Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text




Har badtos

SSS

ESTABLISHED 1895

»



«



GHAVAM RESIGNS OF

Raise U.S. Flies | ,

Crowd Clamours
For Mossadegh

TEHERAN, July 21.
TTANEH handed his res-
y night after failing to put

“PREMIER GHAVAM ES SUL
ignation to the Shah on Monda
down bloody rioting.

Supporters of the former Premier Mossadegh paraded

through the city, bearing Persian flags
nation has scored a victory,
as Prime Minister.

and shouting “the
we want Mossadegh to return
We also demand a trial of traitors.”

The crowd marched to Mossadegh’s house begging him to|}

accept Premiership.

The Persian Parliament met in a special session and
Deputies are voting for a new Prime Minister. As Mossa-
degh’s supporters haye suddenly increased their numbers
it is expected he would be reappointed.

Prominent National Front Deputies announced the
defeat of Ghavam over Teheran Radio and promised that

they will do everything to reinstate Mossadegh, All shops !

were closed today but suddenly opened up this evening
on hearing the news of Mossadegh’s victory and flags were
flying from all public buildings. ‘

Mossadegh Deputies spread
alarmist reports of rioting and
said 300 to 500 were killed today
throughout the country. Despite
a flood of rumours there were
cnly 20 confirmed deaths here.
These Deputies said a general



U.K. And U.S,
Consult On



strike is in effect throughout Iran

and that in some areas scores of |

people have been killed

Only Way Out

One pro-Mossadegh Deputy,
Khosro Chassgi said Mossadegh
supporters in Parliament had in-
creased to 33 Deputies and that
they advised the Shah that the
only way out of the present chaos
is to re-appoint Mossadegh

Rioting climaxed the week-
end of disturbances that left
scores injured and hundreds

jailed. Eight Sherman tanks and|
six truck loads of troops guard-|
ing Parliament Square withdrew |
later in the afternoon after pro- |
Mossadegh Deputies had appealed
to rioters to return home, Demon-
strators stood, silent one minute
then dispersed shedding tears
However, their efforts to sejze
the Parliament building touched

Tran Crisis
By H. C. THALER
LONDON, July 21.

Britain and the United States
were reported on Monday to have
begun direct consultation on the
explosive situation in Iran. With
a simultaneous government crisis
in Egypt there was fear and sen-
sitivity that the Middle East might
be engulfed in a wave of unrest
with | unpredictable consequences.

Britain and the United States
were said to be considering what
steps might become necessary if the
situation worsens in Iran, So far
they have not taken any decisions
and hoped the Iranian government
could restore order.

The interests of neighbouring
Russia in Tran has been made only
too clear in the recent past. Offi-

off the biggest battle of the, fay.|Sials stated go far they had no in-





























“Fa e: z
oa

*

i





U.S. Sends
Memorandum
To Israeli

WASHINGTON, July 21.
A state department spokesman



|

| Must Decide

TUESDAY. JULY 2, 1952

FICE



Democrats Open |
Angry Convention

(By LYLE C. WIL

THE FERUDI
their thirty-first N

apparent ho

SON)
CHICAGO, July 21.
and rudderless Democrats opened
al Convention on Monday with littl:
of preventing a factional split that could
jpaneriie chances oi keeping the White House in
ovember.

The party's 1652 dele® es, flanked by alternates and
thousands of guests and spectators, trooped to a big meet-
ing hall by the stockyards for the angriest and most con-
fused Demeeratic Convention in 20 years.

Privy Council



Many of them would like to
caraft for the presidential race
sf0vernor Stevenson of Iilinoi
who delivered an impassioned
plea for harmony in his main
address of the opening session,

But harmony ‘hopes seemed
certain to explode by Monday
night or Tuesday.

Stevenson, who doesn’t want
nomination, but hasn't said “no”

Ownership

LONDON, July 21,

ae , 0 the draft, told delegates to
Pitains nphest court, the | “orget personalities and concen-
ivy ‘oune. gan heariny pate on principles. Above all
Monday an appeal against the

Hong Kong court judgment that he pleaded with them not to re-







ONDON BREEZE makes handling the bridal veil a bit.of a problem as Gerald David Lascelles,
oom e al Queen Elizabeth II, leaves St. Margaret's, Westminster, with his bride. The groom is
the son of Mary, Princess Royal, an aunt of Queen Elizabeth. The bride is the former Angela Dowding,
daughter of Lady Fox and step-daughter of Sir John Fox. Because of a cold, Queen Elizabeth could not
be present, but Prince Philip and Princess Margaret Rose attended. (international Radiophoto)

‘Eight Odd’

iwardea@ the ewnership of 40 civ.
iirplanes valued at more than
£1,000,000 to the Chinese Com-
munist government. The aireraft
are at Hong Kong government air-
field at Kai Tak.

The appeal was brought by
Civil Air Transport Incorpora‘ed
of Delaware United‘ States #d
the aircraft were formerly part
af the assets of Central Air Trats-
port Corporation that was deserio-
ed as an “unincorporated ¢ ere
cial enterprise ef the gove ment |
of the Republic of China.

“Because of the international
implications of the case it has
been ordered to be heard by the
Privy Council by a special der
in Council,

Counsel for the Delaware Cor-!
poration, Siy Hartley Shawerbss |
said the international implications '

had grown graver owing to the! privilege or people.”

peat the hate, breeding “carnage,”
which characterized the Republi-
can struggle two weeks ago
between the camps of General
Dwight D. Eisenhower and Sen-
tor Robert Taft.

“Human Rights”

Vice-president Walter Reuther
of the Congress of Industrial or-
wanizations said on Monday that
unless the Democratic Party
adopts a strong “No-Compromise
ef Human Rights” platform with
an antifillibuster plank, labour
leaders “will not deliver the
vate” in November.

In an impassioned plea to the
Democratic platform Writing
Committee, Reuther said that the

| Democrats cannot compromise on

any of the basic issues and win
the election. He told the com-
mittee ‘you must stand for
He denied

‘Hearing Of Writ |

For Contempt Of

Court Continues |
Chief Justice Will Sum Up To-day

HIS LORDSHIP the Chief Justice Sir Allan Collymore,
Kt,, will sum up to the Special Jury empanelled to decide
on the Rule of Court issued against Colonel R. T. Michelin
and the Advocate Company :or alleged Contempt of Court
when hearing of the Writ continues this morning at 10.3(
o'clock
At 3 o'clock yesterday after-
noon, Mr. Reece, Q.C,, Counsel fo;

the Advocate Company, co-de- Harriman Tries

fendant with Colonel R, T. Miche- |

lin, concluded

*‘Objects”’
Fly Over U.S.

WASHINGTON, July 21.
The Air Force disclosed Monday
night that National Airport Radar
operators reported picking up
eight unidentified “objects” on
adar screens about midnight last
| Saturday. It also said that airline
| pilots travelling south and west
lof here reported seeing lights mov-
ling up and down and horizontally
in the sky about the same time,
Latest report of a strange “ob-
| jects’—Air Force carefully avoid-
}ed saying “ flying saucers”—came
as the Air Force was investigating
the report by two airline pilots

{who said they saw eight “glow-
ling red-orange” discs flying in for-

150 miles of here

13

mation south

on July

Korean war, The aircraft were}ihat any labour leader can actu

a six-hour address To Halt Revolt The Air Force said airports traf-





i
Fas ; in which he submitted to the jury Fa ia rol tower picked up on its
The outlawed pro-Communjst aes of the Soviet moves in| affirmed on Monday that the} flown to Hong Kong by Chiang; ally deliver the votes of Labour that there was nothing in the CHICAGO, July 21 ae tes eight unidentified
Tudeh Party is reported to have | Onin rae was always the pos-} United States has no intention of) Kai Shek’s Nationalist. gov-|\Jnion members unless the party|article, a report of a speech de-! averii) Harrimar ean aia Fontes |retyects" in the vicinity of An-
taken a prominent part in the fo yh indirect manipulations moving its embassy from Tel-A-|¢rnment when it wis re-|takes a strong stand on vital] livered by the other co-defendant, ;), a Sess Aneel Presidential nom. |drew’s Air Force base near here
MOPRITg. FS Sad Cheetos iG Tudeh Pant Penne CPTTACAD Vie to Jerusalem, Fhig spoleessj organized by the British | spi ieeues. But with s strong Demo- which constituted a contempt of! ination took personal domimat a about midnight last Saturca;
SDOURAg. ANG BRAN Somes B08 ‘Ex ode i man sald department memeran-|» De jure government. On: De-|eratic platform he-sald a Labour Court, and invited them to return | ¢ . Monday of Rae to block The Report said the objects were
with smashing his statue. parts on the Soviet and Mid-| dum to that effect has been sent|cember 12, 1949, they were sold| leader can use his influence with| "su, guilty” verditt against the\ihe wide Spen bedi Among No. \movingmk speeds ranging from
—UP, dle Eastern affairs cautioned{io the Israeli government. It|by the Nationalists to the qpr-|: workers to point out issues} So rendant Company York's 94 Corivention vogs.}100 to 130 mites per tiou,—-\Wwiitt
strongly that the overthrow of Mo-} said Israel has not formally | decéssors in ti of the Delaware! and the ‘worker himself will Mx. Walbatt, iy spite of the rule Frat af He us t a security g1.|made the mystery even. greater
ve Mossa brings with it, | requested, although ii has reveal-| Corporation, ree or four weeks| deliver the vote. The bread box ; ’ P arriman and mutual se y
a8

automatically, renewed

Communists

G.nger of Soviet efforts to inter-

ed plans for moving its foreign
office to Jerusalem,

later the British government re-

is tied to a ballot box.”

ing by His Lordship that Counsel | )ninistrators aall



since traditional “saucers” usual-

cognized the Communist govérn-

for the plaintiff would have the

appeared pers

| the New York delegate cause in| ly are said to zipp by at speeds



ie as og hour The
fere in Iranian affairs, The spokesman said the! ment as the De jure government] He said that the C.1.O, and Its}right of reply to the legal sub-|an effort to stem a revolt among | OVE lrcenithe abi eola 2 plane
Cancel Mossadegh diplomacy has in the| “United States has always sup- unions worked for Truman in the! missions made by counsel for the|his home delegation Vou | shat left National Airport shortls
past’ apparently satisfied the} ported the international’ regime] The Privy Council must now] 1948 election beeause of the| Defendant Company, did not claim|tor me is to vote for th: | ter 3.00 a.m. Sunday reporte
: e Kremlin “because it withheld oil} for Jerusalem that will proyide|decide whether that change in re-| Democratic Party's stand on|that right, and aaid that he “would: principles — of Franklin Roose} ¢ aul onde lights between Wash-
Meetin from the west, weakened the west’s} protection for holy places and ba) cognition affected the proprietary} Human Rights in its platform. | prefer to err on the side of cau-,velt and Harry Truman” he} ate and Martinsburgh, West
{position in Iran and weakened the] acceptable to Israel and Jordan|rights already obtained by third| He said ‘that his union printed! on, rather than deal with cases| (old delegates, After an unoffici. iota: UP.
TORONTO, July, 21. |Country itself making it an easier} as Well as to the world com-|parties outside China and which | same 8,000.000 political hand{with which he had already dealt,|Survey of the democratic stafe| Y'FBNN
: unist dele-|Ptey for potential revolutionary ! munity.” resulted in the aircraft being}bills for Truman’s candidacy and! {,, find that he was not entitled to. ( hairman Paul Fitzpatrick recess
A meeting of Commynis 1 Rea|Zevelopments. Information reach-) He said the memorandum em-|registered in the United States.| “rang hundreds of thousands of|peply on them, jed the session until later in th«
Otene eltte aouind Were ing London claimed the Tudeh| phasized that the United States|Shaweross said there was no; doorbells. But unless you give; cay. The recess however was no

Labour Relations
I

rre

At this point,
hearing ended.
*‘|began a week ago was expected

to finish in about two or three

; days, but twice the Court of Grand |
Sessions had to be adjourned to}

| permit hearing of the case V'alks On Defaulted

Party were already active exploit-
ing the pro-Mossadegh demonstra-
tions.

soe. sith lay lled until after several delega
The ay *| ca p é Yr severe Megat
The mater wich ‘including James Farley left th

| meeting room, —-U.P.

government continues to adhere
to the policy that there should
be international control of Jeru-
salem and the United Nations
should be given a chance to re-
view the situation with a view
to arranging a status for Jerusa-

authority to support the Hong
Kong court’s view that the succes-
sion of one government to another
could affect im any way rights!

@ On page 3 a :
| Steel Strike Cuts

on Wednesday was called off
today when North Korean and
Rumanian delegates failed to ar-
rive,

Airline officials said the dele-
gates from two satellite countries}
had missed their plane which}

us the tools to work with we ean-,
not deliver the vote.” —UP



re

OV



—U.P.



Get Fresh Boost:





KINGSTON, July 2}

Gen. Ridgway

Jamaica broke new ground
; jem which would be satisfactory 1 . { J labour relations to-day with the
arrived on Sunday, } to all i ‘ iongime Pr tion | Law and Fact . ae a Joint Industrial
A seven member Russian deles| In Greece “rt emphasized that the United lruce Talks: odue It is expected that hearing witl| Jap Bonds Start ey Ro direct. and control
gation arrived on Friday and ha States ; “ EAST HARTFORD ecticut,|be concluded to-day when on
nisaned to nike Sams otha’ tte States has no plans for transfer. , Connecticut,

ATHENS, July 21.

labour relations and employment
ring its













: ; ; embassy to Jerusalern. = 2 July 21, |resumption His Lordship will sum NEW YORK, July, 21. -onditions on the Kingston
day ore the conference) General Ridgway ‘arrived by| ‘The memorandum also made tt Brief Sessions! Pratt and Whithey aircraft/up, and the jury retire to con- Representatives of Britien,) eau,
res Tadit a Basen! Pai, sag) on a, eres five; Gear that the United States gov-| ' division of United Aircraft Cor-|sider and return a verdict on both | united States and French holders Governor Sir Hugh Foot said
s “3 =z storey That een ee at a reece.| ernment is cerned over ‘ t poration disclosed oy Monday | questions of law and facet. xf about 400,000,000 defaulted | ; satest development in
Poland and China are expected | He will visit Salonika on Tuesday | decision a seeoel ede _ PANMUNJOM, July 21. | that the steel sitike ia aaeiee | : When " neatins resumed yester- jenanain bonne are scheduled to Sort ptt Peoseas ‘field of indus-
at the conference in addition ta)where he will inspect Greek| move its foreign office to Jerusa-| Allied and Communist truce! into its production of engines for day morning, His Lordship asked | ‘cet here with a Japanese delega-| Pijai ‘relations since unionism
dclegsiies trom @5 other coun-| frontiers. lem - —U.P. negotiators held a twenty-minute armed forces, : Mr Reece for further understand-| ion at 7 p.m. G.M,.T. on Monday ak introduced here.
tries. It is believed that the; A Greek flag with an inscrip- : ae secret session On Monday, but The aireraft firm said material ing on a point Mr, Reece had made} ‘n an effort to reach agreement on The Council admit six em
Communist charges that germ|tion against Ridgway was hoisi- apparently made no progress) shortages resulting from the} tast Friday as to there being thre« itstanding pre-war claims, ployers representatives, six
warfare has been used by United|ed by supposed Communists on Truman Back toward settling the prisoner of| trikg will force it to reduce an Cand potnce ane ait AREY cveskatatives witht” 10
Nations troops in Korea would|the building where the American | war deadlock. Some observers) Gojiveries to military services ota ae ess i | James Grafton Rogers, Presi-| Hs" acemt poll. is divided as
be one of the main wrangles at, mission offices are housed. Police At We A believed that the brevity of] ing veduce working hours. It OM os Reece said that the High{sent of the American Bondhold-| sotjows four B.1.T.U., . one
the conference. —UP. removed it. —UP. Lor recent meetings indicated that the} said the shorter work week would | ,. a we —_ a 4 _ Protective Council said the] yow.u.—uU.P.W.U one T.UC
two sides have again reached the go into effect August 11th Courts in England went on all the ‘iy aakaduled nonteranaae are a 7a” Mveaeh BLEU.
P eat ae tae “Nothing new to say” stage in ”~ gust up, |time. In Barbados some Superior x f to delegates only, with the island supervisor elected _ first
° resident Truman return talks. —* |Courts went on continually, those} P&" ea, de oe a ge 9 . f Couh
Violent Earth uake his office on Monday for the first Sunday's meeting lasted 12 like the Common Pleas, the Chan 1ess excluded. ohn peg af oe So
Sune eine ke beceihe a = — minutes and Saturday’s 29. How- NO QUORUM AT: cery, ate., but the Court of Gran sia sadder wn. nelolon tne LST TRGe OF cent aeelnees ae
e assed b: ath gand Cc wen, a oe a ee Sessions died. If His Lordshit} woss af any development on the] chairman.
Ania frum: = d ‘ rib- a att) sam, 00 We re MEETING OF HOSPITAL vould Jook at cases which hag sis of preliminary understand- The government Labour De
Ss Os nge €s Jed as feeling “chipe gee side or her ae aeoa lift oe een cited by Learned Counsel, it] jo. petween delegates which will] partment is pushing a plan for
: news ackout imposed on ,

LOS ANGELES, July 21. |

A VIOLENT EARTHQUAKE, which felt “like a ride |
on a “bucking brone” rolled through California on Monday,
leaving “many dead and injured”. At least 10 are dead
and in the little desert town of Tehrachapi, the home of the
California Women’s State Prison, the long rolling waves |
of the quake, which began at 11.55 G.M.T. and was felt in |
diminishing strength for the next 45 minutes. were record-
ed as far north as Santa Rosa, sixty miles north of San
Francisco and south to Ensenada, Mexico, two hundred
miles south of Los Angeles, and east to Renc, Nevada and
Brawley, California.

The quake was recorded as of
7.75 intensity by the Rev. Joseph
Lynch of New York’s Fordham
University, who described it as
California’s “worst since the 1906!
San Francisco quake.”

Six of the victims are reported
to have died when the main hotel

Jamaica Is Insect
Control Centre

(Fron Our Own Correspondent)



KINGSTON, July 21.
Jamaica has been chosen to
poe] technical personnel conduct-
ing an intensive regional insect
control campaign throughout the
Caribbean Dr. M. F. De Caires of|
W.H.O. announced today.

Personnel will be drawn
mainly from the Caribbean area
consisting of Public Health
Officers, insect control, an area
adviser and four sanitarians at
supervisory level. This will grad-
ually increase until eight officers
are stationed in the area by next
year.

at Tehrachapi, an old two storey
brick strueture, collapsed, Others
died as they dashed in fright into‘
the street and were caught by the
falling buildings.

The huge Tehrachapi Women’s
Prison, was “made unusable” by
the violent action of the tremor.

There are no reported injuries
at red adobe brick plant, which
thas been described as “America’s
j}most beautiful prison.” The plant,
which looked more like an estate
than a penal institution is com-
pletely “unusable” according to
ihe Kern County Sheriff's Office.



The campaign will take in’ all
Caribbean territory now carrying
out an insect control programme

sponsored by U.N.LC.E.F. W.H.O,|

and the local government At
present there are two pro-
grammes in’ the area sponsored
by U.N.LC.E.F. and W.H.O. in
Jamaica and Grenada.

The Jamaica government has
already allocated $300,000 yearly
for the

the first two vears of
mpaigr

Prison officials said that the in-
|mates and the staff miraculously
“escaped with their lives” as they
ran from the building. Emergency
supplies were immediately called
for, and big circus tents for hous-



ing plus sanitary equipment and
food are being rushed to the strick-
en prison.

Two railroad tunnels between
Tehrachapi and Marcel on the
Southern Pacific main line be-
tween San Fr sco and Los An-«
I sel € U.P

of State Dean Acheson was his
only ealler, Press Secretary Joseph
Short said Truman probably will

|spend a quiet bit of time watch-

ing the Democratic National Con-
vention on television befare he
goes to Chicago himself later in
the week.



Chinese Beginning
Tu Hate Russians

CHICAGO, July “21.
Democratic Senator Paul H.
Douglas, said Monday that the
Chinese are beginning to hate
their Russian masters as a
o@ the Korean war and that
“soil is therefore being
for revolt.
He said also that when Rus-
sian Premier Josef Stalin dies a

struggle for power may break
out in the Soviet Politburo
“which would convulse Russia

and render it incapable
sion.”

ee
Couple Completes
Automobile Tour

NEW YORK, July 21.

A middle aged Indiana poupte
arrived in New York on Monday
after completing the journey of
which they had.dreamed for all
31 years of their married lide.
Howard Jones, 52, and his wife
Tyrah 51, had completed their two
year 40,000 mile auto trip that toek



them through most of the Wes-
tern Herhisphere.~ They arrived
from Buenos Aires, Argentina, im
the liner “Brazil” of the Moore
McCormack Lines, Also aboard |
was tk pecially rigged Chevro-
which on June 13, 1950, they

left Dunkirk, Indiana, where

a funeral home.—U,P.

talks since July 4. Both sides had
agreed to conduct talks In seeret
in a seemingly futile hope that
an agreement could be reached

more §| ily than in the prev~

The issue holding
is the Communis
all 170,000 war prisoners h

eld R.
allies should be returned. Allic

would return those who
want to return to Communism—
some 70,000. oft :

liaison cers injected a
new puzzler imto the situation on
Mi y by seerna, We sicorn ise
the ternational ttee of

oe ae CEeareaens used oy

088 0

to the nhied Nations

E fa to list the

names of 101 Chinese prisoners.

Comnaunists had previously de-

nounced the International Red
Cross as an “Imperialist Tool.”



up the truce'not held due to the
ts’ demand that! quorum.

|

ADVISORY COMMITTEE

The meeting of the Barbado
General Hospital Advisory Com-
mittee which was scheduled
take place at the Hospital a
3 oelock yesterday afternoon wa
lack of

to

On the agenda, the Committe
were to advise the Medical Super-
intendent on the cost of providing
furniture, etc, for the newly-
acquired property, “Avalon”
Jemmett’s Lane and Collymos
Rock—the first step in the pro-
posed extension of the Hospitai
and also on the estimated cost
of a complete overhaul of the
electrical installation of the Ho
pital.

Members present were D
H. G. Cummins, M.C.P., Chair-
man, Mrs. J. A. Martineau an!

at

Dr. D, S. Gideon, Medical Super-Jing with contempt which woula

intendent.



Fish Fly Half Around World

NEW YORK, July 21

Six hundred small-mouthed
‘Bass fingerlings, a gift from New
York State and Governor Thomas
‘Dewey to Bao Dai, Vietnam
Chief of State. left Idlewild sir-
port aboard a Pan American
Airways plame Monday on a trip
which will take them more than
half way around the world,

The six weeks old fish are be-
ing shipped to Bao Dai as the re-
sult of a trip Dewey made to the
Far East last year during which
he learned that the Vietnam
ruler. an awid angler had never
fished for Bass. August Rabaut
of the New York Tropical Fish
Suppliers ernployed by Para-

|

mount Aquarium of New York
City accompanied the fish on the
trip. The Aquarium supervised
the packing and shipping of the
fish.

Oliver Kingsbury of Albany
New York superviser and fish
distributor for the New York

State Conservation Department
said upon their arrival the fish
will be placed in a lake 5,000 feet
above sea level near Saigon “to
see how they will fare in that
climate.” The fish will be flowr
to Bangkok, Thailand by Par
American and then will be trang

ferred to a Vietnam Government
plane the remainder of the
trip. They are expected to rea
Saigon next Friday.—U.P



for

o}

would be noticed that no reference
iad been made of the Assizes.
His Lordship then asked Mr
teece whether he was saying that
here could be no Contempt of the
trand Sessions except when that
‘ourt was sitting, and Mr, Reece
eplied that that was the possible
onstruction if his argument war
followed to its logical conclusion
(hough, he added, the question
would then arise whether it migh
ot still be contempt in itself.
Fair Trial
Mr. Reece then continued to tel
he jury that he did not intend t
sursue that aspect of the case, bu
i¢ would assure them that the
sence of the case was whether o
ot the words used tended
prejudice the fair trial of a pend
ing case. He cautioned them not
to misunderstand him at any time
and stressed that they were deal

the

council

at



formally the institution of

for other industri

ironed out
nference.—U.P.

ei

MACHINE





be prejudicial to the trial of any
case, whether civil or criminal
And it waa for them to say whether
oy not the words spoken were
rejudicial,

Under the Jury Laws of Barba-
dos, not only were they empanelled
to try the issue ,on fact, but also



on law Nobody, not even His
Lordship the Learned Judge
could rot ove! the word
hat et rhe Legislator
of the day, as His Learned Friend‘
had gaid, in their wisdom must

have wanted to take away the pow- |
Vhnich inherent in the
rt. reasor
nich

were

ou oO ome other
he did not particularly wist
er ested the

to decide

for
the
of law
Questions of Law
um telling you that
ten to
judge |} to tell

li power in

A SIX-MILLION VOLT MACHINE that can shoot X-rays at deep-seated
cancer tissue is being built under the direction of these Stanford Unt
versity, Calif., scientists. They are Prof. Edward L. Ginzton (left),
director of Stanford’s microwave laboratory, and Dr. Henry Kaplan,
head of the radiology department. Their new weapon is known as the
ur electronic accelerator and reportedly car } rate layers of
hy tissue without injuring ther The machine v

th t hospita ne

em

on ques

I

t
not



ill be so ir



' : at mo Ils will be able to buy
@ On page 3



PAGE TWO BARBADOS ADVOCATE TUESDAY, JULY 22, 1952

——









Come Calling Quite Worth Noting | MANVILLE PICKS NUMBER NINE King Nep’s Friend, Methie

Judgi a al : —Shadows Thought He Had an Odd Name—
udging from recent enquiries, 4 i > | TRELL
1 number of Readers would learn | , By MAX TREL {

~R. PE DRO - GC NZJ ALEZ from quite a lot by making a careful “THIS,” said King Nep pointing
DE CSS venues oivet ~Melon-Choly Baby M® From Versace oS 3 on bee | |
ing I







AND MRS. RONALD | to the very old man with the long |

Tene | white beard sitting on a rock be-|

JITCH from Caracas, Vene- jew Sank t | re A
zuela, arrived yesterday morning Don'ts” for Brushes | side him, “is my good o rien





ah He was accom- i. oT : > Now that hair-bcushes are obé | Methie.” |
by B.W.LA. vis Trinidad for OW air-b-ushes are 0 ; F ee

Bi sma Mk _daug sh- about two weeks’ holiday and are tainable again I sug-est four im-} Knarf and Hanid both said: |

t the Colo . c “Aig "St guests at Paradise Beach Club. portant “don’is”: | “Who?” It was a very strange|

name.

Mr, Hitch is working with the Don’t giip your hair-brush by | g 5
“Methie, for short,” answered

Richmond Exploration Co. of the bristles or press your fingers!

' Controller Gf Suppli +s

Caracas. egainst them. | King Nep. “His full name is Grand-
Me A. V. SPROTT, Controller Also arriving by the same plane Don’t comb out the hairs too father Methusaleh. He’s quite hard
ipplies, St. Vincent, ar- from Trinidad were Messrs. Simon roughly. i of hearing,” King Nep added.

i — yesterday morning by

Pietri and her little granddaughter Don’t wash the brush in soda, “Hello there!” he shonted into the







Pp. G. Ai®ways intronsit for\Puer- Maria from Caracas. They have but use tepid, ssapy water. old man’s ear. “These are the two
t ic@ahd the U.S.A. where he OS yee for fifteen days’ holiday Don’t dry it in hot sunshine or| children 1 was telling you about—
will spemd part of his long leave. which they are spending as guests strong artificial heat Knarf and Hanid.”
Duriag-hi rt stay in Barba- at the Hotel Royal. a ngs | T j rgn kled. He| : i
be test of Mr. and Hed Pleasant Holid io Mixi pink cheeks. “Ab,” he said, “I’m |
do nie i x = t of 7 ane easan oliaay No Mixing-Bowl ? had pink cheeks. “Ah,” he said. “I’m i
Mrs ed Cole of Henry's Lane R. AND MRS. C. H. BIRNN f e very glad to know you.” “A stitch in time saves nine,”
For-Summer Holidays a of New Jersey, left by _,Fxplo ation in a junk shop is Glad to K said Methie.
HA and COLIN REDMAN, B.W.1.A. yesterday morning for ©!te? os while. A a We’ ~ ns |
stents of the Lodge School, Antigua-and Puerto Rico on their "Ue. long mourning a_ cracked “We're very glad to know you, :
heft eS apatite aint way back to the U.S.A. after ™ixing-bowl, is now crowing with Grandfather Methie,” said Hanid.| Old Grandfather Methie was glad
ing for the Dominican Republic spending two weeks’ holiday as delight, having picked up an old Knarf also greeted Grandfather | to explain. It means that if you
to spend the summer holidays with guests at the Ocean View Hotel. washstand-besin in her local Methie. Then he said: “We can’t | mend something right away, you
heir parents, Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Mr. Birnn who has been here on “antique’’ shop. It is one of the | stay very long. It’s almost dinner-.| can do it with one little stitch. But
Redman. ‘several oyeasions said that this “ood, old-fashioned kind, and time. We have to hurry home.” if you were lazy and put off mend-

At this Grandfather Methie (who! ing until another day, the tear will
seemed to be able to hear quite well get worse and you will have to use
when he wanted to) said: “Hurry? | nine stitches where before you only

Hamel who has just finished his
studies at the Lodge, will be going
on to Canada in September to en-

was one of the most pleasant holi- makes an admirable mixing- bowl, {
days he has ever had here and Perhaps your attic houses one of
hopes to return soon again. He these bowls, which might give

















ier MeDonald College to study is a confectionery manufacturer good service in the kitchen? Did you say hurry?” needed one. But—” said Grand-
agricultural science while Colin of aon oer and Dean of Hand- “Yes,” said Knarf. ree Methie, ; ae another
will be returning here for the re- craft Confectioners of the Nationa) ‘ . sh? “Never hurry, my boy. Haste | breath, “it doesn’t only mean those
opening-ef school next term. Panne eotd tae Pee Association of the U.S.A. Mind The Paint-Brush! makes waste.” things about mending and sewing.
Engaged aloft after being chosen to reign Cinema Proprietress Perhaps you are thinking were a proverb!” Hanid ex- -natcoonband ines see ee your
, HE ENGAGEMENT is an- over the iz + coing a little amateur house-pain! . claimed, - . ullding a house—or
I unced between Miss Beryl Soune eee ae RS. M. LUCKY SAMAROO, jing this year? Brushes are still ex- a " = , King Nep took Knarf and Han | fixing a broken toy. If you do what-
daha oF Mee, C tales “Glaake a i b pageans 5 Preprietress of the Lucky pensive, so if you’re investing in| a aside. “Old Grandfather Methie is ever has to be done right away, you
Sao e ee cee mgt ahaa S : ree n the state's famed amaroo Circuit of Cinemas in 4 new im neue Tk ies aha inet | SMILING TOMMY MANVILLE, the asbestos millionaire, steps up to a always using proverbs—” won’t have to do nine times as much
nd the late Mr. E. Williams, and alley of the Sun. (International) ae is ner in Barbados for for twenty four houte before usc,| ©letk’s window in New Rochelle, N. Y., to obtain his ninth marriage “What are proverbs?” Knarf in- | later when it gets worse. There!”
Vir. Cleophas Drakes, son of Mrs ( aie wee [ . wee vamer: After use, the brush should be license, The next Mrs. Manville, pictured with him, is dancer Anita terrupted to ask. 3 “My goodness!” Knarf exclaimed.
Lilian Drakes of Spooner'’s Hill, Intransit staying at Wanewater Hotel, Bath. thoroughly cleaned in turpentine} 0ddy-Eden, 29. It will be her first marriage. (International) “Proverbs are expressions like |“And one little proverb means all
St. Michael, and the late Mr. NTRANSIT yesterday morning sheba atn=' substitute; it's important to work ‘haste makes waste’ or ‘look before | that!

Not 1 Drakes. Carib offers them from St. Vincent by B.G. Air- wi out all the paint while the brush a renner ta ir a Se you leap.’ You see,” King Nep said} Old Grandfather Methie nodded.
heartiest congratulations, ways was Mr. Errol Comma who With The Royal Bank _ is soft, particularly high up on " . SHOCK FOR SWIMMERS smiling, -“Grandfather Methie is!“That’s what’s so wonderful about
T will be leaving shortly for An- Spending two weeks’ the bristles by the handle. Then| Listening Hours very old and so are proverbs, I think | proverbs. They’re very short and

On Extended Tour tigua to take up his new appoint- ~~ . holiday in Trinidad with his wash in warm, soapy water, rinse HELSINKI, July 17. he and the proverbs he uses were all | they’re very true.”
R. K. M. HICKS, Export Re- ment under aC. D. and W. Scheme gelatives in Port-of-Spain, Mr. well, shake and hang to dry in a _ TUESDAY, JULY 22, 1952 The cream of the world’s swim- | born at the same time. But let’s go| Just before Knarf and Hanid left
presentative of Messrs, Ran- as Senior Depusre sees i he Be wanes” Leite is MARTA, yes- cool, airy place. : 4.00 19/i6m,, 25.53m mere bad to get over a slight ini-| back.” to go home, Old Grandfather Methie
Sims and Jefferies Ltd, of gineering department of the Gov- ip Oy ew, Ie " ” pi Phe News ea. tial shock when they strolled into , back th or ‘
Ipswich "England, is now in the ernment of Antigua. He was for- ‘ransit for Dominica where he is 4.00. p.m.) ‘The News, 410 p.m. The ¥ When they went back they were | sang a proverb song for them, This

: Snri . : se Daily Service, 4.15 pm New Records, the men’s dressing room at the! gs ri » Old Gran is how i :
Caribbean on an extended tour merly Draughtsman Builder at- employed with the Royal Bank of “' ring-Cleaning Preliminary |5'o°) m. Cricket, 3.05 p m_ Interlude, Olympic swimming pool and found Tee es te — A tuteh |

















making a general survey of agri- tached to the Public Works De- Canada. He left later the same t ith eens on every|5 15 pm BBC jaiorthers Drchentte, that all the attendants were Poa pmetadle5, . aie ne tea
a “5 ae . ; ; ji irwave se-wife’s OgTs ear 1600 p.m ster Magazine, 5 pm ar
cultural conditions in the various partment in St. Vincent. day by B.G. Airways, peed AI ace rai tera? Te AR salth, 645 pm, Women, “A stitch in time ine,” i s : :
colonies. Mr. Comma is staying with his Spent Two Weeks cleaners will be working overtime. |syorts Round-Up and Programme Par. ' Some even walked out in a a stitch in time saves nine,” he G Still water runs so deep:
‘He arrived here. yesterday brother-in-law, Mr. Errol Barrow R. AND MRS. ERIC DouG- Nw is the time to make sure that |ade, 700 pm The News, 710 pm hurry thinking they had gone into said. 4 reat oaks from little acorns
morning by B.G. Airways from M.C.P. and Mrs. Barrow of "LAS of British Gufana, 1 ft they are in good order. If the belt ;Home News From Britain, | the wrong dressing room. But all ‘What does that proverb mean?’ grow.
St. Vincent and left later the same “Westward Ho”, Lands End. ot: Gunday. by’ BAT wie for Pas worn slack, replace it—new pir TERE BES 9h Pee eee ee then became used to it and one of| Knarf wanted to know. So, look before you leap.
day for Martinique by B,W.1LA. Trini ye W.*-44. FOr ones are to be had, though still] 715 p.m Rendezvous, 7.45 pm _ Per- them said, “If it’s all right with
Mr. -Hicks said that he left After Three Weeks rene et way back home scarce. F sonal Portrait, 8 is pm Be i BEae hing them (women attendants) it’s all
England on June 8 and so far has ISS ALFREDA GEORGES, ,. noes ee me . ay holiday If your model is fitted with |s°52 oo hapiude 8 S em ‘From Tight with us. —U,P.
covered Trinidad, Grenada, St. 2 Chief Clerk of L. Rose and * & . zeaton-on-Sea”, brushes, see that these are not|The Editorials, 9.00 pm. Bedtime With!

ee
Lucia, Barbados and St, Vincent. Co. of Dominica, returned home The Stream. choked with hairs and make sure |Btaden, 9 30 pm Country Dances, 9.45

aie i 0
He expects to return home some- yesterday morning by B.G: Air- Mt. Douglas is Supervisor of the that connections are sound. ae Onrinpie saree, ste Setar iat ee ~

BLOOD IMPURITIES Of aiee

Many ailments are caused by poor blood whic rari








i Tove oy Co-operative Credit Bank * ews,
gee ERR SA A pie weys after spending three weeks’ P anks | at Dust Answer erbert Hodge Talking, 10.30 p.m, Focus
To Reside In Canada holiday. She was the guest of Mr. tached to the Department of Agri- y

on Borstal

. r-- culture. While we're on this subject, may affect the whole system. Skin eos
MONG the passengers leaving and, Mrs. C. B, Stuart of “Retreat”, ‘ ’ ‘ don't forget a spring-cleaning for | $46666666669690090000999 and irritation, simple r nee and
yesterday morning for the Tweedside Road. a Attended Niece s Wedding the mattresses. The vacuum clean- es OR EAE ve Gane one seers See Se you neve hel res Som
U.S.A. via Antigua and Puerto To Take Up Appointmsrt ING to Trinidad on er’s attachment will remove dust Mixture. famous medicine helps $Q/M/

Tote ae oo A ieee aad eimilar COMPLARTS
nee 8 ee eS
troub! complaints. Be sure to ask for owes

FURNISHING 2 > Can You Say ‘NO’ to

All These Questions?

Rico by B.W.1.A. was Mr, Sel- I EAVING for Dominica yester- , Sanday night by B.W.LA. trom these—remember to work|
wyn Kirton formerly of Messrs, 4 day by B.G. Airways, was eee r. and Mrs. Eric Lange round and under the tufts, where |

Da Casta gnd Co,, Ltd, Mr. Alfred P. Crawford of British who were guests at the Hotel there is always an accumulation. YOU SHOULD MOVE LIKE A











> ee





Selw , s 2s : iana Ww ; Royal and Mr, and Mrs, Ra hi : i HURRICANE TO GET THESE S|
a iy Pane es is oe ge Pat Guiana who has gone to take up Langw who wele ae ies. Oe ar This attachment, too, will make THINGS : 2/ Do you suffer from ’ One. ACHES
and Mrs.« . Kirton of “San- an appointment as surveyor with View. They had f a good job of removing dust from 5 | BACKACHE? 1 =,
down”, Fontabelle, will spend two the Dominica Government. a aaa y faa come over fOr books standing on open shelves. Bureaus $15 up >| RHEUMATISM? ck
weeks in New York with his rela~ While in Barbados, Mr, Craw- 57° we ding of their niece Miss other Saaete % | SLEEPLESSN Blood Mixture 127 c
tives before leaving for Canada to ford was the guest of Mrs. Hulse J04" Lange and Mr. John Massiah Coll 4 ; ‘te ae eet 2
reside in Montreal at “Alcot”, Worthin which took place on Thursday at From My Post-Bag lows $1.50, Laths, Cradles, Beds, $8 | HEADACHES? ee ETAT ZIT en BAGS
3 : : : r St. Patrick's Roman Catholic is) oy, i “PDINING and other Tables’ in ¥ LOSS OF ENERGY?
conceal ———__—___—-——— Church, © : a ‘ow should I wash white hand- Beautifully “Polished, Mahogany, 9 | 100 FREQUENT
Me. mate Lange is Deputy Mayor me roy pnt ee : Cedar, Birch or. sanded Deal, %| URINATION?
GNF A AGN tT ae of San Fernando and a Director of i yak in salt and cold water Larders $11 up, Waggons, Liquor If your answer is “YES” t
U ES is W HO Trinidad Agencies of which his for an hour or so, Cale teerertiter ties eevee | questions then you are tkely a nici ok
<5 aS brother Mr. Ray Lange is Manag-~ (ii) Rinse, to get rid of the salt. etn Geet Bo mn ak Type- & | faulty kidneys, Don’t delay. Act at once.
ing Director. (iii) Wash in hot, soapy water. Mats $1.20 up, BIG ICE BOXES Take Dodd’s Kidney Pills—the ie proved

|
| remedy. For over half a

| sufferers in all parts of the worl Saente fod
|

IM AKE A WIFE Canadian Engineer tiv): Boll for about ten, minuteeee 920 up
: FTER spending eighte with a little borax in the water.
Li o einen in Peta dns. Seed In suitable weather a good plan is ae ae prompt relief and throug

the use of this famous remedy,





























and Mrs. J. Housley and their two to spread them out to bleach in ‘ S. WILSON | Kidney Pills
on f-N mind, do you? L just couldn't children Olive and Brian, are now bright sunshine. ‘ and = ti take. ara’ buy “Every Picture x
go away without enowing wha’ on their way to their home in “How can I clean a stained wine SPRY STREET. DIAL 4009 oe tear Bottle of 40 pills 3/~.J16 tells a Story”
SA nappens to Eddy”. . Toronto, Canada,’ They left yes- decanter?” " , Y 4
The six young men who sweep terday morning by BWA. ‘tor Put into it one tablespoon each | YO AAAI ° d s Kidney Pills |
by VENETIA MURRAY into the cocktail party in even the U.S.A. via Antigua and of coarse salt and vinegar, Leave eek ee Backache, Rheumatic Pain Relieved
ing dress with, in tow, the Puerto Rico. for a few hours, Shake well and ‘ ‘ yr
a gs Tei vere She ene Te Mr, Housley who is an engineer, rinse thoroughly. \sardening, painting, odd jobs rvund the house can
Heeteas ean . ‘ oy ey a * caches clans neage e he “Why not save time and use| eaecac a eee, ine from backache,
, ae ee me stor or Messrs, Evelyn, water from the a i) for theumatic pains, stiff, aching muscles and joints, lum-
full marks to The quest who appears Roach and Co. He has now gone ae ze tt a poor s oe bago or common urinary Sables due ot ‘sitie
rhe girl who leaves some Of ravenous. looking for breakfast home to take charge of a bigger ; ell eee ied ule rere i ye
her liy ele mn the pillow the at eight o'clock, when you were plant in Torohto say that cold water must be used in the blood.
glass nd the table napkins; hoping for a long morning in . for this?” Why not get happy relief by taking Doan’s Backache
and 2n takes the res a iy art of . — ; : + .
ache ae ee ee For Health Reasons _ Old wiveg certainly do say this: Kidney Pills. ‘They help the kidneys to rid the blood
"he 1an w ‘ The guest who wanders down and scientists back them up, To of excess uric acid and other impurities which other-
The young man who asks him- are 12.30 ask R, DIGBY HADLEY, a plant- sia, ; ae ; ; ; other:
self to dinner and rings up at in a dressing gown at 12.30 ask- rot St. Vincent make good tea, water must have wise might collect in the system and cause distress. =
eight‘ o'clock to say “Can 1 ‘M8 for breakfast when you're er of ot. vincent, came over 4 certain amount of air in it, Cold |
ring Wendy too?" ‘ getting lunch, . . yesterday morning by B.G. Air- water. freshly. drawn. econ the HALF A CENTURY of success in relieving ailments due to inadequate
+ * * ways on a visit in the interest of tinh’ Soe Shae carts ; : kidney action is the proud record of Doan’s Pills. Grateful men and
* * * his health and is staying at the ‘@P, has that aeration. Water from ‘ * cg aa ‘
The girl who ean pnly pick at The straightiorward | klepto Hotel Royal ie : the hot tap has not. wonsen of all ages sss and recommend this «ificient disresic an? winery

maniacs who abscond, after the

a grapefruit when you have pre- Remember, to at if the k antiseptic to their friends and neighbours.
A grapefruit when you have pre- week-end, with anything from , too, that if the kettle








































































Johnny Mack BROWN |
i ny

WY. De LUXEA

——
: anc ; Fri. & Sat. 445 & 8.50
| WED. AT 830 p.m ta ; aol Johnny Mack BROWN D 7 . j
rt " 7" . ai ; . , COWBOY AND THE INDIANS Don BARRY & pm
- R. E \ TANS & CO. LTR. [MADAM O'LINDY AND HER Starring: Gene AUTRY i —Sming FRIDAY eon || FRONTIER ; “RT'S DANCE”
- oorty) bial ert ee Pred STA =
9 7 > ARAA | = WED. & THUR. 4.30 & 8.15 | FOR THEM THAT Lash La RUE SMIGH VENTURE”
20 Broad St. Phone 4644 CARACAS NIGHTS” WHOLE SERIAI tH) TRESPASS @OMING FRIDAY John PAYNE
. r is THE Ss O1 1s {GLE GIRL” \{ “BRIGHT VICTORY Technicolor Double! !
DIAL 4220 YOUR SHOE STORES DIAL 4606 emmnaneel REE EIES Sa |S AS SP GRALPLGLSLLLL LESS

“PHANTOM OF THE AIR” “IN A LONELY PLACE” Jimmy WAKELY & THURS. Special 1.30 pm

pared the most. delicious dinner a is allowed to boil for more than 1/3
sans she our eye black to y yest
because she's slimming Wrench record. Ai te ee a few moments, water loses its Ask your 5 oe
The young man who lights up a CROSSWORD aeration, Sc it on to the leaves I |
a cigarette in the middle of a The guest who leaves every- GAT erer e+e Geet ae ey ee : : Dealer for P
Wine you. have taken trouble ‘hing behind, so vou're posting directly it boils. 4 This sovereign Whisky possesses that distinction of flavewy Backache Kidney Pills 5]/-
over choosing parcels for the rest of the Incidentally, experts say that tne 84 which will claim your allegiance from the first sip. | €®OO@O@ > DO D
+ - * week . best flavour is to be had from tea 4 ;
The guest who adores babies which has infused for just five
The girl who departs orf Mon- and wakes yours up WW say minutes, no longer. f
day morning taking your hus- “Goodnight” when you've had a cane
band’s favourite novel-of-the a two-hour struggle to get it te SSSFSOSSSSVSSSSSIIISOGIS™
moment. saying “You don't sleep... i
. London Express Service te A a & W Y . j
} The Garden—St. James :
- | To-day & To-morrow 8.30 p.m. Offers a Commission of $1.50 in CASH for every New
_
J ' i
BY 1 HE WAY e « « By Beachcomber LT | | | MY FOOLISH HEART & § SCOTCH WHISKY Subscriber brought to and accepted by the Company.
eT | THE BIG STEAL ~ 3 Sits fico. REDIFFUSION will pay in addition a bonus of $25.00
i “HUM -~ wan . : .
ry7O the evident chagrin of the They would indeed! nAnd much ee eed tg | Ober: Serene ; ES) W.S. MONROE & CO. LTD., BRIDGETOWN, BARBADOS to any person who brings in twenty-five New Subscrib-
youth of Pibney St. Vitus, happiness wou i ring em Avross > THURS. (Only) 8.30 P.M :
the procession, which was the Anyhow, a mass invasion of the } grom whien WOK SATS date. (5) GOLDEN STALLION” % MACDONALO & MUIR .TO DISTILLERS LEITH SCOT! ers in one Calendar month who are accepted by the
most important part of the Carni- kitchens would not improve the 8 Fancy it making ma idiotic, (9) Roy ROGERS & : § | -——— —-—----- ee Company.
val, threatened to pass off without tempers of the chemists in 4 7 Ee ee for use Oe, el DOR y cnamnepiotietetaates k
a hiteh white hats, and would give the |: Playea in 22 (4) : “ 7 a ces et
Even Mimsie Slopeorner, who whole place a rowdy air. A lunch- ’ pe Ward te quite sheltered. (3) a ©666* es een , Have always a supply of Recommendation Forms ready
can always be relied on ‘to make er or diner might find himself (¢ Tamer of the species. (5) | |
an ass of herself, managed to re- struggling with a walter, om get 18. A deformed snake. (3) |) 4 ; || and take advantage of ~ THEY CAN BE OBTAINED AT THE OFFICE
main on the hayeart, and to bal- possession of a tasty morsel for 4) re th orons ig ¢ ;
ance spear, shielé and crown, But his guests, and at any moment a < ay Ps) more than 11 Across in g u é 60-DAY EXCURSION FARES TO CANADA REDIFFUSION tet Traialgar Street.
opposite the Town Hall things be- kind of tug-of-war might end_ by i. Easot spt oul Tas a \* ® e $ and_new low
gan to go deliciously wrong. The ruining a dish beyond repair. This 35° Softly breaks the lyre. (5) . g TOURIST FARES, CANADA TO BRITAIN
flag was run up, but what ran up correspondent mentions hygiene. Down to which persons were g
was a tattered shirt, which the What! With one man furtively i. Outcome of the mad mile. (7) invited by ke the yey by big, S-cngiond “North Star™
short-sighted Mayor saluted cramming a whole pudding into 2. The Lido lady possessed one. (4) ; Fees We seed enme Attendee tees somiem E :
smartly. Hearing the * laughter, his pocket before returning to the 7 Seer ee sereer (8) x | charge is cer eem & fon manien GLOB
Mimsie turned her regal head and Gane e se tak — coe oa 3. Stand before itor, 18 Bown, (4) MR. CONRAD PETERSEN ¢ 4 ONLY $1,267.50 BW.I yo
Min = Ny oes rea There wrested ‘trom x tin? nee if 7 Withdraw’ eo naadred toi the | will still be held on ‘ i Bridgetown to London Return * ‘ Today and This Evening: 5 & 8.30 pm. — Last Shows
ig i -1In-Wweé z. . ' eache. (4) $
were no further incidents, but as ; 10. After a car, nutritious, (3) FRIDAY NIGHT, 25TH JULY ¢
the local paper remarked: in an /Vosebags and troughs 12 Refreshing pluce no doubt, (6) ie ce BELLES ON THEIR TOES
acid leader: “That was enough to or women 15 As a musician Haydn was. (5 oe, os Rte , soe ol
Zo on with,” for u 17 The alternative in existence (4) O6-936006° GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD. Myrna LOY—Debra PAGET—Hoagy CARMICHAEL
. 18 See 6. (4) DDD-H-H-@
Oh: I say, look t ’ MISOGYNip»:' suggests that |y Anagram of 4, (4) McGregor St, :0: Phone 4518 Tomorrow and Thursday — 4.45 & 8.30
tl, say, (00. were! if women took nusebags to 1 Another refreshing place. (3) ”
CORRESPONDENT suggests matinees it would avoid all the _ %gliiton of vestorday s puzzle Across “BILLY THE KID” — Robert TAYLOR
that every restaurant-user noisy eating that goes on during ‘tter. 12 Rare.” ENGRAVING Ea at
should be given by Parliament a the performance. But what about = {nny 48 oe f MONTE CRISTO” MONTGOMERY
tatutory right to inspect the drinking? -Could there not be an JE ELLERY 0 ee SSS er SWORD of M —Geo. MER
kitchen “People would then exquisite little trough fixed to each | W ‘ a
know what they were eating.” stall, and filled with tea? | | R oO ODA L THEA TR ES Sa APL PLL S ALLL LL PSES
DO
pereetriens ” eee & EMPIRE ROXY
ie ! | TODAY Last Two Shows 445 & 8.15
Pt: we | |JPTODAY Last ‘Two Shows 4.45 & 8.30 Universal Pictures Presents
|{$Republic Pictures Presents “THE RAGING TIDE”
7 7 | vy | REPAIRS i “BAL TABARIN” Shelley Sintec Hickiea Cont = own. oy
| ' 4 ontel | { “BRIDGETOWN BARBARE ; "IN
P ae toms ere ae ; Starring Ei Not even the fury of the lashing sea (Dial 2310) (Dial 5170) ‘ (Dial 8404)
|] Also Jewellery made to order J] Muriel, Lawrence <2 Witnm scitsk | peuma them, eine Pesslons (De) co-pay 445 & 830 pm i" i SES pan |] Tosday &, To-morrow
KITCHEN SCALES e (aia 1 Reel Short—Aav. OF TOM THUM! Wntertainment! Alan Ladd in Pee anes
4 ei Snort-—. ve a a
x a Lo Re cts tos Cs vas ssw ati Oi ar were $10.66 now $6.00 Waa cuty le wae IW} Ray Gene |] APPOINTMENT CASA MANANA 4
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a9 1



@ from page i

there is the law. It is for you to
decide the question on law and
fact, and say whether or aot th
words complained of tended t
prejudice the fair trial of a case.”
Much play, he said, had been
made both by His Learned Friend,
Mr. Ward and His Learned Friend,
Mr. Walcott, upon the judgment
of the Judges in the famous case
of Hunte and Clarke. ke Nap
that unless“they



had told them

could find the matter prejudicial
to the issue, even although the
words constituted a technical con-
tempt, there could be no offence.
Mr. Walcott on the other hand, had
told. them that if they found it
likely or calculated, and it was
technical, the question of punish-
ment was for the Court. He, how-
ever, was going to take them into
the cases cited and submit that
there could be no other conclu-
sion to be arrived at other than
that arrived at by Mr. Ward

Technical Contempt

The Learned Judges having
expressed themselves that there
was a technied! Contempt of Court,
were able to say so not by way of
punishment, or that they could rep-
rimand the defendant and dis-
charge him, but they discharged
the rule nisi, and left the matter
exactly where it was. And the
reason, he was telling them, was
clearly expressed in their words
in giving Judgement.

Here His Lordship referred back
to the circumstance of the jury
having to decide the issue both
on law and fact and pointed out
to Mr. Reece that he would
observe that the Judge had to
deliver a charge to the jury.

Mr. Reece held, however, that
it did not mean that it would have
the same binding effect. As he had
said, he did not agree with the
Act at all, and he thought it
should be removed from the
Statute Book. That the jury should
try the issue both on law and fact
seemeéd to him to strip the Judge
of all the authority that was inher-
ent in him.

No Order for Costs

He then returned to the Hunte
and Clarke case to which other
Counsel had made reference, and
to which he also had been mak-
ing reference and pointed out that
one Judge had said that he thought
the proper course would have
been to refuse making an order
on the application and give no
order for costa on either side.

It was felt at the time the
Order was Made, the proper
course would have been to re-
fuse on the footing that there
had been no contempt calling
for the interference of the Court.
Whereas the Judges of England
had said no Order, it was. for
the present jury when the matter
came before them, to say that
the Order should no; be made
absolute.

His Lordship at this point re-
ferred to the argument made by
Mr. Walcott that it was for the
jury to say whether or not there
was contempt of Court, not to go
into whether it was technical or
not, and then leave the punish-
ment to the Judge.

Mr. Reece repeated that he
was saying that it was for the
jury to say whether the Rule be
made absolute and His Lordship
what the punishment should be
in case the jury felt it should be
absolute,

Order Absolute

His Lordship referred to the
Act which he said stated that
the defendant had to be found
guilty or not guilty and Mr.
Reece held that that was the
same thing as saying the Order
had to be made absolute. Hd
added that from the time tha
original application was being
made, the Judge hat the right
to say that there was nothing in
the application and refuse to
grant it. But as it was then, it
was for the jury to arrive at
their findings on facts and law.
It was for the jury to say
whether or not the words com-
plained of were calculated or
were likely to interfere with the
fair course of justice.

He again referred to Justice
Cotton’s judgment in the Hunte
and Clarke case in which it was
felt that no Order should be
made because there was no con-
tempt calling for the interference
of the Court, the question being
not whether technical contempt
had been committed, but whether
it was of such a nature as would
justify the Court to interfere.

952



Justice Cotton had said that
he would not have entertained
the question at all, and that he,
Mr, Reece, was submitting was
the question for the jury.

Newspaper Article

“Every. time aman made a
speech or sOme person wrote an
article in a paper touching a
matter before the Court,” he
Said, “it does not follow that be-
cause the words may even be
strong, that they constitute a
contempt. If that were so, it
would be impossible in any way
to discuss a matter before the
Court. The Court does not inter-
fere unless there has been real
substantial interference with the
course of justice and Mr. Justice
Cotton is saying that.”

He added that the other judge
who had sat with Mr. Justice
Cotton had even put it stronger.

Here, a comment from him
concerning the course his add-
ress would later take — “And [
am going to submit to you later
that by no stretch of the imagin-
ation can you construct this to
be contempt; that this could ever

tend to interfere with the. fair
course of a trial.’ evoked from
His Lordship the caution, “Do

not try to frighten the jurymen.”
Mr. Reece, however, assured
His Lordship that he had never
done that, and the observation
that the jury was a Barbadian
jury,

Article’s Influence

He then referred to the Juds-
ment of the other Judge in the cas
of Clarke and Hunte, in which
he said it had even been put
stronger “... I can hardly imagine
any person of much intelligence
being influenced by this article,
and I think it is not in point of
fact in any way likely to preju-
dice the trial. . .”

He also said that it had been
forcibly expressed by the Lord
Chief Justice that there was the
anx'ety of the Court not to en-
courage trifling and useless appli-
cations.

So what..he was submitting
was that although it was techni-
cal contempt in the case cited, it
was not from the Judge’s point
of view sufficient to interfere
with the stream of justice. He
was therefore asking the jury to
look at the nature of that case,
the strong language which had
been used, look at the absolutely
innocuous words of the publica-
tion before them, and ask them-
selves whether any intelligent
person would be influenced in
the matter of the trial of which
they had heard so much, or
whether there was nothing tend-
ing to prejudice the fair trial of
a case, In other words, he
repeated, the essence of the
offence was whether the words
tended or ‘were calculated or
were likely to prejudice the fair
trial. And he was telling them
that if they could not find that,
no matter how strong the expres-
sions might be, they would, have
to say not guilty.

He referred to the case of
Payne which had earlier been
cited, to show, he said, that there
had been stromg terms used and
the case had been dismissed, and
said that in other words, there
had to be something which really
interfered or was likely really
to interfere or was calculated
really to interfere with a fair
trial,

“Extraordinary Act”

After again referring to the
“Extraordinary Act,” which gave
the jury power to decide not only
on facts but on questions of law.
he said that the idea must have
been to clip the wings of the
Judge. He told them that having
listened to all the authorities
which had been cited by all the
counsel, having heard all the
evidence and all the arguments,
he was asking them whether or
not in the point of fact and in
law, the words complained of,
which ‘were spoken by Colonel
Michelin and published in the
Advocate were words which
would tend to inteFfere with the
fair trial of a person,

“You sit there as 12 intelligent
men”, he stressed. “Do you be-
lieve in point of fact that these
words can tend or be likely in
any way to interfere with the
trial ?”

Thinking of the ordinary lay-~
man who might be empanelled
to try the other issue, the hear-
ing of which it was held would
be prejudiced, were the words of
such a nature as would interfere
with their deliberations if they
were empanelled ?

He again pointed out that it

Court Continues ‘corres on mst ocEAN FUGHT





BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Hearing Of Writ For Contempt Of



fea lk aS f

TWO H-19 HELICOPTERS are pictured (top) at Westover Air Base,

Mass,, a few moments before they

flight ever attempted by “fiying windmills”,

many, as their goal, the 'copters p!
3,800 nautical mile route. First leg
a 330-mile hop. At bottom, Mac!

took off on the first trans-Atlantic
With Wiesbaden, Ger-
enned to make six stops along their
of the flight is Presque Isle, Maine,
nist Specialist Leo Osciak (left),

of Hatfield, Mass., and Leon Janus, of Palmer, Mass., install extra gas
tanks in the 12-passenger compartment of one of the helicopters.

(International)



was for them, the jury, to decide
on points of law, but he added
that his advice to them was that
despite that, they could listen
carefully to what the Judge had
to say on any point of law.

His last point before the lunch

adjournment was on what he
called. the whole essence of the
offence, whether it tended tu

prejudice the fair trial of a case.
Four Steps

Continuing his address during
the afternoon Mr, Reece referred
to a point on which His Lordship
had earlier in the day directed
him, and argued that in England
there were really four steps. First-
ly, leave had to be obtained to
apply for the Writ, secondly, there
was the application proper, which
was the application for the Rule
of Court, then came the decision
on the merit, on which decision
the order was made absolute or
not absolute, and then there was
the question of punishment.

He said that as His Lordship was
well aware, in’ England attach-
ment for contempt of court was
vastly different from what it was
prior to the passing of the Judi-
cial Act,

His Lordship here interpolated
that he did not quite see the point
of the argument, and reminded
Mr. Reece that they were going
entirely by the local Act. In re-
ply, Mr, Reece said he was point-
ing out that the order to make
attachment absolute in England
was equivalent to a local verdict
of “guilty”, and then the question
of punishment followed,

Mr. Reece went on to point out
that in England the Order was
made calling upon a man “to show
cause why he should not be at-
tached. He went before the Court
which went into the merits of the
case and either discharged the or-
der or made that order absolute.
Thereafter, if the Order was
made absolute, and then the Writ
of Attachment was issued through
the Court.

Mr. Reece stressed the serious
nature of a Writ of Attachment,
and said it was one in which the
person against whom such a writ
was issued could be incarcerated
for a long period,

In England although they used
the form “to show cause why you
should not be attached, yet in

Barbados they empanelled a jury





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which tried the matter, and they
were the persons who determined
whether or not the person charg-
ed could be attached, by their
verdict of guilty or not guilty, So
that their verdict of “guilty” or
“not guilty” was the same thing
as an Order Absolute or Order
Discharged.
“No Order Absolute”

The point he was making was
that on the authorities cited, “not
euilty” meant “no Order Abso-
lute’, and no question of punish-
ment.

He referred to a case in point,
and said that the Judges of the
Appeal Court, in so discharging
the person charged, were doing
what a jury in Barbados did in
saying not guilty. He argued furs
iher that if the Judges were doing
(he same thing as a jury saying

not guilty,” then the question
which they had in mind at the
time of discharging the Order
ould also be considered by a jury
i. Barbados,

Again His Lordship interpolat-
ed and reminded Counsel that in
Barbados the jury’s verdict was
‘guilty” or “not guilty”, and con-
‘inuing, Mr, Reece submitted that
even in England, before they
rame to the question of punish-
ment, they had to decide whether
‘he Order was made or not. His
Lordship pointed put that the
whole question was, in spite of
he argument, whether the matter

complained of tended to prejudice :

the fair trial of the man.

English Case Law
Mr. Reece continuing said that

in as much as they in Barbados 7

were forced to

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Scientists

Survey Apoporis River

A PARTY OF SCIENTISTS from the Imperial College

of Tropical Agriculture are

1. ow in Colombia investigatins

the Apoporis River, one of the upper tributaries of the

Amazon, in search of new

Cacao types. The expedition

is being financed jointly by the British West Indian and
the British West African Cacao Research Schemes wit!

the full co-operation of the

New Steamship
Serviee Kor

Guadeloupe

_ A new steamship service link-
ing up Guadeloupe and its depend-
encies has just been inaugurated.
The first ship in this service, the
“Ie d’Emeraude” (The Emerald
Isle). made its first voyage just
1ecently to Marie Galante, which
iy the largest of Guadeloupe’s
dependencies. On the inaugura
trip, the vessel carried a group of
severnment officials, the President
od members of the General Coun-
cil and others. It is confident]
expected that this new, regula:
service will do much to popularis:
Marie Galante, the Saintes, Saint
Mert, Saint Barthelmy and
Desirade, as holiday resorts,
both for residents of Guadeloupe
end for tourists from outside the
area, The Tile d’Emeraude is
equipped to carry 180 deck pas-
sengers, and has, in addition, six-
double-bunk cabins, It is 46 metres
(about 150 feel) overall in length,
with a beam of 6.8 metres (21
feet), and is powered by eight
diesel engines of 225 horsepowe:
each driving twin propellers,

PRIVY COUNCIL

@ From Page 1.
otherwise lawfully acquired fro
the previous government relat):
to property outside the sovervigrit
of either,



Three. airlines operated’ in
China during the Civil War
1949, Shaweross continued, om
was American and owned by
General Claire Chennault and
Whiting Willauer. The were
predecessors to the Deliware

Corporation. The other two line
were Chinese: China Nationa!
Aviation Corporation whose air

Government of Colombia.

It is expected that the investiga-
tion will last for some twelve o
fifteen months and will cover five
or six distinct focalities in the
Orinoco and Amazon forests: Co-
lombian scientists. are schedulec
to accompany the expedition, .
which will also have, on its first)
trip, the advice of Dr, R. E,
Schultes, who has had long ex-
perience of these forests gained
while collecting cacao types for}
the United States Department of
Agriculture. The Imperial Col-
lege party will consist of three
scientists, but as conditions in the
forests are expected to be ardu-
us, a series of reliefs has been
wranged, so that nobody will
pend more than three months in |
the forest without a break. The |
advance party consists of Mr. |
F. W. Cope, Senior plant, breeder ,
to the B.W.1. Cacao Research |
Scheme, who heads the expedi- |
tion; Mr, R. EB, D. Baker, Plant ,
Pathologist; and Mr. D. J. Taylor,
Entomologist. The expedition |
plans to follow the main rivers,
using aluminum canoes fitted with
‘outboard motors. These can be}
transported from Bogota, the main
base of operations, and from river
to river, by the catalina aircraft
which carries supplies to and from
the rubber, cacao and _ chicle
workers in the forests of Colom-

bia. |



New Air Service

MARTINIQUE. —

A new air service has recently

been inaugurated between Mar-
Unique and Guadeloupe under the
ide of Air Antilles, a service

hacked by Air France, The new
ervice will offer three flights a
eek between the two islands, at

intes appreciably cheaper than
hose offered by the other compan-
es which at present connect thf
islands on their Trinidad-Puerto
Rico flights. This new service also
»lans to include Marie Galante on
its schedule, when the new runway
ow in course of constructio:

eraft lying at Hong Kong were the there shall have been completed

subject of separate action and the
Central Air Transport Corpor.

tion, a China Governmetn organ
isation that operated valuab\
modern American aircraft,

Move To Hong Kong

In the summer of 1949 it
seemed decided that two lines
would move to Hong Kong, O+
November 9, the President of the
respondent Corporation, C.1, Cher
arranged for two aircraft to fly
ostensibly to Hong Kong and he
was aboard ome of them. But
they flew instead to Peiping.
There the Corporation was claimed
as the property of the Chinese
People’s Government and “the
Glorious Me. Chen”, as hé was
called, was a
Manager, aceording to Shaweross.
The Hong Kong Court held that
subsequent British recognition ol
the Communist Government was
retroactive as from October 1,

inted General



MAIL NOTICES

for the United Kingdom, by th

‘Golfito will be closed at the General
t Office as under: a

Parcel Mail at 12 noon, Registered Ma}
t 2 p.m., Ordinary Mail at 2.30 p.m, ©
the 24th July, 1952,

Mails for Dominica, Antigua, Nev
St. Kitts, and Montserrat by the m.Â¥
‘unbbee will be closed at the Genera

st Office as under

I »] Mail at 12 noon, Registered

Wall at 2 pan, Ordinary Mail at 2.30 p.m
the 2and July, 1962

|

| BULO



1949, giving ownership of the air- |

craft. Hearing was
until Tuesday,
—UP.

RATES OF EXCHANGE

21ST JULY, 1952

Selling NEW YORK Selling
73 :1/10% Pr. Cheques on
Bankers 71 4/10% Pr.
Sight or Demand
Drafts 71 2/10% Pr,
73 1/10% Pr. Cable
7! 6/10%.Pr. Curreney 69 9 /10% Pr,
Coupons 69 2/10% Pr.
Pr Silver 20% Pr.
CANADA
: 3/10% Pr. Cheques on
Bankers 76 5/10% Pr,
Demand Deafts 76.35% Pr.
Sight Drafts 76 2/10%% Pr.
3/10% Pr. Cable
Currency he Pr,
Coupons 74 3/10% Pr.
Oe Pr. Silver 20% Pr,




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PAGE FOUR




eid ADVOCATE

San ss oomelf Su ieee Be cy
Printed by the Advocate Co., Lid., Broad 8t., Bridgetews

Tuesday, Juiy 22, 1952

HOME MAKING

SOME years ago a resident of the British
West Indies wrote to an English newspaper
suggesting that there were too many con-
ferences and too many upturned cocktail
glasses at Government House parties in
the British Caribbean. The suggestion be-
hind this picturesque description of high
living was that analysis of West Indian
problems would not ‘solve any of them.
Only . direct contact with the problems
would lead to their solutions.

Perhaps some similar thought occurred
to Miss Dora Ibberson, Social Welfare
Adviser to the Development and Welfare
Organisation, when she told representa-
tives of Trinidad’s Press recently “we must
take people where they are and help them
to make better use of what they have.”
Miss Ibberson expanded her meaning by
quoting examples. Men she said could
build a separate cot for the baby from
local materials: and women could be made
better judges of what they buy, both food
and textiles and taught the value cf a
home vegetable plot.









Miss Ibberson it would seem was only
saying what has been so often said before
by thousands of West Indians during the
last two decades, and what was said so well
in the paragraphs on rural education in
Sir George Seel’s latest report on Develop-
ment and Welfare in the West Indies. “In
the British West Indies” writes the author
of these paragraphs “where almost four
fifths of the population is rural, it would
be impossible to over-emphasize the need
for a complete revision of the syllabus and
of the methods of teaching in the rural
schools ... if rural schools are to develop
the right education, the teaching must be
rooted in reality finding its material at the
starting point in the environment of the

child... a rural emphasis should be

given in the professional preparation
of teachers who are likely to be em-
ployed in rural schools, Without that spe-
cialist training the rural school teacher
will find it difficult to acquire the neces-
sary skill and experience in imparting a
rural colour to the curriculum.”

It is quite impossible to take people
where they are and help them to make
better use of what they have when the
‘energies of parents and teachers and pupils

are strained to preserve the existing aca-—

demic educational system which has as its
goal the winning of five Barbados Scholar-
ships and the acquiring of school certifi-
cates, exhibitions and Island Scholarships.

Before people can be taken as they are
the syllabus and methods of teaching in
the rural schools will have to be revised.
Prominence will have to be given as Sir
George Seel’s Education Adviser writes “to
subjects correlated to the three major
fields of agriculture, health and home life
education.” Everyone will remember the
story of the visiting inspector who found
a teacher giving a lecture on hygiene to
pupils in a room where cobwebs trailed
across the teacher’s desk. When reproved
by the inspector he tartly replied that he
was employed to lecture on hygiene not
to sweep cobwebs.

Equally illuminating is the letter writ-
ten by a former classical student of Har-
rison College some years ago to this news-
paper. This student complained that where-
as he was familiar with the forensic elo-
quence of Cicero and Demosthenes and
was well acquainted with the distinguish-
ed historical ability of Sallust, Tacitus,
Thucydides and Livy, he had been taught
nothing about personal hygiene and did
not even know how to eat well balanced
meals.

Perhaps Miss Ibberson is being over-
pessimistic when she states that we must
take people where they are. Perhaps there
is no need at least in Barbados to do any~
thing more drastic than follow the advice
of Sir George Seel’s adviser on education.

Revision of the syllabus and of the meth-
ods of teaching in the rural schools ought
to provide an adequate channel for the
teaching of home economics and ought to
precede any invitation to the United Na-
tions to carry out demonstrations. No ex-
periment however successful and by whom-
_soever conducted could compete against
the highly organised vested interests of
local academic education. If home eco-
nomics is to be taught in Barbados the sub-
ject must be included in every school’s
curriculum. Otherwise it will be “cold-
shouldered” and become something for the
minority who are incapable of joining in
the all-island educational race to acquire
the five yearly scholarships provided by
the government of Barbados.

Unless the prejudices against “home-
making” subjects in the schools’ curricula
can be broken down, little progress to-
wards the ideals cherished by Miss Ibber-
son and the other delegates attending the
Conference on Home Economies and Nutri-
tion Teaching will be made in Barbados.

a

i ee a eC a a ——

War Against T.B. In
e Colonies

rh





A warning against > much
reliauce of the effectiveness of
drugs in the treatment of tuber-
culosis in the colonic was

given at today’s resumed Com-
monwealth Health and Tubercu-
losis Conference in London.

it was given by one of Britain’s

foremost authorities on tuber-
culosis, and one who has travell-
ed widely in the colonies, Pro-
fessor F. R. G, Heaf, of the
Welsh National School of Medi-
cine.
He spoke at this morning’s
session of the conference which
was entirely devoted to an ex-
change of information on tuber-
culosis in British colonial ter i-
tories.

Professor Heaf was summit.
up a number of papers which
had been read by Colonial
health officers and representa-
tives of voluntary organizations
concerned in the work of com-
batting tuberculosis.

There was a lack of confi-
dence in the treatment of tuber-
culosis, he said, on the part of
native sufferers, though fortun-
ately this attitude was on the
decrease, Many of the natives
undergoing treatment for tuber-
culosis failed to understand
what was being done for them.

Doctors had great difficulty in
getting them to remain in hos-
pital when they began to feel
better. In fact, said Professor
Heaf, there were new’ drugs
which gave relief in a matter of
a few months, and these gave
the patient a feeling of such
well-being that he thought he
was cured long before the treat-
ment was completed.

The co-operation of the native
sufferer, he said, was a very
important factor in the treat-
ment of tuberculosis. ‘‘We must
make him understand what we
are trying to do,” he added.

When the necessary co-oper-
ation of the patient had been ob-
tained, he believed we. could
look forward to the time when
both the wnortality and the in-
cidence of tuberculosis would
fall in every one of our colonies,

Earlier, Professor Heat
referred to the papers read to-
day as probably the most im-
portant series of papers on
tuberculosis in the colonies that
had ever been delivered in one
morning.

The problem of tuberculosis in
Colonial territories, he said, was
serious but not, hopeless. The
men and women engaged in the
fight against this disease were
doing valuable work, often un-
der the worst conditions. Many
of the reports which they had
sent back to this country were
“really remarkable pieces. of
work,” considering that in many
vases local health officers and
others engaged in anti-TB work
were cut off from the modern
facilities available in this coun-
try.

Professor Heaf stressed that no
generalization could be made
about the best method of stamp-









News From

LONDON. July 11th.

The Very Rev. Hewlett John-
son, Dean of Canterbury,
certainly made the most spec-
tacular news of the week. He
arrived in London after his tour
to Pekin via Moscow bearing a
great 40ft. long scroll written
in Chinese characters, which he
said he would like to deposit in
the Holy Library within the
Cathedral of Canterbury.

“The Red Dean”, with his flow-
ing white hair—about which he
is inordinately vain — told cor-
respondents he had ‘ proof’? that
the United States forces are
using insects to create epidemics
in Korea and Manchuria. He did
not bring any proof with him,
and all his reports ‘were at sec-
ond hand, or worse, He cpuld
explain nothing, and brought
no evidence,

Now there is quite an uproar
in political quarters about the
Dean. How can this short-
sighted and credulous cleric
continue to hold his position at
Canterbury and at the same
time aid the Communist cause
by pubiicity and false witness?
Again, everyone is asking
whethar he can actually de-
posit his scroll in the library
of Canterbury.

The Dean of Canterbury
appointed, officially by the
Chapter, but his name is put
forward by the Crown on the
advice of the Prime Minister,
“The Red Dean” obtained his
lifelong appointment to Canter-
bury because he caught the eye
of Mr, Ramsay MacDonald as
one of the few Socialist Minis-
ters of the Church, (Bishop
Barnes of Birmingham was
another similar appointment of
Ramsay MacDonald).

Since 1688 the King has not

ig,

had the right to remove a
Bishop or the Dean of Can-
terbury, once he has been
appointed. Like Judes, tha

high dignitaries of, the English
Church can only be removed if
they can be certifled as insane.



It would be very dificult to
change the rules of appoint-
ment — although Porlament

could certainly do it. The life-
long tenure of Bishops, Deans
and Judges is knotted into the
British Constitutlian @nd it is
difficult to make a fundament-
tal change in order to deprive
one misguided old man of the



@ur Readers Say;
“Twelth Night” Success

To the Editor, The Advocate,

SIR,—Those who gave so
kihdly a reception to the recent
production of “Twelfth Nigh’
may be interested to learn how
the enterprise came out finan-
cially.

I venture to think that the ac-
companying balance sheet should
be highiy encouraging to any

who want to use the Pocke
Theatre as a base, so to speak,
for some further production of a

play of genuine literary merit in
Barbados.

You will note that the finan-
cial success of the undertaking
was even more complete than
the balance sheet reveals at first
sight. The original t t

Council subvention of $199.12 i






had .

ing out tuberculosis in the col-
onies. Each colony must work
out its own plan, based on care-
ful research and investigation by
the men on the spot,

There was evidence, he con-
tinued, that natives could with-
stand the disease as well as any-
body, provided their living con-
ditions were improved. Anti-
tuberculosis measures must
therefore go forward side by
side with other public health
services.

Treatment centres would have
to be established to follow up
the work of diagnosis and in-
vestigation, otherwise the con-
fidence of local populations
would be lost. Bu®@ these things
must evolve gracually.

Professor Heaf criticized the
expenditure of large sums of
money on anti-tuberculosis
measures which could, at best,
benefit only a small minority cf
local populations. What is re-
quired, he said, are schemes that
give the greatest benefit to the
greatest number of people at the
lowest cost,

Referring to the increasing use
cf B.C.G. in the prevention of
tuberculosis in the colonies, he
said, “We must not live in a
fool’s paradise and think that
because we have B.C.G, all is
well.” Even when a person had
been vaccinated with B.C.G.
there was still a risk that tuber-
culosis could be contracted
through frequent exposure to
active infection,

Professor Heaf warned that it
would require a good deal of
money and extra staff before
tuberculosis could be brought
under control in the colonies.
Besides doctors, more nurses and
technicians were needed, and he
hoped that more people would
take advantage of the training
scholarships offered by the Na-
tional Association for the Pre-
vention of Tuberculosis. It was
far better, he added, that men
and women should come from
the colonies and be trained here
than that we should send out
nurses who could ill be spared,

The need for more medical
staff in the colonies was also re-
ferred to by Mr. Oliver Lyttel-
ton, Secretary of State for the

Colonies, who opened to-day’s
session of the conference.
Discussing the work being

done to control the spread of
tuberculosis in the colonies, he
said, “We suffer in this field, as
in many others, from lack of

staff, and we are making great
efforts to send doctors home to
study the latest methods. We
must spread knowledge, and we
must have schemes which will
enable the local doctors to help
the people they know and serve
in their own territories.” He paid
tribute to the N.A.P.T. for the
help they had given the author-
ities in this work.

Mr. Lyttelton pointed out that
with the decline in the incidence
of malaria, tuberculosis now
heads the list of killer diseases.

rn

by DAVID TEMPLE ROBERTS

cloak of office.

The Rev. Hewlett Johnson is
Dean of Canterbury; he does
not speak for the Church of
England; and he is not head of
the Church of England, as
some people overseas seem to
think.

Moscow must find him val-
uable, though. A _ cartoonist,
this week, had the last word.
He showed a new idea of the
Commissar for Propaganda, A
whole row of Red Deans, fully,
gaitered, were drawn up for
Stalin’s inspection. The demon-
strator was made to echo, sar-

castically, the germ warfare
propaganda, and to plan that
each ‘Red Dean” should bo

dropped in a metal container on
a different Western capital!
4 *

American Victory

The liner ‘United States”
has probably won the Blue
Riband of ‘the Atlantic for
many years to come. People
here with a combative spirit
were rather hoping that the
“Queen Elizabeth” would@ have
a try at the Blue Riband, and
beat the United States. Prob-
ably “Liz” could take a few
hours off the time “Mary” set
but she certainly cannot catch
the “United States”.

The Cunard Company is
maintaining a dignified tone. It
will be several years before a
British ship is ready to chal-
lenge the “United States’s” new
record, In a sense the Ameri-
cam ship is part battleship. It
has been built with a large
military subsidy — because of
its value in wartime as a troop
transport. If the Cunard Com-

pany could obtain a_ similar
Subsidy from the services it
could commission two ships,

But while the Queens are ser-
viceable and fast and, can
each carry a whole division of
troops the British authori-
ties are unlikely to subsidize the
ship owners to build another
Blue Riband ‘challenger,

A much more serious prob-
lem than speed faces the trans-
atlantic shipping lines. Some«
time in 1953 or 1954 the Comet
will start flying the Atlantic.
Then there will be no aerial dis-
comforts to drive passengers to
the ist Class Cabins of the





more than covered by the bal-
ance in hand of $326.73; and, in
addition, the Council is now in
possession of a theatrical ward:
robe which could certainly not
be bought from any costumier
fer the $222.00 entered on the
balance sheet. A total of $67.26
was retained, as previously ar-
ranged, by the Social Welfare
Department of the Barbados
Government in respect of the
two performances given under
iis auspices, and $58.45 by Cod-
rington College for local chari-
ties, and these sums do not ap-
pear in the balance sheet. It
may be added that my small ad-
visory committee and |] prefer-
red that no profits sheuld accrue
to us for the final performance,
which was given before some
300 school children at Queen's
College, or from the sale of pro-



~don’s last





BARBADOS ADVOCATE

It was one of the gravest and

most urgent problems confront-j

ing the authorities in the Co'o-
nial Empire.

“~The stamping out of tubercu-
losis has often been regarded as
& purely medical concern,” th
Colonial Secretary a

vant to state again at su is
in the fight against, tuberculosis
depends upon action by all mem-
community. Over-

bers in a
crowding, lack of fresh air, bad
sanitation or poor feeding, all

contribute to the spread of
disease.

“So far, therefore, from being
a medical matter the problem
extends ‘to many other subjects,
and above all the wide spread
of knowledge is necessary about
the incidence of this terrible
scourge.”

Mr. Lyttelton said there were
signs that the Colonial people
were beginning to be more aware
of the dangers and were willing
to help more whole-heartedly in
the measures intended to over-
come it. There was, however, a
long way to go.

He extended his warmest
praise and gratitude to the vol-
untary organizations which have
been assisting in this work.
“There are few objects which
should attract our sympathy and
our help more than this,” he
said.

Dr. E. D. Pridie, Chief Medi-
cal Officer, Colonial Office, said
tuberculosis was a very serious
public health problem—proba-
bly the gravest problem of all.

“There is no reason whatever
for complacency,” he said, “and
any success there has been in
dealing with tuberculosis should
merely stimulate us to further
efforts.”

The fact that a consultant on
tuberculosis had recently been
appointed in the Colonial Office
indicated the importance the
authorities attached to the dis-
ease.

The tuberculosis problem
should be tackled frora all an-
gles, and each territory should
work out its own plan for deal-
ing with it. But “the closer
Great Britain and the Colonial
territories can work together in
solving the tuberculosis problem
the better.”

Papers were read by Dr. IL.
Briggs, tuberculosis specialist,
Lusaka, Northern Rhodesia, Dr.
V. Hetreed, tuberculosis special-
ist, Lagos, Nigeria, who is in
charge of a tuberculosis survey
in that area, Dr. H, P. F. Fer-
nandes, tuberculosis officer, Brit-
ish Guiana, Dr. P. W. Dill-
Russell, deputy director of
medical services, Nyasaland, Dr.
J. A. R. Lavoipierre, director of
medical services, Mauritus, Dr.
G. H. Garlick, medical director

Singapore Anti - Tuberculosis
Association, Dr. L. G. Poole,
tuberculosis officer, Tamavua

Hospital, Fiji, Dr. M. L. Freed-
man director of médical services,
Bechuanaland, and Dr, W. J.
Vickers, director of medical ser-
vices, Singapore.

Britain

great liners. “Ist Class” will be
doomed. Already it is half-
empty. More and more liners
will have to refit themselves as
“one-class” boats, with tha
gradation of luxury, comfort and
crowding removed.
eo}

From Chicago
‘T think I’m going to win”,
said Ike,
The British Press_‘has
overwhelmingly pro-
in its “unconscious bias”. Cer-
tainly the reporters in Chicago
have tried hard to tell us what
is actually happening. But as
Eisenhower's chaincas hava
risen their reports have grown
increasingly jubilant in tone,
One of the meral assump-
tions in Britain is that Truman
will win.® His “announced de-
cision not to stand again is com-
pletely ignored by the shrewd.
ep ee *

been
ower

Last Clang

Londoners never ioved their
trams like they adore their
buses. The red “dquble-detk-
ers”, that foreigners always feel
are going to fall over as they
weave through the streets are
the recognized badge of London.

But trams clang. Trams are
noisy, Trams were always
shabby, and usually had wooden
seats. And they were soon
driven out of central London to
the great chartless -wastes of
South London, The fashionable
Londoner often takes buses, But
the tram he hardly touched—
save for a rare ride down the
embankment.

But last Sunday night Lon-
tram saited, (that
seems the right verb!) through
the dark streets of South Lon-
don to its final depot at New
Cross. The Mayer, the press
poomersree and a crowd of
undreds. waited to greet the
last tram on its way to oblivion,
The time was half past mid-
night. We were paying homage.
Very suitably, the last tram
arrived, at last, twenty-five
minutes late, ang overcrowded.
Thousands tried to board it
along the route, Indeed all the
day, Londoners with nostalgic
tastes for childhood, waited for
- of their last trams in order
o savour again, (without the
need to visit Glasgow or Black-
pool) the lollipop delights of
riding on top.
haphictbestitnpelias sted
grammes at any performance.

You will appreciate that my
purpose in making these facts
public is not to show how clever
we all were, but simply to dem-
onstrate that at could have
been regarded as a “highbrow”
production which could only be
put on because British Council
finances were at the back of it
did in fact ‘urn out to be a mo-
mey-making concern. It does
seem that others contemplating
a similar production need not be
deterred by fear of financial loss,

I should perhaps end by saying
that the British Counci! is noi
recouping itself for the original
subvention, and the sum of
$326.73 is thus available for fu-
ture needs in the furtherance of
the drama in Barbados.

RISELY TUCKER.














“MALAYA—The Facts

LONDON,

A suitable sub-title for the new official
publication, “Malaya—the Facts Behind the
Fighting”, might be: “An Intelligent Man’s
Guide to the Unknown War.” For this slim
volume of facts and figures about the Malay-
an emergency obviously assumes no previous
knowledge.

The facts are presented in the question and
answer form so dear to Government publi-
cists. They begin with the vital statistics of
the fighting forces engaged—25,000 British
soldiers, sailors and airmen, 10,000 Gurkhas,
five battalions of the Malay Regiment, two
battalions of the King’s African Rifles and
one battalion of the Fiji Infantry Regiment.

The next question asks what these forces
are doing in Malaya, and the reader is told,
with disarming simplicity, “Exterminating

; oe «
Communist terrorists.

Fortunately, the booklet goes on to give
some useful information on the background
to the emergency. It relates how the “shoot-
ing war” started when the Malayan Com-
munist Party failed in their attempt to gain
control of the country through the trade
unions.

There is good reason to believe, it goes on,
that the decision to abandon “peaceful pene-
tration” in favour of open terrorism was
taken at the Second Congress of the Com-
munist Party of India, which was held under
cover of the Calcutta Youth Festival in
Merch 1948,

When one comes to the question: “What
would the loss of Malaya mean?” one finds
the highly-publicised economic wealth of the
country relegated to fourth place in the list
of reasons why Britain is determined to elim-
inate the Communist menace.

The first three reasons are as follows:

1, That with world affairs as they are,
the loss of any territory to the Communists
would be serious: :

2. That the loss of Malaya would soon

lead to Communist domination of the whole
stretch of southern Asia between India and
China; and
3. That a Communist Malaya means
Communism across one of the world’s main
highways. It means a centre of Communist
infection right down among the East Indian
islands. And it means that Australia and
New Zealand are directly menaced.
A fifth reason why it would be a bad thing
if the Communists gained control of Malaya
is “simply that the people of Malaya don’t
want Communism.” ‘

For the rest, the booklet isa well-illustrat-
ed and informative account of the problems
encountered in combatting the terrorists—
“it is worse than looking for a needle in a
haystack”—and the progress madé in reset-
tling several hundred thousand Chinese
squatters.

One learns that the war is costing £40,000
a day, that the Communists have totally fail-
ed in their main objective of creating eco-
nomic chaos as a prelude to seizing power,”
and that social services in the Colony “are
good enough for Malaya to claim the best
health and education satistics in South-
East Asia.”

Under the question: “What About Malaya’s
Future?” the booklet is less informative. It
restates that the political aim is for Malaya
‘o become a fully self-governing nation, but
warns that there are “unusual difficulties” to
be overcome before this can be achieved.

If in style and format the booklet looks
rather like a “popular version” of a Govern-
ment White Paper it is something that should
not be held against it. On the contrary. There
‘s much in it of intense interest—especially,
perhaps, to the wives, mothers and sweet-
hearts of those who are fighting there.

Nor should it be criticised on the grounu.
‘hat its information is of the “basic” type
There is a great need for just that sort of
information—though one might be excused
for wondering why the Government has
waited so long before giving it.

If there is any serious criticism to be made
it is that the booklet costs one shilling. The
facts behind the fighting in Malaya should
be more widely known—and by more, people
than are willing to pay one shilling to learn
them.

lt Is Now The Customs Who
Are ‘Wonderful’ —

Britain's Policemen Have Rivals

THE men who ask “Anything to declare”
a thousand times a day at London’s airports
are taking top place from Britain’s police-
men in the esteem of visitors from all parts
of the world.

Travellers are going home full of praise
fur the courtesy and friendliness of the Cus-
toms officers.

Typical comment from an American
business. man before taking off for New
York was: “Your Customs officers are a first-
class advertisement for Britain.

“When I came in it took them exactly
three minutes to clear my luggage.

“And Americans I met while in London
told me they found British Customs the
quickest and most efficient to negotiate.”

British visitors to New York find it takes
anything up to two hours to pass through
controls at the airport.

At London Airport the average time for a
passenger to complete formalities is twenty
minutes. And the Customs part of it norm-
—L.ES.



ally takes under five minutes.

TUESDAY, JULY 22, 1952

PLES OE SOG OES CELE LPC SPIE

On Sale at ADVOCATE STATIONERY.
DSO LOSPOSOSEELEP OD EL ELE PEDP ELLE LPL PPE PLS PDEE



|
|



PAN BOOKS.

The Widest Selection in Town.

When We have this Wide Selection!
GALVANISED CORRUGATED SHEETS
Ot. 7 %.'3 ft.
Gauge: 26 — 28 — 30
ALUMINUM SHEETS

6 ft., 8 ft.

Guage: 24
Also GALVANIZED ROLL TOP RIDGING,
DOWN PIPES, EAVE GUTTERS, GUTTER
RESTS AND WATERHEADS.

C. S. PITCHER & CO. Ph. 1472





Shis week, most people are considering The
Ymportance of Being Earnest —

Although the Flouse of Da Costa lay stress
on She Importance of Being Garnest
every day and every month of the year —

And this, it is felt, is reflected in the

Company s buying policy, with a resultant
excellent vartety of stock in all departments
and, most important, at prices within reach

of all —

So naturally, Da Costa & Co, Lid. deem

it timely to suggest to the general public
that they make the necessary arrangements
this week to see and judge for themselves,
all that is meant by —

“THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING EARNEST”








>
}

$

ALADS

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Heinz Mayonaise
Heinz Vegetable Salad
+ Macaroni

Hams in Tins

Carr’s Cream Crackers

aad

News

We have large stocks of:
Super Rice, Bacon, Butter
and Cheese.

Tosday's









pe at

Phone To-day—We Deliver Carr’s Cheese Crisps
Easy to Prepare SPECIALS
a Eales Tomato Soup, 802—22
cents
pthtangesN! wt Chocolate Nut Roll 14c.
Weet-a-bix each
Pablum Italian Ketchup 46c.
Farex Italian Chili Sauce 74c.
Bacon Prepared Mustard 25c.
Calves Liver She t Gelatine 24c. per
Bacon pkg.





Make your own Bran Muffins
with Posts Bran Flakes
37c. per pkg,

Please drive carefully—the
life you save may be your

own.



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PHONE TO-DAY WE DELIVER

GODDARDS



———





TUESDAY, - JULY -22,

1962 .



ilearing Of Writ For Contempt Of Court Coni

@ From Page 3

Case Law, ‘hey must of necessity
try to discover what the position
was in England. His Lordship ex-
plained that it was entirely. dif-
ferent from wha‘ it was here, and
Mr. Reece rejoined that it was
entirely different on the question
of procedure, but not upon the
question of punishment. In Eng-
land the Judge or Judges found
the man guilty or not guilty of
the contempt complained of and
the Order was made absolute or
not absolute. Similarly in Barba-
dos the jury found him guilty or
not guilty as the case might be,
and then came the question of
punishment,

In England the question of pun-
ishment was through the instru-
ment of a Writ issued through the
Court. In Barbados the punish-
ment was stated and the Judge
then came into the matter and
determined what the punishment
should be.

When Mr. Reece attempted to
refer to a case in point, His Lord-
ship pointed out that the judges,
disagreeing with the Court below,
considered that the matter com-
plained of was prejudicial to the
trial of the action, but said that
in their view there was a techni-
cal contempt, but that in the cir-
cumstances of the case, they were
not going to proceed any further
and they added that it would have
been better if the defendant in
the action had not applied for the
Order,



Real Contempt

Mr. Reece submitted that that
meant a verdict of “not guilty”,
because all three of the Judges
said “not guilty’ and that there
must be a real and substantial
contempt of Court, and that a
contempt which is technical is not
ong of which the Court should
take notice.” As he’ had argued
‘earlier, in not making the Order
absolute, they had really said not
guilty.

His Lordship pointed out that
“they did not say that” and add-
ed that in their view the matter
complained of was prejudicial to
the action, but they said further
that it amounted toa _ technical
contemp!; it was of such a nature
that they would not proceed fur-
ther, and they were not going to

punish.
Mr. Reece submitted that if it
was a technical contempt they

should have made the Order ab-
solute, and on the question of pun-

ishment say that they did not
think so and so. He submitted

further that the jury as the judg-
es of the case could say in view
of the circumstances, that there
was no contempt, and that the
words complained of were never

likely, or could never tend to
prejudice.
His Lordship again reminded

Mr. Reece that the judges did not
say so, and that they had said
that the matter was prejudicial,
but Mr. Reece rejoined that he
had read passages from “Fry”, and
he did not think it could be more
clearly stated. That might be a
question of law where the offence
although trivial, amounted to a
contempt.
question of law, in Barbados, it
was the function of the jury. Pun-
ishment was something which
could only flow from the time the
Order was made absolute,

Principle Recognised

Tt was a principle which was
recognised, even in very small
matters, Mr. Reece said. And, he
added: “Anybody who studies
the Police Magistrate’s Act would
know that a police magistrate has
the right to say not guilty despite
the evidence.”

Concluding his argument on the
point, Mr, Reece submitted that in
the case before the jury, if it was
a question of a technical contempt
the jury had a perfect right te say
not guilty. The question of pun-
ishment, he said, was not their
concern, So long as a man was
guilty, the Writ of attachment was
issued. In Barbados, as soon as he
was found guilty, the judge came
into play, and he then expressed
his view on the question of pun-
ishment. He submitted that that
was the correct position when
Lord Justice Cotton said that un-
der the circumstances “we do not
find any reason why a Writ of
Attachment should be issued,

He recalled that when he left
off on the adjournment being
taken, he was about to deal with
the article in question, a portion
of which was complained of by
the plaintiff. He was submitting
then, and he submitted to them
again, that there was nothing in
the article which any twelve men
of average intelligence could find




Gee!! Gils!!

If You only realise

The Importance of Being Earnest

about the

Home

Decorations

You certainly would

immediately select these:-

SISAL PLACE MATS @

” ” ” ose

GLASS MATS

”

Also CANELILY PLACE MATS @ .............

On the facts and the’

Sas es aiuabh dose eiady abies 72 each
xs op vans oa a repadveagh 60 ,,
CL laa sian’ ee
hs
de 9: angeaesalerceaieans 6»

that it was likely to pervert the
course of justice.

Reading From Article

Directing the attention of the
jury to the article, he asked “what
do we find in here?” Mr. Reece
read from the article “It has been
my custom for the past two years
to have a talk at the énd of the
licensing year and before you
come for the renewal of licences
ete., and appealed to the jury to
put themselves in the position of
ihe man who read the article on
the morning of the 13th, the day
after the speech had been deliv-
ered by Colonel Michelin.

He asked them to suppose that
they were driving on the morning
the article appeared in the Press,
end say whether they felt within
themselves that the words com-
plained of in the setting in which
they were, would or could tend,
or could be calculated to make
them convict a man charged either
with manslaughter or anything
else.

His Lardship reminded Mr
Reece that the question was not
whether those words tended to
convict, but whether they tended
to prejudice, and Mr. Reece sub-
mitted that some of the judges
had definitely used words to that
effect,

He told the jury that they were
trying the issue, and assured
them that he was not trying to
put anything to them that he
should not. He asked them if they
were driving on the morning of
the 13th June, whether the words
would tend, or would be likely to
interfere with the discharge of
their duty as a jury, and so cause
the course of justice to be per-
verted,

His Lordship again reminded
Mr. Reece that it was not whether
the jury would tend to pervert
the course of justice, but whether
the words complained of would
so tend,

Replying Mr. Reece said he
might be wrong, but as he under-
stood it, and as he interpreted the
law, the question was whether
the persons who were summoned
as jurors would be likely to be
effected in their judgment whea
the matter came before them, He
was asking the jury that same
question.

He wanted to say right away
that the article should be read
as a whole, end then, having read
it, the question was whether the
words complained of tended to
affect the course of justice.

Expressed Opinion

He mentioned that any opin-
ion expressed by any witness, no
matter who he was, whether it
was Colonel Michelin or a wit-
ness for the prosecution, or be
it another person, whether a wit-
ness or not, could in no way
affect their opinion on the words.
In other words, whatever might
have actuated Colonel Michelin;
or whether he would or would
not use those words again,
whether Mr. Vanterpool express-
ed any opinion either in the Press
or otherwise, that did not affect
the issue.

The issue, Mr, Reece, submit-
ted, was a very simple one. “Do
these words tend or are they like-
ly to pollute the stream of justice,
or that they may, he would pul
it no higher, prevent, or hinder
justice from being done when the
other case came before them or
some other jury. *

He emphasised once more that
the case against Mr. Haddock,
whatever the nature, was not be-
fore them, The facts in that case,
whether he be found guilty or
not—the nature of the facts in
that case were absolutely nothing
to do with them.

Fact And Comment

There they kad in a newspaper
a siatement of fact and comment.
It could be no two ways about it.
Some of the statement were
facts. He asked “What person
hearing of this very sad occur-
rence would not make some ex-
clamation, some expression signi-
fying his or her horror? Look at
it however you like, it is seldom
that three children are removed
at the same time from any
cause,” Mr. Reece said.

He expressed the belief that
anybody throughout the length
and breadth of the is’and would
have given expression of their
feelings in some ways or other,
and argued that to say that a
person using the words “ghastly”
and “eppaliing” in relation to the
cudden death of three children,







frcm whatever cause such sud-
den death came, that such a per-
son would thereby be likely to
pollute the streams of justice, was
“ridiculous.”

Mr, Reece appealed te the jury
to examine the article not with
the gid of an Oxford and Cam-
bridge Dictionary, or with the aid
of the c’ean brain which ‘is pos-
sible to read into the words and
sentences” a certain meaning, be-
cause it wat not the duty of a
jury trying the issue to do so, but
rather to read it as ordinary mea
would read it.

Out of Context

He reminded them that a sen-
tence taken out of iy; context
might be capable to any meaning
under given circumstances, but
when they had it in relation to
the article or the Report, then
of course it was an ebtirely
different matter.

He told them that when they
looked at the article in its entirety
and in the surrounding circum-
stances, there was absolutely
nothing in point of fact, to say
nothing of point of law, He asked
whether there was anything in
that article, so stromsz, so start-
ling or outstanding as to make
the man in the street, or any per-
son who might be likely to sit on
a jury not approach his task with
the right judicial mind.

He asked further: “Do you
think as he is sitting there in the
jury box, discharging his func-
tion which jis almost judicial, that
he weuld fail to discharge that
duty according to the oath which
he has taken, or that this article
would even tend to make him do
that, or tend to do it, or would be
likely to cause him to do it?”

There it was, he said. It was a
fact beyond dispute that the three
children died on the day in ques-
tion, “Is there any mention in that
article,” he asked, “as to how
they came by their death apart
from what is stated therein? Is
there any mention of Haddock
by name?” Mr. Reece however
pointed’ out that it was not
necessary to mention his name,
and that a mere inference was
all that was necessary.

He submitted that the Advocate
in printing the article did so in
support of a good cause, and in
keeping with their motto, “for
the cause that needs resistance.”

It was no border tine case, Mr.
Reece said. He submitted that it
was no case at all of contempt.
No matter how it was read, it
could never amount to contempt,
taking into consideration the facts
and circumstances of te case,
He ‘invited them to return a ver-
dict of “not guilty” for the Advo-
cate Company Limited.

At 3 p.m. Mr. Reece concluded
his address, and on hearing from
Mr. Walcott that he would not
be replying, preferring to err
on the side of caution rather then
deal with the cases which he had
already dealt with, and in view of
the fact that Mr, Reece had not
cited any further cases, His Lord-
ship adiourned further hearing
until 1030 o'clock this morning
when he will sum up to the jury.

Woman Dies
After Accident

NINETY-YEAR-OLD Florence
O’Brien of Black Rock, St. Michael,
died at the General Hospital at
about 4.20 a.m. on Sunday after
being involved in an accident
along Barbarees Road, St. Michael,
at about 7.45 ‘p.m. on Saturday
with a bicycle owned and ridden
by Albert Gibbs of Mansion
Place, Bay Land, St. Michael.

A post mortem examination was
performed by Dr. A. S. Cato and
an inquiry is fixed for Wednesday.







WHAT’S ON TODAY

Court of Common Pleas—10.30
a.m.

Meeting of Legislative Coun-
cil—2.00 p.m.

Meeting of House of Assemi-
bly—3.00 p.m.

Basket Ball at Y¥.M.P.C.—
7,30 p.m.









HOME PRODUCTS

CAVE
SHEPHERD
ooo. Le



DEPT,

10-13 BROAD ST,



BARBADOS

“Trinidad
Has Good
Sugar Crap

Trinidad has had a reasonably
it was not
to tne
weather, Mr. A. R. Starck, U.K.
Trade Commissioner for the Brit-

good sugar crop but
up to expectations owing

ADVOCATE



WEEK-END
THER TS

SIMON
Hali

GONZALVES of Bus
reperted to the Police that
sycle valued $60 was stoler
¢ outside the house of Julian
Massiah at Cheapside Road, St.
Michael 9.40 and 9.55
om
De
tion,





on Sat



ae ael, reported that










ish West Indies told the Advo- Cisht fowls valued $40 were stolen
cate yesterday morning fre his fowl-house at the same
: e lontatio sae nee ¥ .
Mr. Starck arrived here from Sie aes be wween Las ee
Prinide, Bis headauertets, ina, 000 Oey SNe hy se am. 9 OURS
transit for Antigua, St. Kitts and el sod 837 wea stolen
St. Lucia where he has gone on 4 : & Tohn hast
routine visit. 1 Sunday. he inci-
He said that trade in ‘trinidad eae es by Dottin ¢
is reasonably good, but like ail Rae teh Rhctow Weucel
Gther- parts of the West: Indies: 5 oo ne ee thats uarin
there is evidence of over-siock- oF Ginth siinis an hour ah ae
ing and some caution in buying yajie of seg. 14 jen: from

among traders. This, however, in

; ; : the Lady Jor on Friday.
his view, is temporary and the ‘The articles are the property of
problem will solve itself in the Noel and Phillip Sarnco's of t
near future. same vessel. It was anchored in

Mr. Starck who returned
Trinidad on Thursday after

week's visit to Bermuda, said that
an extremely

it has had

MR. A. R. STARCK

tourist season.

paign particularly

good



The island carries
out an intensive publicity cam-
in Nortna









transit for Trinidad.

At the airport to meet them were
Mr. L. A. Lynch, Life Vice-Presi-
dent of the A.A.A.B., Mr, Gilmour
Rocheford, Honorary Secretary
and a number of cyclists,

CHARTER AIR
SERVICE PLANNED
FOR SURINAM



America on which it spends a
great deal of money, but this SURINAM,
shows dividends as is demon- Private Dutch interes © pre-

strated by the amount of money
into circula-

which visitors put

tion, initially two‘or three passenge:
Imports planes, provided the Governme:

Last year, the imports of the cisetcine oeleased ae = Sahl ‘

colony were worth over £10,000,- of 109,000 guilders, Since the pr

000 which for a_ resident popu- posed ‘air service would meet

laticn of less than 40,000 people gcute need for a means oi

fs fantastic. But it does serve to tiansportaiion for passenge i

show how valuab’e the tourist freight, states the World Ban!

trade is to the colony. Mission in its report, the projeci
Imports this year are UD, should be given a priority and

compared with last year, and if pushed forward promptly.

they continue at the present — aia

scale, Bermuda will have a re-

cord in her history.
“Responsible people

=



pared to operate a charter ai
service within Surinam, utilising





“This confidence is fully justified
An@vife regard to the effors

in the which are made, not only to bring

island are very confident of their tourists to ‘the island, but to cater

ability to continue to attract for them in a first class mann°:
tourists” he said and added: when they are in the colony.”



| GLA

WE HAVE



ALL





g

rues

cade he De Ge. QUI

iHe death occurred yesterds

f Mr. Mi. OT. OG Viahon, M.A,
tormirly Secretary of the Edu
cation Board, afler a short ilin

i$ in fais seventiy~irst

Michae. Thomas Greaves Mano):
was educated at Harrison Colleg
and Codrington College wher
he won an Island Scholarsh:
Leaving Codrington he became
Headmaster of the Alleyne
School in 1904 but came to his o!
school Harrison College as an As-
sisiant Master in 1908. Anothe
four years found him Secretar)
of the then Education Board an
it was here he made his greate:
contribution to education in th.
island.

It was regarded as a high tri
bute to the public spiritednes
of men in this island when it wa
said and with much truth tha
the Government of Barbados wa
really in the hands,of her Boards.

year.













to the Careenage at the time of the Of these, it will be realised th
a incident. the Education Board was one
hs *) most important. And it was
not merely because of its func-
‘ i 2 » . tions but because of the standar
Cyclists Returi of amictiney: with which ‘th:
i hic
7 re. Board carried out its duties. M
From Martinique winon baa’ tiitowea ‘the Rov.
Nichols as Secretary and whe
Four Barbadian cyelists, Darn- pouquets were being thrown ¢
ley Simari, John Skinner, Duncan the Education Board for the ex-
ss — aoe Brathwaite, e-lient standard which had bee
returned from Martinique yester~ paintained, the members of th:
day afiernoon by B.W.I.A, after Board new that Se great ex
takin g part in ae OTe Prix, the +ont it meont that ye efficienc
155 kilometer cycle event. ni 2s based on the thoroughness +
Accompanying them was Assist- o >
C B th ratory. “Milew* Mohon. o
ant Manager C, E, Jemmott who , : 4 i
c , mow? %t merely to h
is also Assistant Secretary of the AubhSbipredeiwa satya
Amateur Athletic Association of {"''â„¢M2 6s bul | foreughot
Barbados, . : Ret et ee ct UDR
D. Schuler, the Trinidad repre- “) Nee 9nd those who shared an
sentative at the meeting arrived work with him knew that he de
here by the same opportunity in- Monded from them nothing whic

ha

AiA

Aste vawnad

Duringshis years as Secretar)
he sometimes acted at Harrison
College and while he was gentl
in his manner he was the teache:
with whom boys did not “play
pranks”,

When he retired and the Board
was superseded by a Department
Mr. Mahon continued to give any
avsistance he could and his experi

not An in hie



ence was of great value to thos
who had to launch the new systen
of administration,

In recent year ivancing year
limited his activities but he sti
prosided as Examiner wheney

he was asked. A few weeks ag
he was taken ill with pneumonic
and he died yesterday,
He was married to Miss Reece
vughter of Rev. Reece and had
me son who lost his life in th:
of the Second Wort
and several daughters.
His funeral took place at th
Westbury Cemetery vyestetda,s
afternoon where the last rite
were performed by Bishop Bent-
Cc, C, Conliffe in tt
presence of a large and distinguish
A esthering while the fleda eo
hyireinecs horees in the Citv wer
Aown nt half-maet during the dav
To

anther



ley and Rev

hi corrowines widow arc

Aeepest

il he extended,

re'ativas sympath:



THE RICH VITAMEIN.PACKED

LOAVES OF DELICIOUS HREAD
BAKED IN

J«R BAKERIES

ene

SS

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PLAIN AND DECORATED

JUST RECEIVED

A WIDE RANGE OF

UTILITY ITEMS INCLUDING—

SALAD PLATES
MEASURING CUPS
SALT & PEPPER SETS
ASH TRAYS



ICE CREAM GLASSES
MIXING BOWLS
FLOWER VASES
REFRIGERATOR
BOTTLES

TUMBLERS—ALL SIZES, COCKTAIL TO 1 PINT CAPACITY

ALSO





WOLD LO CSOUVOO OO UELUL D DLVOYO ED LUV LD PUY YW OCUDT

| KITCHEN AND TABLE

Cy
ala 3





SALAD DISHES
GLASS JARS
JUG & TUMBLER SETS

“PYREX” AND “PHOENIX” HEATPROOF GLASSWARE :

PIE PLATES, SOUP PLATES, DINNER PLATES, RAMEXINS, OPEN ‘
DISHES, CASSEROLES, MIXING BOWLS, CUSTARD CUPS. ETC. gi ae

See US First for all YOUR GLASSWARE REQUIREMENTS “rth

4

F
’ ¢
| H A R R : S O N HARDWARE DEPARTMENT

DEG ABBA OVO SOE} 448490 FF8O9OO4

TEL.

OBE8DO®OLEOOOS3O0OO44

2364



6 FINE BLENDS TO CHOOSE FROM:
Sole Agents: MESSRS

Only Scotland, traditional home of fine tobaccos, could
produce Four Square. Only in Four Square tobaccos
will you find selected leaf, blended with skill handed
down by successive generations for over 140 years,

FOUR. SQUARE

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PARRADOS

A HORSE OWNER |

SHOULD BE

A HORSE LOVER

We Highly Recommend

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EMBROCATION

For the treatment of Curbs,

Capped Hocks, Ete.

It is also an excellent application for Windgalls,

Thoeroughpins and the Swelling from Sprung
Hock Joints of horses.

PRICE 12/6 AND 6/6 AT

KNIGHTS DRUG

Se



Splints, Sprains,

STORES

=

a if









MACE BY DOBIE OF PAISLEY
SONS (BARBADOS) LTD.





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|

OVID OBOI OOS 1S 590 990959959OG0000R)
JUST OPENED

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72” WIDE—FOR BUS TOPS and SIDES
INNER HOOD LINING

56” WIDE. FAWN AND GREY 2

%

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>

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8 §
: ECKSTEIN BROTHERS
$ BAY STREET — DIAL 4269 §
Robddensiibai kenekuiissebiiaidiiieacediada susie
+” $0004 : 1900 DOO
; THE ONLY CYCLE IN THE WORLD =
: PERMITTED TO CARRY
THIS MARK OF

PERFECTION
IS. THE —
: The Aristocrat of all Bicycles
:
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FULL 3

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SIZES
IN STOCK

RISON'S for HUMBERS



>

1922 OOSGS 0000909 OOO







CLASSIFIED ADS.

i
TELEPHONE 2508 ; j



















a





BARBADOS







F




























ADVOCATE
PUBLIC SALES (|PURLIC NeTICES! LosT & FOUND





















TUESDAY, JULY 22, 1952



Sore Mouth SHIPPING NOTICES



REAL ESTATE reliable Company ¢*tablished in ~ . . | aie
lg aan nl agg me 5 i i dala ik a oe 7 ; ee ae cea oan cro : LOST | .poese Bloody Teeth | as oh Loan bad OSS S SP > - »
‘ ° hoe or ervices of ¢ etent ar e. enced - —— moreecenons —— | . : LEALAN LIMITED.
. DIED j . | pCALCUCHIMA On the Rockley Coast. itanager for Branch Office’ to be| _B.T.C CE TICKET—Series FFF| , Viceding Gums, Sore Mouth and | (M.A.NZ. LENE)
: roan SALE } . . ee at . established in Barbados end Septems. | 4040 for midsummer meeting im Bush 6 nue mean = Fae may
GOODING—On July 21, 1952, Beatrice | ‘Saaae wie race 952. Please send fu ails and) Hall Yard Gap. Finder kindly return 9 *ys Soe hak tans eae ‘a | 8S. “GLOUCESTER” ts scheduled to The M/V CARIBBEE will accept
Gooding. Her funeral will leave her) ee sisepiehinid CUMUEIE Gig. Seceeet ie lary required with Passport | to the Adveeate Advertising Department. | aa ue te aan ome tecth te | #il fom Port Pirie May 3ist, Devonport cargo and passengers for Dominica,
late residence Lameaster Piantation - : ie : age Mon thy . cture to Advocate T. c/o; - eee a oe il out and may also cause Rheu- une Sth, Melbourne June I4th, Sydney Antigua, St. Kitts, sens and
tMousd, St, James, at 4.45 for St.} t ‘ ine ole clan de gegiyr ‘ ivocate Co 19.7, 52-108 TS—2 Barbades Turf Club Mid : noch | une 2th, Lrisbane July Sth, arriving at Montsertat. Salling on the 28nd
- # Parish Church. No Flowers AUTOMOTIVE j a lpn ae ; = ga- ~ ee - 7500—7501 reer yr Satdiac’ tie ie o | sarbados ‘about August 6th. July 1962.
by request, | -- - ~ + -——- ‘ Saath ane ia ie se return, Pierre Pointe ¢/v ; ids sore mou! uickly tieht-
Gladys Outram, Dorothy Gooding. CAR—Vauxhall Velox. Green. Late ial Be Sy Bg Aye eee e w NCE a oval Store, No. 12 High Street ' ns t eth. nop eek sparen , | in fo gpl A gars ge Bow ned oe veee M/‘V MONEKA “2 accept cargo
- i850, Owner driven and well kept. whet junie et Er we ae aen Pg BP ivounscinentes Amosal ust mal urmouth wet | end passengers for Dominiea,
WORRELL, — On ist July, 1952.) Appi’ Courtesy Garage. Phone 116 koe 3 ; Tee. with Basins & Importation from U.K. of CORN SiFl SWEEPSTAKE © TEHCKRET. - Series end save your tee Py money book TONER: SEBS, Antigua, St. Kitts, Nevis and
Emmeline Worrell, of Belleplaine | 18.7.52~6n — x . =) 1 see Stone oe LERS and we ghaill appreciate it if'e 2” Finder please return same ‘dj on return of empty pac * ie } Cargo accepted on through Bills of Montserrat. Sailing on the 24th
St. Afgrew. The funeral leaves her) ——-——— tke aca eo Ty yes ants ender will ene Straughan, Braggs Hitt, $t.,Jngeph.+ Amosan from your chemist toda | Lading fee transHipment at Trinidad to July 1952
late miidence at 4 Peleck this eve-| CAR—One Proicet Ford 199 model.|ncon,’ Everite Root Al Condition |. auirements to us immediately. 2.79% -ly , Yee guarantee protects you >ritish Guians, Leeward and Windward
ning for St. Andrew's Church./ A-1 Condition, Practically New, Owner | peor yay eg OG, And. Condition COURTESY GARAGE, — $$ slands. 2
Friend’ are invited. { Briven Price $800, Owner leaving ax bat ene Si — ga White Park SaaS For further particulars apply— BW.1. SCHOONER OWNERS
Rosalind Jordan, Augusta Jordan! i:and Contact Smith's Garage, Roe- | 2%), pa aA ps RR A ar 20.7 \ ASSOCIATION (INC)
“Sisters}, Lioyd Worrell ‘Son at} vick St. 99,7 Ph.) Now's Bedwnoin ene binaalen, al a EXAMINATION NOTICE | CURNESS WITHY @ CO., LTD., Consignee:
U.S.A), Eudalie Alleyne (Cousin). | Car pon. | 1/8 Acre, Going Under £1.10. AT} NOTICE |‘ TRENTDAD. adele
CAR—Austin A-40 Somerset Car, Done J roe : 3k Appiications w is ¢ th ané m
} LIGHTFOY Xx LANE A 2 Bedroam pplica will be received by t
IN MEMORIAM jeniy 1600 miles. Dia) 9210, 4162. T. H. | Cottage, Govis Water, Rlectricigy, Very | Clerk of the Vestry up to la moon) m Next LP.S. Shorthand )})), DA COSTA & CO., LTD.
aneiesiail aia ana { as 22.7 .52—2n | Good Condition, Can Remain, Very t« iday, Ist Augusi, 1952 for:-- Exam. takes place on Satur- 4 ieee



ALIEYNE—In loving memory of Cuth-j





CAR— r-de Li (X+ 88) ood . . hae! ms iebe? j

hat SEA. Abeipe. whe sell AiteDt win car nee cash beet eee bot for Almost anything in Kea) St. Michael's Girls’ School, now

Long’ days, long nights he bore his{ smaller car. First class order, owner Real Estate Agent, “Olive Rou tast-| 2. Any Vestry Scholarship at the
aa ; aiven, Dial 3359. ings 26.7, 62--In. 4 same School which may become} ©
Waited for cure but all in vain, | $15 BOS 5% Oren trea or) ae Ge Se Sees reat te

i 3 at SE 7 (70) §& e n. the es andidates must e
Until = Himself saw what was CARS—One wm sree nrasee sain aheiae wos Ltd. Hubert B rishioners in straitened cncerenopies
And@= took my dear with him to} ("ee reading 14,000 miles, battery and) Finch 20.7.52--2n |end must not be less than 9 wears nor
|

‘res in A-l condition, price
soe (1) Ford “Prefect” $400.00,

2,000 00
excel- |



rest.” ‘
Ever to be remembered by Iris Alleyni i lent buy at this price.











j Land Rent



The undersigned will





Going Under One Archer Gittens Scholarsinip ¢







more than 10% years of age on Ist
offer for sale}














eae oe 4 aT oie gj at their office, No. 17, High Street,!tisma} Certificate which must’ accom-
ALLEYNE—In loving memory of my | aa oe (2950) Ltd., 19,7 a | Bridgetown, on Friday, the 25th July | pany the application.
dear beloved mother Levinia Matilds , '*'9* . an "- | 1952, at 2 p.m ails | Forms x sppiieation win be vases
wi yparted this life on 2Iet July, t a ee ee eer The dwellinghouse called “VENTNOR” | end received a e Vestry Clerk's Office
1961. oie ‘5 ‘ at 5 ~pgeerey ag al aa condi- | with the land whereon the same stand | between the hours of 10 a.m. andwJ2
We cannot Lord thy purpose see, naan : - 5 | containing by admeasurement 4,093 | (noon)
hut all ip well that’s done by thes. ! yine {sland _ Contact David: Bo Rice. | square feet or thereabouts situate xt | E, C. REDMAN,
Ever to be remembered by Doris Skeete; - B Rice & Co, a —tfn- | the Corner of Pine Road and ist Avenue, | Clerk, St Michael's, Vestry.
ghter), Elaine, Audie, Cena —————————————— ie ne Ug
Winslow Hobert “(Grangeniidren) and {| CARS—Austin A-40 in very good ne ection on Mondays, Wednesdays} — inaiae -
family. 22.7. 5a—1n ee Going cheap. Owner left the | oi priduys between the hours of 4 and LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE}
stand, 6 p.m. on application to the tenant ' cn f i “$s
Etaoin Monday Fs etic |, Netgleg 10 fae, Macatent comaiion |" Ror hiring pactewars sd conationn|, The, appestion of, Lawson, ane
= a ed nlover at 2 seater n gair f enle ¢ ly to , Br etor ba wn, &§ 0 » -
Witenes Rethie Risen at Temidna, | CQRT ROYAL GARAGE LED, Telephone |°f "He apply tor chaser of liquor license No. 648 of 1952
Her™ funeral took place yesterda 504. 17.7,52—4n | . 10.7. 52—8n, | Stanted to Alfred Da Silva in respect |
aion ‘at ae Westbury Ceme- igi i) a if a wall building situate at Cox Road,

re
FERGUSON TRACTORS-—Just arrived
nd can be scen at COURTESY GARAGE

tery. 22.7.52—1n
(Trinidad Guardian please copy




























































































!
Ls n their Office No. 17 High Street, on Frida - reported on ai according to the nature and priority thereoi respectively,
| ul 4616 f 20 7 58—tn. the 25th July are P. Pa by pubis } baits ae ree Peoria at awe sherwilll such persons Will be precluded from the benefits of any decree and be
a ~ - , o 4 2 2 . win _o . : y
PERSONAI MORRIS OXFORD SALOON, dome oer een we eg ee soed equore |and to use the said license at such last | °cPrived of all claims on or a said. property.
4 vnly 2,700 mijes and as new. Owner | feet of land at George: titres t, Belleville, | deseribed premises. ' Plaii t ESELSENE and
: Ga havens “aataad arsine | aq! Cr EGY BREAGH. | St: Michael. ‘The Dwellinghouge contains | Dated this 18th day of July, i962 Defendant: CRESENCO COPPIN
The fiiblic are herebs warned against | <9 90.90. Dial 4616, COURTESY GARAGE gallery, drawing and dining rooms, two | T0:-—C DDER E*q., f of » lar
giv credit to my wife VERA Mc}; ee nnctnitiaheeel - = r 7 ve | Police Magistrate, Dist. “B” that certain pieeé or parcel of land part of the lands of a
St . I de 1] A i 7 a bedrooms, (one with running water), \ , ‘S: 7 or known by the name of “THE RISK" situate in
1 SH (nee STRAKER) as 0 not} ONE (1! Austin two ton truci: and one | jsten toilet and bath. Electric lMght Sed.) L. I. BRERETON
hold myself responsible for her or any-!;;; Austin A40 Car. ‘Telephone 4921 Seen See ath e ig { Applicant. in this Is: gonveinizig by Se Than an apenas
one .else_contracting any debt or debiv 1) y. geott & Co,, Ltd “inspection on application to Mr,| .N.B.—This application will ne con- Ww. tA 4 4 Pe Baa At tt ang id BONNE.
in my n@meé unicss by « written order 26,8. 52--t.f.n 4 + eo ridered at the Licensing Court to be . eyor) eres x erches. Abutting an joun
eigned RR. ' eal a — {H- A. M. Lashley by phoning 4007 | held on Friday, Ist day of August, 1983 ing on North on formerly of the estate of James L. Gaskin deceased
oe. sr * aia az err anes Hine Wor further particulars and conditions | Ohh eases e ; ered but now of the of one Burrowes deceased on lands of Elizabeth
ee Main tr “44 t , \TRUC™--Chevrolet truck, no reason-} 4¢ sale apply to: ha ees Gee re i en One ee a ee COTILE CATEORD: & CO., ares > W. RUDDER Ha Ot. T. Burrowes deceased and Liian Webb respectively
ole P27 ey | it 6--ain Police Magis: rate, Dist. “B.” on the Mats, of Seeets Besrawes and Kitty Piggott but now of
i K 2 . .7,52-~ > e Theow George Gaskin but now of A. L.
The public ste hereby warned again ELECTRICAS L TREVOR", Black Rock, St. Michael } an rbd and all apcretions ze jhe sare area by ie
7 ife, Gwendol: ‘T . Black Rock, St. Micha 0 } eC samme may be up to high water mark; the
giving oehe* Watson) “ do tot hola Just received new shipment of Garrarcd | desirable bungalow-type Dwelling- WAC TED | said Dy the Public Road running North and
myself responsible for her or anyo. thiee speed Automatic Changers at house, ee on 3 roods 30 Deedee tikes i | So ; Together with the messuage, or |
« ary 4 > . 8. fei 0. Ltd. Radio Em- | d, and containing open marble-tiled ‘y "+ and all and every the erections
Ores cates by oor uit : eee ME eC 15.6.52—t.f.n. | verandah to North and East, drawing ; ph lana and built standing and being and
my 7 end dining rooms, 3 bedrooms (each with reel of land (also part of the said’
signed by me. | Ss pa
Sed SAMUEL JACKMAN JUST ARRIVED “Pye” De Luxe|]running water), and usual conveniences, | HELP pla oe i ‘ aie cotitaming by estimation 4 Acres
SPA: > Boseobelle, St. Peter , Ultra-Modern Radiv-Grams (wiih Ger-| ‘all on one flat), and, on ground, level, er neennnnnenns | pia ea ( it of the area shown on the said plan to
22.7.52-—21 :d 3-speed changers) Two Pickup Heads | *pacious Kitchen, breakfast room, "wash-) = CasHIER AND OFFICI ASSISTANT-- | corveade : ) on the East on lands of Oxnard
eS needle worries, in utiractive walnu;| 700m, store room &c. Electrielty, Gas! viele or Female. Apply by letter and in| wd On now or late of Philip Johnson et al on the North
PCCHEMONML [ihet, 2 Matters th 2 Le" | Sec AE Wee ae COE soya (See ne aes oat eae eeu Wart cde Me hoe
3420.00, P. C. 8. MAFFEL & CO., LTD Fore OF wi aR, SERV NS ~ reet. 7, . the ; : on the West on lands late o: rs,
Pr; . He ) Street {fewl house, flower garden, lawp, and; 0 , ¥ 4 Nl, Mary Green and Charlies Branch
se TL Wah Menry Sees 28.6.52--t.f.n. | orchard, in spacious yard, OVERSEER WELDER—For Fairfield | Hae $ fi tesa Tnniv deceased, J. Lawrence, the
ALEXANDRA SCHOOL Lileaibeibeeai asians ; _—.. | The house and outbulld ngs have just Pactony, St. Luey. Successful Applicant | ~ vie Marsha, ‘M. Tul, thé estate of E.
“ ; RS—7 ¢ een repeired and painted throughout. i) take up appointment on 17th respe reel-of land con-
The following candidates have gained ger ere Fa ee a Oke one nh | Inspection any day (except Sunday Au soiuel Apply: Menasar | Burrowes deceased, and one b oe ae 33 ‘Coppin (former
admission (8 the Alexanatn, Sctopi;—- |‘! Sesled, units © yess guarantee. 25) SOP mn) to 4 pam, on apeliention to. “Ue 20.7. 58—8n. tg@iniag J Agr 8. Perches devised. bye ciaine Clarke ond on: RUAGKE 0
1. BATSON, Loraine Athena. ee Venta bine wre oges8 00 the Caretaker on the premises. — — | ata he artecay groans cyhar nN aa Rinkrose Vaughn or however els:
2. BEST, Avaunda Doreen. pa om 7 : nia 1 Rood 64 perches of Land opposit 5 land dev: y hi el of land
t Royal Gara Ltd, Telephon: | : 5 : . | THIRDLY ALL THAT certain other parce
3. BOYCE, Audrie Eudora. Bort): Rev ge Ltd, | Tplephon:| , "REVOR" at b ack Tock MISCELLANEOUS } L ze fg abutting. and Tandy. of tui RUSK" containing by, estimation
< ‘ . oa HT via The ebove propertte € om } ’ 7 ‘ow Ian now or e ewste
See ecia Evelyi PYE BATTERY SETS—Just a few left | by P npetition nt WANTED TO RENT } 1 Acte More om Risk’ on lands now of late ot Many Ann Knight and
8. CLEMENT, Inez Eunice “AFFEI'S RADIO EMVORIUM. ;O James eet, Bridgetown, on | BUNGALOW —Three Room Bungalow i lands of one Tull or however else the same is abutting the said severa
3 SORBEN: Soar orgeni eet DARW SoD kt CE [ atienden so neee OF See eect | parcels of land heréditament-s and premises being the property of {he
9. GUMBERBATCH, Vashte Naom! | “rrr | aon Gotitors. | Laat Sitees “pretteied, teem Coieter, |, ieaaam
18: TWICK, Hazel ‘Patricia Ruth TWO (2) New Electric Floor Polishers. | i8.7.62—7n ong OK. D te is Ea ste 157, | Bill Piled, Ist July, 1952.
il, EVELYN, Margaret Isabel. Phone 4148. SE cae Reet ass een ae becodatt Dated 2ist July, 1952, a. Wickes
12. GRAHAMy Jean Henrietta. pee 100 BARBADOS FOUNDRY LAD. repent tEdeienerashie —— | Registrar-in-Chancery.
13) GREPFITH, Carmilla Alinda. LIVESTOCK SHARES. 30 POCKET MONE\ casily earned ! 22,7. 5240
14. HINDS, vleen Glivia. Netifeeudtibsinisalentaletawents — 150 BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE -ecommending 25 new subseribers te ee A ON
15. HUSBANDS, Margaret Francina. CALF—One well bred Holstein heifer | COTTON FAC LTD., EDIFE USION in one month } as SSOP SSPESSO FOP POP OS IFS OE!
16: i aoe, Ortin Loree valf two weeks old, out of good milk-| 135 BARBADOS FTA INSURANCE L.7.82-6n. | \SCGOSSIOHROSSOSISGSSSS
17. , Brenda Lareta. og strain, Dial 3008, The Rex Dairy | co... UTD. RES an _—aome amas ot i
18. LISLIE, Sheila Yvonne Mothersall Turning, St. Michael. 250 BARBADOS SHIPPING & PEDIFFUSION offers 31.60 cash for! ° A Beautiful assortment of - -
19, RICE, Melinda Diana. 22.7. 53—2: TRADING CO, LTD, SHARES eel new Subseriber recommended by | \
®. SINCKLER, Maxine Jenice | 3 2100 ST. GEORGE'S PARISH a 1.7,62—6n. | LEMONADE SETS
s Pabst Biists ermine. | uA oa pie seas MS APs’ | a BP eaD aw tomago 4 SGRLLSETYGUR TREE
; . Farr! s' mine. | Milech Goat. Phone 4760. 22.7 | 2 & TO mee 9 SUPPLEMENT YOUR COME. by) \
2. 7 . Carmen Euleen. ——|} BONDS ree ending REDIFFUSION, Obtain | } ook at them in our Show
2, OTHY, Joan Olivette ECH ICAL | @ £20 JRINEDAD & TOBAGO 4 full particulars from the REDIFFUSION | just received, Have a 1 th
2S. BSTER, Joan Carole. MECHANIC BONDS office ix Window, then buy.
“8. WILSON, Gracie Alecia. FILING SYSTEM . lat The above mentioned sharea wil! be set Sais i j &
s ona’ asked -MsS—C: > p> rang » for sal a > ic . on re "
t bee vet mA camtpeervaeenie the | Shannon filing and cant ‘syeem. Man] cea ne aoe " aise akon ae WENTY-FIVE DOLLARS extra e * EMPORIUM
o bring their daughters/wa e fflc ; re aay the. 26th July, 1952 at 2 p.m | fromm Rediffusion for 25 tecommenda Tae CE
School at 9.30 a.m. on Monday, Sep-| tome. office, or business. Supplies fo | Carrington & Sealy, Lueas Sireet tions in one calendar month ‘
tember 16th, 1952. any kind cf filing record keeping. Come | 1) jc getown. 24.7 Benn. | 17 1.7.52--0n. | ,
wie 22.7 Sain, |p and discuss your requirements, ov | ts | - ieee} Corner Broad and Tudor Sts.
— ‘ uN te o. }
Lower Broud strset. “Gat va th AORN ! OR RENY | 266509:6604606666600555655509S0095999G5 9005 9G8O THN)
— | ~—--——~----—------ - j A |
REALTORS LIMITED GRASS MOWERS — Masse;-Harris 5 | We have received instructions to sel: | | = PR nce nr nn
i vidth cut Trailer and p.t.o, type fo |. Auction a Four roomed Bourd anc | |
AUCTION SALE mmediate delivery. Courtesy Garage shingle House. at Tam arind, Road. | HOUSES
20.7.52—6n Hansehell’® Land, Fagle Mall, St. ch- | “ 7 1
nel. Land rented at ten shillings, pes} _ a ea oe ee tne UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF
hagas the sand duly, by order,of POULTRY quarter, | Sale at 2 p.m. on Wednesda. | “Attractive seaside Flat main road Has: |
On Tuesday, the 22n uly, by order ©: 2srd. July ash on the fail jo “| tings somfortably shed, Pnglis %
Mr, on Millet, we will sell the furni . | Hammer. John M. Bladon & Co., Auc ith. ones Verantink eae oe guise EXTRA-MURAL DEPARTMENT
ture and household effects at Mr. B, A POULTRY -~ Barred Plymouth Rocl: ! ¢ioneers 20.7 Liao ons (or coupl F July 1
Brooks’ residence “ADULO" at Venino | “ullets, $6.00 each. Excellent Cd lechote Me age Ree A Lectire
Hill, Rockley, which ineludes Drawiny J trains, John Alleyne, Ebworth, UNDER THE DIAMOND |
room suite consisting of three chairs and ‘‘eter. Phone 91—20 any day except ‘i —Dayrelis Road. FX hed |
settee to seat two, plastic top table, threc Sunday, 20.7.52—2n. | HAMMER - rn * aarconie Brawn by
carved pedestal Ashtrays tables, four } f will sell wy publ auction on Dining, breakfast rooms, | Kitchen, p
dining room chairs, all im bireh | Vradnesd next 23rd July begin Gktage. cehal cukivenionses Phone S317 JUDGE J. W. B. CHENERY, B.A.
birch table with ee eae aan MISCELLANEOUS | 12,30 o’clock at Crane Villa, near 22.7,52—1n. on
mahogany table, painte ’ — | Hotel, St. Philip an entire lot of house a
table, one simmons double bed, with CHIFFEROBE—. srican bab: hiff- | old turniture which includes: Pp CARTREFF—Strathelyde Drive, cqn- |
slumbering spring, two single beds} che op press Saieten bee Maple |holstered sofa and chair, wall se aining gallery, drawing and " aining SELF-GOVERNMENT AND THE JAMAICAN
one Birch dressing table, China tea set.) 1 ig, ” phone 2808. 22.7.52—2n. | iahog, dining table and 6 chair na, 3 bedrooms, toilet, bath & kitchen. |
salad bowls, fruit. dishes and \variou e ea ____ «| painted dining table and 6 chairs, Sick Yial Mrs. Puckerin 3663. | PROPOSALS
table ~ ar mm cD at dae sar aeie JUST received a shipment of Garr board, tea trolley, lady's desk, painter 19,7.52—n. |
table, ‘mahogany chest o nwers, per hree speed Changers, secure one now.! Wardrobes, dressing tables And StOO)S, | eens ’ *
fection three burner ail seve, ope gre Also a eaat) cuantti of o volt batter) | bedside tables, chegt of drawers, doub! ONE (1) JOHNSON’S Beautifloor Blec- at the British Council, Wakefield
7 cubic foot general electric refrigera in {record players. Both the above with | bedstead with spring and spring fillec| tric floor Polisher, For terms phone on
bon of ee, an Ns ih er ee nagnetic heads ittress, kitchen cupboards pacar 1748 19.7,52—3n.
able lamp an , at DaCOSTA & CO. LTD., chatrs, kitchen utensils, cutlery, glasy- Lan—eliccnantpicdenrarimctitiod
kitehen utensils and many other items, Elect, Dept |ware ‘and other itema of interest . ROOMS—Hastings. Furnished or Un- ' Wednesday, July 23rd
‘TEE EAE se eectian 20-7.82—0n. | Terms CASH, D'ARCY ‘A. SCOTT,| (urvished. With or without Meals {Hy at 8.15 pm
| Auctioneer, 19.7.52—4n Phone 3317. 22.7.52-—In, | ' co .
PDDODBODOGPRS OHSS OSOOY, | Tate ob yards ‘for 120, Buttons 12¢ | 5 ist : ADMISSION:. .FREE
GAS ber dozen, Buckles Ge each, Canadiar | ~ oF
THE COOKER astic Belts 36c each Modern Dres
ihoppe, Broad Street. “ee eCSISHSSSSOSSSS os







RAINCOATS — Children’s | Raincoat
2.40, Misses’ Raincoats $3.60, Ladies |
Telegraph, Englond’s leading Daily News-

|

With Everything U Want





size ‘sincoats $3.88 in blue, maize, green
LOOKS ! rhite and florals. The Modern Dres
THEIMOSTATIC CONTROL | shoppe, Broad Street. 20.7.52-—2n
and {t's essay to keep clean r one “8
See them before it's too late, ‘| SUBSCRIBE now to the Dally

At your Gas Showroom, Bay

Street ¢ vaper. now arriving in Barbados by. Air

ir EY. caly a ew jays after pul ication a

SOLy sae. & | -ondon. Copies oe yes C/o, ert

7 9-9O00OOOH cate Co. Ltd, a epresentative
V®EBHOLCOOED ON el, atte. . 11.4.52—t.£.n



BEDDING GIFT—A few ironing beard
nd No-cord iron sets, subject to specia

wedding-gift allowance, A Barnes &








Act no get relief ina few short }\0., Lid. 4.9.52—t.f.n
hours . Chase’s Kitdey-tives ——— ;
laxative in. theytrent | ot AWE









WWNOURCEMEN TS





\

eigattoney pain

} BARN BIG MONBY by selling Pedi!

} ‘usion in your spare time. Get a suppl
ae of forms today, L.7.52—6n. 5





e

?.ot%
ALS:






TODAY'S NEWS BLAS | igs





\ G ¢
sandy Spencer nee i On eot

SAIL subseribera: te. TINE aud ‘

L Magaziges. whe wWiyh to }'

1 Leal their ter on ». Should 4 Tenia mini tel
end © )) Le je ‘ 4ce8 .
a thelr a WAL. TICES ) ne pietes bur BIND Arde
5 a8 to avoid having to pay the \§ ane bleak? "
neW advance rate demanded by ({!} | (1# Stops ble ;



Tits



SMahers,

_ BEST QUALITY BRASS

ion the



or] 1s
Hepouitton
ruga@iat tode

noesitive
tbs

ke

STATIONTRY

: JONSON'S
: : ond

HAKDWARE
-

A: att {sion your
aims Bnd troutles er thorey b
tarn of empily packaim.






FOR SALE

- NO. 27, BROAD STREET





The undersigned will offer
High Street, Bridgetown, on P
2.30-p.m.,

“OPHE MESSUAGE OR STOWE known as No, 27, Broad
Street, Bridgetown, standing o» 4,340 square feet or there-
abouts ahd at present occupied by Messrs, T. R. Evans,

sale at their Office, No. 17,
lay the 25th July, 1952, at



Inspection on application on the premises.
For further particulars and conditions of sale, apply to:—

COTTLE, CATFORD & CO.



The undersigned









Ch. within District “B’ for



; ~t for sale at|Ch pen
will offer for sale ot) ission (0 tse the said Meense af.































































































fowl be glad ‘jou assed cox
: eR BP 2 e, 99
Ovaltine Biscuits

t
Be



SN een net Ae
STH ae



BLP OS PESO SPT S SSS





fed park
digestible and sustair



exceptional noprshing.qu |









ome from t es edient |
cluding a pr aot deTbions |

Ovaltine "the world’s finest food
overage |
: \
or all occasions there is nothing |

i» : jnite so Gainty, add: appetiz ne

i AO ; Ovaltine * Biseuits. |
ae jet }

a i f ee . ‘ . ‘
‘ ijt ie ae i hot Pil
the ails § aye y Je 1 a ey. |
; OR ‘ Ae ‘h y :





eee

AE A ONERE



day, August 2nd, 1952, at
Combermere at 11 a.m.
Next Typewriting Exam.

» Vitamin Bl is a world:
renoy.ned appetite restorer.

ao Combi : ; takes place on Saturday,
San awricls blood-b uild- August 30th, 1952, at Com-
& minerais you have the bermere.
a ; :
ey to joyous buoyant | Cc. B. ROCK,



having or claiming any. estate, ri;

affecting the property hereinaft:

bring before me an attount of
nuchers to be examined by
! rion and 3 o'clock in the afternoon at the Registration









health, Sole LP.S. (Pitmans)
itive,

Representa’
Oistin Hill, Ch. Ch.
22.7.52—2n,

OFFICIAL NOTICE

IN THE COURT GF CHANCERY
In pursuance of the Chancery





DARBADOS

me on any Tuesday or Friday





Barbados. Amateur Boxing Assn.
Under the patronage of
CANADA DRY

Invite
Entries for the . 1952 CHAMPIONSHIPS
to be held at

THE MODERN HIGH SCHOOL STADIUM

during the month of August at a date to be announced later
; Chemeionehipn vat be contested in the following divisions:

t — under 112 lbs,
Bantamweight — » 118 ,
Featherweight — » 1236 |,

Ligutw: — » 185 ,
Welterweight — ., 47 , ,
Middleweight Bk og A oie
Light Heavyweight— ,, 175 ,,
Heavy — over 175 _,,

intending competitors are asked to call at Modern High School
for Entry Forms any afternoon 4—5 p.m.

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF THE WEST INDIES

EXTRA-MURAL DEPARTMENT

THE CHILD, THE PARENT, AND THE
TEACHER
A Lecture

by
J. B, NICOL, O.B.E.

on
THE CHILD AT SCHOOL,

Thursday, July 24th, British Council, Wakefield, 5 p.m.
ADMISSION: 1 - a lecture (except to those who have
paid fees for the course)



Act, 1906 I do hereby give notice to all persons
ight or interest or any lien or incumbrance in or
mentioned (the property of the defendant) to
heir claims with their witnesses. documents and
‘een ‘the hours of

} 12 icé, Public Buildings,
Bridgetown, balers agate day of September, 1952 in order that such claims may be














Â¥,






















NEW YORK SERVICE.
A STEAMER sails 20 June—arrives @.irbados ist July.
| NEW ORLEANS SERVIOE.
| Ba 21st June.
| Seco Re eu hcg An sme
} :

(a mente rare NEE





CANADIAN SERVICE

SOUTHBOUND
8. FROM
S/S “SAPHO” J uly 3!
3 Rie: om | =
iss *
“A a augist 12th Sn he
oN STEAMER” pur

August 9th for oe SO, N.B.. and

ST LAWRENCE RIVER PORTS

ee

ROBERT THOM LTD.— NEW YORK & GULF SERVICE
Apply:— DA COSTA & CO., LTD. CANADIAN SERVICE







CANADIAN SERVICE
From. Montreal and Halifax.















ee
Expected Arrival
Montreal Halifax Bridgeton:
3 A 2 : fi .~ duly 2t July 6 Att®ust
WV “BRUNO” 2 ° 1 Aug. 4 August 22 Al
»<. “SUNDIAL” 14 August 19 August 3 tember
“Vv “BRUNO” 30 Aug. 4 Sept. 16 September
U.K. SERVICE
From South Wales, Liverpool and Glasgow.
South Expected Arriva\
Wales Liverpool Glasgow Dates Bridgetown,
s. “SUNWHIT” +.30June 5SJuly 9 July 23 July
8. DRARLA DE
RRINAGA”" +. 26 July o. July S August 19 A st
S.S. “STUG. ates! ive MAGE SM t 26 August 9 September
8.8, SEABREEZE” ..Early September. Mid Mid

U.K. AND CONTINENTAL SERVICE
From Middlesbrough, Antwerp, Rotterdam and London.



y Middles- Rotter- baaaaes ibd
brough Antwerp dam London
5 wn
3.8. “SPURT’ , 8 July 10 July 12 July 16July.. 3 <
2.8. ..° . a — Mid Aug. End A Tee
S.S. “SUNADELR” — Mid Sept. End E Oe!
-e-.,-—_- ———



SELLS ESS FD +

-,

SRLS

KESOD

ore

or




Roofing

including :

aterials
@ Aluminum Sheets

® Galvanized Sheets
® Everite Sheets

See Us Now and Stop those Leaks

PLANTATIONS LTD.



TWO BARGAINS

oa

A NICE WHITE CREPE 80 cents
and
Another CREPE in White ard
Coloured
at 80 Cenis the yard

The above are both 36 Inches wide and are subject
to our usual 5% discount.

You are advised to secure your requirements early
as we only have a limited quantity which we pur-
chased at a greatly reduced price.

+
TAYLOR LTD.

A. E.



DIAL 4100
$
x Where
ix Quality is HIGH
x And
ss Prices are LOW!!! %
3596066656606 555669S6S95699S 9999S TOOWE SOS HOOOFSOSS!





































eS weet ee a ee ae se Se

TUESDAY, JULY 22, 1952 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE SEVEN
; . ! eR SS LT LL eT

HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON







TOAST TO
YOUR
HEALTH!!

ur WINCARNIS Whe

ASSIST YOU TO GUARD IT
BUY A BOTTLE TO-DAY.

THE FLYING SQUAD....



AEY-LOOK!
ISN'T THAT &





















YOU'RE DEAD!
4 SAW you o1eE!!





BLONDIE







HLTH!
i

I wouner >) N
ce




IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE |

WHAT WERE



=





eS oS A SS ES TT

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PAGE EIGHT



2 Centuries Scored In
Intermediate Division

TWO CENTURIES were scored when the fourth round
of games in the Intermediate Division opened on Saturday.

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Unknown American Wins

BAILEY FINISHES

~L00m.

SECOND >

TUESDAY, JULY 22,

1952



Final



SURREY MAY BEAT MIDDLESEX

LONDON, July 21.
Even with their four test play-
ers still absent Surrey still look
like being too good for Middlesex

paved the way for Surrey’s first
innings’ lead of 91. Fishlock ir
his last season and in what will
be his last appearance at Lords,

r "i ~ }plus Denis Compton at Lord’s. At failed by only five to obtain his
IN THIRD PLA CE DIVISION Sports Window |the close of the second day Mid- century,
4 dlesex held a slender 70 run lead Successful batsmen today were

Mr. T. A. D. Gale, Advertising Manager of the Advocate
is at present in Helsinki covering the Olympic Games.

HELSINKI, July 21.

On Saturday the fourth series
xf Second Division games opened
at the various grounds.

Combermere played Y.M.P.C. at
Combermere. The Beckles Road

Harrison College and Har-
rison College Old Boys are
scheduled to meet tonight at
Y.M.P.C. at 7.30 in a First
Division Basketball fixture.
The other match will be Pi-

with only five wickets in hand.
Veteran Fishlock, former Eng-
land batsman, was the man who

THE WEATHER



Yorkshire’s Teq Lester who made
114 against Sussex.

Two days sufficed for Worcester
to beat their near neighbours .and
last season’s County champion-
ship winners Warwick.

: 2G SM at IN WHAT MUST HAVE BEEN one of the closest of] team was first to bat. They kneck- | tates vs. ¥.M.P.C.
— poe 0 leher gl Ege agen ar pintd hrm g = pal finishes over the Olympic 100 metres final oft referred to|ed up 181 runs. D. Edghill, one cf The Harrison College--Col- REPORT Scoreboard
dapace y P ; 8 as the championship for the title “The fastest man in the] the opening batsmen, scored. a lege Old Boys match will be YESTERDAY.

CABLE AND WIRELESS

in their match against

Carlton at Boarded Hall, repeated their third round per-
formance by being bowled out cheaply in their first innings.

The Cable team made

76 in their first innings. In

reply Carlton have lost eight wickets for 139 runs.

world” was won by an almost unknown American Lindy

Remigino.

It took the judges several minutes

while they

consulted a photo finish picture before they finally an-

nounced the winner
McKenley who is f
came second.

and to add to the surprise Herbert
ar the more famous as a 400 metre man,

valuable 63 before being out leg
before to R. Fields. G. Greenidge
knocked up 24 while Mandeville
made 22,

Bowling for the school team,
Callender took four wickets for
35 runs in 13 overs and four balls,

interesting as the results will
help to decide whether College
will win the Challenge Cup.
College must win this match
and their other match to beat
Carlton on goal averages.

In their last encounter Col-



Rainfall from Codrington: nil
Total Rainfall for Month to
date: 2.63 ins.

} Highest Temperature: 86.5 °F.
Lowest Temperature: 72.5 °F.
Wind Velocity 10 miles per

ho’

|

Worcester beat Warwick by ten
wickets — Warwick 155 and ‘149
Worcester 280 and 28. for no
wickets.

Middlesex vs. Surrey: Middle-
sex 192 and 161 for 5: Surrey 283.

Leicester vs. Derby: Derby 284

G. Matthews had a very suc- ‘ . i hree beat College Old Boys by ur and 26 for 1; Leicester 302.
cessful bowling spell. He sent wicket and they added 116 runs Third, much to the disappoint- was fourth. But perhaps the mos! + Gmesides and © Burke ac a point, ’ Barometer (9 a.m.) 29.988 Seite vs. Yorks: Notts 383;
down nine overs, five balls and for the fifth wicket, This partner- RMeDenaia Bailey of Trinidad Sivbaby eae — ¢ all was the oo cesponsible for the colla of the ; (8 pm.) 20.950 Yorks 448 for ,7.

i tcteate ‘ shi - ; eae é rst four com ; , : =
= six io for 32 runs. = coppice the Park team to as usual was rupning for Great clocked 10.4 Snag Rusieee Com . team in their first « SHOOTING TO-DAY oan ee oe rents ee
olin Cox took three wickets for make 181 runs. Britain. B. P. Smith of the U.S.A. Kharov, fifth, and John Treloar of tii od Cae ne made 86. RIFLE SHOO Sunrise: 5.49 a.m. .;.-lemar:

mine runs in three overs.

Chase made 172 before being



Australia who was last, both re-

{ Harewood topseored with 19.



Essex vs. Glamorgan: Glamor-

The Cable & Wireless team: had caught by Evelyn off the bowling Greenii sent down eight overs af gan 217 and 123 for 6; Essex 293.
gery thaky start MeKensie of Parmer.” Wood mace Stl] Olympics Diary. | sini Biter e ttoaitied MS and tooxtseven ‘wickets tor 28 Ten Qualify For || Matt ue Kent ‘vs, Lancashire: Lanca-
and B. Matthews opened but Bowling for Windward N. coveted prize, much the same as 122: O. Burke captured three for High Tide: 3.00 am., 4.52 p.m shire 471 for 7 declared; Kent 191

they were both out
runs were scored.

before any

r 222 and 73 for 2; Northants 330
in and scored three before being balls. competition, semi- however still has the 200 metres ir i A. House Competi- 5 j
bowled by Gordon Matthews, Windward in reply have lost finals) to go for and the present indica- ee te tae ak, oe oe won So wen seven rounds to _

Knight Topscores
It was Knight and King, who
by their fighting manner, saved
the Cable team from even worse

i ) i iq- complete team
disgrace. They carried the score : 10 am. TRACK AND FIE awe rit i , overs of which three were maid- compicte | . =
to 44 before the partnership was , B+ Del. Inniss scored a century (discus, qussAvten caine tae on alten. te comet ens. E. Hinds took two for 9 runs | The position Ff ee owat OF BEING EARNEST
broken, Knight topscored with 19 se ae RRS eto 10 a.m. WRESTLING (free back in the second heat yesterday {? gight aera ce and L. King buy a iipearea by Capt. Warn-
while Kin contributed 17. Mere eee ie style to gain a elose vict . ‘wo for two runs in one over and o ; . ; -
Branker scorei 12. and a valu, 129 before being run out. Pick- | 1pm. YAORTING dore Bast of Holland aed vente: three balls, cr, 2,688; Red, | skippered. by ABOUT YOUR COMFORT EVEN
ale 13 came from byes, legs Wick occupied the wicket for the 3pm. GYMNASTIcs returned the same 10.4. To-day ,_ Central have so far made 143 eed ci by Lt Cok. Connell;
ie aaa entire day and have lost eight | 3 p.am--FENCING (foil, | in the Semi-Final, however, he for the loss of three wickets. C, siippered by tN. Cor, coun. ON AN ORDINARY STROLL....
Carlton in reply knocked up Wickets for 333 runs. C. S. Green- team = competition, | ‘vas beaten by McKenley in the Goddard, an opening batsman, Capt. Jordan, 2,586 points.
139 runs and still have two ‘18¢ scored 38 and G. Moore 39. final same time and it was therefore all made 41 before being run out. C. “Conditions Saturday on the

wickets in hand. A. C. Browne
topscored with 50 which includ-

ihornton captured seven wickets

Croney came !2r 40 runs in 18 overs and two

two wickets for 73 runs. The not
cut batsmen are R. Atkinson 29
and E. Evelyn 37.

C. Skinner and
teok the wickets for Spartan.

N. Medford

Bowling for Combermere Sealy
took three wickets for 66 runs



Wednesday, July a2

8 a.m.

FENCING (foil, team



8a.m. GYMNASTICS
9am. MODERN PEN-
TATHLON (fencing)

9am. BOWING (semi-
finals

)
3 p.m. TRACK AND PIELD
(200 m. heats, pole

it did for Barney Ewell at the
London Olympics in 1948, Bailey

tions are that he will succeed,

Remigino, who not even his own ,

eountrymen knew much about be-
fore the Olympics began, first gave
notice of his ability when he ran

the more surprising when he won
the final. Remigino is the force-

10 runs in five overs.
At Vaucluse Central met Pick-
wick. Pickwick were all out in

opener M. Lashley made 27 and
1. B. Lashley 16. L. Hoad con-
tributed 12.

Bowling for Central V. King
took five wickets for seven in 8

Hinds has 44 not out to his credit
whiie F, Storey contributed 20.
The wickets were taken by

Skill Shoot Badges

Low Tide: 10.10 a.m., 9.59 p.m.





and 142 for 5.

Northants vs. Sussex: Sussex



“ount at 200, 500 and 600 yards,
Green House headed the table
with a very fine score of 465. This
was the only House to field a

whole were good but light gave
some trouble at 500 and 600





“THE IMPORTANCE



CALLS FOR A PAIR OF ....




















ce ot -, in 11 overs. O. Wilkinson took vault. final; 100 m. ful type of runner who leaves no ¢ ‘
ed eight fours and a Six. Burke Tid fein GN ins 1k ween: ladies, semi-finals: doubt that he is putting every- Jackie Hoad and Willie Wells for ro ts tise feeloanig bal i
has 27 not out to his credit whiie ; i aatciedl i e- $6 and 17 ri The eigh P
diseus, final; 5,000 | thing he has into it. His style re- an runs respectively. apt. C. R..E., Warner 96, Lt, E. ;
Harding and Kenny Hutchinson caBLE & WIRELESS vs. CARLTON heads: i ; i Capt. C. R.-E, it : ;
L ‘ m., heats; 100m.. la- minded me something of John R. Goddard 95, Mr. G. F. Pilgrim ' 4
scored 22 and 21 respectively. Cerna” ere eels ‘ sep dies, final 200 m., 2nd Goddard as he appears to run with EMPIRE—LODGE 94 Major J. BE. Griffith 93, Mr. ‘
to. King was the most suc. “Seen, Or B wicnete) ee heats) more strength than speed. He also | Empire played Lodge at Bank j’w Syassell 93, Mr. G. E. Mar-
cessful bowler for the Cable team. McKenzie ¢ Kennedy b Edghill 0 4pm. ROWING (seni- holds his head forward and {ft Hall. The school batted first and {j,'92 p.c. O, shepherd 91 and
He took 3 wickets for 19 runs in a Baibens GM Rie aes 2 finals) would not be surprising to learn were all out for 92. Mr. Hoyos Sgt. E E. Edwards 91.
seven overs of which two were Knignt 1b.w. b G. Matthews 19 7 pam. WRESTLING (free that by doing this he just won. ‘topscored with an undefeated 23. “7, the N.R.A. Non-Central ONLY
maidens. H. King took two for 41 H. King lb.w., b G. Matthews 17 style) McKenley’s fine and consistent Bowling for Empire, N. Skeete Competition the above eight and
in 16 overs while B. Matthews Brenker bg geasinens ” 7 pm. HOCKEY (match for showing in the 100 metres is ex- took four for 45 in 12 overs. L. tyo others have qualified for Skill
and Branker captured one each R 1. "M. Clarke Lb.w., b ©. Cox 6 3rd place). ceptional, as it is seldom that as rae wled three overs and Shoot Badges. The other two are: }
for 26 and 31 respectively. N. T. Clarke Lb.w.. b C. Cox 0 a man grows older he improves on four and took three wic- Major A DeV. Chase 90 and Mr
At the Garrison, Barbados ?: Archer © wipr.’ Marshall. b G ==" short distance instead of longer kets for four runs. M. G. Tucker 90. .
Regiment played Police. The high- 7. King nat out” 0 M. Grichlow ¢ Branker b 1. Burke 4 Ones. Although it was very good In reply Empire scored 148 be~- Owing to the B.T.C. Races,
light of the game was a_ hat Extras 13 Burrowes ¢ Branker b R Austin 3 for Jamaica to get the second fore declaring. R. Norville top- which have disorganised the pro-
trick by E, Denny. In his sixth kaa << Maen Tie Rhee 16 place in this important event, one scored with 56. H, Brewster made gramme, the next shoot will be Sad
over he took the wickets. of y ee Chase b R. Austin , wonders if McKenley’s preference 36 not out and E. Jones 21. on August 16. This will also be AT
Price, Bispham and Weekes. BOWLING ANALYSIS Wiltshire run out for sprints will not jeopardise the For Lodge, C. Deane and V. a Spoon Shoot at 300, 500 and 600
a ' . Oo M R. Wz atcon b K, A. Branker chances of his team in the all-im- Brookes took two wickets each for yards
Regiment were all out in_theit ~ aratthews a5 1 82 6 Todd not out tant 1,600 metres rel t ae : AVE
first innings for 128 runs. Police Gagniil ee ae Knight lbw. K. A, Branker POFANE 25 7m mee our and 29 respectively. The Martinez Shiela will be
have so far lost one wicket for A. Browne 2 oe Hone © wkor., b K. Branker ° Three More Medals At Fosters, Leeward met Wan- shot for around the middle of
Cc. Cox 3 0 oe Extras the derers. The Bay team was first to August
56 runs. Haitians i. Gk eaeihas i In addition to the hundred p.¢ and knocked up 131. Eggl . SHEPHERD
Allan Ishmael topseored for the K. Hutehinson c & b Branker 21 Total 68 metres, the U.S.A. also collected field topscored with 42 -whhe ei 7
soldiers with 45. He was caught © Matthews 1 bw. b B. Matthews 9 BOWLING ANALYSIS ~ three more gold medals in the pierce made 22. - e s a & TD
by wicketkeeper Morris off the jonnedy run out 2 Oo. M. R. Ww. course of the day and two of their " George Gilkes was the most suc- F LY Co. L .
bowling of Shannon. J, Brath- A. C. Browne ¢ & b King 50 baie ix 4 «ig. «Winners broke Olympic records. cessful bowler for Leeward. He
waite contributed 16° and 1. Par- Herding ot, Ming, b HL. King .. $3 oe Bger '! 722 11 4 %In_the Shot Putt it was an all took five wickets for 35 runs in 10, 11,12 &1
is 13 EB U f fi em
ris 13. Cox Lb.w., b H. UL. King 3 3 Snuner aon e o U.S.A. final for the first three 20 overs and five balls. G. :
Five Maidens A. Nicholson b H, A, King os Dotter a 0 16 © places, Parry O’Brien won with a took two for 39 in 11 overs B d Street
Parente ees Suwieu ica i Ree gut A gare ¥.MP.C. — ist Mosinee +r eae Olympic record of 57 feet, 1.4 Leeward has scored 81 runs roa
ee a te ee ee —— . Lewis ¢ Williams, b Hope 6 inches, Clarence Hooper was sec- without loss. L. Foster is 32 not .
’ a ave Total (for 8 wickets) 139 -~W. F. Hoyos not out 39 and and James Fuchs, world out and Alleyne 49 not out
es x06 ot 1U0S. UW. duatuou Pelle eaiiccee 2 ae D. King e wor. Gaskin, b Hope 19 \ecord holder, was third, ‘ai stu
1 Wilee 10P 21h th at UVELd te ” f él In the long jum J. C. Biffl and
, ; oe RW D . e H.C.—FOUNDATION
Ww Mave were in cs, Lue re- i Total if rickets 7 ELC,
ts of sp prreg ues ~ H. King re ee ae a S eee 6 M. C. Peareene, Roma ‘onic oma fartiaen Colltes played Founda-
‘ " , ll 4 1 1 $ ; 10n al nda -
tae vouve asoxe wee below AR 18D Se mnie Qui a. y. Boldesi of Hungary was third. Bit loge ‘baited first ane ‘kockod S Gr 4
Se s SLOLe (as 6 HH. 4 er 7 . es, e ju
the Iirst WicKel Iell, Morris Woe POLIOE ys, WARBADOS IheGiMENT B Hope 6: 0 H 3 was the ‘shortest ainge "18 L & Gritth mean if cake as ¢/ y ay
Bene by enlupe: for 4, Gy Police (for 1 wicket) Ba 5s 5, Wilthire | Phe 8 ina en ween tenes who scored an undefeated 14. ie v
Dewy, the ouner opener, is pat- Le Resiment —~ lst Innings femetak Gc eens yesterday broke the olympic re- For Foundation Mr. Springer
lng very steady. me nas an un- 4. Ishmael pr. . oa seaman , is, Cord in his second 400 metre hur- took five wickets for 46 runs in 4 A Sm
deleatead 31 to nis creail. 1ne |, Licorish e Skinner b Carter... 11 Windward (for 2 wickets) . a dle heat, easily won. the final to- jj] overs and Mr, Callender three re rn
cmer not out batsman is Chel- ¢ enalibe 2 Raney - oe S. Barris ree? eet tnalngs ; day in the same time of 50.8 sec- wickets for 26 runs in 15 overs ey rf
‘ 3 2 J. it t y . Dw, e , 3 “fs ‘ i ers, 5 J
tennam who is tive. . See er 15 E. Roach ¢ whnr. Evelyn b Thornton 5 ena ee ee Russia was Foundation have lost five wickets v W Sim bs g
Frank ‘Laylor, one of the Em- 1, Price b Denny oe elt aoe 18 2 in ii = n Holland of New fcr 63 runs, Mr. Jones is 24 not
pire opening batsmen, scored 1 N. pleshan, & Bon De re Se eee teeter world record to be Si yg2yragshaw scored 11 and
century for his team in their 7° parris ¢ & b Shannon 13 Earl Wood ¢ Atkinson b Thornton 57 jroken was set by Gi o M. Evelyn 10. If your job takes you througr
Maten against Wanderers at Bank G, Pinder not out 6 A. F.C. Matthews 1.b.w. Thornton 0 ,was set up by Giuseppe EF. Griffith took three wickets , ARES Bh
Hall. J. bynoe, who looked as J: Clarke b Denny 10 Ngee 2b Theriee ; 9 ee ee re he walk, for 21 runs in 11 overs, F. Charles mud and water then you need our
, 0 é -b.w., rnton ME s e 5 i pg ‘d i 2
though he too would make a cen- ae —— C. Skinner c R. Farmer b Thornton 2 Viet Sead nts 2s he enter~ raptured one for 12 and C. Tudor high-grade durable WATER
. . Be ete yd 198. W. Cimberbatch not cut 3 ed the Stadium far ahead of the one for 7
tury, was es, by ‘MaeChlaty Total lee ieee Gea te ( others he also appeared to be the At ferdiston shacice BooTs.
off the bowling = Skeete zO8 by BOWLING ANALYSIS —— least distressed. His record might met Windward, Erdisto ae om Cigna 3
Empire won the toss and batted. oO. M R WwW. Sota 181 also have been better, had he not {o occupy the wicket ond tence ome in today and get. yours,
They occupied the wicket for the j. Shannon 48 Ok we BOWLING ANALYSIS i stood still just before breaking up 205°” Norville t and knocked
fopaeoved’ with 108" A. E, Clarke i garter” PP A Bay MR. w, ‘he tape and raised his hands in $) 7° @ topscored with
4 . . . arke ;° 4 p 5 . Farmer 5 the sir as ; en
| 2a ete Bg BRM a tet oiSyRomepbere OF 2 BOOB Windward nse ra
: : ena ae » -C,., Bealy f L. Gr me RR OQ. . : iy Lave lost four wickets for 33
Bowiing for the Bay team, G, ©: Sealy | 4 0 22 1 Nf Thornton 182 2 40 7 He completed the course in runs.
Skeete captured four wickets for ¢ sealy ree Ist Innings 31 &. Farmer 2 6 13 © jour hours, 28 minutes, 7.8 see- Powling for E » Deane took RIO DE JANEIRO WATER. PROOF PROOF
Seine te BS oves, 20, ham: & SOUL Pala Ho himgome’ 34 $8 bonds. Second man Joset Dolezal: gyorg." nes “oF 4 Fung in nine| "gy Baie
sey bowled 15 overs and took @ Cheltenham not out ; Windward — ist Innings | of Czechoslovakia also broke the ¥.M.P.C.
three wickets for 68 runs. A. G. ing ‘ Soom Tee ¢ Cumberbatch b- world record, Third was Anral y¥ eect ihe ee 181 From Trinidad nificent double- * HIGH WATER BOOTS
93 saad Cc 3 Tate teas es :
Seale took two for 62 in ten overs, Total (for 1 wicket) 41 es a Be ate oon ka of Hungary , SN rae Greenidge 24, Mande- | decked “El Presidente,” world’s 7 *
Not one of the Wanderers bowi- BOWLING ANALYSIS R. Atkinson not out 29 Marjorie Jackson of Australia fo 49. r # for 3, R. Fields 3] Jargest, most luxurious airliner. . Pair
ers was able to bowl a maiden Oo M oR. ow. © Evelyn not out Nee 37 ran away with both her heats in: COMBERMERE 1st Innings oo | Direct flights to Rio, Montevideo
over, C. Phillips ees ee ae Total Miter f —, ‘he Ladies 100 metres, doing 11.6 , Harewood 19, Alleyne 12. G. Greenidge | and Buenos Aires, Convenient con- .
Mental Hospital — Y.M.P.C” ; “zk eS a ee ‘otal (tor # wickets) in each, but Fanny Blankers-koén 7? !* ieee © tt 10. nections at Rio for Sho Paulo.
Mental Hospital “met YM PC. r Brathwaite *, ‘6 Ms "0 BOWLING ANALYSIS was beaten in her second heat by proxwick 1st Innit ha aha 71
at Beckles Road. Mental Hospital ee, ee akan eo: Me Mapip. Sanday ct Gene. f king 8 fort, BY wind ‘or OL. icing * WATER BOOTS
, Empire A tbisidg rah od i 3 3 : 4 f ur int won his metre >’ ' is 2 for 9, ink
were first to occupy the wicket. Empire — ist Innings - aoe + ~ 3 2} semi-final but did not appear to bentabas, dak Tuleteie <0 :
The Black Rock team knocked |» Boume ¢ Alleyne b Ekeete 1i2-S. Chase 2 9 11 0 (ye going as well as Ulzheimer and |G. Goddard 41, BY Hinds not out at, ; Si $5 85 Pair
up 68, C, Yarde topscored with )° gynoe ¢ MeChlery b Skeete ag W- Cumberbateh 2 reueet © iielsen who won the other two, F, Storey 20. J. Hoad 1 for 36, W: ,
23. The only other batsman fo. Clarke co & 'b Ramsey 3 Pickwick for ® wickets) tee gag Mal Whitfield ran well within "ele 1 fori ;
enter double figures was Carl K. Hutchinson b Ramsey " Pickwick — Ist Innings -imself to come second to Nielsen. LopGe 1st a heer 9 Montevideo SIZES 6—l1
Williams. He scored 18 before he ¢ prescod ¢ Sub. b Pierce eA Bane gg are ane Mr, “Hoyos 23.'R. Mayers 15. N. Skeete | vi
=m u -Ghatiene 3. Seale 9 € Free! rec > Pere ee ARON. Custaane bh O. Bete I) Kidney “e Weekes b Branker a RLBLY.C. LAWN TENNIS” foci © * Bynoe 2 for §: 1. Harris Buenos Aires
Bran. . ‘ h nniss run oul 29 EY
for 11 runs and Rody Austin three © ?*Exfras"?* a5 G. Moore © Branker b Sealy 9 RESULTS ae et ae ite Bee ee oe
= ‘ ital e : R arke retired hurt 5 R. ille 56, E water |
iP eh NE es ‘Total gap B. Lewis 1.b.w, Sealy 0 Ladies’ Doubles (Finals) F Jones 2. C. Deane 2 tors, °\" | at Trinidad. Regular servige vie
In reply Y.M.P.C. are 65 for E W. Grenidae hat out 20 Miss D. Wood and Miss_G. Broakes 2 for 29. d Belem to Rio, Sho Paulo, Monte-
= loss ‘* ive Sicaee. Ben BOWLING ANALYsis ews 2 Pilgrim beat Mrs. P, Pattersan WANDURERS hot Incing eae a video and Buenos Aires.
Hoyos, ong pf the ¥.MP.C. open- ee 0. M RW and. Mrs, R. S. Bancroft 7—5, kgglesfield 42, J. Pierce 22. G. Gilkes
ing batsmen, has 39 not cut to ! eee a 5 a 2 Total (for 8 wkts.) - 383 gg ae 5 for 35, G. Alleyne 2 for 39 Prresiceh soe
en a Hope wickets were |; O. Ramsey mB Oo Mt 3 BOWLING ANALYSIS Men’s Doubles a Stig Ys eer Bid
y B. >. ‘ ’atterson a : c O° NM ak. W P. tters: a H. J an- 49 . .
Windward met Spartan at Con- 4. G. Seale 10 60) = 622. Brathwaite ee MeO ale — 7. ae a5 oe FARRISON COLLEGE vs, FOUNDATION
go Road. Spartan won the toss & Pierce 8 ® 50 1 {Phillips a. oy ae ee eo . “7 istry COWLEGE ist Innings mi | eetias
a hoe o®S R. MeChlery 2 0 1% 60 Sealy 11 60-666 3S. ~Patterson 6—2, 6—3, 6—B, &. Hassell 23, E. Griffith 16. ©. Ward
and elected to bat, The Park tear MENZAL HOSPITAL ve. EMLP.C. | Mr. Smith j 2 0 4 0 94 pat out 16. Mr. Springer & for 46. Mrs re ey MOST SAP ERIEROO?
i Ment. osp' rele eees< wiht Brank o 38 1 > ‘ . ; Sy
started badly, having lost four Yoptel Moma iia, 6 6. Wilkinson 44. ae TO-DAY’S FIXTURES SEER "te. binines ‘dau 7
wickets for 41 runs. However: Mental Hospital — Ennings W. Maxwell 4 0 20 ©; Play begins at 4,15 p.m. Wkts.) 63
Noel Wood joined Chase at the ¢. Yarde c Burke b B, Porter . 23° «L. Weekes 6 0 14° «0 } Men’s Singles (Finals) ‘ Me. donee not out mt, z. Bradshaw 1, AN ERICAN
‘ D. E. Worme vs. L. St. Hill. a py at 2s Sharies stor 18
~ - \ dor 1 for 7. Hoanto Armnars
5 { Mixed Doubles rion
i ERDISTON vs. WINDWARD |
| They'll Do It Every Time bret ote By Jimmy Hatlo| | yp. al he, RS thocraft xa ing me ao be caste 8 Go tis
FA CEE ELE: f | vs. Mrs. A. A. Gibbons and J. G. winDWARD Ist Innings (for 4 wkts.) 35| Phone: 212% Giier Soximens t'ee-s, 2908)
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BARBADOS ADVOCATE II I s|,\V. II IV 22. 1*52 Qahib fatting. Quite Worth Noting MANVILLE PICKS NUMBER NNE f King Nep's Friend, Methie & IBkA^iaBniHM^^Hi^liH^^^^HMA^iata I a.*... 1-1 L. UIJ-.I /1JJ Warn*. D iNZALEZ from %  and they %  CoGtroil*r Of* Suppl ;> s .*i st. vi if In A long leave %  in BarbaLane For Summer Holidays H .^UTL and COUN Rl he Lodge School. %  i -, ing for ID Republic the tummcr holidays with i: and Mrs t\ C nniahed ins studies al the I.on to Canada In September to en•ld Cot* e to study ..nirp while Colin mg hart lot tinnopralni ( nhool next term. Engaged %  twean Miss Beryl i l Mrs. C St. Michael 4 E. wlllbunf. and on oi Mif %  .;... I 111 Dd the late Mr. %  ilaUons. Melon-Choly Baby From Venezuela M R .M) MI'S KONALD HI1 i> fmrr Caracas. VeneJudging from recent enquiries. .. number of rV*auen* would learn quit" a lot h) making tha I UMrini "Don"'-" (or Brushes H W I A via Trinidad for Now lhat halr-b uah are oOi-bout two weeks' holiday and are taxable again I aug eM guests at Paradise Beach Club. portant "don'is" Mr Hitch is working with the Richmond Exploratlor. Cam H Also arriving h> the same plane from Trinidad were Messrs. Simon Pietrl and hrr little granddaughter Maria from Caracas. They have %  ome over foi fifteen days" holiday which they are upend II %  I tha Hotel Roval. Had Pleaaant Holiday M R. AND MRS. C. H BIRNN of New Jersey, left by B.W I A. yesterday morning for Antigua and Puerto Rico on their W bark to the US.A after aswstsftavg two weeks' holiday •west* at the Ocean View Hotel Ml li. i i who has been here on thai Ihji Don'f g ip your hnlr-brush b> tha brtauaa oi pna .. ovir imgeri-L.aln.it Ui in Don't comb out the hairs too ioughly Don't wash the brush in aoda. Lut u- teul'l. s opv > i. in ho: sunshine or guests gtiong artificial heat. No Mixing-Bowl ? Explo ation In a junk shop is (ten worth while. A friend of nine, long mourni ig a e.acked 1 ixing-bowl. is now crowing with as delight, having picked up an old uBthst.tiul-h. sin in her local of tha ad kind, and i one of the most pleasant holtmakes an admirable mixing-bowl. A WINNIR in her Held, statuesque Joanna Cudd holds a prize melon alert after being chosen to reign over the Arlrona lllelon Festival at Glendale. The gala pageant will take place In the states' famed Valley of the Sun. (InL-mattowal> i has ever had here and Perhaps your attic houses .me i hopes to return soon again He tha inch might gn is a confectionerv manufacturer g(^d service in tne kit. of New Jersey and Hean of Hand%  if) Confa %  tinner*, of the National Association of thr I" S A Mind The Pa.nt-l.ruOi: Cinema Proprietress M FfS Intranail I NTHANS1T vcvn.L ) nOC1llA| from St. Vincent by B.G. Airways, was Mr. Errol Comma who will be leaving shortly for Antigua to take up his new appoint* MR K M HICKS. Export Rement under u C D. and W. Schemeuresentatlvc of Messrs. Kanas Senior Draughtsman in the en,. Ud. 01 rtneering .U T rtn,c„, ol the Co.Wjjj. morning land. Is now in ihc eminent of Antigua. USJ thinking bfJ -ring a little amateur houae-p..inl LUCKY SAMAKOO. („„ Ih is ye.n Bnish.-< are still ex Sl _, r I'" i ; i ,'! : "r ';',-"'*' Lu, *V %  *• • aamaroo Cireuii of cinemas 'Trinidad, is now In Barbados a week's rest. She arrived yesterSUW&TJ&att! ssaarjireOn Extended Tour i for%  %  if. exleiidcd tour n: %  of .uiiI %  by B.G. Airways from M„ CP He rly Draughtsman Builder attached to the Public Works Department in St. Vincent. Mr Comma is staying with his brother-in-law, Mr. Errol Barrow, Mrs. Barrow Lands End. ol and Westward H'i After Thrsr Weeks ISS ALFREDA GEORGES. Chief Clerk of L. Rose and Co. of Dominica, returned home yesterday morning by B.G Alrsheba. With The Royal Bank A FTER spending two weeks' holiday 111 Trinidad with hi relatives in Port-of-Spain. Mr. OOJMKj arrived here yesterday morning by B.W.I.A. intransit for Dominica where hr li employed with the Royal Bank of Canada. He left later the §ame day by B.G Airways. Spent Two Week. %|H AND MRS ERIC DOUG_ Haw one, soak it in cold Water 5 or for twenty-four hours before use. After use. the bJttatl n tuipaotiiM %  1 mi.tnt TII ml k out all the paint while the brusli is soft, particularly high up on Iha Ix fat ha bj UM bandla. Than wash in warm, soupy water, rinse well, shake mid hung to dry in | Cool, airy place Biriagf ClatsssJssg Preliminary With spring-cleaning on CVerj bOUa* wlfe'e pingmmme. vacuurr cleancrs will be working oWtinkt Now la the time to make sure that M" st Vincent and left later the .. i. n.w.i.A. Mr. Hick5 .said that he left England on June 8 and so far has covered Trimdad, Grenada, St Lucia. Barbados and St. Vincent. i.'idin home some% %  .iiber. To Resid* In Canada A NUiN -.'I.leaving ytler nioniing for the Via AmlKua nnd Puerto H W I A wai Hi S<-:vwii KM arty of Mewra. i of Mr. and Mrs. Zl W, Kirlon ut "Sannn jpiointimnt as surveyor l ID spend two the Dominica Government York with his relaWhile in Barbados. Mr. Cro* im Canada to ford was the guest of Mrs. Hul i OtiaaL at "Alcot", Worthing they are In good order If the belt I.AS of British Guiana, left nM W1>m aUck ^^ it—new ^ ?, U, i dtt, .fi B w -"-A. lOT onc ar ,. lo bc har , t though still Trinidad on their way back home aoarce. after spending two weeks' holiday if your modal i* titled artth %  W 'i i-eatoiwon-sr..". htiiahjaa. iaa thai tfaaaa -.^.oot Sl ^ c *' n rhoked with hjdn Mr. Douglas is Supervisor of the l( ., ( t connection* are sound. Co-operative Credit Banks atSMIUNO TOMMY MANVIUf, the asbestos millionaire, steps up to a clerk's window in New Rocbelle, N. Y H to obtain his ninth marriage hrense. The next Mrs. Manville. pictured with him, Is dancer Anita Roddy-Eden, 29. It will be her first marriage. (International) SHOCK FOR SWIMMERS I istrn'-ry; Hours HELSINKI, July 17 •a The cream of UM wort "• %  mcrs had to get over a slight iniTH ** %  ho< k when they strolled into UM riKii!, dressing room at thi 4 10 oo pn> Tw I ly 8*rvif. 4 IS i) p m Cricket, t us p m p m a.B.r N.>rlhrn B p m U!Ur Muailn*. %  IS rt Th* Commonwtelih, • IS .it. Round-Up and Pnummm* .. 7 OS p in The Hews, 1 I" nw Nrwi Prom Britain. i %  %  • :i pm U Um II STn I'-:jMTv'ssa.'Ssi-: Xri'"'" holiday. She was the guest and Mrs. C. B. Stuart of "Retreat'-, Tweedside Rood. To Take Up Appointment I EAVING for Dominica yester-4 day bv B.G. Airways, was Mr. Alfred P Crawford of British Guiana who has gone to take up with Attf nded Niece'a Wedding R ETURNING to Trinidad on Sunday night by B.W I A were Mr. and Mrs. Eric Lange who were guests at the Hotel Royal and Mr. and Mrs. Ray Lange who wdFe t the CYcam View. They had come oval (Of the wedding of th.lt DHCa Mi Joan Lange and Mr. John Masslah which took place on Thursdav ut St. Patrick's Roman Catholic Church. Eiie.iv Answer While we're on this subject, don't forget a spring-cleaning for the mattresses. The vacuum cleaner's attachment will remove dust from the*—remember to work round and under the tufts, where aulation. Tinattachrnant, too, will make n gr-rfl job of removing dust from books standing on open shelves. From My PiMl-Kat,' •How sliould I wfuh white handT IS p m Bnn>ivo. 1 45 p m Pr. Mi'al Portrait. %  IS pm Radio Hewf •• i. %  SS p m ItppnM Prom Biilsln. a li u m InWrlud*. %  U p n From Tl> EdllorlBlii 100 |i n< IW-llunr With „d make, '?£-/£££ tusn?Tsr as Hew., 10 10 p m N*Talk. 10 IS p 4 rt u.ids* Tllcine. 10JO p. BofBtal inrrtiud.-! Olympic swimming pool and found that all the attendant* were women. Some even walked out in a hurry thinking they had gone Into the wrong dressing room. But all then become used to it and one of them said. "If it's all right tritli ihrm (women attendants) it's all riant with us. — l.P. —Shadows Thought Hr Had n Odd Nan By MAX IKH.I. "THIS.said Klnr Nep pointinf to |he very ol.l man with the long white beard sitting on a rock be*i U him. "is my arood old friend >ii Uue." hnarf and llanid both said: a very strange •M.lhi,-. for .id..it." answered | p 'Mi* full name is tirand Uwaaloh Ha's quite hard of hearing." Kinj* Nsp added. -Hello there!" he shouted into the eld man's ear. "These are the two sjMldrea I ** telling you about— Knarr and Hsni.l." The aid man's eyes sparkl.d. He had pink cheeks. "Ah," he said. "I'm very glad to knew you." i;iad to Know "We're eery glad to know you. Grandfather Methie,' said Hamd. Knarf also rreeted Grandfather Methie. Then he said: "We can't •tay very long. It's almost dinnertime. We have to hurry home." At this Grandfather Methie (who seemed to be able to hear ouite well when he wanted tot said: "Hurry? Did you say hurry?" "Yea," said Knarf. "Neear awry, my hoy. Ilnste makes waste." "Oh, that's a proverb!" Hnnid exclaimed. King Nep took Knarf and Han I uUt. "Old Grandfather Methie is always using proverbs—" "What are proverbs?" Knarf interrupted to ask. "Proverbs are expressions like 'haste makes waste' or 'look before you leap.' You see," King Nep said smtlmir, "Grandfather Methie is very old and so are proverbs. I think he and the proverbs he uses wore all born nl the same time. But let's go back." When they went hack they were aurprised to see Old Grandfather Methie sewing a toar in the sleeve of his coat. "A stitch In time saves nine," he %  aid. "What does that proverb mean?" Knarf wanted to know. stltrh In time aarea nine," %  aid Melbie. Old Grandfather Methie was glad to explain. "It means that if you mend something right away, you can do it with one little stitch. But if you were laiy and put off mending until another day. the tear will get worse and you will have to use nine stitches where before you only needed one. But-" said Grandfather Methie, taking another breath, "it doesn't only mean those things about mending and sewing. It can also mean about doing your lesaona—or building; a house—or fixing a broken toy. If you do whatever has to be done right away, you won't have to do nine times as much later when it gets worse. There!" "My goodness!" Knarf exclaimed. "And one little proverb means nil that!" Old Giandfnthcr Methie nodded. "That's what's so wonderful about proverbs. They're very short and they're very true." Just before Knarf and llanid left to go home. Old Grandfather Methie sang a proverb song for them. This is how It went: A stitch in time saves nine, my dear. Still water runs so deep: Great oaks from little acorns grow. So, look before you leap. GUESTS WHO MAKE A WIFE SCREAM Mr. Eric Lannc Is Deputy Mayor kerchiefs a) home, please?n %  a %  %-.. j • III C~.IT I. ...It -iJ iw>U i i Fernando and n'Director of Trinidad Agencies of which his brother Mr. Ray Lange Is Managing Director. Canadian Engineer A FTER spending eighteen is. months noun b£ VENETIA MURRAY W HO arc MI people who irritate a U most'. I kill murks lo. .., M p and ihe table napkin* rasi on a: %  'wela. into me* *ho asks him1 '.!: %  I and rings up at sai -Ceii I SJ, Wendy too * Tlu nri hi) can unh HICK ut LiaVf pi %  K LU dinner anttni %  v be Uahts up %  cigar* ... nidcui i wine you have taken trouble sY Thc" ho departs oif Monday Rsornint takiim iour hu*favourite rwvrl-of-tne ruana ng You don't mind, do you f I ju.i fWlldn I nlihoui Knoaina ! %  naooens to Eddv I hitir foano SMn who swee: 1 Into iiii oockiell osuti in even i ilk diess mih in lo* th" prettl atirl vou deliheralelv did not ask. . * Tin ~iw'i wlio appeara Inoking for breakta-at eight o'clock, when you weir Hoping for a Ion/ morning in children Olive and Mrian, are now on their way to their home In Toronto. Canada. They left yesB* lerday morning by H.W.I.A. for Put into it ihe U.S.A. via Antigua and I'uert,. Rico. Mr. Housley who Is an engi • ;nnf nysj tu in.ui.mo tha cold storage plant for Messrs. Evelyn. (I) Souk In salt and cold water fm an hour or so. HI; Etlnaas t-> gal rid of the gait um Wash In hot. soapy water. (iv) Boll for about ten minutes with a little borax in the water. in suitable weather a good plan a. td 'hem tint tn bleach In biight sunshine. Ifinv ran I clean a stained wine III ll'l \M SIS -.It i „i. j !• i last -i-i' .1 Senna* as up. Plllowa SI SO. l-titi" t'lodie*. BeOi.sa 'PI\IN<; i tbai TaMai M i %  %  i %  l, or %  nndrd r>"l KANQg i •tlrr. Wai .m SI 10 EXAMINE YOURSELF Can You Say 'NO' to All These Questions? BLOOD IMPURITIES \oCSL L. S. i ip. Hid ICE BOXES — WILSON J Do tea suffer froai %  ACKACHEr KHF.UMATISM? SLEF.PI.ESSNKS5! HEADAOIESf HISS OF ENERGY? TOO rRFQUENT URINATION? II i" Mr answer U "VES" la any one ol Ihe %  u*il The afraio'iforiMird Klrphmantaci who abscond al i week-end. with nnvthlng froi.v sour eve nlack to vour newest French record. Roach and Co. He has nowgone tea? ,„,., It „ oUl wive. u e lo h ? m ? I c Ji har v oI bl er ;y that cold water must be usea plant in Toronto. fui (huir t7nr u.,iiL D.,Old wive* ccrUiinly do say thi-' eT ,, P ""I" " "' Ooodnight "* when vouve had a two-hour struggle to get It te sleep . london Exoreas Service BV THE WAY ... By Beachcomber T*0 UM .viurnt thttKrin ol the They would Indeed! And much youUl of I'lbncy St. Vltu. happiness would It bring them! i which was the Anyhow, a mass Invasion ol the moat lm|>: i.n.l put of the Carolkitchen* would not Improve the MIT without temptrs ol the chemists in their while hats, and would give the nopcOrMT, \ho whole place a rowdy air. A lunchi.li.-.i on to mat* •> or diner might nnd hlmsell l| U i. struggling with a waiter, to jet li ic and crown. But J> %  guest... and at any moment a c Town Hall thing, liekind of tug-ol-wor might end by rooa. The ruining flsh beyond repair. Thin run up, but what ran up ; orn^uonilent mentions hygiene. which the What! With one man lurl.vo > short-sighted Mayor saluted cramming a whole pudding into irini the'laughter, his .pocket beCore returning to the ,1 head and dming-">"'. and CMOS SWORD > 5 JTT r i a | j i i • J 113 • ii 11 -'i 77 %  py %  • „] %  *l tup. has that aeruti the hot tap has nut. Remember, too. that If the kettle allowed to boll for more thun few moments, water loses Its ration S. the leave rtJsQ H lHs. Incidentally. aa^MTel say that toe boat flavour Is to be had fr .vhich has Infused for just H minutes, no longer. Backache, Rheumatic Pain Relieved gardening, painting, odd lobs tMund the hi be a pleasure again when you are >>ee from backache, rheumatic pains, stiff, sching muscles and joints, lumbago or commoo urinary troubles due to impunties in the blood. Why not get happy relief by taking Doan's Backache Kidney Pills. They help ihe kidneys to rid the blood c acid and other impuriitci which otherc might collect io the system and cause distress. HAL* A Cl-STVRYof nci is r*asss*a> ail, kiJrwy action if iht prottd record of Doan't Pilli. Graitful man and n of all agtt HU and rtco mm nd this eflkitw diuretic an-' unnar) atuntpiic to their friends and neighbours. Dealer (ar ^Jg^^ ^^ m§ ^} 5 /Pnim winch \o\i f..iu\ ii ma'tin 11 || DAM fir ut* aa fuel aboard. li A dafotmml jfl Ha) i || 11 Mav Df moi 3 ..... ant i ii IlKf 1 no. a remedr. (Si i than 11 Aero*, i II almost iunI -in-wiiiting. la IdsWtS, bill as remarked In an enough to go on with." fJ/i. / MV, loo* lure! „ 111 Una his hat with bits of omelette Tlu re .vrested from a tin? rWgaMeVasJI "'•' trtmgh* fur wotifti Ui (txaet a'pilhat for" I l *rftl breaks the lyre. Ihn i iiuteome at (be mad mil I li.licit, mcli poaaerO i jtty tnasm %  — or oi cheip > % %  • % %  %  i Stand Betorr u (nr IB Down. bwni.li oallad 34. i5i i WittiOraw a Hundred from I eaene i*| to AC.ar a car nutritious, m ;.' Hetreahms P I it Caned at IM nop It Aa a mi II CtHUtKSPtlNDF.NT suggests ma ti MISOGYhTiai' suggests that If women took nosebags to it would avoid U the /\ u -:;iui.inl-uT noisy eating that goes on during i. ParUsjnent %  tlv performance. But what about lo inspect the drinking? Could there not be an "People would then exquisite little trough fined to each know what they wcie eating stall, and filled with tea? See • Aiiagr.m tu a the l.l VIIMI KillTHl'BM iSaiyi til B-SB pm • atst.rK* aioi %  nv Mack BROWN n a ... ii.*-. m m 111^ HANCI 1 AHTAIRE m III. 11 1IMI.I lo| 1 lto <>1 *'





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Tl [ sl.W. JI1.Y 22. 19.-.2 HAKHADOS ADVOCATE PACI ^F.VEN HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON FLINT OF THE FLYING SQUAD .... BY ALAN STRANKS ft GEORGE DAVIES BLONDIE BY CHIC K*U1)If homo you've alwaya Longed Eoi al an outlay well within jrour moani Vou < an Loam 1 bring your rich now beauty Into every room, how to ehooM the boat htrnlahlng, how to lend di odd oornera or attic bedroom Pron proof lm; wiills to lixinc curl from painting tho Boon to renovatli this lxK.k ;;i Z. .\OW X SALE — ADVOCATE STATIONERY SOLE AGENTS INTERNATIONAL TRADING CORPORATION LIMITED eewnawavnaeeeaeai %  %  qutuiona Of'Wwa I the wom of tod*/. Fcr *trt th f>m Rerdtll l" mtpircd tor.fld" In all wom.n who know thai IIMM pfo^tj* io comptaw protection and v*lttf. AK YOUR CHIMiil fOA PUU DtMIU THE "INTERNATIONAL TRADING CORPORATION. LID. Iico Bulldinf. Colri


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rxr.t. c*c CLASSIFIED ADS. p.mmnos ADVOI \TT TTTSDAV. JtTY K. 1*52 rf i re... N l DIED nooDOifj ai MM. '1 !rl Oaadtag HeHi earn he. • %  Tho*r Pan**, Chutrn N fo* M. UlaSy* Outran*. DoHMky %  ... %  OK VtlJE -.." EXU %  11 nl lletlcfilanv'"" %  Chiller, "' ; a, Awiu Jantac' W.*nr.l .Son i, Allrln* ,C|*uain< MTOMOT". 1 • liXi. U*MT driven and aril k**pl >naay t.-r-aa r*r MI I ('Alt Ox. PlMMt f'oid IMS (MM %  IS..,.,, H.e IN MEMOKUM All A... IT AM IM 111 (I HUB •• %  Hl.lf NOTMEV REAL ESTATE : %  t il.it, SI em X*nd llOS Ml | HI %  Knar B>l> <. hrw. aim a Baatd.nce lo A.I Undtr £I.S*>, BY NAVY GA Cupboard*! n i !" h Stone Runa-alow IBbout T rr. o'di. Duvng A Hreahfa loan7 Toil"-. Mtix : tnclOMd -nil su>iw. about CI.ISO. AT MAXttRll. Hill. n fi (. i -aa %  i I to.dm...,. OMaaa*. i —%  W.lar. ElaclrirM*. Vary a ct>ninBtent .1 f.ntrknrr.) ui Branch bOrt to fa IB Barbadoe -no %  i tend i I'iiWf %  %  1 Advntaie Bow G.T •>• ! 7 *-*•,, : NOTiCr: %  %  %  •KAUI m -. m -i LOVT A FOIVD LOST TICKET -Brrie. TF ( In Buih Finder kindly niuin I n "MkV 1)01 rvd. n I* C Plnrre pntnte c S. 13 High *Nrt %  %  II H %  %  Jew %  >• Sore Mouth Laaaa Bleed* Teeth mt Oumi, Sore II"'. Taalh main that Ton PtorTBen. Trench U •ma bad dl*-*"i %  i fun blaedln*; thn %  aor mouth and • tha *acth Iron clad imii %  aahdl..iit maker*-" n-eetl t-*ln otuona* i .-.l,r.„ %  SHIPPING NOTICES i -aLoucnrtm** u %  ehaguieg w .il (ram 1 n mit Mar Hat. DvraapOTt .<*** MA. Melbourne June 1MB, IT) SB IT UM MM. iiiUwiK July Mb. arriving al -i i—daa about AVffM MB. In addition la general cargo thi* vaaaal (•11 *<*• %  bora I .V_te-J for CUT* But -ii in \i.i l*nlll O..J Hi%  -. f nw -hat n**. Pvrr ii tor nrorniWraa by Irk* AU>n iniiM In kmnf in.-mnr of No deer br-Un.n motha-r 1 rv!Wa Mai.W. .. %  Em i n* mnawnb.11 Hi I".. I 11..!•<•< t i^r.tW. I II ni%_,. ,(.,, ,. O'nvial lh.-l llal *M Arvnki i -It'OW"* '* %  ,.itbuy Cf^nc hai > I r caah. hai cttcr, boiujhl uillcr ear. Flrat rlaai orucr. mm ilvn IMaJ J*M II ) 1 I %  %  'Hi'! rradlnf 14.0W n.iia. Ikillary .m., %  rn in A-l condltMx.. prkr %  ill Pnrd •Prrlavi*' MSDOa, an •.* %  ... >rlM Oararr HIM" 1 %  '! i-AJIVauahnll Vrlcn rrawtii I M 7 %  i SEVENTY •!• %  SHARKS In lha Wl 'i r (or *le i thci HW, No If, Mih 5llr-*t. BrtddHown. on Fildav. thSHh July boatktnl condH'on T'laiaail 1,1-..IMHVOWI F-taUiUKON TRACTORSJ nit arrlvM i i unarm OAIIAOC %  7 ;,* BJ Ifltt, %  ;llh thl %  ltu.il* -; i %  I %  i on Monday.. Wxlnr-day. n tha haur< of 4 and %  wplkMioi. to :.. %  i %  %  %  sch. %  **H inr Mhool -^_ i murt ba lha daugbtari of In 'liaitmad uicumKMNI "'< •> ln> tlia" | i.iorr than la v,r. of ait on tat I DUmdrr. IMS. to ba povad by a % %  %  ^U which muai .cenm.. %  %  %  !>• -r rorav Of .-M.l^atw>will ba laauad I at the Vaalry ci.rk. Ofllcc | 1 tiottri of it a in anaV^Jl L 0 CMB* D a worl.l I apprtiir rcsKtrcr. HII h'ooal.tu.Myiw Ik* ", %  huov.n LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE .< I.s M uotam 'Ni -'Li. ULOOM %  • %  ) %  niy J.TOO in..t.nd * m Otrap oar A barCMq at -••.<*• Dial tkla. COU1ITCSY CARAG1 %  lor Mia at %  %  S6tn July IMI al I p.m. Of public npdtiioi me l).ij"i|lnm. known ivf,; us oronar v, Ttai pubifc .r^ i vTfby wainaO MpUn /ulna; n*ll -ra n.y wlfa. OufnndoV .'ncMBM UMM> WnUon. I da not hol.1 niT —M rHportiiVi* lor nti ting t.ndabt or d*bl". TLKCTRK A fnad br &*P d '.W lllllllllll. ...... -a ip— d AuleanalH Ckanart" i C n Haffi Co Ud Itoito k-rr NM IB! M—I f.B laajl SAMUEL JACKMAN riiniiMivti ALEXANDRA SCHOOL Tha i %  Vkraii mdidalci i'.>iidr School:• nm. Atb*ia I BATHOS. I BE8T A\;i BOVCB, A'.idtw Eudoi. 4 BOYCE, Jean 1 nOVCC Tatikl. Kvalyn n CIXMENT Inri Elinlrr T fOBBIN. Collaan Anlla %  COMBIN. Duphna C'lfanla n cuMiiruiivTni v..hi.Nam it USlTWlfK ii.o'i Patricia Bulk u mi AII -M. %  I cmrum. .'^rmiiiI 1II\I> tT!t>ln-n Ollvlj %  : JACKSON. Diiiii i1J:A<-iH.'K. Iliaiwt.. lan-la in LBMUI .1 RITR \frli"la Ill.ina ' 1INC1CUH. klaxln* Jtntir JUSS, Valarr PaUalba. M HafUUM. r"ii r> i TAaTT Carnvn Vulatn M TMIorKY Jon OllvMli WHH9TER. Joan Carol* t. WILSON. Grade AW la it r (In.^rdlani am aaka i .id* lo Ii school * %  • . on Moiid-y. Baii-rjia*' lti. If REALTORS LIMITED AUCTION SALE AT IIM A.M. On Ti"-*d'. "' % %  -"?nd Jul) Mr Blton Millet, ur Kill % %  . I RMtfer rteMenra ''ADtlUT l Venit. Hill. Bnckic*. whWh tneluoaa Dtawlni .iMUilnc "I three ehalra anial4 i i ii nia-ii .peed drin, ,.,il •l.indinu lamp, la.t chai. id many othac lian.. TatMi oh I THE GAR COOKaU ViiiliFwnlliiiiiiiHanl IAXIKH I Tl.liRTATIC COSTHOI I t and H't e.,In ktap i %  L'*tT AIUUVBD "l*yc .'.Ira-Modam Radlo-Omm. d >->p d %  hatklktll T r PirKup llaadI r.ced.e worriea. MO.00. PC f Al r : .. (' %  ,.CoNAIU> lUfr-Klol-KATitKH— T to i Sealed unit. f. jrar fiaM ...mill Irottn food and it* cumparl ..-nl Vateuhl. Db M Hoyat UaraKc I I anouwl <>ii fMt >s d al Oaoif Itraat. Belbtt • K>iUrry. dmitr and dininf ._. • i *..! % %  I oi U running watci to Mi I I "f Mle .Ip, : '.fill • • -, .1 .ill I TMVOH'. Black Pock. St. Mtchaai I %  %  I'nlnh' l %  -** on 3 roody perthe* n.' I....d. *nO • randi.'i lo Nirlli and Ea*l. drawlni, i "mi 1 bodroema • looana. . flower gaiden. lawn, and .<'chard, in apaloua yard. • T*te r.on-e and i,..: I In.paclion any day lexeept Sunday 1 : -..IT, 1A an ti. 4 pm on app.ianUon lo MtgaW on lha praanMaa. %  > Alliad Da Sll*u within DiMiicB I,* paaii M |..n lo uaa taw aatd lleawaa at m i "aid and .hlng.ad h p allitchCd to • %  idem* altaalad at tac'lyn. at Ueorge %  1 .nth laa' .i . Oaled thla lath day I J C w HLUOKB E %  i.trau. Dial •' %  'Sgg i. 1 BREIIKTOK Xppnoani MMti wm no coo%  %  i %  i..,-id .m Friday, i.t day of Augint. IMM ana. a 1 Police Count -..-, M ilrk -7*7t:Y-VlJ -tUial, Naxl I.P.8. sborlamad I uaan Ukta, plgtt on SataraU. \u: ii-i 'I:.I lttt at I ..ml"Tiin-r. a< 11 rn Next Tyaarwrluns t.**ni (ik.iii J. on Satarda*. .nruat 30th. IT,:!, at i .anC. 11 KIM K IPS. (ritouuM) Reprt>-krnatlv Olatin HOI. Ck. Ck. 23.7 52—2n. %  %  i'i*r paitiaatiara apply— it-BVBgg Wtm CO. LT.. i "ItA • CO.. LTO.. tXVrt**. **V>1 Tha M. V CAJUaMBK wi.1 ael '.rge and i,.-""ri for Uomlota nallfMa M Ratta, NaWa ai .. -epl earaj* ... M KIM* Na.l. and ImkA&a* * !" *** 9**. NEW TORK BBBTICB. NEW (IKI.I. ws saavicr. VRPAIKW OFFICIAL NOTICE C W BL'UUER. HVilMJ AN'D fiffiri' AiSaSTAHT— ttbK anj m Chaenaan. 1M, Rnabsek IT r— In (It WKLOK.K -.-, tal %  loikTlten II 7 .M-lt UVESTOCR CAUr-Ona well brad Hol.leln heK-i II two weak, old, out o( ,., I main Dial atxm ing. M Miatiael Inlb ataiU Turning. '•OAT MECHANICAL i-'UJMG eta tang liannon fllam und rard .rMam l.i ">in iiltke Of bu %  % %  ny kind if Hlum racord kaeptng Cotn< n and dlaruaa VOMI iruuiramanU oi Hal klM R R IIii l*. i .. I I.I l HAR11A1HJS FOUNDRY LCD SIIAHEM -ffapt i-TIi Ai>OS 1 lWriN-,L;KANCr. %  .-vr, A THA DUsO :.. 1 £1NI THimOAD a. TOBAOi. i .AGO 4 Th* abuV.' mantl.-i.fO %  hai..... ...iy tna Mil L-.nlngloii at V %  MlSC ELLA iM^OLS tl INI 1 ) TO HINT I 'W-thiM Hootn %  aa coal lla>Iinga. %  >Lawrence or Roekla !.• %  Leitr piel.riad. (luin Oclobai K D Edward* P.O. aV City. W.T. ^ !" "" % %  com i or .HAS.,,-, In purau ,ii" ^ tna Chancery Art. IMg I do hereby IIV* notice to all nxiann* h..lng or alolmlna; any aatal-. rigi.i or mwrr.t m nv ||. „ ... ll .cji,d, D .* )r ,,, ilrclirr lha proparty hereinafter •n.-i,ti. w d ,ihproperly r d-fendant %  to .ilng Wfoee me an account nf then cl-lm. with their •IMTIH) do,unmt> and ,„ehr. to be eaamiwed lie ma an -ny Tuaadav or Friday b-lween th, hunt ^f -' noon and 3 o clock la tna afternoon .it the Rcgtetrntlon Oflk-e. Pi.bllr P,illd|iir<. .cu-iawn. batora tha Mth day of aVpWmatar. I0W In order t-iat mci ilalma maj-W -od ranked aecording to USa nalura and prior,t> inmui r..tarwiaa liath warn Will ba prachided froin Ihe haneHu f an; decn • -d nl all .-.aim* on a. igalnM lha "Ml pioparfv r0 ,..ti(f* RORALIT MRIXI ANN AIJjnNC and TlffioDOflar WOODUn A1I-EVM ITfltaiOi • CRBSANCO ALMUTtfM) t < %  -I'lN* i. Firat all that cartaln piece nr part., ol 1 p:.nla*a>M or placa calked or known h*y Ihe name oi TUP HI*K ..T-inle in :~\v pariah of Saanl J*m*i in ihia 1-lawd containing by idmaauurarr.nl laeiordmg | an old Plan thrraof dated tha thi, daj nl Aug>,n :*)l and mada by 1 W. Clarke. Swoan gurveyon I Aerao 1' s I Pwronco. AbuftlBfJ *rd Hound iig on lha North on laada formaaly of the ett.ite <>l .'amc I Oaakm .leoeaaatl out naar af lha eatata of onerhwtwae* daceated en landa ol pl.abat-i iawraaao aa tha Ban on landa tataw'ly of Geonrc. Kail lha aaUla of %  T Bmrowedace-ard and l.i la,. Webb ii tha Saul* on landa law of Jacob Bun owe* nnd Kru ItgRott i„i now Ol eophilua Ha*(a and an lanaW Ule ol OeorsOatkln but now ol A I.. GUI ...d on tha Waal en lha %  aaakota *n* all accretion* of the '.iiiie .irea by lh. tding of tha -ea whatavar tha aaaaa mar ba up to high vrntar murk: the ,id partal of land being lnier*ae*td by the Public Road running North and ,ilh from Bridgetown to 5*palfgttatowr. Together with Ihe -ncsiuage 01 *elhaMfehtajaa Oariai mllg "TTtE HTSK und all nd avet* tha riertk-n* ing btdhHeaa on lha ^iid land erected and built . Parehaai Abutting on the Ea-t on landa of Oanard PlantalhWi anal on landa now or lta ol I-hlllp Jnhnaoti el il on lha North n nnd. Jle of Aaron Haynaa dacaaied but now of lha mortgagor balnt iarr*l o' lfd hataln thirdly dcatribad on the We.t on landa laU ol Mfa llall, Oaarga Oaaklti at al. Mr Marthall. Mary Green and Ch.ne. Bianch :eaaatMVt>r ba* oaar of tha i-rtate of on.Innlw dm -e.i J Lawrence. Ihe %  *UHa o ona BLarkMt ftoccaacd. P MarahaH. M. Tu'l. Ihe a..taU ol I 1 Ihirrowfa d ihe will ol Ida Jana Coppin ilorrnat owner of tha aakl |uov**it> i lo VMlal llaroldlna Clarke and on I Aore land dented by tht aajna will lo Stella Honln ba tamo In abutting and THIRDLY ALL THAT ., ..djolnlng the above deacribad Undof THE RISK ; Arrr more or law. Abutting . land* i thar landa of 'THE RISK" on lanaw raw %  'Da of ona Tull or howew 1-arcal* Of l-nd hc(rditairia*nl-t .md premlai -id ant. ,., i i.iad. IM July. IfSl iT*| Dated Hal JlW, l**3 CANADIAN HBRV1CI %  HI IIWII'-I, d i "i. "A STXAMEH ^afatwff J*!T uih J.ly Jult Ann a>t vigim 1 Dl E PARntHI). Augu.l &th for ST JtlHN. ST LAWRENCF RIVPB I KOBUT THOU LTD.—NEW TOBB % QVLW SFRVU'I Applj:— DA COSTA a> CO LTD. CAf#Aj>t\lf s,.ff\ v K CANADIAN SERVICE Krom .Monir.-iil and Halifax. i Vaughn n tain i.I'm pan %  i ol ' lontaininf by eatlmauor. „ —c o( Edmund BrawaUi M %  late of Mint Ann Knight arc i abultmt the aald n\. K propeil> f 4 h. MORE. rc.iwianandlng * n*W ..i a IK. .1 "•Illlrd b> I .'.. U 4 ii i i'i:i>iprt>lON '• 11 particular* Ira IVI ., %  on RadlfhMkm lor K r.... ... AUCTION (.HASS MOWKRS MaBM.'-llarrli S idth cut Trailer and pin. type lo. nmadlate delivery. Courteiy Gaiugi POULTRY POULTNY fUirad PlyiaouUi Rod' I ullcla. MOO each. Bicallant lau-l| iBina Jokn Albayna. Cbwwrth. St eter Phone tl—10 nni day gagapt •inda.S3 T -" %  MIS( KIJ ANKOUS CIIIPTEROBE-Anvr'. on baby chid %  piru and night .la'J n,n: i M : M.7 5S—kn of Oarrar JUST reiwlvad a thipr hfaa (Deed Changer-, -reinone no* Mao a antall quantity of II volt bailer aaapg i>ia:.•. i-.iti: ., abevi .ia na IU) head* DaCOETA A COLTD,. in i u a Wa.lhr. %  %  f dxien. Mucklr* ', Math it-it.... | w, Umad tiira, i r ., i i .. i Uouaa t Tamo—.i, i. : mwhall-a 1-n.d l.iyle Bail. Si Mini -. I. land i killing*, p' quartet Saia al 3 p m on WaantMa Iiimmrr Juhn M Mu\-'. • ^ l.inetn. SIMIn i It THE D UrIOND HAMMER I wul h-ll bl puBln %  ;.'M o'ciorii -lal. SI l-hlllp an %  %  ..ling dining table an.i 1 %  i '.ird, laa liolla>. ladi" de*k pain'i.i i urdroae.. drraaing tablet and %  loola. i ibJda tablaa. cha^t ol Ta* %  .1.lead wlih aprMg ttrti". klivhan i .ipl... .ni sardBr. ..... utwma, .uti.iv. pmm* i „,,. %  i TttM CASH. D-ARCV A. SCOTT. 19 1 HS-ti%  H iir;* : HOIINES II WILLIAMS. MlffallBi Mt n i _g.ijj-1' VV///.'.//''y/////'V////////' 'V'V^V//'/.'.'/.V/-V A fibaniti/ul agorifnrfil of LLMOVtlM: SLI'S I oil received. Hevc a loot ol IMm in our Show Window. Ihen buy. Pat** tXXWmVUL KMPOMUVM Coratr ltr*>ad and Taalor Mft i.\-?i Msn|aj ,. ii-: if** Hat-. BrMt.tawa. SMraaa 13 July 11 July g Auguit 1 Aug. 4 Augiu M AugUM j Scpumber 14 August -u Aug 4 S>ni It Sapiembar U.K. SERVICE i ...in Soulh Wales. Liverpool and Glugow. Baalh Sapaaug A Kir a. Hale. Lltripaal Uln|>* Hale. BrUt'toWB suNwiirr* "MARIA DE 1AHRLNAGA "Sl'UaARD" %  sEAUiux?a; % %  ..MJuot B July • July 3 July ..mju!* ^1 July 5 Auguat li Augu.l .. .a Aug 11 AuaTUgt 30 August S EepWmbar ran* aaptaaiber Mil Sap* Mid Octobor U.K. AND CONTINENTAL SERVICE j From Middlesbronglt, Anlwerp, Rotterdam and Landon. MlddlatKaltatI >pei-i-d Arrival branch M ,.,,.. .,„ lad*a Data aotnwr.. „ Jvkf 0 Jl||y a JMf f ^SuW* — Mid Aug. Aug Mid gaptantbar — MM Sop! Ei.d Sapt Mid October '-rtrV,',V,'/,V,. I -a.ld. PUt main load II • ing*. ramionably f.irn ahed. Fngl -n itdah I M I perann lor eonpltl. From July | 10 l.w—t.f.n r iita WTTAOI i Fllrnlahts, %  %  mS Mll ioon.1. Kitchen 'hone Mi; i 7 H CARTRErT -Slrathelydr Dnr*. confining gl->i.'. drawing and dtmnir I 1 hedrorun.. toilet, hath kllchen hal Mri Purkenn MB IS.7 M—an. i JOHNSON'S Beautlfloor Blecr P*,iiihor For term* phone l> 1 M ai> il.had. With %  ,. Mil. or V %  M... M M 1 BAINCOATS Chl.di.ii. Kaincoa' 40. Miaaaa' Raincoat* gJ *U, Lad,,im-uat* W M In blue, malic, ar,, d 'l.iT.I. The Moden io.Mid blieal 10 l.Uu '11 i %  ultuk t/ou e%  •r Qvullhii' Hiscuitn" I .MVtKSII. COLLEGE OF llll. WEST INDIES EXTRA-MURAL DEPARTMENT A Lecture by JUDGE J. W. B CHEiNERY. BA. on SELF-GOVERNMENT AND THE JAMAICAN PROPOSALS a, Ihe British Council, Waketield on Waaawdav, July ztrA at B.1S p.m. ADMISSION: I III 1 Barbados Amateur Boxing Assn. Aa-enti: PLANTATIONS LIMITED — Phone 47*1 ; -----.-----.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.'.-.v-.-y,,-,-,-.-.-.v.vv.-.vxvvmv. WE HAVE . Hoofing Materials including : a Aluminum Shawls • Galvanized Sheets • Everile Sheet* a Hubberold Hoofing a Aluminum Guttering a Etc.. Etc. See Us Now and Stop those Leaks PLANTATIONS LTD. TWO BARGAINS A NICE WHITE CREPE 80 cents and Another CREPE in White and Coloured at SI, Ceil is Ihe vard The above arc both 36 Inches wide and re subject to our usual 5*% discount. You are advised to secure your requirement* early as we onlv have a limiled quantity which we purchased at a greatly reduced price. A. E. TA Yl.Oll LTD. DIAL 1100 Where Quality is HIGH And Prices *re LOW I



PAGE 1

-•2. 19S2 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGr FIVE Hearing Of Writ For Contempt Of Court Continues • Frm r 3 nun of necessity the position WM in England. Hi; Lordship cx:irely dif%  %  W rejoined that it was i>n ;he question it not upon the iJudges found the man guilty or not Kull'.y of npt complained of and %  rnoao absolute or %  dos tht there was no contempt, and that tho unploined of WOM ncvi-r novor Mnd lo lice Hh I M-n.indcd %  that the judges did not say so, and that they had said that the matter was prejudicial, Ileece rejoined that he hod read passages from "Fry", and he did not think it could be more clearly stated. That might be a tba offence aluhough trivial, amounted to a contempt. On the facts and the quootlon of Law, ba Barbados. It jury. Punishmaol was something which could only Bow from the time the Order was made absolute. Principle Hcc : fTectcd In their Judgment whe I the matter came before them, lie K the Jury that same HP wanted to say right away that the article -hou'd be read as a whole. re it another person, whether a witness or not, could in no Waj ..fleet their opinion on the words. In other words, whatever might nave actuated Colonel Michelin; Or whether he would or would not use those words again, Wbotfal r Mr. Vantcrpool expressOd any opinion either in the Press or otherwise, that did not affect the issue. The Issue, Mr. Reece, submitted, was a very 'imple one. "Do .:s tend or are they likely to pollute the stream of justice, Or lh t they may, he would pui ii no higher, prevent, or hinder justice from being done when the other case came before them or saM other jury. H: emphasised once more that the case against Mr. Haddock, whatever the nature, was not before them. The facts In that case, whether he be found guilty or net—the nature of the facts in that case were ab'olutelv OOtVing to do with them. Fad And Comment There they hid in a newspaper a s..dement of fact and comment. It could be no two ways about It Some of the statement were facts. He iiskcd "What perso.i hearing of this very sad occurrence would not make some cxclonullon, some expression signifying his or her horror? Look at I I r you like. It is %  '.(-Idem that three children are removed nt the same time from any Mr. Recce said. He expressed the belief th:t anybody throughout the length idth of the is'and would an expression of their feelings 'n some ways or other. and argued that to s person nsing the words "ghastly 1 palling** In relation to toe -t; contcx* might be capable to any meaning under gin incoa, bu*. when they had it In relation to the article or the Report, then of course it was a> iliffcrcnt matter. He told them that when thi looked at tinarUdfl in its entirety and in the surrounding circumw a s absolutely mrtnlng in point oi fact nothing of point of law. He asked whether there was anything in tnat arttelOi so stroi*j, so startling or outstanding as lo Make the man in the street, or any person who nunht be :ikely to sit on a jury not approach his task with the right Judicial mind. He asked further; "Do you think as he Is sitting Ih< jury box, discharging his function which M almost judicial, that he wculd fail to discharge th it duty according to the oath which he has taken, or that this artleja would even tend to make him do ih.it. or tend to do It. or would be likely to cause him to do H'.'" There it was. he said. I fact beyond dispute that th e three children died on the day in question. "Is there any mention in thai article," ho asked, "as t>> bp-w they came by their death apa-t from what is slMed therein' Is there any mention of Haddock by name'" Mr. Recce however pointed out that it was not necessary to mention his namand that a mere inference was all that was necessary. Hi' submitted thai (he Advocate in punting the artie'e did so I'I support of a good cause, and In keeping with their motto, "for i . that needs resistance." It was no border line case, Mr. Rj M ,nl. He ubmitted that It was no case at all of contemp'. No matter how it was read. It could never amount to contempt, taking into consideration the fac's and circumstances of mo case. ][•• Invited them lo return a veidlcl of "not guilty" for the Advocate Company Limited. At 3 p.m. Mr. Reece concluded his address, and on hearing from Mr. Walcott that he would not I* replying, preferring to err on th? side of caution rnthcr th.'ii deal with the cases which he hi I already dealt with and in view of the fact that Mr. Reece had not cited any further cases, H Lordfhip ndtourned further hearing until in,30 o'clock this morning when l.e will sum up to the Jury. Woman Dies After Accident NINETY-YEAR-OLD Florence I Black Hock. St Michael. died at the General Hospital at about 4.20 a.m. on Sunday after being involved in an jOC i d on l along Barharecs Road, St. Michael. at about 7.45 p.m. on Saturday with a bicycle owned and ridden bv Albert Gibbs of Mansion Place. Bav Land. St. Michael. A posf morN-m examination was performed by Dr. A. S. Cato and an Inquiry Is fixed for Wednesday. Trinidad Has Good Sugar Crop Trinidad has had a reasonably good sugar crop but it was not up to expectations Owtnj weather. Mr. A. R. Staick. UK Trade tVnm.vioi.e, ( 11 '.: IT. we Indies told l 1 W... eaee yesterday mornini: Mr. Starck arrived here fnwn Trinidad, his headqu. %  %  r Antiima. St K St. Lucia where he has gone on i routine visit. He said that trade III I la reasonably *ood. bin other parts of the W there i cvin.i..,of ovei-s.ock|ng and some caution in buvm,; among traders. This, however, 'n ins VlOW, i'.emporary and the problem will solve itself in th? near future. Mr. Starck who returned to Trinidad on Thursday after a WOOk*l visit to BermuiL it has had ID tat WEEK-END rHEFTf . . Pol ri house of Julian H and 9 55 ... %  %  %  B < i %  %  1 I I The hi:, i rI i the Careenage at the time of the I \K) : MR. A. R. STARCK tourist season. The Island carries out an intensive publicity campaign particularly in Nona A'i,Bfteg on which it spends a eel .if money, hut this : videnda as Is demonstrated by the amount of money which visitors put into circulation. Import \ ( \fists Return From Martinique i i R returneo I by B.W.l.A. after .. %  % %  l %  1 Secretary of the Athletic A**-. I 9 lit* the naottng arrived I-TC by the same opportunity intraimt for Trinidad. Al the airport to meet them were 111 I. V 1 > %  !, %  l %  den; of the A.A.A.B.. Mr. Gllmour %  and a numbnr of cyclists. CHARTER AIX SERVICE PLANNED FOrl SURINAM %  P Lvato Dutch %  %  iII In %  i •. utihsii,. i.-.itnlh tv.-.. or I or 10'j.ooo guilder I %  %  Or, the imports of the coluiiy were woi th over £10,000,000 which for a rcsnt lalicn of ]es; than 40.000 people Is fantastic. But it docs sei >. Show how valuribe the lOU trade s to th, colony. Imports this ye iU d b(l priority gmt compared with last year, and U ; 1 %  ntlnno at the preaent acale. Bermudii will have re"This conndence ifully Justillel cord in her history. irsWaaC regasd to the i "Responslbl:people In tho which are made, not onlj I I island are very confident of their tourists to'the island, bu: nbili'y lo continue la attr." I for ihem In a first entoun-ts" no nid and nddod wtiei ihoj .. ,. i. %  i and L'odriiigton Coiiege whet %  became AJIoyni JS an As%  i %  %  %  I as a high trl%  I when it wa arlth much truth In %  %  ... \ %  %  %  ; |no R"\ N %  IE %  Boor : tor the exi %  %  %  %  I H It he ,iKM JIJ nn During.his years as Secretar..ted al Harrlsoi. College and wluiilie was genth %  :ti boyi did not "pi rj v %  %  i % % %  ,' I %  ,i Di ; : tmeti* Mr. Main n r.-slstance he could and I %  ... to Hi %  lo | %  %  %  of admlnbri ..: ho -' 1 .'Miner WhOltOV %  %  i %  and h i I %  I %  i v n ^,i f i P ^ H %  %  %  %  %  ... i %  i %  %  WHAT'S ON TODAY Court of Common Pleas—10.30 turn. Meeting of Legislative Council—2 00 p.n:. Meeting of House of Assembly 3 00 p.m. Basket Ball at Y.M.P.C.7.30 jj.m QeeU Qirlsl! If You only rea/ise The Importance of Being Earnest abcLt the ^fOk Home Decorations / You certainly would immediately select these SISAI. PLACK MATS 4 72 each 60 .. ;.i ASS HATS 1 /. V CANEULT PLACE MATS 4 48 ., M „ • >,' HOME PRODUCTS DIPT. CAVE SHEPHERD a CO. LTD. 10-13 MOAD ST. TllK ilK'll VITAAONaPAOKKD LOAVES OF ll.1 .KIWI s irillUU IIAHI.II l.\ .1 A II HAKIr eo*oeeaaoeoes'eeeoo e<< r e-a-eeoooooooooeoooo'eoe > oo i e'*aooo*^ KITCHEN AND TABLE GLASSWARE PLAIN AND DECORATED WE HAVE JUST RECEIVED A WIDE RANGE OF UTILITY ITEMS INCLUDING— SALAD PLATES MEASURING CUPS SALT Si PEPPER SETS ASH TRAYS ICE CREAM CLASSES MIXINC HOWLS FLOWER \ .'. REFRICEl'.ATOR BOTTLES SHERBET PLATES SALAD DISHES GLASS JUG ,v JETS FRESH FR0WSC0TUHOJ ^ ,n vacuum tins ^j^^/ — Y' >V V •JU, Only ScoilanJ. trsdilmal home nf fin* tobaccoa, could produce lour Square. Only in l : our Square tobaccoa Will you find aOsMOsfl kiof, blended wiih skill handed down by successive pfn*rainni for over 143 years. FOUR KQFARE TOBACCOS FINI ILCNDS TO CMOOS* FROM • MACE r 0O8IE OF FAISLCV Mb Apnlt: MHSSRS \ s s,>Ns 1^RIIADOS) LTD. |. I | 0) i %  TUMBLERS-ALL SIZES, COCKTAIL TO 1 PINT CAPACITY — ALSO — "PYREX" AND "PHOENIX" HEATPROOF GLASSWARE I'lK PLATES. SOUP PLATE I I iPEN ^.^ DISHES, CASSEROLES. M i 1^* BM US Fir.l (or all WM IKE I KEM *vX HARRISON'S HARDWARE DEPARTMENT TEL. 23 64 | ; : .*. . .3 &f .III... A HORSE OWNER SHOULD BE A HORSE LOVER ~ J **" W> llichly Recommend HARVEY"S WATTS EMBROCATION trMtnwl "f Curb.. opUrrta, Spratak\ Capped Hi I k.. Bte It ili;ni i x,i ii.iu %  ppUeatlon f.,1v.'mdgalU. TherouKhpins nnd the Swelling from Sprung ll-H-k Joints of hoi IMIH'K 12/B AND B II AT KNIGHTS DRUG STORES .it ST OI*I:XI; BIRKMYRE CANVAS W tVlDK—I OR BUS TOPS and SIDES INNER HOOD LINING 56" WIDE. FAWN AND C.RF.Y LIONIDE LEATHERETTE 50 WIDE. ATTRACTIV1C SHADES. BLACK MIRACLE ADHESIVE 1 194-OZ. or SOZ. TUBS8 ECKSTEIN BROTHERS BAY STREET DIAL 4269 8 IMM I MM I MI>MOMMMIMMW I MM I : : THE ONLY CYCLE IN THE WORLD PERMITTED TO CARRY THIS MARK OF PERFECTION IS THE — HUMBER 77i Aristocrat of all UirycUt FULL RANGE OF SIZES IN STOCK liViiM-iiil>i-r— l"v HARRISONS for HUMBERS It+c >



PAGE 1

IAT, JULY 55. 1955 lt\RBAIX>S ADVOCATE PACF TIIRFF. Hearing Of Writ For Contempt Of I.C.T.A. Scientists Survey Apoporis River Court Continues ,co "w <** !" <***" RKSHT • from mr I tha law. it L lor you .'> I : %  %  Muih I "d been mad* both by l\. Mr. Walcuti. upon the judjmcni of the Juouited out to Mr. Recce that he would observe that the Judge had to deliver a charge to tha Mr. Reece held, however, that it did not mean that it would have the same binding effect. As he had said, he did not agree with the Act at all, and he thought it should be removed from the Statute Book. That tike Jury should try the Issue both on law and fact seemed to him t %  > It ip the Judge of all the authority that was Inherent in him. No Order for Coals He then returned V. the Hunte and Claike case to which other Counsel had made reference, and to which he also had been making reference and pointed out that one Judge had said that he thought the proper course would have been to refuse making an ordci on the application and give no order fo: costs on cither side. It was felt at the time the Order was made, the proper course would have been to refuse on the footing that there had been no contempt calling for the interference of the Court. Whercai the Judges of England had said no Order, it was for the present Jury when the matter came before them, to say that the Order should no) absolute. His Lordship at this jnilnt referred to the iiiguiuent made by Mr. Walcuit that it was for the Jury to say whether or not l here WHS contempt of Court, not to go into whether it was technical or not, und then leave the punishment to the Judge. Mr. Reece repeated that he was saying that it wa3 for the jury to say whether the Itulo lx* made absolute and His Lordship what the punishment should be in case the jury felt it not try to frighten the jurvmen Mr. Reece. however, assure 1 His Lordship that he had neve %  done that, and the observ.ittn i that the Jury wa* a Barb.lf;. i jury. Article's Influence He then referred to the Jud*iitem of the other Judge in the CM of Clarke and Hunte. it had %  veil been pui Itronger ". . I can hardl. any perenn of much intclligenc • Wing influenvcd by Hi.article. and I think it a not tn point o* fact in any way likely to preju dice '.he thaL .*' He also said that it had been forcibly expressed bv the Lord Chief Justice that there was thu Of the Court not to entrlrUng and useless uppliSo what he was submitting was that although It wa cal contempt in the case cited, it was not from the Judge's point of view sufficient to interfere with the stream of ju't o II" ana therefore asking the jury to look at ihe nature of that case. rhldh had been used, look at the absolutely innocuous words of the publication before them, and a^k them%  rnetber any intelligent person would lie Influenced In the matter of the trial of which they had heard so much, or whether there was noth Ing to prejudice the fair trial of n case. In other word*, he repeated, the essence of the offence was whether the words tended or were calculated or Wan likely to prejudice the fair trial And he was telling them that If they could not find that, no matter how strong the expressions might be. they would, have %  I guilty. 11. i.ierred to the case of Payi %  ..Mch had carii. • baan cited, to show he smd, that there had been strong terms u*ed and ad baan d.smlssed. and said that In other words, there had |o l>e something which reallv Intaratrad or was likely really to Interfere or was oaleolatad really to interfere with a fair trial. "Extraordinary Act" After again referring to the "Extraordinary Act." which gave the jury power to decide not only "lit on questions of law. • idea must have been to clip the wings of the Judge. He told them that having listen. 1 to all the authorities which had been cited by all thf counsel having heard all trie ;id nil the arguments. he was asking Uiem whether i nnt i'i the point of fact rIt law. Uw words complained of which were spoken bv Colonel Michelin and published in the Advocate were words which would tend to interfere with the f->ir trial of a person. You sit there as 12 intelUgen' men", he stressed. "Do you believe in point of fact that these words can tend or be likely It any way to Interfere with th< trial T" Thinking of the ordinary layman who might be empanelled to try the other issue, the hearM which it was held wouh: %  ere the words of '.lire ,(s would interferr v -h their ..eliberat'ons if thei were empanelled ? BU pointed out that U V-vv Steamship STVHT For <.HU(lcl;U|M just len inaugurated STl ., .; %  Hie d-Cmerstide(The Emerald Nie 1 mada ... i :< the largest of Guadeloupe': depe noenctaa. On the nmugur. i raa a grouD ol %  %  od i-icmN, ..f the (;. nersl Council and othc l It I %  I ... aaiantt %  od Pathologisl ind Mr i>. .i Tayio: TWO n i tm ""TPM an p.aurod (topi at WMteror Air Base fcta-s.. a lew mom ni 'for. ibe% took otf oil tin flr*t trans-AU.nUc night evsi attomat>-d by -fiyuig *i!iaaull*". With Wie.bsden. Qei many, as their goal, thr Coptari p'^nasd to auute Ux utopalvuthtr 3,800 usuUcsl mile route. Firot It the flight u Ptwu]iio I-le, Mmn %  330-mile bop. At bottom. Mac daM Spaclsll-t Leo Ot>dak (lft) of HatSfld. Mass.. sod Leon Jaimof Palmer, M*-s., install oxtra gs^ tanks in the 12-pasMngar compartn.ent of one of tfaa hallcoptsn. ^"(.'rnafiopind wB3 for them, the jury, to decldit on pogotj of law. but ho added thst his advice to them was that despite that, they could listen carefully to what the Judge had to say on any point of law His last point before the hmcJl adjournment was on what lu called the whole essence of the offence, whether it tended tprejudice the fair trial of a cose. Knur Steps durinj' the afternoon Mr. Heeee referred to a point on which His Lordship had aarUar In ttaa day directed him. and argued trial In England there were reallv foui steps Firstly, leave had to be obtained to apply for the Writ, secondly, taara was the application proper, which was tho application for the Itule Of Court, then came the daoanOBI >n the merit, on whh h 'he order was made absolute or not absolute, and Bhen loan WM the question of punishment. He said that as His Lordship wa well aware, In England ment for contempl of court wo' vaatry dlrVarant from what it was prior i i ihe pausing of the Judfdaj Act. in Lordship here lota that he did not quite see the point of the argument, and reminded Mr. Reece thai they were going entirely by trie local Act. In replv. Mr. Recce said he wns pointing out that the order to make attachment absolute in England reliant, to a local verdict of "guilty", and then the question of punishment followed. Mr. Reece went on lo point out that in England the Order was made e.lling upon I mnn "to show cause why he should not be attached. He went before the Court which went into the merits of the rase and either discharged the order or made that order absolute. Thereafter, if the Order wa-i made absolute, and then the Writ of Attachment was Issued through the Court. Mr. Recce stressed the serious nature of a Writ of Attachment, and said It was one in which the jH-rson against whom such a writ wns issued could be Incarcerated for a long period. In England although they used the form "to show cause why you hotdd not be attached. **jg In Barbados they empanelled a Jury which tried the matter, and they v ere the persons who determined not the person charged could be attached, by their I guilty or not guilt v. So uhal Tlieir verdiei of guilty" or "not guilty" was the same thing M an Order Absolute or Order Discharged. No Order Ahsoluie The point he was making was that on the authorities cited, "not milty~ meant no Order Abso'"i question of punishment. lie referred to a case in point. %  nd said thai the Judges of the Appeal Cuur. in n discharging lw person charged, were ,\,,„, .. Hi -i jury In Barbados did in %  guilty, Ha argued lur• % %  vn tlutt It the Judge* were doing I'l'v saying t guflty," then in.question which tbaj bed m irdnd at tii" ume of diachargmg the order •uaJ thw b i-i.i.-r.-i i ., ,u,, Baj bCffiai %  vK.iin His Lordship mteriKtlati and rarnlgaJad Cotutatl tint in diet was "not guilty", and connuing. Mr. Reece submitted that even in England, before they ime to trie question of punisheni. they had to decide whether %  he Order was made or not. His ord-hir poaXM nut that the whole question was. in spite of 'he argument, whether the matter iplained of tended to prejudi'-c he fnlr trial of the man. Kntilish fuse Law Mi. Hee.e <-nntiiiumg ssld that tk > In Harbadoa e,. rorOBd to use the English • On page 5 its holiday resorts, both for residents of (i. from outatdo the area, Tnt I I I %  l anff er g, and has. In addli 1(1 metre; In length %  baasn or 68 metres fJi II ;-iwered by eight :ues of 223 horsepowe %  tv % %  -,' %  %  % %  PRIVY COUNCIL • Inn rage 1. lawfuU* acqi. 1 : the i %  %  Thiee airlines operated lit chinr. du'-n.g the Civfl w., liMH, Shawcross continued, on. was American and owned In Claire Chcnnault ...i %  Ifffcil ng Willauer. They wen to the lielawar,' Cofporatton. The othei two hue Wlea Chinese. China Nstiona 1 .v Corporation whose ait craft lying at Hong Kong were the ion and thl ce ni J AnTrai i •IOI. .i i iiui.i Oorernmata orga Ikatlon that oper mi tern American ancrafl. Move To Hong Kong In the summer of HHH II %  aamad decided that two hna> would move to Hong Kong O* Novembei t, the President of thi %  %  -. .• c.i. ca for two aircraft to flv ostensihly to Hong Kong and h. i was aboard one of them. But j thjk) flaw instead to I'eiplnc I %  dome j as (he property of the Chinese 1'eople's Covcrnment and "th< 1 Mr. Chan", as he „ %  I cauad, wa* :.ppoime t Mntn Manager, neenidlni: to ftneweross The Bong Kong Coin I In Id thai I I il Hiittsh riS'ogiiHion ul ihi Oommunatl Oovernmeol was retroactive its from Octobai i .,: ownership of Ihe alrrroft. Hearing was adjourn* d until Tu. .1. -U.P ffiTKs or h:\cnA\vr --"I"" ST JULY. 111*1 vrw lORK lUnHo,' 71 t lO. I i I KM and I I I %  I bVara CsWr 1 ,I,.T.. %  f'ANAA MM **•.','. V,VkVM'.'.'. rf 7i i/is n i, siii>t n.ftin tnv %  Pr ( .i.i. Cunnr. % %  • %  i'i aOver m f\ ,.k-, ^s^* BULOVA WATCHES Only i few in stock o.s the ffUOtl is limited. BUT YOUR BEST BET IS TO GET ONE Thpy are real magic when it comes In quality. 17 Jewels (*uarHnteed Y. De LIMA A CO.. I-TO. %  'i I si. ..ni (it. and Marino Gardens YES SIR/ n %  the I I M MI;. A PMasaftra Flavour Always Rlaht— THAT IS S&SRUM MODERN HEAVY DUTY MASSEY HARRIS Proudly cliosen hy worlil-l'iiiiioiis people for themxilirr. . mid an yiftx VHASS a i MI # S UM. KQltf.UK.\r Jut try il and II * w.ll be .vour^ always J, STUAIIT & SAMPSON j (1938) OB. .\ lle_dqurtem for Br-t Rum J llulidav inlfrlainwfnl J; • i I i in i In CRASS LOADER SIDE DFL1VFRY RAKE AVAiLAttLE IIIOM STOCK. Secure Vour Requirements Now COURTESY GARAGE 'IIOIMTI TIIOIII I imifrd) Wiiil. -r:irli lid. — lfti.il IliICi MIXLTt) thx £ SLICED HAM | LAMB TONGtE* l a Uaa ^ CORNED MUTTON In tl B ROAST BEEP In ffgsj B VEAL LOAF ID Uns ^ LUNCHEOV BEEF In tU Ang Our Posalsr I FIVE STAR ROM EVCE & CO. LTD. %  A a. ROEBnCK KT %  *OVK*/0ajo***eA'.I li" New Parker '> I' i the el ion t illuHtrious i^oplfi all over UM v.iirkl — both for personal use. %  I il-o a* n Hpwial gift. Kamoiit.trvfiMin. leaders in husinew "Wfor. women who set Ihi fashion for the world—ail • • proud to own and use it; witli %  ' %  iticaj are aigned. and famou>kare writu-n. .'or someone whose affection i vsiui-. a Parker '61' would gsj a most discerning present >our own use, nooomparal'l' tfjkj iriHtnnncnt has ever been // 90 Parker'51' i! arf#< steal sajnalad pen A. S. BRYDEN & SONS (Barbados) Ltd—AfcnU. i .i l H!-' i(i|.KTRI< |M. aav are fcHt-.i J AISVIM as. %  %  MV4MW '' • %  ram ID.i ,iii 'KiM sail nau •> %  i-.). (e jtKW MATUHK.i. .rw /•** %  n %  • g**j 'i • KIW KM) %  >I • HS.W iiui.i paj Doctors Frove A PAKTY OF SCKBNTU'TS from the Imperial O .v.iKLilture arc i OV in Colombia InvcatlffAtUi) pCaig Hivcr. agM 0 llaa upper tnbu Armzon, in search of new Oncao ty pfa i tns> v\^ the Hrit. Waait African i*:ica RCsWRrcl ration el i:* CJovi man ol C >l( Dr. U 1. A new -taamship service link*hultes, who has had long exing up Guadeloupe and its dependpe £* nc *-?L M 1 1 ,or " t •"" A Lovelier Complexion in 14 Days /*J*m liile -ollecling cacao types for lie United Stales Iiepan 'Vriu'liliuri' The Imperial Colol three in u condltloiu in tin i axpaetad lo be ardulua, a aeries <>t rallafi baa baai .tnuigocl. so thst nobO -a liian thn-e n I sdtoput a break. The tdvance partv consists uf Mr r w. Cope. Senior plant breeder lo the B.W.I Cacao Rewwrr^ scheme, who heaoa "ie .-xnedit..n; Mr. H E D. Maker. Plant Tor a Briehtcr. Fresher Cor.; emi I .r.e Prlmolivc Ml .is Ooctars Admsed ^W Bntomoh^Mxist The rxpeditlor pUUU to follow the m.ifi. using aluminum canoe* fitted with i These ran be the msiti paranona, and from rivelo nvcr. hv Ihe cataluU v. huh ojriies supnltes to and from ihe rubber, cacao and chlcli .,1 Colomleading iWin tpetiolitu peeved Ira* *.#... i* ....*•.*•..<. •.Im.l... i.of . n i.p.... <0'-"""—-^ 2 (sr *0 ..•!. Mill iMBraai In many way* oily thin lean •* %  )•. >-a, aWras Ian eily —duH, drnb Vln wondtifvly 1 ••" %  aanrnr* aHfflMBr. Coo'.e-ioelonp thin oppei't flrtr New Air Service MAHTINIQUE A new i reeacdls .1 in.si; mque and Guiidel"'iiv UIMtt] lb ile of Air Antilles, a airvlcickssj ba A„ Prance The new ."rvlce will offer three flight* .• Wanda, at ta ,i|i|iMii.il>ly cheaper than rompafi a Wttleb at present D islands on their ilco IHRnta ThiD> i liute M. in-' tlnlaiitc %  %  runway %  ow in couraa >f eon I i %  • 'i complaled MAIL NOTICES ir*l IXHiiinlc "view From all poui-'.i the woHds J'GCEST sualicarbuy! fa* KIOJWI M. 'I.inptlSSljISI LK.S.fd hrdfakc bul... •I.IIIMJ e^ t hr n aaih %  • % %  > *-aJ>hl> m UM nx-lMa. t.mcSnof. Two So u Saloon •ma CnMStt Ul m iaki •uu lot • anHaMlfi*loB H*a ami (Bur* So* iMIa % %  cu*U l-r." [ 9* *•*""*" Bib — boyond belitf! FORT ROYAL GAGAGE LTD. Phone 2385 Sole Di.tniulori Phone 4504 In I/amihum*' ami 1 III J h — I LATCHES I 2 cocas 2 :t HOLTS :i I IIIX1.CS 4 M 1 ** hurt' rwewfsassf Hurrirtini' Ctmlvrns. HivliH. Shorvls. Hurkvts iiml Itiiliimizfil Tubs. BAHBAMtOS CO-OP. COTTO.X CACTOBY CTB. laws \






Har badtos

SSS

ESTABLISHED 1895

»



«



GHAVAM RESIGNS OF

Raise U.S. Flies | ,

Crowd Clamours
For Mossadegh

TEHERAN, July 21.
TTANEH handed his res-
y night after failing to put

“PREMIER GHAVAM ES SUL
ignation to the Shah on Monda
down bloody rioting.

Supporters of the former Premier Mossadegh paraded

through the city, bearing Persian flags
nation has scored a victory,
as Prime Minister.

and shouting “the
we want Mossadegh to return
We also demand a trial of traitors.”

The crowd marched to Mossadegh’s house begging him to|}

accept Premiership.

The Persian Parliament met in a special session and
Deputies are voting for a new Prime Minister. As Mossa-
degh’s supporters haye suddenly increased their numbers
it is expected he would be reappointed.

Prominent National Front Deputies announced the
defeat of Ghavam over Teheran Radio and promised that

they will do everything to reinstate Mossadegh, All shops !

were closed today but suddenly opened up this evening
on hearing the news of Mossadegh’s victory and flags were
flying from all public buildings. ‘

Mossadegh Deputies spread
alarmist reports of rioting and
said 300 to 500 were killed today
throughout the country. Despite
a flood of rumours there were
cnly 20 confirmed deaths here.
These Deputies said a general



U.K. And U.S,
Consult On



strike is in effect throughout Iran

and that in some areas scores of |

people have been killed

Only Way Out

One pro-Mossadegh Deputy,
Khosro Chassgi said Mossadegh
supporters in Parliament had in-
creased to 33 Deputies and that
they advised the Shah that the
only way out of the present chaos
is to re-appoint Mossadegh

Rioting climaxed the week-
end of disturbances that left
scores injured and hundreds

jailed. Eight Sherman tanks and|
six truck loads of troops guard-|
ing Parliament Square withdrew |
later in the afternoon after pro- |
Mossadegh Deputies had appealed
to rioters to return home, Demon-
strators stood, silent one minute
then dispersed shedding tears
However, their efforts to sejze
the Parliament building touched

Tran Crisis
By H. C. THALER
LONDON, July 21.

Britain and the United States
were reported on Monday to have
begun direct consultation on the
explosive situation in Iran. With
a simultaneous government crisis
in Egypt there was fear and sen-
sitivity that the Middle East might
be engulfed in a wave of unrest
with | unpredictable consequences.

Britain and the United States
were said to be considering what
steps might become necessary if the
situation worsens in Iran, So far
they have not taken any decisions
and hoped the Iranian government
could restore order.

The interests of neighbouring
Russia in Tran has been made only
too clear in the recent past. Offi-

off the biggest battle of the, fay.|Sials stated go far they had no in-





























“Fa e: z
oa

*

i





U.S. Sends
Memorandum
To Israeli

WASHINGTON, July 21.
A state department spokesman



|

| Must Decide

TUESDAY. JULY 2, 1952

FICE



Democrats Open |
Angry Convention

(By LYLE C. WIL

THE FERUDI
their thirty-first N

apparent ho

SON)
CHICAGO, July 21.
and rudderless Democrats opened
al Convention on Monday with littl:
of preventing a factional split that could
jpaneriie chances oi keeping the White House in
ovember.

The party's 1652 dele® es, flanked by alternates and
thousands of guests and spectators, trooped to a big meet-
ing hall by the stockyards for the angriest and most con-
fused Demeeratic Convention in 20 years.

Privy Council



Many of them would like to
caraft for the presidential race
sf0vernor Stevenson of Iilinoi
who delivered an impassioned
plea for harmony in his main
address of the opening session,

But harmony ‘hopes seemed
certain to explode by Monday
night or Tuesday.

Stevenson, who doesn’t want
nomination, but hasn't said “no”

Ownership

LONDON, July 21,

ae , 0 the draft, told delegates to
Pitains nphest court, the | “orget personalities and concen-
ivy ‘oune. gan heariny pate on principles. Above all
Monday an appeal against the

Hong Kong court judgment that he pleaded with them not to re-







ONDON BREEZE makes handling the bridal veil a bit.of a problem as Gerald David Lascelles,
oom e al Queen Elizabeth II, leaves St. Margaret's, Westminster, with his bride. The groom is
the son of Mary, Princess Royal, an aunt of Queen Elizabeth. The bride is the former Angela Dowding,
daughter of Lady Fox and step-daughter of Sir John Fox. Because of a cold, Queen Elizabeth could not
be present, but Prince Philip and Princess Margaret Rose attended. (international Radiophoto)

‘Eight Odd’

iwardea@ the ewnership of 40 civ.
iirplanes valued at more than
£1,000,000 to the Chinese Com-
munist government. The aireraft
are at Hong Kong government air-
field at Kai Tak.

The appeal was brought by
Civil Air Transport Incorpora‘ed
of Delaware United‘ States #d
the aircraft were formerly part
af the assets of Central Air Trats-
port Corporation that was deserio-
ed as an “unincorporated ¢ ere
cial enterprise ef the gove ment |
of the Republic of China.

“Because of the international
implications of the case it has
been ordered to be heard by the
Privy Council by a special der
in Council,

Counsel for the Delaware Cor-!
poration, Siy Hartley Shawerbss |
said the international implications '

had grown graver owing to the! privilege or people.”

peat the hate, breeding “carnage,”
which characterized the Republi-
can struggle two weeks ago
between the camps of General
Dwight D. Eisenhower and Sen-
tor Robert Taft.

“Human Rights”

Vice-president Walter Reuther
of the Congress of Industrial or-
wanizations said on Monday that
unless the Democratic Party
adopts a strong “No-Compromise
ef Human Rights” platform with
an antifillibuster plank, labour
leaders “will not deliver the
vate” in November.

In an impassioned plea to the
Democratic platform Writing
Committee, Reuther said that the

| Democrats cannot compromise on

any of the basic issues and win
the election. He told the com-
mittee ‘you must stand for
He denied

‘Hearing Of Writ |

For Contempt Of

Court Continues |
Chief Justice Will Sum Up To-day

HIS LORDSHIP the Chief Justice Sir Allan Collymore,
Kt,, will sum up to the Special Jury empanelled to decide
on the Rule of Court issued against Colonel R. T. Michelin
and the Advocate Company :or alleged Contempt of Court
when hearing of the Writ continues this morning at 10.3(
o'clock
At 3 o'clock yesterday after-
noon, Mr. Reece, Q.C,, Counsel fo;

the Advocate Company, co-de- Harriman Tries

fendant with Colonel R, T. Miche- |

lin, concluded

*‘Objects”’
Fly Over U.S.

WASHINGTON, July 21.
The Air Force disclosed Monday
night that National Airport Radar
operators reported picking up
eight unidentified “objects” on
adar screens about midnight last
| Saturday. It also said that airline
| pilots travelling south and west
lof here reported seeing lights mov-
ling up and down and horizontally
in the sky about the same time,
Latest report of a strange “ob-
| jects’—Air Force carefully avoid-
}ed saying “ flying saucers”—came
as the Air Force was investigating
the report by two airline pilots

{who said they saw eight “glow-
ling red-orange” discs flying in for-

150 miles of here

13

mation south

on July

Korean war, The aircraft were}ihat any labour leader can actu

a six-hour address To Halt Revolt The Air Force said airports traf-





i
Fas ; in which he submitted to the jury Fa ia rol tower picked up on its
The outlawed pro-Communjst aes of the Soviet moves in| affirmed on Monday that the} flown to Hong Kong by Chiang; ally deliver the votes of Labour that there was nothing in the CHICAGO, July 21 ae tes eight unidentified
Tudeh Party is reported to have | Onin rae was always the pos-} United States has no intention of) Kai Shek’s Nationalist. gov-|\Jnion members unless the party|article, a report of a speech de-! averii) Harrimar ean aia Fontes |retyects" in the vicinity of An-
taken a prominent part in the fo yh indirect manipulations moving its embassy from Tel-A-|¢rnment when it wis re-|takes a strong stand on vital] livered by the other co-defendant, ;), a Sess Aneel Presidential nom. |drew’s Air Force base near here
MOPRITg. FS Sad Cheetos iG Tudeh Pant Penne CPTTACAD Vie to Jerusalem, Fhig spoleessj organized by the British | spi ieeues. But with s strong Demo- which constituted a contempt of! ination took personal domimat a about midnight last Saturca;
SDOURAg. ANG BRAN Somes B08 ‘Ex ode i man sald department memeran-|» De jure government. On: De-|eratic platform he-sald a Labour Court, and invited them to return | ¢ . Monday of Rae to block The Report said the objects were
with smashing his statue. parts on the Soviet and Mid-| dum to that effect has been sent|cember 12, 1949, they were sold| leader can use his influence with| "su, guilty” verditt against the\ihe wide Spen bedi Among No. \movingmk speeds ranging from
—UP, dle Eastern affairs cautioned{io the Israeli government. It|by the Nationalists to the qpr-|: workers to point out issues} So rendant Company York's 94 Corivention vogs.}100 to 130 mites per tiou,—-\Wwiitt
strongly that the overthrow of Mo-} said Israel has not formally | decéssors in ti of the Delaware! and the ‘worker himself will Mx. Walbatt, iy spite of the rule Frat af He us t a security g1.|made the mystery even. greater
ve Mossa brings with it, | requested, although ii has reveal-| Corporation, ree or four weeks| deliver the vote. The bread box ; ’ P arriman and mutual se y
a8

automatically, renewed

Communists

G.nger of Soviet efforts to inter-

ed plans for moving its foreign
office to Jerusalem,

later the British government re-

is tied to a ballot box.”

ing by His Lordship that Counsel | )ninistrators aall



since traditional “saucers” usual-

cognized the Communist govérn-

for the plaintiff would have the

appeared pers

| the New York delegate cause in| ly are said to zipp by at speeds



ie as og hour The
fere in Iranian affairs, The spokesman said the! ment as the De jure government] He said that the C.1.O, and Its}right of reply to the legal sub-|an effort to stem a revolt among | OVE lrcenithe abi eola 2 plane
Cancel Mossadegh diplomacy has in the| “United States has always sup- unions worked for Truman in the! missions made by counsel for the|his home delegation Vou | shat left National Airport shortls
past’ apparently satisfied the} ported the international’ regime] The Privy Council must now] 1948 election beeause of the| Defendant Company, did not claim|tor me is to vote for th: | ter 3.00 a.m. Sunday reporte
: e Kremlin “because it withheld oil} for Jerusalem that will proyide|decide whether that change in re-| Democratic Party's stand on|that right, and aaid that he “would: principles — of Franklin Roose} ¢ aul onde lights between Wash-
Meetin from the west, weakened the west’s} protection for holy places and ba) cognition affected the proprietary} Human Rights in its platform. | prefer to err on the side of cau-,velt and Harry Truman” he} ate and Martinsburgh, West
{position in Iran and weakened the] acceptable to Israel and Jordan|rights already obtained by third| He said ‘that his union printed! on, rather than deal with cases| (old delegates, After an unoffici. iota: UP.
TORONTO, July, 21. |Country itself making it an easier} as Well as to the world com-|parties outside China and which | same 8,000.000 political hand{with which he had already dealt,|Survey of the democratic stafe| Y'FBNN
: unist dele-|Ptey for potential revolutionary ! munity.” resulted in the aircraft being}bills for Truman’s candidacy and! {,, find that he was not entitled to. ( hairman Paul Fitzpatrick recess
A meeting of Commynis 1 Rea|Zevelopments. Information reach-) He said the memorandum em-|registered in the United States.| “rang hundreds of thousands of|peply on them, jed the session until later in th«
Otene eltte aouind Were ing London claimed the Tudeh| phasized that the United States|Shaweross said there was no; doorbells. But unless you give; cay. The recess however was no

Labour Relations
I

rre

At this point,
hearing ended.
*‘|began a week ago was expected

to finish in about two or three

; days, but twice the Court of Grand |
Sessions had to be adjourned to}

| permit hearing of the case V'alks On Defaulted

Party were already active exploit-
ing the pro-Mossadegh demonstra-
tions.

soe. sith lay lled until after several delega
The ay *| ca p é Yr severe Megat
The mater wich ‘including James Farley left th

| meeting room, —-U.P.

government continues to adhere
to the policy that there should
be international control of Jeru-
salem and the United Nations
should be given a chance to re-
view the situation with a view
to arranging a status for Jerusa-

authority to support the Hong
Kong court’s view that the succes-
sion of one government to another
could affect im any way rights!

@ On page 3 a :
| Steel Strike Cuts

on Wednesday was called off
today when North Korean and
Rumanian delegates failed to ar-
rive,

Airline officials said the dele-
gates from two satellite countries}
had missed their plane which}

us the tools to work with we ean-,
not deliver the vote.” —UP



re

OV



—U.P.



Get Fresh Boost:





KINGSTON, July 2}

Gen. Ridgway

Jamaica broke new ground
; jem which would be satisfactory 1 . { J labour relations to-day with the
arrived on Sunday, } to all i ‘ iongime Pr tion | Law and Fact . ae a Joint Industrial
A seven member Russian deles| In Greece “rt emphasized that the United lruce Talks: odue It is expected that hearing witl| Jap Bonds Start ey Ro direct. and control
gation arrived on Friday and ha States ; “ EAST HARTFORD ecticut,|be concluded to-day when on
nisaned to nike Sams otha’ tte States has no plans for transfer. , Connecticut,

ATHENS, July 21.

labour relations and employment
ring its













: ; ; embassy to Jerusalern. = 2 July 21, |resumption His Lordship will sum NEW YORK, July, 21. -onditions on the Kingston
day ore the conference) General Ridgway ‘arrived by| ‘The memorandum also made tt Brief Sessions! Pratt and Whithey aircraft/up, and the jury retire to con- Representatives of Britien,) eau,
res Tadit a Basen! Pai, sag) on a, eres five; Gear that the United States gov-| ' division of United Aircraft Cor-|sider and return a verdict on both | united States and French holders Governor Sir Hugh Foot said
s “3 =z storey That een ee at a reece.| ernment is cerned over ‘ t poration disclosed oy Monday | questions of law and facet. xf about 400,000,000 defaulted | ; satest development in
Poland and China are expected | He will visit Salonika on Tuesday | decision a seeoel ede _ PANMUNJOM, July 21. | that the steel sitike ia aaeiee | : When " neatins resumed yester- jenanain bonne are scheduled to Sort ptt Peoseas ‘field of indus-
at the conference in addition ta)where he will inspect Greek| move its foreign office to Jerusa-| Allied and Communist truce! into its production of engines for day morning, His Lordship asked | ‘cet here with a Japanese delega-| Pijai ‘relations since unionism
dclegsiies trom @5 other coun-| frontiers. lem - —U.P. negotiators held a twenty-minute armed forces, : Mr Reece for further understand-| ion at 7 p.m. G.M,.T. on Monday ak introduced here.
tries. It is believed that the; A Greek flag with an inscrip- : ae secret session On Monday, but The aireraft firm said material ing on a point Mr, Reece had made} ‘n an effort to reach agreement on The Council admit six em
Communist charges that germ|tion against Ridgway was hoisi- apparently made no progress) shortages resulting from the} tast Friday as to there being thre« itstanding pre-war claims, ployers representatives, six
warfare has been used by United|ed by supposed Communists on Truman Back toward settling the prisoner of| trikg will force it to reduce an Cand potnce ane ait AREY cveskatatives witht” 10
Nations troops in Korea would|the building where the American | war deadlock. Some observers) Gojiveries to military services ota ae ess i | James Grafton Rogers, Presi-| Hs" acemt poll. is divided as
be one of the main wrangles at, mission offices are housed. Police At We A believed that the brevity of] ing veduce working hours. It OM os Reece said that the High{sent of the American Bondhold-| sotjows four B.1.T.U., . one
the conference. —UP. removed it. —UP. Lor recent meetings indicated that the} said the shorter work week would | ,. a we —_ a 4 _ Protective Council said the] yow.u.—uU.P.W.U one T.UC
two sides have again reached the go into effect August 11th Courts in England went on all the ‘iy aakaduled nonteranaae are a 7a” Mveaeh BLEU.
P eat ae tae “Nothing new to say” stage in ”~ gust up, |time. In Barbados some Superior x f to delegates only, with the island supervisor elected _ first
° resident Truman return talks. —* |Courts went on continually, those} P&" ea, de oe a ge 9 . f Couh
Violent Earth uake his office on Monday for the first Sunday's meeting lasted 12 like the Common Pleas, the Chan 1ess excluded. ohn peg af oe So
Sune eine ke beceihe a = — minutes and Saturday’s 29. How- NO QUORUM AT: cery, ate., but the Court of Gran sia sadder wn. nelolon tne LST TRGe OF cent aeelnees ae
e assed b: ath gand Cc wen, a oe a ee Sessions died. If His Lordshit} woss af any development on the] chairman.
Ania frum: = d ‘ rib- a att) sam, 00 We re MEETING OF HOSPITAL vould Jook at cases which hag sis of preliminary understand- The government Labour De
Ss Os nge €s Jed as feeling “chipe gee side or her ae aeoa lift oe een cited by Learned Counsel, it] jo. petween delegates which will] partment is pushing a plan for
: news ackout imposed on ,

LOS ANGELES, July 21. |

A VIOLENT EARTHQUAKE, which felt “like a ride |
on a “bucking brone” rolled through California on Monday,
leaving “many dead and injured”. At least 10 are dead
and in the little desert town of Tehrachapi, the home of the
California Women’s State Prison, the long rolling waves |
of the quake, which began at 11.55 G.M.T. and was felt in |
diminishing strength for the next 45 minutes. were record-
ed as far north as Santa Rosa, sixty miles north of San
Francisco and south to Ensenada, Mexico, two hundred
miles south of Los Angeles, and east to Renc, Nevada and
Brawley, California.

The quake was recorded as of
7.75 intensity by the Rev. Joseph
Lynch of New York’s Fordham
University, who described it as
California’s “worst since the 1906!
San Francisco quake.”

Six of the victims are reported
to have died when the main hotel

Jamaica Is Insect
Control Centre

(Fron Our Own Correspondent)



KINGSTON, July 21.
Jamaica has been chosen to
poe] technical personnel conduct-
ing an intensive regional insect
control campaign throughout the
Caribbean Dr. M. F. De Caires of|
W.H.O. announced today.

Personnel will be drawn
mainly from the Caribbean area
consisting of Public Health
Officers, insect control, an area
adviser and four sanitarians at
supervisory level. This will grad-
ually increase until eight officers
are stationed in the area by next
year.

at Tehrachapi, an old two storey
brick strueture, collapsed, Others
died as they dashed in fright into‘
the street and were caught by the
falling buildings.

The huge Tehrachapi Women’s
Prison, was “made unusable” by
the violent action of the tremor.

There are no reported injuries
at red adobe brick plant, which
thas been described as “America’s
j}most beautiful prison.” The plant,
which looked more like an estate
than a penal institution is com-
pletely “unusable” according to
ihe Kern County Sheriff's Office.



The campaign will take in’ all
Caribbean territory now carrying
out an insect control programme

sponsored by U.N.LC.E.F. W.H.O,|

and the local government At
present there are two pro-
grammes in’ the area sponsored
by U.N.LC.E.F. and W.H.O. in
Jamaica and Grenada.

The Jamaica government has
already allocated $300,000 yearly
for the

the first two vears of
mpaigr

Prison officials said that the in-
|mates and the staff miraculously
“escaped with their lives” as they
ran from the building. Emergency
supplies were immediately called
for, and big circus tents for hous-



ing plus sanitary equipment and
food are being rushed to the strick-
en prison.

Two railroad tunnels between
Tehrachapi and Marcel on the
Southern Pacific main line be-
tween San Fr sco and Los An-«
I sel € U.P

of State Dean Acheson was his
only ealler, Press Secretary Joseph
Short said Truman probably will

|spend a quiet bit of time watch-

ing the Democratic National Con-
vention on television befare he
goes to Chicago himself later in
the week.



Chinese Beginning
Tu Hate Russians

CHICAGO, July “21.
Democratic Senator Paul H.
Douglas, said Monday that the
Chinese are beginning to hate
their Russian masters as a
o@ the Korean war and that
“soil is therefore being
for revolt.
He said also that when Rus-
sian Premier Josef Stalin dies a

struggle for power may break
out in the Soviet Politburo
“which would convulse Russia

and render it incapable
sion.”

ee
Couple Completes
Automobile Tour

NEW YORK, July 21.

A middle aged Indiana poupte
arrived in New York on Monday
after completing the journey of
which they had.dreamed for all
31 years of their married lide.
Howard Jones, 52, and his wife
Tyrah 51, had completed their two
year 40,000 mile auto trip that toek



them through most of the Wes-
tern Herhisphere.~ They arrived
from Buenos Aires, Argentina, im
the liner “Brazil” of the Moore
McCormack Lines, Also aboard |
was tk pecially rigged Chevro-
which on June 13, 1950, they

left Dunkirk, Indiana, where

a funeral home.—U,P.

talks since July 4. Both sides had
agreed to conduct talks In seeret
in a seemingly futile hope that
an agreement could be reached

more §| ily than in the prev~

The issue holding
is the Communis
all 170,000 war prisoners h

eld R.
allies should be returned. Allic

would return those who
want to return to Communism—
some 70,000. oft :

liaison cers injected a
new puzzler imto the situation on
Mi y by seerna, We sicorn ise
the ternational ttee of

oe ae CEeareaens used oy

088 0

to the nhied Nations

E fa to list the

names of 101 Chinese prisoners.

Comnaunists had previously de-

nounced the International Red
Cross as an “Imperialist Tool.”



up the truce'not held due to the
ts’ demand that! quorum.

|

ADVISORY COMMITTEE

The meeting of the Barbado
General Hospital Advisory Com-
mittee which was scheduled
take place at the Hospital a
3 oelock yesterday afternoon wa
lack of

to

On the agenda, the Committe
were to advise the Medical Super-
intendent on the cost of providing
furniture, etc, for the newly-
acquired property, “Avalon”
Jemmett’s Lane and Collymos
Rock—the first step in the pro-
posed extension of the Hospitai
and also on the estimated cost
of a complete overhaul of the
electrical installation of the Ho
pital.

Members present were D
H. G. Cummins, M.C.P., Chair-
man, Mrs. J. A. Martineau an!

at

Dr. D, S. Gideon, Medical Super-Jing with contempt which woula

intendent.



Fish Fly Half Around World

NEW YORK, July 21

Six hundred small-mouthed
‘Bass fingerlings, a gift from New
York State and Governor Thomas
‘Dewey to Bao Dai, Vietnam
Chief of State. left Idlewild sir-
port aboard a Pan American
Airways plame Monday on a trip
which will take them more than
half way around the world,

The six weeks old fish are be-
ing shipped to Bao Dai as the re-
sult of a trip Dewey made to the
Far East last year during which
he learned that the Vietnam
ruler. an awid angler had never
fished for Bass. August Rabaut
of the New York Tropical Fish
Suppliers ernployed by Para-

|

mount Aquarium of New York
City accompanied the fish on the
trip. The Aquarium supervised
the packing and shipping of the
fish.

Oliver Kingsbury of Albany
New York superviser and fish
distributor for the New York

State Conservation Department
said upon their arrival the fish
will be placed in a lake 5,000 feet
above sea level near Saigon “to
see how they will fare in that
climate.” The fish will be flowr
to Bangkok, Thailand by Par
American and then will be trang

ferred to a Vietnam Government
plane the remainder of the
trip. They are expected to rea
Saigon next Friday.—U.P



for

o}

would be noticed that no reference
iad been made of the Assizes.
His Lordship then asked Mr
teece whether he was saying that
here could be no Contempt of the
trand Sessions except when that
‘ourt was sitting, and Mr, Reece
eplied that that was the possible
onstruction if his argument war
followed to its logical conclusion
(hough, he added, the question
would then arise whether it migh
ot still be contempt in itself.
Fair Trial
Mr. Reece then continued to tel
he jury that he did not intend t
sursue that aspect of the case, bu
i¢ would assure them that the
sence of the case was whether o
ot the words used tended
prejudice the fair trial of a pend
ing case. He cautioned them not
to misunderstand him at any time
and stressed that they were deal

the

council

at



formally the institution of

for other industri

ironed out
nference.—U.P.

ei

MACHINE





be prejudicial to the trial of any
case, whether civil or criminal
And it waa for them to say whether
oy not the words spoken were
rejudicial,

Under the Jury Laws of Barba-
dos, not only were they empanelled
to try the issue ,on fact, but also



on law Nobody, not even His
Lordship the Learned Judge
could rot ove! the word
hat et rhe Legislator
of the day, as His Learned Friend‘
had gaid, in their wisdom must

have wanted to take away the pow- |
Vhnich inherent in the
rt. reasor
nich

were

ou oO ome other
he did not particularly wist
er ested the

to decide

for
the
of law
Questions of Law
um telling you that
ten to
judge |} to tell

li power in

A SIX-MILLION VOLT MACHINE that can shoot X-rays at deep-seated
cancer tissue is being built under the direction of these Stanford Unt
versity, Calif., scientists. They are Prof. Edward L. Ginzton (left),
director of Stanford’s microwave laboratory, and Dr. Henry Kaplan,
head of the radiology department. Their new weapon is known as the
ur electronic accelerator and reportedly car } rate layers of
hy tissue without injuring ther The machine v

th t hospita ne

em

on ques

I

t
not



ill be so ir



' : at mo Ils will be able to buy
@ On page 3
PAGE TWO BARBADOS ADVOCATE TUESDAY, JULY 22, 1952

——









Come Calling Quite Worth Noting | MANVILLE PICKS NUMBER NINE King Nep’s Friend, Methie

Judgi a al : —Shadows Thought He Had an Odd Name—
udging from recent enquiries, 4 i > | TRELL
1 number of Readers would learn | , By MAX TREL {

~R. PE DRO - GC NZJ ALEZ from quite a lot by making a careful “THIS,” said King Nep pointing
DE CSS venues oivet ~Melon-Choly Baby M® From Versace oS 3 on bee | |
ing I







AND MRS. RONALD | to the very old man with the long |

Tene | white beard sitting on a rock be-|

JITCH from Caracas, Vene- jew Sank t | re A
zuela, arrived yesterday morning Don'ts” for Brushes | side him, “is my good o rien





ah He was accom- i. oT : > Now that hair-bcushes are obé | Methie.” |
by B.W.LA. vis Trinidad for OW air-b-ushes are 0 ; F ee

Bi sma Mk _daug sh- about two weeks’ holiday and are tainable again I sug-est four im-} Knarf and Hanid both said: |

t the Colo . c “Aig "St guests at Paradise Beach Club. portant “don’is”: | “Who?” It was a very strange|

name.

Mr, Hitch is working with the Don’t giip your hair-brush by | g 5
“Methie, for short,” answered

Richmond Exploration Co. of the bristles or press your fingers!

' Controller Gf Suppli +s

Caracas. egainst them. | King Nep. “His full name is Grand-
Me A. V. SPROTT, Controller Also arriving by the same plane Don’t comb out the hairs too father Methusaleh. He’s quite hard
ipplies, St. Vincent, ar- from Trinidad were Messrs. Simon roughly. i of hearing,” King Nep added.

i — yesterday morning by

Pietri and her little granddaughter Don’t wash the brush in soda, “Hello there!” he shonted into the







Pp. G. Ai®ways intronsit for\Puer- Maria from Caracas. They have but use tepid, ssapy water. old man’s ear. “These are the two
t ic@ahd the U.S.A. where he OS yee for fifteen days’ holiday Don’t dry it in hot sunshine or| children 1 was telling you about—
will spemd part of his long leave. which they are spending as guests strong artificial heat Knarf and Hanid.”
Duriag-hi rt stay in Barba- at the Hotel Royal. a ngs | T j rgn kled. He| : i
be test of Mr. and Hed Pleasant Holid io Mixi pink cheeks. “Ab,” he said, “I’m |
do nie i x = t of 7 ane easan oliaay No Mixing-Bowl ? had pink cheeks. “Ah,” he said. “I’m i
Mrs ed Cole of Henry's Lane R. AND MRS. C. H. BIRNN f e very glad to know you.” “A stitch in time saves nine,”
For-Summer Holidays a of New Jersey, left by _,Fxplo ation in a junk shop is Glad to K said Methie.
HA and COLIN REDMAN, B.W.1.A. yesterday morning for ©!te? os while. A a We’ ~ ns |
stents of the Lodge School, Antigua-and Puerto Rico on their "Ue. long mourning a_ cracked “We're very glad to know you, :
heft eS apatite aint way back to the U.S.A. after ™ixing-bowl, is now crowing with Grandfather Methie,” said Hanid.| Old Grandfather Methie was glad
ing for the Dominican Republic spending two weeks’ holiday as delight, having picked up an old Knarf also greeted Grandfather | to explain. It means that if you
to spend the summer holidays with guests at the Ocean View Hotel. washstand-besin in her local Methie. Then he said: “We can’t | mend something right away, you
heir parents, Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Mr. Birnn who has been here on “antique’’ shop. It is one of the | stay very long. It’s almost dinner-.| can do it with one little stitch. But
Redman. ‘several oyeasions said that this “ood, old-fashioned kind, and time. We have to hurry home.” if you were lazy and put off mend-

At this Grandfather Methie (who! ing until another day, the tear will
seemed to be able to hear quite well get worse and you will have to use
when he wanted to) said: “Hurry? | nine stitches where before you only

Hamel who has just finished his
studies at the Lodge, will be going
on to Canada in September to en-

was one of the most pleasant holi- makes an admirable mixing- bowl, {
days he has ever had here and Perhaps your attic houses one of
hopes to return soon again. He these bowls, which might give

















ier MeDonald College to study is a confectionery manufacturer good service in the kitchen? Did you say hurry?” needed one. But—” said Grand-
agricultural science while Colin of aon oer and Dean of Hand- “Yes,” said Knarf. ree Methie, ; ae another
will be returning here for the re- craft Confectioners of the Nationa) ‘ . sh? “Never hurry, my boy. Haste | breath, “it doesn’t only mean those
opening-ef school next term. Panne eotd tae Pee Association of the U.S.A. Mind The Paint-Brush! makes waste.” things about mending and sewing.
Engaged aloft after being chosen to reign Cinema Proprietress Perhaps you are thinking were a proverb!” Hanid ex- -natcoonband ines see ee your
, HE ENGAGEMENT is an- over the iz + coing a little amateur house-pain! . claimed, - . ullding a house—or
I unced between Miss Beryl Soune eee ae RS. M. LUCKY SAMAROO, jing this year? Brushes are still ex- a " = , King Nep took Knarf and Han | fixing a broken toy. If you do what-
daha oF Mee, C tales “Glaake a i b pageans 5 Preprietress of the Lucky pensive, so if you’re investing in| a aside. “Old Grandfather Methie is ever has to be done right away, you
Sao e ee cee mgt ahaa S : ree n the state's famed amaroo Circuit of Cinemas in 4 new im neue Tk ies aha inet | SMILING TOMMY MANVILLE, the asbestos millionaire, steps up to a always using proverbs—” won’t have to do nine times as much
nd the late Mr. E. Williams, and alley of the Sun. (International) ae is ner in Barbados for for twenty four houte before usc,| ©letk’s window in New Rochelle, N. Y., to obtain his ninth marriage “What are proverbs?” Knarf in- | later when it gets worse. There!”
Vir. Cleophas Drakes, son of Mrs ( aie wee [ . wee vamer: After use, the brush should be license, The next Mrs. Manville, pictured with him, is dancer Anita terrupted to ask. 3 “My goodness!” Knarf exclaimed.
Lilian Drakes of Spooner'’s Hill, Intransit staying at Wanewater Hotel, Bath. thoroughly cleaned in turpentine} 0ddy-Eden, 29. It will be her first marriage. (International) “Proverbs are expressions like |“And one little proverb means all
St. Michael, and the late Mr. NTRANSIT yesterday morning sheba atn=' substitute; it's important to work ‘haste makes waste’ or ‘look before | that!

Not 1 Drakes. Carib offers them from St. Vincent by B.G. Air- wi out all the paint while the brush a renner ta ir a Se you leap.’ You see,” King Nep said} Old Grandfather Methie nodded.
heartiest congratulations, ways was Mr. Errol Comma who With The Royal Bank _ is soft, particularly high up on " . SHOCK FOR SWIMMERS smiling, -“Grandfather Methie is!“That’s what’s so wonderful about
T will be leaving shortly for An- Spending two weeks’ the bristles by the handle. Then| Listening Hours very old and so are proverbs, I think | proverbs. They’re very short and

On Extended Tour tigua to take up his new appoint- ~~ . holiday in Trinidad with his wash in warm, soapy water, rinse HELSINKI, July 17. he and the proverbs he uses were all | they’re very true.”
R. K. M. HICKS, Export Re- ment under aC. D. and W. Scheme gelatives in Port-of-Spain, Mr. well, shake and hang to dry in a _ TUESDAY, JULY 22, 1952 The cream of the world’s swim- | born at the same time. But let’s go| Just before Knarf and Hanid left
presentative of Messrs, Ran- as Senior Depusre sees i he Be wanes” Leite is MARTA, yes- cool, airy place. : 4.00 19/i6m,, 25.53m mere bad to get over a slight ini-| back.” to go home, Old Grandfather Methie
Sims and Jefferies Ltd, of gineering department of the Gov- ip Oy ew, Ie " ” pi Phe News ea. tial shock when they strolled into , back th or ‘
Ipswich "England, is now in the ernment of Antigua. He was for- ‘ransit for Dominica where he is 4.00. p.m.) ‘The News, 410 p.m. The ¥ When they went back they were | sang a proverb song for them, This

: Snri . : se Daily Service, 4.15 pm New Records, the men’s dressing room at the! gs ri » Old Gran is how i :
Caribbean on an extended tour merly Draughtsman Builder at- employed with the Royal Bank of “' ring-Cleaning Preliminary |5'o°) m. Cricket, 3.05 p m_ Interlude, Olympic swimming pool and found Tee es te — A tuteh |

















making a general survey of agri- tached to the Public Works De- Canada. He left later the same t ith eens on every|5 15 pm BBC jaiorthers Drchentte, that all the attendants were Poa pmetadle5, . aie ne tea
a “5 ae . ; ; ji irwave se-wife’s OgTs ear 1600 p.m ster Magazine, 5 pm ar
cultural conditions in the various partment in St. Vincent. day by B.G. Airways, peed AI ace rai tera? Te AR salth, 645 pm, Women, “A stitch in time ine,” i s : :
colonies. Mr. Comma is staying with his Spent Two Weeks cleaners will be working overtime. |syorts Round-Up and Programme Par. ' Some even walked out in a a stitch in time saves nine,” he G Still water runs so deep:
‘He arrived here. yesterday brother-in-law, Mr. Errol Barrow R. AND MRS. ERIC DouG- Nw is the time to make sure that |ade, 700 pm The News, 710 pm hurry thinking they had gone into said. 4 reat oaks from little acorns
morning by B.G. Airways from M.C.P. and Mrs. Barrow of "LAS of British Gufana, 1 ft they are in good order. If the belt ;Home News From Britain, | the wrong dressing room. But all ‘What does that proverb mean?’ grow.
St. Vincent and left later the same “Westward Ho”, Lands End. ot: Gunday. by’ BAT wie for Pas worn slack, replace it—new pir TERE BES 9h Pee eee ee then became used to it and one of| Knarf wanted to know. So, look before you leap.
day for Martinique by B,W.1LA. Trini ye W.*-44. FOr ones are to be had, though still] 715 p.m Rendezvous, 7.45 pm _ Per- them said, “If it’s all right with
Mr. -Hicks said that he left After Three Weeks rene et way back home scarce. F sonal Portrait, 8 is pm Be i BEae hing them (women attendants) it’s all
England on June 8 and so far has ISS ALFREDA GEORGES, ,. noes ee me . ay holiday If your model is fitted with |s°52 oo hapiude 8 S em ‘From Tight with us. —U,P.
covered Trinidad, Grenada, St. 2 Chief Clerk of L. Rose and * & . zeaton-on-Sea”, brushes, see that these are not|The Editorials, 9.00 pm. Bedtime With!

ee
Lucia, Barbados and St, Vincent. Co. of Dominica, returned home The Stream. choked with hairs and make sure |Btaden, 9 30 pm Country Dances, 9.45

aie i 0
He expects to return home some- yesterday morning by B.G: Air- Mt. Douglas is Supervisor of the that connections are sound. ae Onrinpie saree, ste Setar iat ee ~

BLOOD IMPURITIES Of aiee

Many ailments are caused by poor blood whic rari








i Tove oy Co-operative Credit Bank * ews,
gee ERR SA A pie weys after spending three weeks’ P anks | at Dust Answer erbert Hodge Talking, 10.30 p.m, Focus
To Reside In Canada holiday. She was the guest of Mr. tached to the Department of Agri- y

on Borstal

. r-- culture. While we're on this subject, may affect the whole system. Skin eos
MONG the passengers leaving and, Mrs. C. B, Stuart of “Retreat”, ‘ ’ ‘ don't forget a spring-cleaning for | $46666666669690090000999 and irritation, simple r nee and
yesterday morning for the Tweedside Road. a Attended Niece s Wedding the mattresses. The vacuum clean- es OR EAE ve Gane one seers See Se you neve hel res Som
U.S.A. via Antigua and Puerto To Take Up Appointmsrt ING to Trinidad on er’s attachment will remove dust Mixture. famous medicine helps $Q/M/

Tote ae oo A ieee aad eimilar COMPLARTS
nee 8 ee eS
troub! complaints. Be sure to ask for owes

FURNISHING 2 > Can You Say ‘NO’ to

All These Questions?

Rico by B.W.1.A. was Mr, Sel- I EAVING for Dominica yester- , Sanday night by B.W.LA. trom these—remember to work|
wyn Kirton formerly of Messrs, 4 day by B.G. Airways, was eee r. and Mrs. Eric Lange round and under the tufts, where |

Da Casta gnd Co,, Ltd, Mr. Alfred P. Crawford of British who were guests at the Hotel there is always an accumulation. YOU SHOULD MOVE LIKE A











> ee





Selw , s 2s : iana Ww ; Royal and Mr, and Mrs, Ra hi : i HURRICANE TO GET THESE S|
a iy Pane es is oe ge Pat Guiana who has gone to take up Langw who wele ae ies. Oe ar This attachment, too, will make THINGS : 2/ Do you suffer from ’ One. ACHES
and Mrs.« . Kirton of “San- an appointment as surveyor with View. They had f a good job of removing dust from 5 | BACKACHE? 1 =,
down”, Fontabelle, will spend two the Dominica Government. a aaa y faa come over fOr books standing on open shelves. Bureaus $15 up >| RHEUMATISM? ck
weeks in New York with his rela~ While in Barbados, Mr, Craw- 57° we ding of their niece Miss other Saaete % | SLEEPLESSN Blood Mixture 127 c
tives before leaving for Canada to ford was the guest of Mrs. Hulse J04" Lange and Mr. John Massiah Coll 4 ; ‘te ae eet 2
reside in Montreal at “Alcot”, Worthin which took place on Thursday at From My Post-Bag lows $1.50, Laths, Cradles, Beds, $8 | HEADACHES? ee ETAT ZIT en BAGS
3 : : : r St. Patrick's Roman Catholic is) oy, i “PDINING and other Tables’ in ¥ LOSS OF ENERGY?
conceal ———__—___—-——— Church, © : a ‘ow should I wash white hand- Beautifully “Polished, Mahogany, 9 | 100 FREQUENT
Me. mate Lange is Deputy Mayor me roy pnt ee : Cedar, Birch or. sanded Deal, %| URINATION?
GNF A AGN tT ae of San Fernando and a Director of i yak in salt and cold water Larders $11 up, Waggons, Liquor If your answer is “YES” t
U ES is W HO Trinidad Agencies of which his for an hour or so, Cale teerertiter ties eevee | questions then you are tkely a nici ok
<5 aS brother Mr. Ray Lange is Manag-~ (ii) Rinse, to get rid of the salt. etn Geet Bo mn ak Type- & | faulty kidneys, Don’t delay. Act at once.
ing Director. (iii) Wash in hot, soapy water. Mats $1.20 up, BIG ICE BOXES Take Dodd’s Kidney Pills—the ie proved

|
| remedy. For over half a

| sufferers in all parts of the worl Saente fod
|

IM AKE A WIFE Canadian Engineer tiv): Boll for about ten, minuteeee 920 up
: FTER spending eighte with a little borax in the water.
Li o einen in Peta dns. Seed In suitable weather a good plan is ae ae prompt relief and throug

the use of this famous remedy,





























and Mrs. J. Housley and their two to spread them out to bleach in ‘ S. WILSON | Kidney Pills
on f-N mind, do you? L just couldn't children Olive and Brian, are now bright sunshine. ‘ and = ti take. ara’ buy “Every Picture x
go away without enowing wha’ on their way to their home in “How can I clean a stained wine SPRY STREET. DIAL 4009 oe tear Bottle of 40 pills 3/~.J16 tells a Story”
SA nappens to Eddy”. . Toronto, Canada,’ They left yes- decanter?” " , Y 4
The six young men who sweep terday morning by BWA. ‘tor Put into it one tablespoon each | YO AAAI ° d s Kidney Pills |
by VENETIA MURRAY into the cocktail party in even the U.S.A. via Antigua and of coarse salt and vinegar, Leave eek ee Backache, Rheumatic Pain Relieved
ing dress with, in tow, the Puerto Rico. for a few hours, Shake well and ‘ ‘ yr
a gs Tei vere She ene Te Mr, Housley who is an engineer, rinse thoroughly. \sardening, painting, odd jobs rvund the house can
Heeteas ean . ‘ oy ey a * caches clans neage e he “Why not save time and use| eaecac a eee, ine from backache,
, ae ee me stor or Messrs, Evelyn, water from the a i) for theumatic pains, stiff, aching muscles and joints, lum-
full marks to The quest who appears Roach and Co. He has now gone ae ze tt a poor s oe bago or common urinary Sables due ot ‘sitie
rhe girl who leaves some Of ravenous. looking for breakfast home to take charge of a bigger ; ell eee ied ule rere i ye
her liy ele mn the pillow the at eight o'clock, when you were plant in Torohto say that cold water must be used in the blood.
glass nd the table napkins; hoping for a long morning in . for this?” Why not get happy relief by taking Doan’s Backache
and 2n takes the res a iy art of . — ; : + .
ache ae ee ee For Health Reasons _ Old wiveg certainly do say this: Kidney Pills. ‘They help the kidneys to rid the blood
"he 1an w ‘ The guest who wanders down and scientists back them up, To of excess uric acid and other impurities which other-
The young man who asks him- are 12.30 ask R, DIGBY HADLEY, a plant- sia, ; ae ; ; ; other:
self to dinner and rings up at in a dressing gown at 12.30 ask- rot St. Vincent make good tea, water must have wise might collect in the system and cause distress. =
eight‘ o'clock to say “Can 1 ‘M8 for breakfast when you're er of ot. vincent, came over 4 certain amount of air in it, Cold |
ring Wendy too?" ‘ getting lunch, . . yesterday morning by B.G. Air- water. freshly. drawn. econ the HALF A CENTURY of success in relieving ailments due to inadequate
+ * * ways on a visit in the interest of tinh’ Soe Shae carts ; : kidney action is the proud record of Doan’s Pills. Grateful men and
* * * his health and is staying at the ‘@P, has that aeration. Water from ‘ * cg aa ‘
The girl who ean pnly pick at The straightiorward | klepto Hotel Royal ie : the hot tap has not. wonsen of all ages sss and recommend this «ificient disresic an? winery

maniacs who abscond, after the

a grapefruit when you have pre- Remember, to at if the k antiseptic to their friends and neighbours.
A grapefruit when you have pre- week-end, with anything from , too, that if the kettle








































































Johnny Mack BROWN |
i ny

WY. De LUXEA

——
: anc ; Fri. & Sat. 445 & 8.50
| WED. AT 830 p.m ta ; aol Johnny Mack BROWN D 7 . j
rt " 7" . ai ; . , COWBOY AND THE INDIANS Don BARRY & pm
- R. E \ TANS & CO. LTR. [MADAM O'LINDY AND HER Starring: Gene AUTRY i —Sming FRIDAY eon || FRONTIER ; “RT'S DANCE”
- oorty) bial ert ee Pred STA =
9 7 > ARAA | = WED. & THUR. 4.30 & 8.15 | FOR THEM THAT Lash La RUE SMIGH VENTURE”
20 Broad St. Phone 4644 CARACAS NIGHTS” WHOLE SERIAI tH) TRESPASS @OMING FRIDAY John PAYNE
. r is THE Ss O1 1s {GLE GIRL” \{ “BRIGHT VICTORY Technicolor Double! !
DIAL 4220 YOUR SHOE STORES DIAL 4606 emmnaneel REE EIES Sa |S AS SP GRALPLGLSLLLL LESS

“PHANTOM OF THE AIR” “IN A LONELY PLACE” Jimmy WAKELY & THURS. Special 1.30 pm

pared the most. delicious dinner a is allowed to boil for more than 1/3
sans she our eye black to y yest
because she's slimming Wrench record. Ai te ee a few moments, water loses its Ask your 5 oe
The young man who lights up a CROSSWORD aeration, Sc it on to the leaves I |
a cigarette in the middle of a The guest who leaves every- GAT erer e+e Geet ae ey ee : : Dealer for P
Wine you. have taken trouble ‘hing behind, so vou're posting directly it boils. 4 This sovereign Whisky possesses that distinction of flavewy Backache Kidney Pills 5]/-
over choosing parcels for the rest of the Incidentally, experts say that tne 84 which will claim your allegiance from the first sip. | €®OO@O@ > DO D
+ - * week . best flavour is to be had from tea 4 ;
The guest who adores babies which has infused for just five
The girl who departs orf Mon- and wakes yours up WW say minutes, no longer. f
day morning taking your hus- “Goodnight” when you've had a cane
band’s favourite novel-of-the a two-hour struggle to get it te SSSFSOSSSSVSSSSSIIISOGIS™
moment. saying “You don't sleep... i
. London Express Service te A a & W Y . j
} The Garden—St. James :
- | To-day & To-morrow 8.30 p.m. Offers a Commission of $1.50 in CASH for every New
_
J ' i
BY 1 HE WAY e « « By Beachcomber LT | | | MY FOOLISH HEART & § SCOTCH WHISKY Subscriber brought to and accepted by the Company.
eT | THE BIG STEAL ~ 3 Sits fico. REDIFFUSION will pay in addition a bonus of $25.00
i “HUM -~ wan . : .
ry7O the evident chagrin of the They would indeed! nAnd much ee eed tg | Ober: Serene ; ES) W.S. MONROE & CO. LTD., BRIDGETOWN, BARBADOS to any person who brings in twenty-five New Subscrib-
youth of Pibney St. Vitus, happiness wou i ring em Avross > THURS. (Only) 8.30 P.M :
the procession, which was the Anyhow, a mass invasion of the } grom whien WOK SATS date. (5) GOLDEN STALLION” % MACDONALO & MUIR .TO DISTILLERS LEITH SCOT! ers in one Calendar month who are accepted by the
most important part of the Carni- kitchens would not improve the 8 Fancy it making ma idiotic, (9) Roy ROGERS & : § | -——— —-—----- ee Company.
val, threatened to pass off without tempers of the chemists in 4 7 Ee ee for use Oe, el DOR y cnamnepiotietetaates k
a hiteh white hats, and would give the |: Playea in 22 (4) : “ 7 a ces et
Even Mimsie Slopeorner, who whole place a rowdy air. A lunch- ’ pe Ward te quite sheltered. (3) a ©666* es een , Have always a supply of Recommendation Forms ready
can always be relied on ‘to make er or diner might find himself (¢ Tamer of the species. (5) | |
an ass of herself, managed to re- struggling with a walter, om get 18. A deformed snake. (3) |) 4 ; || and take advantage of ~ THEY CAN BE OBTAINED AT THE OFFICE
main on the hayeart, and to bal- possession of a tasty morsel for 4) re th orons ig ¢ ;
ance spear, shielé and crown, But his guests, and at any moment a < ay Ps) more than 11 Across in g u é 60-DAY EXCURSION FARES TO CANADA REDIFFUSION tet Traialgar Street.
opposite the Town Hall things be- kind of tug-of-war might end_ by i. Easot spt oul Tas a \* ® e $ and_new low
gan to go deliciously wrong. The ruining a dish beyond repair. This 35° Softly breaks the lyre. (5) . g TOURIST FARES, CANADA TO BRITAIN
flag was run up, but what ran up correspondent mentions hygiene. Down to which persons were g
was a tattered shirt, which the What! With one man furtively i. Outcome of the mad mile. (7) invited by ke the yey by big, S-cngiond “North Star™
short-sighted Mayor saluted cramming a whole pudding into 2. The Lido lady possessed one. (4) ; Fees We seed enme Attendee tees somiem E :
smartly. Hearing the * laughter, his pocket before returning to the 7 Seer ee sereer (8) x | charge is cer eem & fon manien GLOB
Mimsie turned her regal head and Gane e se tak — coe oa 3. Stand before itor, 18 Bown, (4) MR. CONRAD PETERSEN ¢ 4 ONLY $1,267.50 BW.I yo
Min = Ny oes rea There wrested ‘trom x tin? nee if 7 Withdraw’ eo naadred toi the | will still be held on ‘ i Bridgetown to London Return * ‘ Today and This Evening: 5 & 8.30 pm. — Last Shows
ig i -1In-Wweé z. . ' eache. (4) $
were no further incidents, but as ; 10. After a car, nutritious, (3) FRIDAY NIGHT, 25TH JULY ¢
the local paper remarked: in an /Vosebags and troughs 12 Refreshing pluce no doubt, (6) ie ce BELLES ON THEIR TOES
acid leader: “That was enough to or women 15 As a musician Haydn was. (5 oe, os Rte , soe ol
Zo on with,” for u 17 The alternative in existence (4) O6-936006° GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD. Myrna LOY—Debra PAGET—Hoagy CARMICHAEL
. 18 See 6. (4) DDD-H-H-@
Oh: I say, look t ’ MISOGYNip»:' suggests that |y Anagram of 4, (4) McGregor St, :0: Phone 4518 Tomorrow and Thursday — 4.45 & 8.30
tl, say, (00. were! if women took nusebags to 1 Another refreshing place. (3) ”
CORRESPONDENT suggests matinees it would avoid all the _ %gliiton of vestorday s puzzle Across “BILLY THE KID” — Robert TAYLOR
that every restaurant-user noisy eating that goes on during ‘tter. 12 Rare.” ENGRAVING Ea at
should be given by Parliament a the performance. But what about = {nny 48 oe f MONTE CRISTO” MONTGOMERY
tatutory right to inspect the drinking? -Could there not be an JE ELLERY 0 ee SSS er SWORD of M —Geo. MER
kitchen “People would then exquisite little trough fixed to each | W ‘ a
know what they were eating.” stall, and filled with tea? | | R oO ODA L THEA TR ES Sa APL PLL S ALLL LL PSES
DO
pereetriens ” eee & EMPIRE ROXY
ie ! | TODAY Last Two Shows 445 & 8.15
Pt: we | |JPTODAY Last ‘Two Shows 4.45 & 8.30 Universal Pictures Presents
|{$Republic Pictures Presents “THE RAGING TIDE”
7 7 | vy | REPAIRS i “BAL TABARIN” Shelley Sintec Hickiea Cont = own. oy
| ' 4 ontel | { “BRIDGETOWN BARBARE ; "IN
P ae toms ere ae ; Starring Ei Not even the fury of the lashing sea (Dial 2310) (Dial 5170) ‘ (Dial 8404)
|] Also Jewellery made to order J] Muriel, Lawrence <2 Witnm scitsk | peuma them, eine Pesslons (De) co-pay 445 & 830 pm i" i SES pan |] Tosday &, To-morrow
KITCHEN SCALES e (aia 1 Reel Short—Aav. OF TOM THUM! Wntertainment! Alan Ladd in Pee anes
4 ei Snort-—. ve a a
x a Lo Re cts tos Cs vas ssw ati Oi ar were $10.66 now $6.00 Waa cuty le wae IW} Ray Gene |] APPOINTMENT CASA MANANA 4
Eee UD savers ; were "$4.90 and $6.08 now $3.00 and $3.50 We now have our iieeans OF LOBT MEN” WED . & THUR, 4.80 & 815 | Mitlana Tierney WITH. DANGER Virginia WELLS & q
Bree aera yas a oe eat etme ne ees pt ae were = 1 now 7 . own = skilled Jeweller J)W og xine pic aie With: DEANNA DURBIN |\y CLOSE_TO MY HEART|) pnyuis Paul MASTER MINDS
“ t & Fed ce tee eee ERR ee eee Oe eee eT . * * ; er E ‘ ‘G AN E Pt | ee Senn a= ro ane _ ia
SANDWICH STANDS were $6.00 now $2.00 Worleng. cn ee eee a SENORITA” and \) wen. rwons. || CONS __Sevaety] ae Ab END ips”
DECORATED LEMONADE SETS ..........-.. "More $10.66 now $6.00 SINGS WHER QURAN OCs 2 Senecio “MADONNA OF THE SEVEN h/t ow nAmanpas was || WED. @ THURS. |/=—“TiUES (Only)
v 4 7 _ s : y s' 1 a A S 3
. A ok TED LIAvEU SEES ccc eeee Pee eeeees eae $ 4 ony oy quick deliveries and |) OL PIC With: SEWART GRANGER | ‘A. ROBBER” igus 8.30 p.m. 445 & 8.30 p.m.
ECORATED LIQUEUR SETS ou... 6. eee eee eee were $6.47 now $4.00 reasonable charges. ’ YMPIC (ce eas areoeted fide Richard GREENE — Sir BOULEVARD’|| “RANGERS RIDE”
BARGE A AT RRR AEMR IE As 00 bed 8 5'4 hee elon ead os SELEY Fe ee 3 for 24 cents q OAS: Be eevee a meee tee ROYAL wieedric. BARE WICES.. Gloria SWANSON & Jimmy WAKELY &
: (Only) 5 oo “HOLIDAY INN” “COLORADO
, , rn ' Last T Sh TODAY 4.4 8.10 THURS, 5 jal 1.30 p.m * 0
WHOLE SERIAL HUMPHREY BOGART oo “RANGERS RIDE” i er ea AMBUSS
|

“COLORADO AMBUSH” “RED DESERT”













TUESDAY, JULY

a9 1



@ from page i

there is the law. It is for you to
decide the question on law and
fact, and say whether or aot th
words complained of tended t
prejudice the fair trial of a case.”
Much play, he said, had been
made both by His Learned Friend,
Mr. Ward and His Learned Friend,
Mr. Walcott, upon the judgment
of the Judges in the famous case
of Hunte and Clarke. ke Nap
that unless“they



had told them

could find the matter prejudicial
to the issue, even although the
words constituted a technical con-
tempt, there could be no offence.
Mr. Walcott on the other hand, had
told. them that if they found it
likely or calculated, and it was
technical, the question of punish-
ment was for the Court. He, how-
ever, was going to take them into
the cases cited and submit that
there could be no other conclu-
sion to be arrived at other than
that arrived at by Mr. Ward

Technical Contempt

The Learned Judges having
expressed themselves that there
was a technied! Contempt of Court,
were able to say so not by way of
punishment, or that they could rep-
rimand the defendant and dis-
charge him, but they discharged
the rule nisi, and left the matter
exactly where it was. And the
reason, he was telling them, was
clearly expressed in their words
in giving Judgement.

Here His Lordship referred back
to the circumstance of the jury
having to decide the issue both
on law and fact and pointed out
to Mr. Reece that he would
observe that the Judge had to
deliver a charge to the jury.

Mr. Reece held, however, that
it did not mean that it would have
the same binding effect. As he had
said, he did not agree with the
Act at all, and he thought it
should be removed from the
Statute Book. That the jury should
try the issue both on law and fact
seemeéd to him to strip the Judge
of all the authority that was inher-
ent in him.

No Order for Costs

He then returned to the Hunte
and Clarke case to which other
Counsel had made reference, and
to which he also had been mak-
ing reference and pointed out that
one Judge had said that he thought
the proper course would have
been to refuse making an order
on the application and give no
order for costa on either side.

It was felt at the time the
Order was Made, the proper
course would have been to re-
fuse on the footing that there
had been no contempt calling
for the interference of the Court.
Whereas the Judges of England
had said no Order, it was. for
the present jury when the matter
came before them, to say that
the Order should no; be made
absolute.

His Lordship at this point re-
ferred to the argument made by
Mr. Walcott that it was for the
jury to say whether or not there
was contempt of Court, not to go
into whether it was technical or
not, and then leave the punish-
ment to the Judge.

Mr. Reece repeated that he
was saying that it was for the
jury to say whether the Rule be
made absolute and His Lordship
what the punishment should be
in case the jury felt it should be
absolute,

Order Absolute

His Lordship referred to the
Act which he said stated that
the defendant had to be found
guilty or not guilty and Mr.
Reece held that that was the
same thing as saying the Order
had to be made absolute. Hd
added that from the time tha
original application was being
made, the Judge hat the right
to say that there was nothing in
the application and refuse to
grant it. But as it was then, it
was for the jury to arrive at
their findings on facts and law.
It was for the jury to say
whether or not the words com-
plained of were calculated or
were likely to interfere with the
fair course of justice.

He again referred to Justice
Cotton’s judgment in the Hunte
and Clarke case in which it was
felt that no Order should be
made because there was no con-
tempt calling for the interference
of the Court, the question being
not whether technical contempt
had been committed, but whether
it was of such a nature as would
justify the Court to interfere.

952



Justice Cotton had said that
he would not have entertained
the question at all, and that he,
Mr, Reece, was submitting was
the question for the jury.

Newspaper Article

“Every. time aman made a
speech or sOme person wrote an
article in a paper touching a
matter before the Court,” he
Said, “it does not follow that be-
cause the words may even be
strong, that they constitute a
contempt. If that were so, it
would be impossible in any way
to discuss a matter before the
Court. The Court does not inter-
fere unless there has been real
substantial interference with the
course of justice and Mr. Justice
Cotton is saying that.”

He added that the other judge
who had sat with Mr. Justice
Cotton had even put it stronger.

Here, a comment from him
concerning the course his add-
ress would later take — “And [
am going to submit to you later
that by no stretch of the imagin-
ation can you construct this to
be contempt; that this could ever

tend to interfere with the. fair
course of a trial.’ evoked from
His Lordship the caution, “Do

not try to frighten the jurymen.”
Mr. Reece, however, assured
His Lordship that he had never
done that, and the observation
that the jury was a Barbadian
jury,

Article’s Influence

He then referred to the Juds-
ment of the other Judge in the cas
of Clarke and Hunte, in which
he said it had even been put
stronger “... I can hardly imagine
any person of much intelligence
being influenced by this article,
and I think it is not in point of
fact in any way likely to preju-
dice the trial. . .”

He also said that it had been
forcibly expressed by the Lord
Chief Justice that there was the
anx'ety of the Court not to en-
courage trifling and useless appli-
cations.

So what..he was submitting
was that although it was techni-
cal contempt in the case cited, it
was not from the Judge’s point
of view sufficient to interfere
with the stream of justice. He
was therefore asking the jury to
look at the nature of that case,
the strong language which had
been used, look at the absolutely
innocuous words of the publica-
tion before them, and ask them-
selves whether any intelligent
person would be influenced in
the matter of the trial of which
they had heard so much, or
whether there was nothing tend-
ing to prejudice the fair trial of
a case, In other words, he
repeated, the essence of the
offence was whether the words
tended or ‘were calculated or
were likely to prejudice the fair
trial. And he was telling them
that if they could not find that,
no matter how strong the expres-
sions might be, they would, have
to say not guilty.

He referred to the case of
Payne which had earlier been
cited, to show, he said, that there
had been stromg terms used and
the case had been dismissed, and
said that in other words, there
had to be something which really
interfered or was likely really
to interfere or was calculated
really to interfere with a fair
trial,

“Extraordinary Act”

After again referring to the
“Extraordinary Act,” which gave
the jury power to decide not only
on facts but on questions of law.
he said that the idea must have
been to clip the wings of the
Judge. He told them that having
listened to all the authorities
which had been cited by all the
counsel, having heard all the
evidence and all the arguments,
he was asking them whether or
not in the point of fact and in
law, the words complained of,
which ‘were spoken by Colonel
Michelin and published in the
Advocate were words which
would tend to inteFfere with the
fair trial of a person,

“You sit there as 12 intelligent
men”, he stressed. “Do you be-
lieve in point of fact that these
words can tend or be likely in
any way to interfere with the
trial ?”

Thinking of the ordinary lay-~
man who might be empanelled
to try the other issue, the hear-
ing of which it was held would
be prejudiced, were the words of
such a nature as would interfere
with their deliberations if they
were empanelled ?

He again pointed out that it

Court Continues ‘corres on mst ocEAN FUGHT





BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Hearing Of Writ For Contempt Of



fea lk aS f

TWO H-19 HELICOPTERS are pictured (top) at Westover Air Base,

Mass,, a few moments before they

flight ever attempted by “fiying windmills”,

many, as their goal, the 'copters p!
3,800 nautical mile route. First leg
a 330-mile hop. At bottom, Mac!

took off on the first trans-Atlantic
With Wiesbaden, Ger-
enned to make six stops along their
of the flight is Presque Isle, Maine,
nist Specialist Leo Osciak (left),

of Hatfield, Mass., and Leon Janus, of Palmer, Mass., install extra gas
tanks in the 12-passenger compartment of one of the helicopters.

(International)



was for them, the jury, to decide
on points of law, but he added
that his advice to them was that
despite that, they could listen
carefully to what the Judge had
to say on any point of law.

His last point before the lunch

adjournment was on what he
called. the whole essence of the
offence, whether it tended tu

prejudice the fair trial of a case.
Four Steps

Continuing his address during
the afternoon Mr, Reece referred
to a point on which His Lordship
had earlier in the day directed
him, and argued that in England
there were really four steps. First-
ly, leave had to be obtained to
apply for the Writ, secondly, there
was the application proper, which
was the application for the Rule
of Court, then came the decision
on the merit, on which decision
the order was made absolute or
not absolute, and then there was
the question of punishment.

He said that as His Lordship was
well aware, in’ England attach-
ment for contempt of court was
vastly different from what it was
prior to the passing of the Judi-
cial Act,

His Lordship here interpolated
that he did not quite see the point
of the argument, and reminded
Mr. Reece that they were going
entirely by the local Act. In re-
ply, Mr, Reece said he was point-
ing out that the order to make
attachment absolute in England
was equivalent to a local verdict
of “guilty”, and then the question
of punishment followed,

Mr. Reece went on to point out
that in England the Order was
made calling upon a man “to show
cause why he should not be at-
tached. He went before the Court
which went into the merits of the
case and either discharged the or-
der or made that order absolute.
Thereafter, if the Order was
made absolute, and then the Writ
of Attachment was issued through
the Court.

Mr. Reece stressed the serious
nature of a Writ of Attachment,
and said it was one in which the
person against whom such a writ
was issued could be incarcerated
for a long period,

In England although they used
the form “to show cause why you
should not be attached, yet in

Barbados they empanelled a jury





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which tried the matter, and they
were the persons who determined
whether or not the person charg-
ed could be attached, by their
verdict of guilty or not guilty, So
that their verdict of “guilty” or
“not guilty” was the same thing
as an Order Absolute or Order
Discharged.
“No Order Absolute”

The point he was making was
that on the authorities cited, “not
euilty” meant “no Order Abso-
lute’, and no question of punish-
ment.

He referred to a case in point,
and said that the Judges of the
Appeal Court, in so discharging
the person charged, were doing
what a jury in Barbados did in
saying not guilty. He argued furs
iher that if the Judges were doing
(he same thing as a jury saying

not guilty,” then the question
which they had in mind at the
time of discharging the Order
ould also be considered by a jury
i. Barbados,

Again His Lordship interpolat-
ed and reminded Counsel that in
Barbados the jury’s verdict was
‘guilty” or “not guilty”, and con-
‘inuing, Mr, Reece submitted that
even in England, before they
rame to the question of punish-
ment, they had to decide whether
‘he Order was made or not. His
Lordship pointed put that the
whole question was, in spite of
he argument, whether the matter

complained of tended to prejudice :

the fair trial of the man.

English Case Law
Mr. Reece continuing said that

in as much as they in Barbados 7

were forced to

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Scientists

Survey Apoporis River

A PARTY OF SCIENTISTS from the Imperial College

of Tropical Agriculture are

1. ow in Colombia investigatins

the Apoporis River, one of the upper tributaries of the

Amazon, in search of new

Cacao types. The expedition

is being financed jointly by the British West Indian and
the British West African Cacao Research Schemes wit!

the full co-operation of the

New Steamship
Serviee Kor

Guadeloupe

_ A new steamship service link-
ing up Guadeloupe and its depend-
encies has just been inaugurated.
The first ship in this service, the
“Ie d’Emeraude” (The Emerald
Isle). made its first voyage just
1ecently to Marie Galante, which
iy the largest of Guadeloupe’s
dependencies. On the inaugura
trip, the vessel carried a group of
severnment officials, the President
od members of the General Coun-
cil and others. It is confident]
expected that this new, regula:
service will do much to popularis:
Marie Galante, the Saintes, Saint
Mert, Saint Barthelmy and
Desirade, as holiday resorts,
both for residents of Guadeloupe
end for tourists from outside the
area, The Tile d’Emeraude is
equipped to carry 180 deck pas-
sengers, and has, in addition, six-
double-bunk cabins, It is 46 metres
(about 150 feel) overall in length,
with a beam of 6.8 metres (21
feet), and is powered by eight
diesel engines of 225 horsepowe:
each driving twin propellers,

PRIVY COUNCIL

@ From Page 1.
otherwise lawfully acquired fro
the previous government relat):
to property outside the sovervigrit
of either,



Three. airlines operated’ in
China during the Civil War
1949, Shaweross continued, om
was American and owned by
General Claire Chennault and
Whiting Willauer. The were
predecessors to the Deliware

Corporation. The other two line
were Chinese: China Nationa!
Aviation Corporation whose air

Government of Colombia.

It is expected that the investiga-
tion will last for some twelve o
fifteen months and will cover five
or six distinct focalities in the
Orinoco and Amazon forests: Co-
lombian scientists. are schedulec
to accompany the expedition, .
which will also have, on its first)
trip, the advice of Dr, R. E,
Schultes, who has had long ex-
perience of these forests gained
while collecting cacao types for}
the United States Department of
Agriculture. The Imperial Col-
lege party will consist of three
scientists, but as conditions in the
forests are expected to be ardu-
us, a series of reliefs has been
wranged, so that nobody will
pend more than three months in |
the forest without a break. The |
advance party consists of Mr. |
F. W. Cope, Senior plant, breeder ,
to the B.W.1. Cacao Research |
Scheme, who heads the expedi- |
tion; Mr, R. EB, D. Baker, Plant ,
Pathologist; and Mr. D. J. Taylor,
Entomologist. The expedition |
plans to follow the main rivers,
using aluminum canoes fitted with
‘outboard motors. These can be}
transported from Bogota, the main
base of operations, and from river
to river, by the catalina aircraft
which carries supplies to and from
the rubber, cacao and _ chicle
workers in the forests of Colom-

bia. |



New Air Service

MARTINIQUE. —

A new air service has recently

been inaugurated between Mar-
Unique and Guadeloupe under the
ide of Air Antilles, a service

hacked by Air France, The new
ervice will offer three flights a
eek between the two islands, at

intes appreciably cheaper than
hose offered by the other compan-
es which at present connect thf
islands on their Trinidad-Puerto
Rico flights. This new service also
»lans to include Marie Galante on
its schedule, when the new runway
ow in course of constructio:

eraft lying at Hong Kong were the there shall have been completed

subject of separate action and the
Central Air Transport Corpor.

tion, a China Governmetn organ
isation that operated valuab\
modern American aircraft,

Move To Hong Kong

In the summer of 1949 it
seemed decided that two lines
would move to Hong Kong, O+
November 9, the President of the
respondent Corporation, C.1, Cher
arranged for two aircraft to fly
ostensibly to Hong Kong and he
was aboard ome of them. But
they flew instead to Peiping.
There the Corporation was claimed
as the property of the Chinese
People’s Government and “the
Glorious Me. Chen”, as hé was
called, was a
Manager, aceording to Shaweross.
The Hong Kong Court held that
subsequent British recognition ol
the Communist Government was
retroactive as from October 1,

inted General



MAIL NOTICES

for the United Kingdom, by th

‘Golfito will be closed at the General
t Office as under: a

Parcel Mail at 12 noon, Registered Ma}
t 2 p.m., Ordinary Mail at 2.30 p.m, ©
the 24th July, 1952,

Mails for Dominica, Antigua, Nev
St. Kitts, and Montserrat by the m.Â¥
‘unbbee will be closed at the Genera

st Office as under

I »] Mail at 12 noon, Registered

Wall at 2 pan, Ordinary Mail at 2.30 p.m
the 2and July, 1962

|

| BULO



1949, giving ownership of the air- |

craft. Hearing was
until Tuesday,
—UP.

RATES OF EXCHANGE

21ST JULY, 1952

Selling NEW YORK Selling
73 :1/10% Pr. Cheques on
Bankers 71 4/10% Pr.
Sight or Demand
Drafts 71 2/10% Pr,
73 1/10% Pr. Cable
7! 6/10%.Pr. Curreney 69 9 /10% Pr,
Coupons 69 2/10% Pr.
Pr Silver 20% Pr.
CANADA
: 3/10% Pr. Cheques on
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Demand Deafts 76.35% Pr.
Sight Drafts 76 2/10%% Pr.
3/10% Pr. Cable
Currency he Pr,
Coupons 74 3/10% Pr.
Oe Pr. Silver 20% Pr,




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PAGE FOUR




eid ADVOCATE

San ss oomelf Su ieee Be cy
Printed by the Advocate Co., Lid., Broad 8t., Bridgetews

Tuesday, Juiy 22, 1952

HOME MAKING

SOME years ago a resident of the British
West Indies wrote to an English newspaper
suggesting that there were too many con-
ferences and too many upturned cocktail
glasses at Government House parties in
the British Caribbean. The suggestion be-
hind this picturesque description of high
living was that analysis of West Indian
problems would not ‘solve any of them.
Only . direct contact with the problems
would lead to their solutions.

Perhaps some similar thought occurred
to Miss Dora Ibberson, Social Welfare
Adviser to the Development and Welfare
Organisation, when she told representa-
tives of Trinidad’s Press recently “we must
take people where they are and help them
to make better use of what they have.”
Miss Ibberson expanded her meaning by
quoting examples. Men she said could
build a separate cot for the baby from
local materials: and women could be made
better judges of what they buy, both food
and textiles and taught the value cf a
home vegetable plot.









Miss Ibberson it would seem was only
saying what has been so often said before
by thousands of West Indians during the
last two decades, and what was said so well
in the paragraphs on rural education in
Sir George Seel’s latest report on Develop-
ment and Welfare in the West Indies. “In
the British West Indies” writes the author
of these paragraphs “where almost four
fifths of the population is rural, it would
be impossible to over-emphasize the need
for a complete revision of the syllabus and
of the methods of teaching in the rural
schools ... if rural schools are to develop
the right education, the teaching must be
rooted in reality finding its material at the
starting point in the environment of the

child... a rural emphasis should be

given in the professional preparation
of teachers who are likely to be em-
ployed in rural schools, Without that spe-
cialist training the rural school teacher
will find it difficult to acquire the neces-
sary skill and experience in imparting a
rural colour to the curriculum.”

It is quite impossible to take people
where they are and help them to make
better use of what they have when the
‘energies of parents and teachers and pupils

are strained to preserve the existing aca-—

demic educational system which has as its
goal the winning of five Barbados Scholar-
ships and the acquiring of school certifi-
cates, exhibitions and Island Scholarships.

Before people can be taken as they are
the syllabus and methods of teaching in
the rural schools will have to be revised.
Prominence will have to be given as Sir
George Seel’s Education Adviser writes “to
subjects correlated to the three major
fields of agriculture, health and home life
education.” Everyone will remember the
story of the visiting inspector who found
a teacher giving a lecture on hygiene to
pupils in a room where cobwebs trailed
across the teacher’s desk. When reproved
by the inspector he tartly replied that he
was employed to lecture on hygiene not
to sweep cobwebs.

Equally illuminating is the letter writ-
ten by a former classical student of Har-
rison College some years ago to this news-
paper. This student complained that where-
as he was familiar with the forensic elo-
quence of Cicero and Demosthenes and
was well acquainted with the distinguish-
ed historical ability of Sallust, Tacitus,
Thucydides and Livy, he had been taught
nothing about personal hygiene and did
not even know how to eat well balanced
meals.

Perhaps Miss Ibberson is being over-
pessimistic when she states that we must
take people where they are. Perhaps there
is no need at least in Barbados to do any~
thing more drastic than follow the advice
of Sir George Seel’s adviser on education.

Revision of the syllabus and of the meth-
ods of teaching in the rural schools ought
to provide an adequate channel for the
teaching of home economics and ought to
precede any invitation to the United Na-
tions to carry out demonstrations. No ex-
periment however successful and by whom-
_soever conducted could compete against
the highly organised vested interests of
local academic education. If home eco-
nomics is to be taught in Barbados the sub-
ject must be included in every school’s
curriculum. Otherwise it will be “cold-
shouldered” and become something for the
minority who are incapable of joining in
the all-island educational race to acquire
the five yearly scholarships provided by
the government of Barbados.

Unless the prejudices against “home-
making” subjects in the schools’ curricula
can be broken down, little progress to-
wards the ideals cherished by Miss Ibber-
son and the other delegates attending the
Conference on Home Economies and Nutri-
tion Teaching will be made in Barbados.

a

i ee a eC a a ——

War Against T.B. In
e Colonies

rh





A warning against > much
reliauce of the effectiveness of
drugs in the treatment of tuber-
culosis in the colonic was

given at today’s resumed Com-
monwealth Health and Tubercu-
losis Conference in London.

it was given by one of Britain’s

foremost authorities on tuber-
culosis, and one who has travell-
ed widely in the colonies, Pro-
fessor F. R. G, Heaf, of the
Welsh National School of Medi-
cine.
He spoke at this morning’s
session of the conference which
was entirely devoted to an ex-
change of information on tuber-
culosis in British colonial ter i-
tories.

Professor Heaf was summit.
up a number of papers which
had been read by Colonial
health officers and representa-
tives of voluntary organizations
concerned in the work of com-
batting tuberculosis.

There was a lack of confi-
dence in the treatment of tuber-
culosis, he said, on the part of
native sufferers, though fortun-
ately this attitude was on the
decrease, Many of the natives
undergoing treatment for tuber-
culosis failed to understand
what was being done for them.

Doctors had great difficulty in
getting them to remain in hos-
pital when they began to feel
better. In fact, said Professor
Heaf, there were new’ drugs
which gave relief in a matter of
a few months, and these gave
the patient a feeling of such
well-being that he thought he
was cured long before the treat-
ment was completed.

The co-operation of the native
sufferer, he said, was a very
important factor in the treat-
ment of tuberculosis. ‘‘We must
make him understand what we
are trying to do,” he added.

When the necessary co-oper-
ation of the patient had been ob-
tained, he believed we. could
look forward to the time when
both the wnortality and the in-
cidence of tuberculosis would
fall in every one of our colonies,

Earlier, Professor Heat
referred to the papers read to-
day as probably the most im-
portant series of papers on
tuberculosis in the colonies that
had ever been delivered in one
morning.

The problem of tuberculosis in
Colonial territories, he said, was
serious but not, hopeless. The
men and women engaged in the
fight against this disease were
doing valuable work, often un-
der the worst conditions. Many
of the reports which they had
sent back to this country were
“really remarkable pieces. of
work,” considering that in many
vases local health officers and
others engaged in anti-TB work
were cut off from the modern
facilities available in this coun-
try.

Professor Heaf stressed that no
generalization could be made
about the best method of stamp-









News From

LONDON. July 11th.

The Very Rev. Hewlett John-
son, Dean of Canterbury,
certainly made the most spec-
tacular news of the week. He
arrived in London after his tour
to Pekin via Moscow bearing a
great 40ft. long scroll written
in Chinese characters, which he
said he would like to deposit in
the Holy Library within the
Cathedral of Canterbury.

“The Red Dean”, with his flow-
ing white hair—about which he
is inordinately vain — told cor-
respondents he had ‘ proof’? that
the United States forces are
using insects to create epidemics
in Korea and Manchuria. He did
not bring any proof with him,
and all his reports ‘were at sec-
ond hand, or worse, He cpuld
explain nothing, and brought
no evidence,

Now there is quite an uproar
in political quarters about the
Dean. How can this short-
sighted and credulous cleric
continue to hold his position at
Canterbury and at the same
time aid the Communist cause
by pubiicity and false witness?
Again, everyone is asking
whethar he can actually de-
posit his scroll in the library
of Canterbury.

The Dean of Canterbury
appointed, officially by the
Chapter, but his name is put
forward by the Crown on the
advice of the Prime Minister,
“The Red Dean” obtained his
lifelong appointment to Canter-
bury because he caught the eye
of Mr, Ramsay MacDonald as
one of the few Socialist Minis-
ters of the Church, (Bishop
Barnes of Birmingham was
another similar appointment of
Ramsay MacDonald).

Since 1688 the King has not

ig,

had the right to remove a
Bishop or the Dean of Can-
terbury, once he has been
appointed. Like Judes, tha

high dignitaries of, the English
Church can only be removed if
they can be certifled as insane.



It would be very dificult to
change the rules of appoint-
ment — although Porlament

could certainly do it. The life-
long tenure of Bishops, Deans
and Judges is knotted into the
British Constitutlian @nd it is
difficult to make a fundament-
tal change in order to deprive
one misguided old man of the



@ur Readers Say;
“Twelth Night” Success

To the Editor, The Advocate,

SIR,—Those who gave so
kihdly a reception to the recent
production of “Twelfth Nigh’
may be interested to learn how
the enterprise came out finan-
cially.

I venture to think that the ac-
companying balance sheet should
be highiy encouraging to any

who want to use the Pocke
Theatre as a base, so to speak,
for some further production of a

play of genuine literary merit in
Barbados.

You will note that the finan-
cial success of the undertaking
was even more complete than
the balance sheet reveals at first
sight. The original t t

Council subvention of $199.12 i






had .

ing out tuberculosis in the col-
onies. Each colony must work
out its own plan, based on care-
ful research and investigation by
the men on the spot,

There was evidence, he con-
tinued, that natives could with-
stand the disease as well as any-
body, provided their living con-
ditions were improved. Anti-
tuberculosis measures must
therefore go forward side by
side with other public health
services.

Treatment centres would have
to be established to follow up
the work of diagnosis and in-
vestigation, otherwise the con-
fidence of local populations
would be lost. Bu®@ these things
must evolve gracually.

Professor Heaf criticized the
expenditure of large sums of
money on anti-tuberculosis
measures which could, at best,
benefit only a small minority cf
local populations. What is re-
quired, he said, are schemes that
give the greatest benefit to the
greatest number of people at the
lowest cost,

Referring to the increasing use
cf B.C.G. in the prevention of
tuberculosis in the colonies, he
said, “We must not live in a
fool’s paradise and think that
because we have B.C.G, all is
well.” Even when a person had
been vaccinated with B.C.G.
there was still a risk that tuber-
culosis could be contracted
through frequent exposure to
active infection,

Professor Heaf warned that it
would require a good deal of
money and extra staff before
tuberculosis could be brought
under control in the colonies.
Besides doctors, more nurses and
technicians were needed, and he
hoped that more people would
take advantage of the training
scholarships offered by the Na-
tional Association for the Pre-
vention of Tuberculosis. It was
far better, he added, that men
and women should come from
the colonies and be trained here
than that we should send out
nurses who could ill be spared,

The need for more medical
staff in the colonies was also re-
ferred to by Mr. Oliver Lyttel-
ton, Secretary of State for the

Colonies, who opened to-day’s
session of the conference.
Discussing the work being

done to control the spread of
tuberculosis in the colonies, he
said, “We suffer in this field, as
in many others, from lack of

staff, and we are making great
efforts to send doctors home to
study the latest methods. We
must spread knowledge, and we
must have schemes which will
enable the local doctors to help
the people they know and serve
in their own territories.” He paid
tribute to the N.A.P.T. for the
help they had given the author-
ities in this work.

Mr. Lyttelton pointed out that
with the decline in the incidence
of malaria, tuberculosis now
heads the list of killer diseases.

rn

by DAVID TEMPLE ROBERTS

cloak of office.

The Rev. Hewlett Johnson is
Dean of Canterbury; he does
not speak for the Church of
England; and he is not head of
the Church of England, as
some people overseas seem to
think.

Moscow must find him val-
uable, though. A _ cartoonist,
this week, had the last word.
He showed a new idea of the
Commissar for Propaganda, A
whole row of Red Deans, fully,
gaitered, were drawn up for
Stalin’s inspection. The demon-
strator was made to echo, sar-

castically, the germ warfare
propaganda, and to plan that
each ‘Red Dean” should bo

dropped in a metal container on
a different Western capital!
4 *

American Victory

The liner ‘United States”
has probably won the Blue
Riband of ‘the Atlantic for
many years to come. People
here with a combative spirit
were rather hoping that the
“Queen Elizabeth” would@ have
a try at the Blue Riband, and
beat the United States. Prob-
ably “Liz” could take a few
hours off the time “Mary” set
but she certainly cannot catch
the “United States”.

The Cunard Company is
maintaining a dignified tone. It
will be several years before a
British ship is ready to chal-
lenge the “United States’s” new
record, In a sense the Ameri-
cam ship is part battleship. It
has been built with a large
military subsidy — because of
its value in wartime as a troop
transport. If the Cunard Com-

pany could obtain a_ similar
Subsidy from the services it
could commission two ships,

But while the Queens are ser-
viceable and fast and, can
each carry a whole division of
troops the British authori-
ties are unlikely to subsidize the
ship owners to build another
Blue Riband ‘challenger,

A much more serious prob-
lem than speed faces the trans-
atlantic shipping lines. Some«
time in 1953 or 1954 the Comet
will start flying the Atlantic.
Then there will be no aerial dis-
comforts to drive passengers to
the ist Class Cabins of the





more than covered by the bal-
ance in hand of $326.73; and, in
addition, the Council is now in
possession of a theatrical ward:
robe which could certainly not
be bought from any costumier
fer the $222.00 entered on the
balance sheet. A total of $67.26
was retained, as previously ar-
ranged, by the Social Welfare
Department of the Barbados
Government in respect of the
two performances given under
iis auspices, and $58.45 by Cod-
rington College for local chari-
ties, and these sums do not ap-
pear in the balance sheet. It
may be added that my small ad-
visory committee and |] prefer-
red that no profits sheuld accrue
to us for the final performance,
which was given before some
300 school children at Queen's
College, or from the sale of pro-



~don’s last





BARBADOS ADVOCATE

It was one of the gravest and

most urgent problems confront-j

ing the authorities in the Co'o-
nial Empire.

“~The stamping out of tubercu-
losis has often been regarded as
& purely medical concern,” th
Colonial Secretary a

vant to state again at su is
in the fight against, tuberculosis
depends upon action by all mem-
community. Over-

bers in a
crowding, lack of fresh air, bad
sanitation or poor feeding, all

contribute to the spread of
disease.

“So far, therefore, from being
a medical matter the problem
extends ‘to many other subjects,
and above all the wide spread
of knowledge is necessary about
the incidence of this terrible
scourge.”

Mr. Lyttelton said there were
signs that the Colonial people
were beginning to be more aware
of the dangers and were willing
to help more whole-heartedly in
the measures intended to over-
come it. There was, however, a
long way to go.

He extended his warmest
praise and gratitude to the vol-
untary organizations which have
been assisting in this work.
“There are few objects which
should attract our sympathy and
our help more than this,” he
said.

Dr. E. D. Pridie, Chief Medi-
cal Officer, Colonial Office, said
tuberculosis was a very serious
public health problem—proba-
bly the gravest problem of all.

“There is no reason whatever
for complacency,” he said, “and
any success there has been in
dealing with tuberculosis should
merely stimulate us to further
efforts.”

The fact that a consultant on
tuberculosis had recently been
appointed in the Colonial Office
indicated the importance the
authorities attached to the dis-
ease.

The tuberculosis problem
should be tackled frora all an-
gles, and each territory should
work out its own plan for deal-
ing with it. But “the closer
Great Britain and the Colonial
territories can work together in
solving the tuberculosis problem
the better.”

Papers were read by Dr. IL.
Briggs, tuberculosis specialist,
Lusaka, Northern Rhodesia, Dr.
V. Hetreed, tuberculosis special-
ist, Lagos, Nigeria, who is in
charge of a tuberculosis survey
in that area, Dr. H, P. F. Fer-
nandes, tuberculosis officer, Brit-
ish Guiana, Dr. P. W. Dill-
Russell, deputy director of
medical services, Nyasaland, Dr.
J. A. R. Lavoipierre, director of
medical services, Mauritus, Dr.
G. H. Garlick, medical director

Singapore Anti - Tuberculosis
Association, Dr. L. G. Poole,
tuberculosis officer, Tamavua

Hospital, Fiji, Dr. M. L. Freed-
man director of médical services,
Bechuanaland, and Dr, W. J.
Vickers, director of medical ser-
vices, Singapore.

Britain

great liners. “Ist Class” will be
doomed. Already it is half-
empty. More and more liners
will have to refit themselves as
“one-class” boats, with tha
gradation of luxury, comfort and
crowding removed.
eo}

From Chicago
‘T think I’m going to win”,
said Ike,
The British Press_‘has
overwhelmingly pro-
in its “unconscious bias”. Cer-
tainly the reporters in Chicago
have tried hard to tell us what
is actually happening. But as
Eisenhower's chaincas hava
risen their reports have grown
increasingly jubilant in tone,
One of the meral assump-
tions in Britain is that Truman
will win.® His “announced de-
cision not to stand again is com-
pletely ignored by the shrewd.
ep ee *

been
ower

Last Clang

Londoners never ioved their
trams like they adore their
buses. The red “dquble-detk-
ers”, that foreigners always feel
are going to fall over as they
weave through the streets are
the recognized badge of London.

But trams clang. Trams are
noisy, Trams were always
shabby, and usually had wooden
seats. And they were soon
driven out of central London to
the great chartless -wastes of
South London, The fashionable
Londoner often takes buses, But
the tram he hardly touched—
save for a rare ride down the
embankment.

But last Sunday night Lon-
tram saited, (that
seems the right verb!) through
the dark streets of South Lon-
don to its final depot at New
Cross. The Mayer, the press
poomersree and a crowd of
undreds. waited to greet the
last tram on its way to oblivion,
The time was half past mid-
night. We were paying homage.
Very suitably, the last tram
arrived, at last, twenty-five
minutes late, ang overcrowded.
Thousands tried to board it
along the route, Indeed all the
day, Londoners with nostalgic
tastes for childhood, waited for
- of their last trams in order
o savour again, (without the
need to visit Glasgow or Black-
pool) the lollipop delights of
riding on top.
haphictbestitnpelias sted
grammes at any performance.

You will appreciate that my
purpose in making these facts
public is not to show how clever
we all were, but simply to dem-
onstrate that at could have
been regarded as a “highbrow”
production which could only be
put on because British Council
finances were at the back of it
did in fact ‘urn out to be a mo-
mey-making concern. It does
seem that others contemplating
a similar production need not be
deterred by fear of financial loss,

I should perhaps end by saying
that the British Counci! is noi
recouping itself for the original
subvention, and the sum of
$326.73 is thus available for fu-
ture needs in the furtherance of
the drama in Barbados.

RISELY TUCKER.














“MALAYA—The Facts

LONDON,

A suitable sub-title for the new official
publication, “Malaya—the Facts Behind the
Fighting”, might be: “An Intelligent Man’s
Guide to the Unknown War.” For this slim
volume of facts and figures about the Malay-
an emergency obviously assumes no previous
knowledge.

The facts are presented in the question and
answer form so dear to Government publi-
cists. They begin with the vital statistics of
the fighting forces engaged—25,000 British
soldiers, sailors and airmen, 10,000 Gurkhas,
five battalions of the Malay Regiment, two
battalions of the King’s African Rifles and
one battalion of the Fiji Infantry Regiment.

The next question asks what these forces
are doing in Malaya, and the reader is told,
with disarming simplicity, “Exterminating

; oe «
Communist terrorists.

Fortunately, the booklet goes on to give
some useful information on the background
to the emergency. It relates how the “shoot-
ing war” started when the Malayan Com-
munist Party failed in their attempt to gain
control of the country through the trade
unions.

There is good reason to believe, it goes on,
that the decision to abandon “peaceful pene-
tration” in favour of open terrorism was
taken at the Second Congress of the Com-
munist Party of India, which was held under
cover of the Calcutta Youth Festival in
Merch 1948,

When one comes to the question: “What
would the loss of Malaya mean?” one finds
the highly-publicised economic wealth of the
country relegated to fourth place in the list
of reasons why Britain is determined to elim-
inate the Communist menace.

The first three reasons are as follows:

1, That with world affairs as they are,
the loss of any territory to the Communists
would be serious: :

2. That the loss of Malaya would soon

lead to Communist domination of the whole
stretch of southern Asia between India and
China; and
3. That a Communist Malaya means
Communism across one of the world’s main
highways. It means a centre of Communist
infection right down among the East Indian
islands. And it means that Australia and
New Zealand are directly menaced.
A fifth reason why it would be a bad thing
if the Communists gained control of Malaya
is “simply that the people of Malaya don’t
want Communism.” ‘

For the rest, the booklet isa well-illustrat-
ed and informative account of the problems
encountered in combatting the terrorists—
“it is worse than looking for a needle in a
haystack”—and the progress madé in reset-
tling several hundred thousand Chinese
squatters.

One learns that the war is costing £40,000
a day, that the Communists have totally fail-
ed in their main objective of creating eco-
nomic chaos as a prelude to seizing power,”
and that social services in the Colony “are
good enough for Malaya to claim the best
health and education satistics in South-
East Asia.”

Under the question: “What About Malaya’s
Future?” the booklet is less informative. It
restates that the political aim is for Malaya
‘o become a fully self-governing nation, but
warns that there are “unusual difficulties” to
be overcome before this can be achieved.

If in style and format the booklet looks
rather like a “popular version” of a Govern-
ment White Paper it is something that should
not be held against it. On the contrary. There
‘s much in it of intense interest—especially,
perhaps, to the wives, mothers and sweet-
hearts of those who are fighting there.

Nor should it be criticised on the grounu.
‘hat its information is of the “basic” type
There is a great need for just that sort of
information—though one might be excused
for wondering why the Government has
waited so long before giving it.

If there is any serious criticism to be made
it is that the booklet costs one shilling. The
facts behind the fighting in Malaya should
be more widely known—and by more, people
than are willing to pay one shilling to learn
them.

lt Is Now The Customs Who
Are ‘Wonderful’ —

Britain's Policemen Have Rivals

THE men who ask “Anything to declare”
a thousand times a day at London’s airports
are taking top place from Britain’s police-
men in the esteem of visitors from all parts
of the world.

Travellers are going home full of praise
fur the courtesy and friendliness of the Cus-
toms officers.

Typical comment from an American
business. man before taking off for New
York was: “Your Customs officers are a first-
class advertisement for Britain.

“When I came in it took them exactly
three minutes to clear my luggage.

“And Americans I met while in London
told me they found British Customs the
quickest and most efficient to negotiate.”

British visitors to New York find it takes
anything up to two hours to pass through
controls at the airport.

At London Airport the average time for a
passenger to complete formalities is twenty
minutes. And the Customs part of it norm-
—L.ES.



ally takes under five minutes.

TUESDAY, JULY 22, 1952

PLES OE SOG OES CELE LPC SPIE

On Sale at ADVOCATE STATIONERY.
DSO LOSPOSOSEELEP OD EL ELE PEDP ELLE LPL PPE PLS PDEE



|
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PAN BOOKS.

The Widest Selection in Town.

When We have this Wide Selection!
GALVANISED CORRUGATED SHEETS
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Gauge: 26 — 28 — 30
ALUMINUM SHEETS

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Also GALVANIZED ROLL TOP RIDGING,
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RESTS AND WATERHEADS.

C. S. PITCHER & CO. Ph. 1472





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Ymportance of Being Earnest —

Although the Flouse of Da Costa lay stress
on She Importance of Being Garnest
every day and every month of the year —

And this, it is felt, is reflected in the

Company s buying policy, with a resultant
excellent vartety of stock in all departments
and, most important, at prices within reach

of all —

So naturally, Da Costa & Co, Lid. deem

it timely to suggest to the general public
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this week to see and judge for themselves,
all that is meant by —

“THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING EARNEST”








>
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Easy to Prepare SPECIALS
a Eales Tomato Soup, 802—22
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pthtangesN! wt Chocolate Nut Roll 14c.
Weet-a-bix each
Pablum Italian Ketchup 46c.
Farex Italian Chili Sauce 74c.
Bacon Prepared Mustard 25c.
Calves Liver She t Gelatine 24c. per
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———


TUESDAY, - JULY -22,

1962 .



ilearing Of Writ For Contempt Of Court Coni

@ From Page 3

Case Law, ‘hey must of necessity
try to discover what the position
was in England. His Lordship ex-
plained that it was entirely. dif-
ferent from wha‘ it was here, and
Mr. Reece rejoined that it was
entirely different on the question
of procedure, but not upon the
question of punishment. In Eng-
land the Judge or Judges found
the man guilty or not guilty of
the contempt complained of and
the Order was made absolute or
not absolute. Similarly in Barba-
dos the jury found him guilty or
not guilty as the case might be,
and then came the question of
punishment,

In England the question of pun-
ishment was through the instru-
ment of a Writ issued through the
Court. In Barbados the punish-
ment was stated and the Judge
then came into the matter and
determined what the punishment
should be.

When Mr. Reece attempted to
refer to a case in point, His Lord-
ship pointed out that the judges,
disagreeing with the Court below,
considered that the matter com-
plained of was prejudicial to the
trial of the action, but said that
in their view there was a techni-
cal contempt, but that in the cir-
cumstances of the case, they were
not going to proceed any further
and they added that it would have
been better if the defendant in
the action had not applied for the
Order,



Real Contempt

Mr. Reece submitted that that
meant a verdict of “not guilty”,
because all three of the Judges
said “not guilty’ and that there
must be a real and substantial
contempt of Court, and that a
contempt which is technical is not
ong of which the Court should
take notice.” As he’ had argued
‘earlier, in not making the Order
absolute, they had really said not
guilty.

His Lordship pointed out that
“they did not say that” and add-
ed that in their view the matter
complained of was prejudicial to
the action, but they said further
that it amounted toa _ technical
contemp!; it was of such a nature
that they would not proceed fur-
ther, and they were not going to

punish.
Mr. Reece submitted that if it
was a technical contempt they

should have made the Order ab-
solute, and on the question of pun-

ishment say that they did not
think so and so. He submitted

further that the jury as the judg-
es of the case could say in view
of the circumstances, that there
was no contempt, and that the
words complained of were never

likely, or could never tend to
prejudice.
His Lordship again reminded

Mr. Reece that the judges did not
say so, and that they had said
that the matter was prejudicial,
but Mr. Reece rejoined that he
had read passages from “Fry”, and
he did not think it could be more
clearly stated. That might be a
question of law where the offence
although trivial, amounted to a
contempt.
question of law, in Barbados, it
was the function of the jury. Pun-
ishment was something which
could only flow from the time the
Order was made absolute,

Principle Recognised

Tt was a principle which was
recognised, even in very small
matters, Mr. Reece said. And, he
added: “Anybody who studies
the Police Magistrate’s Act would
know that a police magistrate has
the right to say not guilty despite
the evidence.”

Concluding his argument on the
point, Mr, Reece submitted that in
the case before the jury, if it was
a question of a technical contempt
the jury had a perfect right te say
not guilty. The question of pun-
ishment, he said, was not their
concern, So long as a man was
guilty, the Writ of attachment was
issued. In Barbados, as soon as he
was found guilty, the judge came
into play, and he then expressed
his view on the question of pun-
ishment. He submitted that that
was the correct position when
Lord Justice Cotton said that un-
der the circumstances “we do not
find any reason why a Writ of
Attachment should be issued,

He recalled that when he left
off on the adjournment being
taken, he was about to deal with
the article in question, a portion
of which was complained of by
the plaintiff. He was submitting
then, and he submitted to them
again, that there was nothing in
the article which any twelve men
of average intelligence could find




Gee!! Gils!!

If You only realise

The Importance of Being Earnest

about the

Home

Decorations

You certainly would

immediately select these:-

SISAL PLACE MATS @

” ” ” ose

GLASS MATS

”

Also CANELILY PLACE MATS @ .............

On the facts and the’

Sas es aiuabh dose eiady abies 72 each
xs op vans oa a repadveagh 60 ,,
CL laa sian’ ee
hs
de 9: angeaesalerceaieans 6»

that it was likely to pervert the
course of justice.

Reading From Article

Directing the attention of the
jury to the article, he asked “what
do we find in here?” Mr. Reece
read from the article “It has been
my custom for the past two years
to have a talk at the énd of the
licensing year and before you
come for the renewal of licences
ete., and appealed to the jury to
put themselves in the position of
ihe man who read the article on
the morning of the 13th, the day
after the speech had been deliv-
ered by Colonel Michelin.

He asked them to suppose that
they were driving on the morning
the article appeared in the Press,
end say whether they felt within
themselves that the words com-
plained of in the setting in which
they were, would or could tend,
or could be calculated to make
them convict a man charged either
with manslaughter or anything
else.

His Lardship reminded Mr
Reece that the question was not
whether those words tended to
convict, but whether they tended
to prejudice, and Mr. Reece sub-
mitted that some of the judges
had definitely used words to that
effect,

He told the jury that they were
trying the issue, and assured
them that he was not trying to
put anything to them that he
should not. He asked them if they
were driving on the morning of
the 13th June, whether the words
would tend, or would be likely to
interfere with the discharge of
their duty as a jury, and so cause
the course of justice to be per-
verted,

His Lordship again reminded
Mr. Reece that it was not whether
the jury would tend to pervert
the course of justice, but whether
the words complained of would
so tend,

Replying Mr. Reece said he
might be wrong, but as he under-
stood it, and as he interpreted the
law, the question was whether
the persons who were summoned
as jurors would be likely to be
effected in their judgment whea
the matter came before them, He
was asking the jury that same
question.

He wanted to say right away
that the article should be read
as a whole, end then, having read
it, the question was whether the
words complained of tended to
affect the course of justice.

Expressed Opinion

He mentioned that any opin-
ion expressed by any witness, no
matter who he was, whether it
was Colonel Michelin or a wit-
ness for the prosecution, or be
it another person, whether a wit-
ness or not, could in no way
affect their opinion on the words.
In other words, whatever might
have actuated Colonel Michelin;
or whether he would or would
not use those words again,
whether Mr. Vanterpool express-
ed any opinion either in the Press
or otherwise, that did not affect
the issue.

The issue, Mr, Reece, submit-
ted, was a very simple one. “Do
these words tend or are they like-
ly to pollute the stream of justice,
or that they may, he would pul
it no higher, prevent, or hinder
justice from being done when the
other case came before them or
some other jury. *

He emphasised once more that
the case against Mr. Haddock,
whatever the nature, was not be-
fore them, The facts in that case,
whether he be found guilty or
not—the nature of the facts in
that case were absolutely nothing
to do with them.

Fact And Comment

There they kad in a newspaper
a siatement of fact and comment.
It could be no two ways about it.
Some of the statement were
facts. He asked “What person
hearing of this very sad occur-
rence would not make some ex-
clamation, some expression signi-
fying his or her horror? Look at
it however you like, it is seldom
that three children are removed
at the same time from any
cause,” Mr. Reece said.

He expressed the belief that
anybody throughout the length
and breadth of the is’and would
have given expression of their
feelings in some ways or other,
and argued that to say that a
person using the words “ghastly”
and “eppaliing” in relation to the
cudden death of three children,







frcm whatever cause such sud-
den death came, that such a per-
son would thereby be likely to
pollute the streams of justice, was
“ridiculous.”

Mr, Reece appealed te the jury
to examine the article not with
the gid of an Oxford and Cam-
bridge Dictionary, or with the aid
of the c’ean brain which ‘is pos-
sible to read into the words and
sentences” a certain meaning, be-
cause it wat not the duty of a
jury trying the issue to do so, but
rather to read it as ordinary mea
would read it.

Out of Context

He reminded them that a sen-
tence taken out of iy; context
might be capable to any meaning
under given circumstances, but
when they had it in relation to
the article or the Report, then
of course it was an ebtirely
different matter.

He told them that when they
looked at the article in its entirety
and in the surrounding circum-
stances, there was absolutely
nothing in point of fact, to say
nothing of point of law, He asked
whether there was anything in
that article, so stromsz, so start-
ling or outstanding as to make
the man in the street, or any per-
son who might be likely to sit on
a jury not approach his task with
the right judicial mind.

He asked further: “Do you
think as he is sitting there in the
jury box, discharging his func-
tion which jis almost judicial, that
he weuld fail to discharge that
duty according to the oath which
he has taken, or that this article
would even tend to make him do
that, or tend to do it, or would be
likely to cause him to do it?”

There it was, he said. It was a
fact beyond dispute that the three
children died on the day in ques-
tion, “Is there any mention in that
article,” he asked, “as to how
they came by their death apart
from what is stated therein? Is
there any mention of Haddock
by name?” Mr. Reece however
pointed’ out that it was not
necessary to mention his name,
and that a mere inference was
all that was necessary.

He submitted that the Advocate
in printing the article did so in
support of a good cause, and in
keeping with their motto, “for
the cause that needs resistance.”

It was no border tine case, Mr.
Reece said. He submitted that it
was no case at all of contempt.
No matter how it was read, it
could never amount to contempt,
taking into consideration the facts
and circumstances of te case,
He ‘invited them to return a ver-
dict of “not guilty” for the Advo-
cate Company Limited.

At 3 p.m. Mr. Reece concluded
his address, and on hearing from
Mr. Walcott that he would not
be replying, preferring to err
on the side of caution rather then
deal with the cases which he had
already dealt with, and in view of
the fact that Mr, Reece had not
cited any further cases, His Lord-
ship adiourned further hearing
until 1030 o'clock this morning
when he will sum up to the jury.

Woman Dies
After Accident

NINETY-YEAR-OLD Florence
O’Brien of Black Rock, St. Michael,
died at the General Hospital at
about 4.20 a.m. on Sunday after
being involved in an accident
along Barbarees Road, St. Michael,
at about 7.45 ‘p.m. on Saturday
with a bicycle owned and ridden
by Albert Gibbs of Mansion
Place, Bay Land, St. Michael.

A post mortem examination was
performed by Dr. A. S. Cato and
an inquiry is fixed for Wednesday.







WHAT’S ON TODAY

Court of Common Pleas—10.30
a.m.

Meeting of Legislative Coun-
cil—2.00 p.m.

Meeting of House of Assemi-
bly—3.00 p.m.

Basket Ball at Y¥.M.P.C.—
7,30 p.m.









HOME PRODUCTS

CAVE
SHEPHERD
ooo. Le



DEPT,

10-13 BROAD ST,



BARBADOS

“Trinidad
Has Good
Sugar Crap

Trinidad has had a reasonably
it was not
to tne
weather, Mr. A. R. Starck, U.K.
Trade Commissioner for the Brit-

good sugar crop but
up to expectations owing

ADVOCATE



WEEK-END
THER TS

SIMON
Hali

GONZALVES of Bus
reperted to the Police that
sycle valued $60 was stoler
¢ outside the house of Julian
Massiah at Cheapside Road, St.
Michael 9.40 and 9.55
om
De
tion,





on Sat



ae ael, reported that










ish West Indies told the Advo- Cisht fowls valued $40 were stolen
cate yesterday morning fre his fowl-house at the same
: e lontatio sae nee ¥ .
Mr. Starck arrived here from Sie aes be wween Las ee
Prinide, Bis headauertets, ina, 000 Oey SNe hy se am. 9 OURS
transit for Antigua, St. Kitts and el sod 837 wea stolen
St. Lucia where he has gone on 4 : & Tohn hast
routine visit. 1 Sunday. he inci-
He said that trade in ‘trinidad eae es by Dottin ¢
is reasonably good, but like ail Rae teh Rhctow Weucel
Gther- parts of the West: Indies: 5 oo ne ee thats uarin
there is evidence of over-siock- oF Ginth siinis an hour ah ae
ing and some caution in buying yajie of seg. 14 jen: from

among traders. This, however, in

; ; : the Lady Jor on Friday.
his view, is temporary and the ‘The articles are the property of
problem will solve itself in the Noel and Phillip Sarnco's of t
near future. same vessel. It was anchored in

Mr. Starck who returned
Trinidad on Thursday after

week's visit to Bermuda, said that
an extremely

it has had

MR. A. R. STARCK

tourist season.

paign particularly

good



The island carries
out an intensive publicity cam-
in Nortna









transit for Trinidad.

At the airport to meet them were
Mr. L. A. Lynch, Life Vice-Presi-
dent of the A.A.A.B., Mr, Gilmour
Rocheford, Honorary Secretary
and a number of cyclists,

CHARTER AIR
SERVICE PLANNED
FOR SURINAM



America on which it spends a
great deal of money, but this SURINAM,
shows dividends as is demon- Private Dutch interes © pre-

strated by the amount of money
into circula-

which visitors put

tion, initially two‘or three passenge:
Imports planes, provided the Governme:

Last year, the imports of the cisetcine oeleased ae = Sahl ‘

colony were worth over £10,000,- of 109,000 guilders, Since the pr

000 which for a_ resident popu- posed ‘air service would meet

laticn of less than 40,000 people gcute need for a means oi

fs fantastic. But it does serve to tiansportaiion for passenge i

show how valuab’e the tourist freight, states the World Ban!

trade is to the colony. Mission in its report, the projeci
Imports this year are UD, should be given a priority and

compared with last year, and if pushed forward promptly.

they continue at the present — aia

scale, Bermuda will have a re-

cord in her history.
“Responsible people

=



pared to operate a charter ai
service within Surinam, utilising





“This confidence is fully justified
An@vife regard to the effors

in the which are made, not only to bring

island are very confident of their tourists to ‘the island, but to cater

ability to continue to attract for them in a first class mann°:
tourists” he said and added: when they are in the colony.”



| GLA

WE HAVE



ALL





g

rues

cade he De Ge. QUI

iHe death occurred yesterds

f Mr. Mi. OT. OG Viahon, M.A,
tormirly Secretary of the Edu
cation Board, afler a short ilin

i$ in fais seventiy~irst

Michae. Thomas Greaves Mano):
was educated at Harrison Colleg
and Codrington College wher
he won an Island Scholarsh:
Leaving Codrington he became
Headmaster of the Alleyne
School in 1904 but came to his o!
school Harrison College as an As-
sisiant Master in 1908. Anothe
four years found him Secretar)
of the then Education Board an
it was here he made his greate:
contribution to education in th.
island.

It was regarded as a high tri
bute to the public spiritednes
of men in this island when it wa
said and with much truth tha
the Government of Barbados wa
really in the hands,of her Boards.

year.













to the Careenage at the time of the Of these, it will be realised th
a incident. the Education Board was one
hs *) most important. And it was
not merely because of its func-
‘ i 2 » . tions but because of the standar
Cyclists Returi of amictiney: with which ‘th:
i hic
7 re. Board carried out its duties. M
From Martinique winon baa’ tiitowea ‘the Rov.
Nichols as Secretary and whe
Four Barbadian cyelists, Darn- pouquets were being thrown ¢
ley Simari, John Skinner, Duncan the Education Board for the ex-
ss — aoe Brathwaite, e-lient standard which had bee
returned from Martinique yester~ paintained, the members of th:
day afiernoon by B.W.I.A, after Board new that Se great ex
takin g part in ae OTe Prix, the +ont it meont that ye efficienc
155 kilometer cycle event. ni 2s based on the thoroughness +
Accompanying them was Assist- o >
C B th ratory. “Milew* Mohon. o
ant Manager C, E, Jemmott who , : 4 i
c , mow? %t merely to h
is also Assistant Secretary of the AubhSbipredeiwa satya
Amateur Athletic Association of {"''â„¢M2 6s bul | foreughot
Barbados, . : Ret et ee ct UDR
D. Schuler, the Trinidad repre- “) Nee 9nd those who shared an
sentative at the meeting arrived work with him knew that he de
here by the same opportunity in- Monded from them nothing whic

ha

AiA

Aste vawnad

Duringshis years as Secretar)
he sometimes acted at Harrison
College and while he was gentl
in his manner he was the teache:
with whom boys did not “play
pranks”,

When he retired and the Board
was superseded by a Department
Mr. Mahon continued to give any
avsistance he could and his experi

not An in hie



ence was of great value to thos
who had to launch the new systen
of administration,

In recent year ivancing year
limited his activities but he sti
prosided as Examiner wheney

he was asked. A few weeks ag
he was taken ill with pneumonic
and he died yesterday,
He was married to Miss Reece
vughter of Rev. Reece and had
me son who lost his life in th:
of the Second Wort
and several daughters.
His funeral took place at th
Westbury Cemetery vyestetda,s
afternoon where the last rite
were performed by Bishop Bent-
Cc, C, Conliffe in tt
presence of a large and distinguish
A esthering while the fleda eo
hyireinecs horees in the Citv wer
Aown nt half-maet during the dav
To

anther



ley and Rev

hi corrowines widow arc

Aeepest

il he extended,

re'ativas sympath:



THE RICH VITAMEIN.PACKED

LOAVES OF DELICIOUS HREAD
BAKED IN

J«R BAKERIES

ene

SS

SSWARE

PLAIN AND DECORATED

JUST RECEIVED

A WIDE RANGE OF

UTILITY ITEMS INCLUDING—

SALAD PLATES
MEASURING CUPS
SALT & PEPPER SETS
ASH TRAYS



ICE CREAM GLASSES
MIXING BOWLS
FLOWER VASES
REFRIGERATOR
BOTTLES

TUMBLERS—ALL SIZES, COCKTAIL TO 1 PINT CAPACITY

ALSO





WOLD LO CSOUVOO OO UELUL D DLVOYO ED LUV LD PUY YW OCUDT

| KITCHEN AND TABLE

Cy
ala 3





SALAD DISHES
GLASS JARS
JUG & TUMBLER SETS

“PYREX” AND “PHOENIX” HEATPROOF GLASSWARE :

PIE PLATES, SOUP PLATES, DINNER PLATES, RAMEXINS, OPEN ‘
DISHES, CASSEROLES, MIXING BOWLS, CUSTARD CUPS. ETC. gi ae

See US First for all YOUR GLASSWARE REQUIREMENTS “rth

4

F
’ ¢
| H A R R : S O N HARDWARE DEPARTMENT

DEG ABBA OVO SOE} 448490 FF8O9OO4

TEL.

OBE8DO®OLEOOOS3O0OO44

2364



6 FINE BLENDS TO CHOOSE FROM:
Sole Agents: MESSRS

Only Scotland, traditional home of fine tobaccos, could
produce Four Square. Only in Four Square tobaccos
will you find selected leaf, blended with skill handed
down by successive generations for over 140 years,

FOUR. SQUARE

TOBACCOS

A. S. BRYDI
P.O. POX 403, BRIDG:







‘

PLIES EEL EO Kee ph Oe

PLLA LAP SSS

CAS

g





PARRADOS

A HORSE OWNER |

SHOULD BE

A HORSE LOVER

We Highly Recommend

HARVEY'S WATTS
EMBROCATION

For the treatment of Curbs,

Capped Hocks, Ete.

It is also an excellent application for Windgalls,

Thoeroughpins and the Swelling from Sprung
Hock Joints of horses.

PRICE 12/6 AND 6/6 AT

KNIGHTS DRUG

Se



Splints, Sprains,

STORES

=

a if









MACE BY DOBIE OF PAISLEY
SONS (BARBADOS) LTD.





‘

|

OVID OBOI OOS 1S 590 990959959OG0000R)
JUST OPENED

BIRKMYRE CANVAS
72” WIDE—FOR BUS TOPS and SIDES
INNER HOOD LINING

56” WIDE. FAWN AND GREY 2

%

%

LIONIDE LEATHERETTE

my

50° WIDE. ATTRACTIVE SHADES. N

>

>

} BLACK MIRACLE. ADHESIVE

1%-OZ. or 5-OZ. TUBES












8 §
: ECKSTEIN BROTHERS
$ BAY STREET — DIAL 4269 §
Robddensiibai kenekuiissebiiaidiiieacediada susie
+” $0004 : 1900 DOO
; THE ONLY CYCLE IN THE WORLD =
: PERMITTED TO CARRY
THIS MARK OF

PERFECTION
IS. THE —
: The Aristocrat of all Bicycles
:
: ;
; + $

FULL 3

, RANGE OF ¢



KRemember—Ii'’s

HAR

3999099490 OO4

SIZES
IN STOCK

RISON'S for HUMBERS



>

1922 OOSGS 0000909 OOO




CLASSIFIED ADS.

i
TELEPHONE 2508 ; j



















a





BARBADOS







F




























ADVOCATE
PUBLIC SALES (|PURLIC NeTICES! LosT & FOUND





















TUESDAY, JULY 22, 1952



Sore Mouth SHIPPING NOTICES



REAL ESTATE reliable Company ¢*tablished in ~ . . | aie
lg aan nl agg me 5 i i dala ik a oe 7 ; ee ae cea oan cro : LOST | .poese Bloody Teeth | as oh Loan bad OSS S SP > - »
‘ ° hoe or ervices of ¢ etent ar e. enced - —— moreecenons —— | . : LEALAN LIMITED.
. DIED j . | pCALCUCHIMA On the Rockley Coast. itanager for Branch Office’ to be| _B.T.C CE TICKET—Series FFF| , Viceding Gums, Sore Mouth and | (M.A.NZ. LENE)
: roan SALE } . . ee at . established in Barbados end Septems. | 4040 for midsummer meeting im Bush 6 nue mean = Fae may
GOODING—On July 21, 1952, Beatrice | ‘Saaae wie race 952. Please send fu ails and) Hall Yard Gap. Finder kindly return 9 *ys Soe hak tans eae ‘a | 8S. “GLOUCESTER” ts scheduled to The M/V CARIBBEE will accept
Gooding. Her funeral will leave her) ee sisepiehinid CUMUEIE Gig. Seceeet ie lary required with Passport | to the Adveeate Advertising Department. | aa ue te aan ome tecth te | #il fom Port Pirie May 3ist, Devonport cargo and passengers for Dominica,
late residence Lameaster Piantation - : ie : age Mon thy . cture to Advocate T. c/o; - eee a oe il out and may also cause Rheu- une Sth, Melbourne June I4th, Sydney Antigua, St. Kitts, sens and
tMousd, St, James, at 4.45 for St.} t ‘ ine ole clan de gegiyr ‘ ivocate Co 19.7, 52-108 TS—2 Barbades Turf Club Mid : noch | une 2th, Lrisbane July Sth, arriving at Montsertat. Salling on the 28nd
- # Parish Church. No Flowers AUTOMOTIVE j a lpn ae ; = ga- ~ ee - 7500—7501 reer yr Satdiac’ tie ie o | sarbados ‘about August 6th. July 1962.
by request, | -- - ~ + -——- ‘ Saath ane ia ie se return, Pierre Pointe ¢/v ; ids sore mou! uickly tieht-
Gladys Outram, Dorothy Gooding. CAR—Vauxhall Velox. Green. Late ial Be Sy Bg Aye eee e w NCE a oval Store, No. 12 High Street ' ns t eth. nop eek sparen , | in fo gpl A gars ge Bow ned oe veee M/‘V MONEKA “2 accept cargo
- i850, Owner driven and well kept. whet junie et Er we ae aen Pg BP ivounscinentes Amosal ust mal urmouth wet | end passengers for Dominiea,
WORRELL, — On ist July, 1952.) Appi’ Courtesy Garage. Phone 116 koe 3 ; Tee. with Basins & Importation from U.K. of CORN SiFl SWEEPSTAKE © TEHCKRET. - Series end save your tee Py money book TONER: SEBS, Antigua, St. Kitts, Nevis and
Emmeline Worrell, of Belleplaine | 18.7.52~6n — x . =) 1 see Stone oe LERS and we ghaill appreciate it if'e 2” Finder please return same ‘dj on return of empty pac * ie } Cargo accepted on through Bills of Montserrat. Sailing on the 24th
St. Afgrew. The funeral leaves her) ——-——— tke aca eo Ty yes ants ender will ene Straughan, Braggs Hitt, $t.,Jngeph.+ Amosan from your chemist toda | Lading fee transHipment at Trinidad to July 1952
late miidence at 4 Peleck this eve-| CAR—One Proicet Ford 199 model.|ncon,’ Everite Root Al Condition |. auirements to us immediately. 2.79% -ly , Yee guarantee protects you >ritish Guians, Leeward and Windward
ning for St. Andrew's Church./ A-1 Condition, Practically New, Owner | peor yay eg OG, And. Condition COURTESY GARAGE, — $$ slands. 2
Friend’ are invited. { Briven Price $800, Owner leaving ax bat ene Si — ga White Park SaaS For further particulars apply— BW.1. SCHOONER OWNERS
Rosalind Jordan, Augusta Jordan! i:and Contact Smith's Garage, Roe- | 2%), pa aA ps RR A ar 20.7 \ ASSOCIATION (INC)
“Sisters}, Lioyd Worrell ‘Son at} vick St. 99,7 Ph.) Now's Bedwnoin ene binaalen, al a EXAMINATION NOTICE | CURNESS WITHY @ CO., LTD., Consignee:
U.S.A), Eudalie Alleyne (Cousin). | Car pon. | 1/8 Acre, Going Under £1.10. AT} NOTICE |‘ TRENTDAD. adele
CAR—Austin A-40 Somerset Car, Done J roe : 3k Appiications w is ¢ th ané m
} LIGHTFOY Xx LANE A 2 Bedroam pplica will be received by t
IN MEMORIAM jeniy 1600 miles. Dia) 9210, 4162. T. H. | Cottage, Govis Water, Rlectricigy, Very | Clerk of the Vestry up to la moon) m Next LP.S. Shorthand )})), DA COSTA & CO., LTD.
aneiesiail aia ana { as 22.7 .52—2n | Good Condition, Can Remain, Very t« iday, Ist Augusi, 1952 for:-- Exam. takes place on Satur- 4 ieee



ALIEYNE—In loving memory of Cuth-j





CAR— r-de Li (X+ 88) ood . . hae! ms iebe? j

hat SEA. Abeipe. whe sell AiteDt win car nee cash beet eee bot for Almost anything in Kea) St. Michael's Girls’ School, now

Long’ days, long nights he bore his{ smaller car. First class order, owner Real Estate Agent, “Olive Rou tast-| 2. Any Vestry Scholarship at the
aa ; aiven, Dial 3359. ings 26.7, 62--In. 4 same School which may become} ©
Waited for cure but all in vain, | $15 BOS 5% Oren trea or) ae Ge Se Sees reat te

i 3 at SE 7 (70) §& e n. the es andidates must e
Until = Himself saw what was CARS—One wm sree nrasee sain aheiae wos Ltd. Hubert B rishioners in straitened cncerenopies
And@= took my dear with him to} ("ee reading 14,000 miles, battery and) Finch 20.7.52--2n |end must not be less than 9 wears nor
|

‘res in A-l condition, price
soe (1) Ford “Prefect” $400.00,

2,000 00
excel- |



rest.” ‘
Ever to be remembered by Iris Alleyni i lent buy at this price.











j Land Rent



The undersigned will





Going Under One Archer Gittens Scholarsinip ¢







more than 10% years of age on Ist
offer for sale}














eae oe 4 aT oie gj at their office, No. 17, High Street,!tisma} Certificate which must’ accom-
ALLEYNE—In loving memory of my | aa oe (2950) Ltd., 19,7 a | Bridgetown, on Friday, the 25th July | pany the application.
dear beloved mother Levinia Matilds , '*'9* . an "- | 1952, at 2 p.m ails | Forms x sppiieation win be vases
wi yparted this life on 2Iet July, t a ee ee eer The dwellinghouse called “VENTNOR” | end received a e Vestry Clerk's Office
1961. oie ‘5 ‘ at 5 ~pgeerey ag al aa condi- | with the land whereon the same stand | between the hours of 10 a.m. andwJ2
We cannot Lord thy purpose see, naan : - 5 | containing by admeasurement 4,093 | (noon)
hut all ip well that’s done by thes. ! yine {sland _ Contact David: Bo Rice. | square feet or thereabouts situate xt | E, C. REDMAN,
Ever to be remembered by Doris Skeete; - B Rice & Co, a —tfn- | the Corner of Pine Road and ist Avenue, | Clerk, St Michael's, Vestry.
ghter), Elaine, Audie, Cena —————————————— ie ne Ug
Winslow Hobert “(Grangeniidren) and {| CARS—Austin A-40 in very good ne ection on Mondays, Wednesdays} — inaiae -
family. 22.7. 5a—1n ee Going cheap. Owner left the | oi priduys between the hours of 4 and LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE}
stand, 6 p.m. on application to the tenant ' cn f i “$s
Etaoin Monday Fs etic |, Netgleg 10 fae, Macatent comaiion |" Ror hiring pactewars sd conationn|, The, appestion of, Lawson, ane
= a ed nlover at 2 seater n gair f enle ¢ ly to , Br etor ba wn, &§ 0 » -
Witenes Rethie Risen at Temidna, | CQRT ROYAL GARAGE LED, Telephone |°f "He apply tor chaser of liquor license No. 648 of 1952
Her™ funeral took place yesterda 504. 17.7,52—4n | . 10.7. 52—8n, | Stanted to Alfred Da Silva in respect |
aion ‘at ae Westbury Ceme- igi i) a if a wall building situate at Cox Road,

re
FERGUSON TRACTORS-—Just arrived
nd can be scen at COURTESY GARAGE

tery. 22.7.52—1n
(Trinidad Guardian please copy




























































































!
Ls n their Office No. 17 High Street, on Frida - reported on ai according to the nature and priority thereoi respectively,
| ul 4616 f 20 7 58—tn. the 25th July are P. Pa by pubis } baits ae ree Peoria at awe sherwilll such persons Will be precluded from the benefits of any decree and be
a ~ - , o 4 2 2 . win _o . : y
PERSONAI MORRIS OXFORD SALOON, dome oer een we eg ee soed equore |and to use the said license at such last | °cPrived of all claims on or a said. property.
4 vnly 2,700 mijes and as new. Owner | feet of land at George: titres t, Belleville, | deseribed premises. ' Plaii t ESELSENE and
: Ga havens “aataad arsine | aq! Cr EGY BREAGH. | St: Michael. ‘The Dwellinghouge contains | Dated this 18th day of July, i962 Defendant: CRESENCO COPPIN
The fiiblic are herebs warned against | <9 90.90. Dial 4616, COURTESY GARAGE gallery, drawing and dining rooms, two | T0:-—C DDER E*q., f of » lar
giv credit to my wife VERA Mc}; ee nnctnitiaheeel - = r 7 ve | Police Magistrate, Dist. “B” that certain pieeé or parcel of land part of the lands of a
St . I de 1] A i 7 a bedrooms, (one with running water), \ , ‘S: 7 or known by the name of “THE RISK" situate in
1 SH (nee STRAKER) as 0 not} ONE (1! Austin two ton truci: and one | jsten toilet and bath. Electric lMght Sed.) L. I. BRERETON
hold myself responsible for her or any-!;;; Austin A40 Car. ‘Telephone 4921 Seen See ath e ig { Applicant. in this Is: gonveinizig by Se Than an apenas
one .else_contracting any debt or debiv 1) y. geott & Co,, Ltd “inspection on application to Mr,| .N.B.—This application will ne con- Ww. tA 4 4 Pe Baa At tt ang id BONNE.
in my n@meé unicss by « written order 26,8. 52--t.f.n 4 + eo ridered at the Licensing Court to be . eyor) eres x erches. Abutting an joun
eigned RR. ' eal a — {H- A. M. Lashley by phoning 4007 | held on Friday, Ist day of August, 1983 ing on North on formerly of the estate of James L. Gaskin deceased
oe. sr * aia az err anes Hine Wor further particulars and conditions | Ohh eases e ; ered but now of the of one Burrowes deceased on lands of Elizabeth
ee Main tr “44 t , \TRUC™--Chevrolet truck, no reason-} 4¢ sale apply to: ha ees Gee re i en One ee a ee COTILE CATEORD: & CO., ares > W. RUDDER Ha Ot. T. Burrowes deceased and Liian Webb respectively
ole P27 ey | it 6--ain Police Magis: rate, Dist. “B.” on the Mats, of Seeets Besrawes and Kitty Piggott but now of
i K 2 . .7,52-~ > e Theow George Gaskin but now of A. L.
The public ste hereby warned again ELECTRICAS L TREVOR", Black Rock, St. Michael } an rbd and all apcretions ze jhe sare area by ie
7 ife, Gwendol: ‘T . Black Rock, St. Micha 0 } eC samme may be up to high water mark; the
giving oehe* Watson) “ do tot hola Just received new shipment of Garrarcd | desirable bungalow-type Dwelling- WAC TED | said Dy the Public Road running North and
myself responsible for her or anyo. thiee speed Automatic Changers at house, ee on 3 roods 30 Deedee tikes i | So ; Together with the messuage, or |
« ary 4 > . 8. fei 0. Ltd. Radio Em- | d, and containing open marble-tiled ‘y "+ and all and every the erections
Ores cates by oor uit : eee ME eC 15.6.52—t.f.n. | verandah to North and East, drawing ; ph lana and built standing and being and
my 7 end dining rooms, 3 bedrooms (each with reel of land (also part of the said’
signed by me. | Ss pa
Sed SAMUEL JACKMAN JUST ARRIVED “Pye” De Luxe|]running water), and usual conveniences, | HELP pla oe i ‘ aie cotitaming by estimation 4 Acres
SPA: > Boseobelle, St. Peter , Ultra-Modern Radiv-Grams (wiih Ger-| ‘all on one flat), and, on ground, level, er neennnnnenns | pia ea ( it of the area shown on the said plan to
22.7.52-—21 :d 3-speed changers) Two Pickup Heads | *pacious Kitchen, breakfast room, "wash-) = CasHIER AND OFFICI ASSISTANT-- | corveade : ) on the East on lands of Oxnard
eS needle worries, in utiractive walnu;| 700m, store room &c. Electrielty, Gas! viele or Female. Apply by letter and in| wd On now or late of Philip Johnson et al on the North
PCCHEMONML [ihet, 2 Matters th 2 Le" | Sec AE Wee ae COE soya (See ne aes oat eae eeu Wart cde Me hoe
3420.00, P. C. 8. MAFFEL & CO., LTD Fore OF wi aR, SERV NS ~ reet. 7, . the ; : on the West on lands late o: rs,
Pr; . He ) Street {fewl house, flower garden, lawp, and; 0 , ¥ 4 Nl, Mary Green and Charlies Branch
se TL Wah Menry Sees 28.6.52--t.f.n. | orchard, in spacious yard, OVERSEER WELDER—For Fairfield | Hae $ fi tesa Tnniv deceased, J. Lawrence, the
ALEXANDRA SCHOOL Lileaibeibeeai asians ; _—.. | The house and outbulld ngs have just Pactony, St. Luey. Successful Applicant | ~ vie Marsha, ‘M. Tul, thé estate of E.
“ ; RS—7 ¢ een repeired and painted throughout. i) take up appointment on 17th respe reel-of land con-
The following candidates have gained ger ere Fa ee a Oke one nh | Inspection any day (except Sunday Au soiuel Apply: Menasar | Burrowes deceased, and one b oe ae 33 ‘Coppin (former
admission (8 the Alexanatn, Sctopi;—- |‘! Sesled, units © yess guarantee. 25) SOP mn) to 4 pam, on apeliention to. “Ue 20.7. 58—8n. tg@iniag J Agr 8. Perches devised. bye ciaine Clarke ond on: RUAGKE 0
1. BATSON, Loraine Athena. ee Venta bine wre oges8 00 the Caretaker on the premises. — — | ata he artecay groans cyhar nN aa Rinkrose Vaughn or however els:
2. BEST, Avaunda Doreen. pa om 7 : nia 1 Rood 64 perches of Land opposit 5 land dev: y hi el of land
t Royal Gara Ltd, Telephon: | : 5 : . | THIRDLY ALL THAT certain other parce
3. BOYCE, Audrie Eudora. Bort): Rev ge Ltd, | Tplephon:| , "REVOR" at b ack Tock MISCELLANEOUS } L ze fg abutting. and Tandy. of tui RUSK" containing by, estimation
< ‘ . oa HT via The ebove propertte € om } ’ 7 ‘ow Ian now or e ewste
See ecia Evelyi PYE BATTERY SETS—Just a few left | by P npetition nt WANTED TO RENT } 1 Acte More om Risk’ on lands now of late ot Many Ann Knight and
8. CLEMENT, Inez Eunice “AFFEI'S RADIO EMVORIUM. ;O James eet, Bridgetown, on | BUNGALOW —Three Room Bungalow i lands of one Tull or however else the same is abutting the said severa
3 SORBEN: Soar orgeni eet DARW SoD kt CE [ atienden so neee OF See eect | parcels of land heréditament-s and premises being the property of {he
9. GUMBERBATCH, Vashte Naom! | “rrr | aon Gotitors. | Laat Sitees “pretteied, teem Coieter, |, ieaaam
18: TWICK, Hazel ‘Patricia Ruth TWO (2) New Electric Floor Polishers. | i8.7.62—7n ong OK. D te is Ea ste 157, | Bill Piled, Ist July, 1952.
il, EVELYN, Margaret Isabel. Phone 4148. SE cae Reet ass een ae becodatt Dated 2ist July, 1952, a. Wickes
12. GRAHAMy Jean Henrietta. pee 100 BARBADOS FOUNDRY LAD. repent tEdeienerashie —— | Registrar-in-Chancery.
13) GREPFITH, Carmilla Alinda. LIVESTOCK SHARES. 30 POCKET MONE\ casily earned ! 22,7. 5240
14. HINDS, vleen Glivia. Netifeeudtibsinisalentaletawents — 150 BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE -ecommending 25 new subseribers te ee A ON
15. HUSBANDS, Margaret Francina. CALF—One well bred Holstein heifer | COTTON FAC LTD., EDIFE USION in one month } as SSOP SSPESSO FOP POP OS IFS OE!
16: i aoe, Ortin Loree valf two weeks old, out of good milk-| 135 BARBADOS FTA INSURANCE L.7.82-6n. | \SCGOSSIOHROSSOSISGSSSS
17. , Brenda Lareta. og strain, Dial 3008, The Rex Dairy | co... UTD. RES an _—aome amas ot i
18. LISLIE, Sheila Yvonne Mothersall Turning, St. Michael. 250 BARBADOS SHIPPING & PEDIFFUSION offers 31.60 cash for! ° A Beautiful assortment of - -
19, RICE, Melinda Diana. 22.7. 53—2: TRADING CO, LTD, SHARES eel new Subseriber recommended by | \
®. SINCKLER, Maxine Jenice | 3 2100 ST. GEORGE'S PARISH a 1.7,62—6n. | LEMONADE SETS
s Pabst Biists ermine. | uA oa pie seas MS APs’ | a BP eaD aw tomago 4 SGRLLSETYGUR TREE
; . Farr! s' mine. | Milech Goat. Phone 4760. 22.7 | 2 & TO mee 9 SUPPLEMENT YOUR COME. by) \
2. 7 . Carmen Euleen. ——|} BONDS ree ending REDIFFUSION, Obtain | } ook at them in our Show
2, OTHY, Joan Olivette ECH ICAL | @ £20 JRINEDAD & TOBAGO 4 full particulars from the REDIFFUSION | just received, Have a 1 th
2S. BSTER, Joan Carole. MECHANIC BONDS office ix Window, then buy.
“8. WILSON, Gracie Alecia. FILING SYSTEM . lat The above mentioned sharea wil! be set Sais i j &
s ona’ asked -MsS—C: > p> rang » for sal a > ic . on re "
t bee vet mA camtpeervaeenie the | Shannon filing and cant ‘syeem. Man] cea ne aoe " aise akon ae WENTY-FIVE DOLLARS extra e * EMPORIUM
o bring their daughters/wa e fflc ; re aay the. 26th July, 1952 at 2 p.m | fromm Rediffusion for 25 tecommenda Tae CE
School at 9.30 a.m. on Monday, Sep-| tome. office, or business. Supplies fo | Carrington & Sealy, Lueas Sireet tions in one calendar month ‘
tember 16th, 1952. any kind cf filing record keeping. Come | 1) jc getown. 24.7 Benn. | 17 1.7.52--0n. | ,
wie 22.7 Sain, |p and discuss your requirements, ov | ts | - ieee} Corner Broad and Tudor Sts.
— ‘ uN te o. }
Lower Broud strset. “Gat va th AORN ! OR RENY | 266509:6604606666600555655509S0095999G5 9005 9G8O THN)
— | ~—--——~----—------ - j A |
REALTORS LIMITED GRASS MOWERS — Masse;-Harris 5 | We have received instructions to sel: | | = PR nce nr nn
i vidth cut Trailer and p.t.o, type fo |. Auction a Four roomed Bourd anc | |
AUCTION SALE mmediate delivery. Courtesy Garage shingle House. at Tam arind, Road. | HOUSES
20.7.52—6n Hansehell’® Land, Fagle Mall, St. ch- | “ 7 1
nel. Land rented at ten shillings, pes} _ a ea oe ee tne UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF
hagas the sand duly, by order,of POULTRY quarter, | Sale at 2 p.m. on Wednesda. | “Attractive seaside Flat main road Has: |
On Tuesday, the 22n uly, by order ©: 2srd. July ash on the fail jo “| tings somfortably shed, Pnglis %
Mr, on Millet, we will sell the furni . | Hammer. John M. Bladon & Co., Auc ith. ones Verantink eae oe guise EXTRA-MURAL DEPARTMENT
ture and household effects at Mr. B, A POULTRY -~ Barred Plymouth Rocl: ! ¢ioneers 20.7 Liao ons (or coupl F July 1
Brooks’ residence “ADULO" at Venino | “ullets, $6.00 each. Excellent Cd lechote Me age Ree A Lectire
Hill, Rockley, which ineludes Drawiny J trains, John Alleyne, Ebworth, UNDER THE DIAMOND |
room suite consisting of three chairs and ‘‘eter. Phone 91—20 any day except ‘i —Dayrelis Road. FX hed |
settee to seat two, plastic top table, threc Sunday, 20.7.52—2n. | HAMMER - rn * aarconie Brawn by
carved pedestal Ashtrays tables, four } f will sell wy publ auction on Dining, breakfast rooms, | Kitchen, p
dining room chairs, all im bireh | Vradnesd next 23rd July begin Gktage. cehal cukivenionses Phone S317 JUDGE J. W. B. CHENERY, B.A.
birch table with ee eae aan MISCELLANEOUS | 12,30 o’clock at Crane Villa, near 22.7,52—1n. on
mahogany table, painte ’ — | Hotel, St. Philip an entire lot of house a
table, one simmons double bed, with CHIFFEROBE—. srican bab: hiff- | old turniture which includes: Pp CARTREFF—Strathelyde Drive, cqn- |
slumbering spring, two single beds} che op press Saieten bee Maple |holstered sofa and chair, wall se aining gallery, drawing and " aining SELF-GOVERNMENT AND THE JAMAICAN
one Birch dressing table, China tea set.) 1 ig, ” phone 2808. 22.7.52—2n. | iahog, dining table and 6 chair na, 3 bedrooms, toilet, bath & kitchen. |
salad bowls, fruit. dishes and \variou e ea ____ «| painted dining table and 6 chairs, Sick Yial Mrs. Puckerin 3663. | PROPOSALS
table ~ ar mm cD at dae sar aeie JUST received a shipment of Garr board, tea trolley, lady's desk, painter 19,7.52—n. |
table, ‘mahogany chest o nwers, per hree speed Changers, secure one now.! Wardrobes, dressing tables And StOO)S, | eens ’ *
fection three burner ail seve, ope gre Also a eaat) cuantti of o volt batter) | bedside tables, chegt of drawers, doub! ONE (1) JOHNSON’S Beautifloor Blec- at the British Council, Wakefield
7 cubic foot general electric refrigera in {record players. Both the above with | bedstead with spring and spring fillec| tric floor Polisher, For terms phone on
bon of ee, an Ns ih er ee nagnetic heads ittress, kitchen cupboards pacar 1748 19.7,52—3n.
able lamp an , at DaCOSTA & CO. LTD., chatrs, kitchen utensils, cutlery, glasy- Lan—eliccnantpicdenrarimctitiod
kitehen utensils and many other items, Elect, Dept |ware ‘and other itema of interest . ROOMS—Hastings. Furnished or Un- ' Wednesday, July 23rd
‘TEE EAE se eectian 20-7.82—0n. | Terms CASH, D'ARCY ‘A. SCOTT,| (urvished. With or without Meals {Hy at 8.15 pm
| Auctioneer, 19.7.52—4n Phone 3317. 22.7.52-—In, | ' co .
PDDODBODOGPRS OHSS OSOOY, | Tate ob yards ‘for 120, Buttons 12¢ | 5 ist : ADMISSION:. .FREE
GAS ber dozen, Buckles Ge each, Canadiar | ~ oF
THE COOKER astic Belts 36c each Modern Dres
ihoppe, Broad Street. “ee eCSISHSSSSOSSSS os







RAINCOATS — Children’s | Raincoat
2.40, Misses’ Raincoats $3.60, Ladies |
Telegraph, Englond’s leading Daily News-

|

With Everything U Want





size ‘sincoats $3.88 in blue, maize, green
LOOKS ! rhite and florals. The Modern Dres
THEIMOSTATIC CONTROL | shoppe, Broad Street. 20.7.52-—2n
and {t's essay to keep clean r one “8
See them before it's too late, ‘| SUBSCRIBE now to the Dally

At your Gas Showroom, Bay

Street ¢ vaper. now arriving in Barbados by. Air

ir EY. caly a ew jays after pul ication a

SOLy sae. & | -ondon. Copies oe yes C/o, ert

7 9-9O00OOOH cate Co. Ltd, a epresentative
V®EBHOLCOOED ON el, atte. . 11.4.52—t.£.n



BEDDING GIFT—A few ironing beard
nd No-cord iron sets, subject to specia

wedding-gift allowance, A Barnes &








Act no get relief ina few short }\0., Lid. 4.9.52—t.f.n
hours . Chase’s Kitdey-tives ——— ;
laxative in. theytrent | ot AWE









WWNOURCEMEN TS





\

eigattoney pain

} BARN BIG MONBY by selling Pedi!

} ‘usion in your spare time. Get a suppl
ae of forms today, L.7.52—6n. 5





e

?.ot%
ALS:






TODAY'S NEWS BLAS | igs





\ G ¢
sandy Spencer nee i On eot

SAIL subseribera: te. TINE aud ‘

L Magaziges. whe wWiyh to }'

1 Leal their ter on ». Should 4 Tenia mini tel
end © )) Le je ‘ 4ce8 .
a thelr a WAL. TICES ) ne pietes bur BIND Arde
5 a8 to avoid having to pay the \§ ane bleak? "
neW advance rate demanded by ({!} | (1# Stops ble ;



Tits



SMahers,

_ BEST QUALITY BRASS

ion the



or] 1s
Hepouitton
ruga@iat tode

noesitive
tbs

ke

STATIONTRY

: JONSON'S
: : ond

HAKDWARE
-

A: att {sion your
aims Bnd troutles er thorey b
tarn of empily packaim.






FOR SALE

- NO. 27, BROAD STREET





The undersigned will offer
High Street, Bridgetown, on P
2.30-p.m.,

“OPHE MESSUAGE OR STOWE known as No, 27, Broad
Street, Bridgetown, standing o» 4,340 square feet or there-
abouts ahd at present occupied by Messrs, T. R. Evans,

sale at their Office, No. 17,
lay the 25th July, 1952, at



Inspection on application on the premises.
For further particulars and conditions of sale, apply to:—

COTTLE, CATFORD & CO.



The undersigned









Ch. within District “B’ for



; ~t for sale at|Ch pen
will offer for sale ot) ission (0 tse the said Meense af.































































































fowl be glad ‘jou assed cox
: eR BP 2 e, 99
Ovaltine Biscuits

t
Be



SN een net Ae
STH ae



BLP OS PESO SPT S SSS





fed park
digestible and sustair



exceptional noprshing.qu |









ome from t es edient |
cluding a pr aot deTbions |

Ovaltine "the world’s finest food
overage |
: \
or all occasions there is nothing |

i» : jnite so Gainty, add: appetiz ne

i AO ; Ovaltine * Biseuits. |
ae jet }

a i f ee . ‘ . ‘
‘ ijt ie ae i hot Pil
the ails § aye y Je 1 a ey. |
; OR ‘ Ae ‘h y :





eee

AE A ONERE



day, August 2nd, 1952, at
Combermere at 11 a.m.
Next Typewriting Exam.

» Vitamin Bl is a world:
renoy.ned appetite restorer.

ao Combi : ; takes place on Saturday,
San awricls blood-b uild- August 30th, 1952, at Com-
& minerais you have the bermere.
a ; :
ey to joyous buoyant | Cc. B. ROCK,



having or claiming any. estate, ri;

affecting the property hereinaft:

bring before me an attount of
nuchers to be examined by
! rion and 3 o'clock in the afternoon at the Registration









health, Sole LP.S. (Pitmans)
itive,

Representa’
Oistin Hill, Ch. Ch.
22.7.52—2n,

OFFICIAL NOTICE

IN THE COURT GF CHANCERY
In pursuance of the Chancery





DARBADOS

me on any Tuesday or Friday





Barbados. Amateur Boxing Assn.
Under the patronage of
CANADA DRY

Invite
Entries for the . 1952 CHAMPIONSHIPS
to be held at

THE MODERN HIGH SCHOOL STADIUM

during the month of August at a date to be announced later
; Chemeionehipn vat be contested in the following divisions:

t — under 112 lbs,
Bantamweight — » 118 ,
Featherweight — » 1236 |,

Ligutw: — » 185 ,
Welterweight — ., 47 , ,
Middleweight Bk og A oie
Light Heavyweight— ,, 175 ,,
Heavy — over 175 _,,

intending competitors are asked to call at Modern High School
for Entry Forms any afternoon 4—5 p.m.

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF THE WEST INDIES

EXTRA-MURAL DEPARTMENT

THE CHILD, THE PARENT, AND THE
TEACHER
A Lecture

by
J. B, NICOL, O.B.E.

on
THE CHILD AT SCHOOL,

Thursday, July 24th, British Council, Wakefield, 5 p.m.
ADMISSION: 1 - a lecture (except to those who have
paid fees for the course)



Act, 1906 I do hereby give notice to all persons
ight or interest or any lien or incumbrance in or
mentioned (the property of the defendant) to
heir claims with their witnesses. documents and
‘een ‘the hours of

} 12 icé, Public Buildings,
Bridgetown, balers agate day of September, 1952 in order that such claims may be














Â¥,






















NEW YORK SERVICE.
A STEAMER sails 20 June—arrives @.irbados ist July.
| NEW ORLEANS SERVIOE.
| Ba 21st June.
| Seco Re eu hcg An sme
} :

(a mente rare NEE





CANADIAN SERVICE

SOUTHBOUND
8. FROM
S/S “SAPHO” J uly 3!
3 Rie: om | =
iss *
“A a augist 12th Sn he
oN STEAMER” pur

August 9th for oe SO, N.B.. and

ST LAWRENCE RIVER PORTS

ee

ROBERT THOM LTD.— NEW YORK & GULF SERVICE
Apply:— DA COSTA & CO., LTD. CANADIAN SERVICE







CANADIAN SERVICE
From. Montreal and Halifax.















ee
Expected Arrival
Montreal Halifax Bridgeton:
3 A 2 : fi .~ duly 2t July 6 Att®ust
WV “BRUNO” 2 ° 1 Aug. 4 August 22 Al
»<. “SUNDIAL” 14 August 19 August 3 tember
“Vv “BRUNO” 30 Aug. 4 Sept. 16 September
U.K. SERVICE
From South Wales, Liverpool and Glasgow.
South Expected Arriva\
Wales Liverpool Glasgow Dates Bridgetown,
s. “SUNWHIT” +.30June 5SJuly 9 July 23 July
8. DRARLA DE
RRINAGA”" +. 26 July o. July S August 19 A st
S.S. “STUG. ates! ive MAGE SM t 26 August 9 September
8.8, SEABREEZE” ..Early September. Mid Mid

U.K. AND CONTINENTAL SERVICE
From Middlesbrough, Antwerp, Rotterdam and London.



y Middles- Rotter- baaaaes ibd
brough Antwerp dam London
5 wn
3.8. “SPURT’ , 8 July 10 July 12 July 16July.. 3 <
2.8. ..° . a — Mid Aug. End A Tee
S.S. “SUNADELR” — Mid Sept. End E Oe!
-e-.,-—_- ———



SELLS ESS FD +

-,

SRLS

KESOD

ore

or




Roofing

including :

aterials
@ Aluminum Sheets

® Galvanized Sheets
® Everite Sheets

See Us Now and Stop those Leaks

PLANTATIONS LTD.



TWO BARGAINS

oa

A NICE WHITE CREPE 80 cents
and
Another CREPE in White ard
Coloured
at 80 Cenis the yard

The above are both 36 Inches wide and are subject
to our usual 5% discount.

You are advised to secure your requirements early
as we only have a limited quantity which we pur-
chased at a greatly reduced price.

+
TAYLOR LTD.

A. E.



DIAL 4100
$
x Where
ix Quality is HIGH
x And
ss Prices are LOW!!! %
3596066656606 555669S6S95699S 9999S TOOWE SOS HOOOFSOSS!


































eS weet ee a ee ae se Se

TUESDAY, JULY 22, 1952 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE SEVEN
; . ! eR SS LT LL eT

HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON







TOAST TO
YOUR
HEALTH!!

ur WINCARNIS Whe

ASSIST YOU TO GUARD IT
BUY A BOTTLE TO-DAY.

THE FLYING SQUAD....



AEY-LOOK!
ISN'T THAT &





















YOU'RE DEAD!
4 SAW you o1eE!!





BLONDIE







HLTH!
i

I wouner >) N
ce




IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE |

WHAT WERE



=





eS oS A SS ES TT

"SUPPER > SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Monday to Wednesday only





SPECIAL OFFERS are now available at our Iranches White Park,
Tweedside, Speightsiown and Swan Street








Usually Now CAMPBELL'S SOUPS:

ac ey ¢ Cream of Asparagus, Beef, Chicken Rice, Cr. of

BACON—per ED: ssisssisscssavsenoivre $1.33 $1.20 Chicken, Cr. of Mushroom Pepper Pot, Con-
. ioe ‘ ‘ ‘ or somme ‘ AG,
STRINGLESS BEANS —Tins 39 36 Tomato 32
>. Tine 3 30 Cooked Macaroni with Cheese— Large ‘ 34
TOMATO JUICE—Tins ...... 33 m Cooked Macaroni with Cheese—Small 23
MM Ror 1.23 1.18 Cooked Spaghetti with Cheese—Large 31
BY DAN BARRY TONO—Tins........... ... Cooked Spaghetti with Cheese—Small : 21
DRINKING STRAWS. Vegetable Salad in Mayonnaise—Large a 55
—500 per pkg. 80 72 Vegetable Salad In Mayonnaise—Small ; 3h

WHY... THE 2 as Baked Beans—Large . .


















VR RE © cipdivibeascivanscoveasescs. goat 30 26 Baked Beans—Small

D. V. SCOTT & Go.

RE A TOOT TEES FREER
=

REACTOR SEEMS OKAY!
SHE'S WARMING UP! L
HOPE FLASH GETS _4
HERE BEFORE WE
WAKE THIS WHOLE CiTy/

iy ‘
THIS SHIPS A
LITTLE RUSTY,
TEX... BUT SHE
SEEMS TO BE
RESPONDING /







FP WH... THAT
A. NOISE / WHAT'S

y BLASTING // COME HERE!
HAPPENING (

AT ONCE /

Â¥ EARTHSHIP! ITS oo
L. ENGINES ARE GUARDS!
\ c
\ °
°
\











PRACTICAL HOME
sui s ecco] Sue ine ces | AND
: REPAIRS

TO GET IT! A BUTLER CARRY

With this book as a guide, you can be certain
of good results and create the kind of home
you've always longed for—at an outlay well
within your means ! You can learn how to
bring your rich new beauty into every room,
how to choose the best colour schemes and
furnishing, how to lend distinctive charm to
odd corners or attic bedrooms, From damp-
proofing walls to fixing curtain pelmets, from
painting the floors to renovating the floors,

7

this book gives information from A—-Z

SACHY FOR
WORKING UPAN
APPETITE!






















1'D LIKE TO. GET
My HANDS ON YOUR

$500 !!








HE DOES! HE NEVER
GAVE ME MY SHARE
OF THE LOOT FROM






NOW ON SALE =

ADVOCATE STATIONERY
|

LENDING /T HE OWES YOu
#s500f |

TO one ee

| }



WELL- I a
WHO SAID UNDERSTOOD |
ANYTHING ABOUT) \ YOL! ‘To SAY
/

iia,




SOLE AGENTS



INTERNATIONAL TRADING CORPORATION — LIMITED

—_—_—














: ‘| [NEVER HEARD OF ) A DANCER... SHE'S INSIDE
a Wesint eed HER... WHAT'S SHE / NOW, REHEARSING,..COME ‘J
Sy} GREAT L do? I'LL GHOW YOUs..

s MANGLER! | f= "~~

oi
GHE'S
TERRIFIC!



NIGHT WATCHMAN
COMING # HURRY!











Freedom from anxiet
of personal hygiene is «
the woman of to f
years the name F
confidence in all w
that these pré
protection and
ASK YOUR CHEM
Sole Distribut
THE INTERNAT L
CORPORATION
Itco Bu
BRIDGETOWN, BARBA

ifaty



rELEPH
PAGE EIGHT



2 Centuries Scored In
Intermediate Division

TWO CENTURIES were scored when the fourth round
of games in the Intermediate Division opened on Saturday.

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Unknown American Wins

BAILEY FINISHES

~L00m.

SECOND >

TUESDAY, JULY 22,

1952



Final



SURREY MAY BEAT MIDDLESEX

LONDON, July 21.
Even with their four test play-
ers still absent Surrey still look
like being too good for Middlesex

paved the way for Surrey’s first
innings’ lead of 91. Fishlock ir
his last season and in what will
be his last appearance at Lords,

r "i ~ }plus Denis Compton at Lord’s. At failed by only five to obtain his
IN THIRD PLA CE DIVISION Sports Window |the close of the second day Mid- century,
4 dlesex held a slender 70 run lead Successful batsmen today were

Mr. T. A. D. Gale, Advertising Manager of the Advocate
is at present in Helsinki covering the Olympic Games.

HELSINKI, July 21.

On Saturday the fourth series
xf Second Division games opened
at the various grounds.

Combermere played Y.M.P.C. at
Combermere. The Beckles Road

Harrison College and Har-
rison College Old Boys are
scheduled to meet tonight at
Y.M.P.C. at 7.30 in a First
Division Basketball fixture.
The other match will be Pi-

with only five wickets in hand.
Veteran Fishlock, former Eng-
land batsman, was the man who

THE WEATHER



Yorkshire’s Teq Lester who made
114 against Sussex.

Two days sufficed for Worcester
to beat their near neighbours .and
last season’s County champion-
ship winners Warwick.

: 2G SM at IN WHAT MUST HAVE BEEN one of the closest of] team was first to bat. They kneck- | tates vs. ¥.M.P.C.
— poe 0 leher gl Ege agen ar pintd hrm g = pal finishes over the Olympic 100 metres final oft referred to|ed up 181 runs. D. Edghill, one cf The Harrison College--Col- REPORT Scoreboard
dapace y P ; 8 as the championship for the title “The fastest man in the] the opening batsmen, scored. a lege Old Boys match will be YESTERDAY.

CABLE AND WIRELESS

in their match against

Carlton at Boarded Hall, repeated their third round per-
formance by being bowled out cheaply in their first innings.

The Cable team made

76 in their first innings. In

reply Carlton have lost eight wickets for 139 runs.

world” was won by an almost unknown American Lindy

Remigino.

It took the judges several minutes

while they

consulted a photo finish picture before they finally an-

nounced the winner
McKenley who is f
came second.

and to add to the surprise Herbert
ar the more famous as a 400 metre man,

valuable 63 before being out leg
before to R. Fields. G. Greenidge
knocked up 24 while Mandeville
made 22,

Bowling for the school team,
Callender took four wickets for
35 runs in 13 overs and four balls,

interesting as the results will
help to decide whether College
will win the Challenge Cup.
College must win this match
and their other match to beat
Carlton on goal averages.

In their last encounter Col-



Rainfall from Codrington: nil
Total Rainfall for Month to
date: 2.63 ins.

} Highest Temperature: 86.5 °F.
Lowest Temperature: 72.5 °F.
Wind Velocity 10 miles per

ho’

|

Worcester beat Warwick by ten
wickets — Warwick 155 and ‘149
Worcester 280 and 28. for no
wickets.

Middlesex vs. Surrey: Middle-
sex 192 and 161 for 5: Surrey 283.

Leicester vs. Derby: Derby 284

G. Matthews had a very suc- ‘ . i hree beat College Old Boys by ur and 26 for 1; Leicester 302.
cessful bowling spell. He sent wicket and they added 116 runs Third, much to the disappoint- was fourth. But perhaps the mos! + Gmesides and © Burke ac a point, ’ Barometer (9 a.m.) 29.988 Seite vs. Yorks: Notts 383;
down nine overs, five balls and for the fifth wicket, This partner- RMeDenaia Bailey of Trinidad Sivbaby eae — ¢ all was the oo cesponsible for the colla of the ; (8 pm.) 20.950 Yorks 448 for ,7.

i tcteate ‘ shi - ; eae é rst four com ; , : =
= six io for 32 runs. = coppice the Park team to as usual was rupning for Great clocked 10.4 Snag Rusieee Com . team in their first « SHOOTING TO-DAY oan ee oe rents ee
olin Cox took three wickets for make 181 runs. Britain. B. P. Smith of the U.S.A. Kharov, fifth, and John Treloar of tii od Cae ne made 86. RIFLE SHOO Sunrise: 5.49 a.m. .;.-lemar:

mine runs in three overs.

Chase made 172 before being



Australia who was last, both re-

{ Harewood topseored with 19.



Essex vs. Glamorgan: Glamor-

The Cable & Wireless team: had caught by Evelyn off the bowling Greenii sent down eight overs af gan 217 and 123 for 6; Essex 293.
gery thaky start MeKensie of Parmer.” Wood mace Stl] Olympics Diary. | sini Biter e ttoaitied MS and tooxtseven ‘wickets tor 28 Ten Qualify For || Matt ue Kent ‘vs, Lancashire: Lanca-
and B. Matthews opened but Bowling for Windward N. coveted prize, much the same as 122: O. Burke captured three for High Tide: 3.00 am., 4.52 p.m shire 471 for 7 declared; Kent 191

they were both out
runs were scored.

before any

r 222 and 73 for 2; Northants 330
in and scored three before being balls. competition, semi- however still has the 200 metres ir i A. House Competi- 5 j
bowled by Gordon Matthews, Windward in reply have lost finals) to go for and the present indica- ee te tae ak, oe oe won So wen seven rounds to _

Knight Topscores
It was Knight and King, who
by their fighting manner, saved
the Cable team from even worse

i ) i iq- complete team
disgrace. They carried the score : 10 am. TRACK AND FIE awe rit i , overs of which three were maid- compicte | . =
to 44 before the partnership was , B+ Del. Inniss scored a century (discus, qussAvten caine tae on alten. te comet ens. E. Hinds took two for 9 runs | The position Ff ee owat OF BEING EARNEST
broken, Knight topscored with 19 se ae RRS eto 10 a.m. WRESTLING (free back in the second heat yesterday {? gight aera ce and L. King buy a iipearea by Capt. Warn-
while Kin contributed 17. Mere eee ie style to gain a elose vict . ‘wo for two runs in one over and o ; . ; -
Branker scorei 12. and a valu, 129 before being run out. Pick- | 1pm. YAORTING dore Bast of Holland aed vente: three balls, cr, 2,688; Red, | skippered. by ABOUT YOUR COMFORT EVEN
ale 13 came from byes, legs Wick occupied the wicket for the 3pm. GYMNASTIcs returned the same 10.4. To-day ,_ Central have so far made 143 eed ci by Lt Cok. Connell;
ie aaa entire day and have lost eight | 3 p.am--FENCING (foil, | in the Semi-Final, however, he for the loss of three wickets. C, siippered by tN. Cor, coun. ON AN ORDINARY STROLL....
Carlton in reply knocked up Wickets for 333 runs. C. S. Green- team = competition, | ‘vas beaten by McKenley in the Goddard, an opening batsman, Capt. Jordan, 2,586 points.
139 runs and still have two ‘18¢ scored 38 and G. Moore 39. final same time and it was therefore all made 41 before being run out. C. “Conditions Saturday on the

wickets in hand. A. C. Browne
topscored with 50 which includ-

ihornton captured seven wickets

Croney came !2r 40 runs in 18 overs and two

two wickets for 73 runs. The not
cut batsmen are R. Atkinson 29
and E. Evelyn 37.

C. Skinner and
teok the wickets for Spartan.

N. Medford

Bowling for Combermere Sealy
took three wickets for 66 runs



Wednesday, July a2

8 a.m.

FENCING (foil, team



8a.m. GYMNASTICS
9am. MODERN PEN-
TATHLON (fencing)

9am. BOWING (semi-
finals

)
3 p.m. TRACK AND PIELD
(200 m. heats, pole

it did for Barney Ewell at the
London Olympics in 1948, Bailey

tions are that he will succeed,

Remigino, who not even his own ,

eountrymen knew much about be-
fore the Olympics began, first gave
notice of his ability when he ran

the more surprising when he won
the final. Remigino is the force-

10 runs in five overs.
At Vaucluse Central met Pick-
wick. Pickwick were all out in

opener M. Lashley made 27 and
1. B. Lashley 16. L. Hoad con-
tributed 12.

Bowling for Central V. King
took five wickets for seven in 8

Hinds has 44 not out to his credit
whiie F, Storey contributed 20.
The wickets were taken by

Skill Shoot Badges

Low Tide: 10.10 a.m., 9.59 p.m.





and 142 for 5.

Northants vs. Sussex: Sussex



“ount at 200, 500 and 600 yards,
Green House headed the table
with a very fine score of 465. This
was the only House to field a

whole were good but light gave
some trouble at 500 and 600





“THE IMPORTANCE



CALLS FOR A PAIR OF ....




















ce ot -, in 11 overs. O. Wilkinson took vault. final; 100 m. ful type of runner who leaves no ¢ ‘
ed eight fours and a Six. Burke Tid fein GN ins 1k ween: ladies, semi-finals: doubt that he is putting every- Jackie Hoad and Willie Wells for ro ts tise feeloanig bal i
has 27 not out to his credit whiie ; i aatciedl i e- $6 and 17 ri The eigh P
diseus, final; 5,000 | thing he has into it. His style re- an runs respectively. apt. C. R..E., Warner 96, Lt, E. ;
Harding and Kenny Hutchinson caBLE & WIRELESS vs. CARLTON heads: i ; i Capt. C. R.-E, it : ;
L ‘ m., heats; 100m.. la- minded me something of John R. Goddard 95, Mr. G. F. Pilgrim ' 4
scored 22 and 21 respectively. Cerna” ere eels ‘ sep dies, final 200 m., 2nd Goddard as he appears to run with EMPIRE—LODGE 94 Major J. BE. Griffith 93, Mr. ‘
to. King was the most suc. “Seen, Or B wicnete) ee heats) more strength than speed. He also | Empire played Lodge at Bank j’w Syassell 93, Mr. G. E. Mar-
cessful bowler for the Cable team. McKenzie ¢ Kennedy b Edghill 0 4pm. ROWING (seni- holds his head forward and {ft Hall. The school batted first and {j,'92 p.c. O, shepherd 91 and
He took 3 wickets for 19 runs in a Baibens GM Rie aes 2 finals) would not be surprising to learn were all out for 92. Mr. Hoyos Sgt. E E. Edwards 91.
seven overs of which two were Knignt 1b.w. b G. Matthews 19 7 pam. WRESTLING (free that by doing this he just won. ‘topscored with an undefeated 23. “7, the N.R.A. Non-Central ONLY
maidens. H. King took two for 41 H. King lb.w., b G. Matthews 17 style) McKenley’s fine and consistent Bowling for Empire, N. Skeete Competition the above eight and
in 16 overs while B. Matthews Brenker bg geasinens ” 7 pm. HOCKEY (match for showing in the 100 metres is ex- took four for 45 in 12 overs. L. tyo others have qualified for Skill
and Branker captured one each R 1. "M. Clarke Lb.w., b ©. Cox 6 3rd place). ceptional, as it is seldom that as rae wled three overs and Shoot Badges. The other two are: }
for 26 and 31 respectively. N. T. Clarke Lb.w.. b C. Cox 0 a man grows older he improves on four and took three wic- Major A DeV. Chase 90 and Mr
At the Garrison, Barbados ?: Archer © wipr.’ Marshall. b G ==" short distance instead of longer kets for four runs. M. G. Tucker 90. .
Regiment played Police. The high- 7. King nat out” 0 M. Grichlow ¢ Branker b 1. Burke 4 Ones. Although it was very good In reply Empire scored 148 be~- Owing to the B.T.C. Races,
light of the game was a_ hat Extras 13 Burrowes ¢ Branker b R Austin 3 for Jamaica to get the second fore declaring. R. Norville top- which have disorganised the pro-
trick by E, Denny. In his sixth kaa << Maen Tie Rhee 16 place in this important event, one scored with 56. H, Brewster made gramme, the next shoot will be Sad
over he took the wickets. of y ee Chase b R. Austin , wonders if McKenley’s preference 36 not out and E. Jones 21. on August 16. This will also be AT
Price, Bispham and Weekes. BOWLING ANALYSIS Wiltshire run out for sprints will not jeopardise the For Lodge, C. Deane and V. a Spoon Shoot at 300, 500 and 600
a ' . Oo M R. Wz atcon b K, A. Branker chances of his team in the all-im- Brookes took two wickets each for yards
Regiment were all out in_theit ~ aratthews a5 1 82 6 Todd not out tant 1,600 metres rel t ae : AVE
first innings for 128 runs. Police Gagniil ee ae Knight lbw. K. A, Branker POFANE 25 7m mee our and 29 respectively. The Martinez Shiela will be
have so far lost one wicket for A. Browne 2 oe Hone © wkor., b K. Branker ° Three More Medals At Fosters, Leeward met Wan- shot for around the middle of
Cc. Cox 3 0 oe Extras the derers. The Bay team was first to August
56 runs. Haitians i. Gk eaeihas i In addition to the hundred p.¢ and knocked up 131. Eggl . SHEPHERD
Allan Ishmael topseored for the K. Hutehinson c & b Branker 21 Total 68 metres, the U.S.A. also collected field topscored with 42 -whhe ei 7
soldiers with 45. He was caught © Matthews 1 bw. b B. Matthews 9 BOWLING ANALYSIS ~ three more gold medals in the pierce made 22. - e s a & TD
by wicketkeeper Morris off the jonnedy run out 2 Oo. M. R. Ww. course of the day and two of their " George Gilkes was the most suc- F LY Co. L .
bowling of Shannon. J, Brath- A. C. Browne ¢ & b King 50 baie ix 4 «ig. «Winners broke Olympic records. cessful bowler for Leeward. He
waite contributed 16° and 1. Par- Herding ot, Ming, b HL. King .. $3 oe Bger '! 722 11 4 %In_the Shot Putt it was an all took five wickets for 35 runs in 10, 11,12 &1
is 13 EB U f fi em
ris 13. Cox Lb.w., b H. UL. King 3 3 Snuner aon e o U.S.A. final for the first three 20 overs and five balls. G. :
Five Maidens A. Nicholson b H, A, King os Dotter a 0 16 © places, Parry O’Brien won with a took two for 39 in 11 overs B d Street
Parente ees Suwieu ica i Ree gut A gare ¥.MP.C. — ist Mosinee +r eae Olympic record of 57 feet, 1.4 Leeward has scored 81 runs roa
ee a te ee ee —— . Lewis ¢ Williams, b Hope 6 inches, Clarence Hooper was sec- without loss. L. Foster is 32 not .
’ a ave Total (for 8 wickets) 139 -~W. F. Hoyos not out 39 and and James Fuchs, world out and Alleyne 49 not out
es x06 ot 1U0S. UW. duatuou Pelle eaiiccee 2 ae D. King e wor. Gaskin, b Hope 19 \ecord holder, was third, ‘ai stu
1 Wilee 10P 21h th at UVELd te ” f él In the long jum J. C. Biffl and
, ; oe RW D . e H.C.—FOUNDATION
Ww Mave were in cs, Lue re- i Total if rickets 7 ELC,
ts of sp prreg ues ~ H. King re ee ae a S eee 6 M. C. Peareene, Roma ‘onic oma fartiaen Colltes played Founda-
‘ " , ll 4 1 1 $ ; 10n al nda -
tae vouve asoxe wee below AR 18D Se mnie Qui a. y. Boldesi of Hungary was third. Bit loge ‘baited first ane ‘kockod S Gr 4
Se s SLOLe (as 6 HH. 4 er 7 . es, e ju
the Iirst WicKel Iell, Morris Woe POLIOE ys, WARBADOS IheGiMENT B Hope 6: 0 H 3 was the ‘shortest ainge "18 L & Gritth mean if cake as ¢/ y ay
Bene by enlupe: for 4, Gy Police (for 1 wicket) Ba 5s 5, Wilthire | Phe 8 ina en ween tenes who scored an undefeated 14. ie v
Dewy, the ouner opener, is pat- Le Resiment —~ lst Innings femetak Gc eens yesterday broke the olympic re- For Foundation Mr. Springer
lng very steady. me nas an un- 4. Ishmael pr. . oa seaman , is, Cord in his second 400 metre hur- took five wickets for 46 runs in 4 A Sm
deleatead 31 to nis creail. 1ne |, Licorish e Skinner b Carter... 11 Windward (for 2 wickets) . a dle heat, easily won. the final to- jj] overs and Mr, Callender three re rn
cmer not out batsman is Chel- ¢ enalibe 2 Raney - oe S. Barris ree? eet tnalngs ; day in the same time of 50.8 sec- wickets for 26 runs in 15 overs ey rf
‘ 3 2 J. it t y . Dw, e , 3 “fs ‘ i ers, 5 J
tennam who is tive. . See er 15 E. Roach ¢ whnr. Evelyn b Thornton 5 ena ee ee Russia was Foundation have lost five wickets v W Sim bs g
Frank ‘Laylor, one of the Em- 1, Price b Denny oe elt aoe 18 2 in ii = n Holland of New fcr 63 runs, Mr. Jones is 24 not
pire opening batsmen, scored 1 N. pleshan, & Bon De re Se eee teeter world record to be Si yg2yragshaw scored 11 and
century for his team in their 7° parris ¢ & b Shannon 13 Earl Wood ¢ Atkinson b Thornton 57 jroken was set by Gi o M. Evelyn 10. If your job takes you througr
Maten against Wanderers at Bank G, Pinder not out 6 A. F.C. Matthews 1.b.w. Thornton 0 ,was set up by Giuseppe EF. Griffith took three wickets , ARES Bh
Hall. J. bynoe, who looked as J: Clarke b Denny 10 Ngee 2b Theriee ; 9 ee ee re he walk, for 21 runs in 11 overs, F. Charles mud and water then you need our
, 0 é -b.w., rnton ME s e 5 i pg ‘d i 2
though he too would make a cen- ae —— C. Skinner c R. Farmer b Thornton 2 Viet Sead nts 2s he enter~ raptured one for 12 and C. Tudor high-grade durable WATER
. . Be ete yd 198. W. Cimberbatch not cut 3 ed the Stadium far ahead of the one for 7
tury, was es, by ‘MaeChlaty Total lee ieee Gea te ( others he also appeared to be the At ferdiston shacice BooTs.
off the bowling = Skeete zO8 by BOWLING ANALYSIS —— least distressed. His record might met Windward, Erdisto ae om Cigna 3
Empire won the toss and batted. oO. M R WwW. Sota 181 also have been better, had he not {o occupy the wicket ond tence ome in today and get. yours,
They occupied the wicket for the j. Shannon 48 Ok we BOWLING ANALYSIS i stood still just before breaking up 205°” Norville t and knocked
fopaeoved’ with 108" A. E, Clarke i garter” PP A Bay MR. w, ‘he tape and raised his hands in $) 7° @ topscored with
4 . . . arke ;° 4 p 5 . Farmer 5 the sir as ; en
| 2a ete Bg BRM a tet oiSyRomepbere OF 2 BOOB Windward nse ra
: : ena ae » -C,., Bealy f L. Gr me RR OQ. . : iy Lave lost four wickets for 33
Bowiing for the Bay team, G, ©: Sealy | 4 0 22 1 Nf Thornton 182 2 40 7 He completed the course in runs.
Skeete captured four wickets for ¢ sealy ree Ist Innings 31 &. Farmer 2 6 13 © jour hours, 28 minutes, 7.8 see- Powling for E » Deane took RIO DE JANEIRO WATER. PROOF PROOF
Seine te BS oves, 20, ham: & SOUL Pala Ho himgome’ 34 $8 bonds. Second man Joset Dolezal: gyorg." nes “oF 4 Fung in nine| "gy Baie
sey bowled 15 overs and took @ Cheltenham not out ; Windward — ist Innings | of Czechoslovakia also broke the ¥.M.P.C.
three wickets for 68 runs. A. G. ing ‘ Soom Tee ¢ Cumberbatch b- world record, Third was Anral y¥ eect ihe ee 181 From Trinidad nificent double- * HIGH WATER BOOTS
93 saad Cc 3 Tate teas es :
Seale took two for 62 in ten overs, Total (for 1 wicket) 41 es a Be ate oon ka of Hungary , SN rae Greenidge 24, Mande- | decked “El Presidente,” world’s 7 *
Not one of the Wanderers bowi- BOWLING ANALYSIS R. Atkinson not out 29 Marjorie Jackson of Australia fo 49. r # for 3, R. Fields 3] Jargest, most luxurious airliner. . Pair
ers was able to bowl a maiden Oo M oR. ow. © Evelyn not out Nee 37 ran away with both her heats in: COMBERMERE 1st Innings oo | Direct flights to Rio, Montevideo
over, C. Phillips ees ee ae Total Miter f —, ‘he Ladies 100 metres, doing 11.6 , Harewood 19, Alleyne 12. G. Greenidge | and Buenos Aires, Convenient con- .
Mental Hospital — Y.M.P.C” ; “zk eS a ee ‘otal (tor # wickets) in each, but Fanny Blankers-koén 7? !* ieee © tt 10. nections at Rio for Sho Paulo.
Mental Hospital “met YM PC. r Brathwaite *, ‘6 Ms "0 BOWLING ANALYSIS was beaten in her second heat by proxwick 1st Innit ha aha 71
at Beckles Road. Mental Hospital ee, ee akan eo: Me Mapip. Sanday ct Gene. f king 8 fort, BY wind ‘or OL. icing * WATER BOOTS
, Empire A tbisidg rah od i 3 3 : 4 f ur int won his metre >’ ' is 2 for 9, ink
were first to occupy the wicket. Empire — ist Innings - aoe + ~ 3 2} semi-final but did not appear to bentabas, dak Tuleteie <0 :
The Black Rock team knocked |» Boume ¢ Alleyne b Ekeete 1i2-S. Chase 2 9 11 0 (ye going as well as Ulzheimer and |G. Goddard 41, BY Hinds not out at, ; Si $5 85 Pair
up 68, C, Yarde topscored with )° gynoe ¢ MeChlery b Skeete ag W- Cumberbateh 2 reueet © iielsen who won the other two, F, Storey 20. J. Hoad 1 for 36, W: ,
23. The only other batsman fo. Clarke co & 'b Ramsey 3 Pickwick for ® wickets) tee gag Mal Whitfield ran well within "ele 1 fori ;
enter double figures was Carl K. Hutchinson b Ramsey " Pickwick — Ist Innings -imself to come second to Nielsen. LopGe 1st a heer 9 Montevideo SIZES 6—l1
Williams. He scored 18 before he ¢ prescod ¢ Sub. b Pierce eA Bane gg are ane Mr, “Hoyos 23.'R. Mayers 15. N. Skeete | vi
=m u -Ghatiene 3. Seale 9 € Free! rec > Pere ee ARON. Custaane bh O. Bete I) Kidney “e Weekes b Branker a RLBLY.C. LAWN TENNIS” foci © * Bynoe 2 for §: 1. Harris Buenos Aires
Bran. . ‘ h nniss run oul 29 EY
for 11 runs and Rody Austin three © ?*Exfras"?* a5 G. Moore © Branker b Sealy 9 RESULTS ae et ae ite Bee ee oe
= ‘ ital e : R arke retired hurt 5 R. ille 56, E water |
iP eh NE es ‘Total gap B. Lewis 1.b.w, Sealy 0 Ladies’ Doubles (Finals) F Jones 2. C. Deane 2 tors, °\" | at Trinidad. Regular servige vie
In reply Y.M.P.C. are 65 for E W. Grenidae hat out 20 Miss D. Wood and Miss_G. Broakes 2 for 29. d Belem to Rio, Sho Paulo, Monte-
= loss ‘* ive Sicaee. Ben BOWLING ANALYsis ews 2 Pilgrim beat Mrs. P, Pattersan WANDURERS hot Incing eae a video and Buenos Aires.
Hoyos, ong pf the ¥.MP.C. open- ee 0. M RW and. Mrs, R. S. Bancroft 7—5, kgglesfield 42, J. Pierce 22. G. Gilkes
ing batsmen, has 39 not cut to ! eee a 5 a 2 Total (for 8 wkts.) - 383 gg ae 5 for 35, G. Alleyne 2 for 39 Prresiceh soe
en a Hope wickets were |; O. Ramsey mB Oo Mt 3 BOWLING ANALYSIS Men’s Doubles a Stig Ys eer Bid
y B. >. ‘ ’atterson a : c O° NM ak. W P. tters: a H. J an- 49 . .
Windward met Spartan at Con- 4. G. Seale 10 60) = 622. Brathwaite ee MeO ale — 7. ae a5 oe FARRISON COLLEGE vs, FOUNDATION
go Road. Spartan won the toss & Pierce 8 ® 50 1 {Phillips a. oy ae ee eo . “7 istry COWLEGE ist Innings mi | eetias
a hoe o®S R. MeChlery 2 0 1% 60 Sealy 11 60-666 3S. ~Patterson 6—2, 6—3, 6—B, &. Hassell 23, E. Griffith 16. ©. Ward
and elected to bat, The Park tear MENZAL HOSPITAL ve. EMLP.C. | Mr. Smith j 2 0 4 0 94 pat out 16. Mr. Springer & for 46. Mrs re ey MOST SAP ERIEROO?
i Ment. osp' rele eees< wiht Brank o 38 1 > ‘ . ; Sy
started badly, having lost four Yoptel Moma iia, 6 6. Wilkinson 44. ae TO-DAY’S FIXTURES SEER "te. binines ‘dau 7
wickets for 41 runs. However: Mental Hospital — Ennings W. Maxwell 4 0 20 ©; Play begins at 4,15 p.m. Wkts.) 63
Noel Wood joined Chase at the ¢. Yarde c Burke b B, Porter . 23° «L. Weekes 6 0 14° «0 } Men’s Singles (Finals) ‘ Me. donee not out mt, z. Bradshaw 1, AN ERICAN
‘ D. E. Worme vs. L. St. Hill. a py at 2s Sharies stor 18
~ - \ dor 1 for 7. Hoanto Armnars
5 { Mixed Doubles rion
i ERDISTON vs. WINDWARD |
| They'll Do It Every Time bret ote By Jimmy Hatlo| | yp. al he, RS thocraft xa ing me ao be caste 8 Go tis
FA CEE ELE: f | vs. Mrs. A. A. Gibbons and J. G. winDWARD Ist Innings (for 4 wkts.) 35| Phone: 212% Giier Soximens t'ee-s, 2908)
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PAGE 1

GHAVAM RESIGNS OFFICE Crowd Clamours nrns Democrats Qpen Angry Convention For Mossadegh TEHEHAN. July 2\ PREMIER CIHAVAM ES SULTANEH handed his resignation to the Shah on Monday night after failing to put down bloody rioting. Supporters of the formei Premier Hmm|^[|i paraded through the city, bearing Persian Hags and shouting "the nation has scored %  victory, we want Mossadegh to return as Prime Minister We also demand a trial of traitors/' The crowd marched to Mossadegh's house begging him to accept Premiership. The Persian Parliament rnei in a speeml session ;md Deputies are voting for %  new Prime Minister. As Mossadegh s supporters have suddenly increased their numbers it is expected he would be reappoinu-d. Prominent National Front Deputies announced the defeat of Ghavam over Teheran Radio and promised that they will do everything to reinstate Mossadegh. All shops were closed today but suddenly opened up this i on hearing the news of Mossadegh's victory and flags were Hying from all public buildings. Mossadegh DspuUM ,>i.-,..: alarmist reports of n said 300 to MO were killed today Throughout the country. Despite a flood of rumours there were tnly 20 confirmed death:' lure. These Deputies said Mrika is in effect throughout Iran Mil that in some area* lieople have been killed Only Way Out One pro-Mossadeah Deputy. Chsugi Hid I upportiTs in Parlianui I leased u> 33 Deputies and that they advised the Shah that .he only way out of the prusenl efaafli li to ni-appoint Mossadegh Hiotlng climaxed the week• ttd of disturbances that left ii injured lad auntfrMl U.K. And US. Consult On Fran CJrisis B> II. <\ i ii M i i LONDON. Julv 21. Britain and the Vnlted States were reported on Monday to have begun direct consultation on the explosive situation in inn. With a simultaneous government efWl in Egypt there was fear and sensitivity that the Middle East might be engulfed in .i wave of unrest with unpredictable conseq ailed. Eight Sherman I 1 j nd the United States ill tiuek loads of troop, gu iru-lV'"' %  "'; idertoi what mg Parliament Square .thdre* **•>"> become necessary If the later In ir, Hen "•"*'"" *•*"* *n Iran. So far Mossadegh Deputies had appealed x c > '• %  "•<\ not taken any decision! to rioters to return home. Demonstrators stood silent QM Bunutt then dispersed shedding le Howevr. their effort.u i i'. i ii,-imeiit building touched off the biggest b.ittl, ol UM Bio The outlawed pro-Cumin uiysl Tudeh Party is reported I taken a prominent |rt in tho and hoped the Iranian government MUM restore order. The interests of neighbouring Russia in fran has been made only too deal in the recent past. Offi'I *. far they hud no inpi the Soviet moves in Iran but there was always the posMbllttj of indirect manlpu morning riots and credited with lll' rnu *' _** >nuounist-dominated shouting anti-Shah slogans and Tudeh Party. with smashing his statue. „ E ***** " f Soviet and Mld—f.p. dk Eastern affairs cautioned I strongly that the overthrow of Mol.oanunfd Mossadegh brings with II it "(naturally. renewed '-.iiff'i of Soviet efforts to Interfere in Iranian affairs. MovwioKh diplomacy has In the prsaranUy satisfie-Misadegh demonstration —U.P. Gen. Ridgway in Greece Rumanian delegates failed T M Airline officials said the delegates from two satellite countries had missed their plane which arrived on Sunday. A seven member Russian delcgaUon arrived on Friday and had planned to meet with others to-1 ATHENS. July 21 day before the conference. General Ridgway arrived bj opened. Seven Communst coun-' plane on Monday night for a ftv* tries includlne CrechoslovSJUa, day inspection tour of Greet. Poland snd China are expected i He will visit Salonika on Tuosda\ at the conference In addition to, where he will inspect Ores* delegation, from t>*> other counfrontiers. tries. It Is believed that the A Greek flag with an insertjCommunist charges that germ, tIon agu n.sj Ridgway was hotstwarfare has been used by United; ed by supposed Communists on Nations troops in Korea would -he building where the America: be one of the main wrangles it mission offices are housed. Poll the conference —rj.p. removed It. —D.P. (By LTlr ( WILSON) CHICAGO. July 21 i udder less Democrats opened invention on Monday with hit 1 ^ .. factional split thai teeping the White House in L.S. Sends Memorandum To Israeli WASHINGTON, July 21 A stale Department spokeMiian %  D Munday that the ..ins has no intention of moving iu embassy from Tel-AViv to Jerusalem. The spoke niiii said %  department memorandum to that effort baa been sent I,I UM Uiauli HovwrnnuMit. It sold Israel has not yet fornuil, tcquvslcd. although It has revealed plain for moving il> foreifMi office io Jerusalem. The spokesman said the "United Statea has always eupportad the International regunu for Jerusalem thai will provide pratactlon lor holy places and 1H> acoaptabJfl to Israel and Jordiin .>' alternatea an.i thoti^ands of guests and sp-t'otoro, trooped to a l I Usflj iwki by the stockyards for the angriest and mo fustsd DorrKKTatic Conventun m 20 years Many at \u, iu .. dd Like la uran for the presidential i i who deUvared %  address of the 01 i i. But h.n Tiinii\ %  i eil.nn to expI'Mi O) Mond.t %  night or Tuesday Stevenson, who doesn't waul lominalii'ii. but b .>. MM rfrafl, told delegates to orgel personalities and concentrate on prlni-ipli % %  Ai-n,. ne pleaded with them not t.. ic•M>at the hale, breeding I which charactarlaad thi* Rapubli< IB -tiutigle two weeks agi l^tWren the asapi ,.' l>wi K ht P BUenlMwtr and Seni toe Hobert Tafl. "Iliiinan l.'i .I.I • Vice -president Waltei Rauthef ana?aaa af Indu aataatloaa sai.i on laoasat) thai i nlesii the lkemi>cratic I'.iH rdopis a strong "No-C'ompromlse i r iiiim.iii Higtit. 1 !" pUtiorrn witii an antifilibuster plank, hiboul* eaders "will not dttlvei ote" In November In .m impussioiird pleu U> th 'ternocratii platform Wrltln.; Committee. Heuther said that the %  etnocfata cannot convpi I <>f the basic issues and win ! %  election Mr i<.|,1 the i rnii .ittee "you mu*1 dartd OU aTown uravcr owing to the prlvftesja or paaple" E daniod Korean war The aircraft wtrtjihat anv labour lender cap acluflown to Kong Kong by Chiang ||, tteltver the votes of Labour Kn Shek'Nationalist favUnion members unless tho party tntment when it w a Privy CoutneiJ Must Decide Ownership LONDON July 21 Bnt.nil'!, highest court, tl Prlyy Council began banrki Mondiiy an appeal against th' Hong Kong court Judgrncng thi.' iwnrded tht owiiersiup of *o ci> i uplauch vsluexl -t more tha>i ii.ooo.noo io tht Chlw ir.unist government. The aircraft 4iwal lions Kiiita Kovcrnmrnt enHtld at KslTak The appc.il was bruugh) by i Civil Air Tranaport [neecpors td il Daluu'ut United' State* £> Ifl Hi 1 .f the asseti of CenUal Air Trar pi rt Corporation that was descri<>'d as an %  uaiocorpoialcd coinm-1 cial enterpnie of the sjpverssnii |i>( the Republic of China. -Because of thi in.. Jinpliciitioni of the case It has been ordered u> be heard by Uie Privy Council by a special Ordi i in Council Counsel lor the Delaware Cor' poratton Sli Hartley Shawcn^; -aid the intfrnutional implication^ .ricaui/ed by the British as l Dr. Jure government On De. cember 12, 1)49, they were sold by UM Nolianalksts to lha a/# lakes a strong stand on "vital i"U*But with a stnmg Damo> ...Hiplatform he suul ., UUMIlcau*r ran ">%  lii> iiiRuwncr wllli to point out Ideceeaors in title of the Delaware and the "worker himself will Corporation Three or four week* | delivr. the vote Tlie bread box later the Britiah government re-| 'J tievl to n hellnt boa." cugnuted Uw Communist government nx the De Jare govemmenli "e laid that the C.I.O and 11 Itiawiu w4ft election berause of th decide whether that chanje in recognition nffccted the |imp'ii \n right* already obtained by third parties outside China and whirl. resulted ID trie aircraft registered in the United Stalai Shaweross said there was no authority to support the Hong Kong court'* view that the succession of one government to another could affect in any way rights t • Oa page 3 A •* %  * lONDON BtllZI nakn l..uidling the bridal veil a bit of a p eou-sin of Bnglaad-s Wueen KUsabelh II. leaves St Margaret's. Weatr I the son of Mary. Princess Royal, M unt of Queen Kllubeth The DT dainihter of I-idv Tax and Mep-d a lighter of Sir John Foa Fleesuse rt be niiii-'. but Pram* Philip aaxi Hrlnoaes Margaret Hose attended. iem aa Gerald DevMl Laseellea, .r. with his bride Toe groom Is is the farmer Angela Dowdlng, -old. Wueaai Elisabeth eould not faestsenatsassst Radluphoft Hearing Of Writ g* <>< l [[ ror Lontempl i)\ FlyOverU.S. Court Continues Chief Justice Wilt Sum Up To-day HIS U IRDSHTP ttie ChiI Justice Sn Allnn Collymot. Kt will sum up to thl S|>'< .il Jury empani'lle*! to decidi on ih.Huir ol Court isnii ub t Colonol R. T Ml WtfJ the AdvM.ile 1'IIIII|I;III\ i a Itemed Cuiiti'inpl nl Com whon hearnii' ol the Writ • n'nnies thai morning ,it |n :• %  o clock A'. .1 "I ll-'k tl' ll'Hl.i oan, Mr, Reece Q %  lU • I v %  %  i %  'ii. .<"" luted %  -i.-n.>ui ,t,i.in n ".hirii ha • libtnHtad to UM jur) hat thcie WBS nolliinu in tin irUela i raaoi I of ,i i %  .y thl i.iYiidiini. %  tlurrinuin Tries To Boll Rendt < H1CAOO ivei MI ii tnai i %  II. mocratli Pn b I tion. took personal "' %  u '" '• "" % %  lav o "w* oalnat th,1* ^ watiV. DuomdaiM ..i.ipany M Mr W.ilmlt. in -n f the iul-1 linrriman and mutual .security a mi by IffJi LonWUp thai i UU.M I %  %  ,i. ,, for the platnttfl would riavo i Vorki a in|l v are light of napl) to 'he legal sub ffOTt 't a mo i missions isel f.,i the ha Vi ijeiciiti.iiir Company, did ooi < is to vole AM tl Di-mocratle Party's stand >n that rtj I that ha arould i princlplaa Of Kmnklm lb-* Human Rights in its plutfoim prefer to err <^i th. " L(l Hrn rui.n..., I He said that his union printed< ,„,„, pgthar than daa] Ortttl v %  %  jajM B.nnnom^ P*UUaal hand: w „ n whl ,. h ,„. ,,.„, „i„, t K deal "rvej ol Uv dam • Triimans candidacy and .,. Ultl Ui..t he ..• not anuUed %  ilrman Paul Pltapal billi •'ranif hundred %  I...,, |. ii,,. WASHINGTON July li tl,. An ihrei .ti~elusd Monday ptl Rndar %  ISM uoldeatlflad "oble atlar screen-, about into Saturday l %  %  %  %  TIIL up and down and hoi .beut the aaa -. • |~rr %  .. %  Jecta"—Air Force careful ed saying iying saucers"—came %  a the Air Fore, %  the report b> who said the> saw eight glow%  ination 1(0 13 The Alt F i control igl news Air rorce base ii about midnlK*.' ,-iVina • p*rt tansV-n; Ifesn ; inn to ISO li lade thi ition.il "sauceri i ,.,'Cr 1,000 mile ultra also laid t left Nations Vii 'ter 3.IHI .. n lights betwe. irMtton and H I IP. thousand) UBSSBH von i:lv I •4ttg7ttr*r5ra-aj: 3SSK not dalhnar the vote Truce Talks: Brief Sessions PANMUNJOU. July 21 Allioa imX ConununUt tiucv A IWMltV-IIH bull Steel Strike Gath ^iifiiiie Production EAST HAHTTORD. C:,ui<:Ucul. July 21 Prall ..ml WttMncv alrcrufi (I,vi.ion of Unlt4 AM [KMNIIOII ,ii.finM>,i m Uoo4aj ',*l .Irike i..inn | lolo it.production ol Minim ( %  Truman Hack At Work WASHINGTON. July 21 il Truman returned to IOLENT EARTHQUAKE, which fell ,n a ••bucking broncroll,,, ,1,,^, CWlforn 1 . t&'Qgfg: UMV1BI many dead and injured At least 10 are dean nUon ..i leievision b!oj IM and in the little desert town ol Tein M.hapi. the home of th< %  •" r • *• Cui himrelf later Is Califomiu Women's State Prison, the ion,! rolling wan-. "" %  *~'l of the quake, which bcKan at 11.65 G.M.T. and was fell In diminishing strength for the next 45 minutes, wvra record ed as far north as Santa Rosa, slxtl r north of Sai Francisco and south to Ensenada, Mexico, two hundred miles south of Los Angeles, and oast • Brawley. California Jamaica h Insect Control Centre l Rtod % %  "f ad it a. Tt*^2u a $Fl*&i KINGSTON July 21 has been chosen to pool technical personnel conducting an intensive regional Insect control campaign throughout the Caribbean Dr M F He Cure, ol WHO. announced today. :..! anil be drawn mainly Irom the Caribbean area consisting of PvbUc Health an area %  supervi*erv levr-l Thiv „iil gradually increase until eight officer* are stationed ii >ear. inpjdaBi AIM | Caribbean territory no th.1900 San Francisco quake." • f the victiiTLs are reported rod whan tt.. main hotel hapt, an old two storey bi Irk structure. c>llapsed. Others died as they d.ishe-1 In fright into the street and were cau,! illdlngs The huge Tchrachapl Women'* Prison, was "made unusable" bv 'remar. There are no repof.ed in)uTle at red ado lam which has been deva-ii-most beautiful pel on." The plant, which looked more like an estate ihan a i.1*'* accordlna: to llv* Keni County SherllT'i Office. %  .ptd aiti CUveaW Beginning 'fIn MaliItiis-iiaiis CHU AOO, July II. laanaacfatlc Senator Paul H iMuglas, laid Monday that the i hate r a a ult a van war and that the era f aaa being preparad" lownrd IMUUlg lha P"' !" ''', ,-lrlk. w,ll hrn II lo noKH war dedl had dreamed for all 31 years of their married hit. Howard Jones, S2. and his wile 70,000 war prisoners held by %  IIlea should be returned Alliewould return ualy those who want to return lb Cominuninn Mime 7i).oou. Red l-sisoti officers injectee new puzzler Into the situation on Monday r.y t ea m ing to reeogr %  -. %  the Inteniiitional Committee of Red C'fiu. Communists used "ir Red Crow list of prisoner. If. eamplain lo the United NaUnn.* that the Alliew (ailed to list the nainoat \A 101 Chinese prisoners Cornmunn'-; had previously danounoed the lnlernatlonal Bod Croaa at an "ImpprialiRt Tool." -c.r. MaBdjB. mi CaaasjilsM idnsa the aladJi al s n-! aahaadant (. the <- %  nf ,no\ in. furniture. < %  •' lot HoIM'W) lOQuJrod proparty, 'Avalon" i lemmctt's Lane Rock -tlie first step In the proposed extension of th' I ind ,ilao on the estimated co-' I Of l'i elect.irai hasailatian of the Ha pita!. Mcmbei %  [/( %  %  %  •lit were |i H G Cummins, MCI*. Chali man. Mrs J. A llartlnaau an Dr. D. S. Oideon. Medical Sunn intendent. out an insect control programme; i;( ,i from tnr buildi Tyrah 51. had comp;sponaored by U.NLCEF W.H %  vere iinrnediately called X^r 40.000 mil* auto trip that took and the hxal govM an d bi? circus tents for housth nt through most of the Wespresent there -re two pro-:,nB plus sanitary equipment and tern Hemisphere. They arrived E"" mm 'j-t are being rushed to the strn. Ma Aires. Aroantina. tr. "y U.h l %  i %  !,ris.n ne, Brazil" of the Moore Jamaica and d T WO railrued tunnelt->twe-Ti M< Corinack Lines. Also aboasd The Jamaica government has Tehraci-api anM rigged Chevroalready allocated 3u.> oulhern Pacdu %  „ %  13. I0, they for the first t**o veer* of the tween Ban Franelseo and Los Anhad left Dunkirk, Indiana where fm alffi gelei ci-ved in —V r .'.neral home -C P Fish Fly Half Around World SEW YORK, July 2! mount Aquartun % %  V I Six hundred Mnall-moulhed City accompanied Uv .M %  ! f .p -FT,, Aquarium sup< Vi J, n r Un ^ V "K N thi oaek'ng and -hippli, York auatearsd Governor li.i ssj ^.w 'Uanafey to Bao Dai. (State left IdlewiM irOlivor Kuigsbury of All KIN port aboard a Pan Amir.ran New York supervr*r and ftili Airways plane Monday on a trip distributor for the New York which will take them more than State Conservation Department half wiy around the worku aald upon their arrival U will be placed in a Igk. The us weeks old Rah are INabove aaa level near Saigon "to ina shipped lo Bao Dai as the resee how thi In that iult of s trip Dewey made to the climate." Thilish will %  Far East last year during which to Bangkok. Thailand by Pan he learned that the Vietnam American and 'hen will rul*r in avid angler had never ferred to a Vietnam Cos. | fished for Bees. August Rabau< Diane fdi the remainder of the of the New York Tropical Pish trip They are espected b Suppliers employed b> ParaSaigon next Pridei F *eek ago was expected in about two or lossaa %  t of Grand • Sessions had to IMW and r'nct It is expe,t,-.i that healing will 1 com lu > %  whan on aau wi pUo ri Hal Lordship will sun. up, and law in > KM' to oannii'i .urn ratui n inn on a point M "ast Friday as (o thara b Courts of Orand Baaslon ci-tain Mi. Reaoa 'i'i thai I I on all the %  • %  ii i rts e/ei %  iery. etc. but th. C rould look .it i %  would be noticed that n tad bean %  f tin Assirea. Hi: I. iying that not of th* %  %  . and Mi Rao utsstnieuV %  U I | unant wa | %  i it* bOglC if COX %  would than arise whether It mli(h. %  1 -.till i Fair Trial he jury li ., caae. ou U would assur" • irordf used u B %  %  rig case. He cautioned them no', Lo misundei d.ii.d him ..' %  Ing with contempt which woulo nil to the || %  whethei not th >'"ii spoken wani nun. al Under tin* Jury Laws *aim-I IMond had said, in their wisdom must have wanted to take away the pow%  %  ilarty wish %  (,uc-linri-. of fjitv • mg you that you vthlng th %  %  • i>n page 1 • I the session until latl II. iy Tiic raoaai howevi i i died im' i including: I eii t IP ••• link n i I I* I .alnnilRelasUons Gel Presfa 1^ l oiks (In DrfmuVd Ju| Bonds Start N/W YORK I i %  r 111 a I %  Frem h bout* ol aboul S400.000.000 defaulted are scheduled to %  11 here with a Japanaai 'ion at 7 pjn ti M.r on Mnnnsj %  i i n> gaa ch aavi • ting on -wai eWnss. %  nit of Ui< Amen. a.. Bond h oldttvg Catsnetl %  Mud the ally scheduled < unfereiices are N to flelegate* only, with the %  %  nary itndoaasatul%  Ironed '"it I tsnall! —IM" Jan. laboui %  t OUIlfll KIICGSTl IK, Iu up "f a Joint Ii tO 'U %  I II is the .i I lel.iUtnu since in %  (in iM I %  poll The .uimit ,, , %  ':vidad a* l„l,T It I P.1 M W I HPfJ ne T.UC and HUgl island Bin v cit with A E W< Mail Una i chairman. The lEovernmem I. I l| %  Mll'll' I I'll I the inaUti %  %  • FIGHT CANCER WITH NEW MACHINE BYTWesl A SIX-MIIHON VOII MACMNI liut can thoot X-ray* at dorp-aaated canter llmir la beln buUt uodar tho direction o( thesa Slanfordi Univanlrf, Calif, Klanti.U. Thej ara Prof. Idar< L. Qlniton (left), director of Slanford'a mlcrowava laboralanr. "id Dr. llrnry Kaplan. bead of tba radlolofj department Their new weapon I. known a. lao Unaai clcclronlc accelerator and rcporledl/ can panetrata lavcr. or health; tlasua without Inlurlna Hem. The naclnnc will ba o Inoxpewlva that molt ho.pllaU will bt abla to buy ooa. (faMmahonatJ \



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I'U.I rorn l!M(!!MMIS ADVfKATi: kV. .Ill BARBADOS^ ADVOCATE cA....r-r"-—-n=— %  %  -r i Tm*d*.v. Jui.v 22, 1152 War Against T. B. In The Colonies IIOMK MAK1X4SOME years ago a resident of the linush paper suggesting that there were too many conferences and toa many upturned OOCh glaaAok at Government House parties in the Uritish Caribbean. The suggestion behind this picturesque description of high living was that anal>v s of West Indian problems would m ' them. Onl; direct contact with the problems would lead to their solutions. Perhaps some similar thought n lubeicuiucis, an i ed widely In U H 0 He r Welsh National School of M,dill, ppoJu nl ihis morning's session of the confeiencc which was entirely devoted to an exchange of information on tuber: British eoIonJ tories. Professor Heaf was %  u m i n ll.j :':;ber of papei had been read by Colonial health officers and re| live* of voluntary or;.' :ti the work of combatting tuberculosis. There w. s a Iho treatment of tuber%  %  though fortunI attitude m decrease. Many of the UttvM undergoing treatment for tuber, culmis failed to understand being done for them. Doctors had gn.ii dlfl getting then I" remain in hospital whrn they began to feel %  Heaf. there were new dnifll which gave relief in %  matter of a few months', and these gav*' the patient a feeling of such wtU-batu that he thought he was cured long before the trcati.lcted. The co-oporation of UM natlva sufferer, b* al i. %  i.ui.ii ui (be treatment of tubcrculosi*. "We must .in understand what Wt ring to do." he added. When co-operation of Uie M1 i M believed %  vaid to the turn %  would f.ill in every one tif our colonies. %  probably tho n •erles of pi i %  %  ilosls in %  serious but not hopel< men and women engaged |o the fight against this a lgt g doing valuable work, often 110 der the WOMl condjtloi which they had Mfl| I, %  !; to this country wi-ie "really work* considerina that in many 1 i ..i health offtca and |and HI antt-TB work il off from the modern facilities available in Ui in I r Heaf stressed that no itlon could be made about the best method of stnmpng out tuberculosis lit onies. Each colony m out its own plan, based on carercfa and investigation by the men on the spot. There was evidence, he con%  ves could withitand the disc ,%  • ;, %  well body, proi were improved. Ant>tubereuloku measures must therefore go forward side by >idc with other public hoaltn services. Treat.. uld haVi? to be established to follow up the work of u.-ignii;, vestigatu %  ridencc of local pof would be loot Ilu* these things ive Rracnally. Professor Heaf criticized the expenditure of large sums of tubeu-uloM' in tin* colonies, he % %  in many others, from lack 01 king great I study the latest im-ihods. We must sprcod know led--?, and on inch will %  l know and serve • He paid tribute to the N.AP.T. for the bad gtvau ui this work. Mr. Lyttelton pointed out that With the decline m i!"incidence of malaria, tuberculosis now list Of killer diseases. It *as one of the gravest and %  .lUthoiiUes in the Co'onpire. ... out oi lubercalosii has often been regarded aj b purely modkal toncern.' the rj lontinued. I utc again Uiat u^" ^oon acUun bjall mm-| fcers in a conuiiumv crowding, lack of Irc-di air. bad or poor feeding. * .<• to the spread of pr. therefore, from being a medical matter the bo many other subjects. and %  bova all the wide spread of knowledge la necessary about Idssoea of 'his terrible scourge." Melton aaJd there were but the Colonial people were beginning to be more awaro of the dangers and WCTC W !li" to help more whole-heartedly In the measures Intended to overOUBM H. Th. re wut, however, a long way to go. He extended his warmest ;d gratitude to the voluntary organizations which have >ern assisting in this work. "There are few objects which should attract our sympathy and our help more than this." he Dr. E. D. Pruiie. Chief Medical Officer. Colonial Office, said tuberculosis was a very serious health problem—probably the gravest problem of all. %  is no reason whatever fur complacency," he said, "and than has been in ,v itli tuberculosis should merely stimulate us to further %  tubeKUlOsdj had recently reen appointed in the Colonial Office Bd the importance the authorities attached to the disproblem should be tackled from all ungles, and each work out its own pi m for dealing with it. Uiu '-die closer Great Britain and the Colonial territories can v.ork together in solving the tubc.-culosis problem the better V read by Dr I. Ir.iiggi.. tuberculosis specialist. Lusaka. Northern Rhodesia. Dr. %  %  .1st. Log" charge r a tuber.aloiiis survey Z that area. Dr. H P. F. Foriiy director of %  %  %  J. AH. I^VOlpiUrre, director of .'. i: 'iiIi G, H. Garllck. medical director Singapore Antl Tuberculosis Association. Dr. L. G. Poole. tubuiculosis officer. Tamavua Hospital. FIJI, Dr. M. L. Freedtor of n.euKal ser^ces, Ilccliuanaland, ana Dr w •• Vlckem. director of raw ^ingapore\ News From Britain I.ONDON. Julv 11th. | r, i !. . !i Julm. on, n • g C interbuj i. ceruiinl.v I t spectacular news of the week Rg arrived In Lond> D I UWI -eroll written i %  Chine % %  ffbiob he i.dd he would like to deposit in library within the ury. %  tinRed I< .ii '. with his Bowing white bate—about which bo i< inordinately vain respondents he had proof*' ttaot the United Stales for. .:. %  not bring any proof with him. i.ii ..11 im reports won ,-oise. He cjmld explain nothing, and brought nee. \ m tii' ro i Qulti in upr< r iout tho DOUB. Mow can this sighted Mid erodulou i continue to hold Ma Canterbury and at the some Una aid the Cotnanunlst cause hv publicity and (alaa wttnessT ARWn. everyone >: aakbUJ whethor ha ul* ua%  eroll in the library of Cand-t The Dean of Canterbury la, appoint ril, orAcially by tho i>ut ins name b put fonrard by the Crown on the i ivko "i tha Prune %  r ue Had Doan* 1 obtal %  lifelong appoint)!.cut %  bury because he OBUgbl uf Mr. Ramsay MacDonald ai one of thi i Ministers of the Church. al Birmingham was another similar appoiri i Itemsay MacDonald). %  iic.i ui Canterbury, once t.ppotutiU 1-IKL.1.,I i'.i-.'i, Urn high dignitaries o( th> Church can only be removed if I It would I.' Ml to %  a i ieni Ithou could cog* long tenun Into Ihe Itritufi C% %  i • dim* utt to maki %  one misguided old run or tho Our BIrjnlt-rs Say : %  hvilih yigki n Sm cetm dttor, rha -in SNI. Thaw kindly a reception to the recent productlu:i of Twelfth Nigh;' may bo interested to II I .prise came out financially, 1 veil': company B 01 ihould be high.y ancourajUng who want to IU lha Pocke I play of | Barbados, You will not. clal success of the und I %  %  sight. '1' i Council subvention of $19912 is by f.\VID TEMPLE ItORERTS cloak of office. v. Hewlett Johnson is li. IT, i Cant' rl ,.IJ; he doe %  ah for the Church of England; and he is nnt head of the Church of Bnj %  ODH people ...ii .....-, think. Moscow must Hud hi uable, though. A cartoonist, this week, had the last He showed a new idea of tho Commissar for Propaganda. A whole row of Hed Dv.ns, fully, i WUra drawn up f"r Slalin's inspection. Tin %  trator was made to echo, sarcastically, the germ warfaro propaganda, and to plan ttu 'each 'Red Dean" should l-o dropped in a metal container on i ..leu in Wedern capital: • • \:. i-rican Victory Tlie liner United has probably won the Blue Riband of the Atlantic for VOBra t.i rnmn. People lure with a combative sprit were rather hoping that the "Queen Elizabeth*' wouUi have .i b al the Muc Ri United States. Probably "Lit" could taka tew houn off the time "Mary" t*t but she certainly car.i. tiie "United S 1 Tlie Cumin Company is maintaining; a dignified tone It will be several yuan before %  British thin Ii ready to challenge the "United Stat. In a MOae the Ameri" i I part battleship. It has been built with a large — because of IU value in wartime o If the Cunerd Crrniid obtain %  similar aubaldy from tiie aar vto ai it aOdld c:>mmiS'ion two Hut white the Queen* arc ser%  nd oan each oarry %  \ bole drrl troops — the Brtttota %  %  ship owners to budd tnothOp i Riband challonaat. A much mme serious problem than Npeed faces the transi i hues. Bomellme in 1953 or 1954 the Comet n tivn i ii.. 11 i a there will be no aerial discomforts to drive passengers to UN Class Cabins of the great liners. "l*t Class' will bd doomed. Already It is halfempty More and more imcr* will havo to rofil themselves a* • %  one-class" lats. with uio gradation of luxury, comfort and Una removed. From Chtauco "I tlilnk I'm going to w Ml | DC*. . The Isritish Presa has been ..vei-whelmuly pro-Eisenhower in its "unconscious bias", certainly the reporter! n Chicago have tried hard to tell us what is actually happening;. But %  Rise n bower's chaoiccH nava ttetn their reports have grown increasingly jubilant In tone. One ot Hie cfneral assump. tions in Britain is that Truman v.'11 wi'i. 1 : clslon not to stand again is completely ignored by the shrewd. • • • Last Clans Londoners never loved their trams like they adore their buses. The red ''dajuble-ikekers", that foreigners always feel arc going to fall over as they waaaa thmuph the street* are Ihe recognised badge of London. But trams clang. Trams are noisy. Trams were always shabby, and usually had wooden %  cats. And they we: driven out of central London to tho great charttcss wastes of South London. The faahksoabsO Londoner often takes buses. But the tiam he hardly touched— iva f'tr a rare ride down the embankment. But la*t Sunday night tendon's last tram sailed, (that jcems the right varbl) I the dark slreeti of South l/ndon to its final depot at New Cros^. The Haver, the presr photographer*, and a crowd of hundreds waited to greet the i II on Its tray to oblivion. The time was half past midnight. We were paying homage. %  -' %  My, UM last tram I I.ft. twenty-JHc Bttd ".ercrnw.ied. iIried to board It along Ihe route. Indeed all "id Loodonon with nostalgl. childhood, waited for one of their last trams In order to savour again, (without tho need io VI.H Glsejtow or Black>e lollipop delights of "Tl tOp. •MALA1 A-Ihe Fads' LONDON, A suitable sub-title for the new official publication, "Malaya—the Facts Behind the (light be. "An Intelligent Man's Guide to the Unknown War." For this slim volume of facts and figures about the Malayan emergency obviously assumes no previous knowledge. The facts are presented in the question and : form so dear lo Government publi;cisia. They begin with the vital statistics of the fighting forces engaged—25,000 British soldiers, sailors and airmen, 10,000 Gurkhas. five battalions of the Malay Regiment, two battalions of the King's African Rifles and one battalion of the Fiji Infantry Regiment. UM next question asks what these forces andoing in Malaya, and the reader is told, with disarming simplicity, "Exterminating Communist terrorists." Fortunately, the booklet goes on to give some useful information on the background tn the emergency. It relates how the "shootin, iftr" si tried when the Malayan ComH Party failed in their attempt lo gain control of the country through the trade unions. There is good reason to believe, it goes on, ih i the decision to abandon "peaceful penetrj tinn" in favour of open terrorism was tai en at the Second Congress of the Commi nisi Party of India, which was held under cover of the Calcutta Youth Festival in 1948. When one comes to the question: "What would the loss of Malaya mean?" one finds the highly-publicised economic wealth of the country relegated to fourth place in the list of reasons why Britain is determined to elimni.de the Communist menace. The first three reasons are as follows: 1. That with world affairs as they are, the loss of any territory to the Communists would be serious: That the loss of Malaya would soon lead to Communist domination of the whole stretch of southern Asia between India and China; and 3. That .i Communist Malaya means Communism across one of the world's main highways. It means o centre of Communist nfcciion right down among the East Indian slnnds. And it means that Australia and New Zealand are directly menaced. A fifth reason why it would be a bad thing those who are fighting there. .'Jur should il be criticised on the grounu. 'hat its information is of the "basic" typ* There is a great need for just that sort of nformation—though one might be excused for wondering why the Government has ailed so long before giving it. If there is any serious criticism to be made is thai the booklet costs one shilling. The facts behind the fighting in Malaya should be m >ra widely kn'.wn—and by more, people iv willing to pay one shilling to learn them. %  v.*v,*,*,','.'.'.'.• :;',','.'s,'s w,w,v/> c oaaaaato>assas*Sj I* 3 TS MM O O Mi s. The Widest Selection in Town. | On Sut.ul \l>\<)1.Vii: SI l7/OW.7Y>. n covered bj the b;ilI .md <: $32.73; and. "i •jnoll is now ii. of I ttsMtrll rohe which Could .oil.inUy Dot bo bought from any rostumuv fcr ihe $222 00 atuanrOd 00 lha Mot A total of $67.26 was rotalra louab arranged, i I Ihe Barbados il of the %  il RujpieOB, and $58.45 bj Oodrington College for local chariI these sums do not apslieet. It may be added that my small advisory commlttrc and I ptoforDO profit* should %  eeruo to us for the final portofmance which was pivrn before some 300 school chil College, or from the 5alc of programmes al any perfo. You wilt appreciate that purpose in making 1 these facis public is not to show how clevo. we all were, but simply to demonstrate that what could haw been regarded as a "highbrow' production which could only be put on because Briti.*;i I finances were at the bock of il I l 'um out to be a m nay-m aking concern, it does it others COOb a similar produd.on need not be deterred by foar of finac I fchCi:'. Ihi! the British Counci'. Is not recouping itself for the original the sum of %  thus availnbl. line Madi In the furtherance of • he drama m Barbados. mSELY TUCKER. It Is Now The (usloms Who Are 'Wonderful' Britain's Policemen Have Rivals THE men who ask "Anything to declare" a thousand times a day at London's airports are talcing top place from Britain's policemen in the esteem of visitors from all parts of the world. Travellers are going home full of praise fur the courtesy and friendliness of the Customs officers. Typical comment from an American business man before taking off for New York was: "Your Customs officers are a lirstemant for Britain. "When I came in it took them exactly three minutes to clear my luggage. "And Americans I met while in London told me they found British Customs the quickest and most efficient to negotiate." British visitors to New York find it takes anything up to two hours to pass through controls at the airport. At London Airport the average time for a passenger to complete formalities is Iwanty minutes. And the Customs part of it normally lakes under five minutes. —L.E-S. ojjfeess Wmm Wk sVgM tku IWdo StbetitmJ GALVANISED C'ORRl'Ci.VILD SHIli-TS 6 ft.. 7 II., 8 It. Gauce: 2G — 21 — SO ALUMINUM SHEETS • ft, • A Guast: 24 Also GALVANIZED KGU lor KlUGINfi. DOWN' PIPES. EAVE GUTTERS. GUTTER RESTS AND WATatUBAM. C. S. PITCHER & CO. i'h. i IT.' cfhis ween, niOfi people aiv considering cJhe ifniportancc of UJemtj ibarnest — %/thhough tnv J(ousr of JJa Oo#Ja lay stress on r/lw • importance of .liana ibarnest every day ana ewnj month <>f trie year — x/tna this, it U felt, is reflected in the \~-ompantjs ouymy punctj. with a resuflatit excellent variety of stock in ail departments ana, most important, at prices within reach of allSo naturally. r JJa Costa & Co., Xtd. deem tt timely to suyaest to the gtnem public that they make the necessarij ananyements tins week to see and pidi/e for I hem selves. till that is meant fuj — "THE IMPORTANCE 0, BEING EARNEST" %  TOMIJIV* 4B>HM! We have large stocks of Super Rice, Bacon, Butter and Cheese. Phone To-day—We Deliver RoMr/ to l B r|>arr MM Krisplcs Com Flakes Shredded Wheat Cream of Wheat Weet-a-bix rablum Farex Bacon Cjlves Liver Bacon HIT own Bran Muffins arftb Posts Bran Flakes 37c. per pkf, %  lies! ArrivoJ Heinz Mnyonaisp Hotrn Vogs able Salad i Hams in Tins Carr't Cream Crackers Carr'i Cheese Crisps SPECIALS S-up. 8oz.—22 Chocolate Nut Roll 14c. %  Italian Kttchuo 46c. ire 74c. luslard 25c. ittM 24c. per pklt. carorulty tho life you save may be your PHONE TO-DAY — WE DELIVER GODDARDS


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TAGF. EIGHT BARBADOS ADVOCATE Tl'ESDAV, Jl'I.Y It. IM2 Unknown American Wins 2 Centuries Scored In Intermediate Division 100m. Final TWO CENTURIES a/ere looted when the fourth round of games in the Intermediate Division opened on Saturday. Bruce lnmas acoa-ed 12K foi Pickwick against Combermere. while Frank Taylor made i>5 for Empire %  gadnfl Wandtran, CABLE AND WIRELESS 111 tbaar match against Carlton at Boarded Hail, icpeatcd their third nmnu performance by being bowled out cheaply in their first innings. The Cable team made 76 in their first innings. In reply Carlton have lost eight wickets lor 139 runs. G. Matthews had a very MH pa nf ul U>wluik vpaU. He sent wicket and they .>udcd 110 rum down unn* ajvarfj flea balla and tea '"> wicket. Th paruwrtook six wicketlor JJ runs. Alp enabled the I'^ih uera i< Colin Cx toofor : '"-' "91 runs. Bine run' in three overs. Chase made 72 before being The Cable & \\ i %  Bad night by Evelyn off the bowling a vcr\ *fc**3 "runner. Wood made 57. and B. Matthews opened but Bowling for Windward BAILED FIMSIIES I/V THIRD PLMJ: Mr. T. A. D. Qaia, AdvattkiBg Manager ul the Advnratr i al present in Helsinki o\ eruig 'lie Olympic flames. Hfcll-SINKI. July 21. IN WHAT MUST HA\ E BIO I khi i i %  the Olympic HtO metre* final olt i<(t-rred to e championship foi the title "The fast**! man in fn ilnuaM unknown American I.inch Rtmiglno li took %  everal minutes while Ikee ronsulled H photo finish picture before they Inallv announced the winnei and to add to tl i Herbert MC&enley who is far the more famous as a 400 metre man 44 before the partnership w.is broken. Knight tODIOOred with 19 while King contributed IT. Braiikcr scored 12 an ;.lc 13 c-iiie from bye*. byes and iu> balls .tptuiid .seven wicket* HI i unin || avari tad two Mis. ad in reply have lost tWO wickets for 73 runs. The no' • nt bulsmen are R. Atkinson 29 fid E. Evelyn 37 C Skinner and N. Mod foiI I ok the apartaa. B I I • [Win scored a century lor Pickwick .igainst Comber'he Oval. Innlss made 129 before being run out Pickleawick occupied the wicket for the • '.tire day and have lo Carlton in reply knocked up 139 runs and still have two wickets in hand. A. i' \\\,,,\ topscored with 50 which included eight fours and .i MX. Hurl, has 37 not out to his credit *vhu< Harding and Kenny Hutchinson %  cored 22 and 21 rosi* H. L. King was the most eessful bowler for the Cable team. M*K He took 3 wickets for 19 runs in seven even or which two wan maidens. H. Kin*; took in IS overs while El. ami BranJtar for 26 and 31 respecti' At l h e Garrison. played Polka Ttu light of the game Ickcts for 333 rUBg C S GreenIge scored 3fl and G. Moor,3?t Bowling for Comberni' | •ok three wicketfor 66 runs n li overs o wilkm wo for BB in (4 eanai (Aai.TON But perhaps the most "t idl was the fuel " %  thi .ompeUti.n 1 1 4 seconds. Russia's SouKharov, fifth, and John Ti SEOOND DIVISION I'n S-turday the fourth senc Division games opened %  Combermerr pUyed Y.M.P.C. at tiam was first to bat Th> ed up 181 runs. D Edgti valuable 63 before being out leg before lo K Fields. G. G knocked up 24 while Mandeville •nade 22. Howling for the school team. Cafiender took four wt IS 'mis in 13 oven and four ball*. t< Fields captured three for 49. G. Greenidge and O. Burke were bet for the collapse of the Cornbermare team in their first Combermere made 66 Sports Window Harrison College and HarrUon OoUaae Old Boys an sckedalsd to aseat tonight at V UP.O. at 7 SO lo a Fir-t Division Basket ball fiitora The othti match will be Pi rates va T.U.P 0. Taa HarrlsoD College—Col lag* O'd Boys match will bs wwrratiiig as the resolta SOU help to dortda whaUier College will win the Challenge Cap. Collage mast win this match and to air other match to beat Carlton on goal averages. In their last encounter College oeat College Old Boys by potnt. SMREY MAY BEAT MIDDLESEX LONDON. July 21. paved the M y'i first Even with their four test playinnings' lead of 91 Fishlock in -till look his last season and in what will hkc being too good for Middlesex be hi? last appearance at Lords. ntua Denis Compton at Lord's. At failed by only five to obtain hi* the close of the second day Hidcentury. dlesex held a slender 70 run lead Successful batsmen today were th only five wickets in hand Yorkshire's Tad Lester who made Fishlock. ind baUman. was former Cng thi aaai hi %  Ml." 1'ahlM to, WlirU l>l I. %  % % %  1VUMII aiaiutfwi c Cos b C M-Uh.-. %  %  i IBtil lit w I. a Mullhrw* Ktne lliw b 0 •!!-• %  Matlhca ffK fcwb 2 ,V Alli-.o. li %  Co* I. M < LMkr III* b r CMl .. %  .ii ., tfVfe> -ruilP I. <; Kinfl n.,t OUI ana i N l -ely. H.o L.i.iM %  high 1 %  Olympics Diary Wedaaaday. July l£ a.m. FBNC1NO (foil, team competition. amlhn,\, a.m. 0YMNABT1C8 '•• a.m. MODERN PEN TATHLON (fencing) 1 m BOW I NO (aotalanal*) 10 a.m. TRACK AND FIELD (dlacir*. qualification) 10 a.m. WRESTLING (free MM 1 p.m. YAOIITIKO 1 pm. OYMNABTIC8 3 p.m. FENCINO (foil team competition. anal) 3 p.m. TRACK AND FIELD (900 m. heats, pole vault, final; lOO n. ladle*, seminnal-. dlsciw. final; 5,000 m.. heaU; 100m.. la diae, final 900 m 2nd heats) 1 p.m. ROWING (semi finale) T pas, WRESTLINO (free style) 7 p.m. HOCKEY (match for 3rd place). 0.8 Thif. ewled II. (llwnio e down eight rv.nr.irf R.ii..<. IS-ITPL T. Q > d took seven wicket* u i u 11. SHOOUM; Donald Bailey's effort for thi> %  in much the same as it did for Barney Ewell at tht London Olympics in 1948. Bailey UM 201 metre'. nl indlca%  will succeed. Itenimino. who not even hi* own countrymen knew much about be_ overs took seven wickets for 2fl run*. O. Burke captured three for "A7 !" £3£ m „ ,v k SkiU Shoot badges Ten Qualify For k Pickwick were all out In their first Innings for 77. Of thin opener M. Lashley made 27 and H. R. Uiahley 16. L. Hoad conUibuteH 12. Oiympioi began."firVt'g^e **"£"* (*T S^SP. V S"! notice of his ahilitv when he ran ,ook flv w ck ,s L tor v^ In away with the first heat in the wera of which three were maidama tlmo as BaOev, He cemt """ E llmn took two for 9 """beck in th. second heat yesterday ln ei hl '""a and L Kin K took to gain a eloea w Lory from Tt.eo ,w fo / '*' runs in one over nnd dore Saat of Holland and again he lnr ** Du u v %  me 10 4. To-da\ Central have so far made 143 in the Semi-Fmal, however, h( w for the lots of three wicket*. beaten by MrKenley in' the ^oddard, an opening batsman. same time and it was therefore all m ad* 41 before being run out. C urprlsing wnen he w.in H,n<1 has 44 not out to his credit the final Remigino is the forcew hulc F Storey contributed 20. Upe or lunner who leaves no i^ 1 wickets were taken by 1 Withe Wells foi doubt that he Is putting everyJackie Hoad and respectively. thinR he h-is into it His style reW and 17 I me ttimething erf John .. % %  — %  ... .„__ Cloddnrd ts he iippcars to run with EMPIRfc—LODGK more strength than speed. He also Empire played Lodge at Bank holds his head forward and It H H Matihn b Kins trick by E. Denny. In over he took the | Price. Blspham and W( Regiment arara n out In (bail %  —-— flmt |nn-ngs for 128 runs. Policeii, Bn 7i! have tit fir lest one wicket for A Br,.-„. M runs. AI an Ishmael topaenred for the %  ^oldien with 45. He wai caught >• "•nl"*' by wicketkeeper kfforrli off Ino K.. l ^^7' n "„. m bowling of anannan J BratnA %  iiinr c a t> Kin* wni'e eentnbuted 15 nnd L. Par"•'?"w • T %  *'" % %  b L Kini rls 13. Five MniHens fUj IABUHI, ...LI.J O...ILV, i Estra. Tout dor a wi<*e... io-r. ...<-. IM _. .. BOWLINO ANALYSIS M i'".'i,.v. n.., H Run.. '" Wllll.. K •' li-ktn lb* | I* Chi. b B Ai > rua mi b K A \" ToM not out I' Knlfhl II... K H tbpr < %  i.ki>r f.tfufour balls and took %  ts for four run*. In reply Empire scored 148 before declaring. R. Norvlllo topTotai BOWtINO ANALYSIS %  : Rrankvr Arrttr p rt | howlng in the 100 metres eeptlonal. n* il Is seldom thnt as n man BTOWl old) r bfi improves on short distance Instead of longer Mthough It was very good for Jamaica to get the second place In this important event, one if McKenlcy'a preference 3<; not out and E. Jones 21. for sprintu will not jeopardisethe For Lodge. C. Deanc and V. i hancef of his team in the nll-imBrookes took two wickets each for port ant 1.600 metrea relay. four and 29 respectively. Three Mnrc Medals A; h '^'^ %  i>---i't m.-i w... in add.t.on to .he hundred tS^^J&TarSS^ em* Of the day Kt,d two of their Gciorg( G||krs was he winners broke Olympic records reacfUl bowler for Leeward. He iJ'ea* A* 0 .* f"".*! 1 V*. "V*. a *'** flvc ***" 'or 35 runj in _.S.A. final for the first throv () *' yards. The elglu beat scorers ware L'apt. C. K. E. Warner 96, Lt. E H. Goddard 95, Mr. G. F. Pilgrim 94, Major J. E. Griffith 93. Mr. L. W. Hasj.tf-11 93. Mr. G. E. Martin 92, P.C. O. snepherd 91 and Sgt. E E. Edwards 91 In the N.R-A. Non-Central Competition the above eight an others have qualified for Skill %  id Mr Major A. DvV. Cha M. G. Tucker Owing to the B.T.C. Hace--. which hove disorganised the proih 56 H. Rrewster made r amme. the next shoot will rx On August 16. This will also be i Spoon Shoot at 300, 500 and 600 yards. The Martinez Shield will h*) ,iot for around the middle of August. THE WEATHER REPORT YKSTEKIIAY. Rainfall from Codxtngton: ml Total Rainfall for Month to data: 2 63 In*. Hlgaeal Temperature: 86.5 F. Lowest Temperature: lib 'F. Wind Velocity 10 nule. per boor Barometer Muy, tin iio.tuig varj pa an unA d li to nig ereou, LAS Oiner not out batsman a Chelc lennaBi who u. five. ', Frana luylor. one ol Iha Emi„ pire opening batiman i a %  J iiomi, ioi ins team m theu f; maicn aguinut wnnueiei %  Bank fl. Hall. J. oynot', WtaO looked as •* %  Itiougli he too would mess %  cenluiy, was caught by aacCnJer) off me bowiuig of Snaata fa Be. Empire won the tus and batted. Tliey occupied the wicket Ioi UM entire day and mode J4B. L %  topscored with 105. A B. Clarke eollUlbUle.l 45. I Bow.ing foi th-' lla\ team. v. Skccle captured lour wieki-i 66 runs in Tl overs. H. O. Ram%  aey bowled 15 overs and took *' three wlcketl for 68 runs. A. O. Scale took two fir til! in In DVM Not one of the Wanderers bowlers waa able to bowl a maiden ova "' II Kins HI ..j n Mtlhw Ifl l,,,. "n\ H.i-i-i its %  lea r-. i Nirkto sa l-iim-M — Ul lni.O.1Iibmarl e wkpr. MWTI*. b Sliannun *S Bhini %  b c-nriar II inilllipi b Drnni \ 0 lirathite b Denr" M ply b Shannon IS Price b llrnny I IH.pli.ru h P-niiv 0 WrekH b pr IU i> a Pani> c a 1> I l-.-.l.r not out ri.rkr l> Dnnv aatna Total si Kniiht Hop* I m mi OK AHALVsn $ r i BOWl i\; ATIAI.VS.IS Rmllli 4 0 %  aal] 4 o % % %  !.. %  — Ul I...,.,,,. aaiv not out i ii.iiup. I'l%.llciihli. nut OUI % %  Ire. Total ifor I wicket) nOWI.IKO ANALVSIS O at Phillip. t 0 "PaaiTAN %  WINOWAH%  aaraw p|Unita i|*r 1 ulrk'Ki SpaiUn Ul Inni.i. H. Pan it l.h*. i. wukir r. fd' e -iEvelyn )• Thomi 11 n Mmn. run out I H rum*i c Wood b Tnornton Cad Wood • %  Atklaion b Thornt. Arc M*tuVw. I b ThornU itraoioii b Tkornlon N MtdfoiU lb b Tfco.nlon C -kinnrr c It Fartwr b ThoinK pel oul Etira. b S. lb I Toll I low I IN(i -v our II F*niwr 8 0 3 D Wilt: it4 1 1Oreonldar 111 N Thornton III 1 41 H r'.rmc-i w Olympic record of 57 feet, 1.4 liiehoo-. Clarence Hooper was sac and and James Fui-hs, world 18 leeord holder, was third. — In the long lump J. C. BbTle and u ^ ^-TOItrJnanpirtw •i M C Gourd.ne. both of the U.S.A.. Hl Tl "'V'7^u ,,^ were first and second whUa Odon uilTTtSS^£^tS^rA' w. roideai of Hungiu-/ was third. BU.,. iLi^"| ^L^^w-a ?" I Cn.r.r^ooSTt'he'S.&A. w"i &23K* gffejl !" E W rt M-i..v broke the Olympic reF o7 rWdatlnn Mr e„H--.. S in his *cond .00 metre burt,.?-^^ J'i,^ I anjiltoli oven, and Mr. Callender three s**wi'kcts for 26 runs in 15 ..ver.. Foundation have lost five wickets fi r 63 runs. Mr. Jones Is 24 not *. „„.rd ,„ b. T r &,£]f h W COred broken was set up by Glusepj" Ooidoin in the 50 kilo-Ti. PAA die heat, easily won the .__ daj in the same time of 50.8 <>nds. Jinn l.ituev of Russia wi vecond and John Holland of Ne> /.r.iland third. 1 E. Griffith took three Waring to bis friends os he ...tcrJaptlxVed ta.i n fir TT** N idlum far ahead of the J& £?-j 2 ilao ;ippeiireii to be the At i-Vfiiitn .*.-. u-. %  l II. -ecordnnght m iwinrf75 p.lhWr ^ Letter, had he St KZS!l&3g&*2 &9!* lend st.11 luti before breaking ^ 9y HMUI \J2LZ!! \Vi tap< ind raited nil handaB l" t J Norvuie topscored with 'ho air as If posing for the benefit u/i-j,..-—. ._ t _, ~ tographcTs. h Wn 1 ? wa / d in th r,r nra mnings have lost four wickets for 33 runs. I % %  luii. for Erdiston, Deane took id C. Tudo Menial llospiljil — Y.M.P.C. Mental Hospital met Y.M.P.C. at Beckles Road. Mental 11were first lo occupy the wicket. The Black Rock team knoB(* up 68. C. Yarde topacoreil with 23. The only other uatMnan to ante* double uures raa Cail Williams. He scored IB before he wag bowled by K. A Bsranker K. Brankei took foui wicke*.. for 11 runs And Rudy Austin law* f< 12 runs in 13 overs. In reply Y M IT ..re 65 for th loss of two wickets. Bei lfoyos. one of the Y.adl'l Ing batsmen, has 39 not < nt hi credit. Both wickets wertoken by II. Hope Windward met Spartan at Congo Road. Sprrt;in won tha nnd elected to bat. The Park tear%  st.,rte.l bitdly. b.ivlng lost four wicket* for 41 run* llo*evNoel Wood joined Chose at the t. Price ,. 1 0 11 J III at ho %  1 tr S 0 4 I til. I % MMII.II. I ".|"rr I nn.hr — Ul I.,...., UOJIM r AlUtfnr b Pkfele 1 Taylor r Mub b Skoelr J Brnuo MrCl.t... I. Skrete Ckarka r b 8 luiwi.tNf. UfAl Van II AltiiKun WIM.U4 — Ul IneMf. N Thornton c CumhTilvtcli b Hajtoed 1. T r.tnior Ihw, b Skinner It AOina-m r-.l .,ut %  1*4*1 %  nol oul Total liar 1 wlrkel.i BOWLINO ANALYSIS O. M R 1' Skinner S (l |g N MHforrt 0 SO I' 4 1 II s rii, u i, %  IMKI. I 0 14 nt Ktvua .t-oMiiasMrnr !-...-.< (far S lebrl%  Pl.kt.1,1 — I.I IM.1I.!. A V. TMII-I 1 Mi South li Hral\ < oMiirawiar completed the course 1 UTS, 28 minutes, 7.8 S*o*i-„_ ^TH"" "" *T" nds Second man Josef Dolcxal I'"L WickeU far S1 """ '" nine < /t'choslovdkiu also broke tk orld record Tliird t Anrai w r.r1,1 I.M B ,, I.eka of Hungary Kjshiji o Gri n idK14. M,„ dl Marjerie Jackson of Australia J, 'J* c>M *'er 4 to. M R new. ray with both her heats in < nuacaMRar. 1.1 i n u.. [-..(: Mill metres, doiiiK ll.fi "-"wwood 1. ,n... .3 Q ;I • mi Fannv Blankcrs-koeti '"' *JJJ,i u Jf e 3 ,D '12_ D In her secondVat by ,eKW^a !" V-4 M V r W K I alarlg Sander of Germany _M Lahi*v n 11 n 1 Arthui Wlnt won his 800 metre %  ini-fin;.! but did not appear tn J, VTB*AI. M uasaa. (far a -kl.. m %  • %  goinj. its well as tllzheimer and a ooaaard 41 a mnd* not out 44 lore, J Hoad I tor *. W 1 for 17. -II 1, „ ., IOIIQK le* *mimm „ a* >lr. Hovoe 13.* R alavNi IS N. 8kMl. MH' won 1 he outer two. •taJ Whlttit Id ran well within 1 ome second lo Nielsi RIO DE JANEIRO SAO PAULO From Trinidad magnificent double%  lecked "El Praildeote. world's largeit, moat luxurious airliner. Direct fllghli to Hlo, Montevideo Idse I and Buenos Aires. Convenient oaaD*ct(one at H10 for Slo Paulo. %  .1 nai % %  id %  It laaiH run uul 1 it Clerkc rriiied hurl II Uwti l.bw. Sealy U Crrenldae nol out P 1 ikm not oul SfUSH roial -lor a wku 1 nvwnNo AV" ran ff.S.y.C. LAWN TENNIS RESULTS I v..,. Ul i>i :,. %  I <-*•* ) lor B WANnmn. I IMIIKIKt I.I Fagleiflrkl U J 1; s. 10 >• % %  !,.a McChleiv 1 %  IMII MO-eitAl. 1 I.I.I Ra.Bllal Met(let s MJealol lla.etlal t They'll Do It Every Time aawa% By Jimmy Hatlo DRXtBERRy IS VCK>i-MCA-TTCO MTU The. CCkVUN'VS COUCwJTWAT E>tra.y UHZH VflO. GO OH SOME SnlMDLE SHEET— K.ITE ,t14> OET TU = KcWAtlLt-VCT—X 4 SOT AHUHCii ladiea' Itoubles iFinaU) Miss D. Wood and Miss Q. klarbn ueat Mrs. P. Patterson .uid Mrs. K. S. Bancroft 7—I, UM.'. 11—tl^ lirAKI. I.I I....., %  Basra iKtui.h^. ro>Ul nut m> I' Patterson and H. GMan %  inng beat J. W. McKinslry and '^SSSSt ^H i." .1 l^tterton 8—2. 6—3, B--8. 8—. TO-DAV'H HXTIRIS Play begins at 4.13 p.m. Mea'a Staglea (Finalst I Worme vs. L. St. Hill. Mixed Itoublc* Mr. and Mrs. R. S. Iftincr-rfi %  '>I*TON i* ir.i... Mr. A A Gibbon, and J. C l \ i D U I *VS ., %  Mnstry. llarr *ki. Sa V? Vf&'V* 'nTl' "ill rol NIIATION Mont^vidoo Bunot Alrejt Connect with popular, aonnomlaaJ "Fl Tunata' IM'-4 r>T)e CUppar* t Trinidad. Regular servioa vks llclem to Uli. Sao Paulo, Moaee. %  % %  aad Buenos Aim %  nda J '"i I VUATtON "lit Sli.l-.B tt V PAN AMERICAN Do Co.tr t Co Ho l>e>d Si^e' %"* 1 it 1139 (*l". i-i... . 330)1 T-I-UW AHD A MT QmC %  ri OLH-^ A raw LOWS eus*era*4u wrcrmrAa^s forth BEST DEAL A wide open invitation to Bridgetown's :.ewet all-purpose Store, where the shelves, counters, show-cases—even the spacious floor, ure all crammed with Home and Oftlce needs and numerous personal requirements too. If. a newStore with NEW STOCK FOR MR. AND MRS. PUBLIC! k. It. Haaaate gf I ... I .l. laner Broaael Si. 114 against Sussex. Two days aunVed for Worrastn to brat their near neighbours and BCTI County ehamplon% %  hip winners Warwick. Scoreboard Worcester beat Warwick by ten wickets Warwick 155 and 14* Worcester 280 and 28. for no wickets. Middlesex vs Surrey Middlesex 1S2 and 161 for 5 Su-rey 283. Leicester vs. Derby Derby 284 and 26 for 1; Leicester 302. Nolls vs. York*! Notts 383. York* 448 for ?. Gloucester vs. Hants : Gloucester 256 and 107 for 6; Hants 240 Essex vs. Glamorgan : Glamoi gan 217 and 123 for 6; Essex 293. Kent vs. Lancashire: Lancashire 471 for 7 declared: Kent 191 and 142 for 5. Northants vs. Sussex : Sussex 222 and 73 for 2. Northants 330. "THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING EARNEST" ABOUT YOUR COMFORT EVEN ON AN ORDINARY STROLL CALLS FOR A PAIR OF KHAKI SHORTS ONLY $4.73 AT CAVE SHEPHERD & CO.. LTD. 10.11,12 & 13 Broad Street &&WW lab takaa you througi. au need our high-grade dui-ible WATER BOOTS Come in todav and get yours. ^ WATER PROOF • HIGH WATER BOOTS S7.95 Pair • WATER BOOTS $5.85 Pair LET is si PPL) YOi ttir/l hoofing and Jiuilding ^Materials Al.t'MIMI M 1 uni:i (. \ 1 11. SHEETS—M Osagr GALVAMSili OOaW nvilli sHEET 16 and 28 Gauge I:\1.K1T1 niKRI l. Ml li SHU IN For (rllinrs. I'arlrtlnnv Daoi BTAMDAsU) HARIIBUAKD The Board of I.9M t sea Panels, etc. rVMTSMMD HARIIBOARll Por Exterior or Interior us Counter Tops. Panrls etc. Can be polKhed, varniahrd. or pamted. sIILETS 4x ': •'; IS'. 1 Window Hood*. Table Tops. PHONE 42S7. Wilkinson & Haynes Co., Ltd.