Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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— Harbavos

ESTABLISHED 1895
Commissioner Of Police
Summoned For Contempt
Advocate Newspaper Co-defendant
HEARING ADJOURNED
"THE hearing of the Writ of Contempt filed by Fitz Haddock against Colonel R. T. Mich-

elin, Commissioner of Police, and the Advocate Co., Ltd., which began in Common
Pleas on Monday took an unexpected turn on resumption yesterday morning. Mr. E. K.

————







WEDNESDAY, JULY 16, 1952
RIOTS FOLLOW MEXICAN ELECTION





Adve





PRICE : FIVE CENTS

Hottest July 14
Hits New York

NEW YORK, July 15.
A mass of cool air slowly moved eastward, promising
some relief for heat weary residents in the eastern Bart ©
the United States but not much hope of relief was % is
southern states that are burning under temperatures ey
high nineties Fahrenheit.
Yesterday was the hottest July 14 on record in MM
York. The thermometer climbed to a sizzling 95, The
Weather Bureau predicted temperatures would be in the



Bomb Attacks
Continue
In Tunisia

TUNIS, July 15.
Bomb throwing terrorists step-
ped up their activity yesterday
in defiance of the display of
military might by -French garri-
sons parading in most cities in
Bastille Day celebrations accord-

ing to reports reaching here.
Tight security measures in
Tunis prevented the “one bomb a



Waleott, Q.C., Counsel for plaintiff Haddock asked for a ruling by the Chief Justice on the

Order in which Counsel should address the jury.

When hearing was adjourned on the previous afternoon, Colonel Michelin had

completed his examination in chief by his Counsel, Mr. D. H. L. Ward, and it was ex-

pected that Mr: E. K. Walcott would proceed with his cros
on resumption yesterday

However, when the matter “was resumed yesterday,

Mr. Walcott raised a legal point on the question of the
order which the Addresses of the Counsel should take, if
the interests of the two co-defendants were the same.

This point led to a lengthy argument involving many
quotations from various authorities on the matter. This

s-examination of the witness

Communists

Beaten Off

continued throughout the entire forenoon, and when the/ By UN Troops

Court reassembled after the luncheon interval, His Lord-|

ship informed the jury which had retired, that ee eni

difficult points had arisen, and he had heard arguments on

them.”
There were certain ramifications————- —-_-—-~--——____
oe necessitated his giving e ,
careful consideration to the points E Se y howe
= had been raised, and there- u nm 5 r
ore it was impossible until he had | ,
given his decision of the points, | Termed An
= Pea at = stage where nas

ad left off on the previous after- : ‘ . a
noon, Further hearing was at this Amateur
stage ey ge egg this morn-
ing at 10,30 o’e

fi, sonatas |g ABINGTON JON,
Colonel bs = ary a termed. Dwight D, Eisenhower,
ee oF Fo! nited. bet Madde | Republican Presidential candidate,

mpany Limited, y ocklas a rank amateur in the field of
alleging contempt of the Court of | iyi) government, He said that on
Grand Sessions, in that they re-!major domestic issues Eisenhower
spectively delivered and printed |would be a prisoner of his own
a speech containing certain state-| advisers,
ments which tend to prejudice his] Joseph A. Beirne, a C.I.O. Vice-
fair trial in a manslaughter charge|President and head of 300,000
brought against him. communications workers, said in

The co-defendants both pleaded|an interview before leaving for
not guilty to the allegation which|the Democratic Presidential Con-
was contained in a Rule of Court|vention that Eisenhower has un-
issued by His Lordship the Chief |questionably been a great military
Justice in the Court of Common|leader, but if he is elected Presi-
Pleas. dent he will be helpless on great

Mr. E. K. Walcott, Q.C., asso-,;domestic issues facing the country
ciated with Mr. G, L. Farmer, and|such as the Taft-Hartley labour
instructed by Messrs Hutchinson law, civil rights, legislation, fed-
and Banfield, Solicitors, appeared |eral aid to States and others.

on behalf of plaintiff Haddock, He will have to depend com-

Mr. D. H. L, Ward, instructed |Pletely on his advisers in making
by Messrs Yearwood ‘and Boyce, |G0mestic policy decisions rather
Solicitors, for defendant Colonei|*®@" making up his own mind,
Michelin and Mr, W. W. Reece,

a4, Solicitor General, Dar toh
diction, tor the actengant Com] Queen Has A
light Chill

Solicitors, for the defendant Com-
LONDON, July 15, |

pany. ;
on yesterday, Mr.
Queen Elizabeth retired to her}

On yesumpti
Walcott told His Lordship that he
room with a slight chill after an
investiture ceremony at Bucking- |

wanted to raise a point with re-
gard to the addresses by counsel.
ham Palace to-day.
The Queen cancelled her at-

He quoted from Halsbury 2nd
Edition, Vol. 2, which states: —
tendance. at the wedding later to-
lay of her cousin Honourable Ger-



“|. . Where the interests of the
Lascelles and Miss Angela

defendants are the same, the Court

will not allow more than one cross-
owding. The marriage is taking
lace at St. Margaret’s Church,

examination of the plaintiff's wit-
nesses or more than one address} 4
to the jury. The defendants’)
witnesses will be examined by the D
eee estminster.
en cad vine sereta ko voit Miss Dowding is the daughter of
ferent counsel will be ‘heard for yer = Bo step-daughter of
each defendant on a legal objec-|Reo oop poe Of ‘York ‘Terrace,
“Where several defendants ap- sitaiiilatins war:
pear by different counsel ani
have different interests, counsel KOREA GOVT. WANT: S
for each defendant so appearing
ine} TO RETURN TO SEOUL
the witnesses on the other side
and to address the jury. It is in
such a case to the discretion of| Political leaders in Seoul peti-
the Judge to say in what order|tioned President Syngman Rhee
for an early return of the Korea
amine witnesses and address the|Government to the capital at
at i fend +|the Government, here temporarily,
nae ery _ _ ere von desired to return to Seoul soon but
“If one defendant calls wit- “it depends on the outcome of
sinbes = and. another, who _ is|2*Mistice negotiations at Panmun-

different counsel .in the same

We Regent's Park.

will be allowed to cross-examine

PUSAN, July 15.

the defendants are to cross-ex-

jury. The order generally followed |Seoul. A spokesman for Rhee said

jom.”
@ On page 6.



—U-P.

U.S. Wants Russian
Magazine Suspended

WASHINGTON, July 15.
The United States ordered Russia ‘to suspend immedi-
ately” publication in this country of the Soviet information
bulletin and all kinds of Red material. :
: In a note delivered to Moscow, the State Department
also notified the Seviets that the U.S. is suspending “im-
mediately”, its own Russian language magazine “America”
printed for Russian readers, ea
The note charged the Kremlin with curbing the distri-
bution and sale of “America” by using “obstructionist”
measures to keep from Soviet readers “the true picture of
American life and thus a misunderstanding between the
two peoples.”
It said Moscow Government with
12 American protests since
December 1949 has violated the
1946 agreement to circulate inside
Russia 50,000 avn of pod United sree 3
States magazine. It cut sales more
than two vanes ago to 35 Soe Bolivia § Tin
io this is now down to 13,00 WASHINGTON, July 15.
State Department requests to Leon Henderson, economist and
find out whether the magazine is former United States government
actually being offered for sale , official, said yesterday that acting
outside Moscow were never an-,0" behalf of a group of associates,
swered. The Russians according 294d with the authority of the
to the State Department, instead, Bolivian government, he offered
increased their propaganda attacks the Reconstruction Finance Cor-
on the magazine and began re-;Poration a long term contract for
jecting articles on human rights, | the ome oe ee te Boli-
The Department's action SUS | eed war adie ae gpl ain
pends the Soviet Embassy's publi- | The offer to RFC aricti % ths °
cation of USSR in a nation alien sole purchaser of tin in the US.
to its supplements and any other wo. the result of a visit Henderson

material published at the expense made several weeks ago to Bolivia.
of Moscow Government. The Unit- Henderson said the contract is



U.S. Offered All

ed States note said the United intended to be for

States would consider resuming| years ieee rat Sa, Oe
publication of “America” if Pet: He estimated Bolivian tin pro-
Soviets would grant “the same

3 s duction to be at least 30,000 tons
freedom of the publication, distri-]annually, about half of which
bution and styles which had been’ formerly came to the U.S. and the
accorded Soviets in the United 'remainder went to other countrie:
—U.P —U.P.

lates

° | Korea to

SEOUL, July 15.

United Nations soldiers hurled
back another savage! Communist
counter-attack on the east coast
hill south of Kosong in a bitter
hand to hand battle that raised
the toll of Red dead and wounded
on the height to nearly 600 for the
last four days.

Reds threw a battalion into
their sixth unsuccessful attack on
the hill in the past 36 hours. One
North Korean unit fought its way
finto Allied bunkers but U.N. sol«
diers hurled back Reds and kill-
et one.

Four days of fighting for the
hill cost Reds 327 soldiers killed,
and 265 wounded.

United Nations artillery killed
60 Red troops on the east central
front east of Satae Valley while
Allied planes accounted for 45
more in attacks across the battle-
front,

Far East Airforce planes also
destroyed 105 Communist bunk-
ers, knocked out 50 gun positions,
burned 15 supply dumps,
destroyed 65 buildings,

United States Sabre jets prob-
ably destroyed one Communist

Bose: 15 jet and damaged

another in two separat

fights. oe
—U.P.



Attempt To
End Steel
Strike Fails

PITTSBURGH, July 15.

A new attempt to end the:
day old strike of 590,000 st
workers failed on Tuesday.

In-
dustry and Union

what to do next,

“Command performance” talks|marry—Private First Class Ronald
requested by Government after|Leo now in Korea.

week-end conferences broke up

with C.I.O. United Steelworkers] fiance’s brothers told police she

rejecting the new industry “sug-|was at one time frightened by the

gestion” for ending the most cost-|attentions of the bus driver who

ly walkout in the nation’s history.| frequently held up his bus in front
We have continued our discus-]of her office waiting for her.

sion this morning and are still in
disagreement,” said Union Presi-
dent Philip Murray after a two-
houf conference. He said he and
Joseph Larking, Bethlehem Steel
Corporation Vice-President repre-
senting the major steel companies,
reported by telephone to the Act-
ing Defence obilizer John R,
Steelman. “He requested us to
stand by for further word from
him,” Murray said.

Two points still apparently
blocking a settlement were the
controversial Union show clause
and the proposed revision of wage
structure of 23,000 iron ore work-
ers.—U.P.

Canada’s Defence
Programme Passes

Milestone

OTTAWA, July 15.
three-year defence



Canada’s

programme has quietly passed a| which
milestone. She has started to ship|experimental treatment of cancer
new equipment to help Atianticlin the early stages. He empha~-
Pact allies in the defence of Eu-}sizeq that the experiments had

rope.

The arms and equipment she has
sent in the past have been things
jeft over from the Second World
War.

It was announced yesterday that
the first of 300 secret new radar
sets, a type to be used by the army
in its anti-aircraft setup, is due
in Britain shortly, possibly Wed-
nesday,-—(CP),



Sirike At Briggs
Auto Plant Ends

DAGENHAM, Essex, July 15.

A_ three-week strike of 10,000
workers at the Briggs automotive
bodies ‘plant and an associate of
the Ford Motor Company, ended
here Tuesday.

The Strike Committee recom-

mended a return to work Wednes-
day after the company agreed to
Ford work-
ers several days ago settled their
own protest stiike against the lay-
ing off of four men because of the

discuss wage claims.

Briggs strike,—(CP).



METHODISTS DISLIKE
GASOLINE BOMBS

PRESTON, England, July 15

The Annual Assembly of the
British Methodist Church called
Monday for a ban on the use of
napalm bombs The
agreed to ask the
}persuade the U
stop using
omb (CP



Command in
iellied

441 day because she repulsed his ad-
eel lvances.

negotiators |six bullets fired at her by a mys-

threw up their hands and waited teri
for the White House to suggest a aes

meeting
Government to

gaso-



IN MEXICO CITY, a half-track (top) guards a midtown intersection as
pot-election riots bring death ad disorder to the Mexican capital.
‘4. ousands of troops, firing bullets and tossing tear gas, battled to halt
outbreaks staged by backers af.Gen. Miguel Henriquez Guzman, de-
feated for the Presidency by fo Ruiz Cortines. At bottom, one of

__the injured is showmbeing carried io safety. (International Soundphoto)
Deadlock, Likely At

Democratic Convention

CHICAGQ, July 15.

Governor Adlai Stevenson's vigorous insistence that he
wont be drafted put a new spark in the contest for next
week’s Presidential nomination by the Democratic’ National
Convention.

Stevenson had not convinced everyone but “favourite
sons” and other candidates whose names are going before
the Convention were eager to believe him.

They feel they have a chance so
long as the Illinois Governor balks.
They are also plugging for numer-
ous Pvresidential ballots.

Seriator Edwin C. Johnson ar-
the prize for Sen-
. Russell, Johnson.

. He
"s omen n
Ey tenth or anyway the last bal-
lot.

Ten ballots is a great many, A
Convention which goes that far
may be said to be deadlocked—and
a deadlock very likely will develoo
here if Stevenson stands firm.

Senator Robert S. Kerr thought
not more than five or six ballots
would be necessary to nominate
the Presidential candidate, Kerr
now has 43% Convention votes
toward the 616 minimum he would
need to win.—U.P,

Rebels Seek Aid
From General
Chiang Kai-Shek

RANGOON, July 15.
Official sources reported rebel
Karen tribesmen fighting Burma’s
Government have gone to For-
mosa for arms aid from Chiang
Kai Shek and the Chinese Nation-
alist army.
Sources said the Karen delega-
tion led by Saw Shwe, tribal chief,





Girl Shot At
Office Desk

NEW YORK, July ic.

Police began searching Tuesday
for a love-crazed bus driver who
may have shot to death a pretty
eighteen-year-old secretary at her
Columbia University desk Mon-















Eileen Fahey died instantly from
“thin man”. Death came

was reading a letter from
the Marine whom she planned to

Eileen’s closest friends and her





Queries On Gancer
Do Not Concer
Eva Peron

VIENNA, July 15.
Austrian gynecologist Kurt H.
Schaffer said he was “one hun-

jared per cent. sure” that queries|flew from Monghat near the
receive from Argentina on his|northern border of Siam _ to
cancer treating methods have}Taipeh, They did not say how~

ever, who flew the group,
Karen rebels recently suffered
severe reverses from Government

nothing to do with the condition
of Senora Eva Peron, ailing wife
of Argentine President Peron,

Schaffer pointed out that}troops who have re-occupied
official announcements had not ;most of the territory in the dis-
even identified the disease from|trict previously taken,

—UP.

U.S. DESTROYER GETS

FOUR DIRECT HITS

WASHINGTON, July 15.

The United States destroyer
Southerland received four hits in
a duel with Communist shore bat-
teries off the East coast of Korea
Monday, and the navy revealed
that eight men suffered minor in-
juries.

which Senora Peron is suffering
and said “requests for informa-
tion from Argentina are among
several hundred routine queries
about my work with polydyn.”
Polydyn is the pharmaceutical
Schaffer has used in



not reached a conclusive stage

and that polydyn definitely was

mot effective in advanced cases,
Schaffer again discounted re-

ports that an Argentine doctor}” The Southerland silenced five of
named Von Witzleben had|}seyen shore batteries in a twenty-
arrived in Vienna for consulta-|four minute battle in which more

tion. He said he had received a

eable from Von Witzleben from

Buenos Aires only yesterday.
—U,P.

than two hundred rounds of five-
inch shells poured into Commun-
ist gun emplacements. oP.



New Envoy Is Finance Expe

WASHINGTON, July 15.

An Indian Embassy spokesman
said Tuesday the pending change
ef Ambassadors to this country
will bring here one of India’s
leading “financial wizards” and
will give added emphasis to the
growing importance of econormuc
relations.

The appointment of Gaganvi-
hari Mehta as the new Indian
Envoy replacing Ambassador
B. R. Sen, was announced in New
Delhi, Saturday. Mehta is an ex-
pert in Indian financial and de-
velopmental problems and one of
the authors of the current Indian
Five Year Plan. Sen is a career
diplomat who was assigned here
from Rome when former Ambas-
sador, Madame, Vijaya Lakshmi
Pandit returned to: India last
year for the national election

but this has not been confirmed
pfficially.

Explaining the new emphasis
jto be given economic affairs, the
spokesman said, “Washington is
our top diplomatic post and has
always been earmarked for the
top public figure. Mr. Mehta is a
financial wizard and it is feit
there is a need here for someonic
who should be in addition to the
top public figure one widely fam-
jliar with the major economic as-
pects of relations between the
two countries.

He said it is felt the appoint-
ment of Mehta to the Washing-
ton post is ‘bound to bring close
economic ties”. He said the date
for the change of Ambassador
has not been set but Mehta is ex-
pected to arrive here in the first
half of December and Sen will

The embassy spokesman said probably leave some days before
reports have been current that Mehta’s arrival. Sen will leave
| Sen would return to New Delhi here Sunday for Chicago to ob-

to be named Foreign Secretary, serve
. Nat

the
top b the Forei I L ¢

Democratic
U.P

Part)

onvention





































day” attacks in the capital itself |
where two bomb attacks caused
considerable damage over the|
week-end.

in Sfax 190 miles south ot| Red
here unidentified attackers staged
two bomb-attacks and authori-
ties called it a miracle that no Attacks US.
Policy

one was hurt. At 9.50 a.m, G.MLT.
a homemade bomb thidden in a
bag went off at the market place
* there was no ome nearby and

e explosion caused no damage,

An h e MOSCOW, July 15.
jean Gee eke bee A Russian magazine reviewing
from the ramparts into a mili- the Mid-Eastern situation said the
tary camp filled with Tunisian United States had converted the
World War II veterans celebra-|Mediterranean into an American
ting Bastille Da with Frenct “mare nostrum” and squeezed out

cot way eh! British, French and other Medi-
civil and military officials, The terranean powers

Taking up individual countries,
it said the United States is fever-
ishly extending and equipping
Turkish bases,

nineties again today.





bomb exploded but hit no one.
—U.P.

Jet Explodes
With USS.



According to the magazine, the
United States obtained from Spain
the use of 50 airports, 40 landing
fields, 10 seaplane bases, 40 sea-

° {ports and all of Spain’s naval

FI in Ace bases, It said many bases and
y £ landing strips are under construc-
tion in Corsica, Sicily, Israel and

ALBANY, Georgia, July 15. [the Arab countries. It said the

Lieutenant Colonel Elmer Da-| United States already possesses a
rosa, air force pilot, was killed|Â¥@Stly superior fleet in the Medi-
Monday when his Thunderjet!terranean permanentiy there and
fighter plane exploded over Iwo|is accelerating. the construction of
ima_on a mass jet flight to the| five huge airbases for heavy
Far East, according to word re- bombers in West France, especial-
ceived here, ly on the Atlantic coast
_ Darosa was leading a flight of
jets from the 21st Fighter Escort
Wing at Turner Air Force Base
here to the Far East. The plane
exploded during an attempted let-
down over Iwo Jima.

Darosa, a native of Sacramento,
California had more than 6,000 fly-
ing hours to his credit during 27
years. He was one of the organ-



The magazine said, if the present
American plans for a_ sep-
arate pact with Spain and Portu-
gal materialize, British Gibraltar
will become a hopeless back num-
ber.

The article concluded: ‘The
purpose of this integrated system
is to enable the United States to

i ¥ »xert constant pressure on all
izers of the Turner Standardiza-|¢*“ is , aon oars
tion Board on flying technique, and] European | countries | especially
President of the group hose situated in the weste pi
Following World V ef the continent, and hold the

War IT he
served as Commanding Officer of
the 68th Night Fighter Squadron
and later as Commander of the
347th Fighter Group in Japan.

He spent 39 months in the Far
East before returning to this coun-
try in 1948.

In 1950 he flew to England as
Commander ‘of the 307th’ Fighter
Escort Squadron, = .

UP.

“Red Dean”
Abused Office

SAYS ARCHBISHOP

LONDON, July 15.

The Archbishop of Canterbury,
primate of the Church of Eng-
land, charged on Tuesday night
that the “Red” Dean of Canter-
bury abused his office but said no
action can be taken against him
under canon law.

Doctor Geoffrey Fisher made
the statement in the House of
Lords a few hours after Prime
Minister Winston Churchill re-
plied no to the setting up of a
special tribunal to investigate tha
“Red” Dean on the grounds that it
would exaggerate the importance
of germ warfare charges, The
Archbishop revealed in his speech
to the Lords that three years ago
in a letter he asked the “Red”
Dean to either resign or to cease
his activities,

He said “by the way in which
the Dean has conducted himself
he has really misused and com-
promised his office, He said the
Dean was free to hold what views
he liked but charged that he
allowed himself to be exploited
by “managers of a _ political
system the supports for their own
ends.

The Dean is no atheist. He is

peoples of Europe, Africa and the
Mid-East in perpetual fear of re-
prisals in the form of air attacks
and blockades. be

Floods In Assam
Leave Thousands

Hameless

CALCUTTA, India, July 15.

Thousands of persons were
homeless today as floods swept
most of Assam and West Bengal.
Communications were cut off and
air travel curtailed. Many per-
sons were rescued by rubber
dinghy and the relief organiza-
tion began dropping food from
planes,

Floods followed the week of
monsoons in the Assam hills and
Himalayan areas, Water was six
to eight feet high in places, To
add to the difficulty an earth-
quake of moderate intensity
shocked Tezpur in Assam,

: —UP.







Big Welcome For
S.S. “United States”

NEW YORK, July 15.

One of the biggest welcomes re-
ported for the superliner United
States which was scheduled to
dock after breaking the East to
West record Atlantic crossing. In
setting the westward speed record
yesterday the United States crossed
in three days 12 hours, 12 minutes
averaging 34.51 knots. It bettered
the previous record set by Britain's
Queen Mary by nine hours, 36
minutes. The liner also set the
West to East crossing record last
week,



social justice better applied in
Communist countries than

they
are here.

—UP,

U.K. Teant Leaves
For Helsinki

LONDON, July 15.
The main body of Britain's
track and field team left for Hel-
sinki by air on Tuesday bearing
the brightest hopes this country
has ever entertained for Olympic
laurels after more than a decade
of lean pickings in Olympic com-
petition.
The British team this year is
rated the strongest ever mustered
for the Games. Manager Jack
Crump said his big worry is how
athletes will sleep in Helsinki’s
21 hours daylight and three
twilight.
High jumper Alan Paterson
already in Helsinki has cabled
asking for warmer clothing. Pater-
son emigrated .to Canada some
months ago but was selected to
compete for Britain
An absentee on Tuesday's flight
was Roger Bannister, Britain's
hope in the 1,500 metres. jan-
nister is as unorthodox er.






as eV

He has no coach or trainer: and

asked to be allowed to fly over

just before the games start

Jesides Bannister, outstanding | t

British prospects include sprinter | am.
Emmanuel McDonald Bailey, | . «
marathoner Jim Peters, middle} FLAG RAISING CEREMONIES mark the formal opening of the Olympic
distance runners Chris Chataway} village in Helsinki, Finland, where the Olympic Games will bé held
and Gordon Pirie, and high jump~| ater in the month, While crowds look on, members of the Ceylon
j ers Shei . Lerwill and Dorothy! team gather in foreground as their flag goes up to join the Japanese.
ae : Pe a fle km yer Set S, s te ak “3

°
§ » {re rush hour stampede. More that
azine 650,000 relief at

oe an official member of the} i eee, pein

0 st =©. Part; d 2

Sane on the datied tie "| RAISE FLAGS AT OLYMPIC VILLAGE |
He denies no Christian doctrine .

and believes in the Christian : 7 eee ee
Principles of, peacemaking and oe ¢

Many New York firms closed
early to permit drooping employ-
ees to get home early and avoid

persons sought A
nearby beaches
Beer For The Patient
In Cleveland, Ohio, it got so hot
a 62-year-old hospital patient whe
vas supposed to be in bed recup-
erating from an abdominal oper+
ation walked across the street to
1 nearby tavern to order beer, The
startled bartender took one look
at the prospective customer dressed
in a hospital gown, and called the



police who rushed him back to
hospital—-without the beer,
Scores of persons collapsed from
the heat in Boston and the city
recorded 17 drownings in the
three-day hot spell. A record of
101 degrees was reported at the

Bedford Massachusetts airport.

Railroad cars loaded with wheat
from Nebraska ond neighbouring
Bthtes piled up at Oklahoma
Farmers said the weather was
“fine for harvesting” and most of

them reported record yields.

Thunderstorms and _ showers
caused trouble at seattered points
throughout the U.S,’ Small craft
warnings were hoisted at the
southern tip of Florida with the
30 m.p.h. wind

Blecu 1 storms with winds up
to 90 mph, lashed the northeast
corner of Maine. Trees were up-
rooted, ire knocked down
chimneys bowled over and many
windows smashed by the sudden
fury of the storm

“Hurricane Hunter”

The weather Bureau despatch-
ed a “hurricane hunter’ plane into
the Gulf of Mexieo to investigate
2 “suspicious” area of squalls and
at the same time, warn small craft
from venturing into the open gulf
during the next.24 hours.

“Hurricane Hunter” left Jack-

sonville about 7.30 a.m. to investi-
gate
ately

the squally area approxim-



cas said they found no
‘circulation’ to winds’ which
would indicate the possible form-
ation of a hurricane, but said the
wea definitely is “suspicious”,
U.P.

EASE MILITARY
CONSORILP'TION

SAYS HUGHES

LONDON, July 15,
A pacifist member of Parliament
Suggested on ‘Tuesday that Britain



ease or repeal military conscrip-
tion,

Emrys Hughes, Labour member,
said the time has come to change
the National Service Act in view
of the large number of trained
soldiers now available. British
youths now are called up for two

years training

Hughes said he will ask Prime
Minister Churchill on Thursday to
give the House of Commons the
idea when he proposes to intro-
duce legislation repealing or modi-
fying conscription.—(CP).



Ambassador To
Atfend U.N. Talks

WASHINGTON, July 15,

The Argentine Embassy an-
nounced today that Ambassador
Carlos Romulc will remain in
New York for two weeks attend-
ing the United Nations Economie
ind Social Council

He will participate in delibera-
tions on technical assistance for
underdeveloped countries, the
Embassy spokesman said.


































# chu
di Rev. K. E. Towers con-—F



PAGE TWO



IS EXCELLENCY Gov
ernor and Lady Savage have
given their patronage to the
which will be held at the
Hotel on Saturday night July 26
Chis is another attempt to raise;
funds for the Blind, Deaf and
Dumb Association and should be
well supported.
Mrs. Deighton

the

Ward and

Orchestra of the Police Band wil

Marilyn were the names given
the infant twins of Mr, and Mrs,
.Hutson. Taylor of “Mara”, Christ
t James Street on Sun-

he baptism ceremony and

na Mrs. Peter

wrence Hote!
Parents.

Morgan of
were the God

Off to U.K.
RS. CECIL NOOTT, wife of
Major Noott, headmaster ot
Combermere School, left for the
U.K. on Sunday by the 55.
Colombie with her baby daughter
whom she has taken up fow her
parents to see. She expects tof
be away for about three months.
*. > *
EV. M. E. GRIFFITHS, Vicar

of St. Matthias, ang Mrs.z R. K
Griffiths were also passengers on M":, 4

Sunday for England by the S.S
Colombie. They hav gone up o!
tong leave.

Other passengers leaving fol
the U.K. by the same opportunity
were Miss Margaret Abbott of
St. Vincent who has gone up to
the Royal Surrey County Hospital
to do nursing, and Mr. and Mrs
J. M. Watson from St. Lucia who
are going up to Scotland for four
months’ holiday.

Mr. Watson is an engineer em-
ployed with the Cul ge Sac and
Roseau Sugar Factories.

Leaving Today
M* WILLIAM DUFF, Presi-
dent of Agromotor in Sao
Paulo, Brazil, will be leaving
torday by B.W.LA.
on his way back

for Trinidad
home afte!
spending a short holiday as a
guest at the Ocean View Hotel.
Mrs. Duff and their two chil-
dren Eleanor and Robert who
came over with him, will be
remaining until the end of the
month.

For Health Reasons
R. W. W. MERRITT, Chief
Sanitary Inspector of St.
Michael, left on Monday By
B.W.1L.A. for Puerto Rico intransit
to the U.S.A. where he will enter
the John Hopkins Medical Centre
in the interest of his health.
During Mr. Merritt's absence,
Mr. Ben Gibson will act as Chief
Sanitary Inspector.

Cyclists Return Home

RRIVING by B.W.LA. on
Monday from Martinique
after taking part in a Cycle
Meeting were Messrs, L. Carmi-
chael, G. Hill and D. Grant.
Other members of the team
are expected to arrive on Satur-
day.



.

been subterranean for more

than two hundred years, is to re-p Umbrage
appear as a fountain when St. Renaissance)
left hip.

Bride’s Church has been restored , =
According to old maps the Dail yh

Express building stands just about.

where its right bank was. Ity
came through Holborn, flowed
slightly east of Shoe-lane, and feil*

Marinell

;
st

4

Mrs

Ben Moore are looking after the
reservations and the ae

supply the music.
Twins Named ‘
UTSON MARK and bBery! e .

BY THE WAY...

‘HE old Fleet River, which hast







MR. AND MRS. PEROY R. J. MAW

For three Weeks

DEAN, Customs Cler!

jaupel and Co, Commis

sion Agents, Mr, J. Koan, Civil
ervant allached to the Govern-
ment Chemist Veparunent and

Wy. A. Ghany, Manager of N. M.
Ghany, Provision Merchant, all ot

Port-of-Spain, are now in Bar-
bados for three weeks’ holiday
which they are spending as Guesis
of Silver Beach Guest house,
Rockley. They were among the
passengers arriving on Sunday by

rhe S. 5. Colombie.

Also arriving on the Colombie

on Sunday from Trinidad were
Miss Lucille Brathwaite, Miss
Lucy Mowlah-Baksh and Miss
Gennilin Smith, nurses attached
do the Colonial MHospitai, San
Fernando. They are up for ten
days’ holiday which they are
6pending as guests at Silver
Beach Guest House.
A Son is Born

Ce ee to Dr.

and Mrs. G. T. M. Cummins,
(Teddy «anc Hyacinth) an the
birth of a on in London on
July 12.

Dr. Cummins is the son of Dr.
H. G. Cummins, M.C.P, and Mrs.
Cummins of “Gothmarc,” Bank
Hall Road.

University Students
R. GEORGE CRICK,
Mr. and Mrs. J.

son of
M, Crick of





“Weston House,” St. James, and
# second year student at the
University College of the West

Indies, arrived from Jamaica on
Sunday night by B.W.1.A. to spend
the summer holidays with his
relatives,

Another student returning on
Sunday night by B.W.I.A. from
the University Collegé to spend
the summer holidays with her
relatives was Miss Beryl] Williams
who was doing her first year in
medicine,

cut the cheek of a Seneschal, re-
bounded and caught Dame Edith
{the Spirit of the
a hefty swipe of the
The procession then
halted

Wisdom of the ages

Had the camel been born with
braces he would no doubt feel em

titled to wear breeches!

into the Thames where Queen? Mabini: wappuonar
Victoria-street meets New Bridge i ifterthought proved.)
street. There was. a bridge at} ~ :

Oldbourne (Holborn), and ships HY not send a Note to the

used to sail up and unload there. ¥

If anyone is interested, let him}
read “London on the Thames”, by
H. Ormsby,

and Co. .

Dress rehearsal at Pibney 2° 40use of Commons.”

T the first full-scale rehearsal’

Russians “telling them that
unarmed aircraft have been
warned not to fire on Russian

. 5 lanes?
a fascinating book? . E
published in'1924 by Sifton, Praedy QPONSORED

parliamentary
debates would commercialise
In these
words Connie Truelove appealed
to all parties to resist the scheme

of the procession which will, {or allowing big firms to sponsor

oma the Pibney St. Vitus Car-
val Mimsie, as Boadicea, got on
to the wrong cart, and found her-
self in the middle of “King Ed-
ward III granting a charter to
Pibney Monachorum’’. Edward
III pushed her into a baron, and
her spear-point ripped up _ his
doublet. In trying to disengage
the spear two other barons rolled
off the cart and tripped up two
serfs carrying a dead deer slung
upside-down on a pole. The deer,
which was a plastic one, broke
in two with a loud spink. ‘The
Master of Ceremonies, dashing to
the scene, fell over a crusader who
had fainted. and his megaphone

icbates or single speeches, “Han-
sard, * she continued, “would read
like a page of advertisements,”

Mr. Whackstraw (Con., Poop-
urst, a lifelong believer in
Snibbo): In my opinion the

Siamese question calls for dras-
tic treatment, as the man said
when he smeared His nose with
Glosso. This is no time for hesi-
tating, and if we can make up
our minds that Glonzoline is the
best remulgent, we can surely
come to an equally important de-
cision about Siam. We must stick
together, like two people who
have used Glujoy too lavishly to
smarten their clothes up. (Thinks:
Hurrah for Glujoy! Opposition



Married at Jamies Street
T James Street Methodist
Church on Saturday after-
noon at 4.30, Miss Joan Evelyn
King, only daughter of Mrs, Edith
King of Chelsea Road and the
late Mr, Hemry King, was married
to Mr. Perey R. J. Maw, son of
Mrs. E. Maw of Oxford, England,
and the late Mr, Maw, and an
employee of Barclays Bank.

The bride was given in marriage
by her uncle, Mr. R, H, King of
Penrith,” Worthing. She wore

dress of white satin embroi-
dered with pearls. Her tulle veil
was kept in place by a headdress
of orange blossoms and _= she
carried a bouquet of cream roses
and gerberas.

She was attended by Miss Greta
Bushell as bridesmaid. She wore
blue embroidered organdie with
hat to match and carried a
bouquet of red roses,

The ceremony was conducted
by Rev. K, E. Towers. The duties
of bestman were performed by
Mr. George Challenor, while
those of ushers fell to Mr. Billy
Watson, Mr. Evan Evelyn and
Mr. Peter Perry.

A reception was held at “West
Ray,” Christ Church, the rési-
dence of Mr. and Mrs. Bruce
Inniss, after which the couple
left for the Crane Hotel on their
honeymoon.

For Indefinite Stay
FTER spending a month’s
holiday in Barbados, Miss
Ailsa Ferguson of Grenada, left
on Sunday by the S.S. Colombie
for the United Kingdom for an
indefinite stay. She was a guest
of Mr. and Mrs, Ernest Newsam
of Flint Hall.

Miss Ferguson’s sister, Mrs. J.
E, Copeland, wife of Dr. Copeland
of Grenada is holidaying in Bar-
bados and will be remaining for
a_longer period with her daughfer,
Dr, Joyce Copeland,

Beachcomber

shouts of “Why not Stikaroo?” A
member; “Try Treaklo!’’)
Silence is a social menace
i a National Association of
Mental Health (sic) wants
the “morose refusal of a hus-
band or wife to talk” to be
grounds for divorce. The sugges-
tion reveals a degree of mental
sickness which is positively as-
founding. I would like to suggest
that a corps of Mental Health
Police be enrolled, so that every
household could have one billeted
on it. His duties would be to
encourage and stimulate conver-
sation between husbang and wife,
ind to report sulkiness and silence
to the Association. A _ senior
official would visit each married
couple one a week to receive re-
ports from the officia] on the spot.

Listening Hours

WEDNESDAY, JULY 16, tnoe
10O—7.15 pom . 176M, 35. 53M
ee

# p.m. The News, 4.10 p.m. The Daily
Service, 4.15 p.m. The Nations in Song,
445 p.m. Gershwin, 5.15 pom. Listeners’
Choice, 5.45 p.m. The Hymns We Sing,
6 p.m. Scottish Magazine, 6.15 p.m, Miy

Kind of Music, 6.45 p.m. Sports Round-up
and Programme Parade, 7 p.m. The News,
7.10 p.m, Home News from Britain

11-100) pom %6.58M, 31. 2M
See EEE ennnR EEE

7.15 p.m. Calling the West Indie§, 7,45

pom, All Hale, 8.15 p.m. Radio News-
reel, 8.30 p.m. Statement of Account,
#45 p.m. Interlude, 8:55 p.m. From the
Editorials, 9 p.m. The Forgotten People,
10 p.m. The News, 10.10 p.m. News
Talk, 10.15 p.m, Mid-week Taik, 10,30

p.m

From the Third Programme,

FS)



Booking Office opens on Friday 23rd. at 8.30 a.m.







for The Barbados Players Presentation

THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING EARNEST
At = EMPIRE THEATRE

July 24th & 25th 8.30 p.m. — Matinee 25th at 5.00 p.m.

Members may book their seats to-morrow from 8.30 a.m.



Sener tt







Reductions in HARDWARE

KITCHEN SCALES
COFFEE MILLS ....

MINCERS
CAKE STANDS

SANDWICH STANDS
DECORATED LEMONADE SETS
DECORATED LIQUEUR SETS

HEAVY TUMBLERS





were $10.66 now $6.00

were $4.90 and $6.08 now $3.00 and $3.50

were $3.14 now $2.00
were $4.00 now $1.20
. were $6.00 now $2.00
were $10.66 now $6.00
.. were $6.47 now $4.00
3 for 24 cents

T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS

DIAL 4220

YOUR SHOE STORES

DIAL 4606

BARBADOS

ADVOCATE

RAHAM GREENE STARTS |
A SEARCH FOR MISS X

GPRAnan GREENE has waited until the age of

47 to write his first

play. He has been content

to win world renown as novelist and film script-
writer before tackling the theatre.

This patience is in welcome contrast to the practice
of many young writers—who, to judge by results, dash

off plays at first though

t and set about ‘carning the

eraft after their audiences have suffered.

Now .G is ) lo make his kk in W,
et 8 ny mark wit exclaahatlan ngtes Por a ;
. 4 el
Living whic the 2

autumn. is likely
controversy of recent years

RETURN JOURNEY



JQ cpvtations have been shake

at the Old Vic this year.
Now comes PAMELA ALAN to
the rescue, with her companions
frem Bristol.

What the London stars were
unable to do. these young
unknowns of the Bristo! Old Vic
did last February. Invited to
the parent theatre for a brief

visit. “as encouragemen' their
presentation of The Two | eotile-
men of Verona—and « ally

Miss Alan's acting of the boy-
disguised heroine — enchanted
critics and public.

*

The unknowns packed the
theatre for a fortnight; when
they were sent her business
dropped again. Their boxs-oifice



takings sill stand as \he season's
fecant--#8 the Old Vic manage-
ment are doing the sensible

thing.

The Bristol juniors are being
brought back te London on
Monday week in the same pro-
duction. This time they stay for
three weeks—and this time. too,
Miss Alan and Co. will do she
encouraging. The “parent
fhentre and its box-office, are in
seed of encouragement.

to pr

au!
a
whi
T
in

only
priest



Brighton Reck*
him.

New York is
left Britain
ticltiywood and

Find the girl
has been, see!

Who will be jest ? One
actor now the part in
roma fe
sereen since .
a the girl's t oat
uthor nor ofoducer a.
vet as a clue. She
4
Sar is ‘avaliable: the is.

of the L emotional
written for a young
recent times

special in new taient

I have for long been
West End dramatists to ele
leading parts for our younger
actresses. to encourage the stats
of to-morrow, We v need
some fresh faces at the top. Here
is one big epportunity.

Miss Murray’s 1952

HE year began so weil for

22 - year old Barbara
Murray

She was picked — dc you

remember? — as TV's _ most



promising young . comedienne.
3 was given her first og
e@ part--in the new N.

Hunter play. Adam's Apple. She
got married at the beginning of
rehearsals.

West End success seemed ae
round the corner, _ for >.
liunter's earlier comedy, Waters
oi the Moon. is one of London's
mash hits Not only Miss
Murray but the three top stars
—Alan Webb, Marie Lohr and
Derek Farr--fe'* confident as







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and 8.30 p.m.

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GALE TY

The Garden—St. James
Last Show TO-NITE 8.30

Packed War Drama!
TANKS ARE COMING’
Steve COCHRAN

THURS, (Only) 8.30 p.m
“ROPE”
Farley Granger James Stewart,

q “OUTY for CONQUEST”
James CAGNEY

FRI, & SAT. 8.30 p.m.
“FLYING LEATHERNECKS”
John WAYNE (Color)

OPENING FRIDAY 4.
8.30 pam. and continuing

LADD'S A FIGHTING AGENT
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Written by RICHARD QREEN and WARREN DUT

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, by HAROLD |
i; CONWAY |

they sut-@ on their preliminary
But now | A "3 apple is

invisiile. 1 hh ane ee End nt ne
see heen \
And A= May not mee he pes

cast.
Their lost chance

I Siting Foun Gletgud there tc

there tc

act in a film of Julius Ceesar.
His name means little or nothing
to cinema audiences; but he ir
our best Shakespearean actor-—
and producer.

Why, however, have our own
film studios left this project-
actor—to Holywood?

has not worked a

rt
fs, romnined for “ag, Americ
st to sugges’ :
on the grand scale.
itish producers have allowed
a t-rate chance to slip past

them.
WORLD COPYRIGHT RESERVED
Lendon Erpress Service



CROSSWORD

tT ledeiel Sat.
rd Foe







3

m 5)
0





WEDNESDAY, JULY 16, 1952

—He Thought He'd Join the Robins and Swallows -—
By MAX TRELL

“T'VE made up my mind,’
Knarf. ;
“You have, dear?” said Hanid in
a far-away-voice. She was sitting
curled up in a chair by the window, |
drawing a picture of the big oak |
tree that stood by the garden wall. |
It wasn’t an easy picture to draw |
because there were so many branch- |
es on the tree, and evel beaneh bad :
so many twigs, and each twig had | }
so many leaves. She really wasn’t
paying much attention to what her |
brother was saying. !
But suddenly Hanid heard Knarf
announcing: “So I'm leaving for |
the south as soon as the Robins and |
the Swallews go. ['m going to go,
with them. And what I'd like to

know is—”

“What did you say?” Hanid ¢X- | plenty of flowers right inside the
claimed in ‘dr. “You're 20iP@ house, The geranium keeps grow-
away somewhere?” ling. It doesn’t lose any of its leaves.

Going Away | And all the other plants in their
|little clay pets in the windows,
keep on growing, too.”

said



| Hanid was drawing a picture. —

“I’m going south,” Knarf re-
peated. “I'm going away when the
Robins and the Swajlows go.” None of Them Stay

“Oh!” | “What about the birds?” said

“They all say it’s wonderful down Knarf, “They all fly away. None of
south. Instead of being gold all win. them stay here. You don’t hear any
ter like it is here, with snow and) singing.”
we ees Sse rcgbiat all the binds Ay away. The

natpciper epee Sart oe obins and the Swallows go. Bu

“Even at nights” asked Hapid | the Sparrows stay. hey fy around,

‘ or y . . %
it does. But it shines good and warm ee o wiadake cold. And Sere
all day long, and none of the trees ja bird right in the house that sings
lose their leaves, and = | ail through the winter—the most
sakes et ndat Dadinetn ee “uae
singing. Now w “What bird?”
is, do you want te norat along, mg “The canary.”

Hanid thought for a minute or! upp» cak a
two. Finally she shook her head. Pring said Knarf, “I forgot about

| ,

“You don’t!” said Knarf. “If you Pega ,
, y ) go south,” said Hanid,
“No. I'd rather stay here. “you can’t have snow for sleigh-













“Why?” ; ' rides. You can’t have ice for ige-
“Because,” replied Hanid slowly, skating. You can’t have a Snow-

“I don’t think you have to go south, | man, And [ don’t think you ean have
or anyplace else, to be warm in the | any Christmas Trees, not the regu-
wintertime, The house is warm jar kind, with snow and frost on
when the big fire burns. And it’s them. So I’m staying right here
warm when you wear a coat, and| where I can have the south inside
mittens, and big heavy shoes.” the house, and the north (and the

Hear “In The Mood, Chatanooga, Choo, Choo

Acwose “But there are no flowers in the| winter) outside the house. Now
1 pele in land. atte. ~ garden in the wintertime, and all|don’t you think you’d better stay
3 Et’ teateed on ey. 48) the trees lose their leaves.” here, too?” And Knarf sighed and
10. ot a * “Yes,” said Hanid,
i? oak” s ores tae ~ S66 eaiaeindnal 00096
4, Solid mass. (4
RS Sere ogee
Ig’ Retap the guy’ ‘a re (3)
38° Taken rope mo TO-DAY & TOMORROW 4.45 & 8.30 P.M,
21, Six this ve.
ai Propet "ay sola: MESTER 880 BURT LANCASTER
1. Bhs part to tether is weed of it
+: Ber .- acount mun. 4) SUN VALLEY SERENADE
4. eving of @ sost. a John Sonja Lynn Nicholas Glenn Miller
* heen end Gene, if
16,

1g. fe Could be quite aps. (ap

"Phone


























FANT RUSKS!

— for
body odours.











FAIR

¥ 19, 1952 — 100—10.00 p.m.

GAMES, LUNCHES, TEAS,
DINNERS, SUPPERS Etc,

Dinners To Be Reserved
Music, Visitors’ Mannequin

Parade — FUN !!!
ste CHILDREN — 94.

HURRICANE SEASON

ANEROID

BAROMETERS

Only a limited number so select yours early and be prepared

Also

HURRICANE LANTERNS

Established

T. HER




Betty HUTTO



Fred ASTAIRE —
in







“LET'S DANCE”
and

Starring
Glenn FORDE = Lucille BALL

OPENING FRIDAY 2.30 & 8.30
“BAL TABARIN”











- MADAM O'LINDY & HER TROUPE,
OLYMPI in
, TO-DAY & TO-MORROW 4.30 & 8.15
pene Corey — Macdonald Carey _ CORES |: OROER OF 208)
in
“DHE GREAT MISSOURI RATD" ROYAL
j and TODAY 430 & 8.30 TOMORROW,

“OOETATN APOE U.8.A.”
ith

Allan LADD — Wanda HENDRIX
OPENING FRIDAY 4.30 & 8.15

Charles Laughton Boris Karlo’
in

“TRE STRANGE DOOR
and

“UNDERTOW”
Starring










Scett

10 & 11 Roebuck Street

TO-DAY & TOMORROW i.0 & &.20

i, “REDHEAD AND THE COWBOY"



Incorporated

BERT LTD.









N 4.50 & BLS

“IN A LONELY PLACE”



with
Humphrey BOGART
and

“COWBOY AND THE INDIANS”



Gene AUTRY — Sheila RYAN
TO-NIGHT AT 8.30



















4.30 (enly)

Rod CAMPRON
in

“STAMPEDE”
and
‘THE HUNTED”

ft

Madam bac dgnar & Her Troupe

ere. (
v toa to the Iacket’ setae.

TODAY 430 TOMORROW & FRIDAY



TOMORROW NIGHT AT 330 6 {f

QPENING FRIDAY —

BELLES ON THEIR TOES

(Dial 6170)
Last 2 Shows TO-DAY
4% & $30 p.m.

CASA MANANA
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GOLDEN STALLION |] Wark "Sorry IIMy FOOLISH
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Steve COCHRAN &

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“ See Alan LADD th





AT
PARADISE BEACH CLUB

ON
OCTOBER 4th 1952.

NOTE THIS DATE.














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ne

WEDNESDAY, JULY 16, 1952

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Cuba To Sell Sugar For Sterling ?-

“To, Help Britain
Deration Sugar”

LONDON.
Britain is arranging to buy 500,000 tons of sugar trom
Cuba for sterling instead of dollars, according to reports in
the sugar trade in London.
Sterling currency paid to Cuba for this sugar would be
used to buy British-manufactured goods which Cuba needs
—particularly cars and buildi materials+and would also

save some of the dollars Britain

sugar, say these reports.

While Government spokemen
will not confirm these reports,
there are many grounds for be-
lieving that they are true. Cuba
is anxious to secure a market for
this year’s record 8,000,000-ton
sugar crop, much of which is sur-
plus to existing requirements,
while Britain is equally anxious to
secure sufficient supplies of sugar
to enable it to come off the ration.

British housewives and man-
ufacturers of foodstuffs who use
sugar have been pressing for
many months for sugar to be de-
rationed. Additional indirect pres-
sure is now being made on the
Government as a result of this
summer’s heavy fruit crop, much
of which may be wasted if in-
sufficient sugar is available for
canning or bottling it.

There is no indication, how-
ever, whether the 500,000 tons
of Cuban sugar mentioned in
these reports would be addi-
tional to the 500,000 tons of
Cuban sugar Britain is com-
mitted to buy this year under
the Anglo-Cuban Trade
Agreement signed in London
last August,

Although it was tacitly accepted
that Britain would pay for its
Cuban sugar in dollars, this was

t specifically laid down in the
1951 agreement,

The arrangement now being
discussed, therefore, could be a
modification of the agreement to
emable Britain to pay for this
yéar’s consignment of Cuban sugar
in sterling instead of in dollars.

Such an arrangement need not
be detrimental to the Cuban
economy and would certainly be
b@neficial to Britain, Instead of
spending dollars in Cuba with no

srtainty that Cuba would use
them to buy British goods, by
paying for the sugar in sterling

itain could ensure that all this
ec cy received by Cuba would

e to Britain in payments for
manufactured goods..

Commonwealth sugar producers
would not suffer, since the British
Government has given a formal
undertaking to find a market for
the entire exportable surplus of

rome eae sugar to the end
' 1953,

'

AIT SIO ma

Additional supplies of sugar in
Britain would not only enable
sugar and sweets to be taken off
the ration, as Government spokes-
men have said they would like to
do, but would also enable manu-
facturers of chocolate and other

fectionery to expand their
production to meet the big export
demand for their alan Tee

“Operation

Skywatch”’

Starts In U.S.

WASHINGTON, July 14
Air Defence officials began
gathering reports Monday night
from 150,000 volunteer aircraft
spotters to see how effectively the
nation is being guarded against
enemy air attack.
Civilian skywatchers began
— the clock operations Mon-
morning at 6,000 observation
posts in 27 states. Reports on the
first day’s activities are being



- assembled at Air Defence Com-

4

- base,
_ said
_ Wednesday b

’ mand Headquarters at Ent air

colons: oa here

it wow be Tuesday or

a they will
able to evaiuate the success
“Operation Skywatch” in its ini-
tial stages,

_ The 24-hour watch began de-
spite the fact that the Civilian
Ground Observers Corps was
badly understaffed. Most spotters

agreed to work overtime to keep

the programme going until more
volunteers were obtained.
Defence »lanners attach great
importenes to ‘ground observers
because they can .cover areas
where natural obstacles such as

now has to spénd on her

A Visit To The
“Advocate”

On Monday, 7th July, 1952, the
boys of the A and part of the B
classés. of the senior school of
the St. Leonard’s Boys’ ‘were
taken to the ‘Barbados Advocate
by Mr. Belle, their teacher,
whose main object in_ taking
them there, was to enable them
to observe the variety of ways
in which the mechanical princi-
ple of which and lever can be
employed. Meanwhile I learnt
some facts about the art of print-



Printing from movable wooden
types was invented by Lawrence
Coster of Haarlem, Holland, in
1438, and from movable cut metal
't by John Guttenburg of
Montz, in South Germany, in
1444, Printing from metal types
cast in moulds was invented by
Peter Schoeffer@n 1452; but pro-
duced no work until 1459.

On entering the Advocate we
were taken to the Cossar Press;
the largest machine in the Advo~
cate, where we saw the “Evening
Advocate” being printed. Most
or all of the machines are worked
by electricity; this was one which
was worked by electricity, and it
was caged in. While we were
moving away from this machine
a new roll of paper was being
put on. When it was turned on
again, a green light flashed from
a box just in front of the ma-
chine. This machine contains
wheels in abundance; also levers
in abundance. We were taken
through the Advocate by one of
the workmen, who explained to
us the things we saw. He gave
Mr, Bélle a copy of their “Eve-
ning Advocate’. Mr. Belle said
he did not know which one ‘of
the boys to give it to, that it
would be better if he kept it him-
self. We were taken to the de-

artment where the types were
eing cut for the machines. The
Cossar Press prints, cuts and
folds the papers. We were then
taken through the lino-type de-
partment. This department has
machines with a key-board like
a t writer, and a light over the
key-=! rd. We went to another
department, where we saw ma-
chines marked “Meteor,” which
pick up the paper, print on them

and send them out. A boy, Em~
merson, was printing “Mount
Gay” labels with a machine

worked by the foot; many more
of this type were seen in this
establishment, printing red ‘and
printing black. We were told
that every colour imaginable is
used in many types of work done
in this department.

We also saw an elevator or
something most like one between
the top and bottom floors carry-
ing up the equipment for print-
ing. We were being taken up-
stairs when we met Mr. Brome,
Assistant Editor of the Advocata
iwho said to the boys, ‘““‘Whoever
‘writes the best essay on what he
sees will have it published in the
Advocate Newspaper.”

We went upstairs and saw the
leaden types being arranged for
the machines. A boy was errang-
ing types for an advertisement
for the film “Viva Zapata” to be
shown at the Globe Theatre. Be-
side him was another boy wear-
ing glasses, also arranging types.
He had a voice like thunder.
While upstairs taking our last
jook, we saw a boy studying hard
Sorting out more types.

We were mow ready to go
home. Mr. Belle gavé some of
the workmen his heartiest thanks
for carrying us_ through the
building. Mr, Belle _ jokingly
asked if any boy or part of him
was left in any of the machines.
No one was left, but I was the
only person tha g had

ed to. smeared

a y

With apots of grease. I am very
sorry that I cannot mention some
ee names, because I do not
aie many people in the Advo-

T hope that I shall some day

mountains, block the detection of in the near future be working

low flvinge aireraM by radar.

Eventually, the
which covers both coasts - 74d the
North Central tates will be _ex-
tended to nine other ctates ive
hymred thousand volunteers .are
néeded.—wW.P.

India Will Not Get
Russian Grain

_ NEW DELHI, July 14.

Russia has not offered India any
rice or wheat this year according
to,the government of India. China
offered 100,000 tons of rice which
were gratefully accepted but no
wheat was offered by China,

The Governmest of India was
prepared to accept any further ex-
port of rice tfom China. Atcord-
ing to an offieial statement, very
large stocks of Wheat exist afd the
question of further imports of this
grain during the year dot nor





Air losses

TOKYO, July 12
Far fas!
the total airplane des

for the two-year-old
war. An Airforce summary




I nm
said

U.N. lost 719 planes compared to

524 for thé Reds.

However thé Airfotce said
of the Allied plane losse
due to ground fire
air combat.—U.P

rather tha

Airforce announced ,;
struction »

548 1

in this place, when the machines
prerramme Will be improved to make them

noiseless.
ORMOND A. ASHBY.
St. Leonard’s Boys’ 8c
10th July, 1952, i oe

Two U.S. Soldiers
Attacked In Tokyo

TOKYO, J 14,
A week-end of southoned vio-
lence, including attacks on two
U.S, soldiers of Japanese descent,
alerted Japanese police to new





Communist outbreaks on the 30th
anniversary of the Japanese Com-
munist party.

Two Americans Were beaten up
on-a street car last night by hood-
lums believed to be Koreans, They
were hospitalized but their in-
jurles were not serious.

Meanwhile, police chiefs from
the entire Tokyo area conferred
over the week-end to lay plans to
combat any violene@® on the Com-
munist anniversary tomorrow.
Some 2,000 police were mobilized
y at Musashino City, 10
ide of Tokvo.
the only activity was
speeches and Com-









rf@unist Songs delivered by student
roups. A fire bomb thrown into
the prosecutor’s. office at Shiba
City caused some damage to furn-
ishings.
fourte Koreans were ‘arrested
the U.S ilitar rserial
K f t i
ns war a?
—U.P

HOP TO HAWAN TESTS AIR REFUELING _ |

a. of 20 F-84 Thunderjet fighter bombers landed at
Tlickem Air Force Base, Honolulu, Hawaii, completing the long-

est non-stop air-refueling jet flight

Travis Ait Force Base, California. They made the over-water hop in
five hours and twenty-seven minutes, averaging 438 miles an hour The
rest of the 31st Fighter-Escort Wing will “island hop” the rer
part of the Pacific to Japan. At top, an F-84 is refueled from «4 |:
bomber. Center, Col. David C. Schilling (right), commande:

Wing; points out the course of the {

William D. Dunham. At bottom, sec
jets before take-off from Travis Air Force Base.



Self-Government Or
Capital Development?

Growth of self-government in undeveloped territories,

however desirable it may be
large obstacles in the way
according to The Economist,
cal-economic journal,

“The security is greater and the obstacles are therefore

less in the Commonwealth i

with the rapid extension of self-government in the Colonies,
the security is no longer an

used to be.”

In an article considering the
sources of capital that could be
tapped for Commonwealth devel-
opment, “The Economist” does
not mention any particular terri-
tory. But it makes several points
which are very pertinent to the
West Indies,

It estimates capital require-
ments for development of the
entire Commonwealth (excluding
the United Kingdom itself) at
£500,000,000 a year, maybe much
more, and adds: “No governmen-
tal corporations, British, inter-
Commonwealth or international,
are going to find as much as that.”

Most of the capital needed for
Commonwealth development has
come in the past from the United
Kingdom, it continues, but it
doubts whether this can continue,
Britain has little savings out of
which such capital can be made
available, its balance of payments
position is not as satisfactory as
would be needed to clear the
way for investment on this scale,
and the current rearmament pro-
gramme precludes Britain from
supplying as much capital equip-
ment as would be needed.

“These facts make it impera-
tive to examine the ssibilities
of obtaining non-Bri capital
for the development of the Com-
monwealth,” the article con-
tinues, making it clear that by
“non-British” it means y
American. The United States can
fulfil all the conditions necessary
to enable it to make large over-
sea Investments.

“Hitherto, however,” the arti-
cle goes on, “there has been an
almost complete lack of enthu-
stam in the United States for
in ng in the sterling area.
The private American investor is
very loth to place his money any-
where outside North America —
except for the direct investments
of the oil companies, where the
impelling force igs more their own
thirst for oil than the desire to
assist in the development of
neglected territories.

“Moreover, even if Americans
were prepared to pour billions of
dollars into the Commonwealth,
would they be entirely welcome?
All unworthy jealousy apart, a
Commonwealth whose develop-
ment was financed predominantly
from America would not long
remain a _ British Common-
wealth.”

It would be unwise, therefo °.
the article says, to count on no -
British capital for more than a
fraction of what is needed. Ts
United Kingdom may not in te

future be the sole supplier of
capital for the Commonweal ':
but it will have to go on doi ¢

at least half the job.

“Tf he Commonwealth a 4
the sterling area are to contin
there will have to be develo:-
ment,” the article concludes f
there is to be development, t
Unité Kingdc ilt have

pit t

yn 250,000,000

yea

T.B. Greatest Scourge |
Of Colonial Empire |

LONDON. i

“Tuberculosis is still a scourge in many parts of the |

Colonial Empire today and presents us with one of the)

gravest problems”, Mr. Oliver Lyttelton, Secretary of State |

for the Colonies, told delegates at the Commonwealth and

ee —— and Tuberculosis Conference in London on!
uly 10th,





“Since the spread of
through the discovery of
now heads the list of killer «
ton.

‘The stamping out of tubercu-
losis has Often been regarded as
& purely medical concern. I want
to state again that success in the
‘ight against tuberculosis depends
Lom aceon by all members in «
& a nity,” he said.

other subjects, and above all the
spread of knowledge is necessary
fos the incidence of this terri-

e .

“T can tell you that there are
signs that in the Colonial Empire
people are beginning to be more
aware of the dangers and are
willing to help more whole-
heartedly in the measure
intended to overcome it.
have, however, a long way to go.

“T would like to tell you of an
example of what is being accom-
plished in certain parts of the
world, A campaign against tuber-
culosis was launched last year in
Jamaica by the World Health
Organisation, the United Nations
International Children’s Emer-
gency Fund and the Jamaican
Government, with the aid of
some funds from the Colonial
Development and Welfare Organ-
isation.

“The aim is to immunise all
Jamaican children and young
people agai tuberculosis within
a period two years, This is an
ambitiotgs attempt; when you
remember that thére are 700,000
people involved. A __ similar
scheme has been started in
Trinidad this year,

In conclusion Mr. Lyttelton
said that he was sure the con-
ference, which had brought
together the medical on
from all over the world, would
bring far reaching benefits to the
people of the Commonwealth and
to humanity.

Among the nine Colotilal medi-
cal officers was Dr. Harold
Pacheco Fernandes, the tubercu-
losis officer for British Guiana
who told the conference that
future accomplishment in British
Guiana will depend on _ the
finances of the colony,

However, he that
future improvements should be
centered around the provision of
more medical personnel, thoracic
surgery and mass miniature
radiography to enable accurate
surveys of the population to be
undertaken,

ever attempted—2,400 miles from

Ste

light of the jets to his ¢
urity guards stand wat :
(In 1

LONDON.

on political grounds, put very
of their rapid development,
London’s authoritative politi-

han elsewhere,” it says. “But

ing like as absolute as it
B.U.P.

ITALIAN FAMILIES
TO SETTLE IN CHILE

ROME, July 14,
i total . 135 renee families
Ww: soon leay
A federal election board spokes- settlement in Chile, te hones
man said official returns of last office of the Provisional Inter-Gov-
week's national elections showed ernmental Committee for move-
President Elect Adolfo Ruiz Cor- ment of ants from Europe
tines, candidate of the Government said today. A great number of
party of Revolutionary Institutions them wil, be agriculture workers,
was piling up “about 50 per cent.’ Several skilled recruits will also
of the total vote, be drafted.
—U.P.

“rc, (SEN AND AIR
TRAFFIC

sections of Mexico, were expected
In Carlisle Bay



Cortines Has 50%
Lead In Polls

MEXICO, CITY, July 14.

to be completed sometime today
and the final official results wili
be announced by the Chamber of
Deputies.

Ruiz Cortines was conceded the
Presidency on the basis of unoffi-
cial returns following last Sun-
day’s balloting. Earlier unofficial
returns had placed Ruiz Cortines
ahead with 7 cent, of the ap-
proximate 5,000,000 votes, This

malaria has greatly decreased,
new insecticides, agg ae
liseases,” continued Mr. Lytte!-

j

Conditions At
Skeete’s Bay |
Improved

ve! I lack of fresh

ail, bad sanitation or poor feed-

ing, all contribute to the spread i

of the disease. So far, therefore '
matter

In reply to questions asked by |
Mr, J. C. Mottley (C) in the/
House of Assembly concerning

difficulties encountered at the an-

chorage at Skeete’s Bay, St. Phil-

ip, the Government have stated

that they are satisfled that every-

thing that is practicable has beer |
done to improve conditions ai
the Bay.

The reply states:—

No complaints have been
ceived from boat owners in|
respect of difficulties to be}
encountered at the | anchorage |
at Skeete’s Bay since _ blast-|
ing operations removed a con-
siderable amount of the coral)
just where boats are moored, The
channel at Skeete’s Bay, does,
howver, present difficulties to,
lishermen at certain times of the |
year. As the result of a survey |
which has been made, the con-|
clusion has been drawn that il
would be necessary to cut an en-)|
tirely new channel.

|
j

re- |

This project would be very ex- |
pensive and uneconomic and the
results could not be guaranteed.
Furthermore, Owing to the con-
our of the laid, sections of the)
beach lands may be lost to the |
sea if the protecting barrier reef |
were opened wide enough to al- |
low boats through in a more di-
rect route than at present. |

In the circumstances the Gov-
erpment is satisfied that every-
thing that is practicable has been '
done to improve canditions at |
Skeete’s Bay, |

BULOVA
WATCHES ||

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JUST OPENED!

PAGE THREE

Build up their
future health



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aid love Marmite’s rich, appetising taste—so

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FOR FAMILY FITNESS



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, development

tremendous geropataae appeared
cut by 20 to 25 per cent. by three
Opposition candidates,

Of the three rivals, General
Miguel Henriquez Guzman, candi-
date of the Leftist Federation, of
the People’s Party and 0
called the “strong man” of the
Mexican leftwing element, was
making the strongest showing and

in some areas was reported to be
running only slightly behind
Ruiz Cortines.—U.P,

Abducted Fr. Monk
Freed By Syrians

TEL AVIV, July 14.
An Israeli Army spokesman
said on Monday that Syrian sol-
diers had abducted a French monk
across the Sea of Galilee and held
him in Syria for two days.

The kesman said the monk
Father Pierre Guichou was am-
bushed by two armed Syrian sol-
diers last Friday as he walked in
Tsraeli territory near the Jordan
River and the Sea of Galilee.

The Israeli said the monk was
released yesterday after interyven-

tion by an Israeli’s member of the mr

U.N. sponsored Israeli-Syrian mix-
ed armistice commission —CP).

_ Gollymore, Mr.

“To do that, the British people
will have to save more than they
do at present—which is the same
thing as saying that they will
have to reduce the level of their
consumption relatively to their
output. And they will have to
rake sure that they have a large

, surplus on their balance of pay-

ments,

This
It means that Commonwealth
presemts no escape
harsh compulsions of

from the

the British economic problem. On “
» the contrary,

success at home in
tving that problem is a _ pre-
isite of (

B.U.P

is a sobering conclusion. 7?

mmonwealth 7*






YOULL BE

DELIGHTED
With THEM

Seh. Timothy

Emeline, Sch. Van
Sluytman, Sch, Sunshine R., Sch. Frances
Ww, ith, Lady Joan, S.S. Bruno, M.V

R Sch. Lucille ‘Smith,
Mary M. Lewis,
h Seh, Zita Wonile, Seh
Rainbow, Sch, Enterprise, M.V. Blue
Star, Sch. Gardenia, Sch. Gloria B.,
Sch. Sunbeam





Belqueen with cargo from 8st.

DEPARTURES
M.V. Monieka for Dotninica

SEAWELL

ARRIVALS ON MONDAY By B.W.LA,
From Martinique—N. Howard, David
Grant, Lyle Carmichael, Géorge Hill.
From Trinidad—A. Burnham, M. Burn-
ram, M fSPaarte. R. Richardson, P
ey, | larke, A, y ae
Miner, J. Miner, M tine fhe, 5
Miner, W. Thomas, B, Thomas.
From Antigua—Derek Walcott, Eugenia

ike, ny Baxter, Herbert Hail
Hall, Oliver Halle. ah
lores

Poer &i90—Do! Hurley,
ison, Dirttcina Staten, Constance
L. Staten, Moise G. Gittens, Geraldine
Wilkenson, Estelle Hurley.
eee Bas Sy BW . ON MONDAY
ro n eorge Cox.

Fer trinidad Meic, lles, A. Quesnel,
G. Degale. f Crages, D. Craggs, Col. R.
Ozanne, J. ‘Thompson, H. Croucher,
Jacqueli Jay, Sydney Simpson, Barbara
Simpson, ‘1. Bonomie, M. °

For Grenada—T. Hawkins, G. Luck,
Ivan Alio.

For Puerto Rleo--Miss Victorine Smith,
Miss Maggic Sartlett, Mr. Walter Merritt,
. Woodley Anthony, /
Hinds, Mr. Peter Creig, Mrs.
Bryan, Miss Viola Bryan, Miss.
Drvan, Miss Vivienne ‘Bryan, Mr.
dley Walters.

For Antigua—M. Reingold, V.
Arrindell, FP, Hariey, W. Griffith, W
Wright, M. Wright, G. Warner, E. Edgar.

For Martinique—D. Johnson

6.55 p.m

RATES OF EXCHANGE

SULA 15, 1952
NEW YORK
Cheques on
Bankers 7h 3/10% pr
. Sight or Demand
Drafts 7h 1/10% pr
CORES: | ghavegnaccses
Currency 69 8/10% pr
Coupons 68 1/10% pr.

Silver 20% pr. !
CANADA |

Sch.
Vincent.

Lucille
Bulese
phne
ector

Selling

Buying
72 O/10% pr.

9/10% pr
il 4/10% pr

O% pr

THE CORNER ~~ SETS
STORE ne

7 p Cheques on
Bankers 76 2/10% pr

Demand Drafts 76.05% pr
Sight Draft 75 9/10% pr
Cuble
Curre 74 7/10% pr

14% pr

20% wm









PAGE FOUR




- faa ee {sarees Poa: way ¢
Printed by the Advocate Co., Ltéd., Broad 8t., Bridgetown



~ Wednesday, July 16, 1952

NOT STORMS

IN AUGUST 1949 at a special meeting
heid in Barbados accredited representa-
tives of British, French and American ter-
ritories agreed to select Puerto Rico as a
hurricane warning centre for the Eastern
Caribbean. °

Puerto Rico transmits four types of mes-
sages to addresses throughout the Eastern
Caribbean.

© of these messages concern storms :

two are about hurricanes, Advisory
signals are sent to warn recipients of dis-
turbances which do not justify the issue
of storm warnings and especially as a
guide to ships. Storm warnings are issued
for storms which are expected to reach an
island within the next twenty four hours.
A storm is not the same as a hurricane.

A storm is a violent disturbance of the
atmosphere with thunder or strong winds
and any violent disturbance of the atmos-

phere accompanied by maximum wind
velocities of less than 55 miles per hour
comes within the category of storms. The
warning system from Puerto Rico gives
ample time for the publication of storm
warnings in Barbados by telephone and
despatch riders, in the Press and over the
government broadeasting system.

The government's notice first published
in the Sunday Advoeate of July 13, 1952,
confuses storms with hurricanes, because
Barbadians are “notified that on the
approach of storms” visible cautionary and
hurricane warnings and “all clear” will
be displayed.

This confusion of terms is most undesir-
able and the government should lose no
opportunity in distinguishing clearly be-
tween storms and hurricanes, A hurricane
is indeed a storm with violent winds but
a storm is not a hurricane. Therefore “on
the approach of storms” no “hurricane”
warnings of any kind ought to be issued.

The government has ample time to pub-
lish in the Press and over the government
broadcasting system and to inform local
government officials by telephone and
despatch rider of any advisory storm
notices or storm warnings it may receive
from Puerto Rico. ,

With hurricanes quite another procedure
is necessary, because hurricanes are storms
with violent winds in excess of 54 miles
per hour.

Puerto Rico transmits “preliminary hur-
ricane alerts” whenever the winds of a
hurricane may cause danger to an island,
but when indications are insufficient to
justify a definite hurricane warning.

It is impossible to tell from the notice
published in Sunday’s Advocate whether
“cautionary warning” refers to the “pre-
liminary hurricane alert” or. whether it
refers to the “approach of storms.” |

Such confusion of terminology will not
make the public feel confident that they
will be receiving precise and accurate in-
formation when bad weather is sus ected.

‘the typeecot messages transmitted from,
Puerto Rico are admirably clear and leave
no doubt as to their meaning. rs

Why then should the Government of
Barbados seek to adopt a procedure of its
own so markedly different from the lucid
Puerto Rican procedure that there is no
distinction made between storms, and hur-
ricanes ? .

Why does it not publish advisory storm
signals and storm warnings as soon as oar
are received by telephone, radio, despate
rider and in the Press ?

Why have visual storm warnings? They
are not necessary and will breed confu-
sion between storm warnings and hurri-
cane warnings should Barbados be doomed
to experience a hurricane.

Telephone subscribers are also wonder-
ing why the “preliminary hurricane alert,”
which is presumably what the government
means by the confusing description of
“cautionary warning” should not be trans-
mitted to them by telephone. The co-op-
eration of the Barbados Telephone Com-
pany could easily be obtained in restricting
telephone calls to “priority hurricane alert”
and telephone subscribers could them-
selves repeat “priority hurricane alert”
signals to other subscribers.

The telephone is the best and quickest
means of passing preliminary hurricane
alert signals and visual signals ought to be
considered as complementary to messages
passed by telephone and despatch rider.
Tf audible signals are thought to be neces-
sary for “preliminary hurricane alert”
there definitely ought not to be any simil-
arity between the audible “preliminary
hurricane alert” signals and the “hurri-
cane warning” audible signals.

In the notice published first on Sunday,
July 18, 1952, plantation and church bel
ate in two “warnings” to be rung rapidly
for a quarter of an hour the only differ-
ence being that for the “cautionary warn-
ing” they will be rung “at frequent inter-
vals” while during the hurricane warning
they will be rung “continuously”. Could
any warning signals have been more
devised to increase public confusion and
to intensify doubt?

The “All Clear’ signal seems to have
been planned merely for use should the
hurrieane fail to arrive, despite the warn-
ings. Otherwise what flags or lights would
be left for hauling down and from where,
after a hurricane had finished its mad
cavorting destruction ?

As for the reports to be made over Bar-
bados Rediffusion Ltd:. or from the Bar-
bados Regiment transmitter at the Garri-
son, how can anyone foretell that both of
these transmitting agencies will not be

wy! ed?



hat happens after a hurricane depends
on what happened during a hurricane,

————_——_

4

es

BARBADOS

ea new are eres eT FR AR Spe R ER ER ee et) ee



ADVOCATE

There Is A Frankmess
About Her Eyes...

YOU may recall (if memory
lasts that long that last month
I wrote of Violet Markham, who
was the first to be made a Com-
panion of Honour,

I quoted the lines which ap-
pear on the medal, but she has
been good enough to send me the
full verse. It is taken from a
tribute to Addison by Pope: —
“Statesman yet friend to truth!

soul sincere, aro
faithful and in honour

clear

Who broke no promise, served
no private end,

Who gained no title and who
lost no friend.”

I am grateful to Miss Mark-
ham, though somewhat disturbed
by the e “Statesman yet
friend to truth!” Why not “And
friend to truth?”

Please don’t tell me.

And So Young

NOW it is my pleasure to in-
troduce to this column another
remarkable woman, although her
fame was won on a different
field.

Miss Kathleen Winsor, who
lunched with my parliamentary
colleague John Rodgers and my-
self at Westminster, wrote an
historical novel called “Forever
Amber.” And so intense was the
interest of the public oe in
pursuit of enlightenment, they
have purchased to date just
under two million copies.

Miss Winsor is absurdly young
for a women who has written a
450,000-word novel, and there is
a frankness about her eyes that
makes a man of the world choose
his words carefully lest he de~
spoil the illusions of maidenhood.

Even her eyebrows, although
a work of art, owe something to
nature. M

In

* *

THIS beautiful creature, with
the air of just having left Vassar,
was divorced by her first hus-
band because she constantly re-
ferred to herself by her maiden
name after the Amber success.

She, in turn, divorced her sec-
ond husband, who was a band
leader. With the historical back-
ground of her novel to assist her
she said that he was worse than
any of the Restoration charac-
ters in her book.

Then she married the lawyer
who acted for her and lived
happily ever afterwards.





News

LONDON, July.

Queen Elizabeth II and her
family have had their salaries
fixed by Parliament. She will re-
ceive £475,000 a year, Prince
Philip will ‘have £40,000, and
(Princess Margaret will have
£6,000 until she marries — then
more.

To foreigners not aware of
British traditions, this salary-
fixing, into which quite a bit of
political argumentation enters,
seems very strange and undig-
nified. a, it has a two hundred.
year history and has e
part of the system that lta the
British Crown high above politics
for the duration of every reign.
A deal was made under which
the Crown’s lands and proper-
ties were handed over to the
state—-they are administered by
the Minister of Works—and in
exchange the Royal family is
pleased to accept stipends from
the Exchequer. This means that
there is no envy or jealousy of
an untaxed Crown estate grow-
ing rich in the midst of a ‘highly
taxed world. For two hundred
years the Crown Lands have
not.carried death duties — like
other peoples’s estates—and so
they have grown in wealth until
their revenues are at least
double the total the ‘state dis-
burses as “Civil List” to sup-
port the daily, pe i and cere-
monial expenses of the Roval
Households,

The Royal Family costs th¢
country very little, If the total
of the “Civil List” is divided
only ‘between the people of En-
gland; Scotland and Northern
Treland it does not amount to
more than sixpence each year
from each of us. If all Her
’s subjects throughout
ared the cost of the
court it will scarcely cost them
more than a penny apiece, each

ear,

Clement Attlee, the former
Premier, put some _ Socialist
objections not exactly to the
cost of the Court, but to the
way its ceremonial is run, I
doubt whether the Labour Party
makes itself popular by taking
a line that seems to be critical
of the Queen. But, in fairness to
Clement Attlee, it should be
said that what he was carping
at was the round of socially
‘exclusive Garden Parties and
Levees rather than at the pano-
ply and pomp and majesty.

But the Socialist critics were
voted down a the routine at
Buckingham Palace will go on

19°

By Beverley Baxter

Miss Winsor is alert, intelli-
gent and good humoured, but I
just cannot see her with a pen
in her hand and a rising moun-
tain of manuscript.

All women authors look fike

women authors except Enid
Bagnold and, now, Kathleen
Winsor.

Like Mr. Baldwin's secret,
when he sealed his lips, Miss
Winsor will probably remain a
mystery for ever.

Believes In Us

ANOTHER visitor to London
is the Vancouver banker A, E.
(Johnny) Jukes, who is so pro-
British that no one would be
surprised if he wore a Union
Jack for a waistcoat.

He actually believes that great
days lie ahead of Britain if she
will concentrate on her oppor-
tunities and stop moaning about
her difficulties.

In the first war Jukes and two
fellow Canadian subalterns, on
leave from the trenches, went to
a wartime Derby at Newmarket.
Unfortunately by the end of the
second race they had run out of
money.

hen they saw a remarkable
looking bookie, dressed with
magnificent elegance and bear-
ing the sign ‘“‘Bob Sievier.” They
bore down on him and explained
their dilemma. Would he cash a
cheque for £100 and would he
tell them the winner of the
Derby?

“Certainly,” said the old sports
man, “and I advise you tg back
Mr. E. (later Sir EdwardS Hul-
ton’s horse, Fifinella.”
upon one of the subalterns
named Stewart wrote out the
cheque, and was given 20 fivers.

Mr, Hulton’s horse won and the
Three Musketeers sought out
their benefactor, paid him back
the money, and then asked for
the return of the cheque.

“Here it is,” said Sievier, “I
guess it wasn’t worth much.”
And for once threé Canadians
blushed.

A week later Stewart was
killed in a raid on the enemy
trenches.

Snob At Heart

WHY write a book when you
can make one? This thought oc-



Where- .



curred to me as I read of Ascot
victories by 100—6 and 20—1
outsiders with the fancied horses
nowhere.

There is, however, an explana-
tion, The horse is a highly im-
aginative. animal, an attribute
which makes him shy at a sha-
dow when any donkey would
know better.

Therefore, when a horse finds
himself racing at an unimport-
ant meeting, with just an ordin-
ary crowd and for a prize not
worth bothering about, he can-
not give of his best.

ALSO long contact with the
best ‘families has made the horse
a snob. Consequently, when he
sees the regiments of grey top-
pers at Ascot and has a look at
the concentrated virtue of the
Royal Enclosure, he is inspired
to excel himself. Literally, he
runs as he never ran before,

As the bookmaker said in the
Casino at Monte Carlo: “WOT?
Me play roulette with 35 run-
aers and all trying?”

Dawn Harmony
THE tide low as dawn
broke over mes... not
a boat-or barge stirred on the
' a lounge off the

Terrace came fine tenor voice
of “Jimmy” Glanville singing
“Drink to me

gnty with thine
eyes” to the actompaniment of
four or five other Socialists har-
monising for once in perfect
unity. ...

Two horsemen rode slowly
across the bridge to the East.
... “They are on their way to
the brewery,” said one of our
chaps....

Someone remarked, “You can
take a horse to the brewery but
you cannot...”

Quite rightly he went no fur-
ther, considering how close was
the river... . Silence. ... The
mystery of a day’s birth ...a
quarter of a mile up the river a
solitary beachcomber was search-
ing a jutting piece of the
shore. ...

“Wagner is all right,” said
Bob Boothby, “but he’s too
jong.” «..

Upstairs Rab Butler was driv-
ing through ine last stages of
the Finance Bill. ... 4

“I assure you,” said Boothby,
“Wagner is much too long.”



From Britain

By David Temple Roberts

as before. We can only hope,
with Parliament, that the Queen
will not find the immense round
of. social and official engage-
ments an unbearable burden.
Queen Elizabeth 1

You may have heard in Scot-
land they would like to call the
new Queen just “Queen Eliza-
beth” and drop the “II” frqm
the title. This is because Good
Queen Bess was not Queen of
Scotland. So they feel our
wresent Queen Elizabeth is their
first Queen Elizabeth, (Inci-
dentally she is descended from
Mary, Queen of Scots, who was
the cousin of Good Queen Bess).

This week a leading news-
paper North of the Border,
(which has lately shown sym-
pathy for Scottish Nationalism)
committed a strange error of
wishful thinking, A silver cup
was presented in Edinburgh to
Her Majesty. The newspaper
commented eagerly that the peo-
ple of Scotland would appre-
ciate the kind consideration of
the Queen in instructing that
the cup should be inscribed
“ELIZABETH”, merely, The fol-
lowing day the cup was pre-
sented, Afterwards, the Queen
“had it sent back to a silversmith
to have the legal and constttu-
tional “II” ‘added. The Queen’s
Press Secretary spoke to the
editor. The Great Newspaper
apologised.

There is some talk, North of
the Border, of stiff-necked En-
glishry among court officials.

Unlucky Return

Lord. Alexander’s mission to
Korea has been dogged with bad
Juek. It was not his fault that
while he was on the way home
the American Air Force bombed
controversial targets that he had
not been told about. But it was
his admitted fault that lead to
an uproar in the House of Com-
mons about his curious refer-

ence at a Canada Club dinner to’

a comment he regarded as secret
and had not told the House of
Lords earlier in the day.

The two upsets have obscured
what were to be the good results
for Anglo-American relations of
the visit of the Minister of
Defence and the brilliant Selwyn
Lioyd (Minister at the Foreign
Office), Lord Alexander brought
a favourable report of the situa-
tion in Korea—tempered with
some of a soldier’s proper doubts.
But it has been the doubts that



Our Readers Say

In Hiding
To the Editor, The Advocate,

SIR,—It was most regrettable
to see a Policeman in uniform
trying to secrete himself under
the balcony of a shop near the
corner of King Street where
several people were gathered in
order to “catch” those who did
not stop at or overrun the major
road studs at the Corner |
Westbury Road, h

It is the primary duty of the
Police to prevent crime instead
of waiting until people have
broken the law then to make
criminals of them. This is a
rather high conception of their
duty but not too high for the
local men to attain.

Hiding around corners until
people have broken the law can
be regarded as eondoning or
conniving at the breaking of the
law. ~The presence of a police-
man in the open roadway is cer-
tainly a deterrent to the most
callous lawbreaker, while hid-
ing until one has broken the law








and then ‘prosecuting him can

only bring disrespect for the

Force and enemies for its men.
CITIZEN,

have gained the publicity—be-
cause of the Gtneral’s inexperi-
ence of political office and his
maladroit speech.

The Labour Party regards the
whole episode as a_ gift in its
cam) against Winston
Churchill’s personal administra-
tion through the agency of what
are now everywhere called the
“overlords.” (Incidentally, Mr.
Attlee conveniently forgets that
his Government included an
overlord called xander; and
Emanuel Shinwell, another Min-
ister of Defence, was famous for
his public indiscretions).

Brixton to Wimbledon

It is a cockney’s regular way,
when he gains a fortune, to move
from Brixton, one suburb, to
Wimbledon, a much more genteel
suburb,

But George Dawson has
achieved it in a trail of cham-
pagne glory. He has probably
made more money faster than
any other Englishman in post-
war years. By applying the
technique of the used-car sales-
man to the masses of technically
derelict military vehicles left
over by the war Dawson man-
aged to amass a fortune that he
has lived on gorgeously, He
spends his money on wine, and
yachts and friends and the good
life by the Mediterranean Sea.

But his wife has just pro-
claimed her total boredom with
life on a yacht at Cannes, She
finds the Riviera coast is stuffy.
She and her husband are not re-
ceived in the villas of Cap
Antibes. Besides, business has
turned bad since the Korean war
put Dawson’s ‘“derelicts” right
back into the front line. The
Dawsons are coming home to a
16 room house near Wimbledon
Common,

Sedgman has just beaten
Drobny, while I have been writ-
ing this article, Good Luck to
Drobny, (who was the British
crowd’s favourite), and Good
Luck to Sedgman! At this Wim-
bledon there has been some talk
while the tournament was in
progress of the winner “turning
professional”, and Jack Kramer,
the American former champion,
was reputed to be waiting in the
stand with so much and so much
in dollars to offer.

It should be reported tihat, de-
spite Flam’s v t struggle, the
overwhelming of the Wim-
bledon-interested public (and
that includes about everyone)
aon glad to see a non-American

nal.



Traffie Etiquette

ae a theatre, dance or party,

it necessary for the owners
of cars to take home those who
are without cars?

ANS. Certainly not, unless the
owners of the cars called for
those without cars and drove
them to the party, and it was
understood return trips were
to be made. If the drivers
feel that they are being im-
posed upon, they might tact-
fully suggest a taxi or a bus.

* * eee |
What are the two most impor-

tant things a pedestrian can do
to avoid trouble and embar-
rassment?

ANS. To watch where he is go-

ing and to obey the traffic
signals.

it ® ‘@ *

Is it necessary to say “Thank

You’ to a driver of a car when
he has waited for you to walk
2

yy?
ANS. Without doubt, a person

should look across to the driver
and with a nod of the head
and a smile say: “Thank you’

After all, the driver has shown
an even greater kindness than
the person who opens the door
of a public building.

* * «* *

When two people are approach-
ing the same parking space on
a street, which one is entitled
to the space?

ANS. The one who has stopped
first and is making the attempt
to park. Never in any circum-
stance should one cut in ahead
of another who is trying to
park,

= : ok *
When a motorist drives at ex-
cessive speed through traffic,
double parks, ay drives un-
reasonably slowly, what should
be the attitude of the driver
inconvenienced?

ANS. He should drive carefully
and say absolutely nothing.
Abusive an@ unbecoming re-
marks are never to any one’s
credit, and are never justifi-
able, f the driver of

even



fault.

at



Slash Costs? Yes
Air Ring? No

From R. M. MacCOLL
WASHINGTON.
IN this tense election year Congressmen

are doing what they always tend to do in
suéh circumstances — slash budgets left,
right, and centre, so that they can face their
constituents as “economy-minded.”

President Truman, who knows the politi-
cal game inside out, realises there is not a
great deal he can do about this, and grudg-
ingly lets them have their way to some
xtent.

But he is fighting like a tiger, election
year or no election year, to stop a proposal
to cut down the funds for the air force’s

world ring of strategic bases,
* * * ca

REPORTS say that some Congressmen are
willing to halve the funds for this purpose,
but Truman, in a letter to Senator, Richard
Russell, of Georgia, calls this possibility “a
terrible disaster.” ‘

Truman has agreed to “stretch-outs”—put-
ting off the zero date for delivery time—of
several sorts of weapons and aircraft, in a
way which many men in defence and army
headquarters think is flirting with defeat.

But he feels passionately that the globe-
circling ring of big bases is, along with the
atom bomb, America’s great answer to the
Red menace, for without the bases to deliver
it effectively, the bomb itself would be a

futile threat.
* * a *

RUSSELL is the chairman of the Senate
Armed Services Committee and, ironically,
it was this committee which strongly criti-
cised Truman only last week for ordering
a “stretch-out” in completing an air force of
143 wings.

EVEN though Canada has made it abun-
dantly clear that she is willing to “go it
alone” on the seaway which will enable
ocean ships to sail from the St. Lawrence
to the Great Lakes, Congressional voices are
still raised in angry outcry against the
scheme.

Latest protest comes from Republican
Senator Irving Ives, who, representing New
York State, has his eye on New York Har-
bour’s shipping interests.

He says that he does not believe that it
will prove possible to charge high enough
tolls on the seaway to make it self-sufficient,
and “that means the taxpayer would be left
holding the bag.”

A SUDDEN windfall for the chimney
sweeps of Britain? Something called a
“tansistor” — a ‘tiny object which makes,
possible the manufacture of radio sets which
will practically never wear out — is made of
a substance called germanium, Germanium
is found in chimneys and, say leading indus-
trial firms in America, English-chimneys are |
an especially rich source of germanium be- |
cause English coal is full of the stuff.

AGAIN the charge of “cartel,” this time}
against some of America’s greatest whisky |
distillers. A Congress committee begins hear-
ings to see if the Justice Department was!

slap-dash or not in investigating America’s!
whisky trade.

PEOPLE have cried “wolf” so often about
Broadway dying that nobody seems to be-|
lieve it any more. But the authoritative
Baltimore Sun has conducted a searching in-
quiry into New York’s theatre street and its
conclusion is that Broadway really is dying.
“Unless something drastic is done, and done
quickly,” says the paper, “there is every
reason to believe that slow attrition will
continue, until those responsible for Broad-
way’s fantastic economic set-up will go
broke or disappear.”

ONCE AGAIN a major effort is afoot to
try to get all the 48 States to agree to a
divorce law which would be recognised in
any of them. Who sponsors the Bill?

Silver-haired Senator Pat MecCarran—who
represents the Reno-famous State of Nevada.

DEAD at 84, in the winter resort of Sara-
sota, Florida, is Sam: Gumpertz, who lived
and breathed show business all his long life.

Starting as a professional acrobat at the
age of nine, when he ran away from his St.
Louis home to join a circus, Sam became
actor, producer, Wild-West rider with the
old Buffalo Bill show, then turned agent,
then built a famous pleasure palace called
Dreamland on New York’s Coney Island.

Even after he retired he just couldn’t keep
away from it all, and continued to manage
the Eden Wax Museum on Coney Island
“just for sentimental reasons.”























Sugar Purchases In Dollar Areas

LONDON.

IN THE House of Commons on 3rd July
Mr. A. E. Baldwin (Conservative, Leomin-
ister) asked the Chancellor of the Exche-
;quer whether he is aware that there is a
heavy crop of fruit in prospect, much of
which will be wasted through shortage of
sugar to the canning industry; and whether
he will release dollars in order that the
crop may be processed and put into store
as a reserve against the possibility of a
crop shortage next year.

Sir Arthur Salter, Minister of State for
Economic Affairs replied :
|_ As regards the first part of the Question.
|I would refer to the answer given yesterday
|by my hon. Friend and Parliamentary Sec-
retary to the Minister of Food to my hon.
Friend the Member for Huntingdon (Mr.
Renton); as regards the second part, my
lright hon. Friend regrets that our position
}does not permit the release of dollars for
additional purchases of sugar.—B.U.P,



on







WEDNESDAY, JULY 16, 1952

PHOTOGRAPHS

Copies of Local Photographs

Which have appeared in the
ADVOCATE NEWSPAPER

Can be ordered from the...
ADVOCATE STATIONERY






Gouges

Ratchet Screwdrivers
Braces

Hatchets

Spanners

Saws

Hammers

Planes

Masons’ Squares

C. S. PITCHER
& CO.





The Answer is Headline

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WEDNESDAY, JULY 16, 1952

Welfare Adviser
Impressed By

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

West Indian Sportsmen

Home On Holiday



Emeline
Limps Into



Sportsman’s Diary
secinsionnerentionedtinniinniemitann

esis kcthaliaine’ taibaiidis “Aiea Two of New York’s prominent West Indian sportsmen, 6 Ne 7, %
- al into the Careenage. yesterday | Mr. Rigaude Placid Prout and Mr, Mortimer Thompson, 9 ations
eve oO ment n morning. It had been lying out- both Barbadians are at present in the island on a holiday ;
@%@ side in Carlisle Bay since Morday __ visit to their relatives. For Aquatics
j afternoon when it arrived from Mr. Prout is a member ofthe original Prout family
' St. Lucia without its captain

Miss Maude T. Barrett, Social Welfare Adviser of the Hiary Clarke, reported lon at Of St. George, while Mr. Thompson, a former member of

At Helsinki

the water, He moves them over
the water’s surface instead of
through it in preparation for his
next stroke.

Americans ‘ook the lead in in-
ternational swimming competition
round 1920 and held it until 1992,
rhen the Japanese came to the
fore, beating almost all competi-
ors at the Olympic Games that
year in the.United States, The
winner of the 1,500-meter free
style, a 15-year-old Japanese
named Kitamura, was on his way
‘o the dressing room before any
ot his rivals had finished,

At London in 1948, the United

PASE FIVE

South Africans, France has Alex
Jany, an excellent freesiyler, a
the Scviet Union has the worlds
record holder in the 100-meter.
breast stroke—a youth *hamed’
Meshkov. ;
These men will be swimming
such outstanding U.S.
swimmers as Dick Cleveland and
Clark Scholes, our fastest sprint-
ers; Ford Konno, a boy of Japan-
ese-Hawaiian descent who — is
probably Furuhashi’s closest com- .
petitor; Ronald. Gora, Wayne
Moore, Kerry Donovan, Bob Nu-
gent, and Jimmy McLane—all
freestylers. In the breaststroke we

Technical Assistance Administration of the United Nations sea on the voyage here.

with headquarters in Guatemala, told the Advocate yester-
day that she had seen some extremely im

valuable developments in

which impressed her very much,

She said that in the field’ of
community organisation and in
the development of community
welfare centres, the whole region
is very far advanced and she
was particulary impressed by
the excellent leadership in the
social field.

Miss Barrett represented the
United Nations at the Confererice
on Home Economics and Educa~
tion in Nutrition in Trinidad
earlier in the month. She is now
visiting some of the colonies in
the Caribbean before returning to
her headquarters in Guatemala
She arrived here on Sunday night
from British Guiana via Trinidad
by B.W.LA. and is a guest at the
Ocean View Hotel,

Technical Assistance

She said that the purpose of her
visit was not to make an inspec-
tion or social survey of any
assessment of programmes, but to
become acquainted with officials
and discuss with them in broad,
general terms, the technical assis-
tance programme of the United
Nations in the social welfare
field and to give them any in-
formation they might require.

Referring to technical assistance
which had been given to coun-
tries and Central America, she
said that the United Nations had
helped the Government of Guate=
mala establish a small school of
social work and that had been
done by providing some techni-
cians, but at the same time, pro-
viding some _ scholarships and
fellowships so that local people
could be trained.

“The whole emphasis of the
technical assistance programme is
on training,” she said, and added:
“We feel that the greatest assis-
tance we can give is by helping
to train local people if that was
needed, rather than by sending
foreign experts in to conduct
programmes for a long continued
period.”

Advice Offered

Miss Barrett said that she felt
very strongly on the point that
it was very uNwise to attempt to
‘super-impose any sort of pro-
gramme within a _ given area.
“What g country must do is to
develop its own programmes and
its own patterns, What a foreign
expert can do is to consult and
advise and give the benefit of any
technical knowledge he or she
happens to have. What should
result is a programme that is to
be adapted to the economic, social

and cultural conditions in the
country.”
Before joining the United

Nations in September 1946, Miss
Barrett spent two years working
with U.N.R.R.A. (United Nations
Relief and Rehabilitation Admin-
istration) and prior to that she
worked in various parts of the
United States in connection with
various social welfare programmes

in Chicago, Washington and
Louisiana.

Since she was stationed in
Guatemala, she has worked in

Central America, Mexico, and
Panama, visiting countries at the
request of officials and assisting
them in any way they wished.
She emphasised that the Gov-
ernments of the particular coun-
tries decided whether or not they
wanted assistance or help from
the United Nations or from her in
any way.

Miss Barrett leaves Barbados
tonight by B.W.I.A. for Trinidad
on her way to Haiti where she
will remain for several days for
conferences. She will then visit
Puerto Rica, the Virgin Islands,
Jamaica and Cuba before re-
turning to Guatemala.

enirenntiensaantenat

“VAN SLUYTMAN”
COMES OFF DOCK

The Schooner Timothy Van
Sluytman came off dock on Mon-
day and is now expected to sail
on July 21 for British Guiana
with cargo. She is consigned to
the Sehooner Owners’ Association.

The S.S. Oranjestad is expect-
ed to arrive in Carlisle Bay this
morning from Trinidad. Her
= are S. P. Musson & Son,

td.



... the inside story of sleep-
‘ing comfort lies
in the spring.

WE



James Rice, mate of the ship
took over at sea and brought it
into Carlisle Bay. Rice was the
mate ef the ill-fated Gloria May
which foundered off the coast of
British Guiana two years ago.

The schooner left British
Guiana on July 4 under -Captain
Hilary Clarke with a
of wood for Barbodes where it
was to be put on dock. On their

rtant and
the whole Caribbean region

Teachers’ Union
Quarters Funds

; *
W way to Barbados they encoun-
ill Be hicreased tered heavy seas and _ strong
Following the initiative of Miss winds which forced them to use
E. L. Cobham, an assistant teacher, their auxiliary engines. They

the Assistant Teachers’ Union on 72" out of fuel and had to put
Saturday decided to set about in- i at St. Lucia.
creasing their funds for building Alarm
Union Quarters. The Teachers’ The Emf€line left St. Lucia on
Union are usually faced with diffi- Saturday July 12 and at about
culty in getting a suitable place 1. 00 p.m. that day there was an
to conduct their meetings and the alarm that the captain wes over-
idea for procuring a building has board. The boat was reversed
long been under consideration. and the lifeboat lowered but he
ivuuss Cobham has already re- was not found.
ceived contributions towards the George Hinkson, a ship’s car-
Building Fund, The Union plans penter who went down to British
staging dances, concerts and such Gyjana with the Emeline said
like entertainments to increase tpt jt was first intended to dock
their funds. the vessel there but there was no
room. There were many leaks
and they had to take it to the
mud flats to plug some of them.

Erdiston Fees

The Union decided to ask the
authorities concerned to change
the system of asking teachers in
training at Erdiston College to pay
$40 a month for nine months.
Teachers feel that $40 a month is
‘too much to be called upon to pay
monthly and they would prefer to
pay it by instalments of perhaps
$10 a month.



Super-Sonic
Plane Has Big
After hearing expressions of Cooling Unit
opinions it was decided that the

Committee would agree as to what MOFFETT AIR FORCE BASE,
approach should be taken. ‘ California, July 15.
i Navy and Douglas Aircraft
Salaries Company officials declined Tues-
The President of the Union day to confirm Air Force officer's
called upon members to supply the announcement that the Navy has
Secretary with information which test flown an airplane at 1,300
will be necessary for the Com- miles per hour almost double the

missioner which is expected to speed of sound at sea level.

review Government Employees’ It is known that the plane the
salaries in the near future. It is Douglas Skyrocket is refrigerated

hoped that teachers who have to prevent melting at terrific
many years in the service—a case speeds, Apparently the unin-
of a teacher with 42 years was tended public announcement







NATIONALIST CHINESE
AMBASSADOR TO SPAIN

TAIPEH, Formosa, July 15.

Chinese Nationalist leader
Chiang Kai-Shek has appointed
Dr. James Thung Chi Yu to be
Nationalist Chinese Ambassador
to Spain. An official announce-
ment said to-day.—U.P.

mentioned yesterday who are not made during an air show at
near their maximum and willsoon awards Air Force Base, super-
be resigning, will be able to get conic plane testing grounds on
accelerated increases. the edge of the Mojave Desert
will discuss anomalies in € already had flown 1,300 miles an
salary scales. Saul nae
Officials at Ames Aeronautical
< Laboratory engaged in supersonic
.
Greek T Still this naval air station oe eee
z s any knowledge of such flight. Bu
In The Running they noted that the plane carries
a refrigeration unit big enough
Greece kept its Olympic basket- to cool the cockpit and prevent,
ball hopes alive by coming from rota) structural parts and even,
behind to beat the fast but smail tires from turning molten at the
Israel team 54 to 52 in a rough nounced high « ba:
sonal fouls were called. A field
goal by Phedon Matheou, star of
the Greek team, with only 90 sec- , 7
onds to go gave the game to the Soviet Jet Plane
Hungary yesterday, ae ,
Israel lost eight of twelve pny: Violates Bor der
ers permitted on the squa iy
personal fouls and had to play the BELGRADE, July 15.
Matheou’s winning shot — with Tuesday charged that a jet fighter
only four men on the court. plane carrying Soviet markings
As a result the Greeks were violated the air space of Yugos-
able to freeze the ball from that lavia, The announcement said the
Israel led by 35 to 27 at halftime miles inside Yugoslavia on Monday
but when the second half started, and remained three minutes inside
Greece used bigger players and the frontier near the village of
there was one period of five min- Lukos before turning back toward
scoreless.—U.P. This is believed to be the first
: instance in which a plane ident1-
fied as Russian was accused of
violating Yugoslavia’s air space
ly have been reported flying over
the frontier.—U-P.
ere
Jap Wonien Will
‘ »
Fight For Freedom

At its next meeting, the Union },-¢ saturday said the Skyrocket
plane research for the Navy at
HELSINKI, July 15. to chill a good sized auditorium
game in which a total of 71 per- —_U.P.
Greeks who were defeated by
last ninety seconds—just after The Yugoslav Government on
time on and hold on to their lead plane flying at 6,000 feet flew two
utes in which Israel was held Communist Hungary.
although satellite planes frequent~
JACKSONVILLE, Florida,
July 15





A Japanese woman editor said
Tuesday that the women and the
press of Japan are willing to fight
for their newly found freedoms.

HUNGARIAN
FORTRESSES

TRE ED Miss Tsugi Shiraishi, Women’s
s NGTHEN Editor of the Nippon Times here
LONDON, July 15. to address a YWCA luncheon said
Hungarian troops are strength~ freedom of the Press and the vote
ening their fortifications on the for women made great changes in
Hungarian-Yugoslav frontier, ac- Japan. She said the men are not
cording to reports to-day in Baor- too fond of the changes. “But they
ba, official paper of the Yugoslav can’t help it. Japan is really a



Communist Party.—U.P. man’s country or has been.—U.I'.
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the Barbados Constabulary under’ Inspector General N. D.
Harold hails from St. Andrew.

Mr. Prout who left here in 1911,
visited Barbados on the last oc-
casion in 1925. Mr. Thompson left
here in 1924 and paid a visit in
1935.

They are both very highly im-
pressed by the social and other
changes in Barbados, and com-
menting on many of the middle
class homes say “they are moré
modern than many of ours back
home in the United States.”

These two prominent sportsmen
play a big part in bringing West
Indians who go to New York to-
gether, concentrating their social
work mainly in the field of cricket,
Both are members of the Cosmo-
politan Cricket League of New
York which, with the New York
League, the Inter-State League
and the Metropolitan District As-
sociation which is comprised of
white players from Brooklyn and
Staten Island, Philadelphia, com-
pete in Saturday and Sunday one
day games.

Mr. Prout has he every office
in the Cosmopolitan League ex-
cept that of Hon.,Secretary, and
last year, held the office of Hon.
Treasurer. This year, he is on the
Board of Trustees of the League.

President of League

Mr. Thompson is President of
the same League, as well as Presi-
dent of the Surrey Field Cricket
Club, one of the eight clubs in the
League, The clubs compete for the
Daly Trophy.

Yearly, the Leagues play a Bene-
fit Game, the proceeds of which
are donated to the DANNAR RAN-
GAS Cancer Fund. This game was
scheduled for the 23rd of June
last, but due to inclement weather,
will now take place on the 17th of
next mexth,

Mr. Prout said there are 12
clubs in the New York League;
eight in the Cosmopolitan League;
four in the Inter-State League and
about six in the Metropolitan
League. Each League has one
Major Trophy and a Smaller
Trophy.

Annually there is also an All-
Jamaica-All-Barbados Match
which takes place on the first
Sunday in August, and these
games draw large crowds. Mr.
Prout said there are many Bar-
badians who feature in these
games, and among the names
which he mentioned were Errol
Millington, the former Empire
left arm medium pacer, the
Crichlow Brothers, Eric and Le-
Roy, Seymour Beckles, and
Charles Alleyne.

W.I. Team In U.S.

Mr. Prout recalled vividly the
visit of the West Indian team
which toured America’ just after
the West Indies Team returned
from England, and he is hoping
that it would be possible, if and
when the West Indies team pay
their proposed visit to Canada
next year, for them to arrange to
fly over from Canada to play a
mateh against a combined League
team.

Mr, Prout said that matches of
the sort are usually arranged with
teams from Canada, The Leagues
pay the expenses and if possible,
hand over part of the proceeds to
the Canadian teams which, be-
cause they have no_ enclosed
grounds cannot raise funds out of
gate receipts,

In addition to his sporting activ-
ities, Mr. Thompson is associated
with the United Parishes of Bar-
bados Charity Group which sends-
direct to the Cathedral, clothing,
tood, and money for the poor of
the island. These gifts come
through Canon Harvey Reid. The
money which goes to purchasing
these gifts is raised by an annual
dance,

Mr. Prout is an employee of the
United States Government at-
tached to the Post Office, where he
has worked for 31 years. Mr.
Thompson is Superintendent of
Apartment Houses at 509 West,
110 Street, New York,

They are both very happy to be
in Barbados once again, and say
they are “thoroughly enjoying”
themselves.

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Taft Wins 3 Seats



Pid xs Sos

«
HECTOR C, BLANES, of Puerto Rico,
answers questions put to him by,
a member of the Republican Cre-
dentials Committee in Chicago.
After a long and bitter debate, the
committee voted 29 to 20 to con-
firrn the seating of the three-man
pro-Taft group. (International)

‘T.B. Radar’
To Be Sold

The Motor Vessel T, B, Radar
for which an Order for sale was
made in the Colonial Court of
Admiralty by His Lordsh'p the
Chief Judge Sir Allan Collymore.
Kt., on June 19th, will be sold
at the Provost Marshal's Office,
Public Buildings at 2.00 p.m.
to-morrow:

The Vessel and its fittings will
be offered for sale at an upset
uppraised price of $385,000, The
Decree for the sale was made on
application by the owner of the
Steamer Amakwra as competsa-
tion for towing the Motor Vessel
T. B. Radar into port with a bréaic
down in her engine on the Ist
April this year.

The Motor Vessel Radar, 116
tons net, at the time of being
takin in tow, had fcr four days
been drifting in a disabled condi-
ticn off Tobago. The breakdown
in her engine was due to trouble
with the timing gear for the
governor, Without which it was
impossible to get the engine work-
ing.

When the engine gav¢ oul, the
Radar was about 140 miles off
Trinidad, and was on her way to
British Guiana. She had weighed
anehor out of Trinidad at 7.15 a.m,
on March 26, and according to re-
ports from her then skipper, her
engines were in good running
oraer,

At about 4.25 on the afternoon
of the following day, the engine





suddenly stepped, and the vessel
began to drift fast. She drifted
for four days, reaching a point

just off Tobago where she was
eventually taken into tow by the
Amakura and brought to Barbados,
the nearest port,

At the time of the breakdown,
the T. B, Radar was carrying a
consignment of general cargo for
Mcssrs, Bookers’ Limited, British
Guiana,



Copra Comes On ‘Belqueen’

The schooner Belqueen under
Captain Rual King called in this
port yesterday morning from St.
Vineent with a cargo of 620 bags
of copra, 14 bags of cocoanuts,
six bags of peanuts, and six
bunches of fresh fruit.

This Schooner is consigned to
the Schooner Owners’ Associa-
tion.

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DOVSSDDOSOOHYS 4 4980 O04O970GH

By BOB KIPHUTH.

Looking back over my many
years as a student of competitive
swimming, I find it difficult to re-
call when interest in the sport was
more widespread than now. There
should be at least 69 nations com-
peting in the aquatic events at
Helsinki to be staged during the
Olympic Games. When the -con-
tests are over, it is likely that a
number of new swimming records
will have been set.

Many nations have contributed
to the prominent place swimming
occupies in the world of sports te
day. For example, the craw)
stroke came to us by way of Eng-
land and Australia, As far as we
know, an Englishman named
Trudgeon was the first to popu-
larize the double overhand stroke,

During the early part of this
century, the Australians refined
the stroke and spe. “cd _H#-up. Ob
serving the South Sea’ Islanders
they changed the leg action of the
Trudgeon stroke from a’ scissors-
like movement to a coordinated
kick in which the legs broke the
surface of the water in coordina-
tion with the swimmer's arms
The Trudgeon stroke was discard-
ed as a sprint stroke when th:
famous Hawaiian swimmer, Duke
Kahanamoku, won the 100-meters
free style for the U.S.A. in 1912
He used an accelerated six-kick-
per-stroke movement at th:
Stockholm Olympics,
later, at the 1920 Olympics in Ant-
werp, he retained his title | by
swimming the same distance in
61.4 seconds. _Kahanamoku is the
father of the popular six-beo!
erawl, and is one of the most re-
markable swimmers of all time,

The “Back Crawl”

American swimmers pioneered
the backstroke and the present
version of the breaststroke. Harry
Hebner, an American
from Chicago, swam an unknown
stroke at the 1912 Olympics in
Stockholm called the “bac!
crawl.” This was simply a re
verse of the standard crawi
stroke, with the, swimmer on hi:
back. It has been in use through-
out the world ever since,

The frog-like movement through
the water known as the breast
stroke was not popular among
speed swimmers until the intro-

duction of the “butterfly” stroke ,

at the 1936 Olympics in Berlin.

The new stroke differs from the |

old in that the user brings his
arms completely out of the water,
At the same time, he kicks his
legs in the usual breaststroke
fashion. The advantage in the
stroke is that the swimmer does
bring his arms completely out of

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States again made a good showing
in swimming. But we were suc-
cessful largely because expert
swimmers from a number of other
nations did not take part.

Watch The Japs

I look for a tremendous amount
“f competition this summer (at
Helsinki—particularly from the
Japanese I know ther well from
pest competition, I know how
they organize, the intelligent
way they swim. One_ of their
freestylers, Hironoshin Furuhashi,
will be hard to beat, Only two
wu in the world have ever beaten
him at his specialty-—the 1,500—
never rece,

have men like Bob Srawner and
Denis O’Connor, and in the back
stroke Dick Thomas, Jack Taylor,
and the veteran Olympic perform -
er, Allen Stack. All, of course,

ave to qualify for the Olymp:
team. None of them is sure of
a ‘berth until he has proved his
ability.

Our country owes much of
swimming skills to other nat!
And, though we wi!l be sttivir:
to win at Helsinki, it will i: ina
spirit of spdrismanBhip ane
friendship. ‘ 4}



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)

We will have strong competi-
tion from others as well. One of
swimmers at Yale, John Mar-
ssall, an Australian who is one
of the world’s best at the middle
and long distances, will be trying
to beat us, Two of Marshall's
countrymen now attending other
colleges in the U.S. arrick
Agnew and John Davies—will be
swimming with him at Helsinki.

Europe will also present some
formidable swimmers, The Eng-
lish, the French, the Yugoslavians,
‘he Hungarians, and the Russians
are all good. So, of course, are
the South Americans and the

West Indies)

noe corm.







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PAGE SIX



matter for ruling.

~
separagely® represen fed, does not, In the case, his submission any-
ior the defendant who how would be that they were

does not call witnesses can

bound to have the same interess

only address the jury omce, name- because they were instructed by

ly, in

before the wit- the same firm of solicitors

whose

general,
nesdes for the other defendant are reputation for honour was suffi-

eXtamined. If the evidence which ciently high not

to represent

it is proposed to give on behalf diverse interests. Otherwise there

of one defendant is hostile to the
interests of the other defendant,
for the defendant

would not be sufficient etiquette.
His Lordship asked Mr. Wai-

who cott whether he was suggestin”

does not cill witnesses may be
alloWed to address the jury after
the @vidence has been ‘heard for
the other defendant.
“Where witnesses are sub
ed by two defendants with
counsel, only one ex-
tion-in-chief of these wit-
nesses will be allowed. Where.
defendants are separately repre-)
sented, counsel] for one co-de-
fendant may cross-examine the
ies called by the co-defend- ,

Osi here Poms are
6pBosed in

erest betwecy

another than to in plaintiff, per-
mission may be given to each
or set of defendanis, ic

‘and Fie their cases sep-

as to crose-

Gate other’s witnesses.”
he did not know wheth-

fe aan pee Mr. Reece,

: was epsemee su ac-
to what the emueBe ig

thet -Lordship ia ask His
Learhéd Friend, Mr. R , wheth-
er he was Wtacina witnesses 0»
it he was not, then a tly
the rule was that he to ad-
drese before the other éguiabe!
called tnesses. It was just a





Dutch Housewife Staggers

that only one counsel should ad-
dress and he replied that he was
not, but that Mr. Reece should ad-
dress at once,

His Lordship said he thought
that the examination of the wit-
ness should be finished. Mr. Wal-
cott went on to say that he had
taken the point, because if he
iwere right, his evidence not hav-
ing been completed, it would ob-
viously prevent counsel from

referring to it at all,

Disagreement
Speaking on this point, Mr.
fleece said he did not agree at al!
with His Learned Friend for the
following reason, The case for the
defendant Company. was not the
case of the defendant Michelin, In
ine first cage, as defendant, Miche-~
lin wag alleged to have made «
speech on ‘ne 12th, out of whith
“@ present proceeding flowéd. I)
was not ssettll the 18th that a re-
sort of that speech appeared in
the defendant Company’s news-
pay
trietly speaking, there. were
wo separate and. distinct, offences,
and it was open to the defendant
Company to ask for and to get

separate trials of the issue on the
ground that the offeneés had taken
place on tw® separate and distinct
dates, That was done for con-
veniente solely, It was a question
of saving time, expenses to the
Government, etc.

“Tt is perfectly trie we are both
instructed by the sarhe fitm of
Solicitors,” he said, “but I am yet
to learn that Solleiters cannot in-
struct different defendants whose

hostile.”

to make any
other comment on the evidénce
then, he said, but it was obvious
that the evidence of the defendant r
Michelin Wad to and did go much
further than the evidence of the
defendant Company would or
could go,

The witness Vanterpool who
had been called by the other side
would, in the normal course of
events, have been called as a wit-
ness by the defendant Company.

He definitely would have been ¢

called on their behalf,

“I am May it please
Your , that there
nothing in case to take it

out of the ordinary run which is
that each defendant, if he likes,

can Call witnesses and if he calls in

witnesses, then he has to address
the jury or the Court before
counsel on behalf of the plaintiff
or prosecutor — in this case,
prosecutor. If he does not call any
witnesses, he has a right to reply,

and I am suggesting that in this «

case we have a right to reply.’
His Lordship said that he had

not discovered yet whether he, Mr.

Reece, was calling witnesses.








Jersey Joe Will

Athletic Fans: Sets Record | fight This Year

LONDON
While Eutope sweltered in near-

tropical conditions recently
Dutch “housewife, and mother ©
two children, was busy provin)
to the world at large that Hollanci
will not be without its share of
ee eens at the Olympic Game
this month. Mrs. Fanny
Blankers-Koen, now 34 years of
age, staggered Rotterdam athletic
fans atid sent then home wildly
exeited with a new world record
of 11.4 seconds for the 100 metres.
She also turned in a time for the *
200 metres which was only one
tenth of a second outside the world
record and was a new Dutch

Impressive Performances

Thesép call to mind
her echievements in e last Olym-
pie Games, héld in London in 1948.
the imp: éssive Wembley Sta-
dium she bec.me the first wom
ever to win three individual .
medals, She took the 100 and 200
metres sprints, won the 80 metres
hurdles and just for good measure,
steered’ the Dutch tearm to victory
in the 4 x 100 metres relay.

No wonder that sports writers
described. her nas the greatest
woman ‘nthlete of all time. Never
had 4 tith been more deservedly
heatowed. This tall, Toose-limbed
woman with the ‘short flaxen-
coloured hair and the heart of a
lion, was inded the brightest star
at the Games.

Those
en
put
to

“best”

“who were fortunate

in ied Boat fiiiess to make her
usual quicl peaway and En“land’s
Maureen hoy er immediately
went into a t lead. This was
worn down by, oe Dutch enamel
ovér the hurdles until at the
run-in they were neck and neck
Fram the stands it was impossible
i@ see who had broken the tape
first:

For several mts it was be-
lieved that ttre glish girl had
won as she na waved 10
irpeeads on thé track, And when thé
commenced to play “God
sabe Phe * the impression
was ineitaa . But as events
turned out the National Anthem
had been the signal for the arrival
of the Royal Family and it was
the Dutch champion who had won
the race. Her time, and Miss
Gardner’s was given as 11,2 se-
conds, a new world and Olymple
record,

On her return to Holland Mis.

BOoOCOS

2 Sry

‘iankers-Koeh was given a real
teroine’s welcome. She was feted
verywhere, In hér own city of
Amsterdam she was presented by
the Lord Mayor with a luxury
edition of Queen Wilhelmina’s
fubilee Book. And when she
finally returned to her own home
she found that neighbours had
decorated the house with flowers
any many coloured lights.

Moved By_ Tribute
Friends who know her best say
be was more moved by this last
tribute than by any of the other
celebrations planned in her honour.

There was however little time
for her to remain quietly with hex
amily. The rest of the world was
eager to see this ae Olym-
pie Champion fe early in
1949 she was 6 Meal this time
to Australia and America, In both
countries she won new admirer
with her magnificent running.

Then suddenly there came a

; bombshell, From New York Mrs.

Blankers-Koen announced that she
had had enough of big-time ath-
letics and would retire after the
Européan Championships in 1950.
The story was heard several times
fter that. But fortunately ~
Holland and for athleties in ge!

eral it pr unfounded, Bihey
che is 1 conquering
fields.

It is more Bi Se es tase es
«ver that 1053 wilt
world-class athletics, With alt ee

onours that ons come her way
Mrs. Blankers-Koen stili has one
unfulfilled, She wants to

our,

NEW YORK, July 14.
Jersey Joe Walcott notis
fied promoter Jim Norris
Monday he will defend his
heavyweight crown Septem-




















ber 8th HS 15th agalnes the
Rocky arciano — Harry
‘Kid” Matthews winner.

Norris had feared that Wal-
cott might not defend it
again until 1953,

He waited nearly a year
before making the first de-
fence against Kzzard Charles
at Philadelphia Jume 5th.
Jersey Joe made the notifi-

cauon during the signing
céremony for the ten-round

$ challengers
bout between Marciano and
Matthews at the Yankee
Stadiurn July 28th.

—UP.

Pilots Sit On
Red Secrets

his
Pitots flying from London to fit) Champion PAULINE DORAN

and French champion P, J. MEL-
LOR, retires from his pusition as
professional to the Dulwich and
Sydenham Hill Golf Club,

Prague often sit on iron-curtain

al
also coritainéd inv sealed dip-
Theta brought to the air-
cars ind locked
pllot’s cock-

Joma’ e,
port

under lB osat thi the

pit for safe ote bong

oat secret top documents are
by couriers from the
Ruble; Polish and Czech Em-
bassies, They travel at least
oneé & weet.

The couriers enjoy diplomaue

be at Wembley, nv her
most aehen privilege and are allowed to board
in the 80 metres . have two more daughters as com- the airplane with their. baggage
‘This was a a racé, WON panions for Jan aged 11 and little \vithout going through Customs.

onee Mrs. fanny aged f

—LE.S.



'SATCHEL

CtuB



Oh! how I nelicd=-but
oh! how

stiit on that

, aa . seem,
and the race I
et table in the dressin:-
ae My amugeies of @ Swedish
eur.

I fone der
ran... ile el ean
ww By E. McDonald Baliey .
. I Bave uw reb FASTEST EVER
a nm as Howey
ene, of on, “the Gor coun ey, to for 5 wmavedas
e Continent ae ig the second city o!
at lee oy cities = Fweden Sgainel the
n me sae)
te ire detente we Re! tae, ae ie egenes
which ‘eat © Bure ean gre
The 8 peop! recor
wradition, “aporte ing Re SRE ee '

revel in open-air fe.
My first visit took me

My performances are, com
to the tively speaking,
when I run

2-
K better
peau iittie elty of Malmo in Sweden. 1.
nd it there tha’ ran first bute this vo the well-prepar
9B, Swedish soll. My @ in rag singer. tracks and the Poreotin
c

metres was a poorish



London Express Service

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e* ¥ cor ae) re hee Tete ee

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Contempt Of Court Hearing Continues Today

Mr.
made ly clear that
witness Vanterpool

in the matter, was the
which they intended galling

he ‘had already been culled. What
was the good, therefore of their

witness

man,

received the copy and did @ery-
a in connection with publi-
cation.

as no peint in calling
the. g Acting, Bor

aerate iia

Saat Wie net Fburee.
His iat observed that



referred



Reece replied that he had would not be uired.
it siousshanet emi

Mr. Reece retiarked that he was

who gave not interested in how the other
evidence on behalf of the plaintiff side conducted their case.

The

Section said that thereupon evi-
but dence should be taken.

He would submit later that it
was a criminal prosecution despite

its cloak of a simple Common
Pleas action.

“T am submitting that I have the
right to reply as 1 would in any
action im the Court of Common
Pleas Sie my interest were

identical with that of the other
co-defendant.
he had already said, that their in-
terests could never be the same.
They stood in two coi

It was obvious

as

letely dif-
but ferent positions. Th their in-
terests went along the same road
up to a point, one went further.
The speech had also contained
certain comments by the Com-
pany’s reporter, Vante 1,
which comments, if they ha not
been carefully worded, would
have given further grounds for
offence

Referred To Halsbury
Replying, Mr. Walcott again
to the passage from
to which he had previ-
referred. He added that he

. bad drawn to His Lordship’s at-
Â¥ tention that the defendants were

instructed by the same solicitors
that would not have been if
their interests were hostile. If
the interests had been entirely
identical, he would have objected
earlier.
His Lordship said that the in-
terests in his view were not the

same and he would allow cross-



@xamination. Being not identi- |
cal, he held that.both counsel had
a right to address, The further
point arose—when they should—-
and that was what he was after. |

After hearing Mr. Reece cite
further case law from “Phipson”,
His Lordship left the bench to
discover the relevant cases. Be-
fore doing so, he said that the
whole procedure had to follow
the procedure in the Court of
Common Pleas.

His Lordship later returned to
the Bench and told counsel that
he had endeavoured to look up
the authorities on the points
raised and it seemed that they
were at variance in many re-
spects. He therefore wished to
hear further argument.



He added that he diq aot want
to hear any argument before the
jury which would in any way
have any effect on their delibera-
tions, and he proposed to let
counsel have a look at the au-
thorities and see if they could!
agree. If this were done, the
jury could leave the Court and
return at 1.30 p.m.

This was decided upon and His
Lordship left the Bench and re-
turned about 15 minutes later to
hear further’ argument from
counsel, particularly on the force
of the case law they were citing.

After this, the Court was ad-
journed until 2.15. On the re-
sumption, His Lordship informed
the jury that certain difficult
points which had arisen had to
be settled first and the Court was
then adjourneg until this morn-
ing at 10.30





Chataway An Enigma?

Chris. Chataway’s shattering
of te Lee toro titi tecord by
5 certain to earn this

eihens ot the track a place on
the Olympic airplane for Hoejsint.

Twenty-one-year-old Chataway,
of Woking, has bem the subject
of muth discussion }y athletics
theorists sincé going up to Oxford
18 months ago.

They say he is all that an
athlete. should not be—too short
in the leg, too narrow ih the
chest. He also likes a cigar after

each race

Some attribute his brilliance to
his low pulse rate, It beats only
‘45 timés a minute against the
normal rate of 72.

Theoriés have an unfortunate
habit of bé@ing exploded by ath-
letes. In Chataway’s case the
solution seems a simple one, He

_just runs faster than his rivals.

Taught wed at
Man whe. wa 2 — the

DUKE gave
lessons Ps ENTY HRY COTTON and
LESLIE,







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The Answer Is Simple

He is CHARLES V SCOTT, now

in his 38rd year with the club.

On Saturday fellow profession-
als A. H. PADGHAM, lL. B.
AYTON, S. L. KING and W. J.
cox

for his benefit at the

Club,

Before he went to Dulwich
Scott was /with down snd

Bembridge clubs. Isle of Wight.

Recommended _
Here is a boy cricketer in
whom Essex should be interested.
He is JAMES COX,

all-round ab’
His latést achievement—play-
school Heathcote Secondary

Loughton,
15 last Sunday, with Pvemanikable |
ility.

1, arret Schoo, “Wal against aang, be |

had Bi 94 not out when his yilea tan Caan |
reared at 118 for 3, and he then
went on ria, take seven wickets
for two

Mr. J. pmSToRY, his
master and coach, tells me
has played for the shot
he was 11. He is a right-h
batsman and a right arm
bowler,

Alth has for the
ough he ar
talents to cricket. |

Walthamstow
not confined his

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DYDVAY DGGE DOONEY

rrép>sn O04 DAO WO oz

He captained his school soccer
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{when they won the Waltham-
{stow School’s Cup and the Hor-
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B.| Cox is still undecided about a
;career, But he would need little
jencouragement to take up pro-
fessional cricket.—L.E.S.



| He was always

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People Make This =

16, 1952

Era Significant

AN HISTORIAN takes
today assesses what goes to
chooses not wars, not dates,
PEOPLE on this age of ours.

a leap ahead of his time and
make this era significant. He
not treaties—but the impact of

American historical writer Donald Robinson, chief
army historian to Eisenhower chooses 100 living people

who, in his view have. bv

force of deeds or personalitv.

most influenced “our civilisation in the last 15 years.”

What is the passport
Robinson gallery?

Not good works—although

hilosopher Albert Schweitzer,

ope. Pius XII, and theological
Reinhold Niebuhr are there.

Not bad deeds—although the
list of 100 includes atom traitor
Klaus. Fuchs “because of the
great harm he has done.”

Robinson says he was advised
in his final choice “by obtaining
the opinions of as many experts
as possible.”

First man in the book is Joseph
Stalin; “the most merciless brain
of the age. .. It is possible that
only death can halt him.”

Molotov is there with Stalin,
but Gromyko and Vishinsky are
not. Robinson says his experts
assured him that in the Soviet
scheme of things they “were just
office boys.’

Truman is “the most impor-
tant person in the free world’:
Churchill “the most heroic figure
of the century”; and Tito “the
mildest man who ever slit a
Digest, are Robinson’s choice for
the most important men in Press
and Communications.

He says: “It is incontrovertible
that Lord Beevrebrook has had
more succes: a. § newspaper pub-
lisher in the last two genera-
tions than any other man alive,”

Rut, “Lord Beaverbrook ep
has consistently backed the wrong
men and wrong ideas.”

Samples, according to Robin-
son: in the mid-20’s “he fought
the League o! Nations ‘of Tp
the 30’s he - approved the
appeasment pclicies of Cham-
berlain.” .. . “Recently he has
been stating that Marshall plan
aid is bad for Britain.”

So, in Robinson's view, it is not
necessary for a great man to be
always right.

This is just, because it appears
that even an historian can make
mistakes. For instance, Robinson
describes Lord Beaverbrook’s
London home as Stornoway House
—although Stornoway House was
badly bombed 11 years ago and
has not been lived in since.

ae

AMONG leaders in the world
of fine arts Arturo Toscanini, “the
foremost orchestral conductor of
our times,” is placed next to Ir-
ving Berlin— “he has been su-
preme since Alexander’s Ragtime
Band.”

Picasso “is still the biggest name
in painting”; Chaplin— the last
man in the book—is ¢‘the only
genius in motion pictures.

Among the arts Europeans,
lead the way. (“As a group the
writers of the United States are
not on a par with their Continen-

tal confréeres.” addmits Robin-
son.)
Sir Alexander Fleming, the

Scot who discovered penicillin,
heads the list of men whose work
has meant most to the health of

the world.
* * *
ONLY two women are listed.
“No one,” laments’ Robinson,

“could recommend to me any be-
sides Mrs. Eleanor Roosevelt and
Senora Peron,” He includes these
two, and adds that one disgrun-
tled diplomat said sourly: “The
only thing Senora Peron is dis-
tinguished for is her lowcut neck-
line.”’

Who of them all, is the great-
» est?

According to Robinson: Albert
Einstein.
_ The biggest mountebank is
Russia’s T.D. Lysenko. (“He is

charlatan whose theories in

etics are. ridiculous.) The

st sinister, another Russian,

urenti P. Berin, had of the
Soviet Secret Police. (“No man
alive has more blood on his
hands.’’)







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It is a good idea, isn’t it? Do-«
ing what comes differentiy—it
strikes at the imagination, it is
exciting and provoking. Isn't it
exactly what we expect from a
holiday, from the long lovely
days of summer, something diff-
erent? A holiday seems to have
all the possibilities and impossi-
bilities of life gathered together
into two precious weeks, like a
wonderful mystery box, waiting
to be opened. And so it can be,
if you approach it constructively.

Summer always seems to hold
the peak of our hopes. We put
off all the big decisions, moves
and changes until the summer.
(he sun gives us energy and en-
deavour, but it cannot make us
into new beings without a little
help.

A holiday is for health—body

and spirit. So turn around and
have a look at yourself, see what
kind of person you are taking on
holiday. It is the same you that
has weathered the other fifty
weeks of the year, but you can
feel different, look different and
live ditferently without for a
moment losing your real identity
or being artificial. You can give
yourself a summer look quickly
enough with a tan, a short hair-
do, a crisp smart beach suit—and
me to tell you how. But what
about your ideas, your habits!
and inclinations —perhaps they
need a change too?
When you go away, are you a
bit inclined to look around
quickly for the sort of people you
feel you are used to? It is just
possible you know, that you
would get more fun out of get-
ting to know some different kinds’
of people,

Colonial Students

LONDON.

In the House of Commons on
8th July, Mr. Ronald Russell
(Conservative, Wembley asked the
Minister of Labour what facilities
exist for colonial students to ob-
tain employment in this country
during their vacation.

Sir Walter Mockton,
of Labour replied:—

The service provided by the
employments exchanges and ap-
pointments offices is available to
colonial students who wish to
obtain employment in the vaca-
tions, I understand that certain
private.organisations such as the
National Union of Students are
also active in this field.

Mr. Russel: Can my right hon.
and learned Friend say whether



Minister

any facilities exist in industry ~

particularly to replace British
workers while they are on holi-
day?

Sir Walter Mockton: I have
in mind the agriculture industries
and the efforts which are made
by the National Unicn of Students
in that field where we heip by
enabling them to travel to and
from the work. If there is any
yther matter perhaps my hon.
Friend will let me know.

Mr. A. F. Brookway, (Labour,
Eton and Slough): Will the right
hon, and learned Gentleman
consult with the Colonial Office
upon this matter with a view to
making the fullest provision of
employment for these colonia
students?

Sir Walter Mockton: I
anxious to do what I can
will consult with them.

am
and



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Chinese Reds Said
To Have Recognized

Two Conventions
LONDON, July 15.

Peiping broadcast said on
Tuesday night that the Chinese
Communist government has re-
cvgnized two international conven-
tions of Geneva on war prisoners
and germ warfare.

The broadcast
statements

quoted . two
by Chou En Lai on
July 13th: “The Central People’s
Government of the People’s
Republic of China has examined
the protocol for the prohibition
of the use of asphyxiating poison
or other gases, and of bacterio-
logical warfare concluded on
June 17th, 1925 and acceded to
in the name of China on August
7th, 1921. The Central People’s
Government considers that the
said protocol is conducive to:the
strengthening of International
Peace and Security and is in con-
formity with humanitarian prin-
ciples, and therefore has decided
to recognize the accession of the
protocol. The Central People’s
Government shall undertake to
implement strictly the provisions
of the proctocol provided all
other contracting and acceded
powers observe them reciprocally,

Secretary of State Dean Ache-
son pointed out the American
position on germ warfare at a
Vienna press conference on June
13, when a Communist reporter
asked why the United States had
not signed the Geneva Conven-
tion on germ warfare, Acheson
replied that the United States
wanted all weapons of destruction
banned by the International Dis-

] ) 2vmament Commission with ade-

quate powers of enforcement.

—U.P.

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



ZOO CH'MPS BUY ICES TO TRY TO KEEP C¢

uartet—Sally (left) and So-So

—believe that eating ice-cream whenever
is the best way to keep cool. They

London Express Service

Canadian Lawn
Bowling Team
Win Two Games

NOTTINGHAM, England, July_15.

Canada’s touring bowlers head-
ed into the centre of England
Monday after recording two vic-
tories against seven defeats in an
ll-day swing through Scotland.

The 30-member lawn bowling
team now about halfway through
a three-month programme of
matches, sight-seeing and civic
entertainment completed its Scot-
tish tour last week and then head-
ed across the border to Carlisle
and Newcastle on Tyne,

The two Canadian victories in
Scotland were at Brought Ferry
near Dundee where the tourists
won 118—84 and at Glasgow where
the score was 102—78. Losing
matches were played at Porto
Bello, Stirling, Edinburgh, Aber-
deen, Dumbarton, Motherwell and
Ayr.—(CP)

—— et ee

r. . “ee
Yugoslavia Given
nl . o
Foreign Aid Note

BELGRADE, Yugoslavia,

July ¥.

Ambassadors of France,
Britain and the United States
handed a long delayed three-
power aide memoire on foreign
aid to Yugoslavia to Foreign Min-
ister Leo Mates. The aid pro-
gramme which covers the next
fiscal year, is considerably reduc-
ed in comparison with that of last
year. The French and British pro-
grammes have been slashed by
about one-third and while the
exact amount of aid earmarked
for Marshal Tito’s government
from the United States was not
yet known, it was expected to be
between $55,000,000 and $70,000,-
000. Last year's figure was $%8,-
000,000.—U.P.

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Dinner In Honour
Of Brazilian
Anibassador

LONDON, July 15.

Ambassadors and Ministers of
many countries plan to honour
retiring Brazilian Ambassador
Senor J. Muniz De Aragao, Doyen
of the diplomatic corps at a fare-
well dinner tonight,

De Aragao is retiring after 12
years’ service here. Among to-
night’s guests will be his succes-
sor as Doyen, Manuel Bianchi,
Chilean Ambassador who has
been in England since 1941,

During his stay in England,
Bianchi married the widow of a
Dutch officer a naturalized Briton
killed in the airborne invasion of
Germany. At 33, Senora Bianchi
will be the youngest ever “first
lady” of the London diplomatic
corps.

—UP,

a paenainne

Unions Consider
“Suggestions”

PITTSBURGH, July 14.

Settlement of the longest and
costliest steel strike in U.S, history
hinged today on C.1.O, United
Steelworkers reaction to the in-
dustry’s latest “suggestion” for
ending the crippling dispute.

Steelmakers announced jointly
that they had made “suggestions
for settling important issues still
in dispute”, and that “those sug-
gestions are still under considera-
tion by the union.”
* CLO, President Philip Murray
also head of the Steelworkers, was
expeeted to issue a call to his 170-
man Wage Policy Committee for
action on the companies offer
which was reported to be close to
the recommendations of the Wage
Stabilization Board. Murray may
calla session of the Committee for
Tuesday.

—U.P.



Canada Win
Games

HELSINKI, July 14

Hungary and Canada won the
first two Olympic games advanc-
ing to the second round of basket-
ball eliminations. Although the
games do not officially open until
Saturday the qualifying rounds in
basketball, football and soccer are

ing owing to the large number of
entries,

Hungary defeated Greece 75 to!
38 in the first game and in the |
second Canada beat Italy 68 to
57. Canada will meet Romania in|
the second round while Hungary |
will clash with the winner of the)
Philippines-Israel game to be
played later to-day.

Romania drew a first round bye
In the basketball qualifying rounds
one defeat does not eliminate a
team. But should it be defeated a/|
second time the team is eliminated.
Ten nations were seeded in the |
basketball draw including U.S.|

) defending Olympic champions.

The first U.S. Olympic team to
see action will be the Soccer
squad which will meet Italy
Wednesday, about 100 miles from
Helsinki. Italy, which defeated
U.S. 1 goal to nil in the last
round of the 1948 Olympics
London is favoured.

Field Hockey eliminations get
under way to-morrow with Swit-
zerland meeting Austria and Fin-
land clashing with Belgium in the
first games. Field Hockey is the
only event on Olympic schedulk
in which the United States is not
entered. Soecer eliminations also
start to-morrow with Yugoslavia
meeting India, Romania clashing
with Hungary and Denmark
against Greece,

The Olympic village at Kapyla
now houses 2,000 Olympic ath-
letes and officials with another
4,000 expected by next Thursday
according to the Organizing Com-
mittee,

North Americans with a 233
strong contingent tops the list fol-
lowed by the Argentine with 200,
Canada 178, Italy 156, South Afri-
ca 119 and Venezuela 74, Foreign
visitors are beginning to stream
into the Olympic capital, Over
700 arrived yesterday and the in-
flux is expected to reach 900 per
day next Monday.

Jap Volley Ball
Teani Rejects
Russian Invitation

TOKYO, July 15.

The Japanese Foreign Office has
forbidden volley ball teams to ac-
cept the Russian invitation to at-
tend “world volley ball echampion-
ships”. j

Announcing this today a Foreign
Office spokesman said: “Govern-
ment can give no guarantee of
safety in Russia”

The invitation received by the
Japanese Volley Ball Association
included free travel and expenses
within, the Soviet Union. us

McKenley May Try
At 100 Metres

HELSINKI, July 14.

The 100 metre dash in the 1952
Olympic track and field games
is so wide open that Herb Mc-
Kenley of Jamaica, 400 metre
star, says he thinks he can win it.
Herb, who is now 30, and no
longer the great runner who set
the world quarter mile record of
46 seconds flat in 1948, had fin-
ished eating at Olympic village
last night, when he began toying
with the idea

“I think I will practise starts
and if I can get out of the holes
quickly enough, I'll run the 100
as well as 400,” said Herb, who is
entered in the 200 as well





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PAGE EIGHT ~~ BARBADOS ADVOCATE WEDNESDAY, JULY 16, 1952
aati linens easiest tieisesesssssssrsnstnanssseinsnbeensesesnnecshthe sts sateen: eaeagaiadtitmadinameeanciics
| t . |
| PUBLIC SALES LOST & FOUND | TAKE N CES
CLASSIFIED ADS.) shel Bud en ean SHIPPING NOTI
EPHONE 2508 | REAL ESTATE LIGHTER—D err Cigarett |
ee sper Raver rete te SNES | AL NETHERLANDS
DIED FOR SALE ARTRAMUN1 situate at Flint Hall, FISH CLUB oe , eT ban ROY. NE



STEAMSHIP CO,

\i Michael, standing on 2 acres 3 roods |
16 perches of land |
.- "wil
m/v ONEKA
|





CRICHLOW— On The house is built of stone and con-


































































































































































: tains 2 galleries, large drawing and dining SHOPPING BAG--On Yonkers Bus on | SAILING FROM EUROPE accept Cargo and Passengers for
at her late residence | coms, halle: Saturday, July 5th with money and other ’ - M as . _ Montserrat,
Si. Michael. "Millicent 4 AUTOMOTIVE See ease te eeet Oik= | cometies, Sneiee tap. rereved: ae |S'8 COnPICA sith sus nase iis. Salling Mao
funeral will leave “the funeral home’ | rooms, kitchenette and usual con-| Calling at Yonkers Bus Co. Office, and |M.S. NESTOR 26th July, 1952 ,
of Burton & Co., Lid t 4.30 —_ t }
tome. Priends ate inves CAn—Dedae Supercde Lune Gt aay | Weniences Paying cost of this advertisement. A |M.S. BOSKOOP Ist August, 1952 ,

j ae eee bent cuit Gor ao a Garage and servants rooms in yard 16.7 52—In SALLING TO EUROPE aecept Cargo and Passengers fer

Kathieen Birch (daughter), Albion,; Will sell for cash offer, bought N fruit t M.S. ORANJESTAD 15th July, 1958. ‘An t,

Vivan and Carl Crichlow (sons s car. First cli order, owner | Numerous fruit T ALSO | SAILING TO TDAD, PARAMARIBO Toe. St. ers acthee RE

16.7/92—11 Dial Bp 16.7.58—t £ 5 atres 2 roeds of land adjoining the PURLIC NOTICES | That GALLAGHER & BURTON, Inc., a corporation under the laws & BRITISH GUIANA Gay 18th inst.
6.7.5 D- | shove (exteiimnt, bathe. site), | ef the State of Kentucky, United Stated’ of America, ers, whose trade OF | M.S. STENTOR 13th July, 1962.
CAR--Vauxhail Velox in A-1. condj-}, Inspection day (except Sundays) business address is Green Lane, Bristol, Pe lvania, USA. has applied for's §. COTTICA 28th July, 1952. B.W.I. SCHOONER ERS’
THANKS tion. Only reason for selling. owner /Setween 4 si-@ B.an. NOTICE the registration of a trade mark’ in Part “Av of Register in respect of guebelie M.S. NESTOR 8th August, 1962. ASSOCIA 2

baad Coe co PSG ef | ble “Cempaition om day "the Bi | gh! male cltsane of, the United States | insite Ree aa ORY: ane Talk De, ited sogiser tne Gams, ction" |SAMING TO TAOMDAD a cURACACIS gy, NEN ay

COR—The undersigned beg to thank ani|© PB Rice & Co. 13. TMB Ep. 15 y958 at 2 p.m. at the office of the ee ae — Face and s — time give notice in duplicate to me at my office of o tion of such registration. |.) < HESTIA Mt Sule tone ey
those who sent wreaths, attended the “AR : - undersigned. ested fan, aS | The trade mark can be seen applica at ce, ] + 1m.

I P . ee S CAR-—One Morris Minor Saloon done CARRINGTON & SEALY the American Consulate from July 1 to Sige tion my 8. P. MUSEON
their pympathy with’ ue i agrees: oir One Sntiem, Saenens enn eg Lucas St.” 81, 1952 for Selective Service Registration Baled CAs SN Gay ee Sune, LEE. HH. WILLIAMS, ee leas er ee
bereavement caused by the death of|® See” at Courtesy Garage. Din adie siolieitars. Sees ce Military Training Registrar of Trade Marks.
Cox. -7,53——9n ; 16.7,8%—3n
; La a All male citizens of the United States
Germaine Seott (daughter), Arthur Scott! ~ 7 oa bees oauieetitenaumuspereseenenea —_—
(s0n-inslaw), Prince ‘Scott ' (grandson) Parma ot SN oes da eo nss |, “HERNE BAY COTTAGE” standing on| WhO attain the age of 18 years sub- }
16.7.52-—1n iorse-power 6 seater grey sedan. | 2 roods 16 perches of land at Land’s End, |Seduent to July 31, 1952, are required |
Excellent condition, always ownerls: wichael, Elestvie and water services | % register upon the day they attain the |
Sere wit Raat Teal dak teohicesen | reealled ‘eS | eighteenth anniversary of day of OVERNMENT O | :
equiped with first new set replacemen their bi: with
IN MEMORIAM res, "RD. Stewart, Dial 9348 yridey, the 20th July 10h eh our omee| Sf ee ete ;
16-7 2? | James ‘Street, at 2.30 p.m. American ‘Consulate. Brulee ,'*| VACANT POST OR RADIOGRAPHER, GENERAL HOSPITAL,
(cttanetteiethepneetiainateennenncemenamneasnia HUTCHIN: . rnd
OLARKE—In loving memory of our dear 4 CAR- monet ere tevaliers ow SON & BAN: bados. $ 6.524 f.n. A BARBADOS, t to th of Ra | eee
mother and aunt Ella Adriana Clarke | dition, low mileage ia 5 Courtesy eaten! ees catio! invited for appointmen post dio-
Peer Tene lees ented aiings teint | omen | 4 LAND 18,008 square feet of land with NOTICE grapher, General Hospital, Barbados OUTWARD FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM
‘Ss v asse 8 ce « >
gua day ” VAUXHALL VELOX 1949 Model—New | {R¢, Ser wren, wat Se babicn aoe PARISH OF ST. PETER 2. The salary attached to the post is at the rate of $1,440x48—

Wawa? One We loved was called y ees a a a Seana as [other fruit” trees thereon, situate cn | vestry Extibitions ot neh eoee tt | $1,584 per annum. In addition free quarters, rations, servant Vessel. From Leaves Due
RNa, SSRI ee iE IE IE! fon oe wis toe Public Road, Ideal ‘site. Offers Will Ne|Parny School will be received by tae} and light or an inclusive allowance of $1 per annum in lieu, Uni- Barbados.
Alleyne (daughter), James Alleyne \son- | TRUCK —Chevrolet truck, no reason- | Twcelved by Messrs. Haynes & Griffith. lundersigned up to the 25th of July 1% 2. | forms are provided. Quarters are not available at present. A temporary l gs « ‘ J
in-law). Irene Jones, Leotta, Cytillenc (able offer refused. A Baines & €o., | N° 5 NA AD 7-54. | jo APBlicants must be the sohs of Parish-| cost of living allowance at the rate of $156 per annum is also payable. ; 8.8. ao. -. London 4th ad 30th
(nieces), Clyde (nephew) Ltd 3.7.58—4.f.n. -7.52—40. Jioners in straitened circumstances and Passage expenses paid on appointment and on completion of Agree-| SS. ‘A’ MAN’ .. Liverpool 10th July. 25th .

161,821 | ee | Cater Wk ca lee eee be between the ages of 7 & 13 Saat S.S. “SCHOLAR” .. London and 24th July 8th Aug.
| ONE (1) Austin two ton truck and one| i oiiints Land Bees Yeats of age. oe M/brotgh
» Lower Westbury Road,| Applicants must sent themselves to 3. The a intment will be on agreement for three years. The
TROTMAN—In loving memory of Every!| (1) Austin A.40 Car. Telephone 4821,) S18n's Lan PP ust present thems 5 ppo: ia ss

Srotmah, who died on dole ith 1001.1D. V. Scott & Co. Ltd. ait with. bearing fruit trees fod water well the | headmaster fot examination 0 ve\employers contribution to an approved superannuation scheme is|S-S. “CROFTER’ .- London 2nd Aug. 15th Aug.

wae, ys 2 Gl aike he et ele ee ee Ue Pa : Tet Street 16.7. 52—2n Application forms ean be obtained at | Payable. anted ts t the Radi

ore. AUTO-CYCLE—One Power-Pak Auto- | TanpTawo Ti Spo Land on | th? Parochial Treasurer's office 4. The holder of the post will be req' assis’ e -

It’s only the ones who love can teli Jeyele excellent condition. Motor can bel mie Waters. Tortace ote, Mapa jon G. §, CORBIN, ologist in the Diagnostic and Therapy services of the X-Ray Depart- HOMEWARD FOR THE UNITED KINGDOM

The wriet of parting without farewell. | purchased separately. Apphy C. W-inesen. Areas 11,966 and 8120 Square Vests | Socom |ment, General Hospital. Candidates must possess the M.S.R. (Diag-

We cherish still and will adore All e, Britton's Cross Road, or €/0] poy ‘adjoining one anetar Ape | 13,7. 207 on tic d Thi Dipl t Vessel, Fer Closes in Barbades.

Her loving life for evermore Advocate Linotype Department H. B. Kinch, 135 Hoabush ‘St. PP eee eee nostic ani erapy ‘oma. lonial S St: "
Rosa Trotman (mother), Colleen (daugh- st ve 10.7.52—t.0.n IN THE COLONIAL COURT oF 5. App eesens should be addressed to the Colo ORTetary, “ *
ter), Rosalie (grandmother), Vetlyn and ssatthnamgnaaae ADMIRALTY Public Buildings, Bridgetown, Barbados to reach him not later _ S.S. “PLANTER .. London 22nd July. ..
Violene” (aunts), Hyacynth and Jean ELECTRICAL 2 roods of land at Charnocks, Christ The Owners of the Steamshi 25th July and the selected candidate will be required to assume duty
(sisters), 1 y (brother), Neville and » e rs o e Steam: p . y For 0; .

Erskine (cousins), James Piggot (uncle) Tanne notes ate” facing en- Amak by 15th August, 1952, or as soon as possible after this date, enc further information apply to
and family. 16,.7,.52—1in Nee ee 93,560 * vs 1.
Just received new shipment of Garrard f square feet of land facing Las 2
three speed Automatic Changers at| Palmas at Rockley, Christ Church. The Motor Vessel “T.B. Radar’ DACOSTA & COw LTD.—Agente
PCB. Mattei & Co. ad, Bate For | eas & Goneaneiae te Nets, otis |. Ad Siem tee allnccoat ae ‘Th
. 7 15.6.52—-t.f.n, ‘onstitution Streets, ge mM, we afternoon of Thurs-
ANNOUNCEMENTS |" OES Pe cr soa. | 2a, tae Bit day of Sully t06a, T wil HURRICANE WARMNGs ; =
| JUST ARRIVED “Pye” De Luxe e above land are excellent build-| offer for sale by ic Competition at It is hereby notified that on the approach of storms, visual warn- e es

-~ — |Ulitra-Modern Radio-Grams (with Gar- | !ng sites. my Office in the Public Buildings for a]. arene . PP he foll ‘. Si hh gone a on teams

EARN BIG MONEY by selling Kedif- |r#rd 3-speed changers) Two Pickup Heads} | The above will be set up for sale on| sum not less than the appraised value | ‘ngs as described below will be displayed at the following places: /

susion in your spare time. Get a supply | 20 needle worries, in ae walaut ee aie Pay * our office, eerie YESS. : a tee Public Buildings.

- binets. A imited juantity only . «m, 7 a n Carlisle Bay, Bridge- iste

of ferme today, 1.7. 8R On. 00. P, C. 8. MAPTEL& CO.,LTD, HUTCHINSON & BANFIELD. | town, With its Attings, Particulars of Office of the Harbour and Shipping Master.

GREAT REDUCTION AT THE MAY-/|Pr: Wm. Henry Street. ; : ma 2 inventory of the said Vessel can be Highgate Signal Station. sou Bails Satis
FAIR GIFT SHOF interesting to local ee a ae The undersigned will offer for sale at *“The Tae ike of the Vessel. E at i ; ee ‘Geamrest Halifax Boston ag Sg a,

iends. Prices cut fron | ———————————_________ . ast Point Lighthouse. - A
natin Mice mate Tainces, “Baskets | MIXER—One Dormeyer De Lane Mix | their Office No. 17 High Street, on Friday | which was built in 1946, 1s the sum of ; : | CANADIAN CONSTRUCTOR 2 July a oe
Souvenirs, all the way through to Doroth; | Master, practically new. Can be seen a ae, ly 108 een kT public) THEN, FIVE THOUSAND DOLLARS South Point Lighthouse. | LADY RODNEY .. .. .. ii July i4July 16July July 2

‘ > "ame, See at C y Garage Office s . ’ an Internal ec ustion ;
Grays Cosmetics—Hurry one, Pik sn ee Sees eres a 15.7,.52—2n. | 48 “Edenville” standing on 2964 square} Diesel Engine, has an estimated speed Harrison Point Lighthouse, ~
: atk si ieee feat, of jana at George Street, Belleville, | of 10 tote, a gross {Opnage of 162,34. Mount Standfast, St. James.
PYE BATTERY SETS—Just a few left. y iehael. © Dwellinghouse contains} & register tonnage o: 16.12, a length £73 NOR’ ile Artives Aatives
MAFFEI'S RADIO EMPORIUM, “| gallery, drawing and dining rooms, two] of 108 feet, a Breadth of 20 & 3/10 tect Crane Hotel, St. Philip. THBOUND Apdcr’ ot. John “B'doo ‘Boston Mellfax Montes!
FOR RENT 15.6.52—t.f.n, }bedrooms, (one with running water), and a depth of 10 feet. The length of Hackleton’s Cliff, St. John,
kitchen, toilet and bath, Electric light}the Engine room ie 24 feet. Ss CANADIAN
and running water. ain a The accommoda on consists of 2 Golden Ridge, St. George. CONSTRUCTOR 24 July 29 July S Aug. 8 Aug. 10 Aug.
napection on application to . | Passengers’ rooms ® each, f A, LADY RODNEY .. 7 Aug. 9 Aug. . @ Aug. 7 .
HOUSES LIVESTOCK H. A. M. Lashley by phoning 4607. sailors’ rooms for 6, cooks’ accommoda- St. Lucy's Church. at ie us ae 19 Aus a ave
“= ere pnenpnsneneennc timid ferent merase ae. fusthee particulars and conditions|tion for 2, Boatswain’s locker nd District “B” Police Station,

APARTMENT—Furnished at Dieppe on; © — ne cow sui le for a dairy. [of sale ap — store room. sat i ion. For further particulars, apply to— a”
sea, 3 bedrooms ete. Running water in |fresh in milk. Apply: Mr. Joseph Smith, co CATWORD & CO. For further particulars and arrunte- aaa ‘amd . 4 oe ‘i
each; all conveniences. Dial 8186: Appiy | Montrose, ris' jure’ .1,.52—2n. ‘itors. men jor inspection app! 0 . § "7
within after 2. 16.7.52-3n . 11.7.52-8n T. T. HEADLEY, District “E” Police Station GARDINER AUSTIN & CO,, LTD.—Agents.
~ BULL—One pedigree Jersey Bull one | —— origin oa Marshal in Admiralty aes : a.

APARTMENT—An Apartment at}year old, mother from imported stock, AUCTION Provost Marshal's e 25.6.52—11n District “F” Police Station.

“O-cetta”, on the seaside, Bay St.. near|gave 24 pints milk with first caif Belleplai Poli Station

Woodside, from ist August. No children, |Father is Blenhein at Pine Livestock Fula Ehanaa its art he NOTICE eueplaine Folice station, = = = = = =—=— CCU | eceeppeSe8eseSedseecoseceosooeseeneaeennaas
7 ao 8 . > 5 as. \* «

Apply to Miss Douglas on premilees: bs Rites wearabe Plantation. re panes, at Bath Village, Christ Church, a Board THE PARISH OF ST. ANDREW 1, Cautionary Warning.

Attractive seaside Flat main road Has- ONE MULE Apply Constant Planta-
tings, comfortably furnished, English} tion 121.7.52—6n.



ee aaa ls and Shingle house. Front house 18 x 10] Applications for two vacant Vestry |‘1) Visual — (a) by day — One red flag with black square centre.
x 8 back house 18 x 10 x 8. Closet | scholarshi ‘

(one boy, one girl) tenaole i _—
ané bathroom, Land can be rented $3.00] at the Alleyne School, ne SE Scien (b) by night One red light.






























































Bath, Open Verandah facing sea. Suitable Pe. Seat. cae CASH. iy Ageher [by the undersigned ‘up to Saturday,|“2) Audible — (a) Plantation and Church bells will be rung rapidly
one person (or couple), From July 1. ee See: B]July 19th, 1952. Applications must be at frequent intervals for a period of a quarter of
e 2949. 18.6,52--t.f.n. MISCELLANEOUS ee accompanied by birth Certificate and
‘ applicants ainust pretent Aienselves to an hour.
BUNGALOW—Newly built Bungalow | ——_—_——————_——————e © Head ster oO} e leyne School
situated Pine Land, Nr. Gost, ill. Con- | .,AMBRICAN | comics super Thriier, | 'NDER THE IVORY HAMMER J oi: stonday ist, 105d "to be Ieearrino (b) Sirens will be blown at Central, Brittons Hill, | }
; h , SKINN “py ‘ X
{aniie eer Sewaee ne Late Tex ‘Ritter, Western Hero, Captain ay instructions received from the Si laity Gist, yi ee | Worthing, Boarded Hall, and District E Police . -
Bath, Kitchen, Dial 2218 V. P. Burgess, [MNGh ata, Super Boo Bell Boye, Tuy 18tN at Messrs” Fort’ Royal Garage: 1.7.52—4n. | Stations for one minute, three times, with an 1EQLE TL A i E
Belle Gully 19 7-829" Tix Gun Heroes, 20 cents each, Press| St. Michael’s Row, (1) 1980 A-40 Austin | TT wae mnie interval of half a minute between blasts. This
BREEZLEY, Maxwell Coast — Unfur-|©!"® Building 59, Swan Street. a pases in accident). Terms REALTORS LIMITED will be repeated every quarter of an hour for an
pishea House’ with 4 Bedrooms, spacious Rap Sate, | CO Oe Gain ane Sailings from Southampton to Guadeloupe, Martinique,
eption Rooms, nuble Garage, anc ” 4 poh lad . AUC 10) S L . |
Hight of way to beach. John M. Biadon | y\NTIQUES of every description, reeray I an. T N A E Il. Hurricane Warning. T La G@ &
* Co. Phone 400, Pit. Lid. Buliding. [colours Early books, Maps Autographs | AT 11.30 A.M. (1) Visual — (a) by day — Two red flags with black square
ete., at Gorringes Antique Shop adjoining UNDER THE SILVER On Tuesday the 22nd July, by order centres hoisted one above the other. ‘i From Southampton Arrives Barbados
FLAT & HOUSE—Fully furnished, st. | ®ve! Yacht Club 3. 2.52—tf.n, HAMMER gt MY, witeh Seiloet,” we will sell the (b) by night T ad light holsted a ahs *“DE GRASSE” 12th July, 1952 24th July, 1952
a “ - — - niture an usehold effects Mr, B. A. > — Two r o one abov e ave ~
LAWERRRE PERE! | FOS IF a 1.310: | SUBSCHTAD now. to the’ Dally | On Shorey Sth, by, cries 0 Abd; [Brooke ctunidenon acts cemins o. : . ; “COLOMBIE” -» Sist July, 1952 .. 13th Aug., 1962 %
_ a Telegraph, England's leading Daily News-| Annie Puckerin we’ will sell her Fur-|Hill, Rockley, which includes Drawine epee ““DE GRASSE” 22nd Aug., 1952 3rd Sept., 1952 §
“TRELAWNY — Hastings, unfurnished [P@Per now arriving in Barbados by Air|niture at Cartref, Strathclyde — which | room suite consisting of three chairs and | (2) Audible — (a) Plantation and Church bells will be rung rapidly on Ug.» “ pt., 1952
third house from St. Matthias Gap, three | 2M” a few days after publication in| includes — Sideboard; u t and Tub e to seat two, plastic top table, three a ti 1 i ted oF ¢ t 1% *Not calling at Guadeloupe
‘bedrooms, water and basins in’ each. {/0ndon. Contact lan Gale, C/o. Advo-| Chairs; Rockers; Settee; Arm Chairs, 7 pedestal Ashtrays tables, four and continuously over a period of a quarter of |
Inspection 4 to 6 p.m. Immediate pos-|#t® _Co., Ltd, Local Representative | Hatstand, Ornament Tables all in Ma- ming room chairs, all in birch, an hour. . SAILING FROM
ession 16.7.52—1n | Tel. 3118 17.4.5%—tf.n. | hogany: Pine Dining Table and Waggon; | birch table with enamel top, one small : ‘ BARBADOS TO EUROPE
- Seems teen ert tr Paintings and Platures: Rajtan Pocksre: mabomuay table, Seinted ching room (b) Two rockets or maroons will be fired from the From Barbados Arrives Southampton ¢
7 = 3G a ew ironing boar ass and China inner ‘ea Services; | table, one simmons jouble d, with ‘ ‘ ‘ 4
APARTMENT. 2 badrooms with, run- ane Meson tron sets, subject ce special Spoons; Forks &c; Carpet; Congoleum, slumberking spring, {we Usingle’ beds, Harbour Police Station and, if possible, from Dis- “COLOMBIE” .» 18th July, 1952 .. 25th July, 1962
» shen, | Wedding-g! allowance, arnes Clock, Vietrola, Records & Cabinet; Ma-|one Birch dressing table, China tea set, | triet Police Stations. ee RA 99
Bae eee. Cae "Anely 9 star oh Co., Ltd. 3.7.52—t.f.n. |hogany Single Bedstead Vono Spring, | salad bowls, fruit dishes and various Ir 1 : nr DE GRASSE -. 6th Aug., 1952 .. 16th Aug. 1982
#h person to Mrs. B. L Barrow, Leonor. YACHT: * Invader" Centre Board righch Orlane Wate cle saad tobie TF remenn cae ai tee Bats sa Poe ee “COLOMBIE” ig 24th Aug., 1952 at! 5th Sept., 1952
7 2 ade! i ‘al : } "4 fei ot ; j
Worthing. 13.1, O-+an 16 long. Brass Stainless Steel Rigging. | Press; Rush Chairs and Rockers; Painted ,; fection three burner oil stove, one oven (1) Visual Flags or lights will be hauled down, ““DE GRASSE” -» 16th Sept., 1952... 26th Sept., 1982
No reasonable offer refused, Phone 2876,] White and Green Furniture in Tables,|7 cubfe foot gereral electric refrige »| (2) Audible — Sirens will be blown continuously for three minutes. | s$ “Sailing direct to Southampton
16.7.52-—1n | Chairs, Waggon, Larders; 3 Burner Oil] box of tools, smali high speed drill, T iditi to the ab ni $
PERSONAL Stove and Oven, Kitehen Utensils; | table lamp and standing lamp, rest chair, | n addi aon io e above warnings :— R. M. JONES & co., LTD.,—Agents,
LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE| Tables and other items kitchen utensils and many other items. (1) The Police will warn parochial authorities and isolated dis- SSSSSS SSOOSHOSOSS
TRANSFER AND REMOVAL BRANKER, TROTMAN & a See tricts
The application of Sydney Lorenzo Hall ’ ” . +" ay 2 . \
ius. Subtle are heresy warned againnt| Teh hrist Church, “purchaser Auctioneers oe REALTORS LIMITED (2) Reports will be made over Barbados Rediffusion Ltd. at
lying credit to my wife OLIVE] granted to George tandel Hen in rement 13.7.$2—2n hourly or half hourly intervals at a quarter past every hour
RINGER (nee FREEMAN) as 1 do not} of ground floor of a 2-store AUCTION SALE
Bcid mysslt temponatbie for her or any-|'°, cro nears a. es or at a quarter past and a quarter to every hour as the case
one else courenrune ae beta bh Church, within District “B" ‘for per- TAKE NCTICE At 11 30 may be. <
in _my name unless py a written order mission to rest she was one Te That THE AUSTIN MOTOR COM = a.m. (3) Reports will be broadcast at hourly or half hourly intervals, | $
3 NAAMAN SPRINGER. and ge wen eC : hop attached to | pany LIMITED, a company incorporated On Thursday the 17th July, by order oe ill b df th b: Regi ‘
Sarjeant's Village eee ad teres Rowe Bridge, St./ under the laws of Great Britain, Motor fhe Terai ag mins, we. will sell as will be announced from the Barbados Regiment transmit-
é ' ’ nee. ieorge and t se a e al : “pe a ne furniture and household effects at ter at the Garrison at < t t h
Ch, Ch such last describe ise Car Manufacturers, whose trade or busi. | ( r a riso’ a quarter past every hour or at a/@
18-7 83-180 Hoes Aaee egeetied, ag tag af ness address is Longbridge Works, North- Mayville’, Codrington Hill, which Cd







field, Birmingham, England, has applied } ‘neludes: quarter past and a quarter to every hour as the case may

ws co C. W, RUDDER, Hag,, Drawing suite three chairs and settee
for the registration of a trade mark in] | QraWing suite | be, Frequency 5.40 megacycles. (Wave length 55.5 metres).

The public are hereby warned against Police Magistrate, Dist. "B.’*



























































son. cr. Darsans Part “A” of Register in respect of motor standing and table
Reet ree to ROY PetOn Ge EE HANDIsr ‘Applicant, | vehicles, their parts and accessories, and | !4™ps, radio fable with bookcase, two 13.7,52—2n. “ TRINITY Cc OTT AGE ”
hold myself responsible for anyone con-[| N,B.—This application will be con. | Will be entitled i sean ante with mirror, folding ehalr wall brackets
acting any debt or debts in my name} sidered at the Licensing Court to be held | ##ter one month: from the j@th: Gee eee Chole canines ane buiet, one Ti Wah e oe
unless by a written order signed by me.}on Monday, 28th day of July, 1952, at} JUly, 1952, unless some person shail 1) T b » e Tip
" — OSCAR MURRAY, iL o'clock a.m. at Police Courts, Dist.{ the meantime give notice in chiplicate to} Top Table with carved pedestal, and SPECIA iE ivi
f Bea Sigg | uy € am. a ; “Th at my Ofice of Opposition of such chairs, Serving Table with Glass Top, Drivin Made E ! t
St. Michael F Cc. W. RUDDER, registration. The trade mark can be see RY as eae Gee te fs Saaig asy !
15.7, 52-—2n Police Magistrate, Dist. "B." | 0" application at AR of iba: 1952, Radio, one Mirror, Lamp shades, Floor DIS CO UNT
= be ete Seoet 16.7.52—1n. | Dated this 30th oh a aanes, Rage ye AR Lamps, Rush Settee Driving Made Ras 1
e public are hereby warned agains w 4 » Clock. Anti {
Wing credit to my wife ADINA Rogisirer, of: Tages Markt, | Qamware including Salad” Dishes, ter F y Derricks (on sea-side) St. James
Perit noel camnainle se ee do A TED eT nee Cope, ae oe we China
not 3 , > of Ww N ea rvice, complete Beer Set. Dinner There is a demand through-
1 tracti é debt \ ox a 3 s fis. in tom
ee, eb ee crhite “bey a written TAKE NCTICE Se ne, Soup Bewis: in. Waits out the world for properly Three Bedroom Stone House, with usual conveni-
order, figned by me, a SCE xOUS AUSTIN Lenguin, (Solad | Bow! ° with ” Servers trained men and women in ot fully furnished or without furniture, S
LERED D.C. MPSON, MI LLAN Single and Double Beds and Springs, every field cn roods and 10 perches. Immediate
Hillaby, s ‘ ’ : : ;
| ae ‘ Tr 1E AUSTEN oR COM. | towel Racks, Triple Mirror Vanity, with . ’
° St. Thoms. | SMALL HOUSE OR FLAT, unfurn- PANY LIMITED, © company ineerporated upholstered stool, Bedside Table and And in Barbados, there’s a Mortgage can be arranged. Inspection invited by
46 “"' fished, 2 bedrooms, garage, for quiet] under the laws of Great Britain, Moto: | Night Chair, One Dressing Tavle, One demand for properly t
elderly couple, Garrison, Hastings. | Car Manufacturers, whose trade or bus: 2 eta = in a une: Pees trained drivers. arrangemen »
oo Worthing. Ring 8185, 8—12 ness address is Longbridge Works, North- | Suite; ne Teadie Singer Sewin: r
9.7.52—4n. | field, B ham, England, has applied | Machine in mahogany Case, one Jones The qualities that go to -
10 D AY’S NEWS FLASH {| “se pecninainee - tor the registration of & trade mark. in Sek Dasbine;’ One ‘painted Breaktast teint = i cokionmint For further particulars Phone 2959. The Barbados
aes $62.6 POC. c 1 earne “ar e otor fs . e . ;
by Tecmenmeiaine 25 new subscribers tc Sekine, hele paste an saan a with Oven, One Hot Plate, One Water driver can only be had if Import & Export Co., Ltd. Plantations Buil Fi
i REDIFFUSION in one month. 1.7.52-6n, | Will be entitled to register the same Coolest eae peek, ne as you are trained by 12.7.5
. + . - 4.940. Tafter one month from the 16th day’ of | © Fash, * a
ES eee a, ‘ . shail in| lee Cream Freezer, Books, Plants, an
Johnson's Stationery REDSFFUSION offers $1.50 cash for ae Go ate eae dophents One Garden Seat, and many other items
. each new Subscriber recommended byf to me at my office of opposition of such Inspection from 9.30 # m, On TAprning on all
Tab Meha? att for you. 1.7.52—€n. | pegistration, The trade mark can be seen} ot sale, Terms cash, 4h.4 Basan
on = walle lieati t my office. * 7 yo =
STOCK-TAKING Sire haa PosN eaan| ee OO aie ee | aaa || PEARL NECKLACES DRIVING SCHOOL
Sie iP hnaee EB {ull particulars from the REDIFFUSION Registrar’ of Trode Marks, | CHRISTIAN SCIENCE SPECIAL CASH OFFER tt
MOUTH ORGANS office, 1.7,52—6n 16.7.52—3n { DING ROOM ) at your Jewellers... Enrol To-day and drive the ye
Just received by— “TWENTY-FIVE DOLLARS extra Bonus | 96600000004000000000006" REA Y. De LIMA BAD.S. Way: HERE’S YOUR OPPORTUNITY TO OWN ONE OF THE
JOHNSON’S STATIONERY from Rediffusion for 25 recommenda ( In our study of the Bible, it is ) ° For Particulars Phone 2933 WORLD’S FAMOUS - - - -
& HARDWARE Nee od ies THE GAS COOKER important to use a Dictionary of & CO. LTD or Consult .
aren the ie. : RAI 2
+12 With Everything U Want ( aoe , 20 BROAD ST. and at ak tssenk Pelee ties
3 ath ( of aN CEN DAVIS > MAI G +s ’ a St. ss
ibd snow LOOKS ! may be purehased at this Room es .
THERMOSTATIC CONTROL | over Bowel @ Sons, Broad Street > SSOSSSSSSSOSOSSOS
at ' aa as con _— een. Cay dakeiawe. Fridays
THE BARBADOS Se eg ST a 10 am.—I2 o'clock on >
* 3 5 Saturdays. y ny >
aneeten CLUB Aap aY ty qeoltiga ee wisobus \ WATER COOLERS (Ice Cans)
(Local and Visiting www as
$42 0O950O000 : www |
Members only) eo Now Obtainable at ¥
—— . + ?
Throdligh the co sy of .
Thais Weeks’s |\\\ Bis Counct there wil UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF THE WEST INDIES || aa CENTRAL EMPORIUM °
ne be a DEPARTMENT AT ATTRACTIVE PRICES %
Special FILM SHOW —— si ;
in the Ball Room $3$4:696999665S6 . .
. ' 7 SSSSSSSSOSSSS ~
THIS EVENING ‘THE CHILD, THE PARENT, AND. SSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSS .
at 8.30 o'clock, THE TEACHER
DOUGHNUTS The programme includes e i :
JELLY British News; The 1948 ' NOTICE [ PHILLIPS BICYCLES Supreme Model
6 ¢ each Olympic Games; Edinburgh’ Two Lectures % GENTS STANDARD GREEN
“ Mile”: b } GENTS STANDARD BLACK
Also a Variety of Royal Iiiie"; at & Geyer y RACERS
DANISH PASTRIES Film — “The Bridge of J. L. NICOL, OBE. Sairateni
= r Time”, showing some of the on ; : } } BOYS’ & GIRLS’
AD itio ; R. M. JONES & . BI “Ss $ s
ARDADOS tediioaal pubtis eke THE CHILD AT SCHOOL %. M. JONES & CO., LTD., beg to notify the public i}
AKERIES T | monies of =e (1) Friday, July 18th, Scouts H.Q., Beckles Tee 8 that, until further notice, due to building alterations ¥/}}
uo , Members are cordially sday, July 24th, British Council, Wakefie ; ; yy BARBADOS HARDWARE C0 LTD
| rite (2) Thursd id : . % the enirance to their office will be on McGregor Street &| ® s
DI | invited. , 2 p.m. ies X (The Hi For B x
AL i aime ¥
4758 No Admission Charge 1] Admission: 1/- a lecture (except to those who have i instead of Prince Wm. Henry Street x e House For Bargains)
n ste 1¢ m. Hen st. . . ‘.
JAMES STREET | 13.7.52—8.n, i paid fees for the course). 1S : * No. 16 Swan Street Phone : 4406, 2109,



Oy y
FSSSOSOSIOSSSH9SSSSS55S5S5SSS5SSSSSOSHSSSSSOSSOOSHSHGEY





ee a a a a a BE ee a ee n et CO a A a Lee ae ee





























WEDNESDAY, JULY 16, 1952 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE NINE







momma, ummm

Restores Yout
in 24 Hours

HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON



ex: ean








ss of this atnazing de «
VI-TABS, has been sa
being distributed



FLINT OF THE FLYING SQUAD.... BY ALAN STRANKS & GEORGE DAVIES

ere — a . |






if SEVERN DIES AND
LAVAT'S OVWIN GUN id
FOUND iN HER CABIN...

SOMEHOW 4 MUST
WARN PETA ABOUT
MARK SEVERN...

er, he e y
| package and get your mone "
j \ AHS costs little, ar ve guar
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} LOL ELLE LCF LEEPE OT,
PAIN
COMES WITH

RAIN

A See tn, la tI co i fh PES

Be kind to your face

USELEss TO BUY the loveliest Cold Cream to cleanse and cherisn
your complexion unless you also use the gentlest of tissues to
remove it.

Don’t scour your delicate skin. There’s no need. Pond’s soft
Tissue Hankies are so absorbent that they will quickly soak up the
cream — dust, stale make-up and all. And they never collapse into
soggy little pieces. They're strong as well as soft and absorbent.

There are so many uses for these Tissues all the time, everywhere.
», Used as hankies, they are softer than the finest cambric,
“A and save you hours of washing and ironing, Destroy
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Get a packet today, and keep it handy.
You will wonder how you ever managed with-
out Pond’s Tissue, Hankies, At all the best
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PR Rema
aa Sag

THAT MUST BE THE
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5

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ALL BRANCHES

ff GOERS

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* FLASH DON = = ae
SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Monday to Wednesday only


















THE CITY WiLL Y...UNLESS I SHOULD LET TONIGHT ena THE = EET An Ge Se ee ee a Bhranchos Ota! work
STROYED \ YOU ESCAPE ON THE SLEEPS, UR FRIEN — ss ‘ £
Oy We Guace. \carpugeD spacesie? Wits, Eb GACORTED tO 118 SPECIAL OFFERS are now available at our Hranches White Park,
x SAFE... BUT TOMORROW — ] THE WRATH OF THE GODS SHIP! BUT YOU, FLASH Tweedside, Speighistown and Swan Street
‘ 7 AND TH WAS NOT AIMED AT »| GORDON, ARE PROMIS es . 3 . f ‘i
3 merour eens ND WE Wi Ca eaermninog. TO ME! You wit STAYS }.ze = vale Sen? CUMS Si tiaepice rcs pe OE EU $ ” ss ans eae enema Usually Now
g BACK, WE'RE IN INE BISCUITS ...... aia 5 / “ESE
$ ? JACOB'S CRACKERS—Tins ... 1.44 —Tins Al 36
» + —Pkgs. . 36 ; 3
: MARTINI CRACKERS ~ 1.81 BREAKFAST ROLL 64 60
¥ ? §
3 > § Cankentore ee ‘ve 4 BATCHELOR’S PEAS 39 36
} | CLUB CHEESE STRAW..................... Li2 Yano , mee
; CARR’S CHEESE CRISPS... vonene LB RINSO ..... Se atte Gil 65 60
" CARR’S TABLE WATER,...00000.000.0 0.0.00. ees 1.58
: ° BOP TOI ID cicssssssecvssosaveasessossisonpevevesesevoese ‘ 1.44 WHITEWAY’S DEVON CIDER — 1.12 1.00
\. JOHNNY HAZARD

“’ HERR UMLAUT 4 ME! YOUR CONNECTIONS WITH WHAT'S MY FIRST | | TO PROVE “HAT YOU A
YOU WISH TO JOIN OUR TOL? yOu! I OFFER FAR EASTERN DIAMONPS,LTD/ Pe oe NOT FROM THE CL?
ORGANIZATION, HERR HAZARD. MY PLANE AND MY

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Re
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AT

ADVOCATE
STATIONERY











PAGE TEN



SE €O0ND

By 0. N.

NINCE the current cricket
season started, Junior Di-
vision batsmen have been piling
up tail scores on wickets which
give bowlers little assistance, It

is significant though that the
majority of these tall seores
have been made on small

grounds Junior Division Cricket
is more or less confined to these

nall grounds, But these small
grounds are really small. It is
observed that too many of these
small grounds have their
houndaries out of proportion to

the size of the ground. You
find that when a batsman hits
a six, on these grounds on a
full sized ground he would be
out, The fieldsman has no
chance. To hold the ball he must
step over the boundary, In

these games, most of the time,
all the batsman has to do is to

swing his bat and nine times
cut of ten, the ball goes over
the boundary. The , Barbados

Cricket Association should step



in and assess the various small
grounds in the island, This

ll in itself make far better
assessment of averages and it



will be

cores

found that all.the tall
are half of those re-
ported. Mental Hospital
grounds, Central and Boarded
Hall are cases to mention. These
grounds are definitely not the

regular size and should not be
allowed boundaries of sixes
and fours, These grounds are
more or less half the size of
grounds like Kensington, Bay
Pasture, Park, College and

Combermere

It is then obvious that Junior
Division Cricket is being played
undey false pretences, and it is
imperative that the Barbados
Cricket Association step in and

make a ruling as to which
Hrounds should have bound-
aries of sixes and fours and
Which should be fours and
two's.

HE Central Cricket grounds

at Vaucluse should not be

six and four; it is definitely too

small and only flatters bats-

men while bowlers suffer, not

through the ability of the bats-

men but through wrong assess-
ment of the ground,

It is not fair to the bowlers,
and the batsmen, who enjoy
fit. It is an untrue value of
themselves, It is hoped that the
Barbados Cricket Association
will take proper action to assess
these small grounds for the
benefit of cricket in the island
It is a simple matter and can
be adjusted for the season to
come,

FPRHE Intermediate and Sec-
ond Divisions have jus>d
completed a series and the
season is yet too young to pre-
dict any results, but on the face
of it, the performances are
good and indicationsgare that
this will be a good season,

This series produced un-
finished games, which goes to
show that two day cricket is
not good enough for Intermedi-
ate Cricket.

If Intermediate cricket is
meant to be the Second String
of First Division Cricket, then
there is little point in taking
them down from three days to
two, because unless rain°® steps
in, there is little chance that
any of the games will be fin-

ished, and then the objectives
will have been defeated, Be-
cause Intermediate Cricket is

STRING

Looker

meant to train and prepare
Junior Division cricketers for
the Senior Division. In two
day cricket batsmen must
hustle for runs in order to get
a decision. Hustling for runs
is akin to Lancashire League
Cricket which is the bugbear to
representatives cricket
Swiping and hitting hard on
small grounds can train no
one for truly representative
cricket.

It is unfortunate that there
are not enough grounds in the
island to accommodate ihree
day junior cricket.

There are pros and cons to
the. argument and suggestions
as to the improvement of this
situation would be welcome,

PARTAN playing at Boarded

Hall, flattered to deceive.
After bowling out the “Spark-
ers” for 90 and making 150 for
9 wickets, declared their in-
nings closed on the second day.
One would have thought that
the “Parkites” had advantage
and would have used it to
good effect. Such was not the
case, Spartan resorted to their
old tricks and allowed Cable
and Wireless to trounce them
to the tune of 212 for 8 wick-
ets declared,

Of this Basil Matthews open-
ing batsman-bowler hit 63; R.
McKenzie 39, H. King 56. This
total seemed too much for the
Park boys. They fell down, and
at stumps could score a meagre
49 for the loss of 8 wickets at
stumps. Therefore Spartan
could not foree home a win but
gained first innings points. H.,
King, former Pickwick fast
bowler gave the batsmen little
chance ending up with the fine
analysis of five wickets for 22
runs in seven overs,

N the second division, Col-

lege defeated Wanderers
outright. It is heartening to see
a school team (of youngsters)
defeating a team of established
cricketers, especially when the
average age of the school team
is taken into consideration,

Mr. Glasgow, former Lodge
School boy, has joined the
ranks of Combermere School as
an sssistant master, Though he
is playing in the most junior
division he is giving good as-
sistance to the school,

He should be a useffMâ„¢ addi-
tion to the school team. And
what’s more he should be
playing for the Intermediate
Division,

F other masters at the

various schools would take
a little more interest in the
school games, the schools would
give a better account of them-
selves,

Mr. Harry Sealy of Comber-
mere a good all-rounder does
not play anymore. Mr, Val
McComie of Lodge has appar-
ently retired from the game.
Mr, Wilkes and Mr. Simpson
of Lodge play in the most
junior Division.

There must be some reasom
why these players who could
give valuable assistance to the
young boys will not concern
themselves with the good of the
school in the sphere of sport,
There seems to be some jm-
ternal trouble. If there is, it
is not good, Without the help
of sports minded masters, the
school boys can make little
(progress. And the schools need
to be encouraged,



COLLEGE’S
Harrison College scored their
first outright victory for the
season when they defeated Wan-
derers on Saturday at Wanderers.
Batting first on the first day,
Wanderers scored 158 runs and
dismissed the Collegians for 90
runs in their first innings. Wan-
derers in their second innings de-
clared when the score was 84 for
the loss of five wickets, thus giv-
ing the schoolboys 153 for vic-
tory.. ‘
L. Waithe, who was undefeat-



WHAT’S ON TODAY

Court of Common Pleas
10.30 a.m,

Basket Ball, Second Division,
at Harrison College, Garri-
son, ¥.M.P.C .... 5.00 p.m.

Gramophone Concert, British
Council .. vv sat O15) Pim

British Council Films at Aqua-
tic Club . 8.30 p.m,



[ They’ ll Do Do It t Every ‘Time







EATS IN THE

FRY -BURG

ACROSS THE
ROAD >>>

THANX ANDA TiP

On HATLO HAT
wi?
| “ roar !



FIRST WIN
ed with 44» helped Harrison Col-

lege to score 156 runs for five
wickets for victory,



THE WEATHER
REPORT

YESTERDAY

Rainfall from Codrington:
in.

Total Rainfall for Month to
Date: 1.90 ins.

Highest Temperature: 87.5° F.

Lowest Temperature: 74.0° F.

Wind Velocity; 11 miles per
hour.

Barometer: (9 a.m.)
(3 p.m.) 29.935,

TO-DAY
Sunrise: 5.48 a.m.
Sunset: 6.19 p.m,
Moon: Last Quarter, July 13.
Lighting: 7.00 p.m.
High Tide: 12.46 p.m.
Low Tide; 6.20 a.m., 6.04 p.m.

os

29.998,



Regiveed US Patent Wee















Know Your Cricket



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Surrey Beat |
Kent At Oval

(From , Our



Own Correspondent)

LONDON, July 15.
strengthened their grip!
at the top of the county table
today as the result of a thrilling
victory over Kent at the Oval. |
Set to make 188 in 92 minutes,
they scampered home with two}
wickets and a couple of minutes
to spare to record their ninth}
successive championship win.
They now have 164 points — a,
lead of 40 over Middlesex who
were held to a draw by Lan-
cashire.

At Sheffield a determined not
out century by Ted Lester foiled
the Indians’ bid to beat York-
shire.

At Northampton, Brookes and
Barrick took their unbroken
overnight partnership to 347 — a
new county record for any
wicket—before Barrick was out |
for 211. He batted 5% hours. |
Brookes was unbeaten with 204 |
when Brown declared with!
Northants 104 ahead, There was |
not sufficient time to force aj
result and Northants took wet
innings points,

Gimblett recorded his oneal |
century of the match for Somer- |
set against Derby. Worcester |
made the 250 for victory against
Sussex in 2 hours 20 minutes,
The Scores are:— ee

Surrey

Surrey beat Kent by two

Laws 28 & 29 wickets, Surrey 325 and 190 for

8; Kent 192 and 320 for 9)

: declared, Olinn 111 not out. |

By O. S. COPPIN Leicester *beat Hants by 10 |

wickets; Leicester '379 and 16 for |

The subject for discussion to- It is obvious then that “Wides” a? wickets; Hants 218 and 180. |
day is the Wide Ball and Laws 28 can never be credited to the g oe a Glamorgan by |
and 29 deal with all aspects of striker’s score since if the ball is 165: Gl pe Sa TR oor 409 and |
the application of the term “Wide struck, the call of “wide” should Oucester 164 and )101 for |

Ball” to a delivery by a bowler

LAW 28. If the bowler shall
bowl the ball so high over or so
wide of the wicket that in the
opinion of the umpire it passes
out of reach of the striker and
would not have been within his
reach when taking guard in the
normal position, the umpire shall
call and signal “Wide Ball” as
soon as it shall have passed the
striker,

Delivered

If the umpire considers that a
ball has been delivered but it
comes to rest in front the striker
“Wide” must not be called and
no runs shall be added to the
score unless they result from the

striker hitting the ball which he
has a right to do without any
interference from the fielding
side.

In other words, if on a wet day
where there are many ball holes
on the wicket a ball from a slow
bowler might well be delivered
and then come to rest in one of
these in front the striker, The
umpire having satisfied himself

that the ball has been delivered

cannot call no ball
striker is
to hit it to amy part of the ground
that he can.

I have already discussed “Um-
pires’ Signals” in this series but
as a refresher I shall remind

and

the
well within his rights

readers that the Umpire signals

“wide” by extending both arms
horizontally.

Revoke

An umpire must at once re-

voke the call of “wide” if a

striker hits a ball after it has
been called “wide”.

The umpire must satisfy

self that the striker would

him-
not

have been within reach of the
ball even if he had moved
towards it. On the other hand it
must be clearly understood

that the striker cannot “manu-
facture” a wide by moving away
towards square leg.

By definition a “No Ball” is not
properly delivered and cannot
therefore be a wide in addition,

If only one run has been made
off a “wide ball” the batsmen do
not cross over to the positions
they occupied before the run was
scored as I have seen done here,

Not “Dead”

Another observation that might!

be necessary is this—When a
“wide” is called the ball does not
become dead and the batsman
may be out “stumped”, “hit;
wicket”, “run out”, “handled the!
ball” or “obstructing the field”,

This is better set out in the
following law.

LAW 29. The ball does
become “dead” on the call of
“Wide Ball”. All runs that are
run from a “Wide Ball” shall be
scored “Wide Balls” or if no runs

not

be made one run shall be so Henry St.
scored, The striker may be out| sesessessosesoossosesssseoesssosseoons. ‘ g
from a “wide ball” if he breaks SSSSSSSSSSSS
Laws 38 (Hit Wicket) or 42

(stumped) and either batsman

may be run out, or given out if
he breaks Laws 36 (Handled the
ball) or 40 (Obsttucting the
fleld).

As in the case with “no ball”,
if a “wide” goes to the boundary!
or the batsmen run, the actual
boundary allowance or number
of completed runs is entered as
“Wides” under Extras,

B

Jimmy Hatlo |

E HEREBY
NOMINATE. AS
THE WORLDS
NERVIEST
NOGOODNIK
THE LONG ,LONG
TRAILER-WINDER
WHO PARKS IN
FRONT OF ONE
RESTAURANT*»







POOP FSG FOSS FH SS5EE > COSVOSS!

| (

nine man,

2, Milton 83 not out,

Lanes versus Middlesex, match |
drawn: Lancs 437 for 7 declared |
and 124 for 5 declared Middlesex |
324 and 92 for 4,

Northants versus
drawn:

be revoked.

Even if a batsman be given out
off a “Wide” this does not affect
the penalty for having bowled it,
so that the penalty or any runs
actually completed while the ball
remains in play are credited’ to
the batting side.

sgex, match |
Essex 428 for 9 declared

6 declared, Barritk 211,
204 not out.

Somerset versus Derby, match
drawn: Somerset 426 for 7
declared and 202 for 5, Gimblett
116; Derby 427 for 7 declared,
Elliott 168, Kelly 93.

Yorkshire versus India,
drawn: Yorkshire

Brookes

The Squire Lost

In his book “The Laws of
Cricket” dealing with their his-
tory and their growth, Colonel
R. S, Rait Kerr makes an inter-
esting reference to the birth of
the law dealing with wides, He

match
192 and 298

writes, for 4, Lester 110 not out Halli-
“The first Law to deal with day 77; India 377 for 5 oe noes
“Wides” probably resulted from Umrigar 137 out,

Worcester beat Sussex by one
wicket: Worcester 376 and 250
for 9, Dewes 104; Sussex 367 and
256 for 7 declared, Cox 106. |

a .well-known .incident .which
occurred at Lord’s in 1810 during
a single wicket match between
that forceful character) Lord
Frederick Beauclerk and’ T. C.
Howard on the one side, and

Squire Osbaldeston and William he could bowl! wide of the wicket |
Lambert on the other. The without any penalty, consistently |
Squire was taken ill, but Lora did so to his noble opponent, who

Frederick insisted on pay or lost his tem } 7 |
play, on which Lambert, realising the match. Bee ee ee

THE
PERFECT

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6

DLOECEEASSS



His Reply
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MAFFEI

THE TOP
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Prince Wm.

EI SO


































and 158 for 4; Northants 532 for |

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PPPPPVODIGVG PDE DHVEOOH,

The Officers and Members
of SCOTTISH DIAMOND
LODGE, No. 84
remind you of their. .

ANNI ERSARY DANCE

— at the —
CHILDREN’S GOODWILL
LEAGUE
SATURDAY NIGHT,
July 19, 1952.
Music by C. B. Brown’s Ork

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WEDNESDAY, JULY 1952

16,

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Full Text

PAGE 1

FAGfc TWO IIUIIHIH.S ,DV ASMlaiion and shf M n | H\ K : Hhil..l„l|-n. M | Btd Mi Petri Hift — lU. Off to U.K. M RS. CECIL NOOTT, VMI. d Major Noott, |.n.dr... Combermerc School, led for tin' U.K. on Sunday by the SS (olMnbtr with her baby daughtci "ivoni rtw n.i taktn v <> %  parent* lo **c. She I be away for about thro MR AMD MRS rERr:V B J. HAW R^rV^iu^lLV.^.!, • %  •' Ihrt Wek. Married at J.n, e Str** J,.J ^ , T.,„iTT k t \:^. I*" • /Y .„i,ii on Saturday after<>ih.r asaaaanaae. .„,„ In ..i Oi lli u Itoad and the IheU K bTthe a Jm, >" %  ""'>' Ku 1 w rrled ^Mu* SKrsiSS Ah M : • M. Ivrcy It. J. Mew. eon of lo do utnttu aiul Mi end Ml ''"' "" > "" "' "' Horelayi Bank. %  re going UP K> Scotland (or loui ,. Ht I, II King ol montl,-houoly Worthmj. si..wonM, W.ST 1 ;.: ague, %  ** '• %  *- % %  ol white satinombrolployed with the Cul de Sec and *"* '" Oeto-e* n -.11, pearls. Her tulle vnl Roseau Sugar Factor.,,.. £" l '" ft2 b> '"^'T? I „ •„„ T„I.. oraiuer blussums and she M ..!.." '"aj !, Muwl.ih.Li..i.Mi and Ma. r.rrM i bouqun l neara rooR. WILLIAM DUFF, Pre, .-rberee. dent of Agrun ,„ Ui4I Coll>J .,, She was attended by M>> Oreti Peulo. Brazil, will be Iravine ftrneekto. n,, ujn Husholl as bridesmaid. Slie won it( Una embroidered omandie with Trtaldt i ti"i toHdey bv n.w.I.A 'MI hut way beiok beem spending a short holiday as aue*t at t'e Ocean View Hole! Mrn. Duff and their two children Eleanor and Robert whc. i camo over with him, will be *-* •" remalnintt until the tnd ol thi (Tedd> month. birth (. For Health Rcagone M\a"lar" In^icT J 'st' "'' 7hrM MlehaH Yen .mMrLJ? H" U T'Z I "" """ "* ^ B.W.I-A lor Puerto Rico intranilt .{*.. .. ... Innuo. TIr which the coupli to the D&A. where he will ante! Univereily btudents lefl tor lh. crane Hotel on their the John Hnpkino MeeUca] Centn AA" 'I^OlKir CRICK, lofl ol neymoon. In the inlereet ol hi. henllh iTI Hi an M M i i M For Indefinite Stay Durlnii Mr. Merrill's abaence. • W'el..i, llui, rTKK ,p,.„d,„ g ., morlhl Mr. Ben Gibson will art as rhiel %  *w W i..i.. ..ht tu B W.I A. from Mia* Ferguwn's sister. Mr.. J iinivrf nv Co->aa)| to toend K. ri ipa Und, wtf of Dr. Copl-mi lUinmer holidnyi with hr of f;imda ia h.iUdavfnir in Barwm. Mi.s Ber.vl Willi.n.. badof and will b rrnu.ltun tf for are exported to ..n.vr on Satura/ho ni doing hrt„M ., „ NIMr pOTIOd withflTdmjtfc. Dr. Joyce Cnpelnnd. jtuest, jt Silver na * match and earrifaj HaaiB. %  d %  "o A ion i, Rorn "• %  rcmony wns conducted *^a7 &£*&££&* O T. MCununui*. Mr George Challenor, whU* HjraeUUhj qn tba hos „ „, llflher feU ( Mr BiU> on in Uindon on wataon, Mr. Evan Evelyn and Mi Peter Pcrrs. j) %  V:'. "' %  •' 1 ruinmii lifter Meetinit *o Mews L. Carmi(he dm I. C. Hill and n. Oianl Other incnibfTs of th.Istm day. BY THE WAY... r ^Acw.r T ilt old Fleet Ki< been .IUUU.I Wtlit .. I-.: || fl t" n -( % %  bri U J .1. ,i liMMtiaL r*> 'the Spirit of tin I i>ti thci than two hundred yvu ^pper * u iwuntaui wbc.i Si. f i.,.i,.,i^.. t , %  i„.ft\ Uridea church luu been raataNtl.ff'lefi hip. The Ai-wrilun. to Old Dltp Exprcw biiUdini. buuiu.s JUM -buui Whilom ,,f lluam where its riaJit bank wa. ItL ,. came U.ruujth Holbo.n, ilu^ea'„ "'. ;" !" Zu, !?? ?"* lij*hUy MM ..( Sho,-l.u, t( and Ie.l! "' ? uu }" /"' • mto the Tiuunto whore (^oenf street. There w..* a bridge -l[ V'^"''^'' Oldbouine (Holbwiij, and alnp^' \A/"^ i' wild a Note to the used lo auil up and unload there.S ** n n wl an a 'tilling ihem thai If anyone is iiLtenwted, let him''' ''iiimied aircraft have been i^aci 'LondtMi on the TUanies". by^*',"^_ r ^*) "" l '*' fir* "n Kuuian It. Uniikby, ^ fd*inatiiig booatf*?, publiNhed in 1924 (>y Stfloi, Praedi"CPONSORED parliumenury nd Co. r* debate* would cornmercialue Dn** nhvun-ut ul l'il„„\ ',:,", In thwr ill|([*_ ( %  III lit %  I I 111 "fiVC irilai>jll>r4 AT the HTM full-leva c raaM0 ll' * of the procession which will |>P'II tillI'lblH, S' V'l-.al I ,,nival Mimsie, UH Boadlcea, got on to the wrong can, and found her-l self in the %  Mdta ol %  Wag Idward III granting a rharU-r In I'ibne.v Monachorum". Edward III pushed her into a baron, an-1 her ipear-pnint ripped up hfet dOMHdt. In trying t diaengaK<' Iho spaar two other barons rolleii %  -If the cart anil trippci up two serfs carrying 1( dead deer alum; K',1 remulganL .. upside-down on I pole The dn-r. ,„„,. ,,, u nualb which was a plastic one. U .t Sim, We'must attek in two with I loud gptnk The locathor, hke two people who Master of Ceremonies, dashing t.> have uatd Glujoy too lavishly to the scene, fell over a crusader who smarten then clothes up. iThinka: had fainted, and hit megaphone Hurrah for Glujoy'. OpportHoti D ill porttai to raaltl tha scheme I nn g n a win g, big Bnai to sponsor I' .'• %  • %  ll..,.-p, .vl.r, II.,,. mid nd ih Wbackatnw (ConPoophurat. .. UfaaoM baUcvar in Mil I.I", i In my opinion (he .uaallon calls f 0[ drastic treatment, as the man said %  ii His nose with Gloaso. This is no lime for hesi% % %  '|'H:. and if m eta make up nds that (ilonzoline is the surely Important detiumU of "Why riot .Sukarno" ' Try TTKokiol") Silence ia a social mi'ituvv T HE National AiMKi..ti.n Mental Health (tic) wants n">ru90 refusal of ,i boifa ni.nd or wife lo talk" to be around* for divorce. The suggesrJagraa *>f maota.' mkness which is positively asuiiuiduig. I would like to suggest %  i-orps of Mental Healtr Police be enrolled, so that every household could have one billeted an It, Ilia duties would be to • iiKturage and stimulate conver. UoQ lH-tween husband and wife rasri niUdaaai ami siii Association A ae • mid visll each married coiiple one a week to receive ieOB the spot. Listening Hours w nsi .o\i JI i.i ia ikA. HH i 4 IS | i IWp •ntr sum acatu-h itafaauM. o 1 i %  ,., -[ %  ,,. ii,iiii,,t'up nd Piodi-nanr p.,^,. i pm Th, Krwa. %  ; %  % %  %  .. %  . i %  in m ,m ..M p it. (.-..limn III.Wet In.tlrt. 7 All Hair. I IS p MI I S SO |. m *t.lme>rt1 „( Aroou nrhiOs, %  u P m rr.>m i rlaU. • p.m. Th* PotgolWn Prop!*, m Th* St**. 10 If. p m I" 10 IS pin M.il-.re. T-lk rioni lh* Third % %  rucTu'iitn* tfoolii-ic/ ##//>/I.IIS mm ' /w 2:h-*i. mt /(..tO II.III. for The Barbados PUyan Preaenlai.. THE IMPORTANCE C^F BEING EARNEST At m IMI'lin llll Mill July 24th & Mlfe Oil p.m. — Malinee 25lh M S.tMl p.m. Members may book llieir seaLs In-mnrrnw from H.dO a.m. Hvduelimns in II tlllttl Mil GRAHAM GREENE STARTS A SEARCH FOR MISS X ^litllAM (.Hfcr.M hut. waited until the ae ot \ % 47 to write his Qrst play. He has been content : t< Brio world renown as novellat and film scripti.. roraj lackllnR the theatie. 1 i %  :i;. r.iniiu.l % %  I (if pructii r of many young wrileB who to judge by result*, dash off plays at fu>i Uicaight and act about .ta.oing the croft after their aodleneea hav sufterea IMP by HAROLD COMWA > Mai il EnJ a bMH %  I.i. aw Roon. auiurno i Mjpa is read* to maac hU mar* in Iha Wast Uqiauon nota. rMr his pay. The which Petai OaMvlD* ta (.. product In u.r hvauas'. driunalkRETURN IOURNBY 33rT. %  a\^ loyaluas and the girra uUi to am outsuV Uwanruoti of BiarriatK This, veu vlll aaUter. %  th* new t>> Or.imm Griaeue He uia* nf h'T! riJ Usn and >lr:|hon Rork* mood Behind Find fhe girl o an. MUM pr.Mi 1 |>*Pla •* ..I Hi. Old \ ll SUM tane* riMl I Use i-Mcur Mfe hrr ALAS 11. .4|l,Ilv What o.r i oiiden star* *frr n ihi' h> da. tha** ...in, uiiSiitiMii-. of lh* llri-l.il Ola Vi. d1 U.i 1'i.riuo liiMlr.1 I. Oi|K>rM.t tliratre for Iin.l • i>il a* •acoumirinrii' thvir ie*nu.ltan u( Tha Tv 'Usmni iii Vf—a %  a nil r .tly Mix Alan* aeUn E f llu ao.aiioul**i1 hcrnlnr — rui-liantnl > tilhi .ml public. %  to lluiinlcinii "^ pLukttl lh* ih.-.lrr fur a i.irltiiht. liin Ihti uric Mil'I i' .InipiH-l -.JIM 1 U ih Ukinr* -.nil st.iul > i rrci.ru — Ihr IHei mmt •" %  •loins I hi**. lh' llri-lnl jiinniiiif I— ii, hraaiihl back M •...<.... rch .-.;.. M ie*ia ago '"' -*1 and Hroadvav ana -a seen bare onlv on the fur .ii* g.ri'rpan oauher tiiim-r not piudiicr Oien*iklrt has a i-lue ahe must b* p :, >ounr ao no astaMia h a d 1 ar a< avj. b.* ihe role is one : lie mob: aniotion. esacUnj *r.U*t! tor a vouny aeteaas In •rcerit Usnea -so Junsthlng special in i** talent la aaaawf I liave for lonir oaeu urglni Wast End dm trait.i>t* to rluii-sJtn* parii lot our viDfiaer .-c-tresses, to anmurayr ihf stars of UMnorro* We badK n#*d van* Iresh ftce* ai Uie 10.J Here ItV !!,' %  TIllll' .' Milt Murray's 1952 T HI tai i>r|:in -o a*n for it %  i. r .d Hareara tfatvaj She CsV neked — flc vou r.-iiMrnihj-r-' as TVs moat, loung roreM'nnt. s. %  *g.v*n hat f'""•'>]! %  -ia* pin r ran N O Huaiar piv Adam s Appiah.e '. marr.d ai the baainnn-, of '.*. sat ofl on UaMr praiisBlriaj-T tow. But no* Adams Apple mri-si-Ha 11;* West End wi.i no; sea It nntU it nas aaaa i*wfi:ien And "hey ma> not see ina aasne oHa Thrir left chance I SALUTI llollyaoiid tar In %  tuna Jalia reletsmd tt>ere •< act in a Sim of Jul.uCsrsai H.i name means Mil* or notlnne • inem* audirnces; nut he '.: our beat Shakevpearean aciorar.d producer. Why. however nave our own (Vm studiOF *elt tliU project-nd this acior-to Hollywood? Gielgud has nor worked In a o'ud'.o lor la yaar^. nobody i %  cm* along wlUi a story or a part writer, iniereated ban 1' lui* remained lor -an Amcr %  %  % %  aim to suggM Snaker-peair on the grand scale Brlttth producers have al-or-'d a first rate chance U> slip pa*' Knar? Wanted to Go South W.JKI :> fopTHiom mmmWtWD CROSSWORD ' r-r-r-' 1-'" j-Z^tt ~ —. 1 .JJ „. -t^->2 ,r __:_:_ ._ TV. I, !r.SrWSei din. ni ^^ i5r ; V movie times youVe had ^~ In years" watch for ^ Warnea* Bros.' n ; "Cow Beau' i MRS *'" STARS RAY MlLlANDUlO C-f WlltKllcl % %  and I oiilinimi. Ii.nlv II. I lilli \ I >10. II.. ana 11.30 era. and 8 at v m '•TAI i'if mi as .iii.lv a-sa %  >. %  oea in. I.I lOKunar" .' . I'AI.M 1 GITSTICK-INSECnCIDE. FARLEY'S INFANT RUSKS! SAVORY & MOORE'S GLUCOSE "D" the body-builder AMPLEX TABLETS -lor si dispelling all body odours. I BANDBOX SHAMPOOS & L CRESCENT EYELASH C ('.ROWER to make you beautiful MEDISED—to relax those tired nerves. RENDELL-FOAM for those who believe in Family Planning. WHAT MORE COULD YOU WANT? Vet these are only a few of the many tine toilets on sale at INTERCOLONIAL PHARMACIES LTD. 12, Swan Street. 'Phone 29M. -We Thought He I Join rhe Robins and SWMIIOWS — ii. NAT. TRELI. "I'VF ri.,d* UP IV, i kn.rf "You hare, dear?" said H.11.1.1 la a far-away voice. She was fitting %  inir.i Bp laachi itr-wlna I | b*au*e ti 1 as on the tre*. aad e-eli (.ranch dad •o many twia-i. and each iwHf had so many leaves. She raall payinic much alltii brotber ass saying. But sndilatiK lUnul ii ard Knarf announcing"So I'm leaving for Uie south as soon uthe IOMM tad tkc ssiia'% gn. laa n*n ' ra, with thai". As.l wkal IM like ia %  %  "What dul sag 'v of ttrwer right Insida tha alatarl %  > •' %  *'!' geranium keeps growaway somawhere? irli( |, ,!,„..„> Ie any of its leaves. GaBM \ws> And all the other plants in their "I'm going Hou.h.' Knarf n ;'" 1 "> g£ £ •" "indowa, peated. "I'm going M|| when the kep 01, growing, U. Rabin* gad Uw S*:i|low go." N* •( Them Stay "Oh!" "Wrsi alt.*; ihe birds?" said "Tb.y all aay It's woud.Tlul daarn a.rrt "Tae| ail ry away. Nane of south. In %  em stay bare You don't hear any ter like il >* here, with snow asjd>stng lee and icicle., it's w-rm on-l -iinny. .. No „|| tftm u, r|ui ny >w ,y. The The sun shloaa all lha lim*Robin, snd th* Swallows go. But "Even 01 night. asked llanid. [ t h„ Sparrows suy. They fly around. -I doiil kno about inat. Maybe ..,„,, e h irp all winter long .They don't it does. But d shine* good and M arm ^„ m ,„ m)nil „,. ooW< And lher< .., all day long, ami none of the trees „ 1^^ righl In „. ^u,, lh ^ t IOMtheir leaves, and lh* Hewerg s picture. all through the winter—Ihe OMBt rnutiful singer you ever heard." -what bi*#r •The canary." "Oh."' said Knarf. "I forgot about him "If you go south." said Hanid. :"you can't liarc snow for sleighrides. You cant have ice for iceskating. You can't have a Snowman. And I d""'l think you can have e %  any Chri-lma' Trees, not the iegum blooming, and th* birds keep singinc. Now whai I'd like to know is. do you want to come along, too?" Hanld thought for a minute or (wo. Finally she shook her head -You don't!" said Knarf. "No. I'd rather stay here.* "Why?' "Because," replied llanid slowly, "I don't think you have to go south, or anyplace else, Lo be warm in thi wintwUra*. Tim house is warm |y kind, with snow and frost "on when the big fire bums. And its them. So I'm staying right here when you wear a root, and where I can have the south insjde *"—the house, and the north (and the in the winter) outside the house. Now nd all don't you think you'd better stay here, too?" And Knarf .ii;hrd and re are 1 said yes. •v*v#**v>vwv *v>oa< mittens, and big heavy shoes." "But there are no flowtri gsrdan in the wintartime, a the trees lose their leaves." "Yes," said Hanld, "but Ihe (.IOIM TO-DAV V TOMORROW 4.45 AS.SO P.M. MI%ILK •• BURT LANCASTER *N %\llli SI HI N 1IH Juhn ttonia Payne Henle Hear "In The (.yon Bart Nicholaa Glenn Miller Bras. Orvhaatra ( haUnooga. Choo, Che* OPENING FRIUAV — BELLES ON THEIR TOES U-AIStESKhnil MMi 'FRIDAY 4 45" and x.go p in. and ranttnulns INK'S I flGHTM. AKNT or TK itaWS cast-wwias samct! KITCHKN SCALES COFKKK MILLS MINI IKS ( AKK STANDS SANDHK II STANDS l)l( OKATI.I1 I.KMIINADL si-rrs UKCOKATLD 1.11(1 I III SITS HEAVY TI'MIILLHS were $10,116 now HS.00 were M.M ana M.08 new IU.IMI and S3.5II were $3.14 now $2.1111 were $4.00 now $1,211 were MUNI now $2.00 were $10.06 now .-r. ill. were $6.47 now $4.00 3 for 24 rents T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS DIAL *22U YOUR SHOE STORES REVUEDEVILLE FAIR By MM. A. I. SrUAttrS SCH001 OF DANCING AI "Nerham", Tweedsldr Road lln KATIIRDAY. flU It. 1IU 140—It.* I.1MIN l.l'NI'HIs. HAiiisMKs. sirrnn re Dlaner. To Be Reserved Mask. Visitors' Mannequin Parade — fTTN !!• ADULTS — l/t I Mll.liM IN — (d. JUST IN TIME FOR THE III Ititlf l.VatY Sfi.l.SO v ANEROID BAROMETERS Only a limited number so select yours early and be prepared Also HURRICANE LANTERNS I'UBOE Um orKNiNn ruiAT sat -BAJ. TA.nA.SUN' DIAL 4b06 mvim\ iwsiuuh. aun atl.l f,,'n*S lll aaaassaMssaa* i PLAZA BARBABEES DIAL 5170 OLYMPIC TO-DAV a 1" VOKK4JM 4-1 A S.I Wenrlrll Com %  a-~*~'-'T Carn Tan nasai MIRSOHU BAID CAITAIN tABICr vtA With Allan LADO Wanaa HKISI>1II\ la %  nuwor n iNiiiiros V*tl URAUV J.Jtui ^^^ OWBOT AND Ta INDIANS TO-NM1BT AT B.M MADAM O'UNDV a HKR TROUPBj ROYAL .(•MAY IS* i a I'oti cANMatm "STAMPaSML %  O lllMiilIRJIl IOHUUOW MOST AT BaSS i 0*UKDY a H*r Troupe •rr M i ,n "nrr S. P. C. K. BOOK DEPARTMENT C r. HAIIII ISO* A CO.. LTD. CHEAP AT HALF THE PRICE" I stank aaia-i'i a i "cmmmr, i>ovri-v cairKirr CIK-lre. All Ihe V*nr NIll* Cardiv. Thr Brholtia OeaatV John Arlotl In iwin and WiiMKra I>ni. CnmnU". NtiX Han In Cier.l,, flminht. erleaet Rrti Aim|>atai Indian Cucka-i ISS* IMi Wlad-n ISM Ufr arul Tim*, of KlnB G*nrv> VI VaciaM* IncManlTh* fltiwv nlHM< Aim A Woman Callrd r*no. nl.o QUifT Ullei in SIMi A BnahLri "AHI Ciuidren of Kaywaaai KM ClHiani Osunin Haiti '.>hn Pai.toTftuMeal Blrdi A IUU. "b Cnlo.., Honk IVvoUonal hook.. Thrnloflcal Work*. Hook> rui theQU Trdamrnl liu children Dlblaa —d Prayer and llvmn Hae.it. singly in a*U and wllh irne, hmami nirtl-.oav flMiirtnif TTaJTmoNT: 411



PAGE 1

WEDNESDAY. JULY 1. 1*42 BARBADOS ADTOCATE PAGE TliBEE Cuba To Sell Sugar For Sterling ? "To Help Britain Deration Sugar' LONDON Cm U lg lo bib 500,001) lolls o! KUdU lf"m Cuba for itorlina instead ol dollars, accdnlinj, lo rtpbrts in the sugar irade in London. Sterling; currency paid in Cuba lor this sugar would bused to buv British-manulacturid u"*!* wtakh Cuba needs —particularly cars and building materials--and would la" nave some ol the dollars Britain now hi< to spend .m her HOP TO HAWAII TESTS AIR HfUIUNp Build up their fu re health NOW! A Visit To The "Advocate" bat clas the i Monday, iui July. n( the A and part m of the senior S: Leonard's 952. tho if the I: sugar, aavy these reports. While Government spokcmeii wUl not confirm these reports. there are nuui> ground* for believing that they are true. Cuba 1, anxious to secure a market for this years record 8,000,000-ton sugar crop, much of wiuch is surplus to existing requirement*. while Britain is equally anxious to secure sumcicm supplies of sugar U enable it to come oil the ration. liritish housewives and mantaken to the 'Barbados ufacturers ol foodsluus who uav by Mr. Bellr. their %  •"* sugar nave bswa pressing lor whose main object many months lor sugar to be ueihem there, wa* to enable "' rationed. AuU.,.onal indirect pre*U> ohswye the variety of W sure is DM being made on the in which the BMeMofnl pni Oovenuutnt ^ a result "1 this P _ which uiiumr's heavy fruit crop, much ol which may be wasted 11 Uisollk'iviit sugar is avail-iuU (Of canning or bottling it. There is no liuucauun, however, whellier the aOU.OOO tons of Cuban sugar meniloned in tnese reports would be additional lo the &00,000 tons of Cuban sugar Britain is committed to buy this year under the Anglo-Cuban Trade Agreement signed in London last August. Although it was tacitly accepted that Britain would pay for itCuban sugar In do.lars. this was not speciiically laid down in the 1901 agreement. The arrangement now being ^^ worked by electricity, discussed, therefore, could be a wg;i caged in. While w rnodiilcation of the agreement to moving away from this machine enable Britain to pay for this u new roll of paper was being year's consignment of Cuban sugar put on. When it was turned on HI sterling instead of in dollars. again, a green light 0;>-" Such an arrangement need not a box Just in front of the Bjabe detrimental to the Cuban chine. This machine contains economy and would certainly be wheels in abundance; %  benellciai to Britain. Instead of in abundance. We spending dollars in Cuba with no through Jhe^Advoca certainty that Cuba would use them to buy British goods, by 'employed. Meanwhile I La I I tome facts about the art of printPrlnting from movable wooden types was. invented by Lawrence Coster uf Haarlem, Holland. 11 1498, and from movable cut metal types by John Guttenburg f Siata for the Colonies, told dele^ales'al the Commonwealth and Empire Health and Tuberculosis Conference in London .in July 10th. "Since the spread of Malaria has greatly decreased thrnimh the discovery of new insecticide*, tubercutosih 1 now heads the hsi of killer 'lseasea." eontinttetl Mr l.u'eton. (conditions At Skeete's Bay Improved In reply to questions asked by Mr. J. C. Mottley GIVE HARMITE ,i 1 ifi* .itaiTti'H if, nro"| .The stamping out of tubcrcuii. often been regarderl a> • purely medical concern. I want Istate again that success in the slit against tuberculosis depend LI members m >:nmuiut\ .' he said. Overcn>wdiag. lack of trvw .mi Lit inn or poor teed nii, all contributo to the sprasxi of the rii—nise So far, therefor'' f 1 Jin being only a medical matter Ibe problem extends into man\ .! reels, and above all the spread ol knowledge is necessar? about the incidence of this terrible scourge. "I can tell you that there arc Sibils that in the Colonial Eniptuv people are bogtnnlng to be more %  ware of the f inO JM lovt Marmki'i rich. aBt.un| u.lt>—to si, PII i th.... to IO*' roelrt ika its .r1.tno-hlogti 'he end part men t. This department hni of IBM. machines with a key-board lik<' Additional supphes of sugar in a typewriter, and a light over the Britain would not only enahle key-board. We went 10 another sugar and sweets to be taken off department where we saw math* ration, as Government .pokesekft-s marked "Meteor," which men have said they would like to S W Jh^ paper^print^on them do. but would also enable inannand send t hewas facturers of chocolate and other me £? n, B ,X confectionery 'o expand their Wl production to meet the big export demand for their products. -B.U.P. "Operation Skyuxttch" Starts In U.S. out. A boy, Emprlnting "Mount *-:th a machine ked by the foot; many more of this type were seen In thl* establishment, printing red and printing black. We were told that every colour Imaginable is used In many types of work done lr. this department. I would like to tet you of an rxsmplc nf what is being accomplished In certain parts of the world. A campaign against tuberculosas was launched last year In Jamaica by the World lUvdt Organlsstlmi. the United Nation international Children's Kruer gaucy Fund and tht Jamaican Goviniinent, with the aid ol iome funds from the Colonial Development and Welfare Organbaflon "The mm is to immunise all Jamaican children and youiu, p-->ple against tuborculosis within a period of two years. This Is an ambitious attempt, when you remember that there are 700,000 people involved. A similar %  uheme has been started in Trinidad this year. In conclusion Mr. l.vttelton s,iid that he was sure the conference, which had brought together the medical | iiafusaliin from all over the world, would bring far reaching benefits to the >keele' I-pitof the Commonwealth and to humanity. Among the nine Colonial medl, cat ofheers was Dr. Harold I'.iclien. Fernandcs, the tubercui.-i orneer for Brttu*. OWann >ebo lold the (•iriference that Growth of seJf-Kovernment in undeveloped territories. Gulan."^wli^'^d^nen 1 '" Brt "* h however desirable it muy be on political grounds, put very nuances of the colon* large obstacles iri_ the way of their rapid development, However, he suggested that ndittm been reto l>if In tar.done to Improve ihe Bay. The r-ply atttes:No complaints have reived from boat 1 ragpaof of ditiicuitk i-ncountered at the Skeete's Hay since blssting operations removed a coniiieriible amount uf th* or*i just where boats are moored. Th i-hnnnel a< Skeete's Buy doer, iiowtever. prem-nt difficulties to %  shermen at eerUnij tUM yeMr A the result of a survey which has been made, the coni lutlon has been drawn Unit 1. ild be n e ces s ary to cut an en1 channel. • %  " SWTHE TRU! atF£& A SOU ADS ON of 20 F-54 Thuivlerjct fighter bombers Un a; Bast Hoi lulu, Hawaii, completing the lo'igatt Donsling Jet ihght over attempted—2,400 miles from Travis Air Fm-ce llasc, California They made Ihe over-water flve hours and twenty-seven mlnulo. averaging 438 miles an h'. rsst of the 31st Fighter-Escort Wing %  rUJ "island hop" tht rei %  part of the Pacific to Japan. At top, an P-84 Is refueled from | bomber. Center, Col. David C. S Mtllng (right), ewnmri' is e of the ilight of the jets to his 1 William Ii urlty guards stand v lets befoie laku olf fi-.n> Tuvis Air Force Base. (I< Self-Government Or Capital Development? LONDON. This pi")ert would Ivery exI UAe> 'iixnni. .aid t&H reNulls could not be guaranteed. Furthermore, owing to the con>ur or the lattd, lecUons of the %  >.\.fli lands may be lost to Iho •• 1 if Uie prou cling be 11 >•• rat nere opened wide enough to allow boats through In a more dill at present In the cii euinstances the OovDU.I' 1, Hatislled tha4 ever> thing that IS pracUrable ha be. %  > %  dune u> unprovo condition-, g| Buy. TRUCK \ BUS TVRE THAT WAS ALREADY MfftE POfllAR THAN ANY .Tattl Sitiv yean of Iradcrthip in ivrc-mskuig l>uiTop thai ihorr %  no .tirJlng mileven The nvi can be hcitered rhat'i ius: ran Iis. I Truck and Bss Trie. Dunl-r Jcturoers h\r d thw ho* basic panern 8 tvrr UUU rcuf— \ IMPROVED That Hit, ihe lnHsM li ,.\\.t •*• M sei up fresh remrdi f Iim-vrauiniii ^,ia today. A areat numlK-r ..f We went upstan and .aw the £500.000X100 a year, maybe muob „a,ty of Revolutionary Inatitution.. then, .111 be .jrUultu,,, ur ,er,. nation h, beu., yarded wialnat toaden type, b., 1U j arran.ed fot ^ re -^,^ BMMTU^of I eiemv >1T attack £• -""'hine, A boy %  mm, fflW S5S25ll?*e, liSSnatKl T more, and adds: "No governmen.va piling up "about "W per cent." the total vote. Several skilled le drafted ecruits will also Civilian skywstchers began iround t'ie clock operations Mon. clay morning at ,non obaen'gtlou ,howi . ,n< clol Theatre. Be, %  ! •„ W TtBiPB B, o.,rt; on the ,,ne-> to pround o'lserver' know many people In the Advo heneuse lr"v ein enver rres cmt*. where LMfVral obrtael*i such as I hope that 1" shall some day inount.iini b'ork -he .l.'eetion of in the near future be Working low flvtne ifrergfl -* P laf In thi* place, when the machine i Fvp—nirillv the ni rammewfll %  improved to make then ... r i„>, povert Kn'h en-*-*' < -h" noiseless. OR MONT) We were now ready to %  with spots of grease. I am very sorry that 1 cannot mention more names, because I do nor SEA AND AIR TKAFHC In Carlialc Bay TUaalli II for the" film "Viv'a Zapata" to be are going to find aa much aa that." 'ctlonH of Mexico, were expecte-i Moat of ahe capital needed for to be completed aometlme todn> Commonwealth development haa "nd the final official results wil. come In the past from the United ' announced by the Chamber o: Kingdom, K conUnuea. but It '*?"<'<* %  __ doubt, whether thu, can continue. <"f Conines was conceded Ui' Britain haa little iavlnijl out of '"residency on the basis of unoffl which luch capital can ba made ''"', r ^ u "f, ' U S W '"" 1 " T, r . s ^rta. of sSd-b? LSaS tt^TJl ^stlt'e" .'carocTUL^iS Z-^ n ", h "J-"S^'t:SSSSiTSm\£^^^^^P S AmP i ii -afn is hiillriuiu Mr R*.lle mhlnpt, and eurrent rearmament pror ( bv 20 t0 j 5 „ CCTlt ^ fa^ Hu ylm§n ^ h tun „ ailwti ft an bov m nar, of hire Tam ""' Pflalaa Britain from „pp„, mm eandidates. Sa' m :H" J '"• %  > "' I lei! ur^Vu^macnlneT: Sl^l^aSiS'lS 'needeo %  """ ..<" ft T' r-""" ""',' 1 OnjEf-J^ No one was left hiit I wo* ttvmrnl n v,ouia bl needed. M guel Henrique* Ouznvn. candiiC h Euna-i-. nth Zlu w„. nnlv per Or, St SnethmV hSi rhe tacX mak ll ""Pf* <•! of ,h pfl "" redenti-m of Kainin*. *h jb.urpt^. M. hlwirS lo 1 nfa livc to inline the possilullues he Peoples Party and often £•'• ^"^'>' % %  M t.f obtaining non-Britlan capital railed the "strong man" of the h in '*^ for the development of the ComMexican leftwlng element, was" sen Bkr monwealth," the article conmaking tha strongest showing and vin.nt linues, malting it clear that by in some arses was reported to be non-British" It means primarily Turaitng only rtlghUy heshlnei American. The United State* can tuia Cor t'nes.— V.T. fulfil all the conditions necessary ^^ S,Tn", h c4uSen1, D "" u *"" m "' Ahdiieted Pr. Monk "Hitherto, however,*' the) art_ %  *- 9 ^thu** reed By Syrians State-, for BULOVA WATCHES Only a few In stock as the quota is limited BUT YOUR BEST BET 15? TO GET ONE They are real mnrric when It comes to quality. 17 Jewels Guaranteed Y. De LIMA A III.. 1.1 lino Brood St. and Marine Gardens DUNLOP TBUCK astO BUS TYRE Select These Tyres at ITnbeat J5CKSTEIN BROS-Ba AHI, AJ.lfm Un'tlnlqu* Orattt, i.jif rvmkln rr Tflr.lt.al A I SEAWELL ear at Ilo-.lt d, t>. TEL AVIV. July 14. sjtt Israeli Army spokesman ^J*Vr,r.h r--t' -fe" ORMOIVD A. ASHBY. t&mA („ n |ne Mhaf —••-> f-Nve St. Leonard's Bovs' Rchool. almost complete lack of hwT'-'r'^ •' B"f ,0lh Julv 195t tlasm In the United vr. invssTly In the sterling area. ^ __ 7fr*rk tt C /*/;„ Ttie V* !" ** American investor is Faid OT Monday that Svrlan ^i. / WO €/.>. OOlaierS very loth to place his money any,,.ers had abducted a French monk Mn.u. Ittfll'i Xt'elt V-M f\-l In ff j r mm whr "* u ^ d L c I *? r,h America across the Sea of Galilee and held k .*•* '11(11.1 W III .XOt U'I Xlltinlyt^l in 7'I—. exceot for the direct investments him in Syria for two days oil companies, where the The spokesman said the monk ripelling f'.rce Is more their own Father Pierre Guichou was amthlrst for oil than the desire ta bu*hcd by two armed Syrian solNTVT DFT.H1 Jnlv 14 '*"" in^nfJuii attacks "on two assisl ln the dpve 'P !" en t ** ,up last Friday aa he walked In p, u <. | rCH j fndla any a i f Tgngnaii descent rie^leeted t-rttories. -.ieli territory near the Jordan rice or wheat this year according alerted Japanese police to new "Moreover, even if Amcrlcani Hlver and the Sea of Galilee ; the gon %  • %  oB the 30th v "'•* prepared to pour billions of The l.sraelt ^id the monk wn offered 100,000 torn of rice v.hi'h v "' %  "' of th* Japanese Com"' : ''" "'" 0* Commonwealth, released ya**rdey n ,r n M 7*r!l "list p.rty. :' ,( • Ientirely welcome^ i in by an Israeli's member nf the %  Ai [ %  11 II in M ) %  .,,. t KUHaifHon. I A. Mrl>.„*l>.,, MIft-T. J Mil.-. ( Tbotrui. •ll WaWolt Euf*n Harlwrl Hull, 1> lia 'Rill fool Get Attacked In Tokyo ; ?$ TS r, •'or nw iuircian Grain TOKYO. July 14, A week-end of scattered vlo''idlni rsttM tl#— ODIOTM %  lUtfn. c. 'mis" a WUktnwi. K.UI1. .i-fir. ni:Fniis m, n i A ONI t rM OrttaSs OtKHst c N niit.* -attt *iw.. A i %¡ l>(j. A CTasiei D (ia((i OIMM*. J rnumpton, H Ci IV.,. M Oonui Two Amerlenn. were beaten u D AH unworthv Jealousy apart, a U N sponsored Israell-Syrli r .i ... .' n .-. • .... -aI.J4 1-erlaHpa "Ant-i I laifi F — were grjtt-: | hut mi %  vieef WSJ offc i I .'"hina. The Qo ii I night by hoodCommonwealth whose develoiiprepared %  I -rexlurns believed to basTsBrean-i. Th nort of in .tin, ra>ta si( MI, %  vitiotint? gssSSi IN MasSK1-rl|ptl. Ml W-ll.r Mf'rttl lr Wbodia-, Anlhoiv, Mil lauaUlai i itd. Mr Pataw cm,. Mi. BuU-r -an Mi.. Ilaph.,i*-. Ml— Vlvinin* TlifiMr IIMIBI CviUfM'*. H>. Dually Wallrra --— r -( 4>Uaa> V Krintvlcl. V Bini. T ,_ Amnd*u. J*. Kwin', w ditSlu-S' "To do ttvit. the British people r ,r>>. M wnsni. < %  wsnwr, s Eds' will have to save more than they i.. NaiiaasD johnM-. i,> at present^—which ii the same Ing as saying that they will RATK8 OF EXCHANGE he art. .. ComBritish capital for more than have to reduce the level of thH. 0t •> ftf3v !" *'. V r rW,r tom ?K? m : frscaon of what is needed T • "msumptlon relatively to their This is n sobering conclusion. !f JUI-V is, IMl vr* YOBS e TOKYO. July 1 / ( ^ I K_Will hav* to. tiadent aI ""^ '"'''" l "' 1 ,, I Thr 1 %  -, %  %  .. .. •>! Far the total ain tOT 1 sVl office at Shlha war. An Airforee summar> said i .. ir .,_ then will have to be develc UN. lost 719 plane* comp^rt^ to i 'lines. ment." the article concludes. 524 for the Ri fl leve1opment, However the Ain'otwasid f.4g r Kingdom of tht Allied plane lueses wi provide capital hi due to ground frre rsther *hsn •'riorsf rural pal :'^i 000.000 air combat — t* r —C.r faar % %  %  • H l" BS 71 1/is* pr lasaM that Commonwealth '' lament presents no escape r*from the hanih rornuulslons of ( the Bi jirohlem. On M trsrv. success at home In t r.-qulst! ;,rnent u ii imun wia BXT 10". pr Currrncy SB B/ttl pCoMptin. SB I/IO* pr Br Siltrtr SfS pr CANADA p~ Chrqurm on lUnkrr M S/M-% pt Dtmand lf.fiTt tt-i pr It S/IB% p. n-j.f. •tlvw JUST OPENED! YOU'LL HE DELMGHTED Mil Si THEM DINNER SETS TEA SETS AT THE (OIIMII snmi BEDROOM SETS



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PAC1 BARBADOS ADVOCATE ireimwr*" JULY i. ut* SE€Oi\U STMMJVG By O. IV. ftfld, Junior Ol%  en nihriM i •.'.'. I. K< %  which Ittl* assistance. It tint thtall wore have of a small > % %  tan t'neket an fln ad t<> these lundl But Hies* email • • %  'its tmalt It I* observed that too many of these Mtu.ll Ki.HindB have their >f proportion to of the around. You whan it batsman hits B RTX wit. Uw hall ,: %  The llarbadoa itnn should step in and loua small ad. Thu A'ill HI UaeU make far better a and It thai all Uw tall If of those ret Hospital pounds. Central and I n These ground* ire deflnltety not the %  "f sixes ;ind (OUTS. These grounds are too. Bay Aaakj and more n i: then .'i M M thai Junior i %  and ii %  -.-.• thai the Bai badca ruling M t" win.-h houndlira and T IOE Centra] Crlekol tirounds ttould not > %  • rutely too small and only natters batsmen while bowlers suffer, not i hi ninth. tha ability of the batsman bul Ihrouxb wrong assessment of tlio Kround. II i not fair to the bowlers. and the batsmen, who enjoy it. It is an untrue Ihan M Olvua, It If hoped that the i i ...-t Association i r action to aasess for the lieneilt of cricket in the Island and can lie sjdjuttod Ibf the season 1" come. qpfuH Intermiiliate and %  oral Divisions have Ju*> completed a series and the senson I H| to P">p results, but oi %  rices are ..<*! and indiraltonsewire that 111 be a KKK1 Biaton. Tin-cries produced unOiuaned frniM, which go*"* to i lekwl li not good enough for Intermediate Cricket. If Into i Ictaat is meant ... IKthe Second Strintt i n %  Dtvutton Cricket, then little point In taking them down from three days to i..111 steps in. there is little chance that mi edll be .bind then the %  d BeItatO Ciiiket in meant to train and prepare Junior Division i-ncKeters for the Senior Division In two day cricket batsmen must hustle tor runs in order to et a decision. Hustling for runs is akin to Lancashire League Cricket win. h is the bugbear to represent)! 11 vos cricket. SwipniK and bitting hard on small grounds can train no one for truly repre-.*nt.itivicricket. It is unfortunate that there are not enough grounds In the i land to accommodate >hree day junior cricket. There are pros and fiOOi to the argument and suggestions ns to the improvement of this Mtuation would be welcome. S I'AltTAN playing at Boarded Hall, nattered to deceive. After bowling out the "SuarkenV for BO and making 150 for 9 wicket* declared their innings closed on the second day. One would have thought that inkites" had advantage and would have used it lo good effect. Such was not the ease. Spartan resorted to their old tricks and allowed Cable and Wireless to trounce iheia 10 (he tune of 212 for 8 wiekSurrey Beat Kent At Oval o r..i. ajssaeaati ASTHMA MUCUS Dissolved First Day <-hoki>s. CBipina. • h-.ilnf Ailhm. and Dietirhll.i Know Your Cricket Lawn 88 & 29 & o. s, com?* LONDON. July 15. trengthened their grip; %  p of the county table today as the result of a thrilling •lie Oval-! Set to make 1M in 02 minute*, Tiey scampered home with two i minutes to span to record their ninth successive championship win.. They now have 1*4 points — a lead of 40 over Middlesex \tfho I to a draw by Lancashire. At Sheffield a deter: out century by Ted Laatl Mast. the Indians' bid to beat YorkAt Northampton. Brookes and Barrtck took their unbroken overnight partnership to 347 — a new county record for any wtdn—before Barrick enmg out for 311. He batted 5' s hours. Brooke* was unbeaten win, 204 when Brown declared wilh NorthanU 104 ahead. There snu not sufficient time to f"i i .• I result and Northants took first Inning* points. Oimblett recorded his second century of the match for Somerset against Derby. Worcester made DM 250 for victory against' Sussex in 2 hours 20 minutes. The Scores are: — Surrey beat Kent by two wickets, Surrey 325 and 190 for H. Kent 192 and 320 for 9 declared. Olinn HI not out. Leicester •> beat Hants by 10 wick.i-. l--ire-trr 379 and 16 for no wickets; Hants 213 and 180. Gloucester beat Glamorgan by , 8 wickets; Glamorgan 209 and u 165; Gloucester 184 aiul 191 for • %  't. ruin imi ^m yOUT MAR. > MKSDACO—th* %  #•• !•)<• 11-..h Ih. blooj. qlehlV(urb> %  ne intiurk< Th v.ry flril 4*/ (It* %  utinffllnc mvru n 4iMuiv*a. ih ft rlM r. caiy bfra(hii> ana r4I M>ap Ha oop**. to amoit**. mq %  atKUoni luM % %  • pivaiwpi. tail*%  Ma UKNOAi-O Ubl.1. si ...ii. .4 ka tnlliHy frv* trn-u Ailhxia ar>S Kronohllla In n.ii la no i Ihousk io nut h>t auAT"d for ..ri Mb.NPAiO M %  a dM M ral thftt It IKU.irontrtd I* |l\a to* ti-. iMn in l honra aaS ij tmi'DlHiiy %  t'-n*r AainmaltildDa *r ir-mi, I. K k i.ii tdgin if amply M.-Us ON ilKNKA'XI from r atir Cktmul Tha fuaranlaa BolwU r ^^ WW7 ,• %  HM • The Officer*, .md Mrinhers of SCOTTISH IHAMOMi LOOOL No. 84 i. mind you of their . WMYHISAIil MNCI ti the < IIII.OKtN s (.IMIIIU II I UtAd I On S\HKI)\V NIGHT. July 19. 1952. Music by <\ B. Bruwu'o Ork >1 Itsi itll'IION I 16.T .32— I To Mothers who cannot feed their babies l> !" 't worry IC'Wimilk can lxpi*prtdo!ha!ilKynunBe!bbj can diwi u wilhoul iroublc. The addition of RobimonN 'Patenl' Barley prevents the milk forming lare clou in haby iomach5. making 11 caay for the delicate digestive organs lo do iheir work thoroughly whilst getting them ready to digest heavier foods later in life.Thal's why e appllcallon of 0 ttrrn %  -Wid. itruck. ..„. Mil of "wide" should ^1!^'M n'cslt. total seemed ,.., imich for the Ball" to a dclive.y l,v a howle, be revoked. ^T"r,TmSi^,, match Park boys. They foil down, and EvM1 l( a „,,,„,„„ „, lven nul drawn: Lanes 437 for 7 declares! iVrL'S ,7 wVkel,"! I-..I the ball so d,r."er ,,r^ "<< • ••Widetin. do not Wtec, nd 124 for 5 tetend M l tMl— .^-. •y,^ the penalty for having bowlcu it. 324 and 92 for 4. %  so that the penalty completed while tne tM Northants versus Essex, match ball dfnwii: Es^a-x 428 for 9 declared, King; r-.nner Pickwick last bOieHr nave the bat-men little chance ending up with the fine analysis ol live wickets for 22 runs In reven over*. N the second division, Colfftumi*. Therefore Spartan *'?> •* the wlrkel thai .-mild not fomhotie a win but %  "'" ' '•"" ( un, P ,rr '• %  "•J gained hrst innings,points. H„ !" u £ JjTtJi brrn within ". rcn,Bin '" P'-X %  '^"^ "> nd 15B f * *i North-nta BS3 for reach when t-ikln,. guard In the ,h *' batting side. 6 declared. Barrick 211. Brookes normal position. Ihr umpire shall 2ft not "rail and Hlcnal "Hide Ball" u The Si|inre Lost Somerset versus; Derby, match toon BSj It Hhall have pauw,) lite In 111. book The Laws of fP* 1 Somerset 426 for 7 -trlher. Crlekel" dealloi with their hisa *$ M £* "" ,I 202 f,,r 5 GunbMl | N the second division. ColDelivered ^ry^ andl their .rouih. CeUnel ffi^lS KCUV'M ? declanK, • ZMX n^S^J!^l'tZ lhe umDUe JM* ,hul " referent !" the *NrW Yorkshire vemia India, match outright. H is heartening to ace b,,, h asl>een delivered but it the law dealing with widen, BJ, drawn Yorkshire 192 and 1 %  %  I %  > % % % % %  %  : MOM to rtat In I Ot the Uikei m.. for 4, UwU-r IIO n.,t nut 11.1111defeating a team of eslabli-ht-cl "Wide" must not lc called and "The first Uiw to deal with a *y 77; ,ndla 377 for a declared, cricketers, especially when the no runs B hall be adle lf h h ; ,, r|kor wou!( ...h. these players who could iavp l>ecn Wllhlll r(%ai n nf th(1 ,-ive valuable .i. ; M-t.,„.v U O* Kl „ )A „ n „ ,. ,,.,, MlnVo) young boys will not concern lownrds a „ n ,., 0 nlhl ., hj u it themselves with til* good Of the „, usl he eleailv understood sehwl in the sphere or sport. lha (ne B r 4,er cannot "m.miThere seems U. be some anfuture" a wide by moving away harraal trnnble, if there Is. It towards aquari Lea in not good. Without the help By definition a "No Ball" is no! of spoils minded masters, lhe properly delivered and cannot achool boys can make little therefore be I wide in addition. ipiogress. And the schorls need if only 'me run has been made to be encouraged off a "wide ball" the batsmen not cross over to the positions _^^^^^^^^ they occupied before the scored as I hav> seen done h* "Dead" Hr.rri.,,n Coll i tiieir ed with 44* helped Harrison ColAnother observation thai rnighl for tha leg*' to score 16 runs for flvo j^ npcogsarv kl this—Whi-n I season whei ited Wanwickets for VKtOtl "wide" is called the ball docs nol ilcrers On Baturd.o at Watuieiers ^___^^^^.^^^^__^____. herome dead and the batsman Batting lirst on the nrrt <\ny may be out "stumped", "hit | 11.8 runs and THF WEATHER wicket", "run out", "handled the iiu f.). 90 nrDnoT b u ol "obntrueting the held" Una] innings. WioiKtrUK i This is better sel out in lha dererr. In theli eooud Innlngg de%  %  ... following law. ilartd ivhen Uv re wm 4 f<-r ^.STERDA\ LAW i9 y,,,, ^^ d the Ion kvtckete, thus glvRaiiifall from Codrinetoo0H become "dead" on the call of 9 for vieln !" -Wide Ball". All rtUU that are Total Ramfsll for Month to n "> '"'•'> Wide Hall" shall IHL. Wnithe. who anal imdefeatDate: 1 WO Inn. KOtnd "Wide Balls" or if be made one i un shall be so scored. The striker may be out from a "wide ball" if he breaks Law* 38 (Hit Wicket) or 42 (stumped) and either batsman may be run out. oi uivcn out if he breaks Laws 36 (Handled the hall) or 40 (Oh-s-tructing lhe field). As in the case with "no ball", if a "wide" goes to the boundary or the batsmen run. the actual boundary allowance or nuinbn of completed run* is entered ** "Wides" under Exlras. WHAT'S ON TODAY Court of Common Pleas 10 Jo a.m. Bnnket Ball. Second Division. %  I Harrison College. Osrn son, Y.M.P O 6 oo p.m. Or:imophono Concsit. BritUh Council .. I 16 p.m. nrm-li Council Fllran st AqiiaUc Clnb 8 30 p.m. THE WEATHER REPORT YESTERDAY Rainfall from Codrington' in Total Rainfall for Monti Data: 1 90 Inn. Huiio-t TemperaturB: t*7 B Lowest Temperature: 74 0 Wind Velocity. 11 mil** hour. Barometer: (B a.m ) TO (3 p.m.) SB 936. OH to r r. per 0B. TO-DAY Suuriho: 6 18 a.m Huniet: ti m p.m. Moon: La*t Qnarter. July i:t URhUng: T 00 inn. High Tide: 12 46 p.m. Low Tide: n _'n a.m., u 04 pm. '',-,'**--,*,' %  ,--.',*,*,',*..',* asked MADF THE ^ PERFECT 'SUIT YOU'RE WEARING? : We now have our own skilled Jeweller working on the premises which guarantees quick deliveries and reasonable charges. V. lie LIMA A IO. I III. 211 Broad Si. Phone 1644 1 G.E.C. FLASHLIGHT BATTERIES Ha rtin nupplf/ from Sloeli . CRITTAl.l. STKKI. SLIDING FOLD1NO DOOM The Ideal Door foi Verandahs The Whole Door slides and folds lo one side. Supplied in Two Sizes With leavrs— 6' 5" wide X V 3" liltli With S leevrs —9' 3" wide X T 2" hllli CRITTAI.L FRENCH DOORS 3' V wide X 7V hlih CR1TTAL1. STEF.L WINDOWS Various widths and helshls wKh or wllheat Venlllators. TIIK Mi HII i: \ WINDOW FOR THE MODERN HOME. Wilkinson & Haynes Co., Ltd. TUANX ASOA Tf> f?->Qf*7HCMAriO**T P*&G.rl.8EED, %  WTY, MAINE.



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PAGE I It.Ml BARBADOS ADVOCATE CLASSIFIED ADS. pim gA1JW i %  arr j !" w WEDNESDAY, JULY It, 1MI TAKE NOTICE TflEf-hOME 2501 REAL ESTATE IMr.li • MMIUH On Turiv lath Jt.l. -t he* late r—id-r. %  S*. Mtt-haa-i %  Mil I !•*• F> %  %  KolMeen Birrr. .la ugl.1. Vlvan i-d i r THANKS <•>The underalglied bejto BMSS> •*• eetit -reelha. .IM.M Iho .. %  no*. I ss U .... rathe, i their ayasaaUi) uriMt-rnMil .....Ml h. the .tr-elh <;.... am* Arthur Skull IN MUMHUAM ... I.mi %  MBM of ii ,!...mother ana BU rl Ella Adn.ma Clarke who died on Julv l1h IM*. Four year, have pa-ord aincr tfi.it •a* day When thr oil. %  war*. Eva* to be itmniibNrd bv MrM.h• (HI v\l>; AUTOMOTIVE •nailer .ir Fl'.t I -I IN •il (.entail Dai i Harm \i..... ( solo* %  i <>iirU-i* Oar—a Dt mibaage 1*1 Be. Str-aart. i CAR MorrU elteni ecnItton. low mllaegr Dial MIS Coutlai Garage II T U31 Dial 4S1S AlhrYne "WuiMr. i. J.m*. \ i T.IUCV -Chevri.let iruk, no INH" in-la* % %  Irene Jonev I-. % %  Va offer tstH—d A Home* fa Co '"I""'. CUM In w Wran Ltd ] 7 a t t ,. ri.,ti.,.ir. Th* blou. Whan n.i July lf>h IS4I i ha.,| the nhark atvaf. mlv |bv one. oho lov* ran TM grief • %  iW* ih*flsh ,UU and will adore llr loving lilr (of rvrrmiiif Ro*o Trotrnan unolhrn. (Vllem Idau tori. Koeatiiigra i Vlolon* isuntal, llw.ryi.lh and J %  nl'tii. I*iv .hroUir. KraMiri* noualnt'. Jamos PUfgut -.tin and famll. I* 1 SS-AIWTttalNrEMEIVTS %  TARN DU. KOM.V I lUMaa In your (pair tin X tm today OJBEAT REDUCTION AT Til* MAY FAIR GIFT SHIMmlei.Ming lo It** and visiting friend* PHeaa eut (ton EntfMh Tailor ti.adr .lacka. lu.kei Sou vomit, all tinwai HimtiHi to DornltOrm— Cbaawtll • %  H'.I t FOR KENT VPAKTMEXT rumlthod. -I Hitp|- "t .•a 1 badrooni. r F inning walei M raeh; all ronvrnlenr-oa Dial HIM" Aiuil' AI'AflTMENT A., Apart mm I a O-etttn *. on th* &f -•Wr. Bay M nri. WoodaMr I: :. • Apply to Miea Douglaa nn prarnlwi. Allractlva ara>lda FUI main toad Haa lln<*, comiortably furnlihad. EiuIIUl Bath. Open Verandah ta.-n-g Ma ButUU ir rouplai I mm July I • ia es> i r n ELECrKlCAL urn *pd npw abipnimt of Oartaid a Automattc Cbangra lafTci Co Ud Radio Emit • ft) I ( JUST ARRIVED %  •*#•" Da Luxi UlUa-Hodatn Badl. Gr-nu IfcTd i fa ad chanf*r*i Two Pickup llrada i>o nvadla -num. In altortiv. wnln eabinafa. A limilrd quamn* ..mv H M P C MAITEI at CO LTD )l-in> Hi nt BB.cn—t I.I taalar. ptaclic^ii> M* Can b* I IIIIIIIH. wr old. mothrr from ava M |.lnla milk 'lallon SlurfMM P Mai THriihiaiP mat I MLTJ! UN<;AI.IW Sr-i MHI Mlualrd Plnr l-i.I lajnlii* Vrrandah Drawing R>ni.. iwu ItrdtiMMii* W" Bath. Kitchen Inal 71U V Bt-llr Cully BRlaW.ldaY. Muwdl CMM U-ftarr.ithrd llixiir nn t v., .ii-%  %  Rn-i-ixin.. ii... %  i. %  Charati. -i rich! of way to brut I. Jol at Cc Phone *r*n. Pit l.ul liniining M | TO AN vi i i %  '• • % %  II >. \M APARTMENT 1 barfrootl i HI W nltif wain. BttU | gaiadv ir required Applv by lallrr i PERSONAL The public are haiawl -giving trtdll i WHIM.I hold myaalf i..t-1 N A AM AN M'lUMil.ll. Sarjaanii Villag< %  !. I l! It 7 U -in The public are hereby wamad agal giving credit to any person or per* Whon.M-.ier In n.r name I ilii bold mvarll reUxmii I IH.rth.rf an. debt or dabl unlean In .. wnitcn gfwtl -igned b> i OHCAN MI-HIIAV. MISCEIJ.ANEOUS AWtlHICAN OOM1CI So,.. I rime. Mike llainatt llaal flue 'l>.| •M Rlt'er Wetern Haro. CnpU! %  i I-. ..i %  hln... old Jewell. IhM Silver Wateroloura Karly h... Ic -I Ix.mnic • Anliqu, Mii l Ya.inq n m i % %  •up %  %  ua. BgaVj rl.ar.pb. Enii..,„r. letiding Dally Nawap..p.r now arriving In IUrl..wl..< i.. Air only a faw daya after publication in lAftatah ConUcI l.n Oaaa, C,'o. AdvoCi ltd I.al Hrureaenlalivc ant nXM n WEDOWO amA few Ironing board lid No-cord lum ie(.. n.bjett to apao|*| weddlng-gtfl .Ilowancr A Barnta Co Ltd. lit) II BnMi 'i. On ire Bo-rd vt-.i u au i i-1 PhAjM IBM. It T ilI U,i oi; LICENSE NOTICE 1 tt *N*I I I IMD HI MIIVAl. appUcaUon at lydi %  Unrgg j g H-H Ha i ir-. ot ii,sj f i i Una. Chr..i Church, aft lot pirmlwluii I.. tMlvanlied nhop atlached M % %  ideme al Chnrlea Rowr I Daacati and In me the aald Utcnae al i, ,i %  ,. %  Dalad Ihla til. day of July IM! T (' "> Ill IIUKR. KM, in.( ll liAMiH. HAIJ. '. i A|i|.Ilruil N B.— Thla jppllci.ti..ii wUI I loba h i jHli dan ..1 July. lM. ..1 n at Poll.e Court. Dt.l ,1 TKAWil.ii aitaate ,1 i landing on 1 acre* 9 roods It parchaa of laaal T*e hnine II built of .lone and eonI in. t gali.ri*. large drawing and dining %  hW, badraaaaia upaUira, 1 badroorna c|ownatair> and arvaol ofnar room. kllchanatle and urual camTanlrnaM Uaragja anl uri.nU ronma In yard Nuni.roiM (: %  ALeJO t aerea f raMa . alw*e laacotMot MulkdM. eewr> .la, -.aewt g.m.i... bolweao 4 ad p ir The above will be % %  up for aaji* al Public Con>tuiloai on rnda. (be lam Julr. IttBarf p m al the office ..I lh.under aigned TAIgglNCTCiM MA1.V 1 ucaa IK •gMniajt. % % % % %  |g I.OST III.KTW Donhlll On). I as* R ai0 % %  IS 1 M M NOTICE r UMMJ Statoa In BarMdoo ~si r sq u aMad the Amarieai. Conaulala from July 1 !• H. IMS for Relecll.e Bervlee Roci.uat.on l-ldajr^tt^U.l.arMl MUlUryTralnlaaJ lirHNF BAY C.rTTAOr landing ,. i-*.ii IS porrhoa of land al Lands bid. SI Mkrhael Electric and water arfv.ee> tatalled Tho above will be ao| up lor aale or Friday. I he atth Julv itU at our offer HUTCHtNSON A HAVFTn.Il t 1 M~dn I-\NT HAM aquara foot ol land wiih •landing thereon al enn' Several Bt.—Hrull Iron tree, thereon, eltuale Public Road Ideal alte Offer, wilt I received by Maaor* Haynaa At GrlflM 11 III,It tweel U...1 tin II 1 1* 4. I^Mtl "ltd aquare leet ol land KnlgM. |..nd. Lowr. Woatbury Rood. With bearing null lieea .nd water well ll.%0f.SO D Arc, A. Scott. MlddU •ilrrot ^. Spou Land on lAffDTwo llou! nine Waipit Teti. peaoh Area. D.aW and S.I3S Squ. feet adiomlng one mi other Apply II II Klnch. I3t. Roobuek %  .. 1T ft*-lf n FOUND and nthor %  [ %  M BM Baturda. Julv 5th with aluablei Owner ran raeovat same by .Ding al Yamker. Bua Co Of*, a agat SHIPPING NOTICES GALLAGHERS-BURTONS PI III II" MIIIII.S ROYAL NETHERLANDS STEAMSHIP CO. l I MENTOR nih JL*NT. IW S COTT1CA 11 in July, 10SJ M I NESTOR Mu. Jul,. 1MI M 1 PMMKotaP Irt Auguat, IMS MI is<. I.I i i ..in vf g ORANJEHTAO 1Mb July. ISM .HIM III in.). rAH\M\lrln A BBIIIHII ul IANA r. in July. I9U OTTICA Mil. July, ltd* NE^TOH i the United ftta|#a All male cllUana of who attain Iho eg* cquenl lo July Jl. iMj. „, rouir-d o regular upon lbs R. Ihey attain tho ilCbloenlh annivaraarr af the day of %  Ibalr blilh. or arHhln Ivo dor* |go> For 'urihor inlormsuon. oonaMll I' • .nwnraa Conautala. Brldgelown. %  s•• %  17 %  ta—I f n. NOTICE FARMH ... .T II inAi.piie.itnm. lor one M n.nre \aea ll Ve.lit Eahlblllon* -t the ColeiMJio Parnr School will be received b> I ie • inderalgned up lo the H4h of J.,i> if, t Applicanu mud bo Iho eena of FuU'iInner* Ul atratlaned clrrumalancra and nun be between the age* at 1 v l| yeare of age AppllcanU niuai pre.., i thorn., .i > Ino ROodmoali-r for rH..itiiiiatM*i lo be hsM aw J.iiv llth at tN ajri can be oM.inad at Iho Parochial Traaauiwr'a ofH.< a. %  i. %  V-ol. It t M-;. Thai OAUAOHU d> BURTON, ll*.. a corworalloe. arlMR under lh. .' the Slate ml Konlutk><. I'nlt.d <(Utd of flBMlRi. TMMIIiac .1— trw i ..inaw addjaas la Oreen Lane HM.I I s A naa applied for s M ...i.iratmi. f a Had* mark In Pan A' ,.f R#gi*W< in rea#ecl nf alaofiol.. s •Mfig" oag-Mlally whiaby, iM will he entitled lo y ggatee the aame ..tlor one „_„. •.,-*.... runn.-... Iho ISIh .lav of Juh. ivtt, ,ie.. ..one pa-a-n ahall lb Iho moan****<• !" "" %  **' CURACAO trno give noltc* In d.pllcoto lo me at IT.* office l opioatlton of .u*h roft.lrt.. uraei, I ,Z1 rhe trod, nuuh can be aoom an appli-um. M an, carTe M HM1A July. ntt. Dalod thii h da> af Jstt, ltW 1 P tf I MOW. RON CO LTD WIIJIAM B Agenla >i of Trade Maika Id l.tt-io ^-^— ,^__^ MUNBKA" W1U and Pgoaangera lor lr.tl|i.a. Monlierrot. Navu and bl KHta Soiling atoeday llth m.t DooaUiKO. An Mrvl. and Bl day ISU) Mat AjQaajara -..1 I ruodi of land at Charn-icfca (Tin.i Cnureh. on the public road facing e.) trance In Seawall Airport. 33.MH aquare feel of Land facing L*. I'almoa al Heckle*. Christ Church 4.o*3 ssjusre reel of land al comor of Crumpton ConaUlution fRreeta. Ilrldge All tho above land are okcollem build I f„r nig ln The above will be eat u rrktay Iho ttui July. IfJK Jama. RUeel at 1 00 p ir, MUTCHINVlN A ItANIIEIJl 9 T n An -nVe The iinderalgnad will offer thou Office No. II High I i July 1U at 1 p.Ri riD* alioullnc ... (eel ol land ..I George Street. Ilell SI Mich .el The Dwrlltnghouae contollu gailort. di-wing and dining rooms, (w< bedrooma. lone with running waleri kllrhon. loUel and bout Electric litfni THE MOTOR VESSEL T id running waloa Inavacllon on apphct.an HAM Ijuhloy by phoning For furlher parllrulara and i td -.tie apply to: — coTTIJI CATFORD a. CO MUcll 11 7 ft) V: AUCTION 1 will Mil on TMiaday llth. al I i al Bath VillaaTc. Chrl.l Church, a Bt ..nd Shingle houae Front bouae It i • a hack huu.e It I Cl anc 1 bolhroom. Land con be ran led W 00 per Quailer. TERMS CASII H Arch., McRenale. Auctioneer IS f M—)n "NDER THE IVORY HAMMER B> matructlona racolvsd from Ul* In.urance Co 1 will asll un FrWoy, J'./ Ifth al Moaara Furl Ro>al Uanufo Ml,!. art. Row i|l ItdO A an AuSMn .Damaged lo acrldanl Torm. cash Hale M 1 p m VTNCENT CKaFtlTH Ati.tli.eer ia 7 i 4., UNDER THE SILVER HAMMER m Thmtday ITIh. I>y order of Mrs i i r *(—.n we will "ii her Furno al CartrerT Stralhclyde whloft li.de. oldoboaid: upright and Tab Chairs. Rack era. Settee. Arm Ctustrs, PalaUnd. Ornament Tsbloa ,.11 In Ma hngajiy Plnp "^ninB Table and Wafa PalntliUM and Piclu.e. IUIUI. Ilockera Clan and China IXnn. A Vl Snoon.. Kniha ftc. f artrat i' by Public Compelition .it my unice In Uie Public Building, 'or m ipfcglSed vahM RAilAI." i,ow oi oncnor in i town wiih iu fltUnga PartMuiari .1 n ol the aald VeenM can be *oon on application The appraMd value ol thq Vaatel. which t bull! m lbtf |, |he MJO. of THiKTi' FIVE THOUSAND IK>LI_41I'.' It la filled with an Inloinal csambti.tu-n L)rf.-i .nlne haa a,, climated i.o of m knota. a groan lomuuM ol 1HJ4 II regi.lri tonnage uf lib II. a U nutf of IM feeL a broMlb ^ N via f !" i and a dvpllt of 10 1,-1 Tho aankBh of the Engine room %  > M foet. Tho atcornrnodsttoti consUts ol 1 paaaatigera' rooms with t bod* ajaxii, asUoea* rooma lor S. cooka' ace mi Tiadatlon lor I. Roauwalna IOSJMT qr.d stors i For i.nher porticulora and arr.Lmania lor Inapeclloi. ai.pl.. lo T T IICALMLFY MarshAl in Admirai'. Pluvoat Marshara Office 3ft S 33 l: GOVERN MENT N OTICES VACANT IMST OR RADIOf.RAPiUR, GENERAL HOSPITAL, BARBADOS. Applicbliuiig arc invited for gppointiDdnl to th* post of Radiogrgpher, General HogpIUl, Barhaiios. 2. The salary attached to ilupost U at the rate of 11,440x48— $1,584 per annum. In addlUm. free quarters, raUons, servant and light or an Inclusive allownn< %  ptj $1,440 per annum In lieu. Uniforms are provided. Quarters arcnot available at present. A temporary tost of living allowance at the rate of $156 per annum la also payable. Paaaage expenses paid on appointment ana on completion of Agroeaja| 3. The appointment fin plovercontribution poyable. 4 The holder of the poet will be required to assist the Radiologist in the Diagnostic and Therapy services of the X-Hay Depart| ment. General Hospital. Candidates must possess the M.S.H. (Diagnostic and Therapy Diploma. 5. Applications should tie uddiwsaed to the Colonial Secretary, Public Ruililinit*-. Bridgetown, Barbados to reach him not later than J -'Hi July and the nelccted candidate will be required to assume duty; by 15th August. 1952. or as soon as possible after this date. 8.7 52—Sn HARRISON LINE OUTWARD ROM THE UNITED KINGDOM will be on agreement for three years. The i an approved superannuation scheme 1. S.S. "HERDSMAN S.S. -STATESMAN' S3. 'SCHOLAR" B.S •Y'ROnVt'' .. London . Liverpool . Lflndon and M'lwough London 4th July 30th July 10th July. 2th July 24th July 8th Aui 2nd Aug. 19th Aug TAKE NOTICE Ttial THE AUSTIN MOT. in O W ANY LIMITED, .1 mmpany Incorporate., idcr the law. ol Groat Britain. Molo. at Manufacturer., whoso trade or b... M ftddnM u [MgbrtdaM Work., N. rlh 1.-lit Birmingham. England, haa onpllod r.~ |hr .rgi-lralion of trade niaik 1.1 P-rt -A ol Rscutar In reapect ol motot ihlclM, their pail, and sccew*one.. ..nd III be enlillcd t-< rogut.: tinMm* ter on* month Iroen the 10th s> IA July. ISM, unleae aopM poraon ahall 1. lh* meantime glvr notice in dUphwale to %  t my ofnee of owitlon %  •( ai„'i -, ,1 % %  :. 111. '.I..1. %  ...' % %  > M I t*4 Ilil. 30th ds) ul June. ISU 11 WOJJAMS. M.giat,.i of Trade Moiki SPECIAL DISCOUNT of 10% NOTICE IM ...i-.il OF ST AMI 111 I. Ajjplu.tk.il, lor two vacant Ve.lri rholarahlno .one boy. ..no girl. Irnaols I the Allevne Sihool. will bo received by Iho under. igBcd up lo Sdlu'.l.i oly ISth. IM? Applicallona mail he •-cumpaniad by but" LertlAcate aid ppllranta muel i.reoocil theme* I v.tu Uvo Head Mo.tor of the Alleynq S. ii..,. II M0nd.1v wet. IBM I,, be Kvain. ... 1 EignM C. A. SaOKN.Jl Vestry Clerk. Kt . 1.1 ll an REALTORS L7MITED AUCTION SALE "n T-le 1 Mr Bhnn WUM. e feL iniin.ie and houaehold effect. Mr. R A. lr...k. .eildoiire 'Ainri.i % %  :..,, Mill, hocklnv. which include. Drawing • aults conslsung of Uirse chairs god • lo .eat Iwn. plaatlc top tabl. ih.re td p1ealal Aablr^v. lahl.. IBUI ninmr loom chalra. all In birch. birch tabl. with enamel Ion. one nna tl mahogany Ubl*. painted dlnlru. room table, on* ainunona double bed with • liurihcrknig aprln. tv.o .ingle Latin. one Birch drcMlng table. Chin* 1., aet, %  aud bowl.. Imii dlahei and .'lout il*ma ..f gUaa .nd China. p.in|oc< Id. His t-blo. m.hoga'iv cheat ol drawer, perfection three burner oil aiovr. on. oven 7 ruble fool gr< ,-ral elect) HlefrlK-rator, •. pf I1-1I.. .man high ape.d drill, laoie lamp and alanding lamp, reel .hair. kitchen ulenail. and many othar ilssu. TVrma caah "REALTORS LIMITED AUCTION SALE At 11.30 .1.1,1. %  Thuradasy th* 17th July, i.y thawing ...He ihreo chair, and >*tl*e clour covered, .landing and tabl* Uinjie, radio table with bookraae two .'hrla -jblnat. one buffet, „•* Tip with carved pad**i.i. and %  hwJr. Serving Table with QU* Top. iP In mahnenny Antique combination Orak. one Host Chair. 10 Tube Phileo K it*, on* k" il i.raci IIh CuahkMla. one Cl'ork AitUqua are Including Salad Dilht*, let -1,-ant Cup., and Gliuu C >! Service, complete Hecr Se'. IHiuiet %  ate iiwiu.iing BOUB it.- u wn,.. nd Gold. P, .. ,kfatt *M enannn Salad 11.. I •ingle uud IhH.I-.. Mod t. wSl Rack.. Triple Mlrm i> O.oti • SO .. Ill rillt \ M IlllMMill is hvieby nutilivd that on the approach of storms, visual war 'ngs as described below will be displayed at the following places:— Public Buildings. OnVc of the Harbour and Shipping Mastei. Highgate Signal SUtioti. East Point Llghthou South Point Lighthouse. Harrison Point Lighthouse. Mount Standfast. St James. Crane Hotel. St Ph Hackleton'^ Cliff, St. John. Golden Ridge, St. George. St. Lucy's Church. District "B" Police Station. District C" Police Station. District "D" Police Station. District "E" Police Station. District "F" Police Suitlon. Relleplaine Police Station. I. Cautionary VYaralRg. 'I) Visual — (a) by day — One red flag with black square centre. (b) by night — One red light. '2) Audible --(a) Plantation and Church bells will be rung rapidly at frequent intervals for a period of a quarter of an hour. Reports will be broadcast at hourly or half hourly intervals as will be announced from the Barbados Regiment transmit, ter al the Garrison at a quarter past every hour or at u I e. Frequency S.40 megacycles. (Wave length S6.5 metres). I 13.7.51—2n. %  OMEWARD FOB THE UNITED KINGDOM Veeael. ,, Cltstg fat % %  rtllll SS ''PI-A^^TER %  .. Lofadon 2Ind July. For further information apply to DA COSTA a CO. LTD.—AfeaU Canadian National Steamships eOCTRBOl'ND 14 July If July AMADIAN CONSTnUCTOB 1* July IS July %  AHY RODKBY .. 7 AM AM. For furlher particulars apply ReGARDINER AUSTIN tc CO.. LTD.—Afeata. %  *^*e'e"e-e*e'e'--V*,'-' F --e**a' CH>"TRANSATLANTIQUE SaUlni. ir„m Moutkiunplo. lo OudAm, IWH|K, 11,,!,.,[,... irini.d. i. uuUr^ (mm a Juulr. rnm Mbw Am... Bajaaata -DE GRASSE" 12Ui Jul>, 1M2 . 34th July. 1W2 %  COLOMBIS" 31.1 July, :952 13th Aug., 1952 •"DE GRASSE" . 22nd Au., 1952 3rd S,l 1.52 'Not calling .t Ouadtioup. SAILING mOM BARBADOS TO FITROPE Fr.n. Bvtal. Arrt. !" IMMMtS "COLOMBIE" -DE OHASSE" "COLOMBIE" -DE GRASSE" 13th July, 1952 Oth Aug., 1952 24th Aug., 1982 I'.ui Mil 1953 ;. 'Sailing 'iirert to Southampton .; R. M. JONES CO., LTD.,— Airiilv .'.v*...v,v.',v,v,v,v,.,w/, W //,.v.. MM ,.'-'.'.'.*.*.'. '.'ss.'ss.'.'.'s.'s^',',::',',',;:;'*'.'*:'.:'*'* 25lh July. 1952 lath Aug 1952 Slh Spl.. 1U2 2th S-p. 1952 Driving Mtdr Easy! Driving Midr Easy! There is a demand througliout the world for properly trained men and women In "•very field. And In ERWbados. there's J demand for properly trained drivers. The qualities that go to make you a competent driver can only b? had If vou are trained by THE BARBADOS AUTO DRIVJNu SCHOOL i %  ,. %  To-day and drive thr B.A.D.S. Way. For i'.ii-.iil.r. Plume 0tJ or Consult MV. PRESTON' CRAIG. e o i.-ii -.Mi i.nn Garair. HalU Rotkd. St. Michael VW//AW W /// / ,y, V /////eV////aMW,y { FOR SALE "TRINITY COTTAGE" Derrick, (on M.-slde) Si. Jimn Three Bedroom Stone Hoiue. with usual convwiiences, fully furnished or without furniture. Standing en 3 roods and 10 perches. Immediate posaeaaton. Mortgage can be arranged. Inspection invited by arrangement. For further particulars 'Phone 2959. The Barbados Import & Export Co., Ltd. Plantations Building. 12.T52— 2n. •"" — -----• -4,r.i>oo


PAGE 1

WEDNESDAY, JULY U, 1KI BARBADOS ADVOCATE PA3E FIVE Welfare Adviser Impressed By Development In W.I. Emetine West Indian Sportsmen Limps Into u r n i. i Careenage Home On Holiday The schooner Eaaa Umt limped .linage yesterday morning. Ii had been lying outride in CuillMe Bay since. Monday afternoon when it arrived front St. L K i.. without it* Miss Maude T. Barrett, Social Welfare Adviser of the Hi ary Clarke, reported lot at Technical Assistance Administration of the United Nations * <*> Itaa voyaaje here, with headquarters in Guatemala, told the Advocate yesterJ-m" Wee, mat* .if the ship day that she had seen some i sU— MJ* immn.nt nri .*. valuable developments which impressed her very much. She said thai in the field of me extremely important and ^ffiU'C'gtat? the whole Caribbean ion SSe g"ff e i5S\ea was the Two c. promlntnt West Indian sportsmen. e Placid Prout am: both Barbadians are at present I on • houdaj %  mber ol ttat ori| n.al Prout famil*. HapfOR, a former member of I abuUry under Inspector General N. D. from St. Andrew. Ill hu left here In 19". Tdf* Wine 1 <.antc rhompaon left IUIT VYinS O JUl here in 1914 and paid I community organisation and In the development of community welfare centres, the whole region is very far advanced and she. was particular-y impressed by the excellent leadership in the social field. Hiss Barrett represented the United Nations at the Conference on Home Economics and Education in Nutrition in Trinidad earlier In the month. She is now visiting some of the colonies in the Caribbean before returning to Teachers* Union i^narters Funds Will Be Increased %  hich foundered ntT trip coant of British Guiana two years UD. "T'IMJ .,rr both XT. nlgrily IraThe schooner IM Brl.l> p^^ bJ lho „,,, .. Guiana ""July 4 under I.plain ,.|, u lgt ., ,„ Barbados. Mid coni%  "mo nit-nUne on many of II of wood for II ,.,,„ bom,, „, -they aIC more wms to be put on docic. On tbttr modern than mm. way to Barbados they encounhame In the United State.* ," vy eas and strong I m to use THu'wo pron luxulary engine,. Thai flay a big part I" h.i rV[r "'"' "• 1 "' PUt K^eone-enfra'S^lTheV^Sa i'" flt %  %  Ll .1 work mainly In the field of < Aiiirm t"iiirs of the CosmoTha I'mrltne left SI. Lucia mi poUtao Cricket League t about Vork which wlta UM Ne. Following the initiative of Miss E. L. Cobham. an assistant teacher, the Assistant Teachers' Ui SatUraiy decidtd to set about increasing their funds for building Union Quarters. The Teachers' Union are usually faced with difflSaturday July 12 her headquarter*, in Guatemala cu ny in getting a suitable place I. 00 p.m. lh.it d*y there was an League, tin She arrived here on Sunday night to conduct thiir meetings and toe nlnrm ihit the oastaln en overan I the W from British Guiana via Trinidad idea for procuring a building has board. The boat WH rvvcisci. sjoelatlon which il com) by B.W.I.A. and Is a guest el the long been under consider-non. and the lifeboat U iW Hd but he white pljycrs from Brook! Ocean View Hotel. ,,.,ss Cobham has already rewas no: Sta'i Technical Assistance ceived contributions towards the Goorge mr.ks.rn. a ships carpete in Saturday and Sunday one She said that the purpose of her Building Fund. The Uni n plane paatar who went down to Britten oaj names. visit was not to make an irupecstaging dances, concerts and such i" Secretary, and room. There wenman] iha i„n year, hf the eight rluhs in the League. The clubs compete Do the D.ily Trophy. Yearly, the Leagues play ,i BeQ4> fit Game, the proceeds of which are donated to the DANNAR RANCalifornia, Julj 15. GAS Cancer Fund. This game was Navy and Douglas Aircraft scheduled for the 23rd of June Company officials declined TucsUst, but due to inclei;.itit weather. The President of the Union day to confirm Air Force officer's w .u now take place on the nth of called upon members to supply the announcement thot the Navy has next n.mth. The whole emphasis of the secretary with information which test flown an airplane at 1,300 technlca as-istance programme is wlI1 ^ necessary for the Commiles per hour almost double the *> r • '^ !" l "' "JJJT iiague" on training," she said, and added: n.issioner which is expee'ed to speed of sound at sea level. J u g s ,' tn p C wmoDOUtan LeMue : "We feel that the greatest asslsreV |ew Government Em R loyees' It | known that the plane tho ZTr ^hTlnt^ScLeitm^^ tance we can give is by helping salaries In the near future. It Is Douglas Skyrocket is refi .iterated nbout ^ x n tho M^ropolltan to train local people if that was hoped that teachers who have to prevent melting at terrific League Each I-eague tins one needed, rather than by sending many years In the service—a case speeds. Apparently the uninnj a j or Trophy and a Smaller foreign experts In to conduct of a teacher with 42 years was tended public announcement Trophy, programmes for a long continued mentioned yesterday who are not ma ^ f during an air show at pn-'nd near their maximum and will soon Edwards Air Force Base, super_ be resigning, will be able to get h0nic p] nnc testing grounds on Advice Offered accelerated increases. Q^ edge of the Mojave Desert At its next meeting, the Unlpn )a5t Saturday M id the Skyrocket will discuss anomalies in the oi^dy had flown 1.300 miles an S/iortmnaii "a Diary 69 Natians Far Aquatics At Helsinki By BOB KIPIII'TII. Looking back over my many years as a student of eoenpeUUvi swimming, I find It difficult to recall when interest in the sport Ma more widespread Uuin now. There should be at least 69 nations com* petlng In the aquatic events at i be ing tru 1 i t.ames. When the tortests are over, it Is likely that %  new swimming record* 1 i MI set. Many nations have contributed to the prominent place swimmfnt %  ;h( v. and ol laj For example, the crawl stroke came to us by way of Encland and Australia As far as ere Km. an Ei.irishman named trudgeon was the first to popu...U7.C the double overhand stroke Durlim Uiv '-he water, lie moves them over 'he waters surface instead of %  'uough it in prep^raHcn for his i-ext stroke. Americans 'o6k the >ad in ni' %  "•na'lonsl swlmmlrig compe'.iti.in jound 1920 and held it until 1932 rhan the Japanese came to ihc 'ore. beating *lmo-t all compeiiors at the Olympic O-imes th.it vesr an the.United States Thi winner of the 1.500-mrt*-r fr*t-tyle, a 15-year-old Japanese named Kitamura. was on his way %  room before any [ his rivals had finished. At London in 1948. the United Slates again made a good showing .:i swlmm.ng. But we were suecessful largely because expert swimmers from a numb*T of other nations did not take port Watch The Japs I Ink lap a tremendou* amount f ec>it*reti'Jon this summer (at Helsinki—particularly from the %  i i tow then t o'inpetition, I know •" ihey organize, the intelligent •..iy they swim. One uf ih^ii m, Hironoshln Fur.ihashl, %  I tie hard to beat. Only two Lbs %  otid d i ii his specially—the 1.500— South Africans. Prance hat Alex Jany, an excellent frecsiyltr, ..mi •he Soviet Union has the world* record holder in the lOO-metaa breast stroke—a youth llamas! M-^hkov These men J1 be swlmmlr.,; against such outstanding U.S. eyunoaere as Dick Cleveland and <;iari. Srholes, jr fastesl •rs; Ford Konno, a buy of Japanae-Hawaltan descent who is probably Furubashl's closest come tor; Ronald Cora, Wayr.c ire. Kerry Donovan. Bob ftvj;er,t. and Jimmy McLane—all rrcestylers. In the breaststruke w have >r.n DM bob itrawner atvi Denis O'Connor, and in the baok k Thomas. Jack Taylor, and the veteran Olympic perron-. cr. Allen Stack, All, of course, will have to qualify for the Olympic •ram None of them isure Of a berth until he has ;,rove4 his ability Our country owes much of fUa swimming skills to other nei-onfj And, though we wl'l b. to win a* Helsinki, it will bin a writ %  tip. Ur %  erving the South b< i I Lhey changed the leg action of the Trudgeon stroke from a scissor?like moveusent to a coordinatu' kU-k in which the legs bteke u> nirface "I th.wafer in c<*ordln.i•lon with the swimmer's arms rtte TIU.IJCI.TI sinke was discard ed as a sprint stroke when Uk famous Hawaiian ewnsunar, Dukt kU, wm tho 10'1-nieter tor the USA In 1S12 .'i ncceleraled slx-klckDer-cnroke movamanl it ih • Stockholm Olympics. Eight year QH IB20 Olvmpics In Antwerp, he retained his title b* swiiuniing the same distance in 61.4 seconds. Kahanamoku Is th. father of the popular slx-ber crawl, and Is one of the most re markable swimmers of all tlm1 Tho "Back Crawl" American swimmers pioneere*' the buLkstroke and the preseii' version of the breuststroke. Harr> Mebner. an American swimmer Inn. rnicago, swam an unknown etroke at the 1012 Olympics lr Stockholm called the "barl erawL" This was simply a n ol I lie standard era" stroke, with Ihe swimmer on hi back, li has been In use throughout the world ever since. h-ive strong eompoU*. in from other-: i well. One of .swimmers at Yale. John MarihalL an Australian who ts one i 'he world's best at the middle .'..I long distances, will be irylni" '. beat u*. Two of Marshall'!..untrymen now attending other alleges In the U.S —Garrick new end John Oavleswill be ."Immlng with him at Helsinki. Europe will also present some %  tinidable swimmers. The Engn, the French, the Yugoslavians. 'he Hungarians, and the Russians ne all good. So. of course, are ihe South Americans and the u FiS#. • ArltruBOJ. • • BanrltiVl, %  l t-l HtUcn, i* S. W Slr-r.*lt. • . Hi" Terv.-ro. %  TtModonua • %  BWn r* *i CIIM11**I Ci-.n •FttiiK. %  I Un.nl. • t II .-: Boullivm CouiitU". • %  rv.l..n-. • < nl T..THm* %  MonncklU, %  %  CaoidLin CW*> Htudor. %  %  Tanki.M>a. • • Ul'.o. a.i. S. Wllfrldo. • A)c. Cllwr !., X—o Purtt. i %  OranlMtMl. St. TtaowOav. %  t Al<-W>. fdral Varuvr. •• Audrey. *. %  BnuU. %  a Bnrj. %  tt. !•*• if Otaan Uonarrh. t.tasnemtt Knini-wr, a i. L*U*. • %  Sa.o*M W.I. Team In U.S. tires from turning molften at the be adapted to the economic, social Israel team 54 to 52 in a rough unannou n C od high speeds. and cultural conditions >n the game In which a total of 71 percountry." sonai fouls were called. A field Before joining the United goal by Thedon Matheou, star of Nations in September IW6, Miss the Greek lemi. with only W stvBarrett spent two years working onds to go gave the game to the with U.N.H.R.A. (United Nations Greeks who were defeated by Relief nnd Rehabilitation AdminHungary yesterday, istration) and prior to that she Israel lost eiglil of twelve pla>worked in various parts of the e !" permitted the .squad bv Soviet Jet Plane Violates Border United States in connection with personal fouls and had to play the ..... i,i -elfarc programmes last ninety seconds-)ust after Washington various social in Chicago, Louisiana. Blnca she was stationed in Guatemala, she has worked in Central America, Mexico, nnd T V, .. %  ] ;uid Us tit l fcr sale at an upset uppi ilaed I>I ea i $:i.'..ooo. Tne 1 %  .!.-... %  anplleation by the oenw i 11 ti %  Si \n>j*i.i.L tion f..i lowing the M. T.it. Radar Into port with down in her englM 00 the UM Apt The Motor Veaeal tua*r. Lit, :,t the time of beiiv: i w, hag f i (nur days Mr. Prout recalled vividly the bean drifting in a disabled condlVlslt >f the West In. i.m ff Tobngo. The breakdown which inured America just after In her engine wae due to trouble %  i. Wi t 1 Team i-tunii'l v. it*, the timing gear for tn* from England, and he is hoping BOirem without wtUCD II rai that It would be poealble, if and Impofalblo to got the enguw wot*when the Wi tndli team pny ing. i ed visit to Canada rfhen Ihe next rear, f"r them t>, arrange la iiadar wag j'bout no mliM oil fly over : I %  • I rid wi on her way to tch against a combined League British GuianaShe had weighed out of Triiiichid at 7.15 a.m. :8. i.nd according to rents I Uv ^-.i .i. nei aren In good running The frog-like movement throug!. the water known as the breasi \ stroke was not popular amono speed swimmers until the Intn. duct ion of the "butterfly" sirokf .1 the IMC Olympics In Berlin The new stroke differs from the old In that the user brings ho. i 1 arms completely out of the water At the same linn, he kicks hll 1 legs in the usual breaststrok' fashion. The advantage In th. stroke Is that the swimmer dor* bring his arms completely out ol I To lighten your step — and jour budget . wonderful Aristoc ny&ru! Pains in Back. Nervous, Rheumatic! %  nd otinha. *i tenm. Id Prout said thiit I BELGRADE. July 15. The Yugoslav Government on -j Muiheou's winning shot — with Tuesday charged that a let ngnlor nd anlvfourmc^^cotirt. plane carrying Bovtet markings the s-wt arc usually arranged with As a rSuTt U*e Greeks were violated the air space of Yugoateams from Canada. The Leaguei able to freeze the ball from that lavia. The announcement said the pay the expenses and II^PMfjblf. tfme on IZ "old on to their lead plane flying at 8.U0U feet tie* ;wn gnd^JJJf**^ BSftS Israel led by 35 to 27 at halftlmc miles inside Yuiioslovin on MonJav the C.utadian l '* !" ** h *K l }*~ l Panama, visiting countries at the £ !" £Z lh l fecond hn ,f started, and remained threo minutes Uiiido jauae • !" ^"gj^J request of officials and assisting c.r^cc used bicr plByers and the frontier near the village of tfoui^imot raleg funds out of them In any way they wi.hed. ViVtQ was otie period of five minLukos before turning back toward ea*e iwapv. She emphasised that the Govu ernmenls of the particular coun, Jcore if S ,._ij.p. Tnt" '" believed to be the Drat |tlcS( Mr Thompson Is aasoclat. .1 ^uwkara and brought .o HarbadWB. tries decided whether or not they Instance in which :i plane iden'iwt n ,. 10 u n |ted Parishes of Barii-e nasraet port' — fled as Russian WM accused -f bados Charity Group which sendsXATIOftALIST CBtNESB violating Vugoslavla's njr apace dlrcct lo thc cathedral, clothing, tie T. B. Radar v. >nf foodw otl.aiidr.*uiirn oohla-rirnpi alraln oo IS. ftldo.ra t>nd Kldn.. Uiaddtr 1-rwbl.i r lha \t— . v a of Eiraaa Acldlry. Oalllni l' Hl|h> Huralns Ti—t—, l- Pajaa N*vouaoaaa. Plialitaia. •••• %  Am l old*T. u ,,i. ul 4 IS on the aft< : il; foU.ming day. thc engifi'' I began to iii ift i i.-itthing a point just off T*iapo ertaerg slie was nualiy lakan Into tow by ih< Hidiit'a v-t\ll ir blooS wh ce Ian. Thf *•* N'"! d"* mal h-ipL"i -~r WHlna. ''••" "' • %  %  ••• Km thlaollf quicNl* ml-youfa*lHlia i Udarih*merintendcnt of Vincent with a caifto of 1.20 bags Apartment Houses at 509 West, of copra, 14 bags of cocoanuts. oman editor said no S'r Hungarian troopa are strengthfreedoi Tuesday Uia*. the women and the presi of Japan ere willing to light for their newly found freedoms. Miss Tsugi Shlraishl, Women's Editor of the Nippon Times hrnto address a YWCA luncheon siin : bags of peanuts, and They arc both very happy to be bunches of fresh fruit. In Barbados once again, and say This Schooner is consigned to they are "thoroughly enjoying" tho Schooner Owners' AsaoelaIhem selves. tion. %  */. %  £-* rut f ,HGE*-FIRE Hi.-imi %  Boa Brownlt* Reflex OaJ Brownie Baby Camera Puaflex Cameras Kodik Brnwnlr Fnldlnr Cameras—Meniscus Len. Kodak Brownie c '• Anaaton Lens Films 127. 120. 20. 116. 61fi Films KISS. XX13S. PX1J5 Also IMM, 16 MM, Maaaslne A Spools Of the Press and the vote The S.S. OranJesUd Is expectenVng their fortihcaUons on "the fir women made great changes in ed to arrive In Carlisle Bay thia Hungarian-Yugoslav frontier, acJapan. She said the men are no. morning from Trinidad. Her cording to reports to-day in BoTton fond ol the changes. Butuic. agents are S. P. Musson 4f Son. ba, offlelal paper of the Yugoslav ean t help it. Japan Ltd. Communist Party..—DJ. "-"'•' %  — %  "*• "• %  really man's country or has been.—lM', aeeeeeae>oaaoaaei'eeeaeeo*e KNIGHT'S LTD. FKOVKS ... the inside story of sleeping comfort lies in the spring. WE HAVE BED SPRINGS in the following sizes. CAVE SHEPHERD & CO.. LTD. 10-13 Broad Street Link Spriru-s 4' 6" x C 3" ,. f 29.1)11 Slumber King Springs 4' 6" x G' 3" $45.00 & $43.3* Rand Springs I 6" x .. 3" B $35.34 & $32.57 Coil Springs 4' 6" x !>' 3" Cd $$8.08 & $41.21 Also Von Spring* 2' 6" x 6' 3" Ti $11.38 arh Obtainable at... *SSSS*&*&S***S*&*S*S*+SS*MWS**&&A&*SSS.'*MtfS*SSSSS.'SSSJ*,'.VS*S**t FOR THE RACES „ THE BEACH „ ALL OCCASIONS FitOCKS in NYLON, ART SILK and COTTON BEACH FROCKS in Stri[w. Plain Clours, and Dots TAILORED FROCKS in Small, Medium and Large Sizos AFTERNOON FROCKS a smart selwl'on of thn pnpulor "UARBARA JOYCE" in several styles and materials HOUSECOATS a sin 1 Art Silk, moderately priced HARRISON'S BROAD STREETDIAL 2352 You'll I— X f— •* • ITM*. IK itlM. bakkultfril nylotiai by Ariatoa. • I.,, u* •pwialiaW I* An* %  tookiDdp airluaaivtslj. Tbalr prM •#• t>loi • i^iiiofull T to*, bu* Utoit v lu„ L. tai K h ... h .h Vl.l Tin Uoliiti Fialiiiia I)a.|Hni|4rir< iKw Di-ii iw-lai. •u An-', %  s: •'.• th*tiM M> ••ho ••/ mooa. btalul *.H> •* -i> ... Pay yo.ir—If lb* aubl Ut of oonplnviiU %  at %  "••ml ptain %  aaMey %  %  •>•<> the aristocrat of stocking* UU8 %  %  %  %  %  %  %  - % MXSiST ON.., •••:ic^ A full range now in Stork — Also — CHICK FKEDEItS, WATF.K PANS. I I I.I.I !.i Hi 1 RINGS etc. Select early frorrj . JASON JONES & CO., LTD. AGENTS. BII a E %  %  c a 3 % i.



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BABBADOS ADVOCATE Contempt Of Court Hearing Continues Today \\1I>M.NI>\\, JULY lb. 1952 S> Krww Pue 1 separately represented, doe* not, J0Un*rl tor thidefendant who doe-not vkll witnesses can v>ru>u4lnfK the Jury once. THDly. In sjoneral. before the witResales tor the other defendant irr <-*Junlned If the evidence which II M p r rsjosed to five on behalf trf **.> defendant Is hostile U il>e Interests o: 'hr other defendant. counsel *r the defendant who .':•• tta.1 i Jill witnesses maj be jllowed to address the Jury after the evidence has been hoard for the other defendant. 'W (icrc witnesses nm nib JIC•• mission rosy uc given 1 defendant, or wt ot defendants, u open and prove their caaea separately, as well as to i •saaoLnc each other's wttnessev. Hr.wiid he did i*X know whetli er Hb Learned Fiicnd. Mr. Reec wa4olna? to call witnesses. Ha.wojtherefore ugs*e-*iliig, n eordtac to what t'.e law laid down that Hie Loithnip *}>ould aak III LearbeflTrlMid. Mr. Beev*, whether he vti adducing witnesses o li hr Wsfei i-trt. then a p p ar e n tly the rub m twrt he had to addreaa before the other counse called wjineeae* It was jmt :, matter for ruling. In the case, hr* submission anyhow would be that they were bound to have th* atom because they were Instruct*-J by the same Ann oJ reputation for honour was MiHieiently high not to represer.. diverse intere-a* Otherwise then would not be aufficienf etiquetti Hf* Lordship a**ed Ml Vl cott whether he was suggest in that only one counsel should nd dress and he replied that he wa. not, but that Mr. Recee should ad drees at once. Hie Lordship said he tnougrthsrt the examination of the witness should be finished. Mr. Wal%  >'-t went on to say that he had '.iken the point, because If he iA-ere right, his evidence not hov ui been completed. K would ob. .fio*ly prevent counwl from %  fei ring to it at all. Disagreement ifl on this point, Mr. .eece aaid he did no*, atree at si %  lth His Learned Friend for thi %  llowing reason. The case for *.h > Pendant Company was not the -e of the deft-ndan: Mirhelm. It at nrst case, an defendant. Mlebe,.n was alleged to have made i %  eeeh on the lith. out of whir] %  e preaenf procredlnj? f!ow*d 1 until the lth that a re %  .rt -.f that sjteech appeared ii. ,'.e defendant Comj'i ( >aper. St.ktly .pcikitiK. there wen %  IftSM nl "w open 'u ilndefend)!!) nd to gf separate trials of (he Issue on the ground that the offences had taken %  jaj wpaiate and dattlhet < for conel*, li wa* a question i.( living time, expense-* to the ent etc. It .4 jwifectly true we are both instructed by the same firm of Solicitors." he said, "but I am yet 10 leam that SoUeitors sSHMaM instruct different defendantwhos*.nlereets are not hostile.' He did not wish to make any other comment on the evidence then, he aaid, but it wu ebvrou* that the evidence of the defendnm %  lkhelin hod to and did "o much furtha* ^han the evidence of the defendant Company would or 'ould go. The witness Vantorpool who had been called by the other side would, in the normal course ot event*, have been culled aa a witnear by the defendant Company. He definitely would have been < ailed on their behalf. "I am suggesting, Map u please Your Lordship, that there la nothing In this case to take It out ol the ordinary run which is ins* each defendant, if he likes, can call wltreiseH nnd If he calls wltneases, dten he lias to address the jury or the Court before counsel on behalf of the plaintiff or prosecutor — in this case. prosecutor. If he does not call anj witn es s es he has a right to reply and I am suggesting thai in thicue we have a right to teply.' Hi:; Lordship said that he La. not discovered yet whother he. Mi Reece, was calling witneases. Mr. Reeve replied that he bad w.iuld not be required jnaeV it abundantly clear that Mr. Reeciremarked that he was. wlines* Vanterpool who gave not imere ten in how the other evidence on behalf of the plaintiff side conductehtp absc< r->unsel had agreed cotieernmg hat. He rusd said that r.ral evidence would be taken of the evl... dene* which appenred previously been carefully worded, would in the a.Mavlt. In Jttich a cirettmhave fdven further grounds for stance, how could he go behind offence. 'turf Referred To IlaUbtirv Mr. Reece ldhe agreed, but i( ep iying. Mi. Walcott again ..dded that evidence had, g*J>c leferred to the passage from much further He under the Halabury to which he had previmpreaakm that normally, evidence „ u sW referred. He added that he is to affidavit would be put hi and ad drawn to His Lordship's at%  .hen th* defenthtnt would snow ti^ntion that the defendants were i-anse. That had rfrt been foln^tructed by the same solicitor* lowed. pad that would not have been if HI* Lcndahrp said that he eoWd merr interests were hostile. If .•it tee that only evidence which -.he mtersets had been entirely ppeared In the aff.davlt was to rkmtlcal. he would have objected I* Blfen. .All the -vldence tha* earlier. lie nlnintlff was calling was alHis Lordship said that the ineady before them the other teresU in his view were not the ^ftneswM who wet' summoned a me and he would allow eross•sxanunation Being not identii Id that both counsel haoints which had arisen had to l>e settled first and the Court was then adjourned until this ma at IOJO. Be wise • i.buy Wisdom Dutch Housewife Staggers Athletic Fans: Sets Record LONDON Wlillc buiope sweltered in near tropical ronditlon' recently Dutch housewife, and mother %  two children, was busy provln to the world at large that Hollanwtll not be without rta share ot E ld medalat the Olympic Cannier this month. Mr* FannBlankcrs-Koert, now 14 years o' age. 'staggered Rotterdam nthletk< fana and sent then home wlkH.< excited with a new world recortt of 11.4 icooiKif; for the 100 melnti She also turned in a tune for th> 200 metres which was oniv MV tenth of n second outside the world record and was g new IJutct Impiassive' Perform amen The-e p erfor m *neerail to mini! her .-oh'evem-nui at the last OlyroS c Oam-^, held in London In 1K46. t the i D gaslva Wen.bl-v Stadium itie bee me the ft-ct -"oma>. ever to v in three Individual gold medals S e took the 100 a-vi 20*' •net' < v Inks, won the 80 metrer hurdl-s and Just for goou measure. F teersM the Dutch team to victory %  n the 4 x 100 rnetres relay. No wondethnt sp-irts wri'er dswa i < i g the great TW'Jtnfl') nthlete of till -line. Never hsd '. Me bawl o d-e:vcdl} K-^towcl. TM* tall, 1%  ose-tlmb#xl \sjoman wtth the afiort flaxeno lou-I hftlr and the heirt of ;i lin wv in "c-d the brighb-r stai the 'lames. Th as who were fortunate enough to he at Wembley, saw her put up rvr most impi essrtv.* perne# in the 80 metre* hurdle*. ,1'H.e "rtcnt r*"* won In teV-n>d timt. Tor once Mrs ni.Tkci'Toen frtllfl' to m-ke hei %  %  wnd En "land's Maureen Caxd 1 %  immedljtel> went Into a slight lead. This was won. own by th" Dutch champion over the huraasa until ot the final run-1^ *hey were nerk and neck. Fi'U! me 'land* it was Impossible i s#-> who had broken the tape firai yoi sv-.uiomu ts .t was belivvcii E..^.ili gl 1 h..d won ii -i %  " wavwl to r ck And when th* LHuVa lasnotV) to pla. "God fise King" the uripn was . ig..teued But as event.' .u ned out the National Anthen. ad rn-eu the signal for the arrival of the Royal Family and it was Die Dutch champion who had won the r..cc. Her time, and Mi.^ Gardner i wai. Riven a; 11.2 seconds, • %  new world and Olymp! record. On hoi .cum to Holland M.i.nke-.-Ko*n was given a real i Ibo was fated erywnvr*, in her own i-itv oi \ iistcrdam she wa.t presented by lb* Lord Mayor with %  luxurj I ition of Queen WllhelmlnaV bilee Hook. And when she inally returned to her own home •lie found that neighbours had decorated the house with flowerny innny coloured lights. Muvetl By Tribute Friendw who know her heat saj -he was more,moved by Hitlaat ributa than by any of the othei '-'•lebratiofu planned In her honour. Tlierv was however little dime 'or her to remain quietly with hci bsj rest of the world was %  iger to see this quadruple Olymi>ic riiampion and to estrlyin 949 she was off -ignin. this tlm* to Australia nd Ame; Ice. In botli 'ouutiies she won new admirer, with her magnificent running. Then suddriilthan csOne t .-imbeheil From New York Mrs. r.lankers-Koen announeed that ahi. certain to earn th. 7%e .Xnxirrr in Simple He is CHARLES V SCOTT, now .i see. is certain to earn mi ru> u LitAitLbb v w-u* i, nu* ... *i>h.J' .iiigm;. of the track plar* on m his Slrd y*ir with tlie club %  '•*_^SJJjj the Ol-mpie airulane fm* Helsinki. On Saturday fellow profession-, ""7" e r!: Twcnty-o„e-year-old Chataway, ;us A H. PADOHAM. U B., __h2? *i.2 tU J %  f Woking. has leei h'\ub)ert AYTON, S. L. KING and W. J %  t murh discussion zy athh^lcs COX will pla> exhibition matches %  iieorlsts since going up lo Oxford (0r his benefit at the Dulwlch IH months ago. i:iub. They say he is all that an (u-f. e I :tihlete sliould no< be—too short Soutt / %  in the leg, too nflrrrw In thH.-snbridjft. chert. He also likes I cigar after He captained his school soccer 1 team at centre-half lean year hen they won the Waltham Cup and tlie Horirh Some attribute his brilliance k> lo. low pulse rate. It beats only O tlrnes a minute against th.'..irmal rat.of 72. I'ilotH Sit On tied Secrets I'li.ii rhrfcnfl ,, u e Dtten si irUI rhoy sM contained in sraseies. They travel at law i >nce %  wee;Tiie courieu enjoy diplomat.. nd ire allowed to board te airpUne w.lh tiivu baggage thout going thitnigh Custom* —I..E.S went to Dulwicfa WiUi Slgndowii ami lubs. Me of Wigfit KCCOIIIIIICIHI. (I Hen K a boy cricketer In .vhom E-sex should be rrrtavwHed. He ts JAMES COX. of Loughton. i* last Sunday, with remarkable %  ll-round ability Hts latest achievementplay)iad hit 94 not out when his team teclared at 118 for S, and he then went on to take seven wickets Taught Champions i ntwo runs. Man who played golf with the Mr J. STORY, his sports lt:KE OF WINDSOR. nave master and coach, tells me Cox lessons to HENRY COTTON and has played for the school since his brother l.ESUE as well as ne was 11. He is a right-handed ill champion PAUL1NR nouAN i^ntsman and a right arm fast ..nd French champion P. J. MELi-owler. IX>R, retires from hi. position n* Although he hHS pliyed for the professional to the Dulwlch and Wllthamstow District. Cos: hast Sydenham Hill i oliruon seems a simple one. H lun runs faateT than his rivals tlie Oh! how oh! how I ran... %  yE. McDonald Bailey I n.v.-K alsrsys re%  gsjoed Sweden n one o( the finest con .tries on (he Conttnr it that i have mitodi' en -s and .Tillages sxe spoUesslv olean. Its houses are delightful to VUDl Ttit SwMut) ptxAii *r of anwtltton, •pnrt* lorlas T "t r*i lo open-air lift U| Ann V1 n UX>K ms tu tne aesuiixui utt;* iu ui Uu.iu. and it tu tnr* that I n oa Svsdtsh tor. M> urn.* Bisirs* wsa a ooortv 1 ae.hetibut ss M£M nad af"rnc : a aiiu onrr in* rnt* lay on '.mUbt m the die** :. r.-is U t!i m*ro -' mu c 10 J —<•• tor Uu> 100 TI, *litcii ctjuuiied tbc kuropn... Olympic ixcortU—mr .wwt PV. st thai tin-,blj perforniaiir** un (htOUSSP tlelr apealitng lwvi bstu wha> I run in BwKien. I attrt but* tbb, io Hi* rtl-prp*r< -ii.,i tir — love •ihatsfteetfysb -! %  London ExoreM Servti XRUSCHEN brought a happy change ig from tl tinmu Krusch BtPl' ckly ga i loy or living :— "Up to a month ago, I had %  offered continually from kidney -. itica. rheumatism. I generally felt off-colour. I *.iis cobstaatlv tired. I tried %  mary remedies but without effect %  \ -.e Kruschoo Salts a t trial. In four weeks Kroacbea :..i-. t-ri>ught about a complete • transformation I onos more feal it Is good to be alive."—B.V.N. The kidneys are the (liters of 11'" i'.umin body. If they become .: I i :i. impurities ssop Into tho '.:..( %  stream and the seed of logon common alimaota is %  %  cl#ntlfIo _ooni ? iBstloa K i 11 %  iba %  tlon. • ur* stim. i'l* irsutm •.. i:.vel>-. All ImpurltlM i -siila BH'KFAST srs ien %  itmaDts rVnl of eonuu a loy usin. -s-'tfTSMtrfflsafca a tors* TAKI HOME A BOTTLfc TODAY Mai CONCRETE PRODUCTS LTD. tExiie batteries for surer starting longer life FOR CARS TRUCKS & BUSES CITY GARAGE TRADING CO.. LTD. —Victoria Street %  I Iskrnx bedtif t. • i %  Ml •>< -If Rests B • %  i MI %  I I %  i .. d rggsn IB |f| -,%  AeSS of i jiMfM !.-.,> ,i tha **>/ kind, i nd bod>, tj ar aeaots rht B n dldassi moi %  .i>-T>c*;nr.mh-rlt tuMural av. tjn>o^ neoaM.1 t '..tarn LODGE HILL, — Telephone 2798 Use HOLLOW CONCRETE BLOCKS when building or renovating your home. We GUARANTEE the blocks we make are of a STANDARD QUALITY and are REGULARLY TESTED HUNDREDS o. NEW HOMES, have been built with them in the past three years and ALL OUR CUSTOMERS have been satisfied It II y from us ami unn icill not bm ltixii s -ipn fnt fit. The CHEAPEST and BEST way to build to-day Tests in MIAM. have shown that Concrete Block Buildings WITHSTOOD HURRICANE DAMAGE better than ai y other type of building. Visit our r'm %  toru und Ivt m nmvinef uou. o o R D E R T O O L A R G E 1 I II HIS MA 4 x 8 x 16 20c. 8 x 8 x 16 31c. Corners 33c. Double !nd 34c. Halves 17c. inn bi wi: STILL LEAD each fx Factory I



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WEDNESDAY. JIXY 16. 152 mitllAlMls \l)\OC\TI MCE ; lf > u approach it constructively, not. Robinson says hut expert' ZOO CH'MPS BUY ICES TO TRY TO KEEP C( Summer always seems to hold the peak of our hopes. We put £IT IT lhi V n ,he SoVk 1 a ">e big decisions, moves %  cfsra of ihings they were just an d changes until the office boys. Th^ sun gives us energy ;(Il(i ,„_ rruman is "tne moat impoideaeour, but it cannot make us Unt person in the free world': into new beings without a little* Church IK "the most heroic ilgurc help. of the century': and Tito 'the A holiday is for health—body mildest man who ever slit i and spirit. So turn around and Digest, are Robinson's choice for have I look at yourself, see whafc the most important men in Press kmd OI Per-on >ou are tak-ng on and Communications. holiday. It is the same you that H ''"".' V." • ineontrovert!hie nas weaihered the other tiny that Lrd Bmvrebrooh more succc.v a. •> new Inner in thw last two a eneraUons than any other man uliv.'.' Rut. "Lord Boa vr-r brook . . has 'onslstently backed th men an.) wrong ideas." Sample) I if the year, but . feel different, look different and live differently without for a moment losing your real Identity or being artificial. You cm I • • yourself a summer look quickly wrong enough with A tan. a short li,.n'a crisp smart beach suit—and according t.. Robin,„,. to „>), you how B h !" I !LS? mld :. 20 > ne ou . nl •*** yur deas, your habit, .lions —perhaps they need a change too? Whan vou go away, are you The t*> oldest and -i Ititrlllsriil MBlllll ol l^mitun Zoo • eblnipauiee ItM-parly >rl*l—Sally left, and So So -brllt-ir thai ralHi* m-nr.m Ihr twl ".. to keep cool. They llil l'll> It lliini-i'l.. I.'V.T their k.-.-|-. r thrm -i.nir immn the League o.' Nations the 30* he .... approved UM appeasment pSUdaa of Chamberlain." "Recently he hns been suiting th-t Marshall plan old Lked the Minister of Labour what facilities AMONG leaders in the world ex,hl ,or colonial students to obof fine arts Arluro Toscanini, "the M1 employment In this country foremost orchestral conductor of during their vacation. our times," Is placed next to lrSlr Walter Mocklon, Minister ving Berlin"he has been suof I "' Friend .*> whethei 80(1 any facilsQes exUt in Industry Sir Alexander Fleming, the EfiSSfft., *>. replace Brltls Scot who diwovor ibling them to travel to and from the work. If there is any ) ther matter perhaps my hon. friend will let me know. Mr A. F. Brookway, (Labour. Eton and Slough): Will the right hon. and learned Gentleman consult with the Colonial Office upon this matter with n view to making the fullest provision >r employment for thesecolonial According to Robinson: Albert gtUdantfT lEInsteln. Sir vfaRw Mockton I am The h 2£* t r mo ntcb i ank anxious to do what I can and •la's T.D. Lysenko. ('He a wiH consult with them charlatan whose theories *n B I M' netics are. ridiculous.) The sinister, another Russian, • "The 100 Most Important %  urenti P Benn. had of the People in the World Todau"— vlet Secret Police. ("No man published in New York by Pocket alive has more blood on his Booki Inc. at 35 cents, hands") L.E.S. Chines*" RVds Said ToBitve Rocogniaed Two Coim-ntioiivs "X>NDON, July 15. i'eipii.g broudcost said on night that the Chineso •Communist government has ret tgnized two international conventions of Geneva on war prisoners and germ warfareThe broadcast quoted two statements by Chou En Lai on July 13th: "The Central People's Government of the People's Republic of China has examined tile protocol for the prohibition of the use of asphyxiating jxiison or other gases, and of bacteriplogleal warfare concluded on June 17th, 1925 and acceded to in the name of China on August 7th. 1921. The Central People's Government considers that the said protocol is conducive to tho strengthening of International Peace and Security and Is In conformity with humanitarian punciples. and therefore has decided 'to recognize the accession of trie protocol. The Central People's Government ahull undertake to implement strictly the provurton of tho proclocol provided nil other contracting and acceded 'i-erve them reciprocally. Sctivtary of State Dean Acheson pointed out the American poMiion on germ warfare at a i press conference on June 13. when a Communist reporter asked why the United Slates had not signed the Gwwva Convention mi germ warfare. Acheaun replied thut the United SLites wanted all weapons of destruction banned by trie International Disarmament Commission with adequate powers of enforcement. —L'-P. For fpath ^r of erpry valour— It cleans, preserves—and how it polishes! Ask your retailer for Propert's. Nothing else is quite the same. Watch the ditTerence it makes to your shoes! PROPERT'S (,itr'fi Scottish tour lasl week and then h< gded across the border to Carlisle %  ndn eaal a tym. The tWO Caii.nli..n vnlntie, u. Scotland were at Brought Parry near Ihindee where the tOUXtltl won 118 84 and al the score was 102—78. Losing matches were played at Porto liellu. Stirling, Edinburgh, Aberdeen. rJumbarton, Motherweii and Ayr.—P> Yugoslavia Giv6fl Foreign Aid Note BELGRADE. Yugoslavia. Jub H I'! %  • A%  Britain and UM Unlt< ii.mded .i long delayed throcpnwii .iic Mowing "'I foralgn aid to Yugoslavia to Foreign Minister Leo Males. The ud 0*0grammc • ihly reducII|I.II-1MIII with that of last yen The Frenrh ;mrt Itritish programmc %  bout ooe-thlrd and a*il tha ntaci amount i lor M.o>lial Tito's i: from the United States was not yet known tt was expected to be bntwoon saS.otw.nou ami 7o.ooo.000. Last year'* figure was $1H 000 0(H).—I'.P. I >"nM.I i' In Honour ( % f Hi*a/ilian AniJNi.ssaffor LONDON. July 15 %  dofl and Ministers of many countries plan to honour retiring Brazilian Ambassador Senoi J.^lunll !>.• Arigao. Doyen of the diplomatie corps at n farewell dinner Unnghl. De Aragao is retiring ufter 12 vears" atrvtco riere. Aniong tonik'ht lueatl will be his nuccesKaT Doyan, IggnuOl Blanehi. Chile..ii Ambasaador who gag Kngflaad atona 1941. During his aUy in England. Bianclu marrtad Una widow of a er a naturalized Briton killwl m the airborne Invasion of Germany At 33. Senora Bianchl will I-the youngest ever "first lady" r.f the I/Hidon diplomatic corps. —U.P. I minis ConHiuVr ^uggoHtions" I'lTTSMUHGH, July If, cnl of the longest and leal Btrifca in U.S. hlstorv hinged toilay on C.I.O. United Bt aalwo rsa n faggillou to the industry's latest "suggestion' f.i ending the crippling dispute. .Steelmakers announced Jointly had made "suggesUon.s ( % %  I -ettling Important issues still in dispute", and that "those sug•'.'' are still under rotiMdeini' i i" the union." 1 l 0 Pn Ufa ttt Philip Murray i in sd ol tha BtaaJworkara. was expeatad to b ua a call to his 170i W,.gc Policy Committee fur action on the companies offer whu h was reported to he close to ' i.menHations of tho Wage I -ttion Board. Murray may ion of the Committee Ut 'lie %  d ly —I'.P. Hungary And Canada Win <>ames HELSINKI. July 14 Hungary and Canada aSM i iiympic games advancing t.i the second round of basketball eliminations AlUiough the games do not officially-open not. Saturday the qualifying rounds In basketball, football and soccer are scheduled before the oflfc in| owtng to Hsa tanaa number of Hungary defeated Greece 7.1 to "H in UM in M Miin' .... n >n| i .in iii.i beat Italy fW to 57 Canada will meet Romania in ail&l Hungai> will clash with the winner ,.f tha l"hihppines-lsrael game to b played later to-day. Pgsmanla dram .i tsrat round byo In the basket IMI II qu lUf) ing rounds lefeat dnaa not aUn te.un Hut should It be d< second time the team is climm ttad Ten nations were seedtM in the basketball draw including U.S. tlafanding Otyanple cnanj The I'll st t'.S. Olymin. 'ii win be Una aquad which will paaat [tarj on Wednesday, about 100 mlV Haartnhl. Italy, wtuen t'.S 1 goal to nil in the Ukst ravtkfl of the 1MH Ol i London Ii Cavourad. Field Urn-key eliminations ge: under my to-morrow wiUi SwitI zerland meeting Au-tna and Finl-tnd clashing with Belgium in tha first games. Field Hockey iUM anl] ivi'tit on Olympic schedule in which the Until entered. Bocoar eUnilnatSoni also I •tart to-moiinw iih Yugonlavia' meeting India. Romania clashim.'' with Hungary and Denma:'i aganm am %  Th. oiyinpk rtUajn at Ranyla now houses 2.000 Olympic athletes and officials with anothot 4.000 expected by next Thursday according to the OrganlriiiR Committee. North Amerv^ans with | 333 strong contingent tops the list followed by the Argentine with ?00. Canada 17fl. Italy 15*1. South Africa 119 and Venezuela 74 Foreign visitors are liegltining to utream intti the Olymnk eaptaL Over 700 arrived yesterday and the influx Is expected to reach 900 par day next Monday. Jap Volley Ball 'Irani Bofecta Russian ln\ iliilion TOKYO, July IS. The Japanese Fortign Office has forbidden vulley ball teams to accept the Itussian invitation to attend "world volley ball championships". Announcing th> today a Foreign Office spokesman said: "Government can give no guarantee of tafaty in Huaala" The invitation received by the lapanese Vollev Hall Association included free travel and expenses within, tha Soviet union SHOE < ** f *49 Wf *9 W 99* THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LTD. White Park Rood. Bridgetown ENGINEERS. BRASS and IRON FOUNDERS Works contain modern appliances for the execution of tirst-ciass work of all'kinds, and especially to SUGAR MACHINERY and STEAMSHIPS Dealers in AGRICULTURAL MACHINERY and GENERAL ENGINE ROOM STORES of all Description IRRIGATION PROJECTS. PUMPING EQUIPMENT and ELECTRICAL INSTALLATIONS A SPECIALTY For Satisfaction. Quality and Service Contact THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LTD. Phone : 4546, 4650 Workshop Phone 4528 Stores Dept: ANOTHCH SHINING IXAMPlt Of /eanfa/eJJi There'', always a clean hygienic fragunce in every room where this S-M-OO-I-H r\me cleanser is used. Hots. Pans. andTilcs.Sinks.and Pamtvsotk respond quickly lo ill Ircatment there's nol a scratch in a mountain of Chcmico. MeKanley Wu> Try At 10C) Metrei 1IKUSINKI. July 14 The 1U<> inelic dash in the 1952 Olympic track and Held game* is so wide open that Herb McKenley of Jumaica, 4tH> metre i hf tiimks ha ean ain i' Herb, who is now 3d. .oid n.. lonajac tha pant runnar a/ho lat the world Quartei mlla raeord • %  4 (l acondi Hal In i'-' tt i''" 1 : labad aatlni at Otympta vtuaga tie began toying a lib ih. %  > %  "1 Dunk 1 will piiietise .lints and if i can v.<^ out ,if tha hola qulokb anougn, Hi run the inn 11 .... ii aj 400," said Horn ll U1 the 2im as well DUPLICATING SERVICE We have jut in.i.illr.l the MOST MODERN KI.KITRIC IH l-l l( \ I i >l; and are now in a position to handle your Duplicating Work WHY WAIT ? TIME LOST IS MONEY LOST I We Guarantee Delivery of all Work Within 24 HOURS • Circulars. Forms. Price Lists, Notices, Work Sheets. Etc. can be duplicated. 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IkfMw. ESTABLISHED 1885 WEDNESDAY. J'JLY 16. 195 PRICE : FIVE CENTS Commissioner Of Police Summoned For Contempt Advocate Newspaper Co-defendant HEARING ADJOURNED qPHI hiring of the Writ of Contempt filed by Fit* Haddock against Colonel R. T. Mirhelin. Commissioner of Police, and the Advocate Co.. Ltd., which began " Common Pleas on Monday took an unexpected turn on resumption yesterday morning. Mr. E. K. Walcott. Q.C., Counsel for plaintiff Haddock asked for a ruling by the Chief Justice on the Order in which Counsel should address the jury. When hearing was adjourned on the previous afternoon, Colonel Michelin had completed his examination in chief by his Counsel. Mr. D. II. L. Ward, and it was expected that Mr. E. K. Walcott would proceed with his cross-examination of the witness on resumption yesterday morning. However, when the matter was resumed yesterday, %  Mr. Walcott raised a legal point on the question of the order which the Addresses of the Counsel should take, it the interests of the two co-defendants were the same. This point led to a lengthy argument involving manv quotations from various authorities on the matter. This continued throughout the entire forenoon, and when the Court reassembled after the luncheon interval. His Lordship informed the jury which had retired, that "certain difficult points had arisen, and he had heard arguments on them." There were certain ramification* --'hich necessitated his giving V~T* V Eisenhmver RIOTS FOLLOW MEXICAN ELECTION careful consideration to the points which had boon raised, and therefore ii am impossible until he had given Ml decision of the points.; to continue at the stage where they had left ofT on the previous afternoon. Farther hearing was at this stage adjourned until this morning at 10.30 o'clock. The case is brought against Colonel R. T. Michelin, Commissioner of Police and the Advocate Company Limited, by Haddock alleging contempt of the Court of Grand Sessions, in that they respectively delivered and printed .i speech containing certain statements which tend to prejudice his fair trial in a manslaughter charge brought against him. The co-defendants both pleaded not guilty to the allegation which was contained in a Rule of Court issued by Ills Lordship the Chief Justice In the Court of Common Pleas Termed An Amateur WASHINGTON. July IS. A top C. I. O. lender on Tuesday termed Dwighi D. Eisenhower, Republican Presidential candidate. as a rank amateur In the field of civil government. He said that on major domestic issues Eisenhower woulcl be a prisoner of his own advisers. Joseph A. Beirne, a C.I.O. Vicel*resldent and head of 300.000 communications workers, said in an interview before leaving for the Democratic Presidential Convention that Eisenhower has unquestionably been a. great military leader, but if he is elected President he will be helpless on great Mr. E. K. Walcott, Q.C., asso-1 domestic issues facing the country dated with Mr. G. L. Farmer, and such as the Taft-Hartley labour instructed by Messrs Hutchknson law. civil rights, legislation, fednd Bunlleld, Solicitors, appeared on behatf of plaintiff Haddock. Mr. D. H. L. Ward, instructed by Messrs Yearwood and Boyce, Solicitors for defendant Colonel Michelin and Mr. W. W. Reece, Q.C., Solicitor General, instructed >y Messrs Yearwood and Boyce. Solicitors, for the defendant Company. On resumption yesterday, Mr. Walcott told His Lordship that he wanted to raise a point with regard to the addresses by counsel. He quoted from Halsbury 2nd Edition. Vol. 2, which states: — "... Where the interests uf the defendants are the same, the Court will not allow more than one crossexamination of the plaintiff's witnesses or more than one address to the Jury. The defendants' witnesses will be examined by the different counsel in the same ifunner as if the defence were joint and not separate, but different counsel will be heard for each defendent on a legul objection. "Where several defendants appear by different counsel and have different interests, counsel for each defendant so appearing will be allowed to cross-examlni the wiUi ci s cs on the other side and to address the jury. It Is in such a case to the discretioi the Judge to say in what order the defendants are to cross-examine witnesses and address the jury. The order generally followed Is that in which the defendant*' names appear on the record. "If one defendant calls witnesses, and another, who • On page . .1 Bid to States and others. He will have to depend completely on hi* advisers in makin.; domestic policy decisions rather than making up his own mind. —KP) Queen Has A Slight Chill LONDON. July IS. Communists Beaten Off By UN Troops SEOUL. July 13. United Nations soldiers hurled back another 5 a vat* Communist counter-attack on the east coast hill soulh of Kosong in l bitter hand to hand battle thai raised the toll of Red dead und wounded on the height to nearly 600 for the lust four days. Reds threw battalion bate their sixth unsuccessful attack on the hill in the past 36 hours. One North Korean unit fouglil Id nraj anto Allied bunkers but U.N. sol'. diers hurled back Reds and killed every one. Four days of fighting for the hill cost Reds J27 soldiers killed, and 265 wounded. United Nations artillery killed 60 Red •roope on the east central front e.-ist of Salae Valley while Allied planes accounted for 45 more in attacks across the bultlcfront. Far East Airfurce planes lso destroyed 105 Communist bunkers, knocked out 50 gun positioiw. burned 15 supply dumps. destroyed 65 buildings. United States Sabre jets probably destroyed one Communist M.T.G. 15 jet and damaged another in two separate air fights. —V.P. Attempt To End Steel Strike Fails PITTSBURGH, July I* A new attempt to end th,. Bomb Attacks! Holiest July 14 Hits New York Queen Elizabeth retired to her! da >'. oId strike of 590,000 stc. I workers failed on Tuesday industry and Union ncgot room with a slight chill after an nvestiture ceremony at Buckingham Palace to-day. The Queen cancelled her attendance, at the wedding later today of her cousin Honourable Gerald Lascelles and Miss Angela Dowding. The marriage is taking S sce at St. Margaret's Church. estmi nster. Miss Dowding is *.he daughter of Lady Fox and step-daughter of Sir John Fox of York Terrace. Regent's Park ^^^^ —U.P. KOREA GOVT. WANTS TO RETURN TO SEOUL PUSAN. July 15. Political leaders in Seoul petitioned President Syngman Rhee for an early return of the Korea Government to the capital at Seoul. A spokesman for Rhee said the Government, here temporarily, desired to return to Seoul soon but "it depends on ihe outcome of armistice negotiations at Paomu jom." —UP. aitcd lufgest threw up their hand* and for the White House to j what to do next. "Command performance" talks requested by Government after week-end conferences broke up with C.I.O. United Steelworkcrs rejecting the new Industry "suggestion" for ending the most costly walkout in the nation's history. "Wo have continued our discussion this morning and are still in disagreement." said Union President Philip Murrav after a twohouf conference. He said he and Joseph Larking. Bethlehem Steel Corporation Vice-President representing the major steel companies, reported by telephone to the Acting Defence Mobllizer John It. Steelman. "He requested Us .. stand by for further word from him." Murray said. Two points still apparently blocking a settlement were the controversial Union show clause and the proposed revision of wage structure of 23.000 iron ore workers— UJ*. In Tunisia TUNIS. July 15. Bomb throwing terrorists stepped up their activity yesterday defiance of the display of military might by French garrt* parading m most dues in BaaSJUs Day celebrations accordi to reports reaching here. Tight security measures in Tunis prevented the "one bomb a ihscsni m the capital itself where two bomb attacks caused considerable damage over the week-end. I Hal 190 miles south of iunidentified aiUsckers Staged i bomb-attacks and authorlcalled It a ml ntcte that no one was hurt. At S.50 .m. G.M.T. bdN t-iniii hidden In u went ,iff .it the market place it there *aj M osai nearby and i* explosion caused no dm*ge An hour later an unidentified TOris* threw a grenade high mi the ramparts into a mili%  y ramp rilled with Tunisian World War II veterans cetebraung Bastille Day with French civil and military officials. The bomb a gp to as sl but hit no one. —U.P. IN MEXICO CITY, a half-lr.-irk (top) guards n i '.-election riots bring death aud disorder to the Mexican capita). "a .1 ndi of troops, firing bullets ami tossing tear gas, battled to halt staged by barkers offae'i Miguel Henrique? (airmail, (Vf< trie Presidency bv Adetfo Itutz Cortlncs At bottom, one of lha ii I <>wa being rnnleiH" afely.flKfcrnatlonol Sounrfphofo) Deadlock Likely At Democratic Convention CHICAGQ. Julv 15. Governor Adlai Stevenson's vigorous insistence that ha wont be drafted put a new spark in the contest for next week's Presidential nomination by the Democratic'National Convention. Stevenson had not convinced everyone but "favourite sons'' und other candidates whose mimes are RONIK before the Convention were eager to believe, him. They feel they have a chance so m Illinois Governor balks. %  il.io plugging fur numerous I "residential ballots. Senator Edwin C Johnson arrived rimming the prize for Sen%  >toi Itichani B. Russell. Johnson is RusaeU'a eaanpaign manager. He rneceasl Russell'* nomination f n %  to Nnth or anyway the last ballot. Ten ballots is a great many. A CMIIVI nti>ni which goes that far may be said to be deadlocked—and •I deadlock very likely will develop her I Btcvtnaon stands firm. Robert s. Kin %  thought not more than (We or six ballots s/ottld i< necessary to nominaUllu Presidential candidate. Kerr now liit.s 43a Convention votes tow ard the 619 minimum he would need to win.—UP. Girl Shot At Office Desk NF.W YORK. July .... Police began searching Tuesday for a love-crnied bus driver who nay havr sho' tt. death a pretty lghtcen-year-old secretary at her Tolumbia University desk Monlay because she repulsed his adK.ihey died instantlv from ix hullcts tired at her by a mystetinU'"thin nun". Death came as she was reading a letter from the Marine whom she planned to irryPrivate First Class Ronald Leo now in Korea. Eileen's closest friends and her fiance's brothers told police she was at one time frightened by the attentions of the bus driver who frequently held up his bus In front of her office waiting for her. —U.P. U.S. Wants Russian Magazine Suspended WASHINGTON, July 15. The United States ordered Russia "to suspend immediately" publication in this country of the Soviet information bulletin and all kinds of Red propaKayida material. In a note delivered to Moscow, the State Department alto notified the Seviets that the U.S. is suspending "immediately", its own Russian language magazine "America" printed for Russian readers. The note charged the Kremlin with curbing the distribution and sale of "America" by using "obstructionist" measures to keep from Soviet readers "the true picture of American life and thus a misunderstanding between the two peoples." It said Moscow Government with "* 12 American protests JincS U.S. Offered All Bolivia's Tin Canada's Defence Programme Passes Milestone OTTAWA. July 15 Canada's three-year defence programme has quietly passed a milestone. She has started to ship new equipment to help Atlantic Pact allies in the defence of Europe. The arms nnd equipment she has sent in the past have been things left over from the Second World War. It was announced yesterday that the first of 300 secret new radar sets, a type to be used by the army in its anti-aircraft setup. Is due in Britain shortly, possibly Wednesdav. —KP). December 1949 has violated th* 1946 agreement to circulate inside Russia 50.000 copies of the United States magazine. It cut sales moi* thiiii two veors ago to 25,000 copies and this is now down to 13.000 .;,,. PatC Department requests to find out whether the magazine t former United States government actually being offered for sale ,WI"'",i yesterday that acting outside Moscow were never an" beh j'" r t a ""HP . f ( as * c .' t *' The WASHINGTON. July 15 Leon Henderson, ;.ftl *•.: m.terl.1 publUhed -t theexpense ^^S^^ of Moseow Government The Una-| Henderson said the contract is ed SUtes ote ^i.l-^V^^. lntwldcd to •* tor %  "" * States would consider resuming; years, publication of "America'* if UM| He'estimated Bolivian tin proSoviets would grant 'the sameU uct ion to be at least 30.000 tops freedom of the publication, distr.U nn ually. about half of which bution and styles which had been formerly came to the U.S. and the accorded Soviets in the United'remainder went to other countries Siatss."—t.P. — "/J\ Queries On Gain<*r Do Not Qtmoetm Eva Pt'fon VIENNA. July 15. Au.arian gynecologist Kurt H S.*ii.ltci sAid he was "one hunIred per cent, sure" Ihat quencs reeetveJ tram Argentina on iu* unccT lltiatlna* nu'thods have ...tiiiii,; t<> d> with the conditloT Cl Eva I'eron, idling wlf< Argentine President Peron. Schaffer pointed out tha oftleial announcements had not fee ksssstsaVVd Ihe disease from hich Senora I'eron is suffetin> and said "requcs'-. for information from Argi'iilu.are among 1 hundred routine querie: about my work with polydyn." Polydyn is the pharmaceutical which Schaffer has used in experimental treatment of cancer lv :i;i,r Me emphasized that the experiments had not reached a conclusive stage and that polydyn definitely wa %  not effective in advanced cases. SchafTer again discounted reports that an Argentine dortos* named Von Witzleben had arrived in Vienna for consultatiun. Me SHKI he had received cable from Von Witziel^-n frOBn Buenos Aires only yesterday. —t'.r. Rebels Seek Aid from Cenerul Chiang Kai-Shek RANGOON, July 15. Official sources reported rebel Kiiren tribesmen fighting Burma's Government have gone to *"< %  la f'*r arms aid from Chiang Ki Shek and tinChm< N,ii,.nh -\ .mi., Sources said Ihe Karen dclegaS.tw Shwe, tribal chief. flew from Moiigh.it neiuthe mtillitin border of Si..in Taipeh. They did not say howaver, who Bow the group. Karen rebels recently suffered • verses from Government troops who have re-occupied moat of the territory in the district pn viousty lasmi —t'.P. U.S. DESTROYER GETS FOUR DIRECT HITS WASHINGTON, July 15. Tlie United Stales desU-oyer .S"-ul"erlond received four hlU in duel with Coimnunisl shore battcnoo off thiEast coast of Korea MoiMl.iy. and the navy revealed that eight men suffered minor injuries The i'oatherUind silenced live of seven shore batteries in a twentyfour minute battle In which more than two hundred rounds of fiveInch shells poured Into Communist gun emplacements -v.r. Jet Explodes With U.S. Flying Ace ALBANY, Georgia. July IS Lieutenant Colonel Elmer Da•osa. Bir force pilot, was killed Monday when his ThundOrJ* nghtct pl.mr cxidixhvl over Iwo Jtma on a mass jet ni|(ht to tl>.. Far K.ist. ii.iimlinu in ivard rccetvod here, Darosu was leading a llighl of lets from the 21st Wing .it Turner Air Force Base here lu the Far Rast. The plan.cxplmied during an atteinpte^l letaonro over Iwo Jima. D,in: .i n.itive ..f SiicrMiiienlo CaUforoia hud more than 6.000 flv ing hours to his credit during 27 years. He WU ine of the organisers of the Turner Standardlutlon Board .s \Ht:iiinsiioi' LONDON, July 15. The Archbishop of Canti^bury, primate of the Church of Engl.unl. shargad on Tuesday night thut the Itrd" Dean of Canterbury abused his office but said i. ixtaken against him BOD law. I >•' In a letter he asked UM l{.i l silber r-esigj| or to cease >*IIS Hit I'. Hi said b] hoe way in which t < %  Date ii ndui lad Ufneatt he has really misused and comI" 'i %  -i 'IViVtHe >..ii-l the beta .%  i inle Isold %  I ii ii n ie liked but charged that he Unwed himself to be exploited by "managen of a poliUcal system he supports, foi then* own i id |1M Daan ll no atheist. He Is not an official member aeeritalU>iX and s4M.1al Justice better applied n C'ommunM countries than thev fn —w.r. 1 A mass of cool air ilo irf lot heat weary residents in ll the United States but not much hope of n soulhern states that are burning (iiili hi^h nineties Fahrenheit. Y. 'mlay was the hottest July 14 i York. The thermometer climb. Weather Bureau predicted temperatures would be in the tnnctifs aiiain today. .... , hour xt-inin" H.d For Tfce Fatienl [i Clevel %  old h.-tpuat pel %  it ion waU treet to i nearby arearn u taiilcd bartender t!H> o r dn'ssed died the %  I him back to inspital—uiihout the beer 1 (jersons COIIM the heal 'hecity .i ihe : %  %  degrees w;m reported at the Is ed i ord Mais* liuaoiti %  %  dill wi'.ii wheel :i"in Nofars hbourtoig • k Farmers said U> -Hue f.r harvesl them roportod I lliuaderstormi and %  tl '• Sm.ill craft %  11 111 %  %  them tip of Flord • %  Mndt up %  •iii many %  i the iiddi-n "Hurricane llnnler 11 % %  .p.ililied him ; i HI. into pici' i HI Ume, .ii'i n %  fii.ni venturing into UM open jmif inc HunUBr" haft Jack< %  %  luallv ores i I mud no OH i" .mds which would null* att the posa t blo tom%  suspicious". —u.r. Keel Ma^ia/inr Attacks L.S. Policy MUXCOW. .' A Russian rnagattne reviewing the Mld-Castern situation said Ihe United Rases had convcn.-d IM Madlttrranean into an American nostrum" u %  llritlsh. French oad othei ssssUIcrraiicHn powers. Taking up Individual countries. it said tho United St.itc-. i5 feverlalus extending and sgutpplng Turklnh bases. According to the Btagaateet UH Unit.ii st.ttcs obtained fi UM %  %  *f i>" airports, 40 Undnn; fields. 10 seaplane bases. 40 sc.iI ports and all of Spain's naval bases. It said many bases and I.Hiding stnp. .ne Under construction in Corsica, Sicily, Israel .mid the Arab countries. It said the United stales already possesses a veetl] luportar Beet In the Meditei: IH HI pstnuuksntl) I 'lacliiin ot live huge airhnseo foi hestV) w. I •MKintic roast. The ni.tgarinu said, if tl" meriean plans for a acpralc pact with Spain .owl I'nrtugal DWtertalrxe, British QUsrattai will bc-ome a hopeless hack number. The article eoiulu-iei 11" irpose of this Integrated to enable the United States to cerl ootutanl praf un on dJ Ruropean eountrlei hose tituated In ihe western part rf the continent, and hold UM oeople. of Europe, Africa and the Mid-Bast in perpetual feat •>' "prlsals in tho form Of i id blockade*. Hoods In Assam Leave Thousands Homeless CALCUTTA, Iiulia. July ISThousands of persons were homeless today as floods swept Daeat of Assam and West Bengal. ConimunifiitioMs wen< %  .. air travel curtailed. Many persons were rescued by rubber syagtn .md the raUal organiia lion begun flropping f<--i from pi .:..Floods follow ad Ifea monsoon* In the Assam hills and .i, iraaa. Water n %  bi In eight fee: lugi. in places T" add u the dilhculty U earthquake of moderate intensity Knocked Terpur in Assam. —U.P. Big Welcome For S.S. -luih (I Slulrs NF.W YOltK, July 15 One of the biggest WslCOtaeg 0 Mgded for Ihe supfrlincr United .stall's wliiii, v,j dock after breaking the Bast to W ul AtlantU i rowing In setting the westward .-|>e.il record yestarday the United Stal< in itiK i del • 11 111.1.: 12 minutes nveiriging 34 51 knot.'. It bottosed Hie previous record set 11 Queen Mnrj I.> %  nine hOUl iiti minutes. The liner also set the West to Fast crossing reoot I I week. —t I 1 EASE MiLITAH. SAYS uucass LONDON, July 15. bar ol Parllanwnl i.a Riilaiu %  i i ti.. mher, id ihe tune has cot %  sj service Ai I %  ii lbs i ".. %  Dumbi wldlt i %  now a* J ued up lor Iwo lining Hughes nU be will ssh Prbno Minbter Chu hursdaj to rive tha Mouse ol Conw | (CPi. AniJ)ii.ssa(l4>r To Attend VJi. Tfllka WAS1UNOTON, July li. Kmbassy an%  Carlos Rormiti will ie :. %  big Ihe United Nations 1 ioctal Council He will participate In debbera%  veloped countries, tho %  aaokaanuui — v.r. The UoM RAISE FLAGS AT OLYMPIC VILLAGE Sfrike At Briggs Auto IMinil EIHIH DAGENHAM, Essex, July IS A three-week striki of 10.000 workers at the Briggs automotive bodies "plant and on associate of the Ford Motor Company, ended here Tuesdav. The Strike Committee recommended a return to work Wednesday after the company agreed t'> discuss wage claims. Ford workers several days ago settled their own protest stiike against the IsyIng off of four men beca Briggs strike.—CP. Mt.riioiHsrs M8UKE GASMJVE HOMHS PRESTON. England. July ir> The Annual Assembly of the British Methodist Church called Monday for a ban on the usa napalm bombs The mcetlna agreed to ask the Government to persuade the t*.N. Command in Korea to stop u'ing )ct)ied gasoline bombs— F>. New Envoy IH Finance Expert WASHINGTON, July 15. but this has not been condone I An Indian Embassy spokesman officially (.aid Tuesday the pending change Explaining the new tTO| of Ambassadors to this country to be given seo n oi i will bring here one of India'.spokesman said. "Washington is le ding %  llnancial wizards" and our top diplomatic prst and has will give added emphasis to the always bean earmarked for the growing importance of economic top public figure. Mr. Mehta b. a ticial wiiard and it is fe.t The appointment nf Caganv.tbre is a need here for somesair harl Mehta as the new Indhm who should be in addition to BH replacing Ambassador top public figure one wide! B. R. Sen. WJS announced in New illar with the major economic asDelhi. Saturday. Mehta is an %  relations betw. i pert in Indun financial and detwo i ountr'as. velopmental problems and I' of He said it i* fall the the authors of the current IndUUl rnent ol Mehta to the Washiut:I la Vssn Plan. Ian si a rarer ton post is "bound i'< bi II J diplomat who was dsslgried here economic ties". He said the daU from Rome when former Atnbas/or the change of Amb'ssadors aador, Madame Vijaya f-'ik f-mi has not been ft but Mehta is exPandM returned to India 1 ist peeled to arrive here in the first year for the national election half of December and Ban will The embassy spokesman said probably leave some days befonreporta havr been current that Merita's arrival. Sen v.,11 saavs 8at) would return to New Delhi here Sunday for ( i i : ign MJnuttiy. .' %  i t' U.K. Tram LIUMS For Helsinki I/)NDON. Julv IS. The main body of Britain*! track and lleld team left for Helsinki by air on Tuesday bearing the brightest hopes this country has ever entertained for Olympic laurels after more than a decade of lean pickings In Olyn pit i petition. The Rntiih team this year is rated the strongest ever for the Games. Manager Jack Crump said his big worry is hoar athletes will sleep Helsinki* 21 hoois daylight and three twilight. Vigh .luinpei Al.ii! I'aterson already in Belsir.ki h asking for warmer clothing. Piterson emigrated to Canada pome months ago but wat Kb rte I An absentee on* Tueu" was Roger Ilsnm Un BrIU hope In the 1.500 metre I a nister is as unorthodox as ever. He has no eoeofc or tr %  akad t<. be sJaowed to ;ust before the game 1st III include spnsae* Fmrr.anue] M> I marathoner Jim Peters, nuortle distance runners Chris Chatawsy snd high lumpers Sheila Lerwill and 'CCi IIAO RAISING CHIMONtlf mark the formal opening of the Olympic Vsaegps in Helsinki, Finland, where the Olympic Games will be | fartar in the month. While crowds look on, members of the Ceylon ttam gathsr in foreground as their flag goes up to Join tha Japanese. %  a. a • -at



PAGE 1

WEDNESDAY, WU I'., is;.' It.VKUADOS AIM Ol A II I M.I NINE HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON ^^| •W ^& i ^~ FLINT OF THE FLYING SQUAD BY ALAN STRANKS & GEORGE DAVIES SO*T>*\A* S GOT ^ %  ** %  •* -*~g$ ANO c£>i*"£*a>' II LAW** **v *•** ** •AND TCNlG"T BLONDIE BY CHIC YOUNG ( THAT MUST BE THC X. MAN FROM THE CLEANERS FOR • '-CMP TIAJuSERS <^> 1 -vi S *• ^ "^ ?DON BY DAN BARRY THE CITY WILL PC DESTROYED 8V THE QUAKE TOMORROW — AND W£. WITH IT, UNLB TONIGHT WHILE THE CITY SLEEP, VOU FRIENDS Wiu. BC ESCORTED TO THE SHIP/ BUT YOU, FIASH GORDON, ABE PROMISED TO ME VOU WILL STAY/ JOHNNY HAZARD mzsm BY FRANK ROBBINS OL* PJWT wove ic NOT CgQM THE C I P • BRINGING UP FATHER BY GEORGE MC. MANUS WMV DO v WU. TMEV VCU MAVE TO \ HAV* WCNDfiPCUL BAT IN A U3W] CO*^D BGKF (WO* P.AOE /• AND CABBAGEL.IICE THAT?// AND >CU Wf as! ii ^VCITE APE torn OP wv\ -f:>TA_iBANTS .N J T5,%'j %  rr WDUU %  r XXi TO TIT/ ONE &= -e^ i^TMEM POO A CHANCE ") %  TCtW A' LOJNC<%  -*3P6C '-0\J eoov^o TMF roPNEO pfl*y *" AND CAB&V3E %  RIP KIRBY TO BY ALEX RAYMOND THF PHANTOM BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES WMBX tO Y Wh' i.-fc 0j4IiM ,'.L i N '.' %  %  %  PUUN6THEN I HOTEL. 1WC! IMN6 TO SVUK-.Ej I '-\ %  .';-' %  % %  . i 1 Be kind to your face UtlLlia TO nv the iovcl>eu told CTMID lo Ueanw *nd .heron your complex, m unlrn you alv> ue the genttett ol" tmuct to remove it. Don't ww your octicatc tkio. Tharc'i ru> ned. r\>nd' ton Tis-ue lUnkrf. are to ab%.>ihenl Out (hey will Bjlckfe iMk .p tbe MNB dMt, sidle nuke up and all. And ihev never colLiptc into tom little pjcutv Thgy'rc JIK-W * U M wft and attorbeoi There are ao many uaea for these Tiuues all the lime, everywhere I'wd a hankie*, they are loiter than the tineM cambric, .ind tave you noun ol washing and ironing Destroy (hem once you have used them. packet today, and keep .: handy. 'ondcr how you car BJMaaid tt i Tiuua. Hankies. At all the bail SOFT STKONG ABSORBINT Gland Discovery Restores Youth In 24 Hours Vi-Tabs V IlltlM Moahaed and Vllmtltf COVES WITH It \l A SACROOI. KNOCKS OUT PAIN ON Ml AT KNIGHTS LTD. ALL BRANCHES IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Monday to Wednesday only SPECIAL OH ICHS arr now avnilable MI our Iri ;.• %  . %  \\ liii. I'ark. l'H<'-tlsilc. S|i.iulilsl.i ii .mil %a.i .Nlr-- OVALTINE RUSKS .6 "VAI.TINE BISCUITS £Z JACOB'S c K \( Kl III ins 1.41 —Pkfi. .X MARTINI CRACKERS 1.81 P. P. COCKTAIL BISCUITS 1.4* P. F. CIIEESKLETS—Tlim I.IS P. F. c III I M l I I -. n. ;s .7 CLUB CHEESE STRAW 1.12 CAKR'S CHEESE CRISPS 1.32 CAKH'S I Mil I WATER IJW UF1I.I.1T BISCUITS 1.44 D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street KRAFT MACARONI CHEESE -Tins -II. ill. .41 Now BREAKFAST HOLE M l,H IIATCIIEEOHS PEAS ..19 M VAN IIOI'TFN S COCOA ,4R .42 R1NSO M .tai WMITEWAY'S OEVON C IDEI1 1.12 1.00 MAJOR CITIES F U.S.A. 1 IN ONE DAY. \ w Vurk. ( hn %  %  % %  Wusliintflun, Mi.inn Di'ltiiil lt*\elaiMl. in jutl 'in. duy. K.W.I.A. .ill |iliin .' %  ui ji>uriit->. iii.il.i\IIUT rrsiTVHtMinv .mil i.sur tickets %  n: 1M thrmiuli U> ymideslination. No mutter when* VBflaf flfstiiiiitinii your journey should alwa>* ln-j-in with B.W.I.A Always see R.WI.A Brit BRITISH WEST INDIAN AIRWAYS %  ft, BfMsvlawa. miISHi ^>^v^.vvvv>.VS.vv> W!A HAVE %  YOU SECURED YOUR COPY OF CRICKET CRUSADERS YET? Buy this valuable book by HAROLD DALE and read about the Wesl Indies Australia Tour. S.'I.JiO AT ADVOCATE STATIONERY




%

— Harbavos

ESTABLISHED 1895
Commissioner Of Police
Summoned For Contempt
Advocate Newspaper Co-defendant
HEARING ADJOURNED
"THE hearing of the Writ of Contempt filed by Fitz Haddock against Colonel R. T. Mich-

elin, Commissioner of Police, and the Advocate Co., Ltd., which began in Common
Pleas on Monday took an unexpected turn on resumption yesterday morning. Mr. E. K.

————







WEDNESDAY, JULY 16, 1952
RIOTS FOLLOW MEXICAN ELECTION





Adve





PRICE : FIVE CENTS

Hottest July 14
Hits New York

NEW YORK, July 15.
A mass of cool air slowly moved eastward, promising
some relief for heat weary residents in the eastern Bart ©
the United States but not much hope of relief was % is
southern states that are burning under temperatures ey
high nineties Fahrenheit.
Yesterday was the hottest July 14 on record in MM
York. The thermometer climbed to a sizzling 95, The
Weather Bureau predicted temperatures would be in the



Bomb Attacks
Continue
In Tunisia

TUNIS, July 15.
Bomb throwing terrorists step-
ped up their activity yesterday
in defiance of the display of
military might by -French garri-
sons parading in most cities in
Bastille Day celebrations accord-

ing to reports reaching here.
Tight security measures in
Tunis prevented the “one bomb a



Waleott, Q.C., Counsel for plaintiff Haddock asked for a ruling by the Chief Justice on the

Order in which Counsel should address the jury.

When hearing was adjourned on the previous afternoon, Colonel Michelin had

completed his examination in chief by his Counsel, Mr. D. H. L. Ward, and it was ex-

pected that Mr: E. K. Walcott would proceed with his cros
on resumption yesterday

However, when the matter “was resumed yesterday,

Mr. Walcott raised a legal point on the question of the
order which the Addresses of the Counsel should take, if
the interests of the two co-defendants were the same.

This point led to a lengthy argument involving many
quotations from various authorities on the matter. This

s-examination of the witness

Communists

Beaten Off

continued throughout the entire forenoon, and when the/ By UN Troops

Court reassembled after the luncheon interval, His Lord-|

ship informed the jury which had retired, that ee eni

difficult points had arisen, and he had heard arguments on

them.”
There were certain ramifications————- —-_-—-~--——____
oe necessitated his giving e ,
careful consideration to the points E Se y howe
= had been raised, and there- u nm 5 r
ore it was impossible until he had | ,
given his decision of the points, | Termed An
= Pea at = stage where nas

ad left off on the previous after- : ‘ . a
noon, Further hearing was at this Amateur
stage ey ge egg this morn-
ing at 10,30 o’e

fi, sonatas |g ABINGTON JON,
Colonel bs = ary a termed. Dwight D, Eisenhower,
ee oF Fo! nited. bet Madde | Republican Presidential candidate,

mpany Limited, y ocklas a rank amateur in the field of
alleging contempt of the Court of | iyi) government, He said that on
Grand Sessions, in that they re-!major domestic issues Eisenhower
spectively delivered and printed |would be a prisoner of his own
a speech containing certain state-| advisers,
ments which tend to prejudice his] Joseph A. Beirne, a C.I.O. Vice-
fair trial in a manslaughter charge|President and head of 300,000
brought against him. communications workers, said in

The co-defendants both pleaded|an interview before leaving for
not guilty to the allegation which|the Democratic Presidential Con-
was contained in a Rule of Court|vention that Eisenhower has un-
issued by His Lordship the Chief |questionably been a great military
Justice in the Court of Common|leader, but if he is elected Presi-
Pleas. dent he will be helpless on great

Mr. E. K. Walcott, Q.C., asso-,;domestic issues facing the country
ciated with Mr. G, L. Farmer, and|such as the Taft-Hartley labour
instructed by Messrs Hutchinson law, civil rights, legislation, fed-
and Banfield, Solicitors, appeared |eral aid to States and others.

on behalf of plaintiff Haddock, He will have to depend com-

Mr. D. H. L, Ward, instructed |Pletely on his advisers in making
by Messrs Yearwood ‘and Boyce, |G0mestic policy decisions rather
Solicitors, for defendant Colonei|*®@" making up his own mind,
Michelin and Mr, W. W. Reece,

a4, Solicitor General, Dar toh
diction, tor the actengant Com] Queen Has A
light Chill

Solicitors, for the defendant Com-
LONDON, July 15, |

pany. ;
on yesterday, Mr.
Queen Elizabeth retired to her}

On yesumpti
Walcott told His Lordship that he
room with a slight chill after an
investiture ceremony at Bucking- |

wanted to raise a point with re-
gard to the addresses by counsel.
ham Palace to-day.
The Queen cancelled her at-

He quoted from Halsbury 2nd
Edition, Vol. 2, which states: —
tendance. at the wedding later to-
lay of her cousin Honourable Ger-



“|. . Where the interests of the
Lascelles and Miss Angela

defendants are the same, the Court

will not allow more than one cross-
owding. The marriage is taking
lace at St. Margaret’s Church,

examination of the plaintiff's wit-
nesses or more than one address} 4
to the jury. The defendants’)
witnesses will be examined by the D
eee estminster.
en cad vine sereta ko voit Miss Dowding is the daughter of
ferent counsel will be ‘heard for yer = Bo step-daughter of
each defendant on a legal objec-|Reo oop poe Of ‘York ‘Terrace,
“Where several defendants ap- sitaiiilatins war:
pear by different counsel ani
have different interests, counsel KOREA GOVT. WANT: S
for each defendant so appearing
ine} TO RETURN TO SEOUL
the witnesses on the other side
and to address the jury. It is in
such a case to the discretion of| Political leaders in Seoul peti-
the Judge to say in what order|tioned President Syngman Rhee
for an early return of the Korea
amine witnesses and address the|Government to the capital at
at i fend +|the Government, here temporarily,
nae ery _ _ ere von desired to return to Seoul soon but
“If one defendant calls wit- “it depends on the outcome of
sinbes = and. another, who _ is|2*Mistice negotiations at Panmun-

different counsel .in the same

We Regent's Park.

will be allowed to cross-examine

PUSAN, July 15.

the defendants are to cross-ex-

jury. The order generally followed |Seoul. A spokesman for Rhee said

jom.”
@ On page 6.



—U-P.

U.S. Wants Russian
Magazine Suspended

WASHINGTON, July 15.
The United States ordered Russia ‘to suspend immedi-
ately” publication in this country of the Soviet information
bulletin and all kinds of Red material. :
: In a note delivered to Moscow, the State Department
also notified the Seviets that the U.S. is suspending “im-
mediately”, its own Russian language magazine “America”
printed for Russian readers, ea
The note charged the Kremlin with curbing the distri-
bution and sale of “America” by using “obstructionist”
measures to keep from Soviet readers “the true picture of
American life and thus a misunderstanding between the
two peoples.”
It said Moscow Government with
12 American protests since
December 1949 has violated the
1946 agreement to circulate inside
Russia 50,000 avn of pod United sree 3
States magazine. It cut sales more
than two vanes ago to 35 Soe Bolivia § Tin
io this is now down to 13,00 WASHINGTON, July 15.
State Department requests to Leon Henderson, economist and
find out whether the magazine is former United States government
actually being offered for sale , official, said yesterday that acting
outside Moscow were never an-,0" behalf of a group of associates,
swered. The Russians according 294d with the authority of the
to the State Department, instead, Bolivian government, he offered
increased their propaganda attacks the Reconstruction Finance Cor-
on the magazine and began re-;Poration a long term contract for
jecting articles on human rights, | the ome oe ee te Boli-
The Department's action SUS | eed war adie ae gpl ain
pends the Soviet Embassy's publi- | The offer to RFC aricti % ths °
cation of USSR in a nation alien sole purchaser of tin in the US.
to its supplements and any other wo. the result of a visit Henderson

material published at the expense made several weeks ago to Bolivia.
of Moscow Government. The Unit- Henderson said the contract is



U.S. Offered All

ed States note said the United intended to be for

States would consider resuming| years ieee rat Sa, Oe
publication of “America” if Pet: He estimated Bolivian tin pro-
Soviets would grant “the same

3 s duction to be at least 30,000 tons
freedom of the publication, distri-]annually, about half of which
bution and styles which had been’ formerly came to the U.S. and the
accorded Soviets in the United 'remainder went to other countrie:
—U.P —U.P.

lates

° | Korea to

SEOUL, July 15.

United Nations soldiers hurled
back another savage! Communist
counter-attack on the east coast
hill south of Kosong in a bitter
hand to hand battle that raised
the toll of Red dead and wounded
on the height to nearly 600 for the
last four days.

Reds threw a battalion into
their sixth unsuccessful attack on
the hill in the past 36 hours. One
North Korean unit fought its way
finto Allied bunkers but U.N. sol«
diers hurled back Reds and kill-
et one.

Four days of fighting for the
hill cost Reds 327 soldiers killed,
and 265 wounded.

United Nations artillery killed
60 Red troops on the east central
front east of Satae Valley while
Allied planes accounted for 45
more in attacks across the battle-
front,

Far East Airforce planes also
destroyed 105 Communist bunk-
ers, knocked out 50 gun positions,
burned 15 supply dumps,
destroyed 65 buildings,

United States Sabre jets prob-
ably destroyed one Communist

Bose: 15 jet and damaged

another in two separat

fights. oe
—U.P.



Attempt To
End Steel
Strike Fails

PITTSBURGH, July 15.

A new attempt to end the:
day old strike of 590,000 st
workers failed on Tuesday.

In-
dustry and Union

what to do next,

“Command performance” talks|marry—Private First Class Ronald
requested by Government after|Leo now in Korea.

week-end conferences broke up

with C.I.O. United Steelworkers] fiance’s brothers told police she

rejecting the new industry “sug-|was at one time frightened by the

gestion” for ending the most cost-|attentions of the bus driver who

ly walkout in the nation’s history.| frequently held up his bus in front
We have continued our discus-]of her office waiting for her.

sion this morning and are still in
disagreement,” said Union Presi-
dent Philip Murray after a two-
houf conference. He said he and
Joseph Larking, Bethlehem Steel
Corporation Vice-President repre-
senting the major steel companies,
reported by telephone to the Act-
ing Defence obilizer John R,
Steelman. “He requested us to
stand by for further word from
him,” Murray said.

Two points still apparently
blocking a settlement were the
controversial Union show clause
and the proposed revision of wage
structure of 23,000 iron ore work-
ers.—U.P.

Canada’s Defence
Programme Passes

Milestone

OTTAWA, July 15.
three-year defence



Canada’s

programme has quietly passed a| which
milestone. She has started to ship|experimental treatment of cancer
new equipment to help Atianticlin the early stages. He empha~-
Pact allies in the defence of Eu-}sizeq that the experiments had

rope.

The arms and equipment she has
sent in the past have been things
jeft over from the Second World
War.

It was announced yesterday that
the first of 300 secret new radar
sets, a type to be used by the army
in its anti-aircraft setup, is due
in Britain shortly, possibly Wed-
nesday,-—(CP),



Sirike At Briggs
Auto Plant Ends

DAGENHAM, Essex, July 15.

A_ three-week strike of 10,000
workers at the Briggs automotive
bodies ‘plant and an associate of
the Ford Motor Company, ended
here Tuesday.

The Strike Committee recom-

mended a return to work Wednes-
day after the company agreed to
Ford work-
ers several days ago settled their
own protest stiike against the lay-
ing off of four men because of the

discuss wage claims.

Briggs strike,—(CP).



METHODISTS DISLIKE
GASOLINE BOMBS

PRESTON, England, July 15

The Annual Assembly of the
British Methodist Church called
Monday for a ban on the use of
napalm bombs The
agreed to ask the
}persuade the U
stop using
omb (CP



Command in
iellied

441 day because she repulsed his ad-
eel lvances.

negotiators |six bullets fired at her by a mys-

threw up their hands and waited teri
for the White House to suggest a aes

meeting
Government to

gaso-



IN MEXICO CITY, a half-track (top) guards a midtown intersection as
pot-election riots bring death ad disorder to the Mexican capital.
‘4. ousands of troops, firing bullets and tossing tear gas, battled to halt
outbreaks staged by backers af.Gen. Miguel Henriquez Guzman, de-
feated for the Presidency by fo Ruiz Cortines. At bottom, one of

__the injured is showmbeing carried io safety. (International Soundphoto)
Deadlock, Likely At

Democratic Convention

CHICAGQ, July 15.

Governor Adlai Stevenson's vigorous insistence that he
wont be drafted put a new spark in the contest for next
week’s Presidential nomination by the Democratic’ National
Convention.

Stevenson had not convinced everyone but “favourite
sons” and other candidates whose names are going before
the Convention were eager to believe him.

They feel they have a chance so
long as the Illinois Governor balks.
They are also plugging for numer-
ous Pvresidential ballots.

Seriator Edwin C. Johnson ar-
the prize for Sen-
. Russell, Johnson.

. He
"s omen n
Ey tenth or anyway the last bal-
lot.

Ten ballots is a great many, A
Convention which goes that far
may be said to be deadlocked—and
a deadlock very likely will develoo
here if Stevenson stands firm.

Senator Robert S. Kerr thought
not more than five or six ballots
would be necessary to nominate
the Presidential candidate, Kerr
now has 43% Convention votes
toward the 616 minimum he would
need to win.—U.P,

Rebels Seek Aid
From General
Chiang Kai-Shek

RANGOON, July 15.
Official sources reported rebel
Karen tribesmen fighting Burma’s
Government have gone to For-
mosa for arms aid from Chiang
Kai Shek and the Chinese Nation-
alist army.
Sources said the Karen delega-
tion led by Saw Shwe, tribal chief,





Girl Shot At
Office Desk

NEW YORK, July ic.

Police began searching Tuesday
for a love-crazed bus driver who
may have shot to death a pretty
eighteen-year-old secretary at her
Columbia University desk Mon-















Eileen Fahey died instantly from
“thin man”. Death came

was reading a letter from
the Marine whom she planned to

Eileen’s closest friends and her





Queries On Gancer
Do Not Concer
Eva Peron

VIENNA, July 15.
Austrian gynecologist Kurt H.
Schaffer said he was “one hun-

jared per cent. sure” that queries|flew from Monghat near the
receive from Argentina on his|northern border of Siam _ to
cancer treating methods have}Taipeh, They did not say how~

ever, who flew the group,
Karen rebels recently suffered
severe reverses from Government

nothing to do with the condition
of Senora Eva Peron, ailing wife
of Argentine President Peron,

Schaffer pointed out that}troops who have re-occupied
official announcements had not ;most of the territory in the dis-
even identified the disease from|trict previously taken,

—UP.

U.S. DESTROYER GETS

FOUR DIRECT HITS

WASHINGTON, July 15.

The United States destroyer
Southerland received four hits in
a duel with Communist shore bat-
teries off the East coast of Korea
Monday, and the navy revealed
that eight men suffered minor in-
juries.

which Senora Peron is suffering
and said “requests for informa-
tion from Argentina are among
several hundred routine queries
about my work with polydyn.”
Polydyn is the pharmaceutical
Schaffer has used in



not reached a conclusive stage

and that polydyn definitely was

mot effective in advanced cases,
Schaffer again discounted re-

ports that an Argentine doctor}” The Southerland silenced five of
named Von Witzleben had|}seyen shore batteries in a twenty-
arrived in Vienna for consulta-|four minute battle in which more

tion. He said he had received a

eable from Von Witzleben from

Buenos Aires only yesterday.
—U,P.

than two hundred rounds of five-
inch shells poured into Commun-
ist gun emplacements. oP.



New Envoy Is Finance Expe

WASHINGTON, July 15.

An Indian Embassy spokesman
said Tuesday the pending change
ef Ambassadors to this country
will bring here one of India’s
leading “financial wizards” and
will give added emphasis to the
growing importance of econormuc
relations.

The appointment of Gaganvi-
hari Mehta as the new Indian
Envoy replacing Ambassador
B. R. Sen, was announced in New
Delhi, Saturday. Mehta is an ex-
pert in Indian financial and de-
velopmental problems and one of
the authors of the current Indian
Five Year Plan. Sen is a career
diplomat who was assigned here
from Rome when former Ambas-
sador, Madame, Vijaya Lakshmi
Pandit returned to: India last
year for the national election

but this has not been confirmed
pfficially.

Explaining the new emphasis
jto be given economic affairs, the
spokesman said, “Washington is
our top diplomatic post and has
always been earmarked for the
top public figure. Mr. Mehta is a
financial wizard and it is feit
there is a need here for someonic
who should be in addition to the
top public figure one widely fam-
jliar with the major economic as-
pects of relations between the
two countries.

He said it is felt the appoint-
ment of Mehta to the Washing-
ton post is ‘bound to bring close
economic ties”. He said the date
for the change of Ambassador
has not been set but Mehta is ex-
pected to arrive here in the first
half of December and Sen will

The embassy spokesman said probably leave some days before
reports have been current that Mehta’s arrival. Sen will leave
| Sen would return to New Delhi here Sunday for Chicago to ob-

to be named Foreign Secretary, serve
. Nat

the
top b the Forei I L ¢

Democratic
U.P

Part)

onvention





































day” attacks in the capital itself |
where two bomb attacks caused
considerable damage over the|
week-end.

in Sfax 190 miles south ot| Red
here unidentified attackers staged
two bomb-attacks and authori-
ties called it a miracle that no Attacks US.
Policy

one was hurt. At 9.50 a.m, G.MLT.
a homemade bomb thidden in a
bag went off at the market place
* there was no ome nearby and

e explosion caused no damage,

An h e MOSCOW, July 15.
jean Gee eke bee A Russian magazine reviewing
from the ramparts into a mili- the Mid-Eastern situation said the
tary camp filled with Tunisian United States had converted the
World War II veterans celebra-|Mediterranean into an American
ting Bastille Da with Frenct “mare nostrum” and squeezed out

cot way eh! British, French and other Medi-
civil and military officials, The terranean powers

Taking up individual countries,
it said the United States is fever-
ishly extending and equipping
Turkish bases,

nineties again today.





bomb exploded but hit no one.
—U.P.

Jet Explodes
With USS.



According to the magazine, the
United States obtained from Spain
the use of 50 airports, 40 landing
fields, 10 seaplane bases, 40 sea-

° {ports and all of Spain’s naval

FI in Ace bases, It said many bases and
y £ landing strips are under construc-
tion in Corsica, Sicily, Israel and

ALBANY, Georgia, July 15. [the Arab countries. It said the

Lieutenant Colonel Elmer Da-| United States already possesses a
rosa, air force pilot, was killed|Â¥@Stly superior fleet in the Medi-
Monday when his Thunderjet!terranean permanentiy there and
fighter plane exploded over Iwo|is accelerating. the construction of
ima_on a mass jet flight to the| five huge airbases for heavy
Far East, according to word re- bombers in West France, especial-
ceived here, ly on the Atlantic coast
_ Darosa was leading a flight of
jets from the 21st Fighter Escort
Wing at Turner Air Force Base
here to the Far East. The plane
exploded during an attempted let-
down over Iwo Jima.

Darosa, a native of Sacramento,
California had more than 6,000 fly-
ing hours to his credit during 27
years. He was one of the organ-



The magazine said, if the present
American plans for a_ sep-
arate pact with Spain and Portu-
gal materialize, British Gibraltar
will become a hopeless back num-
ber.

The article concluded: ‘The
purpose of this integrated system
is to enable the United States to

i ¥ »xert constant pressure on all
izers of the Turner Standardiza-|¢*“ is , aon oars
tion Board on flying technique, and] European | countries | especially
President of the group hose situated in the weste pi
Following World V ef the continent, and hold the

War IT he
served as Commanding Officer of
the 68th Night Fighter Squadron
and later as Commander of the
347th Fighter Group in Japan.

He spent 39 months in the Far
East before returning to this coun-
try in 1948.

In 1950 he flew to England as
Commander ‘of the 307th’ Fighter
Escort Squadron, = .

UP.

“Red Dean”
Abused Office

SAYS ARCHBISHOP

LONDON, July 15.

The Archbishop of Canterbury,
primate of the Church of Eng-
land, charged on Tuesday night
that the “Red” Dean of Canter-
bury abused his office but said no
action can be taken against him
under canon law.

Doctor Geoffrey Fisher made
the statement in the House of
Lords a few hours after Prime
Minister Winston Churchill re-
plied no to the setting up of a
special tribunal to investigate tha
“Red” Dean on the grounds that it
would exaggerate the importance
of germ warfare charges, The
Archbishop revealed in his speech
to the Lords that three years ago
in a letter he asked the “Red”
Dean to either resign or to cease
his activities,

He said “by the way in which
the Dean has conducted himself
he has really misused and com-
promised his office, He said the
Dean was free to hold what views
he liked but charged that he
allowed himself to be exploited
by “managers of a _ political
system the supports for their own
ends.

The Dean is no atheist. He is

peoples of Europe, Africa and the
Mid-East in perpetual fear of re-
prisals in the form of air attacks
and blockades. be

Floods In Assam
Leave Thousands

Hameless

CALCUTTA, India, July 15.

Thousands of persons were
homeless today as floods swept
most of Assam and West Bengal.
Communications were cut off and
air travel curtailed. Many per-
sons were rescued by rubber
dinghy and the relief organiza-
tion began dropping food from
planes,

Floods followed the week of
monsoons in the Assam hills and
Himalayan areas, Water was six
to eight feet high in places, To
add to the difficulty an earth-
quake of moderate intensity
shocked Tezpur in Assam,

: —UP.







Big Welcome For
S.S. “United States”

NEW YORK, July 15.

One of the biggest welcomes re-
ported for the superliner United
States which was scheduled to
dock after breaking the East to
West record Atlantic crossing. In
setting the westward speed record
yesterday the United States crossed
in three days 12 hours, 12 minutes
averaging 34.51 knots. It bettered
the previous record set by Britain's
Queen Mary by nine hours, 36
minutes. The liner also set the
West to East crossing record last
week,



social justice better applied in
Communist countries than

they
are here.

—UP,

U.K. Teant Leaves
For Helsinki

LONDON, July 15.
The main body of Britain's
track and field team left for Hel-
sinki by air on Tuesday bearing
the brightest hopes this country
has ever entertained for Olympic
laurels after more than a decade
of lean pickings in Olympic com-
petition.
The British team this year is
rated the strongest ever mustered
for the Games. Manager Jack
Crump said his big worry is how
athletes will sleep in Helsinki’s
21 hours daylight and three
twilight.
High jumper Alan Paterson
already in Helsinki has cabled
asking for warmer clothing. Pater-
son emigrated .to Canada some
months ago but was selected to
compete for Britain
An absentee on Tuesday's flight
was Roger Bannister, Britain's
hope in the 1,500 metres. jan-
nister is as unorthodox er.






as eV

He has no coach or trainer: and

asked to be allowed to fly over

just before the games start

Jesides Bannister, outstanding | t

British prospects include sprinter | am.
Emmanuel McDonald Bailey, | . «
marathoner Jim Peters, middle} FLAG RAISING CEREMONIES mark the formal opening of the Olympic
distance runners Chris Chataway} village in Helsinki, Finland, where the Olympic Games will bé held
and Gordon Pirie, and high jump~| ater in the month, While crowds look on, members of the Ceylon
j ers Shei . Lerwill and Dorothy! team gather in foreground as their flag goes up to join the Japanese.
ae : Pe a fle km yer Set S, s te ak “3

°
§ » {re rush hour stampede. More that
azine 650,000 relief at

oe an official member of the} i eee, pein

0 st =©. Part; d 2

Sane on the datied tie "| RAISE FLAGS AT OLYMPIC VILLAGE |
He denies no Christian doctrine .

and believes in the Christian : 7 eee ee
Principles of, peacemaking and oe ¢

Many New York firms closed
early to permit drooping employ-
ees to get home early and avoid

persons sought A
nearby beaches
Beer For The Patient
In Cleveland, Ohio, it got so hot
a 62-year-old hospital patient whe
vas supposed to be in bed recup-
erating from an abdominal oper+
ation walked across the street to
1 nearby tavern to order beer, The
startled bartender took one look
at the prospective customer dressed
in a hospital gown, and called the



police who rushed him back to
hospital—-without the beer,
Scores of persons collapsed from
the heat in Boston and the city
recorded 17 drownings in the
three-day hot spell. A record of
101 degrees was reported at the

Bedford Massachusetts airport.

Railroad cars loaded with wheat
from Nebraska ond neighbouring
Bthtes piled up at Oklahoma
Farmers said the weather was
“fine for harvesting” and most of

them reported record yields.

Thunderstorms and _ showers
caused trouble at seattered points
throughout the U.S,’ Small craft
warnings were hoisted at the
southern tip of Florida with the
30 m.p.h. wind

Blecu 1 storms with winds up
to 90 mph, lashed the northeast
corner of Maine. Trees were up-
rooted, ire knocked down
chimneys bowled over and many
windows smashed by the sudden
fury of the storm

“Hurricane Hunter”

The weather Bureau despatch-
ed a “hurricane hunter’ plane into
the Gulf of Mexieo to investigate
2 “suspicious” area of squalls and
at the same time, warn small craft
from venturing into the open gulf
during the next.24 hours.

“Hurricane Hunter” left Jack-

sonville about 7.30 a.m. to investi-
gate
ately

the squally area approxim-



cas said they found no
‘circulation’ to winds’ which
would indicate the possible form-
ation of a hurricane, but said the
wea definitely is “suspicious”,
U.P.

EASE MILITARY
CONSORILP'TION

SAYS HUGHES

LONDON, July 15,
A pacifist member of Parliament
Suggested on ‘Tuesday that Britain



ease or repeal military conscrip-
tion,

Emrys Hughes, Labour member,
said the time has come to change
the National Service Act in view
of the large number of trained
soldiers now available. British
youths now are called up for two

years training

Hughes said he will ask Prime
Minister Churchill on Thursday to
give the House of Commons the
idea when he proposes to intro-
duce legislation repealing or modi-
fying conscription.—(CP).



Ambassador To
Atfend U.N. Talks

WASHINGTON, July 15,

The Argentine Embassy an-
nounced today that Ambassador
Carlos Romulc will remain in
New York for two weeks attend-
ing the United Nations Economie
ind Social Council

He will participate in delibera-
tions on technical assistance for
underdeveloped countries, the
Embassy spokesman said.































# chu
di Rev. K. E. Towers con-—F



PAGE TWO



IS EXCELLENCY Gov
ernor and Lady Savage have
given their patronage to the
which will be held at the
Hotel on Saturday night July 26
Chis is another attempt to raise;
funds for the Blind, Deaf and
Dumb Association and should be
well supported.
Mrs. Deighton

the

Ward and

Orchestra of the Police Band wil

Marilyn were the names given
the infant twins of Mr, and Mrs,
.Hutson. Taylor of “Mara”, Christ
t James Street on Sun-

he baptism ceremony and

na Mrs. Peter

wrence Hote!
Parents.

Morgan of
were the God

Off to U.K.
RS. CECIL NOOTT, wife of
Major Noott, headmaster ot
Combermere School, left for the
U.K. on Sunday by the 55.
Colombie with her baby daughter
whom she has taken up fow her
parents to see. She expects tof
be away for about three months.
*. > *
EV. M. E. GRIFFITHS, Vicar

of St. Matthias, ang Mrs.z R. K
Griffiths were also passengers on M":, 4

Sunday for England by the S.S
Colombie. They hav gone up o!
tong leave.

Other passengers leaving fol
the U.K. by the same opportunity
were Miss Margaret Abbott of
St. Vincent who has gone up to
the Royal Surrey County Hospital
to do nursing, and Mr. and Mrs
J. M. Watson from St. Lucia who
are going up to Scotland for four
months’ holiday.

Mr. Watson is an engineer em-
ployed with the Cul ge Sac and
Roseau Sugar Factories.

Leaving Today
M* WILLIAM DUFF, Presi-
dent of Agromotor in Sao
Paulo, Brazil, will be leaving
torday by B.W.LA.
on his way back

for Trinidad
home afte!
spending a short holiday as a
guest at the Ocean View Hotel.
Mrs. Duff and their two chil-
dren Eleanor and Robert who
came over with him, will be
remaining until the end of the
month.

For Health Reasons
R. W. W. MERRITT, Chief
Sanitary Inspector of St.
Michael, left on Monday By
B.W.1L.A. for Puerto Rico intransit
to the U.S.A. where he will enter
the John Hopkins Medical Centre
in the interest of his health.
During Mr. Merritt's absence,
Mr. Ben Gibson will act as Chief
Sanitary Inspector.

Cyclists Return Home

RRIVING by B.W.LA. on
Monday from Martinique
after taking part in a Cycle
Meeting were Messrs, L. Carmi-
chael, G. Hill and D. Grant.
Other members of the team
are expected to arrive on Satur-
day.



.

been subterranean for more

than two hundred years, is to re-p Umbrage
appear as a fountain when St. Renaissance)
left hip.

Bride’s Church has been restored , =
According to old maps the Dail yh

Express building stands just about.

where its right bank was. Ity
came through Holborn, flowed
slightly east of Shoe-lane, and feil*

Marinell

;
st

4

Mrs

Ben Moore are looking after the
reservations and the ae

supply the music.
Twins Named ‘
UTSON MARK and bBery! e .

BY THE WAY...

‘HE old Fleet River, which hast







MR. AND MRS. PEROY R. J. MAW

For three Weeks

DEAN, Customs Cler!

jaupel and Co, Commis

sion Agents, Mr, J. Koan, Civil
ervant allached to the Govern-
ment Chemist Veparunent and

Wy. A. Ghany, Manager of N. M.
Ghany, Provision Merchant, all ot

Port-of-Spain, are now in Bar-
bados for three weeks’ holiday
which they are spending as Guesis
of Silver Beach Guest house,
Rockley. They were among the
passengers arriving on Sunday by

rhe S. 5. Colombie.

Also arriving on the Colombie

on Sunday from Trinidad were
Miss Lucille Brathwaite, Miss
Lucy Mowlah-Baksh and Miss
Gennilin Smith, nurses attached
do the Colonial MHospitai, San
Fernando. They are up for ten
days’ holiday which they are
6pending as guests at Silver
Beach Guest House.
A Son is Born

Ce ee to Dr.

and Mrs. G. T. M. Cummins,
(Teddy «anc Hyacinth) an the
birth of a on in London on
July 12.

Dr. Cummins is the son of Dr.
H. G. Cummins, M.C.P, and Mrs.
Cummins of “Gothmarc,” Bank
Hall Road.

University Students
R. GEORGE CRICK,
Mr. and Mrs. J.

son of
M, Crick of





“Weston House,” St. James, and
# second year student at the
University College of the West

Indies, arrived from Jamaica on
Sunday night by B.W.1.A. to spend
the summer holidays with his
relatives,

Another student returning on
Sunday night by B.W.I.A. from
the University Collegé to spend
the summer holidays with her
relatives was Miss Beryl] Williams
who was doing her first year in
medicine,

cut the cheek of a Seneschal, re-
bounded and caught Dame Edith
{the Spirit of the
a hefty swipe of the
The procession then
halted

Wisdom of the ages

Had the camel been born with
braces he would no doubt feel em

titled to wear breeches!

into the Thames where Queen? Mabini: wappuonar
Victoria-street meets New Bridge i ifterthought proved.)
street. There was. a bridge at} ~ :

Oldbourne (Holborn), and ships HY not send a Note to the

used to sail up and unload there. ¥

If anyone is interested, let him}
read “London on the Thames”, by
H. Ormsby,

and Co. .

Dress rehearsal at Pibney 2° 40use of Commons.”

T the first full-scale rehearsal’

Russians “telling them that
unarmed aircraft have been
warned not to fire on Russian

. 5 lanes?
a fascinating book? . E
published in'1924 by Sifton, Praedy QPONSORED

parliamentary
debates would commercialise
In these
words Connie Truelove appealed
to all parties to resist the scheme

of the procession which will, {or allowing big firms to sponsor

oma the Pibney St. Vitus Car-
val Mimsie, as Boadicea, got on
to the wrong cart, and found her-
self in the middle of “King Ed-
ward III granting a charter to
Pibney Monachorum’’. Edward
III pushed her into a baron, and
her spear-point ripped up _ his
doublet. In trying to disengage
the spear two other barons rolled
off the cart and tripped up two
serfs carrying a dead deer slung
upside-down on a pole. The deer,
which was a plastic one, broke
in two with a loud spink. ‘The
Master of Ceremonies, dashing to
the scene, fell over a crusader who
had fainted. and his megaphone

icbates or single speeches, “Han-
sard, * she continued, “would read
like a page of advertisements,”

Mr. Whackstraw (Con., Poop-
urst, a lifelong believer in
Snibbo): In my opinion the

Siamese question calls for dras-
tic treatment, as the man said
when he smeared His nose with
Glosso. This is no time for hesi-
tating, and if we can make up
our minds that Glonzoline is the
best remulgent, we can surely
come to an equally important de-
cision about Siam. We must stick
together, like two people who
have used Glujoy too lavishly to
smarten their clothes up. (Thinks:
Hurrah for Glujoy! Opposition



Married at Jamies Street
T James Street Methodist
Church on Saturday after-
noon at 4.30, Miss Joan Evelyn
King, only daughter of Mrs, Edith
King of Chelsea Road and the
late Mr, Hemry King, was married
to Mr. Perey R. J. Maw, son of
Mrs. E. Maw of Oxford, England,
and the late Mr, Maw, and an
employee of Barclays Bank.

The bride was given in marriage
by her uncle, Mr. R, H, King of
Penrith,” Worthing. She wore

dress of white satin embroi-
dered with pearls. Her tulle veil
was kept in place by a headdress
of orange blossoms and _= she
carried a bouquet of cream roses
and gerberas.

She was attended by Miss Greta
Bushell as bridesmaid. She wore
blue embroidered organdie with
hat to match and carried a
bouquet of red roses,

The ceremony was conducted
by Rev. K, E. Towers. The duties
of bestman were performed by
Mr. George Challenor, while
those of ushers fell to Mr. Billy
Watson, Mr. Evan Evelyn and
Mr. Peter Perry.

A reception was held at “West
Ray,” Christ Church, the rési-
dence of Mr. and Mrs. Bruce
Inniss, after which the couple
left for the Crane Hotel on their
honeymoon.

For Indefinite Stay
FTER spending a month’s
holiday in Barbados, Miss
Ailsa Ferguson of Grenada, left
on Sunday by the S.S. Colombie
for the United Kingdom for an
indefinite stay. She was a guest
of Mr. and Mrs, Ernest Newsam
of Flint Hall.

Miss Ferguson’s sister, Mrs. J.
E, Copeland, wife of Dr. Copeland
of Grenada is holidaying in Bar-
bados and will be remaining for
a_longer period with her daughfer,
Dr, Joyce Copeland,

Beachcomber

shouts of “Why not Stikaroo?” A
member; “Try Treaklo!’’)
Silence is a social menace
i a National Association of
Mental Health (sic) wants
the “morose refusal of a hus-
band or wife to talk” to be
grounds for divorce. The sugges-
tion reveals a degree of mental
sickness which is positively as-
founding. I would like to suggest
that a corps of Mental Health
Police be enrolled, so that every
household could have one billeted
on it. His duties would be to
encourage and stimulate conver-
sation between husbang and wife,
ind to report sulkiness and silence
to the Association. A _ senior
official would visit each married
couple one a week to receive re-
ports from the officia] on the spot.

Listening Hours

WEDNESDAY, JULY 16, tnoe
10O—7.15 pom . 176M, 35. 53M
ee

# p.m. The News, 4.10 p.m. The Daily
Service, 4.15 p.m. The Nations in Song,
445 p.m. Gershwin, 5.15 pom. Listeners’
Choice, 5.45 p.m. The Hymns We Sing,
6 p.m. Scottish Magazine, 6.15 p.m, Miy

Kind of Music, 6.45 p.m. Sports Round-up
and Programme Parade, 7 p.m. The News,
7.10 p.m, Home News from Britain

11-100) pom %6.58M, 31. 2M
See EEE ennnR EEE

7.15 p.m. Calling the West Indie§, 7,45

pom, All Hale, 8.15 p.m. Radio News-
reel, 8.30 p.m. Statement of Account,
#45 p.m. Interlude, 8:55 p.m. From the
Editorials, 9 p.m. The Forgotten People,
10 p.m. The News, 10.10 p.m. News
Talk, 10.15 p.m, Mid-week Taik, 10,30

p.m

From the Third Programme,

FS)



Booking Office opens on Friday 23rd. at 8.30 a.m.







for The Barbados Players Presentation

THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING EARNEST
At = EMPIRE THEATRE

July 24th & 25th 8.30 p.m. — Matinee 25th at 5.00 p.m.

Members may book their seats to-morrow from 8.30 a.m.



Sener tt







Reductions in HARDWARE

KITCHEN SCALES
COFFEE MILLS ....

MINCERS
CAKE STANDS

SANDWICH STANDS
DECORATED LEMONADE SETS
DECORATED LIQUEUR SETS

HEAVY TUMBLERS





were $10.66 now $6.00

were $4.90 and $6.08 now $3.00 and $3.50

were $3.14 now $2.00
were $4.00 now $1.20
. were $6.00 now $2.00
were $10.66 now $6.00
.. were $6.47 now $4.00
3 for 24 cents

T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS

DIAL 4220

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BARBADOS

ADVOCATE

RAHAM GREENE STARTS |
A SEARCH FOR MISS X

GPRAnan GREENE has waited until the age of

47 to write his first

play. He has been content

to win world renown as novelist and film script-
writer before tackling the theatre.

This patience is in welcome contrast to the practice
of many young writers—who, to judge by results, dash

off plays at first though

t and set about ‘carning the

eraft after their audiences have suffered.

Now .G is ) lo make his kk in W,
et 8 ny mark wit exclaahatlan ngtes Por a ;
. 4 el
Living whic the 2

autumn. is likely
controversy of recent years

RETURN JOURNEY



JQ cpvtations have been shake

at the Old Vic this year.
Now comes PAMELA ALAN to
the rescue, with her companions
frem Bristol.

What the London stars were
unable to do. these young
unknowns of the Bristo! Old Vic
did last February. Invited to
the parent theatre for a brief

visit. “as encouragemen' their
presentation of The Two | eotile-
men of Verona—and « ally

Miss Alan's acting of the boy-
disguised heroine — enchanted
critics and public.

*

The unknowns packed the
theatre for a fortnight; when
they were sent her business
dropped again. Their boxs-oifice



takings sill stand as \he season's
fecant--#8 the Old Vic manage-
ment are doing the sensible

thing.

The Bristol juniors are being
brought back te London on
Monday week in the same pro-
duction. This time they stay for
three weeks—and this time. too,
Miss Alan and Co. will do she
encouraging. The “parent
fhentre and its box-office, are in
seed of encouragement.

to pr

au!
a
whi
T
in

only
priest



Brighton Reck*
him.

New York is
left Britain
ticltiywood and

Find the girl
has been, see!

Who will be jest ? One
actor now the part in
roma fe
sereen since .
a the girl's t oat
uthor nor ofoducer a.
vet as a clue. She
4
Sar is ‘avaliable: the is.

of the L emotional
written for a young
recent times

special in new taient

I have for long been
West End dramatists to ele
leading parts for our younger
actresses. to encourage the stats
of to-morrow, We v need
some fresh faces at the top. Here
is one big epportunity.

Miss Murray’s 1952

HE year began so weil for

22 - year old Barbara
Murray

She was picked — dc you

remember? — as TV's _ most



promising young . comedienne.
3 was given her first og
e@ part--in the new N.

Hunter play. Adam's Apple. She
got married at the beginning of
rehearsals.

West End success seemed ae
round the corner, _ for >.
liunter's earlier comedy, Waters
oi the Moon. is one of London's
mash hits Not only Miss
Murray but the three top stars
—Alan Webb, Marie Lohr and
Derek Farr--fe'* confident as







° The sige ve
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Last Show TO-NITE 8.30

Packed War Drama!
TANKS ARE COMING’
Steve COCHRAN

THURS, (Only) 8.30 p.m
“ROPE”
Farley Granger James Stewart,

q “OUTY for CONQUEST”
James CAGNEY

FRI, & SAT. 8.30 p.m.
“FLYING LEATHERNECKS”
John WAYNE (Color)

OPENING FRIDAY 4.
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LADD'S A FIGHTING AGENT
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Action-~
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ALAN LADD. PRYLUS CALVERT

PAUL STEWART “JAN STERLING «Jaok Webb
Prodyced by Drtecivd dy
ROBERT FELLOWS + LEWIS ALLEN
Written by RICHARD QREEN and WARREN DUT

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By MRS. A,L. STUART'S SCHOOL OF DANCING
At “Norham”, Tweedside Road

, by HAROLD |
i; CONWAY |

they sut-@ on their preliminary
But now | A "3 apple is

invisiile. 1 hh ane ee End nt ne
see heen \
And A= May not mee he pes

cast.
Their lost chance

I Siting Foun Gletgud there tc

there tc

act in a film of Julius Ceesar.
His name means little or nothing
to cinema audiences; but he ir
our best Shakespearean actor-—
and producer.

Why, however, have our own
film studios left this project-
actor—to Holywood?

has not worked a

rt
fs, romnined for “ag, Americ
st to sugges’ :
on the grand scale.
itish producers have allowed
a t-rate chance to slip past

them.
WORLD COPYRIGHT RESERVED
Lendon Erpress Service



CROSSWORD

tT ledeiel Sat.
rd Foe







3

m 5)
0





WEDNESDAY, JULY 16, 1952

—He Thought He'd Join the Robins and Swallows -—
By MAX TRELL

“T'VE made up my mind,’
Knarf. ;
“You have, dear?” said Hanid in
a far-away-voice. She was sitting
curled up in a chair by the window, |
drawing a picture of the big oak |
tree that stood by the garden wall. |
It wasn’t an easy picture to draw |
because there were so many branch- |
es on the tree, and evel beaneh bad :
so many twigs, and each twig had | }
so many leaves. She really wasn’t
paying much attention to what her |
brother was saying. !
But suddenly Hanid heard Knarf
announcing: “So I'm leaving for |
the south as soon as the Robins and |
the Swallews go. ['m going to go,
with them. And what I'd like to

know is—”

“What did you say?” Hanid ¢X- | plenty of flowers right inside the
claimed in ‘dr. “You're 20iP@ house, The geranium keeps grow-
away somewhere?” ling. It doesn’t lose any of its leaves.

Going Away | And all the other plants in their
|little clay pets in the windows,
keep on growing, too.”

said



| Hanid was drawing a picture. —

“I’m going south,” Knarf re-
peated. “I'm going away when the
Robins and the Swajlows go.” None of Them Stay

“Oh!” | “What about the birds?” said

“They all say it’s wonderful down Knarf, “They all fly away. None of
south. Instead of being gold all win. them stay here. You don’t hear any
ter like it is here, with snow and) singing.”
we ees Sse rcgbiat all the binds Ay away. The

natpciper epee Sart oe obins and the Swallows go. Bu

“Even at nights” asked Hapid | the Sparrows stay. hey fy around,

‘ or y . . %
it does. But it shines good and warm ee o wiadake cold. And Sere
all day long, and none of the trees ja bird right in the house that sings
lose their leaves, and = | ail through the winter—the most
sakes et ndat Dadinetn ee “uae
singing. Now w “What bird?”
is, do you want te norat along, mg “The canary.”

Hanid thought for a minute or! upp» cak a
two. Finally she shook her head. Pring said Knarf, “I forgot about

| ,

“You don’t!” said Knarf. “If you Pega ,
, y ) go south,” said Hanid,
“No. I'd rather stay here. “you can’t have snow for sleigh-













“Why?” ; ' rides. You can’t have ice for ige-
“Because,” replied Hanid slowly, skating. You can’t have a Snow-

“I don’t think you have to go south, | man, And [ don’t think you ean have
or anyplace else, to be warm in the | any Christmas Trees, not the regu-
wintertime, The house is warm jar kind, with snow and frost on
when the big fire burns. And it’s them. So I’m staying right here
warm when you wear a coat, and| where I can have the south inside
mittens, and big heavy shoes.” the house, and the north (and the

Hear “In The Mood, Chatanooga, Choo, Choo

Acwose “But there are no flowers in the| winter) outside the house. Now
1 pele in land. atte. ~ garden in the wintertime, and all|don’t you think you’d better stay
3 Et’ teateed on ey. 48) the trees lose their leaves.” here, too?” And Knarf sighed and
10. ot a * “Yes,” said Hanid,
i? oak” s ores tae ~ S66 eaiaeindnal 00096
4, Solid mass. (4
RS Sere ogee
Ig’ Retap the guy’ ‘a re (3)
38° Taken rope mo TO-DAY & TOMORROW 4.45 & 8.30 P.M,
21, Six this ve.
ai Propet "ay sola: MESTER 880 BURT LANCASTER
1. Bhs part to tether is weed of it
+: Ber .- acount mun. 4) SUN VALLEY SERENADE
4. eving of @ sost. a John Sonja Lynn Nicholas Glenn Miller
* heen end Gene, if
16,

1g. fe Could be quite aps. (ap

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FAIR

¥ 19, 1952 — 100—10.00 p.m.

GAMES, LUNCHES, TEAS,
DINNERS, SUPPERS Etc,

Dinners To Be Reserved
Music, Visitors’ Mannequin

Parade — FUN !!!
ste CHILDREN — 94.

HURRICANE SEASON

ANEROID

BAROMETERS

Only a limited number so select yours early and be prepared

Also

HURRICANE LANTERNS

Established

T. HER




Betty HUTTO



Fred ASTAIRE —
in







“LET'S DANCE”
and

Starring
Glenn FORDE = Lucille BALL

OPENING FRIDAY 2.30 & 8.30
“BAL TABARIN”











- MADAM O'LINDY & HER TROUPE,
OLYMPI in
, TO-DAY & TO-MORROW 4.30 & 8.15
pene Corey — Macdonald Carey _ CORES |: OROER OF 208)
in
“DHE GREAT MISSOURI RATD" ROYAL
j and TODAY 430 & 8.30 TOMORROW,

“OOETATN APOE U.8.A.”
ith

Allan LADD — Wanda HENDRIX
OPENING FRIDAY 4.30 & 8.15

Charles Laughton Boris Karlo’
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and

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Starring










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with
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Gene AUTRY — Sheila RYAN
TO-NIGHT AT 8.30



















4.30 (enly)

Rod CAMPRON
in

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and
‘THE HUNTED”

ft

Madam bac dgnar & Her Troupe

ere. (
v toa to the Iacket’ setae.

TODAY 430 TOMORROW & FRIDAY



TOMORROW NIGHT AT 330 6 {f

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GOLDEN STALLION |] Wark "Sorry IIMy FOOLISH
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GUNMASTER __ Robert MITCHUM_ || THE BIG STEAL
meek Lane __| "TANKS ‘ate COMING?

Steve COCHRAN &

Opening FRIDAY “PRETTY BABY"




“ See Alan LADD th





AT
PARADISE BEACH CLUB

ON
OCTOBER 4th 1952.

NOTE THIS DATE.














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Indian Cricket 1950—1951

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WEDNESDAY, JULY 16, 1952

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Cuba To Sell Sugar For Sterling ?-

“To, Help Britain
Deration Sugar”

LONDON.
Britain is arranging to buy 500,000 tons of sugar trom
Cuba for sterling instead of dollars, according to reports in
the sugar trade in London.
Sterling currency paid to Cuba for this sugar would be
used to buy British-manufactured goods which Cuba needs
—particularly cars and buildi materials+and would also

save some of the dollars Britain

sugar, say these reports.

While Government spokemen
will not confirm these reports,
there are many grounds for be-
lieving that they are true. Cuba
is anxious to secure a market for
this year’s record 8,000,000-ton
sugar crop, much of which is sur-
plus to existing requirements,
while Britain is equally anxious to
secure sufficient supplies of sugar
to enable it to come off the ration.

British housewives and man-
ufacturers of foodstuffs who use
sugar have been pressing for
many months for sugar to be de-
rationed. Additional indirect pres-
sure is now being made on the
Government as a result of this
summer’s heavy fruit crop, much
of which may be wasted if in-
sufficient sugar is available for
canning or bottling it.

There is no indication, how-
ever, whether the 500,000 tons
of Cuban sugar mentioned in
these reports would be addi-
tional to the 500,000 tons of
Cuban sugar Britain is com-
mitted to buy this year under
the Anglo-Cuban Trade
Agreement signed in London
last August,

Although it was tacitly accepted
that Britain would pay for its
Cuban sugar in dollars, this was

t specifically laid down in the
1951 agreement,

The arrangement now being
discussed, therefore, could be a
modification of the agreement to
emable Britain to pay for this
yéar’s consignment of Cuban sugar
in sterling instead of in dollars.

Such an arrangement need not
be detrimental to the Cuban
economy and would certainly be
b@neficial to Britain, Instead of
spending dollars in Cuba with no

srtainty that Cuba would use
them to buy British goods, by
paying for the sugar in sterling

itain could ensure that all this
ec cy received by Cuba would

e to Britain in payments for
manufactured goods..

Commonwealth sugar producers
would not suffer, since the British
Government has given a formal
undertaking to find a market for
the entire exportable surplus of

rome eae sugar to the end
' 1953,

'

AIT SIO ma

Additional supplies of sugar in
Britain would not only enable
sugar and sweets to be taken off
the ration, as Government spokes-
men have said they would like to
do, but would also enable manu-
facturers of chocolate and other

fectionery to expand their
production to meet the big export
demand for their alan Tee

“Operation

Skywatch”’

Starts In U.S.

WASHINGTON, July 14
Air Defence officials began
gathering reports Monday night
from 150,000 volunteer aircraft
spotters to see how effectively the
nation is being guarded against
enemy air attack.
Civilian skywatchers began
— the clock operations Mon-
morning at 6,000 observation
posts in 27 states. Reports on the
first day’s activities are being



- assembled at Air Defence Com-

4

- base,
_ said
_ Wednesday b

’ mand Headquarters at Ent air

colons: oa here

it wow be Tuesday or

a they will
able to evaiuate the success
“Operation Skywatch” in its ini-
tial stages,

_ The 24-hour watch began de-
spite the fact that the Civilian
Ground Observers Corps was
badly understaffed. Most spotters

agreed to work overtime to keep

the programme going until more
volunteers were obtained.
Defence »lanners attach great
importenes to ‘ground observers
because they can .cover areas
where natural obstacles such as

now has to spénd on her

A Visit To The
“Advocate”

On Monday, 7th July, 1952, the
boys of the A and part of the B
classés. of the senior school of
the St. Leonard’s Boys’ ‘were
taken to the ‘Barbados Advocate
by Mr. Belle, their teacher,
whose main object in_ taking
them there, was to enable them
to observe the variety of ways
in which the mechanical princi-
ple of which and lever can be
employed. Meanwhile I learnt
some facts about the art of print-



Printing from movable wooden
types was invented by Lawrence
Coster of Haarlem, Holland, in
1438, and from movable cut metal
't by John Guttenburg of
Montz, in South Germany, in
1444, Printing from metal types
cast in moulds was invented by
Peter Schoeffer@n 1452; but pro-
duced no work until 1459.

On entering the Advocate we
were taken to the Cossar Press;
the largest machine in the Advo~
cate, where we saw the “Evening
Advocate” being printed. Most
or all of the machines are worked
by electricity; this was one which
was worked by electricity, and it
was caged in. While we were
moving away from this machine
a new roll of paper was being
put on. When it was turned on
again, a green light flashed from
a box just in front of the ma-
chine. This machine contains
wheels in abundance; also levers
in abundance. We were taken
through the Advocate by one of
the workmen, who explained to
us the things we saw. He gave
Mr, Bélle a copy of their “Eve-
ning Advocate’. Mr. Belle said
he did not know which one ‘of
the boys to give it to, that it
would be better if he kept it him-
self. We were taken to the de-

artment where the types were
eing cut for the machines. The
Cossar Press prints, cuts and
folds the papers. We were then
taken through the lino-type de-
partment. This department has
machines with a key-board like
a t writer, and a light over the
key-=! rd. We went to another
department, where we saw ma-
chines marked “Meteor,” which
pick up the paper, print on them

and send them out. A boy, Em~
merson, was printing “Mount
Gay” labels with a machine

worked by the foot; many more
of this type were seen in this
establishment, printing red ‘and
printing black. We were told
that every colour imaginable is
used in many types of work done
in this department.

We also saw an elevator or
something most like one between
the top and bottom floors carry-
ing up the equipment for print-
ing. We were being taken up-
stairs when we met Mr. Brome,
Assistant Editor of the Advocata
iwho said to the boys, ‘““‘Whoever
‘writes the best essay on what he
sees will have it published in the
Advocate Newspaper.”

We went upstairs and saw the
leaden types being arranged for
the machines. A boy was errang-
ing types for an advertisement
for the film “Viva Zapata” to be
shown at the Globe Theatre. Be-
side him was another boy wear-
ing glasses, also arranging types.
He had a voice like thunder.
While upstairs taking our last
jook, we saw a boy studying hard
Sorting out more types.

We were mow ready to go
home. Mr. Belle gavé some of
the workmen his heartiest thanks
for carrying us_ through the
building. Mr, Belle _ jokingly
asked if any boy or part of him
was left in any of the machines.
No one was left, but I was the
only person tha g had

ed to. smeared

a y

With apots of grease. I am very
sorry that I cannot mention some
ee names, because I do not
aie many people in the Advo-

T hope that I shall some day

mountains, block the detection of in the near future be working

low flvinge aireraM by radar.

Eventually, the
which covers both coasts - 74d the
North Central tates will be _ex-
tended to nine other ctates ive
hymred thousand volunteers .are
néeded.—wW.P.

India Will Not Get
Russian Grain

_ NEW DELHI, July 14.

Russia has not offered India any
rice or wheat this year according
to,the government of India. China
offered 100,000 tons of rice which
were gratefully accepted but no
wheat was offered by China,

The Governmest of India was
prepared to accept any further ex-
port of rice tfom China. Atcord-
ing to an offieial statement, very
large stocks of Wheat exist afd the
question of further imports of this
grain during the year dot nor





Air losses

TOKYO, July 12
Far fas!
the total airplane des

for the two-year-old
war. An Airforce summary




I nm
said

U.N. lost 719 planes compared to

524 for thé Reds.

However thé Airfotce said
of the Allied plane losse
due to ground fire
air combat.—U.P

rather tha

Airforce announced ,;
struction »

548 1

in this place, when the machines
prerramme Will be improved to make them

noiseless.
ORMOND A. ASHBY.
St. Leonard’s Boys’ 8c
10th July, 1952, i oe

Two U.S. Soldiers
Attacked In Tokyo

TOKYO, J 14,
A week-end of southoned vio-
lence, including attacks on two
U.S, soldiers of Japanese descent,
alerted Japanese police to new





Communist outbreaks on the 30th
anniversary of the Japanese Com-
munist party.

Two Americans Were beaten up
on-a street car last night by hood-
lums believed to be Koreans, They
were hospitalized but their in-
jurles were not serious.

Meanwhile, police chiefs from
the entire Tokyo area conferred
over the week-end to lay plans to
combat any violene@® on the Com-
munist anniversary tomorrow.
Some 2,000 police were mobilized
y at Musashino City, 10
ide of Tokvo.
the only activity was
speeches and Com-









rf@unist Songs delivered by student
roups. A fire bomb thrown into
the prosecutor’s. office at Shiba
City caused some damage to furn-
ishings.
fourte Koreans were ‘arrested
the U.S ilitar rserial
K f t i
ns war a?
—U.P

HOP TO HAWAN TESTS AIR REFUELING _ |

a. of 20 F-84 Thunderjet fighter bombers landed at
Tlickem Air Force Base, Honolulu, Hawaii, completing the long-

est non-stop air-refueling jet flight

Travis Ait Force Base, California. They made the over-water hop in
five hours and twenty-seven minutes, averaging 438 miles an hour The
rest of the 31st Fighter-Escort Wing will “island hop” the rer
part of the Pacific to Japan. At top, an F-84 is refueled from «4 |:
bomber. Center, Col. David C. Schilling (right), commande:

Wing; points out the course of the {

William D. Dunham. At bottom, sec
jets before take-off from Travis Air Force Base.



Self-Government Or
Capital Development?

Growth of self-government in undeveloped territories,

however desirable it may be
large obstacles in the way
according to The Economist,
cal-economic journal,

“The security is greater and the obstacles are therefore

less in the Commonwealth i

with the rapid extension of self-government in the Colonies,
the security is no longer an

used to be.”

In an article considering the
sources of capital that could be
tapped for Commonwealth devel-
opment, “The Economist” does
not mention any particular terri-
tory. But it makes several points
which are very pertinent to the
West Indies,

It estimates capital require-
ments for development of the
entire Commonwealth (excluding
the United Kingdom itself) at
£500,000,000 a year, maybe much
more, and adds: “No governmen-
tal corporations, British, inter-
Commonwealth or international,
are going to find as much as that.”

Most of the capital needed for
Commonwealth development has
come in the past from the United
Kingdom, it continues, but it
doubts whether this can continue,
Britain has little savings out of
which such capital can be made
available, its balance of payments
position is not as satisfactory as
would be needed to clear the
way for investment on this scale,
and the current rearmament pro-
gramme precludes Britain from
supplying as much capital equip-
ment as would be needed.

“These facts make it impera-
tive to examine the ssibilities
of obtaining non-Bri capital
for the development of the Com-
monwealth,” the article con-
tinues, making it clear that by
“non-British” it means y
American. The United States can
fulfil all the conditions necessary
to enable it to make large over-
sea Investments.

“Hitherto, however,” the arti-
cle goes on, “there has been an
almost complete lack of enthu-
stam in the United States for
in ng in the sterling area.
The private American investor is
very loth to place his money any-
where outside North America —
except for the direct investments
of the oil companies, where the
impelling force igs more their own
thirst for oil than the desire to
assist in the development of
neglected territories.

“Moreover, even if Americans
were prepared to pour billions of
dollars into the Commonwealth,
would they be entirely welcome?
All unworthy jealousy apart, a
Commonwealth whose develop-
ment was financed predominantly
from America would not long
remain a _ British Common-
wealth.”

It would be unwise, therefo °.
the article says, to count on no -
British capital for more than a
fraction of what is needed. Ts
United Kingdom may not in te

future be the sole supplier of
capital for the Commonweal ':
but it will have to go on doi ¢

at least half the job.

“Tf he Commonwealth a 4
the sterling area are to contin
there will have to be develo:-
ment,” the article concludes f
there is to be development, t
Unité Kingdc ilt have

pit t

yn 250,000,000

yea

T.B. Greatest Scourge |
Of Colonial Empire |

LONDON. i

“Tuberculosis is still a scourge in many parts of the |

Colonial Empire today and presents us with one of the)

gravest problems”, Mr. Oliver Lyttelton, Secretary of State |

for the Colonies, told delegates at the Commonwealth and

ee —— and Tuberculosis Conference in London on!
uly 10th,





“Since the spread of
through the discovery of
now heads the list of killer «
ton.

‘The stamping out of tubercu-
losis has Often been regarded as
& purely medical concern. I want
to state again that success in the
‘ight against tuberculosis depends
Lom aceon by all members in «
& a nity,” he said.

other subjects, and above all the
spread of knowledge is necessary
fos the incidence of this terri-

e .

“T can tell you that there are
signs that in the Colonial Empire
people are beginning to be more
aware of the dangers and are
willing to help more whole-
heartedly in the measure
intended to overcome it.
have, however, a long way to go.

“T would like to tell you of an
example of what is being accom-
plished in certain parts of the
world, A campaign against tuber-
culosis was launched last year in
Jamaica by the World Health
Organisation, the United Nations
International Children’s Emer-
gency Fund and the Jamaican
Government, with the aid of
some funds from the Colonial
Development and Welfare Organ-
isation.

“The aim is to immunise all
Jamaican children and young
people agai tuberculosis within
a period two years, This is an
ambitiotgs attempt; when you
remember that thére are 700,000
people involved. A __ similar
scheme has been started in
Trinidad this year,

In conclusion Mr. Lyttelton
said that he was sure the con-
ference, which had brought
together the medical on
from all over the world, would
bring far reaching benefits to the
people of the Commonwealth and
to humanity.

Among the nine Colotilal medi-
cal officers was Dr. Harold
Pacheco Fernandes, the tubercu-
losis officer for British Guiana
who told the conference that
future accomplishment in British
Guiana will depend on _ the
finances of the colony,

However, he that
future improvements should be
centered around the provision of
more medical personnel, thoracic
surgery and mass miniature
radiography to enable accurate
surveys of the population to be
undertaken,

ever attempted—2,400 miles from

Ste

light of the jets to his ¢
urity guards stand wat :
(In 1

LONDON.

on political grounds, put very
of their rapid development,
London’s authoritative politi-

han elsewhere,” it says. “But

ing like as absolute as it
B.U.P.

ITALIAN FAMILIES
TO SETTLE IN CHILE

ROME, July 14,
i total . 135 renee families
Ww: soon leay
A federal election board spokes- settlement in Chile, te hones
man said official returns of last office of the Provisional Inter-Gov-
week's national elections showed ernmental Committee for move-
President Elect Adolfo Ruiz Cor- ment of ants from Europe
tines, candidate of the Government said today. A great number of
party of Revolutionary Institutions them wil, be agriculture workers,
was piling up “about 50 per cent.’ Several skilled recruits will also
of the total vote, be drafted.
—U.P.

“rc, (SEN AND AIR
TRAFFIC

sections of Mexico, were expected
In Carlisle Bay



Cortines Has 50%
Lead In Polls

MEXICO, CITY, July 14.

to be completed sometime today
and the final official results wili
be announced by the Chamber of
Deputies.

Ruiz Cortines was conceded the
Presidency on the basis of unoffi-
cial returns following last Sun-
day’s balloting. Earlier unofficial
returns had placed Ruiz Cortines
ahead with 7 cent, of the ap-
proximate 5,000,000 votes, This

malaria has greatly decreased,
new insecticides, agg ae
liseases,” continued Mr. Lytte!-

j

Conditions At
Skeete’s Bay |
Improved

ve! I lack of fresh

ail, bad sanitation or poor feed-

ing, all contribute to the spread i

of the disease. So far, therefore '
matter

In reply to questions asked by |
Mr, J. C. Mottley (C) in the/
House of Assembly concerning

difficulties encountered at the an-

chorage at Skeete’s Bay, St. Phil-

ip, the Government have stated

that they are satisfled that every-

thing that is practicable has beer |
done to improve conditions ai
the Bay.

The reply states:—

No complaints have been
ceived from boat owners in|
respect of difficulties to be}
encountered at the | anchorage |
at Skeete’s Bay since _ blast-|
ing operations removed a con-
siderable amount of the coral)
just where boats are moored, The
channel at Skeete’s Bay, does,
howver, present difficulties to,
lishermen at certain times of the |
year. As the result of a survey |
which has been made, the con-|
clusion has been drawn that il
would be necessary to cut an en-)|
tirely new channel.

|
j

re- |

This project would be very ex- |
pensive and uneconomic and the
results could not be guaranteed.
Furthermore, Owing to the con-
our of the laid, sections of the)
beach lands may be lost to the |
sea if the protecting barrier reef |
were opened wide enough to al- |
low boats through in a more di-
rect route than at present. |

In the circumstances the Gov-
erpment is satisfied that every-
thing that is practicable has been '
done to improve canditions at |
Skeete’s Bay, |

BULOVA
WATCHES ||

Only a few in stock as |]
the quota is limited. |
BUT YOUR BEST BET ||}
Is TO GET ONE |
They are real magic }}|
when it comes to |
quality.
17 Jewels Guaranteed

Y. De LIMA

& €O., LTD.

|

20 Broad St. and |
Marine Gardens
|

i

|



\





‘



JUST OPENED!

PAGE THREE

Build up their
future health



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EVERY DA»

ies the vitomins in Marmite that help children to grow up

strong and sturty. Health-Building Marmice is a food

everyone needs every day to maintain fiticss and strengthen fz od

je body's resistahce to diseases. Boch young and ral
aid love Marmite’s rich, appetising taste—so

delicious in soupg, meat dishes, savouijes— 4
and in Sondwichés too! Cooks also ‘ike
Mannicé because ajar lasts such alongtim a. A Fa

MARMITE ||
‘HE VITAMIN B FOOD ih
FOR FAMILY FITNESS



ae ee a eee eRe RNR am a mm es eee mm

ee

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, development

tremendous geropataae appeared
cut by 20 to 25 per cent. by three
Opposition candidates,

Of the three rivals, General
Miguel Henriquez Guzman, candi-
date of the Leftist Federation, of
the People’s Party and 0
called the “strong man” of the
Mexican leftwing element, was
making the strongest showing and

in some areas was reported to be
running only slightly behind
Ruiz Cortines.—U.P,

Abducted Fr. Monk
Freed By Syrians

TEL AVIV, July 14.
An Israeli Army spokesman
said on Monday that Syrian sol-
diers had abducted a French monk
across the Sea of Galilee and held
him in Syria for two days.

The kesman said the monk
Father Pierre Guichou was am-
bushed by two armed Syrian sol-
diers last Friday as he walked in
Tsraeli territory near the Jordan
River and the Sea of Galilee.

The Israeli said the monk was
released yesterday after interyven-

tion by an Israeli’s member of the mr

U.N. sponsored Israeli-Syrian mix-
ed armistice commission —CP).

_ Gollymore, Mr.

“To do that, the British people
will have to save more than they
do at present—which is the same
thing as saying that they will
have to reduce the level of their
consumption relatively to their
output. And they will have to
rake sure that they have a large

, surplus on their balance of pay-

ments,

This
It means that Commonwealth
presemts no escape
harsh compulsions of

from the

the British economic problem. On “
» the contrary,

success at home in
tving that problem is a _ pre-
isite of (

B.U.P

is a sobering conclusion. 7?

mmonwealth 7*






YOULL BE

DELIGHTED
With THEM

Seh. Timothy

Emeline, Sch. Van
Sluytman, Sch, Sunshine R., Sch. Frances
Ww, ith, Lady Joan, S.S. Bruno, M.V

R Sch. Lucille ‘Smith,
Mary M. Lewis,
h Seh, Zita Wonile, Seh
Rainbow, Sch, Enterprise, M.V. Blue
Star, Sch. Gardenia, Sch. Gloria B.,
Sch. Sunbeam





Belqueen with cargo from 8st.

DEPARTURES
M.V. Monieka for Dotninica

SEAWELL

ARRIVALS ON MONDAY By B.W.LA,
From Martinique—N. Howard, David
Grant, Lyle Carmichael, Géorge Hill.
From Trinidad—A. Burnham, M. Burn-
ram, M fSPaarte. R. Richardson, P
ey, | larke, A, y ae
Miner, J. Miner, M tine fhe, 5
Miner, W. Thomas, B, Thomas.
From Antigua—Derek Walcott, Eugenia

ike, ny Baxter, Herbert Hail
Hall, Oliver Halle. ah
lores

Poer &i90—Do! Hurley,
ison, Dirttcina Staten, Constance
L. Staten, Moise G. Gittens, Geraldine
Wilkenson, Estelle Hurley.
eee Bas Sy BW . ON MONDAY
ro n eorge Cox.

Fer trinidad Meic, lles, A. Quesnel,
G. Degale. f Crages, D. Craggs, Col. R.
Ozanne, J. ‘Thompson, H. Croucher,
Jacqueli Jay, Sydney Simpson, Barbara
Simpson, ‘1. Bonomie, M. °

For Grenada—T. Hawkins, G. Luck,
Ivan Alio.

For Puerto Rleo--Miss Victorine Smith,
Miss Maggic Sartlett, Mr. Walter Merritt,
. Woodley Anthony, /
Hinds, Mr. Peter Creig, Mrs.
Bryan, Miss Viola Bryan, Miss.
Drvan, Miss Vivienne ‘Bryan, Mr.
dley Walters.

For Antigua—M. Reingold, V.
Arrindell, FP, Hariey, W. Griffith, W
Wright, M. Wright, G. Warner, E. Edgar.

For Martinique—D. Johnson

6.55 p.m

RATES OF EXCHANGE

SULA 15, 1952
NEW YORK
Cheques on
Bankers 7h 3/10% pr
. Sight or Demand
Drafts 7h 1/10% pr
CORES: | ghavegnaccses
Currency 69 8/10% pr
Coupons 68 1/10% pr.

Silver 20% pr. !
CANADA |

Sch.
Vincent.

Lucille
Bulese
phne
ector

Selling

Buying
72 O/10% pr.

9/10% pr
il 4/10% pr

O% pr

THE CORNER ~~ SETS
STORE ne

7 p Cheques on
Bankers 76 2/10% pr

Demand Drafts 76.05% pr
Sight Draft 75 9/10% pr
Cuble
Curre 74 7/10% pr

14% pr

20% wm






PAGE FOUR




- faa ee {sarees Poa: way ¢
Printed by the Advocate Co., Ltéd., Broad 8t., Bridgetown



~ Wednesday, July 16, 1952

NOT STORMS

IN AUGUST 1949 at a special meeting
heid in Barbados accredited representa-
tives of British, French and American ter-
ritories agreed to select Puerto Rico as a
hurricane warning centre for the Eastern
Caribbean. °

Puerto Rico transmits four types of mes-
sages to addresses throughout the Eastern
Caribbean.

© of these messages concern storms :

two are about hurricanes, Advisory
signals are sent to warn recipients of dis-
turbances which do not justify the issue
of storm warnings and especially as a
guide to ships. Storm warnings are issued
for storms which are expected to reach an
island within the next twenty four hours.
A storm is not the same as a hurricane.

A storm is a violent disturbance of the
atmosphere with thunder or strong winds
and any violent disturbance of the atmos-

phere accompanied by maximum wind
velocities of less than 55 miles per hour
comes within the category of storms. The
warning system from Puerto Rico gives
ample time for the publication of storm
warnings in Barbados by telephone and
despatch riders, in the Press and over the
government broadeasting system.

The government's notice first published
in the Sunday Advoeate of July 13, 1952,
confuses storms with hurricanes, because
Barbadians are “notified that on the
approach of storms” visible cautionary and
hurricane warnings and “all clear” will
be displayed.

This confusion of terms is most undesir-
able and the government should lose no
opportunity in distinguishing clearly be-
tween storms and hurricanes, A hurricane
is indeed a storm with violent winds but
a storm is not a hurricane. Therefore “on
the approach of storms” no “hurricane”
warnings of any kind ought to be issued.

The government has ample time to pub-
lish in the Press and over the government
broadcasting system and to inform local
government officials by telephone and
despatch rider of any advisory storm
notices or storm warnings it may receive
from Puerto Rico. ,

With hurricanes quite another procedure
is necessary, because hurricanes are storms
with violent winds in excess of 54 miles
per hour.

Puerto Rico transmits “preliminary hur-
ricane alerts” whenever the winds of a
hurricane may cause danger to an island,
but when indications are insufficient to
justify a definite hurricane warning.

It is impossible to tell from the notice
published in Sunday’s Advocate whether
“cautionary warning” refers to the “pre-
liminary hurricane alert” or. whether it
refers to the “approach of storms.” |

Such confusion of terminology will not
make the public feel confident that they
will be receiving precise and accurate in-
formation when bad weather is sus ected.

‘the typeecot messages transmitted from,
Puerto Rico are admirably clear and leave
no doubt as to their meaning. rs

Why then should the Government of
Barbados seek to adopt a procedure of its
own so markedly different from the lucid
Puerto Rican procedure that there is no
distinction made between storms, and hur-
ricanes ? .

Why does it not publish advisory storm
signals and storm warnings as soon as oar
are received by telephone, radio, despate
rider and in the Press ?

Why have visual storm warnings? They
are not necessary and will breed confu-
sion between storm warnings and hurri-
cane warnings should Barbados be doomed
to experience a hurricane.

Telephone subscribers are also wonder-
ing why the “preliminary hurricane alert,”
which is presumably what the government
means by the confusing description of
“cautionary warning” should not be trans-
mitted to them by telephone. The co-op-
eration of the Barbados Telephone Com-
pany could easily be obtained in restricting
telephone calls to “priority hurricane alert”
and telephone subscribers could them-
selves repeat “priority hurricane alert”
signals to other subscribers.

The telephone is the best and quickest
means of passing preliminary hurricane
alert signals and visual signals ought to be
considered as complementary to messages
passed by telephone and despatch rider.
Tf audible signals are thought to be neces-
sary for “preliminary hurricane alert”
there definitely ought not to be any simil-
arity between the audible “preliminary
hurricane alert” signals and the “hurri-
cane warning” audible signals.

In the notice published first on Sunday,
July 18, 1952, plantation and church bel
ate in two “warnings” to be rung rapidly
for a quarter of an hour the only differ-
ence being that for the “cautionary warn-
ing” they will be rung “at frequent inter-
vals” while during the hurricane warning
they will be rung “continuously”. Could
any warning signals have been more
devised to increase public confusion and
to intensify doubt?

The “All Clear’ signal seems to have
been planned merely for use should the
hurrieane fail to arrive, despite the warn-
ings. Otherwise what flags or lights would
be left for hauling down and from where,
after a hurricane had finished its mad
cavorting destruction ?

As for the reports to be made over Bar-
bados Rediffusion Ltd:. or from the Bar-
bados Regiment transmitter at the Garri-
son, how can anyone foretell that both of
these transmitting agencies will not be

wy! ed?



hat happens after a hurricane depends
on what happened during a hurricane,

————_——_

4

es

BARBADOS

ea new are eres eT FR AR Spe R ER ER ee et) ee



ADVOCATE

There Is A Frankmess
About Her Eyes...

YOU may recall (if memory
lasts that long that last month
I wrote of Violet Markham, who
was the first to be made a Com-
panion of Honour,

I quoted the lines which ap-
pear on the medal, but she has
been good enough to send me the
full verse. It is taken from a
tribute to Addison by Pope: —
“Statesman yet friend to truth!

soul sincere, aro
faithful and in honour

clear

Who broke no promise, served
no private end,

Who gained no title and who
lost no friend.”

I am grateful to Miss Mark-
ham, though somewhat disturbed
by the e “Statesman yet
friend to truth!” Why not “And
friend to truth?”

Please don’t tell me.

And So Young

NOW it is my pleasure to in-
troduce to this column another
remarkable woman, although her
fame was won on a different
field.

Miss Kathleen Winsor, who
lunched with my parliamentary
colleague John Rodgers and my-
self at Westminster, wrote an
historical novel called “Forever
Amber.” And so intense was the
interest of the public oe in
pursuit of enlightenment, they
have purchased to date just
under two million copies.

Miss Winsor is absurdly young
for a women who has written a
450,000-word novel, and there is
a frankness about her eyes that
makes a man of the world choose
his words carefully lest he de~
spoil the illusions of maidenhood.

Even her eyebrows, although
a work of art, owe something to
nature. M

In

* *

THIS beautiful creature, with
the air of just having left Vassar,
was divorced by her first hus-
band because she constantly re-
ferred to herself by her maiden
name after the Amber success.

She, in turn, divorced her sec-
ond husband, who was a band
leader. With the historical back-
ground of her novel to assist her
she said that he was worse than
any of the Restoration charac-
ters in her book.

Then she married the lawyer
who acted for her and lived
happily ever afterwards.





News

LONDON, July.

Queen Elizabeth II and her
family have had their salaries
fixed by Parliament. She will re-
ceive £475,000 a year, Prince
Philip will ‘have £40,000, and
(Princess Margaret will have
£6,000 until she marries — then
more.

To foreigners not aware of
British traditions, this salary-
fixing, into which quite a bit of
political argumentation enters,
seems very strange and undig-
nified. a, it has a two hundred.
year history and has e
part of the system that lta the
British Crown high above politics
for the duration of every reign.
A deal was made under which
the Crown’s lands and proper-
ties were handed over to the
state—-they are administered by
the Minister of Works—and in
exchange the Royal family is
pleased to accept stipends from
the Exchequer. This means that
there is no envy or jealousy of
an untaxed Crown estate grow-
ing rich in the midst of a ‘highly
taxed world. For two hundred
years the Crown Lands have
not.carried death duties — like
other peoples’s estates—and so
they have grown in wealth until
their revenues are at least
double the total the ‘state dis-
burses as “Civil List” to sup-
port the daily, pe i and cere-
monial expenses of the Roval
Households,

The Royal Family costs th¢
country very little, If the total
of the “Civil List” is divided
only ‘between the people of En-
gland; Scotland and Northern
Treland it does not amount to
more than sixpence each year
from each of us. If all Her
’s subjects throughout
ared the cost of the
court it will scarcely cost them
more than a penny apiece, each

ear,

Clement Attlee, the former
Premier, put some _ Socialist
objections not exactly to the
cost of the Court, but to the
way its ceremonial is run, I
doubt whether the Labour Party
makes itself popular by taking
a line that seems to be critical
of the Queen. But, in fairness to
Clement Attlee, it should be
said that what he was carping
at was the round of socially
‘exclusive Garden Parties and
Levees rather than at the pano-
ply and pomp and majesty.

But the Socialist critics were
voted down a the routine at
Buckingham Palace will go on

19°

By Beverley Baxter

Miss Winsor is alert, intelli-
gent and good humoured, but I
just cannot see her with a pen
in her hand and a rising moun-
tain of manuscript.

All women authors look fike

women authors except Enid
Bagnold and, now, Kathleen
Winsor.

Like Mr. Baldwin's secret,
when he sealed his lips, Miss
Winsor will probably remain a
mystery for ever.

Believes In Us

ANOTHER visitor to London
is the Vancouver banker A, E.
(Johnny) Jukes, who is so pro-
British that no one would be
surprised if he wore a Union
Jack for a waistcoat.

He actually believes that great
days lie ahead of Britain if she
will concentrate on her oppor-
tunities and stop moaning about
her difficulties.

In the first war Jukes and two
fellow Canadian subalterns, on
leave from the trenches, went to
a wartime Derby at Newmarket.
Unfortunately by the end of the
second race they had run out of
money.

hen they saw a remarkable
looking bookie, dressed with
magnificent elegance and bear-
ing the sign ‘“‘Bob Sievier.” They
bore down on him and explained
their dilemma. Would he cash a
cheque for £100 and would he
tell them the winner of the
Derby?

“Certainly,” said the old sports
man, “and I advise you tg back
Mr. E. (later Sir EdwardS Hul-
ton’s horse, Fifinella.”
upon one of the subalterns
named Stewart wrote out the
cheque, and was given 20 fivers.

Mr, Hulton’s horse won and the
Three Musketeers sought out
their benefactor, paid him back
the money, and then asked for
the return of the cheque.

“Here it is,” said Sievier, “I
guess it wasn’t worth much.”
And for once threé Canadians
blushed.

A week later Stewart was
killed in a raid on the enemy
trenches.

Snob At Heart

WHY write a book when you
can make one? This thought oc-



Where- .



curred to me as I read of Ascot
victories by 100—6 and 20—1
outsiders with the fancied horses
nowhere.

There is, however, an explana-
tion, The horse is a highly im-
aginative. animal, an attribute
which makes him shy at a sha-
dow when any donkey would
know better.

Therefore, when a horse finds
himself racing at an unimport-
ant meeting, with just an ordin-
ary crowd and for a prize not
worth bothering about, he can-
not give of his best.

ALSO long contact with the
best ‘families has made the horse
a snob. Consequently, when he
sees the regiments of grey top-
pers at Ascot and has a look at
the concentrated virtue of the
Royal Enclosure, he is inspired
to excel himself. Literally, he
runs as he never ran before,

As the bookmaker said in the
Casino at Monte Carlo: “WOT?
Me play roulette with 35 run-
aers and all trying?”

Dawn Harmony
THE tide low as dawn
broke over mes... not
a boat-or barge stirred on the
' a lounge off the

Terrace came fine tenor voice
of “Jimmy” Glanville singing
“Drink to me

gnty with thine
eyes” to the actompaniment of
four or five other Socialists har-
monising for once in perfect
unity. ...

Two horsemen rode slowly
across the bridge to the East.
... “They are on their way to
the brewery,” said one of our
chaps....

Someone remarked, “You can
take a horse to the brewery but
you cannot...”

Quite rightly he went no fur-
ther, considering how close was
the river... . Silence. ... The
mystery of a day’s birth ...a
quarter of a mile up the river a
solitary beachcomber was search-
ing a jutting piece of the
shore. ...

“Wagner is all right,” said
Bob Boothby, “but he’s too
jong.” «..

Upstairs Rab Butler was driv-
ing through ine last stages of
the Finance Bill. ... 4

“I assure you,” said Boothby,
“Wagner is much too long.”



From Britain

By David Temple Roberts

as before. We can only hope,
with Parliament, that the Queen
will not find the immense round
of. social and official engage-
ments an unbearable burden.
Queen Elizabeth 1

You may have heard in Scot-
land they would like to call the
new Queen just “Queen Eliza-
beth” and drop the “II” frqm
the title. This is because Good
Queen Bess was not Queen of
Scotland. So they feel our
wresent Queen Elizabeth is their
first Queen Elizabeth, (Inci-
dentally she is descended from
Mary, Queen of Scots, who was
the cousin of Good Queen Bess).

This week a leading news-
paper North of the Border,
(which has lately shown sym-
pathy for Scottish Nationalism)
committed a strange error of
wishful thinking, A silver cup
was presented in Edinburgh to
Her Majesty. The newspaper
commented eagerly that the peo-
ple of Scotland would appre-
ciate the kind consideration of
the Queen in instructing that
the cup should be inscribed
“ELIZABETH”, merely, The fol-
lowing day the cup was pre-
sented, Afterwards, the Queen
“had it sent back to a silversmith
to have the legal and constttu-
tional “II” ‘added. The Queen’s
Press Secretary spoke to the
editor. The Great Newspaper
apologised.

There is some talk, North of
the Border, of stiff-necked En-
glishry among court officials.

Unlucky Return

Lord. Alexander’s mission to
Korea has been dogged with bad
Juek. It was not his fault that
while he was on the way home
the American Air Force bombed
controversial targets that he had
not been told about. But it was
his admitted fault that lead to
an uproar in the House of Com-
mons about his curious refer-

ence at a Canada Club dinner to’

a comment he regarded as secret
and had not told the House of
Lords earlier in the day.

The two upsets have obscured
what were to be the good results
for Anglo-American relations of
the visit of the Minister of
Defence and the brilliant Selwyn
Lioyd (Minister at the Foreign
Office), Lord Alexander brought
a favourable report of the situa-
tion in Korea—tempered with
some of a soldier’s proper doubts.
But it has been the doubts that



Our Readers Say

In Hiding
To the Editor, The Advocate,

SIR,—It was most regrettable
to see a Policeman in uniform
trying to secrete himself under
the balcony of a shop near the
corner of King Street where
several people were gathered in
order to “catch” those who did
not stop at or overrun the major
road studs at the Corner |
Westbury Road, h

It is the primary duty of the
Police to prevent crime instead
of waiting until people have
broken the law then to make
criminals of them. This is a
rather high conception of their
duty but not too high for the
local men to attain.

Hiding around corners until
people have broken the law can
be regarded as eondoning or
conniving at the breaking of the
law. ~The presence of a police-
man in the open roadway is cer-
tainly a deterrent to the most
callous lawbreaker, while hid-
ing until one has broken the law








and then ‘prosecuting him can

only bring disrespect for the

Force and enemies for its men.
CITIZEN,

have gained the publicity—be-
cause of the Gtneral’s inexperi-
ence of political office and his
maladroit speech.

The Labour Party regards the
whole episode as a_ gift in its
cam) against Winston
Churchill’s personal administra-
tion through the agency of what
are now everywhere called the
“overlords.” (Incidentally, Mr.
Attlee conveniently forgets that
his Government included an
overlord called xander; and
Emanuel Shinwell, another Min-
ister of Defence, was famous for
his public indiscretions).

Brixton to Wimbledon

It is a cockney’s regular way,
when he gains a fortune, to move
from Brixton, one suburb, to
Wimbledon, a much more genteel
suburb,

But George Dawson has
achieved it in a trail of cham-
pagne glory. He has probably
made more money faster than
any other Englishman in post-
war years. By applying the
technique of the used-car sales-
man to the masses of technically
derelict military vehicles left
over by the war Dawson man-
aged to amass a fortune that he
has lived on gorgeously, He
spends his money on wine, and
yachts and friends and the good
life by the Mediterranean Sea.

But his wife has just pro-
claimed her total boredom with
life on a yacht at Cannes, She
finds the Riviera coast is stuffy.
She and her husband are not re-
ceived in the villas of Cap
Antibes. Besides, business has
turned bad since the Korean war
put Dawson’s ‘“derelicts” right
back into the front line. The
Dawsons are coming home to a
16 room house near Wimbledon
Common,

Sedgman has just beaten
Drobny, while I have been writ-
ing this article, Good Luck to
Drobny, (who was the British
crowd’s favourite), and Good
Luck to Sedgman! At this Wim-
bledon there has been some talk
while the tournament was in
progress of the winner “turning
professional”, and Jack Kramer,
the American former champion,
was reputed to be waiting in the
stand with so much and so much
in dollars to offer.

It should be reported tihat, de-
spite Flam’s v t struggle, the
overwhelming of the Wim-
bledon-interested public (and
that includes about everyone)
aon glad to see a non-American

nal.



Traffie Etiquette

ae a theatre, dance or party,

it necessary for the owners
of cars to take home those who
are without cars?

ANS. Certainly not, unless the
owners of the cars called for
those without cars and drove
them to the party, and it was
understood return trips were
to be made. If the drivers
feel that they are being im-
posed upon, they might tact-
fully suggest a taxi or a bus.

* * eee |
What are the two most impor-

tant things a pedestrian can do
to avoid trouble and embar-
rassment?

ANS. To watch where he is go-

ing and to obey the traffic
signals.

it ® ‘@ *

Is it necessary to say “Thank

You’ to a driver of a car when
he has waited for you to walk
2

yy?
ANS. Without doubt, a person

should look across to the driver
and with a nod of the head
and a smile say: “Thank you’

After all, the driver has shown
an even greater kindness than
the person who opens the door
of a public building.

* * «* *

When two people are approach-
ing the same parking space on
a street, which one is entitled
to the space?

ANS. The one who has stopped
first and is making the attempt
to park. Never in any circum-
stance should one cut in ahead
of another who is trying to
park,

= : ok *
When a motorist drives at ex-
cessive speed through traffic,
double parks, ay drives un-
reasonably slowly, what should
be the attitude of the driver
inconvenienced?

ANS. He should drive carefully
and say absolutely nothing.
Abusive an@ unbecoming re-
marks are never to any one’s
credit, and are never justifi-
able, f the driver of

even



fault.

at



Slash Costs? Yes
Air Ring? No

From R. M. MacCOLL
WASHINGTON.
IN this tense election year Congressmen

are doing what they always tend to do in
suéh circumstances — slash budgets left,
right, and centre, so that they can face their
constituents as “economy-minded.”

President Truman, who knows the politi-
cal game inside out, realises there is not a
great deal he can do about this, and grudg-
ingly lets them have their way to some
xtent.

But he is fighting like a tiger, election
year or no election year, to stop a proposal
to cut down the funds for the air force’s

world ring of strategic bases,
* * * ca

REPORTS say that some Congressmen are
willing to halve the funds for this purpose,
but Truman, in a letter to Senator, Richard
Russell, of Georgia, calls this possibility “a
terrible disaster.” ‘

Truman has agreed to “stretch-outs”—put-
ting off the zero date for delivery time—of
several sorts of weapons and aircraft, in a
way which many men in defence and army
headquarters think is flirting with defeat.

But he feels passionately that the globe-
circling ring of big bases is, along with the
atom bomb, America’s great answer to the
Red menace, for without the bases to deliver
it effectively, the bomb itself would be a

futile threat.
* * a *

RUSSELL is the chairman of the Senate
Armed Services Committee and, ironically,
it was this committee which strongly criti-
cised Truman only last week for ordering
a “stretch-out” in completing an air force of
143 wings.

EVEN though Canada has made it abun-
dantly clear that she is willing to “go it
alone” on the seaway which will enable
ocean ships to sail from the St. Lawrence
to the Great Lakes, Congressional voices are
still raised in angry outcry against the
scheme.

Latest protest comes from Republican
Senator Irving Ives, who, representing New
York State, has his eye on New York Har-
bour’s shipping interests.

He says that he does not believe that it
will prove possible to charge high enough
tolls on the seaway to make it self-sufficient,
and “that means the taxpayer would be left
holding the bag.”

A SUDDEN windfall for the chimney
sweeps of Britain? Something called a
“tansistor” — a ‘tiny object which makes,
possible the manufacture of radio sets which
will practically never wear out — is made of
a substance called germanium, Germanium
is found in chimneys and, say leading indus-
trial firms in America, English-chimneys are |
an especially rich source of germanium be- |
cause English coal is full of the stuff.

AGAIN the charge of “cartel,” this time}
against some of America’s greatest whisky |
distillers. A Congress committee begins hear-
ings to see if the Justice Department was!

slap-dash or not in investigating America’s!
whisky trade.

PEOPLE have cried “wolf” so often about
Broadway dying that nobody seems to be-|
lieve it any more. But the authoritative
Baltimore Sun has conducted a searching in-
quiry into New York’s theatre street and its
conclusion is that Broadway really is dying.
“Unless something drastic is done, and done
quickly,” says the paper, “there is every
reason to believe that slow attrition will
continue, until those responsible for Broad-
way’s fantastic economic set-up will go
broke or disappear.”

ONCE AGAIN a major effort is afoot to
try to get all the 48 States to agree to a
divorce law which would be recognised in
any of them. Who sponsors the Bill?

Silver-haired Senator Pat MecCarran—who
represents the Reno-famous State of Nevada.

DEAD at 84, in the winter resort of Sara-
sota, Florida, is Sam: Gumpertz, who lived
and breathed show business all his long life.

Starting as a professional acrobat at the
age of nine, when he ran away from his St.
Louis home to join a circus, Sam became
actor, producer, Wild-West rider with the
old Buffalo Bill show, then turned agent,
then built a famous pleasure palace called
Dreamland on New York’s Coney Island.

Even after he retired he just couldn’t keep
away from it all, and continued to manage
the Eden Wax Museum on Coney Island
“just for sentimental reasons.”























Sugar Purchases In Dollar Areas

LONDON.

IN THE House of Commons on 3rd July
Mr. A. E. Baldwin (Conservative, Leomin-
ister) asked the Chancellor of the Exche-
;quer whether he is aware that there is a
heavy crop of fruit in prospect, much of
which will be wasted through shortage of
sugar to the canning industry; and whether
he will release dollars in order that the
crop may be processed and put into store
as a reserve against the possibility of a
crop shortage next year.

Sir Arthur Salter, Minister of State for
Economic Affairs replied :
|_ As regards the first part of the Question.
|I would refer to the answer given yesterday
|by my hon. Friend and Parliamentary Sec-
retary to the Minister of Food to my hon.
Friend the Member for Huntingdon (Mr.
Renton); as regards the second part, my
lright hon. Friend regrets that our position
}does not permit the release of dollars for
additional purchases of sugar.—B.U.P,



on







WEDNESDAY, JULY 16, 1952

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WEDNESDAY, JULY 16, 1952

Welfare Adviser
Impressed By

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

West Indian Sportsmen

Home On Holiday



Emeline
Limps Into



Sportsman’s Diary
secinsionnerentionedtinniinniemitann

esis kcthaliaine’ taibaiidis “Aiea Two of New York’s prominent West Indian sportsmen, 6 Ne 7, %
- al into the Careenage. yesterday | Mr. Rigaude Placid Prout and Mr, Mortimer Thompson, 9 ations
eve oO ment n morning. It had been lying out- both Barbadians are at present in the island on a holiday ;
@%@ side in Carlisle Bay since Morday __ visit to their relatives. For Aquatics
j afternoon when it arrived from Mr. Prout is a member ofthe original Prout family
' St. Lucia without its captain

Miss Maude T. Barrett, Social Welfare Adviser of the Hiary Clarke, reported lon at Of St. George, while Mr. Thompson, a former member of

At Helsinki

the water, He moves them over
the water’s surface instead of
through it in preparation for his
next stroke.

Americans ‘ook the lead in in-
ternational swimming competition
round 1920 and held it until 1992,
rhen the Japanese came to the
fore, beating almost all competi-
ors at the Olympic Games that
year in the.United States, The
winner of the 1,500-meter free
style, a 15-year-old Japanese
named Kitamura, was on his way
‘o the dressing room before any
ot his rivals had finished,

At London in 1948, the United

PASE FIVE

South Africans, France has Alex
Jany, an excellent freesiyler, a
the Scviet Union has the worlds
record holder in the 100-meter.
breast stroke—a youth *hamed’
Meshkov. ;
These men will be swimming
such outstanding U.S.
swimmers as Dick Cleveland and
Clark Scholes, our fastest sprint-
ers; Ford Konno, a boy of Japan-
ese-Hawaiian descent who — is
probably Furuhashi’s closest com- .
petitor; Ronald. Gora, Wayne
Moore, Kerry Donovan, Bob Nu-
gent, and Jimmy McLane—all
freestylers. In the breaststroke we

Technical Assistance Administration of the United Nations sea on the voyage here.

with headquarters in Guatemala, told the Advocate yester-
day that she had seen some extremely im

valuable developments in

which impressed her very much,

She said that in the field’ of
community organisation and in
the development of community
welfare centres, the whole region
is very far advanced and she
was particulary impressed by
the excellent leadership in the
social field.

Miss Barrett represented the
United Nations at the Confererice
on Home Economics and Educa~
tion in Nutrition in Trinidad
earlier in the month. She is now
visiting some of the colonies in
the Caribbean before returning to
her headquarters in Guatemala
She arrived here on Sunday night
from British Guiana via Trinidad
by B.W.LA. and is a guest at the
Ocean View Hotel,

Technical Assistance

She said that the purpose of her
visit was not to make an inspec-
tion or social survey of any
assessment of programmes, but to
become acquainted with officials
and discuss with them in broad,
general terms, the technical assis-
tance programme of the United
Nations in the social welfare
field and to give them any in-
formation they might require.

Referring to technical assistance
which had been given to coun-
tries and Central America, she
said that the United Nations had
helped the Government of Guate=
mala establish a small school of
social work and that had been
done by providing some techni-
cians, but at the same time, pro-
viding some _ scholarships and
fellowships so that local people
could be trained.

“The whole emphasis of the
technical assistance programme is
on training,” she said, and added:
“We feel that the greatest assis-
tance we can give is by helping
to train local people if that was
needed, rather than by sending
foreign experts in to conduct
programmes for a long continued
period.”

Advice Offered

Miss Barrett said that she felt
very strongly on the point that
it was very uNwise to attempt to
‘super-impose any sort of pro-
gramme within a _ given area.
“What g country must do is to
develop its own programmes and
its own patterns, What a foreign
expert can do is to consult and
advise and give the benefit of any
technical knowledge he or she
happens to have. What should
result is a programme that is to
be adapted to the economic, social

and cultural conditions in the
country.”
Before joining the United

Nations in September 1946, Miss
Barrett spent two years working
with U.N.R.R.A. (United Nations
Relief and Rehabilitation Admin-
istration) and prior to that she
worked in various parts of the
United States in connection with
various social welfare programmes

in Chicago, Washington and
Louisiana.

Since she was stationed in
Guatemala, she has worked in

Central America, Mexico, and
Panama, visiting countries at the
request of officials and assisting
them in any way they wished.
She emphasised that the Gov-
ernments of the particular coun-
tries decided whether or not they
wanted assistance or help from
the United Nations or from her in
any way.

Miss Barrett leaves Barbados
tonight by B.W.I.A. for Trinidad
on her way to Haiti where she
will remain for several days for
conferences. She will then visit
Puerto Rica, the Virgin Islands,
Jamaica and Cuba before re-
turning to Guatemala.

enirenntiensaantenat

“VAN SLUYTMAN”
COMES OFF DOCK

The Schooner Timothy Van
Sluytman came off dock on Mon-
day and is now expected to sail
on July 21 for British Guiana
with cargo. She is consigned to
the Sehooner Owners’ Association.

The S.S. Oranjestad is expect-
ed to arrive in Carlisle Bay this
morning from Trinidad. Her
= are S. P. Musson & Son,

td.



... the inside story of sleep-
‘ing comfort lies
in the spring.

WE



James Rice, mate of the ship
took over at sea and brought it
into Carlisle Bay. Rice was the
mate ef the ill-fated Gloria May
which foundered off the coast of
British Guiana two years ago.

The schooner left British
Guiana on July 4 under -Captain
Hilary Clarke with a
of wood for Barbodes where it
was to be put on dock. On their

rtant and
the whole Caribbean region

Teachers’ Union
Quarters Funds

; *
W way to Barbados they encoun-
ill Be hicreased tered heavy seas and _ strong
Following the initiative of Miss winds which forced them to use
E. L. Cobham, an assistant teacher, their auxiliary engines. They

the Assistant Teachers’ Union on 72" out of fuel and had to put
Saturday decided to set about in- i at St. Lucia.
creasing their funds for building Alarm
Union Quarters. The Teachers’ The Emf€line left St. Lucia on
Union are usually faced with diffi- Saturday July 12 and at about
culty in getting a suitable place 1. 00 p.m. that day there was an
to conduct their meetings and the alarm that the captain wes over-
idea for procuring a building has board. The boat was reversed
long been under consideration. and the lifeboat lowered but he
ivuuss Cobham has already re- was not found.
ceived contributions towards the George Hinkson, a ship’s car-
Building Fund, The Union plans penter who went down to British
staging dances, concerts and such Gyjana with the Emeline said
like entertainments to increase tpt jt was first intended to dock
their funds. the vessel there but there was no
room. There were many leaks
and they had to take it to the
mud flats to plug some of them.

Erdiston Fees

The Union decided to ask the
authorities concerned to change
the system of asking teachers in
training at Erdiston College to pay
$40 a month for nine months.
Teachers feel that $40 a month is
‘too much to be called upon to pay
monthly and they would prefer to
pay it by instalments of perhaps
$10 a month.



Super-Sonic
Plane Has Big
After hearing expressions of Cooling Unit
opinions it was decided that the

Committee would agree as to what MOFFETT AIR FORCE BASE,
approach should be taken. ‘ California, July 15.
i Navy and Douglas Aircraft
Salaries Company officials declined Tues-
The President of the Union day to confirm Air Force officer's
called upon members to supply the announcement that the Navy has
Secretary with information which test flown an airplane at 1,300
will be necessary for the Com- miles per hour almost double the

missioner which is expected to speed of sound at sea level.

review Government Employees’ It is known that the plane the
salaries in the near future. It is Douglas Skyrocket is refrigerated

hoped that teachers who have to prevent melting at terrific
many years in the service—a case speeds, Apparently the unin-
of a teacher with 42 years was tended public announcement







NATIONALIST CHINESE
AMBASSADOR TO SPAIN

TAIPEH, Formosa, July 15.

Chinese Nationalist leader
Chiang Kai-Shek has appointed
Dr. James Thung Chi Yu to be
Nationalist Chinese Ambassador
to Spain. An official announce-
ment said to-day.—U.P.

mentioned yesterday who are not made during an air show at
near their maximum and willsoon awards Air Force Base, super-
be resigning, will be able to get conic plane testing grounds on
accelerated increases. the edge of the Mojave Desert
will discuss anomalies in € already had flown 1,300 miles an
salary scales. Saul nae
Officials at Ames Aeronautical
< Laboratory engaged in supersonic
.
Greek T Still this naval air station oe eee
z s any knowledge of such flight. Bu
In The Running they noted that the plane carries
a refrigeration unit big enough
Greece kept its Olympic basket- to cool the cockpit and prevent,
ball hopes alive by coming from rota) structural parts and even,
behind to beat the fast but smail tires from turning molten at the
Israel team 54 to 52 in a rough nounced high « ba:
sonal fouls were called. A field
goal by Phedon Matheou, star of
the Greek team, with only 90 sec- , 7
onds to go gave the game to the Soviet Jet Plane
Hungary yesterday, ae ,
Israel lost eight of twelve pny: Violates Bor der
ers permitted on the squa iy
personal fouls and had to play the BELGRADE, July 15.
Matheou’s winning shot — with Tuesday charged that a jet fighter
only four men on the court. plane carrying Soviet markings
As a result the Greeks were violated the air space of Yugos-
able to freeze the ball from that lavia, The announcement said the
Israel led by 35 to 27 at halftime miles inside Yugoslavia on Monday
but when the second half started, and remained three minutes inside
Greece used bigger players and the frontier near the village of
there was one period of five min- Lukos before turning back toward
scoreless.—U.P. This is believed to be the first
: instance in which a plane ident1-
fied as Russian was accused of
violating Yugoslavia’s air space
ly have been reported flying over
the frontier.—U-P.
ere
Jap Wonien Will
‘ »
Fight For Freedom

At its next meeting, the Union },-¢ saturday said the Skyrocket
plane research for the Navy at
HELSINKI, July 15. to chill a good sized auditorium
game in which a total of 71 per- —_U.P.
Greeks who were defeated by
last ninety seconds—just after The Yugoslav Government on
time on and hold on to their lead plane flying at 6,000 feet flew two
utes in which Israel was held Communist Hungary.
although satellite planes frequent~
JACKSONVILLE, Florida,
July 15





A Japanese woman editor said
Tuesday that the women and the
press of Japan are willing to fight
for their newly found freedoms.

HUNGARIAN
FORTRESSES

TRE ED Miss Tsugi Shiraishi, Women’s
s NGTHEN Editor of the Nippon Times here
LONDON, July 15. to address a YWCA luncheon said
Hungarian troops are strength~ freedom of the Press and the vote
ening their fortifications on the for women made great changes in
Hungarian-Yugoslav frontier, ac- Japan. She said the men are not
cording to reports to-day in Baor- too fond of the changes. “But they
ba, official paper of the Yugoslav can’t help it. Japan is really a



Communist Party.—U.P. man’s country or has been.—U.I'.
eee. e



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the Barbados Constabulary under’ Inspector General N. D.
Harold hails from St. Andrew.

Mr. Prout who left here in 1911,
visited Barbados on the last oc-
casion in 1925. Mr. Thompson left
here in 1924 and paid a visit in
1935.

They are both very highly im-
pressed by the social and other
changes in Barbados, and com-
menting on many of the middle
class homes say “they are moré
modern than many of ours back
home in the United States.”

These two prominent sportsmen
play a big part in bringing West
Indians who go to New York to-
gether, concentrating their social
work mainly in the field of cricket,
Both are members of the Cosmo-
politan Cricket League of New
York which, with the New York
League, the Inter-State League
and the Metropolitan District As-
sociation which is comprised of
white players from Brooklyn and
Staten Island, Philadelphia, com-
pete in Saturday and Sunday one
day games.

Mr. Prout has he every office
in the Cosmopolitan League ex-
cept that of Hon.,Secretary, and
last year, held the office of Hon.
Treasurer. This year, he is on the
Board of Trustees of the League.

President of League

Mr. Thompson is President of
the same League, as well as Presi-
dent of the Surrey Field Cricket
Club, one of the eight clubs in the
League, The clubs compete for the
Daly Trophy.

Yearly, the Leagues play a Bene-
fit Game, the proceeds of which
are donated to the DANNAR RAN-
GAS Cancer Fund. This game was
scheduled for the 23rd of June
last, but due to inclement weather,
will now take place on the 17th of
next mexth,

Mr. Prout said there are 12
clubs in the New York League;
eight in the Cosmopolitan League;
four in the Inter-State League and
about six in the Metropolitan
League. Each League has one
Major Trophy and a Smaller
Trophy.

Annually there is also an All-
Jamaica-All-Barbados Match
which takes place on the first
Sunday in August, and these
games draw large crowds. Mr.
Prout said there are many Bar-
badians who feature in these
games, and among the names
which he mentioned were Errol
Millington, the former Empire
left arm medium pacer, the
Crichlow Brothers, Eric and Le-
Roy, Seymour Beckles, and
Charles Alleyne.

W.I. Team In U.S.

Mr. Prout recalled vividly the
visit of the West Indian team
which toured America’ just after
the West Indies Team returned
from England, and he is hoping
that it would be possible, if and
when the West Indies team pay
their proposed visit to Canada
next year, for them to arrange to
fly over from Canada to play a
mateh against a combined League
team.

Mr, Prout said that matches of
the sort are usually arranged with
teams from Canada, The Leagues
pay the expenses and if possible,
hand over part of the proceeds to
the Canadian teams which, be-
cause they have no_ enclosed
grounds cannot raise funds out of
gate receipts,

In addition to his sporting activ-
ities, Mr. Thompson is associated
with the United Parishes of Bar-
bados Charity Group which sends-
direct to the Cathedral, clothing,
tood, and money for the poor of
the island. These gifts come
through Canon Harvey Reid. The
money which goes to purchasing
these gifts is raised by an annual
dance,

Mr. Prout is an employee of the
United States Government at-
tached to the Post Office, where he
has worked for 31 years. Mr.
Thompson is Superintendent of
Apartment Houses at 509 West,
110 Street, New York,

They are both very happy to be
in Barbados once again, and say
they are “thoroughly enjoying”
themselves.

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Taft Wins 3 Seats



Pid xs Sos

«
HECTOR C, BLANES, of Puerto Rico,
answers questions put to him by,
a member of the Republican Cre-
dentials Committee in Chicago.
After a long and bitter debate, the
committee voted 29 to 20 to con-
firrn the seating of the three-man
pro-Taft group. (International)

‘T.B. Radar’
To Be Sold

The Motor Vessel T, B, Radar
for which an Order for sale was
made in the Colonial Court of
Admiralty by His Lordsh'p the
Chief Judge Sir Allan Collymore.
Kt., on June 19th, will be sold
at the Provost Marshal's Office,
Public Buildings at 2.00 p.m.
to-morrow:

The Vessel and its fittings will
be offered for sale at an upset
uppraised price of $385,000, The
Decree for the sale was made on
application by the owner of the
Steamer Amakwra as competsa-
tion for towing the Motor Vessel
T. B. Radar into port with a bréaic
down in her engine on the Ist
April this year.

The Motor Vessel Radar, 116
tons net, at the time of being
takin in tow, had fcr four days
been drifting in a disabled condi-
ticn off Tobago. The breakdown
in her engine was due to trouble
with the timing gear for the
governor, Without which it was
impossible to get the engine work-
ing.

When the engine gav¢ oul, the
Radar was about 140 miles off
Trinidad, and was on her way to
British Guiana. She had weighed
anehor out of Trinidad at 7.15 a.m,
on March 26, and according to re-
ports from her then skipper, her
engines were in good running
oraer,

At about 4.25 on the afternoon
of the following day, the engine





suddenly stepped, and the vessel
began to drift fast. She drifted
for four days, reaching a point

just off Tobago where she was
eventually taken into tow by the
Amakura and brought to Barbados,
the nearest port,

At the time of the breakdown,
the T. B, Radar was carrying a
consignment of general cargo for
Mcssrs, Bookers’ Limited, British
Guiana,



Copra Comes On ‘Belqueen’

The schooner Belqueen under
Captain Rual King called in this
port yesterday morning from St.
Vineent with a cargo of 620 bags
of copra, 14 bags of cocoanuts,
six bags of peanuts, and six
bunches of fresh fruit.

This Schooner is consigned to
the Schooner Owners’ Associa-
tion.

RACES
BEACH ¢
OCCASIONS

Colours, and Dots

Cotton and Art Silk,

ET— DIAL 2352









DOVSSDDOSOOHYS 4 4980 O04O970GH

By BOB KIPHUTH.

Looking back over my many
years as a student of competitive
swimming, I find it difficult to re-
call when interest in the sport was
more widespread than now. There
should be at least 69 nations com-
peting in the aquatic events at
Helsinki to be staged during the
Olympic Games. When the -con-
tests are over, it is likely that a
number of new swimming records
will have been set.

Many nations have contributed
to the prominent place swimming
occupies in the world of sports te
day. For example, the craw)
stroke came to us by way of Eng-
land and Australia, As far as we
know, an Englishman named
Trudgeon was the first to popu-
larize the double overhand stroke,

During the early part of this
century, the Australians refined
the stroke and spe. “cd _H#-up. Ob
serving the South Sea’ Islanders
they changed the leg action of the
Trudgeon stroke from a’ scissors-
like movement to a coordinated
kick in which the legs broke the
surface of the water in coordina-
tion with the swimmer's arms
The Trudgeon stroke was discard-
ed as a sprint stroke when th:
famous Hawaiian swimmer, Duke
Kahanamoku, won the 100-meters
free style for the U.S.A. in 1912
He used an accelerated six-kick-
per-stroke movement at th:
Stockholm Olympics,
later, at the 1920 Olympics in Ant-
werp, he retained his title | by
swimming the same distance in
61.4 seconds. _Kahanamoku is the
father of the popular six-beo!
erawl, and is one of the most re-
markable swimmers of all time,

The “Back Crawl”

American swimmers pioneered
the backstroke and the present
version of the breaststroke. Harry
Hebner, an American
from Chicago, swam an unknown
stroke at the 1912 Olympics in
Stockholm called the “bac!
crawl.” This was simply a re
verse of the standard crawi
stroke, with the, swimmer on hi:
back. It has been in use through-
out the world ever since,

The frog-like movement through
the water known as the breast
stroke was not popular among
speed swimmers until the intro-

duction of the “butterfly” stroke ,

at the 1936 Olympics in Berlin.

The new stroke differs from the |

old in that the user brings his
arms completely out of the water,
At the same time, he kicks his
legs in the usual breaststroke
fashion. The advantage in the
stroke is that the swimmer does
bring his arms completely out of

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States again made a good showing
in swimming. But we were suc-
cessful largely because expert
swimmers from a number of other
nations did not take part.

Watch The Japs

I look for a tremendous amount
“f competition this summer (at
Helsinki—particularly from the
Japanese I know ther well from
pest competition, I know how
they organize, the intelligent
way they swim. One_ of their
freestylers, Hironoshin Furuhashi,
will be hard to beat, Only two
wu in the world have ever beaten
him at his specialty-—the 1,500—
never rece,

have men like Bob Srawner and
Denis O’Connor, and in the back
stroke Dick Thomas, Jack Taylor,
and the veteran Olympic perform -
er, Allen Stack. All, of course,

ave to qualify for the Olymp:
team. None of them is sure of
a ‘berth until he has proved his
ability.

Our country owes much of
swimming skills to other nat!
And, though we wi!l be sttivir:
to win at Helsinki, it will i: ina
spirit of spdrismanBhip ane
friendship. ‘ 4}



In Touch With Barbados
Coastal Station

CABLE AND WIRELESS
Limited, advise that they
municate with the :
through their Rorbadea Coast Sist

8.8. Alcoa Partner, s.s. Brit
8.8. Regent Leopard, s.s. Patuetl' 4 6
Mike, s.s, Ariguani, s.s. Rangitiki,
Lady Nelson, s.8. E. W. Sinciair,
Rio Tercero, 8.8, Theodoxus, 8.6.
Breae, s.s. Canadian Crtuser, ss: Trigeno-
semus, s.s, Urania, s.s. Harperley. 5.*
Southern Counties, s.9. Dirango, 3.4, h.
8.8. Dolores, s.s. Colombic, s 5, Tommres,
s.8. Mormackite, s.s. Canadian
structor, 8.8. Tankland, 5.5. Macao, #.8.
S. Wilfrido, s.s, Alcoa Clipper, 5.8. Esso
Purfleet, s.s. Oranjestad, s,s. Thorshoy,
s.s. Aleides, s.s. Federal Voyager, #8.
Audrey, 4s, Brazil, s.s. Bruno, 8,4.
Fearless, 8.s. Ocean Monarch, 5.5, African
Enterprise, s.8, Latia, s.8. Seaboard

)

We will have strong competi-
tion from others as well. One of
swimmers at Yale, John Mar-
ssall, an Australian who is one
of the world’s best at the middle
and long distances, will be trying
to beat us, Two of Marshall's
countrymen now attending other
colleges in the U.S. arrick
Agnew and John Davies—will be
swimming with him at Helsinki.

Europe will also present some
formidable swimmers, The Eng-
lish, the French, the Yugoslavians,
‘he Hungarians, and the Russians
are all good. So, of course, are
the South Americans and the

West Indies)

noe corm.







1 LO
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PAGE SIX



matter for ruling.

~
separagely® represen fed, does not, In the case, his submission any-
ior the defendant who how would be that they were

does not call witnesses can

bound to have the same interess

only address the jury omce, name- because they were instructed by

ly, in

before the wit- the same firm of solicitors

whose

general,
nesdes for the other defendant are reputation for honour was suffi-

eXtamined. If the evidence which ciently high not

to represent

it is proposed to give on behalf diverse interests. Otherwise there

of one defendant is hostile to the
interests of the other defendant,
for the defendant

would not be sufficient etiquette.
His Lordship asked Mr. Wai-

who cott whether he was suggestin”

does not cill witnesses may be
alloWed to address the jury after
the @vidence has been ‘heard for
the other defendant.
“Where witnesses are sub
ed by two defendants with
counsel, only one ex-
tion-in-chief of these wit-
nesses will be allowed. Where.
defendants are separately repre-)
sented, counsel] for one co-de-
fendant may cross-examine the
ies called by the co-defend- ,

Osi here Poms are
6pBosed in

erest betwecy

another than to in plaintiff, per-
mission may be given to each
or set of defendanis, ic

‘and Fie their cases sep-

as to crose-

Gate other’s witnesses.”
he did not know wheth-

fe aan pee Mr. Reece,

: was epsemee su ac-
to what the emueBe ig

thet -Lordship ia ask His
Learhéd Friend, Mr. R , wheth-
er he was Wtacina witnesses 0»
it he was not, then a tly
the rule was that he to ad-
drese before the other éguiabe!
called tnesses. It was just a





Dutch Housewife Staggers

that only one counsel should ad-
dress and he replied that he was
not, but that Mr. Reece should ad-
dress at once,

His Lordship said he thought
that the examination of the wit-
ness should be finished. Mr. Wal-
cott went on to say that he had
taken the point, because if he
iwere right, his evidence not hav-
ing been completed, it would ob-
viously prevent counsel from

referring to it at all,

Disagreement
Speaking on this point, Mr.
fleece said he did not agree at al!
with His Learned Friend for the
following reason, The case for the
defendant Company. was not the
case of the defendant Michelin, In
ine first cage, as defendant, Miche-~
lin wag alleged to have made «
speech on ‘ne 12th, out of whith
“@ present proceeding flowéd. I)
was not ssettll the 18th that a re-
sort of that speech appeared in
the defendant Company’s news-
pay
trietly speaking, there. were
wo separate and. distinct, offences,
and it was open to the defendant
Company to ask for and to get

separate trials of the issue on the
ground that the offeneés had taken
place on tw® separate and distinct
dates, That was done for con-
veniente solely, It was a question
of saving time, expenses to the
Government, etc.

“Tt is perfectly trie we are both
instructed by the sarhe fitm of
Solicitors,” he said, “but I am yet
to learn that Solleiters cannot in-
struct different defendants whose

hostile.”

to make any
other comment on the evidénce
then, he said, but it was obvious
that the evidence of the defendant r
Michelin Wad to and did go much
further than the evidence of the
defendant Company would or
could go,

The witness Vanterpool who
had been called by the other side
would, in the normal course of
events, have been called as a wit-
ness by the defendant Company.

He definitely would have been ¢

called on their behalf,

“I am May it please
Your , that there
nothing in case to take it

out of the ordinary run which is
that each defendant, if he likes,

can Call witnesses and if he calls in

witnesses, then he has to address
the jury or the Court before
counsel on behalf of the plaintiff
or prosecutor — in this case,
prosecutor. If he does not call any
witnesses, he has a right to reply,

and I am suggesting that in this «

case we have a right to reply.’
His Lordship said that he had

not discovered yet whether he, Mr.

Reece, was calling witnesses.








Jersey Joe Will

Athletic Fans: Sets Record | fight This Year

LONDON
While Eutope sweltered in near-

tropical conditions recently
Dutch “housewife, and mother ©
two children, was busy provin)
to the world at large that Hollanci
will not be without its share of
ee eens at the Olympic Game
this month. Mrs. Fanny
Blankers-Koen, now 34 years of
age, staggered Rotterdam athletic
fans atid sent then home wildly
exeited with a new world record
of 11.4 seconds for the 100 metres.
She also turned in a time for the *
200 metres which was only one
tenth of a second outside the world
record and was a new Dutch

Impressive Performances

Thesép call to mind
her echievements in e last Olym-
pie Games, héld in London in 1948.
the imp: éssive Wembley Sta-
dium she bec.me the first wom
ever to win three individual .
medals, She took the 100 and 200
metres sprints, won the 80 metres
hurdles and just for good measure,
steered’ the Dutch tearm to victory
in the 4 x 100 metres relay.

No wonder that sports writers
described. her nas the greatest
woman ‘nthlete of all time. Never
had 4 tith been more deservedly
heatowed. This tall, Toose-limbed
woman with the ‘short flaxen-
coloured hair and the heart of a
lion, was inded the brightest star
at the Games.

Those
en
put
to

“best”

“who were fortunate

in ied Boat fiiiess to make her
usual quicl peaway and En“land’s
Maureen hoy er immediately
went into a t lead. This was
worn down by, oe Dutch enamel
ovér the hurdles until at the
run-in they were neck and neck
Fram the stands it was impossible
i@ see who had broken the tape
first:

For several mts it was be-
lieved that ttre glish girl had
won as she na waved 10
irpeeads on thé track, And when thé
commenced to play “God
sabe Phe * the impression
was ineitaa . But as events
turned out the National Anthem
had been the signal for the arrival
of the Royal Family and it was
the Dutch champion who had won
the race. Her time, and Miss
Gardner’s was given as 11,2 se-
conds, a new world and Olymple
record,

On her return to Holland Mis.

BOoOCOS

2 Sry

‘iankers-Koeh was given a real
teroine’s welcome. She was feted
verywhere, In hér own city of
Amsterdam she was presented by
the Lord Mayor with a luxury
edition of Queen Wilhelmina’s
fubilee Book. And when she
finally returned to her own home
she found that neighbours had
decorated the house with flowers
any many coloured lights.

Moved By_ Tribute
Friends who know her best say
be was more moved by this last
tribute than by any of the other
celebrations planned in her honour.

There was however little time
for her to remain quietly with hex
amily. The rest of the world was
eager to see this ae Olym-
pie Champion fe early in
1949 she was 6 Meal this time
to Australia and America, In both
countries she won new admirer
with her magnificent running.

Then suddenly there came a

; bombshell, From New York Mrs.

Blankers-Koen announced that she
had had enough of big-time ath-
letics and would retire after the
Européan Championships in 1950.
The story was heard several times
fter that. But fortunately ~
Holland and for athleties in ge!

eral it pr unfounded, Bihey
che is 1 conquering
fields.

It is more Bi Se es tase es
«ver that 1053 wilt
world-class athletics, With alt ee

onours that ons come her way
Mrs. Blankers-Koen stili has one
unfulfilled, She wants to

our,

NEW YORK, July 14.
Jersey Joe Walcott notis
fied promoter Jim Norris
Monday he will defend his
heavyweight crown Septem-




















ber 8th HS 15th agalnes the
Rocky arciano — Harry
‘Kid” Matthews winner.

Norris had feared that Wal-
cott might not defend it
again until 1953,

He waited nearly a year
before making the first de-
fence against Kzzard Charles
at Philadelphia Jume 5th.
Jersey Joe made the notifi-

cauon during the signing
céremony for the ten-round

$ challengers
bout between Marciano and
Matthews at the Yankee
Stadiurn July 28th.

—UP.

Pilots Sit On
Red Secrets

his
Pitots flying from London to fit) Champion PAULINE DORAN

and French champion P, J. MEL-
LOR, retires from his pusition as
professional to the Dulwich and
Sydenham Hill Golf Club,

Prague often sit on iron-curtain

al
also coritainéd inv sealed dip-
Theta brought to the air-
cars ind locked
pllot’s cock-

Joma’ e,
port

under lB osat thi the

pit for safe ote bong

oat secret top documents are
by couriers from the
Ruble; Polish and Czech Em-
bassies, They travel at least
oneé & weet.

The couriers enjoy diplomaue

be at Wembley, nv her
most aehen privilege and are allowed to board
in the 80 metres . have two more daughters as com- the airplane with their. baggage
‘This was a a racé, WON panions for Jan aged 11 and little \vithout going through Customs.

onee Mrs. fanny aged f

—LE.S.



'SATCHEL

CtuB



Oh! how I nelicd=-but
oh! how

stiit on that

, aa . seem,
and the race I
et table in the dressin:-
ae My amugeies of @ Swedish
eur.

I fone der
ran... ile el ean
ww By E. McDonald Baliey .
. I Bave uw reb FASTEST EVER
a nm as Howey
ene, of on, “the Gor coun ey, to for 5 wmavedas
e Continent ae ig the second city o!
at lee oy cities = Fweden Sgainel the
n me sae)
te ire detente we Re! tae, ae ie egenes
which ‘eat © Bure ean gre
The 8 peop! recor
wradition, “aporte ing Re SRE ee '

revel in open-air fe.
My first visit took me

My performances are, com
to the tively speaking,
when I run

2-
K better
peau iittie elty of Malmo in Sweden. 1.
nd it there tha’ ran first bute this vo the well-prepar
9B, Swedish soll. My @ in rag singer. tracks and the Poreotin
c

metres was a poorish



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e* ¥ cor ae) re hee Tete ee

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Contempt Of Court Hearing Continues Today

Mr.
made ly clear that
witness Vanterpool

in the matter, was the
which they intended galling

he ‘had already been culled. What
was the good, therefore of their

witness

man,

received the copy and did @ery-
a in connection with publi-
cation.

as no peint in calling
the. g Acting, Bor

aerate iia

Saat Wie net Fburee.
His iat observed that



referred



Reece replied that he had would not be uired.
it siousshanet emi

Mr. Reece retiarked that he was

who gave not interested in how the other
evidence on behalf of the plaintiff side conducted their case.

The

Section said that thereupon evi-
but dence should be taken.

He would submit later that it
was a criminal prosecution despite

its cloak of a simple Common
Pleas action.

“T am submitting that I have the
right to reply as 1 would in any
action im the Court of Common
Pleas Sie my interest were

identical with that of the other
co-defendant.
he had already said, that their in-
terests could never be the same.
They stood in two coi

It was obvious

as

letely dif-
but ferent positions. Th their in-
terests went along the same road
up to a point, one went further.
The speech had also contained
certain comments by the Com-
pany’s reporter, Vante 1,
which comments, if they ha not
been carefully worded, would
have given further grounds for
offence

Referred To Halsbury
Replying, Mr. Walcott again
to the passage from
to which he had previ-
referred. He added that he

. bad drawn to His Lordship’s at-
Â¥ tention that the defendants were

instructed by the same solicitors
that would not have been if
their interests were hostile. If
the interests had been entirely
identical, he would have objected
earlier.
His Lordship said that the in-
terests in his view were not the

same and he would allow cross-



@xamination. Being not identi- |
cal, he held that.both counsel had
a right to address, The further
point arose—when they should—-
and that was what he was after. |

After hearing Mr. Reece cite
further case law from “Phipson”,
His Lordship left the bench to
discover the relevant cases. Be-
fore doing so, he said that the
whole procedure had to follow
the procedure in the Court of
Common Pleas.

His Lordship later returned to
the Bench and told counsel that
he had endeavoured to look up
the authorities on the points
raised and it seemed that they
were at variance in many re-
spects. He therefore wished to
hear further argument.



He added that he diq aot want
to hear any argument before the
jury which would in any way
have any effect on their delibera-
tions, and he proposed to let
counsel have a look at the au-
thorities and see if they could!
agree. If this were done, the
jury could leave the Court and
return at 1.30 p.m.

This was decided upon and His
Lordship left the Bench and re-
turned about 15 minutes later to
hear further’ argument from
counsel, particularly on the force
of the case law they were citing.

After this, the Court was ad-
journed until 2.15. On the re-
sumption, His Lordship informed
the jury that certain difficult
points which had arisen had to
be settled first and the Court was
then adjourneg until this morn-
ing at 10.30





Chataway An Enigma?

Chris. Chataway’s shattering
of te Lee toro titi tecord by
5 certain to earn this

eihens ot the track a place on
the Olympic airplane for Hoejsint.

Twenty-one-year-old Chataway,
of Woking, has bem the subject
of muth discussion }y athletics
theorists sincé going up to Oxford
18 months ago.

They say he is all that an
athlete. should not be—too short
in the leg, too narrow ih the
chest. He also likes a cigar after

each race

Some attribute his brilliance to
his low pulse rate, It beats only
‘45 timés a minute against the
normal rate of 72.

Theoriés have an unfortunate
habit of bé@ing exploded by ath-
letes. In Chataway’s case the
solution seems a simple one, He

_just runs faster than his rivals.

Taught wed at
Man whe. wa 2 — the

DUKE gave
lessons Ps ENTY HRY COTTON and
LESLIE,







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The Answer Is Simple

He is CHARLES V SCOTT, now

in his 38rd year with the club.

On Saturday fellow profession-
als A. H. PADGHAM, lL. B.
AYTON, S. L. KING and W. J.
cox

for his benefit at the

Club,

Before he went to Dulwich
Scott was /with down snd

Bembridge clubs. Isle of Wight.

Recommended _
Here is a boy cricketer in
whom Essex should be interested.
He is JAMES COX,

all-round ab’
His latést achievement—play-
school Heathcote Secondary

Loughton,
15 last Sunday, with Pvemanikable |
ility.

1, arret Schoo, “Wal against aang, be |

had Bi 94 not out when his yilea tan Caan |
reared at 118 for 3, and he then
went on ria, take seven wickets
for two

Mr. J. pmSToRY, his
master and coach, tells me
has played for the shot
he was 11. He is a right-h
batsman and a right arm
bowler,

Alth has for the
ough he ar
talents to cricket. |

Walthamstow
not confined his

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B.| Cox is still undecided about a
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WEDNESDAY, JULY



People Make This =

16, 1952

Era Significant

AN HISTORIAN takes
today assesses what goes to
chooses not wars, not dates,
PEOPLE on this age of ours.

a leap ahead of his time and
make this era significant. He
not treaties—but the impact of

American historical writer Donald Robinson, chief
army historian to Eisenhower chooses 100 living people

who, in his view have. bv

force of deeds or personalitv.

most influenced “our civilisation in the last 15 years.”

What is the passport
Robinson gallery?

Not good works—although

hilosopher Albert Schweitzer,

ope. Pius XII, and theological
Reinhold Niebuhr are there.

Not bad deeds—although the
list of 100 includes atom traitor
Klaus. Fuchs “because of the
great harm he has done.”

Robinson says he was advised
in his final choice “by obtaining
the opinions of as many experts
as possible.”

First man in the book is Joseph
Stalin; “the most merciless brain
of the age. .. It is possible that
only death can halt him.”

Molotov is there with Stalin,
but Gromyko and Vishinsky are
not. Robinson says his experts
assured him that in the Soviet
scheme of things they “were just
office boys.’

Truman is “the most impor-
tant person in the free world’:
Churchill “the most heroic figure
of the century”; and Tito “the
mildest man who ever slit a
Digest, are Robinson’s choice for
the most important men in Press
and Communications.

He says: “It is incontrovertible
that Lord Beevrebrook has had
more succes: a. § newspaper pub-
lisher in the last two genera-
tions than any other man alive,”

Rut, “Lord Beaverbrook ep
has consistently backed the wrong
men and wrong ideas.”

Samples, according to Robin-
son: in the mid-20’s “he fought
the League o! Nations ‘of Tp
the 30’s he - approved the
appeasment pclicies of Cham-
berlain.” .. . “Recently he has
been stating that Marshall plan
aid is bad for Britain.”

So, in Robinson's view, it is not
necessary for a great man to be
always right.

This is just, because it appears
that even an historian can make
mistakes. For instance, Robinson
describes Lord Beaverbrook’s
London home as Stornoway House
—although Stornoway House was
badly bombed 11 years ago and
has not been lived in since.

ae

AMONG leaders in the world
of fine arts Arturo Toscanini, “the
foremost orchestral conductor of
our times,” is placed next to Ir-
ving Berlin— “he has been su-
preme since Alexander’s Ragtime
Band.”

Picasso “is still the biggest name
in painting”; Chaplin— the last
man in the book—is ¢‘the only
genius in motion pictures.

Among the arts Europeans,
lead the way. (“As a group the
writers of the United States are
not on a par with their Continen-

tal confréeres.” addmits Robin-
son.)
Sir Alexander Fleming, the

Scot who discovered penicillin,
heads the list of men whose work
has meant most to the health of

the world.
* * *
ONLY two women are listed.
“No one,” laments’ Robinson,

“could recommend to me any be-
sides Mrs. Eleanor Roosevelt and
Senora Peron,” He includes these
two, and adds that one disgrun-
tled diplomat said sourly: “The
only thing Senora Peron is dis-
tinguished for is her lowcut neck-
line.”’

Who of them all, is the great-
» est?

According to Robinson: Albert
Einstein.
_ The biggest mountebank is
Russia’s T.D. Lysenko. (“He is

charlatan whose theories in

etics are. ridiculous.) The

st sinister, another Russian,

urenti P. Berin, had of the
Soviet Secret Police. (“No man
alive has more blood on his
hands.’’)







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It is a good idea, isn’t it? Do-«
ing what comes differentiy—it
strikes at the imagination, it is
exciting and provoking. Isn't it
exactly what we expect from a
holiday, from the long lovely
days of summer, something diff-
erent? A holiday seems to have
all the possibilities and impossi-
bilities of life gathered together
into two precious weeks, like a
wonderful mystery box, waiting
to be opened. And so it can be,
if you approach it constructively.

Summer always seems to hold
the peak of our hopes. We put
off all the big decisions, moves
and changes until the summer.
(he sun gives us energy and en-
deavour, but it cannot make us
into new beings without a little
help.

A holiday is for health—body

and spirit. So turn around and
have a look at yourself, see what
kind of person you are taking on
holiday. It is the same you that
has weathered the other fifty
weeks of the year, but you can
feel different, look different and
live ditferently without for a
moment losing your real identity
or being artificial. You can give
yourself a summer look quickly
enough with a tan, a short hair-
do, a crisp smart beach suit—and
me to tell you how. But what
about your ideas, your habits!
and inclinations —perhaps they
need a change too?
When you go away, are you a
bit inclined to look around
quickly for the sort of people you
feel you are used to? It is just
possible you know, that you
would get more fun out of get-
ting to know some different kinds’
of people,

Colonial Students

LONDON.

In the House of Commons on
8th July, Mr. Ronald Russell
(Conservative, Wembley asked the
Minister of Labour what facilities
exist for colonial students to ob-
tain employment in this country
during their vacation.

Sir Walter Mockton,
of Labour replied:—

The service provided by the
employments exchanges and ap-
pointments offices is available to
colonial students who wish to
obtain employment in the vaca-
tions, I understand that certain
private.organisations such as the
National Union of Students are
also active in this field.

Mr. Russel: Can my right hon.
and learned Friend say whether



Minister

any facilities exist in industry ~

particularly to replace British
workers while they are on holi-
day?

Sir Walter Mockton: I have
in mind the agriculture industries
and the efforts which are made
by the National Unicn of Students
in that field where we heip by
enabling them to travel to and
from the work. If there is any
yther matter perhaps my hon.
Friend will let me know.

Mr. A. F. Brookway, (Labour,
Eton and Slough): Will the right
hon, and learned Gentleman
consult with the Colonial Office
upon this matter with a view to
making the fullest provision of
employment for these colonia
students?

Sir Walter Mockton: I
anxious to do what I can
will consult with them.

am
and



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Chinese Reds Said
To Have Recognized

Two Conventions
LONDON, July 15.

Peiping broadcast said on
Tuesday night that the Chinese
Communist government has re-
cvgnized two international conven-
tions of Geneva on war prisoners
and germ warfare.

The broadcast
statements

quoted . two
by Chou En Lai on
July 13th: “The Central People’s
Government of the People’s
Republic of China has examined
the protocol for the prohibition
of the use of asphyxiating poison
or other gases, and of bacterio-
logical warfare concluded on
June 17th, 1925 and acceded to
in the name of China on August
7th, 1921. The Central People’s
Government considers that the
said protocol is conducive to:the
strengthening of International
Peace and Security and is in con-
formity with humanitarian prin-
ciples, and therefore has decided
to recognize the accession of the
protocol. The Central People’s
Government shall undertake to
implement strictly the provisions
of the proctocol provided all
other contracting and acceded
powers observe them reciprocally,

Secretary of State Dean Ache-
son pointed out the American
position on germ warfare at a
Vienna press conference on June
13, when a Communist reporter
asked why the United States had
not signed the Geneva Conven-
tion on germ warfare, Acheson
replied that the United States
wanted all weapons of destruction
banned by the International Dis-

] ) 2vmament Commission with ade-

quate powers of enforcement.

—U.P.

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



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London Express Service

Canadian Lawn
Bowling Team
Win Two Games

NOTTINGHAM, England, July_15.

Canada’s touring bowlers head-
ed into the centre of England
Monday after recording two vic-
tories against seven defeats in an
ll-day swing through Scotland.

The 30-member lawn bowling
team now about halfway through
a three-month programme of
matches, sight-seeing and civic
entertainment completed its Scot-
tish tour last week and then head-
ed across the border to Carlisle
and Newcastle on Tyne,

The two Canadian victories in
Scotland were at Brought Ferry
near Dundee where the tourists
won 118—84 and at Glasgow where
the score was 102—78. Losing
matches were played at Porto
Bello, Stirling, Edinburgh, Aber-
deen, Dumbarton, Motherwell and
Ayr.—(CP)

—— et ee

r. . “ee
Yugoslavia Given
nl . o
Foreign Aid Note

BELGRADE, Yugoslavia,

July ¥.

Ambassadors of France,
Britain and the United States
handed a long delayed three-
power aide memoire on foreign
aid to Yugoslavia to Foreign Min-
ister Leo Mates. The aid pro-
gramme which covers the next
fiscal year, is considerably reduc-
ed in comparison with that of last
year. The French and British pro-
grammes have been slashed by
about one-third and while the
exact amount of aid earmarked
for Marshal Tito’s government
from the United States was not
yet known, it was expected to be
between $55,000,000 and $70,000,-
000. Last year's figure was $%8,-
000,000.—U.P.

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Dinner In Honour
Of Brazilian
Anibassador

LONDON, July 15.

Ambassadors and Ministers of
many countries plan to honour
retiring Brazilian Ambassador
Senor J. Muniz De Aragao, Doyen
of the diplomatic corps at a fare-
well dinner tonight,

De Aragao is retiring after 12
years’ service here. Among to-
night’s guests will be his succes-
sor as Doyen, Manuel Bianchi,
Chilean Ambassador who has
been in England since 1941,

During his stay in England,
Bianchi married the widow of a
Dutch officer a naturalized Briton
killed in the airborne invasion of
Germany. At 33, Senora Bianchi
will be the youngest ever “first
lady” of the London diplomatic
corps.

—UP,

a paenainne

Unions Consider
“Suggestions”

PITTSBURGH, July 14.

Settlement of the longest and
costliest steel strike in U.S, history
hinged today on C.1.O, United
Steelworkers reaction to the in-
dustry’s latest “suggestion” for
ending the crippling dispute.

Steelmakers announced jointly
that they had made “suggestions
for settling important issues still
in dispute”, and that “those sug-
gestions are still under considera-
tion by the union.”
* CLO, President Philip Murray
also head of the Steelworkers, was
expeeted to issue a call to his 170-
man Wage Policy Committee for
action on the companies offer
which was reported to be close to
the recommendations of the Wage
Stabilization Board. Murray may
calla session of the Committee for
Tuesday.

—U.P.



Canada Win
Games

HELSINKI, July 14

Hungary and Canada won the
first two Olympic games advanc-
ing to the second round of basket-
ball eliminations. Although the
games do not officially open until
Saturday the qualifying rounds in
basketball, football and soccer are

ing owing to the large number of
entries,

Hungary defeated Greece 75 to!
38 in the first game and in the |
second Canada beat Italy 68 to
57. Canada will meet Romania in|
the second round while Hungary |
will clash with the winner of the)
Philippines-Israel game to be
played later to-day.

Romania drew a first round bye
In the basketball qualifying rounds
one defeat does not eliminate a
team. But should it be defeated a/|
second time the team is eliminated.
Ten nations were seeded in the |
basketball draw including U.S.|

) defending Olympic champions.

The first U.S. Olympic team to
see action will be the Soccer
squad which will meet Italy
Wednesday, about 100 miles from
Helsinki. Italy, which defeated
U.S. 1 goal to nil in the last
round of the 1948 Olympics
London is favoured.

Field Hockey eliminations get
under way to-morrow with Swit-
zerland meeting Austria and Fin-
land clashing with Belgium in the
first games. Field Hockey is the
only event on Olympic schedulk
in which the United States is not
entered. Soecer eliminations also
start to-morrow with Yugoslavia
meeting India, Romania clashing
with Hungary and Denmark
against Greece,

The Olympic village at Kapyla
now houses 2,000 Olympic ath-
letes and officials with another
4,000 expected by next Thursday
according to the Organizing Com-
mittee,

North Americans with a 233
strong contingent tops the list fol-
lowed by the Argentine with 200,
Canada 178, Italy 156, South Afri-
ca 119 and Venezuela 74, Foreign
visitors are beginning to stream
into the Olympic capital, Over
700 arrived yesterday and the in-
flux is expected to reach 900 per
day next Monday.

Jap Volley Ball
Teani Rejects
Russian Invitation

TOKYO, July 15.

The Japanese Foreign Office has
forbidden volley ball teams to ac-
cept the Russian invitation to at-
tend “world volley ball echampion-
ships”. j

Announcing this today a Foreign
Office spokesman said: “Govern-
ment can give no guarantee of
safety in Russia”

The invitation received by the
Japanese Volley Ball Association
included free travel and expenses
within, the Soviet Union. us

McKenley May Try
At 100 Metres

HELSINKI, July 14.

The 100 metre dash in the 1952
Olympic track and field games
is so wide open that Herb Mc-
Kenley of Jamaica, 400 metre
star, says he thinks he can win it.
Herb, who is now 30, and no
longer the great runner who set
the world quarter mile record of
46 seconds flat in 1948, had fin-
ished eating at Olympic village
last night, when he began toying
with the idea

“I think I will practise starts
and if I can get out of the holes
quickly enough, I'll run the 100
as well as 400,” said Herb, who is
entered in the 200 as well





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PAGE EIGHT ~~ BARBADOS ADVOCATE WEDNESDAY, JULY 16, 1952
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: tains 2 galleries, large drawing and dining SHOPPING BAG--On Yonkers Bus on | SAILING FROM EUROPE accept Cargo and Passengers for
at her late residence | coms, halle: Saturday, July 5th with money and other ’ - M as . _ Montserrat,
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tome. Priends ate inves CAn—Dedae Supercde Lune Gt aay | Weniences Paying cost of this advertisement. A |M.S. BOSKOOP Ist August, 1952 ,

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Kathieen Birch (daughter), Albion,; Will sell for cash offer, bought N fruit t M.S. ORANJESTAD 15th July, 1958. ‘An t,

Vivan and Carl Crichlow (sons s car. First cli order, owner | Numerous fruit T ALSO | SAILING TO TDAD, PARAMARIBO Toe. St. ers acthee RE

16.7/92—11 Dial Bp 16.7.58—t £ 5 atres 2 roeds of land adjoining the PURLIC NOTICES | That GALLAGHER & BURTON, Inc., a corporation under the laws & BRITISH GUIANA Gay 18th inst.
6.7.5 D- | shove (exteiimnt, bathe. site), | ef the State of Kentucky, United Stated’ of America, ers, whose trade OF | M.S. STENTOR 13th July, 1962.
CAR--Vauxhail Velox in A-1. condj-}, Inspection day (except Sundays) business address is Green Lane, Bristol, Pe lvania, USA. has applied for's §. COTTICA 28th July, 1952. B.W.I. SCHOONER ERS’
THANKS tion. Only reason for selling. owner /Setween 4 si-@ B.an. NOTICE the registration of a trade mark’ in Part “Av of Register in respect of guebelie M.S. NESTOR 8th August, 1962. ASSOCIA 2

baad Coe co PSG ef | ble “Cempaition om day "the Bi | gh! male cltsane of, the United States | insite Ree aa ORY: ane Talk De, ited sogiser tne Gams, ction" |SAMING TO TAOMDAD a cURACACIS gy, NEN ay

COR—The undersigned beg to thank ani|© PB Rice & Co. 13. TMB Ep. 15 y958 at 2 p.m. at the office of the ee ae — Face and s — time give notice in duplicate to me at my office of o tion of such registration. |.) < HESTIA Mt Sule tone ey
those who sent wreaths, attended the “AR : - undersigned. ested fan, aS | The trade mark can be seen applica at ce, ] + 1m.

I P . ee S CAR-—One Morris Minor Saloon done CARRINGTON & SEALY the American Consulate from July 1 to Sige tion my 8. P. MUSEON
their pympathy with’ ue i agrees: oir One Sntiem, Saenens enn eg Lucas St.” 81, 1952 for Selective Service Registration Baled CAs SN Gay ee Sune, LEE. HH. WILLIAMS, ee leas er ee
bereavement caused by the death of|® See” at Courtesy Garage. Din adie siolieitars. Sees ce Military Training Registrar of Trade Marks.
Cox. -7,53——9n ; 16.7,8%—3n
; La a All male citizens of the United States
Germaine Seott (daughter), Arthur Scott! ~ 7 oa bees oauieetitenaumuspereseenenea —_—
(s0n-inslaw), Prince ‘Scott ' (grandson) Parma ot SN oes da eo nss |, “HERNE BAY COTTAGE” standing on| WhO attain the age of 18 years sub- }
16.7.52-—1n iorse-power 6 seater grey sedan. | 2 roods 16 perches of land at Land’s End, |Seduent to July 31, 1952, are required |
Excellent condition, always ownerls: wichael, Elestvie and water services | % register upon the day they attain the |
Sere wit Raat Teal dak teohicesen | reealled ‘eS | eighteenth anniversary of day of OVERNMENT O | :
equiped with first new set replacemen their bi: with
IN MEMORIAM res, "RD. Stewart, Dial 9348 yridey, the 20th July 10h eh our omee| Sf ee ete ;
16-7 2? | James ‘Street, at 2.30 p.m. American ‘Consulate. Brulee ,'*| VACANT POST OR RADIOGRAPHER, GENERAL HOSPITAL,
(cttanetteiethepneetiainateennenncemenamneasnia HUTCHIN: . rnd
OLARKE—In loving memory of our dear 4 CAR- monet ere tevaliers ow SON & BAN: bados. $ 6.524 f.n. A BARBADOS, t to th of Ra | eee
mother and aunt Ella Adriana Clarke | dition, low mileage ia 5 Courtesy eaten! ees catio! invited for appointmen post dio-
Peer Tene lees ented aiings teint | omen | 4 LAND 18,008 square feet of land with NOTICE grapher, General Hospital, Barbados OUTWARD FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM
‘Ss v asse 8 ce « >
gua day ” VAUXHALL VELOX 1949 Model—New | {R¢, Ser wren, wat Se babicn aoe PARISH OF ST. PETER 2. The salary attached to the post is at the rate of $1,440x48—

Wawa? One We loved was called y ees a a a Seana as [other fruit” trees thereon, situate cn | vestry Extibitions ot neh eoee tt | $1,584 per annum. In addition free quarters, rations, servant Vessel. From Leaves Due
RNa, SSRI ee iE IE IE! fon oe wis toe Public Road, Ideal ‘site. Offers Will Ne|Parny School will be received by tae} and light or an inclusive allowance of $1 per annum in lieu, Uni- Barbados.
Alleyne (daughter), James Alleyne \son- | TRUCK —Chevrolet truck, no reason- | Twcelved by Messrs. Haynes & Griffith. lundersigned up to the 25th of July 1% 2. | forms are provided. Quarters are not available at present. A temporary l gs « ‘ J
in-law). Irene Jones, Leotta, Cytillenc (able offer refused. A Baines & €o., | N° 5 NA AD 7-54. | jo APBlicants must be the sohs of Parish-| cost of living allowance at the rate of $156 per annum is also payable. ; 8.8. ao. -. London 4th ad 30th
(nieces), Clyde (nephew) Ltd 3.7.58—4.f.n. -7.52—40. Jioners in straitened circumstances and Passage expenses paid on appointment and on completion of Agree-| SS. ‘A’ MAN’ .. Liverpool 10th July. 25th .

161,821 | ee | Cater Wk ca lee eee be between the ages of 7 & 13 Saat S.S. “SCHOLAR” .. London and 24th July 8th Aug.
| ONE (1) Austin two ton truck and one| i oiiints Land Bees Yeats of age. oe M/brotgh
» Lower Westbury Road,| Applicants must sent themselves to 3. The a intment will be on agreement for three years. The
TROTMAN—In loving memory of Every!| (1) Austin A.40 Car. Telephone 4821,) S18n's Lan PP ust present thems 5 ppo: ia ss

Srotmah, who died on dole ith 1001.1D. V. Scott & Co. Ltd. ait with. bearing fruit trees fod water well the | headmaster fot examination 0 ve\employers contribution to an approved superannuation scheme is|S-S. “CROFTER’ .- London 2nd Aug. 15th Aug.

wae, ys 2 Gl aike he et ele ee ee Ue Pa : Tet Street 16.7. 52—2n Application forms ean be obtained at | Payable. anted ts t the Radi

ore. AUTO-CYCLE—One Power-Pak Auto- | TanpTawo Ti Spo Land on | th? Parochial Treasurer's office 4. The holder of the post will be req' assis’ e -

It’s only the ones who love can teli Jeyele excellent condition. Motor can bel mie Waters. Tortace ote, Mapa jon G. §, CORBIN, ologist in the Diagnostic and Therapy services of the X-Ray Depart- HOMEWARD FOR THE UNITED KINGDOM

The wriet of parting without farewell. | purchased separately. Apphy C. W-inesen. Areas 11,966 and 8120 Square Vests | Socom |ment, General Hospital. Candidates must possess the M.S.R. (Diag-

We cherish still and will adore All e, Britton's Cross Road, or €/0] poy ‘adjoining one anetar Ape | 13,7. 207 on tic d Thi Dipl t Vessel, Fer Closes in Barbades.

Her loving life for evermore Advocate Linotype Department H. B. Kinch, 135 Hoabush ‘St. PP eee eee nostic ani erapy ‘oma. lonial S St: "
Rosa Trotman (mother), Colleen (daugh- st ve 10.7.52—t.0.n IN THE COLONIAL COURT oF 5. App eesens should be addressed to the Colo ORTetary, “ *
ter), Rosalie (grandmother), Vetlyn and ssatthnamgnaaae ADMIRALTY Public Buildings, Bridgetown, Barbados to reach him not later _ S.S. “PLANTER .. London 22nd July. ..
Violene” (aunts), Hyacynth and Jean ELECTRICAL 2 roods of land at Charnocks, Christ The Owners of the Steamshi 25th July and the selected candidate will be required to assume duty
(sisters), 1 y (brother), Neville and » e rs o e Steam: p . y For 0; .

Erskine (cousins), James Piggot (uncle) Tanne notes ate” facing en- Amak by 15th August, 1952, or as soon as possible after this date, enc further information apply to
and family. 16,.7,.52—1in Nee ee 93,560 * vs 1.
Just received new shipment of Garrard f square feet of land facing Las 2
three speed Automatic Changers at| Palmas at Rockley, Christ Church. The Motor Vessel “T.B. Radar’ DACOSTA & COw LTD.—Agente
PCB. Mattei & Co. ad, Bate For | eas & Goneaneiae te Nets, otis |. Ad Siem tee allnccoat ae ‘Th
. 7 15.6.52—-t.f.n, ‘onstitution Streets, ge mM, we afternoon of Thurs-
ANNOUNCEMENTS |" OES Pe cr soa. | 2a, tae Bit day of Sully t06a, T wil HURRICANE WARMNGs ; =
| JUST ARRIVED “Pye” De Luxe e above land are excellent build-| offer for sale by ic Competition at It is hereby notified that on the approach of storms, visual warn- e es

-~ — |Ulitra-Modern Radio-Grams (with Gar- | !ng sites. my Office in the Public Buildings for a]. arene . PP he foll ‘. Si hh gone a on teams

EARN BIG MONEY by selling Kedif- |r#rd 3-speed changers) Two Pickup Heads} | The above will be set up for sale on| sum not less than the appraised value | ‘ngs as described below will be displayed at the following places: /

susion in your spare time. Get a supply | 20 needle worries, in ae walaut ee aie Pay * our office, eerie YESS. : a tee Public Buildings.

- binets. A imited juantity only . «m, 7 a n Carlisle Bay, Bridge- iste

of ferme today, 1.7. 8R On. 00. P, C. 8. MAPTEL& CO.,LTD, HUTCHINSON & BANFIELD. | town, With its Attings, Particulars of Office of the Harbour and Shipping Master.

GREAT REDUCTION AT THE MAY-/|Pr: Wm. Henry Street. ; : ma 2 inventory of the said Vessel can be Highgate Signal Station. sou Bails Satis
FAIR GIFT SHOF interesting to local ee a ae The undersigned will offer for sale at *“The Tae ike of the Vessel. E at i ; ee ‘Geamrest Halifax Boston ag Sg a,

iends. Prices cut fron | ———————————_________ . ast Point Lighthouse. - A
natin Mice mate Tainces, “Baskets | MIXER—One Dormeyer De Lane Mix | their Office No. 17 High Street, on Friday | which was built in 1946, 1s the sum of ; : | CANADIAN CONSTRUCTOR 2 July a oe
Souvenirs, all the way through to Doroth; | Master, practically new. Can be seen a ae, ly 108 een kT public) THEN, FIVE THOUSAND DOLLARS South Point Lighthouse. | LADY RODNEY .. .. .. ii July i4July 16July July 2

‘ > "ame, See at C y Garage Office s . ’ an Internal ec ustion ;
Grays Cosmetics—Hurry one, Pik sn ee Sees eres a 15.7,.52—2n. | 48 “Edenville” standing on 2964 square} Diesel Engine, has an estimated speed Harrison Point Lighthouse, ~
: atk si ieee feat, of jana at George Street, Belleville, | of 10 tote, a gross {Opnage of 162,34. Mount Standfast, St. James.
PYE BATTERY SETS—Just a few left. y iehael. © Dwellinghouse contains} & register tonnage o: 16.12, a length £73 NOR’ ile Artives Aatives
MAFFEI'S RADIO EMPORIUM, “| gallery, drawing and dining rooms, two] of 108 feet, a Breadth of 20 & 3/10 tect Crane Hotel, St. Philip. THBOUND Apdcr’ ot. John “B'doo ‘Boston Mellfax Montes!
FOR RENT 15.6.52—t.f.n, }bedrooms, (one with running water), and a depth of 10 feet. The length of Hackleton’s Cliff, St. John,
kitchen, toilet and bath, Electric light}the Engine room ie 24 feet. Ss CANADIAN
and running water. ain a The accommoda on consists of 2 Golden Ridge, St. George. CONSTRUCTOR 24 July 29 July S Aug. 8 Aug. 10 Aug.
napection on application to . | Passengers’ rooms ® each, f A, LADY RODNEY .. 7 Aug. 9 Aug. . @ Aug. 7 .
HOUSES LIVESTOCK H. A. M. Lashley by phoning 4607. sailors’ rooms for 6, cooks’ accommoda- St. Lucy's Church. at ie us ae 19 Aus a ave
“= ere pnenpnsneneennc timid ferent merase ae. fusthee particulars and conditions|tion for 2, Boatswain’s locker nd District “B” Police Station,

APARTMENT—Furnished at Dieppe on; © — ne cow sui le for a dairy. [of sale ap — store room. sat i ion. For further particulars, apply to— a”
sea, 3 bedrooms ete. Running water in |fresh in milk. Apply: Mr. Joseph Smith, co CATWORD & CO. For further particulars and arrunte- aaa ‘amd . 4 oe ‘i
each; all conveniences. Dial 8186: Appiy | Montrose, ris' jure’ .1,.52—2n. ‘itors. men jor inspection app! 0 . § "7
within after 2. 16.7.52-3n . 11.7.52-8n T. T. HEADLEY, District “E” Police Station GARDINER AUSTIN & CO,, LTD.—Agents.
~ BULL—One pedigree Jersey Bull one | —— origin oa Marshal in Admiralty aes : a.

APARTMENT—An Apartment at}year old, mother from imported stock, AUCTION Provost Marshal's e 25.6.52—11n District “F” Police Station.

“O-cetta”, on the seaside, Bay St.. near|gave 24 pints milk with first caif Belleplai Poli Station

Woodside, from ist August. No children, |Father is Blenhein at Pine Livestock Fula Ehanaa its art he NOTICE eueplaine Folice station, = = = = = =—=— CCU | eceeppeSe8eseSedseecoseceosooeseeneaeennaas
7 ao 8 . > 5 as. \* «

Apply to Miss Douglas on premilees: bs Rites wearabe Plantation. re panes, at Bath Village, Christ Church, a Board THE PARISH OF ST. ANDREW 1, Cautionary Warning.

Attractive seaside Flat main road Has- ONE MULE Apply Constant Planta-
tings, comfortably furnished, English} tion 121.7.52—6n.



ee aaa ls and Shingle house. Front house 18 x 10] Applications for two vacant Vestry |‘1) Visual — (a) by day — One red flag with black square centre.
x 8 back house 18 x 10 x 8. Closet | scholarshi ‘

(one boy, one girl) tenaole i _—
ané bathroom, Land can be rented $3.00] at the Alleyne School, ne SE Scien (b) by night One red light.






























































Bath, Open Verandah facing sea. Suitable Pe. Seat. cae CASH. iy Ageher [by the undersigned ‘up to Saturday,|“2) Audible — (a) Plantation and Church bells will be rung rapidly
one person (or couple), From July 1. ee See: B]July 19th, 1952. Applications must be at frequent intervals for a period of a quarter of
e 2949. 18.6,52--t.f.n. MISCELLANEOUS ee accompanied by birth Certificate and
‘ applicants ainust pretent Aienselves to an hour.
BUNGALOW—Newly built Bungalow | ——_—_——————_——————e © Head ster oO} e leyne School
situated Pine Land, Nr. Gost, ill. Con- | .,AMBRICAN | comics super Thriier, | 'NDER THE IVORY HAMMER J oi: stonday ist, 105d "to be Ieearrino (b) Sirens will be blown at Central, Brittons Hill, | }
; h , SKINN “py ‘ X
{aniie eer Sewaee ne Late Tex ‘Ritter, Western Hero, Captain ay instructions received from the Si laity Gist, yi ee | Worthing, Boarded Hall, and District E Police . -
Bath, Kitchen, Dial 2218 V. P. Burgess, [MNGh ata, Super Boo Bell Boye, Tuy 18tN at Messrs” Fort’ Royal Garage: 1.7.52—4n. | Stations for one minute, three times, with an 1EQLE TL A i E
Belle Gully 19 7-829" Tix Gun Heroes, 20 cents each, Press| St. Michael’s Row, (1) 1980 A-40 Austin | TT wae mnie interval of half a minute between blasts. This
BREEZLEY, Maxwell Coast — Unfur-|©!"® Building 59, Swan Street. a pases in accident). Terms REALTORS LIMITED will be repeated every quarter of an hour for an
pishea House’ with 4 Bedrooms, spacious Rap Sate, | CO Oe Gain ane Sailings from Southampton to Guadeloupe, Martinique,
eption Rooms, nuble Garage, anc ” 4 poh lad . AUC 10) S L . |
Hight of way to beach. John M. Biadon | y\NTIQUES of every description, reeray I an. T N A E Il. Hurricane Warning. T La G@ &
* Co. Phone 400, Pit. Lid. Buliding. [colours Early books, Maps Autographs | AT 11.30 A.M. (1) Visual — (a) by day — Two red flags with black square
ete., at Gorringes Antique Shop adjoining UNDER THE SILVER On Tuesday the 22nd July, by order centres hoisted one above the other. ‘i From Southampton Arrives Barbados
FLAT & HOUSE—Fully furnished, st. | ®ve! Yacht Club 3. 2.52—tf.n, HAMMER gt MY, witeh Seiloet,” we will sell the (b) by night T ad light holsted a ahs *“DE GRASSE” 12th July, 1952 24th July, 1952
a “ - — - niture an usehold effects Mr, B. A. > — Two r o one abov e ave ~
LAWERRRE PERE! | FOS IF a 1.310: | SUBSCHTAD now. to the’ Dally | On Shorey Sth, by, cries 0 Abd; [Brooke ctunidenon acts cemins o. : . ; “COLOMBIE” -» Sist July, 1952 .. 13th Aug., 1962 %
_ a Telegraph, England's leading Daily News-| Annie Puckerin we’ will sell her Fur-|Hill, Rockley, which includes Drawine epee ““DE GRASSE” 22nd Aug., 1952 3rd Sept., 1952 §
“TRELAWNY — Hastings, unfurnished [P@Per now arriving in Barbados by Air|niture at Cartref, Strathclyde — which | room suite consisting of three chairs and | (2) Audible — (a) Plantation and Church bells will be rung rapidly on Ug.» “ pt., 1952
third house from St. Matthias Gap, three | 2M” a few days after publication in| includes — Sideboard; u t and Tub e to seat two, plastic top table, three a ti 1 i ted oF ¢ t 1% *Not calling at Guadeloupe
‘bedrooms, water and basins in’ each. {/0ndon. Contact lan Gale, C/o. Advo-| Chairs; Rockers; Settee; Arm Chairs, 7 pedestal Ashtrays tables, four and continuously over a period of a quarter of |
Inspection 4 to 6 p.m. Immediate pos-|#t® _Co., Ltd, Local Representative | Hatstand, Ornament Tables all in Ma- ming room chairs, all in birch, an hour. . SAILING FROM
ession 16.7.52—1n | Tel. 3118 17.4.5%—tf.n. | hogany: Pine Dining Table and Waggon; | birch table with enamel top, one small : ‘ BARBADOS TO EUROPE
- Seems teen ert tr Paintings and Platures: Rajtan Pocksre: mabomuay table, Seinted ching room (b) Two rockets or maroons will be fired from the From Barbados Arrives Southampton ¢
7 = 3G a ew ironing boar ass and China inner ‘ea Services; | table, one simmons jouble d, with ‘ ‘ ‘ 4
APARTMENT. 2 badrooms with, run- ane Meson tron sets, subject ce special Spoons; Forks &c; Carpet; Congoleum, slumberking spring, {we Usingle’ beds, Harbour Police Station and, if possible, from Dis- “COLOMBIE” .» 18th July, 1952 .. 25th July, 1962
» shen, | Wedding-g! allowance, arnes Clock, Vietrola, Records & Cabinet; Ma-|one Birch dressing table, China tea set, | triet Police Stations. ee RA 99
Bae eee. Cae "Anely 9 star oh Co., Ltd. 3.7.52—t.f.n. |hogany Single Bedstead Vono Spring, | salad bowls, fruit dishes and various Ir 1 : nr DE GRASSE -. 6th Aug., 1952 .. 16th Aug. 1982
#h person to Mrs. B. L Barrow, Leonor. YACHT: * Invader" Centre Board righch Orlane Wate cle saad tobie TF remenn cae ai tee Bats sa Poe ee “COLOMBIE” ig 24th Aug., 1952 at! 5th Sept., 1952
7 2 ade! i ‘al : } "4 fei ot ; j
Worthing. 13.1, O-+an 16 long. Brass Stainless Steel Rigging. | Press; Rush Chairs and Rockers; Painted ,; fection three burner oil stove, one oven (1) Visual Flags or lights will be hauled down, ““DE GRASSE” -» 16th Sept., 1952... 26th Sept., 1982
No reasonable offer refused, Phone 2876,] White and Green Furniture in Tables,|7 cubfe foot gereral electric refrige »| (2) Audible — Sirens will be blown continuously for three minutes. | s$ “Sailing direct to Southampton
16.7.52-—1n | Chairs, Waggon, Larders; 3 Burner Oil] box of tools, smali high speed drill, T iditi to the ab ni $
PERSONAL Stove and Oven, Kitehen Utensils; | table lamp and standing lamp, rest chair, | n addi aon io e above warnings :— R. M. JONES & co., LTD.,—Agents,
LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE| Tables and other items kitchen utensils and many other items. (1) The Police will warn parochial authorities and isolated dis- SSSSSS SSOOSHOSOSS
TRANSFER AND REMOVAL BRANKER, TROTMAN & a See tricts
The application of Sydney Lorenzo Hall ’ ” . +" ay 2 . \
ius. Subtle are heresy warned againnt| Teh hrist Church, “purchaser Auctioneers oe REALTORS LIMITED (2) Reports will be made over Barbados Rediffusion Ltd. at
lying credit to my wife OLIVE] granted to George tandel Hen in rement 13.7.$2—2n hourly or half hourly intervals at a quarter past every hour
RINGER (nee FREEMAN) as 1 do not} of ground floor of a 2-store AUCTION SALE
Bcid mysslt temponatbie for her or any-|'°, cro nears a. es or at a quarter past and a quarter to every hour as the case
one else courenrune ae beta bh Church, within District “B" ‘for per- TAKE NCTICE At 11 30 may be. <
in _my name unless py a written order mission to rest she was one Te That THE AUSTIN MOTOR COM = a.m. (3) Reports will be broadcast at hourly or half hourly intervals, | $
3 NAAMAN SPRINGER. and ge wen eC : hop attached to | pany LIMITED, a company incorporated On Thursday the 17th July, by order oe ill b df th b: Regi ‘
Sarjeant's Village eee ad teres Rowe Bridge, St./ under the laws of Great Britain, Motor fhe Terai ag mins, we. will sell as will be announced from the Barbados Regiment transmit-
é ' ’ nee. ieorge and t se a e al : “pe a ne furniture and household effects at ter at the Garrison at < t t h
Ch, Ch such last describe ise Car Manufacturers, whose trade or busi. | ( r a riso’ a quarter past every hour or at a/@
18-7 83-180 Hoes Aaee egeetied, ag tag af ness address is Longbridge Works, North- Mayville’, Codrington Hill, which Cd







field, Birmingham, England, has applied } ‘neludes: quarter past and a quarter to every hour as the case may

ws co C. W, RUDDER, Hag,, Drawing suite three chairs and settee
for the registration of a trade mark in] | QraWing suite | be, Frequency 5.40 megacycles. (Wave length 55.5 metres).

The public are hereby warned against Police Magistrate, Dist. "B.’*



























































son. cr. Darsans Part “A” of Register in respect of motor standing and table
Reet ree to ROY PetOn Ge EE HANDIsr ‘Applicant, | vehicles, their parts and accessories, and | !4™ps, radio fable with bookcase, two 13.7,52—2n. “ TRINITY Cc OTT AGE ”
hold myself responsible for anyone con-[| N,B.—This application will be con. | Will be entitled i sean ante with mirror, folding ehalr wall brackets
acting any debt or debts in my name} sidered at the Licensing Court to be held | ##ter one month: from the j@th: Gee eee Chole canines ane buiet, one Ti Wah e oe
unless by a written order signed by me.}on Monday, 28th day of July, 1952, at} JUly, 1952, unless some person shail 1) T b » e Tip
" — OSCAR MURRAY, iL o'clock a.m. at Police Courts, Dist.{ the meantime give notice in chiplicate to} Top Table with carved pedestal, and SPECIA iE ivi
f Bea Sigg | uy € am. a ; “Th at my Ofice of Opposition of such chairs, Serving Table with Glass Top, Drivin Made E ! t
St. Michael F Cc. W. RUDDER, registration. The trade mark can be see RY as eae Gee te fs Saaig asy !
15.7, 52-—2n Police Magistrate, Dist. "B." | 0" application at AR of iba: 1952, Radio, one Mirror, Lamp shades, Floor DIS CO UNT
= be ete Seoet 16.7.52—1n. | Dated this 30th oh a aanes, Rage ye AR Lamps, Rush Settee Driving Made Ras 1
e public are hereby warned agains w 4 » Clock. Anti {
Wing credit to my wife ADINA Rogisirer, of: Tages Markt, | Qamware including Salad” Dishes, ter F y Derricks (on sea-side) St. James
Perit noel camnainle se ee do A TED eT nee Cope, ae oe we China
not 3 , > of Ww N ea rvice, complete Beer Set. Dinner There is a demand through-
1 tracti é debt \ ox a 3 s fis. in tom
ee, eb ee crhite “bey a written TAKE NCTICE Se ne, Soup Bewis: in. Waits out the world for properly Three Bedroom Stone House, with usual conveni-
order, figned by me, a SCE xOUS AUSTIN Lenguin, (Solad | Bow! ° with ” Servers trained men and women in ot fully furnished or without furniture, S
LERED D.C. MPSON, MI LLAN Single and Double Beds and Springs, every field cn roods and 10 perches. Immediate
Hillaby, s ‘ ’ : : ;
| ae ‘ Tr 1E AUSTEN oR COM. | towel Racks, Triple Mirror Vanity, with . ’
° St. Thoms. | SMALL HOUSE OR FLAT, unfurn- PANY LIMITED, © company ineerporated upholstered stool, Bedside Table and And in Barbados, there’s a Mortgage can be arranged. Inspection invited by
46 “"' fished, 2 bedrooms, garage, for quiet] under the laws of Great Britain, Moto: | Night Chair, One Dressing Tavle, One demand for properly t
elderly couple, Garrison, Hastings. | Car Manufacturers, whose trade or bus: 2 eta = in a une: Pees trained drivers. arrangemen »
oo Worthing. Ring 8185, 8—12 ness address is Longbridge Works, North- | Suite; ne Teadie Singer Sewin: r
9.7.52—4n. | field, B ham, England, has applied | Machine in mahogany Case, one Jones The qualities that go to -
10 D AY’S NEWS FLASH {| “se pecninainee - tor the registration of & trade mark. in Sek Dasbine;’ One ‘painted Breaktast teint = i cokionmint For further particulars Phone 2959. The Barbados
aes $62.6 POC. c 1 earne “ar e otor fs . e . ;
by Tecmenmeiaine 25 new subscribers tc Sekine, hele paste an saan a with Oven, One Hot Plate, One Water driver can only be had if Import & Export Co., Ltd. Plantations Buil Fi
i REDIFFUSION in one month. 1.7.52-6n, | Will be entitled to register the same Coolest eae peek, ne as you are trained by 12.7.5
. + . - 4.940. Tafter one month from the 16th day’ of | © Fash, * a
ES eee a, ‘ . shail in| lee Cream Freezer, Books, Plants, an
Johnson's Stationery REDSFFUSION offers $1.50 cash for ae Go ate eae dophents One Garden Seat, and many other items
. each new Subscriber recommended byf to me at my office of opposition of such Inspection from 9.30 # m, On TAprning on all
Tab Meha? att for you. 1.7.52—€n. | pegistration, The trade mark can be seen} ot sale, Terms cash, 4h.4 Basan
on = walle lieati t my office. * 7 yo =
STOCK-TAKING Sire haa PosN eaan| ee OO aie ee | aaa || PEARL NECKLACES DRIVING SCHOOL
Sie iP hnaee EB {ull particulars from the REDIFFUSION Registrar’ of Trode Marks, | CHRISTIAN SCIENCE SPECIAL CASH OFFER tt
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WEDNESDAY, JULY 16, 1952 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE NINE







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PAGE TEN



SE €O0ND

By 0. N.

NINCE the current cricket
season started, Junior Di-
vision batsmen have been piling
up tail scores on wickets which
give bowlers little assistance, It

is significant though that the
majority of these tall seores
have been made on small

grounds Junior Division Cricket
is more or less confined to these

nall grounds, But these small
grounds are really small. It is
observed that too many of these
small grounds have their
houndaries out of proportion to

the size of the ground. You
find that when a batsman hits
a six, on these grounds on a
full sized ground he would be
out, The fieldsman has no
chance. To hold the ball he must
step over the boundary, In

these games, most of the time,
all the batsman has to do is to

swing his bat and nine times
cut of ten, the ball goes over
the boundary. The , Barbados

Cricket Association should step



in and assess the various small
grounds in the island, This

ll in itself make far better
assessment of averages and it



will be

cores

found that all.the tall
are half of those re-
ported. Mental Hospital
grounds, Central and Boarded
Hall are cases to mention. These
grounds are definitely not the

regular size and should not be
allowed boundaries of sixes
and fours, These grounds are
more or less half the size of
grounds like Kensington, Bay
Pasture, Park, College and

Combermere

It is then obvious that Junior
Division Cricket is being played
undey false pretences, and it is
imperative that the Barbados
Cricket Association step in and

make a ruling as to which
Hrounds should have bound-
aries of sixes and fours and
Which should be fours and
two's.

HE Central Cricket grounds

at Vaucluse should not be

six and four; it is definitely too

small and only flatters bats-

men while bowlers suffer, not

through the ability of the bats-

men but through wrong assess-
ment of the ground,

It is not fair to the bowlers,
and the batsmen, who enjoy
fit. It is an untrue value of
themselves, It is hoped that the
Barbados Cricket Association
will take proper action to assess
these small grounds for the
benefit of cricket in the island
It is a simple matter and can
be adjusted for the season to
come,

FPRHE Intermediate and Sec-
ond Divisions have jus>d
completed a series and the
season is yet too young to pre-
dict any results, but on the face
of it, the performances are
good and indicationsgare that
this will be a good season,

This series produced un-
finished games, which goes to
show that two day cricket is
not good enough for Intermedi-
ate Cricket.

If Intermediate cricket is
meant to be the Second String
of First Division Cricket, then
there is little point in taking
them down from three days to
two, because unless rain°® steps
in, there is little chance that
any of the games will be fin-

ished, and then the objectives
will have been defeated, Be-
cause Intermediate Cricket is

STRING

Looker

meant to train and prepare
Junior Division cricketers for
the Senior Division. In two
day cricket batsmen must
hustle for runs in order to get
a decision. Hustling for runs
is akin to Lancashire League
Cricket which is the bugbear to
representatives cricket
Swiping and hitting hard on
small grounds can train no
one for truly representative
cricket.

It is unfortunate that there
are not enough grounds in the
island to accommodate ihree
day junior cricket.

There are pros and cons to
the. argument and suggestions
as to the improvement of this
situation would be welcome,

PARTAN playing at Boarded

Hall, flattered to deceive.
After bowling out the “Spark-
ers” for 90 and making 150 for
9 wickets, declared their in-
nings closed on the second day.
One would have thought that
the “Parkites” had advantage
and would have used it to
good effect. Such was not the
case, Spartan resorted to their
old tricks and allowed Cable
and Wireless to trounce them
to the tune of 212 for 8 wick-
ets declared,

Of this Basil Matthews open-
ing batsman-bowler hit 63; R.
McKenzie 39, H. King 56. This
total seemed too much for the
Park boys. They fell down, and
at stumps could score a meagre
49 for the loss of 8 wickets at
stumps. Therefore Spartan
could not foree home a win but
gained first innings points. H.,
King, former Pickwick fast
bowler gave the batsmen little
chance ending up with the fine
analysis of five wickets for 22
runs in seven overs,

N the second division, Col-

lege defeated Wanderers
outright. It is heartening to see
a school team (of youngsters)
defeating a team of established
cricketers, especially when the
average age of the school team
is taken into consideration,

Mr. Glasgow, former Lodge
School boy, has joined the
ranks of Combermere School as
an sssistant master, Though he
is playing in the most junior
division he is giving good as-
sistance to the school,

He should be a useffMâ„¢ addi-
tion to the school team. And
what’s more he should be
playing for the Intermediate
Division,

F other masters at the

various schools would take
a little more interest in the
school games, the schools would
give a better account of them-
selves,

Mr. Harry Sealy of Comber-
mere a good all-rounder does
not play anymore. Mr, Val
McComie of Lodge has appar-
ently retired from the game.
Mr, Wilkes and Mr. Simpson
of Lodge play in the most
junior Division.

There must be some reasom
why these players who could
give valuable assistance to the
young boys will not concern
themselves with the good of the
school in the sphere of sport,
There seems to be some jm-
ternal trouble. If there is, it
is not good, Without the help
of sports minded masters, the
school boys can make little
(progress. And the schools need
to be encouraged,



COLLEGE’S
Harrison College scored their
first outright victory for the
season when they defeated Wan-
derers on Saturday at Wanderers.
Batting first on the first day,
Wanderers scored 158 runs and
dismissed the Collegians for 90
runs in their first innings. Wan-
derers in their second innings de-
clared when the score was 84 for
the loss of five wickets, thus giv-
ing the schoolboys 153 for vic-
tory.. ‘
L. Waithe, who was undefeat-



WHAT’S ON TODAY

Court of Common Pleas
10.30 a.m,

Basket Ball, Second Division,
at Harrison College, Garri-
son, ¥.M.P.C .... 5.00 p.m.

Gramophone Concert, British
Council .. vv sat O15) Pim

British Council Films at Aqua-
tic Club . 8.30 p.m,



[ They’ ll Do Do It t Every ‘Time







EATS IN THE

FRY -BURG

ACROSS THE
ROAD >>>

THANX ANDA TiP

On HATLO HAT
wi?
| “ roar !



FIRST WIN
ed with 44» helped Harrison Col-

lege to score 156 runs for five
wickets for victory,



THE WEATHER
REPORT

YESTERDAY

Rainfall from Codrington:
in.

Total Rainfall for Month to
Date: 1.90 ins.

Highest Temperature: 87.5° F.

Lowest Temperature: 74.0° F.

Wind Velocity; 11 miles per
hour.

Barometer: (9 a.m.)
(3 p.m.) 29.935,

TO-DAY
Sunrise: 5.48 a.m.
Sunset: 6.19 p.m,
Moon: Last Quarter, July 13.
Lighting: 7.00 p.m.
High Tide: 12.46 p.m.
Low Tide; 6.20 a.m., 6.04 p.m.

os

29.998,



Regiveed US Patent Wee















Know Your Cricket



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Surrey Beat |
Kent At Oval

(From , Our



Own Correspondent)

LONDON, July 15.
strengthened their grip!
at the top of the county table
today as the result of a thrilling
victory over Kent at the Oval. |
Set to make 188 in 92 minutes,
they scampered home with two}
wickets and a couple of minutes
to spare to record their ninth}
successive championship win.
They now have 164 points — a,
lead of 40 over Middlesex who
were held to a draw by Lan-
cashire.

At Sheffield a determined not
out century by Ted Lester foiled
the Indians’ bid to beat York-
shire.

At Northampton, Brookes and
Barrick took their unbroken
overnight partnership to 347 — a
new county record for any
wicket—before Barrick was out |
for 211. He batted 5% hours. |
Brookes was unbeaten with 204 |
when Brown declared with!
Northants 104 ahead, There was |
not sufficient time to force aj
result and Northants took wet
innings points,

Gimblett recorded his oneal |
century of the match for Somer- |
set against Derby. Worcester |
made the 250 for victory against
Sussex in 2 hours 20 minutes,
The Scores are:— ee

Surrey

Surrey beat Kent by two

Laws 28 & 29 wickets, Surrey 325 and 190 for

8; Kent 192 and 320 for 9)

: declared, Olinn 111 not out. |

By O. S. COPPIN Leicester *beat Hants by 10 |

wickets; Leicester '379 and 16 for |

The subject for discussion to- It is obvious then that “Wides” a? wickets; Hants 218 and 180. |
day is the Wide Ball and Laws 28 can never be credited to the g oe a Glamorgan by |
and 29 deal with all aspects of striker’s score since if the ball is 165: Gl pe Sa TR oor 409 and |
the application of the term “Wide struck, the call of “wide” should Oucester 164 and )101 for |

Ball” to a delivery by a bowler

LAW 28. If the bowler shall
bowl the ball so high over or so
wide of the wicket that in the
opinion of the umpire it passes
out of reach of the striker and
would not have been within his
reach when taking guard in the
normal position, the umpire shall
call and signal “Wide Ball” as
soon as it shall have passed the
striker,

Delivered

If the umpire considers that a
ball has been delivered but it
comes to rest in front the striker
“Wide” must not be called and
no runs shall be added to the
score unless they result from the

striker hitting the ball which he
has a right to do without any
interference from the fielding
side.

In other words, if on a wet day
where there are many ball holes
on the wicket a ball from a slow
bowler might well be delivered
and then come to rest in one of
these in front the striker, The
umpire having satisfied himself

that the ball has been delivered

cannot call no ball
striker is
to hit it to amy part of the ground
that he can.

I have already discussed “Um-
pires’ Signals” in this series but
as a refresher I shall remind

and

the
well within his rights

readers that the Umpire signals

“wide” by extending both arms
horizontally.

Revoke

An umpire must at once re-

voke the call of “wide” if a

striker hits a ball after it has
been called “wide”.

The umpire must satisfy

self that the striker would

him-
not

have been within reach of the
ball even if he had moved
towards it. On the other hand it
must be clearly understood

that the striker cannot “manu-
facture” a wide by moving away
towards square leg.

By definition a “No Ball” is not
properly delivered and cannot
therefore be a wide in addition,

If only one run has been made
off a “wide ball” the batsmen do
not cross over to the positions
they occupied before the run was
scored as I have seen done here,

Not “Dead”

Another observation that might!

be necessary is this—When a
“wide” is called the ball does not
become dead and the batsman
may be out “stumped”, “hit;
wicket”, “run out”, “handled the!
ball” or “obstructing the field”,

This is better set out in the
following law.

LAW 29. The ball does
become “dead” on the call of
“Wide Ball”. All runs that are
run from a “Wide Ball” shall be
scored “Wide Balls” or if no runs

not

be made one run shall be so Henry St.
scored, The striker may be out| sesessessosesoossosesssseoesssosseoons. ‘ g
from a “wide ball” if he breaks SSSSSSSSSSSS
Laws 38 (Hit Wicket) or 42

(stumped) and either batsman

may be run out, or given out if
he breaks Laws 36 (Handled the
ball) or 40 (Obsttucting the
fleld).

As in the case with “no ball”,
if a “wide” goes to the boundary!
or the batsmen run, the actual
boundary allowance or number
of completed runs is entered as
“Wides” under Extras,

B

Jimmy Hatlo |

E HEREBY
NOMINATE. AS
THE WORLDS
NERVIEST
NOGOODNIK
THE LONG ,LONG
TRAILER-WINDER
WHO PARKS IN
FRONT OF ONE
RESTAURANT*»







POOP FSG FOSS FH SS5EE > COSVOSS!

| (

nine man,

2, Milton 83 not out,

Lanes versus Middlesex, match |
drawn: Lancs 437 for 7 declared |
and 124 for 5 declared Middlesex |
324 and 92 for 4,

Northants versus
drawn:

be revoked.

Even if a batsman be given out
off a “Wide” this does not affect
the penalty for having bowled it,
so that the penalty or any runs
actually completed while the ball
remains in play are credited’ to
the batting side.

sgex, match |
Essex 428 for 9 declared

6 declared, Barritk 211,
204 not out.

Somerset versus Derby, match
drawn: Somerset 426 for 7
declared and 202 for 5, Gimblett
116; Derby 427 for 7 declared,
Elliott 168, Kelly 93.

Yorkshire versus India,
drawn: Yorkshire

Brookes

The Squire Lost

In his book “The Laws of
Cricket” dealing with their his-
tory and their growth, Colonel
R. S, Rait Kerr makes an inter-
esting reference to the birth of
the law dealing with wides, He

match
192 and 298

writes, for 4, Lester 110 not out Halli-
“The first Law to deal with day 77; India 377 for 5 oe noes
“Wides” probably resulted from Umrigar 137 out,

Worcester beat Sussex by one
wicket: Worcester 376 and 250
for 9, Dewes 104; Sussex 367 and
256 for 7 declared, Cox 106. |

a .well-known .incident .which
occurred at Lord’s in 1810 during
a single wicket match between
that forceful character) Lord
Frederick Beauclerk and’ T. C.
Howard on the one side, and

Squire Osbaldeston and William he could bowl! wide of the wicket |
Lambert on the other. The without any penalty, consistently |
Squire was taken ill, but Lora did so to his noble opponent, who

Frederick insisted on pay or lost his tem } 7 |
play, on which Lambert, realising the match. Bee ee ee

THE
PERFECT

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ANNI ERSARY DANCE

— at the —
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WEDNESDAY, JULY 1952

16,

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p\rr. rav, BARBADOS ADVOCATE WEDNESDAY, JULY li, 1KZ BARBADOS*^ ADVOCATE ( %  ...>..-"! n r • PrtaM fcT !• A*MM C. LM. I \VliirMl>. July 1, 1S32 \l NIOMiS There Is A Frankness About Her Eyes... IN AUGUST 1949 at a special meeting I leprcsenta1 Yench and American territories agreed to select Puerto Rico as a hurricane warning centre for the Eastern Caribbean. Puerto Rico transmits four types of messages to addresses throughout the Eastern Caribbean. ^Mf, of theae messages concern storms : 0R tvo ;ue about hurricanes. Advisory ,1s are sent to warn recipients of disturbances which do not justify the issue of storm warnings and especially as a guide to ships. Storm warnings are issued for storms which are expected to reach an island within the next twenty four hours. A storm is not the same as a hurricane. mill violent disturbance of the atmosphere with thunder or strong winds and any violent disturbance of the atmosphere accompanied by maximum wind velocities of less than 55 mijes per hour comes within the category of storms. "Die warning system from Puerto Rico gives ample time for the publication of storm In Barbados by telephone and despatch riders, in the Press and over th;government broadcasting system. The government's notice first published in the Sunday Advocate of July 13, 1952. confuses storms with hurricanes, because Barbadians are "notified that on the approach of storms" visible cautionary and hurricane warnings and "oil clear" will be displayedThis confusion of terms is most undesirable and the government should lose no opportunity in distinguishing clearly between storms and hurricanes, A hurricane .deed a storm with violent winds bui a storm is not a hurricane. Therefore "on the approach of storms" no "hurricane" warnings of any kind ought to be issued. The government has ample time to publish in the Press and over the government Uuatfaiafrllllg system and to inform local government officials by telephone and despatch rider of any advisory storm notices or storm warnings it may receive from Puerto Rico. With hurricanes quite another procedure is necessary, because hurricanes are storms with violent winds in excess of 54 miles per hour. Puerto Rico transmits "preliminary hurricane alerts'* whenever the winds of a hurricane may cause danger to an island, but when indications are insufficient to justify i> definite hurricane warning. II is impossible to tell from the notice published in Sunday's Advocate whether "cautionary warning" refers to the preliminary hurricane alert" or whether it refers to the "approach of storms.' Such confusion of terminology will not the public feel confident that they will be receiving precise and accurate information when bad weather is suspected. The types of messages transmitted from Puerto Rico are admirably clear and leave no doubt as to their meaning. Why then should the Government m Barbados seek to adopt a procedure of it* own so markedly different from the lucid Puerto Rican procedure that there is no distinction made between storms and hurricanes ? Why does it not publish advisory storm signals and storm warnings as soon as they are received by telephone, radio, despatch rider and in the Press ? Why have visual storm warnings? They are not necessary and will breed confusion between storm warnings and hurricane warnings should Barbados be doomed to experience a hurricane. Telephone subscribers are also wondering why the "preliminary hurricane alert," which is presumably what the government means by the confusing description of "cautionary warning" should not be transmitted to them by telephone. The co-opersjfon ot the Barbados Telephone Com panj could easily be obtained In restrictlnc telephone calls to "priority hurricane alert" and telephone subscribers could themselves repe;it "priority hurricane alert" ils to other subscribers. The telephone is the best and quickest means of passing preliminary hurricane alert signals and visual signals ought to be considered as complementary to messages passed by telephone and despatch rider. If audible signals are thought to be necessary for "preliminary hurricane alert" en definitely ought not to be any similarity between the audible "preliminary hurricane alert" signals and the "hurricane warning" audible signals. In the notice published first on Sunday, July 13, 1952, plantation and church bells are in two "warnings" to be rung rapidly fbr a quarter of an hour the only difference being that for the "cautionary warning" they will be rung "at frequent intervals" while during the hurricane warning they will be rung "continuously". Could any warning signals have been more devised to Incrajaaa public confusion and to intensify doubt? The "All Clear" signal seems to have been planned merely for use should the hurricane fail to arrive, despite the warnings. Otherwise what flags or lights would 1ft for hauling down and from where, after a hurricane had finished its mad < "struction ? As for the reports to be made over Barbados Redifluston Ltd. or from the Barbados Re nitler at the Garrison, how can anyone foretell that both of smitting agencies will not be 1 appens after a hurricane depends hat happened during a hurricane. m lasts Ui.-.t Ions that last month I wrote of Violet Markham. who was the first to be made %  Companion of Honour. I quoted the lines which appear on the medal, but he has been good enough to send tni the full verse. II is taken from a tribute to Addison by Pope? — •Statesman yet friend to truth' Of soul liiuvn. In action faithful and in honour clear.' Who broke no promise, ttrved no private end. Who pained no title and who lost no friend." I am grateful to Miss Markham, though somewhat disturbed by the line "Statesman yet friend to truth!" Why not "And friend to truth?" Please don't tell me. And So Young NOW it is my pleasure to Introduce to this column another remarkable woman, although her fame wjs won on a different Acid. Miss Kathleen Wlnsor, who lunched with my parliamentary colleague John Hodgers and myself at Westminster, wrote an historical novel called "Forever Amber." And so intense was the Interest of the public that, In S uriuit of enlightenment, they %  ve purchased to date just under two million copies. Miss Winsor Is absurdly young for a women who has written a 45U.O00-wurd novel, and there is a frankness about her eyes that makes a man of the world choose his words carefully lest he despoil the illusion-,of maidenhood. Even her eyebrows, although a work of art, owe something to nature. By Beveriey Baxter Miss Wlnsor is alert, intelligent and good humoured, but I lust cannot see hex with a pen In her hand and a rising mountain uf manuscript All women authors look like women authors except Enid Bagnold and, now, Kathleen Wlnsor. I Uke Mr Baldwin's secret, when he sealed his lips. Miss Winsor will probably remain a mystery for ever. Believes In Us ANOTHER visitor to London Is the Vancouver bauker A. E. (Johnny) Jukes, who uld 1 THIS beautiful creature with the air of Just having left Vassur, was divorced by her first husband because she constantly referred to herself by her maiden name after the Amber success. She. in turn, divorced her second husband, who was a band leader. With the historical background of her novel to assist her the said that he was worse than any of the Restoration characters In her book Then she married the lawyer who acted for her and lived happily ever afterwards. British "ih.it no one would be surprised if he wore a Union Jack for a waistcoat. He actually believes that great days He ahead of Britain if she will concentrate on her opportunities and stop moaning about her dlfli< lilt In the first *rai Jukes and two fellow Canadian subalterns, on leave from the trenches, went to a wartime Derby at Newmarket. Unfortunately by the end of the second race they had run out of money Then they la* a remarkable looking bookie, dressed with magnificent elegance and bearing the sign "Bob Sievier." They bore down on him and explained their dilemma. Would he cash %  cheque for £100 and would he tell them the winner of the D*rby1 "Certainly." s;iul the man. "and 1 Jdi* ><" ly hack Mr. E (Inter Sir EdwardT ""'ton's horse, Filinella." Whereupon one of the subalterns named Stewart wrote out the cheque, and was given 20 fivers. Mr. Hulton's horse won and the Three Musketeers sought out their benefactor, paid him back the money, and then asked for the return of the cheque. •Here it Is." said Sievier "I guess It wasn't worth much. And for once three Canadiuns blushed. A week later Stewart was killed In u raid on the enemy trenches. Snob At Heart WHY write a book when you can make one? This thought occurred to me as I read of Ascot victories by 100—6 and 20—1 outsiders with the fancied horses nowhere There Is, however, an explanation. The horse is a highly imaginaUve animal, an attribute which makes him shy at a shadow when any donkey would know belter. __ Therefore, when a horse nnds himself racing at an unimportant meeting, with Just an ordinary crowd and for a prize not worth bothering about, he cannot give of his best. • • ALSO long contact with the best "families has made the horse n snob. Consequently, when he ees the regiments of grey toppers at Ascot and has a look at the concentrate! virtue of the Royal Enclosure, he is Inspired jo excoi himself. Literally, he runs as he never ran before. As the bookmaker said In the Casino at Monte Carlo: "WOT? Me play roulette with 35 runodff and all trying?" Dawn Harmony THE tide was low as dawn broke over tha, Thames ... not a boat or barge siirred on the river. . From a lounge off the Terrare i amethe fine tenor voice of "Jimmy" GUnvilta singing "Drink to me only with thine eyes" to the accompaniment of four or five other Socialists harmonising for once in perfect unity. . Two horsemen rode slowly across the bridge to the East . "Thry are on their way to the bi ewery," said one of our chaps. . Someone remarked, "You can take a horse to the brewery but you cannot . ." Quite rightly ho went no further, considering how close was the river. . Silence. . The mystery of a day's birth ... a quarter of a mile up the river a solitary beachcomber was searching a Jutting piece of the shore. . "Wagner is all right." said Bob Boothby, 'but he's too long." ... Upstairs Hab Butler was driving through the last stages of the Finance BIB. , "I assure you." said Boothby. "Wagner Is much too l n i" News From Britain By David Temple Roberts LONDON, July. Queen Elizabeth II and her family have had their salaries fixed by Parliament. She will receive £475.000 a year. Prince Philip will have MO.OOO. and Princess Margaret will have £6.000 until she marries — then more. To foreigners not aware of British traditions, this salarynxlng. into which quite a bit of POUtka) argumentation enters, M-finii very strange and undignified. But It has a two hundred year history and ha* becumu part of the system thai lifts* the British Crown high above politics for the duration of every reign. A deal was made under which ttiei Crown's lands and properties were handed over to the state—they are administered by the Minister of Works—and in oxchunge the Royal family is pleased to acrapt stipends from the Exchequer. This means that there Is no envy or jealousy of an untaxed Crown estate growing rich In the midst of n highly taxed world. For two hundred years the Crown Lands have not carried death duties — like other peoplea's estates—and MI they huve grown In wealth until i heir levenues are at least double the totnl tha state disburse*; as "Civil List" to supix-t-t tfhe dally, personal and ceremonial expenses ofj the R"vi Households. The Royni Family costs thi country very little. If the total Of the "Civil Listis divided only 'between the people of England; Scotland and Northern Ireland it does not amount to more than sixpence each year from each of us. If all Her Majesty's subjects throughout the world shared the cost of the court It win scarcely cost them more than a penny apiece, eaeti year. Clement Attlee, the former I>rernier, put some Socialist objections not exactly to the cost of the Court, but to the way Its ceremonial Is run. I doubt whether the Labour lNirty makes itself popular by taking a line that seems to be critic! of the Queen. But, In fairness to Clement Attlee, it should be %  .ml that what he was carping st was the round of socially j exclusive Garden Parties and Leveos rather than at the panoply and pomp and majesty. But the Socialist critics were voted down and the routine at Buckingham Palace will go on as before. We can only hope. with Parliament, that the Queen will not find the immense round of social and official engagements an unbearable burden. Queen Elizabeth II You may have heard in Sootland they would like to call the new Queen just "Queen Elizabeth" and drop the "II" DTOBl the title This Is because Good Queen Been was not Queen of Scotland. So they feel our present Queen EH/nlwth Is thelr llrst Queen Elizabeth. (Incidantalb* .she ii descended from Mary. Queen of Scots, who was the cousin of Good Queen Bess). This week a leading newspaper North of the Border, (which has lately shown sympathy for Scottish Nationalism) committed a strange error of wishful thinking. A silver cup was presented in Edinburgh to Her Majesty. The newspaper commented eagerly that the people of Scotland would appreciate the kind consideration of the Queen in Instructing that tha nap should ba taaarlbad "ELIZABETH*', merely. The following day the cup was presented. Afterwards, the Queen had it sent back to a silversmith to h.'vs the legal and constitutional "II" added. The Queen's Press Secretary spoke to the editor. The Great Newspaper apologised. There is sonic talk. North of the Border, of stiff-necked Engllshry among court officials. Unlucky Return Lord Alexander's mission to Korea has been dogged with bad luck. It was not his fault that while he was on the way home the American Air Force bombed controversial targets that he had not been told about. But it was his admitted fault that lead to an uproar in the House of Commons about his curious reference at a Canada Club dinner to' a comment he regarded as secret and had not told the House Of Lords earlier in the day. The two upsets have obscured what were to be the good results f-ir Anglo-American relations of the visit of the Minister of PtCanca and the brilliant Selwyn Lloyd t Minister at the Foreign Office). Lord Alexander brought a favourable report of the situation In Korea-tempered with some of a soldier's proper doubt*. But U has been the doubts that h..ve gained the publicity—because of the Guieral's inexperience of political office and his maladroit speech. The Labour Party regards the whole episode as a gift in ita campaign against Winston Churchill's personal administration through the agency of what aro now everywhere called the •overlords.'' (Incidentally. Mr. Attlee conveniently forgets that his Govtrnment Included an overlord calbtd Alexander; and Emanuel Shlnwell. another Minister of Defence, was famous for his public Indiscretions). Brixton to ••Vimbledon It is a cockney's regular way, when he gains a fortune, to move from Brixton, one suburb, to Wimbledon, a much more genteel suburb. But George Dawson has achieved it in %  trail of champagne glory. He has probably inade more money faster than any other Englishman in pottwar years. By applying the technique of the used-car salesman to the masses of technically darallet military vehicles left over by the war Dawson managed to amass a fortune that he has lived on gorgeously. He spends his money on wine, and yachts and friends and the good life by the Mediterranean Sea. But his wife has just prorlalmorj bar total boredom with life on a yacht at Cannes. She llnds the Riviera coast Is stuffy. She and her husband are not reSlash Costs? Yes Air Ring? No From K. M. MacCOLL WASHINGTON. IN this tense election year Congressmen are doing what they always tend to do in such circumstances — slash budgets left, right, and centre, so that they can face their constituents as "economy-minded." President Truman, who knows the political game inside out, realises there is not a great deal he can do about this, and grudgingly lets them have their way to some extent, But he is lighting like a tiger, election year or no election year, to stop a proposal to cut down the funds for the air force's world ring of strategic bases. • • • L REPORTS say that some Congressmen are willing to halve the funds for this purpose, but Truman, in a letter to Senator Richard Russell, of Georgia, calls this possibility "a terrible disaster." Truman has agreed to "stretch-outs"—putting oft thi' zero date for delivery time—of several sorts of weapons and aircraft, in a way which many men in defence and army headquarters think is flirting with defeat. But he feels passionately that the globecircling ring of big bases is, along with the atom bomb, America's great answer to the R>d menace, for without the bases to deliver j it effectively, the bomb itself would be a I futile threat • • • • RUSSELL is the chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee and, ironically, t was this committee which strongly criticised Truman only last week for ordering 'stretch-out" in completing an air force of 143 wings. EVEN though Canada has made it abundantly clear that she is willing to "go it alone" on the seaway which will enable ocean ships to sail from the St. Lawrence to the Great Lakes, Congressional voices are still raised in angry outcry against the scheme. Latest protest comes from Republican : Senator Irving lves, who, representing New! York State, has his eye on New York Har-. hour's shipping interests. He says that he does not believe that It will prove possible to charge high enough j tolls on the seaway to make it self-sufficient, and "that means the taxpayer would be left holding the bag." A SUDDEN windfall for the chimney sweeps of Britain ? Something called a "tansistor" — a tiny object which makes possible the manufacture of radio sets which: will practically never wear out — is made oil a substance called germanium. Germanium is found in chimneys and, say leading indus-1 trial firms in America, English chimneys arej an especially rich source of germanium be-' ause English coal is full of the stuff. AGAIN the charge of "cartel," this time against some of America's greatest whisky distillers. A Congress committee begins hear-, ings to see if the Justice Department was lip-dash or not in investigating America's 1 whisky trade. PEOPLE have cried "wolf so often about Broadway dying that nobody seems to believe it any more. But the authoritative Baltimore Sun has conducted a searching inquiry into New York's theatre street and its conclusion is that Broadway really la dying. "Unless something drastic is done, and done quickly." says the paper, "there is every iho villas of cap reason to believe that slow attrition will d'Ajititxs. Besides, business has continue, until those responsible for Broad: 'way's fantastic economic set-up will go broke or disappear." ONCE AGAIN a major effort is afoot to try to get all the 48 Stales to agree to a divorce law which would be recognised in any of them. Who sponsors the Bill ? Silver-haired Senator Pat McCarran—who PHOTOGRAPHS Copies of Local Photograph* Which have appeared in the ADVOCATE NEWSPAPER Can be ordered from the -. ADVOCATE STATIONERY put Dawson's "derelicts" right back into the front line. The Dawsons are coming home to a 18 room house near Wimbledon professional", and Jack Kramer, the American former champion, was reputed to be waiting in the sUind with so much and so much in dollars to offer. K should be reported that, despite Flam's valiant struggle, the overwhelming mass of the Wimbledon-interested public (and that includes nbout everyone) was glad to see a non-American WithikU Apl&ndid Ac he tion Off Tbui) Jtwk! C. S. PITCHED & CO. Our Readers Say in Hiding To the Editor, The Advocate, SIR.—It was most regrettable to see a Policeman In uniform trying to secrete himself under the balcony of a shop near the corner of King Street where several people were gathered in order to "catch" those who did not stop at or overrun the major road studs at the Corner 01 Weatl urv Road. t It is the primary duty of the Police to prevent crime instead of Waiting until people have bi nkeu the law then to make criminals ot them. This Is a rather high conception of their duty but not too high for the local men to attain. Hiding around corners until people have broken the law can be regarded as condoning or conniving at the breaking of the law. The presence of a policeman In the open roadway is certainly a deterrent to the most .^breaker, while hiding until one has broken the law and then prosecuting him can only bring disrespect for the Force and enemies for Its men. CITIZEN. Traffic* Etiquette Sedgman has Just beaten Drobny, while I have been writing this article. Good Luck to Drobny, (who was the British crowd j favourite), and Good, Luck to Sedgman! At this Wim! represents the Reno-famous State of Nevada. bledon there has been some talk DEAD at 84, in the winter resort of SaraZ^o, .UnSS? ".umli' U. Florida, is San. Cmpertz, who lived and breathed show business all his long life Starting as a professional acrobat at the age of nine, when he ran away from his St Luuis home to join a circus, Sam became actor, producer. Wild-West rider with the old Buffalo Bill show, then turned agent.! then built a famous pleasure palace called. Dreamland on New York's Coney Island. Even after he retired he just couldn't keep away from it all, and continued to manage the Eden Wax Museum on Coney Island "just for sentimental reasons." After a theatre, dance or party. is it necessary for the ownai i of cars to take home those who are without cars? After all. the driver has shown an even greater kindness than the person who opens the door of a public building. ANS. Certainly not. unless the • • • • SlaaTAirt c?rs S and'^ro've When two people --*: them to the party, and It was mg.the. same parking space ~* understood return trips were street, which one Is cntuled Sugar Purchases In Dollar Areas LONDON. IX THE House of Commons <<> 3rd July Mr. A. E. Baldwin (Conservative, Leoministcr) asked the Chancellor of the Exchej quer whether he is aware that there is posed upon, they might tactruDQ ^igsest a taxi or a bus. What are the two most Important things a pedestrian can do to avoid trouble and emb;.r,„. • -_.i y nen .i rassmentT ANS. To watch where In ing and to obey the signals. tel^rSiv £•%£*!£ ANS. The one who has stopped (heavy crop of fruit in prospect, much of first and Li making the attempt f which will be wasted through shortage of to park. Never in any cireum, sugar to xhc canning industry; and whether TSSSPJfr&mZ *•" % %  £• dfl in order that E park. OTOp niay be processed and put into store, as a reserve against the possibility of a .crop shortage next year. j Sir Arthur Salter. Minister of State for Economic Affairs replied : aids the first part of the Quest."... I would refer to the answer given yesterday by my hon. Friend and Parliamentary Seethe Minister of Food to my hon. Friend the Member for Huntingdon (Mr Renton); as regards the second part, my right hnn. Friend regrets that our position does not permit the release of dollars for additional purchases of sugar.— B.U.P. traffic -"!' motorist drives at excessive speed through traffic, double [kirks, ou drives unraasonably slowly, what should be the attitude of the driver inconvenienced? It It" necessary to say 'Thank You' to a driver of a car when ANS. He should .drive he has waited for you to walk ANS. Without doub; a person should look across to the driver and with a nod of and a smile say: T!i. arofully nnd say absolutely nothing. Abusive and) unbecoming remarks are never to any one's Dd iire never Justiili tn if the driver of another car U at fault. 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