Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

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Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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Sunday Advocat



ESTABLISHED 1895



KING FAROUK FO
Military Take Over
The Royal Palaces

Ex-King’s

Six-Month

Son Rules By Regency

(By WALTER COLLINS)

King Farouk abdicated
the Egyptian new

“strong man”
Naguib Bey. The King agreed to leave the country. The

CAIRO, July 26.
on Saturday at the demand of
General Mohammed

new King it was announced, will be Farouk’s baby son
Crown Prince Ahmed Fuad, born to him and Queen Narri-

man last January 17.

It is expected that a R
to rule in Ahmed’s name
32-year-old King prepared

egency Council will be named
until he becomes of age. The
to flee on Saturday evening

by yaeht—the fabulous yacht in which he spent his honey-
moon with 18-year-old Narriman.

General Naguib in a statement to the nation said, | Anglo-Persian dispute.

“To-day is a day of action”.
their emotions.
Naguib personally made a

He called on people to control

London heard Cairo Radio saying that

broadcast statement saying he

asked Farouk to abdicate in favour of his son and Farouk
agreed. Naguib said he asked the King to get out of the
country by 6.00 p,m. and that Farouk agreed to that also.

It was reported in Cairo:that Farouk was preparing to
leave the country by 6.00 p.m.

Wild cheering broke out in
Cairo when the news of the abdi-
cation of the fun loving King was
broadcast by the official radio.
War planes started sweeping low
over the city. Farouk reached the
end of his reign in Alexandria, the

nean coast.

The first news of the diama
came in a report from Alexandria
that army troops had broken into
Farouk’s Rashline Palace after a
clash with his bodyguard. The
troops arrested Lieutenant Gen-
eral Abdulla El Nagoumi, the
King’s chief aide-de-camp.

Troops surrounded the Palace
where Farouk, the Quaen and the
Crown Prince are staying, advices
said. Troops with tanks and cav-

summer capital on the Mediterra- |

‘alry also surrounded Abdine and |

Koubbeh Palaces in Cairo.
“Man of Destiny”
Troops here and in Alexandria
operated under orders by General
Mohammed Naguib “Bey; “sypt's
new “man of, destiny”, who en-

| Shortage Of
Nurses At Caura
Sanatorium

(From Our Own Correspondent)

} PORT-OF-SPAIN, July 26.

! The Nursing Council which
‘meets on Monday afternoon will
consider the possibility of employ-
ing nurses of other colonies to ease
the critical shortage at Caura
Sanatorium. Three Ward Sisters
| and five nurses are left to tend 155
patients at the Sanatorium today
when three nurses and a Ward
Sister returned to Jamaica.

Dr. L. G. W. Urich, Acting Di-
rector of Medical Services, said to-
‘day there were 500 registered
nurses in the colony. “The prob-
lem I should say, is that nurses





are not keen to do T.B. work,” Dr,

Urich added.

gineered the coup four days agoj LAND SET TLEMENT
and put independent Aly Maher | Ot the $500,000 grant which
Pasha into office as Premier. | Trinidad is hoping to get from the

Maher and Naguib conferred in
Alexandria on Saturday morning,
and then Maher went to Rashtine
Palace to see Farouk. It was re-
ported he found the Palace sur-)
rounded and its doors barricated.

Colonial Development and Wel-
fare for a Land _ Settlement
Scheme more than half is ear-
marked for roads,
water supplies.
The grant is being held up by

bridges and



BARBADOS, JUUY 27, 1952
ee : ‘
CED

HE GAVE CONVENTION BIG LAUGH







Mossadegh
Will Discuss _
Compensation

TEHERAN, July 26. |

g |

A semi-official source said on
Saturday that during yesterdey’s
interview between Mossadegh and
the British Charge D’Affaires,
George Middleton, the Persian s
Prime Minister indicated he
would be prepared to discuss
compensation to be paid to the ea
Anglo-Iranian Oil Company, and 3
he was also prepared to let the
British take up any disputes, 2
with the Persian Court of Law!
now that The Hague had declared
itself incompetent. to judge the

Middleton, who is the frst!
Foreign Envoy to visit Mogssr |

=



of Marcelino Romani, a Puerto Rican al te, provided the delegates
with a welcome break, After the three-ffian delegation had voted in
favor of Taft backers, Ro i ught down the house by demanding
a poll, When the poll was taken, Romani further convulsed the gath-
ering by voting for Eisenhower stpportera,

ls

(International)

Argentina’s First Lady
Eva Peron, Dies At 30

BUENOS AIRES, July 26.
Senora Eva Peron the wife of President Juan Peron, |
died at 8.25 p.m. on Saturday.

| WHEN TENSION MOUNTED at the GOP convention in Chicago, the antics |




The announcement of her death followed a series of |
medical bulletins deseribing her condition as “very seri-

ous.” The latest said she lapsed into unconsciousness.
Senora Peron, Argentina’s first lady, underwent a
major operation last November and has been declining

| steadily since. Her age is given officially as 30.

. Senora Peron, South America’s
. j most controversial woman, had
Allies Walk enjoyed unprecedented power and
cnormous wealth for seven years

( , Of K. a ee { President Peron.
5 ( Put : ter the operation Argentine's
| PREMIER MossADEGH Sipe gr the countrys
} pn eee | affairs and to r@sume control of
ore ae _fedppbiiitdneht as her many philanthropies and
emier » talke wo hours. with MUNSAN., Korea, July 26 Labour Union activities, but she
the Persian statesman and later} Ajlied edctiikae take tock ied made few public appearances and
described the meeting as most}Communists of utter hypocrisy |{P°%t little time «at her offices in
friendly. He called on Mossadeghiand walked out of the Korean |the Labour Department building
at the Premier’s request, Truce talks for a week. ‘where she issued orders and
During the past week all Iran; Maj. Gen. William K. Bprticon, | Tore ee ministers and ambassa-
has been. combed for .GhavamjJr.. the senior United Nations} Gors despite the fact that she

He got inside with difficulty, re-) Colonial Development and Wel-j|who is still in hiding. Newspaper | delegate, told the protesting Reds ,mever held an official Government

ports said, and found Farouk in| fare because it is the Comptroller’ reports said on Saturday that the

Admiral’s uniform standing in the |
middle of a protective group of|
naval officers in thé garden over-

who is questioning the “direct
productivitv” of these items.

looking the Mediterranean. PARCEL POST

Maher conferred with Farouk
twenty minutes. He then went!
back to Government officers to!
confer with Naguib, reports sail.

American Ambassador Jefferson
Caffery called on Maher to dis-
cuss the crisis. Caffery like other
Ambassadors, King and Govern-
ment make their headquarters in
Alexandria during the oppressive
summer heat in Cairo.

Reports spread swiftly that
Naguib insisted on amending the
Egyptian constitution and that
Farouk refused. It was reported
Caffery told Maher that the Unit-
ed States would be prepared to
guarantee the safety of the King
if he left the country,

A bulletin received from Alex-
andria said the King already left
there in his yacht Fayd El Bihar
and that he intended to go to the
United States. The American Em-
bassy had no confirmation of this.

Disturbing Rumours

Negui® has been disturbed by

rumours that the navy cruising in
@ On Page 12

Rear-Admiral
Metzel Dies

WASHINGTON, July 26.
Rear Admiral Jeffrey Metzel,
55, who commanded a destroyer
division in World War I died on



Saturday from a fractured skull. |
examiner, Frank Bros-;

Medical
chart said Metzel plunged a Jap-
anese Samurai sword into his ab-
@omen, then jumped from the
window of his home in Chevy
Chase. ip, se
Friends said the Admiral who
retired in 1949 after serving in
the office of Naval Inspector of
Materials, had been _ suffering
from a heart condition.—U.P,

Red China Objects

Tw Formosa

TORONTO, July 26.

The Chinese Communist officially
protested against the seat-
ing of the Formosan representa-
tive at the eighteenth
tional Red Cross Conference, The
official protest mote said that no
representative of the government
of Formosa — a Nationalist —
should be allowed to sit in the
Conference of an equal basis with
delegates from ‘the Feople’s Re-
public of China.” It is not knows
what action the Conference offi-
cials planned.—U.P.

NO QUORUM AT
HOUSING BOARD

A meeting of the Housing Board
which was scheduled to take place
yesterday at 10 a.m., did not take
place due to the lack of a quorum.
Up to 10.40, only three members
had arrived, Messrs. J 3eckles,



ee a: Pe BOR. Se wel

O’Mahony

Interna-!

Arising out of the Conference
last Friday between Hon, Mitra
Sinanan, Acting Minister of Works
and Communications, C, G. Fol-
well, Postmaster General, A. Shill,

j; Comptroller of Customs and Ex-

cise, gift parcels will be opened #n
future before the eyes of the re-
cipient. This follows
complaints of pilfering.
studied at the conference were

measures to improve the efficiency | On Foreign Policy

at the Parcel Post Department and]

to prevent pilferage. Additional
Customs Officers may be posted at
the Parcel Post Department.

August 2 A Public
Holiday In J’ca

(From Our Own Correspondent)

KINGSTON, July .26.



The Governor, Sir Hugh Foote,| sentatives of the two parties.

declared Saturday, August 2, a
publie holiday in honour of Rho-
den's victory in the 400 métres.on
Thursday and his showing in Ja-
maica’s team.

The decision of the declaration
followed a cable of congratula-
tions sent to the Jamaica team,
and money by the
people and the Jamaica newspa-
pers, It was suggested by the
Mayor of the City.






|



mexico Holds Annual Talks

Governor,|and Puerto Rico, There will be| Special

| PARENTS FULFILL Gi SON’S WISH 9] sss, ‘armados) “Pr M| Yee

that he would return on August 3, | position. Until almost the last she
Persian Government has instruc- He said: “If you have anything kept in touch with events by
ted all its envoys in the neigh-}] Worth saying before August 3 you telephone,
bouring countries to contact rele-{¢@n say it to our staff officers | Her last public appearance
lvant governments to inform the The walkout ended the first}came on June 4 when she was at
| Persian Government when and if}Pen session at Panmunjom injher husband's side during his
Ghavam arrives in their country.| three weeks, Eighteen of the re- {inauguration for a second term

—UP. cord meetings since July 4 failed She was very thin, Her once pho-

to break the deadlock over how tographic face bad shrunk and
. *
Celgate ‘Varsity



to exchange prisoners of war, the i a
key obstacle to an Armistice in Wan, eee
Tokyo. .
Gen. Mark Clark, Supreme Thai : : se
Allied Commander, said the closed ante pte : > ‘t gradual
sessions failed to produce results! word that she. _and there came
because the Communists refused | ry ys she was failing, During
to recognize the inescapable fact |; '% weeks of her life masses

Gradual Decline



HAMILTON, NW, July 26. | that a large percentage of the {or ber health were, celebrated
Colgate... Universié ms its}COMmunist prisoners refused to) PMS! Cally, usually under
fourth Abmual Ashecican eign| 8° back to their. former masters., Labour or Government spon-

—ICP),



I }sorship. One Labour Union sent
Aten Wik Mahe. foekigh cabal members in relays to the Church
sadors among the speakers for a Ch \ ss | B W I A |e. Bray os the clock for her
meare. wesibiongtebaaaioe: More| anges nb.W.LA. : covery and many statues in her
than 200 delegates are expected 7 . nae eae Pp anned. ;
to hear the Foreign Policy stands: Organisation va Peton had gone a long way
of the Republican and Democratic pee Mand youth and she had
platforms analyzed by the repre~ As a result of the visit here on| pest an Fenn iia spe, ring Ot Hep
Friday of Sir Errol Dos Santos, | por *e Slate Cree 100; “Dray
Hume Wrong, Canadian Am-j Chairman of the Board of Direc- |i tir rivate Secretary and
bassador to the United States|tors of B.W.LA. Ltd. and the|‘helr mother live near the presi-
speaks at the opening session, and| General Manager, Mr. John Rahr dential mansion in Buenos Aires’
is expected to discuss Canadian-| certain changes have been made} suburb, Little is known of the
United States relations. Other am-|to the company’s organisation in |/@@rly life of “Eveita” little Eva,



bassadors who will speak at vari-| Barbados and effective from Au-|#8 She liked to be known to the|

ous sessions include those from|gust 1. Mr. Percy Taylor, present| People. She was born in the vil-
Australia, Pakistan, New Zealand| manager, will assume the title of|!#8e Los Tolgeos 150 miles from
Representative B.O.A.C/| Buenos Aires, probably on May.
round tables, luncheon sessions,, B.W.I.A., Barbados in chtrge of)/7, 1919. In recent years she!
Vera eeening partion. \ Public Relations. jinsisted that dhe was born
1 —UP. Mr. Oliver Johnson, the pres) 1922, a claim that helped last;
_..jent Assistant Manager, will suc-!year to keep her from becoming
President for which
minimum age is 30.

KITCHEN BLAZE q



family of Juan Duarte and

A portion of the kitchen of a| Her mother took her brood to the
house at Black Rock, St. Michael railway centre of Junin during
was burnt when a fire occurred at Eva's childhood. Early in the
about 2.35 a.m. yesterday. The 1940's, Eva Duarte went to the
Haye is the property of Louis«
|



Haynes, , as actress.
Re The Fire Brigade turned out, She made little impression on
ut arrived on the scene only to\Stage, sereen and radio, despite

find that the blaze was ady ;her beaut er striki
eee ng s already | beauty, her strikingly blonde







GEORGETOWN, July 26.

Crowism in the United States’ race segregation as practised
by the Demerara Bauxite Company Ltd., in British Guiana

on a motion by Hon. Lionel Luckhoo.
A motion




















in jthe Republicans, they come forth

the it again this year.
Eva was one of five children ot ollt ever since I have been jn

Senora Juana Ibarguren Duarte,|tions, you
big city to geek her fortune ag}the newspapers and magazines on

The damage is not esti-}hair and her husicy voice, untiljin 1948 acted like monkeys

- White Wines—Chille
mated. she met President Peron. -U.P. the famous jungle book—monkeys | $ Red Wines par
$1 D ‘ had a convention—they said ‘ity ¥ 2 ‘ea «~Port | all

: ° must be so, since we all say so’ "| $ E ei, :

| r. Jagan Urges Sending This got ahother big laugh. 13 W acuta) Sweet f room
* N ‘It turned out differently in| % : ‘Deandy Sherry | fempera-
Army ‘I oO South Afr 1948. All those pollsters and| % Brandy j ture

1 1¢ca pressmen should have conferred} % And dont be confused



: J among themselves. In five elec-'
Hon, Dr. Cheddi B. Jagan, elected member for Central tions in a row people have showed 3
Demerara urged that an army be sent to South Africa toithey don’t do what the news- %
rid the country of the “blatant Fascist tyranny”. Jim [|P@Pers tell them.’ %

and racial prejudices in the banks and elsewhere in Water , but
* 20 g i

“treet also were deplored by other members of the Legis-|Republican policies. “Republicans ¥
lative Council during a two-day debate ending on Friday |@ve @ candidate, but they have

PRICE : SIX CENTS

a

TO ABDICATE

monte Adlai Stevenson Accepts

| Presidential Nomination

From All Quarters:

Democrats Cheose
Sparkman: As Mate

(By LYLE C. WILSON)
Ci! SAGO, July 26.

> s
Convicts Will
7 +
Get An Annual
__ Adlai E. Stevenson accepted the Democratic Presiden-, Holiday
tial nomination on Saturday and tired delegates w rapped |

up the Party’s national convention in a final session] Cateutta: Under new penal re-
and called to make Senator John J, Sparkman convicts in Bombay Stata



Illinois Governor's mate. Stevenson picked the 52-year-old] are. to be allowed an annual
Alabaman as Vice Presidential nominee at near dawn with oo 5 ar etanet cames a

> C Ga 7G } f y -
President Truman and the other party leaders. ; ;

ence.
The President who backed Stevenson for the top spot] to use free hair oil are
concessions
Wellington; Several boys at
Palmerston North Technical High
School were too tired to do their
work properly Investigations
showed they were all apprentice
jockeys who had been appren-
ticed since they were twelve, and
that they went to school only to
rest.

Permission to smoke and
otner
was delighted by the addition of Sparkman to the ticket.
After a morning conference he flew to Kansas City for a
visit to nearby independence Missouri his home town
“There's not a better fellow (than Sparkman) for the
job. It’s a winning ticket. That's all I care about”, Truman
told reporters. The last session af the thirty-first Demo-
cratic National Convention started less than twelve hours
after Stevenson was proclaimed unanimously the Party’s

choice for White House. Berlin; Berlin’s oldest
. - Herman Laebe. 98, this week

, tion by Senator Lister Hill of :

= : showe rt O z
Truman S BOO | eeoee tea “heartiah ot anal to prove that his daiher was Born
a league as a “guardian of mall : a n

as i in 1796.
‘and an acclaimed leader Washington

Sparkman was put for nomina- man,

. business Eighteen - stona
mocrats in the struggle of free nations for) comedian Jack Leonard, appear-

jeollective security

He said together Sparkman and
Stevenson “will tear away the
mask of hypocrisy and pretension
seek the stark

ing in a stage show of a Wash-
ington cinema convalesced his
audiences with “I've got ong
piece of good news for you—the
Russians will never occupy
Washington. They just couldn't

Must Win
that people may

: CHICAGO, July, 26. naked reaction of the republican
: yen Truman told a cheer-|party, the party of the few by the
ing Democratic convention eariy|}few and for the few”. >
to-day that he is going to “take Paris; A workman who fished

afford to live here,”
Sparkman who supported Sena-). ape. « ;
my coat off” and do everything |tor Richard Russell of Georgia | fibre suitcase from the Seine



; } N found it crammed with 100,000
possible to help Governor Adlai|presidential nomination sald he ; .

Â¥ i a Se lars-wor shes
Stevenson capture the White]felt it a good thing to have a Sonera Worth of Ame iten Ghone

1 ; ’ i notes about
House, “This, in my opinion, “fee on the ticket, i

police found that they were
forgeries —- thrown away by
members of an international for-
gery gang during a police chase
three months ago.

New York: A talking road is
being planned by New Jersey. A
two-foot strip of scored concrete
will be laid in the centre and a
one sweresan on to it will set up
such a
party to dedicate itself) elad i» = sake LE eee eee,
of the foad — or maybe right
across to the wrong side,

_ Rangoon: Henceforth — local
party of} cinemas will play the national
don't | °%@ bo i oe at the commencement of
, dor e asked fellow Democrats}|@ performance to compel the
oer ay = or party had who nominated him against his} @uUdienee to stand to attention
“r nen to choose from and Wel wishes to give “all you have.” He] instead of making a rush for the

have had a lot of geod men in the t m
g I < se ‘ta give 4 g its when the anth i
Democratic Party, It is hard ‘to promised in turn ‘to give you all 7 when the anthem is play

£40,000. But
the greatest Democratic conven-
tion ever held” he said. “You
have stood by the principles that
the Democratic Party is a great Addressing a tumultuous jam-
arty. » packed drowd shortly after his
“You have nominated a winner nomination, Governor Stevenson
eedged himself to muster “the
osts of courage, morality, and wis-

Stevenson Speaks

for the next President of the
United States. You are going out ”
from this Convention much strong- {10 And to do battle against
er than when you went in,’ _. ignorance and mistrust. “He called
Speaking trom notes, the Presi- |“ “*e

dent said: “One of the things that to becoming “the people’s party,
impressed me, and I watched this not the Labour party, not the
Convention on television, is the|{@¢mer's party, nor the employ-
great wealth of ability we have in| °'® Party", but “the
the Democratic Party. I Syren



‘ ! have” in what, as is confidently] @t the end of a programme,
make a choice on these great predicted, will be a eaten of cm
leaders. oy our choice is one that] quest to capture the White House
we can all get behind. He said that the Republicans /

; “We are bound to win this elec-|are hopelessly divided, and that Marryshow
tien, Not four years ago I spoke|EKisenhower—the leader whom we

at a Democratic convention injall respect—‘ha been calle Expected Here
Philadelphia, 1 aid Senator,;upon to minister to a hopele

Barkley and I were going to win|case
in 1948. There are people who ‘did
not believe.. They turned out to
be wrong. I am telling you now
that Adlai Stevenson is going to|/done me”, but that “I accept your Hon. T.
win in 1952. This brought a|rmvemination and your programme
tremendous roar from the crowd | should have preferred to hear
“We will win in 1952 the same|those words uttered by a strong
Way we won in 1948” he pledged.|°", Wiser, better man than my
“And I say to you iow, that | Self.”
am going to do everything I cao Stevenson was
to make us win.” the
Then he brought laughs and
chuckles when he said: “A lot of|

of political schizophrenia
Unsought Honour
“Stevenson said that he did not

eek the honour which “you have

Vor Qorference

(From Our Own Correspondent?
GRENADA, July 26.
A. Marryshow flies to
Barbados tomorrow to join Nor-
man Manley and Grantley Adams
in what Marryshow described as
“discussions on certain matters of
West Indian importance”. Marry-
introduced to] show decided on the visit after
tumultuous crowd by Presi-]a radio-phone call from B.L.P.
@On Page 12 Secretary Walcott this morning.

people can’t understand why the ys SOC LLLP PLP PPP PPAF
Tenwcret beep on winning elec | 8
ions. They have just gone crazy) } Renowned ‘or inti i i

: ; az) eneE ovr Distinctic f 4
trying to figure out what it % J : ascites Caen s
You know the real reason why| %

>

Â¥

the Democratic party wins elec- R
tions is a perfectly simple reason %
Democrativ %

Kh. W. OV.

“The Wine of All Time.”

It is because the
party gives them the kind {| %
Government they want, q

62,000,000 Jobs

“Think what our country has
done in 20 years of Democratic
leadership,” Truman said. “We
have 62,000,000 jobs. The highest
living standards in history. Ags for

When the tine comes for Wine, it's time for
r r r
kh. W. WV.
and for a little discreet

WINE WISDOM

and try to stop the progress of a
mighty people» Well, they are at}

SOCSSS OOOO SIO SS

I think it has been my experi-

polls on their side
Well, the pollsters of the press

general rule to follow :
Dry Sherry—Slightly chilled



%
politics—if we to. 35, oie 3 PTHERE's no special rit-
tianitee % _ ual for serving wine;

That has been my policy and| % in fact, it couldn’t be,easier

that’s what will have to be done.| % It is quite true some wines
The Republicans have nearly ail| x require chilling, and others
Side sith Thee mar Tae moe Ny taste better at room tem-
probably will have, pub'ic opinion x perature. Here is a good

¢

v

%

GOK

in|



with peopl nste: alking | i
people, instead of talking) ¥ about the times to serve
different wines. Compli-

cated wine etiquette is , . .



: frowned on by people who

No Programme j % know = love wine. They

¥ erve : ine ay »

ee eG dle oa serve the wines they like,
auiatk woleed % When they like, and they

ee, eee always like K.W.V,

no programme. People are not

Make a point to serve these PAARL WINES with dinner—

LLLP LELEFESSPPEEL SLL LLLP LESSEE SLLSCSELESOPEPPES ESSA SECS SSSSESSSPSSS GAS

‘ . : ae r ' going to pay any atten t he @ , ’ . . ; :
ad condemning racialyResolution to the Secretary of - ane nt nt a tion to t you'll be delighted when you discover the special full-bodied
segregation enforced by South|State for the Colonies and to the|™°®" Wn Rave been opposing % favours these wines give the
7 Africa and placing on record the|United Nations, urging that steps everything they have wanted for % flav s these wines give the food you serve.
SHORTLY AFTER the President Wilson docked in San Francisco, Kim |Council’s abhorrence of the atti-|be taken by U.N. to persuade the |tMe past 20 years 3
»on Joong, 16-year-old Korean youth is met by his new “Mom” and | ‘ude adopted to various races in]South African Governme ode-| “The Republicans have been| %
7 ~ y a ; ; , rnment to de me @
and Mrs. Victor Beauchamp, Sr. Kim was a buddy of Gr | PUrsult of this poliey which “is|sist frorn such a disastrous course |4éainst social security; fair } S Remember
tor Beauchamp Jr., a machine gunner in Korea, who wrote his par= pisere to affect adversely amicable |and to adopt a policy towards al] | management laws; against housir 2 P Bi ga a ss ; :
f I s ever happens to me, please arrange for Kim to come re ad existing amongst peoples | races in South Africa in keeping| programmes gainst measut % to Steck up on K. W.V, SHERRY, BRANDY,
‘a and live in our home.” When the young soldier lost his muito’ er aren, the Declaration of Humanjfor peaceful co-operation with) and excellent Table Wines
life at the battlefront, his parents carried out his wish. (International) lernor to transmit a copy of the| eter et MaBons of the world % x
ernor 2 nsmit a ypy of —C.P. iat POSSE OCSOOOS SOCSSOCSSOOSSSSOCSOSSS9O9 GOS OSSSOSSGLN





3
$





PAGE TWO

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Orders taken for your Dresses for the Races.

"POOCVESOOS COLE LCLECLLPLE LPP AAD

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JERRY WALD & NORMAN KRASHA presse

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PAUL DOUGLAS
ROBERT RYAN

MARILYN MONROE

CLAsH By NIGHT





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\ ‘TO-DAY TO TUREDAY 445 & 8.15
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Brian BONLEVY. Forrest TUCKER
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& 8.30 and Continuing
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Barbara Stanwyck aul Douglas






| Robert Ryan Marilyn Monroe t
1 in Claire Trevor — Vera, Ralston
“CLASH BY NIGHT" WED. & THUR. 6.30 & 8.18
Allan “Rocky” LANE
Extra in E
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| “DESERT OF LOST MEN”
MPIC an
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GLOBE
This Evening 3.30

\don.— Tues. 5 28.30

Wed. — Thurs: 4.45 & 8.30
SHOW BOAT

Ava GARDNER—Joe E,
AND

JESSE JAMES



BROWN

Randy SCOTT : Tyrone POWER

GAIETY

The Garden—St. James

TODAY & TOMORROW 4.30 p.m.
MAT. TODAY 4.45 pm
“GRAND CANYON"

Richard ARLEN &
“DEPUTY MARSHAL"
Jon HALL — Dick FORAN

TUES. & WED. 8 © pm
“CASA MAN A’
Virginia WELLS — Robert CLARK <:
“MASTER: MINDS"
Leo GORCEY & The De
AF PE

>




SUNDAY ADV

ROFESSOR A. K. CROSTON,
Professor of English at the
University College of the West
Indies, arrived from Jamaice on
Priday night by B.W.1.A. to. take
part in the Extra Mural Sumner
; School at Codrington College. He
jis staying at Codrington Colleg®.

Intransit

R. ANDREW PEARSE, Res-

ident Tutor in Trinidad for

the University College of =

Indies, arrived here on aay

morning by the S.S. Golfite in-

transit for the United Kingdom

where he has gone on leave. He

was accompanied by his wife and
children.

Veterinary Surgeon

. EARLE KIRBY of St. Vin-

cent who qualified as a Ve-
terinary Surgeon at Toronto Uni-
versity earlier this year, passed
through here on Friday from Can-
ada by the Lady om his
way back home to take up an ap-
pointment with the Government.

After One Year

Aut spending a year in the
US.A., Miss Daisy Hill re-
turned to Barbados on Friday

?

night by BWA. via Puert:
Rico and Antigua. She is 7 ing
with her brother-in-law and, sis-

ter Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Weagther-
head of Enterprise Road, Christ
Church. %

From B.G.

ee at the Crane Hotel
are Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Pater-
son and their little c
Sybil of McKenzie, British Guiana.
Mr. Paterson is the Chief Mining
Engineer of the Demerara Bauxite
Company. He was here. on holi-
day since tl.c 19th July.

The Patersons’ original home is
Toronto, Canada.

Mining Engin.-er

R, JOHN JESSE HAYES of
Cuidad Bolivar who spent
a month's holiday in Barbados,
returned home on Friday night
via Trinidad by B.W.LA. to
resume his duties as a mining en-
gineer with the U.S, Steel Cor-
poration,
While here, he was marrieq to
Miss Mary Wilkie, daughter of
Mr. and Mr@® Glenn M. Willie ‘of
Detroit, Michigan, at St, Peter's
, Church by Rev. A. J. Hatch. He
' Was a guest at Paradise Beach
| Club. His wife is expected to
join him towards the end of the
month,
Dr. Hayes said that he had
travelled to every Continent ex-

boot Africa and his wife and he

expressed the view that Barbados
was the most delightful place
they had ever visited and they
were sorry they had to leave.

(From Our Own Correspondent)

His Excellency the Governor,
accompanied by Lady Black-
.burne, will mae Antigua on the
and discuss various
matters with the Comptroller
for Development and Welfave
and his Advisers. After these
discussions His Excellency will
spend a few days local leave in



By MAX PRELL

“WILERE are you goltig, Willy?’ |
“Tin in a hurry, Knarf,” said/
Willy, stopping for a moment, just!
“Tm doing al
\

to enich his breath.
wom *

Kiort tooked at Willy, puzzled, |
‘Boing a poem, Willy? What poem?!

Hew are you doing it?”

“Well,” said Willy, “1 just made}
| up ® poem. It’s all about myself. |

cause I’m a toad.
derstand?”

Now do you un-

ing a poem.”

in a Hurry

tom t aDeputy.



Willy Tood Wrote a Poem

—And He Acted It Out Himself—

{ mean, it’s about a toad—and {'m
\ toad, so it’s all about a toad like
myself, so it’s all about mysel: be-

“But why do you have to do rhis
poem? +I never heard of anyone do-

OCATE



SUNDAY,

Carib (Calling

On Holiday

R. AND MRS. RAYMOND
BEGUELIN from Caracas,
Venezuela arrived in the colony
on tHe 18th July after touring the
French Antilles and are guests at
the Crane Hotel. Mr. Béguelin is
Head of C.A. OFJAP specialised

firm in Far Eastern Trade.

Spent Eighteen Months
RS. ROSE ALEXIS of Trini-

dad who has been in the
island for the past 18 months, re-

turned to Trinidad by the SS. De
Grasse on Thou ? was
accompanied by her daughter
Mary,

Mrs. Alexis also e to visit

Curacao later and will be return-
ing to the island in about two
months in time for the reopening
of the, Ursuline Convent where her
daughter is a pupil.

U.S. Civil Servant
ISS ARIEL THOMPSON, 2 Mr. HERMAGE G. SMITH.

Civil Servant im the U.S.A.
attached to the Taxation Depart. - After 39 Years
R! HERMAGE G, SMITH, a

ment, leaves tomorrow morning
Barbadian who has been



by B.W.LA. for Antigua and
Puerto Rieo on her way back

horfie after g seven ‘weeks’ residing in the U.S.A. for the past
holiday wi her aunt, Mrs. 39 years, returned home on Fri-
Eugene Gadsby of Salters, St. day night by B.W.1A. via Puerto
Michael, Rico and Antigua on a visit to his

relatives and
brother-in-law

On her first visit to the West

is a guest of his
Indies, Miss Thompson was deep-

end_ sister, Mr.

ly impressed by the y of and Mrs. F, A. Waterman of
the people-and the climatic con- “Montrose,” Water Street, Christ
ditions She has asked to say Church,

thanks to all those friends who At the airport to welcome him

assisted im making her stay such were his father, Mr. Joseph S.

an enjoyable one. Smith who resides with his

R oe» ae oor and

Schoolmast: éturns many of his relatives and friends.

H sr A Civil Servant attached to the

Post Office in New York, Mr.

M* eit: eo a Smith is 8 ectier of Br. Ravils

| w as en Smith of “Brooklyn, River Road,

teaching at Kingston College, and Mr, Irvin Smith of Chelsea
Jamaica for the past three years. Road. ‘

returned home on Friday even-
ning by B.W.LA. © ee the Back To Venezuela
summer vacation wit is rela- :
tives at Orange Hill, St. James. “eo hn “Soueer wen
Next term, Mr. Wellington will. B.WEA. were Mr. and Mrs
be going on to St. Kitts to take John “Miner of Anaco who had
up an appointment at the Gram- spent twelve days’ holiday a:
guests of Paradise Beach Club.

mar School.
* Mr. Miner is Superintendent for
Attended Public Health Qin Maahere ‘Division a te

Course Tech Service Co. _
PENDING a week in Barbados For Two Weeks

before returning. to Domin-
RS. F. A. BROWN, wife of

ica are Mr. Emanuel ae eee
Z , Pa , bot n-
ind Mr. Georve Bruney, bo a fie Manager of the British

itary Inspectors of Roseau. They

arrived here on Friday evening by Bata Shoe Company in St. Kitts,
B.W.LA. from Jamaica after arrived here on Friday morning by
attending a ten months’ course at Me Lady for two weeks

the Public Health Training Centre. holiday. She was accompanied
They are guests of Mrs, Wooding by her daughter, Phyllis and they
of Nelson Street. are guests at the Aquatie Club.

Barbados, returning to Antigua
on the 14th August. During his
absence, the Hon, P, D. Mac
Donald will be Governor’s

A Noted London Surgeon
Explains why the Bulletins
from Buenos Aires Speak of
‘Desperate’ one day and
‘Rallying the next. . .

By GEORGE SAVA

Everybody is puzzled by the
seemingly conflicting reports about
Eva Peron’s illness. One day she
is said to be sinking. A few days
later we hear of her smilingly
receiving a delegation in the
|course of her duties.

Then she is reported to
“critical” again.

What is really wrong with her?
How can she. be alternately
ee one day, then critically
ill?

From personal knowledge of
Eva Peron, I believe I know the

Sir Kenneth Blackburne has
been in the Leeward Islands two
years and this is the first occas-
ion that he will be taking a few
days leave.

be

truth,
Up-down
Leucemia, from whieh she is
suffering,

the white corpuscles of the blood
multiply alarmingly. Violent ups

| _CRossworD

MAG{ABB DABS



}



Willy wrote down two lines.

Barbadian Returns To

U.S.A.

ETURNING to the U.S.A. dur-

We the past week was Miss

Beryl Walcott, eldest daughter of
Mr, and Mrs. Alport Walcott of
“Mildred Cot,” Britton’s Hill. Miss
Walcott's visit to Barbados lasted
five weeks, and was the first since
she left the island some fourteen
years ago. Despite fourteen years
of ultra-modern New York, she
is, however, still impressed by the
great strides her native island has
made in its social and business
lives simce the days of 1938, She
left by B.W.LA. on the first leg
of her journey, refreshed by her
holiday, and wishing farewell to
the many friends to whom she
Was unable to say a last goddbye.

For Indefinite Stay
F geaing the passengers leaving

on Friday*night by B.W.1A.
for Trinidad was Miss Ruby Gib-
son of Arch Hall, St. Thomas, who
hag gone to spend an indefinite
holiday with her relatives at
Point Fortin,

For Trinidad Holiday
Iss MARINA SIMPSON,
eldest daughter of Mr. and
Mrs, Laurence Simpson of Guinea
Plantation, St. John, left the col-
ony yesterday by B.W.LA. to
spend part of her summer vaca-
tion with Mr, and Mrs, Austin
Wood of Port-of-Spain.

. s
Druggist On Holiday
EAVING for Trinidad on Fri-

day night by B.W.LA. was
Mr. Aubrey W, Smith, Druggist
of Baxter’s Road, who has gone
on four weeks’ holiday, He was
accompanied by his sister, Mrs.
Blanche Spencer of Port-of-Spain
who was here on holiday as a
guest of her brother and siste:-
in-law, Mr. and Mrs. J, N. Smith
of ‘“Melwi,” Brown’s Gap, Hast-

ings.
Businessman In Caracas
RRIVING in the colony on the
19th July were Mr. and Mrs.
Henry R. Ralicki of Caracas,
Venezuela, who are origindily
from Buffalo, New York. Mr,
Ralicki is the Manager in Caracas
of Pan-American Standard Brands
INC, Mr. and Mrs. Ralicki are
guests at the Crane Hotel.

Supervisor Of Agencies
T. COL. F. WOOD, Supervisor
of Agencies for the British
West Indies of Messrs, Sankey-
Sheldon Ltd. of London, arrived
from Trinidad on Friday by the
S.S. Golfito on a business visit
and will be remaining for two
weeks as a guest at the Hotel
Royal. He was accompanied by
Mrs. Wood,

| Governor Blackburne To Visit B’dos |'THE PERON PUZZLE ‘ :

and downs in the condition of the
patient are typical because of the
treatment.

The diseased blood may be
almost completely drained from
the body and healthy blood infused,
Within a short while the patient
would be normal again, but not
for long. The white corpuscles
multiply and a collapse oecurs
again. The spleen is sometimes
removed as a desperate remedy,
and blood transfusions will repeat-
edly restore the sufferer, but the
recurrent relapse grows steadily
graver,

In December 1948, when lectur-
ing in Buenos Aires on surgery
in Britain, I was presented to
resident Peron and his wife.

Her face was pale arid intense,
She seemed to be consumed with
fever,

Beneath her eyes were dark,
heavy rings. She had the appear-
anee of a woman who was burning

is a disease in whichâ„¢#erself out, though she was not

then 30,

That look on her face might
have been a sign of illness—or
the result of ecstacy which some-
times comes to women of her tem-
perament.

Next day I talked to her personal
physician, All he would say was
that Evita, the workers’ heroine,
wag driving herself to death for the
people, ...

JULY 27, 1952

On Short Visit

RS. ALEDA BOWEN, Pro-
4 fessor of Engineering Draw.
ing of the University of Houston,
Texas, and Mrs. George Lowe,
Seeretary to an oil operator, also
f Texas, arrived here on Friday
night by B.W.1.A, via Puerto Rico
and Antigua for a short holiday
visit and are guests at the Hotel
Royal.

Off To The U.K,
M* ASHTON C. ASHBERF,

Manager of Ultvlugt Plan-
tation in British Guiana and Mrs.
Ashbee who had beem sp@nding
three weeks’ holiday in BarBados
at Bathsheba and the Hotel Royal,
left on Priday morning by the
S.S. Golfito for where
they will remain for about four
months. "

Accompanying them were Mr,
Raymond C. Bell, Secretary-
Accountant of Albion Sugar
Estate, British Guiama, his wife
and their infant son. They spent
a week's holiday as guests at the
Hotel Royal and have now gone
to the U.K. to reside.

Mrs. Bell is the daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Ashbee.

For Summer Holidays
ASTER MARTIN BLACK-
BURNE, son of Sir Ken-
neth Blackburne, Governor of the
Leeward Islands and Lady Black-
burne, arrived from Antigua on
Friday re. by B.W.LA, to
spend part of his summer vaca-
tion with Major and Mrs. H, W.
Peebles of Bayleys, St. Philip.
Travellirig Representative
R. M, REINGOLD, Travelling
Representative of Messrs.
J. A. Marson & Sons, return to
Barbados on Friday evening by
B.W.IA,. after paying a two-week
business visit to Antigua and St.
Kitts.

Second Visit In 45 Years
ETURNING to Barbados on
Friday from the U.S.A. via
Puerto Rico and Antigua by
B.W.LA. was Mr, Otway L. Wil-
kinson, a member of the Ameri-
can Aid Society for West Indies,
Ine. He expects to be here for
about five weeks anq is staying
with Mr, Bascombe of Roebuck
Street.

This is Mr. Wilkinson’s second
visit te the island since he left
here 45 years ago. The last occa-
sion was in 1920 when he spent
about four months.

With C. P.I.M.
R. C. W, CRAWFORD who is
1 employed with C.P.I.M, in
Curacao, arrived here on Thurs-
day by B.W.LA. and left the fol-
lowing evening by B.W.LA, for
Trinidad to spend his two months’
holiday. He was accompanied by
his wife and smal) daughter,
Violet,
While heve, they were
the Cosmopolitan Guest

ests at
ouse,

points to this being the truth.

Leuczemia could produce all the

signs T saw on the sé@nora’s face,
Drastie

Since leuesemia is akin to can-
cer, X-ray treatment is sometimes
given, That would account for the
visit of the specialist from New
York.

The more drastic remedy of
removing the spleén is an opera-
tion only a first-class abdominal
specialist would undertake. And
it was Professor Finochietto who

operated,
I have now in Britain two
patients under treatment for
leucemia.

One is a woman of 33—almost
precisely the age of Eva Peron.



POCKET CARTOON
by OSBERT LANCASTER

LER

:



“Ll never heard of anyone walking) , |
on his ear,” said Willy. “But does | his hind legs and then sprang vj A week later I was sent for'
again by her secretary, My books
joing this poem. Right now I'm in| reach even the top of the trunk. ie had pleased Mme. Peron and she

a hurry to find a road.”

“KEEP EM FLYING”

DANCE AT THE

CRANE HOTEL
SAT. 30th August

TO THE TUNES OF

“KEITH CAMPBELL”
and HIS “SOCIETY SIX”
and




“THE JUMPING JACKS STEE!. BAND"

featuring our own

BING of the CARIBBEAN PAUL WILKINS

83

“A FREE 15 MINUTE FLIGHT
IN “BIM” TO

-ONE IN EVERY 30 PERSONS”
ENTERING THE DANCE

DANCING from 8.30 p.m.

Supper included Dress Optional

ADMITTANCE — $2.00










































“A road, Willy? Why?”

“Why? Because the first two lines
of my poem go

There once was a toad

Who hopped down the road—
So I've got to find a road to hop
lown.” With that Willy started
wpping off again, but turned
around to call over his shoulder to
Knarf: “Come along and you'll see
now | do the rest of my poem. [t's
very peewtian.”

Knarf ran after Willy across the
garden and over the fence to (he
coad, When he got there, Willy was
already hopping down it. A minute
later, however, he stopped under a
tall chestnut tree. He was looking
ap at the high branches as Knarf
reached him,

“What are you
Knarf asked,

“I’m doing the next two lines of
the poem—

He hopped and he hopped
And all at once stopped—”
“Yes?” said Knarf. “Then what?”
“Then,” said Willy, “then
He said: ‘Now let's see?
Vl’ hop up this tree
Saying this, Willy bont back

doing now?”

on






|
|
that mean you can’t do it? I’m! with all his might, But he could |

THEATRE

| fell back. Then he tried again . .
| and again... and again. It was ne
juse. At last, quite disappointe:| |
Willy sat down under the tree an:
sobbed:
“The tree was so high
It made Willy ery—”
| But suddenly Willy stopped cr
ing and broke out into a smile.
| “Ts that part of the poem, tov’




Across:

ird to siing round a satlor. (8)
neds oon 2 a
Bae ” Ovintalnorte fashion.

(6) il. ¥y j (4)

lL.
8.
10.

2. }.
| Knarf wanted to know, ie . a ~ i ms
Willy nodded, “Oh yes! This iv,:: | "8 TRE tH eet my Ge: on: the
rest of th d es 18. A type o: 14 ._ (3)
est of the poem, Just listen - D ae: B tetpyo. ( ek)

So finally he said: at. (3)

be: . 1. Get into debt.
‘Let the tree hop instead! =
I’ve made enough tries; # ‘comer ’
I'll just stay and catch .
i Willy interrupted himself at |
instant to shoot out his tongue :
catch something.
“Willy!” shouted Knarf. “W
| are you catehing?”
| “Plies!” answered Willy. “1

bag@y, (4)

7

PAPPeY




last word of the whole poem. 4 9. Bervid. (8) ‘

now I've done it ell! Isn% it a © warning. oa eis

dovful game?” Barts got caught in, (¢)
Knarf had to agree that it mt trans Tnetrimeint > Ss

It was the first time be he
seen anyone do a poem
about a toad- and espec'ally
tond to do it!



'§ puaule.— Across:
Beal: esi
Riennatlye hcerise:
: 3 ;

Fuel 9B! Ay




t 1,
so,
YW



3












~~" BRIDGETOWN “BARBAREES ~“GaS¥1N
Dist 1m) (ta) 5170) (Dial 8404)
rr aon 2 ga To-day & To-morrow wie? th ae
THEM THAT ee a i SEPTEMBER
TRESPASS BRIGHT VICTORY AFFAIR
Steph Patrici: eh i J Joseph
'muRRAY — PLUNKITr || KENNEDY — Dow FONTAINE corror

Richard TODD

420 & 8.90
at WAS AN AMERICAN
sry" a
Ann DVORAK &
“BLUE BLOOD

) Bill Williams—Jane Nigh

Speciat 1.20 pom
“IN OLD AMARILLO

Roy ROGERS &

“THE WYOMING

BANDIT"

NE

STORM






Rocky I



——

BBE EE SAEED LEADS

eee
NEXT ATTRACTYON !

LIFE OF RILEY
MUMMY’S GHOST

Coming FRIDAY

WARNING

Ronald REAG



and

SILVER CITY
(Color)
Edmond O'BRIEN —

Yvonne De CARLO















nd

@ MEN’S
TUES. & WED
4.45 & 8.30 p.m.

Action Packed Double

‘IN OLD AMARILLO’

Roy ROGERS &

“THE WYOMING

BANDIT’
ky LANE












>

N
Doris DAY! Roc






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wished me to write her biography.

Why should a young woman
like Eva Peron want her biography
written? When I thought of how
she looked, I thought inevitably
of incurable disease.

Now I Knew

A year ago I again met Eva
Peron in Buenos Aires. She was
desperately ill, Every movement
was an effort. The curious) burn-
ing look had inereased. And the
fact that she had two specialists

in attendance left no room for
doubt.

One was Professor Ricardo
Finochietto, among the best ab-

dominal surgeons in the world. The
other was a famous cancer expert
from New York. They called on
her several times. A little later the
Argentine hedrd that an opera-
tion had been performed.

One rumour—that she had can-
cer of the womb—was in my view
unlikely to be true.

A gyneecologist would have been
necessary for such an operation
and none was present.

But since Eva Peron was alter-
nately reported unconscious and
revived, the suggestion that she
had in fact, leucaemia began to
gain credence. All the evidence

An Assortment of

— ALSO —

YOUR SHOE STORES













** Really, it was too idiotic
of thac gipsy co cell me to
watch out for a dark man
comirig into my life without
telling me just how dark!”

After two pints of blood had
been transfused, she was sitting
up and entertaining me to tea
an hour later, and she has been
kept alive for the past two years
by transfusions, ‘

The other patient is a man
whose spleen was removed two
years ago, To-day I ently
receive urgent messages that he
is dying. Yet blood transfusion
restores him. The “dying man” is
able to resume light work the
next day,

But in the end leucemia is invar-

iably fatal, Removal of the
spleen, transfusions—these can
save life sometimes for a few

months, sometimes for a couple of
years, or even more, But that is
all.
It is this evil thing that has
gripped Eva Peron.
—L. E. S.

$2.09, $2.15, $2.28, $2.41

$2.50
: rere - $131
30, 32 & 46 CENTS

T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS

DIAL 4606





SUNDAY, JULY

CINEMA NOTES

27,



; Hy



1952

G. WH.

B.B.C. Radio Notes

BRIGHT VICTORY THE ATOMIC

THIS WEEKEND, top billing goes to “Bright Victory”

showing at the Plaza, Barbarees.

Director Mark Robson

and_a fine cast headed by Arthur Kennedy deserve much

credit for an excellent and

moving drama in which senti-

mentality and over-emphasis have been skillfully avoided.
This film is about the rehabilitation of blind war veterans,
and the splendid work that is done for them both thera-
peutically and psychologically, as well as the understand-
ing and encouragement from those who can see and those

who are blind, alike.

Arthur Kennedy, who recently
completed a long run in the lead-
ing role of the Broadway success,
“Death Of A Salesman” is the
partieular veteran with whom we
are concerned. Wounded in the
North African invasion, he is re-
turned to the U.S. where he is to'd
that he will be blind. His bitter-
ness and fear of the future are
gradually overcome by the treat-
ment he receives at the Valley
Forge Army hospital, where the
men are taught confidence and
complete self-reliance. His first
visit home preves a shattering ex-
perience. Pity, lack of under-
standing and thoughtlessness are
the chief causes of his unhappiness
and when his fiancée tells him she
cannot face the uncertainty of
their future, he returns
hospital and to a young girl whose
love for him, and _ clear-sighted-
ness, give him fresh hope and
self-reliance.

Arthur Kennedy’s performance
is first rate and carries strong
conviction in his gradual growth
and development and his realiza-
tion that ultimate security must
come from within himself. Peggy
Dow is charming as the young girl
whg loves him with a warm, sym-
pathetic understanding and un-
felfishness that his family and
friends could not give him.

There are good dramatic situa-
tions i.e. when the blind soldier is
forced by the officer in charge to
tell his parents over the phone of
his blindness. Expressing his
bitterness to his superior, the
veteran learns that he too is blind.
There is a moving love scene and
the fleeting glimpses of race pre-
judice is delicately and effectively
touched on. Director Robson has
used perception and restraint in
an engrossing film that should ex-
cite the sympathies of anyone,

For Them That Trespass

Playing at the Plaza Bridgetown,
FOR THEM THAT TRESPASS is
the dramatic story of a miscar-
riage of justice. Starting off in
the genteel atmosphere of an
upper middie class English family,
the scene shifts to the drab and
sordid background of a London
slum, However, squalid as_ this
part of London may be, the char-
acters are remarkably vital and
sharply drawn, from the Little
Cockhey shop girl down to the
engine driver who commits mur-
der in a blind fit of jealousy.

The story concerns a young
Englishman whose ambition is to
be a writer. To see how the
“other half’ lives, he takes him-
setf'to Lenten Town, where under
am assumed name, he becomes
friendly with a Cockney girl A
midnight visit to her room is
rudely interrupted by the arrival
of her “steady” and our author
beats a hasty retreat. Next morn-
ing,+he reads that the girl has
béen murdered and though he
knows who committed the crime,
he lets another man be condemned
sooner than expose himself to the
publicity that would follow were
it known that he was _ consorting
with slum people. The “other
man” is Richard Todd, who made
his first. screen appearance in this
picture and has since gone to the
top. A petty burglar, condemned
for an act he did not commit, he
spends fifteen years in jail and on
his release, neatly collects his
evidence and forces the writer to
admit his presence in the murder-
ed girl’s room and the identity of
the killer.

His fervent portrayal of the
wronged man is exeellent and it
is obvious that Mr. ‘Todd has fine
acting ability and knows how to
use it. Stephen Murray’s role of
the writer, Christopher Drew,





WE

HAVE
THE
KITCHEN-
WARE
IN
STOCK

Veer

to the |




HUMPHREY BOGART

emerges as a_ thoroughly self-
centered smug and rather colour-
less person, Perhaps he is sup-
posed to be so, but I found his
characterization unimpressive, Of
the women, I would give first place
to Rosalyn Boulter for her care-
free, come-easy, go-easy interpre—
tation of a Cockney floozie. Patri-
cia Plunkett and Michael Laur-
ence both give a good aceount of

themselves, and the contrasting
types, representing the middle-
class and the slum _ dwellers

couldn’t be bettered. The minor
roles in English films are always
done to perfection and give a
foundation to the picture that is
often sadly lacking.

A last word—a bar-room brawl
between two of the women—that
probably has its moments, has
been removed from the film “in
toto” with the result that the
continuity is rudely jarred. I may
say that the picture arrived here
with this deletion and I cannot
see why we should not be left to
make our own decisions as to
what scenes should be censored.

Deadline U.S.A.

DEADLINE U.S.A. starring
Humphrey Bogart, Ethel Barry-
more and Kim Hunter can be seen
at the Globe. A realistic newspaper
drama, it succeeds in showing the
many pressures under which a
free press operates. There also
seems to be a good deal of law-
enforcing activity undertaken by
the staff of the paper that might
better have been left in the pro~
per hands. However, the newspa-
per background is so qetailed and
authentic that the film carries
weight and conviction.

The plot concerns a managing
editor whose wife has divorced
him because she feels that he is
wedded to his work. With his job
being terminated in three days,
due to the paper being sold to
rival interests he devotes his re-
maining time to exposing a vice
king and gangster—nearly loses
his life in doing so—but neverthe-
less goes down in a blaze of head-
lines! though he loses the paper,
he does succeed in getting his
wife back.

Bogart fans will probably en-
joy the star’s performance which
struck me as somewhat fiercely
morose, with the exception of a
quiet scene with Miss Barrymore,
widow of the paper’s founder,
where he shows a more human
side. Kim Hunter plays Mr. Bo-
gart’s wife, who would definitely
seem to have had the short end
of the marriage stick, while Mar-
tin Gabel is an effective wicked
gangster.



House Seales
Counter Scales

Cake Pans

Dripping Pans

Pattie Pans

&

f

Sponge Finger Pans

Mincers



THE CORNER



AGE
Another Talk

From London

A sequel to last weeks talk
over the B.B.Cs General Over-
seas Service on atomic power
will be given in the coming week
The subject this time will be
Britain's atomic development.
The speaker this time will be
Dr, A. S. MeFarlane of the
National Institute for Medical
Research at Mill Hill, North Lon-
don, where isotopes from Har-
well are being used in medical
research. His talk is, called
Isotopes Bring New Knowledge’.
Isotopes are among the most
powerful research tools available
to scientists today; they were
described last year in the sim-
plest possible terms by Professor
Frederick Soddy as ‘atoms with
the same outsides but different
insides.’ The talk can be hear
at 10.15 p.m. on Wednesday, 30th
July, in the ‘Mid-week Talk,’

Travel Talks

There are two travel talks to
be heard in the B.B.C’s General
Overseas Service in the coming
week. The first is ‘Pleasant Jour-
ney by Wynford Vaughn Thoma
who rounds off his recent return
visit to India and Pakistan after
five years absence in recalling
the pleasures of travel in those
countries. He leaves facts and
figures behind him to talk of art,
including the arts of cooking, con-

versation and salesmanship. He
will be heard at 10.30 p.m. in
Tuesday, 29th. The second talk is

‘Return Journey to Finland by
Edward Ward who tells the story
of his return visit to the country



SUNDAY



ADVOCATE

FARM AND GARDEN

ity

Agricola

THE COCONUT—H
We in the western hemisphere, long aceustomed, for

table and culinary purposes

to our butter and other anima!

fats, reinforced by olive oil_and the cheaper cotton-seed
eil, and to luxury ereams and similar unguents for per-
sonal use, have tended perhaps to overlook the great im-

portance and essentiality of
For culinary and personal us¢®s,

both internally and externally,
this product is closely inter-
woven with their habits and
fabric of life generally, and has
been so for generations. It is,
too, in many cases, their main
illuminant. Domestically, the
crude product is made in the
primitive way of utilizing the
immature nut by grating the

fresh kernels, mixing with water,
squeezing, boiling and decanting;
it is still practised in the villages.
These simple methods have been
brought to the West Indies by
immigrants, and, in many cases,
small commercial plants on simi-
lar lines have sprung up com-
bining pig-keeping as a side-line;
eoconut refuse plus. discarded
products of rice mills providing
the chief ration. Simple refining
methods too are sometimes prac-
tised but in the main, the eastern
mind prefers the crude article.
Now, the origina] export trade
in these parts consisted largely of
dried nuts for confectionery pur-
poses, Actually, it is only about
50 years or so ago that commer-
cial and industrial developments
ensured the greater utilisation of
the coconut as an important
source of vegetable fats—both of
tallow and oils. Coconuts were
soon decsribed as the “Consols of
the East.” There was a demand
for the dried nut in the form of
copra (either sun or kiln dried)
and this trade also developed in
the West Indies. Later local
eapital was invested in modera
milling and refining plants; today,

where he was B.B.C. War Cor-~ with efficient crushing and the use

respondent in 19840. He gives
listeners the background picture
of the amazing recovery of this
little country, which is in the
news this year as the centre of
the Olympic Games. He will
speak at 9.00 p.m. on Wednesday
30th July.

The Promenade Concerts
Broadcasts from
Albert Hall, London, of some of
the Henry Wood Promenade Con-
certs now in their 58th Season
will be heard in the B.B.C’s

G. O. S. in the coming week. On Sition from

Sunday at 9.00 p.m, listeners will

of hydraulic presses, the bulk of
the oil is extracted, the remain-
ing cake providing a valuable
stock feed or fertilizer. The re-
fined product is sold in the form
of oil or made up into margarine
and related compounds. Marga-
rine thas become a product of
world wide significance. Its high

the Royal quality and food value in relation

to high priced butter fat are no
longer questioned; and, even in the
United States, where there has
been severe criticism and oppo-
the dairy industry,
its sale is rapidly gaining ground.

hear a repeat of part of the first Animals just cannot compete with

concert of the Season in

a Nursery Song for Piano and
Orchestra, by Dohnanji played
by the B.B.C.
chestra conducted by Sir Mal-
colm Sargeant, with Joyce
Hedges at the piano. On Thurs-
day at 9.00 p.m. the violinist
Campoli will be heard in Lalos
Symphonie Espagnole for yiolin
and orchestra and Tchaikovsky s
‘Overture—tantasia: Romeo and
Juliet’ from the same programme
will be broadeast, Another re-
corded programme will be heard
at 5.15 p.m. on Tuesday, with the
same orchestra and conduetor,
includes Haydn's ‘Sinfonia Con-
certante in B flat’ for oboe, bas-
soon, violin, violincello, and
orchestra, in which the soloist in
each instrument is leader of the
respective section of the B.B.C.
Symphony Orchestra,

‘Caribbean Voices’

‘Caribbean Voices’
27th. presents a short story by
Geoffrey Drayton of Barbados,
another by Ian Ramsay of Jamaica
and Tove poems by Joseph Penco
of Trinidad and Horace Mitchell
of British Guiana. Broadcast be-

gins at the regular time of 7.15
p.m.

on Sunday,

TALKING POINT

Bet after all what would the
English be without their sweet
unreasonableness? {

—John Galsworthy. |
|

KITCHEN |

READY?

Coffee Mills
Sifters

Fish Turners
Ladles
Spoons
Seoops

Cork Screws
Can Openers
Egg Beaters
Icing Sets



STORE

j which the palm,
the main work is ‘Variations on doubt, a

Symphony Or interest.



Margarine is, without
boon to the harassed
housewife and future develop-
ments will be watched with great
The eoconut is regarded
now as the world’s most impor-
tant food fruit.

What about the paim itself?
Qpinion is divided as to whether
it is of old or new world origin.
The fact is that sea currents have
played an important part im
transporting the nuts from one
shore to another, ;Â¥t is a halo-
phyte, that is, it tolerates and
resists salt, not that it requires
Salt as is often supposed, It does
not flourish at high altitudes.

A rainfall of 60 inches evenly
distributed is considered adequate
if the ground water ascends
within reach of the root system,
providing such water is on the
move and never. stagnamt. Heavy
compact, water-retaining — soils
are unsuitable. To primitive man,
the coconut was simply a tree
that provided food, drink, she!l-
ter and raiment. It still does ail
these things and more in these
modern times. Let us glance
briefly at its many uses, From
the husk comes coir fibre for
brooms cordage, brushes, mais,
mattresses, upholstery, etc., also
used for caulking; the leaves
furnish »baskets, mats and thatch-
ing; the leaf stalks yield fencing,
handles for tools and brushes; the
husk may also be used as a scour-
ing brush and together with the
shell _as fuel; the shell is made





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our PYREX TABLEWARE.

@ OVENWARE
@ SOUP PLATES

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@ SAUCE BOATS

The above extensive
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WARE.



BARBADOS
CO-OP. COTTON
FACTORY LTD.

coconut oil to eastern peoples. |
into buttons, cups, ladles, spooos
and other utensils; the oute!
parts of the trunk furnish post:
and vafters; the roots, a dye

And finally, the immature inflo:

escence yields a sap from whic)
wine, vinegar or sugar even can

be made Altogether, what an
opportunity for handcrafts 1
provided by this unique tree!

GARDENING HINTS
FOR AMATEURS

Hedges

The secret of a well kept hedge |
is—never to let it get out of hand, |
In gether words give it a weekly |
or atvany rate a fortnightly clip,
and in this way it will keep its)
trim well groomed appearance and |
the labour of clipping it will be
considerably less than if this job
is done less often.

Once a hedge is neglected until
it is overgrown it is a tedious and
difficult job to get it into shape
again, and when just cut after this |
neglect the hedge presents an ugly |
chopped look, instead of the nice |
smooth shaven look of the well)
kept hedge. j

Many people make a great fuss
over this hedge trim: .1i ind the
gardener is sure to i.iab ut that
it is some highly skilled job re-
quiring great strength and endur-
ance! It is nothing of the sort, once
the hedge is in order, and requires
no more than a straight eye, a pair
of sharp well oiled shears, and a
couple of hours steady work. Once
the hedge has been regularly trim-
med, thirty or forty feet of hedge
ean be well clipped top and sides
in a couple of hours.

Keeping the hedge in good order
is important, for while a well kept
nedge is always a source of admir-
ation, nothing looks worse than a
neglected hedge. Its neglect seems
to lower the standard of the whole
garden, and does more to spoil its
general appearance than almost
any other kind of neglect. Some
hedges are easier to keep trimmed
than others.

Sweet Lime, Chetry, Bread and
Cheese and Olive are clipped more
easily than Casuarina. These first
mentioned give a _ firmer more
even purfa&a, whereas tthe fine
springy tendrils of Casuarina seem
to jump about and elude the
shears. Of all our hedges Casua-
rina is probably the most difficull
to keep in good shape, yet when
this hedge is well kept it makes| >
a splendid hedge.

Flowering hedges need not be|))
kept quite as severely trimmed as
the mon-flowering kind, for we do
wait to give the flowers, which
are their chief beauty, a chance
Yet even the flowering hedge must
not be allowed to go untrimmed
but must be kept judiciously clip-
ped all the time. But beware of
leaving this job to be done with-
out supervision, it is fatal (to the
hedge) for trimming the flower-
ing hedge needs more judgment,
and is a less straight forward job
than trimming the non-flowering



kind. In Trinidad, the Exora
hedges are very lovely, but a
smaller and more bushy type of
Exora is used for these hedges
than the Exora commonly seen in
Barbados This smaller Exors

grows quite easily here, and it
would be quite an idea for some-
one to try growing it in a hedge

In British Guiana it is the cus-
tgm to have a hedge made up of
diferent kinds of flowering plant $
This novel idea might also be tried
here by some pioneering spirited
gardener. Our Barbadian gardens
are inclined to be rather conserva-
tive, and would be all the better

for some bold spirit to lead us
along new and as yet untried
paths. oi




is the time



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PAGE FOUR



!
j



Protect your gums and you protect your

teeth, for gum troubles cause over 50 per cent. of tooth-
losses. To promote firm, healthy gums, use Ipana tooth paste —
Ipana and Massage. Use Ipana, also, to brush your teeth extra-
white and reduce acid-forming bacteria that cause decay, This
is the way to keep your whole mouth healthy; the way you will
find “refreshingly different” because of Ipana’s mint flavour.

THE TOOTH PASTE..
REFRESHINGLY DIFFERENT |

A PRODUCT OF BRISTOL-MYERS,




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AGENTS —

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'

SATURDAY, 2ND AUGUST, 1952
MONDAY, 4TH AUGUST, 1952 (BANK HOLIDAY)
THURSDAY, 7TH AUGUST, 1952
SATURDAY, 9TH AUGUST, 1952



THIRTY ONE EVENTS IN ALL. THE START OF

» HE FIRST RACE ON THE FIRST, SECOND AND

FOURTH DAYS IS 1.15 P.M., ON THE THIRD DAY
: ——_—2,00-P.ME.



CROSS SOOOOOOOS

6969090 98SO OOS OE

of

The 2/- SWEEPSTAKE will be officially closed on
THURSDAY, 31ST JULY, 1952, and will be drawn for
on FRIDAY, 8TH AUGUST, 1952, at the GRAND
STAND at 4.00 P.M. Tickets can be purchased from
Registered Sellers up to 4.00 p.m. of the same day.



The Plan for Admission to the Grand Stand will
be opened, as follows:—
.To SUBSCRIBERS on THURSDAY 24TH JULY, 1952.

To THE GENERAL PUBLIC on MONDAY, 28TH
JULY, 1952, between the hours of 8.15 a.m. and
3.00 p.m, daily.





All Bookings must be paid for by FRIDAY, 1ST %
AUGUST, 1952, by 3.00 P.M. : ; x

+

PRICES OF ADMISSION: %
SUBSCRIBERS:—Free and Three (3) Ladies or Juniors &

@ $2.88 Each for the Season, ; %

%,

GENERAL PUBLIC:—Ladies per Day... ... $1.20 &
Gents per Day 1.92 }

Ladies Season 4.00 %

Gents Season 7.00 §

Admission to the Paddock per Day $1.20 Each x
FIELD STAND:—Per Person per Day 3/- Each x

my

— &

s

N.B. No Passes for re-admittance will be given. %

All Bookings close at the Office at 3.00 p.m, on FRIDAY, >
1ST AUGUST, 1952. x

na %

rh)

3 POSITIVELY NO BOOKINGS BY TELEPHONE ¥
B WILL BE ACCEPTED >
% ¥
g G. A. LEWIS x
% Secretary s
6.6555096559SSSSSSSOSS9S5OSS00SSS9SS9959655090006 8

a SUNDAY

ADVOCATE



ALL IS NOT WELL WITH
LOCAL CRICKET
College Carry Off Basketball
Championship
By O. S. COPPIN

RECENT events in the local Barbados Cricket
Association games have gone to prove an old con-
tention of mine that there is need for a revision of
the competition rules to meet present day conditions,

The basic principles of the rules cannot be
questioned but I should only be pushing at an open
door if 1 attempted to press an obvious case, I shall
simply draw attention to the existing state of
affairs. ;

HASTY DECISION
y= the Barbados Cricket Association, through its Board of
Management made a comparatively hasty decision to change
the method of awarding points this season and also shuffled teams in
the three divisions, finally changing the number of playing days
allotted to Intermediate games from three to two days, I thought that

this alone was ample suggestion that the entire rules governing asso-

ciation games should be reviewed,

For example, the law which requires teams to start games at 1.00
p.m. also allows 30 minutes grace. This has.created such an anomaly
in past days that it has now deteriorated into plain nonsense.

NOT A SINGLE GAME
T has resulted in the fact that not a single game has commenced
at 1.00 p.m., within my knowledge, for the past fifteen years and
players have become so accustomed to the 1.30 p.m. hour that they
are taking their half an hour’s grace from 1.30, so that many games
now start nearer 2 p.m. than 1 p.m,

This rule should be amended and the law made either 1 p.m. or
1.30 p.m, Teams which have turned up in time to start at 1 p.m. in
the hope of forcing a decision have been dubbed unsporting and have
met with no success in having the opposing teams take the field.

UMPIRES GUILTY TOO

HERE iz complaint that some umpires have refused to take the

field before 1.30 p.m. and so on, If a definite law were made and
the grace cut out of it, teams could be made to start on time,

One appreciates the fact that some business houses close at 1 p.m.
on Saturdays and players employed in them would be at a disadvan-
tage. Well then if this is considered sound grounds for extenuation
then make it 1.30 p.m, but cut out the grace and let there be some-

thing definite.
AFRAID?
MPIRES too have been afraid to invoke the law of fair and unfair

play. There has been a recent instance in, which a team, in a
good position for scoring quick runs for victory were partially robbed
because of the delaying antics of bowlers.

It was obvious to most people that there was deliberate delay and
I see no reason why the Board of Management cannot move on such
occasions, If I read the law correctly they have a right to intervene
without an appeal having been received in instances of this sort.

SHORT BOUNDARIES
rYEAMS are complaining about the shortness of the boundaries at
some of the playing fields, This has had its echo in fantastic
scores being returned, out of relation to the performance itself.

This could be adjusted too because there had been general coni-
plaints for some time now against certain grounds and everybody could
hardly be wrong.

The vexatious question of the preparation of the wicket needs some
examination, too. Bitter have been the observations made by some
teams on the condition of the wicket given them on occasigns when

| weather conditions denied anything short of a perfect wicket,

ACCIDENT OR DESIGN
N some cases there could be no suggestion of design but accident
has the same effect if the deed has been done, The umpires can
function in these cases but I have yet to see any of them take this
bold step.

A directive from the Board of Management with reference to these
subjects would go a long way towards convincing the cricket playing
public that the Board of Management is not an aloof austere body that
makes regulations for cricket on theory but is the executive committee
of the Barbados Cricket Association with an abiding interest in local
cricket and some understanding and sympathy with the problems
that must inevitably crop up during the course of the years.

COLLEGE BASKETBALL CHAMPIONS

Y congratulations this week go out to Harrison College who have

carried off the First Division Basketball Challenge cup this season,

It is true that they have won by the irritating route of goal avery
age but as is the case with the Barbados Amateur Football Association
rules as well, award by goal average seems to be the most practical
method of awarding a championship between teams who are other-
wise tied on points. :

Carlton, from whom the College team won on goal average will
receive a spontaneous measure of sympathy from basketball fans in
the circumstances and their effort will be commendéd even more when
it is learnt that the Carlton team is a comparatively young basketball
team.

The Knockout competition starts this week and as each team has
been beaten during the course of the season’s competition it is not easy
to predict the winner.

WEIGHTLIFTING SHOW. PLANNED i
HE Barbados Amateur Weightlifting Association are planning a
| ~=mammoth show to take place at the Empire Theatre on August
28. . ;
Weightlifters are practising hard for this show since the winners
will tour Trinidad in September to compete against their counter-
parts there,

This form of sport is 1
tribute to the pioneers that while their show two year
or five teams enter competitors, this year seventeen
are expected to take part.

the first of its 1952

THE B.C.L. PREPARE
ARBADOS CRICKET LEAGUE will play

B series of big games with a match against a team representative

of the Intermediate division of the Barbados Cricket Association

to-day at Y.M.P.C.

The Barbados Cricket League continues its policy of team _build-
ing, which was begun last season, On this occasion the B.C.L. will
be without the services of C. De Peiza and Guy Kirton. Both of these
players have joined Empire C.C.

Of the players who took part in the B.C.L. big games last season,
the Sobers brothers will be available. Also Ashton Blackman, the
burly fast bowler from Romans and who can hit the ball very lustily.

apidly gaining popularity and it is some
s ago saw four
affiliated clubs

| Kenneth Goddard now.in the veteran stage will be in charge of the

team,
OPPORTUNITY

Opportunity will be given to K. Maloney of St, Catherine who
comes into fhe team as a result of his performances last season. His
average of 49.2 was the best last season and in addition he scored the
most runs in the League. He was also one of the players to win a
prize for three consecutive 30's.

One of the players who should be watched is Green of Middlesex
who is reported to be the fastest bowler seen for the season, The
selected players quite naturally include W. A. Clarke of Rangers who
has scored two consecutive centuries this season, Altogether the stage
is set for development on a big scale.



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* BAY STREET — DIAL 4269 }

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s

-



Yesterday’

WANDERERS vy. PICKWICK

Wanderers (1st Innings) 343
Pickwick 131 and (for 5
wkis) . wieds sipinke 119

Pickwick collapsed on a wicket
that was taking some turn yester-
day for 131 in reply to Wander-
ers’ first innings total of 343, and
forced to follow on, are now faced
with a similar fate, having lost

five second innings’ wickets for
119 runs. “
Defeat for the Pickwickians

appears inevitable seeing that thev
have lost the wickets of E. L. G.
Hoad, Junior, K. A. Greenidge,
topscorer in the first innings with
49, and Edwards, their opening
batsman. John Goddard held on
determinely and at the end of
the day, was undefeated with 43.

Resuming their innings at 23
for 1 yesterday, Pickwick were
soon in trouble, two quick wickets
falling for an additional 20 runs,
Birkett was out for 11, and Hoad
followed shortly after for 19,

K. A. Greenidge the hero of the
first innings and John Goddard
saw the score to 78 before God-
dard was caught behind the wicket
off Eric Atkinson.

Greenidge Caught

Greenidge went on to score 49
before he went at number 7,
caught by a sub off Denis Atkin-
son’s bowling. His innings includ-
ed 7 fours and a five. Except for
M. Foster’s 14, the other batsmen
all fell below double figures,

Dry and flaking at the top, the
wicket played trickily, and the
medium pacers were getting the
ball to turn nearly a yard at times.
On other occasions, the ball kept
only a few inches off the ground.

This, however, should not ex-
cuse the Pickwick batsmen for
their extremely poor showing, and
this fact was borne out in the
second innings when E. L, G. Hoad
and E, Edwards, the. two openers
batted confidently, and saw the
score past fifty before the former
was bowled by a shoot from Eric
Atkinson.

John Goddard too, batted sound-
ly in the second innings, and it
was simply amazing to see how the
other batsmen gave away their
hands. K. Greenidge was out
caught off a full pitch which he
pulled around from the off to
mid on,

Evelyn Run Out

Evelyn, who was run out in the
first innings, was out similarly in
the second innings when he badly
judged a second run which he
could and should have made.

The result was that from 100 for
2 wickets in the second innings,
three wickets fell for an additional
5 runs, leaving Pickwick at the
end of the day’s play with 5 of
their second innings’ wickets
down, and 93 runs behind the
Wanderers’ first innings total of
343.

Denis Atkinson bowled very
well in the first innings to bag 5
for 46 in 16.3 overs. Four of those
five wickets fell in the last four
overs at a cost of only 14 runs.
His brother Eric alsoftook 2 for
only five runs in his last 3 overs.

In the second innings Eric
Atkinson took 2 for 26 in 11 overs,
while L, St. Hill took 2 for 22 in
12 overs. ,

CARLTON vs. LODGE

Carlton (for 8 wkts. decl’d) 228
Lodge 81 and 56
C.. B Wjtltiams with his spin-
ners was unplayable at Black
Rock yesterday afternoon and
was mainly responsible for Carl-
ton’s win over Lodge School by
an innings and 91 runs as their
first division game came to a
close shortly after lunch, a day
ahead of the scheduled time.
Williams in a fine spell of bowl-
ing, sent back eight Lodge bats-

‘men for 17 runs after having sent

down six overs one of which was
a maiden.

Lodge who had scored 81 in
their first venture had dismissed
seven Carlton batsmen for 172
runs when play ended on the first
day.

Resuming yesterday on a per-
fect wicket, C, B. Williams 30 and
H. Cox who had not yet opened
his account, carried the score to
190 when Cox edged one from
Brookes into the safe hands of
wicket keeper Grant to bring his
innings to a close. He had con-
tributed a valuable 23 including
three boundaries.

Innings Closed
Noel Lucas joined Williams and
this pair took the score well past
the double century mark and
were still together when the in-
nings was declared closed at 2.15



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SUNDAY, JULY 27, 1952



s Cricket

with the total at 228. Lucas who
had done the bulk of the scoring,
had reached 19 including two
fours and one six. Williams on the
other hand was fairly quiet for
his undefeated knock of 47
which included six boundaries.

The Lodge ground fielding was
particularly good during this
period and they prevented Car)-
ton from piling up a bigger score
by saving many a boundary. J.
Farmer and K. L. Brookes each
got 3 for 62 and 70 respectively,
— M. Wilkie captured 2 for

With a deficit of 147 runs,
Lodge began their second innings
with C. B. Grant and L. M. Mur.
ray and this pair opened confi-
dently, playing the pace bowling
of Edghill and Warren comfort-
ably. They had taken the score
to 42, thus giving Lodge a good
send off when C. B. Williams
broke the partnership by knock-
ing back Grant’s stumps for a
very useful 21 including two
boundaries, His was actually the
beginning of the end, because,
apart from Murray who was
bowled by F. Edghill after con-
tributing a valuable 24 which was
inclusive of three boundaries, no
other batsman reached double
figures,

With Hutson absent, the innings
closed shortly after lunch for 56.

HARRISON COLLEGE ys.
EMPIRE

HARRISON COLLEGE
EMPIRE

Empire has so far gained first
innings lead on Harrison College

In their match at the College
grounds. Harrison College scored
196 in their first innings. The

Bank Hall team
day with 253.

When play opened yesterday,
College occupied the wicket for
a little over half an hour. They
carried their over-week total of
183 for nine to 196. Holder got
his first wicket of the match
yesterday. He took a good re-
turn to dismiss Reid for four.
G. Foster was the not out bats-
man with nine to his credit.
| ‘The chief contributor to the
College total was Camie Smitn
who made 48 on the first day of
play. Alleyne scored 30 and F.
Tudor 29.

For Empire, Barker took five
Wickets for 52 runs in 25 overs
of which six were maidens. H.
King teok two for 30 while
Holder and Fields captured one
each.

replied yester-

GC; DePeiza
Empire with 73.
boundaries to his
Drayton. played a __ splendid
innings to score 68, Robinson,
Empire opener, got his team off to
a good start with 56.

Claude Lewis, the last man mM
for Empire, however brightened
the day’s play. He scored fours
off three consecutive balls of Mr.
Sam Headley’s last over—the last
for the day.

Mr. Headley was the most suc-
cessful bowler for College. He
took five for 76 in 16 overs. M.
Simmons also had a very good
day. He bowled 17 overs and
took three wickets for 48 runs.

SPARTAN vs, POLICE

SPARTAN I41 & (for 2 wkts) 123
POLICE 146

Police were able to secure a
narrow first innings lead in the
second day of their mateh against
Spartan at the Park yesterday
when they put up 146 in reply to

epren Ist innings score of

Spartan in their second innings
have put up the good total of 123
for the loss of two wickets,

The first day of play saw Spar-
tan routed soon after lunch for
141, when N, Harris who eventu-

topscored for
He had ten
credit. W.

ally scored 49 not out, and K,
Bowen, saved them from
thorough. collapse. Then, Police

went on to score 42. for the loss of
three wickets,

Yesterday, Captain Farmer’s
invaluable knock of 36 at number
five, helped Police to gain the first

innings lead. When he went to
the wicket, the score was 47 for
the loss of four wickets. Another
batsman whose last minute stand
of 15 was very valuable to, Police,

was B. Dodson who was bowled
by King.
Frank King who took four

wickets for 66 runs in 14 overs,
was the most successful bowler.
Phillips took three for 35 in 13.5
overs and K, Bowen two for 34
in 12 overs. Bowen was more
troublesome on the first day of



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TAS/A

RACING NOTES
By BEN BATTLE

The lethargy at the Savannah has disappeared since last I wrote
and now the most casual visitor to the track can tell that something is
afoot, Not only have the horses intensffied their efforts, but the
trainers and even the hangers on, wear a keener air. Indeed it has
been rumoured that it is not only the horses that get fit around this
time, certain particularly conscientious trainers, so gossip would have
us believe, becoming even more wound up than their charges! Be that
as it may, there is no doubt that Races are almost upon us, and some
attempt to analyse the form in the more important events is clearly

justified.
THE DERBY

The position in regard to the Derby is easily summarised. It con-
sists in trying to find the answer to the question “Who or What can
be found to beat Bright Light?” At first the answer—“nothing”’—to
this appears all too easy, and, certainly on form alone it is difficult,
even impossible to visualise Mr. Barnard’s filly being seriously threat-
ened. Racing however would be a dull business if the unexpected
never happened, and I think that the Derby situation is at least open
enough to permit us to indulge in a little mild speculation.

First of all, we may as well admit that at her best Bright Light
would surely outclass her field. The question then resolves itself into
whether we have any grounds whatever for assuming that she may
not be quite at her peak. I think that perhaps we have, if only the
very slenderest. Surely we can assume that the Trinidad June meet-
ing must have taken something out of her, as must the sea voyage up.
Bright Light like all her family, is a keen type of filly, the reverse
of phlegmatic, and it is at least possible that her prolonged career in
Trinidad may have just taken the fine edge off her. Assuming this
to be true, are there still among the other candidates any likely to
take her measure?

Unfortunately the one with the best credentials for this task, I
refer to Dunquerque, is unlikely to be at her best. She is not a
robust filly by any means, and has suffered more than one setback
in her preparation. It will take all the skill that her connections
possess to produce her on Derby Day in a condition to do herself jus-
tice. I do not intend to leave her out of my calculations by any
means, but I shall be a little surprised if she pulls it off. That leaves
us with Cardinal, First Admiral, Seedling, and Rambler Rose. Of
these, Cardinal has been coughing, and may or may not be fully re-
covered by Races. He is doing reasonable gallops, but hardly up to
Derby form so far. First Admiral tried conclusions with Bright
Light in Trinidad and I can think of no reason why he should re-
verse the form over here. Rambler Rose is undergoing a most serious
preparation, and doing so with credit, but she has disappointed before
and may again. There remains only Seedling, and it is from _him,
if I read the signs correctly, that the greatest danger to Bright Light
may develop. An undoubtedly backward colt at two, he has made
great progress since, and his veteran trainer has made no bones about
getting him ready for the big race. I should certainly, if I_ had to,
tip Bright Light to win, but I should at the same time bear Seedling
very much in mind,

THE CHAMPION STAKES

The form for the Champion Stakes is a lot less easy to interpret
than that for the Derby. ‘As we have never previously seen any of
the field perform over the distance, we must rely on our interpretation
of their previous performances aided by our observations of the
gallops. Even the gallops are not very straightforward, as we are
constantly being confronted with the unexpected sight of horses doing
a mile and a quarter or even further, instead of that old standby of
the Grandstand Clock—a box to box. The confusion which this en-
genders was exemplified recently, when an experienced stop watch
expert, took the time for what he considered to be a rather slow half
mile, only to be astonished a few moments later when the same
horse passed the winning post a second time having completed a credi-
table mile and a quarter.

Bearing all this in mind, let us pass to a consideration of the in-
dividual candidates. Ten are entered and with few exceptions all are
entitled, on their best form, to some sort of a chance, The exceptions
I would make are Embers, who has so far showed no sign of being
able to compete with the A’s over any distance and Tiberian Lady
to whom the same criticism applies. To these might be added Slainte,
although.there is no doubt that at his best he would have had a rea-
sonable chance; but one doubts whether he can hope at this stage to
regain his youth. Flieuxcé might be the next on our elimination
list, but for the fact that she has been going so well at exercise. A
soft track on Race Day would put her in with an outside chance.
Red Cheeks is a bit of a dark horse, but I cannot fancy her seriously
on the amount of work I have seen her do. The brilliant Rebate does
not impress as a mile and a half horse and I should not be surprised
if she is not sent. The remainder would I think pose a problem to
any bookmaker anxious to lay their true odds. For my money, the
consistent and genuine Landmark would be first choice, but Doldrum
has been going so well that she cannot be left out. Nor for that matter
can Firefly or Notonite; but my selection (made a full week before
Races) would be Landmark.

Ah well! I shall keep this article by me until after Races. . I
or how many of my closely reasoned conclusions will look by
then, *





play than he was yesterday. Table Tennis:
Police were all out about 20 min-
utes before lunch,



Bad Start

Spartan were off to a bad start
with the early loss of S. Griffith
who was adjudged l.b.w. to Brad-
shaw when he had not yet scored.
But then G, N. Grant and Atkins
came together in a fruitful second
wicket stand. Both of these bats-

men played the Police pace
attack, Mullins and Bradshaw
fairly comfortably, although it

was evident that they were al-
ways cautious, Skipper Farmer
had to keep on the fast bowlers,
especially Mullins who bowled, 16
overs, as the spinners were in-
effective and costly.

Mullins off whom 28 runs were
scored for one wicket, held a good
length and kept down the scor-
ing.

The partnership was _ broken
with the score at 83 by a brilliant
eatch by F. Taylor at short leg.
The batsman was G. N. Grant
who scored 40, The incoming
batsman, N. Harrison helped
Atkins to take the score to 123 for
the loss of two wickets. At the
en’ of the day’s play, Atkins was
54 and Harrison 20, both not out.

Slack fielding from the Police
players,

were in some measure
responsible for Spartan’s 123
runs.

Scores on page 5



|
:
|

New Shipment arrive and

Semi-finals
Tomorrow

Table Tennis semi-finals in
Grade A and B and Ladies’ Dou-
bles Championships will be played
at the Y.M.C.A. to-morrow night.
The finals of these competitions
will take place on Friday, August
1

In the A Class, Norman Gill will
meet Lincoln Worrell while Roy
Phillips will play Frank Wil-
loughby,.

The games in the B Class are:
George King vs. D. Guiler and D,
Archer vs. C. Hendy,

Ruth -Williams and J. Clarke,
the Queen’s College double pair,
will play Renee Gloumeau and
Patsy Humphrey of Y.M.P.C,

Fewer Flags
Kingston: Fewer flags will

wave in this outpost of the
Empire because it will cost more

to wave them, Twenty per
cent. more. For, through an
oversight by customs officers

drafting the new tariff rates, the
one-time duty-free Union Jacks
must now pay an ad valorem
holidaying with her relatives at
duty of 20 per cent.





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SUNDAY, JULY 27,

OLYMPICS





More Records Broken At Helsinki | **.;

BARTHEL

1952

WINS THE

1,500 METRES

Mr. T. A. D. Gale, Ad

of the Advocate, —

vertising
is at present in Helsinki rere F e Olympic Games.

LSINKI, July 26.

AT HELSINKI to-day -it was rather a tame day,

although the march of records continues.

it is quite possi-

ble that not since the first games have so many records

been established.
no doubt someone will

ing on points with the

y has lost count, but
a list when it is all over.

So far in all the ene y entire games Russia is lead-

the track and field events began with the De-

-

of these as well as the
fourth and fifth in this event all
broke the old Olympic record of
45 feet 1% inches, The Russian
women are obviously as strong if
not stronger than they were said
to be by nearly all sports writers
before the Games.
Surprising Result

But the most surprising result
in the Games came off to-day
when the little considered —"
Barthel of Luxembourg won the
1,500 metres. No doubt a num-
ber of people were sorry to see
the name of the great Jack Love-
lock wiped off as the holder of the
Olympic record, but there was no
uncertainty about it as the first
eight in this event all fae i
better time. With the Steeplechase
yesterday it ranks as the greatest
record breaking feat of the
Games.

It was a mixed up race from
start to finish. The order changed
several | we the new wine
Tecord erner o
Germany took over ‘tia Dane
1% laps to go, He ran into the
Reding Wt Gorge ‘nate ost

yy sever: s and as
he began his final sprint on the
last bend it looked as if he was
the certain winner, Roger Ban-
nister and Robert McMillan of
the U.S.A. were prominent at this
time and Barthel and Frances FE)
Mabrouk were chasing them.

Home Stretch

Coming into the home stretch
MeMillan, Bannister and Barthel
were all gaining on Lueg. MeMil-
lan caught Lueg first and just
when he looked like winning,
Barthel pulled out something ex-
tra and passed both of them to



SCOREBOARD >

eathlon which as I is still going en. As pected,
Bob Mathias of the OBA te Meiite bet te eee:

nd.
by inehes from the American.
rather quiet reception
received it was
people diq not

it and
consul the
r programmes.

But Barthel won on his merits
and his time ef 3 minutes 45.2
seconds lowered Lovelock’s

ic records by as much as
fi He was 2.2 seconds
outside Gunder Hagg’s world
record. Why so few people
thought of Barthel as the likely
winner is probably due to the fact
that Britain’s Bannister by his re-
cords in England and America
over a mile Was considered
almost a certainty. Lueg of Ger-
many had also gained plenty of
publicity with his world record
over this distance only a few
weeks ago. But Barthel won both
his heat and Semi Final, The final
order was Barthel, McMillan of
the U.S.A., Lueg of Germany and
Roger Bannister of Britain. Ban-
nister who claims that he can
only run one or two very good
miles per year certainly ran one
of his best to-day; but it was not
good enough.

Ladies’ 200 Metres

The last final at the Olympic
Stadium today was the Ladies’
200 metres and in this Marjorie
Jackson handsomely won but not
as easily as she did in the Semi-
Finals yesterday when she broke
the world record. Her time for
the final was 23.7; Berther Brower
of Holland, however, improved
her time by a tenth when she
did 24.2 to come second. Third
was Russia’s Nadezhda Khmykina
and fourth Winsome Cripps of
Australia who both did 24.2, once
again beating Mrs. Blankers
Koen's old record.

The first heats in the 400-metre
relays were also run, In the
latter the Jamaican team quali-
fied easily with a time of 3 min-
utes 12.1 seconds, but both the
U.S. and German teams did
better times in their respective
heats which they won,

,



ARLTO _ LODGE HARRISON COLLEGE vs. EMPIRE
Ledge aon . * ar es a $4244 81 Harrison College ist Innings
Cariton ist FEF. Hope c Rudder b Barker ... 2
Cc. McKenzie c Brooks Wilkie 34 U. Tudor stpd. (w.k. DePeiza) b
E. . Mi i ec Farmer b Brookes 21° ait, Seated icce ; 29
R. St. C. Hutchinson ec Goddard b C. Smith c Hunte b King 48
WROMBO oss n ce csuvevtascsscrs 4 ©. Blackman ec (w.k. DePeiza) b
G. Hutchinson c Welch b Wilkie .. 4 Fields at 24
F. hill ¢ Murray b Farmer .. #2 Mr. Headley b Barker ’ 15
J. A Wiliams ¢ ob Parmer ued 2 A. Alleyne c Robinson b Barker 30
. Edghill e Brookes b Farmer . 0 M. Worme run out 0
& B. Williams not out ...... ... 47 M. Simmons b Barker 21
H. Cox c (w.k. Grant) b K. L. 8S. Hewitt 1.b.w. Barker 3
Brookes .......... a Otte ata edad G. Foster not out . & 9
N. S, Lucas not out ...........+5- C. Reid c and b Holder 4
Extras: b. 8, 1.b. 2, w.1 ++ Extras IE 1
Total (for 8 wkts. decid.) 228 Total 196
Fall of wickets: 1 for 38, 2 for 46, 3 BOWLING ANALYSIS
for 106, 4 for 116, 5 for 131, 6 for 183, \ O.. M. R w
7 for 140, 8 for 190. fi asker ‘ 6 6 52 5
LING ANALYSIS ewis 6 3 6
now: 3 M R. W. S. Rudder 9 4 25
. ich ... vw 6 _ % j— A. Holder 16.5 1 38 1
§ co beves 5 - 19 —~ ©. Fields 1 ae 2 15 1
K. Brookes 17 - 70 2 es ME ws ¥:0:00 0.9% m7 30 2
M. Wilkie 7 1 28 2 W. Drayton 3 il
3. Farmer 11 — @ 8 O. Robinson 2 8
R. Goddard Rs 14 - Fall of wickets: 1 for 5, 2 for 76, 3
Lodge Innings for 99, 4 for 118, 5 for 128, 6 for 128, 7
Cc. B. Grant bC, Bo wiiliams s.ccss 21 for 175, 8 for 180, 9 for 183.
. M. Murray b F. Edghill ....... cd ire Ist Innings
. G. Wilkes b C. B, Williams .. © ©. Robinson b Mr. Headley 56
Â¥ . Brookes c Lucas b C. B. C. Hunte b Mr. Headley A 7
. Winiams ne te ee CE 5 C. Depeiza b Simmons . 4s ZANT Ke 73
3. E. Farmer not out ..........++. 1 W. Drayton c Worme b Mr. Headley 68
H. Welch Lb.w. C. B. Williams 0 ©. Fields run out 2
R. L. Goddard c J. Williams b A. Holder run out .. 0
Cc. B. Williams vegaatee 0 8. Rudder c Reid b Simmons 21
D. St. C. Reefer b C. B, Williams 2 W. Grant not out vie 5
N. G. Wilkie . (w.k. Marshall) H. King c Smith b Mr. Headley 0
, bc. B. Williams ..... ; ® H. Barker c Alleyne b Simmons 0
3. G. Outram b C. B. Williams 1 ¢. Lewis b Mr. Headley 12
J. A. C. Hutson absent ead c Extras . ie ‘ 9
Extras: lb. 2 .....++ 2
i. Total
ft 23 BOWLING ANALY S Be
ickets: 1 for 42, 2 for 42, Oo M y
tor 82, ¢ for 62, 8 for 52, 6 for 58,7 for wr Headley > % 5
54, 8 for 54, 9 for 56. M. Simmons 17 48 3
; BOWLING ANALYSIS C. Reid Te ae
oOo M F C. Smith ae
G. Edghill 3 — 0 = G. Poster g 40
K. B. Warren 4 11 — E£. Hope ne ae AP oe
J. A. Williams . ok Fall of wickets: 1 for 23, 2 for 118, 3
Cc. B. Williams 6 1 MW 8B fer 492, 4 for 172, 5 for 181, 6 for 227
F. Edghill ...... 3 2 4 1 4 for 82, 8 for 232, 9 for 235
(ae





: Olympic
Summaries

HELSINKI, July #6

U.S. beat Czechosioyakia 72 to 47 in
' one-sided Olympte elimination Basket -
ball game. At half time U.S. wete 35
Czechs 21 .

Czechoslovakia and Hungary have been
ciiminated from the Basketball tourna-
ment by losing two matches in the first
round

Bulgaria beat Mexico 52 to 44 in an
Olympic basketball tournament Saturday
Half time score was Bulgaria 27, Mexico

i6. The Bulgarian team averaged six
feet three i which dwarfed Mexi-
co's whieh averaged a little under six

feet. In addition to their height advan-
toge the Buigarians had better speed
and form on the Olympic Court.
WATER POLO
Brazil beat Portugal six to two in a
Water polo second round game. Half
time was Brazil 3, Portugal 2. Portugal)
eliminated Brazil and advanced to th»
first round tournament
The U.S. water polo team from Segun-
da, Calijornia, qualified for the tourna-
ment round of the Olympic event today,
beating Romania by six goals to three
in the second round of the eliminations
DECATHLON (Total Points Score after
Seven Points)




ist Mathias (U.S.A... 6000; 2nd Camp-
be (0 S.A.) S704; Sed Simons (U.S.A.)
5308; Sth Tanknder iSweden) 4929: 6th
Widenicit iSweden) 4928; 7th Vokov
iL S.R.) 4894; 8th Franyer (France)
4745; 8th Schimer (Germany) 4644; 10th
Kuznetskvy (U.S.S.R.) 4577; 11th Elliott

(Britain) 4491; 12th Fernandes (Portugal)

#421; 13th Rebula (Yusoslavia) 4369; 14th
latre (Venezuela) 4321; 15th Figueloa
(Chile) 4252; 16th Adami (Canada) 4215
Mth Ciko (Fimland) 4129.
DECATHLON 110 METRES HURDLES
First Heat
Ist Schirmer (Germany) 16; 2nd
Adams (Canada) 16.¢
Second Heat
Ist Heinrich (France) 16; 2nd Iriarte

(Venezuela) 16.6; 3rd Oliver (Puerto
Rico) 16.7; 4th Landstrom (Finland) 17.2
SWIMMING—100 METRES FREE STYLE
First Heat (24 best times qualify for

Semifinals

ist Hamaguchi (Japan)

58 sees.; 2nd

Minin (France) 59.2 sees.; 3rd Novac 1
min. 0.53 sees.; “4th Muniz (Mexico); 5th
Leo Teleyug (Finland); 6th Conde

(Spain); 7th Buch (Israel)






FENCING
Fencing 's Epee Semifinal
Poule one: Luxembourg 10, Denmark

5 Luxembourg :
Gretsche 2, Anen 4
Denmark: Carnera 2, Swane
Eynker 0, Keuxho 2
SHOT PUT
Russia's Klavdija Tochenova broke the
Olympile record in the ladies’ shot put
in the qualifying Tgqgnd with a throw
of 13.86 metres. The old mark of 13.75
was set by France's M
London, 1948,
WOMEN’S SHOT PUT -FINAL
ist Zybina (UsS.S.R.) 15.28, new world

Buck 3, Liesehgn 1,

Lund 1,

Ostermieyer in

record, @nd Werner (Germany) 14.57;
Sri Tochenova (U.S.S.R.) 14.50; 4th
Kevich (U.S.S.R.) 1442; Sth Kille
(Germany) 13.84; 6th Williams (New
Zealand)

FOUR BY 100 METRES RELAY

First Round

The first three teams in each heat will
run in the semi finals :

First Heat: Ist U.S.A, 40.3; 2nd France
408; 3rd Poland 41.8; 4th Finland 42
Sth Canada 42.3

Second Heat: Ist Britain 41.2; anda
Italy 41.5; 8rd U.S.A, 41.9; 4th Gold Coast
42.29; Sth Australia 423; 6th Thailand
42.5
SWIMMING—100 METRES FREE

FOURTH HEAT

ist Cleviand (United States) 57.8 secs
tnd Sugaki (Japan) 58 secs.; 3rd Peter
soli (Italy) 58.8.

STYLE

—U.P.

PICKWICK vs. WANDERERS
Wanderers Ist Innings “ AS
Pickwick 181 and (for & wkts.) 119

Pickwick Ist Innings

EL. G. Hoad, jnr. e E, Atkinson
b D. Atkinson 19
F. Edwards b J. Corbin . 13
Birkett c sub b R. Lawless 11
K. Greenidge c sub b\D. Atkinson 49
J. D. Goddard ec (w.k Knowles) b
E. Atkinson 9
C. Evelyn run out 9
W. Greenidge b D. Atkinson 0
R. Foster e Proverbs b D. Atkinson 14
T. Hoad c & b E. Atkinson * 1
C. White not out 0
H. Jordan c sub b D. Atkinson 5
Extras 1
Total 131

Fali of wickets 1 for 23, 2 for 43, 3

for 43, 4 for 78, 5 for 111, 6 for 111, 7 for
116, 8 for 126, 9 for 126
BOWLING ANALYSIS
Oo M R Ww
I Atkinson 12 1 32 2
J Corbin 3 1 5 1
I Atkinson 16.3 3 46 5
I Lawless 4 1 6§ 1
H Toppin 5 1 2 «C-
L. St. Hill 4 1 3 —
Pickwick 2nd Innings
L.. G. Hoad, jnr. b E. Atkinson 33
Edwards c D. Atkinson b
E. Atkinson 33
D. Goddard not out 43
White 1.b.w. b St. Hill . 3
Greenidge c H. Toppin b St. Hill o
Evelyn run out 2
Greenidge not out 0
Extras 5
Total (for 5 wkts.) 119

Fall of wickets
wy 103, 4 for 108, 5 for 105

BOWLUNG ANALYSIS

oO M yaw
Atkinson 1 2 26 2
Atkinson 13 3 27
Proverbs J 6
Toppin 6 28
A. Lawless 2 1 &
St. Hill 12, 3 22 2






1 for 58, 2 for 100, 3



SUNDAY



ADVOCATE



League Cricket Notes

By SCRIBBLER
Big Games

First of the series of the B.C.L
big games will begin to-morrow
at YÂ¥.M.P.C. grounds when an
official League team will meet a
team representative of the Inter.
mediate division of the Barbados
Cricket Association. Althougb
this is an unofficial fixture
should serve some useful purpose
and ought to be a regular fixture
between the League and the
Barbados Cricket Association, In
the first place it would provide
an opportunity for the Intermedi-
ates to stake a claim for any of
the players in this division fo:
consideration in the senior grade
of cricket and secondly it will
essist the B.C.L- in gaining experi-
ence in representative cricket. As
a matter of fact there should be
more than one of these unoffi-
cial games so that when the an-
nual B.C.A, vs. B.C.L, fixture is
due the League will have discov-

ered its best players to place in
the field against the Island XI.
B.C.L. Team

The B.C.L, team began a team
bi ilding programme iast season
aid the annual match found 4 fair-
ly good combination in the field.
What is more the team was be-
ginning to show signs of knowing
itself and its members not being
strangers to each other. With the
opening of this year’s series, the
B.C.L. will be without the ser-
vices of DePeiza who has joined
Empire C.C. Guy Kirton who has
also joined Empire C.C. These are
just two of a long list of players
who have migrated from B.C.L
cricket to B.C.A. cricket, and
which goes to prove that the
B.C.L, is as important a nursery
as Harrison College, Combermere
and Ledge School, The League
will centre its strength around
the Captain, Kenneth Goddard,
Ashton Blackman, the Sobers
brothers and W. A. Clarke of
Rangers who made two consecu-
tive centuries this season. An
opportunity is being given to K.
Maloney (St. Catheriney Green
(Middlesex) Bourne (Lanes) and
Browne (Kendal). Green is con-
sidered one of the fastest bowl-
ers in the League today and
should make use of the oppor-
tunity. Maloney scored the larg-
est number of runs last season
obtained the best average and
won a prize for the first batsman
to score three consecutive 30's
last season, Brown of Kendal
comes back inte the team after
having failed at Bank Hall in
the last big game. He has been
making some good scores and
once the stage fright phase has

been overcome he should be in a
position to justify his selection.



Victories

In the City and Central divi-
sions victories were scored with
time to spare. Rangers declared
at 317 for the loss of 9 wickets
and then dismissed Yorkshire for
70, to win the game by an in-
nings. Barker 3 for 15, Pinder 3
for 5 and Skeete 3 for 5 were
Rangers’ best bowlers,

In the Central division St
Luke’s proved no match for Ken.
dal, the present cup holders and
were dismissed for scores of 31
and 106 as against 141.

Romans’ 212 also proved too
formidable for St, Augustine, St.

Augustine were down for 52 in
the first innings but made a bet.
ter show in the second with 153.
This, however, was not good
enough to win the game

Danes ran up totals of 135 and
86 for 3 to better the scores of
80 and 133 by White Rose. A.
Blackman 40, Lucas 43 were the
best scores returned by St. Augys-
tine batsmen.

Another Century

Another century was recorded
on Saturday when C, Rogers hit
121 for Radcliffe against Rangers
B. It is the fourth B.C.L. century
this season and assisted Radcliffe
io reach the fine total of 280. In
addition to Rogers’ effort, Green-
idge hit 56, Forde 35 and Neblett
83. At the close of play Rangers
hec lost four wickets for 70 runs.

the other games of this divi-

it Middlesex also scored the
ble, getting 228 against Advo-

ca eo, Craig top scored with 77 and
\Jilkie was responsible for 45. Ii
their turn at the crease, Advocate
were all out for 114, veteran of
he team, Namaan Holder, led the
vay with 45, Rudder for Middle-

“¢x took 8 for 35 and Harding 3

r 38

St. Matthias and Chamberlain
vere engaged in a comparatively

ven struggle, Chamberlain were
jismissed for 127 and St. Mat-

hias bettered this with a score of

46 for the loss of 9 wickets at

e close of play.

The Bellefield vs. Telephone
mah provided a game of thrills
1 Which the ball dominated.
l'eilefield were dismissed for 58
Blackman took 5 for 22 and Taitt
2 for 17. In their turn at the
wicket Telephone failed to obtain
first innings lead and fell for 37.
Brooks 5 for 14 and Dyal 4 for
14 were the men who shared the
bowling honours. At the close of
play Bellefield were 22 for the
loss of six wickets, The game
therefore is quite an open one,

Liberty had the better of the
game against Petroleum Market-
ing. Liberty with a score of 101
left it to their bowlers to place

i¢ side in a good position ana
this they did in handsome man-
her, dismissing Petroleum for 34.
Dlaeckman 5 for 4 and Hope 4 for
1} were the bowlers who carried
a'l before them.

Slender Lead

In the South, Searles
a slender nine run lead
Cambridge. Scores were: Searles
129 and Cambridge 120. Sydney
also took the lead with a score
of 106 against Lancs who fell for
95

In the Windward Division, Sus-
sex B_ defeated Oxford in a
single day while Sussex A are
engaged in a struggle with St.
Catherine that may well deter.
mine the destination of the Cup.
St. Catherine scored 101 and at
the drawing of stumps Sussex
were 94 for 5.

enjoyed

against

Small Grounds

Mr, O. N, Looker might be in
terested to know that the ques-
ticn of small grounds in relation
to the value of boundaries has
had the attention of the B.C.L.
and it was decided to fix the value
of the boundaries at all grounds.

The Carrington Village ground is,

in the category of twos and fours
Teams adopting any other valu-
ation do so at their risk. Certainly
no record scored at = ground:
where the boundaries are of a
higher valuation than that agreed

a UUndnNEInEE NE RRENENEENNEEEEEneeeemmmmeeseeseemeeeeel

SPARTAN V. POLICE

SPARTAN Ml & (for 2 wkts.) 123
POLICE ...,.. é es : 146
Polloe—ist Innings
Cc. Blackman b King 1
F. Taylor run out 39
A. Blenman stpd. wkpr. b Bowen 21
Cc. DeC. Springer c Phillips »b
Bowen 0
Cc. Amey lbw. b King 4
W. Farmer c King b Phillips 36
J. Byer c whee b King 6
B. Dodson b King 15
G. Sobers not out 5
C. Mullins b Phillips 6
C. Bradshaw b Phillips 4
Extras 9
Total . 146
Fall of wickets 1-6, 2—33, 3—34,

4—41, 5—67, 6—117, 7-129, 8—131, 9—138

BOWLING ANALYSIS

*

—

Ann /

E SHOULD HAVE
DRANK THIS IN

THE FIRST PLACE/eiesy BEER

o M a

F Phillips 13.6 3 35 3
F. King i4 -_ 66 4
K, Bowen 12 4 a4 2
N. Harris 1 s—
S. L. Harris 1 1 - -

SPARTAN—nd Innings
A. Atkins not out 54
S. Griffith lb.w, b Bradshaw 0
G. N. Grant ec F. Taylor b C. Muliina 40
N. Harrison not out 20
Extras: 9
Total: (for 2 wkts.) 123
Fall of wickets: 1—0, 2—83,

BOWLING ANALYSIS

oO M R Ww
c. Mullins 16 6 28 1
Cc. Bradshaw 8 3 23 1
€ Blackman 3 |
Cc. Dec. Springer 4 14
J, Byer .... 1a @ 36
G. Sobers 1 11 i"



YEAH!
cucers//

ANH

BREWED
ANY WHE RE.)





JULY 27



Topic

Last Week



What English |! Oh
Why culture
course

what English
gone up stairs
there're various angles
That one must sell his wares
Son shout out mangoes! mangoes
Son Shout breadfruit no r
Come madam! buy your breadfruit
A whole one or a slice





The man with the newspapers

Cries paper at the v

The fellow with the weepstake

Cries buy naught, naught wught
. . . .

For even in the old days

Way in Victorian age

All young men without coppers
Set mother-in-laws in a rage

. . . . .
To-day the same procedure
Seems to upset this town
The family have the last word
Bout if the man is brown

. .
They ask if he’s a smoker
And how long he was born
W he lacks race horse pedigre:
They look on him with se





They ask him ‘bout his great-aunt
And her society

Forgetting at the same time

A rroaned i laver

Sometimes these boys get “1
iying the double game
And boys without discretior

femain ‘earnest’ just the same








Sometimes like little children
hey querrel and turn red
And guess what cause a battle
\ J & R Sandwich Bread
is one phase of culture
fice Joe and Lou
i ir friend Batchelor Robert
Love Madam O'Lindy crew
The show at the Olympic
W worth going miles to

\ceording to a youngster
it was “the petticoat spree

nsation ! oh sensation !
Robert blood start to surge
And when the Fire-Fly

Seam Midget had “the urge

Qalypsoes, Sambas, Rhumbas
Phté and Marico
The same time Lou was dreaming
A woman “hold she Joe”

* “ . .

Luciile, Slim Jim, Lord Coffee
et Molly, Chureh Ivan

Fius the mighty Dictator

Served mirth in a wash pan

. . . °

Aiter this how at mid-night

The crowd went to a bar

From midnight until morning

They all drank J & R

sponsored by

J & R BAKERIES
makers of

ENRICHED BREAD

and the blenders of

J&R RUM



DYUNLOP

NO. 234

‘burn down"



|



RUBBER
Depots

OMPANY
ind Distributors

PAGE FIVE



can taste the cream
in Cadburys
Dairy Milk
Chocolate ———_



Neuralgia,
Neuritis,

Sciatica, Toothache

A generous application of
comforting, soothing
THERMOGENE Medica-
ted Rub to the painful

In extra large
Jars and handy Tins

part will soon bring

relief. Repeat the appli-

Head and Chest olds, Coughs

cationas required until the




pain has disappeared.

Musculsr Paing

Of all good Stores
ond Chenvict

DOUBLE-2.CTION

THERMOGENE

MEDICATED RUB

In big glass Jars and handy Tins



Bult tiv the Seb!

BIRMINGHAM,
the Worie

ito

ENGLAND
throughout ome







PAGE SIX





FOR WOMEN :
ONLY! ae

HA! HA!

a



*«

ARIES Mercury mc

March 21—April 20 today, prom
K Do attend ¢
day better.

*

Unnecessary
with Sunda
But day
recreation,

*

Splendid in
well aspecte
as you usu

SO THE GALS THINK THEY C.\N KEEP US OUT, eh? but here's a
grand tip on the quiet fellas. If the ‘Little Woman’ sniffs suspiciously
after your night out with the boys, give her a kis, pronto: Sure I
said a kiss—a grana beso: Suck an AMPLEX tablet a day, boys, and
you can spree every night with breath sweet as a Ouch!
Mary's just landed me one—but I'll be back.

what your outlook is, according

FOR SUNDAY,

babe's.

SURE HE’LL BE BACK, for his favourite
dishes, With AIR-WICK in my. kitchen I can
relax in comfort. No unpleasant cooking
smells in MY home now. The air is as sweet
as ‘yours truly’. That's what Herbert says—
oh yes, he'll be back, AIR-WICK really
makes a difference in the home.

*

GEMINI
+ May 23—June 21

CANCER
x June 22-—July 23

TAURUS
April 21—May 22



A mild day
gramme cal
supply tnat

Can be idea
tion, home,
You in ar

SO, THIS IS A GALS COLUMN AFTER ALL! Like

to possess my abundant energy, girls? It’s easy.

*
x

LEO

Keep healthy July 24—Anug. 22

ind trim, using the genile, safe laxa-
tive, MEDILAX. For INNER CLEANLINESS you
can’t beat MEDILAX — you'll take life in your



*« bag i Fine indica
stride, and oh boy, just listen to the lads whistle! ae ee ~~ a ai
A : you should

«x LIBRA *

Neither’ exc
Ideal in ma
your very

it. 24—Oct, 23
I'D WHISTLE A GAL ANY DAY’! Travelling Sales- ~~

man I am, My line? SPA BRUSHES. Finest on

*
SCORPIO
KK Oct. 24—Nov. 22

x
x

«x
CAPRICORN
«x Dec. 21—Jan. 20

x

the market. Toothbrushes, hairbrushes, baby

brushes. SPA BRUSHES are the finest in the world,

May be the
fully, calml
tion when

cheap too. oured.

My old girl’s teeth are like the stars—
they come out at night. SPA have brushes for them

1. cae
ARE THE YOUNG MARRIEDS PUZZLED?

SAGITTARIUS

too! Nov. 23—Doc. 20

your spiritu

ful hobby c

3 No need to be. For those who believe
in

Ps Day can be

family _ planning we recommend
RENDELL-FOAM. Dainty and safe,
this contraceptive tablet is one of the
best. Use RENDELL-FOAM once and

you'll use it always. Safe, sure, and on

AQUARIUS No need for

Jan. 21—Feb. 19

your soul’s
one for you

*

On whole
with matter
entertaining
among «top



sale everywhere, 8
PISCE:
20—March 20

*« Feb.
*«

CAN I_SAY SOMETHING NOW, GIRLS?

See my new hair-do. Percival it’s

too high-falutin’ but it does stay put. Ah

BANDBOX ALMOND OIL
SHAMPOO, You can do just anything with

says

YOU BORN TODAY are se
Sava oi and talented. May have to curt
jus"; Sve the past and perhaps to doubt

*«

your hair afterwards—did you say some-

thing, Percival?



Ah didn’t say a mumblin’ word, Daisy Bell, BY THE

“Girls, we gotta a cute littke number in our
office now. Uses BANDBOX' téo—bit oh boy!

Does her hair glitter. It's this new Bandbox

HILE reading of a man who
danced with a_ waltzing
horse at a fair, it struck me that
one advantage of dancing with a
horse is that you can “sit the next
one out” on your partner's back,

COLAIR—makes your hair sparkle like dia-

monds, girls, COLAIR by Bandbox.

Try it,



i i ich is ore than can be ex-
Any cimculty--ring our flee: Me, sot. the a i balls confined to human
girls. 70 I cP beings.
a9 satis be (Enter U Baw Me, a Burmese

Don't mind little Samson down there, he’s been up business man.)
U Baw Me: Mrs. Ribstone, you
are a pippin. :
Mrs, Ribstone: Hush! Mr, Rib-
stone is within earshot,

(The ceiling falls in. Slow curtain.)

all night walking the new baby. Never happened
No Sir! Always had good old WOOD-
WARD'S GRIPE WATER’ handy—did the trick

to me.

In passing

HENEVER the professional
politicians feel that» they
would like to raise their own sal-
aries a not very subtle form of
propaganda begins, At present our
i S$ 7 pi ¥ 2 by reve-

» Agents covering this column, INTERNATIONAL TRADING J hearts are, being broken by re
aie 9e"CORPORATION LTD., Coleridge St., Tel: 5009. lations of the squalid lives lived

by these men who have sacrificed
e
e agaae
weth

every time. Try it Sammy old boy! And don't

forget to put the cat out. Say—is this supposed to



be a wimmins cofumn! Fiddlesticks !



*ASPRO” brings definite palin-relief
within a few minutes. The sensation
is a soothing one. You suddenly
realise that the pain has faded
away. ‘ASPRO’ just does the job
sand then disappears, leaving no trace
—leaving no harmful after-effects
whatever. ‘ASPRO’ provides Nature
with the ‘chance she needs to get you fit
again. Take ‘ASPRO’ when you feel
the first twinge or ache which warns
you of the onset of rheumatic pain,
neuritis, neuralgia, sciatica or lumbago.
That is the way to forestall the constant
nagging pain which these distressing ail-
ments cause. ‘ASPRO’ brings peace, too,

to overwrought nerves—so remember,

th when you are overstrained, overtired,

ot overworked—
Semmorh wenen YOU'RE NERVY
se

AND IRRITABLE —

Feverishness

Overcome

MAHMUD AHMED EL SHATHILI of
4 Sharia Soliman Abaza, Sakakini, Cairo,
writes :—This letter is my declaration of
the great value of the small white tablet,
*ASPRO', which alleviates the aeey of
mankind and has come to the front of all
new discoveries. I have tried ‘ASPRO’
in recovering from feverishness, the re-
sult of the heat of the sun in summer,
snd found it to be the best medicine,

"Take ‘ASPRO’ For




heartburn and flatulence. Itssothe

a sparkling, invigorating health-d

FIT AS A FIDDLE
NEXT MORNING

Gentleman, Hackney, E.9.
It is with the greatest pleasure that I
write this letter to prove the genuine
effect of your ‘ASPRO' tablets, some-
times have a headache which is unbear-
able, but a little while after I have taken
two ‘ASPRO’' tablets it has gone. When
I have felt a “'flu” cold coming over me,
I have gone to bed with 2‘ASPRO’ tablets
and a hot Gein’ one the next morning I
amas “fitasa e."”
Iam, yours gratefully, B.C.R.

3 Tablets 3d. 39 Tablets 2/6




Re Sead
CTC ferns
INVIGORATING.

Pe Gr a

MFLUENZA COLDS

‘EADACHES IRRITABILITY ERY WHERE

UMBAGO. RHEUMATIC Pain OBTAINABLE EVERY

4ERVINESS SLEEPLESSNESS All Trade Enquiries to:

NEURALGIA ALCOHOLIC W. B. HUTCHINSON & CO.

NEURITIS AFTER-EFFECTS REET, BRIDGETOWN

TOOTHACHE PAINS PECULIAR MARHILL STREET,

SCIATICA TO WOMEN Made In England by fl
Gout SORE THROATS ASPRO LIMITED, Slough, Bucks FIRS 'Y

“ The words “sno” and





YOUR INDIVIDUAL

highly
brain



and our great cause

children, oldsters,

*

You will find encouragement, help in ngs yb
that are right to do.

SUNDAY

ADVOCATE



\ The STARS: +*

and YyoU age etl me



~

HOROSCOPE

Look in the section in which your birthday comes and fina

to the stars.
JULY 27, 1952

yst favourably aspected planet
ising for keen mental alertness.
hurch first, you will enjoy your

*

work, activities incompatible 3
y are not in order, of course.
sponsors reading, healthy

work, entertainment.

clinations with your Mercury
d. If as capable and helpful 3
ally are, you can do a lot of

good at home and in your community.

say your stars, but if your pro-
ls for verve, certainly you can
and be in the swim of things.

* ¥

1 for Sunday interests, recrea- 3
family, church, charity affairs.
ed st vs, keep faith in God

+

tions here. It should be happy
Go to church, do chores as
then enjoy free hours.

iting nor too slow tendencies,
ny ways for a week-end, Lend
entertaining qualities to aid

time to slow down, view cheer-
y. Take due rest and recrea-
you can, Urgent duties .fav-

* *





Give more thought to
al needs, to improving a health-

x talent.

to your liking but do remember

+

it is Sunday and prayers, church attend-
ance are due God in thanksgiving for all
His blessings.

* *

rushing or extremes. Keep anâ„¢

even disposition, and do think deeply of

welfare. Today can be a happy
and loved ones." +

a cheerful, interesting period yg
s requiring brightness of mind,
qualities, reading, writing

favoured, +

nsitive, courteous, sympathetic,
» tendency to look too much to
others’ sincerity occasionally.

You have bright years ahead and, with faith and prayer, should
accomplish a great deal. Prayer your great aid always, Birth y4
date: Alexandre Dumas the Younger, Fr.

novelist, dramatist.

kak Kwek Ke we KK EY

WAY...

By BEACHCOMBER

themselves in order to “represent”
us in Parliament. While the rest
of us are fortunately free from
financial anxiety, these down-
trodden, selfless people are besét
by sordid money worries. The re-
frain of all their songs is: “If you
want the best type of man in Par-

liament, you must reward him
suitably, and free him from the
cares and anxieties which are

meant for less important people”
(i.e, the electorate). The latest
suggestion is that a_ politician’s
salary should be tax-free. If that
idea does not attract “the best type
of man,” nething will.

On a venal reviewer

Grateful for snacks from any
plate,

And cocktails grabbed from
passing trays,

He’s ready to humiliate

Even good writers with his

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USNESS.
ION, ete

THE KITCHEN

TURTLE

For the sucky people who can
ge: turtic and who like it, here
aré some very good recipes. Fur
the unlucky cones» who cannot get
turtle but who are lucky enough
to get veal these recipes will be
just as good, as you can cook
veal and make it taste just like
turtle and you can cook turtle and
make it taste just like veal, ex-
cept the part of the turle which
has-a fishy taste.

One goed way to cook turtle is
to curry it, and I gave you my
recipe on curry some time back
with the different ways to cook

rice.
TURTLE SOUP
For Six People

2 Ibs. ef turtle or 1 calf’s head.
Marjoram
Thyme
Parsley
Onion, 1
Tomato paste, 1 teaspoonful
Bovril, 1 teaspoonful

Rum or Sweet Vermouth, 1
very small glass
Pepper

1 slice of ham (lean)

1 slice of ham (fat).

if you use turtle:—

Put the turtle to boil with some
water and when almost cooked
add the parsley, the marjoram,
the thyme, the chipped onion and
the 2 slices of ham. Let all cook
until boiling point, then take off
the fire and put the saucepan in

a warm spot for about 4 of an
hour. Sieve the broth now and
then, add 1 teaspoonful of con-

centrated tomato paste, 1 teaspoon-
ful of bovril and let everything
boil again for another % hour.
When you are ready to serve, cut
the turtle in small squares and
peur the broth over it. Serve
with toast or with small meat-
balls the size of a nut which you
have fried in butter or margarine.

If you use the head of a caif

instead of turtle:—

Put the head to boil with some
water. When cooked, take all the
fat and the lean pieces and leave
only the jelly-like part whicn
forms the outside of the head.
Let this jelly coo!, under some
weight. You can then follow the
recipe by adding the parsley etc.
When you are ready to serve, cut
the head of the calf in small
squares which you will add ia
the broth.

VEAL OR TURTLE WITH
SAUCE
For Six People

2lbs of veal or turtle.

Butter,-2 ozs.

O.ive oil or margarine

Carrot

Onion '
Thyme

Marjoram

Parsley

Whole tomatoes, 1 tin

Water

Bovril, 1 teaspoonful

Pepper

Flour, 1 teaspoonful

Rum

Pepper

Put the butter and margarine
or oil in the saucepan and add
the chipped onion and 1 carrot
very finely sliced, Let the carrot
and the onion fry gently for
about 10 minutes; then add the

parsley marjoram, thyme and let
cook for a few minutes, Add then
the tin of whole tomatoes. When
you see that the sauce is getting
thick add two or three big table-
spoonfuls of water and 1 teaspoon-
ful of bovril. Add the veal
turtle cut in very small pieces as
if you were going to make a
stew. Season with salt and
pepper, add more water until you
cover the whole and let every-
thing boil until the sauce has
again thickened. Put a tiny bit of
rum if you like and 1 teaspoon-
ful of flour more water and let
it boil again until the sauce is
thick again. Serve hot with rice
or, English potatoes.

CATTLE DISEASE
STILL THREATENS U.K,

LONDON, July, 25.

Sir Thomas Dugdale, Minister
of Agriculture, told the House of
Commons on Thursday that Brit-
ain may be faced with another
invasion of the livesteck foot and
mouth disease. He said restrictions
on the movement of livestock in
south-eastern England will con-
tinue because of the risk of, in-
fection from France.

The French situation _ still is
grave he said, and the infection
seems to be moving westward.

—C-P.

4



SUNDAY,

9"

mt,

1952

JULY



It Is Important ‘To Be Fashionable

By DOROTHY BARKLEY
LONDON.

A gala film premiere always
brings forth a gala display of en-
chanting evening dresses in the
latest fashion. But many in the
audience at the premiere of Oscar
Wilde’s delightful farce “The Im-
portance of Being Earnest” played
a trick on the wizard of fashion.
They had delved deep into theatri-
cal prep cupboards and grandma's
wardrobes. And in place of the
newest fashion, they wore the late.
Victorian costumes portrayed in
the film.

The crowd in the foyer of the
cinema looked like the Gay Nine-
ties suddenly come to life. Wornlen
wore improbable “birdcage” hats
piled high on the head, suits with
sprigged muslin blouses and ankle
length skirts. Their escorts, as
the gay dogs of the ’nineties, wore
long flowing black capes over cor-
rectly cut tweed suits with high

white collar and stock, or the
striped blazer, striped tie and
white flannels of the late -Vic-

torian tennis “uniform.”

But then came the turn of the
wizard of fashion to ply his craft
(with London designer Ian Mere-

dith out in the limelight). To pre-
vent Victorian fashigns stealing
the show and to illustrate that

1952 fashions are also important,
he presented a collection of mod-
ern dresses inspired by the clothes
of the film. So the sophisticated
modern dress paraded side by side
with its Victorian ancestor.
An example to illustrate
point: In the film, the young

the
ac-

tress Dorothy Tutin (as Cicily
Cardew), wore a delightfully de-
mure white organdie dress pat-
terned with tiny blue flowers. It
was ankle-length, high collared,
long-sleeved, with enormous puffs
to the sleeves, and a wide blue
cummerbund at the waist. Its
modern counterpart was a dress
in the newest white nylon with a
blue pin stripe. It also had a blue
cummerbund and a high buttoned
neckline, but it had none of the
Victorian frilly fussiness. Its
sleeves were featly capped and
the skirt was ballet-length.

To adapt an old saying, the more
fashion changes, the more it re-
mains the same!

French Designs in
London

Of late, top London and Paris
couturiers have been designing
special collections for wholesalers.
A group of Paris designers known
as the “Couturiers Associes” de-
sign regularly for a chain of Lon-
don stores, The Queen's dress-
maker, Norman Hartnell, who has
designed for an English whole-
saler for some years, recently de-
cided to export His designs to
Paris.

Now Pierre Balmain has de-
signed a small selection of suits
and day and cocktail dresses to be
includest in “Rembrandt’s® new
collection. He is using a new ma-
tezial called “Vigoroux”’—a 100
per cent pure worsted. The light-
est yet produced, it weighs only
9} oz. per yard. Extremely crease-
resisting, it is consequently diffi-
cult to tailor.

So suits and dresses in this ma-
terial were all of the dressmaker
variety with tucks, folds and
drapes rather than intricate pleat-
ing. Dresses had low double
breasted buttoning, long, cuffed
sleeves, and skirts folded into soft,
unpressed pleats at back and front.
Grey dresses were given a new
season’s touch with black velvet
collar and cuffs. These were ins
variably partnered with a spotted
silk scarf-cap and gloves. Typical
is the one illustrated here in grey
vigoroux,

Cecktail - into -evening dresses
had halter-necks and slim-fitting
skirts and were worn with little
matching boleros, Colours are
richer and more exotic than pre-
viously. Antique gold duchesse
satins, peacock tinsel voiles, and
green and gold striped shantungs
had all the eastern richness of
saris. A’ sleeveless lame blouse
added richness to a black velvet-
een cocktail dress-and-bolero and
a gold lame halter-necked bodice
went with a black grosgrain suit.

Metallasse, the new cocktail
material, added further richness.
It ig a quilted niaterial with a
bubbly effect. Illustrated is a
cocktail dress in black-shot-bronze
metallasse. It has natural should-
ered bodice and a full button-
through skirt.

For those who want to be up-to-
the-minute: wear outsize silver
charms not on your wrist, bub
dangling from your waist on silver
chains, or marquisites sewn on the
collar of your dress.

EOPLE AND GOVERNMENT

Blueprint for Point Four
WASHINGTON

A great deal is being said these

days about international tech-
nical cooperation as the chief
weapon in humanity’s war
against poverty, disease, hunger,

or and despair. The Point Four idea

sharing accumulated knowledge
—is called the world’s best hope
for peace and a better standard
of living for men everywhere.

But are these great exvecta-
tions possible of realization? Can
cooperative action really conquer
man’s ancient enemies? A look at

the record of the Institute of
Inter-American Affairs should
convince even the most cynical
that the answer is a resounding
“yes’’,

This agency~ of the United

States Government has just com-
pleted its first 10 years of whole-
hearted co-operation with the
governments of 19 other American
republics, During this time, U.S.
technicians have been wprking
side by side with. their Latin
American colleagues in the fields
of agriculture, health and sanita-
tion, and education.

In custom-built projects, tailor-
ed to fit the needs of each par-
ticular nation and situation, long-
range plans have been drawn up,
technical knowledge supplied,
and local personnel trained,

The experience of Chimbote,
Peru, is the story of a city and



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its people getting a new start in
life thanks to the Institute. As
in each development project, the
work was done through an or-
ganization known as a_ servicio.
These executive agencies are set
up by the host government and
the IIAA, provided with their
own money, and manned by per-
sonnel furnished by the coopera-
ting countries.

Chimbote, in northern Peru,
has one of the best natural har-
bours on the Pacific Coast, but
back in 1943 people were afraid
of the area. It was a malaria-
ridden village of about 7,000 per-
sons and had no prospects for
growth despite its fine harbour
and good location,

Under the direction of the
Servicio Cooperativo Inter-Ameri-
cano de Salud Publica, to whom
the Institute assigned a handful
of U.S. medical technicians, a
malaria-control program was set
up. Lagoons and other mosquito-
breeding places were ‘drained
and sprayed with pest - killers.
Atabrine was distributed to cut
down the incidence of infection,
A hospital and health center
were set up. Local ordinances
were passed to make health
measures compulsory.

A visitor who had seen the
Chimbote of 10 years ago would
scarcely recognize it for the Chim-

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transfo-mation is so complete that

Chimbote has become an
attractive health resort, Now a
thriving seaport of 18,000, its

population is virtually free of
malaria, and other diseases are
also effectively held in check, The
town is developing enough elec-
tric current to supply a sub=-
stantial trade area, and there is
promise of continued expansion
in manufacturing and shipping.
Chimbote is only one of more

#:an 3,000 examples, of what
international cooperation has
meant to the people of Latin

America, It has helped them help
themselves raise more food, con=
serve their natural resources,
improve their health, expand
their economies, and live fuller

‘and more satisfying lives.

Based on cooperation freely
asked and freely given, the In-
stitute has a record of 10 years
of solid achievement, Its pur-
poses, techniques, and _ spirit
have served as a blueprint for
expanding the program to other
developing countries, as is being
done under Point Four.

In the face of this, let no one
ask if the Point Four idea will
work—it has worked and is con=-
tinuing to work for the benefit
(LATIN
POINT FOUR)

of all participants.
AMERICA:






wonderful







SUNDAY, JULY 27, 1952

THE WRONG







SUNDAY



BABY—for six

INSTALMENT THREE OF THE STRANGE AND TRUE STORY of what really happened
hospital _ . .

when a child’s cradle got switched in




WHO'S WHO

Reet all over Britain have

discussing the story of
the mother whose twirs
“switched” by mistake in
X . Not till they were
nearly seven years old was the
error established—and then the
decision had to be made:
“Should the children be
switched back’ to their right-
jul mothers ?”

What would you have done?

were

rs. Madeleine Joye mother
o/ the twins, made Av crsion
—it was that th; dren
should be, switched
@ The children—!'au iippe,
ind Lrnsilti—were | ibout
the same time ia a 8 hos-
pital to Luo mether Philiwpe
and Ernstli were tron Paul
beionged to the other violher.
Paul (the wrong hab! went
with Phitippeas a twin while
Erustli. Philipne’s twin, went to
the ther mother Madame
y
@ When the change was made
Erustt, went back to Mrs Joye,
reul mother, and Paul wee

to Madame X.

T the end of July | knew [ would never hear from
Paul again. His new mother sent a parcel to
Ernstli and in it I found a little note written for me
in very broad handwriting. ‘‘ Please don’t write to
Paul,’ it said.

The parcel was addressed ; “Ernstli X, c/o The Family
Joye.” She didn’t use our surname, I noticed. How well I
understood !

Gradually, however, Ernstli began to have confidence.
‘He seemed to be getting sure of me; sure that I would con-
sole him if he was unhappy, that I would wash him if he
was dirty; that he need have no fear of asking for a fifth

slice of bread and butter.
He was only seven, which meant he gave me a little

IN BRITAIN...

Prompt identification ... To forestall any
ehance o/ baby mix-wps a plastie bracelet
marked with indelible ink is routine drill
in most London hospitals, Picture here
taken in Whitechapel, E.



there couldn’t be two of them.
We tpoke to Ernstli, who
showed no undue concern.
“I'd like to be called ‘Charles’,

woman, did not, however, con-
quer my feeling of unhappiness
at having no news of Paul, I tele-
phoned the principal of his



I was no longer surprised to
find in Ernstli certain charac-
teristics in common with Philippe,
When we were out for a walk,
and I gave him my hand, he
stroked my wrist exactly as
Philippe did, Paul had never
dane so

Just before they fell asleep
both Ernstli and Philippe would
suck their right thumb; Paul had
always sucked his forefinger —
and then only as a very small
child, ;

Ernstli has the same voice as
his brother, the same laugh, the
same vanity.

Yes, I could see they were true
twins all right.

‘Voices’

FYVHE house was a change for
him. He found it pretty, and
began to take a serious interest in
all his toys, The sunny days
invited him ‘to live out of doors.
After having looked at them
for a long time from the low,
he decided to join company with
our little neighbours in front of
the house.
Bit by bit his memories grew
more misty, and I heard less
often phrases such as:—

“Mummy told me to put on my
brown shorts to play in...”

“Mummy forbade me to lend
the cart.”

I had rigidly respected all these
wishes, -But when Enrnstli no
longer heard his “secret voices,”
or even deliberately began to
disobey them, I felt a new sense
of security and happiness,





There is an American adver-
tising slogan: “Never Under-
estimate the Power of a
Woman.” And no one in the
United States would under-

estimate the power of Assistant
Secretary of Defence Mrs. Anna
Marie Rosenberg, who arrived
in London oma “familiarisation
tour” last night.

So at London Airport, to
greet this dynamic, £5,000-a-
year pint-sized (5ft. 3ins, in
high-heeled, peep-toe black
court-shoes) manpower control-
ler the chiefs of the American

forces in Britain were in full,
formal splendour of khaki,
olive-drab and two shades ol

blue (navy and air force).
Outside the V.I.P. lounge as

the U.S. Air Force plane landed

were one three-star Vice Admi-





_

of his childhood and I felt better for it.



Hy MRS.
MADELEINE
JOYE .



Bewildered

FYCHERE were many difficulties
with little Philippe. For him

it must have been almost as be-

wildering as for me.

His unhappiness was very real
and I tried to reassure him and
to make him understand that it
was imperative at this time to
spoil Ernstli.

One day, at the end of a long
argument, I said to him: “You
have always been here, you
should know very well that you
are the favourite, Ernstli hardly
knows us. He is very unhappy
and we all have to help him. You
must help us too.”

Philippe responded. He took his
responsibilities very seriously. I
remember him running to me one
day and saying solemnly: “Mum-
my, come quickly the little one
is sad and crying.”

Ernstli! . . . Each time I pro-
nounced or wrote that name [
felt a sensation of unreality, The
truth was I did not want my son
to go on using this Christian
name. He ought to be called
“Paul”, I decided.

But, unfortunately, we had
already had a real Paul with a
round head and black eyes—and





Boss Of U.S.

ral, two one-star generals, and
ten other assorted Service per-
sonnel rangins from a couple of
colonels to a doug!.boy-hatted
sailor “aval photogy apher,
first class.”

Waiting alongside were
cars, one station-wagon,
Jeep.

For, according to General
Griswold, commander of the
U.S. 3rd Air Force in Britain.
who led the reception commit-
tee, little Anna is “the boss, and
we like to get a visit from the
headman.”

And Mrs. Rosenberg, Buda-
pest born, Bronx bred, got the
No. 1 treatment for “visiting

11
one



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ee GOOD FOR BABY
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ee!

he said, “because I have an Uncle
Charles and I think he loves me.”

So I went to the school and
announced two new pupils,
Charles and Philippe Joye. “Paul”
will not be imscribed in any
register, for there is no longer
such a person, Madame X has
made an “Ernst” of him and
‘Paul’ only exists in our hearts.

Off To School
CAN see them now — two
little boys carrying satchels
on a strap over their shoulders
setting out for school at 8 o’clock
in the morning.

There was a whole new world
in each satchel, A slate, pencils,
books . . . materials to make a
scholar, a pedant, or a man,

Charles and Philippe
very happy because they had
leopard-skin satchels (imitation,
of course, but they did not know
that) and because they were
dressed in new clothes, with red
jerseys and blue jackets cut from
their mother’s old skirts.

“Very successful, those blue
jackets,” said the mother,

“A great success, those little
boys,” replied the father,

Both of us were proud.

When I was a girl I never col-
lected rose petals, letters, snap-
shots, souvenirs of any kind,
Never.

But now I know that I shall
keep for ever Paul's first baby
clothes, his first trousers, his first
spoon and fork, To me they are
more eloquent than photographs
could ever be.

A Phone Call
Aâ„¢ these little developments,
which mean so much to a

were



By EVE PERRICK
firemen.”

A naval lieutenant went
around distributing large buff
envelopes which contained a
short biography, an hour-by-
jour itinerary for her four-day
trip here, and a photograph,

At 6.50 p.m. (20 minutes later
than the time stated on the
itinerary—“even Anna can’t do
much about plane times” said an
officer) Mrs. Rosenberg arrived
to inspect her troops.

The generals and the others
stood, caps in hand, while the
tiny, feminine figure, wearing a
smart grey suit, lily-of-the-
valley shell-shaped cap, white





soap

scum.
waste
Every



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Because FAB Soaks
| clothes clean without
| hard scrubbing FAB-
} washed clothes give
| longer wear — stay

fresh looking.

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MONEY
In hard water much

boarding school. She told me
“Ernst” was very well, that he
was happy, already very attached
to his mother and sister; that he
was a good pup!l both friendly
and industrious,

But the head of the school also
told Madame X that I had tele-
phoned, Madame X was extremely
annoyed. She urged me not to
inquire about her son any more,
and added: “It is you who started
this whole story, and you who
wanted to go through with it.
You succeeded. What have you to
complain about? Bring up your
own children as you think fit,
and leave me to bring up mine.”

I wish these words had been
said with less harshness, because
they are, in fact, profoundly just
and intelligent. Alas, I couldn’t
feel so at the time.

A Meeting
NE afternoon we went to the
baths and saw Paul there.
Philippe tried to speak to him,
but Paul ran away.

Philippe came over to me, with
tears in his eyes, saying: “I
wanted to talk to Paul and he
ran away.”

I tried to console him, but I
was soon weeping myself,

I found Paul was in the water
with his sister.

“Come here,” I said, “Philippe
would like to talk to you a little.”

Paul and “his sister, with
Philippe and Charles, setiled
down under a tree to talk.

We all had ice cream and then
Paul walked with Philippe to the
gate, where they said goodbye. I
held out my hand to Paul, who
bowed with a rather embarrassed:

Generals Arrives—It s Annu

gloves, and a white gardenia
in her battonhole, walked up
and down with the precise,
determined strut of the short-
legged, shaking hands all
round,

She her

made way into the

lounge and fired-off answers to

questions in a merry manner
and the slightest of Continental
accents,
“Now
closer, Make
brown eyes twinkling,
downright winking, as the men
gathered round,
Where was
“France, Britain,

she

a
ECONO
ghord

Ve




is wasted as
FAB forms no
ful soap scum.

come on generals, get
me look impor-
tant,” she exhorted, her bright
if not

going?
Germany,

MICAL AS SOAP
ater



ADVOCATE

years





|

“Goodbye, Madame Joye.”
I said with a_ smile:
eedn’t call me that.”
" “No,” he replied, “T would
rather say Madame Joye.”
Madame Joye! Was that
all that remained in exchange for
seven years’ tenderness and care?

I explained to the children that
it was probably the last time we
would speak to Paul because his
mother would telephone — that
evening and forbid it.

1 was right, She did telephone
and in the most firm terms

asked me not to speak to her

children again.
{ never have done.

“You

Postscript
FTODAY Charles, in his man-
ner, has little to remind me
of the shy, tearful boy of those
first days, He has grown gay,
amusing, and aggressive.

Physicaly the twins resemble
each other more and more and
when we go about together many
people still cannot distinguish
between them,

For my own part, though, I
shall go through the rest of my
life with this strange memory of
the little boy I lost and the little
boy I gained,

I have talked to a hundred
people about it all, but I shall
never really believe anyone wil)
truly understand what it means
to lavish seven years of your
life on a baby you think is yours

-and then discover you're wrong.

“Look after your own
children,” said Madame X, sim-
plifying the problem,

I am doing so. And cheefully.

Sad parents don’t make good
parents—but could any mother
face a trickier task?

The End.

—LES,

Austria, Turkey and North
Africa—wherever our men are

“IT like going to places where
they don’t get many visitors from
home You’re so welcome
there.”

‘How long would it take?
“Well. I've got a good three

weeks—that’s quite a long time,

don't you think?”

What would she do in Britain?
“Inspect the houses and living
Americans
Help General
Griswold with his problems, if

of
here.

conditions the

stationed

he has any problems, that is.”

The general politely assumed
indicated
that if he hadn’t any he would

an expression which
soon dig up some to oblige such
a charming lady.

Had she any ideas?
@ On Page 11



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very
dine

EAU DE COLOGNES & LAV-
ENDER WATERS in fascinating
bottles and LIP-COAT, among
he
are sold at P. A. Clarke’s Drug
Store on Prince Wm Henry St.—
1 step and a jump from Broad

St. Brush & Comb Sets and plas- ,

ic backed Nail brushes are part
ft an attractive Toiletrie. The
». A. Clarke Candy Counter is
justly famous for its always fresh
Sweets and variety. Ph4441 &
2041.

* °

OYSTER WATCHES
and perpetual—meaning they
Keep on going without winding,
care, in wet or sun, rightside up
xv upside down and ALWAYS AT
THE RIGHT TIME. Naturally
hey’re expensive—but they’re
marvellous ! Tudor Oyster
Watches are by the same Swiss
makers and moderately priced
while in:the same counter there
ire all sorts of Ladies’ and Men's
Watches from $22.50—at LOUIS
BAYLEY’S.
.

+

ROLEX

YOUR LEAKING—well, you
roof is, isn't it? This Roofing Ma-
erial at Plantations Ltd, is de-
signed to fix it quickly and well
vith free advice into the bargain
*hone 4400; ask for Charlie
Thomas to help you in the matter
xf which roofing to choose—Gal-
vanized Corrugated or Aluminum
or Everite or Rubberoid, See‘
-—you'll need help, so drop in or
phone and it’ll be gladly given

* * *

NO USE GROANING ABOUT
COST and borrowing your neigh-
bour’s LAWNMOWER. The new
lightweight FOLBATE MOWER
at S. P, Musson’s and Manning’s
Corner Store costs $25 and will
last you till your mowing days
are through The mechanism
hows many improvements on
older types and the whole ma-
shine is perfectly balanced——no
need to grunt, simply rest on the
thing and it goes—for twenty-

five bucks





Mothers, now you can relieve the
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faster with the Buckley White Rub
TWO-WAY treatment.

(1) Al the first symptom, place @ spoon'at oa
Buckley's White Rub oy o bowl or br yin of
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Buckley's White Rub-—we @ fens b's
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eves while the little one seems vv

| (2) Now massoge chest, bock and throat with
'
|









Man About Town

most recent of new Lipsticks ,

WITH HIGHLY MEDICATEL BUCKLEY'S WHITE RUB

PAGE SEVEN.



2
T Greamed of a
levelier figure in

muailenforms

EXTRAORDINARY —but true.
hey’re ALWAYS opening NEW
»TOCK at George Sahely & Co.

9 Swan St. And it’s ALWAYS

fferent! Just look—Silk Cham- Mai *
bray with the wrappings barely denette
off and in many colours,’ best

value imaginable. And Canadian
Printed Waffle Pique & Waffle-
lex in flowered patterns on
white—very new, very different
and typical Sahely Value! You'd
ike to check? Sure, sure, —
phone 4934,

oe * ®
HERE THEY COME AGAIN—
ese gliding beauties, these very
mplete automobiles in a choice
distinctive colour combinations.
Whispering engines to give near
lent power and luxuries interi-
to smooth the miles. Easy to
andle in town—a joy to drive
the open road, a car that gives
perfect satisfaction and sells it-
elf at Redman Taylor’s—the
ROVER °52. Dial 65 tomorrow!

* *

GIVING A KIDDIES’ PARTY?
| know where you can get CHER-
ty CUP CAKES for 4c., COFFEE
CAKES for 4c.. GINGER CAKES
fc 4c.—delivered to your door,
furthermore, Want to know? Dial
ve22 and speak to ZEPHILIN’S
who speeialise in such party re-
Jiirements They'll send you
LUNS for 3c. and BUN LOAVES

10ce. if you wish Certainly,
vey'll handle the food problem,

why not take advantage of that
ervice?

* * ®
TWEEDS & WORSTEDS tail-
red to fit your pocket, At WARD

‘¢ SPENCER Ltd. on Marhill St
(ph. 2223) the cost of a suit is in
var favour—drop in and they'll
| you how! And show you, too,
their extensive selection of Wool-
jeas, Tropicals and Gabardines,
nich you can buy if you wistt,'|

Ww a dream come true
Maidenette’s marvelous accent

bh, the yard. Khaki and White| gg ourves, the firm young Sift
Drill is here, too, so are Tailors ' 3 ae

Trimmings and Linen, & gives your figure! Discover

i, 2 ps this popular Maidenform bra

rOOLS, WHAT A SELEC- today, in your favorite fabrics

TION! ! Have you been into C, S,
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drivers and Braces; Spanners and.
Hammers; Planes and Saws—the |
variety is terrific and every tool |
is built to last. Prices are reason- |
able and the shipment is still new
erough to give you every choice
fod di* I say Masons’ Squares
od Hecchets? They're all at
Pitcher’s and so should you be! |

Genuine Maidenform Brassi
eres are made only inthe | mitont
Seates of America. a

Where is a MAMET
for every type of figure,

. Pens, Bae, Par. OFF

Pimples Go
led in 3 Days

tar
|

Cause Ki

very fir
derm begir
like nage
snd you will soar
combing soft, eva
derm is a new di



AWAY NASTY

COUGHS
COLDS

LIKE MAGIC

plication









1 ixo:
very that kills

Serios and parnsites on the skin-that
Red Blotches,

cause Pimple Boil
Heaema, Ringeworre,
You cant get rid of yo
wntil you remove the germs
in the tiny pores of your slet
met Nixoderm trom your chemis
day Under the positive guaraptee t
Nixoderm will banish pimples. a



that hide
30

clear your skin soft and smeeth oF

a oney
| Nixoderm = aii
| us

Tor Skin Troubles bacloweore,

Getting Up Nights
Makes Men Old

Yo other RUB has these
‘4 Important Features
Buckley's White Rub is ssowwhia

Ms soothing medicated vapors carry
4. on the good work longer while the
patient sleeps.

in men), To overcome th

in 24 hours dulokly eters
Vigour and th, take the new
No'matiar how long you have'set?
fered w long you have -

| you night reheriaees oe
e
| Late Gland and make you ee
"0 years vounger or money “
mis

| Aegens Brom your chemist
“uarantee protects you.

aoee Getting tights, b séiisa
} up A ~
© penetrates deeper, brings relief | tion of Oteanae whiticn ditdheres,
“ festur, gut abe ait, ese of spine, groin
1 Is more highly medicated, honca Reap Gnd loen Of raanie eitows mae
3 more effective. | SAused ta ae tne Beng
| land (a most important sex a
|





| TRIPLE YOUR MONEY BACK | | |

|
4

| =f Buckley's Stainioss White Rub dows
| aot prove faster and more effective han
| aay preparation you have ever used.

ee en

—_ ee








.

-

}

B
he





goes to make active
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soaks even heaviest
work clothes clean in
half an hour.

particle of FAB





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Yellow Reds : Vivid, Wright Red, Holly Red
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From the many glorious Yardley Lipstick shades choose the one
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they work on easily and last well.







PAGE EIGHT ~

pun meme -aeinneanieLCll COCLCCCNTEI TCLtC ttt tees eaten ett

BARBADOS ei ADVOCATE

Ct. | (ir Dis ee



@rinted by the Advocate Co., Ltd., Broad St., Bridsetows

‘Sunday, July 27, 1952





a



OILS AND FATS

BEFORE the end of August an announce-

ment will be made by British Caribbean
governments expressing acceptance or re-
jection of the recommendations made at
the recent conference on oils and fats
which was held at Hastings House.

Present indications are that govern-
ments will ratify the recommendations
made by the conference. The delegates who
attended the oils and fats conference came
to Barbados at a time when the price of
vegetable oils and fats was falling. It might
reasonably have been expected therefore
that they would have sought to bring down
the price paid to the copra producers of
the area, since the price paid for copra
represents by far the greatest expenditure
of the regional oils and fats industry. lf
the total value of the industry were
assessed in 1951 at say $13,000.000 the copra
growers would have received some
$7,000,000 imported raw materials would
have amounted to some $2,000,000, wages
and profits would have approximated to
$2% million and transportation and insur-
ance would have accounted for $14 mil-
lion.

The importance of the price of copra
to the local oils and fats industries is there-
fore apparent.

The higher the price paid for copra the
greater the profits that will accrue to the
producer of copra and the higher will go
the price that the consumer must pay for
the finished products of soap, margarine,
lard and edible oil.

The consumers of Barbados might well
be expected to complain therefore if the
government of Barbados decided to ap-
prove an agreement which recommended
any increase over the present price of £60
per ton of copra however slight.

Unfortunately for the government of
Barbados the consumers of Barbados are
not the only people to be considered. The
delegates to the recent oils and fats con-
ference come from territories all of which,
with the exception of the Leewards, are
copra producers.

Barbados is dependent entirely on copra
imported from the Windwards. By refus-
ing to meet the demands for higher prices
which were most certainly put forward by
the copra producers of the Windwards,
Trinidad, British Guiana and Jamaica,
Barbados would literally have brought
down the wrath of attending delegates.

The dependent position of Barbados in
the oils and fats industry of the region
leaves it open to pressure from the copra
producers of the region. All the other
copra-producing territories except the
Leewards are copra-processors and the
Windwards are now following a policy of
self-sufficiency which will almost certainly
result in the exclusion of Barbados’ fin-
ished products from the Windwards.

If Barbados stuck out for lower prices
the copra producers of the Windwards
might it is said, withhold supplies and
force the local oil and fats industries to
close down or to buy in uncertain markets
outside,

The argument of the producers of copra
has always been that the oils and fats
agreement prevented them from obtain-
ing the full world price for their products
at times when the regional price for copra
was lower, sometimes, than half the world
price.

As a result of this argument the price of
copra has been constantly rising in the
Caribbean and has shot up in.recent years
from £45 per ton to the present price of
£60 per ton.

It was hoped that when the oils and fats
agreement was renewed this year that the
price of copra would have fallen to keep
in step with falling world prices of other
vegetable oils and fats.

Now it seems that there will be a further
increase over the existing price of £60 per
ton if the British Caribbean governments
ratify the recommendations of the recent
oils and fats conference.

There is little likelihood of the recom-
mendations not being ratified. The con-
sumers of Barbados must therefore look
forward to a further rise in the price of
soap, margarine, edible oil and lard when
the new price of copra is announced be-

fore next September.

Before becoming too vociferous in their
complaints, however, they ought to realise
that the oils and fats agreement has bene-
fited Barbados in the past by ensuring it
supplies of copra at an agreed price lower
by far than the world price of copra. They
must not forget either that the oils and
fats agreement guaranteed a supply of oils
and fat products to Barbados during the
critical war and post-war periods when
there was a world shortage of oils and
fats.

They must not forget these things and
they will not forget that the lower price
paid to the copra growers in previous years
resulted in the saving of hundreds of
thousands of dollars to Barbados.

At the same time no one likes to pay



more for a product than is absolutely ne-
cessary and today when there is no longer
a world shortage of raw materials for the
oils and fats industry and when it is
claimed that if there was no restrictive
agreement the finished products of export-
ing countries could be exported to Barba-
dos and could be sold here at prices lower
than the prices of locally manufactured
products then continuous scrutiny will be
necessary to see that the interests of the
consumers are not sacrificed to those of
the copra producers who already receive
the lion share of profits from the oils and
fats industry. There is a limit even to the
benefits to be derived from regionalism
and from the value of the industry as em-
ployer of labour and it seems that the
limit is close at hand when the price of
copra inthe Caribbean is being raised for
the benefit of the copra producer rather
than for that of the consumer.

SHIPS

THE arrival in the West Indies next
month of an official of Booker Brothers to
investigate the possibilities of establishing
shipping service between Georgetown and
other Eastern Caribbean, territories will
be welcomed by everyone.

The absence of adequate inter-island
communication in the Eastern Caribbean
is an ancient complaint to be heard in the
Caribbean and in London at different
seasons of the year. Great Britain alone
among Colonial powers in the Caribbean
has shown such neglect of passenger-
steamship communications between Brit-
ish islands, although British cargo steam-
ers appear to conduct a lucrative trade.

Now that the two Lady liners are defin-
itely being withdrawn this autumn the
difficulties of inter-island travel will be
increased, not to mention the unemploy-
ment which will result from the discharge
of West Indian seamen.

Mr. Shenfield’s exploratory visit on be-
half of Messrs. Booker Brothers takes on
new significance because of the impending
withdrawal of the Lady liners.

If Booker Brothers can be persuaded to
run an inter-island passenger steamship
between Georgetown and other islands of
the British Caribbear. the blow which is
going to fall when the two Lady liners go
in the autumn will be softened to some
extent. Ms

The great fear is that Mr. Shenfield’s in-
vestigations will reveal what other inves-
tigations have revealed that an_ inter-
island passenger steamship cannot be run
profitably. :

If Booker Brothers are going to take a
short term view little hope can be enter-
tained of Mr. Shenfield’s report leading to
the inauguration of a new Eastern Carib-
bean shipping ora ; . ;

If on the other hand a long term view 1s
taken of the. possibilities. of increasing
regional trade and inter-island travel there
seem to be solid grounds for hoping that
eventually an inter-island steamship ser-
vice would pay dividends.

In recent months the possibilities of the devel-
opment of the interior of British Guiana have
come once again into the limelight and the pro-
jecied visit to British Guiana of a mission of the
World Bank suggests that some action is con-
templated = =

The. development of the interior of British
Guiana is a subject of great significance for
Barbados, Only if the interior of British Guiana
is developed does there seem to be any outlet for
the large numbers of Barbadians who must emi-
grate or be content with lower standards of liv-
ing than they have been taught in recent years
to expect. : v ‘

Already there is oceasional mention in the
British Guianese press of shortage of labour in
certain industries like balata and cocoa. If there
was regular steamship communieation between
the islands and Georgetown there would be
greater chances of Barbadians seeking employ-
ment on the mainland than at present.

If, as Barbados must continue to hope, the day
is drawing nearer when large sums are to be
poured into British Guiana to accelerate its
development then a steamship service between
Georgetown and the rest of the Eastern Carib-
bean will be a pre-requisite of development, be-
cause British Guiana despite the growing popu-
lation of Georgetown would have to recruit some
of the personnel necessary for development
schemes from neighbouring West Indian islands.
The development of the interior of British Gui-
ana and the natural tendency for trade and
travel between that territory and the rest of the
Caribbean to increase ought to receive full: at-
tention from anyone investigating the possibility
of inaugurating a steamship service in the Carib-
bean. Mr, Shenfield who is no stranger to the
area will be well equipped to report on the
missien he has undertaken, Everyone in the
Eastern Caribbean will wish him success In his
task.





_ Oe Bm @
TWO CLASSES

AMONG cinema goers Barbadians are sharply
divided into two classes, those who stand with
respect during the playing of the national anthem
and those who not only do not stand but who
make rude noises while carrying through the
motions of exit.

It is not an unfair generalisation to state that
disrespect to the national anthem is more com-
monly perpetrated by the patrons of the pit than
by the patrons of the balcony or boxes.

Respect for the British Queen among cinema
goers seems to be most clearly shown by the
educated and the well-to-do,

Racegoers may have noticed similar occur-
ences. ‘

When the band plays the national anthem
pins can be heard dropping in the stands but
among the sightseers on the savannah the hub-
bub of voices and the motion of bodies continue
as if the national anthem had no meaning for
the crowd.

Barbadians pride themselves on their stand-
ards of education and it is hard to believe that
the majority of patrons of the cinema pits or of
the crowd which throngs the Savannah on race
days does not understand what is happening
when the national anthem is plaving,

Surely no one who goes to a cinema or to a
race meeting is so ignorant as to believe that by
making noises or moving during the playing of
the national anthem that the young Queen of
England is aware of their discourtesy.

Whenever the national anthem is played on
public occasions in Barbados it is played to
honour and respect the Royal Queen to whom
our allegiance as british subjects is lawfully
owed. By showing our respect for the national
anthem we show our gratitude to Her Majesty
for the privilege of being British subjects. We
are all without distinction British subjects in
tthe full sense of the word. The Queen does not
need our respect, Her Majesty is by no means
diminished because Barbadians display publicly
their lack of education and good breeding, The
playing of the national anthem is a_ privilege
conferred on us by the Queen. We should strive
to show our appreciation by showing respect to
the national anthem, which reminds us of Her
Gracious Majesty.

(orescence A item nites

!

‘



SUNDAY ADVOCATE



The man that

keeps Barbados
laughing on

Sundays



NATHANIEL GUBBINS



ULLO! Is that the Bottom-
less Pit? ‘

Bottomless Pit here,

Mr. Lucifer speaking?

At your service, Mr. Gubbins.

Oh, Mr. Lucifer, According
to Old Moore’s Almanack Joe
Sfalin should have died last
month, Has he arrived yet?

Here, Mr.-Gubbins?

Of course, Mr. Lucifer.

Are you trying to get a scoop
for your newspaper ,?

One always trics, Mr. Lucifer,

If you were the manager of an
hotel, Mr. Gubbins, would you
answer all casual telephone calls
about your guests?

I hope I would be more dis-
creet, Mr, Lucifer.

Well, Mr. Gubbins, I am the
manager of the biggest and most
luxurious hotel in the universe.
Most of my guests wish to keep
their address secret.

Naturally, Mr, Lucifer.

Suppose, Mr. Gubbins, the
daughter of a deceased father
rang up and asked, “Is Daddy
there?” If he is, am I to answer
“Yes” and let the poor girl run
to her widowed mother crying
“Daddy’s in hell, Mummy. Dad-
dy’s in hell?” My dear friend
Stalin has a most devoted
daughter.

I understand, Mr. Lucifer.

Imagine her dismay if she
reads such distressing news in
your column, All the same, I
believe a good reporter is willing
to go anywhere?

That’s so, Mr. Lucifer,

If you paid us a visit I could
hardly prevent you reporting
what you see. All food, accom-
modation, and drinks are on the
a,

How wonderful, Mr. Lucifer,

And The Widow, who still asks
after “her dear Nat”, would be
here to mix the most delicious
cocktails,

Thank you, Mr. Lucifer.

Yow’re welcome, Mr. Gubbins.
Think it over.

Beautiful Lottie
ILL Lottie, The Devil Cat,
become Beauty Queen of
the South-East coast this sum-
mer? j
If she is chosen, will her suc-
cess be followed by a Hollywood
film contract and marriage to a
millionaire American cat?

Who is asking these ridiculous
questions?

ridiculous publicity agent, N.
Gubbins, Esq., who is trying to
cash in on the activities of Lottie.

All the same, people who have
seen her picture agvee that she

The answer is nobody but her > ga 7

is prettier than most of the local
girls.
ob +

They atso think that the elec-
tion of a cat as Beauty Queen
would not only be a novelty to
attract visitors, but allow any
local mayor to stroke a Beauty
Queen for the first time without
causing a scandal,

It is pointed out also that as
she would not be the first cat to
get a film contract she ought to
be groomed for stardom now.

At the moment she is doing her
own grooming in a blaze of pub-
licity. That is to say she sits for
hours on a window sill facing the
front, washing herself all over in
the sunshine, a daring innovation
in publicity which could not be
imitated by ordinary film aspir-
ants without police intervention.

Saucer Sensation

OW that flying saucers are

being taken seriously by the
U.S. Air Force and the French
Ministry of Information, I might
as well reveal the story of a fly-
ing saucer that dropped in our
garden.

When it had stopped revolving,
three little politicians from Mars
stepped out.

“We are a Coalition represent-
ing the World Government of
The Martian Empire,” said The
First.

“The Empire to which we are
all proud to belong,” said The
Second.

“And on which the sun never
sets.” said The Third.

“No more war,” said The First.

“Nobody to go to war with,”
said The Second.

“You can’t go to war with
yourself,” said The Third.

“Can’t you?” asked The First.
“Ever heard of civil war?”

“What about?” asked The
Second. \
“Anything,” said The Third.

“Unrest among the workers, per-
haps.”

“Ours only work an hour a
day,” said The First.

“They want it reduced to half
an hour,” said The Second.

“They don’t want to work at
all,” said The Third.

“Blast the lazy so-and-sos,
said The First. “I hate them.”

A (them more than you.”
e Third, “I was one of
them.”

“The man who was elected as
The People’s Friend,” said The
Second. “What a pal.”

“If they don’t work how can

we live?” asked The Third.
_ “Maybe they don’t care if we
live or not,” said The Second.

“Then we must have a civil
war,” said The Third.

“Yhat’s right,” said The First.
“Frighten them into work. It’s
the only way we can keep our
jobs.”
you what,” said The
» “when we get back I’ll
denounce you as a Fascist swine,
which you are, who hates the
workers, which you do.”

“And T'll denounce you,” said
The First, “as a Communist can-
nibal, which you are, who hates
the workers more than anybody
which is true, That'll start
something. Come on. Let’s go.”

“What are you doing?” The
Third asked The Second.

“As I am neither a Communist
cannibal nor a Fascist swine,
hating nobody,” said The Second,
“T think I’ll stay here and join
the Libefal Party. They could
do with one more.”

,

Struck Dumb
_ A business executive, sign-
ing himself Northerner,

writes to a newspaper: “I
am 35 years old, yet when
alone with women I admire
I am literally struck dumb.
I am celibate and likely to
remain so unless I am cured.
Is there anything I can do
for myself before I haye to
take to drink?”

R. GUBBINS, the Fleet-
street psychiatrist, writes:
Northerner was probably
frightened by women when he
was a little boy, This is a fairly
common experience, as women
are more frightening than usual
i you are little and they are
ig.

The only difference. between
Northerner and the majority of
grown-up men is that Northerner
has never recovered from the
shock, and probably never will
at his age.

* * *

Therefore, as a man of his tem-
perament will be led to the altar
the moment he opens his mouth,
I advise him to regard his early
experience as a blessing, remain
struck dumb in the presence of
women, and take to drink at once.

In this way he will save a lot
of money. Despite the current
vrice of intoxicants, drinking is
sill cheaper than marrying, and
as marriage would probably
drive nervous Northerner to
drink anyway, silence will save
him both money and trouble.



FIVE EMPTY BEDS

Five beds lie unused in the

two guest bedrooms of the
Y.W.C.A. building in Pinfold
Street.

They can be filled on pay-

ment of a low weekly rent of
$3.00, ‘which includes morning
tea. Not long ago one of the
beds was filled by Miss Doris
Hart of the World Y.W.C.A.
during several weeks of her
residence in Barbados and
others are occasionally filled by
girls frem neighbouring West
Indian Islands,

Why are ‘the five beds empty
today? Are they not five Bar-
badian girls in need of good
sleeping accommodation? Or
are the girls afraid to seek beds
in a hostel which is adminis-
tered by an association which
is part of a movement based on
the Christain way of life?

If the beds are empty because
there are no girls who need
them locally then living condi-
tions in Barbados cannot be as
bad as they are said to be, The
dificulty of filling beds is not
the only difficulty which the
young Y.W.C.A. of Barbados
has to face,

The building in Pinfold Street
has been there for a long time »

and it is in need of repair bute®

the Y.W.C.A.
pay one

does not
penny in

have to
rent,

the owner,
The Y.W.C.A, got off to a

good start by obtaining grants |

from the Government and from
the Vestry and was successful
in obtaining subscriptions from
individuals and trading com-
panies in Barbados, It has money
in the bank and it has one hun-
dred and fifty members. What
more does it want? A_ great
deal.

The Y.W.C.A; Was opened in
January 1951. Its situation in
Pinfold Street makes it accessi-
ble to girls working in the
neighbourhood and there is a
regular clientele of more than
a dozen girls who eat their mid-
day meals at the Y.W.CA.
daily, There are two prices for
meals—42 cents for non-mem-
bers und 36 cents for members.

Girls eat their meals at’ tables
seating on average four girls.
Tables and chairs are made of
good quality polished wood and
the dining room at the Y.W.C,A.
is up to the best Bridgetown
restaurant standards. There is
a small writing desk in the din-
ing room for the use of girls
who want to write letters during
their lunch hour. In the main
room of the Y.W.C.A. is a table
tennis set. Upstairs are bedrooms
and lavatories, In the front of
the Y.W.C.A. two garden beds
are planted with beans and there
are some flowering plants. What
more does the Y,W.C.A. want?
Next month three of its officers

et : The.
building is provided rent free by 9â„¢

Hy George Hunte

are attending a Y.W.C.A. con-
ference in Trinidad. When they
return they will have a much
better idea of what to do next.

They have of course been
doing things already.

Almost every evening some-
thing is going on at the Y.W.C.A,
in Pinfold Street. Girls attend
cookery and needlework classes,
listen to lectures “mn all kinds of
bubjects, yiay tatle tennis and
basket ball against club and
scho~! teams.

Something is goirg on at the
Y.W.C.A. daily but not quite
enough think the Committee
responsible for the Association.

Y.W.C.A,. werk demands, they
think, a trained leader ¥ ao will
by personal -enthusiasm and

know-how keep the organisation
alive and brimful of new ideas.
They do not believe that the Pin-
fold Street house should become
just. another social service: just
another cheap eating place fir
class girls

middle with sma.!







i

“No, blockhead, this is a
note his’ excellency will
not deliver in person,
T's for the milkman—
one wint less from the
middle uf next month,”

eae






London Express Serve

salaries. They want the
Y.W.C.A. to play an active part
in the life of the young girls of
the community. They want the
Y.W.C.A. to become a com-
munity home in which young
women from all classes in Bar-
badian life can meet together
and in a friendly atmosphere
discuss with one another
informally or formally questions
of interest to the community,
They do not believe that such
a leader can be produced with-
out training. And they are hop-
ing that somehow or other they
are going to obtain sufficient
revenue to pay a _ properly

trained Y.W.C.A, organiser to
keep the /Y.W.C.A. members
keyed up to the pitch necessary
to make the Y.W.C.A. a “live”
cell in the life of the female
community.

Sceptics might ask whether
the Y.W.C.A,. is not biting off
more than it can chew, whether
it is not- trying to cover ground
which is already adequately
covered by the Girls Industrial
Union and various other religi-
ous and social organisations,

Perhaps the best answer to
seeptics would be an invitation
to visit the Police criminal
records office where they could
see for themselves the hundreds
of pink cards which reveal the
offences of Barbadian women.
They might. then wonder
whether the hundreds of pink
cards are not traceable directly
or indirectly to the paucity of
women in the community who
regard' work for their fellow
women as the most important
social function they can per-
form

It is easy to sneer at wiat is
being done for the women of
Barbados, When things’ go
wrong a few “TI told you so’s”
or aS many “you can’t make
silk purses out of sow’s ears”
will chill the Spirits of all but
the most heroic souls,

But so much work remains to
be done for the women of Bar-
bados that the Y.W.C.A. so far
from being an interloper and
meddler seems to have come late
in the field.

It has plenty of work to do.

The girls who make use of its
facilities whether for eating or
for recreation or for educational
purposes prove that it fills a
gap in the social services,

What is to be its future?

Is it to. become just another
girls club?

Or will it play a vital role in
raising the moral standards of
Barbadian womanhood?

Tt has begun auspiciously.
Everyone wishes it well. With
wider membership and with
increased revenue from public
and private grants and donations
it can afford to pay the salary
of a trained organiser.

Without a trained organiser
the Association can play a small
part in the long uphill task of
raising the reputation of Bar-
badian womanhood to a higher
level than it now enjoys, With
a trained organiser a reduction
in the number of pink record
cards kept by the Police Crim-
inal Investigation Department
may not be noticed immediately
but the greater the number of
women working for the better-
ment of their fellow women the

greater their influence will be
spread throughout the com-
munity,








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SUNDAY, JULY 27,



1952





“The Importance Of Being Earnest”

By A Correspondent tele yee arc ate ov teas



CECILY HELPS explode Mr. Bunbury. Cecily Cardew (Audrey Mac-

Intyre, Algernon Moncrieff.



THE CANON DEFENDS the governess. Lady Bracknell (Greta Ban-

croft), Canon Chasuble (Frank Collymore).

Up to fifly* years ago, little
attention was paid to research
in the Caribbean—with the pos-
sible exception of sugar cane (as
distinet from sugar) investiga-
tions

But even in the field of sugar
cane, then even more than now
the mainstay of Caribbean
economy, research was conduct-
ed at “experiment stations”
which were, in effect, small
botanic gardens, concentrating
on plant. varieties, and by no
means research undertakings
comparable with to-day’s institu-
tions:




Undoubtedly, the greatest yield
of research of all time within the
Caribbean was the discovery in
the late XIXth Century of the
possibility of raising sugar cane
from seedlings and of cross-
breeding cane to produce new
varieties.

This discovery, which revolu-
tionised the world’s sugar in-
dustry, was largely due to John









RESEARCH IN THE CARIBBEAN aan eave

R. Bovell, and his death
knighted, not a wealthy man, is
an outstanding example of a
colonial unhonoured and unsung,
after bequeathing to the sugar
world the wealth of Croesus,

un-

Actually, as early as 1859, a
man named Parris had written a
letter in the Barbados Press
claiming to have seen self-sown
cane seedlings, but no notice was
taken of Mr. Parris’ observations.
In fact, many” sugary authorities
dubbed this claim a hoax.

Some years later, while super-
intendent of the Boys’ Reforma-
tory, Bovell was shown a
self-sown seedling by one of the
overseers, and he began his
experiments on cross-breeding to
produce new varieties
These experiments have brought















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Also a lovely assortment of
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value.



CAVE SHEPHERD & (0.,

w; fi, tea 13

















The recently thoroug com-
pr sive review of pre
duction of “The Importance of
Being Earnest” leaves the reade1
with a strong impression that
very little remains to be said
on the subiect, and that all
other comments will only be on
expression of further and yet

more detailed scrutiny.

In the first place, however
the Barbados Players should be
very genuinely congratulated on

their performance of Friday
night, not because it was a per.
fect performance, but becaus¢
it was such a very marked im-
provement on that of the pre-
vious evening. This points to :
quite remarkable spirit on the

part of all the players. it

obvious that they not only ¢
eepted and took to heart the
words of the recent critic bt

they also listened to the spoken
opinions of many of the ordin-

iry . playgoers nd they acted
accordingly For this quick
#rasp of the position and intel

ligent reaction to it
praise them enough.

This is no place for discussing
the virtues of the play itself,
and this is no place for taking
each member of the cast and
throwing each one in turn a few
flattering or derogatory remarks.
This is our chance for looking
at the play as a whole, for ap-
preciating its highlights, sav-
ouring its well delivered witti-
cisms, and examining its weak.
nesses,

one cannot!

In criticising professional act-
ing one very rarely needs to
mention the question of audi-
bility and delivery, but in ama-
teur acting this always seems to
be a major problem. The whole
fabric of this play is made of

conversation and not of move-
ment, it is therefore imperative
that not. a line should be lost

and in order to sustain the high
standard of wit and to ensure
that each subtlety and innuendo
reaches the audience the pro-
ducer must be certain that each
word uttered by his players can
be heard. Besides clear. articu-
lation, timing is a factor that





ALGERNON IS WORRIED about
Layne, (Wm. Bertalan),
Gwendolyn Fairfax (Pam Chaytor)

By A Special

forth abundant, almost
lous, results. New
resistant to disease, higher in
sucrose content, yielding better
tonnage to the acre, standing up
to the prolonged droughts, have
doubled and even tripled tne
sugar yields of the Bourbgn cane
days.

miracu-
types, more



This not the be-all aad
end-all ¢ 3ovell’s efforts, even
if the 3H. 10/12 ° (Barbados

Hybrid) might have justified his
sitting on his laurels. Bovell did
much more.

He studied the effect of man-
ures, compared the suitability of
different varieties of cane to
varying soils and climates, and
encouraged improved cultivaticn
methods

But Bovell’s work was not
typical of the period as far as the

wae

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Broad Street



Algernon
, John Worthing (Anthony Haynes)







SUNDAY

PAGI

ADVOCATI



NINE



- — poeenecessintnaneregetnseepecnmemans eee SEN a So


















perb in her reful blended but
needs careful considerat ve ld eostum it t} } “ he VERM UT
There are some tedious patches g sonorous lines wer Willian Bertalan’s thunder 0 q
in the second and third act always expressed with the t t keloth w lepre ng espe
which Wilde himself is respon- fidence that the character cially aft the vy jerful farr
ible and the only way to com- demanded, one felt at tinies that portrai rt t act Wherever you find the best
bat this weakness in the script Greta Bancro’t and Lady Brack- *% *y° . me
is to quicken the tempo nell were eyein each F Al : R a ; . 1 - tha youl; find Martini
considerably, it should never be warily ~ ! : - ne =. and as — Vermouth
allowed to flag. I found that Ar Lastly e look’ of ‘the pla ; $ . thea " ee =. ee
thony Haynes as Earnest, Greta The costu the whol , Se ee ee, oe ~ ronestly say
Bancroft as Lady Bracknell veer plee aoa reels —- in sit - ° ao Succeede ;
and Frank Collymore. as Chasu- ilmost rivalled thosi wo! by : ‘i r io 7 he rareg Sooner
ble were always completely Gule: GP Hes ciembere of the a - ‘ o the next productior
audible and = ee oi rom this very able company

their delivery» was
excellent, also one rerely ‘ost
any of Pam Chaytor's or Michoel

Timpson’s lines, Aud'ey Macin-
tyre and Margot Dewhurst h
ever were sometimes rather
slurred although both have
extremely good voices for ths
stage

Frank Collymore chose the
richt people for the interpreta-

tion of this small group of ch

acters. This is by no means
easy task, as each personality
Ithough quite convincing is a



little larger than life size there-
fore great care 3 necessary
to avoid over emphasis.

Although, I thoroughly en) yed
the flamboyant and amusing
Algy, the pontifical Chasuble,
the fluttering Prism and the
charm of Gwenooline and
Cecily, it is the parts played by
Anthony Haynes and Greta Ban-
croft that I should like to con-
sider a little moe fully



Produced by Martini & Ross:
Torino (Italy)



Anthony Haynes in his por-
trayal of Earnest should be
given full marks for his acting,
his carefully controlled voice is
a pleasure to listen to, in all, his
encounters with the nonsensical
Algy he is the ideal, highminded,
Earnest, always slightly dis-
approving but avoiding priggis4-
ness. His mourning scene was
delightfully funny and his final
act when he really took the
centre of the stage was handled
extremely well





TEA FOR A VISITOR. Maid
Merriman (Alfred Pragnell)

(Ellice Collymore), Cecily Cardew,

The man
who didn’t
know...



Greta Bancroft’s playing of
Wilde’s immortal mortinet Lady
Brackness was just a trifle un-

sure. It is difficult to criticize
Greta Bancroft’s acting, e
is often brilligat and al



extremely competent, and yet Sriiins Where's Boxter ainidaer »
.

‘Oh, he preferred snoozing
indoors. I don’t know what's
come over that puppy! No life
in him at all, and his coat looks

‘Condition—that’s the answer!
A dog needs regular condition.
ing to keep really fit. Try givir
Buster Bob Martin’s Condition
Tablets daily and you'll



soon

terrible’. have him straight again. The stuff
‘ ; in them—vitamins and minerals
wee are you doing about and so on—does a dog good

naturally by purifying his blooa
and toning him up generally’.

"Bob Martin’s, ch? I’ve heard
of them’

‘Doing about it? A dog can
look after himself, surely! I
must just have picked a dud,
that’s all. But he looked fine
when we got him’.

‘That’s where you're wrong.
cle is a fine pup, but he can’t
look after himself, the way wild
animals can. It’s up to you to
do something if you've let
him get in such a bad state.
Now, what I give Judy 64 it.

here—’ o
| PAs

‘I must say she always
looks in lovely condition’.

BOB MARTIN'S CONDITION TABLETS for dogs of any age or breed.
LOCAL AGENTS

‘All dogs need Bob Martin’s
and they’re particularly impor-
tant for pups, to start them off
well, and to build healthy bone
and teeth. Judy has them regu-

larly, and she’s seven now’,



‘I'd never have guessed

Bob Martin’s has cer-
tainly done her - proud!
Thanks for the tip, and I’
get some today’.

From all good chemists and store
.B MEYERS & COLTD
BRIDGETOWN RARBADOS BRITISH WEST INDIES

‘



the missing cucumber sandwiches.
Moncrieff (Michael Timpson),





THE HAND BAG is restored to it
Prism (Margot Dewhurst).

owner. Anthony Haynes, Miss










dave k here ie 1 SRE a
should bear 2d Ce
mind that tropical conditio at \
make agriculture and other field Ns ay
Correspondent of yesearoh different and uniqu S ] I | i ) i ! ! . > ;
hs in Caribbean territorie
Caribbean as a whole was col- unthinking people in our cor _ re moore “sR :
cerned munitie there are two schoo What may provide the answe “* Z
What a different story is pré of thought: the first state quit , : ol nes ; . Ea KEE 2 - — : y,
sented to-day. The accent is on definitely that research is a wa to a problem in temperate clim | I [EM fi

certainly will not solve the situa

research throughout the are», of tion ir

money, and that the co
and four years ago the Yearbook

outweigh the benefits; the second



Jamaica or Barbados, anc

IN FINE



of Caribbean Research, a survey claim that there are far beticr a nee Hh cea) rs a Sea
of research and investigation in equipped research statior j Ms asiaitte kaa ower ~ ~
the non-self-governing Carib- other parts of the world, h A , Brad Seas Toh = yl re CONDITIC IN
bean, could list some 800 separate England or America, and that ee iin dtd oe g ein ,
research projects underway we could save effort and money re — With Bip EN
And the field these projects . by leaving research to those Having (it 1s Hoped) settled th: HARVEY'S ERADICATING WORM POWDERS
cover! Not only § agriculture, more capable of conducting it question of the necessity of 1 Without Ball — 6/.
forestry, fish and wildlife, but search, the obvious question is: |} jag lee ; 4 With Ball — 7/-
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engineering, nutrition, sociology has already. been given: Bovgil What are these 800 projects? 1 for Foals and Yearlings without Ball — 6/-
statistics, economics, education, et alia 3ovell was an instance vhat agencies are they bei HARVEY'S ACONITE POWDERS

planning and housing, chemical of

Caribbean research
technology, geodesy and survey-

‘ undertaken?
ing the Caribbean in terms not

Quite apart

for Cough in Horses — 5/-
from the Govern

ing, geclogy, and what-have- computable in money figure ment departments, which ar
you. and, what’s more, of benefiting doing considerable work in re JOHN GILL & C3 AND
Among the opponents to r¢ the world to boot earch, each in its own field .
search—and there are many Group Two appear at first @ On Page 15 ’ S O CQ
| KNIGHTS’ DRUG STORES
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WSS







PAGE TEN SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY, JULY 27, 1952



———————





THE PEOPLE OF BARBADOS—XVI_

By JOHN PRIDEAUX.

A new religious body arrived
in the Island of Barbados in 1789,
this was the, Wesleyans, who built
their first- meeting house in
Bridgetown, and the first meeting
was held on the 16th of August of
this year... The mobs pelted the
building with stones and inter-
rupted the prayers with hideous
noises. They received little or
no protection from the Law of
the Island due to their teachings.
The founder of this religious
body was John Wesley (1703
—§1), who came of a very aus-
tere Methedist family, knew
England as the home of slave-
traders, kidnappers and smug-
glers. It was an England of gin-
ships, corrupt politics ang soul-
lass religion, which he fo t
hard to correct. Due to the in-
fluence of men like Wesley the
Church ‘was taking an interest in
the unfortunate African who had
been transported from his home
some thousand of miles away and
sold to a life of perpetual slavery.
This activity gradually reached
the West Indies, but was met
with strong opposition, as the en-
tire civil and economic life of
Barbados was built on slavery
and this influenced the whole
outlook on the life of the jnhabi-

Barbados, due to its position,
was one of the first ports of call
for slave ships on their way to
the other West Indian Islands, or
the Spanish Main; thus the trade
of Bridgetown was largely in
supplying these ships, which only
stopped here for supplies for their
human cargo. Such was the case
when. Thomas Coke, the founder
of the Wesleyan Mission in the
West Indies, arrived at Bridge-
town in Dé@cember, 1788 He
found a nucleus of Wesleyans al-
ready in existence, and these
‘were soldiers who had served a
part of their time inAreland.

It was not only the Moravians
and the Wesleyans who were
fighting for the religious recogni-
tion of the slaves, but im 1795
‘The Incorporated Society for the
Conversion and Religious Instruc-
tion and -Education of Negro
Slaves’, which had been recently
formed, sent out clergymen to
Barbados and other West Indian
Islands. This. was acknowledged
by the Bishop of London, under

Are You Superstitious :

I think it is true to say that
everyone is superstitious to some
extent, even though perhaps they
do not even admit it to them-
selves. If you believe in “luck”
you are superstitious and it will
be interesting to watch the vari-
ous types of superstition mani-
fested at the Races next month.
Some people will buy a No, 9
ticket simply because they were
born ‘on the ninth, others may
favour thirteen or seven, and
hundreds of other little super~
Sstitions will become apparent.

It is quite rematek ule how
widespread certain superstitions
are. For instance, at one time
it was the practice of people in
Britain of passing’ children
through split ash saplings in
order to cure them of certain
ailments; and in Africa the
Medicine Men of Uganda and
Lake Nyassa did a similar pass-
ing through split trees of people
stricken with illness, The point
of interest is that the practices
of the three peoples were in use
at one and the same _ time,
although there could not have
been any communication be-
tween the savage and the civil-
ized practitioners.

But let us have a look at some
of the common superstitions and
perhaps diseover the reasons

behind thera.

To staft with one phrase that
nearly everyone must have
added at ome time or another
to the announcement of their
good health or fortune, “touch
wood", at the same time touch-
ing withthe forefinger of the
right hand an object made of
wood, The meaning in supersti-
tion, is that we are chall
our fate, but at the same time
Seeing the protection of things

y.

Sanctuary

There are two _ possible
origins of the “touch wood”
superstition. The first is the
protection of the Cross; and it
seems to have arisen in this
connection from the old-time
practice of sanctuary. That is,
the sanctuary provided by “a
hunted person touching the door
of a church, when it was
regarded as sacrilege for any
of his pursuers.to continue their
efforts to catch him, as he was
regarded as under ‘the protection
of the church,

But that is a comparatively
modern explanation of “touch
wood”, and to discover the rea\
origin of fhe superstition we
have to go back to those early
circumstances in which man
paid reverence to certain trees

In those times the cult of the



© ESE PSFO PRS ONSSSI9S

SEA VIEW GUEST
HOUSE

HASTINGS, BARBADOS
Daily and Longterm Rates
quoted on request.

% “srmanent Guests

o welcome.

x ie er and Cocktail

‘ Varties arranged.

S J. H, BUCKLAND

y Proprietor.
Mega tO ALA FLL BEEAO ASLO

1O-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

Large Shipment of .. .




WALKING S'TICKS
. Just Arrived
Many Sargains lefi in the
HARDWARE




DEV ARTMENT

JOHNSON . NERY

TTARDW ARE



whose diocese the West Indian
Islands were, also aided in this
work. Circulars were sent out
recommending the establishment
of Sunday. Schools for the
instruction of negro children, A
teacher was sent to a_ school
established on the estate of one
Dr. Holder in the parish of St.
James,

Commenting on these turbulent
times, one planter of high stand-
ing in the Island, and a General
in the Militia, wrote the follow-
ing in his Diary: —

“Considerable concern’ is
manifested (amounting, in fact,
to as much as publick agita-
tion (as to the probable effects
of cértain indiscreet and ill-
timed utterances of certmin per-
sons in Authority, both here and
in Great Britain. It is generally
allowed ‘by all persons of
Humanity and sensibility that
this ‘most necessary’ institu-
tion of Slavery (as it exists at
present) is exposed, by its very
nature to abuses. Let these, by
all means, receive all possible
alleviations — and as soon as
may be,

But it is at the same time
hardly to be borne that the
unwarrantable conduct of these
few shall be made an excuse
of the extremists for a pillory-
ing of all owners alike! This is
not in any way representative
of the whole truth. I can my-
self testify that there are others
(of this nothing is said) «who
use their people with all reas-
onable care and indulgence —
save where sych is neither
reasonable nor warranted.

There are also many
instances of those who have not
neglected to make due pro-
vision for their slaves follow-
ing such owner’s demise,

I am likewise minded-—by no
means along in this to
attribute a fair share of the
blame to the underhand activi-
tiles of the sect known as
Quakers, These, from the very
beginnings of the settlement of
nur Island having played a
very subtle—and in these days
all too little heeded—part in
the instigation of others to
rebellion, at the same time
openly avowing their detesta-
tion to any form of violence!
Not scrupling, withal, to avail

By IAN GALE

oak tree became universal
throughout Europe, and _ it
became associated with the Sky
God. Men observed that the oak
was the tree most commonly
struck by lightning, go they
presumed that it was the
dwelling place of the irritable
Sky God, who punished boasters
either by the lightning stroke or
by some other dire influence.
So, to avert evil through boast-
ing, @What we now call sym-
pathetic magic had to be
employed, and to touch the oak
or another sacred tree meant
that one would be safe from the
Sky God.

One ot the most common
superstitions still practised to-
day is that connected with the
number thirteen, ‘he ill luck of
uhirteen is heightened if by
chance the thirteenth of the
imonth should fall on a Friday.
Va the other nand the belief is
meld that a child born on the
thirteenth will be lucky in all
his ventures started in after life
on this day,

The thirteen superstition
exists throughout Europe, and it
is impossible in any French
lown or city to find a house
numbered thirteen. Also, few
passenger liners would dare to
wave a bumber 13 cabin,

Thirteen Guineas

As evidence that the super-
stiion was not confined to the
less intelligent of the population,
there may be sighted the case of
Mr, Justice Luxmore, an Eng-
lish High Court Judge, who
held very strongly by the super-
stition, When practising at the
Bar, he would never accept any
brief marked thirteen eas,
One solicitor, whe knew this,
sent him on one occasion a brief
marked “twelve and another’.
it was returned to him,

Religious circles ascribe the
origin of the thirteen supersti-
tion to the Last Supper, at
which there were Christ and His
twelve disciples—thirteen in all,

But this would hardly
poceets, for the dislike of the
omans and the Greeks
number thirteen, It gh
accountable in this case by the
story of the Valhalla banquet in
Greek mythology, to which
twelve of the gods were invited.
Loki, the spirit of Strife and
Mischief, intruded, making thir-
teen, and Balder, the favourite
of the gods, was killed,

Talking of superstitions, I










s DOWN!! The

Office 4493

themselves fully of the safety

and protection afforded them

by the laws and defenses of

this country.” (1)

The General goes on to relate
that there was an attempted rising
of slaves in some parts of the
Island; but that this was quickly
suppressed—‘the immediate shew-
ing of discipline Taking excellent
and speedy effect — but at this
time a general anxiety thus
engendered by nO means, even
now, wholly allayed.’

He concluded — ‘it is, accord-
ingly, much to be hoped that
these over-zealous advocates of
freedom may duly take this late
ae ena it is too
ate! Such es, permitted to
further flourish unchecked in our
very midst, in these dangerous
times, must perforce yield fruit
in still worse happenings. Which
God forbid! there seems no
doubt but these instigators in
Great Britain can have little, or
no real cognizance of the nature
of this deep and dangerous men-
ace, which, from time immem-
orial, has overshadowed and
even threatened our very
existance.” (1)

There was a dispute over the
Wesleyans in 1801, this eventually

clos-
wd their Chapel in i
town. The Methodist uae
scribe Bridge town as one of the
most turbulent places in the
shown these people closely re-
sembled the mob-violence which
was meted out to the Wesleyans
of the latter part of the eighteenth
century in England, Historians
recorded —the motives natural to
a godless and coarsely vicious
community, animated by a strong
infusion of aristocratic pride and
of contempt for the novelties in
religion, were in this case raised
to feverheat through Mission-
aries’ friendship for the Negro,
exciting the suspicion that they
were agents of the anti-slavery
movement in England, to whic:
was added the belief that their
preaching encouraged
and made for the overthrow of
slavery,’

Lord Seaforth was sent out as
Governor of Barbados, and was
especially charged to endeavour

could not leave out horseshoes,
ie se. aera ee
ood luc! ie gen -
sition is that a horseshoe nailed

5
5
&
&
:
é

bri ood luck to all inside,
but there are variations. On the
Scottish coast

same time framing a wish,
wish will come true.”

Nafled Upward

But remember, horseshoes
must always be nailed upwards.

“qharm” was ted, always
travels in cireles, and is conse-
quently interrupted when he
arrives at either of the heels of
the shoe and is forced thereby
to take a retrograde course.
Great men have had the fail-
ing for horseshoes, Nelson, it is
recorded, always had a horse-
shoe firmly nailed to the mast
of the “Victory”.

There are two explanations as
to the origin of the horseshoe
superstition, The first is
aseribed to the legend of St.
Dunstan and the Devil. The
Saint was noted as a blacksmith
and, according to the legend, one
aay the devil presented himself
and asked to have his hoof shod.
St. Dunstan recognized him
and, after fastening his yisitor
to a wall, went to work on his
hoof so roughly that the devil
had to beg for mercy. Before
releasing him, however, St. Dun-
stan exacted a promise that he
should never enter a_ place
where he saw a horseshoe dis-
played,

The more likely explanation,
however, is that ted from
‘tthe Roman belief that evil could
be nailed, and the hammering
of nails on the doors and over
buildings was a well-recognized
means of curing or diverting ill
luck and disease.

How great was the belief in
the charm of the horseshoe at
one time is illustrated by the
fact that one of the “good
wishes” of the early part of the
last century was: “That the
horse-shoe may never be pulled
trom your old.”

Incidentally, I consumed a
portion of a horseshoe shaped
wedding cake this week, so I
should be well protected from
the Devil—touch wood!

(To be Continued)

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to ameliorate the conditions of
the slaves in Barbados, John
Poyer in his open letter to Lord
Seaforth, refers to this matter
no uncertain terms:—

“I am now in the last place,
to solicit your attention, my
Lord, to the condition of the
coloured People of this Island.
l flatter myself that your
Exceilency has come among us
with a mind superior to those
prejudices, on the subject of
Slavery, which have, unhappily,
found so general and favourable
a reception among our mis-
taken and misinformed fellow
subjects on the other side of
the Atlantic. Withoat attempt-
ing to-discuss a question on
which some of the most dis-
tinguished and enlightened
Characters in Europe have dis-
agreed, I shall content myself
with remarking, abstructed
fror the Idea of Slavery, that,
in every well constituted So-
ciety, a state of subordination
necessarily arises from the
nature of civil Government.
Without this no political Union
could long subsist. To maintain
this fundamental principle, it
becomes absolutely nec@ssary

accidentally introguced into the
Community. With us, two grand
distinctions result from the
state of Society: Firstly be-
tween the White Inhabitants
and free people of Colour, and
secondly between Masters and
Slaves. Nature has strongly
the difference not only

in complexion, but in the mental
intellectual and corporeal fac-
ulties of the different Species,
ind our Colonial code has
acknowledged and adopted the
distinction. The Passage in
your Excellency’s speech to the
lature in which you pro-

fess your intention ‘to preserv:
the constitutional freedom of
and necessary subordination, in
the Island, to promote the cause
of Religion and irtue, to
encourage trade and to Secure
the property and happiness of
all ranks of People’ affords the
most heartfelt satisfaction to
every friend of their Country.”
Mr yer goes on to expose the

> IfFaith Can Heal—What
Is The Church Doing?

By CANNON HUGH WARNER

“Streams of them—yes, I can
truthfully say I have seen
streams of people coming
here with various kinds of
sickness. None of them leaves
us without in some way
being the better.”

1 could not doubt the ring of
conviction in the @voice of Rev.
Robert Horn Andrews as we sat
talking in his cel-like study down
Dorset way. His hair was silver,
and he did not look his 77 years.

He recalled the day, nearly
four years ago, when he joined
ihe pioneer founder of ‘ton
Abbey sanct , Blandford—the
Rev. John Mailiard—as an. assis-
tant priest,

Father John, he told me was
away in Devonshire conducting
one of his many healing missions.

“Yes,” he went on,“nowadays
we take only the so-called incura-
bles. For over 15 years Father
John has lived here, building up
this centre of spiritual healing.
Among the ‘incurables’ who have
stayed with us—three or four
weeks is the average time—we
have seen real miracles happen.”

If beauty and peace can heal,
I was not surprised.

The Setting

Through his study window I
looked across to the wooded
Dorset hiils on which a complete
village had once stood. The
squire, 200 years or so ago,
levelled the houses to the ground
because they spoiled this lovely
view. He had rebuilt the village
of Milton Abbas—with a new
church—half a mile away, to be
the first ‘“model’ vilage in
England.

You might call Milton Abbey

today a Church of England
“model” sanetuary of healing.
The vast eighteenth century house
nestles in the shadow of a great
penedictine abbey with a_ story
going back to King Athelstan, 128
years before the Conquest.
Tt was shown the chapel with a
nigantic picture, along the length
of the west wall, of the child
Jesus going into Egypt.

Here in this one-time monastic
refectory 60 residents, staff and
patients, meet morning and
evening. Two books on the altar
hold the names of hundreds of
sick who are prayed for each
morning before breakfast at the
Tiolv Communion.

Every Wednesday a special
healing service, with laying on
sf hands, brings visitors and
their sick friends.

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immorality of some men in the}
higher walks of life and the)
effect on public morals. He states |
that the people of Barbados have |
much cause to depreciate the
illicit intercourse between men |
in power and the coloured
women, which by hig account
must have been in a deplorable
state.

With reference to the Gov-
ernor’s recommendation to the
passing of an Act by the Legisla-
ture, respecting the Manumis~
sion of Slaves was ‘a wise and
salutary measure, which as it is
caleulated to prevent the artificial
inerease of free coloured People,
must tend to preserve the peace
and security of the Country.
But,’ he continues, ‘permit me.
my Lord, to suggest to your
serious consideration a circum-
stance pregnant with conse-
quences which may, be, at some
future moment productive of much
mischief. I allude to the accumu-
lation of real property in the
hands of free People of Colour.
By the Laws of England Aliens
are declared incapable of inherit-
ing lands; and though I am aware
that this is not strictly a case in
point, conceive that upon a simi-
jar -principle of national Policy
eur Colonial laws many properly
interfered and prevented the ac-
quisition of Real estate in the
possession of free Negroes or
Mulattos That they should be
allowed to exercise their talents
and = industr. in procuring a
comfortable Subsistence for them-
selves and their families, and that
they should be protected in the
full and quite enjoyment of an
honest livelihood, is readily
admitted ‘But that they should
be prohibited from purchasing or
acquiring Lands or Slaves is a
measure of as inseparably
connected with the safety of our
Country and perfectly congenial
with the Spirit of our Constitu-

tion.”
(To be continued.)

1. ‘The Barbadian Diary of
Gen. Robert Haynes. 1787—
1886; Edited by M. W.
Cracknell, 1934.

2. The Journal of the Barba-
dos Museum and Historical
Society, Vol. ‘VIII, pages
162—164.





Father Maillard, Father An-
drews, and a third resident pries*,
che Rev. Leslie Dumwell, share
in these healing services at the
altar rail, moving down to those
who cannot leave their seats,
(ouching, and praying.

“We have a doctor here who
has lately joined Our commu-
nity,” I was told. “He, too
shares in the laying of hands in
‘he chapel service.’

“So you believe in medical co-

operation?” 3 asked.
For- , I was led to a

door marked “Occupational
Therapy.” Inside were two large
looms for weaving, and three
smaller ones, A model plane lay
in a window recess, and ma-
terials for doll raffia
work, and other crafts filled the
shelves.

He opened another door, Here
were large lamps for light and
ray treatments, and couches for
massage, each with ifs screen.

“You see,” explained Father
Andrews, “the prayer of faith is
the instrument of the divine
healing forces of the Heavenly
Father. This attitude is not
opposed to the medical and nurs-
ing professions; it pnly insists
on prayer as the divinely ap-
pointed way of _ transferring
spiritual healing, which is neither
better nor worse than any other
agency.

“Material remedies must be
limited in their scope because
they do not include the moral |
element, For complete healing, |
youve got to get at all the root,
couses, spiritual as well. |

“Spiritual healing is projected
through the fellowship of two
o- three gathered in the name of
the present, living Christ.”

The Nurses

As a nursing sister passed along
the passage he went on; “We have
a resident staff of five trained |
nurses and two male nurses.
There is a trained physiotherapist
who givas her services. Dr.
Woodard, grandson of the founder
of the Woodard schools, our
doctor, believes with us that no
sickness should be regarded as
incurable, or condition as hope-
less.” Three of the children in
the home are “Spastics’,—unable |
to control muscle movements.

I stood by my car in the great)
courtyard. Father Andrews spoke |
as EP was leaving of another com-
pany—friends who pray in groups
of 12 all over the country for the |
sick, “We send them six new
names from time to time for
their intercessions.” |



























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ee SAT a NS

et en



a - Bn ee fi. S _ a, a
aio Ihagnrar ca




war OD B8epthse Wesiss ow ib



ow an Abbot’s cell -































‘ wiyey TINS ’ 7 ern - “ATS ago, 1s ¢ :
“SERT RATS BECOME MONKS AND *\°%° noma :
tht id - af . 4d Fl + is 47, and a r r scholar r ¢ ai ‘ h ]
Christ's Hospita hose of ve ally t
SS so i 2 wa herein’ shee, are mt can help you to success
x . wrt % an 7 . . . . \ 1v '
WORSHIP IN BALLROOM CHAPEL Disciplinarian ae oi eB vr
. - = . " ¢ E x 4s ife t
Rover morte ee seg, peng Him equ through personal postal tuition
Vivi G HELA cae: aiaeeiel— 4 the man's usual conception of a in other s of life t
ae GN eeryeeene jmunce “then te helt wee ae Se, Ee EL cece thet Be tos ee nen toe | FJTHOUSANDS OF MEN in important positions were once students of
» sicie 4 7 ele A . ae hat of his monks © t t he here KnoW that this is the wav tr ~ ;
NASHDOM (Bucks), Friday au tw ) have dedicated wears a silver ¢ rucifix attached whieh we have been callec upot The Bennett College. They owe their success to Personal Postal
= M ROBER’ ETITPIERRE . ne oe to @ doubie silver ch aroun t orve." : « T enne ege way. Y same chance
9M ROBERT PETITPIERRE themselves *0 ¢ jee of God, who do his neck. He is jovial. much “aS"the angelus tolled. Dom Tuition — The Bennett Colleg way Yow have the wo
F (“I'm British by birtn and = t ae Bey a travelled. and entertains his Robert left to foin his brother qualify for a fine career, higher pay and social standing.
Sexi s. . qe ; : ron beds at 5 a.m and return to th guests with riddles and. Bp the Mone im. the anenel
} i eb ae ‘ Pe ae Pe. Roe Hive 2h Se house Foe Sg Mane wns. Wan ease te ‘reamne ot One of these courses will lead to your advancement
scholarly figure in monk’s blac servants used to look after the Prince But he is a strict disciplinarian. members of the court at Windsor
robes, looked up from the lawn ®P4,Princess and their guests “- I asked Dom Robert whether. and the fashionable Ascot meet- nae Seadore Cavinene eCnee: -reemaee
at the white facade he house The monks come trom many peck when men were living together ing crowd Book-keeping English Subjects Mathematics
post wi ; ite facade of the house gr nae a neers Me ma at close quarters. the human Torre aeel asishinetia. Gotaee! Gdamadien Pulte Spoettiog
“ Said : oric ar ne « tne her

Police Subjects
Short Story Writing

element of getting On each other s

Costing
ves did not occasionally

Economics

Geography
Journalism

Brierly, tends the pigs and live y
exchanging his monk's habit for ox



“That circular room

Mark
the Princess’s bedroom. u

used to be
Now it is





ur
Of course.” he agreed.

ngarees and a skullcap when he is “We al Ensines D Sanitation
our library. Those windows on the working in the grounds must get over that in two ways py tal “tae. Sheet Metal Work
oT te dees ane Ss room. Now We must learn > live tomether Aircraft Maintenance Machine Design Steam Sagiieering
it is the Ot's cell.’ The ex-sergeant as a family, and tolerate each Building Mechanica! Engineering orveying
ras so kine ‘oe i the: , Motor Foy . elecommunications
He was speaking of Nashdom 8 other. And if the Abbot sees that ee, Make Television
Abbey. Built in 1910 by Sir Edwin Dom Walstan, former staff sergeant, {)‘° eed al SE ee ty co will Civil Engineering Power S atic Engineesing Wireless Telegraphy
Lutyens as an £80,000 week-end is in charge of the kitchen catering and thesis of we on er a a Diesel Engines Press Too) Work Works Management
home for Russian Prince Alexis Dol- the infirmary $0 Or teaser ey are no Draughtemanship Qe ancl Surveying Workshop Practice
r rj his Engli ineees er ’ al : Eluctrical Engincering iadio fF n-cring
gorouki and his Bnsiish Princess, Bp a ah mo ge oy Ee I The Order bought the Lutyens Electric Wiring Road Maniitg OVERSEAS SCHOOL
Wasna Me Ne 0 e a, ; = : mansion for 1ey mov

Then he took Holy Orders and became

only Anglican Order of St. Benedict Vicar of Norwich. He jotned the staff

~ emmy CERTIFICATE
in this country.

here from their previous home
n Pershore in 1926.

preresensie seve wor See on mi







‘ £, DEPT 188, CHEN FIELD, ENGLAND. » GENERAL
; - f ; of Toc H and later was in charge of 0 THE BENNETT COLLEG | -
DOM ROBERT PETITPIERRE, an ex-science ihaiette eto ee oo rang a St. Annes House Soho, He has been £700 a © isan end ine free your prospectus CERTIFICATE OF
master, has taken life vows at Nashdom Abbey. race-meeting partion. the a Sere Be in the pig five years year ane | ¥, EDUCATION
He has given up all world! sessi r § a aletertaet . aU =. Like the other monks who have taken Unlike the Benedictine Orders ‘ l
st Pp Y possessions, to-day are the singing of the monks in ‘Mie . ws _he gave up every worldly on the Continent who distill the aren
pS eerycgt He een to famous liqueur and derive much 1 ADDRESS ° SEND TODAY
eet private income. He bre . ncoome from it, the Nashdom 1 1 p can. a
ae ae eae nye ae Abbey monks : have no profit- \ Se
: ag Ot Fang making pursuits. i y Noes ae
nad : belonged Je his Brand: Most of the income is derived PLEAS® Ss = on
parents a lacquered hat-bDOX from payment made to the els ollie dei tabla sa 27.7.52 ch intlen ss caus



which had belonged to a Chinese
mandarin. Everything was given
to the Order

monks for priestly and literary
activities, and from donations



and subscriptions from the
The piano. the settee. the laity

chairs and the hatbox now One of their members, now
stand in the ante-room where dead, was Dom Gregory Dix
visitors Cincludin women who wrote @ theological hand-
visitors, who are Larrea from book which has a wide sale. The
the house generally) are revenue from royalties still
received. brings in about £700 a year.

The monks &#re allowed to

lron bedstead

Dom Robert occupies a
by 16ft

and a nard chair.

boards are bare, a
ana over the bed
“But we have

our beds and we can have

main chapel

Members of the public

sit in the minstrels’ gullery

10ft
cell with an iron bed-
stead, a chest of drawers. a desk
The floor

crucifix

mattresses on

the minstrels’ gallery. is now the

may
attend Mass in the chapel and

smoke and to take a drink. They
are issued with a ration of
tobacco each week,and most of
them have cider at their places
on the bare tables in the refec-
tory. which 1s the original din-
ing room. large enough to hold
50 people :

“We have wine if it is sent
to us. or oeer.” Dom Robert said

In @ quiet private cemetery in
their grounds. amid iris o!ooms
and rhododendrons. are buried
monks and !ay brothers wh
have ended their labours at the



THE ABBOT
Dom Augustine Morris

RES.





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many blankets as we like. One None of the mon s any

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and feels the cold has about away on business for the Oraes or Acidity due to Indigestion.
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seven.” he said he is given the m y t us

where noted orchestras played in account for it on s retur?

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The monks use the drawing- monastery



Toom as a common room Among them = lies Brotner
“Every evening from 7.30 til} Alban who started ite as &
8.30 we all meet for recreation,” ship's chandler I'wenty-fve




Dom Robert exp, ained “We years ago he joined the Order a
Aer — Ts ver: may play cards, talk or read & lay brother He chose to wash
ul ve ar ved t reak ® upstairs pantry
iN THE GARDEN of the £80,000 house built by Lut i i _ e not allowed to break Up in whe ups ad
: yens for a Russian prince, monks no ‘oups or ‘schools. That would take on ne#ther duty and
They belong to the-only Anglican Order of St. Benedict in this country, rte gg Cups or MACON. TE

The ballro. f
where noted orchestras once played is now the main chapel, om of the house,

~The New Pattern Of Celebrity

for the quarter *A a century he
was at Nashdofa he washed the
dishes for his brother monks

ve must all be together





it the Abbey house- oe A ‘
incomplete The Prior The two latest recruits are
ond incommand to the Brother Andrew. who used to be













rently » w@ seaman, and Brother Breach
ee te ee ton saan from Bermondsey who arrived a BROTHER MARK BRIERLY ex-
nted few weeks ago Desert Rat, tends the livestock.
PARIS By DRUSILLA BEYFUS ® Abbot who took office four Betore pe said good-bye Don na rs ’ :
THE FIRST General’s Lady io Ks 3 has,ever done before, . . She held ora Tree t

make it her. business to splasn heavily escorted enterprise. She a personal Press party. Q.: What did she miss most Mrs. Ridgway pointing to an JT’S ANNA—From Page 7
about in the limelight is Penny, 18 usually accompanied by three The place chosen was thein Japan? F “Ike” brooch in diamonds. about what?” Oh, about any-
the third Mrs. Ridgway, wife Suardians who make Penny’s way nearest thing to an American As: “My flower decoration For a moment Penny looked as inne ‘ad you evel Meet “a
of the Sypreme Allied Com- up far easier, They are:;— country club that France can classes.” * if she had singed herself in the woman who dian't have ideas?”

mander in Europe. Penny has | The Elegant Guardian, Mrs. offer (notices written in English Jt was noted solemnly limelight. “Oh no,” she said, inquired Anna e ne
made a celebrity of the General's M. Biddle, wife of Brigadier A. only, a barbecue in the garden, Q.: How many servants have frowning. Was it true that she sais t
Lady She thas shaped up a star Biddle. She has been heard to and murals of the American civil you? “Now, now; no politics,” said celebrating her fiftieth birthday |
part out of a traditionally dul! say at parties when asked to pose war to decorate the restaurant). ans “I haven't had time to Mrs. Mathews loudly, attempt- stationed. , ee
role. for pictures with Mrs. Ridgway It is situated nicely near allied count.” ing to smooth things over with a on Saturday? “At my age you|
Penny has washed the starch “I'd rather not, my dress headquarters, One flowery hat was bitten pink .steamroller. forvet about birthdays, Any-"
right out of) her job. She is would show up you know.” Just in the appointed hour, by this, She murumured appre- It was the nearest thing to o way, who let out that top

\, prettier and younger than most | The Plump and Jolly Guardian, the Ridgways’ mighty Chrysler cjatively: “She hasn't had to diplomatic incident, secret?”
other generals’ wive>, and Mrs. Greunther, wife of the car crunched along the gravel-ount them.” 3ut Mrs. Ridgway was soon What clothes had she brought
s makes sure her _ assets general who nearly got General drive of the Country Club de la al a back on safe ground She with her how many hats? ,
beautifully shown off. Ridgway’s latest job, She keeps Nouree Villenes-sur-Seine. + Emissary climbed into her mink. into “Oh, you know my weakness” |
When she puts on a hat even the party spirit moving -during Mrs, Mathews officiated, look- Christian Dior, the celebrated the American car, trailed by the said Anna. “Really ,this is the;
Field-Marshal Montgomery no- the odd evening the generals’ ing a picture of cool crispery in dress designer, sent his chosen two good guardians, the wives oddest sort of Defence interview |
tices it. “My dear, it really is 1nost wives spend at home. a grey nylon dress, emissary, the salon manageress, of the generals—and sped off. I've ever civen, Goodbye now.’ |
‘ sweet” he said about a little Peron Guest 3 . to pay respect to the General 4 one ; The diamond anthers of her}
straw number she wore recently. The he See ‘Hello, Sweetie’ Lady. She was a woman cf gold lily brooch flashed; the!
Penny catches on wherever = -ne Professional Guardian, She we'comed the Supreme paralysing elegance who reduced 4 . medallions on her bracelet —|
she goes. Her nickname is always Mrs. Burrows Mathews, whose Commander's wife: “Hel lo, everyone there to limp off-the- P Pr L each a milestone in her personal
used. Nobody calls her by the husband is attached to Ridgway’s sweetie; come right on in.” peggers. en ais and professional life, inscribed
proper one, Mary. Pictures of CiVilian staff. Mrs, Mathews Penny came right on in, wear- ‘Tall, and in Dior’s black, she i with messages like “Xmas 1937,
Penny appear in the papers ines’ dee’ te see line in promy- ing a mink, a tussore dress, and bent low over Mrs, Ridgway, De@r Sir, Love RKS” and “Asst. Secty, to|
enny.

she stops. a big he j ca a Re bait. cRioact I am asking you if you would = fefence 1950”—jangled. \
wherever she stops ‘iin, Ridgveay ie! very rest 1 big hat that tickled the photog- and murmured a few well chosen kindly give me space in

His ‘Pearl’







} : t raphers. words: “Monsieur Dior... at & y eye = juan vee Mrs, Rosenberg waved a hand}
Penny is the general's pearl. Pain Nand ots ey ae told But soon Penny made it plain your service . . enchanted, Sake est oateeh, publishing my _ moved towards the front}
When the general takes a trip, pefore her maveia ree fo eos that she was keeping her pretty madame, to see you. .. our salo. ““y am 17 years old and my hob- Sen yeople squeezed into the
Penny goes ‘too. “The general know,’ she is the meee do you mouth closed. She might look your home. .. ’ bies are stamp collecting, ex- blue Buick with’ her, Tho rest
reckons that it doesn’t look as the world to be fi bul a ae i sensational, but she kept to the On the tick of 17.30—the ap- changing snapshots and going to sorted themselves into the other
if he's come to fight a wer vit tained by ida -Peronte’ enter- pen se pa eh ag it came to raeegten’ ae oe Ss the the cinema. vehicles, and the cavaleade —
a wife on his arm,” said aa : _ ? ’ naking comments. eneral’s Lady rose to leave. 3 = on seaera |
officer at headquarters, inde renee eee ee higher The ladies of the Press, in One more picture, please, a Blairmont Estate. Pr on thee aah that led back “| R. M. JONES & Co., Ltd—Agents
Penny's flight into fame is a She did what e right lights. flowery hats and little black photographer pleaded. He asked Berbice, U.S. headquarters, Grosvenor-
at no general’s wife frocks, listened attentively. .., if he could take a picture of British Guiana, square, ‘Sa



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PAGE TWELVE



AGRICULTURAL REPORT :

June Rainfall Below Average _Prize-Giving

In his report on the work of
the Department of Science and
Agriculture for the month of June,
1952, the Acting Director of Agri-
culture said that the rainfall for
the month of June, 1952, was
slightly below the average. In the
majority of districts light to mod-
erate showers fell on approxim-
ately 16 days during the month,
heavy and widely distributed rains
fell on the 4th and 9th. According
to rainfall returns received from
29 Stations, situated in the vari-
ous rainfall categories of the
Island, the average total rainfall
for the month was 5.15 inches, The
average total for June 1951 was
7.39 inches and™ the avérage™ for
June for the past 105 years was
5.41 inches. The approximate to-
tal rainfall for the six months
January to June 1952 is 14.90
inches, the total for the corres-
ponding period for 1951 was 37.04
inches.

The highest total rainfall for
June 1952, at any of the above 29
Stations, was 7.51 inches, record-
ed at a station in the parish of St.
Thomas, and the lowest was 2,63
inches measured at a station on
the coastal area of Christ Church.

Sugar Cane
The harvesting of the old cane
crop was completed early in
June. According to final returns
received from sugar factories the
total crop for the 1952 season is
the equivalent of 167,876 tons of

e young cane crop made good
growth during the month and is
green and vigorous in appearance.

Food Crops

The newly planted yam crop, has
germinated satisfactorily and has
a healthy appearance. A _ large
number of fields were planted to
sweet potatoes during the month.

Inspection of the cotton grow-
ing areas was continued during
the month so as to ensure that the
plots had been propel cleaned.

The search for wild.cotton trees
was continued and a total of 2,343
was found in 4 months,

The distribution of cotton seed
for planting commenced at the
end of the month and owners and
occupiers are asked to make ear-
ly application for seed. Up to the
end of June, seed was distributed
to plant 120 acres, (plantations 18
acres, peasants 102 acres).

PEASANT AGRICULTURE

Peasants continued planting of
cme, sweet potatoes, eddoes, In-
lan corn and eow peas during
the month, In response to the en-
couragement given by the Depart-
ment, peasants generally display-
ed a willingness to grow more
food, but were handicapped by
shortage of planting material,
. By the end of the month, the
young ratoon canes in the lower
rainfall areas were beginning to
show the effect of the dry weather
condition’. In other areas good
rogress was maintained | h
Piant and ratoon canes, and some
cultivators were able to apply
dressings of sulphate of ammonia.
. June was the last month of the
close season. During the month
sants were preparing their
lots for planting this crop. There
are indications that a larger acre-
age will be planted this year than
last year.

Small plots of groundnuts were
pmpe during the month in St.

ucy and St. Peter, Good germin-
ation has been reported.

Coconuts and mangoes were in
good supply in the market.
yields of breadfruit
expected in due course,

Some minor damage continued
‘to be caused by leaf hoppers on

and pears are

food crops. The laying ‘out of
contours and other heavy culti-
vation work were completed, and
the planting of yams, sweet
potatoes, Indian corn and cow
peas was continued. Applications
of sulphate of ammonia were aso
given to the young canes.

The total number of livestock
at the six stations at the end of
June was 118, .ineluding young
stock born during the month.
Three hundred and seventy-six
gallons of milk were produced,
and 22 young pigs sold, mainly
for breeding.

Five hundred and four stud
services were paid for at the
stations. These were as follows: —
bulls 191, bucks 110, rams 83
and boars 120.

ENTOMOLOGICAL

‘the number of moth borer egg
parasites bred in June was 80,216,
v00 and the number distributed
to. planters was 70,129,000. This
brings the total bred so far for
this year to 310,543,000 and the
number liberated to 271,725,000.

More Diatraea infested can®
hearts, bringing the total for this

ear to 6,100 were dissected in
June in an attempt to discover
whether the larval parasites Lixo-
phaga diatraea and Metagonysty-
jum minense could be found in
cane fields. None was found, and
it is coneluded after repeated
efforts over many years at estab-
lishment, that these parasites
cannot establish themselves in
Barbados.

Examination of fields in which
patehes of ratoons were showin
poor growth, or were drying, re-
vealed more attacks by root borer
and by the ant Acropyga and i's

ssociated mealy bug Neorhizoe-
cus. Surveys carried out showed
many other ratoon fields attack-
ed by Neorhizoecus in which no
ratooning failure was s»pparent,
but which had prébably suffer-
ed less in tonnage due to destruc-
tion ‘of roots. The real status of
this pest has yet to be deter-
mined.

Application of Insecticide

to Cane-fields

Further work has been carried
out in plots at Codrington and in
large scale experiments on plan-
tations for root borer control. |

During June, five government
buildings were examined and
tre; tment against wood ants car-
ried out, and four inspections and
tresiments of private buildings
were made. Fields at four estates
were examined for . the presence
of Nasutitermes , the cane-
field wood ant.

BOTANICAL

Nursery and Short Season First
Year Trial. These seedlings
were successfully established un-
der irrigation and received their
full dose of fertilizer during the
month of June. The seedlings are
now well established and are mak-
ing satisfactory growth. Irrigation
will be continued if this becomes
necessary.

The breeding plots at Groves
were supplied during the month.
As four cuttings are planted per
hole, it was possible to do most
of the supplying necessary by
singling the existing plots. The
remainder was done by digging
up stumps from the old field. By
the end of the month the supplies
had taken and were starting to
grow vigorously,

S. spontaneum — Burma. ny
of the older cuttings of this
variety which were taken in May,
failed to grow, and have been re-





Guava 31
Cherry 20
Papaw .,... 11
Grape © 2005 14
Water-lemon 3

754
Coconuts: PY ls ee

Distribution of Ornamental
Plants. Two thousand nine hun-
hundred and twelve ornamentai
plants of different species were also
distributed from January to June.

CHEMICAL

Organie carbon, pH, total ex-
changeable base capacity deter-
minations were made on Seawell
soil samples.

The final analyses in the com-
parison of exchangeable soil pot-
ash determination methods were
made, and the statistics are almost
completed.

Further nylon bloek/soil cali-
brations were commenced; also
indirect permanent wilting point
moisture determinations. The read-
ing of bloeks in the field continued.

Nitrogenous fertilizer was ap-
plied to five 8 x 8 x 8 direct and
residual potash trials; to three
4x 3x 2K.N.P. trials; to the peas-
ant cane potash trial and to the two
bagasse trials,

One 3 x 3 x 3 direct and residual
K20 trial (1st ratoon) wag aban-
doned because of estate potash
application to the plots.

The urea fertilizer was applied
to the B.47419 (1st ratoon) canes
at Codrington in the comparison
between it and the normal sul-
phate of ammonia application.
Severe scorching of the leaves
occurred at both spray solution
strengths (3% and 6%).

Foliar Diagnosis

New, quicker methods of cane
leaf N.PJK. analysis are being
tried comparatively with last
year’s methods, These newer tech-
niques require less leaf material,
are quicker, and cheaper since less
chemical reagents are required
per determination.

One hundred and twenty-three
leaf samples were collected from
the 4x 3 x 2 K.N-P, trials, 14 leaf
samples from the Pine sulphate of
ammonia time of application in
relation to irrigation experiment
and 5 samples from the Codring-
ton urea trial, and 2 samples from
the Pine estate cane leaf nutrient
trend work.

One hundred and twenty-three
samples were dried and ground in
the Wiley Mill, 12 K20 and 15 N.
determinations were made.

The Pine perennial fodder trial
experimental results have been
recorded in publication form.

Thirty-eight Pine, Central Live-

stock Station milk samples were

received for routine B.F. and
S.N.F. analysis.

Miscellaneous Analysis
Three samples of B.A.F. were
received for protein and sand
adulteration tests,
One butter sample was analysed
for free chlorine, suspected of
causing a taint,

_ CO-OPERATION

During the month the Co-opera-
tive Officer attended 15 meetings
ot co-operative societies 6 of these
were regular general meetings of
established soctcties, 2 were com-
mittee meetings, 5 were meetings
of groups in process of formation
and 2 were in connection with the
presenta: of certificates of reg-
d twelve ornamental
tive Officer gaye an address on
fome aspects of Co-operation to
the Christ Church Old Scholars’
Association.

SUNDAY ADVOCATE ~~ ~*

Antigua Grammar
School Holds

trespondent
ANTIGUA.

The Annual Prize-Giving of the
Antigua Grammar School teok
place at 5 p.m. on Thursday last.
His Excellency, Sir Kenneth
Blackburne, K.C.M.G., O.B.E., was
unable to attend but Lady Black-
burne was present, accom
by the Private Secretary, Captain
F. E. W. Hewitt. =

The Headmaster Mr, J, F, Foote
in his report paid tribute to the
late Walter McSeveney who was
an old boy of the school and for
many years a member of the Goy-
erning Body of the school. The
School now has a new Gov
Body comprising of the Dean
Antigua, the Reverend, Canon
i. M. Yerbury, Lt, Col. J. R. A.
Branch, M.B.E., Mr. E. G.
the Hon. E. H. Lake and Mr, P.
A. W. Gordon. The school year
opened with two hundred and
thirty-seven boys and the year’s
work showed considerable im-
provement on the previous year,
examination results "were com-
paratively speaking good but the
age at which boys in Antigua are
sitting the School Certificate is
still two years later than boys in
other West Indian islands and it
is vitally necessary for them to
speed up edueational standards in
order for them to come in line
with the other colonies.

The Hon, P, D. MacDonald Coal-
onial Secretary of the Leeward
Islands then addressed the lar;
gthering of parents and boys, b
acDonald stressed that a long
term policy was necessary for the
general improvement in
of the Antigua Grammar Sch

The Dean of Antigua spoke on
behalf of the Governing Body and
said that with the co-operation
of Mr. Foote and his staff it
their intention to work t
modernising the school. The Head-
master’s task was an exceedingly
difficult one and he deserved every
possible help.

Prizes and certificates were pre-
sented by Lady Blackburne.

Cotton Planting
Season Begins
In Antigua

{From Olir Own Correspondent)



Antigua’s cotton planting sea-
son will begin on ist September
and prior to this date an an-
nouncement will be made regard-
ing the type of cotton to be plant-

Government has only received
an offer of 40 pence per Ib. lint
for between 240,000 lb. to 360,000
Ib, cotton lint.

Although Government has not
received a firm offer for the whole
of the 1953 crop, it is not propos~
ed to impose any restriction on
cotton planting.

Government will purchase pea-
sants cotton in 1953 and
to make a first payment be-
tween 12 cents and 14 cents per
lb. seed cotton.

Government does not undertake
to purchase estate cotton but es-
tates will be assigned one fifth of
the amount of cotton for which
a market is secured,

Steps are being taken by the
West Indian Cotton Growérs’
Association, the Antigua Cotton
Growers’ Association and Govern~
ment to obtain new markets.



to four. The formal presentation
of the certificates of registratiom
to the Welchman Hall Co-operative

Scout Notes

SEA SCOUTS
IN CAMP

Garrison Sea Scout Troop (2nd
ot. Micnael) is in Camp at Baih-
sheba, St. Joseph, near to Powe:
pring. There are about 20 las
an camp with Mr. C. A. ‘Boo’
vatterson, Group Scoutmaster, :”
charge. The Assistant Commuis-
sioner for their sub-area, Caps.
«, A. Sealy, visited them on
Saturday. The camp will end on
Monday afternoon.

Executive Committee
Meeting é

The Executive Committee of the
Island Scout Council will meet
to-morrow afternoon (Monday)
it Scout Headquarters at 5 p.m.

August Camps

Many troops haye planned to
camp during the month of August
and all H.Q. Camp equipment
nave been booked up already.
This is indeed a healthy sign and
we hope that more Troops will
»e camping during September as
well. Those Groups who have not
y@t paid up their Assessment Dues
to the end ef the last term (Jan.
—April) are reminded to do s©
as soon as possible. No Camp
equipment or “Badges will be
issued to Groups which are ‘un-
financial’.

Film Show

There will be a_ special Film
Show for Scouts and Scouters in
uniform at the British Council
Centre, “Wakefield”, White Park
Road, at 5 pm. on Thursday
afternoon next, July 31st, at 5
p.m. Special feature of the show
will be the film of the last World
Jamboree which was held in
Austria in August 1951. Don’t miss
it! Seating accommodation is
limited so be sure to come early
and to wear your Uniform.

Group Activities

The Hon. Secretary will be glad
to receive news of your Group’s
activities through your Assistant
Commissioner for publication in
“Scout Notes”. Please let us
know what’s ‘cooking’ in YOUR
GROUP. It will encourage other
Groups too, BUT please send in
your notes not , — oe
Thursday before publication y.
GOOD CAMPING TO YOU ALL.

= @ .«
Barbadian Studies
Shakespeare
At Stratford

The British Council in con~
junction with the Extra-mura]
Department of Birmingham Uni-
versity has arranged two courses
on Shakespeare at Stratford-on-
Avon during the summer. The
first of these will be attended by
20 teachers and students of
English from Australia, Canada,
Southern Rhodesia, Barbados,
Belgium, Finland, France, Greece,
Italy, Sweden, Israel, Brazil,
Peru, Uruguay and US.A.

The gramme consists of a
series lectures at the Shake-.
speare Institute by Dr. Clifford
Leech on “Shakespeare’s Roman
Plays,” Mr. H. V. D. Dyson on
“Comedy, Tragedy, and tha
Last Plays,” and Professor C. J.
Sisson on “The Road to Discov-
ery” and additional lectures by
leading British scholars on
Shakespeare and his contempor-
aries ard the Elizabethan Age.

Members attend performances
of plays at the Memorial Theatre,
and tutorials and discussions on
these plays will be held. There
are also play-readings. talks and
visits to places of interest in



.to be appointed to form a new|

KING FAROUK
ABDICATES

‘rem pece 1

v



Alexandria to bring the naval
command in line. }
After a morning long conference
with Maher, his troops went to the |
King’s Palace. They were barred
by the King’s bodyguard. Naguib
forces opened fire on the guards
when they refused the demand for
entry to the Palace. Nagtib’s |
forces then smashed their way.into,
the Palace and arrested Abdulla |
El Nafuim Pasha. i

Maher’s two-day-old Govern-
ment was reported ready to resign
on Saturday night, and ionegene-
ent Bassiedn Barakt Pasha be-|
lieved the most likely candidate |

Government.

The “day of action” fell exactly |
six months after ‘Cairo’s “black
Saturday” riots of January 26th in |
which Cairo was ripped by riots, |



arson and murder which burned |
out great sections of the city’s
modern business area and left un- |
numbered hundreds dead and in- |
jured. |

The constitutional amendment |
Naguib was reported to have de- |
manded would have stripped |
Farouk of his Royal prerogatives |
to dismiss an Egyptian govern- |
ment and dissolve the Chamber of ;
Deputies.—U.P.

a eeeiediciiie
Stevenson Accepts. |

Nomination

@ From page 1
dent Truman, who flew here from
Washington for the purpose as
well as to deliver a a talk” in
which he tore into the Republi-
eans and staunchly defended his
Fair Deal programme, He intro-

duced Stevenson as the man who |

had been nominated for the Presi-
dency on a “real honest to good-

ness draft “because” he en |

not make deals with anybody”.
At the time that Kefauver and
Russell marched before the Con-

vention and conceded, Stevenson |

was still 14% votes shy of the 6144

he needed to win nomination. As
soon as the two defeated candi- |

dates finished short addresses to
the Convention Utah made a
payoff change in a vote that
thrust Stevenson to victory,

TREES FOR
CORONATION

Scotland plans to mark Queen
Elizabeth’s Coronation in many |
ways. One of the most attractive
ideas is the planting of com-
memorative trees and shrubs in
cities, towns, and villages






2

—ve.|

OOH)



throughout Scotland.

Young people will play a
prominent part in this scheme,
following the example of the
Edinburgh Girl Guides who, for
the 1937 Coronation of King
George VI, ‘planted 400 flowering

cherry trees in an Edinburgh glen.

To-day, after 15 years, the trees
make a magnificent display each

“spring. i





West Indian
Teachers In U.K.

Five West Indian teachers
have arrived in Britain as guests
of the Colonial Office, They are
spending a month in Britain see-
ing many activities connected
with their work, and other
aspects of the British way of life.

The party consists of Mr. E.
Fields, head teacher of the Anna



Pelican”,



SUNDAY, JULY 27, 1952

@F e
the Mediterranean when his coup
was staged Wednesday was not
loyal to the new regime. He is in i e
os

Scientist Explains How
New Discovery Makes
Men Feel Years Younger

ment physician, with more than



Or James Rastelli
she wees For instance, Dr ng fee.
5 an phys: -
cian, rare: chen a power
ryation that the

dino!

tone . mem-
the | ory Jokers vitality are
about the discovery Ww
‘act that he has per-| f:
a Con ged of herbs ed

hs & marked slow:
nm in all the body processes

oplice thst the ae or outhful
vi er and vitautty les in’ bee
iy





JUST RECEIVED

MINIATURES

among which you will find the well known
Mr. and Mrs, Duck with Dack and Dilly. Mr.
and Mrs, Penguin with Benny and Penny. Mr.
and Mrs. Rabbit, and last but not least floral
Babies, Wynken, Blynken, Nod and Bear be-

. ns

We have also some very reasonable bird

“Woodpecker”,

“Budgerigar” and “Heron”.
e

Come early and make your choice at your

. i Yoast- Regina Senior School Essequebo,
beans, scale insects on fruit and placed by fresh cuttings. It is o¢ anisation and Registration Marketing Society and the Leeward wee caine and the Coa Brtige conic Se ae
ornamental trees, the cabbage ‘ly yet to say if these will of Co-operative Societies. One Co-operative Savings Society took ds. Beton Shane, MN Py eee!
White butterfly on cabbage and ow satistacterhly. geisty, Walkers Co-operative place on the 4th and 11th June Mr. H. Jackson, head teacher of
related crops and slugs on a wide ®!0W Satistactoriiy. . Savings Society of St. Andrew, respectively. , Jamaican Musician’s gg Pi de arc Maggs. An all
variety of crops. Control measures — Economic Tree Propagation and Was organised during the month. in Trinidad; Mr. ‘T, Miranda, a
are continuing. Distribution, Six hundred and This was formed as a preliminary Suc cesses i tish

OF
odist teacher from
Peasant Livestock eight lime, 82 mandarin, 365 to the farm machinery society ee

| LOUIS L. BAYLEY

Co-operators’ Day





i ; Celebratio: Honduras; and Mr. V, G. §, Pin- Iton La
A t hortage of con ana ae ve ok ren oe cuthelent capital nebebens when During the month "the officers Among medal winners announ- nock, headmaster - panei Bay Be Pe and Aquatic Club Booth
Ste eee ne of Con- and 25. shadddck trees were bud=_ * as been accumu- of “*k Credi i ti ent School, Jamaica.
entrated feed was reported dur- ao during the past six months— lated en@ the time is suitable. A cf the Shamrock Credit Society ced at the final concert of the Governm Phone 3909 Phone 4897

met the Co-operative Officer and Festival of Commonwealth Youth Before setting out on their

g the month. Supplies soon re- Janyary to June, Fruit trees de- marketing Society is in process of Overseas tour the party were received by

turned to normal. In many dis- }j\ered from Codrington during formation in St. Thomas. Another discussed plans for the observance organised by the





Se

ed wf Co- s’ Day . f ague on Monday June 30 was the Crown agents for the Colon- , ’ .
Bicts the supply of green fodder 11.0 same period were as follows:— soclety, situated in St, Michael, Chicd te montgone tee cele es Tale’ Barber of Jamaica, He ies, Sir Harold Downie, and by QO OHSS
ee th improve by the en CPAR ES od che suibis +.» 176 which chas_— been = accumula- ¢;; m 5th to 19th July, This was Was prevented with the Colonies the deputy Chairman of the
*"The Poapent Agricultural In- Grapefruit ........+65 iM ting fete some time, dis- done with a view to giving the Med by Colanial Secretary mort Sst Society, Sir Gerald :
Appie RG: i. deh eye OH cusse @ Co-operative Off- ¢ayicus societi ss Oliver Lyttel ampbell. ; 4
structors visited 982 peasant ihold- Lime ae “laws fee Cane = various societies more time to On July 10 a reception was| $
ings and 28 school gardens dur- Shaddock ..,..++..:> 25 = cer model by-laws for Consumers @ audience were ‘

sk 2 ake th ~ . ions Amo 7, : ; lion's
ing the month EM TL sine sheen se 8 Societies. These discussions are to |, y ‘iene: YT ate ooo many ed musicians in- held in the delegation’s honour

hi
i
# amme,

e ; Mandarin .........++5 $5 = continue. cluding Arnold Bax (Master by the Earl of Munster, Parlia- |
pete ue aa wed Vs is bs ashes 19 One society was registered during of the Queen’s Misick), Roser me p tary Under-Secretary of | %
at 9 meetings of co-operative PORE cai vicyot sk reeres 75 the month. This was the Sayes General Progress Quilter, et — — They ere Visiting « number of | $
groups held in June. Genip ose. ever venee 2 Court (Christ Church) Co-opera- The general response to co-oper- ea es var Directo Or British schools of different types.

The main activities at all Sta- Golden Apple ...... 16 tive Producers’ and Marketing siive propaganda has been satis- mt ustk wart ik Colnens F and On ‘the industrial side they are |
tions. in addition to the usual Sugar Apple .......+ 8 Society, Limited, which was reg- { ctory, and on the whole, estab- Ruth ‘Railton (Director National visiting a cotton factory to see;
routine operations, were those Breadfruit .........++ 8 istered on 4th June. This brings lished societies continue to make Youth Orchestra of Great Brit- West Indiay Sea Island cotton |
connected with the planting of Botr PA ese clay ns 1 the number of societies registered ; .0d progress. * Jain). being spun, and a sugar refinery.















FOR STYLE COMFORT AND VALUE

BUY 4 RELIANCE SHIRT

OBTAINABLE AT ALL LEADING
: STORES

HURRICANE SEASON
ANEROID BAROMETERS

Only a limited number so select yours early and be prepared
Also

HURRICANE LANTERNS ne
she Incorpora’
“sabe. HERBERT LTD.

10 & 11 Roebuck Street 1926







vp» Chetiated

® More Economical
© More Comfortable

© More Powerful





AFTER THE RACES THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LID.

















White Park Road, Bridgetown f e
< 2 2 9)
+ ENGINEERS, BRASS and IRON FOUNDERS A Car with all the ‘Extras’ you'll
UITS Works contain modern liances for the execution of desire.”
We proudly present C fT BISCUITS..... Tins UAE sb vain caeudintion . Bots feavclans Sedat xin an onal ng i
The SILVER KING ons atte — SANDWICH PASTE , GREEN CHARTREUSE ,, SUGAR MACHINERY and STEAMSHIES 4
Complete re-design of frame angles has C. T. CHERRIES ... .Bots. DRAMBUIE ....... + i TURAL MACHINERY and
i T MAJOR IMPROVEMENT = Dealers in AGRICUL an : *
seme ee. FIRS oa il pa care UTS ..... s Se a ee ” RENEE AL A Geoceent STORES '% New Shipment of these Famous Cars
EASIER STEERING Car. ORS veh " 2 poe» acu
EASIER PEDALLING a. CORPEART vos sce 2 1k IRRIGATION PROJECTS, PUMPING EQUIPMENT 3) arriving shortly,
and the FLOATING RIDE performance. ae at KOLA TONIC ....+ ” and ELECTRICAL INSTALLATIONS A SPECIALTY i
Great Beauty has been combined with ICE CREAM MIX Tins DRY MONOPOLE For es
improved STRENGTH at all the important BRANDY ee ey Bots DRY FLY SHERRY ,, eshataitenk Maacina call a .
TOUGHER FORK TIPS Wee. Recasdws os “a GOLDEN ARROW RUM ,, in
c ’
STREAMLINE FORK SWEEP 1 Sinner ere _ :
H CHROMIUM THIMBLES y i
2 ee tO ORTING RIDE NOW. PERKINS & CO.. LTD. THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY ED. j § COMaNn & taylors varage
“make-out” with any other? - ‘ Phone : 4546, 4650 Worksho :
Roebuck Street Dial 2072 & 4502 p Phone 4528 Stores Dept: . Near Cathedral
Â¥

eS | $909O0999449-9-09-9H9 99-59 99HHSHO-GHHHSHGHHHHOOOOHOHOT | 7

|





SUNDAY, JULY 27, 1952 E SUNDAY ADVOCATE

PAGE THIRTEEN






HENRY =k BY CARL ANDERSON How Aladdin’s Lamp

®@won the Princess









The Princess had refused many suitors.
But when Aladdin offered her a dish of
Royal Pudding, she cried, “It's delicious!
1 will marry Aim if he promises to serve
me Royal Pudding every day.”

2
Once a poor young man named Aladdin
found a magic lamp. Whenever he
rubbed the lamp a genii would appear
and grant his every wish. Now Aladdin
was in love with a beautiful princess




One day Aladdin asked the genii how he
could get the Princess to marry him
“Here, Master,” said thegenii, and hand-
ed him a package of Royal Pudding






©
Yes, everyone loves Roym: Puddings.
They're so rich and smooth, So .
too. 3 wonderful flavors: chocolate, va-
nilla, and butterscotch, Try one today.












1 HEARD A
WHAT HAPPENED?

By Appointment
Gin Distillers

to the Late
King George VI

‘rots

Gordons

Stands Suptome



PAR IM 2 |

BLONDIE . BY CHIC /OUNG








SWS























2s
King Features Syndicate, Inc, World rights reserved LE csinaslbeas tained SAR nc NAN EESTI,
FLASH GORDON IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE
: (Aaa ae v WELLL), oo i
— vt IF WE TAKE THIS ws ONLY ONE THING TO DO! SY) SPECI ff. 4
GARL'S SOLDIERS NOw ae ELEVATOR UR SOMEBODY'S GOT TO STAY BEHIND Uf AL offers to all Cash and Credit Cust
TRAIN THEIR ‘FREEZE’ pe ) | THEY'LL KNOCK Vag AND DRAW THEIR FIRE WHILE THE pe 4 ee Stele for Thursday to Saturday only
ace Say coe i ey p vont OVER aes » eee OF eae IN THE ¢ 3 SPECIAL GEFEME abe aow avallahis at cae Geuuches CL
L K CUTTING PU oo LAY PIGEONS. LEVATOR! WELL s+ oe ew pare now available at our ranches Whi
' FLASH AND HIS PARTY » e GET GOING! : is so pe ite P ark,
OFF FROM ESCAPE | Iweedside, Speightstown and Swan Street
we
Usually NOW BE MOEIIEA, | ciisisssisserseisinssisissnnsessonis j Gio eae Cae
OATMEAL TI a SnaIE oss sisssbasasovesanesass eoadhoua aeaammen lice
j POD A OMe. sere & DIOR iscsersessitiniavbpectonts $ 48 -— §$ 40 Genta ae WamAT i ssceesensennnes us sess -
-ELICAN SOAP ee ; sarge) mes
PELICAN SOAP. ..... roe TB 72 GREAM OF WHEAT (Small) ‘51
FRY’S COCOA SnFedosresssreeseecedesserstaenabosves 50 AG PEARL BARLBY .......... = 51
\ SAUSAGES VIENNA (4-0z, Tins)... 0° 36 COFFEE CHICORY .......... a ee
GHEGEEN GOO. M5 iissssbiiviiaseorsiens 42 —. 40 CHASE-SANBORNE INSTANT COFFEE wow 87
Ss Ss 9 V ‘EG Bb Mab basses aviicaureslpniaainas aetiaditibesess a tieae 4
MUSHROOM SOUP wsvsssee 3 40 PUPAE LAME, PIN ds Scdii sits sscaciaiese hobtotakinbvecrécaninese Soodduueee 49
eo Wipe PCP OE oes, ul irsstsvess 36 = ‘34 PINEAPPLE CHUNKS wy BL
CHDOPN PGP eh ue aan 36 = 34 GUAVAS (Large) vou 65
GREEN. PRA SOUR eee a as 34 APRICOTS (Small) ......%..... 39
FRUIT CAKES — 31 Tins . wu 8,00
WE'VE GOT TO HOW? THAT GUARD AT LEAVE THAT TO Me/ OKAY, PARADISE! JUST :
FIN? OUT JUST | MY DOOR MIGHT RAISE BUT WE CAN'T WASTE | REMEMBER...IVEGOT TO
LET'S TRY, TO REASON “FRONT” FOR THEIR WHAT IT 15! J COPPERJACKETED OBJECTIONS | | TIME HANGING AROUND J GET THERE AND? BACK
THIS OUT, JOHNNY! WHY OPERATIONS...OR, \F | DECIDED TO TAKE A STROLL WAITING: HERE WITHOUT ANYBODY rs
WAS YOUT MEETING WITH | THEN AGAIN, JUST ; 15 HOUR! SUSPECTING I DUCKED
THE BISSHOT HELD AT =_4. {5 INP TO THROW re

SCHLUGGENS ?





-* MBs . »
s Le

“GUINNESS

STOUT
FOR STRENGTH












SINCE YOULIKED
(T6GO WELL ANID ATE
] ALL OF IT-HERE IS

———.._/” 6OME MORE! IF YOU
EAT IT ALL- DOW'T



I JUST WENT
IN THE KITCHEN

F AND TOLD HER
wow: ~ 5 / WE ATE If ALL-

WHAT KIND ¥ p K NOW I WONDER
OF FOOD MUSTN'T OFFEND HER- Se 3 f WHAT GHE’LL HAVE
IS THIS? THROW IT OUT THE ¢ FOR DESSERT!

WINDOW AND WELL TELL ad a
HER WE ATE IT/ sd Iya, ie 5
P ° ee





A WORRY-- I
A HAVE PLENTY
“”
3hy MORE //

















—_—
oe "TM SORRY, MISS) FRIEND? I DESPISE] | WHAT DID PAGAN LEE SAY Y se
amt LEE... THAT HIM! IF HE CALLS MANGLER? 1S SHE GOING SHE
PHONE TO DITCH HER BOOKING
Tx OuT.. I'M BUSY., AT THE OASIG AND SIGN

ANYTHING | UP WITH USF pp








NN i J 4
Weg? De

BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES

2 : Es

MIGHT IN THE | USTEN $ DOESN'T THAT]
| JUNGLE<~ | SOUND LIKE A CHILDS
ae



= ZTE HIM, BOBO! gate
Se I HiM/ MAKE

ae




HIM GO AWAY /-
VOICE? IT DOES!
C. F. HARRISON & CO. (BARBADOS) Ltd.
P.O. BOX 304
BARBADOS



:
as ay
SAT







PAGE FOURTEEN

CLASSIF





BIRTH
GREAVES -— On Tuesday
Oistin Hill, Christ Church, to Mr













ane, Telephone 2949. 18.6.52—t.f.n. | Shops producing an income of 756 dollars
Harold Greaves the gi a ae daug a ——|per annum. Suitable for a bond with
titel ogg tloent Ecsta da Sg ae AUTOMOTIVE BREEZLEY, Maxwell Coast — Unfur-| enough land to erect more buildings
et.t.ce-—s ao . nished House. with 4 Bedrooms, Spacigus | ee day on application to
eer : 2 Reception Rooms, Double Garage, and tenants he above will be set up for
DIED Saloor _ fgodel M.S. 1500 yo 4 right-of-way to beach, John M. Bladon|saie by Public Competition at my
aS ner driven, 15,000 miles. ORF |g Co Phone 4640, Plt. Ltd. Building. |office VICTORIA STREET, FRIDAY ist
- reason for sale, owner going abroad: . 27.7.58~1n | AUGUST at 2 m Dial ‘o947
OETA Hobbtin Aimie Augusta, Tres ooo oe - uO". ARCHER McKENZIE
al, i ugusta ne , E
funeral. leaves “her late residence.| CAR-Hillman 10 HP, A'l’ Gondition,| p BUNGALOW—At — Brighton, Black | 37.7,88—4an
“Rosedank", Bush Hall, St. Michael.]|New Tyres & Battery. Price $1000.00, | Rock, 3 bedrooms, modern convenien@es | mm ————————————————————
at 4 o'clock this evening for the] For Inspection Dial 2144 from ist August 1952. Bus service. Apply | “BRIGHTWOOD” situate on the seaside
Pilgrim Holiness Church, Kew Road * . 26.7.52—2n..| Mrs. R. Cools, or Dial 2209 or 4988. }at St. Lawrence, Christ Chureh. stand-
and thence to the Westbury Cemeter> 26.2.52—2n | ‘og on oo. square feet of land
are asked to attend "AR r , e louse contains three bedrooms,
Pretthenet Altesheinssband Victor.|aieh ‘Very ood conaitan, elephant | co CEEOUMES, — Uarumnied, Chel: | rawing. dining and Tviny rom. garage
* Frank, Leatha (children), Victo 3962 es 27.7 bin sea Gardens. Inspection any day 4—6 and servants’ rooms with electric light
Rosalie, Adina, Cyrilene, Angela] ———___ * except Sundays. 27.7,.52—3n eae eetenies eouahos Inspection by
( ren) 27.7.52—In 2 appointment, one 8250 between the
prea nenaaners _CAR—190 STANDARD 10. in excellent) ““GaANAAN,” Cattlewash, Bathsheba-— | hours of 9 and 12 a.m
or. good bargain, Phone 5130 or Furnished, Electricity and Water, Sept., The above will be set up for sale at
THANKS _ -. Bernstein. 26.7 .52-—2n | Oot , Nov. Apply Mrs. A. A, Gibbons, | Public Competition on Friday, the 15th
Sindieren it " : . : Folkestone, St. James. Tel, 0117 | day of August 1952, at 2 p.m, at the
ER—Mr. Christopher Banniste mit a ae ae od 27,7.52—1n | office of the undersigned
and family beg to thank all those] Will sed, at bargain price, enquiries to see CARRINGTON & SEALY,
friends who so kindly attended th : . 21.7.52--40 FLATS—Two Furnished Flats at Dun- Lucas Street.
funeral, sent letters, cards, wreath dee, St. Lawrence. Suitable for 2 only.



and other expressions of sympathy ir
their recent bereavement, occasionec
by the death of Mrs. Bery! Bannister
. 27.7.52—1n

‘orner Pinfold St. Ma Lane. rivers with hydraulic powered

3 rere oe — « ner erae 7 89 in |unfurnished “Las Campanas” situate| Arrow Root Factory Estate House,

REID—The Reid family er i a ceten ey ae | «CAvenue = Belleville, containing 3) Animal Stalls ete. Situated 4% miles

eee oe Mind te ineny other ways, cAR—Austin A-40 6000 miles, Mxoelys|mecrooms, Living Room, Eitchen, Beth.,| from City. | Very ‘Suitable’ tor Stock

a sympathy with them In thei: | lent condition. Available September. Zollet with Front and Back Riis be Avply BH. A. Haynes, N.S

Salant Seccnvement, oecanioned by ths | $1.90 ‘Nearest. Telepnone sale." | Garnee, sacar Servo. or, par: | wauom St Vincent ap naan
B . . a a h =| 5

death of heir mother Mabel Agnes) 7 $2-1n. |ieutars phone 9728 2.100. | erate —y

. 5 a ore ate ih 'T MISS THESE—Aimost New 3

—_—_—<—<—<—<$—$s AP—One Ford 10. Bargain $300.00, | “"STANUELITA” — Maxwell Coast.| Bedroom Stone Bungalow, a Residence

IN MEMORIAM



HOPE—In loving memory of our dea
mother and sister Elsie Evelyn Hope
who died on July 25th 1948

Out of a world of sorrow

Into a heaven of rest

God must have a beautiful garden

For He always chooses the best.

Always remembered by— .
The Hope family. 27.7.52—l1



ANNOUNCEMENTS









——

TELEPHONE 2508

last at



FOR RENT |

IED ADS.



HOUSES

Attractive seaside Flat main road Has-| Al
tings, comfortably furnished,
Bath, Open Verandah facing sea. Suitable
one person





FOR SALE































Available July 15th onward. Phone 8240.

CAR—1949 2240. 1,6,52—t.f.n.

twner driven,
ondition

Minx
miles,
island

Hillman
17,500
Leaving

X-1040,
excellent
Inspecyon





— Furnished or | two

!
ee
CAR—Ford V-8 Super DeLuxe X-—754
“LAS CAMPANAS”





Fully furnished. Dial 3222.

St. Michael, 2nd House from Roebuck
st 27.7.52—1n





i. Tt

English | STREET and the land
| built of
tor couple). From August 1 | Galvanise at present
|
|

DAUPHINE ESTATE, St. Vincent. 175
acres of fertile lands partly bordered by



to Admire,
| Near Sea,



NDAY









1AT MESSUAGE AT TUDOR
n which it stands
and covered with

rented out as two



stone

27.7,.52—10n

all Modern Conveniences,
Going Undér £2,400.—Almost

r

excellent condition, owner driven. Apply

Williams » Se "| bedrooms and all modern conveniences Desirable 3 Bedroom (with Basins &
Ssure"Governmant Tari Careers | APD satine Cour”. Maasngys | Eaaboan, IS Sto, une
(Bus-stop in front) ‘ 21.7 In 27.7.52—t.f.n. | (about 7 yrs. old), Dining & Breakfast
eS ee tea op ens = core pg a hiya Garage, Servant’s
CARS-- VICTORIA — On-the-Sea, Worthing. | oom, verite oof, A-1 Condition
i tae ae gg ery dns Fully furnished. Vacant from the ist, |Back Yard enclosed with Stone, about
$2000. Austin A40, Citroen and Dodge|Aug. Dial 8150. C. N. Weekes. 12,000 sq. ft. Going for Only Under
saloons, prices from $1700 to $2300, Hill- 23.7,.52—8n | £3,100. AT MAXWELL HILL — A

















| be seen at “Archville’, Country Rd ,

man Estate car $1900. All of these cars
in excellent



23.7.52—2n.

ROOSEVELT MANOR—On the _ sea,
Beach Court, Avenue, Hastings. Three

New 3 Bedroom (Partly Stone) Bunga-
low, also a Residence to Admire, Going
aoe £1,500, BY NAVY GARDENS—A
er.

CAR-—1950 Vauxhall (12-4) Car in







New 2 Bedroom Stone Bungalow, about
1/8 Acre,



condition Phone 4316, Going Under £1,100, AT







































































RENTAL, PLATES SKU | Core & “Cory Lid Rise hy | PUL NOTICES oneness cane ™ 4 2 Beawom
FULL REPAIRED--Save, that crack; —_ - aac anes ee mate ectricity, Very
from going further: « stitch in time CAR-—Citroen light fifteen, one year Po fone ont ea om Pasa ort eae
saves nine, teeth replaced, slack pintes old, small mileage. Excelient new paint ’ NOTICE tan aimoeae oninine:. in Wea une
tightei ‘ Square eon -aboratory | job. Good as new. Twin carburettors . > Je ; cl
Bebe Risea cect” "St web. | hing hah ‘cine "pestormanae Somer |, Almela, ites othe, urine Strtn| Bil ih, ae Abre. Adeulanens
—_— ——--—_—_ | buying larger car. Apply D. Harvey |i. Barbados are requested to call at| ings sent, o POUR. TSS iA
EARN BIG Soeey by selling met Read, C/o Canadian Bank of epstss. the Atecan Coseblate dara duly 1 t0 BS. 27.7.52—1n
- supply 4 1 a Ty ere
Careaaee wees oe toe en b 8.4 "| 31, 1952 for Selective Service Registration HOUSE—(1) board and shingle house
. CAR--Dodge $uj fe Luxe (X—#e) |Under the Universal Military Training | 20 x 11 gainted throughout with Bedroom,
Will sell for cai best offer, bought Service Act. shedroof and kitchen attached, can be
WASTED smaller car. First class order, owner | ‘A!l male citizens of the United States | boiight separately. Apply Cuthbert E
driven. Dial 3359. who sve Ry = ah yg Aha Rogers, near Rices, St. Philip
, n sequen u , 1952, req 27.7.52—1n
HELP 16.7.524-£.0. | t register upon the day they attain the
a " = eighteenth anniversary of ‘the day ef} LAND—2 Spots % acre each situated
LADY. CLERK—With office experience | oT OR eee) eer od. Apply | thelr birth, or within @ve days there-| piack Rock. For information, Phone
for the Northern Filling Station. Written] Gittens, Corner James and Roebuck | *fter. Fred Carmichael, 2443 or 4502
applications must be addressed to J. D. | cSireets. Dial 4353 27.7.52—1n| , For further information, consult fhe 26.7. 52—2n
, Country Road, St. Michael > - z American Consulate, Brid, Ne
27.7.52—2n | ““TRUCK-—Chevrolet truck, no reason- | 5ados. §3—t.f.n./ LAND—4% acres situated Black Rogk
- ‘ able offer refused. res & €o . For information phone Fred Carmichael,
Old reliable Company established in’ jitq, 6—t.i.n OTICE 2443 or 4502. 26.7.52—2n.
Teiniled for many years requires the CULE &@ CO “ itintinel Gites!
services of a competent and experienced . ; “MOSS CLIFF”, St. Michael—(Near
Manager for Branch Office to be ELECTRICAL Ane ea alia Bridgetown, Paradise Beach Club) a newly reno-
established in Barbados end September | —————— ri B.W 4 * | vated 3 bedroomed house with garage,
1952. Please send full details and] 1 Blectric Oscillating Fan — Price bes er } Our friends and | S¢rvant’s quarters and all modern con-
Salary required with small Passport} 45.00. 1 Electric Oscillating Orbit Fan |Gustomers that our Spare Parts Depart- | Vemlences — standing on neatly 3 acres
picture to Advocate Box G.T. ¢/0/ 340.00. 1 Electronic Strobe Light, For of land irrigated for kitchen garden.
ment will be closed for our Annual
Advocate Co. 19.7.62—10n. | Pirticulars: Phone 4620. 27.7,52—-30 | Stock-taking from July 29th to Sist. Inspection any day. Telephone os
—— —— ———S— Cr ror 24.7.52—3n. 26.7.52—2n
NEOUS MIX MASTER—Pratically new. Gan be . -
MISCELLA seen at the Courtesy Ferage omce: NOTICE AUCTION
7.9—1n
TO RENT |
HOUSE,—From ist September. Com- MASO eataaee | Wednesday 30th July at 1 p.m. at 6th
fortable House 3 bed and Usual rooms. LIVESTOCK Applications are invited for one | Avenue, Peterkins Land, Boarded and
Fur (without crockery and linen). | — puamestiieinaalagies — | Albion” Lodge (Foundation) Scholar- | Shingled House 16 x 9 x 8, kitchen,
Garden space. Sea Coast preferred but} GOATS,—Two Goats fresh in milk.| ship tenable at Combermere School, as | Closet and palings. Land can be rented
elsewhere considered within 5 miles Hast-| Apply Harold Weatherhead, Fontebelle. | from the term commencing September |*)\“! ner month. Terme CASH on fall
stati fail particu able oe ent ey 2. tin. | 1952 i of hammer. R. Archer McKenzie
stati ull particuiats | a = a ee 7pm Each lication must be for the child | 27.7.52—3n
Box "XX, C/o Advocate jyortieee JENNY DONKEY—Not 2 years oid. | or emt palative of a Freemason in| ~— $$$
Dept: .7,52—3n Apply Mrs. a Ginpase, Folkestone. | straitened circumstances. | To be on manos on eee
at ames. leph » 0117. sse next 3lst July at x Dairy ‘arm,
WANTED: Friends and general public “cha ving oo 1.52—1n 9 tee cateate “ ag cape ed | Hothersal Turning: 21 heads ot Dairy
to ow of my new economic andp ooo 69, will be received up to July 30th. Cows and one pedegree Holstein Bull.
convenient Taxi Service at Holborn PUPS—-4 Bull-Terrier pups no reason- ” . R. D. MURPHY 26.7.52-—2n .
aoe driver cars tor periods of dave | 2° offer refused. Apply Cuthbert E ; 28.7. 89—2n
ew self- nan" 3 ) ser » .
Weeks, Or months at tates uncompared | *°#ers. Near Hices, St, aiaae 7.50—1n F UNDER THE DIAMOND
Chauffer driven cars at the rate o! NOTI HAMMER
4c. per mile. Give me your business and PUPPIES —Pedl : olen PARISH OF CHRIST CHURCH By instruction’ recetseds from: ates.
be satislied, Tel. 3723 ; rue: Seneea? ') “Applications for the post of Inspector |» Y YyStructions received tron
27.7.52—1 Apply: Alston Landscape, St. OMas. | oF Pp il bi ived by the Church I will sell at her house
Bt. 7. See $7.7.88—In, | OF Foor e regety y the Church= | “Ebenezer”, Bank Hall Road, on Wednes-



OFFICE,—Small Office with Telephone



Required to Rent. City centre, Details to

Box A.Q,, Advocate Advertising Dept.
25.7,.52—3n.

$62.50 POCKET MONEY easily earner
by eens 25 new guvetnes te
REDIFFUSIO one month,

; n 1.7.52—6n

REDIF FUSION offers $1.50 cash fo

each new Subscriber recommended b

you. 1,7,.82—6n
SUPPLEMENT YOUR COME >»
recommending REDIFFUSION. _Obtair

full particulars from the REDIFFUSIO?
office 1.7,52—6n

TWENTY- DOLLARS extra Bonu
from Rediffusion for 28 recommenda
tions in one calendar month

1.7 52—6r



ee

Public Official Sale

(Phe Provost Marshals Act Lo0t
(1904-6) & 30)
On Tuesday, the 12th day

1982, at the hour of 2 o'clock in th

of August

afternoon will be sold at my office

the highest bidder for any sum ne
under the appraised value:

All that certain piece of Land cor

taining by admeasurement 10.0674» Squar
Feet situate at Station Hill in the Paris
of Saint Michael, butting and boundin
on lands now or late of S.° Peer, ¢
lands now or late of Thomas Cobhan
on lands of one Moore, or lands now ¢
late of one J. F. Bellamy, on lands nov
or late of Elizabeth Moore, on land
formerly of Clarence Lowe, but now
R. L. Hutson and on the Public Rea
knowf as Station Hill or however els
the same may abutt and bound togethe
with the dwellinghouse and = appur
tenances thereto &c., appraised a
follows:—~ : 5

The whole property appraised to sI>
THOUSAND DOLLARS (96,000.00)

Attached from R, L. Hutson for an
towards satisfaction, &c

N.B.—25% Deposit to be paid on da
of purchase.

ote HEADLEY.
Provost Marshal.
Provost Marshal's Office
24th July, 1952 , ‘
27.7


















Under the Auspices
of

THE BARBADOS WORKERS’
UNION

and the

BARBADOS iABOUR
PARTY

in honour of

MR. N. W. MANLEY

QC., MER.

Labour Leader,
Jamaica
on

Sunday, 27th July 1952
; At 830 p.m.

At
QUEEN’S, PARK



Guest Speaker - - -
Mr. N. W. MANLEY,

Other Speakers - - -
Mr. G. H. ADAMS,
C.M.G., M.C.P.

Hon. T. A. MARRY-
SHOW, M.E.C.,
Grenada.





warden Mrs. H. A. Talma, Welehes Christ
Church, up to 3 p.m. on Thursday, July
Bist 1952.

day next 80th July beginning at 12
o'clock her entire lot of household furni-
ture which includes:— (1) Piano by

MECHANICAL





ce Terms of Appointment obtainable from PP.

CHILD'S TRICYCLE Full sizer Excel. |the Patorhial Treasurer. 19.7.62—4n | Hecustein, Morris chairs, rockers, sitting
ent model, Little used. Phone Bellamy. and records, tip top table and 4 chairs,
1968) 27.7.52—31: ' tea trolley, waggon, Larder, Mahog.
CYCLESLimited Mier of” Gent NOTICE cabinet, Apex refrigerator, _ scales,
eles $60,00 each, K. J. Hamel-Smith & PARISH OF ST. JON screen, clock, Mahog. bedstead with
%.. Lta ‘Bridge Street. Applications in writing and in person| *pring and mattress, presses, book

Oo

ny kind of filing record
mn and

lial 5136. . .
Lower Broad Street.



picughs.

Phone










Q.Cc.,.M.H.R. «4
|

All this equipment in stock, Phone 4316,









shelves, mirrors, electric stove and oven,
oil stove and oven, kitchen tables,
vacuum cleaner, (1) goat (8 pts. when
fresh) glass ware, kitchen utensils and
other items of interest. TERMS CASH.
D'Arcy A. Scott, Auctioneer.

for the post of a Special @Nurse tor the
Almshouse, St. John, will be received
E. B. Carter, P.M.O. up to the
st, 1952. Applicants must be
id-Wives and not more than
20 years of age. Appointments for inter-
views may made by telephoning
95—225; recommendations if any, should
be produced. The salary to be $60.00)
per month, inclusive of C. of L.B

and ration allowance of $21.60 if not
in residence at the Almshouse. The
successful applicant to assume duties on
the 25th August, 1952.

By order of the
BOARD OF POOR LAW GUARD2ANS
FE St. John.








23.7,.52—6n

FILING SYSTEMS—Complete range
shannon filing and card systems: for
‘ome, office, or business. Supplies for
keeping. Come
your requirements or
Hunte & Co., Ltd

22.7,52—6n.

INTERNATIONAL Harvester Equip-
nent—Subsoil ploughs complete with
tandards. Little Genius %-Furrow

Green crop hay loaders with
tyres. Lister wings for ditching.

26.7.52—4n

UNDER THE SILVER
HAMMER

On Tuesday 29th by order
Executors to the Estate of Mrs.
Knowles we will
“The Midget", Palm
which includes.

Round Tip Top Dining Table, Upright

discuss





of the
Rosie
sell the Furniture at

ubber Beach, Hastings,

OLE & CO. LTD. 26.7.52-—3n























Signed, R. S. FRASER, Clerk. | Chairs, Book Case with Escritoire and

SEWING MACHINE—One (1) Treadle 26.7.52—3n | Glass {Doors; Lovely, Cheffonier inlaid
Sewing Machine with embroidery parts} ~ Wancig Wouline: Wrath ae eee rea
thio Rite’ Upper Git Ra ae PERSONAL Mant and Cord cables) ail’ tn old. Mae
Rio Rita MB CE ie I. wid hogany: M.T. Tables, Folding Card
: Tables; Settee and. Upho!s, Rocker, in

The public are hereby warned against | Oak s & China, Dinner and Tea

POULTRY giving credit to my wife, Winifred Cot-| Services, Very Handsome Military Chest

tle (nee Watson) as I do not hold myself|of Drawers with Brass Fittings, Single

PIGEONS—A few pairs Black Caru®]tesponsible for her or anyone else con-| Pine Bedstead with Vono Springs and
ux Silver @& White Kings, P. D. | tracting any debt or debts in my name|/pDeep Sleep Mattresses, Mahog. and

Cedar Presses, Chest of Drawers, Large

Maynard, Porters, St. James. Dial 0119 | unless by a written order signed by me
Rees i 26.7.52—6n. Sed. RUFU











iS COTTLE, Three Wing Mahog. Press. Sewing

aes ee Machine, Mirrors, Linen, Ping Bong Set.

’ t ndrew . Books, Electric Fan; Larders, 2 Burner

MISCELLANEOUS 26,7.52—2n. | Klee. Hot Plate, G.E.C. Refrigerator.

ANTIQUES of Acai Gian 2 Burner Oil Stoves and Oven; Pavetern

of every description, 88, Utensils and Tables, Scales, Anthurium

‘hina, old Jewels, fine Silver Water- Lost & FOUND and Amaysilis, Lillies and numerous

siours. Early books, Maps Autographs " other items of value. This Furniture is

te., at Gorringes Antique Shop adjoining both Antique and Modern, Sale 11.30
toyal Yacht Club. 3.2. tin, o’elock. Terms CASH.

eae eeeS LOST BRANKER TROTMAN & CO.

CUSHIONS,—-With Imported Spring-
*iNed Units,—finished in Domestic, ready
or Tapestry Cover at $8.00 each, Will be
old in lots of not less than 4. Apply:-—





Auctioneers
PIN—Platinum_ bar Pin with safety
catch, with one Pear! in the centre, held

24.7.52—2n











the Standard Agency (B’dos) Co, 14) in. place with smail diamonds. ndly

swan Street, Dial 3620, 26.7,62—In, | return to Advocate and me gene ., UNDER THE SILVER
CHEMICAL EXTRACT—Here’s some- | —————— HAMMER

thing for Race Horse Owners -- | _ SWEEPSTAKE TICKET—Series O 8110

CHEMICAL EXTRACT — an antiseptie | Pinder lease return same to Gordon On THURSDAY, Sist by order of Mr
embrocution for Sprains, Stiff Joints, | Shepherd, Prince of Wales Ra., Bank! pred Bennett we will sell his Furniture
Swellings, Sore Shoulders, Muscular | Hall 27.7.52—1n | 6 No, 1 Bungalow, B’dos Distilleries,
trains ete, etc. Price 5/- bt. KNIGHT'S | — Ti ese aaa Black Rock, which includes



Sideboard, Upright Chairs, Morris Chairs,
Ornament Tables, Waggon all in Mahog-

a Pine Dini Table, Sette and 2
MISCELLANEOUS 1 “naires in Rubee Rockers and Chairs;

Congoleum, Glass and China, good Clock;



FORKS—Agricultural Forks made oft
he Best Steel and the right pattern abt
The Auto Tyre Co , opposite

5 20



he Cathedral, Spry Street, “THYMOL EMULSION” is highly re- | Painted Double Bedstead Vono Spring
27.4.52~6N | commended for expelling Red and other | nd Mattress; Dressing Tubles,. Canwne
et orms from Horses and Foals, Price Single Mahog, Bedstead ono

sand Mattress; Chest of Drawers;
Washing. Machine; L.B.C, Re-
rigerator, Kitehen Utensils and Tables;
Burner Valor Oil Stove and Oven;
Plymouth Rock and other Powls; Rabbits
ind pens; Bicycle, Garden Tools, also a
5-Burner Perfection Oil Stove with built
in Oven and other items.

Sale 11.30 o'clock

$e . " Ww.
GAS RANGE-—One table model Gas —_ HT'S

with three jets and one Grill $76 OF eee gn
2308, 27.7.52—1n |

WEDDING GIFT—A few troning board
and No-cord iron sets, subject to special
gift allowance. Barnes &

Ce., Ltd.

Obtajnable at

Range










TERNATIONAL TORNADO K.39.
275.00 nearest Owner leaving Island. A
nquiries, Yacht Club. 27 .7.52—1n. 3.7.52—t.f.n.

ance
IF you want a good absorbent dressing | yAWL “FRAPEDA”. Excellent con-



















SKuretra, “mwae Sy Sty Sone | RR ST Bittle | DRANK ER, ett an
Hewitt Lid. Price 5/- box. Byers 20. bi 20.7.52—6n. | a 27.7. 52—2n
ke OE AE Ahi acaba 2 | SSE
Be fone) pet ae ake LN Plants. Nurse, ee tot & 5. William Skeete, Wesiey | 5
r3.ap-n. fe Maa ee NOTICE

RECORDS Clearing all stocks of 78

R.P M. Records at 3 for $1.50 at Da { "
Costa & Co., Ltd. Electrical Departinetis. IMPORTANT NOTICE CAPTAIN, OWNERS OR AGENTS,
“SILK POPLIN _V Eh ahi quality a, Please note that the gas supply $} pene Me axe re

zrey and blue 36 inches wide at 72 cents will be cut off from 1.30 p.m. to debt or debts contracted by any



















ard at Kirpalani, 27.7,52—In, about 3.00 p.m. each day, ex- member of the crew of this vessel
cept on Saturday and Sunday, be- while in port
SUBSCRIBE now to the Daily tween Rockley and Top Rock :
Telegraph, England's leading Daily News- @:eas, commencing on Monday R. M. JONES & COMPANY,
paper now arriving in Barbados by Alr 28th July. LIMITED
only a few days after publication ry } Agents
London, Contact Ian Gale, C/o. Adyo-|@ THE BARBADOS GAS COMPANY, M.V. GLORIA MARIA
‘te Co. Ltd, Local » Representative , 46.7, 52—6n
Tel, 3118, 17.4.52—t.i.n =
£ ,| LPRSSTSPOS POO OO PIII OOO,
EXAMINATION NOTICE MODERN HIGH SCHOOL = & x Ss
eroal THE ENTRANCE exaAM- 3 A MI. WEBB 3}
Next LP.S. Shorthand INATION % x ; rt 2
Exam. takes place on Satur- for School Year 1963, com- 3% Stockbroker. $
day, August 2nd, 1952, at mencing September 1952 ¥ ° eillaietcuiie x
Combermere at 11 a.m. will be held on Wednesday, % % BARBADOS INVEST- %
Next Typewriting Exam. 30th July, commencing at $$ ‘MERTS IN BONDS x
takes place on Saturday, 9 am. f XR "AND SHARES : %
August 30th, 1952, at Com- The entrance and exam- $ PN eae . %
ermere. ination fee of $2 payable on ¥)$ BR a y .
' : is office is cl f
A Cc. B. ROCK, the morning of the examin- % % ue a . , ath he r pace tg x
Sole LP.S. (Pitmans) ation is returnable if the x q ea Sat x
Representative, @ pupil does not gain admis- R)g 7S “e" : xz
Oistin Hill, Ch. Ch. % sion. X|X 33, Broad Street, Bridge- ¥
c § o1¢ s
22.7.52—2n, } % L. A. LYNCH. : s town.
Ng OOOO S SOO OOO CS SE g SSODSSSS SOS FOSS SOSSIOSD









r

to the School
15th 1952 at 9.15 a.m.

ADVOCATE
PURLIC SALES |

REAL ESTATE

1. ADAMS, Karnetto Cecilia

2. AIMEY, Dorian Yvonne

3. ALLEYNE, Celestia Oriandine

4 ALLEYNE, Selma Leotta

5. AUSTIN, Mary Adele

6. BAYLEY, Marva Oreitha

7. BELLE, Alpha Veronica

8. BENTHAM, Marva Elaine

9. BEST, Ruby Eunice

10. BIBBY, Patricia Elaine

11. BLACKMAN, Dorothy Maureen
BANE, Noreen Elmira

13, BUTCHER, Ina Elrita
CALLENDER, Edlin Valda

15. CALLENDER, Ruth Eileen

6. CORBIN, Cicely Veronica’

1. COX, Myrtle Yolande

18. CRAIGG, Peggy Annette

CRICK, Marva June

DOTTIN, Monica Verina

ELCOCK, Lorna Avashni

FORDE, Brenda Jayce

GARNES, Monica

GOODING, Marjorie Hazel

GRIFFITH, Pamela Ethel

HOLDER, Dawn La Payette

HOWARD, Claudine Sylvester

HOYTE, Patricia Bureta

HURLEY, Mersada Alita

LASHLEY, Noreen Hyacinth

. LORDE, Florence Victoria

MOSELEY, Maurva Oneta

REED, Norma Eileen

SANDIFORD, Joan Patricia

SKEETE, Gwendene Erneathea

SMALL, Verna Ariene

SPRINGER, Aileen Alinda

EDUCATIO!
St. Michael's Girls’ School |

Rewlis of the Entrance Examination for
the Year September 195%— July 1953 .





An |

sense, ha

have.

or ever



FOR



Ticket No, 7.

PCPIF AOE

Ré-opens Tues
2nd, 1952. Near 1
Rd., St. Michael,
dren to this
where we shall

tion and the Lon
Commerce

One scholarship
to your children.

Apply

snasesiinliinenapeetiieapiiee nanan stile SA TAT

any

p.m

TALKING
j No Englishman has any common
will
Bernard Shaw.



Tuesday,
Saturday between



POINT

d, or ever



SALE

Held at St. Michael's Girls’ Scheol on
June 6th, 7th and 9th. 1952 CAR-—One Hiliman Minx Car.
The following is the complete list of Latest model in perfect condition.
New Girls to be admitted to St. Mich- Frice reasonable Apply Cecil
ael'’s Girls’ School on Menday, Septem Jernmmott, 48, Tudor Street. Phone
ber Ith, 1982. 4563. 27.7.52—In

CLIFTON CHARLES

Ditinnchiecedoe:

LPL OES

27.7.52.—1n,

REGENT HIGH SCHOOL

day September
st Avenue, Pine
send your chil-

secondary school,

tutor them, for

the General Certificate of Educa-

don Chamber of

examinations.

is now available

Thursday,
10 a.m. and 2

THE PRINCIPAL.

27.7.52—1n

SSStStt See GSS SE SAERBNABERRESS

TUART, Cyrilene

FHOMPSON, Yvonne Jeanette
THORNE, Anita Felicia
TROTMAN, Monica Eusiyn
WALKER, Monica Caroline
WARNER, Deanna Winifred

. WATERMAN, Laureen Clotilda
WHARTON, Dolores Marietta
WILTSHIRE, Opal Patricia

. WORRELL, Harriet Patricia

P.s. The. Headmistress invites the
ayents/guardians of the above named
irls to accompany their daughter/wards
on Monday, September

27.7.52-—2n









What you need are the life-

to the full! You'll feel
ver, healthier witb . .

Silt

‘ei





GENERAL TONI



FOR SALE :
PIANO x
One German Piano.
‘Rich in Tone Quality.
Sturdy in construction. ¥
Beautiful in appearance. .
Attractively Priced. %
*CECIL JEMMOTT

:
48 Tudor St. ‘Phone 4563
27.7.52.—1n.
+



LEARN TO EARN
Thousands of L.S.C. Students

throughout the British Empire
have increased their salaries
through studying our eagy postal
courses in BOOK-KEEPING,

LAW, ECONOMICS, ete. Reduced
fees to overseas students Diplo-
mas awarded. Prospectus free.—
LONDON SCHOOL OF
COMMERCE

(Dept B.A.5) 116, High Holborn

London, W.C.I, England.





REX DAIRY FARM

HOTHERSAL TURNING
St. Michael

THURSDAY NEXT

Sist JULY
at 2 p.m.

We are instructed by Mr. L. C,
Hill to sell by Auction his herd
of twenty one Dainy Cows, one
pure bred Holstein Bull, Quantity
of Everite Sheeting and Mise,
Dairy Equipment.

Stock may be inspected day
prior to and morning of sale.

Cash on Fall of Hammer.

e
AUCTIONEERS

Joan 4. Biadon
& ce.

Phone 4640
Plantations Building.

MIRROR

giving vitamins and minerals
of YEAST-PHOS. Enjoy life
|

SEC-
RETARYSHIP, BUSINESS Of-
GANIZATION, | COMMERCIAL





1] west and a nice patio to the east.
Standing on approximately i%
acre of land

BLUE VISTA o
At Rockley New Road. Modern
three room bungalow with com-
bination living and dining room.
Lovely open gallery offering mag-
nificent view of Golf Course and
coast line. All built in cupboards
Garage and servants’ room down-
stairs. Going Cheap
WYNDOVER
At Mile and a Quarter, st
Peter. Another lovely heuse. 3
}

REALTORS LIMITED
OFFERS

BUNGALOW

At Rockley New Road: On ap-
proximately 1,900 square feet of
land. Magnificent view of Golf
Course,

Three bedrooms drawing
and dining room, kitchen. Down-
st 8: Garage, servant room with
bath and toilet and enough room



for laundry or workshop.
BUNGALOW

At Rockley New Road. Three
bedrooms, drawing and dining
room, modern kitchen, toilet and
bath. All built in cupboards,
Very close to Golf Course. The
last available spot at this very
popular residential area. Immedi-

ate possession
WYNDAL
At Rockley Partly stone and
lath and plaster comprising three
bedrooms, dining and living room,
toilet and bath, and a large gal-
lery The outbuildings comprise
Servants’ room and garage. Stand-
ing on approximately 10,000
square feet of land. This house
is very close to the famous Rock-
ley Beach,
BUNGALOW

At Graeme Hall Terrace. Very
attractively designed. Comprising
three bedrooms with toilets and
baths attached, dining and living
rooms, kitche: verandah to the



Bedrooms, dining
room, modern
hot and

room, living
toilets and baths,
cold water, Large ver-
andahs. Outstanding view to sea.
Extensive outbuildings
big garage, 2
laundry,
orchard

including
servants’

workshop.
with specially selected
fruit trees, The property has
been well. cared and is in excei-
lent condition. Immediate pogsses-
sion Very low price

COVE SPRING COTTAGE
Situate on the lovely St. James
Coast on 2 Roods 27 Perches of
land, having
bathing
three bedrooms,
ing and = dining
galleries on
Private bath
bedroom,
European
cold wat
kitchen,
ment

{rooms,
Extensive

its own private
Comprised of
separate draw-
rooms,
sides.

beach

open
Study.
and toilet to main
Seneral toilet and
yle bath with hot and
Modern
inspection by
only,

two





up-to-date
appoint-

BUNGALOW
At Codrington Hill. Good sized
two bedroom bungalow with small
Spare room, dining and drawing

rooms and closed gallery. Govern-
ment
stalled,

water, electric light in-

SYBSTAN

y Gardens. Three bed-
toilets and baths, com-
munal dining and living room,
pantry, kitchen and store room,
2 ‘servants rooms in yard with
toilet and bath Laundry room
end garage, This is a lovely
house offered at a competitive
price

At N

rooms,







CHURCHILL
At Maxwell's Coast Road. Three

bedrooms with running water
combination drawing and dining
room, modern kitchen, toilet and
bath. Good residential area. Ex-
cellent sea bathing. A sound in-
vestment at the very low reserve
price.

WYNDAL

At Rockley. Partly stone and

lath and plaster comprising three
bedrooms, dining and livigg room,
toilet and bath, and a large gal-
lery. The outbuildings comprise
servants’ room and garage. Stand-
ing on approximately 10,000
square feet of land. This house
is very close to the famous
Rockley Beach

BUNGALOW
Hall Terrace
attractively designed. Comprising
thyee bedrooms with toilets and
baths attached, dining and

At Grae



Very



rooms, kitchen, verandah to the
west and a nice patio to the east.
Standing on approximately “% acre
of land

ee ee

REALTORS Limited

REAL: ESTATE AGENTS
AUCTIONEERS
VALUERS

151/152 Roebuck Siceet,
Phone 4900



GLASS

Straight and Bevelled Edged

In an assortment of sizes, is now obtainable’ at

THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM

SSOOSSOSSSSSSSE666S85

Corner Broad and Tudor Sts.

SSSSSESSSE46SSSS8S8S66S56

J.D.7T. SPECIAL RUM
THE RUS4

(With the distinctive flavour)

Is

A MUST AT EVERY PARTY

TRY THIS UNIQUE BLEND.



Blended & Bottled by

Dial 4335



——o3Q i





- Taylor & Sons.





Ltd.

Roebuck Street.





=,



PLLA PO EEF
The Bicycle Raffled in

Aid of FIELD JEWELRY
STORE has been won by



‘SHIPPING NOTICES

SUNDAY, JULY 27, 1952

ROYAL NETHERLANDS



LADY

CANAD
LADY
CAN.

CANAR ceaUmNoms BBE

NORTHBOUND



STEAMSHIP CO.

SAILING FROM EUROPE
M.S. NESTOR 25th July 1952
S.S. BOSKOOP Ist A 1952
M.S. BON. 8th
M.S. STENTOR 22nd
SAILING TO
WILLEMSTAD

The M.V. MONEKA will accept
Cargo and Passengers for Domin-
ica, Antigua, St. Kitts, Nevis and
Montserrat Sailing on the 26th
July 1952.

The M.V. CARIBBEE will Ac-

t Ca gers
AND BRITISH GUIANA Tminics” Antigua, St ists,
a Skea sa tee Pie Nevis and Montserrat. Sailing date
MS. STENTOR 5th 1952 yh ee
SAILING TO AND





B. NERS’
BOSKOOP 8th August 1982 SOCIATION (INO)
SAILIN' D Comniganey

Tele. —t 0 t=

G TO TRINIDA
SCHIE 28th July 1962.



Canadian National Steamships



SOUTHBOUND

Ri





E

Arrives
Barbados 'b:
7 Aug.

15 Aug.
28 Aug.
5Sept. 1
15 Sept. 1
30 Sept.
6 Oct
19 Oct. 2€

>> p>
eee

For further particulars, apply to—





* Barbados Anateui Boxing Assn. 3



GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD.—Agents.







Under the patronage of
CANADA DRY :

' Invite
Entries for the 1952 CHAMPIONSHIPS
to be held at

THE MODERN HIGH SCHOOL STADIUM

during the month of August at a date to be announced later
Champic 1s will be contested in the fo divisions;
it under 112 lbs.



Bantamweight a ee
Tigntwn :: ae
Welterweight Seas, aS Sas :
Middleweight ses ee RN
Light Heavyweight—- , 175 ,

— over 175

for Entry Forms any afternoon 4—5 p.m.





UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF THE WEST INDIES

EXTRA-MURAL DEPARTMENT
A LECTURE
sigs CUB ks
RECENT WEST INDIAN NOVELS
aay ax

PROFESSOR A. K. CROSTON

IN THE
HARRISON COLLEGE LIBRARY
me ON oe
FRIDAY, AUGUST 1ST
AT 8.00 P.M.

APMISSION Ses per

MODERN HIGH SCHOOL
Calling all PARENTS!

We would draw to your attention the following points:—



fa) Former pupils of this school are to be found in the Civil Service.
The elementary Teaching Service, Teaching at Secondary Schools,
The State Nursing Service, Messrs Cable & Wireless, The local Con-
stabulary, local Business Houses. C.P.I.M, (Curacao); New York
University, Student nurses at English hospitals and other places of
employment too many to enumerate.

EVERY ONE of our many certificated alumni is employed:—

You cannot fail to have noticed our academic results annually

you know that for four consecutive years we have been Cham-
pion Boys’ School at Athletics in the annual B.A.A.A. Championships;
unbeaten at Basketball for the 1951 season in our Division; runner-up
for two consecutive years at local Table-Tennis Championships?

At this school your child can take any examination for which
he,she is capable including the Barbados Scholarship as we have
been declared eligible to take its examinations by the Oxford &
Cambridge Examination Board.

We educate more pupils free annually than does the Govern-
ment in any of its schools. This is done parthy through the generosity
of the Commissioner free who permits us to run an annual prize«
drawing for this spec purpose, This is the only form of Assistance
these underprivileged children receive.

Call, telephone 2846 or send for waiting-list form for school year
1953 commencing September 1952. On the result of the entrance
examination we will award six or more free scholarships; lunch, bus-
fare, and uniforms given in proven necessitous cases; at end of school
career we guarantee ethployment to any scholarship pupil completing
the course.

(b)
{e)

(d)

te)

(f)

L. A. LYNCH, Principal.

— REAL ESTATE
LAND
RENTALS

â„¢

RESIDENCES
INVESTMENTS



“This one is John M. Bladon’s listing looks as though it might
suit us. We had better call and have a chat with him as I know
from his reputation he will give us all the help he can and in any
case he usually has for sale everything worth having.”

e

JOHN M. BLADON & CO.

A.F.S., F.V.A.

Phone 4640. Plantations Building.





SSSSSOS + SOCSSSIOGSOSSSS





Intending Competitols are asked to call at Modern High School







Mis.

SUNDAY, JULY 27, 1952

Research In The Caribbean



@ From Page 9
the Caribbean has been very
fortunate within this century to
have welco:nea within its fron-
tiers several highly specialised
organisations-

In Trinidad there is the
Imperial College of Tropical
Agriculture, the Colonial Micro-
biological Ressarth Institute, the
Caribbean Medical Centre, the
Commonwealth Bureau of Bio-
legical Control, Dr. William
Beebe’s naturalist research sta-
tion at Arima, and, of course,
the experimental laboratories ot
Trinidad’s industrial south.

In other parts of the Carib-
bcan, British and _ otherwise,
Twentieth Century, gevegeen has
been equally servéd by such
institutions as the Station des
Recherches Agronomiques des
Antilles et de la Guyane. Fran-
caise, the Institut des Fruits et
Agfumes Coloniaux Station
Regionale des Cultures Fruitieres
des Antilles, the Service Mete-
orologique du Groupe Antilles-
Guyane Francaises, the Pasteur
Institute (all of which operate in
the three French Departments):
the Netherlands Natural Science
Study Group; the Agricultural
Experiment Station of the Uni-
versity of Puerto Rico, a very
elaborate organisation; the U.S.
Rockefeller Foundaticn, the
School of Tropical Medicine,
Puerto Rico; the British West
Indies Sugar Producers’ Associa-
tion and its local member
asSociations; the B.W.I, Centra?
Sugar Cane Breeding Station,
Barbados; the Central Cotton
Station, Empire Cotton Growing
Corporation, Antigua; the Uni-
versity College of the West
Indies, Jamaica; the Institute of
Jamaica; and the Colonial Devel-
opment and Welfare Organisa-
‘tion,

The stress, it would seem from
these names, is still on agricul-
tural research, Rightly so, for
agriculture is the main economic
basis for most of the archipelago,
for some of us, our very
existence.

Crops are always menaced by

new Giseascs, and it is unneces-
sary to remind a West Indian
reading public of the threat of
the Mosaic disease to sugar, of
Panama disease to bananas,
Witches’ Broom to cacao, the
“unknown” disease of coconuts,
or scale on citrus.
* To mention the work being
done on but one of these crops,
the Yearbook of Caribbean
Research lists no fewer than 16
separate projects aiméd at im-
proving the citrus industry.

Not only dre these investiga-
tions trying to conquer disease,
scab, scale, and insects, but
things like rootstock trials, the
control of pre-harvest drop, the
propagation of new and better
species, improvement of bud-
ding methods, determination of
varieties suitable to particular
conditions, citrus manurial trials,
and the control of tree ants, all
of winich will yield results in
terfis of money to the citrus
growers, are being carefully
studied,

These projects are taking place
in Jamaica, Puerto Rico, Sur-
inam, Trinidad and other citrus
territories, and the. scientific
liaison made sible by such a
survey as the Yearbook will un-
doubtedly mean the pooling and
collating of ideas, findings and
solutions, to the betterment of
the Caribbean as a whole.

The same sort of thing goes
for other fields of research
activity. I)r. Wharton, of British
Guiana; Lr. Mackay of Chaca-
ehbacare, Trinidad; and Dr.
Montestruc of Martinique, have
all done leprosy research, the
results of which are available to
all leprosaria; Dr. i work-
ing for the British juna Sugar
Producers Central Medical
Laboratory, has made George-
town safe from malaria, and his
methods are there for others to
examine; the Pasteur Institute
has done considerable work in
the French islands and Cayenne
on tuberculosis, typhoid, rickett-
sial diseases, filaria and other
illnesses,

The real value of a research







exams, Distance is no disadvantage.

crmiaaton) free rom
WOLSEY HALL,

” ”

No. 9 High St.



1





—



HOME-STUDY COURSES FOR

GENERAL CERTIFICATE of EDUCATION
CAMBRIDGE SCHOOL & HIGHER SCH. CERT.

tions; Ee he Cankce laser” Beareees A.

se enim, rom

PITMAN’S SHORTHAND INSTRUCTORS
ii KEY TO SHORTHAND

: Also :
THE TEACH YOURSELF BOOK SERIES

ROBERTS & CO.,

Your Stationers,

PAINT
REMOVER

4 pt Tins — 83 ¢
1 pt Tins — $1.55

Now obtainable from

cenerAL FARDW ARE corecirs

{| RICKETT STREET (Opposite Post Office)



programme is often intangible
and more often invaluable. Its
“true impaet in the improvement
of agriculture, or health, or
education, li¢s in the transfer-
ence of its findings to the country
in general,

Unfortunately, the time lags
between investigation and im-
plementation is often such that
the latfer comes as a matter of
course, its original cause for-
gcttcn, The results of research
are thus often not recognised
when seen, and research, as such,
earns a bad reputation as head-
in-the-clouds impractical dream-
ing.

That this is not so, we only
have to remember the story of
John R. Bovell. The sugar
authorities laughed at Parris in
1859; they blessed Bovell in 1900
when the new cane varicties,
with their better yields, saved
them from bankruptcy as sugar
prices fell,

Res@arch may net solve all our
problems, but it will improve our
production, our health, our edu-
cation. In other words, research
spells a high standard of living.
Let’s welcome and support it.



Japan Wants Freer
Trade Movement
With Red China

WASHINGTON, July 25.

Japanese sources said on Friday
that Japan will ask for a relaxa-
tion of the bans on its trade with
Communist China when the In-
ternational Trade Policy meeting
opens here next week.

Representatives of the United
States, Britain, France, Canada,
and Japan will meet on Monday
to start talks on increasing co-op-
eration on export control policy
regarding trade with Communist
areas, especially in the Far East.

“Japan is discriminated against
in trade with China” a Japanese
official said. “Japan should like to

be placed on an equal footing
with other powers.”
He explained that the _yestric-

tions on Japanese trade with the
mainland were set up under a law
passed during the occupation pe-
riod. They conform closely to a
very strict list on banned goods
followed by the United States, and
Japan has been respecting this
list scrupulously. Other countries
such as Britain and France, how-
ever, follow a more lenient list-
ing of banned items set up by the
United Nations, he said, and this
gives
Japan in its limited trade with
Red China.—wU.P,



FLOODS DRIVE WILD

BEASTS FROM FOREST

CALCUTTA, India, July 25
Wild elephants and tigers, driv-
en from the forests by floods, are

terrorizing the villages in Assam, P

reports from that area said on
Friday. Reports said that the ele~
phants have demolished houses
and damaged crops and trees and
killed two women, Tigers are re-
ported to haye mauled three per-
sons, Armed police reinforcements
were sent into the area today.





M

Schooner
Mary
Schooner Enterprise S
dent I

Schooner
Smith

Cc

dalay

Ni

M.V
Schooner

SEA AND AIR
TRAFFIC

In Carlisle Bay

Schooner
ary E. Carolin

M. Lewis,

G Se!

lara, M.V

nN. M.S

Lady

Frances W

Sunlight,
Schooner Triumphant Star
Daerwood,

Noeleen,
e, Schooner
Smith

Schooner
Emeline
‘ Schooner
Schooner Zita’ Wonita
Sehooner Cont
Rainbow M
Schooner Cyril FE
MV
Man-
Barre

hooner

Schooner
Maniuy, Gulf

oO. 2, Tug Willett, Schooner Cloudia §

Terra Nova

Wonderful Counsellor,

a, Schooner May Olyre,
Motor

Vessel Moneka, Schooner Marea Henr'-

etta, Schooner At Last, ss, Statesman
M.V. Canadian Constructor, Schooner
Henry D. Wallace

ARRIVALS
M.V. Gloria Maria, 388 tons Capt
Rivas, from Maracaibo, Agents: Messr
R. M. Jones

DEPARTURES
S.S. Lady Rodney, 4,908 tons, Cap:
LeBlanc, tor St Vineent, Agent
Messrs. Gardiner Austin & Co., Ltd

Seawell

ARRIVALS

From Jamatea:

A
Ni

Croston,

Emanuel Bertr:
rthur Johnson,
orman Manley,

From Antigua:

el

Martin Blackby

s O'Neil

Alice Bowen, G

— BY BWHA

wd, George Brune
Leviston Wetlingto:
Yvonne George, Arthur
Lowe,

wne, Martha Manning

Morton Reingold, Clarence Payiie, Fran-

From Puerto Rico:

Smith,
Winfiekt Crichlow, Keith Lintor

R

Spencer, C
Smith, 1
ford, V

Margaret Seal,
Otway L,

Clari¢e Seal, Hermage

Wilkinson, Daisy iil

DEPARTURLS — B
for Trinidad: sey asta

C. Belle,
* Gibson,
Spe
Haynes,
Crawto

Sheppard
Por British Guiana:

Vv

B. Smith, M

Sir E,
0. Bellamy, D

Smith, M
Singh, M. King, .f

Dos Santos, J. Rahr,
Downie, B
neer, A. Pouchet, A
C. Crawford, L. Craw-
rd, John Miner, Peter

Snijders, R
Willems, A. Maoin,

Morris, M. Parker; W Baron; F
Baron, B. Ferreira, I Fernandes, W.
Kingston, Doris Prowell, E Goodridge,

F. Goodridge, G. Goodrick

them an advantage over jo:

Harry Harris,



V. Vezina, R. Kowlessar
ie , , . ‘
RATES OF. EXCHANGE:
26th July, i962
Selling NEW YORK Buying
73 1/10 pr. Cheqties on
Bankers 71 4/10°%% pr
Sight or Demand
ba Drafts 71 2/10% pr
72 1/10% pr. Cable ee vhs
71 6/10% pr Currency 69 9/10% pr
. Coupons 69 2/10% pr
60% pr Silver 20% pr
CANADA
78 9/10% pr. Cheques on
Bankers 77 1/10% pr
Demand Drafts 76.95 % pr
Sight Drafts 76 8/10% pr
78 9/10 pr. Cable ‘
77 4/10% pr. Currency 75 6/10°) pr
Coupons 74 9/10 pr
40% pr Silver 20% pr

4.00—7.15

Listening Hours

SUNDAY,

— 19.76m.,

JULY 27, 1952

26.53m



4.00 p.m. The News, 4 10 pm Inter

and Interlude, 700 p m
p.m. Home
7.1—10.45

Jude, 4.15 pm For
430 pm
From The Bible, 5 15 pm
Arthur's Inn,
Magazine, 6 45 p m

Sunday
m
ews

p.m.

he Common Good,
HMalf-Hour, 5 00 p m
Verdi, 5-45
615 pm. English
Programme Parade
The News, 7.10
From Britain

25.54m,, $1.32m

715 pm Caribbean Voices, 7.45 p m

reel,
845 pm



Sunday Service, 815 pm Radio News-
830 ph Communism

In China

Interlude, 8 55 p.m. From The
Editorials 9 00 p.m Henry Wood Prom-



enade Concerts, 945 pm Olympic
i —U.P. Report, 10 00 p m. The News, 10 10 p.m.
News Talk, 10.15 pm. London Forum,
10.45 p.m, The Authority Which ets
BUS FALLS INTO RIVER: ©",

- MONDAY, JULY 28, 1952

ISSING 10—7.15 pm. — 19.76m., 25.53m
3 DROWN, 19 M ee pm The News, 410 pm. The
aily Service, 415 pm A Tale of Two
MEXICO CITY, MEXICO, Cities, 445 p'm Take It Easy, 5 00 p.m
July 25. gree, pia m. Peter Yorke With His
f alon rehestra, 5 55 pm Interlude,
Three children were drowned 6°99) im Welch Miscellany, 6.15 pm
and 19 persons missing after a Listeners’ Choice, 645 pm Sports
bus overturned while attempting nee aoe Programme Parade, 7.00
to ford the Las Vegas river accord- From Buta’ 1° 2 '™ Honk News

ing to reports reaching here, The
accident occurred near the border
of Sinaloa on the Pacific coast.
Reports said 31 persons were in
the bus which swept down the

were rescued by soldiers stationed
nearby. Only the bodies of the
children were recovered.

—UP.


















ENGLAND

OXFORD



POCKET
DICTIONARY

INSTRUCTOR



Dial 3301



PHONE 4918

Fr

715 pm
Talk, 7 45 p

om Britain

m

T15—-10.30 pom, — t6.5tm., 31.9%m

Books To Read and Theatre
Ballads and Songs, 8.15

bm. Radio Newsreel, 8 30 p m African

- 7 Survey/# 8 45
river and overturned, Nine persons From ‘The Editorials,

Well To Tank, 945 p m

port, 10 00 p m

News Talk,
; Man, 10 45 p m



10.15









or ARE YOU
IF SO, ENROL NOW FOR ONE OF THESE COURSES.

Architectural

manship Building and

Design Course.
A.M.S-E., (Civil, Elec.,
and Mech.)
Automobile Repairman’s
Course,

Electrical Installation and
Wiring Course.

General Electrical Engin-
eering Course,

General Certificate of Ed-

ucation.

Write for full particulars if course is not mentioned, Hy}

Interlude, 8.55 p m

900 pm From
Olympic Re-

The News, 10 10 p.m
pm. The Health of

Montmartre Players

DO YOU REALISE THE NEED FOR MORE
QUALIFICATION?

INTERESTED

Draughts-

Write to the:

Caribbean Educational

nstitute

P.O. Box, 307, P.0.8.,

Agents for :

BRITISH INSTITUTE OF ENG.
TECH. & BRITISH TUTORIAL

Trinidad

INSTITUTE, LONDON

We beg to notify the public
that as from

JULY.
Our Address will be

Our Telephone No. remains
and our P.O. Box No.

D. L. JOHNSON

(THE UNITED BRITISH INSURANCE CO., LTD.)



THERE IS NO TOMORROW-—-POST TODAY! —



28th

iST FLOOR
BARNES’









BUILDING
BRIDGE STREET.

SUNDAY

Church Services
ANGLICAN

ST. PAUL

3 Dy Holy Cemmunion, 9.30
m. Solemn Masy & Sermon 3 pm
Sunday School & Children’s Service 7

p.m. Solemn Evensong, Sermon and
Procession ote
ST. MARY'S
TRINITY VT.

7.30 a.m. Matins 8 a.m. Low
Mass. 9.00 a.m. Solemn Mass and
Sermon, 3.30 p.m. Sunday School. 4.00
p.m. Children’s Vespers. 4.15 p.m
Holy Baptism. 7.00 p.m. Solémn Even-
ong & Sermor Preacher Rev. J
Dat Harewood, D_D From U.S.A

METHODIST

Speightstown Cireult
JAMES STREET -11 a.m. Rev, K. E
Tow ors, B.A... B.D 7 p.m, Rev, S. W. C.
Crosse

PAYNES BAY—9.30 a.m. Rev. K. E.

Towers B.A, B.D. 7 p.m. Mr. W.,
St. Hill om
WHITEHALL—$.30 a.m. Mr. Phillips
7 p.m, Mr, P. A. Deane
GILL. MEMORSAL—11 a.m. Mr. G,
Marper. 7 p.m. Rev. G. Sinkler.
HOLETOWN—8,30 a.m. Rev. F. Law-
rence. T p.m. Mr, D. Scott,
BANK_HALI-—9.30 a.m. Mr. J. T
Oxley. 7 p.m, Mr. Brathwaite
SPEIGHTSTOWN—11 a.m. Mr. Hi
Husbands. 7 p.m. Mr. G. Harper
SELAH—!I1_ a.m. Rev. F. Lawrence

8 7pm. P.M,
BETHESDA—3 p.m. Missionary Meet-
Mrs. K. E. Towers

T. EB. New

Chairman
Rev

ing
Speaker

Ebenerer Circuit

EBENEZER—9 a.m. Rev. S. W. C
rosse, 7 p.m. Mr. C. G. Reid
BEULAH—77 a.m. Rev. S. W.C. Crosse,
% p.m. Mr. J. Tudor

SREWSBURY—11 a.m Mr A. b.
Lucas, 7 p.m. Mr. EB. Brathwaite
RICES—11 a.m Mr oO. HW. Millar,
7 p.m. Mr. George Brathwaite.
Sunday Schools at 3 p.m.

Special Sunday August 3rd 1062; at
3.30 p.m

Beulah Church will rededicated after
Renovation. Doors will be, opened by

Mesdames F. Lawrence and S. W, C
Crosse. Rev. F. Lawrence will preach
the Sermon. Mr. Vineent St. John wil)
be Chairman. The Minister will perform
the Act of Rededication.

MORAVIAN
ROEBUCK STREET: 9 a.m
Service; Preacher: Rev E
7 p.m. Evening Service, Preacher:
E. E. New

Morning
Now
Rev

GRACE HILL: 11 am. Mérning Ser
vice, Preacher: Mr. O, R. Lewis; 7 pm
Evening Service, Preacher Mr s
Weekes

FULNECK: 11 a.m. Morning Service
(followed by Holy Communion) Preacher



Rev. E. E. New; 7 p.m. Evening Ser
vice, Preacher: Mr. F. G. Downes
MONTGOMERY: 7 p.m. Evening Ser
her: Mr. D. Culpepper
1BE: 7 p.m Evening Ser
vice, Preacher: Mr. F. Deane

SHOP HTLL Tpm. Evening Service

BETHEL METHODIST CIRCUIT

PREACHING APPOINTMENTS
Sunday, July 23th, ise

BETHEL: 11 am, Rev, T, J, Furtey
7 p.m, Mr. V. Pilgrim.

DALKEITH; 1i am, Miss Bryan;
pun, Mr. L Blackman, .

BELMONT: 9 am, Rev. T, J, Furley
7 pm. Mr. C. Brathwaite

STH, DISTRICT; 9 a.m. Mr. G. Bas
combe; 7 p.m. Mr L. Waithe

PROVIDENCE : 11 aim, Mr, D. Griffith

7pm _ Reception Service.
VAUXHALL; 11 am, Mr. G. Jones
7 p.m Mr J. Lovell: 3 pm. Mission

ary Meeting.

THE ST. JAMES NATIONAL BAPTIST
11 am, Matins and Sermon; 7 p.m
Evensong and Sermon, preacher for both
services, the Rev. J. B. Grant, L:Th
Minister in charge
4.30 p.m, Monday, Wednesday, Friday
training for youths, this will be con
ducted by the Rev L. Bruce-Clarke
(Assistent Pastor) and Mrs. Olga Brownc
THE SALVATION ARMY
FOUR ROADS: 11 a.m, Holiness Meet
ing; 3 p.m. Company Meeting; 7 p.m
Salvation Meeting. Mrs. Major 8, Morris,
BRIDGETOWN CENTRAL: 11) am
Holiness Meeting; 3 p.m, Company Meet-
ing; 7 p.m, Salvation Meeting. Sr. Cap-
tain W. Bishop

WELLINGTON STREET: 11 a.m. Moli-
ness Meeting; 3 p,m. Company a
7 p.m, Salvation Meeting. Sr. or

Gibbs,

OISTIN: 11 a.m, Holiness Meeting;
3 p.m. Company Meeting; 7 p.m, Salva-
tion Meeting. Lieutenant K. Gibbons.

DIAMOND CORNER: 11 a.m, Holiness
Meeting; 3 p.m, Company Meeting; 7
p.m. Salvation Meeting, Captain L
Moore,

PIE CORNER
ing; 3 p.m, Company
Saivation Meeting. Sr.
lingsworth

il a.m. Holiness Meet
Meeting; 7 p.m,
Major J. Hol-

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
First Chafrch of Christ, Scientist,
Bridgetown, Upper Bay Street,
Sundays 11 a.m. and 7 p.m,
Wednesdays 8 p.m. A Service which
includes Testimonies of Christian Science
Healing

SUNDAY, JULY 27, 1952
Subject of Lesson-Sermon: TRUTH.
Golden Text: 1 John 5:6. HM is the

Spirit that beareth witness, because the
Spirit is truth
The following Citations are tneluded
in the Lesson-Sermon
The Bible: Many,
are thy wonderful works whieh thou
hast done Psalms 40:5.
Science and Health with Key toe the

Scriptures,
by Mary Baker Eddy. $
Life, Truth, Love, combine as
are the Scriptural names for
No wisdom is wise but
no good is, but the
Page 275

O Lord my God,

Spirit
one,—and
God
His wisdom;
good God bestows.






SSS

IN MAKING MORE MONEY?
Sanitary Inspector Course-

General Agriculture
Course,

Insurance Practice.
Salesmanship.

Petroleum Technology
Course,

School Certificate Course,

Accountancy.

Civil Service

Course, }
Police Promotion Course |



Entrance






POST COUPON TO P.O.
BOX 307, P-O.S.

Please send me Free Book.
Name
Address ;
Subject of Career of
Interest
Age

1952

a

2422
167

So cng emrneentieeaenaiasititon santas






































$< ee



Applications are invited for the post of Road Construction Engi: -
eer, Public Works Department, St. Lucia, on a three-year contract, |

ADVOCATE



GOVERNMENT NOTICES



with salary in the seale $3,840 » $240--$4,800 per annum.

The applicant should fulfil the following requirements: —

(a) Qualified or have passed sections A and B of the Associate
Examination of the Institution of Civil Engineers:

(») Have had at least

five years experience in the construc-

tion of low cost roads; and

(c) Should possess a
equipment.

The commencing salary will be determined according to the |

working knowledge of road-making

experience and qualifications of the applicant.
A temporary cost of living allowance at the rate of $384 pe:

annum will be payable.

9

2.

withdrawal at any time.
3. The appointee will be required to keep a car Tor the proper

“performance of his official duties, and will be paid a basic travelling ,
allowanee at the rate of $192 per annum plus an additional mileage
allowance of 10 cents for each mite travelled on duty. .

4.

5.

6.

The allowance is subject to variation or

The appointment will be subject to Colonial Regulations and

Cost of passages for appointee and family (up to a maximum |
of 5) will be paid in first instance and on completion of contract
Unless person appointed relinquishes appointment before expiration |
of contract in which case return passages will not be paid.

local orders in foree and to taxation at local rates,

Applicants should furnish full details of qualifications and

experience, accompanied by at lx ist two testimonials and a certificate
of medical fitness, and should be addressed to reach the Acting Admin-
istrator, St, Lucia, not later than 15th August, 1952.

27.7.52—3n



Electrical Engineer, Government Electrical Inspector's
Department

Applications are invited for the vacant post of Electrical Engineer,

2.
annum.
$156 per annum is payable.

5.

6.

Government Electrical Inspector's Department, Barbados.

The post is pensionable with salary at the rate of $5,760 per
In admition a non-pensionable cost of living allowance of
Holder will be liable to the payment of
Widows and Orphans contributions at the rate of 4% of salary. No
quarters are provided. Passage expenses of officer and family not
exceeding $1,440 are payable on first appointment.
provided.
3.

Leave passages

Appointment will be made subject to medical fitness, and

will be subject to the Colonial Regulations and the local Civil Service
Regulations and instructions.
4.

Candidates should be under the age of 40 years and should

possess the following qualifications: —

Corporate Membership of the Institution of Eléctrical Engin-
eers, London, or equivalent qualifications, with at least five year:
experience in power electrical engineering since qualifying.

The holder will be required to take charge of all electrical
installations under Government control and be responsible for the
inspection of all non-official installations.

Applications should be submitted to the Colonial Secretary, |

Public Buildings, Bridgetown, not later than 12th August, 1952.

2.

5.

27.7.52—2n.



FOR SALE

Tenders are invited for the condemned Tug and Water Boat “Ida”
Length 76’, Beam 16’, Draught 8 6”-—-130 B.H.P., Coal burning
two cylinder reciprocating engine.

3. Tenders should be forwarded in sealed envelopes addressed
to the Colonial Secretary (and not to any officer by name) so kas to
reach the Colonial Secretary's Office not later than 4 pim. on Friday
the 15th of August, 1952, The envelope should be clearly mwrked—
“Tender for Ida”.
4. The sale of the craft will be conditional on its removal from
the Careenage within such period of time as shall be decided upon
by the Harbour and Shipping Master.

Further information

Shipping Master,

6. The Government does not bind itself to accept the highest
or any tender.







DEPARTMENT

is

obtainable from the Harbour and

27.7.52—2n,



OF EDUCATION

Applications are invited from teachers and other suitably quali-
fied persons for the vacancy at

9

3.

4.

5.





St, Matthias’ Girls’

School

The minimum qualification for entry to the teaching service
is a School Certificate.
Applications must be submitted on the appropriate forms
(E.35 (c) which may be obtained from the Department of Education

out candidates who have already submitted one of these forms in
respect of previous vacancies (now filled) may apply py letter ac-
companied by a recent testimonial .

Any teacher who applies for a vacancy on the staff of another

All applications must

BE

school must inform his or her present Chairman of Managers and the |
Head Teacher of an application for such a transfer,

be enclosed in envelopes marked

“Appointments Board’ in the top left hand corner and must reach |
the Department of Education by 9th August, 1952. Candidates are |
warned that canvassing may lead to their disqualification,

27.7,52,.—1n.



THRIFTY =

SHOP AT
G. W. HUTCHINSON & CO.,LTD.

‘or these Special Low Prices in



HOUSEHOLD
HARDWARE |

e
7-PIECE DECORATED



Lemonade Sets Set $3.86
Water Jugs ......... each 41
Tumblers 6 14
‘Cocktails ¥ 08
Refrigerator
BIOGETSS iaiiceiecisscsese, 59 85
Decorated
Tumblers .............. 30
Stainless Forks ...... i 74
+s Knives .... _,, 94
” Table
Spoons... ,,’ 74
Cups & Saucers... ,, 36
Plates (Soup) ....... ,, 44
» (Dinner)... ,, 40
SN ihc Istincsssthinacany > 56
Fry Pans .............. up 62
Saucepans (Milk) each .98
Enamel Pots » 2.99

G. W. HUTCHINSON
& CO. LTD.

Broad Street-——DIAL 4222 ;
DEEDES SNEDDON

| 9 O94-006-0-40006-0000606+ 5

PAGE FIPTEEN

acres mn aniretnetastateideesetese eee ee

OO SOG awe

© POEL OHO GPOO 8-0"

Convalesce ter

Hiness

ce al

TAKE

VINERGY TONIC WINE

THIS, TONIC WINE contaii oedium Glycerophos-
phate, Acid Glycerophos acid, and is ideally suited to
tone up tired nerves, enabling vou to sleep well and
wake up feeling refreshed

| Remember it’s a Tonic Wine

| VINERGY

Obtainable at .

BOOKER'S (80s) DRUG STORES LTD.

Broad STREET AND Hastincs (ALPHA PHARMACY)
e
NOTICE

| Please note that as from AUGUST Ist, 1952, our
DISPENSARY in Bridgetown will not be opened for
Business on “Sunday Mornings”.

For Urgent Prescriptions Dial 8289

oe

| Ot Uilt be caretul-thats
Mummys new radto set J,

Pn

DONT WORRY, JEAN.
ITS NOT A RADIO
SET AT ALL. ITS
REOIFFUSION — JUST
A LOUDSPEAKER wiTH|
A WIRE DIRECT To
THe Sti bpIO































THERE YOU ARE, BILL. RELAYED
STRAIGHT FROM THE STUDIK
BY WIRE. ITS PERFECT
LISTENING AND WONDERFULLY
CHEAP TO RUN. ,

HOW AMAZING, Mary /
IVE NEVER HEARO A
PROGRAMME SO CLEARLY
BILL AND | WOULD Love
IT BuT WEVE Gor
NO ELECTRICITY,



ITS AMAZING!
REDIFFUSION 1% JUST

VOU DONT MEER IT. THE JOB FOR US MARY. ||

JEAN. REDIFFUSI ON
SUPPLIES ITS Ow

CURRENT! WHY DONT
YOU BRING BILL IN

ONE NIGHT?
CAN HEAR IT FOR

HIMSELE XO

ie

4



REDIFFUSION

FOR WETTER LISTENING

Hear it at Trafalgar Street. |
|





Benen PRECESSION n

@y SAVING
CAMPAIGN










PPPOE LGSSE FDS OFF



Here's interesting news
Beginning at:

for Ladies and Gentlemen

N. E. WILSON & CO. on Saturday 26th and
continuing for ONE WEEK ONLY, a great Dollar-
saving Campaign.

There will be a huge assortment of real bar-
gains calculated to save dollars in your purse, Heré
are just a few of our numerous offers :~

FOR LADIES x

CGE LECCE LOO AEM AL itt tt LEIA AM tA,

x

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Usually Now %

Flowered & Figured Spuns per yd, $1.55 90c. %
Taffeta Plaids . oo ae 120. 8
Silk Plaids : ise 1.00 72¢: g
Finest quality Satin . aa ies 90 80c. >

is J (figured) ,, 1,86 « 1.08 %
Flowered Linens ve s 1.64 1,20 ~
Silk Shantung 40” wide Pa 2.28 200 »
Ribbed Georgette 3.15 2.90
Flowered Crepe 5 ange 2.81 2.50 =
Jersey Silk 50” wide _,, Mai ae 100 %
Plain Spun in many shades ... 1.09 49 »

é :
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|% Sea Island & Egyptian Cotton Dress x
1% Shirts by Elite ; 6.73 .@86. >
{% Regal Dress Shirts in attractive >
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Sor FLPIPS PSPSPS FLL FOOLS FPF PE SISO 09OS »





PAGE SIXTEEN

SUNDAY



Parent—Teachers’ Day
At St. Silas Girls’ School

Several pai
last Wednesday at Parent-
n. cuseu with the Hes
nd staif, subjects

Amon,
Educatior
of Education; Mr. L. T

those who

ents were present at St. Silas Girls’ Scheol

Teachers’ Day. Parents joined
1dmistress, Mrs. Elsa Spencer,

concerning the welfare of their children.
represented
were Mr. E. C. M. Theobalds, Deputy Director
Gay, District Inspector of Schools;

the Department of

Mr. O. Weekes, District Welfare Officer; and the Assistant

of Visual Aids to Education

OBITUARY :

Mr. ‘tT. S. Birkett

The death occurred on Thurs-
day last of Mr. T. Sydney Bir-

kett af “Wynthorp,” Belleville
A keen statistician, Mr. Birkett
nN ussociation with the late Mr.
L. T. Yearwood was responsible



for most of the authentic existing

records of Intercolonial as well
as local cricket.

Mr. Birkett is father of two
cricketing sons, well known in

nmiereoloniai and local creles. In
instance there is L. S
vine represented both

the first
Pi rket

Leinidad and Barbados in the
regular pre-war Triangular In-
te colonial Tourngments and the
Wes: Indies too in Australia in
1931 when ne was appointed vice-
captain to G. C. Grant

1 3rkett, Pickwick all
rounder, is the second cricket ng
son, He h been on the verge of
Intereelonial honow for ome-
time, but is invaluable to the
Pickwick C.C, as a first class all
roune ebub ericketer,

Mr... Sydney Birkett turned out

for the Pickwick Second XI in his
younger days but his chief con-
tribution’ was his recording of the
history of the game

In an article in the Sport sec-
tion of the Barbados Year Book,
entitled “Cricket in Barbados and
the West Indies, Mr. Birkett dnd

Mr. L. YT. Yearwood have made
a contribution to West Indies
cricket history that is unique, in

many respects, For example there

no other work in which one
could find at a moment’s notice
ihe name of the oldest Cricket
Club in the West Indies, which
these gentlemen place as King-
pton C.C. (Jamaica (1863).

The results of the first interco-
lonial matehes; the first English
team to visit the West Indies; the
first tour of the West Indies Cric-
ket tearh 1886 to Canada and the
U.S.A.; the formation of the West
Indies Cricket Board of Control
the First Local Competitions and
Cups, the Formation of the Bar-
bados Cricket Association and a
host of other valuable data, not
to be found if at all in any one
work in the West Indies, all bear
ample testimony of the high stan-
dard and industry which these
gentlemen obviously brought to
bear upon to what must ultimate-
ly have been a labour of love.

In addition to his two sons, Mr.
Birkett leaves to mourn their loss
his widow, Mrs, Winifred Birkett
og eerie, Mrs, Gladys Wafer.

o these sympathy wi Dp eX-
tendan pathy will be ex

Mrs. A. S. Hutsoat

_ ‘fhe death occurred at her resi-
dence Wendover, Brittons Hill, on
Friday-of Mrs. Alice Sarah Hutson
widow of Mr. Francis Hutson late
owner of Rock Hall, St. Peter,
She was 94. ;

Mrs. Hutson who was
daughter of the late George
Richards Challenor of Speights-
town Was a woman of quiet and
reserved manner, Erought up
according to the Victorian tradi-
tion, she never took part in public
lite but deveted all her energies
to the rearing of a large fan ly

the





of six sons and two dau®hter
Among these were Mr. Georgie
Hutson of Blackmans, and Hon
Frank Hutson of the Legislative
Council,

Her funeral attended by a
large gathering, took place at

St. Michael's Cathedral yesterday
afternoon,

To her’ bereaved relatives
aeepest sympathy will be ex-
tended

Foundation Old
Boys’ Association













who acted as Chairman.

Included on the programme
were songs by the pupils of the
school wko drew much applause
from the audience; their singing
was up to the standard expected





{ girls who had won prizes. at
the Singing Competition,

There was an Exhibition of
hancicrafts, drawings and paint-
ings, weaving and basketry
which was of a hi-h standard.

Miss L. V. Walcott and Mrs.
M. L. Robinson, Assistant Teach-

ers, had appealed to parents for
better co-operation ‘with the
teachers, as a means of further
progress in the school,

Headmistress’ Report

The Headmistress then gave
her reports, After welcoming the
parents she reminded them that
their children were their respon-
sibility, that they owed to them
a proper training and a _ good
education to fit them for life. She
pointed out the importance of the
meetings of parents and teachers
in ironing out the = difficulties
presented themselves both
in the home and at school, She
tressed too the importance of
good training at home and pointed
out that it was very much easier
for teachers to deal with the well
trained child, Finally she
expressed the hope that the
13 |. children would continue
longer in school and not be seen
idle in the district and that more
of them would join the Old
Scholars’ Association,

which

Mr, L. T. Gay = stressed
importance of parents training
their children and being fit

examples for them in the home.

the

Mey ee M. Theobalds
expressed pleasure at seeing so
many parenta present and at

their taking part in the discussion,

He then told parents of the new
kind of Secondary Education
which would start at the two new
pilot schools for pupils of 11 4

at Richmond Gap and advised
parents to make use of those
schools,
CRICKET :



Indians Bowl Out
Surrey For 71

‘From Our Own Correspondent)

LONDON, July 26.

Tony Lock, Surrey and England
slow left arm bowler’ who ap-
peared in the last Test at Man-
chester, was no-balled for throw-
ing three times in’a mateh against
the Tourists at the Oval _ today,
Spectators booed Price and Lock,
seemingly puzzled, spoke with the
Surrey Captain, Peter May, be-
fore bowling his next ball.

Altogether it was an entertain-
ing game of cricket for the large

crowd who saw the Indian pace.

bowlers Divecha and Ramchand
rout Surrey for 71. Divecha had 6
for 29 including the hat trick—
Whittaker, Laker and Bedser, The
Indians lost 6 for 95, but recov-
ered through Manjrekar (44) and
Ramehand (37) to gain first in-
nings’ lead of 108 and in the clos-
ing half hour they captured one
Surrey wicket for 19.

The best batting of the day was
by Cyril Poole who made 219 out

of Notts’ total of 337 against
Derby. It was his second double
century of: the season.
SCOREBOARD—

Indians vs. Surrey
Surrey...........71 and 19 for 1.
Indians 179—Loader 5 for 63.

Derby vs. Not's
Notts SN dae tabi eriitacite 6 337.
Derby............17 for no wickets.

Glamorgan ys. Essex
Glamorgan inahnn doe fore6.

Lancashire vs. Gloucester

Gloucester 266—J. Crapp 107.



ADVOCATE



CAUGHT IN BEAR-FACED ESCAPE PLOT



BACK IN THEIR CAGE at the Highland Park Zoo, Pittsburgh, are the
polar bears above after supposedly trying to dig their way out to free-
dom through a passage under the sidewalk. Attendants became sus-
picious when they noticed the animals huddling around one bear. He
was discovered digging away while the others acted as “lookouts.”
At left, Howard Hayes, assistant superintendent, crouches in the 10-

(International)

Crippled Killer
banged In Mostreal

MONTREAL, July, 25.

Genereux Ruest, 54 ~ year - old
crippled watchmaker from Quebec
was hanged here early on Friday
for his part in Quebec’s Bizarre
airlines murder case in 1949,

Puest suffering from Tuber-
culcsis of the bones and unable
to walk without support, was
taken in a wheel chair from his
cell to the scaffold in Montreal's
Bordeaux jail.

Ruest was convicted on Decem-
ber 19, 1950, of the murder of 22-
year-old Mrs. Rita Guay, killed
with 22 others when the airliner
she was travelling in blew up in

foot-long tunnel] after the escape was foiled.
qmcbiairtiee ate runendcaianssinenantceiaiaemapnpabiaiie

End Of Steel
Strike Near

WASHINGTON, July 25.

The longest and costliest steel
strike in the United States history
neared an end to-day as the C.LO.
Union’s 170 man Wage Policy
Committee was scheduled to meet
at 2 p.m. formally to approve the
agreement reached at the White
House late yesterday between
C.1.0. President Philip Murray and
U.S. steel President Benjamin Fair-
leas, to end the 54 day old strike

As soon as the Committee acted,
Murray was expected to issue an
immediate return-to-work call to
600,000 workers in the basic steel



industry, Workers had been on mid-air near Quebec.

strike since June 2 when they He manufactured the time
walked out minutes after the bomb which shattered the air-
Supreme Court ruled President eraft—C-P.

Truman's seizure of the industry
was unconstitutional.

Settlement of the dispute came
dramatically late yesterday after
seven hours of on and off talks
between Murray and Fairless in a
room near Truman’s White House
office.

U.K. Ambassador
May Soon Return
To Egypt

LONDON, July 25.
The British Foreign Office an-
nounced on Friday night that Sir
Ralph Stevenson, Ambassador to
"S Egypt, would probably return to
Cairo “in the next few days”. The
decision was made after exten-
sive talks during the afternoon
between Stevenson and Foreign
Secretary, Anthony Eden who is
recuperating in the country from
his recent illness.—U.P.

—U-P.












© War of Words



“Flying Saucers”
Over Chicago

CHICAGO, July 25.
University of Chicago scientists
are way ahead of “Flying Saucers”
reports they started drifting in
Friday. The University sent a 25
balloon cluster carrying equip-
ment for atomic research into the

sky Thursday.
4 Soon after the balloons drifted
skyward. authorities, started re-|



ceiving reports of “flying saucers”,
just as officials had predicted.
The balloons measured six to
seven feet in diameter when they
_ were released from the Univer-
sity, but expanded to 35 feet in |
~ the thin air of the stratosphere.
The balloons will
burst, allowing, equipment
drift back to the earth, The flight
' was made to check theories that
_ certain component of cosmic rays |
vary during the day and night,







% > | Sargeant’s Village, (arist Chureh
* At the
Gramophone Concert $ At QUEEN'S, PARK, % | VOLUNTEER DRILL HALL
1% FRIDAY NIGHT, | On FRIDAY ist AUGUST, 1952
A MERE six-footer, Chief Yeoman at B.C. % Ist August, 1952, : a jeegianing at 8 p.m.
oval stands beside the There will be a gramophone| % Musie by The Society Five. \ ee eas | pecralasion of | the
John F, Kova ¢ a ¥ iissioner of Police The Police
rapidly rising files of a single concert of English Musie at the $ Dinner Served og Dance Orchestra under the direc-
ear’s record of the truce talks in British Council, “Wakefield,”| S$ apMIsSION 2). y |) ton of Captain C; E. Raison M.B.E,,
Korea The documents contain White Park, on Wednesday, July | % ——97.9.53,-—In 3 | ADMISSION re Ns 00
ery word spoken since the ar- 30th, at 8.15 p.m. The programme % | Refreshments on Saze,
mistice sessions began on July fo, includes i— | 999999455956 FOO

Rawsthorne
Overture,
Warlock — Capriol Suite.

1951 at Kaesong. The files weigh — Street Corner

about 500 pounds, (International)
























Vaughan Williams — The Lark































SUNDAY, JULY 27, 1952
| eeiatemenenanenenaamnianariiitinn
French Battalion |
; }
1 i E
Repels Red Assault.
SEOUL, July 25. |
FRENCH TROOPS holding “T. Bone Hill” on Korea’s
explosive Western front beat off an assault by screaming
Chinese Communists in a battle that choked French bunk-
ers with Communist dead. The hard-fighting French
battalion, which has won more United States heroism |
awards than any other United Nations unit of its size in SHEER
Korea, counted more than 200 Red casualties from a foree
of 600 ordered to seize their hill position. Of the casualties | |
64 were killed, 150 wounded. BEAUTY |
The Chinese have assigned an »
army of about 30,000 men to pum- ae 2
mel U.N. positions, blocking the Parbadiar. Priest
Chorwon gateway on the classic
invasion route to South Korea. Ordaired In B. G.
From this army the Chinese =
hurled a battalion at the French Leavirg the Island on Friday}
unit. The attack, which becan fast by B.W.I. Airways for British
about two a.m, on Thursday, was Guiana was the Reverend H. W.|
preceded by 2,000 rounds of artil- Riley, B.A., who has been appoint-
levy and mortar explosives. The ed Assistant Curate of St. Philip’s .
artillery of the United States Sec- Church George- i : i
ond Infantry Division to which the town, and will be with Shadow Toes and
French battalion is attached, ordained Priest Hesthat oh » Sms
caught the Chiness attackers on eee = a eels in shades of Tan
- way i : ditions 4+George’s Cathe- J . iy
their way into French positions. Barai by ‘the CAVE gola, Sweet Spice and
But a large force of Chinese Lord Archbishop | | F
sctambled through the protecting cree West In- SHEPHERD Beige: Blush
barbed wire and mine fields into oe old. Harri ,
the French bunkers and fought the are P > er @
United Nations troops hand to Mey = Ri of & CO., LTD. SOCKS
hand, One French position held by ieedthnnlide on for Children from Sizes
rt = was overrun party ee Boscobelle Boys" 10, 11, 12 & 13 4
rench troopers, some of them School, and Mrs. 414—6 in lovely colours
wounded, fought with rifle butts Riley - ¢ Y
7 ~ a ey, Harold, Broad Street
knives, bayonets, and fists. They soon after his and White
drove the Reds down the slope. [graduation from! i
The Eighth Army identified the Codrington Col-
second division, veteran of Some lege Was \ap-|
of Korea’s bloodiest battles as the rev. u. w. RiLEY pointed on the

unit engaged in the seven day old
fight for
Bone”, vital hills west of Chorwon,

patrol found action, but there were
no major fights. Thunder showers
hampered the Fifth Air Force, but , .peseeccene see. 456566
the planes were able to

7 : % : ;
more than 1,000 sorties against the | % Hello Everybody! Again }

. 1% 6 N . a N
communist supply transport and | ¥ Meets, JOR Db Doon”
troops sitions. The navy also | invite you to their

: ¥ | * : 7 TT
sent sweeps of carrier planes | $ ANNUAL MIDSUMMER *
against the same targets. —U.P. | % DANCE
‘ ’ v
Wee ee es | xt
° & On TUESDAY NIGHT,
1 29th July, 1962
| % At SILVER BEACH CASINO
en your | x Holetown, St. James
| & ADMISSION M1 0 im: 2/-
i Music By
ecco | Mr. ©, B, BROWNE'S Orchestra



+

434309 GSOCCCOSOGSSSSOS *

eventually POPES OOP OSS PPI OPI ED
5

to,

cad
~
%

.
‘.
x










Staff of Kingston College, Jamaica,
where he served until eighteen
months ago, when he returned to
Codrington College to take Holy
Orders. He has just been success-
ful in his Honours Theology Ex-
amination.

“Old Baldy” and “T

Along the rest of the front the

SIOOS

SHRP OR RP Oe rrr rr
mount | ¥ -



4) REFRESHMENTS ON SALE
‘ Leeward Buses leave
the Lower Gireen at 9.30 P.M.

Backache is usually caused by lazy kidneys.
The kidneys are the blood’s filters. When

. A
- get oe oo. yg hyd Fray | 64666966566696969969660!

+,
oS

~

Then sige Pe ke Ale | SPODELI DOOD OOS PP SPOPOG,
backache,

disturbed rest or that ‘tired out’ feeling j $

soon follow. To make your kidneys work | X

properly —and to keep them in good order —
use Dodd’s Kidney Pills. Dodd’s Kidney
Pills quickly rid your over-burdened blood
of excess acids and wastes so that pure,
fresh blood flows to every nerve and muscle.
Then you feel better—look better—work
better and you are ready to dance with
joy. Insist on the genuine Dodd’s Kidney
Pills in the blue package with the red

will be given by
Messrs. CARDON TUDOR
well-known shopkeeper of
Baxter's Road
and

A GRAND DANCE |
:

ADOLPHUS SEALY

(Better known as ‘Cain’)
At QUEEN'S PARK HOUSE
MONDAY NIGHT, 28TH JULY
OS

POSS POS PSS

1952

i
bands. Only 3/- at all drug stores. j24 | ADMISSION — 2/-
Py Music by Mr. C, B, Browne's
Dodds Kidney Pill —
n Ss | Bar Solid Miss This and blame
| Yourself !

OCC OOS OBS











5659S 54656654" POD ‘s |
Yi
7 14) = | Hf
A GRAND DANCE} DANCE
. ' |
will be given+by a .
= x In aid of
MR. CLYDE HINDS «& MISS &
M. CRAIGG % Strathclyde Tennis Club
At their residence s
BLACK ROCK s at
THURSDAY, JULY 31,1952 * CRANE HOTEL
»,
bd hideaink ive .
ADMISSION: 2/ % on
Music by Mr. P. Green's ¥ S
wie by Mr. F reer s Saturday, 2nd August
Refreshments on oF ‘ x TICKETS: :-: $1.00

13,7,562—3n.



|





DANCE

THE TRIO'S DANCE
— held by —
NEBBS AND THE BOYS



».
46,6 .6,66,66% LEO









|
|
|
|

“FILM SHOW {i











| .
gi : — AT — | ;

At the monthly meeting of the Hants vs, Warwick _ SOIL CONSERVATION IS Ascending. THE BARBADOS AQUATIC Barbados Choral Society
Foundation Old Boys’ Association, | Warwick 185 Cannings 7 for 66 KEY TO FUTURE William Walton — Symphony. | CLUB WM Patron : His Excellency
held last Friday night it was de- Hants ven B84 for 1 Speaking at Sydney recently | (Local and Visiting Mem- {| the Governor ;
cided that a Social would be held z ie. ent Sir John Northeott, Governor of WEATHER REPORT | bers Only). \
at the Boys’ Foundation School on Sussex vs. Kon . the New South Wales, said that Through the courtesy of | CONCERT
August 29, ; Kent 302; Ufton 119 not out. Conservation of soil was one of YESTERDAY The British Council there | af ,

All interested old boys are re- Sussex ........21 for no wickets. the most vital problems of the Rainfall from Codrington: nil will be a FILM SHOW in at
quested to obtain full particulars ; orenae band ieee er 193, World today, He said. that the ee eae for month to the Ballroom on Wednesday | : :
about this social from either of the seicester 364 for 8; Palmer le lesert areas of the Middle East ate: 4. ns. July 30th, at 8.30 p.m.
following members: — Yorkshire vs. Middlesex ned begun with, soil ae 7 and Temperature: 73.5 °F. The Programme includes COMBERMERE HALL

H. G. Bayne, Woodside, Max- Middlesex 250—-Leslie Compton jt could happen anywhere. This ae 9 miles per Croce NEWS; THE on

, ; Christ Church: I; J. 381. question of soil erosion, the RIDGE OF TIME, show- |
Ring: Woltiant, Portatveile’ (Tele. Yorkshire 37 for no wickets. cificulty of re-afforestation and Barometer (9 am.) 30.015 i 4% ing some of the Traditional }}) | Tuesday, 29th July, 1952
phone No. 2406); P. M. Welch— Somerset vs. Northants other problems associated with (11 a.m.) 30,010 i{{ Ceremonies af England; at 8.15 p.m.
Ebenezer, Maxwell Hill or (c/o | Somerset 109—F. R. Brown 7 the land must be tackled if , TO-DAY | THE GREEN’ GIRDLE, Pri A
Labour Department, Telephone for 33. future generations were to sur- Sunrise: 5.48 a.m. (London’s Parks and open | ices of Admission :
No. 2494) 7 Northants wine 45 for 5. vive at all. Sunset: 6.20 p.m. spaces) and CRICKET Reserved Seats $1.00

Sere ate Z Moon: New, July 21. Members are cordially Unreserved Seats 60c, & 48¢.

$$$ — i 5st 4 p.m. oo ' invited. ee Tickets may be obtained at
pT ya Be oe ecarl Sn . ; ‘ Hig le: 6.53 a.m., 7.28 p.m. | ‘ the Advocate Stationery or
| They il Do It E ery Time Reglvered U. $. Patent OFtee By jimmy Hat O | Low Tide: 12.49 am. 12.58 | | rnreeeere ae be no from Members of the Society
ree Sie SSS Pee p.m. } dantaskher. r this until | 5.7.52,—5n.
Z AND THEY CALL } | | :
WHATS WT Co Nf Bundt roo me | US CR WAIN EE |
iA ; > GIRL. =
Sean a, Nort ne JOB.IF HE OVERDOES /{ HELL BE GOINS







DON’T TELL ME








BARBER PUT
SOME STICKUM
ON IT MAKES

IT LOOK A LITTLE
DARKER , THAT'S

Au! J cal












I SAW HIM GET
CAUGHT IN THE RAIN
THE OTHER DAy* HE
CAME BACK WITH A



IT, THEY'LL MAKE 7
HM OFFICE BOY=: }







IN FOR THE



THEM KIDDERS JUST
WISH THEY HAD
MENLOWS NERVE“THEY
CLIP THEIRS SHORT
SO THE GRAY,
WON'T SHOW:



DDING THE CO-WORKER
WHO SHOWS.UP WITH
THE’ BLACK MICHAEL”



Ng

1ANX ANO A TIP OF














By LUSINA of
Switzerland—
a perfect gift



hr A random choice from
” eur remarkable watch
and jewelery counter.

Unsurpassed value ...

atid guaranteed LUSINA servicing !

kK. BR. Haunate & Co., Led.
Lower Broad $t.








SSS ‘

| VARIETY CONCERT & DANCE ’
Under the patronage, of 4

MR. F. C, GODDARD M.C.P. & ‘
MRS. GODDARD é

In aid of the °

NEW HAVEN DAY NURSERY ,

$000900O000000000009 092 9HHOOPOOOF OF HO OE

An age-old equation on which our costing has been.
consistently based. It illustrates three tacts:
One is that of value.

The second, embodied in the text, is proof of
careful buying.

The third is in the expressed satisfaction of our
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Rice & Ce.

Merchant Tailors

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BOWRANITE Anti-Corrosive PAINT

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% Stocked in RED and GREY %
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1% BOWRANITE is supplied ready-mixed qnd %
g should be well stirred before use. x
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1% If required, a Special Thinners can be supplied $
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& TANT O NID £1 =

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666606600080 C0







Full Text

PAGE 1

PACE TWEI.Vr Sl'NDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY. JULY n, 1SS2 SBUCVl TVKAl KKPOHT: Antigua Orummar June Rainfall Below Average nt^cuy In lut report on Ihe work of '"•' > %  %  • Uylna oul ol (Jua.-a 1] iVrTuma th. DrtpammMit • •( Science and ioi.iuurs ITJ vuluCherry Th „ .„„„„, p,,_ojl 1 . i ,w_ ApiculUlr. in, th. month of June, % ...ted. .nd Pap.t. 11 Anusu. 0^0^ SchMl loo! ram '"" for 3 Hi. Excellency S.. %  ItainSh unatom of June. lf,2. ni pea. wa. muniwd. Appl,...: Ki'Mll. O.B.E. wu at"".:.. :n iho ul .ulpii .jto ?M unable to .Hand but Lady Buck"";""'> '?!"f S!" lu: "*• u " on c *"~2 >" """ %  "" premnt. arcunipaiueu ante ahosven. ten .... „pr..xim|',„. u,l„l number o( llvestot* INMrlanstle. ml inunUI I. Hie Private Secretary CuUUn ately >• daya duBn the month. ,| u^. „ .ui.ons t the end ul riaata. I ... K K W Flrwitt n*.vy aaia widely dKinbute.1 ratn. j unw WM na, UKIU.IN. youiu un.lr.yl Hid l.vHvc ornamental The Headmaster Mr, J, F Foote mi on inr aih .md U1 According .pjck ix,,,, duiut Ihe mouth. H.nl.oldinVrenl specie. weie.l. In I... .euort p.i.1 tribute to a £ SJS_. "if"? J !" CI ''V !" ,rom Thtee bUOdrad and sevc.ily-.ix distributed tiom January u, June, bta W.lter MrSevmey who was on. ".Sail cXforl". V",£ -'"" ulk "" "'" d "' W < '" ** U. .n old bo, o/^hTSSo! and for IslandI the .vcr.ac t.Sl rainfall ,nd Jroun •"* """ %  ra *"'" Oraiuc .artoon. pH. UXal aaa.nJF '*"> %  member of Ihe Covfor"tniontAw?Sl^hJrThe '"' breeding, deteri"""f "". "' 'he bo* Th, awraKc total for 1, .19M wi. " """drcd and four .tud i.unat.on. we,.mad...„ Se-well J","" 1 now ha. a new Governing June f.„,. p.t 105 year, wtl "• %  "on. There were a. follows:— res.il lib ''n7''''^'^ ^•Jf !" '., Canon 5 4. inches The approximate ,£ "uU. 1(1. buck. 110. ram „,, vu ,. LJL*B*Jjf %  %  Co ,; tTX tal rainfall for lhe „x month. and *• %  H* i.lemUnotlon auMhod. wore I' 1 „,,,, f £ i w 1^2' January to June 1952,. I4.M ...._,.„,„ .„.„.,, .. Ik M.m „ %  ,ta. S" ,;L" '£ 1^'.' Ineha. the total for the correar.NTOMOLOOICAL OKrirt i*n two L^eS ^S pondin,, ww for ,05, „.. 04 ,„„ numW „, moll „„„ , "H ^* ~j[. -^ 3 ...y-^.e^biy? JSlff^S! jHa^rnn'"^ SfSl 'S "" ^ STiT S£ H ^£2%^ ^ !" ^ Hre^l* X WctffS^, -j---,.. ^dlTuitS.'ag IBCM rS •" duweted ; .. MaeDonald ColloUl crop for the IMI i..on I. can. Held.. Nona was found. I, rtiiiie wa. audiial "" •'' *"i"ar of the Leaw.M the enuivalen, of I67.B76 to, .."ddri-rt thTILrE ""K r ' %  %  .. ,,„,„, %  ,h. .wiLiJiZ f"""1 "'"" of parent, and boy., iff tbe.vou,.ane,r.„, made >,.onal,l slreaaed thai Ti low >•....•', durini Hie month and I. .anno. aaUUi* IbemMlvea In T, a ".. of arnmon a SSieaion UT "' W w !" ""*"> '"' the creen and vigor !" ,., ..„,..:„.,„. it .rbudo.. g !" ? ZJSSitol th? leavTs ^"T 1 .""Provemenl in .tatxtard. The nawly planted v.m.r ,„.!,,. l ..'~JT „~.. n '"?";'J,^T. r J'" The Ilenn of Anti^a ipok, on arm nated latlalart. liylrutre, f Oomnmlril. aS.' .i^i % %  ..^"""r SffT"—' / ,V;nL"^i"A.r. 0 ,x, I ..liar D^nosi* ,.,,d 'tirr'hT'^SfaSS rr^r,'.. .X^V^"rSUi.oe. NV, uuu-ker nietl.., Vr^j^bjju.rt ln.pee.lo,, of the eotlon Bunf4-I rarrl.-d .nil ,!, ';'' "Jfv"** are U-uul ^ !" r ^' "' !" J "-k !" rd ,,,.i n ,,ed durini nj ..ther ratoon Held, attack,rt "•' l„t, !" l the month .o . %  t„ e„ure that th. 1 N~rhi.oee. ,n which %  ,-, year rnathod. Thne newer tech. !" £;;, %  !" • %  "T^** plot, had !., %  M. mi.on.n. failure ( ue.. requiie U Uaf mal.rial, ^^""""a "• %  < %  " %  "y The -earrh f.„ %  1 -,dt. ,„ %  ee, hu, which had pribably .ulfer•"* quicker, and eheapor ,„„. M ""^ J r t d p ( orUlk Uj waa continued and totnl of 2 543 cd loas in bmnnce due to delruccliemnal reoKenta are i-equlred KnIod hv i, v Hlackbume tea. ^lnd In 4 month.. II !" of roou. The roil .utii of i 1 detarmliuUloti. • ""* %  "•caoume The di.nribution of rnttrrn .eed .hipttX ha. yet 10 be deterf ""' hundred and twenty-three i for planting; commenced at the mined ''*af samples were collected from *, --_ end of the month Uld owner, und Annlleali.... ,.< In.e.lleld. ""' 4 2 KJM.P trial-. 14 leaf (yOtlOII Plailtiniff occupier, are aaked to make earApplic.lt.,1, „f InseclUMe ...,mpU-i fcan the Pino Milph.l. of """ %  • ly ..ppll.n'i !" roJ teed, tip to Ihe Jt '<• lane-lieldt ommonl. time of application in Soiiaivra Rnnin. end of June .red wa. dirih.ited further work nat bean carried .elation to Ideation experiment •! s ' ak experiment, on plantori urea ^,1 Bnd 2 samples from Ul V I1?l''lf:[ • i "tis for root borer control. ,, lo i>,„ 0 ^rtate cane i eaf nu trlcnt PEASANT AflKlf'I'l.TITRK I'uring June, dye government „ rn(I work .met... tiimjlsl i tt__.i. !" ..i„„. .!..!„. rf bui'dlnf* were exambled and One hundred and twentv-three , ANTTGUA. PMaants continued planllni of ,„. „,,.„, a^nn.t wood ants car.ample, wet* dried and around In A "tlmia' cotton planUne aeayam.. ...... ,x,.atnc, eddnea. In,.„. „,„ „ nd our i„^„. rt |o„. .„., „ VlhWII I'wSuf on w '" bo8ln !" '• Septmber dlan com and cow pea. durimr „..,„„„,„ „, rlu> ,. !" nati !" we^ mad. nd P* !" '" "' d " %  %  "the month. In reapons.-J,. the en ..,, „ f „ ur „ latol ,^*„_V.'',',,:;,,., rlal no.i.u.-ment ..-111 be made reaardcouranment otven by the Depart„, ,, nmmhKt for ihe predepc. ,,„SmSL rSiTlt, have been '"' "> e • > co "" < > P'""" ment peasiinl. generally dl.pl.. UIMHBII ttatyi lh..,,ne"l" !" "*"""! "f"'^ nave been ^^ *rig^t^aCa -,o rf-JSSL. K,rs. ~ F '""•-"-ws ,b ^ ** youiut n.tooi. eanes ill Ihe lower Vtm Tr |.|. T-iese aeedlinrj. SN F "' VM Alth !" .!, a„vemment hu not rainfall areas were beglnnmc to „ ri ,„„e.,f u ||y estublish.-d unMbrell.nenus AnalyiK '" elved u llrm offer for the whole .hov, the atreel ortlie dry weather d< r irr ,„ llo „ „„„ rKm ved thai. Thre.sample, of B.A.I". were "' "" %  "" ""P l not propoaK. r,. !" n ;,, Ji i^e " nl1 ' •"" Th ablings are adulntntuon test.. cotton planting. ?,,.,„-; „, ££. 2 ?,? .^ea. "OW • "biblUied and are makOne butter „mplr waa onaljmed '', ov !!T. ra n t "]" PurchMe pea22 !" „t tnthie"r !" !" u "1 •atl.faetor, growth Irrigation 'or f,co chlorine, suspected of J""" '?' on i" >• ""d pnnx-dressmes of '"Iphalc ''>amiiionlt. e.munii5 II thb. bacenm. causing a taint. '" m,k JL • ""d Payment of beJune wa. the U* m.atth of Uta *"• oe vonunuw n ml. o-c.ana. Iween 12 rente and 14 cents pea dote season Durlnn the month '"'/""'* , rnnaeRieinu lb, seed cotton pen.anl. .cr,. preparing their The breeding: plou at Groves ft. rin V^ !" A !" ' llovcrnment doe, not undertake age will he planted Ihls year than b, le it wa. possible to do mo., ;J rr ^ p u 1" ve J !" '.'• ' ho the .mount of cotton for which la* year %  the .upplyng nccowary by % "'.f M ^, 6 " r a~aeral meeUiuB of „ „ ar |„, s ^.^^^ Small plots of aroundnut. were ungling the existing plots. The r~,),'''"' %  ,, L " 2 wore comsteps are boin. taken bv thrS jnted durln. the month In St r.mainder wa. done by dinning "1"~f.. "* %  5 "''>' n>colins.s w,-st Indian Cotton Growers' ... indSt Pew Goodgerminup stumps from the old field. By ''' !" " %  Process of ror.n.tl.,, A„ociatioii, the Antigua Cotton •Uon ha. been reported. tl,c end of the month th. .upplies ^ nd ' JJ hn!" n,l lu „ with the Growers' Amdatlon and GovernCoconuu. and mangoes wore 'r, h.„l taken and were starting to P r !" '"ollwi of eertillcales of rgm ,.„, u, obt^, new „,„]. rood supply in Ihe market Ooori arow vleorouslr. ,, ,.i nd 'waive ornamental yields of breadfruit and pears are s —„ ll ,.,. MI nurma Manv ""leer gar* an address on expected In due course. ,„,„,„„ „,,„„ of shi. i"^^'" !" ,p > -"' K,r 1 i< > '; ''1 Ilour The fonnal presentation Some minor damage continued |v wmih wmfm ,^„ n ,„ „,,. tht l rt c hurel, Old Sokola. ,„ „,, ,,,„„„„, „, .egiaraoor, to 1 ..U...I l,v leaf l,,y.,.r or, h h aasxtCuTllm. b> the Welchnum Hall Cu-operaUvr beans, scnle Insects on fruit and ,,.,.. ." ,_., ,.„,,,„„. „ „ ."•"""a"on aad Re.utr.tloa M „ kctina S.Hi,-tv anil llu-Lewai-d ^^^^''"1,...' !" T1de ...is-actorlly. ^^ JJ^^ lOgOX, lS c JK e g' >"' '"" ,,lh variety of crops. Control measure. tc.,iu>mic Tree Propaaalloo and waa organised during the month •re conUnulng. IHstrlhutlon. Six hundred and Ibis .va formed as a prelbnlii.ir. Co-aueriilmV Day Peasant l.ivealock lime. 82 mandann. 365 to the farm machine., ancM> rclcbrali.m HI | spa-truB, M UrtVMl which i. to lie orgamsed when Durlna ikL^HSSUn^ a. I.,.m-..l. which was ,.: lor) and on the whole, esuibroutlne operations, were those llrcadfruit l.teicd on 4th June. Th il .. ,ctio. continue lo m.k. connected with the planting of Sour Sop . 1 ta. number of socielics registered .1 progress. Satstatl \..e. SEA SCOUTS IN CAMP Ooitlkoik BM SKUUI I ip .il B*.tll.„ l'u*n. opruiKTlnne are ul>vut 2a IMU. -u camp witii Mr. C. A. Boo' cjiouj, Bcouta i .large, rhtj AaWUlunt Cutnniu. iuner few UMir nuU-arM, Cap:. (. A ^c-Uy, viaimi Uiva. •>:! Saturday. Tlta camp will D4 on ., aflcraoou. bxcculive ( UUIIUIUMMWMIUJX The Executive Comtnii'. island Scout Council will ntevi •o-morrow afternoon (Monday i t Seoul Haadquaxwr-. at & pjn. August Camps Many troops have planned to amp durin the monUi tt Augu.st md all H.-W. Camp iuipmcin iuve been booked up already Tins is indeed l healthy sijpi aad ,e hope that more Troops wul %  cumpum during September H *eil. Those Groups who have not . o ihe rnd of lhe la&t term (Jan. Apr! i .mmissioner for publication %  •Scout Notes". Please let u know what's 'cooking' In YOUn CROUP. It will encourage other Cioups too. BUT please send 1" TOUT notes not later than the Thursday before publication dav. GOOD CAMPTNG TO YOU ALL Barbadian Studies Shakespeare \\ Stratford The British Council in conjunction with the F.xti;i-imir| Department of Birmingham University has arranged two courses on Shakespeare at Sli,itforf English from Auslralln. Canada. Southern Rhodesia. Bartades Itrlgium. Finland. Frsnee. Greece. Italy, Sweden Isr.el. Braill, Peru. Urugusy and USA. The protrranime eon ,,,,.-. rtf lecturev !*• Kh-ke'l^-nre Institute by Dr. rilfforel leeeeh on "Shakeipeare^ Romnn Playa." Mr. H. V D. Dyson nn <-.. %  ne.lv. Tragedy and thfl I^st Plays." and Professor C. JSi**on on "The Rond to Discovery" -nd additional lecture* hv lendlnR British scholar? on Sh-ikespeare und hl eontemp'irnri. n..d the IlllUlllasI Age. Mnnr>fT' attend perfni-mnnretr of olays at the Memorial Theatre, and tutorials and diciision <>n these plavs will he held There are also plav-readlnc Wki and vllui to place* of Interoft In Warwickshire and the Coastwl.ls. KING FAR0VK ABDICATES HI l-raea aesc 1 oup wc* staged Wedm^rt.v was not He is In lhe aaval mminand in line. .. irning long conference 1 with Mahei. his troops went to the King'* Palace. They were barred 'iit'ii bodyguard. Naguib I forres opened lire on the guards j when they refused the demand for (he Palace Nag*1b'< smashed their way into the Palace and arrested Abdulla 0 Nafuim Paiha. Matter's two-day-old Government was reported ready to resign on Saturday night, and independent Baesiedn Barakt Pasha is believed the most llkel> candidate to be appointed to form a new 1 %  Net, The "day of uclioa>" fell exactly -.x months afl*-i Cairo's "black' Saturday" rlotB of Januar> 26th In Which Cairn was ripped by rtot> I murder which burned nut great sections of the city modem business are., und left unT'umbered hundred* dea.l and Injurad. ..( %  .uiuii.in.,! en %  Naguib was reported U) huve deii.jtnded vtimld have stripped I Fitnuk f liir, Kuyal preionatlve1 1 dismiss an Egyptian government, and dissolve the Chamber of Deputies II' Stevenson Accepts Nomination a) Kroaa PMf 1 dent Truman, who flew hennaaej I !: 1,. i 11 1 %  %  : which he loir ml.) the ftcpubhj cans and staunchly defended Ms Fair Deal programme. He intro-' .lured Stevenson as the gee*] whn had been numm-tid im the Praatdency on a "reul honest to goodtt "because" he would DOl make deals with anybody". At the time that Kefauver Bnd, Hussell marched before the Convention and conceded, Stevenson was still 1 Vi votes shy of the 614'v he needed to win nomination. As soon as the two defeated candidates finished short addresses to the Convention Utah made a payoff change In a vole thai Stevenson t ways. One of the mcen attrnctlv. 1 ideas Is the plantinc of commemorative trees and shrubs in titles, towns, and villages throughout Scotlnnd. Young paopM will play a ijr.nniin'i't part ; n this icheme. following Ihe example of the Edinburgh Girl Guides who. for the 1937 CnroniUIOn of King George VI. planted 400 flowering cherry trees In an Edinburgh glen To-day. after IS years, the trees make a magn'flcent display each spring Jamaican Musieian's Successes Among medal winners announce 1 at the final concert of the Ft -aval of Commonwealth Youth organised i>y the Overseas league on Monday June 30 was Julian Barber of Jamaica. He was presented with the Colonies Media by Colonial Secretary Oliver Lytteiton. Among the audience wer.r. any dilUngulshed mHtteiaqg m• niimg Sir Arnold Bax (MasU-r .if the Queen's Mtsick). Rogcr giilter, Harriet Cohen. Albert Ss'i imons. Harold Craton. Seymour Whlnyates (Director or Music, Brlti.-h Council), and Hi-lb RailUm (Director. National Yntith Orchestra of Great BritWest Indian Teachers In U.K. Five West Indian teachers have trrrvad 111 Unta.n as gUMM of the Colonial Otllcv. They are spcndiiig %  month in Britain seeing many acUviUes connected with their work, and other aspvets of the British way of Hie. The party consists of Mr. E. (• .,-,.i-. !,.-...{ I..mi. 1 ol lhe An .1 Kcgina Senior School Essouueh-. .ni,, Qulana; Mr. B. French. Mipervisuig tcichur at St. L-ucia. Mr. H. Jackson, head teachei of a Roman Catholic primary .school in Trinidad; Mr. T. Miranda, .. Methodist teacher from British Honduras; and Mr. V. G. S. Pinnoek, headmaster of Morant Bay Government School, Jamaica, Before setting out oft tiveir tour the party were received by the Crown agents for the Colonies, Sir Harold Downle. and by the deputy Cha.rman of the Royal Empire Society, Sir Gerald Campbell. On July :0 a reception was held In the delegation's honour by the Earl of Minister, parllam e n t a r y Under-Sec retary of State. Tbey are visiting a number of i-honls of different types. Oil Ihe Industrial side they are v siting a cotton factory to see West Indus Sea Island cotton being spun, and a sugar refinery. JUST IN TIMK FOR THE > m unit ivi si is0i.\ ANEROID BAROMETERS Only a limited numbe. so selecl >,airs early and be prepared HURRICANE LANTERNS E,ub,uh T. HERBERT LTD. "" !" A I860 in 4: II Roebuck Street w We proudly present The SILVER KING Floating Ride" Cycle Complete re-deeign ol frame angle, ha. ..suited in Ihe FIRST MAJOR IMPROVEMENT in bicycle design wnce the War. with EASIER STEERING EASIER PEDALLING and the FLOATING RIDE performance. Great Beauty ha. been combined with improved STRENGTH at all the Important po.nl*— TOUGHER FORK TIPS STREAMLINE FORK SWEEP POUSH CHROMIUM THIMBLES Buy Ihe new Silver King FLOATING RIDE NOW. Why "make-out" with any other? • A. BARNES & CO., LTD. FW STYLE IOMI Olll AND VALVE BUYA RELIANCE SHIRT THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LTD. White Park Road, Bridgetown ENGINEERS. BRASS and IRON FOUNDERS Works contain modern appliances for the execution of first-class work of all kinds, and especially to SUGAR MACHINERY and STEAMSHIPS Dealers in AGRICULTURAL MACHINERY and GENERAL ENGINE ROOM STORES of all Description IRRIGATION PROJECTS, PUMPING EQUIPMENT and ELECTRICAL INSTALLATIONS A SPECIALTY Satisfaction. Quality and Service Contact THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LTD. Phone : 4546, 4650 Workshop Phone 4528 Stores Dept: m i i i nniniii i iHmiHi ii Glands Restored to Youthful Vigour In 24 Hours Scientist Explains How New Discovery Makes Men Feel Years Younger m -; t phnM r "irrttsil BrCIKlai |b.lh'*ltMsl. •• •Hi. and Health la U M IHM HI U •lr.*ri *iu> mart i.*u ; it., .v.I* rot I .. —I (Man Tlua dktvonr, i all< ViT,W. U taaUi'H and H>v lo lae. i*l II vaiki w*t H i aaaaatfif sapttetl in actitia til* naU) i.rr. iw jiaMi. kiaod. aitu bwar %  ah... M i—.. Tin* imitMHm M • ttmH. la— i ir-.ian.M a..ri ]l UMf, IH r.al (>MULi>f • W* Daet't Be • Wts* Mae. Mo kae*i U II nn-aaa, (of r<" • •*><' tfoiTlw. ol *lp>ur. •••-. maoi (M a r, Mr* y .aa . uap^i* "*-a •'rtdf HHiiHril. aei pasr i pa iMifl. laar inu r.r. Kala*tl*—•> T,H UI Bfttl Uval Toai. alai.tt ..'!*, I larl |et.iaa ana Doctor Prone. Vi-Tofci iKUta, Dr Jama* Ra< % %  W ill and ph,a it— J**— *<"* peeai u* •i" ti awin kaMXuaM. n. kirn* tM. astatan aae aaxi a and nalil ar* I— frets u*e Uvr* la a aaartad alo-in. 4o.r> in all Irw Body pro-.net arts K'lnlaau an of IM Baxrt. an mi imtt ar ni.n.r... Hua> 3*sis.'.a, .U'K HaatSa aaat Uwa '". %. r. %  al t tsoar aad vll.liiy la IM reel tooae U In 1 Day eeiame Vt-Taka air a.i.i,[.i i-'.i.Uti W a.i (Irniu bpaat thr (laiidi aim iiiua laiuauraia Is* aieodi ar.i >.. K imaU IM tod). tUara la no lnoa aalllrn i, H oa.ni ivpan an aato*ltl.ni lB*BitK>BHal rUU I* IMI and toa. may la*! Urn padri eui-r -nMn %  nr viN TMaf raoilu ana e**F . !" t ad mm eaaai — tu R.ttals 0 aritl..a Bo aalMladim baa Mia lit* aueeaai a' V, *a*t ir, roiimitc aaalbliil an I a oSer i0 lime alwr llau M teniaeanda af aoBH al arMeh had alaioal |ir -1* ol e-ir Mla| all and .il. and UR8 S -.ianua lo aaal eellUat nail. rl, tat.af.rlgii U t'tjj wai On VI. %  M I 'on rfW taMSBBtl .adar IhU -rtllaa awl saaM ft ,ni*a II Bgaai nat* yea ratiDajaf. •irvi^ii, fiai of u(aa af 111* aa a-all aa WHI did anaa rn war* M -our pnata. ao;. a.aaa.r raturn IM aaaax, pa you, rH.i.i untaMUiia Ifcroeitioail I lodai TM luaranla* enlacta fv TeatfMtere VJIaJMy a ififout^c.i I Vi-Tabl a Guaranteed M ; tt.tt t tt. ... .... i ii iiim ti .11 S / HEf EH E MINIATURES amoija whirl' you will find the well known Mr and Mrs. Duck with Dack and Dilly. Mr. and Mrs. Penguin with Benny and Penny. Mr. and Mrs. Rabbit, and last but not least floral Babies. Wynken. Blynkcn, Nod and Bear behi'i<(. Wr have also some very reasonable bird figurines "the Pelican". "Woodpecker". "Budgerigar" and "Heron". Come riirl> ii.I make unit choice ul your ItoalrTr, LOUIS L. BAYLEY OF llolton Lane and Aquatic Club Botrih Phone 3l Phone 4897 • _/*w H*W w^-9Vm% c^evtntu-*^/ive • • .. tlit Lil,-il .•/ &tU*tm't <=Jln* C*t* • More Economical • More Comfortable • More Powerful a "A Car with aU (he> 'Extraa* you'll deairc.** &f New Shipment of these Famous Cars arriving shortly. &f Redman & Taylor's Garage V.'-V'X-C^-W^OO* Near Cathedral



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I'M.I TWO MAHAY ADVOCATE M M)AY. Jl'LY 2T. 132 JAM n\ IIII ss SHOP <\>xt Door lo Singer'*) fto n„ Ctmtnfi Mtsfttrj W t w k K a 4 While and Odour. I Shorts, Jeen*.. Plnv-Suiis. sim SIIIU in iiiiinv itylaa. Older* t.iki-11 for your OriANfv for ihe Rare-. ASTHMA MUCUS Dissolved First Cat I %  -->. •> 1 fioJuA dtijoux '\o Johnton't Stationary Bid, ogfBAA UOU JAe Bud golhdtiim in Quality LdaldieA %  rfi YM"wiiii >'Mr r %  •rarmlinc mu u. t* dw-lvnl. inn* Clvtnc fr*#. • % %  y briaihinc and nMful *Wm No dofa. no •moh-ii. • i -' i.k. pMnnl lute UbMU ai mula %  %  > 'it.tif> tr+* **em tuiaiu sn4 IlroixMtU In nan to no MM., -v.n 1ov*h v„ ... k*.. •uttkr*..r. MKHOACO M..M inn II n *ua**at# lo (1*1 rou li—. "M l-r—lMng In > hours ar.,1 lo or 1—*1 l"k on rxurn of •r.ipty MckafOat MKVIUCO frn .r Chomlil THa svaraMM BTMWU o TO-DAY 4.45 & 8,30 AND CONTINUING DAILY AT E .?# # # ft #v SOU)...H.ISTH>INO,.,B'" N Y OUfSPQKlN I IIIII mi %  % %  mi iimi — BARBARA STANWYCK PAUL DOUGLAS ROBERT RYAN MARILYN MONROE KLIM \s PURE, SAFE MILK Oft M "ja 1 •SJ& MILK F-il In Prefereact Hi. Wsrid OVM GIOBf ll..% l*t-ealss S S.IO P ROFESaOH A K ( ROTTON Pr-fn*oc of Enjilish at the i '* %  %  • the ww. Indies, arrived from -famatcn nn Ight b\ B.W I A part in the Extra Mura' Sum*** r School at Codrington O |is staying at Codrington Cottag Intransit M H ANDREW PEARSE. Resident Tutor In Trinidad for Ihe University CoMeeyof Tht West Indie*, irrlved here on Frii ij mornBiK by the 33. IMMa i transit f<* the Untied KirigaV ban h* ha* gooe on leave. He ai accompanied by his wife and children. Vuterinary Surgeon D R. BUU KIRtlY of 9|. Vncent who qualified a* a V terinary Surgeon gt Toronto Sfev versity earlier this year, paaar i through here on Friday from Ca. ada by th? La4y InW, on h ncay hack home to take up an avjomtment wtih the GovernmerAftar One Yw \ rTER spending a year in trUSA MaM DaHy Kill r turned io Barbado* on Frid. %  night by B.W! A via Puert Rico and Ajt W gm She M resldli>" ith her brother-in-law antL i ter Mr. and Mm. Sidney VV|rn.head of Enterprise Roan Chritt Church t From B.C. S TAYING at the Crane Rotet nre Mr and Mrs J A. Pate'and their little daught< -r Sybil of McKcrme. British Oui..n Mr Paterson ia the Chief Mining F.nnineer of the Demerura Batixlt.' Company. He wna here on holiday since ll..• ItHh July. The Patersor.s' oriidnal home ^ Toronto. Canada Mining Engin -D R. JOHN JESSE HAYES ol Cuidad Bolivar who spent a month's holiday in Harltodov. returned home on Fridav night via Trinidad by B W.I A t., resume hu duties as .1 raining en gineer with the l.< S Steel I'mooratlon. While here. h. Miss Mary Wilkie. daughter of Mr. and Mr* Glenn M WitHi. ,,( Detroit. Michigan, at St FVter'j Church by Rev A. J. Hatch. 11 was a guest at Paradise Bead Club. His wife is expected Join him toward> the end of v month. In llr.i md mat he IIJI I travelled to every Continent except Africa and nis wife and he expressed the view that Barbed"was the most delightful place they had ever visited .md they were sorry they had to leave. Qahib QaUinq M' His Excellency the (;<*veni< accompanied by Lady MM buine. arQl leave Antigua on Ihe 1st August in iu.. .> - Barbados and discuss various matters with the ComptrolUr for Development and WftflN and his Advisers. After these discussions His Excellency will M v\ IRkLI %  W IIDRI gft von Rolnr. WflleT TW 111 a huny. Knuil.' gU tfiMt*. ioppfii|> for 11 moment, ni^I •0 fwen hihresttft "I'm .W,, w iiiy. pumied. 1 4 %  %  paeet, With? Whnt paemT 1 rev ih'iiiK it*" W.ll," said "til.. 1 just male Ip n -item H's all About mxi-lf I mean, it's about a toad all about a toad like Of, ell. *o lt*g n'l about myael. bemill I'm n toad. Mow do rau n rlenitgnd?" "Itui why do you ka*e to do 'his poem? I never heard of anyoni doing a norm On Holiday M R. AND MRS. RAYMOND BEGUELIN from Caracas. •1 in ihe colony on the ifth July after touring the French Antilles and are guests at The Crane Hotel. Mr. Beguelln is Head of CA. OFJAP penalised Arm in Far Eastern Trade Spe*nt Eighteen Months M RS ROSE ALEXIS of Trinidad who has been m the Island for the past IB months, relumed to Trinidad by the S.S. De Orgeae a Thursday She erag accompanied bv her daughter Mary Mr* Alexis also expects to vttlt Curacao later and will be returning 10 the island in about two months m time for the reopening •>f the. Ursnline Convent where her daughter is a pupil U.S. ail S#rvgnt M ISS ARIEL THOMPSON. .1 Civil Servant in the U.S.A. attached to the Taxation Defn Tient, leaves tomorrow mor i.ng b) IIWIA tr.r Antigua and Puerto Rico on her way bark nome after spending seven weeks' hotlday with her aunt. Mil Eugene Gadsbv of Saltern. St. Michael. On her rtnt vlalt to the We*( Indies. Mies Thompson was deeply impressed by the hospitality of the people and the climatic conditions She naa asked to say thanks to all thoae friends who assisted in making her stay such an enjoyable one. Schoolmaster Returns Hone M R L. S. WELLINGTON. Barbadian wHo has been teaching at Kingston College. Jamaica for the past three years, returned home on Friday eventiing by B.W.I.A. to spend th<-ummer vnrntion with his relatives at Orange (flit. St. Jarne^. Next term. Mr. Wellington will be going on to St. Kilts to take up an appointment .it the BrgJBmar School. Atttncfsd Public Health Coars* S PENDING a week In Barbado, before returning to Domin,ca are Mr. Emanuel Bertrand ..nd Mr Georve Bruney, both San. itgry Inaoectori of Roseau. The> .irrived here nn Friday evening by H.W.I.A. from Jamaica after ;it'.ending a ten months' course at the Public Health Training Centre. They are guests of Mrs. Wooding of Nelson Street. R Mr. HERMAOE Q, SMITH. • After 39 Years M R.' HERMAGF. G. SMITH. .1 Barbadian who has been residing in the US.A. for the put 39 years, returned home on Friday night by B W IA. via Puerto Rico and Antigua on a visit to his relatives and is a guest of his brother-in-law md sister. Mr. and Mrs F. A. Waterman of "Montrose," Water Street. Christ Church. At the airport lo welcome him were his father. Mr. Joseph S Smith who resides with his daughter at Water Street and many of hit relatives and friend'. A Civil Servant attached to the Post Office in New York. Mr. Smith is a brother of Mr. Neville Smith of "Brooklyn. River Road, and Mr. Irvfn Smith of Chelsea Road. Back To Venezuela ETURNING to Venezuela via Trinidad on Friday night by B.W.I.A. were Mr. and Mrs. John Miner o( Anaco who had spent twelve days' holiday .1guests of Paradise Beach Club. Mr. Miner is Superinrendeni for the Eastern Division of Peiio Tech Service Co. For Two Weeks M RS. F A. BROWN, wile of ihe Manager of the British Bato Shoe Company in St. Kltt.s. arrived here on Friday morning b\ the Lasty Rodney for two week-' holiday. She was accompanied by her daughter, Phyllis and they are guests at the Aquatic Clu>>. R Barbadian Returns To U.S.A. ETURNING to the U.S.A. during the past week was Mis.* Ber\l Walcoft. eldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Alport WaTcott of •Mildred Cot," BrfctonH Walcotfs visit to Barbados lasted live weeks, and was the first since she left the island some years ago. Despite fourteen years of ultra-modern New York, she is, however, still impressed by the great strides her native island has made in its social and business lives since the day of 1958. She left by B.W.I A on the first leg of her journey, refreshed by her holiday, and wishing farewell to the "nn v friendto whom she WH>mable to sav a last goodbve For Ind-finite Stay A MONG the passengers leaving on Fridayought by B W.I.A for Trinidad was Mis* Ruby Gibson of Arch Hall, St. Thomas, who has gone to spend an indefinite hxaloaW with her relatives at Point Fortui For Trinidad Holiday M ISS MARINA SIMPSON, eldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Laurence Simpson of Guinea Plantation, St. John, left the colony yesterday by B.W.I.A. to spend part of her summer vaeution with Mr. and Mrs. Austin Wood of Port-of-Spain Druggist On Holiday L EAVING for Trinidad on Friday night by B.W I.A. was Mr. Aubrey W. Smith. Druggist of Baxter's Road, who has gone on four weeks' holiday. He was accompanied by his sister, Mrs. Blanche Spencer of Port-of-Spain who was here on holiday as a guest of her brother and sisteiin-law. Mr. and Mrs. J. N. Smith of "Melwi." Brown's Gap. Hast %  Businessman In Caracas A RRIVING in the colony on th> 19th July were Mr. and Mn. Henry R. Rallcki of Caraca>. Venezuela, who are orlginifllj from Buffalo. New York. Mr. Ralicki is the Manager in Caracas Of Pan-American Standard Brands INC. Mr. and Mr*. Rallcki are guests at the Crane Hotel. Supervisor Of Agencies L T. COL. F. WOOD, Boparvuni of Agencies for the British West Indies of Messrs. SankeySheldon Ltd. of Ixindon. arrived from Trinidad on Friday by the S S. Golflto on a business visit and will be remaining for two weeks as a guest at the Hotel Royal. He was accompanied by Mrs Wood. On Short Visit RS. Al.KDA BOWEN. Pro1 |tn*Mr1ni Diawrig of Ihi Texas, -md Mrs. George Lowe, Ttsiirliij to an oil operator, also here on Friday night by B.W.I.A. vu Puerto Rico :ind Anli H ua lo* g short fwudav visit and are guests at the Hotel Royal. Off To The U.K. M l: ASHTON C ASHBFF Manager of L'ltvlugf Plantation in British Guiana :n the 14th August. During ntt absence, the Hon. P. D. Mac Donald will ho Governor's Sir Kenneth Blackburn* has been in the Leeward Islands two years and this Is the first occasion that he will be taking u few •Jays leave. A Noted London Suigeon Explains why fho BuJielins from Buenos Aires Speakof 'Desperate' one day and *RaI/ymg fhe nexr . By GEORGE SAVA Everybody upuzzled by the seemingly conflicting reports about Eva Rerun's iUness. One day she is said to be sinking A few days later we hear of her fmllingly receiving a delegation In th" course of her duties. Then she is reported to be "critical" again. What is really wrong with hn How rnn she be alternately working one day. then critical!..' HI? From personal knowledge of I Eva Pemn, I believe I know ihe truth. ITp-ctovrn Leu co? mi a, from which she is suffering, is a disease In which' the white corpuscles of the blood multiply alarmingly. Violent upg CROSSWORD "I never heard of anyone milking on his ear." said Willy. "Bui does thai mean vou csn't do it? I'm lomg this poem. Rirht %  hurry to ttnd a road." "A road, Willy? Wa] %  Why" ftacftMse the first d my poem irrfhe Who Hopped down ihe road -' %  In got lo find a read to hop Iowa," With that willy ttsjstsdj topping otf again, but nvnasj il lo Call over his SlOMSilSI to Kniui: "(urn* along and you'll *** 10W I do the rest of my poem. It's *ery peculiar." Knarf ran after W illy gat ,'imU-ti and over the fence to ike road. When he got there, Willy ** %  Uresstj hopping down it. A inirute later, however, he stopped all ehestuut in*. He g ip at the high brant-he* ... | re ached him. "What are you doing no?" I Knarf asked. "I'm doing the nexl two linen jf | :b poemHe hopped nnd he heaped And all at one M p I I "Yea?" said Knarf Then," said Willy, "taw He said; -Now W iet? I'll hoi. gg Saying Hit,. Willy hrt h-rk ^n %  rotedo 1 his hind legs and then sprang i with all hin might. But he could reseh even the top of the trunk, i! fell bsck. Then he tried again and again . and again. It wa* r use. At last, quite disappointWilly sat down under tht Hohhed: "The tiee was so high It made Willy cry-" But suddenly Willy stopped r log and hrolie out into s smile. "Is lhat part of the poem, too' Knryf wanted to know, Willy nodded. "Oh yes'. This h rest Of the poem. Just listen So finally he eaMi l.el the tiee hop instead' I've made enough tries; m just tray i d Willy interrupted himself at Instant to ghost out his toagtir calch something. "Willy!" shouted Knarf. "\\ are yon mtchtng?" •Files!" answered Wih |last word of the whole p now I've done it rll! l-nt n | %  riWful gnme?" Knarf hail to agree thn it ... ,i seen anyone il a poeie about a to tnsd lo do i(! 1* r iriT Tr 1 T:T in rm '" IT lo rr I U — — R Igird U> al'ng -ound %  aailor. a a PMUshr.tw consumed ha u moawwts e7. <9k —" %  l'si;l<(ll ruhlOD PLAZA THEATRES BARBARKKH l*l lli BRIGHT VICTORY Ar"i U i PeCSV KI'ATI.V DOW NEXT ATTHAt-TXiN LIFE Of RILEY MUMMY'S GHOST STORM WARNING SEPTEMBER AFFAIR SILVER CITY AMAinio imorwt a I Vill\i. %  ANMi < SI n. gvtry sneak dots. • is. i..u iic -1*1am •• %  IS. A tip* o: :. i. iseaml#l ; Automaton, if) SO. rtrt • i debt. ^SIS: ft ___* fnentr. isi 1 nine be mud. ll moiiym o* two thirds of B i. i Onuad in March. <|> %  • a deorat pt but %  ssBdrea•irii: ;sucr it. lei . Fervid, a i IS. gprtafele wuiS. warouif •o'.urt. .*• is Fart vou set as %  It. gtaua irsmaa inntrumeni ? letuttsn i t*a*ro' uui•! r. -assweu l ns U. Imc *•: ... Aw a >uWMl %  '. hnto O, sr.urwi. i.< ., "l; SO AT'r.:'t!ir IftlPfrfl. UIPII n*n l. mar: . mto. <, It^nl'jr^tl and downs in the condition of the patient arc typical because of Ihe treatment The diseased blood may ba ulmont tompli'tely drained from the, body and healthy blood infused. Within a short while ihe patient would be normal again, but m.i for long. The white corpuscle,* multiply* and a collapse occurs again. The spleen Is sometimes lemoved ag a desperate remedy. nnd blood transfusions will repeBtcdly restore the sufferer, but the iicurrent relapae groan Si aver. In December 1948. when lecturing in Buenos Aires on surgery n Itniain. 1 was presented lo i leMdeut I'eron .md his wife. Her face ws pale nnd intense, She seemed to be consumed with fever. BetuMth her eyes were dark, neavy rtogg, EkM ll.id llM gBgWhll gnag of a woman who was hurnlni; -nerself out, though she was not then 30. That look on her face mighi have bean a sign of illness-—or the result of ecstacy which sometime; romes to women of net tempsseanent. Next day I talked to her personnl physician. All he would say was that Evlta. the worker' heroine, was driving herself to death for the people. . A week later I was sent for" agaln by her secretary. My book* had pleased Mme. Peron and she wished me to write her biography. Why should a young woman like Eva Peron want her biography written" When 1 thought of hew she looked, I thought inevitably of incurable disease. Now I knew A year ago 1 again met BvH Peron in Buenos Aires. She wus desperately ill. Every movement was an effort. The curious burning look had incre as ed. And the fact that she had two specialists in attendance left no room for doubt. One was Professor Rleardo Flnoehlctto. among the best abdominal surgeons m the world. The other WM a famous cancer expert Irom New York They called on her several times. A little later the Argentine heard that an operation had been performed. One rumour—that ?ihe had cancer of the womb—was in my v lew .nlikely lo be true A gynaecologist would hawg bean necessary for such an operation irul none was present. But since Eva Peron was glttrnately reported unconscious and revived, Ihe suggestion that she had in fact, leucaemia began to gain credence. All the evidence points lo this being the truth. Leucarmia could produce all the signs I saw on the sertora's face. Drastic Rernedy Slncp leucstmia is skin lo cancer. X-ray treatment Is sometimes given. That would account for ihe visit of the specialist from New York. The more drastic remedy of removing the spleen Is an operation only a first-class abdominal specialist would undertake. And :• was Professor Fmochietto who oaajnrtad I have now in Britain two patients under treatment for leucapmia. One is a woman of 33—almost precisely the age of Eva Peron. POCKET CARTOON by OSBFRT LANCASTER ...u UMI ftt u dark .... Lurrum into my li/rwiiho '.fin', %  •* %  |i. i how il'ir' After two pints of blood had been transfused, she was sitting up and enlertalnlng me to tea an hour later, and she has been kept alive for the past two year' i \ t ransfuai on s. The other patient Is a man whose spleen was removed two years ago. To-day I frequently receive urgent messages that he i.-. dying. Yet blood transfusion restores him. The "dying man" is able to resume light work the next day. But in Ihe end leucarmia la invariably fatal. Removal of the spleen, transfusions—these can am Ult sometimes for a few months, sometimes for a couple of years, or even more. But that i.i all. It is this evil thing that has gripped Evn Peron. — L E. S. • IX STOCK .t#* Assortment #/ • LADIES' NYLON HOSE • LADIES' NYLACE IK .i • LADIES LISLE HOSE • CHILDREN'S ANKLETS ALSO — NEW SHIPMENT OF . • MEN'S WILSON FELT HATS S2.M. S2.lo. S2.2K. S2.I1 $2.l $1.31 30. 32 & 4B CENTS $4.40 T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS DIAL *220 YOUR SHOE STORES OIAL M K



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I'W.I sl\ili\ SUNDAY AIVIM ATI -I Ml \Y. .Ill Y L'T. 11V! Parent-Teachers' Da; At St. Silas Girls* School i a1 St. Silas Girls' School eoti joined Un EfaH Spencer. i nlnjl the welfare of their children Ap.. i led ihe IX'partment of I' 1 ., tbaldt, Dt'puty Director i %  %  Mr. O 'anatelhi n( V. H -ted as Chairtnan. Included oa the pros. of Undrear much appiau** ii.ni ihr audience: I bad won p. Izcs at tinging Competition. H .,:i Exhibition of CAUGHT IN BEAR-FACED ESCAPE PLOT n Ok? Iir.ll I l/VI Mr. 1 S. Mil k.ll The dejtlh occurred on tllUn> MaaiC .ifponsiblc ,,,,,,., _J • A L. Robinson. Assistant Taeeh.id appealed la PMg •'.IT co-operation with ttM MChtn, as B meant of furthe. L a Headmistress Report r B The HeadnsJatreai then tave %  i, r her report*. After waloajnlng the ID parente she ra m l n aad then thai Daren weninato reapon%  ii>ih'.>. thai they owad to 1 training and a good luiittiuii to lit them Tor life. She Mil the importance Of UN parent d taacbari ling out the riinTcultiiv %  ickv Irk CM KTHIK French Battalion Repels Red Assault FRENCH TROOPS holding "T. Bone Hill" 1 rive Western I rawnind Chinese Communisis m %  battle thai choked French bunk%  ith Commui.isi d. .id Thfl hard-flRhtlni battalion, which has won more l %  ward! than any other U %  unit (A iti size in Korea, counted more than i!00 Ri C* of 600 ordered to seize their nil. ualties 64 were killed. 1!>0 wouiuied. Chinese Ordained In B.C. 1 v %  ACK IN THEIR CAOI at the Highland Park Zoo. Plttiburgh, are the polar beam above after iupposedly tr>mg to dig their way out to freedom through • passage under the sidewalk. Attendants became suspicious when they noticed the animals huddling around one bear He was discovered digging away while the others acted as "lookouts." At left, Howard Hayes, assistant superintendent, crouches In the 10" ''" %  •%  :% %  • %  %  %  "' %  '' '' % %  End Of Steel CWppled Killer Strike Near %  a,, - wl ln M*-.„# mel UN. portion*, blocking the lift rOlitltU I* / /\f'SI DB gateway on 1'ic 1:. raula t<> Boutfa K From this JI> UM Qu noao hurled a battalion at the French Leaving the Island on Friday unit The attack, which be:an la 1 b%• B.W.I. Airways for British ab"ut two a.m. on Thursday, was Guiana ri %  < nd H. W. (IF coded by 2.000 rounds .-f aridR bee hren appointle.-y and mortar exph Aaatatant Curate of Si Philip-. Church Georgetown, and will be ordained Priest today at Si. George's Cathed r al by the Lord Archbishop of ihe West InMONTHF.AU. July, 25. WASHINGTON, July 25 Oaaaweiu. Huesl 54 year old fhL The longest and co*tlic*t steel enpled v-itehmaker from Ugbac second rtivisi. satnled %  both brUw In tht 1 ':• n ."tday „t Korea's bloodiest battle* 1 trUer? ( .f the United S try Division la K enrh battalion is c.tught the ChbMaa attackers on I Bul .1 large (area of Chinas! .'. %  rlra and ie %  I'.e French bunkers and fOUghl Ino United NaU oi troopa hand to hand, One French poaltl* ix men was ovcr.un briefly, bul French troopers, wmr ol Hum wounded, fougnt with rifle butts knives, bayonets, and tl ta. They drove the Reds down ihr alone Eighth Army Identified the veteran of tome the a* v. .. An old Harrisonian and son of Mr. J. P Hil.-v. I her of %  oaceeelh iiov School, and Mrs. Riley, Harold, soon after his graduation from Ct-ilnngton Colline | s :u>u mil v pointed on Ihe, I Staff of Kl ...;e. Jamaica. where he ser\'eil until eighteen If0, when lie returned to Codrtngton College to taka B0I3 Hi hai |UH been success,. ful In his Honours Theology Exlior fights. Thunder -xiowers "ininatinn. hampered the Fifth Air Force, bul ...*'. cidos and longer In school and 111.1 be ei ,. I 1 strike Huest was convicted on Decemthe planes were able to mount % 'H West Indk Mi r.nktt ifiid idle In tthe district and that inou*_ ,„, „ ht i'„„iiniUee acted, "r IB, 1950, of the murder of 22nurc than t.000 sortie* intainst UM , '^,4',. JOMS u 1 miuc.i L. T. V than would join the Old Murrav was expected lolsaua an yaar-Old Mrs. Rita Guay. klllfl communist supply transport and * 4 ixiwtn WIIKISlodiea Scholars' Asmbnawdiate raturn-to-work call to *''h 22 others when ihe airliner tioops positions. The navy also ^ j"''' .„',,,„.„ n thai i>. unique ba auomio v.orke. B in ihe basic steel aha waa travelling in blew up in sent sweep* of earriei 1 %  | SHEER BEAUTY! NYLON HOSE CAVE SHEPHERD & CO.. LTD. 10,11,12 & 13 Broad Street with Shadow TOM nnil ll.-.-u In ikadx ..t T,.II %  DW, Bwtol Spur mid BWM lllml: SOCKS for Children from blara |i 1. ID lovely rotoun and White of ihe game. iii QuabflCa Bi/arro unit engaged in Ihe m %  11c murder case in 1MB. light for "Old Baldy" and "I :ing from TuberBone*, vital hUJa wait of Chorwoi of the bones and unable in Ihe'home and at school. She n^^fin and to-dajr a theC.LO rtanea of ,-„.„„., ,, ind potntad r imnil „,„ ys.but his chief conollt (l ,„ H W11 .. Vl y nmch llv U( • hers to deal with the well jKieement reached at the WhUa to walk without support, was Along the rest of ihe fi-n. in trainad child. Finally she u„ uw | H t e yesterday between tekan In | athaeJ chair from hli patrol found action, bul in article m ihe Sport racexpressed the hope that the Philip Murray and call to the scaffold in Montreal's no fc, 13 children would continue yja^ s „.,| Praaldeat l'.-nj;.i..m FtUTBordeaux jail children and being lit %  i which one .... Bull at it moment's notlco thail n 1 of unaldaai Ci ickal 11 the V,< -t Indies, which KingMr. E. C. M. 1 1 (Jamaica ii3>. xpr aaaad iieasure at %  ,.,MV parents present Mr, L T On auiraij ihe ^u^at.y w ,.,, oa mM-alr naar Quei>ec portancc of parents training slrlk , ,,, • w hen they He manufactured ihe time walked out minutes ;ifter the hornb which shattered the ;iirples for Bhem in the home gu-Jffl , .. , ,, f|—<-.p. Th.Hii-.niiU Truman'.reiiurc of the industry InVso waa unconstitut10n.1i r -, a—g. ^.A, Tent ol the dispute came C.A. /WlOtlHMUIOI lly lale yesleidav aHal aeninrt the same targets. —U.P. When your BACK ACHES... • -Z\^f]Zt ESSS-S-' *V Soon Return | BgS^w,^ JUKI OtlCKKT: Aral tour ol Ino West Indies Crickind of Secondary Education ket lei-m 1886 to 1 |hd blcJi would start at the two new U.S.A.; the fornnhon „f the Wmf pilot schools for pupils of 11 i Indies Cricket Board 0/ Control '' Huhmond Gap and advised the First Local .md |>arenU to make *ise of those Cups, the Formation of the Barschoola. badoa Cricket Association and a host of other valuable data, not lo be found if at all i„ any one%  vork in Ihe W. |.„i!i;,]| t. aP %  Umony of the hlrh stan... . %  *\ 2^i^2 ^f^ whIcfi lhesc Indians Howl Out gentlemen obviously brought to paar upon to what must ultimately have been a labour of tove sons. Mr. Birketl laavna to mourn their loss WIi if', d Birketl nd daughb 1. Hi Ql idvi Wafer, M '' M %  \ room near Trumiin's While Huus.' offlce. —C.P. DANCE To Egypt War of Words Surrey lor 71 Tun; n OVII Own Co*ra*onaiiU IXJNDON, July 26. Lock, Surrey and F.ngl; B-HH rffsusAca^uvjt landad, Mrs. \. s. Hntaon The death OCCUrrad .it her resiI idoeer, Brlttona Hill, on Frtday-ol Mn Alice Sarah iiubcnn addowofafy Francti llutson late pearcd in the last Test at Mi i he u i was no-balled for throwing three times in a match tgainai Iba Tourists at the Oval today. Spectators booed Price and Lock, %  earnlngb puzzled, spoke with the Surrey Captain, Peter May. bcfon bowling his next ball. Altogether It was an entertainShe was M crowd who saw the Indian pate Mrs. Hnu,,.. ... .. „ ..„ bowlers Divei-ha and Ramchand JSZhtor %  Burrej rot 71 Dtvaei 2B iDcludln. the hat trick waa %  %  rouajht up %  % % %  -. v %  Ian ii idltion, aha r1 in publU life but itev< ted nil h to the rearing ol £ %  il "" wnCM of six aom and two daulhten Surras wlckel tor 19. tteae wan M Hutaon .' gnd Hon Frank ii. Legislative Council Her funeral iltan tad bj :. large gathering, look mel* Cathrdi i uftarnoon. To hei n-Litue II le exl.nded rhallrimi I s.,, i, • 'or i inciuuuiK me tniiu.noi it hpj iri;..Whl „,, h „ r | i,ker ind i d .. to. a if "M P adaai tl %  %  .-.i through Man)rtkar < %  *+' and i ($7) to Rain linn in. lead of 108 and in the ClOl rhe in -t bahUru of tin by Cyril Poola who made 219 ou. totiil of 337 auainti Darby, n waa hin HOOO4 doubla Cantun <>f Ihe season. LONDON, July 25. The British Foreign Oflice an-1 nounced on Friday night that Sir ( Rulph Stevenson, Ambassador to, Egypt, would probably return to In the next few days". The decision was made after extensive talks during the afternoon bet w een Baavanaon and Foreign Secretary, Anlhony Eden who is rwuperallng in the country from • illness.—U.P. "Flying Suiat't-rfl" Over Chicago CHICAGO. July 25. Univorsity of Chicago scientists gra way ihaal ..f "roing saucers" reports they started drifting in Friday. The University sent a 25 balloon cluster carrying equipment ( aiomic research into the • r KM kbodi f Jim. Whta ll>' •! sat ol •f.lrr. r, ..I ,-lt am) Miwwn % %  !*! ili) m llw iiilrm. Then WhadM. hei^Mhc, rtwumitum. duludwd real *r thai tirvd owl' flwi( loan Ulow To m>h> itm •"*• ".rk ptowrll and lo harp lham in [aod u'lln u.r IMd'a kidn ? 1Mb I >,-!.! K.Hn.i Pill. <|ui. r and ..m..:. Than you la*l battar laak ball*. -k batter v*d -on ara raadi In .Un. wrih |o* In.i.l an Ihr (rnuana lledd'i Kidnay PJIt in lha blua packata -illi the rrd innJi (Ml. I al all -In.. .1 .r,. JJ4 Dodds Kidney Pills On TVr^DAV SIOltT i.. ISU \i -M.ii i i. II i \ ,r\n asaiTiao. si. i.m-. AIIMISMOS .\ a ; %  i/ UuaV a If I B. HUOHM OI.I.--0. J PKrRKSHMENTS ON SALE l"-nJ Blix Iran| , MR 4 V'/lWiV,VaV. • A GRAND DANCE I ^ HMan < AlillON Tt now j* *rl! KIKHIII < hnkikn-i. t .it I %  "•" I II 1 Ml.lll '" -' %  "I I m SRALT .nrll At I). ggN S IM K UOI RB M..NI. .1 Ml.lll ITH II I 1 I'.' "I"N — 1/Mo.l. b> U. C II aO S Ml %  m ags : ... .nd liltimt Younaif A GRAND DAM! ','-'-'.'-'-'.'---'-'-*-*.'-'-'-'-*,*,--'-*-*-*Tin bu '. uiifi i.. balloons will allowing, etiulpment tk to lha earth. The flight tde lo check theories that component of cosmic rays ting the day and night. —U.P. eventually •" fbtmdaiion Old Bays' Association the At the montl I held last i elded that | Social wi.ld be held at the Boys' Foundation School on August 29. J All Interested ,ild boj laltl full particulars %  bout thii aoetal frorn etthai of the follOWlni members— ii (, H.iMie. Woodatda, Maxwell Hill. Christ chmeh, 1. J. '• ... -_ tnr King, Vermont, ronubatla (TeleYoikshire 37 for phorM No 1400) P M OFelcl (lemrrst Maxwell inn oi (i o Somerset I Labour Department. Telephone for 33. St OR FRO Alt D— Indians v Sarrrv 71 and 19 for I. Indians 179—I-oader S for 6.1. Ileiby vs. Sol's Notts 3*"Derbv 17 for no wickeb. 1.1..in-.nin vs. aaan Ql imorgan 353 for fl. Lancashire v (iloiierstcr i tar 266-J. Crapp 101 II.nU vs. Warwick Warwick 109 Canninga for 86 Hants M rat I Samrx vs KMII Kent 302; Uflon 119 Ml 0M1 Sussex 21 fot DO wfcfcOB) Worcester vs. I.elces rt I lt es',er 3til f.-t Bi Palmer 12.1 Vorkihlre fa. Middlesex Middlesex 2:<> L-.lie Comptor. A MItl six-footer, Chicl Yeoman John F. Koval standi Iwside the Gramophone Concert at B.C. There will lie a gramophone j IK-SlUt llio unit m.i. -v m %  ••~p" i ^ rickets. Narakel —F. R. Brown 7 Northants MS for 5. vive at all. year's record of the truce talks Korea. The doevments contain every word spoken since Ihe armistice sessions began on July 10. 1951 at Kaesong The tiles weigh •bout 500 pounds f International* SOU, CONSERVATION IS KKY TO FUTURE tg ,i r Svdnev recently • i Jmin Northeolt, Go %  New South Wales, said that ,ooaervatlon of soil \>.' Vital problems of the world today Ha mid that the raai "f the Ifld I had begun with soil erosion, and n i-i i.i happen anywhere. Th's nun rttoQ of soti ero (ifTlculty of re-alforestatlon and i.iher |ii..liliri,associated with Ihe land must be tackled if future generations were to surWhite Park, on Wednesday. July ^ 30lh. at 8.IS pm. The programme) %  m hides:— Kawslhorne — Street Corner' rverture. Warlaek — Caprlol Suite. Vaughan William. — The Lark Ascending. William Wallun — Symphony. %  cirnr HINIIS a MIM i a MI. i. Al lhali raaidriii'* BIACK ROCK rni KHOAV ii i v it lav? ADMUStON — .1/W.V/,V--.V//'//.V//'V'V. 1 'J DANCE THK TRIO'S DANOI — held by — M III'.AND TIIK BtiYS At Ql'FKN'S PARK. FRIDAY NIGHT, 1st August, 1952. Music by The Swirl* I hm Diimi i Served ADMISSION 2 1Buuvas In aid of Slrallulyde Tennis Club I CRANE HOTEL on Saturday, 2nd August TK KKTS: :-: $1,041 13.7.02—311. .','-' .'.'.',;'.• .;:','.•*'.• WEATHER REPORT YESTERDAY Rainfall from Codrtngton nil Total Rainfall for month to daw 2 72 ins. Temperature73 5 'T. Wind Velocity 11 miles per hour Barometer (tt a.m.> 30 01f> (11 a.m.) 30 010 TODAY SnnrUMK ft.48 a.m. Sunset: 620 p.m. MOOD: NSW. July 21. LlghUng: 7 00 p.m. High Tide tt.ft3 a-m., 7.28 p.m. Low Tide 1249 a.m.. 1258 pjn. — AT — T1IK BARBAIMtS ,\|| A 11( cum I Local and Vinitini Members tknlyl. Through the couiti The llrilish (oui nl ihciv .ill be a FILM SHOW in M Ballroom on Wednesday Jal> 30th. al :ti p.m. Progt-iiunc kncludea BRITISH NEWS; THE IlKllHJE OK TIME, showi of Ihe Tr.. I Can nuMuaa of England; THE OREBf OIRDLE, (London's Parks and open spnees) and CHKKET. Members are invited. N.B.—There will be no shows, after Ihis umil September. riilrr tiniC. OODIIASD Her a Man. COIHIAKD IP aid ..f l^ r.H IIAVtN UAV Nl HS|'.tlV .-.-A..I \i'.. („rl.l Chvrrk Al llir VOUfMTBBa i;i I. llAI-L Oa IRIII.AV I.i Air.i'sr. IVSI -III.-IB, .1 • a m ln.il pt'tmualon of (ha Co. MMM<" %  • l*il* I to**'" 1 "' .11 i H SHLE WORKMANSHIP AND QUALITY SUITINGS You Surely Musi I v, nl.on P. c. s. & CO. LTD. .s Ihe TOP" SOOHBM IN TAILORING. '.Q'.'.''.'*C B 000B..COO0ttt> CB OB | J #*• %  your Hoof iift-l l*ainlinff > i \ THEN BOWRANITE rr j timl BlM'f0ft it * Tor rhe best protection against Rusr and Corrosion us* o I BOWRANITE bMmdn PAINT | GOES FARTHEST LASTS LONGEST One Gallon will cow 700—1.000 q. fl. Slocked In RED and GREY BOWRANITE i. supplied readymi.ed an should be well .lined before use. II required, a Special Thinner, can be supplied al S2.40 per gallon. Phone 4456, 4267. WILKINSON & HAYNES (0.. LTD. &W*******S*A************SSS*S. Ws .*.*/////'//// -.-,> I



PAGE 1

ESTABLISHED 18J5 BARBADOS t V ft 1952 PRICE : SIX CENTS KING FAROUK Military Take Over The Royal Palaces Ex-King's Six-Month Son Rules By Regency (Bv WALTEB COU.INS1 CAIRO. July 26. King Karnuk tbdkCted OH S.iiui '..\ ;.' Ihe dcm:uui of ihe Egyptian new "strong man" General Mohammed NaRuib Boy. The Km, agreed to leave the mutiny The new King it WU announced, will bo Farouk's baby son Crown Princ" Ahmed Fuad. born to him and Queen Narriman last January 17. It Is expected that a Regency Council will bo named to rule in Ahmed's name until he becomes of ae. The Sl-ycgr-old King, prepanu 10 flee on Saturday evening by yacht—the fabulous yacht in which he spent his honeymoon with lii-vear-uld Namman. General Naguib in a statement to the nation said. "Today is a day of action". Hf called on people to control their emotions. London heard Cairo Radio saying that Naguih personally made a broadcast statement saying he asked Farouk to abdicate in favour of his son and h arouk agreed. Naguib said he asked the King to get out ot the country by 6.00 p.m. and that Farouk agreed to that also. It was reported in Cairo-thai Farouk was preparing to leave the country by 6.00 p.m. ____ Wild cheering broke out in Shortage Of \urse$ At Caura Sanatorium Cairo when the news of tl cation of the fun lovlnu King was oroadcast bv the official radio. War prunes started sweeping low over the city. Fnrouk reached Ihe end of his reign in Alexandria. the summer capital on the Mediterranean coast. The first news of the d.ama came in a report from Alexandria that army troops had broken into Farouk's Rashline Palace after a claih with hi* bodyguard. The Mossadegh Will Discuss Compensation TEHERAN. July 26. A semi-official MKIFCP MM Saturday that during jrg Interview between Mossadegh and UN MIMISII Charge D'AfTauv*. George Middlcton. the IVrsian Prime MnMer Indicated he would be prepared to dfcMUH 'ii to be paid to the Anglo-Iranian Oil Coat) le was alio prepared to let tlv *." in * co,on >' — 1 should say, >• Troops here .... opcratoU under ordsi %  by General Mohammed Naguib rVv new "man of destiny", who engineered the coup four days ago and put Independent Aly Moher Pasha into office as Prcinur. Maher and Naguib conferred in _. Alexandria on Saturday morning. t m [„ r and then Maher went to Rashtine Scheme mor"The probthat RUrSN 1 II ^..rK." Ur. nrr nol Seer Urtch mlded. LAND SETTLEMENT Ol the $500,000 grant which Trinidad Is hoping to get from the Colonial Development and WelI'lmiiiii Mo*HAm.c.n degtl r-ince renppnfntnieht irx I*remie r talked two hour-, with the Persian statesman and later Land Settlement described the meeting as most than half is earfriendly. He called on Mossadegh Palace to sec Farouk It was remarked for roads, bridges and at the Premier's request, ported he found the Palace nn>' W atet supplies, During the past week All Iran rounded and its doors barrtcated < The grant Is being held up by has been combed for Ghavam He got inside with difficulty, reColonial Development and Wef-iwno is sHU ports said, nnd Pound Farouk in | f arc because it is the Comptroller reports said WHIN TINSION MOUNTID at the GOP ..invention In Chicago, the antics el Marcelino Rorasnl, s Puerto Rfcen alternate, provided ihe delegates with a welcome break. After lh tl -c-mart delegation had voted In favor of Taft hackers. Rinnant breaig) t down the house by demanding %  polL When Ihe poll was taken, I'w.-.i further coir, i.l-ed (he gathering by voting for Elsenhower iVpporlers, (International) Argentina's First Lady Eva Peroiia Dies At 30 IV ENOS AIHKS. July 26. Senora Eva Per.in the trtfe of President Juan Reran, died at 8.25 p.m. on Saturday. Th*' announcement of her death followed a series of medical bulletin*, describing her condition as "very senous." The latest said she lapsed into unconsciousness. Senora Peron. Argentina.-, first lady, underwent a major operation last November and has been declining. steiidilv line*, Her aiie is BlVen ofDcialle as i'ti Amei cm A % %  • f ia "' v conlroveralal woman, had Allies Walk ;TJ. --^ rf~v#eT^a ftl1 ""' Presideni Peroa Out Of Korea' ^"S^" n iS l ^"SiJSjS& Truce Talks MUNSAN. Korea. Jul> tft Allied negotiators lodeU ISCI I (( a protective group of | )H -oductivltv" of HICM' ltemi [ted aU its envoM In the neighnaval officer* in the garde* m PARCEL POST mm countries to contact relelooldngthe Medlternm een. rvn x ,K.,,A eovernrasnti t., inform the J^JSS^l^^^^^y^^ "'" Mltrl-PemJi Government when a f twstrtj %  gWH^Hj o n m ',: ( Minister o( Works.Ghnvam arrives evsunw strmu' PHrtlclueiUOB m Ihe i ountry 1 fTiihs and to resiinn' contlOl of *r many phllaiithmpie* end Idlxiiir Uni"ii /ii tivitie.i, but she public appetiruiice-4 and trnt tittle (In c t btf i Oi %  lr the Labour Depart m ent building where %  i Sp H'kmaii nnd %  •will tear away the %  %  %  irty, the party <>f the ft %  Sparkmari ho wpporti I Ben %  I lfll-M'll of < .< 1.1 nonunation said he %  %  I n UM iiekel Truman Says Democrats Must Win back confer with Naguib. reports American Ambas&adoi -i '' CafTery called on Maher to discuss the crisis, Caffery like otbei Ambassadors. King nnd Government make their neadq Alexandria during the oppressive summer hent In Cairo. Reports spread swiftly that Naguib insisted on amending the Egyptian constitution and UUP Farouk refused. U was reported Caffery told Maher that the United States would be pn guarantee the safety of the King if he left the country. A bulletin received from Alexandria said the King sin there in his yacht Fapd H Bihar and that he intended to g<* t" the United Mates. Th* Americsn Embassy had no confirmation of this. Disturbing; Kiimnurs NP.TUI* has been disturbed by mmouis that the navy cruising in # On Page IZ and Communication*. C, G. Fol%  sttrO* aeral, A. Shin. Comptroller of Custom* and Excise, gift parcels will be opened to future before the eyes of the recipient. This follow, numerous complaints of pilfering. Also Studied %  '! ths wnference were measures tr> improve the efficiency at the Parcel Post DerarrtrAant anri| U) prevent pilferage. Additional may he posted at Parcel Post Department August 2 A Public Holiday In J'ca in their country —U.P. Rear-Admiral Melzel Dies WASHINGTON. July 26 Rear Admiral Jeffrey Mattel, SS who commanded a diitroyei division in World Wur t died ol Saturday from a fractured skull. Medical examiner. Frank Brosehart said Meucl plunged a Japanese Samurai sword into his ab•timeti then jumped trom the window of his home In Chevy Chase. Friend* said the Admiral who retired in !tU* after serving in the office of Naval Inspector of Materials, had been suffer-r / from a heart condition.—U.P. OTtwn Our O*" • %  nr'.iwytidotili KINGSTON. July 26 The Govern..!. Sn Hugh Foote. B ituraay, August 2. PUblk holiday m honour of Rh den'i victory In ths m fnasrei < Thursday and his showing in Jamaica's team. The decision of the declaration followed a cable of congratulations sent to the Jamaica teem, and money by the Governor people rnd the Jamaica newsparound tables, luncheon suggested by the land evening parties. Mayor of the City. Qflataste "Varsitv Holdb ViiiMi;il"':;lkOn Foreign Policy HAMILTON. N.Y July 26. Colgate University opens it* fourth Annual American Foreign PoUe) Oonrersnos on Saturday night with eight foreign ambasMng the speakers for a nearly week-long conclave. More than 200 delegates are expected; hear the Foreign Policy stand* uf the Republican and Democratic platforms analyzed by the rcpreeaatatrres of the two parties. Hum" Wrong. Canadian Ambassador to the United States speaks at the opening session, and is expected to discuss CanadianUnited States relations. Other ambassadors who will speak at various sessions include those from Australia, Pakistan. New Zealand and Puerto Rico. There will be •sssioa He said: "If you h.ve unyt %  can say it to our Ilia walkoui ended open session at Panmunjon in %  ska Eighteen <>f UM r. cord mcetmi; since July fulled to bo ih the deadlech om how I.. (XI h.. key obstacle to an Arm Tokyo Gen Mark Clark. Supreme Allied Commander, said the closed sessions failed lo produce results W(| kept in t.nich with events by i. %  phj i %  Her last public appearance .mie in June 4 when she was at side during his inauguration fa ssc o i %  'iy thiu. Me, OSS %  % %  • Uar/aphlc faes bad hrunk and • %  I.I.MIII.,1 lie. IIII. %  news i>f her Bt KlUS] decline fold.wet grid '' I because the Communists re/used I wmr ''"" *• "f/ '•*" %  ""'" K to recognize the inescapable fact,"* ^ v T k s t hc "fe max** that a lar E ' percenuge X the for ** JJ" were e'ebreted Communist prisoners refuw d lo I*" 0 "'" u ashiaUj nude. so back lo their form. \ "' %  POO. repi p. Oi rnkm soot q to the Church ^. i ii %  4 '" '"" '' % %  %  ,l "' clock for her i •h*U Mr ''^ III l>." .1. \. > uiue In her ~ honoui .i < to the ompany's orj;.ii Ba rb ado and streettve i gust I. Mr. Percy Taylor, present manager, will assume 'I %  Speci.il Reprr*< ntStlve I! OJt.l I! W I A i. %  I Public ItMr Oliver Johnson the pn ent Assistant Manager, will • eeed Mr. Taylor as Branch M. ager. Barbados ( HICAGO. July. 26. President Truman told a < lie* ing DemiH-ratic convention ear-y to-day that he is going t., "take my coat off" ..n,i possible to kMlp OesjarslOI A.II i Stevenson capture Us House. "Tlii.s in my opinion. the greatest Democratic conven tinn ever held" he laid V have stood by the prin. || the Demon.in Partj pjuly. "You have nominated a u inn. i for the next Presidrnt Df the United States. You n rc going out from this Convention much slrun,t** tn Si' wnwn yo a-sre ns. UW1 -hp— sing rrnrn notes, the Fre„dent said. "One of Ihe things tli.it Impressed me, and I watched Convention en usk vhJoi great wealth of ability we have the Democratic Party. I don't know of any lime our party hud man % %  Had | lot ,.f good men erstlc Psrty. Il is h a choice on the i i Isaden Hut nor ehotcs i we can .di as) oeiimd Wr an bound to win thai el Not i nt a DsBscsaral nventlon ii i bil.Vlelphi.. I a ,,, VII.-UM ii.nkh v and i re solna '<> wii in I1M8. Then are people who di< %  % %  Thay tun i i ksliina you a that Adlui Btevensoq win in 1952. This i tremendous row from tl "Wc win win m ios'2 in? same waj am won In 1040' hi pledged "And I '-iv (.. you SOI going i.i do ev< i %  to make us win." Then he brought laughs and chuckles when lie said A lot •( people can't understand why th Democrats-keep on winning else i . %  ., tryinc to flsjUrs 0U1 WTlSl it go* the Democratic party %  1 %  parted .;,. reason because the Dem i i and part\ ttlves Ihem the Idj 11114 "U11 sii-veuson npaalu %  BUrvi n % %  , %  ., %  thi and wls. %  rtoi th ers' pai t. pai i\ overyono". He who nominated htm .. h 1 11 %  i • will ix' .i 1 %  ipturs the White House th.it ihe Ihopi and the ail rasped upon to n UrsSOOghl Honour ek tho bonoui whli h but ih it i 1 1 should have pref< those words I.... , Fnmi \tt IJuiirtvr* : Convicts Vi ill Get An Annual Holiday CaJasjaSH Under new penal rea Bombay Stato are to he allowed an annual holiday outside prison unless r robbery wttl ence. Pennistion to smoke and r Oil are other "IIS. Vlrlltnita: Several boys at N. th Technical Hlsh %  %  '.Fl .1 iperl [rrei I all apprentice bo bad been appreni cad Inee laws wets twelve, ant thathey went lo school only to rest. Merlin Berlm's oldest man. Herman Laebc 98. this week %  hawed tdrthday callers papers i< 1 1 ive that ii* father was bora m i:n6. weaaksSsrtera Kighteeu stona -lack Leonard, appearon, in %  stugp ,how of a Wsshmi 1 onvalesced his %  Ith [*ea sot ..no Place of n I nosri for you -the will never occupy Washington. They just couldn*. afford to ive hart I'srta: A workman who fished u llca ss from tha s. hVa found it crammed with 100,000 ith of American bankn %  %  T %  —. .bout £40.000. But 11.ii that they were f"i 1 1 if thrown away by member a of an international forgery sang during a polu. Ihre< months ago. New York: A talk ng road is bains planned by New Jersey. A 1 rip of scored concrete Will IHlaid in Ihe ,>.-ntre and a mg on to it will set up huts that drivers will bo n Meat right • iff the read — or rnaytS %  1 %  -•• to 'he wrong side, RjiKtKtti: Hencerorfll local l raMflSi Will play the national anthem at the I'immencement of a performance to compel the %  UdKs W ee to stand to attention i .N.nl % %  ( iT-.kinu a rush for th" %  n Ihe inthern is played SI the end o' a pn>gramme. If 1 I on fan p 1 L 'A.'***',;;*,* f ', v, yfxMrrynhotv Expectetl lien* lor flonforencn r.ltKNAll.V July 26 lion T. A. Marryshow flies to Barbados tomorrow to Join Norman Manley and Grantley Adams m what Marryshow described as ... i. D on I ertaln matters of m Importance**, llair\%  1 ow dot i'"' "' rolgWoa I", I.I,,.,,, '-" i "'I. "We Aires, prolkshlv on Mav hav ^">.OO0 jobs. The hlghe.l 1MI0 In recent years %  het l v n standards in hi.tory. As for that she was bom hi/" 1 itspublieans, they come forth OlafaX) that helperl last,""' 1 '•> '" ^'M the proH-. mm to] t^-oi.Mng ( ,,,l ^ h, y People w-11. the) ire it Vice Prostdent for which the'" %  '" "" %  m age is 30. | think it has been my eapSftEvs was one of five children ol] !" ** ever since I have been in family or Juan Dunrte and'P" l,C5 — ,r y ,rtJ want to win itionN you have lo *i. merits. That has been my po that's what will have to be dona. %  nearly <• Ihe newspapers and magazines 0.1 *•'%  %  Ids They may have, ant' probably will have, put. ie opinion! polls on the,,tsde Well, the pollsters of the preKi 9enois Juuna Ibarguren Duarte. Her rnothei IO0SI he, i.rood to the railway centre of Junin during alldhood. Early in the oie went to the big city to seek her fortune as as actress. Fire Brigade turned out s ho made little impression rrlved on the Kene only i (l |tant>, screen and radio, despite bnd Uiat the blaze was aJreed* her beauly. he. stnkmKly blonde >ut out. The damage Is not *ti-;hslr and her husky voice, until • he met Pr essaa r d itn-n. -U.PDr. .laoan Urges Sending Army r Io South Africa 1V4B aeisd like monkeya In j UiO famous jungle hr-ik had a convention they aid must be so, untc we ell say so,' Tnis got another big laugh. 'Ii turned out dim 11 I1H8 Ai in and pressmen should havt with jtoople. in t inong themselvea In S ':3TLV Ann the rrcrfdent IV.[son docked in San Francisco, Kim Id Korean youth is met by his new "Mom" and Mr, and Mrs. Victor Beauchamp, Sr. Kim was a budcr 0! GI [:caurhamp Jr.. a maeblne gunner in Korea, who wrote : i: ever happens to me. please srrenge for Kim to come 1 live in our home."* When the young soldier loit his UM bittlcfront. bis parents carried out bis wish. (lntert.U:onalJ GEORGETOWN, July 26. Hon. Dr. Cheddi B. Ja,un. elected member for Centra) I'tona in a row people have aho> Oemerara ur^ed that an array be sent to South Africa toi ,h r d r ''' '" rid the countryof the 'blatant Fascist tyranny". Jim '*' aUTj in the Unit'"l StStaS' i.< 1 AgatiOf) :is piactised by the Desnerara Bauxiti mp British Guiana and racial prejudices 111 U.Lbanks BtsfJ elsewhere If] plored bv other members of tinLtsfJ iativc Countil during a two-dav ting on Knd. on a motion hy Hon. Lion1 fjickhoo. A motion condemning racl.il aregalion enfon rd 1 '.g on record tie Council'* abtiorretice of the at* tude adopted to various races in puriuit of this pOstSy which 1 likely to affect adversely amicable relations existing amongst people-* Iher mixed commum' • ifie Governor to trnnimit s copy of the to the Secretary of Stale fur tha Colonies and lo the irxlng that steps be taken by UN. to persuade the South African Oovernir %  slst from such a disastrous course and to adopt a policy towards all races In South A/jica In Keeping with the Declaration of Murr Rignts. No I'M.. 1 .HI in. Then he timed lo a slashing %  %  Republican poli< |i no programme. I'eopli going to pay an) attention to th<* men who have been the past 2n The Ri save been %  manasement law programmes. against 1 '•itfitmil far IHxtttulion ami Ounlily AY. W. V. 11.< II 111.' OJ All I it'u When 'he tint* COffKJ l"r Wine, its ffltaj /." AT. II. I. WINE WISDOM *pill-RI S no apscisj nl "ii for %  arvfati wine, in but, il KHIsdn'l hc,caMcr Il is quite HOC M>mc wines rctiuirc chilling, and other* Il M bettef si rK)m tcm1 Han Ii %  aood anaral rule to follow l):\ Sherr) Uighlh hilh-J While WlneM Inltut Had Wtan I* room 1 tempera\ lure Furl Sherr) Dnodj Aiui don 1 atNtul lh< be coafiatad unit. (0 serve diflercnl wines, ("omplicafsd arinc etiquette is frouned on b) paopls v.ho kaoa and love *me. 1 naj the wilbn they liVc. when the) like, anil ihc\ kg K W x ; ant to serve these PAARJ WINES with dinner you'll be da Ii [hted *hn you discover the loeclal fub oaasd tUi\our\ ifaeSS I UIC1 live the hnul VOU serve. % %  '... • K U t SH'RRY.IiRANPY. and r\, Utnl TabU Wines other r arid %  —1 r =w..,~.,,~ •.-.-.-.-.---.-.-.-.•.-.-.-.





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l\V<.i I 11.11 I SI Si)AJ At>\Ot All. -I Mi\l. II I.Y 27. 1SS2 ..I.M. r .*• ....^i. c LM ktrf sv. > > %  *" Sunday. July 27. 1H2 Oil S AMI FATS BEFORE the end of August an announcement will be made by British Caribbean governments expressing acceptance or rejection of the recommendations made ai the recent conference on oils and fats which was held at Hastings House. PnMn. indications are that governments will ratify the recommendations made by the conference. The delegates wim attended the oils and fata conference came to Barbados at a time when the price ol vegetable oils and fats was falling. It night reasonably have been expected therefore that they would have sought to bring down the price paid to the copra producers of the area, since the price paid for copra represents by far the greatest expenditure of the regional oils and fat* industry, it the total value of the industry were assessed in 1951 at say $13.000 000 the copra growers would have received some $7,000,000 imported raw materials would have amounted to some $2,000,000, wages and profits would have approximated t<> $2'i million and transportation and insurance would have accounted for $lfc million. The importance of the price of copra to the local oils and fats industries is than fore apparent The higher the price paid for copra the greater the profits that will accrue to the producer of copra and the higher will go the price that the consumer must pay for the linished products of soap, margarine. lard and edible oil. The consumers of Barbados might well be expected to complain therefore if the g.ivemment of Barbados decided to ap prove an agreement which recommended any increase over the present price of £60 per ton of copra however slight. Unfortunately for the government of Barbados the consumers of Barbados are not the only people to be considered. The delegates to the recent oils and fats conference come from territories all of which, with the exception of the Leewards, are copra producers. Barbados is dependent entirely on copra imported from the Windwards. By refusing to meet the demands for higher prices which were most certainly put forward by the copra producers of the Windwards. Trinidad, Urilish Guiana and Jamaica. Barbados would literally have brought down the wrath of attending delegates. The dependent position of Barbados in the oils and fats industry of the region leaves it open to pressure from the copra producers of the region. All the other copra-producing territories except the lA-ewards are copra-processors and the Windwards are now following a policy oj self-sufficiency which will almost certainly result in the exclusion of Barbados' finished products from the Windwards. If Barbados stuck out for lower prices the copra producers of the Windward might it is said, withhold supplies and force the local oil and fats industries to close down oi to buy in uncertain markets outside. The argument of the producers of copra has always been that the oils and fats agreement prevented them from obtaining the full world price for their products at times when the regional price for copra was lower, sometimes, than half the world price. As a result of this argument the price of copra has been constantly rising in the Caribbean and has shot up in.recent years from £45 per ton to the present price of £60 per ton. It was hoped that when the oils and fats agreement was renewed this year that the price of copra would have fallen to keep 111 step with falling world prices of other vegetable oils and fats. Now it seems that there will be a further increase over the existing price of £60 per ton if the British Caribbean governments ratify the recommendations of the recent oils and fats conference. There is little likelihood of the recommendations not being ratified. The consumers of Barbados must therefore look forward to a further rise in the price of soap, margarine, edible oil and lard when the new price of copra is announced before next September. Before becoming too vociferous in their complaints, however, they ought to realise that the oils and fats agreement has benetited Barbados in the past by ensuring it supplies of copra at an agreed price lower by far than the world price of copra. They must not forget either that the oils and fats agreement guaranteed a supply of oils and fat products to Barbados during the critical war and post-war periods when there was a world shortage of oils and fats. They must not forget these things and they will not forget that the lower price paid to the copra growers in previous years resulted in the saving of hundreds of thousands of dollars to Barbados. At the same time no one likes to pay more for a product than is absolutely necessary and today when there is no longer a world shortage < n, r ..>;<. joain into Ihe limelight unit *• I"" ,„ i,,,,,!, Qulana .m mission .MM Worl.l llank suggests that some action IcinIhi'Vlevelopmenl ol the Interior I Outana a subicct of great .ltntllcan.ee lor f&bSdo.' Only A the interlo, of British Gu,„ is developed does there seem to be an> outlet tor the large number! ol Barbadians who must emi%  "or be content with lower standards ol living than they have beco taught in meant twn "'Already there is occasional mention in *J llrilisl. Gu.anoc press of shortage ol labour in certain industries like balata and cocoa. It there was regular steamship communication bttwagn the islands and Georgetown there would be %  natal chance, ot Barbadians seeking cmploy„.,,t an the mainland than at •"• %  . P Il,ib..d..must continue to h..|ie> OM IN drawing, nearer when large .urn. arc to be poured into Brill* Guiana to accelerate its development then a sleam.hu Georgetown and the ret of the Eastern Caribbean will be a pre-requlsite of development, because Brilish Guiana despite the growing population of Georgetown would have to recruit .ome ol the personnel neccMary lor development %  bents from neighbouring West Indian Islands. Tiie development ot the Interior ol British *.uiana and the natural tendency tor trade and travel between that territory and the rest of the Caribbean to increase ought t" receive full attention from anyone investigating the poMiOlllly of inaugurating a steamship service in itie < .intibMn Mi ShcnIMd who is no stranger to the am will be well eoulpoed 10 report on the luhas undertaken. Ev. Ea.tern Caribbean will wish him so.. talk. TWO i 'LASSES AMONG CllpamS goers Barbadians nre sharply .h.iriixl Into iwo classes, those who stand with reap**! during the playing of the iuilion.il anthem %  • who not only do not stand bill Who ilu iii.l.MH.II while carrying through Uu* nii'iions of exit. It is not on unfair generalisalion to state that disrespect to the national anthem is more commonly perpetrated by the patrons ot the pit than by the patrons of the balcony or boxes. Reaped for the British Queen among emcnui goers seems to be moat clearly shown %  > Uneducated and the well-to-do. Racegoers may havt noticed similar occurrences. When the band plaji the national anthem pins can be heard dropping in the stands but among the sightseers on the savannah the hubbub of voices and the motion >f bodies continue as if the national .inlhcm had ;io meaning for Ihr crowd. Barbadians pride themselves on their stand, ards of education and It Is hard to believe that the majority of patrons of the cinema pits or or Ihe trowd which throngs the Savannah %  > dsjs docs not ui;uer*tnd what lupnsfltnj when the national anthem it plaving. Surely no one who goes to a cinema Of to a race meeting is so Ignorant as to bsttovs that by making noises or mo/uig during the playing of the national anthem that ihe y.-unu QuSSn <>f Finland Is aware of their discourtesy. Whenever the national anthem is playsd Of! public occasions in Barbados it is pU] honour and respect the Royal Quasi. I" whom our ulicgi.ii.ee M l-ii'i i. lawfullj owed. By showing our respect for the I antln %  Wf uratltude lo Her llaJSSt) for the privilege of being British Noted Wi are all without distinction British sui-ithe full sense of the word. The Queen does not need ..f ". % %  conferred on us by tho Queen. We should strive to show our api i nil anthem, which reminds us ot Her Onalsw Hatastjr, H ULLO' It that the Bottomlev 1 BoiUmlets Pit here. ifi speaking-' At yaw erpnon> ralis about your uucsli? I hope I would be more di-rreet, Mr Ludfer, Weil. Afr. Gubbint. / am 0• :igrit and motl luxurlotii hotel lit thr unimertr Most of my tmesis utish to kr.-f %  Mr. Ludfer Mr. Gtiooiiii. Mie daughter i>/ a deceased fattier rany up and asked, -fa Daddy (here?" ff he Is. am / lo ansteer "Yew" and lei the poor yirl run lo her U r crying •'Daddy'* in hell, Iftmrny. Daddu's In hell?" My dear friend Stalin has a xiost dcDoted daughter. I understand, Mr. Lucifer Imauinr her dximay if aJie reads such dlsiressiritf adSN li your eolumn. All the some, / MHeW gt**i r*f*>rtvr is uHHing lo go anywlnre'' That's M. Mr. Lucifer, ff poii paid us a risif / could hardly prevent you reporfinu u'hai you tee. All food, accoinFFiodeiion. and drinks are on the house. How wonderful, Mr. Lucifer. And The Widow, who stiU asks after "her dear ffst". iMsjld !> % %  here lo mi* the tnatt delicious COClttSatS. Thank you. Mr. Luc HST You're loeleorne, Mr <. Thin/. II OVtr, Heailtiilll l.-'linW ILL Lottie, The DavU Cat. becfimc Beauty Queen of the South-Kast coast this Min> mer? If she li chosen, will her surceei bs followed by %  Hollywood tllm contract and marriage to a millionaire American cat? Who is asking these ridiculous gsaoeMoSsf The answer is nobody but her ridiculous publicity agent. N. QubMns, Eaq n who Li bning io cash in on OS Lottie. All the ^amc, peopV wh.i have uu lu-r picture ag.ee that she prettier lhan most of the local They also think that the election of a cat as lleauty Queen would not only be a BSVtsQ to ..(tract visitors, but allow any local mayor to stroke a Beauty Queen for the first time without %  A scandal. It is pointed out also thai H i>-i cat to might to ted lor sta*dom now. At the moment she Is doing her own grooming in a blaze of publi ity. That is to sav <.he sits for hours on a window aOl facing the ung hers. If all over In the sunshine, a daring innovation in publicity which could not be imitated by ordinarv film aspirants without police intcrvenlmn. Saucer Sen-a I ion N OW that flying saucers are being taken seriously by the tl S Air Force and the French Of Information. 1 mighl as well reveal the story of a flying saucer that dropped in our %  When it had stoppod revolving, three little politicians from Mars stepped out. We arc a Coalition representing the World Government of The Martian Empire,' said The % %  ; %  -1. %  The Empire to which we are all proud to belont," said The Second. "And on which the sun never els," said The Thud. No more war, said The First Nobodv to go to war with. TinSecond You cant go to war with v.urself," ssld The Third. 'Cnn't jatil" asked The First. "Ever heard of civil war?" What about?" asked The -Anything," said The Third. "L'nrest among the work* rs. perhaps." "Ours only work an hour a dv," said The First. %  They want it reduced to hair an hour." said The Second. % %  Tin v don't want to work at id The Third. the lazy so-and-sos. said Tru, First. "I hate them.' %  vl !M** lh ,n mnic lh n >ou 'I (.,.1*1 TinThiid "I was one of l hem "The man who WSJ elected as The People's Filen.l,*' said The Second. "Whit % "If they don't work how can we live?" asked The Third. "Maybe they don't care if we live or not," said The Second. "Then we must have a civil war.*' said The Third. "That's right." said The First. "Frighten them Into work. It's the only way we can keep our j. is." T.il vou what." said The Third, "when we get back I'll denounce you as a Fascist swine, which you are, who hates the workers, which you do." "And I'll denounce you," said The Pint, "as a Communist cannibal, which you are, who hates tl.t workers more than anybody, which is true. That'll start something. Come on. Let's go." "What are you doing?" The Third asked The Second. "As I am neither a Communist cannibal nor a Fascist swine, hating nobody," said The Second, "I think 111 stay here and Join the Liberal Party. They could do with one more." Struck Dumb A business executive, signing himself Northerner, writes to a newspaper: "I am 35 years old, yet when alone with women I admire I am literally struck dumb. I am celibate and likely to rssnaln so unless I am cured. Is there anything I can do for myself before I have to take to drink"*' D R. GUBBINS. the Fleetstreet psychiatrist, writes: Northerner was probably frightened by women when he was a little boy. This Is a fairly common experience, as women are more frightening than usual when you are little and they are big. The only difference between Northerner and the majority of crown-up men Is that Northerner PSff recovered from the shock, and probably never will at his age. Therefore, as a man of his temperament will be led to the altar the moment he opens his mouth. I advise him to regard his early < %  as a bltssing, remain struck dumb in the presence of •reman, and take to drink at once. In this way he will save a lot of money. Despite the current sirlre of Intoxicants, drinking is -.till cheaper than marrying, and as marriage would probably dries nervous Northerner to drink anyway, silence will save him both money and trouble. FIVE I:MII Y in ins Five beds lie unused In Ihe two guest bedrooms of tho YW.C.A. building in Pinfold Strsst They ess be Bllsd 01 mem of %  low wsskl) ran ot $3.00, which includes morning tea. Not long ago one of the beds was Ailed by Miss Doris llarl of •htWo'l I V W ( A during .-.cveral weeks of hei in Barbados and Othsn .inin.-. Mt.ii.ill> ill led b> flrfal tttta neighbouring West rattan Islands. Why arg UM Bva b" %  today? Ate they not n ~M Hal badian g'rls in need of good sleeping accommodation.' Or are the girls afraid to seek beds in n hostel Which is odminlsI an association Which is part of a movement based on the Christaln way of 1 fsl If the lied* art empty bstauac there are no girls who need them locally then IIVIIIR conditions in Barbados cannot bad as they are said to be. The ili.tl.ulty of filling bed, not the only dullculty which the young Y.W.C.A. of Barbados Tha building Ul Pinfold Street has been there for %  long time and it Is In nee<; of i thS YWCA does not have loj pay one ienny building is provuW rent free bv V the 0 %  Tho YWCA. got orT It, I good stort by obtaining grant's from the Government and from | nccessful in obtaining subscriptions from Individuals and trading companies in Barbados. It bus money in the bank and it has ons bundred and fifty members What more does it want? A great deal. The Y.W.C.rt. was opened In 1851. Its situation in Pinfold Street makes it accessible to girls working in the neighbourhood and thai regular clientele of n a dozen girls who eat their midday meals at the YWCA <..uly There are two prices for meals—42 cents for non-meiubSH .me! 38 cents for mrmbcrv Girls eat their meals at t.bles seating on average four girls. Tables and chairs are made ot good quality polished wood and Iks (lining room at pus Y.W.C.A is up to Ihe best Bridgetown restaurant standards. ,< small writing desk In the dining room for ttM %  t to writs loit< their lunch hour. In the main room of tha Y W c A is a table M Upstairs are bedrooms and Isvatonrs in the front of the YWCA two garden bed* are some flowering pi I %  .'. .:li three of ,\ Ifv 4>t'rui' llinil*' %  I* attending a Y WC.A 00nferen.e in Trinidad. When they return they will have a much better idea of what to do next. They have of course been doin,: things already. Alirm.n awry evening something is going on at the Y W C A. u sttand cookery and noi-dlewoik claSsSS. listen to lect'.ii-es -*n all kinds of i uhjt eti. i ui] uu U tannin and basket ball against club and scho" 1 'earns. Something W goirrf on at the Y.W.C.A. daily U'il not quite SIM i li Uiink t',r Committee responsible l'>r ilio Ajatociation. Y.W.C.A. work demands, they think, a trained lea d Sr v ao will by personal enthusiasm and know-how keep the organisation Bllvo and l.innlul of new Ideas. They dn not believe that Ihe Pln%  B> %  ''I •aOUSO %  nOttsd become just another social service: just another cheap eating place f_r middle class girls with sma.l %  S o bfor'.-fceotf. this Is a "Of* *M not cWlrrr tn gerion. Ii'i Ijr the mtlkmai.— next "ijuth." salaries. They want the v w t \ to play an active part in Ihe life of the young girls of the commuiuiy They want the Y.W.C.A. to become a community h. rns in which young From sll classes In Barbadian life can meet together and in > fncndly atmosphere dlscurs with one another informally or formally questions f IntSffSSl to the community. %  sUovs thai such %  produssd with* tnit training. And they are hoping that somehow or other they in obtain sufficient to pay a properly trained Y.W.C.A. organiser to keep the Y.W.C.A. members keyed up to the pitch necessary' to make the Y.W.C.A. a "live" cell In the life of the female community. Scepticmight ask whethei the YWCA is not biting off more lhan it can chew, whether It is not trying to cover ground which Is already adequately covered by the Girls Industrial Union and various other religious and social organisations. Perhaps the best answer to sceptics would be an Invitation ti. visit the Police criminal records ofnee where they could see for themselves the hundreds of pink cards which reveal the i tTen.'-s of Barbadian women. They might then wondei whether the hundreds of pink cards are not traceable directly or Indirectly to the paucity of Iranian in the community who regard work for their fellow M the most important social function they can perform It U easy to sneer at w,a.t is lieing done for the women of Barbados. When things go wrong %  fciv "i told you so's" or as many "you can't make silk purses out of sow's ears" will chill the spirits of all bui, the most heroic souls. But so much work remains to !*' done for the women of BarIwidoa that the Y.W.C.A. so far from bSCttg an interloper and meddler seems to have come late in the field. It has plenty of work to do. The girls who make use of its facilities whether for eating or for recreation or for educational purposes prove that it fills n gap in the social services. What is to be Its future? Is it to become just another girls club? Or will it play a vital role in raising the moral standards of Barbadian womanhood? It has begun auspiciously. Everyone wishes It well. With wider membership and wtta Increased revenue from public and private grants and donation* it can afford to pay the salary of a trained organiser. Without n trained organiser the Association can play a small part in the long uphill task of raising the reputation of Barbadian womanhood to a higher li vi/1 than it now enjoys. With a trained organiser a reduction in the number of pink record cards kept by the Police Criminal Investigation Department may not be noticed Immediatelybut the greater the number of women working for the betterment of their fellow women the greater their influence will be *.]>read throughout the community. >> lliisins — 22" y 1" ti" X 18" Toilet Knife* — Unit and 2-IMcri. C. S. PITCHER & CO. Ph. **n (ESTABLISHED 1845) THE POLICIES THAT CARRY THE SEAL OF SECURITY AND SERVICE DA COSTA & CO.. LTD. (AGENTS SINCE 1868) S*lk*ui&udfy 6AWH, Selfrldje'i. London Is one of the many famous buildings which have been painted with International Paints. If you require the best In paints always specify International %  Our agents will be glad to advise on the paint for your job. Rtf'tUltd Q^SmnmtstVma^ vSksnA VJ/svrAt 3m DA COSTA & CO.. LTD. COMMISSION DtPARTMENT. HERE'S THE DRINK OF THE DAY!! .x*e otf> V5** liplv mix Si 0 ooi.li will) ms HI-. 1 bou Ml IV \t irtNADA DI1 ill I MM Ml K. ChippM lc and A Ht-a. U.i,(ji,-.i -i Hi-ilk (ot • ui.a!l party



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•1MHI II I \ HI, IM1 -I M>AY AKVIM \u lUJtEE l\l>l\ Mil IS: 11. .. II. IIII I K.,.!, % %  >* BRIGHT VICTORY !" E ATOMIC III MI'IIKF. IU. \t; i THIS WEEKEND, mp billing goes to "Brlgt.1 ej the Plaza, Barbaiv. -. Kobsun and a fine cast headed by Arthur Kennedy deserve much credit for an .'xerlUnt ;ind moving drama in which sentimentality and over-emphasis have been skillfully avoided. This film is about the rehabilitation of blind war veterans, and the splendid work that is done for them both therapeutically and psychologically, as well as the under %  tand tng and encouragement from those who can see and those who are blind, alike. Arthur Kftinnh. who recently completed a long run in the leading role of the Broadway success, Dentil Of A Salesman" U tha particular veteran with whom wf are concerned Wounded In the .Mean invasion, he is returned 10 the U.S where he is to d that he will be blind. His bltlcrnsg |Bd IMaf Of the future are tcniduallt OWKOM by the treatment he receive* at the Vallt-v Forge Army hospital, where gsg men are taught eonlldenre ax>d complete self-reliance. His Or* visit home prove-: ., shattering exI'uv. I.,, k el understanding* and thoughtlessness are the chief causes of his un happiness nn.l wh. n 111 him she cannot face the muor'.iinty of their future, he returns to the hospital and to a young girl whose love for him, ;ind clear-sightedness, give him fresh hope and self-reliance. Arthur Kennedy's performance is tlrst rate and carries strong conviction in his gradual growth i iupmcnt and his reallzaUon thai ultimate sscurity ma* mtrv!t u m thoroughly ggtfm Within himself. Peggy entered smug and rather colourDow U charming as the younggirl lvn peTva „ Pvrtina he Is tupwhj lqyv him with a warm sym^^ |0 ^ ^ but found hla pathette understanding and uncharacterisation unimpressive. Of selfishness that his family and lhfl wome „ ( i would give llrst place friendcould not give him. to Roaalyn Boulter for her careThere are good dramatic situafiw come-easy, go-easy mterpretlons I.e. when the blind soldier is i a ti.. n of a Cockney floozie. Palriforced by the nflicer in charge to ri m brawl lift ween two of the women—that probably has its momenta, has been removed from the film "In lol<>" with the result that the continuity is rudely jarred. I may say that the picture arrived here with i[ys deletion and I cannot see why we should not be left to make our own decisions as to what scenes should be censored. Deadline I'.S.A. DEADLINE USA. starring re remarkably vital and Humphrey Bogart. Ethel Barrysharply drawn, from the Little "i'rc and Kim Hunter can be seen Cockney shop girl down to the ht the Globe. A realistic newspaper engine driver who commits murdrnnvi, it succeed* in shewing the der In l blind (It of Jealousy. --any pressures under which a The story concerns a young free press operates. There also Englishman whose ambition Is to seems to be a good deal of law* be a writer. To see how the snfo <•<> %  -' gcttvlta undertaken by 'other halt" l.i ha t..kt>s himthe %  liilT of the paper thai misht setf to Lenten Town, where under iietter have been left In the pro,is> assumed name, he becomes per hands. However, the newspofrlendly with a Cockney girl. A per background is so detailed and midnight visit to her room Is authentic that the film carries rudely interrupted by the arrival weight and conviction. of her "steady" and our author The plot concerns a managing heats a hasty retreat. Next morneditor whose wife has divorced ing. he reads that the girl has him because she feels that he Is Wen murdered and though he wedded to his work With his Job knows wh" committee] the crime, being terminated in three days, i.other man be condemned due to the paper being sold to sooner than exiiose himself to tho rival interests he devotes hit republiclty that would follow were maliung time t exposing a vlea it knowr. that he was contorting king and gangster—nearly loses with slum people. The "other his life in doing so—but neverthcmon" Is Hiohnrd Todd. who made less goes down in a bla?<* of headhls flrsl screen appearance in this lines' though he loses the pape.-. picture, and ha* since gone to the he does succeed in getting his top. A petty burglar, condemned wife back, • he did not commit, he Doirart fans will probably enpsnda %  fi. i ysaui m kul and m kjj the. itar*i pttforaunea vfaidb nil release, neally collects his (ruck me as somewhat fiercely and forces the writer to morose, with the exception of a admit his presence in the murderquiet scone with Miss Barrymore, ed girl's room and the identity of srtdow ,,f the paper*! founder, the killer. where he shows a more human Hil fervent portrayal of tho side Kim Hunter [.lavs Mr nowronged man iv excellent and it gait's wife, who would definitely is obvious that Mr. Todd ha.fine seem lo have had the short end acting ability and knows how to of Ue marriage stick, while Maruse it. Stephen Murray's role of tin Gabel is an effective wicked the writer. ChristopBer Drew. c..ngster. AGE Another Talk from London A sequel to Usl weeks talk over ihe BJsX* General Overseas Service on atomic power will be given in Uw coming week The subject this lima atomic development. The Speaker Uw-. tune will be Or. A. S Mcfarlaiuof the Nation*! Institute *' i Research at Mill Hill. North London, whcie Isotopes I utll .lie being u*ed in medical research Hu talk %  Isotopes are amon| poweiful %  %  %  %  dMgribssJ plest possible terms bv Professor Fred, rick Soddy H 'B* • %  .it 10 15 p ID OH W..r 0 the 'Msd-week Talk. FARM AND GAKDIA IsU t^rnnl.i THK COCONUT—M fcVfl wi the western hemi>t hi i.-. long accustomed. En i nun y purposes to i ur butter ami Othei fate, rainlorood t>\ allv >ii and the cheaper cottt sreansg and iimiiur ungucntg for personal use, hj ;..ihapa u> uvarlook the Rrwil n portance and essentiality of coconut oil to east. 11 ind personal us*, into buttons, cups, ladles, ipoo Uy, and other utensils, toe hj interpjrui of the trunk furnish post %  .md and .altersthe roots, a dye fabric of life generally, and has Ai.d finally, the unOUituri been so for gensrations. it i, essence ytotds a sap from VftU UA\ m IIIMIV case-, iheir main w-.e. vinegar or sugar even saw the b. made Altognher. gfhg4 SB ortumty for handcraft itili/ni|[ ihe pewrtjded by Uns unique brta grating th> ITCHING 1 INFLAMED /j^SKIN FNINIi HINTS KIR AMATEURS ii.a i i it Travel Talkrite the svmpalhies of anyone. Fr Them Thai Tmppgs .it the Plazii Bridgetown, FOR THF.M THAT TRESPASS is rhe dramatic story of a miscarriage of Justice. Starting off In the genteel atmoNphere of an upper middle class English family, the scene sbtftl to the drab and rordid backgiound of a London slum. However, squalid as this parl ol London osay be. the charThere are IWQ travel talks l. %  Overseas Si lbs eomini '.v flrsl Is 'Pleasant JouiWyn/ord Vaughn Tbonu who rounds off his recent retun< visit to India and Pakistan after five years absence in recallli %  urea ean Vaicea' on Sunday, 27th. presents a short story by Geoffrey In-nylon of Barbados. another by Ian Ramsay of Jamaica and love poems by J oseph Ptoeo of Trinidad and Horace Mitchell of British Guiana. Broadcast begins at the regular time of 7.15 p.m. TAI.KINf. POINT Bcf after atl whaf tcmild tli. E'ipluh be \ci too ai\M.meumes pracor at any rate a fortnightly din Used but in the mam the eastern and in this way it will keep it mind prefers Ihe crude article. trim well groomed Now, ii* rigU) i export njde Ihe laboui of clipping it will be parts consisted :> less than if this ]0b| dried nuta for eoolenajnsry puiis done less often. poses. Avlually. it l| only about Ome a hedge is neglected until! ..u lhal conunerll '' overgrosfi it is a tedious and cial aiul industrial developments dWtcult job lo get it Into thaM ensured the greater uUilsallOJi ol Map, ""I when Just c.ut after ihi gCWl aa an important neglect ihe hedge preseiits jn uglv %  i h.,ih .1 ^"I'l"'*' I" 1 *. Instead of Ihe nil < tLiiow and'oiL^v:-':.^":.," E^g^-* ^ !" I >bed as the Consols of ^ J^ e „ lilk ,. tl (ll the tost. • There was a demand ovl r nls ht f le lrtn , n ,, ht II DBS dried mil in ihe form ol sjUdSOer U| MIIC \-> it thai copra (either sun or kiln dried) u |, ^, mv highly skilled job rcand this trade also developed In quiring great sfrength and andurthe West Indies. Later local an. e It is nothing .1 n,. capital was invested In BMdar.i thhedge Is In nrder. in milling,,: %  r.i..>. in. rnore than a straight eye, a pair with efficient crushing and the use of sharp well oiled shears, and I of hydraulic presses the i>ulk of couple of hours steady work. Once DM BJ is extracted. Uie remainthe hedge has been regularly trimUig cake providing a valuable nu u 'bntv or forty feet of hedge stock feed or fertilizer. The icrBI "^ we r,l PI H,d U 'V anft aidr ^ fined product is sold in the tore* in .:' T vl *'"' J 1 ", 11 !" _, of oil or made up into marg..nn 0 Katphig 'he hedge in good ord and related eompOU i M u ., U,, '. J ,, ^ beCO "^ ** rod ucl ! anon, nothing looks worse than %  world wide significance. Its high ^Urlr* Keage Its neglect seem %  quality and food value In relatiNi to lower the lUndard of the whol< lo high priced butler fnt are no garden, and does more lo -jii ll and. even In the general appearance than almost United States, where there his am other kind of neglect. & been severe crltium and opnoBad M to ksstp MsVntd sllion from the dairy industry, than others. its sale Is rapidly gaining ground. Sweat Lime. Cherry. Bread and. Animals just oannel compete wttsi ' Olive are dipped mou the pahn HargmrlnS Is, without easilv lhan Casuarina. These tlrvi. doubt, a boon lo ihe harassed mentioned give %  firmer mou I housewife and future developev '" •" T "T'^ 1 *nor" • ... miiii.n. mi> i ..'(.. in. nured by 0uq> %  k'hukg kio> "iimrti II r fnends because "I bouisnds have %  trouble* for ever 1 rbsdoB sur ^^ln irouhl.. UK IMM) V>HIU be .khghlcd how %  < NfacTM and heals. SB an -km comi MsUna Sores, DhotN l neiil'U ^ HUI S-g*. osHuuuecuon /tase i penclts %  1 DOB gc I ur jH / —f I. ihng . n l-P DD PRESCRIPTION FOR THE BEST I SUSTIFM us*-n-uui SILVEfi STAR' CONGOLEUM INSIST ON SILVER STAR SOLD AT ALL THE LEADING STORES llant for While I well ker' always .i source of adr interest. The coconut is regarded now AS the world's mo | ImpaTs tant food fruit. What about the pa.m •tseli.' Opinion is divided as to it i.s of old or in The fact is lhal sea currents lui to jump about and elude she.us Of all our hedges Casuarlna Is probably the most difficult to keep m good anape ret srbet tin haaM is well kept it make Rossaj r lnl helges need not be iiuite as severely trimmed a* playad an important p-rt m t*" JStv-n-w*teUsB Wnd. lor Wdi U-ansporlUkg ihe iiul* from oiu u ,, * Ko ,hl %  "ers. whic .ti_. ... .l.^..r t.....i ,t i, ..I........ •atneigy if you ( %  •! wors out. deprensd. Of gsnerillr rua down %  glut or two %  ear of gwcklMt Tontc Wins will qunUly rtor lost •ntr|y and tons up the wl-ole nroui iriivm. Gividf naw vitiiii) it forufiti you igiintt hrrsf and ihuition ind rsmaniDsr. Bucklut Tonic Wins u Mpemllx valvsble 4(u il". %  i.'.ei ;Ti halo in In. II hief heauty. a chance phyle. thai is. It tOSBTatsa and V. i .ve.. :i. il.,wering hedge , lt lto ltm be allowed to s^untrimmed %  -"ust be kept judiciously clipbut i qui A i.iinfall o, ,10 ,.u„., e,e:,l ^rttSJ^uS iMFlS** distributed la considered ademia^ ^^n,,, trimming tall toe ground WlgCT asesgsdl lliu h,.dKtneeds more judginenl nght forward ] %  -. BTOVstttni uca water i on ti,; ,| i:in trlmndni the non-fl d nevei atagnanm Hta% %  kind in Tiinidmi. ihe laori ol.i hedges are verj tOvtly, but %  arc unsuitable. Tb priiiutiva mj gt bush] brpi the coconut was simply a n %  that provided fd. drink, sht than the Bxora commonly seen In ter and raiment. Ii nidi docs ; .1 Harbados This smallci I%  l these things and more in the .c trowt quite easily here, and ll modern time*. U-t ugli.n. .'Niild be quite an Idea for somebrlefly at Its many uses. lS ihe. huj-k wmcs coit Bbffg for broosns cordage, brushe-.. ma .-. ti*.. ,ilto uaefj for caulking; the loaves .i lhatd i niir; the leaf >*U>lks yiel.i felling. handles for tools and brushes; tho husk may also be used as a atom Ing brush and together with the vhell b fuel, the shell ta mule In British Guiana it I torn to have a hedge made up ol dil'ere-it kinds <.r fiou.rlng plan!This novel idea might also be tried here by some pioneering spinU-d -odener Our Harhadiati |smkfl aie inclined to be rather coii:.crvn\.. and would (>.sU the bett fin some hold puit to lead ulong new and aa /et untm WE Braw Seli CtSji MilU Sillers HAVE THE ( i Scale* Cake Pans Fish Turners USka Spoons KIT4 IIK\\v\ni: Drippiuu Pan Pallie Pan Sponge 1 iii.-i i Pans Seoups Cork Screws Can Openers En 11, .il, rSTOCK Mincers IcinR Sets THE CORNER STORE NEW AMERICAN AND CANADIAN %  P R E S S E S ALL ONE PRICE • BREEZY BARE ARM SPORT DRESili Pretty Solid Colours • ORGANDY WITH APPLIQUE FLOWERS Youthful, colourful New Dresses For Cocktails or Dancing • SHEER FLORALS COCKTAIL DRESSES "BOLERO SUN DRESSES • PRETTY FLORAL CREPE DRESSES • MATERNITY DRESSES Solid Colours and Pretty Florals DOZENS (IF STYLES TO MOOSE FROM THESE NEW DRESSES $1 00 NEW PLASTIC HANDBAGS Transparent Dark and Light Pastel Shades $ 3.10 CANADIAN NYLON PANTIES The quality you have long been waiting for $ 2.31 LADIES COCKTAIL HATS Smadly Styled Hats to suit the most discriminating $4.32 Select from a large and varied Stock :Permanent Pleated Nylon Skids, Ladies' Blouses. Ladies Shods. Half Slips 51 also 60 gauge Canadian Nylon Stockings American Pretty Dress Materials Pure Silk and Ad Silk Scarves. H.Mtlt.MtOS CO-OP. rOTTOS I 10'TOMY TTO. in |rt DRESS lr\i: "ISHOPPE BROAD STREET


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SUNDAY, JULY SUNDAY ADVOCATE PACE THIRTEEN FLINT OF THE FLYING SQUAD .... BY ALAN STRANKS & GEORGE DAVIES FLASH GORDON BY DAN BARRY ...ONLY ONE THING TO PO.' SOMEBODY S GOT TO STAY BENO ANO DRAW THE R FRE WHILE THt ^ I REST OK YOU GO UP IN THE ELEVATOR' Weil.. JOHNNY HAZARD BY FRANK ROBBINS LET'S THt TO KEA40N THIS OUT. JOHNNY.' WHY rMCETWfi WIT i %  %  IT COUlP BE A *— BTONT'RSeTMEir CPEB:ATiC^5...0e. THEN AGAIN. JUST : NPTOTHRXW CKAY, BMTAPlSE'JLrST KE*E" 1 0£e\..lvEGOT TC flSTUKI ANPBBCS %  • *our /tfjyBOPv %  •S I PJCXEP OUT' __^BRINGING UP FATHER BY GEORGE MC. MAN US RIP KIRBY BY ALEX RAYMOND •B 7 I' KW %  EE...TWAT Mil WBUflO ~J ^$er %  **...BUT i %  *?w ... %  % %  %  %  %  %  %  S HJjfT A*CBT ^.AY THE PHANTOM BY LEE FALK 8> RAY MOORES is is AicGisv i, PF .,„„_ !" i" Hii.,iKlnt Oeorie VI Gordons Stands SuptefK& IT PAY S YOU TO DEAL HERE SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Thursday to Saturday only %  ^— —-%  — ^ =m '* ..—.,%  M ^ SI'I I I \l, Ol I I Its are now mail,.1.1. at our HVunrhr* W I.ite Park, I >... il-iil. Spt-i||l>lMs $.48 — $.40 OATMEAL imTim. . .60 iStiPSaSF 2 ;:|! "" s *"" S %  IICSIOCUA M .4B I'EAHI. BARLEY Jl SAUSAOES VIENNA (4-..z Tins) 40 — .39 COFFEE CHICORY .11 CHICKEN SOUP 42 .4" CIIA.SK-.SAN>10I<\K INSTANT COFTOC %  MUSHROOM SOUP 42 .40 KffiT^JKJSKs % TOMATO SOUP 36 .34 KXAPPIS anflOU is! ONION SOUP 36 — .34 OIIAVAS (Large) 6S GREEN PEA SOUP .36 — 34 APRICOTS (Small) ,__„...... .J FRUIT CAKES — 31b Iln3.00 D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street G . %  : V^ GUINNESS STOUT FOR STRENGTH C. F. HARRISON & CO. (BARBADOS) Ltd. P.O. BOX 304 BARBADOS % 



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PAGI TT\ -.1 MIAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY. JUI.Y THE PEOPLE OF BARBADOS-XVI •SLAVEET" JOHN rRIDVAl'X. IKM diocaec the Weet Indian !-stand* were, also aided In this work. Circular), were sent out A new religious body arrWad rr c a achool „f stave* m *omparts of the Bfttutewuu, and the iimmcwi ruablishsaj on the estate of one lsUndi but thai this was quickls i op Uul61 ^ *"*""* Dr Holder in the pariah of St suppraaaad—the immediate shewing of dlacipllne Taking excellent i>inamba| n these turbulcn-. .,„d speedy affect — but at thii mea. out planter of hliati standtime a general anxiety thus a in the Island, and n General ••ngendared by no means, even the Militia, wrote the follownow. wholly allayed c in his Diary — He concluded — it is. accordTaiiafitarihli concern i ingly. much to be hoped that riianlfaaiad (asnounllng, in fact. (MM over-u:alou.s advocate* of 1<> a* much aa publick agitafreedom may duly take this late dflfl ltd to the probable effects warning to heart before it ia loo of certain indiscreet and '11late! Such doctrine*, permitted to timed uttarances of t-erlgun perfurther Sourish unche c ked in oui %  "n in Authorn-< both here and very midst, in theee dangerous 1 BriUiii it ii generally i ime *. mmt perforce yield fruit allowed by ill persons of in stm worse liappemnp. Which Humanity and .sensibility that (.,,„, forbid! there <*eom* no noat necessary' instltui^ u bt but theee instigators in lion of Slavery (aa it exists at (JnPfrt Britain con have Uttle, or present) is exposed, by Its very no rea i ccgntaane* of the nature nature lo abuses. 1-et these, by U1 thii, deep and dangerous meniUl means, receive nil pnsaiblt. „.. which, from time lmmcm.illevlatkma — and aa soon aa nrlal. has overshadowed and may be, i-ven threatened our vary Bui it Is 'I Ihe sume lime .•xistaiice." (1) hardly U> be borne that the There anM I dmpuuuver Ui< inwarraatabli.-undmt of theae u/esleyaiu in 1801, this .ventually ,,U iinadV an excuse reached the CfdaTU of L*w, and %  rf the extnnn-t. fm a pillory,(,,. Magistrates actually dosing of nil owner* alike! This is vH [ their Chapel in Bridgenot in any way representative UlW n The Methodist record* di of the whole truth. I ran myM r ibe linage town us one of th self testify that than an othera iof thu nothing is sold* .who use Iherr people with all reaaonahlc care and indulgence — .i-re mh is neither eaionablr nor warranted. Tharf -re utau mauy instances of those who have not lo make due pro' their slaves following such owner's demise I am likewise minded—by no means alongIn this rtssaeet—to —Ibtrte a fair share of the ;_. M lsionol *o themselves fully of the safew %  smell rate the r.nditiona t immorality and protection afforded them Ihe slavein Barbados. John higher walks b> the tawa and defenses of Poyer in h's open letter to Lorl -ffeet on pu<> this country" (1) Seaforth. refers to this matter la that the people ol Barbados hay The General goes on lo relate t men in the j life and the rals. He states ui M the piayers wllh hideous navies They received litUe or .,, |>Ti>tecUon from the LJW of :.i. 1 land due lo iheir teachingsThe founder of this religious % %  body was John Wesley (1703 —fill, who came of a very austere MetiNKhst family. knew England as the home of slavetraders, kidnapper? and MiiUgglers. It was an England of ginships, corrupt politics and souV lea* religion, which he fought hard to correct Due to Ui< Church was taking an mlwiit in the unfortunate Ahrciin who had been transporlod from his homt ( of miles away anu sold to .) lift of ixrpetual slavery nal activity gradually reaches) the West Indies, but was met *ftn strong opposition, as the entire civil and economic lif wosnen. coloured People of tin* Island, must Hi I Halter myself thai your state. , ha* come among us Wiin with a mind superior to those ern-r'prejudice*, on tfie subject ^of p.. Indoor smells killed inlheair!^ Ihf rOloUffd ..him by bis iccouat b^'ii i M l — I New AMAZING PBCOVMl* Thtrt's nothing better for a troublesome Cough than FERROL COMPOUND reference u> the Oovrecommendaiion to Uu of an Art by the LesjtaUSlavery. which have, unhappily, ture. reapecting the Manumisfound 'o general and favourable MOB of SLives was "a wiae and a reception among our mil*. alutarj' measure, which as it i.taken and misinJornied fellow alculatcd to prevent the artiflciil subKcu on the other side of increwe of free coloured People, the Atlantic. Without attemptmust tend to preserve the peact ing to -discuss a question on and security ol the Country. which ome of the most dlaBut,' he continues, 'permit me. tmguudied and enlightened my Lord, to suggest lo your Characters in Europe have dlsseetou* consideration .i encumgantd, I shall conteul myself tance pregnant with consewith remarking, abstructed usjancea which may. be. at some frotthe Idea of Slavery, that, lulun moment productive of much Ui esrary wel consUtuted Somischief I allude to the secumucwtv a state of subordination latlon of real property in the neceasarlly arises from the h nda of free People of Colour nature of civil Government. By *he Laws of England AlienWilhuul this no political Union -ie declared incapable of inherncould long subsist. To maintain ingj I -nds. and ihough I am aware %  KiainenUl principle, 11 that this Is not strictly a case — absolulaly naceasary i>otnl conceive that upon i u, preserve the distinction* '- prmeipli ulame to the underhand activi I rs of the sect known as Quakers. These, from the very most turbulent place* ta ,inbled the mob-violence whirn *-i meted out to the Wesleyanof the latter part of the eiglitecntit i (ntury In England. Historian* recorded -Ihe motives natural I a godless and coarsely vicious .-immunity, animated by .i stron* infusion of ari-sto-Tut ii pride and .( coatempi fur loe novelties in igion, ware In this case rais>v feverheei through wtiich naturally exist or are accidentally Introduced Into the Community. With us, two grand distinctions resuh from stale i* Society, firstly between the White Inhabitant* ami free people ol Colour, ana secondly between Master* and SlaveNature has strongly friendship ior the Negn. *.*** .., .rum vae vrr. %  %  ^ ln ^12".^,.^ %  .ginning* of the settlement of !" w l f ' S^" .. whir ui island having played a movement InM""* ' "*^' nd In theae days was added -ha belief **ei headad-pariTin pr-chahg c S^,J h '^. Ut *i i of othera to >"' ,or m v rthro ilmitkmal PoUey Colonial laws many properly terfered and prevented the aciisitlon of Real eal-te in the git possession of free Negroe-; or Mulattos That they should be Uowed to exercise their talents nd industry in procuring a r-omfortaMc Subsistence for themand their families, and that defined the difference not only they should be protected in the in complexion, but .n the mental full and quite enjoyment of an intellectual and cipoival fachonest livelihood, is readily ultles of Ihe diffeienl Species, admitted ;But that they vhoui .ud our Colonial code has be prohibited from purchasm* a acknowledged ano adopted ihe icqutrlng Lands or Slaves is uiatinKiiun. The P*aWgt U afura of pru< ence Insepar-blypur ExcUoncya speech to the on necl.nl with te -teyorou Loglalalure in which you proCountry ana* perfectly !" > 1 feaT your intention 'to preserve wlthtfie Spirit of our Conatituthe conitltutional freedom of; on and necessary subordination in if* AK AMA71SO D1JCOVBSY. AiS-wick, kiaa uopfcaani indoor uncus^crcn ihr scrongni cooking imclk.. iul •i-banosmells,bathroomunclii likill them in ihe air It actually aaakes fOM heme mull frmh and desn. Air-wick contains ctuotophyll. ill lubstancc in nature thai keeps ill growing plant* fresh and green It h.iU5 other natural compound* too. Air-wick ii so simpki aas. |u* unscrew the cap. pull up the wick, pi*. ihe huitlc <* lugh hell abov, IIH vittfcc ut smell. Smcllt vauiklt a* a hy magK. Air-wick .orv subtle— .'U lOO little ihe instigation of others rebellion, at the same time slavery. ... openly avowing Ihelr detestaI-ord Seaforth was ent out ,lion to any form of violence! Governor of Barbados, and f Not scrupling, withal, to avail especially charged to endeuvout the Island, to promote the cause of Religion and Vlrtuo, Jo encourage trade and to Secure the property and happiness ) all ranks of People' affords th. most heartfelt satisfaction to every friend of their Country Mr Poyer goes on to expose the (To be eontmued.) The Barbadian Diary of Oen. Robert Haynes. 1781— 1836; Edited by M. WCracknell. 1984. The Journal of the Barbados Museum and Historical Society. Vol. vni. page* 182—184. Are You Superstitious? I ihlnk n Ii : i u]>''i>ditiou* to aorm ntant %  van ihough pertw.i/ti" i do not even adsnh it t<> ihmim "luck vm are miiaiiiIlium and it will be in'' II Hni t,, watob th-vri. ol -uperstltiun manifested .it the Races next month. Some people will buy a No. 9 ticket simply because they wore born on the ninth, others may favour thirteen or seven, and kmd ada of other little super%  ittt o, v 11 becor: %  ;>o.ireiit uirkjbui how le : prend certain super slit iota. Tor Instance. i the practlci one time people in Britain of passing children through split anh saplings in order to cure them of certain rtHment.s; and In Africa the Medicine Men of Uganda and Like Nyassa did n similar passing thiough spill trees of people Mrlcken with Illness. The point of h reaTlgJ Is that Ihe practices of the three peoples were in use %  ( ou BM the same time, although 'here could not have be* 1 !! any coniinunlcatlon between Ihe savage and the civillaed pnei ttoaan ii-. have a loos; at some -superstitions *nd perhaps dyscover the reason'. iMthlnd thaen. it wi'h one phrase that %  gflM must have esjdod it OflM tune or nnother to UK' announcement of theli gOod health or fortune, "touch wood", at the same lime touching with the forefinger of the light hiind an object made of win>d. The meaning In Hiperstltiou". b Hud we .ire challenging: our fate, hut at the same lime seekina the protection of thing holy. Sanctuary Theie uu two possible origins of the 'touch wood" .superstition. The first Is the protectioa of the Cross; and It seems to have arisen In this connecUon from the old-time practice <>( sanctuary. Ttial ii the sanctuary provided by a hunted person touching the door at a church, when It was regarded as sacrilege for an> )( his tursuers lo continue Iheii to catch him. as he waregardcl aa under the protection of the church. But that is a comparativeh modem explanation of "touch ATOod", and to discover the nai origin of *he superstition W have to go back to those earl., cirrunistanccs In which man paid reverence to certain treeIn those times the cull of thBy IAN GALE oak tree became universal 'hioughout Europe, and It iiecame associated with the Sky i* lluu connacuKl with Ihe number Uurtocn. iiie ill luck of Juilveii u> heightened if by i-hance the UuriecnlA of the iDskUil aliould lull on a Friday. JO Uie uiher nand lb* beuaf is aged Dial a child burn on the nincet.th will be lucky in all ius ventures started in after life n this day. The thirteen superstition exists throughout Europe, and It is impossible in any French town or city to Hod a house .lumbered thirteen. Also, few jhisscnger liners would dare to 'Live ,i uumber 13 cabUi. Thirteen Guineas As evidence that the superstition waa nut cuiinned lo the less intelligent of the population, there may be sighted the coae of Mi Justice Lux more, an English High Court Judge, who held very strongly by the super.tun.n When practising at the Bar, he would never accept any irrief marked thirteen guineas One solicitor, who knew this, sent him on one occasion a brief marked "twelve and another" It was returned lo him. Religious circles ascribe the Origin <>f the thirteen superstition to bhe Last Supper, at which thete were Christ and His Iwclve disciples—thirteen in all. Bui this would hardly account for the dislike of the Humans and the Greek* for the number thirteen. It is more accountable in this case by the story of the Valhalla banquet in Greek mythology, to which twelve of the goda were Invited l-okl. the spirit of Strife and Mischief, Intruded, making thuleen, and Balder, the favourite '>f the gods, was killed. Talking of superstitions, [ Id not leave out horaeatfioBBi. those universal emblema of ,.ood luck. The general superaition U that a horseshoe naileo over the Untal of a house will Uring good luck to all inside. i ut there are variations. Ow the Scottish fishing coast it u Relieved that a hc ra s jh oe naded to the mast of a fishing smack rtlll protect it from gvorms and In the North of England the upenrtition runs: "If you see a ,,..rseshoe In your path, pick It op. and spit on it, and throw It !v,.. your left shoulder, al the -am* Urn* framing a wish, the ..Ish will come true." If Faith Can Heal—What Is The Church Doing? \u CANNON HIGH WARNER Nailed Upward "StrggflM t Ihem—yc>. **" iruihfuilb *db / have seen stmniM of people comtaa here with various kinds of sickness. None of them leaves as without m some u>op bciiio Ihe belter." I could not doubt the ring ol HiiiVicUon I" theekoice of Rev. Hubert Horn Andrew.as we sot i.lklng In his cel-lik* study down iKwset way. Hv ban wo* silvei .md he did not look in* n ysacm. He recalled the day, iiaorlj i U i years ago. when he jome-i .tie pioneer founder of Wilton But remamber. horseshoe* Abbey sanctuary. B land for d-the John Malltard—as an astls.... prleat. Father John, he told DM w-' i way In Devonshire conduct** %  rie of his many healing mission"Yes," he went on,"nowaday\o take only the so-called incunjles. For over 15 years Father [ohn has lived here building up m* centre of spiritual healing \iiiong the incurables' who have stayed wh us—three or four necks t the average time—we i.av seen real miracles happen." If beauty and peace can heal. it surprised. The Setting always be nailed upwards. IdThe origin of this was the bellol tiiat the Devil, against whom the oharm" woe directod. always traveU in circles, and is consequently interrupted when he arrives at either of the heels of the shoe and is forced thereby to take a retrograde course. Great men have had the falling for horseshoes. Nelson, it Is iccorded, always had a horseshoe firmly nailed to ihe mast of the "Victory". There are two explanations as to the origin of the horsaahoe upenrtition. The first Is ..scribed to the legend of St Duusum and the Devil. The S.iin! w:i, noted ;e blacksmith and. according to the legend, one nay the devil presented himseir .Hid asked to have his hoof shod. St. Dunstan recognized him ..nd. after fastening bis yisiloi to a wall, went to work on hi* %  hoof so roughly that the devil hud lo bug for mercy. Before eleasing lum. however. SL Dunstan exacted a promise that he should never enter a place i where he saw a horsaahoe displayed. The mure likely explanation. however. Is that originated from the Roman belief thai evil could he nailed, and the hammering Of natl on the doors and over nuilitings was a weU-iecognlied means of curing or diverting ill luck and dHoane) How great *•"' '',> .„„"olng Into Egypt. the charm of the horseshoe at one time Is Illustrated by the fact that one of the "good wishes" of the early Prt of the last century was: "That the horse-shoe may never be pulled fi.-n your threshold." ioentally, 1 consumed Fathei oloiltaiu. Father Anirewa, and a third resident prte 1, tie Kev. Leslie Dunwoll, share ,n these Healing services al the ...tar rail, moving down to those *rbfl cannot ieve their MBta, ouching. and pi-yuig We have a doctor here who nag taly Joined our couunu:,ity,' I was told. "He. loo hares in the laying of hands in l. e chapel %  •rvice.'' So you believe in medical co%  i eration?" 1 oskad. For answer. I was IN to %  %  or marked "Occupational Therapy." Inside were two larg' h>om for weaving, and 'hree iiuller ones. A model plane ley in a window receas, and ie rials for doU nudung, raffia work, and other crafts flUeri th. 11 elves. lie opened another door. Her a/erg large lamps for light an'l i ;.y treatments, and couches for -N.i&sagtt, each with its screen You see." explained Father Midrews, "the prayer of faith is the Insu-ument of the divine haling forces of the Heavenly Father. This attitude is not %  posed to the medical and nur| II g professions; It pn'.y insist-, on prayer as the divinely ap( mted way of transferring; q ritual healing, which If neither, 1 "er nor worse lhan any tther -•n.y Material remedies must be Smiled in their scope becau?'' they do not Include the mor'il i %  inent For complete heallni!. i u've got to get ot all the root uses, spiritual as well. Spiritual healing is proiecled "Ugh the fellowship of two throe gathered In the name of present, living Christ."' The Nursea As a nursing sister passed aloni t e passage ha want on: "We haw resident staff of five trained %  '> %  •• and two male nurses, trained physiotherapist her oervicea. Dr. Woodard, grandson of the founder MCkness should be regarded as on the altar to control muscle movements. STOP PAIN QUICKLY with Phensic The famous threefold u ol PHENSIC tablets RELIEVED V N. St>OTHES NERVES, COl'N i r.i itH'S D1 SION. No mailer how matier how weary your r you feel, PHENSIC tai relief and comfort, qui>. member this — PHI \ harm the heart nor u Doni accept substitutes PHENSIC tablets by yoi, the pain, no cs, how<,'c/''V.w; will i ; and safely. Rc'! tablets ncithct ie! the stomach. Keep a supply t>i Through lu* study window ikvd across to the wooded )oreai hi.i which "'"P'*'' bad once stood The nune. 200 years or so ago. ,. Had ttV Dtg#al to the groun .itlent'. \-enlng. Two bonk-.. mid the names of hundreds of ..k who are prayed for earti rriing before breakfast at tr —WONDER WHEELS N Why Hercules is the finest bicycle built to-day 1 portion of a horseshoe shaped rlnlv rommunIrwv wedding cake this week, so I Every Wednesday as should be well protected from I .-.ling service, with layir the Devil—fouch wood: ^f hands, bring* visitor* (To be Continued) 'heir sick friends. I stood by ray car In the great' .. rtyard. Father Andrews apoko 1 wa' leaving of another cominl grlmda who pray in KTOUDS • 12 all over the country for th-' %  '. "We send them six ne' from time to time for lr Intercession.* The he^i designers and cnp.ie.-p. in the GJOhl induatr>' use the lincst mai.i .ii to build your Hercules. Even the smallc i partN arc tested many time and each Herculc* | built sepjraiely brilliant liniah ft quality, and you Imvc ic reasons why Hercules "The Finest Bicycle Built To-day." INOIM TISTINO *HO OOMaONSMn Hercules THE HEKCULES CYCLE MOTOR COMPANY lTD. IISMiaCHAM (NClAMO ^^fgSrV-V SOLO BY ALL LEADING DEALERS T. GEDDES GRANT LTD., BRIDGETOWN


|





Sunday Advocat



ESTABLISHED 1895



KING FAROUK FO
Military Take Over
The Royal Palaces

Ex-King’s

Six-Month

Son Rules By Regency

(By WALTER COLLINS)

King Farouk abdicated
the Egyptian new

“strong man”
Naguib Bey. The King agreed to leave the country. The

CAIRO, July 26.
on Saturday at the demand of
General Mohammed

new King it was announced, will be Farouk’s baby son
Crown Prince Ahmed Fuad, born to him and Queen Narri-

man last January 17.

It is expected that a R
to rule in Ahmed’s name
32-year-old King prepared

egency Council will be named
until he becomes of age. The
to flee on Saturday evening

by yaeht—the fabulous yacht in which he spent his honey-
moon with 18-year-old Narriman.

General Naguib in a statement to the nation said, | Anglo-Persian dispute.

“To-day is a day of action”.
their emotions.
Naguib personally made a

He called on people to control

London heard Cairo Radio saying that

broadcast statement saying he

asked Farouk to abdicate in favour of his son and Farouk
agreed. Naguib said he asked the King to get out of the
country by 6.00 p,m. and that Farouk agreed to that also.

It was reported in Cairo:that Farouk was preparing to
leave the country by 6.00 p.m.

Wild cheering broke out in
Cairo when the news of the abdi-
cation of the fun loving King was
broadcast by the official radio.
War planes started sweeping low
over the city. Farouk reached the
end of his reign in Alexandria, the

nean coast.

The first news of the diama
came in a report from Alexandria
that army troops had broken into
Farouk’s Rashline Palace after a
clash with his bodyguard. The
troops arrested Lieutenant Gen-
eral Abdulla El Nagoumi, the
King’s chief aide-de-camp.

Troops surrounded the Palace
where Farouk, the Quaen and the
Crown Prince are staying, advices
said. Troops with tanks and cav-

summer capital on the Mediterra- |

‘alry also surrounded Abdine and |

Koubbeh Palaces in Cairo.
“Man of Destiny”
Troops here and in Alexandria
operated under orders by General
Mohammed Naguib “Bey; “sypt's
new “man of, destiny”, who en-

| Shortage Of
Nurses At Caura
Sanatorium

(From Our Own Correspondent)

} PORT-OF-SPAIN, July 26.

! The Nursing Council which
‘meets on Monday afternoon will
consider the possibility of employ-
ing nurses of other colonies to ease
the critical shortage at Caura
Sanatorium. Three Ward Sisters
| and five nurses are left to tend 155
patients at the Sanatorium today
when three nurses and a Ward
Sister returned to Jamaica.

Dr. L. G. W. Urich, Acting Di-
rector of Medical Services, said to-
‘day there were 500 registered
nurses in the colony. “The prob-
lem I should say, is that nurses





are not keen to do T.B. work,” Dr,

Urich added.

gineered the coup four days agoj LAND SET TLEMENT
and put independent Aly Maher | Ot the $500,000 grant which
Pasha into office as Premier. | Trinidad is hoping to get from the

Maher and Naguib conferred in
Alexandria on Saturday morning,
and then Maher went to Rashtine
Palace to see Farouk. It was re-
ported he found the Palace sur-)
rounded and its doors barricated.

Colonial Development and Wel-
fare for a Land _ Settlement
Scheme more than half is ear-
marked for roads,
water supplies.
The grant is being held up by

bridges and



BARBADOS, JUUY 27, 1952
ee : ‘
CED

HE GAVE CONVENTION BIG LAUGH







Mossadegh
Will Discuss _
Compensation

TEHERAN, July 26. |

g |

A semi-official source said on
Saturday that during yesterdey’s
interview between Mossadegh and
the British Charge D’Affaires,
George Middleton, the Persian s
Prime Minister indicated he
would be prepared to discuss
compensation to be paid to the ea
Anglo-Iranian Oil Company, and 3
he was also prepared to let the
British take up any disputes, 2
with the Persian Court of Law!
now that The Hague had declared
itself incompetent. to judge the

Middleton, who is the frst!
Foreign Envoy to visit Mogssr |

=



of Marcelino Romani, a Puerto Rican al te, provided the delegates
with a welcome break, After the three-ffian delegation had voted in
favor of Taft backers, Ro i ught down the house by demanding
a poll, When the poll was taken, Romani further convulsed the gath-
ering by voting for Eisenhower stpportera,

ls

(International)

Argentina’s First Lady
Eva Peron, Dies At 30

BUENOS AIRES, July 26.
Senora Eva Peron the wife of President Juan Peron, |
died at 8.25 p.m. on Saturday.

| WHEN TENSION MOUNTED at the GOP convention in Chicago, the antics |




The announcement of her death followed a series of |
medical bulletins deseribing her condition as “very seri-

ous.” The latest said she lapsed into unconsciousness.
Senora Peron, Argentina’s first lady, underwent a
major operation last November and has been declining

| steadily since. Her age is given officially as 30.

. Senora Peron, South America’s
. j most controversial woman, had
Allies Walk enjoyed unprecedented power and
cnormous wealth for seven years

( , Of K. a ee { President Peron.
5 ( Put : ter the operation Argentine's
| PREMIER MossADEGH Sipe gr the countrys
} pn eee | affairs and to r@sume control of
ore ae _fedppbiiitdneht as her many philanthropies and
emier » talke wo hours. with MUNSAN., Korea, July 26 Labour Union activities, but she
the Persian statesman and later} Ajlied edctiikae take tock ied made few public appearances and
described the meeting as most}Communists of utter hypocrisy |{P°%t little time «at her offices in
friendly. He called on Mossadeghiand walked out of the Korean |the Labour Department building
at the Premier’s request, Truce talks for a week. ‘where she issued orders and
During the past week all Iran; Maj. Gen. William K. Bprticon, | Tore ee ministers and ambassa-
has been. combed for .GhavamjJr.. the senior United Nations} Gors despite the fact that she

He got inside with difficulty, re-) Colonial Development and Wel-j|who is still in hiding. Newspaper | delegate, told the protesting Reds ,mever held an official Government

ports said, and found Farouk in| fare because it is the Comptroller’ reports said on Saturday that the

Admiral’s uniform standing in the |
middle of a protective group of|
naval officers in thé garden over-

who is questioning the “direct
productivitv” of these items.

looking the Mediterranean. PARCEL POST

Maher conferred with Farouk
twenty minutes. He then went!
back to Government officers to!
confer with Naguib, reports sail.

American Ambassador Jefferson
Caffery called on Maher to dis-
cuss the crisis. Caffery like other
Ambassadors, King and Govern-
ment make their headquarters in
Alexandria during the oppressive
summer heat in Cairo.

Reports spread swiftly that
Naguib insisted on amending the
Egyptian constitution and that
Farouk refused. It was reported
Caffery told Maher that the Unit-
ed States would be prepared to
guarantee the safety of the King
if he left the country,

A bulletin received from Alex-
andria said the King already left
there in his yacht Fayd El Bihar
and that he intended to go to the
United States. The American Em-
bassy had no confirmation of this.

Disturbing Rumours

Negui® has been disturbed by

rumours that the navy cruising in
@ On Page 12

Rear-Admiral
Metzel Dies

WASHINGTON, July 26.
Rear Admiral Jeffrey Metzel,
55, who commanded a destroyer
division in World War I died on



Saturday from a fractured skull. |
examiner, Frank Bros-;

Medical
chart said Metzel plunged a Jap-
anese Samurai sword into his ab-
@omen, then jumped from the
window of his home in Chevy
Chase. ip, se
Friends said the Admiral who
retired in 1949 after serving in
the office of Naval Inspector of
Materials, had been _ suffering
from a heart condition.—U.P,

Red China Objects

Tw Formosa

TORONTO, July 26.

The Chinese Communist officially
protested against the seat-
ing of the Formosan representa-
tive at the eighteenth
tional Red Cross Conference, The
official protest mote said that no
representative of the government
of Formosa — a Nationalist —
should be allowed to sit in the
Conference of an equal basis with
delegates from ‘the Feople’s Re-
public of China.” It is not knows
what action the Conference offi-
cials planned.—U.P.

NO QUORUM AT
HOUSING BOARD

A meeting of the Housing Board
which was scheduled to take place
yesterday at 10 a.m., did not take
place due to the lack of a quorum.
Up to 10.40, only three members
had arrived, Messrs. J 3eckles,



ee a: Pe BOR. Se wel

O’Mahony

Interna-!

Arising out of the Conference
last Friday between Hon, Mitra
Sinanan, Acting Minister of Works
and Communications, C, G. Fol-
well, Postmaster General, A. Shill,

j; Comptroller of Customs and Ex-

cise, gift parcels will be opened #n
future before the eyes of the re-
cipient. This follows
complaints of pilfering.
studied at the conference were

measures to improve the efficiency | On Foreign Policy

at the Parcel Post Department and]

to prevent pilferage. Additional
Customs Officers may be posted at
the Parcel Post Department.

August 2 A Public
Holiday In J’ca

(From Our Own Correspondent)

KINGSTON, July .26.



The Governor, Sir Hugh Foote,| sentatives of the two parties.

declared Saturday, August 2, a
publie holiday in honour of Rho-
den's victory in the 400 métres.on
Thursday and his showing in Ja-
maica’s team.

The decision of the declaration
followed a cable of congratula-
tions sent to the Jamaica team,
and money by the
people and the Jamaica newspa-
pers, It was suggested by the
Mayor of the City.






|



mexico Holds Annual Talks

Governor,|and Puerto Rico, There will be| Special

| PARENTS FULFILL Gi SON’S WISH 9] sss, ‘armados) “Pr M| Yee

that he would return on August 3, | position. Until almost the last she
Persian Government has instruc- He said: “If you have anything kept in touch with events by
ted all its envoys in the neigh-}] Worth saying before August 3 you telephone,
bouring countries to contact rele-{¢@n say it to our staff officers | Her last public appearance
lvant governments to inform the The walkout ended the first}came on June 4 when she was at
| Persian Government when and if}Pen session at Panmunjom injher husband's side during his
Ghavam arrives in their country.| three weeks, Eighteen of the re- {inauguration for a second term

—UP. cord meetings since July 4 failed She was very thin, Her once pho-

to break the deadlock over how tographic face bad shrunk and
. *
Celgate ‘Varsity



to exchange prisoners of war, the i a
key obstacle to an Armistice in Wan, eee
Tokyo. .
Gen. Mark Clark, Supreme Thai : : se
Allied Commander, said the closed ante pte : > ‘t gradual
sessions failed to produce results! word that she. _and there came
because the Communists refused | ry ys she was failing, During
to recognize the inescapable fact |; '% weeks of her life masses

Gradual Decline



HAMILTON, NW, July 26. | that a large percentage of the {or ber health were, celebrated
Colgate... Universié ms its}COMmunist prisoners refused to) PMS! Cally, usually under
fourth Abmual Ashecican eign| 8° back to their. former masters., Labour or Government spon-

—ICP),



I }sorship. One Labour Union sent
Aten Wik Mahe. foekigh cabal members in relays to the Church
sadors among the speakers for a Ch \ ss | B W I A |e. Bray os the clock for her
meare. wesibiongtebaaaioe: More| anges nb.W.LA. : covery and many statues in her
than 200 delegates are expected 7 . nae eae Pp anned. ;
to hear the Foreign Policy stands: Organisation va Peton had gone a long way
of the Republican and Democratic pee Mand youth and she had
platforms analyzed by the repre~ As a result of the visit here on| pest an Fenn iia spe, ring Ot Hep
Friday of Sir Errol Dos Santos, | por *e Slate Cree 100; “Dray
Hume Wrong, Canadian Am-j Chairman of the Board of Direc- |i tir rivate Secretary and
bassador to the United States|tors of B.W.LA. Ltd. and the|‘helr mother live near the presi-
speaks at the opening session, and| General Manager, Mr. John Rahr dential mansion in Buenos Aires’
is expected to discuss Canadian-| certain changes have been made} suburb, Little is known of the
United States relations. Other am-|to the company’s organisation in |/@@rly life of “Eveita” little Eva,



bassadors who will speak at vari-| Barbados and effective from Au-|#8 She liked to be known to the|

ous sessions include those from|gust 1. Mr. Percy Taylor, present| People. She was born in the vil-
Australia, Pakistan, New Zealand| manager, will assume the title of|!#8e Los Tolgeos 150 miles from
Representative B.O.A.C/| Buenos Aires, probably on May.
round tables, luncheon sessions,, B.W.I.A., Barbados in chtrge of)/7, 1919. In recent years she!
Vera eeening partion. \ Public Relations. jinsisted that dhe was born
1 —UP. Mr. Oliver Johnson, the pres) 1922, a claim that helped last;
_..jent Assistant Manager, will suc-!year to keep her from becoming
President for which
minimum age is 30.

KITCHEN BLAZE q



family of Juan Duarte and

A portion of the kitchen of a| Her mother took her brood to the
house at Black Rock, St. Michael railway centre of Junin during
was burnt when a fire occurred at Eva's childhood. Early in the
about 2.35 a.m. yesterday. The 1940's, Eva Duarte went to the
Haye is the property of Louis«
|



Haynes, , as actress.
Re The Fire Brigade turned out, She made little impression on
ut arrived on the scene only to\Stage, sereen and radio, despite

find that the blaze was ady ;her beaut er striki
eee ng s already | beauty, her strikingly blonde







GEORGETOWN, July 26.

Crowism in the United States’ race segregation as practised
by the Demerara Bauxite Company Ltd., in British Guiana

on a motion by Hon. Lionel Luckhoo.
A motion




















in jthe Republicans, they come forth

the it again this year.
Eva was one of five children ot ollt ever since I have been jn

Senora Juana Ibarguren Duarte,|tions, you
big city to geek her fortune ag}the newspapers and magazines on

The damage is not esti-}hair and her husicy voice, untiljin 1948 acted like monkeys

- White Wines—Chille
mated. she met President Peron. -U.P. the famous jungle book—monkeys | $ Red Wines par
$1 D ‘ had a convention—they said ‘ity ¥ 2 ‘ea «~Port | all

: ° must be so, since we all say so’ "| $ E ei, :

| r. Jagan Urges Sending This got ahother big laugh. 13 W acuta) Sweet f room
* N ‘It turned out differently in| % : ‘Deandy Sherry | fempera-
Army ‘I oO South Afr 1948. All those pollsters and| % Brandy j ture

1 1¢ca pressmen should have conferred} % And dont be confused



: J among themselves. In five elec-'
Hon, Dr. Cheddi B. Jagan, elected member for Central tions in a row people have showed 3
Demerara urged that an army be sent to South Africa toithey don’t do what the news- %
rid the country of the “blatant Fascist tyranny”. Jim [|P@Pers tell them.’ %

and racial prejudices in the banks and elsewhere in Water , but
* 20 g i

“treet also were deplored by other members of the Legis-|Republican policies. “Republicans ¥
lative Council during a two-day debate ending on Friday |@ve @ candidate, but they have

PRICE : SIX CENTS

a

TO ABDICATE

monte Adlai Stevenson Accepts

| Presidential Nomination

From All Quarters:

Democrats Cheose
Sparkman: As Mate

(By LYLE C. WILSON)
Ci! SAGO, July 26.

> s
Convicts Will
7 +
Get An Annual
__ Adlai E. Stevenson accepted the Democratic Presiden-, Holiday
tial nomination on Saturday and tired delegates w rapped |

up the Party’s national convention in a final session] Cateutta: Under new penal re-
and called to make Senator John J, Sparkman convicts in Bombay Stata



Illinois Governor's mate. Stevenson picked the 52-year-old] are. to be allowed an annual
Alabaman as Vice Presidential nominee at near dawn with oo 5 ar etanet cames a

> C Ga 7G } f y -
President Truman and the other party leaders. ; ;

ence.
The President who backed Stevenson for the top spot] to use free hair oil are
concessions
Wellington; Several boys at
Palmerston North Technical High
School were too tired to do their
work properly Investigations
showed they were all apprentice
jockeys who had been appren-
ticed since they were twelve, and
that they went to school only to
rest.

Permission to smoke and
otner
was delighted by the addition of Sparkman to the ticket.
After a morning conference he flew to Kansas City for a
visit to nearby independence Missouri his home town
“There's not a better fellow (than Sparkman) for the
job. It’s a winning ticket. That's all I care about”, Truman
told reporters. The last session af the thirty-first Demo-
cratic National Convention started less than twelve hours
after Stevenson was proclaimed unanimously the Party’s

choice for White House. Berlin; Berlin’s oldest
. - Herman Laebe. 98, this week

, tion by Senator Lister Hill of :

= : showe rt O z
Truman S BOO | eeoee tea “heartiah ot anal to prove that his daiher was Born
a league as a “guardian of mall : a n

as i in 1796.
‘and an acclaimed leader Washington

Sparkman was put for nomina- man,

. business Eighteen - stona
mocrats in the struggle of free nations for) comedian Jack Leonard, appear-

jeollective security

He said together Sparkman and
Stevenson “will tear away the
mask of hypocrisy and pretension
seek the stark

ing in a stage show of a Wash-
ington cinema convalesced his
audiences with “I've got ong
piece of good news for you—the
Russians will never occupy
Washington. They just couldn't

Must Win
that people may

: CHICAGO, July, 26. naked reaction of the republican
: yen Truman told a cheer-|party, the party of the few by the
ing Democratic convention eariy|}few and for the few”. >
to-day that he is going to “take Paris; A workman who fished

afford to live here,”
Sparkman who supported Sena-). ape. « ;
my coat off” and do everything |tor Richard Russell of Georgia | fibre suitcase from the Seine



; } N found it crammed with 100,000
possible to help Governor Adlai|presidential nomination sald he ; .

Â¥ i a Se lars-wor shes
Stevenson capture the White]felt it a good thing to have a Sonera Worth of Ame iten Ghone

1 ; ’ i notes about
House, “This, in my opinion, “fee on the ticket, i

police found that they were
forgeries —- thrown away by
members of an international for-
gery gang during a police chase
three months ago.

New York: A talking road is
being planned by New Jersey. A
two-foot strip of scored concrete
will be laid in the centre and a
one sweresan on to it will set up
such a
party to dedicate itself) elad i» = sake LE eee eee,
of the foad — or maybe right
across to the wrong side,

_ Rangoon: Henceforth — local
party of} cinemas will play the national
don't | °%@ bo i oe at the commencement of
, dor e asked fellow Democrats}|@ performance to compel the
oer ay = or party had who nominated him against his} @uUdienee to stand to attention
“r nen to choose from and Wel wishes to give “all you have.” He] instead of making a rush for the

have had a lot of geod men in the t m
g I < se ‘ta give 4 g its when the anth i
Democratic Party, It is hard ‘to promised in turn ‘to give you all 7 when the anthem is play

£40,000. But
the greatest Democratic conven-
tion ever held” he said. “You
have stood by the principles that
the Democratic Party is a great Addressing a tumultuous jam-
arty. » packed drowd shortly after his
“You have nominated a winner nomination, Governor Stevenson
eedged himself to muster “the
osts of courage, morality, and wis-

Stevenson Speaks

for the next President of the
United States. You are going out ”
from this Convention much strong- {10 And to do battle against
er than when you went in,’ _. ignorance and mistrust. “He called
Speaking trom notes, the Presi- |“ “*e

dent said: “One of the things that to becoming “the people’s party,
impressed me, and I watched this not the Labour party, not the
Convention on television, is the|{@¢mer's party, nor the employ-
great wealth of ability we have in| °'® Party", but “the
the Democratic Party. I Syren



‘ ! have” in what, as is confidently] @t the end of a programme,
make a choice on these great predicted, will be a eaten of cm
leaders. oy our choice is one that] quest to capture the White House
we can all get behind. He said that the Republicans /

; “We are bound to win this elec-|are hopelessly divided, and that Marryshow
tien, Not four years ago I spoke|EKisenhower—the leader whom we

at a Democratic convention injall respect—‘ha been calle Expected Here
Philadelphia, 1 aid Senator,;upon to minister to a hopele

Barkley and I were going to win|case
in 1948. There are people who ‘did
not believe.. They turned out to
be wrong. I am telling you now
that Adlai Stevenson is going to|/done me”, but that “I accept your Hon. T.
win in 1952. This brought a|rmvemination and your programme
tremendous roar from the crowd | should have preferred to hear
“We will win in 1952 the same|those words uttered by a strong
Way we won in 1948” he pledged.|°", Wiser, better man than my
“And I say to you iow, that | Self.”
am going to do everything I cao Stevenson was
to make us win.” the
Then he brought laughs and
chuckles when he said: “A lot of|

of political schizophrenia
Unsought Honour
“Stevenson said that he did not

eek the honour which “you have

Vor Qorference

(From Our Own Correspondent?
GRENADA, July 26.
A. Marryshow flies to
Barbados tomorrow to join Nor-
man Manley and Grantley Adams
in what Marryshow described as
“discussions on certain matters of
West Indian importance”. Marry-
introduced to] show decided on the visit after
tumultuous crowd by Presi-]a radio-phone call from B.L.P.
@On Page 12 Secretary Walcott this morning.

people can’t understand why the ys SOC LLLP PLP PPP PPAF
Tenwcret beep on winning elec | 8
ions. They have just gone crazy) } Renowned ‘or inti i i

: ; az) eneE ovr Distinctic f 4
trying to figure out what it % J : ascites Caen s
You know the real reason why| %

>

Â¥

the Democratic party wins elec- R
tions is a perfectly simple reason %
Democrativ %

Kh. W. OV.

“The Wine of All Time.”

It is because the
party gives them the kind {| %
Government they want, q

62,000,000 Jobs

“Think what our country has
done in 20 years of Democratic
leadership,” Truman said. “We
have 62,000,000 jobs. The highest
living standards in history. Ags for

When the tine comes for Wine, it's time for
r r r
kh. W. WV.
and for a little discreet

WINE WISDOM

and try to stop the progress of a
mighty people» Well, they are at}

SOCSSS OOOO SIO SS

I think it has been my experi-

polls on their side
Well, the pollsters of the press

general rule to follow :
Dry Sherry—Slightly chilled



%
politics—if we to. 35, oie 3 PTHERE's no special rit-
tianitee % _ ual for serving wine;

That has been my policy and| % in fact, it couldn’t be,easier

that’s what will have to be done.| % It is quite true some wines
The Republicans have nearly ail| x require chilling, and others
Side sith Thee mar Tae moe Ny taste better at room tem-
probably will have, pub'ic opinion x perature. Here is a good

¢

v

%

GOK

in|



with peopl nste: alking | i
people, instead of talking) ¥ about the times to serve
different wines. Compli-

cated wine etiquette is , . .



: frowned on by people who

No Programme j % know = love wine. They

¥ erve : ine ay »

ee eG dle oa serve the wines they like,
auiatk woleed % When they like, and they

ee, eee always like K.W.V,

no programme. People are not

Make a point to serve these PAARL WINES with dinner—

LLLP LELEFESSPPEEL SLL LLLP LESSEE SLLSCSELESOPEPPES ESSA SECS SSSSESSSPSSS GAS

‘ . : ae r ' going to pay any atten t he @ , ’ . . ; :
ad condemning racialyResolution to the Secretary of - ane nt nt a tion to t you'll be delighted when you discover the special full-bodied
segregation enforced by South|State for the Colonies and to the|™°®" Wn Rave been opposing % favours these wines give the
7 Africa and placing on record the|United Nations, urging that steps everything they have wanted for % flav s these wines give the food you serve.
SHORTLY AFTER the President Wilson docked in San Francisco, Kim |Council’s abhorrence of the atti-|be taken by U.N. to persuade the |tMe past 20 years 3
»on Joong, 16-year-old Korean youth is met by his new “Mom” and | ‘ude adopted to various races in]South African Governme ode-| “The Republicans have been| %
7 ~ y a ; ; , rnment to de me @
and Mrs. Victor Beauchamp, Sr. Kim was a buddy of Gr | PUrsult of this poliey which “is|sist frorn such a disastrous course |4éainst social security; fair } S Remember
tor Beauchamp Jr., a machine gunner in Korea, who wrote his par= pisere to affect adversely amicable |and to adopt a policy towards al] | management laws; against housir 2 P Bi ga a ss ; :
f I s ever happens to me, please arrange for Kim to come re ad existing amongst peoples | races in South Africa in keeping| programmes gainst measut % to Steck up on K. W.V, SHERRY, BRANDY,
‘a and live in our home.” When the young soldier lost his muito’ er aren, the Declaration of Humanjfor peaceful co-operation with) and excellent Table Wines
life at the battlefront, his parents carried out his wish. (International) lernor to transmit a copy of the| eter et MaBons of the world % x
ernor 2 nsmit a ypy of —C.P. iat POSSE OCSOOOS SOCSSOCSSOOSSSSOCSOSSS9O9 GOS OSSSOSSGLN





3
$


PAGE TWO

? SOS SOSSSSSSS “o PCFSSSSOOSO a SPOOF POOP SRO OOOE,

ANETTA DRESS SHOP :

doe

6-8 DOGS

(Next Door to Singer's)

For The Holiday Week-End.

Coming

H+ 4-3-80OO¢

White and Coloured Sherts, Jeens, Play-Suits,
Swim Suits in many styles.

Orders taken for your Dresses for the Races.

"POOCVESOOS COLE LCLECLLPLE LPP AAD

rrr rr A, AAAS

3

TCHMA
<1Siy

a










|
KER |
i
1

Tho Bost (Zollection in Quality Watches







ee ee ee ee ee

TO-DAY 4.45 & 830 AND CONTINUING
DAILY

AT,
EMPIRE

JERRY WALD & NORMAN KRASHA presse

BARBARA STANWYCK
PAUL DOUGLAS
ROBERT RYAN

MARILYN MONROE

CLAsH By NIGHT





EMPIRE

\ ‘TO-DAY TO TUREDAY 445 & 8.15
_ TO-DAY 4.45 Republic Pictures Presents —

Brian BONLEVY. Forrest TUCKER
“HOODLUM EMPIRE”
with”

& 8.30 and Continuing
Daily


















Barbara Stanwyck aul Douglas






| Robert Ryan Marilyn Monroe t
1 in Claire Trevor — Vera, Ralston
“CLASH BY NIGHT" WED. & THUR. 6.30 & 8.18
Allan “Rocky” LANE
Extra in E
!2 Reel Musical: “Follow That Music”
| “DESERT OF LOST MEN”
MPIC an
OLY 1c “RODEO KING AND THE
| TODAY & TOMORPOW 4.09 & 815 1th SENORITAâ„¢
| Laura ELLIOTT Jim) ARNESS —

Rex ALLEN
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“TWO LOST WORLDS” ROYAL
| Last 2 Shows 4.50 & & 15
endl Dane CLARK - Ben JOHNSON
in

“FORT DEFIANCE”

and
“THE TORCH"
Starring
Paulette Goddard Pedro
Armenderiz

in







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Starring
| Robert PRESTON Elizs





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| TUBS. & WED 1.80 & 815









itawart, Gra behenes MON @ TUES, 4.30 & & 15
| in “TWO LOST WORLDS”
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} Starring

Robert Preston —- Elizabeth Sellars







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GLOBE
This Evening 3.30

\don.— Tues. 5 28.30

Wed. — Thurs: 4.45 & 8.30
SHOW BOAT

Ava GARDNER—Joe E,
AND

JESSE JAMES



BROWN

Randy SCOTT : Tyrone POWER

GAIETY

The Garden—St. James

TODAY & TOMORROW 4.30 p.m.
MAT. TODAY 4.45 pm
“GRAND CANYON"

Richard ARLEN &
“DEPUTY MARSHAL"
Jon HALL — Dick FORAN

TUES. & WED. 8 © pm
“CASA MAN A’
Virginia WELLS — Robert CLARK <:
“MASTER: MINDS"
Leo GORCEY & The De
AF PE

>




SUNDAY ADV

ROFESSOR A. K. CROSTON,
Professor of English at the
University College of the West
Indies, arrived from Jamaice on
Priday night by B.W.1.A. to. take
part in the Extra Mural Sumner
; School at Codrington College. He
jis staying at Codrington Colleg®.

Intransit

R. ANDREW PEARSE, Res-

ident Tutor in Trinidad for

the University College of =

Indies, arrived here on aay

morning by the S.S. Golfite in-

transit for the United Kingdom

where he has gone on leave. He

was accompanied by his wife and
children.

Veterinary Surgeon

. EARLE KIRBY of St. Vin-

cent who qualified as a Ve-
terinary Surgeon at Toronto Uni-
versity earlier this year, passed
through here on Friday from Can-
ada by the Lady om his
way back home to take up an ap-
pointment with the Government.

After One Year

Aut spending a year in the
US.A., Miss Daisy Hill re-
turned to Barbados on Friday

?

night by BWA. via Puert:
Rico and Antigua. She is 7 ing
with her brother-in-law and, sis-

ter Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Weagther-
head of Enterprise Road, Christ
Church. %

From B.G.

ee at the Crane Hotel
are Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Pater-
son and their little c
Sybil of McKenzie, British Guiana.
Mr. Paterson is the Chief Mining
Engineer of the Demerara Bauxite
Company. He was here. on holi-
day since tl.c 19th July.

The Patersons’ original home is
Toronto, Canada.

Mining Engin.-er

R, JOHN JESSE HAYES of
Cuidad Bolivar who spent
a month's holiday in Barbados,
returned home on Friday night
via Trinidad by B.W.LA. to
resume his duties as a mining en-
gineer with the U.S, Steel Cor-
poration,
While here, he was marrieq to
Miss Mary Wilkie, daughter of
Mr. and Mr@® Glenn M. Willie ‘of
Detroit, Michigan, at St, Peter's
, Church by Rev. A. J. Hatch. He
' Was a guest at Paradise Beach
| Club. His wife is expected to
join him towards the end of the
month,
Dr. Hayes said that he had
travelled to every Continent ex-

boot Africa and his wife and he

expressed the view that Barbados
was the most delightful place
they had ever visited and they
were sorry they had to leave.

(From Our Own Correspondent)

His Excellency the Governor,
accompanied by Lady Black-
.burne, will mae Antigua on the
and discuss various
matters with the Comptroller
for Development and Welfave
and his Advisers. After these
discussions His Excellency will
spend a few days local leave in



By MAX PRELL

“WILERE are you goltig, Willy?’ |
“Tin in a hurry, Knarf,” said/
Willy, stopping for a moment, just!
“Tm doing al
\

to enich his breath.
wom *

Kiort tooked at Willy, puzzled, |
‘Boing a poem, Willy? What poem?!

Hew are you doing it?”

“Well,” said Willy, “1 just made}
| up ® poem. It’s all about myself. |

cause I’m a toad.
derstand?”

Now do you un-

ing a poem.”

in a Hurry

tom t aDeputy.



Willy Tood Wrote a Poem

—And He Acted It Out Himself—

{ mean, it’s about a toad—and {'m
\ toad, so it’s all about a toad like
myself, so it’s all about mysel: be-

“But why do you have to do rhis
poem? +I never heard of anyone do-

OCATE



SUNDAY,

Carib (Calling

On Holiday

R. AND MRS. RAYMOND
BEGUELIN from Caracas,
Venezuela arrived in the colony
on tHe 18th July after touring the
French Antilles and are guests at
the Crane Hotel. Mr. Béguelin is
Head of C.A. OFJAP specialised

firm in Far Eastern Trade.

Spent Eighteen Months
RS. ROSE ALEXIS of Trini-

dad who has been in the
island for the past 18 months, re-

turned to Trinidad by the SS. De
Grasse on Thou ? was
accompanied by her daughter
Mary,

Mrs. Alexis also e to visit

Curacao later and will be return-
ing to the island in about two
months in time for the reopening
of the, Ursuline Convent where her
daughter is a pupil.

U.S. Civil Servant
ISS ARIEL THOMPSON, 2 Mr. HERMAGE G. SMITH.

Civil Servant im the U.S.A.
attached to the Taxation Depart. - After 39 Years
R! HERMAGE G, SMITH, a

ment, leaves tomorrow morning
Barbadian who has been



by B.W.LA. for Antigua and
Puerto Rieo on her way back

horfie after g seven ‘weeks’ residing in the U.S.A. for the past
holiday wi her aunt, Mrs. 39 years, returned home on Fri-
Eugene Gadsby of Salters, St. day night by B.W.1A. via Puerto
Michael, Rico and Antigua on a visit to his

relatives and
brother-in-law

On her first visit to the West

is a guest of his
Indies, Miss Thompson was deep-

end_ sister, Mr.

ly impressed by the y of and Mrs. F, A. Waterman of
the people-and the climatic con- “Montrose,” Water Street, Christ
ditions She has asked to say Church,

thanks to all those friends who At the airport to welcome him

assisted im making her stay such were his father, Mr. Joseph S.

an enjoyable one. Smith who resides with his

R oe» ae oor and

Schoolmast: éturns many of his relatives and friends.

H sr A Civil Servant attached to the

Post Office in New York, Mr.

M* eit: eo a Smith is 8 ectier of Br. Ravils

| w as en Smith of “Brooklyn, River Road,

teaching at Kingston College, and Mr, Irvin Smith of Chelsea
Jamaica for the past three years. Road. ‘

returned home on Friday even-
ning by B.W.LA. © ee the Back To Venezuela
summer vacation wit is rela- :
tives at Orange Hill, St. James. “eo hn “Soueer wen
Next term, Mr. Wellington will. B.WEA. were Mr. and Mrs
be going on to St. Kitts to take John “Miner of Anaco who had
up an appointment at the Gram- spent twelve days’ holiday a:
guests of Paradise Beach Club.

mar School.
* Mr. Miner is Superintendent for
Attended Public Health Qin Maahere ‘Division a te

Course Tech Service Co. _
PENDING a week in Barbados For Two Weeks

before returning. to Domin-
RS. F. A. BROWN, wife of

ica are Mr. Emanuel ae eee
Z , Pa , bot n-
ind Mr. Georve Bruney, bo a fie Manager of the British

itary Inspectors of Roseau. They

arrived here on Friday evening by Bata Shoe Company in St. Kitts,
B.W.LA. from Jamaica after arrived here on Friday morning by
attending a ten months’ course at Me Lady for two weeks

the Public Health Training Centre. holiday. She was accompanied
They are guests of Mrs, Wooding by her daughter, Phyllis and they
of Nelson Street. are guests at the Aquatie Club.

Barbados, returning to Antigua
on the 14th August. During his
absence, the Hon, P, D. Mac
Donald will be Governor’s

A Noted London Surgeon
Explains why the Bulletins
from Buenos Aires Speak of
‘Desperate’ one day and
‘Rallying the next. . .

By GEORGE SAVA

Everybody is puzzled by the
seemingly conflicting reports about
Eva Peron’s illness. One day she
is said to be sinking. A few days
later we hear of her smilingly
receiving a delegation in the
|course of her duties.

Then she is reported to
“critical” again.

What is really wrong with her?
How can she. be alternately
ee one day, then critically
ill?

From personal knowledge of
Eva Peron, I believe I know the

Sir Kenneth Blackburne has
been in the Leeward Islands two
years and this is the first occas-
ion that he will be taking a few
days leave.

be

truth,
Up-down
Leucemia, from whieh she is
suffering,

the white corpuscles of the blood
multiply alarmingly. Violent ups

| _CRossworD

MAG{ABB DABS



}



Willy wrote down two lines.

Barbadian Returns To

U.S.A.

ETURNING to the U.S.A. dur-

We the past week was Miss

Beryl Walcott, eldest daughter of
Mr, and Mrs. Alport Walcott of
“Mildred Cot,” Britton’s Hill. Miss
Walcott's visit to Barbados lasted
five weeks, and was the first since
she left the island some fourteen
years ago. Despite fourteen years
of ultra-modern New York, she
is, however, still impressed by the
great strides her native island has
made in its social and business
lives simce the days of 1938, She
left by B.W.LA. on the first leg
of her journey, refreshed by her
holiday, and wishing farewell to
the many friends to whom she
Was unable to say a last goddbye.

For Indefinite Stay
F geaing the passengers leaving

on Friday*night by B.W.1A.
for Trinidad was Miss Ruby Gib-
son of Arch Hall, St. Thomas, who
hag gone to spend an indefinite
holiday with her relatives at
Point Fortin,

For Trinidad Holiday
Iss MARINA SIMPSON,
eldest daughter of Mr. and
Mrs, Laurence Simpson of Guinea
Plantation, St. John, left the col-
ony yesterday by B.W.LA. to
spend part of her summer vaca-
tion with Mr, and Mrs, Austin
Wood of Port-of-Spain.

. s
Druggist On Holiday
EAVING for Trinidad on Fri-

day night by B.W.LA. was
Mr. Aubrey W, Smith, Druggist
of Baxter’s Road, who has gone
on four weeks’ holiday, He was
accompanied by his sister, Mrs.
Blanche Spencer of Port-of-Spain
who was here on holiday as a
guest of her brother and siste:-
in-law, Mr. and Mrs. J, N. Smith
of ‘“Melwi,” Brown’s Gap, Hast-

ings.
Businessman In Caracas
RRIVING in the colony on the
19th July were Mr. and Mrs.
Henry R. Ralicki of Caracas,
Venezuela, who are origindily
from Buffalo, New York. Mr,
Ralicki is the Manager in Caracas
of Pan-American Standard Brands
INC, Mr. and Mrs. Ralicki are
guests at the Crane Hotel.

Supervisor Of Agencies
T. COL. F. WOOD, Supervisor
of Agencies for the British
West Indies of Messrs, Sankey-
Sheldon Ltd. of London, arrived
from Trinidad on Friday by the
S.S. Golfito on a business visit
and will be remaining for two
weeks as a guest at the Hotel
Royal. He was accompanied by
Mrs. Wood,

| Governor Blackburne To Visit B’dos |'THE PERON PUZZLE ‘ :

and downs in the condition of the
patient are typical because of the
treatment.

The diseased blood may be
almost completely drained from
the body and healthy blood infused,
Within a short while the patient
would be normal again, but not
for long. The white corpuscles
multiply and a collapse oecurs
again. The spleen is sometimes
removed as a desperate remedy,
and blood transfusions will repeat-
edly restore the sufferer, but the
recurrent relapse grows steadily
graver,

In December 1948, when lectur-
ing in Buenos Aires on surgery
in Britain, I was presented to
resident Peron and his wife.

Her face was pale arid intense,
She seemed to be consumed with
fever,

Beneath her eyes were dark,
heavy rings. She had the appear-
anee of a woman who was burning

is a disease in whichâ„¢#erself out, though she was not

then 30,

That look on her face might
have been a sign of illness—or
the result of ecstacy which some-
times comes to women of her tem-
perament.

Next day I talked to her personal
physician, All he would say was
that Evita, the workers’ heroine,
wag driving herself to death for the
people, ...

JULY 27, 1952

On Short Visit

RS. ALEDA BOWEN, Pro-
4 fessor of Engineering Draw.
ing of the University of Houston,
Texas, and Mrs. George Lowe,
Seeretary to an oil operator, also
f Texas, arrived here on Friday
night by B.W.1.A, via Puerto Rico
and Antigua for a short holiday
visit and are guests at the Hotel
Royal.

Off To The U.K,
M* ASHTON C. ASHBERF,

Manager of Ultvlugt Plan-
tation in British Guiana and Mrs.
Ashbee who had beem sp@nding
three weeks’ holiday in BarBados
at Bathsheba and the Hotel Royal,
left on Priday morning by the
S.S. Golfito for where
they will remain for about four
months. "

Accompanying them were Mr,
Raymond C. Bell, Secretary-
Accountant of Albion Sugar
Estate, British Guiama, his wife
and their infant son. They spent
a week's holiday as guests at the
Hotel Royal and have now gone
to the U.K. to reside.

Mrs. Bell is the daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Ashbee.

For Summer Holidays
ASTER MARTIN BLACK-
BURNE, son of Sir Ken-
neth Blackburne, Governor of the
Leeward Islands and Lady Black-
burne, arrived from Antigua on
Friday re. by B.W.LA, to
spend part of his summer vaca-
tion with Major and Mrs. H, W.
Peebles of Bayleys, St. Philip.
Travellirig Representative
R. M, REINGOLD, Travelling
Representative of Messrs.
J. A. Marson & Sons, return to
Barbados on Friday evening by
B.W.IA,. after paying a two-week
business visit to Antigua and St.
Kitts.

Second Visit In 45 Years
ETURNING to Barbados on
Friday from the U.S.A. via
Puerto Rico and Antigua by
B.W.LA. was Mr, Otway L. Wil-
kinson, a member of the Ameri-
can Aid Society for West Indies,
Ine. He expects to be here for
about five weeks anq is staying
with Mr, Bascombe of Roebuck
Street.

This is Mr. Wilkinson’s second
visit te the island since he left
here 45 years ago. The last occa-
sion was in 1920 when he spent
about four months.

With C. P.I.M.
R. C. W, CRAWFORD who is
1 employed with C.P.I.M, in
Curacao, arrived here on Thurs-
day by B.W.LA. and left the fol-
lowing evening by B.W.LA, for
Trinidad to spend his two months’
holiday. He was accompanied by
his wife and smal) daughter,
Violet,
While heve, they were
the Cosmopolitan Guest

ests at
ouse,

points to this being the truth.

Leuczemia could produce all the

signs T saw on the sé@nora’s face,
Drastie

Since leuesemia is akin to can-
cer, X-ray treatment is sometimes
given, That would account for the
visit of the specialist from New
York.

The more drastic remedy of
removing the spleén is an opera-
tion only a first-class abdominal
specialist would undertake. And
it was Professor Finochietto who

operated,
I have now in Britain two
patients under treatment for
leucemia.

One is a woman of 33—almost
precisely the age of Eva Peron.



POCKET CARTOON
by OSBERT LANCASTER

LER

:



“Ll never heard of anyone walking) , |
on his ear,” said Willy. “But does | his hind legs and then sprang vj A week later I was sent for'
again by her secretary, My books
joing this poem. Right now I'm in| reach even the top of the trunk. ie had pleased Mme. Peron and she

a hurry to find a road.”

“KEEP EM FLYING”

DANCE AT THE

CRANE HOTEL
SAT. 30th August

TO THE TUNES OF

“KEITH CAMPBELL”
and HIS “SOCIETY SIX”
and




“THE JUMPING JACKS STEE!. BAND"

featuring our own

BING of the CARIBBEAN PAUL WILKINS

83

“A FREE 15 MINUTE FLIGHT
IN “BIM” TO

-ONE IN EVERY 30 PERSONS”
ENTERING THE DANCE

DANCING from 8.30 p.m.

Supper included Dress Optional

ADMITTANCE — $2.00










































“A road, Willy? Why?”

“Why? Because the first two lines
of my poem go

There once was a toad

Who hopped down the road—
So I've got to find a road to hop
lown.” With that Willy started
wpping off again, but turned
around to call over his shoulder to
Knarf: “Come along and you'll see
now | do the rest of my poem. [t's
very peewtian.”

Knarf ran after Willy across the
garden and over the fence to (he
coad, When he got there, Willy was
already hopping down it. A minute
later, however, he stopped under a
tall chestnut tree. He was looking
ap at the high branches as Knarf
reached him,

“What are you
Knarf asked,

“I’m doing the next two lines of
the poem—

He hopped and he hopped
And all at once stopped—”
“Yes?” said Knarf. “Then what?”
“Then,” said Willy, “then
He said: ‘Now let's see?
Vl’ hop up this tree
Saying this, Willy bont back

doing now?”

on






|
|
that mean you can’t do it? I’m! with all his might, But he could |

THEATRE

| fell back. Then he tried again . .
| and again... and again. It was ne
juse. At last, quite disappointe:| |
Willy sat down under the tree an:
sobbed:
“The tree was so high
It made Willy ery—”
| But suddenly Willy stopped cr
ing and broke out into a smile.
| “Ts that part of the poem, tov’




Across:

ird to siing round a satlor. (8)
neds oon 2 a
Bae ” Ovintalnorte fashion.

(6) il. ¥y j (4)

lL.
8.
10.

2. }.
| Knarf wanted to know, ie . a ~ i ms
Willy nodded, “Oh yes! This iv,:: | "8 TRE tH eet my Ge: on: the
rest of th d es 18. A type o: 14 ._ (3)
est of the poem, Just listen - D ae: B tetpyo. ( ek)

So finally he said: at. (3)

be: . 1. Get into debt.
‘Let the tree hop instead! =
I’ve made enough tries; # ‘comer ’
I'll just stay and catch .
i Willy interrupted himself at |
instant to shoot out his tongue :
catch something.
“Willy!” shouted Knarf. “W
| are you catehing?”
| “Plies!” answered Willy. “1

bag@y, (4)

7

PAPPeY




last word of the whole poem. 4 9. Bervid. (8) ‘

now I've done it ell! Isn% it a © warning. oa eis

dovful game?” Barts got caught in, (¢)
Knarf had to agree that it mt trans Tnetrimeint > Ss

It was the first time be he
seen anyone do a poem
about a toad- and espec'ally
tond to do it!



'§ puaule.— Across:
Beal: esi
Riennatlye hcerise:
: 3 ;

Fuel 9B! Ay




t 1,
so,
YW



3












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Dist 1m) (ta) 5170) (Dial 8404)
rr aon 2 ga To-day & To-morrow wie? th ae
THEM THAT ee a i SEPTEMBER
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Steph Patrici: eh i J Joseph
'muRRAY — PLUNKITr || KENNEDY — Dow FONTAINE corror

Richard TODD

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at WAS AN AMERICAN
sry" a
Ann DVORAK &
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“IN OLD AMARILLO

Roy ROGERS &

“THE WYOMING

BANDIT"

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Coming FRIDAY

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wished me to write her biography.

Why should a young woman
like Eva Peron want her biography
written? When I thought of how
she looked, I thought inevitably
of incurable disease.

Now I Knew

A year ago I again met Eva
Peron in Buenos Aires. She was
desperately ill, Every movement
was an effort. The curious) burn-
ing look had inereased. And the
fact that she had two specialists

in attendance left no room for
doubt.

One was Professor Ricardo
Finochietto, among the best ab-

dominal surgeons in the world. The
other was a famous cancer expert
from New York. They called on
her several times. A little later the
Argentine hedrd that an opera-
tion had been performed.

One rumour—that she had can-
cer of the womb—was in my view
unlikely to be true.

A gyneecologist would have been
necessary for such an operation
and none was present.

But since Eva Peron was alter-
nately reported unconscious and
revived, the suggestion that she
had in fact, leucaemia began to
gain credence. All the evidence

An Assortment of

— ALSO —

YOUR SHOE STORES













** Really, it was too idiotic
of thac gipsy co cell me to
watch out for a dark man
comirig into my life without
telling me just how dark!”

After two pints of blood had
been transfused, she was sitting
up and entertaining me to tea
an hour later, and she has been
kept alive for the past two years
by transfusions, ‘

The other patient is a man
whose spleen was removed two
years ago, To-day I ently
receive urgent messages that he
is dying. Yet blood transfusion
restores him. The “dying man” is
able to resume light work the
next day,

But in the end leucemia is invar-

iably fatal, Removal of the
spleen, transfusions—these can
save life sometimes for a few

months, sometimes for a couple of
years, or even more, But that is
all.
It is this evil thing that has
gripped Eva Peron.
—L. E. S.

$2.09, $2.15, $2.28, $2.41

$2.50
: rere - $131
30, 32 & 46 CENTS

T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS

DIAL 4606


SUNDAY, JULY

CINEMA NOTES

27,



; Hy



1952

G. WH.

B.B.C. Radio Notes

BRIGHT VICTORY THE ATOMIC

THIS WEEKEND, top billing goes to “Bright Victory”

showing at the Plaza, Barbarees.

Director Mark Robson

and_a fine cast headed by Arthur Kennedy deserve much

credit for an excellent and

moving drama in which senti-

mentality and over-emphasis have been skillfully avoided.
This film is about the rehabilitation of blind war veterans,
and the splendid work that is done for them both thera-
peutically and psychologically, as well as the understand-
ing and encouragement from those who can see and those

who are blind, alike.

Arthur Kennedy, who recently
completed a long run in the lead-
ing role of the Broadway success,
“Death Of A Salesman” is the
partieular veteran with whom we
are concerned. Wounded in the
North African invasion, he is re-
turned to the U.S. where he is to'd
that he will be blind. His bitter-
ness and fear of the future are
gradually overcome by the treat-
ment he receives at the Valley
Forge Army hospital, where the
men are taught confidence and
complete self-reliance. His first
visit home preves a shattering ex-
perience. Pity, lack of under-
standing and thoughtlessness are
the chief causes of his unhappiness
and when his fiancée tells him she
cannot face the uncertainty of
their future, he returns
hospital and to a young girl whose
love for him, and _ clear-sighted-
ness, give him fresh hope and
self-reliance.

Arthur Kennedy’s performance
is first rate and carries strong
conviction in his gradual growth
and development and his realiza-
tion that ultimate security must
come from within himself. Peggy
Dow is charming as the young girl
whg loves him with a warm, sym-
pathetic understanding and un-
felfishness that his family and
friends could not give him.

There are good dramatic situa-
tions i.e. when the blind soldier is
forced by the officer in charge to
tell his parents over the phone of
his blindness. Expressing his
bitterness to his superior, the
veteran learns that he too is blind.
There is a moving love scene and
the fleeting glimpses of race pre-
judice is delicately and effectively
touched on. Director Robson has
used perception and restraint in
an engrossing film that should ex-
cite the sympathies of anyone,

For Them That Trespass

Playing at the Plaza Bridgetown,
FOR THEM THAT TRESPASS is
the dramatic story of a miscar-
riage of justice. Starting off in
the genteel atmosphere of an
upper middie class English family,
the scene shifts to the drab and
sordid background of a London
slum, However, squalid as_ this
part of London may be, the char-
acters are remarkably vital and
sharply drawn, from the Little
Cockhey shop girl down to the
engine driver who commits mur-
der in a blind fit of jealousy.

The story concerns a young
Englishman whose ambition is to
be a writer. To see how the
“other half’ lives, he takes him-
setf'to Lenten Town, where under
am assumed name, he becomes
friendly with a Cockney girl A
midnight visit to her room is
rudely interrupted by the arrival
of her “steady” and our author
beats a hasty retreat. Next morn-
ing,+he reads that the girl has
béen murdered and though he
knows who committed the crime,
he lets another man be condemned
sooner than expose himself to the
publicity that would follow were
it known that he was _ consorting
with slum people. The “other
man” is Richard Todd, who made
his first. screen appearance in this
picture and has since gone to the
top. A petty burglar, condemned
for an act he did not commit, he
spends fifteen years in jail and on
his release, neatly collects his
evidence and forces the writer to
admit his presence in the murder-
ed girl’s room and the identity of
the killer.

His fervent portrayal of the
wronged man is exeellent and it
is obvious that Mr. ‘Todd has fine
acting ability and knows how to
use it. Stephen Murray’s role of
the writer, Christopher Drew,





WE

HAVE
THE
KITCHEN-
WARE
IN
STOCK

Veer

to the |




HUMPHREY BOGART

emerges as a_ thoroughly self-
centered smug and rather colour-
less person, Perhaps he is sup-
posed to be so, but I found his
characterization unimpressive, Of
the women, I would give first place
to Rosalyn Boulter for her care-
free, come-easy, go-easy interpre—
tation of a Cockney floozie. Patri-
cia Plunkett and Michael Laur-
ence both give a good aceount of

themselves, and the contrasting
types, representing the middle-
class and the slum _ dwellers

couldn’t be bettered. The minor
roles in English films are always
done to perfection and give a
foundation to the picture that is
often sadly lacking.

A last word—a bar-room brawl
between two of the women—that
probably has its moments, has
been removed from the film “in
toto” with the result that the
continuity is rudely jarred. I may
say that the picture arrived here
with this deletion and I cannot
see why we should not be left to
make our own decisions as to
what scenes should be censored.

Deadline U.S.A.

DEADLINE U.S.A. starring
Humphrey Bogart, Ethel Barry-
more and Kim Hunter can be seen
at the Globe. A realistic newspaper
drama, it succeeds in showing the
many pressures under which a
free press operates. There also
seems to be a good deal of law-
enforcing activity undertaken by
the staff of the paper that might
better have been left in the pro~
per hands. However, the newspa-
per background is so qetailed and
authentic that the film carries
weight and conviction.

The plot concerns a managing
editor whose wife has divorced
him because she feels that he is
wedded to his work. With his job
being terminated in three days,
due to the paper being sold to
rival interests he devotes his re-
maining time to exposing a vice
king and gangster—nearly loses
his life in doing so—but neverthe-
less goes down in a blaze of head-
lines! though he loses the paper,
he does succeed in getting his
wife back.

Bogart fans will probably en-
joy the star’s performance which
struck me as somewhat fiercely
morose, with the exception of a
quiet scene with Miss Barrymore,
widow of the paper’s founder,
where he shows a more human
side. Kim Hunter plays Mr. Bo-
gart’s wife, who would definitely
seem to have had the short end
of the marriage stick, while Mar-
tin Gabel is an effective wicked
gangster.



House Seales
Counter Scales

Cake Pans

Dripping Pans

Pattie Pans

&

f

Sponge Finger Pans

Mincers



THE CORNER



AGE
Another Talk

From London

A sequel to last weeks talk
over the B.B.Cs General Over-
seas Service on atomic power
will be given in the coming week
The subject this time will be
Britain's atomic development.
The speaker this time will be
Dr, A. S. MeFarlane of the
National Institute for Medical
Research at Mill Hill, North Lon-
don, where isotopes from Har-
well are being used in medical
research. His talk is, called
Isotopes Bring New Knowledge’.
Isotopes are among the most
powerful research tools available
to scientists today; they were
described last year in the sim-
plest possible terms by Professor
Frederick Soddy as ‘atoms with
the same outsides but different
insides.’ The talk can be hear
at 10.15 p.m. on Wednesday, 30th
July, in the ‘Mid-week Talk,’

Travel Talks

There are two travel talks to
be heard in the B.B.C’s General
Overseas Service in the coming
week. The first is ‘Pleasant Jour-
ney by Wynford Vaughn Thoma
who rounds off his recent return
visit to India and Pakistan after
five years absence in recalling
the pleasures of travel in those
countries. He leaves facts and
figures behind him to talk of art,
including the arts of cooking, con-

versation and salesmanship. He
will be heard at 10.30 p.m. in
Tuesday, 29th. The second talk is

‘Return Journey to Finland by
Edward Ward who tells the story
of his return visit to the country



SUNDAY



ADVOCATE

FARM AND GARDEN

ity

Agricola

THE COCONUT—H
We in the western hemisphere, long aceustomed, for

table and culinary purposes

to our butter and other anima!

fats, reinforced by olive oil_and the cheaper cotton-seed
eil, and to luxury ereams and similar unguents for per-
sonal use, have tended perhaps to overlook the great im-

portance and essentiality of
For culinary and personal us¢®s,

both internally and externally,
this product is closely inter-
woven with their habits and
fabric of life generally, and has
been so for generations. It is,
too, in many cases, their main
illuminant. Domestically, the
crude product is made in the
primitive way of utilizing the
immature nut by grating the

fresh kernels, mixing with water,
squeezing, boiling and decanting;
it is still practised in the villages.
These simple methods have been
brought to the West Indies by
immigrants, and, in many cases,
small commercial plants on simi-
lar lines have sprung up com-
bining pig-keeping as a side-line;
eoconut refuse plus. discarded
products of rice mills providing
the chief ration. Simple refining
methods too are sometimes prac-
tised but in the main, the eastern
mind prefers the crude article.
Now, the origina] export trade
in these parts consisted largely of
dried nuts for confectionery pur-
poses, Actually, it is only about
50 years or so ago that commer-
cial and industrial developments
ensured the greater utilisation of
the coconut as an important
source of vegetable fats—both of
tallow and oils. Coconuts were
soon decsribed as the “Consols of
the East.” There was a demand
for the dried nut in the form of
copra (either sun or kiln dried)
and this trade also developed in
the West Indies. Later local
eapital was invested in modera
milling and refining plants; today,

where he was B.B.C. War Cor-~ with efficient crushing and the use

respondent in 19840. He gives
listeners the background picture
of the amazing recovery of this
little country, which is in the
news this year as the centre of
the Olympic Games. He will
speak at 9.00 p.m. on Wednesday
30th July.

The Promenade Concerts
Broadcasts from
Albert Hall, London, of some of
the Henry Wood Promenade Con-
certs now in their 58th Season
will be heard in the B.B.C’s

G. O. S. in the coming week. On Sition from

Sunday at 9.00 p.m, listeners will

of hydraulic presses, the bulk of
the oil is extracted, the remain-
ing cake providing a valuable
stock feed or fertilizer. The re-
fined product is sold in the form
of oil or made up into margarine
and related compounds. Marga-
rine thas become a product of
world wide significance. Its high

the Royal quality and food value in relation

to high priced butter fat are no
longer questioned; and, even in the
United States, where there has
been severe criticism and oppo-
the dairy industry,
its sale is rapidly gaining ground.

hear a repeat of part of the first Animals just cannot compete with

concert of the Season in

a Nursery Song for Piano and
Orchestra, by Dohnanji played
by the B.B.C.
chestra conducted by Sir Mal-
colm Sargeant, with Joyce
Hedges at the piano. On Thurs-
day at 9.00 p.m. the violinist
Campoli will be heard in Lalos
Symphonie Espagnole for yiolin
and orchestra and Tchaikovsky s
‘Overture—tantasia: Romeo and
Juliet’ from the same programme
will be broadeast, Another re-
corded programme will be heard
at 5.15 p.m. on Tuesday, with the
same orchestra and conduetor,
includes Haydn's ‘Sinfonia Con-
certante in B flat’ for oboe, bas-
soon, violin, violincello, and
orchestra, in which the soloist in
each instrument is leader of the
respective section of the B.B.C.
Symphony Orchestra,

‘Caribbean Voices’

‘Caribbean Voices’
27th. presents a short story by
Geoffrey Drayton of Barbados,
another by Ian Ramsay of Jamaica
and Tove poems by Joseph Penco
of Trinidad and Horace Mitchell
of British Guiana. Broadcast be-

gins at the regular time of 7.15
p.m.

on Sunday,

TALKING POINT

Bet after all what would the
English be without their sweet
unreasonableness? {

—John Galsworthy. |
|

KITCHEN |

READY?

Coffee Mills
Sifters

Fish Turners
Ladles
Spoons
Seoops

Cork Screws
Can Openers
Egg Beaters
Icing Sets



STORE

j which the palm,
the main work is ‘Variations on doubt, a

Symphony Or interest.



Margarine is, without
boon to the harassed
housewife and future develop-
ments will be watched with great
The eoconut is regarded
now as the world’s most impor-
tant food fruit.

What about the paim itself?
Qpinion is divided as to whether
it is of old or new world origin.
The fact is that sea currents have
played an important part im
transporting the nuts from one
shore to another, ;Â¥t is a halo-
phyte, that is, it tolerates and
resists salt, not that it requires
Salt as is often supposed, It does
not flourish at high altitudes.

A rainfall of 60 inches evenly
distributed is considered adequate
if the ground water ascends
within reach of the root system,
providing such water is on the
move and never. stagnamt. Heavy
compact, water-retaining — soils
are unsuitable. To primitive man,
the coconut was simply a tree
that provided food, drink, she!l-
ter and raiment. It still does ail
these things and more in these
modern times. Let us glance
briefly at its many uses, From
the husk comes coir fibre for
brooms cordage, brushes, mais,
mattresses, upholstery, etc., also
used for caulking; the leaves
furnish »baskets, mats and thatch-
ing; the leaf stalks yield fencing,
handles for tools and brushes; the
husk may also be used as a scour-
ing brush and together with the
shell _as fuel; the shell is made





to select your ,
requirements from
our PYREX TABLEWARE.

@ OVENWARE
@ SOUP PLATES

@ FISH OR MEAT

@ CASSEROLES
@ SAUCE BOATS

The above extensive
seleetion is also
available
WARE.



BARBADOS
CO-OP. COTTON
FACTORY LTD.

coconut oil to eastern peoples. |
into buttons, cups, ladles, spooos
and other utensils; the oute!
parts of the trunk furnish post:
and vafters; the roots, a dye

And finally, the immature inflo:

escence yields a sap from whic)
wine, vinegar or sugar even can

be made Altogether, what an
opportunity for handcrafts 1
provided by this unique tree!

GARDENING HINTS
FOR AMATEURS

Hedges

The secret of a well kept hedge |
is—never to let it get out of hand, |
In gether words give it a weekly |
or atvany rate a fortnightly clip,
and in this way it will keep its)
trim well groomed appearance and |
the labour of clipping it will be
considerably less than if this job
is done less often.

Once a hedge is neglected until
it is overgrown it is a tedious and
difficult job to get it into shape
again, and when just cut after this |
neglect the hedge presents an ugly |
chopped look, instead of the nice |
smooth shaven look of the well)
kept hedge. j

Many people make a great fuss
over this hedge trim: .1i ind the
gardener is sure to i.iab ut that
it is some highly skilled job re-
quiring great strength and endur-
ance! It is nothing of the sort, once
the hedge is in order, and requires
no more than a straight eye, a pair
of sharp well oiled shears, and a
couple of hours steady work. Once
the hedge has been regularly trim-
med, thirty or forty feet of hedge
ean be well clipped top and sides
in a couple of hours.

Keeping the hedge in good order
is important, for while a well kept
nedge is always a source of admir-
ation, nothing looks worse than a
neglected hedge. Its neglect seems
to lower the standard of the whole
garden, and does more to spoil its
general appearance than almost
any other kind of neglect. Some
hedges are easier to keep trimmed
than others.

Sweet Lime, Chetry, Bread and
Cheese and Olive are clipped more
easily than Casuarina. These first
mentioned give a _ firmer more
even purfa&a, whereas tthe fine
springy tendrils of Casuarina seem
to jump about and elude the
shears. Of all our hedges Casua-
rina is probably the most difficull
to keep in good shape, yet when
this hedge is well kept it makes| >
a splendid hedge.

Flowering hedges need not be|))
kept quite as severely trimmed as
the mon-flowering kind, for we do
wait to give the flowers, which
are their chief beauty, a chance
Yet even the flowering hedge must
not be allowed to go untrimmed
but must be kept judiciously clip-
ped all the time. But beware of
leaving this job to be done with-
out supervision, it is fatal (to the
hedge) for trimming the flower-
ing hedge needs more judgment,
and is a less straight forward job
than trimming the non-flowering



kind. In Trinidad, the Exora
hedges are very lovely, but a
smaller and more bushy type of
Exora is used for these hedges
than the Exora commonly seen in
Barbados This smaller Exors

grows quite easily here, and it
would be quite an idea for some-
one to try growing it in a hedge

In British Guiana it is the cus-
tgm to have a hedge made up of
diferent kinds of flowering plant $
This novel idea might also be tried
here by some pioneering spirited
gardener. Our Barbadian gardens
are inclined to be rather conserva-
tive, and would be all the better

for some bold spirit to lead us
along new and as yet untried
paths. oi




is the time



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PAGE FOUR



!
j



Protect your gums and you protect your

teeth, for gum troubles cause over 50 per cent. of tooth-
losses. To promote firm, healthy gums, use Ipana tooth paste —
Ipana and Massage. Use Ipana, also, to brush your teeth extra-
white and reduce acid-forming bacteria that cause decay, This
is the way to keep your whole mouth healthy; the way you will
find “refreshingly different” because of Ipana’s mint flavour.

THE TOOTH PASTE..
REFRESHINGLY DIFFERENT |

A PRODUCT OF BRISTOL-MYERS,




LONDON AND NEW YORK















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AGENTS —

L. M. B. MEYERS & CO., LTD.

'

SATURDAY, 2ND AUGUST, 1952
MONDAY, 4TH AUGUST, 1952 (BANK HOLIDAY)
THURSDAY, 7TH AUGUST, 1952
SATURDAY, 9TH AUGUST, 1952



THIRTY ONE EVENTS IN ALL. THE START OF

» HE FIRST RACE ON THE FIRST, SECOND AND

FOURTH DAYS IS 1.15 P.M., ON THE THIRD DAY
: ——_—2,00-P.ME.



CROSS SOOOOOOOS

6969090 98SO OOS OE

of

The 2/- SWEEPSTAKE will be officially closed on
THURSDAY, 31ST JULY, 1952, and will be drawn for
on FRIDAY, 8TH AUGUST, 1952, at the GRAND
STAND at 4.00 P.M. Tickets can be purchased from
Registered Sellers up to 4.00 p.m. of the same day.



The Plan for Admission to the Grand Stand will
be opened, as follows:—
.To SUBSCRIBERS on THURSDAY 24TH JULY, 1952.

To THE GENERAL PUBLIC on MONDAY, 28TH
JULY, 1952, between the hours of 8.15 a.m. and
3.00 p.m, daily.





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AUGUST, 1952, by 3.00 P.M. : ; x

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a SUNDAY

ADVOCATE



ALL IS NOT WELL WITH
LOCAL CRICKET
College Carry Off Basketball
Championship
By O. S. COPPIN

RECENT events in the local Barbados Cricket
Association games have gone to prove an old con-
tention of mine that there is need for a revision of
the competition rules to meet present day conditions,

The basic principles of the rules cannot be
questioned but I should only be pushing at an open
door if 1 attempted to press an obvious case, I shall
simply draw attention to the existing state of
affairs. ;

HASTY DECISION
y= the Barbados Cricket Association, through its Board of
Management made a comparatively hasty decision to change
the method of awarding points this season and also shuffled teams in
the three divisions, finally changing the number of playing days
allotted to Intermediate games from three to two days, I thought that

this alone was ample suggestion that the entire rules governing asso-

ciation games should be reviewed,

For example, the law which requires teams to start games at 1.00
p.m. also allows 30 minutes grace. This has.created such an anomaly
in past days that it has now deteriorated into plain nonsense.

NOT A SINGLE GAME
T has resulted in the fact that not a single game has commenced
at 1.00 p.m., within my knowledge, for the past fifteen years and
players have become so accustomed to the 1.30 p.m. hour that they
are taking their half an hour’s grace from 1.30, so that many games
now start nearer 2 p.m. than 1 p.m,

This rule should be amended and the law made either 1 p.m. or
1.30 p.m, Teams which have turned up in time to start at 1 p.m. in
the hope of forcing a decision have been dubbed unsporting and have
met with no success in having the opposing teams take the field.

UMPIRES GUILTY TOO

HERE iz complaint that some umpires have refused to take the

field before 1.30 p.m. and so on, If a definite law were made and
the grace cut out of it, teams could be made to start on time,

One appreciates the fact that some business houses close at 1 p.m.
on Saturdays and players employed in them would be at a disadvan-
tage. Well then if this is considered sound grounds for extenuation
then make it 1.30 p.m, but cut out the grace and let there be some-

thing definite.
AFRAID?
MPIRES too have been afraid to invoke the law of fair and unfair

play. There has been a recent instance in, which a team, in a
good position for scoring quick runs for victory were partially robbed
because of the delaying antics of bowlers.

It was obvious to most people that there was deliberate delay and
I see no reason why the Board of Management cannot move on such
occasions, If I read the law correctly they have a right to intervene
without an appeal having been received in instances of this sort.

SHORT BOUNDARIES
rYEAMS are complaining about the shortness of the boundaries at
some of the playing fields, This has had its echo in fantastic
scores being returned, out of relation to the performance itself.

This could be adjusted too because there had been general coni-
plaints for some time now against certain grounds and everybody could
hardly be wrong.

The vexatious question of the preparation of the wicket needs some
examination, too. Bitter have been the observations made by some
teams on the condition of the wicket given them on occasigns when

| weather conditions denied anything short of a perfect wicket,

ACCIDENT OR DESIGN
N some cases there could be no suggestion of design but accident
has the same effect if the deed has been done, The umpires can
function in these cases but I have yet to see any of them take this
bold step.

A directive from the Board of Management with reference to these
subjects would go a long way towards convincing the cricket playing
public that the Board of Management is not an aloof austere body that
makes regulations for cricket on theory but is the executive committee
of the Barbados Cricket Association with an abiding interest in local
cricket and some understanding and sympathy with the problems
that must inevitably crop up during the course of the years.

COLLEGE BASKETBALL CHAMPIONS

Y congratulations this week go out to Harrison College who have

carried off the First Division Basketball Challenge cup this season,

It is true that they have won by the irritating route of goal avery
age but as is the case with the Barbados Amateur Football Association
rules as well, award by goal average seems to be the most practical
method of awarding a championship between teams who are other-
wise tied on points. :

Carlton, from whom the College team won on goal average will
receive a spontaneous measure of sympathy from basketball fans in
the circumstances and their effort will be commendéd even more when
it is learnt that the Carlton team is a comparatively young basketball
team.

The Knockout competition starts this week and as each team has
been beaten during the course of the season’s competition it is not easy
to predict the winner.

WEIGHTLIFTING SHOW. PLANNED i
HE Barbados Amateur Weightlifting Association are planning a
| ~=mammoth show to take place at the Empire Theatre on August
28. . ;
Weightlifters are practising hard for this show since the winners
will tour Trinidad in September to compete against their counter-
parts there,

This form of sport is 1
tribute to the pioneers that while their show two year
or five teams enter competitors, this year seventeen
are expected to take part.

the first of its 1952

THE B.C.L. PREPARE
ARBADOS CRICKET LEAGUE will play

B series of big games with a match against a team representative

of the Intermediate division of the Barbados Cricket Association

to-day at Y.M.P.C.

The Barbados Cricket League continues its policy of team _build-
ing, which was begun last season, On this occasion the B.C.L. will
be without the services of C. De Peiza and Guy Kirton. Both of these
players have joined Empire C.C.

Of the players who took part in the B.C.L. big games last season,
the Sobers brothers will be available. Also Ashton Blackman, the
burly fast bowler from Romans and who can hit the ball very lustily.

apidly gaining popularity and it is some
s ago saw four
affiliated clubs

| Kenneth Goddard now.in the veteran stage will be in charge of the

team,
OPPORTUNITY

Opportunity will be given to K. Maloney of St, Catherine who
comes into fhe team as a result of his performances last season. His
average of 49.2 was the best last season and in addition he scored the
most runs in the League. He was also one of the players to win a
prize for three consecutive 30's.

One of the players who should be watched is Green of Middlesex
who is reported to be the fastest bowler seen for the season, The
selected players quite naturally include W. A. Clarke of Rangers who
has scored two consecutive centuries this season, Altogether the stage
is set for development on a big scale.



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-



Yesterday’

WANDERERS vy. PICKWICK

Wanderers (1st Innings) 343
Pickwick 131 and (for 5
wkis) . wieds sipinke 119

Pickwick collapsed on a wicket
that was taking some turn yester-
day for 131 in reply to Wander-
ers’ first innings total of 343, and
forced to follow on, are now faced
with a similar fate, having lost

five second innings’ wickets for
119 runs. “
Defeat for the Pickwickians

appears inevitable seeing that thev
have lost the wickets of E. L. G.
Hoad, Junior, K. A. Greenidge,
topscorer in the first innings with
49, and Edwards, their opening
batsman. John Goddard held on
determinely and at the end of
the day, was undefeated with 43.

Resuming their innings at 23
for 1 yesterday, Pickwick were
soon in trouble, two quick wickets
falling for an additional 20 runs,
Birkett was out for 11, and Hoad
followed shortly after for 19,

K. A. Greenidge the hero of the
first innings and John Goddard
saw the score to 78 before God-
dard was caught behind the wicket
off Eric Atkinson.

Greenidge Caught

Greenidge went on to score 49
before he went at number 7,
caught by a sub off Denis Atkin-
son’s bowling. His innings includ-
ed 7 fours and a five. Except for
M. Foster’s 14, the other batsmen
all fell below double figures,

Dry and flaking at the top, the
wicket played trickily, and the
medium pacers were getting the
ball to turn nearly a yard at times.
On other occasions, the ball kept
only a few inches off the ground.

This, however, should not ex-
cuse the Pickwick batsmen for
their extremely poor showing, and
this fact was borne out in the
second innings when E. L, G. Hoad
and E, Edwards, the. two openers
batted confidently, and saw the
score past fifty before the former
was bowled by a shoot from Eric
Atkinson.

John Goddard too, batted sound-
ly in the second innings, and it
was simply amazing to see how the
other batsmen gave away their
hands. K. Greenidge was out
caught off a full pitch which he
pulled around from the off to
mid on,

Evelyn Run Out

Evelyn, who was run out in the
first innings, was out similarly in
the second innings when he badly
judged a second run which he
could and should have made.

The result was that from 100 for
2 wickets in the second innings,
three wickets fell for an additional
5 runs, leaving Pickwick at the
end of the day’s play with 5 of
their second innings’ wickets
down, and 93 runs behind the
Wanderers’ first innings total of
343.

Denis Atkinson bowled very
well in the first innings to bag 5
for 46 in 16.3 overs. Four of those
five wickets fell in the last four
overs at a cost of only 14 runs.
His brother Eric alsoftook 2 for
only five runs in his last 3 overs.

In the second innings Eric
Atkinson took 2 for 26 in 11 overs,
while L, St. Hill took 2 for 22 in
12 overs. ,

CARLTON vs. LODGE

Carlton (for 8 wkts. decl’d) 228
Lodge 81 and 56
C.. B Wjtltiams with his spin-
ners was unplayable at Black
Rock yesterday afternoon and
was mainly responsible for Carl-
ton’s win over Lodge School by
an innings and 91 runs as their
first division game came to a
close shortly after lunch, a day
ahead of the scheduled time.
Williams in a fine spell of bowl-
ing, sent back eight Lodge bats-

‘men for 17 runs after having sent

down six overs one of which was
a maiden.

Lodge who had scored 81 in
their first venture had dismissed
seven Carlton batsmen for 172
runs when play ended on the first
day.

Resuming yesterday on a per-
fect wicket, C, B. Williams 30 and
H. Cox who had not yet opened
his account, carried the score to
190 when Cox edged one from
Brookes into the safe hands of
wicket keeper Grant to bring his
innings to a close. He had con-
tributed a valuable 23 including
three boundaries.

Innings Closed
Noel Lucas joined Williams and
this pair took the score well past
the double century mark and
were still together when the in-
nings was declared closed at 2.15



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SUNDAY, JULY 27, 1952



s Cricket

with the total at 228. Lucas who
had done the bulk of the scoring,
had reached 19 including two
fours and one six. Williams on the
other hand was fairly quiet for
his undefeated knock of 47
which included six boundaries.

The Lodge ground fielding was
particularly good during this
period and they prevented Car)-
ton from piling up a bigger score
by saving many a boundary. J.
Farmer and K. L. Brookes each
got 3 for 62 and 70 respectively,
— M. Wilkie captured 2 for

With a deficit of 147 runs,
Lodge began their second innings
with C. B. Grant and L. M. Mur.
ray and this pair opened confi-
dently, playing the pace bowling
of Edghill and Warren comfort-
ably. They had taken the score
to 42, thus giving Lodge a good
send off when C. B. Williams
broke the partnership by knock-
ing back Grant’s stumps for a
very useful 21 including two
boundaries, His was actually the
beginning of the end, because,
apart from Murray who was
bowled by F. Edghill after con-
tributing a valuable 24 which was
inclusive of three boundaries, no
other batsman reached double
figures,

With Hutson absent, the innings
closed shortly after lunch for 56.

HARRISON COLLEGE ys.
EMPIRE

HARRISON COLLEGE
EMPIRE

Empire has so far gained first
innings lead on Harrison College

In their match at the College
grounds. Harrison College scored
196 in their first innings. The

Bank Hall team
day with 253.

When play opened yesterday,
College occupied the wicket for
a little over half an hour. They
carried their over-week total of
183 for nine to 196. Holder got
his first wicket of the match
yesterday. He took a good re-
turn to dismiss Reid for four.
G. Foster was the not out bats-
man with nine to his credit.
| ‘The chief contributor to the
College total was Camie Smitn
who made 48 on the first day of
play. Alleyne scored 30 and F.
Tudor 29.

For Empire, Barker took five
Wickets for 52 runs in 25 overs
of which six were maidens. H.
King teok two for 30 while
Holder and Fields captured one
each.

replied yester-

GC; DePeiza
Empire with 73.
boundaries to his
Drayton. played a __ splendid
innings to score 68, Robinson,
Empire opener, got his team off to
a good start with 56.

Claude Lewis, the last man mM
for Empire, however brightened
the day’s play. He scored fours
off three consecutive balls of Mr.
Sam Headley’s last over—the last
for the day.

Mr. Headley was the most suc-
cessful bowler for College. He
took five for 76 in 16 overs. M.
Simmons also had a very good
day. He bowled 17 overs and
took three wickets for 48 runs.

SPARTAN vs, POLICE

SPARTAN I41 & (for 2 wkts) 123
POLICE 146

Police were able to secure a
narrow first innings lead in the
second day of their mateh against
Spartan at the Park yesterday
when they put up 146 in reply to

epren Ist innings score of

Spartan in their second innings
have put up the good total of 123
for the loss of two wickets,

The first day of play saw Spar-
tan routed soon after lunch for
141, when N, Harris who eventu-

topscored for
He had ten
credit. W.

ally scored 49 not out, and K,
Bowen, saved them from
thorough. collapse. Then, Police

went on to score 42. for the loss of
three wickets,

Yesterday, Captain Farmer’s
invaluable knock of 36 at number
five, helped Police to gain the first

innings lead. When he went to
the wicket, the score was 47 for
the loss of four wickets. Another
batsman whose last minute stand
of 15 was very valuable to, Police,

was B. Dodson who was bowled
by King.
Frank King who took four

wickets for 66 runs in 14 overs,
was the most successful bowler.
Phillips took three for 35 in 13.5
overs and K, Bowen two for 34
in 12 overs. Bowen was more
troublesome on the first day of



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ENGLAND
TAS/A

RACING NOTES
By BEN BATTLE

The lethargy at the Savannah has disappeared since last I wrote
and now the most casual visitor to the track can tell that something is
afoot, Not only have the horses intensffied their efforts, but the
trainers and even the hangers on, wear a keener air. Indeed it has
been rumoured that it is not only the horses that get fit around this
time, certain particularly conscientious trainers, so gossip would have
us believe, becoming even more wound up than their charges! Be that
as it may, there is no doubt that Races are almost upon us, and some
attempt to analyse the form in the more important events is clearly

justified.
THE DERBY

The position in regard to the Derby is easily summarised. It con-
sists in trying to find the answer to the question “Who or What can
be found to beat Bright Light?” At first the answer—“nothing”’—to
this appears all too easy, and, certainly on form alone it is difficult,
even impossible to visualise Mr. Barnard’s filly being seriously threat-
ened. Racing however would be a dull business if the unexpected
never happened, and I think that the Derby situation is at least open
enough to permit us to indulge in a little mild speculation.

First of all, we may as well admit that at her best Bright Light
would surely outclass her field. The question then resolves itself into
whether we have any grounds whatever for assuming that she may
not be quite at her peak. I think that perhaps we have, if only the
very slenderest. Surely we can assume that the Trinidad June meet-
ing must have taken something out of her, as must the sea voyage up.
Bright Light like all her family, is a keen type of filly, the reverse
of phlegmatic, and it is at least possible that her prolonged career in
Trinidad may have just taken the fine edge off her. Assuming this
to be true, are there still among the other candidates any likely to
take her measure?

Unfortunately the one with the best credentials for this task, I
refer to Dunquerque, is unlikely to be at her best. She is not a
robust filly by any means, and has suffered more than one setback
in her preparation. It will take all the skill that her connections
possess to produce her on Derby Day in a condition to do herself jus-
tice. I do not intend to leave her out of my calculations by any
means, but I shall be a little surprised if she pulls it off. That leaves
us with Cardinal, First Admiral, Seedling, and Rambler Rose. Of
these, Cardinal has been coughing, and may or may not be fully re-
covered by Races. He is doing reasonable gallops, but hardly up to
Derby form so far. First Admiral tried conclusions with Bright
Light in Trinidad and I can think of no reason why he should re-
verse the form over here. Rambler Rose is undergoing a most serious
preparation, and doing so with credit, but she has disappointed before
and may again. There remains only Seedling, and it is from _him,
if I read the signs correctly, that the greatest danger to Bright Light
may develop. An undoubtedly backward colt at two, he has made
great progress since, and his veteran trainer has made no bones about
getting him ready for the big race. I should certainly, if I_ had to,
tip Bright Light to win, but I should at the same time bear Seedling
very much in mind,

THE CHAMPION STAKES

The form for the Champion Stakes is a lot less easy to interpret
than that for the Derby. ‘As we have never previously seen any of
the field perform over the distance, we must rely on our interpretation
of their previous performances aided by our observations of the
gallops. Even the gallops are not very straightforward, as we are
constantly being confronted with the unexpected sight of horses doing
a mile and a quarter or even further, instead of that old standby of
the Grandstand Clock—a box to box. The confusion which this en-
genders was exemplified recently, when an experienced stop watch
expert, took the time for what he considered to be a rather slow half
mile, only to be astonished a few moments later when the same
horse passed the winning post a second time having completed a credi-
table mile and a quarter.

Bearing all this in mind, let us pass to a consideration of the in-
dividual candidates. Ten are entered and with few exceptions all are
entitled, on their best form, to some sort of a chance, The exceptions
I would make are Embers, who has so far showed no sign of being
able to compete with the A’s over any distance and Tiberian Lady
to whom the same criticism applies. To these might be added Slainte,
although.there is no doubt that at his best he would have had a rea-
sonable chance; but one doubts whether he can hope at this stage to
regain his youth. Flieuxcé might be the next on our elimination
list, but for the fact that she has been going so well at exercise. A
soft track on Race Day would put her in with an outside chance.
Red Cheeks is a bit of a dark horse, but I cannot fancy her seriously
on the amount of work I have seen her do. The brilliant Rebate does
not impress as a mile and a half horse and I should not be surprised
if she is not sent. The remainder would I think pose a problem to
any bookmaker anxious to lay their true odds. For my money, the
consistent and genuine Landmark would be first choice, but Doldrum
has been going so well that she cannot be left out. Nor for that matter
can Firefly or Notonite; but my selection (made a full week before
Races) would be Landmark.

Ah well! I shall keep this article by me until after Races. . I
or how many of my closely reasoned conclusions will look by
then, *





play than he was yesterday. Table Tennis:
Police were all out about 20 min-
utes before lunch,



Bad Start

Spartan were off to a bad start
with the early loss of S. Griffith
who was adjudged l.b.w. to Brad-
shaw when he had not yet scored.
But then G, N. Grant and Atkins
came together in a fruitful second
wicket stand. Both of these bats-

men played the Police pace
attack, Mullins and Bradshaw
fairly comfortably, although it

was evident that they were al-
ways cautious, Skipper Farmer
had to keep on the fast bowlers,
especially Mullins who bowled, 16
overs, as the spinners were in-
effective and costly.

Mullins off whom 28 runs were
scored for one wicket, held a good
length and kept down the scor-
ing.

The partnership was _ broken
with the score at 83 by a brilliant
eatch by F. Taylor at short leg.
The batsman was G. N. Grant
who scored 40, The incoming
batsman, N. Harrison helped
Atkins to take the score to 123 for
the loss of two wickets. At the
en’ of the day’s play, Atkins was
54 and Harrison 20, both not out.

Slack fielding from the Police
players,

were in some measure
responsible for Spartan’s 123
runs.

Scores on page 5



|
:
|

New Shipment arrive and

Semi-finals
Tomorrow

Table Tennis semi-finals in
Grade A and B and Ladies’ Dou-
bles Championships will be played
at the Y.M.C.A. to-morrow night.
The finals of these competitions
will take place on Friday, August
1

In the A Class, Norman Gill will
meet Lincoln Worrell while Roy
Phillips will play Frank Wil-
loughby,.

The games in the B Class are:
George King vs. D. Guiler and D,
Archer vs. C. Hendy,

Ruth -Williams and J. Clarke,
the Queen’s College double pair,
will play Renee Gloumeau and
Patsy Humphrey of Y.M.P.C,

Fewer Flags
Kingston: Fewer flags will

wave in this outpost of the
Empire because it will cost more

to wave them, Twenty per
cent. more. For, through an
oversight by customs officers

drafting the new tariff rates, the
one-time duty-free Union Jacks
must now pay an ad valorem
holidaying with her relatives at
duty of 20 per cent.





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SUNDAY, JULY 27,

OLYMPICS





More Records Broken At Helsinki | **.;

BARTHEL

1952

WINS THE

1,500 METRES

Mr. T. A. D. Gale, Ad

of the Advocate, —

vertising
is at present in Helsinki rere F e Olympic Games.

LSINKI, July 26.

AT HELSINKI to-day -it was rather a tame day,

although the march of records continues.

it is quite possi-

ble that not since the first games have so many records

been established.
no doubt someone will

ing on points with the

y has lost count, but
a list when it is all over.

So far in all the ene y entire games Russia is lead-

the track and field events began with the De-

-

of these as well as the
fourth and fifth in this event all
broke the old Olympic record of
45 feet 1% inches, The Russian
women are obviously as strong if
not stronger than they were said
to be by nearly all sports writers
before the Games.
Surprising Result

But the most surprising result
in the Games came off to-day
when the little considered —"
Barthel of Luxembourg won the
1,500 metres. No doubt a num-
ber of people were sorry to see
the name of the great Jack Love-
lock wiped off as the holder of the
Olympic record, but there was no
uncertainty about it as the first
eight in this event all fae i
better time. With the Steeplechase
yesterday it ranks as the greatest
record breaking feat of the
Games.

It was a mixed up race from
start to finish. The order changed
several | we the new wine
Tecord erner o
Germany took over ‘tia Dane
1% laps to go, He ran into the
Reding Wt Gorge ‘nate ost

yy sever: s and as
he began his final sprint on the
last bend it looked as if he was
the certain winner, Roger Ban-
nister and Robert McMillan of
the U.S.A. were prominent at this
time and Barthel and Frances FE)
Mabrouk were chasing them.

Home Stretch

Coming into the home stretch
MeMillan, Bannister and Barthel
were all gaining on Lueg. MeMil-
lan caught Lueg first and just
when he looked like winning,
Barthel pulled out something ex-
tra and passed both of them to



SCOREBOARD >

eathlon which as I is still going en. As pected,
Bob Mathias of the OBA te Meiite bet te eee:

nd.
by inehes from the American.
rather quiet reception
received it was
people diq not

it and
consul the
r programmes.

But Barthel won on his merits
and his time ef 3 minutes 45.2
seconds lowered Lovelock’s

ic records by as much as
fi He was 2.2 seconds
outside Gunder Hagg’s world
record. Why so few people
thought of Barthel as the likely
winner is probably due to the fact
that Britain’s Bannister by his re-
cords in England and America
over a mile Was considered
almost a certainty. Lueg of Ger-
many had also gained plenty of
publicity with his world record
over this distance only a few
weeks ago. But Barthel won both
his heat and Semi Final, The final
order was Barthel, McMillan of
the U.S.A., Lueg of Germany and
Roger Bannister of Britain. Ban-
nister who claims that he can
only run one or two very good
miles per year certainly ran one
of his best to-day; but it was not
good enough.

Ladies’ 200 Metres

The last final at the Olympic
Stadium today was the Ladies’
200 metres and in this Marjorie
Jackson handsomely won but not
as easily as she did in the Semi-
Finals yesterday when she broke
the world record. Her time for
the final was 23.7; Berther Brower
of Holland, however, improved
her time by a tenth when she
did 24.2 to come second. Third
was Russia’s Nadezhda Khmykina
and fourth Winsome Cripps of
Australia who both did 24.2, once
again beating Mrs. Blankers
Koen's old record.

The first heats in the 400-metre
relays were also run, In the
latter the Jamaican team quali-
fied easily with a time of 3 min-
utes 12.1 seconds, but both the
U.S. and German teams did
better times in their respective
heats which they won,

,



ARLTO _ LODGE HARRISON COLLEGE vs. EMPIRE
Ledge aon . * ar es a $4244 81 Harrison College ist Innings
Cariton ist FEF. Hope c Rudder b Barker ... 2
Cc. McKenzie c Brooks Wilkie 34 U. Tudor stpd. (w.k. DePeiza) b
E. . Mi i ec Farmer b Brookes 21° ait, Seated icce ; 29
R. St. C. Hutchinson ec Goddard b C. Smith c Hunte b King 48
WROMBO oss n ce csuvevtascsscrs 4 ©. Blackman ec (w.k. DePeiza) b
G. Hutchinson c Welch b Wilkie .. 4 Fields at 24
F. hill ¢ Murray b Farmer .. #2 Mr. Headley b Barker ’ 15
J. A Wiliams ¢ ob Parmer ued 2 A. Alleyne c Robinson b Barker 30
. Edghill e Brookes b Farmer . 0 M. Worme run out 0
& B. Williams not out ...... ... 47 M. Simmons b Barker 21
H. Cox c (w.k. Grant) b K. L. 8S. Hewitt 1.b.w. Barker 3
Brookes .......... a Otte ata edad G. Foster not out . & 9
N. S, Lucas not out ...........+5- C. Reid c and b Holder 4
Extras: b. 8, 1.b. 2, w.1 ++ Extras IE 1
Total (for 8 wkts. decid.) 228 Total 196
Fall of wickets: 1 for 38, 2 for 46, 3 BOWLING ANALYSIS
for 106, 4 for 116, 5 for 131, 6 for 183, \ O.. M. R w
7 for 140, 8 for 190. fi asker ‘ 6 6 52 5
LING ANALYSIS ewis 6 3 6
now: 3 M R. W. S. Rudder 9 4 25
. ich ... vw 6 _ % j— A. Holder 16.5 1 38 1
§ co beves 5 - 19 —~ ©. Fields 1 ae 2 15 1
K. Brookes 17 - 70 2 es ME ws ¥:0:00 0.9% m7 30 2
M. Wilkie 7 1 28 2 W. Drayton 3 il
3. Farmer 11 — @ 8 O. Robinson 2 8
R. Goddard Rs 14 - Fall of wickets: 1 for 5, 2 for 76, 3
Lodge Innings for 99, 4 for 118, 5 for 128, 6 for 128, 7
Cc. B. Grant bC, Bo wiiliams s.ccss 21 for 175, 8 for 180, 9 for 183.
. M. Murray b F. Edghill ....... cd ire Ist Innings
. G. Wilkes b C. B, Williams .. © ©. Robinson b Mr. Headley 56
Â¥ . Brookes c Lucas b C. B. C. Hunte b Mr. Headley A 7
. Winiams ne te ee CE 5 C. Depeiza b Simmons . 4s ZANT Ke 73
3. E. Farmer not out ..........++. 1 W. Drayton c Worme b Mr. Headley 68
H. Welch Lb.w. C. B. Williams 0 ©. Fields run out 2
R. L. Goddard c J. Williams b A. Holder run out .. 0
Cc. B. Williams vegaatee 0 8. Rudder c Reid b Simmons 21
D. St. C. Reefer b C. B, Williams 2 W. Grant not out vie 5
N. G. Wilkie . (w.k. Marshall) H. King c Smith b Mr. Headley 0
, bc. B. Williams ..... ; ® H. Barker c Alleyne b Simmons 0
3. G. Outram b C. B. Williams 1 ¢. Lewis b Mr. Headley 12
J. A. C. Hutson absent ead c Extras . ie ‘ 9
Extras: lb. 2 .....++ 2
i. Total
ft 23 BOWLING ANALY S Be
ickets: 1 for 42, 2 for 42, Oo M y
tor 82, ¢ for 62, 8 for 52, 6 for 58,7 for wr Headley > % 5
54, 8 for 54, 9 for 56. M. Simmons 17 48 3
; BOWLING ANALYSIS C. Reid Te ae
oOo M F C. Smith ae
G. Edghill 3 — 0 = G. Poster g 40
K. B. Warren 4 11 — E£. Hope ne ae AP oe
J. A. Williams . ok Fall of wickets: 1 for 23, 2 for 118, 3
Cc. B. Williams 6 1 MW 8B fer 492, 4 for 172, 5 for 181, 6 for 227
F. Edghill ...... 3 2 4 1 4 for 82, 8 for 232, 9 for 235
(ae





: Olympic
Summaries

HELSINKI, July #6

U.S. beat Czechosioyakia 72 to 47 in
' one-sided Olympte elimination Basket -
ball game. At half time U.S. wete 35
Czechs 21 .

Czechoslovakia and Hungary have been
ciiminated from the Basketball tourna-
ment by losing two matches in the first
round

Bulgaria beat Mexico 52 to 44 in an
Olympic basketball tournament Saturday
Half time score was Bulgaria 27, Mexico

i6. The Bulgarian team averaged six
feet three i which dwarfed Mexi-
co's whieh averaged a little under six

feet. In addition to their height advan-
toge the Buigarians had better speed
and form on the Olympic Court.
WATER POLO
Brazil beat Portugal six to two in a
Water polo second round game. Half
time was Brazil 3, Portugal 2. Portugal)
eliminated Brazil and advanced to th»
first round tournament
The U.S. water polo team from Segun-
da, Calijornia, qualified for the tourna-
ment round of the Olympic event today,
beating Romania by six goals to three
in the second round of the eliminations
DECATHLON (Total Points Score after
Seven Points)




ist Mathias (U.S.A... 6000; 2nd Camp-
be (0 S.A.) S704; Sed Simons (U.S.A.)
5308; Sth Tanknder iSweden) 4929: 6th
Widenicit iSweden) 4928; 7th Vokov
iL S.R.) 4894; 8th Franyer (France)
4745; 8th Schimer (Germany) 4644; 10th
Kuznetskvy (U.S.S.R.) 4577; 11th Elliott

(Britain) 4491; 12th Fernandes (Portugal)

#421; 13th Rebula (Yusoslavia) 4369; 14th
latre (Venezuela) 4321; 15th Figueloa
(Chile) 4252; 16th Adami (Canada) 4215
Mth Ciko (Fimland) 4129.
DECATHLON 110 METRES HURDLES
First Heat
Ist Schirmer (Germany) 16; 2nd
Adams (Canada) 16.¢
Second Heat
Ist Heinrich (France) 16; 2nd Iriarte

(Venezuela) 16.6; 3rd Oliver (Puerto
Rico) 16.7; 4th Landstrom (Finland) 17.2
SWIMMING—100 METRES FREE STYLE
First Heat (24 best times qualify for

Semifinals

ist Hamaguchi (Japan)

58 sees.; 2nd

Minin (France) 59.2 sees.; 3rd Novac 1
min. 0.53 sees.; “4th Muniz (Mexico); 5th
Leo Teleyug (Finland); 6th Conde

(Spain); 7th Buch (Israel)






FENCING
Fencing 's Epee Semifinal
Poule one: Luxembourg 10, Denmark

5 Luxembourg :
Gretsche 2, Anen 4
Denmark: Carnera 2, Swane
Eynker 0, Keuxho 2
SHOT PUT
Russia's Klavdija Tochenova broke the
Olympile record in the ladies’ shot put
in the qualifying Tgqgnd with a throw
of 13.86 metres. The old mark of 13.75
was set by France's M
London, 1948,
WOMEN’S SHOT PUT -FINAL
ist Zybina (UsS.S.R.) 15.28, new world

Buck 3, Liesehgn 1,

Lund 1,

Ostermieyer in

record, @nd Werner (Germany) 14.57;
Sri Tochenova (U.S.S.R.) 14.50; 4th
Kevich (U.S.S.R.) 1442; Sth Kille
(Germany) 13.84; 6th Williams (New
Zealand)

FOUR BY 100 METRES RELAY

First Round

The first three teams in each heat will
run in the semi finals :

First Heat: Ist U.S.A, 40.3; 2nd France
408; 3rd Poland 41.8; 4th Finland 42
Sth Canada 42.3

Second Heat: Ist Britain 41.2; anda
Italy 41.5; 8rd U.S.A, 41.9; 4th Gold Coast
42.29; Sth Australia 423; 6th Thailand
42.5
SWIMMING—100 METRES FREE

FOURTH HEAT

ist Cleviand (United States) 57.8 secs
tnd Sugaki (Japan) 58 secs.; 3rd Peter
soli (Italy) 58.8.

STYLE

—U.P.

PICKWICK vs. WANDERERS
Wanderers Ist Innings “ AS
Pickwick 181 and (for & wkts.) 119

Pickwick Ist Innings

EL. G. Hoad, jnr. e E, Atkinson
b D. Atkinson 19
F. Edwards b J. Corbin . 13
Birkett c sub b R. Lawless 11
K. Greenidge c sub b\D. Atkinson 49
J. D. Goddard ec (w.k Knowles) b
E. Atkinson 9
C. Evelyn run out 9
W. Greenidge b D. Atkinson 0
R. Foster e Proverbs b D. Atkinson 14
T. Hoad c & b E. Atkinson * 1
C. White not out 0
H. Jordan c sub b D. Atkinson 5
Extras 1
Total 131

Fali of wickets 1 for 23, 2 for 43, 3

for 43, 4 for 78, 5 for 111, 6 for 111, 7 for
116, 8 for 126, 9 for 126
BOWLING ANALYSIS
Oo M R Ww
I Atkinson 12 1 32 2
J Corbin 3 1 5 1
I Atkinson 16.3 3 46 5
I Lawless 4 1 6§ 1
H Toppin 5 1 2 «C-
L. St. Hill 4 1 3 —
Pickwick 2nd Innings
L.. G. Hoad, jnr. b E. Atkinson 33
Edwards c D. Atkinson b
E. Atkinson 33
D. Goddard not out 43
White 1.b.w. b St. Hill . 3
Greenidge c H. Toppin b St. Hill o
Evelyn run out 2
Greenidge not out 0
Extras 5
Total (for 5 wkts.) 119

Fall of wickets
wy 103, 4 for 108, 5 for 105

BOWLUNG ANALYSIS

oO M yaw
Atkinson 1 2 26 2
Atkinson 13 3 27
Proverbs J 6
Toppin 6 28
A. Lawless 2 1 &
St. Hill 12, 3 22 2






1 for 58, 2 for 100, 3



SUNDAY



ADVOCATE



League Cricket Notes

By SCRIBBLER
Big Games

First of the series of the B.C.L
big games will begin to-morrow
at YÂ¥.M.P.C. grounds when an
official League team will meet a
team representative of the Inter.
mediate division of the Barbados
Cricket Association. Althougb
this is an unofficial fixture
should serve some useful purpose
and ought to be a regular fixture
between the League and the
Barbados Cricket Association, In
the first place it would provide
an opportunity for the Intermedi-
ates to stake a claim for any of
the players in this division fo:
consideration in the senior grade
of cricket and secondly it will
essist the B.C.L- in gaining experi-
ence in representative cricket. As
a matter of fact there should be
more than one of these unoffi-
cial games so that when the an-
nual B.C.A, vs. B.C.L, fixture is
due the League will have discov-

ered its best players to place in
the field against the Island XI.
B.C.L. Team

The B.C.L, team began a team
bi ilding programme iast season
aid the annual match found 4 fair-
ly good combination in the field.
What is more the team was be-
ginning to show signs of knowing
itself and its members not being
strangers to each other. With the
opening of this year’s series, the
B.C.L. will be without the ser-
vices of DePeiza who has joined
Empire C.C. Guy Kirton who has
also joined Empire C.C. These are
just two of a long list of players
who have migrated from B.C.L
cricket to B.C.A. cricket, and
which goes to prove that the
B.C.L, is as important a nursery
as Harrison College, Combermere
and Ledge School, The League
will centre its strength around
the Captain, Kenneth Goddard,
Ashton Blackman, the Sobers
brothers and W. A. Clarke of
Rangers who made two consecu-
tive centuries this season. An
opportunity is being given to K.
Maloney (St. Catheriney Green
(Middlesex) Bourne (Lanes) and
Browne (Kendal). Green is con-
sidered one of the fastest bowl-
ers in the League today and
should make use of the oppor-
tunity. Maloney scored the larg-
est number of runs last season
obtained the best average and
won a prize for the first batsman
to score three consecutive 30's
last season, Brown of Kendal
comes back inte the team after
having failed at Bank Hall in
the last big game. He has been
making some good scores and
once the stage fright phase has

been overcome he should be in a
position to justify his selection.



Victories

In the City and Central divi-
sions victories were scored with
time to spare. Rangers declared
at 317 for the loss of 9 wickets
and then dismissed Yorkshire for
70, to win the game by an in-
nings. Barker 3 for 15, Pinder 3
for 5 and Skeete 3 for 5 were
Rangers’ best bowlers,

In the Central division St
Luke’s proved no match for Ken.
dal, the present cup holders and
were dismissed for scores of 31
and 106 as against 141.

Romans’ 212 also proved too
formidable for St, Augustine, St.

Augustine were down for 52 in
the first innings but made a bet.
ter show in the second with 153.
This, however, was not good
enough to win the game

Danes ran up totals of 135 and
86 for 3 to better the scores of
80 and 133 by White Rose. A.
Blackman 40, Lucas 43 were the
best scores returned by St. Augys-
tine batsmen.

Another Century

Another century was recorded
on Saturday when C, Rogers hit
121 for Radcliffe against Rangers
B. It is the fourth B.C.L. century
this season and assisted Radcliffe
io reach the fine total of 280. In
addition to Rogers’ effort, Green-
idge hit 56, Forde 35 and Neblett
83. At the close of play Rangers
hec lost four wickets for 70 runs.

the other games of this divi-

it Middlesex also scored the
ble, getting 228 against Advo-

ca eo, Craig top scored with 77 and
\Jilkie was responsible for 45. Ii
their turn at the crease, Advocate
were all out for 114, veteran of
he team, Namaan Holder, led the
vay with 45, Rudder for Middle-

“¢x took 8 for 35 and Harding 3

r 38

St. Matthias and Chamberlain
vere engaged in a comparatively

ven struggle, Chamberlain were
jismissed for 127 and St. Mat-

hias bettered this with a score of

46 for the loss of 9 wickets at

e close of play.

The Bellefield vs. Telephone
mah provided a game of thrills
1 Which the ball dominated.
l'eilefield were dismissed for 58
Blackman took 5 for 22 and Taitt
2 for 17. In their turn at the
wicket Telephone failed to obtain
first innings lead and fell for 37.
Brooks 5 for 14 and Dyal 4 for
14 were the men who shared the
bowling honours. At the close of
play Bellefield were 22 for the
loss of six wickets, The game
therefore is quite an open one,

Liberty had the better of the
game against Petroleum Market-
ing. Liberty with a score of 101
left it to their bowlers to place

i¢ side in a good position ana
this they did in handsome man-
her, dismissing Petroleum for 34.
Dlaeckman 5 for 4 and Hope 4 for
1} were the bowlers who carried
a'l before them.

Slender Lead

In the South, Searles
a slender nine run lead
Cambridge. Scores were: Searles
129 and Cambridge 120. Sydney
also took the lead with a score
of 106 against Lancs who fell for
95

In the Windward Division, Sus-
sex B_ defeated Oxford in a
single day while Sussex A are
engaged in a struggle with St.
Catherine that may well deter.
mine the destination of the Cup.
St. Catherine scored 101 and at
the drawing of stumps Sussex
were 94 for 5.

enjoyed

against

Small Grounds

Mr, O. N, Looker might be in
terested to know that the ques-
ticn of small grounds in relation
to the value of boundaries has
had the attention of the B.C.L.
and it was decided to fix the value
of the boundaries at all grounds.

The Carrington Village ground is,

in the category of twos and fours
Teams adopting any other valu-
ation do so at their risk. Certainly
no record scored at = ground:
where the boundaries are of a
higher valuation than that agreed

a UUndnNEInEE NE RRENENEENNEEEEEneeeemmmmeeseeseemeeeeel

SPARTAN V. POLICE

SPARTAN Ml & (for 2 wkts.) 123
POLICE ...,.. é es : 146
Polloe—ist Innings
Cc. Blackman b King 1
F. Taylor run out 39
A. Blenman stpd. wkpr. b Bowen 21
Cc. DeC. Springer c Phillips »b
Bowen 0
Cc. Amey lbw. b King 4
W. Farmer c King b Phillips 36
J. Byer c whee b King 6
B. Dodson b King 15
G. Sobers not out 5
C. Mullins b Phillips 6
C. Bradshaw b Phillips 4
Extras 9
Total . 146
Fall of wickets 1-6, 2—33, 3—34,

4—41, 5—67, 6—117, 7-129, 8—131, 9—138

BOWLING ANALYSIS

*

—

Ann /

E SHOULD HAVE
DRANK THIS IN

THE FIRST PLACE/eiesy BEER

o M a

F Phillips 13.6 3 35 3
F. King i4 -_ 66 4
K, Bowen 12 4 a4 2
N. Harris 1 s—
S. L. Harris 1 1 - -

SPARTAN—nd Innings
A. Atkins not out 54
S. Griffith lb.w, b Bradshaw 0
G. N. Grant ec F. Taylor b C. Muliina 40
N. Harrison not out 20
Extras: 9
Total: (for 2 wkts.) 123
Fall of wickets: 1—0, 2—83,

BOWLING ANALYSIS

oO M R Ww
c. Mullins 16 6 28 1
Cc. Bradshaw 8 3 23 1
€ Blackman 3 |
Cc. Dec. Springer 4 14
J, Byer .... 1a @ 36
G. Sobers 1 11 i"



YEAH!
cucers//

ANH

BREWED
ANY WHE RE.)





JULY 27



Topic

Last Week



What English |! Oh
Why culture
course

what English
gone up stairs
there're various angles
That one must sell his wares
Son shout out mangoes! mangoes
Son Shout breadfruit no r
Come madam! buy your breadfruit
A whole one or a slice





The man with the newspapers

Cries paper at the v

The fellow with the weepstake

Cries buy naught, naught wught
. . . .

For even in the old days

Way in Victorian age

All young men without coppers
Set mother-in-laws in a rage

. . . . .
To-day the same procedure
Seems to upset this town
The family have the last word
Bout if the man is brown

. .
They ask if he’s a smoker
And how long he was born
W he lacks race horse pedigre:
They look on him with se





They ask him ‘bout his great-aunt
And her society

Forgetting at the same time

A rroaned i laver

Sometimes these boys get “1
iying the double game
And boys without discretior

femain ‘earnest’ just the same








Sometimes like little children
hey querrel and turn red
And guess what cause a battle
\ J & R Sandwich Bread
is one phase of culture
fice Joe and Lou
i ir friend Batchelor Robert
Love Madam O'Lindy crew
The show at the Olympic
W worth going miles to

\ceording to a youngster
it was “the petticoat spree

nsation ! oh sensation !
Robert blood start to surge
And when the Fire-Fly

Seam Midget had “the urge

Qalypsoes, Sambas, Rhumbas
Phté and Marico
The same time Lou was dreaming
A woman “hold she Joe”

* “ . .

Luciile, Slim Jim, Lord Coffee
et Molly, Chureh Ivan

Fius the mighty Dictator

Served mirth in a wash pan

. . . °

Aiter this how at mid-night

The crowd went to a bar

From midnight until morning

They all drank J & R

sponsored by

J & R BAKERIES
makers of

ENRICHED BREAD

and the blenders of

J&R RUM



DYUNLOP

NO. 234

‘burn down"



|



RUBBER
Depots

OMPANY
ind Distributors

PAGE FIVE



can taste the cream
in Cadburys
Dairy Milk
Chocolate ———_



Neuralgia,
Neuritis,

Sciatica, Toothache

A generous application of
comforting, soothing
THERMOGENE Medica-
ted Rub to the painful

In extra large
Jars and handy Tins

part will soon bring

relief. Repeat the appli-

Head and Chest olds, Coughs

cationas required until the




pain has disappeared.

Musculsr Paing

Of all good Stores
ond Chenvict

DOUBLE-2.CTION

THERMOGENE

MEDICATED RUB

In big glass Jars and handy Tins



Bult tiv the Seb!

BIRMINGHAM,
the Worie

ito

ENGLAND
throughout ome




PAGE SIX





FOR WOMEN :
ONLY! ae

HA! HA!

a



*«

ARIES Mercury mc

March 21—April 20 today, prom
K Do attend ¢
day better.

*

Unnecessary
with Sunda
But day
recreation,

*

Splendid in
well aspecte
as you usu

SO THE GALS THINK THEY C.\N KEEP US OUT, eh? but here's a
grand tip on the quiet fellas. If the ‘Little Woman’ sniffs suspiciously
after your night out with the boys, give her a kis, pronto: Sure I
said a kiss—a grana beso: Suck an AMPLEX tablet a day, boys, and
you can spree every night with breath sweet as a Ouch!
Mary's just landed me one—but I'll be back.

what your outlook is, according

FOR SUNDAY,

babe's.

SURE HE’LL BE BACK, for his favourite
dishes, With AIR-WICK in my. kitchen I can
relax in comfort. No unpleasant cooking
smells in MY home now. The air is as sweet
as ‘yours truly’. That's what Herbert says—
oh yes, he'll be back, AIR-WICK really
makes a difference in the home.

*

GEMINI
+ May 23—June 21

CANCER
x June 22-—July 23

TAURUS
April 21—May 22



A mild day
gramme cal
supply tnat

Can be idea
tion, home,
You in ar

SO, THIS IS A GALS COLUMN AFTER ALL! Like

to possess my abundant energy, girls? It’s easy.

*
x

LEO

Keep healthy July 24—Anug. 22

ind trim, using the genile, safe laxa-
tive, MEDILAX. For INNER CLEANLINESS you
can’t beat MEDILAX — you'll take life in your



*« bag i Fine indica
stride, and oh boy, just listen to the lads whistle! ae ee ~~ a ai
A : you should

«x LIBRA *

Neither’ exc
Ideal in ma
your very

it. 24—Oct, 23
I'D WHISTLE A GAL ANY DAY’! Travelling Sales- ~~

man I am, My line? SPA BRUSHES. Finest on

*
SCORPIO
KK Oct. 24—Nov. 22

x
x

«x
CAPRICORN
«x Dec. 21—Jan. 20

x

the market. Toothbrushes, hairbrushes, baby

brushes. SPA BRUSHES are the finest in the world,

May be the
fully, calml
tion when

cheap too. oured.

My old girl’s teeth are like the stars—
they come out at night. SPA have brushes for them

1. cae
ARE THE YOUNG MARRIEDS PUZZLED?

SAGITTARIUS

too! Nov. 23—Doc. 20

your spiritu

ful hobby c

3 No need to be. For those who believe
in

Ps Day can be

family _ planning we recommend
RENDELL-FOAM. Dainty and safe,
this contraceptive tablet is one of the
best. Use RENDELL-FOAM once and

you'll use it always. Safe, sure, and on

AQUARIUS No need for

Jan. 21—Feb. 19

your soul’s
one for you

*

On whole
with matter
entertaining
among «top



sale everywhere, 8
PISCE:
20—March 20

*« Feb.
*«

CAN I_SAY SOMETHING NOW, GIRLS?

See my new hair-do. Percival it’s

too high-falutin’ but it does stay put. Ah

BANDBOX ALMOND OIL
SHAMPOO, You can do just anything with

says

YOU BORN TODAY are se
Sava oi and talented. May have to curt
jus"; Sve the past and perhaps to doubt

*«

your hair afterwards—did you say some-

thing, Percival?



Ah didn’t say a mumblin’ word, Daisy Bell, BY THE

“Girls, we gotta a cute littke number in our
office now. Uses BANDBOX' téo—bit oh boy!

Does her hair glitter. It's this new Bandbox

HILE reading of a man who
danced with a_ waltzing
horse at a fair, it struck me that
one advantage of dancing with a
horse is that you can “sit the next
one out” on your partner's back,

COLAIR—makes your hair sparkle like dia-

monds, girls, COLAIR by Bandbox.

Try it,



i i ich is ore than can be ex-
Any cimculty--ring our flee: Me, sot. the a i balls confined to human
girls. 70 I cP beings.
a9 satis be (Enter U Baw Me, a Burmese

Don't mind little Samson down there, he’s been up business man.)
U Baw Me: Mrs. Ribstone, you
are a pippin. :
Mrs, Ribstone: Hush! Mr, Rib-
stone is within earshot,

(The ceiling falls in. Slow curtain.)

all night walking the new baby. Never happened
No Sir! Always had good old WOOD-
WARD'S GRIPE WATER’ handy—did the trick

to me.

In passing

HENEVER the professional
politicians feel that» they
would like to raise their own sal-
aries a not very subtle form of
propaganda begins, At present our
i S$ 7 pi ¥ 2 by reve-

» Agents covering this column, INTERNATIONAL TRADING J hearts are, being broken by re
aie 9e"CORPORATION LTD., Coleridge St., Tel: 5009. lations of the squalid lives lived

by these men who have sacrificed
e
e agaae
weth

every time. Try it Sammy old boy! And don't

forget to put the cat out. Say—is this supposed to



be a wimmins cofumn! Fiddlesticks !



*ASPRO” brings definite palin-relief
within a few minutes. The sensation
is a soothing one. You suddenly
realise that the pain has faded
away. ‘ASPRO’ just does the job
sand then disappears, leaving no trace
—leaving no harmful after-effects
whatever. ‘ASPRO’ provides Nature
with the ‘chance she needs to get you fit
again. Take ‘ASPRO’ when you feel
the first twinge or ache which warns
you of the onset of rheumatic pain,
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That is the way to forestall the constant
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th when you are overstrained, overtired,

ot overworked—
Semmorh wenen YOU'RE NERVY
se

AND IRRITABLE —

Feverishness

Overcome

MAHMUD AHMED EL SHATHILI of
4 Sharia Soliman Abaza, Sakakini, Cairo,
writes :—This letter is my declaration of
the great value of the small white tablet,
*ASPRO', which alleviates the aeey of
mankind and has come to the front of all
new discoveries. I have tried ‘ASPRO’
in recovering from feverishness, the re-
sult of the heat of the sun in summer,
snd found it to be the best medicine,

"Take ‘ASPRO’ For




heartburn and flatulence. Itssothe

a sparkling, invigorating health-d

FIT AS A FIDDLE
NEXT MORNING

Gentleman, Hackney, E.9.
It is with the greatest pleasure that I
write this letter to prove the genuine
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able, but a little while after I have taken
two ‘ASPRO’' tablets it has gone. When
I have felt a “'flu” cold coming over me,
I have gone to bed with 2‘ASPRO’ tablets
and a hot Gein’ one the next morning I
amas “fitasa e."”
Iam, yours gratefully, B.C.R.

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“ The words “sno” and





YOUR INDIVIDUAL

highly
brain



and our great cause

children, oldsters,

*

You will find encouragement, help in ngs yb
that are right to do.

SUNDAY

ADVOCATE



\ The STARS: +*

and YyoU age etl me



~

HOROSCOPE

Look in the section in which your birthday comes and fina

to the stars.
JULY 27, 1952

yst favourably aspected planet
ising for keen mental alertness.
hurch first, you will enjoy your

*

work, activities incompatible 3
y are not in order, of course.
sponsors reading, healthy

work, entertainment.

clinations with your Mercury
d. If as capable and helpful 3
ally are, you can do a lot of

good at home and in your community.

say your stars, but if your pro-
ls for verve, certainly you can
and be in the swim of things.

* ¥

1 for Sunday interests, recrea- 3
family, church, charity affairs.
ed st vs, keep faith in God

+

tions here. It should be happy
Go to church, do chores as
then enjoy free hours.

iting nor too slow tendencies,
ny ways for a week-end, Lend
entertaining qualities to aid

time to slow down, view cheer-
y. Take due rest and recrea-
you can, Urgent duties .fav-

* *





Give more thought to
al needs, to improving a health-

x talent.

to your liking but do remember

+

it is Sunday and prayers, church attend-
ance are due God in thanksgiving for all
His blessings.

* *

rushing or extremes. Keep anâ„¢

even disposition, and do think deeply of

welfare. Today can be a happy
and loved ones." +

a cheerful, interesting period yg
s requiring brightness of mind,
qualities, reading, writing

favoured, +

nsitive, courteous, sympathetic,
» tendency to look too much to
others’ sincerity occasionally.

You have bright years ahead and, with faith and prayer, should
accomplish a great deal. Prayer your great aid always, Birth y4
date: Alexandre Dumas the Younger, Fr.

novelist, dramatist.

kak Kwek Ke we KK EY

WAY...

By BEACHCOMBER

themselves in order to “represent”
us in Parliament. While the rest
of us are fortunately free from
financial anxiety, these down-
trodden, selfless people are besét
by sordid money worries. The re-
frain of all their songs is: “If you
want the best type of man in Par-

liament, you must reward him
suitably, and free him from the
cares and anxieties which are

meant for less important people”
(i.e, the electorate). The latest
suggestion is that a_ politician’s
salary should be tax-free. If that
idea does not attract “the best type
of man,” nething will.

On a venal reviewer

Grateful for snacks from any
plate,

And cocktails grabbed from
passing trays,

He’s ready to humiliate

Even good writers with his

praise,




Healthy, happy families take ENO’S

3 “Fruit Salt”.
o- “ Fruit Salt” is the gentle corrective
most of us need to keep the system regular. ENO’S is particularly
suitable for children—and for anyone witha delicate stomach. ENO’S
safely relieves over-acidity, a most frequent cause of indigestion,

Pleasant, refreshing

s and settles the stomach upsct by

unsuitable food or drink. A dash of ENO’S at any time of day makes

rink. Keep ENO’S handy !

Eno’s

SPECIALLY
RECOMMENDED
t\ for IRRECULAR ACTION,
2) SICK HEADACHE,
BiLt
INDIGES

USNESS.
ION, ete

THE KITCHEN

TURTLE

For the sucky people who can
ge: turtic and who like it, here
aré some very good recipes. Fur
the unlucky cones» who cannot get
turtle but who are lucky enough
to get veal these recipes will be
just as good, as you can cook
veal and make it taste just like
turtle and you can cook turtle and
make it taste just like veal, ex-
cept the part of the turle which
has-a fishy taste.

One goed way to cook turtle is
to curry it, and I gave you my
recipe on curry some time back
with the different ways to cook

rice.
TURTLE SOUP
For Six People

2 Ibs. ef turtle or 1 calf’s head.
Marjoram
Thyme
Parsley
Onion, 1
Tomato paste, 1 teaspoonful
Bovril, 1 teaspoonful

Rum or Sweet Vermouth, 1
very small glass
Pepper

1 slice of ham (lean)

1 slice of ham (fat).

if you use turtle:—

Put the turtle to boil with some
water and when almost cooked
add the parsley, the marjoram,
the thyme, the chipped onion and
the 2 slices of ham. Let all cook
until boiling point, then take off
the fire and put the saucepan in

a warm spot for about 4 of an
hour. Sieve the broth now and
then, add 1 teaspoonful of con-

centrated tomato paste, 1 teaspoon-
ful of bovril and let everything
boil again for another % hour.
When you are ready to serve, cut
the turtle in small squares and
peur the broth over it. Serve
with toast or with small meat-
balls the size of a nut which you
have fried in butter or margarine.

If you use the head of a caif

instead of turtle:—

Put the head to boil with some
water. When cooked, take all the
fat and the lean pieces and leave
only the jelly-like part whicn
forms the outside of the head.
Let this jelly coo!, under some
weight. You can then follow the
recipe by adding the parsley etc.
When you are ready to serve, cut
the head of the calf in small
squares which you will add ia
the broth.

VEAL OR TURTLE WITH
SAUCE
For Six People

2lbs of veal or turtle.

Butter,-2 ozs.

O.ive oil or margarine

Carrot

Onion '
Thyme

Marjoram

Parsley

Whole tomatoes, 1 tin

Water

Bovril, 1 teaspoonful

Pepper

Flour, 1 teaspoonful

Rum

Pepper

Put the butter and margarine
or oil in the saucepan and add
the chipped onion and 1 carrot
very finely sliced, Let the carrot
and the onion fry gently for
about 10 minutes; then add the

parsley marjoram, thyme and let
cook for a few minutes, Add then
the tin of whole tomatoes. When
you see that the sauce is getting
thick add two or three big table-
spoonfuls of water and 1 teaspoon-
ful of bovril. Add the veal
turtle cut in very small pieces as
if you were going to make a
stew. Season with salt and
pepper, add more water until you
cover the whole and let every-
thing boil until the sauce has
again thickened. Put a tiny bit of
rum if you like and 1 teaspoon-
ful of flour more water and let
it boil again until the sauce is
thick again. Serve hot with rice
or, English potatoes.

CATTLE DISEASE
STILL THREATENS U.K,

LONDON, July, 25.

Sir Thomas Dugdale, Minister
of Agriculture, told the House of
Commons on Thursday that Brit-
ain may be faced with another
invasion of the livesteck foot and
mouth disease. He said restrictions
on the movement of livestock in
south-eastern England will con-
tinue because of the risk of, in-
fection from France.

The French situation _ still is
grave he said, and the infection
seems to be moving westward.

—C-P.

4



SUNDAY,

9"

mt,

1952

JULY



It Is Important ‘To Be Fashionable

By DOROTHY BARKLEY
LONDON.

A gala film premiere always
brings forth a gala display of en-
chanting evening dresses in the
latest fashion. But many in the
audience at the premiere of Oscar
Wilde’s delightful farce “The Im-
portance of Being Earnest” played
a trick on the wizard of fashion.
They had delved deep into theatri-
cal prep cupboards and grandma's
wardrobes. And in place of the
newest fashion, they wore the late.
Victorian costumes portrayed in
the film.

The crowd in the foyer of the
cinema looked like the Gay Nine-
ties suddenly come to life. Wornlen
wore improbable “birdcage” hats
piled high on the head, suits with
sprigged muslin blouses and ankle
length skirts. Their escorts, as
the gay dogs of the ’nineties, wore
long flowing black capes over cor-
rectly cut tweed suits with high

white collar and stock, or the
striped blazer, striped tie and
white flannels of the late -Vic-

torian tennis “uniform.”

But then came the turn of the
wizard of fashion to ply his craft
(with London designer Ian Mere-

dith out in the limelight). To pre-
vent Victorian fashigns stealing
the show and to illustrate that

1952 fashions are also important,
he presented a collection of mod-
ern dresses inspired by the clothes
of the film. So the sophisticated
modern dress paraded side by side
with its Victorian ancestor.
An example to illustrate
point: In the film, the young

the
ac-

tress Dorothy Tutin (as Cicily
Cardew), wore a delightfully de-
mure white organdie dress pat-
terned with tiny blue flowers. It
was ankle-length, high collared,
long-sleeved, with enormous puffs
to the sleeves, and a wide blue
cummerbund at the waist. Its
modern counterpart was a dress
in the newest white nylon with a
blue pin stripe. It also had a blue
cummerbund and a high buttoned
neckline, but it had none of the
Victorian frilly fussiness. Its
sleeves were featly capped and
the skirt was ballet-length.

To adapt an old saying, the more
fashion changes, the more it re-
mains the same!

French Designs in
London

Of late, top London and Paris
couturiers have been designing
special collections for wholesalers.
A group of Paris designers known
as the “Couturiers Associes” de-
sign regularly for a chain of Lon-
don stores, The Queen's dress-
maker, Norman Hartnell, who has
designed for an English whole-
saler for some years, recently de-
cided to export His designs to
Paris.

Now Pierre Balmain has de-
signed a small selection of suits
and day and cocktail dresses to be
includest in “Rembrandt’s® new
collection. He is using a new ma-
tezial called “Vigoroux”’—a 100
per cent pure worsted. The light-
est yet produced, it weighs only
9} oz. per yard. Extremely crease-
resisting, it is consequently diffi-
cult to tailor.

So suits and dresses in this ma-
terial were all of the dressmaker
variety with tucks, folds and
drapes rather than intricate pleat-
ing. Dresses had low double
breasted buttoning, long, cuffed
sleeves, and skirts folded into soft,
unpressed pleats at back and front.
Grey dresses were given a new
season’s touch with black velvet
collar and cuffs. These were ins
variably partnered with a spotted
silk scarf-cap and gloves. Typical
is the one illustrated here in grey
vigoroux,

Cecktail - into -evening dresses
had halter-necks and slim-fitting
skirts and were worn with little
matching boleros, Colours are
richer and more exotic than pre-
viously. Antique gold duchesse
satins, peacock tinsel voiles, and
green and gold striped shantungs
had all the eastern richness of
saris. A’ sleeveless lame blouse
added richness to a black velvet-
een cocktail dress-and-bolero and
a gold lame halter-necked bodice
went with a black grosgrain suit.

Metallasse, the new cocktail
material, added further richness.
It ig a quilted niaterial with a
bubbly effect. Illustrated is a
cocktail dress in black-shot-bronze
metallasse. It has natural should-
ered bodice and a full button-
through skirt.

For those who want to be up-to-
the-minute: wear outsize silver
charms not on your wrist, bub
dangling from your waist on silver
chains, or marquisites sewn on the
collar of your dress.

EOPLE AND GOVERNMENT

Blueprint for Point Four
WASHINGTON

A great deal is being said these

days about international tech-
nical cooperation as the chief
weapon in humanity’s war
against poverty, disease, hunger,

or and despair. The Point Four idea

sharing accumulated knowledge
—is called the world’s best hope
for peace and a better standard
of living for men everywhere.

But are these great exvecta-
tions possible of realization? Can
cooperative action really conquer
man’s ancient enemies? A look at

the record of the Institute of
Inter-American Affairs should
convince even the most cynical
that the answer is a resounding
“yes’’,

This agency~ of the United

States Government has just com-
pleted its first 10 years of whole-
hearted co-operation with the
governments of 19 other American
republics, During this time, U.S.
technicians have been wprking
side by side with. their Latin
American colleagues in the fields
of agriculture, health and sanita-
tion, and education.

In custom-built projects, tailor-
ed to fit the needs of each par-
ticular nation and situation, long-
range plans have been drawn up,
technical knowledge supplied,
and local personnel trained,

The experience of Chimbote,
Peru, is the story of a city and



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its people getting a new start in
life thanks to the Institute. As
in each development project, the
work was done through an or-
ganization known as a_ servicio.
These executive agencies are set
up by the host government and
the IIAA, provided with their
own money, and manned by per-
sonnel furnished by the coopera-
ting countries.

Chimbote, in northern Peru,
has one of the best natural har-
bours on the Pacific Coast, but
back in 1943 people were afraid
of the area. It was a malaria-
ridden village of about 7,000 per-
sons and had no prospects for
growth despite its fine harbour
and good location,

Under the direction of the
Servicio Cooperativo Inter-Ameri-
cano de Salud Publica, to whom
the Institute assigned a handful
of U.S. medical technicians, a
malaria-control program was set
up. Lagoons and other mosquito-
breeding places were ‘drained
and sprayed with pest - killers.
Atabrine was distributed to cut
down the incidence of infection,
A hospital and health center
were set up. Local ordinances
were passed to make health
measures compulsory.

A visitor who had seen the
Chimbote of 10 years ago would
scarcely recognize it for the Chim-

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bote of to-day. And there are
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transfo-mation is so complete that

Chimbote has become an
attractive health resort, Now a
thriving seaport of 18,000, its

population is virtually free of
malaria, and other diseases are
also effectively held in check, The
town is developing enough elec-
tric current to supply a sub=-
stantial trade area, and there is
promise of continued expansion
in manufacturing and shipping.
Chimbote is only one of more

#:an 3,000 examples, of what
international cooperation has
meant to the people of Latin

America, It has helped them help
themselves raise more food, con=
serve their natural resources,
improve their health, expand
their economies, and live fuller

‘and more satisfying lives.

Based on cooperation freely
asked and freely given, the In-
stitute has a record of 10 years
of solid achievement, Its pur-
poses, techniques, and _ spirit
have served as a blueprint for
expanding the program to other
developing countries, as is being
done under Point Four.

In the face of this, let no one
ask if the Point Four idea will
work—it has worked and is con=-
tinuing to work for the benefit
(LATIN
POINT FOUR)

of all participants.
AMERICA:






wonderful




SUNDAY, JULY 27, 1952

THE WRONG







SUNDAY



BABY—for six

INSTALMENT THREE OF THE STRANGE AND TRUE STORY of what really happened
hospital _ . .

when a child’s cradle got switched in




WHO'S WHO

Reet all over Britain have

discussing the story of
the mother whose twirs
“switched” by mistake in
X . Not till they were
nearly seven years old was the
error established—and then the
decision had to be made:
“Should the children be
switched back’ to their right-
jul mothers ?”

What would you have done?

were

rs. Madeleine Joye mother
o/ the twins, made Av crsion
—it was that th; dren
should be, switched
@ The children—!'au iippe,
ind Lrnsilti—were | ibout
the same time ia a 8 hos-
pital to Luo mether Philiwpe
and Ernstli were tron Paul
beionged to the other violher.
Paul (the wrong hab! went
with Phitippeas a twin while
Erustli. Philipne’s twin, went to
the ther mother Madame
y
@ When the change was made
Erustt, went back to Mrs Joye,
reul mother, and Paul wee

to Madame X.

T the end of July | knew [ would never hear from
Paul again. His new mother sent a parcel to
Ernstli and in it I found a little note written for me
in very broad handwriting. ‘‘ Please don’t write to
Paul,’ it said.

The parcel was addressed ; “Ernstli X, c/o The Family
Joye.” She didn’t use our surname, I noticed. How well I
understood !

Gradually, however, Ernstli began to have confidence.
‘He seemed to be getting sure of me; sure that I would con-
sole him if he was unhappy, that I would wash him if he
was dirty; that he need have no fear of asking for a fifth

slice of bread and butter.
He was only seven, which meant he gave me a little

IN BRITAIN...

Prompt identification ... To forestall any
ehance o/ baby mix-wps a plastie bracelet
marked with indelible ink is routine drill
in most London hospitals, Picture here
taken in Whitechapel, E.



there couldn’t be two of them.
We tpoke to Ernstli, who
showed no undue concern.
“I'd like to be called ‘Charles’,

woman, did not, however, con-
quer my feeling of unhappiness
at having no news of Paul, I tele-
phoned the principal of his



I was no longer surprised to
find in Ernstli certain charac-
teristics in common with Philippe,
When we were out for a walk,
and I gave him my hand, he
stroked my wrist exactly as
Philippe did, Paul had never
dane so

Just before they fell asleep
both Ernstli and Philippe would
suck their right thumb; Paul had
always sucked his forefinger —
and then only as a very small
child, ;

Ernstli has the same voice as
his brother, the same laugh, the
same vanity.

Yes, I could see they were true
twins all right.

‘Voices’

FYVHE house was a change for
him. He found it pretty, and
began to take a serious interest in
all his toys, The sunny days
invited him ‘to live out of doors.
After having looked at them
for a long time from the low,
he decided to join company with
our little neighbours in front of
the house.
Bit by bit his memories grew
more misty, and I heard less
often phrases such as:—

“Mummy told me to put on my
brown shorts to play in...”

“Mummy forbade me to lend
the cart.”

I had rigidly respected all these
wishes, -But when Enrnstli no
longer heard his “secret voices,”
or even deliberately began to
disobey them, I felt a new sense
of security and happiness,





There is an American adver-
tising slogan: “Never Under-
estimate the Power of a
Woman.” And no one in the
United States would under-

estimate the power of Assistant
Secretary of Defence Mrs. Anna
Marie Rosenberg, who arrived
in London oma “familiarisation
tour” last night.

So at London Airport, to
greet this dynamic, £5,000-a-
year pint-sized (5ft. 3ins, in
high-heeled, peep-toe black
court-shoes) manpower control-
ler the chiefs of the American

forces in Britain were in full,
formal splendour of khaki,
olive-drab and two shades ol

blue (navy and air force).
Outside the V.I.P. lounge as

the U.S. Air Force plane landed

were one three-star Vice Admi-





_

of his childhood and I felt better for it.



Hy MRS.
MADELEINE
JOYE .



Bewildered

FYCHERE were many difficulties
with little Philippe. For him

it must have been almost as be-

wildering as for me.

His unhappiness was very real
and I tried to reassure him and
to make him understand that it
was imperative at this time to
spoil Ernstli.

One day, at the end of a long
argument, I said to him: “You
have always been here, you
should know very well that you
are the favourite, Ernstli hardly
knows us. He is very unhappy
and we all have to help him. You
must help us too.”

Philippe responded. He took his
responsibilities very seriously. I
remember him running to me one
day and saying solemnly: “Mum-
my, come quickly the little one
is sad and crying.”

Ernstli! . . . Each time I pro-
nounced or wrote that name [
felt a sensation of unreality, The
truth was I did not want my son
to go on using this Christian
name. He ought to be called
“Paul”, I decided.

But, unfortunately, we had
already had a real Paul with a
round head and black eyes—and





Boss Of U.S.

ral, two one-star generals, and
ten other assorted Service per-
sonnel rangins from a couple of
colonels to a doug!.boy-hatted
sailor “aval photogy apher,
first class.”

Waiting alongside were
cars, one station-wagon,
Jeep.

For, according to General
Griswold, commander of the
U.S. 3rd Air Force in Britain.
who led the reception commit-
tee, little Anna is “the boss, and
we like to get a visit from the
headman.”

And Mrs. Rosenberg, Buda-
pest born, Bronx bred, got the
No. 1 treatment for “visiting

11
one



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he said, “because I have an Uncle
Charles and I think he loves me.”

So I went to the school and
announced two new pupils,
Charles and Philippe Joye. “Paul”
will not be imscribed in any
register, for there is no longer
such a person, Madame X has
made an “Ernst” of him and
‘Paul’ only exists in our hearts.

Off To School
CAN see them now — two
little boys carrying satchels
on a strap over their shoulders
setting out for school at 8 o’clock
in the morning.

There was a whole new world
in each satchel, A slate, pencils,
books . . . materials to make a
scholar, a pedant, or a man,

Charles and Philippe
very happy because they had
leopard-skin satchels (imitation,
of course, but they did not know
that) and because they were
dressed in new clothes, with red
jerseys and blue jackets cut from
their mother’s old skirts.

“Very successful, those blue
jackets,” said the mother,

“A great success, those little
boys,” replied the father,

Both of us were proud.

When I was a girl I never col-
lected rose petals, letters, snap-
shots, souvenirs of any kind,
Never.

But now I know that I shall
keep for ever Paul's first baby
clothes, his first trousers, his first
spoon and fork, To me they are
more eloquent than photographs
could ever be.

A Phone Call
Aâ„¢ these little developments,
which mean so much to a

were



By EVE PERRICK
firemen.”

A naval lieutenant went
around distributing large buff
envelopes which contained a
short biography, an hour-by-
jour itinerary for her four-day
trip here, and a photograph,

At 6.50 p.m. (20 minutes later
than the time stated on the
itinerary—“even Anna can’t do
much about plane times” said an
officer) Mrs. Rosenberg arrived
to inspect her troops.

The generals and the others
stood, caps in hand, while the
tiny, feminine figure, wearing a
smart grey suit, lily-of-the-
valley shell-shaped cap, white





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AS

FAB SAVES YOU
MONEY
In hard water much

boarding school. She told me
“Ernst” was very well, that he
was happy, already very attached
to his mother and sister; that he
was a good pup!l both friendly
and industrious,

But the head of the school also
told Madame X that I had tele-
phoned, Madame X was extremely
annoyed. She urged me not to
inquire about her son any more,
and added: “It is you who started
this whole story, and you who
wanted to go through with it.
You succeeded. What have you to
complain about? Bring up your
own children as you think fit,
and leave me to bring up mine.”

I wish these words had been
said with less harshness, because
they are, in fact, profoundly just
and intelligent. Alas, I couldn’t
feel so at the time.

A Meeting
NE afternoon we went to the
baths and saw Paul there.
Philippe tried to speak to him,
but Paul ran away.

Philippe came over to me, with
tears in his eyes, saying: “I
wanted to talk to Paul and he
ran away.”

I tried to console him, but I
was soon weeping myself,

I found Paul was in the water
with his sister.

“Come here,” I said, “Philippe
would like to talk to you a little.”

Paul and “his sister, with
Philippe and Charles, setiled
down under a tree to talk.

We all had ice cream and then
Paul walked with Philippe to the
gate, where they said goodbye. I
held out my hand to Paul, who
bowed with a rather embarrassed:

Generals Arrives—It s Annu

gloves, and a white gardenia
in her battonhole, walked up
and down with the precise,
determined strut of the short-
legged, shaking hands all
round,

She her

made way into the

lounge and fired-off answers to

questions in a merry manner
and the slightest of Continental
accents,
“Now
closer, Make
brown eyes twinkling,
downright winking, as the men
gathered round,
Where was
“France, Britain,

she

a
ECONO
ghord

Ve




is wasted as
FAB forms no
ful soap scum.

come on generals, get
me look impor-
tant,” she exhorted, her bright
if not

going?
Germany,

MICAL AS SOAP
ater



ADVOCATE

years





|

“Goodbye, Madame Joye.”
I said with a_ smile:
eedn’t call me that.”
" “No,” he replied, “T would
rather say Madame Joye.”
Madame Joye! Was that
all that remained in exchange for
seven years’ tenderness and care?

I explained to the children that
it was probably the last time we
would speak to Paul because his
mother would telephone — that
evening and forbid it.

1 was right, She did telephone
and in the most firm terms

asked me not to speak to her

children again.
{ never have done.

“You

Postscript
FTODAY Charles, in his man-
ner, has little to remind me
of the shy, tearful boy of those
first days, He has grown gay,
amusing, and aggressive.

Physicaly the twins resemble
each other more and more and
when we go about together many
people still cannot distinguish
between them,

For my own part, though, I
shall go through the rest of my
life with this strange memory of
the little boy I lost and the little
boy I gained,

I have talked to a hundred
people about it all, but I shall
never really believe anyone wil)
truly understand what it means
to lavish seven years of your
life on a baby you think is yours

-and then discover you're wrong.

“Look after your own
children,” said Madame X, sim-
plifying the problem,

I am doing so. And cheefully.

Sad parents don’t make good
parents—but could any mother
face a trickier task?

The End.

—LES,

Austria, Turkey and North
Africa—wherever our men are

“IT like going to places where
they don’t get many visitors from
home You’re so welcome
there.”

‘How long would it take?
“Well. I've got a good three

weeks—that’s quite a long time,

don't you think?”

What would she do in Britain?
“Inspect the houses and living
Americans
Help General
Griswold with his problems, if

of
here.

conditions the

stationed

he has any problems, that is.”

The general politely assumed
indicated
that if he hadn’t any he would

an expression which
soon dig up some to oblige such
a charming lady.

Had she any ideas?
@ On Page 11



FAB SAVES YOU
TIME AND WORK

No need tw boil,
bleach, blue, scrub or
rinse with FAB. FAB

| eucie

“Ideas





TUXEDO TROPICALS $85—
és! at the London Shop for men
\ad Evening accessories inchud-
ng Socks, Dress Shoes, Ties, Col-
lar & Shirts, For sport, the
iilored pants for $8.75 are won-
terful value and there’s a multi-
from which to choose. The
smart Tropical asad Gabar-
single or double breasted
suits are priced from $35 and
among the new _ arrivals are
sporty raincoats from England.
a ae =

very
dine

EAU DE COLOGNES & LAV-
ENDER WATERS in fascinating
bottles and LIP-COAT, among
he
are sold at P. A. Clarke’s Drug
Store on Prince Wm Henry St.—
1 step and a jump from Broad

St. Brush & Comb Sets and plas- ,

ic backed Nail brushes are part
ft an attractive Toiletrie. The
». A. Clarke Candy Counter is
justly famous for its always fresh
Sweets and variety. Ph4441 &
2041.

* °

OYSTER WATCHES
and perpetual—meaning they
Keep on going without winding,
care, in wet or sun, rightside up
xv upside down and ALWAYS AT
THE RIGHT TIME. Naturally
hey’re expensive—but they’re
marvellous ! Tudor Oyster
Watches are by the same Swiss
makers and moderately priced
while in:the same counter there
ire all sorts of Ladies’ and Men's
Watches from $22.50—at LOUIS
BAYLEY’S.
.

+

ROLEX

YOUR LEAKING—well, you
roof is, isn't it? This Roofing Ma-
erial at Plantations Ltd, is de-
signed to fix it quickly and well
vith free advice into the bargain
*hone 4400; ask for Charlie
Thomas to help you in the matter
xf which roofing to choose—Gal-
vanized Corrugated or Aluminum
or Everite or Rubberoid, See‘
-—you'll need help, so drop in or
phone and it’ll be gladly given

* * *

NO USE GROANING ABOUT
COST and borrowing your neigh-
bour’s LAWNMOWER. The new
lightweight FOLBATE MOWER
at S. P, Musson’s and Manning’s
Corner Store costs $25 and will
last you till your mowing days
are through The mechanism
hows many improvements on
older types and the whole ma-
shine is perfectly balanced——no
need to grunt, simply rest on the
thing and it goes—for twenty-

five bucks





Mothers, now you can relieve the
misery of kiddies’ colds so mich
faster with the Buckley White Rub
TWO-WAY treatment.

(1) Al the first symptom, place @ spoon'at oa
Buckley's White Rub oy o bowl or br yin of
bolling water and let the litte ene inh le the
sieam, Every breath carries soothing edico-
tion be the epper bronchial tract, -ubduing
coughing, loosening phlegm, easing eathing.

Buckley's White Rub-—we @ fens b's
SNOW WHITE and POSITIVELY STAINLESS
Tt external treaiment beips breck up
congestion, ease sore Chest muscinn, and
enxoyroges restful sleep. The wothing
vapors given off keep up the good work tor
eves while the little one seems vv

| (2) Now massoge chest, bock and throat with
'
|









Man About Town

most recent of new Lipsticks ,

WITH HIGHLY MEDICATEL BUCKLEY'S WHITE RUB

PAGE SEVEN.



2
T Greamed of a
levelier figure in

muailenforms

EXTRAORDINARY —but true.
hey’re ALWAYS opening NEW
»TOCK at George Sahely & Co.

9 Swan St. And it’s ALWAYS

fferent! Just look—Silk Cham- Mai *
bray with the wrappings barely denette
off and in many colours,’ best

value imaginable. And Canadian
Printed Waffle Pique & Waffle-
lex in flowered patterns on
white—very new, very different
and typical Sahely Value! You'd
ike to check? Sure, sure, —
phone 4934,

oe * ®
HERE THEY COME AGAIN—
ese gliding beauties, these very
mplete automobiles in a choice
distinctive colour combinations.
Whispering engines to give near
lent power and luxuries interi-
to smooth the miles. Easy to
andle in town—a joy to drive
the open road, a car that gives
perfect satisfaction and sells it-
elf at Redman Taylor’s—the
ROVER °52. Dial 65 tomorrow!

* *

GIVING A KIDDIES’ PARTY?
| know where you can get CHER-
ty CUP CAKES for 4c., COFFEE
CAKES for 4c.. GINGER CAKES
fc 4c.—delivered to your door,
furthermore, Want to know? Dial
ve22 and speak to ZEPHILIN’S
who speeialise in such party re-
Jiirements They'll send you
LUNS for 3c. and BUN LOAVES

10ce. if you wish Certainly,
vey'll handle the food problem,

why not take advantage of that
ervice?

* * ®
TWEEDS & WORSTEDS tail-
red to fit your pocket, At WARD

‘¢ SPENCER Ltd. on Marhill St
(ph. 2223) the cost of a suit is in
var favour—drop in and they'll
| you how! And show you, too,
their extensive selection of Wool-
jeas, Tropicals and Gabardines,
nich you can buy if you wistt,'|

Ww a dream come true
Maidenette’s marvelous accent

bh, the yard. Khaki and White| gg ourves, the firm young Sift
Drill is here, too, so are Tailors ' 3 ae

Trimmings and Linen, & gives your figure! Discover

i, 2 ps this popular Maidenform bra

rOOLS, WHAT A SELEC- today, in your favorite fabrics

TION! ! Have you been into C, S,
Pitcher & Co, to see them? Chis-
els and Gouges; Ratchet Screw-
drivers and Braces; Spanners and.
Hammers; Planes and Saws—the |
variety is terrific and every tool |
is built to last. Prices are reason- |
able and the shipment is still new
erough to give you every choice
fod di* I say Masons’ Squares
od Hecchets? They're all at
Pitcher’s and so should you be! |

Genuine Maidenform Brassi
eres are made only inthe | mitont
Seates of America. a

Where is a MAMET
for every type of figure,

. Pens, Bae, Par. OFF

Pimples Go
led in 3 Days

tar
|

Cause Ki

very fir
derm begir
like nage
snd you will soar
combing soft, eva
derm is a new di



AWAY NASTY

COUGHS
COLDS

LIKE MAGIC

plication









1 ixo:
very that kills

Serios and parnsites on the skin-that
Red Blotches,

cause Pimple Boil
Heaema, Ringeworre,
You cant get rid of yo
wntil you remove the germs
in the tiny pores of your slet
met Nixoderm trom your chemis
day Under the positive guaraptee t
Nixoderm will banish pimples. a



that hide
30

clear your skin soft and smeeth oF

a oney
| Nixoderm = aii
| us

Tor Skin Troubles bacloweore,

Getting Up Nights
Makes Men Old

Yo other RUB has these
‘4 Important Features
Buckley's White Rub is ssowwhia

Ms soothing medicated vapors carry
4. on the good work longer while the
patient sleeps.

in men), To overcome th

in 24 hours dulokly eters
Vigour and th, take the new
No'matiar how long you have'set?
fered w long you have -

| you night reheriaees oe
e
| Late Gland and make you ee
"0 years vounger or money “
mis

| Aegens Brom your chemist
“uarantee protects you.

aoee Getting tights, b séiisa
} up A ~
© penetrates deeper, brings relief | tion of Oteanae whiticn ditdheres,
“ festur, gut abe ait, ese of spine, groin
1 Is more highly medicated, honca Reap Gnd loen Of raanie eitows mae
3 more effective. | SAused ta ae tne Beng
| land (a most important sex a
|





| TRIPLE YOUR MONEY BACK | | |

|
4

| =f Buckley's Stainioss White Rub dows
| aot prove faster and more effective han
| aay preparation you have ever used.

ee en

—_ ee








.

-

}

B
he





goes to make active
cleansing suds.





soaks even heaviest
work clothes clean in
half an hour.

particle of FAB





FAB 15 MILD — Exciting contrasts or subtle harmonies are yours for the choosing.
KIND TO HANDS
DAB is safe for daint-
ur hands, “AB YARDLEY Lipstick
aves everything "
. 7 = io Pinks: Pretty Pink, Natural Rose, Pink Heather + Blue Redi : Cherry, Fuchsia, Burguady
Yellow Reds : Vivid, Wright Red, Holly Red
-§ EVERYTHING BRIGHTER, WHITER. ‘
VARDBEY * 38 OLD BOND STREET BRONDON





From the many glorious Yardley Lipstick shades choose the one
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Smooth and bright as a silken ribbon




they work on easily and last well.




PAGE EIGHT ~

pun meme -aeinneanieLCll COCLCCCNTEI TCLtC ttt tees eaten ett

BARBADOS ei ADVOCATE

Ct. | (ir Dis ee



@rinted by the Advocate Co., Ltd., Broad St., Bridsetows

‘Sunday, July 27, 1952





a



OILS AND FATS

BEFORE the end of August an announce-

ment will be made by British Caribbean
governments expressing acceptance or re-
jection of the recommendations made at
the recent conference on oils and fats
which was held at Hastings House.

Present indications are that govern-
ments will ratify the recommendations
made by the conference. The delegates who
attended the oils and fats conference came
to Barbados at a time when the price of
vegetable oils and fats was falling. It might
reasonably have been expected therefore
that they would have sought to bring down
the price paid to the copra producers of
the area, since the price paid for copra
represents by far the greatest expenditure
of the regional oils and fats industry. lf
the total value of the industry were
assessed in 1951 at say $13,000.000 the copra
growers would have received some
$7,000,000 imported raw materials would
have amounted to some $2,000,000, wages
and profits would have approximated to
$2% million and transportation and insur-
ance would have accounted for $14 mil-
lion.

The importance of the price of copra
to the local oils and fats industries is there-
fore apparent.

The higher the price paid for copra the
greater the profits that will accrue to the
producer of copra and the higher will go
the price that the consumer must pay for
the finished products of soap, margarine,
lard and edible oil.

The consumers of Barbados might well
be expected to complain therefore if the
government of Barbados decided to ap-
prove an agreement which recommended
any increase over the present price of £60
per ton of copra however slight.

Unfortunately for the government of
Barbados the consumers of Barbados are
not the only people to be considered. The
delegates to the recent oils and fats con-
ference come from territories all of which,
with the exception of the Leewards, are
copra producers.

Barbados is dependent entirely on copra
imported from the Windwards. By refus-
ing to meet the demands for higher prices
which were most certainly put forward by
the copra producers of the Windwards,
Trinidad, British Guiana and Jamaica,
Barbados would literally have brought
down the wrath of attending delegates.

The dependent position of Barbados in
the oils and fats industry of the region
leaves it open to pressure from the copra
producers of the region. All the other
copra-producing territories except the
Leewards are copra-processors and the
Windwards are now following a policy of
self-sufficiency which will almost certainly
result in the exclusion of Barbados’ fin-
ished products from the Windwards.

If Barbados stuck out for lower prices
the copra producers of the Windwards
might it is said, withhold supplies and
force the local oil and fats industries to
close down or to buy in uncertain markets
outside,

The argument of the producers of copra
has always been that the oils and fats
agreement prevented them from obtain-
ing the full world price for their products
at times when the regional price for copra
was lower, sometimes, than half the world
price.

As a result of this argument the price of
copra has been constantly rising in the
Caribbean and has shot up in.recent years
from £45 per ton to the present price of
£60 per ton.

It was hoped that when the oils and fats
agreement was renewed this year that the
price of copra would have fallen to keep
in step with falling world prices of other
vegetable oils and fats.

Now it seems that there will be a further
increase over the existing price of £60 per
ton if the British Caribbean governments
ratify the recommendations of the recent
oils and fats conference.

There is little likelihood of the recom-
mendations not being ratified. The con-
sumers of Barbados must therefore look
forward to a further rise in the price of
soap, margarine, edible oil and lard when
the new price of copra is announced be-

fore next September.

Before becoming too vociferous in their
complaints, however, they ought to realise
that the oils and fats agreement has bene-
fited Barbados in the past by ensuring it
supplies of copra at an agreed price lower
by far than the world price of copra. They
must not forget either that the oils and
fats agreement guaranteed a supply of oils
and fat products to Barbados during the
critical war and post-war periods when
there was a world shortage of oils and
fats.

They must not forget these things and
they will not forget that the lower price
paid to the copra growers in previous years
resulted in the saving of hundreds of
thousands of dollars to Barbados.

At the same time no one likes to pay



more for a product than is absolutely ne-
cessary and today when there is no longer
a world shortage of raw materials for the
oils and fats industry and when it is
claimed that if there was no restrictive
agreement the finished products of export-
ing countries could be exported to Barba-
dos and could be sold here at prices lower
than the prices of locally manufactured
products then continuous scrutiny will be
necessary to see that the interests of the
consumers are not sacrificed to those of
the copra producers who already receive
the lion share of profits from the oils and
fats industry. There is a limit even to the
benefits to be derived from regionalism
and from the value of the industry as em-
ployer of labour and it seems that the
limit is close at hand when the price of
copra inthe Caribbean is being raised for
the benefit of the copra producer rather
than for that of the consumer.

SHIPS

THE arrival in the West Indies next
month of an official of Booker Brothers to
investigate the possibilities of establishing
shipping service between Georgetown and
other Eastern Caribbean, territories will
be welcomed by everyone.

The absence of adequate inter-island
communication in the Eastern Caribbean
is an ancient complaint to be heard in the
Caribbean and in London at different
seasons of the year. Great Britain alone
among Colonial powers in the Caribbean
has shown such neglect of passenger-
steamship communications between Brit-
ish islands, although British cargo steam-
ers appear to conduct a lucrative trade.

Now that the two Lady liners are defin-
itely being withdrawn this autumn the
difficulties of inter-island travel will be
increased, not to mention the unemploy-
ment which will result from the discharge
of West Indian seamen.

Mr. Shenfield’s exploratory visit on be-
half of Messrs. Booker Brothers takes on
new significance because of the impending
withdrawal of the Lady liners.

If Booker Brothers can be persuaded to
run an inter-island passenger steamship
between Georgetown and other islands of
the British Caribbear. the blow which is
going to fall when the two Lady liners go
in the autumn will be softened to some
extent. Ms

The great fear is that Mr. Shenfield’s in-
vestigations will reveal what other inves-
tigations have revealed that an_ inter-
island passenger steamship cannot be run
profitably. :

If Booker Brothers are going to take a
short term view little hope can be enter-
tained of Mr. Shenfield’s report leading to
the inauguration of a new Eastern Carib-
bean shipping ora ; . ;

If on the other hand a long term view 1s
taken of the. possibilities. of increasing
regional trade and inter-island travel there
seem to be solid grounds for hoping that
eventually an inter-island steamship ser-
vice would pay dividends.

In recent months the possibilities of the devel-
opment of the interior of British Guiana have
come once again into the limelight and the pro-
jecied visit to British Guiana of a mission of the
World Bank suggests that some action is con-
templated = =

The. development of the interior of British
Guiana is a subject of great significance for
Barbados, Only if the interior of British Guiana
is developed does there seem to be any outlet for
the large numbers of Barbadians who must emi-
grate or be content with lower standards of liv-
ing than they have been taught in recent years
to expect. : v ‘

Already there is oceasional mention in the
British Guianese press of shortage of labour in
certain industries like balata and cocoa. If there
was regular steamship communieation between
the islands and Georgetown there would be
greater chances of Barbadians seeking employ-
ment on the mainland than at present.

If, as Barbados must continue to hope, the day
is drawing nearer when large sums are to be
poured into British Guiana to accelerate its
development then a steamship service between
Georgetown and the rest of the Eastern Carib-
bean will be a pre-requisite of development, be-
cause British Guiana despite the growing popu-
lation of Georgetown would have to recruit some
of the personnel necessary for development
schemes from neighbouring West Indian islands.
The development of the interior of British Gui-
ana and the natural tendency for trade and
travel between that territory and the rest of the
Caribbean to increase ought to receive full: at-
tention from anyone investigating the possibility
of inaugurating a steamship service in the Carib-
bean. Mr, Shenfield who is no stranger to the
area will be well equipped to report on the
missien he has undertaken, Everyone in the
Eastern Caribbean will wish him success In his
task.





_ Oe Bm @
TWO CLASSES

AMONG cinema goers Barbadians are sharply
divided into two classes, those who stand with
respect during the playing of the national anthem
and those who not only do not stand but who
make rude noises while carrying through the
motions of exit.

It is not an unfair generalisation to state that
disrespect to the national anthem is more com-
monly perpetrated by the patrons of the pit than
by the patrons of the balcony or boxes.

Respect for the British Queen among cinema
goers seems to be most clearly shown by the
educated and the well-to-do,

Racegoers may have noticed similar occur-
ences. ‘

When the band plays the national anthem
pins can be heard dropping in the stands but
among the sightseers on the savannah the hub-
bub of voices and the motion of bodies continue
as if the national anthem had no meaning for
the crowd.

Barbadians pride themselves on their stand-
ards of education and it is hard to believe that
the majority of patrons of the cinema pits or of
the crowd which throngs the Savannah on race
days does not understand what is happening
when the national anthem is plaving,

Surely no one who goes to a cinema or to a
race meeting is so ignorant as to believe that by
making noises or moving during the playing of
the national anthem that the young Queen of
England is aware of their discourtesy.

Whenever the national anthem is played on
public occasions in Barbados it is played to
honour and respect the Royal Queen to whom
our allegiance as british subjects is lawfully
owed. By showing our respect for the national
anthem we show our gratitude to Her Majesty
for the privilege of being British subjects. We
are all without distinction British subjects in
tthe full sense of the word. The Queen does not
need our respect, Her Majesty is by no means
diminished because Barbadians display publicly
their lack of education and good breeding, The
playing of the national anthem is a_ privilege
conferred on us by the Queen. We should strive
to show our appreciation by showing respect to
the national anthem, which reminds us of Her
Gracious Majesty.

(orescence A item nites

!

‘



SUNDAY ADVOCATE



The man that

keeps Barbados
laughing on

Sundays



NATHANIEL GUBBINS



ULLO! Is that the Bottom-
less Pit? ‘

Bottomless Pit here,

Mr. Lucifer speaking?

At your service, Mr. Gubbins.

Oh, Mr. Lucifer, According
to Old Moore’s Almanack Joe
Sfalin should have died last
month, Has he arrived yet?

Here, Mr.-Gubbins?

Of course, Mr. Lucifer.

Are you trying to get a scoop
for your newspaper ,?

One always trics, Mr. Lucifer,

If you were the manager of an
hotel, Mr. Gubbins, would you
answer all casual telephone calls
about your guests?

I hope I would be more dis-
creet, Mr, Lucifer.

Well, Mr. Gubbins, I am the
manager of the biggest and most
luxurious hotel in the universe.
Most of my guests wish to keep
their address secret.

Naturally, Mr, Lucifer.

Suppose, Mr. Gubbins, the
daughter of a deceased father
rang up and asked, “Is Daddy
there?” If he is, am I to answer
“Yes” and let the poor girl run
to her widowed mother crying
“Daddy’s in hell, Mummy. Dad-
dy’s in hell?” My dear friend
Stalin has a most devoted
daughter.

I understand, Mr. Lucifer.

Imagine her dismay if she
reads such distressing news in
your column, All the same, I
believe a good reporter is willing
to go anywhere?

That’s so, Mr. Lucifer,

If you paid us a visit I could
hardly prevent you reporting
what you see. All food, accom-
modation, and drinks are on the
a,

How wonderful, Mr. Lucifer,

And The Widow, who still asks
after “her dear Nat”, would be
here to mix the most delicious
cocktails,

Thank you, Mr. Lucifer.

Yow’re welcome, Mr. Gubbins.
Think it over.

Beautiful Lottie
ILL Lottie, The Devil Cat,
become Beauty Queen of
the South-East coast this sum-
mer? j
If she is chosen, will her suc-
cess be followed by a Hollywood
film contract and marriage to a
millionaire American cat?

Who is asking these ridiculous
questions?

ridiculous publicity agent, N.
Gubbins, Esq., who is trying to
cash in on the activities of Lottie.

All the same, people who have
seen her picture agvee that she

The answer is nobody but her > ga 7

is prettier than most of the local
girls.
ob +

They atso think that the elec-
tion of a cat as Beauty Queen
would not only be a novelty to
attract visitors, but allow any
local mayor to stroke a Beauty
Queen for the first time without
causing a scandal,

It is pointed out also that as
she would not be the first cat to
get a film contract she ought to
be groomed for stardom now.

At the moment she is doing her
own grooming in a blaze of pub-
licity. That is to say she sits for
hours on a window sill facing the
front, washing herself all over in
the sunshine, a daring innovation
in publicity which could not be
imitated by ordinary film aspir-
ants without police intervention.

Saucer Sensation

OW that flying saucers are

being taken seriously by the
U.S. Air Force and the French
Ministry of Information, I might
as well reveal the story of a fly-
ing saucer that dropped in our
garden.

When it had stopped revolving,
three little politicians from Mars
stepped out.

“We are a Coalition represent-
ing the World Government of
The Martian Empire,” said The
First.

“The Empire to which we are
all proud to belong,” said The
Second.

“And on which the sun never
sets.” said The Third.

“No more war,” said The First.

“Nobody to go to war with,”
said The Second.

“You can’t go to war with
yourself,” said The Third.

“Can’t you?” asked The First.
“Ever heard of civil war?”

“What about?” asked The
Second. \
“Anything,” said The Third.

“Unrest among the workers, per-
haps.”

“Ours only work an hour a
day,” said The First.

“They want it reduced to half
an hour,” said The Second.

“They don’t want to work at
all,” said The Third.

“Blast the lazy so-and-sos,
said The First. “I hate them.”

A (them more than you.”
e Third, “I was one of
them.”

“The man who was elected as
The People’s Friend,” said The
Second. “What a pal.”

“If they don’t work how can

we live?” asked The Third.
_ “Maybe they don’t care if we
live or not,” said The Second.

“Then we must have a civil
war,” said The Third.

“Yhat’s right,” said The First.
“Frighten them into work. It’s
the only way we can keep our
jobs.”
you what,” said The
» “when we get back I’ll
denounce you as a Fascist swine,
which you are, who hates the
workers, which you do.”

“And T'll denounce you,” said
The First, “as a Communist can-
nibal, which you are, who hates
the workers more than anybody
which is true, That'll start
something. Come on. Let’s go.”

“What are you doing?” The
Third asked The Second.

“As I am neither a Communist
cannibal nor a Fascist swine,
hating nobody,” said The Second,
“T think I’ll stay here and join
the Libefal Party. They could
do with one more.”

,

Struck Dumb
_ A business executive, sign-
ing himself Northerner,

writes to a newspaper: “I
am 35 years old, yet when
alone with women I admire
I am literally struck dumb.
I am celibate and likely to
remain so unless I am cured.
Is there anything I can do
for myself before I haye to
take to drink?”

R. GUBBINS, the Fleet-
street psychiatrist, writes:
Northerner was probably
frightened by women when he
was a little boy, This is a fairly
common experience, as women
are more frightening than usual
i you are little and they are
ig.

The only difference. between
Northerner and the majority of
grown-up men is that Northerner
has never recovered from the
shock, and probably never will
at his age.

* * *

Therefore, as a man of his tem-
perament will be led to the altar
the moment he opens his mouth,
I advise him to regard his early
experience as a blessing, remain
struck dumb in the presence of
women, and take to drink at once.

In this way he will save a lot
of money. Despite the current
vrice of intoxicants, drinking is
sill cheaper than marrying, and
as marriage would probably
drive nervous Northerner to
drink anyway, silence will save
him both money and trouble.



FIVE EMPTY BEDS

Five beds lie unused in the

two guest bedrooms of the
Y.W.C.A. building in Pinfold
Street.

They can be filled on pay-

ment of a low weekly rent of
$3.00, ‘which includes morning
tea. Not long ago one of the
beds was filled by Miss Doris
Hart of the World Y.W.C.A.
during several weeks of her
residence in Barbados and
others are occasionally filled by
girls frem neighbouring West
Indian Islands,

Why are ‘the five beds empty
today? Are they not five Bar-
badian girls in need of good
sleeping accommodation? Or
are the girls afraid to seek beds
in a hostel which is adminis-
tered by an association which
is part of a movement based on
the Christain way of life?

If the beds are empty because
there are no girls who need
them locally then living condi-
tions in Barbados cannot be as
bad as they are said to be, The
dificulty of filling beds is not
the only difficulty which the
young Y.W.C.A. of Barbados
has to face,

The building in Pinfold Street
has been there for a long time »

and it is in need of repair bute®

the Y.W.C.A.
pay one

does not
penny in

have to
rent,

the owner,
The Y.W.C.A, got off to a

good start by obtaining grants |

from the Government and from
the Vestry and was successful
in obtaining subscriptions from
individuals and trading com-
panies in Barbados, It has money
in the bank and it has one hun-
dred and fifty members. What
more does it want? A_ great
deal.

The Y.W.C.A; Was opened in
January 1951. Its situation in
Pinfold Street makes it accessi-
ble to girls working in the
neighbourhood and there is a
regular clientele of more than
a dozen girls who eat their mid-
day meals at the Y.W.CA.
daily, There are two prices for
meals—42 cents for non-mem-
bers und 36 cents for members.

Girls eat their meals at’ tables
seating on average four girls.
Tables and chairs are made of
good quality polished wood and
the dining room at the Y.W.C,A.
is up to the best Bridgetown
restaurant standards. There is
a small writing desk in the din-
ing room for the use of girls
who want to write letters during
their lunch hour. In the main
room of the Y.W.C.A. is a table
tennis set. Upstairs are bedrooms
and lavatories, In the front of
the Y.W.C.A. two garden beds
are planted with beans and there
are some flowering plants. What
more does the Y,W.C.A. want?
Next month three of its officers

et : The.
building is provided rent free by 9â„¢

Hy George Hunte

are attending a Y.W.C.A. con-
ference in Trinidad. When they
return they will have a much
better idea of what to do next.

They have of course been
doing things already.

Almost every evening some-
thing is going on at the Y.W.C.A,
in Pinfold Street. Girls attend
cookery and needlework classes,
listen to lectures “mn all kinds of
bubjects, yiay tatle tennis and
basket ball against club and
scho~! teams.

Something is goirg on at the
Y.W.C.A. daily but not quite
enough think the Committee
responsible for the Association.

Y.W.C.A,. werk demands, they
think, a trained leader ¥ ao will
by personal -enthusiasm and

know-how keep the organisation
alive and brimful of new ideas.
They do not believe that the Pin-
fold Street house should become
just. another social service: just
another cheap eating place fir
class girls

middle with sma.!







i

“No, blockhead, this is a
note his’ excellency will
not deliver in person,
T's for the milkman—
one wint less from the
middle uf next month,”

eae






London Express Serve

salaries. They want the
Y.W.C.A. to play an active part
in the life of the young girls of
the community. They want the
Y.W.C.A. to become a com-
munity home in which young
women from all classes in Bar-
badian life can meet together
and in a friendly atmosphere
discuss with one another
informally or formally questions
of interest to the community,
They do not believe that such
a leader can be produced with-
out training. And they are hop-
ing that somehow or other they
are going to obtain sufficient
revenue to pay a _ properly

trained Y.W.C.A, organiser to
keep the /Y.W.C.A. members
keyed up to the pitch necessary
to make the Y.W.C.A. a “live”
cell in the life of the female
community.

Sceptics might ask whether
the Y.W.C.A,. is not biting off
more than it can chew, whether
it is not- trying to cover ground
which is already adequately
covered by the Girls Industrial
Union and various other religi-
ous and social organisations,

Perhaps the best answer to
seeptics would be an invitation
to visit the Police criminal
records office where they could
see for themselves the hundreds
of pink cards which reveal the
offences of Barbadian women.
They might. then wonder
whether the hundreds of pink
cards are not traceable directly
or indirectly to the paucity of
women in the community who
regard' work for their fellow
women as the most important
social function they can per-
form

It is easy to sneer at wiat is
being done for the women of
Barbados, When things’ go
wrong a few “TI told you so’s”
or aS many “you can’t make
silk purses out of sow’s ears”
will chill the Spirits of all but
the most heroic souls,

But so much work remains to
be done for the women of Bar-
bados that the Y.W.C.A. so far
from being an interloper and
meddler seems to have come late
in the field.

It has plenty of work to do.

The girls who make use of its
facilities whether for eating or
for recreation or for educational
purposes prove that it fills a
gap in the social services,

What is to be its future?

Is it to. become just another
girls club?

Or will it play a vital role in
raising the moral standards of
Barbadian womanhood?

Tt has begun auspiciously.
Everyone wishes it well. With
wider membership and with
increased revenue from public
and private grants and donations
it can afford to pay the salary
of a trained organiser.

Without a trained organiser
the Association can play a small
part in the long uphill task of
raising the reputation of Bar-
badian womanhood to a higher
level than it now enjoys, With
a trained organiser a reduction
in the number of pink record
cards kept by the Police Crim-
inal Investigation Department
may not be noticed immediately
but the greater the number of
women working for the better-
ment of their fellow women the

greater their influence will be
spread throughout the com-
munity,








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A eee






SUNDAY, JULY 27,



1952





“The Importance Of Being Earnest”

By A Correspondent tele yee arc ate ov teas



CECILY HELPS explode Mr. Bunbury. Cecily Cardew (Audrey Mac-

Intyre, Algernon Moncrieff.



THE CANON DEFENDS the governess. Lady Bracknell (Greta Ban-

croft), Canon Chasuble (Frank Collymore).

Up to fifly* years ago, little
attention was paid to research
in the Caribbean—with the pos-
sible exception of sugar cane (as
distinet from sugar) investiga-
tions

But even in the field of sugar
cane, then even more than now
the mainstay of Caribbean
economy, research was conduct-
ed at “experiment stations”
which were, in effect, small
botanic gardens, concentrating
on plant. varieties, and by no
means research undertakings
comparable with to-day’s institu-
tions:




Undoubtedly, the greatest yield
of research of all time within the
Caribbean was the discovery in
the late XIXth Century of the
possibility of raising sugar cane
from seedlings and of cross-
breeding cane to produce new
varieties.

This discovery, which revolu-
tionised the world’s sugar in-
dustry, was largely due to John









RESEARCH IN THE CARIBBEAN aan eave

R. Bovell, and his death
knighted, not a wealthy man, is
an outstanding example of a
colonial unhonoured and unsung,
after bequeathing to the sugar
world the wealth of Croesus,

un-

Actually, as early as 1859, a
man named Parris had written a
letter in the Barbados Press
claiming to have seen self-sown
cane seedlings, but no notice was
taken of Mr. Parris’ observations.
In fact, many” sugary authorities
dubbed this claim a hoax.

Some years later, while super-
intendent of the Boys’ Reforma-
tory, Bovell was shown a
self-sown seedling by one of the
overseers, and he began his
experiments on cross-breeding to
produce new varieties
These experiments have brought















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Also a lovely assortment of
Ends.
value.



CAVE SHEPHERD & (0.,

w; fi, tea 13

















The recently thoroug com-
pr sive review of pre
duction of “The Importance of
Being Earnest” leaves the reade1
with a strong impression that
very little remains to be said
on the subiect, and that all
other comments will only be on
expression of further and yet

more detailed scrutiny.

In the first place, however
the Barbados Players should be
very genuinely congratulated on

their performance of Friday
night, not because it was a per.
fect performance, but becaus¢
it was such a very marked im-
provement on that of the pre-
vious evening. This points to :
quite remarkable spirit on the

part of all the players. it

obvious that they not only ¢
eepted and took to heart the
words of the recent critic bt

they also listened to the spoken
opinions of many of the ordin-

iry . playgoers nd they acted
accordingly For this quick
#rasp of the position and intel

ligent reaction to it
praise them enough.

This is no place for discussing
the virtues of the play itself,
and this is no place for taking
each member of the cast and
throwing each one in turn a few
flattering or derogatory remarks.
This is our chance for looking
at the play as a whole, for ap-
preciating its highlights, sav-
ouring its well delivered witti-
cisms, and examining its weak.
nesses,

one cannot!

In criticising professional act-
ing one very rarely needs to
mention the question of audi-
bility and delivery, but in ama-
teur acting this always seems to
be a major problem. The whole
fabric of this play is made of

conversation and not of move-
ment, it is therefore imperative
that not. a line should be lost

and in order to sustain the high
standard of wit and to ensure
that each subtlety and innuendo
reaches the audience the pro-
ducer must be certain that each
word uttered by his players can
be heard. Besides clear. articu-
lation, timing is a factor that





ALGERNON IS WORRIED about
Layne, (Wm. Bertalan),
Gwendolyn Fairfax (Pam Chaytor)

By A Special

forth abundant, almost
lous, results. New
resistant to disease, higher in
sucrose content, yielding better
tonnage to the acre, standing up
to the prolonged droughts, have
doubled and even tripled tne
sugar yields of the Bourbgn cane
days.

miracu-
types, more



This not the be-all aad
end-all ¢ 3ovell’s efforts, even
if the 3H. 10/12 ° (Barbados

Hybrid) might have justified his
sitting on his laurels. Bovell did
much more.

He studied the effect of man-
ures, compared the suitability of
different varieties of cane to
varying soils and climates, and
encouraged improved cultivaticn
methods

But Bovell’s work was not
typical of the period as far as the

wae

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Broad Street



Algernon
, John Worthing (Anthony Haynes)







SUNDAY

PAGI

ADVOCATI



NINE



- — poeenecessintnaneregetnseepecnmemans eee SEN a So


















perb in her reful blended but
needs careful considerat ve ld eostum it t} } “ he VERM UT
There are some tedious patches g sonorous lines wer Willian Bertalan’s thunder 0 q
in the second and third act always expressed with the t t keloth w lepre ng espe
which Wilde himself is respon- fidence that the character cially aft the vy jerful farr
ible and the only way to com- demanded, one felt at tinies that portrai rt t act Wherever you find the best
bat this weakness in the script Greta Bancro’t and Lady Brack- *% *y° . me
is to quicken the tempo nell were eyein each F Al : R a ; . 1 - tha youl; find Martini
considerably, it should never be warily ~ ! : - ne =. and as — Vermouth
allowed to flag. I found that Ar Lastly e look’ of ‘the pla ; $ . thea " ee =. ee
thony Haynes as Earnest, Greta The costu the whol , Se ee ee, oe ~ ronestly say
Bancroft as Lady Bracknell veer plee aoa reels —- in sit - ° ao Succeede ;
and Frank Collymore. as Chasu- ilmost rivalled thosi wo! by : ‘i r io 7 he rareg Sooner
ble were always completely Gule: GP Hes ciembere of the a - ‘ o the next productior
audible and = ee oi rom this very able company

their delivery» was
excellent, also one rerely ‘ost
any of Pam Chaytor's or Michoel

Timpson’s lines, Aud'ey Macin-
tyre and Margot Dewhurst h
ever were sometimes rather
slurred although both have
extremely good voices for ths
stage

Frank Collymore chose the
richt people for the interpreta-

tion of this small group of ch

acters. This is by no means
easy task, as each personality
Ithough quite convincing is a



little larger than life size there-
fore great care 3 necessary
to avoid over emphasis.

Although, I thoroughly en) yed
the flamboyant and amusing
Algy, the pontifical Chasuble,
the fluttering Prism and the
charm of Gwenooline and
Cecily, it is the parts played by
Anthony Haynes and Greta Ban-
croft that I should like to con-
sider a little moe fully



Produced by Martini & Ross:
Torino (Italy)



Anthony Haynes in his por-
trayal of Earnest should be
given full marks for his acting,
his carefully controlled voice is
a pleasure to listen to, in all, his
encounters with the nonsensical
Algy he is the ideal, highminded,
Earnest, always slightly dis-
approving but avoiding priggis4-
ness. His mourning scene was
delightfully funny and his final
act when he really took the
centre of the stage was handled
extremely well





TEA FOR A VISITOR. Maid
Merriman (Alfred Pragnell)

(Ellice Collymore), Cecily Cardew,

The man
who didn’t
know...



Greta Bancroft’s playing of
Wilde’s immortal mortinet Lady
Brackness was just a trifle un-

sure. It is difficult to criticize
Greta Bancroft’s acting, e
is often brilligat and al



extremely competent, and yet Sriiins Where's Boxter ainidaer »
.

‘Oh, he preferred snoozing
indoors. I don’t know what's
come over that puppy! No life
in him at all, and his coat looks

‘Condition—that’s the answer!
A dog needs regular condition.
ing to keep really fit. Try givir
Buster Bob Martin’s Condition
Tablets daily and you'll



soon

terrible’. have him straight again. The stuff
‘ ; in them—vitamins and minerals
wee are you doing about and so on—does a dog good

naturally by purifying his blooa
and toning him up generally’.

"Bob Martin’s, ch? I’ve heard
of them’

‘Doing about it? A dog can
look after himself, surely! I
must just have picked a dud,
that’s all. But he looked fine
when we got him’.

‘That’s where you're wrong.
cle is a fine pup, but he can’t
look after himself, the way wild
animals can. It’s up to you to
do something if you've let
him get in such a bad state.
Now, what I give Judy 64 it.

here—’ o
| PAs

‘I must say she always
looks in lovely condition’.

BOB MARTIN'S CONDITION TABLETS for dogs of any age or breed.
LOCAL AGENTS

‘All dogs need Bob Martin’s
and they’re particularly impor-
tant for pups, to start them off
well, and to build healthy bone
and teeth. Judy has them regu-

larly, and she’s seven now’,



‘I'd never have guessed

Bob Martin’s has cer-
tainly done her - proud!
Thanks for the tip, and I’
get some today’.

From all good chemists and store
.B MEYERS & COLTD
BRIDGETOWN RARBADOS BRITISH WEST INDIES

‘



the missing cucumber sandwiches.
Moncrieff (Michael Timpson),





THE HAND BAG is restored to it
Prism (Margot Dewhurst).

owner. Anthony Haynes, Miss










dave k here ie 1 SRE a
should bear 2d Ce
mind that tropical conditio at \
make agriculture and other field Ns ay
Correspondent of yesearoh different and uniqu S ] I | i ) i ! ! . > ;
hs in Caribbean territorie
Caribbean as a whole was col- unthinking people in our cor _ re moore “sR :
cerned munitie there are two schoo What may provide the answe “* Z
What a different story is pré of thought: the first state quit , : ol nes ; . Ea KEE 2 - — : y,
sented to-day. The accent is on definitely that research is a wa to a problem in temperate clim | I [EM fi

certainly will not solve the situa

research throughout the are», of tion ir

money, and that the co
and four years ago the Yearbook

outweigh the benefits; the second



Jamaica or Barbados, anc

IN FINE



of Caribbean Research, a survey claim that there are far beticr a nee Hh cea) rs a Sea
of research and investigation in equipped research statior j Ms asiaitte kaa ower ~ ~
the non-self-governing Carib- other parts of the world, h A , Brad Seas Toh = yl re CONDITIC IN
bean, could list some 800 separate England or America, and that ee iin dtd oe g ein ,
research projects underway we could save effort and money re — With Bip EN
And the field these projects . by leaving research to those Having (it 1s Hoped) settled th: HARVEY'S ERADICATING WORM POWDERS
cover! Not only § agriculture, more capable of conducting it question of the necessity of 1 Without Ball — 6/.
forestry, fish and wildlife, but search, the obvious question is: |} jag lee ; 4 With Ball — 7/-
medicine, public health, sanitary The answer to the first sehc What research is being done? || HARVEY’S WORM & CONDITION POWDERS
engineering, nutrition, sociology has already. been given: Bovgil What are these 800 projects? 1 for Foals and Yearlings without Ball — 6/-
statistics, economics, education, et alia 3ovell was an instance vhat agencies are they bei HARVEY'S ACONITE POWDERS

planning and housing, chemical of

Caribbean research
technology, geodesy and survey-

‘ undertaken?
ing the Caribbean in terms not

Quite apart

for Cough in Horses — 5/-
from the Govern

ing, geclogy, and what-have- computable in money figure ment departments, which ar
you. and, what’s more, of benefiting doing considerable work in re JOHN GILL & C3 AND
Among the opponents to r¢ the world to boot earch, each in its own field .
search—and there are many Group Two appear at first @ On Page 15 ’ S O CQ
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PAGE TEN SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY, JULY 27, 1952



———————





THE PEOPLE OF BARBADOS—XVI_

By JOHN PRIDEAUX.

A new religious body arrived
in the Island of Barbados in 1789,
this was the, Wesleyans, who built
their first- meeting house in
Bridgetown, and the first meeting
was held on the 16th of August of
this year... The mobs pelted the
building with stones and inter-
rupted the prayers with hideous
noises. They received little or
no protection from the Law of
the Island due to their teachings.
The founder of this religious
body was John Wesley (1703
—§1), who came of a very aus-
tere Methedist family, knew
England as the home of slave-
traders, kidnappers and smug-
glers. It was an England of gin-
ships, corrupt politics ang soul-
lass religion, which he fo t
hard to correct. Due to the in-
fluence of men like Wesley the
Church ‘was taking an interest in
the unfortunate African who had
been transported from his home
some thousand of miles away and
sold to a life of perpetual slavery.
This activity gradually reached
the West Indies, but was met
with strong opposition, as the en-
tire civil and economic life of
Barbados was built on slavery
and this influenced the whole
outlook on the life of the jnhabi-

Barbados, due to its position,
was one of the first ports of call
for slave ships on their way to
the other West Indian Islands, or
the Spanish Main; thus the trade
of Bridgetown was largely in
supplying these ships, which only
stopped here for supplies for their
human cargo. Such was the case
when. Thomas Coke, the founder
of the Wesleyan Mission in the
West Indies, arrived at Bridge-
town in Dé@cember, 1788 He
found a nucleus of Wesleyans al-
ready in existence, and these
‘were soldiers who had served a
part of their time inAreland.

It was not only the Moravians
and the Wesleyans who were
fighting for the religious recogni-
tion of the slaves, but im 1795
‘The Incorporated Society for the
Conversion and Religious Instruc-
tion and -Education of Negro
Slaves’, which had been recently
formed, sent out clergymen to
Barbados and other West Indian
Islands. This. was acknowledged
by the Bishop of London, under

Are You Superstitious :

I think it is true to say that
everyone is superstitious to some
extent, even though perhaps they
do not even admit it to them-
selves. If you believe in “luck”
you are superstitious and it will
be interesting to watch the vari-
ous types of superstition mani-
fested at the Races next month.
Some people will buy a No, 9
ticket simply because they were
born ‘on the ninth, others may
favour thirteen or seven, and
hundreds of other little super~
Sstitions will become apparent.

It is quite rematek ule how
widespread certain superstitions
are. For instance, at one time
it was the practice of people in
Britain of passing’ children
through split ash saplings in
order to cure them of certain
ailments; and in Africa the
Medicine Men of Uganda and
Lake Nyassa did a similar pass-
ing through split trees of people
stricken with illness, The point
of interest is that the practices
of the three peoples were in use
at one and the same _ time,
although there could not have
been any communication be-
tween the savage and the civil-
ized practitioners.

But let us have a look at some
of the common superstitions and
perhaps diseover the reasons

behind thera.

To staft with one phrase that
nearly everyone must have
added at ome time or another
to the announcement of their
good health or fortune, “touch
wood", at the same time touch-
ing withthe forefinger of the
right hand an object made of
wood, The meaning in supersti-
tion, is that we are chall
our fate, but at the same time
Seeing the protection of things

y.

Sanctuary

There are two _ possible
origins of the “touch wood”
superstition. The first is the
protection of the Cross; and it
seems to have arisen in this
connection from the old-time
practice of sanctuary. That is,
the sanctuary provided by “a
hunted person touching the door
of a church, when it was
regarded as sacrilege for any
of his pursuers.to continue their
efforts to catch him, as he was
regarded as under ‘the protection
of the church,

But that is a comparatively
modern explanation of “touch
wood”, and to discover the rea\
origin of fhe superstition we
have to go back to those early
circumstances in which man
paid reverence to certain trees

In those times the cult of the



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JOHNSON . NERY

TTARDW ARE



whose diocese the West Indian
Islands were, also aided in this
work. Circulars were sent out
recommending the establishment
of Sunday. Schools for the
instruction of negro children, A
teacher was sent to a_ school
established on the estate of one
Dr. Holder in the parish of St.
James,

Commenting on these turbulent
times, one planter of high stand-
ing in the Island, and a General
in the Militia, wrote the follow-
ing in his Diary: —

“Considerable concern’ is
manifested (amounting, in fact,
to as much as publick agita-
tion (as to the probable effects
of cértain indiscreet and ill-
timed utterances of certmin per-
sons in Authority, both here and
in Great Britain. It is generally
allowed ‘by all persons of
Humanity and sensibility that
this ‘most necessary’ institu-
tion of Slavery (as it exists at
present) is exposed, by its very
nature to abuses. Let these, by
all means, receive all possible
alleviations — and as soon as
may be,

But it is at the same time
hardly to be borne that the
unwarrantable conduct of these
few shall be made an excuse
of the extremists for a pillory-
ing of all owners alike! This is
not in any way representative
of the whole truth. I can my-
self testify that there are others
(of this nothing is said) «who
use their people with all reas-
onable care and indulgence —
save where sych is neither
reasonable nor warranted.

There are also many
instances of those who have not
neglected to make due pro-
vision for their slaves follow-
ing such owner’s demise,

I am likewise minded-—by no
means along in this to
attribute a fair share of the
blame to the underhand activi-
tiles of the sect known as
Quakers, These, from the very
beginnings of the settlement of
nur Island having played a
very subtle—and in these days
all too little heeded—part in
the instigation of others to
rebellion, at the same time
openly avowing their detesta-
tion to any form of violence!
Not scrupling, withal, to avail

By IAN GALE

oak tree became universal
throughout Europe, and _ it
became associated with the Sky
God. Men observed that the oak
was the tree most commonly
struck by lightning, go they
presumed that it was the
dwelling place of the irritable
Sky God, who punished boasters
either by the lightning stroke or
by some other dire influence.
So, to avert evil through boast-
ing, @What we now call sym-
pathetic magic had to be
employed, and to touch the oak
or another sacred tree meant
that one would be safe from the
Sky God.

One ot the most common
superstitions still practised to-
day is that connected with the
number thirteen, ‘he ill luck of
uhirteen is heightened if by
chance the thirteenth of the
imonth should fall on a Friday.
Va the other nand the belief is
meld that a child born on the
thirteenth will be lucky in all
his ventures started in after life
on this day,

The thirteen superstition
exists throughout Europe, and it
is impossible in any French
lown or city to find a house
numbered thirteen. Also, few
passenger liners would dare to
wave a bumber 13 cabin,

Thirteen Guineas

As evidence that the super-
stiion was not confined to the
less intelligent of the population,
there may be sighted the case of
Mr, Justice Luxmore, an Eng-
lish High Court Judge, who
held very strongly by the super-
stition, When practising at the
Bar, he would never accept any
brief marked thirteen eas,
One solicitor, whe knew this,
sent him on one occasion a brief
marked “twelve and another’.
it was returned to him,

Religious circles ascribe the
origin of the thirteen supersti-
tion to the Last Supper, at
which there were Christ and His
twelve disciples—thirteen in all,

But this would hardly
poceets, for the dislike of the
omans and the Greeks
number thirteen, It gh
accountable in this case by the
story of the Valhalla banquet in
Greek mythology, to which
twelve of the gods were invited.
Loki, the spirit of Strife and
Mischief, intruded, making thir-
teen, and Balder, the favourite
of the gods, was killed,

Talking of superstitions, I










s DOWN!! The

Office 4493

themselves fully of the safety

and protection afforded them

by the laws and defenses of

this country.” (1)

The General goes on to relate
that there was an attempted rising
of slaves in some parts of the
Island; but that this was quickly
suppressed—‘the immediate shew-
ing of discipline Taking excellent
and speedy effect — but at this
time a general anxiety thus
engendered by nO means, even
now, wholly allayed.’

He concluded — ‘it is, accord-
ingly, much to be hoped that
these over-zealous advocates of
freedom may duly take this late
ae ena it is too
ate! Such es, permitted to
further flourish unchecked in our
very midst, in these dangerous
times, must perforce yield fruit
in still worse happenings. Which
God forbid! there seems no
doubt but these instigators in
Great Britain can have little, or
no real cognizance of the nature
of this deep and dangerous men-
ace, which, from time immem-
orial, has overshadowed and
even threatened our very
existance.” (1)

There was a dispute over the
Wesleyans in 1801, this eventually

clos-
wd their Chapel in i
town. The Methodist uae
scribe Bridge town as one of the
most turbulent places in the
shown these people closely re-
sembled the mob-violence which
was meted out to the Wesleyans
of the latter part of the eighteenth
century in England, Historians
recorded —the motives natural to
a godless and coarsely vicious
community, animated by a strong
infusion of aristocratic pride and
of contempt for the novelties in
religion, were in this case raised
to feverheat through Mission-
aries’ friendship for the Negro,
exciting the suspicion that they
were agents of the anti-slavery
movement in England, to whic:
was added the belief that their
preaching encouraged
and made for the overthrow of
slavery,’

Lord Seaforth was sent out as
Governor of Barbados, and was
especially charged to endeavour

could not leave out horseshoes,
ie se. aera ee
ood luc! ie gen -
sition is that a horseshoe nailed

5
5
&
&
:
é

bri ood luck to all inside,
but there are variations. On the
Scottish coast

same time framing a wish,
wish will come true.”

Nafled Upward

But remember, horseshoes
must always be nailed upwards.

“qharm” was ted, always
travels in cireles, and is conse-
quently interrupted when he
arrives at either of the heels of
the shoe and is forced thereby
to take a retrograde course.
Great men have had the fail-
ing for horseshoes, Nelson, it is
recorded, always had a horse-
shoe firmly nailed to the mast
of the “Victory”.

There are two explanations as
to the origin of the horseshoe
superstition, The first is
aseribed to the legend of St.
Dunstan and the Devil. The
Saint was noted as a blacksmith
and, according to the legend, one
aay the devil presented himself
and asked to have his hoof shod.
St. Dunstan recognized him
and, after fastening his yisitor
to a wall, went to work on his
hoof so roughly that the devil
had to beg for mercy. Before
releasing him, however, St. Dun-
stan exacted a promise that he
should never enter a_ place
where he saw a horseshoe dis-
played,

The more likely explanation,
however, is that ted from
‘tthe Roman belief that evil could
be nailed, and the hammering
of nails on the doors and over
buildings was a well-recognized
means of curing or diverting ill
luck and disease.

How great was the belief in
the charm of the horseshoe at
one time is illustrated by the
fact that one of the “good
wishes” of the early part of the
last century was: “That the
horse-shoe may never be pulled
trom your old.”

Incidentally, I consumed a
portion of a horseshoe shaped
wedding cake this week, so I
should be well protected from
the Devil—touch wood!

(To be Continued)

to a new standard

other words, the









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to ameliorate the conditions of
the slaves in Barbados, John
Poyer in his open letter to Lord
Seaforth, refers to this matter
no uncertain terms:—

“I am now in the last place,
to solicit your attention, my
Lord, to the condition of the
coloured People of this Island.
l flatter myself that your
Exceilency has come among us
with a mind superior to those
prejudices, on the subject of
Slavery, which have, unhappily,
found so general and favourable
a reception among our mis-
taken and misinformed fellow
subjects on the other side of
the Atlantic. Withoat attempt-
ing to-discuss a question on
which some of the most dis-
tinguished and enlightened
Characters in Europe have dis-
agreed, I shall content myself
with remarking, abstructed
fror the Idea of Slavery, that,
in every well constituted So-
ciety, a state of subordination
necessarily arises from the
nature of civil Government.
Without this no political Union
could long subsist. To maintain
this fundamental principle, it
becomes absolutely nec@ssary

accidentally introguced into the
Community. With us, two grand
distinctions result from the
state of Society: Firstly be-
tween the White Inhabitants
and free people of Colour, and
secondly between Masters and
Slaves. Nature has strongly
the difference not only

in complexion, but in the mental
intellectual and corporeal fac-
ulties of the different Species,
ind our Colonial code has
acknowledged and adopted the
distinction. The Passage in
your Excellency’s speech to the
lature in which you pro-

fess your intention ‘to preserv:
the constitutional freedom of
and necessary subordination, in
the Island, to promote the cause
of Religion and irtue, to
encourage trade and to Secure
the property and happiness of
all ranks of People’ affords the
most heartfelt satisfaction to
every friend of their Country.”
Mr yer goes on to expose the

> IfFaith Can Heal—What
Is The Church Doing?

By CANNON HUGH WARNER

“Streams of them—yes, I can
truthfully say I have seen
streams of people coming
here with various kinds of
sickness. None of them leaves
us without in some way
being the better.”

1 could not doubt the ring of
conviction in the @voice of Rev.
Robert Horn Andrews as we sat
talking in his cel-like study down
Dorset way. His hair was silver,
and he did not look his 77 years.

He recalled the day, nearly
four years ago, when he joined
ihe pioneer founder of ‘ton
Abbey sanct , Blandford—the
Rev. John Mailiard—as an. assis-
tant priest,

Father John, he told me was
away in Devonshire conducting
one of his many healing missions.

“Yes,” he went on,“nowadays
we take only the so-called incura-
bles. For over 15 years Father
John has lived here, building up
this centre of spiritual healing.
Among the ‘incurables’ who have
stayed with us—three or four
weeks is the average time—we
have seen real miracles happen.”

If beauty and peace can heal,
I was not surprised.

The Setting

Through his study window I
looked across to the wooded
Dorset hiils on which a complete
village had once stood. The
squire, 200 years or so ago,
levelled the houses to the ground
because they spoiled this lovely
view. He had rebuilt the village
of Milton Abbas—with a new
church—half a mile away, to be
the first ‘“model’ vilage in
England.

You might call Milton Abbey

today a Church of England
“model” sanetuary of healing.
The vast eighteenth century house
nestles in the shadow of a great
penedictine abbey with a_ story
going back to King Athelstan, 128
years before the Conquest.
Tt was shown the chapel with a
nigantic picture, along the length
of the west wall, of the child
Jesus going into Egypt.

Here in this one-time monastic
refectory 60 residents, staff and
patients, meet morning and
evening. Two books on the altar
hold the names of hundreds of
sick who are prayed for each
morning before breakfast at the
Tiolv Communion.

Every Wednesday a special
healing service, with laying on
sf hands, brings visitors and
their sick friends.

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immorality of some men in the}
higher walks of life and the)
effect on public morals. He states |
that the people of Barbados have |
much cause to depreciate the
illicit intercourse between men |
in power and the coloured
women, which by hig account
must have been in a deplorable
state.

With reference to the Gov-
ernor’s recommendation to the
passing of an Act by the Legisla-
ture, respecting the Manumis~
sion of Slaves was ‘a wise and
salutary measure, which as it is
caleulated to prevent the artificial
inerease of free coloured People,
must tend to preserve the peace
and security of the Country.
But,’ he continues, ‘permit me.
my Lord, to suggest to your
serious consideration a circum-
stance pregnant with conse-
quences which may, be, at some
future moment productive of much
mischief. I allude to the accumu-
lation of real property in the
hands of free People of Colour.
By the Laws of England Aliens
are declared incapable of inherit-
ing lands; and though I am aware
that this is not strictly a case in
point, conceive that upon a simi-
jar -principle of national Policy
eur Colonial laws many properly
interfered and prevented the ac-
quisition of Real estate in the
possession of free Negroes or
Mulattos That they should be
allowed to exercise their talents
and = industr. in procuring a
comfortable Subsistence for them-
selves and their families, and that
they should be protected in the
full and quite enjoyment of an
honest livelihood, is readily
admitted ‘But that they should
be prohibited from purchasing or
acquiring Lands or Slaves is a
measure of as inseparably
connected with the safety of our
Country and perfectly congenial
with the Spirit of our Constitu-

tion.”
(To be continued.)

1. ‘The Barbadian Diary of
Gen. Robert Haynes. 1787—
1886; Edited by M. W.
Cracknell, 1934.

2. The Journal of the Barba-
dos Museum and Historical
Society, Vol. ‘VIII, pages
162—164.





Father Maillard, Father An-
drews, and a third resident pries*,
che Rev. Leslie Dumwell, share
in these healing services at the
altar rail, moving down to those
who cannot leave their seats,
(ouching, and praying.

“We have a doctor here who
has lately joined Our commu-
nity,” I was told. “He, too
shares in the laying of hands in
‘he chapel service.’

“So you believe in medical co-

operation?” 3 asked.
For- , I was led to a

door marked “Occupational
Therapy.” Inside were two large
looms for weaving, and three
smaller ones, A model plane lay
in a window recess, and ma-
terials for doll raffia
work, and other crafts filled the
shelves.

He opened another door, Here
were large lamps for light and
ray treatments, and couches for
massage, each with ifs screen.

“You see,” explained Father
Andrews, “the prayer of faith is
the instrument of the divine
healing forces of the Heavenly
Father. This attitude is not
opposed to the medical and nurs-
ing professions; it pnly insists
on prayer as the divinely ap-
pointed way of _ transferring
spiritual healing, which is neither
better nor worse than any other
agency.

“Material remedies must be
limited in their scope because
they do not include the moral |
element, For complete healing, |
youve got to get at all the root,
couses, spiritual as well. |

“Spiritual healing is projected
through the fellowship of two
o- three gathered in the name of
the present, living Christ.”

The Nurses

As a nursing sister passed along
the passage he went on; “We have
a resident staff of five trained |
nurses and two male nurses.
There is a trained physiotherapist
who givas her services. Dr.
Woodard, grandson of the founder
of the Woodard schools, our
doctor, believes with us that no
sickness should be regarded as
incurable, or condition as hope-
less.” Three of the children in
the home are “Spastics’,—unable |
to control muscle movements.

I stood by my car in the great)
courtyard. Father Andrews spoke |
as EP was leaving of another com-
pany—friends who pray in groups
of 12 all over the country for the |
sick, “We send them six new
names from time to time for
their intercessions.” |



























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robes, looked up from the lawn ®P4,Princess and their guests “- I asked Dom Robert whether. and the fashionable Ascot meet- nae Seadore Cavinene eCnee: -reemaee
at the white facade he house The monks come trom many peck when men were living together ing crowd Book-keeping English Subjects Mathematics
post wi ; ite facade of the house gr nae a neers Me ma at close quarters. the human Torre aeel asishinetia. Gotaee! Gdamadien Pulte Spoettiog
“ Said : oric ar ne « tne her

Police Subjects
Short Story Writing

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Costing
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Economics

Geography
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Brierly, tends the pigs and live y
exchanging his monk's habit for ox



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Mark
the Princess’s bedroom. u

used to be
Now it is





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Of course.” he agreed.

ngarees and a skullcap when he is “We al Ensines D Sanitation
our library. Those windows on the working in the grounds must get over that in two ways py tal “tae. Sheet Metal Work
oT te dees ane Ss room. Now We must learn > live tomether Aircraft Maintenance Machine Design Steam Sagiieering
it is the Ot's cell.’ The ex-sergeant as a family, and tolerate each Building Mechanica! Engineering orveying
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He was speaking of Nashdom 8 other. And if the Abbot sees that ee, Make Television
Abbey. Built in 1910 by Sir Edwin Dom Walstan, former staff sergeant, {)‘° eed al SE ee ty co will Civil Engineering Power S atic Engineesing Wireless Telegraphy
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Wasna Me Ne 0 e a, ; = : mansion for 1ey mov

Then he took Holy Orders and became

only Anglican Order of St. Benedict Vicar of Norwich. He jotned the staff

~ emmy CERTIFICATE
in this country.

here from their previous home
n Pershore in 1926.

preresensie seve wor See on mi







‘ £, DEPT 188, CHEN FIELD, ENGLAND. » GENERAL
; - f ; of Toc H and later was in charge of 0 THE BENNETT COLLEG | -
DOM ROBERT PETITPIERRE, an ex-science ihaiette eto ee oo rang a St. Annes House Soho, He has been £700 a © isan end ine free your prospectus CERTIFICATE OF
master, has taken life vows at Nashdom Abbey. race-meeting partion. the a Sere Be in the pig five years year ane | ¥, EDUCATION
He has given up all world! sessi r § a aletertaet . aU =. Like the other monks who have taken Unlike the Benedictine Orders ‘ l
st Pp Y possessions, to-day are the singing of the monks in ‘Mie . ws _he gave up every worldly on the Continent who distill the aren
pS eerycgt He een to famous liqueur and derive much 1 ADDRESS ° SEND TODAY
eet private income. He bre . ncoome from it, the Nashdom 1 1 p can. a
ae ae eae nye ae Abbey monks : have no profit- \ Se
: ag Ot Fang making pursuits. i y Noes ae
nad : belonged Je his Brand: Most of the income is derived PLEAS® Ss = on
parents a lacquered hat-bDOX from payment made to the els ollie dei tabla sa 27.7.52 ch intlen ss caus



which had belonged to a Chinese
mandarin. Everything was given
to the Order

monks for priestly and literary
activities, and from donations



and subscriptions from the
The piano. the settee. the laity

chairs and the hatbox now One of their members, now
stand in the ante-room where dead, was Dom Gregory Dix
visitors Cincludin women who wrote @ theological hand-
visitors, who are Larrea from book which has a wide sale. The
the house generally) are revenue from royalties still
received. brings in about £700 a year.

The monks &#re allowed to

lron bedstead

Dom Robert occupies a
by 16ft

and a nard chair.

boards are bare, a
ana over the bed
“But we have

our beds and we can have

main chapel

Members of the public

sit in the minstrels’ gullery

10ft
cell with an iron bed-
stead, a chest of drawers. a desk
The floor

crucifix

mattresses on

the minstrels’ gallery. is now the

may
attend Mass in the chapel and

smoke and to take a drink. They
are issued with a ration of
tobacco each week,and most of
them have cider at their places
on the bare tables in the refec-
tory. which 1s the original din-
ing room. large enough to hold
50 people :

“We have wine if it is sent
to us. or oeer.” Dom Robert said

In @ quiet private cemetery in
their grounds. amid iris o!ooms
and rhododendrons. are buried
monks and !ay brothers wh
have ended their labours at the



THE ABBOT
Dom Augustine Morris

RES.





‘

N

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P.O, Box 171,

PAINS

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DOSE

kK ks has any juickly relieves Stomacli Pains,

many blankets as we like. One None of the mon s any

of our number who is very thin money of mis own — If he ts pid tulence, Heartburn, Nausea

and feels the cold has about away on business for the Oraes or Acidity due to Indigestion.
" : > 2 money 1e :

seven.” he said he is given the m y t us

where noted orchestras played in account for it on s retur?

B. MEYERS & CO, LTD.,
Bridgetown.

The monks use the drawing- monastery



Toom as a common room Among them = lies Brotner
“Every evening from 7.30 til} Alban who started ite as &
8.30 we all meet for recreation,” ship's chandler I'wenty-fve




Dom Robert exp, ained “We years ago he joined the Order a
Aer — Ts ver: may play cards, talk or read & lay brother He chose to wash
ul ve ar ved t reak ® upstairs pantry
iN THE GARDEN of the £80,000 house built by Lut i i _ e not allowed to break Up in whe ups ad
: yens for a Russian prince, monks no ‘oups or ‘schools. That would take on ne#ther duty and
They belong to the-only Anglican Order of St. Benedict in this country, rte gg Cups or MACON. TE

The ballro. f
where noted orchestras once played is now the main chapel, om of the house,

~The New Pattern Of Celebrity

for the quarter *A a century he
was at Nashdofa he washed the
dishes for his brother monks

ve must all be together





it the Abbey house- oe A ‘
incomplete The Prior The two latest recruits are
ond incommand to the Brother Andrew. who used to be













rently » w@ seaman, and Brother Breach
ee te ee ton saan from Bermondsey who arrived a BROTHER MARK BRIERLY ex-
nted few weeks ago Desert Rat, tends the livestock.
PARIS By DRUSILLA BEYFUS ® Abbot who took office four Betore pe said good-bye Don na rs ’ :
THE FIRST General’s Lady io Ks 3 has,ever done before, . . She held ora Tree t

make it her. business to splasn heavily escorted enterprise. She a personal Press party. Q.: What did she miss most Mrs. Ridgway pointing to an JT’S ANNA—From Page 7
about in the limelight is Penny, 18 usually accompanied by three The place chosen was thein Japan? F “Ike” brooch in diamonds. about what?” Oh, about any-
the third Mrs. Ridgway, wife Suardians who make Penny’s way nearest thing to an American As: “My flower decoration For a moment Penny looked as inne ‘ad you evel Meet “a
of the Sypreme Allied Com- up far easier, They are:;— country club that France can classes.” * if she had singed herself in the woman who dian't have ideas?”

mander in Europe. Penny has | The Elegant Guardian, Mrs. offer (notices written in English Jt was noted solemnly limelight. “Oh no,” she said, inquired Anna e ne
made a celebrity of the General's M. Biddle, wife of Brigadier A. only, a barbecue in the garden, Q.: How many servants have frowning. Was it true that she sais t
Lady She thas shaped up a star Biddle. She has been heard to and murals of the American civil you? “Now, now; no politics,” said celebrating her fiftieth birthday |
part out of a traditionally dul! say at parties when asked to pose war to decorate the restaurant). ans “I haven't had time to Mrs. Mathews loudly, attempt- stationed. , ee
role. for pictures with Mrs. Ridgway It is situated nicely near allied count.” ing to smooth things over with a on Saturday? “At my age you|
Penny has washed the starch “I'd rather not, my dress headquarters, One flowery hat was bitten pink .steamroller. forvet about birthdays, Any-"
right out of) her job. She is would show up you know.” Just in the appointed hour, by this, She murumured appre- It was the nearest thing to o way, who let out that top

\, prettier and younger than most | The Plump and Jolly Guardian, the Ridgways’ mighty Chrysler cjatively: “She hasn't had to diplomatic incident, secret?”
other generals’ wive>, and Mrs. Greunther, wife of the car crunched along the gravel-ount them.” 3ut Mrs. Ridgway was soon What clothes had she brought
s makes sure her _ assets general who nearly got General drive of the Country Club de la al a back on safe ground She with her how many hats? ,
beautifully shown off. Ridgway’s latest job, She keeps Nouree Villenes-sur-Seine. + Emissary climbed into her mink. into “Oh, you know my weakness” |
When she puts on a hat even the party spirit moving -during Mrs, Mathews officiated, look- Christian Dior, the celebrated the American car, trailed by the said Anna. “Really ,this is the;
Field-Marshal Montgomery no- the odd evening the generals’ ing a picture of cool crispery in dress designer, sent his chosen two good guardians, the wives oddest sort of Defence interview |
tices it. “My dear, it really is 1nost wives spend at home. a grey nylon dress, emissary, the salon manageress, of the generals—and sped off. I've ever civen, Goodbye now.’ |
‘ sweet” he said about a little Peron Guest 3 . to pay respect to the General 4 one ; The diamond anthers of her}
straw number she wore recently. The he See ‘Hello, Sweetie’ Lady. She was a woman cf gold lily brooch flashed; the!
Penny catches on wherever = -ne Professional Guardian, She we'comed the Supreme paralysing elegance who reduced 4 . medallions on her bracelet —|
she goes. Her nickname is always Mrs. Burrows Mathews, whose Commander's wife: “Hel lo, everyone there to limp off-the- P Pr L each a milestone in her personal
used. Nobody calls her by the husband is attached to Ridgway’s sweetie; come right on in.” peggers. en ais and professional life, inscribed
proper one, Mary. Pictures of CiVilian staff. Mrs, Mathews Penny came right on in, wear- ‘Tall, and in Dior’s black, she i with messages like “Xmas 1937,
Penny appear in the papers ines’ dee’ te see line in promy- ing a mink, a tussore dress, and bent low over Mrs, Ridgway, De@r Sir, Love RKS” and “Asst. Secty, to|
enny.

she stops. a big he j ca a Re bait. cRioact I am asking you if you would = fefence 1950”—jangled. \
wherever she stops ‘iin, Ridgveay ie! very rest 1 big hat that tickled the photog- and murmured a few well chosen kindly give me space in

His ‘Pearl’







} : t raphers. words: “Monsieur Dior... at & y eye = juan vee Mrs, Rosenberg waved a hand}
Penny is the general's pearl. Pain Nand ots ey ae told But soon Penny made it plain your service . . enchanted, Sake est oateeh, publishing my _ moved towards the front}
When the general takes a trip, pefore her maveia ree fo eos that she was keeping her pretty madame, to see you. .. our salo. ““y am 17 years old and my hob- Sen yeople squeezed into the
Penny goes ‘too. “The general know,’ she is the meee do you mouth closed. She might look your home. .. ’ bies are stamp collecting, ex- blue Buick with’ her, Tho rest
reckons that it doesn’t look as the world to be fi bul a ae i sensational, but she kept to the On the tick of 17.30—the ap- changing snapshots and going to sorted themselves into the other
if he's come to fight a wer vit tained by ida -Peronte’ enter- pen se pa eh ag it came to raeegten’ ae oe Ss the the cinema. vehicles, and the cavaleade —
a wife on his arm,” said aa : _ ? ’ naking comments. eneral’s Lady rose to leave. 3 = on seaera |
officer at headquarters, inde renee eee ee higher The ladies of the Press, in One more picture, please, a Blairmont Estate. Pr on thee aah that led back “| R. M. JONES & Co., Ltd—Agents
Penny's flight into fame is a She did what e right lights. flowery hats and little black photographer pleaded. He asked Berbice, U.S. headquarters, Grosvenor-
at no general’s wife frocks, listened attentively. .., if he could take a picture of British Guiana, square, ‘Sa



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PAGE TWELVE



AGRICULTURAL REPORT :

June Rainfall Below Average _Prize-Giving

In his report on the work of
the Department of Science and
Agriculture for the month of June,
1952, the Acting Director of Agri-
culture said that the rainfall for
the month of June, 1952, was
slightly below the average. In the
majority of districts light to mod-
erate showers fell on approxim-
ately 16 days during the month,
heavy and widely distributed rains
fell on the 4th and 9th. According
to rainfall returns received from
29 Stations, situated in the vari-
ous rainfall categories of the
Island, the average total rainfall
for the month was 5.15 inches, The
average total for June 1951 was
7.39 inches and™ the avérage™ for
June for the past 105 years was
5.41 inches. The approximate to-
tal rainfall for the six months
January to June 1952 is 14.90
inches, the total for the corres-
ponding period for 1951 was 37.04
inches.

The highest total rainfall for
June 1952, at any of the above 29
Stations, was 7.51 inches, record-
ed at a station in the parish of St.
Thomas, and the lowest was 2,63
inches measured at a station on
the coastal area of Christ Church.

Sugar Cane
The harvesting of the old cane
crop was completed early in
June. According to final returns
received from sugar factories the
total crop for the 1952 season is
the equivalent of 167,876 tons of

e young cane crop made good
growth during the month and is
green and vigorous in appearance.

Food Crops

The newly planted yam crop, has
germinated satisfactorily and has
a healthy appearance. A _ large
number of fields were planted to
sweet potatoes during the month.

Inspection of the cotton grow-
ing areas was continued during
the month so as to ensure that the
plots had been propel cleaned.

The search for wild.cotton trees
was continued and a total of 2,343
was found in 4 months,

The distribution of cotton seed
for planting commenced at the
end of the month and owners and
occupiers are asked to make ear-
ly application for seed. Up to the
end of June, seed was distributed
to plant 120 acres, (plantations 18
acres, peasants 102 acres).

PEASANT AGRICULTURE

Peasants continued planting of
cme, sweet potatoes, eddoes, In-
lan corn and eow peas during
the month, In response to the en-
couragement given by the Depart-
ment, peasants generally display-
ed a willingness to grow more
food, but were handicapped by
shortage of planting material,
. By the end of the month, the
young ratoon canes in the lower
rainfall areas were beginning to
show the effect of the dry weather
condition’. In other areas good
rogress was maintained | h
Piant and ratoon canes, and some
cultivators were able to apply
dressings of sulphate of ammonia.
. June was the last month of the
close season. During the month
sants were preparing their
lots for planting this crop. There
are indications that a larger acre-
age will be planted this year than
last year.

Small plots of groundnuts were
pmpe during the month in St.

ucy and St. Peter, Good germin-
ation has been reported.

Coconuts and mangoes were in
good supply in the market.
yields of breadfruit
expected in due course,

Some minor damage continued
‘to be caused by leaf hoppers on

and pears are

food crops. The laying ‘out of
contours and other heavy culti-
vation work were completed, and
the planting of yams, sweet
potatoes, Indian corn and cow
peas was continued. Applications
of sulphate of ammonia were aso
given to the young canes.

The total number of livestock
at the six stations at the end of
June was 118, .ineluding young
stock born during the month.
Three hundred and seventy-six
gallons of milk were produced,
and 22 young pigs sold, mainly
for breeding.

Five hundred and four stud
services were paid for at the
stations. These were as follows: —
bulls 191, bucks 110, rams 83
and boars 120.

ENTOMOLOGICAL

‘the number of moth borer egg
parasites bred in June was 80,216,
v00 and the number distributed
to. planters was 70,129,000. This
brings the total bred so far for
this year to 310,543,000 and the
number liberated to 271,725,000.

More Diatraea infested can®
hearts, bringing the total for this

ear to 6,100 were dissected in
June in an attempt to discover
whether the larval parasites Lixo-
phaga diatraea and Metagonysty-
jum minense could be found in
cane fields. None was found, and
it is coneluded after repeated
efforts over many years at estab-
lishment, that these parasites
cannot establish themselves in
Barbados.

Examination of fields in which
patehes of ratoons were showin
poor growth, or were drying, re-
vealed more attacks by root borer
and by the ant Acropyga and i's

ssociated mealy bug Neorhizoe-
cus. Surveys carried out showed
many other ratoon fields attack-
ed by Neorhizoecus in which no
ratooning failure was s»pparent,
but which had prébably suffer-
ed less in tonnage due to destruc-
tion ‘of roots. The real status of
this pest has yet to be deter-
mined.

Application of Insecticide

to Cane-fields

Further work has been carried
out in plots at Codrington and in
large scale experiments on plan-
tations for root borer control. |

During June, five government
buildings were examined and
tre; tment against wood ants car-
ried out, and four inspections and
tresiments of private buildings
were made. Fields at four estates
were examined for . the presence
of Nasutitermes , the cane-
field wood ant.

BOTANICAL

Nursery and Short Season First
Year Trial. These seedlings
were successfully established un-
der irrigation and received their
full dose of fertilizer during the
month of June. The seedlings are
now well established and are mak-
ing satisfactory growth. Irrigation
will be continued if this becomes
necessary.

The breeding plots at Groves
were supplied during the month.
As four cuttings are planted per
hole, it was possible to do most
of the supplying necessary by
singling the existing plots. The
remainder was done by digging
up stumps from the old field. By
the end of the month the supplies
had taken and were starting to
grow vigorously,

S. spontaneum — Burma. ny
of the older cuttings of this
variety which were taken in May,
failed to grow, and have been re-





Guava 31
Cherry 20
Papaw .,... 11
Grape © 2005 14
Water-lemon 3

754
Coconuts: PY ls ee

Distribution of Ornamental
Plants. Two thousand nine hun-
hundred and twelve ornamentai
plants of different species were also
distributed from January to June.

CHEMICAL

Organie carbon, pH, total ex-
changeable base capacity deter-
minations were made on Seawell
soil samples.

The final analyses in the com-
parison of exchangeable soil pot-
ash determination methods were
made, and the statistics are almost
completed.

Further nylon bloek/soil cali-
brations were commenced; also
indirect permanent wilting point
moisture determinations. The read-
ing of bloeks in the field continued.

Nitrogenous fertilizer was ap-
plied to five 8 x 8 x 8 direct and
residual potash trials; to three
4x 3x 2K.N.P. trials; to the peas-
ant cane potash trial and to the two
bagasse trials,

One 3 x 3 x 3 direct and residual
K20 trial (1st ratoon) wag aban-
doned because of estate potash
application to the plots.

The urea fertilizer was applied
to the B.47419 (1st ratoon) canes
at Codrington in the comparison
between it and the normal sul-
phate of ammonia application.
Severe scorching of the leaves
occurred at both spray solution
strengths (3% and 6%).

Foliar Diagnosis

New, quicker methods of cane
leaf N.PJK. analysis are being
tried comparatively with last
year’s methods, These newer tech-
niques require less leaf material,
are quicker, and cheaper since less
chemical reagents are required
per determination.

One hundred and twenty-three
leaf samples were collected from
the 4x 3 x 2 K.N-P, trials, 14 leaf
samples from the Pine sulphate of
ammonia time of application in
relation to irrigation experiment
and 5 samples from the Codring-
ton urea trial, and 2 samples from
the Pine estate cane leaf nutrient
trend work.

One hundred and twenty-three
samples were dried and ground in
the Wiley Mill, 12 K20 and 15 N.
determinations were made.

The Pine perennial fodder trial
experimental results have been
recorded in publication form.

Thirty-eight Pine, Central Live-

stock Station milk samples were

received for routine B.F. and
S.N.F. analysis.

Miscellaneous Analysis
Three samples of B.A.F. were
received for protein and sand
adulteration tests,
One butter sample was analysed
for free chlorine, suspected of
causing a taint,

_ CO-OPERATION

During the month the Co-opera-
tive Officer attended 15 meetings
ot co-operative societies 6 of these
were regular general meetings of
established soctcties, 2 were com-
mittee meetings, 5 were meetings
of groups in process of formation
and 2 were in connection with the
presenta: of certificates of reg-
d twelve ornamental
tive Officer gaye an address on
fome aspects of Co-operation to
the Christ Church Old Scholars’
Association.

SUNDAY ADVOCATE ~~ ~*

Antigua Grammar
School Holds

trespondent
ANTIGUA.

The Annual Prize-Giving of the
Antigua Grammar School teok
place at 5 p.m. on Thursday last.
His Excellency, Sir Kenneth
Blackburne, K.C.M.G., O.B.E., was
unable to attend but Lady Black-
burne was present, accom
by the Private Secretary, Captain
F. E. W. Hewitt. =

The Headmaster Mr, J, F, Foote
in his report paid tribute to the
late Walter McSeveney who was
an old boy of the school and for
many years a member of the Goy-
erning Body of the school. The
School now has a new Gov
Body comprising of the Dean
Antigua, the Reverend, Canon
i. M. Yerbury, Lt, Col. J. R. A.
Branch, M.B.E., Mr. E. G.
the Hon. E. H. Lake and Mr, P.
A. W. Gordon. The school year
opened with two hundred and
thirty-seven boys and the year’s
work showed considerable im-
provement on the previous year,
examination results "were com-
paratively speaking good but the
age at which boys in Antigua are
sitting the School Certificate is
still two years later than boys in
other West Indian islands and it
is vitally necessary for them to
speed up edueational standards in
order for them to come in line
with the other colonies.

The Hon, P, D. MacDonald Coal-
onial Secretary of the Leeward
Islands then addressed the lar;
gthering of parents and boys, b
acDonald stressed that a long
term policy was necessary for the
general improvement in
of the Antigua Grammar Sch

The Dean of Antigua spoke on
behalf of the Governing Body and
said that with the co-operation
of Mr. Foote and his staff it
their intention to work t
modernising the school. The Head-
master’s task was an exceedingly
difficult one and he deserved every
possible help.

Prizes and certificates were pre-
sented by Lady Blackburne.

Cotton Planting
Season Begins
In Antigua

{From Olir Own Correspondent)



Antigua’s cotton planting sea-
son will begin on ist September
and prior to this date an an-
nouncement will be made regard-
ing the type of cotton to be plant-

Government has only received
an offer of 40 pence per Ib. lint
for between 240,000 lb. to 360,000
Ib, cotton lint.

Although Government has not
received a firm offer for the whole
of the 1953 crop, it is not propos~
ed to impose any restriction on
cotton planting.

Government will purchase pea-
sants cotton in 1953 and
to make a first payment be-
tween 12 cents and 14 cents per
lb. seed cotton.

Government does not undertake
to purchase estate cotton but es-
tates will be assigned one fifth of
the amount of cotton for which
a market is secured,

Steps are being taken by the
West Indian Cotton Growérs’
Association, the Antigua Cotton
Growers’ Association and Govern~
ment to obtain new markets.



to four. The formal presentation
of the certificates of registratiom
to the Welchman Hall Co-operative

Scout Notes

SEA SCOUTS
IN CAMP

Garrison Sea Scout Troop (2nd
ot. Micnael) is in Camp at Baih-
sheba, St. Joseph, near to Powe:
pring. There are about 20 las
an camp with Mr. C. A. ‘Boo’
vatterson, Group Scoutmaster, :”
charge. The Assistant Commuis-
sioner for their sub-area, Caps.
«, A. Sealy, visited them on
Saturday. The camp will end on
Monday afternoon.

Executive Committee
Meeting é

The Executive Committee of the
Island Scout Council will meet
to-morrow afternoon (Monday)
it Scout Headquarters at 5 p.m.

August Camps

Many troops haye planned to
camp during the month of August
and all H.Q. Camp equipment
nave been booked up already.
This is indeed a healthy sign and
we hope that more Troops will
»e camping during September as
well. Those Groups who have not
y@t paid up their Assessment Dues
to the end ef the last term (Jan.
—April) are reminded to do s©
as soon as possible. No Camp
equipment or “Badges will be
issued to Groups which are ‘un-
financial’.

Film Show

There will be a_ special Film
Show for Scouts and Scouters in
uniform at the British Council
Centre, “Wakefield”, White Park
Road, at 5 pm. on Thursday
afternoon next, July 31st, at 5
p.m. Special feature of the show
will be the film of the last World
Jamboree which was held in
Austria in August 1951. Don’t miss
it! Seating accommodation is
limited so be sure to come early
and to wear your Uniform.

Group Activities

The Hon. Secretary will be glad
to receive news of your Group’s
activities through your Assistant
Commissioner for publication in
“Scout Notes”. Please let us
know what’s ‘cooking’ in YOUR
GROUP. It will encourage other
Groups too, BUT please send in
your notes not , — oe
Thursday before publication y.
GOOD CAMPING TO YOU ALL.

= @ .«
Barbadian Studies
Shakespeare
At Stratford

The British Council in con~
junction with the Extra-mura]
Department of Birmingham Uni-
versity has arranged two courses
on Shakespeare at Stratford-on-
Avon during the summer. The
first of these will be attended by
20 teachers and students of
English from Australia, Canada,
Southern Rhodesia, Barbados,
Belgium, Finland, France, Greece,
Italy, Sweden, Israel, Brazil,
Peru, Uruguay and US.A.

The gramme consists of a
series lectures at the Shake-.
speare Institute by Dr. Clifford
Leech on “Shakespeare’s Roman
Plays,” Mr. H. V. D. Dyson on
“Comedy, Tragedy, and tha
Last Plays,” and Professor C. J.
Sisson on “The Road to Discov-
ery” and additional lectures by
leading British scholars on
Shakespeare and his contempor-
aries ard the Elizabethan Age.

Members attend performances
of plays at the Memorial Theatre,
and tutorials and discussions on
these plays will be held. There
are also play-readings. talks and
visits to places of interest in



.to be appointed to form a new|

KING FAROUK
ABDICATES

‘rem pece 1

v



Alexandria to bring the naval
command in line. }
After a morning long conference
with Maher, his troops went to the |
King’s Palace. They were barred
by the King’s bodyguard. Naguib
forces opened fire on the guards
when they refused the demand for
entry to the Palace. Nagtib’s |
forces then smashed their way.into,
the Palace and arrested Abdulla |
El Nafuim Pasha. i

Maher’s two-day-old Govern-
ment was reported ready to resign
on Saturday night, and ionegene-
ent Bassiedn Barakt Pasha be-|
lieved the most likely candidate |

Government.

The “day of action” fell exactly |
six months after ‘Cairo’s “black
Saturday” riots of January 26th in |
which Cairo was ripped by riots, |



arson and murder which burned |
out great sections of the city’s
modern business area and left un- |
numbered hundreds dead and in- |
jured. |

The constitutional amendment |
Naguib was reported to have de- |
manded would have stripped |
Farouk of his Royal prerogatives |
to dismiss an Egyptian govern- |
ment and dissolve the Chamber of ;
Deputies.—U.P.

a eeeiediciiie
Stevenson Accepts. |

Nomination

@ From page 1
dent Truman, who flew here from
Washington for the purpose as
well as to deliver a a talk” in
which he tore into the Republi-
eans and staunchly defended his
Fair Deal programme, He intro-

duced Stevenson as the man who |

had been nominated for the Presi-
dency on a “real honest to good-

ness draft “because” he en |

not make deals with anybody”.
At the time that Kefauver and
Russell marched before the Con-

vention and conceded, Stevenson |

was still 14% votes shy of the 6144

he needed to win nomination. As
soon as the two defeated candi- |

dates finished short addresses to
the Convention Utah made a
payoff change in a vote that
thrust Stevenson to victory,

TREES FOR
CORONATION

Scotland plans to mark Queen
Elizabeth’s Coronation in many |
ways. One of the most attractive
ideas is the planting of com-
memorative trees and shrubs in
cities, towns, and villages






2

—ve.|

OOH)



throughout Scotland.

Young people will play a
prominent part in this scheme,
following the example of the
Edinburgh Girl Guides who, for
the 1937 Coronation of King
George VI, ‘planted 400 flowering

cherry trees in an Edinburgh glen.

To-day, after 15 years, the trees
make a magnificent display each

“spring. i





West Indian
Teachers In U.K.

Five West Indian teachers
have arrived in Britain as guests
of the Colonial Office, They are
spending a month in Britain see-
ing many activities connected
with their work, and other
aspects of the British way of life.

The party consists of Mr. E.
Fields, head teacher of the Anna



Pelican”,



SUNDAY, JULY 27, 1952

@F e
the Mediterranean when his coup
was staged Wednesday was not
loyal to the new regime. He is in i e
os

Scientist Explains How
New Discovery Makes
Men Feel Years Younger

ment physician, with more than



Or James Rastelli
she wees For instance, Dr ng fee.
5 an phys: -
cian, rare: chen a power
ryation that the

dino!

tone . mem-
the | ory Jokers vitality are
about the discovery Ww
‘act that he has per-| f:
a Con ged of herbs ed

hs & marked slow:
nm in all the body processes

oplice thst the ae or outhful
vi er and vitautty les in’ bee
iy





JUST RECEIVED

MINIATURES

among which you will find the well known
Mr. and Mrs, Duck with Dack and Dilly. Mr.
and Mrs, Penguin with Benny and Penny. Mr.
and Mrs. Rabbit, and last but not least floral
Babies, Wynken, Blynken, Nod and Bear be-

. ns

We have also some very reasonable bird

“Woodpecker”,

“Budgerigar” and “Heron”.
e

Come early and make your choice at your

. i Yoast- Regina Senior School Essequebo,
beans, scale insects on fruit and placed by fresh cuttings. It is o¢ anisation and Registration Marketing Society and the Leeward wee caine and the Coa Brtige conic Se ae
ornamental trees, the cabbage ‘ly yet to say if these will of Co-operative Societies. One Co-operative Savings Society took ds. Beton Shane, MN Py eee!
White butterfly on cabbage and ow satistacterhly. geisty, Walkers Co-operative place on the 4th and 11th June Mr. H. Jackson, head teacher of
related crops and slugs on a wide ®!0W Satistactoriiy. . Savings Society of St. Andrew, respectively. , Jamaican Musician’s gg Pi de arc Maggs. An all
variety of crops. Control measures — Economic Tree Propagation and Was organised during the month. in Trinidad; Mr. ‘T, Miranda, a
are continuing. Distribution, Six hundred and This was formed as a preliminary Suc cesses i tish

OF
odist teacher from
Peasant Livestock eight lime, 82 mandarin, 365 to the farm machinery society ee

| LOUIS L. BAYLEY

Co-operators’ Day





i ; Celebratio: Honduras; and Mr. V, G. §, Pin- Iton La
A t hortage of con ana ae ve ok ren oe cuthelent capital nebebens when During the month "the officers Among medal winners announ- nock, headmaster - panei Bay Be Pe and Aquatic Club Booth
Ste eee ne of Con- and 25. shadddck trees were bud=_ * as been accumu- of “*k Credi i ti ent School, Jamaica.
entrated feed was reported dur- ao during the past six months— lated en@ the time is suitable. A cf the Shamrock Credit Society ced at the final concert of the Governm Phone 3909 Phone 4897

met the Co-operative Officer and Festival of Commonwealth Youth Before setting out on their

g the month. Supplies soon re- Janyary to June, Fruit trees de- marketing Society is in process of Overseas tour the party were received by

turned to normal. In many dis- }j\ered from Codrington during formation in St. Thomas. Another discussed plans for the observance organised by the





Se

ed wf Co- s’ Day . f ague on Monday June 30 was the Crown agents for the Colon- , ’ .
Bicts the supply of green fodder 11.0 same period were as follows:— soclety, situated in St, Michael, Chicd te montgone tee cele es Tale’ Barber of Jamaica, He ies, Sir Harold Downie, and by QO OHSS
ee th improve by the en CPAR ES od che suibis +.» 176 which chas_— been = accumula- ¢;; m 5th to 19th July, This was Was prevented with the Colonies the deputy Chairman of the
*"The Poapent Agricultural In- Grapefruit ........+65 iM ting fete some time, dis- done with a view to giving the Med by Colanial Secretary mort Sst Society, Sir Gerald :
Appie RG: i. deh eye OH cusse @ Co-operative Off- ¢ayicus societi ss Oliver Lyttel ampbell. ; 4
structors visited 982 peasant ihold- Lime ae “laws fee Cane = various societies more time to On July 10 a reception was| $
ings and 28 school gardens dur- Shaddock ..,..++..:> 25 = cer model by-laws for Consumers @ audience were ‘

sk 2 ake th ~ . ions Amo 7, : ; lion's
ing the month EM TL sine sheen se 8 Societies. These discussions are to |, y ‘iene: YT ate ooo many ed musicians in- held in the delegation’s honour

hi
i
# amme,

e ; Mandarin .........++5 $5 = continue. cluding Arnold Bax (Master by the Earl of Munster, Parlia- |
pete ue aa wed Vs is bs ashes 19 One society was registered during of the Queen’s Misick), Roser me p tary Under-Secretary of | %
at 9 meetings of co-operative PORE cai vicyot sk reeres 75 the month. This was the Sayes General Progress Quilter, et — — They ere Visiting « number of | $
groups held in June. Genip ose. ever venee 2 Court (Christ Church) Co-opera- The general response to co-oper- ea es var Directo Or British schools of different types.

The main activities at all Sta- Golden Apple ...... 16 tive Producers’ and Marketing siive propaganda has been satis- mt ustk wart ik Colnens F and On ‘the industrial side they are |
tions. in addition to the usual Sugar Apple .......+ 8 Society, Limited, which was reg- { ctory, and on the whole, estab- Ruth ‘Railton (Director National visiting a cotton factory to see;
routine operations, were those Breadfruit .........++ 8 istered on 4th June. This brings lished societies continue to make Youth Orchestra of Great Brit- West Indiay Sea Island cotton |
connected with the planting of Botr PA ese clay ns 1 the number of societies registered ; .0d progress. * Jain). being spun, and a sugar refinery.















FOR STYLE COMFORT AND VALUE

BUY 4 RELIANCE SHIRT

OBTAINABLE AT ALL LEADING
: STORES

HURRICANE SEASON
ANEROID BAROMETERS

Only a limited number so select yours early and be prepared
Also

HURRICANE LANTERNS ne
she Incorpora’
“sabe. HERBERT LTD.

10 & 11 Roebuck Street 1926







vp» Chetiated

® More Economical
© More Comfortable

© More Powerful





AFTER THE RACES THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LID.

















White Park Road, Bridgetown f e
< 2 2 9)
+ ENGINEERS, BRASS and IRON FOUNDERS A Car with all the ‘Extras’ you'll
UITS Works contain modern liances for the execution of desire.”
We proudly present C fT BISCUITS..... Tins UAE sb vain caeudintion . Bots feavclans Sedat xin an onal ng i
The SILVER KING ons atte — SANDWICH PASTE , GREEN CHARTREUSE ,, SUGAR MACHINERY and STEAMSHIES 4
Complete re-design of frame angles has C. T. CHERRIES ... .Bots. DRAMBUIE ....... + i TURAL MACHINERY and
i T MAJOR IMPROVEMENT = Dealers in AGRICUL an : *
seme ee. FIRS oa il pa care UTS ..... s Se a ee ” RENEE AL A Geoceent STORES '% New Shipment of these Famous Cars
EASIER STEERING Car. ORS veh " 2 poe» acu
EASIER PEDALLING a. CORPEART vos sce 2 1k IRRIGATION PROJECTS, PUMPING EQUIPMENT 3) arriving shortly,
and the FLOATING RIDE performance. ae at KOLA TONIC ....+ ” and ELECTRICAL INSTALLATIONS A SPECIALTY i
Great Beauty has been combined with ICE CREAM MIX Tins DRY MONOPOLE For es
improved STRENGTH at all the important BRANDY ee ey Bots DRY FLY SHERRY ,, eshataitenk Maacina call a .
TOUGHER FORK TIPS Wee. Recasdws os “a GOLDEN ARROW RUM ,, in
c ’
STREAMLINE FORK SWEEP 1 Sinner ere _ :
H CHROMIUM THIMBLES y i
2 ee tO ORTING RIDE NOW. PERKINS & CO.. LTD. THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY ED. j § COMaNn & taylors varage
“make-out” with any other? - ‘ Phone : 4546, 4650 Worksho :
Roebuck Street Dial 2072 & 4502 p Phone 4528 Stores Dept: . Near Cathedral
Â¥

eS | $909O0999449-9-09-9H9 99-59 99HHSHO-GHHHSHGHHHHOOOOHOHOT | 7

|


SUNDAY, JULY 27, 1952 E SUNDAY ADVOCATE

PAGE THIRTEEN






HENRY =k BY CARL ANDERSON How Aladdin’s Lamp

®@won the Princess









The Princess had refused many suitors.
But when Aladdin offered her a dish of
Royal Pudding, she cried, “It's delicious!
1 will marry Aim if he promises to serve
me Royal Pudding every day.”

2
Once a poor young man named Aladdin
found a magic lamp. Whenever he
rubbed the lamp a genii would appear
and grant his every wish. Now Aladdin
was in love with a beautiful princess




One day Aladdin asked the genii how he
could get the Princess to marry him
“Here, Master,” said thegenii, and hand-
ed him a package of Royal Pudding






©
Yes, everyone loves Roym: Puddings.
They're so rich and smooth, So .
too. 3 wonderful flavors: chocolate, va-
nilla, and butterscotch, Try one today.












1 HEARD A
WHAT HAPPENED?

By Appointment
Gin Distillers

to the Late
King George VI

‘rots

Gordons

Stands Suptome



PAR IM 2 |

BLONDIE . BY CHIC /OUNG








SWS























2s
King Features Syndicate, Inc, World rights reserved LE csinaslbeas tained SAR nc NAN EESTI,
FLASH GORDON IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE
: (Aaa ae v WELLL), oo i
— vt IF WE TAKE THIS ws ONLY ONE THING TO DO! SY) SPECI ff. 4
GARL'S SOLDIERS NOw ae ELEVATOR UR SOMEBODY'S GOT TO STAY BEHIND Uf AL offers to all Cash and Credit Cust
TRAIN THEIR ‘FREEZE’ pe ) | THEY'LL KNOCK Vag AND DRAW THEIR FIRE WHILE THE pe 4 ee Stele for Thursday to Saturday only
ace Say coe i ey p vont OVER aes » eee OF eae IN THE ¢ 3 SPECIAL GEFEME abe aow avallahis at cae Geuuches CL
L K CUTTING PU oo LAY PIGEONS. LEVATOR! WELL s+ oe ew pare now available at our ranches Whi
' FLASH AND HIS PARTY » e GET GOING! : is so pe ite P ark,
OFF FROM ESCAPE | Iweedside, Speightstown and Swan Street
we
Usually NOW BE MOEIIEA, | ciisisssisserseisinssisissnnsessonis j Gio eae Cae
OATMEAL TI a SnaIE oss sisssbasasovesanesass eoadhoua aeaammen lice
j POD A OMe. sere & DIOR iscsersessitiniavbpectonts $ 48 -— §$ 40 Genta ae WamAT i ssceesensennnes us sess -
-ELICAN SOAP ee ; sarge) mes
PELICAN SOAP. ..... roe TB 72 GREAM OF WHEAT (Small) ‘51
FRY’S COCOA SnFedosresssreeseecedesserstaenabosves 50 AG PEARL BARLBY .......... = 51
\ SAUSAGES VIENNA (4-0z, Tins)... 0° 36 COFFEE CHICORY .......... a ee
GHEGEEN GOO. M5 iissssbiiviiaseorsiens 42 —. 40 CHASE-SANBORNE INSTANT COFFEE wow 87
Ss Ss 9 V ‘EG Bb Mab basses aviicaureslpniaainas aetiaditibesess a tieae 4
MUSHROOM SOUP wsvsssee 3 40 PUPAE LAME, PIN ds Scdii sits sscaciaiese hobtotakinbvecrécaninese Soodduueee 49
eo Wipe PCP OE oes, ul irsstsvess 36 = ‘34 PINEAPPLE CHUNKS wy BL
CHDOPN PGP eh ue aan 36 = 34 GUAVAS (Large) vou 65
GREEN. PRA SOUR eee a as 34 APRICOTS (Small) ......%..... 39
FRUIT CAKES — 31 Tins . wu 8,00
WE'VE GOT TO HOW? THAT GUARD AT LEAVE THAT TO Me/ OKAY, PARADISE! JUST :
FIN? OUT JUST | MY DOOR MIGHT RAISE BUT WE CAN'T WASTE | REMEMBER...IVEGOT TO
LET'S TRY, TO REASON “FRONT” FOR THEIR WHAT IT 15! J COPPERJACKETED OBJECTIONS | | TIME HANGING AROUND J GET THERE AND? BACK
THIS OUT, JOHNNY! WHY OPERATIONS...OR, \F | DECIDED TO TAKE A STROLL WAITING: HERE WITHOUT ANYBODY rs
WAS YOUT MEETING WITH | THEN AGAIN, JUST ; 15 HOUR! SUSPECTING I DUCKED
THE BISSHOT HELD AT =_4. {5 INP TO THROW re

SCHLUGGENS ?





-* MBs . »
s Le

“GUINNESS

STOUT
FOR STRENGTH












SINCE YOULIKED
(T6GO WELL ANID ATE
] ALL OF IT-HERE IS

———.._/” 6OME MORE! IF YOU
EAT IT ALL- DOW'T



I JUST WENT
IN THE KITCHEN

F AND TOLD HER
wow: ~ 5 / WE ATE If ALL-

WHAT KIND ¥ p K NOW I WONDER
OF FOOD MUSTN'T OFFEND HER- Se 3 f WHAT GHE’LL HAVE
IS THIS? THROW IT OUT THE ¢ FOR DESSERT!

WINDOW AND WELL TELL ad a
HER WE ATE IT/ sd Iya, ie 5
P ° ee





A WORRY-- I
A HAVE PLENTY
“”
3hy MORE //

















—_—
oe "TM SORRY, MISS) FRIEND? I DESPISE] | WHAT DID PAGAN LEE SAY Y se
amt LEE... THAT HIM! IF HE CALLS MANGLER? 1S SHE GOING SHE
PHONE TO DITCH HER BOOKING
Tx OuT.. I'M BUSY., AT THE OASIG AND SIGN

ANYTHING | UP WITH USF pp








NN i J 4
Weg? De

BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES

2 : Es

MIGHT IN THE | USTEN $ DOESN'T THAT]
| JUNGLE<~ | SOUND LIKE A CHILDS
ae



= ZTE HIM, BOBO! gate
Se I HiM/ MAKE

ae




HIM GO AWAY /-
VOICE? IT DOES!
C. F. HARRISON & CO. (BARBADOS) Ltd.
P.O. BOX 304
BARBADOS



:
as ay
SAT




PAGE FOURTEEN

CLASSIF





BIRTH
GREAVES -— On Tuesday
Oistin Hill, Christ Church, to Mr













ane, Telephone 2949. 18.6.52—t.f.n. | Shops producing an income of 756 dollars
Harold Greaves the gi a ae daug a ——|per annum. Suitable for a bond with
titel ogg tloent Ecsta da Sg ae AUTOMOTIVE BREEZLEY, Maxwell Coast — Unfur-| enough land to erect more buildings
et.t.ce-—s ao . nished House. with 4 Bedrooms, Spacigus | ee day on application to
eer : 2 Reception Rooms, Double Garage, and tenants he above will be set up for
DIED Saloor _ fgodel M.S. 1500 yo 4 right-of-way to beach, John M. Bladon|saie by Public Competition at my
aS ner driven, 15,000 miles. ORF |g Co Phone 4640, Plt. Ltd. Building. |office VICTORIA STREET, FRIDAY ist
- reason for sale, owner going abroad: . 27.7.58~1n | AUGUST at 2 m Dial ‘o947
OETA Hobbtin Aimie Augusta, Tres ooo oe - uO". ARCHER McKENZIE
al, i ugusta ne , E
funeral. leaves “her late residence.| CAR-Hillman 10 HP, A'l’ Gondition,| p BUNGALOW—At — Brighton, Black | 37.7,88—4an
“Rosedank", Bush Hall, St. Michael.]|New Tyres & Battery. Price $1000.00, | Rock, 3 bedrooms, modern convenien@es | mm ————————————————————
at 4 o'clock this evening for the] For Inspection Dial 2144 from ist August 1952. Bus service. Apply | “BRIGHTWOOD” situate on the seaside
Pilgrim Holiness Church, Kew Road * . 26.7.52—2n..| Mrs. R. Cools, or Dial 2209 or 4988. }at St. Lawrence, Christ Chureh. stand-
and thence to the Westbury Cemeter> 26.2.52—2n | ‘og on oo. square feet of land
are asked to attend "AR r , e louse contains three bedrooms,
Pretthenet Altesheinssband Victor.|aieh ‘Very ood conaitan, elephant | co CEEOUMES, — Uarumnied, Chel: | rawing. dining and Tviny rom. garage
* Frank, Leatha (children), Victo 3962 es 27.7 bin sea Gardens. Inspection any day 4—6 and servants’ rooms with electric light
Rosalie, Adina, Cyrilene, Angela] ———___ * except Sundays. 27.7,.52—3n eae eetenies eouahos Inspection by
( ren) 27.7.52—In 2 appointment, one 8250 between the
prea nenaaners _CAR—190 STANDARD 10. in excellent) ““GaANAAN,” Cattlewash, Bathsheba-— | hours of 9 and 12 a.m
or. good bargain, Phone 5130 or Furnished, Electricity and Water, Sept., The above will be set up for sale at
THANKS _ -. Bernstein. 26.7 .52-—2n | Oot , Nov. Apply Mrs. A. A, Gibbons, | Public Competition on Friday, the 15th
Sindieren it " : . : Folkestone, St. James. Tel, 0117 | day of August 1952, at 2 p.m, at the
ER—Mr. Christopher Banniste mit a ae ae od 27,7.52—1n | office of the undersigned
and family beg to thank all those] Will sed, at bargain price, enquiries to see CARRINGTON & SEALY,
friends who so kindly attended th : . 21.7.52--40 FLATS—Two Furnished Flats at Dun- Lucas Street.
funeral, sent letters, cards, wreath dee, St. Lawrence. Suitable for 2 only.



and other expressions of sympathy ir
their recent bereavement, occasionec
by the death of Mrs. Bery! Bannister
. 27.7.52—1n

‘orner Pinfold St. Ma Lane. rivers with hydraulic powered

3 rere oe — « ner erae 7 89 in |unfurnished “Las Campanas” situate| Arrow Root Factory Estate House,

REID—The Reid family er i a ceten ey ae | «CAvenue = Belleville, containing 3) Animal Stalls ete. Situated 4% miles

eee oe Mind te ineny other ways, cAR—Austin A-40 6000 miles, Mxoelys|mecrooms, Living Room, Eitchen, Beth.,| from City. | Very ‘Suitable’ tor Stock

a sympathy with them In thei: | lent condition. Available September. Zollet with Front and Back Riis be Avply BH. A. Haynes, N.S

Salant Seccnvement, oecanioned by ths | $1.90 ‘Nearest. Telepnone sale." | Garnee, sacar Servo. or, par: | wauom St Vincent ap naan
B . . a a h =| 5

death of heir mother Mabel Agnes) 7 $2-1n. |ieutars phone 9728 2.100. | erate —y

. 5 a ore ate ih 'T MISS THESE—Aimost New 3

—_—_—<—<—<—<$—$s AP—One Ford 10. Bargain $300.00, | “"STANUELITA” — Maxwell Coast.| Bedroom Stone Bungalow, a Residence

IN MEMORIAM



HOPE—In loving memory of our dea
mother and sister Elsie Evelyn Hope
who died on July 25th 1948

Out of a world of sorrow

Into a heaven of rest

God must have a beautiful garden

For He always chooses the best.

Always remembered by— .
The Hope family. 27.7.52—l1



ANNOUNCEMENTS









——

TELEPHONE 2508

last at



FOR RENT |

IED ADS.



HOUSES

Attractive seaside Flat main road Has-| Al
tings, comfortably furnished,
Bath, Open Verandah facing sea. Suitable
one person





FOR SALE































Available July 15th onward. Phone 8240.

CAR—1949 2240. 1,6,52—t.f.n.

twner driven,
ondition

Minx
miles,
island

Hillman
17,500
Leaving

X-1040,
excellent
Inspecyon





— Furnished or | two

!
ee
CAR—Ford V-8 Super DeLuxe X-—754
“LAS CAMPANAS”





Fully furnished. Dial 3222.

St. Michael, 2nd House from Roebuck
st 27.7.52—1n





i. Tt

English | STREET and the land
| built of
tor couple). From August 1 | Galvanise at present
|
|

DAUPHINE ESTATE, St. Vincent. 175
acres of fertile lands partly bordered by



to Admire,
| Near Sea,



NDAY









1AT MESSUAGE AT TUDOR
n which it stands
and covered with

rented out as two



stone

27.7,.52—10n

all Modern Conveniences,
Going Undér £2,400.—Almost

r

excellent condition, owner driven. Apply

Williams » Se "| bedrooms and all modern conveniences Desirable 3 Bedroom (with Basins &
Ssure"Governmant Tari Careers | APD satine Cour”. Maasngys | Eaaboan, IS Sto, une
(Bus-stop in front) ‘ 21.7 In 27.7.52—t.f.n. | (about 7 yrs. old), Dining & Breakfast
eS ee tea op ens = core pg a hiya Garage, Servant’s
CARS-- VICTORIA — On-the-Sea, Worthing. | oom, verite oof, A-1 Condition
i tae ae gg ery dns Fully furnished. Vacant from the ist, |Back Yard enclosed with Stone, about
$2000. Austin A40, Citroen and Dodge|Aug. Dial 8150. C. N. Weekes. 12,000 sq. ft. Going for Only Under
saloons, prices from $1700 to $2300, Hill- 23.7,.52—8n | £3,100. AT MAXWELL HILL — A

















| be seen at “Archville’, Country Rd ,

man Estate car $1900. All of these cars
in excellent



23.7.52—2n.

ROOSEVELT MANOR—On the _ sea,
Beach Court, Avenue, Hastings. Three

New 3 Bedroom (Partly Stone) Bunga-
low, also a Residence to Admire, Going
aoe £1,500, BY NAVY GARDENS—A
er.

CAR-—1950 Vauxhall (12-4) Car in







New 2 Bedroom Stone Bungalow, about
1/8 Acre,



condition Phone 4316, Going Under £1,100, AT







































































RENTAL, PLATES SKU | Core & “Cory Lid Rise hy | PUL NOTICES oneness cane ™ 4 2 Beawom
FULL REPAIRED--Save, that crack; —_ - aac anes ee mate ectricity, Very
from going further: « stitch in time CAR-—Citroen light fifteen, one year Po fone ont ea om Pasa ort eae
saves nine, teeth replaced, slack pintes old, small mileage. Excelient new paint ’ NOTICE tan aimoeae oninine:. in Wea une
tightei ‘ Square eon -aboratory | job. Good as new. Twin carburettors . > Je ; cl
Bebe Risea cect” "St web. | hing hah ‘cine "pestormanae Somer |, Almela, ites othe, urine Strtn| Bil ih, ae Abre. Adeulanens
—_— ——--—_—_ | buying larger car. Apply D. Harvey |i. Barbados are requested to call at| ings sent, o POUR. TSS iA
EARN BIG Soeey by selling met Read, C/o Canadian Bank of epstss. the Atecan Coseblate dara duly 1 t0 BS. 27.7.52—1n
- supply 4 1 a Ty ere
Careaaee wees oe toe en b 8.4 "| 31, 1952 for Selective Service Registration HOUSE—(1) board and shingle house
. CAR--Dodge $uj fe Luxe (X—#e) |Under the Universal Military Training | 20 x 11 gainted throughout with Bedroom,
Will sell for cai best offer, bought Service Act. shedroof and kitchen attached, can be
WASTED smaller car. First class order, owner | ‘A!l male citizens of the United States | boiight separately. Apply Cuthbert E
driven. Dial 3359. who sve Ry = ah yg Aha Rogers, near Rices, St. Philip
, n sequen u , 1952, req 27.7.52—1n
HELP 16.7.524-£.0. | t register upon the day they attain the
a " = eighteenth anniversary of ‘the day ef} LAND—2 Spots % acre each situated
LADY. CLERK—With office experience | oT OR eee) eer od. Apply | thelr birth, or within @ve days there-| piack Rock. For information, Phone
for the Northern Filling Station. Written] Gittens, Corner James and Roebuck | *fter. Fred Carmichael, 2443 or 4502
applications must be addressed to J. D. | cSireets. Dial 4353 27.7.52—1n| , For further information, consult fhe 26.7. 52—2n
, Country Road, St. Michael > - z American Consulate, Brid, Ne
27.7.52—2n | ““TRUCK-—Chevrolet truck, no reason- | 5ados. §3—t.f.n./ LAND—4% acres situated Black Rogk
- ‘ able offer refused. res & €o . For information phone Fred Carmichael,
Old reliable Company established in’ jitq, 6—t.i.n OTICE 2443 or 4502. 26.7.52—2n.
Teiniled for many years requires the CULE &@ CO “ itintinel Gites!
services of a competent and experienced . ; “MOSS CLIFF”, St. Michael—(Near
Manager for Branch Office to be ELECTRICAL Ane ea alia Bridgetown, Paradise Beach Club) a newly reno-
established in Barbados end September | —————— ri B.W 4 * | vated 3 bedroomed house with garage,
1952. Please send full details and] 1 Blectric Oscillating Fan — Price bes er } Our friends and | S¢rvant’s quarters and all modern con-
Salary required with small Passport} 45.00. 1 Electric Oscillating Orbit Fan |Gustomers that our Spare Parts Depart- | Vemlences — standing on neatly 3 acres
picture to Advocate Box G.T. ¢/0/ 340.00. 1 Electronic Strobe Light, For of land irrigated for kitchen garden.
ment will be closed for our Annual
Advocate Co. 19.7.62—10n. | Pirticulars: Phone 4620. 27.7,52—-30 | Stock-taking from July 29th to Sist. Inspection any day. Telephone os
—— —— ———S— Cr ror 24.7.52—3n. 26.7.52—2n
NEOUS MIX MASTER—Pratically new. Gan be . -
MISCELLA seen at the Courtesy Ferage omce: NOTICE AUCTION
7.9—1n
TO RENT |
HOUSE,—From ist September. Com- MASO eataaee | Wednesday 30th July at 1 p.m. at 6th
fortable House 3 bed and Usual rooms. LIVESTOCK Applications are invited for one | Avenue, Peterkins Land, Boarded and
Fur (without crockery and linen). | — puamestiieinaalagies — | Albion” Lodge (Foundation) Scholar- | Shingled House 16 x 9 x 8, kitchen,
Garden space. Sea Coast preferred but} GOATS,—Two Goats fresh in milk.| ship tenable at Combermere School, as | Closet and palings. Land can be rented
elsewhere considered within 5 miles Hast-| Apply Harold Weatherhead, Fontebelle. | from the term commencing September |*)\“! ner month. Terme CASH on fall
stati fail particu able oe ent ey 2. tin. | 1952 i of hammer. R. Archer McKenzie
stati ull particuiats | a = a ee 7pm Each lication must be for the child | 27.7.52—3n
Box "XX, C/o Advocate jyortieee JENNY DONKEY—Not 2 years oid. | or emt palative of a Freemason in| ~— $$$
Dept: .7,52—3n Apply Mrs. a Ginpase, Folkestone. | straitened circumstances. | To be on manos on eee
at ames. leph » 0117. sse next 3lst July at x Dairy ‘arm,
WANTED: Friends and general public “cha ving oo 1.52—1n 9 tee cateate “ ag cape ed | Hothersal Turning: 21 heads ot Dairy
to ow of my new economic andp ooo 69, will be received up to July 30th. Cows and one pedegree Holstein Bull.
convenient Taxi Service at Holborn PUPS—-4 Bull-Terrier pups no reason- ” . R. D. MURPHY 26.7.52-—2n .
aoe driver cars tor periods of dave | 2° offer refused. Apply Cuthbert E ; 28.7. 89—2n
ew self- nan" 3 ) ser » .
Weeks, Or months at tates uncompared | *°#ers. Near Hices, St, aiaae 7.50—1n F UNDER THE DIAMOND
Chauffer driven cars at the rate o! NOTI HAMMER
4c. per mile. Give me your business and PUPPIES —Pedl : olen PARISH OF CHRIST CHURCH By instruction’ recetseds from: ates.
be satislied, Tel. 3723 ; rue: Seneea? ') “Applications for the post of Inspector |» Y YyStructions received tron
27.7.52—1 Apply: Alston Landscape, St. OMas. | oF Pp il bi ived by the Church I will sell at her house
Bt. 7. See $7.7.88—In, | OF Foor e regety y the Church= | “Ebenezer”, Bank Hall Road, on Wednes-



OFFICE,—Small Office with Telephone



Required to Rent. City centre, Details to

Box A.Q,, Advocate Advertising Dept.
25.7,.52—3n.

$62.50 POCKET MONEY easily earner
by eens 25 new guvetnes te
REDIFFUSIO one month,

; n 1.7.52—6n

REDIF FUSION offers $1.50 cash fo

each new Subscriber recommended b

you. 1,7,.82—6n
SUPPLEMENT YOUR COME >»
recommending REDIFFUSION. _Obtair

full particulars from the REDIFFUSIO?
office 1.7,52—6n

TWENTY- DOLLARS extra Bonu
from Rediffusion for 28 recommenda
tions in one calendar month

1.7 52—6r



ee

Public Official Sale

(Phe Provost Marshals Act Lo0t
(1904-6) & 30)
On Tuesday, the 12th day

1982, at the hour of 2 o'clock in th

of August

afternoon will be sold at my office

the highest bidder for any sum ne
under the appraised value:

All that certain piece of Land cor

taining by admeasurement 10.0674» Squar
Feet situate at Station Hill in the Paris
of Saint Michael, butting and boundin
on lands now or late of S.° Peer, ¢
lands now or late of Thomas Cobhan
on lands of one Moore, or lands now ¢
late of one J. F. Bellamy, on lands nov
or late of Elizabeth Moore, on land
formerly of Clarence Lowe, but now
R. L. Hutson and on the Public Rea
knowf as Station Hill or however els
the same may abutt and bound togethe
with the dwellinghouse and = appur
tenances thereto &c., appraised a
follows:—~ : 5

The whole property appraised to sI>
THOUSAND DOLLARS (96,000.00)

Attached from R, L. Hutson for an
towards satisfaction, &c

N.B.—25% Deposit to be paid on da
of purchase.

ote HEADLEY.
Provost Marshal.
Provost Marshal's Office
24th July, 1952 , ‘
27.7


















Under the Auspices
of

THE BARBADOS WORKERS’
UNION

and the

BARBADOS iABOUR
PARTY

in honour of

MR. N. W. MANLEY

QC., MER.

Labour Leader,
Jamaica
on

Sunday, 27th July 1952
; At 830 p.m.

At
QUEEN’S, PARK



Guest Speaker - - -
Mr. N. W. MANLEY,

Other Speakers - - -
Mr. G. H. ADAMS,
C.M.G., M.C.P.

Hon. T. A. MARRY-
SHOW, M.E.C.,
Grenada.





warden Mrs. H. A. Talma, Welehes Christ
Church, up to 3 p.m. on Thursday, July
Bist 1952.

day next 80th July beginning at 12
o'clock her entire lot of household furni-
ture which includes:— (1) Piano by

MECHANICAL





ce Terms of Appointment obtainable from PP.

CHILD'S TRICYCLE Full sizer Excel. |the Patorhial Treasurer. 19.7.62—4n | Hecustein, Morris chairs, rockers, sitting
ent model, Little used. Phone Bellamy. and records, tip top table and 4 chairs,
1968) 27.7.52—31: ' tea trolley, waggon, Larder, Mahog.
CYCLESLimited Mier of” Gent NOTICE cabinet, Apex refrigerator, _ scales,
eles $60,00 each, K. J. Hamel-Smith & PARISH OF ST. JON screen, clock, Mahog. bedstead with
%.. Lta ‘Bridge Street. Applications in writing and in person| *pring and mattress, presses, book

Oo

ny kind of filing record
mn and

lial 5136. . .
Lower Broad Street.



picughs.

Phone










Q.Cc.,.M.H.R. «4
|

All this equipment in stock, Phone 4316,









shelves, mirrors, electric stove and oven,
oil stove and oven, kitchen tables,
vacuum cleaner, (1) goat (8 pts. when
fresh) glass ware, kitchen utensils and
other items of interest. TERMS CASH.
D'Arcy A. Scott, Auctioneer.

for the post of a Special @Nurse tor the
Almshouse, St. John, will be received
E. B. Carter, P.M.O. up to the
st, 1952. Applicants must be
id-Wives and not more than
20 years of age. Appointments for inter-
views may made by telephoning
95—225; recommendations if any, should
be produced. The salary to be $60.00)
per month, inclusive of C. of L.B

and ration allowance of $21.60 if not
in residence at the Almshouse. The
successful applicant to assume duties on
the 25th August, 1952.

By order of the
BOARD OF POOR LAW GUARD2ANS
FE St. John.








23.7,.52—6n

FILING SYSTEMS—Complete range
shannon filing and card systems: for
‘ome, office, or business. Supplies for
keeping. Come
your requirements or
Hunte & Co., Ltd

22.7,52—6n.

INTERNATIONAL Harvester Equip-
nent—Subsoil ploughs complete with
tandards. Little Genius %-Furrow

Green crop hay loaders with
tyres. Lister wings for ditching.

26.7.52—4n

UNDER THE SILVER
HAMMER

On Tuesday 29th by order
Executors to the Estate of Mrs.
Knowles we will
“The Midget", Palm
which includes.

Round Tip Top Dining Table, Upright

discuss





of the
Rosie
sell the Furniture at

ubber Beach, Hastings,

OLE & CO. LTD. 26.7.52-—3n























Signed, R. S. FRASER, Clerk. | Chairs, Book Case with Escritoire and

SEWING MACHINE—One (1) Treadle 26.7.52—3n | Glass {Doors; Lovely, Cheffonier inlaid
Sewing Machine with embroidery parts} ~ Wancig Wouline: Wrath ae eee rea
thio Rite’ Upper Git Ra ae PERSONAL Mant and Cord cables) ail’ tn old. Mae
Rio Rita MB CE ie I. wid hogany: M.T. Tables, Folding Card
: Tables; Settee and. Upho!s, Rocker, in

The public are hereby warned against | Oak s & China, Dinner and Tea

POULTRY giving credit to my wife, Winifred Cot-| Services, Very Handsome Military Chest

tle (nee Watson) as I do not hold myself|of Drawers with Brass Fittings, Single

PIGEONS—A few pairs Black Caru®]tesponsible for her or anyone else con-| Pine Bedstead with Vono Springs and
ux Silver @& White Kings, P. D. | tracting any debt or debts in my name|/pDeep Sleep Mattresses, Mahog. and

Cedar Presses, Chest of Drawers, Large

Maynard, Porters, St. James. Dial 0119 | unless by a written order signed by me
Rees i 26.7.52—6n. Sed. RUFU











iS COTTLE, Three Wing Mahog. Press. Sewing

aes ee Machine, Mirrors, Linen, Ping Bong Set.

’ t ndrew . Books, Electric Fan; Larders, 2 Burner

MISCELLANEOUS 26,7.52—2n. | Klee. Hot Plate, G.E.C. Refrigerator.

ANTIQUES of Acai Gian 2 Burner Oil Stoves and Oven; Pavetern

of every description, 88, Utensils and Tables, Scales, Anthurium

‘hina, old Jewels, fine Silver Water- Lost & FOUND and Amaysilis, Lillies and numerous

siours. Early books, Maps Autographs " other items of value. This Furniture is

te., at Gorringes Antique Shop adjoining both Antique and Modern, Sale 11.30
toyal Yacht Club. 3.2. tin, o’elock. Terms CASH.

eae eeeS LOST BRANKER TROTMAN & CO.

CUSHIONS,—-With Imported Spring-
*iNed Units,—finished in Domestic, ready
or Tapestry Cover at $8.00 each, Will be
old in lots of not less than 4. Apply:-—





Auctioneers
PIN—Platinum_ bar Pin with safety
catch, with one Pear! in the centre, held

24.7.52—2n











the Standard Agency (B’dos) Co, 14) in. place with smail diamonds. ndly

swan Street, Dial 3620, 26.7,62—In, | return to Advocate and me gene ., UNDER THE SILVER
CHEMICAL EXTRACT—Here’s some- | —————— HAMMER

thing for Race Horse Owners -- | _ SWEEPSTAKE TICKET—Series O 8110

CHEMICAL EXTRACT — an antiseptie | Pinder lease return same to Gordon On THURSDAY, Sist by order of Mr
embrocution for Sprains, Stiff Joints, | Shepherd, Prince of Wales Ra., Bank! pred Bennett we will sell his Furniture
Swellings, Sore Shoulders, Muscular | Hall 27.7.52—1n | 6 No, 1 Bungalow, B’dos Distilleries,
trains ete, etc. Price 5/- bt. KNIGHT'S | — Ti ese aaa Black Rock, which includes



Sideboard, Upright Chairs, Morris Chairs,
Ornament Tables, Waggon all in Mahog-

a Pine Dini Table, Sette and 2
MISCELLANEOUS 1 “naires in Rubee Rockers and Chairs;

Congoleum, Glass and China, good Clock;



FORKS—Agricultural Forks made oft
he Best Steel and the right pattern abt
The Auto Tyre Co , opposite

5 20



he Cathedral, Spry Street, “THYMOL EMULSION” is highly re- | Painted Double Bedstead Vono Spring
27.4.52~6N | commended for expelling Red and other | nd Mattress; Dressing Tubles,. Canwne
et orms from Horses and Foals, Price Single Mahog, Bedstead ono

sand Mattress; Chest of Drawers;
Washing. Machine; L.B.C, Re-
rigerator, Kitehen Utensils and Tables;
Burner Valor Oil Stove and Oven;
Plymouth Rock and other Powls; Rabbits
ind pens; Bicycle, Garden Tools, also a
5-Burner Perfection Oil Stove with built
in Oven and other items.

Sale 11.30 o'clock

$e . " Ww.
GAS RANGE-—One table model Gas —_ HT'S

with three jets and one Grill $76 OF eee gn
2308, 27.7.52—1n |

WEDDING GIFT—A few troning board
and No-cord iron sets, subject to special
gift allowance. Barnes &

Ce., Ltd.

Obtajnable at

Range










TERNATIONAL TORNADO K.39.
275.00 nearest Owner leaving Island. A
nquiries, Yacht Club. 27 .7.52—1n. 3.7.52—t.f.n.

ance
IF you want a good absorbent dressing | yAWL “FRAPEDA”. Excellent con-



















SKuretra, “mwae Sy Sty Sone | RR ST Bittle | DRANK ER, ett an
Hewitt Lid. Price 5/- box. Byers 20. bi 20.7.52—6n. | a 27.7. 52—2n
ke OE AE Ahi acaba 2 | SSE
Be fone) pet ae ake LN Plants. Nurse, ee tot & 5. William Skeete, Wesiey | 5
r3.ap-n. fe Maa ee NOTICE

RECORDS Clearing all stocks of 78

R.P M. Records at 3 for $1.50 at Da { "
Costa & Co., Ltd. Electrical Departinetis. IMPORTANT NOTICE CAPTAIN, OWNERS OR AGENTS,
“SILK POPLIN _V Eh ahi quality a, Please note that the gas supply $} pene Me axe re

zrey and blue 36 inches wide at 72 cents will be cut off from 1.30 p.m. to debt or debts contracted by any



















ard at Kirpalani, 27.7,52—In, about 3.00 p.m. each day, ex- member of the crew of this vessel
cept on Saturday and Sunday, be- while in port
SUBSCRIBE now to the Daily tween Rockley and Top Rock :
Telegraph, England's leading Daily News- @:eas, commencing on Monday R. M. JONES & COMPANY,
paper now arriving in Barbados by Alr 28th July. LIMITED
only a few days after publication ry } Agents
London, Contact Ian Gale, C/o. Adyo-|@ THE BARBADOS GAS COMPANY, M.V. GLORIA MARIA
‘te Co. Ltd, Local » Representative , 46.7, 52—6n
Tel, 3118, 17.4.52—t.i.n =
£ ,| LPRSSTSPOS POO OO PIII OOO,
EXAMINATION NOTICE MODERN HIGH SCHOOL = & x Ss
eroal THE ENTRANCE exaAM- 3 A MI. WEBB 3}
Next LP.S. Shorthand INATION % x ; rt 2
Exam. takes place on Satur- for School Year 1963, com- 3% Stockbroker. $
day, August 2nd, 1952, at mencing September 1952 ¥ ° eillaietcuiie x
Combermere at 11 a.m. will be held on Wednesday, % % BARBADOS INVEST- %
Next Typewriting Exam. 30th July, commencing at $$ ‘MERTS IN BONDS x
takes place on Saturday, 9 am. f XR "AND SHARES : %
August 30th, 1952, at Com- The entrance and exam- $ PN eae . %
ermere. ination fee of $2 payable on ¥)$ BR a y .
' : is office is cl f
A Cc. B. ROCK, the morning of the examin- % % ue a . , ath he r pace tg x
Sole LP.S. (Pitmans) ation is returnable if the x q ea Sat x
Representative, @ pupil does not gain admis- R)g 7S “e" : xz
Oistin Hill, Ch. Ch. % sion. X|X 33, Broad Street, Bridge- ¥
c § o1¢ s
22.7.52—2n, } % L. A. LYNCH. : s town.
Ng OOOO S SOO OOO CS SE g SSODSSSS SOS FOSS SOSSIOSD









r

to the School
15th 1952 at 9.15 a.m.

ADVOCATE
PURLIC SALES |

REAL ESTATE

1. ADAMS, Karnetto Cecilia

2. AIMEY, Dorian Yvonne

3. ALLEYNE, Celestia Oriandine

4 ALLEYNE, Selma Leotta

5. AUSTIN, Mary Adele

6. BAYLEY, Marva Oreitha

7. BELLE, Alpha Veronica

8. BENTHAM, Marva Elaine

9. BEST, Ruby Eunice

10. BIBBY, Patricia Elaine

11. BLACKMAN, Dorothy Maureen
BANE, Noreen Elmira

13, BUTCHER, Ina Elrita
CALLENDER, Edlin Valda

15. CALLENDER, Ruth Eileen

6. CORBIN, Cicely Veronica’

1. COX, Myrtle Yolande

18. CRAIGG, Peggy Annette

CRICK, Marva June

DOTTIN, Monica Verina

ELCOCK, Lorna Avashni

FORDE, Brenda Jayce

GARNES, Monica

GOODING, Marjorie Hazel

GRIFFITH, Pamela Ethel

HOLDER, Dawn La Payette

HOWARD, Claudine Sylvester

HOYTE, Patricia Bureta

HURLEY, Mersada Alita

LASHLEY, Noreen Hyacinth

. LORDE, Florence Victoria

MOSELEY, Maurva Oneta

REED, Norma Eileen

SANDIFORD, Joan Patricia

SKEETE, Gwendene Erneathea

SMALL, Verna Ariene

SPRINGER, Aileen Alinda

EDUCATIO!
St. Michael's Girls’ School |

Rewlis of the Entrance Examination for
the Year September 195%— July 1953 .





An |

sense, ha

have.

or ever



FOR



Ticket No, 7.

PCPIF AOE

Ré-opens Tues
2nd, 1952. Near 1
Rd., St. Michael,
dren to this
where we shall

tion and the Lon
Commerce

One scholarship
to your children.

Apply

snasesiinliinenapeetiieapiiee nanan stile SA TAT

any

p.m

TALKING
j No Englishman has any common
will
Bernard Shaw.



Tuesday,
Saturday between



POINT

d, or ever



SALE

Held at St. Michael's Girls’ Scheol on
June 6th, 7th and 9th. 1952 CAR-—One Hiliman Minx Car.
The following is the complete list of Latest model in perfect condition.
New Girls to be admitted to St. Mich- Frice reasonable Apply Cecil
ael'’s Girls’ School on Menday, Septem Jernmmott, 48, Tudor Street. Phone
ber Ith, 1982. 4563. 27.7.52—In

CLIFTON CHARLES

Ditinnchiecedoe:

LPL OES

27.7.52.—1n,

REGENT HIGH SCHOOL

day September
st Avenue, Pine
send your chil-

secondary school,

tutor them, for

the General Certificate of Educa-

don Chamber of

examinations.

is now available

Thursday,
10 a.m. and 2

THE PRINCIPAL.

27.7.52—1n

SSStStt See GSS SE SAERBNABERRESS

TUART, Cyrilene

FHOMPSON, Yvonne Jeanette
THORNE, Anita Felicia
TROTMAN, Monica Eusiyn
WALKER, Monica Caroline
WARNER, Deanna Winifred

. WATERMAN, Laureen Clotilda
WHARTON, Dolores Marietta
WILTSHIRE, Opal Patricia

. WORRELL, Harriet Patricia

P.s. The. Headmistress invites the
ayents/guardians of the above named
irls to accompany their daughter/wards
on Monday, September

27.7.52-—2n









What you need are the life-

to the full! You'll feel
ver, healthier witb . .

Silt

‘ei





GENERAL TONI



FOR SALE :
PIANO x
One German Piano.
‘Rich in Tone Quality.
Sturdy in construction. ¥
Beautiful in appearance. .
Attractively Priced. %
*CECIL JEMMOTT

:
48 Tudor St. ‘Phone 4563
27.7.52.—1n.
+



LEARN TO EARN
Thousands of L.S.C. Students

throughout the British Empire
have increased their salaries
through studying our eagy postal
courses in BOOK-KEEPING,

LAW, ECONOMICS, ete. Reduced
fees to overseas students Diplo-
mas awarded. Prospectus free.—
LONDON SCHOOL OF
COMMERCE

(Dept B.A.5) 116, High Holborn

London, W.C.I, England.





REX DAIRY FARM

HOTHERSAL TURNING
St. Michael

THURSDAY NEXT

Sist JULY
at 2 p.m.

We are instructed by Mr. L. C,
Hill to sell by Auction his herd
of twenty one Dainy Cows, one
pure bred Holstein Bull, Quantity
of Everite Sheeting and Mise,
Dairy Equipment.

Stock may be inspected day
prior to and morning of sale.

Cash on Fall of Hammer.

e
AUCTIONEERS

Joan 4. Biadon
& ce.

Phone 4640
Plantations Building.

MIRROR

giving vitamins and minerals
of YEAST-PHOS. Enjoy life
|

SEC-
RETARYSHIP, BUSINESS Of-
GANIZATION, | COMMERCIAL





1] west and a nice patio to the east.
Standing on approximately i%
acre of land

BLUE VISTA o
At Rockley New Road. Modern
three room bungalow with com-
bination living and dining room.
Lovely open gallery offering mag-
nificent view of Golf Course and
coast line. All built in cupboards
Garage and servants’ room down-
stairs. Going Cheap
WYNDOVER
At Mile and a Quarter, st
Peter. Another lovely heuse. 3
}

REALTORS LIMITED
OFFERS

BUNGALOW

At Rockley New Road: On ap-
proximately 1,900 square feet of
land. Magnificent view of Golf
Course,

Three bedrooms drawing
and dining room, kitchen. Down-
st 8: Garage, servant room with
bath and toilet and enough room



for laundry or workshop.
BUNGALOW

At Rockley New Road. Three
bedrooms, drawing and dining
room, modern kitchen, toilet and
bath. All built in cupboards,
Very close to Golf Course. The
last available spot at this very
popular residential area. Immedi-

ate possession
WYNDAL
At Rockley Partly stone and
lath and plaster comprising three
bedrooms, dining and living room,
toilet and bath, and a large gal-
lery The outbuildings comprise
Servants’ room and garage. Stand-
ing on approximately 10,000
square feet of land. This house
is very close to the famous Rock-
ley Beach,
BUNGALOW

At Graeme Hall Terrace. Very
attractively designed. Comprising
three bedrooms with toilets and
baths attached, dining and living
rooms, kitche: verandah to the



Bedrooms, dining
room, modern
hot and

room, living
toilets and baths,
cold water, Large ver-
andahs. Outstanding view to sea.
Extensive outbuildings
big garage, 2
laundry,
orchard

including
servants’

workshop.
with specially selected
fruit trees, The property has
been well. cared and is in excei-
lent condition. Immediate pogsses-
sion Very low price

COVE SPRING COTTAGE
Situate on the lovely St. James
Coast on 2 Roods 27 Perches of
land, having
bathing
three bedrooms,
ing and = dining
galleries on
Private bath
bedroom,
European
cold wat
kitchen,
ment

{rooms,
Extensive

its own private
Comprised of
separate draw-
rooms,
sides.

beach

open
Study.
and toilet to main
Seneral toilet and
yle bath with hot and
Modern
inspection by
only,

two





up-to-date
appoint-

BUNGALOW
At Codrington Hill. Good sized
two bedroom bungalow with small
Spare room, dining and drawing

rooms and closed gallery. Govern-
ment
stalled,

water, electric light in-

SYBSTAN

y Gardens. Three bed-
toilets and baths, com-
munal dining and living room,
pantry, kitchen and store room,
2 ‘servants rooms in yard with
toilet and bath Laundry room
end garage, This is a lovely
house offered at a competitive
price

At N

rooms,







CHURCHILL
At Maxwell's Coast Road. Three

bedrooms with running water
combination drawing and dining
room, modern kitchen, toilet and
bath. Good residential area. Ex-
cellent sea bathing. A sound in-
vestment at the very low reserve
price.

WYNDAL

At Rockley. Partly stone and

lath and plaster comprising three
bedrooms, dining and livigg room,
toilet and bath, and a large gal-
lery. The outbuildings comprise
servants’ room and garage. Stand-
ing on approximately 10,000
square feet of land. This house
is very close to the famous
Rockley Beach

BUNGALOW
Hall Terrace
attractively designed. Comprising
thyee bedrooms with toilets and
baths attached, dining and

At Grae



Very



rooms, kitchen, verandah to the
west and a nice patio to the east.
Standing on approximately “% acre
of land

ee ee

REALTORS Limited

REAL: ESTATE AGENTS
AUCTIONEERS
VALUERS

151/152 Roebuck Siceet,
Phone 4900



GLASS

Straight and Bevelled Edged

In an assortment of sizes, is now obtainable’ at

THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM

SSOOSSOSSSSSSSE666S85

Corner Broad and Tudor Sts.

SSSSSESSSE46SSSS8S8S66S56

J.D.7T. SPECIAL RUM
THE RUS4

(With the distinctive flavour)

Is

A MUST AT EVERY PARTY

TRY THIS UNIQUE BLEND.



Blended & Bottled by

Dial 4335



——o3Q i





- Taylor & Sons.





Ltd.

Roebuck Street.





=,



PLLA PO EEF
The Bicycle Raffled in

Aid of FIELD JEWELRY
STORE has been won by



‘SHIPPING NOTICES

SUNDAY, JULY 27, 1952

ROYAL NETHERLANDS



LADY

CANAD
LADY
CAN.

CANAR ceaUmNoms BBE

NORTHBOUND



STEAMSHIP CO.

SAILING FROM EUROPE
M.S. NESTOR 25th July 1952
S.S. BOSKOOP Ist A 1952
M.S. BON. 8th
M.S. STENTOR 22nd
SAILING TO
WILLEMSTAD

The M.V. MONEKA will accept
Cargo and Passengers for Domin-
ica, Antigua, St. Kitts, Nevis and
Montserrat Sailing on the 26th
July 1952.

The M.V. CARIBBEE will Ac-

t Ca gers
AND BRITISH GUIANA Tminics” Antigua, St ists,
a Skea sa tee Pie Nevis and Montserrat. Sailing date
MS. STENTOR 5th 1952 yh ee
SAILING TO AND





B. NERS’
BOSKOOP 8th August 1982 SOCIATION (INO)
SAILIN' D Comniganey

Tele. —t 0 t=

G TO TRINIDA
SCHIE 28th July 1962.



Canadian National Steamships



SOUTHBOUND

Ri





E

Arrives
Barbados 'b:
7 Aug.

15 Aug.
28 Aug.
5Sept. 1
15 Sept. 1
30 Sept.
6 Oct
19 Oct. 2€

>> p>
eee

For further particulars, apply to—





* Barbados Anateui Boxing Assn. 3



GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD.—Agents.







Under the patronage of
CANADA DRY :

' Invite
Entries for the 1952 CHAMPIONSHIPS
to be held at

THE MODERN HIGH SCHOOL STADIUM

during the month of August at a date to be announced later
Champic 1s will be contested in the fo divisions;
it under 112 lbs.



Bantamweight a ee
Tigntwn :: ae
Welterweight Seas, aS Sas :
Middleweight ses ee RN
Light Heavyweight—- , 175 ,

— over 175

for Entry Forms any afternoon 4—5 p.m.





UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF THE WEST INDIES

EXTRA-MURAL DEPARTMENT
A LECTURE
sigs CUB ks
RECENT WEST INDIAN NOVELS
aay ax

PROFESSOR A. K. CROSTON

IN THE
HARRISON COLLEGE LIBRARY
me ON oe
FRIDAY, AUGUST 1ST
AT 8.00 P.M.

APMISSION Ses per

MODERN HIGH SCHOOL
Calling all PARENTS!

We would draw to your attention the following points:—



fa) Former pupils of this school are to be found in the Civil Service.
The elementary Teaching Service, Teaching at Secondary Schools,
The State Nursing Service, Messrs Cable & Wireless, The local Con-
stabulary, local Business Houses. C.P.I.M, (Curacao); New York
University, Student nurses at English hospitals and other places of
employment too many to enumerate.

EVERY ONE of our many certificated alumni is employed:—

You cannot fail to have noticed our academic results annually

you know that for four consecutive years we have been Cham-
pion Boys’ School at Athletics in the annual B.A.A.A. Championships;
unbeaten at Basketball for the 1951 season in our Division; runner-up
for two consecutive years at local Table-Tennis Championships?

At this school your child can take any examination for which
he,she is capable including the Barbados Scholarship as we have
been declared eligible to take its examinations by the Oxford &
Cambridge Examination Board.

We educate more pupils free annually than does the Govern-
ment in any of its schools. This is done parthy through the generosity
of the Commissioner free who permits us to run an annual prize«
drawing for this spec purpose, This is the only form of Assistance
these underprivileged children receive.

Call, telephone 2846 or send for waiting-list form for school year
1953 commencing September 1952. On the result of the entrance
examination we will award six or more free scholarships; lunch, bus-
fare, and uniforms given in proven necessitous cases; at end of school
career we guarantee ethployment to any scholarship pupil completing
the course.

(b)
{e)

(d)

te)

(f)

L. A. LYNCH, Principal.

— REAL ESTATE
LAND
RENTALS

â„¢

RESIDENCES
INVESTMENTS



“This one is John M. Bladon’s listing looks as though it might
suit us. We had better call and have a chat with him as I know
from his reputation he will give us all the help he can and in any
case he usually has for sale everything worth having.”

e

JOHN M. BLADON & CO.

A.F.S., F.V.A.

Phone 4640. Plantations Building.





SSSSSOS + SOCSSSIOGSOSSSS





Intending Competitols are asked to call at Modern High School




Mis.

SUNDAY, JULY 27, 1952

Research In The Caribbean



@ From Page 9
the Caribbean has been very
fortunate within this century to
have welco:nea within its fron-
tiers several highly specialised
organisations-

In Trinidad there is the
Imperial College of Tropical
Agriculture, the Colonial Micro-
biological Ressarth Institute, the
Caribbean Medical Centre, the
Commonwealth Bureau of Bio-
legical Control, Dr. William
Beebe’s naturalist research sta-
tion at Arima, and, of course,
the experimental laboratories ot
Trinidad’s industrial south.

In other parts of the Carib-
bcan, British and _ otherwise,
Twentieth Century, gevegeen has
been equally servéd by such
institutions as the Station des
Recherches Agronomiques des
Antilles et de la Guyane. Fran-
caise, the Institut des Fruits et
Agfumes Coloniaux Station
Regionale des Cultures Fruitieres
des Antilles, the Service Mete-
orologique du Groupe Antilles-
Guyane Francaises, the Pasteur
Institute (all of which operate in
the three French Departments):
the Netherlands Natural Science
Study Group; the Agricultural
Experiment Station of the Uni-
versity of Puerto Rico, a very
elaborate organisation; the U.S.
Rockefeller Foundaticn, the
School of Tropical Medicine,
Puerto Rico; the British West
Indies Sugar Producers’ Associa-
tion and its local member
asSociations; the B.W.I, Centra?
Sugar Cane Breeding Station,
Barbados; the Central Cotton
Station, Empire Cotton Growing
Corporation, Antigua; the Uni-
versity College of the West
Indies, Jamaica; the Institute of
Jamaica; and the Colonial Devel-
opment and Welfare Organisa-
‘tion,

The stress, it would seem from
these names, is still on agricul-
tural research, Rightly so, for
agriculture is the main economic
basis for most of the archipelago,
for some of us, our very
existence.

Crops are always menaced by

new Giseascs, and it is unneces-
sary to remind a West Indian
reading public of the threat of
the Mosaic disease to sugar, of
Panama disease to bananas,
Witches’ Broom to cacao, the
“unknown” disease of coconuts,
or scale on citrus.
* To mention the work being
done on but one of these crops,
the Yearbook of Caribbean
Research lists no fewer than 16
separate projects aiméd at im-
proving the citrus industry.

Not only dre these investiga-
tions trying to conquer disease,
scab, scale, and insects, but
things like rootstock trials, the
control of pre-harvest drop, the
propagation of new and better
species, improvement of bud-
ding methods, determination of
varieties suitable to particular
conditions, citrus manurial trials,
and the control of tree ants, all
of winich will yield results in
terfis of money to the citrus
growers, are being carefully
studied,

These projects are taking place
in Jamaica, Puerto Rico, Sur-
inam, Trinidad and other citrus
territories, and the. scientific
liaison made sible by such a
survey as the Yearbook will un-
doubtedly mean the pooling and
collating of ideas, findings and
solutions, to the betterment of
the Caribbean as a whole.

The same sort of thing goes
for other fields of research
activity. I)r. Wharton, of British
Guiana; Lr. Mackay of Chaca-
ehbacare, Trinidad; and Dr.
Montestruc of Martinique, have
all done leprosy research, the
results of which are available to
all leprosaria; Dr. i work-
ing for the British juna Sugar
Producers Central Medical
Laboratory, has made George-
town safe from malaria, and his
methods are there for others to
examine; the Pasteur Institute
has done considerable work in
the French islands and Cayenne
on tuberculosis, typhoid, rickett-
sial diseases, filaria and other
illnesses,

The real value of a research







exams, Distance is no disadvantage.

crmiaaton) free rom
WOLSEY HALL,

” ”

No. 9 High St.



1





—



HOME-STUDY COURSES FOR

GENERAL CERTIFICATE of EDUCATION
CAMBRIDGE SCHOOL & HIGHER SCH. CERT.

tions; Ee he Cankce laser” Beareees A.

se enim, rom

PITMAN’S SHORTHAND INSTRUCTORS
ii KEY TO SHORTHAND

: Also :
THE TEACH YOURSELF BOOK SERIES

ROBERTS & CO.,

Your Stationers,

PAINT
REMOVER

4 pt Tins — 83 ¢
1 pt Tins — $1.55

Now obtainable from

cenerAL FARDW ARE corecirs

{| RICKETT STREET (Opposite Post Office)



programme is often intangible
and more often invaluable. Its
“true impaet in the improvement
of agriculture, or health, or
education, li¢s in the transfer-
ence of its findings to the country
in general,

Unfortunately, the time lags
between investigation and im-
plementation is often such that
the latfer comes as a matter of
course, its or