th August 29th

ROBERT THOM LTD.— NEW YORK & GULF SERVICE

LTD. CANADIAN SERVICE












SOLES

$2.30





‘with Escolite Soles

$3.85





TUESDAY, JULY 29, 1952 BARBADOS



BY CARL ANDERSON

HENRY









HELP ME TO GET
THIS MAN TO

TF acon IT UP, LAUR -
THE SICK BAY.

i cK UP THAT GUN!



WHAT HAPPENED >
1 HEARD A SHOT.. ‘



BLONDIE





























| Hine (1 KNOw, DADDY, | [WELL, LETS BE BUSINESSLIKE-- C GEE--I WONDER
_~_ ~—> BUT A GIRL | [YoU MAKE’A LIST OF THESE IF SHE'O SETTLE
25 CENTS T MY AGE NEEDS | JURGENT REQUIREMENTS Z FOR
I JUST GAv ~~ SO MANY | |AND WELL GO OVER IT ( FIFTY CENTS!
YOUR ALLO’ E ) CS THINGS -
YESTERDAY ! : #
= » > “7 yi

omer ee EER TAKE HER, KENT! IT'S
Re aE om | rT Set Seine ee
(ME! 'S GOT TO STAYP /

| BEHIND TO HOLD OFF GARL'S L&I OF You! I'LL HOLD
SOLDIERS,’ NOW THE REST OFF THE GUARD /
OF ¥CJ GET COING!



JOHNNY HAZARD

( 1'D BETTER SHUT THIS
THING OFF SO THE BOYS IN
THE BACK ROOM CAN /
UNPLUG THEIK EARS/

LITTLE SOMETHING FOR
CLEANING UP MY ROOM!

RIGHT, PARADISE!

I’M LEAVING NOW, JOHNNY’
BE READY TO MOVE WHEN I
GIVE THE GO SIGN/

LA)

)
PRY Ke

4]

O
oes: )











HEY! you! WHEN
GIT THROUGH
SPRINKLIN' THE



HE MUST BE
THROUGH ~ -T

HEAR HIM IN
THE HALL /













OUMB- HE WAS

G6ITTIN' LOOKIN’ AT

THE WASHIN’ MACHINE -
HE THINKS IT’S

A TELEVISION SET!












J 4
PS FOL, King Festares Syuilcate, tne eaters

BY ALEX RAYMOND






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S MY NEW



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Lay?
ae } Qa

a
BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES

| Be A NS Sse
ma AT
Ee hs i
| ie

THE. PHANTOM

eS MOMMYA Lo
WANT MY Mommy!)
a

RTO VEN WITH A PERFECT SHOT, THE LION
re ae 7 WOULD MANGLE HIM BEFORE HE
ees aa al DROPPED*«AND BEFORE | COULD

DP q “< p
JUNGLE ?1 CANT of GET TO HIM

|RISK A SHOTSO <4 ~~ Fae *
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PAGE SEVEN
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PAGE FIGHT
OLYMPICS: —



Farnum Eliminated In 2nd Round Of Heats

CRICKET

Six Intermediate Teams
Score Ist Innings Point

THE fourth round of games in the Intermediate Divi-
turday. Pickwick, Windward, G. Yarde c Burke b Austin

sion was concluded on Sa

Y.M.P.C., Carlton, Empire and Police got first innings

points in their matches.

their match at the Oval.
first innings.

Combermere ly
bowled out for 100, giving _the
Kensington team a first innings
lead of 233.
the school team with 33 while Mr.
Glasgow made 24.

BARBADOS ADVOCATE





V. Butler b Todd
Extras 2

Total (for 4 wkts, deelared i54
BOWLING ANALYSIS
oO N

Vv. Knight 10

A

1
B. Hope . 12 9 33 2
Vv. Todd 20 2 52 1
A, Wiltshire 2 0 6 0
M. Crichlow 1.2 0 a 1
R. Chase 5 9 4

MENTAL HOSPITAL

0
2nd Innings

M. Crichlow_b Butler ° 3

N. Burrowes b Butler « a

A. Wiltshire run out oO

C. ee ec K. Branker b Butler 2
. M > , : . Gaskin ¢ wkpr. b/ Buth D
Pickwick got first innings points from Combermere in & Chase » ie aenauer we
Pickwick amassed 333 in their {- fodd ¢ Butler b K. Branker a
Of this Bruce Inniss contributed 129. Vv. Knight c & b K. Branker 0
in ly were 8. Hope not out 2
out to his credit while A. Ishmae! Extras 8
ig - a. out. ‘as les is Total “109
A ice ocked up ‘or the hh
red for . . ;
Inniss topscored loss of one wicket in their second BOWLING ANALYSIS s
innings. {. Burke cle Be
h, Austin 9 2 13
PICKWICK vs. K. Branker ... il 24

Bowling for Pickwick J. Peter-
kin took four wickets for 22 runs
in nine overs and two balls. Bruce
Inniss took three for five runs :a
eight overs of which four were
maidens.

Sent back to the wicket, the
school team gave a much better
performance. When stumps were
drawn they were 114 for the loss
of three wickets. Wilkinson made
49 while Branker had 32 not out
to his credit. '

Empire secured first innings
lead in their match against Wan-
derers at Bank Hall. Empire
seored 348 in their first innings.
Wanderers replied with 116 of
which D. Alleyne topscored with
47.

Bowling for Empire C. Beckles
took three for 18, C, Prescod three
for 27 and G. Amory two for 1}.

Wanderers in their second in-
nings scored 64 for the loss of
one wicket. A G. Seale has s+
net out to his credit. The wicket
was taken by Preseod for’ 21
runs, ‘
First innings points in the
Spartan—Windward match

at

Congo Road went to Windward. 4.

Spartan made 181 in their first
innings. Windward replied with
185 for the loss of eight wickets

declared. R. Atkinson topscored eMPIRE Ist Innings .

with 55 while E. Evelyn made &

COMBERMERE
PICKWICK ist Innings ............ 333
COMBERMERE ist Innings
Inniss hit wicket b Peterkin
Branker run out 1

Wilkinson 1.b.w. Clarke ll»

Brathwaite lb.w. C. Greenidge ..
Mr. Glasgow c Clarke b Peterkin

Phillips stpd. wkpr. Trotter b Tnniss
Weekes b Inniss )
Mr. Smith b Peterkin 4
Sealey c W. Greenidge b Peterkin 2
Maxwell b Inniss “e i

Rabinson not out 3 0
Extras 6
Total » 100

BOWLING ANALYSIS
M

R. Clarke 8 3 15 1
2. Lashley 7
Lewis 7
Cc. Greenidge 8
J Peterkin . 9 “
3. Inniss 8 4 6 3
COMBERMERE 2nd Innings
(nniss c Lewis b Lashley 9
Branker not out
Brathwaite run out
Wilkinson l.b.w. Peterkin
Mr, Glasgow not out 9
Extras 3

Total (for 3 wkts.)
BOWLING ANALYSIS
Oo M

R, Clarke

o, Lashley

8. Inniss
Peterkin
W. Greenidge
G. Moore 2
c. Greenidge 0

°
17
EMPIRE vs. WANDERERS
8

Be

wee taas
8

WANDERERS 1st Innings

A. G, Seale c Clarke b Beckles 4

valuable 53. D, Alleyne .b Bg a

N. Medford, C. Wood and Bb. c. AtpavEDOE ou Beokles 7
Morris took two wickets each for J. Patterson c Beckles i reseod 15
48, 32 and 25 respectively. aaa ee ae

‘Spartan were skittled out for M. Proverbs b Amory ; 0
66 in their second innings. H. M. ¥ Ramsey b, Armstrong fw
Farmer took four wickets and 5. Nicholls not out 16
Thornton three. Fi Moony stpd. wkpr, Bourne,

b Pres 5

When stumps were drawh Extras 6
Windward had lost two wicke:s Total : Te
for 34 runs. This wicket was taken —_
by Medford for 13 runs. BOWEN ABATE: A

Y.M.P.C tried to force an oul- 2, Beckles 8 Ls 3
right vietory against Mental Hos-.° expe ul 3 4 8
fatal but failed by 1i-runs, The 7, See ee Pd BG
Beckies Road team got first in- U. Armstrong $ Be oe
nings points. . Hutehinson 3 16 0

Mental Hospital were bowled 5, ane en rant ae
but in their first innings for 68 A. G. Seale not out 34
runs. YÂ¥.M.P.C. replied with 154 * Arrpasrons not out =
for the loss of four wickets de- ? naa
clared. Ben Hoyos topseored with Total (for 1 wkt.) 64
83 while K. A. Brancker scored eee amataiee TO
an undefeated 37. i i ae oO M R w

In their second innings Mental £. Beckles a
Hospital were bowled out for \, Pxoreod Re econ
109 runs, leaving the Beckles &. Hutchinson .... ‘ 9 ‘ °
road team 24 runs for victory. 9. Kirton ........
When stumps were drawn WINDWARD vs. SPARTAN
YOLP-C. were 12 runs without *PARTAR lst tapings ininss
joss. N. Thornton e Cumberbatch b

N. Burrows topseored in the i oe ee cet uneass ,
Mental ‘Hospital’s second innings &' Atkinson e sub b Wood |. 5S
with 41 runs. M, Crichlow scored E. Evelyn e¢ wkpr. b B. Matris 53
30. Bowling for YMB:C, K. & % Beemer ic whpr. » Morris 20
Branker took three for 24 in 11 © Ning nny 'b Pawo. ig
overs and a ball. be Greseidas uae aut tibaies 5

Carlton secured first innings * Wie oo! " ledfo: :
points in their match against ¢ A. Farivar Gid not bat 0
Cable and Wireless at Boarded Extras .. i 4
Hall, On the first day Cable and waxht thon 6 wate: 6 a
Wireless were all out for 76. ar eet foreren #8
Carlton by close of play were 139 BOWLING Aa es *
for eight wickets. The Black Rock =. skinner 8 eee
team on Saturday took their score Medford 8 oa & 3

5, Parr 7 oes

ta:361, W Cumberbateti Bie) Oe ee

Cable and Wireless were off to a 4 Chase 2 . Bhs
good start in their second innings 4, inert: pias ie ee
when the opening pair B. Mat- | SPARTAN 2nd Innings
thews and R, McKenzie put 0” } Rouen Lbw. i. M. Farmer 0
56 runs before McKenzie was Out vy. Wood lbw, H. M, Farmer ¢ 0
leg before to Burke for 21. Mat- °. Wood b L. Greenidge . : 6
thews scored 44 and Cable and ; ©. Matthens gine Gichkiich 16
Wireless went on to make 188 for W. Jemmott c wkpr. b Wilkie 18
four wickets declared. H. H. King Neen eatt e R, Atkinson b ‘i
knocked up 44 and R. Croney was >, skinner l.b.w. H. M. Farmer... 8
not out with 42 to his credit. w. Gumbarbatea pat out 0
Cortien dakeed 50 ae. Ae as tok 7 ; ;
of four wickets. I. Matthews took Total 65

two for 42. Kenny Hutchinson
scored 17 not out and P, Kennedy
1%.

At the Garrison, Police got first
innings points from the Regiment.
Regiment in their first innings
scored 128. Police replied with
189, C. Sealy topscored with 50.

Bowling for Regiment C.. Phil- ©

lips took four wickets for 50 runs
in 16 overs and two balls. G
Pinder took three for 24 in nine
overs.

Regiment in their second in-
nings made 101 for one wicket
declared. D. Beckles had 53 not



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THE CLUS LAST
NIGHT

WINDWARD 2nd Innings
N. Thornton c Morris, b Parris
®. Evelyn not out ‘ 2 ‘ 13
8. Atkinson c Matthews b Medford 20

Total (for 2 wkts.) 34
BOWLING ANALYSIS

° M Ww

N. Medford 24 0 13 1

Skinner 1 0 8 0

5.-Parris or 2 9 13 1

MENTAL HOSPITAL vs.
Y.M.P.C,

MENTAL HOSPITAL Ist Innings 68
Â¥.M.P.C. ist Innings

Vv. Lewis ec Williams b Hope aé 6

W. Hoyos ec & b Crichlow : 83

D. King ¢ wkpr. b Hope 9

K. Branker not out ‘ : 37








ARE MARRIED TO
RED AND HERMAN

1
YÂ¥.M.P.C. 2nd Innings
Branker not out
Lewis not out

Extras

noo uneot

Total (without loss)

| ee
lt!

CABLE & WIRELESS vs
CARLTON

CABLE & WIRELESS Ist Innings cid
CARLTON Ist Innings ° ». ML
CABLE & WIRELESS @nd Innings

B. Matthews b G. Matthews
R. MeKenzie l.b.w. Burke 21
QO, Knight Lb.w. Cox il
R. Croney not out 42
H, King c Cox b G. Matthews 8
Extras . 18
Totai (for 4 wkts. declared) 188

BOWLING ANALYSIS
o M w
G. Matthews . 7 1 42 2
A. Browne . 3 1 14 0
=. Edghill 3 1 9 0
a. 6 o 6 0
3. Gill . 2 0 ll 0
Cc. Cox 5 0 26 1
H. Burke 5 0 17 1
A. Nicholson 2 0 20 0
CARLTON 2nd Innings

K. Hutchinson not out 17
G. Matthews b B. Matthews 6

P. Kennedy c wkpr. Clarke b

Branker 17
£, Edghill stpd. wkpr. Clarke b

Branker oe eake ox

C, Cox c Alleyne b King 1

Extras . 9

Total (for 4 wkts..) - 60

BOWLING ANALYSIS

oO M w

Bee aa iine ds a5 2 14 1

B, Matthews 4 1 9 1

E. Branker . 4 0 18 2
POLICE vs. REGIMENT

REGIMENT Ist Innings
POLICE Ist Innings ; .
REGIMENT 2nd Innings
A. Ishmael not out
Licorish Lb.w. Griffith
D, Beckles not out
Extras ......

Total (for 1 wkt. declared)

BOWLING ANALYSIS
Oo M

Shannon . 5 1

Griffith 3 o 6 1
Carter .. 6 1

Denny 4 1
Smith 3 0 14 0
Sealy 3 0 15 0
POLICE %nd Innings

. Sealy not out :
6. Morris c Ishmael b Bispha: ¥

ozsree

a

Cheltenham not out
Total (for 1 wkt.)
BOWLING ANALYSIS

Oo M
Phillips
Clarke

Beckles
Bispham

aoe
woe
auceea

Shooting:

‘British Guiana
Wins Cup

British Guiana won the Over-
seas Rifle Postal Match, 1951, for
H.R.H, “The Duke of Gloucester’s”
Challenge Cup with a score of
1,132, Barbados was second with
1,104.

The results for 1951 are: —

Winning Team, BRITISH
GUIANA, the Challenge Cup and
Silver Medals.

Captain of Team
W. A. Orrett.



- Colonel

300 500 600 Total

J. A. Sutton 49 48 47 144
N. J. Driver 47 47 48 #142
Â¥ #. Allevne 46 49 47 142
Major F. T. 47 49 46 142
M. A. Wright 49 47 46 142
D. B. St. Aubyn 47 46 48 141
Sat. S. Leydoo 48 48 45 (141
G. K. Ridley 45 47 46 138
Totals 378 381 373 1,132
Pe en eavi é
Fired at Thomas’ Ranges,

Georgetown, 6th October, 1951
BARBADO

Second Team, Ss,
Bronze Medals,
Captain of Team :— Major
A. D. V. Chase, :
1A.-Col, J. Connell 49 47 47 «148
Capt, C. B, Neblett 47 47 48 142
T. A. Ll. Roberts.... 48 48 46 lie
Major 0. F. C
Walcott .. 48 48 44 #140
Major J. E, Griffith 45 47 44 136
G, F. eeaae 46 49 41 136
M. R. DeVerteuil... 47 43 45 155
Major A. S. Warren 42 44 44 130
372 373 359 1,104

Fired at Barbados Government
Range, 20th October, 1951.

Third:— KENYA, Captain of
Team, Capt, W. H. Dickens; Score,

1,086;

Fourth :— JAMAICA, Captaio
of Team, Rfn, B. N, Crindland;
Score, 1,063.




Y A LOOGE BROTHE!

JEDDy GOONSBERRY
4 FLIES AROUND THESE HERE ( Do NO SPEEDIN’! THE Guy |
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IN THE FISHTAIL EIGHT \
















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OF "UNQUOTE "' CALIF.









Rides Second
In First Round

Mr. T. A. D. Gale, Advertising Manager of the Advocate,
is at present in Helsinki covering the Olympic Games.
HELSINKI, July 28.

Ken Farnum was eliminated today in the second round
of the heats for the 1,000 metre sprint. Ken rode well in
his first heat and was unlucky to be second as he misjudged
his sprint, But in the second attempt he was completely
outmanoeuvred by the entire field.

Yet the irony of it is that he is a much better sprinter
than any of the three who beat him. But that simply proves
that until our cyclists are well schooled in the department
of tacties, they will never have a fair chance in the inter-
national arena. i
Actually the very natur the

three places. Fourth was P. J.
competitions at home do pre-

Capilla of Mexico who appeared
to be the only other competitor
worthy of opposing the Americans.

I also saw the world record
holder for the 1,500 meters H.
Furuhashi of Japan win his first
400 metre heat, but he could not
have been extending himSelf as
he won by several yards in very
easy fashion.

pare them for this kind of racing,
as the only race we have compar=
able with the 1000 metre sprint is
the half mile.



Olympics Diary

TUESDAY, JULY 29

8.00 am. Fencing (sabre
team competition,
1st round).

9.00 am. Equestrian.

9.00 a.m. Shooting.

9.00 a.m, Basketball.

10.00 am. Swimming (spring
board diving, la-

dies, ist group of
dives; 400 m. free
style, men, ,semi-
finals); 100 m.
backstroke, ladies,
heats; water polo)



11.00 am. Cyeli (1,000 m.
scratch race, 2nd
heats; 4,000 m.
rs persuit race, 2nd
KEN FARNUM _ 100 gas oes
Naturally it will be very dis- 3.00 pm. Fencing (sabre,
appointing to everybody at home team competition,
but no one could be more dis- 2nd round).
appointed than Ken Farnum him- oo pm, Basketball.
self. He has almost slept. with his 00cm Swings Aa
eycle under his pillow since he a ne SOD -—
has been here and it was a bitter ae vestrols bo
pill for him to swallow indeed. I Seoe daa ieee
hope that he will do much better hoard a one
in the time trial, aad cating
With the athletic events over, ieee: me vio)
the entire place seems to have | 6.00 p.m Cycling a Dot ae
become subdued overnight and = .- emahoh rage, semi-
the Olympic village is emptying finals; 4,000 m.
quickly. The Jamaica track team pursuit race, seni-
left this morning for Stockholm | finals; 4,000 m
where they will run before goi ursui re
on to Belgrade and London, Suite > peiee San;

a number of journalists have also

departed and those left are now 7.00 p.m. Football. :
concentrating on the swimming 7.30 pm. Boxing.

events,



Swi i
The first final in the swimming
was held yesterday when C.
Scholes of the U.S.A. won the
men’s free style 100 metres in 57.4
seconds. The Japanese H. Suzuki
was almost level at the finish and
his time although he was second
was the same, Third was G.
emer of Sweden who clocked
This afternoon I saw the final
of the men’s springboard div:
Once again the U.S.A, brought
another triple with D. G. Brown-
ing, M. A. Anderson and R. L.



Sports Window

The Water Polo Knockout
Competition starts to-night.
Division “A” matches will be
played on Thursday nights
and Division “B” on Tuesday
nights.

The draw for to-night are:
Whipporays vs Police and
Bonitas vs. Oaviars.






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j

Cricket

Four ovtright victories were

scored as the fourth round of Sec-| Sealy was
-ond Division

Saturday.

| first
|} batsmen were run out while M
| Skeete took two for 16.

Second Division |



games ended 0N| howler for Erdiston.

TUESDAY, JULY 29, 1952 ‘



wicket fell at 79 runs. Four

Erdiston scored an outright
{victory against Windward at
Erdiston. Erdiston scored 205 in

their first innings. C. Norgrove
topscored with 50. . Cuffley
made 35 and Cecil Pinhiero 33
not out.

For Windward Deane took four
for 31, F. Fields two for 54 and
McConney two for 43.

Windward were bowled out in
their first innings for 62. Nolan
the most successful
He took six
wickets for 23 runs in 17 overs.

Central scored an outright vic-|C, Cuffley captured two for seven.

tory in their match against Pick-
wick at Vaucluse. Pickwick on
the first Saturday were bowled
out for 77. Central replied with
287 for five wickets declared and
bowled out the Kensington team
in their second innings for 95 runs
to win by an innings and 115 runs.

E. Weekes topscored for Central
with 58. C. Hinds contributed a
valuable 57 while C, Goddard and
C. Patricks made 41 and 33 respec-
tively. Bowling for Pickwick,
Jackie Hoad took two for 62.

C. Hinds was chiefly responsible
for the collapse of the Kensington
team for a meagre 95. He took
four wickets for seven runs.
Fields took two for 8 and King two
for 20.

At Lodge, Empire scored an
outright victory against the school
team. Lodge were out for 92 in
their first. innings and the Bank
Hall team replied with 148 for
four wickets declared.

Lodge in their second innings
were bowled out for 166. Mr.
Timpson topscored with 50. A,
Wilkie knocked up 43 and J, St.
Hill 36,

C. Spooner was the most success-
ful bowler for Empire. He took
six wickets for 59 runs in 16 overs
and two balls. L. Bynoe took two
for 10,

Given 110 runs to make for
victory, Empire went in and made
120 for the loss of four wickets.
E. Jones scored an undefeated 41.

Leeward defeated Wanderers
by an innings and two runs at
Fosters. Wanderers made 137 in
their first innings. Leeward re-
plied with 259 xr two wickets
declared and bowled out the Bay
team for 120,

J. Egglesfield topscored in the
Wanderers first innings with 42.
J. Pierce scored 22.

Bowling for Leeward, George
Gilkes took five for 35 and G.
Allen two for 39.

J. Alleyne topscored for Lee-
ward with 77. L. Foster made 61
while George Gilkes and C.

Durant, the not out batsmen, were
69 and 44 respectively.





J. Armstrong and M. I. Clarke
were the only batsmen to stand
up to the Leeward attack in the
Wanderers second innings. Arm-
strong made 59 while
knocked up 31.

George Gilkes, in a devastating
spell, took seven for 33. L. Foster
captured two for 27.

Y.M.P.C. lead on first innings
in their match against Combermere
at Combermere grounds, The
Beckles Road team scored 181 in
their first innings, Combermere
replied with 66.

Bowling for Y.M.P.C, G. Green-
idge took seven wickets for 26
runs in eight overs and a ball.

Combermere knocked up 217 in
their second innihgs. Fields top-
scored with 47 while Callender,
the last man in scored an unde-
feated 43. Lashley made 32 and
Harewood 29,

Y.M.P.C, was given 103 to win.
When stumps were drawn the
Beckles Road total was 102 just
one run short of victory, with
three wickets in hand, D. Edghill,
ho opened, scored 49 and the





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Sent back to the wicket, Wind-
ward were bowled out for 60.
Sealy took three for 18, Bourne
two for 12, Pinhiero one for 3 and
Roachford one for 7.

Pickwick vs. Central
Pickwick lst innings ...... 17
Central lst innings (for 5 wkts.

declared) 287; E. Weekes 58, C.
Hinds 57, C. Goddard 41, C.
Patricks 33, C. King 26. J. Hoad
2 for 62, C. Cheeseman 1 for 48.

Pickwick 2nd innings 95; C.
Hinds 4 for 7, King 2 for 20, Fields
2 for 8, Andrews 1 for 11, Weekes
1 for 22.

Empire vs. Lodge

Lodge Ist i 92.

Empire 2nd innings (for 4 wkts.)
WIEOET Be egcaotsg ¢a'sysoasn dee + 48

Lodge 2nd

1
innings 166; Mr.

Timpson 50, A. Wilkie 43, J. 6t.
Hill 36.

C. Spooner 6 for 59, L. Bynoe 2
for 10

Empire 2nd innings (for 4 wkts.
120; E. Jones not out 41,

Wanderers vs.

Wanderers Ist
Egglesiield 42, :
Gilkes.5 for 35, G. Allen 2 for 39.
Leeward Ist innings 259 for 2
declared; L, Foster 61, L. Alleyne
77, G. Gilkes 69 not out, C. Durant
44 not out.

R. Inniss 2 for 65.

Wanderers 2nd i 120; J.
Armstrong 59, M. I. Clarke 31.

G. Gilkes 7 for 33, L. Foster
for 27.

Â¥.M.P.C. vs. Combermere

Y.M.P.C, 1st innings ...... 181,

Combermere ist innings 66; G.
Greenidge 7 for 26.

Combermere 2nd innings 217;
ae 47, Callender 43, Lashley

G. Greenidge 6 for 77.
Y.M.P.C. 2nd innings (for 7
wkts.) 102.
Erdiston vs. Windward
Erdiston Ist innings 205; C.
Norgrove 50, C. Cuffley 35, C.
Pinhiero 33 not out.
Deane 4 for 31, Fields 2 for 54,

62; N.
Sealy 6 for 23, C. Cuffley 2 for 7.

Windward 2nd innings 60. N.
Sealy 3 for 18, Bourne 2 for 12,
Pinhiero 1 for 3, Roaghford 1 for 7.


















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Full Text

PAGE 1

I'W.I TWO BARBADOS \lKin \n TUESDAY. JII.Y 2*. 1M QaJub QaSUnq H fIS Kc*ll*ncv t-hr Governor and \jtdy Savage jrnvr their diKtinitiilvlMvi pntmiiMRr to the> Chan:-. %  Hotel in • %  id of the Barbados AsBOcianon for the Blind and tX\.f on Saturday nignt Thouw-s j fine atunvdance including the President of the .^gwi Ao'iatl..ii. Sir Allan CoHymore -""W-tuatl Lad> Collymore. Tke niuaiv tu supplied L> the PolKf Band Otrhestru with Capt. Ralsiui tarrying thebaton. It WHS an evenlnjc of One entertainment for those who attended and an indication of public support for a deserving institution For One Week |RS P. D MACDONALD wife of the Colonial Secretary of the Leeward Islands arrived in Barbados on Sunday. Mrs. Macdonald, who Is on a week's visit is the guest of Mr. and Mr*. Philip Hcwllt-Mrring at -Chaden'. Marine Gardens. Cocktail Party M R. G. H. ADAMS. C.M.G M.C.P., was host at a cocktail party at his residence 'Tyrol Saturday evening. The M B akw 3 aY • %  ^B 1;: %  %  %  t [I J Post Graduate? in Education M ls.s BABBARA KlNCH. Mr .,tid Mrs ings. arrived from England via lay morning by H W.I A. In spend about a month's, holiday with her parents. Miss Kinch who got her B.A. In English last year In Canada, at th.Unlv* i Mb of ft i \o England where she took part in a post graduate course in Education at Oxford %  come down to get mar' %  ':. Anthony L' i ployed with the Ouli Oil Company in Canada. He led to arrive here about 'ilc of next month. TUBBY HUBBIES DOING WELL Holidaying From Germany M R. OLIVER his Witt MR J. W. B CKXNERT, Hrs D. R. I. Ward and lion N W Stanley were among the gueata at the ball at the Marina Hotel Saturday night. Cot" For Six Weeks On Holiday S PENDING six weeks' holiday in 11*RS N. TAWIL whose husBarbados are Mr. and Mrs "1 band Manley. Q.C. of Jamaica who had Joseph Moraine of Port-U-Spain, of the Faulkencr Trading Comcome over to attend the Barbados Trinidad. They were arrivals by pany Ltd. of Port-of-Spam. TrtnlLaibour Party's annual ConferB.W.I A yesterday morning and dr.d. arrived yesterday %  TO) guests of Mr and Mrs. W t.y H.W.I.A. for n holiday and % %  well attended It.irewood of "Camelot." Chelsea Allan C(tllyiii in ence. The Party wat and iriiiuded Sir Sir George Seel. Members of the Mr* Moraine i_ Civil Establishment, the Legistaifjrewood while lure, business intercuts and the a i parunental mi waterfront. .i r. Johnson's 1, Welfare? Adviser Returns M ISS DOHA 1BBERSON, Social Welfare Adviser to th. Comptroller of Development and Welfare, returned from TiinidaJ last week. Miss Ibberson had gone ttwn to have talks with the ibna-ma United Nations Mission on COtnmunity self help in Trir-idad Attended Workers' Conference H ON. T. A. MARRVSHOW C.B.E.. M.L.C of Grenada arrived in Barbados on Sunday In attend the Annual Oogtferaaea >>' She Barbados Workers' Union Which took place the same day. He will also take the opportunity to discuss mailers of West Indian interest with Mr. Norman Manley. Q.C. During hli itu hi will be the gueid of Mr. and Mrs, at W. Barrow al "Westward Ho." Lands End. Students Intransit A NUMBER of student* inin-.i here yesterday morning by B.W 1 A from Mt St Bat College. Trinidad. intransii Boi Guadeloupe and Martinique U X md the summer holidays with rlr relatives. They were Michael Divies, Maurice and Louis Lacour of Guadeloupe and Allan Dcvaux of Martinique. Controller of Supplies M R A V. SPROTT, Controller of Supplies, St. VtaoSSTt, Ittl tluHotel Royal. tabojsd o| Uassri While here. Mrs. Ta %  %  %  i UM RaoM i band is expected lo Joii Saturday rill CECIL HALL, and eighteen months' son arrivt-.l hex bran Germany a fortnight ago on holiI The Halls have been in Germany for the past six yoars where Mr. Hall is vnipluyctl with the Q.M. staff of the army in the it %  bora In the U.S A ,• to Barbados but Mrs. Hall was born bars aJttWUflll she has spent the greater part of her llfiin the %  tided in Germany and the Halls have lived together there fur Oaf. past six years. Boby Herbert was born In Germany eighteen months ago. Tulkini: Point I without a shadow of doubt thai science and peace ioW Snailti triumph ouer lanora; and iror, and thai ffte* nations of tottt (lyr.-r nor to drstro)/ bur to build up.—Louis Pastcui I wish your horses siri/t i sure of foot.—StutkeSfM To forcf "i(/5fi/ to earn more sieesSf/, i MvsMiies] to apend more.—James Agate. lUlf-Time Wetr.hu Show 51 ae. Lssgaaj the Daily rlubtk) Club ieS irted last night; "Losing weight. Tinfive — who ar 0 testing the launched in the J w kl t it eed Tiuve lost an average of 51b. SftCtl i.mming days. the Tubby-llubby-byTubby-Hubby report. In some %  tarting weights shown tare vary from those given last week. The reason : The five Kxtcatly) guessed tneir tfhen \olunieerIng; The WSSghta given today were taken al an official weigh-in ;— ll\RKY JOHN Loot MMSs, 16al. 101b Waist Last Nlfht lfct. lb. 44ms (MOTE: 'It must be working all right. Now I know • i mm mix can bread, potatoes and beer." STANLEY TANNER I % %  M I .. 15st. 41b. Waist 43v,ms. LISTENING HOURS Last Night 14at. Hi'ilb 4241ns (gVOTB: "I'm feeling jolly SJOOd. arid the family say I've t one chin. You know you interrupted DM .leaning tht car — just after Sunday lunch 100 I must bo feeling good. I geneuU) JOHN JOHNSTON LaaS Moaaiay 14st. lib. Wai.M 4Uns laat Night I3*t lull) 401 ,in. QI'OTC : I'm afraid f feel very hungry periodically, but on the whole it's a livable-with daughter wants me tr keep It up until I go down to three atone and she can carry me around !" DONALD GLOAG 1 TAumus April 21—May 1 — MS l<< •1 i uuvsuoitn S T. MA the si MB. and MRS. MICHAEL CLARKE MATTHIAS CHURCH ... U'IMW Rio lotarwl Mr*, Dudley transit for the U-8A. where he %  •Hyde St. La The bride j esierday %  -1 -i %  --• %  in.: for will -pend part of his long tlon. While here, he was a guest Ot Mr. and MiFieil Call I I HtMT' Lane. Trinidad Mdrchant M R. ARTIE S. Joseph, a merchant of Trinidad, Is now Barbados for a holiday He rived yesterday miming maid, also two flower girls Miss Huth Cox. and Miss Margaret .adding at 5 pm. on Saturday, Simpson, all of whom wore 26 July; when Miss Sheila Dorten dresses of blue embroidered organHeath, eldest daughter of Mr. and nville. Worthing, was married rosrs. with headdresses to match, son of Mr The ceremony was conducted Clarke ot by Rev. S, H. Hipper and the the bestman was Mr Inn Hnmnson, the ushers were Mr. William ho was given In Simpson. Mr Hob Edghill. by It W 1 A i<> Mi Michael Clark awrence. Roett and Mr. i hael marriage by her father, wore uowii of Slipper Satin, cut on simple and beautiful lines, with deep blonde lace forming frills al the bottom of the front of her %  > skirt. „ in HIT finger tip nylon veil was Coupli irheld in place by a tiara of orange where by blossoms. She carried a bouquet spent. id will be remaining of Cattclya President Wilson Mr. and Mrs Clarke Accra Orchids, and was attended by her ly be leaving for their home in Harold Clarke. The reception was held at "DaylOO", Woi thing, the home of Mr and Mrs. I. S. Cox and the Happy left for the Crane Hotel the honeymoon Is being shortfor a week as a guest st Rockley. •liter Mln Mnry Hnlh • bridesTrinidad. KY THE WAY. • • Hy Baaekeomber <•• /..•^;rw./. !" i DI lOEl !?*•• %  J |-. R STRABISMUS (Whom .._ ,_. „ ,.„,. U God Prcacrve) of Utrecht is M Y rclormce to the mggesUon polircwomun. rontinulns on her eX|OTimc nli „, „, Wnlu llnB Pa rva. (made , .. <"iicprl • 00 p m UIMrr %  ii p m Mm Hi, %  rWflh S 45 p.m. Spoil. Roti .ntdr lpm Th. S,-. in P m lli.ni* N-. nom RrlHin i — Mat p m SBiuai si at M T II p m Rrndprvi.iim 7 r ..-I I1...,-tt. a OB p m Tu-II p in irp^rl rrom Britain. S M p m lnl-r r. S M p m mm thr Cdiloriali. S.00 — AuMralia r*u 0 30 p m Royal 'indior Horso Show, %  44 p m Oirmpl* report 10 nn p m Th.. NC- IO 10 in K*i Talk, 10 IS p.m. Gtatliiry %  mptiiTy TilktiiK. 10 JO p in FMniinl OI>l SISI. I RIB41 4 45 ft 8.30 P.M. & Continuing Daily DRAMATIC THUNDER.' 13st. 4 41b. Waist 36 l -ins. Laat Mi hi 13-t No change. i*l OTK : Never felt better in) lif'I think I've lost some wtight off my face and neck" WAI.TKR GRATRIX Laat Monday 12st. Sib. Waist 421ns. Lost Nlcht 11-1. 131b. 41lns. QI'OTE : "It's doing the trick The first two days w*ro rlm. hut now I find the diet Is adequate. H> wife — she has started th diet, too — says my collar hunging round my neek, making me look like a cart-horse." CARIBBEAN PREMIERE! FRIDAY 2 30. 4.45 ft 8.30 PM ,a %  ftagsjaa. l. Oeu tmftni ofllw ol espTMaion. ... Wlirre lo roast oala 7 l4i 12. Wlioro iMrm alter UIK cup *w use w pl*. Ul IS. m 13. 13) It Vouna Lwonnra and 1 taUrt I liastrt frnoi'ihai RBial PJTTOM -S!ee BS:JIE lames ICWMDS RicM ICO IK IIR.IitMrsgMUI.IJu: Jfl -^ <7Ae S TARS' *B" YOTR INDIVIDtAL HOROSCOPE &f Look In ch# section in which your birthday comes and find *T what your outlook it, according to the start. ^ FOR TDERDAT, JULY . 19*2 jg^ ARTxa could be gainful period (or creative work. Starch 21—April new methods of merchandizing, building. xperlments lor future. Be careful not to J** overload self, Impair health. Money matters, investments In good pro*r uerUes can bring profits II you take ume study and are astute. Don t be afraid ol new ideas. W oiani Vibrations on generous side tor nianulac^ domesticity ^ ^ ..__ Excellent day tor unusual matter; Fresh. 0A ??, !" lv favoured: travel, shipping all urgent Jane 91-Jaly 83 ' M| J£ ,_,,_, nrws ma mislead to-day; be X> One ol your "be careful" days. SUrt early *> and with system. Wl*ly mix busbres. with social lite; don't attempt to rush things. aT • A little prodding will be medicine now Courshlp. marriage, family affairs demand xf diplomacy, serenity. Reina sufflclcnlly consistent in handling ^" probfems will add to your gb. """ aspecta between am and 4 p.m. tor conccntrated effort. *J • * Combining energy and trlen dly rays should make It a happy, productive day. Yon can accomplish most In a neceasary jL, line The unusual may go over big. * Planetary configurations still on favourable *• should br rX^Se .WTST others are trying, too. •*•• %  *J*. Aspects sponsor general 1 !" '^' !" "'' ^ future plans; dlcuisng contacti, •aUmales, paving way for bigger things ahead. Heart ^_ Interests bright. "* it ir -k Keep keyed up to the best, maybe the unyi usual Dont be caught oft balance when T A0DAin opportunity knocks. Exercise extra toreJan. M Tab. 20 bought in business openings. j Vmi should experience little trouble with best. •fC Generous aspect^theseday^^ T^^ngion. novelist; Wm W I, K n Kith '"it* I || Hi IS Uomr di"(j Hinl i %  .Ircaiii %  op %  H • %  ol our iraa • : %  PLAZA BRIDGETOWN (DIAL 2310) iisaof r^ STiVI PLAZA BARBAREES (DIAL 5170) €411 Is The Gardes—at. Jsssea TOOAV a TOMOOJsOW ',< %  CASA MANANA Vlrflnla WK1J* B.>l*u CtAHK i MASTER MINDS unit, u aonu Ni interested In inattern of mo In Ihc tloht o/ a ttnall ^TuV iiis I unbrring hygiene thun In ilndlng out what hoy in the slrecl. u-ith hit note hismovements. The action of the they were eating. This Is probably true. Every now ond then there nre angry letters to the Press about assistants* in food shops who blow into paper bags before putting food into them. How ore you to stop hotel and restaurant chefs from breathing all over the place? And every normal breath, as Professor Numskull has proved, contains 43.721.480 disease-laden germs. A m posse of diners surging into a West End kitchen, each diner carrying a germ-recorder, would certainly add to the gaiety of nations. But cKallope de reat. La/ayelle would still be horse. AV, fee! 1 MPUD EN C E will, u policewoman is inadvisable; llu-y can look after theinselves."* These stem words raesdlsd '<• me Uncase of a man who approached a lovely policewoman with Hie Words: "Hello my pretty one! What %  "' He got no furUm The pretty one gripped him. and flung him clean over her hsSHl and through the open window of a first-floor ll.it. He lanaed In a bath-tub. and when the occupant of the flat came In lo bathe tier little Billy, she. being an expollcewoman. picked the stranger up and flung him out of the window "Fifteen all." said the jiTctsfd against a toldou* burttinu IffWl cr^am-calces. (tvenlng paper) Trati'llfr'* Joy A DESCRIPTION, by a visitor, of the spire of Salisbury ignet On the buttons would set off an alarm connected with the nearesl policc-stnllon. Prodnote: Would not llM trousers of the police full, loo? All/self: No. X\n'i would wear special magnet-proof buttons. Cathedral as u whale of a prong Whthun of Ihr *r*' %  i to I" remembered side by %  ids \vi:ti the American's salute to fl la ..' %  Ckhartres Cathedral as a nifty hunk ditltnouit'res of niasunrv. hit goat. %  iiI u his hat flial learned man front (Turkish proverb) Rupert's Spring AdventureWi. Ap.,1 On lovflv moinini, Rupcn hi. MI oft lot J brisk i m lh NruUrks. What a lop. ping day," h feast*. "Wh, atn'i ill my pal* hcrt too' Hallo, there", a np a l rm^-i over there. That meant thai somebody u ihcre. I aorder what they (an't be ha in the year. 1. He scrambles around. Then .mokr dulling awa*. "Then ughi ar %  a ajfkm doing. Surely they it a picnic eo early —" too chilly.* 1 arid girei he laoka al the -What murmu'i. IX si(II k raVn Assortment ot • l.ADIKS' NYLON HOSE • LADIES' NYIJVCE HOS*: • 1.AIHI.S' I.ISI.K HUSK • CHILDREN'S ANKLETS — ALSO — NEW SHIPMENT OF . • MEN'S WILSON FELT HATS $2.09, 12.15. S2.2K. $2.11 $2.50 $1.31 M, 32 & 46 CENTS $45.4.0 T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS DIAL *220 YOUR SHOE STORES DIAL 4606 &f t gAOITTAEIDl 0AHU0OW ^ Dc. 23 —Jan. 21 LEO Joly 04—Ang. 99 VIEOO Aug. 23—ttopt 23 LIBRA gpt. 24—Oct. 23 SCORPIO Oct. 94—HOT. 94 * * "Blrtrid"ate: Newton Powell, actor. • • • • More Meat On The Table PEABL BIVER, £• V ? r July Pjnd J"":'^,"^'^ !" ^"" Researcher, respo^ibl. if. th. poru lo %  fc f dcvcloumenl ol n.w animal I.ls. Th' ''" '' tapad OB modern-day antibiotics, a recent articl.. Mo" %  "" believe that their .Boris will have Ihe Table published in J H important economic rults in Ih. Monlhly Bullet!" 'by 1 he Le derte m|t producing countries o, lh„ ^bo.alo.ic.^mvl.ion **. cla The article traces UM development The new feeds, which cut down ol Aurolac, the 1M . _* BBW on animal mortality and speed up Itoda. developed '" %  "> 'J 1 "*A~ ilicn growth, hold the promise ol ol aureomycin, and points to inc ,ncreacd output and higher marlar-reachlng raulu already kel prices lor countries that deachieved by U.s>. Ifc-raers. . %  • II I TODAY 5 and g.30 p.m. LAST SHOWS DEADLISE V. S. A. HUMPHREY BOGART — KIM HUNTER ^-,',^','.V.'.'.V.^^'.V>^'.'.•>**'.'.'.'.'.'.'-'-'-''*''.'''''-'''''''-'•*-'-*•*-'-*•' TOMORROW AND THURSDAY 4.45 and B.30 p.m. JESSE JAMES AW SHOW BOAT OI'r.NISG FRIDAY 5 and 8.38 p.m. FRED ASTAIRE — VEHA EI.l.EN 111 I I I OF NEW YORK m -. ... — _:.-._. -r_ s=its;j-ai~ %  ^%  -r?-, ^^i.aBsr |PLAar^ tv JHUA LTRE* j KKHM.rliiUN TO-Sf • Ta-l-ar... it-, a a.M pn Acllon Packed Double IN OLD AMARILLO Rov ROOERS ft -THf: STOMBO BANDIT' IhMlr* LANE wed Than 4 90 ft • 30 P m THELIFEOFRILEY William BendU ft MUMMY'S GHOST Till It* <4f*(lal 1 .<• t> %  is OLD \M\ Um ROGERS m • MIX Wl'OMIX. HA suit • !(,. 1 AM %  S3 p m. WALK aOSTLT •IKNI," "JMI fnt GrWY'i •NVVAOA" K-ri-.it Mlirhum Wed A Thun 4 > p in %  TRS MO TI*L" loberl Mltrtuim WMIam Bendli At •TMr. Ot'TLAW" fstara spii 1 pm Harold l.LOYD IB ••MAD WIDNBKDAYirASI'H MAIN* Mldnil* •"'-1 %  '• %  I nn Mil it HO orPreaton foater ft WHIRLWIND KAiiira* ROOD AM, rUEATHES EMPIRE Tn Sal 4 *1 4 1 and C rantinuint BOXY To-da> Un T*o Show* 4.10 ft 1 t ^PUBLIC PRTTURKS Prewnl. Brian DONLSVY-rorre.l TUCKER %  IIOODI.IM EMPtmE" Claire TRKVOR VSta RAISTON Dally R K O RADIO PICTURES Barbara STANWVC Paul DOUGLAS Robei M.tilyn MOKHOB PreaenU 1 RYAN "CLASH BY NIGHT" 1 brim Two Reel Short — •TOIAOW TBAT MVH WH A Thuri 4 H a I II Allan iRock> tANtt in • DIKERT or LOT MIN and in.in ii KINO ft Hi" HINOSITA" ; with Rex ALLEN OLYMPIC To-day at To-morrow 4SI UNITS* ARTISTS Double BLANCHE FUI with Stewart GRANC and %  TULSA" ft I IS Y" sst BOYAL Lat Two Showa To-day JO fc 1 11 •TWO LOT WOBJ.Da" with Laura IUXIOTT—Jim ARNESS and i inrn nraar Btamni: Robert PRESTON !:..(-'. I' SILIXUS





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FKC1 von: r. \rrn\iM>s DVIX .m: TUESDAY. JOLT M. 152 MMM hr U. MlHW C*. LM. PM** Bw. MMtl Tuesday. July W. ISS* HMUISI IXIHSTIIY SIR ALEXANDER MAXWELL, chairman Ol Iht British Travel and Holidays Association has been speaking words of wisdom in London which might very well be applied to Barbados. Addressing the annual general meeting of the Association this month he asked "whether we deserved as many visitors as we had and whether the Government had a tourist policy." "Plant and machinery" he said "was needed in this as in any other industry". We had to choose whether to stabilize the industry at its present level or whether to develop it in every way possible. If we wanted to double our tourisi earnings then we must build and invest and do everything possible to obtain the maximum benefit from this great invisible export trade. Last year the United Kingdom earned £73 million of foreign currency and there had been 695,000 oversea visitors. Yet the Chairman of the British Travel and Holidays Association could ask whether the Government had a tourist policy. In Barbados the government if it has a tourist policy bases it on suspicion of the motives of hotel keepers and distrust of those who advocate the development of the tourist industry as essential for the maintenance of Barbadian living standards. This criticism can only be applied to the political side of the government : the executive side of the government supports the Barbados Publicity Committee which obtains funds from a government grant and from private subscriptions and donations. Basically the political opposition to tourism as an industry is based on the legacy of the past when the hotels of Barbados catered almost exclusively for guests of one colour. To-day criticism of Barbadian hotels on grounds of racial discrimination could only be made by persons with little knowledge of Barbadian hotels. At the same time it is worth nothing that in Nassau where racial discrimination is practised in hotels some proprietors of hotels run exclusively for persons of one colour have themselves another pigmentation. In Barbados no such discrimination exists to-day although it did exist in some hotels up to quite recent years. The time is therefore ripe for the government of Barbados to recognise that tourism as an industry deserves to be treated as an industry and ought not to be made a whippingpost fur the diatribes of a few individuals who cannot forget the past. Professor Beasley in A Fiscal Survey of Barbados has shown clearly what little hope can be placed on any economic development of the island other than low IMH If ho errs in his analysis at all he errs on the side of optimism. Barbados therefore is forced with a very bleak future unless oil Is found in large quantities or unless the tourist industry is considerably expanded. Even if the average yearly production of sugar could be doubled, there will never be any guarantee against hurricane, drought, or cane diseases and unless world wars occui with regular frequency the markets for Barbadian sugar must always depend on world supplies of sugar which are increasing. Only an efficient and well-run tourist industry can provide additional employment lo an extent necessary for a population which is not only increasing but expecting higher living standards. Opposition to the tourist industry based on the prejudices of the past is really opposition to the interests of the young Barbadian generation. No other Caribbean territory is less active to consider the economic value of the tourist industry than Barbados. Haiti. Cuba, Jamaica and Puerto Rico among the Greater Antilles, Trinidad. Tobago, Martinique. Antigua, Grenada, among the lesser are advertising their attractions for tourists and have given tourism the priority it deserves in plans for economic development. Barbados continues it is true to attract tourists bui in the words of Sir Alexander Maxwell "We should I selves whether we deserved as many Vast! ors as we had" ought to be asked and answered here by everyone connected with the tourist industry Hotel waiters, cooks, taxi-drivers, shop assistants, restaui.mts. clubs hotels. itTMl ti.idei> are only some of the persons and institutions to der,ve benclit from the influx of visitors to Barbados. Yet the tourist industry Is not well organised here and sectional rivalries are creeping in which may do as much damage to the industry as the antagonism of those who see nothing else in tourism but the colour of someone's skin, or an intrusion on someone's privacy. If Barbados is to maintain the expensive social services which it hopes to maintain and which it ought to maintain and seek to improve, no one can afford to sniff at tourism. The expert investigators have explored every avenue have looked into every cranny and are forced back to the inevitable conclusion that barring any potential re %  eipts from oil, and except for the encouragement of tourism and investors' capital ihe people of Barbados are going to be faced verv shortly with serious problems which cannot be solved by political promises or even by increased prodin nvit>. The government of Barbados has got to have a tourist policy and to have it soon before Tobago. Antigua, Martinique and Grenada become as well known and their tourist facilities as developed as those of Barbados. Jamaica, Puerto Rico. Haiti and Cuba have such a flying start that it would be folly even to try to catch up with them although urgent efforts must be made to pi .interact the advertising which is luring Venezuelans to fly to Jamaica instead of to Barbados during the summ.-i HOME COSTS AMI I YPOHI PISH IS l/NDON. in one sector of her trade last for British products in lBSl we •us com, rr la inly did w.l: exported to her about £13 million turned to foreign markets lor -rulud big surplus with oth<. of machinery. With the better most kindof naflufed rims area countries, as she delivery dates which can now be tkutarly consumer goods, says the %  sually does, though it was only offered this figure should be much Buii.-tit. KM laduatn I U fraction abm ih,IPM Ma*ar ,! % %  ?• H this surplus m rat* %  "\2al Un i ^i r f'" Mm tl I' ^aSuK'uSS tnthenon-Uerhng'world, Kingdom In 1951 German exUM c*N %  %  Hat w K"Iwhich was over three times a> porll lo LMn Amei : ic a were well ipltal good', where Urge. And it is here that tho OVpr lwlw lhf value they were %  v heavy, trouble lies. m 19&0; and since 1047 West GerThe normal patlem of trade man earnings In Latin America v.ny if export earnings are tu be (visible and invisible) for the have risen from a mere £100.000 Increased, particularly when lorUnited Kingdom, both before the to £ 130 million. What Is it that eign firms can offer shorter uVWlt „nd since, has been a surthe United Stales and Germany livery dataa BBd longer credit. p] us with the rest of the sterling can manufacture and sell in those What has been happening to Britar ea and a deficit with the nonmarkets which we cannot? tah export price* recently nwl st.-rlmg world. And when this 3. This country is on the verge what are the factors no* at work U.K. deficit Is counter-balanced <>' having to settle the whole ol which will determine their future bv the rest of the sterling area'* "* deficit with the European level? buiplua with the non-alerUng p W" nrtl """" m *. ld : < A %  By March 1M2 British export^. )r i d then the whole of Ihc ^tS tL'SionTlarg^proP^pn.es for metal, and engineering M ,, tm g area's account with the TloSotXht&X SvSiZ^d products togelhe, •"•"outside world balance*. But. in and rgmVllerprop^riio? allowed der 30 per cent higher than in (he nrsl place, our non-slcr.ini flS tredu We have used up nearSen umber 1M9 (the time of dedeficit in 1951 WH £521 mlllloa ly all our crct ilt ) That means D). The average price ->f bjr*. ,than our sterling surplus, that for a while any extra exports ill United Kingdom export, rose |„ the second place, the rest of to anv E.P.U. country or possesby about 35 per cent in this period, Inc sterling area, Instead of hav slon are worth 80 per cent of their but for textiles .inri clothing the j I;i( ; counter-balancing surplus value In gold. At the moment, more than 40 per cent. |„ the second half of 1851. was therefore, any currency of any This Is some 8 per cent below the Hsatf in deficit with the nonE.P.U. country Is hard; and, bepe.uk reached last September, b'.t pterUiUj world cause of the Payments Union, exI that UatUa prices b*vi To rebuild the reserves the sterports to one country in the Union ao high at to offset the ^ hole u ng atea mU st not only get in'o are just as good as exports to any effect ol devaluation; the.r dolbalance, but must have a surother. From Iceland lo Tu ^f>m the -amp | UI wUh lne „„. of the world. •H exports are potential gold... in the summer of 1MB. Th e go n United Kingdom's aim "'her con„,,( merely to reduce her deficit BBOda, particularly paper wn >, (h e non-slerling v,orld It i' and rubber manufactures wns (> e ii m |nate It altogether in the also much greater than for engin.,.,,. n .| half of 1952 fwith the help evring goods Q f Defence Aid). Since the deficit Calculations made by the Eco| n the second half of 1M1 w.-s aomk Commission for Europe £e nn million, this calls for a ihow that the average increase ii „iightv effort British (Xpert prices. between lion and the third quar'/////'///* PAN BOOKS THE WIDEST SELECTION IS TOWN On Sale Al ADVOCATE STATION KitY earners. There cannot be many products manufactured In this country for which there is not a arkot somewhere In this huge area. Production last year In the engineering, shipbuilding and electrical goods industries was 7 per cent higher than in 1950. The role of Increase, however, fell from per cent In the first four Suiar Funds IT has been decided that Barbados is 10 nceivethesum of £196.1100 ($941.2:12) procieds from the resale uf West Indian sURar by Clrcat Britain lo Canada. It is important to decide at an early time what is to be dme with that money. Within recent months there have been many statements made as regards projects which might be giver, priority when the time comes ihese will be the it is signillcan his Survey of Barbados has been at pains to point out that the million dollars spent nn subsidisation would pay the interest on the fourteen millions needed to build the Harbour. On the other hand it might be argued that the sum of $941,000 could be supplemented to raise the first million to pay for the harbour. There will be those who beUtVi Ibal Inaamuch as the money has been derived from the sale of sugar it should be kept for i,.,. ,,! tlu.s.. | pic who contribute to Ihc ii dustry. This has already been done by icans of the Labour Welfare Fund allocjted specitically to housing for those people in the sugar industry. Since it was announced that the various colonies would receive amounts of money i.i accordance to the amount of sugar prociuced Jamaica and British Cuiana have announced their amounts. The Barbados amount has not yet been published and it i-i not known whether the Secretary of Stole for the Colonies has indicated any ..venue in which this sum should be spent. It is however to be realised that while such expression of opinion should be re. peeled U is not binding on Ihc loc.il !<-i:islaturc to accept it. For that reason it would be well for the Legislalure to discuss Ihc matter in the light of suggestions which will be made. The extension of the Peasants' Loan Bank and the liberalising of its policy to cater lo renters of land will mean that the capital of the Bank should be increased. 11 started sixteen years ago with ten thousand pounds and when it was necessary to increase that amount legislation provided that the amounts needed should l.e drawn from the Public Treasury. That i>; no! good enough. In a recent Mbat* "> the I-cgislative Council the Colonial Secretary pointed out that the amount needed for IM Bank was $150,000. This amount r-nild easilv be taken from the amount lo i.,. ivccivcd now and the $790,000 set aside (or paving the interest and •Joking hind on the lirsl loan for the Deep Water Harbour. In this way the claims of ihe agriculturalist would have been satislied and the interest of the sugar industry buttressed. If there ii no bulk shipment of sugar such as can l.e done in a deep Water Harbour, the sugar industry is likely to suffer very greatly. Only the Beginning of IBM wnn less than In must Cloalna Ihe gap. moreover, will months lo 4 per cent in the last Tba eonparison bt only the bMlnnlni. Thar* onM lour. In January and rrtruary ~~ —* 5S3 tB aMLTVKS MTttM ZPW5 The rrice fruaperl r nuctual ion. And we cannot **' %  „_,, .. rutUfl p %  %  %  : Brut* eaporUJ. ,„ r i ong be content with the pres, In the building and contracting depmu largely on p^-.u movesh-n n,^. more rflw male riaH la n {JJ ^I^S^MM oSod of R o, produc.ion: .x ; „ M ^ nil priKlucli(fl ; and we ml ^^^u^'wS^'so h^TgK^S ?n .'. m .^. r l ... c U .M." bu[)d U P our 8toctts agaln / 19*0 (housebuilding alone was the trrnjil (thul (puitu-ularly c aAa) It was the steep Increase in Import coats, after the outbreak :ean war, that set off the listin prices ol manufactured 1961. Tha wholesale pi i i h ,-.. mataruua t Ubous,, exports to kets must rib i-sterllng marhighest for that quarter since the isidcrably; and war |. Last vcar the industry was H rapidly as poai overloaded as a result of bad ll.'crnlly. non-sterling exports weather, steel shortages and a I ;.vi l>.-en lagging behind. By heavy programme of defence DOtUBM il % %  doubtful whether building. The three months stand. .* %  they were any higher at all In still (from December 1951 to hich 1951 than in 1950. All the extra February 1952) on the granting rattWta thsi east to Uriti'-h ii.dusaWOdJ cxportid last year went to ,,f ix-rmission to start new work, the sterling area. By wilue they with the main exceptions or raataaa fai i> i In Ml Uiaa try of comnnKii'u' thirds of the way buck, tba downard movement of prices last summer huving been renewed in jumap Prices of wool, hides and skins. cotton and rubber are the main ones which have been falling ..^iof lid. especially 13 per cent as against 37 per cent, forcing steel. What are the prospects now? .^.— Recent trends for thn-e types of In manufacturing and in buildexports to non-sterling markets ing, therefore, steel shortage is are shown in a chart on this page, still hindering production. And Tho general impllcaUon Is that from behind the shortage of steel the chances are better for capital is beginning to emerge another recent months: the rtrst two aro than for consumer goods. Hence difficulty : coke supplies to enable ibatantially below their prethis year'r cuts in home investmore pig iron to bo made from K,,,,,,, 'levels l*i ices of copper incut in plant and machinery, for increased supplies of Iron ore. and other non-Iarrous metals the *akc of oxports. But It does both from home sources and from ( %  Beaut WU though ."till birth not follow—quite the contrary— abroad, in replacement of dwind!" ILH,* f!T JIM? IMP h M heen *" %  > "" maiiuf,., turcr of consumer ling scrap Imports. reinilvu to Juiu iw. am ssw >Js ( bother about nonCrude steel output in the first %  ;;,, v II l.ilmg markets. After all. most '.wo months was 4 per cent below quarter of 1051. tyen a rur allow1(| (>ur exjU(Ils to the United last year. March (not affected by IIK time for changes in lav. ^^^ arp conhumer goodSi The Easter as it was in 1951) showed n itortal eoetl to work through t>> moai un ukcly sounding products an increase, and in the first quarthe price rk bats. It is hoped that a progressive The vicissitudes of world raw Jhe limits Of a ^" *' X%o n nrodur!fon ^ don -xpo.t pricaa are coiiipaU, x ,xrts it can do it. bast to .^Tile i-i in gS SUD" live depends therefore to a large remove obstacles and provide X? This ^iiemH in turn on a extent on home coats of pcodu But it cannot, iuelf. ^Jid^Jihle increase in iroi. ore tmn and OH profit margins. Hentake the initut.ve: that depends. TndStT^^^U^ P,osp^U tho outlook is far from clear. on manufacturers realising how or (m nf ^ „ gj~ The Coal f labour rave and dangerous the situation imBro ^ b ut lack of coke sultSuu-e the end of 195(1 ^'if'i K ; SlSt" abl( for b ' sl furnaces may hold i.,,,. i teaih upward moveincni •"fflfl i "' %  %  \ !" M bach m: IMO produotloB Uboureo.UastherieiM,et.ol Jua^TuTpiAdiiS 'I Th CT* ^* CCd m0K ice* of some nuuiufacttli rih 1 .LS hard coke to make more pig iron. aoods (benin bv Ihe rise in imBonrd of l^? c h ? s 1,1 sho V ld Three new blast furnaces arc f S IiiSiT l il ^suctesitul ela n \ m ,? m9 *. ^V" 1S ,he fl m "w Mn b,ow n and if there Is part cost*! Ii d to MIUO*IUI iiainui tentlon of the Government Ut seek cnoueh roke thev .honld orovid* I "'""" J r*T!}" IO mnke -"verything poulble availS 00 000 tonfSf pig^ron a red any increase In productivity ilb | e (o thcm and to makp ^^^ %  "." -The steel Industrv Is the The chart shows the diverge..' for export a more attractive i argeirt u9 „ oI hard coke/supplymovements of a >rnmgs and outproposition than selling for the ( n (,bout two-thirds of its needs put per man in manufueturinn In home market" Advice can be had f rom n 8 own ovens The rest 1951. in contrast to the positio I direct from Hi. Board, from the nd the needs of other consumers in 1HR to 1950 when they kept long-established national trade the largest of which are founfnirly well in step. organisations, and for dollar mardriesl. are met from the National Increases in labour costs and kets from the Dollar % x P" r J s Coal Board's ovens and from inimport prices m 1951 were also Council. The txports credits dependent ovens. Although coke the' mam aauae of the recent rise ? n u ""^ n i ^T, S, *E& prodlirtlnn nas bcrn '"basing Of transport and of c £" J n J rf m .-"> ,'}*}? y !" ( } "^ f ""her increases are expeelthe control of the i xporter and Cf | has for the Iteuefit of the dolli the total current supplies i th n | }' '"' k „ with the Umted States fteeTlmpared with Ihe1 pei cent .inwnj .Market Pointers port* are expected to be over o .tveragc from September. 1WO. to There are three pointers to nonmillion tons higher (in ingot Novetnber. 1951. Between Februsterling sale aendvalarrt) than last year. The the index reimin-* |. Canada is the largest importer full benefit will however not be cd unehan JO! capital goods In the world and felt until after 1952 because a We sli.ilt ind to look ansUoUSsBBfji 1950 her total new investment substantial proportion of these •i> '-nr export pi" pet-** 1 hudi"ln plant and equipment was about supplies has to be further processor labour costs in industry woul £730 mfll l o n and year by year ed in the U.K. At the end of the and dangerous upward the total grows. There is plenty first quarter only about 172,000 thrust to i of room in this vast expenditure On Page 5 Itasins. m Zt' x it" 25" X 18" Toilet Suite* Unit and 2-Piece C. S. PITCHER & CO. Ph447* Our Itt'utaU'rs Say; Sunday OtaWatNIM To The Editor. The Advocate — SIR.—Religious contioveisut; in the newspaper are not always in the best interest but there are limes when some of the atiatements made should be examined. I must confess to a great respect for the opinions of "F.G." and I have no desire to encourage a desecration ol the Sabbath; but 1 think "F. G.'s latest effusion Is a waste of time end space. If the Olympic Games at Helsinki opened on Sunday, there Is nothing that • in bd done in Barbados about It. 1 do not cavil at the space Inoccupied in your paper on Friday but it might have been better utilised In advocating BOBM other cause. Let me however draw F G.'s attention to these facts: (a) that the original Christian Sabbath was Saturday and not Sundf.y: (b) that the setUnjr athirt of Sunday as a day of p was because there was %  deetre lo keep Christ' racttan; and Kl that the manmade laws t/M keeping the Sabbath holy always refer to "Sunday" and rot "the Sabbath". It is the rdtirtll Commandment which speaks of "the Sabbath". I shall not be replying or loining in any controversy but 1 thought it worth while to record these facts. Yours CHURCHMAN l)isri'*fnTtiii}i Jaw Church To The Editor. The Advocate — SIR.— It would have been astonishing to moat people to see members of the congregation at St. Mary's walking out of service nn Sunday night while the Rev. Mr. Harewood of St. Philip's Episcopal Church. Philadelphia; was preaching. In years past when things religious were of greater value it was good to see large and au%  cinigrcgaUons flocking lo hear visiting preachers. One well remember* the case of the late Rev Duruut another Barbadian who had lived in the United %  Mi %  al lha 81 laUehaan Cathedral. lo loll ease the message and greeting which Mr HarcwiH*! brought was no less Interesting H. : oc speaker with n good delivery and even at his age, 82 vears. he has a pulpit manner which is to say the lenst engaging. He spoke of the work w huh Barbadians had been doing in the Church in the Untied States and how that work a>aa proanaring and enjoined hi* '\earers to support the Church not only with im-ir Bible, and Ptaj" and Hymn lto-.k* but with their "Pocket Hooks". Up to this potnl the address was interesting but then the Reverend Gentleman took his text from Kzekiel Chapter 2. vena I * Ol man. arise and I %  fill speak unto thev" l-i an axtatnpora dleeoune rte invited the congregation to progress spiritually and educathat their children were educated and so i the tasks ahead. Lea ii wag obvious that he had to overstep the ttoe for his sermon. When 11 *a| 1.10, voting people with nothing mote important than to reach a theatre or some bryaUiifl place could le seen walking out when I was not vet tabbed Other, fallowed until it looked that the Mtpport which should have come from their "pocket books*' or purses would IH lc>s*. to EM M In this same church where form and ceremony lake pneM deuce to many other tahmgs and where genuflecting has become a fine art and part of a hybrid ritual il was distressing to-see paopla mat the Church ; ijfl hand a manner and the visiting preacher with such scant courUaV It '"ay be that those who %  0 OfTeaVdad were not members of Ihe St. Mary**) congregation and had onlv been attracted by the,, voice Of Ihe Pit ^reliable but nevertheless true that our people Me i much more discipline of mind. Their conduct on Sundae arould lead atraiiajm to the con*ian community, %  fairly un-Christian one That but il lias become nhe the priests to accommodate the rinemn poor bv preaching short sattnani and llnistiing Evetisonn bafOfft 830 so that members of the congregation, who desire to do ao can get to the show in to T We need a strong gnd convincing call back to the paths of nil respect for moral and spiritual enlightenment. Yours CHURCHMAN. / In Jim. (iuttrr* To The Editor. The Adeocole— S1H Some weeks ago yout* JTuewag ^tdeonue called attention continuously to the nnnoj-ing conditions created bv the Scavenging Cart flushing gutters In %  arly in the day. The condition of things abated but now it seems to have returned with even greater inconvenience th.ob %  it land to ba the men operating the i U) diagonally across the road and then run the attached hose to farthest gutv cart had h->en allowed to remain with the gutter there would have been opportunity for nl smaller one, to Baai "" one e*de of ihc road. But the method of leaving •he shaft Jutting out on one side while the hose ran across the i vented any passage for some time. A few protests by drivers and pedestrians made them put the cart in line with the gutter and so there was some relief as 'buses were not passing always. I* they have returned to the old practice of blocking the road. What makes matters worse L that the time for flushing these gutters is the peak hour of traffic. between 7.30 and 8.30 a.m. when people are hurrying to work and others who have no car are trying to gel to their jobs by •buses. There are very few people who di. no) now feel that there is an attitude on the part of the men h with the cart merely to cause inconvenience. It must be realised that the gutters must be flushed but surely the men doing the work could have a little more consideration for the travelling public. On the other hand it is up to the Sanitary Commissioners to point out to then that while they are doing public service obey should not cause inconvenience unnecessarilv. MOTORIST. *fe New Gasellr Motor Mower to whip away the roughest and touches* iraes. 14" BLADES. 98c.c. Villiers New Minor Motor Mower —an Ideal machine for smooth lawns. 14" BLADES The long proven Tiger llandmower his no peer in If. field. | MariasThe Featherllfht \rlel Mower Is amaflngly easy for a lady to use. 17916 12" or 14" Blades t IV. 14" or lfi" BLADES Da Costa & Co., Ltd. KEEP A HAM ON HAND COLD STORAGE HAMS CCT OR WHOLE ? lbs. In Tin* 8 lbs. In This 12 lbs. In Tina lin-k-i of Beef in Tins Ox Tonsues In Tina l.uneh Tongues In Ttas Cheese In Tins FOR YOl'R PINIC CAKE Sal tanas Currant* Mixed Fruit-In \Prune* Nab THESE nonmr ItM.MmUTS SPECIALS Saper Rice In Boxes •• each Fruit Salsd In Cellophane .75 each SUing Beans m f ir lb. '1 .nl.-i Soap "I the ". >.tr Vinola — 16c. per tablet Baby Site—5 cent* each GOLD BRAID RIM IS CHEAPER THAN FLf Try a Bottl(3 yr OM) IMtlaTt ON A 12 OZ. ltd l OF BEER Basa'a Ale 30c, each WorthioRton Ale^—Sac. es Twhori Beer 3ac. each Ouinnesa Stout 32c. each 1 anada Dry Drinks 6 Flavours FOR THROATS SAKE SMOKE A CRAVEN A PHONE GODDARDS WE DELIVER



PAGE 1

TUESDAY. JU.Y 29. 1*52 BARBADOS ADVOCATK I'M.i I l\ I" Butcher Condemned to Die in 1-Day Trial hau. 1 rum Page 1 woman and the man were la Ken burden of proof on the part of the Without answering, the accused to the General Hospital. defence was not a* high as the *-H MP f !" n over the woman and About a half hour before ihburden of proof on the part of thislashed his throat on the ten uicid.nt the accused ..mi the tieprosecution in proving their case. de with the knife which he ceaaed parsed nUn on Baxter : tying to wtabtlsrt 4 DU !at n i K.. ---%  „ ,.. road !" accused appeared to be that the abused did not kill the i^VLJ^J"^"^"^ -***"' 0 to the deceased, but she woman, but that on the uarncula. 1 V* mlnSS d d n l ** m ' repl > " •">•" %  id %  supported hy the occasions, the accused was drrwd evidnm p r o—CUMon, L— something was wrong with HM tnil •used, or that something %  ting on hi* mind. What wa Maulcv Introdurt'H To ../Oral Bar witness took • ndaifct and a few BjInttMl later a constable arrived on the h scene. The Police also arrived ,h %  " *•> „ shortly afterwards and both the Cp J* V* 1 !" Williams corrobor;.•accused and the deceased were d m< '-tter part of the story al*s 0) From Page I h gave ;i grejt nuiiiof its member* to dUtaM Mi Iganftg) no exception. He had for ( H lleers Elected At \\ orkcrs" Union Gonferatoe Indians N&ed 206 Runs To Beat Surrey great number of years taken part the political life of his colony put In a van and taken away. ready told by previous witnesses, more, even the people with whom Te Sir. Smith: I only saw the * %  %  *• %  Marshall told of ms he worked. Uled to avoid him. and ai uied his fellow citizens in accused thai evening. The acarrival on the scene and described saying, "don't mind you. you are tnal wav He ^,4 served „ a cused worked as a butcher In the the condition of the woman and ha If-a-madman.DN| number of Boards 111 Kingother members of tl market. 1 cannot say If the the accused whom he had removed The fact that the accused had Jamaica and also was the founder I Cabral, oncern bu Wclaccused is a 'hard' drinker, by van to the General Hospital. killed the woman did not mean .,f the co-opei Sometimes in the market the On the 4th March he arrested thai he was the criminal |m ,..i,;m.illv ki KTSiS .1SL fJY!" Mlhe accuw d Bn d charged him witn but he was submitting that at the f,,re Ltd It was placed on a basis J. ,h ^VTJ lhe murder of Clark*. On beins time of ihe fatality, something which tl !nf it V Z*Z ^tnt'J ££ "uUoned the accused said I had IW wrong with the accused t?r!iiil PKSS m KS W "! d not "* nything" -something wh.ch >mly proviwoulf make So troubt hSSjse -"*„ C !" ?" ** Clarice dence could tell, and which he w* he was thought to be half-mad Benne and Judah Ramsay for suggesting was a mental blaca actions tend to show that cro s - am 'nation. Ramsay told of out." The following lhe Annual Delegtite. the Ha. bat-do* %  rorkan Union at U* b Psin nil I %  President Mr. G. H. Adan Secretary: Mr V L Surrey skipper Peter May ei Wslcott L Treasurer: Mr. Archie ablcd Surrey to recover agai "ounthe Indians at the Oval tod HepMay hit 143. his seventh ctniui.. LONDON, July 28. A splend:u COnttJjj 1 ark* I WsJcott, W. 0 f the season ad 1 1 ieuit SWUM Colonial Development nd Welfare had since recommended to other pan.of the British West Indies. U.S. Agreement In 1M7 he went to the I'tnted States and negotiated a special xport agreement, the main proHe Mkea the jury ta say that visions of which helped subthe accused waat the time suffct anltaHy with their minor tnfering from such a defect ->f dustries. in rca * n or d,so c f mmu no l o has — lower also tendered for cross-exam! n 11O know lh nature or quality of losing the rem o clock th' I) Holder. H C. Rock and Erro' Jonsg he was not In a sound state of f lnst n *when the accused at mind. tacked him with a knife becaiis Dr. A. S. Cato who performed * witness, rescued one of th the post mortem examination children or the accused whom th described the multiple injuries latter had turned out from honv which included a deep incised Daisy Scamleburv was five inch wound Ilefect of Keavon COMMITTEE GIVES ADVICE ON "AVALONS" FURNITURE • Ivttors ContmlUoa ol opinion to shock and haemorrHoai (; rH .„,^ hnge from the multiple injuries. The wounds were the defendant. ed S19. leaving the tourists 'Hi to wm. And they made a bad start losing cne wicket hi in th,rtn.l 20 minutes. Apaii Horn May. four otnei %  Darbraain 1 Haanar leading me 165 — his hignest In M Wral Hoapiul '"> Cnaal cricket < %  %  :•. w-terday recomHstRMl OtoMHott, Somerset tded that certain furniture batsman celebrated his benefit tury xidM pr. ..„,„„,; "* •" 10 lhe bone, frown cloaed Its cue anlnat the w ** do,,> w ** wron %  "" dutiea on behalf ..f lit. fellow TUe left Uing was cut over an accined The adicurnmenl' w,. Hc counielled the jury locll)/. fH "?' JC Ch i?" '" S* IOW '""O" 1 lhi point rch their minds carefully, beHe said that apart from his I' I--. 111 the abdomen there was cause on their verdict which he other qualifications. Mr. Manlev 'iHi, VVI'I""" ^I"""!' 1 '.., Molher Gives Evidence totW "uld be in keeping With had been an outstanding alhlelo. Electrical Inspector bt nr.a-micd 1 ADA SMALL Is. of F.iuiell the high tradition of the Jury sys"It amasc, me My Lord, to with III %  cleclrir.il inMallatlons "' UM Hospital recomiiH'n.li ,1 by Hie Acting unction Jjoeared to bo unsound In mind a "" v %  ? "ot so onerous as the nW are, ha. a man with his distim The decea^-came up Baxters %  ecuid-s father has a siste, u 1Pn ,' P !" wh ''^J','"" ,L"' " %  %  eminence Hi th. pro. Road and lurned Into Weslbury **£• "• lhe Mental Hospital. P !" ee"llon, but "^nled that tension been lntrodu.,.1 Road. The accused used lo ii-w „„ none Ihe less, the defence had to liar of Oils island (le 1-.. • _. %  nnH he—I. _1i ~riulltr>CI nl'l|l|ibi|i I .* 'Ill' "I'ltll'.Ihniia llelmiltn^I •-..^^_>II'll.ll i—iti-s-j iiia --"U€i(ii, was me tint wit%  %  *" \itf\ / iti--ii •• %  --. %  -— .^-.^..w. ... IW nionus m. .m w,,h .^,a, in^ment SST2 T^S^"* !" - FX^ZSfcZlEZ! , &&£, &JS?iSis-d Cuthbert Arelse, of New Or"" "cused and she got on "•'"• l"< ^'..J" !" ""'"" "' M, n f r ^^ PC "" h n tam St. Michael said that on v "y eU until he was scalded, knowing thai 12 "honest men and |{e had aUn' mrt-.i I .h,, 20th February he wa, standing *nd struck on the head. FWa ,ru *-' P""" ,h r VCTd cl bf Mr M.nlev Zl rnSTS? ££ at lhe iunclon of Passage Road lhen he beat her and dr..J h cause they were convinced < lh-r ;„ \ "',". ""J 1 mMr hu m rk .. and Weslbury Road. lE hri "B lhe bed. He dlo nof s^hin '"" mnncence. ti^\ ^Jl^li',^'ZZ '" Jhouls of murder and when he self ,.f,.., lul nn denl Heplying. Mr. Field, the Crown DOU J*"'.L J '"if' "' '* J| •*"'' '* looked around he saw Ihe accused He was a verv nice child before prosecutor argued that Ihe fact Sji,,.-"' .""..*'"?. !" inly striking lh ,ideea.MiL He related the raiding incidem '"•' olher relsllve. of the ac,K„ team In ,„. ou m Z f.#H ss— S-SteSS ~ "-s- witnesses ho waist.nd.rj on the ^^ *used's father's broth,. ,rc "' f on *• d e,ence I, prove fc *"r %  "Jft. _s_ui Mad aa If worried. "not guilly on ground of Insanity". '"•' d milling him lo au II. nee Mmeen Foede. 26. butcher ol It was for them to say lhal at lhe R_2S, !" 5 " %  %  "•> ">" """ as a butcher of reasoning, with the deceased and the '" l" 0 market where they worked CJ. Sums Up accused. s 'de by side slaughtering animals ., ,. ^ To Mr. Sadlh: 1 „ the Ben defendant and he got on '" f" 1 1 "!' -""';" cused give only one slab when very well, cscept lhat a, |tM ha hn an no ur and ",".""' 1 "" "'" on Ihe wound. 1 do nol reappeared not to be in his prop*, "\ 'luest.on I.n lhe jury .••. member siying lhal 3 men held senses. He used lo take up other *eUier "" ""' particular day the accused. people's things and walk off with ; "' a "> lh0 P"' !" lar time of the Lionel Wilkinson. Warehouse them '" "ce. the accused was suffering part, of Huiite Streel told ol This closed ,he case for the de" om ""-'"I"' "errl,oi, •*£> -e, %  k ,i, "„ ~ U \ ch „, „ ', fe.hrd V ^?omT„"b e ,eed d 'Z^J^ y^ST" """" VSftnWMTiTSSK E£^ t£f^^ '",.e B?3 the knife from ^^"M *• 'l^ "" IU "" C • toSISJZJSttSblSlo do the accused K had cu^m. o^n '"'" !" £ ,h ,""' '" "— ""T^ were there! two ver""" %  ."" n <"**< * throat, and short,, after th. !" '" \ ^"^^J?? !" dlc^oWTloVem aTdmT,ted by at the Hospital. Grieves 118. Mfsjabat. pranini were-— ihH O. Cummins. M.C.P. (Chalr1 I M llthMBIl, Mr. H It BlMsjta Mi H M. Cave • no Dr. 1). S. (silicon. \I.-Hu..! >Hddleev \-erus Yerhihire IX ... 250 and 2 for fVlcket. The accused stepped out of a nd break up anything he put Ins nearby shop, crossed the road "•'' %  as on. Her other two children and said 'I tola you when vou who are ' lhe Mental Ilosuit-I go out don't slay so late.' Thn Just took suddenly HI deceased made some Inaudible Te Mr. Field: The accuse., w, reply and the accused held her scalded and beaten on the s,, by the hand, pulled her a few day. She sew her son—the ^tz, at hl r ,ousc u,u y". and because he used to b-at he. The deceased fell. Witness £*, lr hon ? She had doub' %  A Tfunnerly "hw iepul".d""*Tfe but !" . ''u' saJd Vou could wait until you thai he would harm her. !" 2* ,"£>*„ go home and beat the woman.' Kelvin (amab.ll, 2. b Utc her of AT, i :n. n she said 'Oh Lord, you Pelerkin Land, said he knew are going lo lei him kill me Small who used to slaughter nv Two men ran lo her and lhe his, (witness*) brother accused said, 'lei me go, let me kill her. Drank Kum He went down on her and gave MILS. SPOR'F s m From Paf r S %  > in. nova ei.*s n Tlr.BHtefi "•eard H Chrnvdlrr M win H.-i.t.l C Cotltinnrr !)( n *"r i.n i i •siir.K it m M OMTI I Aahb, < Rani • m. tn,.id J I.ur !" 4 n 1 I... in-." n -tl MOT* i M.i r U in A KMkh mi. and 1. CUrhr %  |(rlht 4 ft I %  • %  Ulren.d' 1 S54. Close 87 imi QSJ| -...ii.. I -..1 versus Norlhaiib Somerset . 109 and 206 for 3 '.iimblett 104. Northanu 2:3 IU11U versus Warwick Warwick 18S and IM for •, Hmn\M 184 SUMWX veriHM K. ni Kent 302 and 10 for 1 Sussex 172 Wright 5 fur (14. Leleeal r versu. Heree.U-r Leicester 364 fo r 8 dc,lar..i lor I. W< rotittr 35.1 Bird 98. Iterhy verous Nolls NotU . 33H and II fa I Derby 5 29 fr 7 de, 1 %  :l I Ki CUnmrian versus Iwx OlanwrsjM Ml (or 1 declared. ParkhruM 99 not out Essex .... 327 f, Ji-nr niBjj. ovrn 11 Joan iDt. md K C'U %  lay and said 'let me die boots on'. An island constable look the knife from hlrr for thrni Iran 1, 1 ..„M|,,,.. um j n;(l that thev were both born in 1893 Afler expn v 1.11* ;i obligation to His 7x>rdship for his Und Rnd generous welcome, he said he was parl.cularly obllge.1 1 „ '" ili^ I.'..in,.I Pneiiti the A'tnrriev f,-nei..l. n..l mlv for II). rd J tandlf.irrl 4 ft I". %  e no.s ovm K Coptotn i.i. Hid A Clark. I, r.ii.b* iA> ishlill 4 ina iR-cmdi I'.M-F. s n | int • INTtSVAl 4— SSI M r -II U HA< | (.INI 11 fetd n ird D. -II >uu *\i | |UI,. lt .11. I-..,, I Mil |, |l IM V SjprinsjM l< %  !• % %  • N I H It-rt lint..ii ilS> Tint*: 1 mm S la •**. Htcord V skvii| .1 ... s MVI t— v.i* notnvm .. ... ni id n nkr. I .111 I %  U I II VM.l. ,1 I • | (.riffltri llllll I.IVNFs i M I iNANIil. M :.' j .iii.ti* iBi. • I Ii OnU RAII M T.IH l.< Milllacknii.ii MOlKM I 1VI Vll ..,! R.B.Y.C TOURNAMENT police waggon arrived and took the two people to the hospital. He did not hear the accused say anything after he. witness, trad on the scene, nor In Ihe van. nor in the hospital where he witness, accompanied the two Iniured parlies. had interrupted hi that on his behalf. Would assure him, wai npliof profession I kiiidnes: They should however discard l olh Counsel for the defence and 1IU courts from thenminds anything which Counsel for the Crown thenbtBarbados Coiirlrsv Ihey might have heard since the >* "uUly of murder" or "nc H( l ,. lllJtll( ,. d ^^T' incident. guilty of murder on grounds of rtanccf n(i( (n ^^ He told them that he would subinsanity. ._._... ... was charged for introduction i mit that the accused at the time of Hls Lordship dcall briefly with sald hill n j. imillra „ WOu wV the incidenl was suffering from ,ht submissions made by CounroRl nlm .i defective mind. Jos ph Down**, an island Conshould return a stable, said on the 20th February guilty-, on grounds ho was at the corner of King Streel. near Baslers' Road. He Accused Ilemeanou heard a woman's voice shoutin.; The demeanour for "murder". He went to the *een in the dock had nothing to verdict of nuilty against the acscene and there saw a womin do with the murder, they were cused. lying on the ground bleeding. Ho concerned wilh tryinK to come t'' The Court rose ns His Lordalso saw a man holding the aca conclusion that at the time th.ship pronounced the sentence of cused who was bleeding from his defendant was suffering from n death, after which the c throat. n> arrested the accused defect of reasoning. adjourned until this morn in.,.1 ami when the Police came, lhe In a defence of insanity, the 10 o'clock. Afeii'ji Doubles final: I.. St. Hill and J. I>. Trimmlngham boat I*. Palcrhou and (1 II. Manning 6—1. 8 . 6 2. At the conclusion of this match ptiita were presented t i.nrsi Intormauon iDial expnii Pcenoni bava no) bora rtopnod Wian in louai with tOd WMm A.(inmiiilralli.il un this mailer and we are confldent thai in lhe disposal of nvail-MII ki-ip • i . ii| will in mind." ,Wi .I'.IH'I has nol himlried binldIni i..u, h tin., yefii. and rumplei.f new permanent houses in the Ant quaruH wara tha htgheal for that tune of year since tin k.u The i umber ni houses undei um at the end nf March %  %  n .1 iv 10400 motor than ..I'IMI, iillrrlinii partly the MI in tin ntlfnlssT of houses un which building started during mboi 1951, and partly the ronoval of tha zno.ooo a yea. colling The housing programme Is to be expanded OVOf tha next three yaart as far as resources of mateproud to id so renowned ave He was particularly building labour force (which has ned little over the past four DiaryASSIZE DIARY No ii. R>g. vs. Eunice Nswln FABRICS 111 IH i I It AT itH, SAVWJVCfSt Plain Bomborn Rodooed from #l 08 to *l il. Qreen, littif. Tarq. I'yjania Btrlpssj 86 ms M u par yd I'vjHiim Btripei L'7 In *l in per yd I" I a i ii Organdiro, Blue, 1 Pinh A. Whit.at 11.02 ner yd. Hoaa i !roM rroon, NaiTi Grey, Blue, Gold, Torq., Blue, BedOeod from frllH to I Also a lovely assortment of Ends. Less one-third of value. CAVE UHBI ITD. \ CO.. 10, 11 12 & 13 Broad Slra.l ^ aaaasa. Mj i factory building, it geneiitiim alter genein„ ll)K1 | a Bn< | transport. These ration. He looked forward to the ductlons have been offset by Intlme when indeed there would be rrea.es in other parts where the •me Bar for the whole of tha m-od for steel Is relatively small. West Indies, guidetj by the tradlparticularly in houses. lion of Barbados. r^-mn. aurv-x t>' a>iroi %  issi ooooaeaeae K BEGINS WITH A SPLASH! See our lovely Ladies' Bath Suits SATIN LASTEX In 1 Piece and Pkre Styles From Sllt.4 to H6.6*i FLOWERED COTTON From I7.S0 to $9 07 WOOLLEN ron iiWGOD FLOORS MTUKE USE MANSION POLISH \ A S Bryden & f ,i Ltd. BarbadosThe nime ipeakmfar ittmtf @***1*t*" i Help* to clean*** thv Kyntftm from blood inipurltlem Isnpurities In the blood nay cadae rheumatle J* acbea astd paws, %  ilfT and painful ii.inis. hells, plmplr. .n.l common akin dlsordars. ii Oarfce'* Blood Mlstars help, lo partly tha blood, c leanses UM system and soaUu la reatoring good health. FOR LOWERED VITALITY! TAKE ••NEBVTFONE TONIC \VI\K" \i S'.IIIHll.'. i nilda UP ni % % %  %  iMkinflj when you %  I U %  I I IK* low par. 3/C und 10 KNIGHTS LTD. AH Branch ;V^-,Thnp Iteparlmi i.l will bfl cloM'd from Tues

4.00 p.m.

8.15 p.m,
8.30 p.m.

at
Water Polo, Aquatic Club





ESTABLISHED 1895



NAGUIB BEY WARNS ABOUT
FOREIGN INTERFERENCE

Army General Promises

Corruption Clean-Up
NILE REJOICE OVER ~ ——

FAROUK’S DEPARTURE |

CAIRO, July 28, |
Egypt's new government re-established itself in Cairo)
to-day, promising the relentless country a wide cleanup of;
bribery and corruption in the wake of King Farouk’s abdi-
cation. The country’s new military power, Major General;
Mohammed‘Naguib Bey promised that he and Premier Aly |
Maher Pasha would meet with armed force if necessary |
any attempt at demonstrations or disorders.

Naguib warned, too that the
army would tolerate no foreign
interference~as the cal — =
its summer capital at
for Cairo and the ousted monarch
sailed toward Italy in the royal
yacht “Mahroussa.” With Farouk
were his six-month old son, now
Egypt’s King Faud II. Farouk’s
teen age second wifg Narriman,
a his three daughters by a pre-

ous marriage. Premier Mohammed Mossadegh

One newspaper said that the|jo baby King would be returned 2 Iran’s oil resources, indicating con-|
Egypt when he oe yore fident hopes of a settlement with
i e at — aS thelr Britain that would end the crip-

pling blockade of this near-bank-
eee The Cabinet meanwhile, rupt nation’s. chief money make
temiporarily held royal powers|'UP' " : ; ae
pending the creation of a regency



Mossadegh —
Will Exploit
Iranian Oil |

TEHERAN, Iran July 28

As the Premier spoke to Par-



MR. NORMAN

W.I. Should

MANLEY





To DieIni-Day Trial

| conducted the defence at the request of the Crown.





TUF DAY,

-_—_——

JULY 29, 1952



Butcher Condemned

Found Guil'y Of Killing
Former Common Law Wife

VALMAR SMALL, J6-year-old butcher of New Or-
| leans, was yesterday found guilty of the murder of Gwen-
| dolyn Small, his former common law wife on the 20th of
| February. His Lordship the Chief Justice, Sir Allan Colly-

. Kt., prerownced the death sentence.
| The jury returned their verdict of guilty after delib
' erating for 25 minutes, five minutes less than His Lordship
| took to sum up the case which ended after only one day's |

hearing. In returning their. verdict of guilty, the jury re-|

n : DR, CATO (extreme left) Sir All
jected an “insanity plea” made by Mr. F. G. Smith, who}

Governor Sir Alfred Savage ch
Saturday night (See page 2)





The Crown alleged that on the
20th February sometime between
6 p.m. and 6,30 p.m,, the accused
| Vatmar Small murdered his ex-
wife when he inflicted some 18]
\stab wounds on her body at the}

Congrats!

LONDON, July 28

Oliver Lyttelton, Secre- corner of Westbury Road near

tary of State for the Cole- ithe Baxters Road junction eS ne a is

nies, to-day sent the follow- [|| Bwidence was produced to the

ie aearen Cie tee jeffect that the accused who had * e
aica’s ec te ltwo children by the deceased, I l *e D ing

at Helsinki. pused to beat her during theii Oo ice oO

“Please give my warmest

congratulations to the Ja-* and that

about six

| residence together,



AT CHARITY BALL

Free Nations Wish Stable |
Government For Egypt




















on nn se ecemncine

WEATHER REPORT
YESTERDAY

fail from Codrington 02 in

rainfall for month to date: 3.523 ins,
nest Temparture: 87.5 °F,

Lowest Temperature: 74.0 F.

Wind Velocity: 6 miles per hour

Barometer ‘9 a.m 29.960; (3

29.909.



p.m.)

TO-DAY
Sunrise: 5.48 a.m,
Sunset: 6.20 p.m.
Moon: First Quaster
Lighting: 7.00 p.m.
High Tide: 8.29 a.m, 848 pm
Low Tide: 2.31 am 266 pm

PRICE : FIVE CENTS

July 29.



an Collymore, LadySavage, Major D. Vaughn and His Excellency the
at together when they attended the Charity Ball at the Marine Hotel
.

EDEN COMMENTS

council. The Nile Kingdom gen-
—. rejoiced at 7 oom on
Farouk, whose downfall started

when 51-year-old General Naguib |

and his coterie of younger officers
teok over the army last Wednes-
day and forced the King to install

Maher Pasha and the new anti-
corruption
The cleanup was expected to

probe into every section of the
government extending to former
cabinet ministers and palace offi-
cials. High on the pene oth ge ng
are charges against seve!
officials, inclu Farouk’s cousin
Prince Abbas who is
charged with supplying faulty
arms to Egypt’s army during the
Palestine war.—(CP)



algae minnie

DEMOCRATIC NOMINEE

liament at the height of his new
patalecy, the newspaper Bakhtat |

mrooz, which often reflects his
views, hinted to the Shah that|
he should never stand in the
way of the nationalists if he wants
to avoid being ousted like Egypt's
Farouk. : |

Mossadeghs plan for exploiting!
Iran's oil riches is part of his
programme for drastic reforms to
lift the country from its present
economic plight. His programme!

Not Rush
Blindly

Into Federation

P.N.P. LEADER of Jamaica,
‘Mr. Norman Manley and Labour
Leader here, Mr. Grantley Adams
both expressed the view at a



mass

|
|
|
| maican team on their splen-
|

called also for higher taxes, land
reforms, and work projects for
the unemployed, measures which}
are bound to be opposed by many]
wealthy supporters of the goyern-
ment. (CP)



meeting at Queen’s Park on
Sunday night that the West Indies
should not rush blindly into
federation without being sure
that the conditions of federation
were secure,

The other West Indian Leader
who spoke on Federation at this
meeting, Mr. T. A. Marryshow,
said that power was in the hands

jof the people, but federation had



not been achieved because the
} people did not use it.

“Where Federation is concern-
ed,” Mr. Manley said, “it is better



that we should make haste
slowly. It is such a great step
that it might be a misfortune,

| might be a disaster, to start on
the wrong foot or before we are
|quite ready.”
Trinidad

| “Until Trinidad comes in the
jway of the P.N.P. of Jamaica and
|the Labour Party’ of Barbados,
and set about putting power in
the hands of the working voters,
j there can be no Federation in the
| West Indies. Federation must
not be on such terms that the
| working class would be ruled by
Mr. “So and so” down Broad
| Street or Frederick Street’,

, Addressing the people, Mr.
| Manley first referred to this be-
jing his first visit to Barbados.
Then spedking of Barbados, he

did achievement in winning
the 1,600 metres relay and |
the 400 metres.”



Manley
‘Introduced
To Local Bar

| lived

MR, NORMAN W. MANLBEY, |
Q.C., M.H.R. Leader of the,
People’s National Party o!
Jamaica, was yesterday intro.
duced to the local Bar by the
Attorney General, Hon. C, Wylie |
and admitted to practise at ty!
Courts of the island by His Lora- |
ship the Chief Justice, Sir Allan
Collymore.

The introduction was done be-
fore the business of the Court of
Grand Sessions was begun, The
Bar was fully represented for the
occasion and the Judges of the
Assistant Court of Appeal were
also present.

Making the introduction, Hon,
Wylie said that Mr. Manley was
born on July 14, 1893. He was
educated at the elementary school
and the Jamaica College and in
1914 became a Rhodes Scholar;
and went to Jesus College, Ox-|
ford. !

He had war service with the
Royal Field Artillery.

He attended Oxford from 1919
to 1921 and achieved the Certifi-|
eate of Honour, He was Lee
Prizeman of Gray’s Inn (Essay
Prize) and was called to the Bar
on April 20, 1921. He was ad-
mitted to the Jamaica Bar on
August 30, 1922 and since 1923



said that it was not surprising
| that the history and achievements
of Barbados has played a prom-
inent and distinguished part in
the West Indian events of the
last 14 years. For, he said, he
counted the years 1937 and 1938
as the second emancipation in the
West Indies when not a territory
escaped the enraged outburst of
}a people unable any longer to
tolerate the sufferings that mal-
jadministration brought upon
them.

Speaking of the accomplish-
ments of the West Indies, he said
he named as foremost of them,
jthe achievement of universal
adult suffrage. He could remem-
ber that before 1943 in Jamaica
one man out of ten had a vote. A
man without a vote was neces-



ay

Holding his glasses in his hand, Governor Adlai Stevenson of Lilinois.
smiles in his office in Chicago. He was chosen Democratic Presiden-
tial nominee at the Democratic National Convention.





|cians because in the last analysis,

Farouk’s Mother Knew
Something Would Happen

BEVERLY HILLS, CALIFORNIA, July 28,
Egypt’s Queen Mother Nazli defended on Monday her |
son who stripped her of all royal rights, and said he would |
face the crisis that forced King Farouk’s abdication “with |
faith and courage.” The dowager queen expressed hope |
that Farouk would come to America, but a close family
friend doubted that the deposed king would make the trip.
Queen Nazli, who was stripped of her royal rights and vir-
tually disowned by Farouk because she approved of the |
marriage of her daughter Princess Fathia to a commoner
in 1950, said that she still loved her son “deeply.” |
“I know he wiil face this crisis, would make a better king if he)
with faith and courage” she said. me to this country and observed |
“He has always been a courageous| American life. Ghali and the
and deeply religious young man.”| Princess Fathia expect their first
The queen, who came to the! child this autumn.
United States about four years ago, | —U.P.
moved here more than a year 12
to live with her thirty year old) E : .
daughter. and. son-in-law Riad State Dept. Agaimst
"Although Farouk cut e nié Pard ins Of Nazi
Altho ‘ar cut of f
mother’s $1,000 per day royal in-, omg azis
come in their dispute over Prin-| WASHINGTON, July 28.
cess Fathia’s marriage the family; The State Department made
lives in a fashionable apartment,| public on Monday its disapproval |
largely upon private funds and in-|of the recently passed Austrian|
vestments. Queen Nazli said she laws pardoning certain lesser Nazi
has been expecting “something to’ war criminals. The laws passed
happen” in Egypt for some time by the Austrian Pariiament go}
because “events have been be- into effect 30 days after submis-
coming worse and worse”. She sion to the Four Power Allied War
said she had no idea what plans Council unless vetoed by any one
her son might have but a friend)| of the four powers
said the queen believed Farouk

;politicians looked after votes
more than anything else.
Revolution

“Believe me,” he said, “nothing
else, nothing else that has been
@ On Page 3





~U.P.

sarily disregarded by the politi- |

PINISH of the much disputed 100 metres.
won
from right next to McKenley

has appeared in every important
and sensational case in that

colony.
Gained His Silk

He recently went to England to
defend a Jamaican charged with

murder, had occasion to go be-
fore the Privy Council, was
President of the Jamaica Bar

Council and had gained his silk.

“On this occasion” the Attorney
General said, “there is another
aspect and it is this, that through-
out the world there is a demand
on all sides for the democratic
and Self-Government and one
sometimes wonders whether the
‘people who make these demands
\think only of the privileges at-}
tached to these desirable political |
| advantages, or whether they
think also of the onerous dutic
which come with them.’
| One of the most onerous of
| those duties, he said, was the duty
of representing and leading and
guiding one’s fellow citizens.

The legal profession had a).
ways regarded itself as a pro.

@ On page 5.

FINISH OF 100







This picture lends much

It also seems to show from the position of the tape that both
The white line behind the heel of MacDonald Bailey's left foot i

| conducted
'Legal-Draughtsman and
|\to the Attorney

; Orleans, St.

having left her for
months prior to the incident, met
her on the evening in question
and fatally stabbed her.

The case for the Crown wa
by Mr. F. E, Field
Assistant
General
New

Daisy Clarke, 52> of

of Gwendolyn Clarke, was the

first witness to give evidence on} He said

behalf of the Crown.
Her daughter and

Michael and mother:

Useful Work

'In Dominica

| The Police Force tin Dominica |
is a good little one which is do-|
ing useful work, Lt. Col, K |
j Ozanne, island’s Superintendent of!
Police told the Advocate shortly!
before returning home yesterday |
iby B.G,. Airways
that

. LONDON, July 28.
British Foreign Secretary Anthony Eden said Monday
that all free nations are interested in seeing a stable and
orderly Egyptian Government emerge from the present
crisis. Eden appeared in the House of Commons to make a
statement on Egypt for the first time since his illness with

jaundice,

“I am sure the House will not
j|expect me to comment on the

the Foree com-' internal course of future develop-

prised 140 members including nine ments but I should like to take

ON PRESENT CRISIS
|



the accused! Barbadians who were doing quite
together as husband and| well

wife for a period of about three Lt.-Col, Ozanne spent a week
or four years, There were erp tsp Barbados after attending the
children, Conference of Fire Officers of the
eee eee Se Savane oer British West Indies in Trinidad.

er CAUSE s at- aa % .

ude vance er Senintes and es Maite of oe foe
herself, she as m to leave. He asa that the fruit export

Gwendolyn. left heme aboutlsiiness in Dominica was’ ex-

this opportunity to stress our in-|
terest and I am sure the interests ,
of all free nations that a stable
and orderly administration may |
emerge from the present crisis.’ |
|Eden said in his statement, \
He said that in the cireumstances
Sir Ralph Stevenson, British Am-
baseador to Cairo who was vacn-—
tioning in France when General |

7.30 o'clock on the morning of the

panding and the new canning in- ;| Mohammed Naguib seized control

; on the road with the accused ov«

20th. She used to leave work at
4 p.m. but on the evening of the dustry _ which had
she heard| was doing well.

just started



20th. about 5.45 p.m,
a report and went to Westbury
Road. .

There she saw her daughter Special B. W.LA
lying in the street jin a pool of
blood. Vi ,

The accused was also there Flight Arranged
lying in the street. The Police’ §. W. I. A, arranged an addit-|

Waggon arrived and took them to|jonal flight from Barbados to St
the General Hospital, Next day'Tucia on Sunday to accommodate
she went to the hospital and], special assembly of Masonic
identified her daughter’s body. Lodge Brethren who ant Gr :

To The Court :—‘When I saw|for the Consecration of
the two persons in the street,| Masonic Temple which took place
Gwendolyn had many. cuts on] yesterday evening.
her, and the accused seemed to This Temple now replaces the
have his throat cut too.’

To Mr. Smith: ‘The deceased|the

Castries fire,
had five children other than the

The party comprised Mr, D, R. D.

two she had for the accused Wiles, Mr. F. A. C. Clairmonte,
During the years when the ac-]0.B,.E,, Mr. Prince Walker, Mi
cused lived at her no other|pon Johnson, Rev. A. E. "arm -'|

‘strange’ friends visited her] stror eS

§ ng, Mr. C,
daughter, She cannot say whether .
the accused drank alcohol,

R. Armstrong, Mr
H. Arrindell, Mr, Fred Olton, Mr,
Carlos Clarke, Mr, H. F. Shearn

To The Court: The accused|Mr. Keith Murphy, Rev. Harold
used to beat my daughter con-| Melville, Mr, Lisle Chase, Mi
stantly. The last time he beat|Colin Redman, Mr, Vincent St
my daughter, he struck her, she]John, Mr, Stanley Davis, Mi:
attempted to strike him back and| Kenneth Cooper, Mr, L. Brath-
the accused told her ‘if you had| waite, Mr, V, H. B, Rocheford,
struck me with that shoe, you|Mr, Arthuy Chase and Mr, E. H
would sleep in the mortuary to-| Bohne.
night.’ One night he did attempt Also leaving by the same flight
to strike me, but he never did.j were Mrs, Kenneth Cooper and
He said if he had put his hands} Mise Mary Reece

Mr, W. W. Reece, Q.C., who i

on me, when he let me go I would
be dead. This was spoken loudly |



Next to give evidence was|'eft by the M.V. Daerwood 0:
Joseph Arthur, a seaman of} Sunday.
Passage Road. On 20th. Feb The party will be returning to
ruary he was in a shop at the |day by

: | a special flight.
junction of Passage and West eer ear ee
bury Roads. He heard a shou

for murder and when he looked |

around, he saw a woman lying |

Rain Halts
Korean War

her.

the new}

old one which was burnt during}

| —UP.
U.K. First Time

also attending the Consecration, |

| was on his way back to Egypt.

| Stevenson was recalled. from
this holiday in the South of France
| last week when General)
|Moharmmed Naguib staged his
| bloodless military coup at Cairo,
| whieh led to King Farouk’s abdi-
cation. Stephenson said that he
would make no comment as he
boarded a “comet” airliner at the |
Loneclon airport. He said “it would
be impossible for me to say any-
thing. I am returning to Cairo
|by the first available service.”

Sir Ralph also had consultations

}here with British Mimister of
'State Selwyn Lloyd over the
weekend,



Rhee Lifts



‘Martial Law
| PUSAN, Korea, July 28.
President Syngmann Rhee
| lifted Monday the martial law he
|imposed on ssorea but called a
{meeting of provincial governors
‘and police chiefs to discuss the
|maintenance of order during the
next week’s Presidential election.
Pusan was ruled by Martial law
for 64 days during which Rhee
wrought a change in the consti-
tution to allow the people to vote
directly for a President.
—UP.



|

Fechteler Says
Armistice Will Be

WASHINGTON, July 28.

He | ; ” drniral William Fechteler,
From the action, he appeare: SEOUL, KOREA, July 28. ° As < a 2
to be beating the woman. HH Torrential rains beat down on| chief of naval pee. ee
the witness, went up to the tw«. me already soaked and mudd, toe da we a the . er that on
people and asked the accused i’ Korean battle lines today an| Mone Mie ee, h . i.
te knew what he was doing vice halted ground and ait ores, we ne reached = tn

fighting for the third straight da) o ‘ :
@ On Page 5 = a“ | “We still think we are going to



METRES FINALS

dha, ofr & ¢ Ltée le

oA

strength to the assumption that McKenley of Jamaica second from right,
Bailey and Smith (together in the middle) beat Remigino who is third
the finishing line.

{get an armistice out there—parti-
cularly because I think the com-
munists want one”, he told
reporters at the National Airport.

Everytime they stick their heads
up they get hurt.”

Fechteler
Japan, Formosa and
-U.P.

Korea,
Philip-

stopped in
the

pines

Steel Workers Go
Back To Jobs

PITTSBURGH, July 28

Steel workers stepped up the
jpace in their “back-to-work”
movement to-day, but a few still
grumbled over the wage settle-
{ment reached with the big steel
undercurrent
| Dissatisfaction led from the
15,500 member of locel united-
‘steel workers at Jones and
| Laughlins, a south side Pittsburgh
plant.

James McLaughlin, local Presi-
;dent, said his group voted du-
ring the week end to return to
work but under protest that he
will forward a protest to the
teelworkers president Philip
Murray that the principal com-
plaimt is that the wage increase

not board, (CP)

acros.

visit— man of the man who founded the
College two centuries age.
. The tishop has a daughter,
Reached In Korea Monica, in London, She is a nurse



ANTHONY EDEN



Bishop Mandeville

(From Our Own Correspondent)
LONDON July 28

The Bishop of Barbados, Rev.
Gay Lisle Griffith Mandeyille, is
seeing Britain for the first time.
He was born in the West Indies.
He says : “My family came from
England so long ago | don’t know
which part of the country to re-
gard as my home.”

Tall, with a dalting of grey in his
hair the Bishop is in his sixties. He
is spending several months’ holi-
day touring Britain, He is arrang-
ing for several men to go to Bar-
the Ministry at
Coliege, which has
Durham Univer-
took his own
He is to

bados to train for
Codrington
affiliations with
sity. The Bishop
degrees at Codrington.

Salisbury Wilts a kins-

at King’s College Hospital, Next
month he will see his eldest
daughter, Sheila, on his way to a
charge conference in Sweden. She
is in her twenties and works at
the British Embassy in Denmark.



Naguib Must Rule
With Restraint

LONDON, July 28.
The London Times Monday saic
that General Mohammed Naguib
must exercise “almost superhuman
restraint” if he is te steer Egypt
away from military dictatorship.
Everything depends the Times
said in an editorial’ on the view
that General Naguib takes of his
for’ there is mn
force in Egypt to challenge his
will. However salutary his action
thus far may be from the stand-
point of the country’s interests—
and he is believed to be disinter-

ested as well as patriotic.—
—v.P.

responsibilities



SHERLOCK ON J’CA
LEG. COUNCIL

KINGSTON, Jamaica July 28

It has been announced that her
Majesty has given instructions for
the appointment of Mr. ~ Philir
Sherlock Vice-Principal of the Uni-
versity College of the West Indies
1s an Official member of the Legis-
lative Council,—€CP)


PAGE TWO



IS Excellency the Governor
and Lady Savage gave their
distinguished patronage to the
Charity Ball staged at the Marine
Hotel in aid of the Barbados
Association for the Blind and Deaf
on Saturday night.
There was a fine attendance in-
cluding’ the President of the

2 ine mag Sir Allan Collymore
ae. Lady Collymore.

The muiSic was supplied by the

Police Band Orchestra with Capt.

Raison carrying the baton. It was

an evening of fine entertainment

for those who attended and an

indication of public support for a
deserving institution.

For One Week
RS. P. D. MACDONALD,
wife of the Colonial Secre-
tary of the Leeward Islands,
arrived in Barbados on Sunday.
Mrs. Macdonald, who is on a
week's visit is the guest of Mr. and
Mrs, Philip MHewitt-Myring at
“Chaden”, Marine Gardens.

Cocktail Party
R. G. H. ADAMS, C.M.G,
M.C.P., was host at a cock-
tail party at his residence “Tyrol
Cot” on Saturday evening. The
Guest of Honour was Mr. N. W,
Manley, Q.C. of Jamaica who had
come over to attend the Barbados
Labour Party’s annual Confer-
ence, .
The Party was well attended
and included Sir Allan Collymore,
Sir George Seel, Members of the
Civil Establishment, the Legisla-
ture, business interests and the
waterfront.

Welfare Adviser Returns
' ISS DORA IBBERSON, Social

Welfare Adviser to the
Comptroller of Development and
Welfare, returned from Trinidad
last week.

Miss Ibberson had gone there
to have talks with the three-mau
United Nations Mission on com-
munity self help in Trinidad

Attended Workers’

Conference
ON. T. A, MARRYSHOW,
C.B.E., M.L.C. of Grenada

arrived in Barbados on Sunday to
attend the Annual Conference of
the Barbados Workers’ Union
‘which took place the same day.
He will also take the oppor-
tunity to discuss matters of West
aoen interest with Mr. Norman
fanley, Q.C. During his stay he
will be the guest of Mr. and Mrs.
W. Barrow at “Westward Ho,”
nds End.

Students Intransit
NUMBER of students arrived
hereâ„¢ yesterday morning by

.W.L.A. from Mt. St. Benedict
ollege, Trinidad, intransit for
Guadeloupe and Martinique to

end the summer holidays with
eir relatives.
“They were Michael Divies,
Maurice and Louis Lacour of
Guadeloupe and Allan Devaux of
Martinique.

Controller of Supplies
M* A. V. SPROTT, Controller
of Supplies, St, Vincent, left

yesterday morning by B.W.LA.
for and Puerto Rico in-
or ‘the USA.

transit where he
will spend part of his long vaca-
tion,

While there, he was a guest of
Mr, and Mrs, Fred Cole of Henry's
Lane, :

Trinidad Merchant

R. ARTIE S. Joseph, a mer-

chant of Trinidad, is now in
Barbados for a holiday: He ar-
rived yesterday morning by
B.W.LA. and will be remaining
for a week as a guest at “Accra,
Rockley. ,

WAY
Y THE ;
Y reference to the suggestion
(made seriously, it seems)
that the public should have a
statutory right to inspect hotel
and restaurant kitchens draws the
comment that people would be far
more interested in matters of

hygiene than in finding out what
they were eating.

This is probably true, Every
now and then there are angry
letters to the Press about assis-
tants in food shops who blow into
paper bags before putting food
into them. How are you to stop
hotel and restaurant chefs from
breathing all over the place? And
every normal breath, as Professor
Numskull has proved, contains
43,721,480 disease-laden germs. A
posse of diners surging into a West
End kitchen, each diner carrying
a germ-recorder, would certainly
add to the gaiety of nations, But
escallope de veau Lafayette would
still be horse,

No luck

MPUDENCE with a police-

woman is inadvisable; they
can look after themselves.” These
stern words recalled to me the
tase of a man who approached a



“



lovely policewoman with the
words: “Hello my pretty one!
What 2” He got no further.

The pretty one gripped him, and
flung him clean over her head,
and through the open window of
a first-floor flat. He landed in a
bath-tub, and when the occupant
of the flat came in to bathe her
little Billy, she, being an ex-
policewoman, picked the stranger
up and flung him out of the win-
dow. “Fifteen all,” said the



MAR. J. W. B. CHENERY, Mrs. D. H. Iu. Ward and Hon. N. W. Manley
were among the guests at the ball at the Marine Hotel Saturday night.

For Six Weeks

PENDING six weeks’ holiday in
\ Barbados are Mr. and Mrs.
Joseph Moraine of Port-of-Spain,
Trinidad, They were arrivals by
B.W.1A. yesterday morning and
are guests of Mr. and Mrs. W
Harewood of “Camelot,” Chelsea
Road,

Mrs. Moraine is a sister of T¢rs
Harewood while her husband is
a C°partmental manager of Messrs.
7. T. Johnson’s Ltd.

oy ame



On Holiday

RS- N. TAWIL whose hus-

band is Managing Director
of the Faulkener Trading Com-
pany Ltd. of Port-of-Spain, Trini-
dad, arrived yesterday morning
by B.W.LA, for a holiday and is
a guest at the Hotel Royal.

While here, Mrs. Tawil will
also attend the Races. Her hus-
band is expected to join her on
Saturday,

MR. and MRS. MICHAEL CLARKE

T. MATTHIAS CHURCH was
the scene of a very pretty
wedding at 5 p.m. on Saturday,
26 July; when Miss Sheila Doreen
Heath, eldest daughter of Mr, and
Mrs. A, Brereton Heath of Jack-
sonville, Worthing, was married
to Mr, Michael Clarke, son of Mr.

ope Mrg, Dudley Clarke of
“Ryde”, St.

Lawrence.

The bride who was given in
marriage by her father, wore a
gown of Slipper Satin, cut on
simple and beautiful lines, with
deep blonde lace forming frills at
the bottom of the front of her
skirt. -

Her finger tip nylon veil was
held in place by a tiara of orange
blossoms. She carried a bouquet
of Cattelya President Wilson
Orchids, and was attended by her
sister Miss Mary Heath as brides-

. By Beacheomber
her

policewoman, continuing on
beat.

Pop goes the widow!

HERE is something very mov-

ing in the sight of a small

boy in the street, with his nose

pressed against a widow bursting
with cream-cakes,

(Evening paper.)
Traveller’s Joy

DESCRIPTION, by a visitor,
of the spire of Salisbury
Cathedral as a whale of a prong
deserves to L* remembered side by
side with the American’s salute to

Chartres Cathedral as a nifty hunk distinguishes a learned man from |

of masonry.



maid, also two flower girls Miss
Ruth Cox, and Miss Margaret
Simpson, all of whom wore
dresses of blue embroidered organ-
dy, carrying horse-shoes of for-
get-me-nots and blush radiance
roses, with headdresses to match.

The ceremony was _ conducted
by Rev. S. R. Ripper and the
the bestman was r. Tan Robin-
son, the ushers were Mr, William
Simpson, Mr. Bob Edghill, Mr.
Harold Roett and Mr, Michael
Clarke,

The reception was held at “Day-
ton”, Worthing, the home of Mr.
and Mrs, I. S. Cox and the Happy
Couple left for the. Crane Hotel
where the honeymoon is_ being
spent,

Mr. and Mrs. Clarke will short-
ly be leaving for their home in
Trinidad.

A new burglar-ularm

R. STRABISMUS (Whom

God Preserve) of Utrecht is
experimenting, at Waggling Parva,
with a new burglar alarm. It is a
strong magnet which, concealed in
a room, would attract trouser-
buttons. The moment the burglar
entered his breeches would fall
about his feet, thus encumbering
his movements. The action of the
magnet on the buttons would set
off an alarm connected with the
nearest police-station,

Prodnose: Would not _ the
trousers of the police fall, too?

Myself: No, They would wear
special magnet-proof Luttons,

Wisdom of the ages

It is often only his hat that

his goat, (Turkish proverb)





One lovely morning in April
Rupert has set off for a brisk trot
in the sunshine. ‘* What a top-
ping day!" he thinks, ‘ Why
aren't all my pals here too?

Hallo, there's a wisp of smoke
over there, That means that
somebody ss there. | wonder



IN STOCK

An



i Ceol ae
f AMET eet
what they are doing. Surely they
can’t be having a picnic so early
in the year, It’s still toe chilly.”
He scrambles up and_ gazes
around, Then he leoks at the
smoke drifting away. ‘* What
can. it mean he = murmurs.
** There's no one here, no one in
sight anywhere!"



Assortment of

@ LADIES’ NYLON HOSE

@ LADIES’ NYLACE HOSE
@ LADIES’ LISLE HOSE
@ CHILDREN’S ANKLETS ...



— ALSO —

NEW SHIPMENT OF ...

@ MEN’S WILSON FELT HATS ............







w. $2.09, $2.15, $2.28, $2.41

$2.50
- $131
30, 32 & 46 CENTS



sa ates alssstionhinnv $6.40

T. R EVANS & WHITFIELDS

DIAL 4220

YOUR SHOE STORES

DIAL 4606





BARBADOS

Post Graduate in Education
BARBARA

M's KINCH,
daughter of Mr.

and Mrs.
Ernest Kinch of “Marlow”, Hast-
ings, arrived from England via
I'rinidad yesterday morning by
B.W.1.A. to spend about a month’s
holiday with her parents.

Miss Kinch who got her B.A.
in English last year in Canada,
at the University of Toronto
went over to England where she
took part in a post graduate
course in Education at Oxford
University.

ried to Mr. Anthony Lee, who is
a Geologist employed with the
Gulf Oil Company in Canada. He
is expected to arrive here about
the middle of next month,

Holidaying From Germany

R. OLIVER CECIL HALL,

P his wife and eighteen
months’ son arrived here from
Germany a fortnight ago on holi-
day. Mr. Hall left yesterday by
B.W.1I. Airways for Puérto Rico,
en route to Germany. via New
York but Mrs. Hall and Junior
will remain for a longer holiday.
The Halls have been in Ger-
many for the past six years where
Mr. Hall is employed with the
Q.M. staff of the army in the per-
sonnel administration department,
Mr. Hall was born in the U.S.A.
and this is his first visit to Bar-
bados but Mrs, Hall was born

here although she has spent the}

greater part of her life in the
U.S.A. Married quarters are pro-
vided in Germany and the Halls
have lived together there for the
past six years. Baby Herbert was
born in Germany eighteen months
ago.



Talking Point
I believe without a shadow of
doubt that science and peace will
finally triumph over ignorance
and war, and that the nations of
the earth wili agree not to destroy
but to build up.—Louis Pasteur:

* * *

I wish your “horses swift and
sure of foot.—Shakespeare.

To force myself to earn more
money, I determined to spend
more.—James Agate.

a ROSSWORD :







She has come down to get mar-|

ADV OCATE

|
’
|
}
|
|
|
|
Hali-Time Weights Show 5lbs.
| Losses

} Five full members of the Daily
; Express Tubby Hubby Club re-
; ported last night: “Losing weight.
| Feeling fine.

The five — who are testing the
12-day diet launched in the
xpress by Bernard Wicksteed—
nave lost an average of 5lb, each
| in six slimming days.
\¢ Here is the Tubby-Hubby-by-
p ebby ae report. In some
cases the starting weights shown
} here vary from those given last





week. The reason: The five
men (modestly) guessed their
weights when volunteering:

The weights given today were
taken at an official weigh-in :—
HARRY JOHN

Last Monday
16st. 10]b. Waist 46ins.
Last Night
16st. 4lb, 44ins.
QUOTE: “It must be work-
ing all right. Now I know

where the weight came from —
bread, potatoes. and beer.”
STANLEY TANNER
Last Monday
15st. 4lb, Waist 43 \sins,

LISTENING HOURS

} TUESDAY, JULY 29
£00 — 7.15 p.m, .. 19.76 M % 53 M
4.00 p.m. The News, 4.10 p.m. The
Daily Service, 4.15 p.m. New Records,
5.00 p.m. Verdi, 5.15 p.m. From the
) Promenade Concerts, 6.00 p.m. Ulster

Magazine, 6.15 p.m. Meet. the Common-
weMth, 6.45 p.m. Sports Round-Up and
Programme Parade, 7.00 p.m. The News,
10 p.m, Home News From Britain
715 — 10.30 pom. 25.53 M 31.323 M

7.15 p.m. Rendezvous, 7.45 p.m. Per-
fonal Portrait, 8.00 p.m. Take It Easy.
® 15 p.m. Radio Newsreel, 8.30 p.m
Report From Britain, 8.55 p.m. Inter
‘ude, 8.55 p.m. From the Editorials, 9.00
ym Australia Fair, 9.30 p.m. Royal
Windsor Horse Show, 9.45 p.m Olympic
Peport 10.00 p.m, The News, 10.10
pm. News Talk, 10.15 p.m. Geoffrley
Pleasant

Fumphrey Talking, 10.30 p.m
Journey °

OPENING FRIDAY
4.45 & 8.30 P.M. & Continuing Daily
DRAMATIC THUNDER!

Ly =








TUBBY HUBBIES
DOING WELL

Last Night
14st. 10 4elb 42 ins |
QUOTE: “I'm _ feeling jolly
good, and the family say Ive

already lost one chin. You know
you interrupted me cleaning tht
car — just after Sunday lunch
too! I must be feeling good. I
generally sleep.”

JOHN JOHNSTON

Last Monday
14st. 1lb, Waist 4lins
Last Night
13st. . 10lb 401, ins,
QUOTE: “I’m afraid I feel

very hungry periodically, but on
the whole it’s a_ livable-with
diet. My daughter wants me
te keep it up until I go down to
three stone and she can carry me
around !”
DONALD GLOAG
Last

M y
13st. 4%lb. Waist 36%%ins.

Last Night

13st. No change.
QUOTE: “Never felt better in
my life. I think I’ve lost some

weight off my face and neck.”
WALTER GRATRIX

Last Monday
12st. 3lb, Waist 42ins.
it Night
11st. 13lb. 4lins,
QUOTE: “Tt’s doing the trick.

The first two days were grim. but
now I find the diet is adequate.
| My wife — she has started the
diet, too Says my collar is
hanging round my neck, making
me look like a cart-horse.”

CARIBBEAN PREMIERE!
FRIDAY 2.30, 4.45 & 8.30 P.M.

che REAL Hore g |
ys QURAGE IN COMag7
a og 0 NOE AND ye,



CY
Hgg fs




















TUESDAY,

JULY 29, 1952



YOUR INDIVIDUAL HOROSCOPE

x

Look in the section in which your birthday comes and find *

what your outlook is, according to the stars.

*«
ARIES
March 21—April 20

FOR TUESDAY, JULY 29. 1952

Could be gainful period for creative work,
new metheds of merchandizing, building,
experiments for future. Be careful not to

*

overload self, impair health.

*«
* TAURUS
April 21—May 20

*

perties can

new ideas.

x GEMINI
May 21—June 20 turing, for

*

tions. P.M.

domesticity

CAN

CER
June 21—July 23 issues,

on guard.

LEO
July 24—Anug. 22
things.

23—Se’ 23
an, diplomacy,

LIBRA
Sept. 24—Oct. 23
aspects

SCORPIO

binin,
Oct. 24—Nov. 22 Cae .

xkxkeewkkkke

study and arg astute.

Vibrations on generous side for manufac-

Excellent day for unusual matters,
oured:
Souk Late news may mislead to-day; be

One of your
and with system.
with social

A little prodding
Courship, marriage,

should make it a happy,
You can accomplish most
line, The unusual may go over big.

Money matters, investments in good pro- *

brin, ofits if you take time,
stu Don’t be afraid of

*
+

social and advertising proposi~
highly favours personal affairs,

Fresh-
travel, shipping, all urgent

+

“pe careful” days. Start early +
Wisely mix business

life; don’t attempt to rush

will be medicine now.
family affairs demand
serenity.

Being sufficiently consistent in handling *

lems will add to your gains.
pat between 9 a.m. and 4 p.m, for con-

centrated effort.

Fine
*

and friendly rays
productive day.
in a necessary

energy

Planetary configurations still on favourable

SAGITTARIUS side.

Nov. 28—Dec. 22

Useful,
should bring good returns.

up-to-date propositions
fb Be aware that

+

others are trying, too.

*

Aspects

CAPRICORN
Dec. 23 — Jan. 21

usual.

.

*

AQUARIUS ©
Jan. 22 — Feb. 20 ;

thought in

future plans;
paving way for bigger things ahead. Heart

interests bright.

sponsor general improvement, +

discussing contacts, estimates,

>

Keep keyed up to the best, maybe the
Don't
opportunity knocks.

un- +
be caught off balance when
Exercise extra fore-

You should experience little trouble with

CES routine, daily tasks.
ven aa aise 20 tend to disrupt. A fresh outlook will serve
st.

business openings.
The unexpected may *


















be
A Robert L. Lippert Presentotion x
saning 5
’ 6 , vant, magnetic personality.
J] Roiert HUTTON - Steve BRCDIE May noe PORN ice You like affection, may become moody
" e . A .
James EDWARDS - Richard LOO if athe you care for show peters. oe int om be pet cba, Rely
wth : spoil our ood v6
Site youtt cots fvays, You Bave fine mind, use it rightly. *
and introd 4 dynamic screen personality iif di
, Generous aspects these days. 1 : Wm.
4 av * ce Birthdate: Newton Booth Tarkington, novelist;
1. Gets together. (9) 7 ,
iB tien of expression, (5) ras Powell, actor i. a +
1. nere oO as’ oats f
oC r
7 Meet bing iter the Cup tte * * * * * ; * * bl
. See .
14 Young Leonard and Thomas mw \ h la e
et hot running. (6) = More Meat On I e€
15. egetable, (4) cs
46 Seen on the paim,, (4) Witten, Produeed ane Drected by SAUNUEL Fuller ! their meat ex-
(8 Features Tor Rood Netening. (4) A brut Comnton hua sonsncsetadby tower Petunia | PEARL RIVER, New York, July, pend ere need economy.
23. Chain of reasoning. (5) Researchers responsible for the ports for
24. Must be driven to. join up, (4) | 7 This fact is shown clearly in a
25. Nothing in man sounds so: (4) development of new animal feeds, ; ie t
Down | ; based on modern-day antibiotics, a recent article, “More wen
1. Wingless washing, (3) | “ believe that their efforts will have the Table”, published 7m ‘ ae
2 Burn inwardly. (8) o Waa gon BRIDGETOWN (DIAL 2310) | important economic results in the Monthly Bulletin” by the . yin
4. It makes the ee! tament. 1 | & meat producing countries of the Laboratories Division °
5. Stone, sounds more e 4 aneee world American ey “Ty Sremnere
Pe S.. Boer (S) ) GINGER [fF RONALD — fppoR - 7 P The article traces the develop
iM Sait mia te inne of an Rap GAIETY The new feeds, which cut down of “aurotac, the ‘irst of the _
ph Hees com mietely, Comaned: 4) AUN \ by h | if on animal mortality and speea up feeds, developed from = wae
cs stream. (6) 17, Educate. § & STEVE ba oe The Garden—St. James their srewsh, hold pee of = ee pills already
og: eines Bepor | hs mam mar = JERRY WALD ; @| increased output an igher mar- far-reac
- Sik-it tactics, ] HAN @ Foal Et ta TODAY & TOMORROW 8.0 p.m. Bit prices for countries that de- achieved by U.S. fermers.
$B One of our secs 8) | CUE > © stunt Htisier CASA MANANA LEC PDSOF PS 9SPSSO OOD S99
Solution of yesterday's pusy ro i
1, Stange ARs "% Virginia WELLS — Robert CLARK &
hottie etre an: | PHEATA a GLOBE
24. Meal, Down ‘ Tele , MASTER MINDS 4 TODAY 5 4 8.30 LAST SHOWS
3, ales 4. Lenient: 5. Ire { and 8. .m.
Rouen’? Searels" Stout. | BARBAREES (DIAL 5170) | $ico concey & me Dead End sia DEADLINE U.S.A.
BSSSSSOSSESSSSS~SSEESS . &







HUMPHREY BOGART — KIM HUNTER
TOMORROW AND THURSDAY 4.45 and 8.30 p.m. -
JESSE JAMES AND SHOW BOAT

OPENING FRIDAY 5 and 8.30 p.m.
24 FRED ASTAIRE — VERA ELLEN
% BELLE OF NEW YORK

s

3855560500 POO HOOD

:

\





PLAZA THEATRES

SSeS
' BAP BAREES
(Mal 5170) ~
HELD OVER TO-DAY
Last 2 Shows
To-day 4.45 & 8.30 p.m:

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TUESDAY, JULY



W.I. Should Not Rush Blindly Into Federation | 9 Sidawels

@ From Page i

done is as great a revolution as

that simple transfer of power
into the hands of the ordinary
man—the power to vote. Natural-
ly, for ‘those who were blessed
With possessions it was not a
happy change I do not know
what they might have thought
about it here, but I know what
they called me in Jamaica in 1938
and I know what they thought
about me.

Lunatic was a mild term. Be-
trayer was more common. Mad

and bad about summed it up.
“Il phophesy, I see all around

me signs of the fact that they
are thinking everytime to find
ways and means to maintain
power in spite of the fact that
the masses have the real power
in their hands. That is one of
the greatest responsibilities on

the shoulders of leadership in the
West Indies today.

“Look at what has happened in
a place like Trinidad where, in
spite of adult suffrage the wealthy
and the privileged are more firm-
ly in the saddle today than they
haye ever been. They are more
solidly entrenched because of the

fallacies of the popular leaders
of the people. The power of the
masses is swabbed up in the

fabrics of disunity.”

After referring to the position
in Jamaica with the workers and
the privileged class, he said that
it was seen that in spite of the
changes and constitutional ad-
vances, the basic problems of the
West Indies had yet to be pattern-
ed. Not that he was by any
means belittling the accomplish.
ments of the last 14 years.

But one thing had been ac.
quired, one other great thing,
may be the greatest of all, may-
be the thing on which West
Indians would one day build the
future, and that was the begin-
ning of a national feeling through-

out all the territories and they
were beginning to feel that a
West Indian Nation was a
possibility,

“Now to me that means a great
deal,” he said. “It means a great
deal because there is nothing in
this world that I am so sworn

in enmity with than I am to
Colonialism and Imperialism in
all its forms. I lJoathe and de-

test Imperialism. I regard it as
a destroyer of the human. spirit
and the human soul. I believe it
inflicted numerous wounds upon
the West Indian spirit and the
West Indian heart,”

He mentioned that ‘sometimes
sensitiveness was felt by persons
of varying colour, and

said
that the inevitable gravita-
tion towards power was the
Bhame of one’s own history, of
their own ancestry. All that
happened because it was the

policy of Imperialism to teach a
Government to feel inferior. If
people were not taughi to feel
inferior, Imperialistic masters
could not rule them, that was
why such happened.

Sacrifices
He said that if there is one
great thing in the West Indian

heritage, it was the sacrifices of
the ordinary people to give an
opportunity of education to their
sons,

After referring to the present
constitutional position of the
various islands, he said that only
a month ago changes were pro-
posed and even expedited where-
by they in Jamaica were to have
eight elected ministers who would
actually be in charge of the de-
partments of administration, so
that the country would cease to
be ruled by Civil Servants to a
large extent, and in part be
ruled by their own people.

“Maybe we will make mis-
takes,” he said, “But when I look
around the West Indies after 300
years of Imperial rule, I do not
think even these mistakes will be
any worse than we have suffered
in the past. At any rate, I am
prepared to gamble it, and I
would sooner make my own mis-
takes and suffer for them than to
suffer for the other people’s mis.
takes.

“Make no mistake, we are only
being given limited doses of
power. Those countries think
freedom is a dangerous medicine
to be given with caution.”

He talked about Jamaicans not
filing as many high posts as
could be wished and said that he
repudiated the advances they had
made as sufficient or adequate.
He denied absolutely that they
were unfit to attempt any aspect





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29.

1952” =



RECORD HROKEN

KEITH CORBIN reaches the tape first in the 440 yards. D. Skeete

is second and J. Gittens

third. Corbin,

who ended up Victor

Ludorum, clipped 1§ second off the record of 612 seconds for the 440

yards.

of the
country.

He had the privilege last week
of reproducing a motion in their

administration of their

House of Representatives where-
by their House unanimously de-
eclared its opinion that Jamaica
was fit and ready for self Gov-
ernment. It had taken him 14
jong years to bring Jamaica to
that point,
Beacon Light
“Some of us think that by

Federation we can quickest reach
the road to dominion status which
is political independence,’ he
said, “that by that means we
would be the first among colour-
ed people of the world in the
British system to build an in-
dependent nation, and our efforts
will be the beacon light of the
Dominion of Africa who are yet to
win their freedom,”

He outlined the situation in
Africa and the British handling
of it, and said that the coloured

people will force others to give
them respect when more and more
negro people were governing
themselves and proving to the
world that they have all the
capacity to stand side by side.
Not that he had any colour pre-
judice, he said. He thought the
West Indies had made a tremend-
ous contribution to civilisation in

that men of all colour were
learning to live alongside each
other,

Again referring to imperialism,
he said that he did not take the
view that in the last analysis
England would make the smallest
sacrifice for a colonial possession,
and if anybody still lived in that
deluded atmosphere of political
ignorance as to suppose that
Imperial Countries really made
sacrifices for the Empire, he could
go back to school.

He then mentioned what he
termed Britain’s failing to put
through a really beneficial scheme
for Africa, but rather spending
money on peanuts which did not
grow. He mentioned too that
many of their young women were
thrown out of work because Brit-
ain placed a heavy tax on cigars,
and factories in Jamaica had
closed down, Then there was the
banana contract which was being
ended abruptly after they had
spent £1,200,000 in restoring the
industry after the recent hurri-
cane,

He said that they should not be
frightened with the idea that if
England did not take our sugar the
West Indies would be in a_ bad
position.

“I know perfectly well that we
buy British goods at a price they
set for their standard of living and
they buy our goods at the prices
they set, but I know that after all
we belong to the Western hemis-
phere,” he said. “More and more
the American continent is going to
demand the products of external
countries, There was a _ recent
economic survey of the United
States and the experts said that in
20 years time America will be im-
porting five times as much as she
is importing, by necessity.’”’ Then,
too, there was vast Canada which

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Pioneers

Five years ago -they had had
a conference in Jamaica on Fed-
eration in which Mr. Adams hac
played a great part. Mr, Adams
and Mr. Marryshow were pion-
eers in that movement and he
doubted if there was any West
Indian who had given more pro-
found and careful study to it than
Mr. Adams had done, At the con-
ference the only decisbon they
could come to was to send it to
a Committee, A proposed constitu-
tion was made which would not
have given the Federal. Govern-
ment as much power as Barba-
dos Executive Committee, as
Jamaica’s Executive Council, and
as far as he and his party were
concerned, when it was adopted
last week in the House of Rep-
redentatives, they repudiated it
entirely as an unsatisfactory in-
strument. A lot of water had
flown under the bridge since the
conference-—and he believed it was
in this very island that it was
concealed—and they were looking
forward to a conference in En-
gland by next year, and that by
then stronger minded people witi
more stomach for freedom would

have a’ chance of saying their
minds.

“Where Federation is con-
cerned,” he said, “It is better to

make haste slowly. It is such a
great step that it might be a mis-
fortune, might be a disaster, to
start on the wrong foot or before
we are quite ready.”

He said that the West Indies

could not fashion our constitu-
tion solely from copying from
places like America or England.

They had to fashion it to suit
their own needs.
His last point was the need

for fostering socialism.

Hon. T. A. Marryshow, the sec-
ond speaker to address the large
crowd, was like Mr, Manley
greeted with an uproarious
applause, and as he claimed asso-
ciation with Barbados, and re-
called how it was as a result of
his encouragement that the late
Mr, C. A. Brathwaite first sought
political honours, the crowd once
again cheered lustily.

He paid glowing tribute to the
Captain Cipriani’s, the Dr.
O'Neales, ‘and those people with
whom he was associated 25 or 30
years ago, and “who saw the light
in the far distant”, and lit the
torch which was now being held
by present day leaders, and ex-
horted West Indians to pay honour
to their memory.

He told of his fifty years of
fight for the working class peo-
ple, the raw and bitter road of
progress in the fight, and said
that if to-day West Indian Fed-
eration was long in coming, they
should not blame the British Gov-
ernment, but themselves.

He said that the problem of
the West Indies was how to get
the people and the leaders to-





a

BARB: BADOS Ss ADVE OCATE — ATE

NINE

when

Keith Corbin of C
up Victor Ludorum

honour

Cerbin gave
performance,

He w





He gave an excellent perform- Time: 1.92 4/5 sees re
V. Skeete’s record of 61 2/5 sec- «m). ara J. Best (Di
gether, and how to get the masses onds by 1 3/5 seconds. Time: 83 sees
“a9 . » , ar things Se 3 s firs i § , Record: R. Worrell
to respect _ own and Zz Set B was first with 73 point ae ee Mee ok aan hs
of that kind, : : > EV Ist L. Jones (A).
The fight for federation and THE EVENTS 3rd I. MeGeary (B)
i i TK 29:1/5 :
freedom is won, he said. But we fhe Results were as follows:— Recard: & wattow wT
are so chicken-hearted, our aims GIRLS’ BICYCLE RACE \) MILE



Ashby



are s hat we would not get Ist H (A), 2nd Jean Brath at J. Lowe (C). Ind M
ee low, soe selves waite ard Joan Brathwaite (A) wa P. W a c ”
up and seize them ourselves. vi 1 min. 48 secs Nine os arn at ‘Seneas
8 YDS. GIRLS CLASS IV Record: L, Jones 90 1/8 aa
Get Down To Job aren ope © hgand H. Chae) MW ¥DS GIRLS CLASS LV
He urged West Indian Leader ete: tee eae ® 2/5 ¢ we O nschoates oe
c 8 i : Record: D. Clarke, 9 2/5 secs rims: S8a/8 wees’ UReeate)
to stop all the talk about self- 00 YDS. GIRLS CLASS UI ecard: 64, Witiiawes Tl ois: pecs
government an qd Ministerial Jt Walker, 2nd F. Holder, aut Watso ) YDS. BOYS CLASS 1
GS ; Time: 18:1 secs (Record) Ist K. Corbin (B), 2nd D
Status, and get down to business. Record: L. Jones & BR. Clarke 13 set es " 4
, Sed A. Clarke (D)
He said, they could appeal to the Bes Bf YyDs Sie oneoee u ‘ Time: 25 secs
; * is > . st L. Jones (A), and J eGeary (B . ; Skeote 24 5
pride of the English people, or oA Xo Clarke GB) . Record: V. Skeete 23 4/5



@ On page 6 Time:








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the Modern High School
was held at Kensington Oval yesterday aiternoon.
meeting was well attended and at the conclusion,
prizes were presented by Mr.

of being Victrix Ludorum
fell to Lorna Jones of Class I
a good all-round

11 2/5 secs (Record)
















Justice Chenery.

lass I ended Recard: E. Barrow 18 se

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Time: 19 2/5
Record: R
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the

D

Uy

four events and finished the day Ist K. Corbin (Bi, and 4 » Clark
with 20 points to his credit. Miss ‘D) 9D Holder
Jones scored ten points after Ritora: c’ warper 10 1/5 secs
having clipped 3/5 of a second 1 YDS" BOYS CLASS 11
off the record for the 100 yards ist J C), Ind C. Clarke

12 seconds — which was held *41 ;
by Mi . ae Time: 03/5 secs. (Record)
»y Miss E. Barrow. Record: C. Harper and H. Chandler

. 11 sees

Not satisfied with her grand 0 YDS. BOYS CLASS
performance in the 100 yards, ist N. Greaves (B), god V. Sprint
Miss Jones returned to the field SH ee a Anton (ay

7 met 12 sees

to equal the record of 29 15 Record: J. Gittens 11 4/5 secs
seconds, alsc held by Miss E.
Barrow for the 220 yards. ‘ia te "0 ea ne ar acl

> . . . >. Stus (A), 2 4

Keith Corbin created new x Innis (D) 7 ween
records in the 440 yards and Time: 10 1/5 secs
High Jump fer Boys over 14. His Record: C. Colivmore 9 secs
jump of five feet four inches, W> BALP-MILE ROADSTER BRACE BOY
two inches better = than ist L.. Bayley (B), 2nd N. Greaves (A
Harper's record. rd M. Sealy (A)

}

Mulliy

tA










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PAGE FOUR

ed ADVOCAT

~ xe See Le ee BL

Printed by the Advocate Co., Ltd., Broad St. Bridsetewn



Tuesday, July 29, 1952.

TOURIST INDUSTRY

SIR ALEXANDER MAXWELL, chair-
man of the British Travel and Holidays
Association has been speaking words of
wisdom in London which might very well
be applied to Barbados.

Addressing the annual general meeting
of the Association this month he asked
“whether we deserved as many visitors as
we had and whether the Government had
a tourist policy.” “Plant and machinery”
he said “was needed in this as in any other
industry”.

We had to choose whether to stabilize
the industry at its present level or whether
to develop it in every way possible. If we
wanted to double our tourist earnings then
we must build and invest and do every-
thing possible to obtain the maximum
benefit from this great invisible export
trade.

Last year the United Kingdom earned
£73 million of foreign currency and there
had been 695,000 oversea visitors. Yet the
Chairman of the British Travel and Holi-
days Association could ask whether the
Government had a tourist policy.

In Barbados the government if it has a
tourist policy bases it on suspicion of the
motives of hotel keepers and distrust of
those who advocate the development of
the tourist industry as essential for the
maintenance of, Barbadian living stand-
ards. This criticism can only be applied to
the political side of the government: the
executive side of the government supports
the Barbados Publicity Committee which
obtains funds from a government grant
and from private subscriptions and dona-
tions,

Basically the political opposition to tour-
ism as an industry is based on the legacy of
the past when the hotels of Barbados
catered almost exclusively for guests of
one colour. To-day criticism of Barbadian
hotels on grounds of racial discrimination
could only be made by persons with little
knowledge of Barbadian hotels.

At the same time it is worth nothing that
in Nassau where racial discrimination is
practised in hotels some proprietors of
hotels run exclusively for persons of one
colour have themselves another pigmen-
tation.





In Barbados no such discrimination
exists to-day although it did exist in some
hotels up to quite recent years.
_The time is therefore ripe for the gov-
ernment of Barbados to recognise that
tourism as an industry deserves to be
treated as an industry and ought not to be
made a whipping-post for the diatribes of
a few individuals who cannot forget the
past.

Professor Beasley in A Fiscal Survey of
Barbados has shown clearly what little
hope can be placed on any economic de-
velopment of the island other than tourism.
If he errs in his analysis at all he errs on
the side of optimism. Barbados therefore
is forced with a very bleak future unless
oil is found in large quantities or unless
the tourist industry 1s considerably ex-
panded.

Even if the average yearly production of
sugar could be doubled, there will never be
any guarantee against hurricane, drought,
or cane diseases and unless world wars
occur with regular frequency the markets
for Barbadian sugar must always depend
on world supplies of sugar which are in-
creasing. Only an efficient and well-run
tourist industry can provide additional em-
ployment to an extent necessary for a popu-
lation which is not only increasing but
expecting higher living standards. Oppo-
sition to the tourist industry based on the
prejudices of the past is really opposition
to the interests of the young Barbadian
generation.

No other Caribbean territory is less
active to consider the economic value of
the tourist industry than Barbados. Haiti,
Cuba, Jamaica and Puerto Rico among the
“Greater Antilles, Trinidad, Tobago, Mar-
tinique, Antigua, Grenada, among the
lesser are advertising their attractions for
tourists and have given tourism the prior-

Our Readers

Sunday Observance

To The Editor, The Advocate— made _ laws

SIR.—Religious controversies
in the newspaper are not
always in the best interest but
there are times when some of

“Sunday”
bath”. It

and

the statements made should be Sabbath”.

examined, _ I shall not
I must confess to a great re- joining in any

spect for the opinions of “F.G.” I thought

and I have no desire to en-~

courage a desecration of the Yours, ow | that work jas progressing
Sabbath; but I think “F. G.’s CHURCHMAN. and enjoined his tearers to sup-
latest effusion is a waste of jp, ; port the Church not only with
time and space. If the Olym- isrespecting The Church their Bibles and Prayer Books

pic (Sames at Helsinki opened
on Sunday, there is nothing that
can be done in Barbados about
it. I @o not cavil at the space
he oecupied in your paper on
Friday but it might have been

SIR,— It
members of the

on Sunday night

a desire to keep Christ’s resur-
rection; and (c) that the man-
for
Sabbath holy always

is the Fourth Com.
mandment which speaks of “the

it worth while to
record these facts.

To The Editor, The Advocate—
would have
astonishing t6 most people to see

St. Mary’s walking out of service





BARBADOS ADVOCATE



ity it deserves in plans for economic de-
velopment. Barbados continues it is true
to attract tourists but in the words of Sir
Alexander Maxwell “We should ask our-
selves whether we deserved as many visit-
ors as we had” ought to be asked and
answered here by. everyone connected
with the tourist industry. Hotel waiters,
cooks, taxi-drivers, shop assistants, restau-
rants, clubs, hotels, street traders are only
some of the persons and institutions to de-
rive benefit from the influx of visitors to
Barbados.

Yet the tourist industry is not well or-
ganised here and sectional rivalries are
creeping in which may do as much damage
to the industry as the antagonism of those
who see nothing else in tourism but the
colour of someone’s skin, or an intrusion on
someone's privacy. If Barbados is to main-
tain the expensive social services which it
hopes to maintain and which it ought to
maintain and seek to improve, no one can
afford to sniff at tourism.

The expert investigators have explored
every avenue have looked into every cran-
ny and are forced back to the inevitable
conelusion that barring any potential re-
ceipts from oil, and except for the encour-
agement of tourism and investors’ capital
the people of Barbados are going to be
tao very shortly with serious problems
which cannot be solved by political
promises or even by increased productiv-
ity. The government of Barbados has got
to have a tourist policy and to have it soon
before Tobago, Antigua, Martinique and
Grenada become as well known and their
tourist facilities as developed as those of
Barbados.

Jamaica, Puerto Rico, Haiti and Cuba
have such a flying start that it would be
folly even to try to catch up with them
although urgent efforts must be made to
counteract the advertising which is luring
Venezuelans to fly to Jamaica instead of to
Barbados during the summer.



Sugar Funds

IT has been decided that Barbados is to
receive the sum of £196,000 ($941,282) pro-
ceeds from the resale of West Indian sugar
by Great Britain to Canada. It is import-
ant to decide at an early time what is to be
done with that money.

Within recent months there have been
many statements made as regards projects
wkich might be giver. priority when the
time comes for spending. First among
these will be the Deep Water Harbour and
it is significant that Professor Beasley in
his Survey of Barbados has been at pains
to point out that the million dollars spent
on subsidisation would pay the interest on
the fourteen millions needed to build the
Harbour, On the other hand it might be
argued that the sum of $941,000 could be
supplemented to raise the first million to
pay for the harbour.

There will be those who believe that in-
asmuch as the money has been derived
from the sale of sugar it should be kept for
use of those people who contribute to the
irdustry. This has already been done by
reeans of the Labour Welfare Fund allo-
cated specifically to housing for those peo-
ple in the sugar industry.

Since it was announced that the various
colonies would receive amounts of money
ia accordance to the amount of sugar pro-
duced Jamaica and British Guiana have
announced their amounts. The Barbados
amount has not yet been published and it
is. not known whether the Secretary of
State for the Colonies has indicated any
avenue in which this sum should be spent.

It is however to be realised that while
such expression of opinion should be re-
spected it is not binding on the local leg-
islature to accept it. For that reason it
weuld be well for the Legislature to dis-
cuss the matter in the light of suggestions
which will be made.

The extension of the Peasants’ Loan
Bank and the liberalising of its policy to
cater to renters of land will mean that the
capital of the Bank should be increased.
It started sixteen years ago with ten
thousand pounds and when it was neces-
sary to increase that amount legislation
provided that the amounts needed should
be drawn from the Public Treasury. That
is not good enough. In a recent debate in
the Legislative Council the Colonial Sec-
retary pointed out that the amount needed
for the Bank was $150,000, This amount
could easily be taken from. the amount to
be received now and the $790,000 set aside
for paying the interest and sinking fund on
the first loan for the Deep Water Harbour.
In this way the claims of the agriculturalist
would have been satisfied and the interest
of the sugar industry buttressed. If there
is no bulk shipment of sugar such as can
be done in a deep Water Harbour, the
sugar industry is likely to suffer very
greatly.

nna nasa

well remembers the case of the
late Rev. Durant another Barba-
dian who had lived in the United
States at the St. Michael's Cathe-

Say :
2
dral.
greeting which Mr.
keeping the
refer to
not “the Sab-
years, he has a_ pulpit

ing.
be replying or
controversy but

been the address was

congregation at then

while the Rev, ‘ mi Yee os

In this case the message and
Harewood
brought was no less interesting.
He is a fine speaker with a good
delivery and even at his age, 82
manner
which is to say the least engag-

He spoke of the work which
Barbadians had been doing in the
Church in the United States and

and Hymn Books but with their
“Pocket Books”. Up to this point
interesting but
the Reverend Gentleman
took his text from Ezekiel Chap-
“Son of man, arise



HOME COSTS AND
EXPORT PRICES

; LONDON. In one sector of her trade last for British products in 1951 we
Serious competition has now re- year Britain certainly did weil: exported to her about £13 million
turned to foreign markets for

she had a big surplus with other of machinery. With the better
sterling area countries, as she delivery dates which can now be
usually does, though it was only Offered this figure should be much

most kinds of manufactures pac-
ticularly consumer goods, says the



Bulletin for Industry. Price con- a small fraction above the 1950 higher in 1952,

siderations are therefore once level. But this surplus was no- In 1951, the United States ex-
again of great importance in the ‘where near sufficient to offset the Ported to Latin America eight
United Kingdom's export trade. deficit with the non-sterling world, “#™¢5,48 much as did the United

* Kingdom,

which was over three times as In 1951, German ex-

i ports to Latin America were well
rt oe it is here that the over twice the value they were
rouble Hes. in 1950; and since 1947 West Ger-
The normal pattern of tradé man earnings in Latin America
(visible and invisible) for the have risen from a mere £100,000
United Kingdom, both before the to £130 million, What is it that
war and since, has been a sur- the United States and Germany
plus with the rest of the sterling can manufacture and sell in those
’ ! area and a deficit with the non- markets which we cannot?
igh export prices recently and sterling world. And when this 3. This country is on the verge
what are the factors now at work U.K. deficit is counter-balanced Of having to settle the whole of
which will determine their future py the rest of the sterling area’s its deficit with the E n
level? : turplus with the non-sterling Payments Union in gold. (As a
By March 1952 British ex sworld, then the whole of the Country gets deeper into deficit
prices for metals and engineering’ sterling area’s account with the With the Union, a larger sereee
products together were jUst uN- outside world balances. But, tion of the deficit is paid in gold
der 30 per cent higher than in the first place, our non-sterling and a smaller proportion allowed
September 1949 (the time of de- deficit in 1951 was £521 million jy a We have used up near-
valuation). The average price of jarger y all our credit.) That means

¢ I than our sterling surplus. that fo
all United Kingdom experts rose Jn the second place, the rest of eee Ria’ outs te _rw

by about 35 per cent in this period, the sterling area, instead of hav- sion are wort
but for textiles and clothing the jng a counter-balancing surplus value in ps Oe t he’ seen.
rise was more than 40 per cent. jn the second half of 1951, was therefore, any currency of any
This is some 8 per cent below the jtself in deficit with the non- E.P.U. country is hard; and, be-
peak reached last September, but sterling world. cause of the Payments Union, ex-
it means that textile prices. have. To rebuild the reserves the ster- ports to one country in the Union
risen so high as to offset the v hole jing area must not only get into are just as good as exports to any
effect cf devaluation: their dol- palance, but must have a sur- other. From Iceland to Turkey,
lar price in March was the same plus, with the rest of the world. all exports are potential gold-
{as in the summer of 1949. The So the United Kingdom’s aim is ©@rners. There cannot be many
risa in export prices of other con= not merely to reduce her deficit products manufactured in this
| sumer goods, particularly paper \yith the non-sterling world it is country for which there is not a
and rubber manufactures was {, gliminate it altogether in the Market somewhere in this huge
also much greater than for engin- second half of 1952 (with the help “"°*
eering goods. of Defence Aid). Since the deficit
Calculations made by the Eco- jn the second half of 1951
Inomic Commission for Europe ¢¢90 million, this calls
es that the average increase iN mighty effort.

Even in the casé of what are gen-
erally termed capital goods, where
world demand is still very heavy,
keen prices may oftea be neces-
sary if export earnings are to be
increased, particularly when for-
eign firms can offer shorter de-
livery dates and longer credit.
What has been happening to Brit-





Production last year in the en-
wes gineering, shipbuilding and elec-
for a trical goods industries was 7 per

cent higher than in 1950. The rate
Coe of increase, however, fell from
Only the Beginning 11 per cent in the first four
Closing the gap, moreover, will months to 4 per cent in the last
other countries. The comparison be only the beginning. There must four. In January and February
was much less favourable, how- follow years of surpluses, enabling of this year output was still ris-

British expert prices, between
devaluation and the third quar-
ter of 1951, was less than in most

ever, for textiles than for metals the reserves to be rebuilt to a ing, and increase over a year
and other manufactured goods. point where they are not threat- oe vee per o The pa
ened with extinction by every ing factor 1s e supply ©
= The rrice Prospect major fluctuation, And we cannot Steel. . Fé
Future prices of British exports, fo. Jong be content with the pres- In the building and contracting
as of gooas for the home market, .nt reduced level of imports: we industry, production was_ higher
depena largely on present move- shall need more raw materials to in the first quarter of 1952 than
ments in cost of production: ex- expand production; and we must in the corresponding period of
ternal (that is import costs) and») i)q up our stocks again.

1951, but was not so high as in
ee labou" “So exports to non-sterling mar-
costs).

(particularly sie ee alone was the
kets must rise considerably; and wae ET ening Banat
con-sberting dbcste ovencacen asa _ result of bad
of the Korean war, that set off the have been lagging behind. By Ware arcane ast ss

ot manufactured volume it is doubtful whether building. The three months stand.
goods in 1951. The wholesale prices they were any higher at all in still (from December 1951 to

ee for basic materials (whieh 1951 than in 1950, All the extra February 1952) on the granting

It was the steep increase in as rapidly as possible.
import costs, after the outbreak Recently,

rise in prices

reflects the cost to British indus- g00ds exported last year went to of permission to start new

try of commodities obtained main- the sterling area. By value they with the main ees a
fly from abroad) rose by 75 per increased far less in 1951 than in housing and some defence proj-
;cent from June 1950 to its peak in 1950; dollar exports went up only ects, was ordered to try to ease
March 1951. By March this year, 16 toma ce ne per cent this overload, Some building work
however, it had fallen about two- re anaes s to O. a coun- js still being delayed by short-
thirds of the way back, the down- ‘Tes and possessions went up only ages of steel, especially of rein.

; 13 per cent inst p ‘ :
ward movement of prices last What nea Ma tate cat toscing steel.

. - —
summer having been renewed 1M Recent trends for three types of | In manufacturing and in build-
January. . - exports to non-sterling markets ing, therefore, steel shortage is
Prices of wool, hides and skins, are shown in a chart on this page. still hindering production. And
cotton and rubber are the main The general implication is that from behind the shortage of steel
ones which have been falling iâ„¢ the chances are better for capital is beginning to emerge another
recent months: the first two are than for consumer goods. Hence difficulty : coke supplies to enable
now substantially below their pre- this year’s cuts in home invest- more pig iron to be made from
Korean levels. Prices of copper ment in plant and machinery, for increased supplies of iron ore,
and other non-ferrous. metals the sake of exports. But it does both from home sources and from
(except tin), though still high not follow—quite the contrary— abroad, in replacement of dwind-
relative to June 1950, have been that no manufacturer of consumer ling scrap imports.

fairly stable since the third goods need bother about non- Crude steel output in the first
quarter of 1951. Even after allow- sterling markets. After all, most two months was 4 per cent below
ing time for changes in raw of our exports to the United last year. March (not affected by

Pe by States are consumer goods, The Easter as it was in 1951) showed
material costs to work through tO Moct unlikely sounding products an increase, and in the fest quar-
the price of the finished goods, it 4, . f 7 ; 7
{ : ; can often be sold in the most diffi- ter production was at an annual
\is unlikely that they will lead oyjt markets. Orchids grown in rate of just under. 16 million ton
any general increase in export this country are flown to America, compared with 16.4 million in the
prices in the next few months. and polyps dredged up from the first quarter of 1951 and 16.6 mil-
They might even make some price Thames Estuary end by gracing lion in the first quarter of 1950.
reductions possible. New York hats. It is hoped that a progressive
The vicissitudes of world raw The Limits Of Government improvement throughout the year
material costs, however, also affect Action will raise production above the
export prices of many other coun- ~he Government can indicate 1951 figure of 15.6 million, But
tries, Whether or not United King- what is needed: more non-sterling there will have to be a large in-
dom export prices are competi- exports. It can do its best to Crease in pig iron production to
tive depends therefore to a large remove obstacles and provide offset the decline in scrap sup-
exterit on home costs of produc- facilities, But it cannot, itsett, Pies, This depends in turn on a
tion and on profit margins. Here take the initiative: that depends. pro tne increase in iron ore
the outlook is far from clear. on manufacturers realising how sop jhard ogee) supplies. Prospects
The Cost of Labour grave and dangerous the situation ieee a on iron ore have
Since the end of 1950 there has 18 and adapting and pushing their ple for blast faradeas ay hold
been a steady upward movement S¢lling policies accordingly. back pig iron ducti rer
: a PeaNied tae “All concerned in the export “ Pe Coe MOns
in labour costs as the rise in retail jnauctry”. th * tse The blast furnaces need more
prices of some manufactured POUSTY + Une President of the hard coke to make more pig i
oer Tee Board of Trade has said, “should Vidi on, Sadao
goods (begun by the rise in im- jecognise that it is the firm i Three new blast furnaces are
port costs) led to successful claims tention of the Government ts ohak being blown in and if there is
for higher wages which outstrip- to make everything possible avail- enpyah core ley sheaed. Provide
ped any increase in productivity. able to them and to make selling another 200,008 Was oF pig ion &
The chart shows the divergent for export a more attractive pot nd The steel industry is the
movements of earnings and out- proposition than selling for the we pcs user of hard coke, supply-
put per man in manufacturing in home market”. Advice can be had fren’ net eye et aes
1951, in contrast to the position direct from the Board, from the anq tae Secs a athe The rest,
in 1948 to 1950 when they kept long-established national trade (the ona Oe GINTaN: Gen hee
i r organisations ‘ gest of which are foun-
fairly well in step. rganisations, and for dollar mar- dries), are met from the Nati
Increases in labour costs and kets from the Dollar Exports Coal Board’s ovens Shh dolce ee
import prices in 1951 were also Council, The Exports Credits dependent ovens. Although ake
the main eause of the recent rise Guarantee Department offers production has been inbreusing
in prices of transport and of Cover against many risks beyond and further increases are expects
home-produced _ materials: iron the control of the exporter iid Gd: the total currant mined
: ; â„¢ : has for the benefit of the dollar not i pies ape
and steel, cement and fuel. In in- ; not sufficient to mee
exporter worked out a wid i t in full the
dustry generally, however, from e range requirements both of the steel

November to March the index of yg ete Nr te Aaa 49 industry and of other essential
weekly wage+rates rose by less ing, advertising and sales promo- ber yee or tak entonaed

than % per cent a month, co A
; tion, ‘ oa with the United States steel im-

pared with the 1 per cent a month
average from September, 1950, 10 Phere are three pointers to non- ports are_expected to be over a

November, 1951. Between Febru-) sterling sales:—- million tons higher (in ingot
ary and March the index remain#®}. Canada Mi tdlaas suivichter equivalent) than last year. The

full benefit will however not be

felt until after 1952 because a

substantial proportion of these

supplies has to be further process-

ed in the U.K. At the end of the

first quarter only about 172,000
@ On Page 5

ed unchanged. fi capital goods in the world an
We shall need to look anxi ng 1950 hae total new avagtinent
to our export prospects; for” #Fin plant and equipment was about
er labour costs in industry would £730 million—and year by year
give a new and dangerous upward the total grows. There is plenty
thrust to export prices. of room in this vast expenditure



that he had to overstep the time
for his sermon. When it was 8.30,
young people with nothing more
important than to reach a theatre
or some trysting place could be
seen walking out when Evensong
was not yet finished. Others fol-
lowed until it looked that the
support which should have come
from their “pocket books” or
purses would he lost to St. Mary's,

In this same church where Pee
form and ceremony take prece Flushing Gutters
dence to many other things and

where genuflecting has become a To:The Editor, The Advocate—

fine art and part of a hybrid” SjTR—Some weeks ago your people ave Haeaaad a oot ia
ritual it was distressing to-see Evening Advocate called atten- others who have on one we is
people treat the Church in so off tion continuously to the annoying to get to their jobs b: Se. * .
hand a manner and the visiting conditions created by the Scaven- There are very ew 1 h
preacher with such scant cour- ging Cart flushing gutters in do not now feel that Esere te .
tesy. It may be that those who Baxters Road early in the day. attitude on the part of th ms
so offended were not members of The condition of things abated who werk with the cart ‘aadoties
the St. Mary’s congregation and but now it seems to have returned to cause inconvenience. f mon
bad only been attracted by the with even greater inconvenience be realised that the tter oA
voice of the Preacher. than before. be flushed but surely the cae oe
ing the work could have a little

the priests to accommodate the
cinema goer by preaching short
sermons and finishing Evensong
before 8.30 so that members of
the congregation, who desire to
do $0 can get to the show in tinve.
_ We need a strong and convinc-
ing call back to the paths of
rectitude and respect for moral
and spiritual enlightenment.
Yours

road. But the method of leavin
the shaft jutting out on one wide
while the hose ran across the
other prevented any passage for
some time.

A few protests by drivers and
pedestrians made them put the
cart in line with the gutter and so
there was some relief as ’buses
were not passing always. Now
they have returned to the old
practice of blocking the road,

What makes matters worse is
that the time for flushing these
gutters is the peak hour of traffic,

It is regrettable but neverthe-

i i a al I will speak °o fr, as It used to be the practice cf 33 ;
beter ee oe advocating a mesewods pe Rt Philip’s ae center aaaaaee a ee less re that our people need the men operating li rahe to dee more consideration for the travel-
: ause, piscopa Mhurch, Philadelphia; ee 5: much more discipline of mind. the vehicle diagonally acr ‘ ing public,
Let me however draw was preachi ’ ted the congregation to progress Their ¢ "Peis e diagonally across the
L Ss preaching. a ae ; Their conduct on Sunday eve g ros é » . ne ac
F. Gs attention to these facts: = morally spiritually and educa- would lead aes Sine cone roa m6 aun bn the ; attached On the other hand it is up to
(a) that the original Christian In years past when things tionally, to see to it that their cjusion that this is, even if not an cart had bee “all wed 4a If nine the Sanitary Commissioners to
Sabbath was Saturday and not religious were of greater value it children were educated and sO anti-Christian community, arallel rith aowed to remain point out to them that while they
Sunday; (b) that the setting was good to see large and ap- fitted for the tasks ahead. 1 \netisen coe Phat aay tees ee gutter there are doing public service they
apart of Sunday as a day of preciative congregations flocking Having given an account of the certainly is not true of Barbados vehicles at le SS ca ae ee should not cause inconvenience
worship was because there was to hear visiting preachers. One work in America it was obvious but it has become the fashion of ones to is ; pa see is smaller unnecessarily,
t C pass 1 one side of the MOTORIST.
‘ {



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Butcher Condemned to Die in 1-Day

@ From Page 1

Without answering, the accused
got up from over the woman and
slashed his throat on the left
side with the knife which he
had. ;

Assisted by another man, the
witness took away the knife from
the defendant and a few minutes
later a constable arrived on the
scene. The Police also arrived
shortly afterwards and both the
accused and the deceased were
put in a van and taken away.

To Mr. Smith: ‘I only saw the
accused that evening. The ac-
cused worked as a butcher in the

market. I cannot say if the
accused is a ‘hard’ drinker.
Sometimes in the market the

accused did a lot of funny things,
He would go into anybody’s stall,
take up their meat and if asked
for it, he would challenge them
to fight. People in the market
would make no trouble because
he was thought to be half-mad.

His actions tend to show that
he was not in a sound state of
mind.

Dr. A. S. Cato who performed
the post mortem examination
described the multiple injuries
which included a deep incised
five inch wound in the lower
part of the middle area of the
back extending down to the bone,

The left lung was cut over an
area one inch long in the lower
lcbe. In the abdomen there was
a deep 5 inch incised wound.

Death, he said, was due in his
opinion to shock and haemorr-
hage from the multiple injuries.

The wounds’ were inflicted
with a sharp instrument such as
a knife.

Cuthbert Archer of New Or-
leans, St. Michael said that on
20th, February he was standing
at the junction of Passage Road.
and Westbury Road. He heard
shouts of murder and when he
looked around he saw the accused
striking the deceased, He related
in detail the same story told by
Joseph Arthur,

Clyde Skeete, mason of Hunte
Street, Bridgetown, was next to
give evidence. Like the two other
witnesses he was standing on the
Westbury-Passage Road junction.

The deceased came up Baxters
Road and turned into Westbury
Road.

The accused stepped out of a
nearby shop, crossed the road
and said ‘I told you when you
go out don’t stay so late’ The
deceased made some inaudible
reply and the accused held her
by the hand, pulled her a few
feet from where he had stopped
her and started to beat her.

The deceased fell, Witness
said ‘You could wait until you
go home and beat the woman.’
And then she said ‘Oh Lord, you
are going to let him kill me?’

Two men ran to her and the
accused said, ‘let me go, let me
kill her.

He went down on her and gave
the woman a stab while she was
on the ground. It was only
after she calleq for help that
per realised he was stabbing

er.

The accused got up and cut
his own throat and then dragged
to a spot near where the woman
lay and said ‘let me die with my
boots on’,

. An island constable took the
knife from him.

The witness at this point cor-
roborated the story about the
arrival of the van and its subse-
quent departure for the hospital
with the deceaseq and _ the
accused.

To Mr. Smith: I saw the ac-
cused give only one stab when
on the ground. I do not re-
member saying that 3 men held
the accused.

Lionel Wilkinson, Warehouse
porter of Hunte Street told of
having arrived on the scene and
seeing the deceased woman bleed-
ing a great deal.

He took away the knife from
the accused who had cut his own
throat, and shortly ‘after the
police waggon arrived and took
the two people to the hospital.

He did not hear the accused
say anything after he, witness,
had arrived on the scene, nor in
the van, nor in the hospital where
he witness, accompanied the two
injured parties, ‘

Joseph Downes, an island Con-
stable, said on the 20th February
he was at the corner of King
Street, near Baxters’ Road. He
heard a woman's voice shouting
for ‘murder’, He went to the

scene and there saw a woman
lying on the ground bleeding, He
also saw a man holding the ac-
cused who was bleeding from his
throat.
and when the Police came,

He arrested the accused
the





woman and the man were taken
to the General Hospital.

About a half hour before the
incident the accused and the de-
ceased passed him on Baxter's
road. The accused appeared to be
speaking to the deceased, but she
did not seem to reply. On both
occasions, the accused was dressed
the same way.

Cpl. Ralph Williams corroborat-
ed the latter part of the story al-
ready told by previous witnesses.

Set. Louis Marshall told of his
arrival on the scene and described
the condition of the woman and
the accused whom he had removed
by van to the General Hospital.

On. the 4th March he arrested
the accused and charged him witn
the murder of Clarke. On being
cautioned the accused said, ‘I
would not say anything.’ 7

The Crown tendered Clarice
Bennett and Judah Ramsay for
cross-examination, Ramsay told of
an instance when the accused at-
tacked him with a knife because
he, witness, rescued one of the
children of the accused whom the
latter had turned out from home.

Daisy Scantlebury was also
also tendered for cross-examina-
tion, and at 12.50 o'clock the
Crown closed its case against the
accused. The adjournment was
taken at this point.

Mother Gives Evidence

ADA SMALL 74, of Fairfield
Road, Grazettes, and mother of
the defendant, was the first wit-
ness to give evidence on behalf
of the defence,

The accused and she got on
very well until he was scalded,
and struck on the head. From
then he beat her and dragged her
off the bed. He did not seem hin.-
self after that incident,

He was a very nice child before
the scalding incident,

She has eight children, Of them,
a boy and girl are at the Menta!
Hospital, They used to beat her
and tear up her clothes,

The accused’s father’s brother
appeared to be unsound in mind.
The accused’s father has a sister
who went to the Mental Hospital,

The accused used to lick up
and break up anything he put his
hands on. Her other two children
who are at the Mental Hospital
Just took suddenly ill,

To Mr. Field: The accused was
scalded and beaten on the same
day. She saw her son—the ac-
cused—at her house this year,
and because he used to beat her,
she left home. She had doubts
that he would harm her,

Selvin Campb.ll, 20, butcher of
Peterkin Land, said he knew
Small who used to slaughter for
his, (witness’) brother,

Drank Rum

There were umes when &mall
drank rum and behaved badly.
He went to fight others who used
to try their utmost to evade him,

On the day of the 20th, some
butchers were playing cards in
the market. Small was there, but
although he did. not behave badly,
he appeared to have something on
his mind, and was shaking his
head as if worried.

Simeon Forde, 26, butcher of
Deacon’s Road said he knew the
accused for about two or three
years. He met him as a butcher
in the market where they worked
side by side slaughtering animals.

The defendant and he got on
very well, except that at times he
appeared not to be in his proper
senses, He used to take up other
people’s things and walk off with
them.

This closed the case for the de-
fence, and the Crown called no
witness in rebuttal.

Mr. Smith then addressed the
jury and said that from the prose-
cution’s evidence, it would appear
to be a cold-blooded murder.

They should however discard
from their minds anything which
they might have heard since the
incident.

He told them that he would sub-
mit that the accused at the time of
the incident was suffering from
a defective mind, and that they
should return a verdict of “not
guilty”, on grounds of insanity.

Accused Demeanour

The demeanour of the accused as
seen in the dock had nothing to
do with the murder, they were
concerned with trying to come to
a conclusion that at the time the
defendant was suffering from a
defect of reasoning.

In a defence of insanity, the

Pt

10,

a) FABRICS

REDUCED AT
| BIG SAVINGS!

Plain (
from $1.63 to $1.44, Green,
Blue; Turq.

Green,
$1.02 per yd.
Moss Crepe -
Grey,
Cerise & Peacock-Blue,

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



burden of proof on the part of the
defence was not as high as the
burden of proof on the part of the
prosecution in proving their case.

He was not trying to establish
that the accused did not kill the
woman, but that on the particular
day, and it was supported by the
evidence fcr the prosecution,
something was wrong with the
accused, or that something was
resting on his mind, What was
more, even the people with whom
he worked, tried to avoid him,
saying, “don't mind you, you are
half-a-madman,”

The fact that the accused had
killed the woman did not mean
that he was the criminal type,
but he was submitting that at the
time of the fatality, something
had gone wreng with the accused
—something which only provi-
dence could tell, and which he was
suggesting was a mental “black

out.”
Defect of Reason

He asked the jury to say that
the accused was at the time suf-
fering from such a defect 90
reason or disease of mind as not
to know the nature or quality of
the acts or to know that what he
was doing was wrong.

He ccunselled the jury to
search their minds carefully, be-
cause on their verdict which he
knew would be in keeping witn
the high tradition of the jury sys-
tem in this country, and because
too, he knew that by their ver-
dict his client, whether condemned
or acquitted, would have the sat-
isfaction and the consolation of
knowing that 12 “honest men and
true” passed their verdict, be-
cause they were convinced either
of his guilt or innocence.

Replying, Mr, Field, the Crown
prosecutor argued that the fact
that other relatives of the ac-
cused were patients of the Men-
tal Hospital did not prove heredi-
tary mental illness,

He agreed that the burden of
proof on the defence to prove in-
sanity was not so on@€rous as the
burden of proof which lay on the
prosecution, but submitted that
none the less, the defence had to
produce evidence of the “proba-
bility” of his being mentally de-
ranged,

Must be Satisfied

The jury had to be satisfied
that on the 20th February the ac-
cused did not know right from
wrong when he was administer-
ing the blows on a woman who
was formerly his reputed wife, but
who no longer was.

It was the duty of the defence
to prove that he was insane, be-
cause every man is thought to be
sane until he was proven insane.

It was not the duty of the
Crown to produce evidence to
prove his condition of mind.

Dealing with the evidence of
the defence witness, the Crown
Prosecutor said that the behaviour
of the accused when he drank,
only went to show that he was

of a violent temper when he did

drink.

The verdict which they would
arrive at was either “guilty” or
“not guilty on ground of insanity”.
It was for them to say that at the
time of the incident, he was or
was not suffering from a defect
of reasoning.

C.J. Sums Up

His Lordship summed up for
half an hour, and pointed out that
the question for the jury was
whether on the particular day
and at the particular time of the
offence, the accused was suffering
from a mental aberration which
would cause him not to know that
what he was doing was wrong or
to know the nature or quality of
his acts.

There were therefore two ver-
dicts open to them, as admitted by
koth Counsel for the defence and
Counsel for the Crown, there be-
ing “guilty of murder” or “net
guilty of murder on grounds of
insanity.”

His Lordship dealt briefly with
the submissions made by Coun-
sel, and after half an hour, in-
structed the jury to retire and
consider their verdict.

The jury deliberated for 25
minutes, and returning to the
Court, the foreman, announced a
verdict of guilty against the ac-
cused,

The Court rose as His Lord-
ship pronounced the sentence of
death, after which the Court was
adjourned until this morning at
10 o’clock.

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Pyjama Stripes —
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$1.30 per yd.
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ll, 12 & 13 Broad Street





Manley Introduced
To Local Bar

@ From Page |
fession which gave a great num.
ber of its members to perform
those civic duties. Mr. Manley
was no exception. He had for a
great number of years taken part
in the political life of his colony
and assisted his fellow citizens in
that way. He had served on a
great number of Boards in
Jamaica and also was the founder
of the co-operative concern
originally known as Jamaica Wel-
fare Ltd. It was placed on a basis
which the Colonial Development
and Welfare had since recom-
mended to other parts of the
British West Indies,
U.S. Agreement

In 1937 he went to the United
States and negotiated a special
export agreement, the main pro-
visions of which helped sub-
stantially with their minor in-
dustries,

“He has been prepared to risk
losing the remuneration of a suc-
cessful practice by taking up
these duties on behalf of his fellow
citizens,”

He said that apart from his
other qualifications, Mr. Manley
had been an outstanding athlete.

“It amazes me My Lord, to
know that in 1914 he put up a
school record of 10 seconds for the
100 yards, which to this day has
not been beaten, though equalled
in 1942 by no less a person than
Manley, Junior.”

He had also understood that
Mr. Manley had made his mark
in boxing, and in recent years
had been a judge in local boxing
bouts. He was also. mainly
responsible for sending an
Olympic team to the Olympic
Games in England in 1944.

In admitting Mr, Manley to
practise, His Lordship said that
in the history of this island,
seldom if ever, so far as I am
aware, has a man with his distine-
tion and eminence in the pro-
fession been introduced to the
Bar of this island. Generally
those admitted to practise were
newcomers, so that, apart from
everything else, it was an ex-
ceptional and unique occasion. So
he was giving him a hearty and
sincere welcome to the Bar of
Barbados.

“Caribbean Bar”

“It well may be that in the not
far distant future there will be
one Bar for the whole of the
British Caribbean area,” he said.
“and that Seniority in one
territory or area, will be
recognised as seniority in another,
and indeed in all the others witin
certain safeguards that may have
to be, but I mention this because
I see you sit where you are in
spite of your wonderful career
otherwise.”

He said that he had heard then
for the first time of the extent
of his athletic achievements of
which he had known something
beforehand, but not of such a
remarkable one as he had jusi
heard, ‘

After admitting him to audience
in the Court of the island, His
Lordship said that there was one
feature common to both of them,
a feature for which neither of
them were responsible, and that
was that they were both born in
1893,

After expressing a sense of
obligation to His lordship for his
kind and generous welcome, he
said he was particularly obliged
to His Learned Friend the At-
torney General, not only for the
very kind words in which he had
moved his admission, but also
because he understood that he
had interrupted his holiday to do
that on his behalf. That he
would assure him, was a good ex-
ample of professional kindness
and courtesy.

Barbados Courtesy

He remarked at the circum-
stances that in Barbados no fee
was charged for introduction, and
said that in Jamaica it would have
cost him or His Learned Friend,
£25. That was another uf the evi-
dences of the preservation of cour-
tesy and customs for which Barba-





Assize Diary

ASSIZE DIARY
Reg. \vs, Eunice New-
ton

No, 6.



DIAL 2352

§


VACATION

HARRISONS
|



°
Officers Elected
rr . Toet
At Workers’ Union
Conference
The following Officers were
elected at the Annual Delegates
Confererice of the Barbados
Workers’ Union at their Fairchild
Street headquarters yesterday :—
President: Mr. G. H. Adams,
General Secretary: Mr. F. L
Walcott, Treasurer: Mr. Archie
King: other members of the Coun-
cil: Messrs. J. Cabral, G. Hep-
burn, R. Clarke, E, Walcott, W.
Blunt, D. Farrell, F. N. Layne, D,

D, Holder, H. C. Rock and Erro!
Jones.



COMMITTEE GIVES
ADVICE ON “‘AVALON’S”
FURNITURE

The Advisory Committee of
the Barbados General Hospital
at their meeting yesterday recom-
mended that certain furniture
should be purchased for the three
bedroom flat at “Avalon” the
newly sequired premises for
members of the hospital staff.

The Committee decided that
the overhauling of the electrical
installations of the Hospital as
recommended by the Acting
Electrical Inspector be proceeded
with urgently,

The Committee also discussed
proposals for relieving the pres-
ent overcrowding at the Hospital.

Members present were:— Dr
H. G. Cummins, M.C.P. (Chair-

man), Mrs, J. A. Martineau, Mr.
R. B. Skeete, Mr. R. M.-Cave
and Dr. D, S. Gideon, Medical

Superintendent.

M.HLS. SPORTS

@ From Page 3
â„¢) YDS. BOYS chass m
Ist J. Gittens (C), 2nd C. Clarke (D),
Srd D. Skeete (B)
Time: 25 4/5 secs
Record: H. Chandler 24 secs
0 YDS BOYS CLASS UI
Ist N. Greaves (B), 2nd C. Linton (8),
3rd E. Clarke (C)
Time: 294/5 secs
Record: J. Gittens 26 secs
1M YDS BOYS CLASS IV
Ist E. Stuart (A), and L. Griffith (D),
K. Inniss (D).
Time: 21 1/5 secs
Record: C. Collymore 193/5 secs
HIGH JUMP GIRLS UNDER 14

Ist N. Greaves (C), 2nd L.. Ashby (A),
wd P. Watson (C).

Height: 4 ft 6 ins. (Record)

Record: J, Laurence 4 ft 2 ins

HIGH JUMP BOYS UNDER 14
ist A. Estwick (B), and L. Clarke (A),
3rd V. Springer (C)
Height: 4 ft 8 ins (Record)
Record: J. Gittens 4 ft @ Ine
HIGH JUMP GIRLS OVER 14
Ist O. St. John (D), 2nd K. Clarke
(B). 3rd J. Trotman ¢D)
Height: 4 ft 5 ins
Record: J. Sandiford 4 ft 6 ins
HIGH JUMP BOYS OVER 14
ist K. Corbin (B), 2nd A. Clarke (D),
ord Ry, Gibbs (A),

Height: 5 ft, 4 ins. (Record)
Record: C. Harper 5 ft. 2 ins
(INTERVAL, 4—4 380)

SET RELAY RACE GIRLS
Ist B, 2nd O, 3rd D
Time: 1.03/5 secs

SET RELAY RACE BOYS
Ist C, 2nd B, 3rd A,

Time: 51 secs
80 YDS FLAT
Ist R. Gibbs, Ind D. Skeete

40 YDS BOYS UNDER M4
Ist V. Springer (CC), 2nd N. Greaves
(B). 3rd C. Linton (By)
Time: 1 min, 5 2/6 secs,
Record: V. Skeete 1 min & sees,
40 YDS BOYS OVER 14
Ist K. Corbin (B), 2nd D. Skeete (B),
3rd J. Gittens (C)
LITTLE VISITORS
(HANDICAP)
Ist E. Griffith,
LITTLE GIANTS
(HANDICAP)
Ist J. Gibbs (B).
OLD GIRLS RACE #0 YDS
Ist Miss Blackman
OLD BOYS RACE 1 YDS
Ist V. Skeete

RACE

RACE

lawr Tennis t

R.B.Y.C. TOURNAMENT

Men's Doubles final: L. St. Hill
and J, D. Trimmingham beat P.
Paterson and G. H. Manning 6—1,
8—6, 6—2.

At the conclusion of this match
prizes were presented to the
various winners,

dos among all the West Indies was
so renowned

He was particularly proud to
be admitted to the Bar of an
island like Barbados with unique
distinctions, Among the things
for which Barbados could be
proud was the fact that the Bar.
badian Bar had been able to pro-
duce its own Chief Justices whu
had sat generation after genera-
tion. He looked forward to the
time when indeed there would be
one Bar for the whole of the
West Indies, guided by the tradi-
tion of Barbados.



See our

Ladies

From

BEGINS WITH
A SPLASH!

CHILDREN’S BATHSUITS

Flowered Cotton
From $2.65 to $7.50

WOOLLEN

Toddlers’ to Girls’ Sizes

Indians Need
206 Runs To
Beat Surrey

‘(From Our Own Correspondent)
LONDON, July 28.

A splendid century by actiag
Surrey skipper Peter May en-
abled Surrey to recover against
the Indians at the Oval today.
May hit 143, his seventh century
of the season and as a result Sur-
rey at their second attempt totall-
ed 819, leaving the tourists 212
to win, And they made a bad start
losing ene wicket for 6 in the final
20 minutes,

Apart trom
batsmen made centuries
Derbysnire’s Hamer
way with 165
first class cricket,

Haro.d Gimblett, Somerset
batsman celebrated his benetit
match by making a century olf
the Nerthants atuack at Glaston-
bury.

SCUREBOARD —
Surrey versus Indians

WEE, Wives ve3's 71 and
Ghulam Ahmed four for 5v.
dians 179 and 6 for 1,

Lancs versus Gloucester

Gloucester 266 and 11 for 1.
Lanes 402 for 8 declared,
Grieves 118.

Middlesex versus Yorkshire

May, four other
to-day,
leading me

his highest in

319.
in-

Middlesex 250 and 2 for
no wicket.
Yorks .. 354, Close 87 not out.

Somerset versus Northants
Somerset .. 109 and 206 for 3.
Gimblett 104,



Northants hae pags eR
Hants versus Warwick

Warwick 185 and 154 for 4

WOR Vs. vert visweate ti: 184,

Sussex versus Kent
Kent 302 and 160 for 9.
WM eis caci tale ee
Wright 5 for 64,
Leicester versus Worcester
Leicester 364 for 8 declared
and 3 for 1,
Wercester
Bird 98,
Derby versus Notts
Notts . . 338 and 18 for 1,
Derby , . 529 for 7 declared,
Hamer 165, Carr 116.
Glamorgan versus Essex
Glamorgen 353 for 6 declared.
Parkheuse 99 not out.
Essex :

355,

. 827 for 8



Home Costs And

Export Prices

@ From Page 4

tons of steel, pig iron and scrap
for the U.K. had been delivered
«at works in the U.S. or other
sources of supply. Of this, 85,000
tons had reached the U.K,

tee . The situation arising
from the steel strike in America
is very uncertain,” said the Min-
ister of Supply on Ist May, "How-

ever, my latest information is that

export licences have not been
stopped, We are in touch with
the United States Administration

on this matter, and we are confi-
dent that in the disposal of avail-
able steel supplies they will keep
our needs well in mind,”
Weather has not hindered build-
ing much this year, and comple-

tions of new permanent houses in]..

the first quarter were the high-
est for that time of year since the
war. The number of houses under
construction at the end of March
was nearly 30,000 greater than a
year earlier, reflecting partly the
rise in the number of houses on
which building started during
April-December 1951, and partly
the removal of the 200,000 a year
ceiling.

The housing programme is to be
expanded over the

intended to increase
varied little over the past four
years), but to attract workers to
housebuilding from other types
of building work. Steel shortages
and increasing defence needs have
made reductions in parts of the
building programme necessary,
notably in factory building,
schools and transport, These re-
ductions have been offset by in-
creases in other parts where the
need for steel is relatively small,

particularly in houses.
Economie Survey of Europe in 1961

lovely

°

From $2.93 to $6.09



PDOs 2 SS HOOOOGO9OO

next three
years as far as resources of mate-~
rials and labour allow; it is not
the total
building labour force (which has



| a rial |














Bath Suits
SATIN LASTEX

In 1 Piece and 2 Piece Styles
From $11.64 to $26.66

FLOWERED COTTON

From $7.60 to $9.07

WOOLLEN

In 1 Piece and 2 Piece Styles
From $10.50 to $15.06

PAGE FIVE


















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a

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aches and pains, stiff and painful joints,
boils, pimples and common skin disorders,
Clarke’s Blood Mixture helps to purify
the blood, cleanses the system and assists
in restoring good health.

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my

NOTICE



“We wish to advise our customers
that our Workshop Department will be
closed from Tuesday 5th August to
Monday 18th August, 1952, both days
inclusive, in order to give our Work-
shop Staff their Annual vacation. There
will be a small relief staff on duty for
any emergencies. Our Office, Parts x
Â¥
Department and Petrol Station will be %
= x
open as usual. %
%,
x
x
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5
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ECKSTEIN BROTHERS §
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— IAL 4269 3
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MARAE ¢

ay POLO OES
CPSOSOSS SSS DI SLIP DS OT PPLSS


PAGE SIX



CLASSIFIED ADS.

TELEPHONE

~~



IN MEMORIAM

MURRAY-—To the



sacred memory of a















7 one person (or couple. From August 1. |
dear friend Rosa Murray, parted thi¢
Vile three years to-day, (3 yrs.) th AUTOMOTIVE | Telephone 249. 18.4, 52-—-t fon
July, 149 [—_—_ ceeeepeseinsiene
Our humble prayer oh God cnenerinen, Sirmione aeenaniliiiniras | oars Two Furnished Flats at Dun-
‘That she has been reconciled to Thee.| _CAR—Morris Oxford in good condition. | 4% are ante ane Suitable fer 2 only.
Joseph N. Howard and others. Tyres and Batteries New Dial 2582. | g: ; ri > oparare oo ‘|
29.7.52—In be Sethe es 1.6.52—t4.n
ABALE—In never {fading memory of curl CAR—Dodge Superde Luxe (X88) |ruie runkne Bala”
dear sister Gladys Seale who was called] Will sell for cash, best offer, bought! " 7.6820
to higher service on 28 July, 1951 smaller = First class order, owner a
To live with Christ is not to die driven. jal 3359. Pn :
Sy - amin * TO AN APPROVED TENANT-Cool
Doris, Cyril and Gordon Seale a weal 16.7.52—t.f.n | comfortably furnished first floor float with
aoe oe wea Le. ake oe ————-——— | modern Gas Cooker, English tub bath,
st eet ae he ae yealinear sea in the Hotel area. Available
PERSONAL job, Good as new. Twin carburettors sone as ae Se be Apply
riving high class performance. Owner | ee pants oe
~ i caddy Teena, cae Resale aa = Apply D. Harvey
1 public ore hereby a Nead/C/o Canadian Bank of
giving credit to my wife, MIRIAM bine Spee Commerce. | PUBLIC SALES
ROBINSON (nee Grant) as I do not ey
myself responsible for her or anyone CAR—Ford V-8 Super DeLuxe X—T754
else contracting any debt or debts in] will sell at bargai to |
my name unless by a written order : D Stewart Dia po ses ean te: AUCTION
signed by me. 7752S |
WALTER ROBINSON, ih decieiacle 4 To be sold by auction on Thursday
Hindsbury ae. CAR—1951 model —- M.S. 1500 Singer | "ext 3ist July at Rex Dairy Farm,
a eae loon. Owner driven, 15,000 miles, Only | Hothersal Turning: 2» heads of Dairy
$2—20 ason for sale, owner going abroad.| Cows and one pedegree Holstein Bull.
il 5114 26.7.52—3n 29.7. 52—I1n.
& seiee les
LOST «A FOUND i" T'RUCK-—Chevrolet truck, no bg Wednesday 30th July at 1 p.m. at 6th
ve offer refused. A Barnes $e. Avenug, Peterkins Land, Boarded and
ant ata. rn bene: .n.'Shingled House 16 x 9 x 8, kitchen,
se closet and palings. Land can be rented
LOST LIVESTOCK $1,00 per month. Terms CASH on fall
of hammer, R. Archer MeKenzie
ANAT ee ce vanes ga answering to the name of Tom. Finder ee “Two (2) Milch Cows, 22 and
will be suitably rewarded. L. A. Walcott, | art an dl Nahi hod Ae ae * .
Teles Sines Sones a ana: | arian Hames, "Ap PUBLIC NOTICES
we TC RACE TICKET —Serios K.K. 20.7.08-—gn
0. 9836. nder kindly return same -
to the Advocate Advertising |Depart- MECHANICAL NOTICE

ee) ee 52—-1n.

SWEEPSTAK® TICKETS -- Series T
7968 and Series A.4703. Finder please
return same. to Charles Cave, er
Road, Carrington's Village

) 29.7, 52— in

SWEEPSTAKE
842. Finder please
Gracie Holder “Samremo,’
Hill.

bs
Saree
asso secmuns

TICKET Series
return same to
Two Mile
29.7.52—In

H.H







ene iggetemrn—pe™
BROKEN DENTAL PLATES SKIiL-
FULLY REPATRED-—Save, that crack
stitch in time
slack plates
Laboratory
26.7.52—2n

from going further; a
saves nine,
tightened. Square
Upper Reed Street

BIG MONEY by soedling Redif
your a time, Get a supply
1.7.52—6n

teeth replaced,
Deal

fusion .



FIRLD OVERSEER for



Spring Vale

Plantation, St. Andrew. Apply to the
Manager. 1.7 .§2—In
GENTLEMAN seeks responsible posi-

tion. Over eleven years office experience
with radi engineering qualifications ano
experience added asset. No night duties,
For arrangement of interview and full
details c/o Advocate.

29.7.5%2--3n.

reply ‘“‘Ramsaey"





Old reliable Company established in
Trinidad for many years requires the
services of a competent and experienced
Manager for Branch Office ‘to be
established in Barbados end September
1952. Please send full deta’ ano
Salary required» with small Passport
picture to Advocate Box G.T. c/o
Advocate Co. 19.7.62—10n

MISCELLANEOUS

BOTTLES—1,000 (8 oz.) Medicine Bot-
tles — ‘aduated preferred — good price
paid. its” 29.7 52-—3n

$62.50 POCKET MONEY easily earnec
by recommending 25 new subscribers t

REDIFFUSION in one month.
1.7.62—6n

——————_—
REDIFFUSION offers $1.50 cash fo
each new Subscriber regornmp ented by
wou, 1.7.6) Db
SUPPLEMENT YOUR YNCOME bh)
recommending REDIFFUSION. Obtain
full particulars from the REDIFFUSIO®
office 1,7.52—6n











SMALL. HOUSE OR FLAT, unfucn-

ished, 2 bedrooms, garage, for quiet
elderly couple. Garrison, Hastings
Worthing. Ring 6185, §—12.

9.7,52—4n.

—_—
TWENTY-FIVE DOLLARS extra Bonus
from Rediffusion for 25 recommenda-
tions in one calendar month. ae
1.52 —6n

MIG’S Damage —
3 U.K. Planes |

SEOUL, July 28.

Communist MIG-15 swooped |
down from Manchuria on Sun |
jay in their most daring thrust
in months, and damaged three
British propellor-driven warplanes,
It was the first MIG attack of the
war against British carrier-bascd
planes, and the deepest southward
pevetration made by Russian-
built jets in many weeks.

All of the damaged planes were
two seater “fireflies” from the
carrier “Ocean”, One plane was
forced down in the Yellow Sea off
the West Korean coast, Another
made a forced landing on the





island and a _ third staggered
back to its landing on
the carrier, The navy said none

of the plane*crews suffered injury.
No damage claims were made.
—U.P.

| iM saow |

THE BARBADOS AQUATIC
CLUB
(Local and Visiting Mem-
bers Only).

Through the courtesy of
The British Council there
will be.a FILM SHOW in
the Ballroom on Wednesday
July 30th, at 8.30 p.m.

The Programme includes
BRITISH NEWS; THE
BRIDGE OF TIME, show-
ing some of the Traditional
Ceremonies of England;
THE “GREEN GIRDLE,
(Londom’s Parks and open
spacés)~ and CRICKET,

Members are cordially
invited. —

N.B—There will
shaWs after this untit
a I

SSS

Palace Oriental

Recuerdos De India,
Chino, y Cylon
Bolsa De Tachapelo








|





2508

FOR SALE

















CHILD'S TRICYCLE—Full size. Excel-! between the ages of 18 26 residing
jant meee Little used. Phone Bellamy. i Barbados are req to call at



CYCLES-—Limited

Co.,

Ltd., Bridge Street.



POULTRY



PIGEONS-—-A few pairs



sit & White Kings, Poo, | after
4x iiver te ings °
Maynard, Porters, St. James. Dial o119 | , 50%, further Antormation, consult the
26.7.52—en | American Consulate, jgetown,
as bados. 27.5.52—+.f.0
SCELLAN } NC on fe
MI tous NOTICE
“AUTO AGCESSORIES including cool
cushions, upholstery rexine, in seat PARIOE OF 83. SOHN

overing, green canyas, chrome wheel
sun visors,
‘ood dressing, cigarette lighters (6 and
licence holders,
‘eur View mirrors (Car & Truck), tyre
,auges (Car and Truck), insulating tape.

Les, Steeringwheel covers,

2

volt), reverse lamps,

Courtesy Garage, Dial 4391.

“CYCLE AC ACCESSORIES including alec
trie generator lamps (Miller
ae kits, Solution (spec
de

ee ee 7.52—n

‘e tinpes), pirce

"ati as, es cele:





27.7.52—8n

‘ number of Gents |
‘cles $60.00 each. K. J. Hamel-Smith &

23.7. 52—6n





HOUSES

Attractive seaside Flat main road Has- |
| tings, comfortably furnisned, English |
| Bath, Open Verandah facing sea. Suitable |

















All male citizens of the United States

the American cons from July 1 to
| wodae ap Uni real Military Training
ve: Training

Serviee Act.
All male citizens of the United States

who 20 Juby =< of 18 years sub-
sequent to 1952, are required
\ to pecisiet upon the’ day ney attain the
eighteen’ anniversary e day of
their birth, or within five days there-

Applications in writing and in person
for the post of a Special Nurse for the
Almshouse, St. John, will be received
by Dr. E. B. Carter, P.M.O. up to the
15th, August, 1952 Applicants must be
qualified Mid-Wives and not more than
30 years of age Appointments for inter-
views may be made by telephoning
95—225; recommendations if any, should
be produced The salary to be $60.06
per month, inclusive of C. of L.B
and ration allowance of $21.60 if not
in residence at the Almshouse. The



Â¥ reno! successful applicant to assume duties on
rene
pumps, br tapes, Tyres and tubes, the 6th August, 1952.
ote, Courtesy Garage. Dial 4391. Ey “pemet of the
98.7.52—6 BOARD OF POOR LAW GUARDIANS
siecagery-4-cireaiieaeaneirpreaeareries: — fiqned, KR. 8 St. John.
FORKS—Agricultural Forks made of | + Be. RED, Slee:
the fae Steel and the right pattern at {Beman
5. 2 The Auto Tyre Co., opposite Se, oe ee
he Cathedral, Spry Street. iii NOTICE
27.7. 52—6n Applications will be received by the
~| Clerk of the Vestry up to 12 (noon) on
PLANTS—Anthurium Plants Nurse, ae Ist August, 1952 for:
vim Beach, St. James. One Archer Gittens Scholarship at
27.7.52—2n St. Michael's Girls’ School, now
vacant.
RECORDS—Clearing all stocks of 78 2. Any Vestry Scholarship at the
R.P.M. Records at 3 for $1.50 at Da same School which may become

Costa & Co., Ltd. Electrical artment
7 52—6)



now to the

pa

on a few days after publication

London, Contact Ian Gale, C/o. Advo-
Representative
17.4,53—t.i.n

TOYS—New American Toys which in-
Beach
Jeeps,
Water Pistols, Dippy Ducks and several
All reasonably
aa ie & Co.,

28.7 ,52—3n.

WEDDING GIFT—A few ironing board
ee No-cord tron sets, subject to special
we allowance. A Barn

eate
Tel,

Co.,

Ltd, Local
3118.



clude Doctor and Nurse Kits,
“alls, Pistols, Cannons. Cars,

wher attractive toys.
priced . a. Me
(Ad. —~ Broad 8t



es
£ ton 3.7.52—t.f.

SUBSCRIBE Daily
Telegraph, England’s leading Daily News-
r now arriving in Barbados by Air





vacant during the school year

Candidates must be the daughters of
parishioners in straitened circumstances
and must not be less than 9 wears nor
more than 10% years of age on_ Ist
September, 1952, to be proved by a Bap-
tismal Castigente which must accom-
pany the apelpation

Forms plication will be issued
and received at the Vestry Clerk's Office
between the hours of 10 a.m. and 12

(noon)
. REDMAN,
Michael's Vestry
22.7.52-—5n

in

in

zB. c
Clerk, St.



NOTICE
PARISH OF ST CHURCH
Applications for a alifed Midwife,
and 35 will be

between the age of
received by the Churchwarden Mrs, H.
& | Talma, Wi es, Ch. Ch. up to 3 p.m,

n. | on the Sth August, 1952



Terms of a euoas obtainable from
YAWL_ “FRAPEDA”. Excellent con- | ‘2¢ Parochial Treasurer.
aiten. New Diesel | Bngine. For_ full 26.7.52—4n
particulars apply Edwards. Phone
2520, 20.7.52—6n NOTICE





NOTIC

GIRLS’ INDUSTRIAL UNION
There will be a General Meeting of t

G. t. U. at the Union Room on Wednes-
H. A.
Ballou has graciously consented to give a

day 30th July 445 p.m. Mrs.

talk.
Subject — Aims and Objects of t
G.L.uU.
G. WELLIAMS,
General Sevretar
29.7 .52—1

YourPiles

t fs no longer Lat? to suffer
pains, ttching and torment from Piles
since the discovery of Hytex (formerly
known as Chinarold). Hytex starts to
work In 10 rolnutes and hot only stops
the pain but also takes out the aweil-
ug, Stopes bleeding and combats nerve
teritation thereby curbing other trou-
lea caused by Piles such as Headache,
iv rvougness, Backache, Constipation,

lose of energy Sabie and irritable
dieposition Get tex from your
drugetet today ae er tho positive
guarantee Hytex must s.op your pile
paine and troubles or money beck or
~eturn of empty packags.

IS HEREBY GIVEN that it is the inten-
tion of the Vestry of the parish of Sajnt
Andrew in this Island to cause to be
introduced into the Legislature of this
Island a Bill authorising the said Vestry
to raise a loan not exceeding £700 to
enable the said Vestry to erect com-
munal Baths and Latrines at St. Simons

he

ie Dated this 28h day of July, 1952.
CARRINGTON & SEALY
Solicitors for the Vestry

y of St. Andrew.

5 29.7.52—3n
Se
LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

REMOVAL
The application of Sylvan Williams
of Vauxhall, Christ Church, holder ot

Liquor License No. 1113 af 1952, granted
in respect of a board and shingled shop
with shedroof attached at Vauxhal:
Christ Church within District “B" for
permission to remove the said License
to a board and shingled shop attached
to residence at Maxwell Hill, Christ
Chureh within Distcict “B” and to use
the said License at such last describeo
premises.
Dated this 25th day of February,
To C, W. RUDDER, Esq.,
Police Magistrate, Dist. “B."
YLVAN WILLIAMS,
Applicant.
N.B.—This application will be con-
sidered at the Licensing Court to be
held on Friday, 8th day of August, 1952,
at 1 o'clock a.m. at Police Courts,

1962

(:99999556999909999969004 | Dist. “B."

% REMOVAL NOTICE x Police Magisiate’ Dist "B."
8 Variety Sandal Shop $ Des Soa
% will be removed to No. 3

% 37 Swan Street as from

Ist August,
x 28.7.52—1 we
RAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAS

AND NOW

you can have

A GAS COOKER



like those you have admired in
the magazines.
SEE THEM TO-DAY .
At Your Gas Showroom.
‘ Bay Street.



/

FURNITURE
WARNING!

BUY NOW — BEFORE
CHRISTMAS TAKES
YOU BY STORM ,

ROUSING VALUES in Vanities,
Wardrobes, Dresser Robes, Chest-
of-Drawers, Simmons an@ other
All-panelled and other Bedsteads,
Coll & flat Springs. narrow and
wide including 4-foot,

DRAWING ROOM SUITES &
separate pieces in Upholstered

and other Morris and _ other

1: Caned Mahogany or Birch, Morris
Especilitamente Spring or Spring-like Cushions,
Menos 15% Quince sore Bedroom and Kitchen
abincts
“Perciento

Durante De Baratillo

THANTS

Pr. Wm.. Henry Street







DINING TABLES in Mahogany,
Cedar or Deal, plain or Polished
Fine. Sideboards $36 to 900,
Liquor Cases $5.50 up, Big Ice-
boxes, $20 up.

L: S. WILSON



Soocceecesere



ARE
“NERVES” A SIGN
YOU'RE GROWING

2O2@6' a



: Without any time in

& for nearly tity years wise

$ ea he been meeting this

8 — by

4 of rest,

x and by’ taking Dr. Chase's

s Food to them up. For

NX) the Vitamin Bi, ieca and other

| needed minerals this time-tested
tonic build up your vitality

< and aid in toning up the entire

| system—so you can face the future

> with confidence.

Give Dr, Chase's Nerve Food a
chance to help banish nervous
fears and doubts. It you rest
better, and feel better. name

. “Dr. Chase” is your assurance. 10
Ps)
+



If not saved but seeking
Salvation, please write for

FREE HOOK

Which Makes

“GOD’S WAY OF

SALVATION PLAIN”
8. Roberts, Gospel

Book & Tract Service, 30

Dial 3466 eres Sener sy) SIA see Central Ave., Bangor, N.I.
= SS Wy PCCP ECCLES CPCS EO FSCO SESES GSS SOS SS SOS























































SOOO SSO SOOO

BARBADOS AD

VOCATE







v~~ TUESDAY,

__Fon ment | The Yanks W.l. SHOULD NOT RUSH |6 Dead In Car,




.
z @ From Page & the good cf destroying this power j il Cr h
| Get }: ort failing that, go to them with an only to be run by people who are rauer as
ultimatum, demanding federation merely running big businesses in
and freedom which “are already Trinidad UNIONTOWN Pennsylvania,
in our hands.” “We in Barbados have a better
Aireraft 1 a Mant ; , constitution than was suggested in July 28
zike Mr. Maniey ne urged the the Rance Report.’ 7" i
ONDON. July 2: masses to support their Jeaders The colonial problem they were Six persons were killed when a
“ LON ION, July 26 ts 1 their demands for a West India: jetting rid of was the 18th cen- tractor trailer went out of control
fhe Privy Council on ppentay Nation He exhorted them to tury domination of people with{" 4 downhill mountain curve on
eS ol aay el nae build up a mighty organ, to create wealth who expected to call in at| ® bighway near here and crashed
Hongkong Supreme Court awatd- 144 wield a terrible power, sO these colonies and buy sugar plan-{/9t0 an auto carrying @ group of
ing 40 civil aircraft to the ye that when they were strong in jations, maybe oil, bauxite and so|Picnicers. The State Police said
Communists ,and awarded €M their own trade unions, they on, and exploit them. “Th the truck, loaded with a cargo of

instead to an American Company.
The Judicial Committee of

, . tion and self-government, but ‘That is what w
Council the highest court of — would be able to stand up with
British Empire, allowed the jjocts gut and heads in the air, we got on the

appeal of the Civil Air Transport
Incorporated of Delaware against

the Hong Kong decision.

ceeded

Nationalist

The American Corporation sue-
Airlines Company
headed by General Claire Chen-
nault of the “Flying Tigers”
China before the civil war.
Chinese sold planes
originally to the Chennault com-
pany. “They sold to Chennault on
December 12th 1949 when Britain
still recognized the Chiang Kal!
Shek government as the legal
government of China.
midnight of January 5th
Britain recognized the Commun-
ist regime as China’s legal gov-

the
i

the

The

But on
1950

would not have to beg for federa- the Colonial

and demand their legitimate share
in the best traditions of the human
pirit, and in keeping with the
dignity of the human person

Mr. G-. H. Adams first spoke o1
the march of events over the past
i4 years and went on to say that
ihe Labour Party of Barbades

Lose we strike

n

them to continue to work together
sn harmony in order that they
might bring about as early as pos-
sible the hopes and aspirations
that they all shared — West In-
dian unity, West Indian Federa-

system,”
e aim to destroy.
“Lock at the amount of cursing

have not yet replied to that.

he

oil question

oil

and every time we tell them we
do not give any monopoly.
ing one company the right
explore for oil we have not com-
mitted ourselves,
pert comes and gives us advice

said

Sup-
in_ Barbados,
ve could build the schools and
hospital and everything else
and incidentally I have a lot more
information about oil possibilities
and why all this is taking place

No Promise

In giv-
to

When the ex-






soap products, failed to make the
curve at the bottom of the moun-
iain and crashed headlong into
the auto. The car was smashed
against the stone wall surround-
ing a roadside estate-—U.P.

1

ow ~ . , ‘TREAL, USTRALI-, NEw
and the P.N.P. of Jamaica had in We four, Mr. Cummins, Mr. MOMALAND ‘Lf LIMITED.
their hands the destinies of the Walcott, Mr. Cox and myself have (MAN Z LINE)

West Indies, and it was up to been beset over and over again,

SS. “GLOUCESTER” 1s scheduled to
ati from Port Pirie May 3ist,

une se x -, Ry =

mune ane arriving

arbados about August 6th.

In addition to general cargo this vessel
vas ample space for and hard

2 cargo.
ernment and since the planes had jjop_ and he says one company, then
originally belonged to the gov- one, and if two, then two. We], “are P sor tranahipment oven ae, ie
ernment air lines, the Hong He had not seen that as yet in never promise. ritish Guiana, Leeward and Windward

Kong court held that the planes

Government.
1949. Uppel of the American firm

had belonged to the Communi
Since October 1

in Hong Kong was dismissed.
Lord Oaksey announced

was en for a

property of the appellants.

that
their Lordships would allow the
appeal and that a judgment hold
declaration
that the forty aircraft were the
He
said there would be no order as

the whole of the Caribbean area
the people have shown the readi-
ness to grasp the power which as
Mr. Marryshow had told them,
yas there.

st

st was 1852.

No one had done more for the
cause of Federation and Self Gov-
ernment than Mr. Marryshow. It
was no accident that they were
seeing them there together in
Barbados. Apart from the fact

to costs, and added that their that he has come Mr. Manley has ,;)

Lordships would give their told you he has come over to fulfil j

reasons for the decision later. this long standing promise to at- “T mention
—U.P vend one of our Annual Confer- ciance to show



ences, it was something more than

are up against.”
that

this only as



“What happened was that these
B.U.0.C. boys thought that .1952
They ran to the Colo-
néal Office and got a few back room
boys to say, ‘leave it to us, we will
tell the Governor
forgetting that there was Sir Grat-
tan Bushe’s new dispensation;
getting that that gave us the right
to say yes or no.

“We feel that if oil is found, i
would be for the

advantage

an
you the things

He said that if the West Indies

of Barbados,”

for-

of us

in-
we




Islands.
For further particulars apply—
;URNESS WITHY @ CO., LED.,
TRINID.

DA COSTA & CO., LTD.,


















JULY 29, 1952

Areas Around

Sydney Flooded

SYDNEY, July 28.
Hundreds of people have been

driven from their homes in
last 24 hours by floods in the
country and coastal areas. Rivers,
swollen by torrential rains, have
burst their banks, Flood waters
are pouring through towns and
over farmiands, extensively ——-
aging property and crops, bloc
ing highways, and pusing tele-
phone communications a

The police
ucks”

supplies out of action.

and troops with army “
ena launches have been evacu-
atung many families to safety,
carrying on their rescue work
efficiently.

NOTICES



















The M/V “CARIBBER’ wil
accept Cargo and eee os
ini Antigua, on
ss uae "St. Kitts. Sailing
‘ist inst.

The M/V
accept Cargo and Pa
Dominica, Antigua,
Nevis and St Kitts
Friday, 8th August,

* Kssoeianion an

Tele. ot



CANADIAN SERVICE
From Montreal and Halifax.









Montreal Haltfax Dates
i e “e aah : OM) , did not make progress the fault Be Bridgetown, Barbados
n tan Riots Todsy we. Sete. penane oe was no longer the British Officials’ 5 ‘SUNDALE” 15 rd 1 Suny * 2 re 4
stage when the destinies of the 4) the British Government's. As], ugus' ugust
West Indies are in the West Indies ni 14 ‘August 19 August 3 September
, t West Indie: 1 h far as Colonial Government was | atv 20 Aug. 4 Sept. 16, Bep
en- ‘P aa. eo ae ads ae = © concerned, they would be asked,
vacussing Wodesesion, YT Gk Bake eo E Pe emicale eh wna solo Ue. ee
at was the attitude of the ‘Colo-
KARACHI, July 28, ee the Secretary of State himself. ia) Office. He would not get it From South Wales, Liverpool and Glasgow.
Police used tear gas to break up He was extremely busy, but I told 45) Barbados because he was G. H.
demonstrations at a meeting of ‘he boys what I was told he want- ‘Adams, but that was the atmos-| —
the Punjab Province League ‘( my opinion on.” phere . Sone Titi is eeicenaah Beroetes sn
Council, meeting in Lahore on 2 , f - . . .
Sunday night, according to news- Hype ae Nae epee ne eh In Barbados they had succeeded “SUNWHIT” -.30 June SJuly 9 July 23 July
aper Te cst & ‘ation he would say tha ‘ ade ses IA DE
a0 Rhy ee ra pare, see the British Government were no es che peotie’ ane ee ot ¢ VARRINAGA” --26 July 31 July -5 August 19 August
member of the Council, was hos- more prepared today whatever jhose promis He had not the :3 ‘eee BP oe RUE. 21 Aust 36 August Sn oe
Se ail 9 ee they might be jn the past, to hitch : ; t 1. “Eure rc = PR mpecaber. ei or
pitalized because of injuries re- ‘hom as far as Self Government SH#nCSt fear Mite een: get YOu U.K. AND CONTINENTAL SERVICE
eeived when a crowd of over 500 —'' Reid eich vee ry on with Federation ae ip 32
hurled stones at Council members “4 Federation were concerned’ jocal draughtsmen to handle it”,| ;
leaving the hall. oO ; they would do it. rom Middlesbrough, Antwerp, Rotterdam and London,
TY d a pponents He said that they had to sane
lhe crowd was reportedly age ; ; every single island — ritis
monstrati j Ahmadia If I had only his enemies to Middles- Rotter- Arrival
anaes 6 — Sansltes sect ‘ight in the West Indies,” he said, Honduras, British, Guiane, At fh brough Antwerp dam London
which has been the centre of Barbados would be a paradise; yo. cot the atmosphere changed “SPURT” 8 July 1 July «12 July _18Juby 3 August
religious controversy in recent and sueh is the same with Mr. gust Zz it had been changed by the “sOAgi " = My ae: = a. Mia Septemnbes
months, The crowd shouted Marryshow and Mr. | Manley. P.NP. in Jamaica and the Labour + — ng Sep’ ¢

Anti-Ahmadia slogans and stoned
Council members’ cars when_ the
meeting failed to pass a resolution
opposing the Ahmadia movement,
‘oreign Zafrullah
Khan, Member of the Ahmadia
sect, and key figure in the recent
controversy, tendered his resigna-
Reports from Lahore said

that the police successfully broke
up the demonstrations with tear





tion,

Minister

gas and that the situation w
under control by midnight.
fatalities were reported.

—U.P.








rich, blood- proper-
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deep you fit!

Cy ag aTTE

â„¢ GENERAL TONIC

Bleeding Gums, Sore Mouth
Loose Teeth mean that you may
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NOTICE

CAPTAIN, OWNERS OR AGENTS




of the Venezuelan Motor Vessel
“GLORIA MARIA” do not hold
themselves responsible for any

debt or debts contracted by any
member of the crew of this vessel
while in port








R. M, JONES & COMPANY,
LIMITED
Agents
M.V. GLORIA MARIA

46.7 .52—6n









‘as
No
RATES OF EXCHANGE



__ No appetite? No pep? The



Whom do you think are Mr, Man-
Jey’s opponents, not so mych the
capitalists whom he can always
beat, but the alleged Labour Par-
iy of Jamaica,












Party

“T told you a moment ago that ticn tomorrow.”
{ was paid a doubtful compliment
in the Legislature in Trinidad. tf
we appear to go slow on Federa-
tion, there is one answer, one
reason and one reason alone —
Trinidad, Trinidad is the most
backward political portion of the
3ritish Caribbean area-

came to the
hamlet.

“What is the good of our fight-
ing as we have fought in this
colony to destroy the powers of
the Chamber of Commerce and



Corner Broad and Tudor Sts.



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Flit in Gls., Qrs., Pts.

R.M. JONES & CO.,



















including :
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See Us Now and Stop those Leaks

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in Barbados.

“We have got to convert every
colony in the West Indies to see
that only socialism can pull us out,
before we can say — have Federa-

Mr, Adams enueu up his address
on the question of loyalty.
Mr. Manley had said, they should
trust their leaders

worst,

The meeting ended just after
midnight with a vote of thanks by

73 210% Pr. Gheques on Buying |ihe Electors’ Association — the
"Bankers 71 5/10% Pr. | 4ssociation spent thousands of to lead them.
Sight or pounds the election before last to
eA me cane ee Pr. |defeat us, but we beat them, and
73 2/10% . Cable <<
71 7/10% Pr. Currency 20% Pr. again we beat them — what is Mr. M. E. Cox:
Coupons 69 3/10% Pr.
50% Pr, Silver 20% Pr
sith be CANADA
9% Cheques on =
Bankers 17 a/10% Pr MIRROR GLASS
Demand Drafts 77.05% Pr.
Sight Drafts 76 9/10% Pr.
79% Pr. Cable os kaa
77 6/10% Pr. Gurreney 45 7710% Br. Straight and Bevelled Edged
* . . Coupons 75% Pr.
50% Pr. Silver 20% Px.

In an assortment of sizes, is now obtainable at

THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM



ESSO PRODUCTS

Flit Sprays Petroleum Jelly

Flit Powder (Vaseline)

Mistol in %-0z. & 2-0z.

Handy Oil —White and Yellow
Paraffin Oil in Gals. Nujol in pts.

Household Wax

LTD.



Guttering
Etc.

.
SSOSORSSSSOR.

As

If the worse

the people
would see him in every village
He instanced Dr.
mins and asked whether
thought a man

Cum-

they
like him would
betray the people of Barbados. He
was: the last man to wish yes men
around him, but they should sup-
port the people they had chosen.

































“ALCOA PEGASUS”

A STEAMER sails 17th July

A STEAMER sails 31st July

A STEAMER sails 14th August

A STEAMER sails 28th August

A STEAMER sails 11th September

SOUTHBOUND

“SAPHO”

“ARGOBEC”’
wre 5's 7
“A STEAMER”

SOUTHBOUND
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WHAT HAPPENED >
1 HEARD A SHOT.. ‘



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PAGE FIGHT
OLYMPICS: —



Farnum Eliminated In 2nd Round Of Heats

CRICKET

Six Intermediate Teams
Score Ist Innings Point

THE fourth round of games in the Intermediate Divi-
turday. Pickwick, Windward, G. Yarde c Burke b Austin

sion was concluded on Sa

Y.M.P.C., Carlton, Empire and Police got first innings

points in their matches.

their match at the Oval.
first innings.

Combermere ly
bowled out for 100, giving _the
Kensington team a first innings
lead of 233.
the school team with 33 while Mr.
Glasgow made 24.

BARBADOS ADVOCATE





V. Butler b Todd
Extras 2

Total (for 4 wkts, deelared i54
BOWLING ANALYSIS
oO N

Vv. Knight 10

A

1
B. Hope . 12 9 33 2
Vv. Todd 20 2 52 1
A, Wiltshire 2 0 6 0
M. Crichlow 1.2 0 a 1
R. Chase 5 9 4

MENTAL HOSPITAL

0
2nd Innings

M. Crichlow_b Butler ° 3

N. Burrowes b Butler « a

A. Wiltshire run out oO

C. ee ec K. Branker b Butler 2
. M > , : . Gaskin ¢ wkpr. b/ Buth D
Pickwick got first innings points from Combermere in & Chase » ie aenauer we
Pickwick amassed 333 in their {- fodd ¢ Butler b K. Branker a
Of this Bruce Inniss contributed 129. Vv. Knight c & b K. Branker 0
in ly were 8. Hope not out 2
out to his credit while A. Ishmae! Extras 8
ig - a. out. ‘as les is Total “109
A ice ocked up ‘or the hh
red for . . ;
Inniss topscored loss of one wicket in their second BOWLING ANALYSIS s
innings. {. Burke cle Be
h, Austin 9 2 13
PICKWICK vs. K. Branker ... il 24

Bowling for Pickwick J. Peter-
kin took four wickets for 22 runs
in nine overs and two balls. Bruce
Inniss took three for five runs :a
eight overs of which four were
maidens.

Sent back to the wicket, the
school team gave a much better
performance. When stumps were
drawn they were 114 for the loss
of three wickets. Wilkinson made
49 while Branker had 32 not out
to his credit. '

Empire secured first innings
lead in their match against Wan-
derers at Bank Hall. Empire
seored 348 in their first innings.
Wanderers replied with 116 of
which D. Alleyne topscored with
47.

Bowling for Empire C. Beckles
took three for 18, C, Prescod three
for 27 and G. Amory two for 1}.

Wanderers in their second in-
nings scored 64 for the loss of
one wicket. A G. Seale has s+
net out to his credit. The wicket
was taken by Preseod for’ 21
runs, ‘
First innings points in the
Spartan—Windward match

at

Congo Road went to Windward. 4.

Spartan made 181 in their first
innings. Windward replied with
185 for the loss of eight wickets

declared. R. Atkinson topscored eMPIRE Ist Innings .

with 55 while E. Evelyn made &

COMBERMERE
PICKWICK ist Innings ............ 333
COMBERMERE ist Innings
Inniss hit wicket b Peterkin
Branker run out 1

Wilkinson 1.b.w. Clarke ll»

Brathwaite lb.w. C. Greenidge ..
Mr. Glasgow c Clarke b Peterkin

Phillips stpd. wkpr. Trotter b Tnniss
Weekes b Inniss )
Mr. Smith b Peterkin 4
Sealey c W. Greenidge b Peterkin 2
Maxwell b Inniss “e i

Rabinson not out 3 0
Extras 6
Total » 100

BOWLING ANALYSIS
M

R. Clarke 8 3 15 1
2. Lashley 7
Lewis 7
Cc. Greenidge 8
J Peterkin . 9 “
3. Inniss 8 4 6 3
COMBERMERE 2nd Innings
(nniss c Lewis b Lashley 9
Branker not out
Brathwaite run out
Wilkinson l.b.w. Peterkin
Mr, Glasgow not out 9
Extras 3

Total (for 3 wkts.)
BOWLING ANALYSIS
Oo M

R, Clarke

o, Lashley

8. Inniss
Peterkin
W. Greenidge
G. Moore 2
c. Greenidge 0

°
17
EMPIRE vs. WANDERERS
8

Be

wee taas
8

WANDERERS 1st Innings

A. G, Seale c Clarke b Beckles 4

valuable 53. D, Alleyne .b Bg a

N. Medford, C. Wood and Bb. c. AtpavEDOE ou Beokles 7
Morris took two wickets each for J. Patterson c Beckles i reseod 15
48, 32 and 25 respectively. aaa ee ae

‘Spartan were skittled out for M. Proverbs b Amory ; 0
66 in their second innings. H. M. ¥ Ramsey b, Armstrong fw
Farmer took four wickets and 5. Nicholls not out 16
Thornton three. Fi Moony stpd. wkpr, Bourne,

b Pres 5

When stumps were drawh Extras 6
Windward had lost two wicke:s Total : Te
for 34 runs. This wicket was taken —_
by Medford for 13 runs. BOWEN ABATE: A

Y.M.P.C tried to force an oul- 2, Beckles 8 Ls 3
right vietory against Mental Hos-.° expe ul 3 4 8
fatal but failed by 1i-runs, The 7, See ee Pd BG
Beckies Road team got first in- U. Armstrong $ Be oe
nings points. . Hutehinson 3 16 0

Mental Hospital were bowled 5, ane en rant ae
but in their first innings for 68 A. G. Seale not out 34
runs. YÂ¥.M.P.C. replied with 154 * Arrpasrons not out =
for the loss of four wickets de- ? naa
clared. Ben Hoyos topseored with Total (for 1 wkt.) 64
83 while K. A. Brancker scored eee amataiee TO
an undefeated 37. i i ae oO M R w

In their second innings Mental £. Beckles a
Hospital were bowled out for \, Pxoreod Re econ
109 runs, leaving the Beckles &. Hutchinson .... ‘ 9 ‘ °
road team 24 runs for victory. 9. Kirton ........
When stumps were drawn WINDWARD vs. SPARTAN
YOLP-C. were 12 runs without *PARTAR lst tapings ininss
joss. N. Thornton e Cumberbatch b

N. Burrows topseored in the i oe ee cet uneass ,
Mental ‘Hospital’s second innings &' Atkinson e sub b Wood |. 5S
with 41 runs. M, Crichlow scored E. Evelyn e¢ wkpr. b B. Matris 53
30. Bowling for YMB:C, K. & % Beemer ic whpr. » Morris 20
Branker took three for 24 in 11 © Ning nny 'b Pawo. ig
overs and a ball. be Greseidas uae aut tibaies 5

Carlton secured first innings * Wie oo! " ledfo: :
points in their match against ¢ A. Farivar Gid not bat 0
Cable and Wireless at Boarded Extras .. i 4
Hall, On the first day Cable and waxht thon 6 wate: 6 a
Wireless were all out for 76. ar eet foreren #8
Carlton by close of play were 139 BOWLING Aa es *
for eight wickets. The Black Rock =. skinner 8 eee
team on Saturday took their score Medford 8 oa & 3

5, Parr 7 oes

ta:361, W Cumberbateti Bie) Oe ee

Cable and Wireless were off to a 4 Chase 2 . Bhs
good start in their second innings 4, inert: pias ie ee
when the opening pair B. Mat- | SPARTAN 2nd Innings
thews and R, McKenzie put 0” } Rouen Lbw. i. M. Farmer 0
56 runs before McKenzie was Out vy. Wood lbw, H. M, Farmer ¢ 0
leg before to Burke for 21. Mat- °. Wood b L. Greenidge . : 6
thews scored 44 and Cable and ; ©. Matthens gine Gichkiich 16
Wireless went on to make 188 for W. Jemmott c wkpr. b Wilkie 18
four wickets declared. H. H. King Neen eatt e R, Atkinson b ‘i
knocked up 44 and R. Croney was >, skinner l.b.w. H. M. Farmer... 8
not out with 42 to his credit. w. Gumbarbatea pat out 0
Cortien dakeed 50 ae. Ae as tok 7 ; ;
of four wickets. I. Matthews took Total 65

two for 42. Kenny Hutchinson
scored 17 not out and P, Kennedy
1%.

At the Garrison, Police got first
innings points from the Regiment.
Regiment in their first innings
scored 128. Police replied with
189, C. Sealy topscored with 50.

Bowling for Regiment C.. Phil- ©

lips took four wickets for 50 runs
in 16 overs and two balls. G
Pinder took three for 24 in nine
overs.

Regiment in their second in-
nings made 101 for one wicket
declared. D. Beckles had 53 not



They'll Do it Every Time

SSS

A Hi, JED, OL’ BOY--. Y HEY, JED LES
7 WHASGA MATTERP Jf HEY, ZEDDY~-





HAVIN? TROUBLE

/ AGAINP YOU OKAYP
YOU'RE NOT HURT,
ARE YGU,FALP

Hi, HERMAN!
H'YA, RED! GLAD
yOu CAME By
THIS WISE GUY
WAS GETTIN’?
TOUGH +++




WE MISSED >A




THE CLUS LAST
NIGHT

WINDWARD 2nd Innings
N. Thornton c Morris, b Parris
®. Evelyn not out ‘ 2 ‘ 13
8. Atkinson c Matthews b Medford 20

Total (for 2 wkts.) 34
BOWLING ANALYSIS

° M Ww

N. Medford 24 0 13 1

Skinner 1 0 8 0

5.-Parris or 2 9 13 1

MENTAL HOSPITAL vs.
Y.M.P.C,

MENTAL HOSPITAL Ist Innings 68
Â¥.M.P.C. ist Innings

Vv. Lewis ec Williams b Hope aé 6

W. Hoyos ec & b Crichlow : 83

D. King ¢ wkpr. b Hope 9

K. Branker not out ‘ : 37








ARE MARRIED TO
RED AND HERMAN

1
YÂ¥.M.P.C. 2nd Innings
Branker not out
Lewis not out

Extras

noo uneot

Total (without loss)

| ee
lt!

CABLE & WIRELESS vs
CARLTON

CABLE & WIRELESS Ist Innings cid
CARLTON Ist Innings ° ». ML
CABLE & WIRELESS @nd Innings

B. Matthews b G. Matthews
R. MeKenzie l.b.w. Burke 21
QO, Knight Lb.w. Cox il
R. Croney not out 42
H, King c Cox b G. Matthews 8
Extras . 18
Totai (for 4 wkts. declared) 188

BOWLING ANALYSIS
o M w
G. Matthews . 7 1 42 2
A. Browne . 3 1 14 0
=. Edghill 3 1 9 0
a. 6 o 6 0
3. Gill . 2 0 ll 0
Cc. Cox 5 0 26 1
H. Burke 5 0 17 1
A. Nicholson 2 0 20 0
CARLTON 2nd Innings

K. Hutchinson not out 17
G. Matthews b B. Matthews 6

P. Kennedy c wkpr. Clarke b

Branker 17
£, Edghill stpd. wkpr. Clarke b

Branker oe eake ox

C, Cox c Alleyne b King 1

Extras . 9

Total (for 4 wkts..) - 60

BOWLING ANALYSIS

oO M w

Bee aa iine ds a5 2 14 1

B, Matthews 4 1 9 1

E. Branker . 4 0 18 2
POLICE vs. REGIMENT

REGIMENT Ist Innings
POLICE Ist Innings ; .
REGIMENT 2nd Innings
A. Ishmael not out
Licorish Lb.w. Griffith
D, Beckles not out
Extras ......

Total (for 1 wkt. declared)

BOWLING ANALYSIS
Oo M

Shannon . 5 1

Griffith 3 o 6 1
Carter .. 6 1

Denny 4 1
Smith 3 0 14 0
Sealy 3 0 15 0
POLICE %nd Innings

. Sealy not out :
6. Morris c Ishmael b Bispha: ¥

ozsree

a

Cheltenham not out
Total (for 1 wkt.)
BOWLING ANALYSIS

Oo M
Phillips
Clarke

Beckles
Bispham

aoe
woe
auceea

Shooting:

‘British Guiana
Wins Cup

British Guiana won the Over-
seas Rifle Postal Match, 1951, for
H.R.H, “The Duke of Gloucester’s”
Challenge Cup with a score of
1,132, Barbados was second with
1,104.

The results for 1951 are: —

Winning Team, BRITISH
GUIANA, the Challenge Cup and
Silver Medals.

Captain of Team
W. A. Orrett.



- Colonel

300 500 600 Total

J. A. Sutton 49 48 47 144
N. J. Driver 47 47 48 #142
Â¥ #. Allevne 46 49 47 142
Major F. T. 47 49 46 142
M. A. Wright 49 47 46 142
D. B. St. Aubyn 47 46 48 141
Sat. S. Leydoo 48 48 45 (141
G. K. Ridley 45 47 46 138
Totals 378 381 373 1,132
Pe en eavi é
Fired at Thomas’ Ranges,

Georgetown, 6th October, 1951
BARBADO

Second Team, Ss,
Bronze Medals,
Captain of Team :— Major
A. D. V. Chase, :
1A.-Col, J. Connell 49 47 47 «148
Capt, C. B, Neblett 47 47 48 142
T. A. Ll. Roberts.... 48 48 46 lie
Major 0. F. C
Walcott .. 48 48 44 #140
Major J. E, Griffith 45 47 44 136
G, F. eeaae 46 49 41 136
M. R. DeVerteuil... 47 43 45 155
Major A. S. Warren 42 44 44 130
372 373 359 1,104

Fired at Barbados Government
Range, 20th October, 1951.

Third:— KENYA, Captain of
Team, Capt, W. H. Dickens; Score,

1,086;

Fourth :— JAMAICA, Captaio
of Team, Rfn, B. N, Crindland;
Score, 1,063.




Y A LOOGE BROTHE!

JEDDy GOONSBERRY
4 FLIES AROUND THESE HERE ( Do NO SPEEDIN’! THE Guy |
\ PARTS LIKE A BAT OUTAA
-) BELFRY! TOTHER FELLA A











IN THE FISHTAIL EIGHT \
















}
|
ANo THE JUSTICE OF THE ||
PEACE IS JEDDYS COUSIN" | |
3 THANX AND A TIP OF (|
THE HATLO WAT TO |
“DON’T QUOTE ME! |
OF "UNQUOTE "' CALIF.









Rides Second
In First Round

Mr. T. A. D. Gale, Advertising Manager of the Advocate,
is at present in Helsinki covering the Olympic Games.
HELSINKI, July 28.

Ken Farnum was eliminated today in the second round
of the heats for the 1,000 metre sprint. Ken rode well in
his first heat and was unlucky to be second as he misjudged
his sprint, But in the second attempt he was completely
outmanoeuvred by the entire field.

Yet the irony of it is that he is a much better sprinter
than any of the three who beat him. But that simply proves
that until our cyclists are well schooled in the department
of tacties, they will never have a fair chance in the inter-
national arena. i
Actually the very natur the

three places. Fourth was P. J.
competitions at home do pre-

Capilla of Mexico who appeared
to be the only other competitor
worthy of opposing the Americans.

I also saw the world record
holder for the 1,500 meters H.
Furuhashi of Japan win his first
400 metre heat, but he could not
have been extending himSelf as
he won by several yards in very
easy fashion.

pare them for this kind of racing,
as the only race we have compar=
able with the 1000 metre sprint is
the half mile.



Olympics Diary

TUESDAY, JULY 29

8.00 am. Fencing (sabre
team competition,
1st round).

9.00 am. Equestrian.

9.00 a.m. Shooting.

9.00 a.m, Basketball.

10.00 am. Swimming (spring
board diving, la-

dies, ist group of
dives; 400 m. free
style, men, ,semi-
finals); 100 m.
backstroke, ladies,
heats; water polo)



11.00 am. Cyeli (1,000 m.
scratch race, 2nd
heats; 4,000 m.
rs persuit race, 2nd
KEN FARNUM _ 100 gas oes
Naturally it will be very dis- 3.00 pm. Fencing (sabre,
appointing to everybody at home team competition,
but no one could be more dis- 2nd round).
appointed than Ken Farnum him- oo pm, Basketball.
self. He has almost slept. with his 00cm Swings Aa
eycle under his pillow since he a ne SOD -—
has been here and it was a bitter ae vestrols bo
pill for him to swallow indeed. I Seoe daa ieee
hope that he will do much better hoard a one
in the time trial, aad cating
With the athletic events over, ieee: me vio)
the entire place seems to have | 6.00 p.m Cycling a Dot ae
become subdued overnight and = .- emahoh rage, semi-
the Olympic village is emptying finals; 4,000 m.
quickly. The Jamaica track team pursuit race, seni-
left this morning for Stockholm | finals; 4,000 m
where they will run before goi ursui re
on to Belgrade and London, Suite > peiee San;

a number of journalists have also

departed and those left are now 7.00 p.m. Football. :
concentrating on the swimming 7.30 pm. Boxing.

events,



Swi i
The first final in the swimming
was held yesterday when C.
Scholes of the U.S.A. won the
men’s free style 100 metres in 57.4
seconds. The Japanese H. Suzuki
was almost level at the finish and
his time although he was second
was the same, Third was G.
emer of Sweden who clocked
This afternoon I saw the final
of the men’s springboard div:
Once again the U.S.A, brought
another triple with D. G. Brown-
ing, M. A. Anderson and R. L.



Sports Window

The Water Polo Knockout
Competition starts to-night.
Division “A” matches will be
played on Thursday nights
and Division “B” on Tuesday
nights.

The draw for to-night are:
Whipporays vs Police and
Bonitas vs. Oaviars.






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j

Cricket

Four ovtright victories were

scored as the fourth round of Sec-| Sealy was
-ond Division

Saturday.

| first
|} batsmen were run out while M
| Skeete took two for 16.

Second Division |



games ended 0N| howler for Erdiston.

TUESDAY, JULY 29, 1952 ‘



wicket fell at 79 runs. Four

Erdiston scored an outright
{victory against Windward at
Erdiston. Erdiston scored 205 in

their first innings. C. Norgrove
topscored with 50. . Cuffley
made 35 and Cecil Pinhiero 33
not out.

For Windward Deane took four
for 31, F. Fields two for 54 and
McConney two for 43.

Windward were bowled out in
their first innings for 62. Nolan
the most successful
He took six
wickets for 23 runs in 17 overs.

Central scored an outright vic-|C, Cuffley captured two for seven.

tory in their match against Pick-
wick at Vaucluse. Pickwick on
the first Saturday were bowled
out for 77. Central replied with
287 for five wickets declared and
bowled out the Kensington team
in their second innings for 95 runs
to win by an innings and 115 runs.

E. Weekes topscored for Central
with 58. C. Hinds contributed a
valuable 57 while C, Goddard and
C. Patricks made 41 and 33 respec-
tively. Bowling for Pickwick,
Jackie Hoad took two for 62.

C. Hinds was chiefly responsible
for the collapse of the Kensington
team for a meagre 95. He took
four wickets for seven runs.
Fields took two for 8 and King two
for 20.

At Lodge, Empire scored an
outright victory against the school
team. Lodge were out for 92 in
their first. innings and the Bank
Hall team replied with 148 for
four wickets declared.

Lodge in their second innings
were bowled out for 166. Mr.
Timpson topscored with 50. A,
Wilkie knocked up 43 and J, St.
Hill 36,

C. Spooner was the most success-
ful bowler for Empire. He took
six wickets for 59 runs in 16 overs
and two balls. L. Bynoe took two
for 10,

Given 110 runs to make for
victory, Empire went in and made
120 for the loss of four wickets.
E. Jones scored an undefeated 41.

Leeward defeated Wanderers
by an innings and two runs at
Fosters. Wanderers made 137 in
their first innings. Leeward re-
plied with 259 xr two wickets
declared and bowled out the Bay
team for 120,

J. Egglesfield topscored in the
Wanderers first innings with 42.
J. Pierce scored 22.

Bowling for Leeward, George
Gilkes took five for 35 and G.
Allen two for 39.

J. Alleyne topscored for Lee-
ward with 77. L. Foster made 61
while George Gilkes and C.

Durant, the not out batsmen, were
69 and 44 respectively.





J. Armstrong and M. I. Clarke
were the only batsmen to stand
up to the Leeward attack in the
Wanderers second innings. Arm-
strong made 59 while
knocked up 31.

George Gilkes, in a devastating
spell, took seven for 33. L. Foster
captured two for 27.

Y.M.P.C. lead on first innings
in their match against Combermere
at Combermere grounds, The
Beckles Road team scored 181 in
their first innings, Combermere
replied with 66.

Bowling for Y.M.P.C, G. Green-
idge took seven wickets for 26
runs in eight overs and a ball.

Combermere knocked up 217 in
their second innihgs. Fields top-
scored with 47 while Callender,
the last man in scored an unde-
feated 43. Lashley made 32 and
Harewood 29,

Y.M.P.C, was given 103 to win.
When stumps were drawn the
Beckles Road total was 102 just
one run short of victory, with
three wickets in hand, D. Edghill,
ho opened, scored 49 and the





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Sent back to the wicket, Wind-
ward were bowled out for 60.
Sealy took three for 18, Bourne
two for 12, Pinhiero one for 3 and
Roachford one for 7.

Pickwick vs. Central
Pickwick lst innings ...... 17
Central lst innings (for 5 wkts.

declared) 287; E. Weekes 58, C.
Hinds 57, C. Goddard 41, C.
Patricks 33, C. King 26. J. Hoad
2 for 62, C. Cheeseman 1 for 48.

Pickwick 2nd innings 95; C.
Hinds 4 for 7, King 2 for 20, Fields
2 for 8, Andrews 1 for 11, Weekes
1 for 22.

Empire vs. Lodge

Lodge Ist i 92.

Empire 2nd innings (for 4 wkts.)
WIEOET Be egcaotsg ¢a'sysoasn dee + 48

Lodge 2nd

1
innings 166; Mr.

Timpson 50, A. Wilkie 43, J. 6t.
Hill 36.

C. Spooner 6 for 59, L. Bynoe 2
for 10

Empire 2nd innings (for 4 wkts.
120; E. Jones not out 41,

Wanderers vs.

Wanderers Ist
Egglesiield 42, :
Gilkes.5 for 35, G. Allen 2 for 39.
Leeward Ist innings 259 for 2
declared; L, Foster 61, L. Alleyne
77, G. Gilkes 69 not out, C. Durant
44 not out.

R. Inniss 2 for 65.

Wanderers 2nd i 120; J.
Armstrong 59, M. I. Clarke 31.

G. Gilkes 7 for 33, L. Foster
for 27.

Â¥.M.P.C. vs. Combermere

Y.M.P.C, 1st innings ...... 181,

Combermere ist innings 66; G.
Greenidge 7 for 26.

Combermere 2nd innings 217;
ae 47, Callender 43, Lashley

G. Greenidge 6 for 77.
Y.M.P.C. 2nd innings (for 7
wkts.) 102.
Erdiston vs. Windward
Erdiston Ist innings 205; C.
Norgrove 50, C. Cuffley 35, C.
Pinhiero 33 not out.
Deane 4 for 31, Fields 2 for 54,

62; N.
Sealy 6 for 23, C. Cuffley 2 for 7.

Windward 2nd innings 60. N.
Sealy 3 for 18, Bourne 2 for 12,
Pinhiero 1 for 3, Roaghford 1 for 7.


















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PAGE 1

PAGE FIGHT BARBADOS ADVOCATE TUESDAY. JULY M, IMZ OLYMPICS: flrt wicket fell -I ~9 run*. Four b att aro e n wera run out while M. Timpson SO. A. WWur 4J. J. MI;IUMI.HI K I.I Initlna. < oMiimii*r IM % % %  %  %  i kel %  Frt.tniP Blank" Wll*lr,->n I I., riarfcr WlCkel. in* Mr CUUOW C Clark. I> Patrrkn. Phillip* -ip-l wksn Trnttar I. InniWa*kr. b Innlw Prtetkln taalry c W Gfrf-nlder b Patovtlit .*. Clarke J. I — I.I-. LSXVM <.... ass** bowled out for 100, giving Kensington team a first innings toad of 233. Iniux topscored for the school team with 33 while Mr. Glasgow made 24. Bowling lor Pickwick J. Peterkin look four wlckei* fur 22 runs in nine overs and two balls. Brwc Inniss took three for live runs -a eight overs of which four weie ni.u Preaood foi 21 run*. rinl innings points In Ufci CMHM Simruui—WinUwaiU natch el |^,* Congo Koad went to Wuidw.u.i. •. PMsr* Sparun made 181 in their luM tuning-. Windward replied svitn 196 for the los* of mint wlakell declared. K. Atkinson lopscoie i with M while E. Evelyn maue valuable S3. N. Medfoid. C. Wood ami B Morris took two wickets each let 41. 32 and 25 respectively Spartan were skittled out lot 0ft in their second inning. H. If, V fiESi Farmer took four wickets and > Thornton three. When slumps were A Windward hud lost two .toi ;U runI in wn I.. : by Medfoid lor 13 runs. Y.M-t'.C tried U> lurci an ouls, right victory against Mental llllg" pital but failed by 11 runs. The I Ucck.cs Koad team got Hist inu r.iri>n. nings pouils. Mental HospiUl wen Mwk out in their llrst innUigs for lid runs. Y.M.P.C repUcd wiUi 14 for the loss of four wickets declared. Ben Hoyos topscored Wlln US while K. A. Bnoekea norct an undefeated 37. In their second innings Menu: Hospital were bowled out foi 109 runt, leuvUig tInroad team 24 runs for When stumps were Y.M.PC. were 12 runs low N. Burrows topscored in thr IHIWLINIi ANALYSIS VM.P.CV IBS I--I-.BtlWIl.VG ANALVSIK 1 HiMkiiNiU :* l-*l. I1I1I-' I'HK It l^^hl'V 1r.nkrr not ojl BielhwatU run out •rUkinioti Ibw Prt. Mr. O I —so* not oul MM Tutl itot 1 MsJ nowi.iN,; ANAI TUI 21 1 II %  W Glrrnldu I 0 I %  I M-rr J 1 I 0 3 0 IT 1 EMPIRE vs. WANDEURS i Mriar IM li>abin MM S'ANUIII* 1.1 UH!B. A O 1*rlr < %  ClaiNe l> n*>kU-. 1 11 Alkuiw l> %  >•!. 41 r ArnMlrona cab Bvcblr* 1 Piltoion c a—klrb l'i*-l Hknr .• U.— I 'i flk*vl> I) Atnory %  %  Aniorv Urankei %  ..ut Bktra. TtaUl iwiihOAit l<*i 1 Mil I & WIKM.KSS xs CAKLTON iLi • iaLs i.t IM C VRI.TOV I.I I..M. ( LAM.I A Hlllll" :n. i %  II AfcKrtuxII. llurh. i Sana*) io. cea %  '" I "Oi oul il Kin*. COK b Ci Matin.1-. B*iru THUI (tor 4 -U. daclatvdi BUWI.INO ANALYSIS O af 3 MAlllwwa 7 1 \ Browne 3 I T Bdfhlll S i Mr. T. A. U. Gale. Advertising Manager of Ihr Advcale. i-. at presenl in Helsinki covering the Olympic Oiamev HELSINKI. July 28. Kan Fmmam was ehmiiuted today in the second round ^ m ^^^ X^cT^n of the heata for the 1,000 inetre sprint. Ken rod* well in ^^ ftRt cjturday were bowled his first heat and was unlucky to be second as he misjudged ((U for 77 central replied with Ins sprint. But in the second attempt he was complete]v 287 for nve wickets declared and %  jMpnrvred b* the entln field. i-wkxi ut ihe ^f^P 0 "^? !" Ye, th, ,n,ny of it i, th-t he b. a much better sprinter g^*eB ^jJj^ W than any of the three who i*at him. But that simply proves E u/eekes topscored for Central I 1! until oui cyclisti are well schooled in the department wllll 53 ( Hinds contributed a of Ijctics, they will nevei have a fair chance in the intervaluable57 w IU sf' SfeK*!"? %  I.IIM.1 C iMtrirk." made 41 and aa reapec9SSJS T J.PT Jn"S •£ * -"* '•" "• % %  """"-'*" 400 metre heat, but he could not '" have been extending himself U he won by several yarrLi in veiv eas>fashion. %  bi* with the inno v 1 h.ilf mile. netre sprint is I also saw holder for the lli.r.r b <• A Nlchotaon 1 n MHIIIV sag Issaaei K Hul.hinMm n..i ...it r. M.iiimi b B suitiMwi Kn.i.l* r wkpf CUirka b wkjir C'larki' i Nitnoll. n MrChtor)' Prasess Ipd Wfcpr Bonn nOVVLINC ANALYSIS Bfi r cightu Brankvr a Co c AJIernr b Klita Bkirat 1 Total .for 4 wkta.J M IIOWUNQ ANALYSIS O M R W ll Kim I) 1 14 1 B a ta Wh se i 4 i a l POLICE vs. REGIMENT BIG I Mf. NT 1.1 In-lni. Ill I'OLirr 1*1 Innlni. I SfOIMP.NT -1.4 Innlnf A labinsvl nol out • l.l.-nrlth I li w Oninth l o Beekta* noi oui -. r-t- i Tolal l^ %  c 1 wkt. daciarxi10 %  owuaa ANA: n M R 3 Shkrmon ft I 11 c. O ss Bai .s o is i. cam-r Amory 11 lluirhiruan T 3 IS WANDIBBBS -M4 UnUi. Allvyrw c Wkpi b PirM-od 0. Saalr no) out A r 11 IB 11 oiuj not out %  sit es Total tlwr I wkt HOWLING ANAIVS1H 4 1 P SiTiith 3 0 ~ tal< roLH'i: :-d I....I.... B t*aly not out n Mo.ru c Iat Bi-(Jiarr D Chfltrnham nol aut ToUl < for 1 wki I BOWUNQ ANALYSIS O at C Phillip3 a I Clarke 1 i> Herib. 3 1 I Beckle: victory. J., drawn without An : wkpr b B Morn* ipt i. a M M Fra>.. O C Wood Kiruj v aub b Pani(Jrrnldsr aal oul WUk*. ,wapr b Maefaid -oul Ewebra i V raim ,t.l Hot S wkli darluadi BOWL1NO ANALVSU irons i o a o Mulchinx.il 4 0 4 0 Kirlon 1 S S S WINDWARD vs. SPARTAN • l-ASTAN1*1 %  III WIMiWARD Hi Ineiao Tin.nil..i. Cumbcibatch P Mad ford Mental Hospital's -econd InntngJ j ( r J~ p 1 B J^J %  'tt**' with 41 runs. M. Crichlow atOI I I 30. Bowling for Y.M.P.(.. K. Branker look ulree for 21 in 11 overs and a ball. Carl ton secured nrst inning points In their match ngaln^l Cable and Wireless at Boarded Hall. On the flr*t day (table a:v! Wireless were nil out for 711 Carlton by close of plav were 13'* for eight wickets The Black Rock team on Saturday took that! I to 151 Cable and Wireiess UNI 00 to good start m their second Inning* when the opening pair B. Matihewi, and R. McKenxie put on 56 runs before MeKenzie was on: lest before to Burke for 21. Matthews scored 44 and Cable and Wireless went on Io make IBS for four wickets declared. H. H KIN ; knocked up 44 and K. Cron ej not out with 42 to bis credit. In die time remaining for play Carlton scored 50 runs for the la of four wickets. I. Matthews took Iwo for 42. Kenny HuU-hn scored 17 not out and P. Kenned* •* IT. At the Garrison, Police got fir I Innings points from the Itegimeni Regiment in tfieir tlrsi innr scored 12B. Police replied With 1S9. C Sealy topscored with 00. N Bowling for Regiment C. Phi • lips took four wickets for 50 run in 10 overs and two ball*. C Pinder took three for 24 In nine overs. ReKiment in their scctfld innings made 101 for one wick. I declared. D. Beckle-i had 33 not p n W.KHI 1 b.w ( M r.n-x-T Morn. Ibw • ub b l' ... % % %  'hornion Skinner lb. H. M. I.r-ia CuintMftMtal pt ael Chaac not out Batraa British Guiana Wins Cup BritltD Guiana won the Ove seas Rifle Postal Mutch. 1951. f II IMI "Tha I hike ..f (;ioticeeterV ChalleriKe Cup with %  score of 1.182. Bnrbndo-i was second with 1.104. The results for 1951 are: — Winning Team. BRITIBH '•UIANA, the Challenge Cup and Silver Medals. Captiiln of Team ; Colonel W. A. Orrett. sen soa •> Tot.i KKN FARN1 Naturally It will be very di..ippolnting to everybody at home but no one could be more di->aprxMnle-l than Keu Farnum him--|f He bU .'ilmost slept with hi. cycle under his pillow since he has been here and it was a bitter pill for him to swallow indeed. I hope that he will do much better ,n the time trial. Wimh the athletic events over, the entire place seems to have become subdued overnight and the Olympic village is emptying nuitkty. The Jamaica track team left this morning for Stockholm where they will run before going on to Belgrade and London. Quite a number of journalists have also departed and those left are now lOtKontrnUng on the swimming events. Swimmins The llrst final In the swimming wiw held yesterday when C. Scholes of the USA won tinmen's tree style 100 metres in 57.4 seconds. The Japanese H. Suzuki wag almost level at the finish and hU time although he was second was the same. Third was G. Larson or Sweden who docked 158.2. | This afternoon I saw the final of the men's springboard diving Once again the U.S.A. brought on I anulher triple with D. G. Brown| ing. M. A. Anderson and R. 1* 1'lutworthy occupying, the first Olympics Diary TUESDAY. JULY %  1.00 IM, Fancing (SSBPB Win competition, lat round). 9.00 a.m. Equtrtrlan 9.00 in Shooting. 9.00 a.m. Basketball. 10.00 am Swimming tspriug board diving, la dm. 1st group of dive*; 400 m. free atyle. men, .asrnlflnal.). 100 in backauoke, ladle", heaU; water solo) 11.00 am. Cycling (1.000 m scratch race. 2nd heata; 4,000 m. person race. 2nd heats) 1.00 pjn. Boxing. .1.00 p m Fencing (sabre, team competition 2nd roond). 4.00 [i in Basketball. 5.00 p. HI Swuaauag (,90o m. relay. men. Onai; 200 m braaaWtroke, laOiefl final; %  .primi board diving, la dies. 2nd group of dives: water polot 6.00 p.m. Oycllug (1.000 m scratch race, semi finals; 4.000 m. pursuit race. Mini finals: 4.000 m. purseit race, final; 2,000 m. tandem. seeml-lnala). 7.00 p m Football. 7.30 p.m. Boxing. Sports Window The Watar Polo Knockout CompeUtion aUrU to-night Division "A" matches will be played on Thursday night* and Division "B" on Tueaday nighu. The draw for tonight an: Whipporars vs Police and Bonltaa vs. Caviars. At Lodge. Empire scored outright victory against the school loam. LAXlge were out for 92 in '.heir first innings and the Bank Hall learn replied with 148 for four wn-kets declared. Lodge in their second innings were howled out for 100. Mr. Timpeon topscored with 50. A. Wukle knocked up 43 and J. St. Hill 30. C. Spooner was Ihe most successful bowler for Empire. He took %  ix wickets for 59 runs in 10 overs ..nd two bolls. U Bynoe took two for 10. Given 110 runs to make for ;>iuwent in and made 120 for the loss of four wickets. E. Jones scored an undefeated 41. Leeward defeated Wanderer* by an innings and two runs a' Fosters. Wanderers made 187 In Iheir iir.f innings. Leeward replied with 259 for Iwo wickets declared and bowled out the Bay team for 120. J. Egglesfield topscored in the Wanderers first Innings with 42. J Pierce scored 22. Bowling for Leeward, George dikes took five for 35 and G Allan Iwo for 39. J AllaWM topscored for Leeward with 77. L. Foster made 01 while George Gilkes and C. Durant. Ihe not out batsmen, were 69 and 44 respectively. J. Armstrong and M. I. Clarke wan the only batsmen to stand up to the Leeward attack In the Wanderers second innings. Armstrong made 59 while Clarke knocked up 31. George Gilkes. in a devastating spell, took seven for 33. L, Foster captured two for 27. Y.M.P.C. lead on first Innings in their match against Combermere at Combermere grounds. The Bcckles Road team scored 181 in their first innings. Combermere replied with 66. Bowling for Y.M.P.C. G. Greenidge took seven wickets for 26 runs in eight overs and a ball. Combermere knocked up 217 In their second innings. Fields top%  rnred with 47 while Callender. the last man in scored an undefeated 43. Lashley made 32 and Horcwood 29. Y.M.P.C. was given 103 to win. When stumps were drawn she Bcckles Road total was 102 lust one run short of victory, with three wickets in hand. D. Edghill. I'd. scored 49 and the Skeete took two for 10. C. Spooner 0 for 59. L. Bynoe 2 Erdislon scored an outright (or 10 victory against Windward at Empire 2nd :nnings (for 4 wkt*. Erdaston. Erdislon scored 203 In 120; E. Jones not out 41. their first innings. C. Norgrove Wanderer* va. Leeward topscored with 50. C. Cufftey Wanderers 1st inninss, 137; J%  l.,cm S3 Eggles.leld 42. J Pierce 23, G. not out. Gilkea>5 for 35, G Allen 2 for 39. (Iward Deane took four Leeward 1st Innings 259 for 2 for 31, F. Fields two for 54 and declared; L. Foster 01, L. AUeyne McConney two for 43. 77. Q, Gilkes 09 not out, C. Durant ird were bowled out in 44 not out. their llrst innings for 02. Nolan R. Iniuss 2 for 05. Seal}was the most su e re s tf ul Wanderers 2nd Innings ISO; J. bowser for Erdislon. He took six Armstrong 59, M 1. Clarke 31. wicket* for 23 runs n 17 overs. G. Gilke). 7 for 83. L. Foster 2 C Cuffley captured two for seven, for 27. Sent back to the wicket, WindY.M.P.C. vs. Combermere ward were bowled out for 60. Y.M.P.C. 1st Innings 1 81. Sealy took three for 18. Bourne Combermere 1st innings M; G. two for 12. Pinhicro one for 3 and Greenldge 7 for 26. Boachford one for 1. Combermere 2nd innings 217; Pkkwirk vv Central Fields 47. Callender 43. Leehlev Pickwick 1st innings ,..., 77 32 Central 1st innings (for 5 wkU. G Greenldge 6 for 77. declared) 287; E. Weekes 50, C. Y.M.P.C 2nd innings (for 7 Hinds 57. C. Goddard 41. C. ett.1 102. Patricks 33. C King 26. J. Hoad Krdastnn vs. Windward 2 for 62. C. Chceseman 1 for 48. Erdislon 1st innings B05; C. Pickwick 2nd innings 95. C Ncargrove 50. C. Cuffley 85. C. Hinds 4 for 7. King 2 for 20. Fields Pinhiero 33 not out. 2 for 8, Andrews I for 11. Weekes Deane 4 for 31, Fields S for 54, 1 for 22. McConney 2 for 41. I BasWfl vs. Ledge Windward 1st innings 62; N. Lodge 1st innings 92. Scaly 6 for 23. C. Cufftey 2 for 7. Empire 2nd innings (for 4 w-kts.) Windward 2nd innings 00. N. declared) *. 148 Scalv 3 for 18, Bourne 2 for 12, Lodge 2nd innings 100; Mr. Pinhicro 1 for 3. Rosohford 1 for 7. LOWEST FARES" now In effect — for 60-day trip* Fly 7ZM to BRITAIN via CANADA — and lafc. ooV ,fop of 6o-D/ y fxestasi MKI ro CANADA :-jmainem .ii %  ewfa* .TOUKISr fUBS, CANADA TO SMTAM r hv big, four-enfiiiwd Star" Skybnen. with y two-abrcHsl seating %  Michoul and famous North *i*r" sarrlea all the way. (On GIGANTIC SALE PRICES N. J. Driver MaJor r. V Mania? M A Wria-M li B SIAiibw. sat i*doo O K 111 41 *1 S Ml Ml 4* 41 111 41 l M M UNBEATABLE Ttotal* J7S SSI n l.ISS Fired at Thomus assMla. C.eorgetown, 6th October, 1951 Second Team. BARBADOS. Bronze Medals. Captain of Team :— Majol A. D. V. Chase. i %  J Cornell B 47 41 14.1 t'apl C t_ Kablall 4T 41 Ualthrw* b MvdlorS SO TMal r J r. Oxflth o. r. misrim M II Da>Vat1ull Malar A %  Wm ran 48 41 4S 44 *I 44 I* ail i MENTAL HOSPITAL vs. Y.M.P.C. M1NTAL HO-riTAI. I.I Innlni. .1 T.at.r.c. ui .V Uwi. c WHUarw b Hap* I W lloyo* i A I. CrMhlaw %  O Kim %  wkl-r I, !<..*• Fired at Barbados 0 Range. 20th October. 1951. Third— KENYA, Captain ream. Capt. W. H. Dickens; Sen:. 1.086; Fourth : JAMAICA. Captiii %  f Team, Rfn. B. N. Crlndla-u Seore. !,•. 1 "i.cv'.i Do H Eva v I imc ..-Bv Ji immv Il.itlo K-.SSA ^wrES? MAlifl' TUDOSUC MSAM?VO\) exjy? KX/RE NOT WURT, AKE )O0.l May, jw3i.rv we vssso x* 1 ( IS OJlLTy OP 8QN3 WAS TAKlNltS IT NCE^i effilrs FROM OUT AH'EASY—, /jB3py S or X0= TOWN ~ ( REAL *N6URA^E*;: %  .•.•.:•*•*•*+'.'*•*'*'*•' '///.•/.•/.'.V.W.V,'///,','^*,'///,.,., By LUSINA of Switzerland— a perfect gift A random choice from our remarkable watch and jewelery counter. Unsurpassed value . . . and guaranteed LUSINA servicing K. II. II \f Cap., I i,l Lower lli-*il St. SHEER BEAUTY! NYLON HOSE CAVE SHEPHERD & CO.. LTD 10,11.12 & 13 Broad Street with Shadow Toes and illin shades of TanKula. Sweet Spice and Brine Blush SOCKS for Chililreii from Siae*. 4'/a—6 in lovely colours niul White. itiii's f/nur Hnof ##**#••/ Painting > THEN B0WRANITE rr unit i*iru<*t it For (he best protection against Bust and Corroaion use B0WRANITE Anti-i. !" 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PAGE 1

WFATHW RfPOWT VBSVTLXDAY IU.nl.ll (,..., Codf1ftton: Total rainfall lor meMk to • H i s* — I Traamur. fll • Lewvat Tempera" iloetw: 3SB 1 p.m.1 TO-l>AY S u —I n : 3 am. %  Mian T.d. %  %.i,,, %  | IAW Tide. I Ji %  m I w| ESTABLISHED 1895 TUl DAY. JULY 2D, 19W PRICE nvr CENTS NAGUIB BEY WARNS ABOUT FOREIGN INTERFERENCE Army General Promises * , ^ , ^ ^ . ^i rr Butcher Condemned \l IIAIUI* HAM Corruption Clean-Up NILE REJOICE OVER FAROUK'S DEPARTURE CAIRO. July 28. Egypt's new government re-established itself in Cairo to-day,' promising the relent leas country u wide cleanup of bribery and corruption in the wake of King Farouk's abdication The country's new military power. Major General Mohammed'Napuib Bey promised thai he and Premier Aly Maher Pasha would meet with armed force if necessary any attempt at demonstrations or disorders Nsguib warned, too that the army would tolerate no foreign interference as the cabinet quit its summer capital at Alexandria for Cairo and the ousted monarch sailed toward Italy ID Mir royal yacht "Mahrouwa." With rarouk were hia six-month old aon, now Egypt's King Faud II. Farouk's teen age second wife, Narrunan, and hia three daughters by a previous marriage. One newspaper Mid that the baby King would be returned to Egypt when he is seven years old the age at which Moslem mothers traditionally lose control of their sons. The Cabinet meanwhile, temporarily held royal powers pending the creation of a regency council. The Nile Kingdom generally rejoiced at the departure on %  Saturday night of fat playboy rarouk. whose downfall started when 51-year-old General Naguib and his coterie of younger officers took over the army last Wednesday and forced the King to Install Maher Pasha and the new anticorruption government. The cleanup was expected to probe into every section of she government extending to former cabinet ministers and palaoe officials High on the action docket are charges against several high officials, including Farouk's cousin Prince Abbas Halim, who is charged with supplying faulty arms to Egypt's army during the Palestine war.—<*> Mossadegh Will Exploit Iranian Oil TEHERAN. Iran July 28 Premier Mohammed Mossadegh last night promised etUkl Iran's oil resources, indicating conudent hopes of n settlement • It I 'Britain that would end tfci Cfftppling blockade of thfc m % %  tupl nation's Gsxset money maker. As the Premlei spoki liamcnt al the height of bli new popul-nty. the newspaper Uakhtai Erarooz. which often raft views, hinted to the Shah thrli he should never stand in the j way i 1 riches Is pert of hia, programme for drastic reforms to ft the country from its present economic plight. Hi programme lied also for higher taj forms, and work projects fcr the unemployed measures which are bound to be opposed by manv wealthy supporters of the government. To Die In ] -Day Trial Found Guil y Of Killing Former (Jon* toon Law Wife VALMAK SMALL. 16-year-old butchei of New Orleans, wtl vesterday found saillv of the murder oJ I dolyn Small, his Conner lonunon law wife on the 20th of i ii.. Lords! j .: Chief Justice, Sir Allan Coltyopeed the leuth sentence. The jury re-tunn diet of guilty nfter di-lib erating for 2f> minutes, ii\f minutes les-s ;h,,:i IILS 1, took lo sum up the case phich ended nfter only OIM d hearing. In returning tfi H verdict "t guilty, the Jurj fe> plea' made by Mr V. G. Smith. wb< conducted the defence at the request ol the Crown Congrats! LONDON, July 28 Oliver Lyltelton, SecreUrry of State for the Colonies, to-day sent the following telegram to the Manage* of Jamaica's Olympi'.iim ai Helsinki. "Please give my warmest congratulationto the Ja' in.i). ah i. .in. „n llieu splen did achievement In winning the 1,600 metres relay and the 400 metres." Ill >MM It VI 14 .MIMI.XIi: Manley Introduced To Local Bar Holding Us glasses in hi* band. Governor Adlal ItanuMU of llbi.oi smiles in bis office in Chicago. lie was chosen Democratic PrestdenUal nominee at the Democratic National Convention. Farouk m s Mother Knew Something Would Happen BEVERLY HILLS, CALIFORNIA. July 28, Egypt's Queen Mother Nazli defended on Monday het son who stripped her of all royal rights, and said he would face the crisis that forced King Farouk's abdication "with faith and courage." The dowager queen expressed hope that Farouk would come to America, but a close fomilv friend doubted that the deposed king would make the trip Queen Nazli, who was stripped of her royal rights mallv disowned by Farouk because she approved of • %  < marriage of her daughter Princess Fathia to a commoner in 1950. said that she still loved her son "deeply." "I know he wiil face this crisis would make a better king if he with faith and courage" she said, came to this country and observed "He has always been a courageous; American life. Ghali and the and deeply religious young man.". Princess Fathia expect their firm The queen, who came to the 1 child ,! "* autumn. United Staten about four years ago.j %  %  moved here more than a year ago; to live with her thirty year old 0..,.,, I\^.. *' %  >-%  daughter and son-in-law R.ad MfllO llOpt. A\gUH OhaD. thirty two i Although F""k cut off his Pardoning Of IVazia mothers 81.000 per day royal ine come In their dispute over PrlnWASHINGTON. Julv 28. cess Fatrdos marriage the family Th* SUn> Department made Uvea In a fashionable apartment, public on Monday its disapproval largely upon private funds and inD f the recently passed Austrian vestments. Queen Naxli said she laws pardoning certain leaser Nam has been expecting 'something to wsr criminals. The laws passed happen" in Egypt for snene time by the Austrian Parliament go" because 'events have been beinto effect 30 days after subnUawetM and worse '. She %  ion to the FoarPower %  said she had no idea what plans Council unless vetoed by any one her son might have but a friend i of the four | said the queen believed Faroukj W.I. Should Not Rush Blindly Into Federation PJfJS 1.KAI1F.R of Jamaica. Mr. Norman Manley and Labour Leader here. Mr. Grantl. I both expressed the view at a Ung at QuastVi Park on usjtat that the West Indies should not rush bllndlv Into federation without being aura that the conditions of federation were secure. The other West Indian Lender ke on Federation at '.ins Mr. T. A. Marryehuw, power was In the hands of the people, but federation had not been achieved because :he Ud not use il. "Where Federation Is concernitl." Mr. Manley said. "It Is betUr Uinl am should make h.Mc %  lowly, H kl such a great step flight be a misfortune, might be k) start on the tvrenf foot or before we ure quite ready." Trinidad "Until Trinidud comes In tne u.i. of the P.N.P. of Jamaica and the Labour Party of Barbados, and set about putting power the hnnda of the working voters. then i. HI be DO Federation in the jWest Indies. Federation angfl not be on such terms that | working class would he ruled by Mr. "Sfi and so" down Broad Street or Frederick Street". Addressing the people. Mr. Manley llrst referred to this bc. ing hit hi.ot visn to Barbados. Then speaking of Barbados, he 1 said that it was not surprising 'h.it the history and act tef Barbados has played a promBBSgkt and distinguished part in the West Indian events of the II % %  „! %  : Fui he said, hi .jnled the years I37 and 13 I 'mil emancipation in the "A •--' It dies when not a territory It' etii.im-li Olltbursl "1 • pe->pn' unable any longer to toiss-ate the sufferings that mal.n i %  •ration brought upon Speaking nf the acrnmplishI menu of the West Indies, he said he named as foremost of them, i the achievement of uruversi'l i.niult sufTr.'igc. Ha cuuld remembtf that l--fore 1W43 in Jamaica 0 II Of BM bssd %  vote. A tnafl without a vote was necea%  _. Bxflj disregarded by the pollti : wnk "la., of the oiwrous dutx leans becauseIn the Last analysis wh h r # me lth *F£u* those duties, he s.iid, was ti B..^.I..I I ** rspresentiriK and lv<< %  I-.-. \ ii"' nuidini; out [elsM assstau "Believe me," he said, "nothing The legal profession had %  mg else that has been' ways regarded Itaelf as a pro. g, On Page 3 f On page S NOHMAN W MANLE^ M.H.R.. Leader of the. or four yeeo*. There were 'v. Bfl g.c. People's National Party 11 Jamaica, was yesterday Intrduced to the local Bel Attorney CJeneral. Hon. C. Wyl | and admitted to practise at i„ Courts of the island by Hit Lot ship the Chief Justice. Sir Allan ('olt.vinoif. I'Miiilruduetion was dona I fore the business of the Court of Qrand ssssseona was begun. The Bar was fully represented for I ho occasion and the Judges of the Assistant Court of Appeal < also present Making the introducti;.. II Wylie said that Mr. Mauley WSJ bom 0B July 14, 1803. He was educated at the elementary %  efaool und the Jumulc.i College and 10 1914 became a Ithodes Scholar und Went to Jusus College, Ufoul. He had war service with the Koyal Field Artillery. Mr M, tided Oxford from IBIS to 1021 and achieved the Certificate of Honour. He was Leo ITizcman of Gr*y'a Inn (Easily Prize) and was called to the Bur on April 20, 11121 H< nutted to the Jamaiou Bar on August 30. 1922 and sum |93| has appeared tn every importaiii and sensational case In that colony. CSuined His Silk He recently went lo England to defeml a Jamaiciin chargeil wiUi murder, had occasion to no I-fore the Privy Council, wag President of the Jamaica Bag Council and had gained his silk. "On this occasion" the Attorney General said, "there Is another aspect and it is this, that throughout the world there is a demand on all sides for the democrat and Self-Government and one sometimes wonders whether the people who make these demand: Ihinli <*nly of the privileges Bi W-hed to these desirable pulit <;. 1 advanUges, or whether %  :.' betwee n 11 %  '. sVM p ni tn. I nail nurdered hi axtu inflii-ted some IH •tab /0Unda on li.i \*xiy al the Hsurj ltiad near %  is Road lunction. v was produced to the at the .UVUM-II who had '".. .lulilren 1>> the deceed. ased t.. beat Mi during Iheh mil that ibosd %  : lie evenllic in questto'i land fatally sUbbiii bi I The r.r, (., %  the Crown v lioiidueted by air. K K Full lAgaJ-Draughtantan snd Assistant i ny General Destl Clarhe, 52.of New st Mu-h-ei and snothoi %¡ 1 Gwendolyn t21arke, was the i v itt % %  u give %  nil* il Hie Cio n Her ighter .mil ilu %  % %  > %  %  period of about three DB CATO i' n.-nie left) Bir Allan OollyiBors. LadyftAVSge. Maioi Uovsmor Blr Alfrad Bavagfl < hat together when they sttcndrd i Saturday night (Bes pags 9) i Vanahn snd HiExcellency the Charity Ball *t Uie Marino HoUl Free Nations Wish Stable Government For Egypt EDEN COMMENTS ON PRESENT CRISIS Police Doing Useful Work In Oominica LONDON, Julv 28 Ilntiah Foreign SecMinv Anthonv Eden said Mondhv were all actually u ulii' roof bill BBBBBsss of hll thude '"•> si li hei dau % %  hcrtteir she asked htm to leave. lyn led ho,: I :i<> n'ckieJl OB the morning of Itie 30th. She wad %  BsBvl i ion but on the avening of %  < ni 5.4S p.m. repori ind BSSB! to Weetbun Road, The hi.-"I The 1 her ilaiinlili the street 'n a pool 0 ajao BH n The Pol ire tliut all free nutuiiis an in dnlv bjpiaMl Ctovt n crisis Eden appeared in Lh i statement on Ejjypt for the laun !ii1 am sure the House will IBM exMCl rue to comment on ihe internal course of future develi.pmenta but 1 should like to Uue tIn i>|)|>rtuiiity to stress our interBBl and I am sure the Intei-estOf nil fiee nations that a stabli .mil orderly administration ma> emerge from the present crisis Eden said in bis statement lid that lii the circumstance: Ralph Stevenson. British Amid, I'oli.v Poree hi ihniuni. I gOOd little one Which is A g useful work, Lt. Col. R 11 !.!• M.I"I %  Superintendent • PoUea loin tinAdvoeavte li-.i T iiefnto returning homa yestsro>v i'. *: Ui Hi I thai the Force comludbtg mi' HnrlKiilian. who WBra doing uur LI--Co < >/.i peul in 11.rb.Kli*. aft. i attemlin/ I i of rtra SnCen of Uv British West Indies In Trlnldo.1 While htm he was u guest ol Mr. M. While a| St Uwntuv. lie IM>.1 that Use truU npa> baetUasJ in Dominica wan % %  tioiutig In Frame when General panding and the new rannin,: In Mohummed Naguib seized eontrttl i itii'sicd in seemv* a stasUe and <'iil emerge from the present 9 House of Commons to make a first time since his illnesa with dustry which had |u-t *tarte<< %  a dotui %  I ii Social H. W.LA Flight Arraitgetl H W .. .> fi. | 1 Waggon arrived and took then, lo|hDnal ih-ht from H-rbad BJ ..1 !! %  %  pital Next .1 pi] ,, „ .„, smnl.r. she viil to the hmpital and hei daugtotan body. To The Court :— When I saw < %  tWO persons in the street. Gwendolyn bad i ly cuts on her. and the accused s e am ed to ttiroai cut too To Mr. Smith: 'The diveiised had five children other than the i i %  11 During the real i whan the aci uaed Heed at bat DO the) Vl'llt.l 1,1 I daughter. She cannot sa.\ i the sectsgej di %  I I'uhoi. To The Court: Tin n ,n e,i lavsd so baai mj o lugMai %  oi suntly. The ball tune he beat my dausjhvsr, ha struck her. she to - %  ol with the aecuse-l 0 < bi r From tin.niioi, bi to be bcuting the woman %  the witness, went up to the In people and asked the aceiis>--' i Fe knew what l.e was dorn • On Page a %  Bsmbly of MiiMn lie B r ethren wt iVlatlon ,.f the in sonic Temple whirh took Bui yeslerdav evening This Temple now replaces the weekend. oiil one "lii.li wasi burnt duriiiii' the Castriea fire. The party comprised Mr D It D Wiles, Mr. F. A. C Clairmonte O.H.E.. Mi Prlnoe Walker. M, BaBBBB, Rev. A. K Aim strong. Mr. C. R. Armstrong, Mi BSkU, Mr. Fred Olton, Mr Carlos Clarke. Mi II K Shemi Mr Keith Muri.hv rsBV H UJ Mek Mr Usle Chsje. MCollB llclman. Mi VtnseBt v > Jean, Mi %  tsaka Davis, Kenneth Ctxiper, Mr L. Brathv atte, Mi his way bark lo Egypt. Stevciistni was recalled from BBI holiday in the South ll llll S FIVAIS e 1 Korea. "We still think we are going to get en armistice out there—particularly because I think the munists want one", he told .it the National Airport K very nine shay stick their he.iih IP 'hey get hurt." hi c n'.i lei itoppvd in Korea, l .nnOBB and the I'hlUpI IFINISH of the much disputed 100 ssetres. Tats pletare leads mock strength to the ssaampUoa that McKenlsy of Jamaica second from rtfht. won. It also sessss to show from the position of the taps Wat both Bailey snd Smith (together in th* middle) best Bemiglno who is third from right next to McKenley. The white line behind the heel of Mac Donald BaileyS left foot Is the finishing line. Steel Workers Go /lack To Jobs PITTSBUROH. July 28 Steel workers stepped up the laco In their "back-lo-work'' movement to-day, but a few still grumbled over the wage settlement reached with the big steel Dlsautrsf action led from the >>uo n inl-M of BsBBl unitedSteel workers at Jones and Laughlins. a south side Pittsburgh Pi"'it. James Mclaughlin, BMB1 I*re-nilent. said his group voted during tho week end to return to work but under protest that he %  ill fotward %  protest to the rteel workers president Phi Up Murray that the principal corn' plaint is that the wage increase :s not across board. (CB ftMlssOHl mi N Bmhop IViaudfvilU' S%'HU.K. FirslT-ime LONI>->N .Inly 28 The Bishop of Itirbados, Rev Gay Luge Griffith Mand aeeing Beitaln Fa the first lame. H -n ui the West Indies. He says : "Hj I u England so long ago I don't know which ps.it of tincountry t.. regard as m> home. 1 i'all, with a salting of grey in hi. hair the Bishop m in his sixties. Re is spending several mom BBJ lonunit Bril.tin He is arranging for aevci.ii in,n to Bo bades to tram for the M>i am UaBton > BUSBBI artueh has %  Slty. The Bishop l-Kik : degrees, at lie is to visit—at Saliabui man of the man who fou ago. n %  %  h I II Ne-< : month he will see hi %  eharge cetilarenee m Sweden. She I h Fmbsey In Denmark. Nuguih Mibsi Rdb With U.Hlruinl LONDON. July 28. The Leaden Tlsne* Monday saio that General Mohammed Hague be aimo.1 sup restraint" If he is I" steer Egypt away from mllita Kveiythnitt de p end! the Tten' said in an editorial on the v* that General NaguiO tskes of hire* ponslbll ities fW there i. b. force in Egypt to challenge he will. However salutary hi thus far may be from the standpoint of the country"'. Intelesta) and he Is believed to be disinterested as well la Mtrtotle.— IP SHERLOCK ON J"CA LEG. COUNCIL Bd that beicttoni fothe appointment of Mr. PfUD Sherlock V rsity Col in Official member of the LeglsiCP>



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PAL. -<\ HUUIUMIS u>\..< \n T UESDAY. JILT . 15* CLASSIFIED ADS. TElfMONI r&OS FUR REIVT HOUSES IN MKMOKIAM MlMtAi r ih. -M-irtt iiwtnorv of n ,ta., friend HCM Mum-. nnriad ih' .... July. 1MB. i>. bto BM< .i. •• .l-d tc Tilt* Jl-aetar, N ll.Maird and "i I If T MIn dair ikW OUi to hiR-he* n.M on SB Julv. li not to 0 I'l IIMI*. l ,1.11 -.1 agaaaal VWI*\I FOR V%I.K AUTOMOTIVE Attractive aaailde Da llngi. rocnforUbly fu Bath. Op— Verandah f. one parson ior couple . Telephone am MM rn. ga .. %  *.. %  .. KUTS Two .l.ert Clata 'I Dunuitabie far 1 only .Ward HUM %  The Yanks rfci. SHOULD NOT RUSH Get Forty Aircraft S l'rtu Page ih* good i ( rvr*,trovmg thu r |0 Them with an i nly lo b< rui, b] iieufJle who are donanding fMrr.!' ig businesses in 'uded I* : .1. i .-111 i r AH-Citroen llihf fl M. MIUII *ulra(* Ban ob Good a> naw T tlvasj kick claas perf. SM •' Apply I' ll-n. i.awaVC/o Canadian Bank of Coanmerra a 1 U On AN APPROVE!) TENANT .-j*t ru*t noat .t fn €•* %  C I n l.i Ih. II. — I ,IM AMI WAI TTH IvmtNSO*. LOST A ratJNB LOST Leal** School. SI Join %  ( 1 on 1 .r 'i .1 1 A Walcoll 3ft 1 U -Jr. CABFord V-S Super OaLua X-TM III aall al bargain prlca. enquiries to D Su-w.fl Blal isss It T.M-4n ("AM ISB1 modal — MS 1M0 Sinav I'l III II SAILS AUCTION TYi be told b. auction On Ttiaradai>nt 1UI JuJy At llr. I. Hother.al T'lrnlru>l head, ot Dah > Cowi and ana pad. • 1 A--la LIVESTOCK A Bamaa A CO-. A\i>nu^. Pa UK -Vp ^hii-dUd H< Inset and palingl*nd tan nr in I 0* par month Turn. CAW ',r. f dammar St Aid.. UcKeavilr II T.M Iv T C HACK TICKET Ha MM Finder kindly return •mIn Ih.Advocatr Adv'-tialnv D-part -iWFKI-STAKr TevKFTS Sei .' %  T TBBt tutd Kerlaa A s.03 Finder i>l-.ireturn .airulo O-iles CaJWP Bay r rat Hoad. CamndtonVIIUSF i ) S 1 M— In SWl.tJ-.TAKI 7.CKET --,,J7T7 s3U rtndar plaaar raaurn aatoa n Qraatf HaldT Samrrmo. Tw> UiW KM >• 1 -' A> \Ol MLHIMS K.U BHOKHN t>ENTAI. PLATt* ri,L.i V rUJ*MMEii roii. itourf f.ulhri %  -Ulrh mn nli--. Wth .rplarrd. -lack plaiaa tiinirnad squaia Danl Oppar HVM Slraa* CAHN lUCi Ki*V b i^lliil Rrd:r alon & twir apare Una. Oal J ippi: at forma touaj I.) 1' •> W\ • II HELP IOWHTo Hi Milch Cawa. Zt and I pU raapax-llval*. alao dankay and it and ha jn iai ApplA P Biownr. .•IUII SUaat. St John 1 5aV-*n MECHANICAL | CMfcfU 90 Mwida> CVVf>M O* th* llonitkoim Suyecnu.' Cuurt awardiiiK 4A civil aircratl to the Chines* (ommuiiUls and awarded thinii instead to an American Company. The Judicial ComnutUtj of tha Council Iha higrMr-.i louri of UM Kmpirc. ..llowtMi ih appeal of the Civil Air Transport ited <'f l>eU*are HHJIU-- the HCKIK Kong decision. Tha American Corporation suacuadeo the Airlines Company hcadad by General Claire Chcnnault of the Flyin*; TIK'*""' "> China before the rtvil war. The Nationalist Chinese old plane* orkaV-n.illy *o the Chennault company, They kold to Chennault on tJw Darnber 12th 1940 when Britain still recognized the Chiang Kal Shek Rovarnment as the PHtM.llMIIIIKS ninry-s TWCYCUC -run ,\, r aajaat" n*d>' Killiiard Phone H.IUmv 17 T St—ar C'Vf-MM I ..nil tad NOTICE Ail mala eltttana of Iha Unltad Staia* '*t-r*n Ut aaa of IS and raaldUMI n % %  fSad M ara raauartad to rail al %  Ammcan Coauiulata from July I. IM1 foi fUladlva SarvK* Kcaittn indar Iha UnlvrraaJ Military Traimras POULTRY II: >f rjanb Smith A All mala clUiana of th> Unltad Stalaa 7 ri r„ ,h 0 aliain tha f of IB -aquant to July >l. US), u %  •i raciatar upon Iha day thai ^____ 'iihiaanlh anaUvaraarr o Ui : ... thalr birth, or arlUiln "^ %  ^^afiar Por rurUiat lnft._ Amarlcan Conaulatr. badoa 011 i day. ataraMUoa, ron.ult Lb> Brtdrt>wn. Bar fr u-i.f %  Like M support Ih*' %  'iiiit,!*|i"fi iha} van fjlrafaj li trade un>ons. Uiey Eoi fdcralioa jiiil -elf-government. Uut a-OUad be able to stand -iu wit) uggextrd ir %  the Ranee Report" Tha colw %  tUni i i irj riomii wealth wfa ill in at :.\ -nit got on the i io dm nid sheLr laaJtlmaU h^r^ i,jve not vet replied to Uiat Supi. the best traditions of the human in order Uiat Uv 6 Dead In Car. Trailer Crash .-4re* Around Sydney Flooded TOWN Pennsylvania. July M government of China. But on flight bring about a early ;.s posmidnight of January Mh lft.SU ,.; ( u hopes and aspiration* Biilaln recognisad the CornmunlIlu ,hcy all shan w. • ii ml regime as China's legal it*>vdlJ[l unMJ vVest Indi.ui Federaernrnent and since the planes had 1lon originally belonged to tinovernment air lines, the Hong Kong court held that the planes had belonged to the Communist Government. Since October 1st 1949. Uppel of the American firm in Hong Kong was dismissed. Lord Oaksey announced that tnelr Irdshlp* would allow the appeal and that a judgment hold was entered for a declaration that the forty oircra'i were the oroperty of the appellantR. He said there would bo no order nn %  oats, and added thai the! He had not seen that as yet In Ihfl whole of the Caribbean art;i have shown thr nadt:.isp the power Whtch .' .Ii Murrysnow had told them. i' there. No one had done more for the .!,... %  -if Federation and Self Govwe strike nil in Barbados, va MMM ouild the scliools and hospital and cveryUun^ ,>nd uacidenully I information about oil posslbllitie and why all thi* ( > taking plarf No Promise We tour. Mr Cummins. Mi inies Of IhV Wakvll. Mr Cox and myself havi _f>. .. n in ncen beset over and o*/tt .nd evi iv time we tell U do not give any monopoh In giv.ng one company the right to explore fur
    ^?*££2' curve m UM bottom of the mounand troops with army lain and craahed headlong into mo launcrn The car was smashed -Un m n y Mie stone wall surround< l"-Phave been evacu•„m,I... to safe*r. their rescue work %  nVicntly. SHIPPING NOTICES forI.ordships MIS( M.I.ANMIUS riaa. a-h.. KIFJJ) nVKRJMB lo. Sun... V,.l. Plantation. Si Andnw A: ; H.I HIn r.rNTlXMAN --k ra*po"hli' P tM>n. CJ.ii aknron .anr* orBca r|*ruc ...II. : uiia Bansssrli w qua laV ftta*i had .mjwr.-ic .ad-il aasrt N.. nlSht duU>a for jrrai.Bfiii.nl of inlirvlaw and full daUlU raplv "Kaania}" ,o Advotala SST M-3-> %  • %  1 draaaUif. riaaiHtr 11|I.U> IS and reKJ I'varar lampa. liraiwa holdar 1 ... HI., minora Kai a Truck'. Irra nigaa (Car and Truck>, miulaUnat tap' ii rtrav Gara|Dial 4JBI ^ I fej . I CIJ AI.-Ct.SS d Barfaado* and Sapttrnbai "-|-arnd full dalaUa SIM raqulrad ltb >mall Pawp-.i to Advocata Box O.Ta/ ,tr Co IS t U—10.) ao'lial.!-. MISCELLANEOUS iwvrrtjca—i.ses n o i siodwina : lira aiadmnd piafrirad — toon |. paid KrUshlaLtd t %  at M POCSrJR HOMaTr • %  ••"> aaraei by racmr"an-t nf .1 Spri .al Nul*a bM UJM Al.nahnnw. 1| John ill tir icrnvrd b> Dr K B Carter. J* M 0 up lo Iha 1Mb Aufiiti. ISM Appilc-nit mu.t t O^llOad Mld-Wlvaa and not mora Ihan 30 yaan of afa Appolnlmantt for inlei vlrws may b* made bv Ivlaphnnlna SS SU: lacammandaliiiM If any. ahoulfl ha producad Tha anl^ry to lie HO in prr month, incluaavinf C of I, B and ration allowance of SSI SO If not II. laaidanca at Iha Almahous*. Tha iiacaaaful apflKant I" naauma dullaa on Ilia loth Au|ti*l. 1U lly ordai of lliw AJUl OF POOR I-..W OUAKIikANl. SI '. %  Sagoad. n 1 ntAJSTJI, Claak is v -. NOTICE AMiilcatHii'will BS i.ii... Clark of tha Vaalr 1 I M i Friday, lit Ausual. 1M2 l„i 1 Ona Archar Glllan* Hch.ii..i-lup at SI Mlchaal'a OIH School, paya vacant Any Vastry SchoLarahlp al, tin %  arna School whirl, ma. baconar vacant during tha achool year i-andldalaa muat ba Iha daudhlai' o( i • %  iihhinara la Mmltancl rlrriunatiuit %  %  : ba 1< fhau %  at •racas TOYS Naw Amarlcan To.m wi uda rioclor -nd Nurac KIL. >lla. PlMoU. Cannons Cnra. .in Plalol*. Dippy DurM ..ml .ii i"i* nmad ""..I llutchlnaon a C<> WtniiaSTQ grjTT A few ironing hi,., .n N-,....I,I iron artf, aubfael lo Mr-lft allowanca A BartKa ?*• TWTJ-'TY-riVE DOlj^AfW aatra Bonv '•oni Radlffoaion for SS raromn.indUon* in ona calandar month lVflG'3 Damage 3 U.K. Planes SEOUL, July 28. C >minunist MU.-15 swooped ..r Manchuria on Sun* i' thalr most daring UUMSI hi, ..nd damaged three v>uvllur-driven warplanes. It was the llrsi M1G attack of the '.var iigalnst BiVish carrier-ba*. i planes, ..nd che i fpsjgt ooihw.mt pe • %  tratlot. ma Kusaianb. jets in many weeks. Ail of the damaged planet were two scalei lias*' from the rarrler "Ocean'. One plane WRforved down In Iha Yellow Sea ofT the W 10 %  '. AioUier m'sde a forcii landing on the Uland ui u tiird -taggerod back to its landing on the corrlci. The navy saul nont oi the plane crews piftertd Injury. No damage eVilms weremade. —U.P. — AC — THI ItAKBAIWIS .UJl'ATIC ILl'B (Loral *iid \ baUng Menslacrs Unlv). Thruagh Ihe courtesy of The British Council ulcru will be a FILM SHOW Hi the Ballroom on Wednesday July 30th. at 8.30 p.m. The Programme Include-t BRITISH NEWS; THE HRIIX-E "F TIME, show.ng some of the Tradii:i.n:il Certiniatiiv!. of England. THE .(.KEEN GIRDLE. (LoiiduatV Parks and open spactt) and CRICKET. Member, are cordially Invited. N.B.—Thera will be na -hov.after this until SejiJ emOer. _^^. YAWL 'TRAPCDA' 1 ecallr..t con lion NaDiaarl aVilina. lor fu ...Ikulara apply J R. Bdwarda Plum : IB.T.SS-Sn NOTICE OIBla' IMll HrfUAL INION Thara will ba a Canrral Marina of th G I U. at iha Union Room on Wadrri %  iv JOUi July 4t* v m Mr* at A llaltou haa aracMyutly cona'i.tad lo gvW %  'k Aim. .nd Ubjacia of IP Palate Oriental Recuerdos Do India. Chino, y Cylon Hnl-.i IhTachapelo Fspecilitamente Menos laWr Quince Perciento Duranle De Bnratilln TIIAXI-S Pr. Win. Hc-nrv Slr.-.-i DI-134M Cu^YourPilei paina l|chln| and to".— it ln-ii. I'H-S tlrtca thadlr..vary ..f MytaaH.am-ria Inown aa Chmar -Id! M,I.< ... I I> (O work In IS lulnutr-ad aol only Mnna (ha pa>ln but aao tak*.ut tha aw... if. ainpa bla. dlna and combats narva Mliallon tharrb* curbtnr othar Irou• iMcauaad by Pllaa such aa Maadacli'. nar'aa. Barkrha. Conalli-allon. I auf ana-a-y, SobUHy anl IniuibU % %  i.,.....n.,n Oat Hylaa from youdruaa-'*t li-la. unu.r tha pc-iitna (ua'antaa Mytaa muat i... u your plla ,.lna asal iroublaa o. monsy back a. •aasrn of a-aptr sackasa ; ;'.' •,',','.W-'V/W-V/'.W/; t I REMOVAL NOTICE | .^ Variety Sandal Shop \ will be removad lo No. s* :17 Swan Slreel us from N UI Augufii. \ 2o 7 52~-ln. i{ ijj .-I. ir. ISM. lo bo provad by a Bap%  mal Crrtifkata which muM accon any Uir apalleahon Forma "f application will ba i-aui nd racauad at Iha Va-lrv Clark • Off.. tha h"i u* 10 for [hi uld glv decb irnmcnt than Mr Marryshow. It getting that that gav,u the righ; no accident Uiai they *er Io M y jnts or no cemg them there togethei in ,. W(l te ^ lnal i( (1| | LS found, Barbados Apart from the fact ttou id be for Ui< that he has come Mr Manley has a -j 8 •^I^UCaWTI-R-' W schadulad to from FoM raa May JIM. DWYonport .,.Mb. UaUHturna June wui. Sydnay )„ SSDk, hrtibane July IU). %  rrWlng al .-Uadoa about Ausuat Sttt. In addlUoB i. ...• arnpia ap ..,. sjfga Carao acrapsad on ihrouSh BUla adjni for iraaehipmaoi al TruiidBd to .rilaMk OUlana. La-rward and Windward ItlaraSS. Por rurtbsr -a-o-tsoiUa-a apply. i'MiM wrraTT a oo.. LTD., TannoAJB. aaj DA ( ""ii a ca., LTD.. ll %  -. Idl M V .-I Paaao-sajara SOT IBIPICa, Antll".' Muiilaallat. .... and SI KilU laUing uraday Jl-I tnrt -ha M v MMMTKA WJU .apt Carso ai-l Paanajaa lot iiiunwa Antiguaacaitaaria* .v-i. and St KRt* •-0ine Augu" isaa Indian Riots Broken-Up their told you he has coin.>ivei tOftataU ihi-, long standing promise lo atOSM of our Annual Confer. i it was ftornethliig more than that. gtj wfl have luge when the desti I lies of the 1 raVSnttOal tins "id. I Jiou you the ti nap .itainst." : th.t if the \V lid not make progn^ II" hull was no longer tiw British 'Ml., labi the British Governmi KARACHI. July 28. .1....UP in th. West Indies |-r as CoI „ nw | Government Vest Indiei aaona. n. 1 .„ K ffrne< | < tne y would be asked, aid. "Only five d*y ago I wag .. Wlll you people support ^uiC 1 Jf i. Thai was the attitude of the •Colodiscussing Federation. the Secretary of State himself' PrJJjlM used tear gas to break up ll "-*• %  ''xuemely busy, but I told onstrntiotis at u meeting of Punjab Province League Council, meeting in Lahore on B .uda. night, according to newspapei refiorti puhiKhed bsri 11M reixirt-i said thol G A. Khan, i.i-iuU i i.f tinCouncil, was hoai itali/iii I-iiiiuse nf injuries reoeivad ..IKMI .. tiowd of over SOU hurled sloncs at Council members leaving the h.ill RHrd was reportedly demonstrating against the Ahmadlii Muslims, a *mall Muslim sect which has been the centre of reUgfoui (ontroversy h. beys what I was told he wantmy i.pinion on." He said that without U t i-xaggeiiitioii he wmih ihe British Government svtr* n n praaganaa loduy whuU*vei !! %  uiiirht be In the past, t.> biteh : n as Sail Qovenuni nt if.d Federation were Opponents •If I had only his enemiefight In the West Indus." he saic | wfn!d be II paradise; ch || the ame with Mi i ihs nial Office He would not get lor Barbados because he wai C 11 Adams, but that was the atmospaWam I uceeadad %  i. had %  11%  •'.' %  proiius" • lo them, thpeopli and those pronii'i' lie ha.i not Ihs riightest Cm thi.' I H Hui iv mi with Fedeiativin. get your local draughtsmen to h they would do it H< said that tiny bad I evcrv single island British Honduras, British Guian... 11 I Ihcm — and preach a eru:.-dc until they got the atmosphere changed ,usi as it had been changed by th. ley's opponenu, not so much Uie n 3j[ hove Bit Mtillclc ,,.r....i ha ram nlwavfi !" e "ave go. IJlbolir NOTICE PABisa OP (Wasar iwsfi Apphcatsuna for a QualiSad Midwifa. iw,.(i \ K. of 30 and M Will 'n-alesd by tha CIL.II.H— rum Mia ll .ima. Waichoa. Ch. Ch up to S p in II Uvo Mh Auauil 1BS1 TSf-ina of appolnlmanl nbtaUi.ihla Iron La r-aiochlal Traaaurrr S' 1 %  *" Auti-Ahinadia slogans and stoned Council members' cars when the masting failed to pass a resolution opposing the Ahmadla movement. Foreign Minister Zafrullah Khan. Member of the Ahmadla sect, and key ilgure in the recent tontroversy. tendered his resignation. Reports from Lahore maid that the police ~mccea*fully broke up the demonstrations with tear gas and that the alluatlon was under control by midnight. No fatalities were reported. —U.P. apluEstl whom he can always eat, but Die alleged Labour Par\ of Jamaica tu convert every __.lcny in the West Indies to sec that only socialism can pull us before we can say — have Federn(icn tomorrow" A0UENAY TERMINALS CANADIAN SERVICE Iron. Munlreal and Halilax. V -LNDAIJ •HHt'NOMM1I..I 'BRUNO" Bfaaajas, ii jut. 1 AikS U Ausual • i A.i* ll July AugtM IS Auru.1 firpt gapaaUd Arrttnsl Dataa 31 Auavst :.S.pt.i.iba< U.K. SERVICE From v.iinii Wales, Liverpool and Glasgow. Bapao.ad Araraaa SUNWIIIT. !" J... MAKIA 1„. l-*nRINA(JA ..as juD Tt OARIJ ..IB Aua sy-ABRirrizi. .f-rly t (UkO AUaTUll U.K. AND CONTINENTAL SKKVICl. rom Middlesbrough. Antwerp, Kollerdarn and London. l.apaaS Arrti-al • srntRT '•rasr' %  SUN, 10 July Mid Auar Mid •>! %  • %  his addrva: NOTICE 11 HEIOJIY GIVEN thai II 1. the tniani.n of Iha Vaatry of tha pariah of Aajnt i 4r*w "i (<> rala* a loan not aacaadUig £T0" to tabla tha aakd Vealr. lo aiact com..inal Bath, and IM l>atrd thu Jfrih day of July. ISM (.-AJUUNOTON J. StAI V Rollcn-ara lor Iha Vaalu of St Andrew T B3 3n LIQUOR UCENSE NOTlCr RBMOVAJ. The appllcauon of Sylvan Wlll la mi %  ( Vau.hall. Coil.t Church, holdar -n :. qii.n Ucansa No HIS uf IBS! i In leapaal of a board and .liiu^lad tho. UT. ahidniof atl.cba.1 al Vauxhah tnrwil Church wilhln Dlalrlct "B" for 'imlailon to ramovr Iha uld Ucanaa i a board and ahtnilad ahop attn.hu. In raaldar-c at MaicwaU Hill. Christ i nurvli v-ithin l)i( MI. I. Ii %  Datod Ihia Sitli day uf Fabruar.. inn.' i C W itl.imi'11. aatq. (• %  llcr Maaxlralc. Dial It SYLVAN WIUJAM1 ABB h ei ii N Ii —This application will I aidarad al th* I u-..in.j Couit i..-id on Friday, SU) day of Augui t II ocloch a m al lallce [Mai "B C W KLDUSJl. Police MasiiUata Dial B m sKATES OF EXCHANGE lllai M TORK liu... Bankan Ti J io". Pr SUM o. Demand Diall. 71 S/10S. Pr. a.' io PI Pr. *>-Pr *0 Pr Bankm ** ;; 1 10 : Pr Demand Dial 71 oft-, pr Siht DraftTS 9 10'; Pr a> PT. fable 7 (0 75 7, IO". Pr f. Pr. Silver m Pr. No appctifc.' No pep? Taa rich, blood-buildiag proptu i..> ..I YEASTPHOS will a rlitoae lott energy deep you fn! FURNITURE : WARNING! HIIV NOW — HI M IK I i Hiii^i M.\s TAKES VOIBV s iniiM '.r; VALUES in Vanllsra, MaadraaSaa. DruM u BoOn. Che-lad-Osaapn Slmmonn and nlhar Aa-f-aaw-fc-d aad oihar Bedsietass. A lal Sf>r>na>. a UHAWING ROOM parala plceaa In Upholotarad .d othoi Morn. and olhar uied Maboffany or Iiu.h MotrU piUig or Sprliia-lika Cushin SgB ii.aioa.r>. ..nd Kilcl DaNIMJ TAB1.KS m Mahogai DaaL plan. M J\ilUhad Plna. 8Maboards SM to I Liquor Can-i SS H up. BIS Icaboxaa. SM up. I J ARE "NERVES" A SIGN YOU'RE GROWING OLD? Oftaa u • won,... .pprojebr. %  uaO* life, bcr Brvi in Ud. ui J t wrvu lai-a a M|n at ftp.. %  I..W ruunrlf bro^ -njy, n.-ao--—or m, o-rvuu. yo. cry With""' nmm f • %  •• ui U.r For Mrlr "IT rf• %  tnmm ksr bm BMCUDI th. *-* *-rr* -*. e"** Teeth L Gums B oose leed ;;..;, %  % %  Uout %  ll. niaaut iit-n you nsay .rrhea. Trench M aaaso (hat wlll latar >auaa your taath to ,n.l may alao r-auac HhaU* nd Heart Tmubla. Ameaan ... blaedlnc the firm day. i.,..uth and quUklv tl*MIron find auar..* ..ragraiurn of AnTosao f n ni Th* auaranto. tnaWa )... r taath I .HI. '...-i: ,, i.. k I told you a moment ago thai SJ paid a doubtful compliment legislature In Trinidad If Mr Adan y on the qucBtion of loyally, rts ( Mr. Manley had said, they should trust ttwii leaders If the worse cmr to the worst, the people would see him in every village h-.mitt. He instanced Dr. Cummins and asked whether they the good of our tightthought a man lik. hi have fought in th B appear to go slow on Fedi Hi there is one answir, om %  son and one reason alone tlnldad. Trinidad is the moi ickword political portion of th I'ibbean areaWhat I olony to destroy the powei tiie Chamber of Commerce ami the Electors' Association — the Association spent thousands of ; ounds the election before last to defeat us, but we beat them, and igain wt beat them — what is betray the people of Barbados. H> was the last man to wish yes men nround him, but they should sup nort the people they had chosen to lead them. The meeting ended Just after midnight with a vote of thanks b> Mr. M. E. Cox Agents : PLANTATIONS LIMITED — Phone 4703 NEW ORLEANS MEVICK. > sTlAUEK aalla ITlh July A sTXAMEH aall, list July • STKAJSBR rfH, ih August \ STXAMEI1 sails -Sir Au.iat A STgAMXH -alia 111*. epianibci .i i ii no ii CIA09 Straight and Bevelled Edged In an assortment of sir., s. is now obtainable at THE CENTRAL E3MPOMUVM Corner Rroad and Tudor SU. ESSO PRODUCTS Now in Slock Fill Spray. Flil Powder Mi.l.,1 in 14.01. It 2-oi. Handy Oil Paraffin Oil in Gab. Flil In UI... l). Pu. P.troleum Jelly IV.IT I im-1 —White and Vellow \.i11.1 in pis. llousrhuld Wax R. M. JONES & CO., LTD. Agent.. S SAI-HO I S -AnOOBEC" 9 S "TIIYA" "A STKAMJUt %  1 1 iir.ui si. CANADIAN MSBVICK saixa rioa MaaoraaJ JumSOU. July I lib July IlUi AugUit l)lh Barbadaa July lath July asm Auar-pt 1Mb Ausuat Mh DCS l Auru.1 >U> fcw ST. JOHN, H|, ai ST LAwiumrr Jtrvrn roerrB ,-. and by tauong Dr. Chfia-f'B Narva Food to build them ap. For tiie Vitamin B-. iron aad otber B mil I ouoerala m I has t ima teat ad toast help build ap ywat aitality aad aid in Uaniag ap taa aBlarc s> staiu -ao yon can faie tao latur* •nth cA-ifkla-ace. _, Grre l>r. Chase's Nerre Food a thaoce u. help banish riervouf taaut and doubt It haipo you reot better, and (eel beurr. The name -Dr. Chaaa" Dodds HIDNEY PILLS BACKACHE Mfi0"l SHIIAUIIIH SSSKT tltlNC TlMDffllM lisfb-il MOOS AO 3/LS. WILSON ^VV^ay^ataV'A*<*MAX *W >Ot V not Bavad bat aaaklng Salvation, plssao write for FREE HOOK "GODS WAY OF SALVATION PLAIN" S. Roberta. Oospel Book • TraH fserrles, SO Oooual aVve-j Baagor. N.I -fOTiii. "OIX>KIA MARIA" do no* bob thamaa ;vaa raapanalhla for an -Mi cont-aewd >>* an' rnambar of tha craw of this vaas* %  port 8 "I JOKES a COMPANY 1 1MI1I Ii •.cm. OLOBIA MAHIA ittumi Hnofinq Materials Including: a Aluminum Sheets a Galvanized Sheets 0 E/erlte Sheet. a Rubberold Rooting a Aluminum Guttering O Etc.. Etc. See Us Now and Stop thtnr Leaks PLANTATIONS LTD. aOBEKT THOM LTD.— NEW TOU a OULT HEBVICE ABVlr:— DA COSTA a OO. LTD. CANADIAN HEEVII'E B ""?£!MAS 1 v C LC^ m r*, . . sThasj iur fiot-r 1 r re yuu •i>le. " av*are ou your 11 pair of %  1 eaa s evere" m xm lf r t and •H*CK SUEDE UPrERS HCBBER SOL^S : UNI I UZI8 I $2.30 fkfsfaaartrafjaraocrijCj'".



    PAGE 1

    TITSD.VT. JTLT 29. 1§H iiutiunos ADVOCATE PACt THHTX W.I. Should INot Rush Blindly Into Federation 9 Records Topple At M.H.S. Sports rr#ai Par 1 KM 1 MI II IMUtKI > pouei iv vl Natural1(or UIOM' who wonhlfssc.1 with po**N*H>'ihapp) change. I do what Uw> 11111UM bw ..boul ii her*, bin ] kl %  1 I and t know what lh#] abotit Lunatic WM .1 mild U l">" as more comn an* bad about MimmM it up. "I prio; I around ine signs or the fart are thinking evei ways an of adult snJTnigr lh< hnd the privileged are more nrrrtly in the uddM todaj have ever been. The. solidly entrenched because of the I %  Of tinpeople, The power of the masses |g swabbed up in the (aMei "f disunity." After i.-friiiiiK t„ UM fMltWfffl in Jamaica with the workers and the privileged dam he paid that it was wen that in spite of thi change)! and constnu* vspess, the bask problems of the Wen Indies had yit to b.' patterned. Not lhat he was by any means bellttlinjr the accomplishments of the last 14 yi Bui one thing had been ae. quired, one other grv.ti thine may be the givulent oi all. irtuy. ho the thing on which WI-M Indians would one day build the future rid thai w., ; the begin ning of a national feeling throughout all the ten ware beginning to feel that a West Indian Nation was a possibility. "Now to me that means a great doal." he said. "It means a great deal because then ; nothing in this world that I am in enmity with than I am to Colonialism and Imperialism in all its forms. I loathe and detest Imperialism. I regard It as a destroyer %  >! iluhuman Spirit and the human soul. 1 haflayi ii inflicted numenoui wounds upon thg U '. Indian : pU U Jliil Utt West Indian hrart." He mentioned that sometimes sensitiveness \ea felt by persons of varying colour, and said that the inevitable gravita. lion towards power M QM aha me of one's own history, of their own ancestry. All that happened because it was the policy of Imperialism to teach a Government to feel inferior. If people were not taught to feel inferior. Imperialistic masters could not rule them, that was why such happened. Sacrifice* He said that if |ben great thing in the West Indian heritage, it was the sacrifices of the ordinary people to g;ve -"i opportunity of education to their : ons After referring to the present constitutional position of the various islands, he said that only a month ago changes posed and even expedited whereby they in Jamaica were to have eight elected ministers who would actually be in CUHN) c.f the departments of administration, so that the country would cease to be ruled by Civil Servants to a large extent, and in pnrt he ruled by their own people. "Maybe we will make mistastes." he aid %  llu' when I look around the West Indies after300 years of Imperial rule. 1 do not think even these mistake^ will be any worse than we have suffered in the past. At any rate, I am prepared to gamble it, and I would sooner make my own mislakes and MiiTer for them than to suffer for the Other peopje's mistakes. "Make no mistake, we are only being given limited doses of power. Those countries think freedom is a dangerous medicine to be given with caution." He talked about Jamaicans not filling U many high posts as could be wished and .said that he repudiated the advances thev han made as sufficient or He denied absolutely lhat they were unfit to attempt any aspect NINE RECORDS TOPPLED tad or* Mod—11 High School Annual Sport* M was ratM at Kamanigto* Oval yettemUy %  flcflaVocm, The %  raj well ittn-iided and at tinoatathuUM thi prise* were presented by Mr Justice Chonery. Keith COffhtS "f Class I andctl up Victor I.udorum while the t %  vhttta Lgatorun till in Lnrna Jones of Class II. gave a good %  awfoenssnsf He was first pi nttt and finished the da' nn 20 points to his credit. Miss • red ton points after h. vmg 1 pped 3 5 of a second ol' 1 he roeurd l"i the lll >.u.i.1s which iyaj < %  %  1 %  row. Suffocating "Hot Flashes" stopped r Orikingly raliavad ^-fc li 3-80-. of cote, in doctors' |ena| S K) JET" "saae EMSSJ 1 "" V^A o In 63 Chaneeol li tag the kOt m %noi. 1 I_\H 1 %  %  1 1ID%  •(• i I *-. n IX J <• Jr I Pir4r iCI Ttu,r ll % -,. 1 BMUnl % re-..1 C I • H Ch Off bass i ThM g..:\ pound ana Tableu gave r*H-rf frooi such dUtrew wi in tl and ft*, iresprr"**• h.w nun Uvelyi of the cases tested. *** Co-iplefeornTurtayreUafJ ^ ] ( _. Surely you know that Lrdla £?."" Sf n'^p^.,'1'' awdern^.acfioa/. Surely ssea Mm^'inES" tout (riirrm—rUTMI tfUtl-Slf 01 lUUilMMT/ KEITH COKBIN rrsehes tintape flnt In tiic iin yard.-. D. Skcete is second mid J. UitWuthud. Corbui. who andMI ap Victor Ludonini. .lipped \{ -econd oH the rtcord of 01. Mconds for the 440 yards. of the ndministration of their would in the future be wanting country, produet*. He had the pnvik-Kt Pioneers of r ep rodu ci ng %  motion m than House oi l live yen i... they had bad by their H ouab de%  co nft w r a nce In Jauiak-a on FVdelnred n lion in which Mr. AJ %  %  .,.. 1 f. alaj 1 'i p ^i.'.n pw 1 air. AJ.HU. II had taken him n -"" 1 afi Itarrysn Jamaica ui •• %  l I 1 "' movement and lie doubted if Uoerv gras aaj) ITl Indian who had alveo nion' pi found and carwful study to it th.ai by Mr. Adams had done. At the conasdg decision thi-y mil could eonw to was to M he a Committee. A proposed constitution wus made wludi would pal thai point. Beucon Light "Some of us think that on we can quJoksst r. the road to dominion status w' %  a political inuepeiKlem-"-." said, "that by that means be the rirst among colourhBVfJ given th r Federal a< ed people of the world in the ment as much power a* BarbaJ stem to build an inI1IK Executive CummiUoe as ii nation, and our efforts Jomaiea'Eaeeutixe CuncU! and tha beacon light of the ^ r,, MV we e ofAfrtea who are yet to concerned, when it was adopted last week in the House of Repto reapeei then own and things kind. freedom is won, he said. But we are so chiekm-!.> are so lour, tip and seize them ourselves* flM Oown 1 Jul. He onfad Waat Indian Uaaden l Mop .ill the talk aba .: %  :< i.milll a 11 d Mllil-.Iell.il Status, and get down l. 1 He said, they cOttld appeal u> the pride of the tnghsh paopie, or • On page l aith her grand piifoimarr.' m in. UHi >.n, %  bat ireord of W 1 Ti ISM held by Miss R II. rro lot the 2*0 yards. K4-iih Corbm crtoisd no* MB .ards and i%  :4 I 1 %  than %  Me aav< anoS in the ** yard) \ Skeete's toeord of 61 1/R seconds by I 15 sei-onds S4-i 11 wv nr,t with 71 DOtnb Tafr: K'KNTN T %  IO-. .:. -,,, „, follow*: — uiai nn n 1. K\, t wii 1 IM l| Arth 1A1. Snri II MI gaja ntJth,tit r >A> %  • viacau cmdkH n 1 r.-i .r> %  1 Tlmr II *n. REDIF FUSION Offer?, a Coniniisainn ol I.' in CASH (or every No 11 tin 1 aoAaerga %  *>< 1 >>••• -1 I lt.>lr> Hv Se N IliHif IA .. .1* A I toI.Ill I -I II %  %  I I I.. w* 1 1 IS 3 • < l..rfcr a t i >n< iw iu> mats (TAin i %  < 'l < • 1 -. %  torn Mtil.i. • 1 \KII I n,. 1A1 Jml J Mi 'd K casrt Tin-: 11 3 I -* %  IIH-DWI r inOUUJ. 11 AM 11 %  .. 1 ano— Tlti.r >IS M,. K" Ktla^.t.-l 1 %  si :. ..... an o oiai* II*-in ii 1 i — .11 fam M W*III 1 Tin . %  ,.,. c. nai u M„ II.' r.l.l 1D1 I 11.-. mi 1 1 Y.1 in K 1 Kitao ii a irks •!> %  Tiuu U **.• \ g> tin race '• &f %  eee' ooeeeeeee* Subscriber brought to ai • KU)IFFI'SK>N will pay to any person who brings 1 ers in one Cnlentlnr mou Company. on pi id by ti.e Company. I :\ a bonus of S25.0P twenty-live New Subscribwho are arcepted by the Have always 11 supply of Ke. innmeiid.tlion forms ready THEY CAN BE OBTAINED AT THE OFFICE I:FI>IF: DSICN Tra.'aleor Street. %  eeaae*ea#*e>aaeeeeaeeae>e.*aaaaaaa>o tlieii freedom." tie outUned the situation % %  > "'•"' Afr..a and the British handling ? u "5 s "\ %  ; H sod add that the coloured lru "wmt. A loi of water had peopU will force others to evee "" UM •" uU 1 l '"' bridjji ,^-ct when more and more 'onfcrence and he beltavad it \.a P negro people were governing '" this \. : U arga thamssltrss and proving to the concealed ano U,. > .-ire looking world that they have all the forward u> a coirference in Eneapacily to stand side by side. *< and by next year, and that by Not that he had any colour pre""•" stronger minded people wit a judice. he said. He thought the more atomach for fieedorn would West Indies had made a tremendhaws u chance of saying iheir ous contribution to civilisation In minds, that men of all colour were „,„. learning U> live alongside eacfc Wh *-" "" '' ,11,er. cerned. he said, "11 is better "> Again referring to imperialism, n;ake h ste slowly it is such a he said that he did not take the a" 1 81 ^'P thaI ll might be a mi*vlew that In the last analysis fortune, might be u disaster, to would make the smallest 5,i,rt " th wrong foot oibefore sacrifice for a colonial possession. w '<' •*• quite ready." and if anybody still lived in that ,, .. ,. ,„ , .. deluded atmosphere of poUtical "• •"* ^ ,ho W 1 1| "" 1 ignorance as to suppose that f x,ia f\ '*• r eonatltuImperlal Countries really made """ *" ie, y fn,m c "Pyng from sacrifices for the Empire he could P* aces llk c America o. Engianri. go back to school. T ncy had to fashion It to suit 1 heir own needs. He then mentioned wtiat he Hilasl point lent ol Uritaln's failing to put f.,fostering soclnlism. through a really beneficial scheme for Afi ua. but rather .-pcndiit*: Hon. f. A. Marryshov. money on peanuts which did not ond speaker to address the large grow. He mentioned too lhat ci-owd. gnu like Mr Manlev many of their young women were greeted with an uproarious thrown out of work becauae Bntapplause, and as he claimed assoain placed a heavy Us on cl*ars, riatlon with Barbados, and ieUd fMOCkH in Jamaica had tailed how it was as a result ol closed down Then there was the n s encouragement that the late banana contract which was being Mr c A B rihwaiie ilrst sought ided "bruplly after they had poi.Ucal honours, the crowd once f^ n L tl -2?' 00 ? m nwtonn* the Kg ,. liwe( luslllv Industry • tho recent hurriHc> |W|d Klowm(E wbu i* to the fS said that they should nut ^ ggjj*^ and^ose" peoX wh West Indies would be in a bod c !" BK i'' Hn .' *?',' w ."f" 1 ngggion '" "• %  '' dawssn and lit the 'I know perfectly well that we \ ,ch which was now l*lng held bUJ British goods at a price they !'>' J'T£L' "u l, '" d,,n ^ **' sot for their standard of living and horted West Indian, to p*J bOnOU they buy our goods at the prices * ,nv mcnw O' they et, but 1 know that after all % %  _,,._. we belong to the Western hamisa 'J' /"''' ."' "U, fffl ) ha sJ>id. More and more f a fot *"• workin* class paothe American continent Is going to P ,c lhc raw bnd ''"tor road ->t demand the products of external progress in tho light, and said There was a recent "at if to-day West Indian Fedeconomic survey of the United eration wa long 09 coming, they States and the experts said that in should not blame the British Gov20 years time America will be imernment, but themselves. porting live times as much as she He said that the problem of is importing, by necessity." Then, the West Indies wan how to get was vast Canada which the people and the leaders toUse LIFEBVGY TOILET SOAP You stay fresh all through the daVJ when you use Lifebuoy Toilei Soap. [ttdJCtpcleansing lather frees you of wcarinc keeps you lastingly frch. Sta.; Lifebuoy Toilet Soap now! F0H PERS0P, il FRESHNESS ILn ITS M-UITM.IIIS41 There's an Sttwttook fountain pen for every writing job ..every writing /I h style! From all point: cf view the worlds tUGGEST small car buy! NUMSIRID POINT STYLIS What's ihcwriting joh—hook* kci'ping, accounting, sln>rtliami — perhaps even music' Them's an Esierbrook Fuuniiin Vvn. suited for each rusk. How you write—fine, very lnu. bold, extra hold? Whatever way, there's an listcrbrook fountain Pen to suit your needs. Just visit the nearest pen counter, select the ksu-rbrook Fountain Pen point (Jut's ri^lit for you tod It' ii into lhc yourself! AMERICA'S FIRST PEN MAKER M.TCJKINN ANDPENCIISIT Mw* ytmr I iterbr*oi l*.,. ssjh /VM u ,ik ga / %  /,. %  „._.. /•*.*-l*,,,/ Apuikom sftsSsS l>iJt Ikr U*Jst BSSaW II..IJ mm /M 4 BBsst PMM /• m,lk* uilhoml rrfllliHK I ,j.l i.**/.. BWWT fmmi. IOMRI ::r""——* %  BIG beyond belief! FORT ROYAL GAGAGE LTD.: Phone 2385 Sole Uiilribulort Phone 4504 ^Sfc^ MODERN HEAVY DUTY MASSEY HARRIS <2Hr niHlBT II 1111 I.SII.M, l.(H ll'UIh\l GRASS LOADER SIDE DELIVERY RAKE HIHIHM FROM STOCK. Secure Your Requirements Now COURTESY GARAGE (Hubert I 'hum limilnll Wl.il. |...rk U.I — Dial KillNOW! u lhc time lo M'lirl your rcquirriiH-nls (rum our I'YRF.X TABLKWASa • OVKNWAKE • SOUP PLATI:S DINNKK I'l.ATKS m DISHES 1IS1I OK MI v l PL,\TTERS c IMBOMS SAUCE BOATS and 26 Piece Dinner Services in PYKKX le above extensive lection is also ailable in EARTHENARE. BARBADOS VO-OIK COTTOJV FACTORY LTD.



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    >AY, jn.Y 2S. UiZ HUtllUln-. IIHIKIII PAGE HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON FLINT OF THE FLYING SQUAD .... BY ALAN STRANKS & GEORGE DAVIES BLONDIE BY CHIC lOUNG FLASH GORDON BY DAN BARRY ...WBLL* >OU ALL HEARD i somtoors or TO GCHIN'D TO MOlP OFF GARL SOLOiUrS' f*c* rue ST OF _. cr .OIKS.' JOHNNY HAZARD BY FRANK ROBBINS YES SIR/ it ili Flavour— A IHitlnrllvr Plivaar Alwa>a Klcht— THAT IS S&SRUM Jurt try It and it will be yours alwaya STUAIT 4 SAMPSON (1938) LTD. llridquarlrrt for Brat Ram I Holiday Enlrrtainurnt Delicious pickles ( IN MUSTARD OH VINEGAR a I CORNED HUt'UM IB Una LAMB TONGUES Is tins LUNCHEON mil In nn. MIXED VEGETABLES In tax ROAST BEEF In Una SLICED HAM VEAL LOAF In Una And Onr Papular FTVE 8TAR RUM UNCE & CO. LTD. %  At, EOKBCCK 8T. IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Thursday to Saturday only SPECIAL Oil I IIS arc POTATOES — 4 lbs I Kl.ICAN SOAP HtY'S COCOA SAUSAGES' VIENNA (4-oz. Tim).... CHICKEN SOUP MUSHROOM SOUP TOMATO SOUP UNION SOUP GREEN PEA SOUP now : %  -lil.iM. ul our liruiirlia-w While Park. I'ncrilsiilc. S|n i^l-isiiMt n and Sunn Sirccl I'MUllY ma J .411 $ .40 .78 — .72 .60 — .48 .40 Jj .42 — .40 .42 .40 .:: .:i4 :IH :M .:iii M Sh.MOI.INA OATMEAL IB TIM OATMFAI, lilt TbH CREAM OK WIIKAT -l CRBAM OF WHKAT (Small) PEARL HAHLEY i IKM'K CHICORY CIIASK.SANHOIINK INSTANT COFFEE WHITE GRAPES ,„....., PURPLE QRAPES I'INKAITI.K CHUNKS OUAVA8 |I..n<') APRICOTS (Small) FRUIT CAKES — 3ro Tim S .80 1.03 .(0 .83 .31 .91 .72 .87 .40 .49 .31 .83 .38 3.00 D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street YONDER IS THE SEA IIY w. TOW.\I:\II "S-;i AilvriiliinStrrirs. WIIIMI tM. luiVr :i pull and flavour of their own. In this class is "Yonder is (he SIM" by W Townend, who has other good novels of the sea to his reputation. *. XOW OIV* SALE ADVOCilTE ST SOLE AGENTS CORPORATION LIMITED