Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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Full Text


Par badr0os

—————

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Ed

ESTABLISHED 1895

»





MILITARY TAKE

CABINET TOLD

CAIRO, July 23.
_ THE ARMY seized control of Cairo Wednesday, accord-
ing to unofficial reports, and ordered the Cabinet to obey
orders or get out. Unofficial sources said the army was in
control of the country including Alexandria, summer capi-
tal where Farouk and his Cabinet are staying.

Mohammed Naguib Bey, commanding the Cairo gar-
rison, seized control of Cairo and apparently of Alexandria
at 4 a.m.

Most reliable semi-official sources said Naguib Bey
issued an ultimatum to the Cabinet demanding that the
Cabinet carry out Army orders and strictly abide by the
constitution or the Army would dismiss it.

He also demanded that martial law be lifted and nor-
mal parliamentary life be restored and that Aly Maher
Pasha be asked to lead the new Cabinet.

Egypt awoke Wednesday to find that the army had

moved into politics seizing power in a well organized and }

seemingly bloodless coup.
In Farouk’s “Black Books”
Mastermind of the action General Naguib Mohammed
has been long in the black books of King Farouk. At 4 a.m.
he sent tanks to take up positions in the public squares of
Cairo and other main cities machine gun posts were set up|
at street corners and steel helmeted troops occupied broad-
casting stations and key public buildings. Air passengers
arriving at Beirut reported there had been some clashes
between Naguib’s men and troops loyal to Farouk. In a
broadcast, Naguib told the country that the army has no |
designs of its own but will work in the interests of Egypt.
He said that the army and the police will be respon-
sible for law and order. He demanded a shake up in the
army high command and a purge in the political life of the
country which has had five Governments in as many
months.

Emergency Meeting
The latest of these headed by Hilaly Pasha was sum-
moned to an emergency Cabinet meeting Wednesday in
the summer capital of Alexandria 130 miles from Cairo.

| Bree DRT cree Sav

The vessel is equipped with a
object.





British Lives -



It was understood that Farouk was in residence there.

‘Naguib, a bitter critic of corruption in high places,
held office as War Minister in the short lived regime of
Sirry Pasha which preceded that of Hilaly Farouk, is
known to have opposed his appointment.

In Egypt Are
Not. In Danger



Egyptian officers participating in the seizure of power
in Cairo, Wednesday asked the American embassy there
to inform Britain that they would meet any British inter-
vention in the dispute with force, the State Department
revealed.

Early Report

American Ambassador Jefferson Caffery in an early
report to the department on the seizure of power said he |
had first heard of the reports of action at 2.45 a.m. Cairo |
time. He added that the reports were confirmed less than |
two hours later when one of the Egyptian officers contacted
the embassy’s assistant air attache.

A first hand report on the action communicated to the |
Embassy asked that the British be informed that officers |
of the “underground” said the action was solely to oust |
top Egyptian military commanders and that any British
intervention from the Suez Canal would be met by a de- |
termined and efficient underground force.

Underground leaders said they had interned top mili-
tary commanders in Egypt including Haidar Pasha Com-
mander-in-Chief, General Farid Army Chief of Staff, and
General Sharrawi Director General of the Royal Egyptian
Air Force, the department said.

The Embassy was informed that the police would eo-op-
erate and that leaders of the action are in control in Cairo. |
Reason .given by participants in the action was said by
them to be the disgust of a line of officers mostly of the
rank of Lieutenant Colonel with alleged incompetence and
reporting of top Egyptian military commanders dating
back to the Arab war with Palestine.—C.P. & U.P.

Peasants’ Loan Bank _—
Will Help Peasant
Holdings Up To 25 Acres—

THE RECOMMENDAT_ON that peasant holdings up|
to 25 acres should be eligible for assistance from the |
Peasants’ Loan Bank will have the effect of bringing ;
within the scope of the Peasants’ Loan Bank “the ideal |



size holding which could best profit from irrigation facili- |

ties.’ Mr. D. A. M. Haynes, Manager of the Peasants’

Loan Bank, said yesterday. In the past only holdings up

to 10 acres were eligible.

Mr. Haynes was pemeng with .
the Advocate some of the advan-
tages to be under the

gained ee
scheme for extending the facili-! ist
ties of the Bank to peasant hold-; |





if

| at < cottages, and sprayed bullets

LONDON, July 23. |
Prime Minister Winston Chur- |
‘hill made the following state-|
ments on Wednesday on Egypt in
the House of Commons in response
io a question by the opposition
leader Clement Attlee: “I am in-
formed that the Egyptian Army,
led by a group of officers who are
jissatisfied with existing condi-
‘ions, took over control in Cairo
n the course of last night. Order
is being maintained, and the police
are apparently obeying the orders
of this group.
The army in Alexandria is, ac-
ording to information that I have
it present, unaffected, and the
members of the new Egyptian
Government, headed by Hilaly
Pasha, have made a contract with
the army leaders.

Go Ee, as can be seen, there is
no risk to British lives or -
ty. According to a leoeliaest
from Cairo, Major General Mo-
hammed Naguib, Commander-in-
Chief of the Egyptian forces, has
ziven assurance*to foreign resi-
dents that their lives and proper-
ty will be safeguarded, and that
the army will make itself respon-
sible for them.”

—U.P.

21 Reported Dead
In Vietminh Raid

SAIGON, July 23.
French Headquarters charged
that the Vietminh raiding party
had massacred 21 unarmed men,
women and children at _ the



French Army Convalescent Cen-
ter. Twenty two others were
seriously wounded when rebels

disguised as coolies swarmed over
the unprotected center on Mon-
day night.

They said there were scenes of
bloody horror as sprayed mach-
inegun bullets and three gren-
ades cut down fleeing victims
like machette knives. Survivors
said that 20 Communists attacked
{at dinner time. They hurled
| grenades inside the main dining

at children playing in the garden.

as well | Official list said the dead in-
coer sccupler, which scheme [ciudad even laren
as ren pee ae the Le gislative ; women, and 3 officers’ servants,
Council when they passed a_ Bill | 7

'

amending the Peasants’ Loan Bank
Act on Tuesday.

The extension of irrigation fa-
cilities to holders of up to 25



dicate the lines along which the





55 Bandits Wiped
Out In Antioquia



acres, Mr, Haynes said, might in-| §

4 | BOGOTA, Colombia, July, 23

% 1 ’ Pen weak scree
future | Seve eine ear Government said on Tuesday
gardening a that Army troops have wiped
a Irrigation Scheme, out 55 bandits in Antioquia in the
the Bank has in mind sinking a | past few days. In Colombia,
yell the average sized holdings where Conservatives rule, the
wae corn she. tae ened : word “bandit” is often used to
ae Mae That, Mr ithynes anit describe militant members of the
ae he very expensive. It is Opposition Liberal Party —C,.P.,

felt, however, that if they could j
encourage groups of between

eight and 12 peasant holders to
combine, the capital expenditure
mvolved in sinking one well could
very well serve the amalgamated
group, and larger holdings would
have no undue advantage over

smaller holdings.



}
Mr. D. A. M. HAYNES.

ity is ample. consideration will be
given such occupiers.”

Personal Security
“Such _ security,” Mr. Haynes
iF dded, “is more a personal secur-

ity

Breaking New Ground

“When you come to the widen- than a legal security, and as



§ng of the scope,” Mr. Haynes] such, great responsibility is thrown
said, “you are opening up a new|on the Manager of the Bank in
field to persons occupying or|determining how far such _assist-

renting land. There are number-| ance should or could go.” He said



less cases on record where absen-| “The experience gained in the
{management of the Labour Wel-

Nifare Housing Loar A tance

\ tended We are satisfied that the



@ On page 5

From Our Own Correspondent)
KINGSTON Jamaica,





1eration

{



SEALER IN PORT



MOTOR VESSEL “Terra Nova” brought 195,000 ft. of lumber to the isla ad from Weymouth, Nova Scotia.

Sangster Wants Details
_ Of Federation Settled

B.G. Run By Sho pkeepers—susrananre

lecause Brit- Guiar

THURSDAY, aLY 24, 1952

Saaieeiael

Barbados

Lying in the inner basin of the
Careenage is the Motor Vesse)
Terra Nova. She was built for
seal fishing. She arrived in Bar-

tados on Saturday from Wey-
mouth, Nova Scotia with 195,00¢

seet of lumber
Che vessel was built at Monroe.

Trinity Bay, Newfoundland lt
was registered on October 13
947 Its owners are Bowronds

Mrothers Ltd, of Newfoundland,
The seal fishing season in New
foundland is the first two months

{ Spring March 1 to May 1
‘nd during that period the Terra
Nova is kept busy. She carries «
crow’'s nest on one mast and from
‘his the lookout can spot schools

seals These are generally

« between the Labrador
coast and Newfoundland

The Terra Nova took part in an
expedition at Frobisher Bay
which is about 2,000 miles north of
the Canadian coast. The harbour
was being surveyed and charts
were drawn for the Canadian
Geographical Society

sught

Marconi Radar set which enables hor, te locate land or any floating



modern

The vessel carries
equipment She has a, Marconi
Radar set which enables her to
pick up land or an object which
may be afloat in the water Ip

sek foggy weather this set shows the
KINGSTON, Jamaica, July 22. position of an iceberg on its sereen

DONALD SANGSTER, Minister of Social Welfare, | *!4 therefore places the boat out
gave notice in the House of Representatives yesterday :|(/.“2780t Of collision. | She als’

“ +e “ A ‘thas a Marconi radio-telephone set
That this House reaffirms its support for the policy of}and a Bendix Marine Deyth

British Caribbean Federation, believing that federation is | Recorder
the means whereby the peoples of our territories can and| ,,Phe Terra Nova is powered by
will advance together in political and economic progress 1 ee Sere aes. ee

: es > 7 Z >s shict fives her ; 8g eed
to establish a new dominion within the British Common-|.) 10 knots, ‘The boat. is ay

‘ of 10 knots, The boat is under
wealth of Nations. the command of Captain Kean of

Newfoundland, The mate is Mr,
Ralph Roberts and the boatswain
Mr. Thomas Best Mr. .Robert
Doyle is the Chief Engineer.
On her trip baek north, the
recommendations in! yerra Nova is expected to take

} This House, in accepting the
report of the Standing Closer
U.N. Entrench Association Committee as a basis
‘ ’ on, considers that the

On ‘Hill Crest |

number of
the report require reconsideration

SEOUL, July 23 and amendment,

Grelorins United Nations

troops burrowed deeper into the ; a
eastern crest of the disputed hill | ©°mcerned to secure that eee
during the lull in the six-day old) P°Wets should be allotted in the
battle for a bloody height on the federal constitution to the elected
western front. United Nations in- | representatives of the people, and
fantrymen were forced to abandon | that federation should be initiated

Nova Scotia, .

Elizabeth I Sees
“Elizabeth I”

LONDON, July, 23. |



This House is particularly



the western crest of the hill yes- with adequate finances to ensure The Queen saw an American
terday after 200 Chinese Commun-| ‘ts ability to function effectively! jj.) the young Elizabeth
a swarmed up the blackened = eR aaa of the area) Tuesday night when she paid her) ight
ee against a small force of al-} ®@ § * first visit to the theatre since be-

\. at, . coming Queen, The play is the
Allied B.26 ee esas senite Questions story of the youth of Good Queen
7 ete, prevente i” Ss ark Bess, Elizabeth I, by Jennette
eee aN — betes cs This House considers that these] Dowling and Francis Letton.
yore ae oa vedueting crating outstanding questions, together —O.P.

with other questions dealt with in;
the joint report of the two Hous-
es of the Jamaica legislature, can
be resolved and can only be re-
solved by discussions with the re-
for miles around, ranged up to 100{Presentatives of Her Majesty's
degrees Fahrenheit. Government and the representa~ LONDON, July 23,

Waves of Allied fighter bombers, ;'ives of other Caribbean Terri-) The Duke of Kent, 16-year-old}
braving intense anti-aircraft fire,|‘ories, and therefore repeats its! cousin of the Queen, will fly to
smashed Communist troops and a|request that a conference should] Helsinki on Friday to see the
supply centre south of Wonsan in|take place in London as soon as} Olympic Games. He will join the
another devastating aerial blow at|possible to decide the future} Duke of Edinburgh, husband of
“ripe” Communist targets. oF course to be followed,” —(CP) the Queen.—C.P,

Barbados May Get
* ° J
Rice From T’dad
(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, July 23.
The Trinidad Government are
considering a request from the
Barbados Government for a loan
of 3,000 bags of rice to ease the
shortage of this commodity. An
official source stated today it is
likely that the request will be
granted in view of the colony's
substantial rice stocks. Last
monthTfinidad assisted Jamaica
in @asing the rice shortage by
making available to that colony

ortion of its rice which wes
till in British Guiana.



and napalming by United Nations
planes. One of the four Red tanks
spotted in the area was knocked
out. Temperatures in the area of
the hill, which dominates the area

Duke Of Kent
Going To Helsinki







|

Sign Loyalty Pledge

(By LYLE C. WILSON)

CHICAGO, July 23
GOVERNOR ADLAI STEVENSON of Lllinois piled
up new support on Wednesday as the managers of the
Democratic National Convention strove to prevent the
party splitting in a floor fignt over credentials and civil
rights. The rebellious Dixi: Democrats refused to sign
the new “Loyalty” pledge, cven though the Northerners
who had rammed it through the Convention on Tuesday

had so modified it as to make it almost meaningless.



Dixie Democrats Won't,

S OVER

| Ahmed Ghavam Eseapes
From Police Custody

Sealer Brings Angry
Lumber To |To Lyneh Ex-Premier



1» load of molasses for Sydney, |

|
{
j
|
|
j
|

pilot
Onl cay evening when a plane of the

Lenogan,

| -eriously injured and is in a ward
jit the
jtlespital. Both are from Trinida4
; Leaseholds, Pointe-a-Pierre
Cartney who is married, has four

vrveck.

. . ‘ ; ‘
Man The convention pushed into its; form. It will involve civil rights.
ley To Visit third day, with the peacemakers| fo-night’s platform debate on
1opeful that the seating of the! civil rights will determine how,
Barbados disputed delegations and the jar the Democratic party can ‘go
adoption of rules could be accom-)|‘o attract northern and other
(From: Our Own” Corespondent) plished without warfare. The| minority votes without deliver-!

KINGSTON, July 23,
Norman Manley Q.C., Presiden!
af P.N.P. and Legal Adviser to the

Credentials Committee presented! ing one or more of the southern
its report shortly after the session| states to Dwight D,

Kisenhower |

|
!
|

| started, Hepublican presidential nominee '

newly formed National Workers There will be less hope of Big news was that Labour was
Union in Jamaica leaves the island] peace tonight when the Resolu-| exerting its own pressure. Union
vriday for Barbados on a few] tions Committee presents ts! leaders who vetoed Vice President
days’ visit. 7 y platform carrying a strong!) Alben W. Barkley’s presidential
Manley who is going to Barba-| ‘Civil Rights’ plank. The men) cualifications now were trying to

dos in fulfilment of a long-stand-

|

: of Dixie are likely to fight for a| climinate Senator Robert S. Kerr
ing invitation from the Barbador | watered down version. Mean-| and Senator Richard B. Russell
Workers’ Union to attend one of | while the opponents of Steven-| from the contest. Leaders and
their Annual Conferences willj son tried to build up a drive to| spokesmen of leftwing Americans
also take the opportunity to dijs-] stop him. |\for Democratic action met last
cuss West Indies Federation with To-night will see the big night to “look over the situation.”

vir. G. H. Adams, hattle over the Democratic plat-



—U.P.

ish Guiana and British Honduras campaign for popular politicians terests created fear in which the





would eventually join against “these shopkeepers” S.C.A.C. Report was drafted
July 23- The multitude of people in adding that if they refuse him fear of popular political move-
Jamaica’s Prime Minister Hon. British Guiana wanted Federa- permission to enter “it will | ment in the Caribbean

V 4. Bustamante said today tion with the West Indies he de- worse for them”. If permitted to The debate on the motion of
that British Guiana took the de- clared but the fact was that land “it will be no good for Minister f Social Welfar

| ion against Federation with British Guiana’s government them.’ Bustamante said he was Sangster proposes changes in the
the West Indies because it had a run by a few shopkeepers and informed that a group in British S8.C-A.( constitution and pro-
hopkeeper government. Busta~ ‘‘one or two wholesalers”. How- Honduras was working towards vide greater powers in the hat]

nante, speaking in a two-day ever new elections are soori tobe Federation also. of selected representati' ( t

iebate in the House of Represen- held and he was certain that this Norman Manley @.C., Leader Federal Government a %

hich continues tomorrow government would be turned of the Opposition supported Bus nterference from outside but t

the Joint Select out of office, when the colony’ mante’ ud to Britis ted that t ‘ I

ch tudied the position regarding federation CGuiana i British H 417 } f

I the rest of uuld change t use the t ested inter- Fr
| West Ind hould press on He aid he was going to Britist est nstead »pkeepe
; ¢

before the electior ‘rmment adding thess

|
|
|
{
}

ae oe et

PRICE : FIVE CENTS



Oe

CAIRO





» Mobs Threaten

(By JOSEPH MAZAND1)
. TEHERAN, July 23.

DEPOSED PREMIER Ahmed Ghavam, arrested by
the order of his successor (Mohammed Mossadegh) escaped
from custody on Wednesday as a mob of frenzied Nation-
alists threatened to lynch him

Gendarmes of National police arrested Ghavam in
the home of Parliament member Aboliz! Towliat at Goom
60 miles from Teheran. The Government ordered that
all measures should be taken ty guard him

An armed mob of 5,000 fanatical Nationalists massed
here and vowed to go to Goom and lynch him. But a
spokesman for the high Nationalist leader reported that
Ghavam eseaped his guards on Wednesday afternoon and
tled

| Immediately a weneral alarm
oom py EKy e a was issued for Ghavam and
| frontier guards were instructed






to arrest him on sight if he trie



i flee the countrys The senate
| voted late today “in favout of
Mossadegh as Premier and the
Shah summoned - him to the
| Palace to give him the Royal
\ degree to form @ cabinet,
\ Chere are no detail immed-
| iately of the means t which
Chavam escaped, Evening news-
papers reported that ‘pandem-
onlum and disorder” exists in
Abadan with all refinery units
on strike and demonstrators
shouting threats to burn big oil
eer if the British return,
| Shrouded Arab tribesmen en-
tered Abadan from outlying

districts and shouted pro- Moss-
| aegh slogans before police fired

j over the heads of the crowd to
iisperse demonstrators. The
} crowd became furious as a tank

j killed a woman demonstrator on

Monday
~U.P.

oO National
Suicide

bia ae Bigs YORK, July 23

Our 1 st ‘he New York Times said edi-
PORT-OF-SPAIN, July, 23. lovially on Wednesday that recent
Harry MacCartney, trainee-} «, velopments in Iran have taken
was killed instantly yester-|4 “grave turn for the worse that
must cause rejoicing in the Krem
lin, It said: “Mohammed Mossa-
tdegh who as Premier brought the
country to the brink of ruin, is
back as Premier under circum-
stances and with a programme
which, should they continue to
prevail, can only lead to national
suicide with the Soviets as heirs

to what remains.”



YREMIbE

Father Of Four!
Dies In Crash

From Our Own Correspondent)

Aeroplane Club crasher
» canefield on the West Camp-
en runway near Couva, John
instructor, the only
ther oecupant of the plane was
Colonisl

San Fernando

Mac -

The Times said Mossadegh i
scarcely free to wield his power
independently though back in
nominal power, “For he is both
the creator and prisoner of terror-
istic and Fascist elements which,
working hand in hand with Com-
munists, swept him back into office

hildren. Lenagan, the inter-
colonial Hockey player, is suffer~
ing from a compound dislocatior
ff both ankles and a head injury

also suspected, ~but is report-
“| to be reacting favourably to
treatment, The aircraft which was

niy made serviceable to clubjon a wave of revolutionary vio-
embers a few days ago, is a total lence. S
i . . It said: “These elements are



now supreme and the most power-
ful of terrorist leaders has publicly

M.P.’s Will Not Get | proctaimed in name Premier Mos-

sadegh a “United front” with Com-
Pay Increase

munists.”
It said that Communists are try-
LONDON, July 23.
lawmakers got bad

ing to take control of this United
front turning campaign against the
moderates of the Shah and Ameri-

news on Tuesday night fromjcans. [1 said “as the United
Prime Minister Churchill. His] States is still giving economie and
Conservative Governm ent is| military aid to Iran the success
ivainst the proposed 25 per cent.) of this campaign might lead to
iy increase for Members of Par-} serious consequences particularly



Britain's





liament They are paid £1,000° ll) view of Mossadegh’s plan.
yearly, —O.P. —U.P.
CROSSES ATLANTIC IN TINY BOAT
. ‘a if ea ; =



BEARDED PATRICK ELLAM, its in his 19} foot sailboat
Sopranino” shortly after he arrived in Miami, Plorida.. Sailing fron
London his first port of call on this side of the Atlantic for Ellan

and Mudie was Barbados



PAGE TWO

Carib Calling

URQUHART,4

IR
Ss:

nor

ROBERT
Ambassador to Vene-
expects to return home this
the Embassy’s two-F
engined aircraft De Havilland
Deve after spending an enjoyable
n days’ holiday as a guest at
» Maresol Beach Flats, St. Law
Gap.
> by Lady
their daughter, Miss Unity Urqu
hart.
Alse travelling by
which, is being piloted
Somipander P. D.





ng by





the aircraft
by Wing

kforth, her little
Miss Ann Bulman

Mr*.. Hat

thony, and



Sgt. Mechanic Davidson who
were guests at the Ocean Viewsâ„¢
Hotel.

To-Night’s Show
“yweHe Barbados Players hav
i completed the finisnin
touches of their preparation foi
ine staging of Oscar Wilde
comedy “‘fne Importance of B
ing barnest” which opens at th
hmpire Tneatre tonight, and con-
linues to-morrow at matinee and
enas with a show at 8.30 p.m.

His Excellency the Governor
and Lady Savage who have ex-
tended their patronage to
show will be attending to-nignt.

This is the first show since the
amalgamation of the Bridgetown
Players and the’ Barbados
Dramatic Club and should at-
tract a generous quota of local
theatre-goers.

The Booking Office opened
daily at the Empire Theatre from
8.30 a.m,

Annual General Meet

EMBERS
Assistant
ation and the

is

of the Barbados
Mistresses’ Associ-
Barbados Assistant
Masters’ Association are remind-
ed that the Annual) General
Meetings of the above will take
piace at Harrison College on Fri-
day, July 25th, at 10.00, a.m., fol-
lowed by the Annual General
Meeting of the Association of As-|
sistant Teachers in Secondar
Schools in the island,

Back To Trinidad

R. JOHN DOBBS, West In
dies Secretary of the London
Lancashire Insurance Com-
stationed in Trinidad, re-
turned to his headquarters over
the week-end by B.W.LA. after
spending ten days’ holiday as a
guest at the St, Lawrence Hotel,

and
pany

Sales Engineer

Greene a month’s holiday in
Barbados are Mr, and Mrs.
E. Pecsi and their small son
Emerick from Caracas, Venezuela,
They arrived over the last week-
end by B.W.1.A, and are guests
at the Ocean View Hotel.

Mr. Pecsi is sales engineer em-
ployed with Stubbins in Caracas.

Back From Canada

I
3

“3

He will be accom-f]
Urquhart andi

; {

W. Hackforth,@
Attache to the Embassy, arell
sonka

Z

he’,
they















ty



























| SIR ROBERT URQUHART

f Concert By Barbados

W

Choral Society
HE Barbados Chorai Society's
Concert at Compermere Hall
on ‘Luesday July 2th, at 8.15 in
the evening, bids fair to be one
of the most interesting that the
Society has given,

It just 30 years since
Society first appeared before
public at a concert given at
Olympic Theatre, then recently
renovated, and during the time
that has elapsed since its founda-
tion the Society has always aim-
ed at giving the best type of
music and rendering it to the best
of its ability,

An unusual feature at the Con-
cert next week will be a Saxo-
ghone Quintet—-a happy idea of
Japt. Raison’s — and a_ Brass
Wind Ensemble.

Mr. B. C. St. John, Baritone, in
addition to a group of songs, will
sing the Solos in the extracts
from Elgar’s “King Olaf” and in
the Spiritual “Peter, go ring dem
bells”.

The talented young. local
Pianist, Mr. Cedric Phillips, who
hopes shortly to proceed to
(Canada to further his musical
Studies, will play Bach, Mendels-
Bohn and York Bowen.

Tickets for the Concert may be
obtained from the Advocate
Stationary where the plan of seats
may be seen and programme’
bought. \

On Holiday
R. AND MRS, HARRY EALY



the
the
the

is

and their daughter Mary
from Maracaibo, Venezuela, ar-
vived in the colony recently by

B.W.1.A. for about ten days’ holi-
day and are guests at the Ocean
View Hotel.

Mr. Ealy is Secretary in the
Administration Office of the Cre-
ole Petroleum Corporation.

Matron At St. Augustine

RS. EVELYN DAY of FTER spending about two
Toronto, Canada, who has} weeks’ holiday in Barbados,
been residing in Barbados for Miss Ursula del Costello, Matron

quite»a while, paid a two-month
visit home and returned last
week. She is a guest at the Hotel
Reyal.



first thing you give a
when you meet him is

» your hand, What impression

do you give of yourself at this
touch? The hands have a lan-
guage; they reveal a lot about
your personality and character,
Their movements express whether
you are shy, self-conscious. .. . or

The
stranger

poised and self-confident, The feel . .

of the skin—if it is soft and fine
to the touch—confirms your per-
sonal fastidiousness. A casual
observer may take you at your face
value, but a discerning person will

take note of your hands and nails. »

Working with the hands is good
for them... even typing and
housework, It keeps them strong
and supple, expressive, ful! of
energy and life, Work is bad
for the hands only if it is allowed
to coarsen and spoil the skin and
nails .... and nowadays it needn't
happen. It isn't very much trou-
ble—more a matter of remember-
ing tovsmooth on ‘invisible gloves’
of barrier cream before starting
any Kind of wet or dirty work.
With this protection you can even
use strong household cleansers—
the worst sinners against hands
and nails—without damage,

The - next essential is regular
hand cream massage; and i mean
regular, This puts back the natural
oil which work and weather steal

fromthe — skin ..-necessary for
good colour,

Girls in their teens may be
bothered by reddish-blue hands

and chilblains, This is usually only
a temporary circulation upset and
part of the bodily changes which
are happening at this time, There
are chilblain creams and skin-
healing preparations which will
help; and to improve circulation
and gain flexibility—both in the
teens and after—practise these few
hand exercises, They’re very sim-
ple. :

1, Bend arms at elbows and let
hands flop, relaxed .. then shake



STOCK



An Assortment of

@ LADIE

kilega

of St. Augustine’s Nursing Home,

Trinidad, returned home on Mon- ~

day evening by B.W.I1.A. She wus

{ a guest at the Ocean View Hotel.

them—hard—from the wrists,

2. Rub palms together... . clap
hands above head until they tingle.

3. One hand at atime .... arms
to dides. Turn palm upwards and
describe a figure of eight from the
wrist, stretching fingers out as far
as possible, and using every muscle,
Stand straight when you do this
. , there is never any point in
moving any of your extremities
gracefully unless the keystone of
your body—the spine—is in good
alignment,

What Can be Done to Hands
Neglected to the Point of
Real Disgrace ?

A little penance ... . sleep in
gloves, first larding hands ex-
travagantly with rich cream.
Keeping them covered helps oils

to penetrate.

Can Nicotine Stains be
Removed ?

Well, if they're deeply burned-
in you'll have a job with them!
Avoid this by using a small iight
cigarette holder (regard it as
necessary as a toothbrush) and
hold cigarettes end-upwards, so
that staining smoke wafts up,
away from fingers, Peroxide and
chlorine paste—especially (in dras.
tic cases) used with pumice—is
one of the best ways of removing
stains. Lemon-juice and “Vim’ are
also pretty efficient. Both work
well on fruit stains and those you
get when preparing vegetables.

Sometimes—particularly during
that time of life known as ‘the
change’'—a local breakdown of
skin pigmentation will cause
brown (sometimes white) patches,
rather like freckles, It isn’t easy
to remove these, but they can be
disguised with a flesh-tinted cov-
ering cream, set with a dusting of
face power,

Enlarged, especially horny-look-
ing, knuckles sometimes can be an
indication of incipient gout, a
condition of the rheumatism fam-

S’ NYLON HOSE



@ LADIES’ NYLACE HOSE

@ LADIES’ LISLE HOSE
@ CHILDREN’S ANKLETS .



— ALSO —

NEW SHIPMENT OF ...

@ MEN’S

WILSON FELT HATS



» $2.09, $2.15, $2.28,





To Meet U.N. Mission

ISS DORA IBBERSON, Soc-

jal Welfare Adviser to the
Comptroller for Development and
Welfare left on Tuesday by
B.W.1LA. for Trinidad to meet the
United Nations Mission which is
surveying self-help techniques in
that colony as well as in Jamaica,
Puerto Rico, Haiti and Mexico.

The experts who arrived in
Trinidad over the week-end from
New York are Dr, Ahmed Pasha
Hussein, former Minister of Social
Affairs in Egypt who is a rural
sociologist, Dr. Carl C. Taylor, 4
rural sociologist with the U.S.
Department of Agriculture and
Mr. Robert C. Jones of the United
Nations Community Organisation
and Development Unit who has
special knowledge of his region.

With Shell In Venezuela

R. AND MRS. F. E. DON-

ALDSON of Caracas, Vene-
zuela, who came over here earlier
in the month for a holiday will
be remaining until August Ist as
guests at Maresol Beach Flats.
Accompanying them is their six-
year-old son, Barry who was at-
tending school at Hexham, Lan-
cashire and travelled out froro
England all by himself to Trini-
dad where he joined his parents.

with Sheil

Mr. Donaldson is t
Venezuela Oil Concessions in
Caracas.

For Three Weeks

R. AND MRS. IVOR HAUCK
and their three daughters
from Caracas, Venezuela, arrived
here on Tuesday by B.W.1A,. via
Trinidad for three weeks’ holiday
and are guests at Maresol Beach
Flats, St. Lawrence Gap.
Mr. Hauck is head of the firm
of Comeca and Co, a super mar-
ket for foodstuffs in Caracas.

BARBADOS

Foundatien Old Boys’
Association

a monthly meeting of th
Foundation Old Boys’ As-
sociation will be held at 8,00 p.m.
to-morrow, Friday, 25th July. A
Progress report for the period
January to June, 1952, will be

submitted by the Committee: of
Management. Consideration
alsc be given to the activities of
the Association for the period

July to December, 1952 ’



CROSSWORD








boats

y on’ you do.



is grown to thig. (3)
Measurer of later time. 6
Some bear! (5)
Age of the radio. (3)
Type of residence (4) ‘

46 Salute. (5)

17 Said each contains one.

3 (t's a berry to lose, (4)
Down

\ Arrived before the gunners;

gives photo-finish proof? (6)

Popular music and drama. (5)

(4)



4 Studv in decay of a pest. (6)
4. Mineral. (3)

5. Very dangerous speed rate. (Â¥)
7. The cant you can get. (4)

8. Sneer, 4)

9. It’s a dog. (6) ll. Serene, (4)

14. See 16 Across. (3)

18. Cargo. (4) :

19 “Ever to do -—— our sole

delignt” (Milton), (3)

20. Plural 24 Across upset. (4)

22. Hailed, openly ? (3) ‘

23. Synonym of 24 Across. (3)

24. Our old slippery friend. (3)
Solution of yesterday's puzzle. —- Acros»:

1 Laurel, 6, Hop; #8, Exterior

Marrow, 1, Treasure; 4, Earn

Soar, 17, Rind; 19, Urge, 21, Slope

Airs; 24 Tone; 25. 8 6 Meta

27. Pibey Dewn: 1, Letter: 2. Axe

Utter, 4. Remand: 5, Erasure: 6, Hor

7, Power: 9 Roe, 12. Rail: 15. Us

14. Agree. 18. None: 20° Espv

‘Hone) Stv 22, Pet



THE LAS

TO LEA
PART

From

GIRL
VE ALY’S

Lovely Lise stays
till the dawn
SYDNEY SMITH: Paris.

HE most exclusive and most expensive party of the
Paris summer season, given by Aly Khan, ended at

4.45

The first birds were stirring and the sky was brighter
than the crystal chandeliers in the restaurant among the
trees of the Bois de Boulogne, on the outskirts of Paris,

when the last two people le

and lovely Lise
France's No. 1 cover girl

This was the biggest party Aly
has yet given for his annual cele-
bration of the Grand Prix race at

Longchamp, just a mile away

There were 180 guests. and

lasted eight hours

The Aga Khan. defying Goctara with. tubles.

orders in a wheel-chair

at a table decorated with a model
n lace of Longchamp racecourse.

The Duke of Windsor. in a mid-
orght blue dinner jacket. presided
it a second table. decorated with

models of Elizabethan

And France's first
only marshal
at the head of the third
which had model cannons.

soldier

nt Hands |

ily. You can take a vegetable her-
bal compound to deal
internal side of the situation. Mas-
sage with ‘Iodex’ will sometimes
improve the externa] side.

Very hot water—or cold—dries
up the hands’ skin, Cut out the
‘washing’ under the tap’ habit.
Use only warm water, dry hands
carefully (important, this) and
always use hand cream or lotion
afterwards.

Use your hands positively. A
handshake should be an easy for-
ward movement of the arm, with
a definite, firm clasp on the end
of it. Negative, uncertain move-
ments look fumbling and clumsy,
They betray lack of confidence . .
they fail to inspire it.

For A Special Date

No one wants to go out to a
party with unkempt hands, but one
can’t wear gloves the whole time!
So try camouflage, A flesh-tinted
foundation (or covering cream)
well powdered; or a hand whiten-
ing cosmetic cream, applied very
thinly. This is really an off-stage

version of the theatrical wet-
white’ which all actresses use, It
is also useful for blending a

tanned hand up to the shade of
an arm that hasn't caught the sun,

Listening Hours

THURSDAY, JULY 24, 1952
4.00—7.15 p.m. — 19.76m,, 25.53m



The
The Portrait

400 pm. The News, 410 pm
Daily Service, 4.15 pm
of a Lady, 445 pm_ Sporting Record,
5 00 pm. Cricket, 5 05 pm. Interlude,
5 15 p.m_ Listeners’ Choice, 600 p m
Welsh Diary, 6.15 pm. Variety Road
Show, 645 pm _ Sports Round-Up and
Programme Parade, 7 00 p m. The News,
710 pm Home News From Britain.
F.15—10.30 p.m, — 25.58m,, SL 3tm



7.15 pm _ We See Britain, 7 45 p.m
Championship Bands, 815 pm _ Radio
Newsree!, 8 30 pm. Special Despatch,
845 pm _ Interlude, 855 pm. From
The Editorials, 900 pm Dockland,
9.45 pm. Olympic Report, 10 00 p m
The News, 10 10 p.m. News Talk, 10 15
Pm. Progress Through Three Univer-
sities, 10 30 pm. Portrait of a Lady.



$2.41
. $2.50
-» $1.31
CENTS



. 30, 32 & 46

$6.40

T. R EVANS & WHITFIELDS

DIAL 4220

YOUR SHOE STORES

DIAL 4606

aft.
Bourdin,

warships
and
Alphonse Juin, was
table.

with the |

They were Aly Khan himself
| The Duchess
of Windsor was
there in a
white off - the-
shoulder dress.
Across it was a
great scarlet
s\Sash pinned



it



e

Begum
Aga

Khan was
there and the
jewetlled
Muaharanees_ ot
Baroda and
Jaipur in saris,
Paris society
women, eagle
eyed for signs
of “romance,” noeem
-~ watehed Aly Khan dancing.
—’ I heard one woman guest say :



Lise

“But, my dear, he dances with
every woman as though she is
the only one he could possibly

love—how can you tell ?”

Well — partner Lorraine
Dubonnet, 23-year-old wine

| heiress. left well before the stares
began to pale. Singer Dany
Dauberson flew straight back tc

| the South But 27-year-old Lise
| Bourdin, who stayed till sunrise

is still in Paris.
London Eixnress Sarvire

mas

OPENING FRIDAY

2.30 — 445 & 8.30 p.m. and
Continuing Daily 4.45 & 8.30 p.m,





ASSOCIATED BRITISH PICTURE CORPORATION PRESENTS

STEPHEN PATRICIA

MURRAY-PLUNKETT
Foy tema
TRESPASS

\ FROM THE NOVEL BY ERNEST RAYMOND wv

\ INTRODUCING TO D D

\ RICHARD

remec » Tieton suovirey « waceree er CAVALCANTI
WORLD DISTRIBUTION BY ASSOCIATED BRITISH PATE LTD.

PEAZA B'TOWN

DIAL 2301
GAIETY .,

SS
The Garden—St. James
LAST SHOW TONITE 830
“GOLDEN STALLION (Colc*)

Roy ROGERS &

“WELLS FARGO GUNMASTER”
Rocky LANE

Midnite



*







Fri.

& Sat. 8.30 Special
Action Packed
Bm Double!
“Dalton Gang”
1 WAS AN Don Barry &
“Outlaw
AMERICAN SPY Country”
Ann Dvorak Lash LA RUE
sSSO



BARBAREES
PLAZA (pia0 5170)

Proudly Presents :
Universal International's

BRIGHT
VICTORY

Starring
Arthur

Peggy
KENNEDY

e DOW
With
James EDWARDS
Will GEER
John HUDSON
| Julix ADAMS
Based on the
“LIGHTS OUT”
by Baynard Kendrick
HERE IS THE SHOCKING
ADULT I AMA THAT
TALKS STRAIGHT
Hi 1

and

Novel



FROM

OPENING FRIDAY
4.45 3.30 PM



March 21—April 20

*«

aggressiveness, recklessness in important
* matters. Be eager to work hard, but don’t
overdo.

*
*

x June 22—Jnly 23

*«



KK suty 24—Ang. 22
*

VIRGO
K Aug. 23—Sept. 23

*«

*

*«

0 OE



ADVOCATE

<

«The STARS: * X°

Fi



will |

Look in the section in which

what your outlook is, according to the stars.
For Thursday, July 24, 1952

ARIES

*

TAURUS .
Some early

April 21—May 22

GEMINI

May 23—June 21 You have li

putting over
noon may sh

health.
CANCER



+ and YOU - fi *

AS +

Stars indicate generous rays for practical
endeavours well managed; for vital indus-
tries; for household and persona! business.
Romance rates high.

mostly in financial matters.

Thoughtlessness, needless changing from

De

your birthday comes and find

*
+

i * +

aspects warn against unwise



* *

ttle obstruction or contention
essential ideas, duties. After-
ow more restricting influences,
Mind your

*
ae

* *

one thing to another, especially in plans,

business or

rights.

LEO
Watch your
first

If possible,
and you sho’

ly aggressive, but conscientious of others’

studying, 2
know. Moderate gain can be expected in
most business, occupational activities.

residence are tabu. Be right-

+
*

*

-M

answers, don’t act without
consulting those in the

an energetic, early-start day
uld have ample time later for

recreation, romance,

LIBRA

M 1
Sept. 24—Oct. 23 (.2y_PeoP

comparison

*«

tions,

SCORPIO
Oct. 24—Nov. 22

Shelve new,
hazards.

SAGITTARIUS

Nov. 23—Dec, 20 On

and modern

*

An array of

CAPRICORN
Dec. 21—Jan. 20

down it can effect home and other rela-
Rationalizing important.

ters that could incur debt or avoidable
Rate action,
cording to your ability, and assets.

the favourably aspected list today,
honoured with your natal planet stressing
earnest, sensible effort. Benefit for new

*

e are unhappy because of a
complex. If this isn’t held

unplanned or unknown mat-

investments, ac-

*

endeavours, fresh business.

*

good prospects if you will dig.

And furnish some real brain work and

«x
*«
*

AQUARIUS
Jan. 21—Feb. 19

PISCES Your planet stresses patience, see a
4 Feb. 20—March 20 from irritating worry. Written, legal,
personal promises, contracts ‘need extra
vigilance.

A
*«

characteristics. You were born
Cusp change of Signs. Can

with fine talents.

able months ahead. Birthdate

« Amer.; Alexandre Dumas the Elder, Fr. novelist, playwright.

a HHH HHH HHH Y

Non-committal type day in part. You are
mostly on your own.
lack of confidence!
earry you through.

YOU BORN TODAY: Have a combination of many fine

capable, successful, or the opposite. i
Develop patience, moderation.

energy to carry on to a successful finish. *
Give your best, always.

* *

But no fretting or
Your best traits will

on the edge of the Cancer-Leu
be exceptionally interesting,
You have strong traits
Some profit-

: Simon Bolivar, hera of So.

Blinky Mole Liked Winter

—It Was a Time for Friendliness, He Said—

By MAX TRELL

BLINKY Mole drew his chair a
little closer to the fire and said: “I
don’t mind the winter coming on.
I've worked hard since early spring. |
We’ve all worked hard, Winter-time
is the time for friendliness, and |
good talk, and a pleasant game or |
two, and some story telling. But |
above all it is the time for think- |
ing.”

Blinky lit his pipe, then looked
around with a smile at Knarf and
Hanid, who were sitting beside him.
“Yes,” he repeated, “there’s no time
like winter-time for good thinking.”

Knarf wasn’t sure he knew what
this meant. “You mean, Blinky,” he
said, “that you just sit and think?”

Wonderful Fun

“That’s right,” replied Blinky. |
“And it’s wonderful fun, just sit-
ting and thinking. There are so
many things to think about—all the
things | did this summer—all the
things I’m planning to do next sum-
mer,”

There was a knock on Blinky’s
door at this moment, and Willy Toad
and Glive the Snail came in,

“We were just talking about the
fun of thinking about all we did
and all we’re going to do,’’: Blinky
explained after Willy and Glive had
found places around the fire. |

“Good idea,” said Willy. “But 1
like dreaming even better.”

“Dreaming, Willy?” said Hanid.

“Dreaming is the same as think-

ing,” said Willy, “only you do it
while you’re sleeping. It’s much
more restful.”
—“Witty’s right,” said Glive. "You |
just close your eyes and dream
about all the wonderful things
you'd like to happen. But,”” he added
with a sigh, “they don’t always
happen.”

“No,” said Blinky, “1 like to think
about real things. | like to think |
about the mistakes that I’ve made
and how | can keep from making
them the next time. | like to think
of better ways to do my work, | like
to think of the good times I’ve had,
and of the better times to come, I
like to think of my friends, and of
all the wonderful days we've had
together. Thinking,” said Blinky
after a pause, “is like reading a|
book. Except that it’s your own |
book—about your own adventures.
And there aren't any words.”









Punch at the circus,

There were some more knocks on
the door, Hop-a-Long the grasshop-
per, Blackie Beetle, Mr. Gr-rumph
the frog, and the two caterpillars
named Clarence and Archibald all
came in. There were hardly enough
chairs for all the company, but
Blinky bustled around and brought
mats and folding chairs out of the
closet.

Lots of Fun

It was lots of fun for Knarf and
Hanid, listening to all of Blinky’s
friends talking over their adven-
tures of the past summer and plan-
ning out what they were going to
do as soon as the winter was over.
Willy said he was going to move
from the edge of the pond to a sunny
spot behind the pine grove where
the flies were larger and fatter.

Glive said he was going to move
around as usual, not staying in any
one spot too long. But he was deter-
mined to see what kind of country
lay over the hill, even if it took him
all of next summer to get there,
Hop-a-Long said he was going to
visit his relatives on the other side
of the river and hoped he would be
able to find a way to get across,
Blackie Beetle said he was going to
build himself a bigger house; and
Mr. Gr-rumph said he was going to
go on ~. long trip to another pond
where his cousins all lived. Archi-
bald and Clarence said they were
waiting to turn into butterflies, and
then they'd fly all over. And Blinky
just sat and smiled, for there was
nothing he enjoyed more than hav«
ing a houseful of old friends.



PLAZA

BRIDGETOWN _,
(Dial 2310)
TODAY (only) 4.30 & 8.30



(Dial 5170)
Last 2 Shows TO-DAY

THEATRES



OisvVIN
(Dial 8404)
To-day 4.45 & 8.30 p.m







4.30 & 8.30 p.m.
a age ederine SUNSET “RANGERS RIDE”
Ma SOFTLY Jimmy WAKELY &
STRANGER” Ss a
Joseph COTTON & Valli & BOULEVARD a keel
Fon etna da Gloria SWANSON & = {] yohnny Mack BROWN
Starring: Robert Mitchum HOLIDAY INN
———— ]} Bing CROSBY Fri, & Sat. 445 & 8.56
———————_—_==_ s
TODAY'S Special 130 p.m. Fred ASTAIRE xm
“RANGERS RIDE” To-day Special 1.30 || Paramount Technicolor
Jimmy WAKELY & “RED DESERT” Double !
“COLORADO AMBUSH” |] Don BARRY & “LET'S DANCE”
Johnny Mack BROWN “FRONTIER Fred ASTAIRE &
FRIDAY 4.30 145 & 8.30 REVENGE” “HIGH VENTURE”
& Continuing Daily Lash La RUE || John PAYNE
“FOR THEM THAT SAY. Special 130 p.m

*
ae
+
*
>

+
*

+

*

THURSDAY,



when

1 Ae

Murrays

“MILK

MANNING & CO,

AGENTS.





JULY 24, 1952

STOUT:
LTD.



Don’t despair when your oven dishes are greasy
and dirty after a day’s cooking. Sprinkle a little Vim
on a damp cloth, give them a quick rub over and see
how they gleam. Vim is so easy to use, so smooth it

won’t leave a scratch.

VIM

cleans everything
smoothly and speedily

Av 488-902



ROODAL
EMPIRE

TO-DAY 5 & 8.30 p.m.

The Barbados Players Presents —

“THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING
EARNEST"



ee
OPENING SATURDAY 44 & 8 30

R.K.O. Presents —
Paul Douglas — Barbara Stanwyck

in
“CLASH BY NIGHT”

OLYMPIC

TODAY Last 2 Shows 4.30 & 8.320
Universal's Whole Serial

“THE PHANTOM OF















TO-DAY T 130 p.m
“RAINBOW OVER TEXAS”
and

“TWILIGHT ON THE RIO GRANDE”

Opening TOMORROW 4.30 & 8.15 p.m
United Artist Double

“TWO LOST WORLDS”

TRESPASS" ||““GOLDEN STALLION" ||Shanite Special SAT With
SAT. Special 9.30 & zal] Roy ROGERS & { I Elliott J A
EKHUNDER MOUNTAIN” |} “WELLS FARGO vale desimateberiaitie
Tim HOLT 8 GUNMASTER see CLOUDBURST’
1OLT & oe : SON i Rs
REGION of the Rocky LANE ae een = it s
| LAWLESS COMING FRIDAY “TRAIL’S END" AU “ Pr E beth Sel
| George ©’BRIEN | “BRIGHT vVicTroRy” !I Johr Mack BROWN") Rob re ella
oleae SSS eee ——=> Soe eee





GLOBE

Today, 4.45 & 8.30 p.m. — Last Shows
BILLY THE KID and SWORD OF MONTE CRISTO

Opening Tomorrow, 5.00 & 8.30 p.m.



else starring

ETHEL BARRYMORE - KIM HUNTER



“THEATRES




a LEVER propucr

THE HEADLINE-
HOT STORY OF
REVENGE KILLINGS!

20. Century-Fox's

USA.

with PAUL STEWART

ROXY

2 Shows

TODAY 4.30 & 8.151%
“LADY ON A TRAIN”

and ¢
“MADONNA OF THE SEVEN
MOONS”

Last





TODAY AT 1.30 p.m.
“DON'T FENCE ME IN”
and
“END OF THE ROAD”

TO-MORROW Only 4.30 & 8.15
Charles Laughton — Boris Karloff
in
“THE STRANGE DOOR”
and
“UNDERTOW”

With

Scott Brady & John Russell





TO-DAY 4.30
4.30 Only
REPUBLIC WHOLE SERIAL !
“ADVENTURES OF FRANK AND
JESSE JAMES”
T
ue

iH

OMORROW NIC
i & He

AT 8.3
Troupe in



“CARACAS NIGHTS OF 19m”
THE SHOW OF SHOWS





THURSDAY, JULY 24, 1952

Speech Day Held At Ursuline

Lady Savage
Presents Prizes

LADY SAVAGE, wife of His Excellency the Governor

Sir Alfred
Speech

‘ed Sauvage; K.C\.M.G., distributed the Prizes at the
ahd Prizé Giving Day held at the Ursuline Con-
vent on Tuesday afternoon.

His Excellency the Governor was also present and in

a short address commented on the high

play “The Rivals” which was done in five acts by the girls.

Presenting her Report of the year’s activities, the
Headmistress Said imter alia :—

This year there has been an increase in the number
of pupils imour School: 174 children ‘are in attendance in
our Montessori and Preparatory Department,.and 133 girls
are being educated in our Main School. 'The total number

of pupils is at present 307.

Moreover, we have again this
year been privileged to co-oper-
ate in the education and training
not merely of some of the children
of Barbados, but also of 90 ‘Girls
from the neighbouring West Indi-
an Islands, British Guiana, Vene-
zuela, ang even Ecuador, who
have been with us as boarders,
Had we the necessary accommo-
dation, we should be able to help
to educate many more children,
for at present we are obliged to

refuse countless applications
which we receive during the
year, We hope in a year or two,

to be able to solve this problem
in providing more accommodation
for ders.

Fully Satisfied

T am happy to be able to report
at the end of this school year that
I am, on the whole, fully satisfied
with the work which has been
achieved, the progress which has
been made, and the standard of
work which has been maintained
throughout the year in the two
departments of the School — the
Preparatory and the Main School.

In the ain School the work
in Form II has been particularly

satisfactory. The members of
this Form have, in_ general,
worked seriously and _ steadily

during the year; they have shown
great interest in their studies, and
the standard of work attained by
the class as a whole has been the
highest in the Main School. In
the other Forms satisfactory work
has also been accomplished,

I must, however, make special
mention of our first Sixth Form,
of which all four members have
not only studied intelligently and
with application throughout the
year, but have also clearly mani-
fested their loyalty, their dutiful-
ness, and their whole-hearted co-
operation with the Staff. I am
happy to know that next year the
numbers in the Sixth Form will
increase to nine or ten.

Thanks To Staff

I must now taauk most heartily
the Nuns and Assistant Teachers
on the Staff of the Main School
who have given me their full co-
operation at all times, not only
during our school hours but also
in the out-of-class duties and
activities of a boarding school.
My work has been considerably
lightened by the devotedness, the
loyalty, and the sense of duty dis-
played on every occasion by each
member of the Staff, and to each
I express my sincere gratitude.

I thank Mrs. Wotton for giving
us a few half-hours of her own
leisure time during the week for
Gymnastics and Dancing lessons.
I am grateful to Mrs. White for
her lessons in Art to the two
upper Forms of the Main School,
and also to Mrs. Hinds-Howell
for her help with the French
classes.

To Mr. McComie I must also
say a word of gratitude for the
Spanish lessons which he has
given to some of our pupils. For
the past two years Miss Field has
beeh on our Staff and we regret
that she is now leaving us, Her
real interest in the progress of
each of her pupils and her devot-
edness to the girls will not be
easily forgotten, and on behalf of
her pupils I thank her sincerely
and wish her success in her new
sphere of work. To Miss Adams
and Miss Rock who have worked
with us for a year, we also say
‘thank you’, and we offer them
our good wishes.

The results of the Oxford and
Cambridge General Certificate

ation at ordinary level,
taken last July by our fourteen
candidates, were on the whole
satisfactory, each pupil obtaining
her certificate in four or five or
six subjects.

This year we have been able to
add several good books to our
Reference Library as well as to
the Form. Libraries,

I should like to take this oppor-
tunity to express our thanks to
the British Council for the Maga-
ziffes and other papers which are

r School,
ee fo oe Se for aoe the
Oxford and pease ST
Adam, bet ce Cosme ee
meee la ease, Marilyn

Netto. :

Prizes awarded for Art: Shirley Walton,
Claudette de Meillac, Jocelyn Steele

Prizes for Needlework : Maureen
Weatherhead, Shirley Ingram. : ;
. Prizes for Music: Mary-Helen Stone, i
Roberta 5
Certificates Awarded for Success ih




Pitman’s Commercial—fxaminaiion :





F

cIry

B.W.1. Shipping

d of the

BARBADOS ADVOCATE _



‘TELEVISION IN T

Television sets—for “business

sereens to avoid the delay and
comparative expense of the post.
The bank found that it
eould televise cheques and
statement sheets over a dis-



- European Sugar

tance of 14 miles.

An official of the bank, Gly? ~

Mills and Co., said to-day: “Wwe

to instal the television
link-up when we build a new
ledger office soon.

The Difficulty—Licences
“We had a licence granted by
the Post office up to April 30
this year. Whether they will
renew it is another matter.”
Licences will be the problem
that will face the business firms.
One of them said; “We have
found that the Post Office
may not be willing to grant

‘Survey Coming Imports Questioned

LONDON.
In the House of Commons on
ly 16, Mr. Emmanuel Shinweil
Labour, Seaham) asked the Serc-
retary of State for the Colonies
when he intends to make a state-
ment on the Government's plan
for the further development ‘of
industry and agriculture in the
West Indies; and what additional
shipping facilities are contem-

plated. 4
Mr, Oliver Lyttelton, Secretary
of State for the Colonies, replied:
‘IT made statements about Jamai-
ca and British Honduras in rep):
to questions by the hon. Member



for Wandsworth Central (Mr.
Richard Adams) and ‘the hon.
Member for Gravesend (Sir

Richard Acland) on 26th March
and 7th May respectively:

“Information about the other
territories will be foumd in my
Annual Report to Parliament, .in
the Report on British Dependgn-
cies in the Caribbean and North
Atlantic, and in the Annual Re-
port for 1951 of the Comptroller
for Development and Welfare in
the West Indies, a copy of which
is in the Library, I cannot yet
add anything to the reply about
shipping facilities which I gave
to. the right hon. Member on 25th
June.”

Mr, Shinwell; “Will the right
hon, Gentleman not agree that the
shipping facilities are very inade-
quate and that the provision for

tramsport at sea is being left
large! to other countries and
Ss concerns, and will he

give this matter his urgent at-
tention?”

Mr. Lyttelton: “I can assure thy
right hon, Gentleman that I 4am
very anxious on this subject. A
firm of British shipowners will.be
making a survey of the W
Indies at the end of this ,month
and the local Governments have
been asked to provide them with

every facility.” wr



Military Force
For Caribbean

LONDON,

In the House of Commons on
July 16, Major Tufton Beamish
(Conservative, Lewes) asked the
Secretary of State for the Colonies
what response has been obtainet
to the proposals to Colonial Gov-
ernments in the Caribbean area
for the establishment of a force,of
two regular infantry battalions to
be liable for service in the aréa;
and if he will make a full state-
ment on the matter.

Mr. Oliver Lyttelton, Secretar;
of State for the Colonies, replied
“The barracks in Jamaica wer:
seriously damaged by last year’s
hurricane, and it was therefore
necessary to reconsider the finan-
cial aspects of these propoSals.
am now putting revised proposals
fo the Governments concerning
these two battalions.”

Major Beamish: “Is my righ?
hon: Friend aware that in the days
of the West Indies Regiment re-
cruits volunteered with great en-
thusiasm to join a very fine force
with proud traditions; and will he
particularly bear in mind the pos
sibility of reviving this force?”

Mr. Lyttelton; “My hon. and
gallant Friend ht be interested
io knew that it has been decided
to give a two battalion force the
title of the West Indies Regiment
which was cisbanded.”

—B.U P.



Type-writing
Intermediate Grade, 1st Class: Rosemary
HC

ng,
2nd Class: Janet Scott, Angele Sarkis,
Certificates of the Trinity College of
Music
First Steps Division: Wendelin Baron,
Ann Taylor.
Passed with Merit: Marlene de Freitn,
Passed with Honours: Joan Millan.
Preparstory Division: Cecilia Farara,
Mary Lesley Knagas, Agnes Sarkis.
Junior Division: Shirley Ingram.
Passed with Merit: Ulusia Lyon.
Certiacates of the Associated Board of
the Royal Schools of M

Grade L, Renata Pen-
“nacchiotth, beth Hall

ed with Merit: Penelope Foster.
Grate Mi Bridget Ferreira, Jocelyn

Roberta Maso.
Roberta Maso.

Steele,
Theory Grade L.

FOR CAR
TRUCKS & B

casi

GARAGE TRADING
VICTORIA STREET.



or extra power & longer life -

BATTERIES

a Sa Ta ls * a i RTT

co.

LONDON, July.

IN THE HOUSE OF COMMONS on July 3, Mr. W. T.
Williams (Labour, Hammersmith) asked the President of
the Board of Trade the total tonnage of sugar exported
during the last 12 months and at what average cost per
ton from Britain and the Colonies to countries in Western
Europe who, in the same period, exported fondant into
Great Britain; what was the total tonnage of such fondant
imported into this country and at what average price

per ton.

More British
Motors for W.I.

LONDON.

The British West Indies are be-
ginning to reap the benefit of the
greater availability of British~
made cars, due to import restric-
tions recently imposed in other
Commonwealth Sa et imaatiole

During May, 51 cars
worth £202,813 were exported to
the West Indies, according to fig-
ures just published by the Society
of Motor Manufacturers and Trad-
ers, in London.

This compares with the 1951
monthly average of 358 British
cars sent to the West Indies, Brit-
ish Guiana and British Honduras.
Last year, these territories receiv-
ed 4,298 British cars. They also
imported 82 cars and 122 commer-
cial vehicles from the United
States, 42 cars and 19 commercial
vehicles from Canada, nine cars
from France and two from West-
ern Germany. ,

An analysis of the figures shows
that Trinidad was Britain’s best
motor customer in the Caribbean
colonies. It took 1,798 cars and

est 601 commercial vehicles in 1951.

Jamaica and her dependencies
took 910 cars and 418 commercial
vehicles from Britain last year,
Barbados took 601 cars and 214
commercial vehicles, British Gui-
ana took 371 cars and 145 com-
mercial vehicles, and the Baha-~
mas took 245 cars and 94 com-
mercial vehicles,

But Australia, which was Bri-
iain’s biggest single motor custom-
cr, has cut ber puccasses abruptly.
She took 36,276 cays last year and
25,178 in the first five menths of
this year. Recent import restric-
tions, however, cut Australian
purehages of British cars in May
to only, 1,192,. Similar. cuts, al-
though not so severe, have also
been imposed in New Zealand.

Trade observers in London say
that this sudden loss of an import-
ant market has foreed British mo-
tor manufacturers to.switch their
exports other area

markets,
—B.U.P.



U.S. Warns Reds
Of Navy Power

_... HONOLULU, July 23.

Carrier-based navy jet and
fighter bpmbers thundered close
along the mainland coast of Com-
munist China Tuesday in a warn-
ing demonstration of the power of
the U.S. Pacifie Fleet,
anno Wednesday. A
man for Pacific Fleet Commander
Admiral Arthur Radford said at
Pearl Harbour that about 100
American pilots flew “just cutside”
three miles off China in the
manoeuvre. He said the demon-
stration was designed to “give
Communists something to think
about.” It was designed to show
Reds that the Navy could bomb
the coastal cities of Amoy, Foo-
chow and Swatow anytime with-
out draining the Korean fleet
power the spokesman said.

Planes atiig in the
manoeuvre law by a carrier
task force under command of Rear
Admiral Souchy sailed into For-
rosa straits this week after a
fast trip from Korea waters.

The Navy did not say how many
planes it could throw against the
Chinese coast in a shooting
attack, ‘but Souchy’s task force
was revealed to be composed of
more than one ¢ er,

—UP.









Mr, Peter Thorneycroft, Presi-
dent of the Board of Trade, re-
plied: “Imports of fondant have
been separately recorded in the
trade returns only since Ist Janu-
ary to May, 1952. Imports into
the United Kingdom of fondant
from Sweden, Norway, Denmark,
the Netherlands, Belgium and
France totalled 18,405 tons at an
average cif. value of £83 a ton.
United Kingdom exports of refin-
ed sugar to these countries in
January to May, 1952, were 1,610
tons at an average f.o.b, value of
£53 a ton. No sugar is exported
from the Colonies to Western
Burope,

“IT should add that the sugar so
exported is bought for dollars, re-
fined in this country and sold for
hard currency at a profit. To
Wop these exports, therefore,
would mean either the lost of
a valuable processing trade
which is a net earner of hard
currency or an addition to our,
dollar import bill’

Mr. Williams: “Will the right
hon. Gentleman convey these
facts to the Minister of Food,
who told me a fortnight ago that
this trade was being brought to
an end? Is it not possible for the
right hon. Gentleman’s depart-
ment to bring about some rela-
tionship between the price for
which sugar is sold and the price
at which fondant is bought, be-
eause fondant is bought at twice
price at which
Thirdly,
right hon. Gen agree
in these circumstances something
ought to be done to provide some
alternative trade in order to pro-
vide sugar for home industries
which are suffering seriously be-
eause of lack of sugar, which is
being sent to Western European
countries?”

Mr. Thorneycroft: ‘The last
question is, of course, a matter
which should be addressed to my
eet hon. and gallant Friend the
Minister of Food. On the point
raised in the question, the answer
is that this arrangement is a net
earner of hard currency, which at
present we certainly need.”

—B.U.P.

FORT TOWNSHEND
STOPS N.Y.-W.1. RUN

(From Our Own Correspondent)
Trinidad, July 11.
The Furness West Indies ship
Fort Townshetad was taken ofi
the New York-West Indies run
this week. An official of Fur-
ness, Withy and Company, Ltd.
agents for the Furness West
Indies Line in Trinidad, announc-
ing this earlier this week dis-
closed that the ship would be
off this run for ay indefinite
period. No reason for withdrawal
‘was given,

Navy After withdrawal of the Lady
‘Nn

€lson and the Lady Rodney

4 from the Caribbean service, it is

expected that people who use
ships for travel between the
islands will experience consider-
able difficulty in getting passages.
The cargo-freighters which are
to replace the “Lady” boats will
have little accommodation for


































S
USES

LTD.

Secure

(Robert Thom Limited)
Whitepark Rd. ee Dial 4616

i

HE OFFICE

suger is.
would not” the
tleman that editorial on Wednesda



GRASS LOADER
AVAILABLE FROM



us a licence

ceive

The Post Office said to-day:
“We have had inquiries about
licences. The position is under
consideration and we can say
nothing.”

Meanwhile the manufacture of
the equipment, which will en-
able the pictures to be sent from
office to office, is continuing.

An official of the manufactur-
ers said: “There is a great future
in this. The Post Office will
have to grant wave-lengths and
licences.”

to send and re-

epcatiie
Salvation Arnty

Celebrates Golden
Jubilee la T’dad

(From Qur Own Correspontent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, July 11.
Speakers at a big public func-
tion held here last Monday
evening in connection with the
Golden Jubilee of the Salvation
Army’s arrival in this Colony
paid high tribute to the Army's

workers.

The Army came to Trinidad in
1902, but some effort had been
made earlier to begin operations
here. At first opposition to the
Army’s workers was fierce and it
is recorded that on one occasion
a leutenant received injuries
necessitating hospital treatment.

It is believed that ‘the Latin
background of the people ren-
dered evangelistic work more

difficult than in the other British
Caribbean islands. In spite of
this, however, converts were
made and the Army’s operations
progressed.

Today the Army
confidence of the Government,
the” business community and
those whom it originally set out
to serve,

enjoys the

At last Monday evening's
meeting principal speaker wes
Mr. P, M. Renison, the Acting

Governor, who said he was well
aware of the services being ren-

dered to the community by the |

Army. Members of the Army
he said, were calfed upon to carry
out duties under the most diffi-
cult conditions, but in spite of

that they always found them-
selves able to accomplish their
tasks.



“Washington Post”
Denounces
Mossadegh

~~ WASHINGTON July 23.

“The Washington Post” in Its
said that
the reinstatement Premier
Mossadegh is a “tragedy for the
Free World” because “the an-
archy which Mossadegh has cul-
tivated is cancerous ahd it can
no more be congained than can
malignant growt{y” The editoria!
says that Mossadegh has “no
policy except continuing the
crisis and national bankruptey,”

and voiced its suspicion that
Mossadegh himself precipated
the crisis in order to knit his
strength.”

It said “perhaps the only re-
maining hope is the Shah him-
elf. The Shah is an astute
young man, and he has eonceiv-~
ably ‘concluded that there is
nothing to do except watch
Mossadegh reap the consequences
of his folly, —UP.



U.S., Canadian $

MONTREAL, July, 23.
The United States dollar on

Tuesday closed at a discount of

2 15/16 sper cent. in terms of
Canadian funds, unchanged from
Monday’s close. Thai is it took
97 1/16 cents Canadian to buy 41
American. the pound sterling was
$2.70 1/2 down, 1/4 from Mon-
day.

In New York the Canadian
doilar was uuchanged at a pre-
mium of 3 1/2 per cent. in terms
of United States funds in closing
foreign exchange dealings on
Tuesday. The pound sterling was
down 3/16 of a cent at $2.78 11/14,

—C.P.

MODERN HEAVY DUTY

} oa



Your Requirements

COURTESY GARAGE

Convent

GRASS
HARVESTING
EQUIPMENT

SIDE DELIVERY RAKE
STOCK.

Insect
Control

In W.L.

(From Our Own Correspondent) 7
TRINIDAD, July I1..
Dr. P. F. de Caires, of ;
World Health Organisation, who
attended the recent Kent House
conference on Home Economics
and Education in Nutrition, ar-
ranged by the Food and Agricul-
ture Organisation and the Carib-
bean Commission, disclosed that
there is a proposal
pool of technical
insect control in
territories.

personnel
the Caribbean

According to him, funds have
been made available for the pro-
ject, but the question of where
the pool's headquarters will be
established has not yet been
settled. Plans call for a staff
which would include a Public
Health Officer, an Insect Control
Area Adviser and four Sanitari-
ans at the supervisor level, all,
it is expected, to be drawn from
the Caribbean area.

Territories which have already
submitted proposals for use of the
facilities, when available, include
Surinam, Barbados, Trinidad and
Tobago, St. Lucia, the Leeward
Islands and the Bahamas.

LA

Bakr And Byroade
Discuss Middle

Eastern Affairs

WASHINGTON, July 23.
peau Minister Abdullah Ibra-
him Bakr discussed ‘Middle Bast
problems on Wednesday with
Henry Byroade, assistant Secre-
tary of State for Near-Eastern!
affairs.

After a half hour meeting Bakr
told reporters that they had sur-
veyed current events in

ditions in Iraq,
up the move of the Israeli For-|
cig Mfnistry from Telaviv to
Jerusalem.

The Minister said that he camel
“on a courtesy visit,
Since Byroade returned from his
recent tour of the Near Fast,”
He said “we talked about his im-
pressions of my country, He
appeared satisfied with the situ-
ation, and with its stability, and
the progress going on, and hopes

this stability and progress will
continue,”

’ When asked about their discus-
sion cf Egyptian and tranian
developments he replied “we just
surveyed them,” —U,P.

—_——-

No Federation
Conference Yet

LONDON,
. In the House of Commons on
July 16, Mr. Reginald’ Sorensen
‘Labour, Leyton) asked the Secre-
fory of State for the Colonies the
present position in respect ‘of
West Indian Federation.

Mr, Oliver Lyttelton, Secretary
of State for the Colonies, replied;
“The Legislatures, apart from
Barbados, which still has to debate
the subject, British Guiana,
Pritish Honduras and the Virgin
Islands, have accepted federation
in principle, I have sugges{od
that the next step should be a cqn-
ference in London; a eopy of my
cespatch setting out detailed plans
for this conference was placed. in
the Library on 27th February: The
preliminary work suggested in
Sargamenh oe of that despatch
as not yet been leted,

1 do not think the Coneréhce at
usefully be held until this has
been done.” tj

Mr. Sorensen; “Supposing one
of the areas of the Caribbean
') which the right hon. Gentle-
inan refers still refuses to join in,
what will happen? Will they ge
on with the proposal?”

Mr. Lyttelton: ‘That is a hypo~
thetical question. I am very keen
to hold the conference to see what
peneral measur of agrgement
can be reached.”















Now !















































tribute to the
value of this

J.B. LESLIE & Co., Ltd.















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PAGE THREE



Bonny

Baby
This is Baby
Elizabeth Sharp-
les brought up
in West Africa
on Cow & Gate
Milk Food, and
a wonderful

famous product
in a tropical
climate.

Her mother
writes, “Elizabeth was making very slow progress
when at four months | put her on Cow & Gate.
| do feel | owe your product a debt of gratitude
for the marked and rapid progress she then made
and for the resulting healthy child she is today.”

ATE 285

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PAGE FOUR

a anécare | When Russia Was Free black Magic Under
Crooked Pine

By HENRY LOWRIE

Rize = aa sas neewomat] w = wees = Pane “ oe
Printed by the Advocate Co,, Lid., Bread 8t., Bridsetewn

Thursday, July 24, 1952

SUMMER VISITORS

' 3S TOURISM in the Caribbean a season-
al industry?

Or has the aeroplane made the Carib-
bean available as an all-the-year holiday
resort for the budget-minded, as well as
for the wealthy ?

The answer to these questions depends
on circumstances. In Barbados for instance
the inflow of families from Venezuela’ has
resulted in the filling of certain beach
residential clubs and seaside hotels.

At the same time the island’s largest
hotel has ample accommodation for visitors.
Venezuelans it would appear at first sigh!
want to spend the summer beside the sea
with their families. But the nearness of
most Barbadian hotels to the sea and the
easy access to beaches from hotels make it
doubtful whether Venezuelans deliberate -
ly avoid hotels which are not actually on
the sea,







Venezuelans read daily in their own
newspapers advertised invitations to spend
their summer holidays in other Caribbean
seaside resorts. Several competing ‘air-
lines offer special summer rates to Europe
and North America. Barbados is only one
of a wide variety of summer vacation re-
sorts a Venezuelan might choose.. The
fact that certain residential clubs and at
least one large hotel maintain a high
Venezuelan patronage during the summer
months is probably due to special reasons.
As far as Barbados is concerned tourism
is still seasonal for the majority of th-
large hotels.

How is tourism to be spread over the
whole year? Can it be done?

Pan-American Airways have recently re-
leased certain information which suggests
that hotels can be filled. during the summer
months by American visitors, May this
year according to traffic officials of the air-
line in the Caribbean has been exceptiona!
for summer visitors from America.
» Nassau which is renowned as a winte?
playground for the wealthy recorded a 5;
per cent increase in Clipper traffic over
May 1951. Nassau is now luring budget-
minded vacationists with low-pricked pack-
age tours. Nassau is being so successful

attraeting summer visitors from America
by low-priced package tours, Barbados can
only attract them by under-cutting Nassau.
But Nassau is not the only Caribbean re-
sort to record summer gains of visitors. In
Jamaica ten per cent. more P.A.A, pas-
sengers arrived in Montego Bay and Kings-
ton than in May 1951. And neighbour-
ing Trinidad also’ received nine per cent.
more passengers than in the previous May.
In Haiti there was a 13 per cent. increase
and in Havana twelve per cent. more
visitors were recorded than in May 1951.
~ Barbados is not served by Pan-American
Airways. It seems certain that if it were,
some of the thousands of Americans who
are now spending summers in the Carib-
bean would tome here.

The reason for Pan-American Airways
not coming to Barbados is well known.
The United Kingdom Government still
uses Barbados as a pawn in international
agreements, affecting landing rights. Grea:
Britain is quite prepared to allow Pan-
American Airways to come to Barbados
provided that the United States Govern-
ment grants the United Kingdom compen-
sating landing rights in the United States.

If Pan-American Airways were permit-
ted to come to Barbados it 1s certain that
more Americans would visit Barbados as
a result. :

- Low-price packaged tours are bringing
Americans in Pan-American planes to
Nassau in such numbers that all but one
of their many hotels have remained open-
ed during the summer.

If Nassau can attract budget-minded
Americans by offering low-priced package
tours, so can Barbados. But low-priced
package tours will not solve Barbados’
summer hotel difficulties unless American
airlines are allowed to fly intending \visit-
ors here.

Barbados was - successful in. obtaining
permission for Venezuelan airlines to cal!
at Seawell. The more airlines that use
Seawell the greater the revenue earned by
the airport.

Why should Pan-American Airways not
be welcomed here by the government of
Barbados? It is clearly in the interest of
the island’s economy that Pan-American
Airways should call here. Either the gov-
ernment of Barbados does not know that
the reason for their not coming here is the
United Kingdom’s use of Barbados as a
bargaining pawn for obtaining landing
rights concessions in United States terri-
tory, or it does. If it does, can it be said
to be acting in the best interests of the
island if it does not press for landing rights
in Barbados to be given to Pan-American
Airways?

* expected.
















Last March marked the 35th
anniversary of the great iMussian
Revolution, when the 30v0-year-
old Romanov dynasty Was over-
thrown and Russia became, in
Lenin’s phrase, “the trees
country “in the world.”

For the outside world, and for
America particularly, the demc-
cratic revolution was quite un-
Only a few weeks
before it broke out, the Petro-
grad correspondent of one of
America’s most esteemed news-
papers cabled that the Tsarist
Government had never been so
strong. The Russian people, the
Ci t went on, might be
dissatisfied with this or that
particular Government policy, or
with this or that particular high
official, but nobody in Russia was
thinking about revolution and
the Russian people was devoted
with all its heart and soul to the
“Little Father,” Nicholas IT.

The correspondent, like many
of his colleagues before and
since, simply was not seeing and
hearing what was plain to be
seen and heard. For on Decem-
ber 16, 1916, the leader of the
liberal Constitutional Democrats
in the Duma, the noted historian,
Professor Paul Miliukov, had
warned:

“The atmosphere is saturated
with electricity—the approach-
ing storm is in the very air.
Nobody, gentlemen, can tell
when and where the thunder
will crash.”

The earlier revolution, in 1905,
thad shown plainly the jre of
the Russian people for tical
freedom, All classes, in all parts
of the country, participated in or
supported the general strike of
October1905. As the strike
raged, Count Witte, one of the
most tened representatives
of the regime, warned the
Tsar:

“The present movement for
freedom is not of new birth.
Its roots are imbedded in
centuries of Russian history
....‘Freedom’ must become
the slogan of the Government,
No other possibility for the
salvation of tihe state exists.
The march of historical pro-

eannot be halted. The
idea of civil liberty will
triumph, if not through reform
then by the path of revolu-
tion.”

As a result of the general
strike, the Tsar was com)
to issue a manifesto recognizing
the rights of free speech, con~
science, assembly and of labour
to organize; and setting up a
liberal suffrage law for elections
to an all-Russian parliament, the
Duma, The Tsar’s manifesto
also promised that, for the first
time, no laws would be enacted
without the Duma’s sanction.

All Russia rejoiced at the news
of the Manifesto. Even the
reactionary Governor of St,
Petersburg (renamed Petrograd
during Pee I), General
Trepov, exc t

_ “Thank goa the manifesto

has been signed, Freedom has

been granted; the people will

choose their own representa-

tives. A new life is begin-
”

In the elections to the first
Duma, in the spring of 1906, the
liberals and radical democrats
gained. a huge majority. Immed-
iatély-the Duma, almost unani-
mously, addressed a petition to
the Tsar outlining a long list of
proposed reforms. It called for
tull political freedom, an amnesty
tor political prisoners and relig-
ious dissidents, the abolition of
capital punishment, full equality
‘for the various national minori-
ties and Jews, autonomy for
Poland and Finland, a broader
suffrage law, democratization cf

‘local government, humane labour

laws, comprehensive social leg-
islation, and the expropriation of
state lands and the estates of the
nobles (wlth just; compensation)
for distribution among the pea~
sants,

For a considerable time, the

BARBADOS ADVOCATF

Hy David Shub
Tsar wavered, At one point, he
went so far as to enter into
negotiations with the liberal
leaders with a view toward €s-
tablisaing a government respon-
sible to the Duma as the British
Cabinet is to Parliament. Finally,
however, the Tsar broke off these
negotiations and dissolved the
Duma. r

The second Duma, convened in
1907, was even more anti-Tsarist
than the first. It was also dis-
solved, but this time the election
law was changed to assure a
conservative majority. Never-
theless, in both the third and
fourth (last) Dumas, the Consti-
tutional Democrats had a large
bloc, and socialists, and even
Bolsheviks, were also represent-
ed. Thus, for eleven years,
opposition parties on the floor of
the Duma continued to fight for
the reforms demanded by the
first Duma,

Most objective historians of
the Russian Revolution now
agree that a new revolution could
have been avoided had the Tsar
granted the demands of the
moderate, liberal elements in
1906. it was one of the great
tragedies of history “that, at the
beginning of our century, the
Russian throne was occupied by
so smail and weak-willed a man
as Nicholas IT.

During World War I, Russian
liberals did not desire a new
revolution, because they feared
it might bring victory for the
Kaiser over the Allies. Ata
conference of the Constitutional
Democrats in July 1915, some
delegates urged that the Duma
defy the Tsar by remaining in
session affer he had adjourned
it. Miliukov opposed this pro-
posal, saying:

“This sort of flippaney might
be called criminal, People
who make such proposals are
playing with fire. Apparently,
they completely disregard the
terrile stress under which all
Russia now lives, Russia today
is one inflamed wound—all is
pain, grief suffering. One care-
lessly-thrown match could
create a terrible conflagration
—God preserve us from seeing
that conflagration.”
Nevertheless, the Revolution

of March 1917 was almost blood-
less, and it was a national one.
The liberal professor, Eugene
Troubetskoy, wrote:

“This revolution is unique,

There have been bourgeois
revolutions and _ proletarian
revolutions but I doubt if

there has ever been a revolu-

tion so truly national, in the

widest sense of the term, as the
present Russian one, Every-
body made this revolution.

Everyone took part in it—the

workers, the soldiers,

bourgeois, even the nobility—
all the social forces of the
land.”

The Provisional Government
ereated after the overthrow of
Tsarism consisted of liberals and
constitutional monarchists,. with
the moderate socialist Alexander
Kerensky as Minister of Justice,
The Government was formed by
a joint committee of the Duma
and the Petrograd Soviet of
Workers and Soldiers’ Deputies,
then led by democratic socialis'
The Provisional Government
later broadened several times,
with Kerensky becoming Premier
and other socialists joining the
Government,

Lenin, Zinoviev, Trotsky,
Rykov, Bukharin, Kamenev,
Sverdlov, Stalin and the other
Bolshevik leaders did not parti-
vipate in the overthrow of the
monarchy or in the creation of
the new democratic government;
they were all either abroad or in
Siberian exile. The initial social
reforms which Lenin and Trot-
sky had demanded had essential-
ly been fulfilled without them,

Without civil war, and without
resistance from the landowners,
the Provisional Government

adopted a broad agrarian reform



-Provisional ”

programme. ll estates and
crown lands were to form a sin-
gle pool, to be divided among
the peasants who personally
cultivated them. Elected agrar-
jan committees,were set up to
work out the distribution. The
Government also
pledged the early convocation of
an All- Constituent As-
sembly, — by universal,
secret and @irect balloting, to
adopt a constitution for Russia.
The Provisional Government also
abolished class, ethnic and re-
ligious restrictions and privi-
leges; established democratic
elections in the municipalities
and extended local self-govern-
ment; proclaimed freedom of
speech, press, association, assem-
bly and labour organization;
granted a full and immediate
amnesty to all political and re-
ligious offenders; recognized the
independence of Poland and the
autonomy of Finland, In short,
the democratic government
established by the March Revo-
jution gave’the people of Russia
the liberty, justice and equality
for which generations of free-
dom-loving men and. women of
all classes had sacrificed their
own freedom and often their
lives.

/The Bolsheviks gained
through the dissensions which
wracked their opponents, The
majority of Army and Navy
officers did not want to defend
the Provisional Government.
After the failure of the Kornilov
rebellion in September, many
officers in fact wanted the dem-
ocratic government to be over-
thrown — they mistakenly be-
lieved that the Bolsheviks would
last only a few weeks, and could
then he replaced by a “strong”
conservative regime. These
views were shared by many
conservatives, including some
members of the Constitutional
Democratic party.

On the other hand, a majority
ef the Mensheviks (Social Demo-
crats) and ‘a great many Socialist
Revolutionaries still believed the
Bolsheviks to be democrats,
These groups favoured a “united
front of the entire Revolutionary
Democracy” (excluding liberals,
including Bolsheviks), and thus
opposed any idea of, suppressing
Lenin's party.

It is, of course, now useless to
speculate on how the Bolshevik
coup d'état could have been pre-
vented. But today no one can
deny that the Bolshevik seizure
of power was a catastrophe for
the entire world. The Bolsheviks
abolished all the liberties which
the Russian people had gained
through a century of struggle.
The political order introduced by
Lenin, Trotsky and Stalin has
turned all of Russia into one vast
prison, and the great mass of the
population into slaves, The
Bolsheviks have sacrificed the
lives of scores of millions of
human beings, debased Russia’s
great humanitarian culture, dis-
eredited the ideals of socialism,
prepared the road for Fascism,
and helped Hitler first to take
power and then to launch the
most terrible war in history.
Today, 35 years after the demo-
cratic March Revolution which
they destroyed, the Communist
rulers are the most dangerous
enemies of peace, freedom and
democracy in the world.

The great majority of liberals,
progressive democrats and social-
ists in the world now realize that
freedom, equality and justice are
eternal ideas toward which
humanity will always strive, and
that socialism is only one of
several conceivable means of
achieving these ideals. The
Bolsheviks deified that means,
while liquidating the ideals,
which were its ultimate aims.
It should now be clear to every
thinking liberal, democrat and
socialist that the world can only
have real peace when the ideals
of the March Revolution have
triumphed again in Russia,

—The New Leader.

—~—S

Point Four—Pract ical Idealism

Millions of ples in the eco-
nomica lly underdeveloped
nations of the world are on the
march toward the achievement
of a better life for themselves
and their children, They want
more food, better health, a
higher standard of living, and
a ce to work out their own
destinies within their own cul-
tural patterns,

The United States ig sym-
eir needs and as-
Proven; sa. wall 26 De

ogram, as as
active participation in the
United Nations program for
technical assistance, the U.S. is

help them help themselves
atta nets bs ectives.
Through int Four Pro-

gram, We are providing tech-
nical assistance to help them
increase ‘their food supplies,
develop theif industries in the
pattern of their own economies,
solve their public health prob-
lems, and broaden their educa-
tional systanys, Jn these and
many other ways, Point Four
is helping these developing coun-
tries realize the full potentials
of their human and. materiat
resources for the benefit of all
their people.

There is an oid Chinese prov-
erb that says?

“If you. plant for a year—

plant grain;

If you plant for twenty-five

—years—plant trees; e

If you plant for a hundred

years—plant men.”

Now Point Four, for one thing.
is planting grain. Through its
help, the people of Asia, Africa,
the Middle Bast, and Latin
America are beginning to ex-
periment with new kinds of
seed, new and better tools, and
improved methods of enrich-
ing the soil. In one place, they
have doubled their wheat crops,
and in many other places they
are getting better yields each
year, which mé@ans more food
for the family and a little cash
income. This is tremendous pro-
gress and it is the first step

toward freeing people from
hunger. This is one of the main
goals we have set

Point Four is also planting
trees. In parts of the world, for-
ests have been plundered and

i



By JONATHAN B. BINGHAM



Jonathan B, Bingham has
been associated with the Point
Four Program since Novem-
ber 1951, first as Deputy Ad-
ministrator of the Technical
Co-operation Administration
and currently as Acting Ad-
ministrator, Other service in
the U.S. Department of State,
the Mutual Security Agency,
and as a free-lance correspon-

© dent in Burope and Asia has
given him a wide knowledge
of worldwide problems and
aspirations. Born in 1914 in
New Haven, Connecticut, Mr.
Bingham was educated at Yale
University and Yale Law
School. He was 4 intelli-
gence officer in the U.S. Army
during World War Il.



the soil has become dry and
eroded. Overcoming this is one
of the most important aims of
our cooperative ‘ams.
_ But most important of all,
Point Four is planting men—
and women—whom the Chinese
sage forgot to mention.
I mean, of course, that our
in Point

purpose
Four is to develop, people; peo-

ple who are s' self-reliant,
and capable of developing their
‘own resources for eir own

use and benefit; people who can
manage their own _ affairs
through their own representa-
tive institutions; people who can

jsuppart ‘themselves and naed
not depend on charity.
One of the appealing things

about the U.S, Point Four Pro-
gram, I think, is, that it is a
two-way proposition. Many of
the animal and plant strains
that we have developed in the
United States came originally
from the very lands which we
are now trying to help through

the export of our technica!
knowledge. For instance, we
got cattle from India, horses

from Arabia, a wonderful kind
of wheat from Turkey. So we

are in @ sense, only

repaying

vhat we have bor:
In this cooperative work, new
ideas and new products are be-

ing developed. IT have never
talked with an American Point
Four. technician who did not
say that he was learning, just
as he was teaching, and getting,
just as he was giving, through
his job.

Second only to food produc-
tion is the work of controlling
disease and developing healthy
people,

Point Four recognizes the
basic interdependence of food
and health, Sick people cannot
work and ‘oduce enough to
feed themselves and their fam-
ilies. Underfed people fall sick
easily, Mi preventive medi-<
cine has found answers to most
of the mass diseases such as
malaria, dys®ntery, typhoid, and
trachoma. Clean water is one
of the answers. DDT is another.
So point Four technicians are
teaching ln nstrating
public hea and = preventive
medicine to ‘millions of people.
_ Of course, many other activi-
ties are carried on in addition
to those in the basic fields of
food, health, “and education, We
are helping in the development
of industries; encouraging pri-
vate capital, both locally and
from the United States, to in-
vest in pretiuctive enterprise
that will con te to the de-
velopment. of countries. we
are working with,

We are
ploration and development of
mineral and water resources that
are so essential in many lands,

We are helping build roads, the |

lack of which is often a serious
obstacle to development.

In all these ‘varied activities
which cover almost the whole
range of human endeavor, it
is our aim), to work directly
with the people we are trying
to help to help themselves, do-
ing what they are interested in.
starting at the technical level
at which they find themselves,
encouraging them to contribute
their Own funds and. especially
their own efforts to these joint
operations
; If Point Four is to succeed,
it must be a oT



ative en-
eae a,

elping in the ex- |



~The



THURSDAY, JULY 24, 1952

POCO CF

PAN

On Sale at

- ,OSCOSOBSS
BOOK 8.
The Widest Selection in Town.
ADVOCATE STATIONERY.

OPPO CSSO SOF POPE SEES EP FOSS SOSSSSP PEP OOS



WASHINGTON.

ago.

crooked pine” in the swamps.

which came from magic roots.

to talk with Joe,

up.

| their final year.

gaining.



hours.

LOOK out, men! The Zontians want to
invade your territory still further.

Zonta comes from the American Indian.
language and means trustworthy and hon-

est.

Anyway, 500 Zontians—professional and
executive women—from the United States
and 13 other countries adopted for the theme
of their plan-making conference at Houston,
Texas, the phrase: “Women’s work has just

begun.”

The Zonta Club was started in 1919 in
Buffalo. Now there are more than 9,000
women in it, although membership is re-
stricted to one top woman from each busi-
ness or profession in a community.

CIVIL DEFENCE bosses of New York are
appealing for 40,000 “hams” the radio ama-
teurs, to help in the 24-hour a day alert

of the United States, is now paying off in a
In Boston a company has been formed to

invest American dollars—800 million of
them (£285,710,000)—in business

the border.

The New York Mirror adds its congratu-
lations today to Canada on its “tight, sweet,

better-kept house”,

wish they could do as well.

WHEN they start making the other side
of the Rommel Story, answering the com-
plaints that James Mason showed him in too
favourable a light, it will be in a specially
built Tobruk on the Californian desert.

“The Desert Rat”, telling how British and
Anzac troops took the arrogance out of Rom-
mel and his famed Afrika Korps, will prob-
ably have Robert Newton in a leading role.

A PERMANENT exhibition centre, known
as “The British Aisles”, will be opening in
New York in September to show British

goods.



Co-operating Actively

By R. M. MacCOLL

SHREWD James Reston, of the New York
Times, writes that “the Republicans and
Democrats may be trading insults about each
other’s foreign policies, but the fact remains
that they are co-operating actively and

| effectively 6n the most exciting and revolu-
|tionary foreign policy adventure Americ:

has had since World War II.”
PERHAPS it’s an

plush offices, Anyway,

| expert.

ARE American doctors getting too tough, :
| losing the “warm, human approach” to their
patients? The American Psychiatric Asso-

IT was-like a tale from the African jungle
| the way Richmond, Virginia, police told it
| today—the story of a murder done six years

They arrested 53-year-old Mrs. Cora Lee
| Nash after they had “broken” the voodoo
| Spell she was supposed to have put on Joe
Nash, aged 56—the man, they say, who saw
her shoot her husband Luther “beside a

BUT the police sent their Mrs. Goldie Bass

She told him her powers were even greater
than Mrs. Nash’s. So he led her to a spot be-
hind the Nash home where bones were dug

Doctors are now trying to decide whether
they are those of the missing husband.

A BANK in Toledo, Ohio, wondering how
university students would fare in the pitfall
world of finance, gave five students 5,000
;dollars (£1,785) to “play around with” in

They came up today with a profit of 4.4
per cent. on their investments.

THE guards at Michigan prison, where
the riots took place in April, have learned
their lesson. No more coddling, no more bar-

The prisoners got tough again after one
had wriggled free and let others out.

Out went the warden’s call for help. One
hundred policemen with guns answered.
They had the jail quiet again in a couple of

Americans,

against a sneak plane attack.

CANADA'S booming prosperity, the envy
practical way.
naturally feel some sense of chagrin and

UNEMPLOYMENT is soaring in Detroit,
the motor-car city, because of the steel
strike: The figure is expected to be 150,000.

instinctive back-to-
nature move on the part of Americans, sub.
poate in rebellion against their super

millionaire elde
statesman Bernard Baruch started the “park
bench diplomacy” business some years age
And now passers-by on New York’s teemin;
Morning-side-drive look twice, Yes, no, ye
—it’s Dwight Eisenhower sitting on tha‘
| bench deep in conversation with John Foste
|Dulles, the Republicans’ foreign affairs

Said Joe, cousin of Luther: She put me
} under a spell and made me bury him.

| Like the other people in this backward
coloured community in Henrico County he
believed Mrs. Nash had voodoo powers

& CO.

across

it says, .
Â¥ 7 important!

Red Kid

from $2 to $7

Toaday’s Good

News

We have large stocks of
Super Rice, Bacon, Butter
and Cheese,

Phone To-day—We Deliver



Easy to Prepare

Rice Krispies
Corn Flakes
Shredded Wheat
Cream of Wheat
Weet-a-bix
Pablum

Farex

Bacon

Calves Liver
Bacon



Make your own Bran Muffins
with Posts Bran Flakes
37c. per pkg,



ciation thinks definitely yes, and recommends

that medical schools should pay more atten-
t to reminding budding doctors of the
“emotional needs” of their future patients.



,



C. S. PITCHER





PHONE TO-DAY

GODDARDS

ENAMEL SINKS
GALVANISED SINKS
ALUMINUM SINKS

In choice of two sizes:
24 x 16
30 » 18

And Double Drain-
Board Sinks for your
kitchen.

4

1, Three-quarters of an
inch more than the
actual foot measure
should be allowed in the
length of a child’s shoe.

2. The heel must neither
pinch nor slip and the
heel seat must be wide
enough to give the child
a firm base with ankles
straight and weight even.
ly distributed.

3. The natural develop-
ment of growing feet
depends on unhampered
movement , . . which re-
quires soft, flexible
leather and proper
width,

4. The shoe must fit the
curves of the arch with
reasonable snugness and
the outer arch of the
feot must have firm
contact with the sole of
the shoe,

Children’s SHOES are so

Our wide selection for Boys &
Girls includes — Black Patent
Leather; White Nubuck &

We have all sizes & prices

Just Arrived

Heinz Mayoraise

Heinz Vegetable Salad
Macaroni

Hams in Tins

Carr’s Cream Crackers

Carr's Cheese Crisps

SPECIALS

Tomato Soup, 80z.—22

cents
Chocolate Nut Roll 14c.
each
Italian Ketchup 46c,
Italian Chili Sauce 74c.
Prepared Mustard 25c.
She-t eGelatine 24c. per
pkg.





Please drive carefully—the
life you save may be your
own. ’



— WE DELIVER






















‘



THURSDAY, JULY 24, 1952 PAGE FIVE

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Cuban Sugar
Under M.S.A.

LONDON.

in the House of «Commons 01
July 10, Mr. Cyril*Osborne (Con-|
servalive, Lineolnshire) asked ihe
Chancellor of the Exchequer if je
wiki request the United St: a
Government to include Cuban
sugar and Canadian wheat in u ey
grunts in aid to Be received un |
the Mutual Security Act; and |
ne will make a statement, |
}



ee

Yellow. Fever Scheme
Discussed With Dr. DeCaires

. Is EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR has informed
the Honourable the House of Assembly and the Legislative
Council that a scheme for eradication from Barbados of
the fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti, has been dis-
cussed with Dr, P. F, De Caires, representative of the
Pan-American Sanitary Bureau, which is the regional
Bureau of the World Health Organisation for the Western
Hemisphere.

and keep your
home bright,

Velicyw



Under the terms of the Agree-

“ Ps 3 ment into which it would be . ; 3 ;
Confident LG. necessary to enter with the Bureau, _ Sir Arthur Salter; Minister
this Government would be required State for

plied: “The 300,000,000-dollar eco-
nomic aid from the Mutual Sec ur-
ity Administration has alresay:
been fully committed. and. ever}
200,000,000 dollars’ of the money |
has been recoveréd, .There {S no;
question, therefore, of inclueio,;
additional items such e* suger

wheat. My right hon. Friend ccs

Ready For Sea te supply a ‘certain amount of

insecticide’ and personnel, whilst
spraying @quipment, insecticide
and the services of one medical
officer and one inspector would
be supplied by the Pan-American
Sanitary Bureau, Besides using a
part’of the existing stock of in-
secticide’ which, as far as can be

Keonomie Affairs, =

The Schooner Confident'-I. G.
which was built at Browne’s
Beagh, Bay Street and launched
On. .November .1,. 1951, .is now
ready for sea. “I hope that by
now. and Tuesday next the
merchants. of the island as well



asthe Schooner Pool will give foreseen, it will be possible to not intend to make a furt)er
me sufficient cargo so as to .en- replace. from the current.vote, a DESIGNED AS A HIGH-FLYING radar sentinel for domestic Gefense, the Navy’s new radar plane is picturea statement at present.” |
oor oa to make my first trip,” sum estimated at $1,000 will be duving a test flight over the California mountains. The grotesque configuration of the WV-2 is caused Unsaieabie

. Ernest Lorde, her owner, needed to meet this Island’s share oy the huge radar’s shark-like fin atop the Super-Constellation and the expanded balloon below. Hints Mr. Osborne: “As were 4%

told the Advocate yesterday.

The Confident LG. was brought
into the Careenage on April 23. _.
1952." While in the inner basin, Director of Medical Services, his
She Was equipped with spars, departmental officers and the
rigging and sails. She was also medical and technical officers of the
sealed and made “ship shape.” Pan-American Sanitary Bureau

At present the only work going Statutory authority to enter and
on is centred on the galley. Car- spray houses and premises with
pentérs are erecting the galley an insecticide approved by the
house which is expected to be General Board of Health and to
completed today. add larvicide approved by the

Board to water or water contain-
2 Cases Of House ers. The General Board of Health
Breaking Reported

of the cost of the scheme.

Authority
It will be necessary to give the

about 1,000,000 tons of udsaies.) v

Sugar
rw “clectronie marvels” preceded the trial appearance of the laboratory ship.

«International)

sugar in Cuba and we stihl huve
rauoning over here, would je

i hm varged With o'ths the ‘surplus coma. on
‘ate an Ci a d ul sh 3 this pl 8

Breaking Into Building — Sisis.e¢ “"
And Stealing Cigarettes

rationing?"

Sir Arthur Salter: “If my jun.
Friena» is thinking of approps:-
ations Wn respect to'a later yer,

THE TRIAL of Oliver Grimes, a watchman of Clap-

ham, who is charged with breaking into the building of
the British-American Tobacco Co. on June 21 while he
was employed there, and stealing cigarettes, unused cig-







Scheme

Abardoned

His Excellency the Governor
has referred to his Message
No. 9/1951 dated the 27th of
February, 1951, to the Honour-
able Legislative Council/House
of Assembly regarding pro-
posals put forward by the
Comptroller of the Develop-
ment and Welfare Organisa-
tion for the extension of Er-

say 1952-53, ¢ would point. .ui.}
that the appropriations have only}
just reached thei final legit. |
tive stage in America and that yo}
do not yet know the views of rey

|



has approved of the proposed pro-
gramme, and has expréssed its
willingness to amend the Mosquito

American administration as ww Bryden & Sons Ltd, Barbados





Regulations t i e arette shells and slides valued $1.26, started at the Court whic re eligibie. ‘oye
Clement Yearwood of Rock ane te eatty Genbontineer cies aren ee —, _ of Grand Sessions -yesterday, before Mr. Justice G. L. a I ‘wil vo ad ¥ iat |
Fs BP AU a eae effectively, commodation and facilities for Taylor, and after five witnesses for the Prosecution gave ™y hon, Friend says.” | a refs anata tae
house was broken and entered , The Directorof Medical Services | training sixteen students & evidence, it was adjourned until today. New Pact K '
between 5.30 a.m. and 5.45 p.m, has been assured of the co-opera- | tae 4 ee i ee Mr. W. W. Reece, Q.C., is prosecuting for the Crown, , Mr. Norman Dodds. (Labou»| eep your
on the 18th instant and $10.00 tion of the Sanitary Authorities in A » Grimes is represented by Mv. D. H. L. Ward. Dartford); “Will. the right ho,

form the Honourable Council/
House that as a result of the
inability of the Governments
of those territories to contri-




Gentleman bear in mind that ie;
The charge was brought against Ward asked the Inspector why Sugar is there now and that in|
Grimes after the Police received they waited so long after Grimes this austerity period housewiws |

the several parishes: this is essen-
tial for the success of the propos-
ed programme.

worth of articles stolen, Year-
wood reported the matter to the
Police on Tuesday.

children...

Charles King of Good Intent. The Honourable the House of but ropriate share of certain reports and on the Satur- had, as they said, entered the would like it now? Is he furty: |
St. George, also reported that his Assembly/Legislative ‘Council is tas, trameaak ‘annually recur. | day of the alleged offence, hid building, before going to him, The aware that the sugar, which co1){) 0° ~~"
house was broken and _ entered invited to approve that the scheme, rent costa, it has been found among canes near the tobacco fac- Inspector said they had waited be sold for sterling to be spen’ || ee
on Monday. Nothing was taken, for the eradication of the yellow necessary to abandon the tory for more than six hours, for any developments, Cpl, Year- this country, is available for jut) -

however. fever mosquito with the assistance
of the Pan-American Sanitary
Bureau should be proceeded with
and that, in accordance with the

over 1d. a lb? Will he have a}
word with the President of the,
Board of Trade and help to ge}
a new pact?” |

keeping an eye on Grimes while
he made his rounds as watchman,

The witnesses who gave evidence
yesterday were. George Reid,

scheme, wood said that there was the pos-
sibility that an accomplice might
have arrived.

Evidence by DeVerteuil, in the





FIT AND

Finances Inquiry

prescribed procedure, the Secre-

Motor Cyclist

In Port-of-Spain

PORT-OF-SPAIN

In the House of
July 16, Mr, James

tary of State for the Colonies may
be asked to sponsor the necessary
epplication for technical assistance
Commons on to the World Health Organisation

Johnson (La-



Struck By Lorry

Hutson Chandler, an Overseer

at the Belle Plantation, was de-

bour, Rugby) asked the Secretary
of State for the Colonies why the

Firewood, Charcoal

tained at the General Hospital on
Tuesday night after he was in-

Inspector of Police, Cpl. Bryan,
Cpl, Yearwood, Henry A, O’N
Skinner, Assistant Manager of the

Company and Marcel R, DeVer-
teuil, General Manager.
DeVerteuil was the last to

give evidence and he has not yet
been cross-examined. The other

main, corroborated the Police’s

. evidence,

When the case continues this
morning at 10 a.m. De Verteuil will
be cross-examined.



U.S. Competition

Sir Arthur Salter: “As I h ve)
pointed out, the money in resp
of this year has already be?n|
fully committed, There is
margin left for use for this p \-
pose,”

Mr. Dodds: “But will the ri: ')
hon. Gentleman have a word wii"



STRONG

Your children will always be full of fun
—full of energy have a real zest
tor work or t= . it you give them
HALIBORANGE every day. It is rich












of State for the Colonies, replied:
“T understand that the report has
not yet béen before the Executive
Council. The Acting Governor has
so far consulted his official advis-
ers only,”

aware that there is acute public
interest in Port-of-Spain in this
matter and that many people in
Port-of-Spain believe that publi-
cation of the Report is being with-
held because Ministers are impli-
cated in the affair?”

that I am aware that it is going
to be withheld, Certain legal mat- batches were milled and flaked

and the official advisers have to
be cleared up before I can make
a statement.”—B.UP.

working elass people in the island
appreciate fair treatment and re-
act favourably. It is principally a
matter of personal relations which
continue to be very good.”

colonies think of Barbados as be-
ing highly cultivated, there is de-
finite’ reom for
cultivation. which includes better
application of
Haynes said.

ance now given, the island’s food
vation .will, be raised because of
the gréater facilities Which are

that in the long run, the relation-
ship

Mr. Oliver Lyttelton, Secretary the week-end.

The Motor Vessel Daerwood
arrived yesterday from St. Lucia
with a quantity of cargo and
many passengers on board. In-
eluded in her cargo were 175
bags of copra, 40 cartons of rice,
23 bags of cocoanuts and fresh
fruit.

Schooner Mandalay II brought
12 bags of arrowroot, 435 bags of
eonrs, 30 bags of cocoanuts and
32 pieces of timber.

General Cargo

The Steamship Sunwhit
brought a quantity of general
cargo. to the island. In_ her

Mr. Johnson: “Is the Minister

Mr, Lyttelton: “I have not said

ters between the Acting Governor oats, machinery, cotton canvas,
paint, sherry, beer, whisky, china-
ware, rayon and medicines.

The Daerwood, Mandalay I
and Cloudia S. are consigned to
the Schooner Owners’ Associa-
tion. Sunwhit is consigned to
Messrs. DaCosta & Co, Ltd.

Peasants’ Loan

@ From page 1



Government
Gfficials On Leave

Agriculture, has been granted
one month’s extension of sick
leave with effect from the 11th
instant.

“In addition, the fact that other

more intensive
manures,* Mr.

It is felt that with the assist-

ill i ital, ten days’ casual leave,
production -will’ increase, as well ‘ico’ with effect from the 16th
as the general standard of culti- jnstant,

being offered. It is also envisaged days’ casual leave
from the Ist August.
which now exists between
peasant owners and factory own-
ers will be improved.

gineer, will act as

Engineer.



Inspect these in our

Linen Department

RAYON & COTTON CURTAIN NET—
36 ins. wide @ $1.11 yd.
Gold, Tango, Blue, Rose, Green

RAYON & COTTON CURTAIN NET—
40 ins. wide @ $1.56 yd.
Gold, Tango, Blue, Rose, Green

COTTON CURTAIN NET—40 ins, wid
@ $i.87 yd ec
Cream, White

FIGURED MARQUESETTE
36 ins, wide @ 97c. yd.



Mr. C. C. Skeete, Director of

Other Government Officials on
leave are Hon, C. Wylie, M.L.C.,
Attorney General, 14 days’ casual
leave with effect from the 16th
instant; and Mr. W. C. Goodman,
M.B.E., Secretary of the General

Mr. T. E. Went, M.B.E., Gain:

i r, has been grante
ial Enginee' as bi ape * 44
Mr. J. C.
Kellman, Assistant Colonial En-
Colonial



CUSHION CORD @
Red, Gold, Green, Blue, Black,
White, Pink, Brown

Scarcity Of Fish

The majority of fishing boats
have been beached at various
parts of the island. A few boats
at Bathsheba and along the east
coast of the island are however
still bringing in catches of flying
fish,

Fish is now scarce in St. Mi-
chael. Very few flying fish are
being caught. On Tuesday only
about 100 flying fish were brought
into the Public Market,

Housewives are now dependent
on catches of seine fish and snap-
pers caught by the few boats still
going te sea. Early in the day
quantities of “pot” fish are being
brought in at some beaches,

CAPT. BRYAN ON
CASUAL LEAVE

Captain G, J. Bryan, M.C., As-
sistant Colonial Secretary 1s at
present on twelve days’ casual
leave. He is expected to resume
duties on the 28th of the month,

Mr, L. N. Chenery, Assistant
Secretary, Colonial Secretary’s
Office, has been appointed to act
as Assistant » Colonial Secretary,
and a member of the Public Ser-
vice Commission,

Mr, G. E, Amory, Long Grade
Clerk; Treasury Department, is
also acting as Accountant, Treas-
ury Department.

BIBLE ADDRESS

The United Holiness Meeting
in the Salvation Army Bridge-
town Central Hall, Reed Street,
will this evening be conducted
by Mrs. Major Morris, and the
Bible Address. will be given by
Snr. Captain W. Bishop. The
Bridgetown Central Songsters
will also take part.

A very cordial invitation is ¢x-
tended to all.

|

17c. Yard,

LACING CORD @ 5c. Yard
Red, Gold, Blue, Green, Black,

Verteuil with regards to the fac-
tory, and also on a ceytain stage
of the process of producing a box
of cigarettes,

First to give evidence was
Inspector Reid, He said that about
10.20 the Saturday morning Cpl.
Bryan, Cpl, Yearwood and he went
to the factory at Lodge Road in
consequence of certain informa-
tion they had received, They took
up a position at the back of the
foctory in a cane fleld where they
could see some doors. They were
later joined by De Verteuil,

At 4.10 Grimes walked down a
corridor and on reaching an
entrance door, disappeared. Cpl.
Bryan went nearer the door while
Cpl. Yearwood and he went besid¢
a fence, About 5, on a signal from
DeVerteuil, Yearwood and he went
towards the door where they saw
Cpl. Bryan holding Grimes who
had a wooden box in his hands.
This box contained some cigarettes,
unused shells and slides, Grimes
handed him a lock and some keys,
Grimes told him at the time that
he had got the cigarettes, ete., out
of the factory,

At this stage of the Inspector's
evidence, four trays of cigarettes
were produced as cigarettes which
had also been in a certain room
of the factory at the time and
which had been removed from
their original position, but Mr.
Ward objected to their being pro-
duced as they did not form part
of the charge.

Charged

Later the Saturday when Grimes
was taken to the Central Police
Station and charged, he said he
knew nothing of the 3,580 ciga-
rettes (those in the tray) but
added nothing with regards to
lanything else.

In his cross-examination, Mr, ¢d on the Pier Head.”
SPOOOSIPOPODEOD POLED IO DIV IO PTOI DOOD OUD OLE LL DLOODDO DOV OD DDD EDIOVOOOE |



Trade whether he is aware of the
growing competition from the
United States of America which
is being experienced by the West
Indies citrus industry; that the
export of citrus products is sub-
sidised by the United States of
America; and whether, under the
terms of the General Agreement
on Tariffs and Trade, he will as«
for a discussion on the limitations
of these subsidies,

Subsidisation

Mr. Peter Thorneycroft, Presi-
dent of the Board of Trade, re-~
plied: “I am aware that the ex-
port of citrus products to certain
markets is subsidised by the Uni-
ted States Government, but I have
no evidence that tihe subsidies are
injuring the interests of the West
Indies citrus industry whose mar-
kets at present lie in countries
which are restricting imports from
the dollar area for balance of
payments reasons,

In these circumstances, I do not
consider that anything will be
gained by taking action under Ar-
ticle XVI of the General Agree-
ment on. Tariffs and Trade, if,
however, my hon, Friend has spe-
cifle evidence of injury to the West
Indies’ industry and will supply
it to me, I will consider it.”

—B.UP.

20'- For Leaving
Cart Unattended

McDonald Willoughby was yes-
terday ordered to pay a fine of
20s. when he pleaded guilty before
His Worship Mr, E. A, McLeod,
City Police Magistrate, to “leay-
ing a horse drawn cart unattend-

CAPACITY

PLATFORM

utmost

ALL-METAL WHEELBARROWS

“BRECKNELL”
THE ALL-METAL

PLATFORM SCALE
MADE IN ENGLAND

BEAM GRADUATIONS 28 Ibs & 4 oz.

A number of these Seales
are in use locally and with-
out exception are giving the

Stamped ready for use and complete
with Weights

1 each 25, 50, 100, 200 and 2 »

$198.78 EACH

Governor of Trinidad’s advisers volved in an accident with a m0- witness who has not yet given his right hon, Friend and try +51 in the body-building and procective vita-
in regard to the report of the Arrive Front B.G. tor lorry on Kingston Road. — evidence is Yearwood, a super- For W. 73 Citrus get a new patt now for sterlia mins A & D—cnsures strong bones and
Coromaiapian ath. diequise, tase 5am Feminine tetas, rie seman visor. r not for this money?” muscles, increases resistance to illness.
finance of the City Council of hundred tons of firewood an as & ieee" —R.UP. : iar yi
Port-of-Spain, Trinidad, include ae bags of charcoal were cycle M.2073. The motor lorry, Description of Factory , LONDON x a Children love taking Haliborange -
Ministers, the conduct of some of 60 ht to the island by the M 1685, is the property of Greg- Much of the evidence given was _ In the House of Commons on 2 the pure halibut oil is blended with
whom has been adversely com- idea: Cloudia S. which ar- ory Hope of Belmont Road. os eee yey the re gm oom a Hoa Dacoeshl ached 14-WHEELED VEHICLI: orange juice to make it extra delicious. It’s
2 i 1e Re sc , Rare : yt —_—_oo- position and its rooms—the - servative, P BK | 4 ade
mented on in the Report. rived from British, Guiana over tion. of the hiding Police ana Te the, Premdentok.the > Meera . of CARRIES TRINIDAD grand for adults too.

OILFIELD EQUIPMENT |

LEYLAND, Lancashire
The problem of transporting |
heavy oilfield equipment in Trini-|
dad is now being solved by the|
use of a l4-wheeled vehicle con-\
sisting of a Leyland Super Hippo |
tractor and a Dyson semi-trail or, ;
according to Leyland Motors, Lid., |
of Leyland, Lancashire.
Trinidad Petroleum Develop-
ment Co,, Lid, who operate the |
machine, used it recently to cir-|
ry a large draw-works for a diese|- |
powered drilling rig from a site
where drilling for a new oil well
had been completed to another
location where drilling was about
to start. The draw-works weigh-
ed about 30 tons and comprised
a maximum load for the trailer,
The type of work on which the
14-wheeler is employed is particu-
larly diMfieult, the company points
out, as many of the roads giving
access to oil well locations have
unpaved gravel, surfaces, often
with gradients up to one in six,
—B.U-P.



REV. CLEMENTSON VICAR
OF ST. JOHN THE BAPTIST

The Revd. J. W. Clementson

has been appointed Vicar of St.
John the aptist Chureh, St,
James. His appointment * took

effect as from yesterday.



ASSIZE DIARY

TO-DAY
No, 2 Reg, vs. Verona Jack-

man
No. 16 Reg. vs. Sylvan Mason



1100 Ibs.

DIMENSIONS 32” x 19”

satisfaction.

300 Ths.




Haliborange

THE NICEST WAY OF TAKING
HALIBUT OIL

Peathem | oN

good



Made tH Mnviany by

ALLEN & HANBURYS LTD. LONDON, &.2

es ee ee





—

A HORSE OWNER

SHOULD BE

A HORSE LOVER

We Highly Recommend

HARVEY'S WATTS ..
EMBROCATION

For the treatment of Curbs, Splints, Sprains,
Capped Hocks, Ete.
It is also an excellent application for Windgalls,
Thoroughpins and the ‘Swelling from Sprung
Hock Joints of horses.

PRICE 12/6 AND 6/6 AT

JOHN GILL & CO.









ENJOY

SOUPS

SO DELICIOUS
SO NUTRITIOUS
Here's a fine range

CAMPBELLS CREAM OF MUSHROOM—per tin ....
CAMPBELLS CREAM OF CHICKEN—per tin
CAMPBELLS CONSOMNE—per tin
CAMPBELLS CHICKEN with Rice—-per tin
CAMPBELLS SCOTCH BROTH—per tin
CAMPBELLS VEGETABLE BEEF—per !b.
CAMPBELL S OX TAIL—per tin
CAMPBELLS TOMATO—per tin
CAMPBELLS VEGETABLE—ver tin
CAMPBELLS BEAN with Bacon—per tin
CAMPBELLS VEGETARIAN VEGETABLE—per tin..
HEINZ CHICKEN GUMBO—per tin
HEINZ CLAM CHOWDER—per tin ...
HEINZ CHICKEN NOODLE—-per tin

HEINZ CREAM OF GREEN VEGETABLE—per tin ....
HEINZ BEEF NOODLE—per tin r

HEINZ PURE MONGOLE—per tin ...
CAMPBELLS BEANS with Pork—per tin



CORNED BRISKET BEEF—per 4-lb. tin
SALISBURY CORNED MUTTON—per tin

COCKADE FINE RUM
CRAWFORDS TRI FRUIT PUFFS—per pkt. ........+-
5 ASST. CREAMS—per pkt.
SWEET ASST.—per pkt.

CUSTARD CREAMS--per pkt.

3 CUBIC FEET CAPACITY — STRONGLY MADE

OUR PRICE ONLY $16.82 EACH
HARDWARE DEPARTMENT

HARRISON DIAL 2364 or 3142

DFO@@VORIUL® VORORGODPOF9O G88 VV GOOT8DOO06 0B G6-4-7898 OO 94 FF-F9OSO9OO?
, ’



White, Pink, Brown

CAVE SHEPHERD
& ¢0., ITD.

10—13 Broad Street







Stansfeld Scott & Co. Ltd.

_———
SSS ?



pedo OOSSS9S SSS DOOSPHOOSOSOOOL OF







}







PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY, JULY 24, 1952

CLASSIFIED ADs§., |Pomtc 'Nericns| pumie sates Canada Trade Is Gravel *2kce St wets eae

able machinery was available, to be economically efficient, must














































| z ‘
j second-hand, in Jamaica. Some spread its capital cost over a mini-
____ TELEPHONE 26 PP Bese et NOTICE j REAL ESTATE } ° 99 local private capital was found mum of 100 bedrooms and must
COLE & CO., LTD., geil eis | Cause For Anxiet T and the corporation was asked to operate or «ne assumption that 70
. DIED FOR SALE Re arene dee eee of land at CATTLE WASH, invest £55,000. Negotiations per cent. of the accommodation
ae . Barbados, B.W.L : ede between Kingsiey Club and dragged on for months and now will be occupied throughout the
CARTE Tala ees, ale | nner memes | ed to" notify our * friends and | Publie inte we tt te hae, 3 the machinery has been sold to year. ces _
kmans, Road, ‘ustom: t Spare rts Depart- ‘ . eone e
Seaton Joweph Cartan age 6] AUTOMORIVE [Sen ih “bet Shned fot sur Armes | piel daz padins beach cottage and} AU, Campbell Repeats A Warning | :~one cise. Oe SE Ss a cer ee ae ae
above. residence at 4.30 p.m. CAR—Vauxhall. Velox, Green. Late |='0c*taking from July oP ee For full particulars Dial Hull and Son Mr. Steele, “the failures of the toria Hotel in Uganda and adds:
forthe “Hothersal. Turning’ Pigeon | 3050.) Owner duiven "sind. well 5 fare — es al LONDON corporation in British Honduras “These ventures are in accord-
Holiness Church and thence to the!Apphy Courtesy Garage. en os. Soate — O uae bat c wii ae ‘a the failure @fce with the corporation’s policy
Migces ckies Tekton) ana omen tea 6 Le NOTICE 100 BARBADOS FOUNDRY LAD. | THE On IN of trade ee auciety peg an cons Cee ae ‘showing the way’; what, should
, Chrysler Windsor. Owner Pyplications will be received by the 3 ada and the British Indies is a grave cause for 7 or pilot sehemes. At no time "OW follow is a display teres:
driven. Very good condition . hone | Clerk of the Vestry up to 12 (noon) on| 18 BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE . bs : A . a . th-
.. THANKS 5962. ‘tt 523m Friday, ist Augush 1 fo eS ma a in the economic picture of the West —_ mre: i was ts Colonial Government >¥, ‘the perinership of pubt oe
WAKE. += The undersigned one year] St. Michael's Girls’ School, now CO. LTD. SHARES : Campbell, chairman of Booker Brothers, onnell an me pat maps ation scheme ance h private enterprise, the
ergy ee Fe! paint vacant. | *R Ree ap ee Co., in his report to shareholders. y corpor high capital cost will discourage
who attended the Funeral of his ttors| 2. Any Vi Scholarship at the TRADING ©O. LTD. SHARES: ’ : + 7 which appears to have Limit«d
estry p at ; é f the West India from -
wife Margaret Wakeham, which ‘Outer dame Sictaret which, tnaw | eoome 3 ST. GEORGE'S PARISH y. Campbell, who is also chairman of t es essful possibilitie . competent hotel men ven
place at 3 p.m, on Thursday, } D. Harvey vacant during the school ye 4 5 " i had gi t the — turing into this highly specialised
July at the Westbury Cemetery, Also of Commerce.| Candidates must be the daughters of} # & TOBAGO «| Committee, repeated the warning he had given a future is the growing of ramie, 62345
Soa ar tk ae ce ee 46.1-52"n | parithloners: th atratened circumstances recent annual peaeral meeting of that Committee that the| a cotton substitute. This is run
Agnes Mod in ay other way express- ft must Tif be less than 9 years nor |, a & TOBAGO 4% between Canada and the West Tndies is highly efficiently by an Ameri- Ramie Estate
A. H. V. Wakeham (Captain) A Dual RG, SAL, TH. | September, 1084 to be proved by & Bap: ei mentioned shares will be at tees A EN TONES SEINE SEBO: a ddibeaine thick wet valle to
7. Mee wala at Pub a : : s 3
=e Sena saaneGaneidiion y ietet tee; 25th > ack ertheless, and petiy sonfi.| _ “In all, the corporation approved the British Honduras stock farm
,

—



: pany the application. Sen ‘July, 1952 at 2 p.m. at

. Taaxe X—88 Forms of application will be i d & Sealy, Lucas Street,

ANNOUNCEMENTS Wil sel fee sell for , ipoughe and received Reine Vestry Clerk's tice wh. 21.7.52—3n,
hoe — 3359.

nomic ee - Gent in the prospects of our sugar | ‘be investment in British Hondu~ or banana schemes, but ft mentions
ny than result failure



owne: wee: hours pec third the development of the 1,500-
s bo jah of 19 sem. 804032)" “The undersigned will offer for sale to appreciate the value of the Undertakings for the next two or oe a ben" eeeae 3 acre ramie estate, of which’ 250
BICYCLE—Hereules l@ Was wor 16.7.52—t.f.n E. C. REDMAN, at their office, No. 17, High Street, c dian market for sugar,” ne three years.” Rébead oo tates the “wealth acres have so far been planted.
by ticket No. 156, Mr. C. ©. Clarke Clerk, St. Michael's Vestry. | Bridgetown, on Friday, ‘the 25th July }C@nadlan tg Turnin: to the company’s The whol tion is ed
of Black Rock 7.52-2n eens, t 1198%, at 2 p.m repeated, & uo ind raising the morale of the Col- le expect:

(a from So msissNb A ali as einiaie EE TRO OR | OS dwellinghouse calted “VENTNOR” Campbell, making his first shopkeeping activities, Mr. Camp-} .,. successive failures are hav- to be in ion in 1956, it says.
: ot goat BONNY Sy. qeiting Rests : citroen Dodge |" MERCHANDISE MARKS ACT, i949 | with the land whereon the same starlet oocyte as ehairman of Booker Pel pacrenre : “The pandard end ing the Feverst effect.” “Present plans are ito duce

fusion spare time. Aa supp a ‘OTICH HEREB VEN ainin: a asurer 4, S$, § i‘

_ of today, — 4.7.52—6n ; Son Ms tase] SONI RAT Ee ENC ot ita, net lsquare’ geet” of thereabouts ‘situate’ wtf Brothers; explained “what — such" QUaut..of our premises... stac dried ‘China grass’ bons

, ‘ondition . West Fifth Street, City of ‘Los Angeles, | the Corner of Pine Road and Ist Avenue,

» salesmanship and display are ‘ adds, “but peceseainy develop-
companies as. Booker Brothers jow second to none.in the Brit-| Projects ments in the United States and

6,
; ber Calitorn | Belleville.
24.7.52—3n. | State of California, U.S.A., intend to | Belleville mean to the social, economic and js; West Indies. We have much | Coincident with the publication other countries are being closely

apply to the Registrar of Trade Marks| ‘Inspection on Mondays, Wednesdays
to be

FOR RENT







* \ arrived tered. as the eproprietors. of os a oe sete me ne and oar ae of poten sae oon 4 to we prove of ae in ome sheng et Mr. monies rover ne latest ee and if any commercial
a ~———iouses SSS and @an be seen .| the Trade rk SUN ‘° in am. : ples. ey form an essen in Britis! Uliana because throug) ssue of the corporation’s quarter- de- process emerges,
ie Dial 4616. .52—6n. ete ts pore Pe pian ctmbsbinor nla of niclaee pareuare and conditions of the ture of the Common- them we are not only supplying }\y magazine, “Colonial Develop- plant may set up on the aolete
» .. Attractive seaside Flat main road Her 1961 OXFORD SALOON, done} without the soodwill of the business in . ee ie wealth, he said. the needs of the people, but rais-} ment,” refers bri to some of to turn out , filasse for .*
: tings, comfortably furnished, Engl, |only 2,700 les as mew. Owner/the goods in question, dated 26th May, * ing all standards throughout thc | the projects in B: Honduras. spinning factories. om} .P.
Benger ie pe lax coat ee Se ea | Paming Comera- | Soe igttea wil sfleciiox sala Bt No Commonwealth Colony and indeed the Caribbean —$—$———$—$—_———
Telephone 2040. “ tee “|said, the teaintered proprietors of the { their Office No. 17 High Street, on Friday

“Without them,” he deciared, oane; ‘ *
“there could have been, and there ,,,_ Freight Ratvien niet
could be, no Colonial economic The Booker Line, which a:

NEW

5 you know provides British Gui-
development — thus no = hy r ana with a valuable freight and MONTREAL, AUSTRALI~,

ONE two truck mark the 25th July 1952 at 2 p.m., by public

w aL ae Cas. Welephone 4a, Any person having any objection to competition, the Dwellinghouse known

D. V. Seott & Co., Ltd. such application or subsequent registra. |S “Edenvilie” standing on 2964 sas

§ 26.6,52—t.f.n. | tion of such assignment shall give nojice | feet of land at George Street, Belleville,

- thereof to the Registrar of Trade Marks, arate atawioe pane ce, p CORES “s x

truek ¥. But) tow he baa vy, dr i’ : LIMITED.
able offer a A me "Co. bond “aay ot Ath ust 52. 2 hefore ‘he | bedrooms, (one with running water), Cc n- Passenger service to and from TEENS LN)

4 3.1.60—t.1,0 SONY Go wikis NC kitchen, toflet and bath. Electric light}could, in fact, be no Commo: Liverpool, like most British ship-

- ——— Pert Cottle, Catford & Co.,}and running -water. wealth.” ing companies carried good car-| 8.8. “GLOUCESTER” ts scheduled to The A/V CARED wil scuert

ELECTRICAL Agents | |,Inspectian on application to Mr.. The value of this year’s sugar eoee eee etree earativels | veil from Port Pirie May dist, rt] @® cargo and passengers for Dominica,

%,7.52—1n. | H. A. M. Lashley by phoning t crop, apart from rum and high freight tags It tras ‘thus ine Sth, Melbourne June 14th, Sydney Antigua, St. Kitts, Nevis and

ct
‘ aie an ve orcas phon
ric oor ‘olisher ee
4748. 25.7. ~

on
LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

Malt Liquors, &c.. at. a wall







-

political development.

UE
i
é
a

ea LER eC ad For further particulars and conditions
TWO (2) New Electric Floor, Polishers.



known os “Bowden Guest House” Hast-














































































































woe une 24th, Brisbane July 5th, arriving at Montserrat. Sailing on the 22nd
j ot sale apply to:— molasses should be over £6,000,- able to earn good profits. ‘arbados about August 6th. July 1952.

Breet iat, Wt eae tse PPE ae 448 abiding TAKE NOTICE COTTLE CATFORD ee coors, | 000, Mr. Campbell continued, but “Throughout the year and since} In addition to general cargo this vessel SV BEGNEEIA. will scomh.uptas
ae Miegiateets Dee MECHANICAL ANGLIA 11.7.52—8n. }payment for it will inevitably be the beginning of this year, how-| }a* ample pproee for chilled and hard} ® ong passengers, for | Dominica,
strate, » AY. oan enrmnieet i vagaries eet ‘ Antigua, .. Kitts, Nevis an

uw Sa, Q..K, JOHNSON, ee 2 roods of land at Charnocks, Christ Sresuise behieson- fp dread oun’ vere ip re a Corgo accepted on through Bills of Montserrat, Sailing on the Mth

duction and transport. tinuously risen while freights ar
Applicant CYSEES Limited number of Gents) phat FORD MOTOR COMPANY LiMi-|Chureh, on the public road facing en- | Produc , : sy Bhits Src}. cding for transhipment at Trinidad tof & July 1952.
NB —This application will ba consis -} Weles $60.00 each, K. J, Hamel-Smith &| pep, q British, Company, Manufacturers, | trance to Seawell Airport The company’s sugar under- tending to fall. We cannot there- | sntich Guiana, Leeward and Windward
eted at a Licensing Court to be held »t]©% Ltd. Bridge Street, | whose trade or business address is %8,| 33,560 square feet of land facing Las}takings did well in 1951, thanks fore count on a repetition of 1951 | vianas.
Police Court, District ‘A’ on ‘Tuescia j %.7.52~6] Regent Street, Londow, \W.1, fingland, | Palhas at Rockley, Christ Church. . results > B.W.. SCHOONER OWNERS’
the day'of August, 1952 at 11 o'clow! — has applied for the regiy..ntion of «| 4,642 square feet of land at corner off 10 good autumn weather, good Sere aad ae a oo } Hor further particulars apply— ASSOCIATION (INC.)
.™. 5 —Somplete range | trade mark in Part “A” of Register in | Crumpton & Constitution Streets, Bridge }managemen e wor e y 0 - | °ORNESS WITHY & ee ee Consigneer
a FILING _SYSTEMS—Complet. rs ge t, fin k th “In British Guiana, our ship CO., LED.
_ KA. McLEOD, | fihannon filing and card systems: for| respect of motor lind vehicles and. their | town. company’s labourers and improv- Ping interests had a rather better TRINIDAD. ‘Tele. whe te 4047
Police Magistrate, Dist. A ase opis, or business. Supplies 4 parts; engines and patts thereof, and All the above land are excellent build- ed effici in the field The year than in 1950, but result: ané }
Piel: S42: | in amet sdiemme Your requlteenenss or] Wat, PO waHied 14 egiates, the, samoling alee. | tit) iter de ipl nay: “Froup of sugar estates Were still disappointing. This is DA COBTA & CO. LTD, *960660609990580080 08000"
Liev Li al 5136, K. R. Hunte & Co., Ltd. | july 1952, unless some person shail in|Friday the 26th July, 1982 at our office, } roduced 157,324 tons of sugar 2,Sphere of our business which is ee ee
iQUOR CENSE NOTICE| ‘ower Broad’ street. 22.7.52—6n.| the meantime give notice in duplicate | James Street, at 2.00 p.m. Pp ¥ ns ug. still in the throes of reorganisa-
abolication of Peas) | “Guanes mowers to me at my office of @ppositionof such HUTCHINSON & BANF#EGD.Jin 1951, as against 138,772 tons tion and which ds cleerly suffer. o °
qhevloepen, of Chase \ a er ot width cut Trailer erene en eh Tears. had frags tae PP ANN aot. fspapetee ce SORE. in 1950 and it is hoped that the ing from the heritage of the past Tan Atenas
iiawie ae of a immediate delivery. Courtesy Garage. ae ated tee ‘sed. Cant Sudo 1982. 1952 crop will be even higher. and of the war. Any modes 4 saa MASA: ‘
ns Thompson .7.52—6n . ; . 1 ASR, £ 9 fen,
floor of a 2 storey board and shingle shop 0 H, WILLIAMS, AUCTION profits which can be made at s my Gne.
at Chureh Village, St, Michael, for per- peut gibt a.) = kt PRONE ie ra he Solin went the Present must be ploughed back ‘ .
mission to use sai quor ense ft Cisse . i i ‘
sata “premises, Church Village. MISCELLANEOUS NINDER THE IVORY HAMMER signing of the Commonwealth $20,.ne_ Pusiness in order that
Dated this 23rd day of July, 1982.09 {| ————————_____.... ________ TAKE NOTICE Sugar Agreement and told his y ee Guten NEW YORK SERVICE.
Tor Be 4 TALMA baa se CUSHIONS WITH IMPORTED SPRING- wea ace mel eh - as possible. a
0 ‘ate, et. = Ae!. FILLED UNITS — tic, y instructions receive rom eps eholders; STEAMER sails June—arrives Barb i
oe ets t [Wil bes ate ist Covert 38.09 each That FORD ae amar. | lactar’ Bue Co. Nelson Btrtet ox fridae. fn 2 Will Not protect the high- More Rum Soid cori iia
plicar so! s not less than 4. a -{Motor Bus Co., Nelson Street on Friday, a : a 7
N.B.—This application will be ponpeds Apply;—The Standard Agency (B'dor) | THD, a British C mony, Manufacturers, ; July 25th (1) 1947-10 H.P. Austin Van, |COSt producer. On the contrary, it Although United Rum Mer- 4 ORLEANS SERVICE.
gre at a Lie coe to be reach at]Co., 14, Swan Street. Dial 7. ‘ a, ee or seuanieds fiedress i ae, | (Domaced in, Becidént) Also we coder. offwill by its very mature impose chants, Ltd., sold 50 per cent, The S/S “THEMISTOCLES” sails 6th June—arrives Barbados 2ist June.
“elice ict “AY on esdas = y 52 e ndon, + En .| the British Council (1) 19 us ‘ar, i 7 z s °
_ the Sth dey uguat, 1952 at 11 o’eloc! SER Cara TRS eee ae ngouied * soe pemeeaon Or # Ragin pore ct working order ‘Verme ae need fos Seaton prices ae eee padi tees A STEAMER sails 19th June—arrives Barbados Sth July.
am LIAN ERED SPUN:-~ Crease | trade mark in Part “A” o: egiater i ‘ash. Sale at 2 p.m, onl. tab. e U ’ e a
een Shabu: Westetiog | in: Rivahtndive 0 ming de- pesbect Gi motte Hand vesicles and thes: VINCENT Gruretri, sufficient to stimulate the flow of Owing to the continued steep rise eT eeeee uci care a hae cr eee
ce ate, st. ‘A’. [signs nehe; ide usually $1.86 d,| parts; engines and parts thereof, an uctionser, i i
24.1.52-in. [now reduced to $1.49 yard ut Kirpalani, | Will be eniiited to register. the sang 20.7. 52-4. | Sterling sugar which this country ditt < ever ph CANADIAN SERVICE
: —-+ }5% Swan Street. 24.7.52—in oe Sm) ee Se ee ae ot aC TURpe tande: we have, — anens intig a al SOUTHBOUND
. + empmameeainia? ‘u @: 80) person a a tha this solic
e LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE JUST received a shipment of Garrari| the meantime give notice in duplicate UNDER THE SILVER a ie Sot ee cites much less Pure Biot fet 1951 + roe, = Arrives Bardados
° - Thesappliestion of Kihel Green, shop- tixeo seas Casngers , seeure one now. co sat ee — Tee ec HAMMER in the past have inhibited full although more than to the same | s/s “saruo” teen “Seth July 15th
keeper of Baxters Rd., holder of liquor 0 8 Quantity of 6 volt battery . : Thursday Sist. Mr. Fred Bennett's date in 1950. Reducti - ene ia os ve és a dun duly: utp
< license No. 458 of 1962 granted to her} Tecord Players. Beth the above with| seen op application at my office, Gale, The Cottage. um Distilleries,f production have been swept eangied.. with:at wcsian in rr Taly ath Auuguat. 11th
in respect of a wooden at Baxters | â„¢%4 eC B. , jack Rock. b. mcreasing costs,
* Road, Clty. for ‘permission to. use sac DaCOSTA & CO. LTD., Reaistiar ae WaAUS.. | BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.,| 4i0e our objective is to pro- may produce very slender profits eT mee ere
+ liquos at a board and shingle shop tT tee 23.7.52—8n Auctioneers ge of for United Rum Merchants in| sournpounp
wi a aac es rn Jus, se EMS Ta — 2%,7.52—1n. wre lon de from the Seen 1952,” ‘A STEAMER” hh Geto ai ane DUE BARBADOS: &
ini this ly, 2 Taoew ta the Deily : nee enn henry ee eNO nn are nae acreage tim’ Bi ; “ A August 9th for ST. JOHN, N.B. and
Police Mugisirate, Dist, 0. pape nob, Rogiand’s leaging Dally News-| | TAKE NOTICE | “ONDER Tie SiLVER at the Icast cost. By Feagh- sand high date ene money St LAWRENCE RIVER PORTS
Srp le Landed Gis etic. [Eanion. “Cage habe hee PILOT ig TiN A NE Nice ot wef future promberity of the sugar “Yin consuanantitl, Mequeton, 3s ee
~ NB applic will be conic . , a c ‘uesday 2 y Order of the e consumption of all spirits i 4
sued at a Licensing Court to be held. [cate Ce, Id Local Representative | oan, ‘Sritian Company: Mamsiectings, (executors to. the Estate of ‘Mrs. Rosie} industry of British Guiana and Britain, there is litile evidence ROBERT THOM LID.— NEW YORK & GULF SERVICE
ice Court, trict “AY on Tuesdoy . 4.52—-t.f, whose trade or business address is 88. “The ee, wee oe eS VFECUTS at thus of the Colony be assured.” f i
6 y a ‘clock, - , Midget”, Palm Beach, Hastings, y . of a reduction in the demand Zz .
oe eee aod,» [x RONG GET CA fey nina, boart| Noo het Yon ia tag mua | lnshuaag, ne Nene But next year, sald Mr, Camp- for rum as against other spints.| Abbi DA COSTA & CO. LED. CANADIAN SERVICE
+ E. A, MeLEOD, ~ pan jo-cor sets, subject to special | + a4 mark in Part “A” of Register in| ound Tip Top Dining Table, Upright) bell, will have its full share of The company’s share of the 7 :
™ Police Magistrate, Disty “a.” }xoddingas allowance. Barnes | respect of motor land: vehicles and their | Chi?s., Book Lovely. “Chetanioe ining, commercial problems for the total rum consumed in the} “#SOS0S6es9sse0e0s ‘ S
og aioren ~ - mene | PATH, engines and parts thereof, anc! With Brass: Liquor Case, Flat ‘Top Desk | COMpany, Tt is not yet ‘known . United Kingdom has actually | > ITY
7 $02.50 POCKET MONEY easily earned | Siu, Re entitled to register the same | 1 aays Writing ‘Table and. Desks Oma-|-what prices it will receive for its increased, which speaks highly | < FOR BEST QUAL a4
THE GAS COOKER Reoireusiow ae FP Pa ai 4 ae ain unless some Defaoe shail un ecart wanes meee: Se AP cot free sugar, rum and molasses. for the seeopananin of the ¢ ENAMELWARE
ae 1.7,62—6n, moantime give, notice. in dupleate | rabies; Settee and Uphols, Rocker, in| company, said Mr, Campbell, | % a
With Everything U Want < J Logatiaton hee fagee mage Cietee | OK, Glass & China, Dinner. and ea | Bulk Rum Mr." Campbell “reported a net|
i a ‘ . REDFFUSION offers $1.50 cash for} oe) ‘ors application at my office. "| Services, Very Handsome Military Chest, ‘We must expect the world profit for the company ot] ¢
ee sin ao new Subscriber pUnCeuentEre a. a Dated this 3rd day of July 1952. ee een ee ee ree eS aes for sugar to be low, the £660,677 in the year ending}? Shop at
tf z 4 : 4. ; H, WILLIAMS, nt ; ; mani ‘
1% | T2ERostane. commons” -$)y SEGRE FOUR wicome s. Pietint ct Hinde Miche, |Eit, reek, Mee rytereee 5 Bee aad eae tage aieeeity’ bea en Fee te La Sr THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM
it and it's eagy’ to. p clean. secommending REDIFFUSION. Obtain ———. | {nree Wing Mahog. Press. Sewing | avalanche in the price of molas- Total net assets of the group in
it See them before: too late. ‘ull particulars from the REDIFFUSION Machine, Mirrors, Linen, Ping Pong Set. | be, ; Pp x
' AA\ ‘your -Giak, Biiglwrbom, Bay fice 17.526, |Books, Electric Fan; Larders, 2 Burn |S@S8, Which we shall begin to feel creased during the year from Corner Broad and Tudor Sts.
i@ 7 Buse rine eee lin i eae TAKE NOTICE Elec. ‘Hot Plate, G.E-C. Refrigerator.) m the second half of this year,” £4,891,650 to £5,614,523,
i >) ONLY A FEW LEFT. . ety wae DOLLARS extra Bonu 2 Burner Oil Stoves and Oven; Kitchen he said. —B.U.P.
ij Re Pa a ¢ | trom n for 25 recommende- CONSUL. | Utensils and Tables, Scales, Anthurium | * :
| Gasee | “ions in one calendar month. That FORD MO COMPANY Lii-/nd Amaysilis, Lillies and numerous
| Beroos GS 1,7,52—@n. | TED, a British Company, Manufacturers, ; other ssemma of vale Ef wares = 6s e R Pr 69 S 655.59SS6S99SSS6SSSSS9SSSSSS95S6SS9
| rave ———-—---—" wher aden or business addres a8 | Gain Antiaye tad etern. Sale 12 6 Ya ye .C. Failures In B.H.
: jon, ai, ngiand, a ° 2
3 FURNISHING ? WANESD | | paar tees asda ee phen Ip Effi: x Iv IS A FACT
if respect of motor land vehicles and their | 759-2 , Sf x
\% you sHounp MOVE LIKE A parts; engines and parts thereof, anc! 24,7. 89-2n | ut Ramiz Plan Is tctent ¥
i HURRICANE 79 CET THESE HELP hah mph ih lle ete ha AF ee - % CAN YOU IMAGINE a complete STONE BUNGALOW with a
f s %
i THINGS. mtr ee TOR eal some person shalt in | | LONDON. s> Galvanize Roof and Pine Floor at Black Rock, near Carlton, for
Hu Pareaus Ba ub) | Simfions u fra ork, ae Pei niet and bt ° 2a, yA bee oe ty up cate | FOUR FAILURES of Colonial Development Corp- % £2,400? It has Drawing and Dining Rooms, 3 Bedrooms,
‘ othe , » . eesman, 5 | i . 4 ¥
NB Coit‘and Fiat Springs $6 up, Pil: YY Street. at, 7, 09—h | eget onniomes cena paacio® sack ait be, oration schemes in British Honduras are listed by the] % Toilet and Bath, Kitchenette and a Basement with the same
+ lows $1.50, Laths, Cradles, prer.e9 a R for Harrisons Plantation, | Dated this $rd.day of July-190n | London Daily Telegraph in a report from its special corre-| % amount of space as upstairs including Toilet and Bath. Make
ih DINING and other Tables ‘in St. Luey. Apply Manager. thabeibas: od A spondent, T. S. Steele, who has been making a tour of % an Appointment with D’ARCY A, SCOTT, Middle Street,
11% Beautifully Polished Mahogany, xP, 6a 23.7.52—3n the British Caribbean %
i@ Cedar, Birch or sanded Deal, Bie | e Dr a . >) and overlook it.
| Larders $11 up, Waggons, Liquor Old reliable Company established i The Corporation’s stock farms was aimed at. Last year there} 24.7.52,—8n.
1)G) Cases $5.50. China Cabinets. Trinidad for many years requires thie TAKE NOTICE huve already been closed. The big was a loss of £20,000. This]
11% . PIANOS, Go.Cart, Prams Types B] iiihmecy ho Competent and experiences! Cc ‘banana growing scheme at Stann month it is hoped to ship 20,000] ) #¢¢9* 9OOSS SOSSSS
Rha $120 iy, Me es Boxes & potabliehea in Barbados end Septembes ZEPHYR In Carlisle Bay Creek is likely to be closed also. stems, says Mr. Steele, but he PLES LLLLE SDDS
iS gu. lls oe PR EO The Fort George Hotel in Belize adds: .“This and any foresce-
} . ‘nlary © required with small es That FORD MOTOR“COMPANY LEMI-| Schooner Lady Noéleen, Schooner is another expensive failure, the able production on this lanc
x ieture to Advocate Box G.T. ‘| RD, a British Company, Manufacturers, | Mary_ BE. Caroline, Schooner Gardenia !?5 vould el lin, : Oo A
rote Advocate Co. 19.7,52—10. | whose trade or business address is 88,|W., Schooner Emeline, Schooner Fran-;Paper says, and the Corporation would merely mean piling ur

has failed to help = Colony meet further Pine weil

its sugar quota under the Com- ilot eme ? : TRE

rmonwealth Sugar Agreement, He criticises the corporation for NO. 27, BROAD S ET
Mr. Steele, reporting from Be- not attempting a pilot scheme to
-said_that the 12 houses-ereet-—find-out whether-bananas could be

ed for the staff at the Iguama grown successfully on a large

Creek stock farm are standing scale. Had local guidance been The undersigned will offer for sale at their Office, No. 17,

Salesman required — preferably one of
wuch experiehce — Gootl Salary, Must
“© prepared to work hard as good pros-~
yects ahead of selected applicant

Applications treated in strict confidence.
‘ull and Son. Dial 2468

EL. S. WILSON |

oo SPRY RTRERT. DIAL 4000

has applied the registration of a/|â„¢M.V. Caribbee, Schooner Mary M, Lewis,
trade mark, in Part “A’ of Register in Schooner Zita Wé>nita, Schooner Burma
espect of motor land vehicles and their |D., Schooner Enterprise §8., Schooner
parts; engines and parts thereof, and {Confident I. G,, Schooner Rainbow M.,
will ba entitled to register the same Schooner Sunlight, Schooner Cyril BE.
atter one m@nth from: the 28rd day of |Smith, Schooner Triumphant Etar, MV.
ae 1952, ufilesg someé person shall in| Clara, M.V. Daerwood, S.S. Sunwhit,







|) 9099059915009 585900"

BIG WELCOME MERTING

‘Unider the Auspices
& of





ie fizaat, London, W.1, England,|ces W. Smith Schooner Lady Joan,
or



he meantine tar oes, in Pup aie Schooner Mandalay IU, L.M.S. Manuy,

to me at myc opposition

such Gulf Barge No 2, Tug Willett, Schooner

oe RUST i R t empty. Farm and storage build- asked, he says, the cor ition High Street, Bridgetown, on Friday the 25th July, 1952, at
PERSONAL Mean ak enidatndat ease ei hi MN are ote ings have been abandoned in would have learned that, while |}}} 2.30 p.m. ; : ;
R Dated this'3x@ dayrof July 1952, SS. Planter, 3,616 tons, Capt. Rovert-} Various stages of completion. the land could and does success-







\ H. WILLIAMS, sun, | tr Dominica, Agents; Messrs,} Vehicles, not i i full ‘Ow it
The public are hereby warned ca Régivtrar of Trade arks. Daosta & Co. Ltd.” ee a Db. use -sinve teep y gr grapefru ahd erence,

THE MESSUAGE OR STORE known as No. 27, Broad
year, were made road-worthy no one has been successful with

CNenceare I pctatat te € ho ik 23.7.82—3n | Schooner Mahdalay II, 30 tons, Capt. Street, Bridgetown, standing on 4,340 square feet or there-

to
whomsoever ih














‘ This is a magnificent building with
had been cut, a floating bridge 33 rooms and will cost
k , some
TAKE NOTICE js bin‘on'a5in duty, toss, Ordinary Mail Seawell ead Ce peat aad
THAMES at 830 am. on 26th July, 1952. axe oe Se Widen.

aseonetelotpeedin
That FORD MOTOR COMPANY LUMI RATES Or EXCHANGE nA Callenter, 2

13.7.52—Tn.

|
whomeoever i my engrae “ae © Bo pt |: ___ ae —— | ntitehett,"’¢rorn " “St Vincent, ‘Agents. | for the drive to Belize. anytiing eo small pines of abouts and at present occupied by Messrs. T. R. Evans.
, . reas zi hm ” + ‘ghooner, Owners’ Association. ananas ‘own on a scale whic *
, WORKERS tracting ang ight or La AR napie MAIL NOTICE sa Synwhit.. xe tons, ant: Floating Bridge would not interest the corpor; tion. Inspection on application on the premises.
1QN (Sed) W MA PRESCOD, ; : fantations Ltd. “| ©The project cost the corpora- ae ag eee. lik + to , For further particulars and conditions of sale, apply to: —
and the Ph nee Mails for St, Lucia, St. John N.B., pn EE ter weed, 38 ai Capt. Neilson, }iion over £80,000,” said Mr. Steele, ©° aa vo fh ais , m
r 247,522. | Montreal by the $.S, “Canadian ‘Gon-| {0 St Lucia, Agents: Schooner Own- “As well as the buildin: as be the Fort George Hotel at 2.
Pr ctping tial SS: }structor. will be closed at the General} °F Association. i. 8, Toa COTTLE, CATFORD & CO.
BARBADOS “LABOUR Post Office as under :— |

7 £200,000, about double the o =
sarough, the property and 600 21 estimated cost, Already it has
Ei iy whens expensively clear- been decided to write off £75,000

in ‘honour of





pata eT oan « = em
ot ate Os
Pa Alpina it Rannt et ee

of this capital investment and then
See ea A. Callender, J. Carter, L. Butler, K “But

- 3 THD, a British Company, Manufacturers, Qard JULY, 1952 Maynard, & Jones, D. Burke, C. Pickers ainte tn cae wok - to try to make the hotel pay its
: ‘MR N. W ‘MANLRY Whose trade or business address is '{i8, NEW YORK ing, S. Haynes, J.” Hassell, H. Ward, B. | cap’ = way. F
i o tte Tie Regent Street, London, W.1, England. }73 2/10% Pr, Cheques on Butler, L, Sorhaind, R. Hall, G. Bagot, |Vestment, for future production “The Colony needed a hotel, but a
| ane, Pl Hed for the reqistrat of (3 { ; eer te ag f/* Pr +f King, N. Torres, r Hauck, M. Hawk, and even more serious in the not on this scale. And, it is asked,

t vat rk in Part “A” o: : or De M. Hauek, M. uck, EB auck. : %,
{ Q.c., MAR. fespect of moter and vehicles aad thes ; ‘os aosatie 71 3/10% Pr, , DEPARTURES — BY BWIA morale of the people. Attempts why has the hotel manager spent WE HAVE

yarts; engines and parts thereof; and }73 2/1 . ‘al for TRIN
Labour Leader, “ter one’ month fsout the ard day e | Cottons gp SADE Br Loose’ D.” Ruse Re 'Delasatce’ Fe foe aees Goverment.and by pri- the corporation payroll, living in a
. ite x y 1/10% P, z fe i bust, plabas . ; ; ‘
} Jamaica uly 1958, unless some person shail,"in 150% Pr. Silver 20% Pr.] Kripacz, W. Clark, E. Greli, N. Cramer, | vate @nterprise to ‘save something corporation house, before the hotel] {# © SHOVELS
i on the meantime give notice in duplidate CANADA . |G Machman, H. O'Callahan, C. O'ca)’ [from the wreck, but so far noth- can hope to open? There is the
; f to me at my office of opposition of sueh |73 5/10% Pr. Cheques on lahan, J. Fulton, H. Ascough, 1 | ing has come from them.” prospect that this will have lasted 2 AGRICULTURAL FORKS
i egistration, The trade mark can be Bankers 76 2/10% Pr Deacon, A. Martin, J. McClean, R Now it is feared that the a year before the hotel opens.”

Sunday, 27th duly 1952 eon on application at my office. Demand Drafts 76.55% Pr.] McCormick, W, Thomas, Christe God- Stann Creek banana a Export Quot

: At 8.30 Dated this 3rd day of July 1982. i Sight Drafts 16 4/10% Pr.J irey, Francis Pau, eae scheme, P a e SICKLES
t 8.30 p.m. H, WILLIAMS, —|78 5/10% Pr. Cable For ST, LUCIA ; which has an authorised capitai Mr, Steele points out that the

Registrar of Trade Warky $77% Pr, Currency ) alone Be M. Taylor, A. Tay tor, rs - resins im of £432,000, may be closed. An Colony has been awarded an ex- ®
fe BT 9 7 1% Be ci 4 ackman, G. > 2. ST
f At j50% Pr, shee? rae, Pr Siiee : yon Scriven, Joseph Tudor. export of 1,000,000 stems of port quota of 25,000 tons of sugar PICK AXES

bananas to Britain every year a year. Production at present is



_ QUEEN’S, PARK





° HOES
® WHEEL BARROWS

ROPE IN ALL SIZES
“OLTS IN ALL SIZES

see

Gucst Speaker - - =

ooMr. N.. W.. MANLEY,
Q.Céy) MALRA |
Other Speakers - -'-

Mr. G. H. ADAMS,
C.M.Gi,, M.C.P.

Mr. T. A. MARRY=-
SHOW? MLC
Grenada.

TO-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

All. subscribers to TIME and





LIFE Magazines who wish to
renew their subscriptions, should
send us their RENEWAL NOTICES
®o as to avoid having to pay the
new advance rate demanded by
Publishers.

have been made by the British months already in the Colony on



BEST QUALITY BRASS
}

BUY

PRODUCTS GENERAL HARDWARE SUPPLIES

and
HARDWARE



‘
4 i
JOHNSON’S STATIONERY |

ARE CTT NE TT
i RICKETT STREET (Opposite Post Office) "PHONE 4918

| GOOD CARE COUNTS .... SO
|
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SOOGS 5565654 SOOO:











THURSDAY, JULY 24, 1952 BARBADOS ADVOCATE



PAGE SEVEN

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PAGE EIGHT

Four Reeords Broken On Fourth



Dillard Wins Hurdles:
Bailey Beaten Again

Mr. T. A. D. Gale, Advertising Manager of the Advocate,
is at present in Helsinki covering the Olympic Games.

LONDON, July 23.

TODAY was a day of records as field and track events

at the XVth Olympiad entered their fourth day.

No less

than four were broken among which were two New World
marks while two other Olympic records were equalled.
It started off when Harrison Dillard strode on to the

track for the first heat in the
his field with ridiculous ease
to equal the Olympic mark

Soon after that Adhemar Fer-
reira Da Silva ran up to the take
off board for the hop, step and
jump and in his first try he was
only five centimetres off the re-
cord. This was a signal of what
was to come and presently he be-
gan to lower not only the Olym-
pic mark, but the world record
with such regularity that
wondered where he was going (0
stop. He must have been
best form, for in
jumps he broke the world record
four times.

one

Speaking in‘ metres, he did
16.12 in his second jump 16.09
in his fourth and 16.22 in his
fifth. In his last he did 16.05.
Incidentally the old record was
16.01 metres which he himself

set up only last year. Being j))

terpreted in feet his new record
is now approximately 53ft. 2.4
inches.

Second in this event was |
Leonnid Scherbakev of the
USS.R. and third Arnoldo Dey-

onish of Venezuela who I believe
has relatives in Barbados

Javelin Next

Next récord to go was the
Olympic Javelin Record. C. Y,
Young of the U.S.A. after trail-
ing behind his team-mate Bill

Miller and the Finn Hyytiainea
and the Russian Zilbulenke, made
a mighty heave in his second
throw to win the event and set

anew mark of 242ft. and one
quarter inch. They eventually
finished in this order—the U.S.A.
once again taking first = and

second place.

Then came a round of further
record beating as no less thar
eight men in the 3,000 metres
steeplechase heats beat the old
mark of 9 minutes 3.8 sec. Even-
tually the best mark was made
in the third heat by H. Ashen-
felter of the U.S.A., but the
second heat won by John Disley

LAST





Fine weather and a fast but
springy track produced a morning
of most interesting work. With
Jess than three weeks left to Races
trainers did not hesitate to send
their charges along. As a result
some #mpressive times were ob-
tained and for the first time there
were some definite indications of
form.

In reporting the gallops I shall
try to group them according to
Classification. To start with, here
is a summary of the work done by

The Derby Candidates

All seven of these were out and
with the exception of March
Winds who was confined to a slow-
ly worked five furlongs and Car-
dinal, all were sent from box to
box. The best time for this trip
was returned, somewhat surpris-
ingly, by Rambler Rose who, with
Watercress as her companion came
back in 1,25 (the last five in
1.08). Definitely an impressive
effort for this filly even though she
could not have had a great deal
in reserve. Seedling took only $
of a second longer to cover the
same distance but he too was not
allowed to loiter, Favourite Bright
Light jumped off rather sluggishly
behind Cross Bow, but soon got on
terms and returned 1.274 for the
trip without ever being under
severe pressure, Dunkirk, who has
had one or two set backs and is
not looking at her best came back
in 1.28%, which is useful in the cir-
cumstances and should bring hei
on, First Admiral, who should be
fit after his Trinidad exertions
Was not asked to do a great deal,
and with Test Match as his com-
panion returned 1.32%. Cardinal
who is also recovering from a bout
of coughing, only did 5 furlongs
which he covered in 1.08,

The Two Year Olds
Easily the best gallop of the
morning as far as these youngsters
were concerned was that of the
Barnard pair Bow Tie and Faerie
Queene. They broke slowly from
the 7 but quickened over the last

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uceessive G



Do It Every Time

110 metre hurdles and leaving
coasted home in 13.9 seconds

cf Britain was the easiest of all
ith himself and the Finn Rin-

tcenpaa not knowing which
10uld lead at the finish.

Disaster

Fhe next record to be equalled
as the Men's 200 metres and in
is final MacDonald Bailey onc:
ain met with disaster, He was
into fourth place by Andy
anfield, Walter Baker and Jim
ithers, all of the U.S.A. Bailey
i not run a bad race however;
fer his time of 21 flat was his best,
Put Stanfield did 20.7 to equal the
et by Jesse Owens in 1936
Baker and Gathers’ both
eturned 20.8. This was the second
time the U.S.A. has won all three
medals in one event.

I cannot help feeling however

| caten

mark

and

hat Bailey is over trained. His
est race was the 100 metre heat
» won on Sunday. He looked
esh and keen, But since then

fter each heat he has looked very

red when he pulled up. It is pos-
sible he reached his peak several
veeks ago at the White City.

Fourth World Record

The tourth world record to be
set or equalled went to Shirley
Strickland of Australia. In her first
heat in the 80 metres hurdles she
equalled Mrs. Fanny Blankers
Koen’s record of 11) sees, and later
in the afternoon she came back in
the Semi-Final to take off a clear
fifth, returning the remarkable
time of 10.8. But the amazing
thing about this Semi-Final was
that both Marie Sander of Ger-
man and Jean Desforges of Britain
also bettered the world mark by
Aoing 10.9.

Not In Form

And last Mrs. Blankers Koen is
clearly not in the form she dis-
played in 1948 and although she
won her first heat she was beaten
by the Russian girl Marija Golu-





ae
.

en” *

adel the ss

“LEG BYE” Signal “BYE”

ichnaja in the Semi Final. Yes-
terday there were rumours that
she did not defend her 100 metre
title because she saw that Mar-
jorie Jackson was too good
but the true story seems to be a
ease of slight blood poisoning.
However, it is now clear ae
only women capable of standing és a is os we
wp to the Rustitns are the Aus- The “Bye” and “Leg Bye’ is
tralians and New Zealanders. In the law to be discussed today
the ladies long jump Yvette Wil- This is a very important law.
liams of New Zealand won with a

By O. 8.

leap of 20 feet 53 inches after Rus- LAW 30

sia’s manly looking Aleksandra Bye and Leg Bye
Chudina had been leading for a ‘

tong while with a jump of 20 feet If the ball, not having been

called “Wide” or “N, Ball’
ihe striker without touching his
bat or person. and any runs be
obtained the umpire shall call or
was 24 feet 10) inches. Sim Iness’ signal “Bye; but if the bail touch
throw in the discus was 180 ft. 61. any part of the Striker’s dress or
inches and the Rev. Bob Richards person except his hand, and any
Pole vaulted 14 ft. 114 inches. run be obtained, the Umpire shall

1? inches. third was Shirley Caw-
ly of Britain.

In the long jump Biffles’ leap



call or signal “Leg Bye”; such
funs to be scored “Byes” and
“Leg Byes” respectively.
WHAT’S ON TODAY
No Runs
Court of Grand Sessions— A most important M.C.C, note ;
10.00 a.m. to this law states that if the
Meeting of St. Thomas Vestry striker wilfully deflects the ball
1.00 p.m. with any part of his person, no
Water Polo, Aquatic Club— runs are scored, ‘and the batsmen
5.00 p.m. may not change ends.

Mobile Cinema, Nightengale
Home, Black Rock-——7.30 p.m.



| BASKET BALL



SATURDAY’S GALLOPS

By A Correspondent

5 which they covered in 1.274—
a rousing gallop indeed. Faerie
Queene was quicker into her stride
but the big Bow Tie had got up
to her at the finish. Sea Foam and
Meersechaum covered 5 furlongs in
1.11%, both appearing very green
and certain to improve on this
performance. Even more back-
ward is Jealousy who could do no
better than 474 seconds for three
furlongs. Apple Sam was hard
held over a slow half mile.

Classes A and B

Only two A Class horses did
fast work. They were Rebate and
Notonite and both did 5 furlongs.
Rebate, looking very stripped in-
deed, covered 5 furlongs in 1.06,
while Notonite was easy to Colom-
bus in 1.05. This last was an im-
pressive performance,

My. Gill’s Belle Surprise did
what I consider to be the best
gallop among the B Class horses.
She covered a box to box in 1.22
flat, the last 5 furlongs in 1.053.
Not far behind her was her stable
companion Sweet Rocket whose
corresponding times were 1,224
and 1.05%. Like all Mr. Gill’s
horses these two are looking par-
ticularly well. The veteran Pep-
per Wine also had a good gallop—
the box in 1,22 with the last five
in 1,06, but she may not have
been capable of a great deal more,
Mr. Walcott’s pair Flying Dragon



































COLLEGE DEFEAT
ST. STEPHEN'S BRIGADE

The Second Division basket ball
match which was played at Har-
Spear Grass), while Devil’s Sym-|rison College yesterday between
phony returned 1.302 Test Match! College and St, Stephen’s Brigade
as already noted did 1.32%. Going | ended in a win for College by a
over 5 furlongs, Darham Jane ran / large margin of 81 points to 32.
clear away from her stablemate The chief scorers for College
Dim View, and in spite of being | were Marvell, King and Robinson
pulled up at the finish returned | who scored 30, 27 and 20 respec-
the excellent time of 1.054 for the | tively, while McClean, Clarke and
trip. Aim Low and Abu Ali did| Archer scored 18, 6 and 4 respec-
the: same distance in 1.064 with |tively for their team.

Aim Low having slightly the bet- |
ter of it. A gallop of this sort re- |,
presents a distinct improvement |
in form for Abu Ali. Street Arab
took } of a second longer, while |
Magic Gaye who appears to have

felt the effects of her Trinidad. trip
did the distance in 1.08%. Dol-
drum indicated that she would be
a force to be reckoned with in the
Champion Stakes by working 10
furlongs, her time from box to box
being 1.258.

D & E Class

The gallops of Watercress
(working with Rambler Rose) and
Cross Bow (Bright Light) have
already been, noted, Colleton was
sent as “schoolmaster” to Jealousy.

F Class

Pride of place among the F's
must go to the sturdy Columbus
who did well to keep up with No-
tonite (5 in 1.05). Miracle took
only $ of a second longer to do the
same distance.. Soprano, who has
put on considerable weight,
worked with Twinkle and was

Sor
Children

























BEST DEA

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Harry MOMENTS |
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THE 3¢-A-D4aY SECTION=4
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Al Ferguson Fabric





BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Signal “LEG BYE”

Know Your Cricket
LAWS 30 & 31

COPPIN.

Experience with the bouncin
ball has made the M-C.C. make
another ruling and it is this: If

player guards his head against
a bouncer with his hand not ac-
tually holding the bat, under thi
Law resulting runs ‘cannot be
seored as either ‘Byes’ or “Le

Pass yes.”

Although the act may be invol-
untary. tne circumstances may b«
vegarded as
terms of the first ruling which
ceals with the wilful deflectin.
of the ball.

Signals

The umpire signals ‘Bye’ oy
raising an open hand above th¢

head and “Leg Bye” by raising
leg and touching it with th
hand,

It must be borne in mind thet
the term wilfully covers the delib-
crate kicking or kneeing away .of
the ball.

R.BY.C. Lawn

Tennis Results

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Men’s Doubles
W. H. C. Knowles and D, I.
Lawless beat D. E. Worme and
H. Johnson 6—2, 6—1, 7—5,

TODAY’S FIXTURE

Men’s Doubles, Semi Final

Play begins at 4.15 p.m.

W. H, C. Knowles and D. I.
Lawless vs. L. St. Hill and J. D.
‘Trimingham. : &)



CHECK UP



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OUR OFFERS
















THURSDAY, JULY 24, 1952



Day Of Olympics














> TA DELO Le , ;
Sports Window
: , : ° Harrison College, leaders in
sequence that is often | cits tuvsion sasker sai
” a ” fixtures will tonignt go all out
e f to defeat Y.M.P.C. and thus
; finish their season as winners
*
a cause of differences Aish thet, se
‘ Although Harrison College
{Ajith the great advances in competitive bidding technique is tied with Carlton on points,
V# and recognition of the importance of the partnership the former has a very much
factor, the take-out double is used in a number of diverse preg mag oe yp aye A
situations, some of which are far from clear-cut for players wat make tiem di =. oy
of limited experience. PCRS Sree net winners of the first division
The ftollowing sequence 1S wu >3 1093 cup.
picat source of snipe eet OAK QSB5 In additi to the H
“ doulas” west. ven: OAS College — ¥.M.P.C. match,
rth, One Diamond ; East, One & K 10 Pickwick will: play Modern
Teart ; South doubre, Is the last Unless his second double is High School.
1a penalty (business) double, ead as showing length and
a further command to North trength in Hearts, there is no
eR, te, ARIAS. MN | guy COURT, 10 a possible blufl bic a
is argue > tlie : y last, a
rave good support for Spades, a Pat whose hand could THE WEATHER
ard in Hearts. it su We ar OKQ85
onds, but nothing in Clubs
vith such a hand he would wel- Q3 REPORT
me any a by North ace oK3
atter can show a secondary 2QI39864 YESTERDAY.
© suit, rebid his Diamonds,
ad a et it he guards With West, unable to ratse a Rainfall from Codrington: .07
abs, or make a penalty pass bid, East would have every reason in.

ver One Heart doublec wilh
me strength in this suit.

North can also contend that
is Diamond response was a
eed call that promised no
yositive strength, so south can
arcely feel that he has the
veating of One Heart in his own
van

" Simple formula

Nevertheles, this case is
wered by a simple tormula
lready quoted in these notes

A double is always for penalties
if the partner has made any call
ther than a pass. The prebable
‘xplanation is that South’s hand
is something like this:



Indians Score 362 Vs.

Commonwealth Team

coming. within th’

From Our, Own Correspondent:
LONDON, July 23.
West Indians including Ken
Rickards of Jamaica are in the
Commonwealth team playing the
Indians at Blackpool. The Indians

batting first made a poor star\,
but Phadkar (94) and Gopinat!:
(79) enabled them to rally and

total 362.

In the half hour before th:
clese Charlie Barnett, forme:
Gloucester and England player,
was caught behind the wicket by
Mantri off Ramehad. Rickards
who came in at the fall of the
first wicket, is four not out

SCOREBOARD —
Indians vs. Commonwealth XI.
SEMA Ae ce nesik age ee 362
Commonwealth ........ 24 for 1
Gentlemen vs. Players
WOM 55.5 Rivne oc bo 265,
Gentlemen .... 0 for no wickets

Surrey vs- Sussex

COT. 5s aie se eae Lela y 297,
(Constable 95), Sussex ....... 24
for 3.

Worcester vs. Derby

TOBE ORs is 4a 8 ea oe
(Elliott 122), Worcester ......
for 6.

Gloucester vs, Essex

BN ati aniceieit resi g ete sce
(Avery 89); Gloucester ...... 56
for ' t;

ON






wn
om













and Demure worked a box in the somewhat disappointing, doing 5 i
useful time of 1.23}. Spear Grass, furans ei .09. Will Mg Wisp | : rf ay
working with Cantaquisine did covere he same distance in ‘ERGUS I FAB ‘Ss. Sui . aa a
he same distance in 1.26 (last 5 1.10%. Betsam did a box under | FERGUSON FABRICS, Suitable for pega : ea
in 1.07), but Red Cheeks was re- re comet in =a wes the band- $1.84 and $2.04 ms noe
strained and returned 1.28, Slainte age pronusk did not impress | eee non uf 4 i s a
i “comfortable, as indeed he over 4 furlongs which he covered | BLACK & WHITE PIG SKIN @ ...... $1.10 ag feeait ‘
ought to have bono, te RBG IR oie aa Il] PLAID SEERSUCKER @ -vvccssssesscssssssssssssssesee 1.10 ee
C Class Best time for the G’s was re- 3" PRE we SE ee hd
Among the C Class horses the turned by that seasoned campaign. LOWERED LAWNS for Nighties @ ............. 1.02 Rae
best time of the morning was again cr Gavotte who did a 5 in 1,08. : PRE forthcoming from the Waterford Not far behind her was Twinkle VLOWERED sca Suitable for
tring. Dashing Princess and High wee ase the wr the gallop House Coats. ic £OM............ $1.32 to 1.02 CAVE
und Li joi n impressive box with Soprano -09). e unre- SO Ae ne Fd 2
to box in 1.228 The ‘Thing cov- ‘iable Blue Diamond: covmred: the aes Eee, ies Pink, Blue, Peach
ered the same distince in 1.25, same distance in 1.11, while little an hite. educ rates $1.50 to 1.08
han a useful gallop for her, Can- Cottage worked with Apronusk (4 SHEPHERD
taquisine got back in 1.26 (see in 56%). | PLAIN SHANTUNG SPUN in Blue, Light
Timmy Halo) || SS=etah So"mtiharmn oem & CO, LTD.
Resistered U.S Patent Ofee y immy at 0 | ose, Peach and White @ won =1.20 10
7 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street
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to fear an adverse game in
Hearts. A psychic Heart call.
with a retreat to Clubs if neces-
sary, is comparatively safe and
mal it difficult for the
opponents to get together in
earts unless North realises tha!
South's second double has
exposed East's attempted bluff

This situation also conforms
to another elementary formula:
a double is for _ penalties
whenever three suits have been
bid. The primary object of a
take-vut double is to invite the
partner to choose between two
or more suits.

London Express Service.

Total Rainfall for month to
date: 2.70 ins.
Highest Temperature: 86.5.°F.
Lowest Temperature: 75.5 °F.
Wind Velocity 11 miles per
hour
Barometer (9 am.) 30.000
(3 p.m.) 29.932
TO-DAY
Sunrise: 5.48 a.m.
Sunset: 6.20 p.m.
Moon: New, July 21
Lighting: 7.00 p.m.
High Tide: 4.35 a.m.
Low Tide: 11.11 am,
p.m.

11.19

Kent
Warwick

133,
for 9

Hants vs Glamorgan

Hants Kibale Semele 150,
Glamorgan ..... Bate itd cake
Notts vs. Middlesex 4 Sweet dreams
Notts . 296 2)

for 9 (Hardstaff 136 not out). No fuss — no tears

Northants vs. Yorks

Yorks
Northants

A happy business ot
Ww ® growing up, when
' 0 8 Mother insists on

ROBINSON’S ‘tent. GROATS

aac « ne . 325
. 14 for no wicket

Lancashire vs. Leicester
Leicester

Thu
C”










iTS aMAzING/
STORM OVERHEAD
- YET YOUR RADIO

NEVER RAINS BUT
1T FOURS! BETTER
COME IN TO MY

WHAT SORT OF SET

THUNDERING is iT ANYWAY ¢

THE woRD! *
THATS ALL WE
SHALL HEAR
THIS WEATHER!

A THUNDERING
SGOP PROGRAMME
ON THE RACIO.

EACH PROGRAMME
COMES STRAIGHT
FROM THE STUDIO
TOMY LOUD-
SPEAKER By WIRE

THANKS A MILLION JOHN
1 MUST TELL THE WIFE
ABOUT REDIFFUSION.
1 SUPPOSE IT'S
EXPENSIVE THOUGH

CURRENT YO PAY FOR. ITS AMAZINGLY
CHEAP ~2 RUN. 40 ;

BIRKMYRE CANVAS

72” WIDE—FOR BUS TOPS and SIDES s

INNER HOOD LINING $

g
:
JUST OPENED :

56” WIDE. FAWN AND GREY s

LIONIDE LEATHERETTE S

50’ WIDE. ATTRACTIVE SHADES. %

.

BLACK MIRACLE ADHESIVE

1%-OZ, or 5-0Z, TUBES

*
% °

ECKSTEIN BROTHERS

BAY STREET — DIAL 4269

45666604
ee ee PSA APPS FSSOSD

POSS PUSS ONEGS



OC







Full Text

PAGE 1

THURSDAY, JULY 24, U52 BABBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE nw.it Speech Day Held At Ursuline Convent Lady Savage Presents Prizes LADY i Governo %  Sir Alfred Suvase, K itributed the Prizes at tho Speech and Prv/r* Otvtng Day held at the Urauline Convent on Tuesday afternoon. Hts Excellency the Governor was also presen' and in a short address commented on the high standard of the play "The Rivals" which was d"i the girls. Presenting her Report of the year's activities, the Headmistress said Inter nlla:— raw there has been an increase in the number of pupils in our School: 174 chlldVen s>e in mtendance in our Montcssori and Preparatory Department, and 133 tfirls are being educated in our Main School. Th.total number of pupils is at present 307. TELEVISION IN THE OFFICE Television WU—lor 'bualnrv* ptirpOMM" only — raay MM W liutlallrd In nuii) oilier*, laclortra and ihowroom* In Britain tipvrimruki by a Land*n bank and a ilt cempaay have proved that TV baa a mumIn industry and eommerce. Mart •rears followed thr testa. I omm.r.ul lirtn. .an uT\ ID 'MJ li Important hi IT.nd cheque* brt v w eeneaa an hercens t avoid the delay and (omnarailvr experuw of th* postThe bank feemd thai It •ould i 1 "!cheque* and vUinnrnl shifts ovT a dUUnrr of 14 sollrAn afllrlal of thr bank. < %  !>• Mill, -uid Co.. malj to-day: "W* hap* to tnatal the wl, ctsu" link-up when we balld B*w Irdirr ofHop toon. ThiDifficulty—Ueeacea "Wr had a lioenw ir.ui-.-i b% the Peat -fup to April JO this year. Whether th.y will rein II la anathrr matter." Licence* will bo thr problem that v UI fa" Uir hu^innu. Hrm-. One of thean aald: Wr nar foicul thai th,rol Office nuy not br will Ui it to grant a* a Itoeaor u> • %  • %  ml and rvrrlvr pictures."' Thr Past Other aald lo-d*>. %  'n> hatM had In yu trie* about lic.-ncv Thr poaltlao ii undn • onsldrratlaii and r can %  > nothing." Meanwhile the manufacture al (li>* < gulpmrnt. which will miblr thr plrturra to be sent fmn. iifllc* to ofnrr. la conUnuinr. \u offlelal of tor manuf-irutrrr MIII. "There bt a treat futimin thi-. Thr Post Office will t ive to franl wavr-bnita* and Wacrs." —UF-.S. Moreover, we have again thi* year been privileged to co-operate in the education and training not merely of some of the children of Bnrbador. but also of W fftrls from the neighbouring West Indian Inlands, British Guiana, Venezuela, and even Ecuador, who have been with us as boarders. Had WO Hu "t—c3sary accommodation, we should be able to help to educate many more children. for at present we are obliged to refuse countless application which we receive during the year. We hope in a year or two. to be able to solve this problem In providing more Accommodation for boarders. Fully Satisfied I am happy lo he able to report at the end ol thra school year that I am, on the whole, fully satisfied with the work which has been achieved, the progress which has been made, and the standard ot work which has been n throughout the year In tho two departments of the School — the Preparatory ami the Mum School. li.W.L Shipping Survey Coming LONDON. i %  Shin wfll Beak :n i .i the Sar(or thiColon tri Mends to mak.. ihe Government's pu for ihc further development tl "id agriculture in tfte Wmt Indies; nnd what ai Lipping f-icilrics are contemplated. Mr. Oliver Lyttelton. Secreiar • l St..te for HIP Colonies, repliet 'aiemenls about Jimi .n-A British Honduras in repl io question* by the hon. Memutdiwortfa Central (J1-Richard Adjms} and the hoifor Cr.ive*end (Si' Richard Aclnnd) on 26th M.ir. May respectively European Sugar Imports Questioned Sulval ion \rnl> Celebrates Golden Jubilee la T'dad Insect Control In W.I. TiilNIDAD. July 11 Dr. P. F. de Cairea. of World Health Organisation, who attended the recent Kent House •n/erence on Home Economics and Education In NeMttta, t.inged by the Food and Agriculture Organisation and the Caribbean Commission, dUcIoaert Oiat there la a proposal to set up a i uiol of tachnkal p<-raonnel (or UH> Canbbeai' LONDON. Juh IN THE HOUSE OF COMMONS on July 3, Mr W 1 Williams (Labour, Hammersmith) asked the PM-SHV the Board of Trade the total tonnage ol sugar exported aolden JuUkv ui the SalvaUoi during the last 12 months and at what average cost per Auny arrival in this Coioi %  ( IMK-.1i,ll PORT-UF-SI'AIN. July H Speakers at %  big public fum tiivi held lure |ait ui ponneetion According to bun, funds hi leen made available f-j. Iht DC0lct. hut th" qu UM pool' h eadquarters will t>*.tabli5hed has not ettled. Plan^ call I %  stal which would mchldr a Pllhlii Mhh Offleei. an hwi Centn I '" Area AdvUer and four s ana at the superrlsor level, all. it expected, to he drawn frorr ton from Brilainand the Colonies^ to countries m We<-\ in jJ^^J" ,nbllU '" ""' Ar,n >"see C a rih aia n Europe who, in the same period, exported fondant Int.. w ^, u !" Viniv ( .. imt u Trinidad lo Territories which have already Great Britain; what was the total tonnage of such fondant ltfu2 hut some tflorl UM> of the imported into this country and at what average prlc made earlier to begin.operation.-: facilities, when available. Include per ton. More British Motors for W.I. IXiNUON. 1 the Mam acnooi. Information about the otrui In the Mam School thwork tcrrlto] found In m in Form II ha* been particularly A 1 1 '"" 1 hepurt to Parliimu-nt. in insatisfactory. The members of "• wport on Dntbh Depci thia Form have, in general. Mr. Peter "Thorne> T '-rofi. Presihere. At first oppoilUori lo Harbadoa. Trinidad ami | the Board of Trade, le>• | % % % %  .> %  was I re* Dd huo, 9l LueU, Uie I-ecward ecorded Uiut on one occasion r-rianda and the Balianii.1 fulenani received lD|Wli tAling hospital ireatment. — i % %  %  : %  -. ihiii the Lnili itiiL,. V„,l R%rffw*a.efi ovnd "t Uw people ret.DUKr AnU I>> RMI Ui lie ^oik more mill, ui; than In th* oUier BAttan ill. In spite of i i ,'. % %  .. cot Vert* wen 1 plied "Importa of fondant havo been separutely recordwl In the traclo returns ily since 1st Janunrv to May. 1932. Imports into the United Kingdom of fondant from Sweden, Norway, Denmark. the Netherlands. BelRlum and France totallod 18,405 tons at an Th' BriUsh Weat Indies are beBVeraJB < %  i.f. value nf C83 a ton. __ nii \-A i.i r. it. md m the A "" u ' "T" rxirina May. 513 British can from the Colonies to Western iTVTsxB E S flSfcaasSV Sr* £ —ttfSSwVrrns^acTorywoS I t*e "s. in London tod currency at a prom To been^ aiconvollEhiHi '< ihe rinht tv SEfe This compares with the 1951 *op these export*, therefore. makTspeclal June" monthly avera*e_ of 358 British would mean either the lost of l>isrU>< \lhldlr l.a-t( ru Affuirn Today the Army enjoys the coiffafehce of the Qovarnment, lhlms|n-r:s ons-.-ixi'iit v md those whom it orlpnnll. '.. rri'i in hai als< I must, ho las) Monday evo ..in, principal speaker I". M. KeniMm. use AcUng WASHINGTON, July 23 li-Miui Minister Ahdull.ih Ibrs!i 111 Bakr discusaoU Middle Rast on Wednesday with Ii Bqrroa > %  ua*lstant Bet: f'ir Near-Bast affairs. After a hall hi Mr 1 ii. iwniwm, ne nruni Go\errior. who .aid he .TC^ !" ," 1 ever. Sixth Form. Mr. ShinweB: Will Uie riant cors sent to the West Indies. Brit.. valuable proceaairut tradu S whTch ull; four members have 1 9J0S ejree ti. .i 1 ""d British llondura,,. which is J net earner of hard not onlv studied intelligently ;"> other ness, and their v. hola-heextad operation with the Staff. I happy to know that nest year numbers in Uie Sixth Form increase to nine or ten. Thanks T Staff shipping concerns, and will he Stales. 42 cars and 19 commercial i acU to uie Minister of Food, t M .k am five this matter hts urgent atvehicles from Canada, nine cars w ], n told me a fortnight ago thit the MOl from France and two from Wastuii, trade was being brought to ill ., T _„ „ ,„ „ ern Germany. ftn end? Is it not possible for the An analyst* of Uie figures shows rlR ht hon. Gentleman's departthat Trinidad was Britain's best ment 1O ^nt nbout some relabetween the price f %  ire of the services being renIhc eonimunity by the Army. Members of the Army era 1 ilfe,! upon to carry out duties under the most dlflirult condition.-*, Iut in %  frnin.i then ives able lo accomplish their I must now tii.i.k moil heartily J—n*-* -"4^*—*-| ;tt r-_"JT ih (tuns and Asristant Teachers ndle . Bt ** e !" 1 of thu .moith on the Stall of Uie Main School Mr. Lyttelton: "I can assure V> right hm GerfUtrnari that I ar lous on this sut.:e.* molor customer in uje Caribbean r.rrn of British shipowners wilLbe Safcolaa. n took 1.798 cars and .king a survey of _the west fl,,, riMmn rc uu vehiclaa In llol who liave given me their full cohe*" operation at all DmeS, BOi only during our school hours but also in the out-of-class duties and activities of a boarding sri) My work ha. been eorUMaraDU lightened by the devotedness, the loyalty, and the sense of duty displayed on every occasion by aaCD member of the Staff, nnd to euch 1 express my sincere gratitude I thank Mrs. Wotton for giving u a few half-hours of her own J,.I leisure time during the week fo. JO D Gymnastics and Dancuig^U-' the local Govemmer. kul to provide Uwan wlih Jamaica and her dependencies took 1110 cars and 418 commercial vehitlua fiem Britain last year. rhich "sugar is sold and the price if which fondant is bought, becanag fondant b) iMiught at twir" .lunrice at which sugar l Thirdly, would not the "\\ asliiiifilim Post" Denounces Mossadegh : something mr reinstatement of Premier Military Force For Caribbean commercial vehicles. British Guiana took 371 cars and 143 commercial vehicles, and the nah;maa took 245 cam and 04 commercial vehicles. But Australia, which was Brinin's bi^gi -t -ingle motor customffVftU^ ,^ %  i b /U A l J '; countries. She took 3.37 cars last yen. „., 25.171 in the ilrat Uve manths of uie tl, this year. Recent Import restric'Ki,-h %  In the Mouse of Coounon r Tufl n BeamWi Uus year. Recent Import L*wcs) asked thi tj ons> however, cut Australian „, ; Secretary of state for the col nfes pura h aaas of British carr, in MV I am grateful to Mrs. White for what response h;is been obtaldei ,„ ,. :i \y 1.19^ $L ill her lessons in Art to the two ;„ the pioposals lo Colonlnl GoVirrough not so severe, have also upper Forms of Uie Main School. ,,.10-11'. In ih c Certhbeaii i.rei. been impoaed in New Zealand Trade observers In Londi WASIUNOTON July 33. 'The Washington Host" In it* __,torial on Wednesday said thai these circumstance* something t f v rcinst ought to be done to provide some Mossadegh is u "tragedy for alternative trade in order to pros> n World" because "the anvide sugar for home Industries archy which Mossadegh has culBjMcb ire suffering senously belivaled l caiuvrous and it can cause of lack of sugar, which b" no more be eoigahuxl than cai Iteing sent to Western European malignant growyk" The editorla: ssys lh.it Mossadegii has "no last policy except continuing uV crisis and national bankruptcy." ind voiced Its suspicion that 'Mossadegh himself prcvlpated ie crisis in order lo kn hi-treniith.Egypt nnd Iran and had discussed coo* ilitions in Ixi q, hoi tlld not take %  he tsffi all Kori MM Mn.r relnrlv The Htawer v„id that ho camel %  n .1 oourtesy vUit. my llr* "• ii' de rctun i d from I leeeni tour of I N are talked about hi* im lewion %  of my country. Mi appeared satislie.l w 'h I •tion. and with Its rtnhii 'he progress gnlnir 00. and'hope Mils stability and prngre.s wtl continue." When ukeil nbout Uieii dwui% %  %  cl E %  i arveyed them —jfij?. Bon n\ Baby | This Is Baby Elizabeth Sharpies brought up in West Africa on Cow & Gate Milk Food, and a wo nderf u I tribute to the val uc of this famous product In a tropical climate. Her mother writes. "Elizabeth was making very slov when at four months I put her on Cow & Gate. 1 do feel I owe your product a debt of gratitude for the marked and rapid progress she then made and for the resulting healthy child she is today." ogress COW& GATE SUftfi Ck,FOODo/" I "^"^ ROYAL BABIES 1 B LESLIE 4 Co Lid DillributOfN and also to Mrs. Hinds-Howell for the establishment of I ton lor her help with the French two rogull olrj I itialions te classes. be liable (or service in th To Mr. McComie I must also an d if he will make a full say a word *>f gratitude for the m ent on the matter. Spanish lessons which he has M r OHvei Lffttltori I S ven to KSU of our pupils. For at $ luw j Uf n l€ Colon!' repUOd t past two years Miss Field has -The barracks In Jamaica wfj bean on our Staff and we regret tcriously damaged by \i that she Is now leaving us. Her hurricane, and It was thercfon real Interest In the progress of mceasiry to reconsider lb each of her puplut and her devot, ipecta of th ie | roposal-;. rdness to the girls will not be am ,,, lW putting revised proposal) easily forgotten, and on behalf of .,. the Governments conccrnbu; her pupils I thank her nines and wish her success in her new Major Beamish: "Is my righ'* %  pheie of work. To Miss Adams 311 fjion,. aw..io that in the day* and Miss Hock who have wontc Wast Indies Regiment rewith us for a year, we also say crults volunteered with great en'thank you", and we ofler them UlUI aS m to Join a very fine fore our good wishes. with proud traditions; and will h Tho results of the Oxford and prjftcularry he..r In mind the pos Cambruge General Certificate fjbfjjtj of revivink this force?" ExaminaUon at ordinary level, Mr ryttclton: "My hen. and taken last July by oufourteen 0 M The United States dollar .,n ww iuuulMif eIo-ed at „ diBcount o| l 19/16'per cent, in terms >t Cinadlan funds, unchnnned from Monday's close. That is it look VI 1/16 cents Canadian to buy M American, the pound sterling arai $2.70 1/2 down, I 1 from Menfor Pacific Fleei Commander from the Caribbean service, Lhtoel^restiM Ad ">-' Arthur Radford said at J on tbe whole r-AKM^^en a decTd"e:; Pl Harbour that about .00 h pupil ebteining ,„ ve lwo ^t.dion tftree the ft^ 0 "..^; e >f '"^; n four br five or i „" ,,., : We I 1 m^Ln^S? i was iibanded." —B.IT-P. add several good books to our Reference Library at well as to the Fo.m Llbn I should like to t^ke tins rppoi, (unity to express Our thnnks U> f the BrinSh uncil for the MagaJ unvan I • papers, Wh.ch are *ent to our & I "* %  • n-.-s_2r..' i*a (•.' %  • JII -' i7rr>o M %  *!,*. OHUI.I I n.1 Moll .;.i... IUKII. AnSrli rrCiMrdcd for W ClstodrtU' S Mclllac. Joci-bm £*••• Pruelor % % %  Slifarli • Mariana da F-i U. Joan Milan. i>i>i>i*a CKIIM rti. KiaSS', Aanaa Ssrku. M %  aalrw) ii..:i.. M>Tll : Uliuta l*-" l..t.u.l •! UM A*>*IM*d S>M< •! ,1.Bafal %  ••!• al *•! r rn f.r.Jt L MaulS" lfci-w. llaea'a fen rTt., uU !h Mall <•:< %  <• %  r.i. talbB ( %  ai t.M-.i. i u> li ,i*rta Mi ,!> %  anoeuvre He said the demonstration was designed to "give Communist., sotnwthing to think about." It was designed to show I'eds that the Navy could bomb the coastal cities of Amoy, Foot-how and Swatow anytime without draining the Korean flee* lower the "pokesman said. Plane* particlciiting in the %  noavSTI launched by a carrier 'n*K force under command of Renr Admiral Souchy sailed Into Formosa strait* will weak after i fait trip from Korea waters. The Navy did not say how man> planes It could throw against tin Chinese coast In a real shooUn* attack, but Souehy's task force ivas revealed to be composed of more than one carrier. —O.P. n expected that people who use ln Ncw Vo ' ltt I *SOai Ships for travel between Uui OO'W was unchanged at ., pn Islands will BXparlenea consider'"'um of 3 i/2 per cent, in term' Ir Lvttetlon %  my In getting passages. *>t united States funds in cl-ini< ihetical queitioti -freuditers which are foreign exchange d*-.illngs on ,, h .. to replace the "Lady" bonU, will Tuasdiiy. The pound sterlina %  have Uttte uc.ornmodation for to keep your whole m.uith healthy; the v..e. und "refreshingly different" beumc of Ipana's mint flavour. THE TOOTH PASTE.. "REFRESHINGLY DIFFERENT soouct o* iantoi-NYiai. IONOON *NO WWTOI ^rT SEE / f/nur Intent' mitl I III f h em I LATCHES I 2 LOCKS 2 :i HOLTS :t 4 HL\GES 4 Wt> harv rifvirt'tl llnri-ittiiif l.tililt'i-ns. Peeks. Slititfls. Beerht'ls tintl imulrunisftl Tubs. UAHIIAOOS CO-OP. COTTOJV FACTORY LTO.



PAGE 1

ESTABLISHED 1895 TIU'KSPAY J'-'.V 'I 1*2 PRICE F1VT MILITARY TAKES OVER CAIRO CABINET TOLD OBEY OR QUIT KING FAROUK IS IN DANGER CAIRO, July 2S THE ARMY seized control of Cairo Wednesday, according i" unofficial reports, and ordered the Cabinet to obey *trders or get out. Unofficial sources said the army was in I control of the country including Alexandria, summer capij tal where Farouk and his Cabinet are staying. Mohammed Naguib Bey, commanding the Cairo garI rison, seized control of Cairo and apparently of Alexandria at 4 a.m. Most reliable semi-official sources said Naguib Bey issued an ultimatum to the Cabinet demanding that the Cabinet carry out Army orders and strictly abide by the [ constitution or the Army wnuld dismiss, it He also demanded that martial law be lifted and nor' mal parliamentary life be restored and that Aly Maher I Pasha be asked to lead the now Cabinet. Egypt awoke Wednesday to find that the arniv had moved into politics seizing power ui a well organized and seemingly bloodless coup. In Farouk'* "Black Book" Mastermind of the action General Naguib Mohammed has been long in the black books of King Farouk. At 4 a.m he sent tanks to take up positions in the public squares of Cairn and other main cities machine gun posts were set up at street corners and steel helmeted troops occupied broadj casting stations and key public buildings Air passengers arriving at Beirut reported there had been some clashes between Naguib's men and troops loyal to Farouk. In a | broadcast, Naguib told the country thai the army has no designs of its own but will work in the interests of Egypt.! He said that the armv and inc. police will be responj sible for law and order He demanded a shake up m 'hi army high command and a purge in the political life of the I country which has had live Governments in as many months. Kmeruenry Meeting The latest of these headed by Hilalv Pasha WHS summoned to an emergency Cabinet meeting Wednesday in the summer capital of Alexandria 130 miles from Cairo. It was understood that Farouk was in residence there. Naguib, a bitter critic of corruption in high places, held office as War Minister in the short lived regime of Sirry Pasha which preceded that of Hilalv Farouk, is known to have opposed his appointment. Egyptian officers participating In the seizure of power in Cairo. Wednesday asked the American embassv there to inform Britain that they would meet any British intervention in the dispute with force, the State Department revealed. Early Report American Ambassador Jefferson. Caffery in an early report to the department on the seizure of power said he had first heard of the reports of action at 2.45 a.m. Cairo time. He added that the reports were confirmed less than two hours later when one of the Egyptian officers contacted the embassy's assistant air attache. A lirst hand report on the action communicated to the Embassv asked that the British be informed that officers of the "underground" said the action was solely to oust top Egyptian military commanders and thai any British intervention from the Suez Canal would be met by a determined and efficient underground force. Underground leaders said they had interned top military commanders in Egypt including Haidar Pasha Commander-in-Chief. General Farid Armv Chief of Staff, and General Sharrawi Director General of ihe Royal Egyptian Air Force, the department said. The Embassy was informed that the police would eo-opernte and that'leaders of the action are in control in Cairo. Reason given by participants in the action was said by them to oe the disgust of a line of officers mostly of the rank of Lieutenant Colonel with alleged incompetence and reporting of top Egyptian military commanders dating back to the Arab war with Palestine —C.P. It I'.P. Ahmed Ghavam Escapes From Police Custody Sealer Brings ]Angry Mobs Threaten Lumber To To Lynch Ex-Premivr MOTOR VESSEL Terr* Nova'' drought 106,000 ft. of lumber to th* IM.*I from Weymoiilli, Nora Scorn The V*H*P! i* equipped With Murooirt Radar set wlitrh ens hi' I i t0 ii .t,. |j M irt „r mv ftoaUu* object. Songster Wants Details Of Federation Settled British Lives In Egypt Are Nol In Danger KIN(;: TON. Jamaica. July 22 DON ALP SANGSTEit Minister of Social'Wei fare, nave notice in the House of Representatives vesterdav "That this House reaffirm-, iti support for the policy ol British Caribbean Federalm believing thai federation a the means whereby .the peoplis of our territories can and will advance together in political and economic progress LONDON. July 23 Prime Minister Winston Chur>hJH made the following IUWBssntf 0O Wo.hn-s.luj on Egypt in of Common* in respon*-' o ,i <(uv*tion by the leader Clement Attlee formed that the Egyptian Arm) led by a group of officers who arf this group. The army in Alexandria is, ac oniing to information that I have present, unaffected, and the '(•embers of the new Egyptian Government, headed by Hilalv Pasha, have made a contract with ihe army leaders. So far as can be seen, there i* m risk to British lives or properly. According to a broadcast from Cairo, Major General Mohammed N,iguib. Coirunander-inChief of the Egyptian forces, ha' .iven assurance *to foreign resitbat thenlives and properA,,; tafeguarded, and mal ihe army will make itself respon%  oble for them." —u.r. to ist.iblish a new dominion wealth nf Nations within the British CommonAwttfiF* Ixsan BankWill Help Peasant Holdings Up To 25 Acres THE RECOMMENDAT.ON that peasant holdings up to 25 acres should be eligible for assistance from tht | Peasants' Loan Bank will have the effect of brinffinK j J within the scope of the Peasants' lan Bank "the ideal size holding which could ben profit from Irrigation facili•i,, Mr. D. A. M. Hayms. Manager of the Peasants' Loan Bank, said yesterday In the past only holdings up 2 1 Reported Dead In Viet in inh Raid SAIGON. July 23 .ill charged that the VicUninh raiding party had massacred 21 unarmed men, women and children at the French A .. -cnl Ceni.ty two oUkan were wounded when rebels disguised us coolies swarmed unprotected center On Monnighl UJN. Entrench !On Hill Crest SEOUL. July 23 Sweltering United Nationoops burrowed deeper into the .stern crest of the disputed hill during the lull In the six-day old battle for a bloody height on th. western front. United Nations infantrymen were forced to abandon the western crest of the hill yesterday after 200 Chinese Commun" is swarmed up the blackcnei .ope against a small force of allies. Allied 8-26 light bombers aimin.' bj radar Drevented the Reds from launching an assault after dark yesterday. Night air attacks followed a day of rocketing, strati ny and napalming by United NationplanW. One of the four Red tankspotted In the area was knocked out Temperature* in the area of the hill, which dominates the area for miles around, ranged up to 100 degrees Fahrenheit. Wave* of Allied lighter bomber*. braving intense anti-aircraft fire •mashed Communist troops and %  •apply centre south of Wonsan In another devastating aerial blow ttt ripe" Communist targets -TJ.P. rtii-. Mouse. In accepting the %  purl of the Standing Closet bsoclauou Committee a-, a basli . conatdera thai ls* recommendation* In M PnorJ "•quire reconsideration ailment. TinHOUM 1 u> parUruIarlj •cur* that gravei . >werx should be allotted in the ,i i.-istiuitiisj to the elected i. pgi %  ill all Ma •>< tini--'iii' .nit' M.II fadaratlon should ba hit la tad u, ith adequate llni it uliilitv lo function effectively / I ralopPMflt -if the area vhole. QumiiaM Phu i[iiusf Nawtou on n Now Ufa) two monuV i Sprinp M..ioy|e is the Cldci Bkigineer %  irlp tmrk rwrir.. Uir lerra Nava |a • IpOCtl i load of molasses for SydntM kotia, (By U.-H'ii MAZANDIl TEHEHAN. July 21 DEP08CD 1'HEMIEK Alimexl Ghavam aneatcd bv ihe order tit his uccwnor (MohamirMd Mossadegh) escaped from custody on Wef rTt nawl Nationalilta ihreatened to Ivnch Inn tleiuhirnits i NsUtono] policct arrcatad GhavajH If) lha rtorna >-t Parliament im-tiil i Abollzl Ton 80 miles Icon Teheran. The Qovarunent ill measures slmuUl taiiK l i :uin An wnwd mob of .">,*H>u i rutticaJ Nattoi nasaed .( and vowed to *;i> to Goon) and Lynch htm. But a fpokwnuui for tinluh \.IIMU. i that 1 thavam aaconod hla niartfa on Wedw fW i iniu... sasssMgotfgssiaa^Lxr sr 1 as issued lor Qhavam and to arrest hin> on MgJn U %  ii.-,,t'i If. %  i %  %  III.IL I Shah le.ii. i' .' i hint to the %  IM I %  III. i i ad, Bvo '..I th..t %  %  %  %  With ..II On tri-.i.inm lbi t)ig oil %  i.ic,i Abad %  %  %  tn. police oreii %  tba crowd lo I The II a tank killed a woman % %  r.r. r.ii/..iin id u Saai KlizaiMlli I LONDON Jubr, -: %  liui^ueen saw an AlBaricari pU) th.voniiK Klljubeth ti >.. i ),. paid hti %  %  .. :i | %  j) %  I Miming QuaaiL Tha ['lay is the •tory of ihe youth ol Cood UUMM K. Uaabatta i by Jennet; • Tn.v. hniand fraad Latlon, —< .r Iran On Way f iur *TTo National latherOfFoiir; Dies In Crash Suicide .j 10 acres were eligible. Mr Haynoo was dlscuasinK with tha Adroeate some of the advan-. lages lo be gained under the scheme for extending the facli-l ties of the Bank to peasant holders of plots up to 25 acres. a^wj| aj t enters-^up4ers whlchschomo, was approved by the L>"**i Council when they passed a Billi .unending the PeasanU' tan Bank Act on Tuesday. The extension of irrigation fanlities to holders of up to 23 acres, Mr. Hayncs said, might indicate the lineo along which the future development of >nf !" gardening and dairying ah take place. Under the Irrigation Scheme, the Bank has in mind linking well on the average sired holdlrup -about two or three acres—on high levels. That, Mr. Hayncs said, would be very expensive. It felt, however, that If they could encourage groups o* betweer eight and 13 peasant holders to combine, the capital expenditure involved in sinking one well could ran wll serve the amalgamated group, and larger holdings would have no undue advantage over •mailer holdings Breaking New Ground %  When you come to the widening of the scope." Mr Hay no* >-ou nre opening up a new to persons occupying or i: land There are numberless cases on record where abeentee proprietor", according to the Ad. have had to give permission before money could be advanced lo occupiers. Today, once the Bank is reasonably sure that the secur1 They said there were scenes of bloody horror us sprayed machir.egun bullet; and three grenades cut down fleeing victual like machetta knives. Survtvon *.-iid that 2d Communists attacked time They hurled grenades inside ihe main dining ball cot luges, and sprayed bullets at children playing in the garden. Ofllctal list said the dead InHuded seven children. two women and 3 ofncr^s• servants. -CJ. .>.*> BundiU Wiped Out In Antioquia %  •< OOTA, Colombia. July. 3J. Government .said on T u esday that Army troops have wiped oul .15 bandits in AnUoquia in the riast few days In Colombia, mservatlve* rule, the %  vord "bandit" is often used tn 'nit member Liberal Party tfarbfpdos May Gel Rice From T'dadf PORT-OF-SI'AIN Jul> T.\ Tha Trtiridad Oovan from tht larhadus Government for a loan >f J.OWi bags of rice to ease the hortage of this commodity Ac Metal urcistated today il ll likely that the request will l wanted In view of the -olon> aKsliintial :icc t.-k IDUrTnoldad nsmsted, Jamaica .ti catting the rice shortage b) 'taking available to that colon> portion of Its rue which Wtt till in British Guiana. Hartley To Visit Barbados Ddkfl Of K<-nl GMtdg TO llrUinUi Tha Duka ( r Kc I 'niMii i %  nenald on tinVToj i I m\ w i runway naai Ootrea la i in natruah th* 9 i oriupant of Ihe plane Was rkou I) mltiied and I* In o wait .' the San Pernando Colom 1 ficspUal. Both arc frimi THnldfl I la Pointe-a-Pierre M.. I .tliiey who is married, has fon.Iz-nagan. the Intel ilocual Hoekas 1 fk from a compound dislocatio | both KDklag and a head injuiv i pat -id. out la reportI lo be n-nrtlng favourably to treatment. The aircraft whirh w.. nly made nervieoable to club rnbera I IMv 'lavggjo % %  %  '"' rooh iFJasn Our Own CoriMpoadtnli KINGSTON. July 23 Nnrman Manley Q.C., Presiflcn .1 I'N 1' ..nd 1^-gal Advi nwiy funned Nulional Work..J'nion in Jamaica leaves the Wand .-liday for Barbados on u few lays' visit Manley who is going to Baibados in fulfilment of a long-stanl usa West Indies Federation —C.P.* /.r Dixie Democrats Won't Sign Loyalty Pledge (Bj LTLB t WILSON, CHICAGO. Julv 23 GOVERNOR ADLA1 IIVKNSON of llln tip new tuppofl On WediH lay as the manager;. <>( the Uemocrattc National Convention .strove to prevtnl Uta party iplitUng m a flooi Rghl oven ondanilaja and civil i nihts The it'lx'lliniis l)i xi' Democrats rc-fu.seii | •he new "l^iyalty" pledge, evan ihim^h the Northa-rncn who had rammed it throui;! the Convention on ] had so modiHed it as to mak tofiraaWP LONDON. July • HnUin's lawmaker < got bad %  wa on Tuesday night frorr. . .i .ill HI i 'Kiscrvativo (iovernaaea llo .!-ist the pnn-—-' %  "" *"' in '" in.nt T*,<*. %  < ,-. t. arly. -c.r. ideuendently %  NKW YtUfK. Jul\ -'3 %  %  ^ i ,11. oi Werini .' %  in [ran h % %  %  i grajro turn (or the eo • musl cause rejoicing in the Kremlin It said "Mohammed IfOaat deiih who its Premier brought the country to the brink of ruin, is Pi stances and with a programme WbJeh, should the) (..ntiniie to .1. i in only lead to i Ith the Sf Steven son tried to l-u Id up a drive to -lop him. To-night II %e. the big I ..tile over the Democrat" i.l i nsOro "f the southerii ttotao to iiwight i) B initial nomlnci llig news was that t-iboio %  •irtliig Its own pr OO PUTI %  %  %  %  Aibeii W. Barkley'a pn : itinin.itis*iiat(t Roberl I Kan %  nd lanatar Rleherd H Kusseii from the rontest Leodet %  pokesmen of left wing Americans' .. i %  night to ii... hjatlon —U.P. | Mr. D. A. M. HATNU. 1 is ample conlderatioii will be %  oicrs." Pi Such ial KecnriU Mr. Haynes i more a personal securlegal security. and as such, great responsibility is thrown i.e The Manager r>f -he Bank in determining how far such assistId or could go" He sold "Trie experience gained in the •tie Labour Wet gang Loans Assistance t.-elng ejetended We are satisfied that the • On page 5. B.G. Run By Shopkeepers—ttusTAmmT. V^r ( r 00 "^ 0 "**"" lil1 hMana and BrtfJah Hondors campaign for popolai i rasMad faar to wl KI,v sn,H %  fomaleo. v miW eventually join ..gainst "these shopke. %  ;. July 21The multitude of people Bidding thai if the% "i\ movj'Jamalca's Prime Minister Koti llritish Guiana wanted ff the Caribbean id today tion with Ihe West Indies < thai British Guiana look ihe dedared but the fact was that land it will be no gornct Federation with British Guutna's govemn | gster proposes changes in the Indie.because it had a run by a few shopkeepers ai Informed that a group in lini'sh S.< Ml ition and propor government. BusU"one or two wholesalers" Ho> H %  ng townrd* v. manle. spooking in a two-day ever new elections are sooti to be r'e-ier.tlon also. ol Rouge of Repreet-f. r was certain thnt th.s Norman Manley Q.C Leader F' I ftinne* tomorrow government esOUld ! %  turned .f the Opposition supported Businteri %  'i the colony's t.-imante"s attitude to British •idled the pos;ton regarding led* 1 said the real of would change hut ll* -*ted Interf< the Wesi Indies should press on He said he was, going to B f-deratlon 'jeeouse BritGuiana before the election.")


PAGE 1

THURSDAY. JULY 24. 132 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PACE SEVEN CARE YOUR BUILDINGS!! REPLACEMENTS COST £'$ Conwion costs o ifear_ D O fan ktkom thf imoum v Corrugated Iron imported mi. tropical countries every • r f TQefigureisairvrmh-ng.', I after I lowing Eoe new Works th* balance represents a hiv forfeit f." lack of taking DfOpCI Protection i eany with mm Anti-Cvrrosive Paint for every INCH of metal. TtPROGENE La an aatt-eorrorivi paint denned for the trop-a. It cttofi closely i. IM WriaOl mttel v •rk,formir.| a .""anii. -kin which preserve* ftalifti [moat locleliatert. In three attract/-shi I.-1 -Red, Grtv aH *" limy If you are embarrassed with flatulence... I U#m heart hum and other indipMtM ACOMfcril Jiicr eating a.~* often Mtjm ol over jud Momjch. I'ut thing* right in double quick iimc-iih 'Dotaa' itomacb Po-der. It leutai >nui ttomach. rapidly neutralizing CftCCM and and restoring h*alth> acid batam Sc.ljtibc. toothing I>ol\4 i Dolsa RESTQRtS DIG t S TI 0 ft %  n*aiiiii4ilM-M I *M I SI..I.I<>..> .....( hi MlTlM %  NM l>hwi m rti *-*•* A.S. BRYDEN & SONS BARBADOS, LTD. IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Thursday to Saturday only M'M l.\l. Ill I IJIS lire now jiii;ihlnl ttnr Ih-iim lies Wliili I'lirk. Tttr-edsiilr. S| ii{lilsl %  • ami Sntrn Street Usually Nuw QUMU EVAPORATED MILK—I Hi Tim Me. 2Ki MEAT LUNCH ** %  >-' MACEDOMK 3'r. Mt. O.K. BEER 311.-. lie. JACOB'S CRACKER — Pk|(s. M CRAPE FRUIT — Tins lie, M \I:M \i VIM .11. i in M.I PJH M\miAI.AIII'. Mi. I IM 'Hi luitil i.o\ I.IM.I i; i \M 'ii> in'I'KI M S — lib Tins H III II III \NS |-r lb iSBOR II H SI Is prr lb I IIIYI Its < IMAKII rtlUIIFR — lift TIM -l tin II: < I -l Mill l-IIWIIIIl — .lb Tin* .19 omtTwn *• BIRTIIDA1 i win.Is 9 MKIITM: PAH* %  *• $1.97 M .52 .4* Ml .it .15 D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street —,...—,.—.— Al.lliiiliii'4'iiM'iii We take pleasure in advising of our recent appointment as DISTRIBUTORS (or the following DIESEL TRACTORS. 1. FIELD MARSHALL. Series 3 heavy duty diesel Trac tor. This Field Marshall means economy of operation-simple and rugged design easy maintenance. The engine at 750 r.p.m. gives 40 B.H P 2. DAVID BROWNE CROPMASTER: These new Cropmaster Diesel Tractors are truly remarkable for their performance and economy The engine of 4 cylinders develops 34 B.H.P. 3. CHALLENGER CRAWLER TRACTOR Six Cylinder Diesel engine developing 95 B.H.P. FOR FURTHER PARTICULARS APPLY CITY OARA IE. We expect our first shipment ol FIELD MARSHALS and CROPMASTERS during the next few weeks and would be very pleased to give demonstrations and fuller details on any of the above equipment. City Garage Trading Co., Ltd. VICTORIA STREET PHONE 4671 ,. .MM H I M I M I M M I M I




Par badr0os

—————

~2
=A







Ed

ESTABLISHED 1895

»





MILITARY TAKE

CABINET TOLD

CAIRO, July 23.
_ THE ARMY seized control of Cairo Wednesday, accord-
ing to unofficial reports, and ordered the Cabinet to obey
orders or get out. Unofficial sources said the army was in
control of the country including Alexandria, summer capi-
tal where Farouk and his Cabinet are staying.

Mohammed Naguib Bey, commanding the Cairo gar-
rison, seized control of Cairo and apparently of Alexandria
at 4 a.m.

Most reliable semi-official sources said Naguib Bey
issued an ultimatum to the Cabinet demanding that the
Cabinet carry out Army orders and strictly abide by the
constitution or the Army would dismiss it.

He also demanded that martial law be lifted and nor-
mal parliamentary life be restored and that Aly Maher
Pasha be asked to lead the new Cabinet.

Egypt awoke Wednesday to find that the army had

moved into politics seizing power in a well organized and }

seemingly bloodless coup.
In Farouk’s “Black Books”
Mastermind of the action General Naguib Mohammed
has been long in the black books of King Farouk. At 4 a.m.
he sent tanks to take up positions in the public squares of
Cairo and other main cities machine gun posts were set up|
at street corners and steel helmeted troops occupied broad-
casting stations and key public buildings. Air passengers
arriving at Beirut reported there had been some clashes
between Naguib’s men and troops loyal to Farouk. In a
broadcast, Naguib told the country that the army has no |
designs of its own but will work in the interests of Egypt.
He said that the army and the police will be respon-
sible for law and order. He demanded a shake up in the
army high command and a purge in the political life of the
country which has had five Governments in as many
months.

Emergency Meeting
The latest of these headed by Hilaly Pasha was sum-
moned to an emergency Cabinet meeting Wednesday in
the summer capital of Alexandria 130 miles from Cairo.

| Bree DRT cree Sav

The vessel is equipped with a
object.





British Lives -



It was understood that Farouk was in residence there.

‘Naguib, a bitter critic of corruption in high places,
held office as War Minister in the short lived regime of
Sirry Pasha which preceded that of Hilaly Farouk, is
known to have opposed his appointment.

In Egypt Are
Not. In Danger



Egyptian officers participating in the seizure of power
in Cairo, Wednesday asked the American embassy there
to inform Britain that they would meet any British inter-
vention in the dispute with force, the State Department
revealed.

Early Report

American Ambassador Jefferson Caffery in an early
report to the department on the seizure of power said he |
had first heard of the reports of action at 2.45 a.m. Cairo |
time. He added that the reports were confirmed less than |
two hours later when one of the Egyptian officers contacted
the embassy’s assistant air attache.

A first hand report on the action communicated to the |
Embassy asked that the British be informed that officers |
of the “underground” said the action was solely to oust |
top Egyptian military commanders and that any British
intervention from the Suez Canal would be met by a de- |
termined and efficient underground force.

Underground leaders said they had interned top mili-
tary commanders in Egypt including Haidar Pasha Com-
mander-in-Chief, General Farid Army Chief of Staff, and
General Sharrawi Director General of the Royal Egyptian
Air Force, the department said.

The Embassy was informed that the police would eo-op-
erate and that leaders of the action are in control in Cairo. |
Reason .given by participants in the action was said by
them to be the disgust of a line of officers mostly of the
rank of Lieutenant Colonel with alleged incompetence and
reporting of top Egyptian military commanders dating
back to the Arab war with Palestine.—C.P. & U.P.

Peasants’ Loan Bank _—
Will Help Peasant
Holdings Up To 25 Acres—

THE RECOMMENDAT_ON that peasant holdings up|
to 25 acres should be eligible for assistance from the |
Peasants’ Loan Bank will have the effect of bringing ;
within the scope of the Peasants’ Loan Bank “the ideal |



size holding which could best profit from irrigation facili- |

ties.’ Mr. D. A. M. Haynes, Manager of the Peasants’

Loan Bank, said yesterday. In the past only holdings up

to 10 acres were eligible.

Mr. Haynes was pemeng with .
the Advocate some of the advan-
tages to be under the

gained ee
scheme for extending the facili-! ist
ties of the Bank to peasant hold-; |





if

| at < cottages, and sprayed bullets

LONDON, July 23. |
Prime Minister Winston Chur- |
‘hill made the following state-|
ments on Wednesday on Egypt in
the House of Commons in response
io a question by the opposition
leader Clement Attlee: “I am in-
formed that the Egyptian Army,
led by a group of officers who are
jissatisfied with existing condi-
‘ions, took over control in Cairo
n the course of last night. Order
is being maintained, and the police
are apparently obeying the orders
of this group.
The army in Alexandria is, ac-
ording to information that I have
it present, unaffected, and the
members of the new Egyptian
Government, headed by Hilaly
Pasha, have made a contract with
the army leaders.

Go Ee, as can be seen, there is
no risk to British lives or -
ty. According to a leoeliaest
from Cairo, Major General Mo-
hammed Naguib, Commander-in-
Chief of the Egyptian forces, has
ziven assurance*to foreign resi-
dents that their lives and proper-
ty will be safeguarded, and that
the army will make itself respon-
sible for them.”

—U.P.

21 Reported Dead
In Vietminh Raid

SAIGON, July 23.
French Headquarters charged
that the Vietminh raiding party
had massacred 21 unarmed men,
women and children at _ the



French Army Convalescent Cen-
ter. Twenty two others were
seriously wounded when rebels

disguised as coolies swarmed over
the unprotected center on Mon-
day night.

They said there were scenes of
bloody horror as sprayed mach-
inegun bullets and three gren-
ades cut down fleeing victims
like machette knives. Survivors
said that 20 Communists attacked
{at dinner time. They hurled
| grenades inside the main dining

at children playing in the garden.

as well | Official list said the dead in-
coer sccupler, which scheme [ciudad even laren
as ren pee ae the Le gislative ; women, and 3 officers’ servants,
Council when they passed a_ Bill | 7

'

amending the Peasants’ Loan Bank
Act on Tuesday.

The extension of irrigation fa-
cilities to holders of up to 25



dicate the lines along which the





55 Bandits Wiped
Out In Antioquia



acres, Mr, Haynes said, might in-| §

4 | BOGOTA, Colombia, July, 23

% 1 ’ Pen weak scree
future | Seve eine ear Government said on Tuesday
gardening a that Army troops have wiped
a Irrigation Scheme, out 55 bandits in Antioquia in the
the Bank has in mind sinking a | past few days. In Colombia,
yell the average sized holdings where Conservatives rule, the
wae corn she. tae ened : word “bandit” is often used to
ae Mae That, Mr ithynes anit describe militant members of the
ae he very expensive. It is Opposition Liberal Party —C,.P.,

felt, however, that if they could j
encourage groups of between

eight and 12 peasant holders to
combine, the capital expenditure
mvolved in sinking one well could
very well serve the amalgamated
group, and larger holdings would
have no undue advantage over

smaller holdings.



}
Mr. D. A. M. HAYNES.

ity is ample. consideration will be
given such occupiers.”

Personal Security
“Such _ security,” Mr. Haynes
iF dded, “is more a personal secur-

ity

Breaking New Ground

“When you come to the widen- than a legal security, and as



§ng of the scope,” Mr. Haynes] such, great responsibility is thrown
said, “you are opening up a new|on the Manager of the Bank in
field to persons occupying or|determining how far such _assist-

renting land. There are number-| ance should or could go.” He said



less cases on record where absen-| “The experience gained in the
{management of the Labour Wel-

Nifare Housing Loar A tance

\ tended We are satisfied that the



@ On page 5

From Our Own Correspondent)
KINGSTON Jamaica,





1eration

{



SEALER IN PORT



MOTOR VESSEL “Terra Nova” brought 195,000 ft. of lumber to the isla ad from Weymouth, Nova Scotia.

Sangster Wants Details
_ Of Federation Settled

B.G. Run By Sho pkeepers—susrananre

lecause Brit- Guiar

THURSDAY, aLY 24, 1952

Saaieeiael

Barbados

Lying in the inner basin of the
Careenage is the Motor Vesse)
Terra Nova. She was built for
seal fishing. She arrived in Bar-

tados on Saturday from Wey-
mouth, Nova Scotia with 195,00¢

seet of lumber
Che vessel was built at Monroe.

Trinity Bay, Newfoundland lt
was registered on October 13
947 Its owners are Bowronds

Mrothers Ltd, of Newfoundland,
The seal fishing season in New
foundland is the first two months

{ Spring March 1 to May 1
‘nd during that period the Terra
Nova is kept busy. She carries «
crow’'s nest on one mast and from
‘his the lookout can spot schools

seals These are generally

« between the Labrador
coast and Newfoundland

The Terra Nova took part in an
expedition at Frobisher Bay
which is about 2,000 miles north of
the Canadian coast. The harbour
was being surveyed and charts
were drawn for the Canadian
Geographical Society

sught

Marconi Radar set which enables hor, te locate land or any floating



modern

The vessel carries
equipment She has a, Marconi
Radar set which enables her to
pick up land or an object which
may be afloat in the water Ip

sek foggy weather this set shows the
KINGSTON, Jamaica, July 22. position of an iceberg on its sereen

DONALD SANGSTER, Minister of Social Welfare, | *!4 therefore places the boat out
gave notice in the House of Representatives yesterday :|(/.“2780t Of collision. | She als’

“ +e “ A ‘thas a Marconi radio-telephone set
That this House reaffirms its support for the policy of}and a Bendix Marine Deyth

British Caribbean Federation, believing that federation is | Recorder
the means whereby the peoples of our territories can and| ,,Phe Terra Nova is powered by
will advance together in political and economic progress 1 ee Sere aes. ee

: es > 7 Z >s shict fives her ; 8g eed
to establish a new dominion within the British Common-|.) 10 knots, ‘The boat. is ay

‘ of 10 knots, The boat is under
wealth of Nations. the command of Captain Kean of

Newfoundland, The mate is Mr,
Ralph Roberts and the boatswain
Mr. Thomas Best Mr. .Robert
Doyle is the Chief Engineer.
On her trip baek north, the
recommendations in! yerra Nova is expected to take

} This House, in accepting the
report of the Standing Closer
U.N. Entrench Association Committee as a basis
‘ ’ on, considers that the

On ‘Hill Crest |

number of
the report require reconsideration

SEOUL, July 23 and amendment,

Grelorins United Nations

troops burrowed deeper into the ; a
eastern crest of the disputed hill | ©°mcerned to secure that eee
during the lull in the six-day old) P°Wets should be allotted in the
battle for a bloody height on the federal constitution to the elected
western front. United Nations in- | representatives of the people, and
fantrymen were forced to abandon | that federation should be initiated

Nova Scotia, .

Elizabeth I Sees
“Elizabeth I”

LONDON, July, 23. |



This House is particularly



the western crest of the hill yes- with adequate finances to ensure The Queen saw an American
terday after 200 Chinese Commun-| ‘ts ability to function effectively! jj.) the young Elizabeth
a swarmed up the blackened = eR aaa of the area) Tuesday night when she paid her) ight
ee against a small force of al-} ®@ § * first visit to the theatre since be-

\. at, . coming Queen, The play is the
Allied B.26 ee esas senite Questions story of the youth of Good Queen
7 ete, prevente i” Ss ark Bess, Elizabeth I, by Jennette
eee aN — betes cs This House considers that these] Dowling and Francis Letton.
yore ae oa vedueting crating outstanding questions, together —O.P.

with other questions dealt with in;
the joint report of the two Hous-
es of the Jamaica legislature, can
be resolved and can only be re-
solved by discussions with the re-
for miles around, ranged up to 100{Presentatives of Her Majesty's
degrees Fahrenheit. Government and the representa~ LONDON, July 23,

Waves of Allied fighter bombers, ;'ives of other Caribbean Terri-) The Duke of Kent, 16-year-old}
braving intense anti-aircraft fire,|‘ories, and therefore repeats its! cousin of the Queen, will fly to
smashed Communist troops and a|request that a conference should] Helsinki on Friday to see the
supply centre south of Wonsan in|take place in London as soon as} Olympic Games. He will join the
another devastating aerial blow at|possible to decide the future} Duke of Edinburgh, husband of
“ripe” Communist targets. oF course to be followed,” —(CP) the Queen.—C.P,

Barbados May Get
* ° J
Rice From T’dad
(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, July 23.
The Trinidad Government are
considering a request from the
Barbados Government for a loan
of 3,000 bags of rice to ease the
shortage of this commodity. An
official source stated today it is
likely that the request will be
granted in view of the colony's
substantial rice stocks. Last
monthTfinidad assisted Jamaica
in @asing the rice shortage by
making available to that colony

ortion of its rice which wes
till in British Guiana.



and napalming by United Nations
planes. One of the four Red tanks
spotted in the area was knocked
out. Temperatures in the area of
the hill, which dominates the area

Duke Of Kent
Going To Helsinki







|

Sign Loyalty Pledge

(By LYLE C. WILSON)

CHICAGO, July 23
GOVERNOR ADLAI STEVENSON of Lllinois piled
up new support on Wednesday as the managers of the
Democratic National Convention strove to prevent the
party splitting in a floor fignt over credentials and civil
rights. The rebellious Dixi: Democrats refused to sign
the new “Loyalty” pledge, cven though the Northerners
who had rammed it through the Convention on Tuesday

had so modified it as to make it almost meaningless.



Dixie Democrats Won't,

S OVER

| Ahmed Ghavam Eseapes
From Police Custody

Sealer Brings Angry
Lumber To |To Lyneh Ex-Premier



1» load of molasses for Sydney, |

|
{
j
|
|
j
|

pilot
Onl cay evening when a plane of the

Lenogan,

| -eriously injured and is in a ward
jit the
jtlespital. Both are from Trinida4
; Leaseholds, Pointe-a-Pierre
Cartney who is married, has four

vrveck.

. . ‘ ; ‘
Man The convention pushed into its; form. It will involve civil rights.
ley To Visit third day, with the peacemakers| fo-night’s platform debate on
1opeful that the seating of the! civil rights will determine how,
Barbados disputed delegations and the jar the Democratic party can ‘go
adoption of rules could be accom-)|‘o attract northern and other
(From: Our Own” Corespondent) plished without warfare. The| minority votes without deliver-!

KINGSTON, July 23,
Norman Manley Q.C., Presiden!
af P.N.P. and Legal Adviser to the

Credentials Committee presented! ing one or more of the southern
its report shortly after the session| states to Dwight D,

Kisenhower |

|
!
|

| started, Hepublican presidential nominee '

newly formed National Workers There will be less hope of Big news was that Labour was
Union in Jamaica leaves the island] peace tonight when the Resolu-| exerting its own pressure. Union
vriday for Barbados on a few] tions Committee presents ts! leaders who vetoed Vice President
days’ visit. 7 y platform carrying a strong!) Alben W. Barkley’s presidential
Manley who is going to Barba-| ‘Civil Rights’ plank. The men) cualifications now were trying to

dos in fulfilment of a long-stand-

|

: of Dixie are likely to fight for a| climinate Senator Robert S. Kerr
ing invitation from the Barbador | watered down version. Mean-| and Senator Richard B. Russell
Workers’ Union to attend one of | while the opponents of Steven-| from the contest. Leaders and
their Annual Conferences willj son tried to build up a drive to| spokesmen of leftwing Americans
also take the opportunity to dijs-] stop him. |\for Democratic action met last
cuss West Indies Federation with To-night will see the big night to “look over the situation.”

vir. G. H. Adams, hattle over the Democratic plat-



—U.P.

ish Guiana and British Honduras campaign for popular politicians terests created fear in which the





would eventually join against “these shopkeepers” S.C.A.C. Report was drafted
July 23- The multitude of people in adding that if they refuse him fear of popular political move-
Jamaica’s Prime Minister Hon. British Guiana wanted Federa- permission to enter “it will | ment in the Caribbean

V 4. Bustamante said today tion with the West Indies he de- worse for them”. If permitted to The debate on the motion of
that British Guiana took the de- clared but the fact was that land “it will be no good for Minister f Social Welfar

| ion against Federation with British Guiana’s government them.’ Bustamante said he was Sangster proposes changes in the
the West Indies because it had a run by a few shopkeepers and informed that a group in British S8.C-A.( constitution and pro-
hopkeeper government. Busta~ ‘‘one or two wholesalers”. How- Honduras was working towards vide greater powers in the hat]

nante, speaking in a two-day ever new elections are soori tobe Federation also. of selected representati' ( t

iebate in the House of Represen- held and he was certain that this Norman Manley @.C., Leader Federal Government a %

hich continues tomorrow government would be turned of the Opposition supported Bus nterference from outside but t

the Joint Select out of office, when the colony’ mante’ ud to Britis ted that t ‘ I

ch tudied the position regarding federation CGuiana i British H 417 } f

I the rest of uuld change t use the t ested inter- Fr
| West Ind hould press on He aid he was going to Britist est nstead »pkeepe
; ¢

before the electior ‘rmment adding thess

|
|
|
{
}

ae oe et

PRICE : FIVE CENTS



Oe

CAIRO





» Mobs Threaten

(By JOSEPH MAZAND1)
. TEHERAN, July 23.

DEPOSED PREMIER Ahmed Ghavam, arrested by
the order of his successor (Mohammed Mossadegh) escaped
from custody on Wednesday as a mob of frenzied Nation-
alists threatened to lynch him

Gendarmes of National police arrested Ghavam in
the home of Parliament member Aboliz! Towliat at Goom
60 miles from Teheran. The Government ordered that
all measures should be taken ty guard him

An armed mob of 5,000 fanatical Nationalists massed
here and vowed to go to Goom and lynch him. But a
spokesman for the high Nationalist leader reported that
Ghavam eseaped his guards on Wednesday afternoon and
tled

| Immediately a weneral alarm
oom py EKy e a was issued for Ghavam and
| frontier guards were instructed






to arrest him on sight if he trie



i flee the countrys The senate
| voted late today “in favout of
Mossadegh as Premier and the
Shah summoned - him to the
| Palace to give him the Royal
\ degree to form @ cabinet,
\ Chere are no detail immed-
| iately of the means t which
Chavam escaped, Evening news-
papers reported that ‘pandem-
onlum and disorder” exists in
Abadan with all refinery units
on strike and demonstrators
shouting threats to burn big oil
eer if the British return,
| Shrouded Arab tribesmen en-
tered Abadan from outlying

districts and shouted pro- Moss-
| aegh slogans before police fired

j over the heads of the crowd to
iisperse demonstrators. The
} crowd became furious as a tank

j killed a woman demonstrator on

Monday
~U.P.

oO National
Suicide

bia ae Bigs YORK, July 23

Our 1 st ‘he New York Times said edi-
PORT-OF-SPAIN, July, 23. lovially on Wednesday that recent
Harry MacCartney, trainee-} «, velopments in Iran have taken
was killed instantly yester-|4 “grave turn for the worse that
must cause rejoicing in the Krem
lin, It said: “Mohammed Mossa-
tdegh who as Premier brought the
country to the brink of ruin, is
back as Premier under circum-
stances and with a programme
which, should they continue to
prevail, can only lead to national
suicide with the Soviets as heirs

to what remains.”



YREMIbE

Father Of Four!
Dies In Crash

From Our Own Correspondent)

Aeroplane Club crasher
» canefield on the West Camp-
en runway near Couva, John
instructor, the only
ther oecupant of the plane was
Colonisl

San Fernando

Mac -

The Times said Mossadegh i
scarcely free to wield his power
independently though back in
nominal power, “For he is both
the creator and prisoner of terror-
istic and Fascist elements which,
working hand in hand with Com-
munists, swept him back into office

hildren. Lenagan, the inter-
colonial Hockey player, is suffer~
ing from a compound dislocatior
ff both ankles and a head injury

also suspected, ~but is report-
“| to be reacting favourably to
treatment, The aircraft which was

niy made serviceable to clubjon a wave of revolutionary vio-
embers a few days ago, is a total lence. S
i . . It said: “These elements are



now supreme and the most power-
ful of terrorist leaders has publicly

M.P.’s Will Not Get | proctaimed in name Premier Mos-

sadegh a “United front” with Com-
Pay Increase

munists.”
It said that Communists are try-
LONDON, July 23.
lawmakers got bad

ing to take control of this United
front turning campaign against the
moderates of the Shah and Ameri-

news on Tuesday night fromjcans. [1 said “as the United
Prime Minister Churchill. His] States is still giving economie and
Conservative Governm ent is| military aid to Iran the success
ivainst the proposed 25 per cent.) of this campaign might lead to
iy increase for Members of Par-} serious consequences particularly



Britain's





liament They are paid £1,000° ll) view of Mossadegh’s plan.
yearly, —O.P. —U.P.
CROSSES ATLANTIC IN TINY BOAT
. ‘a if ea ; =



BEARDED PATRICK ELLAM, its in his 19} foot sailboat
Sopranino” shortly after he arrived in Miami, Plorida.. Sailing fron
London his first port of call on this side of the Atlantic for Ellan

and Mudie was Barbados
PAGE TWO

Carib Calling

URQUHART,4

IR
Ss:

nor

ROBERT
Ambassador to Vene-
expects to return home this
the Embassy’s two-F
engined aircraft De Havilland
Deve after spending an enjoyable
n days’ holiday as a guest at
» Maresol Beach Flats, St. Law
Gap.
> by Lady
their daughter, Miss Unity Urqu
hart.
Alse travelling by
which, is being piloted
Somipander P. D.





ng by





the aircraft
by Wing

kforth, her little
Miss Ann Bulman

Mr*.. Hat

thony, and



Sgt. Mechanic Davidson who
were guests at the Ocean Viewsâ„¢
Hotel.

To-Night’s Show
“yweHe Barbados Players hav
i completed the finisnin
touches of their preparation foi
ine staging of Oscar Wilde
comedy “‘fne Importance of B
ing barnest” which opens at th
hmpire Tneatre tonight, and con-
linues to-morrow at matinee and
enas with a show at 8.30 p.m.

His Excellency the Governor
and Lady Savage who have ex-
tended their patronage to
show will be attending to-nignt.

This is the first show since the
amalgamation of the Bridgetown
Players and the’ Barbados
Dramatic Club and should at-
tract a generous quota of local
theatre-goers.

The Booking Office opened
daily at the Empire Theatre from
8.30 a.m,

Annual General Meet

EMBERS
Assistant
ation and the

is

of the Barbados
Mistresses’ Associ-
Barbados Assistant
Masters’ Association are remind-
ed that the Annual) General
Meetings of the above will take
piace at Harrison College on Fri-
day, July 25th, at 10.00, a.m., fol-
lowed by the Annual General
Meeting of the Association of As-|
sistant Teachers in Secondar
Schools in the island,

Back To Trinidad

R. JOHN DOBBS, West In
dies Secretary of the London
Lancashire Insurance Com-
stationed in Trinidad, re-
turned to his headquarters over
the week-end by B.W.LA. after
spending ten days’ holiday as a
guest at the St, Lawrence Hotel,

and
pany

Sales Engineer

Greene a month’s holiday in
Barbados are Mr, and Mrs.
E. Pecsi and their small son
Emerick from Caracas, Venezuela,
They arrived over the last week-
end by B.W.1.A, and are guests
at the Ocean View Hotel.

Mr. Pecsi is sales engineer em-
ployed with Stubbins in Caracas.

Back From Canada

I
3

“3

He will be accom-f]
Urquhart andi

; {

W. Hackforth,@
Attache to the Embassy, arell
sonka

Z

he’,
they















ty



























| SIR ROBERT URQUHART

f Concert By Barbados

W

Choral Society
HE Barbados Chorai Society's
Concert at Compermere Hall
on ‘Luesday July 2th, at 8.15 in
the evening, bids fair to be one
of the most interesting that the
Society has given,

It just 30 years since
Society first appeared before
public at a concert given at
Olympic Theatre, then recently
renovated, and during the time
that has elapsed since its founda-
tion the Society has always aim-
ed at giving the best type of
music and rendering it to the best
of its ability,

An unusual feature at the Con-
cert next week will be a Saxo-
ghone Quintet—-a happy idea of
Japt. Raison’s — and a_ Brass
Wind Ensemble.

Mr. B. C. St. John, Baritone, in
addition to a group of songs, will
sing the Solos in the extracts
from Elgar’s “King Olaf” and in
the Spiritual “Peter, go ring dem
bells”.

The talented young. local
Pianist, Mr. Cedric Phillips, who
hopes shortly to proceed to
(Canada to further his musical
Studies, will play Bach, Mendels-
Bohn and York Bowen.

Tickets for the Concert may be
obtained from the Advocate
Stationary where the plan of seats
may be seen and programme’
bought. \

On Holiday
R. AND MRS, HARRY EALY



the
the
the

is

and their daughter Mary
from Maracaibo, Venezuela, ar-
vived in the colony recently by

B.W.1.A. for about ten days’ holi-
day and are guests at the Ocean
View Hotel.

Mr. Ealy is Secretary in the
Administration Office of the Cre-
ole Petroleum Corporation.

Matron At St. Augustine

RS. EVELYN DAY of FTER spending about two
Toronto, Canada, who has} weeks’ holiday in Barbados,
been residing in Barbados for Miss Ursula del Costello, Matron

quite»a while, paid a two-month
visit home and returned last
week. She is a guest at the Hotel
Reyal.



first thing you give a
when you meet him is

» your hand, What impression

do you give of yourself at this
touch? The hands have a lan-
guage; they reveal a lot about
your personality and character,
Their movements express whether
you are shy, self-conscious. .. . or

The
stranger

poised and self-confident, The feel . .

of the skin—if it is soft and fine
to the touch—confirms your per-
sonal fastidiousness. A casual
observer may take you at your face
value, but a discerning person will

take note of your hands and nails. »

Working with the hands is good
for them... even typing and
housework, It keeps them strong
and supple, expressive, ful! of
energy and life, Work is bad
for the hands only if it is allowed
to coarsen and spoil the skin and
nails .... and nowadays it needn't
happen. It isn't very much trou-
ble—more a matter of remember-
ing tovsmooth on ‘invisible gloves’
of barrier cream before starting
any Kind of wet or dirty work.
With this protection you can even
use strong household cleansers—
the worst sinners against hands
and nails—without damage,

The - next essential is regular
hand cream massage; and i mean
regular, This puts back the natural
oil which work and weather steal

fromthe — skin ..-necessary for
good colour,

Girls in their teens may be
bothered by reddish-blue hands

and chilblains, This is usually only
a temporary circulation upset and
part of the bodily changes which
are happening at this time, There
are chilblain creams and skin-
healing preparations which will
help; and to improve circulation
and gain flexibility—both in the
teens and after—practise these few
hand exercises, They’re very sim-
ple. :

1, Bend arms at elbows and let
hands flop, relaxed .. then shake



STOCK



An Assortment of

@ LADIE

kilega

of St. Augustine’s Nursing Home,

Trinidad, returned home on Mon- ~

day evening by B.W.I1.A. She wus

{ a guest at the Ocean View Hotel.

them—hard—from the wrists,

2. Rub palms together... . clap
hands above head until they tingle.

3. One hand at atime .... arms
to dides. Turn palm upwards and
describe a figure of eight from the
wrist, stretching fingers out as far
as possible, and using every muscle,
Stand straight when you do this
. , there is never any point in
moving any of your extremities
gracefully unless the keystone of
your body—the spine—is in good
alignment,

What Can be Done to Hands
Neglected to the Point of
Real Disgrace ?

A little penance ... . sleep in
gloves, first larding hands ex-
travagantly with rich cream.
Keeping them covered helps oils

to penetrate.

Can Nicotine Stains be
Removed ?

Well, if they're deeply burned-
in you'll have a job with them!
Avoid this by using a small iight
cigarette holder (regard it as
necessary as a toothbrush) and
hold cigarettes end-upwards, so
that staining smoke wafts up,
away from fingers, Peroxide and
chlorine paste—especially (in dras.
tic cases) used with pumice—is
one of the best ways of removing
stains. Lemon-juice and “Vim’ are
also pretty efficient. Both work
well on fruit stains and those you
get when preparing vegetables.

Sometimes—particularly during
that time of life known as ‘the
change’'—a local breakdown of
skin pigmentation will cause
brown (sometimes white) patches,
rather like freckles, It isn’t easy
to remove these, but they can be
disguised with a flesh-tinted cov-
ering cream, set with a dusting of
face power,

Enlarged, especially horny-look-
ing, knuckles sometimes can be an
indication of incipient gout, a
condition of the rheumatism fam-

S’ NYLON HOSE



@ LADIES’ NYLACE HOSE

@ LADIES’ LISLE HOSE
@ CHILDREN’S ANKLETS .



— ALSO —

NEW SHIPMENT OF ...

@ MEN’S

WILSON FELT HATS



» $2.09, $2.15, $2.28,





To Meet U.N. Mission

ISS DORA IBBERSON, Soc-

jal Welfare Adviser to the
Comptroller for Development and
Welfare left on Tuesday by
B.W.1LA. for Trinidad to meet the
United Nations Mission which is
surveying self-help techniques in
that colony as well as in Jamaica,
Puerto Rico, Haiti and Mexico.

The experts who arrived in
Trinidad over the week-end from
New York are Dr, Ahmed Pasha
Hussein, former Minister of Social
Affairs in Egypt who is a rural
sociologist, Dr. Carl C. Taylor, 4
rural sociologist with the U.S.
Department of Agriculture and
Mr. Robert C. Jones of the United
Nations Community Organisation
and Development Unit who has
special knowledge of his region.

With Shell In Venezuela

R. AND MRS. F. E. DON-

ALDSON of Caracas, Vene-
zuela, who came over here earlier
in the month for a holiday will
be remaining until August Ist as
guests at Maresol Beach Flats.
Accompanying them is their six-
year-old son, Barry who was at-
tending school at Hexham, Lan-
cashire and travelled out froro
England all by himself to Trini-
dad where he joined his parents.

with Sheil

Mr. Donaldson is t
Venezuela Oil Concessions in
Caracas.

For Three Weeks

R. AND MRS. IVOR HAUCK
and their three daughters
from Caracas, Venezuela, arrived
here on Tuesday by B.W.1A,. via
Trinidad for three weeks’ holiday
and are guests at Maresol Beach
Flats, St. Lawrence Gap.
Mr. Hauck is head of the firm
of Comeca and Co, a super mar-
ket for foodstuffs in Caracas.

BARBADOS

Foundatien Old Boys’
Association

a monthly meeting of th
Foundation Old Boys’ As-
sociation will be held at 8,00 p.m.
to-morrow, Friday, 25th July. A
Progress report for the period
January to June, 1952, will be

submitted by the Committee: of
Management. Consideration
alsc be given to the activities of
the Association for the period

July to December, 1952 ’



CROSSWORD








boats

y on’ you do.



is grown to thig. (3)
Measurer of later time. 6
Some bear! (5)
Age of the radio. (3)
Type of residence (4) ‘

46 Salute. (5)

17 Said each contains one.

3 (t's a berry to lose, (4)
Down

\ Arrived before the gunners;

gives photo-finish proof? (6)

Popular music and drama. (5)

(4)



4 Studv in decay of a pest. (6)
4. Mineral. (3)

5. Very dangerous speed rate. (Â¥)
7. The cant you can get. (4)

8. Sneer, 4)

9. It’s a dog. (6) ll. Serene, (4)

14. See 16 Across. (3)

18. Cargo. (4) :

19 “Ever to do -—— our sole

delignt” (Milton), (3)

20. Plural 24 Across upset. (4)

22. Hailed, openly ? (3) ‘

23. Synonym of 24 Across. (3)

24. Our old slippery friend. (3)
Solution of yesterday's puzzle. —- Acros»:

1 Laurel, 6, Hop; #8, Exterior

Marrow, 1, Treasure; 4, Earn

Soar, 17, Rind; 19, Urge, 21, Slope

Airs; 24 Tone; 25. 8 6 Meta

27. Pibey Dewn: 1, Letter: 2. Axe

Utter, 4. Remand: 5, Erasure: 6, Hor

7, Power: 9 Roe, 12. Rail: 15. Us

14. Agree. 18. None: 20° Espv

‘Hone) Stv 22, Pet



THE LAS

TO LEA
PART

From

GIRL
VE ALY’S

Lovely Lise stays
till the dawn
SYDNEY SMITH: Paris.

HE most exclusive and most expensive party of the
Paris summer season, given by Aly Khan, ended at

4.45

The first birds were stirring and the sky was brighter
than the crystal chandeliers in the restaurant among the
trees of the Bois de Boulogne, on the outskirts of Paris,

when the last two people le

and lovely Lise
France's No. 1 cover girl

This was the biggest party Aly
has yet given for his annual cele-
bration of the Grand Prix race at

Longchamp, just a mile away

There were 180 guests. and

lasted eight hours

The Aga Khan. defying Goctara with. tubles.

orders in a wheel-chair

at a table decorated with a model
n lace of Longchamp racecourse.

The Duke of Windsor. in a mid-
orght blue dinner jacket. presided
it a second table. decorated with

models of Elizabethan

And France's first
only marshal
at the head of the third
which had model cannons.

soldier

nt Hands |

ily. You can take a vegetable her-
bal compound to deal
internal side of the situation. Mas-
sage with ‘Iodex’ will sometimes
improve the externa] side.

Very hot water—or cold—dries
up the hands’ skin, Cut out the
‘washing’ under the tap’ habit.
Use only warm water, dry hands
carefully (important, this) and
always use hand cream or lotion
afterwards.

Use your hands positively. A
handshake should be an easy for-
ward movement of the arm, with
a definite, firm clasp on the end
of it. Negative, uncertain move-
ments look fumbling and clumsy,
They betray lack of confidence . .
they fail to inspire it.

For A Special Date

No one wants to go out to a
party with unkempt hands, but one
can’t wear gloves the whole time!
So try camouflage, A flesh-tinted
foundation (or covering cream)
well powdered; or a hand whiten-
ing cosmetic cream, applied very
thinly. This is really an off-stage

version of the theatrical wet-
white’ which all actresses use, It
is also useful for blending a

tanned hand up to the shade of
an arm that hasn't caught the sun,

Listening Hours

THURSDAY, JULY 24, 1952
4.00—7.15 p.m. — 19.76m,, 25.53m



The
The Portrait

400 pm. The News, 410 pm
Daily Service, 4.15 pm
of a Lady, 445 pm_ Sporting Record,
5 00 pm. Cricket, 5 05 pm. Interlude,
5 15 p.m_ Listeners’ Choice, 600 p m
Welsh Diary, 6.15 pm. Variety Road
Show, 645 pm _ Sports Round-Up and
Programme Parade, 7 00 p m. The News,
710 pm Home News From Britain.
F.15—10.30 p.m, — 25.58m,, SL 3tm



7.15 pm _ We See Britain, 7 45 p.m
Championship Bands, 815 pm _ Radio
Newsree!, 8 30 pm. Special Despatch,
845 pm _ Interlude, 855 pm. From
The Editorials, 900 pm Dockland,
9.45 pm. Olympic Report, 10 00 p m
The News, 10 10 p.m. News Talk, 10 15
Pm. Progress Through Three Univer-
sities, 10 30 pm. Portrait of a Lady.



$2.41
. $2.50
-» $1.31
CENTS



. 30, 32 & 46

$6.40

T. R EVANS & WHITFIELDS

DIAL 4220

YOUR SHOE STORES

DIAL 4606

aft.
Bourdin,

warships
and
Alphonse Juin, was
table.

with the |

They were Aly Khan himself
| The Duchess
of Windsor was
there in a
white off - the-
shoulder dress.
Across it was a
great scarlet
s\Sash pinned



it



e

Begum
Aga

Khan was
there and the
jewetlled
Muaharanees_ ot
Baroda and
Jaipur in saris,
Paris society
women, eagle
eyed for signs
of “romance,” noeem
-~ watehed Aly Khan dancing.
—’ I heard one woman guest say :



Lise

“But, my dear, he dances with
every woman as though she is
the only one he could possibly

love—how can you tell ?”

Well — partner Lorraine
Dubonnet, 23-year-old wine

| heiress. left well before the stares
began to pale. Singer Dany
Dauberson flew straight back tc

| the South But 27-year-old Lise
| Bourdin, who stayed till sunrise

is still in Paris.
London Eixnress Sarvire

mas

OPENING FRIDAY

2.30 — 445 & 8.30 p.m. and
Continuing Daily 4.45 & 8.30 p.m,





ASSOCIATED BRITISH PICTURE CORPORATION PRESENTS

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Midnite



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Fri.

& Sat. 8.30 Special
Action Packed
Bm Double!
“Dalton Gang”
1 WAS AN Don Barry &
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AMERICAN SPY Country”
Ann Dvorak Lash LA RUE
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BARBAREES
PLAZA (pia0 5170)

Proudly Presents :
Universal International's

BRIGHT
VICTORY

Starring
Arthur

Peggy
KENNEDY

e DOW
With
James EDWARDS
Will GEER
John HUDSON
| Julix ADAMS
Based on the
“LIGHTS OUT”
by Baynard Kendrick
HERE IS THE SHOCKING
ADULT I AMA THAT
TALKS STRAIGHT
Hi 1

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Novel



FROM

OPENING FRIDAY
4.45 3.30 PM



March 21—April 20

*«

aggressiveness, recklessness in important
* matters. Be eager to work hard, but don’t
overdo.

*
*

x June 22—Jnly 23

*«



KK suty 24—Ang. 22
*

VIRGO
K Aug. 23—Sept. 23

*«

*

*«

0 OE



ADVOCATE

<

«The STARS: * X°

Fi



will |

Look in the section in which

what your outlook is, according to the stars.
For Thursday, July 24, 1952

ARIES

*

TAURUS .
Some early

April 21—May 22

GEMINI

May 23—June 21 You have li

putting over
noon may sh

health.
CANCER



+ and YOU - fi *

AS +

Stars indicate generous rays for practical
endeavours well managed; for vital indus-
tries; for household and persona! business.
Romance rates high.

mostly in financial matters.

Thoughtlessness, needless changing from

De

your birthday comes and find

*
+

i * +

aspects warn against unwise



* *

ttle obstruction or contention
essential ideas, duties. After-
ow more restricting influences,
Mind your

*
ae

* *

one thing to another, especially in plans,

business or

rights.

LEO
Watch your
first

If possible,
and you sho’

ly aggressive, but conscientious of others’

studying, 2
know. Moderate gain can be expected in
most business, occupational activities.

residence are tabu. Be right-

+
*

*

-M

answers, don’t act without
consulting those in the

an energetic, early-start day
uld have ample time later for

recreation, romance,

LIBRA

M 1
Sept. 24—Oct. 23 (.2y_PeoP

comparison

*«

tions,

SCORPIO
Oct. 24—Nov. 22

Shelve new,
hazards.

SAGITTARIUS

Nov. 23—Dec, 20 On

and modern

*

An array of

CAPRICORN
Dec. 21—Jan. 20

down it can effect home and other rela-
Rationalizing important.

ters that could incur debt or avoidable
Rate action,
cording to your ability, and assets.

the favourably aspected list today,
honoured with your natal planet stressing
earnest, sensible effort. Benefit for new

*

e are unhappy because of a
complex. If this isn’t held

unplanned or unknown mat-

investments, ac-

*

endeavours, fresh business.

*

good prospects if you will dig.

And furnish some real brain work and

«x
*«
*

AQUARIUS
Jan. 21—Feb. 19

PISCES Your planet stresses patience, see a
4 Feb. 20—March 20 from irritating worry. Written, legal,
personal promises, contracts ‘need extra
vigilance.

A
*«

characteristics. You were born
Cusp change of Signs. Can

with fine talents.

able months ahead. Birthdate

« Amer.; Alexandre Dumas the Elder, Fr. novelist, playwright.

a HHH HHH HHH Y

Non-committal type day in part. You are
mostly on your own.
lack of confidence!
earry you through.

YOU BORN TODAY: Have a combination of many fine

capable, successful, or the opposite. i
Develop patience, moderation.

energy to carry on to a successful finish. *
Give your best, always.

* *

But no fretting or
Your best traits will

on the edge of the Cancer-Leu
be exceptionally interesting,
You have strong traits
Some profit-

: Simon Bolivar, hera of So.

Blinky Mole Liked Winter

—It Was a Time for Friendliness, He Said—

By MAX TRELL

BLINKY Mole drew his chair a
little closer to the fire and said: “I
don’t mind the winter coming on.
I've worked hard since early spring. |
We’ve all worked hard, Winter-time
is the time for friendliness, and |
good talk, and a pleasant game or |
two, and some story telling. But |
above all it is the time for think- |
ing.”

Blinky lit his pipe, then looked
around with a smile at Knarf and
Hanid, who were sitting beside him.
“Yes,” he repeated, “there’s no time
like winter-time for good thinking.”

Knarf wasn’t sure he knew what
this meant. “You mean, Blinky,” he
said, “that you just sit and think?”

Wonderful Fun

“That’s right,” replied Blinky. |
“And it’s wonderful fun, just sit-
ting and thinking. There are so
many things to think about—all the
things | did this summer—all the
things I’m planning to do next sum-
mer,”

There was a knock on Blinky’s
door at this moment, and Willy Toad
and Glive the Snail came in,

“We were just talking about the
fun of thinking about all we did
and all we’re going to do,’’: Blinky
explained after Willy and Glive had
found places around the fire. |

“Good idea,” said Willy. “But 1
like dreaming even better.”

“Dreaming, Willy?” said Hanid.

“Dreaming is the same as think-

ing,” said Willy, “only you do it
while you’re sleeping. It’s much
more restful.”
—“Witty’s right,” said Glive. "You |
just close your eyes and dream
about all the wonderful things
you'd like to happen. But,”” he added
with a sigh, “they don’t always
happen.”

“No,” said Blinky, “1 like to think
about real things. | like to think |
about the mistakes that I’ve made
and how | can keep from making
them the next time. | like to think
of better ways to do my work, | like
to think of the good times I’ve had,
and of the better times to come, I
like to think of my friends, and of
all the wonderful days we've had
together. Thinking,” said Blinky
after a pause, “is like reading a|
book. Except that it’s your own |
book—about your own adventures.
And there aren't any words.”









Punch at the circus,

There were some more knocks on
the door, Hop-a-Long the grasshop-
per, Blackie Beetle, Mr. Gr-rumph
the frog, and the two caterpillars
named Clarence and Archibald all
came in. There were hardly enough
chairs for all the company, but
Blinky bustled around and brought
mats and folding chairs out of the
closet.

Lots of Fun

It was lots of fun for Knarf and
Hanid, listening to all of Blinky’s
friends talking over their adven-
tures of the past summer and plan-
ning out what they were going to
do as soon as the winter was over.
Willy said he was going to move
from the edge of the pond to a sunny
spot behind the pine grove where
the flies were larger and fatter.

Glive said he was going to move
around as usual, not staying in any
one spot too long. But he was deter-
mined to see what kind of country
lay over the hill, even if it took him
all of next summer to get there,
Hop-a-Long said he was going to
visit his relatives on the other side
of the river and hoped he would be
able to find a way to get across,
Blackie Beetle said he was going to
build himself a bigger house; and
Mr. Gr-rumph said he was going to
go on ~. long trip to another pond
where his cousins all lived. Archi-
bald and Clarence said they were
waiting to turn into butterflies, and
then they'd fly all over. And Blinky
just sat and smiled, for there was
nothing he enjoyed more than hav«
ing a houseful of old friends.



PLAZA

BRIDGETOWN _,
(Dial 2310)
TODAY (only) 4.30 & 8.30



(Dial 5170)
Last 2 Shows TO-DAY

THEATRES



OisvVIN
(Dial 8404)
To-day 4.45 & 8.30 p.m







4.30 & 8.30 p.m.
a age ederine SUNSET “RANGERS RIDE”
Ma SOFTLY Jimmy WAKELY &
STRANGER” Ss a
Joseph COTTON & Valli & BOULEVARD a keel
Fon etna da Gloria SWANSON & = {] yohnny Mack BROWN
Starring: Robert Mitchum HOLIDAY INN
———— ]} Bing CROSBY Fri, & Sat. 445 & 8.56
———————_—_==_ s
TODAY'S Special 130 p.m. Fred ASTAIRE xm
“RANGERS RIDE” To-day Special 1.30 || Paramount Technicolor
Jimmy WAKELY & “RED DESERT” Double !
“COLORADO AMBUSH” |] Don BARRY & “LET'S DANCE”
Johnny Mack BROWN “FRONTIER Fred ASTAIRE &
FRIDAY 4.30 145 & 8.30 REVENGE” “HIGH VENTURE”
& Continuing Daily Lash La RUE || John PAYNE
“FOR THEM THAT SAY. Special 130 p.m

*
ae
+
*
>

+
*

+

*

THURSDAY,



when

1 Ae

Murrays

“MILK

MANNING & CO,

AGENTS.





JULY 24, 1952

STOUT:
LTD.



Don’t despair when your oven dishes are greasy
and dirty after a day’s cooking. Sprinkle a little Vim
on a damp cloth, give them a quick rub over and see
how they gleam. Vim is so easy to use, so smooth it

won’t leave a scratch.

VIM

cleans everything
smoothly and speedily

Av 488-902



ROODAL
EMPIRE

TO-DAY 5 & 8.30 p.m.

The Barbados Players Presents —

“THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING
EARNEST"



ee
OPENING SATURDAY 44 & 8 30

R.K.O. Presents —
Paul Douglas — Barbara Stanwyck

in
“CLASH BY NIGHT”

OLYMPIC

TODAY Last 2 Shows 4.30 & 8.320
Universal's Whole Serial

“THE PHANTOM OF















TO-DAY T 130 p.m
“RAINBOW OVER TEXAS”
and

“TWILIGHT ON THE RIO GRANDE”

Opening TOMORROW 4.30 & 8.15 p.m
United Artist Double

“TWO LOST WORLDS”

TRESPASS" ||““GOLDEN STALLION" ||Shanite Special SAT With
SAT. Special 9.30 & zal] Roy ROGERS & { I Elliott J A
EKHUNDER MOUNTAIN” |} “WELLS FARGO vale desimateberiaitie
Tim HOLT 8 GUNMASTER see CLOUDBURST’
1OLT & oe : SON i Rs
REGION of the Rocky LANE ae een = it s
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oleae SSS eee ——=> Soe eee





GLOBE

Today, 4.45 & 8.30 p.m. — Last Shows
BILLY THE KID and SWORD OF MONTE CRISTO

Opening Tomorrow, 5.00 & 8.30 p.m.



else starring

ETHEL BARRYMORE - KIM HUNTER



“THEATRES




a LEVER propucr

THE HEADLINE-
HOT STORY OF
REVENGE KILLINGS!

20. Century-Fox's

USA.

with PAUL STEWART

ROXY

2 Shows

TODAY 4.30 & 8.151%
“LADY ON A TRAIN”

and ¢
“MADONNA OF THE SEVEN
MOONS”

Last





TODAY AT 1.30 p.m.
“DON'T FENCE ME IN”
and
“END OF THE ROAD”

TO-MORROW Only 4.30 & 8.15
Charles Laughton — Boris Karloff
in
“THE STRANGE DOOR”
and
“UNDERTOW”

With

Scott Brady & John Russell





TO-DAY 4.30
4.30 Only
REPUBLIC WHOLE SERIAL !
“ADVENTURES OF FRANK AND
JESSE JAMES”
T
ue

iH

OMORROW NIC
i & He

AT 8.3
Troupe in



“CARACAS NIGHTS OF 19m”
THE SHOW OF SHOWS


THURSDAY, JULY 24, 1952

Speech Day Held At Ursuline

Lady Savage
Presents Prizes

LADY SAVAGE, wife of His Excellency the Governor

Sir Alfred
Speech

‘ed Sauvage; K.C\.M.G., distributed the Prizes at the
ahd Prizé Giving Day held at the Ursuline Con-
vent on Tuesday afternoon.

His Excellency the Governor was also present and in

a short address commented on the high

play “The Rivals” which was done in five acts by the girls.

Presenting her Report of the year’s activities, the
Headmistress Said imter alia :—

This year there has been an increase in the number
of pupils imour School: 174 children ‘are in attendance in
our Montessori and Preparatory Department,.and 133 girls
are being educated in our Main School. 'The total number

of pupils is at present 307.

Moreover, we have again this
year been privileged to co-oper-
ate in the education and training
not merely of some of the children
of Barbados, but also of 90 ‘Girls
from the neighbouring West Indi-
an Islands, British Guiana, Vene-
zuela, ang even Ecuador, who
have been with us as boarders,
Had we the necessary accommo-
dation, we should be able to help
to educate many more children,
for at present we are obliged to

refuse countless applications
which we receive during the
year, We hope in a year or two,

to be able to solve this problem
in providing more accommodation
for ders.

Fully Satisfied

T am happy to be able to report
at the end of this school year that
I am, on the whole, fully satisfied
with the work which has been
achieved, the progress which has
been made, and the standard of
work which has been maintained
throughout the year in the two
departments of the School — the
Preparatory and the Main School.

In the ain School the work
in Form II has been particularly

satisfactory. The members of
this Form have, in_ general,
worked seriously and _ steadily

during the year; they have shown
great interest in their studies, and
the standard of work attained by
the class as a whole has been the
highest in the Main School. In
the other Forms satisfactory work
has also been accomplished,

I must, however, make special
mention of our first Sixth Form,
of which all four members have
not only studied intelligently and
with application throughout the
year, but have also clearly mani-
fested their loyalty, their dutiful-
ness, and their whole-hearted co-
operation with the Staff. I am
happy to know that next year the
numbers in the Sixth Form will
increase to nine or ten.

Thanks To Staff

I must now taauk most heartily
the Nuns and Assistant Teachers
on the Staff of the Main School
who have given me their full co-
operation at all times, not only
during our school hours but also
in the out-of-class duties and
activities of a boarding school.
My work has been considerably
lightened by the devotedness, the
loyalty, and the sense of duty dis-
played on every occasion by each
member of the Staff, and to each
I express my sincere gratitude.

I thank Mrs. Wotton for giving
us a few half-hours of her own
leisure time during the week for
Gymnastics and Dancing lessons.
I am grateful to Mrs. White for
her lessons in Art to the two
upper Forms of the Main School,
and also to Mrs. Hinds-Howell
for her help with the French
classes.

To Mr. McComie I must also
say a word of gratitude for the
Spanish lessons which he has
given to some of our pupils. For
the past two years Miss Field has
beeh on our Staff and we regret
that she is now leaving us, Her
real interest in the progress of
each of her pupils and her devot-
edness to the girls will not be
easily forgotten, and on behalf of
her pupils I thank her sincerely
and wish her success in her new
sphere of work. To Miss Adams
and Miss Rock who have worked
with us for a year, we also say
‘thank you’, and we offer them
our good wishes.

The results of the Oxford and
Cambridge General Certificate

ation at ordinary level,
taken last July by our fourteen
candidates, were on the whole
satisfactory, each pupil obtaining
her certificate in four or five or
six subjects.

This year we have been able to
add several good books to our
Reference Library as well as to
the Form. Libraries,

I should like to take this oppor-
tunity to express our thanks to
the British Council for the Maga-
ziffes and other papers which are

r School,
ee fo oe Se for aoe the
Oxford and pease ST
Adam, bet ce Cosme ee
meee la ease, Marilyn

Netto. :

Prizes awarded for Art: Shirley Walton,
Claudette de Meillac, Jocelyn Steele

Prizes for Needlework : Maureen
Weatherhead, Shirley Ingram. : ;
. Prizes for Music: Mary-Helen Stone, i
Roberta 5
Certificates Awarded for Success ih




Pitman’s Commercial—fxaminaiion :





F

cIry

B.W.1. Shipping

d of the

BARBADOS ADVOCATE _



‘TELEVISION IN T

Television sets—for “business

sereens to avoid the delay and
comparative expense of the post.
The bank found that it
eould televise cheques and
statement sheets over a dis-



- European Sugar

tance of 14 miles.

An official of the bank, Gly? ~

Mills and Co., said to-day: “Wwe

to instal the television
link-up when we build a new
ledger office soon.

The Difficulty—Licences
“We had a licence granted by
the Post office up to April 30
this year. Whether they will
renew it is another matter.”
Licences will be the problem
that will face the business firms.
One of them said; “We have
found that the Post Office
may not be willing to grant

‘Survey Coming Imports Questioned

LONDON.
In the House of Commons on
ly 16, Mr. Emmanuel Shinweil
Labour, Seaham) asked the Serc-
retary of State for the Colonies
when he intends to make a state-
ment on the Government's plan
for the further development ‘of
industry and agriculture in the
West Indies; and what additional
shipping facilities are contem-

plated. 4
Mr, Oliver Lyttelton, Secretary
of State for the Colonies, replied:
‘IT made statements about Jamai-
ca and British Honduras in rep):
to questions by the hon. Member



for Wandsworth Central (Mr.
Richard Adams) and ‘the hon.
Member for Gravesend (Sir

Richard Acland) on 26th March
and 7th May respectively:

“Information about the other
territories will be foumd in my
Annual Report to Parliament, .in
the Report on British Dependgn-
cies in the Caribbean and North
Atlantic, and in the Annual Re-
port for 1951 of the Comptroller
for Development and Welfare in
the West Indies, a copy of which
is in the Library, I cannot yet
add anything to the reply about
shipping facilities which I gave
to. the right hon. Member on 25th
June.”

Mr, Shinwell; “Will the right
hon, Gentleman not agree that the
shipping facilities are very inade-
quate and that the provision for

tramsport at sea is being left
large! to other countries and
Ss concerns, and will he

give this matter his urgent at-
tention?”

Mr. Lyttelton: “I can assure thy
right hon, Gentleman that I 4am
very anxious on this subject. A
firm of British shipowners will.be
making a survey of the W
Indies at the end of this ,month
and the local Governments have
been asked to provide them with

every facility.” wr



Military Force
For Caribbean

LONDON,

In the House of Commons on
July 16, Major Tufton Beamish
(Conservative, Lewes) asked the
Secretary of State for the Colonies
what response has been obtainet
to the proposals to Colonial Gov-
ernments in the Caribbean area
for the establishment of a force,of
two regular infantry battalions to
be liable for service in the aréa;
and if he will make a full state-
ment on the matter.

Mr. Oliver Lyttelton, Secretar;
of State for the Colonies, replied
“The barracks in Jamaica wer:
seriously damaged by last year’s
hurricane, and it was therefore
necessary to reconsider the finan-
cial aspects of these propoSals.
am now putting revised proposals
fo the Governments concerning
these two battalions.”

Major Beamish: “Is my righ?
hon: Friend aware that in the days
of the West Indies Regiment re-
cruits volunteered with great en-
thusiasm to join a very fine force
with proud traditions; and will he
particularly bear in mind the pos
sibility of reviving this force?”

Mr. Lyttelton; “My hon. and
gallant Friend ht be interested
io knew that it has been decided
to give a two battalion force the
title of the West Indies Regiment
which was cisbanded.”

—B.U P.



Type-writing
Intermediate Grade, 1st Class: Rosemary
HC

ng,
2nd Class: Janet Scott, Angele Sarkis,
Certificates of the Trinity College of
Music
First Steps Division: Wendelin Baron,
Ann Taylor.
Passed with Merit: Marlene de Freitn,
Passed with Honours: Joan Millan.
Preparstory Division: Cecilia Farara,
Mary Lesley Knagas, Agnes Sarkis.
Junior Division: Shirley Ingram.
Passed with Merit: Ulusia Lyon.
Certiacates of the Associated Board of
the Royal Schools of M

Grade L, Renata Pen-
“nacchiotth, beth Hall

ed with Merit: Penelope Foster.
Grate Mi Bridget Ferreira, Jocelyn

Roberta Maso.
Roberta Maso.

Steele,
Theory Grade L.

FOR CAR
TRUCKS & B

casi

GARAGE TRADING
VICTORIA STREET.



or extra power & longer life -

BATTERIES

a Sa Ta ls * a i RTT

co.

LONDON, July.

IN THE HOUSE OF COMMONS on July 3, Mr. W. T.
Williams (Labour, Hammersmith) asked the President of
the Board of Trade the total tonnage of sugar exported
during the last 12 months and at what average cost per
ton from Britain and the Colonies to countries in Western
Europe who, in the same period, exported fondant into
Great Britain; what was the total tonnage of such fondant
imported into this country and at what average price

per ton.

More British
Motors for W.I.

LONDON.

The British West Indies are be-
ginning to reap the benefit of the
greater availability of British~
made cars, due to import restric-
tions recently imposed in other
Commonwealth Sa et imaatiole

During May, 51 cars
worth £202,813 were exported to
the West Indies, according to fig-
ures just published by the Society
of Motor Manufacturers and Trad-
ers, in London.

This compares with the 1951
monthly average of 358 British
cars sent to the West Indies, Brit-
ish Guiana and British Honduras.
Last year, these territories receiv-
ed 4,298 British cars. They also
imported 82 cars and 122 commer-
cial vehicles from the United
States, 42 cars and 19 commercial
vehicles from Canada, nine cars
from France and two from West-
ern Germany. ,

An analysis of the figures shows
that Trinidad was Britain’s best
motor customer in the Caribbean
colonies. It took 1,798 cars and

est 601 commercial vehicles in 1951.

Jamaica and her dependencies
took 910 cars and 418 commercial
vehicles from Britain last year,
Barbados took 601 cars and 214
commercial vehicles, British Gui-
ana took 371 cars and 145 com-
mercial vehicles, and the Baha-~
mas took 245 cars and 94 com-
mercial vehicles,

But Australia, which was Bri-
iain’s biggest single motor custom-
cr, has cut ber puccasses abruptly.
She took 36,276 cays last year and
25,178 in the first five menths of
this year. Recent import restric-
tions, however, cut Australian
purehages of British cars in May
to only, 1,192,. Similar. cuts, al-
though not so severe, have also
been imposed in New Zealand.

Trade observers in London say
that this sudden loss of an import-
ant market has foreed British mo-
tor manufacturers to.switch their
exports other area

markets,
—B.U.P.



U.S. Warns Reds
Of Navy Power

_... HONOLULU, July 23.

Carrier-based navy jet and
fighter bpmbers thundered close
along the mainland coast of Com-
munist China Tuesday in a warn-
ing demonstration of the power of
the U.S. Pacifie Fleet,
anno Wednesday. A
man for Pacific Fleet Commander
Admiral Arthur Radford said at
Pearl Harbour that about 100
American pilots flew “just cutside”
three miles off China in the
manoeuvre. He said the demon-
stration was designed to “give
Communists something to think
about.” It was designed to show
Reds that the Navy could bomb
the coastal cities of Amoy, Foo-
chow and Swatow anytime with-
out draining the Korean fleet
power the spokesman said.

Planes atiig in the
manoeuvre law by a carrier
task force under command of Rear
Admiral Souchy sailed into For-
rosa straits this week after a
fast trip from Korea waters.

The Navy did not say how many
planes it could throw against the
Chinese coast in a shooting
attack, ‘but Souchy’s task force
was revealed to be composed of
more than one ¢ er,

—UP.









Mr, Peter Thorneycroft, Presi-
dent of the Board of Trade, re-
plied: “Imports of fondant have
been separately recorded in the
trade returns only since Ist Janu-
ary to May, 1952. Imports into
the United Kingdom of fondant
from Sweden, Norway, Denmark,
the Netherlands, Belgium and
France totalled 18,405 tons at an
average cif. value of £83 a ton.
United Kingdom exports of refin-
ed sugar to these countries in
January to May, 1952, were 1,610
tons at an average f.o.b, value of
£53 a ton. No sugar is exported
from the Colonies to Western
Burope,

“IT should add that the sugar so
exported is bought for dollars, re-
fined in this country and sold for
hard currency at a profit. To
Wop these exports, therefore,
would mean either the lost of
a valuable processing trade
which is a net earner of hard
currency or an addition to our,
dollar import bill’

Mr. Williams: “Will the right
hon. Gentleman convey these
facts to the Minister of Food,
who told me a fortnight ago that
this trade was being brought to
an end? Is it not possible for the
right hon. Gentleman’s depart-
ment to bring about some rela-
tionship between the price for
which sugar is sold and the price
at which fondant is bought, be-
eause fondant is bought at twice
price at which
Thirdly,
right hon. Gen agree
in these circumstances something
ought to be done to provide some
alternative trade in order to pro-
vide sugar for home industries
which are suffering seriously be-
eause of lack of sugar, which is
being sent to Western European
countries?”

Mr. Thorneycroft: ‘The last
question is, of course, a matter
which should be addressed to my
eet hon. and gallant Friend the
Minister of Food. On the point
raised in the question, the answer
is that this arrangement is a net
earner of hard currency, which at
present we certainly need.”

—B.U.P.

FORT TOWNSHEND
STOPS N.Y.-W.1. RUN

(From Our Own Correspondent)
Trinidad, July 11.
The Furness West Indies ship
Fort Townshetad was taken ofi
the New York-West Indies run
this week. An official of Fur-
ness, Withy and Company, Ltd.
agents for the Furness West
Indies Line in Trinidad, announc-
ing this earlier this week dis-
closed that the ship would be
off this run for ay indefinite
period. No reason for withdrawal
‘was given,

Navy After withdrawal of the Lady
‘Nn

€lson and the Lady Rodney

4 from the Caribbean service, it is

expected that people who use
ships for travel between the
islands will experience consider-
able difficulty in getting passages.
The cargo-freighters which are
to replace the “Lady” boats will
have little accommodation for


































S
USES

LTD.

Secure

(Robert Thom Limited)
Whitepark Rd. ee Dial 4616

i

HE OFFICE

suger is.
would not” the
tleman that editorial on Wednesda



GRASS LOADER
AVAILABLE FROM



us a licence

ceive

The Post Office said to-day:
“We have had inquiries about
licences. The position is under
consideration and we can say
nothing.”

Meanwhile the manufacture of
the equipment, which will en-
able the pictures to be sent from
office to office, is continuing.

An official of the manufactur-
ers said: “There is a great future
in this. The Post Office will
have to grant wave-lengths and
licences.”

to send and re-

epcatiie
Salvation Arnty

Celebrates Golden
Jubilee la T’dad

(From Qur Own Correspontent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, July 11.
Speakers at a big public func-
tion held here last Monday
evening in connection with the
Golden Jubilee of the Salvation
Army’s arrival in this Colony
paid high tribute to the Army's

workers.

The Army came to Trinidad in
1902, but some effort had been
made earlier to begin operations
here. At first opposition to the
Army’s workers was fierce and it
is recorded that on one occasion
a leutenant received injuries
necessitating hospital treatment.

It is believed that ‘the Latin
background of the people ren-
dered evangelistic work more

difficult than in the other British
Caribbean islands. In spite of
this, however, converts were
made and the Army’s operations
progressed.

Today the Army
confidence of the Government,
the” business community and
those whom it originally set out
to serve,

enjoys the

At last Monday evening's
meeting principal speaker wes
Mr. P, M. Renison, the Acting

Governor, who said he was well
aware of the services being ren-

dered to the community by the |

Army. Members of the Army
he said, were calfed upon to carry
out duties under the most diffi-
cult conditions, but in spite of

that they always found them-
selves able to accomplish their
tasks.



“Washington Post”
Denounces
Mossadegh

~~ WASHINGTON July 23.

“The Washington Post” in Its
said that
the reinstatement Premier
Mossadegh is a “tragedy for the
Free World” because “the an-
archy which Mossadegh has cul-
tivated is cancerous ahd it can
no more be congained than can
malignant growt{y” The editoria!
says that Mossadegh has “no
policy except continuing the
crisis and national bankruptey,”

and voiced its suspicion that
Mossadegh himself precipated
the crisis in order to knit his
strength.”

It said “perhaps the only re-
maining hope is the Shah him-
elf. The Shah is an astute
young man, and he has eonceiv-~
ably ‘concluded that there is
nothing to do except watch
Mossadegh reap the consequences
of his folly, —UP.



U.S., Canadian $

MONTREAL, July, 23.
The United States dollar on

Tuesday closed at a discount of

2 15/16 sper cent. in terms of
Canadian funds, unchanged from
Monday’s close. Thai is it took
97 1/16 cents Canadian to buy 41
American. the pound sterling was
$2.70 1/2 down, 1/4 from Mon-
day.

In New York the Canadian
doilar was uuchanged at a pre-
mium of 3 1/2 per cent. in terms
of United States funds in closing
foreign exchange dealings on
Tuesday. The pound sterling was
down 3/16 of a cent at $2.78 11/14,

—C.P.

MODERN HEAVY DUTY

} oa



Your Requirements

COURTESY GARAGE

Convent

GRASS
HARVESTING
EQUIPMENT

SIDE DELIVERY RAKE
STOCK.

Insect
Control

In W.L.

(From Our Own Correspondent) 7
TRINIDAD, July I1..
Dr. P. F. de Caires, of ;
World Health Organisation, who
attended the recent Kent House
conference on Home Economics
and Education in Nutrition, ar-
ranged by the Food and Agricul-
ture Organisation and the Carib-
bean Commission, disclosed that
there is a proposal
pool of technical
insect control in
territories.

personnel
the Caribbean

According to him, funds have
been made available for the pro-
ject, but the question of where
the pool's headquarters will be
established has not yet been
settled. Plans call for a staff
which would include a Public
Health Officer, an Insect Control
Area Adviser and four Sanitari-
ans at the supervisor level, all,
it is expected, to be drawn from
the Caribbean area.

Territories which have already
submitted proposals for use of the
facilities, when available, include
Surinam, Barbados, Trinidad and
Tobago, St. Lucia, the Leeward
Islands and the Bahamas.

LA

Bakr And Byroade
Discuss Middle

Eastern Affairs

WASHINGTON, July 23.
peau Minister Abdullah Ibra-
him Bakr discussed ‘Middle Bast
problems on Wednesday with
Henry Byroade, assistant Secre-
tary of State for Near-Eastern!
affairs.

After a half hour meeting Bakr
told reporters that they had sur-
veyed current events in

ditions in Iraq,
up the move of the Israeli For-|
cig Mfnistry from Telaviv to
Jerusalem.

The Minister said that he camel
“on a courtesy visit,
Since Byroade returned from his
recent tour of the Near Fast,”
He said “we talked about his im-
pressions of my country, He
appeared satisfied with the situ-
ation, and with its stability, and
the progress going on, and hopes

this stability and progress will
continue,”

’ When asked about their discus-
sion cf Egyptian and tranian
developments he replied “we just
surveyed them,” —U,P.

—_——-

No Federation
Conference Yet

LONDON,
. In the House of Commons on
July 16, Mr. Reginald’ Sorensen
‘Labour, Leyton) asked the Secre-
fory of State for the Colonies the
present position in respect ‘of
West Indian Federation.

Mr, Oliver Lyttelton, Secretary
of State for the Colonies, replied;
“The Legislatures, apart from
Barbados, which still has to debate
the subject, British Guiana,
Pritish Honduras and the Virgin
Islands, have accepted federation
in principle, I have sugges{od
that the next step should be a cqn-
ference in London; a eopy of my
cespatch setting out detailed plans
for this conference was placed. in
the Library on 27th February: The
preliminary work suggested in
Sargamenh oe of that despatch
as not yet been leted,

1 do not think the Coneréhce at
usefully be held until this has
been done.” tj

Mr. Sorensen; “Supposing one
of the areas of the Caribbean
') which the right hon. Gentle-
inan refers still refuses to join in,
what will happen? Will they ge
on with the proposal?”

Mr. Lyttelton: ‘That is a hypo~
thetical question. I am very keen
to hold the conference to see what
peneral measur of agrgement
can be reached.”















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tribute to the
value of this

J.B. LESLIE & Co., Ltd.















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PAGE THREE



Bonny

Baby
This is Baby
Elizabeth Sharp-
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in West Africa
on Cow & Gate
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in a tropical
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Her mother
writes, “Elizabeth was making very slow progress
when at four months | put her on Cow & Gate.
| do feel | owe your product a debt of gratitude
for the marked and rapid progress she then made
and for the resulting healthy child she is today.”

ATE 285

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PAGE FOUR

a anécare | When Russia Was Free black Magic Under
Crooked Pine

By HENRY LOWRIE

Rize = aa sas neewomat] w = wees = Pane “ oe
Printed by the Advocate Co,, Lid., Bread 8t., Bridsetewn

Thursday, July 24, 1952

SUMMER VISITORS

' 3S TOURISM in the Caribbean a season-
al industry?

Or has the aeroplane made the Carib-
bean available as an all-the-year holiday
resort for the budget-minded, as well as
for the wealthy ?

The answer to these questions depends
on circumstances. In Barbados for instance
the inflow of families from Venezuela’ has
resulted in the filling of certain beach
residential clubs and seaside hotels.

At the same time the island’s largest
hotel has ample accommodation for visitors.
Venezuelans it would appear at first sigh!
want to spend the summer beside the sea
with their families. But the nearness of
most Barbadian hotels to the sea and the
easy access to beaches from hotels make it
doubtful whether Venezuelans deliberate -
ly avoid hotels which are not actually on
the sea,







Venezuelans read daily in their own
newspapers advertised invitations to spend
their summer holidays in other Caribbean
seaside resorts. Several competing ‘air-
lines offer special summer rates to Europe
and North America. Barbados is only one
of a wide variety of summer vacation re-
sorts a Venezuelan might choose.. The
fact that certain residential clubs and at
least one large hotel maintain a high
Venezuelan patronage during the summer
months is probably due to special reasons.
As far as Barbados is concerned tourism
is still seasonal for the majority of th-
large hotels.

How is tourism to be spread over the
whole year? Can it be done?

Pan-American Airways have recently re-
leased certain information which suggests
that hotels can be filled. during the summer
months by American visitors, May this
year according to traffic officials of the air-
line in the Caribbean has been exceptiona!
for summer visitors from America.
» Nassau which is renowned as a winte?
playground for the wealthy recorded a 5;
per cent increase in Clipper traffic over
May 1951. Nassau is now luring budget-
minded vacationists with low-pricked pack-
age tours. Nassau is being so successful

attraeting summer visitors from America
by low-priced package tours, Barbados can
only attract them by under-cutting Nassau.
But Nassau is not the only Caribbean re-
sort to record summer gains of visitors. In
Jamaica ten per cent. more P.A.A, pas-
sengers arrived in Montego Bay and Kings-
ton than in May 1951. And neighbour-
ing Trinidad also’ received nine per cent.
more passengers than in the previous May.
In Haiti there was a 13 per cent. increase
and in Havana twelve per cent. more
visitors were recorded than in May 1951.
~ Barbados is not served by Pan-American
Airways. It seems certain that if it were,
some of the thousands of Americans who
are now spending summers in the Carib-
bean would tome here.

The reason for Pan-American Airways
not coming to Barbados is well known.
The United Kingdom Government still
uses Barbados as a pawn in international
agreements, affecting landing rights. Grea:
Britain is quite prepared to allow Pan-
American Airways to come to Barbados
provided that the United States Govern-
ment grants the United Kingdom compen-
sating landing rights in the United States.

If Pan-American Airways were permit-
ted to come to Barbados it 1s certain that
more Americans would visit Barbados as
a result. :

- Low-price packaged tours are bringing
Americans in Pan-American planes to
Nassau in such numbers that all but one
of their many hotels have remained open-
ed during the summer.

If Nassau can attract budget-minded
Americans by offering low-priced package
tours, so can Barbados. But low-priced
package tours will not solve Barbados’
summer hotel difficulties unless American
airlines are allowed to fly intending \visit-
ors here.

Barbados was - successful in. obtaining
permission for Venezuelan airlines to cal!
at Seawell. The more airlines that use
Seawell the greater the revenue earned by
the airport.

Why should Pan-American Airways not
be welcomed here by the government of
Barbados? It is clearly in the interest of
the island’s economy that Pan-American
Airways should call here. Either the gov-
ernment of Barbados does not know that
the reason for their not coming here is the
United Kingdom’s use of Barbados as a
bargaining pawn for obtaining landing
rights concessions in United States terri-
tory, or it does. If it does, can it be said
to be acting in the best interests of the
island if it does not press for landing rights
in Barbados to be given to Pan-American
Airways?

* expected.
















Last March marked the 35th
anniversary of the great iMussian
Revolution, when the 30v0-year-
old Romanov dynasty Was over-
thrown and Russia became, in
Lenin’s phrase, “the trees
country “in the world.”

For the outside world, and for
America particularly, the demc-
cratic revolution was quite un-
Only a few weeks
before it broke out, the Petro-
grad correspondent of one of
America’s most esteemed news-
papers cabled that the Tsarist
Government had never been so
strong. The Russian people, the
Ci t went on, might be
dissatisfied with this or that
particular Government policy, or
with this or that particular high
official, but nobody in Russia was
thinking about revolution and
the Russian people was devoted
with all its heart and soul to the
“Little Father,” Nicholas IT.

The correspondent, like many
of his colleagues before and
since, simply was not seeing and
hearing what was plain to be
seen and heard. For on Decem-
ber 16, 1916, the leader of the
liberal Constitutional Democrats
in the Duma, the noted historian,
Professor Paul Miliukov, had
warned:

“The atmosphere is saturated
with electricity—the approach-
ing storm is in the very air.
Nobody, gentlemen, can tell
when and where the thunder
will crash.”

The earlier revolution, in 1905,
thad shown plainly the jre of
the Russian people for tical
freedom, All classes, in all parts
of the country, participated in or
supported the general strike of
October1905. As the strike
raged, Count Witte, one of the
most tened representatives
of the regime, warned the
Tsar:

“The present movement for
freedom is not of new birth.
Its roots are imbedded in
centuries of Russian history
....‘Freedom’ must become
the slogan of the Government,
No other possibility for the
salvation of tihe state exists.
The march of historical pro-

eannot be halted. The
idea of civil liberty will
triumph, if not through reform
then by the path of revolu-
tion.”

As a result of the general
strike, the Tsar was com)
to issue a manifesto recognizing
the rights of free speech, con~
science, assembly and of labour
to organize; and setting up a
liberal suffrage law for elections
to an all-Russian parliament, the
Duma, The Tsar’s manifesto
also promised that, for the first
time, no laws would be enacted
without the Duma’s sanction.

All Russia rejoiced at the news
of the Manifesto. Even the
reactionary Governor of St,
Petersburg (renamed Petrograd
during Pee I), General
Trepov, exc t

_ “Thank goa the manifesto

has been signed, Freedom has

been granted; the people will

choose their own representa-

tives. A new life is begin-
”

In the elections to the first
Duma, in the spring of 1906, the
liberals and radical democrats
gained. a huge majority. Immed-
iatély-the Duma, almost unani-
mously, addressed a petition to
the Tsar outlining a long list of
proposed reforms. It called for
tull political freedom, an amnesty
tor political prisoners and relig-
ious dissidents, the abolition of
capital punishment, full equality
‘for the various national minori-
ties and Jews, autonomy for
Poland and Finland, a broader
suffrage law, democratization cf

‘local government, humane labour

laws, comprehensive social leg-
islation, and the expropriation of
state lands and the estates of the
nobles (wlth just; compensation)
for distribution among the pea~
sants,

For a considerable time, the

BARBADOS ADVOCATF

Hy David Shub
Tsar wavered, At one point, he
went so far as to enter into
negotiations with the liberal
leaders with a view toward €s-
tablisaing a government respon-
sible to the Duma as the British
Cabinet is to Parliament. Finally,
however, the Tsar broke off these
negotiations and dissolved the
Duma. r

The second Duma, convened in
1907, was even more anti-Tsarist
than the first. It was also dis-
solved, but this time the election
law was changed to assure a
conservative majority. Never-
theless, in both the third and
fourth (last) Dumas, the Consti-
tutional Democrats had a large
bloc, and socialists, and even
Bolsheviks, were also represent-
ed. Thus, for eleven years,
opposition parties on the floor of
the Duma continued to fight for
the reforms demanded by the
first Duma,

Most objective historians of
the Russian Revolution now
agree that a new revolution could
have been avoided had the Tsar
granted the demands of the
moderate, liberal elements in
1906. it was one of the great
tragedies of history “that, at the
beginning of our century, the
Russian throne was occupied by
so smail and weak-willed a man
as Nicholas IT.

During World War I, Russian
liberals did not desire a new
revolution, because they feared
it might bring victory for the
Kaiser over the Allies. Ata
conference of the Constitutional
Democrats in July 1915, some
delegates urged that the Duma
defy the Tsar by remaining in
session affer he had adjourned
it. Miliukov opposed this pro-
posal, saying:

“This sort of flippaney might
be called criminal, People
who make such proposals are
playing with fire. Apparently,
they completely disregard the
terrile stress under which all
Russia now lives, Russia today
is one inflamed wound—all is
pain, grief suffering. One care-
lessly-thrown match could
create a terrible conflagration
—God preserve us from seeing
that conflagration.”
Nevertheless, the Revolution

of March 1917 was almost blood-
less, and it was a national one.
The liberal professor, Eugene
Troubetskoy, wrote:

“This revolution is unique,

There have been bourgeois
revolutions and _ proletarian
revolutions but I doubt if

there has ever been a revolu-

tion so truly national, in the

widest sense of the term, as the
present Russian one, Every-
body made this revolution.

Everyone took part in it—the

workers, the soldiers,

bourgeois, even the nobility—
all the social forces of the
land.”

The Provisional Government
ereated after the overthrow of
Tsarism consisted of liberals and
constitutional monarchists,. with
the moderate socialist Alexander
Kerensky as Minister of Justice,
The Government was formed by
a joint committee of the Duma
and the Petrograd Soviet of
Workers and Soldiers’ Deputies,
then led by democratic socialis'
The Provisional Government
later broadened several times,
with Kerensky becoming Premier
and other socialists joining the
Government,

Lenin, Zinoviev, Trotsky,
Rykov, Bukharin, Kamenev,
Sverdlov, Stalin and the other
Bolshevik leaders did not parti-
vipate in the overthrow of the
monarchy or in the creation of
the new democratic government;
they were all either abroad or in
Siberian exile. The initial social
reforms which Lenin and Trot-
sky had demanded had essential-
ly been fulfilled without them,

Without civil war, and without
resistance from the landowners,
the Provisional Government

adopted a broad agrarian reform



-Provisional ”

programme. ll estates and
crown lands were to form a sin-
gle pool, to be divided among
the peasants who personally
cultivated them. Elected agrar-
jan committees,were set up to
work out the distribution. The
Government also
pledged the early convocation of
an All- Constituent As-
sembly, — by universal,
secret and @irect balloting, to
adopt a constitution for Russia.
The Provisional Government also
abolished class, ethnic and re-
ligious restrictions and privi-
leges; established democratic
elections in the municipalities
and extended local self-govern-
ment; proclaimed freedom of
speech, press, association, assem-
bly and labour organization;
granted a full and immediate
amnesty to all political and re-
ligious offenders; recognized the
independence of Poland and the
autonomy of Finland, In short,
the democratic government
established by the March Revo-
jution gave’the people of Russia
the liberty, justice and equality
for which generations of free-
dom-loving men and. women of
all classes had sacrificed their
own freedom and often their
lives.

/The Bolsheviks gained
through the dissensions which
wracked their opponents, The
majority of Army and Navy
officers did not want to defend
the Provisional Government.
After the failure of the Kornilov
rebellion in September, many
officers in fact wanted the dem-
ocratic government to be over-
thrown — they mistakenly be-
lieved that the Bolsheviks would
last only a few weeks, and could
then he replaced by a “strong”
conservative regime. These
views were shared by many
conservatives, including some
members of the Constitutional
Democratic party.

On the other hand, a majority
ef the Mensheviks (Social Demo-
crats) and ‘a great many Socialist
Revolutionaries still believed the
Bolsheviks to be democrats,
These groups favoured a “united
front of the entire Revolutionary
Democracy” (excluding liberals,
including Bolsheviks), and thus
opposed any idea of, suppressing
Lenin's party.

It is, of course, now useless to
speculate on how the Bolshevik
coup d'état could have been pre-
vented. But today no one can
deny that the Bolshevik seizure
of power was a catastrophe for
the entire world. The Bolsheviks
abolished all the liberties which
the Russian people had gained
through a century of struggle.
The political order introduced by
Lenin, Trotsky and Stalin has
turned all of Russia into one vast
prison, and the great mass of the
population into slaves, The
Bolsheviks have sacrificed the
lives of scores of millions of
human beings, debased Russia’s
great humanitarian culture, dis-
eredited the ideals of socialism,
prepared the road for Fascism,
and helped Hitler first to take
power and then to launch the
most terrible war in history.
Today, 35 years after the demo-
cratic March Revolution which
they destroyed, the Communist
rulers are the most dangerous
enemies of peace, freedom and
democracy in the world.

The great majority of liberals,
progressive democrats and social-
ists in the world now realize that
freedom, equality and justice are
eternal ideas toward which
humanity will always strive, and
that socialism is only one of
several conceivable means of
achieving these ideals. The
Bolsheviks deified that means,
while liquidating the ideals,
which were its ultimate aims.
It should now be clear to every
thinking liberal, democrat and
socialist that the world can only
have real peace when the ideals
of the March Revolution have
triumphed again in Russia,

—The New Leader.

—~—S

Point Four—Pract ical Idealism

Millions of ples in the eco-
nomica lly underdeveloped
nations of the world are on the
march toward the achievement
of a better life for themselves
and their children, They want
more food, better health, a
higher standard of living, and
a ce to work out their own
destinies within their own cul-
tural patterns,

The United States ig sym-
eir needs and as-
Proven; sa. wall 26 De

ogram, as as
active participation in the
United Nations program for
technical assistance, the U.S. is

help them help themselves
atta nets bs ectives.
Through int Four Pro-

gram, We are providing tech-
nical assistance to help them
increase ‘their food supplies,
develop theif industries in the
pattern of their own economies,
solve their public health prob-
lems, and broaden their educa-
tional systanys, Jn these and
many other ways, Point Four
is helping these developing coun-
tries realize the full potentials
of their human and. materiat
resources for the benefit of all
their people.

There is an oid Chinese prov-
erb that says?

“If you. plant for a year—

plant grain;

If you plant for twenty-five

—years—plant trees; e

If you plant for a hundred

years—plant men.”

Now Point Four, for one thing.
is planting grain. Through its
help, the people of Asia, Africa,
the Middle Bast, and Latin
America are beginning to ex-
periment with new kinds of
seed, new and better tools, and
improved methods of enrich-
ing the soil. In one place, they
have doubled their wheat crops,
and in many other places they
are getting better yields each
year, which mé@ans more food
for the family and a little cash
income. This is tremendous pro-
gress and it is the first step

toward freeing people from
hunger. This is one of the main
goals we have set

Point Four is also planting
trees. In parts of the world, for-
ests have been plundered and

i



By JONATHAN B. BINGHAM



Jonathan B, Bingham has
been associated with the Point
Four Program since Novem-
ber 1951, first as Deputy Ad-
ministrator of the Technical
Co-operation Administration
and currently as Acting Ad-
ministrator, Other service in
the U.S. Department of State,
the Mutual Security Agency,
and as a free-lance correspon-

© dent in Burope and Asia has
given him a wide knowledge
of worldwide problems and
aspirations. Born in 1914 in
New Haven, Connecticut, Mr.
Bingham was educated at Yale
University and Yale Law
School. He was 4 intelli-
gence officer in the U.S. Army
during World War Il.



the soil has become dry and
eroded. Overcoming this is one
of the most important aims of
our cooperative ‘ams.
_ But most important of all,
Point Four is planting men—
and women—whom the Chinese
sage forgot to mention.
I mean, of course, that our
in Point

purpose
Four is to develop, people; peo-

ple who are s' self-reliant,
and capable of developing their
‘own resources for eir own

use and benefit; people who can
manage their own _ affairs
through their own representa-
tive institutions; people who can

jsuppart ‘themselves and naed
not depend on charity.
One of the appealing things

about the U.S, Point Four Pro-
gram, I think, is, that it is a
two-way proposition. Many of
the animal and plant strains
that we have developed in the
United States came originally
from the very lands which we
are now trying to help through

the export of our technica!
knowledge. For instance, we
got cattle from India, horses

from Arabia, a wonderful kind
of wheat from Turkey. So we

are in @ sense, only

repaying

vhat we have bor:
In this cooperative work, new
ideas and new products are be-

ing developed. IT have never
talked with an American Point
Four. technician who did not
say that he was learning, just
as he was teaching, and getting,
just as he was giving, through
his job.

Second only to food produc-
tion is the work of controlling
disease and developing healthy
people,

Point Four recognizes the
basic interdependence of food
and health, Sick people cannot
work and ‘oduce enough to
feed themselves and their fam-
ilies. Underfed people fall sick
easily, Mi preventive medi-<
cine has found answers to most
of the mass diseases such as
malaria, dys®ntery, typhoid, and
trachoma. Clean water is one
of the answers. DDT is another.
So point Four technicians are
teaching ln nstrating
public hea and = preventive
medicine to ‘millions of people.
_ Of course, many other activi-
ties are carried on in addition
to those in the basic fields of
food, health, “and education, We
are helping in the development
of industries; encouraging pri-
vate capital, both locally and
from the United States, to in-
vest in pretiuctive enterprise
that will con te to the de-
velopment. of countries. we
are working with,

We are
ploration and development of
mineral and water resources that
are so essential in many lands,

We are helping build roads, the |

lack of which is often a serious
obstacle to development.

In all these ‘varied activities
which cover almost the whole
range of human endeavor, it
is our aim), to work directly
with the people we are trying
to help to help themselves, do-
ing what they are interested in.
starting at the technical level
at which they find themselves,
encouraging them to contribute
their Own funds and. especially
their own efforts to these joint
operations
; If Point Four is to succeed,
it must be a oT



ative en-
eae a,

elping in the ex- |



~The



THURSDAY, JULY 24, 1952

POCO CF

PAN

On Sale at

- ,OSCOSOBSS
BOOK 8.
The Widest Selection in Town.
ADVOCATE STATIONERY.

OPPO CSSO SOF POPE SEES EP FOSS SOSSSSP PEP OOS



WASHINGTON.

ago.

crooked pine” in the swamps.

which came from magic roots.

to talk with Joe,

up.

| their final year.

gaining.



hours.

LOOK out, men! The Zontians want to
invade your territory still further.

Zonta comes from the American Indian.
language and means trustworthy and hon-

est.

Anyway, 500 Zontians—professional and
executive women—from the United States
and 13 other countries adopted for the theme
of their plan-making conference at Houston,
Texas, the phrase: “Women’s work has just

begun.”

The Zonta Club was started in 1919 in
Buffalo. Now there are more than 9,000
women in it, although membership is re-
stricted to one top woman from each busi-
ness or profession in a community.

CIVIL DEFENCE bosses of New York are
appealing for 40,000 “hams” the radio ama-
teurs, to help in the 24-hour a day alert

of the United States, is now paying off in a
In Boston a company has been formed to

invest American dollars—800 million of
them (£285,710,000)—in business

the border.

The New York Mirror adds its congratu-
lations today to Canada on its “tight, sweet,

better-kept house”,

wish they could do as well.

WHEN they start making the other side
of the Rommel Story, answering the com-
plaints that James Mason showed him in too
favourable a light, it will be in a specially
built Tobruk on the Californian desert.

“The Desert Rat”, telling how British and
Anzac troops took the arrogance out of Rom-
mel and his famed Afrika Korps, will prob-
ably have Robert Newton in a leading role.

A PERMANENT exhibition centre, known
as “The British Aisles”, will be opening in
New York in September to show British

goods.



Co-operating Actively

By R. M. MacCOLL

SHREWD James Reston, of the New York
Times, writes that “the Republicans and
Democrats may be trading insults about each
other’s foreign policies, but the fact remains
that they are co-operating actively and

| effectively 6n the most exciting and revolu-
|tionary foreign policy adventure Americ:

has had since World War II.”
PERHAPS it’s an

plush offices, Anyway,

| expert.

ARE American doctors getting too tough, :
| losing the “warm, human approach” to their
patients? The American Psychiatric Asso-

IT was-like a tale from the African jungle
| the way Richmond, Virginia, police told it
| today—the story of a murder done six years

They arrested 53-year-old Mrs. Cora Lee
| Nash after they had “broken” the voodoo
| Spell she was supposed to have put on Joe
Nash, aged 56—the man, they say, who saw
her shoot her husband Luther “beside a

BUT the police sent their Mrs. Goldie Bass

She told him her powers were even greater
than Mrs. Nash’s. So he led her to a spot be-
hind the Nash home where bones were dug

Doctors are now trying to decide whether
they are those of the missing husband.

A BANK in Toledo, Ohio, wondering how
university students would fare in the pitfall
world of finance, gave five students 5,000
;dollars (£1,785) to “play around with” in

They came up today with a profit of 4.4
per cent. on their investments.

THE guards at Michigan prison, where
the riots took place in April, have learned
their lesson. No more coddling, no more bar-

The prisoners got tough again after one
had wriggled free and let others out.

Out went the warden’s call for help. One
hundred policemen with guns answered.
They had the jail quiet again in a couple of

Americans,

against a sneak plane attack.

CANADA'S booming prosperity, the envy
practical way.
naturally feel some sense of chagrin and

UNEMPLOYMENT is soaring in Detroit,
the motor-car city, because of the steel
strike: The figure is expected to be 150,000.

instinctive back-to-
nature move on the part of Americans, sub.
poate in rebellion against their super

millionaire elde
statesman Bernard Baruch started the “park
bench diplomacy” business some years age
And now passers-by on New York’s teemin;
Morning-side-drive look twice, Yes, no, ye
—it’s Dwight Eisenhower sitting on tha‘
| bench deep in conversation with John Foste
|Dulles, the Republicans’ foreign affairs

Said Joe, cousin of Luther: She put me
} under a spell and made me bury him.

| Like the other people in this backward
coloured community in Henrico County he
believed Mrs. Nash had voodoo powers

& CO.

across

it says, .
Â¥ 7 important!

Red Kid

from $2 to $7

Toaday’s Good

News

We have large stocks of
Super Rice, Bacon, Butter
and Cheese,

Phone To-day—We Deliver



Easy to Prepare

Rice Krispies
Corn Flakes
Shredded Wheat
Cream of Wheat
Weet-a-bix
Pablum

Farex

Bacon

Calves Liver
Bacon



Make your own Bran Muffins
with Posts Bran Flakes
37c. per pkg,



ciation thinks definitely yes, and recommends

that medical schools should pay more atten-
t to reminding budding doctors of the
“emotional needs” of their future patients.



,



C. S. PITCHER





PHONE TO-DAY

GODDARDS

ENAMEL SINKS
GALVANISED SINKS
ALUMINUM SINKS

In choice of two sizes:
24 x 16
30 » 18

And Double Drain-
Board Sinks for your
kitchen.

4

1, Three-quarters of an
inch more than the
actual foot measure
should be allowed in the
length of a child’s shoe.

2. The heel must neither
pinch nor slip and the
heel seat must be wide
enough to give the child
a firm base with ankles
straight and weight even.
ly distributed.

3. The natural develop-
ment of growing feet
depends on unhampered
movement , . . which re-
quires soft, flexible
leather and proper
width,

4. The shoe must fit the
curves of the arch with
reasonable snugness and
the outer arch of the
feot must have firm
contact with the sole of
the shoe,

Children’s SHOES are so

Our wide selection for Boys &
Girls includes — Black Patent
Leather; White Nubuck &

We have all sizes & prices

Just Arrived

Heinz Mayoraise

Heinz Vegetable Salad
Macaroni

Hams in Tins

Carr’s Cream Crackers

Carr's Cheese Crisps

SPECIALS

Tomato Soup, 80z.—22

cents
Chocolate Nut Roll 14c.
each
Italian Ketchup 46c,
Italian Chili Sauce 74c.
Prepared Mustard 25c.
She-t eGelatine 24c. per
pkg.





Please drive carefully—the
life you save may be your
own. ’



— WE DELIVER






















‘
THURSDAY, JULY 24, 1952 PAGE FIVE

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Cuban Sugar
Under M.S.A.

LONDON.

in the House of «Commons 01
July 10, Mr. Cyril*Osborne (Con-|
servalive, Lineolnshire) asked ihe
Chancellor of the Exchequer if je
wiki request the United St: a
Government to include Cuban
sugar and Canadian wheat in u ey
grunts in aid to Be received un |
the Mutual Security Act; and |
ne will make a statement, |
}



ee

Yellow. Fever Scheme
Discussed With Dr. DeCaires

. Is EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR has informed
the Honourable the House of Assembly and the Legislative
Council that a scheme for eradication from Barbados of
the fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti, has been dis-
cussed with Dr, P. F, De Caires, representative of the
Pan-American Sanitary Bureau, which is the regional
Bureau of the World Health Organisation for the Western
Hemisphere.

and keep your
home bright,

Velicyw



Under the terms of the Agree-

“ Ps 3 ment into which it would be . ; 3 ;
Confident LG. necessary to enter with the Bureau, _ Sir Arthur Salter; Minister
this Government would be required State for

plied: “The 300,000,000-dollar eco-
nomic aid from the Mutual Sec ur-
ity Administration has alresay:
been fully committed. and. ever}
200,000,000 dollars’ of the money |
has been recoveréd, .There {S no;
question, therefore, of inclueio,;
additional items such e* suger

wheat. My right hon. Friend ccs

Ready For Sea te supply a ‘certain amount of

insecticide’ and personnel, whilst
spraying @quipment, insecticide
and the services of one medical
officer and one inspector would
be supplied by the Pan-American
Sanitary Bureau, Besides using a
part’of the existing stock of in-
secticide’ which, as far as can be

Keonomie Affairs, =

The Schooner Confident'-I. G.
which was built at Browne’s
Beagh, Bay Street and launched
On. .November .1,. 1951, .is now
ready for sea. “I hope that by
now. and Tuesday next the
merchants. of the island as well



asthe Schooner Pool will give foreseen, it will be possible to not intend to make a furt)er
me sufficient cargo so as to .en- replace. from the current.vote, a DESIGNED AS A HIGH-FLYING radar sentinel for domestic Gefense, the Navy’s new radar plane is picturea statement at present.” |
oor oa to make my first trip,” sum estimated at $1,000 will be duving a test flight over the California mountains. The grotesque configuration of the WV-2 is caused Unsaieabie

. Ernest Lorde, her owner, needed to meet this Island’s share oy the huge radar’s shark-like fin atop the Super-Constellation and the expanded balloon below. Hints Mr. Osborne: “As were 4%

told the Advocate yesterday.

The Confident LG. was brought
into the Careenage on April 23. _.
1952." While in the inner basin, Director of Medical Services, his
She Was equipped with spars, departmental officers and the
rigging and sails. She was also medical and technical officers of the
sealed and made “ship shape.” Pan-American Sanitary Bureau

At present the only work going Statutory authority to enter and
on is centred on the galley. Car- spray houses and premises with
pentérs are erecting the galley an insecticide approved by the
house which is expected to be General Board of Health and to
completed today. add larvicide approved by the

Board to water or water contain-
2 Cases Of House ers. The General Board of Health
Breaking Reported

of the cost of the scheme.

Authority
It will be necessary to give the

about 1,000,000 tons of udsaies.) v

Sugar
rw “clectronie marvels” preceded the trial appearance of the laboratory ship.

«International)

sugar in Cuba and we stihl huve
rauoning over here, would je

i hm varged With o'ths the ‘surplus coma. on
‘ate an Ci a d ul sh 3 this pl 8

Breaking Into Building — Sisis.e¢ “"
And Stealing Cigarettes

rationing?"

Sir Arthur Salter: “If my jun.
Friena» is thinking of approps:-
ations Wn respect to'a later yer,

THE TRIAL of Oliver Grimes, a watchman of Clap-

ham, who is charged with breaking into the building of
the British-American Tobacco Co. on June 21 while he
was employed there, and stealing cigarettes, unused cig-







Scheme

Abardoned

His Excellency the Governor
has referred to his Message
No. 9/1951 dated the 27th of
February, 1951, to the Honour-
able Legislative Council/House
of Assembly regarding pro-
posals put forward by the
Comptroller of the Develop-
ment and Welfare Organisa-
tion for the extension of Er-

say 1952-53, ¢ would point. .ui.}
that the appropriations have only}
just reached thei final legit. |
tive stage in America and that yo}
do not yet know the views of rey

|



has approved of the proposed pro-
gramme, and has expréssed its
willingness to amend the Mosquito

American administration as ww Bryden & Sons Ltd, Barbados





Regulations t i e arette shells and slides valued $1.26, started at the Court whic re eligibie. ‘oye
Clement Yearwood of Rock ane te eatty Genbontineer cies aren ee —, _ of Grand Sessions -yesterday, before Mr. Justice G. L. a I ‘wil vo ad ¥ iat |
Fs BP AU a eae effectively, commodation and facilities for Taylor, and after five witnesses for the Prosecution gave ™y hon, Friend says.” | a refs anata tae
house was broken and entered , The Directorof Medical Services | training sixteen students & evidence, it was adjourned until today. New Pact K '
between 5.30 a.m. and 5.45 p.m, has been assured of the co-opera- | tae 4 ee i ee Mr. W. W. Reece, Q.C., is prosecuting for the Crown, , Mr. Norman Dodds. (Labou»| eep your
on the 18th instant and $10.00 tion of the Sanitary Authorities in A » Grimes is represented by Mv. D. H. L. Ward. Dartford); “Will. the right ho,

form the Honourable Council/
House that as a result of the
inability of the Governments
of those territories to contri-




Gentleman bear in mind that ie;
The charge was brought against Ward asked the Inspector why Sugar is there now and that in|
Grimes after the Police received they waited so long after Grimes this austerity period housewiws |

the several parishes: this is essen-
tial for the success of the propos-
ed programme.

worth of articles stolen, Year-
wood reported the matter to the
Police on Tuesday.

children...

Charles King of Good Intent. The Honourable the House of but ropriate share of certain reports and on the Satur- had, as they said, entered the would like it now? Is he furty: |
St. George, also reported that his Assembly/Legislative ‘Council is tas, trameaak ‘annually recur. | day of the alleged offence, hid building, before going to him, The aware that the sugar, which co1){) 0° ~~"
house was broken and _ entered invited to approve that the scheme, rent costa, it has been found among canes near the tobacco fac- Inspector said they had waited be sold for sterling to be spen’ || ee
on Monday. Nothing was taken, for the eradication of the yellow necessary to abandon the tory for more than six hours, for any developments, Cpl, Year- this country, is available for jut) -

however. fever mosquito with the assistance
of the Pan-American Sanitary
Bureau should be proceeded with
and that, in accordance with the

over 1d. a lb? Will he have a}
word with the President of the,
Board of Trade and help to ge}
a new pact?” |

keeping an eye on Grimes while
he made his rounds as watchman,

The witnesses who gave evidence
yesterday were. George Reid,

scheme, wood said that there was the pos-
sibility that an accomplice might
have arrived.

Evidence by DeVerteuil, in the





FIT AND

Finances Inquiry

prescribed procedure, the Secre-

Motor Cyclist

In Port-of-Spain

PORT-OF-SPAIN

In the House of
July 16, Mr, James

tary of State for the Colonies may
be asked to sponsor the necessary
epplication for technical assistance
Commons on to the World Health Organisation

Johnson (La-



Struck By Lorry

Hutson Chandler, an Overseer

at the Belle Plantation, was de-

bour, Rugby) asked the Secretary
of State for the Colonies why the

Firewood, Charcoal

tained at the General Hospital on
Tuesday night after he was in-

Inspector of Police, Cpl. Bryan,
Cpl, Yearwood, Henry A, O’N
Skinner, Assistant Manager of the

Company and Marcel R, DeVer-
teuil, General Manager.
DeVerteuil was the last to

give evidence and he has not yet
been cross-examined. The other

main, corroborated the Police’s

. evidence,

When the case continues this
morning at 10 a.m. De Verteuil will
be cross-examined.



U.S. Competition

Sir Arthur Salter: “As I h ve)
pointed out, the money in resp
of this year has already be?n|
fully committed, There is
margin left for use for this p \-
pose,”

Mr. Dodds: “But will the ri: ')
hon. Gentleman have a word wii"



STRONG

Your children will always be full of fun
—full of energy have a real zest
tor work or t= . it you give them
HALIBORANGE every day. It is rich












of State for the Colonies, replied:
“T understand that the report has
not yet béen before the Executive
Council. The Acting Governor has
so far consulted his official advis-
ers only,”

aware that there is acute public
interest in Port-of-Spain in this
matter and that many people in
Port-of-Spain believe that publi-
cation of the Report is being with-
held because Ministers are impli-
cated in the affair?”

that I am aware that it is going
to be withheld, Certain legal mat- batches were milled and flaked

and the official advisers have to
be cleared up before I can make
a statement.”—B.UP.

working elass people in the island
appreciate fair treatment and re-
act favourably. It is principally a
matter of personal relations which
continue to be very good.”

colonies think of Barbados as be-
ing highly cultivated, there is de-
finite’ reom for
cultivation. which includes better
application of
Haynes said.

ance now given, the island’s food
vation .will, be raised because of
the gréater facilities Which are

that in the long run, the relation-
ship

Mr. Oliver Lyttelton, Secretary the week-end.

The Motor Vessel Daerwood
arrived yesterday from St. Lucia
with a quantity of cargo and
many passengers on board. In-
eluded in her cargo were 175
bags of copra, 40 cartons of rice,
23 bags of cocoanuts and fresh
fruit.

Schooner Mandalay II brought
12 bags of arrowroot, 435 bags of
eonrs, 30 bags of cocoanuts and
32 pieces of timber.

General Cargo

The Steamship Sunwhit
brought a quantity of general
cargo. to the island. In_ her

Mr. Johnson: “Is the Minister

Mr, Lyttelton: “I have not said

ters between the Acting Governor oats, machinery, cotton canvas,
paint, sherry, beer, whisky, china-
ware, rayon and medicines.

The Daerwood, Mandalay I
and Cloudia S. are consigned to
the Schooner Owners’ Associa-
tion. Sunwhit is consigned to
Messrs. DaCosta & Co, Ltd.

Peasants’ Loan

@ From page 1



Government
Gfficials On Leave

Agriculture, has been granted
one month’s extension of sick
leave with effect from the 11th
instant.

“In addition, the fact that other

more intensive
manures,* Mr.

It is felt that with the assist-

ill i ital, ten days’ casual leave,
production -will’ increase, as well ‘ico’ with effect from the 16th
as the general standard of culti- jnstant,

being offered. It is also envisaged days’ casual leave
from the Ist August.
which now exists between
peasant owners and factory own-
ers will be improved.

gineer, will act as

Engineer.



Inspect these in our

Linen Department

RAYON & COTTON CURTAIN NET—
36 ins. wide @ $1.11 yd.
Gold, Tango, Blue, Rose, Green

RAYON & COTTON CURTAIN NET—
40 ins. wide @ $1.56 yd.
Gold, Tango, Blue, Rose, Green

COTTON CURTAIN NET—40 ins, wid
@ $i.87 yd ec
Cream, White

FIGURED MARQUESETTE
36 ins, wide @ 97c. yd.



Mr. C. C. Skeete, Director of

Other Government Officials on
leave are Hon, C. Wylie, M.L.C.,
Attorney General, 14 days’ casual
leave with effect from the 16th
instant; and Mr. W. C. Goodman,
M.B.E., Secretary of the General

Mr. T. E. Went, M.B.E., Gain:

i r, has been grante
ial Enginee' as bi ape * 44
Mr. J. C.
Kellman, Assistant Colonial En-
Colonial



CUSHION CORD @
Red, Gold, Green, Blue, Black,
White, Pink, Brown

Scarcity Of Fish

The majority of fishing boats
have been beached at various
parts of the island. A few boats
at Bathsheba and along the east
coast of the island are however
still bringing in catches of flying
fish,

Fish is now scarce in St. Mi-
chael. Very few flying fish are
being caught. On Tuesday only
about 100 flying fish were brought
into the Public Market,

Housewives are now dependent
on catches of seine fish and snap-
pers caught by the few boats still
going te sea. Early in the day
quantities of “pot” fish are being
brought in at some beaches,

CAPT. BRYAN ON
CASUAL LEAVE

Captain G, J. Bryan, M.C., As-
sistant Colonial Secretary 1s at
present on twelve days’ casual
leave. He is expected to resume
duties on the 28th of the month,

Mr, L. N. Chenery, Assistant
Secretary, Colonial Secretary’s
Office, has been appointed to act
as Assistant » Colonial Secretary,
and a member of the Public Ser-
vice Commission,

Mr, G. E, Amory, Long Grade
Clerk; Treasury Department, is
also acting as Accountant, Treas-
ury Department.

BIBLE ADDRESS

The United Holiness Meeting
in the Salvation Army Bridge-
town Central Hall, Reed Street,
will this evening be conducted
by Mrs. Major Morris, and the
Bible Address. will be given by
Snr. Captain W. Bishop. The
Bridgetown Central Songsters
will also take part.

A very cordial invitation is ¢x-
tended to all.

|

17c. Yard,

LACING CORD @ 5c. Yard
Red, Gold, Blue, Green, Black,

Verteuil with regards to the fac-
tory, and also on a ceytain stage
of the process of producing a box
of cigarettes,

First to give evidence was
Inspector Reid, He said that about
10.20 the Saturday morning Cpl.
Bryan, Cpl, Yearwood and he went
to the factory at Lodge Road in
consequence of certain informa-
tion they had received, They took
up a position at the back of the
foctory in a cane fleld where they
could see some doors. They were
later joined by De Verteuil,

At 4.10 Grimes walked down a
corridor and on reaching an
entrance door, disappeared. Cpl.
Bryan went nearer the door while
Cpl. Yearwood and he went besid¢
a fence, About 5, on a signal from
DeVerteuil, Yearwood and he went
towards the door where they saw
Cpl. Bryan holding Grimes who
had a wooden box in his hands.
This box contained some cigarettes,
unused shells and slides, Grimes
handed him a lock and some keys,
Grimes told him at the time that
he had got the cigarettes, ete., out
of the factory,

At this stage of the Inspector's
evidence, four trays of cigarettes
were produced as cigarettes which
had also been in a certain room
of the factory at the time and
which had been removed from
their original position, but Mr.
Ward objected to their being pro-
duced as they did not form part
of the charge.

Charged

Later the Saturday when Grimes
was taken to the Central Police
Station and charged, he said he
knew nothing of the 3,580 ciga-
rettes (those in the tray) but
added nothing with regards to
lanything else.

In his cross-examination, Mr, ¢d on the Pier Head.”
SPOOOSIPOPODEOD POLED IO DIV IO PTOI DOOD OUD OLE LL DLOODDO DOV OD DDD EDIOVOOOE |



Trade whether he is aware of the
growing competition from the
United States of America which
is being experienced by the West
Indies citrus industry; that the
export of citrus products is sub-
sidised by the United States of
America; and whether, under the
terms of the General Agreement
on Tariffs and Trade, he will as«
for a discussion on the limitations
of these subsidies,

Subsidisation

Mr. Peter Thorneycroft, Presi-
dent of the Board of Trade, re-~
plied: “I am aware that the ex-
port of citrus products to certain
markets is subsidised by the Uni-
ted States Government, but I have
no evidence that tihe subsidies are
injuring the interests of the West
Indies citrus industry whose mar-
kets at present lie in countries
which are restricting imports from
the dollar area for balance of
payments reasons,

In these circumstances, I do not
consider that anything will be
gained by taking action under Ar-
ticle XVI of the General Agree-
ment on. Tariffs and Trade, if,
however, my hon, Friend has spe-
cifle evidence of injury to the West
Indies’ industry and will supply
it to me, I will consider it.”

—B.UP.

20'- For Leaving
Cart Unattended

McDonald Willoughby was yes-
terday ordered to pay a fine of
20s. when he pleaded guilty before
His Worship Mr, E. A, McLeod,
City Police Magistrate, to “leay-
ing a horse drawn cart unattend-

CAPACITY

PLATFORM

utmost

ALL-METAL WHEELBARROWS

“BRECKNELL”
THE ALL-METAL

PLATFORM SCALE
MADE IN ENGLAND

BEAM GRADUATIONS 28 Ibs & 4 oz.

A number of these Seales
are in use locally and with-
out exception are giving the

Stamped ready for use and complete
with Weights

1 each 25, 50, 100, 200 and 2 »

$198.78 EACH

Governor of Trinidad’s advisers volved in an accident with a m0- witness who has not yet given his right hon, Friend and try +51 in the body-building and procective vita-
in regard to the report of the Arrive Front B.G. tor lorry on Kingston Road. — evidence is Yearwood, a super- For W. 73 Citrus get a new patt now for sterlia mins A & D—cnsures strong bones and
Coromaiapian ath. diequise, tase 5am Feminine tetas, rie seman visor. r not for this money?” muscles, increases resistance to illness.
finance of the City Council of hundred tons of firewood an as & ieee" —R.UP. : iar yi
Port-of-Spain, Trinidad, include ae bags of charcoal were cycle M.2073. The motor lorry, Description of Factory , LONDON x a Children love taking Haliborange -
Ministers, the conduct of some of 60 ht to the island by the M 1685, is the property of Greg- Much of the evidence given was _ In the House of Commons on 2 the pure halibut oil is blended with
whom has been adversely com- idea: Cloudia S. which ar- ory Hope of Belmont Road. os eee yey the re gm oom a Hoa Dacoeshl ached 14-WHEELED VEHICLI: orange juice to make it extra delicious. It’s
2 i 1e Re sc , Rare : yt —_—_oo- position and its rooms—the - servative, P BK | 4 ade
mented on in the Report. rived from British, Guiana over tion. of the hiding Police ana Te the, Premdentok.the > Meera . of CARRIES TRINIDAD grand for adults too.

OILFIELD EQUIPMENT |

LEYLAND, Lancashire
The problem of transporting |
heavy oilfield equipment in Trini-|
dad is now being solved by the|
use of a l4-wheeled vehicle con-\
sisting of a Leyland Super Hippo |
tractor and a Dyson semi-trail or, ;
according to Leyland Motors, Lid., |
of Leyland, Lancashire.
Trinidad Petroleum Develop-
ment Co,, Lid, who operate the |
machine, used it recently to cir-|
ry a large draw-works for a diese|- |
powered drilling rig from a site
where drilling for a new oil well
had been completed to another
location where drilling was about
to start. The draw-works weigh-
ed about 30 tons and comprised
a maximum load for the trailer,
The type of work on which the
14-wheeler is employed is particu-
larly diMfieult, the company points
out, as many of the roads giving
access to oil well locations have
unpaved gravel, surfaces, often
with gradients up to one in six,
—B.U-P.



REV. CLEMENTSON VICAR
OF ST. JOHN THE BAPTIST

The Revd. J. W. Clementson

has been appointed Vicar of St.
John the aptist Chureh, St,
James. His appointment * took

effect as from yesterday.



ASSIZE DIARY

TO-DAY
No, 2 Reg, vs. Verona Jack-

man
No. 16 Reg. vs. Sylvan Mason



1100 Ibs.

DIMENSIONS 32” x 19”

satisfaction.

300 Ths.




Haliborange

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Peathem | oN

good



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—

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A HORSE LOVER

We Highly Recommend

HARVEY'S WATTS ..
EMBROCATION

For the treatment of Curbs, Splints, Sprains,
Capped Hocks, Ete.
It is also an excellent application for Windgalls,
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PRICE 12/6 AND 6/6 AT

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ENJOY

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SO DELICIOUS
SO NUTRITIOUS
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CAMPBELLS CREAM OF MUSHROOM—per tin ....
CAMPBELLS CREAM OF CHICKEN—per tin
CAMPBELLS CONSOMNE—per tin
CAMPBELLS CHICKEN with Rice—-per tin
CAMPBELLS SCOTCH BROTH—per tin
CAMPBELLS VEGETABLE BEEF—per !b.
CAMPBELL S OX TAIL—per tin
CAMPBELLS TOMATO—per tin
CAMPBELLS VEGETABLE—ver tin
CAMPBELLS BEAN with Bacon—per tin
CAMPBELLS VEGETARIAN VEGETABLE—per tin..
HEINZ CHICKEN GUMBO—per tin
HEINZ CLAM CHOWDER—per tin ...
HEINZ CHICKEN NOODLE—-per tin

HEINZ CREAM OF GREEN VEGETABLE—per tin ....
HEINZ BEEF NOODLE—per tin r

HEINZ PURE MONGOLE—per tin ...
CAMPBELLS BEANS with Pork—per tin



CORNED BRISKET BEEF—per 4-lb. tin
SALISBURY CORNED MUTTON—per tin

COCKADE FINE RUM
CRAWFORDS TRI FRUIT PUFFS—per pkt. ........+-
5 ASST. CREAMS—per pkt.
SWEET ASST.—per pkt.

CUSTARD CREAMS--per pkt.

3 CUBIC FEET CAPACITY — STRONGLY MADE

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CAVE SHEPHERD
& ¢0., ITD.

10—13 Broad Street







Stansfeld Scott & Co. Ltd.

_———
SSS ?



pedo OOSSS9S SSS DOOSPHOOSOSOOOL OF







}




PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY, JULY 24, 1952

CLASSIFIED ADs§., |Pomtc 'Nericns| pumie sates Canada Trade Is Gravel *2kce St wets eae

able machinery was available, to be economically efficient, must














































| z ‘
j second-hand, in Jamaica. Some spread its capital cost over a mini-
____ TELEPHONE 26 PP Bese et NOTICE j REAL ESTATE } ° 99 local private capital was found mum of 100 bedrooms and must
COLE & CO., LTD., geil eis | Cause For Anxiet T and the corporation was asked to operate or «ne assumption that 70
. DIED FOR SALE Re arene dee eee of land at CATTLE WASH, invest £55,000. Negotiations per cent. of the accommodation
ae . Barbados, B.W.L : ede between Kingsiey Club and dragged on for months and now will be occupied throughout the
CARTE Tala ees, ale | nner memes | ed to" notify our * friends and | Publie inte we tt te hae, 3 the machinery has been sold to year. ces _
kmans, Road, ‘ustom: t Spare rts Depart- ‘ . eone e
Seaton Joweph Cartan age 6] AUTOMORIVE [Sen ih “bet Shned fot sur Armes | piel daz padins beach cottage and} AU, Campbell Repeats A Warning | :~one cise. Oe SE Ss a cer ee ae ae
above. residence at 4.30 p.m. CAR—Vauxhall. Velox, Green. Late |='0c*taking from July oP ee For full particulars Dial Hull and Son Mr. Steele, “the failures of the toria Hotel in Uganda and adds:
forthe “Hothersal. Turning’ Pigeon | 3050.) Owner duiven "sind. well 5 fare — es al LONDON corporation in British Honduras “These ventures are in accord-
Holiness Church and thence to the!Apphy Courtesy Garage. en os. Soate — O uae bat c wii ae ‘a the failure @fce with the corporation’s policy
Migces ckies Tekton) ana omen tea 6 Le NOTICE 100 BARBADOS FOUNDRY LAD. | THE On IN of trade ee auciety peg an cons Cee ae ‘showing the way’; what, should
, Chrysler Windsor. Owner Pyplications will be received by the 3 ada and the British Indies is a grave cause for 7 or pilot sehemes. At no time "OW follow is a display teres:
driven. Very good condition . hone | Clerk of the Vestry up to 12 (noon) on| 18 BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE . bs : A . a . th-
.. THANKS 5962. ‘tt 523m Friday, ist Augush 1 fo eS ma a in the economic picture of the West —_ mre: i was ts Colonial Government >¥, ‘the perinership of pubt oe
WAKE. += The undersigned one year] St. Michael's Girls’ School, now CO. LTD. SHARES : Campbell, chairman of Booker Brothers, onnell an me pat maps ation scheme ance h private enterprise, the
ergy ee Fe! paint vacant. | *R Ree ap ee Co., in his report to shareholders. y corpor high capital cost will discourage
who attended the Funeral of his ttors| 2. Any Vi Scholarship at the TRADING ©O. LTD. SHARES: ’ : + 7 which appears to have Limit«d
estry p at ; é f the West India from -
wife Margaret Wakeham, which ‘Outer dame Sictaret which, tnaw | eoome 3 ST. GEORGE'S PARISH y. Campbell, who is also chairman of t es essful possibilitie . competent hotel men ven
place at 3 p.m, on Thursday, } D. Harvey vacant during the school ye 4 5 " i had gi t the — turing into this highly specialised
July at the Westbury Cemetery, Also of Commerce.| Candidates must be the daughters of} # & TOBAGO «| Committee, repeated the warning he had given a future is the growing of ramie, 62345
Soa ar tk ae ce ee 46.1-52"n | parithloners: th atratened circumstances recent annual peaeral meeting of that Committee that the| a cotton substitute. This is run
Agnes Mod in ay other way express- ft must Tif be less than 9 years nor |, a & TOBAGO 4% between Canada and the West Tndies is highly efficiently by an Ameri- Ramie Estate
A. H. V. Wakeham (Captain) A Dual RG, SAL, TH. | September, 1084 to be proved by & Bap: ei mentioned shares will be at tees A EN TONES SEINE SEBO: a ddibeaine thick wet valle to
7. Mee wala at Pub a : : s 3
=e Sena saaneGaneidiion y ietet tee; 25th > ack ertheless, and petiy sonfi.| _ “In all, the corporation approved the British Honduras stock farm
,

—



: pany the application. Sen ‘July, 1952 at 2 p.m. at

. Taaxe X—88 Forms of application will be i d & Sealy, Lucas Street,

ANNOUNCEMENTS Wil sel fee sell for , ipoughe and received Reine Vestry Clerk's tice wh. 21.7.52—3n,
hoe — 3359.

nomic ee - Gent in the prospects of our sugar | ‘be investment in British Hondu~ or banana schemes, but ft mentions
ny than result failure



owne: wee: hours pec third the development of the 1,500-
s bo jah of 19 sem. 804032)" “The undersigned will offer for sale to appreciate the value of the Undertakings for the next two or oe a ben" eeeae 3 acre ramie estate, of which’ 250
BICYCLE—Hereules l@ Was wor 16.7.52—t.f.n E. C. REDMAN, at their office, No. 17, High Street, c dian market for sugar,” ne three years.” Rébead oo tates the “wealth acres have so far been planted.
by ticket No. 156, Mr. C. ©. Clarke Clerk, St. Michael's Vestry. | Bridgetown, on Friday, ‘the 25th July }C@nadlan tg Turnin: to the company’s The whol tion is ed
of Black Rock 7.52-2n eens, t 1198%, at 2 p.m repeated, & uo ind raising the morale of the Col- le expect:

(a from So msissNb A ali as einiaie EE TRO OR | OS dwellinghouse calted “VENTNOR” Campbell, making his first shopkeeping activities, Mr. Camp-} .,. successive failures are hav- to be in ion in 1956, it says.
: ot goat BONNY Sy. qeiting Rests : citroen Dodge |" MERCHANDISE MARKS ACT, i949 | with the land whereon the same starlet oocyte as ehairman of Booker Pel pacrenre : “The pandard end ing the Feverst effect.” “Present plans are ito duce

fusion spare time. Aa supp a ‘OTICH HEREB VEN ainin: a asurer 4, S$, § i‘

_ of today, — 4.7.52—6n ; Son Ms tase] SONI RAT Ee ENC ot ita, net lsquare’ geet” of thereabouts ‘situate’ wtf Brothers; explained “what — such" QUaut..of our premises... stac dried ‘China grass’ bons

, ‘ondition . West Fifth Street, City of ‘Los Angeles, | the Corner of Pine Road and Ist Avenue,

» salesmanship and display are ‘ adds, “but peceseainy develop-
companies as. Booker Brothers jow second to none.in the Brit-| Projects ments in the United States and

6,
; ber Calitorn | Belleville.
24.7.52—3n. | State of California, U.S.A., intend to | Belleville mean to the social, economic and js; West Indies. We have much | Coincident with the publication other countries are being closely

apply to the Registrar of Trade Marks| ‘Inspection on Mondays, Wednesdays
to be

FOR RENT







* \ arrived tered. as the eproprietors. of os a oe sete me ne and oar ae of poten sae oon 4 to we prove of ae in ome sheng et Mr. monies rover ne latest ee and if any commercial
a ~———iouses SSS and @an be seen .| the Trade rk SUN ‘° in am. : ples. ey form an essen in Britis! Uliana because throug) ssue of the corporation’s quarter- de- process emerges,
ie Dial 4616. .52—6n. ete ts pore Pe pian ctmbsbinor nla of niclaee pareuare and conditions of the ture of the Common- them we are not only supplying }\y magazine, “Colonial Develop- plant may set up on the aolete
» .. Attractive seaside Flat main road Her 1961 OXFORD SALOON, done} without the soodwill of the business in . ee ie wealth, he said. the needs of the people, but rais-} ment,” refers bri to some of to turn out , filasse for .*
: tings, comfortably furnished, Engl, |only 2,700 les as mew. Owner/the goods in question, dated 26th May, * ing all standards throughout thc | the projects in B: Honduras. spinning factories. om} .P.
Benger ie pe lax coat ee Se ea | Paming Comera- | Soe igttea wil sfleciiox sala Bt No Commonwealth Colony and indeed the Caribbean —$—$———$—$—_———
Telephone 2040. “ tee “|said, the teaintered proprietors of the { their Office No. 17 High Street, on Friday

“Without them,” he deciared, oane; ‘ *
“there could have been, and there ,,,_ Freight Ratvien niet
could be, no Colonial economic The Booker Line, which a:

NEW

5 you know provides British Gui-
development — thus no = hy r ana with a valuable freight and MONTREAL, AUSTRALI~,

ONE two truck mark the 25th July 1952 at 2 p.m., by public

w aL ae Cas. Welephone 4a, Any person having any objection to competition, the Dwellinghouse known

D. V. Seott & Co., Ltd. such application or subsequent registra. |S “Edenvilie” standing on 2964 sas

§ 26.6,52—t.f.n. | tion of such assignment shall give nojice | feet of land at George Street, Belleville,

- thereof to the Registrar of Trade Marks, arate atawioe pane ce, p CORES “s x

truek ¥. But) tow he baa vy, dr i’ : LIMITED.
able offer a A me "Co. bond “aay ot Ath ust 52. 2 hefore ‘he | bedrooms, (one with running water), Cc n- Passenger service to and from TEENS LN)

4 3.1.60—t.1,0 SONY Go wikis NC kitchen, toflet and bath. Electric light}could, in fact, be no Commo: Liverpool, like most British ship-

- ——— Pert Cottle, Catford & Co.,}and running -water. wealth.” ing companies carried good car-| 8.8. “GLOUCESTER” ts scheduled to The A/V CARED wil scuert

ELECTRICAL Agents | |,Inspectian on application to Mr.. The value of this year’s sugar eoee eee etree earativels | veil from Port Pirie May dist, rt] @® cargo and passengers for Dominica,

%,7.52—1n. | H. A. M. Lashley by phoning t crop, apart from rum and high freight tags It tras ‘thus ine Sth, Melbourne June 14th, Sydney Antigua, St. Kitts, Nevis and

ct
‘ aie an ve orcas phon
ric oor ‘olisher ee
4748. 25.7. ~

on
LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

Malt Liquors, &c.. at. a wall







-

political development.

UE
i
é
a

ea LER eC ad For further particulars and conditions
TWO (2) New Electric Floor, Polishers.



known os “Bowden Guest House” Hast-














































































































woe une 24th, Brisbane July 5th, arriving at Montserrat. Sailing on the 22nd
j ot sale apply to:— molasses should be over £6,000,- able to earn good profits. ‘arbados about August 6th. July 1952.

Breet iat, Wt eae tse PPE ae 448 abiding TAKE NOTICE COTTLE CATFORD ee coors, | 000, Mr. Campbell continued, but “Throughout the year and since} In addition to general cargo this vessel SV BEGNEEIA. will scomh.uptas
ae Miegiateets Dee MECHANICAL ANGLIA 11.7.52—8n. }payment for it will inevitably be the beginning of this year, how-| }a* ample pproee for chilled and hard} ® ong passengers, for | Dominica,
strate, » AY. oan enrmnieet i vagaries eet ‘ Antigua, .. Kitts, Nevis an

uw Sa, Q..K, JOHNSON, ee 2 roods of land at Charnocks, Christ Sresuise behieson- fp dread oun’ vere ip re a Corgo accepted on through Bills of Montserrat, Sailing on the Mth

duction and transport. tinuously risen while freights ar
Applicant CYSEES Limited number of Gents) phat FORD MOTOR COMPANY LiMi-|Chureh, on the public road facing en- | Produc , : sy Bhits Src}. cding for transhipment at Trinidad tof & July 1952.
NB —This application will ba consis -} Weles $60.00 each, K. J, Hamel-Smith &| pep, q British, Company, Manufacturers, | trance to Seawell Airport The company’s sugar under- tending to fall. We cannot there- | sntich Guiana, Leeward and Windward
eted at a Licensing Court to be held »t]©% Ltd. Bridge Street, | whose trade or business address is %8,| 33,560 square feet of land facing Las}takings did well in 1951, thanks fore count on a repetition of 1951 | vianas.
Police Court, District ‘A’ on ‘Tuescia j %.7.52~6] Regent Street, Londow, \W.1, fingland, | Palhas at Rockley, Christ Church. . results > B.W.. SCHOONER OWNERS’
the day'of August, 1952 at 11 o'clow! — has applied for the regiy..ntion of «| 4,642 square feet of land at corner off 10 good autumn weather, good Sere aad ae a oo } Hor further particulars apply— ASSOCIATION (INC.)
.™. 5 —Somplete range | trade mark in Part “A” of Register in | Crumpton & Constitution Streets, Bridge }managemen e wor e y 0 - | °ORNESS WITHY & ee ee Consigneer
a FILING _SYSTEMS—Complet. rs ge t, fin k th “In British Guiana, our ship CO., LED.
_ KA. McLEOD, | fihannon filing and card systems: for| respect of motor lind vehicles and. their | town. company’s labourers and improv- Ping interests had a rather better TRINIDAD. ‘Tele. whe te 4047
Police Magistrate, Dist. A ase opis, or business. Supplies 4 parts; engines and patts thereof, and All the above land are excellent build- ed effici in the field The year than in 1950, but result: ané }
Piel: S42: | in amet sdiemme Your requlteenenss or] Wat, PO waHied 14 egiates, the, samoling alee. | tit) iter de ipl nay: “Froup of sugar estates Were still disappointing. This is DA COBTA & CO. LTD, *960660609990580080 08000"
Liev Li al 5136, K. R. Hunte & Co., Ltd. | july 1952, unless some person shail in|Friday the 26th July, 1982 at our office, } roduced 157,324 tons of sugar 2,Sphere of our business which is ee ee
iQUOR CENSE NOTICE| ‘ower Broad’ street. 22.7.52—6n.| the meantime give notice in duplicate | James Street, at 2.00 p.m. Pp ¥ ns ug. still in the throes of reorganisa-
abolication of Peas) | “Guanes mowers to me at my office of @ppositionof such HUTCHINSON & BANF#EGD.Jin 1951, as against 138,772 tons tion and which ds cleerly suffer. o °
qhevloepen, of Chase \ a er ot width cut Trailer erene en eh Tears. had frags tae PP ANN aot. fspapetee ce SORE. in 1950 and it is hoped that the ing from the heritage of the past Tan Atenas
iiawie ae of a immediate delivery. Courtesy Garage. ae ated tee ‘sed. Cant Sudo 1982. 1952 crop will be even higher. and of the war. Any modes 4 saa MASA: ‘
ns Thompson .7.52—6n . ; . 1 ASR, £ 9 fen,
floor of a 2 storey board and shingle shop 0 H, WILLIAMS, AUCTION profits which can be made at s my Gne.
at Chureh Village, St, Michael, for per- peut gibt a.) = kt PRONE ie ra he Solin went the Present must be ploughed back ‘ .
mission to use sai quor ense ft Cisse . i i ‘
sata “premises, Church Village. MISCELLANEOUS NINDER THE IVORY HAMMER signing of the Commonwealth $20,.ne_ Pusiness in order that
Dated this 23rd day of July, 1982.09 {| ————————_____.... ________ TAKE NOTICE Sugar Agreement and told his y ee Guten NEW YORK SERVICE.
Tor Be 4 TALMA baa se CUSHIONS WITH IMPORTED SPRING- wea ace mel eh - as possible. a
0 ‘ate, et. = Ae!. FILLED UNITS — tic, y instructions receive rom eps eholders; STEAMER sails June—arrives Barb i
oe ets t [Wil bes ate ist Covert 38.09 each That FORD ae amar. | lactar’ Bue Co. Nelson Btrtet ox fridae. fn 2 Will Not protect the high- More Rum Soid cori iia
plicar so! s not less than 4. a -{Motor Bus Co., Nelson Street on Friday, a : a 7
N.B.—This application will be ponpeds Apply;—The Standard Agency (B'dor) | THD, a British C mony, Manufacturers, ; July 25th (1) 1947-10 H.P. Austin Van, |COSt producer. On the contrary, it Although United Rum Mer- 4 ORLEANS SERVICE.
gre at a Lie coe to be reach at]Co., 14, Swan Street. Dial 7. ‘ a, ee or seuanieds fiedress i ae, | (Domaced in, Becidént) Also we coder. offwill by its very mature impose chants, Ltd., sold 50 per cent, The S/S “THEMISTOCLES” sails 6th June—arrives Barbados 2ist June.
“elice ict “AY on esdas = y 52 e ndon, + En .| the British Council (1) 19 us ‘ar, i 7 z s °
_ the Sth dey uguat, 1952 at 11 o’eloc! SER Cara TRS eee ae ngouied * soe pemeeaon Or # Ragin pore ct working order ‘Verme ae need fos Seaton prices ae eee padi tees A STEAMER sails 19th June—arrives Barbados Sth July.
am LIAN ERED SPUN:-~ Crease | trade mark in Part “A” o: egiater i ‘ash. Sale at 2 p.m, onl. tab. e U ’ e a
een Shabu: Westetiog | in: Rivahtndive 0 ming de- pesbect Gi motte Hand vesicles and thes: VINCENT Gruretri, sufficient to stimulate the flow of Owing to the continued steep rise eT eeeee uci care a hae cr eee
ce ate, st. ‘A’. [signs nehe; ide usually $1.86 d,| parts; engines and parts thereof, an uctionser, i i
24.1.52-in. [now reduced to $1.49 yard ut Kirpalani, | Will be eniiited to register. the sang 20.7. 52-4. | Sterling sugar which this country ditt < ever ph CANADIAN SERVICE
: —-+ }5% Swan Street. 24.7.52—in oe Sm) ee Se ee ae ot aC TURpe tande: we have, — anens intig a al SOUTHBOUND
. + empmameeainia? ‘u @: 80) person a a tha this solic
e LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE JUST received a shipment of Garrari| the meantime give notice in duplicate UNDER THE SILVER a ie Sot ee cites much less Pure Biot fet 1951 + roe, = Arrives Bardados
° - Thesappliestion of Kihel Green, shop- tixeo seas Casngers , seeure one now. co sat ee — Tee ec HAMMER in the past have inhibited full although more than to the same | s/s “saruo” teen “Seth July 15th
keeper of Baxters Rd., holder of liquor 0 8 Quantity of 6 volt battery . : Thursday Sist. Mr. Fred Bennett's date in 1950. Reducti - ene ia os ve és a dun duly: utp
< license No. 458 of 1962 granted to her} Tecord Players. Beth the above with| seen op application at my office, Gale, The Cottage. um Distilleries,f production have been swept eangied.. with:at wcsian in rr Taly ath Auuguat. 11th
in respect of a wooden at Baxters | â„¢%4 eC B. , jack Rock. b. mcreasing costs,
* Road, Clty. for ‘permission to. use sac DaCOSTA & CO. LTD., Reaistiar ae WaAUS.. | BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.,| 4i0e our objective is to pro- may produce very slender profits eT mee ere
+ liquos at a board and shingle shop tT tee 23.7.52—8n Auctioneers ge of for United Rum Merchants in| sournpounp
wi a aac es rn Jus, se EMS Ta — 2%,7.52—1n. wre lon de from the Seen 1952,” ‘A STEAMER” hh Geto ai ane DUE BARBADOS: &
ini this ly, 2 Taoew ta the Deily : nee enn henry ee eNO nn are nae acreage tim’ Bi ; “ A August 9th for ST. JOHN, N.B. and
Police Mugisirate, Dist, 0. pape nob, Rogiand’s leaging Dally News-| | TAKE NOTICE | “ONDER Tie SiLVER at the Icast cost. By Feagh- sand high date ene money St LAWRENCE RIVER PORTS
Srp le Landed Gis etic. [Eanion. “Cage habe hee PILOT ig TiN A NE Nice ot wef future promberity of the sugar “Yin consuanantitl, Mequeton, 3s ee
~ NB applic will be conic . , a c ‘uesday 2 y Order of the e consumption of all spirits i 4
sued at a Licensing Court to be held. [cate Ce, Id Local Representative | oan, ‘Sritian Company: Mamsiectings, (executors to. the Estate of ‘Mrs. Rosie} industry of British Guiana and Britain, there is litile evidence ROBERT THOM LID.— NEW YORK & GULF SERVICE
ice Court, trict “AY on Tuesdoy . 4.52—-t.f, whose trade or business address is 88. “The ee, wee oe eS VFECUTS at thus of the Colony be assured.” f i
6 y a ‘clock, - , Midget”, Palm Beach, Hastings, y . of a reduction in the demand Zz .
oe eee aod,» [x RONG GET CA fey nina, boart| Noo het Yon ia tag mua | lnshuaag, ne Nene But next year, sald Mr, Camp- for rum as against other spints.| Abbi DA COSTA & CO. LED. CANADIAN SERVICE
+ E. A, MeLEOD, ~ pan jo-cor sets, subject to special | + a4 mark in Part “A” of Register in| ound Tip Top Dining Table, Upright) bell, will have its full share of The company’s share of the 7 :
™ Police Magistrate, Disty “a.” }xoddingas allowance. Barnes | respect of motor land: vehicles and their | Chi?s., Book Lovely. “Chetanioe ining, commercial problems for the total rum consumed in the} “#SOS0S6es9sse0e0s ‘ S
og aioren ~ - mene | PATH, engines and parts thereof, anc! With Brass: Liquor Case, Flat ‘Top Desk | COMpany, Tt is not yet ‘known . United Kingdom has actually | > ITY
7 $02.50 POCKET MONEY easily earned | Siu, Re entitled to register the same | 1 aays Writing ‘Table and. Desks Oma-|-what prices it will receive for its increased, which speaks highly | < FOR BEST QUAL a4
THE GAS COOKER Reoireusiow ae FP Pa ai 4 ae ain unless some Defaoe shail un ecart wanes meee: Se AP cot free sugar, rum and molasses. for the seeopananin of the ¢ ENAMELWARE
ae 1.7,62—6n, moantime give, notice. in dupleate | rabies; Settee and Uphols, Rocker, in| company, said Mr, Campbell, | % a
With Everything U Want < J Logatiaton hee fagee mage Cietee | OK, Glass & China, Dinner. and ea | Bulk Rum Mr." Campbell “reported a net|
i a ‘ . REDFFUSION offers $1.50 cash for} oe) ‘ors application at my office. "| Services, Very Handsome Military Chest, ‘We must expect the world profit for the company ot] ¢
ee sin ao new Subscriber pUnCeuentEre a. a Dated this 3rd day of July 1952. ee een ee ee ree eS aes for sugar to be low, the £660,677 in the year ending}? Shop at
tf z 4 : 4. ; H, WILLIAMS, nt ; ; mani ‘
1% | T2ERostane. commons” -$)y SEGRE FOUR wicome s. Pietint ct Hinde Miche, |Eit, reek, Mee rytereee 5 Bee aad eae tage aieeeity’ bea en Fee te La Sr THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM
it and it's eagy’ to. p clean. secommending REDIFFUSION. Obtain ———. | {nree Wing Mahog. Press. Sewing | avalanche in the price of molas- Total net assets of the group in
it See them before: too late. ‘ull particulars from the REDIFFUSION Machine, Mirrors, Linen, Ping Pong Set. | be, ; Pp x
' AA\ ‘your -Giak, Biiglwrbom, Bay fice 17.526, |Books, Electric Fan; Larders, 2 Burn |S@S8, Which we shall begin to feel creased during the year from Corner Broad and Tudor Sts.
i@ 7 Buse rine eee lin i eae TAKE NOTICE Elec. ‘Hot Plate, G.E-C. Refrigerator.) m the second half of this year,” £4,891,650 to £5,614,523,
i >) ONLY A FEW LEFT. . ety wae DOLLARS extra Bonu 2 Burner Oil Stoves and Oven; Kitchen he said. —B.U.P.
ij Re Pa a ¢ | trom n for 25 recommende- CONSUL. | Utensils and Tables, Scales, Anthurium | * :
| Gasee | “ions in one calendar month. That FORD MO COMPANY Lii-/nd Amaysilis, Lillies and numerous
| Beroos GS 1,7,52—@n. | TED, a British Company, Manufacturers, ; other ssemma of vale Ef wares = 6s e R Pr 69 S 655.59SS6S99SSS6SSSSS9SSSSSS95S6SS9
| rave ———-—---—" wher aden or business addres a8 | Gain Antiaye tad etern. Sale 12 6 Ya ye .C. Failures In B.H.
: jon, ai, ngiand, a ° 2
3 FURNISHING ? WANESD | | paar tees asda ee phen Ip Effi: x Iv IS A FACT
if respect of motor land vehicles and their | 759-2 , Sf x
\% you sHounp MOVE LIKE A parts; engines and parts thereof, anc! 24,7. 89-2n | ut Ramiz Plan Is tctent ¥
i HURRICANE 79 CET THESE HELP hah mph ih lle ete ha AF ee - % CAN YOU IMAGINE a complete STONE BUNGALOW with a
f s %
i THINGS. mtr ee TOR eal some person shalt in | | LONDON. s> Galvanize Roof and Pine Floor at Black Rock, near Carlton, for
Hu Pareaus Ba ub) | Simfions u fra ork, ae Pei niet and bt ° 2a, yA bee oe ty up cate | FOUR FAILURES of Colonial Development Corp- % £2,400? It has Drawing and Dining Rooms, 3 Bedrooms,
‘ othe , » . eesman, 5 | i . 4 ¥
NB Coit‘and Fiat Springs $6 up, Pil: YY Street. at, 7, 09—h | eget onniomes cena paacio® sack ait be, oration schemes in British Honduras are listed by the] % Toilet and Bath, Kitchenette and a Basement with the same
+ lows $1.50, Laths, Cradles, prer.e9 a R for Harrisons Plantation, | Dated this $rd.day of July-190n | London Daily Telegraph in a report from its special corre-| % amount of space as upstairs including Toilet and Bath. Make
ih DINING and other Tables ‘in St. Luey. Apply Manager. thabeibas: od A spondent, T. S. Steele, who has been making a tour of % an Appointment with D’ARCY A, SCOTT, Middle Street,
11% Beautifully Polished Mahogany, xP, 6a 23.7.52—3n the British Caribbean %
i@ Cedar, Birch or sanded Deal, Bie | e Dr a . >) and overlook it.
| Larders $11 up, Waggons, Liquor Old reliable Company established i The Corporation’s stock farms was aimed at. Last year there} 24.7.52,—8n.
1)G) Cases $5.50. China Cabinets. Trinidad for many years requires thie TAKE NOTICE huve already been closed. The big was a loss of £20,000. This]
11% . PIANOS, Go.Cart, Prams Types B] iiihmecy ho Competent and experiences! Cc ‘banana growing scheme at Stann month it is hoped to ship 20,000] ) #¢¢9* 9OOSS SOSSSS
Rha $120 iy, Me es Boxes & potabliehea in Barbados end Septembes ZEPHYR In Carlisle Bay Creek is likely to be closed also. stems, says Mr. Steele, but he PLES LLLLE SDDS
iS gu. lls oe PR EO The Fort George Hotel in Belize adds: .“This and any foresce-
} . ‘nlary © required with small es That FORD MOTOR“COMPANY LEMI-| Schooner Lady Noéleen, Schooner is another expensive failure, the able production on this lanc
x ieture to Advocate Box G.T. ‘| RD, a British Company, Manufacturers, | Mary_ BE. Caroline, Schooner Gardenia !?5 vould el lin, : Oo A
rote Advocate Co. 19.7,52—10. | whose trade or business address is 88,|W., Schooner Emeline, Schooner Fran-;Paper says, and the Corporation would merely mean piling ur

has failed to help = Colony meet further Pine weil

its sugar quota under the Com- ilot eme ? : TRE

rmonwealth Sugar Agreement, He criticises the corporation for NO. 27, BROAD S ET
Mr. Steele, reporting from Be- not attempting a pilot scheme to
-said_that the 12 houses-ereet-—find-out whether-bananas could be

ed for the staff at the Iguama grown successfully on a large

Creek stock farm are standing scale. Had local guidance been The undersigned will offer for sale at their Office, No. 17,

Salesman required — preferably one of
wuch experiehce — Gootl Salary, Must
“© prepared to work hard as good pros-~
yects ahead of selected applicant

Applications treated in strict confidence.
‘ull and Son. Dial 2468

EL. S. WILSON |

oo SPRY RTRERT. DIAL 4000

has applied the registration of a/|â„¢M.V. Caribbee, Schooner Mary M, Lewis,
trade mark, in Part “A’ of Register in Schooner Zita Wé>nita, Schooner Burma
espect of motor land vehicles and their |D., Schooner Enterprise §8., Schooner
parts; engines and parts thereof, and {Confident I. G,, Schooner Rainbow M.,
will ba entitled to register the same Schooner Sunlight, Schooner Cyril BE.
atter one m@nth from: the 28rd day of |Smith, Schooner Triumphant Etar, MV.
ae 1952, ufilesg someé person shall in| Clara, M.V. Daerwood, S.S. Sunwhit,







|) 9099059915009 585900"

BIG WELCOME MERTING

‘Unider the Auspices
& of





ie fizaat, London, W.1, England,|ces W. Smith Schooner Lady Joan,
or



he meantine tar oes, in Pup aie Schooner Mandalay IU, L.M.S. Manuy,

to me at myc opposition

such Gulf Barge No 2, Tug Willett, Schooner

oe RUST i R t empty. Farm and storage build- asked, he says, the cor ition High Street, Bridgetown, on Friday the 25th July, 1952, at
PERSONAL Mean ak enidatndat ease ei hi MN are ote ings have been abandoned in would have learned that, while |}}} 2.30 p.m. ; : ;
R Dated this'3x@ dayrof July 1952, SS. Planter, 3,616 tons, Capt. Rovert-} Various stages of completion. the land could and does success-







\ H. WILLIAMS, sun, | tr Dominica, Agents; Messrs,} Vehicles, not i i full ‘Ow it
The public are hereby warned ca Régivtrar of Trade arks. Daosta & Co. Ltd.” ee a Db. use -sinve teep y gr grapefru ahd erence,

THE MESSUAGE OR STORE known as No. 27, Broad
year, were made road-worthy no one has been successful with

CNenceare I pctatat te € ho ik 23.7.82—3n | Schooner Mahdalay II, 30 tons, Capt. Street, Bridgetown, standing on 4,340 square feet or there-

to
whomsoever ih














‘ This is a magnificent building with
had been cut, a floating bridge 33 rooms and will cost
k , some
TAKE NOTICE js bin‘on'a5in duty, toss, Ordinary Mail Seawell ead Ce peat aad
THAMES at 830 am. on 26th July, 1952. axe oe Se Widen.

aseonetelotpeedin
That FORD MOTOR COMPANY LUMI RATES Or EXCHANGE nA Callenter, 2

13.7.52—Tn.

|
whomeoever i my engrae “ae © Bo pt |: ___ ae —— | ntitehett,"’¢rorn " “St Vincent, ‘Agents. | for the drive to Belize. anytiing eo small pines of abouts and at present occupied by Messrs. T. R. Evans.
, . reas zi hm ” + ‘ghooner, Owners’ Association. ananas ‘own on a scale whic *
, WORKERS tracting ang ight or La AR napie MAIL NOTICE sa Synwhit.. xe tons, ant: Floating Bridge would not interest the corpor; tion. Inspection on application on the premises.
1QN (Sed) W MA PRESCOD, ; : fantations Ltd. “| ©The project cost the corpora- ae ag eee. lik + to , For further particulars and conditions of sale, apply to: —
and the Ph nee Mails for St, Lucia, St. John N.B., pn EE ter weed, 38 ai Capt. Neilson, }iion over £80,000,” said Mr. Steele, ©° aa vo fh ais , m
r 247,522. | Montreal by the $.S, “Canadian ‘Gon-| {0 St Lucia, Agents: Schooner Own- “As well as the buildin: as be the Fort George Hotel at 2.
Pr ctping tial SS: }structor. will be closed at the General} °F Association. i. 8, Toa COTTLE, CATFORD & CO.
BARBADOS “LABOUR Post Office as under :— |

7 £200,000, about double the o =
sarough, the property and 600 21 estimated cost, Already it has
Ei iy whens expensively clear- been decided to write off £75,000

in ‘honour of





pata eT oan « = em
ot ate Os
Pa Alpina it Rannt et ee

of this capital investment and then
See ea A. Callender, J. Carter, L. Butler, K “But

- 3 THD, a British Company, Manufacturers, Qard JULY, 1952 Maynard, & Jones, D. Burke, C. Pickers ainte tn cae wok - to try to make the hotel pay its
: ‘MR N. W ‘MANLRY Whose trade or business address is '{i8, NEW YORK ing, S. Haynes, J.” Hassell, H. Ward, B. | cap’ = way. F
i o tte Tie Regent Street, London, W.1, England. }73 2/10% Pr, Cheques on Butler, L, Sorhaind, R. Hall, G. Bagot, |Vestment, for future production “The Colony needed a hotel, but a
| ane, Pl Hed for the reqistrat of (3 { ; eer te ag f/* Pr +f King, N. Torres, r Hauck, M. Hawk, and even more serious in the not on this scale. And, it is asked,

t vat rk in Part “A” o: : or De M. Hauek, M. uck, EB auck. : %,
{ Q.c., MAR. fespect of moter and vehicles aad thes ; ‘os aosatie 71 3/10% Pr, , DEPARTURES — BY BWIA morale of the people. Attempts why has the hotel manager spent WE HAVE

yarts; engines and parts thereof; and }73 2/1 . ‘al for TRIN
Labour Leader, “ter one’ month fsout the ard day e | Cottons gp SADE Br Loose’ D.” Ruse Re 'Delasatce’ Fe foe aees Goverment.and by pri- the corporation payroll, living in a
. ite x y 1/10% P, z fe i bust, plabas . ; ; ‘
} Jamaica uly 1958, unless some person shail,"in 150% Pr. Silver 20% Pr.] Kripacz, W. Clark, E. Greli, N. Cramer, | vate @nterprise to ‘save something corporation house, before the hotel] {# © SHOVELS
i on the meantime give notice in duplidate CANADA . |G Machman, H. O'Callahan, C. O'ca)’ [from the wreck, but so far noth- can hope to open? There is the
; f to me at my office of opposition of sueh |73 5/10% Pr. Cheques on lahan, J. Fulton, H. Ascough, 1 | ing has come from them.” prospect that this will have lasted 2 AGRICULTURAL FORKS
i egistration, The trade mark can be Bankers 76 2/10% Pr Deacon, A. Martin, J. McClean, R Now it is feared that the a year before the hotel opens.”

Sunday, 27th duly 1952 eon on application at my office. Demand Drafts 76.55% Pr.] McCormick, W, Thomas, Christe God- Stann Creek banana a Export Quot

: At 8.30 Dated this 3rd day of July 1982. i Sight Drafts 16 4/10% Pr.J irey, Francis Pau, eae scheme, P a e SICKLES
t 8.30 p.m. H, WILLIAMS, —|78 5/10% Pr. Cable For ST, LUCIA ; which has an authorised capitai Mr, Steele points out that the

Registrar of Trade Warky $77% Pr, Currency ) alone Be M. Taylor, A. Tay tor, rs - resins im of £432,000, may be closed. An Colony has been awarded an ex- ®
fe BT 9 7 1% Be ci 4 ackman, G. > 2. ST
f At j50% Pr, shee? rae, Pr Siiee : yon Scriven, Joseph Tudor. export of 1,000,000 stems of port quota of 25,000 tons of sugar PICK AXES

bananas to Britain every year a year. Production at present is



_ QUEEN’S, PARK





° HOES
® WHEEL BARROWS

ROPE IN ALL SIZES
“OLTS IN ALL SIZES

see

Gucst Speaker - - =

ooMr. N.. W.. MANLEY,
Q.Céy) MALRA |
Other Speakers - -'-

Mr. G. H. ADAMS,
C.M.Gi,, M.C.P.

Mr. T. A. MARRY=-
SHOW? MLC
Grenada.

TO-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

All. subscribers to TIME and





LIFE Magazines who wish to
renew their subscriptions, should
send us their RENEWAL NOTICES
®o as to avoid having to pay the
new advance rate demanded by
Publishers.

have been made by the British months already in the Colony on



BEST QUALITY BRASS
}

BUY

PRODUCTS GENERAL HARDWARE SUPPLIES

and
HARDWARE



‘
4 i
JOHNSON’S STATIONERY |

ARE CTT NE TT
i RICKETT STREET (Opposite Post Office) "PHONE 4918

| GOOD CARE COUNTS .... SO
|
|

SOOGS 5565654 SOOO:








THURSDAY, JULY 24, 1952 BARBADOS ADVOCATE



PAGE SEVEN

Tf you are
embarrassed
with
flatulence...

Flatulence, heartburn and other indi-
gestion discomforts after eating are
often signs of over acid stomach, Put
things right in double quick time with
*‘Dolsa’ Stomach Powder, It settles
your stomach, rapidly neutralizing
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Dolsa

RESTORES DIGESTION

‘The balance of acidity in your stomach can be
upset by rich or acid producing foods, or by worry,
overwork and nervous strain. Then Dolsa is
needed to spread its gentle, soothing solution over
the inflamed acid producing glands and to restore
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gastric juices exsential for digestion, Each individ-
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packed, is accurately measured for its job, Take
one alter meals, repeat the dose tater if discomfort
is still felt, When pain persists, do see your doctor,





me CARE YOUR BUILDINGS!!
REPLACEMENTS COST £'s

Corrosion costs you , FE: Pa year

} H/ O you know the amount of

Corrugated Iron imperted inti
tropical countries every viar ?

e figure is astonish: ngiy high, and
after allowing for new Works the
balance represents a heavy forfeit for
lack of taking proper precautions

Protection is easy with



HENRY


































Rec



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for every INCH of metal.
FERROGENE is an anti-corrosive

paint designed for the tropics. It clings
closely tc the surtace of metal-work, forming
a damp-proof, air-proo! skin which preserves
its life Llmost indefinitely, Jn three attractiv:
shades :— Red, Grey avd Cieen

Manufacturers: BURRELL'S PAINTS, Mitcham, Surrey
(Props.: R, J. HAMBR & SONS (Paints)
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Also makers of - -
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Enamel


































BY CHIC ‘OUNG “ty re eit Ol Bound Washable -sS es
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A.S. BRYDEN & SONS oareavos L TD. | a
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IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE

















SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Thursday to Saturday only —













LZ

Y MARLAS KEEP THAT
ENGINE RUNNING ¢
IL BE RIGHT BACK:

...GOTTA MELT A
BIT OF THIS ICE
RAMP... THERE /





eee EEE
SPECIAL OFFERS are now atalelle at our ‘Hranches White Park,
Tweedside, Speightstown and Swan Street

Usually Now MARMALADE — 8Ib Tins siguieanisnand SEO
OLD ENGLISH MARMALADE Vitiligo
GLORIA EVAPORATED MILK—1I1b Tins 30. 28e. FIG JAM — 2% Tins : Ti Peat Sec aa
i et ten MELON-GINGER JAM — 2b Tins
MEAT LUNCH ................ aieTeRre nes ean yN . 4e. 42c¢. PRUNES — 7% Tine
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JACOB'S CRACKER — Pkgs. ........0. 0.05 24 OWUPNEX oo, iu
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GRAPE FRUIT — Tins ...........0.00.65 ie 48¢, WRITING PADS Net a rc iathaaianb aioe: ae =
TS ET RDS ES ASS a



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——$——E ,
ODED G99GGO9GHHODDOPDDHO4 DDHVGYODYE DP DWDODDDDPDGD GOD OO DTD H OOF



Announcement





We take pleasure in advising of our
















soe ea

Ws 60RRV-t
JUST HEARD ABOUT
YOUR WIFE LEAVING

recent appointment as DISTRIBUTORS
for the following DIESEL TRACTORS.

60 -HIS WIFE
“ LEFT HIM!
POOR FELLER -
I GUESS HEIS
VERY UNHAPPY --

THERE HE IS NOW i
AT, THE STATION! Bl + a
A Pr

" Ly T FASS TH’
ra ui 204D STATION — HE'S
SEEN HIM
SINCE HIS WIFE








WAIT AROUND THE “\
STATION HOPIN'
SHE’LL COME IN!





ca — f

I JUST LIKE ony
SEE THE TRAING
COME IN- IT MAKES
ME HAPPY KNOWIN’
° ‘ SHE'S NOT .






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tor. This Field. Marshall means economy of operation—simple
and rugged design— easy maintenance. The engine at 750 r.p.m.
gives 40 B.H.P.



2. DAVID BROWNE CROPMASTER:

These new Cropmaster Diesel Tractors are truly remarkable
erg ay eee MANGLER, YOU KNOW
VONE ! se GUE T i
THE STAR OF OUR FLOOR THEY OOOKED fom. NA aT | Lee eat THE OASIS! ME OUTFIT THAT OWNG

TH s |
SHOW | NOW NEXT WEEK ? CAN'T BEAT IT... SIMPLE, AIN'T ITF BEGGING FOR A HOLE

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2
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FOR FURTHER PARTICULARS APPLY CITY GARAGE.

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pleased to give demonstrations and fuller details on any of the

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PAGE EIGHT

Four Reeords Broken On Fourth



Dillard Wins Hurdles:
Bailey Beaten Again

Mr. T. A. D. Gale, Advertising Manager of the Advocate,
is at present in Helsinki covering the Olympic Games.

LONDON, July 23.

TODAY was a day of records as field and track events

at the XVth Olympiad entered their fourth day.

No less

than four were broken among which were two New World
marks while two other Olympic records were equalled.
It started off when Harrison Dillard strode on to the

track for the first heat in the
his field with ridiculous ease
to equal the Olympic mark

Soon after that Adhemar Fer-
reira Da Silva ran up to the take
off board for the hop, step and
jump and in his first try he was
only five centimetres off the re-
cord. This was a signal of what
was to come and presently he be-
gan to lower not only the Olym-
pic mark, but the world record
with such regularity that
wondered where he was going (0
stop. He must have been
best form, for in
jumps he broke the world record
four times.

one

Speaking in‘ metres, he did
16.12 in his second jump 16.09
in his fourth and 16.22 in his
fifth. In his last he did 16.05.
Incidentally the old record was
16.01 metres which he himself

set up only last year. Being j))

terpreted in feet his new record
is now approximately 53ft. 2.4
inches.

Second in this event was |
Leonnid Scherbakev of the
USS.R. and third Arnoldo Dey-

onish of Venezuela who I believe
has relatives in Barbados

Javelin Next

Next récord to go was the
Olympic Javelin Record. C. Y,
Young of the U.S.A. after trail-
ing behind his team-mate Bill

Miller and the Finn Hyytiainea
and the Russian Zilbulenke, made
a mighty heave in his second
throw to win the event and set

anew mark of 242ft. and one
quarter inch. They eventually
finished in this order—the U.S.A.
once again taking first = and

second place.

Then came a round of further
record beating as no less thar
eight men in the 3,000 metres
steeplechase heats beat the old
mark of 9 minutes 3.8 sec. Even-
tually the best mark was made
in the third heat by H. Ashen-
felter of the U.S.A., but the
second heat won by John Disley

LAST





Fine weather and a fast but
springy track produced a morning
of most interesting work. With
Jess than three weeks left to Races
trainers did not hesitate to send
their charges along. As a result
some #mpressive times were ob-
tained and for the first time there
were some definite indications of
form.

In reporting the gallops I shall
try to group them according to
Classification. To start with, here
is a summary of the work done by

The Derby Candidates

All seven of these were out and
with the exception of March
Winds who was confined to a slow-
ly worked five furlongs and Car-
dinal, all were sent from box to
box. The best time for this trip
was returned, somewhat surpris-
ingly, by Rambler Rose who, with
Watercress as her companion came
back in 1,25 (the last five in
1.08). Definitely an impressive
effort for this filly even though she
could not have had a great deal
in reserve. Seedling took only $
of a second longer to cover the
same distance but he too was not
allowed to loiter, Favourite Bright
Light jumped off rather sluggishly
behind Cross Bow, but soon got on
terms and returned 1.274 for the
trip without ever being under
severe pressure, Dunkirk, who has
had one or two set backs and is
not looking at her best came back
in 1.28%, which is useful in the cir-
cumstances and should bring hei
on, First Admiral, who should be
fit after his Trinidad exertions
Was not asked to do a great deal,
and with Test Match as his com-
panion returned 1.32%. Cardinal
who is also recovering from a bout
of coughing, only did 5 furlongs
which he covered in 1.08,

The Two Year Olds
Easily the best gallop of the
morning as far as these youngsters
were concerned was that of the
Barnard pair Bow Tie and Faerie
Queene. They broke slowly from
the 7 but quickened over the last

| They'll

DO you_ HAVE

“TENDER ROCKS"?
I KNOW IT'S VERY
POPULARI SUPPOSE
EVERYBODY ON

YOUR LIST WANTS
TO TAKE IT
OUT





















THE LEN
COPIES

ALL OUT:
YOU CAN





wt oY
SLL

in his +
uceessive G



Do It Every Time

110 metre hurdles and leaving
coasted home in 13.9 seconds

cf Britain was the easiest of all
ith himself and the Finn Rin-

tcenpaa not knowing which
10uld lead at the finish.

Disaster

Fhe next record to be equalled
as the Men's 200 metres and in
is final MacDonald Bailey onc:
ain met with disaster, He was
into fourth place by Andy
anfield, Walter Baker and Jim
ithers, all of the U.S.A. Bailey
i not run a bad race however;
fer his time of 21 flat was his best,
Put Stanfield did 20.7 to equal the
et by Jesse Owens in 1936
Baker and Gathers’ both
eturned 20.8. This was the second
time the U.S.A. has won all three
medals in one event.

I cannot help feeling however

| caten

mark

and

hat Bailey is over trained. His
est race was the 100 metre heat
» won on Sunday. He looked
esh and keen, But since then

fter each heat he has looked very

red when he pulled up. It is pos-
sible he reached his peak several
veeks ago at the White City.

Fourth World Record

The tourth world record to be
set or equalled went to Shirley
Strickland of Australia. In her first
heat in the 80 metres hurdles she
equalled Mrs. Fanny Blankers
Koen’s record of 11) sees, and later
in the afternoon she came back in
the Semi-Final to take off a clear
fifth, returning the remarkable
time of 10.8. But the amazing
thing about this Semi-Final was
that both Marie Sander of Ger-
man and Jean Desforges of Britain
also bettered the world mark by
Aoing 10.9.

Not In Form

And last Mrs. Blankers Koen is
clearly not in the form she dis-
played in 1948 and although she
won her first heat she was beaten
by the Russian girl Marija Golu-





ae
.

en” *

adel the ss

“LEG BYE” Signal “BYE”

ichnaja in the Semi Final. Yes-
terday there were rumours that
she did not defend her 100 metre
title because she saw that Mar-
jorie Jackson was too good
but the true story seems to be a
ease of slight blood poisoning.
However, it is now clear ae
only women capable of standing és a is os we
wp to the Rustitns are the Aus- The “Bye” and “Leg Bye’ is
tralians and New Zealanders. In the law to be discussed today
the ladies long jump Yvette Wil- This is a very important law.
liams of New Zealand won with a

By O. 8.

leap of 20 feet 53 inches after Rus- LAW 30

sia’s manly looking Aleksandra Bye and Leg Bye
Chudina had been leading for a ‘

tong while with a jump of 20 feet If the ball, not having been

called “Wide” or “N, Ball’
ihe striker without touching his
bat or person. and any runs be
obtained the umpire shall call or
was 24 feet 10) inches. Sim Iness’ signal “Bye; but if the bail touch
throw in the discus was 180 ft. 61. any part of the Striker’s dress or
inches and the Rev. Bob Richards person except his hand, and any
Pole vaulted 14 ft. 114 inches. run be obtained, the Umpire shall

1? inches. third was Shirley Caw-
ly of Britain.

In the long jump Biffles’ leap



call or signal “Leg Bye”; such
funs to be scored “Byes” and
“Leg Byes” respectively.
WHAT’S ON TODAY
No Runs
Court of Grand Sessions— A most important M.C.C, note ;
10.00 a.m. to this law states that if the
Meeting of St. Thomas Vestry striker wilfully deflects the ball
1.00 p.m. with any part of his person, no
Water Polo, Aquatic Club— runs are scored, ‘and the batsmen
5.00 p.m. may not change ends.

Mobile Cinema, Nightengale
Home, Black Rock-——7.30 p.m.



| BASKET BALL



SATURDAY’S GALLOPS

By A Correspondent

5 which they covered in 1.274—
a rousing gallop indeed. Faerie
Queene was quicker into her stride
but the big Bow Tie had got up
to her at the finish. Sea Foam and
Meersechaum covered 5 furlongs in
1.11%, both appearing very green
and certain to improve on this
performance. Even more back-
ward is Jealousy who could do no
better than 474 seconds for three
furlongs. Apple Sam was hard
held over a slow half mile.

Classes A and B

Only two A Class horses did
fast work. They were Rebate and
Notonite and both did 5 furlongs.
Rebate, looking very stripped in-
deed, covered 5 furlongs in 1.06,
while Notonite was easy to Colom-
bus in 1.05. This last was an im-
pressive performance,

My. Gill’s Belle Surprise did
what I consider to be the best
gallop among the B Class horses.
She covered a box to box in 1.22
flat, the last 5 furlongs in 1.053.
Not far behind her was her stable
companion Sweet Rocket whose
corresponding times were 1,224
and 1.05%. Like all Mr. Gill’s
horses these two are looking par-
ticularly well. The veteran Pep-
per Wine also had a good gallop—
the box in 1,22 with the last five
in 1,06, but she may not have
been capable of a great deal more,
Mr. Walcott’s pair Flying Dragon



































COLLEGE DEFEAT
ST. STEPHEN'S BRIGADE

The Second Division basket ball
match which was played at Har-
Spear Grass), while Devil’s Sym-|rison College yesterday between
phony returned 1.302 Test Match! College and St, Stephen’s Brigade
as already noted did 1.32%. Going | ended in a win for College by a
over 5 furlongs, Darham Jane ran / large margin of 81 points to 32.
clear away from her stablemate The chief scorers for College
Dim View, and in spite of being | were Marvell, King and Robinson
pulled up at the finish returned | who scored 30, 27 and 20 respec-
the excellent time of 1.054 for the | tively, while McClean, Clarke and
trip. Aim Low and Abu Ali did| Archer scored 18, 6 and 4 respec-
the: same distance in 1.064 with |tively for their team.

Aim Low having slightly the bet- |
ter of it. A gallop of this sort re- |,
presents a distinct improvement |
in form for Abu Ali. Street Arab
took } of a second longer, while |
Magic Gaye who appears to have

felt the effects of her Trinidad. trip
did the distance in 1.08%. Dol-
drum indicated that she would be
a force to be reckoned with in the
Champion Stakes by working 10
furlongs, her time from box to box
being 1.258.

D & E Class

The gallops of Watercress
(working with Rambler Rose) and
Cross Bow (Bright Light) have
already been, noted, Colleton was
sent as “schoolmaster” to Jealousy.

F Class

Pride of place among the F's
must go to the sturdy Columbus
who did well to keep up with No-
tonite (5 in 1.05). Miracle took
only $ of a second longer to do the
same distance.. Soprano, who has
put on considerable weight,
worked with Twinkle and was

Sor
Children

























BEST DEA

in Town ,

Harry MOMENTS |
YE GIFTE SHOPPE IN
THE 3¢-A-D4aY SECTION=4
NO A TIP OF THE

y HAT TO
= LIAMS, JR, i
LYN RB, SUMMIT, AAZ fF





Al Ferguson Fabric





BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Signal “LEG BYE”

Know Your Cricket
LAWS 30 & 31

COPPIN.

Experience with the bouncin
ball has made the M-C.C. make
another ruling and it is this: If

player guards his head against
a bouncer with his hand not ac-
tually holding the bat, under thi
Law resulting runs ‘cannot be
seored as either ‘Byes’ or “Le

Pass yes.”

Although the act may be invol-
untary. tne circumstances may b«
vegarded as
terms of the first ruling which
ceals with the wilful deflectin.
of the ball.

Signals

The umpire signals ‘Bye’ oy
raising an open hand above th¢

head and “Leg Bye” by raising
leg and touching it with th
hand,

It must be borne in mind thet
the term wilfully covers the delib-
crate kicking or kneeing away .of
the ball.

R.BY.C. Lawn

Tennis Results

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Men’s Doubles
W. H. C. Knowles and D, I.
Lawless beat D. E. Worme and
H. Johnson 6—2, 6—1, 7—5,

TODAY’S FIXTURE

Men’s Doubles, Semi Final

Play begins at 4.15 p.m.

W. H, C. Knowles and D. I.
Lawless vs. L. St. Hill and J. D.
‘Trimingham. : &)



CHECK UP



of












OUR OFFERS
















THURSDAY, JULY 24, 1952



Day Of Olympics














> TA DELO Le , ;
Sports Window
: , : ° Harrison College, leaders in
sequence that is often | cits tuvsion sasker sai
” a ” fixtures will tonignt go all out
e f to defeat Y.M.P.C. and thus
; finish their season as winners
*
a cause of differences Aish thet, se
‘ Although Harrison College
{Ajith the great advances in competitive bidding technique is tied with Carlton on points,
V# and recognition of the importance of the partnership the former has a very much
factor, the take-out double is used in a number of diverse preg mag oe yp aye A
situations, some of which are far from clear-cut for players wat make tiem di =. oy
of limited experience. PCRS Sree net winners of the first division
The ftollowing sequence 1S wu >3 1093 cup.
picat source of snipe eet OAK QSB5 In additi to the H
“ doulas” west. ven: OAS College — ¥.M.P.C. match,
rth, One Diamond ; East, One & K 10 Pickwick will: play Modern
Teart ; South doubre, Is the last Unless his second double is High School.
1a penalty (business) double, ead as showing length and
a further command to North trength in Hearts, there is no
eR, te, ARIAS. MN | guy COURT, 10 a possible blufl bic a
is argue > tlie : y last, a
rave good support for Spades, a Pat whose hand could THE WEATHER
ard in Hearts. it su We ar OKQ85
onds, but nothing in Clubs
vith such a hand he would wel- Q3 REPORT
me any a by North ace oK3
atter can show a secondary 2QI39864 YESTERDAY.
© suit, rebid his Diamonds,
ad a et it he guards With West, unable to ratse a Rainfall from Codrington: .07
abs, or make a penalty pass bid, East would have every reason in.

ver One Heart doublec wilh
me strength in this suit.

North can also contend that
is Diamond response was a
eed call that promised no
yositive strength, so south can
arcely feel that he has the
veating of One Heart in his own
van

" Simple formula

Nevertheles, this case is
wered by a simple tormula
lready quoted in these notes

A double is always for penalties
if the partner has made any call
ther than a pass. The prebable
‘xplanation is that South’s hand
is something like this:



Indians Score 362 Vs.

Commonwealth Team

coming. within th’

From Our, Own Correspondent:
LONDON, July 23.
West Indians including Ken
Rickards of Jamaica are in the
Commonwealth team playing the
Indians at Blackpool. The Indians

batting first made a poor star\,
but Phadkar (94) and Gopinat!:
(79) enabled them to rally and

total 362.

In the half hour before th:
clese Charlie Barnett, forme:
Gloucester and England player,
was caught behind the wicket by
Mantri off Ramehad. Rickards
who came in at the fall of the
first wicket, is four not out

SCOREBOARD —
Indians vs. Commonwealth XI.
SEMA Ae ce nesik age ee 362
Commonwealth ........ 24 for 1
Gentlemen vs. Players
WOM 55.5 Rivne oc bo 265,
Gentlemen .... 0 for no wickets

Surrey vs- Sussex

COT. 5s aie se eae Lela y 297,
(Constable 95), Sussex ....... 24
for 3.

Worcester vs. Derby

TOBE ORs is 4a 8 ea oe
(Elliott 122), Worcester ......
for 6.

Gloucester vs, Essex

BN ati aniceieit resi g ete sce
(Avery 89); Gloucester ...... 56
for ' t;

ON






wn
om













and Demure worked a box in the somewhat disappointing, doing 5 i
useful time of 1.23}. Spear Grass, furans ei .09. Will Mg Wisp | : rf ay
working with Cantaquisine did covere he same distance in ‘ERGUS I FAB ‘Ss. Sui . aa a
he same distance in 1.26 (last 5 1.10%. Betsam did a box under | FERGUSON FABRICS, Suitable for pega : ea
in 1.07), but Red Cheeks was re- re comet in =a wes the band- $1.84 and $2.04 ms noe
strained and returned 1.28, Slainte age pronusk did not impress | eee non uf 4 i s a
i “comfortable, as indeed he over 4 furlongs which he covered | BLACK & WHITE PIG SKIN @ ...... $1.10 ag feeait ‘
ought to have bono, te RBG IR oie aa Il] PLAID SEERSUCKER @ -vvccssssesscssssssssssssssesee 1.10 ee
C Class Best time for the G’s was re- 3" PRE we SE ee hd
Among the C Class horses the turned by that seasoned campaign. LOWERED LAWNS for Nighties @ ............. 1.02 Rae
best time of the morning was again cr Gavotte who did a 5 in 1,08. : PRE forthcoming from the Waterford Not far behind her was Twinkle VLOWERED sca Suitable for
tring. Dashing Princess and High wee ase the wr the gallop House Coats. ic £OM............ $1.32 to 1.02 CAVE
und Li joi n impressive box with Soprano -09). e unre- SO Ae ne Fd 2
to box in 1.228 The ‘Thing cov- ‘iable Blue Diamond: covmred: the aes Eee, ies Pink, Blue, Peach
ered the same distince in 1.25, same distance in 1.11, while little an hite. educ rates $1.50 to 1.08
han a useful gallop for her, Can- Cottage worked with Apronusk (4 SHEPHERD
taquisine got back in 1.26 (see in 56%). | PLAIN SHANTUNG SPUN in Blue, Light
Timmy Halo) || SS=etah So"mtiharmn oem & CO, LTD.
Resistered U.S Patent Ofee y immy at 0 | ose, Peach and White @ won =1.20 10
7 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street
—————— => ———————- = — | , ’ e
WHAT A_COME-ON! I NEVER SAW A BOOK J . i
EVERY BOOK YOU /-~— IN HERE I'D WANT TO i SS |< Sees Sessa essences
WANT IS ALWAYS 2 RENT THE vie | .
EE oe Te Soop ONES pt | A wi invitati .
NenmaT Boor, BY THE TE PN wide open invitation to Bridgetown’s
DING \Y Just Got To // BOOK »OU WANT | (THERE'S ALWAYS | P the
ARE BUY ITs HERE , T'S OUT A LOT OF NICE shelves, counters, show-cases—even the
« BUT IN THE QUARTER fF MURDER ONES ON ak a :
BUY ae 4 HAND-*ISN'T MURDER spacious floor, are all crammed with
STANDS + AR NY Home and Office needs and numerous
2) Ts. personal requirements too. It’s a new
‘ =) } é
| litscs@ tl Store with NEW STOCK FOR MR.
EEL Se NY
. A BTA ANS nae AND MRS, PUBLIC!
Ea m yh | K.R. Hante & Co. Leta.
! ii 1 Broad §
iz over wepan ¢.
J




















to fear an adverse game in
Hearts. A psychic Heart call.
with a retreat to Clubs if neces-
sary, is comparatively safe and
mal it difficult for the
opponents to get together in
earts unless North realises tha!
South's second double has
exposed East's attempted bluff

This situation also conforms
to another elementary formula:
a double is for _ penalties
whenever three suits have been
bid. The primary object of a
take-vut double is to invite the
partner to choose between two
or more suits.

London Express Service.

Total Rainfall for month to
date: 2.70 ins.
Highest Temperature: 86.5.°F.
Lowest Temperature: 75.5 °F.
Wind Velocity 11 miles per
hour
Barometer (9 am.) 30.000
(3 p.m.) 29.932
TO-DAY
Sunrise: 5.48 a.m.
Sunset: 6.20 p.m.
Moon: New, July 21
Lighting: 7.00 p.m.
High Tide: 4.35 a.m.
Low Tide: 11.11 am,
p.m.

11.19

Kent
Warwick

133,
for 9

Hants vs Glamorgan

Hants Kibale Semele 150,
Glamorgan ..... Bate itd cake
Notts vs. Middlesex 4 Sweet dreams
Notts . 296 2)

for 9 (Hardstaff 136 not out). No fuss — no tears

Northants vs. Yorks

Yorks
Northants

A happy business ot
Ww ® growing up, when
' 0 8 Mother insists on

ROBINSON’S ‘tent. GROATS

aac « ne . 325
. 14 for no wicket

Lancashire vs. Leicester
Leicester

Thu
C”










iTS aMAzING/
STORM OVERHEAD
- YET YOUR RADIO

NEVER RAINS BUT
1T FOURS! BETTER
COME IN TO MY

WHAT SORT OF SET

THUNDERING is iT ANYWAY ¢

THE woRD! *
THATS ALL WE
SHALL HEAR
THIS WEATHER!

A THUNDERING
SGOP PROGRAMME
ON THE RACIO.

EACH PROGRAMME
COMES STRAIGHT
FROM THE STUDIO
TOMY LOUD-
SPEAKER By WIRE

THANKS A MILLION JOHN
1 MUST TELL THE WIFE
ABOUT REDIFFUSION.
1 SUPPOSE IT'S
EXPENSIVE THOUGH

CURRENT YO PAY FOR. ITS AMAZINGLY
CHEAP ~2 RUN. 40 ;

BIRKMYRE CANVAS

72” WIDE—FOR BUS TOPS and SIDES s

INNER HOOD LINING $

g
:
JUST OPENED :

56” WIDE. FAWN AND GREY s

LIONIDE LEATHERETTE S

50’ WIDE. ATTRACTIVE SHADES. %

.

BLACK MIRACLE ADHESIVE

1%-OZ, or 5-0Z, TUBES

*
% °

ECKSTEIN BROTHERS

BAY STREET — DIAL 4269

45666604
ee ee PSA APPS FSSOSD

POSS PUSS ONEGS



OC








PAGE 1

PAGE EIGHT IIARBAUOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY. JULY U. IM2 Four Record s Broken On Fourth Day Of Olympics Dillarcl Wins Hurdles: Bailey Beaten Again Mr. T. A. D. Gale, Advi-ni-iii-j Nu is ill preM-nt in Helsinki Covering iger of the Advocate llir Olvmpir O w l LONDON. Jlllj 23 TODAY % %  • i'l *nd u..' ..i the XVth 01; rnptad entered their fourth di than four were broken among which a/ei marks while two other Olympic records were equalled ]• tarted T! "hen Hamton Dillard strode on to the track for the Brat heat in the 110 metre hurdles and leaving hli Bald with ridiculoua ai to equal the Olvmpk mark D was the easiest of all %  ,. r iw Rii ml knowing 'i %  (AC tinisli. Maaatar %  %  a metres and in t with disaster. Eta Wl %  Walter linker and Jim BU of the U.S.A. Bailaj m aowavai •1 r hitime af II Hat arm has best. ltd But 81 in |((" Soon utter thai Adl.. I TII. 1 Da SUva ran up I 5ft board for the imp ;••< 1 %  %  jump and in his first try ha W4I natrai <>n the i-cord This was a signal of what was to come and presently hiUfan to lower not oat) USS Olyn rk, but the woi with men refill 1 1 wbara ha %  lop. lie must haw been in hi* jumps he broke the iv< 1 four times. Sneaking in' metraa, he UP 111 hi^ second )umi 1 OB 1 1 k sel %  Chnajl m the Semi Final Yesin 'his fourth d leMl ' fathers both terdu '.herewenrumours that ff l i n ... i,. t 1,1 iaj) M did not defend her 100 metre incidentally the .... bag mm all thl* im ^. n tt4 *hirh hrilnvv.f medals In one event. 1 %  .inekson was toe £ upon* IM v-r BH? I % %  •"'."' >""> '•*> •>" '"" """""' *"'?"*?"" < 1, ^gsmamsBBsmmm i sequence that is often a cause of differences >mpeiit;ve bidding technique importance of the partnership 1 used in a number of diverse t .r from clear-cut for players HiBiiu BVK Sign.il LEO BYE Know Your Crickel LAWS SO & 31 is now approximately r, 3" %  Sunday. Me looked In ml '" "'" %  ? %  • lh '' 1 Leonnid Schertakee • £ %  1-ikcd very USSR and thii to % %  < h ) '" %  nulled up. it iapos1 ' %  > %  several ,,..,.. I QM RfMM CM I Javelin \Y\i I ..tnlh World Rerord : ( SnlHey U. hihernrsi %  ng bcbJa I ^WtifS Mfller and the Finn m-lled Mrs. Fanny Rlankei a mighty hen\. Ihe anernoon aha cama back In throw t win Ike tvanl and MI tha 8aml-Flnal to tal < %  <>rT a clear a new marie of 242f1 ehl DJ tha remarkable „ at in 11 iiut tbe a m a iln a nnlshe.1 %  I MIL,. Bbout mh Baml final was once apaln tokiiiR flm And t | ia t |,oth Mint Sandai of slight blood 1, 100 metre haal Howeear, it li now pokMniBi that the nv o. s (OPPIN. only woman eaaaihU ol standing up to the Raanansi ara the Aus..1 New Zealanders. In ma larHtl long jump Yvette Williams of New Zealand a I leap of 20 feet 5J Inches aft) 1 Runlj looking All Chudina hml been leading for n long Whilr with I |tu P II inches, third wag Shirh Caa ll of nritnin In the long Jump Bifnes' leap was 24 feet 101 inches. Sim [MM 1 throw in th. .1 1 ,i tha Rev Mob Richards Pole v. lted M fl III inches second pBO Then came 1 rouadi oi turthi r record baal eight men in the 3.U0II metrM steeplei-hase heats beal the old mark of 9 minuu tusiiy the I-M mark %  In the third haal in 11 A .lean Deaforges of Britain I o battarad the world mark by Not In Form And last Mrs. Ulankors Koen is clearly not in I he (mm Indis layad In iy and although she fcher of ihe is A., but the woi her first heat she was bcatei second het won b) .1"! tha Russian girl Marija GoluWHAT'S ON TODAY Court of Oraud Sessions10.00 a.m. IfeeUag of 81 Thomas Vestry 1 00 p.m. Wster Polo. Aquatic Clnli 5 00 p.m. Mobile Cinema. Klgbtengsle Home, Blsck Kock—T.Wp.aa. LAST SATURDAYS GALLOPS By A Correspondent Fine we.itiiei and 1 mat but springy track produced a morning of most Intaiegllng work. With less Ihan thrc, waem left In Races trainers did not haritata to send their charges along. As a result some tnpressive times were obtained and for the first turnthru were some definite indications of form. In reporting the gallops I shall try to group them according lo Class!IIcation To start with, here Is .1 .umiM., I I* -lone b\ The l)erb> ( andidaleAll seven of these were out and with the exception of Mnrrh Winds who wai confined to a slowly worked five furlongs and Cardinal, all wen sent Irom box to box The l>eM linn lor this trip was returned, somewhat surprisingly, by Rambler Rose who, with Watercress as her companion CUM back in 1.25 (the last five in 1.08). Definitely an Impressive effort for this llllv even though she could not have had a great deal In reserve HeadUng hwk only t of a second longer to cover the same distitme hut be too was not %  Sowed to loiter. Favourite Briaai Light jumped off rather sluggishly behind Cross Bow. but 1 terms and returned 1 27J for the trip without ajvai ieing under severe pressure. Dunkirk, who bus %  not looking at her l'*t 1 in i.28i, which 1 us. 1 ni in the cures ami should bl INK hei on Fir.st Admiral, who should In lit aftoi lus Trinidad exertions .,-knl to (h> %  great deal. %  I'. %  Mi* % %  Sean returned 1 32| Cardinal v of coughing, only did r < furktni which he oovt rao In 1.08. The Two Van OUi Easily the best gallop of tbe morning as far nv itMM youngsters were concrrnwl was that ol the Barnard pair Row Tie and Faerie S eane. 1 hi %  broke slowly from 1 7 but quickened ovar the last ft which they covered in IJtfr— a rousing gallop Indeed. Ficnv guevne 'v;> %  |Uickei into her stride out the big Bow Tic had got up 'ii her at the finish. Sea Foam and nu covered 5 furlongs in I. 111. both appearing very green iln to improve on this 1 : Ei mancc FA en more bu< k ward is Jealousy who rould do no belter than 47* seconds fi furlongs Apple Sam wah hard .er a slow half mile. Clnsac* A .mil %  Only two A Class horses did fatl work %  Hebetc and totonlta and imth did 5 furlongs 1 r tripped ln.. rod 5 furlongs in 1.06. %  11I. KotoniU was. easy to Colombui irj 1.05. This last wa an 1m%  I %  lS 1.ill I'.-I. Surnrise did What I ninsider to be the best lap ..mong the B Class horses rrad %  box to box in 1.22 flat, the last 5 furlongs In 1.05*. Not far iHrhiiid her wa* hi Lcinpanlun Sweet Rocket whose eurres|>onding limes were 1.221 „nd I 051. Like all Mr Gills horses these two are looking par,11. well The veteran PepWini glgo had a gid gallop— Q 1 U with the last five in l 06. but aha may not have een capable ol .i great deal tnopi I I' % %  1 %  "iked a IHX in the ,.( : -:r speai Qraai ".'•iking with • the same distance in 1 26 (last f. .11 1.071, but Red Cheeks was r* %  rained and returned 1 28. Slainte .ndced he %  have been, in 1 311 ( Ctati Among the C Class horses the .1 the morning was again %  from tha Watarnsrd 1 fiBg Prineaaa and High nd Low doing an impressive box 10 box in 1 22|. The Thing COT%  red tin 1 %  In 1.2V .nte a usel lu'r. lantaqulslne got back in 128 (see Spear Grassi, while DevilSymphony returned 1.301 Test Match : as already DOlad did l.32|. Going over 5 furlongs, Darham Jane ran clear awav from her slablemaUDim View, and In spite nf being pulled up at the finish returned the excellent time of 1 05J for the trip. Aim l.ow and Abu All did the same distance in 1.061 with Una LOW having slightly tha belter of ll. A gallop of this sort reiinct improvement In form for Abu All Street Arab •nk \ of n 'ccond longer, while i. in to have felt the effects of lu-r Trinidad trip did the distance in 1 0B|. Doldtum indicated that she would he n force to be reckoned with In the Champion Slakes uy working 10 %  f time frmn box to box iK-tng 1 KM. 1> & K Class The gallops of Wati i working with Rambler Rose) am) Cross Bow (Bright Light) havi already been noted. CouetOQ wai a hiHilmaster" to Jealousy. f Class Pride of plan .oner mmt go to the sturdv Columbus •van did well to keep up with Notonltg (fl In 1 05) Miracle took only | of a second longer to do the same dlstaim S gno WBO hai put on considerable weight. WOriDHl with Twinkle %  vli.it disappointing, doing B furlongs in I.IW. Wit) O the WUp overed the u l 10J. Betsiim did a Iwx under n |.|8, while the bandid Apronusk did not Lmpm over 4 furlongs which he covered %  CClass Rest time for the C'$ was rci i Gavotte who did a 5 in 1 08 Nut far behind hw wai Twinkle who had the better of the gallo|i rano (i ,091 The unra,. Diamond < oen d th" tance In 1.11, while little Cottage worked with Apronusk (4 i ..;i> The -By,-" and Lag Bye" i tha law to Iw .ii cussad today This is a very importnnt law. LAW 3ti B\ v und I,eg Bye ll the lull nol having be. < ailed "WJda" r N. IU1T' pa 11. %  striker .iil ..ill toN.liui, In l.il ur person and any runN be I hi.uinl fini iiiitui -hall ea.ll or Kian-l %  Uye/; bui tl Iht Oall twrh any purt of the Striker's drrsa M perssn rxeept bin hand, and SK) run l" ol. .nurd. Uie t'mpire -bill i ill ,,r Skjigal "I. PK Bye"; such Innlo be aaarad "But." ami "Leg lives" rrxpri liv el\ No Run* A most important M.C.C. note i 'e. thai n th. striker wilfully dMlecL* the ball pi-rson. n^ batan %  tliSKf-T HALL COLLEGE DEFEAT l ST. STEPHEN'S BRIGADE The Second Division basket ball mateh which was played at Harrison College yesterday between College and St. Stephen's Brigade ended In %  win for College by a large margin of 81 points to 32. The chief scorers for College were Marvell, King and Robinson who scored 30, 27 and 20 respectively, while McClean, Clarke and Archer scored 18, 6 and 4 respeci:vel> for their team. I'M iieuce with the bouncinI all has made the MCC. maki imother ruling and II is this: Ii player guards hh hew a bouncer with his hand not ac%  i.iiiy holding Ihe bal under thi i rw reaulttng nan cannot scored as either "ttyttf" or "IJ Ityev" Although truact may be involuntary. He. ,i m ncai may i u coming a .:i!ii ti^ %  i ins. of the llrst ruling whlcl. I'I ills with the wilful r the ball. SU-nais The umpire %  r. i...l |;. (K>ve th< head and "Leg Bye" 1. leg and touching it with th %  and. It must be bOrTM Ihc term wilfully covci • rate kicking or kneeini ihe ball. R.B.Y.C. Lawn Tennis Results > 1 1 1 it 11 w RESULTS Men's Double* W. II C. Knowles and D. I. Lawless beat D. E Worme and 1' Johnson 6—2. 8—1. 7—8. W ith tat gn at adtai an \ f the ooabte iich are ,! ;imit-d ixperlence. %  nurre ol mlsund>. %  QM Clul> West pass. One Diamond F.a*t. one Mub". Is the lust aasmeasi douo%  :. 11 .:. I Keen HfOr . %  U 1 th it SouUi migllt ..ve good suppor*. lor Bpadea. a uaid in Hearts, (air support tor • ,1 mnd he oulil wet%  i %  .in a a secondary ;ll rebid his rnamonds. 'aba, or make a penalty pats 1 >ie Heart douS. m unamiL North ran also contend that .. Diamond response was a ed call that promised no illve strength %  * douth can •ry teat that he b .un* & %  Oaf flaafi in iuaon Simple formula rlevertl*le.s IhM 'J*e U 1 nv a simnle Iready quoted >..: ii oiu.-av> l lk> pQ'tniv hat maii' unv call • % %  lunapati Tl>e probable ktlon is thai Smith* hand something Ilk* this : .) 10 a 3 e> A K Q I D 0 A J ? K 10 %  vond double b .%  ad .v .noting Imgth am in Hearts, there U no IO a tms-sible blufl b 0 whose hand could b-* 0KQII 0 S3 fUJMM WlUi West unable U rates bM, laat .vmild hare every reaao^ La fear an adverse game in liwti A piychtc Heart call nth a retreat to Clubs If nectary, is roniparativelv safe am: iiiakes it difficult for the '•pponfOt* TO get tocether b ilearta un'.ias North realises tha -souUi's tecond double ha. -xpcKed Bast's aatempted blur This situaUon also conform 10 another el-mmtary formuls double is for nensite -'•'leiieMr ISree tulU 1ee 5*e The primary object of %  ilw-uut double L> to inv 1 %  o choose between to 4 %  ore to-.doa ISfeSM Sports Window Ham-on College, leaden 111 •he arst dlTlslon Baaket Ball fixtures will tonignt go all eat to defeat Y H P C and thus finish their season as winnerID this division. Although Harrison Collage u tied with Carltoii on polnte. the former has a very sanch betUr goal average. %  a vletory over Y at P O te-alght will make them iiieiHagai.il winner' of the Brst divtsiea enp. In addition to the Harrison College Y M P C match. Pickwick will play Modem High School Indians Score 362 Vs. Commonwealth Team THE WEATHER REPORT YESTERDAY. Rainfall from Codrington .07 Total Rainfall for month to date: 270 ui... Highest Temperature: SS.&'F. Lowest Temperature: 75.6 T. Wind Velocity 11 mtles par hoar Barometer <9 aJS.) (3 p.m.) 29.9Sg TO-DAY Sunrise: 6 46 a.BL Sunset: 6.20 p.m. Moon: New. July 21 lagbtuig: 7 00 p.m. Hivl; Tide: 4.36 a.m. Low Tide: 11.11 SJ p.m 30.000 11.18 OWS I'r.l inpotiOetilr LCWDOM, J West Indians including Ken Hickards of Jamaica ore in Uu Commonwealth team playing Ihe Indians at Blackpool The Indi • batting llrst made a DOM kai ,nt. and Q %  79) enabled them to rally and total 362. In the h.di hour baton laiila Uariieit, form i Qlouaa rta r and England player, was caught Ix-bind the wicket by Mantri o|T Ramchad. Rbkanl ho came in at the fall of tbe Kent v. Worwlek Kent Warwick 203 133, for 9 Hants vs (ilamorxjti Hanta CHaniorgi i . 71 150, lor 1 Notu \. anasBsasaoi Natti ... for i (Hardatafl ISH not oi 11. %  I foi III SCOREBOARD — Indians \s c ommonwrutth \l Indians 3 62 Commonwealth 24 for I Oentlemeii vs I'lmis Players i!(i.. QauUemen 0 for no wlckeis Surrey Surrey (Constable 93). Sussex Ni.ithjnu v* Vnrks York* 3 -': u toi i... Lancaakire vs. Leleesier Leicester 327 B I Munden 100). No Age I.. just anihn -Li," in ih> lup|>v bll*il>e ill growiiu; up. when M"ih>r irmiKii' ROBINSON'S '">"' GROATS Thundering good radio reception/ [ They'l l Do Ii 1 MT\ liimrBBOUSON PABBICS. BLACK t, WHITE PIG SKIN g PLAID SKKKSri'KI-.K II ll.DUIKKI) LAWNS lor m/Um I l.l>WKKKl> SKKKSl CKKKS. Suilablr for House Coitl*. Kedured from SI.:I2 to I BECKED OBOAMDIB in 1'ink. Blur. Pch and Wliilv. Hi-iliKed from $1.50 lo PLAIN SBANTDNG SPUN in Blu*. l.iuhl lirt'co. Dark liret-n. Pink. Torquoisr. Croam. Rosr. IViuli itncl Whitr 3 SO' WIDK. ATTBAITIVK KIIAHES. BLACK MIRACLE ADHESIVE 1%-OT. or 5-OZ TUBFS ECKSTEIN BROTHERS BAY STREET DIAL 4269



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r.\r.r rom n\r.r, \nns ADVOTATF THURSDAY. Jtl.Y M. IM BAfTCADOSstk AD\t>CATi: t,..i —r-itrt MM! br •*• UtNM C. 1*4 %  IMM •.. M4MWI Tliur>dy, July U, IU2 W BHII Hiissia Was Free SI IMMDI VISITORS TvS TOURISM in the Caribbean a seasonal industry? Or has the aeroplane made the Caribbean available as an ull-the-year holiday resort for the budget-minded, as well N faff (he wealthy ? The answer to these questions depends on circumstances. In Barbados for instance the inflow of families from Venezuela ha* resulted in the filling of certain beach residential clubs and seaside hotels. At the same time the island's largest hotel has ample accommodation for visitors Venezuelans it would appear at first siKtr. want to spend tho summer beside the sea with their families. But the nearness of most Barbadian hotels to the sea and the easy access to beaches from hotels make i! doubtful whether Venezuelans deliberate ly avoid hotels which are not actually o-i the sea. Venezuelans read daily in their own newspapers advertised invitations* to spend their summer holidays in other Caribbean seaside retorts. Several competing airlines offer special summer rates to Europe and North America. Barbados is only on of a wide variety of summer vacation resorts a Venezuelan might chooae.. The fact that certain residential clubs and at least one large hotel maintain a nigl* Venezuelan patronage during the summer months is probably due to special reasons. As far as Barbados is concerned tourism is still seasonal for the majority of th %  large hotels. How is tourism to be spread over th I whole year? Can it be done? Pan-American Airways have recently uleased certain information which suggest.; that hotels can be filled during the surnmci months by American visitors. May this year according to traffic officials of the an line in the Caribbean lias been exceptions' for summer visitors from America. Nassau which is renowned as a winte playground for tho wealthy recorded a 5 I per cent increase in Clipper traffic over May 1951. Nassau is now luring budge iminded vacationists with low-pricked package tours. Nassau is being so successful U.M mX\ huwU witja. une exception, are remaining open all summer. If Nassau is attracting summer visitors from America by low-priced package tours, Barbados can only attract them by under-cutting Nassau But Nassau is not the only Caribbean r the airport. Why should Pan-American Airways DOl be welcomed here by the government oi Barbados? It is clearly in the interest of tho island's economy that Pan-Amcucan Airways should call here. Either the government of Barbados does not know thnt the reason for their not coming here is the United Kingdom's use of Barbados as i> bargaining pawn for obtaining landing rights concessions in United States territory, or it docs. If it does, can it be said to be acting in the best interests cf the md if it does no*, press for landing rights In Barbados to be given to Pan-American Airways? %  . iin.iivwrt.-i. ut in. t ..-'. BlVOluttOBi wtwn UM old Romanov dynasty thrown and Russia b* Lenin's phrase country in uie world >or the outside world, and tor America uarUeui-i .>. '.:.< ui:. ciSOc revolution we* quite unexpected. Only a few week* before it broke out, the Pelrograd correspondent of one ot America'! most tStMAOd BOWS" papers cabled that Iht Tsarist Government hod never been so strong. The Russian people, tho correspondent went on, might be dusaiutflcd with Uus or that particular Government policy, or with this or that particular high official, but nobody in Russia was thinking about revolution and the Russian people was devoted with all Its heart and soul to the "Little Father," Nicholas II. The correspondent, like many of his colleagues before and since, simply was not seeing and hearing what wan plain to be seen and heard. For on December 16. 1810, ww leader of the liberal Cousutuuonat Democrats in the Duma, the noted historian. Professor Paul MUlukov. had warned: "The atmosphere is mturaU-d with electricity—the approaching storm is in the very uir. Nobody, gentlemen, can tell when and where the thunder will crash." The earlier revolution, in 1905, had shown plainly the desire of the Russian people for poiltn al freedom. All classes. In all parts of the country, participated In or supported the general strike of October 1805. As the strike raged. Count Witte, one of tho mosl enlightened representatives of the old regime, warned the Tsar: "The present movement lor freedom is not of new birth. Ha roots arc Imbedded in centuries of Russian history .•Freedom' must become the slogan of the Government. No other possibility for the salvation of the state exists. The march ot historical progress cannot be hailed. The Idea of cavil liberty will triumph, if not through reform then by tho path of revolution." As a result of the general strike, the Tsar was compelled to issue a manifesto recognizing the rights of free speech, conscience, nssembly and of labour to organize; and setting up a liberal suffrage; law for election!, to an all-Russian parliament, the Duma. The Tsar's manifesto also promised that, for the first tune, no laws would be enacted without the Duma's sanction. All Hussin rejoiced ut the news of the Manifesto. Even the react ionory Governor of St. Petersburg (renamed Pelrograd during World War I), General Trepov, exclaimed: "Thank Qod the manifesto bus been signed. Freedom has been granted; tho people will choocc Inch* own representative*. A new life is beginning." In the elections to the first Duma, in the sprmg of 1906, tho liberals and rudlcal democrats gdincd a huge majority. Immedmiuiy ihc Duma, almost unanimously, addressed a petition to the Tsar outlining a long list of proposed reform*. It called for lull political freedom, an amnesty lor polltlc.il prisoners and religious dissidents, the abolition of capital punishment, full equality for the vurioui national minorities and Jews, autonomy for Poland and Finland, a broader suffrage law, democratization of local government, humano labour laws, comprehensive social legislation, and the exproprlauon of state binds and the estates of the nobles (with Just compensation) for distribution among the pennants. For a considerable limo, the II. lint id Mi i.l. U one point, ho Ur as to enter into rcgo.alions with the liberal leader* with view toward •labLuvunK a government responsible to the Duma as it* HntUo Cab.nct is to Parliament. FlnaBy, i broke ofl tn *e ons and dissolved the Duma. The second Ihima, convened In lu7 T uas %  'i-Tsarist thaa the first It was also dissolved, "l! assure a conservative i tjorthy. Neverthcle**.. in both the 'hird and four* (last) Dumas, the Constitutional Dome-rat* had a large bloc, and %  orfallsta, and even .I'o represented. Thu.. for eleven years, opposition parlies on the floor of ine Duma continued to nght for the reforms demanded by the first Duma. Mod objective historian* of the Russian Revolution now agree that a new revolution could D avoided nod the Tsar granted the demands of the liberal elements in 1908. U was one of the great tragedie • of history that, ot the | of our century, the Russian throne was occupied b> .uid weak-willed a man a* Nicholas II During World War I. Russian liberals did not desire a new revolution, because they feared it might bring victory for the Kniscr Over Ihe Allies. Al a •Uutional Democrats In July 1915. some delegates urged that the Duma defy the Ttar by remaining hi had adjourned idaae opposed tfiis proposal, saying: "This sort of flippancy might be called criminal. People who make • uch proposals are piny In* with fire. Apparently, •Hey eomplctel) disregard the teCTXble Strew under which all Russia today is one infln">cd wound—all U pain, grief suffering. < % %  ay-thrown match c au I d I terrible i-onflagraUon —God preserve u s from seeing thnt conflagration." NeverlVele^v the Revolution Of March 11" was almost blood,.. The lit. Tal p roce ss or) Eugene Tratlbetsfcoy, wrote: "This revolution' U unique, have been bourgeois revolutions and proletarian i-volu'loi 1 but I doubt If 1 as ever oeen s revoluiil. in the widcrt sense of the term, in the present Russian one Everybody made this revolution. DM toolt part In It—tho workers. the soldiers, the i teals, even the nobility— all the social forces of the land." The Provtsionnl Government ereat-d after the overthrow of Twri*m consisted of liberals and constllutlnnal monarchists, with the moderate socialist Alexander Kerensky ;is Minister of Justice. The Government was formed by %  joint committee of the Duma and the Petrograd Soviet of and Soldiers' Deputies, then led by democratic socialist* The Provisional Government wnf later broadened several times, with Kerensky becoming Premier BBd other socialists joining the Government. Lenin, ZlnovW, Trotsky. Rykov, Bukharin, Kamenev, Sverdlov, Stalin and the other Bolshevik leaders did not participate in the overthrow of the monarchy or In the creation of the new democratic government; they were all either abrond or in Siberian exile. The Initial social reforms which Lenin nnd Trotsky had demanded had essentially been fulfllled without them. Without civil war, and without resistance from the landowners, the Provisional Government adopled a broad agrarian reform e All estates and crown lands were to form a sinI gle pool, to be divided smong j tho peasants who personally cultivated them Elected agrar' tan commitSMs were apt up to f work out the distribution. fn. Provisional Government also pledged the early convocation of an AU-Uiisstan Constituent As, sesnbty, elected by universal, acrel ..nd afreet balloting, to adopt i constitution for Russia. 1 be Provisional Govnunent also abolished class, ethnic and reivjgrlHInns an leges; sslabl -.ocratic elections in the muni %  jid ixlcndcd local self-governinciit; proclaimed freedom of %  i ess, association, assembly and labour organization; granted a full and Immediate ha all political and religious oaTeariers; recognized the independence of Poland and the autonomy of Finland. In short. nocritic government %  -.Ublfehed by the March Rovovithe people of Russia the liberty. Justice and equnlity for which generations of freedom-loving men and women of all classes had sacrificed their own freedom and often their lives. The Bolsheviks through the dissensions which wracked their opponents. The majority of Army and Navy officers did not want to defend the Provisional Government. After the fHllurc of the Kornilov rebellion in September, many oft'.cers HI fact wanted the democratic government to be overthrown — they mistakenly believed that the Bolsheviks would last only a few weeks, and could Ihea i replaced by a "strong" conservative regime. These views weia shared by many conservatives, including some members of the Constituiion.nl Demociatic party. On the other hand, a majority nsbev SS ts-lal Democrats) and a great many Socialist OQanea still bebeved tho to bo democrats. These giii. favoured a "united front of the entire Revolutionary Democracy" (excluding liberals, including Bolsheviks), and thus opposed any idea of suppressing party. It Li of course, now useless to speculate on how the Bolshevik coup rt'.rof could have been prevented But today no one can I nj r it thrBolshevik seizure of power was a catastrophe for the entire world. The Bolsheviks Abolished all the liberties which the Ru sitin people had gained through a century of struggle. The political order Introduced by I^nin. Trotsky and Stalin has turned all of Russia into one vast prison, and the great mass of the populsttoti into slaves. The Bolshevik* have sacrificed the lives of scores of millions of human bcinirs, debased Russia's great humanitarian culture, discredited the Ideals of socialism. prepared the ronrf for Fascism. and belpSd INIler flr*t to take power and then to launch the most terrible war In history. Today, SS yennt after the democrat!.• March Revolution which they destroved. the Communist roVtra are the mot dangerous enemies of rence. freedom and democracy In the world. Tho grcnt majority of liberal'". Ive democrats -ind sodal\'1% In the world now rcaliro that freedom, equality nnd justice are eternal ideas toward which humanltv will always strive, and that socialism Is only one of •vet l conceivable means of achtovine these Ideals. The Bolsheviks deified that means. whllf* liquidating the ideals. which were its ultimate aims. It %  hOttM nff )>o clear to Oflffy thlnklnc liberal, democrat and L ..ii tl e erorlfl can only 1 nonce when the i-leals of the March Revolution have triumphed again in Russia. —The Nvw Leader. Point Four—Pract itral Iilfaliwm Millions of peoples in the ecoiiomicalfy underdeveloped notions of the world are on the inarch toward the achievement of a belter life for themselves and their children. They want more food, better health, a higher standard ot living, and ii chance to work out their own destinies within their own cullural patterns. The United States is sympathetic to their needs and asplratlons. Through the Point Four Program, as woll as by active participation in the United Nations program for technical assistance the U.S. Is helping them help themselves iiitaln their objectives. Through the Point Four Program, we are providing technical assistance to help them Increase thalr food supplies, develop their Industries In tho pattern of their own economies, solve their public health problems, and broaden their educational syvtekqsv kn Uicso and many other ways. Point Four is helping these developing countries realize the full potential* of their human and material resources for the benefit of all their people. There is an did Chin* erb that says: "If you pluai for a year— S lant grain; you plant for twenty-five —years—plant trees; r If you plant for a hundreJ years—plant men." Now Point Four, for one thlnp. i' planting grain. Through lb" help, the people of Asia. Afrlc .. the Middle Cast, and Latin are beginning to experiment with new kinds o' seed, new and better tools, and hirpiove(( methods of enriching the soil. In one place, they have doubled their wheat crop", and in many other places thev are getting better yields each pgar, which means more food for the family and a lit! Income. Th's Is tremendous progress and it Is the first stop toward freeing people from hunger. This U one of I goals we have si Point Four Is abut planting trees. In parts of the world, forests have been plundered and By JONATHAN B. BINGHAM Jonathan B. Blngham has been associated with tho Point Tour Program since Novembar 1061. first as Deputy Ad mhustrator of the Technical CooperaUon AdmlnlntraUon and currently as AcUog Ad aunlatraMr. Other service in the US. Department of Stats, the Mutual Security Agency, and as a free-lance correspondent In Europe and Asia has given Mm a wide knowledge of worldwide probleou aad asplraUons. Born In 101-1 in New Haven. Ooastactleot. Mr. Blngham wsa educated at Yale University and Tale X*w School. He was an intelligence officer tn the TJ.B. Army during World War H the soil has become dry and eroded. Overcoming this is one of the most important alms of our cooperative programs. But most Important of all. l\tint Four U planting men— and women—whom the Chinese sage forgot to mention I mean, of course, that our fundament'' purpose Four Is to develop people, people who arc strong, sea nnd capable of developitu t. nwn resources for BM us* and benetit; people who can manage thcr own affairs through their own Pen live InatltuUons; people who • ;Mipport themselves and neVi! ROC depend on charity. One of the appealing things ioul the U.S. Pe*D Four Program I think, is that It Is a two-way proposition. Many of the animal and pla: that we have developed in the United States came originally from the very lands which en are now trying to help through the export of our knowledge. For Instance, wo f ot cattle from India, horses rom Arabia, a wonderful kind f wheat from Turk' are in a sense. I what we have borr In this cooperative work new Ideas and new products are being developed. I have never talked with an American Point Four technlcinn who did not say thnt ho was learning, just as he was teaching, nnd getting, lust as he waa giving, through bis lob. Second Only to food production ll the work of contioll'iiB disease and developing healthy people. Point Four recognizes the basic interdependence of food and health. Sick people cannot work and produce enough to feed themselves and their families. Underfed people fall sick easily. Modern preventive medicine has fousd answers to mo*l of Ihe mn*i diseases such ;imalarla dy*entery, t> pi.....! an | trachoma 'Mean water is one of the answers. DDT is another. So point Four technicians are and demoi^'.ratp public lit.H,h and | revent.vc medxinc to millions of people. Of course, many other activities are carried on in addition to those In the basic ilclds of food, health.'and edUi-atlon. Wo arc helping In the development of industries^ encouraging private cap,tal both locally and from the United States, to invest in proghictlve cnterprlst' that will coatfMsute ,o the development of the countries wc are working with. We are helping u the exploration and development of mineral and water resources that are so essential In many lands. We are helping build roads, the lack of which is often a serious i development In all these varied at which cover almost the whole I human eniU is eur aim to work dir-xtlv with the people wc are trying to help to help themselves, doing what thev are interested In Starting at 'he technical level they dm' themselves Ksepuregng them to contribute n lu.uls and especially its to these Joint %  U is to succeed, it must be a coopeI As the people host countries and our .k together, thev %  inhips and better understanding. Magic Under The Crooked Pine Bv 111 NK\ KOVVKII-: WASHINGTON. IT wag like a tale from the African jungle the way Richmond, Virginia, police told it today—the story of a murder done six years ago. They arrested 53-year-old Mrs. Cora Lee Nash after they had "broken" the voodoo gpej] she was supposed to have put on Joe Nash, aged 56—the man. they say, who saw her shoot her husband Luther "beside crooked pine" in the swamps. Said Joe, cousin of Luther* She put me under a spell and made me bury him. Like the other people in this backward coloured community in Henrico County ho believed Mrs. Nash had voodoo powers which came from magic roots. BUT the police sent their Mrs. Goldie Bass to talk with Joe. She told him her powers were even greater than Mrs. Nash's. So he led her to a spot behind the Nash home where bones were dug up. Doctors are now trying to decide whether I they are those of the missing husband. | A BANK in Toledo, Ohio, wondering how : university students would fare In the pitfall world of finance, gave five students 5.000 dollars (£1,785) to "play around with" in [ their final year. They came up today with a profit of 4.4 per cent, on their investments. THK guards at Michigan prison, where the riots took place in April, have learned their lesson. No more coddling, no more bargaining. The prisoners got tough again after one had wriggled free and let others out. Out went the warden's call for help. One hundred policemen with guns answered. They had the jail quiet again In a couple of hours. LOOK out, men! The Zontians want to invade your territory still further. Zonta comes from the American Indian language and means trustworthy and honest. Anyway, 500 Zontians—professional and executive women—from the United States and 13 other countries adopted for the theme of their plan-making conference at Houston. Texas, the phrase: "Women's work has just begun." 1 The Zonta Club was started in 1919 in 1 Buffalo. Now there are more than 9,000 I women in it, although membership is re| stricted to one top woman from each busi%  ness or profession in a community. CIVIL DEFENCE bosses of New York are appealing for 40,000 "hams" the radio amateurs, to help in the 24-hour a day alert against a sneak plane attack. CANADA'S booming prosperity, the envy of the United States, is now paying off in a practical way. In Boston a company has been formed to invest American dollars—800 million of them (£285,710,000)—in business acro the border. The New York Mirror adds its congratulations today to Canada on its "tight, sweet, better-kept house". Americans, it says, naturally feel some sense of chagrin arU wish they could do as well. WHEN they start making the other side f the Rommel Story, answering the complaints that James Mason showed him in too favourable a light, it will be in a special'y built Tobruk on the Califomian desert. "The Desert Rat", telling how British and Anzac troops took the arrogance out of Rommel and his famed Afrika Korps, will proliably have Robert Newton in a leading roLe. A PERMANENT exhibition centre, known ns "The British Aisles", will be opening In New York in September to show British goods. I UNEMPLOYMENT is soaring in Detroit, ithe motor-car city, because of the steel I strike: The figure is expected to be 150.000. ^^^>>ooe>e#sag^gaa<'<-o<^. c. C4 cc ^< x ^ f^ %  c-K'-'^ov^-xi /* A -V BOOKS. The Widest Selection in Town. On Salal AJtrtMStl* STiTIOMCRy. i Co-operating Actively By R. M. MacCOLL SHREWD James Reston, of the New Yoik Times, writes that "the Republicans I j Democrats may be trading insults about ea< h other's foreign policies, but the fact reman that they are co-operating actively and i effectively on the most exciting and revolui tionary foreign policy adventure Americ has had since World War II." PERHAPS it's an instinctive back-ti nature move on the part of Americans, sub consciously in rebellion against their super plush offices. Anyway, millionaire eldt statesman Bernard Baruch started the "part bench diplomacy" business some years ag' And now passers-by on New York's teemin Morning-side-drive look twice. Yes, no, ye —it's Dwight Eisenhower silting on tha bench deep in conversation with John Foste Dulles, the Republicans' foreign affairexpert. ARE American doctors getting too tough. :he "warm, human approach" to the* patients? The American Psychiatric Asso* thinks definitely yes. and recommend; that medical schools should pay more atten tion to reminding budding doctors of the "emotional needs" of their future patients. C. S. PITCHER & ca. ENAMEL SINKS GALVANISED SINKS ALUMINUM SINKS In choice of two sizes: 30 X 18 And Double DrainBoard Sinks for your kitchen. 1. Three-quarteri of an Inch more ihan the actual foot measure should be allowed In the length of a rtilld'* ihoe. 2. The heel moat neither pinch nor slip and the heel seat must be wide enough to give the child a firm base with ankles atralght and weight even, ly distributed. 3. The natural development of growing feet depends on unhampered movement . whlrh requires toft, flexible leather and proper width. 4. The

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PAGE TWO BARBADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY. JULY 24. 152 Qafub galling f S IR ROBERT URgUHART,* A ntau d) to Vene-j %  if..', ) UM Embassy's two-i ..rcraft EhHavilland %  .,1 Ulid*} Ma (uW at the Mareaol Beach Fli>. si I-. h I'rgunart i niy t'rqu (inrt. Alan travelling by mm tdrarsvB i by Win tfjfmanriiT p. D. W. llarkfnr-u vlorth. hrr little a.i Ann Bultnan am Davidson wi> %  U .it theOcean Vn-'. RMaL lo-Nighi t Show %  touches 01 thai preparation t'>rf lag ,! Oacni M Ud •dii IwnkMtr which opens at tin %  UnUM to-morrow "1 :1 HOW .il 8 M I' i" HH b i Iktui ) nV ban < %  u-mied then patronage lo th*' show will be aiu-noVi* kt-nlgnt. 1 • a ill Barbados To Meet U.N. Miion Foundation Old Boys' Association T ttBfl of th< Old BoysAt) at H.00 p.it 25th ProgiiUM per M ISS DORA 1BBERSON. SotJanuary to June. I52. will ial Welfare Adviser to ihesubrmr. i •immlttwa Comptroller for Development and K-nageinenl. Con Welfare left on Tuesday ^^e STARS*; BW.I.A. for Trinidad to meet lb" United Nations Mission which H surveying self-help le< I that colony M well M The Hooking Office hi oponod OlympicTheatic. then recently Bred total t> %  Concert By Barbados Choral Society -'/T^Hfc Haruadna Choiai Society o'. M. Concert at Con mil &> a. Mr. Donaldson is with Shell II b Jug| ;tn yoon %  jgCO Uto Venezuela Oil Concession* isl ,i|i|n.tnvl before the „"". v. III IB .*>a*.irri ol iil'r ITU" in-.tr %  ijl %  %  ISI •mid m' ; H a In Arit*i iw-Ir.if UM *urnM %  IVM |>:iulo-tliilati proot 1*1 mu!r nif rtrama. II Ol D-#t. it*. \ you o*n gat. II .ih at the Empire The.iin I | | N ...m. Annual General MeeH M EMBERS pi the Barbados %  %  i Barbodoo AK M.iters' Association an n ed that the Annual G %  %  i UM anovg arUI taki %  Rarrlaon oolle i %  n day, July 25th. ii IO.OO, ,.11.. Mf .-novated, and during the time that has elapsed since Ha found.iUon UM Bodoty has always ainiglvlng UM best type For Three Week* |H AND MRS. IVOR HAUCK 4. Mineral, in 3 Vc> aonaeruua I ll,r % %  II w It'a aoa> (8) 11. oen 14. !*• 16 MTOM. Oi IB. Cargo. i41 iv %  Ever to ao -^— light' i Hilton t. f3t_ TADKtTg April 21-May 1 GEMINI May 83—Jna. 2\ i.rftoii in u'hich pour birthday '' %  ii. according to the stars. For Thurutay. Jul> 34. 152 Stan indicate generous rays for practical _• %  fX March 21—April 20 endHovouri well managed; for vital indus^ trie*; for household and personal business. Romance rates high. • • • Some early aspecLi warn against unwise agaf i-iivenes, recklessness in important ^ matters. Be eager to work hard, but don't ^ overdo. • • You have little obstruction or contention T putting over essential ideas, duties. Afternoon may snow more restricting influences. ^ mostly in financial matters. Mind your ^ he .llh. • • • Thoughtlessness, needless changing from T ono thing lo another, especially in plans, business or residence are tabu. Be right^, ly aggressive, but conscientious of OtM ^ right** * Watch your answers, don't act without ^ brsl studying, consulting those in the Know. Moderate gain can be expected in ^ most business, occupational activities. • • possible, an energetic, early-start day i w CANCEK ^ June 22—July 23 LEO July 24 Aug. 22 V1ROO Aug. 23—Bept • ample ne later for %  if the Association of AsMStant Teachers In Secondai) Schools in the island. Back To Trinidad M R. JOHN IBS W< i ln-1 ol tha Londoi itud7es" Ud 1 urance ' pany stntinne<) in Trinidad, turned to hLs i ...k-i %  and rendering it to the b; '1 .— -i.,m^ Iheir U,rco d.UghWTI g• g;a|. *UKjr ,ST' —ol 24 Arrow. (SI bility. unusual feature at the Con icxt weak win be a SaxojbOna QuInW -; hnppy idea ol \il>l K.uson'ii — and n Bras* rfnd Ensemble. Mi Ii ( st John, Baritone, In irhhtion In ii group of sonjgs, will lOWH by the Annual CJenerti. ,,„ K i nc Solos in the cxtrncu linicas, Venezuela, arrived Tuesday by B.W.I.A. via Trinidad (or three weeks' holiday and are guests at Mnresol Bench Dais, St. ljiwrence Gap. Mr. Hauck is head of the turn of Comeca and Co. a super market for fcodstufTs In Caracas. i allpperv (riend •tiUMlM pum. %  i i i i M. if. u-K#. -. % %  r 2 ' SCORPIO Oct. 24—Nov. BAOITTAsUUl Nov. 23—Dec 80 (.in, Hc.u King Olar* and he Spii1tu.il %  I'eter, go ring dem Mast**. e talented young local Brt, Mr. Cedric Phillips, who "mtiy to proceod lo C.in.iH.i to further his musicil ill play Bach, Mendelsohn and York Bowcn. Tickets for the Concert may be r ol>tjiincd from t Ii e Advocate 5 '/V %  "* %  Sbitionnry where the plan of sea' i •en .tnd iirogrammeSales Engineer 1 may be bought. On Holiday AND MRS. HARRY EAl-Y CPENDIN-c; a month'.holldoy n %  • %  ind Ihttr daughter Mary J Barbados are Mr. and Mrs. from Maracailm. Venezuela, arBnull ,M:I nved in the colony recently ry Enwrlcll from Ciracas, Veiiecueii. li.W.I.A. for about ten days' holi(.1 ovtr the last weekday and m |%MHg nt the Ocean end by H.W.I A and are fUOS*.< View Hotel. %  I UM Ol M Vlo* Hotel. Mr. Enly Is Secretary in the Mr. Pr< i;meer emAdministiation Office of tin I I wth Stul.biiis in Cararns. olg POtrOMUDI Corporation. Matron At St. Auguitin* of A rtlR spending iiboul two nto Canada, who ha*"* weeks' holiday in Barbados, for Miss Ursula del Cisjtello, Matron quite m while, paid a two-month of St. Augustine'.-' Nursing Home visit home and returned |n<-t Trinidad, returned home on Mmi a guest ,,! t)„. HotOl day evening by B.W I.A. She w:>s • a guest at the Ocean View Hotel. THE LAST GIRL TO LEAVE ALY'S fl\,l A till th, tlatcn FtM SYINEY SMITH: ParU. 'PHF most I'xclii-ive and mot expensive purty of toe Paris rammer .season, given by Aly Khan, ended at The first birda were stirring and the sky waa brighter • nan the crystal chandeliers in the restaurant among the of the Bms de Boulogne, on the outskirts of ParU CAPRICORN Dec. 21—Jan. 20 AtJUAsUUI Jan. 21— Feb. 10 piaoEs -ft Feb. 20—March I when ihe last two people left. ana lovely Use Bourdln France's No 1 cover girl rtus *ns ttic nincst panv Alv ,-.:, 0 II brutlon of (he Grand Prix rare at Longchamp tusi mile awav ITMH Mft tso nucsfs and H lasted etchi hours thi Khan himself YOU HORN TODAY: Have charaeterlstlcs. You were born ihould hav n-c real ion. romance. • * Many people are unhappy bcciuse or a comparison complex. If this isn't held down it can effect home and other rela*sL tions. Rationalizing important. • • • Shelve new. unplanned or unknown matters that could incur debt or avoidable ^ hazards. Rate action, investments, acT cording to your ability, and assets. • • On the favourably aspected list today, honoured with your natal planet stressing Jkf earnest, sensible effort. Benefit for new and modern endeavours, fresh business. • • • An array of good prospects if you will dig. And furnish somere.l brain work and energy to carry on to a successful finish. Jf* Give your best, always. Non-committal typo day in part. You are *r nuw-lh on vour ovvr But no fretting or lack of confidence! Your best traits will carry you through. 3f" • • • Your planet stresses patience, freedom ^ from irritating worry. Written, legal. %  * person il promises, contracts need extra vigilance. combination of many fine the edge of the Cancer-Leo Can be exceptionally Interesting. t The ttncV From Connda JLf"?EVELYN 1>AY i 'Bole iSvcoraUMl i :i lucr ol ^ili H M I Duke r,i Windsor in a nnilnsrht blue dinner liickrt presided %  t a seeond table ditoraied aiib naxiels ol EnzatMVhan an Mid Prance's nrat wldi. >nlv marshal AlpaonM .In; tt the head of the ihisd >hich had model cannons. of Winder **.•> Mi.-re in a wntte ofl-ibe-houlder dress. Across II was a jreii scarlet >^sh Dinned w;u rubles, 11IP Sl'i Khar, srai 'here and l l I 4mh tnuM irodi UI.I ud l aaa> The first thing you give i run you DMI him fa %  . your hand. What impresfio: do you give of yourself it tin The hands have i liiMge; they reveal a lot em—hard—from Ihe wrists. ily. You ran take a vegetable her2 Rub palnu together. clap bal compound to deal with the hands above head until they tingle, internal side of the situation. Mas3 J nc J ,and Hl ltmc *""" "•• w h 'lodexwill lotn ianto aides Turn palm upwards and improve the external side about describe a figure of eight from the Very hot waler-or cold drUg m< vm !" ,,t< v !" ^LiL Wr S1, %  lrw< ' wm out as far up the hands' skin. CMt Out the f^.^f !" ,. WhP,he P"'ble. and using every muscle. waAbig under the tap' ha .11 SrSlTTtafsBft lad ££ • • there npv ^ y P"'"' * carefully (Important. IhLsi and ,,: ">'-v.ng any of your OXtn ,.H Uways MMJ bsWd cream or lotion nwi pei,... ( ,..[ L1 ]i v un iess uu loBygkooo ol giitrnidb ^ Joinu Pans komen. r-Ki,.sr "• '* %  atehed Aly Khan dancing. 1 tintrd one uotnan guest say j Bui. mv dear, he dances *iUi %  nan as though she is ihe only one tie could POSfloli lovo two vn rou 'ell f Well partner I orr tt :ne DuiMinnct .':i-v car-old w.n OVO UM stn began to uulc. ainger Dnn\ Dauberson flew straight D>ck t< Ihe 3ou:h Ha 11 ft .. i Hourdiu %  %  i pnu '• is sitll in Pans t .tnrinn ITxn^nM i>rv"' Their to UM Irmnh nnnflniH sonal fastidiousness. A casual your body—the spine Ls In good -nay take you nt you.face alignment. value, hut ;, discerning person will U/i,,,, r-_ L. %  > < % %  j HUM ... to ol your ruutSb' and nails W J. U tan j* "'.""J" """^ Working uim the hands is good WSSWMNJI W the Poinl ol for them even ivpin,; and Real Disgrace ? 'iK. II keeps them strong A little penance .... sleep in %  > le twprMMiVo, full of gloves, first larding hands exBd 111 Work is bad tmvagiintly with rich cream. I BHdl only if II is %  DowOd Keeping Ihem covered helps oils lad spoil the skin and %  > penetrate. ami nowadays it needn't i i HI very much urouob with them: any kin t of Wtt Of duly work Avoid this by using a small dght proucUoa you can even cigarette holder (regard It as strong household cleansers— necessary a n toothbrush) and DfMffl against hands hold cigarettes end-upwards, so and nalU—without damage. that staining smoke wafts up. sway from Angara, peroxide und is i-egulnr chlorine paste—especially (in dmi am massage; and ; mean tic cases) used with pumiee -is regular. This puts back the natural one of the be* wavs of removing ml which WOrt and weather steal stains. Lemon-Juice and 'Vim' are WO skin necessary for also pretty efficient. Both work l"r. well o n fruit stains and those you *•*-> %  %  • CMr&j m their MOBt may uget when preparing vegetables. 4 M ,„ THP ti< 0d by ri-ddish-blue hands Sometimesparticularly during D.a svit. 4 is ll usually only that time of llf P known as the "'J l-a %  nilaUon upset and change—a local breakdown of i E V •lie bodily change* which skin pigmentation will cause w.i.h uiar>. • is p^m' i oning at this time. There brown (sometimes white) patches, ?** %  ** £ m s ? ,, on eh.lhlain creams and skinrather like freckles. It isn't easy fw^? T'XS^'KXT f\ healing preparations which will to remove these, bv* they can be Ml MUM anua i:elp; and t, improve circulation disguised with a flesh-lintcd covTH =TZ ^T, i'e^a^d i',' x,i,,ll,v "h '" the erin, cream, set with a dusting of oLnU^""-^. ".' "t .' % %  : . N-w.i-1. S M UM TOUT hands positively. A handshake should he an M %  srard rnoveaMnl ol the arm. with a definite, firm clasp on the end of it. Negative, uncertain movements look fumbling and clumsy. They betray lack of confidence they fall to Inspire it. For A Special Hate No one wants to go out fan I larty with unkempt hands, hut one can't wear gloves the whole tune So try camouflage. A Hesh-luitet' foundation <" %  >"' homy-took. ** wL&*?a "P" SuS *n. knuckle sometimes can brinlu.m ol>mp.c Hn*>n. 1* ta p id lei indication of Incipient Bout a *** N ". '• ,0 P ni Np — T.ifc M h.ike condition of the rheumatism fam,^., ^Tp*„, KSrai !" !"*. U* l.\ SMHh Iff Issttrtnit'iif ol' • LAD1KS' NYLON HOSK • 1.ADIKS* NVLACK HOSK • I.ADIKS" LISLE HOSE • CHILDREN'S ANKLETS — ALSO — HI MMI'MENT OF . • MEN'S WILSON FELT HATS S2.M $2.15. $2.28. S2.il S2.5I1 $1.31 30. 32 & 46 CENTS (.ill I 1 The Claeden—at. Jai ...t H k I* IAHI.O OlNlII(, He. k LAN1 I WAS AN AMERICAN SPT M H T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS DIAL '220 YOUR SHOE STORES DIAL 4606 II Mill iIII I % "' 4#.4 (DIAL 5170 Proudly Preacnte : 1'nlvertal lnli'm:itioiul> BRIGHT 4IC I OKI ning Arthur Pcgfiv KKNNKDV — DOW With James EDWARDS WHI OEEH John HUDSON and Juli. ADAMS Based on th< "i.i'i'i r< oi i EtBRI is % %  HI ADU1 TAJ Ks RTB %  on VIM. nut) v^ 4.43 A I M I'M Punch st. the circaa Cusp ehange of Signs. _. capable, successful, or the opposite. You have strong traits i with fine titenls. Develop patience, moderation. Some proiil. able months ahead. Birthdate: Simon Bolivar, hero of So. ^ I^CAmer.; Alexandre Dumas the Elder. Fr. novelist, pluywight. r ^****** Blinky Mole Liked Winter — It Was a Time for Friendliness. He Said— By MAX TRELI, til.INKY Mole drew his chair a little closer to the flro and said: "1 don't mind the winter coming on. I've worked hard since early spring. We've all worked har.l. Winter-time is ihe time fnr friendlinesi, and good talk, and a pleasant game or tvo, and some story telling. But above all it is the time for thinking." Blinky lit his pipe, then looked around with a smile at Knarf and llanid. who were sitting beside him. "Yes." he repeated, "there's no time like winter-time for good thinking." Knarf wasn't sure he knew what thin in'.. "You mean, Blinky," he mi hi. "thiit you junt sit and think?" Wonderrul Fun "Thnt'K right." replied Blinky. "And it's wonderful fun, just sit_. ting and thinking. There are so .. "I"* *"* ,om ""T* knock • on many thing* to think sbout— all the lhe !" r Hop-a-Long Ihe grasshopthings 1 di.l this summer-all tb* 8"', Blmck,e lp t Uc Mr *"-"?">Ph the frog, and tho two caterpillars named Clarence and Archibald all came in. There were hardly enough chairs for sll the company, but Blinky buHtled around and brought mats and folding chsirs out of the closet. I.ola of Fun It was lots of fun for Knarf and llanid, listening to all of Blinky's friends talking over their adtenlures of the psst summer and planning out what they were going to do a* soon as the winter was over. Willy anid ho was going to mova from the edge of the pond to a sunny %  pot bchim! the pine grow where Ihe Hies were larger and fatter, Glive said ho was going to move around us usual, not staying in any one spot too long. But he was determined to sea what kind of country lay over Ihe hill, even if it look him all of next summer to get there, Mop-a-Long said he was going to visit his relatives on Ihe other side i>f the river Hnd hoped he would be able to find a way to get across. Blackie Beetle aaid he was going to build himself a bigger house; and Mr. Gr-rumph said he was going to things I'm planning to do next sumThere was a knock on Blinky's door al this moment.and Willy Toad snd QIITC the Snail came in. "We were lust talking about th.fun of thinking about all we did and all we're going to do." Blinky explained after Willy and Glive had found places around the fire. "Good idea." said Willy. "Bui 1 hko dreaming even better." "Dreaming. Willy?" said Hsnid. "Dreaming is the *am a. thinking." aaid Willy, "only you do It whirl you're sleeping. It's much more restful -Willy's right." ssld Glive. "You fust '•lose your eyes and dream about all the wonderrul things you'd like to happen. But." he added with a sigh, "they don't always happen." "No." said Blinky, "I like to think about real things. 1 like to ihmk sbout Ihe mistakes lhat I've made and how I can keep from making them the next time. I like to think of belter ways lo do my work. I like lo think of the good times I've had, and of the better times to come. 1 j go on -. long trip to another pond like to think of my friends and of ; where his cousins all lived. Archiall the wonderful days we've had bald and Clarence said they were nt Blinky [ waitingto turn into butterflies, and reading a then they'd fly all over. And Blinky your own | just sat and smiled, for there was Murraus MILK STOUTMANNING & CO., LTD. AGENTS. Don't despair when your oven dishes are greasy and dirty after a day's cooking. Sprinkle a little Vim on a damp cloth, give them a quick rub over and sec how they gleam. Vim is so easy to use, so smooth it won't leave a scratch. VIM cleans everything smoothly and speedily GLOBE Tndnv, 4.15 & KM p.m. — Last Shows BILLY THE KID and SWORD OF MONTE CRISTO Open inc Tomorrow. 3.00 & 8.30 p.niThinking." togeth.' after book. Except that It's book—about your own adventures. And there aren't any words." nothing he enjoyed ing a houseful of old fi HKIfH.r TOWN ODAV issaVl sat a aw WALK -OIIIV -I" ^'l 1 oa*l>h COTTON A Vulll Zan* GTV "NSVAJ1Anns Hobcrt M.t.ht.n K aNOlfsui mi., Jimmy WAKRI.V a I l>l oil Mi,, VMm Kg JoKniw M-cfc nttOWN raiDAV tat i ., . (' % %  llaalm Uall< rOS ISIM THAT raasrAsa *i Sp — ai > a i IPIAJLA THEATRE* 11 Mill \ HI %  > %  I'l.l SI*S>> •I t Sha>* TO-DAY SUNSET BOULEVARD Gloria SWANSON & HOLIDAY INN Dina caosnv ASTAtBE Ipeciai 1 -i 1 I l< HIM Ii I Dnn IIARRY aV isoNTtta War IAV. -SfUl I I. Ill in s < Bocrns HI> \u



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TllfRSnAV. SUL1 24, 1952 HART.ADOS ADVOC \TF. PAGE rrvi "Confident !.<;.•* Uruilv For Sea Yellow Fever Sclieme Discussed W'ilh Dr. DeCaires HI ERNQB has informed \ ^embly and the Leiiu,.ativ* for eradication from Barbados of lea aegypU, has bct-n datDr. P. K De Cairet, representgtrve of the Bureau, which ia the regional u of the World Health Organisation for the Western %  %  %  %  Uodsr the leim* <>f the Agree%  MOI into which it v.-ould be nccnMary to antvr uilh :i %  his lii'vcrnnifnl would I" tc supply • certain amount uf Insecticide and personnel, whits". Tiie Schooner Confident I. G. 5nr *y'> equipment. Inn which wus built at Browne'i nnd ihe *<*vlces of one medical Bea^H, Bay Street and laumhed "*<*: %  and one iiupx:<> i on Novesnbff 1, I9&L lj now "•* supplied by the Pan-AmO;-io as the Schooner Pool will give foreseen. It will be possible to :ne nuuCient t-aigti ao us to enreplace from the ourrm able ma to nukfl r-.y first trip." sum estimated at $1,000 will be Mr. Ernest. Lord*, he,owner, needed to meet this Inland's share told the Advur.it* eaterday. „f ,h e cost of the scheme. The Confident i.e.. was brought Authority Inlo the Careenage on AnrU S3 w; be necessary to yho the H.5J. While In th£ timer basin, I>i rector of Medical Services, his she was equipped with spars, departmental officers and the rigging and sail*. She was also medical and technical offlcers of the sealed and made "ship shape." Pan-American Sanitary Bureau At present the only work going "Statutory authority to 'enter aod on U, centred en the galley. Carspray houses and premises with C ier* are erecting the galley an insecticide approved by the st which is expected to be General Board of Health and to tad UrviYlde approved by the Board to water or water confcilnQeneral Board of Reaatt hue approved of the proposed programme, and has expressed Its willingness to amend the Mosquito Regulation** so as to make It poaClement Vearwpod of Rock sible to carry through the scheme Land. Spooner'n Hill St. Michael, effectively reported to the I'olice that Ml house was broken and entered between 530 a.m. on the IStfa instant and . worth of articles stolen. Year'he several parishes: this is easeowood reported the matter to the • %  •'• Rfle a success of the proposPolice on Tuesday. ed programme. Cij.iles King of Good Intent The Honourable the House of St. George, also reported that his Assembly/Legt-lntive Council is house was broken and entered invited to approve that the sc h eme on Monday. Nothing was taken, for the eradication of the yellow NAVY'S NEW RADAR-PLANE IN TEST FLIGHT | 1 . %  ^^^^^^s*akaaeaea6JggJsiW__ ^^^^^aff^P*'*'*^**^^* mmtmmsM 1 Dl. ONFD AS A HlOM-FlYINO radar lentloel for domestic defense, tha Na\ ys new radar plane Is pictured i last flight over the California rnount.ilns. The grotesque conflB.;mtton of the WV-I Is caused %  %  ..fir's shark-li . %  ftn atop tha Super-Constaliatino and the p\pj'ulcd balloon below. Hints td the trial appearance of the taborator> ship. /Internet tonal; 2 Cases Of House Breaking Reporti'd The Director of Medical BarrlOM *and"*5.4s"p"it" nna h c n asured <•( the lit and S10.0J '" [l oJ ,nt Sanitary Authorities in howc .*er. Finances Inquiry In Hort-of-^pain lever mosquito with the assistance ul the l\m-American Sanitary Bureau should be proceeded with and that, in accordance with the prescribed procedure, the Secretary of State for the Colonies may be asked to ••ponsor the necessary ii for technical assistance Scheme Aba rationed Hircfllrncy the Oovernor baa referred to his Mataaga Ko. 9/1961 dated the 27th of February. IBM. to toe Honour Mi Legislative Council'House of Aasaubly rogarding proposal %  put forward by the Comptroller of the Development and Welfare Organisation for the extension of Erdlatou TraUung Collage for Teachern o si to aSord accommodHtioQ and facilities for training aixtoon stodanta a year from the Leeward and Windward Islands, and to Inform the Honourable Council/ Hoeae that as a result of the Inability of tho Oovernments of those territories to contribute an appropriate share of the increased annually recurrent cost*, it baa been found neoeasary to abandon the scheme. POUT-OF-SPA1N In the House of Commons on to the World Health Orgnnisat: Julv 16. Mr. Jamag Johnson (LaMbtor Cyclisl Stnick By Lorr) hour, Kugby) asked the Secretary %  -,, %  fn,^ m ltm t of State for the Colonies why tho 1' ireHOtXI, UWPOOCU Go\*crnor of Trinidad's advisers ( _, __ ,, in regard to the report of the Arrive From Is.is. Commission of Inquiry into the i <# !" "" tinance of the City CouncU of 0nc hundred tons of firewood Chandler was ruXmn his W atrliman Charged \\ ilh Breaking Inlo iiuilding And Stealing Cigarelles THl fRIAL ol niivcr arinu :i witcfamai ham. who Li ehgtrged with bwiking Into the '• uUdtnff tf the Bntish-Amrric:!!! Tobctecu (\ on -1 u^ %  '^1 while he was t-nipl'ivrct there, tnd tie* unnwd ciatrette ihelu tarted gl the Couj i of Grand Sessions yesterday before Mi Ju ties? 0, I.. Taylor, ami eftet Hve v/itDM w for th* ProeeeuttO evidence, it Wit adjourned until today. Mi \V W Recce, Q.C.. is prosecuting for the Crown. Grimes is represented by Mr l> II I, Wan! The charge was brought against Ward asked the baogctef *'hy Grimes after tho Police received lhe% waited a., long after Grimes certain reports and on the Saturhad. as they said, entered the day of the allege i offence, hid building; before going u> him. The among cam-, near t*^ tohacco facInsi>ector said they had waited tory for more than six hours, for any developments. Cpl. Yeurkeeping an e.ve 00 Grimes while >ve-d said that there was the poshll rao&dl at watchman, situllty that an accompllcn might The witnesses who gave evidence have arrived, yesterday were George Rcid, Evidence by DeVerteuil. in the Inspector of Police. Cpl. Biyan. nuiin, corroborated the Pollca'a CpC Yearwood. Henry A. ON i Skinner. A-Ssislant Manager of the When the case continues UUg Company and Marcel R. DcVcrmoi-iing at 10 a.m. De Verteuil will ersecr ru ,| General Manager. be i-roea-examlned. l).>Vcrteij|l was the last t< >s give evidence and he has not yet tf o -*' s's* •nbeen cr.*-examined The other C/.Q. IsOtttpi'tttiOn mlved in .m aeCHlent with a mo...u— ..._v -_ —. Hutson Chandler, an O at UM Dalit Hlantation. was d lained ut the General Hospital on R v e evidence and he has not yet ) night after he was inbe e fl cross-examined. volved in an accident wilh a mow ii ncs „. no hai not jet giv— lor lorry on Ktnsision Road. evidence la Yearwood. a suoerAt the nmc of the accident. vlflor M *~ r motor Description of Factory evidence given was of the factory—Its position and its :-ooins—the posl£ %  •. // / %  f. Uon ul the hiding Police and De — —— bCttrcdy OJ tlSn firteuU with regard, to tho facTrad %  [ ," L lory, and also on a certain stage ^'>'" The majority of Ushing boats 0 ( i ni p rot e M of producing a box ,F ll! < For W.I. Citrus l,„:.„,St ,a,„. Trinidad, include „„S 510 S. o cbirVoii "or. cjd. M 2073. Tho mo.or lorry. Oer,p ,„ im tho conduct of some o( £ !" M to the inland by tho Al !. I. >• uropen, ol .GreuMu.h „ h ri, !" has been advoratly com-hoSwr CIKll. 8. whu-h arcry Hope of Helin.nl Houd. • %  '^'>' "'_ IX>NDON I ho House of Commons on .. "S^r ly SS& ^di. 8. wh,ch aror, Hopo. Hehn.nl 10.0. ^JSTSS',miZZZETZS: (i K!SJ5MK3 menled on in the Report. llvcd „„,„ llrllUh Culano over ,.,... Uon S liVhldtotMtaTSJSe %  '•• %  PIMM 5 tSTaimi "f t -.unril. The Acting Oovernor h.. many paMeneer. on %  %  !" : p. IU of the islantl. A f !" bo.u K.,-i ... pn evldna w, IndJ irus industry; that u.o so far consulted his omclal advlseluded in her cargo • !" 01 nubsneba nd along the et Inspector Held. He sal.l that about export ,.r cllru, prmlucts I. sul.? a8 ? ' "? „f %  ..,j SS coast of the island are however 1020 tho Saturday nioiniim Col. siuKmi by the Unllad Slate. n( Minister 23 bags ol cocoanula and fre*. fm „,.,„„„,, ,„ l, lcll 1 „, „,„,„ B ryn, Cpl. Yrood and hS wl ArofttaPl and whelher, under th. u ,^.,.. ,, i. wllB hl ''sh. to Ihe f.iclory at Lodge Ro.id in terms of tho General Agreement !" mS *"''' nuw • r ~ '" S1 Mi_ ".n^uen.e of ,ld|M cation of the Report is being with32 pleees_oi ompw. Bboul lm Hyln|| |1(h WB( broulIh |T1C n( 1(| wher „ lhp r [_._ %  - BnUU U.d..t i-a j .whit general her Cuban Sugar linder M.S. \. UWtOUA la the l Mr. CyrU Osi" n-ii.ii kCui'.ii %  tk % %  • %  ..i' Security Act; sno . -..: %  Si. Arthui s B ite POi %  ronomft* An . iiOO.OOO.oOO -dollar fco> nomic aitl from the MUW %  %  %  teen fully committrd %  oO.OOO.OOO dollar i e c0 TtgesJL There b n %  aieiefoeet oil addition it llrnr" ni !% right hoi. I not intend to make n fur: Pi %  M i at present." Ciioaieablf Sugar Mr. Oaooiiie. As ui<.re •• aouui a.aou,uoj leate el %  tftd W tUll I rauonlng over here, would • %  Mmisier bo-r'u in mind ID In to ihat the surplus could >> btouglit lo tin* eOUniT] -:"J ten end sugai and et < i rationing?" Sir Arthur Saltej ii DJ Friena is tiiinkiiig ol appro.i Ipotl I I that the appropriations have 01 lust reecned u tive stage in America and that • % %  • iiti eat yet know ihe sei in ; .. ( i, adminlstrati' which items are ellgib e. II • ever, 1 arlll beai In mmd .: mj hun. Friend New I'act Hi ROJ .:> in 1 I0SM I 1 B DarUord); "Will iiright I Guiitlcmoii bear In mind tha*. ai sugar la there nuw and that in thu austerity period tttesew would like it now? Is he fur* .. aware that the sugar, which o be sold for sterling to be spen this country. Is available for i 1 over Id. a lb? Will he h.iv word with the rresldent of tt. Hoard of Trade and help to ( > a new pact?" Sir Arthur Saltei "A I h %  pointed out, the money in real > of this year has already l> fullv coounmed There is n margin left for use for this p Mr rVMfls"nut will the ri • hon Oentlecun nsree %  word m his right hon. Prletid and trv i.! | new part now for sterli i not for this money?" —ii.ii.r .Mr. Johnson: "Is the aware that there is acute public fruit. Interest in Port-of-Spain in this Schooner _. — matter and that many people In 1? bogs of arrowroot. 435 bags or that publiennrs. 30 bags of cocoauuts and f !" ; being with32 pieces of timber, held because Ministers are impliGeneral Cargo ml(J \^ VuT.iic" Mai k.rl could'see aorne"do.)rs*. They were Suhsidisallon rated In the affair?" The Sleotmhip sunwhis Housewives are now dependent i..t Pt ,,,ined by !>-• Verteuil MrPeter T*-imeycroft, PresiMr. I-yUelton: -j hove not said brouphl a quantity of icnetai ^ ^.^ of 8einc n8n and mtp M 4 ,„ GrhnCs uiit kc.i down a ,!r ; f ho Hoard of I that 1 am aware that it is going cargo to the Island lo be withheld. Certain legal mathitches were milled ?. i.'-lwecn tho Acting Governor o-it*. machinery, cotti I \\p? s>ovan.= ui js^-.i.w .,„. aaiaaa —-—al\i *...^ ,. .an %  LJ vr—aa ,n .,Li pen caught by the few boats still corridor nnd on reaching an l' 1 "* ^ "' *' %  wnre n : i (l !" going tc sea. Early in the day tfran and the olllcial advisers have to paint, sherry, he. be cleared up before I can make j.-. !: ,jit %  —B.V.P. whisky IN-iLsaiits' Loan Bank .....on and medicines. Tho Daerwond. Mandslay II ;md Claudia S. are consigned to tlio Schooner Owners' Association. 8anv.*lt Is consigned lo Messrs. DaCostn & Co. Ud. going to sea. Early in the day entrance door, disappeared. Cpl. P' 1 r citrus products to eertai.. chinaquantities of "P^", l ) h "^ btta ibvan went nc.rer the door while m, ';P_ts.u,su'oaldlaed by the Unlbrought in at some beaches. Cpl. Yearwood and he went besli Oovernment, but I ba .. l.-n.e. About 5, .HI a signal from TA.PT BRYAN ON DeVerteuil. Yearwocxl and he went "'luring tho mlerests of the We.: ^rVTatlU I HVC U.wanls tha door wncrr Hoy saw '"',"*• c'lrua Industry whose niaiCASUAL LEAVb. Cl ,, Dl v ,„ ,,„„„„, (inmK who ke.s at present lie In countries . .. „..,.. u r Ashad a wooden box In his hands ,,""";"" "• %  "' %  Imports from Captain O. J. Bryan, MC As Thta to M „ u(m| ,^ rcm i Ih. ...liar area for balance of 0, From page 1 working etaas people In tho Island '..• fair Irealmtnt and react favourably. It Is principally a mailer of personal relations which continue to be ery good." "In ftduition, Uta fact that other cotonieg Hunk of B.nbados as beleave Cwveritniein Officials On Leave Captain u. J. uryan, '-'_ %  -•"• ThUboxoontaine,laom.elarotu. !" !" Mr %  %  slstant Colonial Secretary U^M ^^ --|i ^ Mam -^^ pvmMi reasons. |: '' j: ''..'''' %  %  ''' %  '', : '\" '"n'Z amiidsxl blmi lock and BOBM kavi l" tlw • % % %  dnim bnew i do "".," SSTSuJ^noTrtT < 1 m '"'" hl "' •< ""• '""" """ maUa ,l,: 1 anMlnng will l„. ihe 2t of the Jh^ „. hud H Iho rUwrt Uc ,. ,.„. „„, Blottl by taking aril !" under Ailicle XVI of th,(luiiTiil AgreeduU Mr. N. Chenery. • Coionli,l .*rt"S 0, A""hl.'1Sige oT the msjieeto,-. I % % %  It on TarilTand Trader M-WHfflfO VEHICU CARRIES TRINIDAD OILFIELD EQUIPMENT LEYLAND, Uncashlrr The problem of traiwport uj heavy olineld equipment in Tri d dad Is now being solved by Iho uno ol a U-wblea vuhlcle • -iiling of a I^yland Super Hippo Iractor and a liys-on semi-trail T %  ccordlng to Leyland Motors, Ltd., of Leyland, Umcajihlie, %  IVIiolfum Development Co., Ltd who operate the ma bine, uetd it raeenUy lo erry a large draw-works (o. I>nwer<-d drilling rig from a Mir Ming for a new oil weU i l %  .1 compli'tod lo mint Ii01 In catt en a/here drilling was about to start. The draw-worki weighed altout 30 tuna and comprised a maximum load fur the trailer. The type of work on wluch the r Is employed In particularly dillkiill, Ihf company points ai neni ir the roau gtvitig ' -ul well I atlona have unpaved gravel, surfaces, onen with gradients up to one in six -HUP. Director of Office, has been appointed to art ^T-7",nr.inted to act At ,h,s Bta "' !" lhc Inspector'. pmn on l ariffs and Trade. 1(, Colo.' .al Secretary, "idem*, four trays of ciga.ettes n owp ver my hon. Friend has ape.. ..f the Pubhe So?wir P'*ducod M cigarettes which gj| eyiden. e of Injury lo the We,t r t th. unuc =. ^ bw;n ^ fl certa(n rOQiii indies 1 Industry and will fl P ply Ing highly cultivated, there is de>nst"t Govcrnmenl official' Jinte room for more intensive Otner " w „, in M .i ...w,-i. 1-J.J— ka.t. r leave arc Hon. C. Wyuc. M. culUi/alien wWeh includes belter ation llaynes *nld. SksMoitlure. has "been" "grantee a* A ^ %  T'-Xtah-s extension o( sick and a member of eiU, effect frop, the llth vice CommUsion. ^^ ,f the factory at the time an<: on Clerk; Treasury D^arfnent, b whkh had been removed from L.C.. al^o %  cttng a Accountant. Treesleir original poslllon. industry and will supply I will consider It." —11.1 V. anure..^ Mr. ^rn^ = ^^ ^ imtBiit' and Mr. W. C\ Gn tBH rodv-building an*' proiivtne vilanuDs A A D — cmure\ stronp hooci and musclc-i. inaca'-rs mi%iance to illness Ch'ldicn IftMM i.iV-ing llaliborangc — he |>ure ha'irut oil is NOBfJcd v.Hh orange juice lu make n citra dchcioifS. Ii' %  '••• i lor adufti ion Haiiborange (H£ NICCS7 WAY Of TAKINC .i.-.i nui i OIL Al II N & It ... .'... .-: II AMU RVW I I II i o \ : 11 > %. ft.-l A HORSE OWNER SHOULD BE A HORSE LOVER W<> Highly Recommend "*& HARVEY'S WATTS EMBROCATION For the treatment of Curbs, S'pHnts, Sprains, Cnppetl Hocks, Etc. It Is also an excellent application for Windfall.'., Thnrnughpins and the Swelling from Sprui.j; Hock Joints of horses. PKICC IZ/G AND 6 6 AT JOHN GILL & CO. CAMI'.iEI.I-S CI.KAM tiV Ml'MI'tOOM-per tie ... .46 CAMI'HKIJ-S (KEAM OF CHICKCN—per tin CAMI'HCl-l-S CONSOMNE—per l.n 46 CAMPBELLS CH1CKCN with Rice—per tin 46 CAMIM.KI.I-S SCOTCH HltfYMI 46 CAMPBELLS VEflEl'ARLE BEEP—per lb 46 CAsYIl'llFXl S OX TAIL JM-I tin 46 CAMI'llKI-LS TOMATO-per lin M CAMII.ELI.S VWJETAHI %  ; oer lin U CAMPDELI-S BEAN wilh D per tui M CAHPBDXA VRCBTARJAN VK. JKTAIH.t: -per tin.. .IS HEINZ CHIt'KES G I'M BO p eg lin 4# HEINZ CLAM CIIOWDI.: p. 53 HEINZ CHICKEN N(X>L)LE--per tin 46 I ': STABLE—per Un 40 HEINZ BRET NOODLE—per Un <• HEINZ 1M ;:!'. MONROLE Per lin 46 ith Pork—|er t;u rOTtNED r.MISKET PEEF—per 4-lb. tin 4. SAI tSBVRY CORIflD MUTTON—per tin 66 COCKADE FINE RUM CBAWFOROS Till Fi:t'IT Pl'FFS— per pkt M ARST. CHE.\MS—per pkt 54 3WFFT ASST.—per pkt .54 CUSTARD CREAM^-per pkL 54 Stiinsfnld Scull & Co., Ltd.



PAGE 1

PACK "SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY, JULY M, 1M> AI -Canada Trade Is Grave Cause For Anxiety" IfcLlPHONC ISO* DIED a -v-v.. *ndrf>ii,.l Mp UuV-**M thi. medium to thank nil |ke*e who attended lb* Funeral of hi* Ik place 41 a p m on Ti... July at the Wc*lbury Cemetery AJao •II laoac no have kindly ami OH*. Sownand in art oilier war eicrjr %  -d ihelr .ympalht A. H V Wakeaaai A > > o i' MIH:M of Rlack Rock 5 OH KALE AUTOMOTIVE ,'auxhnll Vrioa orwn, I-at* wner drrvan and will kept. irUay Oared* lliene """ le.s w 4*1 NOTICE REAL ESTATE Beieede*. "W.I. W*lw" lad Mfli a be man! will U* Stock-taauui (r. buildi.' Depart :k**d for our Annual in July Spin lo ll.i I'AR IP*7 Chryeler WindM* Owner neer. Vary |M c*ndlue>. Telephon, •n *• i %  %  IMM BAR• Me old. an.il !... %  Oeod at Kii.ng hie* cla B nnH iaJ %  *.. Twin caa CAB—AuaUn A-40 SonfiM Oar Done orii > I MM mil*!. Dial BIO. 41*1 T H ii n?u an <. An UudK BupcT-dc Luie IX W *IU eell for rath, teat otter, boufhl mailer car. Pint clae* order, owner Irlven. Dial IN. ia T u-i f i. NOTICE Applieatione wi (~le.k of the Vaalrv up to 1| (. rriday. lit Auruit. i*fia r I On* Archer Oman. %  tfci KU f h lp .> St Michael. GUI. School, no. t~BB 7 Any Veetry *rh.%t*rhlp at t h< vacant during tho echool year r\in.ini-lei mutt ba the daughter* <.< panahVener* tr atrallenrd rirnmdaiir. ind mual not bo low than t ire.ira noi note than 10*. year* of af* on In S-T>tember. IBM. to bo proved by a Rap. laroal Caruncete which mual aeccan %  ny tha application Form* of application WIJ be hiurt nd received at tho Veetry Clerk* OffW. between the houi. of It a m .lo-.i... I"." JBOO Au.'.i ...wr-. price mn Eetata %  HOUSES I %  to Lid isao and iaai MU..,.^ I .-|iil from iW < At". ClUoan and !--!< %  from tnao to BBSS KiuI 11W00 All of Ilia-.CM pbaaa r M I Telephone JM9 4T*i It a noouM/loor %  *.Pnr tormi phoi,. 7i 7 •; ..;.. LIQUOR UCENSE NOTICE .t>Mlin ol (rroraw K. Mi rrcprtoto.o( Uow4*ft. Ox f>. f. pe-r-i-l o to .,11 Spirt Ma:t l^qunra. 4c. it a wall buildii. -ftod.ti Ciueat Konac" lln.ire* Cr c> 'I Milnet "A," OatrU tU, o. j d. 0 f July, un hJ BOO P^q .trala Dial "A" Bd U. K JOKNrUiN. App... %  t a LKrrrlrn rorl tn L* MB it^? at II o> r A McLCtU I a*. LIQUOR l.l( ENSi: NOTICE T'a appliiaUcn of Pyja4. TlPMMl •n.plr-ataarct CKurcb Vilbiai, Kolrt-i Ltquaj ikm* No. an of ISM 'o % %  B. TwHHifnn In roapoat Boor of a I atorr-y board andih [ JiCTORt Juat axrlTad at COUKTEST QAH A< .• LM (' ItrDMAN HtCttacri V.-" B 1 it 1MI M' ilEKJS < i>nly I.TOO ml n gjaarwa XTOttD iALOU* 0 — I. COUKTKSV a. %  ARAa ELECTRK AI I rr* .-**. MECHANICAL VtLSflLknltrd nt.inl.rr of Oent irckM m>-> each. '< J H.,,. ,-i %  ., >. IXd. Hrldak Slrirl m T 5i . Mi.i.Nr; svsmfft H %  rasa SUM %  %  %  I SaZ ..ik.. >r buataw nji kind .f Mini ,„-„, • nd oi if uaa TOvr Hal 51M K B Hi l.o-r Broad struct it In rarapaat PI bottom CRAW MOWERS — Uaaaw-Hatrt ldU cut Trailer and p.to. l>pr for inunodlal* dalUrry (.uuriciv Oaianr SO 7 U-flr lr. St Michael. ... rruaalon to uao uld iiq.mr licrnar i • *aM p umi aii Churcn Village Dated Ihb J3rJ day of July. IfH i H A. TALMA r..q roiita Maarirttatr. Out A %  Nd S B. THOMPSON. A,-,. :, %  H II —Thil application wUI bcon. | cad al b UctmUf C.mri to br hrM i -UKC.-urt. Ihitrnt \ oa Taeadvi' tic Mh day of Aurtret, ivs; • II o'clu. • H. A TAUU P*o)lrr Ma0atr;.te. OKI 'A' M riai '"IKi.tMiM MAHK* ACT. I*!* NOTICB is HH*:BY UiWt V 'I'NXIST OROWtnS ISC of No AV-t Plfth *( C of Loa Anfo; llllf o( California. D.l.A Intend %  •ppi/ lo tha Baflatrar of Trade Ma to be reflatrred at the proprietors Uta Trada Mark SUNKI-Tr No \V> ronn-etlor. with toed* lo nirh I clai"i to lie ent'led under an aaaianniwlthout the Momlwlll uf tha builnaaa In the a-eori1" atmtlon. dated Wh M-. M. rSMI Callfarrua F-ehlrui Corpora ton ol the City of Lea Anaele* afo>e •aid tha realrtered proprietor* of lh" mart. Aay peraon harlnr any ob]ertUm U. uh -pplicollon or lubaaquant reiiitrn Ion of lurh aaalfrtment "halt (iv. p 0 ti,-. Iiereol to tha ftoalnror of Trade Ma^V •tib.Jf Bull BM % %  I TAKE NOTICE ANGLIA Thai POM) MOTOR COM PA:.* I Wilt TKD, a l*i ii •>> Coaanaf. Mii-I..u.iii Ii ...I. r n-am Slra-t tnndou. W I. %  MMHi .-• appUatl lor tha rof ,atioa of Had* mark it J>art "A ^.i Ka^i.tei ••pad of ,,-otor land vehVI t>arla: anamaa and parba thayeof. arn will be entitled to rryUter tha> am>. after ona inoiith from the B.rl day e July iau. iinleaa win* rf*" ihail n tha maajtUm* civa mMI*,to rtupltent to me al nv oAoo of t—pa.l; seat'tiiiiioia Tin* Irada imuk en h een on a|ivlu-ntlon al my oftler Dated thU Ird day of July IBM. 11 WILLIAMS. Raiiitrar of TTa* Marki (IQUOR ITCENSE NOTICE Orena, on K-epar ol lutcrRd holder M luiuoi Iwrnaa no *:• of isrj granted to hri in iMpact ol a arcuden tfui at Ha.lItoad. Clli for prini.aK>n lo ua %  liquot ucanaeat , boafd and inin(la at. ; Oi' Iload. IM Mlcfiaat. -.i^ar. W K:A& £i*,':' y I w IV V, '. „ %  ill .'.., Md B. aiux-, Anpltcunl P -Thla apbllcMlon *IU he mi eil at a L-rernl.ta Coil.' h KnLtn roun. Dbtrm "A" •* Tui-ada IheSlh jfai of A-tfUU. IBBS al 11 o'clock I A McLKOD. Potto tfaclatraui DM, -A MMt i nHMMMMM, TUI CAS 0OOKH With Ever) lbin£U Want THF.IItOSTATIC CONTHOLI and Iti .<• to beep clean. %  ,tli-m bafere lt"a loo lale. Al your 0.. Sltuwrooni. ilay SU..I OK1.Y A rKW LOT FURNISHING ? MOV I. Ilk) A Huroaui SI:> up, Sinm..iia awl icr BedaUada ] m ft faal wlje. II and Flat Sri"*t i Iowa NN. Lath* Cradle*, lied* M up. niNINO .-inU olh-r Table. In Deaulilullv f.r-frd Ma ho can v Cedar, tl.rch n landed Danl. larder* 111 Up, Kiffvm, L.q.ioi Can. 1 M l riAMoia, o.'c.rt. Vtakvaa TI pe. %  \ IP I 'Ac; MISCELLANEOUS CUSHIONS WFTH IMPOHTEO SI'lllNC HI.!jn irNITB — SnUh.-J In OtimritL reaoy for Tapeatry Cover "% Ml C* each WUI tee aeld in lota of not |*n than 4 A|.p pi TIM Standard Aarr-r*" 'B'do* Co. l. Swan Sirael. Dial JSW S3 %  • %  2. ITALIAN BORDPRETI BPVNlCrao. fl IWalallnl In Twenly-Bve eharmlnti di *iaa Jo iDChaa wide uard at K I bwai, Strevt JUST received a %  hlprntnt el 0.'""r 1 Jieo aix-ad Cbancera. aoaur* ona now AUo a aaiai] aua. tCy of 6 vott Lull, r-record pla)en lloth the abore wli!t I. ,' %  % %  lie DoCOSTA A CO. LTD.. Elect IH|>I SB 7 M %  ..r, Telearaph. EoRland'a teadin Dally Ne oauer now arrivina in Darbadoa hr Al miy a few day* after publication i London. Coot Act Itn Oale, C/o. Adv.i < %  • Co.. Lid., Local Rrnraaan tally l*£ aim ir-.tfn WfeDDaNU OIPT—A few iroruna boaj uid No-cord Iron aeU. *ubt<-cl to apeci v.ddinB-iift allowance. A Barne* -b Lid i 7 x t I i t'A/I-!\ I WA-I' Club and Ind be-ond Uta beach nittaaa a**d Per (uU aeUewia: That Hull and : _.. FACTORY LTD isa MAKiiADoa rnz ntsuRANt-c CO LTD ailAlKS %  a BAMBADOa tHTPpINO at TRADING CO LTD *IIA"ES a *ipa arr aaxfROia PARISH I B) USD v I I U-J ST (J BONDS 4% a aim TBINIDAD BOND* a 10 TRINIDAD a TOBAGO 4. BONXka. The above m*nUot..d *hare* wlU be aat up far ante at PnbUc Auction, on PHdav tha 7Mh July. 1M2 ,.'. 1 p m M Seaty. Luoaa St rapt. 81 7 os-iT CarrMaNori 11B-i l l i II I igned will offer for naJ ( 1 their orhre. N. W. HIRh Street rlup. %  lain, on ffllday, the lath July •11. at a p m The dwelllaehmiae railed "VXNTNOB" ith (ha tond where.n, r • .amrt.rpj. nnUlnlna by art m. inurement ajfa luaro frat or thercn. out* iltiale n Comer of Pine Ro-d and 1*1 Avci Bauavhua InepacUon on Mondoya. Wcdna*da* end Frlda between Ihe hour* of 4 and V m on application I" the tenant Pnr further patt,r,i,-it and condltldbi COTTL*:. CAT1-ORD A CO. ID 7 -ftt i* %  •Eder.vilie*' aundlni on 3*64 mjuare faol of land al Ceorpa Slreot, %  oUavaio. Th,D*>ellincho atena frota Ihe fnlh to make use of local kmin Utl;' 4hT pilot vheBBni At no timi was the t'nlonlii Governniet:. a**ed far arrvlre. "The aaaly corparation aefc^e which opfwsws to hsve BBBBV sncBtsafBl poobibllktie* for Ihe 'u.un* i. the grawinf of ramie. eottoo subsUtum. Thla la run ,1. M. rllirl nil* hy an Xnirri tan with years of local experience. of 'showing the way'; what should %  low follow is a display of inter**'. enterprise But without the partnership of public tinanee with private enterprise, the high capital cost will discourage I'.mpetcnt hotel men from venturing into this highly specialised field" Ramie Estate The magazine does not refer to Church, on the Wfe id faelna an. %  %  SS.sau aqua re feet of lard facln* Lai fauna* at Bocklev. Chrtat church 4J4S aquare feet ol land at corner %  awaapton &**ituuoi Btfotta, HrLjcAll the at*ive land are aac.iient buUdUW Mir*. The i.hoie wlU be *d up for ' tha MUt July. IBM al uur a 1IUTC11LSSO.S \ UAN/H AUCTION n\DtR THE IVORY HAMMER n> HietrucUena raccivrd from tin in-nrnn-e In I *, .It acl! ,t the Oener.i on rnday .'iuv Mm Ii 1047-1" H P AuaUp Van iDoaMCOd In accident. Aian I. Ihe Brlli.h Council ill IB*I ... ik.n, otder Tone Ca*h 1I.IT> u t 2 \> m. VtWCBWT OR1PTITH. %  30 l.aa—4n L'NDKR THE SILVER nAMMKR Thund.iv 31*1 Mr Prod Dennett I laia The Cotlace num Dtatlllerle* 1 oierK RocH '•nM.ll: TROTMAN • CO., PfiJ M HOCKET MUSKY really earned iy r ecom mending SB new lubxrlbcri iv IXDUTUSION In one ni.mih 1.7.SI—On II ... ... .i. i SUITI J>I:U;T YOUR l*lC(>au b .-omiiiend.iia RSEDIe*PUaiON OtAoln 1:1 parUculan from the RED 11 nee i T u—as TWENTY-FIVE DOLLARS e>t "V iflkr ul oppoaition ol auctt mf.Mr.iUmi. The trade mark ran h> een oil applMatton at my oihce. Dated ll.i. ltd dy of Jul; ins U. WUJ.IAUS. Ra-nirar %  >' Tn I %  ; B> %  tTNDKR TinSILVER I'UIMII! rp. utor* lo the Eitate ul Mr* .oil aell the rmi Haaui Freight Service "Tha Booker Line, which a' you know provides British Guiana with a valuable freight and passenger service to and Iron Liverpool, like most British shipping companies carried good cargoes in 1B51 ut comparative!?. high freight rates. It was thus able to earn good ; "Throughout the year and In all, thccoiporalion approved the British Honduras stock farm be investment m British Honduor bamanai sCbenMS, but It mentions ris of £1,732.000. Perhaps a third the development of the 1.500^f the money has been spent, but cre ramie estate, of which 250 nstead of Increasing the wealth "£res have so far been planted nd ralslni the morale of the ColThe whole plantation la_ expected ->ny, successive failures are hav' £e in production in 1950, it says rig the reverse effect" ''Preaent plans are to produce dried 'China grass' ribbons, it Projects adds, "but processing developments in tho United States and Coinei.lent with the pubUcauon other countries are being closeiy / Mr. Steelc's report, the latest followed and if any commercial ussUB of tho corporation's quarterde-gumming process emerges. magazine, "Colonial Developplant may be set up on the estate .ent." refers briefly to some of to turn out fllasse for export to ne projects in British Honduras, spinning factories." — B.O.P. SH!PPr,G NOTICES pnyment for it will Inevitably be tha beginning of this yaar. howirregular owing to the vagaries ot t-vor, operating costs hnve ronprixluction and transport. tmuotasU rlSeo while freight The company's sugar und-i u-ndinK to fa'.i. .'i i I I takings did well in 1951, thanks fore count on n repetition of 195 to good autumn weather, good results. management, t\nr than in II I, btrl rosul' CQCepVXr** group of sugar estates produced 157,324 totia of sug.tr In 1951. aj ngalnst 138.772 tons in 1950 and It Is hoped that the 1952 crop will bo even higher. Sugar Agreement Mr. Campbell welcomed the .signing of the Commonwealtii Sugar Agreement and told his >iiareholders: "It will not protect the highcost producer. On the contrary, will by Its very nat b need for the utmost -.lucid .iiid will only establish pries -utlciuni to stimulate Ihe llow of sutrling sugar which this country so urgently necda. Now that by thla ^.TrrtBrrM the fears and anxleUes which In the paat have iahlbrted full production have been swept :|de, our objective la to protill disappointing. Thi a sphere of our business which t still in the tin <.tiou and which la clearly Buffering from tho heritage of the jwi and of the wnr. Any modest profits which CAB bu mad* present must be ploughed bacl: into the business in order tha assets may be restored as quick!; as possible. More Ruin Sold "Although United Rum Mermpo e chants, Ltd.. sold 50 pe more rum during 1951 than the. sold in I960, their prollts droppe owing to tho continued steep ru in lue costs of productive ..n distribution. To dale this yei we have, disappointingly, sold rasttfa tasB rum than in 1951, although more than to the sain-. date in 1950. Reduction n sales, coupled with increasing cost;-. ^u„ lhr^. ttM ,„, o. ~ ft"*' "'i %  i5^Sf.?. ? fl s TAKE NOTICE iTBD, BT HELP CAhHUJI AND OeTtCI. ASS1STANTPtabj or Pemala Apply bv letter and fci trraon. S H. Chaaonaan, IM. hoebupl: .treat |f T M—ft). a 7.w -tn L S. WILSON •;--'V;y.'--v/ 1 ' • .,'.: %  .: %  piGWEItOilLMKL'TlMi \ I'niliT the Auspices & ol 5; THE BARBADOS WOR'.CtRS' UNION and thi2AHBAD0* LABOUR PARTY in honutir of HR. :N. W. MAME. Q.C. M.KR. labour Leader, Jamaica Sundny. 2T(h July IK At 8.30 p.m. At QUEEN'S. PARK a.. Speaker Mr. N. W MANIatY. I Q.C| HUM. Oihtr Sprakert Mr O. H. ADAMS. o C.MG.. M.C.R ^ Mr. T A. MARRY^ Llla-MlliR. g Old reliable Compnnv aetabtuhed Sv Ylnldad lor many veer* require* th>< ervfetea ol a roinpelclM aoj experl-nceil l.n-rer for Rronch Oftlcc to be -t.'li.hnl in L'aihbil.t and S-tii.inb BM. Pleaae aand lull detail* .n>l %  almi required with wn-ill Pawparitiire lo Advocate Uo> OT a/a >dvocal Co. It 7 M— ltd -gulled — preferably one Of i nv Mm ran i lo work hard a* good urea %  1 of telertid applicant AbplbaaUur.1 Ire a ted In "Irlct CONSUL l PllRD MfiTon COMPANY I.SM1a iirituh comp*n>, Maruilsctuni i trade or buitne** nod..-, t. an, t Rueet London. W I. Una land i a* applied for the reguiratlon of %  I,.ie n-erk. In J"arl "A" of Bagtalar In •eapatt of motor tend vclutleand then I art*; eaplnra and put* t i-Ul be %  Mitred tu fefietcr 11,^ MIP Utefl one rn.ith Irom tbe Hrd dav „r .'.iy ItSa, uniaae nune beraou thall In t.ie n^anthnc alva noiv l i ire al n. office "f oppuattlo.i of *uch Th* Wade mark can !> .en on uupllcaboii al n. on. Dahd Ibl* 3rd day of July 1P9B. II WIIJ.lAMs. Hem.liar ol Trad %  neat and Card TaM.i 'I.T. Tablaa, Fo f Tablaa: Settee and Upho'.. R.-cWer.itOiOt: Olana ft Chin.. Dinner and Tea SeiVbMS. Vrrv Itondrome Mllitarv Chct with Br*. riltlna* SlngU I'mc Dedalrad with Vooo BprUirpi ami Deep Sleep Maltrewc. Mabo. and Cedar t *r*aai. Che.i of Dniwera, Large Bg Maho*. Plata. Sewl" Machine Mtrrvra. Linen. Plug Pons • P.b*. tlectrvr Pan. Uirdera. 2 Burn BM*} Hot J'latc, HFC Refr'.eeratoi. 1 Rumer Oil Stove* and Oven. Kitchen 1'teneila and Table. Scale* Anlhutiun. and AmartllM, Ullle* and numarri'it • >( value Til. PiutiUUr* K. Moth Antique and Mode n. Sale lt.?t o-cloeb Term* CASH BltANRER TKOTMAN ot CO Anctlonrer* 7 ia-xh loi United Rum Merchants JreBaV* But while bhoriagc of mont; and high duties are bringim. about a substantial reduction in tbe i.imumpikm of all spirits ir. Britain, there is little evidem. ituuelion in the dcmanu for rum as ugulnst other spirit.The company'b ahare of thi lotai ruin consumed in the United Kingdom has actually increased, which agw tkg highh for the salesmanship of the company, sad Mr. Campbell Bulk Kum Mr, Campbell reported a net "We must expect the worl.i profit tor tbe company Brtoa for sugar to be low, the £860,677 in the year end in • demand for bulk rum to be less December 31, 1951, as against —_ and there has already been an £435,453 In the previous year %  *•'"'' I .ivalanche In the price of molasTotal net assets of the group In -—. which we shall begin to feel cieased during Uie year from the second half of this year." £4,891,650 to £5,614,523. said. —B.U.P. sterling nugar from the ajnalle*t aereacr In tha sharteat time nt the least cost. Only by reaching this objective ran the future prosperity of the sng.ir industry of British Guiana and thus of the Colony be aa*urrd. %  Hut next year, said Mr. Camp..s Table. upri'M boll, will hnve Its full shar of !!oWi>-. chSinieT"^-"* commercial problems for the •*'**. T^p De-k eompany. It Is not yet known CUraa, Bool *" %  ,"" v wiiii Bran. I^^.. v ... ^ %  <, vi* %  --. ....,^..p^* %  ,f, ,av\ T r. r\ i n. .^ %  i o?£* T JS!! l "" „ D T -u \aM*' : u n t pr,rwl win receive for Ms ** free sugar, rum and molasses. TAKE NOTICE ZEPHYR TNEf, a BilUab Cninpani. 1 i addreaa la SB. SEA AND MR TRAFFIC In Carlisle Bay taboo nar Lady Nooloan, Schooner Harj t Caruln*. Schooner Ci-Wnla iV Vctlooner BmcRnc, Schooner Pra„. .%  W. Si lid I Mv Joan VI V Canbbee, rMitoon,-, Mary M. LewM, lehoanor ZlU V*>nlta Heho,>ner Burma I> Srhoon-i Fnlerpnte .•% 'Four CD.C.Faaures In B.H." But Ramie Plan h Efficient LONDON. FOUR FAILURES of Colonial Development CorpOHrtson. schemes in British Honduras are listed by the London Daily Telegraph in a report from its special correspondent, T. S. Steele, who has been making a lour of the British Caribbean. The Corporation's stock farms h.ive already been closed. The bU :>anana growing scheme at Sunn ("reek if likely to be closed also The Fort George Hotel in Belize i. another expensive failure, the aper says, and the Corporation has failed to help trie Colony meet is ..ugur MUOLI un;n the CecO.'.onwcnlth Sugar Agreement. wlU bo enUUed to ivaiaicr Ih* a-rt.e .Schooner Si. or.i i,on> Ihe lid %  . July ls*J ..n,.-. aaae pei a .11 ... '"lara, Mv I 0 iuM> wan a t a—d at. Last year there was a toss of xzoooa. The month It i-t hoped to ship 20,00 •rtems, HA>H Mr. Steele. but h. adds: "This and any foreareable production on i 1 would merely mrau piling Bl further loa n ea." Pilot Scheme He criticises the corporation for Mr. Steele. reporting from Benot attempting a pilot scheme to 'i int 4.P viv "^ %  %  *"** """ Uw ia Irouawo ereetfind out whether berlBDBa could b< t -,i for the sL.If at tbe Iguana grown successfully on a larg (arm are standing calc. Had local guidance boci nd storage buildasked* ha says, the corporalioi Jraek stock emply Fnrro ings havo been abandoned In would have learned that, whili various stage* of completion, the land could and does successVehicles, not in use since last fully grow grapefruit and oranges year, were made road-worthy MO one has been successful with for the drive to Ueln ny thing but small patches bananas grown on a scale which would not interest the corporation "A third exjionslve failure, 1 fcr CAA 000" said Mr Ru**i*> continues Mr, Steele, "Is likely t.. ell the bwldbig roads ^^ron George Hotel at Befit" This is a magnificem building with 33 rooms and will cost some i 200,000, about double the originFloating Bridge "The project cost the corporaion .. the building, roads nad been cut. a floating bridge nstailed on the river ninning through the property and 800 .erwr.f hn^i^£a-wnd I"" W estimated cost. Already It ha: vdTy inaclS.e y bwn decided, to write off £75.00. "Ilut the colony's loss Is the •/hole of the intended capital in.cstiiien-. for future production and even more serious In the morale of the people. Attempts have been made by the British ol this capital investment and UMBI to try to make the hotel pay it' Bray, "The Colony needed a hotel, but not on this scale. And. it la asked. why has the hotel manager spent months already in the Colony on Uniiduraa Government and by prithe corporation puyroll. living"in a enterprise to save soanething corporation house, before the hotel can hope to open? There Is Uie prospect that this will have lasted a year before the hotel opens." Export Quota Mr. Steele points out that the < atony has been awarded an export quota of 35,000 tons of sugar a year. Production at present la the wreck, but so far nothing has come from tliarn." Now It hi fr*rsd that thi UULB Creek bAMSara achrm. I -is an auUvrrlftcd cau.l..; uf £4JTf>00 m.iy IT rloaoa. A. rOt pBtt of l.OOO.UUO sbMBB uf bananas to lln tain | 7BALAND \J pi lALle, IftW UMITtl). I'M IS -aLOUCBerXH'U acheduled to ir.e 14th. firtabano July Mh. arrhffia at ^rbadoa about Auruat (th. in addition lo genera) carpo tola Taaoel i ample apace for chlUed and hard I Ipptanl on thraush fUlla of %  uimlpment at Trinidad to i, dana. Leeward and Wit Jward jantJ For further parUenlai* apply — tNXKSS WITHT A CO.. LIB.. TRINIDAB. BM PA %  <>-,• co.. iy,'.v,'.Ve4otr Tho M. V CAR1SBBC will accept raise "'Ml paaaenBen lor Domlnlta. Anlliua. At. Kit!-. Nv.* and Monlaerrat Sailing on the Bk>d July IS9S. Antlguo. St. Kitt*. Monbwnat RMHIna ra J..ly ISM. Ill MIIIIUM* ASSOCIATION l Ceaalfaoi — Mil W^X.W*y ^^ Stuwutdp fa 9nt. NBW TOBrl SFIVKF. NEW ORLEANS SERVICE. sntruBomtD •SA: ,IO "AH irac •ThiA" \ gTBMMBSr ANADIAN 8ERVICF. SAILS mow Arete** Barea^aa July lUi July asth Auguat 11th Augual Bin in i r. M r. M". • .urutt Uth for ST. JOrUS, N %  au ST LAWIUthXE RJ\-ri( POHTB ROBERT THOM LTD.—NEW YORK A GULF SERVICE Appli:— UA COSTA o% CO.. LTD. CANADIAN SERVICE V/*r.OV/.V/V.V,V*V/.V.V.'.W.'/,V/.'//,V! FOR BEST QUALITY E\AiMELWilKE Shop at I rare CENTmAL t\u>n. O I Oil SALE NO. 27, BROAD STREET The undersigned will offer tor sale at thenOffice, No. 17, High Street, llndgetown. on Friday the 25th July, 1952, at 2.30 p.m. THE MESSUAGE OR STORE known as No. 27, Broad Street. Bridgetown, standing on 4,340 square feet or thereabouts and at present occupied by Messrs. T. R. Evans. Inspection on applicatlo For further particulars i i on the premise*. nd conditions of isle, apply to: — COTTLE, CATFORD £. CO. 1S.7.52—7n. QOOD CARE COUNTS .... SO PRODUCTS MR. PLANTER WE HAVE SHOVELS • AGRICULTURAL FORKS • SICKLES • PICK AXES • HOES • WHEEL BARROWS ROPE IN ALL SIZES "OLTS IN ALL SIZES GENERAL HARDWARE SUPPLIES RICKETT STREET (OpVMlle M OIBecl PHONE Wll